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Full text of "Genealogical and family history of the state of Connecticut : a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation"

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V- 

GENEALOGICAL AND FAMILY mi 

HISTORY ''^ 



OF THE 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

A RECORD OF THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF HER PEOPLE IN THE 

MAKING OF A COMMONWEALTH AND THE 

FOUNDING OF A NATION 



EDITORIAL STAFF: 

WILLIAM RICHARD CUTTER, A. M. 

Historian of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society; Librarian Emeritus of 
Woburn Public Library; Author of "The Cutter Family," "History of Arlington," 
"Bibliography of Woburn," etc., etc. 

EDWARD HENRY CLEMENT 
Editor "Boston Transcript," i88i-igo6. 

SAMUEL HART, D. D., D. C. L. 

Dean of Berkeley Divinity School; President of Connecticut Historical Society. 

MARY KINGSBURY TALCOTT 

Registrar Connecticut Society, Colonial Dames ; Member Connecticut Historical Society, 
and New England Historic-Genealogical Society. 

FREDERICK BOSTWICK 

Librarian and Life Member of New Haven Colony Historical Society; Member Connecticut 
Historical Society. 

EZRA SCOLLAY STEARNS 

Ex-Secretary of State, N. H. ; Member Fitchburg Historical Society, American Antiquarian 
Society, New England Historic-Genealogical Society, New Hampshire State Histori- 
cal Society, Corresponding Member Minnesota State Historical Socfety. 



VOLUME IV 



ILLUSTRATED 



NEW YORK 
LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

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COPYRIGHT 
LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1911 




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CONNECTICUT. 



John Jacob Enders was a na- 
ENDERS tive of New York state and 
resided at Glen, New York, 
where he was a merchant. He married Re- 
lief Ostrom. 

(II) Thomas Ostrom, son of John Jacob 
Enders, was born in Glen, New York, Sep- 
tember 21, 1832. He was educated in his 
native town and the Meriden Academy, and 
at an early age worked on his grandfather's 
farm. At the age of seventeen he went to 
Connecticut and found employment in Meri- 
den. He also worked for a time with George 
Rice & Co., dry goods, in New Haven, and 
met with considerable success. He was em- 
ployed by Curtis L. North, of Meriden, the 
first agent of the yEtna Life Insurance Com- 
pany, as a solicitor, and thus became inter- 
ested in the insurance business. Three years 
later he removed to New York and entered 
the employ of the Avery Sewing Machine 
Company. ' While there he made the acquaint- 
ance of the secretary of the ^Etna Life In- 
surance Company, and on his invitation went 
back to Hartford, at the age of twenty-two, 
and entered the office of that company as 
clerk. In 1858, four years later, he was 
elected secretary, serving until 1872, when he 
became president. To his ability, industry and 
faithfulness was due largely the great success 
of that business in Hartford. In his zeal for 
the advancement of his company his health 
became impaired, and in 1879 he was obliged 
to resign his position as president, although 
he continued as a director. He had seen the 
company grow from $175,000 in 1854 to over 
$25,000^000 in 1879. In 1881 he accepted 
the presidency of the United States Bank 
of Hartford (then the United States Trust 
Company), at a time when it was suffering 
from old losses, the stock being quoted 
at eighty. He remained in office until June 
16, 1891, when he declined reelection. Un- 
der his administration the bank advanced 
rapidly, and at the close of his presidency 
was in percentage of surplus, value of shares 
and ratio of deposits to capital, far in advance 
of the other banks of the city. Mr. Enders 
was a Republican in politics, and represented 



the West Hartford district in the general as- 
sembly in 1889-91, serving on the committees 
on appropriations and banks. He was a di- 
rector of the ^tna Fire Insurance Company, 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & Insur- 
ance Company, Society for Savings, Dime 
Savings Bank, Charter Oak Bank and various 
other financial institutions. He was a mem- 
ber of St. John's Lodge, F. and A. M., at 
Hartford. He died June 21, 1894. With- 
out the aid of influence or inherited wealth, 
he rose to a leading position among the 
prominent business men of the state. He 
was a man of wonderful business knowledge 
and ability, and a financier of sound judgment. 
He married, December 29, 1858, Harriet 
Adelaide, born March 12, 1835, daughter of 
Dennis and Harriet (Sloane) Burnham, and 
a lineal descendant of Thomas Burnham. Chil- 
dren : Harry ; Harriet Burnham ; Dr. Thomas 
B., and John Ostrom. 

(Ill) Dr. Thomas B. Enders. son of Thom- 
as Ostrom Enders, was born in Hartford, May 
14, 1865. He graduated from the Hartford 
high school and "from Yale College in the class 
of 1888. He studied medicine in the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons in New York 
City, graduating in 1891. After two years 
in the surgical division of Bellevue Hospital, 
he was for a year in private practice in New 
York, and iii 1894 returned to Hartford, 
where he has since been engaged in practice. 
Dr. Enders is a member of the Society of the 
Alumni of Bellevue. and a fellow of the New 
York State Society; also of the Hartford 
Citv and Countv Medical societies. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth t. Daly, of New York City. 

(Ill) John Ostrom, son of Thomas Os- 
trom Enders, was born in Hartford, De- 
cember 3, 1869. He was educated in the 
schools of West Hartford and at Phillips Ex- 
eter Academy. He was connected with the 
United States Bank at Hartford, resigning his 
position in 1894. He is a director of the .\et- 
na Life Insurance Company, the Hartford 
Steam Boiler Insurance Company, the Charter 
Oak Bank, United States P.ank, Society for 
Savings, and Dime Savings Bank. In 1899 '1*^ 
served as a representative from West llart- 
701 



I702 



CON,NECTICUT 



ford in the general assembly, serving on the 
finance committee. He married, June 12, 1895, 
Harriet Goulden Whitmore. Children : John 
Franklin, born February 10, 1897; Harriet 
Burnham, January 26, 1900; Ostrom, Septem- 
ber 19, 1902; Elvia, July 3, 1904. 



Messina Clark, born in Delaware 
CLARK county, New York, April 15, 181 1, 
married Julia Ann, daughter of 
Samuel Chatters. Children : Edward M., mar- 
ried Hughes ; Adeline J., living in 

France, married J. I. Goodrich, has son, Clark 
Goodrich ; Julia Russell ; Frank P. 

(II) Frank P., son of Messina Clark, was 
born in New Haven, May 17, 1853. He at- 
tended the public schools and the pri- 
vate school of John Lovell and the 
Dr. Thayer School of Poughkeepsie, New 
York. His brother Edward and he are 
occupied in the care and management of ex- 
tensive real estate and other investments. Ed- 
ward Clark has an office in the Washington 
building, Church street. New Haven. Frank 
P. Clark married, September 7, 1886, Eliza- 
beth May, daughter of Arthur Hughes, of 
New Haven. Children : Elizabeth Jane, 
March 15, 1892; Messina, born July 21, 1895; 
child, died in infancy. 



Nicola Joseph Mariani was 
MARIAN I born at Limatola, Italy, in 
1848, and has always resided 
there. He has made several visits to his son 
in this country. He married Maria Giacomina 
Marotta, born also at Limatola. Italy, in 1848. 
She died in 1901. Children: i. John W., 
born in 1872, who came to America in 1895, 
entered the Yale University Law School in 
1898, and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1901 ; he returned to 
Italy in 1905 and is now practicing law at 
Naples. Married Zina Proto and has one 
child, Giacomina Margherita. 2. Dr. Nicola. 

(II) Dr. Nicola Mariani, son of Nicola Jo- 
seph and Maria Giacomina (Marotta) Mari- 
ani, was born in Limatola, province of Bene- 
vento, Italy, August 3, 1868. He was well 
educated in a national college, being gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1S87. He studied medicine at the Roval LTni- 
versity of Naples, Italy, and was graduated 
there with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in the class of 1893. He was subsequently 
an interne at the General Hospital of the city 
of Naples for twenty-six months. He came 
to this country in April, 1896, and after study- 
ing English for a time, entered Yale Medical 
School for post graduate study, remaining 
in 1898-99, and at the same time practicing 



among the Italian-speaking people of New 
Haven and vicinity. He took the state ex- 
amination in April, 1897, and began the gen- 
eral practice of medicine in New Haven. He 
is a member of the Connecticut Medical So- 
ciety, New Haven Medical Association and 
American Medical Association, and from time 
to time has contributed to the various medical 
journals and periodicals of the country. He 
has a very large and interesting practice both 
in medicine and surgery. Of high character, 
culture and learning, he occupies a unique 
position in the city of New Haven. He was 
attracted to this country by a sincere love of 
its institutions and, as an American citizen, is 
zealous in the support of them and exerts a 
strong and wholesome influence upon the la- 
boring classes of his countrymen in Connec- 
ticut. He has accomplished much in the work 
of Americanizing the Italian immigrants of j 
this section, and is counted among the most ' 
useful citizens of New Haven. He has at 
the same time helped the men of his own 
race and strengthened the citizenship of his 
adopted country. To such men, who aid most 
in the amalgamation of the diverse races that 
come to America, the nation owes a great debt. 
He is the president of the New Haven Branch 
of the Societa Nazionale Dante Alighieri for 
the diffusion of the Italian language and cul- 
ture. This society is prominent in Italy and 
has branches in other countries wherever Ital- 
ian-speaking people are located in sufficient 
numbers in other parts of the world. 

Dr. Mariani is a member of Yale Conclave 
of Heptasophs, No. 244, and of Wooster 
Lodge, No. 29, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, of New Haven. His home and of- 
fice are at No. 119 Greene street. New Haven. 
While in Italy he served in the regular army 
as a private in the ranks and rose to the rank 
of lieutenant. Pie was subsequently a sur- 
geon in the Italian army. He married in 
New Plaven, 1897, Margarita, born at Sant' 
Arsenio, Italy, in 1871, daughter of John Spi- 
nello. They have no children. 

Dr. Mariani was recently honored in a man- 
ner of which he may well feel proud. In 
April, 1910, the King of Italy conferred upon 
Dr. Mariani the title of Chevalier of the 
Crown of Italy, as a mark of recognition of 
the services rendered by the doctor in this 
country. That Dr. Mariani is eminently de- 
serving of the honor thus bestowed upon him 
was amply evidenced at a banquet given in 
his honor, June 2, 1910, by his fellow citizens, 
on which occasion Governor Weeks, Mayor 
Rice, Michael Riccio, consular agent for Italy, 
and a host of other distinguished men were 
present, and united in their praise of Dr. Ma- 





The CBtiliiry I'liiilishinJ a:7-ii.f,vaviM*Ci)Xl'icaiS,ij, 



CONNECTICUT 



1703 



riani. The New Haven Ez'ening Register^ of 
June 3, 1910. had the following editorial: 
"New Haven does well to evince its pride in 
Dr. Nicola Mariani. whose honor from the 
king of his fatherland reflects light on this, 
his adopted country. A gentleman, a scholar, 
a man of mark, a physician of distinguished 
ability, he is one among many of a race which- 
is contributing distinct and considerable ad- 
vantage to this growing civilization. This 
community does credit to itself in showing its 
appreciation." 

Solomon Lucas, an honored and 
LUCAS prominent member of the New 
London county bar, was born 
April I, 1835, in Norwich, Connecticut, sixth 
son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Miles) Lucas, 
both of whom were natives of Trowbridge, 
Wiltshire, England. 

;\Ir. Lucas w'as entirely a self-educated man. 
He was left an orphan when only ten years 
old and, with no provision made for his sup- 
port, his life became one of toil upon the 
farm and in the factory until he attained the 
age of nineteen years. Nothing daunted by 
the fact that his education at this time con- 
sisted simply of what he had been able to learn 
in the country schools, he resolutely set about 
fitting himself for his chosen profession, that 
of the law. By studying evenings and teach- 
ing school he was enabled to take a course in 
the Albany Law School, after which he read 
law for a time in the office of the Hon. John 
'J . Wait, in Norwich, and was admitted to 
the New London county bar in 1861, from 
which time to the very moment of his death he 
continued in active practice. Mr. Lucas" ca- 
reer at the bar was a successful and an hon- 
orable one. He was a thorough master of 
the deep-lying princi])les of law, and his un- 
tiring industry, his keen insight, and his faith- 
fulness to the' interests of his clients won for 
him confidence and a place in the very front 
ranks of the profession. In the preparation 
ot cases he was painstaking to the last de- 
gree, and in their trial was forceful and alert. 
In 1880 he was appointed state's attorney for 
New I ondon county, an office for which h." 
was admirably fitted, and which he held with 
distinction until his death. His power as a 
cross-examiner of witnesses made him a ter- 
ror to evil-doers. He was fearless in the dis- 
charge of his duties, and although at heart 
kind and sympathetic, he never allowed his 
feelings to interfere with his strong sense 
of justice. He deeply recognized the truth 
that he stood as the protector of the law- 
abiding community against the criminal. In 
1863 Mr. Lucas represented the town of Pres- 



ton in the legislature. Although one of the 
younger members, he won the approval of 
his constituents and gained recognition 
throughout the state. After this brief term of 
service he persistently refused to accept any 
political office, preferring to give his whole 
time and energy to the growing demands of 
his profession. As a citizen Mr. Lucas was 
enterprising and public-spirited. He gave his 
services and keen penetration freely to the 
town, and his private enterprises were of a 
character to add to the general welfare. The 
same loyalty and devotion were shown in his 
relations with the Second Congregational 
Church of Norwich, of which he was a mem- 
ber for forty-two years. 

Mr. Lucas married, June 22, 1864. Eliza- 
beth A., daughter of the late Hiram Crosby, 
of Norwich. His wife died ten years later 
and he remained a widower to the close of his 
life. Two daughters, Nancy E. and Mary C. 
Lucas, survive him. 

The death of Mr. Lucas was extremely sud- 
den, occurring March 13, icpfi, in the supreme 
court room at Norwich, while he was in the 
full tide of professional, activity. It was felt 
as a public bereavement and many tributes of 
respect and admiration were oifered to his 
memory. Mr. Lucas was a man of simple 
tastes, fond of outdoor life and nature, but 
found his chief pleasure in his home. Only 
those who knew him intimately understood his 
deep, affectionate nature. He was a man of 
su])erb physical and moral courage and the 
world is better fur his life. 



Timothy Kelley, descendant of 
KELLEV an ancient and distinguished 

family of this surname, was 
born, lived and died in Ireland. He was a 
farmer all his active life. Me married Joanna 
O'Neil. Among their children was Edward, 
mentioned below. 

(II) Edward, son of Timothy Kelle\-, was 
born in the Parish CuUen. county Tipperary, 
Ireland, and received a good common school 
education in his native parish in private and 
national schools. He came to .America when 
a voung man. in 1849, and located at W'ol- 
cottvillc. in the town of Torrington. Connec- 
ticut. He found employment as a section 
hand on the railroad for a year and was then 
appointed baggage master and freight agent, 
a position he held with fidelity and efficiency 
for a jieriod of twenty-one years. He re- 
signed his position in 1871 to give his atten- 
tion to his private Inisiness. In 1865 he 
started in the teaming, trucking and express 
business and his energy, faithfulness and en- 
terprise bnnght him a large measure (^f sue- 



1/04 



CONNECTICUT 



cess and prosijerity in business. The history 
of Torrington says ""he is about as well 
known as any other man about Wolcottville. 
Regularly and as faithfully as the days come 
and go, he is on his truck or express wagon 
delivering goods, and although he is a ser- 
vant of all, yet he rules the town according 
to the law of a certain book he carries, as 
thoroughly as though he were King Edward 
the First." 

He was always interested in politics and 
for a time served on the board of selectmen. 
He was highly respected by all his townsmen 
and universall}- popular with all classes of 
people. 

He married, in 1857, at Terry ville, Connec- 
ticut, Catherine Donovan, daughter of John 
and Margaret ( IJurns) Donovan. Children: 

I. Timoth\- F., born June 15, 1858. died De- 
cember II, 1883. 2. John P.. (3ctober 11, 
1859. died December 8, 1859. 3. Margaret 
Agatha, born February 6, 1865, died October 
16, 1865. 4- Edward J., mentioned below. 5. 
Thomas P., born May 10. 1869, died Septem- 
ber 12, 1877. 6. William John, born January 
ID, 1871. died October 25, 1875. 7. Terrence, 
who resides at Elizabeth, New Jersey. 8. 
Thomas A., of Torrington. 9. Joseph F., of 
Torrington. 10. Francis B., of Torrington. 

II. Mar}-, married T. F. Ryan, an attorney, 
living at Litchfield, Connecticut. 12. Agnes, 
married John ]\loran, of New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 13. Katherine. of Torrington. 14. 
Anna M., of Torrington. 

(HI) Edward John Kelley. son of Edward 
Kelley, was born in Torrington, September 7, 
1866. He was educated there in the public 
schools and was associated in business with 
his father. He succeeded to the express and 
trucking business that his father established 
and conducted it until 1907 under his own 
name. It was then incorporated as the E. J. 
Kelley Company, of which he is president and 
general manager, and of which Miss Anna 
Kelley is secretary and treasurer. The com- 
pany deals in coal, wood and lumber and 
conducts a general contracting business, in- 
cluding all kinds of express, trucking and 
freight transportation, employing sixty men 
regularly and a hundred horses. Mr. Kelley 
has also a farm of several hundred acres in 
Go.shen, He takes a prominent part in pub- 
lic affairs and has been an assessor of the 
town and member of the board of burgesses 
for the borough of Torrington. He is a presi- 
dent of the Torrington Business Men's Asso- 
ciation and second vice-president of the Con- 
necticut State Business Men's Association. Fie 
is a member of the Knights of Columbus and 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of 



Torrington. In religion he is a Roman Cath- 
olic. 

He married, January 30, 1907, Frances 
Elizabeth, daughter of Henry T. and Sarah 
(Young) Smith. Henry Smith, father of 
Henry T. Smith, was born in England, 
whence he went to Ireland and later to Am- 
■erica ; he married Catherine Gaynor, who died 
on the voyage to this country, of ship fever, 
Henry T. Smith settled in New Hartford, 
Connecticut, with his father. He has been 
engaged in the hardware business in that town 
for fifty years. Children of Edward John and 
Frances Elizabeth (Smith) Kelley: Mary, 
born January 8, 1908; Frances, February 2, 
1909: Edward J., May 4, 1910. 



James Parker, immigrant an- 
PARKER cestor, came from England be- 
fore 1640, when he settled in 
Woburn, ^lassachusetts, and he was a tax- 
payer there as early as 1645. He was prob- 
ably related to some of the numerous other 
pioneers of this surname, who located in that 
section of the Bay colony, Abraham, Parker 
at Woburn, John Parker, of Woburn and Bil- 
lerica, who were brothers, and perhaps others, 
James Parker removed to Billerica about 
1654, to Chelmsford, ^lassachusetts, in 1658, 
and to Groton in 1660. He owned rights in 
Groton and increased his holdings of land by 
purchase until he was the largest owner of 
real estate and probably the wealthiest pro- 
prietor of that town. In both town and church 
he was prominent, a deacon of the church, 
selectman of the town from 1662 to 1699, a 
period of more than thirty years. He was 
also town clerk for a time, moderator of all 
the important town meetings of his day, chair- 
man of many important committees to locate 
highways, to lay out lots to the proprietors 
and to establish town boundaries, etc., repre- 
sentative to the general court in 1693. While 
living in Groton he was once elected a select- 
man of the adjoining town of Dunstable. A 
brave and sturdy Indian fighter, he became 
captain of the Groton company. His home 
was at some distance from the present vil- 
lage of Groton, near Martin's pond, some- 
what distant from the highway, shaded and 
secluded, and no trace of it now remains. A 
description of the homestead is given in a 
recent publication, but the house therein de- 
scribed must have bebinged to a later genera- 
tion, A small part of the original homestead 
plot was still owned, at last accounts, by de- 
scendants at Groton, He owned a large part 
of Half-moon Meadow. He died aged eighty- 
three years. He married (first) May 28, 1744, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Long, of 



CONNECTICUT 



1705 



Charlestown. Massachusetts; (second) Eunice 

. Children : EHzabeth, born April 12, 

1645. ''t \^'oburn ; Anna, January 5, 1646-47; 
John. January 18, 1649: Sarah, August 29, 
1630, died young: Joseph, born in Woburn, 
1631 : James, April 15, 1652, killed at Biller- 
ica by the Indians, July 27, 1694 ; Josiah, 1655 ; 
Samuel, about 1657; Joshua, March 3, 1658, 
at Chelmsford; Zachariah, January 14, 1659; 
Eleazer, mentioned below. Thirty years after 
the birth of his youngest child by the first 
wife, he had by his second wife, Eunice, as 
shown by his will and the town records, a 
daughter Sarah, born December 12, 1697. His 
will is published in full in Pjutler's "Histor}' 
of Groton." 

(II) Eleazer, son of James Parker, was 
born in Groton, November 9, 1667, and mar- 
ried Mary . Children, born at Gro- 
ton: Anna. April 17. 1686; Eleazer. Septem- 
ber 2^. 1695: ;\Iarv, July 21, 1697: Zachariah, 
mentioned below: Thomas. December 7. 1700; 
Mehitable, June 6, 1702; Elizabeth, May 21, 
1704. 

(III) Lieutenant Zachariah Parker, son of 
Eleazer Parker, was born at Groton, Janu- 
ary 29, 1699. He married (first) at \\'eston, 
Massachusetts, August 11, 1731, Rebecca 
Parks, who died June 11, 1748. He married 
(second) at ]\iansfield, Connecticut, October 
26, 1748, Peace Ames. He settled at Mans- 
field, where many of his descendants have 
lived. Children of first wife, born at Weston : 
Zachariah, C)ctober 27, 1732; Ephraim. men- 
tioned below ; James, born in Dutchess county, 
New York. August 18, 1740. Children of 
second wife, born at Mansfield: ^lary, July 
2, 1750: Daniel, October 5, 1751, died August 
25. 1775: Eleazer, March 10, 1733: Isaac, 
February 4, 1756; Love, August 21, 1757; 
Sarah. November 17, 1759; John Keith, .\pril 
4, 1763. died April 13, 1765; Rachel, February 
2, 1763- 

( I\" ) Ephraim, son of Lieutenant Zacha- 
riah Parker was born at W'eslon, Massachu- 
setts. ( )cti)ber I. 1733. and came when a child 
with his parents to Mansfield, Tolland county, 
Connecticut. He married Deborah Sargent. 
Children, 1x)rn at Mansfield: Phineas, July 2, 
1737: Rebecca, .August 19. 1759; James, 
March 8, 1762; Annie, .\pril 10, 1764; De- 
borah, July 21, 17^)6; Jerusha, July 14, 176S: 
Ephraim, mentioned below; Zachariah, May 
16, 1773: Nathan, September 3, 1776. 

(V) Ephraim (2), son of F])hraim (\) 
Parker, was born at Mansfield, Connecticut, 
November 10. 1770, He attended the district 
schools and worked on his father's farm at 
Mansfield. .Shortly after his marriage he lo- 
cated at W'illington. Tolland county, Connec- 



ticut, and engaged in the manufacture of 
clocks, spoons, etc. After about 1818 he re- 
moved to Dobsonville, a village in the town of 
A'ernon, where he conducted a hotel, where 
he died at an advanced age. His wife died at 
the age of seventy-three. He was accounted 
a mechanical genius. He married Lucy Prior. 
Children : Augustin, a machinist and inven- 
tor, married OHve Sparks, and had Augustin 
B., cashier of the Co-operative Savings So- 
ciety of Rockville. Connecticut ; Lucius, men- 
tioned below : Ephraim : Joseph ; William ; 
Jerusha : Lucy ; Almena and Emeline. 

(\'I) Lucius, son of Ephraim (2) Parker, 
was born at Willington. Connecticut, and edu- 
cated there in the public schools. He was 
employed when a young man in the factory of 
the famous Peter Dobson. For a time he 
manufactured on his own account at Hop 
River, Connecticut. He remoA-ed to Manches- 
ter, Connecticut, where he built a mill and 
manufactured yarns, twine, cotton warps and 
sheetings, building up a large and profitable 
business and continuing in active business un- 
til his death in 1888, during a period of nearly 
forty years. He was not only the pioneer 
manufacturer at Manchester, beginning in 
1846. but one of the cijmpetent. successful and 
prominent men. His business was incorjxir- 
ated as the Mutual Manufacturing Company 
of Manchester and he built and conducted 
the Pacific ^Nlills at Manchester Green. In 
jiolitics he was a Democrat. He married 
(first) I'ath.sheba Belcher, born in Wapping. 

Connecticut. He married( second) . 

Children of first wife: Rienzi I'.elcher, men- 
tioned below: Adelliert C. mentioned below. 
Child of second wife: Minnie L.. now li\-ing 
in I'oston. 

(\TI) Rienzi Belcher, son of Lucius Par- 
ker, was born at South Coventry, Connec- 
ticut, h'ebruary 13. 1838. As soon as he left 
the public schools, he began to work in his 
father's cotton mills in Manchester. From 
i8()6 to 1890 he was manufacturing cotton at 
\'ernon. Connecticut. Since then he has re- 
sided in Hartford. Connecticut. In May. i8tj3. 
he was elected i)resi(lent of the Hartford Life 
Insurance Comjiany and he held this honor- 
able and ini])ortant office for seven years. He 
is a director of the First National l?ank of 
Hartford and of the Security Company of 
that city. His heme is on I'armington avenue. 
He married, in Seinember, i8(>3, lunma S. 
Dobson, daughter of Hon. John S. Dobson, 
of \ernon. Connecticut, state senator in 1832 
and incumbent from time to time of various 
other offices of trust and honor. Her grand- 
father. Peter Dobson, came from Preston, 
l"n"land, and established one of the first cot- 



1706 



CONNECTICUT 



ton mills in Connecticut. He was a noted 
mathematician and geologist, a recognized au- 
thority on the glacial period. Children of Air. 
and Mrs. Parker: John Dobson, married 
Edith, daughter of the late Dr. P. W. Ells- 
worth : Julia W., married Collins W. Ben- 
ton ; Lucius R., married Marie Antoinetta. of 
Turin, Italv, and she died in June, icj02. 

(VII) Adelbert C. Parker, brother of 
Rienzi Belcher Parker, and son of Lucius Par- 
ker, was born February 16, 1844, in Manches- 
ter, Connecticut. He spent his youthful years 
in Manchester and was educated there in the 
public schools. He learned the cotton manu- 
facturing business in his father's mills and re- 
mained in that business until 186S, when he 
came to Bridgeport and devoted his attention 
to real estate. Since 1907 he has been retired 
and has made his home with his daughter, 
Mrs. Harding. In politics a Republican, he 
served two terms as alderman of the Eleventh 
district of Bridgeport. He married, in 1868, 
Jennie Andrews, born December 7, 1843, '" 
Bridgeport, only daughter of AH Andrews, a 
native of Wallingford, Connecticut, who came 
to Bridgeport and was prominently engaged 
in real estate business there until he died in 
1887. Her mother was Ruth A. (Curtis) An- 
drews and she was the only child of Ira and 
Lucy Curtis, of Bridgeport. Children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Adelbert C. Parker : Alice, died 
aged two years : Ruth Ann, mentioned below. 
Mrs. Parker died Januarv 21, igo6. 

(VIII) Ruth Ann, daughter of Adelbert C. 
Parker, was born May 28, 1876, at Bridge- 
port, Connecticut. She married, in 1896, John 
Studwill r\Iead, a real estate broker, of Bridge- 
port, who died in 1907. She married, Janu- 
ary 12, 191 1, Harvey Harding, president of 
the Bainbridge & North Eastern Railroad 
Companies of Georgia, having offices at At- 
lanta and New Haven. Mr. Harding has for 
some years resided in New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, at the L'nion League Club, during part 
of the year, and spending his winters in the 
south. 



\\'illiam Dobbs was born in New 
DOBBS York City of an old colonial fam- 
ily and English ancestry, in 1718. 
He died in his native city, September 6, 178 1, 
and was buried in Trinity churchyard, Broad- 
way. He married Catherine Van Size, born 
in New York City, January 25, 17 10, died 
May 4, 1799. Children: Ann, Polly, Cath- 
erine, William, mentioned below, and eight 
others. 

(II) William (2). son of William (i) 
Dobbs, was born in New York City in 1757, 
died January 30, 1829. He was a soldier in 



the revolution in the First Regiment, New 
York Line, Colonel Goose Van Schaick. He 
married, June 17, 1777, Urania Hoyt, born 
1760, died October 15, 1854. Children: i. 
\\'illiam, born September 17, 1778, died May 
30, 1804. 2. Joseph, January 18, 1781, died 
April 16, 1813; married Anna Read; their 
eldest child, JMary A., born August 23, 1807, 
died January 11, 1890, married George Crane 
Meeher. 3. Betsey, December 11, 1782, died 
December 3, 1869. 4. John, November 4, 
1784, died December, 1872. 5. Oliver, Feb- 
ruary 8, 1787. 6. Russell, March 29, 1789, 
died March 13, 1879. 7. Rachel, December 
22. 1792, died September 10, 1848. 8. Cath- 
erine, December 26, 1794, died November 23, 
1883. 9. LTrania, August 14, 1797, died Feb- 
ruary, 1875. 10. David, March 14, 1799, 
mentioned jjelow, died February 8, 1870. 

(Ill) David, youngest of the ten children 
of ^^'illiam (2) Dobbs, was born March 14, 
1799, died February 8, 1870. He was very 
prominent in the Masonic bodies of Dan- 
bury, and was one of the organizers and the 
first to sign the charter of the First Hatters' 
Beneficent Society, now known as the United 
Hatters of North America, witli thousands 
of members. He was twice married, his first 
wife being Maria Hull. Four children were 
born to the couple: Theodore, Elizabeth, 
Louise, Frederick, mentioned below. The 
second wife of David Dobbs was Martha 
Phillips, who survived him. 

(I\'') Frederick, son of David Dobbs, was 
born at Danbury, Connecticut. January 4, 
1835, died there August 5, 1S95. He was 
educated in the common schools and was a 
hatter by trade. In early life he learned his 
trade in New York City and became very 
skillful in making silk hats. He married, 
December 21, 1859, Sarah R. Bennett. Chil- 
dren: William F., mentioned below; Susan, 
born at Danbury, died there in infancy, Jan- 
uary 27, 1865. 

(\') William F., son of Frederick Dobbs, 
was born January 29, 1861, at Danbury. He 
attended the public schools and high school 
of Danbury. In 1876 he entered the employ 
of the Danbury Ncivs and has continued on 
that paper, with slight intermission, until the 
present time. In 1900 lie went to Dayton, 
Ohio, as advertising manager of the Na- 
tional Cash Register Company. After one 
season in that capacity he returned to Dan- 
bury and restnued a position as superintend- 
ent with the Nczi's, and at the same time es- 
tablislied the Dobbs Advertising Agency, 
which he has built up to a high standard in 
the business world, especially in the general 
newspaper advertising field. Lie attends to 



,^«'!.^- ■'*««iKSSk 




T^nue^ 



Lewis EistoyTcni Pnr C.i 



CONNECTICUT 



1707 



the advertising of nearly all the most promi- 
nent local merchants, also of the famous Dan- 
bury Fair, and has a part in nearly all the 
publicity for which Danbury is noted. He is 
vice-president and treasurer of the Danbury 
Square Box Company. He is a director of 
the Danbur}- Business Men's Association and 
chairman of its publicity committee, belongs 
to all the Masonic bodies of Danbury and to 
Pyramid Temple. Mystic Shrine, of Bridge- 
port. He is an Elk and a member of the 
Royal Arcanum, and a member of the Dan- 
bury Club. He is a Methodist, and in poli- 
tics a Republican. He married, April 19, 1882, 
Katherine M., daughter of Harris and Sarah 
(Keeler) Eames at West Haven, Connecti- 
cut. Three children were born to them: i. 
Frederick Eames, born at Danbury, Janu- 
ary 27, 1883, now holding a responsible posi- 
tion with the Standard Oil Company, in 
Brooklyn, New York; married, July 9, 1904, 
Marie Cromwell, at Brooklyn, New York ; 
children: Marie Cromwell, born April 15, 
1905; Natalie, June 11, 1906. 2. Edward 
Harris, born at Danbury, May 27, 1888, now 
a member of the New York Produce Ex- 
change. T,. Mabel R., born at Danbury, June 
18, 1892.^ 



Albert Frederick Wintter, 
\\TNTTER late secretary, treasurer and 

general manager of the Con- 
necticut Breweries Company, and for many 
years a well-known resident and successful 
business man of Bridgeport, was a native of 
Stuttgart. Wurtemberg. Germany, born No- 
vember 7, 1842. son of Dr. W'illiam and Car- 
lotta Wintter. and grandson of Dr. \\'illiam 
Wintter, all of whom were natives of Stutt- 
gart, Wurtemberg, Germany. The family 
were originally of Sweden, but have made 
their home in Germany for the past three 
hundred years, their history being interwoven 
with that of both Sweden and Germany. 
Many members of the family were profes- 
sional men. Dr. Wintter (father) was a very 
prominent physician in the city of Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, taking up his residence 
there in 1848, and he continued in the prac- 
tice of his profession until his death at the 
age of fifty-nine years. He was the father 
of ciffht children, one of whom is living at 
the present time (1911): Lydia, widow of 
John Benz, who was tlie first man to o])erate 
a brewery in Connecticut, o]ierating what is 
now known as the Connecticut Breweries ; 
after his death his widow returned to Ger- 
many. News was received from Stuttgart, 
Wurtemberg, Germany, of the deatli of Dr. 
William Wintter, Iirother of the late Albert 



F. ^\'intter of Bridgeport. The deceased 
was well known here and his death will be 
regretted by many friends. He was about 
seventy years of age. Dr. Wintter for many 
years had an extensive medical clientage in 
Philadelphia, but retired from active practice 
in 1890, when he took up his residence in 
Stuttgart, where he spent his last days in 
medical study and research. The funeral of 
Ernest Frederick Wintter took place from 
the late residence of his brother, Albert F. 
Wintter, 313 Seaside avenue. Mr. Wintter 
was very well known here, having entertained 
so hospitably at "Frohheim," the country resi- 
dence of the Wintters in Long Hill. For 
the last eight years he resided in Newark, 
New Jersey, where he died March i, 191 1, 
after a long illness. 

Albert F. Wintter was educated in the 
schools of his native place, and at the age of 
thirteen years joined his father in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. Not being satisfied with 
the advantages offered in that city, after a 
residence of a few years, he crossed the plains 
to California in a prairie schooner. He then 
went to Nevada, where he resided in Carson 
City and in Virginia City, engaged in min- 
ing, and made and lost several fortunes. 
A\'hile west he was a member of the United 
States Cavalry, and at the outbreak of the 
civil war embarked in the service of carry- 
ing the mail across the plains. On the death 
of his brother-in-law. John Benz, in 1871, 
Mr. Wintter came to Bridgeport, Connecticut, 
at the request of his sister, to take charge of 
the brewery formerly conducted by her late 
husband. Two years later he purchased his 
sister's interest in the brewery. By good man- 
agement he increased the capacity and value 
of the plant immensely, and in 1882 he formed 
a partnership with the late John H. McMahon 
and Peter W. Wren, the firm becoming known 
as A. Wintter & Com])any, brewers. Later 
this company was consolidated witli the Meri- 
den Brewing Company, which now forms the 
Connecticut Breweries Company, in the man- 
agement of which Mr. Wintter played so 
]5niminent a part. Mr. Wintter was the soul 
of honor and his word was as good as his 
bond. He was one of the best known men in 
his section of tlie state, and his honor and 
integrity in all business transactions won for 
him a large circle of friends and acquaint- 
ances who loved and respected him. and by 
whom he is sadly missed and sincerely 
mourned. He was generous to a fault and 
contributed large sums to charity, also aiding 
many less fortunate in business, but with char- 
acteristic modesty kept his identity in the 
background. He at one time represented the 



i7o8 



CONNECTICUT 



old fourth ward in the common council, ren- 
dering- valuable and efficient service in that ca- 
pacity. 

Mr. Wintter married, in 1875, Pauline K., 
only daughter of the late Godfrey and Chris- 
tiana C. \'eit. She survives him, as do also 
three children, as follows: i. Lydia, who has 
traveled extensively ; married Clarence B. 
Payne, a promoter of various enterprises in 
New York and Boston. 2. Wilbert, a gradu- 
ate of a military academy and also of Wes- 
leyan University. 3. Cora, a graduate of Cort- 
landt School and ex-member of Smith Col- 
lege (1910). The children reside with their 
mother, and all are members of the South 
Congregational Church, Bridgeport. Mr. 
^^'intter passed away at his home, 313 Sea- 
side avenue, Bridgeport, March 10, 1902. 

Airs. Christiana C. Veit, widow of Godfrey 
Veit, and mother of Mrs. Pauline K. (Veit) 
Wintter, passed away at her home in East 
Bridgeport, where she had resided for over 
half a century, being one of the oldest German 
residents of the city. For many years she 
was connected with the Bridgeport Protestant 
Orphan Asylum, being a member of the board 
of managers, and shortly before her death 
having been made an honorary member. She 
was a charter member of the German Re- 
formed church of Bridgeport, and was ac- 
tively identified with many local charities. 
During the civil war she took an active part 
in the auxiliary work w^hich was carried on 
in the northern cities, supplying linen for 
bandages and other liospital supplies for the 
wounded. Her demise was mourned by a 
large following of friends and acquaintances 
about the city, she being well known and 
highly respected. Mr. A'eit was a carriage 
maker in Bridgeport. He learned his trade 
in German}-, and subsequently came to the 
United States where he conducted business 
for many years, up to his death at the age of 
sixt}--two, being one of the representative 
business men of Bridgeport. His wife died 
at the age of eighty years. They were the 
parents of five children: Pauline K., widow 
of Albert F. Wintter; Henry F., a prominent 
merchant of Bridgeport, engaged in the cloth- 
ing business ; Robert J., a resident of Bridge- 
port ; Theodore, who died in Germany ; " a 
chilli who died young. 



The Wilmot familv came from 
WILiMOT good old English stock, and 
was closely allied to the Eng- 
lish nobility, being a lineal descendant of Sir 
John Eardiy Wilmot. 

(I) Dr. Samuel Wilmot was a surgeon in 
the British army. He came to America dur- 



ing the revolutionary war. being taken pris- 
oner at the battle of Bunker Hill. Before 
an exchange was effected he met General 
Washington, and became his ardent admirer. 
Dr. Wilmot was a man of prominence in his 
profession, and served as surgeon to the king. 

(II) Dr. Robert Wilmot, son of Dr. Sam- 
uel Wilmot. was born at Exeter, England. 
He was a graduate of Eton College in Eng- 
land, and a physician and surgeon by profes- 
sion. He came to America in 1837, bringing 
his family, four sons, one of whom was 
drowned during the voyage, and one daughter, 
Eliza Eardiy Wilmot. He followed the Hud- 
son river and Erie canal from New York to 
Indiana, where he bought and settled on a 
farm. He continued to practice and study, 
and in the course of his researches, when sev- 
enty-three years of age, made an important 
discovery of the functions of the brain, and 
published a book on the brain. 'Xfter his 
death his son Robert conducted the farm, 
which was sold a few years later, when Rob- 
ert and his widowed mother removed to 
Michigan. 

(III) Samuel Russell, son of Dr. Robert 
Wilmot, was born in England, July 28, 1829, 
died in Bridgeport, Connecticut, February 4, 
1897. He came to this country with his par- 
ents, residing during his youth on his fath- 
er's farm. He attended the local schools, but 
was largely self-educated. He was by nature 
a vigorous, manl_v, self-reliant character, and 
being possessed of great inventive ability be- 
came a skillful machinist and n-ianufacturer. 
His trend of mind was essentially mechanical 
and inventive, and during his life he obtained 
about one hundred patents for his inventions 
from the United States government, many 
of which were patented in England and other 
foreign countries. His first conspicuous in- 
vention was a portable steam sawing machine 
for felling forest trees and sawing them into 
lumber in an incredibly short space of time. 
It was known as the \\'ilmot Steam Saw, and 
it added greatly to the wealth of the country 
by making available tin-iber that was formerly 
inaccessible to the water-power mills or water 
courses. Nathaniel \\'heeler and Mr. Hough, 
of Watertown, were interested in the manu- 
facture and development of this invention. 
The machines were easily moved from one 
location to another. .At the outset they were 
manufactured by Fairbanks & Company, of 
Brooklyn, New York, of which concern Mr. 
Wilmot was a member, having surrendered 
his patents for the transfer of their estimated 
value in the capital stock of the company. 
Later on disaster can-ie to the company, and 
the entire thing, with the patents, passed into 



CONNECTICUT 



1709 



the hands of parties in New Orleans. Louis- 
iana, Mr. Wihnot thereby meeting- with a 
crushing reverse in his early business career. 
This experience came in 1856, but had little 
effect upon his indomitable will, as he soon 
turned his attention to other lines and his 
inventive genius was never at rest. A promi- 
nent business at this time was the manufac- 
ture of hoop skirts out of whalebone, but the 
material soon became too scarce to meet the 
requirements of the business, and Mr. Wil- 
mot conceived the idea of substituting steel 
spring metal for whalebone, which proved so 
successful that he derived a large and profit- 
able income from it, the result of which gave 
him the financial basis for the more extensive 
business enterprise that followed. It was in 
1859 that he started a brass business in Brook- 
Ivn, New York, soon after taking with him 
a younger brother. Daniel W. Kissam be- 
came his' bookkeeper, and later on he put a 
small amount of money into the venture, with 
the privilege of withdrawing it in a year if he 
so desired. But the prosperity of the business 
warranted a larger plant, and in 1863 they 
removed to Bridgeport. Connecticut, and or- 
ganized the Bridgeport Brass Company. All 
the plans for the new plant and provision for 
its prospective possibilities were arranged for 
and drawn by Mr. Wilmot's own brain and 
hand. He was president of the company for 
manv years, j\Ir. Kissam being secretary. 

.\fter retirement from active connection 
with the Bridgeport Brass Company, Mr. Wil- 
mot spent several years in experimenting with 
details for larger schemes, meanwhile patent- 
ing various small inventions that brought him 
many thousands of dollars. He concentrated 
his thoughts upon a new caloric engine with 
a system of tubing suggested by the intesti- 
nal' principles of the human body, and while 
constructing a large model of it there came a 
necessity for steel of different quality than 
he could buy. and a need for tubing with a 
seam so perfect that it nuist be invisible. From 
this grew a large business and the postpone- 
ment of his larger scheme. After six years of 
hard work and much expenditure of money, 
he had conqiletcd a cold rolling mill for steel, 
all the details being done under his personal 
supervision and according to original iileas 
of his own. In 1884 he organized the \\'ilniot 
and Hobbs Manufacturing Company; former- 
ly known as the firm of Wilmot. Hoblis & 
Companv. which business was established in 
1.877 by Mr. Wilmot: in 1894 Mr. Hobbs sold 
out his entire interest. The list of this firm's 
entire products is a long one. Bessemer, open 
hearth, and the celebrated "Swedoh"' steel, 
billets, bands, sheets and strips for pressed, 



stamped and drawn work, anti-rust, copper- 
ized. and nickel-plated oilers, lamps, engineers' 
and steamboat sets, bicycle tubing and nickel- 
plated stove edge and ring trimmings, may 
be mentioned among them. 

For a number of years these works were 
conducted on the departmental plan, and the 
hot rolling department was deserving of spe- 
cial mention. This was advantageously lo- 
cated on a branch track of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford railroad. Here, each 
vear, the company received its raw materials, 
thousands of tons of domestic and foreign 
billets, these to be cut by enormous shears to 
the desired size and weight, heated in large 
gas furnaces capable of turning out one hun- 
dred tons per day. passed to and fro through 
the hot rolling mill train, operated by engines 
of some fifteen hundred horse-power, and thus 
turned into bands and plates. A portion of 
the annealing and pickling of hot rolled steel 
was conducted at the hot rolling department, 
or lower mill, situated at the corner of How- 
ard and A\'ordin avenues, and a portion at 
the main works at Railroad and Hancock ave- 
nues. On the night of February 4. 1895, the 
cold rolling mills were burned to the ground, 
destroving machinery, and the patterns and 
drawings therefor that had been the work of 
years to accumulate. Shortly afterward a 
substantial fireproof structure was erected in 
the place of the old, wdth greatly increased 
facilities for handling the extensive business. 
At the time of Mr. Wilmot's death he had in 
development several mechanical ideas which 
were designed to add to the already comjiletely 
appointed ])lant, the perfecting of which de- 
volved upon his son, Frank A. Wilmot. who 
was his successor as president of the Wilmot 
& Hobbs Manufacturing Company. 

For many years Mr. Wilmot was a mem- 
ber of the First Congregational Church of 
Bridgeport, being one of its deacons for 
twelve years. He recognized the need of re- 
ligious privileges in the neighborhood where 
he resided, and purchased a jiroperty on East 
Main street, near Stratford avenue, on which 
he erected a church building and parsonage. 
A society was formed called the Berean 
Church, which steadily grew and was a bless- 
ing to many jieople. Mr. Wilmot was the 
first jiresident of the Christian Alliance, of 
which Rev. .\. B. Simpson, of New York City, 
was the moving spirit, and to this cause Mr. 
Wilmot gave liberally. His private charities 
were numerous, and the substantial aid he was 
wont to give to young inventors by his quick 
insight into the value or uselessness of their 
inventions brought men from far and near to 
seek his counsel. In politics he was a staunch 



I7IO 



CONNECTICUT 



Republican, but never sought or held public 
office. 

Air. Wilmot married, in 1855, Sarah M., 
born September 20, 1838, at Sharon, Con- 
necticut, daughter of Ebenezer Guernsey, of 
Watertown, Connecticut, whose ancestors set- 
tled in Connecticut in 1663. Children: i. 
Florence E., born September 5, 1859, at 
Watertown, married Willis F. Hobbs, of 
Providence, Rhode Island ; child, Clifford R. 
Hobbs. 2. Jendall, died aged six months. 3. 
Effie Ala}-, born at Watertown, died aged 
three years. 4. Frank Ashley, see for\vard. 
5. Ethelyn AL, married Percy L. Biyning. 

(IV) Frank Ashley, son of Samuel Rus- 
sell and Sarah AI. (Guernsey) Wilmot, was 
born in Brooklyn, New York, February 21, 
1865. During his early infancy his parents 
removed to Bridgeport, Connecticut, and that 
city has been his home ever since. The sum- 
mers of his boyhood were spent in Water- 
town, Connecticut, part of which is known as 
Guernseytown, named for his maternal grand- 
father. He attended the Bridgeport public 
schools and Air. Strong's private school. He 
was an intelligent and earnest reader, espe- 
cially of books devoted to mechanical engi- 
neering, metallurgy and finance. At the age 
of fifteen lie began his business career by 
working in the summer time as a cashier. 
Two years later, upon the completion of his 
studies, he entered his father's business, then 
known as the Wilmot & Hobbs Manufactur- 
ing Company, which is now the American 
Tube & Stamping Company, and since the 
death of his father, in 1897, he has been presi- 
dent and treasurer of the company. He be- 
gan at the lowest round of the ladder, working 
at the humblest mechanical work in the fac- 
tory and in the office, and was advanced 
through all the grades of factory and office 
work. During the years just preceding and 
following his coming of age he was a travel- 
ing representative of the company. He was 
soon afterward made secretary, in 1894 be- 
came treasurer and vice-president, and later 
president. Under his management the com- 
pany has been greatly enlarged in its plant, 
its capital and its business, and has been 
changed in style to its present form. Through 
his influence and skillful handling he brought 
about the establishment of Connecticut's first 
basic open hearth steel ingot-making fur- 
naces and billet mills. When the organization 
of the steel trust made it difficult to secure 
the special quality of steel billets used in his 
company's finishing rolling mills, Mr. Wil- 
mot originated the scheme of making them 
from scrap iron and steel produced in New 
England which had previously been shipped 



to the steel makers in Pennsylvania. His plan 
of thus supplying his rolling mill plants and 
others with raw material in the form of the 
best open hearth steel billets, slabs and even 
ingots weighing as high as forty to fifty tons 
in one piece for large forge work proved 
highly successful, saved his concern from clos- 
ing because of the withholding of its raw ma- 
terials, and has tended to increase the com- 
pany's output many times. Mr. Wilmot has 
made many important inventions connected 
with his manufacturing interests and has 
United States and foreign patents covering 
them. 

In addition to his own business, he 
serves in the capacity of director in the City 
National Bank of Bridgeport. He is an at- 
tendant of St. John's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, and in politics is a Republican. He 
is a member of Corinthian Lodge, Free and 
lA.ccepted Alasons ; Jerusalem Chapter, Royal 
Arch Alasons ; Royal and Select Masters ; 
Hamilton Commandery, Knights Templar, 
and of the other bodies including the thirty- 
second degree. He belongs to the Bridgeport 
Board of Trade, Manufacturers' Association, 
Hartford Club, Transportation Club of New 
York, the Brooklawn, Seaside, Brooklyn 
Country, Algonquin, Calumet and Yacht clubs 
of Bridgeport. 

Mr. Wilmot married, September 26, 1888, 
at Bridgeport, Florence Alargaret, daughter 
of Charles Cartwright (see Cartwright). 
Children: i. Russell Cartwright, born De- 
cember 12, 1889. 2. Alargaret Florence, April 
21, 1891. 3. Dorothy Eardley, Alay 31, 1892. 
4. Gladys Elizabeth, September 15, 1893. 5. 
Frank Ashley, December 20. 1899. 6. Edwin 
Guernsey, February 3, 1902. 

(The Cartwright Line). 

The surname Cartwright belongs to a large 
class of English surnames formed from trades 
and occupations of progenitors. The trade 
name "wright" is from the Anglo-Saxon 
wyrhta, meaning about the same as the Latin 
Faber, a workman or mechanic. Gradually 
"wright" came to mean a worker in wood in 
distinction from smith, a worker in metals. We 
find the trade names copperwright, wheelwright, 
plowwright, arkwright, tellwright, allwright, 
all in use as surnames after the introduction 
of surnames in England about the year 1200. 
The family are found scattered throughout 
England, Ireland and .Scotland, Jeffry Cart- 
wright, of Dublin, in February, 1636, bore 
these a,rms : Per fess embattled sable and or 
three Catherine wheels counterchanged a cres- 
cent for difference. It is similar to the coat- 
of-arms of the Cartwrights of Devonshire, 



CONNECTICUT 



1711 



Englaml, whence the Irish branch probably 
came. 

Charles Cartwright, who came to this coun- 
try in 1850. was a native of England. He was 
a shoemaker by trade. From New York City, 
where he landed, he came to Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut, where he followed his trade, and 
after a time began to manufacture shoes and 
boots, opening a retail store in Bridgeport. 
His mercantile career was very successful, 
and his business was afterwards incorporated 
under the name of the Cartwright Shoe Com- 
pany, of which Mrs. Frank Ashley \\'ilmot, 
his daughter, is president. He was a member 
of Trinity Protestant Church, and in politics 
a Republican. He married (first) Sarah N. 
Atkinson. Child, Frank N., who was drowned 
at an early age. He married (second) Eliza- 
beth Kingston, born at Stafford. England, died 
aged forty-nine years, and is buried in ?iIoun- 
tain Grove Cemetery. Child, Florence Mar- 
garet, aforementioned as the wife of Frank 
Ashlev Wilmot. 



John Peet, immigrant ancestor, 
PEET was born in England in 1597, died 
in Stratford, Connecticut, 1678. 
He came from Duffield Parish, county Derby, 
England, in the "Hopewell," Captain P>un- 
doch, in 1635. He was thirty-eight when he 
came to America and was the first of the name 
in Stratford. His wife Sarah was daughter 
of Richard Osborn, of England. The name 
was at first spelled Peake, after that Peat, and 
finally Peet. Children : Mary ; John, about 
1638, mentioned below; Benjamin, about 1640, 
married Phebe Benton; Benjamin (2), mar- 
ried Priscilla Fairchild ; Thomas, married 
Phebe Nichols ; Phebe, married Mitchell Cur- 
tis, and had: Daniel Mitchell, married Huldah 
Burr; Justis Burr, married Huldah Edwards; 
Elizabeth, married Aaron Banks Sherwood. 

(H) John (2), son of John (i) Peet, was 
born about 1638, died September i, 1684. He 
married Sarah , and slic married ( sec- 
ond) John Brooks, as learned from a recei])t 
given by five of her children, dated Novem- 
ber 15, 1694. Children: Samuel, born De- 
cember 26, 1663; Sarah, October 5, iC/ij; 
Hannah, December f\ 1667; Elizabeth, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1669; John, November 20, 1672, 
mentioned below; Joseph, March 10, 1674-75; 
Jane, October 17, 1677. 

(HI) Sergeant John (3) Peet, son of John 
(2) Peet, was born November 20, 1672, died 
February i, 1709-10. The inventory of his 
estate was dated March 13, 1709-10. and 
amounteil to three hundred and seventeen 
pounds, eleven shillings, six pence. Tie married 
Mary, daughter of Thomas Morehouse, May 



12, 1695, oi" 1696. His widow married John 
Corbet before 1719; and Septemljer 5, 1723, 
married Benjamin Peet. Children : Joseph, born 
January 4, 1696-97; David, June 30, 1698; 
Sarah, June 4, 1701 ; Mary, December 3, 
1702; Hannah, December 22, 1704; John, 
April 23, 1707; Daniel, March 30, 1708-09. 

(IV) David, son of Sergeant John (3) 
Peet, was born June 30, 1698. He gave land 
to his three sons in New Milford, Connecti- 
cut, where they settled and where some of 
their descendants still reside. The family at- 
tended the Episcopal church. He married 
(first) i\Iary Titharton, October i, 1719. She 
died in 1737, and he married (second) Thank- 
ful Whippo, November, 1739. Children: 
Samuel, born April i, 1721 ; Mehitable. No- 
vember 15, 1722; John, June, 1726; Thaddeus, 
January, 1727; David, October, 1730; Mary, 
July, 1733; Patience, September, 1735; Han- 
nah, December, 1737; Sarah, December, 1740; 
Benjamin, baptized March, 1744. 

(V) Harmon Peet, of a later generation of 
the New Milford family, was born at Canaan, 
Connecticut. He was a farmer. He married 
Sarah Webb, who died at Canaan. She was 
educated in a Moravian Seminary in Pennsyl- 
vania, and was a woman of refinement and 
culture. Children : Joseph W'elib. mentioned 
below ; John Harman. 

(VI) Joseph Webb, son of Harmon Peet, 
was born at Canaan, in 1842, died there in 
1904. He was educated in the public schools. 
He was clerk in his father's general store and 
succeeded to the business at Canaan. He was 
hx later life a banker and farmer. He was 
senior warden of the Protestant Episcopal 
church at Canaan. His father helped to build 
the church and was the first person confirmed 
there, while he was the first child baptized in 
the chinch. He was a member of the general 
assemlily one term. He married Frances 
.Stoddard, Ijorn in 1841, at Salisbury, Connect- 
icut, died in Canaan, resided in Canaan. Chil- 
dren : George. Church, mentioned below; En-- 
sign, died aged twenty years; child, died in 
infancy. 

(VII) George Church, son of Josejih Webb 
Peet, was born at Canaan, .\pril 15, 1866. He 
was educated there in the public schools. At 
the age of seventeen he entered the firm of 
T. Hawley &• Company, dealers in hardware, 
Bridgeport. He was at Staml'ord for two 
years and then returned to llridgeport and 
engaged in tiie furniture business three years 
there, after whicli he went to Canaan where 
for seven vears he was associated with his 
father in the general store. He returned to 
Bridgc])ort and has for many years been in- 
terested in the furnitiu'e business and in the 



iyi2 



CONNECTICUT 



management of his father's estate in Canaan. 
In poHtics he is a Democrat. He is a member 
of the Seaside Club and of the Improved 
Order of Red !Men. and Sons of the American 
Revolution. He married, February 5, 1890, 
Julia Crissy Sumner, of Bridgeport, daughter 
of Samuel Barstow Sumner (see Sumner X). 
They have no children. 

(Tlie Sumner Line). 

(IV) ^^^illiam (2) Sumner, son of \\\\- 
liam (I) Sumner (q. v.), was born February 
9, 1656, in Boston, died in Aliddletown, Con- 
necticut, July 20. 1703. He was a freeman 
in May, 1678, a member of the artillery com- 
pany, 1679. He married (first) May 22, 
1677, in Dedham, Rachel, daughter of William 
Avery, of Dedham. She died soon, and he 

married ( second ) Hannah . About 

1687 he moved to ^Nliddletown. Fie was dea- 
con, lieutenant and deputy in 1701-02-03. 
Children : William, born November 22, 1679. 
Boston, died young : Hannah, September, 
i68r, Boston: Hezekiah, February 21, 1684, 
Boston, mentioned below ; Sarah, December 
29, 1685, Boston: Daniel, September 26, 1688, 
IMiddletown : Ebenezer, September 28, 1691, 
Middletown, died 1698. 

(V) Hezekiah, son of William (2) Sum- 
ner, was born February 21, 1684, in Boston. 
He lived in Middletown and died May 7, 1749. 
He married, February 10, 1704, in Middle- 
town, Abigail Bidwell. His widow married 

(second) Frary. Children, born in 

IMiddletown: \\'illiam. January 12, 1705, 
mentioned below: Hannah, ^Nlarch 11, 1707; 
Abigail, October 20, 171 1: daughter, August 
25, 1713, died same day ; t)aniel, December 26, 
1714; Elizabeth, June 7, 1718. 

(VI) William (3), son of Hezekiah Sum- 
ner, was born January 12, 1705. He lived in 
Aliddletown and died November 15, 1739. He 
married, January 15, 1724, Hannah Clark, 
who married (second) September 15, 1759, 
Joseph Johnson. She died April 12, 1795, at 
Middletown. Children, born in Middletown : 
Hezekiah, December 4, 1725, mentioned be- 
low;- Hannah, June 20, 1726: Sarah, July 12, 
1727; Mary, June 8, 1730: William, January 
14, 1733; John, June 30, 1735; Ebenezer, Au- 
gust 14, 1737. 

(VII) Hezekiah (2). son of William (3) 
Sumner, was born December 4, 1725, in Mid- 
dletown. He lived first in IMiddletown, where 
he was second lieutenant in the Fourth Con- 
necticut Regiment. .-Kbout 1767 he moved to 
Sandisfield, Massachusetts, and thence to 
Bethlehem, now ( )tis, Massachusetts. He 
died there in 1802. He married (first) Feb- 
ruary 10, 1744, Desire Higgins. She died 



and he married (second) Widow Mary 

. Children : Samuel, born December 

25, 1745 ; Tabitha, December 14. 1746, died 
November, 1747; Clement, September 26, 
1748; Tabitha, July, 1750: Abigail, June 13, 
1752: Desire, September 15, 1754, died May 

1, 1758; Hezekiah, August 13, 1757; Daniel, 
May 26, 1759, mentioned below; Desire, Jan- 
uary 7, 1765. 

(VIII) Daniel, son of Hezekiah (2) Sum- 
ner, was born May 26, 1759, in Middletown. 
He married (first) in 1779, Lucy Cook. His 
wife died May 21, 1788, and he married (sec- 
ond) November 26, 1789, Hannah Watson. 
He lived in Otis, Massachusetts, and died 
November 23, 1838. His widow died Sep- 
tember 5, 1848. Children of first wife, born 
in Bethlehem: Daniel, May 9, 1780: \\'illiam, 
.Mav 3, 1782: Lucv, lune 15, 1784: Darius, 
March 7, 1786; IMary S., April 6, 1788. Chil- 
dren of second wife : Almira, September 25, 
1790; Emilia, March 15, 1792; Watson, May 
29, 1794; Susanna, November 9, 1797, died 
August 7, 1800: Increase, ]May 13, 1801, men- 
tioned below ; Ethan Newton, November 18, 
1806, died September 18, 1808; Caroline, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1810. 

(IX) Increase, son of Daniel Sumner, was 
born May 13, 1801, in Otis, died January 28, 
1871. He lived in Great Barrington. He 
was representative, 1833-34, senator from 
Berkshire, 1840-42, representative, 1859, 
judge of district court of Southern Berkshire. 
He received the degree of ]\I. A. from Wil- 
liams College, 1839. He married (first) ]May 
25, 1827, Pluma Amelia, daughter of Sam- 
uel Barstow, of Great Barrington, Massachu- 
setts. She died in May, 1847, 3"'' ^^ mar- 
ried (second) Clara A., daughter of \\'illiam 
Carroll Wells, of Boston. Children, born in 
Great Barrington: Elizabeth, April 2, 1828, 
died IMarch, 1837 • Samuel Barstow, February 
16, 1830; Edward Prescott, January 7, 1833, 
died March 24, 1834: Charles Allen, August 

2. 1835; Julia Elizabeth, October 20, 1839; 
Albert Increase, February 4, 1841. 

(X) Colonel Samuel Barstow Sumner, son 
of Increase and Sumner, was born in Great 
Barrington, February 16, 1830, died in 
Bridgeport, February 26, 1901. His pre- 
liminary education was acquired in the 
academies of Lenox and Great Barrington, 
and he then matriculated at Williams College, 
from which he was graduated in 1849, ^nd in 
1852 he was admitted to the bar in Berkshire 
county, where he practiced with his father. 
He held the office of postmaster during the 
administrations of Presidents Pierce and 
Buchanan, and in i860 was elected state sen- 
ator from South Berkshire district, com- 



CONNECTICUT 



1713 



prising- the seventeen towns soutli of Pitts- 
field. Upon the outbreak of the civil war he 
at once offered his services to his country. 
He enHsted, Xoveinber 19, 1862, in the Forty- 
ninth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers, 
was captain of a company and was later ad- 
vanced to the rank of lieutenant-colonel of the 
regiment. During the assault on Port Hud- 
son, Louisiana, May 27, 1863, he was wounded 
by a bullet in the shoulder, which was later 
cut out. The term of his enlistment expired 
September i, 1863. Returning from the war 
he removed to Bridgeport, where he resumed 
the practice of his profession and was ad- 
mitted to the Fairfield county bar in 1863. 
Here he was very successful and became one 
of the leading lawyers of the county. He 
served several terms as city attorney, one term 
as judge of the cit_\' court, and for six years 
was judge of the probate court. He was as- 
sociated for six years with Judge Sidney B. 
Beardsley in the firm of Beardsley & Sum- 
ner. In 1884 he was appointed clerk of the 
superior and supreme courts of Fairfield 
county, and held that office until his death. 
Colonel Sumner was in great demand as an 
orator on all public occasions and was also 
well known as a poet. In conjunction with 
his brother, ex-Congressman Charles A. Sum- 
ner, of California, he published a volume of 
poems in 1877, which earned for them high 
and well-merited praise. Colonel Sumner 
was a member of Elias Howe Jr. Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic ; an honorary member 
of the Society of the Army of the Potomac, 
before which he delivered an oration at the 
annual re-union in 1881 ; was a prominent 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, having been noble grand of the Arcanum 
lodge ; eminent commander of Knights Tem- 
plar ; past master of St. John's Lodge, Xo. 3, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Bridgeport; 
honorary member of Cincinnatus Lodge, of 
Great Britain, as was also his father. Col- 
onel Sumner was interested in the building of 
the Fairfield county court house, and was a 
member of the building committee. Member 
of Zeta Psi Greek fraternity, of which he had 
been a member while at college. 

Colonel Sumner married. 1855, Georgianna 
Davis, of Bridgeport, who died in 1887. Chil- 
dren : I. Edward Stewart, a lawyer, admit- 
ted in 1878, a member of St. John's Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, since 1879; has 
done a great deal of work in the Masonic fra- 
ternity, and has held all offices up to the 
thirty-second degree; has been a member of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine since January, 
1882; recorder of Hamilton Commandery for 
eleven \ears, and has held all offices up to 



that of high priest. 2. Caroline St. Leon 
(twin), born September 10, 1858, married Dr. 
Charles C. Godfrey. 3. Clara Elizabeth, twin 
of Caroline St. Leon, born in Great Barring- 
ton, was assistant clerk at the superior court, 
she married Frank H. Betts, of Bridgeport, 
and has a child, ]\Iarian Sumner. 4. Julia 
Crissy, born June 11, 1867, Bridgeport, mar- 
ried George C. Peet (see Peet VII). 



The ancient English surname 
CURTIS Curtis is also spelled Curtiss, 

Curtess, Curteis and Curtoys. 
Stephen Curtis was of Appledore, Kent, 
about 1450, and several of his descendants 
were mayors of Tenterden, a town from 
which came many settlers of Scituate, Massa- 
chusetts. The family has also lived, from an 
ancient date, in county Sussex, England. The 
ancient coat-of-arms is thus described : Ar- 
gent, a chevron sable, between three bulls 
heads caboshed, gules. Crest : A unicorn pas., 
or, between four trees proper. 

(I) William Curtis lived in England and 
probably died there. His widow Elizabeth, 
and sons John and William, settled in Strat- 
ford, Connecticut, in 1639. 

(II) John, son of William and Elizabeth 
Curtis, came to Stratford, Connecticut, among 
the first settlers with his brother William and 
his mother. He was born in England, died 
December 2, 1707, aged ninety-four years. 

He married Elizabeth • , who died 

March, 1681-82. Children, born at Stratford: 
John, October 14, 1642, settled in Newark, 
New Jersey; Israel, Ajiril 3, 1644; Elizabeth, 
May 2, 1647; Thomas, January 14, 1648; Jos- 
eph, mentioned below; Benjamin, September 
30, 1652; Hannah, February 2, 1654. 

(III) Joseph, son of John and Elizabeth 
Curtis, was born November 12, 1650. He 
married, November 9, 1676, I'ethia, daugh- 
ter of Richard Booth. Children, born at 
Stratford: Elizabeth, January 17, 1678; .\nna, 
September 1, i'i79: Mary, about 1681; Eph- 
raini, mentioned below ; Joseph, November 6, 
1687; Nathan, February 21, 1689-90; Josiah, 
March 31, 1691; Bethia, March 10, 1695-96; 
Elizer, July 30. 1698; Eliphalet, August i, 
169Q. 

(I\") Eiihraim. ■■on of Jose])h and P.ethia 
(Booth) Curtis, was born at Stratford, Con- 
necticut, December 31, 1684. died in 1776. 
He married, June 26, 1706. Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Ephraini Stiles ; she died in October, 
1775. Children, born at Stratford: Stiles, 
mentioned below; Sarah. September 3, 1708; 
Henry, ( )ctober 12. 1709; .\nn. .August 31, 
1711; riicbc (twin), .\ugu^t, 1713; Elizabeth 
(twin), died 1716; Fiihraini. August 30. 1717, 



1/14 



CONNECTICUT 



died 1737; Elizabeth. October 2. 1719; 
Martha, November 26, 1721 : Ruth, baptized 
October 27. 1723: Ethiiund, baptized August, 
1725; Bathsheba, baptized November, 1728; 
Elnathan, born January, 1726-27. 

(V) Stiles, son of Ephraim and Elizabeth 
(Stiles) Curtis, was born at Stratford, Con- 
necticut, March 18, 1707. He married, No- 
vember 7, 1730, Rebecca Judson. Children, 
born at Stratford: Sarah, May 17, 1732; Eli- 
zabeth. December 28. 1733; Elihu. December 
17, 1734; Hannah, December 15, 1736: Eph- 
raim, mentioned below; Elihu, May 10, 1741; 
Silas, baptized June 14. 1743; John, baptized 
September. 1745; Rebecca, baptized February 
14. 1747-48: Catee. baptized June, 1752. 

(\T) Ephraim (2), son of Stiles and Re- 
becca ( Judson ) Curtis, was born in Stratford, 
Connecticut, March 27, 1739, died in Hunting- 
ton, Connecticut, August 30, 1794. He was a 
lieutenant in the revolution in Captain lieach 
Tomlinson's company, 1777. and was a sol- 
dier in Captain Joshua Lirown's company in 
1779. He married, December 2^. 1764. Ann, 
born July 2-. 1743, died January 15, 1802, 
daughter of Josiah and ]\Iary Curtiss, of Strat- 
ford. Children, born in Huntington : Levi, 
December 29, 1765; Mary Ann. September 
14. 1767: Philo. October 2^. 1772: Ephraim, 
mentioned below: Rebecca, September 17, 
1782; Agur, February 19, 1786. 

(\'n) Ephraim (3). son of Ephraim (2) 
and Ann (Curtiss) Curtis, was born at Hunt- 
ington, Connecticut, July 12. 1780. He mar- 
ried, December 3. 1S04. Phebe, born at Strat- 
ford, died at Huntington, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Phebe (Judson) Brooks. Children: 
Polly, born December 13, 1805 : Agur, July 9, 
1807-; Brooks, June 7, 1809: Phebe, April 9, 
1811; Emily, ^larch 20, 1813; Ephraim, Feb- 
• ruarv 21. 1815: Philo, September 5, 1817; 
Susan. June 10. 1819: Lucius. July 14. 1821 ; 
William" Birdseye. (\-tober 21. 1823: Sylves- 
ter, mentioned below. 

(VHI) Sylvester, son of Ephraim (3) and 
Phebe ( Brooks) Curtis, was born at Hunting- 
ton, Connecticut, April 17, 1826. died April 
17, 1885. at \\'aterbury. He attended the 
public schools. He worked in a sash and blind 
factory, and followed the trade of carpenter 
for a time, and during the last twenty years 
of his active life, he was superintendent of the 
Waterbury Clock Company. He was a faithful 
member of the ^lethodist Episcopal church 
and a man of exemplary character. He was a 
member of the local lodge of Odd Fellows. 
He married Caroline Elizabeth Russell, born 
at Middlebury, Connecticut, February 11, 
1830, died there in 1888. She was a daugh- 
ter of Charles A. and Lockey ( Beebe ) Rus- 



sell. Charles A. Russell was a son of Enoch 
and Sally Russell, the former of whom died 
April 15. 1834. aged sixty years; the latter 
died September 30, 1850. probably in Middle- 
bury or \Voodbur}'. Lockey ( Beebe ) Rus- 
sell was a daughter of Amzi and Jerusha 
( Summers) Beebe. the former of whom died 
December 15, 1839. and the latter at the age 
of fifty-three years (see Beebe X). Children: 
I. George P.. married (first) Margaret Croft, 
of Waterbury, and had one child. Croft Cur- 
tis, now living in San Fancisco : married ( sec- 
ond), Jennie Lounsbury. who bore him six 
children. 2. Henry, died young. 3. Daugh- 
ter, died in infancy. 4. Rollin Alanson, men- 
tioned below. 5. Caroline Elizabeth, resides 
with her mother in Waterbury. 

(IX) Rollin Alanson. son of Sylvester and 
Caroline Elizabeth (Russell) Curtis, was born 
at Waterbury. Connecticut, October 19. 1865. 
He attended the ]uiblic schools and graduated 
from Wesleyan Academy. Wilbraham. Mass- 
achusetts. He studied his profession at the 
New York University, graduating with the 
degree of ]\I.D. in 1893. He served as'interne 
atl'ellevue Hospital, New York City. 1893- 
95. and in 1895 began the general practice of 
medicine in Bridgeport. Connecticut, retiring 
in 1908; he made his home in Stratford. He 
is a member of St. John's Lodge, No. 8. Free 
and Accepted Masons: Jerusalem Chapter, 
No. 13, Royal Arch Masons: Jerusalem Coun- 
cil. No. 16, Royal and Select ^Masters; Ham- 
ilton Commandery, N^o. 5. Knights Templar; 
Pyramid Temple. .Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and has taken 
all degrees to the thirty-second in .Scottish 
Rite Masonry : member of N^osahogan Lodge, 
N^o. 21. Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of Waterbury, and of Tunxis Tribe, No. 10, 
Improved Order of Red Men, of Waterbury. 
He is a member of the Seaside Club, of 
Bridgeport and of Cupheag Club, of .Strat- 
ford. In religion Dr. Curtis is a Protestant, 
and in politics a Republican. He married, 
March 23, 1904, Catherine Theresa, bi.irn at 
Seymour, Connecticut, daughter of William 
and Catherine Colbert. One child. Catherine 
Carohne, born October 27, 1906. 

(The Beebe Line). 

It is interesting to know that the name Beebe 
occurs in the time of Rameses II. about 3000 
B. C, in the form of Bebi, whose hierogly]ihic 
is given in the table of Sakkarah, a monument 
in Egypt. Also in Book 21. in Livy's "His- 
tory of Rome." a Quintius Baebius. an aged 
man. was sent as ambassador to Hannibal and 
to the Carthaginian Senate to demand ]jeace 
or war, and the date, \ear of Rome, was 334. 



CONNECTICUT 



1715 



There is a very plausible tradition of French 
origin. Some ancient family papers, said to 
be in the archives of Aston Hall, Warwick- 
shire, England, show that the family de- 
scended from the two Norman knights, Rich- 
ard and William de Boebe. These knights 
were in the Royal Guard of William the Con- 
queror, and came to England at the time of 
the conquest. They were granted manors in 
Warwickshire, bv the king, where the family 
lived to the close of the Commonwealth. In 
the ancient Norman Rolls which are in the 
Tower of London, there is the name Willil- 
mus Babbe, Praepositus, A. D. 1204, who ad- 
judged the values of property with four other 
jurors. One of the first authentic records of 
the name is in Bridge's "History of Northam- 
tonshire." England, printed in 1740. which 
says, under the heading of Town of Brackley, 
Sutton Hundred : "Here was formerly an In- 
firmary or Hospital for the sick, dedicated to 
St. Leonard, one of which was Joh. Beby, 
February 10, 1403." Joh. Beby was in- 
cumbent of the Church of St. John Baptist 
at East Farndon, some time between the years 
1398 and 141 1. There is a church at Castre 
dedicated to St. Kyneburga, and upon the 
porch of this, on the moulding of the door is 
cut the inscription: "Ricardus Beby, Rector, 
Ecclesie de Castre, Fecit Fieri." The coat- 
of-arms of the family is : A blue shield with 
golden chevron and three gold bees. Crest : A 
golden bee-hive, indicative of industry, vigi- 
lance, and persistency of purpose. Motto : 
"Se defendendo." The motto of the branch 
of the family under consideration is "Fidele 
€t Brave," and was granted by Henry ^■. to 
Sir John Beebe for distinguished gallantry 
at the siege of Harfleur. 

(I) Alexander Beebe lived in Great Ad- 
dington, England, and died there in 1623. 

He married Elizabeth , who died in 

1633. 

(II) John, son of Alexander Beebe. died ni 
England in 1634, in Great Addington. His 
wife was .-Mice . 

(III) John (2), son of John (i) Beebe, 
was born in 1600, died 'Slay 18, 1650, while 
on his way to America. He left five sons and 
two daughters. A third daughter, Mary, who 
was baptized in 1637, was not mentioned in 
her father's will, where the other children arc 
mentioned, nor the fact that they came from 
Broughton, England. He left England in 
Ajjril or May, 1650 and was accomjianied by 
his five children. Two .sons ]irece<led him to 
America, and his daughter Hannah and wife 
Rebecka probably died Ijefore he started. His 
will was written and signed on shipboard, at 
■which time his eldest son was twent\-two, and 



his youngest child thirteen. He appointed 
William Lewis and John Cole executors of ' 
his will. Children born in Broughton, Eng- 
land, and dates of baptism : John, November 
4, 1628, of whom further; Rebecka, August 
II, 1630; Thomas, June 23, 1633; Samuel, 
June 23, 1633; Nathaniel, January 23, 1635; 
Mary, March 18, 1637; Hannah, June 23, 
1640: James, 1641. 

(I\') John (3), son of John (2) Beebe, 
was baptized in Broughton, England, Novem- 
ber 4, 1628. He married, about December, 
1660, Abigail, born about 1638, died March 9, 
1725, daughter of James Yorke, of Stoning- 
ton, Connecticut, died March 9, 1725. Her 
father may have been the James Yorke, aged 
twenty-one, who sailed from England, June 
20, 1635, in the ship "Philip Richard," Mr. 
Morgan, master. He was sergeant of the 
train band for twenty years, and in the sum- 
mer of 1676, Ensign John Beebe, of New Lon- 
don, with Captain George Denison, were with 
a company which was raised in New London 
county for the Indian war. In 1690 he was a 
lieutenant. There was once a dispute between 
the New London and Lyme people over the 
right to mow grass on debatable land. The 
New London men came and began to mow 
the land. Then the Lyme men came with a 
constable, who began to read a warrant for 
the ajjprehension of Ensign Minor. Sergeant 
Beebe interrupted him, crying, "We care not 
a straw for }our pai)er." There was a strug- 
gle between the two jiarties which did not 
result seriously to either side. In 1671-72 he 
was brought before court with many others in 
New London, "for an attempt to drive Mr. 
Matthew Griswold and Lieut. William Wal- 
ler by violence oiif their lands, resistance to 
authority and assault." \'ery likely he had 
been for some time on the plantation of New 
London in the service of John Winthrop, the 
founder. He came to New F.ngland in 1650. 
September 4, 1631, one acre of land was 
granted him; December 2, 1651, five acres; 
March 5, 1652, lots of ten, seven, and si.\ 
acres. In 1707 he deeded thirty-one acres to 
his son Benjamin. This deed was recorded 
.April 28, 17 14, but very likely he was dead at 
this time. He was called a "I.eather Dresser" 
in a deed dated i'Xxd. In ifi^i he is men- 
tioned among the grantees or ])lanters of New 
London, Connecticut. He was given house 
lots in the sjiring of 1651, in Poquiogh and 
also Fog Plain, and in 1652 he was granted 
land east of the Mystic. In 1675 he was ap- 
liointcd ensign by the general court, in Cap- 
tain George Denison's company in New Lon- 
don county. Over sixty-eight men were 
raised there, May 11. 1676, for the standing 



I7I6 



CONNECTICUT 



army, as well as a part of the three hundred 
"and fifty men raised in the colony of Connec- 
ticut. During King Philip's war, in June. 
1676, he went on several expeditions against 
the Indians, to Rhode Island, Taunton, and 
beyond Westfield, JMassachusetts, on the way 
to Albany. On one of these expeditions the 
company ascended the Connecticut river to 
Northampton, where they joined Major Tal- 
cot with supplies of which the army was in 
urgent need. On January 21, 1707-08, he was 
living at New London. Children : John, men- 
tioned below; Benjamin, born about ihCjT,: 
Rebecca, about 1665. 

(V) John (4), son of John (3) Beebe. was 
born in New London, about 1661. He gave 
deeds of land there in 1687-88-90, the last 
two being to Richard Shaw, husband of his 
sister Rebecca. These deeds were recorded in 
June, i6g6. No further mention of him has 
been found. Children : Joseph, mentioned be- 
low ; Mary, born 1686; Stephen, married, 
November 16, 1716, Mary Leach; jerusha ; 
child. 

(A I) Joseph, son of John (4) Beebe. was 
born about 1684 in New London. He mar- 
ried, December 26, 1706, Elizabeth Graves, 
born April 16, 1671. The New London rec- 
ord says. "Joseph Beebe married Elizabeth 
Graves," while his wife's name is given as 
Mehitable in the records of baptism of his 
children. A Rebecca Graves is recorded just 
before Elizabeth Graves, as marrying Jona- 
than Daniells, and the two were very probably 
sisters. A history of the Graves family con- 
firms the marriage of Elizabeth. Children : 
Joseph, born December 4, 1707; Jonathan, 
I\larch 2. 1709; Ephraim. mentioned below; 
Stephen. July 13. 1714; David, about 1716; 
Elisha, about 1718; Simeon, about 1720; Abi- 
gail, baptized October 20, 1728; JMehitable, 
baptized October 20, 1728. 

(VII) Ephraim, son of Joseph Beebe, was 
born in New London, May 5, 171 2. He had 
a son Reuben. 

(\TII) Reuben, son of Ephraim Beebe. was 
born about 1750. died July 20, 181 2. He mar- 
ried, June 24. 1775, Hannah, daughter of 
Enoch Scott, and she died February 25, 1807. 
Children, born at Waterbury: Amzi, men- 
tioned below; Chloe, August 13. 1778; Isaac. 
January i. 1780; Reuben. August 3. 1781 : 
Hannah. November 15, 1782; Thankful. .Au- 
gust 8, 1784. 

(IX) Amzi, son of Reuben Beebe, was born 
February 23, 1777, at Waterbury. He mar- 
ried, March 28, 1802, Jerusha Summers, of 
Milford. Child, born at Waterbury : Lockey 
or Lockie, mentioned below. 

(X) Lockev or Lockie. daughter of Amzi 



Beebe, was born May, 1804. She married Jan- 
uary I, 1825, Charles A. Russell, born March 
16, 1803, at Prospect, Connecticut. He was a 
farmer at Middlebury, Connecticut, where he 
died at the advanced age of eighty years. He 
was the son of Enoch and Sally Russell. En- 
och Russell died at Woodbury in 1834, his 
wife, Sally, September 30, 1850. Children of 
Charles A. and Lockey Russell ; Amzi, born 
January i, 1826, at TVIiddlebury, Connecticut; 
Henry K. (twin), February 16, 1828; Charles 
M. (twin); Caroline Elizabeth, February 11, 
1830, married Svlvester Curtis (see Curtis 
Mil ) ; Stearns, February 25, 1832. 



(Ill) Israel Curtiss, son of 
CLTRTISS John Curtiss (q.v.), was born 
in Stratford, Connecticut, Ap- 
ril 3, 1644. AA ith his cousin, Joshua Curtiss, 
he was an original proprietor of Woodbury. 
Connecticut, in 1672. He attained the rank 
of lieutenant in the train band of Woodbury, 
and in 1689 was chosen a deputy to the gen- 
eral court. He was also a commissioner of 
Woodbury. He died in Woodbury, October 
28, 1704. and the settlement of his estate was 
filed in Fairfield, Connecticut, November 10, 
1704. He married Rebecca . Chil- 
dren : Israel, born March 18, 1666-67, ^t Wood- 
bury, died young; Israel. May 12, 1668, 
AA'oodbury ; John, October 7, 1670, mentioned 
below; Stephen, August 24, 1673, Woodbury; 
Peter, died young; Hannah, Woodbury; Re- 
becca, November, 1677, Woodbury; Ruth, 
baptized 1680-81, died young; Josiah. baptized 
November 1682-83, Woodbury; Ruth, bap- 
tized September, 1686-87, '^'^'^ young. 

(IV) John, son of Israel Curtiss. was born 
in W^oodbury. October 7. 1670. He was en- 
sign in the train band, and in 171 7 was sent 
as a deputy from Woodbury to the general 
court. He died April 14. 1754. and his wife 
September i, 1749. He married Johannah 
, about 1696. Children, born in Wood- 
bury: Elizabeth, baptized September, 1697; 
Harriet, November i, 1699; Nathan 
(Elnathan), February 2, 1701-02; Abigail, 
February 29, 1703-04; Esther, April 5, 1706; 
Joanna, September 5, 1708; Hannah, No- 
vember I, 1709; John, February 3, 171 1; 
Olive, I\Iay 6, 1713; Peter, January 1, 1715- 
16; David, January 21, 1718, mentioned be- 
low; Eunice, March 20, 1720. 

(V) David, son of John Curtiss. was born 
January 21, 1 718, in Woodbury. He married 
Eunice, daughter of Lieutenant Francis and 
Mary Stiles, of Southbury, Connecticut. He 
died September 15, 1782; she died Alarch 5, 
1783. aged sixty-five years. Children: David, 
baptized January 30, 1743. at Woodbury, men- 



CONNECTICUT 



1717 



tioiied below; Asa. baptized August 3, 1746, 
Woodbury ; Eunice, baptized February 26, 
1750, Woodbury ; Olive, baptized April 5, 
1752, \\'oodbury; Love, baptized August 31, 
1755, Woodbury. 

(VT) David (2), son of David (i) Curtiss, 
was baptized January 30, 1743, VVoodbury. 
He married, September 27, 1764, Sarah, 
daughter of Captain Matthew Minor, of 
Woodbury. He died there, November 11, 
1819, and his wife February 14, 1820, aged 
seventy-seven years. Children, born in Wood- 
bury: Phebe, February 14, 1766; David Stiles, 
January 14, 1767, mentioned below; William 
Preston, May 11, 1769; Anna, October 26, 
1771 ; Sarah, January 23, 1774; Elizabeth, 
October 26, 1776; Currence, baptized October 

5. 1783- 

(VII) David Stiles, son of David (2) Cur- 
tiss, was born January 14, 1767, Woodbury. 
He was a farmer by occupation and lived in 
his native town, where he died January 21, 
1846. He married Sybilla, daughter of Dan- 
iel and Sybilla Huntington, of Woodbury. 
She died December 31, 1837, aged sixty-eight 
years. Children, baptized in Woodbury : Sy- 
iailla Cleora, November 23, 1794; David Hunt- 
ington, April 3, 1796; Sarah, February 11, 
1798; Nathan, March 19, 1799, died young; 
Daniel, November 8, 1801, mentioned below; 
Elvira, November 13, 1803; Mary Ann, June 

6, 1805; Maria, August 13, 1808; Caroline, 
August 13, 1808; Harriet, baptized August 
13, 1808; Eliza, baptized August 13, 1808; 
William, baptized September 24, 1809; 
Charles, July 5, 1812. 

(VIII) Hon. Daniel Curtiss, son of David 
Stiles Curtiss, born September 18. 1801, 
baptized at Woodbury, November 8, 1801. 
He was educated in the public schools, and 
for two or three winter terms taught school 
in Middlebury and Litchfield before he came 
of age. He began his business life as an 
itinerant merchant in the employ of a New 
Jersey firm. Returning at length to \A''ood- 
bury. he established himself as a dry goods 
merchant and also had a general stock includ- 
ing groceries. He continued in this Inisiness 
many years with nuich success. He was a 
pioneer in the manufacture of silverware, 
spoons, thimbles, spectacles, in this part of the 
state. He was one of the first in this coun- 
try to use German silver in his goods. At first 
the product of his shop was sold by peddlers 
who traveled throughout the country on foot 
and iiorse-back carrying their stock with 
them. At times Mr. Curtiss had as many as 
seventy-five of these itinerants in his employ. 
About 1840 he sold his manufacturins; Inisi- 
ness and it was removed to \\'aterburv, Con- 



necticut. About the same time he engaged in 
manufacturing woolen goods and established 
the industry conducted after his death by his 
sons under the firm name of Daniel Curtiss' 
Sons. After 1845, when he sold his store, he 
devoted all his attention to manufacturing. 
In 185 1, when the Woodbury Bank was estab- 
lished, Mr. Curtiss became its president. He 
was active in town afl^airs and often elected to 
offices of honor and trust. He was selectman 
for a number of years, represented the town 
in the general assembly for three years and 
was state senator one year. In politics he was 
originally a Whig, afterward a Republican. 
He was active in supporting the government 
during the civil war and gave freely of his 
time and means to furnish troops and aid the 
Union army in the field. He was public- 
spirited and always held the respect and con- 
fidence of his townsmen. He was essentially 
a self-made man, possessing rare business 
talents, great force of character and high 
ideals. He was not only quick in his mental 
processes, ready to seize upon a new idea and 
develop it, but he was vigorous and enterpris- 
ing in his business. He acquired a large for- 
tune in a legitimate way that benefited the 
community as well as himself. 

He married, January 27, 1835, Julia F. 
Strong, born at Woodbury, February 9, 1812, 
daughter of John and Flora (Preston) 
Strong. Her grandfather was a lieutenant in 
the re\'olution. About the time of his mar- 
riage Mr. Curtiss bought the Jabez P.acon 
farm where he lived the remainder of his life. 
He died May 16, 1878. Children: Walter 
Stiles, born February 9, 1836; Emily Amelia, 
October 30, 1837, married Homer Tomlinson ; 
Ellen C, November 8, 1839, married Perry 
.•\verill, of Jackson, Michigan ; Horace Daniel, 
mentioned below; Cordelia S., March 13, 
1843. married George C. White Jr., of Brook- 
lyn, New York ; Edward John. January 24, 
1845; Francis J., July 7, 1848; Elizabeth 
Stiles, September 7, 1850, married Edward F. 
Cole, of \\'aterbury. 

(IX) Horace Daniel, son of Hon. Daniel 
Curtiss, was born in Woodbury, July 20, 1841, 
died .August 12, 1906. He attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native town, and then en- 
gaged in business with his father in the manu- 
facture of woolen goods and in the course of 
time became a partner in Daniel Curtiss' Sons. 
He was a prominent and successful woolen 
manufacturer all his active life. He was iden- 
tified with public affairs of the comnnniity and 
held a high ]iosition in the esteem of his em- 
ployees and townsmen. He served on the 
board of education and was selectman of the 
town. He represented the town in the .gen- 



I7I8 



CONNECTICUT 



eral assembly of the state and was state sena- 
tor. He was a delegate also to the last con- 
vention which revised the state constitution. 
He was a prominent member and for many 
rears treasurer of the First Congregational 
Church of Woodbury. He married, October 
6, 1868, Harriet F.' Atwater, born at New 
Haven, now living at \\'oodbury, daughter of 
Ira Atwater. Children : Horace Atwater, 
born at Woodbury, 1871, died in infancy; 
Charles Atwater, mentioned below ; Olivia 
Harriet, born at Woodbury, March 30, 1878, 
lives with her mother at Woodbury. 

(X) Charles Atwater, son of Horace Dan- 
iel Curtiss, was born at Woodbury, Connecti- 
cut, May 24, 1875. He was educated at the 
Woodbury Acadeiny and the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School of Yale Universit}-, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1895 with the 
degree of Ph.B. He took a post-graduate 
course at the Philadelphia Textile School and 
afterward engaged in business in the mill of 
Daniel Curtiss' Sons at Woodbury. He rose 
step by step until he became superintendent 
and general manager of the concern. After 
the plan was destroyed by fire and the affairs 
of the company settled, he became associated 
with Firth & Foster, woolen goods, Phila- 
delphia, for a short time, and with the Win- 
sted Hosiery Company of Winsted, Connecti- 
cut, where he remained until the death of his 
father, when he returned to Woodiniry to take 
charge of the estate. In 1907 he was ap- 
pointed assistant postmaster of Thomaston 
and since 1910 he has been postmaster. He 
represented the town of \\'oodbury in the 
state legislature in 1905-06 and served on the 
finance committee. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican and a man of wide influence in public af- 
fairs. He is a director of the Woodbury 
Water Company and president of the Auto- 
matic Telephone Company. He is a member 
of King Solomon Lodge, No. 7, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Woodbury, and was master 
of the lodge two years; member of Granite 
Chapter, No. 36, Royal Arch Masons, Thom- 
aston, serving as treasurer; of Litchfield 
County L'uiversity Club. He is a member 
of the First Congregational Church of Wood- 
bury and succeeded his father as treasurer of 
the society. He was for four years clerk and 
treasurer of the Sunday school. He mar- 
ried, June 21, 1905, Jane M. Bidwell, born 
December 20. 1878, daughter of Henry -A., and 
Martha (Foster) P.idwell, of Thomaston. 
Child, Horace Daniel, born February 12, 1908. 



The first representative of the 
H.AWLEY family here under considera- 
tion was Joseph Hawley, born 



1603, died 1690. He emigrated from Eng- 
land to the new world about the year 1639, 
coming from Derbyshire, and was among the 
first settlers of Stratford, Connecticut. He 

married, 1646, Katharine, daughter of 

Birdsey. Children : Samuel, see forward ; 
Joseph, Jr., born 1649, ^'^d 1691 ; Elizabeth, 
1651, died 1676; Ebenezer, 1654, died 1681 ; 
Hannah, 1657; Ephraim, 1659, died 1690; 
John, 1661, died 1729; Mary, 1663, died 1731. 

(II) Samuel, son of Joseph and Katharine 
(Birdsey) Hawley, born 1647, died 1734. He 
married (first) 1673, Mary, daughter of 
Thomas and Ann (Wills) Thompson, of 
Farmington, Connecticut; she died 1691. 
Married (second) Patience, daughter of 
"Widow Hall." Children of first wife: Sam- 
uel Jr., born 1674, died 1754; Joseph, 1675, 
died 1752; Thomas, 1678, see forward; Mat- 
thew, 1680, died 1693; Ebenezer, 1682; Jehiel, 
1(585, died 1727; Elizabeth, 1687, died 1765. 
Children of second wife : Ephraim, born 1692, 
died 1771 ; Catharine, 1693, died 1696; 
Stephen, 1695, died 1790; Benjamin, 1696. 
died 1765; ]\Iary, 1699; Nathaniel, 1701, died 

1754- 

(III) Deacon Thomas Hawley, son of 
Samuel and I\Iary (Thompson) Hawley, born 
1678, died 1722. He married, 1701, Joanna, 
born 1678, died 1761, daughter of Ephraim 
and ^lary (Clarke) Booth, of Stratford, Con- 
necticut. Children: Ebenezer, born 1703; El- 
len, 1705, died 1740; Elizabeth, 1706, died 
1731 ; Thomas, 1708-09, died 1726; Ezra, 
1711, see forward; i\lary, 1713; Hannah, 
1715; Hester, 1717, died 1773; Samuel, 1719, 
died 1740; Katharine, 1722. 

(I\^) Captain Ezra Hawley, son of Deacon 
Thomas and Joanna (Booth) Hawle_\-, born 
171 1, died 1773. He married Abigail, born 

1715, died 1786, daughter of Hall. 

Children: Thomas, born January, 1736, died 
November, 1736; Elizabeth, 1737, died 1776; 
Thomas, 1738, died 1797; Hannah, 1742, died 
1822; Ezra, 1747, see forward; Samuel, 1751 ; 
Grissell, 1754, died 1816. 

(V) Ezra (2), son of Captain Ezra (1) 
and Abigail (Hall) Hawley, born 1747, died 
1796. He married (first) 1771, Abigail, born 
1748, died 1772, daughter of Abraham and 
Mary (Wheeler) Brinsmade, of Trumbull, 
Connecticut. Married (second) 1774, Ruth, 
born 1754, died 1829, daughter of Samuel and 
Ruth (Wilson) ^Morehouse, of Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, Children, Gurdon, born Ai^ril 20, 
1775. died January 21, 1867; Wilson, born 
April 15, 1776, see forward: Samuel, De- 
cember 29, 1778, died 1824; Ruth, 1780, died 
1876^ Ezra, 1781, died 1855; Abraham, 1784,. 
died 1868 ; George, 1794, died 1836. 



CONNECTICUT 



1719 



(VI) Wilson, son of Ezra (2) and Ruth 
(Morehouse) Hawley, born April 15. i//*), 
died October 30, i84(). He married. October 
3, 1799, Charity, born .May 19, 1775, died Au- 
gust 30, 1844, daughter of Captain Stephen 
and Mary (44olhurton) Summers. Children: 
Bronson, born September 27. 1800, died Feb- 
ruary 12, 1880; Mary. January 12, 1803. 
died December 26. 1847; Catharine, January 
25, 1805, died May 11. 1833; Cornelia. De- 
cember 9, 1806, died i\Iay. 1893: Ruth Abby, 
November 19. 1808, died April 24, 1891 ; 
Francis W., January 2, 181 1, died March i, 
1845; Edmund Summers, June 15. 1813, see 
forward; Eusebia M., December 12, 1816, 
died May 30, 1818; Charles F.. March 3, 1819, 
died May 27. 1846. 

(\'II) Edmund Summers, son of Wilson 
and Charity (Summers) Hawley. was born in 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. June 15, 1813, died 
February 10, 1894. When about twenty-one 
years of age he removed to Catskill, New 
York, where he remained in business some 
3-ears, and while there became associated with 
the Catskill Bank. After his return to his 
native city he was engaged in the dry goods 
and clothing business, and in 1849, with his 
father-in-law. Thomas Cook Wordin, and 
Monson Hawley, was extensively engaged in 
the California trade, they being among the 
first to ship goods to that then new country. 
For many years he was a prominent merchant 
and business man, but later gave up his mer- 
cantile business and devoted his time and en- 
ergies to banking. In 1859 he became presi- 
dent of the Farmers' Bank (now First Bridge- 
port National), which office he held for 
more than thirty years. He was connected 
with the Bridgeport Savings Bank as direc- 
tor, trustee, vice-president, president for over 
forty years, being the sixth president of this 
bank, elected in 1875, and was regarded as a 
conservative, sagacious and successful finan- 
cier. At the age of eighteen Mr. Hawley 
united with the Second (South) Congrega- 
tional Church, then under the able ministry 
of Rev. Nathaniel Hewick. D.D. Although 
not active in politics, he was always a staunch 
Republican. 

Mr. Hawley married. July 19. 1842. Lucy 
Sherwood, born November 17, 1816, died Oc- 
tober 30, 1883, daughter of Thomas Cook 
Wordin. Children : Mary Wordin ; Charles 
Wilson, married. April 17, 1884, Katharine 
A., daughter of Frederick J. and Margaret 
(Edmond) Beardsley. of Stratford. Connecti- 
cut ; children : Marguerite Wordin. married, 
December 23, 1909. Lieutenant Chauncey L. 
Fenton, of the L^nited States army : Edmund 
Summers. 



(Ill) Samuel Wheeler fifth 
WHEELER child of Moses iq. v.), 
and Sarah (Nichols) Wheel- 
er, was born in Stratford. February 2y, 1682. 
He lived at Oronoque. one of the outlying 
districts of Stratford, and died in 1721. His 
estate was appraised at fourteen hundred and 
fifty pounds. He married (first) May. 1708, 
Mary Brinsmade. Children: i. Sarah, born 
November 6, 1710. 2. Samuel, July 25, 1712, 
removed to Derby, married Abigail Wheeler, 
four children. Samuel Wheeler married (sec- 
ond) 1713, Lois, widow of Ebenezer Riggs, 
of Derby; she married (third) John Obertius, 
(fourth) Abraham Tomlinson. and died 
in Derby, September 11, 1767, aged eighty- 
seven. Children of Samuel and Lois (Riggs) 
Wheeler: 3. IMary, born [May 30. 1714. 4. 
James, see below. 

(IV) James (known as captain), fourth 
child of Samuel Wheeler by his second wife 
Lois, was born in 1716. Removing to Derby 
Narrows, Connecticut, he was a representa- 
tive, and an influential and very substantial 
citizen. In 1756 he was commissioned cap- 
tain in the military forces of Connecticut. He 
died July 9, 1768, leaving, like his father and 
grandfather an estate of large amount for the 
period. He married, 'Slay 9. 1736, Sarah, 
daughter of Lieutenant Ebenezer Johnson Jr., 
of Derby; she died September. 1812. aged 
ninety-two. Children: i. Sarah, born De- 
cember 27. 1737. married Stephen \Miitney; 
they were grandparents of the noted Stephen 
\\'hitney. of New York City. 2. Samuel, born 
September 24. 1739. married Lois Fairchild ; 
eight children. 3. Simeon, born April 15, 
1741, died 1776; married Captain Timothy 
Baldwin of Derby ; seven children. 4. Ruth, 
born May 26, 1743, married Nathan Fair- 
child. 5. James, born April 6. 1745. see be- 
low. 6. Daughter, born [March i. 1747. died 
soon. 7. Joseph, born May 2. 1748. lived at 
Derby Narrows; married (first) Sarah, 
daughter of-Ephraim Wheeler; no children; 

married (second) Lucy — , and had six 

children. 8. Moses, born July 28. 1750, mar- 
ried Lucy Hecock. of Waterbury ; eight chil- 
dren. 9. Anna, born August 10, 1752. 10. 
David, born [March 14. 1754. 11. John, born 
June 2. 1756. married (first) Sibyl Todd; one 
child ; married (second) Sarah Johnson ; three 
children. 12. Elijah, born December 22, 1758, 
died May 5, 1775. 13. Hannah, born [March 
25, 1 761. 14. Sarah, born April 5. 1764. 

(V) James (2) (known as deacon), fifth 
child of Captain James and Sarah (Johnson) 
Wheeler, was born April 6, 1745. For most 
of his life he resided in that portion of Derby 
which is known now as Beacon Falls, but 



1720 



CONNECTICUT 



-finally established himself at Watertown, Con- 
necticut, where he died May 25, 1819. He 
married, June 13, 1767, Mary Clark, of Mil- 
ford, Connecticut. Children: i. Mary, born 
February 5, 1768. 2. Lucy, December 23, 
1769, died March 6, 1787. 3. Ann, born Sep- 
tember 12, 1 77 1. 4. Sarah, December 12, 
1773- 5- Hannah, January 30, 1776. 6. Lois, 
]\Iarch 14, 177S. 7. James, March i, 1781. 
8. Huldah, September 16, 1784, died July 4, 
1786. 9. Huldah (2d), April 21, 1787. 10. 
David, September 6, 1789, see below. 11. 
Lucy, May 28, 1791. 

(VI) David, tenth child of Deacon James 
(2) and Mary (Clark) Wheeler, was born 
September 6, 1789. A resident of Watertown, 
he was engaged successfully in the carriage 
manufacturing business. He died in Water- 
town. Lie married (first) Phoebe De Forest. 
Children: i. James, born September 26, 181 1, 
2. Mary, born August 14, 1814. David 
Wheeler married (second) Sarah De Forest, 
sister of his first wife. Children: 3. Nathan- 
iel, born September 7, 1820, see below. 4. 
Jane, December 20, 1823. 5. George, Febru- 
ary 24, 1826. 6. Belinda Polly, May 18, 1828. 
The De Forests were originally a Liuguenot 
family of Avesnes, France, some of whose 
members f^ed to Leyden, Holland, to escape 
religious persecution. One of these, Isaac De 
Forest, son of Jesse and Marie (De Cloux) 
De Forest, came from Leyden to New Am- 
sterdam in 1636, and there married Sarah De 
Trieux, who bore him fourteen children ; a 
son. David, settled in Stratford, Connecticut, 
and was the ancestor of Phoebe and Sarah 
De Forest, wives of David Wheeler. 

(VII) Nathaniel Wheeler, organizer of the 
Wheeler & Wilson jManufacturing Company, 
and also executive head and president from 
its inception until his death, was the chief 
promoter throughout the world of the great 
and beneficent labor-saving invention of the 
sewing machine with which his name is in- 
dissolubly connected, and the colleague of its 
inventor in its marvellous development. 

He was born in Watertown, Litchfield coun- 
ty, Connecticut, September 7, 1820, third child 
of David Wheeler and eldest by his second 
wife, Sarah (De Forest) Wheeler. After ob- 
taining a jound English education in the com- 
mon schools of his native place he apprenticed 
himself to his father and learned the carriage 
maker's trade. Having a special taste that 
way, he was given charge of the ornamental 
part of the work, but on coming of age he 
assumed the management of the entire busi- 
ness in order that his father might be able to 
devote himself more fully to the cultivation 
of the farm. About five vears later he took 



up the manufacture of various small metallic 
articles — largely buckles and slides for hat- 
bands ; and, substituting machinery for hand 
labor, very greatly reduced the cost of pro- 
duction — thus displa3-ing that eminently prac- 
tical ability manifested throughout his life. In 
1848 he united his business with that of 
Messrs. Warren & Woodruff, manufacturers 
of similar articles. The new firm, taking the 
style of Warren, Wheeler & Woodruff', erected 
a building for the enlarged business, of which 
Mr. Wheeler took entire charge. In a short 
time he discovered that the plant could be 
still further utilized, and it was while seek- 
ing something new to manufacture that he 
became interested in the machine with which 
his whole subsequent business life was iden- 
tified. 

While it is true that the act of sewing by 
machinery (one of the most important of all 
mechanical arts relating to labor-saving ma- 
chines) was essentially American in 'its ori- 
gin and has been pre-eminently so in its pro- 
gressive development, European genius and 
skill had been groping toward it for nearly a 
century before practical results of value were 
reached by American inventors working with 
no knowledge of the eft'orts of their European 
brethren. Weisenthal, as early as 1755, Heil- 
mann, Thomas Saint (granted an English pat- 
ent in 1790), Thimonier (who first obtained 
a patent in France in 1830), Newton and 
Archbold, in England, and possibly others, 
essayed the invention, but not one of these, 
nor all collectively, ever pointed the way to 
what would now be considered a practical 
sewing machine. Something was done, it is 
said, by Walter Hunt, of New York, as early 
as 1832-34, but the contrivance alleged to have 
been made by him was abandoned or neglected 
tmtil the success of others had become pub- 
licly known. The imperfect production of 
Elias Howe, patented in 1846, was undoubt- 
edly the first important step toward a prac- 
cal machine, but the perfected "Howe"' was 
not patented until 1857. 

The American inventor whose work in this 
field first reached satisfactory results was Al- 
len B. Wilson, a native of Cortland. New 
York. While working at his trade as a jour- 
neyman cabinetmaker in Adrian, Michigan, 
in 1847, '""^ conceived the idea of a sewing 
machine. He knew nothing of what others 
had thought or done in this direction. In 
1848, while working at his trade in Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts, he completed the drawings of 
his projected machine, and in the spring of 
the following year finished his model. Al- 
though not a machinist, and not able to pro- 
cure suitable tools, he made with his own hand 



COXNECTlCliT 



1721 



every p:irt of the tuachiiie, wIil-iIkt of wood 
or metal. This machine contained as essen- 
tial parts a curved eye-pointetl needle, a two- 
pointed sluUlIc niakinj; a stitch at each for- 
ward and at eacli backward movement, and 
a two-motion feed. This "feed-motion" con- 
sisted of a serrated bar, horizontally recipro- 
cated, and, being constantly in contact with 
the cloth, movecl the material forward at the 
proper time by the forward inclination of the 
teeth, and receded while the material was held 
in position by the needle before the latter was 
withdrawn therefrom, Authorities agree that 
"this was the first machine ever constructed 
that contained a device answering to any ex- 
tent the requirements of a feed that would 
enable the operator to control at will the di- 
rection of the stitching, and thus to sew con- 
tinuous seams of any length, either straight 
or curved, and to turn corners of any angle." 
Building" a second machine on the same plan 
but of better construction, at North Adams, 
Massachusetts, in May, 1849, he secured a 
United States patent for it November 12, 
1850. Not yet quite satisfied wnth his work, 
Mr. Wilson, in a third construction, sup- 
planted the shuttle by a rotating hook and re- 
ciprocating bobbin, while the two-motion feed 
gave way to a segmental screw-feed. A pat- 
ent for this was issued to j\Ir. Wilson on Au- 
gust 12, 185 1. But the inventor, desiring 
greater perfection, devised a machine with 
rotary hook and stationary bobbin, for which 
he obtained a patent, June 15. 1852. This last 
machine contained another most important im- 
provement, which Mr. Wilson described but 
did not claim in his application for the patent, 
but for which he obtained a patent, Decem- 
ber 19, 1854. This improvement was the cele- 
brated "four-motion feed" which, in some 
form or other, has been adopted in almost all 
systems of sewing machines. These later and 
important improvements were all developed 
after Mr. Wheeler became interested. 

Impressed by his first view of Mr. Wil- 
son's achievement, in December, 1850 and fore- 
seeing great possibilities, Nathaniel Wheeler 
entered into an agreement with Messrs. E. 
Lee & Company, of New York, then controll- 
ing the patent, to build five hundred machines 
at Watertown. His next step was to secure 
Mr. Wilson's services to superintend their 
manufacture. Shortly afterward new ar- 
rangements were entered into, and, relations 
with the New York firm being terminated, a 
co-partnership was formed between Messrs. 
Warren, Wheeler, Woodruflf and Wilson, 
under the title. "Wheeler, Wilson & Com- 
pany," for the purpose of developing the in- 
ventions of the last-named, and for the man- 



ufacture and sale of sewing machines em- 
bodying his devices. They manufactured the 
original "Wheeler & \^'ilson Sewing Ma- 
chines," and made a thorough success of them, 
not only in the household, but in light manu- 
facturing as well. This success was due to 
the intelligent, energetic, and persevering ef- 
forts of Mr. Wheeler, wdio became the mer- 
cantile head of the new concern, and who put 
into practical shape the improvements sub- 
sequently devised by Air. ^^'ilson. The intro- 
duction of the machine, placing it in factories 
and workshops and demonstrating its value 
in families, was carried out under Mr. Wheel- 
er's tactful and vigorous initiative. Opposi- 
tion, prejudice and disbelief melted before 
the enterprising activity of this persevering 
and resourceful man. In a brief period the 
machine was in successful operatitm not only 
in New York, but as well in Boston, Phila- 
delphia, and other large cities. In October, 
1853, the business was reorganized as a joint 
stock company under the laws of Connecti- 
cut, taking the title "Wheeler & Wilson Man- 
ufacturing Company." The capital of the 
corporation was Si 60,000. the patents being 
valued at $100,000 and the machinery and 
stock at $60,000. For a year or two, the cru- 
cial period in the enterprise, Mr. Wheeler 
acted as general manager and executive head 
of the company. In 1855 he became president, 
and that office he filled during the remainder 
of his life. Mr. Wilson retired from active 
participation in the business about a year pre- 
viously, but received a regular salary and also 
considerable sums on the renewal of his pat- 
ents. He died April 29, 1888. Of his rotat- 
ing hook and stationary bobbin it has been de- 
clared by high authority that "they constitute 
an invention as absolutely original, ingenious, 
and effective as any to be found in the whole 
range of mechanics, and which has never 
failed to excite the unqualified admiration of 
competent experts." 

In 1S56 the factory was removed from 
Watertown to Bridgeport. Mr. Wheeler also 
removed thither and at once identified him- 
self actively with the interests of the city. 
One of the first steps taken was to enlarge 
the output. When, with increased factory 
space and improved machinery (secured at 
the expenditure of a few thousand dollars, 
which to many of the stockholders seemed 
like reckless extravagance) the output had 
reached twenty-five machines a day, it was 
supposed the demands of the world could 
easily be supplied. Even Air. Wheeler him- 
self expected no greater success. But the 
business advanced with rapid strides. In 1859 
the capital stock was advanced to $400,000 



1722 



CONNECTICUT 



and by special act of the Connecticut legis- 
lature was increased to $1,000,000 in 1864. 
Fire swept away a portion of the buildings 
in 1875, but they were rebuilt immediately on 
an improved plan. Important additions have 
been made from time to time, and to-day the 
company's works, including the machine fac- 
tories, the cabinet factory, the needle factories 
and the foundry, cover a ground space of 
some fifteen acres. 

It is almost needless to say that Bridgeport 
has been a great gainer through the estab- 
lishment of these works within its limits. 
During the first decade the population doubled, 
growing from about 7,500 to nearly 15,000, 
and it is now (1910) over 100,000. The 
wealth and importance of the city likewise 
increased proportionally, and the impetus 
given is still felt. 

Mr. Wheeler's activity in the sewing-ma- 
chine business was not confined to the admin- 
istration and supervision of affairs, but ex- 
tended to the mechanical department, and 
he advanced the art by important inventions 
of his own, for which patents were granted 
in the United States and foreign countries. 
In recognition of his services in this depart- 
ment of industry, he was decorated at the 
World's Exposition, held in A'ienna in 1873, 
with the Imperial Order of Francis Joseph, 
and at the Exposition Universelle, held in 
Paris in 1889, he received the Cross of the 
Legion of Honor of France. His energies, 
however, were exercised with equal ability 
in other directions — in various business enter- 
prises and in the field of invention. His ver- 
satility was remarkable. As sole inventor, or 
jointly with others, he held patents for in- 
ventions in wood-filling compounds, polish- 
ing the eyes of needles, power transmitters, 
refrigerators, ventilating railway cars, heat- 
ing and ventilating buildings, and for a mul- 
titude of devices for the sewing-machine. In 
experiments toward the perfection of the 
sewing-machine alone he empowered the dis- 
bursement of nearly half a million dollars. 
The results achieved attest the wisdom of this 
large expenditure, for the original output of 
one machine a day has been increased to six 
hundred, and since the business was estab- 
lished upward of two million have been sold 
and in every part of the world. 

As a business man j\Ir. Wheeler was dis- 
tinguished for his organizing and administra- 
tive abilities, his energv, enterprise, foresight, 
good judgment and fair dealing, (|ualities 
which were recognized throughout the busi- 
ness world. His power and influence as a 
citizen were exercised with beneficent effect 
in the social, political, educational and relig- 



ious activities of Connecticut and were felt 
in a still wider sphere. His solicitude for all 
employed by the great corporation of which 
he was the head was especially marked and 
won for him a profound reciprocal regard. 
He always had at heart the best interests of 
Bridgeport, and in many substantial ways 
evidenced this civic pride. His intelligence, 
activity and wealth contributed largely to the 
success of a number of important local enter- 
prises. He was a corporator and trustee of 
the People's Savings Bank, a director of the 
Bridgeport City Bank, Bridgeport Hydraulic 
Company, Bridgeport Horse Railroad Com- 
pany, Fairfield Rubber Company, Willimantic 
Linen Company, and New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad Company. He was an 
active member of the board of trade, of the 
board of education, and of the building com- 
mittees of schools and county public build- 
ings. His public spirit was shown in a va- 
riety of ways. He was founder and first 
president of the Seaside Club, one of the 
chief donors of Seaside Park to the city, and 
a commissioner for its development. He sub- 
scribed liberally toward improving the city's 
chief cemetery and to St. John's Church, also 
the Fairfield County Historical Society. A 
Democrat in politics, he repeatedly declined 
nomination to high official positions, yet he 
served willingly in the Bridgeport common 
council and also for several terms in the state 
legislature and senate. Under a natural dig- 
nity he concealed a warm heart, which be- 
trayed itself, however, in the family circle, 
among close friends, and especially of those 
in the community in which for so long a 
period he was a vital and beneficent factor. 
His activities made him a millionaire. Blessed 
with robust health until 1893, he failed rapidly 
when overtaken with illness, and died at his 
residence on Golden Hill, Bridgeport, Decem- 
ber 31, 1893. 

Nathaniel \\'heeler married (first), in 1842, 
Huldah R. Bradley. Children: i. Martha, 
born August 24, 1843, died February 19, 
1857. 2. Samuel H., born September 16, 1845. 
3. Ellen B., born June 19, 1848, married Ed- 
ward W. Harral, of Bridgeport (see Harral 
IV). 4. Anna B., born September 6, 1851, 
died January 26, 1852. Nathaniel Wheeler 
married (second), August 3, 1858, Mary E. 
Crissy, of New Canaan. Connecticut, who sur- 
vived him (see forward). Children: 5. Harry 
De Forest, born April 6, 1863, died July 10, 
1881. 6-7. Archer Crissy and William Bishop, 
twins, born September 14, 1864. 8. Arthur 
Penoyer, born October 20, 1875, died Tulv 13, 

1877. 
Mary E. (Cris.sy) Wheeler, above-mentioned 



CONNECTICUT 



i7-'3 



as the second wife of Xathaniel Wheeler, was 
a member of one of the most ilistinsjuislied 
families in the state of Connecticut. She was 
born in New Canaan. Connecticut, February 
16, 1835, died April 20. 19 10. She was the 
daui^hter of Deacon Hiram and Polly (Pen- 
oyer ) Crissy. Her childhood was spent in the 
home of her birth and was in keeping with 
the life of her parents, simple and charac- 
teri.stic of the old New England families. In 
1858 she came to ISridgeport, and August 3 
of that )car she was married to Xathaniel 
\\'hceler. thus uniting two of the oldest and 
most distinguished families in New England. 
The residence of Mr. and Airs. Wheeler was 
for many years where the county court house 
now stands and was a most beautiful man- 
sion. In 1866 they moved to the fine Harral 
homestead on Golden Plill street, known for 
years as "Walnutwood.'' where the remainder 
of her life was spent. The house was lo- 
cated on a simple but spacious piece of land 
covering nearly half a block, and here for 
years Mrs. Wheeler entertained her friends 
on the spacious lawns and in its handsome 
apartments. Mrs. Wheeler was one of the 
most generous and charitable women of 
Bridgeport, a ready contributor to all chari- 
table organizations and deeply interested in 
the work which they did. She was one of 
the founders of the Bridgeport Protestant 
Orphan Asylum and was a member of the 
board of management from its organization 
until her death : she was a director of the 
\\\iman's Auxiliary of the Young Alen's 
Christian Association, and a director of the 
Young Women's Christian Association. She 
was a devout member of St. John's Episcopal 
Church and very active in its work. She 
was a woman of fine mind, ciiltured and in- 
tellectual, and her reading had been extensive. 
She was a fine conversationalist, was in touch 
with the larger affairs of life to an unusual 
degree, and was a most agreeable hostess. 
Her sympathies were broad and she was in- 
terested in all charitable and philanthropic 
movements. Her character was a very lovely 
one and she will be greatly missed by her very 
large circle of friends and acquaintances, as 
well as by the poor of the city, to whom she 
always extended a helping hand. 



George Harral, emigrant an- 
HARRAL cestor of the Harral family, 

was born in the city of Heidel- 
berg, Germany. September 7, 1744. He was 
of English parentage and not a German ex- 
cept by accident of birth. In what year or by 
what vessel he came to this country is not 
known, but it is probable, however, that he 



came from Germany about 1765 to Charles- 
ton, South Carolina. He was a resident of 
Charleston about 1770, and the records of the 
English Lutheran church, now called St. 
John's Lutheran Church, show that he was 
married there, February 24, 1778, to Barbara 
Ann Muilin. 

After the earthquake of August 31, 1886, 
the pastor of the church, while examining the 
steeple, discovered a mahogany box which was 
found to contain a book of records of the 
church from 1737 to 1785. Among them was 
found the record of the marriage" of George 
Harral and Barbara Ann Muilin and also the 
baptisms of their two children. 
^ George Harral was elected a member of the 
German Fusiliers (an organization dating 
back to Colonial times) on July 12, 1775. He 
also served his country in a military capacity 
in the year 1778 during the siege of Savan- 
nah, Georgia, and returned to Charleston in 
1779 with the other surviving members of his 
company who had served in the defense of a 
sister state. He was also a member of the 
German artillery and served in it at the siege 
of Charleston in 1780, in which he was se- 
verely wounded. 

His wife, Barbara Ann (Aluilin) Harral. 
was born in Germany, July 23, 1755, died Jan- 
uary 23, 1829, in Charleston, South Carolina. 
He died in Charleston, December 20, 1799, 
and both he and his wife are interred in the 
cemetery of St. John's Church. George and 
Barbara Ann ( Aluilin) Harral were the par- 
ents of two children: i. Catherine Ann, born 
December 14, 1778, in Charleston, died Alay 
2j, 1850. She married (first) Jacob Samuel 
Yoer, son of Jacob Yoer, December 21, 1794, 
in Charleston. They had four children : i. 
Ann Catherine, born November 14, 1797, died 
young: ii. Charlotte, born May 5, 1799. died 
young: iii. Eliza, born August 5, 1800, mar- 
ried Tristam Tupper and had eleven children: 
he was fifth in descent from Captain Thomas 
Tupper, who came from England in 1629: iv. 
Anna Harral, born July 6. 1802. died voung. 
She married (second) Captain Oliver Fuller. 
By this marriage there were two children : v. 
Oliver, born June 22. 1818. died young: vi. 
daughter, who married Silas Howe. 2. 
George, mentioned below. 

(II) George (2), second child of George 
(i) and Barbara Ann (Aluilin) Harral, was 
born October 10, 1780, in Charleston, South 
Carolina, and baptized in the German Luth- 
eran Church of that city. He received his ed- 
ucation in Charleston, studying to be a phvsi- 
cian. and at nineteen years of age removed to 
Savannah. Georgia, where he practiced his 
profession for some years. He was married 



1/24 



CONNECTICUT 



April 14, 1799, in Savannah, to Charlotte 
^^'right, born in London, England, June 4, 
1779, daughter of Edward and Ann Wright. 
Edward Wright was born in London in 1754, 
died in Savannah, Georgia, October 2, 1800, 
and his wife x'Vnn was born in London, June 
29, 1746, died in Philadelphia, September jy, 
1819. 

Dr. George Harral removed from Savan- 
nah to Philadelphia, about 1813, where he re- 
mained for about ten years, then went to 
Rochester, New York, where he owned a 
house in 1827. He remained in Rochester un- 
til 1849, when being quite advanced in years, 
he gave up his profession and passed the lat- 
ter days of his life in visiting his married 
sons and daughters. His wife died in New 
York, February 13, 1847, and he died in Tar- 
rytown. New York, December 17, 1856, and 
both are interred in Greenwood cemetery. Dr. 
George and Charlotte (Wright) Harral were 
the parents of thirteen children : 

1. George Edward, born in Savannah, 
Georgia, April 18, 1800, died in New Orleans, 
October i, 1854. He was said to have been 
one of the handsomest men of his time. He 
married (first) a celebrated beauty, Julia Ann 
Neafus, of Rochester, January 8, 1829, and 
had one daughter, Mary Marshall, who died 
at twenty-three years. He settled in New 
Orleans and practiced his profession of physi- 
cian there. He was divorced from his first 
wife and married (second) Anna C. Righton, 
in Charleston, South Carolina, January 19, 
1841, and they had one son, William Righton. 
After this marriage Dr. Harral moved to Mo- 
bile, Alabama. Anna C. Righton was a de- 
scendant of William Righton, Sr., who emi- 
grated from England to the "Sommers Isles" 
"(now- the Bermudas) between the years of 
1600 and 1700 and on August 23, 1673, his 
name appears as one of the council of the as- 
sembly of those Islands. 

2. Lucy Ann, born in Savannah, Georgia, 
October '31, 1801, died April 4, 1886. She 
married, in Rochester, New York, September 
27, 1 83 1, Alanson Penfield. They had three 
children : i. James Harral, born in Cleveland, 
Ohio, January 20, 1834, died in New York, 
September i, 1874; ii. ]Mary Elizabeth, born 
in Cleveland, Ohio, March 23, 1837, married, 
December 7, 1862, Alfred Hopkins, son of 
James Edgar (born in Hartford, Connecticut, 
December 11, 1804) and Mary (Lane) Hop- 
kins, born in Onondaga, New York. August 

25, 1808. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hopkins had 
five children : a. Daughter, born September 

26, 1863, died same day: b. Alfred Harral, 
born March 4, 1870; c. Isabella Eugenie; d. 
Ralph Edgar, born June 19, 1876, died June 



4, 1878; e. Walter Lane, born December i, 
1879; iii. Francis Henry, born in Cleveland, 
Ohio, January 11, 1845. 

3. Jacob Yoer, born December 20, 1803, in 
Savannah, died there January 6, 1804. 

4. Hugh Wright, born October 11, 1805, in 
Savannah, died there January 6, 1867. 

5. William, born November 7, 1807, in Sa- 
vannah, died young. 

6. Henry Kollock, born November 26, 1808, 
in Savannah, mentioned below. 

7. William, born October 9, 1810, in Savan- 
nah, died August 5, 1877, in Summerville, 
South Carolina. As a child he was considered 
delicate and his father decided to have him 
learn the trade of cabinet maker to obtain the 
necessary exercise to make him more robust. 
By the time he had mastered the trade, the 
object was attained and he became an asso- 
ciate of his older brother Henry K. in Charles- 
ton, becoming his partner and afterward had 
full charge of the business. After his broth- 
er's death, in 1854, he formed a partnership 
with a Mr. Nichols and the firm became Har- 
ral, Nichols and Company. He was promi- 
nent in Charleston, was an elder in the Globe 
Street Presbyterian Church, and a member of 
the building committee. He served all during 
the war and was wounded on the last day, 
April 9, 1865. He married (first) August 15, 
1837, Anna Vardell, born in Charleston, 
South Carolina, August 18, 1818, daughter of 
Thomas Addison and Susan \'ardell. She 
died December 26, 1871. They were the par- 
ents of eleven children, born in Charleston : i. 
George Edward. June 18, 1838, died April 
14, 1839; ii. W'illiam James. October 3, 1839, 
died April 10, 1842 : iii. Thomas Addison, No- 
vember 25, 1840, died February 11, 1841 ; iv. 
Frances Marion, October 17, 1841, died Octo- 
ber 18, 1841 ; V. Anna Vardell, August 26, 
1843, died October 2, 1865; vi. Albert Wright, 
March 28, 1845, died July 19, 1846; vii. Wil- 
liam. [March 9, 1847, died August 22, 1870; 
viii. Susan, June 30, 1848, died June 12, 1851 ; 
ix. Charlotte Wright, November, 3, 1850, died 
August 27, 1852; X. Emma, March 12, 1853, 
died August 17, 1855 ; xi. Richard Labrum, 
February 5, 1855, died October 30, 1873. He 
married (second) September 21, 1875, Mary 
Geraldine (Eraser) Hughes, widow of W'il- 
liam N. Hughes, of Philadelphia, who died in 
April, 1872, and daughter of Charles R. Fra- 
ser. By this marriage he had one son, Wil- 
liam, born in Charleston, August 6, 1876. 

8. James, born September i, 1812, in Savan- 
nah, died July 25, 1893, in Brooklyn, New 
York. He was engaged in the drug business 
and the firm of Harral, Risely & Kitchen was 
a leadintr one in this line. Their business was 



CONNECTICUT 



1725 



principally with the prosperous southern states 
and was conducted successfully until both 
business and fortune were ruined by the civil 
war. But in 1875 he began again in Charles- 
ton, and later returned and renewed the busi- 
ness in New York. He married, June 8, 1843, 
Emnia P., daughter of Thomas \\irdell. She 
died, in Orange, New Jersey, December ly, 
1868. Mr. and Mrs. James Harral were the 
parents of eight children : i. Louis Allen, born 
in Charleston, March 7, 1844, died August 

26, 1846. ii. James, born in Charleston, April 
5, 1845, married, November 17, 1875, Agnes 
Reid, daughter of George Reid, of New York. 
She died September 14, 1886. They had 
three children : a. Frederick Reid, born De- 
cember I, 1876: b. Edith Agnes, born May 19, 
1878, died February 1, 1879: c. Jessie Doug- 
lass, born December 2, 1882. iii. Richard 
Weston, born in Charleston, September 15, 

1848, died in New. York, October 14, 1878. 
iv. Francis, born in Charleston, February 9, 
1850, married ]\Iary Adelaide Jacques, daugh- 
ter of James ]\Ionroe Jacques, born October 
4. 1819, and ;\Iary Louise ( Mullock) Jacques, 
born December 14, 1824. ;\Ir. and ^Mrs. Fran- 
cis Harral were the parents of three children : 
a. Mary Louise, born January 4, 1883: b. 
Richard Weston, born May 18, 1885, died De- 
cember 15, 1885; c. Clarence Van Buskirk. 
born March 5, 1889, died December 4, 1889. 
V. Emma A'ardell, born in Charleston, Decem- 
ber 22, 1851, married Henry Wyer Scudder, 
January 5, 1875. Fie was born November 26, 

1849, died September 10, 1886, and was the 
son of John (born June 24, 181 5, died May 

23, 1869) and Sarah Amanda Crawford (Wil- 
son) Scudder. 'Mr. and ]\Irs. Henry AV. 
Scudder were the parents of two children : a. 
Henrv Harral, born September 10. 1877, died 
September 26. 1877: b. ]\Iai Harral, born AIa>' 

27, 1881. vi. Susan, born in New York, June 

24, 1854, died in New^ York, January 8, 1885. 
vii. Henrv Kollock, born in New York, Janu- 
ary 30, 1856. viii. Bertha, born in Irvington. 
New Jersey, July 5, 1859, married Edward 
Wamsley Field, October 23, 1893. He was 
born July 27, i8;8, son of Augustus (born 
May 5, 1S23, died December 2, 1866), and Ev- 
eline Blanke (Filley) Field, born February 3, 
1832, died November 6. 1886. 

9. Charlotte, born in Philadelphia, July 22. 
1814, died there December 14. 1816. 

10. Francis, born in Philadelphia, IMarch n, 
18 1 6, died there April 20, 1819. 

11. Charlotte, born in Philadelphia, October 
24, 181 7, married, January i, 1838, in Bridge- 
port, Connecticut, Ambrose A. Lane. They 
were the parents of five children : i. George 
Ephraim, born in Newburg, New York, 



March 10, 1839, and married Mary Somers. 
Their children were George, Ida, Rol)ert, 
b'rancis. ii. Charlotte Augusta, born in Hud- 
son, New York, January 26, 1841, died March 
II, 1875. She married Robert Powell and 
had one son, Frank Irving. The entire fam- 
ily are dead. iii. Cornelia Ambrosia, born in 
Brooklyn, New York, July 21, 1843. iv. Rich- 
ard Harral, born in Trumbull, Connecticut, 
June 6, 1845, married ■ — . Chil- 
dren : Albert, Arthur, Robert, Grace, v. An- 
drew, born May 21, 1850, married Serena 
Johnson. Children : William and Rose. 

12. Francis, born in Philadelphia, July 24, 
1819, died in St. Louis, January 13, 1861. 

13. Richard Labrum, born in New York 
June 19, 1 82 1, died in Charleston, South Car- 
olina, March 2, 1854. 

(Ill) Henry Kollock, sixth child of Dr. 
George and Charlotte (Wright) Harral, was 
born in Savannah, Georgia, November 26, 
1808, died in Augusta, Georgia, May 10, 
1854. He was named for the Rev. Henry 
Kollock, 'who was pastor of the Independent 
Presbyterian Church, of Savannah, from 1806 
until the time of his death in 1819. Henry 
Kollock Harral located in Newark, New Jer- 
sey, where he was associated in the saddle and 
harness manufacturing business with William 
Wright, subsequently United States senator 
from New Jersey. He was later sent to 
Charleston to take charge of Mr. Wright's 
business there. He remained in the south 
only a short time when he bought out the 
Wright interest in the business, placed his 
brother William in charge of the Charleston 
house and returned to New York. He took 
charge of the house in New York, estab- 
lished the manufactory of the goods in 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, and associated him- 
self with Philo C. Calhoun, of that city. He 
was a successful business man, a much es- 
teemed citizen, prominent in the community 
and was for seven years mayor of Bridge- 
port. He married, in Bridgeport, August 14, 
1834, Sarah Ann Peet, daughter of William 
and Jemima (Tomlinson) Peet, descendant 
of one of the early Stratford families, and 
was born iMarch 5,' 1806, and died December 
17, 1867. The Peet family are of English 
ancestry, and members of it took an active 
part in the early wars, therefore the children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry K. Harral are eli- 
gible to membership in the various societies 
open only to descendants of colonial families. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kollock Flarral were 
the parents of six children: 

I. William Wright, born in Bridgeport, 
June 30, 1836, married, December 12, 1860, 
Jane Augusta Wells, born August 5, 1838, 



1726 



CONNECTICUT 



daughter of George Augustus and Jane Ag- 
nes (Keeler) Wells. George Augustus Wells 
was born December 12, 1816, and his wife, 
Jane Agnes Keeler, was born in Bridgeport, 
June 28, 1820. Mr. and Mrs. William 
Wright Harral are the parents of four chil- 
dren: i. Frederick William, born in Bridge- 
port, January 17, 1862, died the same day. 
ii. George Strong, born May 29, 1863. in 
Bridgeport, married Nellie Beardsley. iii. 
Frederick List, born in Bridgeport, i\ugust 
16, 1865, married (first) Columbia ^liliano, 
married (second) Gertrude Burbank. iv. 
William Wright, born in Bridgeport, August 
7, 1869, married, April 15, 1896, Estelle Jo- 
sephine Clark. 

2. Henry Hazeltine, born in Charleston, 
South Carolina. jMarch 8, 1838. 

3. Helen Maria, born in Bridgeport, Feb- 
ruary 29, 1840, married, in New York City, 
December 12. 1867, Samuel Mulliken. He 
was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts. Sep- 
tember II, 1833, died in Washington, D. C., 
March i, 1888. He was the son, of Dr. 
Samuel Alulliken (born in Lexington, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1 79 1, died in Dorchester, Massa- 
chusetts. February 19, 1843) and Mary Lar- 
kin (Payson) Mulliken (born in Charles- 
town, Massachusetts, August 19, 1797, died 
in 1886). Mr. and !Mrs. Samuel }vlulliken 
were the parents of two children : i. 
Harral, born September 25, 1869, in New 
York City; ii. Helen Payson, born January 
27. 1883, in Washington. 

