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Full text of "A genealogical and historical register of the descendants of Edward Morris of Roxbury, Mass., and Woodstock, Conn."

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1164733 



GENEALOGY COLLE-CTrON 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 1833 00859 7020 




COMMODORE CHARLES MORRIS AT 4-1 



A 

Genealogical and Historical 
REGISTER 



OF THE 



DESCE^DAISTTS 



OP 



EDWARD MORRIS 




:,vcyuy 



ROXBURY, MASS., AND WOODSTOCK, CONN. 



COMPILED BY 

Jonathan Flynt Moeris. 



" Tal6 ye the mm of all the Children of Israel, after their families, by the hmise of ttieir 
fathers, with the number of their Ma;««s."— Numbers i, 2. 



Published by the Cojveipiler. 



HA-RTEORiD, coisnsr. 

1887. 



The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., Printers, Hartford, Conn. 



1164733 



DKDICATION 



®D tl)e illemorj) of 

My Venerable and Honored Uncle 

' OLIVER BLISS MORRIS 

WHOSE INTEREST IN FAMILY HISTORY STIMULATED THE BEGINNING 
OF THIS WORK 

AND 

®0 tl)e ilIemor|) of 

My Invalid Wife 

HARRIETT (HILLS) MORRIS 

from whose claim to society and care many an evening and 

midnight hour were stolen that it might be completed 

this book is 

Reverently Inscribed. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



[Autotypes by W. P. Allen, Gardner, Mass.J 

Page. 

I. Portrait, Commodore Charles Morris at 41, Frontispiece. 

From an oil portrait by Ary Scheffer, Paris, 1825, in possession of 
Mrs. Harriet B. (Morris) Coolidge, Washington. 

II. Gravestone, Lieut. Edward Morris, ... To face, 18 

From a photograph in the winter of 1885-6. 

III. Portrait, Samuel F. B. Morse, 26 

From a steel engraving. 

IV. Gravestone, Dea. Edward Morris, 40 

V. The Bliss-Morris House, 58 

From a rough sketch in 1842, by Capt. Henry Morris and the 
Compiler. 

VI. Portrait, Oliver B. Morris, 77 

From a photograph. 

VII. Portrait, Calvert Comstock, Ill 

From a card photograph. 

VIII. Portrait, Captain Henry Morris 139 

From a Daguerreotype in 1842. 

IX. The "Mary Bright," 133 

From an oil painting in 1843. 

X. Portrait, Jonathan F. Morris, 133 

From a photograph. 

XI. Portrait, Captain Lemuel Morris, 207 

From an oil painting in 1813, in possession of Mrs. Frances (Morris) 
Shipman, Cottonwood Falls, Kan. 

XII. Portrait, Commodore Charles Morris 221 

From a Daguerreotype. 

XIII. The "Constitution" and "Guerriere," 227 

From an old print. 

XIV. Portrait, Gen. William L. Marcy 254 

From an engraving. 

XV. Portrait, Commander George U. Morris, .... 269 

From a card photograph. 

XVI. The " Merrimac " and "Cumberland," 276 

From a woodcut in the Century. 

XVII. The Woodstock BuryingGround, 336 

XVIII. Fac-Sim^l?:?, 363 



PEEFAOE 



The compiler began this work in 1870. It is the result of a 
simple inquiry in regard to the members of his own family. In 
his boyhood he had traced the direct line of his paternal ancestors 
back to Lieutenant Richard Morris, one of the few professional 
soldiers who came over to New England in the fleet with Winthrop 
in 1630, whom he then believed to have been the emigrant 
ancestor and founder of the family in America. In the autumn of 
1870, in company with his brother George, he made a visit to the 
early Connecticut home of the family — Woodstock. There he 
examined the early records of the town and visited the ancient 
graves marked by perishing stones, and almost illegible inscriptions, 
some of them bearing hitherto unknown and unheard-of names. 
Inspired by these examinations, he sought to trace the connection 
of those names with those of his known ancestors, and finally to 
trace all their generations. This, however, he found, was im- 
practicable for him to do, and he has confined his work principally 
to the descendants of the sons of the family. In some instances, 
however, the descendants of some of the daughters appear for one 
or two generations. 