4. Frederick Fanning, born in Bridgeport, 
February 24, 1843, died July 5. 1881. He 
was unmarried. 

T. George, born in Bridgeport. April 26, 

6. Edward Wright, mentioned below. 

(IV) Edward Wright, sixth child of Henry 
Kollock and Sarah Ann (Peet) Harral, was 
born in Bridgeport, December 12, 1845. After 
completing a course of study in the local 
schools, he attended Marlborough Churchill's 
Military School at Sing Sing. New York, 
then the leading institution of its kind in the 
L'nited States. When the civil war broke out 
he displayed his sympathy with the Union 
cause by enlisting in the Fourteenth Connecti- 
cut \'oluntcer Infantry, but was rejected, ow- 
ing to his youthful years. He became asso- 
ciated with the firm of Lacey, Meeker & 
Company, manufacturing harness and sadilles, 
where he remained ten years, and for four 
years he was general agent for the Wheeler & 
Wilson ^lanufacturing Company, of Bridge- 
port, his duties requiring extensive travel 
in the southern and western states. In 1880 
he retired from that position and soon after 



became connected with the Fairfield Rubber 
Company, then in its infancy. Mr. Harral 
is a public-spirited citizen, generously ex- 
tending aid in any worthy movement, takes 
an active part in religious matters, was a 
vestryman in Philadelphia, and while a resi- 
dent of P'airfield was a junior warden of the 
Episcopal church, and for thirteen years has 
been senior warden of St. John's Church. 
Political honors have no attraction for him, 
and while his sympathies are mainly with 
the Democratic party, yet he votes inde- 
pendently, as in the campaign of 1896, when 
his ballot was cast for McKinley. Mr. Harral 
is justly regarded as one of the ablest busi- 
ness men of the state, and the prosperous 
condition of the business of which he is 
now the head represents his best energy, skill 
and judgment. He married (first) Julia, 
daughter of Hiram and Polly (Penoyer) 
Crissy, of New Canaan, Connecticut, on June 
12, 1867. She was born July 24, 1844, died 
June 30, 1872. They were the parents of 
one son, Crissy De Forest, born December 13, 
1868. Mr. Harral married (second) Ellen B., 
third child of Nathaniel and Huldah Rose 
(Bradley) Wheeler. She was born June 19, 
1848. They are the parents of one child, 
Mary Wheeler, born July 11, 1879, married 

(first) Rowland; married (second), 

August 22. 1910, in Bridgeport, Harry L. 
Stratton, of Bronxville, New York, who is 
engaged in the automobile business in New 
York Citv. 



The surname Hyde has been in 
HYDE use in England for fully five hun- 
dred years, and branches of the 
family are found in all parts of the kingdom. 

( I ) 'William Hyde, immigrant, was born 
in England. He was among the founders 
of Hartford, Connecticut, and his name is 
on the monument to the first settlers. He 
doubtless came with Rev. Thomas Hooker to 
Cambridge and went thence with him to Hart- 
ford. He removed to Saybrook, Connecti- 
cut, as early as 1652, and to Norwich about 
1660. He died at Norwich, January 6, 1681. 
He was a man of considerable importance 
and wealth ; was frequently selectman. Flis 
house lot devised to his grandson William 
was at last accounts still owned by a lineal 
descendant. Children: Samuel, born 1637, 
mentioned below : Hester, married John Post. 

(II) Samuel, only son of William Hyde, 
was born in 1637. died in 1677. He settled 
at Norwich West Farms, Connecticut, in 1660, 
and became a leading citizen. He followed 
farming all his life. He married, June, 1659, 
Jane Lee, of East Saybrook, daughter of 




Leii^'. Ssret-icai Fut> Cc 



^ZZ. 



r?r<< 



CONNECTICUT 



1727 



Thomas and 



(Brown) Lee. Children, 



born at Norwich : Elizabeth, born in August, 
1660. married Richard Lord ; Phebe, Jan- 
uary. 1663, married Mather driswold; Sam- 
uel, May, 1665. married Elizabeth Calkins; 
John. December, 1667, married Experience 
Abel; Isaac. January. 1670, married Anne 
Bushnell : Thomas, July, 1672, mentioned be- 
low: Jabez, May. 1677, niarried Elizabeth 
Bushnell. 

(Ill) Thomas, son of Samuel Hyde, was 
born in Norwich, July, 1672, died April 9, 
1755. He was a farmer at Norwich West 
Farms. He married, in December, 1697, 
Mary Backus, died March 27, 1752, daugh- 
ter of Stephen Backus. Children, born at 
Norwich: Mary, February 21. 1698, mar- 
ried John Pember : Thomas. July 29, 1699, 
married Elizabeth Huntington : Phebe. March 
16, 1702, married John French: Jacob, Jan- 
uary 20, 1703. mentioned below : Jane. De- 
cember 4, 1704. married John Birchard; x\b- 
ner, September 12, 1705. married (first) 
Jerusha Huntington, and (second) Mehitable 
Smith. 

(R) Captain Jacob H}de, son of Thomas 
Hyde, was born at Norwich. January 20, 1703. 
He also settled at Norwich \\'est Farms and 
followed farming. He married, October 11, 
1727. Hannah Kingsbury, born March 13. 
1709, at Haverhill, daughter of Deacon Jo- 
seph and Ruth (Denison) Kingsbury, grand- 
daughter of Joseph and Love (Ayers) Kings- 
bury. She died March 16, 1770. at Benning- 
ton. \'ermont. while on a visit. Children, 
born at Norwich: Jacob, born August i, 
1730. married Hannah Hazen ; IMary, March 
24. 1732. married Peabody ]Moseley ; Ephraim, 
born April 23, 1734, mentioned below : Jo- 
seph, June I, 1736. married Abigail Abel; 
Hannah, ]\Iay 5, 1738, married Samuel Ladd ; 
Ruth, January 26, 1740. married Ezekiel 
Ladd: Jonathan, January 4. 1742, died Oc- 
tober 22, 1743; Silence, born April 13, 1744, 
married Joseph Ladd; Rebecca. December 11, 
1745. married Lebbeus Armstrong: Phebe, 
October 7, 1750, died January 28, 1771, at 
Bennington, Vermont, unmarried. 

(Y ) Ephraim, son of Captain Jacob Hyde, 
was born April 23, 1734, at Norwich West 
Farms, now Franklin, Connecticut. He mar- 
ried Martha Giddings, of Norwich, and set- 
tled at Stafford, Connecticut. Children : Na- 
thaniel, born ]\Iarch 7. 1757, mentioned be- 
low; Hannah. November 15. 1758, died un- 
married: Lydia. January 6, 1761, married Jo- 
seph Alden : Ephraim, January 23, 1763, mar- 
ried ]\Iargaret Walbridge : Martha. February 
15, 1765. married Oliver Welles: Jacob. No- 
vember 13, 1767, married Lydia Hall; Jasper, 



December. 1769. married Delight Strong; 
Eunice, August 2, 1772, married Eli Con- 
verse; Eli, May 4, 1777, married Mehitable 
Lyon. 

(VT) Nathaniel, son of Ephraim Hyde, was 
born at Stafford. March 7, 1757, died in 1825 
at Stafford. He was an iron founder. He 
married (first) Sarah, daughter of Lieutenant 
D. Strong; (second) Cynthia Palmer. His 
widow was living at Hartford in 1856. Child 
of first wife: Alvan. born October 26, 1786, 
mentioned below. Children of second wife: 
Nathaniel, born February. 1800, died October 
II, 1830. married, January 11. 1826, Caroline 
Converse and had three children ; Sarah, mar- 
ried Asahel Johnson, of Ellington ; Lavina, 
married, June 30. 1823, David Rockwell: JMar- 
tha. married. October 12. 1825. Joseph Phelps 
and had three children. 

(YH) Alvan, son of Nathaniel Hyde, was 
born October 26. 1786. at Stafford, died Oc- 
tober 4, 184 1. He succeeded to his father's 
business and for many years was an iron 
manufacturer at Stafford. He married Sarah 
Pinney, born January 9. 1793. at Stafford, died 
September 13, 184S, daughter of Daniel Pin- 
ney. Children, born at Stafford: i. Edward 
G., married. ]\Iay 5. 1845. Sarah ]\I. Bum- 
stead, of Monson, ^lassachusetts ; settled at 
Staff'ord : children : i. Charles E., born April 
4, 1848. died August 19, 1849: ii. Edward A., 
born J\Iay 30, 1850: iii. Charles T. 2. Alvan 
Pinney, born March 10. 1825. mentioned be- 
low. 3. Henry L., born December 6, 1827, 
died November 15. 1S30. 4. Salisbury, re- 
sided at Chicopee, unmarried, 5. Jenney, mar- 
ried Charles Fox and settled at "Staff'ord. 6. 
Maryette, married James S. Kent, resided in 
Richmond, \'irginia. 

(VIII) Hon. Alvan Pinney Hyde, son of 
Alvan Hyde, was born in Staff'ord, March 10, 
1825. He attended the public schools, fitted 
for college at Munson Academy and grad- 
uated with honor from Yale College in the 
class of 1845. He studied law in the office 
of Loren P. Waldo, of Hartford, then of Tol- 
land, and also in the Yale Law School, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1847, He re- 
mained in Stafford until 1849, when he re- 
moved to Tolland and was associated with 
his father-in-law. Judge Loren P. Waldo, one 
of the leading lawyers of the state. Then the 
office of the firm was removed to Hartford. 
In 1867 the firm became Waldo, Hubbard 
& Hyde, Governor R. D. Hubbard being ad- 
mitted to partnership. In 1877 Charles E. 
Gross was admitted. Four years later Judge 
Waldo died and the firm name w-as changed 
to Hubbard. Hyde & Gross. \\'illiam Waldo 
Hyde and Frank Eldridge Hyde, sons of Mr. 



1728 



CONNECTICUT 



Hyde, became partners. In 1884 Governor 
Hubbard died and the firm became Hyde, 
Gross & Hyde. The present firm name is 
Gross, Hyde & Shipman. Mr. Hyde was for 
many years one of the leading lawyers of 
Connecticut. He was a gifted public speaker 
and a skillful trial lawyer. He was a promi- 
nent Democrat. In 1854-58-62 he represented 
the town of Tolland in the general assembly. 
He was made a Mason in Uriel Lodge, No. 24, 
in 1858, at' Merrow Station, Tolland county, 
and was a member of Royal Arch Masons, 
Royal and Select Masters, Knights Templar. 
He was grand master of the Connecticut State 
Lodge for two terms, first elected May 15, 
1862, and his administration was notable, 
demonstrating his great executive ability and 
personal popularity. He was a member of 
the Yale Alumni Association of Hartford. 
He traveled extensively in Europe and visited 
all parts of the United States, including 
Alaska. His home on Charter Oak Place is 
a historic spot, being the location of the 
famous old Charter Oak. He was interested 
in local history and evinced much public spirit. 
He married, September 12, 1849, Frances 
Elizabeth ^Valdo, born }ilarch 21, 1831 (see 
Waldo VII). Children: William Waldo, 
born March 25, 1854, mentioned below; Frank 
Eldridge, January 21. 185S, member of the 
law firm of Hyde, Foiard & Harper, of Paris ; 
has lived in Paris, France, since 1894; mar- 
ried, October 20, 1881. at Hartford, Carrie 
Adelaide, daughter of Hon. Julius and Ada- 
line (Conger) Strong. 

(IX) William Waldo, son of Alvan Pinney 
Hyde, was born in Tolland, Connecticut, 
]\Iarch 25, 1854. He resided in his native 
town until he was ten years old and went to 
school there. His family then moved to Hart- 
ford, and he prepared for college in the Hart- 
ford public high school, graduating in 1872. 
He entered Yale College and was graduated 
in 1876 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
President Arthur T. Hadley and other promi- 
nent men were classmates. After graduation 
he spent two years as a law student, one in 
his father's office and one in the law school 
of Boston University. He was admitted to 
the bar in Hartford in 1878 and began to 
practice in the office of \\'aldo, Hubbard & 
Flyde, the firm of which his father and grand- 
father were partners before him. The pres- 
ent style of this law firm is Gross, Hvde & 
Shipman, and Mr. H}-de has contributed his 
part in maintaining the prestige of this firm, 
taking rank among the foremost lawyers of 
the state. In public affairs he has taken the 
part of an able and public-spirited citizen. 
For many years he was a member of the 



school board and for six years school visitor, 
and he devoted himself earnestly to the im- 
provement of the public schools. For many 
years he was president of the board of street 
commissioners of Hartford. In politics he 
is a Democrat, and from 1892 to 1894 was 
mayor of Hartford. His administration was 
characterized by good judgment and excep- 
tional executive ability, and is cited as a model 
to be followed by his successors. Mr. Hyde 
is prominent also in social life, a member, of 
the Order of Free and Accepted Alasons, 
Royal Arch Masons, Royal and Select Mas- 
ters, Washington Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar, and of the various Masonic bodies to 
the thirty-second degree ; of the Mayflower 
Descendants, being a descendant of Elder 
William Brewster ; of the Society of Colonial 
Wars and the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion (his Avery and Eldredge ancestors being 
prominent in the revolutionary war) : of the 
Improved Order of Red Men; of the Hart- 
ford Club, the Hartford Golf Club, the Farm- 
ington Country Club, the University Club of 
New York City, the Yale Club of New York 
City, the Graduates Club of New Haven and 
the Nayassett Club of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. He is a member of the South Congre- 
gational Church of Hartford. He married, 
December i, 1877, Helen Eliza AVatson, born 
October 30, 1854, in New York City, daugh- 
ter of George W. and Eliza W. (Pixley) Wat- 
son. She was a classmate of her husband 
in the Hartford public high school. Children : 
Elizabeth, born October 17, 1878 ; Alvan 

Waldo, August 21, 1880, married — ■ and 

has children : Helen Waldo and Elizabeth 
Howard, twins, born October 22, 1906. 

(The Waldo Line). 

(I) Cornelius Waldo, immigrant ancestor, 
was born about 1624, probably in England, 
died at Chelmsford, Massachusetts, January 
3, 1700-01. His name is first mentioned in 
the court records at Salem, July 6, 1647. It 
is probable that he settled first in Ipswich 
and was one of the committee appointed to 
run the line between Ipswich and Gloucester. 
He owned a share and a half in Plum Island 
and was living at Ipswich as late as 1664. He 
married Hannah Cogswell, born 1624, died 
December 25, 1704, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Thompson) Cogswell, of Ipswich. 
Her father was a native of Westbury Leigh, 
county Wilts, England, and came to New 
England on the ship "Angel Gabriel" ; he was 
a well-to-do woolen manufacturer in England. 
Her mother was daughter of Rev. William 
Thompson, vicar of Westbury parish. On 
January 2. 1^)51, John Cogswell gave to his 



CONNECTICUT 



1729, 



son-ill-law his chvelling house at Chehacco 
Falls and forty-nine acres of land. About 
1655, Cornelius \\ aldo removed to Chelmsford, 
and on February 15 of that year sold his 
Chebacco halls house to Edward Bragg. In 
various deeds during the next fifteen or twen- 
ty years he is called sometimes of Chelmsford 
and sometimes of Dunstable, probably be- 
cause his farm lay part in each town. He 
was one of the first settlers of Chelmsford, 
and in 1673 was on the committee to instruct 
the selectmen, and in 1678 was chosen select- 
man. He was a charter member of the church 
organized Decemiier 16, 1685, in Dunstable, 
and was one of the first deacons. In 1686 
he was one of the purchasers of land at 
W'amesit of Jonathan Tyng, and in 1690 he 
was licensed to keep a tavern in Chelmsford. 
He was chosen selectman again in 1698. He 
disposed of his property, which consisted of 
a large amount of land in Dunstable and 
Chelmsford, with a dwelling house and build- 
ings in each town, before his death, and died 
intestate. Children : Elizabeth ; John, men- 
tioned below ; Cornelius ; Daniel, born August 
19, 1657; Martha, February 27, 1658; twin 
sons, February 24, 1659, buried February 27, 
1659 : Deborah, January 14, 1661 ; Rebecca, 
January 28, 1662 ; Judith, July 12, 1664; Mary, 
September 9, 1665, died at Chelmsford, No- 
vember 29, 1665 ; Jonathan, 1669. 

(II) John, son of Cornelius Waldo, was 
born probably at Ipswich and died at Wind- 
ham, Connecticut, April 14, 1700. He was 
in King Philip's war in the fight at Brook- 
field, August 2, 167s, and was wounded. He 
served at the garrison at Groton also. He 
resided at Chelmsford and in 1682 was em- 
ployed by the town of Dunstable as a mounted 
guard against the Indians. He removed to 
Dunstable and was a farmer and owned a 
grist mill on Nacooke brook in that town. 
He was deputy to the general court in 16S9, 
and about this time removed to Boston. In 
1697 he owned a mill and five acres of land 
in town cove in Hingham, but probably never 
lived in Hingham. He sold this mill and 
bought, November 29, 1697, a grist mill and 
mill works, dwelling house and an acre of 
land at Windham, Connecticut, and in January 
following purchased an allotment of a thou- 
sand acre right in Windham. He was ad- 
mitted an inhabitant of Windham, January 
30, 1697-98. He died there about a year 
later. His will was dated April 14, 1700, the 
day that he died. He married Rebecca 
Adams, who died at Canterbury. Connecticut. 
September 17. 1727, daughter of Captain Sam- 
uel and Rebecca (Graves) Adams, of Charles- 
town. She married (second) (intentions 



dated .\pril 26, 1710) Deacon Eliczer Brown, 
of Canterbury. Children : Rebecca, died 
July 2, 1677, at Charlestown ; John, born May 
19, 1678: Catharine, 1679-80; Edward, April 
2^, 1684. mentioned below; Rebecca, August 
0. 1686; Ruth: Sarah, baptized December 6, 
1691 ; Abigail. 

(III) Edward, son of John ^^'aldo, was 
born April 23, 1684, at Dunstable, died at 
Windham, August 3, 1767. He was educated 
in the Boston schools and for a number of 
years taught school at Windham. He was 
an extensive farmer in that part of Windham 
which is now Scotland. Fie built a house 
about 1714, near the count)^ line, which is 
still standing and is occupied by a descendant. 
He was moderator of the first meeting of the 
Third Society of Windham, or Scotland Par- 
ish, in June, 1732, and was on several im- 
portant committees in the church. In 1734 
he was chosen a deacon, and in 1735 he and 
his wife were transferred from the Wind- 
ham to the Scotland Parish church. In 1746 
he and his family were strong supporters of 
the Separate Church, but in 1763 he was re- 
stored to his standing in the First Church. 
He was a member of the general assembly 
in 1722-25-30. He was lieutenant of militia, 
and in 1745 was one of the jury which tried 
Elizabeth Shaw for murder and resulted in 
the first public execution in ^^'indham county. 
His will was dated April 3, 1766, proved Sep- 
tember 16, 1767. He married (first), June 
28, 1706, at Windham, Thankful Dimmock, 
born March, 1682, at Barnstable. Massachu- 
setts, died December 13, 1757, at Windham, 
daughter of Deacon Shubael and Joanna 
(Bursley) Dimmock. of Mansfield, Connecti- 
cut. He married (second) Mary , 

probably daughter of Elisha and Rebecca 
(Doane) Paine, of Eastham. She was born 
February i, 1695-96, and was widow of Rob- 
ert Freeman. Children, all by first wife: 
Shubael. born April 7, 1707: Edward, July 
27, 1709, mentioned below: Cornelius. Feb- 
ruary 18. 1711-12; Anne, November 8, 1714- 
15, died January 17, 1734. unmarried: John, 
April 19, 1717, died .\ugust 29, 1726; Bethuel. 
June 10. 1719: Thankful, July 3. 1721, died 
August 25, 1726: Joannah, April 18, 1723; 
Zaccheus, Tulv 19. 1725 : John. October 18, 
1728. 

(IV) Edward (2), son of Edward (i) 
Waldo, was born at Windham, July 27, 1709. 
died at Canterbury, September 4, 7807. He 
and his wife were members of the Windham 
church, but joined the church at Scotland at 
its organization in 1735. He bought land at 
Canterbury soon afterward and removed there 
and joined the Separate or Baptist Church 



1730 



CONNECTICUT 



there. Rev. Daniel Waldo sa_vs of him : "He 
was a man of ardent piety. Towards the 
close of his life his mind was clouded. The 
Baptists assailed him, assuring him if he 
would go into the water by the hand of their 
minister the cloud would vanish and he would 
see a great light. He was immersed, but he 
told me no more light shone on him. He 
took no further step with them in the pecu- 
liarities." He may have lived in Norwich a 
short time, but returned to Canterbury. He 
was tything man in 1765. He married (first), 
January 25, 1733, at Frankdin, Connecticut, 
Alaigail Elderkin, born at Norwich, September 
29, 17151 daughter of John and Susannah 
(Baker) Elderkin. Ide married (second) 

Ruth , who died October 14, 1824, aged 

ninety-seven years. His will was dated Au- 
gust 22, 1797, and proved October 31, 1807. 
Children, all by first wife: Zachariah, born 
February I, 1734-35, mentioned below; Ann, 
September 5, 1737; Nathan, June 23, 1740; 
Abigail, July 15, 1744. 

(V) Zachariah, son of Edward (2) Waldo, 
was born February i, 1734-35, and lived in 
Canterbury, where he died February 8, 181 1. 
He was highway surveyor in 1765-81-82-85; 
grand juryman, 1771 ; member of the commit- 
tee of safety, 1777; selectman, 1779; lister, 
1780-82; member of committee of supplies, 
1782. He was in the revolution, in the Sec- 
ond Company, Eighth Connecticut Regiment, 
from July 18, to December 16, 1775 ; in Cap- 
tain Buell's company, First Connecticut Regi- 
ment, from January i, 1781, to December 31, 
1 78 1, although this latter service may have 
belonged to his son. He married (first), 
November 21, 1758, Elizabeth Wight, born 
July 20, 1738, died Septeml^er 7, 1800, daugii- 
ter of Joshua and Elizabeth (Cary) Wight, 
of Windham. He married (second), Novem- 
ber 18, 1806, at Canterbury, Cynthia Park. 
Children, all by first wife : Anna, born .\u- 
gust 27, 1759; John Elderkin, October 5, 
1761 ; Zachariah, May 8, 1764; Elizabeth, Jan- 
uarv 23, 1767; Ebenezer, April 6, 1771, men- 
tioned below; Samuel, March 3, 1779. 

(VI) Ebenezer, son of Zachariah Waldo, 
was born at Canterbury, April 6, 1771, died 
at Tolland, August 27, 1840. He was a man 
of prominence at Canterbury ; was highway 
surveyor, 1798; lister, 1 802-05-07-1 1 : grand 
juryman, 1806; fence viewer, 1810-12-13-14- 
16-17; selectman, 1815-24. He was admitted 
to the church at Westminster. March 9, 1806, 
and was inspector of school district No. 4 
in that parish. He probably lived at Tolland 
after the removal of his sons there. He mar- 
ried, March 31, 1798, at Canterbury, Cynthia 
Parish, born February 19, 1770, died Feb- 



ruary 21, 1837, daughter of Lemuel and Zer- 
■viah (Smith) Parish. Children: Obadiah 
Parish, born June 8, 1800 ; Loren Pinckney, 
February 2, 1802, mentioned below; Hannah 
Badger, May 16, 1807; Ebenezer Elderkm, 
June 9, 1809, died January 30, 1825. 

(VH) Loren Pinckney, son of Ebenezer 
Waldo, was born February 2, 1S02, at Canter- 
bury, died at Hartford, September 8, 188 1. 
He attended school until he was fourteen, 
and thereafter until he was twenty-one taught 
school every winter and worked on the farm. 
Fie applied himself to study and mastered 
the higher branches of mathematics and had 
a good knowledge of Latin. "Hedge's Logic"' 
he studied in the field. \Mien twenty-one 
years old he went, penniless, to study law 
with his rjncle, John Parish, at Tolland. He 
was admitted to the bar of Tolland county 
in September, 1825, and began the practice 
of law at Somers, Connecticut. He was post- 
master there two years and a superintendent 
of schools. He returned to Tolland in 1830 
and lived there until 1863. wdien he removed 
to Hartford and resided there the remainder 
of his life. He was a member of the general 
assembly from Tolland in 1832-33-34-39-47- 
48. In 1833 he was clerk of the house of 
representatives. He was a member of the 
board of visitors of schools in Tolland, of 
the board of commissioners of common 
schools of Connecticut, and chairman of the 
committee of education in the house. He 
was attorney for the state for Tolland county 
from 1837 to 1849, ^"d judge of probate for 
Tolland district in 1842-43. In 1847 ^''^ ''^'^^ 
unanimously chosen by the legislature as a 
member of the committee to revise the stat- 
utes, and in 1864 was again appointed on a 
similar committee. In 1849 'i^ '^'^'''s ^ member 
of the thirty-first congress of the United States 
and was chairman of the committee on revolu- 
tionary pensions. He was commissioner of 
the school fund of Connecticut and commis- 
sioner of pensions in ^^'ashington during the 
,-idministration of President Pierce, and con- 
tinued in that office until elected judge of the 
superior court of Connecticut for a term of 
eight years. At the exiiiration of this term, 
about 1863. he went to Hartford and engaged 
in general practice at first with his son-in-law. 
Alvan Pinney Hyde, and later in the firm of 
Waldo, liubbard & Hyde. He was the au- 
thor of the "History of Tolland" and gath- 
ered much material for the genealogy of the 
Waldo family. In politics he was a Demo- 
crat. He was a member of the Westminster 
church, but later rejected some of the tenets 
of the orthodox faith, and both he and his 
brother were excommunicated in 1826. He 



COXNECTICL"! 



'731 



became a ciniservativc Unitarian, and after 
removing- to Hartford was a constant and 
devout attendant at the South Congregational 
Church. 

He married, at Tolland, November 22, 1825, 
Frances Elizabeth Eldredge, born at New 
London, December 10, 1806, died March 29, 
1874, dausjhter of William and Elizalieth 
(Avery) Eldredge, of Tolland. Her grand- 
father, Charles Eldredge. was severely wound- 
ed in the massacre at Fort Griswold, Sep- 
tember 6. 1 78 1, and her maternal grandfather, 
Captain Elijah .Avery, was killed in the same 
massacre. Children, born at Tolland: Ebe- 
nezer Eklerkin, born JMarch 9, 1827. died 
JMarch 19, 1833: Frances Elizabeth, March 
21, 1831, married, September 12, 1849. Hon. 
Alvan Pinney Hyde (see Hyde VHI) ; Loren 
Pinckney. March 24, 1834 ; Cynthia Paulina, 
October 25, 1836. 



Professor Andrew Wheeler 
PHILLIPS Phillips is a descendant of a 
branch of the Phillips family 
that settled early in Rhode Island. The tirst 
of his line to come to Connecticut was \\'illiam 
Phillips, son of William Phillips, who was 
born in 1756, enlisted December, 1775, as pri- 
vate in the company of Captain Hawkins, Col- 
onel \^arnum's regiment. He served for a 
period of thirteen months, engaging in the 
battles of Harlem Heights, Trenton and 
Princeton. He married. March 14, 1782. at 
North Kingston, Rhode Island, Mrs. Martha 
Albro, widow of Captain James Albro. Her 
descent can be traced to Pardon Tillinghast 
and many other Rhode Island families. June 
29, 1818, William Phillips, then living at Vol- 
untown, Connecticut, and aged sixty-two years, 
applied for and received a pension, and July 
15, 1825, he died. In his will, dated December 
I, 1824. and proved August i, 1825, he men- 
tions his beloved wife, Martha, his son, Daniel 
Phillips, his grandson, Harry Phillips, and 
his daughter, Peggy Hawkins. His inventory 
includes the item : avails of Pension. The 
surname Phillips is derived from the ancient 
baptismal name of Philip and dates from the 
first use of surnames in England. 

Michael Phillips, the great-great-grand- 
father of William Phillips, settled in Rhode 
Island where his name appears in Newport 
as a freeman in 1668. The name of his wife 

was Barbara . After his death, in 168S, 

she married (second) Edward Inman. May 
22, i68g, his widow joined with her second 
husband in a deed of gift to her sons. John, 
James and Richard Phillips. August 26, 1706, 
his widow, who is now also the widow of her 
second husband, declined administration on the 



hitter's estate. Children: i. John, married 

Rebecca ; was of Newport, Rhode 

Island. 2. William, married Christian Baker, 
of Newport, Rhode Island. 3. James, married 
(first) Mary Mowry, daughter of John and 
Mary Mowry; (second) Elizabeth Foster, of 
Westerly ; was of Providence and Smithfield. 

4. Richard, born 1667, married Sarah Mowry, 
daughter of Nathaniel and Joanna ( Innian ) 
Mowry; was of Providence and Smithfield. 

5. Joseph, married Elizabeth Malavery, daugh- 
ter of John and Elizabeth Malavery, died Sep- 
tember 3, 1719, in Providence. 6. Alice, mar- 
ried Joshua Clarke, son of Joseph Clarke, and 
died after 1702. The sons are found living 
in various parts of Rhode Island, and by the 
third and fourth generation nearly every town 
was occupied by some branch of the family. 

Daniel, son of William and Martha (Albro) 
Phillips, was born in 1787, probably in Volun- 
town, Connecticut, and married Sarah Barber, 
daughter of Jonathan and Sabra (Stanton) 
Barber. 

Saljra. wife of Jonathan Barber, was born 
December 4, 1752, daughter of John and Su- 
sanna (Lamphere) Stanton. The first Stanton 
in this branch of the family was Robert, who 
was born in 1599, and settled in Newport, 
Rhode Island, in 1638, residing there until 
his death, August 5, 1672. By some he is 
called brother of Thomas Stanton, of Ston- 
ington, but no proof of such relation exists. 
He married Avis , family name un- 
known. 

John Stanton, son of Robert and Avis Stan- 
ton, was born August, 1645, married (first) 
Mary, daughter of John Harndel, in 1667, 
and (second) Mrs. Mary Cranston, widow of 
Governor John Cranston and daughter of Gov- 
ernor Jeremiah Clarke. He was ancestor of 
the Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, secretary of war 
under I'resident Lincoln. His son. John Stan- 
ton, born April 22, 1674, by his first wife, 
i\Iary Harndell, married (second) Susanna 
Lamphere and was father of Sabra. 

Israel Denison Phillips, son of Daniel Phil- 
lips, was born in \'oluntown. Connecticut. Au- 
gust 4, 1809. He was educated in the public 
schools and was a typical New England farm- 
er, endowed with hardheaded common sense, 
sturdy integrity, patient industry and tireless 
energy. He lived at Griswold, New London 
county. He married Wealthy Browning 
\MTeeIer, daughter of Guy and Fanny (Brown- 
ing) Wheeler. She was a woman of great 
mental vigor and deep spirituality. Children : 
I. .Andrew Wheeler, mentioned below. 2. 
Daniel Lyon, born July t8, 1852, married 
Mary Young, of Jewett City. Griswold, Con- 
necticut. He is a farmer and has held va- 



1732 



CONNECTICUT 



rious public offices of trust and responsibility 
in his native town. 

Wealthy Browning Wheeler, wife of Israel 
Denison Phillips, was descended from Mr. 
John Wheeler, who came to New London, 
Connecticut, in 1667, was a prominent mer- 
chant and very enterprising and successful in 
foreign trade, leaving at his death property 
which inventoried, December 16, 1691, £1,383 
3s. 6d. His wife Elizabeth married (second) 
Richard Steere, who with her was appointed 
administrator of the estate. 

Joshua Wheeler, son of John Wheeler, born 
1680, was father of Captain Zaccheus Wheel- 
er, who, September 23, 1736, married Sarah 
Harris, of a family of that name prominent in 
the early settlement of New London. Guy 
Wheeler, of the next generation, born May 
23, 17^3, married ^lercv Bolles, born July 19, 

1758. ^ 

Joseph Bolles, the first of the name to cross 
the Atlantic, was in 1640 engaged in trade 
at "Winter Harbor" near the mouth of the 
Saco river in the then province of Maine, re- 
moving later to Wells, Maine, where he held 
the office of town clerk from 1654 to 1664. 
:Mr. Bolles died at Wells in the fall of 1678, 
leaving a widow Mary, daughter of Morgan 
Howell, and a large estate for his eight chil- 
dren, all living at that date. 

The name Bolles is found in the roll of 
Battle Abbey and the family is of long stand- 
ing in the county of Lincoln. Thanks to the 
will of John Bolles, of St. James, Clerkenwell, 
Aliddlesex, Esquire, i, July, 1665, proved 9 
2ila.y, 1666, leaving £300 "unto my brother 
Joseph Bolles, living in New England." Jo- 
seph Bolles is positively identified as the Jo- 
seph, son of Thomas Bolles, of Osburton in 
the visitation of Nottinghamshire, connecting 
him with a pedigree of fourteen generations 
back to Alane or'Alaine Bolle, of Swineshead 
and Bolle Hall in the county of Lincoln in 
the reign of Henry III. This makes a line of 
twentv-one generations from Professor Phil- 
li]3S to the same Alain, with numerous coats- 
of-arms of connecting families. 

The Bolles coat-of-arms is very interesting, 
being an early specimen of the pumiing arms. 
A shield azure with three boars heads of gold 
in cups or bowls of silver the cups represent- 
ing the name Bowls (Bolles) and boars heads, 
the name of the estate, Swineshead. Mr. 
William S. Appleton includes the arms of 
"Joseph Bolles, Wells. Mass., now Maine." in 
his limited list of thirty-one "Positive Pedi- 
grees and Authorized Arms." 

Thomas Bolles, son of Joseph and Mary 
(Howell) Bolles, removed to New London 
soon after he reached manhood and married 



there ( first) Zipporah Wheeler, of Groton, 
Connecticut. 

John Bolles, the third and only surviving 
son of Thomas and Zipporah Bolles, was born 
August, 1677, at New London. At the age 
of thirty becoming dissatisfied with the ten- 
ets of the Presbyterian church, he united with 
the Rogerenes and was immersed by John 
Rogers, the elder. Well educated, familiar 
with the Bible, independent in fortune, earn- 
est in his convictions and of a proselyting 
spirit, bold and fond of discussion, Mr. Bolles 
engaged very actively in polemical contro- 
versy and wrote and published many books 
and pamphlets, some of which, still extant, 
prove him to have been as ]Miss Caulkins says, 
"fluent with pen and adroit in argument upon 
the spurr of his convictions." He devoted 
himself to the great cause of religious free- 
dom, encountering opposition and persecu- 
tion and suffering fines and imprisonments 
and beating with many stripes. It is no ex- 
travagant eulogy to say that John Bolles was 
a great and good man. His works are his 
best epitaphs. He married for his first wife 
Sarah, daughter of John Edgecombe, of New 
London, and his wife, Sarah Stallion (or 
Sterling). Sarah Stallion was the daughter 
of Edward Stallion, of New London, at first 
a coastwise trader for whom was built the 
ship "Edward and Margaret" in 1681. His 
stone house in Town street. New London, 
was built before 1660. Later in life he be- 
came a resident farmer in North Groton, now 
Ledyard. 

John Edgecombe, the father of Sarah, was 
son of Nicholas Edgecombe, and the line runs 
back from Professor Phillips, twenty gen- 
erations, to John de Edgecombe, born about 
1250, A. D. The present Earls of Mount 
Edgecombe are of this family. 

Joshua Bolles, of the next generation, born 
August 5, 1712, New London, married Jan- 
uary- 30, 1739. Joanna, daughter of Thomas 
and Sarah (Babcock) Williams, granddaugh- 
ter of Thomas and Joanna Williams, of New 
London, 1670. 

]\Iercv, daughter of Joshua Bolles, born 
July 19, 1758, married Guy Wheeler, as above. 

Fanny Browning, wife of Guy Wheeler, Jr., 
son of Guy and Mercy (Bolles) Browning, 
was descended from another group of Rhode 
Island ancestors. 

Nathaniel Browning, of Portsmouth and 
Kingston, Rhode Island, married Sarah, daugh- 
ter of William Freeborn, one of the eigh- 
teen original proprietors of Aquidneck, who 
settled Pocasset (later Portsmouth), 1638. 

^^'illiam Browning, son of Nathaniel Brown- 
ing, married Rebecca, daughter of Samuel 



CONNECTICUT 



1733 



ami Hannah (Porter) Wilbur, granddaugh- 
ter of Sanniel W'ilhur, another of the ]iro- 
prietors of Aquidneck, 1638, and named in 
the Royal Charter granted by King Charles 
II, 1663. 

John Porter, the lather of Hannah Porter, 
was also an original proprietor of Aquidneck, 
1638, and named in the Royal Charter. As- 
sistant, 1640-44-50-64, commissioner from 
1658 to 1661. 

John Browning, son of William and Re- 
becca (Wilbur) Browning, married Ann Haz- 
ard, daughter of Jeremiah and Sarah (Smith) 
Hazard, granddaughter of Robert and Mary 
(Brownell) Hazard, and great-granddaughter 
of Thomas Hazard, a founder of the Historic 
Charter Colony of Newport, 1639. 

Mary Brownell, daughter of Thomas and 
Ann Brownell, and wife of Robert Hazard, 
died January 28, 1739, age one hundred years 
(see "Boston Gazette," February 11, 1739), 
leaving five hundred children, grandchildren 
and great-grandchildren. 

Sarah Smith, wife of Jeremiah Hazard, 
was daughter of Jeremiah and Mary (Ger- 
eardy) Smith, and granddaughter of John 
Smith, of Prudence Island. 

Mary Gereardy, wife of Jeremiah Smith, 
was daughter of Jan Gereardy and his wife 
Renewed, daughter of John and Margaret 
Sweet, and granddaughter of Philip and Marie 
(Pollet) Gereardy. 

Ephraim Browning, son of John and Ann 
(Hazard) Browning, married Susanna Davis 
and his daughter Fanny was the wife of Guy 
^^^^eeler and the mother of Wealthy Browning 
\Mieeler, wife of Israel Denison Phillips. 

Professor Andrew Wheeler Phillips, son 
of Israel Denison Phillips, was born in Gris- 
wold, March 14, 1844. In youth he attended 
the district school of his native town and 
private schools taught by college men in 
their summer vacations. During four years 
he was engaged in teaching in the public 
schools of eastern Connecticut and in study- 
ing by himself the higher branches of 
mathematics. From 1864 to 1875 he was 
instructor in that branch at Cheshire Acad- 
emy. In 1 87 1 he began to study mathe- 
matics under Professor Hubert A. Newton, 
of Yale College, and in 1873 received the de- 
gree of Ph. B. from Yale, followed in 1877 
by the degree of Ph. D. after specializing in 
mathematics, physics and political economy. 
Trinity College conferred upon him the hon- 
orary degree of A. ]M. in 1875. He began to 
teach in Yale College in 1876 and was elected 
a tutor there in 1877. In 1881 he was made 
assistant professor and in 1891 full professor 
of mathematics. Since 1895 he has been dean 



of the Graduate School of Yale University. 
In 1883 he was chosen a trustee of the 
Episcopal Academy of Connecticut at Che- 
shire; in 1886 a trustee of the Hopkins 
Grammar School in New Haven; in 1891 
trustee of the Hotchkiss School at Lake- 
ville, of which board he has been president 
since 1900. He is a member of the American 
^latheniatical Society and the Connecticut 
Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow 
of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. In politics he is a Republi- 
can ; in religion an Episcopalian. He is a 
member of the Connecticut Society, Sons of 
the American Revolution, by virtue of the 
revolutionary service of his ancestors. He 
belongs to the Graduates' Club of New Haven 
and to the New Haven Colony Historical 
Society. Professor Phillips was the originator 
of the Connecticut Almanac, and edited it 
from 1882 to 1894. He wrote a biographical 
sketch of Professor Hubert A. Newton for 
the Bulletin of the American [Mathematical 
Society, and has contributed numerous papers 
on mathematics and astronomy to scientific and 
mathematical societies which have lieen pub- 
lished in whole or in part. He is joint author 
of "Transcendental Curves" (Newton and 
Phillips, 1875) : "Graphic Algebra" (PhiUips 
and Beebe, 18S2): "The Elements of Geom- 
etry" (Phillips and Fisher. 1896); "Trigo- 
nometrv and Tables" ( Phillips and Strong, 
1898) ;'"The Orbit of Swift's Comet" (Beebe 
and Phillips, 1891). Professor l^hillips in- 
troduced at Yale on an extensive scale, 
a system of instruction by the use of 
mathematical curves and models whereby the 
principles of the advancel mathematics are 
brought down to the comprehension of the 
freshmen and sophomores. He has invented a 
multitude of models and machines to illustrate 
a great variety of mathematical operations and 
principles. Among these may be mentioned 
a device for the discussion of the general cubic 
equation, whereby a model is so constructed 
as to transform one figure of space into an- 
other and also showing how two figures of 
space may intersect each other (American As- 
sociation for the Advancement of Science, 
Rochester. 1892) : also a machine for trans- 
forming one stereographic projection of the 
sphere into any other ( British Association for 
the Advancement of Science, Montreal, 1884) ; 
also models showing the projection of a defin- 
ite fourth dimensional figure into a figure of 
three dimensional space (Yale Mathematical 
Club, 191 1 ). 

President Hadley in speaking recently of 
Professor Phillips' work said : "He is one of 
the few men who has shown a positive genius 



1734 



CONNECTICUT 



for teaching. He combined a great enthusiasm 
for his own subject with an ahnost unique 
power of appreciating the difficulties of those 
who knew less about it than he did. He was 
fertile in illustrative expedients which enabled 
most boys to appreciate mathematics from at 
least one side, and inspired a few of them to 
look at it from all sides. This was not charac- 
teristic of his mathematical teaching alone: it 
ran through his whole life. He cared for the 
person with whom he was dealing even more 
than for the thing he was trying to do. Every 
one felt this, and this was why men worked 
for him and cared for him." 

Professor Phillips completed in June, 191 1, 
fifty-one years of service as a teacher. His 
resignation as Professor of Mathematics and 
Dean of the Graduate School was accepted 
by the Yale corporation. He was made Pro- 
fessor Emeritus, and the following vote was 
adopted by the corporation : 

Voted, to adopt the following minute with 
reference to the resignation of Dean Phillips : 

"The Corporation wishes to record its deep 
appreciation of the services of Professor An- 
drew Wheeler Phillips, who retires at the close 
of the present year from the position of Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

"Mr. Phillips has been connected with Yale 
University for forty years. After taking his 
Bachelor's and Doctor's degrees at Yale, the 
former in 1S73 and the latter in 1877, he has 
held successively the positions of Tutor, As- 
sistant Professor of Mathematics, Professor 
of Mathematics, and for the past sixteen years 
the important post of Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

"The Corporation is mindful of the many 
services which Dean Phillips has rendered as 
an inspiring teaclier of imdergraduates, as Sec- 
retarv of the College Faculty, as the successful 
head of one of the most important schools of 
the University and as the Corporation's repre- 
sentative in the raising of the fund for the 
erection of the Bi-Centennial buildings. 

"His loyal devotion to the University has 
been an inspiration to all who have known 
him and the Corporation desires to place on 
record its sense of appreciation of what his 
character, spirit and work have meant to 
Yale." 

Professor Phillips married Maria Scoville, 
daughter of Rev. Peter G. Clarke, chaplain 
of United States navy. She died February 
22, 1895. 



The Rembert family is of 

REMBERT French Huguenot stock. The 

progenitor was among the 

early settlers of South Carolina, coming 



thither, according to family tradition, from 
Canterbury, England, whither the family went 
for refuge after the revocation of the Edict 
of Nantes, late in the seventeenth century. 
In 1790 the first federal census shows that 
the descendants of the immigrant were then 
numerous in the Camden district of Clare- 
mont county, South Carolina. Abijah Rem- 
bert had a family of three sons under sixteen 
and five females, and held eleven slaves ; James 
had three sons under sixteen, four females, 
and had thirty slaves. E. Rembert and John 
Rembert also lived in this county ; Joachim 
Rembert in the Georgetown district of Prince 
Frederick parish ; and Jacob Rembert also in 
South Carolina. Most of them appear to be 
well-to-do planters. 

( I ) Raphael, son of one of the Remberts 
mentioned above and grandson or great- 
grandson of the immigrant ancestor, lived in 
Georgetown county. South Carolina, and was 
a cotton planter. 

(II) Stephen, son of Raphael Rembert, was 
born in Georgetown county. South Carolina, 
in October, 1831. He removed to Walling- 
ford, Connecticut, where he lived on his in- 
come during the summer months, spending 
the winters in the south. After the civil war 
he made his home in the south altogether. 
He married Sarah Laura Hiddleston, born at 
W'allingford, Connecticut, April 9, 1831, died 
in Georgetown, South Carolina, 1903. daugh- 
ter of John and Sybil (Mansfield) Hiddleston, 
the former a native of South Carolina, the 
latter born in Connecticut, and a granddaugh- 
ter of John Mansfield (q. v.). He had first 
met her during his early youth while he was 
a student. Children: i. John Raphael, see 
forward. 2. Henry H., born 1855, lives in 
South Carolina. 3. Robert PL, died at age 
of ten years. 4. Herbert, was murdered by a 
negro whom he employed in 1884. 5. Florine 
S., liorn 1866, died at age of thirty years. 
6. Mary, died 1906. 

(III) John Raphael, eldest child of Stephen 
and Sarah Laura (Hiddleston) Rembert, was 
born at Wallingford, Conecticut, July 30, 1853. 
He attended the public schools of his town 
and of New Haven, and upon the completion 
of his education was a clerk in a stationery 
business until he had attained the age of 
twenty years. In 1873 he went into business 
for himself, and in 1898 he formed the firm 
of John R. Rembert & Company, in a sta- 
tionery store on State street. New Haven. 
In this venture they were uniformly suc- 
cessful, and the business has enjoyed a con- 
stantly growing popularity. In politics Mr. 
Rembert entertains independent opinions and 
he is a member of the Protestant Episcopal 




iMl/&^-— 'W^ 



CONNECTICUT 



1/35 



cliiircli. lly virtiR' of the services of liis ma- 
ternal ancestor. C'aptain John Mansfield, men- 
tit)nc(l hereinafter, Mr. Rembert is a member 
of tlie Connecticut Society, Sons of'the Amer- 
ican Revolution, and has been accepted in the 
Scx'iety of the Cincinnati. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Union League Club of New Haven, 
and of Hiram Lods^e. No. i. Free and .Ac- 
cepted Masons. ^Nlr. Rembert married. July 
30, 1884. Charlotte Rosette Johnson, born in 
\\'aterbury, Connecticut, June 19, 1867. Her 
line of descent is as follows : 

Ira Johnson, great-grandfather of j\Irs. 
Rembert, married Lois Holcomb. Linus, son 
of Ira and Lois (Holcomb) Johnson, was 
born in Llarwinton. May 29, 1810, and died 
February 11, 1905 ; married, about 1832, ]\Iary 
Riley, of Southbury, born 1809, died April 8, 
1841. Riley, son of Linus and Mary (Riley) 
Johnson, was born in Torrington, Connecti- 
cut, 1836, and died December 29, 1887; mar- 
ried, August 19, 1863, Louisa M. Bronson (see 
Bronson). and had children: Charlotte Ro- 
sette, who became ?ilrs. Rembert ; and Burr 
Benham. born in Torrington, Connecticut, Oc- 
tober 5, 1871, died June 19, 1908, was a clerk 
and marrie:!, October, 1892, Mary L. Hunt. 

(The Mansfield Line). 

(I) Sir John Mansfield, Knight, was mayor 
of Exeter, England, also master of the sur- 
vey under Queen Elizabeth. 

(II) Richard, son of Sir John Mansfield, 
died January 10, 1655. He was one of the 
first settlers in New Haven and ancestor of 
almost all the Connecticut ]\Iansfields. of 
many in the state of New York, and of some 
in the south and west. He came from Exeter, 
Devonshire. England, and settled in Quin- 
nipiack in 1639, as shown by deeds of land 
from James Marshall, of Exeter. England, 
which are in the New Haven Land Records, 
vol. i. He owned a number of other parcels 
of land, but only erected a sort of cellar, part- 
ly in the ground, with a thatched roof, which 
kind of dwellings were used by the most repre- 
sentative inhabitants during the first few years 
of their life in this country. In the schedule 
of the list of the first planters he is put 
down at £400 — thirty acres in the First Di- 
vision, si.x acres in the "Neck," twenty-two 
acres of meadow and eighty-eight in the Sec- 
ond Division. About this time it is sup- 
posed he established his farm and built his 
large dwelling house and farm accommoda- 
tions at a place called the "East Farms," 
about four and a half miles out on the pres- 
ent North Haven road, where he spent the 
remainder of his life. Governor Theophilus 
Eaton administered the oath of fidelity to 



Richartl Mansfield at the general court at 
New Haven, July 1. 1044. In the list of the 
one hundred and twenty-three first grantees 
of New Haven he has "Mr." afifixed to his 
name, with only seven others in the whole 
list with that honor. The title of "Mr." ( Mas- 
ter) at tliat time was far more honorable 
than that of Esquire two hundred years later. 
He is mentioned in a large number of public 

documents. He married Gillian , and 

had children: i. Joseph, born about 1636 
(O. S.) : took freeman's oath, Februarv 8, 
1657. He owned a large estate, a portion 
of it being the present site of Yale Uni- 
versity, and died November 15. 1692. He 

married, about 1657, Mary , joined the 

church, August 30, 1683. 2. jMoses, see for- 
ward. The widow of Richard Mansfield mar- 
ried (second), 1657, Alexander Field, and 
after his death in 1666 she lived with her son 
Moses. 

(Ill) Moses, son of Richard and Gillian 
Mansfield, was born in January 1639 (O. S.), 
and died October 3, 1703. He was twenty- 
one years of age when he took the freeman's 
oath. May i, 1660. A part of the inscription 
on his monumental table is as follows: "Here 
lyeth interred the body of Major Moses Mans- 
field, .'\ssist.. Aged 63." Major was the high- 
est military title at that time, and for defeat- 
ing a body of Indians in the time of King 
Philip's war, about where the town of Mans- 
field is situated, the town was named after 
him. He was a member of the general court 
or assembl)' for forty-eight sessions, judge 
of probate, and of the county court. He 
married (first), May 5, 1664, Mercy, daugh- 
ter of Henry Glover, an early settler and a 
prominent man: (second) Abigail, born Mav 
5, 1660. died February 28. 1709. daughter 
of Thomas and Mary Yale. Children, all bv 
first marriage : 

1. Abigail, born February 7, 1664, died 
September 24, 1717; married, September 13, 
1682, John Atwater, who settled in Walling- 
ford, and died in 1748. They had seven sons 
and three daughters, and among their de- 
scendants were: Ward Atwater, a prominent 
sea captain in the West India trade, and Jere- 
miah Atwater, president of Middlebury Col- 
lege, \'ermont, and later of the Dickinson 
College, Pennsylvania. 

2. Mercy, born April 2, 1667: married, about 
1691, John, born August 6, 1667, son of Ser- 
geant John and grandson of Anthony Thomp- 
son, the first settler. Their farm was at 
"South End," near the old light house. Chil- 
dren: i. John, born October 11, 1692. ii. 
.\l3igail. October 6. 1694. iii. Mercy, Feb- 
ruar}' 21, 1696. iv. Moses, November i. 



173^ 



CONNECTICUT 



1699, married Desire Hemiiigwa}-, and their 
daughter, also Desire, married, December 6, 
1758, Rev. Nicholas Street, v. Helena, born 
April 28, 1702. vi. Samuel. September 30, 
1704. vii. Joseph, viii. Bathsheba. Almost 
all the Thompsons of East Haven are de- 
scended from John and [Mercy, and the late 
Nathaniel F. Thompson, president of the ^le- 
chanics' Bank, was a descendant. 

3. Hannah, born March 11, 1669, died No- 
vember I, 1726; married, about 1695, Ger- 
shom Brown, born October 9, 1665, died 
1724, who was a merchant and ship owner, 
and considered a man of considerable wealth 
for that time. He was the son of Eleazar and 
the grandson of Francis and Mary (Edwards) 
Brown, who arrived in Boston from England, 
June 26, 1637, and were among the first set- 
tlers of New Haven. Children : i. Eleazar, 
born 1696, died September 21. 176S: mar- 
ried, January 21. 1725, Sarah Rowe. ii. Han- 
nah, born January- i, 1702. iii. Olive, born 
February 22. 1708, died October 10, 1743; 
married, 3,Iarch 20, 1728, Nathaniel Brown, 
who came from England, and had a son Ben- 
jamin, who was a sea capatin in the West 
India trade. 

4. Samuel, born December 31. 167 1, died 
unmarried, 1701. He was graduated from 
Harvard College in 1690, and had charge of 
the Hopkins Grammar School, 1694-99. then 
went into the ^\'est India trade. 

5. Moses, born .\ugust 15, 1674, died Feb- 
ruary 15, 1740. He is sometimes stvled mer- 
chant, sometimes mariner, and his name ap- 
pears many times on the town records. In 
1718 he was one of the persons to whom 
hcense was granted "to set up a mill to im- 
prove the flax seed of this colony and for 
the extracting and producing linseed oyl," 
and in the following year they were granted 
the exclusive right "to make linseed and rape 
oyl." He married, November 3, 1702. Mar- 
garet, born June 7, 1682, daughter of John, 
and granddaughter of Timothy Prout, of 
Boston. She was the sister of John Prout, 
who was graduated from Yale College in 
1708, and was treasurer of that institution, 

1717-65- 

6. Sarah, born June 14, 1677: married, Jan- 
uary I, 1698, William Rhodes, a mariner from 
Newport, Rhode Island, and probably lived 
in New Haven. They had a son who be- 
came a physician. 

7. Richard, born July 20, 1680. died Au- 
gust 7, 1 68 1. 

8. Bathshua, born January i. 1682: mar- 
ried, January 22, 1705, Joseph Chapman, of 
Newport, Rhode Island. 

9. Jonathan, see forward. 



(IV) Deacon Jonathan, son of Moses and 
Mercy (Glover) Mansfield, was born Feb- 
ruary 16, 1686, baptized March 21, same year, 
and died January 10, 1775. His name appears 
on the land records in fifty-six deeds, and in 
the court and town records, thirty-nine times. 
He was an enterprising and active business 
man, and was appointed a member of im- 
portant and responsible public trusts. In farm- 
ing he was equally successful. His will, dated 
October i, 1767, left an estate of £1,493, 
which was considered large for that time. He 
joined the church under the Rev. James Pier- 
pont, August 28, 1709. 

Deacon Jonathan Mansfield married (first), 
June I, 1708, Sarah Ailing, born in 1685, died 
May 4, 1765, daughter of John Ailing, re- 
corder and treasurer of Yale College, who 
married Susannah, daughter of Robert Coe, 
of Stratford, Connecticut, granddaughter of 
Rodger Ailing, one of the first settlers of 
New Haven, who came from England in 1639 
and became deacon and treasurer of the juris- 
diction. Deacon Jonathan Mansfield married 
(second). May 13, 1766, Abigail, born Sep- 
tember I, 1707, died January 25, 1798. widow 
of Ebenezer Dorman, and daughter of James 
and Abigail (Bennet) Bishop. Children, all 
by first marriage: 

1. Moses, see forward. 

2. Jonathan, born January 27, 171 1, died 
young. 

3. Susannah, born December 9, 1712, died in 
1797; married (first), December 23, 1736, 
Samuel, born January 28, 171 1, died 1750, 
only child of Ebenezer (changed from Icha- 
bocl) and Hannah (Bassett) Mansfield, and 
had one child, Susanna. She marrietl (sec- 
ond) John Stone, of Milford. 

4. Sarah, born ]\Iay 2, 1715; married. Feb- 
ruary 21, 1739, Captain Thomas Wilmot, born 
August 25, 1712, a joiner and builder, and the 
great-grandson of Benjamiia and Anne Wil- 
mot, who came from England about 1640. 
Children: Rhoda, born February 29, 1740; 
Samuel, March 6, 1742; Daniel, October 16, 
1744; Sarah, February 6, 1747. The land 
records show that he was living in 1792, and 
his wife in 1787. 

5. Stephen, born November 14, I7i(), died 
July 15, 1774. He was a captain in the W^est 
India trade, and prominent in public mat- 
ters. He married, December 31, 1746. Han- 
nah Beach, of Wallingford, born 1728, died 
September 20, 1795. 

6. Nathan, born November 15. 1718. died 
March 13, T783: married, 1745, Deborah Day- 
ton, born 1724, died May 29, 1817. 

7. Lois, born April 27, 1721, died IMarch 16, 
1806; married (first), January 9, 1746, Abra- 



CONNECTICUT 



1737 



hain. born 1720, died 1748, great-grandson 
of William Ilradley, ancestor of all the New 
Haven r.radle\>. wIiq came there about 1O45. 
Children; i. Abraham, born 1746, died Jan- 
uary 24, 1825: married Mary Punchard, who 
died September 25, 1823, and their only child, 
William, married Caroline ^lunson, of New 
Haven, and had six children, ii. Lois, born 
March 3, 1748. died April 20, 1805 : she mar- 
ried (second I josiah W'oodhouse, of London, 
England, born 1722, died September 3. 1764; 
they had one child: Robert, who probably 
died young. She married (third), July 10, 
1766, John Watts, and she joined the church, 
October 30, 1764. 

8. Richard, born in New Haven, October i, 
1723, died April 12, 1820. He was fitted to 
enter college at the age of eleven years, but 
did not einer until he was fourteen years old. 
He was graduated from Yale College in 1741, 
remained two }-ears longer, and then pursued 
theological studies. He became an Episco- 
palian and had charge of the Hopkins Gram- 
mar School in New Haven. 1744-47. He was 
ordained deacon in Kensington Church, Lon- 
don, England, August 3, 174S, by Dr. Thomas 
Herring, Archbishop of Canterbury, and ad- 
vanced to the priesthood August 7, same year. 
Returning to America in 1749, he took his 
first charge at Derby and had charge of this 
parish almost seventy-two years. He sided 
with the Englisli during the revolution and 
was obliged to flee. He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Yale College in 
1792. He married, October 10, 175 1, Anna, 
born 1726, died August 20, 1776, eldest 
daughter of Joseph Hull (2), of Derby, and 
of the same family as Commodore Isaac Hull, 
of the United States Navy. Children :• i. 
Richard, born September 3, 1752, married 
Abia Shelton. ii. Elizabeth, baptized Septem- 
ber 29. 1754, died February 22, 1826, unmar- 
ried, iii. Anna, baptized INIay 2, 1756, died 
April II. 1841. married, October 22, 1774, 
Major Elijah Humphreys, born 1746, died on 
his way to the West Indies, ^lay 2, 1785. 
iv. Sarah, born August 9, 1758, died De- 
cember 23, 1790 ; married Rev. Edward 
Blakeslee, born in 1767, died July 17, 1797; 
they had one child, Sarah Mansfield, who 
married, December 24, 1812, Dr. Pearl Crafts, 
v. Plenrietta, born October 3, 1760, died Feb- 
ruary 3, 1761. vi. Joseph, born February 24, 
1762, died December 19, 1782. vii. William, 
baptized January 12, 1764, died October i, 
1816: he was graduated from Yale College 
in 1784 and was a merchant and a manufac- 
turer of linseed oil in Derby ; he married Eu- 
nice Hall, and had eleven children. viii. 
Stephen, born September 12, 1765, died Au- 



gust 9, 1819; his death was caused by a fall 
from his carriage, i.x. Jonathan, baptized Jan- 
uary 21, 1768, died in infancy, x. Jonathan, 
baptized November 12, 1769, died December 
10, 1770. xi. Lucretia, born January 12, 1772, 
died February 10, 1849, married, August 10, 
1796, Abel Allis, and had six children, xii. 
Mary Louisa, baptized June 12, 1774, died 
May 6, 1863, married Giles Mardenbrough, 
and had two children, xiii. Grace, born Au- 
gust 15, 1776, died October 14, 1776. 

(V) Moses, eldest child of Deacon Jona- 
than and Sarah (Ailing) Mansfield, was born 
May 5, 1709, and died in New Haven, in 
1754. He was graduated from Yale Col- 
lege in 1730. By occupation he is styled 
"schoolmaster," had charge of the Hopkins 
Grammar School, 1730-34. and afterward kept 
a private school in which young men were 
prepared for college. His name appears on 
the land records in sixteen deeds. He was 
chosen several times as constable and collector 
of taxes, and was a number of times a mem- 
ber of public committees. He married (first), 
May 17, 1734, Ann Mary, born in 1709, died 

Julv 5, 1742, daughter of Kierstead, 

of New York, a wealthy Dutchman, who came 
to New Haven in his old age. He married 
(second), February 17, 1748. \\'idow Rachel 
Ward. Children : 

1. Sarah, born July 7, 1736. died February 
18, 1775 : married, Julv 13, 1758, John Daniel- 
son, a Scotchman. <Jf their three children, 
two died young, and the third, JMary Ann, 
married William Lamont, a mariner, had one 
child, Sarah Mansfield, who dieil unmarried, 
October 15, 1867. 

2. Jonathan, born ]\Iarch 8, 1739, died Sep- 
tember 2, 1769. He was a sea captain and 
owned a homestead on Union street, between 
Wooster and East Water streets. He mar- 
ried, November 10, 1761, Mary, daughter of 
Benjamin and Sarah Dorchester: she mar- 
ried (second) Edmund Burke, and died Sep- 
tember 24, 1830 ; by her second marriage she 
had a daughter, who married Deacon Sher- 
man Blair. Jonathan and Mary (Dorchester) 
Mansfield had children : i. Mary, born about 
1765, died about 1793, married Wheeler, son 
of Caleb Beecher. of Woodbridge, Connecti- 
cut : they had no children. He married ( sec- 
ond) Mary (Polly) Hotchkiss. of Wood- 
bridge, and had several children, ii. Sarah, 
born 1768, died April 26. 1836, married, 1786, 
John Benedict, born in New York, 1766, died 
in New Haven, 1838 : children : Lyman, born 
1787, died July 9, 18^3, married Annie Moul- 
throup ; Barnabas, born 1788. died Decem- 
ber 21, 1S36; Walter and Polly, died in in- 
fancy; Sarah, born 1796, died June 2, 1873: 



1738 



CONNECTICUT 



Truman, born April 19, 1798, died April 14, 
1880, married (first), July 4, 1819, Elizabeth 
Hotchkiss, (second) Mary A, Auger; Mary, 
born 1800, died 1857, married, January 12, 
1823, Morris Church, born 1800, died 1834, 
had six children : Nancy, born 1802, died un- 
married, 1883 ; Harvey, born 1804, died No- 
vember II, 1878, married Henrietta Hotch- 
kiss, who died November 21, 1868, and had 
seven sons; Charles W., born 1809, died on 
day appointed for his wedding, January 15, 
1832; Sherman, born October 16, 1811, mar- 
ried (first), September 18, 1833. Lucy J. Prin- 
dle, born October 30, 1810, died January 9, 
1843, ''''id two children, (second), December 
31, 1843, Eliza A. Ives, born November 14, 
1820, who also had two children; George W., 
born 1814, died May 26, 1847, married Polly 
Landcraft, of East Haven, and had three 
children. iii. John, was a mariner, never 
married. 

3. John, see forward. 

4. Moses, born September 25, 1749, died 
December 31, 1831. He was also a school- 
master, and his homestead was on Grove 
street near Church street. He married the 
widow of Thomas Dodd, a mariner, who left 
his wife with five small children. He had 
no children of his own. 

5. James Kierstead, usually called by the 
second of these names, was born February 15, 
1751, and died in 1804. He owned the greater 
part of the Mansfield home lot that faced Elm 
street and the Green. He was a mason and 
builder, engaged in calico printing, and man- 
ufactured saltpetre. In this last industry he 
caught a cold which developed into consump- 
tion and caused his death. He was a member 
of the Governor's Foot Guard, and, being 
six feet in height, was chosen one of the 
twelve grenadiers. At the time of the revo- 
lution he was already ill and could not serve 
his country in the field. He married, February 
2, 1774, Mary Hitchcock, who was taken into 
the First Congregational Church, July 26, 
1788. Children: i. Jonathan, baptized July 
26, 1788, died in West Indies in 1801 ; mar- 
ried, about 1796, Hannah, daughter of David 
Dougal, who came from Edinburgh, Scotland, 
ii. Kierstead. baptized July 26, 1788, died Jan- 
uary 16, 1805, aged twenty-eight years; he 
was a merchant in New Haven, and married, 
March 15, 1797, Anna Thompson, born in 
1779. died October 6, 1849; slie married (sec- 
ond) Eli Osborn. a widow, among whose 
children by his first wife were : Walter Os- 
born, for many years collector of taxes, and 
Minott Osborn, editor of the New Haven 
Daily Register, iii. Mary, baptized Septem- 
ber 12, 1799, married, March 4, 1800, Leman 



Hall, a grocer, and had six or eight children. 
iv. Sarah, baptized Alarch 17, 1782, married, 
about 181 5. Stephen Porter, and had one 
child: George H., born November 2, 1819, 
who married, November 21, 1849, Sarah 
Hotchkiss, and resides in New Haven ; they 
have an adopted daughter, Alta H. Porter. 
v. Julia, born November i, 1784, died Oc- 
tober 9, 1850, married, March 21, 1821, David 
Ritter, born 1778, died October 14, 1842, a 
manufacturer of monuments, etc., who was 
a widower with a number of children ; by 
this second marriage he had : Stephen, a com- 
mercial traveler, born September 22, 1822, 
married, September 7, 1846, Margaret 'G. 
Bond, of New York, and has three children; 
Joseph, a jeweler, born October 24, 1824, 
married, 1845, Elizabeth Pease, of Hartford, 
Connecticut, and has one child, vi. Rachel, 
born March 14, 17S7, died February 26, 1855, 
married June 20, 1807, James Webster Town- 
send, a mariner, born July 20, 1782, died De- 
cember 21, 1824; children: Lucius Beardsley, 
born April \(\ t8o8, died March 19, 1882; 
Martha, born 1810, died in infancy; John, 
born July 10, 1812, died ]\Iarch 16, 1867, 
married and had children; Mary, born 1814, 
died in infancy ; ^Mary Frances, iDorn June 20, 
1820. 

( \T ) Captain John Mansfield, son of Moses 
and Ann Mary (Kierstead) Mansfield, born 
in New Haven, Connecticut, August 17, 1748, 
died in Wallingford, Connecticut, in 1823. 
He owned and occupied the lot now owned 
and occupied by Mr. Harrison and formerly 
bv John Hiddleston, Esq. He served during 
the revolution, and his record is given as 
follows : 

Capt. John Mansfield, of Wallingford, Conn. 
(1748-1823), was a sergeant in the company of 
Isaac Cook Jr. in the ist Regiment, Col. David 
Wooster, raised on the first call for troops in 
.\pril-May, 1775. Served in New York and on 
Long Island dnring the summer. In September 
marched to the northern department, where it 
served under Gen. Schuyler about Lakes George 
and Champlain. In Octolier served at the re- 
duction of St. Joiins. He was discharged No- 
vember 28. 1775. In June, 1776, he was ensi.gn 
of the 6th Company of the 5th Battalion, Wads- 
worth's Brigade, commanded by Col. William 
Douglas, raised to reinforce Washington's army 
at New York. Served in the City and at the 
right of the line during the battle of Long 
Island, .'\ug. 27th; was at the battle of White 
Plains, Oct. aSth and continued in service until 
December 25th. 1776, re-enlisting in the Con- 
necticut Line. Jan. 1st.. 1777. On March 14th, 
1777, he was commissioned a lieutenant in the 
6th Regiment. Connecticut Line, raised to contin- 
ue through the war, went into camp at Peckskill 
in the summer, and served during the fall in Par- 
son's brigade, on the Hudson, wintered 1777-78 at 
West Point, and in the summer was encamped 



CONNECTICUT 



1739 



with the main army at White Plains; wintered 
177^-7'^ ;it KeiUliiig. In the summer of 1779 
served on the Kast side of the Hudson; wintered 
'77'1-iSo at Morristown Huts, New Jersey, and in 
the summer of 1780 served on Iioth sides of tlie 
Hudson; wintered 1780-S1 at Camp Connecticut 
Village, opposite West I'oint, and there consoli- 
dated for formation 1781-1783. In this formation he 
continued as a lieutenant in the 4th Regiment 
Connecticut Line, and was present with the regi- 
ment at Vorktown. At the storming of the en- 
emy's redoubts on the night of October 24th, 
1781, the column was preceded by a "forlorn hope" 
of twenty men under Lieutenant Manstield, who 
was wounded in scaling the works. He was 
complimented in Col. Hamilton's report. In 
the formation of January-June. 1783, he contin- 
ued as lieutenant in the 2d Regiment Connecti- 
cut Line, commanded by Col. Heman Swift, in 
service at West Point and vicinity, until early in 
June the regiment was disbanded with the great- 
er portion of the army by orders of Washington. 
He was a member of the Society of the Cincin- 
nati. He was granted a pension. — (Conn. Society, 
S. A. R. Year Book, 1897-98-99, page 537). 

He married Eunice, daughter of Colonel 
Thaddeus Cook, of Wallingford. Children : 
I. Ira, born in Wallingford, October 16, 
1776, died in Atwater, Ohio, June 16, 1849. 
His occupation was that of farming and he 
was a captain in the Indian wars under Gen- 
eral Harrison and Commander Perry on the 
lakes. He married Sukie Kirtland, and had a 
son, Isaac K., born in Atwater, Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 3, 1809, died in Poland, Ohio, August 
16, 1850. He was a merchant in Poland and 
in Philadelphia, and married, 1839, Lois, 
daughter of Elkanah Morse. Their son, Cap- 
tain Ira Franklin, was born in Poland, Ohio, 
June 27, 1842, and was graduated from 
Poland College. He served in the civil war, 
1862-65, and was promoted through the vari- 
ous ranks to that of captain of the One Hun- 
dred and Fifth Ohio Regiment. He lived in 
Beaver, Pennsylvania, was a member of the 
legislature, a member of the American Philo- 
sophical Society, and elder and superintendent 
of the Presbyterian church. He married, 
December 11, 1872, Lucy E., daughter of Dr. 
Eli Mygatt, of Danbury, Connecticut, and 
has children : Kirtland M., iNIary L., Henry 
B. 2. Sybil, see forward. 

( VH) Sybil, only daughter of Captain John 
and Eunice (Cook) Mansfield, married John 
Hiddleston, as mentioned above (see Rem- 
bert II). 

(The Bronson Line). 

This name is usually spelled Brownson on 
the Hartford, and Brunson on the Farming- 
ton records. 

(I) John Bronson, father of the Waterbury 
Bronsons, was early in Hartford. It is be- 
lieved that he was one of the company that 



came with Mr. II(X)ker in 1636. of whose 
church lie was a member. He was a soldier 
in the Pequot battle of 1637. He is not 
named among the proprietors of Hartford in 
the land division of 1639, but in the saine 
\-ear is mentioned in the list of settlers who 
by the "towne's courtesie" had liberty "to 
fetch woode and keepe swine or cowes on 
tlie common." His house lot was in the "sol- 
diers' field," in the north part of the old 
village of Hartford, on the "Neck Road" 
(supposed to have been given for service in 
the Pequot war), where he lived in 1640. 
After the purchase of Tunxis (Farmington) 
by the Hartford people, John Bronson removed 
to that place about 1641. He was one of the 
seven pillars at the organization of the Farm- 
ington church in 1652: was deputy to the 
general court. May, 1651, and at several later 
sessions ; and "the constable of Farmington," 
who collected the rate for "ye Fort at Sea- 
brook" in 1652. His name is on the list of 
freemen of Farmington in 1669, and he died 
November 28, 1680, his estate being inven- 
toried at £312. He married and had children: 
I. Jacob, born January, 1641, died T708: lived 
in Farmington, in the society of Kensington, 
married, and had children. 2. John, born 
January, 1644. 3. Isaac, see forward. 4. 

l\Iary. married Ellis, or Allis. 5. 

Abraham, baptized November 28, 1647: he 
signed the IMattatuck articles, but declined the 
responsibilities of a planter ; removed to Lyme, 
where he died at an advanced age. He mar- 
ried Hannah, daughter of Matthew Griswold, 
and had children. 6. Dorcas, died May 13, 
1697 ; married Stephen Hopkins, of Hart- 
ford, and had a son, John, who was of Water- 
bury. 7. Sarah, married Ebenezer Kilbourn, 
of \Vethersfield. 

''II) Sergeant Isaac, son of John Bronson, 
died about 1719. He was one of the original 
thirty subscribers, and is believed to have 
been one of the first company who came to 
Waterbury, and was one of the patentees 
named in the first town patent. He joined 
the Farmington church, ]\Iay 15. 1684. and 
was active in establishing a church in Water- 
Inirv, being one of the netitioners to the gen- 
eral court for liberty "to gather" a church, 
and was one of its seven pillars at its final 
organization in 1691. Fie was appointed cor- 
poral of the train band in 1689. and became 
sergeant in 1695. He served as deputy in 
May, 1697, and October. 1701, and heM a 
number of other public offices, being evidently 
prominent in all public matters of the time 
and highly respected. The inventory of his 
estate showed the ainount to be distributed 
to be £386. 



1/40 



CONNECTICUT 



Isaac Bronson married, about 1669, Mary, 
who died shortly after his death, daughter of 
John Root, of Farmington. Children: i. 
Isaac, born 1670, died June 13, 1751 ; he was a 
bachelor proprietor, a deputy to the general 
court in 1723-33, and owned a considerable 
amount of property. In all probability he 
was the first permanent settler in what is 
now known as Middlebury, and tradition savs 
that his eldest son Isaac was the first child 
born within the limits of that town. 2. John, 
see forward. 3. Samuel, born about 1676; 
was a cooper, and lived in Kensington. 4. 
Mary, born October 15, 1680, died 1756, mar- 
ried Deacon Thomas Hickox, and supported 
herself efliciently after she became a widow. 

5. Joseph, born 1682, died May 10, 1707. 6. 
Thomas, born January 16, 1686. died I\Iay 6, 
1777 ; he was the fifth deacon of the \^'aterburv 
First Church, being appointed in 1750, and 
was a lieutenant, as shown by the inscription 
on his tombstone. 7. Ebenezer, born in De- 
cember, 1688, died July 20, 1775 ; he is called in 
deeds a "yeoman," and appears to have been a 
man of wealth. 8. Sarah, born November 15, 
1691, died 1748. 9. Mercy, born September 
28, 1694 : married Richard Bronson, of Wood- 
bury. 

(Ill) Lieutenant John, son of Sergeant 
Isaac and j\Iary (Root) Bronson, was born 
in 1673, and died about the close of 1746. 
He is supposed to have lived at Breakneck, 
where he had a house and a considerable 
amount of land, and later purchased a number 
of other pieces of property. He became a 
lieutenant of the militia and was several times 
a selectman. He was licensed as a tavern 
keeper by the New Haven county court in 
1730 and afterward. His inventory amounted 
to £1,184 4s 8d. He married and had chil- 
dren: I. Mary, born April 9, 1698: married 
(first) Samuel Porter, (second) John Barnes, 
and died in 1774. 2. John, born April 23, 
1701 : was a lieutenant, removed to Northbuiy 
about 1737, and later to Amenia, New York. 
3. Hannah, born October 13, 1704: married 
Nathan Gaylord ; lived in New Milford. 4. 
Jemima, born August 27, 1706: married 
Stephen Hopkins. 5. Joseph, July 15. 1709. 

6. Benjamin, October 2, 171 1. 7. Tamer, 
March 14, 1730; married Joseph Nichols. 8. 
Ezra, see forward. 9. Phebe. }> larch 23, 
1734 : married Nathaniel Richardson. 

(R') Captain Ezra, son of Lieutenant John 
Bronson, was born April 24, 1732, and died 
September i, 1795. He served as town clerk, 
town treasurer, representative to the assem- 
bly, justice of the peace, and commissary of 
the revolution. He married, September 6, 
1753, Susanna, born 1738, died October 13, 



1828, daughter of Thomas Judd. Children: 
I. Michael, see forward. 2. Hannah, born 
March 26, 1757; married William Leaven- 
worth. 3. Mark, born August 4, 1762. 4. 
Susanna, born March 6, 1766; married 
Stephen ^^^elton. 5. Anne, born December 26, 
1770; married Joseph Cook. 6. Meliscent, 
born June 27, 1773 ; married William Durand. 

(V) Lieutenant Michael, son of Captain 
Ezra and Susanna (Judd) Bronson, was born 
March 25, 1754, and died July 25, 1822. 
Many from Waterbury were in the northern 
army under General Gates, and took part in 
the movements and battles which terminated 
in the capture of Burgoyne in October, 1777. 
Lieutenant Michael Bronson, attached to Col- 
onel Cook's regiment, acted as adjutant and 
particularly distinguished himself. He mar- 
ried, July 5, 1776, Eunice, died in 1841, 
daughter of Joseph Nichols. Children : Cla- 
rissa, born .September 30, 1776, married 

A Bronson ; Horatio Gates, see forward ; 

Hannah, born February 12, 1780, married Joel 
Scott: Ezra, born December 6, 1783. 

(\'I) Horatio Gates, son of Lieutenant Mi- 
chael and Eunice (Nichols) Bronson, was born 
October 2, 1777, and died October 25, 1825. 
He was named for the famous general under 
whom his father had served, and served as 
a private in the war of 1812. 

(VII) Michael, son of Horatio Gates 
Bronson, was born in 1812, and died July 29, 
1881. He married Julia Ann Marks (see 
Marks). 

(\^III) Louisa M., daughter of INIichael 
and Julia Ann QIarks) Bron.son, was born 
in Litchfield, June 12, 1841, and died De- 
cember 30, 1 88 1. She married Riley Johnson, 
of Torrington, Connecticut. 

(IX) Charlotte Rosette, daughter of Riley 
and Louisa M. (Bronson) Johnson, married 
John Raphael Rembert (see Rembert III). 



(The IMn 



Line"). 



(I) Mordecai IMarks, the immigrant an- 
cestor, was born in London, England, April 
23, 1706, and died in Derby, Connecticut, 
January 8, 177 1. He came to New England 
in 1726, lived for a time in Stratford, then 
removed to Derby, where he was a mer- 
chant and did a large business. He also 
owned considerable land, and his will is dated 
i/CiT). He married. 1729, Elizaljeth, born in 
Derbv, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Gunn) Hawkins, the former born February 
14, 1669, the latter born in Milford, April, 
1672, was married there, August 9, 1693. 

(II) Zachariah, son of Mordecai and Eliza- 
beth (Hawkins) Marks, was born in Derby, 
June 28, 1734, and died in Milford, August 



CONNECTICUT 



174X 



25, 1802. He located near the ".Marble 
Quarry," in Milford. and his land was di- 
vided by the Indian river. He died suddenly 
of "heart trouble," and left a good estate. He 
marrietl Mary Bryan, born in Milford, in 
1736, daughter of Richard and Sarah (Treat) 
Bryan, the former born in Milford in 1707, 
died there February 19, 1792, the latter born 
in Milford, June 6, 1699, died November 12, 
1748: granddaughter of Richard and Sarah 
(Piatt) Br}an, the former born in Milford in 
1666, died January 18, 1734, the latter born 
in Milford. September. 1(173: great-grand- 
daughter of Richard and Mary (Pantry) 
Bryan, the former born in England, the latter 
born in 1629, married in Milford in 1649; 
also granddaughter of Joseph and Frances 
(Br_\-an) Treat, the former born in Milford 
in 1662, died August 9, 1731. the latter born 
in Alilford in 1668, died in 1703; great-grand- 
daughter of Governor Robert and Jane 
(Tapp) Treat, the former born in England in 
1622. died July 12, 1710, the latter born in 
England in 1628. Children : Abraham, see 
•forward; Comfort, married Josiah Pardee: 
Content, married James Downs : Edward, 
probably died young. 

(HI) Abraham, son of Zachariah and Mary 
(Bryan) Marks, was born in A'lilford, No- 
vember 23, 1765. He inherited the home- 
stead and resided on it until his death. He 
was a very industrious man, a mechanic as 
well as a farmer, and there was a mill on the 
river at the rear of his house which he util- 
ized as a workshop in stormy weather. Some 
of his grandsons inherited this mechanical 
tendency and have achieved eminence in the 
manufacture of artificial limbs and kindred 
necessities. IMr. Marks owned a tract of 
land of about two hundred acres in the town 
of Bethany, and there he pastured his young 
stock, of which he had numbers, during the 
summer months. He was noted for his in- 
tegrity and for the stanch support he gave 
to the Protestant Episcopal Church, at which 
he had been a regular attendant and every 
Sunday within his memory, as he was fond 
of telling. He married Content, born in Mil- 
ford, September, 1768, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Buckingham) ]\Ierwin. John Mer- 
win was born in Milford in 1734 and was 
descended from Miles INferwin, born in Eng- 
land in 1623, died April 25, 1697: Elizabeth 
(Buckingham) jNferwin was born in Milford, 
April II, 1738, died in 1833. descended from 
Thomas Buckingham, born in England. Chil- 
dren : I. John, see forward. 2. Abraham, 
married Mary, a descendant of John Bur- 
well, a founder : he died young, leaving son 
Abram. 3. Nehemiah, went to Ohio at the 



age of twenty-one years, and married Clarissa 
Palniiter ; he prospered and left numerous de- 
scendants. 4. Content, accompanied her 
brother to Ohio, and married Cyrus Palmiter, 
of Stratford, isrother of her brother's wife. 
5. Levi, born in Milford, February 8, 1792, 
died February 21, 1880; lived on a farm in 
Waterbury twenty years, then removed to 
Bethany, where he spent the remainder of 
his life. His children were all born in Water- 
bury ; the three eldest attended the Academy, 
and all became teachers. He married, April 
18, 1813, Esther Tolles Tuttle, born in \\'ood- 
bridge, Connecticut, December 23, 1792, died 
in New York, January 12, 1858, daughter of 
.Amasa and Esther (Tolles) Tuttle, and a 
descendant of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, 
the immigrants. Children : i. Mary Esther, 
born October 20, 1814, died August 2, 1890: 
commenced teaching at age of sixteen years 
and was so successful that she continued in 
this occupation as long as her strength per- 
mitted her to do so ; she is well known as 
both a prose and poetical writer, the greater 
number of her writings have a religious ten- 
dency, and were productive of excellent re- 
sults, ii. Minerva Content, born May 18, 
1817, married January i, 1837, Elias Newton 
Clark, iii. David Beecher, born November 
9, 1819, married, in Hallsport, New York, 
November 9, 1846, Seraphina Helen Hall. iv. 
William Levi, born August 27, 1822. died 
March 10, 1832. v. Amasa Abraham, born 
April 3, 1825, married, in New York, August 
22, 1850, Lucy Ann Piatt, vi. Eliza Jennette, 
born July 13, 1828, married (first), January 
21, 1853, in New Haven, George H. Clinton, 
who died July 2, 1879, (second), December i, 
1881, Jairus F. Lines, who was graduated 
from Yale ]\Iedical School in 1862, received 
his commission from Governor Buckingham 
as assistant surgeon in the civil war. and con- 
tinued in service until the close of the war. 

(IV) John, son of Abraham and Content 
(^Merwin) Marks, settled in Harwinton, Con- 
necticut, and was a prosperous farmer. He 
married Anna Fenn (see Fenn). 

(V) Julia Ann, daughter of John and Anna 
(Fenn) ^larks, married Michael Bronson 
(Bronson VII). 

(The Fenn Line). 

(I) Benjamin Fenn. the immigrant ances- 
tor, was of great prominence in the affairs of 
Milford, as well as those of the entire colony. 
He was first of Dorchester and probably 
came to this country in 1630 in the ship "Mary 
and John," with Governor Winthrop. He 
served as assistant governor from 1665 to 
1672. He was the owner of large estates 



1742 



CONNECTICUT 



both here aiul in A\-lesbury, England, and died 
in 1672. He married (first) Sarah, who was 
baptized in Aston, Clinton, Bucks county, 
England, 1621, died 1663, daughter of Syl- 
vester and Sarah (Bryan) Baldwin. He mar- 
ried (second), March 12, 1664, Susannah 
Ward, or Wood, who died in 1675. Among 
his children were: Benjamin, married the 
only daughter of Jasper Junn, M. D. ; James, 
see forward. 

(H) Lieutenant James Fenn, son of Benja- 
min, was born JMay 14, 1672, and died in 
1754. He married Joanna Prudden, born in 
]\Iay, 1676, daughter of Samuel Prudden, born 
1644, who married, December 31, 1669, Grace 
Judson, born February 19, 165 1. Joanna 
(Prudden) Fenn was the granddaughter of 
Rev. Peter Prudden, who was born in Eng- 
land in 1600, died in July, 1666. He owned a 
good estate in Edgeton, York county, Eng- 
land, and for many generations his heirs re- 
ceived rents from the same. He came with 
Rev. John Davenport to Boston ; was in New 
Haven in 1638; in Milford in 1639, where he 
was the first pastor. He married, in Eng- 
land, Joanna Boyce, who died in 165 1. Will- 
iam Judson, grandfather of Grace (Judson) 
Prudden, was born in Yorkshire, England, 
and died in New Haven, Connecticut, July 
29, 1662. He came to New England in 1634; 
was first in Concord, then removed in suc- 
cession to Hartford, to Milford in 1639, to 
Stratford, to New Haven. He married Grace 

, who died in 1659. Joseph, son of 

W'illiam and Grace Judson, was born in Eng- 
land, in 1619, and died October 8, 1690. He 
was ensign and lieutenant during King Phil- 
ip's war, and deputy from Stratford in 1655. 
He married, October 24, 1644, Sarah, born 
in 1627, died ]\Iarch 16, 1697, daughter of 
John and Rose Porter. 

(HI) John, son of Lieutenant James and 
Joanna (Prudden) Fenn, was born in 1714. 
and died September 4, 1793. He married 
Susanna, born in 1727, died February 13, 1799, 
daughter of Gamaliel and Susanna Gibson. 

(IV) Isaac, son of John and Susanna (Gib- 
son) Fenn, was born in February, 1778, and 
died November 16, 1824. He married Anna 
Hotchkiss, born in 1788, died in 1872. 

(V) Anna, daughter of Isaac and Anna 
(Hotchkiss) Fenn, married John Marks, (see 
Marks IV). 



William Cheney, the immigrant 
CHENEY ancestor, probably born in Eng- 
land in 1604, was a very early 
resident of Roxbury, Massachusetts Bay Col- 
ony (now included in the city of Boston). 
One record fixes the date of his death as June 



30, 1667, and the church record gives it: 
Died, "1667, month 5 day 2, William Cheany 
Sen." The records show that he was a land- 
holder and resident at Roxbury before 1640. 
In that year or the year before he owned 
twenty-four and a half acres of land there, 
and there are land deeds which show that he 
possessed other tracts. His homestead lay 
in a bend of the old highway, now Dudley 
street, near its junction with Warren street. 
In 1645 the Roxbury Free School was found- 
ed, and the name of William Cheney is found 
on the list of subscribers to the school fund, 
also among the few who specially guaranteed 
the town the payment of their yearly contri- 
butions. Late in 1664 he was chosen a mem- 
ber of the board of directors, or "feofees," of 
this school. In 1648 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the board of assessors, and February 
23. 1653, as one of a committee to raise a 
certain sum for the maintenance of the min- 
ister. In 1654-55 he was one of the two 
constables, and January 19, 1656-57, was a 
member of the board of selectmen. May 23, 
1666, he was made a freeman of the colony. 
He was admitted to full communion of the 
cliurch, March 5, 1664-65, and his wife, April 

22, 1644. His wife was Margaret . 

After his death she married (second) a Mr. 
Burge or Burges, and was again a widow 
before 1679. She spent her last years in 
Boston, but was buried in Roxbury, July 3, 
1686. Children: Ellen, born in England 
about 1626; Margaret, married, April, 1650, 
in Roxbury, Deacon Thomas Hastings : Thom- 
as, mentioned below : William : John, Septem- 
ber 29, 1639, in Roxbury: Mehitabel, June i, 
1643, in Roxbury : Joseph, June 6, 1647, in 
Roxbury. 

(II) Thomas, son of William Cheney, was 
probably born in Roxbury, there being no 
record of his birth or death. January 29, 
1654-55, he was one of a committee appointed 
by the town to inspect the bounds between 
Roxbury and Dorchester. Somewhat later he 
selected a spot on the south side of the Charles 
river, within the limits of Cambridge at that 
time, but later included in Brighton, and made 
his home there. The deed of his earliest pur- 
chase of land is dated April 26, 1659 : his 
second, December 20, 1665 : his third, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1665-66. When the town of Cam- 
bridge divided the pasture lands. February 27, 
1664. he received ten acres and two cow 
commons ; in a later division, in 1683, he had 
five acres. In 1662 he was one of the sur- 
veyors of highways in Cambridge; in 1664 one 
of the signers of a petition to the general 
court for the conservation of Cambridge rights 
and privileges. He became a freeman, with 



CONNECTICUT 



1743 



liis father, May 2^, i66(). In 1O75 he scrvcil 
in Cai^tain john.son's cclcljralcd Rnxbury com- 
pany of soldiers, who marcheil from lloston, 
July 6, i()75, for Mount Hope, the stronghold 
of the Indians, and rendered very efficient ser- 
vice in December of that year. After his 
father's death, in 1667. he returned to Rox- 
bury to live with his mother, and continued 
there some years. April 13, 1684, three of 
his children, Thomas, John and William, 
"owned the covenant" in the Roxbury church. 
His last years were spent in Cambrid.i^e, and 
his will was dated November 6, 1693. at 
Charlestown. ]\rarch 4, 1694-95, the inventory 
of his estate, amounting- to one thousand and 
sixt_\'-four pounds, was presented by the widow 
and I\Ir. Fessenden. He married, January 11, 
1655, in Roxbur}-, Jane Atkinson, of whose 
birth and parentage no record has been found. 
She may have been a sister of Theodore At- 
kinson, of Boston, or a daughter of Thomas 
Atkinson, of Concord. She died, it is sup- 
posed, Julv 2g. 1724, in Cambridge. Chil- 
dren : Margaret, November 26, 1656, mar- 
ried Nicholas Fessenden, one of the most effi- 
cient and prosperous men of the town ; Thom- 
as, December 25, 1658; Mehitabel, February 
20, 1660; John, 1662; William, June 30, 1663; 
Mary, 1664: Jane, June 5, 1667: Joseph, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1670: Hannah, July 6, 1673; Benja- 
min, mentioned below ; Ebenezer, November 
2, 1678. 

(HI) Benjamin, son of Thomas Cheney, 
was born January 29, 1675, died July 13, 1718. 
He lived in Cambridge, and in 1718 conveyed 
to his brother-in-law, Josiah Cheney, of Med- 
field, certain lands in Cambridge, and all the 
interests which he or the children of his first 
wife might have in the estate of her father. 
In Cambridge he owned a homestead with 
house and barn and fifty-two and one-half 
acres of land, besides woodland, pasture and 
meadow lands. The aopraised value of his 
estate was nine hundred and forty-eight 
pounds at the time of his death, but a second 
appraisal, in 1726, gave considerably larger 
estimates. Administration on his estate was 
granted to his widow, January 9, 1718-19. 
He married ("first) his cousin Mary, daughter 
of Joseph Cheney, of Medfield, born June 23, 
1683, died October 31, 1705; (second), No- 
vember 14. 1706, ]\Iary Harbert, who survived 
him, and married (second) Michael Felsshaw, 
of Killingly, Connecticut, and she died May 
15, 1760, at Ashford, Connecticut. Children : 
Mary, born April 2t, 1701, died in infancy; 
Benjamin, September 7, 1703 ; Mary and Han- 
nah (twins), October 23, 1705 : Thomas, about 
1708: Joseph, November 2, 1710: Ebenezer, 
about 171 1, died about 1731 ; Ruth, born about 



1713; Jnhn, mentioned l)ek)w ; William, about 
1717; daughter, 1718, died liefore 1724. 

(IV) John, son of Benjamin Cheney, was 
born in Cambridge about 1715-16. He re- 
moved some time after marriage to Ro.xbury. 
The time is determined approximately from 
the date when the selectmen of the latter 
town "warned" him and his family, December 

28, 1750, a legal way by which a town se- 
cured itself against paupers. Both he and his 
wife were members of the church. He died 
intestate in 1758. The inventory of his per- 
sonal effects was presented at once, also an 
estimate of lands for which he had bargained 
with his brother, Colonel Thomas Cheney, 
rated worth two hundred and forty-two 
pounds thirteen shillings four pence. The 
will of his widow was dated March 18, 1781. 
He married (published), September 2. 1738, 
Martha, born February 29, 1719, daughter of 
Williain and Martha (Wyeth) Fessenden, of 
Cambridge ; she was also a descendant of 
Thomas Cheney through his daughter Mar- 
garet. Children: Mary, born before 1744; 
Thomas, mentioned below ; Lucy, January 9, 

1755- 

(\') Thomas (2), son of John Cheney, was 
born May 20, 175 1, in Roxbury, died May 20, 
1835. He went, when quite young, to live 
with his uncle. Colonel Thomas Cheney, of 
Dudley, and became almost a son to him. He 
lived in that part of old Dudley which was 
afterward included within the limits of South- 
bridge. He married, May 18, 1769, Eunice, 
born February 9, 1752, died February 18, 1833, 
daughter of Amos Gleason, of Charlton. 
Children : John, mentioned below : Thomas, 
born July 21, 1771 ; Sally, August 6, 1773; 
Mary, August 18, 1775 ; Lucy, January 18, 
1778: Leonard, March 18, 1780; Joel, March 
3, 1782; Hiram, March 3, 1784; Charles. No- 
vember 9, 1786: Eunice, July 22, 1789; Cla- 
rissa. July 31, 1791 : Hannah, May 12, 1793. 

(\T) John (2), son of Thomas (2) Cheney, 
was born November 19, 1769, in Sturbridge, 
Massachusetts, died at Xenia, Ohio, February 
2, 1858. During the early years of his mar- 
ried life, and for many years later, he lived 
in Rowe, -Massachusetts, then removed to 
Xenia, Ohio. He married (first), January 
12, 1794, Luria, born December 18, 1774, (sec- 
ond), June 1847, Isabel Morris, widow. Chil- 
dren: John, born January 25, 1796: Lura, 
August 16, 1798 ; Polly, July 26. 180T ; David. 
October 17, 1803 ; Lucy W., January 12. 1806; 
Laban Clark, mentioned below ; Eunice, March 

29, 1810, died December 17. 1826. 

(VII) Rev. Laban Clark Cheney, son of 
John (2) Cheney, was born March 20, 1808, 
in Southbridge, Massachusetts, died April 15, 



1744 



CONNECTICUT 



1864, and was buried at Xenia, Ohio. He 
entered the ministry of the ^Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, and preached at New Britain, 
Derby and other towns in Connecticut. He 
hved for some time in Vicksbiirg, Mississippi, 
where his eldest son was born ; later in New 
York City. He was chaplain of the Fourth 
Ohio Cavalry, a nine months' regiment; was 
discharged July 17, 1862. He married, No- 
vember I, 1831, Cynthia Jane Smith, of Derby, 
Connecticut, born April 13, 1813, died March 
3, 1864. Children: Benjamin Hicks, men- 
tioned below : Edward Olin, born and died in 
1840; Harriet Josephine, born February 7, 

1845- 

(V'ni) Dr. Benjamin Hicks Cheney, son 

of Rev. Laban Clark Cheney, was born Oc- 
tober 10, 1838, in V'icksburg. He was edu- 
cated at Amherst College in 1856 and lived 
first in New York City, afterward removed 
to New Haven, Connecticut. He is a prac- 
ticing physician of the homeopathic school. 
He is a member of the Connecticut Society of 
Arts and Sciences, also of the Graduates' 
Club of New Haven, and of the New Haven 
Country Club. He married, March 10, 1863, 
at Westport, Connecticut. Sarah Jane Austin, 
born at Newcastle, [Maine, August 27, 1841. 
Children: Benjamin Austin, born June 10, 
1867, now at Joliet. Illinois; Arthur Sand- 
ford, October 4, 1869, at New Haven ; Harold 
Clark. June 19, 1877: Alice Josephine, August 

5, 1879- 



Henrv Brooks, immigrant an- 
BROOKS cestor, settled in New Haven, 
Connecticut, about 1670, with 
his brother John. Subsequently they removed 
to Wallingford, and located in that part of 
the town which is said to have been named, 
Cheshire, for their former home in England. 
In the house of Henry Brooks was held the 
first religious meeting in Cheshire. 

(I) Simeon Brooks, the revolutionary an- 
cestor of this family, was born in 1740 and 
was descended from the Brooks family of 
Haddam and Saybrook, Connecticut. He and 
Samuel Brooks were in the Saybrook com- 
panv, commanded by Captain John Ely, Ninth 
Company, Sixth Regiment, Colonel Samuel 
Holden Parsons, in the revolution, in 1775. 
Simeon Brooks was also in Captain Stevens' 
company, Colonel Samuel Mott's regiment, 
in the northern department in 1776, and in 
Captain Bezaleel Bristol's company. Colonel 
Newberry's regiment, in 1777. In 1790, ac- 
cording to the first federal census, James and 
Simeon Brooks were heads of families in 
Saybrook, INIiddlesex county, Connecticut, and 
Simeon had in his familv two males over 



sixteen, two under sixteen and three females. 
He lived in Chester, which was formerly part 
of Saybrook. He married Lois Church, 
daughter of Simeon and Eunice Church, of 
Chester, in Saybrook. Her father was born 
in 1708, and died in Chester, October 7, 1792; 
her mother Eunice died July i, 1809, aged 
ninety. Children of Simeon and Eunice 
Church: Titus, lived at Pawlet, Vermont; 
Eunice, married Phineas ^^'arner ; Philemon, 
lived at Saybrook; John, lived at ^^■inchester ; 
Samuel, at Saybrook ; Lois, mentioned above ; 
, married Isaiah Huntley ; Simeon, set- 
tled in Rensselaerville, New York. (See 
N. E. Hist. Reg., \'ol. 46,. p. 88.) Simeon 
Brooks died -May 9, 18 19, in Chester. He 
had sons : Simeon, a prominent manufac- 
turer in Chester; Nathan, mentioned below; 
and other children. 

( 11 ) Nathan Brooks, son of Simeon Brooks, 
was born at Chester, January 23, 1789. He 
was a stone cutter by trade. He married 
Nancy A. Clark, daughter of Joseph Clark, 
who was a soldier in the revolution, a farmer 
in Chester, and a man of much ability. After 
his marriage Nathan Brooks lived for a time 
at Westbrook, Connecticut, and afterward set- 
tled in the lower part of Killingworth (now 
Clinton), where he followed his trade for 
many years. In 1839 he came to Guilford, 
where he made his home until his death at 
the advanced age of eighty-eight years. He 
was buried at Guilford. In early life he was 
a Democrat, in later years a Republican in 
politics. His wife, a woman of lovely Chris- 
tian character, also died and was buried at 
Guilford. Three of her thirteen children died 
in infancy. Children: i. Julius, born May 
19, 18 16, died February 2, 1849; married 
Louisa Griffin, daughter of James Needham 
Griffin, mentioned below ; children : Charles 
J. Brooks and George E. Brooks, both now 
reside in New Haven, Connecticut, and are 
engaged in business there, the manufacturing 
of special machinery. To Charles J. was born 
a daughter, Louise, now living ; to George 
E., a daughter, died young. 2. Zerah 
Clark, mentioned below. 3. Roxanna M., 
married George H. Chapman, of Saybrook, 
for many vears a merchant in Boston, resid- 
ing in Winchester, Massachusetts. 4. Cap- 
tain Oliver N.. born February 7. 1822. mas- 
ter mariner, in 1851, appointed keeper of 
Faulkner's Island lighthouse, receiving med- 
als for rescuing shipwrecked sailors : retired 
in 1882; went to Arch Beach, California, in 
1887, where he was postmaster: returned to 
Guilford in 1890: represented town in general 
assemblv in 1892-98 : married, January 4, 1846, 
Marv \L Hart; children: Oliver N., died 



CONNECTICUT 



1745 



j-Qiint:;; .Mary K., iiiarricil Henry I. Thrall, 
now of Cuba: and Nancy Amelia, married 
Edwin G. Hnsted. 5. Eliza ]■"., married James 
II. I'rince, of Winchester, Massachusetts. 6. 
Laura .A., niarrietl Frederick II. Fowler. 7. 
John G., born August 16, 1830; unmarried; 
drowned in Nebraska, June 30, 1859, on his 
way to California. 8. Julia A., married Rich- 
ard n. Woodward, a real estate broker, of 
Lonsi' Crancli, New Jersey. 9. Cynthia E., 
married Erastus H. Crosby. 10. Frances E., 
married R. H. Chipman, a coal dealer in New 
York City, residing in Philadelphia. 

(III) Zerah Clark Brooks, son of Nathan 
Brooks, was born in Chester, Connecticut, 
October 19, 1817. He was quite young when 
his father settled in Killingworth (now Clin- 
ton), Connecticut. From his father he learned 
the trade of stone cutting and stone mason 
work. Later he established a stone-yard in 
Clinton, and carried on the business of stone 
cutting and stone construction work up to 
within a few years of his death. He was a 
man of high moral standing, strict integrity, 
and was highly respected in his community 
and by all who came in contact with him. He 
died at the home of his son, James Weston 
Brooks, in Derby, Connecticut, May 14, 1903, 
and was buried at Clinton, Connecticut. He 
married, December 31, 1843, Susan Cecelia 
Griffin, of Clinton, Connecticut, born October 
23, 1823, daughter of James Needham and 
Jemima (Rossiter) Griffin. She was a woman 
of lovable disposition. She possessed bright 
intellectual qualities, a keen sense of humor 
and was beloved by all. She was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church in Clinton 
as was also her husband. She died March 25, 
1899. Children: i. John Henry, born Octo- 
ber 18, 1846, died April 17, 1851. 2. James 
Weston, mentioned below. 3. Ansel Jones, 
born November 16, 1853 ; married February 
10, 1880, Jessica Sturges, of Clinton, Con- 
necticut : no children ; he is president of the 
Huntington Piano Company, Shelton, Con- 
necticut, and a member of the board of di- 
rectors of the Sterling Company of Derby, 
Connecticut, piano manufacturers. 

(IV) James Weston Brooks, son of Zerah 
Clark Brooks, was born at Clinton, Connecti- 
cut, March 21, 1850. He attended the public 
schools of his native town, and the academy. 
He began his business career in the employ of 
Hull & Wight, manufacturers of ornamental 
tinware. Afterward, he was with the New 
Haven Organ Company of New Haven, and 
became an expert in tuning organs. For a 
number of years he had the contract for the 
tuning of the ^Monroe Organ Reed Company, 
of Worcester, Massachusetts. After a short 



absence in the west he returned to New Ha- 
ven in 1878, and was again with the New 
Flavcn (Jrgau Company, as a contractor until 
1884, then by recomiuendation of the Monroe 
Organ Reed Company, was engaged to devel- 
op and perfect the tone qualities of the Vo- 
calion Organ, the inventor of this organ, 
James Baillee Hamilton, having in several 
years of experimenting in Europe and a num- 
ber of trials in this country been unable to 
find anyone who could satisfactorily do this 
work, Mr. Brooks successfully completed this 
imdertaking in about one year, enabling Mr. 
Hamilton to form the Vocalion Organ Com- 
pany, in Worcester, and Mr. Brooks was 
placed in charge of the tuning and experi- 
menting department of their factory, which 
position he held until the latter part of the 
year 1887, when he resigned and came to 
Derby, Connecticut, under contract with the 
Sterling Company, piano manufacturers, in 
charge of the tuning department, and in Janu- 
ary, 1889, he was appointed to an important 
position in the office of that concern. In De- 
cember, 1894, the Huntington Piano Com- 
pany was organized at Shelton, Connecticut, 
and j\Ir. Brooks became secretary and gen- 
eral manager of the corporation ; also a mem- 
ber of the iDoard of directors. Largely through 
his efforts and executive ability this concern 
has grown rapidly and prospered greatly. Mr. 
Brooks makes his home at Derby. He is 
a member of the Board of Trade of Derby ; 
of the Derby and Shelton Business Men's 
Association ; the Linion League Club of New 
Haven ; the Golf Club of Derby ; Humphrey 
Ward Chapter, Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, of New Haven, as a descendant of Si- 
meon Brooks and Joseph and Reuben Clark. 
In religion he is a Unitarian, a member of 
the church at Derby and in politics a Repub- 
lican, He is past senior warden of Jephtha 
Lodge, No. 95, Free Masons, of Clinton. He 
served six years in the Connecticut National 
Guard, Company E, Second Regiment. 

Mr. Brooks married, April 13, 1870, Sarah 
Esther Piatt, born April 14, 1849, at Nor- 
walk, Connecticut, daughter of Nathan Bry- 
ant Piatt, of Huntington, L. I., New York 
(born December 26. 1800, died May 6, 1871), 
and Mary Jane ( Bixby ) (this name spelled 
Byxbee in deeds dated 1810) Piatt, of Norwalk 
(born JMarch 31, 1813, died February 21,1861), 
a relative of Sheriff Bixby of Meriden, Con- 
necticut. Nathan Bryant Piatt was a master 
mariner. Children: i. John, born May 5, 
1871, died May 8, 1871. 2. Edith Louise, 
born June 21, 1873. 3. James Ansel, born 
April 7, 1876, graduate of Sheffield Scientific 
School, Yale University, 1897 (Ph. B.), 1900 



1746 



CONNECTICUT 



(M. E.). For several years instructor in 
mechanical engineering at Yale, and now pro- 
fessor of mechanics at Brown University, 
Providence, Rhode Island. He is a member 
of Sigma Xi, American Society of !\Iechani- 
cal Engineers, American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, American Society 
for the Promotion of Engineering, Providence 
Universitv Clnb, president Rhode Island Aer- 
onautical Society. 4. Susan May, born Sep- 
tember I, 1878. 5. Grace Elizabeth Piatt, 
May 9, 1881. 6. Ethel Chapman. August 11, 
1884. 

( 'I'lie .\lden-MuIlins Line). 

(I) John .\lden, married Priscilla MuUins. 

(II) Elizabeth, daughter of John .\lden 
and Priscilla (Mullins) Alden, married Wil- 
liam Pabodie. 

(III) Lydia, daughter of ^\■illiam Pabodie 
and Elizabeth (Alden) Pabodie. married Dan- 
iel Grenell. 

(IV) Lydia Grenell, daughter of Daniel 
Grenell and L}-dia ( Pabodie ) Grenell, mar- 
ried Joseph Clark. (See Clark IV.) (Some 
of the Pabodie descendants use the form of 
Peabody for the family name, and it is now 
tlie most common ) . 

(The Clark Line). 

(I) John Clark settled in Cambriilge, IMas- 
sachusetts, 1632. He came to Hartford, Con- 
necticut, with Thomas Hooker's company in 
1636, and removed to Saybrook, Connecticut, 
about 1645, where his descendants settled. 
He was one of the company under Captain 
John Mason, who cair.e down from Hartford 
in 1637 and fought the Pequots at Mystic. 
He was one of the patentees to whom the 
Royal Charter was granted by King Charles 
II, which was hidden in the Charter Oak in 
Hartford by Captain Wordsworth. John 
Clark was one of the most influential men in 
the colony. He died in IMilford, Connecticut, 
in 1673. He married (first) : (sec- 
ond) Mary Ward Fletcher; no children by 
second wife. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) Clark, 
married Rebeckah Porter. 

(III) Major John (3), son of John (2) 
and Rebeckah (Porter) Clark, served in the 
French war in 1708-09, and was promoted to 
rank of major. He also served in King Phil- 
ip's Indian war. He married Rebeckah, 
daughter of William and Lydia ( Danforth) 
Beamont. 

(IV) Joseph, son of John (3) and Rebeck- 
ah (Beamont) Clark, married (first) Lydia. 
daughter of Daniel and Lydia f Pabodie) 

Grenell: (second) Priscilla . James 

W. Brooks is a descendant from Tohn 



Alden and Priscilla Mullins through the first 
marriage of this Joseph Clark. 

(V) Joseph (2), son of Joseph (l) and 
I^ydia (Grenell) Clark, married Parnell (Ship- 
man ?). 

(VI) Reuben, son of Joseph (2) and Par- 
nell (Shipman?) Clark, served in the revolu- 
tionary war, ranking as ensign. He married 
(first) Elizabeth Truby, (second) Prudence 
Wright. 

(VII) Joseph (3), son of Reuben and Eliz- 
abeth (Truby) Clark, was too young to enlist, 
and entered the army with his father Reuben 
as his servant ; later he enlisted and served to 
the end of the war. He married Ann South- 
worth. 

(VIII) Nancy A., daughter of Joseph and 
Ann (Southworth) Clark, married Nathan 
Brooks (see Brooks II). 

(IX) Zerah Clark Brooks, son of Nathan 
and Nancy A. (Clark) Brooks, married Susan 
Cecelia Griffin (see Brooks III). 

(X) James Weston Brooks, son of Zerah 
C. and Susan C. (Griffin) Brooks, married 
Sarah Esther Piatt (see Brooks IV). 

(The Rossiter Line). 

(I) Edward Rossiter came from England 
to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630, 
with Rev. John Wareham, and settled at 
Dorchester, Massachusetts. He had numer- 
ous descendants. 

(II) Bryan, son of Edward Rossiter, came 
to Connecticut in 1636, with others forming 
the Connecticut Colony. Fie became a dis- 
tinguished physician, and was prominent in 
public affairs. He removed from Windsor, 
Connecticut, to Guilford, Connecticut, about 
1652. 

(III) Josiah, son of Bryan Rossiter, was 
much engaged in public affairs, and was a 
member of the Upper House of Assembly 
1700-1711. Fie married Sarah, daughter of 
Hon. Samuel Sherman, of Woodbury, Con- 
necticut. 

(IV) Josiah (2), son of Josiah (i) and 
Sarah (Sherman) Rossiter, married Mary 
Hill. 

(V) John, son of Josiah (2) and Alary 
(Hill) Rossiter, married Jemima Bristol. 

(VI) John (2), son of John (i) and Je- 
mima (Bristol) Rossiter, married Submit 
Wright. 

(VII) David, son of John (2) Rossiter and 
Submit (Wright) Rossiter, married Abigail 
Buell. 

(VIII) Jemima, daughter of David and 
.Xbigail (Buell) Rossiter married James 
Needham Griffin. 

■ (IX) Susan Cecelia Griffin, daughter of 



CONNECTICUT 



1747 



James N. and Jemima (Rossiter) Griffin, 
married Zerah Clark Brooks. 

(X) James \\'eston Brooks, son of Zerah 
C. and Susan C. (Griffin) Brooks, married 
Sarah Esther Piatt (see Brooks I\'). 



(Ill) Theophilus Munson, 
i\lL'NSOX son of Samuel Munson (q.v.), 
was born September 10, 1675, 
died Xovember jS, 1747. He lived in New 
Haven, where he was a very prosperous and 
prominent citizen. For forty-five years he 
lived at the southwest corner of College and 
Wall streets, where PVesident Dwight now 
lives. His name appears continually in the 
Xew Haven records, and during his entire 
life he served the town in various official ca- 
pacities. By trade he was a locksmith or 
blacksmith, and also an extensive dealer in 
real estate. ■ April 29, 1701, he took the free- 
man's oath, and in 1703, his name was on the 
list of freemen in Xew Haven. In December, 
1705, he was chosen lister for the first time, a 
position to which he was elected several times 
later. December 26, 1709, he was made town 
treasurer. December 25, 1710, he was first 
elected sealer of weights and measures, a po- 
sition which he continued to hold for thirty- 
five consecutive years. In 1712-13-14-15-16- 
17, he was selectman: in 1718-19-20, deputy 
to the general court. April 3, 1719, he was 
admitted, with his wife, to communion of the 
First Church. March 16, 1720, he contrib- 
uted one acre of land for the benefit of Yale 
College. February 19, 1722, he bought the 
ancestral home on Grove street. In 1722 and 
1 73 1 he was chosen tythingman. In 1725 he 
was one of a committee to treat with the In- 
dians concerning the purchase of land. He 
was chosen a trustee of the Hopkins Gram- 
mar School in 1742, and served until his death 
in 1747. He was also prominent in the mili- 
tary affairs of the colony; sergeant in 1712; 
ensign in 1726, and captain in 1731. Early in 
his careeii 1696, he was granted land, and 
from then on was continually buying, selling 
or exchanging land. 

He married Esther, daughter of John Mix 
or Meeks. She died September 16, 1746, 
aged sixty-eight years. Her father was the 
son of Thomas and Rebecca (Turner) Meeks, 
the latter a daughter of Captain Nathaniel 
Turner. Theophilus Munson died November 
28, 1747. His will was dated March 29, 
1746, and proved December 28, .1747. The 
inventory of his estate was large, amounting 
to seven thousand two hundred and fifty-four 
pounds, nineteen shillings, six pence. Chil- 
dren born in New Haven : Elizabeth. Sep- 
tember 26, 1697, married Rev. Richardson 



Miner; Esther, November 8, 1O99; Israel, De- 
cember II, 1701 ; Martha, August 8, 1704; 
Daniel, January 12, 1708-09, mentioned be- 
low; Benjamin, March 28, 171 1; Theophilus, 
June 25, 1713; James, October i, 1715; Ann, 
January 4, 1717-18; Sybil, March 22, 1719- 
20; Lois, June 7, 1722. 

(IV) Daniel, son of Theophilus Munson, 
was born January 12, 1708-09, in New Haven, 
and was the first of the American Munsons to 
become a physician. He graduated from Yale 
College in 1726, and received the degree of 
A. M. in 1729. His father's will says: "Dan- 
iells Education & what he has Since Received 
of me is to be accounted equal to what I have 
given my two Sons Benjamin & Theophilus 
by Deed." 

Mr. Munson was rector of the Hopkins 
Grammar School in 1729-30. He lived in 
Xew Haven until 1740, and in 1736 was wit- 
ness to a conveyance by his father, which is 
recorded in that year. April 9, 1740, he bought 
in Stratford, Connecticut, two acres right of 
commonage. He became a member of Christ 
Church, Stratford, February 5, 1744. He 
married, April 27, 1730, Mary, daughter of 
Joseph and Sarah Gorham, of Stratford. She 
was born in Yarmouth, Maine, and after the 
death of her first husband, married (second) 
November, 1747. Benjamin Arnold. Her 
father was the .son of James Gorham, born 
April 2, 1650, the fourth of eleven children 
of Captain John Gorham, who commanded the 
Barnstable company in the great Swamp fight, 
December 19, 1675, at Narragansett. In this 
fight, Captain John Gorham contracted dis- 
ease from cold and exposure and died at 
Swansea, February 5, 1676. He came to Ply- 
mouth, in 1643, from Benefield, England, 
where he was baptized January 28, 1621. He 
was deputy from Yarmouth. He married De- 
sire, daughter of John Howland. who came 
over on the "Mayllower," and married while 
on board, Elizabeth, daughter of John and 
Bridget (Van .der Velde) Tilley, both "May- 
flower" pilgrims, and the last of the name. 
John Howland, father of Desire, was born 
1593, died February 23, 1673, and was the 
son of John Howland, of Newport, Essex, 
England. The latter was the son of John 
Howland. of London, baptized August 11, 
1541, and his wife Emma, daughter of Nich- 
olas Revell. John Howland, of London, was 
the son of John and Anne (Greenway) How- 
land, and John was the son of John Howland, 
citizen and Salter, London, making five gen- 
erations of the name, including the Pilgrim. 
Daniel Munson died June 21, 1746. Children: 
Kirk, baptized August i, 1 731, as Joseph Kirk 
Munson; George, July 21, 1740, Stratford; 



1748 



CONNECTICUT 



Sarah, November 21, 1742, Stratford; Daniel, 
April 4, 1745, Stratford. 

(V) Kirk, son of Daniel Munson, was bap- 
tized August I, 1 73 1, in New Haven, and 
married Margaret C., daughter of Elihu Cha- 
pin, who was the son of Japhet Chapin. The 
latter was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, 
October 15, 1642. His father came from Eng- 
land, 1638, and removed to Springfield, 1642. 
Kirk Munson lived in Huntington, Connecti- 
cut. His name was originally Joseph Kirk, 
and his son, originally named Joseph, added 
Kirk on removing to New Haven, where there 
was already a Joseph. Children : Anne, liap- 
tized July 16, 1758, Stratford; Sarah, baptized 
October 5, 1760, Stratford; Polly, married 

George Clark ; Is^aty, married H(5llis- 

ter, of Farmington ; Joseph (Kirk), men- 
tioned below. 

(VI) Joseph (Kirk), son of Kirk Munson, 
was born August 13, 1765. He married. Jan- 
uary I, 1786, Lucinda, daughter of John and 
Frances (Plum) Sears, of Milford. John 
Sears was the son of John and Elizabeth 
(Moore) Sears. Frances was daughter of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Bailey) Plumb. Her 
father, Joseph Plumb, was the son of John 
and Elizabeth (Norton) Plume, son of Robert 
and Mary (Baldwin) Plume, son of John and 
Dorothy Plume, son of Robert and Grace 
(Crackbone) Plume, son of Robert and Eliza- 
beth (Pursas) Plume, son of John and Eliza- 
beth Plume. Joseph (Kirk) Munson was by 
trade a shoemaker, and a farmer. He was a 
Congregationalist in religion. He lived in 
Milford and New Haven, Connecticut. At 
the age of thirteen, he is described as a drum- 
mer in Captain Joseph Birdley's company, in 
Colonel Whiting's regiment, five days in serv- 
ice, July 4. 1779. This was at the time of the 
New Haven invasion. According to one au- 
thority, he had served previously, October 5- 
27. 1777- He was living in Milford, in 1793, 
and in that }ear, October 30, bought a piece 
of land. In 1802, he sold land at "Stubing 
Plains." According to the records of the 
Second Church. Milford, the covenant was 
propounded to Joseph Munson and his wife 
"]\ larch 23, 1798. and later the church voted 
them a letter of recommendation to the first 
church in New Haven." He was a resident 
of New Haven, July i, 1808. In 1812 he pur- 
chased a lot with a dwelling-house on it, 
where he lived until 1822, when he sold the 
dwelling-house. In 1824 he sold the remain- 
der of this property, and probably went to 
live on land which he had purchased for a 
farm in 1821. It is supposed that he followed 
his trade of .shoemaker until about this time. 
During the next ten or twelve years, he seems 



to have engaged extensively in the buying and 
selling of land. He and his wife were admit- 
ted to membership in the North Church in 
April, 1810. In November, 1823, he was 
chosen pound-keeper. He died January 15, 
1841, and his wife February 21, 1848. His 
will was dated January 14, 1841, and signed 
by a mark, "On account of bodily suffering." 
The total value of his real estate was $4,355. 
Children: Margaret, born November lo, 
1787; Francis Plum, January 5, 1790; Charles, 
February 14, 1792, mentioned below; Han- 
nah, July 17, 1794; Phebe, December 15, 
1796; Mary, February 7, 1799; Lucinda, July 
26, 1802; George, February 11, 1804; Elihu 
Chapin. March 7, 1807. 

( VII ) Charles, son of Joseph (Kirk) ^lun- 
son, was born February 14, 1792, died June 9, 
1879. He served in the state militia in the war 
of 1 812, under Captain Joseph A. Bishop. He 
resided in New Haven, but for a time was in 
the retail shoe business in Newbern, North 
Carolina, in partnership with his brother. He 
also resided in Woodbridge, Connecticut, 
where he was highway surveyor in 1832-45- 
57; grand juror in 1835-36. He and his wife 
were members of the Congregational church. 
He married, April 11, 1815, Mabel Beach, 
born August 2, 1792, daughter of Benajah 
Beach. She died February 16, 1878. Chil- 
dren: Charles Newton, born April 30, 1816, 
at New Haven ; Edwin Beach, October 30, 
1817, mentioned below ; Francis. July 25, 1824, 
died March 7, 1825; Francis, July 15, 1827, at 
Woodbridge. 

(\TII) Edwin Beach, son of Charles Mun- 
son, was born at Woodbridge, October 30, 
1817, died August 15, 1879. He became an 
elector at Woodbridge in 1840. He became 
associated with his brother-in-law, Hon. N. D. 
Sperry, and Willis Smith, as masons and 
builders, and the firm lasted three years. For 
many years he was a railroad contractor and 
he superintended the construction of the ma- 
sonry and purchase of materials for the New 
Haven, New London & Stonington railroad 
in 1857-59. President Giles, in a letter about 
this work, said of him : "He not only equalled 
our expectations, but far exceeded them in 
aliility, energy and mechanical skill." Later 
Mr. Munson Ijuilt the Derby railroad. He be- 
came superintendent of the Fair Haven & 
\\'estville horse railway. His place of resi- 
dence was New Haven and in i860 he served 
in the common council. On the breaking out 
of the civil war, he raised Company K. Tenth 
Connecticut Regiment of Volunteers, and was 
commissioned captain, September 25, 1861. 
He was mustered into the service. October 3. 
1861, and remained until December 14 follow- 



CONNECTICUT 



1749 



ing, when he resigned. Captain Munson was 
a man of tine and imposing appearance and 
commanded the respect and esteem of his 
townsmen and all others who knew him. 

He married, June 3, 1S41, Amelia Cather- 
ine Sperry. of Woodbridge, born June 13, 
1822, daughter of Wvllis and Catherine 
(Ramsdell) Sperry. Children: i. Albert Le- 
roy, born March 24, 1842, connected with the 
National Folding Box and Paper Company of 
New York City ; was second lieutenant in the 
Fifth New York Artillery in the civil war, 
JMarch 5, 1862, first lieutenant, December, 
1862, and captain, March 15, 1865, and brevet- 
lieutenant colonel; married, April 4, 1891, 
Lizzie Mineur, born in Copenhagen, Den- 
mark, daughter of Flenry Mineur. 2. Henry 
Theodore, born March 26, 1844, lawyer of 
New York City ; was clerk in the New Haven 
postoffice, then in the patent office at Wash- 
ington and became principal examiner, resign- 
ing in July, 1S75, to engage in the practice of 
law in New York City; married, December 26, 
1876, Nellie Sarah Porter, born October i, 
1856, at Grand Rapids, Michigan, daughter 
of Lewis and Hannah (Gregory) Porter. 3. 
j\Iary Gertrude, April 18, 1846, married, 
June 20, 1867, Richard Henry Greene, a law- 
yer of New York City. 4. Kate Amelia, born 
August 15, 1849, in New Haven, married, 
September 7, 1869, Louis Hartman Todd, 
born September 14, 1839, son of James Laur- 
ence and Louisa Marietta (Hartman) Todd. 
5. Sarah Augusta, April 18, 1852, married, 
IMarch 21, 1882, Albert T. Candee. of New 
Haven. 6. Edward Benjamin, June 12, 1854, 
mentioned below. 7. Harvey Sperry, March 
3, 1837, associated with his brother, Edward 
B., in the manufacture of patented paper 
boxes ; has taken out numerous patents on de- 
vices used in the business ; secretary of the 
National Folding Box and Paper Company; 
married, February 11, 1886, Grace Louise 
Catlin : child, Marion Catlin, born August S. 
1887. 8. Harriet Eliza, March 16. 1859. 9. 
Emma ?\IabeI, March 25, i86-|, died .\ugust 2, 
1888. 

(IX) Edward Benjamin, son of Edwin 
Beach Munson, was born in New Haven, 
June 12, 1854, on what is now the northeast 
corner of George and West streets. Tn those 
days that was a farming section and the only 
road leading toward the city was Chapel 
street. He attended the old Webster school 
and from there went to the old Hillhouse high 
school, the building of which during the pe- 
riod of his attendance was demolished and the 
construction of the present building begun. 
School was held in the old state house during 
the progress of the improvements. He left in 



his sophomore year to begin his business ca- 
reer. As a boy he was ambitious and soon 
proved his business ability. He was carrier 
for the A'c7.i' Haven Courier when a yt)ung 
boy and later for the New Haven Palladium 
and he used to deliver papers at the factory on 
the corner of Williams and Bradley streets, 
among others, and this property afterwards 
was owned by himself and brother. Manv of 
his boyhood friends became prominent busi- 
ness men and distinguished in public life. A 
souvenir of that period of his life, something 
he prizes very highly, is a photograph of a 
baseball team of which he was a member and 
of which others also rose to positions of prom- 
inence in professional and business life. .\t 
the age of fifteen he was an errand boy in the 
store of Bradley and Pratt on the southwest 
corner of State and Chapel streets. From 
there he went to the firm of Kimberlv & 
Candee in the same line of business. The 
firm failed and instead of continuing in this 
business he refused a position and engaged 
with his brother, Harvey S. Munson, in the 
business of office stationery and supplies. The 
business was successful. Early in 1874 the 
young firm secured the New England rights 
to manufacture folding paper boxes from J. 
B. Osborn, of Newark, New Jersey. The 
very first order was for fifty thousand boxes 
for C. Cowles & Company, of New Haven, 
and the manufacturer could not fill the order, 
for want of facilities. The firm soon installed 
machinery to make the goods, and in 1875 the 
firm of jMunson & Company was established. 
The first location was on the top floor of a 
building on Artisan street, the 40x50 room 
serving as factory and office. Many difficul- 
ties due to the infancy of the industry and 
lack of capital were overcome, and in two 
years larger quarters were required and they 
took the whole of the top floor of the 
building. Later, the floor beneath was added, 
but it was not until 1878 that the busi- 
ness was really prosperous. Costly pat- 
ents had been bought and the product had 
been introduced to the trade, however. In 
1879, a die was perfected for the business, the 
efficiency of which was proved by the fact 
that it has since been in almost universal use 
without improvements. In 1881 larger quar- 
ters were again needed and the property at 
the corner of Bradlev and ^^'illiams streets, 
the old plant of the New Ha-ven Organ Com- 
pany, was purchased by the firm. In 1888 
another building was erected on this site, 40X 
SO, five stories high, and a structure connect- 
ing with the original building, which was 33X 
90 feet, and also five stories in height. Tlieir 
boxes found a ready market and from time to 



I750 



CONNECTICUT 



time new inventions were applied to increas- 
ing the product at less expense and in improv- 
ing the style and quality of the goods. In 
i8gi the business was consolidated with others 
in the formation of the National Folding Box 
and Paper Company. The real estate was re- 
tained by ]\Iunson & Company and is still 
owned by the firm. 

In February, 1896, owing to internal dis- 
sensions in the corporation, the iMunson 
Brothers withdrew from the National Com- 
pany and prepared to resume business. Mun- 
son & Company was then incorporated with 
Harvey S. Munson as president and Fdward 
N. Munson as secretary and treasurer. They 
started again in the same quarters where the 
business was first established on Artisan 
street. The new company found plenty of 
business and grew rapidly. In ]\Iarch. 1898. 
the present quarters on Clinton avenue were 
bought and transformed into one of the most 
convenient and up-to-date plants in the busi- 
ness. From the outset the business was pros- 
perous. The firm was peculiarly well-fitted 
to meet competition and hold its share of busi- 
ness. The partners possessed a thorough 
knowledge of the manufacture and sale of 
their product, both business and mechanical 
ability of a high order. The business is now 
conducted under the corporate title of The 
^ifunson Folding Box Company, with C. H. 
\\'ickham as president, E. B. ]\Iunson as trea- 
surer and H. Benjamin jMunson as secretary. 
The New York office is at 47 West Thirty- 
fourth street. Harvey Benjamin Alunson is 
.son of Edward B. Munson. The office and 
factory is at 385 Clinton avenue. He and 
two brothers formerly owned the Munson To- 
bacco Company, incorporated August, 1893, 
to manufacture the ^lunson continuous cig- 
arette machine. 

Edward Benjamin Munson is a prominent 
Free r^Iason. having taken the thirty-second 
degree, Scottish Rite ^Masonry. He is a mem- 
ber of Wooster Lodge, of New Haven : of 
Franklin Chapter, Royal Arch Masons : of 
Harmony Council, Royal and Select Masters : 
of New Haven Commandery. Knights Temp- 
lar, and the Lafayette Consistory. He is a 
Republican in politics and has served two 
terms in the common council of the city of 
New Haven, representing the eighth ward. 
He is a member of the Knights Templar Club 
of New Haven. He and his family attend 
the United Congregational Church of the Re- 
deemer. His residence is at 129 Lexington 
street. New Haven. 

He married. February 24, 1879, Josephine 
Etta, born July 13, 1856, daughter of Oscar 
B. Leavenworth, of New Haven. Children: 



I. Grace Amelia, born April 24, 1880, gradu- 
ate of Mrs. Cady's School, New Haven. 2. 
]\Iaude Josephine, November 22, 1881, gradu- 
ate of the same school. 3. Harvey Benjamin, 
December 20, 1884, associated in business 
with his father. 4. Ethel May, August 13, 
1892. 5. Thornton Sperry, January i, 1897. 

(II) John (2) Warner, eldest 
\\'ARNER son of John (,i-q.v.) and 

Anne (Norton) Warner, was 
born about 1645, ™ Hartford, or Farniington. 
probabh- the latter, and was reared in that 
town, appearing on the list of freemen in 1669 
and the list of proprietors in 1672, together 
with his father. He also subscribed to the 
articles of 1674 and made an effort to secure 
his right in the "W'aterbury estate," of which 
he was a pioneer. Flis name occurs in all the 
fence divisons and he is called "Senior" in the 
Waterbury records. He had recorded there, 
February 19, 1703, one and a half acres of 
land on which his dwelling then stood. He 
called himself "of Farniington'' in April, 1703, 
and again in 1706. In his will, however, 
dated Farniington, December 27, 1706, he 
speaks of himself as "of \'\'aterbury." He 
died soon after the latter date, in his sixty- 
third year, and the inventory of his estate was 
made in March, 1707. His real estate and 
homestead in Waterbury were given to his 
son John, and the latter with Samuel Bron- 
son, a son-in-law, were executors of the will. 
Children: i. John, born March i, 1670; was 
a physician in Westbury (now Watertown), 
and first deacon of the church there. 2. Eph- 
raini, mentioned below. 3. Robert settled in 
\\'oodbury, died 1759. 4. Ebenezer, a physi- 
cian, resided in Woodbury, where he died, 
1769. His grandson, Colonel Seth Warner, ar- 
rived with five hundred fresh troops at a crit- 
ical moment in the revolutionary battle of 
Bennington, turning threatened defeat into 
one of the notable victories of that struggle. 

5. Lydia, baptized March 13, 1680: married 
Samuel Bronson, and received by her father's 
will his "beds, bedding and household stuff'." 

6. Thomas, baptized May 6, 1683, probably 
died before his father. 

( III) Doctor Ephraim, second son of John 
(2) M'arner, was born in 1670. and died Au- 
gust I, 1753, in his eighty-fourth year. His 
first grant of land in Waterbury was on the 
northeast corner of Willow and Grove streets, 
made Januarv 21, 1690. on condition that he 
"should erect a house and co-inhabit it for four 
years." There he built his house and resided 
until 1701, his next house being on a plot of 
forty-two and a half acres on Ruck's Hill. 
This he exchanged February 21, 1704, for an- 



CONNECTICUT 



1751 



other house ami two lots of land. He received 
his forty pound right March iS, 1701, and 
soon after removed to Woodbury. In the latter 
town he was associated with his youui^er 
brother J'"benezer, who was also a physician. 
He continued practice there until April, 1714, 
when the town of W aterbury passed the fol- 
lowing vote : "The town, to encourage Dr. 
Ephraim Warner to come and live with us, 
grant him the use of the school land for 
three years (only one-half the lot in Hancox's 
meadow is exenii>t this year), he to maintain 
the fence." They also voted him ten acres 
in the "sequester" on the condition that he re- 
main four years. He is not called doctor on 
the records until December, 1706, and he 
probably removed to Waterbury in response 
to the vote above quoted, being then called a 
practitioner. After his return to that town he 
became one of its notable men, bought and 
sold real estate to a large extent, and was 
much engaged in public business. He appears 
to have settled on Buck's Hill with several of 
his sons, to whom he gave houses and lots. 
He served as townsman, school committee, 
town collector, deputy to the general court in 
May, 1 717, May, 1719, May and October, 
1720, and May, 1722. As early as 1722 he 
was chosen captain of the train band, being 
the second thus distinguished, and was mod- 
erator of the town meeting in 1730. His es- 
tate was first settled by agreement of the heirs, 
ratified by order of probate in 1762. Much of 
it had been given to his children during his 
lifetime. He married Esther, daughter of 
Obadiah Richards, of Waterbury. Children : 
I. Margaret, born February, 1693, died the 
following month. 2. Ephraim, October 29, 
1695, died when nine years old. 3. Benjamin, 
September 30, 1698; was a physican, called 
"Dr. Ben" to distinguish him from his father, 
and died in 1772. 4. John, mentioned below. 
5. Obadiah, February 24, 1703. 6-7. Ebene- 
zer and Esther, mentioned in probate records. 
(IV) Captain John (3), third son of Dr. 
Ephraim and Esther (Richards) Warner, was 
born June 24, 1700, baptized in Woodbury, 
May 23, 1703, and died at Plymouth, Con- 
necticut, September 7, 1794, in his ninety-fifth 
year. He was captain of the train band, dea- 
con of the First Church, and was one of the 
first settlers of Northbury (now Plymouth), 
Connecticut. The proprietors granted him 
one half of a bachelor lot, which was the 
fourth property lot, November 28, 1722. His 
father, with whom he then lived, gave him 
twenty acres of land and a house on Buck's 
Hill valued at "60 pounds money," in Decem- 
ber, 1724. He married (first) December 17, 
1724, Esther, daughter of David Scott. She 



dictl l-'ebruary 18, 1727, and he married (sec- 
ond) October 3, 1728, Mary, daughter of 
Thomas Hickox. There was no surviving is- 
sue of the first marriage. Children of second 
wife: Esther, born September 11, 1729, died 
.\ovember 4, 1730; I'hebe, born January 8, 
1731-32; Annise, January 13, 1734-35; James, 
December 11, 1737: Mary, October 9, 1742, 
died -April 21, 1745; Elijah, born ;\larch 21, 
1745-46. John, mentioned below. 

(\') John (4), youngest child of Captain 
John (3) and Mary (Hickox) Warner, was 
liorn October 14, 1749, in Plymouth, and died 
June 19, 1822, in his seventy- fourth year. He 
married, November 8, 1770, -\nne, daughter 
of Captain John Sutliff, the second settler of 
the wilderness in the Naugatuck \'alley above 
\\'aterbury, and the first in his immediate vi- 
cinity. Children: Chloe, born May 16, 1773; 
Martha, January 24, 1775; Eliel, October 28, 
1776: Aaron, March 6, 1779; Randal, men- 
tioned below; .\bijah, February 10, 1784; Da- 
vid, -April 19, 1786. 

( A 1 ) Randal, third son of John (4) and 
-Anne (Sutlifl:) W^arner, was born Septem- 
ber 28, 1781, in Plymouth, and died Novem- 
ber 26. 1853, in his seventy-third year. In 
18 1 5 he removed to Plymouth Hollow (now 
Thomaston) and built the house now stand- 
ing on what is commonly known as "War- 
ner's Corner," at the junction of the Water- 
bury and Litchfield and \\''atertown roads, one 
mile below the village of Thomaston. He 
owned and cultivated a large part of the es- 
tate of his grandfather. Captain John Sut- 
liii", and was one of the most prominent and 
extensive farmers in the county. For fifty- 
six years after his death the homestead was 
owned and occupied by his son, Frederick 
Eliel ^^"arner, for many years first selectman 
of the town and one of its leading citizens. 
He now resides in New York, and the home- 
stead is owned and occupied by Randal War- 
ner's grandson. Dr. Horace Seeley Warner. 
Randal ^^'arner married (first) November 24, 
1803, Ruth^ Atwater, who died November 
14, 1815: (second) February 5, 1817, Electa, 
daughter of Jonathan Alarsh of Winchester, 
Connecticut (see ^larsh A'). Children of first 
wife: Alerritt, born November 29, 1804, died 
1806; Alerritt, born 1807, died 1869; Randal 
A., November 8, 1815, died December 21, 
1855. Children of second wife: Ruth Ann, 
born December 17. 1817, died June 9,. 1823; 
Jonathan. May 8, 1820, died February 20, 
1821 : Jonathan Marsh, mentioned below; 
Ruth -Ann, Alay 13, 1824, died .August 6, 
1905; Frederick Eliel, March 7, 1820 (living 
April, 1911): Horace, May 21. 1832, died 
January 6, 1848. 



1752 



CONNECTICUT 



tVH) Jonathan Marsh, fifth son of Randal 
Warner and third child of his second wife, 
Electa Marsh, was born April 23, 1822, in 
Plymouth, and in early life was a carpenter 
and builder, devoting many years to clock- 
making, but most of his life was devoted to 
agriculture. He was town clerk and chair- 
man of the school board, and for many years 
was connected with the choir of the First 
Congregational Church, of which church he 
was a member more than sixty years. In 
1852 he built his home on the Waterbury 
road in Plymouth Hollow, on land given him 
by his father, adjoining the latter's estate on 
the site where his great-grandfather Captain 
John Sutlifif built his house. The original 
well dug about 1730, sixty-five years before 
the incorporation of the town of Plymouth, 
remains, the oldest and still the best well in 
the locality. Jonathan M. Warner moved into 
his house in November, 1852, and lived there 
until his death, January 13, igii, in his 
eighty-ninth }ear. The "Old Red House" 
.'5tood about ten feet north of the house now 
in use on the property, being removed soon 
after the latter was built in 1852. He mar- 
ried, June 2, 1851, Emily Virginia Seeley, 
born February 27, 1828, daughter of Dr. 
Lloyd and Elizabeth (Staples) Seeley, of Fas- 
ten (see Seeley IX). Children: i. Ada 
Louise, born April i, 1852; married Decem- 
ber 29, 1879, Joseph Frederick Klein, then 
assistant professor at Yale University, and 
now professor of mechanical engineering and 
dean of the faculty of Lehigh University. 2. 
Horace Seeley, mentioned below. 3. Florence 
Electa, December 7, 1859; now occupies the 
homestead known as "The Pines," on the site 
of the first house built in that section of the 
Nangatuck Valley by her great-great-grand- 
father. Captain John Sutliff. 4. Arthur Lloyd, 
January 19, 1863; now superintendent of the 
extensive machinery factory of Williams, 
White & Company, on the banks of the Mis- 
sissippi river, at Moline, Illinois. 

(VHI) Dr. Florace Seeley Warner, elder 
son of Jonathan M. Warner, was born Janu- 
ary 21, 1858, at Thomaston, then Plymouth 
Hollow. He attended the public schools of 
Thomaston, and entered Williams College, 
from which he was graduated with the degree 
of B. A. in the class of 1881. He studied 
his profession at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons of New York, where he was 
graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1884. 
On September 25, 1884, he married Carrie 
Stuart Crosby, born in Danbury, Connecti- 
cut, March 14, 1856, daughter of George 
Crosby, of New York, and Caroline Birchard, 
of Danbury, Connecticut. Dr. Warner was 



connected with the New York City Hospital 
for one year and the Post Graduate Medical 
School and Hospital for another year. He 
began to practice medicine at Thomaston, 
Connecticut. After two years there and two 
years at Collinsville, Connecticut, he removed 
to Atlanta, Georgia, on account of the ill 
health of his wife. After practicing for two 
years in Atlanta he went to Waterbury, Con- 
necticut, for a year. Since then he has lived 
and practiced in Brooklyn, New York, and 
also has an office at 220 Broadway, New York 
City. Dr. Warner is a member of the Kings 
County Medical Society, the New York State 
^Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. In politics he is a Republican. 
Dr. and Mrs. Warner have one child, John 
Birchard Warner. 

(IX) John Birchard Warner, son of Dr. 
Horace Seeley and Carrie Stuart ( Crosby) 
^^'arner, was born in Thomaston, Connecticut, 
July 6, 1886. He attended the public schools 
of Brooklyn, and the Polytechnic Preparatory 
School of Brooklyn, New York, graduating 
from the latter in 1906. In 1910 he gradu- 
ated from Amherst College with the degree 
of B. A., emu laiidc, and is now a law stu- 
dent at Columbia University. 

(The Seeley Line). 

(JV) Nathaniel (3), eldest child of Na- 
thaniel (2) Seeley (q. v.), and Hannah 
(Odell) Seeley, resided in Fairfield. 

(V) Nathaniel (4), son of Nathaniel (3) 
Seeley, was born 1701, and married Elizabeth 
Jackson. 

(\'l) Nathaniel (5), son of Nathaniel (4) 
and Elizabeth (Jackson) Seeley, was born in 
1726, and died in 1810. He married Reliecca 
Hubbell. 

(\TI) Ebenezer, son of Nathaniel (5) and 
Rebecca (Hubbell) Seeley, was born January, 
1761, and resided in Easton, Connecticut, 
where he died May 21, 1842. He married 
Anna Coley, born 1762, died April 14, 1813, 
in the fifty-first year of her age. Children : 
Uri, Elicnezer, James, Lloyd, Arthena, Eu- 
nice, Horatio N., Philander Horace .and 
Eloise. 

(\'III) Dr. Lloyd Seeley, fourth son of 
Ebenezer and Anna (Coley) Seeley, was born 
September 23, 1796, in Easton, and died in 
Georgetown, Connecticut, July 18, 1870. He 
entered Yale College, but did not graduate. 
He received a letter of recommendation from 
the Yale Medical School in 1820, having stud- 
ied one year and "equipped himself credit- 
ably," and the faculty "recommended him to 
the confidence of the public." He was an 
accomplished scholar and Latin student, a 



CONNECTICUT 



1/53 



iiK'ilical wriUT, ami l)t.'camc inie of the most 
successful auil uotcil physicians in the state. 
He was the autlu)r of a Scelc\- genealogy 
which was not ]niblislKxl, and whose niaiui- 
script clisa])])earcil after his death. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Staples, born March 15. 1796, 
at Easton. died May 13, iiS74. Children: 
Elizabeth, Horatio Nelson, Emily \'irginia, 
Jane, James and I\rary Louise. 

(IX) Emily X'irginia, second daughter of 
Dr. Lloyd and Eliza ( Staples) Seelew was 
born b^eliruary 27, 1828, in Easton. She was 
educated in the best private schools of that 
day, and was a brilliant conversationalist and 
a giftetl writer of poetry and prose. She mar- 
ried, June 2, 1851, Jonathan ^larsh Warner 
of Thomaston, Connecticut ( see Warner 
\'II). For nearly sixty years she occupied her 
home "The Pines" at Thomaston, noted for 
its hospitality, in a beautiful section of the 
Naugatuck valley. She died June 30, 1909, 
in the eighty-second }-ear of her age, idolized 
by husband and children. 

(The ]\Iarsh Line). 

(HI) Captain Jonathan Marsh, son of John 
(2) Marsh (q. v.), was born August 7, 1688, 
in Hartford, and was second on the list of the 
early settlers of New Hartford, Connecticut, 
being one of its first three selectmen. He 
went there to e.xplore in 1733 and removed 
with his family in 1736, settling on a hill 
"where he had a splendid view of hills and 
valleys," and died in 1783. He married (first) 
probably in 1714, Elizabeth, daughter of Cap- 
tain Joseph \\'adsworth, of Charter Oak fame. 
Her brother, Jonathan Wadsworth, had prev- 
iously married Jonathan Marsh's sister Hep- 
zibah, and from this marriage tlrrough Sam- 
uel, born 1716, Gurdon, 1748, came Gurdon's 
grandson, Gurdon Wadsworth Russell, M. D., 
author of "Up Neck,'" which vividly describes 
a part of Hartford, where many of the j\Iarsh 
and Wadsworth name have lived. Captain 
Marsh married (second) in 1723, Elizabeth, 
born December 26, 1704, in Windsor, daugh- 
ter of David and Lydia (Marsh) Loomis. 
She survived her husband and returned to 
Hartford, where she lived twelve years with 
her daughter Hannah, and died in 1795. Chil- 
dren : Jonathan, mentioned below ; Joseph, 
born January 18, 1717; Elizabeth,' baptized 
February 12, 1720-21 : Sarah (or Sarai), bap- 
tized June 28, 1724: John, baptized July 2, 
1727; Job. baptized IMarch 8, 1729-30; Moses, 
born 1731 : Eunice, born 1736; Lois, baptized 
October 28, 1742; Hannah, baptized October 
16, 1746. 

(IV) Jonathan (2), eldest child of Jona- 
than (r) and Elizabeth (Wadsworth) Marsh, 



was born in Hartford, and baptized there 
May I, 1715. Ele had just attained man's 
estate wdien he removed with his father 
to Xew Hartford, and was there a farmer, 
wheelwright and carpenter. He married, 
April 4, 1745, Theodocia, daughter of Lsaac 
Kellogg, one of the early settlers of New 
Hartford. She reared a large family, was an 
expert weaver, and several of her daughters 
did a large amount of weaving, as shown by 
an old account book still preserved. She died 
March 5, 1795, and was survived nearly seven 
years by her husband, who died January 12, 
1802. Children: Theodocia. born July 13, 
1747; Ruth, July 14, 1749: Chloe, November 
12, 1750; Mary, July 22. 1734: Jonathm, men- 
tioned below, Elizabeth, October 13, 1759; 
Ashbel, July 11, 1762. 

(V) Jonathan (3), elder son of Jonathan 
(2) and Theodocia (Kellogg) Marsh, was 
born March i, 1757, in New Hartford, and 
died there January 27, 1838. By trade he was 
a carpenter, and also engaged in farming in 
New Hartford, where he held various public 
offices, being selectman, often representative, 
and a member of the convention of 1818 which 
framed the present constitution of Connecti- 
cut. He married, about 1779, Damaris Pit- 
kin, born October 12, 1756, daughter of Ca- 
leb and Damaris (Porter) Pitkin. Children: 
Frederick, born September 18, 1780; Wyllys, 
September 23, 1782; Lucy, November 20, 
1784: Electa, February 18, 1787, died July 7, 
1789: Electa, born March i, 1789; Cynthia, 
October 16, 1791 ; Lois, October 28, 1792; 
Jonathan, October 18. 1795, died February 18, 
1796; Jonathan Pitkin, February 13, 1798. 

(\T) Electa, third daughter of Jonathan M. 
and Damaris (Pitkin) Marsh, was born 
March 1, 1789, near New Hartford, and died 
in Plymouth. February 1 ?, 186^. She mar- 
ried, February 5, 1817, Raridal Warner of 
Plvmouth (see Warner W). 



John Brooker, immigrant an- 
BROOKER cestor, is first found in Guil- 
ford, Connecticut, in 1695, 
with his wife Mary. It is probable that he 
was in Boston some time before he came to 
Guilford, as he contiiuied to transact business 
with the leading men of that city until his 
death. He is said to have been of East Guil- 
ford, and six of his children are recorded in 
Guilford but not the seventh. He bought land 
in Killingworth (now Clinton), in 1708, with 
"dwelling house, barn, orchard and other priv- 
ileges," for one hundred pounds. He was a 
shipwright by trade. His will was dated 1742, 
and his property, after all claims were ]iaid, 
was divided among his four sons or their 



1754 



CONNECTICUT 



children ; nothing is left to the fifth son, Ed- 
ward, or to his two daughters. He united 
with the old church in Killingworth in i/ii, 
and his wife Mary in 1714. Children, six 
born in Guilford: John, July 9, 1695; Orton, 
January 2, 1698: ^lary, July 5, 1699; Edward, 
January 7, 1701 ; Sarah, January i, 1703; 
Abraham, ]\Iarch, 1705, mentioned below; Ja- 
cob. 

(II) Abraham, son of John Brooker, was 
born in Guilford, ilarch, 1705. He married 
Mary , marriage recorded in Killing- 
worth. He remained in East Guilford (Mad- 
ison), until 1735. when he settled in Killing- 
worth ( now Clinton ) . He is called merchant 
in the deeds. He was taken suddenly ill and 
made his will, April 10, 1739, proved April 
16, 1739. By his will he gave to his sons, 
Isaac and Abraham, one hundred pounds 
each ; after providing for his widow he dis- 
tributed the remainder of his property equally 
among his two sons and three daughters. His 
estate, after paying his debts, amounted to one 
thousand seven hundred and eighty pounds, 
which was a large sum for those days. His 
widow married ( second) ^Matthew AlcCure, 
April 15, 1740, and they relinquished all prop- 
erty in favor of Abraham's children. Chil- 
dren: Isaac, born December 22, 1730; Mary; 
Sibyl; Abraham, August 17, 1736, mentioned 
below; Elizabeth, October 7, 1738. 

(III) Abraham (2), son of Abraham (i) 
Brooker, was born .Vugust 17. 1736. He mar- 
ried Tamar [Murry, of Guilford, October 12, 
1757. His marriage is recorded in Branford, 
where he was probably living at the time. His 
father died when he was three years old, and 
his mother and five children remained in Clin- 
ton for some years. He sold land left him by 
his grandfather on Chestnut hill. May, 1759. 
He was in the revolution ; term of service 
from July 16 to December 18, 1775; Captain 
Edward Shipman's company, sixth of Say- 
brook, Colonel Charles \A^ebb's, seventh regi- 
ment. He died in Wolcottville, his wife in 
Branford. Children : John, born March 29, 
1759; Mary, December 18, 1760; Chloe, mar- 
ried John Scoville : Sally, married Asher Sco- 
ville ; Samuel. 1774, mentioned below; Polly, 
married Roberts ; Eliza, married Wil- 
liam Wilson. 

(IV) Samuel, son of .\braham (2) 
Brooker, was born in 1774, in Killingworth, 
died in Torrington. Connecticut, in 1856. He 
came to the latter town when a young man, 
and married Mary Cook, of Harwinton, 
daughter of Oliver Cook. He purchased a 
farm, then lying in Litchfield, where he lived 
and died. He was a successful farmer by oc- 
cupation. His wife died in 1852. Children: 



Warren, July 27, 17 — ; Russell, December 29, 
1802; Ursula, October 17, 1804; Mary, July 
16, 1807, died July 23, 1812; Chester, Sep- 
tember 26, 1810; Samuel, April 13, 1813, 
mentioned below; Martin, April 5, 1816. 

(V) Samuel (2), son of Samuel (i) 
Brooker, was born in Torrington, April 13, 
1813, died there September 30, 1896. He was 
a farmer by occupation. He was selectman, 
and representative to the state legislature. He 
married, JMay 10, 183..1, Julia, born 1812, died 
1887, daughter of Samuel and Susan (Tay- 
lor) Seymour. Children : Maria Lucretia, 
born April 23, 1835, deceased; Albert Freder- 
ick, r^Iarch 10, 1837, mentioned below; Helen 
Eliza, October 10, 1839; Mary Jane, Septem- 
ber I, 1841, deceased; Frank Russell, March 
31, 1843, served in civil war for three years; 
Alice Josephine, married James Doughty, of 
Torrington; Arthur Seymour, February 3, 
1850, of Haddam, Connecticut; Ella Taylor, 
February 23, 1852, married Charles Brown, 
of Brooklyn, New York, deceased. 

(\T) Major Albert Frederick Brooker, son 
of Samuel (2) Brooker, was born at Torring- 
ton, March 10, 1837. He attended the public 
schools of his native town and the academy at- 
Norfolk, Connecticut, when William B. Rice 
was principal. He began his business career' 
with the Waterbury Brass Company, with 
which he remained two years. He returned to 
Torrington to engage in the meat and provi- 
sion business and continued in this line until 
the time of the civil war. He had enlisted at 
the age of eighteen in Company G, Fourth 
Regiment. Connecticut Militia, and had won 
promotion through the various grades to the 
rank of first lieutenant, and as captain of the 
company lived at Ansonia and was in com- 
mand of the company for some time. He en- 
listed in April, 1861, and was commissioned 
first lieutenant of Company I, Fourth Regi- 
ment of Connecticut \'olunteers, afterwards 
the First Connecticut Heavy Artillery, and 
was mustered into service at Hartford, May 
22, 1861. This regiment is said to be the 
first to enlist for three years or until the close 
of the war. For four years he was in active 
service, taking part in many severe engage- 
ments and acquitting himself with honor and 
distinction. He assisted in the defense of 
Washington on the south side of the Potomac 
river, went through the Peninsular campaign, 
including the siege of Yorktown, the Seven 
Days' fight under McClellan and bore a prom- 
inent part in the battle of Malvern Hill. He 
was commissioned captain of Company B of 
this regiment. May 26, 1862. His company 
and Companv M were ordered to Fredericks- 
burg, Mrginia, in General Burnside's com- 




rrgra-Jdly ChaiB.HMl.N.Y 



^^.F: BR. O OK.ER 



CONNECTICUT 



'/.1,T 



inaiid, and contiiuied lor a \ear and a hall in 
the Army of the i'otoniac. Among the many 
otlier engagements in w hich he took part were 
the battles of Chancellorsville and Petersburg. 
He was promoted to the rank of major. In 
May, 1864, the two batteries 15 and .M were 
ordered to Washington and there the\' joined 
the ten companies untler ( leneral Abbott who 
fitted out the siege train and was ordered to 
report to lieneral Benjamin F. llutler in the 
Army of the James, afterwards merged with 
the Army of the Potomac. 

In May, 1865, Major P)rooker resigned, and 
returning to Connecticut again engaged in the 
meat and iirovision business. He continued 
for two years, then he bought what was 
known as the Pine Grove property and cut 
the lumber, from which he built several 
houses to rent, and was a pioneer in investing 
in houses to rent in this section. In Septem- 
ber, i86g, he accepted a position with the 
Coe Brass Manufacturing Company, and was 
superintendent of that concern for nine years. 
Since then he has devoted his attention al- 
most exclusively to real estate. He is one of 
the largest owners of real estate in Torring- 
ton. He has also conducted a farm there. He 
has a very attractive residence which he built 
at Torrington in 1890, most admirably located 
with a fine view of the surrounding country. 
He has always taken a keen interest in local 
affairs. He has been selectman of the town 
and held other offices of trust. He is a sup- 
porter of the Congregational church, member 
of Seneca Lodge, Free and Accepted ^Masons, 
of Torrington. since 1863, and of L. \\'. Steele 
Post, Xo. 34, Grand Army of the Republic. 

He marrie'd, December 10, 1873, Alice ^l.. 
born February 5, 1852, died February 10. 
1898, daughter of \\'illiam and ^Mary (Todd) 
Cooper. One child, Julia Edna, born August 
6. 1876, married Dr. Austin C. Thompson, of 
Torrington. 



The pedigree of this family 
ADAMS traces the ancestry, according to 

one account to Ap Adam, the 
father of John or Lord Ap Adam, who was 
called to Parliament by Edward I, as Baron 
of the Realm, 1296- 1307, and states that he 
came out of the ^larches of Wales into De- 
vonshire. This statement has been discred- 
ited by genealogists, though proof of error 
seems as much wanting as proof of correct- 
ness. The lineage includes kings of England 
and France and goes back to Charlemagne. 

(I) Henry Adams, the immigrant ancestor, 
born in England, came from Braintree, Eng- 
land, to Braintree, Massachusetts, about 1632- 
33. He was allotted forty acres of land for 



the ten persons of his family February 24, 
1639-40. President John Adams, a descend- 
ant, believed that Henry Adams came from 
Devonshire, and erected a monument to him 
in the old burying ground at Braintree, now 
Ouincy, with this inscription: 'In memory of 
Henry Adams who took flight from the Dra- 
gon persecution in Devonshire, England, and 
alighted with eight sons near 2^Iount Wallas- 
ton. One of the sons returned to England ; 
and after taking time to explore the country, 
four removed to Aledfield, and two to Chelms- 
ford. One only, Joseph, who lies here at his 
left hand, remained here — an original pro- 
prietor in the township of Braintree.'' The 
monument commemorates ''the piety, humil- 
ity, simplicity, prudence, patience, temper- 
ance, frugality, industry and perseverance of 
the Adams ancestors." President John" 
Ouincy Adams, however, dissented from the 
conclusion of his father that Henry Adams 
was from Devonshire. Savage agrees with 
the younger Adams that the immigrant w-as 
of Braintree, county Essex, England, and 
some of the sons from Chelmsford in that 
county. It is generally believed that the wife 
of Henry Adams returned to England with 
the daughter L'rsula, and died there. Henry 
died at Braintree October 6. 1646. and was 
buried on the 8th. In his will, proved June 8, 
164-7. he mentions sons Peter, John. Joseph, 
Edward. Samuel, and daughter L'rsula. Chil- 
dren, all born in England : Lieutenant 
Henry, 1604, married November 17. 1643, in 
Braintree, Elizabeth Paine, settled in Med- 
field : Lieutenant Thomas, 1616: Captain 
Samuel, 1617: Deacon Jonathan, 1619; Peter, 
1622: John, about 1624: Joseph, 1626: En- 
sign Edward, mentioned below. 

(II) Ensign Edward Adams, son of Henry 
Adams, was horn in 1630, in England, and 
came with his parents to Braintree, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, in 1632 or 1633. He married (first) 
1652, Lydia. daughter of Richard and Asnes 
(Bicknein Rookwood. She died ]\Iarch 3, 
1676-77, and he married (second) 1678, 
widow Abigail (Craft) Ruggles of Roxbury. 
Massachusetts, who died in 1707. He mar- 
ried (third) January 6, 1709-10. Sarah Tay- 
lor. He settled with three other brothers in 
Medfield, ^Massachusetts. He was ensign and 
selectman, and represented the town in the 
general court, in 1689-92 and 1702. He died 
November 12, 1716, in Medfield, "the last of 
the original settlers." Children, born in Med- 
field ; Lydia. July 12. 1633: Captain Jona- 
than, April 4, 1655 ' John. February 18, 1657- 
58: Eliashib, February 18, 1658-59, married 
a great-granddaughter of ]\Iiles Standish : 
Sarah, Alay 29, 1660; Lieutenant James, Jan- 



1/56 



CONNECTICUT 



uary 4, 1661-62; Henry, mentioned below; 
Mehitable, Alarch 30, 1665 ; Elisha, August 
25, 1666; Edward Jr., June 28, 1668; JJethia, 
April 12, 1670, died 1672; Bethia, August 18, 
1672, died }-oung ; Abigail, June 25, 1675, 
died young; Aliriam, February 26, 1676-77, 
died young. 

(III) Henry (2), son of Ensign Edward 
Adams, was born October 29, 1663, in ]Med- 
field, and married (first) December 10, 1691, 
Patience, daughter of Thomas and Alary 
(Wight) Ellis. She was born February 22, 
1668-69, and died 1695. He married, 1697- 
1698, in Providence, Rhode Island, Ruth, sis- 
ter of Patience Ellis, born October 31. 1670. 
He married (third) Mrs. Hannah Adams, at 
Canterbury, Connecticut. He removed first to 
Providence, where he married his second wife 
and had several children born. Thence he 
removed to Canterbury about 1706. where 
he spent the rest of his life. He died there 
June 28, 1749. His last wife, Hannah, died 
March 20, '[748-49. His will, made Septem- 
ber 10, 1748, proved July 21, 1749, be- 
queathed to his wife the goods she brought 
with her, for her three daughters ; names his 
three sons David, Solomon and Ebenezer, 
giving to the first mentioned £20 and to the 
other two £10 each. To his three daughters 
Hannah Burnap, Ruth Kingsley and Patience, 
he gave £400 in bills of credit. A residue 
of his property was to go to Henry and Jo- 
seph, and his son David and son-in-law Abra- 
ham Burnap were named as executors. Chil- 
dren of first wife, born in Medfield ; David, 
September 3. 1692; Hannah, February 21. 
1693-94. Children of second wife, born in 
Providence: Solomon, April 23, 1699: Henry 
Jr., October 14. 1700; Ruth, April 10, 1702; 
Ebenezer and Patience (twins). February 11, 
1704; Joseph, July 28, 1706. 

(IV) Ebenezer, son of Henry (2) Adams, 
was born February 11, 1704, in Providence, 
and married, October 11, 1744, Elizabeth 
Sears. He settled in Becket, Massachusetts. 
Children : Ebenezer Jr., mentioned below ; 
Barnabas, born March 12, 1749, in Canter- 
bury. 

(V) Ebenezer (2). son of Ebenezer (i) 
Adams, was born August 19, 1746, in Can- 
terbury, and married, April 30, 1770, I\Iary 
Carpenter, of Becket. She was born July 9, 
1752; married (second) November 26, 1812, 
Ephraim Gibbs, of Blandford, Massachusetts. 
She died November 8. 1823. Ebenezer Adams 
settled in Becket, where he died April 19, 
1798. Durincr the revolution he was corporal 
in Captain William Watkins' company. Col- 
onel Benjamin Simon's Berkshire regiment: 
enlisted December 16, 1776, served two 



months and nine days ; was at Ticonderoga 
sick in camp February 25, 1777. In IMay, 
1782, he was allowed a bounty for killing a 
"woolf." Children, born in Becket : Elijah, 
March 27, 1773; Betsey, February 25, 1775; 
Ebenezer, January 3, 1777, died 1779; Ebene- 
zer, born July 2/, 1779; Elisha, mentioned 
below; Barnabas, October 29, 1784; Origen, 
October 6, 1786; jNIary, April or May 10, 
1790; Chester, June 6, 1792; John, May 7, 
1794; Flavia, May 20, 1796, died 1799. 

(VI) Elisha, son of Ebenezer (2) Adams, 
was born September 7, 1781, in Becket, and 
married, October 2, 1806, Betsey Hurd, born 
March 9, 1784. died before 1845. He was a 
farmer and died March i, 1845, ™ Becket. 
Children, born in Becket : William L., Au- 
gust 19, 1807; Eliza, May 28, 1809; Elisha 
Hurd, December 29, 181 1; Stephen Lorenzo, 
November 11, 1813; Chester Adrastis, men- 
tioned below; Minerva, August 19, 1818: Eb- 
enezer, January 11, 1822; Theresa, i\larch 12, 
1828; Henry, October i, 1831. 

(VII) Chester Adrastis, son of Elisha 
Adams, was born May 11, 1816, in Becket, 
and married, April 27, 1840, Catherine Wood- 
worth, of Suffield, Connecticut. He died in 
Suffield, February 19, 1866. Children, born 
in Suffield : Everett Hurd, April 7, 1844, 
died Mav 22, 1844: Julia Sophia, September 
2, 1845, 'died October 3, 1845: Dr. Clififord 
Burdett, mentioned below ; Catherine Adella, 
March 10, 1852; Dr. IMarshall Jewell, No- 
vember 6, 1864. 

(\TII) Dr. Clififord Burdett Adams, son 
of Chester Adrastis .Adams, was born Janu- 
ary 8, 1850, in Suffield, and married, Octo- 
ber 3, 1871, Georgia M., daughter of Thomas 
M. Sheridan, of Thompsonville. Connecticut. 
Children: i. Burdette Sheridan, April 19, 
1S73. 2. Clara Belle, February 7, 1875, mar- 
ried, November, i8g6, Wallace S. Moyle; 
children : Wallace Adams, Edgerton. Eliza- 
beth. 3. Clifford Irving. March 9, 1878, died 
young. 4. Matie Lucile. Octoljer 20, 1S80. 5. 
Georgia. July 20, 1882; died July 17, 1883. 
6. Ethel Marie, January 10, 1884; married 
Richard .Simpson ; children : Helen, Shirley. 

(IX) Dr. Burdett Sheridan Adams, son of 
Dr. Clififord Burdett Adams, was born at 
Tarififville. Connecticut, April 19, 1873. He 
came to New Haven with his parents when 
he was a year old, and attended the public 
and high schools of that city. In 1804 he 
began to study his profession in the Hahne- 
mann Medical College and Hospital, of Phila- 
delphia. Penn.sylvania. and was graduated 
there in the class of 1898 with the degree of 
M. D. He took post-graduate courses at the 
Philadelphia Lying-in Charity Hospital, and 



CONNECTICUT 



^7 hi 



was an interne at Grace Hospital, New Ha- 
ven, Connecticut, for a time, and also on the 
medical stalY tiiere. He has been in general 
practice in Xew Haven since 1898. He is a 
member of the Connecticut Homeopathic 
Medical Society, and one of its censors, and 
member of the Hahnemann JNIedical Society 
of New Haven. He belongs to Hiram Lodge, 
No. I, Free IMasons, of New Haven. He is 
an agent of the Connecticut Humane Society. 
He is a Congregationalist in religion, and a 
member of the Grand .-\venue Church. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

He married, April 5, 1899, ^lary Jane 
j\Iunson, born JMay 22, 1872, daughter of 
Hendrick Hudson Munson, of New Haven, 
and Emily Celestia (Todd), daughter of Am- 
brose and Jane (Cook) Todd (see Munson). 
Children : Clifford Ilurdett, born September 
27, 1900; Jarvis Munson, Februaiy 26, 1902; 
Chester Gordon, February 4, 1906. 

(The Munson Line). 

(I) Thomas [Munson, the immigrant an- 
cestor, was born in England, about 1612, and 
first appears in this country in 1637 as a 
resident of Hartford, who performed military 
service in the Pequot war, 1637. From that 
time he has a long and honorable record for 
civil and military service in the colonies of 
Hartford and New Haven. As a reward for 
his services in the Pequot war, he with other 
soldiers was allotted a large tract of land 
from the Soldiers' Field which had been set 
aside by the town for that purpose. This 
grant, which was one hundred acres, was not 
confirmed by the general court until May 13, 
1673. His house-lot, comprising two and one- 
half acres, stood on the east side of the pres- 
ent High street, opposite the head of Wal- 
nut. There was a house on this ground in 
February, 1641, which he had doubtless built 
himself. Previous to this date he had sold 
the place, and is mentioned in the records as 
having sold his allotment in the Soldiers' 
Field and as forfeiting other land on the east 
and west sides of the Connecticut river by 
removal. Before February, 1640, he had re- 
moved with other settlers to the neighboring 
settlement of Ouinnipiac. June 4, 1639, "^ 
Fundamental Agreement" was signed by 
sixty-three persons who had invested in the 
common property of the new town, providing" 
that church members only should be free bur- 
gesses and have the elective franchise. Tho- 
mas IMunson, as a prospective planter, was 
the sixth to sign the Agreement. April 3. 
1640, his name appeared on the records at a 
"Court" held on that date. June nth of the 
same year, he was made freeman. He 



was a member of the First Church as 
early as 1640 and had land granted him in 
the same year. In 1642 he was chosen ser- 
geant of the train band, which title he held 
tor nineteen years. In 1644 his name appears 
on a list of 182 inhabitants who took the oath 
of fidelity. During the next ten years his 
name appears frequently on the records, from 
which it is evident that he served the town 
in various capacities. He was placed on com- 
mittees to treat with the Indians, to appraise 
estates, and being a carpenter by trade, was 
given numerous building contracts. In 1655 
he became the leader in the movement of 
some of the townsmen, begun in 1651, to 
found a new commonwealth at Delaware Bay, 
but after several years' agitation the affair 
was given up, and he remained in New Ha- 
ven. In 1657 he was chosen selectman. In 
1659, when a colony school was started in 
New Haven, he was on a committee of four 
who were appointed to provide a house for 
the schoolmaster and a schoolhouse. April 29, 
1661, he was made ensign. June 6, 1662, he 
was one of the deputies for the town court, 
and ]\Iay 27, a deputy for the general court. 
After the union of New Haven colony with 
that of Hartford (1665), he was chosen dep- 
uty for the general assembly in Hartford, also 
in 1666 and 1669, and for every succeeding 
year up to 1683. In 1664 he was made lieu- 
tenant of the military company. August 7, 
1673, he was one of a committee of six called 
the Grand Committee, appointed by the gen- 
eral assembly for the defense and safety of 
the colony against the Dutch. During King 
Philip's War, 1676, he saw active service, and 
September 19, 1675, was in command of the 
New Haven forces which marched to North- 
field. December 20 of same year he was made 
first commissary, and February 25, 1676, he 
was appointed captain, and May 15, when it 
was decided by the court of elections that a 
standing army should be raised, he was chosen 
captain for JN^ew Haven county. In 1678-79- 
80-81-82-83 he was selectman, or townsman, 
besides serving the town in various minor ca- 
pacities. He married Joanna , born 

about 1610, died December 13, 1678. He died 
^'lay 7, 1685. and was buried on The Green; 
his monument may still be seen in the Grove 
street burial ground. Children: Elizabeth: 
Samuel, mentioned below; Hannah, baptized 
June II, 1648. 

(II) Samuel, son of Thomas Munson, was 
baptized August 7, 1643, and married, Octo- 
ber 26, 1665, IMartha, daughter of William 
and Alice (Pritchard) Bradley. After his 
death, between January 10 and March 2, 
1693, she married (second) 1694, Eliasaph 



1758 



CONNECTICUT 



Preston, born 1643, died 1707, schoolmaster, 
second town clerk, and deacon of W'alling- 
ford. She married (third) Matthew Sher- 
man. 

Samuel Munson was made a freeman of 
New Haven in 1667, and in 1670 was one of 
the founders of the new plantation of Wall- 
ingford, Connecticut. He signed the agree- 
ment relative to the founding of the same, 
and was assigned one of the original house- 
lots in the new town, besides a river or farm 
lot. April 6, 1671, he was present at the first 
town meeting, and April 29, 1673, ^'^o in 
1674, was chosen selectman. June 17, 1674, 
he was made drummer. October 19, 1675, 
during King Philip's war, he was chosen en- 
sign by the court at Hartford, and November 
25 colony agent. In 1679 he was chosen the 
first schoolmaster of Wallingford, and in 1684 
was made rector of Hopkins Grammar 
School. In the years 1676-80 he was auditor, 
and in 1677-78-80-81-92 he was lister. In 
1680-81 he was again selectman, and in 1692 
constable. The administration of his estate 
was given to his widow Martha and his son 
John. Children: Martha, born May 6, 1667; 
Samuel, mentioned below ; Thomas, ]\Iarch 12, 
1670-71 : John, January 28, 1672-73 ; The- 
ophilus, September 10, 1673 : Joseph, Novem- 
ber I, 1677; Stephen, December 5, 1679; 
Caleb, November 19, 1682 ; Joshua, February 
7, 1684-85 ; Israel, ]\Iarch 6, "1686-87. 

(Ill) Samuel (2), son of Samuel (i) 
Munson, was born February 28, 1668-69. and 
lived in Wallingford. He married ^lartha 

, who died January 7, 1707. and he 

married (second) March 10, 1708, Mary, 
widow of Caleb Merriman, daughter of Dea- 
con Eliasaph Preston. She was born April 
24, 1674, and died November 28, 175.5. He 
died November 23, 1741. In 1690 Samuel 
received from his father a deed of his dwell- 
ing house, barn, and one-half his "accommo- 
dations" in Wallingford. March 15, 1692, he 
was given by the town thirty acres of land 
gratis, and in 1696 was given liberty with 
five others to build a saw-mill. April 26, 
1698, he was chosen treasurer of the town, 
and in December of the same year auditor. 
In 1694-95, 1701 and 1704 he was chosen 
lister. He was townsman in 1709 and 1713. 
In 1710 he was made sergeant, and in Octo- 
ber, 1712, ensign. December 25, 171 1, he 
was chosen town clerk, an office which he 
filled continuously for twenty-nine years. His 
will was dated July 11, 1741, and his son 
Lent, who inherited the larger part of the 
estate, was executor. To his other sons Solo- 
mon, William, Waitstill and Merriman, he had 
already conveyed a full portion of land. The 



inventory of the estate was i 1,5 12 15s. 7. 
Children of first wife : Solomon, born Feb- 
ruary 18, 1689-90; Samuel, August 25, 1691 ; 
Mario, February 15, 1693-94; William, men- 
tioned below; Waitstill, December 12, 1697; 
Eunice, September 13, 1700; Obedience, Oc- 
tober 13, 1702; Catharine, June 3, 1704. Chil- 
dren of second wife : Tamar, December 5, 
1707; Lemuel. February 5, 1709; Merri- 
man, November 30, 1710; Mamre, December 
16, 1 712; Lent, November 16, 171 4. 

(IV) William, son of Samuel (2) Mun- 
son, was born October 13, 1695, and married 
Rebecca, daughter of Thomas Curtis, of Wall- 
ingford. He died July 21, 1773. He lived 
in Wallingford, now Cheshire, Connecticut, 
a mile and three-quarters north of Cheshire 
Green, on a farm which remained in his fam- 
ily for four generations. January 28, 1718, 
he purchased sixteen acres of land, and Feb- 
ruary I, 1726, the land bounded east by 
Honey Pot Brook, upon which he made his 
home. He had previously received land from 
his father, and in March, 1755, bought eleven 
and one-half acres in New Cheshire parish, 
and in December of that same year seventy 
acres in Farmington, and in 1757 twenty acres 
in New Cheshire parish. Before his death he 
made gifts of land to four of his five sons 
— ^^'illiam, Peter, Samuel and Amasa. Chil- 
dren: Martha, born April 2, 1729; William, 
July 5, 1731 ; Eunice, August 15, 1733: Peter, 
November 22, 1735 ; Hannah, September 6, 
1737; George, October 7, 1739; Samuel, about 
1741 : Amasa. January 27, 1741-42. 

(V) William (2). son of William (i) 
Munson, was born July 5, 1731, and married, 
February 28, 1753, Sarah, daughter of Isaac 
Griggs, of Wallingford. She was born June 
26, 1734, and died October 7, 1806. He died 
May 26, 1815. He lived in Waterbury, now 
Wolcott, Connecticut. There is a tradition in 
the family that after William's marriage he 
and his bride went away from home in a cart, 
and that his mother "hung en the cart and 
cried because they were going away into the 
woods and the bears would eat them up." 
In 1755 his father gave him thirty-three and 
one-half acres of land in Waterbury. In 
1760 he was living in East Branch, which was 
incorporated as Wolcott in 1796. In 1764 
he bought two pieces of land east of the town 
of \\'aterbury. fifteen acres bounded by Wall- 
ingford and Farmington roads, five acres 
bounded by Wallingford road. Later he sold 
some of this same land. A granddaughter of 
his states that he was in the revolution, and 
that he and his wife were members of the 
Congregational church in Waterbury, also 
that two or three of their children were bap- 



CONNECTICUT 



1759 



tized in the Episcopal church. Children: 1. 
Isaac, born July 24, 1754. 2. Elisha, October 
10, 1756. 3. Peter, January 20, 1759; saiil to 
have been a revolutionary soldier. 4. Henian, 
May 20, 1761. 5. Aaron, February 2, 1764; 
killed in battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1778; 
enlisted for a term of three years in Captain 
Smith's company, Eighth Regiment Connecti- 
cut Line, Colonel Chandler, December 3, 1777. 
6. Chloe, May 4, 1767. 7. William, Novem- 
ber 12, 1769. 8. David, July 30, 1772. 9. 
Seba, mentioned below. 10. Silvia, Ma\' 22, 
1778. 

(VI) Seba, son of William (2) 'Slunson. 
was born January 6, 1775, in Wolcott, and 
married, April 17, 1806, Abigail Pardee, of 
East Haven. She was born November 4, 
1779, and died March 24, 1852. ;\[arch 30. 
1797, he was an inhabitant of Waterbur\', and 
that date bought a small piece of land on 
the Cheshire road, with the buildings stand- 
ing thereon. He sold the same December 
6, 1805, and in January, 1806, purchased six 
acres in Hamden. He was admitted freeman 
in the latter place April 11, 1808, but evi- 
dently moved to East Haven in iSoq and 
made a small purchase of land there July 6, 
1809. He was a member of the East Haven 
militia during the war of 1812, but was never 
called into active service. By trade he was 
a shoemaker, also a farmer, and for over 
thirty years taught singing-school. He died 
July 19, 1861. Children: George Pardee, 
born ]\Iarch 12, 1807, in East Haven ; Lewis 
Griggs, June 15, 1808; Abijah ^loulthrop, 
mentioned below; Miranda Roseanna, Octo- 
ber 2, 1814: Sarah Ann, February 3, 1818. 

(VII) Abijah Moulthrop, son of Seba 
Munson, was born September 26, 181 1, and 
married (first) October 4, 1832, Zeruiah 
Forbes, who died May 15, 1847. He married 
(second) Mary C. Chamberlain, of Durham, 
Connecticut. She died April 5, 1891. He 
became a sailor at the age of fourteen, and 
followed the sea nearly sixty years. By 1839 
he was a captain and had coinmand of a 
schooner, the "Smith Baker," named from 
the ship-chandler who had presented her with 
a set of colors. He sometimes sailed to Great 
Britain, but usually to the Mediterranean, 
South America, the West Indies. In 1840 he 
bought one-fourth of an acre with buildings 
in Fair Haven village, where he lived when 
on land. His last years were spent at Fair 
Haven Heights, in the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. Smith. He was said to be "one of the 
ablest and most humane sea-captains who ever 
sailed from Fair Haven. Sailors were always 
glad to ship with him." He died April 19. 
1892. Children: Margaret Zeruiah, born 



August 21, 1833, died July 29, 1834; Georgi- 
anna Estella, May 31, 1841 : Hendrick Hud- 
son, mentioned below. 

(VIII) Hendrick Hudson, son of Abijah 
M. Munson, was born May 5, 1847, in l''^''' 
Haven, and married, November 11, 1868, 
Emily C. Todd, of the same place. He was a 
clerk by occupation, and lived in Fair Haven. 
He made one voyage with his father to 
Greece. He died November 9, 1888. Chil- 
dren, born in Fair Haven: Ambrose Abijah, 
September 3, 1869; Alary Jane, May 22, 1872, 
married Dr. Burdett Sheridan Adams (q.v.) ; 
Henry Hallett, February 3, 1880. 



The name Munroe is an an- 

MUNROE cient Scotch clan name, and 
has been variously spelt, 
"Monrow," "Munrow," ":\Iunroe" and "Mon- 
roe." 

(I) Donald Munroe. founder of the ancient 
House of Fowlis, was the son of O'Cathan, 
an Irish chief, and Prince of Fermanagh. He 
is supposed to have flourished towards the 
latter end of the reign of Malcolm II. King 
of Scots, to whom he rendered material aid 
in his contests with the Danish invaders of 
the country. For the services thus rendered, 
Donald received from the hands of his grate- 
ful sovereign the lands between Dingwall and 
the river Aneron, or Alness water. The lands 
received the name of "Fearann-Domhnuill," 
anglicized Ferindonald, that is, "Donald's 
land." :\. portion of them was subsequently 
erected into a barony called the Barony of 
Fowlis. Donald is supposed to have died 
about 1053, and to have been succeeded by 
his son, George i^Iunroe. through whom the 
family line continues. 

(li) George, son of Donald Munroe or 
Georgius de Munroe, is said to have assisted 
Malcolm III, "Ceann Mor," in his conten- 
tions with Macbeth for the crown of Scotland, 
between 1054 and 1057. According to tra- 
dition he lived to an advanced age and died 
about iioi, leaving a son, Hugh ]\Iunroe. 

(Ill) Hugh, son of George Munroe, is the 
first of the family to be designated "Baron of 
Fowlis." That barony has ever since formed 
the title and been the chief residence of the 
head of the house, which for nearly eight 
hundred years has existed in uninterrupted 
descent in the male line, a fact said to be un- 
exampled in the annals of Scotland or Eng- 
land, and only paralleled in the succession of 
the Lords Kingsale, Premier Barons of Ire- 
land. Hugh is said to have increased the 
family estates by the acquisition of the lands 
of Logie-Wester and Findon, Covmty of Ross, 
of which the Earls of Ross were at that time 



1/60 



CONNECTICUT 



the superiors. He died about 1126, and was 
succeeded by his son, Robert. 

(IV) Robert, son of Hugh Munroe, sec- 
ond baron of Fowlis, was a loyal subject of 
David I and Alalcolm IV of Scotland. Ac- 
cording to the family tradition he married 
Agnes, daughter of Angus Mor Macdonald 
IV, of the Isles, by a daughter of Sir Colin 
Campbell, of Glenurchy. This, however, can- 
not be true, from the fact that Angus Mor, 
who lived between 1255 and 1300, was not 
born in Robert's time, or for a century after, 
his death having occurred in the latter year. 
Robert died in 1164, and was interred in the 
Chanonry of Ross, which continued there- 
after to be the family burying place for more 
than four hundred years. He married and 
had among other children a son, Donald. 

_(V) Donald (2), son of Robert Munroe, 
third baron of the name, is said to have built 
the old Tower of Fowlis as early as 1154, 
during the life of his father. He is said to 
have served under William the Lion, when 
the latter came to suppress the lawlessness 
and rebellion which prevailed in Scotland, in 
1179, and to have rendered him material as- 
sistance at that time. He married and had 
the following children : Robert, his heir and 
successor : David, from whom it is alleged the 
family of Mackays, or ■■:\Iac Dhaibhidhs," at 
one time in Tarradale, were descended ; Al- 
lan, progenitor of the Mac Allans of Ferin- 
donald. Donald died in 1192 at his Tower 
of Fowlis, and was buried in the Cathedral 
Church of Chanonry. wliere the bishups of 
Ross had their Fpiscopal seat from prior to 
1 130 until the Reformation. 

(VI) Robert (2), son of Donald (2) Mun- 
roe, fourth baron of the name, married, be- 
tween 1 194 and 1214, a daughter of Hugh 
Freskvn de Moravia. He died in 1239, and 
was buried at the Chanonry of Ross, leaving 
among others a son George, who succeeded 
him. Robert is said to have married a daugh- 
ter of the Earl of Sutherland. 

(VIT) George (2). son of Robert (2) 
Munroe, was the fifth baron of the name, 
and the first of the family of whom there is 
any authentic historical record. He wit- 
nessed a charter by William Earl, of Suther- 
land, to the Archdeacon of Moray, dated 
1232-37, and had his Ross-shire lands con- 
firmed to him by a cliarter from .Alexander IT 
before 1249. He died about 1269, and was 
succeeded bv his son, Robert ]\Iunroe. 

(VUl) Robert (3), son of George (2) 
Munroe, was the sixth baron and was' placed 
under the guardianship of the earls of Ross 
and Sutherland until he attained his ma- 
jority in 1282. After 1290 Robert joined the 



party of Bruce, and continued steadfast in 
his support throughout the varying fortunes 
of that family. \Mien quite advanced in 
years, he raised his clan, and took part in 
the memorable battle of Bannockburn. Here 
his eldest and apparently only son was slain, 
along with many more of his followers. 
Robert lived for nine years after his return 
home, and died in 1323. 

(IX) George (3), son of Robert (3) Mun- 
roe, who fell at Bannockburn, had married a 
year before his death a daughter of the Earl 
of Sutherland, and had children as follows : 
George, who succeeded his grandfather; John. 

(X) George (4), son of George (3) ^Mun- 
roe, and the seventh baron was a steadfast 
supporter of the Bruce dynasty, and a firm 
upholder of the interests of his native coun- 
try. He was killed at the battle of Halidon 
Hill, in 1333. while fighting bravely at the 
head of his clan. He married a daughter of 
Hugh, Earl of Ross, and had a son, Robert, 
who succeeded him. 

(XI) Robert (4), son of George (4) Mun- 
roe, the eighth baron, succeeded his father 
when he was a mere child. During his min- 
ority, his estates were carefully managed by 
his Uncle John, who during his guardianship 
redeemed portions of the ancestral posses- 
sions which had been mortgaged by his an- 
cestors. He is mentioned in various charters, 
dated 1341-62-68-72. He married (first) 
Jean, daughter of Hugh Ross I, of Bal- 
nagowan, on record in 1350 and 1366, by his 
wife, Margaret Barclay, niece of Queen Eu- 
phemia. the second wife of Robert II, King 
of Scotland. By her he had one son. Hugh, 
his heir and successor. He married (second) 
Grace, daughter of Sir Adam Forrester, of 
Corstorphine. Children : Thomas ; John, 
who is mentioned in a charter dated July 22, 
1426; John, of whom nothing is known. Rob- 
ert Munroe was killed in a clan fight in 1369. 

(XH) Hugh (2), son of Robert (4) M\m- 
roe, was the ninth baron. He obtained sev- 
eral charters, dated 1369-70-94. He married 
(first) Isabella, daughter of John Keith, sec- 
ond son of Sir Edward Keith, great mare'schal 
of Scotland, by his wife, Mariotta, daughter 
of Sir Reginald Cheyne, of Inverugie. They 
had one son. George, the heir and successor. 
He married (second) Margaret, daughter of 
Nicholas (son of Kenneth, fourth Earl of 
Sutherland, and brother of William, the fifth 
Earl) by his wife Mary, daughter of Regin- 
ald le Cheyne and Alary, Lady of Dulfus. 
They had the following children : John, 
Janet, Elizabeth. Hugh Munroe died in 1425. 

(XIII) George (5), son of Hugh (2) 
jMunroe, and the tenth baron, is on record 



CONNECTICUT 



1761 



as "George Aluiiro of Fowlis" in charters of 
the years 1437-3S-39-40-49. lie was killed, 
with several members of his family and many 
of his followers, at the battle of "iJeallach- 
nam-brog," in 1452. He married (first) iso- 
bel, daughter of Ross of Balnagowan, by 
whom he had a son, George, who was killed 
with his father at the above-mentioned bat- 
tle. He married (second) Christian, daugh- 
ter of John MacCuUoch, of Plaids. Children: 
John, who succeeded to the estates and chief- 
ship of the clan; Hugh; William. 

(XIV) Hugh (3), son of George (5) 
Munroe, of Fowlis, by his second wife. Chris- 
tian, was the first of the Munroes of Coul 
and Balcony. His lands were in the parish 
of Alness, and he is on record in 1458. He 
is said to have married (first) Eva, daughter 
of Ewen Maclean II, of Urquhart, chief of 
the "Siol Thearlaich," who subsequently re- 
moved to and owned the lands of Dochgar- 
roch. Children : John, his heir and succes- 
sor; Hector; Andrew. He married (second)' 
Jane, daughter of Dugal Cattanach, of Craig- 
nish. Children : Alexander, Donald, Robert, 
George. He married (third) "a daughter of 
Keith Marschall's," by w'hom he had one son, 
John. 

(XV) John, son of Hugh (3) Munroe, des- 
ignated as "Mr. John Munroe of Balcony," 
studied for the church, and took his M. A. 
degree at Aberdeen University. In 1498 he 
was presented to the "A^icarage of Logie-Ur- 
quhard," apparently Logic- Wester and ITrqu- 
hart in the Black Isle. In 1551 Queen Mary 
presented William IMunroe, second son of Sir 
William Munroe, to the chaplaincy of Saint 
Monan, on the lands of Balconie, vacant by 
the decease of "Master John Monro." He 
married a daughter of Mackenzie, Strath- 
conon ; children: Inhn O^Ior, his heir and suc- 
cessor ; Hugh ; William ; Andrew ; David ; 
Donald. 

(XVI) John Mor, son of John Monroe. 
was the third of Coul and second of Balconie. 
He married Katherine, daughter of John 
Vass, of Lochslinn, by his wife, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thomas Urquhart, of Cromarty. 
Children: John, his heir and successor; 
Hugh ; Robert ; Farquhar ; David ; Margaret ; 
Catherine. Tohn Munroe died about t66o. 

(XVII) Farquhar, son of John Mor Mun- 
roe, married Catherine, daughter of William 
MacCulloch, of Badcall : Children : John, 
Robert. 

(XVIII) Robert (5) , son of Farquhar 
Munroe, married and had the following chil- 
dren : Robert, George, William, Sir Bene- 
dict, Elizabeth. 

(XIX) William, son of Robert (5) Mun- 



roe, was born in 1625, in Scotland. He 
fought at the battle of Worcester, was taken 
prisoner and banished by Cromwell, from 
London, November 11, 1O51, to Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, along with several others. He ul- 
timately settled at Le.xington, ^lassachusetts, 
where he married, and became the progenitor 
of a large family of Munroes. He married 
(first) about 1665, Martha, daughter of John 
George, of Charlestuwn, a prominent Bap- 
tist, who was fined, imprisoned, and finally 
ordered out of the town for heresy. Martha 
died before 1672, and in or about the same 
year he married (second) Alary Ball. She 
died in August, 1692, aged forty-one years, 
and he married (third) Elizabeth, widow of 
Edward Wyer, of Charlestown. She died De- 
cember 14, 171 5, aged seventy-nine years. 
Children of first wife : John, mentioned be- 
low ; Martha, born November 2, 1667; Wil- 
liam, October 10, 1669; George. Children of 
second wife: Daniel, born August 12, 1673; 
Hannah; Elizabeth; Mary, June 24, 1678; 
David, October 6, 1680; Eleanor, February 
24, 16S3; Sarah, ;March 18, 1685; Joseph, 
August 16, 1687; Benjamin, August 16, 1690. 

(XX) John (2), son of William ^Munroe, 
was born JMay 10, 1666. He was admitted to 
the church, February i, 1699. He subscribed 
to the building fund of the meeting house 
in 1692, and was on the tax list of 1693. He 
became a very prominent citizen, serving the 
town as assessor in 1699-1714-20: constable 
in 1700; selectman in 1718-19-26; treasurer 
of the town 1 718-19-20. He held many posi- 
tions of trust and honor. He was lieutenant 
of the militia there. He received a grant of 
nine hundred acres of land for his services 
in the battle with the Indians at Lamprey 
river, June 6, 1690. In addition to his many 
other oiflces and duties, he was sexton of the 
church and rang the bell for years in the first 
church in Lexington to call the worshippers 
to service. His death occurred September 14, 

1753. Fie married Hannah , who died 

April 14, 1753. Children: John, Hannah, 
Constance. Jonathan, William, Elizabeth, Su- 
sannah, Jonas, mentioned below, Martha, 
born December 6, 1710; IMarrett, December 

6, I7i,-^- 

(XXI) Jonas, son of John (2) INIunroe, 
was born in Lexington. Massachusets, No- 
vember 22, 1707. He was a lieutenant of the 
Lexington militia company. He married 
(first) June 3. 1734, Joanna, born February 
2. 1713, died September 17, 1748, daughter 
of Joseph and Mary (Mead) Locke. He 
married (second") 1750, Rebecca Watts, of 
Chelsea. He died November 9, 1765, and his 
widow married, April 19, 1773. John Muzzy, 



1762 



CONNECTICUT 



of Lexington, grandson of the first settler, as 
his second wife. Children of first wife : 
Jonas, born November 2, 1735; John, Febru- 
Liary i, 1737; Stephen, October 25, 1739; Jon- 
athan, May 25, 1742; Joanna, April 12, 1747. 
Children of second wife : Ebenezer, men- 
tioned below; Rebecca, born June 17, 1755; 
Martha, September 12, 1758. 

(XXII) Ebenezer, son of Jonas Munroe, 
was born April 29, 1752. He was a member 
of the Lexington "]\Iinute-men," turned out 
on the memorable 19th of April, 1775, and 
claimed to have fired the first shot on the 
American side. He also took part in the Jer- 
sey campaign, 1776, after which he retired 
with the rank of lieutenant. He 'was after- 
wards a settler at Ashburnham, where he be- 
came a prominent citizen, and where he died, 
May 25, 1825. He married, April 10, 1780, 
Lucy Simonds, of Woburn. Children : 
Charles, born September 12, 1781 ; Ebenezer, 
February 25, 1785; Jonas, mentioned below; 
John, October 4, 1793; Merrick, November i, 
1802; Lucy, November 4, 1803; Rebecca. 

(XXIII) Jonas (2), son of Ebenezer Mun- 
roe, was born May 27, 1790. He was an 
officer for two years, commanded the Light 
Infantry, and in 1824 removed to Rindge, 
New Hampshire, where he died May 9, 1849. 
He married. May 9, 181 5. Eliza Sargent, of 
Winchendon. Children : Jonas A., born Feb- 
ruary 4, 1816; James W., September 30, 
1824; Merrick A., mentioned below: Charles 
M.. January 7, 1831 ; George M., November 
4, 1832: Eliza D. 

(XXIV) Merrick Adams, son of Jonas (2) 
Munroe, was born February 27, 1828. He is 
still living in Middlebury, Vermont. He mar- 
ried, November 2, 1869, Henrietta Perez Ma- 
son. Children : Theodore Hapgood, men- 
tioned below : Charlie Andrews, born Febru- 
ary 9, 187s ; Henrietta JNIason, born April 24. 
1 88s. 

(XXV) Theodore Hapgood, son of Mer- 
rick Adams Munroe, was born in Boston. 
July 25, 1870. He attended the graded 
schools in Middlebury, Vermont, and after- 
wards ]\Tiddleburv College, for four years, 
class of 1S98. He was in general business 
for four years in Boston, as manager for a 
large New York corporation. He became as- 
sistant superintendent of the Rutland railroad 
for the purpose of extending the road from 
Burlington to Rouse's Point. He then came 
to Hartford, Connecticut, where he organized 
the Hartford Securities Corporation, August 
17. TO04. of which lie is now president and 
treasurer. He is a Republican in politics. He 
married Florence Filley. Child, Harriet, born 
March 26, 1907. 



Elder Thomas Dimock, the im- 
DIMOCK migrant ancestor, born in Eng- 
land, settled first in Dorchester, 
Massachusetts, in 1635, and was selectman of 
the town that year. He was admitted a free- 
man, May 25, 1636, and removed to Hingham, 
where he was living in 1638, and to Scituate 
in 1639, and finally settled in Barnstable, on 
Cape Cod, in May, 1639, of which town he 
was one of the grantees and founders. He 
was chosen ordaining elder of Mr. Lothrop's 
church there August 7, 1650, and was deputy 
to the general court and freeman of the Ply- 
mouth colony in 1639, magistrate in 1641-44, 
and six times a deputy, 1639-50 ; was lieuten- 
ant and drillmaster in 1645. He married, it 
is supposed, in Barnstable, Ann Hammond, of 
Watertown, Massachusetts, before his re- 
moval to the former town. She sur- 
vived him. He made a nuncupative will, was 
proved June 4, 1658, leaving all his es- 
tate to his wife, "for the children were hers 
as well as his." Children : Elizabeth, married 
Knyvet Sears ; Timothy, baptized January 12, 
1639, buried June 17, 1640: twin sons, buried 
March 18, 1640; Mehitable, baptized April 18, 
1642; Shubael, mentioned below. 

(II) Ensign and Deacon Shubael Dimock, 
son of Elder Thomas Dimock, was born in 
1644, and baptized September or December 
15, 1644. He removed to what is now Mans- 
field, Connecticut, among the pioneers in 1693, 
and had been before that a prominent citizen 
of Yarmouth on Cape Cocl, and selectman 
from Barnstable : ensign and deputy to the 
general court in 1685-86 and 1689. His name 
appears as one of the six founders engraved 
on the dedication tablet which appears on the 
First Church of Mansfield. His house at 
Mansfield is still in good repair, and occupied 
at last accounts. The house in which he lived 
at Barnstable was the fortification house that 
his father built and was taken down in 1800. 
It stood near the house lately owned by 
Isaac Davis of Barnstable, was two stories 
high, twenty feet square, the first story of 
stone, the upper of wood. He died October 
29, 1732, at Mansfield, in his ninety-first year. 
ITe married, April, 1663, Joanna Bursley, bap- 
tized March, 1645, '^^'^'^ ^t Mansfield, Rlay 8, 
1727, aged eighty-three, daughter of John 
Bursley. Children : Captain Thomas, born 
in Barnstable. April, 1664; John, June, 1666; 
Timothy, March. 1668 ; Shubael, September, 
1673 ; Joseph, September, 1675 ; Mehitable, 
1677: Benjamin, 1680: Joanna, 1682; Thank- 
ful, November, 1684. 

(III) John, son of Shubael Dimock, was 
born in June, 1666, and married, November 
1689, Elizabeth Lombard, or Lambert. He re- 




o / ^'/'^- / 




n'.n:^ ,-i-y^ ■ ' iJ- •^f.J...Vl. 



ji~^' /0 UyC^cJ 




CONNECTICUT 



1763 



iiiDved in ijwj to Ivilniuiilli, Massachusetts. 
lie was a fanner by occupation. Chiklrcn, 
born in Uarnstable: Sarah, December, 1690; 
Anna, 1692; Mary, 1O95 ; 'rhco[)hihis, 1696; 
Timothy, mentioned below ; iibenezer, Febru- 
ary, 1700; Thankful, April, 1702; Elizabeth, 
April 20, 1704; David, May 19, 1706. 

(IV) Timothy, son of John Dimock, was 
born in iCX;)8, and married, August 15. 1723, 
Ann, daughter of Joseph P.radford. The lat- 
ter was son of Major William, son of (.iov- 
ernor \\'illiam Bradford. He removed to 
Mansfield, Connecticut. Children, born in 
Mansfield: Ann, May 23, 1724; Captain 
Timothy, mentioned below ; John, March 24, 
1727-28; Joanna. August 28, 1730; Josiah, 
March 2, 1732: Simeon, September 19, 1735; 
died 1737-38; Sylvanus, June 18, 1738; Oli- 
ver, December 31, 1740; Dan, May 13, 1743. 

(V) Captain Timothy (2) Dimock, son of 
Timothy (i) Dimock, was born April 8, 1726, 
and married, March 11, 1749-50, his cousin, 
Desire Dimock, daughter of Ensign Thomas, 
"who was son of Captain Thomas, son of En- 
sign Shubael, son of Elder Thomas. He lived 
in Coventry, Connecticut. Children, from 
Coventry recferds : Eunice, born February 9, 
1753; Ann, September 15, 1754; Lois, May 12, 
1756; Desire, January 22, 1757; Sybil, March 
18, 1758; Lucy, May 22, 1760, died July, 
1779 ; Timothy, August 22, 1762 ; Daniel, men- 
tioned below; Mason, June 22, 1767; Rhoda, 
August 10, 1770; Roger, August 5, 1772. 

(VI) Captain Daniel Dimock, son of Cap- 
tain Timothy (2) Dimock, was born Febru- 
ary 20, 1765, and married, November 16, 
1786, Anne, daughter of Eleazer and Anne 
(Marsh) Wright, of Windham, Connecticut. 
She was bom February 20, 1765, and died 
January 26, 1832. He lived in Coventry, where 
he became a large landholder. He died Au- 
gust I. 1833. Children, born in Coventry: 
Anne, August 18, 1787; Parthene, April 9, 
1789; Lucinda, March 18, 1791 ; Sally, June 
23, 1793 ; Harty, December 24, 1794 ; Clara 
Maria, September 14, 1796: Eliza, May 24, 
1798 ; Dr. Timothy, mentioned below ; Desiah, 
March 31, 1802. 

(VII) Dr. Timothy (3) Dimock, son of 
Captain Daniel Dimock, was born in Cov- 
entry, April 17, 1800, and married (first) 
Mary Ann Moody, of Granby, Massachusetts, 
(second) Laura, daughter of Rev. Chauncey 
Booth, who died January 15, 1872. She was 
a woman of unusual abilities and good sense. 
He was educated at the common schools, and 
the Beacon Academy at Colchester, Connecti- 
cut. He received instruction also from Rev. 
Chauncey Booth, who was at that time pastor 
at Coventrv. He studied medicine in the of- 



fices of Dr. Chaunce)' Burgess, of Coventry, 
and Professor Jonathan Knight, of New Ha- 
ven, and graduated from Vale College, 1823, 
with the degree of M. D. After a few years 
practice at Granby he settled in 1837 in his 
native town and was a successful physician 
there for nearly forty-five years. His supe- 
rior mental endowments, good judgment, and 
faithful and self-reliant character made him a 
favorite with his patients and his brother 
physicians. He was a member of the Con- 
necticut State Medical Society, and in 1858 
was on its standing committee on examination 
for degrees. He was also for many years a 
regimental surgeon in the Connecticut militia. 
He was a member of the Connecticut legisla- 
ture in 1838, and senator for the 21st Dis- 
trict in 1846. In person he was tall, symmet- 
rical and prepossessing. He died April 20, 
1874. He left a large landed estate, which 
became the property of his son. Children, 
born in Coventry, of first wife: Daniel, M. 
D., served in civil war; two others. Of sec- 
ond wife: Mary Elizabeth, 1840, died 1842; 
Henry Farnum, mentioned below ; Maria Far- 
num, October 2, 1843, died August 13, 1861. 
(VIII) Henry Farnum, son of Dr. Timothy 
(3) Dimock, was born in South Coventry, 
Connecticut, March 28, 1842. He attended 
the public schools of his native town, was 
fitted for college at Ellington, Connecticut, and 
Williston Seminary, East Hampton, Massa- 
chusetts, and entered Yale College, from 
W'hich he was graduated with the degree of 
bachelor of arts in the class of 1863. In 1865 
he graduated with the degree of LL. B. from 
the Harvard Law School, and in the follow- 
ing year he was admitted to the bar and be- 
gan to practice his profession in New York 
City, and continued until his death. Not only 
in his profession did Mr. Dimock achieve 
great distinction, but in the financial and busi- 
ness world as well. He was president and 
director of the McCall Ferry Power Com- 
pany : director of the Boston & Maine railroad, 
the Dominion Coal Company, the Dominion 
Iron and Steel Company, the Knickerbocker 
Trust Company, and member of the advisory 
board of the United States Lloyds. In poli- 
tics he was active and prominent. He sup- 
ported the Democratic candidates and plat- 
forms, and was commissioner of docks of 
New York City six years, and a member of 
the important commission to devise plans for 
the government of cities of the state of New 
York, appointed by Governor Tilden in 1875. 
He was at one time oflfered a cabinet position, 
which he declined. He was a member of the 
Yale Corporation, the Society of IMayflower 
Descendants, the University, Manhattan, Met- 



1764 



CONNECTICUT 



ropolitan, Down Town, Barnard, Lawyers and 
Democratic clubs of New York City. His 
residence was at 25 East Sixtieth street, New 
York City, and his office at 60 Wall street. 
i\Ir. Dimock died April 10, 191 1. He left a 
bequest of $40,000 for the establishment at 
South Coventry, Connecticut, of the Booth 
and Dimock ]\Iemorial Library, in memory of 
his grandfather, Rev. Chauncey Booth, and 
father. Dr. Timothy Dimock. 

He married, September 5, 1867, Susan Col- 
lins Whitney, daughter of General James 
Scolly Whitney (see Whitney). Mrs. Dimock 
is one of the most prominent among the wom- 
en interested in the local and family history 
of this country, in historical research, and the 
preservation of records and historical sites 
and structures. She published the vital rec- 
ords of the towns of Coventry and Mansfield, 
Connecticut, thus setting a much-needed ex- 
ample in the state of Connecticut and giving 
to the genealogists and historians of the coun- 
try access to very valuable material. She is 
a member of the Society of Mayflower De- 
scendants and of the Society of Colonial 
Dames. As president of The George Wash- 
ington Memorial Association she is known 
throughout the country. This society was or- 
ganized in the city of Washington in Sep- 
tember, 1898, for the purpose of erecting a 
building to be known as the "George Wash- 
ington Memorial Building," in commemora- 
tion of our first president and his interest in 
higher education in America. ^Vashington 
often expressed the thought contained in his 
various messages to congress, and in his Fare- 
well Address said: "Promote, then, as an 
object of primary importance, institutions for 
the general diffusion of knowledge." He also 
urged "the promotion of science and litera- 
ture." 

This IMemorial Building is to be practical 
in plan and construction, and of the most dur- 
able character, planned so as to furnish a home 
and gathering place for national patriotic, 
scientific, educational, literary, art, medical 
and similar organizations. It will furnish a 
place where all patriotic societies both north 
and south may testify to their love for the 
Father of his Country. The building will 
contain a great hall or auditorium, and rooms 
for large congresses, rooms for small and 
large meetings, office rooms and students' re- 
search rooms. It is proposed to raise $2,000.- 
000 for the building, and $500,000 more for 
an endowment for maintenance, in order that 
conventions and societies may use the build- 
ing without rental. Senator Root says : "I 
know nf no better tribute to the memory of 
Wa,shington than to establish such an institu- 



tion in this city." President Hadley says : "It 
will certainly be a most worthy memorial to 
\\'ashington and one of which he would have 
approved most heartily." The board of man- 
agement of the Empire State Society, Sons of 
the American Revolution, passed a resolution 
December 3, 1909, heartily favoring the pro- 
ject. A similar resolution was adopted, De- 
cember II, 1909, by the board of managers of 
the Connecticut Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution. Other great organizations offi- 
cially endorsing the objects of the associa- 
tion are the American Federation of Arts, the 
Washington Academy of Science, the Associa- 
tion of American Physicians, the Association 
of Military Surgeons, the American Medical 
Association, etc. ]\Iany newspapers have 
given cordial support and wide publicity to 
the proposed ^^'ashington Memorial Hall, and 
there is no reason to doubt the ultimate suc- 
cess of its ambitious and patriotic plans. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Dimock was born a 
daughter, Susan Maria, November 18, 1869 : 
who married Cary Hutchinson, in 1900. and 
is now living with her mother in New York 
City. 

(The Collins Line). ' 

(I) Deacon Edward Collins, the immigrant 
ancestor, appears first in Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1638, when he was deacon of the 
First Church, and he was admitted a freeman. 
May 13, 1640. He brought with him from 
England his wife Martha- and several chil- 
dren. He lived for many years on the plan- 
tation of Governor Craddock in ■\Iedford, and 
finally purchased it. From 1654 to 1670, with 
the exception of the year 1661, he was deputy 
to the general court. Cotton Mather in his 
"Magnalia" speaks of Collins as the "good, 
old man, the deacon of the church at Cam- 
bridge, who has now gone to heaven." He 
died at Charlestown, Massachusetts, April 9, 
1689, aged eighty-six years. Children: Dan- 
iel, born 1629, merchant at Konigsberg, Prus- 
sia : John, 1633; Samuel, 1636, died in Mid- 
dletown, Connecticut, January 10, 1696: Sibyl, 
1639, married Rev. John Whiting, and (sec- 
ond) Rev. John Russell : Martha, September 
1639: Nathaniel, March 7, 1642: Abigail, Sep- 
tember 20, 1644: Edward, June 1646. 

(II) Rev. Nathaniel Collins, son of Deacon 
Edward Collins, was born March 7, 1642, in 
Cambridge, and died at ^liddletown, Con- 
necticut, December 28, 1684. He graduated 
at Harvard College in 1660, and was ordained 
pastor of the Middletown church November 
4, 1660. He had land granted to him Janu- 
ary 4, 1664. Of him, Mather says in the 
"Magnalia" : "There were more wounds given 
(by his death) to the whole colony of Con- 



CONNECTICUT 



1765 



necticiit in our New England tlian the body 
of Caesar did receive wlicn he fell wounded 
in the senate house." Nathaniel Collins mar- 
ried, August 3, 1664, Mary Whiting, who 
died October 25, 1709, daughter of William 
Whiting, lie died December 28, 1684. Chil- 
dren: Mary, born May 11, 1666; John, Jan- 
nary 31. 1OO8; Susannah, November 26, 1669; 
Sybil, August 20. 1672 ; Martha, December 
26, 1674; Nathaniel, mentioned below; Abi- 
gail, June 21, 1682; Samuel, April 10, 1683. 

(III) Rev. Nathaniel (2) Collins, son of 
Rev. Nathaniel (i) Collins, was born at Mid- 
dletown, June 13, 1681, and died February 6, 
1758. He was graduated at Harvard College 
in 1697, and was minister of the church at 
Enfield, now of Connecticut. He married, in 
1701, Alice Adams, who died February 19, 
1755, a daughter of Rev. William Adams, of 
Dedham, Massachusetts, and a descendant 
of Governor \\'illiam Bradford, who came in 
the "Mayflower." Children, born at Enfield: 
Abb. December 20, 1702; John, January 7, 
1704-05; Alice, February 10, 1706-07; Na- 
thaniel, August 17, 1709; William, mentioned 
below; Edw^ard. November 16, 1713; Alice, 
March 14, 1716. 

(IV) IDeacon William Collins, son of Rev. 
Nathaniel (2) Collins, was born at Enfield, 
June 20, 171 1, and died there in 1804. He 
married, ]\Iay 31, 1734, Anne Jones, born 
1714, died 1808. Children, born at Enfield: 
Ann, July 13, 1735; William, May i, 1737; 
Abi, died May 23, 1742 ; Jabez, born Decem- 
ber 9, 1744 ; Joseph, mentioned below ; John, 
September 14, 1749. 

(V) Lieutenant Joseph Collins, son of Dea- 
con William Collins, was born at Enfield, De- 
cember 25, 1747, and died there March 2, 
1829 (gravestone). He married (first) Grace 
Brown, born 1748, died 1789; (second) Abiah 
, born 1750, died March 3, 18 19. Chil- 
dren, born at Enfield: Grace, 1772; William, 
mentioned below; Elan, 1782; Elan, 1784: Dr. 
Lora, 1787, died June 19, 1819. 

(VI) William (2), son of Joseph Collins, 
was born in 1774, and died in 1869. He mar- 
ried Eunice Parsons, born 1774, died 1873. 
Children, born at Somers, formerly Enfield : 
Abiah, 1803, died 1814; Abigail, 1805, died 
1814; Elizabeth; William, born and died in 
1818; Laurinda, married General James S. 
Whitney (see Whitney). 

(The Whitney Line). 

(II) Richard Whitney, son of John Whit- 
ney, the American immigrant, was born in 
England, and baptized at Isleworth-on- 
Tliames, January 6, 1623-24. He was admit- 
ted a freeman ]\Iay 7, 1651, and was a pro- 



prietor of the town of Stow, Massachusetts, 
June 3, 1680, probably coming there when it 
was a part of Concord. He married, March 
19, 1650, Martha Coldam. For the reason that 
he was seventy years old he was released from 
military training, April 7, 1697. Children, 
born at Watertown : Sarah, March 17, 1652; 
Moses, August i, 1653; Johannah, January 
16, 1656; Deborah, October 12, 1658; Re- 
becca, l3ecember 15, 1659; Richard, mentioned 
below; Elisha, August 26, 1662; Ebenezer, 
June 30, 1672. 

(Ill) Richard (2), son of Richard (i) 
\\'hitney, was born at Watertown, January 
13, 1660, and died December 15, 1723. He 
resided at Stow, where he had a grant of 
land, October 24, 1682. His will was dated 
December 22, 1723. He married Elizabeth 
Sawtell, widow, daughter of Jonathan Saw- 
tell, of Groton, Massachusetts. She was born 
February 3, 1668, died November 24, 1723; 
married (first) 1 691, Joseph Morse ; (second) 
Benjamin Nurse (third) Richard Whitney. 
Children of Richard and Elizabeth Whitney. 
Richard, mentioned below : Jonathan, Febru- 
ary 26, 1699; Joshua, 1706; Hannah; Eliza- 
beth, married John Wetherby ; Sarah, 1703; 
Hepzibah, 1710. 

(R') Richard (3), son of Richard (2) 
W'hitney, was born in Stow, in 1694, and died 
April 27, 1775. He resided in Stow, and 
married (first) Hannah Whitcomb, born 1693, 
died November 17, 1743, daughter of Josiah 
Whitcomb, of Lancaster, (second, intentions 
daterl October 26, 1745) Flannah Ay res, wid- 
ow, born 1794, died September 27. 1775. Chil- 
dren: Mary, born November 24, 1715; Doro- 
thy, April 13, 1718; Hannah, May 29, 1723; 
Richard, July 31, 1725; Elizabeth, July 23, 
1728 ; Josiah, mentioned below ; Sarah, mar- 
ried December 23, 1769, Captain Hezekiah 
Whitcomb. 

(V) General Josiah Whitney, son of Rich- 
ard (3) Whitney, was born at Stow, October 
12, 1731, and died January 24, 1806. His 
parents deeded to him land in Flarvard, Sep- 
tember 2, 1746, and he settled there soon after 
his marriage. Flis house stood nearly oppo- 
site the present almshouse, until taken down 
in 1S69, after it had served the town forty- 
five years as an almshouse. Josiah Whitney 
in his day was the most prominent military 
man in Harvard, evidently inheriting an apti- 
tude for military afifairs. In the spring of 
1755 he was a soldier in the French and In- 
dian war in Captain William Pierce's com- 
pany. Colonel Whitcomb's regiment, at Crown 
Point, and also took part in the bloody battle 
at Lake George, September 8, 1755, when the 
gallant Dieskau, leading a large force of 



1766 



CONNECTICUT 



French and Indians, was signally defeated by 
the provincial forces under General Phineas 
Lyman. August 13-26, 1757, he was a mem- 
ber of the foot company commanded by Cap- 
tain Israel Taylor, marching as far as Spring- 
field upon the alarm for the relief of Fort 
\\'illiam Henry. He became captain of the 
younger company of militia at Harvard in the 
early seventies, and took an active part in the 
events that led up to the revolution, and was 
appointed one of a committee of ten to> in- 
spect breaches of the covenant signed by the 
inhabitants pledging themselves to resist Brit- 
ish invasion. In April, 1775, when the militia 
and minute-men were organized into an army, 
he was active in forming a regiment which 
Colonel Asa Whitcomb commanded, and of 
which he was lieutenant-colonel, the largest 
of the twenty-six Massachusetts regiments en- 
gaged in the siege of Boston. He was ap- 
pointed to take command of a battalion raised 
by the state April 10. 1776. Under date of 
October 29, 1776, he wrote to the Provincial 
Congress of Massachusetts, sitting at Water- 
town : "though the pay of the state was 
small, yet my zeal for the liberties of my coun- 
try was so great that I cheerfully undertook, 
etc." In July, 1777, the Massachusetts Coun- 
cil of War, suddenly aware of New Eng- 
land's peril, if the victorious progress of Bur- 
goyne's army were not checked, hurried rein- 
forcements to General Benjamin Lincoln, who 
was then harassing the rear of the invading 
army. Colonel Whitney ordered a draft of 
one-sixth of the training bands and alarm lists 
in his regiment to march at once with six 
days' rations to Bennington. A^ermont, and on 
August 2 ordered half the militia to follow 
with eight days' rations. He was chairman 
of a committee appointed by the town of Har- 
vard "to take into consideration the Articles 
of Confederation and Perpetual Union of the 
United .States of America Concerted on by 
Congress." The report urged the representa- 
tive to use his best efforts to support our in- 
dependence. In August and September, 1778, 
a more determined attempt was made by the 
Continental forces to wrest Rhode Island from 
the enemy, an attack by combined forces of 
French and Americans on land and water sim- 
ultaneously, being planned. The Second 
Worcester Regiment took part in this unsuc- 
cessful campaign under General Whitney. In 
1780 he was one of the two delegates to the 
state constitutional convention from Harvard. 
Joseph Stone was his colleague. At the close 
of the revolution he commanded the Second 
Worcester County Regiment, of which the 
seventh and eleventh companies were from 
Harvard. He was commissioned brigadier- 



general in 1783, but resigned before Shay's 
Rebellion and took no active part in it. In 
1782 he was appointed by the governor jus- 
tice of the peace for the county of Worcester; 
in 1783-84-87-88-89 he was a selectman, and 
during a long period of years was moderator 
of the town meetings, an office he filled with 
ability and to the satisfaction of his fellow- 
citizens. He was again a delegate to the state 
convention to ratify the federal constitution, 
held in Boston, January 9, 1788, and voted 
with the minority against accepting the consti- 
tution. He stated in the convention, however, 
that though he opposed it, now that the ma- 
jority had adopted it, he should support it as 
much as if he had voted for it. He was rep- 
resentative to the general court in 1780-81-87- 
88-89. He was a prominent member of the 
church, and the important place he was given 
in the seating of the meeting house shows 
that he was one of the foremost men of the 
town for many years. He died in Ashby. 

He married (first, intentions dated Septem- 
ber 9, 1751), Sarah Farr, or Farrar, born 
January 19, 1735, died April 21, 1773; (sec- 
ond) in Harvard, February 3, 1774, Sarah 
Dwelly, of Bridgewater. She died at Whit- 
ington, Vermont, February 18, 1817. By his 
first wife he had sixteen children, thirteen of 
whom died young, and had nine by his second 
wife. Children of first wife : Josiah, men- 
tioned below; Elizabeth, born May 7, 1755; 
Stephen, May i, 1757: infant, died June 4, 
1761 : infant, died May 10, 1762; infant, died 
March 16, 1763; infant, died February, 1766; 
infant, died February 18, 1768; five others. 
Children of second wife : Sarah, born April 
II, 1775; Oliver, January 9, 1777; Artemas 
Ward, November 17, 1778; Susanna, October 
2, 1780: Dwelly, August 2, 1782; Lemuel, 
September 19, 1784; Daniel, October 25, 
17S5 : John Hancock, December 13, 1788; Mo- 
ses Gill, February 4, 1791 ; two others, died 
young. 

(VI) Josiah (2), son of General Josiah (i) 
\\'hitney, was born February 25, 1753, and 
died January 2, 1827. He resided at iJarvard 
until soon after the revolution, when he re- 
moved to Nelson, New Hampshire, where he 
conducted a large farm the rest of his life. 
He was a soldier in the revolution, in a com- 
panv of minute-men from Harvard that re- 
s]ionded to the Lexington alarm, April 19, 
1775 : also in Captain Manasseh Sawyer's 
companv. Colonel Dike's regiment, Massachu- 
setts militia, in T776, at Dorchester Heights. 
He married, in Harvard, January 10, 1776, 
Anna Scollay. baptized April 18. 1758, died 
March 8, 1824. Children : Nancv, born 
April T2, 1777; Sally, June 26, 1778; Lois, 



CONNECTICUT 



1767 



March 15, 1781 : Stephen, mentioned Ik'Iow ; 
Lucy, married Asa Lawrence: James, l-'eiirn- 
ary 24. 17S2; James, Deeemlier (\ 1789; Ly- 
(Ua, July (>. 1795: Sc(5Ua\-. ( )ctul)er 6, 1798; 
lletsey, Jime 4, 1801. 

(\'II) Hon. Stephen W'liitney, son of Jo- 
siah (2) Whitney, was born at Harvard, July 
I, 1784, and died July 12, 1852. He resided 
at Conway, New Hampshire, but removed to 
Bloody Brook, Deerfield, Massachusetts. He 
was a prominent merchant and respected citi- 
zen, and represented Deerfield in the general 
court in 1S34-36. In 1834 he was monitor of 
the first division of the house and a member 
of the committee on accounts. He was also 
a monitor in 1835, and in the same year one 
of the commissioners havinsf charge of the 
building of the enlargement of the State 
Lunatic Asylum at Worcester. He married, 
January 13, 1810, Mary A. Burgess, born 
July 12, 1786. died at Saratoga, New York, 
in 1868, daughter of Dr. Benjamin Burgess 
of Goshen. Children : James Scolly, men- 
tioned below : Mary Ann ; Susan C, married 

James L A\'akeneld : Fanny J., married 

Pickering. 

(\'ni) General James Scolly Whitney, son 
of Hon. Stephen \\'hitney, was born May 19, 
181 1, and died at South Deerfield, Alassachu- 
setts, October 24, 1878. His early education 
was obtained principally from the instruction 
of his parents at home. At an early age he 
entered the store of his father as a clerk, and 
by his tact, industry and resourcefulness soon 
demonstrated superior business qualifications. 
When he came of age he purchased the busi- 
ness of his father and continued as a general 
merchant at Bloody Brook until 1838, when 
he removed to Conway, Massachusetts, and 
became a partner of his broth'er-in-law, Anson 
Shepard, in the firm of Shepard & Whitney, 
soon gaining a large and profitable trade. 
Charles Wells succeeded Mr. Shepard in the 
firm, and the name became Whitney & Wells, 
afterward, \\'hitney. Wells & Company. 

His public spirit and enterprise, general in- 
telligence and capacity, his tact in dealing with 
men and affairs, soon placed him in a position 
of prominence in the community. In 1843 he 
was chosen town clerk and continued in that 
office until 1852. He was frequently chosen 
as agent of the town in important matters, and 
in all cases was vigilant in attending to the 
interests of his constituents. He represented 
Conway in the general court in 185 1 -and again 
in 1854. It has been said that his vote elected 
Charles Sumner as United States senator. The 
legislature at that time was controlled by the 
memorable coalition of Democratic and Free 
Soil parties, and a part of the understanding 



that ])recede(l the coalition was that Sumner 
should be chosen senator, but several Demo- 
crats, of whom Whitney was one, refused to 
vote for Sumner. Whitney was a Democrat 
of the Andrew Jackson type, and always had 
the courage of his convictions. He was no 
friend of American slavery, but he was an 
ardent supporter of the constitution of the 
United States, and regarded the agitation of 
the slavery question in congress as detrimental 
to the peace and welfare of the country. He 
regarded Mr. Sumner as an anti-slavery agi- 
tator, and cast his vote some twenty or more 
times for a Democrat. Efiforts were then 
made to convince him that he was mistaken 
in his views of Air. Sumner's character and 
purposes. Apparently by accident, Mr. Sum- 
ner met Mr. Whitney in the state library for 
the purpose of an interview. General Whit- 
ney was assureil by Mr. Sumner that he was 
not disposed to play the part of an agitator, 
and the result of the interview was reason- 
ably satisfactory to Mr. Whitney, but know- 
ing that the Democrats of his town were op- 
posed to the election of Sumner and had ap- 
proved his course in opposing the coalition, 
he decided to refer the matter to them. He 
conferred with his constituents, who decided 
that he should settle the deadlock by voting 
for Sumner, and on the following ballot he 
cast the deciding vote, thus closing the contest. 
He was appointed sheriff of Franklin county 
in May, 185 1, and filled that office acceptably 
and efficiently for two years. He was a dele- 
gate to the state constitutional convention in 
1853 and took an active part in the proceed- 
ings, being one of the ablest and most useful 
members. In 1854 he was a prime mover in 
procuring the charter of the Conway Bank, 
of which he was a director as long as he lived 
in Conway. In the same year he was one of 
the founders of the Conway Mutual Fire In- 
surance Company and became its first presi- 
dent. But while he was thus devoting his 
time and abilities to the management of his ex- 
tensive private business and the affairs of his 
immediate vicinity, he was unexpectedly called 
to a new and more important field of public 
service. From early youth he had been inter- 
ested in military affairs, and it became his 
duty to reorganize the state militia, a work in 
which his father was also interested. He made 
such an excellent record that when onlv twen- 
tv-four years old he was commissioned briga- 
dier-general of the Second Brigade, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Militia, Fourth Division. A 
superb horseman, an efficient executive, he 
won the respect and confidence of both officers 
and men. By an Act of Congress, early in 
1854, the office of superintendent of the ar- 



1/68 



CONNECTICUT 



mory at Springfield, ?\Iassachusetts. was to be 
filled by a civilian, and President Pierce found 
the selection from candidates for the place 
difficult. Without the knowledge of Gen- 
eral Whitney he was recommended by Caleb 
Cushing, then a member of the president's 
cabinet, who had been associated with Air. 
Whitney in the legislature, and the position 
was oflered to Mr. Whitney and accepted. He 
took charge October 19, 1854, and his ap- 
pointment and administration proved alike 
satisfactory. A testimonial, consisting of an 
elegant silver service, was presented to him 
by the otificers and armorers, March 3, 1S60. 
He introduced great improvements i-n the 
buildings and grounds, machinerv and guns, 
and brought peace, order, harmony and good 
feeling to the armory and community, where 
previously bitter controversies had raged. Al- 
though a staunch Democrat himself, he kept 
politics out of the management of the armory. 
From Springfield he went to Boston, March i, 
i860, as collector of the port by appointment 
of President Buchanan, and his administra- 
tion of the custom house was efficient and sat- 
isfactory, but it was cut short by the success 
of the Republican party in the election of i860. 
President Lincoln, according to custom, ap- 
pointed a Republican in his place. He re- 
sumed his business career and became con- 
nected with enterprises of large extent and 
importance. For some years and at the time 
of his death he was president of the Boston 
Water Power Company and of the Metropoli- 
tan Steamship Company, the outside line to 
New York City. 

But his political career did not end with his 
retirement as collector of the port. For many 
years he continued an active Democratic lead- 
er in the state. He had been Democratic can- 
didate for state senator in 1840 and for elect- 
or-at-large in 1852. In 1856 he was a dele- 
gate to the Democratic national convention 
that nominated Buchanan in i860; he was del- 
egate-at-large to the Democratic national con- 
vention at Charleston, and in the division that 
followed he supported Breckinridge. In 1872 
he represented the First Norfolk district in 
the state senate: in 1876 he was chairman of 
the Democratic state. convention that nominat- 
ed Charles Francis Ada'ms for governor, and 
of the convention in Faneuil Hall in 1878 
where- Josiah G. Abbott was nominated for 
governor in opposition to General Benjamin 
F. Butler, who was nominated by a faction 
of the Democratic party in a convention at 
Worcester. On that occasion he made an 
able and powerful speech that attracted much 
attention. He died suddenlv. October 24, 
1878, having until the hour of his death en- 



joyed excellent health. "In all the active and 
bu,sy walks of life," writes one who knew him 
well, "as well as in the quiet home circle, his 
conduct was most exemplary. No question 
was ever raised, no doubt was ever suggested 
as to his integrity and honor in his dealings 
with his fellow men, either in public or private 
capacity. He was temperate in all his hab- 
its, and the open avowed friend of temper- 
ance and good order, of industry and econ- 
omy and of all the virtues that tend most to 
promote the prosperity and true welfare of a 
community." His home, after i860, was at 
the corner of Beacon and Pleasant streets, 
Brookline, Massachusetts. 

He married, at Somers, Connecticut, No- 
vember 25, 1836, Laurinda Collins, born July 
6, 1810 (see Collins). Children: i. Mary A., 
born September 16, 1837: unmarried, resides 
in Brookline. 2. Henry Melville, born Octo- 
ber 22, 1839; educated in public schools and 
Williston Seminary : clerk in his father's store 
and in the Conway Bank and Bank of Redemp- 
tion, Boston : clerk in the naval agent's office ; 
engaged in shipping business in New York 
City, and in 1866 became Boston agent of the 
Metropolitan Steamship Company, of which 
he gained control ancl became president in 
1879: successful operator in real estate in 
Brookline and Boston : prominent factor in 
consolidating the street railroads of Boston 
and forming the West End Street Railway 
Company, which developed into the present 
Boston elevated system : president of the 
Never-slip Horseshoe Company, the Glouces- 
ter Steamship Company, the Asbestos Wood 
Company, King's Asbestos Mines, the Ameri- 
can Asbestos Company, director of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad Company and of the Amer- 
ican Express Company : former president of 
the Boston Chamber of Commerce: member of 
the Algonquin and Exchange Clubs : former 
chairman of the park commission of Boston ; 
for years one of the foremost Democrats of 
Massachusetts, candidate for lieutenant-gov- 
ernor and in 1907 for governor : married, in 
Brookline, October 3, 1878, Margaret Foster 
Green, born December, 1856, daughter of .Ad- 
miral Green, U. S. N., children : Ruth Bow- 
man, born December i, 1879: Elinor Green, 
January 18, 1881 : Laura Collins, June 20, 
1882; James Scolly, June 20. 1886: Margaret, 
April, 1891. 3. Hon. \\'illiam Collins, born 
July 5, 1841 : graduate of Yale College, 1859: 
studied law at Harvard, and became a suc- 
cessful and prominent lawyer in New York 
City, in partnership with Henry F. Dimock, 
his brother-in-law : active in the campaign that 
resulted in Governor Tilden's election : became 
corporation counsel of the city of New "N'ork ; 



CONNECTICUT 



1769 



prominent in Ueniocralic national politics, and 
was appointed Secretary of the Navy by Pres- 
ident Cleveland, and is generally credited with 
laying wisely the foundation of the modern 
steel navy; died February 5, 1S93 ; married 
Flora, daughter of United States Senator 
Henr_\' B. Payne, a distinguished capitalist. 
4. Susan C. born March 27, 1845 • niarried 
Henry Farnum Diniock (see Dimock). 



(Ill) Joseph Wilcox, son of 
WILCOX Obadiaii Wilcox (q.v.), was 
born in East Guilford, after- 
wards ^.ladison, Connecticut, in 1694, died 
July 15, 1770. He married. 1722, Hannah 
Goodale, of Long Island. Children, born in 
Madison; Timothy, May 27, 1724; Joseph, 
mentioned below: Elizabeth. September 17, 
1728; Jehiel, June 12, 1731 ; Hannah, Septem- 
ber 15. 1733. (The family name also appears 
as Wilcoxon in early generations. ) 

(IV) Joseph (2), son of Joseph (i) Wil- 
cox, was born in East Guilford, May 27, 
1726, died April 2. 1808. He married (first) 
September 17, 1754, Sarah, born February 10, 
1729, died September 8, 1782, daughter of 
James iNIunger; (second) 1784, Prudence 
Dudley, born 1742, died April 15. 1804. Chil- 
dren, born in East Guilford: jMabel, i\Iay 
25, 1756; Abel. 1760: Joseph, mentioned be- 
low; Sarah, June 14. 1773, died November 
27, 1863. 

(V) Joseph (3). son of Joseph (2) Wil- 
cox, was born in East Guilford, 1763, died 
November 2. 1826. He married, 1783, Olive, 
born 1757, died November 9, 1835, daughter 
of Abraham and Mary (Bishop) Doud. Her 
father, Abraham Doud. born 1718, died 1801, 
was son of Abraham Doud, born 1691, died 
1756, and Jane Doud. his cousin, born 1682. 
died 1748. daughter of John Doud. born 1650, 
died 1713, who married Sarah Tallman, in 
1679. Abraham Doud Sr. was the son of 
Thomas Doude. who f'ied in T713, married, 
1678. Ruth Johnson, who died in 1713. Tho- 
mas Doude was the son of Henrv Doude of 
Guilford, county Surrey. England, who came 
to this country in 1639 i" company with Rev. 
Henry Whitfield, and settled in Guilford. 
Connecticut, on land still owned by his de- 
scendants. Children of Joseph Wilcox, born 
in East Guilford : Olive, died December. 
1864: Prudence, born July 15. 1784: Anna. 
1786: Abel, February 12, 1788; Zenas, men- 
tioned below : Roxanna. 1800. 

(VI) Deacon Zenas Wilcox, son of Joseph 
(3) Wilcox, was born October 20, 1791. in 
East Guilford, died March 14, 1873. He was 
a deacon in the First Congregational Church. 
He married (first) September 15, 1820, Betsy, 



born 1798, died April 21, 1822, daughter of 
Pitman Wheaton. Married (second) Novem- 
ber 18, 1824, Lovisa, born January 5, 1802, 
died May 2, 1878, daughter of John Meigs 
(see i\leigs VII). Children, born in Madi- 
son: Son, December 7, 1825, died same day; 
Betsy Wheaton, March 26, 1827, died Decem- 
ber 7, 1906; Vincent Aieigs, mentioned be- 
low; Lucy Maria, June 8, 1830, died February 
II, 1906; Charles Morrison, August 20, 1832-, 
died January 3, 1899. 

(VII) Colonel Vincent ]\Ieigs Wilcox, son 
of Deacon Zenas Wilcox, was born in Madi- 
son October 17, 1828, died in New York 
City, May 9, 1896. He served in the civil 
war as colonel of the One Hundred and 
Thirty-second Regiment Pennsylvania \olun- 
teers. He was president of the corporation 
of E. & H. T. Anthony & Company ; an elder 
of Phillips Presbyterian Church ; a comrade 
of Lafayette Post, No. 140. Grand Army of 
the Republic, department of New York : com- 
panion of the New York Commandery, ^lili- 
tary Order of the Loyal Legion of the United 
States; member of the Society of the Army 
of the Potomac, and of his Regimental As- 
sociation. He married (first) June 17, 1855, 
Catherine Millicent, born June 13, 1832. died 
April I, i860, daughter of Dr. Reynold Webb, 
of Madison (see \\'ebb). He married (sec- 
ond) November 27, 1866. ^ilartha Fannie, 
born August 28, 1839. died ]^Iarch 20. 1873, 
daughter of George Dowd. of ]\Iadison. He 
married (third) November 17. 1875, Eliza- 
beth Bosrert, born September 27, 1841, daugh- 
ter of Harmon K. Wells, of New York City. 
Children of first wife, born in JMadison : Rey- 
nold Webb, mentioned below: Kate Elizaljetb, 
born March 7, 1858. died October 7, 1858. 
Child of second wife : Son. born March 20, 
1873, died same day. Child of third wife: 
Francis Wells, born August ^, 1882. 

(VIII) Dr. Reynold Webb^Vilcox, son of 
Colonel Vincent Meigs Wilcox, was born in 
Madison. March 20. 1856. He attended the 
public schools of his native town and en- 
tered Yale College, from which he was crad- 
uated in the class of 1878 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. He pursued a post- 
graduate course at Hobart College and re- 
ceived the degree of .blaster of Arts there in 
1881. He studied his profession at Harvard 
Medical School and graduated with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine in 1881. He re- 
ceived the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws 
from Maryville College in 1892. He studied 
in the hospitals of \'ienna. Heidelberg. Paris 
and Edinburgh in 1881-82. His life has been 
devoted to study, research, teaching and hos- 
pital practice. F^e served as house officer 



1/7'- 



CONNECTICUT 



of the House of the Good Samaritan, Boston, 
of the Children's Hospital, Boston ; and of the 
Woman's Hospital, New York. He was pro- 
fessor of medicine at the New York Post- 
Graduate Medical School and Hospital from 
i8go to 1908; was assistant visiting physician 
to Bellevue Hospital of New York City from 
1890 to 1895, has been physician to St. Mark's 
Hospital, New York, since 1895, and since 
1903 consulting physician to the Nassau Hos- 
pital. He was surgeon-general of the Sons 
of Veterans of the United States in 1892-93, 
surgeon of the Society of Colonial Wars in 
1905, and surgeon of the Society of American 
Wars since 1910. He is the author of "A 
System of Case Records" (1887) '• "Madison, 
her Soldiers" ( 1890) ; "Materia Medica" and 
"Pharmacology and Therapeutics," of which 
seven editions of each have been issued since 
1892 ; "The Descendants of William Wilcox- 
son, Vincent Meigs and Richard Webb" 
(1893) ; "Manual of Fever Nursing" (two 
editions since 1904) : "Practical ^Medicine" 
(three editions since 1907) ; and a contribu- 
tor to Gould's "Year ESook of Medicine," 
and of some four hundred medical and his- 
torical papers, published in the American 
Journal of Medical Science, of which he 
was the therapeutic editor from 1891 to 1908, 
also in Amevicaii Medicine, the Medical 
Ne7vs, Neic York Medical Journal and 
other periodicals. He was a member of the 
revision commission of United States Phar- 
macy, 1900-10, of which he was also vice- 
chairman, and vice-president of the conven- 
tion. He is a member of the American Thera- 
peutic Society, of which he was president. 
1901-02, and chairman of the council since 
1902 : a fellow of the American Academy of 
]\Iedicine, of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and of the Harvard 
Medical Society, of which he has been presi- 
dent. He is vice-president of the Society of 
Medical Jurisprudence, the Pennsylvania So- 
ciety of the War of 1812, and vice-president 
general in the General Society, and an officer 
of several of the local societies. He is a 
member of the Medical Association of the 
Greater City of New York, of which he has 
been president since 1900, the association of 
Military Surgeons, the Harvard Medical Al- 
umni Association, the New York Society of 
Colonial Wars, the New York Commandery 
of the American Wars, the New York Society 
Sons of the Revolution, the ^Military Order of 
the Loyal Legion, and of the Metropolitan 
Gub and of the Army and Navy Qub. of 
New York. Dr. Wilcox is an Episcopalian 
in religion and an independent in politics and 
is not married. 



(The Webb Line). 

(I) Richard Webb, the immigrant ances- 
tor, came from Dorsetshire, England, to 
Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1626, thence to 
Boston, where he was made a freeman in 
1632. In 1635 he removed to Hartford, Con- 
necticut. He settled in Norwalk, Connecticut, 
in 1650, and removed subsequently to Stam- 
ford, Connecticut, in 1655. He died there 
January i, 1676. He was a deputy in 1655. 
He married Elizabeth, sister of John Greg- 
ory, died January 24, 1680. Children: Jo- 
seph, died 1685 ; Richard, born 1623, died 
March 15, 1656; Caleb, died May 24, 1704: 
Mary, died September 18, 1706; John, died 
May 19, 1670; Joshua, born September 15, 
1660; Samuel, mentioned below; Sarah, mar- 
ried John Marshall. 

(II) Samuel, son of Richard Webb, was 
born March 30, 1662. and married Hannah 

, died October 7, 1729. Children : 

Waitstill, born January 6, 1691 : Samuel, 
mentioned below; Mercy, born April 11, 1693 r 
Charles, ]\Iarch 12, 1697; Nathaniel, Novem- 
ber 6. 1700 ; Mary. January 7. 1709. 

(HI) Samuel (2), son of Samuel (i) 
Webb, was born November 6, 1692, and died 
January, 1731. He lived in Stamford, and 
married, December 8, 1720, Abigail Slason, 
born March 8, 1700, died 1760. Children: 
Abigail, born January, 1722; Samuel, men- 
tioned below; Elizabeth, January 16, 1725; 
Charles, April 19, 1730, died same day. 

(I\') Samuel (3), son of Samuel (2) 
Webb, was born November 14, 172^, and 
died October, 1762. He lived in Chester, 
Connecticut, and married, 1744. Mary Cat- 
lin, horn 1722, died 1770. Children: Sam- 
uel, born 1745; Jemima; Stephen, born 1746; 
Mary, 1749; Ann; Esther, born March 13, 
1753. died August 2. 1830; Reynold, men- 
tioned below ; Isaac ; James. 

( \' ) Reynold, son of Samuel (3) Webb, 
was born October 9, 1759, and died March 
20, 1834. He married, November 15, 1787, 
Catherine Parmele, born June 30, 1768, died 
July 15, 1851. He served in the war of the 
revolution: Private, June 2. 1777, discharged 
January, 1778, Captain IMartin Kirtland's 
company. Colonel William Douglas' regiment; 
Sixth Connecticut Line. 1777-1781. Children: 
Samuel Parmele, born October 24, 17S8; Rey- 
nold, mentioned below ; Sally, born December 
d. 1792; Catherine. April 20, 179.S : Isaac, 
January 13, 1798: Mary, April 29, 1801 ; Am- 
brose. December 0, 1803 : Ann, IMarch 6, 
1806; William Tones, April 11, 1808. 

(VI) Dr. Reynold Webb, son of Revnold 
Webb, was born January 3, 1791. and died 
July I, 1856. He was musician in Captain 



CONNECTICUT 



1771 



Zachariah Clarke's company, Colonel iilisha 
Sill's rcyinicnt, July 5-14, 1813. He received 
the degree of Al. D. from Yale College, 1819. 
He was a member of the American .Medical 
Association, ilc married for his second wife, 
March 8, 1821, Deborah Hopson, daugher of 
Sergeant Daniel and Millicent Hopson Meigs, 
born May 24, 1797, died December 7, 1859. 
Sergeant Daniel Meigs was son of Captam 
Jeheil iMeigs (see Meigs). Sergeant Daniel 
Meigs served in the revolution : Sergeant, 
Captain Peter Vail's company, enlisted April 
ID. 1781, served 8 months 20 days; ser- 
geant, Lexington Alarm, 1775, served 5 days. 
His first wife was Chloe Scranton, died Mav 
19, 1788. Children of Dr. Reynold Webb: 
Daniel Meigs, born April 6, 1822, died Janu- 
ary I, 1906; Catherine Millicent, born June 
13, 1832, married Colonel Vincent Aleigs Wil- 
cox (see Wilcox). 

(The Meigs Line). 

(I) Vincent Meigs, the immigrant ancestor, 
born in 1583, came from Bradford, Peverill, 
Dorsetshire, England, to this country, 1637, 
with his family, and was at New Haven, 
Connecticut. He settled upon the border of 
the present public square in Guilford, Con- 
necticut, in 1638, and later removed to East 
Guilford (now Madison), and settled in 
Hammonasett (upon the spot owned and oc- 
cupied by Dr. Reynold Webb in 1856). He 

married, in England, Churchill. He 

died, December. 1658. Children: Vincent, 
born 1609, died December 3, 1700; John, 
mentioned below ; Mark, born 1614. 

(H ) John, son of Vincent Meigs, was born 
February 28, 1612. and died January 4, 1672. 
He married, in 1632, Tamzin Fry, of Wey- 
mouth. England. He was allotted land in 
East Guilford, March 3, 1653, and was made 
a freeman 1657. Children, born in East Guil- 
ford : Mary, 1633, died April 30, 1703; Con- 
currence, died October 9, 1708; Elizabeth, 
born 1645; Tryal, died 1690; John, mentioned 
below. 

(HI) John (2), son of John (i) Meigs, 
was born 1640 and died November 9, 1713, 
in East Guilford. He married (first) Alarch 
7, 1665, Sarah, daughter of William Wilcox- 
son, of Stratford. She died November 24, 
1691, he married (second) Lydia, widow of 
Isaac Crittenden, died December, 1729. Chil- 
dren, born in East Guilford : Sarah, Febru- 
ary 14, 1667; John, November 11, 1670; Jan- 
na, mentioned below : Ebenezer, September 
19. 1675; Hannah, February 25, 1678: Hes- 
ter, November 10, 1680; Mindwell, 1682. 

(IV) Lieutenant Janna Meigs, of the Pe- 
East Ardsley, West Riding, Yorkshire, Eng- 



December 21, 1672, died December 5, 1739, 
and married, JMay 18, 1698, Hannah Willard, 
of Wethersfield, Connecticut, born 1674, died 
January 4, 1750. He was the first magis- 
trate of East Guilford, and deputy in 1716- 
26. Children, born in East Guilford : Janna, 
August 17, 1694; Joseph, May 14, 1697; Je- 
hiel, mentioned below; Hannah, August 13, 
1703; Return, March 16, 1708; Hester, De- 
cember ig, 1709; Silence and Submit (twins), 
January 5, 1712, died January, 1712; Tim- 
othy, September 19, 1713; Eunice, October 

19, 1715- 

(V) Captain Jehiel Meigs, son of Janna 
Meigs, was born June 11, 1701, and died 
March 23, 1780, in East Guilford. He mar- 
ried, September 27, 1736, Lucy Bartlett of 
Lynn, iMassachusetts, born 1712, died Decem- 
ber 8, 1800. Children, born in East Guilford : 
Lucy, 1739, died 1740; Lucy, born Septem- 
ber 21, 1741; Jehiel, July 6, 1743; Lucretia. 
July 14, 1745; Daniel, July 24, 1747; Elihu, 
mentioned below; Lovisa, December 31, 1751. 

(VI) Elihu, son of Captain Jehiel Meigs, 
was born September 21, 1749, died Septem- 
ber 9, 1827, in East Guilford, and married 
Elizabeth Rich, died September i, 1826. Chil- 
dren, born in East Guilford: Benjamin Hart, 
January 23, 1772; John, mentioned below; 
Lucy, September 28, 1775; Benjamin Hart, 
December 28, 1777; Elihu, January 21, 1780; 
Lovisa, January 17, 1782; Josiah, May 23, 
1784; Edmund, October 3, 1786: Elizabeth, 
May 10, 1790; Lucretia, August 31, 1792; 
Bezaleel Ives, August 4, 1794. 

(VII) John (3), son of Elihu Meigs, was 
born in East Guilford, November 27, 1773, 
and died August 14, 1848. He married, April 
2, 1 80 1, Mary, daughter of Captain Timothy 
and Ann Dudley Field, born November 19, 
1778, died July 28, 1855. Her mother, Ann 
Dudley, born 1752, died 1819, was great- 
great-great-granddau.shter of Governor The- 
ophilus Eaton. Her father. Captain Timothy 
Field, born 1744, died t8i8, married. 1767, 
was the son of Ensign David Field, born 
1607, died 1770, married 1742, widow Abi- 
.eail Stone, who died in 1783. Ensign David 
Field was the son of Ebenezer Field, born 
1672, died 1713, married, 1697, Mary Dud- 
ley, who died 1740. Ebenezer Field was the 
son of Zechariah Field, born 1645. died 1674, 
married 1668, Sarah Webb (see Webb). 
Zechariah Field, the immigrant ancestor, 
was the son of Zechariah Field, born 1600, 
died 1666, married 1741, Mary Stanley, died 
1670. Zechariah Field was the grandson of 
John, Astronomer Royal. He was born at 
land, and settled first in Dorchester, Massa- 
quot war, son of John (2) Meigs, was born 



1772 



CONNECTICUT 



chusetts, in 1629, went to Hartford, in 1636, 
to Northampton, JNIassachusetts. in 1659, and 
finally settled in Hatfield, Massachusetts, in 
1661. Children of John Meigs, born in East 
Guilford: Lovisa, January 5, 1802, married 
November 18, 1824, Deacon Zenas Wilcox 
(see Wilcox) : David Rich, December i, 1803; 
Edward M., March 20, 1805, died August i, 
1867; Mary Ann, born June 6, 1807; Abigail 
Field, May 14, 1809; Emmeline, March 8, 
181 1 ; John Morrison, March 15, 1813; Eliza- 
beth, April g, 1815; Jehiel, September 24, 
1817, died November 18, 1842; Timothy Al- 
fred, January 29, 1820, died April 26, 1904: 
Henry Josiah, born October 29, 1823. 



Commander Edward Hooker, 
HOOKER United States navy, in a paper 

read before the Hooker gather- 
ing in August. 1892. gives the following as the 
English ancestry of Rev. Thomas Hooker, 
the American immigrant : 

(I) John Hooker was of Devonshire. Eng- 
land. He had a brother Roger, and a sister 
Mary who married John Russell, of Leices- 
tershire. Children : John, lived in Somerset- 
shire: Thomas, mentioned below; Rev. Zach- 
ariah. rector of St. Michael's, Cathavs, Corn- 
wall. 

(II) Thomas, son of John Hooker, was of 
Devonshire. Children : A daughter, married 
Dr. George Alcocl-:. of London : Rev. Thomas, 
mentioned below ; Dorothy, married John 
Chester, of Leicestershire. 

(III) Rev. Thomas (2) Hooker, son of 
Thomas (i) Hooker, was the immigrant an- 
cestor. He was born at Marfield, Leicester- 
shire, England, July 7, 1586. Cotton Mather, 
in his "Magnalia", says of him: "He was born 
of parents that were neither unable nor un- 
willing to bestow upon him a liberal educa- 
tion ; whereunto the early lively sparkles of 
wit observed in him did very much to en- 
courage them. His natural temper was cheer- 
ful and courteous : but it was accompanied 
with such a sensible grandeur of mind, as 
caused his friends, without the help of astrol- 
ogy, to prognosticate that he was born to be 
considerable". Regarding his education and 
conversion, Sprague says : "He was educated 
at Emanuel College, Cambridge, of which in 
due time he became a Fellow. He acquitted 
himself in this office with such ability and 
fidelity as to secure universal respect and ad- 
miration. It was while he was thus employed 
that he became deeply impressed with the 
importance of eternal realities, and after a 
protracted season of bitter anguish of spirit 
he was enabled to submit without reserve to 
the terms of the Gospel, and thus to find peace 



and joy in believing. His religious experience, 
in its very commencement, seems to have been 
uncommonly deep and thorough, and no doubt 
it was partly owing to this that he became 
much distinguished, in after life, as a counsel- 
lor, comforter and guide, to the awakened 
and desponding". He frequently preached at 
Cambridge, and for some time in London and 
vicinity. In 1626 he became a lecturer and 
assistant to the Rev. Mr. ]Mitchell, at Chelms- 
ford, and among his hearers were noblemen 
and others of high standing in English society. 
He was accustomed once a 3'ear to visit his 
native county and was once asked to preach 
in the great church at Leicester. One of the 
chief burgesses of the town was greatly op- 
posed to his preaching there, and not being 
able to hinder it, he set persons to fiddling in 
the churchyard, with a view to disturb him. 
But Mr. Hooker was able to retain command 
of his audiences, and at last even the fiddler 
went to the door to listen, and the story goes 
that his conversion followed. In 1630 a Spir- 
itual Court, which held its sessions at Chelms- 
ford, silenced Mr. Hooker for nonconformity. 
Although he was in accord with the doctrines 
of the English church, where were certain 
forms of worship which he could not practice, 
and on this ground he was forbidden to min- 
ister to the people. He continued, however, 
to live near Chelmsford, and was employed in 
teaching a school at Little Braddow, having 
John Eliot, afterwards the famous Indian 
Apostle, in his family as an usher. A petition 
signed by forty-seven ministers of the Estab- 
lished Church was sent to the Spiritual Court, 
asking to have ]\Ir. Hooker re-established, but 
it did no good. After a short residence in 
retirement under the patronage of his friend, 
the Earl of Warwick, he determined to seek 
a home in Holland, and his steps were watched 
by his persecutors, and he was followed even 
to the shore, but the ship fortunately got oflf 
shore before his pursuers arrived. Mr. Hooker 
remained in Holland three years, and was at 
first employed as an assistant of Mr. Paget at 
Amsterdam. On account of a misunderstand- 
ing with him, Mr. Hooker removed to Delft, 
and was associated with Rev. Mr. Forbes, a 
Scotch minister. Two years later he accepted 
a call to Rotterdam to assist Rev. Dr. William 
Ames. Dr. Ames is said to have remarked 
that he never met a man equal to Mr. Hooker 
as a preacher or a learned disputant. 

A-Ir. Hooker decided to go to New England, 
but wished to return to England first, as the 
times were supposed to be somewhat more 
tolerant. On his arrival there he found, 
however, that his enemies were still active, and 
he was obliged to live in concealment until 



CONNECTICUT 



1/73 



his departure for New England. He left Eng- 
land about the middle of July, 1633, from the 
Downs, on the ship "Griffin". Such was his 
peril that Ik- and his friend, Mr. Cotton, were 
obli,>,'ed to remain concealed until the ship was 
well out to sea. lie arrived at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, .September 4, 1633, and on October 
1 1 was chosen pastor of the church at New- 
ton (Cambridge). He remained here to the 
great satisfaction of the people for two and 
one-half years. In June, 1636, he joined the 
company of those who went to make a settle- 
ment at Hartford. Coimecticut, and from this 
time was identitied with almost all the im- 
portant public movements of the colony. He 
was one of the moderators of the first New 
England Synod held at Cambridge, in the 
case of the celebrated Anne Hutchinson. He 
published many books and sermons between 
1637 and his death. He fell a victim of a vio- 
lent epidemic disease, and died July 7, 1647, 
a great loss to the community. 

Rev. Thomas Hooker, according to family 
tradition, married a sister of John Pym, who 
was an intimate friend. Children: i. Rev. 
John, settled in the Established Church in 
England. 2. Joanna, born about 1616. died 
1646. 3. Mary, born about 1618. 4. Sarah, 
married Rev. John Wilson. 5. Daughter, mar- 
ried and became a widov,-. 6. Samuel, men- 
tioned below. 

(IV) Rev. Samuel Hooker, son of Rev. 
Thomas (2) Hooker, was born in 1633, ^"d 
was educated at Harvard College, graduating 
in 1663. He succeeded Rev. Roger Newton, 
his brother-in-law. and was second pastor of 
the church at Farmington. Connecticut, where 
he was ordained in July, 1661. He was on a 
committee of four in 1662 to treat with the 
New Haven colony in reference to the pro- 
posed union with Connecticut under one col- 
onial government. All of the descendants of 
Rev. Thomas Hooker bearing the surname 
Hooker are also his descendants. He was a 
Fellow of Flarvard, and on account of his 
earnestness and piety was called "the fervent 
Hooker". He had the habit of committing 
his sermons to memory, and was a powerful 
and effective preacher. He died at Farming- 
ton, November 6, 1697. 

He married, September 22, 1658, Marv Wil- 
lett, born at Plymouth, May 4. 1643, daugh- 
ter of Captain Thomas \\'illett. of Swansea, 
Massachusetts, afterward Seeknok. Rhode 
Island. Her mother was IMary (Brown) Wil- 
lett. Mary Hooker married (second) Au- 
gust 10, 1703, Rev. Thomas Buckingham, of 
Saybrook, Connecticut. Children: i. Dr. 
Thomas, born June 10, 1639. 2. Samuel, May 
22, 1661. 3. William, May 11, 1663, mer- 



chant at Farmington. 4. John, February 20, 
1664-65, mentioned below. 5. Hon. James, 
October 27, 1666, resided at Guilford. Con- 
necticut. 6. Roger, September 14, 1668, died 
unmarried, 1697-98; resided at Hartford. 7. 
Nathaniel, September 28, 1671, died 171 1. 
8. Mary, July 3, 1673, third wife of Rev. 
James Pierpont, of New Haven, and mother 
of Sarah, who married the celebrated Rev. 
Jonathan Edwards. 9. Flezekiah, November 

7, 167s; died 1686. 10. Daniel, March 25, 
1679. II. Sarah, May 5, 1681 ; married Rev. 
Stephen Buckingham, of Norwalk, Connec- 
ticut. 

(V) Hon. John Hooker, son of Rev. Sam- 
uel Hooker, was born at Farmington, Febru- 
ary 20, 1664-65, died there February i, 1746- 
47. He was an able, useful and eminent citi- 
zen, and represented that town in the general 
court twenty-four years, 1699-1723, and was 
clerk of the House three sessions and speaker 
six sessions. He was assistant of the prov- 
ince eleven years, 1723-34, and during eight 
years of the time was judge of the superior 
court. He married, November 24, 1687, 
Abigail, daughter of Captain John Stanley 
(or Standley). She died February 21, 1743. 
Children, born in Farmington: i. Hezekiah, 
October 14, 1688, mentioned below. 2. 
Abigail, May 25, 1691, died September 30, 
1692. 3. John, December 17. 1693, died De- 
cember 26, 1693. 4. John, of whom further 
elsewhere. 5. Abigail, January 14, 1697-8: 
married, in 1719, Nathaniel Flart. 6. Mary, 
June II, 1700; married, December 25, 1723, 
Samuel Hart. 7. Sarah, September 11. 1702: 
married, Januarj^ 7, 1724-5, Mathew Hart. 

8. Joseph, February 15, 1705-6: died Decem- 
ber 19, 1764. 9. Ruth, April 16, 1708: mar- 
ried. Captain Asahel Strong, of Farmington. 
10. Roger, September 17, 1710: died ^ilav 23, 

1774. 

(VI) Hezekiah, son of Hon. John Hooker, 
M'as born at Farmington, October 14, 1688: 
died December 18, 1756. He was a farmer 
at Kensington, Connecticut. He removed to 
Bethlehem Society in Woodbury, Connecti- 
cut, among the early settlers, and became a 
leading citizen there. He married Abigail 
Curtiss. of Stratford. Children: i. Hezekiah, 
born October 30, 1717 : married Elizabeth 
Stone. 2. James, January 30, 1720, married 
Dorothy Parmalee. 3. Josiah, April 2, 1722. 
4. Abigail, September 25, 1724, died unmar- 
ried, September 24, 1750. 5. ]Mary, Janu- 
ary 8. 1727. married, June 5, 1755, Waitstill 
Goodrich. 6. William, June 20, 1729, mar- 
ried Rachel Waller. 7. Jesse, April 27. 1732, 
died on the same day as her sister Abigail. 
8. Eunice, October 30, 1734, died September 



1774 



CONNECTICUT 



17, 1750. 9. Asahel, December 13, 1736, men- 
tioned below. 10. Sarah, May 30, 1739, mar- 
ried, January 26, 1763, Timothy Judson. 

(VII) Asahel, son of Hezekiah Hooker, 
was born December 13, 1736. He was a 
farmer at Bristol, Connecticut. He married, 
February 15, 1759, Anne Parmalee. Children, 
born at Woodbury: i. Ira, March 12, 1760. 
2. Rev. Asahel, August 29, 1762, minister at 
Norwich, Connecticut. 3. Bryan, August 5, 
1763, mentioned below. 4. Anne, February 
10, 1767. 5. Levi, August 15, 1769. 

(VIII) Bryan, son of Asahel Hooker, was 
bom August 5, 1763, in Woodbury, died in 
Bristol, in 1826. He was one of the first 
woolen manufacturers in Connecticut, and was 
very successful in producing fine and service- 
able cloth for men's wear. He built a fine 
house on a hillside in Bristol, on land sloping 
to the river. He married, in 1804, Mrs. Nancy 
(Lee) Fuller, daughter of William Lee, of 

Bristol, and widow of Fuller, a teacher 

in Hartford. Children: i. Lydia, born 1805, 
married Hon. Cyrus P. Smith, mayor of 
Brooklyn, New York. 2. Nancy, 1809, mar- 
ried William Hill, of Troy, New York; oc- 
cupied the Hooker homestead ; in 1899 cele- 
brated her ninetieth birthday with an informal 
gathering of friends and relatives. 3. Bryan 
Edward, mentioned below. 

(IX) Bryan Edward, son of Bryan Hooker, 
was born in Bristol, January i, 1813, died De- 
cember 9, 1888, of pneumonia. At the age of 
twelve he attended a school for boys in Farm- 
ington, boarding in the family of Rev. Dr. 
Porter, father of President Porter, of Yale 
College. For a year after leaving school he 
was employed in a store, but early engaged in 
the manufacturing business, as his father had 
done. In 1840 he represented the town in 
the legislature, being the youngest member 
there at the time. In 1844, he removed to 
Hartford and engaged in business with Law- 
son C. Ives, the firm being Ives, Hooker & 
Company, wool merchants. In 1862 he retired 
from the firm to take up the management of 
the Broad Brook Woolen Manufacturing 
Company, of which he became secretary and 
treasurer. At this time the company was 
heavily in debt, and the business situation most 
discouraging. His ability was shown by the 
immediate improvement of conditions, and 
the success which came to the company dur- 
ing the twenty-five years under his manage- 
ment. 

Mr. Hooker was a member of the First Con- 
gregational Qiurch of Hartford, and active in 
church work. Under the pastorate of Rev. 
Dr. Hawes he was elected deacon, and re- 
mained in office twenty-two years, when he 



resigned on account of partial deafness, and 
this difficulty led him to resign from various 
boards of directors. He was the first to pro- 
pose that the office of deacon should be tem- 
porary and not for life, and that system was 
soon established in the church. For many 
years he had a class of young men in the Sun- 
day school, and he- was always promptly pres- 
ent at nine o'clock, the opening hour. In 
politics he was a Republican, and the last time 
he left his home he cast his vote for General 
Harrison for president. Mr. Hooker was 
strictly honorable, and all shams were abhor- 
rent to him. He was liberal and magnanimous, 
and ever thoughtful for others. He was con- 
scientious to the last degree, and, even when 
he could not hear a word of the sermon was 
always in his accustomed place in church. 

He married (first) Maria Robbins Williams, 
of Rocky Hill; (second) Martha Huntington 
Williams, daughter of Solomon Williams. 
Children: I. Edward Williams, born Octo- 
ber 19, 1865, mentioned below. 2. Robert 
Huntington, April 21, 1867, died May 21, 
1874. 3. Thomas Williams, May 10, 1871. 

(X) Hon. Edward Williams Hooker, son 
of Bryan Edward Hooker, was born at Hart- 
ford, October 19, 1865. He attended the pub- 
lic schools, and graduated from the Hartford 
high school in the class of 1885. He began 
his career in the employ of the Broad Brook 
Woolen jNIanufacturing Company, of which 
his father was treasurer and general manager 
for forty years. He learned the various ope- 
rations of woolen manufacturing, and became 
a practical carder, sorter, spinner, weaver and 
designer. He was with the establishment in 
various positions of responsibility for ten 
vears, and until the business was purchased 
by the present owners, Ogden & Brook. Mr. 
Hooker then became secretary and treasurer 
of the Perkins Electric Switch Manufacturing 
Company, serving for four years, and resign- 
ing to enter into partnership with William R. 
Penrose in the general fire insurance business, 
having the agency of the Commercial Union, 
Palantine and the New York Underwriters, as 
well as other companies. In 1896, Mr. 
Flooker was elected to the general assembly 
from Hartford, and was appointed chairman 
of the banking committee, which secured the 
enactment of many important measures. He 
was elected mayor of Hartford for two years 
in April, 1908, and his administration was suc- 
cessful and creditable. In November, 19 10, 
he was elected state senator from the second 
district. He is an active member of the First 
Church of Christ of Hartford (Congrega- 
tional), and was chairman for a number of 
vears of the business committee. He is also a 



CONNECTICUT 



1/75 



member of the huard of nianasemciu of tlie 
Hartford Hospital, the Hartford I heological 
Seminary, and is active in various other l)ene- 
volent and educational institutions. He was 
a member of Company !■", First Regiment, 
Connecticut National Guard, and was major 
of the Veteran ISattalion of the City Guard. 
He is quartermaster with rank of captain on 
the stall' of the Governor's Foot Guard. He 
is a member of La Fayette Lodge of Free 
Masons ; of Pythagarus Chapter, Royal .\rch 
Masons: of W'olcott Council, Royal and Select 
]\Iasters; of Washington Commandery, 
Knights Templar ; of the Consistory, thirty- 
second degree : and of Sphynx Temple, Mys- 
tic Shrine. He is also a member of the Bene- 
volent and Protective Order of Elks of Hart- 
ford. 

Mr. Hooker married, November 12, 1889, 
Mar)- Mather Turner, born February 26. 1866, 
daughter of Dr. Charles P. Turner, and grand- 
daughter of INIajor Roland Mather. Children, 
born at Hartford : Rosalie, September 26, 
1892 ; Roland iMather, September 10, 1900. 



(VI) John (2) Hooker, son 
HOOKER of John ( i ) Hooker, was born 
March 6, 1695-6, at Farm- 
ington, and married, July 4, 1728, ]\'Iercy 
(Mary) Hart, daughter of Deacon Thomas 
and Mary (Thompson) Hart, of Kensington, 
Connecticut. She was born at Kensington, 
September 29, 1703, and died there 1782. 
He was justice of the peace, and a prominent 
and active man in the business of the town. 
He died at Kensington, August 3, 1766. 
Children, born at Kensington: John, (men- 
tioned below) : Seth, born December 8, 1731 ; 
Ashbel, April 18, 1737: EHjah, April 12, 
1746. 

(VII) John (3), son of John (2) Hooker, 
was born at Kensington, RIarch 19, 1729-30, 
and graduated from Yale College, 1751. He 
was ordained at Northampton, Massachu- 
setts, December 5, 1753, and was settled there 
for twenty-four years, until his death of small 
pox, February 6, 1777. He married, Decem- 
ber 10, 1755, Sarah, daughter of John and 
Mary (Pratt) Worthington, of Springfield. 
She was born January 27, 1732, at Springfield, 
and died at Northampton, April 5, 1817. 
Children, born at Northampton : Mary, Sep- 
tember 10, 1756; Sarah. January 30, 1757; 
Seth, October 26, 1759 : John (mentioned be- 
low), August or October 8, 1761 : Lucy, bap- 
tized August 19, 1764, died June 30, 1766: 
William, November 26. 1766: Thomas, May 
20, 1770; John Worthington, baptized April 
12, 1772: Lucy, July 16, 1775. 

(VIII) John (4), son of John (3) Hooker, 



was born at Northam])ton, .\ugust or October 
8, 1761, and graduated from Yale College, 
1782. He settled at Springfield, and became 
a lawyer, and judge of court of common pleas. 
He was a deacon of the First Congregational 
Church, and a member of A. B. C. F. M. He 
married, F'ebruary 9, 1791, Sarah, daughter 
of Colonel Josiah and Elizabeth ( Buckmin- 
ster ) Dwight (see Dwight). She was born 
December 13, 1764, and dierl at Springfield, 
Se]5tember 5, 1842. He died at Springfield, 
March 7, 1829. Qiildren, born at Spring- 
field: John, December 15, 1791 ; George, March 
I?' 1793 ; Sarah, October 16, 1795 ; Josiah, 
April 17, 1796; Elizabeth Dwight, February 
16, 1798: Mary, September 14, 1799: Rich- 
ard, July 15, 1801, died April 24, 1802: Clar- 
issa, February 11, 1804, died October 8, 1804; 
Worthington, March 13, 1806; Richard (men- 
tioned below ) . 