The work has been prosecuted at intervals of leisure during a 
busy life, with periods of long suspension, and of brief resumption 
from time to time, as opportunities and health have permitted. A 
good portion of the genealogical matter was collected as early as 
1876, which will account for no mention of new members in some 
families since that date. The work at that period was in a very 
unsatisfactory condition, as no account of many families had then 
been obtained, and very little historical and biographical matter 
collected. The compiler believes that however incomplete the work 
may now be, he has succeeded fairly well in the compilation of fami- 
lies and names, and that it is not more complete, he has at least a 
reason, common in the experience of genealogical compilers — the 



Vih MOHRTS FAMILY. 

diffioulty of getting correct and complete answers to his inquiries, 
and in some instances of any answer at all. 

Doubtless, there will be found differences in the names and dates 
recorded, and the records of some families — the compiler has 
found such between the records of towns, churches, inscriptions, 
and family records, and he has endeavored to reconcile them as he 
best could. He has found that no one of these sevei'al sources of 
information is infallible; records have sometimes proved to be 
incorrect; memories have proved failures, and the statements of 
members of the same family different. 

The compiler is, however, indebted for information to many 
members of the family — some of them have passed away and 
been gathered to the early generations here recorded; the living 
will receive his thanks for their aid and co-operation. 

For some historical matter he is indebted to the "Historical 
Collections" of the late Mr. Holmes Ammidown of New York city, 
and also to Miss Larned's "History of Windham County"; for 
although many of the facts quoted from that work had been col- 
lected by the compiler before its publication, he has chosen the 
charming style of that author in which to present them. "While 
thus indebted to others for information and facts, the entire com- 
pilation, the search and abstract of records, the copying of in- 
scriptions, the compilation of historical matter, and the entire con- 
struction of the work has been the labor of the compiler, and 
therefore, whatever faults and demerits it may contain, they may 
be attributed solely to him. Doubtless it will be criticized as con- 
taining much that is trivial and unimportant, especially in the mat- 
ter of anecdote; but it is to be considered tliat this is a family 
history, and to many even trivial things are of interest. 

It may also be thought that the work contains too much histori- 
cal matter; the compiler trusts, however, that this may be taken as 
an expression of his personal interest in the history of the times 
and events in which many of the family have lived and been con- 
nected, and of his desire to stimulate the interest of others in the 
same. 



When the compiler began the work, he only contemplated bring- 
ing down the generations of the three sons of Edward Morris, who 
left posterity — Edward, Ebenezer, and Samuel — and compiling 
them separately as they now appear in the three branches of the 



PREFACE. IX 

family. Subsequently he collected a number of the descendants 
of his daughters, and these may be found under the head of the 
" Second Generation." A further account of the descendants of 
Grace and Elizabeth Morris, who married Benjamin and Joshua 
Child may be found in the "Child Genealogy," compiled by Elias 
Child of Utica, N. Y. The compiler believes that genealogies of 
the Johnson and Lyon families are in the course of preparation — 
these will contain the descendants of Margaret Morris who married 
John Johnson, and of Martha Morris who married William Lyon, 
and thus we may hope soon to obtain the generations of all the 
children of Edward Morris. 



The compiler has adopted the system of giving the generations in 
order, and also that of reference numbers as being the easiest way 
of connecting them; that is, the number in one generation refers 
to the same number in the preceding one. 

The abbreviations, b, m, d, etc., will be readily understood as 
meaning born, married, died, etc. 



An idea of the personal appearance of the family may be inter- 
esting to many. The compiler believes that from a comparison of 
a number of families of the latest generations, that the prevailing- 
type of the past generations has been among the men: a stature 
generally above the average height, with good length of limbs; a 
square body, a full stomach with but little tendency to obesity; 
broad chests and shoulders, a square or round or slightly oval, full 
face, a fair complexion with slight ruddiness of cheeks ; light brown 
or sandy hair, and blue ot gray eyes. There are of course many ex- 
ceptions to this description as to complexion, especially among the 
immediate descendants of Isaac Morris [No. 23, First Branch]. 

The compiler has often been asked if there is any connection 
between his family and those of Gen. Lewis Morris and Robert 
Morris, who signed the Declaration of Independence. No connec- 
tion can be traced, although there undoubtedly is a common but 
very remote ancestry. 

The family of Gen. Lewis Morris is of Monmouthshire origin, and 
is sketched in appendix "B." Its history in America has been so 
interwoven with that of the country, that it may properly be 
designated as the "Historical Family." 



X . MORRIS FAMILY. 

Robert Morris, whose fame as a signer of the Declaration and as a 
financier, and whose ability extricated the country from the financial 
difficulties under which it had so long labored during the Revolu- 
tion, was born in Lancashire, England, in 1734, and brought to 
America by his father at the age of thirteen. His fame is too 
well-known to need further mention. 

Several emigrants bearing the name of Morris came to America 
previous to the middle of the Seventeenth Century. Of those who 
came to New England other than our own family, only four had 
sons, so far as the compiler has been able to trace them — Thomas 
Morris at New Haven in 1637, who had five; John Morris at 
Hartford in 1639, who had two or three; Evar Morris at Topsfield 
in 1055, who probably had one; and William Morris at Boston in 
1684, and later at Wethersfield, Conn., who is supposed to have 
had one. 

The descendants of Thomas Morris of New Haven were some- 
what numerous in New Haven, Fairfield, and Litchfield counties 
in Connecticut prior to the Revolution and are at the present time, 
although they have been scattered into other States. 

There is no trace of the descendants of John Morris of Hartford. 
The name is to be found in the northern New England States, borne 
by some not connected with our family, but from what source it 
has come, the compiler has no information; he however, believes 
it is from emigration subsequent to the opening of the Eighteenth 
Century. 

Before 1635, there were several Morris emigrants to Virginia. 
The name is quite common in the South and Southwest, and the 
compiler believes it comes principally from the Virginia settlers. 

The name is common in Pennsylvania and Delaware, and origi- 
nated probably with a number of emigrants who settled in those 
States after the coming of William Penn to Philadelphia. 

In some instances, names of German or Hungarian origin, as 
Moritz, have been anglicized to read like our own. 



II^rTEODUCTIOI^ 



The name of Morris, according to Mark Antony Lower, is 
derived from two sources: one of native Welsh origin; the other 
coming from the Continent of Europe. It is variously spelled: 
Morys, Morrys, Moris, Morris, Morice, Morrice, Moryce, Mawrice, 
Maurice, etc., and is compounded with various initial expressions, 
as DeMont, Fitz, Clan, etc. When these latter occur and when 
the name is spelled Maurice, it may generally be considered of 
Continental and perhaps of Moorish origin, coming from Africa 
by way of Spain into Western Europe at an early period. "It is 
a well-known fact," says Lower, "that the particular species of 
saltation called the Morrice-dance and the several branches of 
magic lore were introduced into these regions many centuries since 
by natives of Morrocco; the professors of these arts enriching 
themselves by their trade, seem in some instances to have embraced 
Christianity and to have become the founders of eminent families. 
Certain it is that several magnates bearing the names of Morrice, 
J-^'itz Morrice, and Mont-Morrice attended AVilliam the Conqueror 
in his descent upon England, and acquiring land settled in Eng- 
land." The name Mont-Morrice is said to signify " Moorish Moun- 
tains." (See Appendix A.) 