(IX) Rev. Richard Hooker, son of John 
(4) Hooker, was born April 10, 1808, at 
Springfield. He attended tlie public schools, 
and graduated from Yale College in the class 
of 1827. He studied theology at Princeton, 
New Jersey, and at the Presbyterian Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Columbia, South Carolina, 
and settled in the South in the ministry, hop- 
ing that the southern climate would benefit his 
health. He preached at Mount Zion, Han- 
cock county, Georgia, in the Presbyterian 
church, for three years (1838-41) : at Monti- 
cello, Georgia, for two years (1841-43) : and 
was settled for nine years over the Presby- 
terian church at Macon, Georgia (1843-52). 
From 1852 to 1857 he lived in New Haven, 
Connecticut, with his family and supplied pul- 
pits as occasion required, though unable to 
accept a permanent charge. He was a man 
of vigorous powers of mind, good judgment 
and cultivated taste. He was a clever writer 
and an able preacher. He spoke usually with- 
out notes. He died at New Haven, Decem- 
ber 19, 1857. ITe married, July 15, 1846, 
Aurelia, daughter of James and Susan 
(Breed) Dwight (see i)age 5), born July 31, 
1816, at New Haven, died January 25, 1874. 
Like her mother, she was a woman of great 
energy and spirit, of strong convictions and 
intellect and moral character. The follow- 
ing was written for the New Hax'cn Palla- 
dium by Professor Noah Porter, of Yale Col- 
lege : 

"To all who knew lier. her iinfooked-for removal 
is a stunning blow, which will be followed by pro- 
longed sorrow-. Though very sensitive and retiring 
in disposition, her strength of mind and of character 
made their impress in everj' circle in which she 
moved. She was eminently intelligent from read- 
ing, thouglit and observation, and as eminently up- 
right, frank and fervent. Her humor was exhaust- 



17/6 



CONNECTICUT 



less, and with her frankness made her llic delight of 
the friends whom she trusted, and to whom she was 
free to express her thoughts and feehngs. She was 
true to her convictions and frank in expressing them, 
and unselfish in feeling, act and sacrifice. In the ex- 
periences of a checkered life, in which she had a 
fair share of bereavement, change and sorrow, she 
was ever the generous friend of the destitute and 
friendless. To her own family and relatives she 
was a wise and sympathizing counselor and a pillar 
of strength. As daughter, sister and mother she 
was faithful and afifectionate. She was an ardent 
friend and liberal benefactor of the college in which 
she had an hereditary interest and pride. Her last 
years were consecrated to unceasing and excessive 
labors and cares for private and public charity, and 
her generous and ardent sympathies for others were 
such at times as to drink up the very springs of 
life. The sharp and sudden attack which brought 
on her death was made sharper by her intense sym- 
pathy with the bereavement of a neighboring house- 
hold. All the thought and strength w-hich she could 
command, during a week of distressing struggle for 
life were given to others. No one can doubt that 
she has found an open and abundant entrance into 
the eternal kingdom, for which she aspired rather 
than hoped, and that its rest and peace are none the 
less welcome because to her timid and humble 
faith they are in soine sort a surprise." 

(X) Thomas, only sou of Rev. Richard 
Hooker, was born in ^Macon, Georgia, Sep- 
tember 3, 1849. He came to New Haven at an 
early age and has lived there since. He pre- 
pared for college at the Hopkins School, and 
entered Yale, from which he was graduated in 
the class of 1869 with the degree of A. B. 
He studied abroad for a number of years and 
was for a time instructor in Greek in Yale. 
For many rears his health was poor and he 
traveled luucli. In 1895 he became a director 
of the First Xational Bank of New Haven, 
and in 1902 became lirst vice-president of that 
institution. Later in the same year he became 
president of the New Haven Trust Company. 
In November, 1909, he was elected president 
Club and Quinnipiack Club of New Haven, 
and soon after retired from the presidency of 
the Trust cojupany. For ten years, 1894-1904, 
he served on the board of education of the 
city of New Haven. He is a member of the 
Country Club of New Haven, the Graduates 
Club and Quinnipiack Club of New Haven. 
In religion he is a Congregationalist. He was 
a 'varsity baseball player when in Yale and 
has retained his interest in athletics. He luar- 
ried, June 30, 1874, Sarah, daughter of Sam- 
uel and ]\Iary D wight (Schermerhorn) 
Bowles, of Springfield, born June 6, 1850, at 
Springfield, died March 10, 1909, at New 
Haven. Samuel Bowles was the founder of 
the Spyhif!,ficld Republican, which for several 
generations has ranked aiuong the best news- 
papers of the country, having a national repu- 
tation for its independence and editorial abil- 
ity even to the present day. Mr. Hooker re- 



sides at 51 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven. 
Children: Aurelia Dwight, born May 2, 1875, 
(lied January 27, 1899, unmarried: Richard, 
born February 20, 1878 (Yale, 1899), ^^'ash- 
ington correspondent of the Springfield Re- 
publican, unmarried; Thomas, July 26, 1882 
(Yale, 1903), a lawyer at New Haven. 

(The Dwight Line). 

(Ill) Captain Henry Dwight, son of 
Captain Timothy Dwight (c|. v.), was born in 
Dedham, Deceiuber 19, 1676. He was a farmer 
and trader at Hatfield, INIassachusetts, of 
wealth and standing, and was for some years 
judge of the county court. The Dwights be- 
came one of the leading families of western 
Massachusetts. He was active in the purchase 
of the territory for the Dedham settlers, es- 
pecially that now comprising the towns of 
Great Barrington, Sheffield, Egremont, Al- 
ford, etc., in Berkshire, from the Indian pro- 
prietors. In 1726 he. Major Pynchon of 
Springfield, and John Ashley, of Westfield, 
were appointed by the general court coiumis- 
sioners under the "Act for issuing one hun- 
dred thousand pounds in bills of credit" for 
government purposes. He was a licensed inn- 
holder in 1728. He married, August 27, 1702, 
Lydia, daughter of Captain Joseph Hawley, 
of Northampton, and Lydia (Marshall) Haw- 
ley, born July 7, 1680, died April 27, 1748. 
He died March 26, 1732. Children: Brigadier 
General Joseph, born October 16, 1703; Cap- 
tain Seth, August 18, 1707; Dorothy, Sep- 
tember 17, 1709; Lydia, April 25, 1712: Anna, 
August 14, 1714: Colonel Josiah (mentioned 
l)elow) ; Captain Edmund, January 19, 1717; 
Colonel Simeon, February 18, 1719: Elisha, 
May 25, 1722; Anna, September 24, 1724. 

(TV) Colonel Josiah Dwight, son of Cap- 
tain Henry Dwight, was born at Hatfield, Oc- 
tober 23, 17 1 5. He graduated at Yale College, 
in 1736, and settled in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. He was lieutenant-colonel of militia 
and judge of the court of common pleas in 
Hampshire, 1750 to 1768, and previously jus- 
tice of the peace. He was a merchant, manu- 
facturer of potash and iron founder. He 
owned some 5,000 acres of land, and was an 
energetic, enterprising prosperous man. He 
married, about 1750, Sarah, daughter of Col- 
onel William and Catherine (Brewer) Pyn- 
chon, born August 14, 1721, died August 4, 
1755. He married (second) October 17, 1757, 
Elizabeth Buckminster, of Brookfield, Massa- 
chusetts, born 1731, died March 10, 1798. He 
died September 28, 1768. Children, born at 
.Springfield, of second wife: Colonel Thomas, 
October 29, 1758: Sarah, August 6, 1760, died 
young; Clarissa, July 4, 1762; Sarah, De- 





^^iS--?--»-^ 




^-6^1 



CONNECTICUT 



1777 



cenil)er 13, I7'>4. married IInii. John Hooker 
(sec Hooker I, Him. Jnsiali, September 17, 
1767. 



(VI) Captain Joseph Hooker, 
HOOKER son of John Hooker (q. v.), 

was born at Farmington, Feb-,^ 
ruary 13, 1705-06. He was a prominent citi- ' 
zen, captain of th6 miHtia. In later years 
he was very corpulent and after he retired it 
was a custom of the local militia to pay their 
respects to the former commander marching 
by his house in review as Captain Hooker sat 
in state upon his piazza. He died at Farming- 
ton, December 19, 1764. He married, January 
23, 1735. Sarah, born May 8, 1712, at Farm- 
ington, died December 25, 1797, daughter of 
Nathaniel and Abigail (Ashley) Lewis, of 
Farmington. Children, born at Farmington : 
Abigail. February 5, 1736; Noadiah, Au- 
gust 29, 1737: Mercy, January 19, 1741-42; 
Ruth, February 21, 1743-44; Anna, December 
14, 1749; Joseph, March 30, 1751. 

(\'II) Xoadiah, son of Captain Joseph 
Hooker, was born at Farmington, August 29, 
1737. died there June 3, 1823. He was an offi- 
cer in the revolutionary war, raised the first 
troops enlisted at Farmington and marched in 
command of a company of one hundred men 
or more, the "very elite of the vicinity." They 
arrived in Boston some three weeks in ad- 
vance of any other enlisted men from Connec- 
ticut. He was commissioned captain by the 
colonial assembly and under that commission 
served in several different regiments. In 1776 
he was commissioned colonel by the provincial 
congress or general assembly of Connecticut 
and served as such to the close of the war and 
was afterward colonel of the Fifteenth Con- 
necticut Regiment of state militia. He repre- 
sented Farmington in the general assembly 
for many years, and was prominent and active 
in church and state. He was for many years 
treasurer of the church and was active in rais- 
ing the funds for building a new church. He 
personally inspected every piece of timber used 
in the construction and made a trip on horse- 
back to the state of Maine to order and select 
the shingles. The fact that the shingles lasted 
for fifty years indicates the care he exercised 
in selecting the stock. He married, January 
I, 1765, Rebecca, born at Wethersfield, Sep- 
tember 7, 1744, died at Farmington, Novem- 
ber 9, 1816, daughter of Major Josiah and 
Mabel (Belden) ^Griswold, of Wethersfield, 
Connecticut. Children, born at Farmington : 
Sarah, October 15, 1765; John, October 24, 
1766; Joseph, October 24, 1766 (twin) ; Sally, 
November 16, 1767; Lucy, January 16, 1771 ; 
John, June 21, 1774; James, September 11, 



1777; Abigail, Mny 23, 1780; Nancy, Sep- 
tember I, 1782 (twin); William G., Septem- 
ber I, 1782. mentioned below; Edward, April 

-V, 1785- 

(VIII) William Griswold, son of Noadiah 
Hooker, was born at Farmington, September 
I, 1782. He was educated as a physi- 
cian and settled at Middlebury, Vermont, 
where he had a drug store. He owned land 
there, which he sold to Cyrus Porter, of Mid- 
dlebury. He was afterward employed in the 
office of the Farmington canal and later be- 
came treasurer of the New Haven Savings 
Bank at New Haven, Connecticut, and con- 
tinued at the head of this institution until his 
death, September 19, 1850. He married, Oc- 
tober 20, 1807, Melinda, born October 30, 
1785, died at New Haven, August 28, 1865, 
daughter of David and Anne (Champion) 
Metcalf, of Lebanon, Connecticut. Children : 
John Metcalf, born at Middlebury, October 
25, i8og, died at New Haven, April 16, 1865, 
graduate of Middlebury College ; Nancy 
Champion, October 18, 1813 ; Samuel, men- 
tioned below. 

(IX) Samuel, son of William Griswold 
Hooker, was born at Middlebury, Vermont, 
June II, 1817, died at White Pigeon, Michi- 
gan, July 12. 1852. He married. May 28, 
1844, Lydia Elizabeth (Strong) Baldwin, born 
August 16, 1816, at Montpelier, Vermont, died 
January 2, 1858, daughter of Subell and Lydia 
Ann (Bailey) Strong, of Montpelier, Ver- 
mont, and widow of Dr. Horatio Marsh Bald- 
win, of Binghamton, New York. Dr. Horatio 
M. Baldwin was a third cousin of Samuel 
Hooker and lived at New Haven. Children : 
William Griswold, mentioned below ; Thomas, 
born January 10, 1848, married Mary Denni- 
son, of Iowa, in 1875, he is manager of the 
Spokane Chronicle; Helen ; Edward D. ; Ar- 
thur ; Harold. 

(X) William Griswold (2), son of Sam- 
uel Hooker, was born in New Haven, Decem- 
ber 25, 1845. , He attended the public schools 
of that city and the Hopkins Grammar School, 
later the Edward L. Hart boarding school at 
Farmington, Connecticut. He was a pupil in 
the old West Middle District school in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. He learned the trade of 
printer in the printing office of Case & Lock- 
wood, of Hartford. He enlisted in Company 
A, Sixteenth Connecticut Regiment of Volun- 
teer Infantry, July 12, 1862, and was dis- 
charged June 25. 1865 (in his nineteenth 
vear). His regiment was in the Ninth Army 
Corps, Second Brigade, Third Division. He 
took part in the battle of Antietam and was 
wounded in tlie shoulder, causing him to be 
absent from dutv for a month. He was at 



1778 



CONNECTICUT 



Fredericksburg, the siege of Suffolk, in the 
Blackberry raid on the peninsula during July, 
1863, and was captured with his regiment at 
Plymouth. North Carolina, April 20, 1864. 
He was confined in the infamous rebel prison 
at Andersonville, from June to September 
and was then removed to Charleston, and later 
to Florence, South Carolina. He was ex- 
changed and returned to his regiment four 
weeks before Lee's surrender. He was one 
of the youngest soldiers from the state of 
Connecticut. He is a member of the Second 
Company, Governor's Foot Guard of New 
Haven and was formerly a member of the 
Hartford City Guard, and of the New Ha- 
ven Grays and was elected lieutenant of that 
company, but declined to serve. He re- 
turned to his trade after the war and for a 
number of years has been connected with the 
Horton Printing Company of Aleriden, Con- 
necticut, as secretary and general manager, 
and is well known and highly respected by the 
business world. He is a member of Merriam 
Post, No. 8, Grand Army of the Republic, 
and was at one time adjutant of the post. 
He is a member of the First Congregational 
Church at ^Nleriden. 

He married, August 31, 1S70, Georgianna, 
born December 22, 1850, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Sarah ( Dennison ) Woodmansee. of 
Mvstic, Connecticut. They have no children. 



The surname Ives is derived from 
IVES the name Iver or Ives, Gaelic, 

meaning chief or leader, and the 
family in England doubtless takes its name 
from St. Ives, county Huntington, England. 
or some other locality, though it may have 
been adopted from a personal name, as many 
other surnames have been. John Ives, of 
the Manor Woodnos. in Orington, Norfolk, 
left his estate to his son Thomas, then less 
than twenty years old. The father died Oc- 
tober 2X, 1568. 

(I) Captain William Ives, believed to have 
been of the county Norfolk family, was born 
in Ens:land, and came to P)Oston in the ship 
"Truelove," in 1635. In 1639 he located at 
New Haven, Connecticut, his name appearing 
in the civil compact, dated June 4, ifi^O. and 
in the allotment to the first settlers. He and 
his wife had seats in the meeting house at 
New Haven in 1646. Children: John, mar- 
ried in 1667, Hannah Merriam: Captain Jo- 
seph, mentioned below. Perhaps others. 

ril) Captain Joseph Ives, son of Captain 
William Ives, was born about 1660, and mar- 
ried Mary Yale. The history of Wallingford, 
Connecticut, gives the following children of 
"John and Mary," but John married Hannah 



, and the children should be credited to 

Joseph and Mary: John died 1738, at Meri- 
den : Hannah, married Joseph Denham ; Dea- 
con Joseph ; Gideon, of Wallingford, married 
Mary Royce ; Nathaniel ; Ebenezer ; Samuel, 
mentioned below; Benjamin. 

(HI) Samuel, son of Captain Joseph Ives, 
was born in Wallingford, Connecticut, June 
5, 1696. He married Mary Gilbert. 

(IV) Dr. Levi Ives, son of Samuel and 
Mary (Gilbert) Ives, was born at New Ha- 
ven, June 4, 1750, and died there October 17, 
1826. He was a physician and surgeon of 
rare qualifications and wide practice. He was 
a patriot in the revolutionary days, served in 
the continental army as surgeon, and was at 
Quebec with General ]\Iongomery. He prac- 
ticed at New Haven from 1773 to the time 
of his death. From 1773 to the present day 
there has been at least one Dr. Ives among 
the leading physicians of New Haven, and 
since 1801 an "Old Dr. Ives," as the senior 
doctor of this remarkable family has . been 
called affectionately by his patients and the 
public. Dr. Ives was an active, conscientious 
and successful physician, who won the repu- 
tation of a public-spirited and patriotic citi- 
zen in troublous times. During the revolu- 
tion he was frequently in active service as 
surgeon to the forces in the field. Once he 
bore a lieutenant's commission in the line dur- 
ing the campaign against General Burgoyne. 

When the British made their wearisome 
and futile expedition from Savin Rock to 
New Haven, he was one of the hardy guerilla 
volunteers that maintained a waspish resist- 
ance to the slow advance of the enemy, and 
he was not only a surgeon but a sharpsliooter 
himself. He married Lydia Augur. 

(V) Dr. Eli Ives, son of Dr. Levi Ives, was 
born at New Haven, February 7, 1779. As 
a youth he was studious and earnest. He fit- 
ted for college partly through his own ex- 
ertions and partly under the tuition of Dr. 
Aeneas Munson and Rev. A. R. Robbins of 
Norwalk, Connecticut. He entered Yale Col- 
lege and was graduated in the class of 1799. 
Professors J. L. Kingsley and Moses Stuart 
were classmates. He was for two years rec- 
tor of the Flopkins Grammar School of New 
Haven. He declined the tutorship offered to 
him in Yale College, and proceeded to study 
medicine under the instruction of his father 
and Dr. Aeneas Munson, a physician of im- 
usual attainments in botany and chemistry. 
He attended lectures under Drs. Rush and 
Wooster in Philadelphia, and in 180T began 
to practice in New Haven in association with 
his honored father. He achieved a notable 
success in practice from the outset. He was 



CONNECTICUT 



1779 



ail inliuential factor in the establishment of 
the Vale Medical School in US13, and became 
one of the first five instructors, as assistant 
professor of materia niedica and botany, con- 
ducting all the duties of that department for 
a period of sixteen years. He devoted nuich 
time and labor to the making of a botanic 
garden, which was located on the present site 
of the Sheffield Scientific School. In 1829 
he was transferred to the department of 
theory and practice of medicine, and contin- 
ued in this chair until he resigned in 1852 on 
account of age and infirmity. During the 
thirty-nine years in which he was a teacher 
in the Yale Medical School he had in his 
classes more than fifteen hundred students. 
He had the advantage in youth of being the 
son of a learned and able physician, and he 
began his career with a thorough and practi- 
cal knowledge of medicine and a good general 
education. He was versed in Latin and Greek 
and ranked well in college. When he was 
but twenty-three years old he was honored 
by his selection as the Phi Beta Kappa orator. 
He spoke on botany and chemistry. He had 
the additional advantage of studying under 
Rush, Shippen. Wistar and liarton, at the 
University of Pennsylvania, then the best of 
their profession in this country. He was 
given the degree of M. D. causa honoris, by 
the Connecticut ]\Iedical Society. Though his 
practice was large, he was not strict in his 
business methods and he was satisfied with 
modest fees when he might have acquired 
wealth. His skill in the use of medicine 
showed a wide acquaintance with drugs not 
then generally known, and he was always a 
leader in study and practice. He and his 
eldest son, Dr. N. B. Ives, in 1832 applied 
chloroform, discovered by Samuel Guthrie of 
Sacketts Harbor, and described in the Journal 
of Science that year, but just failed of dis- 
covering its properties and usefulness as an 
anaesthetic. He was a member of the con- 
vention of physicians that framed the first 
United States Pharmacopeia in 1820, and ten 
years later at the next meeting of the con- 
vention he was the presiding ofticer. He was 
vice-president of the Connecticut Medical So- 
ciety, 1824-27, and in 1861 was president of 
the American Medical Association. He was 
a candidate for lieutenant-governor of Con- 
necticut on the Anti-Masonic ticket in 1831. 
He was simple in his tastes and lived plainly. 
It has been said that his face was a plain in- 
dex of his character, showing a charming 
combination of benevolence, shrewdness and 
simplicity and often lighted with mirthful- 
ness. He enjoved the privilege and happiness 
of a serene and beautiful old age, closely sur- 



rounded and consulted by two sons and one 
grandson, all engaged with conspicuous suc- 
cess in the practice of medicine. He was ten- 
der and generous in disposition and made 
many friends among all ages and classes. 

He was a man of varied interests, loving 
horticulture and agriculture especially, and 
was president of the horticultural and pomo- 
logical societies. Pie was an earnest promo- 
ter of the Sheffield Scientific School. He 
sought after the truth, it has been said, in all 
its forms, and recognized the common bond 
which connects arts and sciences. He re- 
ceived many diplomas and degrees from insti- 
tutions of learning in this country and abroad. 
He possessed a retentive memory, clear in- 
sight and profound knowledge of many 
things. He had the courage to undertake bold 
treatment in desperate cases. In all the walks 
of life he was thoroughly honorable and up- 
right. He was one of the founders of the 
New Haven Medical Association, and was 
active in the State Medical Society. When 
an old man, he was president of the National 
Medical Association. He was an earnest op- 
ponent of slavery, and an advocate of total 
abstinence, when his position on both issues 
was extreme!}' uniDopular. He joined the 
North Congregational Church in 1808. and 
was a prominent member for many years. 

He married, September 17, 1805, Ma- 
ria, daughter of Dr. Nathan and Mary 
(Phelps) Beers. Her father was an adjutant 
in the revolution, and had charge of .\ndre 
the night before his execution. Dur- 
ing that time Major Andre drew a pen por- 
trait of himself and gave it to Mr. Beers. 
This interesting heirloom is now in the Yale 
Art Gallery. Dr. Ives died October 8, 1861. 
Children : Levi, and Nathan Beers, both men- 
tioned below. 

(VI) Dr. Levi Ives, son of Dr. Eli Ives, 
was born July 13, 1816, at New Haven. He 
attended the Hopkins Grammar School, and 
took a partial course in Yale College. He be- 
gan the study of medicine under his father's 
instruction and entered Yale Medical School,, 
from which he graduated in the class of 1838. 
He was an interne at Bellevue Hospital for a 
year and a half, and then began to practice 
medicine at New Haven in association with 
his father and brother. The fame of the fa- 
ther and grandfather did not suffer at his 
hands. He made obstetrics a specialty, and 
had a very large practice. With undoubted 
natural skill, quick in judgment, of good 
sense and genial disposition, he won the hearts 
as well as the confidence of his patients. Aft- 
erward he widened his field of [iractice and 
became consulting physician and surgeon in 



i78o 



CONNECTICUT 



the Connecticut State Hospital. He \vas a 
member of the New Haven Medical Society, 
of which he was at one time president ; mem- 
ber of the Connecticut Aledical Associ'ition 
and the American Medical Association, to the 
conventions of which he was often a dele- 
gate. He belonged to the American .\cademy 
of Arts and Sciences. He married, in June, 
1841, Caroline, daughter of Elijah Shoemaker. 
of Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, grandson 
of Elijah, one of the victims of the horrid 
massacre. Their only child was Robert, born 
April 1842, graduate of Yale, A. AJ. and 
I\I. D., deceased. 

(VI) Dr. Nathan Beers Ives, son of Dr. 
Eli Ives, was born at New Haven, June 26. 
1806, died there June 18, 1869. He was edu- 
cated at Yale College, receiving the degree of 
A. B. in 1825 and M. D. in 1828. He began 
to practice medicine in 1828 at the age of 
twenty-two years, and continued until dis- 
abled by ill health during his last years. As 
the fruit of his lifetime of industry and a 
token of his ability in his profession he left 
an ample estate, much larger than had ever 
before been accumulated in the practice of 
medicine in New Haven. For a good many 
years it was admitted that he took the cream 
of the business in his profession, and although 
he was naturally envied by his younger or less 
fortunate fellow practitioners, none said or 
felt that his success was unmerited. "His per- 
ceptive faculties were naturally keen and his 
management of his resources showed unusual 
tact. He devoted himself to his professional 
duties and to the welfare of his patients with 
a singleness of purpose which can spring 
only from the genuine fitness of a man for 
his calling. Rarely did he enter a household 
as a physician without becoming permanently 
bound to it as a friend. He had a vivid en- 
joyment of good company and bright conver- 
sation, in which with his natural vivacity of 
temperament he always bore an active part. 
There always seemed a certain fitness in it 
that these gifts should be lodged in a short, 
slight, alert figure." "His soul", as old Ful- 
ler says, "had but a small diocese to visit." 
"It was related of him as a child that he 
climbed the branches of a great stramonium 
weed among the herbs of his father's wonder- 
ful garden." For many years he gave pri- 
vate instruction to medical students, but ne\er 
consented to become an instructor in the med- 
ical school. He married Sarah Badger. 

f\'II) Dr. Charles Linneus Ives, only child 
of Dr. Nathan Beers Ives, was born in New 
Haven, June 22, 183 1. He attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native city, Yale College, 
and studied medicine in' Philadelphia. In 



Yale, in the professional school and in the 
great hospitals of New York City, he had 
the best opportunity America could afford 
to prepare him for his life work. "During 
the period of preparation, as throughout his 
life, it was characteristic of him that what- 
ever his hand found to do he did it with his 
might. There was a bright alacrity in his way 
of work and living and, if natural zest ever 
failed to attract him, an inexorable sense of 
duty always stood ready to supply motive 
power. He was a devoutly religious man 
with an intense feeling of responsibility for 
himself and for other people by which rather 
than by considerations of e.xpediency or com- 
fort he was actuated. He had a curiously un- 
hesitating way of attacking situations which 
men are apt to fight shy of, as being knotty 
and unproductive or involving troublesome 
collisions." 

Dr. Ives was in his thirty-eighth year when 
he was appointed professor of the theory and 
practice of medicine in Yale ]\Iedical School. 
He had been in active general practice in as- 
sociation with his father in New Haven for 
thirteen years, and had gained a large share 
of the respect and confidence of his profes- 
sional fellows, as well as that more common 
favor which makes itself manifest in the 
length of a doctor's visiting list. "To his in- 
tercourse with his pupils, accordingly, he 
brought a considerable wealth of observation 
and experience as well as that native enthu- 
siasm which was one of his most striking 
traits. It is a trait which greatly endears a 
teacher to his pupils, an elder to his juniors. 
Sharp statements, if not of fact, at least of 
opinion, with no trimming or qualifications, 
are apt to stick fast in the mind, easy to jot 
<lown in the notebook — these are the delight 
of the learner, especially in medicine, where 
as yet too many regions in which of neces- 
sity he wanders darkling. That agnosticism 
in therapeutics, which was somewhat fash- 
ionable for a while not long since, and which 
its apostles seemed to regard with compla- 
cence as a mark of intellectual superiority has 
never prevailed at New Haven. Dr. Ives at 
least was free from it — it was foreign to his 
nature to be lacking in positive convictions on 
any subject to which he turned his serious 
attention." 

From his }outh he had a constant struggle 
against ill health, and five years after he was 
chosen professor he had to resign for this 
reason. On the same account he gave up his 
practice, but afterward he accepted the pro- 
fessorship of diseases of the nervous system 
in the Medical School of the University of 
New York, and went to Europe to make a spe- 



CONNECTICUT 



1781 



cial study of the subject. Owing to contin- 
ued ill liealtii, liowever, he was never able to 
enter n])un tlie duties of this position. In la- 
ter years he found congenial occupation in the 
preparation of a book, cntitleil "The Bible 
Doctrine of the Soul," embodying the result 
of theological studies, to which he was for a 
long time addicted. He died at New Haven 
March 21, 1879. He was a member of the 
New Haven IMedical Society, the Connecticut 
Medical Society, and the American Medical 
Association. He married, June 20, i860, Eliz- 
abeth Watson Salter, born in New Haven, 
December 27, 1833, daughter of Cleveland 
Jarman Salter, granddaughter of Daniel Sal- 
ter of Tiverton, England, who settled at New 
Haven. Her mother was Eliza (Cotton) Sal- 
ter of Hartford. They had no children. Mrs. 
Ives resides at- 66 Trumbull street, New Ha- 
ven. 



The surname ^^'ads- 
^^'ADS\^'ORTH worth is derived from 

the Anglo-Saxon word, 
W'aldesworth, meaning "Wood's Court, and 
from very ancient times has been in use in 
Yorkshire, England, where it is still common. 
The surname Walworth had the same origin. 
The only coat-of-arms of Wadsworth is of 
the Yorkshire family and is described : Gules 
three fleurs-de-lis stalked and slipped argent. 
Two immigrants of the family, probably sons 
of Thomas Wadsworth, came from England 
to America in the early settlement, Christo- 
pher and William, mentioned below. The Bi- 
ble that Christopher brought with him is still 
preserved in the Cowles family of Hartford. 
He settled in Duxbury, Massachusetts, and 
became a prominent citizen. 

(I) William Wadsworth came with his 
brother Christopher in the ship "Lion," land- 
ing at Boston, Sunday, September 16, 1632, 
after a voyage of twelve weeks. It is believed 
that he was here earlier and had returned to 
England. He was born about 1600. He was 
admitted freeman of Massachusetts TJay Col- 
ony, November 6, 1633. He settled in Cam- 
bridge and when the town was organized he 
was elected to the first board of selectmen 
and served in 1634-35. From Camijridge he 
came to Hartford, Connecticut, in the Hook- 
er company and lived there the remainder of 
his days. He died in 1675. He was among 
the more wealthy and substantial proprietors 
of the town. He was collector in 1637, se- 
lectman, 1642-47, and active in church and 
state affairs. His house lot was co-extensive 
with the present square bounded by Asylum, 
Trumbull and West Pearl streets, and the road 
to the river and continued in the family until 



1773, when it went into the hands of George 
and William Burr, relatives. He married 
(second) I'^lizabcth, daughter of Rev. .Samuel 
Stone. Children of first wife : Sarah, mar- 
ried John Wilco.x; William, died in infancy; 
Mary, married Thomas Stoughton ; John, 
mentioned below. Children of second wife: 
Elizabeth, born 1645; Samuel, 1646; Joseph, 
captain, immortalized in history by his exploit 
in hiding the colonial charter in the Charter 
Oak; Sarah, 1650; Thomas, 165 1 ; Rebecca, 
1656. 

(II) John, son of' William Wadsworth, was 
born in Hartford. He was an early settler 
of Farmington, Connecticut, where he resided 
until his death. His widow Sarah survived 
him. He was one of the most prosperous 
and influential citizens. In 1669 of eighty- 
four taxable estates his was third with a valu- 
ation of one hundred and eighty-three pounds. 
He was sergeant of the military company, and 
member of what was later called the state 
senate. He was present when his brother, 
Captain Joseph, concealed the charter. He 
married Sarah Stanley, born at Hartford. 
Children: Sarah, born -1657: Samuel, 1660; 
John, 1662; Mercy, 1665: William, mentioned 
below: Nathaniel, 1677: James (twin), 1677; 
Thomas, 1680; Hezekiah, 1683. 

(III) William (2), son of John Wads- 
worth, was born in 1671, died in 1751. He 
represented Farmington in the general assem- 
bly from 17 18 to 1740. He married (first), 

1696, Abigail Lewis, who died in 1707. He 
married (second), 1707, Sarah Bunce. Chil- 
dren, born at Farmington : William, born 

1697, died young; Mary, 1700: Hannah, 1701 ; 
Abigail, 1702; Ezekiel, 1704: William, men- 
tioned below. 

(IV) WilHam (3), son of William (2) 
Wadsworth, was born in 1709, died 1769. He 
lived in Farmington. He married, in 1740, 
Ruth Hart. Children, born in Farmington: 
William, 1742: Asahel, mentioned below; 
Gad, 1743; Ezekiel, 1746, died 1748. 

(V) Asahel, son of William (3) \yad_s- 
worth, was born at Farmington, 1743. died in 
1817. He married (first) "Mercy Woodruff, 
who died in 181 1. He married (second) 
Hannah Wadsworth, who died in 18 18, aged 
sixtv-one, daughter of Nathaniel W'adsworth, 
Jr. ' Children, born at Farmington: Manna, 

horn 1768, died 1791 : Ruth, married 

Washburn and went to Vermont : Thomas 
Hart, mentioned below. 

(VI) Thomas Hart, son of Asahel Wads- 
worth. was born at Farmington, 1771. died 
in 1853. He married (first) Sarah North, 
who fifed in 1809: (second), in 1812, Eliza- 
beth Rowe. Children, born at Farmington:. 



I 



1782 



CONNECTICUT 



Anna Deming, 1805, died young; Marcus 
North. 1806: Lucy, 1808; Winthrop Manna, 
mentioned below: Adrian R., 1814; Elizabeth 
A., married Rockwell. 

(VII) Winthrop Manna, son of Thomas 
Hart Wadsworth, was born at Farmington, 
November 27, 181 2, died November 24, 1891. 
He was educated in the public schools. He 
owned the homestead which has been in the 
family since 1682. He was a well-to-do and 
prominent farmer, at one time president of 
the State Dairymen's Association, and presi- 
dent of the Farmington Creamery Corpora- 
tion, the first of its kind in New England ; 
president also of the Union Agricultural So- 
ciety, comprising the farmers of five towns, 
for fifteen years. He was a charter member 
of the Farmers Savings Bank, which now 
has more than two million dollars in de- 
posits. He represented the town in the gen- 
eral assembly. He married, December 21, 
1853, Lucy Ann Ward, who died February 
10, 1883. Children, born at Farmington : 
Ward M., 1854: Adrian R., mentioned below: 
Harry H.. 1857: Frederick A., 1858: Frank 
H., 1859 ; Isabella, died in infancy ; George 
B., 1864. 

(VIII) Adrian R., son of Winthrop ^^lanna 
Wadsworth, was born in 1855 at Farmington. 
He attended Deacon Hart's Academy at 
Farmington, Professor Camp's School at New 
Britain and graduated from the Sheffield Sci- 
entific School of Yale University in the class 
of 1880. He followed the profession of en- 
gineering and in 1882 was city surveyor of 
Shamokin, Pennsylvania. In 1883 he was 
in the employ of the Clark Bridge Company 
in Virginia and practiced both civil and min- 
ing engineering" in Minnesota. He retm-ned 
afterward to his native town and followed 
farming and civil engineering. He was a 
prime mover in organizing the Farmington 
^^'ater Company, of which he is secretary and 
treasurer. He is also secretary, and treasurer 
of the Farmington Creamery Company, one 
of the oldest and most prosperous in New 
England. He was president of the State 
Dairymen's Association for two years. He 
is secretary and treasurer of the Connecticut 
Association of Civil Engineers. He repre- 
sented his town in the general assembly in 
1897 and was Iiouse chairman of the com- 
mittee on contingent expenses and forfeited 
rights. In 1899 he was on the committee on 
roads, bridges and rivers, and in 1901 was 
chairman of the agricultural committee. He 
has been justice of the peace and first select- 
man of Farmington. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. He is a member of the Congre- 
gational church. He is a member of Evening 



Star Lodge, No. loi. Free and Accepted 
Masons : Royal Arch Masons : Royal and Se- 
lect Masters and Knights of Pythias. He 
married, April 16, 1890, Charlotte B., daugh- 
ter of William C. and Mary W. Steel, of 
Hartford. Children : Helen B., born April 
ID, 1891 : Adrian R., Jr., February 25, 1895 ; 
William Steele, December 16, 1899. 



James Cole, immigrant ancestor, 
COLE came probably from Essex county, 

England, and settled in Hartford, 
Connecticut, with the founders under Hooker. 
His name is on the list of the original set- 
tlers and on the monument at Hartford. His 
home lot was on Main street. He was a 
cooper by trade. His will was dated in 
1652. His widow died February 20, 1678-79. 
Children : Abigail, married Daniel Sullivan ; 
John, mentioned below. 

(II) John, son of James Cole, was born 
in England. He was admitted a freeman at 
Hartford in 1655 ; was constable in 1657. 
He owned eleven lots of land, comprising 
eighty acres. His will was dated August 4, 
1683, proved March 4, 1686. Children : 
John; Job; Samuel, mentioned below; Marv, 

born June 27, 1654 ; Anne, married 

Benton ; Lydia, married John Wilson ; Na- 
thaniel. 

(III) Samuel, son of John Cole, was born 

in Hartford. He married ]\Iary , who 

died M^arch 16, 1693. Children, born at Hart- 
ford : Samuel, 1673: Ichabod : John; Jona- 
than, mentioned below : Elizabeth, married 
Richard Smith ; Dorothy ; Hannah. 

(IV) Jonathan, son of Samuel Cole, was 
born about 1685 at Hartford. He lived at 
East Hartford and Manchester, Connecticut. 
He married . Children : Jon- 
athan, mentioned below : Mary, married John 
Kendall : Hannah ; David. 

(V) Jonathan (2), son of Jonathan (i), 
Cole, was born at Hartford. He received 
land from his father by deed. April 24, 1749, 
and sold it June 29, 1756, to Captain David 

Good. He married . Had two 

children : Thomas, mentioned below, and 
Mary. 

(VI) Thomas, son of Jonathan (2) Cole, 
was born about 17.S5. He was a soldier in 
the revolution and was with the continental 
army when it was occupying New York City. 
He was sick in New York, and his wife 
passed through both lines on horseback and 
took him home and nursed him back to health. 
He married, at Norwalk, Connecticut. No- 
vember 28. 1779, Alary Ressiquie, of French 
ancestry, daughter of .Alexander Ressiquie, 
granddaughter of Alexander Ressiquie and 



CONNECTICUT 



1 7^3 



great-granddaiishter of Pierre Bontecue, one 
of the French Huguenot settlers. His widow 
was granted a pension on account of his ser- 
vice in the revohuion. 'Jliey Uved in \\'ilton 
parish, part of Norwalk, and he was a wagon- 
maker hy trade. Children, born at Norwalk : 
Thomas, October 20, 1780; Ira, February 10, 
1783; Timothy, August ii, 1785; Sally, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1788; Curtis, mentioned below; Sam- 
uel, October 22, 1792; Sherman, June 4, 1804, 
manufacturer of carriages and hubs in Wil- 
ton, married Susan, daughter of Louis Hurl- 
butt. 

(V'll) Curtis, son of Thomas Cole, was 
born May 10. 1790, in Wilton. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, and followed his 
father's trade as carriagemaker and wheel- 
wright and later had a farm at Easton, Con- 
necticut. He spent his last years at the home 
of his daughter at Huntington, Connecticut. 
He married Mary Sturges, who was born in 
^^'eston, daughter of James and Mary (Deit- 
mann) Sturges. She died at the age of sev- 
enty-seven years. Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Cole 
had two children : Julia Ann and James 
Sturges, mentioned below. Julia Ann mar- 
ried Joseph E. Fields, who was a resident of 
Huntington, later Stepney, Connecticut, and 
they had two daughters: Mary D., married 

Lampheer and died January 28, 191 1, 

and Anne, married Wright and resides 

in Newtown. 

(VIII) James Sturges, son of Curtis Cole, 
was born at Wilton, September 19, 1825. 
He was reared and educated in Wilton. At 
the age of eighteen he came to Easton, Con- 
necticut, and followed farming for many 
years. Afterward he lived in Trumbull, Con- 
necticut, where he followed farming for five 
years. For a time he resided in that part of 
Fairfield now in Bridgeport, and in 1889 came 
to Bridgeport and there spent his last years 
in retirement. He died August 30, 1906, aged 
eighty-one years, an honored and respected 
citizen. He was successful in business and 
earned the confidence and esteem of all who 
knew him by fair dealing and scrupulous in- 
tegrity in all his transactions. He was a 
faithful member of St. John's Church. In 
politics he was a Democrat, later a Republi- 
can, and he was for one term a selectman of 
Easton. He married Emeline Mallett, a na- 
tive of Trumbull, daughter of Ephraim San- 
ford Mallett (see Mallett VI). Children: 
I. George Wilbur, born December 14, 1858, 
resides in Long Hill, Trumbull, Connecticut ; 
married Annie Sherwood Burr ; children : 
Amy Burr, Clifford Mallett, Mabel Sherwood 
and Cynthia. 2. Charles Mallett, born Feb- 
ruary 26, 1863, married February 11, 1893, 



Edith Anna Wheeler (see Wheeler VIII), 
and had one son, Hobart Fairchild Cole. 3. 
Mary Emma, born October 28, 1867, mar- 
ried Edward Larry Baldwin, of Leicestershire, 
New York, and they have two children : 
Stanley Cole and Esther M. Baldwin. 4. Jen- 
nie Estelle, born December 11, 1871, married 
C. Henry Hurlburt : children : Henry Cole, 
James Sturges and Edward Glenn Hurlburt. 

(The Mallett Line'). 

(I) David lilallett, the progenitor, was a 
French Huguenot living at Rochelle, France. 
During the persecution of his sect his brother 
and brother-in-law were among the victims 
put to death by being broken on the wheel. 
In 1687 he took refuge in England, where he 
died in 1691. Early in life he had a com- 
mission as commissary under the French gov- 
ernment. 

(II) John, son of David Mallett, was born 
in France and went to England with his fa- 
ther. After the death of his father he re- 
turned to his native land and secured his wife 
and two children and some money and sailed 
with other Huguenots for South Carolina. 
At Santee his vessel landed, and two other 
ships that came in company with that vessel 
landed their passengers at Beaufort. His wife 
and two children died. He later returned to 
Europe, to some part of Germany, where a 
brother had taken refuge, and for two years 
he was a soldier. He came again to this 
country by way of New York to Santee and 
located soon at the Huguenot town of New 
Rochelle, New York, about 1695. One of his 
brothers was a physician in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land : another was, as stated, in Germany, and 
a third came to xA-merica with him. He mar- 
ried, in 1695, Johanna Lyon, born in 1663, 
died September 16. 1764, aged one hundred 
and one years, in the house where Mrs. Cole's 
father was born. Her will v/as dated March 
18, 1763. bequeathing to sons John and David. 
He settled at Fairfield, Connecticut, and died 
September 23, 1745 ; is buried at Stratfield 
cemetery. Children : David, mentioned be- 
low : Captain John, born October 16, 1703 ; 
Lewis, August 14, 1706: Johanna, March 10, 
1710: Peter. March 31. 1712. 

(III) David (2), son of John Mallett, was 
born January 10, 1701, died August 22, 1777. 
He resided at Tashua. He married Esther 
Angevine, born at New Rochelle, New York, 
in 171 1, died at Tashua. January 16, 1787. 
A journal of some one hundred and eighty 
pages, written by David (i) and John (2). 
was finallv lost, but was reproduced in some 
measure from memory by a descendant who 
was familiar with its pages. His account is 



1784 



CONNECTICUT 



given in the Mallett genealogy and is exceed- 
ingly interesting. He describes the elegant 
home at Fairfield, the family, servants, all 
speaking French, and gives an unusually good 
account of the first settler and his family. 
Practically all of this account has been veri- 
fied by records. David's will was dated 
March 5, 1775, mentioning all the children 
but Hannah. Children of David Mallett, born 
at Tashua and Trumbull, Connecticut : John, 
October 28, 173 1 ; Hannah, September 10, 
1733; David, November 15, 1735: Joseph, 
mentioned below; Esther, January I, 1745, 
married John Wheeler (see Wheeler V). 

(IV) Joseph, son of David (2) Mallett, 
was born March 25. 1740, died November 15, 
1819. He married May 4. 1768, Jerusha 
Middlebrook, born August 31, 1742, died Au- 
gust 31, 1819. Children, born at Tashua and 
Trumbull: Elizabeth, February 7, 1769; 
Ephraim, February 18, 1772, died young; 
Elijah, mentioned below; Robert, June 15, 
1778; Esther, April 8, 1781. 

(V) Elijah, son of Joseph ^Mallett, was 
born August 31, 1773, died July 6. 1806. He 
married, December i, 1795, Sarah Sanford, 
born January 11, 1777, died February 27, 
1834. Children, born at Tashua : Ephraim 
Sanford, mentioned below ; Josiah, April 23, 
1798; Esther, January 17, 1802. 

(VI) Ephraim Sanford, son of Elijah Mal- 
lett, was born at Tashua, January 6, 1797, 
died March 15, 1881, at Tashua. He mar- 
ried, April 2, 1828, Cynthia Sherman, born 
April I, 1792. died August 10, 1881, 
daughter of Ebenezer Sherman. Chil- 
dren, born in Trumbull : Sarah Ann, 
February 22, 1830, died August 31, 
1834; Emeline, born September 29, 183 1, 
married James Sturges Cole, April 27, 185 1 
(see Cole VIII) ; Mary Esther, December 16, 
1834, married Charles Middlebrook Jennings; 
Josiah H., February 16, 1838, married Juliette 
Sherwood, December 14, 1870. 

(The Wheeler Line). 
(I) Sergeant Ephraim Wheeler, immi- 
grant ancestor, came from England at an 
early date in company, very likely, with Rev. 
John Jones and party. He located first at 
Concord, Massachusetts, where he was made 
a freeman, March 13, 1639, and in 1644 he 
came to Fairfield with Mr. Jones' colony. 
At this time he had a wife and one child, if 
not two children. He became prominent in 
the colony, acquiring a large amount of land, 
which was mentioned in his will, dated Sep- 
tember 22, 1669. On October 28, 1670, his 
estate was inventoried at ten hundred and 
twenty-six pounds sterling eighteen shillings 



and six pence, and in 1681 his widow paid 
taxes on seven hundred and six acres of land. 
Children: Isaac, born in 1638, died young; 
Isaac, mentioned below ; Mary ; Ruth : Han- 
nah ; Rebecca ; Judith ; Abigail, died February 
7, 17.12 ; Samuel, less than twenty-one years 
of age in 1669; Timothy; Ephraim, 

(II) Deacon Isaac \\'heeler, son of Ser- 
geant Ephraim Wheeler, was born December 
13, 1642. He received from the town of Fair- 
field, on February 12, 1673, a building lot and 
pasture lot, according to the custom of the 
town with new householders. This tract lay 
on the west side of what is now Park avenue 
and in the vicinity of State street, and it was 
occupied by him as a homestead. He also 
received from his parents a large amount of 
real estate and became a well-to-do farmer. 
His interest in religious progress is seen from 
the fact that he was one of the first nine 
members of the Stratfield Congregational 
Church. He married and had children ; 
Isaac, mentioned below ; Samuel ; Sarah ; Re- 
becca ; Mary ; Experience ; IMercy. 

(III) Isaac (2), son of Deacon Isaac (i) 
Wheeler resided in Fairfield, and on April 
18, 1698, his estate was inventoried at four 
hundred and thirty-nine pounds nine shillings 
and five pence. He married and had chil- 
dren : Isaac, born 1692 ; Ebenezer, men- 
tioned below ; Elizabeth. 1696. 

(IV) Ebenezer, son of Isaac (2) Wheeler, 
was born 1694; m.ade his home in Stratford; 
his estate was distributed June 12, 1747-48, 
He married Abigail Edwards. Children : 
Ebenezer, born February 21, 1732, died April 
-7- 1735; Sarah, died July 29, 1733; IMary ; 
Rebecca ; John, mentioned below. 

(V) John, son of Ebenezer Wheeler, was 
born in 1738. He married, January 26, 1761, 
Esther Mallett, born lanuary i, 1745, daugh- 
ter of David IMallett (see Mallett III), Chil- 
dren: Ebenezer, born February 11, 1765; 
David, August, • 1767 ; John M.. mentioned 
below. 

(VII) John M., son of John Wheeler, was 
born January 7, 1769, and settled in the town 
of Trumbull, where he was a farmer. He 
married Ann Walker, born July 11, 1774. 
daughter of Eliakim Walker. Children : Me- 
lissa, born 1797; Walker, January 21, 1803; 
Ebenezer, mentioned below. 

(VII) Ebenezer (2), son of John AI, 
^^'heeler, was born November 18. 1812, in 
Trumbull, He always took a lively interest 
in all the affairs of his town, holding various 
town offices, and was a member of the state 
legislature in 1853. He was an active mem- 
ber of the Episcopal church at Long Hill, 
being warden at the time of his death. He 



CONNECTICUT 



1785 



died September 17, 1887. On February 20, 
1840, be married CordcHa ^fallctt. Children: 
Hon. llobart R.. mentinnetl below ; W'ibnot C, 
March 11, 1848. 

(VIII) Hon. Hobart Riitlcdgc Wheeler, 
son of Ebenezer (2) Wheeler, was born in 
Trumbull, November 20, 1840. He attended 
the public schools of Trumbull and New 
Britain, Connecticut, and New York City. He 
)s one of the wealthiest and most inlluential 
citizens of Trumbull, having large holdings 
of valuable real estate in that town and in 
Bridgeport. His winters are spent in liridge- 
port and his summers at his country home 
in Trumbull. He is a Democrat in politics 
and takes a keen interest in public affairs. 
He has represented the town of Trumbull in 
the general assembly. He is an Episcopalian 
in religion. He married, June 15, 1864, An- 
toinette S., daughter of Daniel Fairchild, of 
Trumbull. Children : Edith Anna, born July 
2, 1867, married February 11, 1893, Charles 
Mallett Cole, and has one son, Hobart 
Fairchild ; Daniel Fairchild, March 28, 1872. 



Thomas Rowley, immigrant 
RO^^'LEY ancestor, was born in Eng- 
land and settled early at 
Windsor, Connecticut. He bought and prob- 
ably resided on the Eggleston lot at Backer 
Row. He removed before 1682 to Simsbury. 
He married. May 5, 1669, Mary, daughter 
of Henry Denslow. Children : Mary, born 
April 16, 1670: Thomas, mentioned below; 
child, died j\lay 22, 1676 : ;\Iartha', born May 
13, 1677; John, October 27, 1679, buried No- 
vember 10, 1679; Thomas; Abigail, February 
10, 1686; Grace, August 5, 1692; Samuel, 
died August 11, 1697; Elizabeth, married 
^^'illiam Lucas. 

(II) Thomas (2), son of Thomas (i) 
Rowlev, was born in Windsor in 1671. died 
October 28, 1741. He married, March 16, 
1699, Violet (Shepard) Stedman. born June 
Ti, 168 1, died April i. 1751. daughter of 
John, granddaughter of Edward Shepard. 
Children: Hannah, born July 5, 1700; Ann, 
September 24, 1703 ; Thomas, December 5, 
1705; Sarah, September 17, 1708; Samuel, 
March 11, 1710, mentioned below; Daniel, 
October 11, 1717; Hannah, February 11. 1720. 
(HI) Samuel, son of Thomas (2) Row- 
ley, was born in Windsor, March 11, 1710, 
died December 6, 181 1, at the great age of 
one hundred and one years. He was a mem- 
ber of the Winterbury Church, W'indsor. 
Children: Samuel, May 29, 1746; Elizabeth, 
March 29, 1748; Job, April 15, 1752, men- 
tioned below; Stephen, March 21. 1755; Silas, 
December 2, 1759 ; Lucina, March 10, 1762 ; 



Kate, December 9, 1766; William, died Oc- 
tober 28, 1770. 

(IV' ) Job, son of Samuel Rowley, was born 
at Windsor, April 15, 1752, tlied b'ebruary 24, 
1823. He resided at Bloomticld, formerly 
Windsor. He was a soldier in the revolution 
in Captain Barnard's company, Connecticut 
Line (Third), Colonel Samuel \Vyllys, of 
Hartford, for eight months, in 1778. He was 
also in Lieutenant Charles Seymour's com- 
pany, General Erastus Wolcott's regiment, 
the previous year. He married Ruth Loomis, 
born March 11, 1763, died February 5. 1816. 
Children, born at Bloomfield. baptized there 
July 20, 1800: Job, born 1788, resided at 
Hartford, died 1864, married Ruth Hale ; 
Ruth, married Hooker Clark, died 1854; 
Emma, died aged five years : Naomi, died 
February 21, 1794, aged two years; Bildad, 
born August 17, 1795, mentioned below ; 
Loomis, born April 13, 1797, married Rachel 
McNeil ; W^arren, died aged eight years. 

(V) Captain Bildad Rowley, son of Job 
Rowley, was born August 17, 1795, died June 
12, 1884. He resided at Bloomfield, Con- 
necticut. He was captain of his company and 
a leading citizen of the town. He married 
(first) Clarissa Latimer, who died September 
25, 1835. He married (second) Nancy 
Welles, who died August 20, 1871. Children 
of first wife, born at Bloomfield: i. Heze- 
kiah Latimer, February 28. 1819, married, 
October 14, 1841, Jane Loomis; George 
Washington, September, 1822, married Re- 
becca Latimer, and died April 13, 1873. 
Children of second wife, born at Bloomfield: 
Henry A\^elles, February 28, 1839, mentioned 
below; Edward Bunce, July 28, 1841, never 
married. 

(VI) Henry Welles, son of Captain Bildad 
Rowley, was born at Bloomfield, February 28, 
1839. He lived at Bloomfield and was a 
leading citizen. He married Harriet T. 
Adams. Children, born at Bloomfield : Will- 
iam Henry. April 15, 1863, married. October 
II. 1888, Lucia P. Bidwell ; George Adams. 
September 29, 1864, died April 24, 18S0 ; 
Andrew Scott, January 20. 1868, died August 
22, 1868 ; Arthur Malcolm. June 6, 1870 ; 
Clayton Welles, August 23. 1874 ; Bertha 
May, July 15, 1877; Robert Lee, .'Kugust 15, 
1879, mentioned below ; Hattie Adams, No- 
vember I, 1880, died August 14. 1881. 

(VII) Dr. Robert Lee Rowley, son of 
Henry Welles Rowley, was born at Bloom- 
field. August 15, 1879. He attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native town and the Hart- 
fort high school, from which he was grad- 
uated in the class of 1898. He studied his 
profession in Yale ]Medical School and re- 



1786 



CONNECTICUT 



ceived the degree of [M. D. in 1903. During 
the following two years he was an interne 
at the Hartford Hospital and was house sur- 
geon six months. For a short time he was 
in the Post-Graduate Hospital in New York 
and in the Bridgeport Hospital. He began 
to practice in Hartford, January i, 1906. 
He is medical director of the department of 
policies of the Hartford Life Insurance Com- 
pany and is on the staff of the Hartford 
Hospital. He is a member of the Hartford 
Medical Society, the Hartford County Med- 
ical Society, the Connecticut Medical Asso- 
ciation, the Hartford Club and Hartford Golf 
Club. In religion he is an Episcopalian and 
a member of Trinitv Church, Hartford. 



Nicholas Knapp, the immigrant 
KNAPP ancestor, was born in England 
and came to ^Massachusetts with 
Winthrop about 1630. He settled at Water- 
town, where he sold land and privileges, May 
6, 1646, and died in April, 1670. He mar- 
ried (first) Eleanor , who died August 

16, 1658; (second), March 9, 1659, Unity, 
widow of Peter Brown and formerly widow 
of Clement Buxton. Plis will bequeaths to 
four sons and four daughters. Children : 
Jonathan, born December 27, 1631 ; Timothy, 
December 14. 1632; Joshua, January 5, 1635; 
Caleb, see forward: Sarah, January 5, 1639: 
Ruth, January 6, 1641 ; Hannah, November 
6, 1643: Moses: Lydia. 

(II) Caleb, son of Nicholas and Eleanor 
Knapp, was born at Watertown, January 20, 
1637. He settled at Stamford, Connecticut, 
and was admitted a freeman, 1670. His will 
is dated December 11. 1674. He married 
Hannah • . Children, born at Stam- 
ford: Caleb, November 24, 1661 : John, see 
forward ; Moses : Samuel ; Sarah, Hannah. 

(III) John, son of Caleb and Hannah 
Knapp, was born July 25, 1664. He mar- 
ried, June 10, 1692, Hannah Ferris. Chil- 
dren, born at Stamford: Samuel, August 27, 
1695; John, August 14. 1697; Hannah, March 
10, 1698-99: Peter, August 5, 1701 ; Charles, 
May 9, 1703 : Deborah, June 28, 1705 : Moses, 
see forward. 

(IV) Moses, son of John and Hannah 
(Ferris) Knapp. was born August 6, 1709. 
He married. November 25, 1731, Jemima 
Weed. Children, born at Stamford: Jemi- 
ma, January 9, 1732-33: Ebenezer, August 4, 
1734: Moses, June 5, 1736: Abraham, De- 
cember 28, 1737: John, see forward: Tamsen, 
born Julv 28, 1739: Jabez, June 24, 1741 : 
Phebe, June 19, 1743 : Sarah, August 2, 
1745: Jane, March 3, 1747-48; Isaac, April 
14, 1750. 



(V) John (2), son of Moses and Jemima 
(Weed) Knapp, was born in 1738, "died in 
1810, and was buried in Danbury in a ceme- 
tery at the north end of Main street. By 
occupation he was a farmer and shoemaker, 
his homestead being in the Pembroke dis- 
trict. "He was an amiable, peace-loving man, 
and conscientiously opposed to the measures 
taken by the colonies to free themselves from 
the English yoke." As his sentiments did 
not please his neighbors, he was obliged to 
leave his home for safety, and for a time 
lived in a cave on Rattle Hill mountain, near 
Neversink Pond, his wife supplying him with 
food by night. 

John Knapp was married, 1759, to Ruth 
Gregory, of an old Danbury and Fairfield 
county family. Children: i. Samuel, born 
about 1760, married Mary Lindsley. 2. 
Elizabeth, 1765, married Ezra Nichols. 3. 
Jehu, November 17, 1767, married Lois 
\\'ood. 4. Ruth, about 1770, married Joshua 
B. Bearss. 5. John, May 13, 1772, removed 
in 181 2 to Harpersfield, New York, thence to 
Huntsburg, Ohio, where he died, July 11, 
1850: married (first), 1796, Lucy Merwin ; 
(second), February, 1829, Albacinda Barnum, 
born in South East, Putnam county. New 
York, May 12, 1790: he had eighteen children 
by his first wife, four by his second,- and some 
of them are now living in Danbury. 6. 
Chloe, about 1774, married Joseph Mansfield. 
7. Levi, see forward. 

(VI) Levi, son of John (2) and Ruth 
(Gregory) Knapp, was born in Danbury, Con- 
necticut, May I, 1777, and settled in New 
Milford, in the same state (p. 797, "New 
]\Iilford History"). He married, in Dan- 
biuy, Elizabeth Hamilton. Children : Gay- 
lord, married Julia Ferriss : W'illiam Albert, 
see forward ; Eunice, married Ebenezer San- 
ford ; Lucy Alma, died young; Levi Sidney, 
born June 10, 1801. 

(Vil) William Albert, son of Levi and 
Elizabeth (Hamilton) Knapp, was born De- 
cember 25, 1797, and died at the age of 
seventy-six years. He was a prominent 
farmer in New Milford, where he spent his 
life. He was a member of the First Con- 
gregational Church, as was also his wife, and 
he was at first an adherent of the old Whig 
party, transferring his allegiance to the Re- 
publican party upon its formation, and served 
as tax collector for several )ears. He mar- 
ried (first) Lucy, born January ig, 1801, died 
April 18, 1846, daughter of Daniel Lines, of 
New Milford. Children: i. William, now a 
lawyer in Denver, Colorado, was graduated 
from the Poughkeepsie Law School, and has 
been engaged in legal practice in the west 



CONNECTICUT 



1787 



since 1880. 2. George San ford, see forward. 
Mr. Knapp married (second) Eliza Sanford. 

Daniel Lines, father of Lucy (Lines) 
Knapp. resided in the eastern part of New 
Milford village, and died January 24, 1837. 
He married, November 20, 1790, Hannah, 
born January 23, 1772, died August 8, 1856, 
daughter of Dr. Jonah Todd" Children: 
Mabel, born April 13. 1795. removed to Great 
Bend, Pennsylvania : Charlotte, born March 
21, 1797, married Garidus Roberts: Lucy, 
born January 19, 1801, mentioned above; 
Mercy, born June 30, 1806, married Alanson 
Canfield, who is still living (1911) at the 
age of one hundred and four years ; Richard 
Daniel, born March 25, 1809: Oliver Todd, 
October 11. 1813. Joseph, father of Daniel 
Lines, came from New Haven in 1750 and 
settled in New ]\Iilford. where he died, Julv 
29, 1792, in his sixtieth year. He married, 
September 11, 1758, Phebe, who died August 
23. 1825, daughter of Ebenezer Baldwin, an 
early settler in the northern part of New 
Milford, on what is now Poplar street. Chil- 
dren : Clarissa, born at New Milford, March 
12, 1759; Reuben, January 21, 1761 : Ann, 
June 9, 1763 ; Daniel, mentioned above : Philo, 
January 11, 1769, was the grandfather of 
Frederick A. Lines, secretary and treasurer 
of the Ansonia Lumber Company. 

(VHI) George Sanford, son of William 
Albert and Lucy (Lines) Knapp, was born 
at New Milford, i\Iarch 2Ti. 1840. He spent 
his early years in his native town, attending 
the common schools until the age of four- 
teen years, then entered the high school and 
subsequently the academy at East Hampton, 
Massachusetts, where he studied for two 
terms. He then went to Fort Edward, New 
York, taught one term in the town of Coey- 
mans. New York, then returned to school 
and completed his studies. During this pe- 
riod he worked on the farm during the sum- 
mer months and taught in the winter time 
up to 1868, when he accepted a jiosition as 
traveling salesman for a hardware firm, in 
which capacity he served thirty years, cover- 
ing twenty-seven states, Canada, New Bruns- 
wick and Nova Scotia. During all this time 
and, in fact, throughout his life he has been 
a total abstainer from the use of liquor or 
tobacco. For the last fourteen years of this 
period he was also interested in the manu- 
facture of hardware, having an interest in 
the Coles Hardware Company, of Unionville, 
Connecticut, and was instrumental in bring- 
ing that business to Bridgeport in 1884. It 
was he who erected the building and financed 
the concern, which later became the Knapp 
& Coles Hardware Company, but owing to 



a misundeistanding he resigned from this 
corporation, and during the following four 
years was engaged in various lines of busi- 
ness. He then returned and undertook the 
management of the concern, and under his 
conduct it had the two most successful years 
of its history. He then sold his interest and 
retired from the company. In 1895 he started 
the first photo-engraving and elect rotyping 
company in Bridgeport, which he conducted 
several years, and then bought out the White 
metal goods business, later adding a small 
hardware specialty business, and still later the 
box business. The latter he still conducts in 
a successful manner, the plant being fitted up 
with the most modern improved machinery. 
He also has interests in the marble, rubber 
and timber lines. He is a member of the 
North Church, with which he has been con- 
nected since he was twenty-one years of age ; 
has served in several offices, and has been a 
pupil and teacher in its Sunday school. Mr. 
Knapp married, August 17, 1872, Jane Au- 
gusta Humphrey, of Unionville, Connecticut, 
where she was born. They have one son : 
A. Carleton, born January 19, 1876, who was 
educated in the common and high schools, 
then attended Columbia College, receiving his 
diploma from the veterinary department of 
the medical school, and is now a veterinarv 
surgeon connected with the health department 
of Bridgeport ; he married Josie Silliman, and 
they have one daughter: Elizabeth Knapp. 

Russell Humphrey, father of Jane Augusta 
(LIumphrey) Knapp, was a prominent man- 
ufacturer of Unionville, which occupation he 
followed throughout the active years of his 
life. He married Amelia Driggs, who bore 
him ten children, of whom the following are 
living at the present time (1911): Howard 
W. ; Nellie, married Adelbert Sallou : Louise 
A. : Jane Augusta, mentioned above ; Kath- 
erine : Carrie, married Harry Starr, at one 
time mayor of Rockford, Illinois, and also 
connected with the Winnebago Bank. yir. 
Humphrey died at the age of sixty-two years, 
and his wife at the age of eijrhtv-three. 



The Pearne family originate 
PEARNE from Rochester Bridge, district 

of London, and were "Cock- 
neys" (or Londoners). They belonged to the 
Church of England. 

(I) Francis Pearne, a resident of England, 
married and had a son, ^^'illiam Nathaniel, 
see forward. 

(II) Rev. William Nathaniel Pearne, son 
of Francis Pearne, was born in England. He 
came to this country about 1820, settled first 
in New York City, and was employed as a 



1788 



CONNECTICUT 



bookkeeper for the Black Ball Line of clipper 
ships. In 1825 he moved to New York ]\Iills 
in central New York state, a cotton mill town 
in Oneida count}', and he was connected with 
the cotton mills there. He was a Methodist 
minister for the remainder of his life. He 
married Hannah Hall, born in London, Eng- 
land, daughter of Thomas Hall. She had 
several brothers who settled in the United 
States. Children: i. William H.. a minister 
of the JMethodist Episcopal church, was also 
a member of the Christian commission and 
presiding elder stationed at Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, during the reconstruction days in the 
south, and while there was for a time super- 
intendent of police and stamped out gambling 
in the city. 2. Nathaniel. 3. Thomas H., 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
a pioneer in Oregon, delegate from Oregon 
to the Republican National Convention in 
1864, at which Abraham Lincoln was nomi- 
nated for president ; he was connected with 
the Christian commission ; after the civil war 
he was editor of the IVhig at Knoxville, 
Tennessee, for a time, and afterward United 
States consul at Kingston, Jamaica ; he was 
the author of a book known as "Sixty-one 
Years of Itinerant. Christian Life in Church 
and State." 4. Francis, died at the age of 
nine years. 5. Mary H. B., married Harmon 
Hubbard. 6. Harriet, married Edwin Hatch. 
7. Benjamin Marshall, see forward. 8. John 
\\'esley. 9. Hester, died at age of fourteen 
3-ears. One child died in infancy. 

(HI) Benjamin Marshall, son of Rev. Will- 
iam Nathaniel Pearne, was born June 22, 
1826. He is now living, retired, at Oxford, 
New York. He was a carriagemaker by trade 
and afterward held a government position in 
the United States navy yard at Brooklyn, New 
York. He married Emily Ann Swathel, born 
in New York City, August, 1826, daughter 
of William and Sarah Shipman (Clark) 
Swathel. Her father resided for a time at 
Middletown. Connecticut. Her brother, Will- 
iam Henry Swathel. resides- at Hartford; her 
sister Sarah married Martin Estelow : her 
sister Jane married Asa P. Brockway, of Es- 
sex, Connecticut. Her brother, Jared Swathel, 
died at sea. Sarah Shipman (Clark) Swathel 
was a daughter of Jared Clark and grand- 
daughter of Colonel Edward Shipman, of 
Chester, Connecticut. Colonel Shipman was 
captain of a Saybrook company in the revolu- 
tion, the Sixth Company, Colonel Charles 
West's regiment (Seventh). He was also 
under the same colonel in the Nineteenth 
Regiment, Continental army, and took part in 
the battles of White Plains and Princeton. 
He was major in the same regiment in 1779 



and colonel of the First Battalion under Gen- 
eral David Waterbury in 1781. Colonel Ed- 
ward Shipman was descended from Edward 
Shipman, the immigrant, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this work. 

(IV) Judge Wesley Ulysses Pearne, son 
of Benjamin Marshall Pearne, was born April 
I, 1851, in New York City. He was edu- 
cated at Oxford Academy, Oxford, New 
York, and at the State Normal School, Cort- 
land, New York, where he was graduated in 
June, 1870, with teacher's certificate. In the 
fall of 1870 he entered Wesleyan University 
and graduated with the degree of A. B. in 
the class of 1874. He then began to study 
law in the office of Hon. Samuel L. Warner, 
of Middletown, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1879. He began to practice immediately 
afterward at Middletown, Connecticut, open- 
ing an office in the Bank Block. He was 
clerk of the Middletown City Court from 
April, 1879, to April, 1895, when he was ap- 
pointed judge of the Middletown City Court, 
a position he has filled with conspicuous abil- 
ity to the present time. He was a member 
■of the common council of Middletown from 
1880 to 1883. He represented the town of 
Middletown in the general assembly in 1901, 
when he was house chairman of the com- 
mittee on incorporations, and in 1905, when 
he was house chairman of the committee on 
railroads. He has been a trustee of \\^ts- 
leyan University since 1905. He was elected 
a member of the board of education, Middle- 
town city school district, in 1880, and was a 
member of the board continuously until 1907. 
except from 1882 to 1886, and secretary of 
the board during the entire period. He has 
been county health officer since 1893. He 
enlisted in Company H, Second Regiment, 
Connecticut National Guard, January 12, 
1875, as a private, was promoted from time 
to time, and in 1882 was commissioned first 
lieutenant of Company H and captain in 1885. 
He resigned in i8g8 after twenty-three years 
of service in the militia, being at the time the 
senior captain of his regiment. He is a mem- 
ber of the Connecticut State Bar Association. 
He is a prominent Free Mason. He is a 
member of St. John's Lodge, of which he is 
past master. He was selected to give the 
historical ad<lress on the occasion of cele- 
brating the one hundred and fiftieth anniver- 
sarv of the foundation of that lodge. He is 
a member and past high priest of Wash- 
ington Chapter, No. 6, Royal Arch Masons, of 
Middletown. He was grand high priest of 
Connecticut in 1900. He is a member of 
Columbia Council. No. 9, Royal and Select 
Masters, and is thrice illustrious master of 



\ 




m 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BI^^^^vKa 1 *. « WluSSBiS&ESSal^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


1 






CONNECTICUT 



1789 



that body: member and past cdiiimander of 
Cyrene Commandery, No. 8, Kiiiijhts Tem- 
plar, of Middletown, and in 1910 is deputy 
grand commander of Knights Templar in 
Connecticut. He has taken all the degrees in 
Free Masonry, including the thirty-second. 
He is director and secretary of the Masonic 
Building Association. He is a member of the 
Delta Kapi)a Epsilon, college fraternity, and 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, and 
trustee and secretary of the Kent Literary 
Club. In religion he is independent, but de- 
votes much of his time to music, and for 
thirty-one years was organist of the First 
Congregational Church. Judge Pearne has 
won distinction in so many different fields of 
activity that his career presents some of the 
most remarkable features. The multitude of 
positions of trust and honor that he has 
filled with so much ability came to him as a 
tribute to his ability. He has been singu- 
larly useful as a citizen. He married. April 
25, 1883, Harriette Cornelia Arnold, born 
April 30, 1853, daughter of Charles G. and 
Betsey (Smith) Arnold, of Middletown, de- 
scendant of the Penfield family of Portland, 
Connecticut, a member of Wadsworth Chap- 
ter, Daughters of the American Revolution. 
They have had one child, Dorothea Arnold, 
born May 16, 1887, died November 14, 1898. 



Edward Sprague, of Upway, 
SPRAGUE England, county of Dorset, 
was a fuller by trade, who died 
in England in 1614. By his wife Christiana 
there were children : Ralph, mentioned be- 
low, Alice. Edward, Richard, Christopher and 
\\'illiam. The three sons, Ralph, Richard and 
\\'illiam, arrived in Naiunkeag (Salem), ]\Ias- 
sachusetts Colony, either in 1628, with Gov- 
ernor Endicott's party, or in the following 
year with a party of independent gentlemen. 
They were employed by Governor Endicott to 
make explorations, and were active in the set- 
tlement of Charlestown. and the making of a 
peace with the Indians between the Alystic 
and Charles rivers. 

(11) Ralph Sprague, born in England, 
about 1603, was about twenty-five years old 
when he came to this country. He died about 
September, 1650, at Maiden, Massachusetts, 
leaving a ^\ idow, Joan or Joanna, who mar- 
ried Edwaid Converse, of \^'oburn, Septem- 
ber 9, 1662. On September 28. 1630, Ralph 
Sprague wa:i one of a jury which seems to 
have been the first one impaneled in ?ilassa- 
chusetts. He was a lieutenant in the train 
band. His children were: Jonathan, who 
died in Maiden, 15 (6), 1650; John, men- 
tioned below : Richard ; Samuel, born about 



103 1, died October 3, 1696, aged 65 (married 
Sarah Hasse, Maiden, January 5, 1669) ; and 
Mary, who married Daniel Edmonds. 

(HI) Captain John Sprague, son of Ralph, 
born in England, 1624, came to this coimtry 
with his father. He settled finally at Maiden, 
Massachusetts, and died there June 25, 1692, 
aged 68. He married, May 2, 165 1, Lydia 
Goft"e, who died (widow) December 11, 1715. 
Children, born at Maiden: John, 9. (i), 1751- 
52, killed December 16, 1703. by falling tree, 
aged 51; 9-6: Lydia. married John Green- 
land: Jonathan, born August, 1656, died 
]\Iarch 8, 1730, aged 75 ; Samuel, born 21 
(12), 1658-59: Mary, born 13 (2), 1661 : Ed- 
ward, mentioned below: Phineas, born (12), 
1665-66, died at ]\Ialden, Augiist 29, 1736, 
aged 70: Deborah, born 21 (7), 1670: Sarah, 
born (12), 1672; and Hannah (?), married 
Samuel Stower. 

(IV) Captain Edward Sprague, son of Cap- 
tain John Sprague, born about 1663. died 
April 14, 1715, aged 52. He married, at Mai- 
den, November 24, 1693, Dorothy, daughter 
of John Lane. His widow administered his 
estate; she died March 29, 1727. Children, 
born at Maiden : William, mentioned below ; 
Anna, born March 20, 1696-97 : Dorothy, Sep- 
tember 9, 1698: Timothy, May 23, 1700: Eb- 
enezer, November 6, 1701 ; Jemima, Novem- 
ber 3, 1703 : Lydia, August 26, 1705 : Heze- 
kiah, INIay 16, 1707 ( ?) ; Phoebe, November 
17, 1709. 

(V) William Sprague, son of Captain Ed- 
ward Sprague, born at Maiden. September 4, 
1695, died there November 21, 1747, aged 52. 
He married there. January i. 171 7. Dorothy, 
daughter of Joseph Floyd, of Lynn, and Eliz- 
abeth. Children, born at ]\Ialden : Mary, De- 
cember 25, 1718, married Thomas Waite : Ed- 
ward, January 24, 1719-20: Joseph, October 
26, 1722 (of Leicester, 1780) : Nathan, Oc- 
tober 24, 1724; John, September 29, 1728; 
Elizabeth, May 12,' 1736: Dorothy, February 
6, 1737-38: Jonathan, April 7, 1739: Israel, 
mentioned below. 

(VI) Israel Sprague, son of \\'illiam 
Sprague, was born at ]\Ialden, October 13, 
1741. He removed from Maiden with other 
Spragues to Leicester, Massachusetts, where, 
j\larch 25, 1762, he married (first) Phebe Ha- 
sey, of Chelsea, Massachusetts, born Febru- 
317 5. I74I. daughter of Samuel and Sarah 
(Upham) Hasey : she died at Athol, June 13, 
1782. He settled at Athol in 1762 (the his- 
torv of Charlestown states that he was of Ath- 
ol in 1780), and lived there until about 1784, 
when he located at the adjacent town of Ger- 
ry, now Phillipston. He died at Phillipston, 
November 21, 1823, aged 82. He married 



I790 



CONNECTICUT 



(second) at Templeton, October i6, 1783, 
Ruth (Larned) Fisk, widow of John Fisk, 
whom she had married at Templeton, July 3, 
1777. She died at Athol, February 27, 1813, 
^g^d 57- 111 1790 the only Israel Sprague 
in Massachusetts, according to the first fed- 
eral census, was Israel of Gerry, and he had 
in his family two males over sixteen, one un- 
der that age, and four females, which corre- 
sponds with his then family. Children of first 
family, born at Athol : Dorothy, December 
16, 1762, died at Athol, May 4, 1844, aged 
eighty-one years ; Hasey Floyd, mentioned be- 
low ; Esther, October 28, 1768. Children of 
second wife: Israel, September 21, 1784; 
died May 2^, 1795 ; Ruth, baptized at Phillips- 
ton, June 22, 1789; child, born and died at 
Phillipston in 1790; William, died at Phillips- 
ton, May 7, 1827, aged thirty-six years. Wil- 
liam's father deeded the farm at Phillipston to 
him, September 10, 1821, conditioned on his 
supporting himself (Israel) and Dorothy 
(daughter of Israel), as long as they lived. 
Israel and Phebe of Athol deeded land to 
John Lucas of Boston, May 2, 1768. 

(VII) Hasey Floyd Sprague, son of Israel 
Sprague, was born at Athol, November i, 
1765, and baptized (Asa Flaud) November 3, 
1765. He married at Athol, May 8, 1788, 
Mary Newhall (Newell), bom June 28, 1768, 
died June 5, 1838, daughter of Hiram New- 
hall, of Leicester, and his first wife, Mary Sea- 
ver. Hiram Newhall was born February 21, 
1738- Jonathan (5) ; Thomas (4) ; Thomas 
(3) ; Thomas (2) : Thomas (i). Hiram died 
September 3, 1816. Mary Seaver was mar- 
ried January 21, 1762, and died February 5, 
1769, aged 29. Between 1795 and 1798 Hasey 
Sprague moved to Stratton, Vermont, and 
acquired several parcels of land. His farm 
was known as Sprague Hill, and was situated 
at Stratton Gore, between Stratton and Som- 
erset. He died in 1844, and was buried in 
Stratton Gore cemetery, as was his wife Mary. 
Children : Joshua, mentioned below ; Seaver, 

born July 26, 1793, at Phillipston, died ; 

Lucy, born November 5, 1795, at Athol, Mas- 
sachusetts, married at Stratton, Vermont, 
Daniel Grant, November 15, 1818, died 

; Jerusha, born December 5, 1798, 

Stratton, Vermont, married Naham Pike, of 
Western Massachusetts, August 21, 1814, at 
Stratton; Israel, born November 12, 1801, 
Stratton, Vermont, died March 20, 1863, in 

Brattleboro Retreat, married Mary , 

and had two sons born at Stratton, Vermont : 
Edwin, November 16, 1827, and Israel Bar- 
nard Baldwin, November , 1836, and 

a daughter, Mary Ann Nancy, June 30, 1838 
( ?) ; wife Mary died on or about June 11, 



1842, at Somerset, Vermont; Hiram, born 
September 7, 1806, Stratton, Vermont. 

(VIII) Joshua Sprague, son of Hasey 
Floyd Sprague, was bom at Phillipston, Mas- 
sachusetts, January 31, 1791, and died at 
North x^dams, Massachusetts, where he moved 
from Wardsboro, Vermont, about 1836, on 
November 10, 1862. He married at Wards- 
boro, Vermont, January i, 1815 (intention 
dated December 11, 18 14, at Phillipston, 
Mass.), Betsey Cummings, daughter of David 
Cummings (see Cummings). The Phil- 
lipston records call her of Wardsboro, Ver- 
mont, in the intention of marriage (p. 87, 
printed records). Betsey Cummings was 
born at Petersham, Massachusetts, October 
30, 1793, and died at North Adams, Massa- 
chusetts, August 30, 1866. He went to Strat- 
ton with his father and family, and about 
1829 went to Wardsboro, the next town, 
where he had a farm. In 1836 he deeded his 
farm to Marcus White, and moved with his 
family to North Adams. ]\Iassachusetts, where 
he was a builder. 

Children, born at Stratton, Vermont: i. 
Lucy E., April 7, 1816, married Henry Whit- 
ney, of Stratton, and had: Henry J., George, 
Charles, Martin, Seva, Ada and Mary, died 
at North Adams. 2. Martha L., born Novem- 
ber 21, 1817, married Dr. Justin Smith, and 
had Williametta and others. 3. George Wash- 
ington, March 11, 1820, died November 22, 
1855, at Springfield, Massachusetts (killed by 
railroad train); children: George N., Mary 
and Egbert. 4. Almira J., born February 19, 
1822, died at North Adams, married (second) 
William Hurd, and had several children. 5. 
Seaver Austin, born October 27, 1823, died 
in New York City, about 1893. 6. Augustin 
Newell, born August 22, 1826, probably died 
about 1891, at Atchison, Kansas; child, Bir- 
die. 7. Elvira Betsey Ann, born April 23, 
1828, married Samuel Parker, and died at 
North Adams. Born at Wardsboro, Vermont, 
near Stratton: 8. Lucena M., born February 
3, 1830 ; died at North Adams, g. David Cum- 
mings, mentioned below. 10. Joshua Martin, 
born September 23, 1835, married Helen Ly- 
ons, and had : Walter, Ralph J., Helen, Eve- 
lyn, Henry H. and Stella. 

(IX) David Cummings Sprague, son of 
Joshua Sprague, \vas born July 3, 1833, at 
Wardsboro, Vermont. He was superintend- 
ent of a hat factory at Milford, Connecticut, 
and afterward lived in the west, where he 
went at the time of the death of his wife in 
1865. Returning East, while in business in 
Rahway, New Jersey, he was instantly killed 
by a railroad train. He married, at New Ha- 
ven, Connecticut, 1852, Frances Julia King, 



CONNECTICUT 



1791 



who tiled siuldenly in 1S65, at ^[ilford, Con- 
necticut, daughter of Franklin King', born Au- 
gust 25, 1798, and Polly (Backus) King, born 
October 23, 1799, and married. .September 12, 
1822. Her father lived at Chicopee Falls, 
Massacluisetts, and was foreman of a cotton 
mill. He had three brothers. Children of 
Franklin and Polly King: i. Xancy .\nn 
King, born Xovember 29, 1823. married 
(first) John Edwards, of Goshen, died at Xew 
Haven, and (second) December 16, 1852. Cor- 
nelius Piatt, and had : Cornelia. December 26, 
1853, married (first) July 12. 1873, Hiram 
Gay, of Stoughton, Massachusetts, and (sec- 
ond) about 1886. Edgar Richards, of Ver- 
mont: Florence Piatt. April 12, 1855, died 
August I, 1853: Jennie Piatt, December 25, 
1857. married (first) Thomas ^latthews, an 
Englishman, and (second) John Holtz. 2. 
Phebe ]M., born April 4. 1827; died September 
10, 1827. 3. Caroline A., born September 3, 
1829, married Asa Weeks, a well-known spir- 
itualist, and lived at Worthington Hills, and 
later at Onset Bay. Wareham. Massachusetts, 
where his wife died, leaving a son, John 
Weeks. 4. Frances Julia, married David Cum- 
mings Sprague. as stated above. 5. Laura, 
married Robert Cunningham, of X'ew Haven, 
Connecticut. Children of David Cummings 
Sprague: i. Seaver, died young. 2. Frank 
Julian, mentioned below. 3. Charles Alay, 
born at Milford, Connecticut, April 30, i860. 
(X) Frank Julian Sprague. son of David 
Cummings Sprague, was born at Milford, 
Connecticut, July 25, 1857. Fie received a 
Wgh school education at North Adams. Mas- 
sachusetts. In 1874 he won the competitive 
appointment to the United States Naval Acad- 
emy at Annapolis, and graduated in 1878 with 
high rank in engineering, physics, mathemat- 
ics and architecture. He then took a special 
course in electrical work, and developed 
strong inventive faculties. In 1878 he was 
ordered to United States Ship "Richmond." 
bound for the Chinese Station, and was spe- 
cial correspondent of the Boston Herald dur- 
ing this cruise at the time of General Grant's 
visit to China and Japan. He returned home 
in 1880. and carried on electrical experiments 
at the Stevens Institute Shops and the Brook- 
lyn Navy Yard. He was then ordered to duty 
on the training ship "Minnesota." where he 
made the first attempts to introduce the in- 
candescent electric light into the naval serv- 
ice. Later he continued his experiments at 
the Torpedo Station at Newport. He was or- 
dered to the U. S. S. "Lancaster." of the Med- 
iterranean squadron, and subsequentlv as- 
signed to duty at the Crystal Palace Exhibition 
at Sydenham, England. He was the only 



American on the jury, and the youngest mem- 
ber of it. Among his associates were Horace 
Darwin, Captain de Abney and Professors 
I'rankland, W. Gryll Adams and Fleming Jen- 
kin, all famous scientists. He was made sec- 
retary of his section, and organized and con- 
ducted experiments on dynamo machines, elec- 
tric lights and gas engines. In his interest in 
his work he overstayed his leave, and was 
possibly saved from a court-martial by his re- 
port to the Navy Department, which was pub- 
lished by the Bureau of Intelligence and re- 
ceived high commendation. 

Passing the examination for ensign, he ob- 
tained a year's leave and resigned to become 
assistant to Thomas A. Edison. He remained 
with him for a year, and during that time 
made important improvements in matters con- 
nected with electric light distribution. Mean- 
while he became interested in the electric 
transmission of power, and at the end of a 
year resigned from Mr. Edison's employ, and 
with E. H. Johnson organized the Sprague 
Electric Railway and Motor Company and be- 
gan the development of electric motors. In 
1884 he exhibited a number of these at the 
Philadelphia Electrical Exhibition. His con- 
stant speed motors, the first of the kind, were 
endorsed by the parent Edison Electric Light 
Company for use by its licensed companies, 
and for the next four years there was an ex- 
traordinary advance in the application of sta- 
tionary motors to industrial operations. 

In 1885 he took up the Elevated Railway 
problem, and in December of that year pre- 
sented a paper before the Society of Arts in 
Boston, setting forth advantages of electrical 
equipment of that road with motors under the 
cars. During 1886 he carried on experi- 
ments on private tracks on East 24th street. 
New York, and then on the 34th street branch 
of the Elevated Road, where was first exhib- 
ited the fundamental method of mounting- 
geared motors which has come into universal 
use. About the same time he built motors 
for experimental operation of cars with stor- 
age batteries, in New York, Boston and Phila- 
delphia ; and also began the construction of a 
motor car for pulling a train of cars to be 
equipped with four 75 H. P. motors. 

In May. 1887. he took contracts for the 
equipment of the L^nion Passenger Railway 
of St. Joseph. Missouri, and the Union Pas- 
senger Railway of Richmond. A'irginia, the 
latter comprising eighty motors for forty cars, 
the complete overhead system, and a central 
station. This contract was finally carried out 
under extraordinary difficulties in spite of 
every prediction of failure. It was the first 
commercial electric road on a large scale, and 



1/92 



CONNECTICUT 



laid the foundation of the modern trolley de- 
velopment. On this road was tried practi- 
cally every device except the carbon brush, 
which characterizes the modern system, and 
within six years five-sixths of the existing 
horse-car lines were converted into electrically 
operated systems. 

About 1890 the Sprague Company was ab- 
sorbed by the Edison General Electric Com- 
pany, and Mr. Sprague remained for a time 
as consulting engineer. He then took up the 
development of electric elevators with Mr. 
Charles R. Pratt, organized the Sprague Elec- 
tric Elevator Company, and developed the 
high-speed screw elevator, the automatic 
house elevator, and the two-motor drum ele- 
vator. Of the latter, forty-nine of large size 
were installed on the Central London Elec- 
tric Railway in lieu of competing hydraulics. 
In the meantime, in 1893, in company with 
Doctors Louis Duncan and Cary Hutchinson, 
he designed one of the earliest large electric 
locomotives for the late Henry v'illard. 

Although he had been out of the railway 
business for a considerable period, Mr. 
Sprague had been for a number of years, and 
still was, keenly interested in the subject of 
rapid transit, but he was an opponent of ele- 
vated railroad extensions in New York and an 
urgent arlvocate of the underground system 
to have both express and local tracks, and to 
be equipped and operated .electrically. As 
early as 1 89 1 he had publicly offered to dem- 
onstrate the possibilities of electrical opera- 
tion on a large scale at his expense. In 1897, 
ten years after the Richmond contract, he un- 
dertook another pioneer development, that of 
the multiple-unit system of train operation, 
which provided for equipping cars with mo- 
tors and controllers of such capacity as indi- 
viduall)- needed, and then combining these 
cars into trains, irrespective of number, se- 
quence or end relation, and with or without 
other non-motor cars, controlling them all 
from master controllers on any or all cars 
through the medium of a secondary train 
line. In 1896-97 he repeatedly but vainly of- 
fered to demonstrate the possibilities of the 
system at his own expense on the j\Ianhattan 
elevated road. In the spring of 1897, being 
called in consultation on the South Side Ele- 
vated in Chicago, he proposed multiple-unit 
equipment, and shortly afterwards personallv 
took the contract for carrying it out. This 
was the beginning of a system which has now 
become universal with electric train operation, 
such as on the underground, elevated, and 
other roads of like character, and in addition 
to the motor cars on the New York Central 
it is also applied to the operation of electric 



locomotives there and on the New York and 
New Haven and P,f nnsylvania railroads. The 
system was developed under the auspices of 
the Sprague Electric Company, a consolidation 
of the Sprague Electric Elevator and the In- 
terior Conduit & Insulation Companies, and a 
few years later this company, after disposing 
of its elevator business to the Otis Elevator 
Company, was absorbed by the General Elec- 
tric Company. 

Shortly afterwards, Mr. Sprague was se- 
lected as a member of the Electric Traction 
Commission of the New York Central Rail- 
road, and for four years was active in the 
inauguration of the electric system on that 
road, collaborating with its chairman, Vice- 
President W. J. Wilgus, in the development 
of the protected under-contact third rail. He 
has not only always been a strong believer in 
and an active pioneer and promoter of the 
electric railway, but has especially advocated 
high potentials for a number of vears. His 
recommendations and work in behalf of direct 
current developments has brought about at 
least a doubling of the standards in early nor- 
mal use for suburban and protected third rail 
work, and much higher possibilities for over- 
head supply for trunk lines. 

He was awarded a medal at the Philadel- 
phia Electrical Exhibition, the gold medal at 
the Paris Exposition in 1889. the Elliott Cres- 
son Medal by the Franklin Institute in 1902, 
the Grand Prize by the St. Louis Purchase 
Exhibition in 1904, and the Edison Medal in 
191 1, for inventions and developments in elec- 
tric motors and electric railways, and special 
achievements in the electric arts. He is past- 
president and member of the American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers and the New 
York Electrical Society, member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Civil Engineers, and the Amer- 
ican Institute of Consulting Engineers, the 
English Institutions of Civil and Electrical 
Engineers and the United States Naval In- 
stitute, and also an associate member of the 
Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engi- 
neers. He is consulting engineer of the 
Sprague Electric, General Electric and the 
Otis Elevator companies, and was recently se- 
lected by the Southern Pacific Company to 
prepare, in collaboration with its officers, a re- 
port on the practicability of electrifying the 
Sierra Nevada mountain .section of the Sac- 
ramento Division of that company, to increase 
its capacity, an operative problem generally 
admitted to be one of the most difficult in the 
railroad world. 

He is a member of the University, Century, 
Engineers, New York Railroad. City Lunch 
and Sleepy LTollow Country Clubs. In poli- 



CONNECTICUT 



1793 



tics, he is an independent Republican, but has 
never held office. During the Spanish War, 
i8y8. he volunteered for special active service, 
but a severe accident to his eyes made such 
impossible for the time. 

lie married (first), 1885. in New Orleans. 
Mary Harned Keatinge, daughter of William 
Keatinge (member of the firm of Keatinge & 
Ball of Columbia, engravers of the Confed- 
erate bank notes"), and a graduate of Dublin 
University, and of liarriettc C. Keatinge, in 
later life a well-known physician in New Or- 
leans and New York. Their children were 
Mary Harned, mentioned above, and Har- 
riette D'Esmonde, now a physician in New 
York. He married (second) October 11, 
1899, Harriet Chapman Jones, daug-hter of 
Captain Henry Roger Jones, U. S. A. (re- 
tired), and Sarah (Cheesebrough) Jones, 
daughter of Dr. Amos Cheesebrough, late a 
trustee of Yale College. Child of first wife : 
Frank D'Esmonde, born in New York, March 
29, 1888: a 191 1 graduate, with degree of civil 
engineering, from Cornell University. Qiil- 
dren of the second wife : Robert Chapman, 
born August 3, 1900, in New York ; Julian 
King, June 14, 1903, in New York ; and Fran- 
ces Althea, August 9, 1906, Sharon, Connecti- 
cut. 

For Harriet Chapman Sprague's genealogy, 
see Chapman and Cheesebrough records. 

(The Cummings Line). 

The family of Cummings seems to have 
had its origin in Comines, near Lille, between 
France and Belgium, and from there emi- 
grated to Scotland. Some members believe 
it to be descended from the famous Red 
Cumin, of Badenoch, in the southeastern part 
of Invernesshire, Scotland. The name is va- 
riously spelled in the records of England, 
Scotland and America. 

(I) Isaac Cummings, immigrant ancestor, 
was born in 1601. He appears in Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, in 1641, in the list of com- 
moners, and is said to have had a planting 
lot in Reedy marsh and a house lot in the 
town as early as July, 1638. He was ad- 
mitted a freeman in 1642 ; was a constable 
in 1666, with his son Isaac as his deputy : 
was elected deacon of the church in 1676, 
and was often moderator of the town meet- 
ings. His will was dated May 8, 1677. Chil- 
dren: Ann, born 1629; John, born about 
1630 : Isaac, mentioned below ; Elizabeth, mar- 
ried John Jewell. 

(II) Deacon Isaac (2) Cummings, son of 
Isaac (l) Cummings, was born about 1633. 
He was a commoner in 1672 and admitted a 
freeman in 1673 ; was a sergeant in the Ips- 



wich company in King Philip's war; was 
often moderator of the town meetings, and 
held office as highway surveyor, town treas- 
urer, tythingman. constable and selectman. 
He was elected deacon in 1686 and served in 
that office during the remainder of his life. 
He fell into the prevalent error of his day 
and was a firm believer in witchcraft. He 
testified against Elizabeth How, that a mare 
of his had been strangely attected by her 
influence, and upon such evidence she was 
condemned and executed in July. 1692. He 
deeded the homestead to his son John, March. 
1714-15. His will was dated April 27, 1712, 
and proved January 19, 1721-22. He mar- 
ried, November 27, 1659, Mary Andrews, born 
1638. daughter of Robert and Grace Andrews, 
of Rowley Village. Her father came there 
from Boxford, England, in 1656, and was 
the immigrant ancestor of the family to which 
the war governor belonged. Children : Son, 
born and died August 28, 1660 ; son, born 
and died November 2, 1661 ; son, born and 
died December 6, 1662 ; Isaac, born September 
15, 1664; John, mentioned below; Thomas, 
June 27, 1670 ; Mary, February 16, 1671-72 ; 
Robert, April i, 1674; Abigail, married Sam- 
uel Perley : Stebbins, born February 27, 1680. 

(III) John, son of Deacon Isaac (2) Cum- 
mings, was born in Ipswich, June 7, 1666. 
He inherited the homestead, and the house 
was still standing in 1882, when it was de- 
stroyed by fire. It is now known as the 
Peterson farm, and was divided between his 
two sons, Joseph and John. His will was 
made ]\Iay 8. 1722, and proved July 16 of 
the same year. His son David, who was the 
executor, was given the lands on the south 
side of the river and on the eastern side of 
Nichols Brook. He married, January 23, 
1688, Susanna Town, born in Topsfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, December 24, 1671, died Septem- 
ber 13, 1766, daughter of Joseph and Phoebe 
(Perkins) Town. Children: Joseph, bap- 
tized January 26, 1689-90; John, baptized 
July 12, 1692, mentioned below: Isaac, born 
December 25, 1695; David, April 15, 1698; 
Mary, May 13, 1700: Susanna. January 13, 
1701-02; Stebbins, August, 1706: Samuel, 
February 14, 1708-09: Rebecca, baptized No- 
vember r, 1713. 

(IV) John (2).. son of John (i) Cum- 
mings, was baptized July 12. 1692, in Tops- 
fiekl He married, February 18. 1715. Mary, 
daughter of Isaac and Martha (Towne) Lar- 
rabee, of Lynn. ^Massachusetts. He was a 
shoemaker by trade and lived first in Middle- 
ton and then Southtoro, Massachusetts. In 
the latter place he bought a farm of John 
Howe. His will was made December 19, 



1794 



CONNECTICUT 



1755, and he died February 29, 1756. Children : 
John, born April 19, 1717; Hannah, Novem- 
ber 6, 1718; Mercy, October 26, 1720; Benja- 
min, September 12, 1723, died young; Reu- 
ben, January 29, 1726, mentioned below; 
Sarah, May 30, 1729; Benjamin, October 9, 
173 1 ; Joseph, February 5, 1733. 

(V) Reuben, son of John (2) Cummings, 
was born January 29, 1726, died intestate in 
1808 at Petersham, Massachusetts. He mar- 
ried (first), 1747, Hannah Booth. He mar- 
ried (second) Elizabeth . Children of 

first wife, born at Southboro ; Reuben, May 
12, 1749; William, October 18, 1752; Han- 
nah, August 8, 1757; Hepsibah, October 8, 
1759. Children of second wife, born at Tem- 
pleton, Alassachusetts ; Elizabeth, April 5, 
1762; Ruany, June 5, 1764; Martha, Novem- 
ber 22, 1767; David, August 31, 1769, men- 
tioned below; Eunice, February 11, 1771. 

(VI) David, son of Reuben Cummings, 
was born in Templeton, August 31, 1769, and 
married, February i, 1793, at Gerry, now 
Phillipston, Massachusetts. Miriam Wheeler. 
Children, born at Petersham : Betsey, Oc- 
tober 20, 1793, married Joshua Sprague (see 
Sprague VHI) ; Reuben, August 20, 1795; 
David, March 19, 1797; Gilbert, October 18, 
1798; Lyman, October 11, 1800; Almira 
(twin), April 26, 1803; Alvira (twin) ; Sum- 
ner, May 9, 1804. The twins were said to be 
the oldest in New England at the time of the 
first's death, at about "JJ years. 



John Russell, immigrant an- 
RUSSELL cestor, came to New England 

and settled first at Cam- 
bridge, where he was a proprietor in 1635. 
He was admitted a freeman, March 3, 1635- 
36, and was a town officer and clerk of the 
writs. He was a subscriber to the orders 
drawn up for the town of Woburn, at 
Charlestown, in 1640, and was one of the first 
settlers of Woburn. He was a proprietor 
there in 1640. He was selectman of Woburn 
several years, and in 1644 was appointed on 
a committee for distribution of land. He was 
deacon of the church, but afterwards became 
a Baptist, and about 1669-70 was admitted 
to the Baptist church of Boston, which at 
that time met for worship at Noddle's Island. 
He was later chosen elder of this church. For 
his change of faith he was summoned before 
the court at Charlestown in 167 1 and sent 
to prison, but was soon released. He died 
June I, 1676. His will was dated May 27, 

1676. He married (first) Elizabeth , 

who died December 16, 1644. He married 
(second), May 13, 1645, Elizabeth Baker, 
who died January 17, 1689-90. Children: 



Samuel, born 1616; John, mentioned below; 
Mary, married, December 21, 1659, Timothy 
Brooks. 

(II) John Russell, son of John Russell, 
was born about 1620, and died December 22, 
1680. He settled first in Woburn and re- 
moved to Boston, where he was ordained to 
succeed Elder Gould as minister of the Bap- 
tist church, July 28, 1679. During the short 
period he was in office he wrote a treatise in 
answer to some harsh reflections in a pub- 
lication by Rev. Dr. Increase ]\lather, assert- 
ing "The Divine Right of Infant Baptism." 
The answer was entitled "A Brief Narrative 
of some considerable passages concerning the 
First Gathering and Further Progress of a 
Church of Christ in Gospel Order, in Boston, 
in New England, etc." It was dated in Bos- 
ton, May 20, 1680, and sent to Londpn for 
publication. He married, October 31, 1661, 
Sarah, daughter of John Champney, of Cam- 
bridge. She died at Woburn, April 26, 1696. 
He is buried in King's Chapel burying 
ground, Boston. Children : John, born Au- 
gust I, 1662; Joseph, January 16, 1663-64, 
mentioned below ; Samuel, February 3, 1667- 
68, died December i, 1668; Sarah, February 
10, 1670-71 ; Elizabeth, February 19, 1672- 
73; Jonathan, August 6, 1675; Thomas, Jan- 
uary 5, 1677-78; Ruth. 

(HI) Joseph Russell, son of John Russell, 
was born at Woburn, January 16, 1663-64, 
died at Boston, March 13, 1713-14. He mar- 
ried Mary , who' died March 28, 1716. 

Both are buried in King's Chapel burying 
ground in Boston. Children ; Joseph, Decem- 
ber 13, 1687; Mary; Abigail; Sarah, married 

Wakefield; Elizabeth, married Joseph 

Miller; Mehitable ; Thomas, born July 11, 
1705, mentioned below ; Skinner, died in Bos- 
ton, June, 1752; Jonathan. 

( IV) Thomas Russell, son of Joseph Rus- 
sell, was born July 11, 1705, died September i, 
1780. He married (first) Elizabeth, daughter 
of Jeremiah Condy and sister of Rev. Jeremiah 
Condy. She was a well educated woman and 
possessed many accomplishments of the day. 
She constructed curious pictures of filigree 
work, also wax flowers of rare beauty. Her 
embroidery attracterl much attention, as did 
also a Holland bedspread. While Boston 
was held by the British in the war of the 
revolution, soldiers were admitted to the house 
and ruined the spread with blood stains. They 
also carried off her finest ]iiece of embroid- 
ery, into which she had wrought gold and 
silver threads. In 1878 a white silk apron 
embroidered by her in 1710-20 had a promi- 
nent place in a loan exhibition of the Society 
of Decorative Art in New York. A sampler 



CONNECTICUT 



1795 



of Elizabeth Russell, her only daughter, 1775- 
76, is still preserved. TIkjukis Russell mar- 
ried (second) Honora Loud, who luarried 
(second) Deacon I'hilip Freeman. Thomas 
Russell is buried in King's Chapel burying 
ground. Children: Thomas, ilied 1752; 
Joseph, born October's, 1732, mentioned be- 
low; Jeremiah Condy, died August 30, 1759; 
John, born April 12, 1737; William, Septem- 
ber 12, 1739; Jonathan, 1741. Children of 
second wife: Elizabeth, born April 16, 1757; 
Thomas, September 8, 1758. 

(V) Honorable Joseph Russell, son of 
Thomas Russell, was born October 2, 1732, 
died in Woodstock, Connecticut, May 18, 
1792. He married (first) Mary Checkley, 
born January 4, 1735, died August, 1770, 
probably a daughter of Samuel Checkley, of 
Boston. He married (second) Amey, born 
September 7, 1748, who was a stepdaughter 
of Governor Stephen Hopkins, one of the 
signers of the Declaration of Independence, 
Avho married Anne Smith, widow, daughter of 
Benjamin Smith. She died August 7, 1784, 
and he married (third) Ann Frances Lippitt, 
daughter of Joseph and Lucy (Bowen) Lip- 
pitt, bom March 30, 1748, died April i, 1827. 
Joseph Russell was a merchant of Providence, 
R. I., associated with his brother William. In 
1785 he was state senator. He was interested 
in the cause of education and was one of the 
trustees of Rhode Island College, now Brown 
University. During the last years of his life 
he lived a retired life at his country seat at 
Woodstock, where he died. He was highly 
respected as a man of business and a good cit- 
izen. In religion he was an Episcopalian. 
Children of first wife: Joseph, born August, 
1755, died September, 1755 ; Joseph Dolbeare, 
September 2, 1756, died March, 1786; Wil- 
liam, May 12, 1758, mentioned below, died 
April 18, 1822: Mary, January i, 1760; Eliza, 
October 29, 1763 : Ann, May 12, 1765, died 
August 10, 1787 : Susannah Condy, October 
17, 1767: Hayley (twin), July 29, 1769. died 
July 16. 1789; Hopkins (twin), July 29, 
1769, died August 7, 1787. Children of 
second wife: Benjamin, February 22, 1774, 
died October 16, 1780: Amey, September 2, 
1778, died March 14, 1783. 

(VI) AVilliam Russell, son of Joseph Rus- 
sell, was born May 12, 1758, and upon the 
death of his father succeeded to the home at 
Woodstock, Connecticut, above referred to, 
which was said to be one of the most beautiful 
in that section of the state. He there en- 
gaged in the manufacture of pearlash and 
potash, which he produced in large quantities 
and sent to Providence, R. I., where there was 
a ready market for it. He was a great ath- 



lete and fond of sports, and, among other 
things, enjoyed skating exceedingly, and, as 
there was a large artificial lake on his place, 
he had many opportunities to indulge in this 
healthy and invigorating exercise. It is re- 
lated of him that at one time when he was 
skating on this lake, his little daughter was 
on the ice, and, without stopping, he stooped 
and took her in his arms, and proceeding, 
jumped, without touching, a five foot fence 
which separated one part of the lake from an- 
other, and placed her safely on the ice on the 
other side, and continued on his way across 
the lake. 

He married, April 7, 17S5, Rebecca Potter, 
who was a daughter of Thomas and Esther 
Potter, and born March 19, 1768. Their chil- 
dren were Harriet, born January 9, 1786, died 
February 21, 1857: Joseph, mentioned below, 
born March 6, 1788, died 1863; Ann Frances, 
born November 22, 1789 ; Haley Hopkins, 
born January 5, 1793 ; Emily Esther, born 
March 28, 1795 ; and Eliza Rhobe. born Au- 
gust 13, 1797. His wife died February 16, 
1816, in the 48th year of her age, and he died 
April 13, 1822, aged 64 years. 

(VII) Joseph Russell, son of William Rus- 
sell, was born March 6, 1788. While a boy at 
home he was in rather poor health and the 
family physician advised his parents to send 
him to sea as his father was engaged in ship- 
ping and owned several East India vessels and 
l<new and could trust the captains of them. 
He made several voyages to China and other 
places, and liked the sea so well that he be- 
came first mate on one of the vessels, and 
continued that life for a number of years. 
Later he moved to Pomfret and continued to 
live there until his death in 1863. He was a 
great reader and an equally great student of 
the dictionary, and had the reputation of 
knowing the definition of more words and be- 
ing able to use them correctly in their various 
shades of meaning than any other man for 
miles around. He was also a careful student 
of the Bible, and read it through many times, 
and his grandson, Frank Fenner Russell, re- 
ferred to later in this genealogy, has now in 
his possession a Bible which he read through 
seven times, being careful to make a note on 
the blank page at the beginning of the book 
of the time when he began and completed each 
reading of it. He was in politics a Democrat 
and in religion an Episcopalian, and, although 
he had never been to divinity .school or fitted 
himself for a clergyman, ^ he was such an ac- 
knowledged authority on the Bible that he was 
often asked to read service in the Episcopal 
Church at Brooklyn, and even allowed to 
preach his own sermons. 



1796 



CONNECTICUT 



He married, on June 14, 1820, Lorancy 
Spalding, who was born October 30, 1797. 
Their children were: Reuben Spalding, born 
June 3, 1821 ; Hannah Maria, born October 
14, 1823 ; Joseph Francis, mentioned below, 
born February 18, 1826: and William Henry, 
born April 3, 1832, died June 6, 1907. 

His wife died May 8, 1832, in the 35th year 
of her age, and on the 31st of the same 
month their daughter, Hannah, also died. He 
did not marry again, but continued to live 
on his place at Pomfret until his death, which 
occurred in 1863. 

(Vni) Joseph Francis Russell, son of Jo- 
seph Russell, was born at Pomfret, Connecti- 
cut, February 18, 1826. He married, Septem- 
ber 25, 1850, Caroline Celestia Fenner, bom 
July 21, 1830, at Killingly, Connecticut, a 
"daughter of Colonel Caleb Fenner, of Scitu- 
ate, R. I., who was born in 1794, and died Oc- 
tober 2, 1872. Her mother was Julia A. Cham- 
berlain, born in 1808, and died August 25, 
1868, who was the daughter of Captain Wil- 
liam and Rebecca (Angell) Chamberlain. 
Captain Chamberlain was born October 5, 
1783, and died February 10, 1855. Rebecca, 
his wife, was born ]\Iarch 2, 1782, and died 
April 4, 1851. Besides Caroline Fenner, Ca- 
leb and Julia Fenner had one other child, 
Helen Fenner, who was born at Killingly, 
Connecticut. July 15, 1833, and died at Wood- 
stock, Connecticut, May 2, 1907, unmarried. 

Joseph Francis Russell, after his marriage, 
moved to Woodstock. Connecticut. Their 
children were Helen Lorancy, born October 
12, 1855, died May 9, 1875, and Frank Fen- 
ner, mentioned below, born August 3, i860. 

Joseph Francis Russell was a carpenter by 
trade, but during his long life has filled many 
positions of trust in the town of Woodstock, 
such as selectman, member of the board of re- 
lief, and registrar of voters, and was for many 
years one of the trustees of Woodstock Acad- 
emy, an institution which for more than one 
hundred years has been sending out students 
to all parts of the world. He and his wife 
are still living at the homestead in Woodstock, 
Connecticut, where they have resided nearly 
fifty years, he being now in his eighty-sixth 
3'ear, and she in her eighty-first, and on Sep- 
tember 25, 19 10, they celebrated the sixtieth 
anniversary of their marriage. 

(IX) Hon. Frank F. Russell, son of Joseph 
Francis Russell, was born at Woodstock, Con- 
necticut, August 3, i860. He attended the 
public schools at Woodstock and Wood.stock 
Academy, in which he prepared for college. 
He entered Trinity College in 1880' and con- 
tinued in the class of 1884 until a month be- 
fore commencement, when he had an advan- 



tageous offer to go abroad as a private tutor, 
but he received his degree as B. A. with the 
class of 1885 in the following year, after he 
returned from Europe. He is accordingly 
claimed by both classes and attends the reun- 
ions of both. He was a master of Holderness 
School for Boys at Plymouth, New Hamp- 
shire, from 1885 to 1887. In the fall of 1887 
he entered Yale Law School and studied for 
one year, completing his law studies in the of- 
fice of Hon. Charles Edwin Searls, under 
whom he began to read law before he went to 
the law school. He was admitted to the Con- 
necticut bar in April, 1890, and in August fol- 
lowing became a partner of Mr. Searls under 
the firm name of Searls & Russell. Since then 
he has practiced with gratifying success. The 
firm is well and favorably known throughout 
the state, and their office is at Putnam. Mr. 
Russell was connected with the schools of 
Putnam as a member of the high school com- 
mittee, the school board, and the town school 
committee for fifteen years, declining fur- 
ther service in 1908. He was appointed judge 
of the city court of Putnam by Governor Mc- 
Lean, of Connecticut, in 1901, and reappointed 
by Governor Chamberlain, Governor Roberts 
and Governor Woodruff, serving continuously 
from July I, 1901, to January i, 1910, when 
on account of the pressure of business he 
declined reappointment. He is a justice of the 
peace and a member of the Connecticut Bar 
Association. In politics he is a Republican. 
He is a communicant of the Protestant Epis- 
copal church of Putnam. 

Judge Russell married. May 21, 1889, Ada 
Frances Robie, born September 23, 1867, at 
Plymouth, New Hampshire, daughter of 
James and Frances A. (Jameson) Robie, 
granddaughter of Samuel and Eunice (Rob- 
erts) Robie, great-granddaughter of Joseph 
and Polly (Davis) Roberts. Her father had 
two brothers. Thomas, and William Robie. 
( ludge Russell is a collateral descendant of 
Judge Stephen Hopkins, born at .Scituate, R. 
I., March 7, 1717, died at Providence in 
1785, one of the signers of the Declaration 
of independence ; also of Esek Hopkins, first 
admiral appointed by the continental con- 
gress, commissioned in December. 1775, com- 
modore and commander-in-chief, born at 
Scituate in 1718). 

Mrs. Frank F. Russell is a member of 
Elizabeth Porter Putnam Chapter, Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution, of Putnam. 
Judge and Mrs. Russell have one child, Con- 
stance Lucile, born December 31, 1898, and 
their home is at the corner of Grove and 
Seward streets, in Putnam, where they have 
resided for a number of years. 



CONNECTICUT 



1/97 



, John Bailey or Baylie, ininii- 

BAILEY grant ancestor, came from Eng- 
land, and was one of the twenty- 
eight purchasers of the town of Haddam, Con- 
necticut, whither he removed from Hartford 
in 1662. In 1648 he was viewer of chimneys 
and ladders. He was constable at Hartford 
in 1656-57. He was admitted freeman in 
May, 1657. He died at Haddam in 1696. He 
had sons: Benjamin, mentioned below, and 
John. 

(ID Benjamin, son of Jolm Bailey, was 
born about 1660. He lived at Haddam and 
had three sons : John, who was deaf and 
dumb, but married and had a family; Benja- 
min, mentioned below : Xathaniel, had sons 
Daniel and Ezekiel. 

(III) Benjamin (2), son of Benjamin (i) 
Bailey, was born in Haddam in 1690. He 
lived in his native town and had sons : Heze- 
kiah : Benjamin, mentioned below ; Samuel. 

(IV) Benjamin (3), son of Benjamin (2) 
Bailey, was born about 1720. He lived at 
Haddam. 

(\") — , son of Benjamin (3) Bailey. 

was born about 1750. He was a soldier in 
the revolution in the Tenth Connecticut Regi- 
ment under Colonel James ^^'adsworth. 

(VI) Benjamin (4), son of Bailey, 

was born at Haddam, Connecticut, and was a 
farmer in his native town. He married Lau- 
rena Tryon, born at JMiddletown. Children : 
Charles Turner, died unmarried, aged forty- 
three years ; Jerry, unmarried : Fanny, mar- 
ried Alva Spencer, of Haddam, and had three 
children: Edgar. Eleanora and Lauren: Dr. 
Samuel B., married Sarah Price: children: 
Edna, Louis. Jane and ]\Iabel ; Sarah ; Wol- 
cott, married Thelia Bailey, a cousin ; chil- 
dren : Ivernot and Blanch; William F., mar- 
ried Rachel Treadwell : children : Aden and 
Clitus : Eleanor, unmarried : Dr. Leonard, 
mentioned below. 

(VII) Dr. Leonard Bailey, son of Benja- 
min (4) Bailey, was born at Haddam, Jan- 
uary I, 1836, in the section known as Higga- 
num. He attended the district schools and 
the Brainard Academy. He began to study 
medicine in Philadelphia Medical School and 
graduated fifth in a class of forty at the 
age of twenty-two. He then spent a year 
with Dr. Burr, of Middletown, and afterward 
practiced for three years at East Haddam. In 
1861 he returned to Aliddletown, where he 
has practiced since that time. He visited 
Philadelphia in 1862 and took a course of 
medical lectures in the winter of 1862-63 
under Professor S. D. Gross and Drs. Pan- 
coast, Wood and Dunglison. He has en- 
joyed a large practice in ]\Iiddletown and 



stands high in his profession. In politics he 
is a Republican. He was a member of the 
board of education for eighteen years and 
director of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Na- 
tional Bank of Michigan for thirty years. 
Dr. Bailey won a notable lawsuit against the 
Xew York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
Company after a long and stubbornly con- 
tested litigation. Dr. Bailey had a claim for 
damages against the railroad on account of 
an accident when he was crossing the tracks, 
due to the negligence of the railroad. De- 
feated in the Connecticut courts, the suit was 
pressed to a decision in the supreme court 
of Massachusetts. He is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He mar- 
ried, February 3, 1863, Sarah J. Robinson, 
of Portland, Connecticut. They have no chil- 
dren. Dr. Bailey resides at 188 Court street, 
Middletown. 



According to family and local tra- 
DAVIS dition, Solomon Davis, ancestor 
of this family, came to Killing- 
worth, Connecticut, from Long Island. From 
him descended Lemuel Davis, who was the 
father of a son, Lemuel Davis, and he in 
turn was the son of Lewis Talcott Davis, 
who married Sarah, daughter of Joseph and 
Huldah (Bailey) Burr, married in 1803. 

Richard Davis, son of Lewis Talcott and 
Sarah (Burr) Davis, was born at North 
Killingworth, Connecticut, May 27, 184S. He 
was educated in the public schools. He 
learned his trade in the Branford Lock Works 
in New Haven, Connecticut, and made, tem- 
pered and dressed his own tools, being a 
skillful mechanic. He accepted the position 
of manager of the firm of Richard Atkins at 
]\Iiddletown, June 10, 1869, and subsequently 
became the owner of the place, which is 
widely known as the Oak Grove Dairy 
Farm. He is one of the most successful 
farmers in Middlesex county, his farm con- 
taining some two hundred and three acres, 
and is located between Middletown and Dur- 
ham, Connecticut. He has been active in pub- 
lic life and held many offices of trust and 
honor. He is a Democrat in politics. He 
served eight successive years on the board of 
selectmen of IMiddletown ; represented the 
town in the general assembly of Connecticut 
in 1900 ; in 1902 was nominated and elected 
high sheriff of Middlesex county, though the 
county is normally Republican, and was re- 
elected to the office by an increased majority 
over the seven hundred and forty-nine plu- 
ralitv he received in his first election. He is 
a member of the Connecticut Pomological So- 
ciety ; the Connecticut Dairymen's Associa- 



1798 



CONNECTICUT 



tion ; Middletown Grange, Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, in which he has held several offices, 
including that of master ; member of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the Connecticut State 
Grange ; member of the Knights of Pythias ; 
director of the Central National Bank, of 
Middletown, and president of the Pine Grove 
Cemetery Association, of Middletown. With 
his family he attends the Methodist church. 
Mr. Davis has an office at Haddam. Hard 
work, attention to details and strictly fair 
and honest dealing in all things have brought 
him unusual success in business. 

Mr. Davis married, October 17, 1871, An- 
nie Talmadge Atkins, born at West Long 
Hill, September 10, 1839, only child of Rich- 
ard and Melinda (Edwards) Atkins, and a 
descendant of George Hubbard, of Middle- 
town, Connecticut, and also a descendant from 
the early settlers of East Hampton, Long 
Island. Children: i. Mary Gray, born Jan- 
uary 27, 1873, a music teacher. 2. Sarah 
Edwards, October 4, 1874, followed the occu- 
pation of school teacher until her marriage to 
Robert Hubbard ; children : Harriet Fairchild, 
born September 9, 1902 ; Willard Davis, Au- 
gust 31, 1905; Lucy Atkins, February 26, 
1908; Robert Meigs, December i, 1909. 3. 
Grace Atkins, July 14, 1876, married Richard 
Ackerman ; children : Annie Davis, born June 
13, 1901 : Richard Atkins, November 15, 1905 ; 
Marion Davis, June 22, 1909. 4. Alice Hub- 
bard, February 3, 1879, married Frederick 
Harris: children: Alice Marion, born Decem- 
ber 3, 1899, died aged seven months ; Richard 
Davis, August 9, 1904. 5. William Atkins, 
September'7, 1882, died April 6, 1883. 

(The Cone Line). 

(I) Daniel Cone, immigrant ancestor, set- 
tled at 'Haddam, Connecticut, and resided 
there until 1680, later removed to the east 
side of the river at Machi-Moodus, and sub- 
sequently returned to Haddam, where he died 
October 24, 1706, aged eighty years. He 
deeded land on the west side of the river to 
his son Caleb. He married (first) Mehitable 
Spence, of Hartford, daughter of Jared and 
Alice Spence. Her father settled in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, in 1634, at Lynn in 
1637, at Hartford in 1660, and at Haddam 
in 1662. He married (second) Rebecca. 
widow of Richard Wakeley, in 1692. Chil- 
dren: Ruth, born January 7, 1662; Hannah, 
April 6, 1664; Daniel, January 21, 1666; 
Jared, January 7, 1668: Rebecca, February 6, 
1670 : Ebenezer, baptized March 25, 1673 : 
Nathaniel, baptized June 4, 1675 ; Stephen, 
baptized March 26, 1678 : Caleb, mentioned 
below. 



(II) Caleb, son of Daniel Cone, was born 
at Haddam in 1679, baptized March 19, 1682, 
at Middletown. He was representative in the 
general assembly in 1731-32-33-45-49, and was 
captain of a military company. He married 
(first) at Haddam, Decemjjer 16, 1701, Eliza- 
beth , who died there, November 14, 

1714. He married (second), September 6, 
1723, Elizabeth Cunningham, who died Sep- 
tember 28, 1743. Children of first wife: 
Caleb, born September, 1702; Joseph, Jan- 
uary 26, 1704; Noah, July 14, 1707; Elisha, 
September 11, 1709; Joshua, July 4, 1714. 
Children of second wife: Simon, born June 
II, 1724; Daniel, December 22, 1725; Beriah, 
September 12, 1727; Abigail, July 2, 1730; 
Mary, March 23, 1732, died October 8, 1796, 
married Richard Knowles (see Knowles IV) ; 
Lydia, January 29, 1735. 

(The Knowles Line). 

(I) John Knowles, the first of the line 
here under consideration, was killed by the 
Indians in King Philip's war, near Taunton, 
Massachusetts, April 3, 1675. He married 
Apphia, daughter of Edward Bangs, a pil- 
grim, coming over in the ship "Ann" in 1623. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) Knowles, 
was born July 10, 1673. died 1757. He mar- 
ried, 1693, Mary Sears, and among their chil- 
dren was John. 

(III) John (3), son of John (2) Knowles, 
married Mehitable Walker (see Walker II), 
and among their children was Richard. 

(IV) Richard, son of John (3) Knowles, 
was born at Fladdam in 1725, died April 9, 
1819. He married, April 4, 1749, Mary, 
daughter of Caleb and Elizabeth (Cunning- 
ham) Cone (see Cone II). Children: Eliza- 
beth, born December 6, 1750 ; Mary, October 
28, 1751, married, 1774, Joseph Burr; Su- 
sannah, February 5, 1755 : Bethiah, March 6, 
1757; Esther, March 7, 1759; Simon, April 
18, 1761. 

(The Walker Line). 
(I) William Walker, immigrant ancestor, 
came from England to Hingham in 1636 or 
earlier. He was born about 1620, died in 
1703. He was on the list of those able to 
bear arms in 1643 ■ ^^ '^'^'^^ admitted a free- 
man, June 3, 1656; surveyor of highways in 
1668-69-78-79: constable in 1682: was ex- 
cused from training, June 2, 1685, because of 
weakness, and having two sons in the train 
band, one of whom was killed. He married, 
in 1654, perhaps second, Sarah, daughter of 
Nicholas Snow, of Eastham, who married 
Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, 
who came in the "Mayflower," progenitor of 
a distinguished family. Children of Mr. and 



CONNECTICUT 



1799 



Mrs. Walker: John, born November 24, 
1655, killed in 1676; William, October 12, 
1657, died young; William, mentioned below; 
Sarah, September 28, 1664; Jabez, July 8, 
1668. 

(II) William (2), son of William (i) 
Walker, was born August 2, 1659, died Jan- 
uary, 1743-44. He married . 

Children: William, married Anne Young; 
Mehitable, married John Knowles ; John, lived 
at Eastham; Susan, married Jonathan Collins. 



This family appeared early 
WAKEFIELD in New England. A town 

in Massachusetts was 
named for the family, and its members have 
been prominent in the fields of education, 
medicine, law and ministry. They have also 
been active as business men, aiding in the 
mental and moral growth, as well as the mate- 
rial development of the commonwealths in 
which they lived. 

John Wakefield, the immigrant ancestor, 
was born in Hertfordshire, England, and came 
to America in 1632. He was an inhabitant of 
Marblehead, Massachusetts, January i, 1637. 
He had a grant of four acres on the Neck, 
and in 1641 he also had a grant under the 
authority of the Ligonia patent, which was 
later known as the Great Hill Farm, in Maine. 
He settled in the town of Wells, Maine, where 
he attained considerable prominence. He was 
commissioner and selectman in 1648, 1654 and 
1657. In 1652 he purchased Drake's Island, 
where he removed and resided for two or 
three years. He then removed to Scarbor- 
ough and resided for several years. From 
there he went to that part of Biddeford which 
is now Saco, where he died February 15, 1674. 
Married Elizabeth, daughter of Edmund and 
Annie Littlefield, of Wells. Children : John, 
married Hester Harbor ; James, mentioned be- 
low ; Henry, died unmarried ; William, mar- 
ried Rebecca Littlefield ; Mary, married Wil- 
liam Frost ; Katherine, married Robert Nanny. 
(II) James, son of John Wakefield, was 
born probably at Salem or Wells. (In 1657 
the town clerk's office at Wells, Maine, was 
burned, and with it all the records.) In 1699 
he was granted, one hundred acres of land on 
Kennebunk river, "at the landing." He and 
his brother William, Moses and Job Littlefield, 
and Joseph Storer Jr., on October 25, 1707, 
"went out in a small sloop to fish, there was 
a heavy sea at the bar, and they attempted 
to drive the sloop over it, she was upset, and 
all were drowned, bodies of four were re- 
covered. These men were all valuable citi- 
zens and their aid was greatly needed." He 
married Rebecca, daughter of James and 



(Lewis) Gibbons, of Saco. Children: 

James, married, December 18, 1719, Mary 
Durrell; John, married. May 27, 1724, Eliza- 
beth Durrell; Keziah, married, May 27, 1724, 
Phillip Durrell Jr.; Nathaniel, married, 1730, 
Hannah Emmons; Samuel, mentioned below; 
Gibbons, married Mary Goodwin, November 
13, 1756. 

(III) Samuel, son of James Wakefield, re- 
sided in Kennebunk, Maine. In 1766 he built 
the first schooner on the Mousam river. He 
was a soldier in the French and Indian war, 
and in 1756 enlisted and was sent toward the 
lakes and Canada. He married, about 1736, 
Ruth Godfrey. Children : Samuel, mentioned 
below; Mary, married, November 27, 1766, 
Daniel Kimball; Benjamin, married, Novem- 
ber 5, 1767, Elinor Littlefield; Daniel, mar- 
ried Priscilla Allen; Lydia, married, June 21, 

1767, Jesse Larribee; Eunice, married, Feb- 
ruary 26, 1767, Benjamin Tripe ; Abigail, mar- 
ried, July 12, 1770, John Fiske; Lucy, mar- 
ried, June, 1770, Samuel Cluff; James, born 
about 1759, married Sarah Wilson. 

(IV) Samuel (2), son of Samuel (i) 
Wakefield, was born about 1737. He removed 
from Kennebunk, where he was born, in 1756- 
57, and settled at the head of the bay, on 
the lot comprising a considerable part of the 
village of Steuben. He was a farmer. He 
married, November 17, 1757, Ruth, daughter 
of John and Hannah Burbank. Her father 
was a millwright, and was a lieutenant at the 
taking of Louisburg in 1745. He married 
(second) probably the widow Small. Chil- 
dren of first wife: Samuel, born March 15, 

1768, married Anna Cox ; Lydia, married Icha- 
bod Godfrey; Benjamin, mentioned below; 
Ruth, married Captain Joseph Perkins ; Phebe, 
married James Kingsley ; Hannah, born Octo- 
ber 15, 1804, married Nathan Cleaves. Chil- 
dren of second wife: Sally, born August 21, 
1810, married Wheeler Tracey ; Miriam, mar- 
ried Winslow Gallison; James, born 1784, 
married Priscilla Small ; Daniel, married Pris- 
cilla Allen ; Lucy, married Lighton. 

(V) Benjamin, son of Samuel (2) Wake- 
field, was born November 12, 1772, and died 
October 28, 1834, in Steuben, Maine, where 
he lived all his life. He married Polly Dor- 
man, born June 30, 1775. died June 25, 1855, 
daughter of Jabez and Mary (Godfrey) Dor- 
man of Harrington, Maine. Children: Sy- 
rena, born May 6, 1796, died March 10, 1800; 
Matilda, born January 15, 1798: Sabina, Sep- 
tember 23, 1799; Hannah, August 25, 1801 ; 
Amasa, April 10, 1803 ; Judith, May 2, 1805, 
died May 18, 1805 ; Lewis, born October 20, 
1806; Mary Dorman, July 19, 1806; Elbridge 
Gerry, May 30, 181 1, died 1888; Ambrose 



i8oo 



CONNECTICUT 



Coffin, born November 15, 1813; George 
Washington, mentioned below ; Hilda Ann, 
born April 3, 1819. 

(VI) Dr. George Washington Wakefield, 
son of Benjamin Wakefield, was born Novem- 
ber 23, 1815, at Steuben, Maine. He gradu- 
ated at the Blue Hill Academy in 1835, and 
attended Waterville College for some time. 
He studied medicine and was a practicing 
physician and surgeon in eastern Maine until 
failing health obliged him to give up his pro- 
fession. He began building mills, and be- 
came a practical millwright and iron founder. 
He was a pioneer in the temperance work in 
Maine and was a strong abolitionist. He was 
a trustee of the Cherryfield Academy for over 
forty years. He married, May 21, 1837, Su- 
san Coffin Campbell, born in Cherryfield, 
Maine, February 7, 1817, died April 21, 1884, 
daughter of James Archibald and Thirza 
(Picket) Campbell. Children: Atwood, men- 
tioned below ; Edwin Campbell, born July 16, 
1841 : Benjamin, October 26, 1844, married 
Abbie Adams ; Abbie Adams, October 6, 1849, 
married Henry Haviland Bowles ; James 
Campbell, October 15, 1853, now a resident 
of Healdsburg, California. 

(VH) Atwood, son of Dr. George Wash- 
ington Wakefield, was born at Steuben, Maine, 
January 9, 1839, graduated at Cherryfield 
(Maine) Academy, 1859, removed to St. 
John, N. B., to engage in the lumber and 
milling business, which resulted in failure ow- 
ing to plant being destroyed by fire with no 
insurance. He then became connected with 
an iron and steel plant and designed and su- 
perintended the construction of the first six- 
wheel driving locomotives in use in America 
on the Canadian Pacific road. In 1884 he 
removed to Hartford to become superintend- 
ent of the Buckeye Engine Company, where 
he has since resided. He married, August 20, 
1861, Albenia Nice, of St. John, New Bruns- 
wick, born February 7, 1840, died July 10, 
1902, a descendant of an old Dutch family 
that was among the very earliest settlers of 
Philadelphia, but owing to their political ac- 
tivities as Tories during the revolutionary 
war, were obliged to leave the country along 
with many of their compatriots that settled 
in Halifax and St. John, N. B. Children: 
Lincoln Fremont, born June i, 1862, died in 
infancy; George Nelson, born June 17, 1863, 
died at Hartford, August 20, 1887; Charles 
Atwood, born April 28, 1865, drowned at 
Hartford, April 27, 1888; Walter Leslie, men- 
tioned below ; James Percival, born June 22, 
1869, died March 12, 1897; Archibald Camp- 
bell, born November 11, 1871, died November 
18, 1891 ; Frederick William, born October 



20, 1875, now a resident of New York City. 
(VIII) Waher Leslie, son of Atwood 
Wakefield, was born in St. John, N. B., May 
6, 1867. He was educated in the public schools 
of St. John, N. B., and business college at 
Hartford, Connecticut. He is successfully 
engaged in the insurance business in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, being senior member of 
the firm of Wakefield, Morley & Co., conduct- 
ing a fire insurance business throughout the 
New England states. Mr. Wakefield is promi- 
nent in the business and social life of Hart- 
ford, and has creditably filled a number of 
political offices, and is held in high esteem by 
a large circle of business and social friends. 
He married, April 26, 1893, Alice Grace Ba- 
con, of Hartford, Connecticut, daughter of 
■Marcus Morton and Delia (Case) Bacon. 
Children: Mildred, born at Hartford, Febru- 
ary I, 1895 ; Katherine Frances, born March 
19, 1897, died June 26, 1898; Helen, born No- 
vember 7, 1898; Elizabeth, January 26, 1908. 



Edward Bergin was born in 
BERGIN Queens county, Ireland, in 1852, 
and came to this country in 
1866. He located first at Waterbury, Con- 
necticut, and made his home there for two 
years. Then he came to Derby, Connecticut, 
where he is now the custodian of the Derby 
Public Library building. He married, March 
21, 1871, Bridget Mansfield, born in Queens 
county, Ireland, in 1853, daughter of Ed- 
ward Mansfield. Children: John J., born 
January 13, 1874, married Katherine Riley, of 
New Haven ; Timothy F., August 7, 1875 ; 
James F., October 2, 1877; Edward Red- 
mond, mentioned below ; Katherine A., August 
26, 1880; Thomas Francis, May 27, 1882; 
Mary ; Joseph, January 14, 1889, unmarried. 

(II) Edward Redmond, son of Edward 
Bergin, was born in Derby, Connecticut, Feb- 
ruary 18, 1879. He attended the public 
schools of his native town, graduating from 
the grammar school. He then entered the La 
Salle Academy, New York City, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1898 with the 
degree of A. B. He returned to Derby and 
was appointed assistant in the office of the 
Derby town clerk and judge of probate. Then 
for a time he was clerk in a grocery store. 
In 1906 he was elected town clerk of Derby 
and has served since then. He was elected 
an alderman of the city and served in 1904- 
06. He is member of the order of Elks, 
Derby Lodge, No. 571, and is its secretary; 
member of the Knights of Columbus, the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, and of St. 
Mary's Roman Catholic Church. In politics 
he is a Democrat. He is unmarried. 



CONNECTICUT 



1801 



(\'III) Frank Go fife Phipps 
BARNES Barnes, son of Major Thomas 

Atwater Barnes (q. v.), was 
born at New Haven, September 18, 1877. He 
attended the public schools of New Haven 
and the Hopkins Grammar School of that city, 
the oldest school in Connecticut. He was en- 
gaged for time in newspaper work and sub- 
sequently in the manufacture of automobiles. 
He is now in the executive department of the 
New Haven Gas Light Company. He is a 
member of the Ouinnipiack Club, the Union 
League Club, the Country Club, the New 
Haven Yacht Club, the Civic Federation and 
the Chamber of Commerce of New Haven. 
In politics he is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of Trinity Church. He resides at 191 
Bradley street, New Haven. He married, No- 
vember 30, 1904, Mae Louise Gilbert, born 
March 2, 1882, daughter of John and Jane M. 
Gilbert, of New Haven. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Barnes 
have no children. Captain John Gilbert, great- 
grandfather of Mrs. Barnes, was a soldier in 
the revolution, and was killed at New Haven 
on the spot where the Young Men's Repub- 
lican Club house now stands. 