Burke, in his " History of the Landed Gentry of England," says 
jn regard to the name of Morys or Morris, "This name, originally 
spelled Mawr-rwyce or Mawr-rhys, was changed into Maurice, 
Morrice, and Morris, Mars, Mavors. The Welsh " Mawr-rwyce " 
— meaning in Enghsh "warlike or powerful " — was a title applied 
to such of the ancient chieftains as were prominent for valor, whose 
numerous descendants account for the present frequency of the 
name in Wales." Other authorities say the name is derived from 
"Mawr," great or brave, and "Rhys," "Rwyce," "Rees," or 
"Rice," a title given to the ancient chiefs, so that the meaning of 
the name is "great" or "brave" "chief" or "prince," which 
seems to be a probable meaning. Certain it is, that the various 



XU MORRIS FAMILY. 

kiiiglited families in England beannp: the name of Morris trace 
their ancestry to such an origin, and Morrice of "VVerrington and 
Betshanger, Morris of York, Morris of Hurst and of Pentenavent, 
all trace their families back to a remote period. (See Appen- 
dix B.) 

Morrice of Werrington and Betshanger, it is said, trace their 
ancestry to Brut, the first king of Britain, one hundred years 
before the Christian era. They have for their motto, "Antiqui 
mores." 

The Morrises of Essex (see Appendix C) trace their descent 
from a noted Welsh cliieftain of the twelfth century, Mawr-Rhys, 
i. e., the ''great" Rhys or Prince; and it is from this Essex family 
that the descendants of Edward Morris may without doubt claim 
descent. 

As stated in the preface, the compiler believed in the tradition 
that the emigrant ancestor and founder of the family in America 
was Lieutenant Richard Morris of Roxbury, one of the few pro- 
fessional soldiers who came over in the fleet with Winthrop in 
July, 1630, and who settled first at Boston, where, with his wife 
Leonora, he was an early member of the church. From whence 
he came in England has not been ascertained; he may have been 
"Rychard Morrisse," who, according to the register of Waltham 
Abbey, was baptized Dec. 8, 1595. He is described by "Winthrop 
as " a stout man and experienced soldier." He was Lieutenant of 
the company at Roxbury. In 1634-5 he was Deputy from Rox- 
bury to the General Court, and in the same year was appointed 
one of a committee to locate and construct the foi-tifications in and 
around Boston. In March, 1636, he was appointed to command 
the fort at Castle Island, wliich position he held until November, 
1637, when, on account of his sympathy with Rev. John Wheel- 
wright, he was disarmed and banished from the colony the follow- 
ing year. In 1639 he was with Wheelwright at Exeter when he 
was apportioned a large quantity of land. In 1641 he went to 
Portsmouth, R. I., and became one of the most prominent military 
men of that Colony. He was hving at Newport in 1672. In his 
researches the compiler has not been able to find that he had more 
than one child — a daughtei', Lettice, who married Richard Bulgar, 
a resident of Roxbury, who was also disarmed at the same time 
with Ricliard Morris, and who went to Rhode Island, where he 
became Solicitor-General of tjiat colony. There was one William 



INTRODUCTION. 



Morris who was made freeman at Portsmouth in 1665, who perhaps 
may have been a son of Richard Morris, but no evidence of any 
relationship has been discovered. The compiler has been reluctant 
in giving up his belief in the tradition which has long been held in 
both branches of the family that this '• stout man and experienced 
soldier " was their ancestor, but his researches have compelled him 
to abandon this belief, and to find a more probable ancestor in 
Thomas Morris, an early settler of Boston, who died as early as 
1637, and whose will was recorded on that most unfortunately 
missing leaf which contained pages IV and 18 of the first book of 
Wills of Suffolk County, Mass., and whose widow the compiler 
believes was living in 1638. There is no I'ecord extant of his 
arrival in this country, nor of the birth of any children, and prob- 
ably there were none born here. 

From the correspondence of the names of many of the early 
settlers of Roxbury with the names on the records of Waltham 
Abbey and Nazmg in the county of Essex in England, and the 
positive evidence that some of the Roxbury people came from 
those places and other places near by, and the connection of 
Edward Morris with some of these families, and the well-known 
fact that the Morrises were early and long established at Waltham 
Abbey, Nazing. and adjoining parishes, we have every reason to 
believe that Edward Morris came from the same neighborhood. 