Hon. Edward T. Buck- 
BUCKINGHAM ingham, at the present 

time mayor of the city 
of Bridgeport, is a descendant of one of the 
most prominent of the Puritan families of 
New England. This family may proudly 
boast of having had many eminent members, 
foremost among whom was the Hon. William 
Alfred Buckingham, the justly famous war 
governor of Connecticut, a statue of whom 
adorns the state capitol at Hartford. 

(I) Thomas Buckingham, the Puritan set- 
tler, ancestor of all who bear the name of 
Buckingham in America, sailed from London 
and arrived at Boston, June 26, 1637, and at 
New Haven, then Ouinnipiack, March 30, 
1638. The following year he removed to Mil- 
ford. He married (first) in England, Han- 
nah , who died at Milford, June 28, 

1647; children: Hannah, Daniel, Samuel, see 
forward, Mary and Thomas. He married 

(second )Ann , and by this marriage 

had one son. 

(II) Samuel, second son of Thomas and 
Hannah Buckingham, was baptized at Mil- 
ford, June 13, 1640, died March 17, 1699. 
He married, December 14, 1663. Sarah, 
daughter of Timothy Baldwin, one of the first 
settlers of Milford ; children : Sarah, Mary. 
Samuel, died in infancy, Samuel, see forward, 
Hannah, Thomas, Anne, Mary, Hester, Ruth. 

(III) Samuel (2), second son and fourth 
child of Samuel (i) and Sarah (Baldwin) 



Buckingham, was born November i, 1668, 
died October 29, 1708. He was a proprietor 
of the town of New Milford although he 
never removed to it. He married Sarah 

, who was admitted to the church in 

Milford, May 17, 1696, and had children: 
Samuel, see forward, Ebenezer, Sarah, Thom- 
as, Elizabeth, Esther, Nathaniel. 

(IV) Samuel (3), eldest child of Samuel 
(2) and Sarah Buckingham, was baptized 
November 21, 1693, died in Old Milford, De- 
cember 29, 1749. He married. May 20, 1714, 
Silence Clark, and had children : Sarah, De- 
borah, Abigail, Ann, Samuel, Ebenezer, Es- 
ther, Jared, see forward, Nathan, Elizabeth, 
Enoch. 

(V) Jared, third son and eighth child of 
Samuel (3) and Silence (Clark) Bucking- 
ham, was born October 16, 1732, died in Ox- 
ford, about 1812. Owing to the loss of many 
of the old records from various causes, we 
cannot trace the name of his wife or the date 
of his marriage, but his children were : John, 
see forward ; Samuel, born in 1772, married 

• Wooster, of Oxford, Connecticut ; 

Isaac, 1774; Eunice, 1775, died in 1880. 

'(VI) John, son of Jared and 



(Wooster) Buckingham, was born in 1770, 
and married, 1791, Esther Osborne. Their 
children were: Fanny, born 1792, married 
Roswell Hill and removed to Ohio ; Heze- 
kiah, 1794, married Matilda Ann Wooster; 
Lucy, 1796, married Ethel ( ?) Bartiss ; Let- 
son, 1799, never married ; Susan Matilda, 
1802, also unmarried : David Harson, Sep- 
tember 19, 1805, married Anne Maria Sco- 
field ; Lucius E.. see forward; Linus, 1809, 
did not marry; Meroe, 181 1, married Corne- 
lius Cahooe : Laura L., 1813, married, Novem- 
ber 2, 1835, Joel F. Webster. 

(VII) Lucius E., seventh child of John 
and Esther (Osborne) Buckingham, was born 
March 17, 1807, died in 1903. He was en- 
gaged in farfning in Roxbury, Connecticut, 
and was also occupied as a stone cutter and 
a builder of monuments. He married, June 
13, 1832, Julia A. Taylor, of New Milford, 
and they lived in Woodbury, Connecticut. 
Their children were: i. Mary A., born April 
2, 1833, in Roxbury; married, December 31, 
1863, Isaac B. Prindle, who was for thirty 
years cashier of Pequonnock National Bank 
of Bridgeport, and died in that city, April 
30, 1910. 2. Esther A., July 16, 1835, died 
December 11, 1855. 3. Walter, see forward. 
4. George, Roxbury, November 14, 1846. 5. 
Ellen L., December 11, 1848, married Henry 
E. Ward. 6. Alice A., April 5, 1853, mar- 
ried Dwight Halleck, and died in 1895. 

(VIII) Walter, eldest son and third child 



l802 



CONNECTICUT 



of Lucius E. and Julia A. (Taylor) Bucking- 
ham, was born in Dover, Dutchess county, 
New York, October 25, 1841. When he was 
three years of age his father removed to Sing 
Sing and engaged in the stove business for a 
number of years, and young Walter was a 
pupil at the public school. He then became 
a student at the Gunnery School, which was 
a celebrated one in its day, and at which Cap- 
tain "Bob" Beedes and a son of Judge Van 
Cott, late postmaster of New York City, were 
also educated. The family then removed to 
Woodbury, Connecticut, where Walter was 
employed in the dry goods business, after 
which he went to Chicago, where he was en- 
gaged in the wholesale commission business 
for two years. Ill health compelled his return 
to the east and he accepted a position as clerk 
in French's Hotel, in New York City, which 
was for many years a famous hotel. At the 
expiration of three years he went to South 
Norwalk, Connecticut, where he was engaged 
in the grocery business for a time, then re- 
moved to Metuchen, New Jersey, where he 
held the position of superintendent of rail- 
road construction, and built the railroads 
throughout that section of the country. His 
next field of activity was in a similar capac- 
ity at Mount Vernon, New York, and during 
this time he built the first macadam road in 
New York City. Returning to Woodbury, 
Connecticut, at the end of one year, he estab- 
lished himself in the insurance business, fol- 
lowing this for three years. Coming to 
Bridgeport in 1881, he accepted the position 
of bookkeeper with the John H. Way Manu- 
facturing Company, holding this until the de- 
struction of the factory by fire. For a period 
of eight and a half years he served as deputy 
collector of customs for the city of Bridge- 
port, and after that was engaged at various 
times as an expert accountant. While resid- 
ing in Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1869, he was 
elected as the first city clerk and served two 
terms in that office. In politics he was a 
staunch supporter of Democratic principles. 
He was made a Mason in King Solomon 
Lodge, No. I, Woodbury, Connecticut, the old- 
est in the state, and was its secretary for a 
number of years until he removed from the 
town, when he affiliated with St. John's 
Lodge in Bridgeport. Mr. Buckingham mar- 
ried, November 8, 1865, Helen E., daughter 
of Robert I. Tolles, a sash and blind maker 
of Plymouth, Connecticut. Their children: i. 
Ida E., married T. W. Joyce, of Bridgeport, 
and has two children : Louis B. and Helen L. 
2. Edward T., see forward. 

(IX) Edward T., only son of Walter and 
Helen E. (Tolles) Buckingham, was born in 



Metuchen, New Jersey, May 12, 1874. When 
he was three years of age his parents removed 
to Bridgeport, where he became a student at 
the Grand street public school and later at the 
Bridgeport high school, from which he was 
graduated in 1891. He then entered Yale 
University, selecting the academic course, was 
graduated in 1895, then commenced the study 
of law in the Law School of Yale University, 
from which he was graduated two years later, 
and in 1898 commenced the practice of the 
legal profession in Bridgeport. In 1901 he 
was elected city clerk, and again in 1903, and 
in the latter year with a majority of twenty- 
five hundred and thirty-five votes, the largest 
vote ever polled for the office of city clerk. 
He was re-elected in 1905 and 1907, serving 
in that office until 1909. He was then nomi- 
nated and elected mayor of Bridgeport, his 
majority for this office being three thousand 
and forty-three, the largest ever polled in the 
city. Mayor Buckingham has numerous af- 
filiations with organizations of various kinds, 
among them being: Past master of St. John's 
Lodge, No. 3, Free and Accepted Masons; 
past sachem of Wowopon Tribe, No. 40, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, in which he had 
been elected to the office of great senior saga- 
more of the state of Connecticut, and May, 
1910, great senior sachem of Connecticut, di- 
rectly from the floor, that being the first time 
that such an honor had been accorded to any 
member. He is a member of Samuel H. Har- 
ris Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; of the Bridgeport Lodge, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks ; of Waldemar 
Council, Order of United American Mechan- 
ics, also the Foresters of America and Knights 
of Pythias ; member of the University Club, 
Yale Club of New York, the Arion and Ger- 
mania societies and the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

Mayor Buckingham is one of the youngest 
mayors in the country in a city of over one 
hundred thousand and the second youngest 
ever elected in the history of the city, and yet 
he is rapidly forging to the front with the 
most prominent men of Connecticut. Perhaps 
no man who has ever been mayor of Bridge- 
port has gained more friends under the try- 
ing conditions of this office. It is an office 
which carries with it heavy responsibilities, 
the assuming of which must necessarily mean 
much criticism and, while Mayor Buckingham 
has not escaped this, in most cases it has been 
the result of avarice and greed or from a 
selfish rather than a just criticism of his ad- 
ministration of aflfairs. Socially he has few 
enemies, and a vast army of friends which is 
daily increasing as his many duties bring him 



CONNECTICUT 



1803 



in contact with men of iironiincnce, anil his 
career has as yet only coninicnced. 

Mayor JJuckint^hani married, June 3, 1903, 
Bessie R. F.udau (see I'.udau 11), and they 
have had children: Russell 11, born June 2, 
1904, and Edward T. Jr., September 2, 1906. 

(The Budau Line). 

(I) John Diedericks Budau was born in Lii- 
beck. llcrniany, October 14, 1817, died in 
Bridgeport, at the corner of Main street and 
\\'heeler avenue, November 20, 1888. At the 
age of sixteen years he came to America and 
for a time followed a seafaring life. He then 
went to New Orleans and worked on the rail- 
road, receiving the magnificent sum of fifty 
cents per day. Later he came north and en- 
gaged in the grocery business for a time, then 
organized the dry goods house at the corner 
of Fairfield avenue and Main street, which 
business is at the present time owned by Rad- 
ford B. Smith. i\Ir. Budau conducted this 
successfully for some time and then sold his 
stock of goods to the firm of Beacon & Smith, 
which later changed to Peet & Smith, and fi- 
nally passed into the hands of Radford B. 
Smith. Subsequently Mr. Budau engaged in 
the settling of estates and general real estate 
business, in which he was eminently success- 
ful, and at his death left a large estate. The 
affairs of the city always engaged his active 
interest and for a number of years he served 
as street commissioner. During this time 
some of the principal streets and avenues of 
the city were laid out, among them being 
North and Park avenues. In the Ma- 
sonic fraternity he held high rank, was a 
charter member of St. John's Lodge, had 
passed through all the bodies including the 
commandery, and was buried with Masonic 
honors. He married, 1845, Louise Jane 
French, one of nine children, and who is now 
(1910) living at the advanced age of ninety 
years. Of the seven children of Mr. and Mrs. 
John D. Budau, but one, jMrs. Alvin D. Moul- 
ton, is now living. Mrs. Budau is the daugh- 
ter of Wheeler French, born in 1792, died in 
1852, who was a carpenter in Bridgeport, in 
which city he spent his entire life. He mar- 
ried Sarah Webb, born in 1794, died in 1862, 
daughter of Zenas Webb. Wheeler French's 
father. Gamaliel French, served during the 
revolutionary war and his name is inscribed 
on the tablets of the gateway erected by the 
]\lary Silliman Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, at the old Stratfield 
burying ground near the corner of North and 
Brooklawn avenues, Bridgeport. 

(H) John (2), son of John (i) Die- 
dericks and Louise Jane (French) Budau, 



was born in Bridgeport, February 24, 
1851, died in that city, December 31, 1904. 
He was reared and educated in Bridgeport, 
was a musician, and for a number of years 
played in the Wheeler & Wilson band. He 
then engaged in the express business for a 
time, but later gave all his attention to insur- 
ance and his real estate interests until he re- 
tired. He was a member of St. John's Lodge, 
I'-ree and Accepted Masons, of which three 
generations of his family were also members, 
and had taken the thirty-second degree in the 
Scottish Rite bodies. He married Annie Rus- 
sell, born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, 
whose father was a soldier during the civil 
war. John D. and Annie (Russell) Budau 
had two children: John H. D. Budau (q. v.), 
and Bessie R., wife of Mayor Buckingham 
(see Buckingham IX). 



(Ill) Daniel Bucking- 
BUCKINGHAM ham, son of Rev. Thom- 
as Buckingham (q. v.), 
was born October 3, 1673. He was for many 
years justice of the peace, and held other im- 
portant ofifices in the town. He was also a 
prominent member of the church. He was 
a large landholder in Lebanon, Connecticut. 
He died March 25, 1725. He married Sarah 
Lee, of Lyme, May 24, 1693. His widow 

married Lynde. Children : Sarah, 

born September 21, 1695 : Daniel, April 9, 
1698, mentioned below; Hester, April 16, 
1701 ; Stephen, August 4, 1703; Ann, October 
II, 1705: Temperance, 1708. 

(IV) Daniel (2), son of Daniel (i) Buck- 
ingham, was born April 9, 1698. He married, 
March 4, 1726, Lydia Lord. Children: Ann, 
born September 11, 1728; Daniel, June — , 
1730, died May 4. 1731 ; Daniel, December 28, 
1731 ; Adonijah, October 11, 1733; John, Sep- 
tember 2, 1735; Lydia, April 27, 1738; Sam- 
uel, May 4 or 14, 1740, mentioned below; 
Giles, Febniary 2, 1742; Andrew, March 31, 
1744; Peggy, . baptized June 15, 1746, died 
July 13, 1746. 

(V) Samuel, son of Daniel (2) Bucking- 
ham, was born May 4 or 14, 1740, died Janu- 
ary 30, 1815. He married Lydia Watrous, 
who died June 12, 1833. Children: Samuel, 
born January or July II, 1770, mentioned be- 
low: Lydia, January 21, 1772; Mehetebel, 
June 22, 1774: Lucy, November 6, 1775: 
Giles, February 8, 1777- 

(A^I) Deacon Samuel (2), son of Samuel 
( I ) Buckingham, was born at Saybrook, Con- 
necticut, January or July 11, 1770, and lived 
there until after his marriage and the birth 
of his eldest child. In 1803 he removed to 
Lebanon, and in 18 15 represented that town 



i8o4 



CONNECTICUT 



in the legislature. He was for many years 
deacon in the church. He was an enterpris- 
ing and thrifty farmer and acquired a hand- 
some property for those times. He was inter- 
ested in the cultivation of fruit, and raised it 
in abundance and of the choicest varieties. 
He also supplied the markets of Hartford 
with all farm products. When a young man, 
and before he had left Saybrook he and sev- 
eral others had built the first two fishing 
piers at the mouth of the Connecticut to take 
shad, and he retained his interest in these fish- 
eries, which became very valualDle. His build- 
ings were always kept in the best of repairs 
and his residence was a striking feature of the 
landscape, and a good example of a New Eng- 
land home. He took an active interest in edu- 
cation and was liberal in assisting to maintain 
the town schools. The church also of which 
he was a deacon always found in him one of 
its best friends. In all its affairs he took a 
leading part, and had a peculiar regard for 
ministers, so much so that his house was fa- 
miliarly known as "The Ministers' Tavern". 
When the temperance reform commenced, he 
was one of the first to adopt its principles and 
to carry them out. He was a man of careful 
and exact lousiness habits, rare good judg- 
ment and reverence for all good things. He 
married, March 8. 1798, Joanna, daughter of 
Nathaniel and Dinah (Newton) 3.Iatson, of 
Colchester, who were married January 15, 
1761. Her father, Nathaniel Matson. was 
born in 1725, son of Nathaniel IMatson, of 
Lyme, a farmer and merchant there, who died 
February 3, 1776, aged ninety-two. He was 
the son of Nathaniel Matson, the first of the 
name to come to this country, who settled in 
Boston. Her eldest sister was the mother of 
Judge Henry M. Waite, chief justice of the 
supreme court of the state. She was a supe- 
rior woman, of great executive ability and 
good judgment. Children : Abigail, born 
March 26, 1801 ; \\'illiam Alfred, Alay 28, 
1804, mentioned below; Luc\' Ann, October 
25, 1806; Samuel Matson, Jtdy 12, 1809, died 
November 26, 1810; Samuel Giles. November 
18, 1812; Israel Matson, .August 5, i8t6, 

(\TI) Hon. William Alfred Buckingham, 
son of Deacon Samuel (2) Buckingham, was 
born May 28, 1804, in Lebanon, Connecticut. 
He was educated in the public and private 
schools of his native town, and at Piacon 
Academy, Colchester. Until twenty years of 
age he was engaged in farming. He then 
entered a dry goods store in Norwich as a 
clerk, and remained there two years. After 
spending a short time in a wholesale store in 
New York, he returned to Norwich in 1826, 
and established himself in the drv goods busi- 



ness there. In 1830 he began the manufacture 
of ingrain carpeting, and in 1848 was one of 
the principal men wlio organized the Hayward 
Rubber Company for the manufacture of In- 
dia rubber goods. He was the treasurer of 
this company from its organization. In 1849- 
50-56-57 he was elected mayor of the city 
of Norwich, and in 1856 was presidential 
elector. He held no other public office until 
1858, when he was elected governor, and re- 
elected seven times, after which he declined 
further service. He was one of the four 
loyal governors who held office through the 
civil war. At the beginning of the war the 
president called for one regiment of troops 
from Connecticut and the governor organized 
three by voluntary enlistments, which he uni- 
formed, armed and furnished with baggage 
train and camp ecjuipage complete for the 
field. They were the first troops sent from 
any state that were in all respects equipped 
for active service. This action was assumed 
as an imperative public necessity, and taken 
upon the personal responsibility of the govern- 
or. On the first Wednesday of May, the general 
assembly was convened, which at once rati- 
fied the action of the governor, authorized 
him to raise ten thousand troops for the de- 
fense of the national government, and placed 
money under his control to be used for this 
purpose at his discretion. A subsequent leg- 
islature removed the restriction which limited 
the number of men. and gaye him authority 
and means to meet any acquisition which 
might be made by the president. Under this 
authority and with the co-operation of his fel- 
low citizens, he raised fifty-four thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-two men, which was 
six thousand and eighty-nine more than the 
number assigned to the state by the general 
government. In 1868 he was elected to the 
senate of the United States to serve- six years 
from March 4, 1869. 

He took an active part in the cause of edu- 
cation, was a liberal benefactor of Yale Col- 
lege, and with one exception contributed more 
money than any other person to endow the 
Norwich Free Academy, of which he was the 
president of the board of trustees. He was 
also president of the Connecticut State Tem- 
perance Union, a member of the Broadway 
Congregational Church in Norwich, a corpor- 
ate member of the American Board of Foreign 
Missions, and in 1865 moderator of the Na- 
tional Council of Congregational Churches in 
Boston. 

He married, September 27, 1830, Eliza, 
daughter of Dr. Dwight Ripley, of Norwich, 
a famous merchant of that city in the early 
part of the nineteenth century. She died 



CONNECTICUT 



1805 



April 19, 1868. Cliildren : William, born Oc- 
tober. 1836, died IXcemher, 1838; Eliza Coit, 
mentioned below . 

(Mil) Eliza Coit, daughter of Hon. Wil- 
liam Alfred Ijiickinghani. was born Decem- 
ber 8. 183S. She married General William A. 
Aiken. The latter was one of Governor LSiick- 
ingham's staff during the civil war, and was 
the first to reach the seat of government with 
dispatches from the north, when Washington 
was beset with enemies, and the approaches 
to the capital were obstructed. He delivered 
these dispatches in person to President Lin- 
coln. Children : Eliza Pjuckingham, born 
May 21. 1862: William Buckingham, Janu- 
ary. 24, 1864: ]\Iary Appleton, April 5, 1866; 
Jane AIcGregor, August 4, 1867; Alfred Law- 
rence, July 6. 1870: John. November 3, 1871. 



(T\') Nathaniel Buck- 

BUCKINGHA^I ingham, son of Samuel 
(2) Buckingham, (q. 
v.), was born in 1702, died in 1780. He was 
elected deacon of the church in 1765. He 
married, May 30, 1728, Sarah Smith. Chil- 
dren: Nathaniel, born March 8, 1729; Joseph, 
July I, 1730: Sarah, February 29, 1734; Abi- 
jah, June 22. 1735 : Sibbell, September 13, 
1737; Oliver, May 27. 1739; Ephraim, Decem- 
ber 6, 1743 : Abel, mentioned below. 

(V) Abel, son of Nathaniel Buckingham, 
was born May 22, 1745, died July 27, 1827. 
He settled near Northville, in the northerly 
part of New Milford. Connecticut. He mar- 
ried (first) Hannah Botsford, who died Sep- 
tember 22, 1801. and he married (second) 
Sarah Barnum. Children of first wife : Na- 
thaniel, born March 3, 1775, mentioned below; 
Abel, July 18, 1776; Joseph, May 5, 1778; 
Samuel, July 4, 1780; Ephraim, August 15, 
1782: Gilbert, July 25, 1788. 

(VL) Nathaniel (2), son of Abel Bucking- 
ham, was born at New Milford, March 3, 
1775- He married. March 24. 1801, Tamer 
Hunt, born May, 1778, died December 19, 
1839. Children, born at Northville, New 
Milford: Harvey, October 30, 1809; Sarah 
Ann, October 2, 1810; Harry, April 10, 1813; 
Hiram Wheeler, June 7, 1815, mentioned be- 
low; Heman, December 24, 1818. 

(VII) Hiram Wheeler, son of Nathaniel 
(2) Buckingham, was born at Northville, New 
Milford, June 7, 1815, died April 12, 1872. 
He attended the public schools. He operated 
a custom mill and saw mill, carded wool and 
printed calicoes, etc. In later years he fol- 
lowed farming. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican ; in religion a Congregationalist. He 
married, June 10, 1846. Susan Baldwin, born 
at Northville, March 17, 1828, died in 1906, 



daughter of Samuel and Mabel Baldwin. 
Children: Andrew D., born February 7, 
1849, died August 29, 1851: Andrew S., De- 
cember ID, 1852; Charles Lester, August 31, 
1855, mining engineer, Denver, Colorado, 
married Edith Jones, of Bridgeport, and had 
Mabel, Harold and Marion ; Edgar B., Jan- 
uary 4, 1859, farmer at Northville, married 

, children : Grace, Ruth, Florence, 

Cora, Homer, Ethel ; Herman Chester, men- 
tioned below. 

(Vni) Herman Chester, son of Hiram 
Wheeler Buckingham, was born at North- 
ville, New Alilford, Litchfield county, Con- 
necticut, March 15, 1864. He was educated 
in the district schools of his native town. At 
the age of seventeen he left home and began 
to learn the trade of machinist in the shops 
of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad 
at Aurora, Illinois. In 1883 he returned to 
New Milford and worked as a tool maker 
there for two years. He was also employed 
for a time by his brother's firm. Marsh & 
Buckingham, in wood- working. He was then 
for more than six years with the Eastern 
Lounge Company of New Milford as foreman 
and superintendent. In 1905 he became the 
junior partner of the firm of Taylor & Buck- 
ingham, in partnership with Henry H. Tay- 
lor. The firm takes all kinds of contract 
work, cement work as well as carpentering, 
and takes rank among- the leading builders of 
the city. Mr. Buckingham also manufactures 
what is known as the "Easy Truck," which 
he invented. In politics he is a Republican. 
He is a member of the Commercial Club and 
of St. Peter's Lodge. No. 21, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of New Milford. In religion 
he is a Congregationalist. He married, in 
July, 1886, Jennie, daughter of John W. and 
Jane (Turrill) Addis, of New Milford. They 
have one daughter, Maud, born at New Mil- 
ford, December 5, 1887. 



(ATI) Captain lohn 
BUCKINGHAM Buckingham, son" of 
David Buckingham (q. 
v.), was born in Watertown, October 17, 1786. 
He was educated in the district schools, and 
followed farming for an occupation. He 
raised a company of men in Watertown and 
was commissioned captain in the war of 18 12. 
While in the service he was stationed at New 
London and New Haven. At the close of the 
war he was commissioned colonel of the state 
militia, but soon resigned. In 1825 he re- 
moved to Waterbury and for more than twen- 
ty-five years was in partnership with his 
brothers-in-law. J. M. L. and W. H. Scovill, 
under the firm name of Scovills & Bucking- 



i8o6 



CONNECTICUT 



ham, manufacturers of brass butts and other 
brass goods at Oakville. When the firm was 
incorporated in 1850 as the Scovill Manufac- 
turing Company, he retained his interests as 
a stockholder. He retired, on account of the 
infirmities of age, a few years before his 
death. He represented both Watertown and 
Waterbury in the general assembly and was a 
state senator from the sixteenth district. He 
was not only a capable business man. but of 
broad and general intellectual gifts. He read 
extensively and appreciated the classic Eng- 
lish authors. He was called upon to fill many 
private as well as public trusts. He was a 
lifelong member of the Protestant Episcopal 
church, and a member of the Masonic Lodge 
to which he was much attached. He was held 
in the highest esteem by his townsmen for 
his sterling integrity and many attractive per- 
sonal qualities. He died ^lay 3, 1867. He 
married, September 10, 1809, Betsey, daugh- 
ter of James Scovill (see Scovill V). She 
was "a lady of most amiable disposition and 
manners, and well qualified to adorn the large 
homestead over which she was destined to 
become the mistress, her husband having in- 
herited the ancestral farm of his Grandmother 
Merrill in Watertown". Children : Scovill 
Alerrill. born August 10, 181 1, mentioned be- 
low; Mary, May 17, 1815, married Abraham 
Ives. 

(VIII) Scovill Merrill, son of Captain John 
Buckingham, was born at Watertown, August 
10, 181 1. He was educated in the common 
schools and began life as clerk in the employ 
of J. M. L. '& W. H. Scovill, his uncles. 
When he came of age he continued with the 
firm and became superintendent of the button 
factory. In 1839 or 1840 a co-partnership 
was formed under the name of Scovill & Com- 
pany with a capital of $20,000 and he became 
one of the firm. He continued in this busi- 
ness until the incorporation of the Scovill 
Manufacturing Company in 1850 with a capi- 
tal of $250,000, including the original firm, 
and the button company in which Captain 
John Buckingham was also interested. After 
the death of his uncles, he became president 
of the corporation. In 1868 he retired from 
the active management of the concern and 
was succeeded as president by Samuel W. 
Hall. He was thoroughly progressive, very 
friendly to new enterprises and ready to aid 
them with mone}' and advice. In this way he 
materially aided in upbuilding Waterbury as 
an industrial center. He was director and 
president of a number of manufacturing com- 
panies between 1S48 and i860. He was a 
director of the Waterbury National Bank and 
president of the Plymouth Granite Company. 



He took great interest in bliilding dwdling 
houses and the block known as the Bucking- 
ham Block was the first of the kind in Wa- 
terbury. He was a substantial stockholder in 
the Naugatuck railroad and the Hartford & 
Fishkill, now part of the New Haven sys- 
tem. He was one of the prime movers and 
always a stockholder of the Wheeler & Wil- 
son Sewing Machine Company. 

For nearly fifty years he held the office of 
warden of St. John's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, succeeding his uncle, William H. Sco- 
vill, and was seldom absent from church ser- 
vices. He was a liberal contributor and ener- 
getic worker in all the affairs of the parish. 
He owned a fine farm a few miles west of the 
town and after he retired from business he 
spent much time on this place, often working 
hard with his men, and greatly enjoying the 
life outdoors. He gave generously to the 
building fund of Trinity College, Hartford, 
and to various other educational and chari- 
table purposes. 

He inherited his father's fondness for good 
horses and outdoor sports and was an excel- 
lent shot. The weather vane of the Congre- 
gational church, which stood where the Wel- 
ton drinking fountain is now, had a hole 
through the star end, made by a bullet from 
his gun, fired from the steps of the Scovill 
store near the southeast corner of H. W. Sco- 
vill's house. Years and business care sobered 
his spirit and he became the grave, sedate, 
scrupulously neat and refined person familiar 
to the elder ones of the present generation. 
"He could never endure dirt or disorder. All 
his appointments, his place, the factories in 
his charge, the roads leading to them, must 
be in good condition. He liked to have a 
share in keeping them so himself, and one of 
the most familiar sights to his neighbors dur- 
ing a period of fifty years was Mr. Bucking- 
ham broom in hand pointing out things which 
needed attention". He died at Waterbury, 
April 27, 1889. 

He married. ]\Iay iS, 1835, Charlotte, 
daughter of Aaron Benedict. She died Janu- 
ary 9, 1887. Their whole married life of over 
fifty years was spent in their house on West 
Main street, built at the time of their mar- 
riage. Child, John A., mentioned below. 

(IX) John A., son of Scovill Merrill Buck- 
ingham, "was born April i, 1839, at Water- 
bun,', died June 9, 1909, in Watertown. He 
was educated in the schools of Waterbury. 

The following is taken from "Biographicnl Re- 
view" (Litchfield county) : "John A. Buckingham,, 
a retired business man, occupied a pleasant resi- 
dence situated opposite to the common in Water- 
town. He received his education in the schools- 



CONNECTICUT 



1807 



of Watcrluiry and at the age of seventeen went to 
New York City, where he was for eight years em- 
ployed as salesman for the Scoville Mannfactnring 
Company. He tlien spent two years travelling in 
Europe and upon his return to the United States, 
he engaged in husiness in New York City, becoming 
an active and successful operator among financiers 
of Wall street. After fifteen years of prosperity in 
the metropolis, he relinquished business pursuits 
and returned to his home in Watertown, where he 
occupied the old Warren place, so called, which 
is one of the most desirable residence properties in 
this vicinity. He was both a prominent and popu- 
lar citizen, interested in the growth and develop- 
ment of the town, and gained the respect and good 
will of the community. He was an Episcopalian in 
religion, as were his parents, and was a liberal sup- 
porter of Christ's Church. He was a Republican 
in politics and was actively interested in public 
aflfairs, but never aspired to political honors. 

"In 1S69 Mr. Buckingham was united in marriage 
with Anne, daughter of Samuel McLean, an exten- 
sive dry goods importer, of Brooklyn, New York, 
and granddaughter of Hon. Charles Chapman, of 
Hartford. Connecticut. Children: Scoville McLean 
and Charles Benedict. Scoville McLean married 
Margaret, daughter of William McConway, of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania ; children : Mary and Margaret 
McLean. Charles Benedict married Agnes De 
Forest, daughter of John W. Curtiss ; children : 
Harriette Anne, John de Forest, Elizabeth Murray. 

(The Scovill Line). 

The family of Scovil, or Scovill, as it has 
been spelled in later years, is one of the most 
proininent in Waterbury, Connecticut. From 
the first settlement of the town the name has 
been distinguished and in a later generation 
James Mitchell Lamson Scovill and William 
H. Scovill laid the foundation of the indus- 
trial greatness of the city of Waterbury. 

(I) John Scovill, the first settler, was early 
at Haddam, Connecticut. 

(II) Sergeant John (2) Scoville, son of 
John (i) Scoville, was one of the early set- 
tlers of Waterbury. He married, February 6, 
1693, Hannah, daughter of Obadiah Richards. 
She died March 5, 1720. He died January 26, 
1726-27. Children: John, January 12, 1694; 
Obadiah, April 23, 1697, died 1719; Sarah, 
October 24, 1700; William, September 7, 
1703, mentioned below; Hannah, March 19, 
1706-07; Edward, February 12, 1710-11. 

(HI) Lieutenant Williatn Scovill, son of 
Sergeant John (2) Scovill, was born at Wa- 
terbury, September 7, 1703, died March 5, 
1755. He married (first) April 17, 1729, Han- 
nah, daughter of John Richards. She died 
April I, 1741, and he married (second) June 
16, 1742, Elizabeth, daughter of James Brown. 
She died May 6, 1752, and he married (third) 
Desire Sanford. widow of Caleb Cooper, of 
New Haven. His widow, Desire, married 
Deacon Jonathan Garnsey. Children of first 
wife, born at Waterbury : Anna, March 25, 
1731 ; James, January 27, 1732-33, mentioned 



below; Samuel, November 4, 1735; Abijali, 
December 27, 1738. Children of second wife: 
William, February 9, 1744-45 ; Darius, May 

15, 1746. 

(IVj Rev. James Scovill, son of Lieutenant 
^Villiam Scovill, was born at Waterbury, Jan- 
uary 27, 1732-33. He graduated from Yale 
College in the class of 1757 and became rector 
of the Protestant Episcopal church in the mis- 
sion field at Waterbury, Northbury and what 
is now Bristol, Connecticut. He made his 
home at Waterbury and was the first Episco- 
pal clergyman located there. After laboring 
thirty years in this field, he removed to New 
Brunswick, Canada, and became the rector 
of the church at Kingston. He died there De- 
cember 19, 1808, in the fiftieth year of his 
ministry. He married, November 7, 1762, 
Ame Nichols, who died in June, 1835, daugh- 
ter of Captain George Nichols. Children, 
born at Waterbury: James, born March 19, 
1764, mentioned below ; William, May 20, 
176(3; Hannah, married Daniel Micheau ; Rev. 
Elias, married Eliza Scovill, of Watertown ; 
Samuel, married Dibby Gilbert and Mary 
Smith ; Daniel, married Amelia Brannah and 
Hannah Wiggins ; Sarah, married Dr. Kushi 
Hatheway ; Edward George Nichols, baptized 
January 20, 1782 ; Henry Augustus, baptized 
January 11, 1784. 

(Y) James (2), son of Rev. James (i) 
Scovill, was born at Waterbury, March 19, 
1764, died November 26, 1825. He was the 
only member of his father's family to remain 
in Waterbury when he removed to New 
Brunswick. He became a prominent citizen, 
a large land owner, justice of the peace, and 
was commonly called "Squire Scovill". Dur- 
ing the war of 1812 he established and con- 
ducted a woolen mill. He was a man of fine 
presence and much dignity of manner and 
force of character. He married, November 

16, 1788, Alathea Lamson, died January i, 
1846, daughter of Mitchell Lamson. Children, 
born at Waterbury: i. James Mitchell Lam- 
son, September 4, 1789; of the finris of J. M. 
L. & W. H. Scovill and Scovill & Coinpany, 
and of the Scovill Manufacturing Company; 
married Mrs. Sarah A. Morton, daughter of 
William H. Merriman, of Watertown. 2. Bet- 
sey, May 12, 1792; married, September 10, 
1809, John Buckingham (see Buckingham 
VII). 3. Sarah Hannah, March 25, 1794; 
married A. Hitchcock. 4. William Henry, 
July 27, 1796, partner with his brother in the 
great Scovill enterprises; married (first) July 
2, 1827, Eunice Ruth, daughter of Hon. 
Thomas J. Davies, of Black Lake, New York ; 
married (second) March 22, 1841, Rebecca 
H., daughter of Hon. Nathan Smith, of New 



i8o8 



CONNECTICUT 



Haven. 5. Edward, December 31, 1798. 6. 
Anna Maria, February 9, 1801, died April 3, 
1804. 7. Caroline, July 4, 1803 ; married Wil- 
liam Preston. 8. Alathea iVIaria, August 14, 
1805 ; married Joel Hinman. 9. Mary, July 
23, 1808; married Rev. J. L. Clark. 10. Stella 
Ann, May 19, 181 1, died September, 1815. 



The surname Merriman is 

MERRIMAN also often written Merriam 

or Meriam. Some of the 

descendants of Joseph ]\Ierriam, of Concord, 

spell their name Merriman. 

(I) Captain Nathaniel Merriman was one 
of the original settlers of Wallingford, Con- 
necticut, in 1670. He had lots Xos. i. and 2, 
on the north, west and east corners of South 
Cross street, also lot No. 2, adjoining the 
west lot. These lots are now or were lately 
owned by Peter ^^■hittlesey and Rev. Edgar J. 
Doolittle. He built his house a short distance 
west of the site of the Whittlesey house. 
Children: John, born September 26, 1651; 
Hannah, May 15, 1653; Abigail, April 18, 
1654; Mamre, July 12, 1657, married Sam- 
uel Munson : John, February 28. 1659 ; Sam- 
uel, September 29, 1662; Caleb, born May 16, 
1665, mentioned below ; Moses, 1667 ; Eliza- 
beth, September 14, 1669, married, December 
2, 1685, Ebenezer Lewis. 

(H) Caleb, son of Captain Nathaniel Mer- 
riman, was born May 16, 1665, died July 9, 
1703. He resided at Wallingford, and left 
an estate valued at four hundred and thirty- 
nine pounds. He married Mary . 

Children, born at \A'allingford : Moses, Oc- 
tober 31, 1691 ; Elizabeth, May 4, 1693; Elia- 
saph. May 21, 1695, mentioned below; Phebe, 
June 17, 1697; Hannah, September 10, 1698; 
Phebe, September 16. 1699: Lydia, Decem- 
ber 31, 1701, died young; Lydia, November 
12, 1702. 

(III) Eliasaph, son of Caleb Merriman, 
was born May 21, 1695, fli^d August 14, 
1758. He married Abigail Hall, who was 
killed by the Indians with her daughter Abi- 
gail, August 4, 1758. Children, born at Wal- 
lingford : Eunice, October 7, 1720, died 
young; Eunice, January 12, 1722, died No- 
vember 14, 1722; Sarah, November 18, 1723; 
Titus, August 28, 1727 ; Caleb, Septemlser 3, 
1729; Amasa, 1730, mentioned below; Eliza- 
beth, July 27, 1832, died young; Esther, De- 
cember 2, 1734; Abigail, killed with her moth- 
er, August 4, 1758; Elizabeth. 

(IV) Amasa, son of Eliasaph Merriman, 
was born at Wallingford in 1730. He mar- 
ried Sarah , and had a son Charles, 

mentioned below. 

(V) Charles, son of Amasa Merriman, was 



born in \^'allingford, August 20, 1762. He 
was in the revolution, enlisting as a druminer, 
in 1776. He became drum major and served 
through the war. He married, May 16, 1784, 
Anna Punderson, of New Haven, who died 
April I, 1844, aged eighty, and settled in 
Watertown, where he commenced business as 
a tailor. He was compelled to give this up 
on account of poor health, and "rode post" 
from New Haven to Sufiield for four years, 
and made a voyage to the West Indies. He 
then engaged in business as a merchant in 
Watertown until his death, August 26, 1829. 
He had a genial nature, and was distinguished 
for decision of character and stern integrity. 
Children: Charles P., died 1794; Betsey, 
married Dr. Samuel Elton, of Watertown ; 
William H., born September 27, 1788, men- 
tioned below; Nancy, 1792, died young; Nan- 
cy, August 8, 1796; Charles P., August 7, 
1798. was a merchant of Savannah, Georgia, 
where he died July 10, 1835 ; Anna, July 7, 
1801, died August 19, 1835, married Edward 
Flickock ; Frederick, August 7, 1803, a mer- 
chant, died in Alabama, November i, 1836; 
William Punderson, September 6, 1805, a mer- 
chant in Augusta, Georgia, died September 3, 
1805; George F., August 5, 1808. 

(VI) William H., son of Charles Merri- 
man, was born September 27, 1788. He mar- 
ried, January 8, 1809, Sarah, born February 
16, 1790, daughter of David and Chloe ( Mer- 
rill) Buckingham (see Buckingham VI ). He 
was an enterprising merchant and leading cit- 
izen of W'atertown, Connecticut. Later he 
removed to Waterbury. Children, born at 
Watertown : Charles IBuckingham, born Oc- 
tober 9, 1809, mentioned below; Sarah A., 
September 27, 181 1, married (first) Thomas 
Morton and (second) James Mitchell Lamson 
Scoville; Joseph P., September 24. 1813; mar- 
ried, in 1840, Julia Judd ; David, May 27, 
1816, died March 28, "1834; Henry, March 25, 
1820. 

(VII) Charles Buckingham, son of William 
H. Merriman, was born in Watertown, Octo- 
ber 9, 1809. He attended the public schools 
of his native town and the Leonard Daggett 
School in New Haven. He resided in Water- 
town in the house located on the present site 
of the Taft school until 1839, when he re- 
moved to W'aterbury with his father. He was 
associated in business with his father in Wa- 
tertown and when he removed to Waterbury 
he entered partnership with Ezra Stiles in the 
dry goods business. Their place of business 
was in the building at the corner of Center 
square and Leavenworth street. In 1843 he 
became a partner of Julius Hotchkiss in the 
Hotchkiss & Merriman Manufacturing Com- 





llMA(Vl6iy 



CONNECTICUT 



1809 



paiiy, succeeding^ the tirni of liotclikiss & 
Priclinrfl and continuing until January, 1S57, 
wlien the business was consolidated with that 
of Warren & Newton Manufacturing Com- 
pany in the same line of business at Oakville, 
and incorporated under the name of the Amer- 
ican Suspender Company. A successful busi- 
ness was conducted by this corporation un- 
til the business was wound up in 1879. Mr. 
Merriman was president of the Hotchkiss & 
Mcrriman Manufacturing Company. He was 
one of tlie most prominent merchants and 
manufacturers in his day, and he was like- 
wise distinguished in public life. He was for 
several years a member of the common coun- 
cil of \Vaterbury and was mayor of the city 
from June 14, 1869, until June 13, 1870. In 
politics he was a Republican. He was presi- 
dent of the Waterbury Gaslight Company ; di- 
rector of the Citizens' National Bank ; presi- 
dent of the Waterbury Savings Bank. For 
many years he was a prominent member and 
vestryman of St. John's Protestant Episcopal 
Church. Of kindly nature, generous in help- 
ing others, sympathetic with the troubled and 
unfortunate, he had to a marked degree those 
qualities that attract the love of family and 
friends and the esteem of the community. He 
was upright in all the dealings of life, an hon- 
ored and useful citizen and good neighbor. 
He died at Waterbury, March 15, 1889. 

He married, June 30, 1841, Mary Margaret 
Field, who died October 5, 1866, daughter of 
Dr. Edward Field. Children, born in Water- 
bury ^r Charlotte Buckingham, Augtist 21, 
1843^ Sarah Morton.^ugust 7, 1845 ;Mielen, 
January 19, i848^rhgd— F -gb riia r y zo r 1903 : 
]\Iargaret Field, March 16, 1850, married Dr. 
Frank E. Castle : William Buckingham, June 
IT, 1853, married, November 17, 1886, Sarah 
Kingsbury Parsons ; Edward Field, Septem- 
ber I, 1854, died June 30, 1909. 

(VIII) William Buckingham, fifth child of 
Charles Buckingham and Margaret (Field) 
Merriman, was born in Waterbury, June 11, 

1853- 

His school days were spent chiefly at 

the Episcopal Academy of Cheshire. In his 
early years he was connected with Benedict 
Merriman & Company, then for several years 
with the Scovill Manufacturing Company, but 
afterward became teller of the Waterbury Na- 
tional Bank, and is now assistant cashier and 
on the board of directors. He was one of the 
original projectors of the Country Club of 
Waterbury, and is also a member of the Wa- 
terbury Club, the Home Club and the Farm- 
ington Club. On November 17, 1886, he niar- 
ried Sarah Kingsbury, daughter of Gueri|ey 
and Eliza (Brown) Parsons. He has two 



sons, Huckinghani Parsons and William Buck- 
ingham Merriman Jr. 

(The Buckingham Line). 

(IV) Thomas (2), son of Samuel (2) 
Buckingham (q. v.), was born in 1699 in Mil- 
ford. He married, January 9, 1724, Mary B. 
Woodruff, who died, a widow, April 18, 1790, 
aged ninety-one. Children : Mary, born Sep- 
tember 16, 1724; Esther, January 29, 1725, 
died July 16, 1726; Thomas, May 17, 1727, 
mentioned below ; Epenetus, baptized January 
10, 1730, died unmarried; Hannah, baptized 
May 13, 1733; Benjamin, baptized January 2,. 

1737- 

(V) Thomas (3), son of Thomas (2) 
Buckingham, was born May 17, 1727. He 
removed to Watertown in 1772, where he 
died January 27, 1796. He married Sarah 
Treat, of Milford, who died January 11, 1802. 
Children: Sarah, born 1751 ; Jean, 1753; 
Isaac, 1755, died young; Epenetus, 1757; 
Mary, 1759; David, March 14, 1760, men- 
tioned below ; Dan, married Philena Guernsey. 

(VI) David, son of Thomas (3) Bucking- 
ham, was born March 14, 1760, died February 
6, 1832. He married, March 14, 1785, Chloe 
Merrill, who died December 18, 1841, aged 
seventy-four. Children : John, born Octo- 
ber 17, 1786; Sarah, married William H. Mer- 
riman (see Merriman VI) ; Chloe, born De- 
cember 13, 1798; David, May 28, 1801 ; 
George, October 2, 1807. 



(IV) Titus Merriman, son 
MERRIMAN of Eliasaph Merriman, 

(q.v.), was born at Wall- 
ingford, Connecticut, August 28, 1727. He 
settled in his native town. In 1790 he had in 
his family, according to the first federal cen- 
sus, two males over si.xteen and three females. 
(V) Dr. Titus (2) Merriman, son of Titus 
( I ) Merriman, a leading citizen and physician 
of Bristol for half a century, was born in 
Wallingford, August 27, 1768. He removed 
to Bristol, Connecticut, about 1792, and was 
one of the first members of the Hartford 
County Medical Society, in whose delibera- 
tions he took a leading part. He was for many 
years the typical, trusted family physician of 
the people of Bristol, he being practically the 
second one to practice medicine in Bristol. He 
bought land in Bristol in 1794 and in 1802 
built the fine old colonial house later occupied 
by Ijis son and grandson, Titus E. Merriman. 
He owned a large portion of what is now 
the center of the town, and was a man of 
large influence and fine character. He mar- 
ried Polly, daughter of Isaiah Thompson, a 
major in the revolutionary war, and a promi- 



l«IO 



CONNECTICUT 



nent citizen. Children : i . Henry E. 2. 
George, mentioned below. 3. Eli Todd, M. 
D., moved to Texas in 1848. 4. Caroline, 
wife of Judge Stone, of Warren, Ohio ; she 
was educated in a girls' school at Litchfield, 
Connecticut, and was a classmate of the fam- 
ous poetess, Lvdia Hunt Sigourne)', of Hart- 
ford. 

(\T) George, son of Dr. Titus (2) Alerri- 
nian, was born at Bristol, 1806. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools. He inherited a 
large portion of his father's estate. In 1825 
he established himself in business as a .gen- 
eral merchant on the North Side in Bristol, 
and the business has been continued by the 
famil}' to the present time. For many years 
the post office was in this store. In addition 
to groceries, dry goods and other staple arti- 
cles, Mr. Merriman added a drug department 
to his business, and this in time became the 
more important part of the business and the 
other departments were discontinued. He 
married Ann Peck. Children: i. Titus E., 
mentioned below. 2. George, mentioned be- 
low. 3. Theodore D., born November 14, 
1845; attended Monson Academy, and upon 
his return from school was taken into the 
drug store as a partner with his father and 
brother George under the firm name of George 
Merriman & Sons; he bought out his brother 
George in 1888, upon the latter's retirement, 
and he retired January i, 1897; '^'■^'^ March 
3, 1897; married, October 15, 1879, Mrs. 
Julia (Macy) Gaul, daughter of Hiram and 
Ann (Hall) Macy and widow of William D. 
Gaul, of Hudson, New York ; children : 
George Macy, born November 20, 1880, Theo- 
dore Hall, April 16, 1882: both educated at 
Yale College. 

(VII) Titus E., son of George Merriman, 
was born in Bristol, September 19, 1833, died 
in Bristol, January 12, 191 1. He was edu- 
cated there in the public schools and at the 
Bristol Academy under Professor Barnes and 
at Baker's Academy at Collinsville, where he 
was graduated in 1852. He entered the em- 
ploy of his father in the drug store at North 
Side, Bristol, and a year later made a trip to 
California, where he was engaged in mining 
and experienced both good and bad luck. He 
came east in 1866 intending to return, but 
except for a brief visit remained in Connec- 
ticut since then. He opened a grocery store 
in 1866 on the North Side and later removed 
to the Seymour Block where now stands^ the 
abutments of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad Company trestle over Main 
street. He lost his store by fire and resumed 
business in the Gridley Block on North Main 
street. He sold out finally to W. H. Scott 



& Company of Terryville. After two years 
of rest and retirement he embarked in the 
harness and saddlery business at 21 North 
Main street, carrying also in stock trunks, 
bags and other leather goods. Mr. Merriman 
was a Republican from the first, voting for 
General John C. Fremont, of California, for 
president when in that state. He married 
Anna Nettleton, widow of George Nettleton, 
in 1868. She lived less than one year. On 
October 4, 1871, he married Alargaret A., 
daughter of Israel Upson, of Waterbury. Mr. 
and Mrs. Merriman v^ere members of the Con- 
gregational church, and Mrs. Merriman was 
active in the ladies' societies. She was for 
six vears a successful teacher in the Federal 
Hill' School. 

(VII) Hon. George (2) Merriman, son of 
George (i) Merriman, was born in Bristol, 
June 3, 1844, where he still resides. He at- 
tended the common schools in his native town 
and then the Pavilion School in Hartford. At 
the age of seventeen he went to work for 
his father, and at eighteen enlisted, on July 23, 
1862, in Company K, Sixteenth Connecticut 
Volunteers, in the civil war. He took part 
in the battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862,- 
and other engagements in which his well- 
known regiment participated. When his regi- 
ment, which was known as the "Fighting 
Sixteenth," was attached to the Department 
of North Carolina, the larger part was cap- 
tured by the Confederates, but Air. Merriman 
being sick and in a hospital in Washington, 
was fortunate enough to escape the war prison 
at Andersonville. He was put on a detach- 
ment to guard the rebel prisoners collected 
near Sandusky, Ohio, and was mustered out 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, August 29, 1865. He 
then returned to Bristol and became associated 
with his father in the drug business. After 
his father died the business was continued by 
Mr. Merriman and his brother Theodore D., 
under the name of Merriman Brothers and 
was a very successful enterprise. In 1888 he 
retired from the firm which has since been 
conducted by his brother's widow. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. He represented the 
town of Bristol in 1888-89 in the general as- 
sembly of the state, and was a member of the 
railroad committee, one of the most import- 
ant of the house and in the deliberations of 
which he took an active part. He is a mem- 
ber of Franklin Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Bristol ; G. W. Thompson Post, 
No. 13, Grand Army of the Republic, and was 
at one time its commander ; Ethan Lodge, 
No. 9, Knights of Pythias, of which he was 
past chancellor commander and one of its 
founders. He was the first captain of Hull 



I 



CONNECTICUT 



1811 



Division, Uniformed Rank, No. 5, Kiiij^hts of 
Pvthias, but resigned when he visited J\ion- 
tana, where he has interests in real estate 
and copper mining property. He is a mem- 
ber of the Congregational clnirch, and active 
in that and dllicr gond work' in the com- 
munity. 

He married, ( )ctuber 2, 1867, Mary 
Jane, born May 2. 1S44, daughter of Lucas 
and Clarinda (Tousey) Barnes, of Bristol 
'^••e Barnes \T). She is a member of the 
:;Tegational church, past president of the 
\\ omen's Relief Corps and past department 
president of Connecticut. 

(The Barnes Line). 

(I) I\Irs. JMary J. (Barnes) Merriman is 
a lineal descendant of Stephen Barnes, who 
moved to Branford, Connecticut, about 1700, 
from Southampton, Long Island. He mar- 
ried Alary Barnes, granddaughter of John 
Lindley or Lindsley. Children : Hannah, 
baptized November 31, 1700; Mary, baptized 
April 6, 1701 ; Pjenjamin, born December 13, 
1702; Stephen, born January 2, 1704, see for- 
ward; Sarah, born May 17, 1708; Experience, 
born December 4, 1710. 

(II) Stephen (2), son of Stephen (i) 
Barnes, was born January 2, 1704, died March 
27, 1777. He moved from Branford to Farm- 
ington and Southington, Connecticut. He 
was a man of much influence, and a large land- 
holder. He married, January 5, 1725-26, Mar- 
tlia. daughter of Thomas Wheden, of Bran- 
ford. She died March 18, 1773, and was 
buried in Plantsville. The inscription on her 
headstone was "I am the first brought here 
to turn to dust." Children : Mary, born 1726, 
married Jacob Carter, Jr. ; Stephen, December 
3, 1728; Martha, August 22, 1734; William, 
November 10, 1738, see forward; Nathan, 
August 26, 1742; Asa, August 24, 1745, mar- 
ried Phebe Atkins. 

(III) William, son of Stephen (2) Barnes, 
Avas born November 10, 1738, died October 
13, 18 1 3. He was a prominent man and held 
the rank of captain. He moved from South- 
ington to Southampton about 1800. He mar- 
ried Martha, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Hipson, of Southington. She was born in 
1735, died 1828. Children: Hannah, born 
1757, married Abraham Loser; Azubah, 1759, 
married Luther Atkins; Benjamin, 1761, see 
forward; Experience, 1763, died 1853, unmar- 
ried; William, Jr., 1767, married Thede Miner, 
of Wolcott ; Elijah, July 23, 1771. married 
Naomi Walker. 

(IV) Benjamin, son of William Barnes, 
was born in 1761. He was in the army about 
six months in 1780. He moved to Southamp- 



ton, Massachusetts, where he purchased a 
large tract of land. He could go a mile in 
any direction on his own property. He was 
buried in Southington. He married Abigail 
Goodscli. Children: Polly, born 1782, mar- 
ried ( )badiah Walker; Julia, 1783-84, married 
Abraham Thorpe; Amos, 1785. see forward; 
Nancy, 1790, married Calvin Torrey; Sylvia, 
1792, died 1795; Rizpah, 1800, married Ches- 
ter Rowley ; Levi, 1803, married Orpah Bar- 
ker ; Annie, 1805, married Thomas Elliott. 
Five children died in childhood. 

(\') Amos, son of Benjamin Barnes, was 
born 1785, died August 19, 1824. He mar- 
ried (first) Esther Danks, 1808; she died 
June 16, 1821. SRe had a brother, Moses 
Danks, who was killed by falling from a build- 
ing at Southampton ; his wife was Tamer 
(Porter) Danks. Amos Barnes married (sec- 
ond) Dorcas Chapman. Children of Amos 
and Esther (Danks) Barnes: Benjamin, born 
July 10, 1809, died May 2, 1864, married Sally 
Keeney; Lucas, December 15, 1812, see for- 
ward; Clarissa, August 18, 1814, married Wil- 
liam W. Carter; Moses Danks, November 12, 
1816, died October 3, ^858, married Rebecca 
Justin, Esther Mariva, October i, 1819, mar- 
ried Levi Stevens. 

(VT) Lucas, son of Amos Barnes, was born 
December 15, 1812, died May 15, 1864. He 
married Clarinda Tousey. Children : George 
Lucas, born April 23, 1838, died September 
15, 1838; Ann Eliza, October 11, 1839, mar- 
ried Samuel R. Goodrich ; George William ; 
Mary Jane, May 2, 1844, married Hon. George 
Merriman (see Merriman VII). 



Robert Davis, the immigrant an- 
DAVIS cestor, was an early settler of 
Barnstable, Massachusetts. He 
was on the list of those in Yarmouth able 
to bear arms in 1643, was a proprietor of 
Barnstable in 1645 ! admitted a freeman in 
1659, and had a grant of land in May, 1657, 
in Barnstable. In 1639 his farm was in- 
cluded in the bounds of Yarmouth, with the 
exception of a small lot. In 1686 his house 
was on the high ground north of the Dead 
Swamp, where the first road probably passed. 
He died in 1693. His will was dated April 
14, 1688, and proved June 29, 1693. His 
widow Ann died in 170.1. Her will was dated 
May 5, 1699, and proved April i, 1701. Only 
the vounger children were named in her will, 
indicating that she may have been the second 
wife of Robert Davis. Children, born in Yar- 
mouth : Deborah, January, 1645 ! Mary, April 
28, 1648. Born in Barnstable : Andrew, May, 
1650; John, March i, 1652; Robert, August, 
1654; josiah, mentioned below; Hannah, Sep- 



I8l2 



CONNECTICUT 



tember, 1658; Sarah, October, 1660; Joseph; 
jNIercy. 

(II) Josiah, son of Robert Davis, was born 
in September, 1656. He was a soldier in Cap- 
tain John Gorham's company in King Philip's 
war in 1675, and was one of the proprietors of 
Gorhanitown. In the division of the common 
shares he was entitled to forty-three and a 
half shares, a number above the average. He 
had monej' invested in trading at sea. His 
house stood a few feet east of the house 
later of Lot Easterbrooks, on -the north side 
of the road. His will was dated April 21, 
1709, and proved October 5 following. He 
married, June 25, 1679, Ann, daughter of 
Richard Taylor, tailor, of Yarmouth. Chil- 
dren : John, mentioned below; Hannah, born 
April, 1683, married Gershom Cobb ; Josiah, 
August, 1687; Seth, October, 1692; Ruth, 
February, 1694; Sarah, February, 1696; Jon- 
athan, 1698; Stephen, December 12, 1700; 
Anna, April 5, 1702. 

(III) Captain John Davis, son of Josiah 
Davis, was born September 2, 1681, and died 
in 1736. He bought part of the great lot of 
Thomas Lunibard, and the house which he 
built was at last accounts still standing. He 
was a captain, justice of the peace, and a 
man of note in his day. He married, August 
13, 1705, Mehitable Dimmock, who died in 
JNIay, 1775, aged eighty-nine, daughter of Shu- 
bael Dimmock, of Yarmouth. She was dis- 
missed from the Yarmouth to the East Church 
in Barnstable, February 12, 1725-26. Chil- 
dren, born in Barnstable : Thomas, October 
I, 1706; John, September 8, 1708; Solomon, 
April 5, 1711, died July 18, 1712; William, 
born April 10, 1713, died July 4, 1713; Solo- 
mon, mentioned below ; Mehitable, born Au- 
gust 10, 1717; William, August 24, 1719; Jo- 
siah, February 17, 1722; Isaac (twin), August 
3, 1724, died October 28, 1724: Jesse (twin), 
died August 13, 1724; Isaac, March i, 1727, 
died November 2, 1727. 

(IV) Solomon, son of Captain John Davis, 
was born in Barnstable, June 24, 1715, and 
died June 6, 1791. He was a merchant, and 
resided at Boston. During the siege he re- 
moved his family to Barnstable. He was an 
intimate friend of Governor Hancock. The 
"History of Barnstable" says: "In 1791 he 
was dining with his Excellency in company 
with some of the rare wits of the day, John 
Rowe, Joseph Balch, and others. Mr. Davis 
made some witty remark which induced Mr. 
Balch to say to him, 'Well, Davis, you had bet- 
ter go home now and die, for you will never 
say as good a thing as that again.' On his 
way home he was taken suddenly ill and sat 
down on the steps of King's Chapel, from 



whence he was removed to his house in the 
vicinity, where he shortly after died." He 
married (first) January 29, 1750, Elizabeth 
Wendell, of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
born October 16, 1729, and died at Plymouth, 
February 20, 1777; (second) November 18, 
1777, her sister Catherine, who died April 7, 
1808, aged sixty-six. Children, all Ijy first 
wife: John, born May 19, 1753; Solomon, 
born September 25, 1754, died at sea Septem- 
ber, 1789; Edward, December 18, 1765, died 
at sea, November 11, 1708; Thomas, July 26, 
1757, died at Falmouth, England, October 10, 
1775; Elizabeth, October 14, 1758, died Au- 
gust 14, 1833; Mehitable, July 14, 1760, died 
October 28, 1761 ; Henry, October 8, 1761, 
died March 15, 1762; Josiah, September 24, 
1763, died June 29, 1777; Isaac, mentioned 
below; William, April 26, 1768, died Septem- 
ber 14, 1804. 

(Vj Isaac, son of Solomon Davis, was born 
April 2, 1765, and died at Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, December 5, 1800. He married Eliza- 
beth Fellowes. 

(\ I) Rev. Gustavus Fellowes Davis, son of 
Isaac Davis, was born March 17, 1797, in Bos- 
ton, and died September 11, 1836. He was 
converted under the preaching of Rev. William 
Bentley, of Worcester, and united with the 
church in April, 1813. He began to preach 
at the age of seventeen in Hampton, Connec- 
ticut. A year later he removed to Preston 
and was ordained pastor there in June, 1816, 
serving as minister three years. He was or- 
dained pastor of the Baptist church at South 
Reading, Massachusetts, April 23, 1818, and 
while there, in addition to his pastoral duties, 
began a course of study in Latin and Greek, 
often walking to Boston, a distance of ten 
miles, to receive instruction from Rev. Mr. 
Winchell. From an entry in his diary it ap- 
pears that he finished reading the Greek testa- 
ment about three years later, under the teach- 
ing of Rev. Francis Wayland, Jr. 

In the spring of 1829 Mr. Davis went to 
Hartford to assist Rev. William Bentley in 
conducting a religious revival. He remained 
in Hartford and was installed pastor July 29, 
1829. During the seven years of his pastorate 
the church prospered in every way. He at- 
tended carefully to all details of organization 
and administration, and took the greatest in- 
terest in the music, doing much to aid and 
improve the choir. His principal strength, 
however, was in the pulpit. He prepared him- 
self carefully, and then preached either without 
manuscript or from brief notes. His knowl- 
edge of the Bible was wonderful, and his fine 
memory enabled him to illustrate his sermons 
with numerous scriptural quotations which 



Hi 



CONNECTICUT 



1813 



wcri- always apt and sometimes amusint;, He 
was natuially an optimist, and liis cheerful 
manner and courteous bearing made him a 
universal favorite. Deprived of a thorough 
school education himself, he took unusual in- 
terest in all educational matters. Through 
his ciTorts an academy was established at 
South Reading, where he then lived. He was 
the chief agent for collecting fmids for the 
Connecticut Literary Institute at Suffield. He 
was interested in Newton Seminary ; was trus- 
tee of Brown University ; examiner at Wes- 
leyan University, and by appointment of Hon. 
Lewis Cass, Secretary of War in 1836, a mem- 
ber of the board of examiners of the United 
States Academy at West Point. In 183 1 he 
was elected a trustee of W'ashington (now 
Trinity) College. He received the degree of 
M. A. from Waterbury (Maine) College (now 
Colby L'niversity) and Yale College, and the 
degree of D. D. from Wesleyan University in 
1835. In August, 1836, while on a visit to 
friends in Boston, he was taken suddenly ill, 
and died there. He married January 5, 1817, 
Abigail Leonard. 

(MI) Hon. Gustavus Fellowes Davis, son 
of Rev. Gustavus Fellowes Davis, was born 
in North Stonington, Connecticut, January 
4, 1818. He went with his father to South 
Reading", where he lived until he was eleven 
years old, at which time his father removed 
to Hartford. He was educated in the public 
schools of Hartford and at Hartford Academy. 
At the age of fifteen he entered the employ 
of the Phoenix Bank, remaining six years. 
-He was then sent to Litchfield, Connecticut, 
to take charge of a branch of that institution 
there. In 185 1 he returned to Hartford to 
become cashier of the City Bank, just organ- 
ized, and in 1857 '^^"^s chosen president, and 
remained in that position until his death, April 
28, 1896. He was identified with a number of 
the leading financial corporations of the city ; 
was president of the State Savings Bank, and 
vice-president and director of the Travelers 
Insurance Company from its organization until 
the election before his death. He was presi- 
dent of the Hartford Dispensary and treasurer 
of the South School District for nearly forty 
years. He was a Republican, formerly a 
\Miig, and in 1840 voted for William Henry 
Harrison for president. In 1880 he was elected 
representative in the legislature and declined 
a re-election. He was a member of the First 
Baptist Church of Hartford, of which his 
father was pastor. He had the universal con- 
fidence and esteem of a large business ac- 
quaintance, and had a reputation for fair 
dealing and strict integrity. He married, May 
14, 1839, Lucy Terry Strong, born August 24, 



1817, daughter of William Strong, of Hart- 
ford, descendant in the sixth generation of 
John Strong, a pioneer of W'indsor, Connec- 
ticut (see Strong). Her line of descent from 
^^'illiam Bradford is as follows : Governor 
\\'i!liam and Lady Alice (Carpenter) (South- 
worth) Bradford; William Jr. and Alice 
(Richards) Bradford; William and Alice 
(Bradford) Adams; Nathaniel and Alice 
(Adams) Collins; Ephraim and Ann (Collins) 
Terry; Samuel and Mary (Kellogg) Terry; 
Samuel and Huldah (Burnham) Terry; Wil- 
liam and Naomi (Terry) Strong. Children: 
I. Charlotte Maria, born at Litchfield, Cour 
necticut, March 4, 1840; married, June 15, 
1862, Rev. Wilder Smith, born July 11, 1835, 
graduated from Yale College, 1857, and was 
a tutor there 1859-61 ; settled as pastor at 
Berlin, Connecticut, 1862-66, at Mihvaukee, 
Wisconsin, and later at Rockford, Illinois ; his 
last }ears were spent in retirement in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. 2. Gustavus Pierrepont, 
mentioned below. 3. Emily Strong, born June 
22, 1847; niarried George E. Taintor. 4. 
F"redcrick W^endell, mentioned below. 

(\TII) Dr. Gustavus Pierrepont, son of 
Gustavus Fellowes Davis, was born in Litch- 
field, Connecticut, January 16, 1845. ^^ at- 
tended the public schools and was graduated 
from Yale College in 1866. He studied medi- 
cine in Paris during the following year and 
continued this study in the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, New York City, from 
which he was graduated in 1869 with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. Upon gradua- 
tion he was appointed a physician in the 
Charity Hospital, New York. Since 1870 he 
has been practising his profession in Hartford, 
Connecticut. Fie has been on the staff of the 
Hartford Hospital since 1878, and was medi- 
cal examiner of the Travelers' Insurance Com- 
pany from 1874 to 1907. He is a member of 
the city, county and state medical societies. 
In politics he is Independent, and in religion, 
Episcopalian. Dr. Davis married, October 5, 
1870, Elise, born October 16, 1842, daughter 
of Edward A. and Elizabeth M. Mitchell. 
Children : Elizabeth Mitchell, born August 
16, 1871, married Otto Schreiber, 1894; Ar- 
thur W., Ma}' 8, 1874, died July, 1904; Louise 
Pierrepont, April 6, 1880; Helen Fitch. No- 
vember 22, 1882, married, 1909, W. S. Glazier. 

(Vni) Frederick Wendell, son of Gustavus 
Fellowes Davis, was born in Hartford, Con- 
necticut, September 9, 1855. He attended the 
public schools of his native city and was grad- 
uated from the Hartford public high school in 
the class of 1873. He then entered Yale 
College, from which he was graduated in the 
class of 1877 with the degree of Bachelor of 



i8i4 



CONNECTICUT 



Arts. He started in business in Kentucky 
in partnership with M. \V. Smith in the sad- 
dlery business, and continued until iS8i, al- 
though the place of business during the last 
three years of the firm was in New Orleans. 
He returned to Hartford and engaged in the 
manufacturing business until i8g6. Since then 
he has held a position of responsibility with 
the firm of J. J. & F. Goodwin. He is a 
director in the City Bank and a trustee in 
the State Savings IBank. In politics he is a 
Republican, has been a member of the city 
council, and for the past eleven years a mem- 
ber of the high school committee. He is a 
member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon college 
fraternity, the Mayflower Society, and various 
other clubs and societies, including the Wolf's 
Head Society. All of the family are members 
of the First Congregational Church. 

Mr. Davis married (first) September 3, 
1879, Lucy Trumbull Smith, of Hartford, born 
November 9, 1858, died at New Orleans, Feb- 
ruary I, 1881. He married (second), October 
I, 1884, Mary, born October 8, i860, daughter 
of Henry G. and Delia W. (Ellsworth) Tain- 
tor. Children: i. Carl Willis, born in New 
(Jrleans, October 27, 1880: received his pre- 
paratory education in the Hartford public 
and high schools anfl was graduated from Yale 
University in 1902 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, receiving the degree of Master of 
Arts in 1908. Since his graduation he has 
been engaged in the printing business in Hart- 
risburg, Pennsylvania. 2. Dorothy Wendell, 
born in Hartford, Connecticut, March 12, 
1886. was graduated from the Hartford pub- 
lic high school, 1903, and from Smith College 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 1907. 
3. Roger Wolcott. born in Hartford, January 
8, 1890; was graduated from the Hartford 
public high school in 1908, and from the Shef- 
field Scientific School, Yale University, in 
191 1. 4. Frederick Ellsworth, born in Hart- 
ford, March 11, 1892, was graduated from the 
Hartford public high school in 1909 ; is a 
member of the class of 191 3 of the United 
States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Mary- 
land. 5. Elise Pierrepont, born in Hartford, 
November 21, 1897. died April 16, 1906. 

(The Wendell Line). 

(I) Evert Jansen Wendel, the immigrant 
ancestor, was born in 161 5, son of Johannes, 
as shown by the patronymic. He lived in his 
native town of Embden, East Friesland, now 
Hanover, upon the confines of the United 
Provinces of Holland. Thence he came under 
the Dutch West India Company to New Neth- 
erlands in 1640, and for five years lived on 
Beaver Lane, between the present Broadway 



and Broad street, New York. Removing to 
Albany to engage in the fur trade he lo- 
cated at what is now the corner of James and 
State streets. He died in 1709. He was dea- 
con of the Dutch church in 1656; magistrate 
of Fort Orange in 1660-61. He married 
(first) July 31, 1644, Susanna, daughter ct 
Philip and Susanna (De Scheene) Du Trieux. 
Her father was marshal of New Netherlands. 
He married (second) in 1663, Marje Abra- 
hamse Bevsrwyck, widow of Thomas Jansen 

Mingael. He married ( third ( Ariantje . 

Children by first wife: Thomas; Abraham; 
Elsje, 1647; Johannes, mentioned below; 
Diewen, 1653; Hieronymus, 1655; Philip, 
1657; Evert, 1660. Children of second wife: 
Isaac ; Susanna ; Diewertje. 

(II) Johannes, son of Evert Janse Wendel, 
was born in New Amsterdam in 1649, and bap- 
tized in the Dutch Church, February 2, that 
year ; became a general trader at. Albany and 
amassed much property; lived on the present 
State street; was magistrate in 1684, captain 
m colonial service 1685 ; alderman of Albany, 
1686; delegate to treat with the Five Nation 
Indians in 169—, and to superintend the de- 
fence of Albany. His will was proved in 1691. 
He married (first) Maritie Jillisse ?ileyer, 
daughter of Gillis Fieterse and his wife Elsie 
Hendrikse Meyer; (second) Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Major Abraham and Katrina (Joch- 
emse) Staets. She married (second) April 
25, 1695, Captain Johannes Schuyler. Chil- 
dren of first wife : Alsie ; Alaritie. Children 
of second wife : Abraham, mentioned below ; 
Susanna; Catalyntje; Elizabeth; Johannes, 
baptized ]\Iarch 2, 1684; Ephraim, baptized 
June 3, 1685; Isaac, baptized January 28, 
1687; Sarah, baptized November 11, 1688; 
Jacob, baptized August 5, 1691. 

(III) Abraham, son of Johannes Wendel, 
was baptized at Albany, December 27, 1678, 
and when of age removed to New York, be- 
coming a merchant and importer and a wealthy 
landowner. Late in life he removed to Bos- 
ton, where he died Septembei 28, 1734. He 
married, May 15, 1702, Katarina, eldest 
daughter of Tennis and Helena (\'an Brugh) 
De Key, granddaughter of Jacob De Key. 
Helena was a daughter of Johannes and Ka- 
tarina (Roeloiife) \'an Brugh, and grand- 
daughter of and Anneke (Janse) Roel- 

offe. Children, with baptismal dates : John 
mentioned below; Elizabeth, August 20, 1704, 
married, April 15, 1723, Edmund Ouincv (see 
Quincy ) ; Abraham, March 3, 1706; Helena 
De Key, September 21, 1707; Catharina, 
March 27, 1709; Jacobus, August 31, 1712; 
Lucretia, July 18, 1714; Theunis De Key, 
June 24, 1716; Theunis De Key, October 30, 



CONNECTICUT 



i8is 



1717; Hendrikus. baptized August 3, 1719; 
Sarah, January 20, 1721 ; jMary. 

(IV) John, born 1703, son of Abraliani ami 
Katarina ( De Key) Wendell, married, No- 
\eniber 10, 1724, Elizabeth Quincy (see 
(Juincy I\') : he died Heceniber 15, 1762. 

(\'j Elizabeth, dauj^hter of John and Eliza- 
beth (Quincy) Wendell, married Solomon 
Davis, and her sister Catherine became his 
second wife (see Davis I\'). 

(The Pierpont Line). 

(III) John Pierpont, son of John and 
Thankful (StOT\e) Pierpont, was born 1652, 
died in 1690. 

(IV) James, son of John Pierpont, married 
Sarah Dorr. Their daughter Sarah Pierpont 
married Captain Gustavus Fellowes. 

(Tin.- Gookin Line). 

The names Gookin, Gokin, Gockin, Cock- 
rain, Cockayn, Colkin, Cokin and Cockin are 
supposed to be of identical origin, and accord- 
ing to one authority "mere contrivances to 
get rid of the uneuphonious and objection- 
able tit'e worn by the first soldier of the fam- 
ily, whose vigilance and chivalric bravery in 
the rude days of old England set him down 
for a Cockin by name, with three cocks in 
his shield, thus winning the name and the in- 
signia together." The coat-of-arms, given by 
Burke, is as follows : Argent, 3 cocks, gules, 
armed, crested and jelloped sable. 

(I) Arnold Gookin, the first of this branch 
of the family, is named in the Visitation of 
Kent in 1619, and must have been born as 
early as the reign of Henry VII. Nothing 
further is known of him, except tliat he was 
the father of Thomas Gookin, mentioned be- 
low. 

( II ) Thomas, son of Arnold Gookin, was 
of Bekesbourne, Kent, England, and was bur- 
ied June 15, 1599. His wife was Amy Du- 

rant, daughter and heiress of Durant, 

undoubtedly of the family of Dorante, of 
Bekesbourne. The date of her burial is Feb- 
ruary 15, 1580-81. He married (second) Syb- 

bell , who was buried August 29, 1598. 

Children : John, mentioned below ; Joan, mar- 
ried October 28, 1566, the same day on which 
her brother was married. There may have 
been also a third child, Elizabeth, born before 
John. 

(III) John, son of Thomas Gookin, was 
born not later than 1546, and was his fa- 
ther's heir. He married Catherine, daughter 
of William and Agnes (Tufton ) Denne of 
Kingston, county Kent, of a very ancient fam- 
ily. The complete lineage of the Dennes dates 
back to the days of Edward the Confessor, as 



follows: William, father of Catherine, was 
sun of Thomas, son of Michael, son of John, 
.son of Thomas, son of Richard, son of Sir 
William, son of John, son of Walter, son of 
Walter, son of Sir Alured de Denn, son of 
William de Denn, son of Robert de Dene, son 
of Ralpe lie Dene, son of Ralph de Dene, son 
of Robert de Dene, .son of Robert de Dene, 
"who held large estates in Sussex and Kent, 
as well as in the duchy of Normandy, and 
was Pincerna or butler to Edward the Con- 
fessor." About the year 1591 John Gookin 
purchased an estate called Little Betshanger, 
in the parish of Northborne, and about 1603 
alienated it to Sir Henry Lodelow. About 
1600 he had purchased the manor of Ripple- 
Court, county Kent, which remained in his 
family about a hundred years. Children : 
Anne, baptized at Bekesbourne, August 28, 
1567: Elizabeth, baptized at Ripple, December 
7, 1571, buried there, July 25, 1575: Thomas, 
baptized at Ripple, January 13, 1571 ; John, 
baptized at Ripple, August 15, 1575; Dan- 
iel, baptized at Ripple, March 31, 1581, died 
same year ; Daniel, mentioned below ; Sir Vin- 
cent : Catherine, married November 4, 1604, 
Thomas Milton, of the parish of St. Ed- 
mund's Church, London : Margaret, married, 
September 4, 1610; Thomas Marshe, of Mar- 
tin or Marton, parish of East Langdon, coun- 
ty Kent. 

(III) Daniel, son of John Gookin, was 
born October 28, 1582. In 1620 he was one of 
the twenty-three "undertakers" of the Planta- 
tion of county Longford, Ireland, and was 
assigned five hundred acres of land there by 
the English king. Within the year, he had 
sold his assignment to Francis Edgeworth, an 
ancestor of Maria Edgeworth. In 1620 he 
became interested in the infant colony of Vir- 
ginia, and in the fall of 1621 arrived there, 
with fifty men of his own, and a large amount 
of provisions and cattle. He settled at New- 
port News, but in the spring or summer of 
1622 returned' to England and was present at 
a meeting of the Virginia Company there, 
July 17, 1622. Apparently, he never went 
back to Virginia, but settled in Ireland, where, 
November 13, 1622, he was in possession of 
the castle and lands of Carygoline, county 
Cork. He married, January 31, 1608, Marian 
or Marye, daughter of Richard Bird, S. T. P. 
Children : Edwine. baptized at Ripple, June 
23, 161 1 ; Daniel, mentioned below: perhaps 
a third, the eldest, named John. 

(IV) General Daniel Gookin, son of Dan- 
iel Gookin, was born in 1612, and died at 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 19, 1686-87. 
In 1639 he was in Virginia and acted as agent 
for his father. December 29, 1637, he had 



i8i6 



CONNECTICUT 



granted to him a tract of land of over two 
thousand acres in the count}' of New Nor- 
folk, and November 4, 1642, another tract of 
fourteen hundred acres on the Rappahannock 
river. Between the dates of these two grants 
he returned to England and was of the par- 
ish of St. Sepulchre, 1639. In March, 1643, 
certain ministers from New England went on 
a missionary tour to Virginia, and as a result 
of their etforts, he was attracted to New Eng- 
land and removed thither in 1644. His con- 
version to New England religious doctrine and 
consequent removal is referred to by Cotton 
Mather in a doggerel in his "Magnalia." He 
was admitted to the First Church in Boston 
May 26, 1644, and was made freeman three 
days later. He was of Roxbury, 1645-46, 
where he founded the public school, and in 
1648 moved to Cambridge and was there ap- 
pointed captain of the military company. In 
1649-51 he was elected representative of Cam- 
bridge and the latter year chosen speaker of 
the house. In 1652 he was elected assistant, 
and re-elected continuously until 1686. He 
made several visits to England and on one 
of these was consulted by Cromwell as to the 
advisability of introducing an English popu- 
lation from New England into the Island of 
Jamaica, which had loeen taken by the Eng- 
lish from Spain in 1654. In 1669, on his re- 
turn from a three years' visit to England, he 
brought back with him the regicides Whalley 
and Goffe, who remained under his protection 
in Cambridge, until they were sent to New 
Haven. 

He was a firm friend of the Indians, 
and in 1656 was appointed by the general 
court superintendent of all the Indians who 
submitted to the government of Massachu- 
setts. In this position he continued until his 
death. In this connection he wrote several 
works of value. He was at the same time 
a sturdy soldier in the Indian wars. In 1662 
he and Rev. Mr. ]\Iitchell were appointed the 
first licensers of the printing press. In 1681 
he was made major-general of the Colony of 
Massachusetts. 

He was married three times. Of his first 
marriage there is only the fact, from the form 
of license of his second marriage, "granted by 
the Bishop of London, nth November. 1639, 
for the marriage of Daniel Gookin, Gentle- 
man, of the parish of St. Sepulchre, London, 
a widower, a.ged about 27, and Mary Dolling, 
of the parish of St. Dunstan in the West, 
London, spinster, aged about 21, whose par- 
ents are dead." He married (third) Han- 
nah, daughter of Edward Tung and widow 
(in 1669) of Habijah Savage, after June 28, 
1675, and before August 13, 1685. She sur- 



vived him. All his children are believed to 
have been by his second wife. He died 
1686-87, a"d was buried in Cambridge, where 
his epitaph may still be read. Children: Mary, 
married, June 8, 1670, Edmund Batter, of Sa- 
lem, Massachusetts, as his second wife; Eliz- 
abeth, baptized at Roxbury, March 14, 1644, 
married (first) Rev. John Eliot Jr., as his 
second wife, (second) December 8, 1680, Ed- 
mund Ouincy (see Quincy) ; Daniel, died a 
few months old, in 1649; Daniel, born July 
12, 1650, H. C. 1669; Samuel, born April 21, 
1652; Solomon, born 1654, died in infancy; 
Nathaniel, born October 22, 1656. 

(The Quincy Line). 

The Ouincy family of America and Eng- 
land has had many distinguished men in both 
ancient and modern times. The surname is 
said to be derived from the name of a town 
in Normandy. In the Roll of Battle Abbfy 
the name appears several times, spelled Quan- 
cey, Quinci and Ouincy. It is not found in 
Domesday Book, and the earliest record of 
land titles of the family is in the Manor of 
Buckby, Northamptonshire, being given by 
Henry II to the famous Baron Saher de Quin- 
ci, who signed the Magna Charta. His son 
Roger became the third Earl of Manchester. 
At one time the American family possessed 
a parolment pedigree of the lineage back to 
the time of the Xorman Conquest, but unfor- 
tunatel)' it has been lost. The arms used by 
the family after coming to America : Gules 
seven mascles conjoined or three three and 
one. Motto: Sine macula nwiia. These arms 
were found on the seal of an unexecuted will 
of Edmund Ouincy, son of the American 
immigrant, affixed about 1698. 

(I) Edmund Ouincy, father of the Ameri- 
can immigrant, resided at Wigsthorpe, a ham- 
let in the parish of Lilford, county of North- 
ampton. He was buried at Lilford, I\Iarch 
9, 1627-28. His will was proved in the dis- 
trict court at Peterborough, March 14, 1627- 
28, by his widow Anne. Her will is dated 
January 29, 1630-31. She was then living at 
Wigsthorpe. The will was proved at the pre- 
rogative court at Canterbury, April 6, 1631, 
by John Ouincy, son and executor. He was 
a yeoman of the middle class, not educated, 
but thrifty and prosperous and of good social 
standing. He owned the leaseholds of sev- 
eral farms, and the bequests in his will were 
on the scale that only a man of some wealth 
could afiford. His will mentions "a habitation 
or dwelling house to be erected by his son Ed- 
mund upon his freehold at Thorpe. ( W'igs- 
thorpe). That he stood high in the estima- 
tion of his ncic'hbors is shown hv liis two 



CONNECTICUT 



1817 



dictions to the office of clnuch-w allien anl 
by the excellent marriages of his (hmnhters. 

F.climini! (Jiiinc}- was baptized Ueceniber 21, 
1559. lie may iiave i)een the son ,of Jolm, 
1 homas or Richard Oninc)'. all of whom were 
living in that parish at the time of his birth. 
He married. October 15, 1593, Anne Palmer at 
Lilford. Children (baptismal dates) : .Anne. 
September 22. 1594: Elizabeth. January 25, 
1596: Helen, or l-lllen. April 5, 159S: Alice, 
September 24. 1603; Edmund, mentioned be- 
low; Denis, February 17, 1634-05, buried 
June 25 following; : Francis, November 16, 
1606; Christian, married Gabriel Munnes: 
John, May id. ifui: William. January 31, 
1612-13: Thomas, August 2/. 1615. 

(H) Edmrnd (2), son of Edmund (i) 
■Quincy, was the immigrant. He was bajHized 
-at Lilford, ?!ay 30, 1602, and was married at 
Lilford to Judith Fares (Paris). The chil- 
dren the_\- had in England were doubtless 
baptized at Achurch (or Thorpe-Achurch), 
county Northampton, England. About the 
time of his father's death in 1628, he emi- 
grated to New England, afterwards return- 
ing to bring his family. He came again with 
his family in company with Rev. John Cot- 
ton from Lincolnshire, England, landing in 
Boston, September j, 1633. In the colonial 
records he is given the title of Mr., then re- 
stricted to designate men of quality. He was 
admitted to the church with his wife Judith 
in November, 1633. He was member of a 
committee to assess rates November 10, 1634. 
The town of r)Oston voted that his lands and 
those of William Coddington at Mount Wol- 
laston ( Braintree) sliould be "bounded out" 
December 14, 1635. He was member of a 
committee to lay out lands there January 4, 
1633-36. "That he was a man of substance 
may be inferred from his bringing six serv- 
ants with him : and that he w^as a man of 
weight among the founders of the new com- 
monwealth appears from his election as a 
representative of the town of Boston in the 
first general court ever held in INIassachu- 
setts Bay (1634). He was also the first named 
on the committee appointed (1634) by the 
town to assess and raise the sum necessary to 
extinguish the title of Mr. Blakestone to the 
peninsula on wdiich the city stands. In com- 
pany with ^^'illiam Coddington, after gov- 
ernor of Rhode Island, he bought of Chicka- 
tabut, sachem of Mos-wachuset, a tract of 
land at Mount Wollaston, confirmed to them 
by the town of Boston in ]\Iarch, 1636, a 
portion of wdiich is yet in the family." He 
died about 1636, ''immediately after he had 
built a liouse yet standing on the estate at 
Mount Wollaston." His widow married Mo- 



ses Pair.e, who died in 1I143, and she mar- 
ried (third) Robert Hull, father of her son- 
in-law John Hull, mentioned below; she was 
dismissed from Boston to the Braintree 
church March 30, 1646. She died Novemlier 
29, 1654. Children: Judith, born September 
3, 1626; Edmund, mentioned below. 

(Ill) Colonel Edmund Quincy, son of Ed- 
mund (2) Quincy, w^as baptized in England, 
March 15, 1628 and married (first) July 
26, 1648, Joanna or Joane, sister of Rev. 
Leonard Hoar, (H. C. 1650), third president 
of Harvard College, whose grandfather was 
Charles Hoar of Gloucester, England, and 
whose father was Sheriff Charles Hoare, of 
the "Cittie" of Gloucester. The illustrious 
family of Concord, Massachusetts, of wdiom 
Senator George F. Hoar was one, were of this 
Hoar family. Mrs. Joanna (Hoar) Quincy 
died May 16, 1680. Edmund married (sec- 
ond) December 8, 16S0, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Major General Daniel Gookin ( see Gookin) 
and widow of Rev. John Eliot, eldest son of 
Rev. John Eliot, the Indian apostle. He lived 
a private life on his estate at Braintree ; was 
magistrate, representative to the general court, 
and lieutenant-colonel of the Suffolk regiment. 
When Governor Andross was deposed Quincy 
was chosen one of the committee of safety 
wdTich formed the provisional government un- 
til the new charter of William and Mary ar- 
rived. He died January 8, 1697-98, leaving 
his second wife, wdio died November 30, 1700. 
He had a military funeral, and his grave is 
marked by two granite stones in which his 
name and arms, cut in lead, were inserted. 
In the revolution the stones were robbed of 
the lead, and all knowledge of their object 
would have been lost had not President John 
Adams remembered the engravings on the 
lead. The same vandals broke the tablet on 
wdiich the coat-of-arms was inscribed on the 
Quincy tomb. The fragments of this stone 
have been preserved by the family. Children 
of first wife:' Mary, born March 4, 1650; 
Daniel, February 7, 165 1 ; John, April 5, 1652 ; 
Joanna," April 16, 1654: Judith, June 25, 1655; 
Elizabeth, September 28, 1656; Edmund, July 
9, 1657, died young; Ruth, October 29, 1658; 
Ann, about 1663, died September 3, 1676; Ex- 
perience, March 24, 1667 ; children of second 
wife: Edmund, mentioned below; Mary, De- 
cember 7, 1684. 

(T\') Judge Edmund Quincy, son of Colonel 
Edmund Quincy, was born in Braintree, Oc- 
tober 14, 1681. graduated at Harvard College, 
1699. He was in the public service all his 
life as a magistrate, councillor and justice of 
the supreme court. He was also colonel of 
the Suffolk regiment w'hen that was a verv 



i8i8 



CONNECTICUT 



important military body. In 1737 the general 
court appointed him its agent to represent it 
in the adjudication of the disputed boundary 
between Alassachusetts Bay and New Hamp- 
shire. He died very soon after his arrival 
in London. February 23, 1737-38, of the 
smallpox, which he had taken by inoculation. 
He was buried in Bunhill Fields, where a 
monument was erected to him by the general 
court, which also made a grant of a thousand 
acres of land in the town of Lenox to his 
family in further recognition of his public 
services. Two portraits of Judge Quincy 
were painted by Smybert, in 1728, one of 
which is deposited in the Boston Art Museum, 
tlie other preserved by the family of the late 
Edmund Quincy of Dedham, mentioned below. 
He married, November 20, 1701, Dorothy, 
daughter of Rev. Josiah Flint (Flynt) (H. 
C. 1664) of Dorchester. Children, born at 
Braintree : Edmund, June 13, 1703, married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham Wendell, 
their daughter Dorothy, born May 10, 1747, 
married ( first ) Hon. John Hancock, first 
signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
afterwards governor of Massachusetts, (sec- 
ond) Captain James Scott, July 27, 1796; 
Elizabeth, born October 17. 1706, married No- 
vember 10, 1724, John Wendell, brother of 
the wife of her brother Edmund (see Wen- 
dell I\') : Josiah, April i, 1710: Dorothv, Jan- 
uary 4, 1709, married Edward Jackson. De- 
cember 7, 1738, the "Dorothy Q." of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes's poem ; she was an ancestor 
of Dr. Holmes. 

{The Wolcott Line). 

(V) William Wolcott, son of Simon Wol- 
cott (q. v.), was born November 6, 1676, and 
lived at South Windsor. He was "a large, 
fleshy man, very handsome and good-na- 
tured." He married, November 5, 1706, Abiah 
Hawley. and he died January 27, 1749. She 
died June 16, 1716. Children: Abiah, Jan- 
uary 14, 1708; Lucia, May 7, 1710; William, 
mentioned below; Ephraim, March 13, 1714: 
Martha, January 20, 17 18. 

(VI) William, son of William Wolcott, 
was born at Windsor, July 21, 171 1, gradu- 
ated at Yale in 1734. The year after he grad- 
uated he resided at the college as the holder 
of the Berkeley scholarship and taught in the 
Hopkins granunar school. He was then ap- 
pointed a tutor in the college, beginning Sep- 
tember, 1735, and continuing to commence- 
ment. 1736. He resided at South Windsor; 
was justice of the peace; for many years rep- 
resentative to the general assembly ; active 
patriot during the revolution, chairman of the 
town committee of correspondence and of the 



county committee of observation. He died 
May 22, 1799. "Throughout a prolonged life 
he was a pillar of the church and an orna- 
ment to his Christian profession ; his life was 
pure, beneficent, approved of God and man, 
and happy was his end." He married (first) 
February 26, 1746-47, Abigail, daughter of 
Abiel and Abigail Abbott. She died October 
12, 1763, and he married (second) Naomi, 
widow of his first cousin, Captain Gideon 
Wolcott. She died November 7, 1775. Chil- 
dren : Eunice, born December 11, 1747; Eu- 
nice, ^larch I, 1750; Abigail, December 25, 
1751, died 1752; William, February 10, 1753; 
Abigail, February 8, 1755-56, married Chief 
Justice Oliver Ellsworth (see Ellsworth) ; 
Martha, April 23, 1757; Abiel, major, August 
10, 1761. 

(V) Lieutenant Henry Wolcott, son of Si- 
mon Wolcott, was born May 20, 1670, and 
died November 17, 1747. He was one of the 
original proprietors of Tolland and Welling- 
ton, Connecticut, a man of afifairs in town, 
and like most of the family tall of stature. 
He married, (first) April i, 1696, Jane Al- 
lyn, born July 22, 1670, died April 11, 1702, 
daughter of Thomas Allyn ; (second) Rachel 
Talcott, who died January 8, 1725-26. He 
lived at South Windsor, a mile from the pres- 
ent church. Children ; Henry, born Febru- 
ary 28, 1697: Thomas, April i, 1702; Peter; 
Rachel; Jane, October 20, 1710; Gideon, men- 
tioned below. 

(VI) Captain Gideon Wolcott, son of Hen- 
ry Wolcott, was born at Windsor, in 17 12. He 
commanded one of the companies in the 
French and Indian war in 1760; "his contem- 
poraries and those who knew him best regard- 
ed him as one of nature's noblemen." He 
died June 5, 1761. He married (first) Feb- 
ruary ^y, 1739-40, Abigail Mather, born Alay 
31, 17 18, died June 1741 : (second) Naomi 
Olmstead, born -March i, 1721, died Novem- 
ber 7, 1775, daughter of Deacon Joseph and 
Hannah -Mather C)lmstead, and she married 
(second) William Wolcott, mentioned aiiove. 
Children: Abigail, born April 9, 1741 : Sam- 
uel, mentioned below ; Naomi, September 28, 
1754: Gideon, November 28, 1756; Elizur, 
April 12, 1760. 

(VII) Samuel, son of Gideon Wolcott, was 
born April 4, 175 1. He was a soldier in the 
Revolution, from South Windsor. "When a 
young man he was a figure of manly beauty, 
near six feet high, robust frame, dark hair 
and eyes of dark hazel and uncommon bright- 
ness, features regular, and a countenance in- 
dicative of a strong: and active mind : in ac- 
tive and extensive business, distinguished for 
incorru]itible integrity, a most judicious coun- 



CONNECTICUT 



1819 



selor, beloved by iiuniermis acqiiaintanci.'s." 
He iiiarricil. DecLMiiber J'j. 1774, Jentsha Wol- 
cott, ulio died at East WimLsor, March ig, 
1844. aged eit;luy-eight, daughter of General 
Erastiis W'olcott, meiitiuned below. Samuel 
died June 7, 1813. Children: Jerusha, Oc- 
tobers, 1775; Naomi, October 10, 1777; Sam- 
uel, December 12. 1781; Elihu, February 12, 
1784: Sophia. March 29, 1786. married Mar- 
tin Ellsworth (see Ellsworth); Ursula, No- 
vember 17, 1788: Elizabeth, .September 27,, 
1791 : Horace, March 25, 1794. 

( \'I ) General Erastus Wolcott, son of Gov- 
ernor Roger W'olcott, grandson of Simon, son 
of Henry, the immigrant, was born at Wind- 
sor, September 21, 1722, and settled in South 
\\'indsor ; was repeatedly representative to the 
general assembly; speaker of the house; jus- 
tice of the peace; judge of probate; chief 
judge of the county court; representative to 
congress; judge of superior court; brigadier- 
general of Connecticut troops in the revolu- 
tion. In the spring of 1775 he was sent with 
Rev. Dr. Samuel Johnson, afterwards presi- 
dent of Columbia College, from the Connecti- 
cut legislature to treat with General Gage, 
then comman<ling the British troops at Bos- 
ton — an interview from which the delegates 
gained only specious and delusive promises of 
peace. In 1776 he commanded a regiment at 
Boston under Washington ; after the evacua- 
tion he fortified New London and garrisoned 
Forts Trumbull and Griswold ; commissioned 
brigadier-general in 1777 and served at and 
about Peekskill, New York. "He was a firm 
patriot and able advocate for the liberties of 
his country ; and Yale College, in recognition 
of his personal worth and public services, be- 
stowed upon him an honorary degree. In per- 
son he was tall, of a large frame, with light- 
gray eyes and light hair, reserved in conver- 
sation, and with such a reputation for sagac- 
ity as earned for him among his neighbors the 
sobriquet of 'Old Long-head.' Plain in 
manners, accessible to and patient with all, he 
was very decided when he had once made up 
his mind ; and he was noble-hearted and gen- 
erous ; with no ambition for public life, ac- 
cepting such as were ofifered him from a sim- 
ple and sincere sense of duty." The sermon 
preached by Rev. David AlcClure at his fu- 
neral was published. He died September 14, 

1793- 

He married, February 10, 1746, Jerusha 
Wolcott, who died June 2, 1789, daughter of 
John Wolcott, mentioned below. Children : 
Erastus, December 24, 1747; Flavia, May 27, 
1750; Erastus, captain, July 6, 1752; Flavia, 
January 5, 1754: Jerusha, November 29, 1755 ; 
married December 29, 1774, Samuel Wolcott, 



mentioned above: Arodi, September 29, 1759- 
60; Albert, December 19, 1761. 

(I\') Henry, son of Henry Wolcott, the 
immigrAt, was born January 21, 1610-11, 
ailniittecfa freeman at Boston, April 'i, 1634, 
and was then a member of the Dorchester 
church; removed to Windsor in 1636; was 
an importing merchant, and was in England 
on business in 1634 and 167 1 ; engaged in pub- 
lic life, and was one of the nineteen promi- 
nent men of the colony named in the charter 
of Connecticut ; a member of the house of 
de])uties in 1660, and of the house of magis- 
trates in 1662, and annually re-elected until 
his death. He was a master of short-hand, 
in which he preserved much of interest and 
value to Windsor history ; gave much atten- 
tion to fruit culture ; was prominent in the 
church. He married, November 8, 1641, Sar- 
ah Newberry, daughter of Thomas. She 
died July 16, 1684, and he died July 12, 1680. 
Children: Henry, born Jamrary 6, 1643; 
John, mentioned below ; Samuel, October 8, 
1647; Sarah, July 5, 1649; Mary, December 
6, 1651 ; Hannah, ]\Iarch 8, 1653-54; Samuel, 
born and baptized April 16, 1656: Josiah, July 
21, 1658. 

(V) John, son of Henry Wolcott, was born 
February 28, 1644-45 : settled at Wethersfield, 
where he was townsman in 1679 ; removed to 
Windsor and was deputy tojhe general court 
in 1698 and afterward. He married (first) 
February 13, 1677, Mary, daughter of Cap- 
tain John Chester and granddaughter of Gov- 
ernor Thomas Wells. She was born Decem- 
ber 23, 1654, and died July 10, 1689. He mar- 
ried (second) June 22, 1692, Mrs. Hannah 
Nicholas, of Stamford. He died January 23, 
1711-12. Children: John, mentioned below; 
Henry, born August 7, 1679; Lieutenant 
Charles, September 3, 1681 ; George, October 
20, 1683 : Benjamin (went to England to pre- 
sent a claim for the ancestral W^olcott es- 
tate) ; Mary, married John Eliot, grandson of 
Rev. John, the Indian apostle. 

(\T) John, son of John Wolcott, was born 
at Windsor, November 20, 1677^; married, De- 
cember 14, 1703, Hannah Newberry, died Au- 
gust 20, 1750, (see Newberry). She was born 
February 10, 1679, died 1719, daughter of 
Thomas. Children, born at Windsor : Alary, 
September 18, 1704; Hannah. October 21, 
1706; John, April 24, 170S-09; Anne, Decem- 
ber 9, 171 1 ; Abigail, September 26, 1716; Je- 
rusha, January 18, 1718-19, married February 
10, 1746, General Erastus Wolcott, mentioned 
above. 

(The Ellsworth Line). 

(V) Martin Ellsworth, son of Chief Justice 
Oliver Ellsworth (q.v.), was born at Windsor, 



1820 



CONNECTICUT 



April 17, 1783; graduated at Yale College in 
1801 and died at Windsor in 1857. He was a 
major in the militia. He succeeded Judge 
Ellsworth in the occupancy of the family man- 
sion, now belonging to the Connecticut Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution, presented to 
them by the heirs of Oliver Ellsworth, October 
8, 1903; He married, October ig, 1807, So- 
phia, daughter of Samuel Wolcott, of East 
Windsor. Their daughter, Delia Williams, 
born June 20, 1818, at Windsor, died January 
23, 1889, at Hartford, married, September 25, 
1839, at Windsor, Henry Griswold Taintor 
(see Taintor IV). 

(The Strong Line). 

(I\') John Strong, son of John Strong 
(q. v.), was born at Windsor, Connecticut, 
Jul\ 14, 1707, died October i, 1793; married 
Hepzibah, born June 23, 1717, daughter of 
Governor Roger Wolcott (see Wolcott), No- 
vember 10, 1737, and she died November 9, 
1780. Children, born at \\'indsor : Mary, 
died September 18, 1751, aged two years; 
Elnathan, born July 30, 1740; Hepzibah, April 
II, 1742; Zerviah, December 13, 1745; Mary, 
May, 1749; Zerviah, July 25, 1752; John, Au- 
gust 12, 1754, died young; Ellen Raynor. Jan- 
uary 22, 1759; John, mentioned below; Sarah, 
baptized November 29, 1761. 

( \' ) John, son of John Strong, was born 
at Windsor, Alay 28, 1760; married, in No- 
vember, 1 78 1, Lydia Sumner. He was a 
farmer. Children, born at East Windsor : 
Elnathan, baptized November 24, 1782, died 
unmarried October 19, 1834. William, men- 
tioned below; Sophia, July 16, 1788, married 
Peter Dobson, a manufacturer of \'ernon, 
Connecticut. 

(\I) ^^'illiam, son of John Strong, was 
born in East Windsor, July 24, 1785, died at 
Hartford, November 10, 1841 ; married, in 
May, 1813, Naomi Terry, born September 21, 
1787, of South Windsor. He followed farm- 
ing until 1828, when he removed to Hartford 
and engaged in the leather business. His 
wife died December i, 1869. Children: i. 
Jane Naomi, born February 24, 1814, married 
Charles Pitkin Welles, of Hartford, who died 
March 3, 1876; she died June 8, 1885. 2. 
Charlotte Maria, born September 10, 1815; 
married Hiram Wolcott Warner, who died in 
1874 ; she died December 25, 1879. 3. Lucy 
Terry, born August 24, 1817; married Gus- 
tavus Fellowes Davis (see Davis). 4. Wil- 
liam Sumner, born February 20, 1820; mar- 
ried, in 1849, Adaline Irwin Blish, resided 
at Kenosha. Wisconsin; he died November i, 
1888; she died October 20, 1874. 5. Emily 
Elizabeth, born February 2, 1823: married 



Josiah Bond, of Kenosha, Wisconsin. 6. Clara, 
iDorn at Hartford, March 25, 1831 ; married 
Rodney Dennis, of Hartford, secretary of the 
Travelers' Life and Accident Insurance Com- 
pany; she died June 7, 1888. 

(The Newberry Line). 

(I) Thomas Newberry, the immigrant, was 
one of the earliest settlers and largest landed 
proprietors of Dorchester, Massachusetts. He 
received from the general court a grant of a 
hundred acres on Neponset, March, 1634, and 
many grants in Dorchester ; laid out a large 
farm in Squantum ; lived on "the Rock" in 
1634; was freeman and selectman; was early 
engaged in the Connecticut enterprise and sold 
his lands at Dorchester, planning to remove 
to \\'indsor, but his death in December, 1635, 
or January, 1636, cut short his plans. His 
widow and children went thither about 1640. 
His widow Jane married (second) Rev. John 
Warham. "Children : Joseph ; John ; Rlajor 
Benjamin, mentioned below ; Rebecca ; Mary, 
married Daniel Clark, their daughter Elizabeth 

married (first) Cook, (second) Job 

Drake, their daughter Sarah married Roger 
^^'olcott ; Hannah ; Sarah, married Henry 
Wolcott (see Wolcott). 

(II) Major Benjamin Newberry, son of 
Thomas Newberry, was the first of the seven 
proprietors of Windsor to whom the patent 
was granted in 1685 ; commanded the military 
department of the colony; died September 11, 
1689; married, June 11, 1646, Mary, daughter 
of Matthew Allyn, of Windsor. Children : 
Mary, born March 10, 1647-48; Sarah, June 
14, 1650; Hannah, December 22, 1632; Re- 
becca, May 2, 1655; Thomas, mentioned be- 
low; Abigail, May 14, 1659; Margaret, Octo- 
ber 13, 1662; Benjamin, April 20, 1669; Han- 
nah, July I, 1673. 

(III) Thomas, son of Benjamin Newberry, 
was born at Windsor, September i, 1657; mar- 
ried, May 12, 1676, Ann Ford, daughter of 
Thomas. She died August 29, 1688; he, April 
30, 1688, in camp, during the war. Children, 
born at Windsor: Thomas, January 20, 1677; 
Hannah, February 10, 1679. married John 
Wolcott (see Wolcott) ; Thomas, March 28, 
1681 ; Thomas, March 22, 1683 ; Joseph, ser- 
geant, October 24, 1684; Benjamin, February 
18, 1686. 

(Tlie Grant Line). 
(Ill) Samuel Grant, son of Samuel Grant 
(q. v.), and Mary (Porter), was born at 
Windsor, April 20, 1659. He was a carpen- 
ter. He married there, December 6, 1683, 
Anna Filley, born August 16, 1664, daughter 
of Samuel and Anna (Gillet) Filley. She died 
April 18, 1686, and he marricfl (second) April 



CONNECTICUT 



1821 



II, 1688, Grace .Minor, horn at Stonington. 
September 20, idjo, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (ISooth) Minor, granddaughter of 
Captain Thomas anil Grace (Palmer) Minor. 
Thomas was son of William Minor. Grant 
died .\la\' S, 1710, and his wile died .\pril 16, 

1753- 

Child of first wife: Sarah, born September 
2, 1684, married, July 19, 1705, Thomas Skin- 
ner. Children of second wife : Hannah, 
March 2S, 1689; Samuel, September i, 1691 ; 
Noah, December 16, 1693 ; Abigail, December 
18, 1695, married January 9, 1717-18, Abiel 
Abbott, born August 10, 1693, died 1758, she 
died August 22, 1724, their daughter Abigail 
Abbott married William Wolcott (see Wol- 
cott VI) ; Ephraim, August 24, 1698; Grace, 
August 17, 1701 ; David, December 10, 1703; 
Ebenezer, October 20, 1706. 

(II) Tahan, son of Matthew Grant, and 
brother of Samuel Grant, who married Mary 
Porter (mentioned above), was born at Dor- 
chester, February 3, 1633-34; a blacksmith by 
trade ; settled in Windsor ; married, January 
22, 1662-63, Hannah Palmer, baptized at 
Windsor, October 11, 1640, daughter of Nich- 
olas and Joan Palmer. He was one of the 
petitioners for' the new town May 13, 1680; 
died there May 30, 1693. He resided on the 
Michael Try lot in the Palizado. Children : 
Matthew, January 4, 1664; Tahan, Septem- 
ber 27, 1665; Hannah, June 8, 1668; Thomas, 
February 20, 1670; Joseph, May 14, 1673; 
Sarah, September 19, 1675, married Jonathan 
Ellsworth (see Ellsworth) ; Mary, October 23, 
1678; son, November 11, 1680. 

(The Bulkeley Line). 

(XVI) Gershom Bulkeley, son of Rev. John 
Bulkeley, was born in Colchester, February 
4, 1709; a prominent citizen of that town, 
holding many offices ; married, November 28, 
1733, Abigail Robbins. Children, born at Col- 
chester: Sarah, January 10, 1735, married 
John Taintor, in 1758 (see Taintor) : John, 
mentioned below ; Joshua, February 24, 1741 ; 
Daniel, May 13, 1744; Eunice, May 14. 1747; 
David, July 18, 1749 : Roger, September 14, 
1 751; Ann, May 11, 1758. 

(XVII) John, son of Gershom Bulkeley, 
was born in Colchester, August 23, 1738; mar- 
ried, January 11, 1759, Judith Worthington. 
Children: John, October 7, 1759; William, 
August 30, 1761 ; Gershom, October 3, 1763; 
Elijah, January 29, 1766; Nabby, December 
30, 1769, married Roger Taintor; Joshua 
Robbins, November 2, 1771 ; Mary, February 
2, 1774; Judith, January 30, 1775, married 
Solomon Taintor (see Taintor) ; Gurdon, 
March 15, 1777; Gad, February 20, 1779; 



Lydia, .\pril 25, 1781 ; Dan, .March 20, 1784; 
Harriet, January 22, 1787. 

(I'he Taintor Line). 

( I ) Charles Taintor, the first of the line 
liere under consideration of whom we have 
information, was a resident of South Wales, 
from whence he emigrated to America with 
his family in consequence of religious perse- 
cution, being deprived of a large estate in 
^^'ales by confiscation. He made his home 
in Fairfield, Connecticut, where he was the 
owner of real estate. He was a ship owner, 
made foreign voyages, and was lost at sea 
in 1654. 

(II) Michael, son of Charles Taintor, was 
born in Wales, died at Branford, Connecticut, 
in 1672-73. The following was taken from 
"The Genealogy and History of the Taintor 
Family," by Charles M. Taintor, published at 
Greenfield in 1847: "In him we find the ship 
master and man of enterprise, the legislator 
and consistent Christian professor, the com- 
missioner and judge, the puritan and patri- 
arch, bringing up his family in the fear of 
God. From all that can be known of him it 
appears evident that he was a man of influ- 
ence and discretion, and posterity held his 
name in great respect and veneration for his 
nobleness and integrity of character." 

(III) Micaiell, son of Michael Taintor, re- 
moved in early life to Windsor, Connecticut. 
In 1698 the legislature of Connecticut passed 
a resolution providing that a new plantation 
should be made at a place called Young's 
Farms, between Middletown and Norwich, and 
the Rev. John Bulkeley was appointed to lead 
out the new colony. Among the most promi- 
nent persons enrolled in this enterprise were 
Micaiell Taintor and his brother-in-law, John 
Loomis, and this was the beginning of the 
present town of Colchester. He was "one of 
her ^Majesty's justices of the peace" (Queen 
Anne) a member of the general assembly for 
twenty-six sessions, town clerk of Colchester 
from its settlement until his death. He was 
held in high esteem by his contemporaries as 
an ornament to the town, as a man of high 
moral worth, superior abilities and attainments. 

(IV) Deacon Micaiell (2), son of Alicaiell 
( I ) Taintor, was born at Windsor, lived in 
Colchester, and died on the place where his 
father settled, at the advanced age of ninety- 
one years. "His word was a bond and his love 
of justice and truth as manifested in his life 
was proverbial." 

The line is continued through John, married 
Sarah Bulkeley; Solomon, married Judith 
Bulkeley ; to Henry Griswold, married Delia 
Williams Ellsworth. 



1 822 



CONNECTICUT 



The surname Hubbard dates 
HUBBARD from the first use of family 
names in England and was 
doubtless in earlier times a personal name. 
Some writers think it a modification of the 
Danish name Hubba, made famous by one of 
the sea-kings who conquered part of England. 
Several forms of spelling survive, Hubbard 
and Hobart being the most prominent as sur- 
names, Hubert and Herbert as personal names. 
In old records some fifty different spellings 
have been found and as late as the colonial pe- 
riod in America the variations are very num- 
erous. The English family has always been 
prominent and many of the branches have an- 
cient coats-of-arms. We find the records men- 
tioning a John Hubbard born about 1235, liv- 
ing in Tye, Norfolkshire, England, and from 
him a numerous posterity in that section of 
the country. 

(I) George Hubbard, immigrant ancestor 
of this family, was born in England in 1601, 
probably in the eastern or southeastern part. 
He settled before 1639 in Hartford, Connecti- 
cut. Another George Hubbard, who settled 
in Wethersfield, Connecticut, was doubtless 
a relative, but not his father. William Hub- 
bard and Thomas Hubbard, also of Hartford, 
among the early settlers, seem also to be closely 



related. George Hubbard came with the first 
settlers overland from the Massachusetts Bay 
colony. He was given six acres of land "by 
courtesy of the town, with privilege of wood 
and keeping cows on the common" and re- 
sided on a lot adjacent to land of James En- 
sign and George Graves ou a road that ran 
parallel with the Connecticut river, from the 
south meadow to George Steele's place. In 
1640 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Rich- 
ard and Elizabeth Watts, and was then as- 
signed a home lot and land on the east side 
of tlie Connecticut river. He moved in March, 
1650-51, with about fifteen other settlers and 
their families to Mattabeseck, later called Mid- 
dletown, Connecticut. He was licensed as 
an Indian agent and trader as early as 1650; 
ill 1654 was admitted a freeman. He owned 
much land on both sides of the river, living 
on what is now Main street. He, with Thomas 
Wetmore and two others, gave land for the 
second meeting house. His son Joseph used 
to beat the drum to call the people to meet- 
ing or to warn them against hostile Indians. 
His will is dated May 22, 1681, and it states 
his age as eighty years. His inventory is dated 
May 13, 1685, and it states that he died 
March 18, 1684. His widow died in 1702. 
One record says that "he was highly respected 




Memorial Boulder on site of old Stockaded Meetino; House. 



CONNECTICUT 



iRi,^ 



C^^'A- 





fj-^ 



^.S^^. 










and of marked integrity and fairness.'' Chil- 
dren : Mary, born at Hartford, January i6, 
1641-42; Joseph, December 10, 1643; Daniel, 
baptized December 7, 1645, died November 9, 
1704; Samuel, born May, 1648, died Novem- 
ber 4, 1732: George, December 15, 1650: Na- 
thaniel, December 10, 1652, mentioned below; 
Richard, July, 1655 ; Elizabeth, January 15, 
1659. 

(II) Nathaniel, son of George Hubbard, 
was born at Middletown, December 10, 1652, 
died there. May 20, 1738. He married, I\Iay 
29, 1682, Mary Earle, born in 1663, died April 
6, 1732. His gravestone is standing. He was 
a subscriber to the fund for the purchase of 
the Middletown church bell. He lived at Long 
Hill on the cro.ss roads, Middletown. Chil- 
dren, born at Middletown : Mary, March 9, 
1683-84; Abigail, February 16, 1685-86; Eliza- 
beth, July 17, 1688; Nathaniel, September 14, 
1690, mentioned below ; John, November 28, 
1692, mentioned below; Sarah, October 5, 
1694 ; Ebenezer, October 2, 1696 ; Thankful, 
October 6, 1698; Hannah, July 4, 1700; 
Esther, July 20, 1702. 



14, 1765, at Long 
married, April 12, 
who died in 1776. 
dletown : Sarah, 
Nathaniel, January 



(III) Nathaniel (2), son of Nathaniel (i) 
Hubbard, was born at Middletown, Con- 
necticut, September 14, 1690, died ( Ictober 
Hill, Connecticut. He 
1 7 16, Sarah Johnson, 
Children, born at Mid- 
February II, 1716-17; 
5, 1718-19; Nehemiah, 
July 22, 1721 \ Samuel, October 8, 1723, re- 
moved with others of the family to Granville, 
Massachusetts; John, April 24, 1726; Eveline, 
February 14, 1727-28; David, August 23, 
1730; Alary, April 10, 1733; Noadiah, March 
14, 1735-36, died young. 

(Ill) John, son'of Nathaniel (i) Hubbard, 
was born at Middletown, November 28, 1692. 
He married, August I, 1722, Elizabeth Stowe, 
born 1688, died May 9, 1804. He was deacon 
of the Middletown church. His will was dated 
May 26, 1743. He died March 12, 1753. 
Children,, born at Middletown : John Earle, 
May 12, 1723; Stephen, June 21, 1725; Eliza- 
beth, April 18, 1729; Jonathan. December 30. 
1730; Jeremiah. October 27, 1732, mentioned 
beiovv ; Benjamin, January 31, 1735; Martha, 



H 



3 



n 

c 







1824 



COXXECTICUT 



1825 



April 18, 1737; Jabez, June 2, 1739, jabcz, 
April 7, 1743; Jemima, May 16. 1744. 

(IV) Jereniiali, son of John Hubbard, was 
born at Middletown, October 27, 1732, died 
there March 7, 1814. He married, June 28, 
1781, Elizaljetii, lioru Feljruary 3. 1748, daugh- 
ter of Deacon Joseph Meigs, of Madis(5n, Con- 
necticut. When Guilford was threatened by 
the Dritish tluring the revolution he marched 
to the defence of the town. His company at- 
tended church there and it is interesting to 
note that he sat m the pew of Deacon ?kleigs 
and there met for the first time the deacon's 
daughter whom he afterward married. Chil- 
dren : Jeremiah, born March 29, 1784. men- 
tioned below; Josiah Meigs, born June 10. 
1785, married Sarah Sill Hubbard, ^lay 12, 
1830, died Xovember 16, 1862: two daugh- 
ters, died unmarried. 

(V) Jeremiah (2), son of Jeremiah (i) 
Hubbard, was born at Middletown, March 
29, 1784. He was a successful farmer. He 
acquired a competence. He bought the farm 
in the Long Hill district formerly owned by 
his grandfather. Deacon John Hubbard, but 
then held outside the family. He possessed 
great industry, integrity and enterprise, and 
was upright and honored by all his townsmen. 
He had a fine physique, we are told. He was 
a member of the North Congregational 
Church ; held various public offices, including 
that of justice of the peace. His youngest 
son had the homestead. He married, Decem- 
ber 25, 181 5, Eunice Prout, born 1795, died 
February 17, 1856. Children, born at Mid- 
dletown : I. Herbert R.. November 11, 1817, 
died [March ig, 1888; married Charlotte Cran- 
dall, of New Haven. 2. Elizabeth R., July 
31, 1819, died at Meriden, June 21, 1891 ; mar- 
ried Robert P. Rand. 3. Josiah, June 19, 
1821, died July 30, 1891 ; married Sarah Wil- 
cox. 4. Jeremiah, March 31, 1823. 5. Mary 
L., August 17, 1824, died unmarried at Mid- 
dletown, September 3, 1890. 6. George W., 
June 8, 1826, resided in Brooklyn, New York; 
married Anna Crainpton. 7. Walter, April 
23, 1828, of the firm of Bradley & Hubbard 
and Bradley & Hubbard Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Meriden, director of the Meriden 
Trust and Safe Deposit Company, member of 
the Union League Club, the New England 
Society, the American Geographical Society 
of New York; married, in 1852, Abbv Ann, 
daughter of Levi Bradley, of Cheshire, sister 
of N. L. Bradley, his partner in business ; his 
wife died four months after marriage in Feb- 
ruary, 1853, ^g^<^cl twenty, and he never mar- 
ried again. 8. Harriet Ellen, October 7, 1830, 
died May 27, 1833. 9. Ebenezer Prout. June 
15. ^833, died at JMiddlefield, January" 10, 



1894; married, March 27, 1866, Martha Har- 
riet Heath, of Tyringham, Massachusetts. 

(\'l) Jeremiah (3), son of Jeremiah (2) 
Hubbard, was born at Middletown, JNLarch 31, 
1823, died May 20, 1894. He was a lumber 
merchant and leading citizen of the town ; 
also a contractor and builder. He married, 
August 17, 1847, Sophia Belden, born June 
16, 1823, died June 13, 1893, daughter of 
Alvin Belden, of New Britain, Connecticut. 
Children, born at Middletown: i. Helen 
Louise, January i, 1853; married, November 
4, 1874, Frank B. Weeks, of Middletown, 
member of firm of Cowles & Weeks, wholesale 
grain merchants ; in 1909 governor of Con- 
necticut; no children. 2. Walter Bulkley, 
mentioned below. 3. Anna Sophia, March 9, 
1859; married, April 15, 1890, Rev. Arthur 
Titcomb, of Gilbertville ; no children. 

(\'n) W'alter Bulkley, son of Jeremiah (3) 
Hubbard, was born in Middletown, Connecti- 
cut, May 31, 1855. On the occasion of the 
two hundred and fiftieth anniversarv of the 
settlement of Middletown, celebrated October 
10 and II, 1900, Air. Hubbard was the lead- 
ing spirit in securing a memorial to the early 
settlers of the town. A large granite boulder, 
with bronze tablet engraved with names of the 
original settlers (of whom George Hubbard, 
mentioned above, was one) and of the Indians, 
from whom the land was purchased was placed 
upon the site of the old stockaded "meet- 
ing house." In the vestibule of the present 
"house of worship," on Court street, of "The 
First Church of Christ" in Middletown was 
placed JMay 19, 1910, a "Historical Tablet" 
which had been planned by ]Mr. Hubbard. It 
consists of three panels of antique brass, en- 
cased in a heavy frame of elegantly carved 
English oak. The central panel has the date 
of the settlement of the town, with a brief 
sketch of the early worship here and a notice 
of the five buildings erected by the church. 
LInderneath is the inscription : 

To commemorate the faithful and uninterrupted 
worship of God in this community for over 250 
years, this tablet is placed in the year of our Lord, 
1910, "But I will, for their sakes, remember the 
covenant of their ancestors, I am the Lord." 

On the left panel are carved the names of 
the founders of the church, November 4, 1668; 
on the right panel, the names of the ten pas- 
tors, with the dates of their service. It was 
fitting that this tablet be placed to Mr. Hub- 
bard's abiding memory. . 

The men of the Hubbard family have been, 
as a rule, men of ability and integrity, loyal to 
church and country — another feature has been 
their reserved and retiring temperament, so 
that much of their work and influence has 



i826 



CONNECTICUT 



been performed in so quiet a way as to have 
escaped public notice and comment. Walter 
Bulkley Hubbard was connected also with the 
families of Hosmer, Meigs, Wilcox and Wil- 
lard, all of whom gave noted service to their 
country, both in the colonial and the revolu- 
tionary periods, and whose descendants, even 
to the present day, hold honorable and import- 
ant positions. 

Mr. Hubbard was a son of Jeremiah War- 
ren Hubbard, a lumber merchant, and much 
respected citizen. . He was associated with his 
father in business for a time and then became 
cashier of the Middlesex County National 
Bank, also a director of the bank, and held 
the position seventeen years, until his death, 
which occurred April 3, 1908. The "tribute" 
paid him by the president and directors reads : 

"He was a man of the highest integrity, loyal to 
all interests with which he was connected, and a true 
friend, with whom it was a privilege to associate. 
Although not caring for public office, he was always 
interested in public affairs, and gave his time and 
thought to the work of helping his church and the 
city, where he has always resided." 

The Middletown Savings Bank, incorpor- 
ated in 1825, passed these resolutions: 

"Resolved, That it is with profound sorrow and 
regret we record the sudden decease of our late as- 
sociate, ]\Ir. Walter B. Hubbard, whose efforts dur- 
ing the past nineteen years, as a trustee and director 
of this bank, have been prompted by excellent judg- 
ment, constant devotion and conscientious regard for 
its best interests, and whose personality gnd influ- 
ence in this Board have been an inspiration to the 
highest conception of duty and adherence to princi- 
ples of justice and safety, and whose kindly methods 
have endeared him to us all." 

His charming personality is spoken of by 
all who knew him. At the annual meeting. 
May, 1908, of the Middlesex County Histori- 
cal Society, the president, the Rev. A. W, 
Hazen, spoke these words : 

"We come to our annual meeting under a shadow. 
The loss we have sustained since we last gathered 
here is a heavy one, and we cannot resist a deep 
feeling of sadness. Indeed, who could be taken from 
our number creating a greater vacancy than has been 
caused by the sudden departure of Walter Bulkley 
Hubbard? It is fitting that we pay our sincere 
homage to his memory, in view of what he was in 
himself, as well as in view of his eminent services 
to this society. A lineal descendant from one of the 
founders of Middletown. a resident of this city dur- 
ing all the fifty-three years of his life, he loved the 
place, and knew much of its history. He welcomed 
the project of forming a historical society here, and 
was helpful in the earliest days of the movement 
which gave to our county this honorable institution. 
For years he was the head of its membership com- 
mittee, and was instrumental in adding not a few 
names to our roll. After this edifice came into our 
possession he was the most natural person to be 
the leader of its house committee. He entered upon 
the task of preparing this building for our occupancy 
with all his cultivated taste, his sound judgment, and 



his unsparing enthusiasm. Much of the present at- 
tractiveness of our rooms and of the expansion of the 
Society is due lo the wi»dom. the sentiment and the 
labor of Mr. Hubbard, while it is known to his 
friends that he was revolving other plans in his 
fertile brain which might contribute to our advance- 
ment, and to the welfare of our entire constituency. 
In short, Walter Bulkley Hubbard, by reason of his 
unblemished character, his business sagacity, his re- 
fined sensibilities, his tireless industry and his loy- 
alty to the town in which he lived, alike with his 
constant devotion to the things which elevate hu- 
manity, was a citizen whom Middletown will long 
remember with sincere gratitude. The Middlesex 
County Historical Society surely cannot soon forget 
his unflagging zeal in its behalf, and it is most ap- 
propriate that we place on record our sense of obli- 
gation to him." 

Mr. Hubbard had a keen artistic sense, par- 
ticularly well developed in architecture and 
landscape gardening. He was only an ama- 
teur, but his advice was solicited and appre- 
ciated by many, even by professionals, who 
spoke of "his sure touch," and some of his 
work, on church and bank and home, will 
long remain a memory to his ability in this 
direction. He was a man conscientious to a 
degree, and frowned upon anything that was 
not true and honorable. Of a somewhat re- 
served disposition, he yet possessed a warm 
heart. In his death Middletown lost a loyal 
son. 

He married, June 20. 1899, Katharine 
Mather Mansfield, daughter of General Joseph 
K. F. Mansfield, granddaughter of Henry 
Mansfield, and descendant of Moses Mans- 
field, sergeant-major of Colonial troops from 
New Haven. By virtue of the service of this 
ancestor she is a member of the Society of Co- 
lonial Dames. Her great-uncle, Jared Mans- 
field, was superintendent of the United States 
Military Academy at West Point, New York. 
Her ancestry on her maternal side includes the 
Rev. Richard Mather, of Dorchester, Massa- 
chusetts, and the Schuylers and Livingstons 
of New York State (see Mansfield and 
Mather). 



Richard Mansfield, the im- 
MANSFIELD migrant ancestor, was born 
in England, and came from 
Exeter, Devonshire, to this country, arriving 
in Boston on November 30, 1634, and settled 
in 1639 at Quinnipiack (New Haven), Con- 
necticut. He owned land in what is now a 
valuable section of the city, corner of Elm 
and Church streets. A schedule of the first 
planters dated 1641 contains his name, valu- 
ing his land at £400, including thirty acres 
of land in the first division, six in the neck, 
and eighty-eight in the second division. At 
about this time he built his dwelling house 
in the second division. East Farms, now 



CONNECTICUT 



1827 



alxmt die corner nf L'liurch and Mini streets, 
and lived there until his death, January 
10, 1655. His wife's Christian name was 
Gillian, and after his death she married, 
in 1657. Alexander Field, and removed into 
town. Her secouil husband died in 1666, and 
she afterward resided with her son, Moses 
Mansfiekl. She died in 1669. Children of 
Richard Mansfield: Joseph, born 1636; 
Moses, mentioned below. 

(II) Major Moses Mansfield, son of Rich- 
ard ]^Iansfield. \\'as born in 1639, at New- 
Haven. Tradition says he was to have been 
named Richard, but in crossing the East river 
on the wa}- to meeting, to have him baptized, 
the canoe was upset, and the infant, well 
wrapped in blankets, floated down the stream 
and lodged among the rushes, from which he 
was taken uninjured, hence called ]\Ioses. He 
certainly became, like the Bible jNIoses, a leader 
and lawgiver. Moses Mansfield was admit- 
ted a freeman, May i, 1660. He married, May 
5, 1664, Mercy, daughter of Henry Glover, an 
early settler and prominent citizen. He mar- 
ried (second) Abigail, born May 5, 1660, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary Yale. 

]\Iajor Mansfield received his title, which 
indicates the highest military rank in the col- 
ony at that time, for defeating a body of In- 
dians in King Philip's war, on the site of the 
present town of Mansfield, which was named 
in his honor. He lived at New Haven, and 
represented the town at forty-eight sessions 
of the general assembly. He was judge of 
probate and of the county court, was often 
moderator, and held other offices of trust and 
honor. He had his father's homestead. In 
the old original records in New Haven the 
earmark of his cattle, pastured on "the green," 
-was a cross in the left ear. Children : Abi- 
gail, born February 7, 1664 ; Mercy, April 2, 
1667; Hannah, March 11, 1669; Samuel, De- 
cember 31, 1671 ; Moses, August 15, 1674; 
Sarah, June 14, 1677; Richard, July 20, 1680; 
Bathshua, January i, 1682; Jonathan, men- 
tioned below. Major Moses Mansfield died 
October 3, 1703; Mrs. Abigail Mansfield died 
February 28, 1708-09. 

(III) Deacon Jonathan Mansfield, son of 
Major Moses Mansfield, was born at New 
Haven, February 15, 1686. He married (first) 
June I, 1708, Sarah, daughter of John and 
Susannah (Coe) Ailing. Her father was treas- 
urer of Yale College. Her grandfather, Rob- 
ert Coe, was of Stratford. John Ailing died 
March 25, 1717, aged seventy-six, -son of 
Roger Ailing. Jonathan's wife died May 4, 
1765, aged eighty, and he married (second) 
May 13, 1766, Abigail, widow of Ebenezer 
Dorman, and daughter of James Bishop and 



Abigail (Bennett) Bishop. She was born Sei> 
teniber i, 1707; married, August 26, 1731, 
Ebenezer Durnian. She lived to be ninety, 
and died January 25, 1798. Deacon Mans- 
field joined the church August 28, 1709, under 
Rev. James Pierpont. Deacon Mansfield was 
prominent in public life, was selectman, en- 
sign, lister, grand juror, moderator. He fol- 
lowed farming. He was trustee of the Hop- 
kins Grammar School. He presided over the 
town meeting when eighty-tW'O years of age. 
Children: Closes, born May 5, 1709; Jona- 
than, January 27, 171 1, died young; Susannah, 
born December 9, 1712; Sarah, May 2, 1715; 
Stephen, mentioned below; Nathan. November 
15, 1718; Lois, April 27, 1721 ; Richard, ( )c- 
tober I, 1723, minister and teacher, Bishop 
of Derby, Connecticut. 

(IV) Captain Stephen Mansfield, son of 
Deacon Jonathan JNlansfield, was born Novem- 
ber 14, 1716, and died July 15, 1774. He 
married, December 31, 1746, Hannah Beach, 
who died September 20, 1795, aged sixty- 
seven years. He was a sea captain, engaged 
ill the \Yest India trade. His home was at 
the northeast corner of Chapel and State 
streets. He was vestryman of Trinity Church 
in 1765. Children: i. Hannah, born No- 
vember 17, 1747; married William Douglass. 

2. Stephen, September, 1750, died 1751. 3. 
Stephen, July 31, 1753, died August 14, 1756. 
4. John, April 11, 1756, died November 5, 
1766. 5. Jared, May 23, 1759; professor of 
mathematics, astronomy and philosophy at the 
United States Military Academy, West Point; 
married Elizabeth Phipps. 6. Henry, men- 
tioned below. 7. Sarah, 1765; married James 
Sisson. 8. Grace, 1770; married, October 15, 
1785, Peter Totten. 

(V) Henry Mansfield, son of Captain Ste- 
phen Mansfield, was born February i, 1762. 
He was engaged in the West India trade, and 
built one of the largest and best houses in the 
city of New Haven, on the east side of State 
street, near Chapel. Nearly two-thirds of this 
house was standing as lately as 1884. He 
died in the West Indies, in 1805. He mar- 
ried, August 3, 1785, Mary Fenno, born April 

3, 1767, daughter of Ephraim Fenno, of Alid- 
dletown. She was aged eighteen years four 
months at the time of her marriage, and died 
January 14, 1825, aged fifty-eight years. Chil- 
dren : I. Henry, born at New Haven. May 2, 
1786; married, November 10, 181 1, Elizabeth 
Buffum, of Smithfield, Rhode Island, daughter 
of Joshua ; he was cashier of the Farmers and 
Manufacturers Bank, afterwards the Village 
Bank of Slatersville, until August, 1839, when 
he was succeeded by his son Henry S. ; he 
died in New York, March 26, 1851. 2. John 



1 828 



CONNECTICUT 



Fenno, January 9, 1788, captain. 3. Mary 
Grace Caroline, June 4, 1792; married David 
Wade; she died April 16, 1825. 4. Grace Tot- 
ten, February 13, 1799, at St. Croix, Fred- 
erickstead, West End, West Indies ; resided 
at Middletown. 5. Hannah Fenno, born at 
St. Croix, February 24, 1801. 6. Joseph King 
Fenno, mentioned below. 

(VI) General Joseph King Fenno Mans- 
field, son of Henry Alansfield, was born in 
New Haven, December 22, 1803. In 1817, 
at the age of fourteen years, he was appointed 
a cadet to the United States Military Acad- 
emy at West Point, and was graduated in 
1822, second in a class of forty, the youngest 
member, and July first, same year, was com- 
missioned brevet second lieutenant of engi- 
neers. Such was the confidence reposed in 
him by the government as an engineer that for 
twenty years or more he was engaged in the 
construction of fortifications and the improve- 
ment of rivers and harbors, and was univer- 
sally regarded as an ornament to the service. 
In 1822-25 'le served as assistant to the board 
of engineers at New York, in the construction 
of Fort Hamilton, 1825-28, and in 1828-30 of 
the defenses of Hampton Roads, being de- 
tached to survey Pasgustauk river. North 
Carolina, and to take temporary charge of 
works in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, 
1830. Among the works he planned and 
constructed as supervising engineer was Fort 
Pulaski, for the defense of the Savannah 
river, Georgia — considered at the time as one 
of the strongest of harbor defenses. From 
1830 to 1846 he was in charge of repairs of 
Cumberland Roads, Maryland; in 1831-32, of 
Savannah river improvement; 1833-39, o^ i"" 
land navigation between the St. Marys and 
St. Johns rivers, Florida ; 1835-39, ^i Sulli- 
van's Island breakwater, South Carolina; 
1837-38, of repairs of St. Augustine sea wall, 
Florida; and of improvement of Brunswick 
harbor, Georgia, 1838-39. He was a member 
of the board of engineers for Atlantic Coast 
Defenses, May 8, 1842, to September 8, 1845. 
He was chief engineer of the army under com- 
mand of Major General Taylor in the cam- 
paign of 1846-47, in the war with JNIexico, 
being engaged in various recomiaissances in 
Texas, and was the builder and renowned de- 
fender of Fort Brown, May 3-9, 1846, and 
was breveted major for distinguished bravery. 
He was engaged in the reconnaissance and 
battle of Monterey, September 21-23, 1846, 
where he was severely wounded while direct- 
ing the storming of the Tannery redoubt, and 
was breveted heutenant colonel for gallant 
and meritorious conduct in the several con- 
flicts at Monterey ; in fortifying Monterey and 



Saltillo, reconnoitering the mountain passes, 
1846-47; and in the battle of Buena Vista, 
February 22-23, 1847, having the honor, it is 
said, of selecting that renowned battle field, 
and was breveted colonel. He was a member 
of the board of engineers for Atlantic Coast 
Defenses, May 13, 1848, to April 11, 1853, and 
for Pacific Coast Defenses, April 11 to May 
28, 1853; superintending engineer of con- 
struction of Fort ^Vinthrop, Boston harbor, 
1848-53; of improvement of the James and 
x-\ppomattox rivers and survey of the Rappa- 
hannock river, Virginia, 1852-53. 

In 1853 hs was still captain of engineers, 
third on the list, when he was promoted into 
the inspector general's department with rank 
of colonel. As one of the two inspectors- 
general of the army, he performed the arduous 
and dangerous duties of inspection of our 
frontier ports, at a time when transportation 
facilities were not of the best, and hostile In- 
dian tribes were to be met, requiring months 
and even a year's absence upon a single tour 
of inspection. He served on inspection duty 
in the Department of New Mexico, 1853 ■ °^ 
the Department of California, 1854; of the 
Department of Texas, 1856; of the Utah army, 
1857 ; of the Departments of Oregon and Cal- 
ifornia, 1858-59; and of the Department of 
Texas, 1860-61. While in this last duty he 
encountered the disloyal sentiment pervading 
the highest army officer commaniling the dis- 
trict, and he hastened to Washington to lay 
the matter before the highest authorities. Civil 
war being broken out, he was the first officer 
appointed to the rank of brigadier-general, and 
was placed in command of the defense of 
Washington, which he inaugurated by moving 
troops across the Potomac at night, almost in 
the presence of the enemy, and occupying Ar- 
lington Heights, which subsecpiently were for- 
tified to render the Capitol secure. His civil 
war services were as follows : 

[Mustering volunteers into service, Colum- 
bus, Ohio, April 19-27, 1861 ; in command of 
Department of Washington, April 27 to July 
2C„ 1861 ; of City of Washington, D. C, July 
25 to October 2, 1861 ; of Camp Hamilton, 
new Fortress Alonroe, \'irginia, C)ctober 13 
to November 24, 1861 ; of Newport News, \'ir- 
ginia, November 24, 1861 to June 12, 1862, 
being engaged in capture of Norfolk, \'ir- 
ginia. May 10, 1862, and of Suffolk, \'lrginia, 
June 2j to September 3, 1862. He com- 
manded a corps in the Army of the Potomac 
in the Maryland campaign, September 10-17, 
1862, being engaged in the battle of Antictam, 
September 17, 1862, where, while "at the 
head of his troops, with sword waving over his 
head, cheering on his men to victory," he was 








rf'i £i'->3 /£,/fff,=j^j='^^ c<- 



CONNECTICUT 



1829 




Monument in Indian Hill Cemetery, Middletown, Conn. 



mortally wounded, and died from the effect, 
September 18, 1862, at Antietam, Maryland, 
aged fifty-eight years nine months. 

In neighborly friendship, General IMansfield 
was exemplary and engaging. As a husband 
and parent he was affectionate and generous, 
and fond of social and domestic life. Being a 
siiacere, influential and uniform friend and 
supporter of the Christian religion, he not only 
believed, but he exemplified the religion which 
he professed. He was always mindful to 
encourage every useful institution by his pres- 
ence, his interest, and his abilities. He con- 
sidered good education as of the highest im- 
portance to the honor, freedom and happi- 
ness of his country, and therefore exerted his 
influence to promote it. Such was his genius 
and enthusiastic love of education that he es- 
tablished a seminary for the education of 
young ladies in the higher branches of learn- 
ing, and sustained it almost wholly with his 
own means, in Middletown, where he was 
married and made his home. 

He married, September 25, 1838, Louisa 
Maria, daughter of Samuel and Catharine 
(Livingston) blather, at IMiddletown. Chil- 
dren, all except the youngest born at Middle- 
town: I. Samuel Mather, September 23, 
1839: married, April 16, 1874, Anne Baldwin 
Wright, of Detroit, Michiran, of whom later. 



2, Mary Louise, March 23, 1841, died June 
22, 1863, 3. Joseph Totten, October 4, 1843, 
died July 15, 1844. 4. Henry Livingstone, 
March 31, 1845; married, August 29, 1866, 
Adeline O. Carter. 5. Katharine Mather, 
May I, 1850; married Walter Bulkley Hub- 
bard, son of Jeremiah Hubbard, June 20, 
1899 (see Mather and Hubbard). 

(VH) General Samuel M. Mansfield, son 
of General Joseph King Fenno Mansfield, was 
entered as a cadet in the United States Mili- 
tary Academy at West Point, July i, 1858, 
graduated June 17, 1862, and was that date 
commissioned second lieutenant. Corps of En- 
gineers. He served during the civil war as 
follows : 

On the staff of his father, Major General 
Mansfield, July i to September, 1862, at Suf- 
folk, Virginia. He was commissioned col- 
onel, 24th Connecticut Volunteers, November 
iS, 1862, and was in command of regiment 
October 13, 1862, to September 30, 1863, in 
operations of the Department of the Gulf, 
December 17, 1862, to August 31, 1863, being 
first lieutenant. Corps of Engineers, March 

3, 1863, engaged in the combat of Irish Bend, 
Louisiana, April 14, 1863 ; march to Alex- 
andria, April-May, 1863 ; skirmishes near 
Port Hudson, May 24-26, 1863, and siege of 
Port Hudson, May 27-July 8, participating in 



1 830 



CONNECTICUT 



the assaults of j\la_v 27 and June 14, 1863. He 
was mustered out of the volunteer service Sep- 
tember 30, 1863, and served as assistant en- 
gineer in construction of fort at Sandy Hook, 
New Jersey, November 6, 1863, to May 19, 
1864; as superintending enginer of the con- 
struction of the defenses of West Pass into 
Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, March 19, 
1864, to November 7, 1865; and of temporary 
batteries at New Haven, Connecticut, May 20, 

1864, to September 7, 1866; in charge of Fort 
Trumbull and Battery Griswold, Connecticut, 
June 8, 1864, and repairs of Fort Adams, 
Rhode Island, June 8, 1864, to November 7, 

1865, being temporarily detached as assistant 
engineer in construction of the defenses at 
Point Lookout, Maryland, July 16-26, 1864; 
on engineer recruiting service November 
2, 1864, to September 25, 1866. He was pro- 
moted to captain, Corps of Engineers, Au- 
gust 15, 1864. He was a member of Special 
Board of Engineers to consider the defenses 
of Willet's Point, New York, April 7 to June 
20, 1865; as assistant engineer in the surveys 
of the Upper Mississippi, September 17, 1866, 
to March 27, 1867 ; in command of an engineer 
company at Willet's Point, New York, Alarch 
28 to August 19, 1867 ; in command of engi- 
neer company and post of Fort Point, San 
Francisco Bay, California, September 26, 
1867, to March 25, 1868, and of company and 
engineer depot, Yerba Buena Island, Califor- 
nia, Alarch 25, 1868, to April, 1871 ; as assist- 
ant engineer in the construction of the de- 
fenses at Fort Hamilton, New York, April i, 
1871, to June, 1872: on engineer recruiting 
service. New York City, October 30, 1871, 
to June, 1872, as superintending engineer; 
(naajor, Corps of Engineers, September 2, 
1874) ; of harbor improvements on the eastern 
shore of Lake Michigan, June 17, 1872, to Oc- 
tober 6, 1879, and of survey of Portage Lake, 

July 24, 1878, to ; as member of 

Board of Engineers to examine harbor at 
mouth of Kalamazoo river, June 9-12, 1875; 
to examine St. Joseph harbor and railroad 
bridge across it, June 10-18, 1875; on im- 
provement of Ahnepec Harbor, Wisconsin, 
October 13 to December 16, 1875; and on im- 
provement of the harbors at Chicago and 
^Michigan City, January, 1878. 

He was on "leave of absence in Europe 
from October 6, 1879, to February 5, 1880; 
in charge of river and harbor improvements 
in Texas from February 25, 1880, to Novem- 
ber 22, 1886; member of commission to run 
and mark the boundary lines between a por- 
tion of the Indian Territory and the State 
of Texas, from October 26, 188=;, to April, 
1887. He was engineer of the Tenth Light 



House District, May 19, 1886, to April 11, 
1888, of the Eleventh District from May 19, 
1886, and of the Ninth District from March 
25, 1887, and in charge of the river and har- 
bor improvements in western Michigan and 
northern Indiana from March 28, 1888, to 
December 18, 1888. (Lieutenant Colonel, 
Corps of Engineers, July 5, 1898). In charge 
of defensive works at Boston, Massachusetts, 
and river and harbor improvements in Massa- 
chusetts till November i, 1898. (Colonel, 
Corps of Engineers, July 5, 1898). Division 
engineer. Pacific Division, and in charge of 
defenses of San Francisco harbor, November 
7, to December 31, 1898, and member of the 
Board of Engineers when it had under con- 
sideration subjects relating to fortifications 
in Pacific Division. In charge of rivers and 
harbors. Cleveland District, November, 1900, 
to May, 1901 ; in charge of river and harbor, 
District of New York, Hudson river. East 
river and Harlem river ; member of Board 
of Engineers, member of harbor line and other 
boards since May, 1901 ; Division engineer of 
northwest division. May 3 to August 19, 1901 ; 
Division engineer of eastern division, July 
24, 1901, to February 20, 1903. (Brigadier 
General, LTnited States Army, February 20,. 
1903). Placed on retired list after forty years 
service, at his own request, February 22, 1903. 

Brevets : Bvt. captain, June 14, 1863, for 
gallant and meritorious services in action at 
Port Hudson, Louisiana ; brevet major and 
lieutenant colonel, March 13, 1865, for gal- 
lant and meritorious services during the rebel- 
lion. 

Civil history : Member of Harbor and Land 
Commission of the State of Massachusetts, 
July 2^, igo6. 



The name Mather is derived 
MATHER from the Anglo-Saxon word 
Math, which means "honor, 
reverence." The family is of ancient English 
descent, and is found also in Scotland, where 
at least two families of this name bore arms. 
The coat-of-arms used by the early Mathers 
of Boston is : Ermine on a fesse wavy azure, 
three lions rampant or. Crest : a lion sedant 
or. This coat-of-arms was recorded as belong- 
ing to William Mather in 1602. Motto : Sunt 
fortia pectora nobis. Also : Virtus vera nobili- 
tas est. 

(I) John Mather was of Lowton, Winwick 
parish, Lancashire, England. 

(II) Thomas Mather, son of John Mather, 
was of the same place. He married Margaret 



(III) Rev. Richard Mather, son of Thomas 
Mather, was born in Lowton, Winwick parish. 



CONNECTICUT 



1831 



Lancashire, England, in 1596. His parents, 
though poor, dt-tennined to give their soil a 
good education and sent him to Winwick 
School, about four miles from their home. 
In the winter he boarded at Winwick, but in 
the summer he travelled the distance on foot 
everv dav. He attended this school until he 
was 'fifteen years old. In 161 1 he became 
teacher in a' school at Toxteth Park, near 
Liverpool. He lived with the family of Mr. 
Edward Aspinw-all in 1614, and while there 
was converted and decided to become a min- 
ister. He continued his studies under the 
teaching of Mr. Aspinwall, who was a learned 
scholar, and then went to Brazenose College^ 
Oxford. Before he had been long at Ox- 
ford he received a call to preach at Toxteth, 
where he had been teaching school. On No- 
vember 30, 1618, he preached his first sermon 
and was ordained a minister of the Established 
English Church. In later years he was wont 
to "speak in terms of regret concerning his 
ordination, calling it a "grievous sin." He 
preached in the town of Prescott in connection 
with his Toxteth church work, and in other 
parishes of the county. In August, 1633, he 
was silenced for non-conformity, but restored 
the November following. In 1634 he was 
again silenced, and his friends could not have 
him restored again. He testified that in the 
fifteen years he had been in the ministry /he 
had never worn a surplice. He decided to go 
to New England, and sailed from Bristol on 
Mav 23, 1635. in the ship "James," arriving 
in iioston on August 17 following. He re- 
mained in Boston some time with his family, 
and finally settled in Dorchester, and was 
chosen teacher of a new church there August 
23, 1636. He was admitted to the church 
with his wife Catherine, September 20, 1636. 
He served as minister until his death, and for 
fiftv years was able to attend to his church 
labors every Sunday. In his last years he lost 
sight of one of his eyes, and for the last two 
years suffered from a distressing malady which 
terminated his life April 22, 1669. He left 
a diary with an interesting account of his 
journey across the ocean, and also a brief 
biography of his life up to his thirty-ninth 
year. With Rev. William Thompson he com- 
posed "An Answer to Mr. Charles Herle," 
and he was the chief author of "The Elder's 
Discourse About Church Government" in 
1639 and the "Cambridge Platform" in 1647. 
His other publications were : "The Bay 
Psalm Book," the first printed book in Am- 
erica, 1640: "A Reply to Rutheford," 1646: 
"An heart melting exhortation, together with a 
cordial of consolation presented in a letter from 
New England to his countrymen in Lanca- 



shire," 1650; "A Chatecism," 1650; "A Treat- 
ise of Justification," 1652; "A Letter to Mr. 
Hooker to prove that it was lawful for a 
minister to administer the sacrament to a 
congregation not particularly under his care" ; 
"A Plea for the Churches of New England"; 
"An Election Sermon," 1660 ; "An Answer to 
Mr. Davenport's work against the proposi- 
tion of the Synod," 1662; "A Farewell exhor- 
tation to the church and people of Dorchester 
consisting of seven directions." He pre- 
pared for the press others which were not 
printed. His grandson, Cotton Mather, says 
of him : 

"His way of preaching was very plain, studiously 
avoiding obscure and foreign terms, and unnecessary 
incitation of Latin sentences, and aiming to shoot 
his arrows, not over the heads but into the hearts 
of his hearers. * * * His voice was loud and 
big, and uttered with a deliberate vehemency : it 
produced unto his ministry an awful and very tak- 
ing majesty. « * * But as he judged that a 
preacher of the Gospel should be, he was a very 
hard student. Yea, so intent was he upon his be- 
loved studies, that the morning before he died he 
importuned his friends that watched with him, to 
help him into the room where he thought his usual 
works and books expected him. To satisfy his im- 
portunity, they began to lead him thither; but finding 
himself unable to get out of his lodging room, he 
said : 'I see I am not able ; I hav-. not been in my 
study for several days; and is it not a lamentable 
thing that I should lose so much time?'" 

His will was dated October 16, 1661. He 
married (first) September 29, 1624, Cather- 
ine Holt, who died 1655, daughter of Edmund 
Holt, of Bury, England. He married (second) 
August 26, 1656, Sarah, widow of William 
Story and of Rev. John Cotton, and daughter 
of Richard Hankridge, of Boston, England. 
She died May 27, 1676. Children : Rev. 
Samuel, born May 13, 1626; Timothy, men- 
tioned below; Rev. Nathaniel, March 20, 1630; 
Joseph, 1634, died young; Rev. Eleazer, May 
'3' "537: Rev. Dr. Increase, June 21^ 1639. 

(I\') Timothy Mather, son of Rev. Richard 
Mather, was born in 1628, in Liverpool, Eng- 
land. He came to America with his father, 
and was the only one of his father's family 
who did not become a minister. He is the 
ancestor of all the New England Mathers. 
He died as the result of a fall in his barn 
in Dorchester, January 14, 1684. He mar- 
ried (first) Catherine, daughter of Major- 
General Humphrey Atherton, about 1649. He 
married (second) March 20, 1678-79, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Amiel Weeks. Children : 
Rev. Samuel, born July 5, 1650; Richard, 
mentioned below ; Catherine, January 6, 1655- 
56; Nathaniel, September 2, 1658; Joseph, 
Mav 23, 1661 ; Atherton, October 4, 1664. 

(V) Richard (2) Mather, son of Timothy 
Mather, was born in Dorchester, December 



1832 



CONNECTICUT 



20, 1653, and died at Lyme, Connecticut, Au-^ 
gust 17, 1688. He married Catherine Wise,' 
July I, 1680. He was named after his grand- 
father, Richard ( i ) Mather, and was a far- 
mer. He settled in Dorchester, but a few years • 
after his marriage he moved to Lyme, Connec- | 
ticut. In 1686 he bought some land in Lyme " 
of Hezekiah Usher, of Boston. He died on i 
the fifty-third anniversary of the landing of | 
ihis grandfather in America (landing occurred | 
August 17, 1635), aged thirty-five. Children: i 
Captain Timothy, born March 20, 1681 ; Eliza- | 
beth, November 20, 1682; Samuel, mentioned j 
below ; Joseph, January 29, 1686. j 

(VI) Samuel Mather, son of Richard (2) 
Mather, was born January 3, 1683-84, and 
died July 12, 1725, at Lyme. He married 
Deborah Champion, January i, 1712. Chil- 
dren : Richard, mentioned below ; Mary, born 
November 14, 1715; Deborah, January 15, 
1718; Lucy, December 18, 1720; Mehitable, 
December 28, 1723. 

(VII) Richard (3) Mather, son of Samuel 
Mather, was born in Lyme, December 22, 
1 71 2, died January 11, 1790. He married 
Deborah Ely, May 18, 1742; she died October 
10, 1803, in her eighty-third year. Children: 
Mehitable, born March 7, 1743; Samuel, men- 
tioned below; WilHam, September 15, 1746, 
died young; William, November 21, 1747; 
Captain Elias, February 10, 1750; Deborah, 
October 3, 1752; Ezra, February 25, 1755. 
died voung; Ezra, April 2"], 1756; Captain 
Sylvester, September i, 1758; Polly, March 
31, 1760; Lucia, March 13, 1763; Richard, 
July 4, 1765. 

(VIII) Samuel (2) Mather, son of Richard 
(2) Mather, was born at Lyme, February 22, 
1745, and died March 26, 1809. He married 
Lois, daughter of Thomas G. and niece of 
Governor Matthew Griswold, November 14, 





Samuel Mather Homestead ; also home of Gen. 

J. K. F. Mansfield, who married Louisa Mather ; 

and of Walter Bulkley Hubbard, who married 
Katharine Mather Mansfield. 



Mather Homestead. 

1765; she was born September i, 1747- ^'^^ 
died November 17, 1804. Children: Anna, 
born December 11, 1766; Thomas, October 
10, 1768; Samuel, mentioned below; Phebe, 
July 22, 1772; Mehitable, November 14, 1774; 
Henry, July 31, 1777; Frances, December 13, 
1779: Richard, May 10, 1782; James, March 
14, 1785 ; Margaret, July 16, 1787; Lydia, Au- 
gust ID, 1790. 

(IX) Samuel (4) Mather, son of Samuel 
(3) INIather, was born in Lyme, January 4, 
1771, and died at Middletown, April 6, 1854. 
He married, September 14, 1807, Catharine 
Livingston, born October 10, 1787, daughter 
of Abraham Livingston, of Stillwater, New 
York; she died February i, 1855. Children: 
Louisa Maria, mentioned below ; Elizabeth, 
born September 24, 1810; Catharine, January 
17, 1813, died November 23, 1817; Jane Ann; 
born Troy, New York, December 16, 1814; 
Samuel L., July i, 1817 ; Howard, March 15, 
1820; Katharine Livingston, May 8. 1822; 
Henrv R., May 17, 1824; Mary Cornelia, July 
25, 1827, died August 20, 1828. 

(X) Louisa Maria Mather, daughter pf 
Samuel (4) Mather, was Iwrn in Middletown, 
June 14, 1 80S, died February 22, 1880. She 
married Major General Joseph King Fenno 



CONNECTICUT 



1833 



Mansfield. September 23, 1838 (see Mans- 
field). Children: i. Samuel Mather, born 
September 23. 1839. 2. Mary Louise, born 
March 23, 1841, died June 22, 1863. 3. Jo- 
seph Totten. born October 4. 1843, died July 
15, 1844. 4. Henry Livingston, born March 
31, 1845. 5. Katherine Mather, born May i, 
1850; married, June 20, 1899, Walter Bulkley 
Hubbard. 



(IV) lohn Earle, son of 

HUBB.-\RD John (q. v.), and Elizabeth 
(Stowe) Hubbard, was born 
1723, baptized May 19, 1723, died July 27, 
1782. He married. February 22, 1745, Anna, 
born 1717, died March 30, 1797, a daughter 
of Lieutenant John Allen. 

(V) John E.. fifth child of John Earle and 
Anna (Allen) Hubbard, was born March 11, 
1756, died May 6, 1816. He married Phoebe 
Brainerd, born 1759, died June i, 1837. 

(yi) Stephen, second child of John E. and 
Phoebe (Brainerd) Hubbard, was born 1786, 
died June 8, 1853. He married Sarah, born 
June 20, 1786. died June 30, 1858, daughter 
of Freelove and Lois Johnson, granddaugh- 
ter of Jedediah Johnson, and great-grand- 
daughter of Joseph Johnson. 

(VII) Samuel Johnson, sixth child of Ste- 
phen and Sarah (Johnson) Hubbard, was 
born in Middletown, May 12, 1820, died Oc- 
tober. 1895. He married, October 5. 1851, 
Frances Drusilla. born January i, 1826. died 
February 13, 1876, daughter of James and 
Dorothy (Sears) Smith. Children: James 
Irvin. born October 11, 1857, died March 21, 
1859: Edwin Smith, born May 18, i860; 
Clement Samuel, born June 20. 1862 ; Elmer 
Stephen, see forward ; Fano)' Dolly, born 
January 13, 1868. 

Dorothy (Sears) Smith, mother of Mrs. 
Samuel Johnson Hubbard, traces her descent 
to the "Mayflower" Pilgrim as follows: (I) 
Stephen Hopkins, who came in the "May- 
flower." (II) Constance, daughter of 
Stephen Hopkins, married Nicholas Snow. 
(Ill) Sarah, daughter of Nicholas and 
Constance (Hopkins) Snow, married William 
Walker. (IV) William Walker. (V) 
Mehitable, daughter of William Walker, 
married John Knowles. (VI) Elisha. son of 
John and Mehitable (Walker) Knowles, mar- 
ried Abigail Cone. (VII) Phebe. daughter 
of Elisha and Abigail (Cone) Knowles. mar- 
ried Stephen Sears. (VIII) Dorothy, daugh- 
ter of Stephen and Phebe (Knowles) Sears, 
married James Smith, and became the mother 
of Mrs. Hubbard. In the early days the name 
was spelled Sayer, and the line of descent is 
as follows: (I) William Sayer, of Hinwich 



parish, Podington county, Bedford, England. 
(II) William Sa\er. married Elizabeth 

. (Ill) Francis. (1\') Thomas. (V) 

Daniel. (VL) Nathan. (VH) Stephen. 
(\'1II) Stephen Sears, who married Phebe 
Knowles, as mentioned above. (IX) Dorothy 
Sears, born June 17, 1793, died April 5, 1857; 
married, December 29, 18 12, James Smith, 
mentioned above. 

(\TII) Elmer Stephen, son of Samuel 
Johnson and Frances Drusilla (Smith) Hub- 
bard, was born in Middletown, Connecticut, 
March 23, 1865. He attended the public 
schools of his native city, and his early life 
was spent on a farm and in the lumbering 
business with his father, where he learned 
the dignity of labor. In 1899 he entered the 
service of the Cutaway Harrow Company, to 
the presidency of which he was elected in 
August. 1908, succeeding the late George M. 
Clark, serving in the same capacity at the 
present time (191 1). The products of this 
company are furnished to every state in the 
LTnion and to other countries as well, and 
under the presidency of Mr. Hubbard, who 
devotes himself so assiduously to its welfare, 
its prosperity will continue and increase. He 
is a member of the Congregational church, 
a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, and 
a Republican in politics. He married, Sep- 
tember 14, 1892, Clemontine Dolly, born Au- 
gust 26. 1871, daughter of George Marshall 
and Clemontine I. Clark. Children : Beverly 
Raymond, born December 27, 1901 ; Dolly 
Bonfoey, October 3, 1904. 

(The Clark Line). 

(I) William Clark, immigrant ancestor, 
was one of the early settlers of Hartford. Con- 
necticut, being a proprietor there as early as 
1639. He was one of the twenty-eight men 
who. in the summer of 1662, settled in what 
was then known as "the lands of thirty-mile 
island" subsequently named Haddam. He and 
a few others settled on land located back of 
the town meadows, beginning at the eastern 
point of Walkley Hill and extending to the 
graveyard. He died July 22. 1681. Cliildren: 
I. Daniel, who had sons: William, Joseph, 
Daniel and John . 2. Thomas, who had sons : 
Thomas, Jonathan, David and Israel. From 
these sons are descended the Clarks of Had- 
dam. Connecticut. 

(IV) Robert Clark, of the fourth genera- 
tion from William Clark, resided in that part 
of Haddam on the east side of the river called 
Haddam Neck. He was a farmer, and lived 
v\'here his descendant. Alexander Clark, lived 
recently. Children: Benajah, Matthew, see 
forward, and Walter. 



i834 



CONNECTICUT 



(V) Matthew, son of Robert Clark, was 
born about 1775, in Haddam Neck, where he 
passed his entire Hfe, a farmer by occupation 
and a successful business man. He was a 
Democrat and active in public affairs. He 
married Hannah Ransom, a native of Had- 
lyme, Connecticut, and both he and his wife 
are buried in Haddam. Children: i. Philena, 
married Harris Cook, a contractor and quar- 
ryman at Haddam; children: Lavinia, Louisa, 
Cynthia and William Cook. 2. George W., 
mentioned below. 3. Amanda, married Amasa 
Ackley, of East Haddam, a dry goods mer- 
chant ; had two daughters, both deceased. 4. 
Betsey Ann, married Henry M. Brainerd, of 
Haddam ; children : Henry, Charles, Nellie 
and another. 5. Gilbert j\I., married, Decem- 
ber 10, 1842, Sarah Ann, daughter of Cap- 
tain Thomas Selden, of Chatham, a soldier of 
the war of 1812 at the time of the invasion of 
Connecticut by the British forces ; children : 
Emerson, teacher in the public schools ; Adel- 
bert, teacher in the New York city public 
schools ; Josephine and Fannie Maria, also 
school teachers. 

(VI) George W., son of Matthew Clark, 
was born at Haddam Neck, January 13. 1805, 
died August 11, 1845. He owned considerable 
quarrv property on Haddam Neck and was a 
contractor for government and city public 
works, furnishing the well-known Haddam 
stone. He was ambitious and enterprising 
and was successful, though he died at the 
early age of forty years. He was a staunch 
Democrat in politics. He married, in Chat- 
ham, Cynthia Selden, sister of Mrs. Gilbert 
M. Clark. Children: i. Thomas Jefferson, 
born September 21, 1831, vice-president of 
the Cutaway Harrow Company ; partner in 
business of his brother, George M., mentioned 
below : married (first) in 1855, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Franklin Quick; married (sec- 
ond) November 4, 1874, Sophia jMadeline 
Warner. 2. George Marshall, mentioned be- 
low. 3. Henry Lee, born June 7, 1835, mar- 
ried Miriam Ursula, daughter of Epaphro- 
ditus Brainerd, of Haddam Neck ; children : 
Coit C, married Ella Manwarring, of Water- 
ford, Connecticut, and Cora C, married Harry 
Brown, of Chatham, and resides at Haddam 
Neck. 4. Mary, born June 21, 1844, married 
L. Oscar Brown, of Portland, Connecticut, 
where he is chief engineer of the Portland 
quarries. The widow of George W. Clark 
married (second) Linus Parmelee, of Middle 
Haddam, and she died in June, 1880. 

(VII) George Marshall, son of George W. 
Clark, was born in Haddam, June 11, 1833. 
He received a rather limited schooling. He 
was but twelve years old when his father died 



and the duty of supporting the family de- 
volved upon him and his eldest brother, who 
was but fifteen. He was Employed on neigh- 
boring farms, and his wages went to his 
mother. He worked at wool carding, and for 
eighteen months at blacksmithing and the 
making of edged tools. In the meantime he 
continued to study at home at every oppor- 
tunity and he acquired a thorough and practi- 
cal knowledge of engineering. At the age 
of seventeen he went to Savannah, Georgia, 
and worked for a time as a common laborer 
in a saw mill. There his opportunity came, 
when a main shaft broke, and he used his 
knowledge and skill as a blacksmith to weld 
it. He won the confidence of his employers 
and soon afterwards was given a contract to 
erect three large steam saw mills in Georgia. 
Within five months he had the work com- 
pleted and the mills sawing over four hun- 
dred thousand feet of pine daily. 

INIr. Clark entered into partnership with 
his elder brother Thomas J., who was a stone 
mason, and the firm of Clark Brothers, masons 
and builders, continued with uninterrupted 
success for more than thirty years. The 
brothers were associated in business all their 
active lives. For about ten years Mr. Clark 
carried on shipbuilding in summer and house- 
building in winter, working from Bangor to 
New Orleans. When he started on his first 
trip he had but fourteen dollars, but during 
the winter he sent home $200 to his mother 
and in the spring $250 more. In the fall of 
1859 he was employed as a journeyman car- 
penter at $1.75 a day, but within a few days 
his mechanical skill was discovered and he 
was made foreman of all the outside help at a 
salary of $10 a day. His brother also found 
employment in Meriden and both worked for 
the company for a period of seven years. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Clark had turned his at- 
tention to the improvement of agricultural 
im])lements, and in the fall of 1867 he and 
his brother commenced to build a factory in 
which to build his tools and machinery. The 
brothers began to make mowing machines, for 
which George M. Clark had invented a new 
mechanical movement. But after a few 
months, it was decided that the invention was 
an infringement on a patent and the firm 
ceased to make the machines and devoted its 
attention to the manufacture of other agri- 
cultural instruments. The business was con- 
ducted by a joint stock company, of which 
George M. Clark was president, and Thomas 
J., vice-president. George M. Clark invent- 
ed many improvements in agricultural ma- 
chinery. To perfect and test them he found 
it necessary to travel to all parts of the coun- 



CONNECTICUT 



i8,v= 



try and he estimated that he had traveled at 
least six hundred thousand miles in this coun- 
try. He frequently took contracts for con- 
struction. In 1871, while he was building- a 
dam, a derrick fell, injuring him, and killing 
one of his laborers. During the time he was 
disabled by this accident, he invented a wire 
rope clanii), which he patented. It is the tirst 
and only device in use for this purpose, ef- 
fectually preventing the slipping of the cable 
and of inestimable value to contractors, tele- 
graph companies and other concerns using 
wire cables. Tons of these clamps were used 
in building the New York tunnel and bridges. 
On account of the success of this patent, an- 
other firm commenced to make a device that 
infringed upon Mr. Clark's patent. Instead of 
prosecuting them, he paid them a visit, ex- 
plained the circumstances surrounding the in- 
vention and allowed them to sell their stock- 
without charging a royalty. He was a mem- 
ber of the Congregational Society and attend- 
ed that church, gave it his hearty support, and 
was always ready to assist the other churches 
or any good work of the town. 

Air. Clark was one of the organizers of the 
Republican party at Hartford in 1856, and 
he always took a keen interest in politics. For 
many years he represented his town in the 
general assembly of the state and the twenty- 
first district in the state senate. For some 
fifty years he was a member of the Republi- 
can town committee. He was a delegate from 
Haddam to the constitutional convention at 
Hartford in 1902 and took a prominent part 
in debates and deliberations. He was a mem- 
ber of Columbia Lodge, Free and Accepted 
^lasons, of East Haddam ; a charter member 
of Granite Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Haddam : member of Burning Bush 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Essex ; and 
of Cyrene Commandery, Knights Templar. 
He never lost his interest in agriculture, and 
resided on the old Bonfoey homestead, to 
which he added many acres and which he 
vastly improved, removing over sixteen thou- 
sand tons of rock. From the lands he cleared, 
over a hundred tons of hay are harvested an- 
nually from sixteen acres. As a writer and 
expert in growing grass, Mr. Clark takes rank 
as one of the agricultural scientists of the 
country. Flis share in the old Clark home- 
stead he gave outright to his two brothers, 
who lived upon it. As one writer has said 
of him : "Mr. Clark's life and deeds speak 
more eloquently than words of his untiring 
kindness, his open-hearted benevolence and 
his patriotic citizenship." 

He married, August 26, i860, Clemontine 
Isabel, daughter of Edwin B. Bonfoey, of 



Haddam (see Bonfoey). Children: i. Es- 
telle Eugenia, born September 17, 1864, mar- 
ried Clement S. Hubbard, of Middletown ; 
children: Frances Estelle, George Marshall 
and Clement Samuel. 2. Harriet Cynthia, 
born January 3, 1869, died February 25, 1873. 
3. Clemontine Dolly (twin), born August 26, 
1S71, married Elmer Stephen Hubbard (see 
Hubbard \ III). 4. Isabel, twin of Clemon- 
tine Dolly, died June 25, 1872. 

(The Bonfoey Line). 

The surname Bonfoey is variously spelled, 
Bonfoy, Bunfoy, Bonnefoy, Bonnefoi, etc. 
The name is French, but the English family 
has borne this name since the Norman inva- 
sion in 1066. The ancient seat of the family 
was at Hayes, county Middlesex. The coat- 
of-arms is described : Azure on a cross ar- 
gent, a human heart gules. Crest : An arm 
couped and erect in armour proper holding 
in the hand a cross Calvary gules. Alotto: 
En Bonnefoy (In good faith). 

There is a tradition apparently well found- 
ed that the ancestors of the American family 
of this surname were two brothers, Jerathmel 
and Benanuel Bonnefoy, who started from 
France together with other Huguenots for 
America, and it said that Jerathmel died on 
the voyage. Benanuel is thought to be the 
ancestor of the Connecticut Bonfoeys. The 
French Huguenots who landed at what was 
afterwards called Bonnefoy's Point, in Echo 
Bay, and settled the town of New Rochelle, 
New York, were part of a larger party or 
group of immigrants of this faith starting to- 
gether after the Revocation of the Edict of 
N antes. Some went to the Delaware, some 
up Hudson rh'er and others into the Connecti- 
cut valley. David de Bonnefoy sold his land 
in France, Ville Pontaux, about 1690, and 
came to New Rochelle, but settled at or near 
Middletown, Connecticut. Of the same fam- 
ily was Susanna Bonnefoy, born 1660, wife of 
John Coutant,of New Rochelle, who was born 
in France in 1659. The old Bonnefoy Bible 
is still in the possession of the Coutant family 
of New Rochelle. It was printed in Amster- 
dam by Jean Frederick Bernard and revised 
and corrected by teachers and professors at 
Geneva. Letters of Denization were issued, 
February 6, 1695-96, according to the his- 
torian Bolton, to David de Repos, Alexander 
Allair, David de Bonnefoy and Louis Guion, 
under the seal of the Province from King 
William. 

(I) Richard Bonfoey, son or grandson of 
the Benanuel Bonnefoy of tradition, and 
doubtless related to David Bonnefoy, men- 
tioned among the Huguenot pioneers, was an 



1836 



CONNECTICUT 



early settler in what was incorporated as Mid- 
dle Haddam. Richard Bonfoey, Nathaniel 
Burr and others in October, 1738, petitioned 
that the part of Haddam between the Con- 
necticut and Salmon rivers be incorporated as 
a parish, and in May, 1740. their petition was 
granted. Children of Richard : Richard, Be- 
nanuel, Susannah and Penelope. 

(II) Benanuel, son of Richard Bonfoey, 
was born about 1720. He was a soldier in 
the French and Indian war and the old pow- 
der horn that he carried, now in the possession 
of Watson E. Bonfoey, of Tipton, Indiana, 
is inscribed "Beenanawell Bonfoey, his horn 
1756". The knife, with which the inscription 
was carved, has been preserved with the horn. 
He died in the service. He belonged to Cap- 
tain James Harris' company of Saybrook, 
Colonel David Wooster's regiment. The chap- 
lain of the regiment was the well-known Rev. 
John Norton, minister of Chatham, taken 
prisoner by the Indians during the war. Be- 
nanuel Bonfoey married, in November, 1752, 
Rachel Bailey. She married (second) Eben- 
ezer Skinner, and she died February 26, 1820, 
aged eighty-eight years. She and her sec- 
ond husband are buried in the cemetery at 
Higganum. Children of Benanuel and Ra- 
chel Bonfoey: -Hannah, born November 12, 
1753 : Benanuel, mentioned below. 

(III) Benanuel (2), son of Benanuel (i) 
Bonfoey, was born December 13, 1755. He 
was a soldier in the revolution, enlisting in 
the Fifth Battalion, Wadsworth's Ijrigade, 
in May, 1776, in Captain Cornelius Higgins's 
company from Haddam. This battalion was 
raised in June, 1776, to reinforce General 
Washington's army at New York and it 
served there and on the Brooklyn front, being 
at the right of the line of works during the 
battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776, and 
in the retreat to New York, August 29 and 
30 ; was stationed with a militia brigade un- 
der Colonel Douglas, of Kips Bay, on the East 
river, at the time of the British attack on 
New York, September 15, He was in the 
battle of White Plains, October 28 of that 
year. He re-enlisted in the Sixth Regi- 
ment of Connecticut Line, April 2, 1777. serv- 
ing in Captain Pond's company as a private 
until honorably discharged, ]\Iarch 29, 1780. 
He was pensioned under the act of congress 
of 1818, at $96 a year, and after his death 
his widow received the pension as long as she 
lived. The Sixth Regiment, Connecticut Line, 
was for the Continental Line equivalent to 
what is now known as the regulars and was 
to continue through the war. It went into 
camp at Peekskill, New York, in the summer 
of 1777, but was frequently detached on ex- 



peditions of outpost duty on the line above 
King's Bridge. It served from August to Oc- 
tober on the Hudson in Parsons' brigade un- 
der General Putnam and engaged in all the 
movements made in consequence of the en- 
emy's move against Fort Montgomery ; win- 
tered in 1777-78 at West Point and assisted 
in constructing permanent fortifications on 
Meigs' redoubt ; also on the redoubts on the 
east side of the Hudson river. In the summer 
of 1778, the regiment encamped with the main 
army under General Washington at White 
Plains; wintered in 1778-79 at Reading, Con- 
necticut ; in the operations of 1779 it served 
with the Connecticut Division on the east 
side of the Hudson and was detached to 
Meigs' Light Regiment, and engaged at the 
storming of Stony Point, July 15, 1779; win- 
tered 1779-80 at Morristown, New Jersey, 
and endured the privations of that winter. 
Mr. Bonfoey was also at \'alley Forge ; in the 
movements of 1780 it served with the Division 
on both sides of the Hudson. Upon the dis- 
covery of Benedict Arnold's treason, the Sixth 
Regiment with other troops was ordered to 
West Point in anticipation of the expected ad- 
vance of the enemy. After the war, Bonfoey 
taught school several terms and among his 
pupils were children of his old comrades-in- 
arms. Captain Cornelius Higgins, Sergeant 
William Scovil, Lieutenant Elijah Brainerd 
and others. Afterwards he was employed at 
ship-calking in New Haven. He built the 
house on Candlewood Hill in which his son 
Benanuel spent his long and useful life, and 
it is still standing. It was begun and the 
chimney built in 1804, and not finished until 
1808. Eugene Scovil resides in the old house. 
Benanuel Bonfoey died August 14, 1825. 

He married, in 1778, Concurrence Smith, 
born in 1759. She was a member of the 
Church of Christ, Congregational, of Had- 
dam, joining October 14, 1804, under Rev. 
David Dudley Field, the famous divine. She 
was a daughter of David Smith, sixth son of 
Stephen Smith, who came from New Haven 
and settled on Candlewood Hill, Middletown, 
and owned a large section in that part of 
the town. David Smith, father of Concur- 
rence, married Lydia, daughter of Robert 
Cogswell, one of the original settlers in Old 
Saybrook. Robert Cogswell's father, Sam- 
uel Cogswell, married Ann, daughter of Cap- 
tain John Mason, of Pequot fame. Captain 
Mason was educated in the arts of war under 
Sir Thomas Fairfax and had served in the 
Netherlands. He was one of the first settlers 
in Windsor and is buried at Norwich. David 
Smith died November 22, 1776, aged thirty- 
nine years ; his wife Lydia died November 22, 



CONNECTICUT 



1837 



1825, aged eiglity-cij;ht years. Chililren of 
Mr. and Mrs. lionfoey: i. David, mentioned 
below. 2. Hannah, born September 19, 1781, 
died in 1864. 3. Concurrence, June 9, 1783, 
died in 1856. 4. Asahel, May 21, 1785. died 
in 1850. 5. Anson, June 13, 1787, died in 
1884 in Michigan : he and Asahel lived at 
Ponsett and were clothiers, making fine broad- 
cloth. 6. Lydia, December i, 1791, died in 
1883. 7. Matilda, 1793, baptized October 2, 
1804, died. in 1883. 8. Horace, 1795. bajitized 
October 2, 1804, died in 1873. 9. Lucinda, 
June 5, 1797, died in 1887. 10. Clarinda, 
March, 1801, died February 16, 1806. 11. 
Benanuel, September 28, 1802, died October 
10, 1894. 12. Richard, September 13, 1805, 
died in August, 1825, aged twenty years. The 
united ages of this remarkable family amount- 
ed to eight hundred and sixty-nine years, 
with an average age, of the ten who lived 
to maturity, of over eighty-four years, the 
ages varying, from seventy-three to ninety- 
seven, half the number living beyond the age 
of ninety. The mother died at the age of 
ninety years, the father lived to the age of 
seventy years. 

(IV) David, son of Benanuel (2) Bon- 
foey, was born at Middletown, November 22, 
1779, died in 1863. He was a ship caulker by 
trade and also a government contractor. He 
lived and carried on business in Haddam. 
He was a skillful and careful workman him- 
self and he required of his men the same care 
and faithfulness in their work that he gave to 
it himself. In politics he was a Whig. He 
was of sensitive and refined nature, upright 
and honorable in all his dealings. He mar- 
ried Dolly Brainerd, who died at the age of 
eighty-five, a daughter of Prosper Brainerd. 
Among their children was Edwin B., men- 
tioned below. 

(V) Edwin B., son of David Bonfoey, was 
born in Haddam, January 15, 1809, diecl 1887, 
"was buried in the Higganum cemetery. Like 
his father he was naturally of a mechanical 
turn of mind, and followed the business of 
caulker and government contractor. He was 
an earnest, conscientious and upright man, 
quiet and kindly in his ways, and of warm 
heart and sterling character. Pie married 
Harriet, daughter of Samuel and Anne (Pow- 
ers) Cotton, and a descendant of the famous 
Cotton Mather (see forward). Children: i. 
Ellen Eugenia, born June 14, 1837, resided 
on the homestead with her father and never 
married. 2. Mary Elizabeth, January 9, 1839, 
died in 1843. 3- Clemontine Isabel, married 
George M. Clark (see Clark VII). 4. Mary 
Elizabeth, July 11, 1843, married Olin Fair- 
child, of Middletown, and has children : 



.Mice and Ciiarlntte. 5. Alice .\melia, May, 
1846, married Louis C. Frey, of Hartford, 
and has one child : Louis Clarence. G. Ar- 
thur L., September 17, 1847, married Jane 
Morley, of Meriden, and has children: Fred- 
erick L., Bayard Clayton and Harriet Morley. 
7. Charles Edwin, I-'ebruary 28, 1851, mar- 
ried Ellen E. Briggs and has children : Louis 
C, \Villiam Ernest and Charles Edwin. 8. 
Frederick Lee, .August 10, 1858, died i860. 

The Cotton descent is as follows: (I) Wil- 
liam Cotton, of Boston, married Anne . 

(II) John, son of WiUiani and Anne Cotton, 
was of Concord, Massachusetts, and married 
Mary Stowe. (Ill) Samuel, son of John and 
Mary (Stowe) Cotton, was of Middletown, 
and married Lydia Bates. (IV) Samuel, son 
of Samuel and Lydia (Bates) Cotton, was of 
Middletown, and married Mary Cornwall. 
(V) Samuel, son of Samuel and Mary (Corn- 
wall) Cotton, yvas of Wethersfield ; he mar- 
ried, 1759, Mable Bibbud. (VI) Samuel, son 
of Samuel and Mable (Bibbud) Cotton, was 
born in Wethersfield, November 7, 1759, mar- 
ried, 1779, Sarah, daughter of W'illiam and 
Sarah Banks, of Middletown. (VII) Samuel, 
son of Samuel and Sarah (Banks) Cotton, 
was born in Middletown, April 9, 1780, mar- 
ried, March 10, 1805, Anne, daughter of 
Thomas and 'Slary (Cape) Powers, of Mid- 
dletown. Children : Mary Ann, born Janu- 
ary I, 1806, died August 16, 1809: Maria, Oc- 
tober 20, 1807; Mary Ann, September 14, 
1810; Caroline A., October 9, 1812: Harriet, 
November 21, 1817, married Edwin B. Bon- 
foey; Elizabeth, February 6, 1821. 



Williani Randall, immigrant 
RANDALL ancestor, was born in Eng- 
land, and settled in Scituate, 
Alassachusetts, before 1640. He had a farm 
on the brook that falls into Till's of Dwelly's 
creek and his house was on the valley twenty 
rods north of the brook on the west side of 
the road to the Elisha Foster house. He had 
a suit in court in 1641. His name was on the 
list of those able to bear arms in 1643. He 
was one of the proprietors as early as 1645, 
and was admitted a freeman, June 6. 1654. 
The history of Scituate says that he was an 
enterprising and useful citizen, but litigious. 
He was fined in 1660 for striking Edward 
Want, and in 1664 for "breaking the King's 
peace by poakeing Jeremiah Hatch with a ho- 
pole" (three shillings, four pence). He was 
one of those who held it unlawful and un- 
scriptural to pay religious teachers and he was 
constantly in conflict with the tax collectors. 
Once his wife was fined for abusing the con- 
stable who came to seize property to pay the 



1838 



CONNECTICUT 



rates. His wife Elizabeth was a legatee in 
the will of Michael Barstow. Children: i. 
Sarah, baptized with the two following, No- 
vember 2^. 1645. -■ Joseph, born 1642. 3. 
Hannah, March, 1644. 4. William. 5. John, 
born 1650, mentioned below. 6. Elizabeth, 
1652. 7. Job, I'^bruary 8, 1654-55, a ship- 
wright in Scituate : children : Mary, born 1680 ; 
Job, 1683, settled on Job's Land in the Two- 
Mile district, Scituate; James, 1685; Nehe- 
miah, 1688; Lydia, 1690; Samuel. 8. Benja- 
min, 1656. 9. Isaac, 1658. 

(II) John, son of William Randall, was 
born in 1650. He settled in Rochester, Massa- 
chusetts. His wife was probably a daughter 
of Thomas Rollins, secretary of Boston, for 
she is mentioned in his will. Children, born 
at Rochester: John, May 6, 1677; Patience, 
January 13, 1679; Thomas, January 25, 1681 : 
Mercy, January 20, 1683 : William, February 
6, 1685; Job, Alarch 3, 1688, mentioned below; 
Judith, April 29, 1690; Lazarus, December 25, 
1691. 

(III) Job, son of John Randall, was born 
at Rochester, March 3, 1688. He married, 
]\Iarch II, 1706-07, Alice Hunter (by Rev. 
Samuel Arnold). Among their children was 
John, mentioned below. They lived at Roch- 
ester. 

(R') John (2), son of Job Randall, was 
born at Rochester. He married (first) at 
Wareham, ^lassachusetts, March 15, 1749, 
Lois Bump, who died at Sharon, Connecticut, 
August 22, 1758, aged twenty-seven years. 
This name is also spelled Ikmipus and was 
originally French, Bompasse. He married 
(second) at Sharon, November 9, 1758, Sarah, 
daughter of John Bates. She was born at 
Sharon, the first white female and second child 
born in the town of Sharon. John Randall 
lived on the farm now owned by William S. 
Marsh a little south of Jewell's Falls. He 
died in Sharon, May 19, 1807, aged eighty- 
one years. He settled in Sharon about 1753. 
Children of first wife : David, born at Roch- 
ester, December 20, 1750; John; Rebecca, born 
at Rochester, August 7, 1753; Lois, married, 
February 15, 1789, George Noney, of Kent; 
Hannah, March 6, 1755. Children, born at 
Sharon, by second wife : Zilpah, November 
30, 1759; Job, October 4, 1760, mentioned be- 
low; Seth, April 8, 1764; Solomon, March 16, 
1766; Sarah, December 27, 1767; Sylvester, 
baptized August 25, 1782, not in infancy prob- 
ably. 

(V) Job (2), son of John (2) Randall, was 
born at Sharon, Connecticut, October 4, 1760, 
and settled in Kent, Connecticut. According 
to the census of 1790 he had in his family two 
females. Children, the order of whose birth 



is not known : Cvnthia, married 



Ben- 



son ; Amanda, removed to Maine ; Flora, mar- 
ried David Chamberlain ; Betsey, married 
Marshall ; C)live, married Rufus Cham- 
berlain ; Walter, lived in Kent; Hiram, men- 
tioned below. 

(\ T) Hiram, son of Job (2) Randall, was 
born in Connecticut, died at Se}-mour, De- 
cember 14, 1833, aged twenty-eight. He mar- 
ried. January 4, 1829 (by Rev. J. Smith) 
Sally Pritchard. They lived at Seymour, Con- 
necticut. Leverett Pritchard, father of Sally, 
died on shipboard during the revolutionary 
war. The only child of Hiram and Sally Ran- 
dall was Hiram \\'., mentioned below. 

(\TI) Hiram W., only child of Hiram Ran- 
dall, was born at Bridgeport, Connecticut, Sep- 
temlier 9, 1830. His father died when he was 
an infant and he was brought up by his wid- 
owed mother, and educated in the public 
schools. He began his business life as clerk 
in the general store of Lucius Tuttle. He was 
industrious, economical and far-sighted, and 
before many years was able to buy out his 
employer. He was eminently successful and 
became one of the substantial citizens of Se}'- 
monr, keen, sagacious, enterprising and thor- 
oughly upright in all his dealings. He was 
reputed to be one of the shrewdest buyers 
in the Naugatuck Valley and his trade grew 
to large proportions. He was public-spirited 
and popular, and for more than a quarter of a 
century was the most prosperous dealer in this 
section. He died at the age of fifty-six, Jan- 
uary 25, 1887, at Hartford, interment was at 
Seymour. During his last years he traveled 
extensivel}', having retired on account of fail- 
ing health. In politics he was a Democrat. 
He married, April 4, 1854, Martha Marie Gil- 
bert, born March 28, 1833, daughter of Ezekiel 
and Sarah (Hurd) Gilbert. She was born in 
the old house erected by General Humphrey, 
of revolutionary fame, and bought by her 
father. She came of a distinguished lineage. 
Her grandfather, Thomas Gilbert, served in 
the revolutionary army where he fell ill of 
smallpox and though he recovered his health 
lost his sight ; his home was at Huntington, 
Comiecticut. and later at Derby, where he died 
at the age of ninety years ; his wife, Abigail 
(Holbrook) Gilbert, was daughter of a revo- 
lutionary soldier ; she also lived to the age of 
ninety ; they had eight children. Ezekiel Gil- 
bert, father of Mrs. Randall, was born and 
brought up in Huntington, working on his 
father's farm and attending the district schools 
during his boyhood. In 1830 Mr. Gilbert re- 
moved to Se\mour, Connecticut, where for 
several years he was engaged in trade. He 
established his son in business in New Haven 



CONNECTICUT 



1839 



and rcturiK'd td Si-yniour when.' he ilifil in 
his fifty-sixth year. .Mr. (lilhcrt married 
Sarah, dauijiitcr of Wilson liurd, of L)Nford, 
Connecticut, w here .'he was born : she died at 
Great Hill. Wilson Hurd was also a soldier 
in the revolution and was a prominent citizen, 
a selectman of the town and representative to 
the general asscmlily. Iloth Air. Gilbert and 
his wife were members of the Episcopal 
church. 

Airs. Randall had sisters: Esther A. Stod- 
dard: Catherine, wife of Alinot F. Osborne; 
Sarah ^^'ilcox, and Charlotte Osborne. Mrs, 
Randall was a communicant of Trinity Protes- 
ant Episcopal Church in Seymour, a member 
of Sarah Ludlow Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, of Seymour, and for 
many years a member of the Woman's Club 
of that town. 

Children of Hiram \\'. Randall : i. Edward 
Hiram, born December 23, 1855, educated in 
the public schools and Cheshire Academy, em- 
ployed in his father's store several years, later 
with the Shelton Plate Company, of Shelton : 
married Elizabeth Steinmetz, a native of New 
York City, and they have children : Kate 
and Hiram : the}- live in Seymour. 2. Kate 
Gilbert, born Alay 9. 1859, died June 24, 1871. 
3. Walter, born October 12, 1863, died Novem- 
ber 15, 1863. 4. Walter, born December 9, 
1868, mentioned below. 5. Gilbert, July 2, 
1873, graduate of the Norwalk Military In- 
stitute, pressman for Price, Lee & Company, 
of New Haven. 

(Mil) Walter, son of Hiram W. Randall, 
was born at Oxford, Connecticut, December 9, 
1868. He attended the public schools of his 
native town and graduated from the high 
school there. He also took a course in the 
Yale Business College, New Haven. He 
worked for a few years in his father's store, 
then became connected with the Silver Plate 
Cutlery Company of Derby, Connecticut. He 
left the cutlery business to become bookkeeper 
for the Whitlock Machine Company, manu- 
facturers of printing presses at Derby, Con- 
necticut. He is now secretary of the H. P. & 
E. Day Company of Seymour, Connecticut. 
He and his family are Episcopalians in religion 
and attend the church at Shelton, where they 
reside. Mr. Randall is a member of the Coun- 
try Club of New Haven and of the Quinni- 
piack Club of that city. 

He married Olive Vouletti Whitlock, born 
March 5, 1870, daughter of H. Sturges Wliit- 
lock, who was one of the founders of the 
\Miitlock Machine Company and the inventor 
of the Whitlock Printing Press. Her mother, 
Mary Olive (Singer) Whitlock, was a daugh- 
ter of the inventor of the Singer sewing ma- 



chine, the niost perfect sewing machine yet 
in\-ented. Mrs. Randall was granddaughter of 
John and Alary .-Vnn (Selleck) Whitlock, and 
on the maternal side of Isaac Alerritt and 
Alary Ann (Sponsella) Singer. Airs. Ran- 
dall's only sister was Alary Lillian Whitlock, 
who niarried Alton T. Terrell. Air. and Mrs. 
Randall have one child, Olive Whitlock, born 
at Derby, December 31, 1897. 



Dr. \\'illiam Bradley Coley, the 
COLEY eminent surgeon of New York 
City, who has earned a world- 
wide reputation by his successful researches 
in various branches of medical and surgical 
practice, is a descendant, in both maternal and 
paternal lines, from the early settlers of this 
country, and is eligible to membership in the 
Sons of the American Revolution. The family 
name was formerly spelled Coole as well as 
Coley. 

(I) Samuel Coley, his ancestor, came to the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony in 163 1, and was 
one of the fortv-four original planters who 
settled in Alilford in 1639; and died there in 
1690. He married, 1640, Ann, daughter of 
James Prudden. Children: i. Peter, see for- 
ward. 2. Abilene, born Alarch 12, 1643, died 
November 17, 1710; she married, July 22, 
1664, Japhat Chapin, of Springfield, born 1642, 
died February 20, 1712; children: Samuel, 
born July 4, 1665; Sarah, March 15, 1668; 
Thomas, May 20, 1671 : John; Ebenezer ; 
Daniel ; Jonathan. 3. Samuel, born Feb- 
ruary, 1646; married, October 21, 1699, 
Alary Carles, baptized November 28, 1703; 
children : i. Daniel, baptized January 2, 1695 ; 
ii. Esther, baptized January 2, 1695 ; iii. 
Alary, baptized January 4, 1684 ; iv. Sam- 
uel, baptized December 5, 1703 ; v. John, 
baptized March 19, 1706, died June 6, 
1775; he married, July 22, 1728, Mary, 
died January 29, 1773, daughter of Benjamin 
Gregory; children: a. Alary, born August 13, 
1732, married John Dikeman ; b. Lois, born 
January 17, 1736, married Jonathan Taylor; 
c. John, Jr., born December 31, 1738, mar- 
ried, April 7, 1 761, Anna, born November 
10, 1736, daughter of Edmond and Mary 
(Gilbert) Ogden : children: John, married Eu- 
nice Alorehouse ; Peleg ; Anna ; Rhoda. vi. 
Ann, baptized .August i, 1709, married, Janu- 
ary 21, 1729-30, John Kellogg, who died April 
17, 1740; children: Ezra, born April 3, 1731; 
Alary, January 22, 1732-33 ; Ann, Alarch 16, 
1734-35: John, May 25, 1737; Seth, February 
8, 1739-40. vii. Abigail, viii. Jetnima, mar- 
ried King. 4. Sarah, baptized Sep- 
tember 24, 1647, fiied 1689: married Joseph, 
baptized March 23, 1644, died November 21, 



1840 



CONNECTICUT 



1681, son of Joseph and Hannah Baldwin. 5. 
Mary, baptized November 2^, 1651, married 
(first) Peter Stimpson, who died in 1685 ; 
(second) John, Jr., who died in 1689, son of 
John Streme. 6. Hannah, baptized October 
8, 1654, married, April 10, 1673, Joseph Garn- 
sey, and had : Joseph, born 1675 ; Sarah, 
1678. 7. Thomas, baptized April 20, 1657, 
married Alartha, daughter of John Streme, 
and had: Thomas, baptized April 8, 1696; 
Samuel, baptized November i, 1702, died Feb- 
ruary 6, 1703-04. 

(H) Peter, eldest child of Samuel and Ann 
(Prudden) Coley, was born about 1640-41, 
baptized April 25, 1641, and died 1690. He 
married Sarah, daughter of Humphrey Hide 
(Hyde). Children: i. Samuel. 2. Sarah. 
3. Peter, see forward. 4. Ann, born January 
13' 1673. 5. Mary, born April 23, 1677, mar- 
ried Nicholas Johnson. 6. Elizabeth, born 
December i, 1680. 7. Hannah. 

(HI) Sergeant Peter (2) Coley, second 
son and third child of Peter (i) and Sarah 
(Hide) Coley, was born June 12, 167 1. He 
married Hannah, daughter of Simon Couch. 
Children: i. Hannah, baptized August 4, 
1700, married Jonathan Beebe. 2. Peter, bap- 
tized .August 30, 1702. 3. Simon, baptized 
January 30, 1703-04. 4. Phebe. 5. Elizabeth, 
baptized ]\Iarch 24, 1706, married Jeremiah 
Jennings, and had : Elizabeth, born October 
25, 1727; Mary, August 21, 1730; Hezekiah, 
October i, 1733; Ruth, November 13, 1735; 
Sarah, July 26, 1738; Jeremiah, September 14, 
1740; Peter, June 12, 1743; Hannah, IMay 20, 
1745. ^- Andrew, baptized July 25, 1708. 7. 
Ebenezer, baptized October 10, 1710. 8. Eb- 
enezer, baptized March 4, 1712. 9. David, see 
forward. 10. Jonathan, born 1717, died March 
13, 1810; married, December 6, 1739, Lucy, 
born 1718, died January 29, 1795. daughter 
of John Sturges ; children: i. Hannah, born 
May 5, 1741, married Robert Downes. ii. 
Sarah, born June 8, 1743. iii. Ann, born No- 
vember 17, 1745. iv. Ellen, born July 17, 

1748, married Stetson, v. Lucy, born 

January 26, 175 1, married Bradley. 

vi. Jonathan, Jr., born September 21, 1754, 
died ]\Iarch 18, 1837: married, Jime 28, 1781, 
Betty Guilbert, born 1760, died February 18, 
1833, and had: a. Sturges, who married, Sep- 
tember 24, 1808, Abigail, born .\pril 25, 
1782, daughter of Lieutenant James Chap- 
man, and had : Abbey, married William 
Holmes ; Eliza ; Mary, married Theodore Cur- 
tis; Lucy, married Benjamin Wheeler: Sarah, 

married Turner: William: Munson : 

Gould, married Cornelia TIammonfl ; John 
Chapman, married Scribner. b. Sam- 
uel, married Abigail, daughter of Thomas 



Whitlock, and had: Bradley; Lucy, married 
Edward Lineburgh ; Sally, married James 
Mitchell; Eliza, married William Lineburgh; 

Emeline, married Allen : Samuel ; 

Burr. c. Gilbert, married Sarah Bunnell, 
born 1794, died June 2, 1835. d. Bailey Still- 
son, born 1793, died May 12, 1830: married 
Sarah (Bunnell) Coley, widow of his brother 
Gilbert, and had: Betsey: Giles, died April i, 
1830 ; Jarvis, twin of Giles, died May 12, 1830 ; 
Levi, born July 4, 1819, died July 16, 1891, 
married, September 26, 1841, Clarissa Whee- 
ler, daughter of John Gray, and had : Frances 
Gertrude, Elisia Burr, Julia Esther, Carrie 
Louisa and Helen G. : Mary, married j\Iay 28, 
1846, Burr French, and had: Emeline, who 
married Burr Adams ; Lloyd, married, April 
24, 1853, Catharine, daughter of Nelson Sher- 
man, e. Jonathan, born July 9, 1797, died 
April 9, 1832; married, February 25, 1823, 
Orra, born April 8, 1802, died March 11, 
1864, daughter of Hezekiah, Jr., and Anna 
(Burr) Coley. vii. Daniel, born May 24, 
1759, married, September 4, 1774, Anna 
Morehouse (?). 11. Mary, baptized June 18, 
1721. 

( IV ) David, sixth son antl ninth child of 
Sergeant Peter (2) and Hannah (Couch) 
Coley, was born January 29, 171 5, died June 
23, 1802. 

He married, December 16, 1740, Mary, 
who died February 11, 1783, .daughter 
of Deacon John Hyde. Children: i. Eben- 
ezer, see forward. 2. David, Jr., born July 
29, 1743, died August 29, 1819; married, 
June 29, 1786, Lydia Sturgess, born Octo- 
ber 12, 1755, died August 16^ 1823; children; 
i. Rachel, born April 16, 1787, died ]\Iarch 19, 
18 19, married Samuel Rowland, ii. Mary 
Hyde, born 1790, died March 26, 1871, mar- 
ried, December 10, 181 1, Levi, son of Captain 
Ebenezer and Abigail (Morehouse) Coley 
(see forward). 3. Rachel, born ]\larch 18, 
1746, married, April 9, 1767, Oliver, ba]5tized 
September 20, 1741, son of Ephraim and Eliz- 
abeth (j\Iix) Sanford, and had: Mary, bap- 
tized July 31, 1768; David, baptized August 
20, 1769: Ephraim, Jr., baptized Septenilier 15, 
1771 : -Abigail, baptized ]\Iay 29, 1774; Enoch 
A., baptized April 28, 1776; Levi, baptized 
December 14, 1777 ; Oliver C. ; Abigail ; Mary ; 
Betsey; Loraine. 4. Mary, born March 2, 
1756, married, June 27, 1775, Enoch Betts, 
and had: Elias, born May 10, 1776; Mary, 
;May 19, 1780; David, February 13 or 18, 
1782; Enoch, born June 5, 1785, died October 
22, 1786; Enoch, born July 29, 1787, died De- 
cember 31, 1787; Calvin, horn November 28, 
17S8: Isaiah, March 6, 1791. 5. .Abigail, born 
-April 29, 1758, married, December iCi, 1781, 



COXXECTICUT 



iS4r 



William Prince, and hail: Uavid, Charles, Jo- 
seph and James. 

(V) Captain Ebenezer Colcy, eldest child 
of David and Alary (Hyde) Coley, was born 
October 19, 1741, died November 2, 181 1. 
He married (tirst) August 11, 1763, Abigail, 
born .March 21 1744, died February 3, 1797, 
daughter of Lieutenant Samuel Morehouse. 
He was captain of the militia prior to the rev- 
olution, and corporal during the revolution- 
ary struggle. lie 'married (second) Marck 
23, 1798, Mary Gedfre_\-, born 1746, died Sep- 
tember 25, 1825. Children, all by first mar- 
riage: I. Abigail, born July 4, 1764, died 
April 14, 181 1 : married Shubael Gorham, and 
had : Sophia, Charlotte and Shubael. 2. More- 
house, see forward. 3. Ebenezer, Jr., born 
January 17, 1768, died November 11,. 1823; 
married, July 2, 1790, Rachel, born 1768, died 
March 9, 1816, daughter of John Goodsell ; 
children: i. Walter, born October 11, 1791, 
died September 5, 1858; married (first), No- 
vember 24. 1816, Anne, born October 10, 1796, 
died October i, 1829, daughter of Nathaniel 
and Mercy (Coley) Wakeman, and had: a. 
Rachel, born October 7, 1817, died April 3, 
1887 : married, November 7, 1840, Benjamin, 
son of William Bradley, and had : Edward, 
Sarah, Joseph and Arthur, b. Sally Wake- 
man, born August 30. 1820, married, February 
2, 1842, Jonas D. Hill, and had: Walter, Lu- 
cretia, Josephine and Ada. c. Wakeman, 
born February 20, 1823, died May 13, 1823. 
d. Mary Ann, born August 15, 1824. died 
July 10, 1826. Walter Coley married (sec- 
ond) November 4, 1834, Orra, daughter of 
Hezekiah, Jr.. and .'Vnna (Burr) Coley, and 
widow of Jonathan Coley, mentioned hereinbe- 
fore. Children: e. Walter, Jr., born Septem- 
ber 9. 1835. f. Alercy Ann, born December 
16, 1836, married Jarvis Taylor, g. Ebenezer, 
born April 26, 1838, died October 10, 1887, 
married. May 14. 1861, Eleanor O., daughter 
of Samuel and Eleanor (Fillow) Gregory; 
children: Stanton, born December 17. 1864, 
married, May i, 1890, Susan M., daughter of 
John W. Hubble : Chester Ebenezer, born De- 
cember I, 1874. h. Samuel Morehouse, born 
May 2. 1839, married, December 16, 1862, 
Sarah E., daughter of Harry Nash, and had : 
Willis, born July 16, 1864: Elouise. born Sep- 
tember 29, 1865, married, June 9, 1882, Wil- 
liam Welsh ; Florence Elizabeth, born Au- 
gust 26, 1875, married, January, 1895, Her- 
bert E. Bates, i. Henry Burr, born April 27, 
1848, married Helen A. Seymour, and had : 
Alice Burr, born August 14, 1869, married, 
October 8, 1890, William Kirk ; Florence 
Henrietta, born October 26, 1873, married, 
April, 1894, John Whitlock ; Infant, born 



b'ebruary 9, 1875, died 1875; Bertha Sey- 
mour, born July 16, 1877, married, October 
6, 1897, Oliver Henry Jennings, ii. David, 
born November 4, 1794, died 1864; married 
Sally, born 1807, died 1856, daughter of 
James Nash; children: Mary, born 1827, died 
.Vugust 19, 1852; Anna, born 1829, died May 
if'i, 1886; Ebenezer, died I'ebruary, 1883; Da- 
vid; Sarah Elizabeth. iii. Ebenezer, born 
July I, 1796, died July 6, 1796. iv. Samuel 
Morehouse, born January 19, 1804, died Jan- 
uary 21, 1883; married (first) November 29, 
1830, Alethea, born October 6, 1805, died 
March 12, 1835, daughter of Taylor and Bet- 
ty (Bennett) Hurlbutt; children: a. Rev. 
James Edward, born October 11, 1832, mar- 
ried. May 29, i860, Mary Gray, born Febru- 
ary 22, 1836, daughter of Rev. Enoch and 
Charlotte (Taylor) Huntington; children: 
Edward Huntington, married Julia Seely, 
daughter of Silas and Mary Elizabeth Co- 
vell, and had : Marjory Covell and Elizabeth 
Huntington : Mary Pearsall, married William 
Gray, son of Captain William C. and .\nne 
(Sankey) Staples, and had: Horace, Horace 
^VilIiam, Mary Coley. Frank Huntington and 
Helen Huntington ; Francis Chase, married 
Cornelia Kelsey, daughter of Ambrose Spen- 
cer and Cornelia (Kelsey) Hurlbut. b. Sarah, 
born and died in September, 1834. Samuel 
Morehouse Coley married (second) Laura 
Dugas, born 1831, died December 7, 18S2, 
and had : Charles Goodsell, died October 18, 
1854. 4. Samuel, born June 6, 1770, died De- 
cember 30, 1850; married, June 23. 1791, Rhu- 
amah. born October 18, 1770, died September 
II, 1855, daughter of Eliphalet and Eunice 
(Bradley) Coley: children: i. John, born 
March 2, 1798, died October 10, 1S22. ii. 
Samuel, died April 12, 1835. iii. F^liphalet, 
twin of Samuel, died April 12, 1835. iv. Ed- 
son, married Jane Brittain, and had : John 
Brittain and Sarah Jane. 5. Michael, born 
September 6, 1772, died December 17, 1807; 
married, July 13, 1793, Eunice, born 1776. 
died September 22, 1805, daughter of John 
and Abigail Hyde ; children : i. John Hyde, 
born October 16, 1796, died December 2, 
1865: married Matilda Beach, and had: a. 
Mary, horn April 27, 1820, died December 
27, 1898 ; married Oliver S. Carter, b. Ju- 
lia W., born February 22, 1826, died January 
2, 1892; married Henry G. Lewis, and had: 
Matilda Colev and Josephine Mites, c. A son, 
born May, 1832, died July 15, 1833. d. Wil- 
liam B., born 1834, died November 11, 1864. 
e. John Hyde, Jr., married Matilda Everett, 
ii. David, born August 16, 1799, died April 
9, 1872; married, January 6, 1819, Mary Ann, 
born November 22, 1799, died February 15 



I«42 



CONNECTICUT 



1867, daughter of Aaron and Huldah Burr ; 
children : a. Abigail Hyde, born x^ugust 24, 
1820, married, December 17, 1838, Talcott, 
who died January 18, 1888, son of Banks and 
Abigail (Jennings) Wakeman; children: 
Mary Ellen, born May 11, 1840; Juha Coley, 
June 2, 1 85 1, b. John Hyde, born June 30, 
1822, married, October 19, 1848, Harriet 
Philips, c. Mary Burr, born September 25, 
1824, married William Hill, and had : Mary, 
born November 4, 1842; John, born Septem- 
ber 12, 1845 ; Harriet, d. Aaron Burr, born 
April 16. 1826, married, November 14, 1853, 
Harriet Spivey. e. Eunice, born July 13, 
1830, died October 14, 1858. f. Rachel, born 
January 9, died January 23, 1832. g. Rachel 
Hyde, born January 25, 1833, married, No- 
vember 14, 1853, Henry Grove, son of Allen 
and Lucy (Hotchkiss) Birge, and had: Ed- 
ward Coley, born October 18, 1855. h. Eliz- 
abeth, born September 10, 1836, died August 
4, 1868. i. Margaret, born July 26, 1838, died 
January 21, 1878. 6. Mary, born September 
9, 1774, died August 19, 1775. 7. Levi, born 
1778, died November 20, 1859; married, De- 
cember 10, 181 1, Mary Hyde, born 1790, died 
March 26, 1871, daughter of David, Jr., and 
Lydia (Sturges) Coley, and had: i. Mary 
Ann, born 1813, died April 3, 1834. ii. Da- 
vid Levi, born October '13, 1815, married 
Catharine, born August 22, 1819, died April 
13, 1889, daughter of Eben Sherwood, and 
had: a. Frederick, born July 11, 1845. b. 
Catharine S., born November 20. 1846, died 
April 6, 1849. c. Julia F., born July 11, 1848, 
died March 20, 1849. d. Katie E., born 
March 16, 1850. e. Julia Dimon, born No- 
vember 12, 1851, died 1897; married Fred- 
erick Sherwood, and had: Ralph Coley, born 
April 17, 1881. f. Maria L., born August 8, 
1854. g. Mary Andrews, born January 10, 
1856, died December 3, 1867. h. David L., 
Jr., born November 29, 1858, married Clara, 
daughter of Frederick and Jane Sherwood, 
and had a son, born February 4, 1894. iii. 
Levi David, born May 5, 18 18, died November 
25, 1874; married Sarah M., daughter of 
Ward Nichols, and had: a. Mary Ann, born 
September 20, 1845, married Cornelius, son 
of William J. and Jane A. Finch, b. Fran- 
cis William, born September 23, 1848, mar- 
ried, December 24, 1875, Minnie H. Tall- 
man, who died December 25, 1881, and had: 
Clarence Tallman and Maria L. c. Caroline 
C., born August 30, 1851, died December 8, 
1881 ; married, December 14, 1871, Charles 
G. Porter, and had : Charles R., born Sep- 
tember 30, 1872. d. Sarah J., born June 13, 
1854. e. Anna M., born June 4. 1856. f. 
William Francis, born May 4, 1859, married. 



January 26, 1881, Harriet, daughter of Henry 
L Hoyt, and had : William F., Jr., born De- 
cember II, 1883, died January 4, 1884; Henry 
L, born March 13, 1884, died March 30, 
1885. iv. Ebenezer, born 1821, died Novem- 
ber 27, 1852 ; married Jane, born February 2, 
1825, died July 27, 1859, daughter of Isaac 
Sturges, and had : a. Agnes Hope, married, 
February 25, 1879, Henry A. Thomson, and 
had: George, born March i, 1880; William 
Albro, born February 7, 1885. b. Jane Fran- 
ces, married Frank Weston, v. Frederick, 
born November i, 1825, died August 30. 1855 ; 
married, April 25, 1849, Harriet Banks, and 

had : Ella, married Smith ; Fanny, 

married Provost. vi. Frances M., 

twin of Frederick, died March 19, 1858; 
married, November 6, 1848, William Lansing. 

8. Mary, born 1780, married Abraham Ba- 
ker, and had : Ebenezer, Abraham, Mary and 
Sophia. 9. Hyde, born December 6. 1786, 
died May 15, 1789. 

(VI) Morehouse, eldest son and second 
child of Captain Ebenezer and Abigail (More- 
house) Coley, was born February 6, 1766, 
died October 6, 1843. He married, February 
17, 1789, Abigail, born March 6, 1767, died 
January 4, 1838, daughter of Jonathan and 
Sarah (Ogden) Ogden. Children: i. John 
Hyde, born May 11, 1790, died May 11, 1834; 
married, February 10, 1819, Hannah Downes, 
born November 12, 1793, died May 21, 1871 ; 
children: i. Morehouse, born August 15, 
1S20, died January 30, 1863; married, Sep- 
tember 21, 1846, Mary, born June 6, 1820, 
daughter of Robert Holden, and had : a. Mar- 
cellus, born July 27, 1847, died September 12, 
1852. b. Robert Hyde, born April i, 1851, 
married, April 28, 1874, Emily Amelia, 
daughter of Daniel B. Bradley, and had : 
Lulu May, born September 3, 1877. ii. John, 
born February 5, 1823, died September 19, 
1854. iii. Harriet Bradley, born April 30, 
1824, married. May 28. 1848, Eliphalet C., 
son of Solomon Gray, and had : a. Anne A., 
born September 21, 1850, married William H., 
son of Daniel B. Bradley, b. Maurice, born 
October 7, 1854, died November 25, 1874. iv. 
Samuel Burr, born December 5, 1826, died 
November 22, 1885. v. Mary A., born April 
14, 1829, died March 31, 1832. vi. Mary A., 
born January 7, 1833. died 1874 : married 
Erastus Green. 2. Abigail, born November 

9, 1791, died August 2, 1867; married John, 
who died December 21, 1875, son of John 
Gray : children : i. Mary Morehouse, born 
October 22, 1817, married Thomas Goodsell. 
ii. Deborah Ann, born May 16, 1821, mar- 
ried. May 22, 1842, Lewis Bradley, iii. Eliza 
Hull, born August 6, 1834, married, Septem- 




C^yCy c-£.,^--c<e>'^'^'-t^ /3 . 




CONNECTICUT 



1843 



bcr 14, 1859, Henry M. Slierwood. 3. Lan- 
son, born August, 1795, died January 3, 1876; 
married (first) 1823, Sally, born September 
24, 1795. died August 4, 1845, <Iaughter of 
Robert Downes ; chiklren : i. Polly Morehouse, 
born April 2, 1825, died December 26, 1898; 
married, October 16, 1844, George S., son 
of Jabez and Anna Adams, and had : a. 
George E., born October 8, 1845, died April 
9, 1857. b. William, born March 11, 1847, 
died ^lay 29, 1848. c. Sarah Georgiana, born 
August 19, 1849, died March 6, 1855. d. 
Emma Jane, born April 27, 185 1, married, 
January 21, 1874, Maurice Wakeman. e. 
Frank Herbert, born 1853, died June 8, 1856. 
f. Arthur Richards, born December 20, 1855, 
died January 7, 1856. g. Jessie Catharine, 
born November 5, 1856, married Joseph W. 
Hill. h. Infant, born and died 1858. i. John 
Lanson, born August 9, i860, j. Charles 
Francis, born March 3, 1864. k. Infant, 
born March 28, 1866, died 1866. 1. Henry 
Frederick, born June 23, 1867. ii. William 
Lanson, born November 14, 1826, married, 
November 17 or 19, 1855, Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Robert Holden, and had : a. William 
H., born September 8, 1856, died August 19, 
1863. b. ;\Iiriam, married, April 22, 1896, 
John Allen Birge. c. John Lanson, born Oc- 
tober 3, 1869. iii. Abigail Jane, born Octo- 
ber 16, 1838, married, May 16, i860, Henry 
A., born September 29, 1831, son of John 
Hyde and Abby (Sherwood) Ogden, and 
had: Harold Hyde, born February i, 1861. 
Lanson Coley married (second) August 30, 
1848s Emily, daughter of Daniel Sanford, 
and had: iv. Sarah Abiah, born March, 1851, 
died April 27, 1890 ; married, December 29, 
1875, Daniel Burr, son of Daniel Burr Brad- 
ley, and had : Herbert Sanford, born De- 
cember 16, 1877, died May 14, 1883. 4. Mary, 
born August 12, 1798, died November 4, 1824. 
5. William, see forward. 6. Jonathan Ogden, 
baptized June 10, 1800. 

(VII) William, third son and fifth child of 
Morehouse and Abigail (Ogden) Coley, was 
born April 30, 1799, died April 13, 1886. He 
married Eunice, born November 19, 1798, died 
September 19, 1851, daughter of Silliman and 
Mary (Coley) Fanton. Children: i. Hor- 
ace ijradley, see forward. 2. Chauncey, born 
March 18, 1836, died August 6, 1873 ; mar- 
ried Susan A. Bradley, and had : Virginia 
E., born October i, 1859, died March 4, 1884; 
married Horace A. Morehouse. 

(VIII) Horace Bradley, eldest child of 
William and Eunice (Fanton) Coley, was 
born June 29, 1829. He married (first) Jan- 
uary 5, 1852, Polly Sophia Wakeman : child, 
Henry Bradley. He married (second) Cla- 



rina Bradley Wakeman (see Wakeman \TII 
and IX). Children: i. Carrie E., born De- 
cember 5,- 1859, died February 22, 1892; mar- 
ried, September 5, 1889, Dr. Frank Gorham. 
2. William Bradley, see forward. He married 
(third) October 13, 1863, Abbey A., who died 
November 28, 1879, daughter of Solomon 
Gray. Children : 3. Henry Wakeman, born 
January 8, 1867. 4. Abby H., born May 21, 
1870, died April 4, 1889. 5. Mary, died 
March 8, 1889. 6. Horace Bradley, Jr., born 
November 3, 1874, died March 12, 1876. He 
married (fourth) Ellen A., daughter of Sol- 
omon Gray. 

(IX) Dr. William Bradley Coley, second 
child and only son of Horace Bradley and 
Clarina Bradley (Wakeman) Coley, was born 
in Westport, Connecticut, January 12, 1862. 
His early education was accjuired in his native 
town at the private school of Rev. James E. 
Coley, and from thence he went to the Easton 
Academy. He then matriculated at Yale Uni- 
versity, in 1880, from which he was gradu- 
ated in the class of 1884 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. He was engaged as senior 
master at the Bishop Scott grammar school 
at Portland, Oregon, for the next two years, 
then entered the Harvard Medical School, be- 
ing graduated from that institution in 1888 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. The 
New York Hospital was the scene of his next 
activities, and he served as interne at that in- 
stitution for two years, on the surgical serv- 
ices of Dr. Robert F. Weir and Dr. William 
T. Bull. He was instructor in surgery at 
the New York Post-Graduate Medical School 
from 1891 to 1897; clinical lecturer ai the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, 1897 to 
1907; was then appointed associate in sur- 
gery, which position he held until 1909, when 
he was appointed professor of clinical sur- 
gery at Cornell University Medical School, 
of New York City. Dr. Coley is chairman 
of the Collis P. Huntington Cancer Research 
Fund in connection with the General Memo- 
rial Hospital, at which he has been attend- 
ing surgeon for twenty years ; he is also at- 
tending surgeon at the Hospital for the Rup- 
tured and (Zrippled. June 22, 1910, the hon- 
orary degree of Master of Arts was conferred 
upon him by Yale University, in recognition 
of his eminent services in medical and surgical 
scientific research. He is equally honored at 
Harvard University, for which institution he 
was instrumental in securing a large endow- 
ment. On June 26, 1911, he received the 
honorary degree of Master of Arts from Har- 
vard. The" discoveries which his careful 
investigations have enabled him to make 
have earned for him a world-wide reputation, 



1 844 



COXXECTICUT 



and, in July, 1909, he was invited to give an 
address upon The Treatment of Inoperable 
Sarcoma (cancer) by Bacterial Toxins before 
the Surgical Section of the Ro^al Society 
of Medicine in London, a method of treatment 
original with himself. He has written a 
number of monographs on abdominal sur- 
gery and malignant tumors, and other sub- 
jects, and these have been published in the 
leading medical journals. When his first pa- 
per upon the radical cure of hernia in chil- 
dren appeared, 1893, a number of surgeons 
upheld the opinion that in children there 
should never be an operation for this trouble, 
as it could be cured by mechanical means 
alone. Dr. Coley replied to this criticism by 
making an analysis of fifteen thousand cases 
of hernia observed at the Hosi)ital for Rup- 
tured and Crippled in adults, in order to as- 
certain as nearly as possible the number which 
gave a history of hernia in infancy and child- 
hood. The careful study given to these cases 
developed the fact that at least one-third of 
those under fourteen years of age, who suf- 
fered from inguinal hernia, were not cured 
by mechanical treatment, therefore, operative 
methods which were free from risks were well 
justified. In a short time his views were fully 
accepted. 

The limits of this article will not permit 
a full list of the writings of Dr. Coley, but 
among the large number are the following: 
"Operative Treatment of Hernia in Children," 
1893 : "The Influence of Injury upon the De- 
velopment of Sarcoma," 1898; "The Parasitic 
Origin of Cancer," 1893 ; "Treatment of Inop- 
erable ^Malignant Tumors with Toxins of Ery- 
sipelas and Bacillus Prodigiosus," 1893-1911; 
"The Disadvantages of Non-absorbable Sutures 
in Operations for the Radical Cure of Hernia," 
1896; "Acute Traumatic Malignancy," 1901 ; 
"The Influence of the Roentgen Rays upon 
Sarcoma," 1902 ; "Amputation at the Hip 
Joint for Sarcoma," 1903; "Bone Sarcoma," 
1908 : "Injury as a Causative Factor in Can- 
cer," 191 1. He is also the author, cojointly 
with the late Dr. ^^'illiam T. Bull, of the sec- 
tion on hernia in "Dennis System of Surgery" 
and "International Text P>ook of Surgery." 
He also wrote the part on hernia of Keen's 
"System of Surgery," recently published. 

The political affiliations of Dr. Coley are 
with the Republican party, and he is a mem- 
ber of the following-named organizations : 
New York Academy of Medicine; New York 
Surgical Society : New York Pathological So- 
ciety ; the University Club : Harvard and Yale 
clubs of New York ; the New York Hospital 
Alumni Association. He is entitled to mem- 
bershir in the Sons of the American Revolu- 



tion. He is a fellow of the American Surgical 
Association : also of the Southern Surgical 
and Gynecological Association ; a member of 
the State Medical Society, of the American 
iMedical Association, and of the Harvard 
Medical Society of 'New York, having served 
as president of the last named in 1902. He 
was president of the New York Hospital 
Alumni Association, 1910-11. He is also a 
Fellow of the American Academy of Science. 

Dr. Coley married, June 4, 189 1, Alice, 
born at Newton, Massachusetts, July 15, 1866, 
daughter of Charles Bartlett and Mary Eliz- 
abeth (Bracket) Lancaster, who were mar- 
ried in i860: ]\lrs. Lancaster was born at 
Newton, April 13, 1837, died December 2, 
1902. Mrs. Coley, by right of her descent, is 
entitled to membership in the Daughters of 
the American Revolution and in the May- 
flower Society. Children, born in New York_ 
City: I. Bradley Lancaster, December 23, 
1892. 2. Malcolm, November 29, 1896. died 
September 23, 1901. 3. Helen Lancaster, 
September 2, 1907. 

(The Wakeman Line). 

(I) Francis Wakeman, of Bewdley, 
Worcestershire, England, was the English an- 
cestor of this family, and died September 2, 
1626. He married at Eastham. England, now 
in Tenbury, Anne Goode, who died January 
29, 1621. Children: i. Mary, baptized 1591, 
married, Januar)- 14, 1622, John Woven, and 
had: Mary. 2. Sarah, married, April 30, 
1621, Richard Hubbell, and had: Richard. 3. 
Martha, died in New Haven. Connecticut, 
1664: married, November 30. 1621. in Bewd- 
ley, ^^'illiam Davis, who died 1659, and had: 
John, who died at sea in 1637 : Sarah, mar- 
ried William Russell, and had : Noadiah and 
Anna. 4. John, see forward. 5. Samuel, 
born in England, was killed at the Bahamas, 
1641 ; married Eliza , and had chil- 
dren : i. A son who died at sea in 163 1. ii. 
Eliza, married Joseph, born in England, died 
in Connecticut, son of John and Susanna 
.\rnold, and settled in Haddam, Connecticut; 
children: John, Joseph, Sanuiel, Susannah, 
Jonathan and Elizabeth, iii. Ezbon, died in 
1683. iv. Joanna, married Francis Hacleton, 
of Northampton and later of Hartford, v. 
Grace, married John Kelly. 6. Isaac, died 
April 14, 1609. 7. Joseph, baptized April 23, 
1609. 8. Anne, married Adam Nichols prior 
to 1645, 3'""^ had: John: Barachiah : .\nna ; 

Esther, who married Ellis : Lydia ; 

Sarah; Ebenezer. 9. Hester, married (first) 
Thomas Selden, and had : i. Thomas, mar- 
ried Feliz, daughter of William and Mary 
(Hopkins) Lewis, of Farmington. ii. John. 



CONNECTICL'T 



1845 



died May, 1650. iii. Alary, married John 
Taykir. iv. Esther, died 1(151. v. Joseph, 
married Rebecca, daughter of Ueacoii Ed- 
ward and Mary Church, vi. Hannah, died 
unmarried, 1695. vii. Esther, viii. Sarah. 
Mrs. Selden married (second) Andrew War- 
ner, and died at Hadley, Connecticut. 10. 
Priscilla, married Thomas Richards, and had : 
Mary and Thomas. 

(II) John, son of Francis and Anne 
(Goode) W'akeman, was born at Bewdley, 
England, about 1598-99, baptized March 21, 
1601, and died at Hartford, Connecticut, 
1661. He emigrated to this country in 1640, 
and held many important public offices in the 
colonies. He married, at Bewdley, January 
28, 1628-29, Elizabeth, baptized in Ribbes- 
ford Church, England, October 10, 1610, 
died at New Haven, Connecticut, 1658, 
daughter of ^^'illiam and Helen (Vickaris) 
Hopkins, who were married October 30, 1609. 
Children: i. John, baptized July 25, 1630, 
died January 19, 1636. 2. Hellena, baptized 
December 23, 1632. died June 22, 1674; mar- 
ried, October 29, 1650, Lieutenant-colonel 
John Talcott, who died July 23, 1688; chil- 
dren: i. John, born November 24, 1651. ii. 
John, born December 14, 1653, married Abi- 
gail Tibbals. iii. Elizabeth, born February 
21, 1655. iv. Samuel, born August 21, 1658, 
died April 4, 1661. v. Mary, born April 26, 
1661, died April 19, 1723; married, about 
1692, Richard Edwards, who was grandfa- 
ther, by his first wife, of Rev. Jonathan Ed- 
wards, vi. Hannah, born December 8, 1663, 
died ]\Iarch 28, 1696; married Lieutenant 
Governor Nathan Gold, Jr. vii. Dorothy, 
born February 20, 1666. viii. Governor Jo- 
seph, born November 16, 1669. ix. Hellena, 
born June 17, 1674. 3. Samuel, see forward. 
4. Elizabeth, baptized September 16. 1638, 
married, March 11, 1656-57, Samuel Kitchell, 
of Newark, New Jersey, born 1633, died April 
20, 1690; children: i. Sarah, born December 
9, 1657. ii. Elizabeth, born February i, 1659; 
married Seth, son of Michael Tompkins, of 
R'lilford, Connecticut, who harbored the 
judges of King Charles in his house, iii. 
Abigail, born August 10, 1661, married John 
Wood, of Newark, New Jersey, iv. Samuel. 
V. Mary, married Josiah Ward, of Newark, 
vi. Susanna, married Ensign Jonathan Bald- 
win, of Milford, Connecticut. Samuel Kitch- 
ell married (second) Grace Pierson. and had: 
Abraham and Grace. 

(Ill) Rev. Samuel Wakeman. second son 
and third child of John and Elizabeth (Hop- 
kins) ^^'akeman, was baptized June 7, 1635, 
died March 8. 1692. He was married in New 
Haven, Connecticut, August 28. 1656. by Gov- 



ernor Stephen Goodyear, to the hitter's daugh- 
ter IJannah, who married (second) Nathaniel 
r.urr, and died 1721. Children: i. Samuel, 
born October 12, 1657, died 1(391 ; married 
(first) Alary, daughter of Jehu Burr, and 
had: Mar)-, who died at the age of sixteen 
years. He married (second) Sarah, daugh- 
ter of John Knowles, and had : Sarah, born 
May 13, 1691, died November 28, .1710. His 
widow married (second) Dugald MacKenzie. 
2. Jolin, see forward. 3. Ebenezer, born 
1668, died 1690: was distinguished for his 
military service. 4. Joseph, born 1670, died 
December 5, 1726; held the rank of captain 
and left an estate of more than five thousand 
pounds : he married, 1697-98, Elizabeth, born 
May 6, 1679, died August 18, 1753, daughter 
of Ebenezer and Esther (Ward) Hawley, 
granddaughter of Ensign William and Debo- 
rah (Lockwood) Ward, and great-grand- 
daughter of Hon Andrew Ward. Children : 
i. Ebenezer, born January 10, 1699, died Sep- 
tember 25, 1726; married Sarah Sturges, and 
had : Ebenezer, born June 26, 1725, who was 
distinguished as justice and deputy in Fair- 
field, ii. Catherine, baptized April 27, 1700, 
died September 25, 1753 ; married, October 
18, 1722, John Burr, and had: Catherine, 
married Robert Wilson ; Sarah, married Dan- 
iel Silliman ; Ann, married Thomas Sher- 
wood ; John ; Deborah, married Ichabod 
Wheeler : Elizabeth, married Colonel Abra- 
ham Gold: I\Iary, married Ebenezer Bar- 
tram ; Justus ; Abigail ; Ozias ; Amos ; Wake- 
man, iii. Elizabeth, baptized April 19, 1702, 
died June 16, 1753: married Captain Samuel 
Burr, and had: Mehitable, married Joseph 
Squire : Seth, died unmarried ; Samuel : Dan- 
iel ; Ebenezer ; Nehemiah ; Ellen, married Cap- 
tain Abel Gold : Elizabeth, married Samuel 
Silliman : Charles. Captain Samuel Burr 
married (second) Ruth Bulkley. iv. Joseph, 
born 1703, died September 23, 1762; married 
Abigail, daughter of Gideon and Annah 
Burr Allen, and had : Ann, married Isaac 
Gorman : Joseph ; Mary, married John Haz- 
zard : Joseph : Abigail, married John, son of 
Joseph Gorham. v. Jabez, born 1705-06, died 
"October 10, 1774: married, June i, 1727, 
Ruth, daughter of Timothy and Sarah (Sher- 
wood) Treadwell, and had: Hannah Eliza- 
beth, married Stephen Hull : William, 'mar- 
ried Sarah, daughter of Joseph and Abigail 
(Dimon) Hill: Joseph: Sarah, married Sam- 
uel Bradley Jr.", of Greenfield Hill ; Jabez ; 
Joseph : Jabez : Mable. married George, son 
of Colonel Andrew and Sarah (Sturges) 
Burr : Peter, married Sarah Jennings : Eu- 
nice, married Lewis Goodsell : Timothy, mar- 
ried Anna, daughter of Rev. John Sherwood, 



1846 



CONNECTICUT 



of Stratfield, Connecticut ; Joel, married Ra- 
chel Thorp, vi. Samuel, baptized January 30, 
1709, died in infancy, vii. Mary, baptized 
July 23, 1710, died RJarch 19, 1743; married, 
August 4, 1736, William, son of Colonel John 
Burr, and had: William, who died in infancy, 
viii. Samuel, born 1713, died August 15, 1752; 
was ensign and lieutenant of the First Com- 
pany in Fairfield ; married Ruth , and 

had : Catherine, married Abraham Andrews ; 
Hannah, married Samuel Andrews ; Mary, 
married Isaac Tucker ; Andrew, was captain, 
and married (first) Hannah, daughter of Da- 
vid Allen, (second) Eunice, daughter of John 
and Eunice Smedley ; Elizabeth ; Elizabeth, 
married Colonel Jonathan Dimon. ix. Ste- 
phen, born 1716, died March 23, 1760; mar- 
ried, January 11, 1734, Mary, daughter of 
Stephen Adams, and had : Eunice, married 
Elihu Burritt, who served in the revolution ; 
Captain Stephen, married Mary, daughter of 
Nathaniel and Ann (Sillinian) Adams; Jes- 
sup, married Amelia, daughter of Nehemiah 
and Abigail (Bradley) Banks: Sarah, married 
Benjamin Banks, of Greenfield; Mary; Bet- 
sey, married Zalmon Bradley ; Mary, married 
Seth Sherwood. 5. Rev. Jabez, born 1678, 
died October 8, 1704; married, at Southamp- 
ton, Long Island, September 29, 1702, Eunice, 
daughter of Colonel Matthew Howell, and 
had: Samuel, born September 27. 1704, died 
in infancy. His widow married Governor 
Joseph Talcott. 6. Mary, married Michael 
Clugstone, and had : John, Samuel and Mary. 
7. Ann, married Abraham Howell, who was 
major of a regiment in Suffolk county. Long 
Island, in 1700. 8. Elizabeth, married Albert 
Denny, and had: i. John, married (first) 
Mary, daughter of John and Mary (Han- 
ford) Edwards, of Stratfield, Connecticut, and 
(second) Sarah, daughter of Rev. Joseph and 
Elizabeth (Nichols )" Webb, of Fairfield: he 
was the grandfather of William Hooper, one 
of the signers of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, and of Joseph Dennie, editor of the 
Portfolio, and author of "The Lay Preacher." 
ii. Grizzell, married Rev. Daniel Chapman, 
iii. Margaret, died young, iv. Annabel, died 
young, v. James, baptized March 14, 1702-03, 
married (first) Eunice , (second) Sar- 
ah , and had : Eunice, who married 

Thaddeus Burr ; Sarah, who married Rev. 
James Sayre. 

(IV) Captain John (2) Wakeman, second 
son and child of Rev. Samuel and Hannah 
(Goodyear) Wakeman, was born 1659, died 
February 15, 1709. He was captain of the 
train band in the east end of the town of 
Fairfield. He married, April 24, 1687, Mar- 
tha, who died June 5, 1710, daughter of Rich- 



ard and Elizabeth Hubbell. Children: i. 
Hellena, born August 24, 1689, died Febru- 
ary 12, 1710-11. 2. Ann, born March 24, 
1692. 3. Samuel, born February 24, 1693, 
died October 19, 1771 ; married Elizabeth, 
born 1695, died March 14, 1759, and had : 
i. Eleanor, baptized August 8, 1726. ii. Mo- 
ses, baptized August 8, 1726, died May 14, 
1764; married, August 21, 1745, Mary, 
daughter of John Goodsell, and had: Epa- 
phras, married Eunice, daughter of Ephraim 
Nichols ; Eliphalet, married Katherine, daugh- 
ter of William Bennett, of Weston, Connecti- 
cut : Elizabeth, married James Hill : ]\Iary, 

married Fitch, of Pennsylvania ; Sar- 

ali, married Elisha Thorp, of Easton, and re- 
moved to Nova Scotia ; Samuel, iii. Anne, 
baptized August 8, 1726, married Nathan 
Hubbell. iv. Elizabeth, baptized 1729. mar- 
ried, January 23, 1746, John Lyon, of Lanes- 
borough, Massachusetts, and had : Jabez, 
Thomas, John, Elizabeth and John. v. Sarah, 
baptized October 5, 1731, died January 18, 
1769: married, November 2, 1756, Gershom 
Hubbell. vi. Samuel, baptized !March 10, 
1734, died August 6, 1809; was lieutenant and 
captain of the Fourth Regiment : married, 
January 17, 1740, Mabel, daughter of Tim- 
othy and Sarah (Rowland) Burr; children: 
Lloyd, of Ballston Spa, New York, married 
Sarah Redfield ; Anne; Samuel, of Ballston 
Spa, married Caty Beach, of ^^'eston, Con- 
necticut ; Mable ; Ezekiel, of Ballston Spa, 
married Sarah, daughter of John Wheeler, of 
Weston, Connecticut ; Jesse ; Eleanor, mar- 
ried Judge Stephen Wheeler, of Weston, Con- 
necticut ; Sarah, married David Bradley, of 
Weston, Connecticut ; Jesse, married Eleanor, 
daughter of Epaphras Wakeman, of Green- 
field Hill, Connecticut. 4. Elizabeth, born 
June I, 1695, died 1737. 5. Martha, born 
September 24, 1700, married, in Stratfield, 
February 2, 1720-21, Israel, born 1693, died 
after 173 1, son of Rev. Charles Chauncey, and 
had : Sarah and Abigail. 6. Stephen, born 
October 15, 1702, died 1761-62; married, in 
Fairfield, Connecticut, April 28, 1727. Rebec- 
ca, baptized February 24, 1712, died 1762, 
daughter of Daniel Morehouse ; children : i. 
Sarah, born March 15, 1728, died June 11, 
1728. ii. David, baptized January 11, 1730, 
died January 13, 1813-14; married Mary E., 
daughter of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Coley) 
Jennings, of Faiiiield, Connecticut, and had: 
Jeremiah, married Phoebe, daughter of John 
Hendricks; Mary, married David Gilbert; 
Sarah, married Thomai^ Ludington, of Dutch- 
ess county. New York ; David, married Es- 
ther ; Eunice, married James Tread- 
well, iii. Daniel, born April 6, 1732, married 



CONNECTICUT 



1847 



Esther, daiislitcr of julni and Esther (Brad- 
ley) Hill, and liad : Sarali. iv. Eunice, horn 
January 3i', 1/35. ''i^-'d January 29, 17^)5 ; 
married Nathan, son of John and Esther 
(Bradley) Hill, and liad : Eunice, married 
Daniel Meeker; Aaron; Sarah; Stephen, v. 
Squier, born June 29, 1738, married Damaris, 
daughter of David and Damaris (Davis) 
Bradley, and had : Olive. Olive and Dama- 
ris. vi. Stephen, born November 19, 1740, 
died May 7. 1744. vii. James, born March 
19, 1742, died about April, 1768; probably 
married, viii. Stephen, born October 23, 
1743, died about April, 1768; probably mar- 
ried, ix. Sarah, born January 26, 1748, died 
April 26, 1779 ; married John Alvord, and 
had : John and David, x. Noah, born No- 
vember 28, 1751, died November 5, 1777; 
married (first) Lydia Wheeler, (second) 
Mary, probably daughter of David Bradley. 
7. John, see forward. 

(V) John (3), third son and seventh and 
youngest child of Captain John (2) and Mar- 
tha (Hubbell) Wakeman, was born August 
27, 1705, died 1789-90. He married Cath- 
erine, born July, 1706, died April 9, 1777, 
daughter of Moses and Jane Gilbert. Chil- 
dren : I. Ebenezer, born January 20, 1729, 
died June 20, 1730. 2. John, see forward. 3. 
Gershom, born November 8, 1731, died May 
30, 178 1 ; he served in the revolution and was 
slain by the British at Compo, Westport, Con- 
necticut ; married (first) April 15, 1757, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of David Down; (second) 
April 12, 178 1, Mrs. Huldah Williams, daugh- 
ter of Hubbell. Children, all by first 

marriage : i. Abigail, born March 10, 1758, 
married Moses Banks, and had : Wakeman ; 
Wakeman ; Mary, married Captain W. Mee- 
ker, ii. Abel, born March 19, 1760, died Au- 
gust 13, 1820: married Eunice Down, and had 
Susan, married Sturges Morehouse ; Abel ; 
Frederick, iii. Gershom, born April 11, 1762, 
died April 5, 1848; married Sibbell Bradley, 
and had : Lucy, married Joseph Odell : Wake- 
man ; Jane ; Mary, married Alonzo Wakeman. 
iv. Molly, born July 21, 1765, died Novem- 
ber 22, 1829 ; married Jonathan Banks, and 
had ; Jonathan ; Zalmon ; Abram ; Sally ; Pol- 
ly, married Charles Nichols ; Sophia. v. 
Isaac, born March 13, 1768, died Septem- 
ber 23, 1844; married Sarah Bradley, and 
had : Clara, married Coville Buckley : Hora- 
tio P., married Rachel, daughter of Nathan 
Lobdell ; Ezekiel B. vi. Betsey, vii. Parme- 
lia, born May 7, 1772, died February 18, 1862 ; 
married (first) Gershom Sherwood, (sec- 
ond) Jeremiah Sherwood; children by first 
marriage : Fanny, married Zalmon Banks ; 
Cynthia, married Daniel Bradley ; children by 



second marriage: Gershom Wakeman; Par- 
melia, marrietl William Banks; Delia M., 
married Eli Wakeman. viii. Seth, born Janu- 
ary 15, 1774, died April 8, 1775. ix. Seth 
Burr, born December 10, 1775, died February 
24, 1857; married (first) February 23, 1805, 
Clara, daughter of Jesse Nichols, (second) 
April 15, 1831, Sarah, daughter of Nathan 
and Mabel (Bulkley) Wheeler, and had by 
the first marriage : Horace, married Jean- 
nette, daughter of John Becker ; Alonzo, mar- 
ried (first) Catherine, daughter of Peter Stall, 
(second) Mary, daughter of Joseph and Lucy 
( Wakeman ) Odell : Horatia ; Maria, married 
Joseph Sharp ; Charles. 4. Ebenezer, born 
July 20, 1737, died March 31, 1823; married 
(first) May 3, 1764, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Josiah and Susanna (Disbrow) Webb; (sec- 
ond) Sarah, daughter of Daniel and Mary 
(Hubbell) Shelton ; children, all by first mar- 
riage: i. Elizabeth, born June 20, 1765, died 
June 4, 1835 : married Hoyt Banks, and had : 

Milly, married Wheeler ; Ebenezer ; 

Emily, married Charles Winton ; Albert ; 
Noah ; Charles, ii. Eunice, born August 10, 
1766, married Asa Squire, and had: Eben- 
ezer, Morris, Sarah, Anne and Mary. iii. Eb- 
enezer, born March 4, 1770, died October 12, 
1848 ; married Eunice, daughter of Seth and 
Dorothy (Williams) Bradley, and had: Cla- 
rissa, married Ebenezer Hawkins ; Errata, 
married Wakeman Hull ; Wyllis, married 
Anna, daughter of Edmond and Esther (Bar- 
low) Jennings; Matilda, married (first) Miles 
Lockwood, (second) James Blackman ; Pau- 
lina, married Abijah Wallace ; Catherine, mar- 
ried Robert Sage ; Eunice, married John Wal- 
lace ; Fanny, married Orrin Sherwood ; Hap- 
py, married William Patterson Knapp ; Fred- 
erick ; Frederick Bradley, married (first) 
Anna B., daughter of Stephen and LTrilla 
(Goodsell) Sherwood, (second) Sally, daugh- 
ter of Levi and Polly (Patchen) Robertson; 
George ; Elizabeth, iv. Abijah, married Mary 
Buckley, and had: Charles, married (first) 
Lydia, daughter of John and Sarah ( Bennett) 
Mitchell, (second) Debby (Mitchell) Bacon, 
daughter of John Mitchell ; Caroline ; Mary, 
married Cyrus Beardsley ; Maria, married Jo- 
seph West : Harriet, married Randolph A. 
Hufford ; Caroline, v. Jonathan, died at Al- 
bany, July 6, 1843: married Clara, daughter 
of Thaddeus and Esther (Bradley) Wake- 
man, and had : Hon. Abram, married Mary 
E., daughter of Cyrus and Mary (Lee) Har- 
wood ; James, married (first) Rath- 
bun, (second) Rebecca Oothout, (third) 
Elizabeth Oothout ; Thaddeus Burr, married 
Emily Frances, daughter of Elbert and Mary 
S. (Cock) Ludlam ; Caroline, vi. Abram. 



1848 



CONNECTICUT 



vii. Rachel, born September 24, 1768, died 
October 7, 1768. viii. Mary, twin of Ra- 
chel, died November, 1768. ix. Sarah, born 
about 1777, died February 14, 1857 ; mar- 
ried Richard Firman or Fairman, and had : 
Julia; Harriet, married William Banks. 5. 
Eleanor, born April g, 1739, died 178 — ; mar- 
ried. May 3, 1764. Eliphalet Lyon, and had : 
i. A\'akeman, born January 25, 1765, died Mav 
23, 17 — . ii. Eleanor, born April 18, 1767, 

married Wilson, iii. Eliphalet, born 

March 28, 1771. died August 7, 1846. iv. 
Rowland, born May 13, 1774, died February 
4) 1775- V. Lucinda, born December 27, 
1777, died September 26, 1833. 6. Abigail, 
born September 22, 1741, died March 3, 1847; 
married (first) March 8, 1758, Seth Meeker, 
(second) David Jennings; children, all by 
first marriage: i. Seth, baptized May 6, 1759. 
ii. Joseph, baptized June i, 1761. iii. Abigail, 
baptized February 12, 1764. iv. Samuel, bap- 
tized September 18. 1768. v. Eleanor, bap- 
tized March 18, 1770, married S. Morehouse. 
vi. Mary, married Nathan Treadwell. vii. 
Huldah, baptized March 19. 1780, married 
Hezekiah Ogden. viii. ^^■akeman, baptized 
January 3, 1784. ix. Joseph G., baptized Feb- 
ruary 20, 1785. 7. Seth, born January 30, 
1744. died July 18, 1770: it is supposed that 
he married and was the father of : Seth. died 
January 9, 1838; married Sarah, daughter of 
Thaddeus Bennett, and had : Alphonson or 
Alonzo ; Edgar Bennett ; Almira ; Seth Mel- 
nor ; Thaddeus Burr, married Hannah, daugh- 
ter of Gershom Bennett ; Mary Louise ; 
George P. ; William. 8. Thaddeus, born Sep- 
tember 19, 1745, married, November 10, 1772, 
Esther, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Burr) 
Bradley ; children : i. Daniel, born and died, 
April 24, 1773. ii. Esther, born January 29, 
died April 24, 1775. iii. Thaddeus Burr, born 
September 13, 1778, died November, 1848 ; 
was a founder and secretary of the American 
Institute of New York. iv. Esther, born Sep- 
tember 23, 1781, died October 25, 1807. v. 
Clara, born 1784, died November 16, 1850; 
married Jonathan Wakeman, and had: 
Abram, James, Thaddeus Burr and Caroline, 
all mentioned above, vi. Eunice (?). vii. 
Daniel, born 1784, died May 30, 1867; mar- 
ried Mary, daughter of Benjamin W. Hallett, 
and had : Sarah, married Philander Ferry ; 
Irene J. ; Ida Frances, married John Burr. 
viii. Abraham, died November 21, 1815. 9. 
Jane, born January 7, died January 27, 1848. 
ID. Catherine, born January 24, 1750-51, mar- 
ried Ichabod \Mieeler. 11. Hannah. 

(VI) John (4), second son and child of 
John (3) and Catherine (Gilbert) Wakeman, 
was born January 29, 1730-31, died July 24, 



1809. He served as private in the Fourth 
Regiment, Connecticut Militia, Colonel Gold 
S. Silliman, May, 1776; in the Coast Guard, 
October, 1776: at Peekskill. under Lieutenant- 
Colonel Jonathan Dimon, October, 1777. He 
married, in Greenfield, Connecticut, October 
3. 1753, Esther, born September 2, 1736, died 
December 20, "[808, daughter of Francis and 
(Sturges) Bradley. Children: i. Ly- 
man, born January 26, 1755, died March 6, 
1836; married, about 1780, Abigail Turney, 
and had: i. Samuel, born DecemlDer 17, 1781, 
died August 2, 1834; married Drusilla Nich- 
ols, and had : David, married Rebecca, daugh- 
ter of Nehemiah Barlow : Abigail, married 
Wakeman Jennings ; John ; Jane ; Samuel, 
married Sarah, daughter of .Alja and Eliza- 
beth (Dimon) Bradley; Seth: Huldah; Polly, 
married Hiram S. Wakeman ; Harriet, ii. 
Lewis B., born July, 1784, died January 10, 
1823 ; married Esther, daughter of Ezekiel 
OTlanks, and had : Bradley, married Lucy, 

daughter of and Roxana (Johnson) 

Jennings ; Hanford ; Andrew, married Mary, 
daughter of Samuel Bradley ; Mary ; Esther, 
iii. Esther, baptized August 29, 1790, mar- 
ried Isaac Jennings. 2. Esther, born August 
15 1756, died March 4, 1820; married Isaac 
Bradley, and had : Uriah ; Isaac ; Eleanor ; 

Uranah, married Nichols, and died 

October 9, 1813. 3. Mary, born July 15, 
1758, died January 20, 1849; married, Janu- 
ary 25, 1781, Levi P. Bradley, and had: i. 
Alja, born October 9, 1783, died December 
2, 1861 ; married Elizabeth Dimon. ii. Cla- 
rissa, born October 21, 1786. iii. Eunice, born 
May I, 1791, died February 18, 1806. iv. 
Woolsey. born December 5, 1794, died Febru- 
ary 18, 1806. 4. John, born r\ larch 10, 1760, 
died September 16, 1803; married (first) 

1786, ; (second) Airs. Lydia Bradley; 

children : i. Sally, born September, 1788, died 

October 14, 1803; married Barnum. 

ii. Fanny, born January, 1790. iii. John, born 
April 27. 1791, died .\pril 8, 1859; married 
Ruth Adams, and had: William Henry Har- 
rison: John Adams; Sherwood E. ; Bradley: 
Eli : Harriet, married Dr. Abraham Bronson ; 
a son ; a daughter ; Maranda. iv. Anna, born 

December, 1794, married Banks, v. 

Laura, born October, 1797, died 1821. vi. Har- 
riet, born June, 1800, died December 12, 1820. 
5. Eleanor, born January 30, 1762, died May 
21, 1846; married, December 26, 1781, Gid- 
eon Couch, and had: i. Wakeman. born 
March 3, 1785. ii. Gideon, born October 12, 
1788, died May 31, 1846. iii. Eli, born June 
2, 1791. died September 3, 1796. iv. Charity, 
born July 2. 1793, f''^'' September 3. 1796. 
v. Eli, born Sei^tember 25, 1797. vi. Charity, 



COWECTICL'T 



1849 



liciin I'l-linur 



I I , iSo_'. 



(1, 



I'-li, baptized 



March 17, i7'i4, dietl in infancy. 7. Xathan, 
baptized ^^al■ch 23. ijiiiK dicil I'ehruarv 16, 
1857; married. Ajiril, 17S7. Aliij^ail (iold, and 
had: i. AInion, Ixirn Jnly 10, 1788, died 1855 ; 

married Ruhaniah , and had : Hiram 

Sherwood, married Polly, daughter of Samuel 
W'akcman : George; David, married Sarah H., 
daughter of Elisha and Sarali (Harper) Ells; 
Morris ; Thomas : I'lsther, married William 
Hem-y Harrison W'akeman ; Sherwood: a 
daughter, luarried Treadwell. ii. Jo- 
seph Hill, horn April 9. 1790, died March 12, 
1823. iii. Xathan, horn March 24, 1792, died 
June 6, 1880: marrie 1 Sarah, daughter of 
Eben and ]\Iollie (Ogden) Burr and had: 
Eleanor; Nathan I!.; Harris, married Irene 
Terry: Scudder 11., married Elizabeth B., 
daugliter of Ephraim and Lois (\^'akeman) 

Osborn : Jehiel H., married Swarth- 

out ; Henry, married ( first ) Jennie Stewart, 

(second ) ■ Shepherd : Harriet, married 

James Covert ; Sarah M. iv. Solomon, born 
February 26, 1794, died December, 1856; 
married Esther, daughter of Zalmon and 
Polly (Ogden) Burr, and had: Jessup Eben, 
married Jennie Ferris, of Lawrence, Michi- 
gan : Moses Aaron, married Lucinda Bulk- 
ley : Polly Sophia, married William Riley ; 
Nathan Burr, married Belle Braybrooks ; 
Abb\- Augusta, unmarried ; Burrows J., mar- 
ried Margaret F. Foot. v. Abigail, born 
March 5, 1796, died 1892. 8. Eli, baptized 
September 10, 1768, married Ruhamah, 
daughter of Epaphras and Jane (Burr) Good- 
sell, and had: i. Medad, baptized September 
19, 1790, died July 17, 181 1. ii. Elihu, bap- 
tized January 22, 1797, married Martha, 
daughter of Andrew Mann. iii. Parmelia 
Burr, born February 14, 1793, died August 
15, 1840; married Josiah Smith, and had: 
Martha, iv. Eleanor, born 1795, died August 
18, 1867; married Bela Seymour, and had: 
Mary Ann, George and William, v. Bradley, 
born 1796, died 1834: married Mary Ann, 
daughter of Jacob \\'ellslager, and had : Aus- 
tin : Alonzo Burr ; Elizabeth Ruhamah, mar- 
ried Joseph Proctor; Lewis Bud, married 
Mary, daughter of Captain William W. and 

(Montgomery) Layfield. vi. Dimon, 

baptized January 22, 1797, died May 8. 1870. 
vii. Gideon, viii. Austin, born February 11, 
1804, died December 13, 1870: married Louisa 
H., dang-hter of Mayor Curtis, of Connecti- 
cut, and had : Julia Ann ; Lewis B., married 
Lavinia P., daughter of Moses Walton ; 
Ma3'or Curtis ; Horetta : Albert C. : Egbert J. ; 
Uriah ; Charles E. ; Frank : Richard A. ix. 
Adelia, born July 21, 1805, died July 20, 1893 ; 
married Austin Sperry, and had : Mary J., 



married James Atwood ; Eliza i\L, married 
Freilerick h'airchild. x. Henry, of Colum- 
bus, Ohio. xi. Susan, born March 22, 1806, 
died h'ebruary 9, 1887; married William 
Hawley, Jr.. and had: Sarah Marshall, mar- 
ried (first) Fredericks, (second) 

— Sanger, xii. Jane, born June 18, 1808, 

died October 22, 1876; married Guy B. Fenn, 
and had : Mary Ann ; Mabel B., RL D., mar- 
ried Dr. Robert L. King; Amelia, xiii. Ma- 
rie, born September 11, 1810, married Oliver 
Clock, and had : Adaline ; Zalmon W. ; Wil- 
liam B. ; Edwin A. ; George E. xiv. Uriah, 
born September 11, 1810, died December 14, 
185 1 : married Elizabeth Abel. xv. Ruhamah, 
born December 19, 1812, married Dayton 
Mattoon, and had : Sarah Elizabeth, married 
George R. Baldwin ; William Bradley, mar- 
ried Sarah Jane Davis ; Amelia Jane, mar- 
ried Henry Truman Dayton ; Alanson ; Helen 
Gertrude ; Charles Burr, married Alice Kel- 
logg, xvi. Medad, died in infancy. 9. Aaron, 
baptized September 26, 1768, died September 
30. 1822; married Sarah Sherwood, and had: 
i. Abigail, born November 27, 1786, died Oc- 
tober 20, 1841 ; married Jonathan Banks, and 
had : Anna, married Eli Sherwood : Polly, 
married Bradley Goodsell ; Catherine, married 
Jarvis Patchen ; Jonathan, married Paurinda, 
daughter of Levi Sherwood ; Aaron. ii. 
Mary, born October 6, 1788, died October 29, 
1826; married Abijah Merwin. iii. Sarah, 
born September 20, 1790, died September 15, 
1873. iv. Charles, born May 31, 1792, died 
August 8, 1866: married Marilla, daughter of 
Natlian Banks, and had : Aaron Burr and L-- 
ving. V. Aaron, born March 21, 1794, died 
February 28, 1810. vi. Laurinda, born Jan- 
uary 20, 1799. died September 12, 1825 ; mar- 
ried Hanford Nichols, and had: Lloyd; Hen- 
ry ; Laura, married David Sherwood, vii. 
Burr, died in infancy, viii. Burr, born De- 
cember 23. 1802, died August 20, 1832 : mar- 
ried Mary A. Lyon, and had : William Burr, 
married Emmeline, daughter of Reuben B. 
and Catherine L. Gilbert ; Jane. ix. Betsey, 
born February 22, 1806, died May 20, 1889: 
married Emory Sherwood, and had : Laurinda 
W., married Arthur Merwin; Sarah .A., mar- 
ried A. C. Lyon. x. Eli, born October 24, 
1809, died October 13, 1888; married Delia 
M., daughter of Jeremiah and Parmelia 
(Wakeman) Sherwood, and had: Hermon, 
married (first) Britannia S.. daughter of 
Richard Tuers. (second) Mrs. Edith Hall, 
daughter of William Wilkinson; Amelia; 
\Mlliam, married Eveline J., daughter of 
William Meeker; Henry, married Sarah A., 
daughter of Apollos K. and Harriet (\J\\- 
mer) Wadsworth ; Elizabeth; ]\Iary ; Dwight; 



i8so 



CONNECTICUT 



Eli, married Mary Burr, daughter of Charles 
W. and Parthena AI. Johnson, xi. Aloses, 
born April 6, 1815, died April 19, 1894; mar- 
ried Lydia, daughter of Hezekiah Sherwood, 
and had : i\Ioses Aaron, married Alary, daugh- 
ter of Bradley Williams ; Charles Burr, mar- 
ried Julia H., daughter of John Lockwood; 
an unnamed child ; Alida Bell, married Melzar 
Brotherton. 10. Asahel, see forward. 11. 
Daniel, born September 26, 1773, died July, 
1849 ; married. May, 1799, Esther, daughter 
of David and Abigail (Waldo) Bucklin, and 
had : i. Stephen, ii. Waldo, born October 
17, 1802, died the same day. iii. John B., 
born December 6, 1804, died March 31, 1862; 
married Mary, daughter of Zalmon and Clara 
(Nichols) Wakeman, and had: Eleanor 
Couch : Warren Waldo ; Hugh B. : John Zal- 
mon ; Horace ; Ward ; Burrell. iv. Eleanor, 
born July 11, 1808, died September 4, 1829; 
married Julius S. Beardsley, and had three 
children, v. Zalmon Bradley, born August 10, 
1809. died September 10, 1887 ; married Al- 
vira Thornton, and had : Laura L. : Julia A., 
married Charles Fancher ; Francis Burr, mar- 
ried Mary E., daughter of John Luscomb, of 
Devonshire, England ; Phebe Esther, married 
William S. Inman : Victoria J. ; Stephen 
Quincy ; Cora. vi. Esther A., born May 24, 
1815, died March 24, 1834; married Wells 
Brayton, and had one child, vii. Laura, born 
December 16, 1817, died July 31, 1825. viii. 
Polly, born December 16, 1817, died June 14, 
1819. 12. Betsey, born October 10, I775> died 
October 7, 1776. 13. Betsey, born December 
14, 1777, died August 26, 1820; married Jona- 
than Goodsell, May 24, 1795, and had: i. 
Bradley, born November 2, 1796, died Decem- 
ber 25, 1815. ii. Maranda, born February, 
1799, died 1890: married Ziba Glover, iii. 
Emily, born July 4, 1808, died June 4, 1809. 
14. Zalmon, born May 11, 1779, died February 
8, 1856; married, October 8, 1806, Clara 
Nichols, and had children: i. Mary, born 
March 22, 1808, married John B., son of Dan- 
iel and Esther (Bucklin) Wakeman, men- 
tioned above, ii. Abigail Turney, baptized 
July 9, 1809. iii. Esther, born December 2, 
1809, died September 17, 1842. iv. John, 
born November 12, 181 1, died Novem- 
ber 17, 1897: married (first) Sarah M., 
daughter of David and Mary (Hubble) Tay- 
lor, and had: Mary E., married Silliman 
Fanton ; he married (second) Esther Jane, 
daughter of David and Rebecca (Barlow) 
Wakeman. v. Zalmon, born June 13. 1814, 
died August 26, 1864 : married Susan Warner 
Nichols, and had : Maria Josephine, married 
Rev. John S. Beers ; Emer.son ]3radley : How- 
ard Nichols, married Grace Melville, daugh- 



ter of Henry and Catharine Silliman (La- 
cey) Hall. vi. Eleanor, born January 19, 
1817, died February 19, 1825. vii. Elizabeth, 
born April 25, 1827. 

(VH) Asahel, seventh son and tenth child 
of John (4) and Esther (Bradley) Wakeman, 
was born May 2, 1 77 1, died November 24, 
1856. He served as a private at Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, April, 1814, during the war of 1812. 
He married (first) February 28, 1798, Polly, 
born December 20, 1774, died August 4, 1819, 
daughter of Epaphras and Eunice (Nichols) 
Wakeman; (second) April 26, 1821, Eliza- 
beth, born September 14, 1786, died May 7, 
1841, a sister of his first wife. Children, all 
by first marriage: i. Alanson, born January 
19, 1800, died December 21, 1881 ; married, 
August 23, 1841, Angeline, daughter of Jud- 
son Fanton, and had : i. Henry, born August 
25, 1842, married (first) Eleanor Amelia, 
daughter of George and Eleanor (Lyon) 
Wildman, (second) Emma E., daughter of 
W. O. and Lydia A. (Wheeler) S'andford ; 
children : Minnie, Anna E., Mary B. and 
Ruth A. ii. Jesse, born March 13, 1844. iii. 
Alecia, born October 10, 1845, married Eli 
C. Goodsell, and had : Minnie A., Charles G. 
and Sarah Louise, iv. Chauncey Cleveland, 
born March 27, 1850, married Lizzie Maria, 
daughter of David and Jane (Avaria) Sum- 
mers, and had : Arthur Sinclair, Jennie Ale- 
cia, Angeline Fanton, Earl Judson and Irwin 
Alanson. 2. Gilbert, born November 29, 1801, 
died December 29, 1891 : married, November 
29, 1832, Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph 
Beardsley, and had : i. Joseph Sherwood, born 
October 3, 1834. married Harriet, daughter 
of Willis Nichols, of Southport. ii. Caroline 
A., born September 25, 1836. iii. Asahel G., 
born March i, 1839, died February 28, 1894; 
married Harriet A. Keeler, and had : George 
Wilbur and Elbee Clare, iv. Elizabeth H., 
born November 26, 1840, married Daniel Ful- 
ler, and had: Stella and Bertha, v. John, 
born December 11, 1843, died June 10, 1868. 
3. Silas, see forward. 4. A daughter, born 
May, 1805, died April 24, 1806. 

(VIII) Silas, third son and child of Asa- 
hel and Polly (Wakeman) Wakeman, was 
born May 6, 1804, died March 28, 1888. He 
married (first) December 23, 1827, Abbey 
Bradley, born October 13, 1807, died June 19, 
1842, daughter of Nathan and Clarina Whee- 
ler, and granddaughter of Nathan \\'lieelcr. 
He married (second) December 2, 1857, Sally, 
born January 31, 1809, died August ifS. 1894, 
daughter of Samuel Wilson. Children, all by 
first marriage: i. Dr. Moses H.. born No- 
vember 4. 1829, died January 6. 1892; mar- 
ried. May 31, 1864, Harriet W., daughter of 



CONNECTICUT 



i8sr 



Samuel James Collins, and had : i. Mary Col- 
lins, married Dr. Ernest Smith, of West Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts, and had : Herman 
W liite and Homer Morgan, ii. Henry Whee- 
ler, born March 6, 1869, died February 25, 

1870. iii. Harriet Wheeler, liorn June 13, 

1871. 2. Polly Sophia, born September 11, 
1831, died April 6, 1854: married Horace 
Bradley Coley (see Coley VHI) 3. Betsey 
Ann, born January 31, 1834, married, May 15, 
1853, Morris ^^'akeman Salmon, and had: 
Charles Curtis ; Fanny Wakeman, married Dr. 
Gorham, of Weston, Connecticut. 4. Clarina 
Brailley, see forward. 5. Abigail B., born 
June 6, 1842, married Erastus B. Sherwood, 
and had : Everett S., William F. and Clarence. 

(IX) Clarina Bradley, daughter of Silas 
and Abbey Bradley (Wheeler) Wakeman, 
born December 15, 1837, died 1863. She 
married Horace firadlev Coley (see Coley 
VIII). 



The Seymour family is one 
SEYMOUR of great antiquity in Eng- 
land. The seal on the will 
of Thomas Seymour, eldest son of Richard 
Seymour, the first settler of the name in this 
country, bears the impress of two wings con- 
joined in lure, the device of the English Sey- 
mours from the time of William de St. Maur 
of Penhow. A "Bishop's Bible", printed in 
1584, in the possession of Hon. Morris Wood- 
rufif Seymour, of Litchfield, a descendant of 
Richard Seymour, has on one of the fly-leaves 
a drawing of the arms of the Seymours of 
Berry Pomeroy, viz. : two wings conjoined in 
lure, cjuartered with the Royal Arms as 
granted by Henry \TII to Edward Seymour, 
Duke of Somerset, and the legend: "Richard 
Seymor, of Berry Pomery, heytor hund. in 
ye Com. Devon, his Booke, Hartford, in ye 
Collony of Connecticut in Newe England, An- 
noque Domini 1640". On another page of 
this Bible there is a memorandum relating to 
some business transaction, and the name, 
"John Seimor, Hartford, 1666". The fact, 
moreover, that John, the son of Richard, died 
possessed of a "great Bible" is established by 
the listing in his inventory dated 1713, and 
still preserved at Hartford, of "a great bible 
los." 

(I) Richard Seymour, though not an orig- 
inal proprietor, was one of the early settlers 
of Hartford. Just when he joined the little 
settlement near "Dutch, Point" on the Con- 
necticut river we do not know, but probably 
in 1639, when we find his name in the list of 
those "inhabitants who were granted lotts to 
have only at the town's courtesie with liberty 
to fetch woode and keep swine or coues on 



the common". His lot was No. 70, on the 
north side, near the "cow pasture". His house 
stood on what is now North Main street, near 
the Ely place. He also owned outlying pieces 
of land including a portion of the tract run- 
ning westward from the bluflfs of the Trinity 
College property to what is now West Hart- 
ford. In 1647 he was elected chimney-viewer, 
which calls to mind that the houses of the first 
settlers were thatched, as in the old England 
they had left behind them, and on that account 
were particularly exposed to fire loss, and 
all the more because built of wood rather than, 
of masonry as most of the corresponding Eng- 
lish houses of the period were. Richard's duties,, 
then, as chimney-viewer, were allied to those 
of a building inspector and fire chief of our 
time. Why he left Hartford is not known, . 
though there is a vague tradition that he was 
not in sympathy with the Rev. Thomas Hoo- 
ker, who dominated the Hartford country. 
Whatever the cause of his removal, we find 
his name among the number who made the 
agreement with Captain Patrick and the bril- 
liant and restless Roger Ludlow "for the 
settlinge and plantinge of Norwalke", June 
19, 1650. As one of the planters of Is^or- 
walk, Richard Seymour's name appears in the 
indenture dated February 15, 1651, between 
the Planters and Runckinheage and other 
Indians. The exact date of his removal from 
Hartford to Norwalk cannot be fixed, but he 
had undoubtedly taken up his residence there 
before the end of 1652, and perhaps earlier. 
His home-lot was well situated, directly oppo- 
site the meeting house and parade ground, and 
on the highway leading from Stamford to 
Fairfield. His house was only a short dis- 
tance from the present roadbed of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford railroad. 
Many of his descendants have probably un- 
consciously viewed the spot where their an- 
cestor lived, while being carried past the place 
in a manner of which he never dreamed. In 
the new plantation of Norwalk, Richard's abil- 
ities were fully recognized. On March 29, 
1655, he was elected townsman, or selectman, 
as we should now say, succeeding Mr. Thomas 
Fitch, who had in 1654 been elected governor 
of the colony. But Richard did not live to 
hold this office long, since in his will, which 
he executed July 29, 1655, he is described 
"very weak & sike". The fact that Governor 
Fitch was translated, so to speak, from the 
office of townsman of Norwalk to that of 
governor of the colony shows what a dignified 
and important office that of townsman was. 
In that primitive social order the townsman 
shared with the minister the first honors of 
the community, since the duties of the office 



I8S2 



CONNECTICUT 



demanded a man of dignit)-, ability, and force 
of character. Richard's election as towns- 
man in succession to Governor Fitch helps 
us to see the kind of a man that he was. 