On the registers of Waltham Abbey are these entries: "Thomas 
Morris and Grissie Hewsone, married August 24, 1629." "Edward 
Morris, son of Thomas Morris, baptized August 8, 1630." Here 
as concerning these names the record ends, and the name of 
Morris does not again appear until 1675. 

The compiler, in the absence of positive evidence that Thomas 
Morris of Waltham Abbey and Thomas Morris of Boston were 
one and the same person, is nevertheless disposed to accept the fact 
as suflBciently conclusive without waiting for the proof for which 
he is still in search and which he hopes to find.' 

The compiler's taste for republican simplicity forbids the present- 
ing of any coat of arms; that " vanity of feudalism "- or of claiming 

1 There was a Thomas Morris living in jMaryland in 1639 who had busi- 
ness relations with New England; he was a surgeon; possibly he came to 
Boston. 

"Canon Farrar — Eulogy on General Grant. 



XIV MORRIS FAMILY. 

a direct descent from any noble or knighted family, though doubt- 
less a connection with the Morris family of Essex could be found, 
and its descent traced back to Gryffydd ap Cynan and the Kings 
of Wales. We may, however, with more pride claim our con- 
nection with that greater class which has been the strength and 
glory of England — her commoners. 

Thomas Morris, it is presumed, was a descendant of one of the 
younger sons of John Morris, who was born in the parish of Roy- 
den, in the county of Essex, in 1440, (see Appendix C) who 
had settled at Waltham Abbey. 

Edward Morris our known ancestor was but a selectman and 
representative; a "representative man" perhaps of his day, who, 
for the high character he bore, and the many years of faithful 
discharge of the duties of his position was long respected and sup- 
ported l)y his fellow-citizens. His descendants have composed a 
family of high respectability, which, while it may not have in- 
cluded many brilliant characters, has contained some who have 
given it great honor by their distinguished deeds, as well as others 
who in the common walks of life have well served their time. It 
has been particularly one of those families on which the super- 
structure of society has been raised and stands. It has been a 
family of social order. It has been generally a rehgious family; 
its early generations particularly so. It is entirely of old Puritan 
origin and descent. Edward Morris was a member of Rev. John 
Eliot's church in Roxbury — the "blessed "Apostle to the Indians, 
— and his children and some of his grandchildren received bap- 
tism from his apostolic hands, and his prayers and blessings seem 
to have followed down the generations. The moral character of the 
family has been mostly good ; Vice has made but little inroads in 
it; at least, not openly. No instance of trial or imprisonment for 
crime among those bearing the family name has come to the knowl- 
edge of the compiler, who has searched the court records of those 
counties where the family lived for the first four genei-ations. and 
the most heinous offences which any of its members have been 
charged with, that he has been able to find, are the two following: In 
1726, Mehitable Morris was before the court of Windham county 
charged with " unseemly conduct," and sentenced to pay a fine of ten 
pounds or be whipped ten stripes on her naked body. What this 
" unseemly conduct " was that merited this sentence the compiler has 
not discovered. Her father was for many years in controversy 



INTRODUCTION. 



with the town of Killingly, in regard to the payment of taxes; 
the assessment of which he claimed to be unjust by reason of his 
peculiar situation on the borders of Woodstock and his paying 
taxes there. Mehitable may have been something of "a scold," 
and on some occasion may have expressed a contempt of authority, 
which in those days was punished by either of the methods named; 
but whatever the offense may have been, it did not hinder or pre- 
vent Miss Mehitable's marriage to Philip Newell on Christmas 
day in 1728. They had been playmates in Roxbury where the 
farms of their parents joined, and now both Samuel Morris and 
Isaac Newell were again settled near each other on opposite 
banks of the Quinebaug, and here the friendship of earlier years 
was renewed and ripened into matrimonial life, destined however 
to be a very brief one. 