The exact date of his death has not come 
down to us, but it probably took place soon 
after the execution of his will, which on Oc- 
tober 25, 1655, was proved before the county 
court at Fairfield. His "loving Wife Mercy" 
and his "faythfull friend Richard Olmsted" 
were designated by him as the "sole Execu- 
tors & Administrators" of his last will and 
testament. His widow was by his will ap- 
pointed guardian of the three minor sons: "It 
is also my Will that my loving wife should 
have the dispose of my three Sons, John, 
Zachary and Richard untill such time as they 
shall be fit to receive & dispose of their Es- 
tate". These minor sons were probably born 
after the arrival of Richard and j\lercy in 
this country. Thomas, referred to in the will 
as "my Eldest Sonn Thomas," was probably 
born in England, but whether or not he had 
the same mother is not known. When Thom- 
as Seymour executed his will September 22, 
1712, he sealed it with a small seal engraved 
with the wings "conjoined in lure," forming 
the paternal coat-of-arms of the English Sey- 
mours. It is significant that Thomas, the eld- 
est son of Richard, the settler, should have 
had possession of this seal, which as a piece 
of evidence supports and reinforces the arms 
on a flyleaf of the "great Bible" already re- 
ferred to as in the possession of the Hon. 
Morris Woodrufif Seymour, of Litchfield. 

Richard Seymour left a fair estate, inven- 
toried October 10, 1655, at £255-09-00. Mer- 
cy, his widow, married, November 25, 1655, 
the Hon. John Steele, of Farmington, one of 
the foremost men of the colony, a man of 
means and education as well as of ability and 
energy. He was town clerk of Hartford, 
town clerk of Farmington, and often deputy, 
&c., &c. His marriage to Mrs. Mercv Sey- 
mour he recorded on the Farmington records 
in his own hand. We may forgive her for her 
speedy re-marriage when we consider that it 
provided a home and a wise counsellor for her 
three young sons, who now left Norwalk and 
became members of the household of their 
stepfather, at Farmington. Of her parentage 
nothing is known, nor the date of her death, 
though she survived John Steele, who died 
November 25, 1665. In his will, dated Janu- 
ary 30, 1664, he bequeaths to his "dear and 
loving wife Mercy Steele the house wherein I 
now dwell and the appurtenances belonging 
to it." 

Thomas Seymour, Richard's eldest son, 
remained in Norwalk and became the 



progenitor of the Norwalk family of the 
name. 

Richard Seymour's English home and par- 
entage and precise connection with the Eng- 
lish family of the name has never been posi- 
tively ascertained ; the loss of records may 
now make that impossible, but the evidence 
of the "Bishop's Bible" referred to and the 
seal used in 17 12 by his son Thomas, of Nor- 
walk, leaves no doubt of his being a scion of 
the English Seymours. 

In his "History of the Rev. Hugh Peters", 
(pub. 1781) the Rev. Samuel Peters gives a 
list of some of the early Connecticut settlers 
credited with gentle blood : 

"Among them was Thomas Seymour, a yomiger 
branch of the family of the Duke of Somerset who 
settled at Hartford, did honor to the stock from 
which he descended, and his numerous posterity 
have distinguished themselves by their virtues, piety 
and literary merits. The Honorable Thomas Sey- 
mour now of Hartford, is the head of the fainily, 
and for his great and general knowledge of the 
law and belle lettres has been employed by the pub- 
lic in many exalted situations which he has dis- 
charged with honor to himself and benefit to the 
State." 

The writer is well aware that the irascible 
Tory parson has never been popular as an au- 
thority, and ofifers the above quotation merely 
as showing that the tradition of the connection 
of Richard Seymour, the settler, with the his- 
toric English family was current over a hun- 
dred years ago. Peters made a mistake in 
saying that it was Thomas rather than Rich- 
ard Seymour who settled at Hartford, but his 
reference to the settler as belonging to the 
younger branch of the family of the Duke of 
Somerset is at least interesting. Evidence is 
not wanting to show that the Honorable 
Thomas Seymour, first mayor of Hartford, 
had received this tradition from his ancestors. 
Mayor Seymour was the last king's attorney 
for Connecticut (he succeeding his father in 
this office), the first state's attorney of Con- 
nectictit, the first mayor of Hartford, and one 
of the foremost men of his day in New Eng- 
land, and of all the members of the American 
family of that time was perhaps in the best 
position to know the facts. It may be admit- 
ted, however, that Mayor Seymour makes no 
claim to a noble origin for Richard, the set- 
tler, in the lirief statement he made regarding 
the family in his eighty-second year, and to 
be found in Dr. Parker's "History of the Sec- 
ond Church at Hartford," p. 134. Still, Pe-, 
ters' statement must have been based upon! 
traditions current in Hartford and attachingl 
themselves to the family of Mayor Seymour | 
who, by the use of the Seymour arms, gave ' 
their endorsement to the tradition. 



COXXKCTICUT 



i«53 



! To all this may lie aihlnl llie inwc «i I'aiii- 
il\- trailitiuns aiul strikin.t;' laiuily iiktiiessus 
anil traits, coiiiKctiiii; the American with the 
En;;lish family of the nanic. Some of these 
traditions were i^athered up and woven into 
a romance entitled, "The I'awn of the I'ale 
Faces", written in Hartford, by J. P. lirace, 
and publi>hed in 1853 by 1). Appleton & Coni- 
panv. This work contains an untlattcrini;- por- 
trait of Richard Seymour, and is only signfi- 
cant as making use of the tradition that Rich- 
ard Seymour was not in accord with the 
"Pious Hooker" antl his company, but was 
a Church of England man. Whatever his per- 
sonal sympathies may have been, it cannot be 
doubted that Mercy, his wife, was of a non- 
conformist family. Of that her given name 
alone is sufficient proof. If more proof were 
wanted it may be found in the name of their 
son Zachary. Only Puritan England employed 
these Biblical names. It may well be that 
his marriage to a woman of a non-conformist 
fann'ly had much to do with his emigration to 
New England. That she was a second wife 
anil consiilerablv his junior is more than 
likely. 

In Richard's time the name was unquestion- 
ably pronounced See-mer, which is the tra- 
ditional and correct pronunciation of the name, 
and the pronunciation always insisted upon by 
members of the present English family, who 
are .never addressed as Seymour. In some 
branches of the Connecticut family See-mer 
as the pronunciation of the name has been 
adhered to an<l is continued to the present 
da}-. Chief Justice Seymour, of Connecticut, 
was always addressed as Judge See-mer, and 
in the family of the writer See-mer was the 
pronunciation invariably employed until with- 
in a few years. The pronunciation Seymour 
now current seems to be an innovation of 
the last half century and is quite wrong. That 
See-mer was the pronunciation employed in 
Richard's time is sutificiently proved by the 
early records, in which the spelling is unques- 
tionably phonetic. The marriage of Mercy, 
the widow of Richard, to the Honorable John 
Steele, is recorded in Farmington in his own 
hand-writing as follows : "John Steel was 
maryed to IMercy Semer Novem the twenty 
& five one thousand six hundredth fiftv & 
five." 

One would have supposed that a man of 
Steele's position and superior education would 
in making such an entry have taken pains 
to have spelled the name of his wife correctly ; 
that he did not do so shows how indififerent 
even educated people were in those days to 
questions of orthography. In another instru- 
ment to which Steele was a party, the name 



is ~i ellcd niit Semer, as in the marriage rec- 
ord, InU Seamer. Reference is made to \ol i, 
folio 10, of the Norwalk Land Records, in 
which is found the following deed: 

".\ true and perfect coppie of the deeide of sale 
made .A.pril 26. 1661, by .Mst. John .Steeile of ff:irm- 
ingtcn into Mathias Sciition Son of N'or\var<, which 
-iiyed Mst. Stceile was administrator unto the estate 
cf Richd Senmer and married with the saved 
Senmers widow. These give testimonies to all 
whom it may concerne that John Steeile of ffar- 
mington in N. E. have sould unto Mathias Sention 
son of Norwalke all the land in Norwake that was 
Richd Se?mcr's now deceased, except the house and 
honic-lott that was the sayed Richd. Seamer's, and 
by exchange for that the sayed .Mathias hath the 
true possession of that house and house-lott that 
was Thos. Seamer's" S:c &c. 

'1 hen follows the description of eleven 
pieces of land. 

It is to be noted that the only jjossible pro- 
nunciation of Semer and Seamer is See-mer. 
L'ndoubtcdly proof of this sort might be mul- 
tiplied to show that when Richard first came 
to the countr)' he pronounced his name "See- 
mer" just as the historic English family 
pronounced it ; it is not without some signifi- 
cance that this pronunciation of the name con- 
tinued down to our own time, and is adhered 
to to-day- among some of his descendants. 

As to the spelling of Richard's natne, no 
autograph of his is known to exist. The first 
occurrence of h.is name known to the writer 
is in the original manuscript of Plartford 
Town \'otes, p. 19, in which the name is writ- 
ten "Richard Seamotire". In the list writ- 
ten in the hand-writing of John Allyn in the 
Book of. Original Distributions the name is 
spelled "Seymore", p. 550. In the same book- 
on page 166, the following entry occurs: 

'"Febr : Anno Dom : 1639 : 

Several parcells of land in Hartford upon the 
river of Conecticott belonginge to Richard Sea- 
mor and to his heirs forever:" 

This is followed by a description of lands 
occupying some two pages. The name Sey- 
mour frequently occurs in the Book of Orig- 
inal Distributions in which it is variously 
spelled "Semor, Seamor, Seeiner and Sey- 
more" : but in the fore part of the next cen- 
tury the name seems to have been spelled 
"Seymour," at least in legal documents. 

The four sons of Richard Seymottr were: 

1. Thomas, "my eldest sonn", undoubtedly 
born in England ; date of birth unknown ; set- 
tled in Norwalk, where he died, 1712: pro- 
genitor of the Norwalk Seymours. 

2. John, probably born in Hartford ; date 
of birth unknown ; removed to Norwalk with 
his father in 1652: removed to Farmington 
in 1655 after the death of his father: died at 
Hartford, 1713; progenitor of the Hartford, 



1854 



CONNECTICUT 



Litchfield, New Hartford and Utica (New 
York) Seymours. 

3. Zachary, born 1642, probably at Hart- 
ford; removed to Norwalk with his father in 
1652; removed to Farmington in 1655, after 
the death of his father ; freeman of Farming- 
ton, 1669; he was a merchant engaged in trade 
with the Barbadoes. He removed to Weth- 
ersfield, where he died August, 1702, ae. 60. 
He had no sons. 

4. Richard, probably born at Hartford ; date 
of birth unknown ; removed to Norwalk with 
his father, 1652 ; removed to Farmington with 
his mother in 1655 ; settled in Farmington ; 
freeman in Farmington, 1669: one of the 84 
proprietors of 1672 ; townsman, 1685 ; leader 
in 1686 in the pioneer settlement at tlie Great 
Swamp (Kensington) : captain of the Sey- 
mour fort built for the protection of these set- 
tlers and made of palisades sixteen feet long, 
sharp at the top and firmly set in the ground 
near together. Captain Seymour was killed 
in 1710 by the fall of a tree, and was the first 
person to be interred in a plot which he had, 
according to tradition, given to the town as a 
burial place. He was the progenitor of the 
Wethersfield, Newington, and Troy (New 
York) Seymours. 

(H) John, son of Richard Seymour, prob- 
ably born in Hartford and presumably the 
eldest son of Richard by Mercy ; date of birth 
unknown ; removed to Norwalk with his fa- 
ther about 1852; undoubtedly went to Far- 
mington in 1655 with his mother after her 
marriage to the Hon. John Steele. From Far- 
mington he removed to Hartford, but when 
we do not know. He appears in Hartford as 
early as March 15, 1664, when John Seymour, 
Joseph Stonhard. Nathaniel Butler, Joseph 
Easton Jr., Joseph Butler, Beuill Waters and 
John Watson, were fined ten shillings apiece 
for "their unreasonable conveening them- 
selves together at the house of Thomas Bunce. 
In his and his wives oiTfence". While we 
must deplore this "unseasonable conveening", 
whatever it was all about, we are grateful for 
the record of it, as it enables us to place John 
Seymour's marriage as prior to this date since 
his wife seems to have been present at this 
"party'' which, from this circumstance we 
cannot believe was a very reprehensible af- 
fair except in the eyes of a magistrate with 
an overheated imagination. His marriage 
probably took place not long before this gath- 
ering on March 15, 1664. His wife was 
Mary, daughter of John Watson and Marga- 
ret (Smith) Watson. Watson was an early 
comer in ITartford, although not an original 
proprietor, his name first appearing in 1644. 
John Seymour, who was made a freeman in 



1667, lived on the south branch of the Little 
river, within the limits of the present town 
of Hartford, near the Farmington road. In 
1688 the town "granted to John Seamor the 
parcel of woodland at the west end of the 
wood lot, he had by exchange with Sergt. Ja- 
cob White unto the river." In the course of 
the settlement of the estate of Mrs. Marga- 
ret Watson, the court allowed to John Seamor, 
September 6, 1683. the land he possessed, 
which was part of the home lot of his mother, 
provided the said Seamor do maintain the 
fence around their land, which John Watson 
the administrator affirmed to be the terms 
upon which the land was granted to said 
Seamor by his mother Watson". 

John Seymour was one of the founders of 
the Second Church at Hartford, on February 
12, 1669, when the name of "John Seamer" 
and "Mary Seamer" appear in the lists of 
those who "owned the Covenant''. They were 
received into the "full communion" on March 
31, 1678. Dr. Parker in his "History of 
the Second Church of Christ in Hartford", 
speaks of John Seymour "as an active and 
influential man" (p. 58). In his tribute to 
Thomas Seymour, Esq., first mayor of Hart- 
ford (a great-grandson of John, the son of 
Richard) Dr. Parker says: "For more than 
two hundred years this Seymour family main- 
tained an unbroken continuity of membership 
in this Church or Society which John Seamer 
helped to found, and for the greater part of 
that time exerted a commanding influence in 
its affairs" (p. 135). John Seymour was 
leather sealer 1673, and chimney-viewer for 
the north side in 1693. His will, dated De- 
cember ID, 1712, was proved August 3, 1713, 
and he died between these dates. Mary, his 
widow, survived him, but the date of her death 
is unknown. In his will, by which he disposed 
of a considerable estate, he appointed his "lov- 
ing Wife Mary Seamore" and his "loving 
friends Mr. Icliabod Wells and Mr. Thomas 
Hosmer" his executors. In the inventory of 
his effects, the item of the greatest interest to 
us is "a great bible 10 /". This is unques- 
tionably the "Bishop's Bible", already referred 
to, containing the arms of the ducal family of 
Seymour, and on another page a memoran- 
dum of a business transaction and the name 
"John Seimor, Hartford, 1666". 

Children: i. John, born June 12, 1666. 
2. Thomas, born March 12, 1669. 3. Mary, 
born November, 1670. 4. Zachary, born De- 
cember 22, 1672, probably died in infancy. 
5. Margaret, born July 17, 1674, baptized 
same day. 6. Richard, born February 11, 
1676, baptized same day. 7. Jonathan, born 
January 10, 1678, bai^tized January 19. 8. 



CONNECTICUT 



I8SS 



Nathaniel, horn November 6, 1680, baptized 
Novemhci" 7. 9. Zacharv, born January 10, 
1684. 

(Ill) John (2), son of John (i) Seymour, 
was born at Hartford, June 12, 1666, and 
married, December 19, 1683, Elizabeth, 
dautjhtcr of Lieutenant Robert and Susannah 
(Treat) Webster, and granddaughter of Gov- 
ernor John Webster. Her mother, Susannah 
Treat, was a sister of Governor Robert Treat. 
He lived on what was then known as the 
South road to Farmington, just west of Rocky 
Hill. Here his "Mansion House" was located, 
but he was an extensive land owner in Litch- 
field and Hartford counties, as appears by his 
will. With Elizabeth, his wife, he was "added 
to the Church and received to full commun- 
ion" of the Second, or South Church, March 
30, 1712. On December 20, 1720, he was 
elected surveyor of highways, and the next 
year was made one of the inspectors to see 
that the act concerning the cutting of wood, 
was duly executed. The act shows that the 
conservation of our forest resources is not a 
new thing by any means, and John Seymour 
is perhaps entitled to be enrolled among the 
earliest of American foresters in the service of 
the state. On September 21, 1722, "Mr. John 
Seymour" was placed by the town of Hart- 
ford on a committee to "view the Western 
Lands and to report in the next Town Meet- 
ing where may be the best place for a new 
Town." On December 25 following he was 
appointed, with Samuel Catlin and William 
Baker, on a committee representing Hartford 
to act in conjunction with a committee rep- 
resenting Windsor, "to make a further view 
of the Land West of the Easternmost Stream 
of Waterbury River, and Northward of Litch- 
field in order to the Settling another Town". 
In payment of his services in connection with 
these "Western Lands" he was granted sev- 
eral parcels of land in the new town of New 
Hartford, and was moderator of a meeting 
held at Hartford, December, 1723, of the first 
proprietors of the new town, where subse- 
quently several of his sons settled, where 
some of his descendants have lived until re- 
cently, and where the name bids fair to be 
perpetuated by a French family, who on their 
arrival in the old town promptly found it con- 
venient to change their name of Simard to 
Seymour, with what confusion to the anti- 
quarian of the future, time alone may reveal. 
In 1737 he was appointed by the general as- 
sembly one of a committee to settle the lo- 
cation of the meeting house at Wintonbury. 
From time to time he served on a committee 
appointed by the town of Hartford to lay out 
land to different individuals, &c., &c. Through- 



out a long life he seems to have constantly 
been in the public service. 

He died at Hartford, May 17, 1748, and is 
buried in the old burial ground back of Cen- 
ter Church. His tombstone, a rudely sculp- 
tured slab of red sandstone, bears the fol- 
lowing inscription : "Here Lies Interred the 
Body of Mr. John Seymour Who Died May 
the 17th A. D. 1748 Aged 84 Years". His wid- 
ow, Elizabeth, died May 15th, 1754, and lies 
buried beside him. His will, by which he dis- 
posed of an estate inventorying £603 01 06, 
was executed September, 1747, and witnessed 
by Ebenezer Webster, Medad Webster, both 
cousins, and George Wyllys. (See Hartford 
Probate Records, vol. xv, p. 197-8-9, 208, and 
Manwaring's "Early Connecticut Probate 
Records", vol. iii, p. 636-637). By his will he 
left lands in New Hartford to his sons John, 
Jonathan and Zebulon. By Elizabeth, his wife, 
lie had twelve children — nine sons and three 
daughters. 

Among his descendants may be mentioned 
Major Moses Seymour, of Litchfield, a Revo- 
lutionary officer of distinction, and Sherifif 
Ozias Seymour, his son ; the Hon. Thomas 
Seymour, first mayor of Hartford, and his son. 
Captain Thomas Youngs Seymour, a gallant 
soldier of the Revolutionary War ; Captain 
Thomas Hart Seymour, a grandson of Mayor 
Seymour, who served with distinction in the 
Mexican War ("Hero of Chapultepec"), was 
U. S. Minister to Russia and Governor of 
Connecticut ; Judge Origen Storrs Seymour 
of Litchfield, Chief Justice of Connecticut, son 
of SherifT Ozias Seymour ; Hon. Edward W. 
Seymour, Hon. Morris W. Seymour, and the 
Rev. Dr. Storrs O. Seymour, sons of Chief 
Justice Seymour ; Governor Horatio Sey- 
mour, of New York, and his sisters — Julia 
Chenevard Seymour, afterwards Mrs. Roscoe 
Conkling, and Helen Clarissa Seymour, aft- 
erwards Mrs. Ledyard Linklaen ; Major Gen- 
eral Truman Seymour, U. S. A. ; Hon. Ho- 
ratio Seymour, for many years U. S. senator 
from Vermont, and a great friend of Daniel 
Webster, who considered him the best lawyer 
in New England in his day ; Rt. Rev. George 
Franklin Seymour, late P. E. Bishop of 
Springfield, Illinois ; and the late Professor 
Thomas Day Seymour, of Yale. To this list 
might be added the names of many Seymours 
who. let us say, from 1700 to 1850, bore prom- 
inent parts in the civil, religious and social 
life of Hartford. 

The family as a family has been "noted for 
its military training and spirit", says Miss 
Talcott, who has collected a vast amount of 
material for a family history. The Hon. 
Morris W. Seymour has compiled a list of 



i8;6 



COXXECTICUT 



seventy men of tlie Connecticut family who 
took part in the Revohitionary \\'a.r, some of 
them with high distinction, and all of them 
with credit. 

( I\') John (3), son of John (2) Seymour, 
was born at Hartford, December 25, 1694; 
married June 25, 1718, Lydia, born August 
2, 1692, daughter of John and Hannah (Ar- 
nold?) jNIason; and (second), May 7, 1733, 
at ^^"est Hartford, Hannah, daughter of Da- 
vid and Hannah ( ) Ensign, of West 

Hartford, baptized at First Church, Hartford, 
February 10, 1711-12. 

After 1730 he lived on the corner where 
the middle road to West Hartford intersects 
"Quaker Lane"'. To this road he seems to 
have given his name, since it was long known 
as "the John Seymour road". At a town meet- 
ing held December 26, 1731, he was elected 
inspector of staddle wood, and again in 1732- 
33-37 ' i" 1739 hs ^^'^s elected inspector of 
staddle wood and leather sealer; in 1740 in- 
spector of wood and hayward : in 1741 con- 
stable: in 1742 leather-sealer, and in 1743-44 
inspector of wood. 

Staddle-wood (an Americanism) was a 
term applied to standing trees between four 
and eighteen inches in diameter. The annual 
election by that small community of an in- 
spector of wood shows the force of the Eng- 
lish traditions by which they were controlled. 
The Hartford of that time was of course sur- 
rounded by forests, but this did not prevent 
its citizens from adopting regulations for the 
conservation of the timber resources of the 
colony, and these regulations had their origin 
in England, where the scarcity of timber had 
been felt long before the settlement of New 
England and where stringent regulations for 
its preservation were already in force. 

On December 17, 1741, it was voted that 
John Seymour Junr., "have liberty to take, 
upon Lease, a piece of Land upon the Town 
Comons, for the purpose of sinking Tan- 
fatts therein". About 1750 (he was then 
fifty-six years of age), or it may have been 
earlier, he removed to New Hartford, then a 
frontier settlement, where his father, who was 
at this time alive, owned a large tract of land, 
the greater portion of which he gave or be- 
queathed to him. Here he lived in that part 
of the town known as West Hill, and here 
"]Mr. John Seymour departed this Life July 
25, 1758" (New Hartford Town Records). 
According to a tradition preserved by Miss 
Talcott, he lies buried in the Town Hill bur- 
ial ground, but no stone marks the spot to- 
day. His great-great-grandson, Henry Albert 
Seymour, of Bristol. (1818-1897) frequently 
went to the Town Flill burying ground as a 



boy, as his grandfather Spencer was buried 
there, but he had no recollection of ever see- 
ing any old Seymour gravestones. In "New 
Hartford, Past and Present," (Pub. New 
Hartford, 1883) the fewness of early stones 
is explained by the springy nature of the soil 
and the character of the stone used for grave- 
stones. "As far as can be found, the only 
graves of the first settlers which are traceable 
are those of Stephen Kelsey, died in 1745; 
Ensign Caleb Pitkin, died in 1768, and Joseph 
^Merrill in 1788". * * * "In what seems 
to have been the early Seymour plot, only one 
partial inscription can be traced — that of the 
grave of the wife of Uriah Seymour". It 
seems likely, then, that the tombstone of John 
Seymour 3rd, who died in 1758, disappeared 
long ago, if indeed he ever had one. His 
grandson, \\illiam Seymour, of Fredonia, 
Xew York, who as a small boy saw his grand- 
father, remembered that he had "a cancer in 
his jaws and face". 

By his two wives he had twenty children, 
all of whom were baptized either in Hartford 
or West Hartford. In "New Hartford, Past 
and Present" (before referred to) it is stated 
of John Seymour that "He was the father of 
twenty children, the majority of whom came 
with him, it is supposed, about 1750. Six of 
his sons settled in New Hartford, as follows: 
William, Uriah, Elias, Hezekiah, Elijah and 
David. His daughters married into the Steele, 
Flower, Marsh, Smith, Andruss, Moody and 
Kellogg families". The same compilation 
says, "Uriah Seymour was a man of intelli- 
gence and influence in town matters. He com- 
manded, as lieutenant, a detachment of mount- 
ed men who volunteered for the relief of 
Charlestown in 1775." Uriah's sons, Captain 
Sylvester Seymour and "Esquire" Chauncey 
Seymour, were among the foremost citizens of 
New Hartford in their day. Nathaniel Sey- 
mour, another of John Seymour's twenty chil- 
dren, died at Crown Point, October 20, 1760, 
"in the old French war". 

(X) William, son of John (3) Seymour, 
was born and baptized at West Hartford, Au- 
gust 18, 1728: removed to New Hartford with 
his father about 1750: married, at New Hart- 
ford, December 27, 1753, Mehitable Merrill, 
flaughter of Noah Merrill, "one of the first 
settlers of the town. Noah Merrill was the 
first man appointed town clerk of New Hart- 
ford, though he never acted in that capacity, 
having died before he took the oath of office. 
He died in 1739, his having been the first 
death among the pioneers". She was born 
May 25, 1734, and baptized in \\'est Hart- 
ford the next day. William Seymour, who 
was a farmer, died at New Hartford, March 



CONNECTICUT 



1 84 1 



William Prince, ami had: David, Charles, Jo- 
seph and James. 

(V) Captain Ebenezer Coley, eldest child 
of David and Mary. (Myde) Coley, was born 
October 19, 1741, died November 2, 181 1. 
He married (first) August 11, 1763, Abigail, 
born .March 21 1744, died February 3, 1797, 
daughter of Lieutenant Samuel Morehouse. 
He was captain of the militia prior to the rev- 
olution, and corporal during the revolution- 
ary struggle. He married (second) Alarcla 
23, 1798, Alary Gedfrey, born 1746, died Sep- 
tember 25, 1825. Children, all by first mar- 
riage: 1. Abigail, born July 4, 1764, died 
April 14, 181 1 ; married Shubael Gorham, and 
had : Sophia, Charlotte and Shubael. 2. More- 
house, see forward. 3. Ebenezer, Jr., born 
January 17, 1768, died November 11, 1823; 
marrieil, July 2, 1790, Rachel, born 1768, died 
March 9, 1816. daughter of John Goodsell ; 
children: i. Walter, born October 11, 1791, 
died September 5, 1858: married (first), No- 
vember 24, 1816, Anne, born October 10, 1796, 
died October i,- 1829, daughter of Nathaniel 
and Mercy (Coley) Wakeman, and had: a. 
Rachel, born October 7, 1817, died April 3, 
1887 : married. November 7, 1840, Benjamin, 
son of William Bradley, and had : Edward, 
Sarah, Joseph and .Arthur, b. Sally Wake- 
man, born August 30, 1820. married, February 
2, 1842, Jonas D. Hill, and had : Walter, Lu- 
cretia, Josephine and Ada. c. W^akeman, 
born February 20, 1823, died May 13, 1S23. 
d. Mary Ann, born August 15, 1S24, died 
July ID, 1826. Walter Coley married (sec- 
ond) November 4. 1834. Orra, daughter of 
Hezekiab, Jr., and Anna (Burr) Coley, and 
widow of Jonathan Coley, mentioned hereinbe- 
fore. Children : e. Walter, Jr., born Septem- 
ber 9. 1835. f. Mercy Ann, born December 
16, 1836, married Jarvis Taylor, g. Ebenezer, 
born April 26, 1838, died October 10, 1887, 
married, Alay 14. iSfii. Eleanor O., daughter 
of Samuel and Eleanor (Fillow) Gregory; 
children: Stanton, born December 17, 1864, 
married. May I, 1890, Susan M., daughter of 
John W. Hubble : Chester Ebenezer. born De- 
cember I, 1874. h. Samuel Morehouse, born 
May 2. 1839, married, December 16, 1862, 
Sarah E., daughter of Harry Nash, and had : 
W^illis. born July 16, 1864 : Elouise. born Sep- 
tember 29, 1865, married, June 9, 1882, Wil- 
liam Welsh : Florence Elizabeth, born Au- 
gust 26. 1875, married, January, 1895, Her- 
bert E. Bates, i. Henry Burr, born April 27, 
1848, married Helen A. Seymour, and had : 
Alice Burr, born August 14, 1869, married, 
October 8, 1890, William Kirk ; Florence 
Henrietta, born October 26. 1873. married, 
April, 1894, John Whitlock ; Infant, born 



lA'bruary 9, 1875, died 1875; Bertha Sey- 
mour, born July 16, 1877, married, October 
6, 1897, Oliver Henry Jennings, ii. David, 
born November 4, 1794, died 1864; married 
Sally, born 1807, died 1856, daughter of 
James Nash ; children : Mary, born 1827, died 
August 19, 1852; Anna, born 1829, died May 
16. 1886; Ebenezer, died February, 1883; Da- 
vid; Sarah Elizabeth, iii. Ebenezer, born 
July I, 1796, died July 6, 1796. iv. Samuel 
Morehouse, born January 19, 1804, died Jan- 
uary 21, 1883; married (first) November 29, 
1830, Alethea, born October 6, 1805, died 
March 12, 1835, daughter of Taylor and Bet- 
ty (Bennett) Hurlbutt; children: a. Rev. 
James Edward, born October 11, 1832, mar- 
ried. May 29, i860, Mary Gray, born Febru- 
ary 22, 1836, daughter of Rev. Enoch and 
Charlotte (Taylor) Huntington; children: 
Edward Huntington, married Julia Seely, 
daughter of Silas and Mary Elizabeth Co- 
vell, and had : Marjory Covell and Elizabeth 
Huntington ; Mary Pearsall, married ^^'illiam 
Gray, son of Captain William C. and Anne 
(Sankey) Staples, and had: Horace, Horace 
W^illiam, Mary Coley, Frank Huntington and 
Helen Huntington ; Francis Chase, married 
Cornelia Kelsey, daughter of Ambrose Spen- 
cer and Cornelia (Kelsey) Hurlbut. b. Sarali, 
born and died in September, 1834. Samuel 
Morehouse Coley married (second) Laura 
Dugas, born 1831, died December 7, 18S2, 
and had: Charles Goodsell, died October 18, 
1854. 4. Samuel, born June 6, 1770, died De- 
cember 30, 1850; married, June 23, 1791, Rhu- 
amah, born October 18, 1770, died September 
II, 1855, daughter of Eliphalec and Eunice 
(Bradley) Co'ley ; children: i. John, born 
March 2, 1798, died October 10, 1822. ii. 
Samuel, died April 12, 1835. iii. Eliphalet, 
twin of Samuel, died April 12, 1835. iv. Ed- 
son, married Jane Brittain, and had : John 
Brittain and Sarah Jane. 5. Michael, "born 
September 6, 1772, died December 17, 1807; 
married, July 13, 1793, Eunice, born 1776, 
died September 22, 1805, daughter of John 
and Abigail Hyde ; children : i. John Hyde, 
born October 16, 1796, died December 2, 
1865; married Matilda Beach, and had: a. 
l\Lary, born April 27, 1820, died December 
27, 1898 ; married Oliver S. Carter, b. Ju- 
lia W'., born February 22, 1826, died January 
2, 1892; married Henry G. Lewis, and had: 
Matilda Coley and Josephine Mites, c. A son, 
born May, 1832. died July 15. 1833. d. Wil- 
liam B., born 1834, died November 11, 1864. 
e. John Hyde. Jr., married Matilda Everett. 
ii. David, born August 16, 1799, died April 
9, 1872; married, January 6. 1819, Mary Ann, 
born November 22, 1799, died February 15 



1842 



CONNECTICUT 



1867, daughter of Aaron and Huldah Burr; 
■trhildren : a. Abigail Hyde, born August 24, 
1820, married, December 17, 1838, Talcott, 
who died January 18, 1888, son of Banks and 
Abigail (Jennings) Wakeman ; children: 
Mary Ellen, born May 11, 1840; Juha Coley, 
June 2, 1851. b. John Hyde, born June 30, 
1822, married, October 19, 1848, Harriet 
Philips, c. Mary Burr, born September 25, 
1824, married William Hill, and had: Mary, 
born November 4, 1842; John, born Septem- 
ber 12, 1845 : Harriet, d. Aaron Burr, born 
April 16, 1826, married, November 14, 1853, 
Harriet Spivey. e. Eunice, born July 13, 
1830, died October 14, 1858. f. Rachel, born 
January 9, died January 23, 1832. g. Rachel 
Hyde, born January 25, 1833, married, No- 
vember 14, 1853, Henry Grove, son of Allen 
and Lucy (Hotchkiss) Birge, and had: Ed- 
ward Coley, born October 18, 1855. h. Eliz- 
abeth, born September 10, 1836, died August 
4, 1868. i. Margaret, born July 26, 1838, died 
January 21, 1878. 6. Mary, born September 
9, 1774, died August 19, 1775. 7. Levi, born 
1778, died November 20, 1859; married, De- 
cember ID, 181 1, Mary Hyde, born 1790, died 
March 26, 1871, daughter of David, Jr., and 
Lydia (Sturges) Coley, and had: i. Mary 
Ann, born 1813, died April 3, 1834. ii. Da- 
vid Levi, born October 13, 1815, married 
Catharine, born August 22, 1819, died April 
13, 1889, daughter of Eben Sherwood, and 
had: a. Frederick, born July 11, 1845. b. 
Catharine S., born November 20, 1846, died 
April 6, 1849. c. Julia F., born July 11. 1848, 
died March 20, "1849. d. Katie E., born 
March 16, 1850. e. Julia Dimon, born No- 
vember 12, 1851, died 1897: married Fred- 
erick Sherwood, and had: Ralph Coley, born 
April 17, 1881. f. Maria L., born August 8, 
1854. g. Mary Andrews, born January 10, 
1856, died December 3, 1867. h. David L., 
Jr., born November 29, 1858, married Clara, 
daughter of Frederick and Jane Sherwood, 
and had a son, born February 4, 1894. iii. 
Levi David, born May 5, 1818, died November 
25, 1874; married Sarah M., daughter of 
Ward Nichols, and had: a. Mary Ann, born 
September- 20, 1845, married Cornelius, son 
of William J. and Jane A. Finch, b. Fran- 
cis William," born September 23, 1848, mar- 
ried, December 24, 1875, Minnie H. Tall- 
man, who died December 25, 1881, and had: 
Clarence Tallman and Maria L. c. Caroline 
C, born August 30, 1851, died December 8, 
1881; married, December 14, 1871, Charles 
G. Porter, and had: Charles R., born Sep- 
tember 30, 1872. d. Sarah J., born June 13, 
1854. e. Anna M., born June 4, 1856. f. 
William Francis, born May 4, 1859, married, 



January 26, 1881, Harriet, daughter of Henry 
L Hoyt, and had : William F., Jr., born De- 
cember II, 1883, died January 4, 1884; Henry 
L, born ]\Iarch 13, 1884, died March 30, 
1885. iv. Ebenezer, born 1821, died Novem- 
ber 27, 1852; married Jane, born February 2, 
1825, died July 27, 1859, daughter of Isaac 
Sturges, and had : a. Agnes Hope, married, 
February 25, 1879, Henry A. Thomson, and 
had: George, born March i, 1880; William 
Albro, born February 7, 1885. b. Jane Fran- 
ces, married Frank Weston, v. Frederick, 
born November i, 1825, died August 30, 1855: 
married, April 25, 1849, Harriet Banks, and 

had : Ella, married Smith ; Fanny, 

married Provost. vi. Frances M., 

twin of Frederick, died March 19, 1858; 
married, November 6, 1848, William Lansing. 
8. Mary, born 1780, married Abraham Ba- 
ker, and had : Ebenezer, Abraham, Mary and 
Sophia. 9. Hyde, born December 6, 1786, 
died May 15, 1789. 

(VI) Morehouse, eldest son and second 
child of Captain Ebenezer and Abigail (More- 
house) Coley, was born February 6, 1766, 
died October 6, 1843. He married, February 
17, 1789, Abigail, born March 6, 1767, died 
January 4, 1838, daughter of Jonathan and 
Sarah (Ogden) Ogden. Children: i. John 
Hyde, born May 11, 1790, died May 11, 1834; 
married, February 10, 1819, Hannah Downes, 
born November 12, 1793, died May 21, 1871 ; 
children: i. Morehouse, born August 15, 
1820, died January 30, 1863; married, Sep- 
tember 21, 1846, Mary, born June 6, 1820, 
daughter of Robert Holden, and had: a. Mar- 
cellus, born July 27, 1847, died September 12, 
1852. b. Robert Hyde, born April i, 185 1, 
married, April 28, 1874. Emily Amelia, 
daughter of Daniel B. Bradley, and had : 
Lulu May, born September 3, 1877. ii. John, 
born February 5, 1823, died September 19, 
1854. iii. Harriet Bradley, born April 30, 
1824, married. May 28, 1848, Eliphalet C, 
son of Solomon Gray, and had : a. Anne A., 
born September 21, 1850, married William H., 
son of Daniel B. Bradley, b. Maurice, born 
October 7, 1854, died November 25, 1874. iv. 
Samuel Burr, born December 5, 1826, died 
November 22, 1885. v. Mary A., born April 
14, 1829, died March 31, 1832. vi. Mary A., 
born January 7, 1833, died 1874: married 
Erastus Green. 2. Abigail, Ixirn November 
9, 1791, died August 2, 1867; married John, 
who died December 21, 1875, son of John 
Gray ; children : i. Mary Morehouse, born 
October 22, 1817, married Thomas Goodsell. 
ii. Deborah Ann, born May 16, 1821, mar- 
ried. May 22, 1842, Lewis Bradley, iii. Eliza 
Hull, born August 6, 1834, married, Septem- 




c^yCy L..€.'C^^c--c--'z.-t,^^ /<^ . V — -CTT^^-t-t/ 



CONNECTICUT 



1843 



ber 14, 1859, Henry M. Sherwood. 3. Lan- 
son, burn Auyust, 1795. died January 3, 1876; 
married (first) 1823, Sally, born September 
24, 1795, died Au.nust 4, 1S45, daugbter of 
Robert Downes : children: i. Polly Morehouse, 
born April 2, 1825, died December 26, 1898; 
married, October 16, 1844, George S., son 
of Jabez and Anna Adams, and had : a. 
George E., born October 8, 1845, died April 
9, 1857. b. William, born March 11, 1847, 
died ^lay 29, 1848. c. Sarah Georgiana, born 
August 19. 1849, died March 6, 1855. d. 
Emma Jane, born April 27, 185 1, married, 
January 21, 1874, Maurice Wakeman. e. 
Frank Herbert, born 1853, died June 8, 1856. 
f. Arthur Richards, born December 20, 1855, 
died January 7, 1856. g. Jessie Catharine, 
born November 5, 1856, married Joseph W. 
Hill. h. Infant, born and died 1858. i. John 
Lanson, born August 9, i860, j. Charles 
Francis, born March 3, 1864. k. Infant, 
born March 28, 1866, died 1866. 1. Henry 
Frederick, born June 23, 1867. ii. William 
Lanson, born November 14, 1826, married, 
November 17 or 19, 1855, Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Robert Holden, and had : a. William 
H., born September 8, 1856, died August 19, 
1863. b. Aliriam, married, April 22, 1896, 
John Allen Birge. c. John Lanson, born Oc- 
tober 3, 1869. iii. Abigail Jane, born Octo- 
ber 16, 1838, married, May 16, i860, Henry 
A., born September 29, 1831, son of John 
Hyde and Abby (Sherwood) Ogden, and 
had: Harold Hyde, born February i, 1861. 
Lanson Coley married (second) August 30, 
1848, Emily, daughter of Daniel Sanford, 
and had: iv. Sarah Abiah, born March, 1851, 
died April 27, 1890 ; married, December 29, 
1875, Daniel Burr, son of Daniel Burr Brad- 
ley, and had : Herbert Sanford, born De- 
cember 16, 1877, died May 14, 1883. 4. Mary, 
born August 12, 1798, died November 4, 1824. 
5- William, see forward. 6. Jonathan Ogden, 
baptized June 10, 1800. 

(VII) "William, third son and fifth child of 
A-Iorehouse and Abigail (Ogden) Coley, was 
born April 30, 1799, died April 13, 1886. He 
married Eunice, born November 19, 1798, died 
September 19, 185 1, daughter of Silliman and 
Mar}' (Coley) Fanton. Children: i. Hor- 
ace Bradley, see forward. 2. Chauncey, born 
March 18, 1836, died August 6, 1873 ; mar- 
ried Susan A. Bradley, and had : Virginia 
E., born October i, 1859, died March 4, 1884; 
married Horace A. Morehouse. 

(A^III) Horace Bradley, eldest child of 
William and Eunice (Fanton) Coley, was 
born June 29, 1829. He married (first) Jan- 
uary 5, 1852. Polly Sophia Wakeman: child, 
Henry Bradley. He married (second) Cla- 



rina Bradley Wakeman (sec Wakeman VIII 
and IX). Children: i. Carrie E., born De- 
cember 5, 1859, died February 22, 1892 ; mar- 
ried, September 5, 1889, Dr. Frank Gorham. 
2. William Bradley, see forward. He married 
(third) October 13, 1863, Abbey A., who died 
November 28, 1879, daughter of Solomon 
Gray. Children : 3. Henry Wakeman, born 
January 8, 1867. 4. Abby H., born May 21, 
1870, died April 4, 1889. 5. Mary, died 
March 8, 1889. 6. Horace Bradley, Jr., born 
November 3, 1874, died March 12, 1876. He 
married (fourth) Ellen A., daughter of Sol- 
omon Gray. 

(IX) Dr. William Bradley Coley, second 
child and only son of Horace Bradley and 
Clarina Bradley (Wakeman) Coley, was born 
in Westport, Connecticut, January 12, 1862. 
His early education was acquired in his native 
town at the private school of Rev. James E. 
Coley, and from thence he went to the Easton 
Academy. He then matriculated at Yale Uni- 
versity, in 1880, from which he was gradu- 
ated in the class of 1884 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. He was engaged as senior 
master at the Bishop Scott grammar school 
at Portland, Oregon, for the next two years, 
then entered the Harvard Medical School, be- 
ing graduated from that institution in 1888 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. The 
New York Hospital was the scene of his next 
activities, and he served as interne at that in- 
stitution for two years, on the surgical serv- 
ices of Dr. Robert F. Weir and Dr. William 
T. Bull. He was instructor in surgery at 
the New York Post-Graduate Medical School 
from 1891 to 1897: clinical lecturer at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, 1897 to 
1907 ; was then appointed associate in sur- 
gery, which position he held until 1909, when 
he was appointed professor of clinical sur- 
gery at Cornell University Medical School, 
of New York City. Dr. Coley is chairman 
of the Collis P. Huntington Cancer Research 
Fund in connection with the General Memo- 
rial Hospital, at which he has been attend- 
ing surgeon for twenty years ; he is also at- 
tending surgeon at the Hospital for the Rup- 
tured and Crippled. June 22, 1910, the hon- 
orary degree of Master of Arts was conferred 
upon him by Yale University, in recognition 
of his eminent services in medical and surgical 
scientific research. He is equally honored at 
Harvard University, for which institution he 
was instrumental in securing a large endow- 
ment. On June 26, 191 1, he received the 
honorary degree of Master of Arts from Har- 
vard. The" discoveries which his careful 
investigations have enabled him to make 
have earned for him a world-wide reputation. 



i844 



CONNECTICUT 



ami, in July, 1909, he was invited to give an 
address upon The Treatment of Inoperable 
Sarcoma (cancer) by Bacterial Toxins before 
the Surgical Section of the Royal Society 
of Medicine in London, a method of treatment 
original with himself. He has written a 
number of monographs on abdominal sur- 
gery and malignant tumors, and other sub- 
jects, and these have been published in the 
leading medical journals. When his first pa- 
per upon the radical cure of hernia in chil- 
dren appeared, 1893, a number of surgeons 
upheld the opinion that in children there 
should never be an operation for this trouble, 
as it could be cured by mechanical means 
alone. Dr. Coley replied to this criticism by 
making an analysis of fifteen thousand cases 
of hernia observed . at the Hosiiital for Rup- 
tured and Crippled in adults, in order to as- 
certain as nearly as possible the number which 
gave a history of hernia in infancy and child- 
hood. The careful study given to these cases 
developed the fact that at least one-third of 
those under fourteen years of age, who suf- 
fered from inguinal hernia, were not cured 
by mechanical treatment, therefore, operative 
methods which were free from risks were well 
justiiied. In a short time his views were fully 
accepted. 

The limits of this article will not permit 
a full list of the writings of Dr. Coley, but 
among the large number are the following : 
"Operative Treatment of Hernia in Children," 
1893 ; "The Influence of Injury upon the De- 
velopment of Sarcoma." 1898; "The Parasitic 
C)rigin of Cancer," 1893 ; "Treatment of Inop- 
erable Malignant Tumors with Toxins of Ery- 
sipelas and Bacillus Prodigiosus," 1893-1911; 
"TheDisadvantages of Non-absorbable Sutures 
in Operations for the Radical Cure of Hernia," 
1896; "Acute Traumatic Malignancy," 1901 ; 
"The Influence of the Roentgen Rays upon 
Sarcoma," 1902; "Amputation at the Hip 
Joint for Sarcoma," 1903 ; "Bone Sarcoma," 
1908: "Injury as a Causative Factor in Can- 
cer," 191 1. He is also the author, cojointly 
with the late Dr. \A^illiam T. Bull, of the sec- 
tion on hernia in "Dennis System of Surgery" 
and "International Text Book of Surgery." 
He also wrote the part on hernia of Keen's 
"System of Surgery," recently published. 

The political affiliations of Dr. Coley are 
with the Republican party, and he is a mem- 
ber of the following-named organizations : 
New York Academy of Medicine ; New York 
Surgical Society ; New York Pathological So- 
ciety : the University Club ; Harvard and Yale 
clubs of New York ; the New York Hospital 
Alumni Association. He is entitled to mem- 
bershir in the Sons of the American Revolu- 



tion. He is a fellow of the American Surgical 
Association ; also of the Southern Surgical 
and Gynecological Association ; a member of 
the State Medical Society, of the "American 
^ledical Association, and of the Harvard 
Medical Society of New York, having served 
as president of the last named in 1902. He 
was president of the. New York Hospital 
Alumni Association, 1910-11. He is also a 
Fellow of the American Academy of Science. 

Dr. Coley married, June 4, 1891, Alice, 
born at Newton, Massachusetts, July 15, 1866, 
daughter of Charles Bartlctt and Mary Eliz- 
abeth (Bracket) Lancaster, who were mar- 
ried in i860: Mrs. Lancaster was born at 
Newton, April 13, 1837, died December 2, 
1902. Mrs. Coley, by right of her descent, is 
entitled to membership in the Daughters of 
the American Revolution and in the May- 
flower Society. Children, born in New York 
City: I. Bradley Lancaster, December 2^, 
1892. 2. ]\lalcolm, November 29, 1896, died 
September 23, 1901. 3. Helen Lancaster, 
September 2, 1907. 

(The Wakeman Line). 

(I) Francis Wakeman, of P.ewdley, 
W^orcestershire, England, was the English an- 
cestor of this family, and died September 2, 
1626. He married at Eastham, England, now 
in Tenbury, Anne Goode, who died January 
29, 1621. Children: i. Mary, baptized 1591, 
married, January 14, 1622, John Woven, and 
had : Mary. 2. Sarah, married, April 30, 
1621, Richard Hubbell, and had: Ricliard. 3. 
Martha, died in New Haven, Connecticut, 
1664: married, November 30. 1621, in Bewd- 
ley, William Davis, who died 1659. and had: 
John, who died at sea in 1657; Sarah, mar- 
ried William Russell, and had : Noadiah and 
Anna. 4. John, see forward. 5. Samuel, 
born in England, was killed at the Bahamas, 
1641 ; married Eliza . and had chil- 
dren: i. A son who died at sea in 1631. ii. 
Eliza, married Joseph, born in England, died 
in Connecticut, son of John and Susanna 
Arnold, and settled in Haddam, Connecticut ; 
children : John, Joseph, Samuel, Susannah, 
Jonathan and Elizabeth, iii. Ezbon, died in 
1683. iv. Joanna, married Francis Hacleton, 
of Northampton and later of Hartford, v. 
Grace, married John Kelly. 6. Isaac, died 
April 14, 1609. 7. Joseph, baptized April 23, 
1609. 8. Anne, married ."Xdam Nichols prior 
to 1645, ^T^ 'i^d : John : Barachiah : Anna ; 

Esther, who married Ellis ; Lydia ; 

Sarah: Ebenezer. 9. Hester, married (first) 
Thomas Selden. and had: i. Thomas, mar- 
ried Feliz, daughter of ^^'ilIiam and Mary 
(Hopkins) Lewis, of Farmington. ii. John, 



CONNECTICUT 



■845 



died May. 1O50. iii. Alary, married John 
Ta)Ior. iv. Esther, died i()5i. v. Joseiih. 
married Rebecca, daughter of Deacon Ed- 
ward and Alary Church, vi. Hannah, died 
unmarried, 1695. vii. Esther, viii. Sarah. 
Mr.s. Selden married (second) Andrew War- 
ner, and died at Hadley, Connecticut. 10. 
Priscilla, married Tliomas Ricliards, and had : 
Mary and Thomas. 

(II) John, son of Francis and Anne 
(Goode) ^^'akeman, was born at Bewdley, 
England, about 1598-99, baptized March 21, 
1601, and died at Hartford, Connecticut, 
1661. He emigrated to this country in 1640, 
and held many important public offices in the 
colonies. He married, at Bewdley, January 
28, 1628-29, Elizabeth, baptized in Ribbes- 
ford Church, England, October 10, 1610, 
died at New Haven, Connecticut, 1658, 
daughter of ^^'illiam and Helen (Vickaris) 
Hopkins, who were married October 30, 1609. 
Children: i. John, baptized July 25, 1630, 
died January 19, 1636. 2. Hellena, baptized 
December 23, 1632, died June 22, 1674; mar- 
ried, October 29, 1650, Lieutenant-colonel 
John Talcott, who died July 23, 1688 ; chil- 
dren : i. John, born November 24, 1651. ii. 
John, born December 14, 1653, married Abi- 
gail Tibbals. iii. Elizabeth, born February 
21. 1655. iv. Samuel, born August 21, 1658, 
died April 4, 1661. v. Mary, born April 26, 
1661, died April 19, 1723; married, about 
1692. Richard Edwards, who was grandfa- 
ther, by his first wife, of Rev. Jonathan Ed- 
wards, vi. Hannah, born December 8, 1663. 
died March 28, 1696 ; married Lieutenant 
Governor Nathan Gold, Jr. vii. Dorothy, 
born February 20, 1666. viii. Governor Jo- 
seph, born November 16, 1669. ix. Hellena, 
born June 17, 1674. 3. Samuel, see forward. 
4. Elizabeth, baptized September 16, 1638, 
married, March 11, 1656-57, Samuel Kitchell, 
of Newark, New Jersey, born 1633, died April 
20, 1690; children: i. Sarah, born December 
9, 1657. ii. Elizabeth, born February i, 1659; 
married Seth, son of ]\Iichael Tompkins, of 
Milford, Connecticut, who harbored the 
judges of King Charles in his house, iii. 
Abigail, born August 10. 1661, married John 
Wood, of Newark, New Jersey, iv. Samuel. 
V. I\Iary, married Josiah ^^^ard, of Newark, 
vi. Susanna, married Ensign Jonathan Bald- 
win, of Milford, Connecticut. Samuel Kitch- 
ell married (second) Grace Pierson, and had: 
Abraham and Grace. 

(III) Rev. Samuel Wakeman, second son 
and third child of John and Elizabeth (Hop- 
kins) W^akeman, was baptized June 7, 1635. 
died March 8, 1692. He was married in New 
Haven, Connecticut, August 28, 1656, by Gov- 



ernor Stephen Cioodyear, to the hitter's daugh- 
ter Hannah, who married (second j Nathaniel 
Burr, and died 1721. Children: i. Samuel, 
born October 12, 1657, died 1691 : married 
(first) Mary, daughter of Jehu Burr, and 
had : Mary, who died at the age of sixteen 
years. He married (second) Sarah, daugh- 
ter of John Knowles, and- had : Sarah, born 
May 13, 1691, died November 28, 1710. His 
widow married (second) Dugald MacKenzie. 
2. John, see forward. 3. Ebenezer, born 
1668, died 1690; was distinguished for his 
military service. 4. Joseph, born 1670, died 
December 5, 1726; held the rank of captain 
and left an estate of more than five thousand 
pounds: he married, 1697-98, Elizabeth, born 
May 6, 1679, died August 18, 1753, daughter 
of Ebenezer and Esther (Ward) Hawley, 
granddaughter of Ensign William and Debo- 
rah (Lockwood) ^^'ard, and great-grand- 
daughter of Hon Andrew Ward. Children: 
i. Ebenezer, born January 10, 1699, died Sep- 
tember 25, 1726; married Sarah Sturges, and 
had: Ebenezer, born June 26, 1725, who was 
distinguished as justice and deputy in Fair- 
field, ii. Catherine, baptized April 27. 1700, 
died September 25, 1753; married, October 
18, 1722, John Burr, and had: Catherine, 
married Robert Wilson ; Sarah, married Dan- 
iel Silliman ; Ann, married Thomas Sher- 
wood ; John ; Deborah, married Ichabod 
WHieeler ; Elizabeth, married Colonel Abra- 
ham Gold ; Mary, married Ebenezer Bar- 
tram ; Justus : Abigail : Ozias ; Amos ; Wake- 
man, iii. Elizabeth, baptized April 19, 1702, 
died June 16, 1753 ; married Captain Samuel 
Burr, and had : Mehitable, married Joseph 
Squire: Seth, died unmarried: Samuel: Dan- 
iel : Ebenezer ; Nehemiah : Ellen, married Cap- 
tain Abel Gold : Elizabeth, married Samuel 
Silliman ; Charles. Captain Samuel Burr 
married (second) Ruth Bulkley. iv. Joseph, 
born 1703. died September 2^. 1762: married 
Abigail, daughter of Gideon and Annah 
Burr Allen, and had: Ann, married Isaac 
Gorman ; Joseph : Mary, married John Haz- 
zard ; Joseph ; Abigail, married John, son of 
Joseph Gorham. v. Jabez. born 1705-06, died 
October 10, 1774; married, June i, 1727, 
Ruth, daughter of Timothy ami Sarah (Sher- 
wood) Treadwell, and had: Hannah Eliza- 
beth, married Stephen Hull; \Mlliam. mar- 
ried Sarah, daughter of Joseph and .Abigail 
(Dimon) Hill: Joseph; Sarah, married Sam- 
uel Bradley Jr., of Greenfield Hill; Jabez; 
Joseph ; Jabez ; Mable, married George, son 
of Colonel Andrew and Sarah (Sturges) 
Burr ; Peter, married Sarah Jennings ; Eu- 
nice, married Lewis Goodsell ; Timothy, mar- 
ried Anna, daughter of Rev. John Sherwood, 



1846 



CONNECTICUT 



of Stratfield, Connecticut ; Joel, married Ra- 
chel Thorp, vi. Samuel, baptized January 30, 
1709, died in infancy, vii. Mary, baptized 
July 23, 1710, died INIarch 19, 1743; married, 
August 4, 1736, William, son of Colonel John 
Burr, and had : William, who died in infancy, 
viii. Samuel, born 1713, died August 15, 1752; 
was ensign and lieutenant of the First Com- 
pany in Fairfield ; married Ruth , and 

had : Catherine, married Abraham Andrews ; 
Hannah, married Samuel Andrews ; Mary, 
married Isaac Tucker ; Andrew, was captain, 
and married (first) Hannah, daughter of Da- 
vid Allen, (second) Eunice, daughter of John 
and Eunice Smedley ; Elizabeth ; Elizabeth, 
married Colonel Jonathan Dimon. ix. Ste- 
phen, born 1716, died March 23, 1760; mar- 
ried, January 11, 1734, Mary, daughter "Of 
Stephen x^dams, and had : Eunice, married 
Elihu Burritt, who served in the revolution ; 
Captain Stephen, married Mary, daughter of 
Nathaniel and Ann (Silliman) Adams; Jes- 
sup, married Amelia, daughter of Nehemiah 
and Abigail (Bradley) Banks: Sarah, married 
Benjamin Banks, of Greenfield ; Mary ; Bet- 
sey, married Zalmon Bradley ; Mary, married 
Seth Sherwood. 5. Rev. Jabez, born 1678, 
died October 8, 1704; married, at Southamp- 
ton, Long Island, September 29, 1702. Eunice, 
daughter of Colonel Matthew Howell, and 
had: Samuel, born September 27, 1704, died 
in infancy. His widow married Governor 
Joseph Talcott. 6. Mary, married Michael 
Clugstone, and had : John, Samuel and Mary. 
7. Ann, married Abraham Howell, who was 
major of a regiment in Sufifolk county. Long 
Island, in 1700. 8. Elizabeth, married Albert 
Denny, and had: i. John, married (first) 
Mary, daughter of John and Mary (Han- 
ford) Edwards, of Stratfield, Connecticut, and 
(second) Sarah, daughter of Rev. Joseph and 
Elizabeth (Nichols) Webb, of Fairfield; he 
was the grandfather of William Hooper, one 
of the signers of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, and of Joseph Dennie, editor of the 
Portfolio, and author of "The Lay Preacher." 
ii. Grizzell, married Rev. Daniel Chapman, 
iii. Margaret, died young, iv. Annabel, died 
young. V. James, baptized March 14, 1702-03, 
married (first) Eunice , (second) Sar- 
ah , and had : Eunice, who married 

Thaddeus Burr ; Sarah, who married Rev. 
James Sayre. 

(IV) Captain John (2) Wakeman, second 
son and child of Rev. Samuel and Hannah 
(Goodyear) Wakeman, was born 1659, died 
February 15, 1709. He was captain of the 
train band in the east end of the town of 
Fairfield. He married, April 24, 1687, Mar- 
tha, who died June 5, 1710, daughter of Rich- 



ard and Elizabeth Hubbell. Children: i. 
Hellena, born August 24, 1689, died Febru- 
ary 12, 1710-11. 2. Ann, born March 24, 
1692. 3. Samuel, born February 24, 1693, 
died October 19, 1771 ; married Elizabeth, 
born 1695, died March 14, 1759, and had: 
i. Eleanor, baptized August 8, 1726. ii. Mo- 
ses, baptized August 8, 1726, died May 14, 
1764; married, August 21, 1745, Mary, 
daughter of John Goodsell, and had: Epa- 
phras, married Eunice, daughter of Ephraim 
Nichols ; Eliphalet, married Katherine, daugh- 
ter of William Bennett, of Weston, Connecti- 
cut ; Elizabeth, married James Hill : Mary, 
married Fitch, of Pennsylvania ; Sar- 
ah, married Elisha Thorp, of Easton. and re- 
moved to Nova Scotia ; Samuel, iii. Anne, 
baptized August 8, 1726, married Nathan 
Hubbell. iv. Elizabeth, baptized 1729. mar- 
ried, January 23, 1746, John Lyon, of Lanes- 
borough, Massachusetts, and had : Jabez, 
Thomas, John, Elizabeth and Jojm. v. Sarah, 
baptized October 5, 173 1, died January 18, 
1769; married, November 2, 1756, Gershom 
Hubbell. vi. Samuel, baptized March 10, 
1734, died August 6, 1809; was lieutenant and 
captain of the Fourth Regiment : married, 
January 17, 1740, Mabel, daughter of Tim- 
othy and Sarah (Rowland) Burr; children: 
Lloyd, of Ballston Spa, New York, married 
Sarah Redfield ; Anne ; Samuel, of Ballston 
Spa, married Caty Beach, of Weston, Con- 
necticut ; Mable ; Ezekiel, of Ballston Spa, 
married Sarah, daughter of John Wheeler, of 
Weston, Connecticut ; Jesse ; Eleanor, mar- 
ried Judge Stephen Wheeler, of Weston, Con- 
necticut ; Sarah, married David Bradley, of 
Weston, Connecticut ; Jesse, married Eleanor, 
daughter of Epaphras Wakeman, of Green- 
field Hill, Connecticut. 4. Elizabeth, born 
June I, i69S,_ died 1737. 5. Martha, born 
September 24, 1700, married, in Stratfield, 
February 2, 1720-21, Israel, born 1693, died 
after 173 1, son of Rev. Charles Chauncey, and 
had : Sarah and Abigail. 6. Stephen, born 
October 15, 1702, died 1761-62; married, in 
Fairfield, Connecticut, April 28, 1727. Rebec- 
ca, baptized February 24, 1712, died 1762, 
daughter of Daniel Morehouse ; children : i. 
Sarah, born March 15, 1728, died June it, 
1728. ii. David, baptized January 11, 1730, 
died January 13, 1813-14; married Mary E., 
daughter of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Coley) 
Jennings, of Faii-field, Connecticut, and had : 
Jeremiah, married Phoebe, daughter of John 
Hendricks ; Mary, married David Gilbert ; 
Sarah, married Thomas Ludington, of Dutch- 
ess county. New York; David, married Es- 
ther ; Eunice, married James Tread- 
well, iii. Daniel, born April 6, 1732, married 



CONNECTICUT 



1847 



Esther, daughter oi jnhn and ICsthcr ( llrad- 
Icy) Hill, and had: Sarah, iv. Eunice, born 
January 31, 1735, thed January 29, 17^)5; 
married Xathan, son of John and Esther 
(Bradley) Hill, and had: Eunice, married 
Daniel Meeker ; Aaron: Sarah; Stephen, v. 
Squier, born June 29, 1738, married Daniaris, 
daughter of David and Damaris (Davis) 
Bradley, and had : Olive, Olive and Dama- 
ris. vi. Stephen, born November 19, 1740, 
died May 7, 1744. vii. James, born March 
19, 1742, died about April, 1768; probably 
married, viii. Stephen, born October 23, 
1743, died about April, 1768; probably mar- 
ried, ix. Sarah, born January 26, 1748, died 
April 26, 1779; married John Alvord, and 
had: John and David, x. Noah, born No- 
vember 28, 1751. died Xovcml^er 5, 1777; 
married (first) Lydia Wheeler, (second) 
Mary, probably daughter of David Bradley. 
7. John, see forward. 

(V) John (3), third son and seventh and 
youngest child of Captain John (2) and Mar- 
tha ( Hubbell ) W'akeman, was born August 
27. 1705, died 1789-90. He married Cath- 
erine, born July, 1706, died April 9, 1777, 
daughter of Moses and Jane Gilbert. Chil- 
dren : I. Ebenezer, born January 20, 1729, 
died June 20, 1730. 2. John, see forward. 3. 
Gershom, born November 8, 1731, died May 
30, 1781 : he served in the revolution and was 
slain by the British at Compo, Westport, Con- 
necticut ; married (first) April 15, 1757, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of David Down; (second) 
April 12, 1781, Mrs. Huldah Williams, daugh- 
ter of Hubbell. Children, all by first 

marriage : i. Abigail, born March 10, 1758, 
married Moses Banks, and had : Wakeman ; 
Wakeman : Mary, married Captain W. Mee- 
ker, ii. Abel, born ^March 19, 1760, died Au- 
gust 13, 1820; married Eunice Down, and had 
Susan, married Sturges Morehouse ; Abel ; 
Frederick, iii. Gershom, born April 11, 1762, 
died April 5, 1848 ; married Sibbell Bradley, 
and had : Lucy, married Joseph Odell ; Wake- 
man ; Jane ; Mary, married Alonzo Wakeman. 
iv. ^lolly, born July 21, 1765, died Novem- 
ber 22. 1829 ; married Jonathan Banks, and 
had : Jonathan ; Zalmon ; Abram ; Sally ; Pol- 
ly, married Charles Nichols ; Sophia. v. 
Isaac, born ;\Iarch 13, 1768, died Septem- 
ber 23, 1844 ; married Sarah Bradley, and 
had : Clara, married Coville Buckley ; Hora- 
tio P., married Rachel, daughter of Nathan 
Lobdell : Ezekiel B. vi. Betsey, vii. Parme- 
lia, born May 7, 1772, died February 18, 1862 ; 
married (first) Gershom Sherwood, (sec- 
ond) Jeremiah Sherwood: children by first 
marriage : Fanny, married Zalmon Banks ; 
Cynthia, married Daniel Bradley ; children by 



second marriage: GerslKim W'akeman ; Par- 
melia, married \\'illiam P>anks ; Delia M., 
married Eli W'akeman. viii. Setli, born Janu- 
ary 15, 1774, died April 8, 1775. ix. Seth 
Burr, born December 10, 1775, died February 
24, 1857; married (first) February 23, 1805, 
Clara, daughter of Jesse Nichols, (second) 
April 15, 1831, Sarah, daughter of Nathan 
and Mabel ( Bulkley ) Wheeler, and had by 
the first marriage : Horace, married Jean- 
nette, daughter of John Becker ; Alonzo, mar- 
ried (first) Catherine, daughter of Peter Stall, 
(second) Mary, daughter of Joseph and Lucy 
(Wakeman) Odell: Horatia ; Maria, married 
Joseph Sharp ; Charles. 4. Ebenezer. born 
July 20, 1737, died March 31, 1823; married 
(first) May 3, 1764, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Josiah and Susanna (Disbrow) Webb; (sec- 
ond) Sarah, daughter of Daniel and Mary 
(Hubbell) Shelton ; children, all by first mar- 
riage : i. Elizabeth, born June 20, 1765, died 
June 4, 1835; married Hoyt Banks, and had: 

Milly, married Wheeler ; Ebenezer ; 

Emily, married Charles Winton ; Albert ; 
Noah ; Charles, ii. Eunice, born August 10, 
1766, married Asa Squire, and had: Eben- 
ezer, Morris, Sarah, Anne and Mary. iii. Eb- 
enezer, born March 4, 1770, died October 12, 
1848: married Eunice, daughter of Seth and 
Dorothy (Williams) Bradley, and had: Cla- 
rissa, married Ebenezer Hawkins ; Errata, 
married Wakeman Hull : Wyllis, married 
Anna, daughter of Edmond and Esther (Bar- 
low) Jennings; Matilda, married (first) Miles 
Lockwood. (second) James Blackman ; Pau- 
lina, married Abijah Wallace ; Catherine, mar- 
ried Robert Sage ; Eunice, married John Wal- 
lace ; Fanny, married Orrin Sherwood : Hap- 
py, married William Patterson Knapp ; Fred- 
erick : Frederick Bradley, married (first) 
Anna B., daughter of Stephen and Urilla 
(Goodsell) Sherwood, (second) Sally, daugh- 
ter of Levi and Polly (Patchen) Robertson; 
George ; Elizabeth, iv. Abijah, married Mary 
Buckley, and had: Charles, married (first) 
Lydia, daughter of John and Sarah (Bennett) 
Rlitchell, (second) Debby (^litchell) Bacon, 
daughter of John JMitchell : Caroline : Mary, 
married Cyrus Beardsley ; Maria, married Jo- 
seph West ; Harriet, married Randolph A. 
HufYord ; Caroline, v. Jonathan, died at Al- 
bany, July 6, 1843 ; married Clara, daughter 
of Thaddeus and Esther (Bradley) Wake- 
man, and had : Hon. Abram, married Mary 
E., daughter of Cyrus and Mary (Lee) Har- 
wood : James, married (first) Rath- 
bun, (second) Rebecca Oothout, (third) 
Elizabeth Oothout : Thaddeus Burr, married 
Emily Frances, daughter of Elbert and Mary 
S. (Cock) Ludlam ; Caroline, vi. Abram. 



1848 



CONNECTICUT 



vii. Rachel, born September 24, 1768, died 
October 7, 1768. viii. Mary, twin of Ra- 
chel, died November, 1768. ix. Sarah, born 
about 1777, died February 14, 1857 ; mar- 
ried Richard Firman or Fairman, and had : 
Julia ; Harriet, married William Banks. 5. 
Eleanor, born April 9, 1739, died 178 — : mar- 
ried. May 3. 1764, Eliphalet Lyon, and had: 
i. Wakeman, born January 25, 1765, died Alay 
23, 17 — . ii. Eleanor, born April 18, 1767, 

married ^^'ilson. iii. Eliphalet, born 

March 28, 1771, died August 7, 1846. iv. 
Rowland, born May 13, 1774, died February 
4' 1775- V. Lucinda, born December 27, 
1777, died September 26, 1833. 6. Abigail, 
born September 22, 1741, died iNIarch 3. 1847; 
married (first) March 8, 1758, Seth Meeker, 
(second) David Jennings; children, all by 
first marriage : i. Seth, baptized May 6, 1759. 
ii. Joseph, baptized June i, 1761. iii. Abigail, 
baptized February 12, 1764. iv. Samuel, liap- 
tized September 18. 1768. v. Eleanor, bap- 
tized March 18, 1770, married S. Morehouse. 
vi. Mary, married Nathan Treadwell. vii. 
Huldah, baptized March 19, 1780, married 
Hezekiah Ogden. viii. ^^'akeman, baptized 
January 3, 1784. ix. Joseph G., baptized Feb- 
ruary 20, 1785. 7. Seth, born January 30, 
1744. died July 18, 1770; it is supposed that 
he married and was the father of : Seth, died 
January 9, 1838: married Sarah, daughter of 
Thaddeus F)ennett, and had : Alphonson or 
Alonzo ; Edgar Bennett : Almira ; Seth Mel- 
nor ; Thaddeus Burr, married Hannah, daugh- 
ter of Gershom Bennett; Mary Louise; 
George P. ; William. 8. Thaddeus, born Sep- 
tember 19, 1745, married, November 10, 1772, 
Esther, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Burr) 
Bradley ; children : i. Daniel, born and died, 
April 24, 1773. ii. Esther, born January 29, 
died April 24, 1775. iii. Thaddeus Burr, born 
September 13, 1778, died November, 1848; 
was a founder and secretary of the American 
Institute of New York. iv. Esther, born Sep- 
tember 23, 1781, died October 25, 1807. v. 
Clara, born 1784, died November 16. 1850; 
married Jonathan Wakeman. and had ; 
Abram, James, Thaddeus Burr and Caroline, 
all mentioned above, vi. Eunice (?). vii. 
Daniel, born 1784, died May 30, 1867; mar- 
ried Mary, daughter of Benjamin W. Hallett, 
and had ; Sarah, married Philander Ferry ; 
Irene J. ; Ida Frances, married John Burr, 
viii. Abraham, died November 21, 1815. 9. 
Jane, born January 7, died January 27, 1848. 
ID. Catherine, born January 24, 1750-51, mar- 
ried Ichabod Wheeler. 11. Hannah. 

(VI) John (4), second son and child of 
John (3) and Catherine (Gilbert) Wakeman, 
was born January 29, 1730-31, died July 24, 



1809. He served as private in the Fourth 
Regiment, Connecticut Militia, Colonel Gold 
S. Silliman, May, 1776; in the Coast Guard, 
October, 1776: at Peekskill, under Lieutenant- 
Colonel Jonathan Dimon, October, 1777. He 
married, in Greenfield, Connecticut, October 
3, 1753, Esther, born September 2, 1736, died 
December 20, 1808, daughter of Francis and 
(Sturges) Bradley. Children; i. Ly- 
man, born January 26, 1755, died March 6, 
1836; married, about 1780, Abigail Turney, 
and had; i. Samuel, born December 17, 1781, 
died August 2, 1834; married Drusilla Nich- 
ols, and had ; David, married Rebecca, daugh- 
ter of Nehemiah Barlow ; Abigail, married 
AV'akeman Jennings ; John ; Jane ; Samuel, 
married Sarah, daughter of Alja and Eliza- 
beth (Dimon) Bradley; Seth; Huldah; Polly, 
married Hiram S. Wakeman ; Harriet, ii. 
Lewis B., born July, 1784, died January 10, 
1823 ; married Esther, daughter of Ezekiel 
O'Banks, and had; Bradley, married Lucy, 

daughter of and Roxana (Johnson) 

Jennings ; Hanford ; Andrew, married Mary, 
daughter of Samuel Bradley ; Mary ; Esther, 
iii. Esther, baptized August 29, 1790, mar- 
ried Isaac Jennings. 2. Esther, born August 
15 1756, died Alarch 4, 1820; married Isaac 
Bradley, and had ; LIriah ; Isaac ; Eleanor ; 

Uranah, married Nichols, and died 

October 9, 1813. 3. Mary, born July 15, 
1758, died January 20, 1849; married, Janu- 
ary 25, 1781, Levi P. Bradley, and had: i. 
Alja, born October 9, 1783, died December 
2, 1861 ; married Elizabeth Dimon. ii. Cla- 
rissa, born October 21, 1786. iii. Eunice, born 
May I, 1791, died February 18, 1806. iv. 
Woolsey, born December 5, 1794, died Febru- 
ary 18, 1806. 4. John, born March 10, 1760, 
died September 16, 1803; married (first) 

1786, ; (second) Mrs. Lydia Bradley; 

children; i. Sally, born September, 1788, died 

October 14, 1803; married Barnum. 

ii. Fanny, born January, 1790. iii. John, born 
A]:iril 27, 1791, died April 8, 1859; married 
Ruth Adams, and had : \\^illiam Henry Har- 
rison ; John Adams ; Sherwood E. ; Bradley ; 
Eli ; Harriet, married Dr. Abraham Bronson ; 
a son ; a daughter ; Maranda. iv. Anna, born 

December, 1794, married Banks, v. 

Laura, born October, 1797, died 1821. vi. Har- 
riet, born June, 1800, died December 12, 1820. 
5. Eleanor, born January 30, 1762, died May 
21, 1846; married, December 2(1, 1781, Gid- 
eon Couch, and had ; i. \\'akeman, born 
March 3, 1785. ii. Gideon, iiorn October 12, 
1788, died Alay 31, 1846. iii. Eli. born June 
2, 1791, died September 3, 1796. iv. Charity, 
born July 2, 1793. died September 3, 1796. 
V. Eli, born September 25, 171J7. vi. Charity, 



CONXECTICl'T 



1849 



horn I'ebruary 11, 1802. 6. Eli, baiJtized 
March 17, I7'>4, dieil in infancy. 7. Nathan, 
baptized .March 23, \j()('k died Fel)ruary 16, 
1857; married, April, 1787, .\l)it;ail (juld, and 
had: i. Ahnon, bdrn July 10, 1788, died 1855: 

married Ruiiamab , and had: Hiram 

Sherwood, married I'olly, daughter of Samuel 
Wakcman ; George : David, married Sarah IT., 
dangliter of Elisha and Sarah (Har])er) Ells: 
]\Iorris : Thomas : Esther, married William 
Henry Harrison W'akeman : Sherwood : a 
daughter, married Treadwell. ii. Jo- 
seph Hill, h(irn April <j. 1790, died March 12, 
1823. iii. Nathan, born March 24, 1792, died 
Jnne 6, 18S0: marrie 1 Sarah, daughter of 
Eben and ^loUie ( Ogden ) Burr an 1 had : 
Eleanor: Nathan Ii. : Harris, married Irene 
Terry: Scudder 1!., married Elizabeth B.. 
daughter of Ephraim and Lois (Wakeman) 

Osborn : Jeliiel H.. married Swarth- 

out : Henry, married ( first ) Jennie Stewart, 

(second) Shepherd: Harriet, married 

James Covert : Sarah ]M. iv, Solomon, born 
Febrrary 26, 1794, died December, 1856: 
married Esther, daughter of Zalmon and 
Polly (Ogden) Burr, and had: Jessup Eben, 
married Jennie Ferris, of Lawrence, Michi- 
gan : Moses Aaron, married Lucinda Bulk- 
ley ; Polly Sophia, married William Riley ; 
Nathan Burr, married Belle Braybrooks ; 
Abb_\- Augusta, unmarried ; Burrows J., mar- 
ried Alargaret F. Foot. v. Abigail, born 
March 5, 1796, died 1892, 8. Eli, baptized 
September 10, 1768, married Ruhamah, 
daughter of Epaphras and Jane (Burr) Good- 
sell, and had: i. Medad. baptized September 
19, 1790, died July 17, 181 1. ii. Elihu, bap- 
tized January 22, 1797. married Martha, 
daughter of Andrew Mann. iii. Parmelia 
Burr, born February 14, 1793, died August 
15, 1840: married Josiah Smith, and had: 
Martha, iv. Eleanor, born 1795, died August 
18, 1867 : married Bela Seymour, and had : 
Mary Ann, George and William, v. Bradley, 
born 1796, died 1834 : married Mary Ann, 
daughter of Jacob Wellslager, and had : Aus- 
tin : Alonzo Burr ; Elizabeth Ruhamah, mar- 
ried Joseph Proctor ; Lewis Bud, married 
Mary, daughter of Captain William W. and 

• (Alontgomery) Layfield. vi. Dimon, 

baptized January 22, 1797, died May 8, 1870. 
vii. Gideon, viii. Austin, born February 11, 
1804, died December 13, 1870: married Louisa 
H., daughter of Mayor Curtis, of Connecti- 
cut, and had : Julia Ann : Lewis B., married 
Lavinia P., daughter of Moses Walton : 
Mayor Curtis : Horetta : Albert C. : Egbert J. : 
Uriah : Charles E. : Frank : Richard A. ix. 
Adelia, born July 21, 1805, died July 20, 1893 : 
married Austin Sperry, and had: Mary J., 



married James Atwotxl ; Eliza AL, married 
Frederick I'airchild. x. Henry, of Colum- 
bus, Ohio. xi. Susan, born iMarch 22, 1806, 
died I'ebruary 9, 1887; married William 
Ilawley, Jr.. and had: Sarah Marshall, mar- 
ried (first) Fredericks, (second) 

Sanger, xii. Jane, born June 18, 1808, 

died October 22, 1876; married Guy B. Fenn, 
and had : Mary Ann ; ]\Iabel B., ]\L D., mar- 
ried Dr. Robert L. King ; Amelia, xiii. JMa- 
rie, born Sejitember 11, 1810, married Oliver 
Clock, and had : Adaline ; Zalmon W. : Wil- 
liam P). ; Edwin A. ; George E. xiv. Uriah, 
born September 11, 1810, died December 14, 
185 1 : married Elizabeth Abel. xv. Ruhamah, 
born December 19, 1812, married Dayton 
Mattoon, and had : Sarah Elizabeth, married 
George R. Baldwin ; William Bradley, mar- 
ried Sarah Jane Davis; Amelia Jane, mar- 
ried Henry Truman Dayton ; Alanson : Helen 
Gertrude : Charles Burr, married Alice Kel- 
logg, xvi. ]\Iedad, died in infancy. 9. Aaron, 
baptized September 26, 1768, died September 
30. 1822 : married Sarah Sherwood, and had : 
i, Abigail, born November 2y. 1786, died Oc- 
tober 20, 1841 ; married Jonathan Banks, and 
had : Anna, married Eli Sherwood ; Polly, 
married Bradley Goodsell ; Catherine, married 
Jarvis Patchen ; Jonathan, married Paurinda, 
daughter of Levi Sherwood; Aaron. ii. 
Mary, born October 6, 1788, died October 29, 
1826; married Abijah Merwin. iii. Sarah, 
born September 20, 1790, died September 15, 
1873. iv. Charles, born May 31, 1792, died 
August 8, 1866; married Marilla, daughter of 
Nathan Banks, and had : Aaron Burr and Ir- 
ving. V. Aaron, born March 21, 1794, died 
February 28, 18 10. vi. Laurinda, born Jan- 
uary 20, 1799, died September 12, 1825 ; mar- 
ried Hanford Nichols, and had : Lloyd : Hen- 
ry; Laura, married David Sherwood, vii. 
Burr, died in infancy, viii. Burr, born De- 
cember 23, 1802, died August 20, 1832: mar- 
ried Mary A, Lyon, and had : William Burr, 
married Emmeline, daughter of Reuben B. 
and Catherine L. Gilbert ; Jane. ix. Betsey, 
born February 22, 1806, died May 20. 1889; 
married Emory Sherwood, and had : Laurinda 
W,, married Arthur Merwin : Sarah A., mar- 
ried A. C. Lyon. x. Eli, born October 24, 
1809, died October 13, 1888; married Delia 
M,, daughter of Jeremiah and Parmelia 
(Wakeman) Sherwood, and had: Hermon, 
married (first) Britannia S.. daughter of 
Richard Tuers, (second) Mrs, Edith Hall, 
daughter of \\^illiam Wilkinson ; Amelia : 
\Mlliam, married Eveline J.. ^ daughter of 
William Meeker : Henry, married Sarah A., 
daughter of Apollos K. and Harriet (L'll- 
mer) Wadsworth ; Elizabeth ; Mary ; Dwight ; 



i850 



CONNECTICUT 



Eli, married IMary Burr, daughter of Charles 
W. and Parthena M. Johnson, xi. Moses, 
born April 6, 1815, died April 19, 1894: mar- 
ried Lydia, daughter of Hezekiah Sherwood, 
and had: Moses Aaron, married Mary, daugh- 
ter of Bradley Williams ; Charles Burr, mar- 
ried Julia H., daughter of John Lockwood ; 
an unnamed child ; Alida Bell, married Melzar 
Brotherton. 10. Asahel, see forward.' 11. 
Daniel, born September 26, 1773, died July, 
1S49: married, May, 1799, Esther, daughter 
of David and Abigail (Waldo) Bucklin, and 
had : i. Stephen, ii. Waldo, born October 
17, 1802, died the same day. iii. John B., 
born December 6, 1804, died March 31, 1862; 
married Mary, daughter of Zalmon and Clara 
(Nichols) Wakeman, and had: Eleanor 
Couch : Warren Waldo ; Hugh B. ; John Zal- 
mon ; Horace ; Ward ; Burrell. iv. Eleanor, 
born July 11, 1808, died September 4, 1829; 
married Julius S. Beardsley, and had three 
children, v. Zalmon Bradley, born August 10, 
1809, died September 10, 1887 ; married Al- 
vira Thornton, and had: Laura L. ; Julia A., 
married Charles Fancher : Francis Burr, mar- 
ried Mary E., daughter of John Luscomb, of 
Devonshire, England ; Phebe Esther, married 
William S. Inman ; Victoria J. ; Stephen 
Quincy ; Cora. vi. Esther A., born May 24, 
1815, died March 24, 1834; married Wells 
Brayton, and had one child, vii. Laura, born 
December 16, 1817, died July 31, 1825. viii. 
Polly, born December 16, 1817, died June 14, 
1819. 12. Betsey, born Pctober 10, 1775. died 
October 7, 1776. 13. Betsey, born December 
14, 1777, died August 26, 1820: married Jona- 
than Goodsell, May 24, 1795, and had: i. 
Bradley, born November 2, 1796, died Decem- 
ber 25, 1815. ii. Maranda, born February, 
1799, died 1890; married Ziba Glover, iii. 
Emily, born July 4, 1808, died June 4, 1809. 
14. Zalmon, born Alay n, 1779. died February 
8, 1856; married, October 8, 1806, Clara 
Nichols, and had children : i. Mary, born 
March 22, 1808, married John B., son of Dan- 
iel and Esther (Bucklin) Wakeman, men- 
tioned above, ii. Abigail Turney, baptized 
July 9, 1809. iii. Esther, born December 2, 
1809, died September 17, 1842. iv. John, 
born November 12, 181 1, died Novem- 
ber 17, 1897; married (first) Sarah ^L, 
daughter of David and Mary (Hubble) Tay- 
lor, and had : Mary E., married Silliman 
Fanton ; he married (second) Esther Jane, 
daughter of David and Rebecca (Barlow) 
Wakeman. v. Zalmon, born June 13, 1814, 
died August 26, 1864; married Susan Warner 
Nichols, and had : Maria Josephine, married 
Rev. John S. Beers ; Emerson Bradley : How- 
ard Nichols, married Grace Melville, daugh- 



ter of Henry and Catharine Silliman (La- 
cey) Hall. vi. Eleanor, born January 19, 
1817, died February 19, 1825. vii. Elizabeth, 
born April 25, 1827. 

(VH) Asahel, seventh son and tenth child 
of John (4) and Esther (Bradley) Wakeman, 
was born May 2, 1771, died November 24^ 
1856. He served as a private at Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, April, 1814, during the war of 1812. 
He married (first) February 28, 1798, Polly, 
born December 20, 1774, died August 4, 1819,- 
daughter of Epaphras and Eunice (Nichols) 
Wakeman; (second) April 26, 1821, Eliza- 
beth, born September 14, 1786, died May 7, 

1841, a sister of his first wife. Children, all 
by first marriage: i. Alanson, born January 
19, 1800, died December 21, 1881 ; married, 
August 23, 1841, Angeline, daughter of Jud- 
son Fanton, and had: i. Henry, born August 
25, 1842, married (first) Eleanor Amelia,, 
daughter of George and Eleanor (Lyon) 
Wildman, (second) Emma E., daughter of 
W. O. and Lydia A. (Wheeler) Sandford ; 
children: Minnie, Anna E., Mary B. and 
Ruth A. ii. Jesse, born March 13, 1844. iii. 
Alecia, born October 10, 1845, married Eli 
C. Goodsell, and had: Minnie A., Charles G. 
and Sarah Louise, iv. Chauncey Cleveland, 
born March 27, 1850, married Lizzie Maria, 
daughter of David and Jane (Avaria) Sum- 
mers, and had: Arthur Sinclair, Jennie Ale- 
cia, Angeline Fanton, Earl Judson and Irwin 
Alanson. 2. Gilbert, born November 29, 1801, 
died December 29, 1891 : married, November 
29, 1832, Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph 
Beardsley, and had : i. Joseph Sherwood, born 
October 3, 1834, married Harriet, daughter 
of Willis Nichols, of Southport. ii. Caroline 
A., born September 25, 1836. iii. Asahel G., 
born March i, 1839, died February 28. 1894; 
married Harriet A. Kceler, and had : George 
Wilbur and Elbee Clare, iv. Elizabeth H., 
born November 26. 1840, married Daniel Ful- 
ler, and had : Stella and Bertha, v. John, 
born December 11, 1843, died June 10, 1868. 
3. Silas, see forward. 4. A daughter, born 
May, 1805, died April 24, 1806. 

(VIII) Silas, third son and child of Asa- 
hel and Polly (Wakeman) Wakeman, was 
born A-Iay 6, 1804, died March 28, 1888. He 
married (first) December 23, 1827, Abbey 
Bradley, born October 13, 1807, died June 19, 

1842, daughter of Nathan and Clarina Whee- 
ler, and granddaughter of Nathan Wheeler. 
He married (second) December 2, 1857, Sally, 
born January 31, 1809, died August 16. 1894, 
daughter of Samuel Wilson. Children, all by 
first marriage: i. Dr. Moses H., born No- 
vember 4, 1829, died January 6. 1892: mar- 
ried, May 31, 1864, Harriet W., daughter of 



CONNECTICUT 



1851 



SanuicI James L'dllins, and liad : i. Mary Col- 
lins, inarrifil Dr. Eriicst Smith, of West Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts, and had: Herman 
White and Homer Mornjan. ii. Henry Whee- 
ler, horn March 6, 1869, died I""ebniary 25, 

1870. iii. Harriet Wheeler, born June 13, 

1871. 2. Polly Sophia, born September 11, 
1831, died April 6, 1854; married Horace 
Bradley Coley (see Coley VHI) 3. Betsey 
Ann. born January 31, 1834, married, May 15, 
1853. Morris ^^'akeman Salmon, and had: 
Charles Curtis ; Fanny Wakeman, married Dr. 
Gorham, of Weston, Connecticut. 4. Clarina 
Bradley, see forward. 5. Abigail B., born 
June 6, 1842, married Erastus B. Sherwood, 
and had : Everett S., ^^'i^liam F. and Clarence. 

(IX) Clarina Bradley, daughter of Silas 
and Abbey Bradley (Wheeler) Wakeman, 
born December 15, 1837, died 1863. She 
married Florace Bradlev Colev (see Coley 
VHI). 



The Seymour family is one 
SEYMOUR of great antiquity in Eng- 
land. The seal on the will 
of Thomas Seymour, eldest son of Richard 
Seymour, the first settler of the name in this 
country, bears the impress of two wings con- 
joined in lure, the device of the English Sey- 
mours from the time of William de St. Maur 
of Penhow. A "Bishop's Bible", printed in 
1584, in the possession of Hon. Morris Wood- 
ruff Seymour, of Litchfield, a descendant of 
Richard Seymour, has on one of the fly-leaves 
a drawing of the arms of the Seymours of 
Berry Pomeroy, viz. : two wings conjoined in 
lure, quartered with the Royal Arms as 
granted by Henry VIII to Edward Seymour, 
Duke of Somerset, and the legend: "Richard 
Seymor, of Berry Pomery, heytor bund, in 
ye Com. Devon, his Booke, Hartford, in ye 
Collony of Connecticut in Newe England, An- 
noque Domini 1640". On another page of 
this Bible there is a memorandum relating to 
some business transaction, and the name, 
"John Seimor, Hartford, 1666". The fact, 
moreover, that John, the son of Richard, died 
possessed of a "great Bible" is established by 
the listing in his inventory dated 1713, and 
still preserved at Hartford, of "a great bible 
los." 

(I) Richard Seymour, though not an orig- 
inal proprietor, was one of the early settlers 
of Hartford. Just when he joined the little 
settlement near "Dutch Point" on the Con- 
necticut river we do not know, but probably 
in 1639, when we find his name in the list of 
those "inhabitants who were granted lotts to 
have only at the town's courtesie with liberty 
to fetch woode and keep swine or coues on 



the comniiiir'. His lot was No. 70, on the 
north side, near the "cow pasture". His house 
stood on what is now North Main street, near 
the Ely place. He also owned outlying pieces 
of land including a portion of the tract run- 
ning westward from the bluffs of the Trinity 
College property to what is now West Hart- 
ford. In 1647 he was elected chimney-viewer, 
which calls to mind that the houses of the first 
settlers were thatched, as in the old England 
they had left behind them, and on that account 
were particularly e.xposed to fire loss, and 
all the more because built of wood rather than 
of masonry as most of the corresponding Eng- 
lish houses of the period were. Richard's duties, 
then, as chimney-viewer, were allied to those 
of a building inspector and fire chief of our 
time. Why he left Hartford is not known, 
though there is a vague tradition that he was 
not in sympathy with the Rev. Thomas Hoo- 
ker, who dominated the Hartford country. 
Whatever the cause of his removal, we find 
his name among the number who made the 
agreement with Captain Patrick and the bril- 
liant and restless Roger Ludlow "for the 
settlinge and plantinge of Norwalke", June 
19, 1650. As one of the planters of Nor- 
walk, Richard Seymour's name appears in the 
indenture dated February 15, 1651, between 
the Planters and Runckinheage and other 
Indians. The exact date of his removal from 
Hartford to Norwalk cannot be fixed, but he 
had undoubtedly taken up his residence there 
before the end of 1652, and perhaps earlier. 
His home-lot was well situated, directly oppo- 
site the meeting house and parade ground, and 
on the highway leading from Stamford to 
Fairfield. His house was only a short dis- 
tance from the present roadbed of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford railroad. 
Many of his descendants have probably un- 
consciously viewed the spot where their an-, 
cestor lived, while being carried past the place 
in a manner of. which he never dreamed. In 
the new plantation of Norwalk, Richard's abil- 
ities were fully recognized. On March 29, 
1655, he was elected townsman, or selectman, 
as we should now say, succeeding Mr. Thomas 
Fitch, who had in 1654 been elected governor 
of the colony. But Richard did not live to 
hold this office long, since in his will, which 
he executed July 29, 1655, he is described 
"very weak & sike". The fact that Governor 
Fitch was translated, so to speak, from the 
office of townsman of Norwalk to that of 
governor of the colony shows what a dignified 
and important office that of townsman was. 
In that primitive social order the townsman 
shared with the minister the first honors of 
the community, since the duties of the office 



1852 



CONNECTICUT 



demanded a man of dignity, ability, and force 
of character. Richard's election as towns- 
man in succession to Governor Fitch helps 
us to see the kind of a man that he was. 

The exact date of his death has not come 
down to us, but it probably took place soon 
after the execution of his will, which on Oc- 
tober 25, 1655, was proved before the county 
court at Fairfield. His "loving Wife Mercy" 
and his "faythfull friend Richard Olmsted" 
were designated by him as the "sole Execu- 
tors & Administrators" of his last will and 
testament. His widow was by his will ap- 
pointed guardian of the three minor sons : "It 
is also my Will that my loving wife should 
have the dispose of my three Sons, John, 
Zachary and Richard untill such time as they 
shall be fit to receive & dispose of their Es- 
tate". These minor sons were probably born 
after the arrival of Richard and Mercv in 
this country. Thomas, referred to in the will 
as "my Eldest Sonn Thomas," was probably 
born in England, but whether or not he had 
the same mother is not known. When Thom- 
as Seymour executed his will September 22, 
1712, he sealed it with a small seal engraved 
with the wings "conjoined in lure," forming 
the jiaternal coat-of-arms of the English Sey- 
mours. It is significant that Thomas, the eld- 
est son of Richard, the settler, should have 
had possession of this seal, which as a piece 
of evidence supports and reinforces the arms 
on a flyleaf of the "great Bible" already re- 
ferred to as in the possession of the Hon. 
Morris Woodrufif Seymour, of Litchfield. 

Richard Seymour left a fair estate, inven- 
toried October 10, 1655, at £255-09-00. Mer- 
cy, his widow, married, November 25, 1655, 
the Hon. John Steele, of Farmington, one of 
the foremost men of the colony, a man of 
means and education as well as of ability and 
energy. He was town clerk of Hartford, 
town clerk of Farmington, and often deputy, 
&c., &c. His marriage to Mrs. Mercy Sey- 
mour he recorded on the Farmington records 
in his own hand. We may forgive her for her 
speedy re-marriage when we consider that it 
provided a home and a wise counsellor for her 
three young sons, who now left Norwalk and 
became members of the household of their 
stepfather, at Farmington. Of her parentage 
nothing is known, nor the date of her death, 
though she survived John Steele, who died 
November 25, 1665. In his will, dated Jaiui- 
ary 30, 1664, he bequeaths to his "dear and 
loving wife Mercy Steele the house wherein I 
now dwell and the appurtenances belonging 
to it." 

Thomas Seymour, Richard's eldest son, 
remained in Norwalk and became the 



progenitor of the Norwalk family of the 
name. 

Richard Seymour's English home and par- 
entage and precise connection with the Eng- 
lish family of the name has never been posi- 
tively ascertained ; the loss of records may 
now make that impossible, but the evidence 
of the "Bishop's Bible" referred to and the 
seal used in 1712 by his son Thomas, of Nor- 
walk, leaves no doubt of his being a scion of 
the English Seymours. 

In his "History of the Rev. Hugh Peters", 
(pub. 1 781) the Rev. Samuel Peters gives a 
list of some of the early Connecticut settlers 
credited with gentle blood : 

''Among tliem was Thomas Seymour, a younger 
branch of the family of the Duke of Somerset who 
settled at Hartford, did honor to the stock from 
which he descended, and his numerous posterity 
have distinguished themselves by their virtues, piety 
and literary merits. The Honorable Thomas Sey- 
mour now of Hartford, is the head of the family, 
and for his great and general knowledge of the 
law and helle lettres has been employed by the pub- 
lic in many exalted situations which he has dis- 
charged with honor to himself and benefit to the 
State." 

The writer is well aware that the irascible 
Tory parson has never been popular as an au- 
thority, and offers the above quotation merely 
as showing that the tradition of the connection 
of Richard Seymour, the settler, with the his- 
toric English family was current over a hun- 
dred years ago. Peters made a mistake in 
saying that it was Thomas rather than Rich- 
ard Seymour who settled at Hartford, but his 
reference to the settler as belonging to the 
younger branch of the family of the Duke of 
Somerset is at least interesting. Evidence is 
not wanting to show that the Honorable 
Thomas Seymour, first mayor of Hartford, 
had received this tradition from his ancestors. 
Mayor Seymour was the last king's attorney 
for Connecticut (he succeeding his father in 
this oftice), the first state's attorney of Con- 
necticut, the first mayor of Hartford, and one 
of the foremost men of his day in New Eng- 
land, and of all the members of the American 
family of that time was perhaps in the best 
position to know the facts. It may be admit- 
ted, however, that Mayor Seymour makes no 
claim to a noble origin for Richard, the set- 
tler, in the brief statement he made regarding 
the family in his eiglity-second )ear, and to 
be found in Dr. Parker's "History of the Sec- 
ond Church at Hartford," p. 134. Still, Pe- 
ters' statement must have been based upon 
traditions current in Hartford and attaching 
themselves to the family of Mayor Seymour 
who, by the use of the Seymour arms, gave 
their endorsement to the tradition. 



CONXECTILTT 



1.^53 



M> all this may be adilcil the force ot fam- 
ily trailitions ami striking family likenesses 
and traits, connecting the American with the 

,;lish family of the name. Some of these 

diiions were leathered up and woven into 
a romance entitled, " Tlie I'awn of the Pale 
I'aces". written in Hartford, by J. P. Brace, 
and published in 1853 by D. Appleton & Com- 
pany. 'I'his work contains an unflattering por- 
trait of Richard Seymour, and is only signfi- 
cant as making use of the tradition that Rich- 
ard Seymour was not in accord with the 
"Pious Hooker" antl his company, but was 
a Church of England man. Whatever his per- 
-iiial sympathies may have been, it cannot be 
iloubted that Mercy, his wife, was of a non- 
conformist family. Of that her given name 
alone is sulificient proof. If more proof were 
wanted it may be found in the name of their 
son Zachary. (Jnly Puritan England employed 
these Piblical names. It may well be that 
his marriage to a woman of a non-conformist 
family had much to do with his emigration to 
Xew England. That she was a second wife 
anti considerably his junior is more than 
likely. 

In Richard's time the name was unquestion- 
ably pronounced See-mer, which is the tra- 
ditional and correct pronunciation of the name, 
and the pronunciation always insisted upon by 
members of the present English family, who 
are never addressed as Seymour. In some 
branches of the Connecticut family See-mer 
as the pronunciation of the name has been 
adhered to and is continued to the present 
day. Chief Justice Seymour, of Connecticut, 
was always addressed as Judge See-mer, and 
in the family of the writer See-mer was the 
pronunciation invariably employed until with- 
in a few years. The pronunciation Seymour 
now current seems to be an innovation of 
the last half century and is quite wrong. That 
See-mer was the pronunciation emplo3'ed in 
Richard's time is sufficiently proved by the 
early records, in which the spelling is unques- 
tionably phonetic. The marriage of Mercy, 
the W'idov^f of Richard, to the Honorable John 
Steele, is recorded in Farmington in his own 
hand-writing as follows : "John Steel was 
maryed to Mercy Semer Novem the twenty 
& five one thousand six hundredth fifty & 
five." 

One would have supposed that a man of 
Steele's position and superior education would 
in making such an entry have taken pains 
to have spelled the name of his wife correctly ; 
that he clid not do so shows how indifferent 
even educated people were in those days to 
questions of orthography. In another instru- 
ment to which Steele was a party, the name 



is siellcd not Semer, as in tlie marriage rec- 
ord, bi:t Seamer. Reference is made to \'ol i, 
folio 10, of the Xorwalk Land Records, in 
whiL'h is found the following deed: 

".\ l;'v.c p.iul perfect coppie of tlie decide of s.ile 
made .April 26. 1661, l)y Mst. Joliii Steeile of ffarm- 
ingtc.ii into Mathias Sention Son of Nor\var<, which 
s^yed Mst. Siceile was administrator unto the estate 
cf Richd Seamer and married with the sayed 
Scrnier s widow. These give testimonies to all 
will m it may concerne that John -Steeile of ffar- 
minfeton in X. E. have sould unto Mathias Sention 
son of Norwalke all the land in Norwake that was 
Richd Scrmcr's now deceased, except the house and 
home-lolt that was the sayed Richd. Seamer's, and 
by exchange for that the sayed Mathias hath the 
true possession of that house and house-lott that 
was 'I'hos. Seamer's" &c &c. 

Then follows the description of eleven 
pieces of land. 

It is to be noted that the only ])ossible pro- 
nunciation of Semer and Seamer is See-iuer. 
Undoubtedly proof of this sort might be mul- 
tiplied to show that when Richard first came 
to the country he pronounced his name "See- 
luer" just as the historic English family 
pronounced it ; it is not without sotne signifi- 
cance that this pronunciation of the name con- 
tinued dow'n to our own time, and is adhered 
to to-tlay among some of his descendants. 

As to the spelling of Richard's name, no 
autograph of his is know^n to exist. The first 
occurrence of his name known to the writer 
is in the original manuscript of Hartford 
Town \'otes, p. 19, in which the name is writ- 
ten "Richard. Seamoure". In the list w'rit- 
ten in the hand-writing of John Allyn in the 
P.Dok o*f Original Distributions the name is 
spelled "Seymore", p. 550. In the same book 
on page 166, the following entry occurs: 

"Febr : Anno Dom : 1639 : 

Several parcells of land in Hartford upon the 
river of Conecticott belonginge to Richard Sea- 
mor and to his heirs forever :" 

This is followed by a description of lands 
occupying some two pages. The name Sey- 
mour frequently occurs in the Book of Orig- 
inal Distributions in which it is variously 
spelled "Semor, Seamor, Seemer and Sey- 
more" : but in the fore part of the next cen- 
tury the name seems to have been spelled 
"Seymoiir," at least in legal documents. 

The four sons of Richard Seymour were: 

1. Thomas, "my eldest sonn", undoubtedly 
born in England : date of birth unknown : set- 
tled in Norwalk, where he died. 1712: pro- 
genitor of the Norwalk Seymours. 

2. John, probably born in Hartford ; date 
of birth unknown : removed to Norwalk with 
his father in 1652; removed to Farmington 
in 1655 after the death of his father: died at 
Hartford, 1713; progenitor of the Hartford, 



3854 



CONNECTICUT 



Litchfield, New Hartford and Utica (New 
York) Seymours. 

3. Zachary, born 1642, probably at Hart- 
ford ; removed to Norwalk with his father in 
1652; removed to Farmington in 1655, after 
the death of his father ; freeman of Farming- 
ton, 1669 ; he was a merchant engaged in trade 
with the Barbadoes. He removed to Weth- 
ersfield, where he died August, 1702, ae. 60. 
He had no sons. 

4. Richard, probably born at Hartford ; date 
of birth unknown ; removed to Norwalk with 
his father, 1652; removed to Farmington with 
his mother in 1655 ; settled in Farmington ; 
freeman in Farmington, 1669; one of the 84 
proprietors of 1672 ; townsman, 1685 ; leader 
in 1686 in the pioneer settlement at the Great 
Swamp (Kensington) : captain of the Sey- 
mour fort built for the protection of these set- 
tlers and made of palisades sixteen feet long, 
sharp at the top and firmly set in the ground 
near together. Captain Seymour was killed 
in 1710 by the fall of a tree, and was the first 
person to be interred in a plot which he had, 
according to tradition, given to the town as a 
burial place. He was the progenitor of the 
Wethersfield, Newington, and Troy (New 
York) Seymours. 

(H) John, son of Richard Seymour, prob- 
ably born in Hartford and presumably the 
eldest son of Richard by Mercy ; date of birth 
unknown : removed to Norwalk with his fa- 
ther about 1852; undoubtedly went to Far- 
mington in 1655 with his mother after her 
marriage to the Hon. John Steele. From Far- 
mington he removed to Hartford, but when 
we do not know. He appears in Hartford as 
early as March 15, 1664, when John Seymour, 
Joseph Stonhard, Nathaniel IButler, Joseph 
Easton Jr., Joseph Butler, Beuill Waters and 
John Watson, were fined ten shillings apiece 
for "their unreasonable conveening them- 
selves together at the house of Thomas Bunce. 
In his and his wives ofTence". While we 
must deplore this "unseasonable conveening", 
whatever it was all about, we are grateful for 
the record of it, as it enables us to place John 
Seymour's marriage as prior to this date since 
his wife seems to have been present at this 
"party'' which, from this circumstance we 
cannot believe was a very reprehensible af- 
fair except in the eyes of a magistrate with 
an overheated imagination. His marriage 
probably took place not long before this gath- 
ering on March 15, 1664. His wife was 
Mary, daughter of John Watson and Marga- 
ret (Smith) Watson. Watson was an early 
comer in Hartford, although not an original 
proprietor, his name first appearing in 1644. 
John Seymour, who was made a freeman in 



1667, lived on the south branch of the Little 
river, within the limits of the present town 
of Hartford, near the Farmington road. In 
1688 the town "granted to John Seamor the 
parcel of woodland at the west end of the 
wood lot, he had by exchange with Sergt. Ja- 
cob White unto the river." In the course of 
the settlement of the estate of Mrs. Marga- 
ret Watson, the court allowed to John Seamor, 
September 6, 1683, the land he possessed, 
which was part of the home lot of his mother, 
provided the said Seamor do maintain the 
fence around their land, which John Watson 
the administrator affirmed to be the terms 
upon which the land was granted to said 
Seamor by his mother Watson". 

John Seymour was one of the founders of 
the Second Church at Hartford, on February 
12, 1669, when the name of "John Seamer" 
and "Mary Seamer" appear in the lists of 
those who "owned the Covenant". They were 
received into the "full communion" on March 
31, 1678. Dr. Parker in his "History of 
the Second Church of Christ in Hartford", 
speaks of John Seymour "as an active and 
influential man" (p. 58). In his tribute to 
Thomas Seymour, Esq., first mayor of Hart- 
ford (a great-grandson of John, the son of 
Richard) Dr. Parker says: "For more than 
two hundred years this Seymour family main- 
tained an unbroken continuity of membership 
in this Church or Society which John Seamer 
helped to found, and for the greater part of 
that time exerted a commanding influence in 
its afifairs" (p. 135). John Seymour was 
leather sealer 1673, and chimney-viewer for 
the north side in 1693. His will, dated De- 
cember 10, 1712, was proved August 3, 1713, 
and he died between these dates. Mary, his 
widow, survived him, but the date of her death 
is unknown. In his will, by which he disposed 
of a considerable estate, he appointed his "lov- 
ing Wife Mary Seamore" and his "loving 
friends Mr. Icliabod Wells and Mr. Thomas 
Hosmer" his executors. In the inventory of 
his effects, the item of the greatest interest to 
us is "a great bible 10 /". This is unques- 
tionably the "Bishop's Bible", already referred 
to, containing the arms of the ducal family of 
Seymour, and on another page a memoran- 
dum of a business transaction and the name 
"John Seimor, Hartford, 1666". 

Children: i. John, born June 12, 1666. 
2. Thomas, born March 12, 1669. 3. Mary, 
born November, 1670. 4. Zachary. born De- 
cember 22, 1672, probably died in infancy. 
5. Margaret, born July 17, 1674. baptized 
same day. 6. Richard, born February 11, 
1676, baptized same day. 7. Jonathan, born 
January 10, 1678, baptized January 19. 8. 



CONNECTICUT 



i8S5 



Nathaniel, born November 6, iG8o, baptized 
November 7. 9. Zacharv, born January 10, 
1684. 

(Ill) John (2), son of John (i) Seymour, 
was born at Hartford, June 12, 1666, and 
married. December 19, 1683, Elizaljeth, 
daughter of Lieutenant Robert and Susannah 
(Treat) Webster, and granddaui^hter of Gov- 
ernor John Webster. Her mother, Susannah 
Treat, was a sister of Governor Robert Treat. 
He Hved on what was then known as the 
South road to Farmington, just west of Rocky 
Hill. Here his "Mansion House" was located, 
but he was an extensive land owner in Litch- 
field and Hartfortl counties, as appears by his 
will. With Elizabeth, his wife, he was "added 
to the Church and received to full commun- 
ion" of the Second, or South Church, March 
30, 1712. On December 20, 1720, he was 
elected surveyor of highways, and the next 
year was made one of the inspectors to see 
that the act concerning tlie cutting of wood, 
was duly executed. The act shows that the 
■conservation of our forest resources is not a 
new thing by any means, and John Seymour 
is perhaps entitled to be enrolled among the 
earliest of American foresters in the service of 
the state. On September 21, 1722, "Mr. John 
Seymour" was placed by the town of Hart- 
ford on a committee to "view the Western 
Lands and to report in the next Town Meet- 
ing where may be the best place for a new 
Town." On December 25 following he was 
•appointed, with Samuel Catlin and William 
Baker, on a committee representing Hartford 
to act in conjunction with a committee rep- 
Tesenting Windsor, "to make a further view 
of the Land West of the Easternmost Stream 
■of Waterbury River, and Northward of Litch- 
"field in order to the Settling another Town". 
In payment of his services in connection with 
fhese "Western Lands" he was granted sev- 
■eral parcels of land in the new town of New 
Hartford, and was moderator of a meeting 
held at Hartford, December, 1723, of the first 
proprietors of the new town, where subse- 
quently several of his sons settled, where 
some of his descendants have lived mitil re- 
cently, and where the name bids fair to be 
perpetuated by a French family, who on their 
arrival in the old town promptly found it con- 
venient to change their name of Simard to 
Seymour, with what confusion to the anti- 
quarian of the future, time alone may reveal. 
In 1737 he was appointed by the general as- 
sembly one of a committee to settle the lo- 
cation of the meeting house at Wintonbury. 
From time to time he served on a committee 
appointed by the town of Hartford to lay out 
land to different individuals, &c., &c. Through- 



out a long life he seems to have constantly 
been in the public service. 

He died at Hartford, May 17, 1748, and is 
buried in the old burial ground back of Cen- 
ter Cluuxh. His tombstone, a rudely sculp- 
tured slab of red sandstone, bears the fol- 
lowing inscription : "Here Lies Interred the 
Body of Mr. John Seymour Who Died May 
the 17th A. D. 1748 Aged 84 Years". His wid- 
ow, Elizabeth, died May 15th, 1754, and lies 
buried beside him. His will, by which he dis- 
posed of an estate inventorying £603 01 06, 
was executed September, 1747, and witnessed 
by Ebenezer Webster, Medad Webster, both 
cousins, and George Wyllys. (See Hartford 
Probate Records, vol. xv, p. 197-8-9, 208, and 
Manwaring's "Early Connecticut Probate 
Records", vol. iii, p. 636-637). By his will he 
left lands in New Hartford to his sons John, 
Jonathan and Zebulon. By Elizabeth, his wife, 
he had twelve children — nine sons and three 
daughters. 

Among his descendants may be mentioned 
Major Moses Seymour, of Litchfield, a Revo- 
lutionary officer of distinction, and Sheriff 
Ozias Seymour, his son ; the Hon. Thomas 
Seymour, first mayor of Hartford, and his son, 
Captain Thomas Youngs Seymour, a gallant 
soldier of the Revolutionary War ; Captain 
Thomas Hart Seymour, a grandson of Mayor 
Seymour, who served with distinction in the 
Mexican War ("Hero of Chapultepec"), was 
U. S. Minister to Russia and Governor of 
Connecticut ; Judge Origen Storrs Seymour 
of Litchfield, Chief Justice of Connecticut, son 
of Sheriff Ozias Seymour ; Hon. Edward W. 
Seymour, Hon. Morris W. Seymour, and the 
Rev. Dr. Storrs O. Seymour, sons of Chief 
Justice Seymour ; Governor Horatio Sey- 
mour, of New York, and his sisters — Julia 
Chenevard Seymour, afterwards Mrs. Roscoe 
Conkling, and Helen Clarissa Seymour, aft- 
erwards Mrs. Ledyard Linklaen ; Major Gen- 
eral Truman Seymour, U. S. A. ; Hon. Ho- 
ratio Seymour, for many years U. S. senator 
from Vermont, and a great friend of Daniel 
Webster, who considered him the best lawyer 
in New England in his day ; Rt. Rev. George 
Franklin Seymour, late P. E. Bishop of 
Springfield, Illinois ; and the late Professor 
Thomas Day Seymour, of Yale. To this list 
might be added the names of many Seymours 
who, let us say, from 1700 to 1850, bore prom- 
inent parts in the civil, religious and social 
life of Hartford. 

The family as a family has been "noted for 
its military training and spirit", says Miss 
Talcott, who has collected a vast amount of 
material for a family history. The Hon. 
Morris W. Seymour has compiled a list of 



i8=;6 



COXXECTICUT 



seventy men of the Connecticut family who 
took part in the Revohitionary War, some of 
them with high distinction, and all of them 
with credit. 

(I\') John (3), son of John (2) Seymour, 
was born at Hartford, December 25, 1694; 
married June 25, 1718, Lydia, born August 
2, 1692, daughter of John and Hannah (Ar- 
nold?) Mason; and (second), ]\Iay 7, 1733, 
at West Hartford, Hannah, daughter of Da- 
vid and Hannah ( ) Ensign, of West 

Hartford, baptized at First Church, Hartford, 
February 10, 1711-12. 

After 1730 he lived on the corner where 
the middle road to West Hartford intersects 
"Quaker Lane". To this road he seems to 
have given his name, since it was long known 
as "the John Se\mour road". At a town meet- 
ing held December 26, 173 1, he was elected 
ins]iector of staddle wood, and again in 1732- 
33-,V • '" 1739 he was elected inspector of 
staddle wood and leather sealer; in 1740 in- 
spector of wood and hay ward ; in 1741 con- 
stable; in 1742 leather-sealer, and in 1743-44 
inspector of wood. 

Staddle-wood (an Americanism) was a 
term applied to stan<ling trees lietween four 
and eighteen inches in diameter. The annual 
election by that small community of an in- 
spector of wood shows the force of the Eng- 
lish traditions by which they were controlled. 
The Hartford of that time was of course sur- 
rounded by forests, but this did not prevent 
its citizens from adopting regulations for the 
conservation of the timber resources of the 
colony, and these regulations had their origin 
in England, where the scarcity of timber had 
been felt long before the settlement of New 
England and where stringent regulations for 
its preservation were already in force. 

On December 17, 1741, it was voted that 
John Seymour Junr., "have liberty to take, 
upon Lease, a piece of Land upon the Town 
Comons, for the purpose of sinking Tan- 
fatts therein". About 1750 (he was then 
fifty-six years of age), or it may have been 
earlier, he removed to New Hartford, then a 
frontier settlement, where his father, who was 
at this time alive, owned a large tract of land, 
the greater portion of which he gave or be- 
queathed to him. Here he lived in that part 
of the town known as West Hill, and here 
"Air. John Seymour departed this Life July 
25. 1758" (New Hartford Town Records). 
According to a tradition preserved by Miss 
Talcott, he lies buried in the Town Hill bur- 
ial ground, but no stone marks the spot to- 
day. His great-great-grandson, Henry Albert 
Seymour, of Rristol, (1818-1897) frequently 
went to the Town Hill burying ground as a 



boy, as his grandfather Spencer was buried 
there, but he had no recollection of ever see- 
ing any old Seymour gravestones. In "New 
Hartford, Past and Present," (Pub. New 
Hartford, 1883) the fe\yness of early stones 
is explained by the springy nature of the soil 
and the character of the stone used for grave- 
stones. "As far as can be found, the only 
graves of the first settlers which are traceable 
are those of Stephen Kelsey, died in 1745 ; 
Ensign Caleb Pitkin, died in 1768, and Joseph 
Alerrill in 1788". '^ * * "In what seems 
to have been the early Seymour plot, only one 
partial inscription can be traced — that of the 
grave of the wife of Uriah Seymour". It 
seems -likely, then, that the tombstone of John 
Seymour 3rd, who died in 1758, disappeared, 
long ago, if indeed he ever had one. His 
grandson, William Seymour, of Fredonia, 
New York, who as a small boy saw his grand- 
father, remembered that he had "a cancer in 
his jaws and face". 
. By his two wives he had twenty children, 
all of whom were baptized either in Hartford 
or W'est Hartford. In "New -Hartford, Past 
and Present" (before referred to) it is stated 
of John Seymour that "He was the father of 
twenty children, the majority of whom came 
with him, it is supposed, about 1750. Six of 
his sons settled in New Hartford, as follows: 
'\\'illiam, Uriah, Elias, Hezekiah, Elijah and 
David. His daughters married into the Steele, 
Flower, Marsh, Smith, Andruss, Moody and 
Kellogg families". The same compilation 
says, "Uriah Seymour was a man of intelli- 
gence and influence in town matters. He com- 
manded, as lieutenant, a detachment of mount- 
ed men who volunteered for the relief of 
Charlestown in 1775." Uriah's sons, Captain 
Sylvester Seymour and "Esquire" Chauncey 
Seymour, were among the forernost citizens of 
New Hartford in their day. Nathaniel Sey- 
mour, another of John Seymour's twenty chil- 
dren, died at Crown Point, October 20, 1760, 
"in the old French war". 

(V) \A^iIliam, son of John (3) Seymour, 
was born and baptized at West Hartford, Au- 
gust 18, 1728 ; removed to New Hartford with 
his father about 1750; married, at New Flart- 
ford, December 27, 1753, Mehitable Merrill, 
daughter of Noah Alerrill, "one of the first 
settlers of the town. Noah Merrill was the 
first man appointed town clerk of New Hart- 
ford, though be never acted in that capacity, 
having died before lie took the oath of office. 
He died in 1739, his having been the first 
death among the pioneers". She was born 
]\[ay 25, 1734, and Ijaptized in West Hart- 
ford the next day. Williani Seyniour, who 
was a farmer, died at New Hartford, l\Tarch 



COXXECTICUT 



'85/ 



I l8, 1782, ami letters of adniiiiistratioii were 
granted to Alehitalile, liis widow, and to Xoah, 
' his son, on January 9th, 1783. After his 
I death she removed to Stillwater, New York, 
I near Saratoga, where several of her thirteen 
I children were living, and where she died June 
; 29, 1819. She is buried in the Yellow Meet- 
ing House Cemetery at Stillwater. 

(\'I) Noah, son of ^^'illiam Seymour, was 
born at New Hartford, November 10, 1759, 
and married there, November 17, 1784, Alir- 
iam, daughter of Deacon Noah and Clemence 
I .Merrill) Kellogg. He entered the army in 
' "76, and served nine months as orderly ser- 
ant in Captain .\masa Mills' company. Col- 
onel Roger Enos' regiment, serving on the 
Hudson. He afterwards served for six 
months in Captain Elijali Seymour's com- 
pany of Dragoons. In the "Register of Con- 
necticut Soldiers during the Revolution" his 
name appears also as a private in Captain 
■ Pettibone's company. Colonel Belden's regi- 
ment, serving at Peekskill, New York, 1777. 
He sold his farm in New Hartford and re- 
moved to Sodus, Wayne county, New York, 
about 1802, where he had a fine farm, and 
where the old' soldier died IMarch 26, 1832. 
His widow, ]\Iiriam, died there Januarv 10, 
1846. 

Alost of Noah Seymour's nine children set- 
tled in New York State, where their descend- 
ants are now living, but Lot Norton settled 
in New Hartford, and Horace in Fairibault. 
^^'i^consin. Noah Seymour and his family 
were Congregationalists, but Lot Norton, his 
son, broke away from the rigors of Calvinism 
and became a Methodist. Perhaps the blue 
Congregationalism of the family was due to 
the mother, whose father. Deacon Noah Kel- 
logg, was a man of old-fashioned piety. Rev. 
Frederick Marsh says of him, in the "Marsh 
Manuscript", "This Mr. Kellogg appeared to 
me in m._v youthful days to be a very grave, 
serious and exemplary man, less cheerful and 
social than his brother Abraham. He was for 
many years a deacon in the church in New 
Hartford. He lived, brought up his family, 
and died, about three-quarters of a mile south- 
west of the meeting house on Town Hill, 
near the spot on which Ira ^Merrill built a 
new house in the summer of 1849. He was 
regarded as eminently pious and consistent ; a 
farmer." Of Noah Seymour and his wife the 
"Marsh iManuscript" says, "Mr. and 'Sirs. 
Seymour were possessors of religion, hopeful- 
ly pious under the ministry of Mr. Griffin." 
In politics Noah Seymour was a strong Fed- 
eralist. 

(\TI) Lot Norton, son of Noah Seymour, 
was born at New Hartford, ]\Iarch 3, 1788 ; 



married, September 5, 1815, Belinda, daughter 
of Henry and Eunice (Ailing) Spencer, of New 
Hartford, and descended on the maternal side 
from several of the early New Haven fami- 
lies, including the Winstons, Newmans, Att- 
waters, Wilmots, Pecks, Bradleys, Allings, 
Nashs and Tuttles. He died October 27, 
1844, and is buried in the old burial ground 
by the river, at Nepaug, in the valley of the 
Najiash. She died at Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, November 19, 1873, at the home of her 
graufldaughter, Mrs. Eliza Vadakin, and is 
buried in the new cemetery near New Hart- 
ford village. 

In personal appearance Lot Norton Sey- 
mour was tall, spare, with very black hair and 
eyes, and had a dark complexion. He was a 
farmer and millwright, but seems to have de- 
voted more time to his books than to either 
his farm or mill, and more time to religion 
than to his books. He was a man of a sen- 
sitive, emotional and religious nature, and 
left behind him the record of a singularly pure 
and blameless life. He had a remarkable 
memory, and committed the entire poem of 
"Paradise Lost" to memory; his memoriza- 
tion of the poem was so perfect that he could 
recite all or any part of it. Even Lord Ma- 
cauley, distinguished as he was for feats of 
memorization, was proud of having memo- 
rized "Paradise Lost". Whether our New 
England student of Alilton would have been 
better occupied tilling his stony farm than 
with his volume of Milton, is an open ques- 
tion which no one need decide. Belinda ( Spen- 
cer) Seymour, his wife, was also tall, of dark 
complexion, and had piercing black eyes. She 
was a woman of keen mind, great energy, had 
a trenchant and sarcastic way of speaking, and 
in her later years was a constant reader and 
greatlv interested in public affairs. It was 
natural to a man of his temperament and 
idealism to break away from the political 
faith of his family just as he broke away from 
its religious faith. He became imbued with 
the principles of Jefiferson, and transferred 
his allegiance to the Democrats, and in that 
small community and in a strong Federalist 
family, may be said to have "suffered accord- 
ingly". 

('\'III) Henry Albert, son of Lot Norton 
Seymour, was born in New Hartford, Janu- 
ary 22, 1818, and married, July 28, 1844, at 
Bristol, Electa, daughter of John and Laura 
(Wells) Churchill, of New Hartford. She 
was born at New Hartford, April 5, 1818. and 
died at Bristol, December 10, 1873. After 
their marriage they lived in New Hartford un- 
til 1846, when they removed to Bristol. His 
father, a poor farmer, was unable to give him 



1858 



CONNECTICUT 



an education more than he was able to get in 
the local schools, but by the time he was six- 
teen years old he had saved enough money 
to accompany his cousins and companions, 
Henry and George Kellogg, to the academy at 
Westfield, Massachusetts, for some extra 
schooling. This academy, of which Amos 
Cheesborough was at that time the princi- 
pal, enjoyed an excellent reputation, and he 
seems to have made good use of the time 
spent there, studying in particular natural 
philosophy and chemistry. He seems, indeed, 
to have had a passion for the natural sciences, 
and probably would have devoted his life to 
them if he could have had the advantage of a 
thorough education. The village library, called 
the Social Library, was a great resource, and 
he made good use of it ; but perhaps the most 
important influence in forming his mind was 
the constant discussion in his own home cir- 
cle of public affairs. His grandfather Sey- 
mour, had been a strong Federalist, but his 
own father, out of deep conviction, had be- 
come an apostate — a Democrat. His father's 
defection from the political faith of the fam- 
ily gave birth to endless discussions and led 
him to wider reading than he would otherwise 
have done. I may mention his reading, when 
a very young man, the four volumes of Jef- 
ferson's "Correspondence and Miscellanies." 

As a young man he seems to have displayed 
some of the military spirit which Miss Mary 
Kingsbury Talcott, the historian of the fam- 
ily, says has been its characteristic. He was 
not twenty when he became captain of the lo- 
cal militia company. One year when the 
state militia had their annual training at Nor- 
folk, Major General James T. Piatt pro- 
nounced young Seymour's company to be the 
best trained in the regiment, which included 
about fifteen companies. For three years his 
company had the position of honor at the right 
of his regiment, of which Abram G. Kellogg 
was colonel. This position of honor was given 
to his company by Generals Sedgwick and 
Phelps and one other, who reviewed the troops 
and decided that his company was the best 
trained in the regiment and so entitled to the 
place of honor at the right of the regiment. 
About this time his health failed — he was 
threatened with consumption — and he re- 
signed his captaincy and sold his accoutre- 
ments. 

On first coming to Bristol he was promi- 
nently identified with town affairs, serving as 
first selectman, &c.. and for many years on 
school committees and as assessor. In 1870, 
when the Bristol Savings Bank was incorpo- 
rated, he became its president and held that 
office until his death, April 6, 1897. He was 



a man of sound judgment, liberal views, wide- 
ly informed, and known for perfect integrity 
of character. Though a man of essentially re- 
ligious nature and much given to reflection on 
such matters, he never joined any church. He 
went to church with his family, but was not a 
communicant. He shared in the revolt against 
the severities of Calvinism, and seems to have 
accepted the tenets of the Universalists. His 
portrait, painted at twenty-six, shows a long 
oval face of strength and refinement, with 
the strongly marked features of the Seymour 
family. He had black hair, dark grey eves, 
a dark complexion, and was above medium 
height. Electa (Churchill) Seymour had a 
brilliant complexion, dark blue eyes, hair dark 
brown almost to blackness, and remarkably 
beautiful hands, — a loyal, gracious and hos- 
pitable woman. On the paternal side she was 
descended from the Belden, Wright, Willard 
(Major Symon Willard of Concord, Massa- 
chusetts), Hosmer, Butler, Boardman, 
Holmes, Betts, Hubbard, Hurlburt and Fitch 
families, &c. ; on the maternal side from the 
Pattersons, Wolcotts, Appletons, Burnhams, 
Goodrichs, Chandlers, Curtis, &c. 

Their children were: i. Laura Electa, born 
at New Hartford, April 5, 1846. 2. Henry 
Albert, born April 2, 1847 ; married October 

30, , at Washington, D. C, Mary Marilla, 

daughter of General Mortimer Dormer and 
Marilla (Wells) Leggett. 3. Mary Harriet, 
born July 22, 1849 ! married, October 18, 
1871, Miles Lewis Peck, of Bristol.* 4. Lilla 
Wells, born May 10, 1852 ; deceased. 5. John 
Churchill, born June 5, 1853 ; died June 5, 
1853. 6. Grace Ella, born Tnly 13, 1856; mar- 
ried October 11, 1881, William Shurtlef? In- 
graham, of Bristol. 7. George Dudley, born 
October 6, 1859, mentioned below. 8. Helen 
Wells, born January 29, 1864; died July 12, 
1866. All these children except Laura Electa 
were born in Bristol. 

(IX) George Dudley, son of Henry Albert 
Seymour, was born at Bristol, Connecticut, 
October 6, 1859. He graduated from the 
Hartford public high school in 1878 : removed 
to Washington, D. C, 1878, and entered the 
law office of his brother ; graduated from the 
Law School of Columbian University, 1880, 
LL. B. ; LL. M., 1881 ; unmarried. 'He has 
practiced in New Haven, Connecticut, since 
1883. and is a member of the firm of Sey- 
mour & Earle. specializing in patent cases. He 
is interested in city planning and in the fine 
arts. He is a member of the New Haven 
Municipal Art Commission, the New Haven 
Civic Improvement Committee (secretary) ; 
the building committee of Ives Memorial Pub- 
lic Library ; member of State Commission on 



CONNECTICUT 



1859 



Sculpture (appointed by Governor Weeks) ; 
trustee of Henry Whitfield State Historical 
Museum (appointed by Governor Woodruff) ; 
member of Connecticut Academy Sciences, 
Sons of the American Revolution, Connecti- 
cut Society of Colonial Wars, corresponding 
member American Institute of Architects. In 
politics he is a Republican, in religion a Con- 
gregationalist. He is author of "The Old 
'Time Game of Wicket and Some Old Time 
I W'icket Players" : "The Familiar Hole Book 
' on New Haven," in preparation, and numer- 
ous papers on architecture, forestry, geneal- 
ogy, &c., &c. He is a collector of Colonial 
furniture, old prints, &c. He has traveled ex- 
tensively, and went round the world in 1902-3 
with Hon. GiiTord Pinchot. Clubs : Gradu- 
ates (New Haven), Century Association 
(New York), Cosmos (Washington, D. C). 
Home, 223 Bradley street; office, 113 Church 
street. New Haven. 

NOTE: The compiler of the foregoing narra- 
tive of the Seymours e.xpresses his acknowledg- 
ments to Miss Mary Kingsbury Talcott, who has 
collected material for a history of the family ; to 
Mrs. Maria Watson Pinney, of Derby, a granddaugh- 
ter of "Squire" Chauncey Seymour, of New Hart- 
ford, who has published a brochure on the family, 
and assisted in an examination of the English rec- 
ords ; and to the Honorable Morris Woodruff 
Seymour, of Litchfield, who has also collected a 
great amount of material about the family and pub- 
lished a brochure on Richard Seymour, the Settler. 



(IV) Moses Seymour, son of 
SEYMOUR John Seymour (q.v.), was 
born at Hartford, 1710, died 
there September 24, 1795. He married Rachel 
Goodman, who died there, July 23, 1763. Chil- 
dren, born at Hartford : Sarah, February 16, 
1740, died 1799; Moses, mentioned below; 
Rachel, December 17, 1744, died July 24, 1794; 
Dorothy, October 13, 1746, died June 5, 1819; 
Aaron, March 4, 1749. died 1820; Eunice, Au- 
gust 7, 1751 ; Samuel, January 21, 1754; Cath- 
arine, August 29, 1756, died March 19, 1814. 
(V) Moses (2), son of Moses (i) Sey- 
mour, was born at Hartford, July 23, 1742. 
He settled at Litchfield, Connecticut. He was 
a soldier in the revolution and was in the 
northern army at the surrender of Burgoyne. 
He died there, September 17, 1826. He mar- 
ried, November 17, 1771, Molly Marsh, who 
died July 17, 1826. Children, born at Litch- 
field: Clarissa, August 3, 1772, died Septem- 
ber 2, 1865; Moses, June 30, 1774, died May 
8, 1826, sheriff, 1819-25, postmaster, gave 
the site for the county court house ; Ozias, 
mentioned below; Horatio, May 31, 1778, died 
November 21, 1857, United States Senator 
from Vermont; Henry, May 30, 1780, died 



August 26, 1837; Epaphroditus, Julv 8, 1783, 
died 1856. 

(VI) Ozias, son of Moses (2) Seymour, 
was born in Litchfield, July 8, 1776, died there 
June, 1851. He was educated in the district 
.schools, and was "& pioneer manufacturer of 
hats. He also conducted a farm. He was 
prominent in public life and was sherif? of 
Litchfield county for several terms, in 1825-34. 
The house that he built in Litchfield in 1807 
is now occupied by Morris Seymour. He mar- 
ried Selima Storrs. Children, born at Litch- 
field : Origen Storrs, mentioned below ; Hen- 
rietta Sophronia, born October 25, 1806, died 
June 22, 1892, married George C. Woodruff 
(see Woodruff VII) ; Amelia Selima, March 
6, 1809, died July 15, 1833, married David C. 
Sanford; Maria, March 8, 1813, iriarried Rol- 
lin Sanford, and died April 5, 1836. 

(VII) Origen Storrs, son of Ozias Sey- 
mour, was born at Litchfield, February 9, 1804, 
died August 12, 1881. He graduated from 
Yale College in 1824 and was admitted to the 
bar in 1826. He began immediately to prac- 
tice in Litchfield and continued for more than 
half a century. He was a Democrat in poli- 
tics and active in public affairs. He was 
elected to various town offices and often rep- 
resented the town in the general assembly, of 
which he was speaker in 1850. He was elected 
to congress in 185 1 and re-elected in 1853. 
In 1855 he was elected one of the judges of 
the superior court and was on the bench for 
eight years. In 1864-65 he was the Demo- 
cratic nominee for governor of the state. In 
1870 he was elected judge of the supreme 
court of errors of the state of Connecticut, and 
in 1873 became chief justice, an office he filled 
until he retired in 1874, upon reaching the 
constitutional age limit. Much of the time 
after his retirement he was employed as ref- 
eree in important cases. The new code prac- 
tice, adopted by the legislature in 1879, was 
prepared bv a commission over which he pre- 
sided. In the last year of his life he was 
elected unanimously to the legislature from 
his native town, a significant tribute of the 
respect and honor in which he was held in his 
towns by citizens of different political belief. 
He received the honorary degree of LL. D. 
from Trinity College in 1866 and from Yale 
in 1873. One of the important commissions 
upon which he served late in life was that to 
settle the disputed boundary between New 
York state and Connecticut. The series of 
brilliant lectures delivered by him before the 
Yale Law School and luembers of the New 
Haven bar in advocacy of the adoption of the 
revised civil practice had much to do with its 
final adoption. ' ! 



i 



i860 



CONNECTICUT 



"Born of a family distinguished both in law and 
politics, Judge Seymour was one of its most bril- 
liant scions. In religion he was an Episcopalian, 
being a devout and devoted churchman. While 
Judge Seymour was prominent in all the walks of 
life, whether in church affairs, politically or socially, 
he will be chiefly remembered a» a great lawyer and 
a good man. By his qualities of mind and training 
he was specially fitted to ornament the bar. His 
intellect was clear and cloudless; -he grasped the 
saHent points of a controversy with remarkable ease 
and quickness ; in statement he was luminous, per- 
spicacious and strong. His style of oratory was 
simple, unornamental, but pellucid and most con- 
vincing. Those who heard him argue a case were 
convinced, in spite of themselves, that Judge Sey- 
mour reasoned from internal conviction of the truth 
of his cause and they felt that the argument flowed 
from his intellect as a logical sequence of estab- 
lished facts. Hence he was, while unrhetorical, a 
most persuasive speaker. By his death the Bar of 
the State loses its brightest luminary, his party an 
able and effective advocate, the church a pious and 
noble member, and society one who was amiable, 
gentle and affectionate, and who loved mankind 
because he recognized in them something akin to 
divinity. Viewed in every aspect his death must 
be regarded as a public calamity. That he will rest 
in peace needs no assurance. With such a noble 
life, such lofty aspirations, such a pure purpose and 
with such noble fulfillments of the promises of his 
early manhood, he leaves behind him a record 
which, while it is to the honor and glory of his 
family, is also a delight and blessing to the pub- 
lic. Judge Seymour was a good and great man. He 
needs no further eulogy." 

He married Lticy M., born July i, 1804, 
daughter of Morris and Candace (Catlin) 
Woodruff, of Litchfield. Children: i. Ed- 
ward Woodruff', mentioned below. 2. Storrs 
Ozias, born January 24, 1836, an Episcopal 
clergyman of Litchfield ; married, Jime 20, 
1861, Mary Harrison Browne and had Edward 
^^'oodruff, born April 11, 1874. 3. ■\Iaria, 
October 2y, 1838, died September 11, 1878. 
4. Morris Woodruff', October 6, 1842, member 
of the class of 1866 at Yale, graduate of Col- 
umbia Law School in 1868, and began to prac- 
tice in Bridgeport, Connecticut ; was elected 
city clerk, city attorney and corporation coun- 
sel ; in 1881-82 was state senator and was 
chiefly instrumental in establishing the state 
board of pardons of which he has been for 
many years a valued member ; has been a lec- 
turer on law in Yale University and has given 
especial attention to admiralty and patent cases 
in the highest courts ; has a stimmer home 
at Litchfield; married, September 15. 1865, 
Charlotte Tyler Sanford ; child, Origen Storrs, 
born April ig, 1872, married, October 25, 
1899, Frances Bolton Lord. 

(A'HI) Hon. Edward Woodruff Seymour, 
son of Hon. Origen S. Seymour, was born at 
Litchfield, August 30, 1832, died October 16, 
1892. He was prepared for college in the 
Classical School of Simeon and Edward L. 
Hart, Farmington, Connecticut, and entered 



Yale College from which he was graduated 
with the degree 'of A. B. in the class of 1853. 
He studied law and was admitted to the bar 
in Litchfield county in 1856 and practiced in,, 
his native town until 1875 when he removed to'. 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, and associated him- 
self in partnership with his younger brother, 
^lorris W. Seymour, continuing thus until he 
was appointed a judge of the supreme court of 
errors of the state. He was for several years 
judge of probate in the Litchfield district. 
He represented Litchfield in the general as- 
seinbly of Connecticut in 1859-60-70-71. and 
was a state senator from 1882 to 1886. He 
was a lay delegate from the diocese of Con- 
necticut in the general convention of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal church. 

"As a lawyer he was thorough, quick in percep- 
tion, sound in reflection, pleasing and eft'ective in 
speech. He prepared his cases conscientiously. His 
knowledge of men, his quick wit, his rare appre- 
hension of humor and humorous things, his abound- 
ing good judgment, his intellectual alacrity in emer- 
gencies, and his courage in a crisis gave him a fine 
outfit for practice. He cross-e.xamined a witness 
always with skill, and sometimes with genius. But 
no temptation to score a point ever led him into the 
petty tyranny of abusing a witness. He wore the 
golden rule on his heart and remembered that the 
man in the witness box was a brother. As a Judge, 
without being hortatory, he warmed his opinions 
with wholesome morals. Such ethics, for instance, 
as we find in the opinion of Coupland vs. Hoiisa- 
ton'ic Railroad Company, in the Sixty-first Connecti- 
cut, make good reading. His career as a lawyer and 
judge strengthens our attachment to our profession 
wdiich he adorned. Judge Seymour is mourned by 
the Bar and by the bench of the state with a 
common and tender grief. Years of closest inti- 
macy bound many manly hearts to him with a love 
wliich ma\- not be told, but which must be undying. 
His grave is the tomb of hope and promise and of 
a life broken when it was strongest. He w'as buried 
in the afternoon of a gentle October day, when the 
sun shone through the clouds and brightened the 
gold and scarlet and crimson of fading nature, and 
he was buried in love." 

The foregoing extract is from the pen of 



Henry C. Robinson. Judge 



Augustus 



H. 



Fenn said of Judge Seymour at the time of 
his death : 

"Yesterday morning, at Litchfield, there passed 
from week-day toil into Sunday rest, from work so 
consecrated that it was worship, into eternal peace 
— as pure a soul, and as gentle, as ever parted from 
earth to enter heaven. One who speaks from a torn 
heart because he loved him living and loves him 
dead ; one who met him in delightful social inter- 
course four days last week (the last time on Fri- 
day) in seeming health, full of life and its inter- 
ests, and to whom the telegram amiouucing his sud- 
den death came with shocking agony, can neither be 
silent nor speak with a calm, dispassionate utterance 
in such an hour. Edward W. Seymour lies dead 
at the age of sixty, in the town in which he was 
born and on the street where he has always lived. 
The oldest son of the late Chief Justice, Origen S. 
Seymour, he inherited the rare judicial tempera- 




C^<>o~:<i^.^^ 



CONNECTICUT 



1 86 1 



ment, the calm, candid, impartial judgment, the 
'nve of mercy-tempered justice, so essentially char- 
leristic of liis father. Educated at Vale Cnllege, 
i,raduate of the famous class of 1853, studying law 
in his father's office, entering into partnership with 
him. early and fre(|ucinly called to represent his 
un, and later his senatorial district in the general 
■^cmhly. a useful member of congress for four 
\ears. having in the meantime, by devotion to his 
profession, as well as by natural ability, become 
the acknowledged leader of the bar in the two 
countxs of Litchlield and Fairlield ; certainly it was 
the principle of n.atural selection which three years 
ago led to his choice as a member of our highest 
judicial tribunal — the Supreme Court of Errors of 
this state. While of his services upon that court, 
this is neither the time nor place to speak with 
fulness, it has been the privilege of the writer to 
know them somewhat tlioroughly. and because of 
such knowledge he can the more truly bear witness 
to the rare spirit of fidelity to duty, to justice, to 
law. as a living, pervading and beneficent rule of 
action, with which, whether upon the bench listening 
to and weighing the arguments and contentions of 
counsel, in private study, in the consultation room, 
or in the written opinions of the court, wdiich bear 
his name, the high duties of that great office have 
been sacredly discharged." 

When Chief Justice Seymour died, Gover- 
nor Richard D. Huhbard, in a pubhc address, 
declared : 

"I think we can all say in very truth, and sober- 
ness and with nothing of extravagance in eulogy, 
that we have just lost the foremost, undeniably the 
foremost lawyer,- and take him for all in all, the 
noblest citizen of our state. If it be too much to 
say of a son, whose years were almost a score less 
than those of the father, surely it is not too much 
to affirm that never did son tread more worthily 
in the footsteps of an honored parent, and never did 
untimely death break truer promise than this which 
has deprived our state of those years of ripened use- 
fulness, which would have made the career of the 
son as fruitful in honor, and all good, and good to 
all. as that of the sire. But God knows best, and 
doubtless what is, is for the best. Certainly to him 
who lies crowned with the beatitude of Christ, 
upon the pure in heart, it is well." 

Judge Seymour married, May 12, 1864, 
Mary Floyd Talmadge, born in New York, 
IMay 26, 183 1, daughter of Frederick Augus- 
tus and Elizabeth (Canfield) Talmadge, the 
former of Litchfield, the latter of Sharon, Con- 
necticut. They had no children (see Tal- 
madge VII). 

(The Talmadge Line). 

(I) Thomas Tallmadge came from England, 
in 1631, in the ship "Plough," which carried 
ten passengers. Another report says that he 
came in the fleet with Governor Winthrop in 
1630. He landed at Charlestown. and later 
moved to Boston, and then to Lynn. On May 
4, 1634, the general court made him a free- 
man, and in 1637 he was allotted two hundred 
acres, and twenty acres was granted to his son 
Thomas. He moved to Southampton, Long 
Island, which was founded in 1640. Most of 



the ])coplc came from Lynn, Massachusetts, 
and Thomas arrived soon after the town was 
settled, in 1642 he was granted a home lot. 
He was a freeman, March 8, 1649, and was 
on the list of townsmen, May 10, 1649. tie 
must have left about 1650 and gone to East- 
hampton, of which his son Thomas was one 
of the founders. On May 24, 1651, he was 
fined- for absence from town meeting at East- 
hampton. He probably died in 1653, for on 
December 9, 1653, the town records show that 
it was ordered "that the share of whale in 
controversy between Widowe Talmage shall 
be divided even as the lott is," and in February 
1654, Thomas (no Sr. or Jr. signed to the 
name) was given five acres of land. Also 
there is a record of Thomas Tallmage Sr., 
deceased, and a Thomas is inentioned on the 
same page as living, though no Junior is at- 
tached to the name. Children, as far as 
known : Simon, William, Christian, Jane, 
Thomas, Robert, mentioned below, Davis, 
born 1630. 

(II) Robert, son of Thomas Tallmadge, 
was born in England, and came to America 
when a young man. In 1638 his uncle, John 
Tallmadge, of Newton Stacey, Hants, Eng- 
land, left Robert a legacy. On September 3, 
1640, at Boston, he, with his brothers and 
brothers-in-law, signed a letter of attorney to 
Ralph King, of Watford, to get the money for 
them from the overseers. On March 7, 1644, 
he was at Southampton, and he next appears at 
New Haven, where he was made a freeman, 
July I, 1644. He was a married inan in 1649, 
and very likely married in 1648. He married 
Sarah Nash, who was born in England, doubt- 
less the third child of Thomas and Margery 
(Baker) Nash. She was living in 1687 when 
Major John Nash left her, "the widow Tal- 
mage," a legacy. Robert Tallmadge was said 
to have been one of the original purchasers 
of New Haven colony in 1639. and his brother 
or father Thomas was also living there for a 
while at least. An inventory of his estate was 
filed in 1662 by the administrators. Children, 
born at New Haven: Abigail, May 3, 1649; 
Thomas, October 17, 1650; Sarah, September 
19, 1652; John, September 11, 1654, mentioned 
below; Enos, October 4, 1656; Mary, Sep- 
tember 2, 1659. 

(III) John, son of Robert Tallmadge, was 
born at New Haven, September 11, 1654. He 
is in Bradley's list of New Haven proprietors 
in 1685. He died in April, i6go. He married, 
November 18, 1686, Abigail, born October 30, 
1658, daughter of James and Mary (Lamber- 
ton) Bishop. She was granddaughter of Cap- 
tain George Lamberton, of the famous phan- 
tom ship. James Bishop, her father, was a 



1 862 



CONNECTICUT 



distinguished man, and held many public of- 
fices as magistrate, commissioner on the union 
of the New Haven and Connecticut colonies, 
deputy governor of New Haven, 1662-63, ^"^ 
of Connecticut, 1683-87, etc. Children : Anne, 
born August 15, 1688; James, June 11, 1689, 
mentioned below. 

(IV) James Talmadge,* son of John Tall- 
madge, was born at Branford, Connecticut, 
June II, 1689, died 1748. He was commis- 
sioned cornet in 1 73 1, lieutenant in 1734, and 
captain in 1735, and commanded the only troop 
of cavalry in the colony of Connecticut. He 
often held important offices, and was several 
times appointed on important missions by the 
colonial legislature. His home was in New 
Haven. 

He married (first), July i, 1713, Han- 
nah, born July 28, 1690, died February 16, 
1744, daughter of Nathaniel and Hannah 
(Frisbie) Harrison. Her father was a wealthy 
man in Branford, and for thirteen years was 
representative in the colonial legislature. The 
two presidents of the United States bearing 
that name were descended from this family. 
On June 22, 1747, Captain James Talmadge 
married (second) Mrs. Marcy Ailing. Chil- 
dren: Abigail, born August 14, 1714; James, 
February 10, 1716; John, May 25, 1718; Han- 
nah, February 7, 1720: Ann, June 12, 1722; 
Dorothy, January 23, 1724; Benjamin, Decem- 
ber 31, 1725, mentioned below; Timothy, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1730. 

(V) Rev. Benjamin Talmadge, son of 
James Talmadge, was born at New Haven, 
December 31, 1725, died February 5, 1786. 
He graduated from Yale College in 1747 and 
studied theology while he was teaching school 
at the Hopkins Grammar School. In 1752 
he was invited to fill a vacant pulpit at Se- 
tauket, near Brookhaven, Long Island, and he 
remained with the church for over thirty years, 
until June 15, 1785. He married (first). May 
16, 1750, Susannah, daughter of John Smith, 
of White Plains, New York, and Mehitable 
(Hooker) Smith. Susannah was great-grand- 
daughter of William Leete, governor of New 
Haven colony, 1661-65, ^"d of Connecticut 
colony, 1670-76; she was also a great-grand- 
daughter of the Rev. Thomas Hooker, "foun- 
der of the State of Connecticut and father of 
its Constitution" ; she was also a great-grand- 
daughter of Captain Thonias Willett, the first 
mayor of New York, and her grandfather, 
Thomas Smith, was one of the founders of 
the First Presbyterian Church in New York ; 
her uncle, William Smith, was justice of the 
supreme court of New York province and 

* From the fourth generation the name is spelled 
Talmadge in place of Tallmadge. 



one of the incorporators of Princeton College 
and the New York Society Library. Susan- 
nah Smith's mother, Mehitable Hooker, was 
daughter of James Hooker, son of Rev. Sam- 
uel Hooker, son of Rev. Thomas Hooker, 
founder of Connecticut. Rev. Benjamin Tal- 
madge married (second) January 3, 1770, 
Zipporah, daughter of Thomas Strong, of 
Brookhaven, and Susanna (Thompson) Strong. 
He had no children by her, and she married 
(second) after his death, and lived until June 

13, 1835- . 

His children by first wife : William, born 
June 9, 1752; Benjamin, February 25, 1754, 
mentioned below ; Samuel, November 23, 
1755; John, September 19, 1757; Isaac, Feb- 
ruary 25, 1762. 

(VI) Colonel Benjamin (2) Talmadge, son 
of Rev. Benjamin ( i ) Talmadge, was born 
at Brookhaven, February 25, 1754, died at 
Litchfield, March 7, 1835. He graduated from 
Yale College in 1773, and taught school. It is 
said that President Dagget, of Yale College, 
exatnined him when he was twelve years old, 
and found him advanced enough in learning 
to enter Yale, although he did not do so for 
several years. He was an officer on the staff 
of General Washington during the greater part 
of the revolution, and his provyess as a soldier 
is recognized by the leading histories of the 
war. 

One of the most notable feats was his 
attack on Fort George, Long Island, in No- 
vember, 1780, which he captured, including 
the ships under its guns, and he returned to 
Connecticut without the loss of a man. Con- 
gress passed a resolution of thanks to Major 
Talmadge and his men, and General Washing- 
ton sent him a letter of congratulation. His 
achievements are many of them given in his 
official correspondence with Washington, and 
in his autobiography. Major Andre was cap- 
tured by men in his command and he was in 
his custody until his death. Even .\ndre spoke 
of the kind and thoughtful conduct of this true 
gentleman. After the war he made his home 
in Litchfield where he became a successful 
merchant and bank president, and for many 
years was a representative in the United States 
congress, from 1801 to 1817, after which he 
refused re-election. One of Colonel Benja- 
min's most prized souvenirs of the revolution 
was a portrait of General Washington with 
which he presented him shortly before his 
death. Colonel Talmadge posed for the lower 
part of the famous portrait of Washington by 
Trumbull, at the request of Washington who 
was too occupied with public affairs, as Trum- 
bull had declared that Colonel Talmadge's 
legs were an exact pattern of General Wash- 



CONNECTICUT 



1863 



ington's. "Col. William Smith Livingston ]30s- 
sessed great physical strength, and with Col. 
Benjamin Talmadge, had the reputation of 
being the handsomest men in the Revolution- 
ary Army." They were second cousins. He 
married (first) March 18, 1784, Mary, daugh- 
ter of General William Floyd, a New York 
representative in the continental congress, a 
signer of the Declaration of Independence, and 
later a governor of New York. She died June 
3, 1805, aged forty-two, and he married (sec- 
ond) Maria, daughter of his old friend, Jo- 
seph Hallett, of New York, May 3, 1808. She 
died September 18, 1838. Children by first 
wife: William Smith, born October 20, 1785; 
Henry Floyd, January 11, 1787; Maria Jones, 
March 25, 1790; Benjainin, August 29, 1792; 
Frederick Augustus, September 10, 1794, men- 
tioned below ; Harriet Wadsworth, April 3, 
1797; George Washington, September 13, 
1803. 

(VII) Frederick Augustus, son of Colonel 
Benjamin (2) Talmadge, was born at Litch- 
field, September 10, 1794, died there Septem- 
ber 17, 1869. He graduated from Yale Col- 
lege in the class of 181 1 and became an at- 
torney at I3W, practicing in New York City. 
He was elected recorder of the city of New 
York and sat on the bench for many years. He 
was a member of congress from New York 
City in 1846-47. He served in the war of 
1812 in Captain Craig's company of Inde- 
pendent Hussars, New York militia, and subse- 
quently received a land warrant. He mar- 
ried. May 22, 1815, Elizabeth Canfield, born 
at Sharon, Connecticut, August 19, 1793, died 
in New York City, December i, 1878. Chil- 
dren: I. Elizabeth Canfield, born August i, 
1816, died April 25, 1897 ; married J. P. White, 
born October 8, 1808, son of Dr. John White, 
of Lewes, Delaware ; children : Caroline Mac- 
kay, Julia Flewwelling, Frederick, Floyd, Cora 
Elizabeth, Annie Louise, Elizabeth, Augusta 
Tallmadge. 2. Julia Flewwelling, July 5, 
1818; married, in 1841, William Curtis Noyes, 
a prominent New York lawyer ; children : Em- 
ily Caroline, William Tracy and Mary Noyes. 

3. William Floyd, born in New York City, 
November 28, 1820, lived at Tolono, Illinois. 

4. Frederick Samuel, January 24, 1822, grad- 
uated at Columbia in 1845 (A. M. in 1849), 
a lawyer in New York ; married, April 16, 
1859, Julia Belden ; he died June 20, 1904. 
leaving a large bequest to the Society of the 
Sons of the Revolution. 5. Mary Flovd, May 
26, 183 1, regent of the Mary Floyd Talmadge 
Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, of Litchfield, named for her grandmother, 
wife of Colonel Benjamin Talmadge ; married 
Edward W. Seymour (see Seymour VIII). 



(II) Daniel Hubbard, son of 
HUBBARD George Hubbard (q. v.), was 

baptized December 7, 1645, at 
Hartford. He was a soldier in the French 
and Indian war in 1675. He removed to Had- 
dam, Ponset district, in 1700. He married 
(first) February 24, 1670, Mary, daughter of 
William Clark, of Haddam, and sister of John 
Clark, of Middletown Upper House. She died 
December 24, 1675, and he married (second) 
Sarah, born October, 1647, daughter of Ser- 
geant William Cornwell, of Middletown. Chil- 
dren : Daniel, mentioned below ; Margaret, 
born July 20, 1676, died April 10, 1769; Mary, 
born January 16, 1678 ; Jacob ; Sarah, March 
10, 1680-81; Mehitable, August 18, 1683; 
Mary, March 23, 1686. 

(III) Daniel (2), son of Daniel (i) Hub- 
bard, was born at Hartford, Connecticut, De- 
cember 16, 1673. He removed to Haddam, 
where he became a wealthy and prominent citi- 
zen. He owned grist mills and much land, 
and here he died November 24, 1758. His will 
was dated January 14, 1756-57, his son Daniel 
being executor. He married (first) December 
8, 1697, Susanna Bailey; (second) Bathsheba 

. Children, born at Haddam : Mary, 

Daniel; Susanna, 1703; Elizabeth, 1706; Han- 
nah, 1708; Martha, 1710, married Abraham 
Stowe; Thomas, 1714, soldier in revolution; 
Jeremiah, mentioned below. 

(IV) Jeremiah, son of Daniel (2) Hub- 
bard, was born at Haddam, February i, 1716. 
Here he spent his life, and died November 30, 
1803. He married (first) November 11, 1736, 
Alice, born March 11, 1713, died December 
2, 1760, daughter of Captain Thomas and 
Katherine Shailer ; (second) Mary Wells, or 
Shailer, born 1715, died July 21, 1810 at Had- 
dam. Children, born at Haddam : Susanna, 
July 31, 1737; Asa, November 22, 1738; Mary, 
May 19, 1740; Catherine, December i, 1743; 
Jeremiah, mentioned below ; David, August 
20, 1749, soldier in revolution; Dorothy, Feb- 
ruary 17, 1751, died young; Dorothy, April 
26, 1754. 

(V) Jeremiah (2), son of Jeremiah (i) 
Hubbard, was born at Haddam, January 29, 
1746; settled in Middletown Upper House, 
now Cromwell, in 1793-94, and here he spent 
his life. He joined the First Congregational 
Church in 1794, and was elected deacon De- 
cember 14, 1807, shortly before his death, 
which occurred August 22,, 1808. He mar- 
ried (first) February 11, 1768. Flora Hazle- 
ton, born November 16, 1747, daughter of 
James and Hannah Hazleton, who were mar- 
ried January 22, 1747. Her father James was 
born October 16, 1723, son of James and 
Susanna (Arnold) Hazleton, who were mar- 



1864 



CONNECTICUT 



ried, November 9, 1720. He was a soldier 
from Haddam, in the revolution. Children, 
born at Middletown Upper House : Rufus, 
November 27, 1768; Jeremiah, November 16, 
1770, died July 4, 1790; Simon, mentioned be- 
low; Alice, March 30, 1776; Susan, August 
28, 1778; George; Flora, February 6, 1783; 
Catherine, April 15, 1785; Asa E. (twin), 
April 28, 1788; Bathsheba (twin of Asa), mar- 
ried Joseph Beaumont, and had Edmund, John 
■and Flora A. Beaumont. 

(VI) Simon, son of Jeremiah (2) Hubbard, 
was born at Middletown Upper House, in 
1773, and died April 10, 1838. He married, 
in 1799, Chloe, daughter of Jehiel and Ann 
(Edwards) Williams, of Cromwell. They had 
eleven children. 

(\TI) Jeremiah, son of Simon Hubbard, 
was born at Middletown Upper House, May 
22, 1800, and died April 4, 1856. He was 
educated in the public schools and followed 
the sea. He became a master mariner, and 
for many years commanded a vessel in the 
West Indian trade. He also owned and con- 
ducted a farm in Middlesex county. "He 
was a man of simple habits, intelligent, brave, 
honest, hard-working and God-fearing, a 
sturdy specimen of the old-time Yankee 'salt'." 
He married, March 16, 1825, Elizabeth, born 
December 8, 1803, died June 23, 1870, daugh- 
ter of Wickham Roberts, a prosperous farmer, 
whose homestead included in part the present 
site of the Connecticut Hospital for the In- 
sane. They had eight sons and two daughters. 

(VIII) Dr. Robert Hubbard, son of Jere- 
miah Hubbard, was born at Middletown Upper 
House, April 27, 1826. He was the eldest 
son, and owing to the frequent absence of 
his father on voyages he was obliged at an 
early age to assume much of the burden of 
management of the farm. In early life he at- 
tended the public schools, but his opportuni- 
ties for education were very limited in his 
boyhood, but by his own efforts he secured the 
advantages that he earnestly desired. As jani- 
tor of the building he earned his tuition at 
the academy at Cromwell, and also paid his 
board and other expenses in labor. Rev. Jared 
O. Knapp was principal of the institution. 
With the consent of his parents, who could not 
afiford the cost, he prepared himself for col- 
lege. As a farm laborer in summer he earned 
some money, and in 1846, at the age of twenty, 
he was admitted to Yale College. At the close 
of his first year he was offered the position 
of principal of the academy at Durham, and 
he accepted with the intention of using his 
savings to continue his studies at college ; 
but a year later Dr. Benjamin F. Fowler, of 
Durham, influenced him to study medicine. 



At the end of his second year as principal of 
the acadeni}- he resigned and began to study 
in the office of Dr. Fowler. After a year he 
became a student of Dr. Nathan B. Ives, an 
eminent practitioner of New Haven, and in 
accordance with a common custom went to 
live in the doctor's family. During the two 
years he was with Dr. Ives he also attended 
the Yale Medical School, and in 1851 was 
graduated with the degree of ^1. D., and was 
valedictorian of his class. In February, 1851, 
he came to Bridgeport, Connecticut, and be- 
gan to practice. His office at first was in a 
drug store on Wall street, and his practice soon 
became large. He had borrowed two thousand 
dollars to carry him through school, but was 
soon out of debt and enjoying a large income 
from his practice. In May, 1854, he fonued a 
partnership with Dr. David H. Nash, and the 
firm continued for a period of seventeen years. 
In 1861 he was. recommended b}' the Connec- 
ticut State Medical Society and appointed by 
Governor Buckingham a member of the board 
of medical examiners to pass upon the quali- 
fications of applicants for posts as surgeons 
of Connecticut troops. In 1862 he went to 
the front as surgeon of the Seventeenth Regi- 
ment, Connecticut Volunteers, with the rank 
of major. He was promoted a few months 
later to the post of brigade surgeon in Gen- 
eral Sigel's corps, and shortly after the battle 
of Chancellorsville was again promoted, be- 
coming surgeon of division in General Deven's 
command. In recognition of meritorious serv- 
ices on the field of battle Dr. Hubbard was 
given the rank of medical inspector and as- 
signed to the staff of General O. O. Howard. 
At the battle of Gettysburg he served as medi- 
cal director in the Eleventh Corps, and he 
held the same position at the battle of Look- 
out Mountain. He was also staff surgeon for 
General Hooker. He took part also in the 
battles of Missionary Ridge and Ringgold, and 
was conspicuous in his devotion to the wound- 
ed on the field of battle. The mental and 
physical strain of his trying duties finally im- 
paired his health so that he was obliged to 
resign. After a short rest he resumed prac- 
tice at Bridgeport. He went abroad, partly for 
study and partly in hope of relieving an at- 
tack of sciatica, caused doubtless by exposure 
in the army, and he visited the principal hos- 
pitals of (jermany. He made a second trip 
in 1883 and a third in 1885. In 1879 he was 
elected president of the Connecticut State 
Medical Society. He was a member of the 
city and county medical societies and of the 
American Medical Association. He contrib- 
uted many interesting reports, addresses and 
papers to the publications of his profession. 



CONNECTICUT 



1865 



He was the instructor of many young physi- 
cians who afterwards won hij^h standing in the 
profession, some titty in all, among whom may 
be mentioned Drs. Godfrey, Garlick, Lauder, 
John C. Lynch, Wright, and Gordon, of 
Bridgeport, and Dudley, of Chicago. During 
the last five \ears of his life he confined his 
practice to oiiice business and consultation. 

Dr. Hubbard was well qualified by tempera- 
ment and training for a public career, and he 
was called upon to fill man}- offices of honor 
and trust. In 1874 he was elected to repre- 
sent the city in the general assembly of the 
state. In 1875 he was the Republican can- 
didate for congress in the Fourth district, but 
his party was then in a minority there and his 
Democratic opponent, William H. Barnum, 
was successful. In 1876 Dr. Hubbard was 
elected a state senator. In the following year 
he was again nominated for congress and his 
opponent won by a narrow margin. He de- 
clined a third nomination, though a Republi- 
can victory was foreseen. He preferred to 
devote his attention exclusively to his prac- 
tice. 

Dr. Hubbard's death was the result of a fall 
from the steps of his office July 18, 1897. His 
skull was fractured and he died the ne.xt dav 
at the home of Mrs. C. L. Hubbard Stead, of 
Bridgeport. He was in active practice for 
the unusually long period of forty-six years. 
He took rank easily among the foremost in 
his profession and his practice was large and 
interesting. He had a national reputation, but 
was beloved most among his own neighbors. 
The poor, whom he always served cheerfullv, 
bear him in affectionate remembrance. He 
had a natural aptitude for his profession, a 
careful and painstaking preparation, long and 
varied experience. His memory is especially 
cherished by the veterans of the civil war in 
which he served so faithfully and well, and 
in which he achieved high distinction and rank. 
Few men enjoyed the respect and esteem of 
their townsmen in Bridgeport to the extent 
that Dr. Hubbard did. In all parts of the 
country friends mourned his death, and none 
more than the men of his own profession. 

He married, April 15, 1855, Cornelia Board- 
man, youngest daughter of Sherman and 
Sophia Hartwell, of Bridgeport. His wife 
died in 1871. Children: 

I. Sherman Hartwell, born in Bridgeport, 
died in 1891 ; graduate of Yale Law School ; 
practiced his profession at Bridgeport, mak- 
ing a specialty of patent law ; he was a mem- 
ber of the Athletic Club of New York City 
and of the Seaside Club of Bridgeport, also 
of the Coast Artillery Company, of which he 
was first lieutenant ; he was a .crack shot with 



the revolver and was the champion of five 
states : he married Comet, eldest daughter of 
Hon. John Theodore Ludeling, Chief Justice 
of Louisiana, and they liad one child, John T. 
Ludeling, born November 12, 1891, now in the 
Yale Law School at New Haven. 

John Theodore Ludeling, . father of iVIrs. 
Hubbard, was born in 1824, in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, son of John Henry and Frances 
Loretta De Salrane De L'Ailleuse Ludeling, 
the former a Prussian officer who served under 
BUicher. John Henry Ludeling was first 
cousin of Queen Louise of Prussia and the 
rightful heir to the throne of Prussia before 
the battle of Waterloo. On coming to the 
United States he settled at Point Coupe, Louis- 
iana, where he practiced law and became judge 
of the district of Point Coupe. He moved to 
JMonroe, and there the boyhood of liis son, 
John Theodore, was spent. The latter was 
educated in a Jesuit College in St. Louis. He 
was admitted to the bar in Louisiana, acquired 
an extensive practice and, like his father, 
served on the bench. From 1868 to 1877 he 
was chief justice of the state of Louisiana. 
He was a Republican, and while his two broth- 
ers enlisted in the Confederate army, he re- 
mained a strong Union man, refusing to fight 
against his family and his country. Although 
considerable pressure was used to induce him 
to give his services to the Confederate cause 
he uncompromisingly declined, steadfastly ad- 
hering to his principles and at the same time 
preserving the respect of both parties. He 
married Alary Singleton, of Singleton Abbey, 
Ireland, daughter of Enoch Copley and a de- 
scendant of John Singleton Copley, the por- 
trait painter, an outline of whose career is 
given below. 

Chief Justice Ludeling died January 21, 
1890, at his plantation near Monroe, Louisiana. 
He was the father of two sons and two daugh- 
ters, of whom the elder married Sherman 
Hartwell Hubbard, as mentioned above. After 
the death of her husband Mrs. Hubbard, be- 
came the wife of C. Frederick Stead, treasurer 
of Salt's Textile Manufacturing Company, and 
they have one son, Charles Frederick. Salt's 
Textile Manufacturing Company now occu- 
pies the factory of the old Howe Machine 
Company on Kossuth street. This concern 
had its origin in 1893 through the absorption 
and purchase of the American branch of the 
influential English firm of Sir Titus Salt, 
Baronet, Sons & Company. The concern em- 
ploys over four hundred' skilled and expert 
operatives in the manufacture of pile fabrics, 
plushes, velvets and seals. Their business 
is chiefly in the United States and Canada. 
The company is capitalized at $100,000, and 



\ 



1 866 



CONNECTICUT 



has the following officers : President, F. E. 
Kip; vice-president, Frederick Rhodes; treas- 
urer, C. F. Stead. It is one of the largest tex- 
tile industries in the country. 

2. Sophia Todd, daughter of Dr. Robert 
Hubbard, married Charles M. Everest, vice- 
president of t]\e Vacuum Oil Company of 
Rochester, New York. 

3. Cornelia E., daughter of Dr. Robert Hub- 
bard, married Courtlandt H., son of the late 
Henry Trowbridge, of New Haven, who was 
an importer and ship owner engaged in the 
West Indian trade, residing in New Haven ; 
children : Virginia and Henry Trowbridge. 

John Singleton Copley, the first great Am- 
erican portrait painter, was born July 3, 1737, 
in Boston, Massachusetts, son of Richard and 
Mary (Singleton) Copley, both of whom, al- 
though of English origin, were Irish by birth, 
the former a native of Limerick, and the latter 
the daughter of John Singleton, of Quinville 
Abbey, county Clare, and Jane Bruffe, his wife. 
Mr. and Mrs. Copley emigrated to the new 
world and settled in Boston, the former dying 
in the West Indies, whither he had gone for 
his health, about the time of the birth of his 
only son. About ten years later Mrs. Copley 
married Peter Pelhani, one son, Henry, being 
born of this marriage. In addition to being 
a land-surveyor and a mathematician, Mr. Pel- 
ham was a mezzotint engraver and a painter 
of passable portraits. Both the brothers, John 
Singleton and Henry, were from their child- 
hood devoted to art. Beyond the instruction 
he received from his stepfather, Copley was 
entirely self-taught. Tradition says that his 
first attempts were made on the walls of his 
nursery and the margins of his school books. 
He early established a reputation as a por- 
trait painter, and in 1766 sent to his country- 
man, the painter, Benjamin West, then resi- 
dent in London, a picture of a boy seated at 
a table, holding in his hand a chain to which 
a squirrel is attached. This painting, a por- 
trait of the artist's half brother, Henry Pel- 
ham, was unsigned, and the letter which 
should have accompanied it having been de- 
layed, the picture reached its destination with- 
out an explanatory word. West, however, 
surmised that it was the work of an American 
painter from the pine wood of the frame on 
which the canvas was stretched, and also be- 
cause the flying squirrel introduced was an 
animal peculiar to America. The painting 
-bore so plainly the evidence of a master-hand 
that he was loud in his praise, pronouncing the 
coloring to be worthy of Titian. The rule 
excluding from the exhibition of the Society 
of Incorporated Artists all anonymous works, 
indeed all works not painted by members of 



the Society, was waived, and Copley's "Boy 
with the Squirrel" was given a place in the 
exhibition. His reputation in England was 
at once established and he was urged to go to 
London, but it was not until 1774 that Copley 
concluded to cross the Atlantic. He was in 
Italy when the revolutionary war broke out, 
and wrote to his wife : "It is very evident to 
me that America will have the power of re- 
sistance till grown strong enough to conquer, 
and that victory and independence will go 
hand in hand." Copley ever remained loyal 
to his native land, and at a later period earn- 
estly desired to return to his old home, but 
was prevented by force of circumstances. Dur- 
ing the remainder of his life Copley lived in 
London. It was not long before he became 
the fashion, and commissions for portraits of 
the nobility and of people of note kept him 
busily employed. In 1779 he was elected a 
member of the Royal Academy, and soon after 
was commissioned by the city of London to 
paint a large picture of "The Siege and Relief 
of Gibraltar," now in the Guildhall of London. 
In this work all the figures are portraits. His 
celebrated canvas, "The Death of the Earl of 
Chatham" established his reputation as a por- 
trait painter. It is now in the National Gal- 
lery, London, and copies were sent by the 
artist to President Washington, John Adams 
and Harvard College. Washington wrote : 
"The work is rendered more estimable in my 
eye when I remember that America gave birth 
to the celebrated artist who produced it." 
Harvard possesses Copley's portraits of John 
Adams, Thomas Hubbard, Madam and Nich- 
olas Boylston, President Holyoke, Thomas 
Hollis, the engraving from "Chatham," and a 
series of eleven prints from the artist's works, 
presented by Gardiner Greene. Among his 
other works are : "Offer of the Crown to 
Lady Jane Grey" ; "Charles demanding in 
the House of Commons the Five Impeached 
Members" ; "King Charles signing Straiiford's 
Death Warrant" ; "Assassination of Bucking- 
ham" ; "Battle of the Boyne" ; "The Five 
Members brought back in Triumph" ; and 
"The King's Escape from Hampton Court." 

Copley married, in 1769, Susannah Farn- 
ham, daughter of Richard Clarke, a wealthy 
merchant of Boston and agent for the East 
India Company, whose name was later to 
become famous as the consigiiee of the cargo 
of tea which was thrown into Boston liarbor. 
Mrs. Copley was a lineal descendant of Mary 
Chilton, the first passenger to land from the 
"Mayflower," who became the wife of John 
Winslow. Not long after his marriage Cop- 
ley became the owner of all the land lying 
between Charles, Beacon, Walnut and Mount 



CONNECTICUT 



1S67 



\'criioii streets, Lmiisbiirg stiuare and I'iiick- 
ney street— a tract about eleven acres. Upon 
this estate — his "farm," he used to call it — 
Copley's early married life was spent. There 
four of his si.\ children were born ; there he 
practised his art with unremitting diligence, 
painting those many portraits of courtly gen- 
tlemen in broaclcloth or in satin coats and 
powdered wigs, and of stately ladies in gowns 
of rich silk and stiff brocade which have made 
his name famous. His marriage was an emi- 
nently happy one. The celebrated "Family 
Group," painted soon after he was established 
in his English home, represents himself and 
his wife, four of his children and his father- 
in-law, Mr. Richard Clarke. For nearly a 
century this picture hung over the fireplace in 
the dining-room of Copley's house in London. 
Upon the death of his son. Lord Lyndhurst, 
it was brought to the United States, and is 
now in the possession of Edward Linzee 
Amory, who has loaned it to the Boston Mu- 
seum of Fine Arts where it now hangs. Cop- 
ley died September 9, 18 15, at his home in 
London. His wife survived him many years, 
as did three children : Mrs. Gardiner Greene, 
who, after her marriage, lived in Boston, 
Massachusetts ; Miss Mary Copley, who re- 
mained in London ; and one son, John Single- 
ton Copley, who became Lord Lyndhurst, the 
distinguished British jurist and statesman, and 
was three times appointed Lord High Chan- 
cellor of England. 



(H) Captain Isaac Wil- 
WILLIAMS Hams, son of Robert Wil- 
liams (q. v.), was born in 
Roxbury, September i, 1638. He settled in 
Newton, Massachusetts, and was deputy to 
the general court five or six years, and cap- 
tain of a troop of horse. His will was proved 
July 27, 1708. He married (first) Martha 
Park; (second) Judith Cooper. Children of 
first wife, born at Newton : Isaac, December 
II, 1661 ; Martha, December 27, 1663; Rev. 
William, February 2, 1665, mentioned below ; 
John, August 31, 1667, settled in Connecti- 
cut ; Ebenezer, October 22, 1669, settled at 
Stonington ; Thomas, October 23, 1673. Chil- 
dren of second wife: Peter, August 31, 1680: 
Sarah, October 2, 1688; Ephraim, October 21, 
1691, settled in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. 

(Ill) Rev. William Williams, son of Cap- 
tain Isaac Williams, was born February 2, 
1665. He graduated at Harvard College in 
1683 and settled at Hatfield, Massachusetts, in 
1685, as a minister. After a long ministry, 
he died suddenly at an advanced age, about 
1746. He published several sermons : one 
on the ordination of Stephen Williams in 



1716; "The Great Salvation Explained in Sev- 
eral Sermons," 1717; election sermon, 1719; 
a sermon on the ordination of i-iev. Warham 
Williams, 1733; the ordination of Nehemiah 
Bull of Westfield ; convention sermon, 1729; 
"The Duty and Interest of a Christian People 
to be Steadfast," "Directions to Obtain a True 
Conversion," 1736; a sermon on the death of 
his wife, 1745. President Edwards, in de- 
scribing his character at his funeral, said in 
part: "He was a person of unnatural com- 
mon abilities, and distinguished learning, a 
great divine, of very comprehensive knowl- 
edge, and of a solid accurate judgment; judi- 
ciousness and wisdom were eminently his char- 
acter. He was one of eminent gifts, qualifying 
himself for all parts of the work of the min- 
istry ; and there followed a savor of holiness 
in the exercise of those gifts in public and 
private. In his public ministry, he mainly in- 
sisted on the most weighty and important 
things in religion. Christ was the great sub- 
ject of his preaching; and he much insisted 
on those things, that nearly concern the es- 
sence and power of religion. His subject was 
always weighty, and his manner of teaching 
them peculiarly happy, showing the strength 
and accuracy of his judgment, and ever 
breathing forth the spirit of piety, and a deep 
sense on his heart of the things he delivered. 
His sermons were some of them vain, but were 
all weighty. His presence and conversation 
did peculiarly command awe and respect, yet 
it was at the same time humble and conde- 
scending." He married (first) Eliza, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Dr. Cotton. He married (sec- 
ond) , daughter of Rev. Solomon Stod- 
dard, of Northampton, one of the greatest 
divines of New England. Children of first 
wife : Rev. William, of Weston, born May 
II, 1688; Martha, October 10, 1690, married 
Edward Partridge ; Rector Elisha, August 26, 
1694: Solomon, born June 4, 1700, mentioned 
below. Children of second wife : Daughter, 

born January i, 1707, married Barnard, 

of Salem ; Elizabeth ; Colonel Israel, of Hart- 
ford, born November 30, 1709; Dorothy, June 
20, 1 71 3, married Rev. Jonathan Ashley, of 
Deerfield. 

(IV) Rev. Solomon Williams, son of Rev. 
William Williams, was born June 4, 1700, and 
graduated at Harvard College in 1719. He 
was ordained December 5, 1722, and was a 
distinguished minister at Lebanon, Connecti- 
cut. He published a sermon at the ordination 
of Jacob Elliot at Goshen, in 1730: a sermon 
on the day of Prayer, on the occasion of the 
visit of Eunice Williams, daughter of Rev. 
John Williams, who was carried captive by 
the Indians to Canada, preached at Mansfield, 



1 868 



CONNECTICUT 



August 4, 1 74 1. He also preached an election 
sermon which was published, one on the death 
of Eleazer Williams in 1743; "Christ was the 
Living Witness of the Truth," 1744; a vindi- 
cation of the Scripture of justifying faith, in 
answer to Andrew Croswell, 1746: "The True 
State of the Question Concerning the Qualifi- 
cations for Communion," in answer to Jona- 
than Edwards. He died in 1769, or, according 
to another authority, in 1776. He married 
Mary Porter. Children : Solomon, died 
young; Solomon, died young; Rev. Eliphalet, 
born February 24, 1727, lived in East Hart- 
ford, died 1803; Ezekiel, May 4, 1729, died 
February 18, 1788, sheriff of Wethersfield ; 
Governor William, March 18, 1731, died Au- 
gust, 181 1, signer of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence; Mary, February 11, 1733; Thomas, 
November 12, 1735, mentioned below; Moses, 
May 8, 1740, died aged ten; Samuel, Decem- 
ber 5, 1741, died January, 1742; Eunice, May 
22, 1745, died June 14. 1836. 

(V) Dr. Thomas Williams, son of Rev. 
Solomon Williams, was born November 12, 
1735, died February 10, 1819. Dr. Williams 
was a graduate of Yale College in 1748. He 
was a physician of Lebanon, Connecticut. He 
married Rebecca Wells, a descendant of Gov- 
ernor Thomas Wells. Children : Solomon 
(twin), mentioned below; Mary (twin), born 
1783, died 1831. 

(\T) Solomon (2) Williams, son of Dr. 
Thomas Williams, was born in 1783, died in 
Manchester, Connecticut, in 1875, at the great 
age of ninety-two years. In 1806 he married 
Martha Baker, of Brooklyn, Connecticut, 
daughter of Dr. Joseph Baker, who was a 
neighbor of General Israel Putnam and went 
with Putnam's regiment on the Lexington 
alarm, April 19, 1775, as surgeon. Dr. Baker's 
wife was a granddaughter of Rev. Ebenezer 
Devotion, of Sufficld, Connecticut, and daugh- 
ter of Rev. Ebenezer Devotion, of Scotland 
parish, Windham, Connecticut, and a descend- 
ant of Edward de Votion, of Boston, a dis- 
tinguished Huguenot refugee. Two of Mrs. 
Williams' brothers were officers in the United 
States army, in the war of 1812, Captain James 
Baker continued in the army until disabled by 
illness, while the other brother. Colonel Ru- 
fus L. Baker, remained until shortly before 
the civil war when he resigned rather than 
obey orders from Jefiferson Davis, then sec- 
retary of war, for the sending of arms and 
ammunition to southern arsenals and forts. 

Children of Solomon and Martha Williams : 
I. Rebecca Wells, born in 1807, married Rev. 
Story Hebbard, and died in Beirut, Syria, in 
1840; he was stationed on the island of Malta, 
she in the Syrian mission. 2. Thomas Scott, 



born in 1812, a civil engineer, married, in 1846, 
Ellen Goodwin, of East Hartford; he died in 
1875, leaving four children. 3. Samuel Por- 
ter, born in 1814, merchant and banker for 
many years at Lima, Indiana, married (first) 
Lydia Hume; (second! her sister, Isabella 
Hume; he died in California, March 31, 1897, 
leaving four children. 4. Sarah Trumbull, 
born in 1816, married Edwin Robinson, of 
Brooklyn, Connecticut, a direct descendant of 
Rev. John Robinson, of Leyden, and had three 
children ; he died February 8, 1881 ; she died 
March 12, 1900. 5. James Baker, mentioned 
below. 6. George W^ells. born in 1820, married 
Martha Woodbridge, of Manchester, Connecti- 
cut, and had one son, Charles S., of Hartford. 

7. William Stuart, born in 1822, married Mary 
Edwards Goodwin, of East Hartford, and he 
was for more than forty years associated in 
business with his brother, James Baker Wil- 
liams ; William S. died in 1894, leaving four 
children : Emily, Mrs. F. D. Glazier, of South 
Glastonbury ; George Goodwin, of Hartford, 
now president of The J. B. Williams Company ; 
Bernard Trumbull, who died in 1898; Mary 
Stuart, jMrs. L. S. Welch, of New Haven. 

8. John Albert, born in 1824, a civil engineer, 
employed in the construction of the Boston 
water works and of the railroad from Galves- 
ton north to Austin, Texas ; married, in Texas, 
Caroline Sherman, and died at Galveston, of 
yellow fever, in 1866, leaving one son, Albert 
Sidney. 9. Solomon Stoddard, born in 1826, 
in Lebanon, died in Manchester in 1847. ^O- 
Martha Huntington, born in 1828, in East 
Hartford, married, in 1862, Bryan E. Hooker, 
a lineal descendant of Rev. Thomas Hooker, 
the first minister of Hartford ; he died in 1888, 
she in 1907, leaving two sons: Edward W. 
Hooker, mayor of Hartford in 1908-09, and 
Thomas Williams Hooker. 

(\'II) James Baker, son of Solomon (2) 
Williams, was born in 1818, at Lebanon in the 
house occupied by his great-grandfather for 
fifty-four years, by his grandfather eighty- 
four years and by his father forty-six years. 
He attended the public schools in Lebanon, 
East Hartford and Hartford and the East 
Hartford Academy for two terms. In the 
spring of 1832 he left the Stone School on 
Dorr, now Market street. Hartford, and went 
to live with Deacon Horace Pitkin, of Man- 
chester, where he worked on the farm and 
learned how to use his brains as well as his 
hands in his daily tasks. In the sjjring of 1834 
he entered the employ of F. & H. C. Wood- 
bridge, nejihews of Deacon Pitkin, as clerk in 
their store on Manchester Green, and con- 
tiiuied during the next four years, receiving as 
wages but twentv-five dollars the first vear and 



CONNECTICUT 



1869 



' thirty-five the second. During this time, how- 
ever, he continued his studies in the evenings 
and early mornings. He picked up a knowl- 
L'lye of drugs and became a skillful chemist 
and pharmacist. In 1838 the senior partner 
withdrew from the firm and Mr. Williams 
was admitted to the firm, the name becoming 
Keeney & Williams. In 1840 he sold his share 
in the business, v,-ith the exception of the drug 
department, to the late Christopher A. Wood- 
bridge, and then formed a partnership with 
his brother, George W. Williams, in the drug 

; business. In connection with the apothecary 
store, the firm manufactured a variety of com- 
pounds, such as all druggists sell, but few 
make. W'hile in Manchester }.It. W'illiams 
became convinced that there w^as a great and 

. increasing demand for a better quality of shav- 
ing soap than was to be had and he began 
to experiment in making soap. For two years 

; he continued this work, giving away his prod- 
uct to friends and neighbors to test. He fin- 
ally placed on the market a superior article 
under the name of "W'illiams' Genuine Yankee 
Soap" ; its success led to countless imitations 
and led the ^^'illiams Brothers into much liti- 
gation to protect their product. The business 
was continued at ^Manchester until 1847 when 
the firm was dissolved. George W. Williams 
retained the drug business and later moved to 
Hartford. James Baker W^illiams moved to 
Glastonbury where he leased from his father- 
in-law, David Hubbard, a small grist mill, and 
continued to manufacture shaving soap and a 
few other articles. After a year or more, 
anijther brother, \^'illiam S. \\'illiams, joined 
him, and the name was changed to James B. 
^^'illiams & Company, remaining thus until 
1885 when the business was incorporated 
under the laws of the state of Connecticut 
under the title of The J. B. Williams Com- 
pany. James B. W^illiams was president to the 
time of his death ; David W. W'illiams was 
vice-president ; his nephew, George G. Wil- 
liams, treasurer, another nephew, Bernard T. 
A\'illiams, secretary, and his son, Samuel H. 
^^'illiams, chemist. The original plant oper- 
ated by Mr. Williams at Glastonbury had less 
than two thousand five hundred square feet 
of floor space, while the company now has 
nearly two hundred thousand feet. The ca- 
pacity has increased eighty-fold and shows 
constant growth. The product finds a ready 
sale in all parts of the world. There is per- 
haps no concern in the multitude of manufac- 
turing establishments of Connecticut that 
reaches with its product as many persons and 
has achieved as extended a reputation as the 
W'illiams Company. The business history has 
been highlv creditable. Though beginning 



with borrowed capital, his cre<lit was always 
of tiie best. He acquired a large fortune in 
the legitimate channels of trade and never 
lost the good will of a customer. Year by 
\ear, almost without exception, the business 
of the concern increased, from the start to 
the present time. 'Mv. Williams was also 
president of the Williams Brothers Alanufac- 
turing Company of Glastonbury and of the 
\'erniont Farm Machine Company of Bellows 
Falls, \"ermont. 

Mr'. W'illiams enjoyed a remarkably long 
life, retaining his health and faculties to an 
extreme age. From 1886 to the time of his 
death he spent his winters in Florida, mostly 
at the town of Leesburg. He was fond of out- 
door exercise and used to work daily in his 
garden. He never used tobacco and when a 
boy of nine signed the total abstinence pledge 
and always kept it. His influence on the side 
of temperance was very great in the commun- 
ity. He cast his first presidential vote for 
^^'illiam Henry Harrison in 1840 and three of 
his brothers supported the same candidate. 
He remained in the WHiig party until the Re- 
publican party was organized and afterward 
gave his support to the principles and can- 
didates of that party. He represented his town 
in the general assembly in 1863-64 and during 
his first term was a member of the committee 
on education ; during the second a member 
of the committee on engrossed bills. Prior to 
that time he had refused several times to ac- 
cept nominations for public office. He refused 
a re-nomination to the legislative office and 
declined all further honors that were offered 
to him. While a resident of ^Manchester he 
served as recorder of votes during the exist- 
ence of that office. 

At the age of eighteen he enlisted in the 
East Hartford Artillery Company and was 
chosen corporal, but he soon resigned on ac- 
count of the confining duties of his position as 
a druggist. 

In 1838 he joined the First Congregational 
Church in ^Manchester and in 1848 was re- 
ceived into the First Church of Christ in Glas- 
tonbury, of wdiich he was chosen deacon in 
1859, continuing in that office the remainder 
of his life. He was very active and useful in 
the church. He was a member of the Con- 
necticut Historical Society, the Connecticut 
Congregational Club, the Harrison Veteran 
Club, the Independent Order of Good Tem- 
plars and the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion. 

He earned and enjoyed the respect and con- 
fidence of his neighbors and townsmen as well 
as the business world in which he moved for 
so manv vears. He set a high standard of liv- 



1870 



CONNECTICUT 



ing and was kind, charitable and sympathetic 
to men in all walks of life. The extent of his 
good works will never be known, he was so 
modest and thoughtful in his ways of giving 
and helping others. In both business and 
private life his record was stainless, a model 
for his successors. Few finer careers of self- 
made American business men can be found 
than that of James B. Williams. He died 
March 2, 1907. 

He married (first) September 24, 1845, Je- 
rusha M. Hubbard, born at Glastonbury, May 
5, 1825, died November 20, 1866, eldest daugh- 
ter of David and Jerusha (HoUister) Hubbard, 
of Glastonbury. She was buried in her na- 
tive town. He married (second), in 1869, 
Julia Elizabeth Hubbard, a younger sister of 
his first wife. For many years the names of 
Hubbard and Hollister were the most num- 
erous and prominent in the town of Glaston- 
bury. The first of the name of Hubbard to 
locate there was George Hubbard, who set- 
tled there when the town was part of Weth- 
ersfield. Mrs. Williams was born May 10, 
1839, died 1902. 

Children of first wife: i. Mary Ellen, born 
November 29, 1850. 2. David Willard, born 
April 12, 1853, died June 8, 1909; he had 
succeeded his father as president of The J. B. 
Williams Company, and as deacon in the 
church ; he had been president of the church 
from the time of its incorporation in 1896; 
he was of a peculiarly winsome disposition, 
and made many warm friends among those he 
was thrown into contact with in matters he 
interested himself in outside of his business ; 
he served two terms in the general assembly, 
1893 and 1895, was a member of the Sons of 
the American Revolution, the Society of the 
Colonial Wars, the Hartford Club, the Yale 
Club of New York, and a trustee of the 
Hartford Theological Seminary. He mar- 
ried (first) October 23, 1876, Helen Penfield 
Rankin, daughter of Rev. S. G. W. Rankin ; 
she died in 1901, and he married (second) 
August 30, 1905, Jennie G. Loomis, daughter 
of Judge Dwight Loomis, of Hartford ; chil- 
dren of his first wife : Helen Louise, born 
1878; James Willard, 1885; Mildred, 1887; 
Ruth Clarice, 1890; Isabel Stoddard, 1894; 
one son of his second wife, Dwight Loomis, 
born 1909. 3. Martha Baker, born October 
17, 1854. 4. Jessie Elizabeth, born Novem- 
ber 17, 1857, married Henry F. Welch, of 
Charleston. South Carolina, and died there in 
1901. 5. James Stoddard, born September 8, 
1859, graduated from the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College in 1882 ; after several years 
spent in farming he entered the Williams 
Brothers Manufacturing Company, makers of 



silver-plated ware, and has been successful 
in building up a large business, succeeding 
his father as president of the company ; he 
also served a term in the general assembly in 
1907 ; he is president of the Glastonbury 
Power Company, a director of The J. B. Wil- 
liams Company and of the Vermont Farm 
Machine Company of Bellows Falls, Ver- 
mont, a member of the Hartford Club, and 
president of the corporation of the First Con- 
gregational Church of Glastonbury. He mar- 
ried. May 26, 1887, Katharine Phillips, 
daughter of Judge R. L. B. Clarke, of Wash- 
ington ; children : Katharine Stoddard, born 
18S9 ; Helen Devotion, 1891 ; Percy Hunting- 
ton, 1894; Edith Clarke, 1896; Jessie Hub- 
bard, 1899; James Rufus, 1902. 6. Samuel 
Hubbard, mentioned below. Children of sec- 
ond wife: 7. Anne Shelton, born November 
5, 1876. 8. Richard Solomon, born July 8, 
1880, graduate of Amherst College in 1902; 
married, October 18, 1904, Marian Homer 
Farnham, of Ossining, New York ; son, Rich- 
ard Gordon, born June 20, 1908. 

(VIII) Samuel Hubbard, son of James 
Baker Williams, was born September 28, 
1864. He attended the public schools and 
academy at Glastonbury and entered Amherst 
College, from which he was graduated in the 
class of 1885 with the degree of A. B. He 
took a post-graduate course in the Sheffield 
Scientific School of Yale University, making 
chemistry a specialty. For some years after- 
ward he was chemist for The J. B. Williams 
Company, soap manufacturers. He was made 
secretary, assistant treasurer and treasurer 
successively, and is now vice-president of the 
corporation which his father established. In 
politics he is a Republican. He has been town 
treasurer, secretary of the board of school 
visitors, president of Glastonbury Free Acad- 
emy, which is now the public high school, as- 
sessor of the town and is now chairman of the 
school committee of Glastonbury. He was 
elected from his native town to the general 
assembly of the state in 1900 and was house 
chairman of the committee on education. He 
is a member of the Hartford Club, the Con- 
gregational Club, the University Club of 
Hartford, Daskam Lodge, No. 86, Free and 
Accepted Masons ; of Pythagoras Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons ; of Wolcott Council, 
Royal and Select Masters : of Washington 
Commandery, No. i. Knights Templar. He 
is a prominent member of the Congregational 
church, of which for twenty years he has been 
superintendent of the Sunday school, and he 
succeeded his brother D. W. Williams at his 
death as deacon of the church, an office their 
father had held for fortv vears. Mr. Wil- 




&[^^S^Xlxxyuu^. 



J. ewis His loricaX Pub, Co. 



CONNECTICUT 



1871 



liams is president of the Connecticut Smiday 
School Association, and of the board of trus- 
tees of the Hartford School of Religious Ped- 
agogy, and is one of the bcst-isnown Congre- 
gationalists in the state. In business, in pub- 
lic life and in social and church atYairs, he 
has proved a worthy successor of his father. 
He married, in India, January 9, 1889, 
Frances A. Scudder. born September 4, 1864, 
daughter of Rev. William W. Scudder, a mis- 
sionary in India, who had been for eleven 
years pastor of the church in Glastonbury, 
who died in Glastonbury in 1895. Children, 
born in Glastonbury : Carol Scudder, born 
May I, 1890; Frances Rousseau, November 
17, 1891 ; Martha Huntington, October 26, 
i8g6: James Baker, July 29, 1900. 



(V) Nathan Williams, son 

WILLIAMS of Isaac Williams (q. v.), 
of Stonington, Connecticut, 
was baptized July 22, 1720. He married, in 
1744, Elizabeth Haley. Children; Prudence, 
born December 18, 1745; Lucy, March 11, 
1747; Joshua, (twin) July 18, 1749; Caleb, 
(twin) ; Isaac, (twin) June 10, 1751 ; John, 
(twin); Martha, July 10, 1754; Elizabeth, 
July 7, 1756; Catherine, (twin) February 27, 
1758 ; Mary, (twin). 

(\'l) Caleb, son of Nathan Williams, was 
born July 18, 1749. By occupation he was a 
farmer, and spent his life in Groton. He 
married Freelove Fanning, of Groton, Con- 
necticut. Children ; Jesse, born June 28, 
1774, mentioned below ; Alfred, Caleb, Miner, 
Edmund. 

(\'II) Jesse, son of Caleb Williams, was 
born June 28, 1774. He married, October 13, 
1802, Betsey Elizabeth Avery. Children: 
Eliza, born December 22, 1803; Caleb Miner, 
March 30, 1806, mentioned below ; Alonza, 
June 26, 1808; Ebenezer, June 6, 181 1; Ly- 
dia, May i, 1813; Frederick, May 11, 1816. 

(VIII) Caleb Miner, son of Jesse Wil- 
liams, was born March 30, 1806, in Groton, 
and died there, at the age of eighty. He was 
a farmer by occupation, and was also in busi- 
ness as a merchant in Noank, Connecticut. 
He was prominent in town affairs, and filled 
many positions of trust. He also represented 
the district in the legislature. He married 
Sabra Gallup, born at Groton, November 11, 
1809, died there, November 27, 1884. She 
was the eighth child of Gurdon and Sibell 
Gallup, who were married February 15, 1795. 
Gurdon Gallup was born at Groton, December 
18, 1771, and his wife, Sibell (Capron) Gal- 
lup, at Preston, Connecticut. He was of the 
sixth generation from John Gallup, the immi- 
grant, who came to America from the parish 



of Mosterne, county Dorset, Englanil, in 1630. 
John Gallup was the son of John Gallup, who 
was the son of Thomas and Agnes (Watkins) 
Gallup, of North Bowood and Strode, whose 
descendants still own and occujjy the manors 
of Strode. He sailed from Plymouth, Eng- 
land, I\ larch 20, 1630, in the ship "Mary and 
John" and arrived in Nantasket, May 30, of 
the same year. He went first to Dorchester, 
and soon after to Boston. His wife and chil- 
dren followed him in 1633. He rendered im- 
portant service to the infant colony. Both 
he and his son John were distinguished for 
bravery in the Pequot war and in King Phil- 
ip's war. He was the leader of the friendly 
Mohegans, in the swamp fight at Narragansett, 
December 19, 1675, and with several other 
captains was slain. The name was originally 
Gollup, and the family was of Franco-German 
ancestry, from Lorraine. Children of Caleb 
Miner Williams; Betsey Ann, born 1831 ; 
Gurdon, January 30. 1832 ; Lucy Elizabeth,' 
April 18, 1833 : Emily, January 30, 1835 ; 
John Coleman, April 24, 1836 ; Nancy, Feb- 
ruary 17, 1838: Jesse Miner, October i, 1840; 
Charles Fish, April 24, 1842, mentioned be- 
low; William Ledyard, October 18, 1843; 
Ellen Adelaide, March, 1845 '• Frank Edgar, 
July 15, 1849. 

(TX) Charles Fish, son of Caleb Miner 
Williams, was born April 24, 1842, in Gro- 
ton, died in Thomaston, Connecticut, Decem- 
ber 17, 1907. He received a common school 
education, and when eighteen years old went 
to work in the drug store of Dr. Seth Smith, 
of New London, where he remained four 
years. He was then employed as clerk by 
Lee & Osgood, of Norwich, and by W. S. 
Tyler & Son, of the same place. For a num- 
ber of years he was in partnership with Mr. 
Tyler, of Greenville, and later opened a drug 
store in Ansonia, which he carried on for 
about nine years. In 1878 he bought the old 
Seth Thomas drug store in Thomaston, Con- 
necticut, and soon established a good business, 
which increased yearly. In politics he was 
a Democrat of the conservative type. He had 
the confidence and esteem of his fellow-towns- 
men wherever he lived, and held various offi- 
ces of trust. In Greenville he was postmaster 
and held other minor offices ; in Ansonia he 
served as warden of the borough : in Thom- 
aston he was selectman for several years, fire 
commissioner, etc. He was one of the di- 
rectors of the Thomaston National Bank. In 
religion he was a Baptist, and his wife a Con- 
gregationalist. He was a man of superior 
intelligence, of genial disposition and a uni- 
versal favorite. He married. November 5, 
1867, Elizabeth Cooke, daughter of Henry 



CONNECTICUT 



Foote Reynolds, a prominent farmer of 
Thomaston, and his wife, Lorinda E. (Ed- 
wards) Reynolds. Henry F. Reynolds was 
the son of Russell and Mary (Castle) Rey- 
nolds. Russell was the son of Samuel and 
Sarah (Foote) Reynolds. Samuel was the 
son. of Samuel and Sarah (Warner) Rey- 
nolds. Samuel was the son of Samuel and 
Susanna (Turner) Reynolds. Samuel was 
the son of John and Abigail (Preston) Rey- 
nolds. John was the son of John and Ann 
Reynolds. Children of Charles Fish Wil- 
liams: Charles Henry, born September ii, 
1868, mentioned below; Frederick, April 12, 
1870, died August 26, 1870. 

(X) Charles Henry, son of Charles Fish 
\Villiams, was born September 11, 1868, in 
Norwich, Connecticut, and came to Thomas- 
ton with his parents when ten years of age. 
He was educated in public and private 
schools, and the New York College of Phar- 
iiiacy, where he graduated in 1889. He was 
with his father as clerk for several years, 
and later was taken in as partner. Up to 1889 
the business was carried on under the name 
of C. F. Williams & Son ; since that time Mr. 
Williams, the younger, has run it alone, under 
the name of C. H. Williams. He is a direc- 
tor in the Thomaston National Bank, a mem- 
ber of Free and Accepted Masons, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, of Thomaston, and 
of the Sons of the American Revolution. He 
married, October 31, 1894, Martha, daughter 
of Gideon Walter and Sylvia (Malthy) 
(Hartsock) Woodruff, of Williamsport, 
Pennsylvania. She was born in the latter 
town, January i, 1872. They have no chil- 
dren. 



William Williams, immi- 
WILLIAMS grant, was born about 1625, 

died December 17, 1689. He 
came from England and settled in the east- 
ern part of Hartford in 1646. He was a cooper 
by trade. He was admitted a freeman in 
1654. He married, November 20, 1647, Jane 
Westover, who died December 25, 1689. His 
will was dated in 1688. Children : William, 
John, mentioned below, James, Gabriel, Sam- 
uel, Elizabeth, Jane, Ruth, Mary. 

(II) John, son of William Williams, was 
born in Hartford. His will was dated in 
1713. He had five children. 

(III) Jacob, son of John Williams, was 
born at Hartford in 1699. He married Rebec- 
ca Hubbard. His will was dated in 1750. 
He had nine children. 

(I\') Israel, son of Jacob Williams, was 
born June 13, 1744, at Hartford or Windsor. 
He removed to West Hartford, where he died 



June 7, 1812. He married (first) July 22, 
1772, Beulah Loomis, born June 22, 1746, 
died December 5, 1784. He married (sec- 
ond), February 2^, 1786, Catherine Coe, born 
January 16, 1744, died November 27, 1789. 
He married (third) October 31, 1791, Martha 
Stanley, who died April 18, 1818. Children 
of first wife: Anna, born May 17, 1776, died 
;\larch 18, 1854; Israel, October 17, 1778, 
died April 29, 1846; Warham, October 20, 
1781, died September 30, 183 1. Child of sec- 
ond wife: Anson, December 18, 1786, died 
January 24, 1826. 

(\') Warham, son of Israel Williams, was 
born October 20, 1781, in West Hartland, 
died September 30, 1831. He was a farmer. 
He lived and died at Hartland, and held 
various town offices. He was a Free Mason. 
He married Lydia Ensign, 1809. Children: 
Dwight, Timothy, Chloe and Clarissa. 

{VI) Timothy Ensign, son of Warham 
Williams, was born at West Hartland, Con- 
necticut, in 181 1, died September 1S95. He 
followed farming in his native and surround- 
ings towns, and taught school for a number 
of years. He represented the town many 
terms in the general assembly of the state and 
was state senator. He possessed great exec- 
utive ability and was held in the highest es- 
teem in the community. He was judge of 
probate for a number of years. He married 
Octavia Persis Gaylord, born at West Hart- 
land, died July 2, 1905, aged eighty years. 
They had only one child, Warham Howard, 
mentioned below. 

(VH) Warham Howard, son of Timothy 
Ensign Williams, was bom in West Hartland, 
October 9, 1853, died in Winsted, Connecti- 
cut, July 14, 1904. Fie attended the public 
schools, and the ^^'inchester Institute, under 
Colonel Ira W. Pettibone, and Williston Sem- 
inary at Easthampton, Massachusetts. He 
also took the Chautauqua Literary and Scien- 
tific Course. He worked on his father's farm 
during boyhood and until September, 1881, 
when he came to Winsted, Connecticut, and 
commenced his business career. He accepted 
a clerkship in the Mechanics' Savings Bank 
and became its secretary in 1886 and held that 
office until the time of his death. He was 
also assistant treasurer. He was also senior 
partner of the firm of Williams, Plallett & 
Griswold. investment brokers : director in the 
Ilurlbut National Bank, the Winsted Hosiery 
Company and the Winsted Edge Tool 
^^'orks : secretary' of the Litchfield County 
Hospital ; treasurer of the Winsted Real Es- 
tate Company ; treasurer of the First School 
District ; treasurer of the First Ecclesiastical 
Society and deacon of the First Congrega- 




'/^4H'^-^/, ■■'■ 



/^^^^^:^:^^^^c 



CONNECTICUT 



1873 



tioiial Church. j\lr. W'iUiams was a iiiombcr 
of Winsteil Lodge, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. He was a Republican in politics. 
He represented the town of Hartland in the 
legislature of the state. He died suddenly, 
beinjj ill but a week. He underwent an oper- 
ation for appendicitis. 

Rev. George W. Judson, pastor of the First 
Congregational Church, in a tribute to Mr. 
Williams at the funeral, said : 

"Mr. Williams will be missed — unspeakably missed 
by his neighbors and friends. None of them are 
yet able to speak of their loss without a choking 
voice and tear-fillcd eyes. His was not a demon- 
strative nature, but rather the calm, quiet, yet ten- 
der and true spirit, a nature you could always de- 
pend upon. Once you had entered into personal 
friendship with him, you knew you possessed some- 
thing that would abide with the passing years. Still 
waters run deep. Quiet souls are those which ere 
wx realize it, have found a place in the affection of 
our hearts, a place which is not the vestibule nor the 
outer court nor the formal audience chamber or re- 
ception hall, but the living room where love abides. 
The family circle, the place where we welcome 
those we love, those who without outward demand, 
have a heart claim to its warmth and affection and 
make a place for themselves which is all their own. 
I do not know a man in this community to whom 
I would have sooner gone in trouble or perplexity 
than to him whose absence from our mids't makes 
all hearts mourn to-day. The laborer on our streets, 
not yet able to speak our language, knew Mr. Wil- 
liams for a friend and he was planning to study 
Italian that he might befriend them better in time 
to come. 

"Mr. Williams will be missed — who of us yet 
knows how much — in our church. I well remem- 
ber how he shrank from his election to the office 
of deacon a few years ago. He dreaded its pub- 
licity and honor, feeling he did not deserve they 
should fall to him. I talked with him about it, tell- 
ing him that to be a deacon meant to be a helper, 
a helper in church work, a helper to his pastor, a 
helper to the Lord Jesus Christ, the great head of 
the church. And that is what Mr. Williams had 
been before he became deacon, what he has been 
all these years, a helper of his pastor, by his ap- 
preciative hearing of the Gospel message and as- 
sistance in every good word and work, a helper in 
bearing the burden of the church's financial sup- 
port, in its regular expenses, its new church con- 
struction and its missionary Gospel extension work. 
A helper in keeping parish accounts and adminis- 
tering church trust funds, a helper in the Sunday 
school as pupil and teacher, a helper in the mid- 
week service where his prayers were an inspiration 
and help to us all, a helper in the Men's Club, in 
which he had a personal interest and took an impor- 
tant part, believing it capable of great things in 
benefiting the men of the church as well as those 
who are without. 

"It goes without saying that our brother was one 
' whose life compared with his religious profession. 
Religion was life to him, the life which is hid with 
Christ in God. He had no habits which ran counter 
to the main purpose of his life, and this fact led 
his physicians to hope that he might rally from the 
severe shock, which he almost did. * * * He had 
the unreserved confidence and trust of everyone of 
us, of all his business associates, acquaintances and 
friends. His word was as good as his bond, and 



he was being sought more and more by those who 
would put trusts both large and small in his hands. 
I'pon such integrity as his the public business wel- 
fare rests. \\'ithout it, each of us would have to 
hoard his own and find himself able to make little 
use of it. \\'ith it, one and another may unite their 
little savings and be sharers in the returns which 
the use of accumulated funds may honorably secure. 
Upon integrity buttressed by sagacity and business 
judgment rest the confidence of widows and or- 
phans in their need, knowing well that their little 
is as safe and secure as the investments of the rich 
and great. Business, in a word, was with Mr. Wil- 
liams a public trust and he discharged its obliga- 
tions in the spirit of the Apostolic injunction, 'Dili- 
gent in business, fervent in spirit, serving the 
Lord.' " 

Mr. Williams married, September 14, 1881, 
Sara Oilman, of West Hartland, daughter 
of Samuel Blakeslee and Harriet Theresa 
(Newton) Oilman (see Oilman VH). 

(The Gilman Line). 

(H) Richard (2) Oilman, son of Richard 
(i) Oilman, was born in Hartford, in 1679. 

(HI) Elias, son of Richard (2) Gilman, 
died before February 18, 1754, when his es- 
tate was distributed among his children. 

(IV) Elias (2), son of Elias (i) Gilman, 
was born aboijt 1720. His brother Richard 
quitclaimed to him, December 23, 1761. He 
deeded to Josiah Oilman, March 30, 1774. 
Various other deeds of his are recorded at 
Hartford. He married twice. Flis first wife 
was Sybil . One child, Epaphras. Sy- 
bil Oilman died when Epaphras was five 
weeks old. 

(V) Epajjhras, son of Elias (2) Oilman, 
was born at East Hartford, 1750, died Sep- 
tember II, 181 1. He was a soldier in the 
revolution. He married Hannah Clark, who 
died August 31, 1813. 

(VI) George Clark, son of Epaphras Gil- 
man, was baptized at West Flartland, Con- 
necticut, (August 3, 1783, died January 2, 
1843. He married Sarah Blakeslee, baptized 
July 26. 1789. 

(ATI) Samuel Blakeslee, son of George 
Clark Oilman, was born at West Hartland, 
Connecticut, October 27, 1821, died in 1867. 
He married Harriet Theresa Newton, born 
at West Hartland, Connecticut, March 5, 
1829, now living with her daughter. She is 
a lineal descendant of Roger Newton, the im- 
migrant ancestor, who married Mary, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Thomas Hooker, one of the found- 
ers of Hartford. Children of Samuel B. and 
Harriet T. Gilman: i. George Lester, a 
farmer in Dakota, married Emily Gaines, of 
Geneseo, Illinois : children : George Gaines, 
Howard, Elias, Raymond Newton, Alice The- 
resa. 2. Sara, married Warham H. Williams 
(see Williams VII). 3. Ick, died in infancy. 



1874 



CONNECTICUT 



4. Ada Tlieresa, married Henry Wetmore 
Beecher, funeral director, of New Haven, 
Connecticut, partner in the firm of Beecher 
& Bennett. 



This name is a prominent one 
DISBROW in the records of Westchester 
county, New York, and the 
ancient residence of the Disbrow family, 
erected in 1677, still stands in the town of 
Mamaroneck. The family originally came 
from the county of Essex, England, and were 
related to, if not immediately descended from, 
General Disbrow, or Disbrough, who married 
Jane Cromwell, sister of the Protector. They 
.had seven sons, of whom the youngest was 
Benjamin.- A Samuel Disbrough was one of 
the first settlers of Guilford, Connecticut, in 
1650. 

The immigrant, Peter Dislarow, was one of 
the first and principal proprietors of Rye, New 
York, having come from England about 1660, 
and in 1665 was a state representative from 
Stamford. He had a son John who had a 
son Henry who, in 1688, conveyed half his 
land, situated in Mamaroneck, to his son, who 
also bore the name of Henry. The estate 
originally consisted of seven hundred acres, 
including a valuable tract of woodland, called 
the hickory grove. There is a small ceme- 
tery in Mamaroneck containing several me- 
morials to the Disbrow family. In the pos- 
session of William Disbrow, of New York, 
are the family Bible, edited by Basket, of 
London, 1756, and a silver-headed walking 
stick inscribed "Henry Disbrow, 1697". 

(I) Joseph Disbrow, born December 6, 
1705, died 1799, married Abigail, daughter 
of John Meeker. Children : John, born Jan- 
uary 15, 1732, died May 11, 1732; Jabez, 
June 23, 1734; Jason, April 30, 1736; Betty, 
November 18, 1738, died September 13, 1748; 
Noah, February -8, 1740; Lois, January 29, 
1742: Joseph, February 28, 1744. mentioned 
below : Asael, March 28, 1747, died May 2, 
1813, moved to Ashland, Greene county. New 
York, in 1799; Thaddeus, May 3, 1749; Elias, 
November 26, 1750, died January 12, 1832. 

(II) Joseph (2), son of Joseph (i) and 
Abigail (Meeker) Disbrow, was born Feb- 
ruary 28, .1744, and married Phoebe Hen- 
dricks, in 1768. They had five children, 
among them, Joseph, mentioned below. 

(III) Joseph (3), son of Joseph (2) and 
Phoebe (Hendricks) Disbrow, married Anna 
Hodge, and they were the parents of a son, 
Meeker, mentioned below. 

(IV) Meeker, son of Joseph (3) and Anna 
(Hodge) Disbrow, was born June 8, 1798, 
died April, 1847. -He was a combmaker and 



had a factory in Brookfield, where he spent 
the greater part of his life. He married, De- 
cember 12, 1836, Julia Whitlock, and the fol- 
lowing sons were born to them : Henry Sel- 
leck, born October 12, 1837; David Burr, Au- 
gust I, 1841 ; William E., mentioned below. 
(V) William E., son of Meeker and Julia 
(Whitlock) Disbrow, was born March 15, 
1844, in Brookfield, Connecticut, died in 
Bridgeport, March 2, 1907. He was self-ed- 
ucated, and like most boys who attained to 
their early manhood in the stirring days of 
the ojiening of the civil war experienced mil- 
itary life instead of a higher education or an 
early start in business. At eighteen he en- 
listed in the Second Regiment, Connecticut 
Volunteers, Heavy Artillery, the date of his 
enlistment being August 11, 1862. He was 
soon promoted to the rank of corporal. On 
June 20, 1864, he was wounded at Peters- 
burg, Virginia, and he also took part in the 
engagements at North Anna, Tolopotomy, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Winchester, Fish- 
er's Hill, Cedar Creek, Sailor Creek, Fort 
Fisher, Spottsylvania, and Snicker's Gap^ 
all in Virginia. In July, 1865, he was hon- 
orably 'discharged. After the war he settled 
in Bridgeport, where he was for a time em- 
ployed as a springiuaker, afterward engaging 
in the fire insurance Inisiness and becoming 
identifietl with pension interests. In 1896 
Governor Coffin appointed him quartermaster- 
general of the state. He filled that position 
most efficiently, resigning in December, 1897, 
in order to take the oath of deputy collector 
and customs inspector, ofiices which he filled 
up to the time of the brief illness which 
caused his death — a period of nearly ten 
years, during which he had full charge of the 
marine department of the customs sei"vice. 
His prominence in the Grand Army of the 
Republic was widely known and appreciated 
by reason of the fact that for twenty years 
he served as quartermaster of Elias Howe 
Post, No. 3, and for four years held the of- 
fice of commander. In 1876 he was elected 
department commander of the Grand Army 
of the Republic in Connecticut, and he also 
served as secretary and president of the Sec- 
ond Connecticut Heavy Artillery Association. 
In local, state and national politics General 
Disbrow took a steady and active interest, and 
he was a lifelong and loyal adherent of the 
Republican party. He was ever an advocate 
of the most honorable, straightforward and 
clean methods in politics, and his high prin- 
ciples and keen interest did much for the 
growth of political integrity in his city. He 
was chairman of the Republican town com- 
mittee and registrar of voters for many years. 



CONNECTICUT 



^^7S 



In iSSo he liad charge of the taking of the 
census. He was a iiieniber of the Masonic 
fiatcrnitj-. the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Good Templars. During the en- 
tire period of his residence in i5ridgeport he 
was a memlier and liberal supporter of the 
First Baptist Church of that city and served 
a- one of the committee in charge of the 
building of the jiresent edifice. 

.A true soldier of many brave deeds, an 
honorable, patriotic and useful citizen, and a 
public official of great capability and integrity, 
General Disbrow made for himself a name 
widely honored by the many not fortunate 
enough to know him as a personal friend. 
ITe was of a kindly, generous and unselfish 
nature, possessing a warm heart and a cheer- 
ful disposition. Flis success in military, civil 
and business life was due to his great indus- 
trw unfailing honor and sterling worth as a 
soldier and a man. 

( ieneral Disbrow married, May 22, 1878, 
Lillie J. Robinson, of La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
daughter of Charles and Hannah P. (Wilder) 
Robinson (see Wilder XII), and their chil- 
dren are : Charles R., connected with the 
Union Metallic Cartridge Company; Lily E., 
stenographer ; Helen J., graduate of Smith 
Institute and a kindergarten teacher. 

(The Wilder Line). 

The first Wilder known in history was 
Nicholas, a military chieftain in the army of 
the Earl of Richmond, at the battle of Bos- 
worth, in 1485. The fact that it is a Ger- 
man name, quite common in some parts of 
Germany at the present time, w'ould indicate 
that he was one of those who came with the 
Earl from France and landed at Milford Ha- 
ven. On April 15, 1497, being the twelfth 
year of the reign of Henry the Seventh, that 
monarch gave to Nicholas Wilder, as a token 
of his favor, a landed estate with a coat-of- 
arms. This estate is still held by his heirs. 

(II) John, son of Nicholas Wilder, was in 
possession of the estate in 1525. He married 

Agnes and they had a son and a 

daughter : John, mentioned below ; and Agnes, 
who died in 1580. 

(III) John (2), son of John (i) and Ag- 
nes \Mlder, died in 1588. He married Alice, 
daughter of Thomas Keats. Children : John, 
Nicholas, \\"illiam, Thomas, mentioned be- 
low : Eleanor, Joan, Alice. 

(IV) Thomas, son of John (2) and Alice 
(Keats) \\"ilder, was of Shiplake, Oxon. and 
proprietor of the Sulham inheritance in Berks 
county, England. He married Martha 

■ , and their children were: John, of 

Nunhide, heir-apparent of Thomas, died in 



1688; Thomas, mentioned below; Elizabeth, 
born 1621, married, in Hingham, Massachu- 
setts, January 17, 1639, Thomas Ensign, of 
Scituate, iMassachusetts; Edward, 1623, died 
October 28, 1690, married Elizabeth Ames; 
Mary. Thomas Wilder, the father, died in 
1634, and in May, 1638, his widow left Ship- 
lake for the colonies, settling at Hingham, 
Massachusetts. The town records show 
grants of land to Edward Wilder and his mo- 
ther, who remained with him in Hingham un- 
til her death in 1652. 

(\'') Thomas (2), son of Thomas (i) and 
Martha Wilder, was born in 1618, and set- 
tled in Charlestown, Massachusetts, where he 
was made a freeman in 1640. In 1659 he re- 
moved with his family to Nashawena, now 
Lancaster, IMassachusetts, where he was a se- 
lectman and filled many other positions of 
trust until his death in 1667. He married, 

in 1641, Anna , who died June 10, 

1692. Children: Mary, born June 30, 1642; 
Thomas, September 14, 1644, married, 1668, 
Mary Houghton; John, 1646, mentioned be- 
low ; Elizabeth, 1648 ; Nathaniel, November 

3, 1650, died July, 1704, married Mary Saw- 
yer. 

(VI) John (3), son of Thomas (2) and 
Anna Wilder, was born in 1646, in Charles- 
town, Massachusetts, and was a farmer in 

Lancaster. He married Hannah , and 

their children were: John, baptized July 12, 
1673, mentioned below; Thomas, born 1676, 
ruarried Susannah Hunt; Hannah, October 
31, 1679, died September 26, 1728; James, 
1681 ; Ebenezer, June 23, 1683, died Decem- 
ber 25, 1728; Anna, 1690, died 1736, married 
Joseph Willard. 

(\TI) John (4), son of John (3) and 
Hannah Wilder, was baptized July 12. 1673. 
He was a farmer at Six Nations, afterward 
South Lancaster, and now the town of Clin- 
ton. He married Sarah Sawyer, and their 
children were: Jonas, born November 16, 
1699, "^I'^"^' I797.- married Eunice Beaman ; Jo- 
siah, January 6, 1701, married Prudence 
Keyes ; Mary, July 9, 1703, married William 
Richardson ; Hannah, ]\farch 4, 1708 ; Jona- 
than, October 5, 1710: John, April 13, 1713, 
married Prudence Wilder; Thankful, April 
15, 1715; William, mentioned below. 

(\TII) William, son of John (4) and 
Sarah (Sawyer) Wilder, was born September 

4, 1717, and was a farmer in that part of 
Lancaster which is now Bolton. He married, 
in 1739, Sarah Sawyer. Children : John, 
born November 28, 1741, married Rebecca 
SawTi-er and removed to Putney, Vermont ; 
William, October 17, 1743, settled in West- 
minster; Sarah, April 24, 1750; Prudence, 



f 



1876 



CONNECTICUT 



April 17, 1757; Abel, January 16, 1760, died 
June 6, 1806, married, March 28, 1779, Han- 
nah Green, of Bolton ; Daniel, mentioned be- 
low. 

(IX) Daniel, son of William and Sarah 
(Sawyer) Wilder, was born August 21, 1764, 
was by trade a carpenter and in early life 
lived in Orwell, \'ermont. He removed to 
Malone, New York, where he lived many 
years, and then went with one of his sons 
to Michigan, where he died in 1851. 
He married, in Vermont, Polly Gould, and 
they had twelve children whose names have 
been preserved, though not in the order of 
birth : Abel, born 1783, mentioned below ; 
Orra, who married and had a son, Hyman A., 
who was a graduate of Williams College and 
a missionary in South Africa, died in 1877, 
in Hartford, Connecticut; Joseph, xA.lvin, Dan- 
iel, William D., Lucretia, Polly, Sarah Eliza- 
beth, Melinda, Jerusha. 

(X) Abel, son of Daniel and Polly (Gould) 
Wilder, was born in 1783, and was a carpen- 
ter at Malone, New York. He married, in 
1808, Hannah Payne, born in 1784. died in 
1842. She was of the Eastham (Massachu- 
setts) branch of the family to which belonged 
Robert Treat Paine, signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. The Paines, or Paynes, 
are of very ancient stock, tracing back, not- 
withstanding the difference of orthography, 
to one ancestral head. Dolly Payne, of this 
family, was the wife of President Madison. 
Children of Abel and Hannah (Payne) Wil- 
der: I. Royal Gould, born February, 1809, 
died in 1815. 2. Thomas P., April 4, 181 1, 

married Polly ■ — . 3. James M., June 25, 

1813, married Angeline Day; children; Laura, 

Eliza. Elmer, Alice and . 4. Hannah 

P., November 13, 1814, mentioned below. 5. 
Royal Gould, h(irn February 28, 1816, mar- 
ried, March 5, 1846, Eliza J. Smith. He was 
for many years a missionary at Kolapoor, In- 
dia, until compelled by ill health to return to 
the United States, when he settled at Prince- 
ton, New Jersey : children : Edward Payson, 
a lawyer in New York, Mary Jane, William 
Royal, Grace Evelyn and Robert. 6. Polly 
Maria, born March 4, 182 1, died March 17, 
185 1 ; married Henry Austin ; one son, Henry. 
7. Phoebe Elmira, born July 16, 1824. mar- 
ried Joseph Lampson ; children: Christina, 
Chester, Augusta and Charles. 8. William 
Clement, born April 24, 1826, married Ada- 
line Hastings ; children : Henry and Adaline. 
9. Sarah Charlotte, born February 15, 1830, 
married Andrew Day ; children : William, El- 
mer, Carrie and Grace. 10. Josiah Prince, 
born January 9. 1832, dierl in infancy. 

(XI) Hannah P., daughter of Abel and 



Hannah (Payne) Wilder, was born Novem- 
ber 13, 1814, in Malone, New York, and mar- 
ried Charles Robinson, of La Crosse, Wiscon- 
sin, later of Malone, New York. He was 
born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, son of 
John and Mary (Drescher) Robinson, the 
former of Scotch and the latter of Dutch de- 
scent. John Robinson was a soldier in the 
war of 1812 and died in Cincinnati. Charles 
Robinson was reared in Philadelphia and 
learned the trade of cabinet maker. He was a 
very fine mechanic and was also an inventor 
of turbine water wheels, which he built, also 
mills and dams in Malone, Franklin county. 
New York. Later he went to La Crosse, 
Wisconsin, where he engaged in the grocery 
business and was later in Oshkosh for the 
purpose of taking up water rights there ; re- 
turned to La Crosse and passed the remainder 
of his life there, dying at the age of seventy- 
seven. Children of Charles and Hannah P. 
(Wilder) Robinson: i. Almira, died young. 
2. John W. 3. Martha L., married Mack 
Kellogg, of La Crosse, Wisconsin. He was 
born in Canada and was a telegraph operator. 
He later became connected with the Nnv 
York Herald as a war correspondent and was 
killed in the Custer massacre. They had two 
children : Sue Cora, married Edward Ulrey, 
and Mattie Grace, married Frank Stuart 
Temple, a physician of Boston ; they have one 
son, Franklin Lyman. 4. Lillie J., mentioned 
below. 

(XII) Lillie J., daughter of Charles and 
Hannah P. (Wilder) Robinson, was born 
June 28, 1845, 3nd married William E. Dis- 
brow (see Disbrow V). Mrs. Disbrow is 
the only survivor of her family. Her mo- 
ther died at the age of seventy-six. Her par- 
ents were members of the Baptist church. 



Morgan Gardner Bulkelev, 
BULKELEY president of one of the 
strongest insurance compa- 
nies in America, the Aetna Life Insurance 
Company of Hartford, ex-governor of Con- 
necticut, former United States Senator, bank- 
er, politician, orator, philanthropist and pa- 
triot, veteran soldier and public servant, has 
had a career of such strong and varied achieve- 
ment that his life has been lived in the public 
eye more than almost any other citizen of 
Connecticut. He was born in the little village 
of East Haddam, Middlesex county, Connecti- 
cut, December 26, 1837. 

His ancestors were among those men of 
spirit and stability who came from England 
in early times to live the life of independence 
and justice which their education and instinct 
taught them to crave. The name Bulkcley 



i 



CONNECTICUT 



1877 



was in remote times lUiclough, first known as 
the name of a range of mountains in the 
county Palatine, Chester, England, where 
Baron Robert Ihiclough was lord of the Man- 
or Buclough in the lime of King John. In 
1634 the Rev. Peter P.ulUeley, fellow of St. 
John's College, Cambridge, silenced for non- 
conformity, after a ministry of twenty-one 
years, emigrated to America with a band of 
adherents and settled in Concord, Massachu- 
setts. His son, the Rev. Gershom Bulkeley, 
was graduated from Harvard College in 1655 
and married the daughter of President 
Charles Chauncey, of Harvard. Gershom 
Bulkeley was a renowned scholar and divine 
as well as' a skillful surgeon, a brave .soldier, 
a leading politician and a forceful contro- 
versialist, linguist and writer. His son, John, 
was the first clergyman to have a church in 
Colchester, Connecticut. 

In his early boyhood, which was spent in 
the village of his birth, Morgan G. Bulkeley 
was vigorous, industrious and zealous in the 
development of both mental and physical 
strength. AMien he was nine years old the 
family located in Hartford where he attended 
the public schools until he was fourteen years 
old. Then, in 185 1, he entered the employ of 
the Aetna Life Insurance Company as office 
sweeper, with wages of one dollar a week. 
Two years later his father became president 
of that company, of which he, too, was to 
be the head in his mature life. After a short 
experience at this humble occupation the lad 
went to Brooklyn, where he acted as bundle 
clerk in a mercantile house, known as H. P. 
Morgan and Company, in which he became a 
partner seven years later. In 1861, in an- 
swer to the call for volunteers at the out- 
break of the civil war, young Bulkeley enlist- 
ed in the Thirteenth Regiment, New York 
Volunteer Infantry, and served with credit 
during the Peninsular campaign. After the 
war he took a keen interest in politics and was 
a member of the Republican general commit- 
tee of Kings county. 

After the death of his father in 1872, Mor- 
gan G. Bulkeley came to Hartford, which has 
ever since been his home and the center of 
his many business and political interests. 
Soon after his return to Hartford he organ- 
ized the United States Bank in that city and 
was its first president, holding that office from 
1872 to 1879. The well-known solidity of that 
institution is greatly due to his sound jug- 
ment and capable financiering. In 1879, upon 
the retirement of Thomas O. Enders, Mr. 
Bulkeley became president of the Aetna Life 
Irtsurance Compan}', established and man- 
aged by his father along such strong lines and 



destined to become under Morgan G. Bulke- 
ley's great organizing skill, firm principle and 
rare managerial genius an institution sur- 
passed by none of its kind for progress, suc- 
cess and sound standing. Its headship de- 
mands far-sighted sagacity, unswerving in- 
tegrity, keen knowledge of men and thorough 
intimacy with all branches of finance as well 
as great executive ability. All these essentials 
are combined in a marked degree in President 
Bulkeley as well as personal magnetism and 
the tact and good fellowship that make him 
the friend of his employees and his policy 
holders. Although the Aetna has been his 
chief business interest he has had many other 
strong business ties and has been a director in 
the Aetna National Bank, the Aetna Fire In- 
surance Company, the LInited States Bank, 
all of H'artford, and in the ^^'illimantic Linen 
Company. 

A political career equally long and strong 
has been achieved by Morgan G. Bulkeley. In 
1875 he became a councilman in Hartford and 
the following year he was elected alderman. 
From 1880 to 1888 he was mayor of the city 
of Hartford, a position for which his con- 
scientious study of municipal ]3olitics and rare 
executive powers made him well fitted. In the 
office of mayor he proved himself wise in his 
vigilance over the city's money, true to his 
principles irrespective of partisan feelings and 
thoroughly the servant and benefactor of the 
people. Each year he spent many times his 
salary in fresh air work of a most practical 
nature and in many other movements for- 
ameliorating the lot of the poorer classes of 
Hartford. Loving the Connecticut river near 
which he was born, he brought its beauties to 
the notice of the public by free excursions up 
and down its course and by making various 
improvements along its course which were 
forerunners of his later great work along this 
line and in securing the new bridge. 

In 1888 Mayor Bulkeley was nominated by 
acclamation for the office of governor, and in 
January, 1889, he entered on an administra- 
tion notable for its strength and efifectualness. 
In 1890 there arose under the new ballot law 
the trying deadlock situation, when the ques- 
tion of succession to the office of governor 
could not be settled and it was Governor 
Bulkeley's duty to remain in office, though 
legislation was in abeyance. In this difficult 
situation he acquitted himself with great tact 
and judgment and w-on admiration from op- 
ponents as well as friends. When the legisla- 
ture failed to make needed appropriations he 
and the Aetna Life Insurance Company ad- 
vanced funds necessary for the maintenance 
of state institutions until proper provision was 



1878 



CONNECTICUT 



made. Then as always tlie governor's re- 
sourcefulness and decision saved the day. Aft- 
er his term as governor expired in 1893 lie 
■ was nominated for United States senator, and 
two years later he withdrew and worked for 
the election of General Hawley. Meanwhile 
other honors were his, for he was a delegate 
to the Republican national conventions in 
1888 and 1896, and in 1889 he was granted 
the honorary degree of Master of Arts by 
Yale University. In January, 1905, Ex-Gov- 
ernor Bulkeley was elected United States sen- 
ator to succeed General Hawley and his ca- 
reer in the National Capitol, terminating in 
191 1, was one of note and distinction, giving 
still further evidence of his great public spirit. 
his grasp of political conditions, his hostility 
to corporate abuses and his unusual executive 
ability. 

Since the burning of the old bridge at Hart- 
ford in 1895, Senator Bulkeley has had at 
heart the vision of the great piece of engineer- 
ing which should connect the two shores and 
make for the convenience and growth of both 
sides of the Connecticut. Since 1897 he has 
been president of the board of commission- 
ers of the Connecticut river, bridge and high- 
way district, and in that capacity has given 
the best efforts of his mind and heart toward 
securing the wonderful structure that now 
spans the Connecticut at its most important 
point, the great world-unrivaled bridge that 
was completed in 1908, and that reached its 
perfect completion chiefly through the inspira- 
tion and efforts of Morgan G. Bulkelc)'. On 
the occasion of the completion of the bridge 
in October, igoS, H^artford enjoyed three days 
of festive and triumphant celebration consist- 
ing of historical pageants, patriotic jubilees 
and many other suitable forms of celebration. 
This great and significant occasion was first 
conceived in the mind of Morgan G. Bulke- 
ley, and the many details of his elaborate 
plans were carried out under his loving super- 
vision and made possible by his generosity. 
The celebration was the bringing together of 
Hartford's present, past and future, her his- 
tory and her hopes were embodied in the fea- 
tures of the jubilee. The event was one of 
the greatest and most significant in the his- 
tory of the city and state, not only because 
of the perfect completion of one of the most 
wonderful, useful and enduring of man-made 
structures, but also because of the new chap- 
ter in municipal and state progress thereby 
propitiously opened. It was both fitting and 
natural that Morgan G. Bulkeley, always the 
public's leader and benefactor, should be the 
moving spirit in this great undertaking and 
its achievement. On December 3, 1908, there 



was held in Parsons' Theatre, Hartford, a 
unique and memorable gathering of the peo- 
ple for the express purpose of doing homage 
to Morgan G. Bulkeley for this his great serv- 
ice to his fellow men. The occasion was one 
of New England dignity and simplicity, the 
hearty enthusiasm being manifested in a truly 
American and democratic manner. A mag- 
nificent silver service of one hundred and 
fifty-six pieces was presented to Senator 
Bulkeley on that occasion. More recently, in 
the spring of 191 1, he was given a silver lov- 
ing cup to mark the appreciation due him for 
further successful efforts in improving land- 
ings on the Connecticut river. In all this 
work he has builded for the future, the splen- 
did bridge, the broad boulevard, the park 
land on the East Side, are all for the genera- 
tions to come. 

In the following patriotic organizations 
Morgan G. Bulkeley is a member and has 
been president: The Connecticut Sons of the 
Revolution, the Society of Foreign Wars and 
the Society of the War of 1812. He is also 
a member of the Mayflower Society, the So- 
ciety of Colonial Wars, the Grand Army of 
the Republic and the Massachusetts Com- 
mandery of the Loyal Legion. He is a hered- 
itary member of the Society of the Cincinnati, 
and a Free Mason. He is a member of the 
Congregational church, and of various local 
social clubs. He is especially interested in 
the Hartford Club, and contributed gener- 
ously towards its present spacious building. 

On February 11, 1885, Mr. Bulkeley mar- 
"ried Fannie Briggs, daughter of James and 
Caroline A. Houghton, of San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. The children born of this marriage 
are : Morgan Gardner Jr., born December 
25, 1885; Elinor Houghton, April 7, 1893; 
Houghton, August 9, 1896. 



Rev. John Crandall, immi- 
CRANDALL grant ancestor, was of 

Providence, Rhode Island, 
as earl}' as 1637. He was early associated 
with the Baptists, and being persecuted for 
his religious opinions, fled from Massachu- 
setts to the above-mentioned place. How 
long he remained at Providence is unknown, 
but he was a resident of Newport in 165 1, 
and was there a prominent memiier of the 
Baptist church, and subsequently became the 
first elder of that denomination at ^^'esterly, 
Rhode Island.- July 21, 165 1, he with John 
Clarke and Obadiah Holmes, being the rep- 
resentatives of that church, journeyed to 
Lynn, for the purpose of holding services 
there, and were arrested and sent to prison 
in r.oston. July 31, he was sentenced to pay a 



CONNECTICUT 



1879 



fine of five jiounds, or be ])ul)licly wliipi)cd. 
On his promise to appear at tlic next court, 
however, he was released. In 1655 lie was 
freeman. lie was commissioner in 1C58-59- 
<ij (1,^. With eight others, lie siijncd a let- 
ter to the court of commissioners of Rhode 
island, August 2~, i66i, in relation to a tract 
of land at Westerly, where they and others 
desired to settle. He was deputy in 1667, and 
in the fall of that same year was at Westerly. 
His name was on the list of inhabitants of 
that town, May 14. 1669. He and Joseph 
Torrey were appointed commissioners tO' treat 
with Connecticut, relative to jurisdiction of 
lands, May 14, 1669, and he was supplied 
with thirty-five shillings by the colony of 
Rhode Island to pay his way to Connecticut. 
He received a letter from the governor and 
assistants of Connecticut, November 18, 1669, 
in which the latter persons complained that 
he and others had appropriated a large parcel 
of Stonington township, and sought satisfac- 
tion. He and Tobias Saunders answered on 
behalf of \\'esterly, and denied any guilt in 
the matter complained of. He was conserva- 
tor of the peace at Westerly, in 1670, and 
deputy from that town, 1670-71. He was ap- 
prehended and held by the colony of Con- 
necticut, May 2, 1671, and desired the advice 
of the governor of Rhode Island, whether to 
give bond, or abide imprisonment. The 
assembly advised him to give no bond, and 
promised to bear his charges and en- 
deavor to justify his acts. His first wife, 
name unknown, died August I, 1670, 
and he married (second) Hannah, probably 
the daughter of \\'illiam and Ann (Porter) 
Gaylord. of Windsor, Connecticut. She sur- 
vived him, and died in 1678. He died at 
Newport, where he had removed on account 
of the Indian war, in 1676. Children : John, 
married, June 18, 1672, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Samuel and Elizabeth Gorton ; James, took 
the oath of allegiance. September 17, 1679; 
Jane, died 171 5, married Job Babcock : Sarah, 
married Josiah ^^'itter; Peter, married ]\Iary 

. died 1734; Joseph, mentioned below: 

Samuel, born 1663; Jeremiah, died 17 18; 
Eber, born 1676. 

(II) Rev. Joseph Crandall, son of Rev. 
John Crandall, lived in Newport, Westerly, 
and Kingstown, Rhode Island. He married 
Deborah, daughter of Robert and Ruth 
(Hubbard). Burdick. She was baptized April 
II, 1685. He was chosen town councilman 
of Westerly, April 20, 1704. but declined to 
serve. In 1712 he removed to Kingstown. 
He deeded one hundred acres of land in 
Westerly to his son John. He was called to 
the pastorate of the Seventh Day Baptist 



Church at Newport, May 8, 1715, and was a 
colleague there with \Villiam Gibson until 
the latter's death, in 1717. He died Septem- 
ber 12, 1737. Children: i. Joseph, married 
at Westerly, February 15, 1715-16. to Ann 
Longworthy and had eight children at 
Westerly (could not have had Colonel John 
who was born before 1705 and no John 
is recorded among the children). 2. Mary, 
married Nathaniel Wells. 3. Deborah, mar- 
ried, at Westerly, April 25, 1729, Joseph 
Clark. 4. Tacy or Lucy, married, March 3, 
1 71 7, John Lewis, son of James Lewis. 5. 
Jane, married, at Westerly, Janary 29, 1718- 
19, Cyrus Richmond. 6. Eber (see records 
of Westerly and mss. additions in R. I. Gen. 
Diet. New England Hist. Gen. Library, Bos- 
ton, and note to Crandall Genealogy (1888) 
in same library). (See Beers Rhode Island 
work p. 1812, ) in which the list is the same 
except Lydia is given instead of Eber. 7. 
John, mentioned below. 

(Ill) John (2), son of Rev. Joseph Cran- 
dall, was born about 1700. His brothers and 
sisters were married between 1715 and 1730. 
At Westerly there are records of marriage 
of John and Mary Crandall, November 19, 
1730 : John Crandall and Elizabeth Lewis, 
June 2%, 1738 : John Crandall and Esther 
Lewis, April 19, 1740. These may be three 
marriages of the same man, in spite of the 
fact that the town records give all the chil- 
dren under the names of John and Esther, 
because, if the date of marriage is given cor- 
rectly that record must be wrong. It should 
be noticed that the children's record was evi- 
dently made after 1742 for the youngest is 
entered first and^the order of birth reversed, 
therefore the date of marriage is more likely 
correctly given. It sometimes happens in the 
records that births recorded in this way are 
given under the step-mother's name. The 
days of the months are missing in the birth 
records and -even the years of iDirth are open 
to suspicion as given from memory. Lewis, 
son of Colonel John, was named evidently 
for his mother, either Elizabeth or Esther 
Lewis, but the date of Elizabeth's marriage is 
but two years earlier. In the will of James 
Lewis, father of Elizabeth, dated May ,6, 
1740, he mentions Elizabeth Crandall. But 
at that time Esther was the wife of Cran- 
dall, if the date of marriage is correct. Then 
again, the marriage of John Crandall and 
Mary Crandall was after the date of birth 
of Hannah in June. 1730. There was at least 
one other John Crandall in Westerly at this 
time, for there is a record of birth of Mar- 
tha, December 18, 1736, at Hopkinton, on the 
Westerly books, Benajah Crandall, son of 



i88o 



CONNECTICUT 



this John, "late of Hopkinton", married, 
March i8, 1754, at Westerly. Eber Cran- 
dall, son of John Crandall Jr., married, at 
Westerly, February 22, 1753, Elizabeth Cran- 
dall, daughter of Eber. It should be stated 
that the name Tacy (misread for Lucy) be- 
longed in the Burdick family and came into 
Colonel John's family through his mother. 
Ruth Hubbard, wife of the pioneer, Robert 
Burdick, was a daughter of Samuel and Tacy 
(Cooper) Hubbard. Deborah Burdick had a 
sister Tacy and both Tacy and her brother 
Samuel had daughters named Tacy. 

Robert Burdick made an agreement, ^March 
8, 1692, with his son-in-law, Joseph Cran- 
dall, by which the latter was to take care of 
his father-in-law and find him with suitable 
meat, drink, washing, lodging, apparel, etc., 
for life, in consideration of which Joseph 
Crandall was "to have the dwelling house and 
land adjoining, forever, and until Robert Bur- 
dick's death, to have also the use of oxen, cart, 
two cows, eight swine, and then to be re- 
turned to be disposed of by will, except the 
cart and wheels." This deed explains why 
John and his brothers and sisters are found 
.at Westerly. Burdick died soon after in the 
same year. 

The most satisfactory supposition as to the 
■solution of the ditificulty caused by the obvious 
errors in the records either in the dates of 
marriage or births of children, is, assuming 
that the birth record is substantially correct 
and that Esther was mother as stated, that 
the date of marriage should be before 1730 
and the error due to misreading manuscript 
instead of in the record itself. Then Mary 
Crandall and Elizabeth Lewjs would belong 
to some other John Crandall, whose children 
are not recorded at Westerly. Children, as 
recorded at Westerly as children of "John 
and Esther" : Hannah, June, 1730 : John, 
January, 1732: JMercy, February, 1734: Lew- 
is, August, 1738; Ann, August, 1740; Esther, 
February, 1742. 

(IV) Lewis, son of Colonel John (2) Cran- 
dall, was born in Westerly, Rhode Island, 
August, 1738, died in the same place. He 
married Bethia Main, of Stonington, Con- 
necticut. Children : Lewis, born October 24, 
1769; Rhoda, September i, 1771 ; John Brad- 
ley, January 23, 1773; Russell Smith, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1775; Dudley, April 11, 1776: 
Charlotte, March 19, 1778: Joshua, August 8, 
1781. 

(V) Lewis (2), son of Lewis ( i") Cran- 
dall, was born in Westerly, Rhode Island, 
October 24, 1769, died in New London. He 
was a carpenter by trade, well-known and 
highly-respected as a citizen. He married, 



February 20, 1805, Bathsheba, daughter of 
Enoch and Mercy (Pendleton) Crandall, and 
granddaughter of James and Damarius (Ken- 
yon) Crandall. Children of Lewis and Bath- 
sheba Crandall: i. Lorenzo, born November 
2, 1805, married Emily Stebbins. 2. Joshua, 
January 14, 1807, married Emily Tinker. 3. 
Lewis, see forward. 4. Fanny, December 
18, 1810, died in 1881, unmarried. 5. Mercy, 
June I, 1813, married Jedediah Baker. 6. 
Washington, October 24, 1815, married (first) 
Jane Blake, (second) Eliza, sister of Jane, 
and daughters of Elder Blake, for many years 
a famous Methodist minister in New London; 
(third) Elizabeth Clark; (fourth) Mary 
Benjamin. 7. Enoch. 8. Mary Ann, May 
2^. 1821, in New London, married Captain 
Samuel Greene, of New London. 

(VI) Lewis (3), son of Lewis (2) Cran- 
dall, was born in New London, January 12, 
1809, died in the same city, January 26, 1896. 
His father was a carpenter, in which occu- 
pation young Lewis took great delight and 
interest, and mastered it in every detail when 
a mere lad. At that time there were only 
three boss carpenters in town, and Crandalls 
were easily the chief. Their lumber yard was 
the source of supply to all in the business 
save those on a larger scale, and Lewis Cran- 
dall sent for all that was used in his own 
work and for retail. He entered with a great 
amount of energy into the work on his own 
account at twenty-five years of age, and put 
considerable skill and taste into everything 
that he did, and possessed the rare faculty 
of having all his business relations character- 
ized with such pleasant feelings on both sides 
that his customers invariably became his 
friends. It would be difficult to enumerate all 
the work of importance that he did, and tell 
the vast, for those days, contracts that he un- 
dertook and carried through, sometimes with 
loss to himself. The period of the growth 
of New London between 1850 and 1880 was 
that of his largest undertakings. He built 
Lawrence Hall, the City Hall, residence of 
J. N. Harris, residence of Adam Prentis. and 
many of the other large houses of the town, 
besides hundreds of houses for men of mod- 
erate means. He employed a force of forty 
men in those days. He was also the actual 
builder of the Pequot Colony, putting the 
large addition to the Pequot House, building 
the Hall, Learned, Appleton, and .dozens of 
other cottages, in fact all those surrounding 
the hotel. He served in the common coun- 
cil during the mayorship of J. N. Harris, was 
on the committee for the Hill street school in 
1858. and was instrumental in bringing New- 
ton Fuller to New London. He was a sin- 



CONNECTICUT 



1881 



cere, unassuming Christian, attending the sec- 
ond Congregational Church, and his creed was 
very simple — Do right — and he lived up to it. 
He married, September 30, 1835, Charlotte 
Cranilall, who was noted for wonderful beau- 
ty, and who bore him eight children : Jennie 
E., widow of William J]ush ; Mary, died 
young; James JNladison, died young; James 
Greene, died young ; Herbert Lewis, see for- 
ward ; Noyes liillings ; Annie, wife of E. D. 
Barker: Fitch D. 

(VH) Herbert Lewis, son of Lewis (3) 
Crandall, was born in New London, January 
3, 1844. He was educated in the common 
schools of his native town and attended same 
until he was sixteen years of age, when he 
entered the counting room of Williams & Ha- 
ven, then a famous whaling house of New 
London. From 1861 to 1895 he was connect- 
ed with that house, through the various 
changes in the firm from the original name 
to Williams, Haven & Company ; Haven, Wil- 
liams & Company, and C. A. Williams & 
Company. Mr. Crandall's long service with 
this well-known concern is the best evidence 
of his trustworthiness and close application 
to duty. When the firm dissolved in 1895, 
he remained until the very last vessel was sold, 
the schooner "Era", one of the manv which 
the company fitted out for long whaling and 
sealing voyages to all parts of the globe. 
After severing his connections with C. A. 
Williams & Company, Mr. Crandall was elect- 
ed vice-president of the New London City 
National Bank, a position he has since held, 
while from 1875 he was a director in the in- 
stitution. He was one of the incorporators 
of the Fisher's Island Brick Company, was 
made a director of it, and was elected, secre- 
tary, an office which he still fills. He is also 
secretary and treasurer of the New London 
Cemetery x\ssociation, successor of the late 
Richard H. Chapell. In his political affiliations 
a Republican, Mr. Crandall's activity in mu- 
nicipal affairs has always been entirely disin- 
terested, as he has sought no official position, 
and has served only on the board of educa- 
tion, where his work during the six years 
from 1884 to 1890 was most valuable. Mr. 
Crandall is a member of the Thames Club 
of New London, while in virtue of his descent 
from John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley, he 
holds membership in the Mayflower Society, 
of Connecticut. He is a member of the Sec- 
ond Congregational Church, of which he has 
been trustee for a number of years, besides 
serving on the society's committee. 

R'lr. Crandall married, October 23, 1879, 
Alice, daughter of the late Captain Samuel 
Greene, one of the best-known whaling cap- 



tains of New London, and his wife, Mary 
Ann (Crandall) Greene, and a descendant 
of Governor William Bradford, of Massa- 
chusetts. One child, Herbert Lewis Jr., born 
July 2, 1885, in New London, died three 
days later. Mrs. Crandall is a member of 
Lucretia Shaw Chapter, No. 94, Daughters 
of the American Revolution, of New London, 
in which she has twice held the office of vice- 
regent, is also a member of the Mayflower So- 
ciety, the Founders and Patriots Society, of 
Connecticut, the Colonial Governors and the 
Mary Washington Monument Association. 
Her interest in philanthropic endeavors is 
indicated by her connection with the Ladies 
Seamen's Friends Society, of New London, 
of which she is treasurer, and is also presi- 
dent of the Society of the LTnited Workers. 
Mr. and Mrs. Crandall have traveled exten- 
sively both in Europe and their own country. 



Hon. Civilian Fones, of the city 
FONES of Bridgeport, is a descendant of 
two French Huguenot families. 
His paternal great-grandfather was an exile 
to England during the reign of Louis XIV, 
and afterward became an officer in the Eng- 
lish navy, and when retired was given a tract 
of land embracing 1,500 acres in the state of 
Rhode Island, where the town of Wickford 
now stands, and on which he located. His 
son Daniel, the grandfather, and Christopher 
(the father of Civilian), were born on the 
ancestral acres, and the latter married Sarah 
A. Marigold, of South Carolinian lineage, 
also a descendant of French Huguenots. The 
son. Civilian, came to Bridgeport from New 
York City in 1858, where he has since re- 
sided. Fie is a graduate of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgeons, and has been en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession, on 
the corner of Main and Bank streets, for 
about thirty-three years, and the appreciation 
of his professional brethren has been ex- 
pressed by electing him president of the Con- 
necticut \'alley Dental Association, also presi- 
dent of the Connecticut State Dental Society, 
and in 1893 he was appointed by Gov. Mor- 
ris one of the five State Dental Commission- 
ers, and upon the organization of the com- 
mission was elected president, which office he 
still holds. Governor Coffin also re-appoint- 
ed him in 1895. 

He has been identified with the Republican 
party since its organization, but never held 
political office until the year 1884, when he 
was elected to represent his ward as council- 
man. The following year he was elected al- 
derman, and at the April election in 1886, was 
elected mayor of the city, overcoming an op- 



I««2 



CONNECTICUT 



position party majority by about i,ooo, and 
was re-elected in the spring of 1887 by an in- 
creased majority, receiving an unusual politi- 
cal support from both parties. During both 
terms of his office every effort was made for 
the improvement of the city. In his message 
of 1886 he made mention of the necessity of 
taking urgent means to procure a new post 
office building, and the council passed a reso- 
lution for him to take such steps as were nec- 
essary to have a bill passed granting the erec- 
tion of said building. Whereupon he, in com- 
pany with several prominent citizens, visited 
Washington, and while there a bill passed the 
house appropriating the money to the city of 
Bridgeport for the new government building 
which now stands at the corner of Broad and 
Cannon streets, the site of the old St. John's 
Church. There were improvements made, 
such as the removal of railroad tracks from 
Water street, the removal of the old Miller 
building, and erection of the lower bridge, 
also locating and placing of numerous gates 
and crossings. One of the marked benefits 
was the improvement of the streets and roads 
about the city. The Park Cottage was also 
built during his last term of office, and many 
other improvements made of minor impor- 
tance. Both terms were mo.st harmonious in 
every respect, as there was not a hitch in 
either party during his administration. 

A singular coincidence is the fact that he 
was born in the same year that the city, of 
which he was twice elected mayor, was incor- 
porated. He is a member of several clubs in 
the city and state, and was president of the 
Seaside Club in 1892. He has taken several 
degrees in Odd Fellowship and is a thirty- 
second degree Scottish Rite Mason. 

The surname Fones or Fownes belongs to 
an old English family, the lineage of which 
is given below. 

(I) William Fones lived at Saxbie, Devon- 
shire, England, in the early part of the fif- 
teenth century, and married a daughter of 
Sir Robert Hyelston. (II) George Fones, 
Esq., son of William Fones, also of Saxbie, 
married a daughter of Malbranch, of Malpas. 

(III) .William, son of George Fones, was of 
Saxbie; married Telham, of Telham. 

(IV) John, son of William Fones, was of 
Saxbie : married Bradley, of Bedham. 

(V) John, son of John Fones, was of Sax- 
bie; married Lawell, of Lawell. (VI) 

John, son of John Fones. lived at Dedford, in 
Bransgrove, Wighorn. (VII) Thomas, sec- 
ond son of John Fones, lived at Dedford, 
Worcestershire. 

(VIII) Thomas Fones, son of Thomas 
Fones, was an apothecary at the Sign of the 



Three Fawns, Old Bayley, London. He died 
April 15, 1629; his will was dated April 14, 
1629, and proved April 29, 1629. ("Waters' 
Gleanings," p. 1 184: Glenn's "Colonial Fami- 
lies," p. 116). He committed the tuition of son 
Samuel during minority to his uncle John 
Winthrop, of Groton, county Suff'olk, and two 
others ; also his daughters Elizabeth and Mar- 
tha "unto my said loving brother John Wyn- 
thropp until they shall be married or attain 
their full age of one and twenty years." The 
tuition of the youngest daughter Mary was 
committed to her mother, Priscilla. (Gover- 
nor) John Winthrop and the widow were 
executors. Fie married (first) February 25, 
1604, Anne Winthrop, born January 16, 1585; 
(second) Priscilla, widow of Bezaleel Sher- 
man, daughter of John Burgess. His widow 
married Rev. Henry Painter. Elizabeth 
Fones, daughter of Thomas, married Robert 
Feake, of \\'atertown. ^Massachusetts. 

John Fones or Fownes, of this family, a 
merchant at Bristol, by will March 28, 1609, 
proved October 23, 1609, gave to his wife 
Anne lands in county Monmouth, called Mon- 
joy, house at Newport, etc., all to go to his 
son John after her death ; son John, then a 
minor, Mary Hester and Sarah Fones were 
the legatees ; also brothers Thomas and James 
and other kinsmen and friends. His widow 
Anne, of Bristol, in will of February 11, 1629, 
proved November 10, 1630, mentions son- 
in-law William Claxton, grandchildren Abel 
and Mathew Rogers, Andrew and Sarah Bar- 
ker, Anne and William Fownes, and grand- 
son John Fownes; also her kinsman, Mr. 
Roger \\'illiams, of Newport, and three 
daughters ; also William Evans, William 
Jones, Catherine Watkins, Elizabeth Stee- 
vens, Mary Longe, John Tomlinson and Rich- 
ard Long, all relatives. 

(I) Captain John Fones, the American im- 
migrant, is believed to be son of John and 
Anne Fones, mentioned above, grandson of 
Anne Fones, mentioned in her will in 1629. 
There can be no doubt that he was of the 
family mentioned above. From him is de- 
scended all the families of this name of any 
considerable residence in this country. He 
settled in Newport, Rhode Island, before 
1659, and afterwards lived at Jamestown and 
Kingstown, Rhode Island. Fie died Decem- 
ber 20, 1703. His wife Margaret died in 1709. 
Fie sold 3-900ths of Conanicut Island, June 
19. 1659, to Richard Tew, for a good ewe 
and six ewe lambs or a mare colt. He was 
called servant of William Coddington. He 
and five others bought of Awashuwctt, chief 
sachem of Ouohesett. in Narragansett, a tract 
of land deeded January i, 1672. Captain 



CONNECTICUT 



1883 



Fones was a member of a court-martial at 
Newport for trial of Indians charg-ed with 
being engaged in King I'liilip's designs Au- 
gust 24, 1676. It was voted that certain ones 
were giility and they were sentenced to be 
shot. He was deputy to the general assem- 
bly 1679-80-81 ; conservator of the peace at 
Kingstown, 1682-83. The Rhode Island as- 
sembly met at his house August 22, 1683, and 
there received a reply to a letter sent by them 
to Governor Cranfield, of New Hampshire, 
who with others sat at Richard Smith's house 
at Narragansett. The assembly prohibited 
Cranfield and his associates from holding 
court in this jurisdiction. He was appointed 
by the president and council of New Eng- 
land, justice of the peace, May 28, 1686, and 
in the same year was clerk of the court of 
commissioners, in following year was one of 
the justices of the inferior court of common 
pleas. He was one of three to contract for 
the building of court houses at Newport and 
Kingstown. He was both deputy and as- 
sistant in 1698. It appears that his wife was 
■ a Quaker, for she gave twelve shillings to- 
wards building the Quaker meeting house at 
]\Iashapaug. His will proved in 1703 desired 
his body to be buried where his two deceased 
sons were laid ; bequeathed to wife, sons John, 
Jeremiah, Samuel ; grandson Fones Greene. 
Shortly after his death, his sons John, Jere- 
miah and Samuel, ratified land to sister 
Greene of Warwick and other provisions of 
the will. Children : John, born September, 
1663, died February 17, 1738, married Lydia 
Smith ; Jeremiah, mentioned below ; Samuel, 
born 1666, lived at North Kingston, married 
Anne Tobbetts ; Mary, married, January 29, 
1689. James Greene ; James, died young ; Dan- 
iel, died young. 

(II) Jeremiah, son of Captain John Fones, 
was born in 1665, and died in 1747. He lived 
at Kingstown, Jamestown and North Kings- 
town, Rhode Island. He married (first) 

Elizabeth May 30, 1694. She died 

March 2, 1709, and he married (second) No- 
vember 9, 1710, Martha Chard, who died in 
1747. Fie was a freeman of Jamestown in 
1703, constable in 1705. His will, dated De- 
cember 2, 1727, proved July 13, 1747, his wid- 
ow Martha executrix, beqeathing to son lo- 
seph the homestead, to son John five pounds, 
grandson John Davis some silverware, to son 
Daniel certain lands, and to two other sons, 
Samuel and Thomas, certain other lands. An- 
other son and a granddaughter are legatees, 
but the names are destroyed in the will. As 
none of his brothers left male issue, all the 
Fones descendants are through Jeremiah. 
Children : James, born June, 1695 ; Jeremiah, 



August, 1697; Joseph, May 11, 1699; daugh- 
ter, Ma)' 22, 1701 ; Margaret, March 9, 1703; 
John. Children of second wife : Mary, Sep- 
tember 20, 171 1 ; Daniel, mentioned below; 
Samuel, March 10, 1715; daughter, Febru- 
ary 23, 1719; Thomas. 

(III) Captain Daniel Fones, son of Jere- 
miah Fones, was born at Jamestown, or 
North Kingstown, March 9, 1713. He lived 
at North Kingstown. He was a prominent 
sea captain and naval officer. The Rhode 
Island records show that he commanded the 
colonial sloop "Tartar" as early as February 
17, 1746 (Civil and Military Lists, Rhode 
Island, p. 100). The sloop mounted fourteen 
guns and twelve swivels, and had a crew of 
ninety men, in 1744, under Captain Fones. 
He took part with his vessel in the expedition 
to Canada, sailing from Kingstown in May, 
1747 (Civil and Military Lists, Rhode Island, 
p. 122). The record book containing the 
dates of birth of his children is mutilated 
and the years are missing. Children, born at 

North Kingston: Mary; ; ; 

Martha, January 11, ; Elizabeth, Oc- 
tober 26, ' — ; Daniel, mentioned below. 

(IV) Daniel (2), son of Captain Daniel 
( I ) Fones, was born at North Kingston, 
Rhode Island, December 9, (prob- 
ably about 1760). He was a soldier in the 
revolution, private in Colonel Elliott's regi- 
ment in 1776, in Colonel Angel's regiment in 
1779, and a corporal in a Rhode Island regi- 
ment in February, 178 1. According to the 
census of 1790, only three heads of families 
of this surname remained at North or South 
Kingston — Joseph, Stephen and William. The 
homestead is in the town of Wickford, for- 
merly North Kingston. His wife or mother 
were probably of French Huguenot stock, 
judging from the family tradition. 

(A") Christopher, son of Daniel (2) Fones, 
was born in North Kingston, or Wickford, 
and educated there in the public schools. He 
learned the trade of carpenter. He married 
Sarah A. Marigold, of South Carolina, who 
was also of French Huguenot ancestry. He 
became an architect and builder. For a time 
he lived at Toronto, Canada, while in charge 
of a large contract in that city, and later in 
New York. His last years were spent at 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. He was a man of 
excellent character and exceptional ability. 
Children: I. Civilian, born October i, 1836; 
studied dentistry, and practiced at Bridge- 
port : president of the Connecticut Valley 
Dental Association ; a Republican, common 
councilman 1884, alderman 1885, mayor 1886; 
married, October 21, 1863, Phebe E., daugh- 
ter of Alfred S. Wright, of New York City ; 



1 884 



CONNECTICUT 



children : George, died young, Grace and 
Alfred C. 2. Adolphus Edwy, mentioned be- 
low. Also Augustus, Daniel, Grace, John, 
Robert. Charles, Calista, and Margaret. 

(\T) Adolphus Edwy Fones, son of Chris- 
topher Fones. was born June 12, 1841, in Up- 
per Canada, where his parents were located 
temporarily, and he died March 9, 1906, at 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. His early educa- 
tion was received in Canadian schools. He 
came to Bridgeport when he was about twen- 
ty-one years old. For a short time he found 
' employment in one of the factories, but aft- 
erward studied dentistry in the office of his 
brother, Dr. Civilian Fones, and was eventu- 
ally received into partnership with him. Some 
years afterward Dr. Adolphus E. Fones 
bought out his brother and continued in busi- 
ness alone up to his death, at his residence, 
which was for many years at 887 East Main 
street, Bridgeport, where his widow now re- 
sides. 

In religion he was a Methodist, and a 
trustee of the church. He was a member of 
the Odd Fellows. His wife built in Bridge- 
port, for investment purposes, a large business 
block and a number of cottages. He married, 
June 18, 1872, Mary Katie, daughter of 
Charles Henry Curtis (see Curtis). Chil- 
dren, born at Bridgeport: i. William Flenry, 
married Anna Connors, of Norwalk ; he is 
with the Smith Publishing Company, New 
York City. 2. Harriet Augusta, married, 
1902, Roy Eldridge Tuttle, a dentist, of 
Bridgeport. 

(The Curtis Line). 

(IF) John Curtis (q. v.), son of Elizabeth 
Curtis, widow, came to Stratford among the 
first settlers, with his brother William and 
mother. He was born in England, and died 
December 2, 1707, aged ninety-four years. 

He married Elizabeth , who died in 

March, 1681-82. Children, born at Stratford : 
John, October 14, 1642, settled in Newark, 
New Jersey; Israel, April 3, 1644; Elizabeth, 
May 2, 1647; Thomas, January 14, 1648; Jo- 
seph, mentioned below; Benjamin, September 
30, 1652 ; Hannah, February 2, 1654. 

(III) Joseph, son of John Curtis, was born 
November 12, 1650. lie married, November 
9, 1676, Bethia, daughter of Richard Booth. 
Children, born at Stratford : Elizabeth, Jan- 
uary 17, 1678; Anna, September i, 1679; 
Mary, about 1681 ; Ephraim, mentioned be- 
low; Joseph, November 6, 1687; Nathan, Feb- 
ruary 21, 1689-90; Josiah, March 31, 1691 ; 
Bethia, March 10, 1695-96; Elizer and Eli- 
phalet, twins, August i, 1699. 

(IV) Ephraim, son of Joseph Curtis, was 
born at Stratford, December 31, 1684; mar- 



ried, June 26, 1707, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Ephraim Stiles. She died in October, 1775. 
He died in 1776, aged ninety-two. Children, 
born at Stratford : Stiles, mentioned below ; 
Sarah; Henry, October 12, 1709; Ann, Au- 
gust 31, 171 1 ; Phebe, August, 17 13; Eliza- 
beth, August 1713, died 1716; Ephraim, Au- 
gust 30, 1717, died 1737; Elizabeth, October 

2, 1719; Martha, November 26, 1721 ; Ruth, 
baptized October 27, 1723; Edmund, baptized 
August, 1725; Bathsheba, baptized Novem- 
ber, 1728; Elnathan, born January, 1726-27. 

(V) Stiles, son of Ephraim Curtis, was 
born at Stratford, March 18, 1708: married, 
November 7, 1729, Rebecca Judsdn. Chil- 
dren, born at Stratford: Sarah, May 17, 1731 ; 
Elizabeth, December 28, 1732 ; Elihu, Decem- 
ber 17, 1734; Hannah, December 15, 1736; 
Ephraim, March 27, 1739; Elihu, May 10, 
174 1 ; Silas, baptized June 14, 1743: John, 
mentioned below ; Rebecca, baptized Febru- 
ary 14, 1747-48 ; Catee, baptized June, 1752. 

(VI) John, son of Stiles Curtis, was born 
at Stratford, and baptized September, 1745. 
He was a soldier in the revolution, and had 
the rank of lieutenant. He married Mary 
Shelton. Children, born at Stratford : Sarah, 
September 29, 1769; Stiles, April 13, 1771 ; 
Judson, February 15, 1774; John, February 8, 
1778; Ezekiel, June 6, 1779; Daniel, men- 
tioned below; Julia, November 27, 1784; Har- 
riet, baptized February, 1791. 

(VII) Daniel, son of John Curtis, was born 
at Stratford, April 8, 1781 ; married Betsey 
Pixley. Children, born at Stratford: i. 
Sheldon Pixley, married Sarah McEwen, and 
had Robert W., Alfred H., Charles B., and 
Fred. 2. Peter Pixley, had five daughters. 

3. Charles H., mentioned below. 4. Mary, 
married Nathan Birdsey. 5. Margaret, mar- 
ried Morgan Curtis. 6. Elizabeth, married 
Edward Fitch, and lived at Detroit, Michi- 
gan. 

(VIII) Charles Henry Curtis, son of Dan- 
iel Curtis, was born at Stratford, January 25, 
1815, and died at Bridgeport, February 2, 
1888. He was educated in the public schools 
and was a pattern maker by trade. He was 
a Republican in politics and a Methodist in 
religion. Fie built the house in which he lived 
on Lafayette street, Bridgeport, for many 
years. He married, March 19, 1840, at Strat- 
ford, Catherine Ann Wheeler, born at Strat- 
ford, August 2, 1816, died at Bridgeport, 
November 10. 1874. Children: i. Mary Ka- 
tie, married, June 18, 1872, Adolphus E. 
Fones (see Fones). 2. Hattie Louise, born 
January 18, 1858, died March 12, 1896; mar- 
ried (first) George Hews; (second) Rev. 
Edward Bassett. 



CONNECTICUT 



1885 



George Sniitli, colonist, born in 
SlMITIl Mertfordsliire, England, mar- 
ried Sarah , died in New 

Haven, Connecticut, May 17, 1662. 

(II) Lieutenant Samuel Smith, son of 
George Smith, born December 4, 165 1, mar- 
ried Obedience Lamberton, January 13, 1675, 
died September 18, 1726. 

(III) Captain Samuel (2) Smith, son of 
Lieutenant Samuel ( i ) Smith, born May 14, 
1678, married Mary Cooper. August 14, 1700, 
died August 22, 1753. 

(IV) Lamberton, son of Captain Samuel 
(2) Smith, born June 21,, 1701, married Bath- 
sheba Burvvell, January 24, 1722, died Decem- 
ber 10, 1779. 

(V) Lamberton (2). son of Lamberton (i) 
Smith, born No\enibcr 28, 1734, married Abi- 
gail Kimberly, March 11. 1757, died April 
28, 1791. 

(VI) Nathaniel, son of Lamberto