The other case is that of a young man brought before the same 
court in 1752, charged with bastardy. He appeared with counsel; 
the plaintiff was called three times, but failed to appear. The 
verdict of the court was that the defendant should receive the costs 
of the suit, and execution against the plaintiff was ordered. We 
may therefore conclude that the charge was a false one. 

Four cases of illegitimate births are recorded, one of them eighty, 
one one hundred and twenty, and two more than one hundred 
and fifty years ago. These cases were probably the result of an 
old social custom prevalent during the periods mentioned, but long 
since abandoned and no longer tolerated. In the last two in- 
stances, the mothers were subsequently admitted to the church and 
had their children baptized, and one, if not both of them, were 
afterwards married. One boy is traced to a reform school. 

Intemperance has prevailed to a far less extent than in many 
other families, and has never become an inheritance. In the few 
cases which have come to the compiler's knowledge, there have also 
been exhibits of some of the noblest traits of character suflBcient 
to atone for the unfortunate weakness. The mental health of the 
family has uniformly been good. The compiler has heard of no 
case of iifherited derangement, and of only two cases of self-de- 
struction. One of these was of very doubtful intent ; the other 
was caused by very prolonged and intense physical suffering. 

The family has not been avaricious of wealth. Greed for 
money, place, or power, has not been a characteristic, and it hke- 
wise has been exempt from the love of display or show of pride 



XVI MORRIS FAMILY. 

or ostentation. Contentment with a competency has been a rule, 
and while honor and respectability rather than riches has been its 
aim, poverty has been the lot of but few. Two instances only of 
dependence upon public charity have come to the compiler's knowl- 
edge, and these were directly traceable to habits of intemperance. 
It has always been a patriotic family. In all the wars in which 
the country has been engaged, fi'om the earliest days of settlement 
down to the present time, its sons have been found in the ranks of 
soldiery or on the quarter-deck. During the late civil war, num- 
bers of them rallied to the defense of the Government and the 
Union, some of whom laid down their lives in the cause, and 
while very few were known to have had any sympathy with the 
rebellion — and these it is believed were influenced by their pecul- 
iar circumstances — none are known to have taken up arms against 
their loyal brethren. 

No greater examples of patriotism or of heroic bravery can be 
found in the annals of history than those of Commodore Charles 
Morris and his gallant son Commander George U. Morris; and 
thus in common with others bearing the name of Morris, as evi- 
denced in contests for civil and religious liberty, botb in England 
and America, it has attested its worthy descent from those invin- 
cible races — the ancient British and the Anglo-Saxon. 

WALTHAM ABBEY. 

"Waltham Abbey is in the County of Essex, and is situated on 
the River Lea, twelve miles north of London. Its history dates 
from the times of the famous Danish King Canute. The name 
Waltham is of purely Saxon derivation. "Wealdham," i. e., a 
home or habitation in the woods. The Abbey, by which this 
place attained so much celebrity, was originally founded about 
1035 by Tovey, Canute's standard-bearer. Waltham Foi-est was a 
famous hunting resort, and in it Tovey built a hunting residence 
for himself and others for his retainers. He also built a convent 
there, and thus founded the nucleus of the town of Waltham 
Holy Cross Abbey, now generally called Waltham Abbey. 

In the days of Edward the Confessor Waltham reverted to the 
crown, and was bestowed by that king upon his brother-in-law 
and rightful successor to the throne of England, Harold the last 
of the Saxon kings. Hai'old rebuilt the church edihce of Tovey 



INTRODUCTION. 



in 1060 and dedicated it to the "Holy Cross" — the battle-cry of 
the English. After the battle of Hastings and the defeat and 
death of Harold, in 1066, William the Conqueror gave consent to 
the burial of Harold at the Abbey. The edifice has undergone 
several changes, the principal one being made by Henry II. in 
1177. About 1860 it was restored, but still retains a portion of 
Harold's architecture and much of the Norman style of that period. 
The Abbey continued 478 years under deans and abbots luitil 
March 23, 1540, when it was surrendered by the last Abbot, 
Robert Fuller, to King Henry the Eighth. Among the abbots 
was Nicholas Morris, who was abbot from 1371 to 1390, and was 
appointed to inquire into the misconduct of King Richard the 
Second. In 1377 John Morris gave the Abbey forty acres of 
land, and in 1383 he, with other inhabitants, gave houses situated 
in the contiguous parishes of Waltham, Nazing, and Royden for 
the support of the brotherhood of the Lady Chapel of AValtham 
Abbey. 



FIRST GEKERATIOJSr. 



EDWARD MORRIS. 

1. EDWARD MORRIS was, as the compiler believes, the son 
of Thomas and Grissie (Hewsone) Morris of Waltham Holy Cross 
Abbey, in the county of Essex, Eng., and was born in August, 
1630, and baptized on the 8tli day of that month, in the Abbey 
Church, by Rev. Joseph Hall, Rector, afterwards Bishop of Nor- 
wich. There is no account to be found of his emigration to 
America, nor that of his parents. It is probable that he was 
brought over by them in his early childhood, and that they set- 
tled in Roxbury, where they had relationship with the families of 
Captain John Johnson and Elder Isaac Heath, as appears by the 
wills of Isaac Heath, Elizabeth Heath, his wife, and Elizabeth 
(Morris) Cartwright, recorded in the probate records of the county 
of Suffolk, Mass. 

The earliest account which we have of Edward Morris in 
America is found on the records of Roxbury Feb. 23, 1652, and is 
as follows: "Voted, that WilHam Peacock and Edward Morris 
have four acres each, and William Lyon three acres of common 
land upon the common by John Polley's: the land to be lotted by 
division as their lot falls provided they build upon the land within 
two years, with no liberty to carry away any wood or timber or 
sell farther than for building purposes until they have built upon 
the land." This grant of land to Edward Morris was subsequently 
forfeited, as appears by a vote of the town January 29, 1654, 
when the town voted " That the ground by John Polley's that was 
given to Edward Morris, is, upon John Maye's request and Edward 
Morris' forfeiture, granted to John May, provided he build there 
within this twelvemonth, or to some other inhabitant with the 
same terms." Edward Morris was then about twenty-four years 
old and unmarried, and probably not ready to comply with the 
terms of the grant. The next account found of him is the record 



2 Moians family. 

of his marriage to Grace Bett, November 20, 165.">, Idv Richard 
BelHnghaiii, Deputy Governor, the law and custom at tliat time 
requiring all marriages to be performed by a magistrate. The 
compiler has. sought to find the family to which Grace Bett be- 
longed, but has entirely failed in his endeavors. He has not even 
found the name on any other record than that of the marriage in 
Boston. That Bett is the true surname the compiler thinks may 
be doubted, unless it is one form of the name of Betts. Savage, 
in his "Dictionary of First Settlers of New England," gives the 
name as Burr. This the compiler believes to be quite as unlikely 
the true name as Bett, there being at the time no family of either 
name in Boston or Roxbury or the neighboring towns. Possibly, 
the name may have been Bell and connected with Thomas Bell, 
who was a prominent resident of Roxbury from 1635 to 1654, 
when he returned to England. The name in the Boston records 
is plainly written Bett ; but as the record is the transcript of other 
records, the name may have been incorrectly copied, and thus still 
leaves room for doubt that it is the correct name. The name of 
Betts was, however, that of Waltham Abbey families, and Grace 
may possibly have been connected with them. 

After his marriage — how soon or in what manner is not 
known — Edward Morris was in the possession of land in -'the 
highway from Elder Heath's pasture lot by Stoney river and 
Gamblin's end," now Amory and School streets. This locality 
was in the immediate neighborhood of Thomas Bell's house, and 
on the southeastern border of Jamaica Plain. Here he was living 
in 1663, in which year he, with John May and Robert Gamblin 
were ordered to remove their fences in order to widen the high- 
way. In 1661, January 27th, he was made chairman of a committee 
to act with the selectmen of the town in surveying "the common 
land belonging to the town." January 19, 1662, the town voted 
that "no more land- should be given away, but be kept for the 
town's use, and Edward Morris to have an eye that the common 
be not damnified, and that for his services in informing the town 
of the bounds of their common they give him fifteen shillings, and 
that he should have half the pines for the year for his care for the 
preservation of the common," — i. e., Jamaica Plain. 

He was chosen one of the constables of the town January 2, 
1664. The office of constable at that time was one of honor and 
held in esteem. Afterwards he is found performing various 



FIRST GENERATION. 3 

duties: viewing fences, running lines, etc. October 13, 1666, 
William Hubbard of Ipswich sold to Isaac Johnson, senior, Wil- 
liam Davis, and Edward Morris one hundred and eighteen acres 
of land in the western part of Roxbury. described in the deed as 
"the 13th lot of the second allotment of lots in the last or second 
division of land." This land was divided equally between the 
purchasers Edward Morris's part lay on the road to Dedham, 
and was bounded on the north and east by the road now known 
as " South street," as it runs from the Roslindale station of the 
railroad to Dedham, toward the village of West Roxbury, and 
was about four miles from the Roxbury meeting-house. To this 
spot he removed, and lived upon it until he removed to Wood- 
stock in 1686. 

He was chosen a selectman of the town at " a full town meet- 
ing," held January 11, 1674, and was afterwards chosen to that 
office as long as he lived in Roxbury, — a period of twelve years, 
with perhaps the exception of the year 1680. He had for his 
associates four otlier leading men of the town ; but no one of them 
during this period was so long continued in office. In 1674 he 
also served as juror of the Court of Assistants. 

In 167 6 he was appointed one of three trustees for the High 
School at Jamaica Plain, which was instituted that year by a gift 
of land for its support by Hugh Thomas and his wife. 

In 1678 he was chosen deputy from Roxbury to the General 
Court, and was thereafter annually chosen until the vacation of 
the Colonial Charter in 1686, a period of nine years, during which, 
with the exception of seven brief sessions of the court, he was the 
sole representative of the town. 

Just what*aU the services of Edward Morris were while deputy 
the meagre records of the court do not inform us. The public 
business of that time did not require the work of many commit- 
tees, and the greater part of it was transacted by the House in 
"committee of the whole." We find, however, that he was one 
of a committee of three appointed to audit the accounts of the 
treasurer of the colony, there being no office of auditor, nor any 
one person specially chosen to perform the duties of such office. 

It was the fortune of Edward jMorris to sit in the House of 
Deputies during a great part of the long contest which Massachu- 
setts had with King Charles II. for the preservation of her charter, 
and which was continued through the remaining years of his 



4 MORRIS FAMILY. 

reign, and finally ended in its abrogation in 1684, and its vacation 
in the reign of James II in 1686. 

The entrance of Edward Morris into public life was in the same 
year and nearly at the same time that Edward Randolph, "that 
messenger of death to the colony," arrived from England with a 
commission to administer to the governor the oath required by 
the royal act of trade, an act which was unpopular, and looked 
upon by the people as an invasion of their rights, they having no 
representatives in Parliament. 

Upheld by public opinion. Governor Leverett refused to take 
the oath. Randolph returned to England, but came over again in 
1683, bringing a writ of quo luarranto and a declaration from the 
king, asking again for a submission. The magistrates referred the 
matters to the deputies, who rejected the proposition and adhered 
to their former action. 

The English court, before which Massachusetts had been brought 
to trial, was composed of judges appointed by the king, and was 
therefore his own creature, and brought in a judgment in accord- 
ance with his wishes. The charter was adjudged forfeited June 
18, 1684. A copy of this judgment was received at Boston Jxily 
2, 1685. The magistrates continued to hold their offices and the 
House of Deputies to sit until May 20, 1686, when, on the arrival 
of Joseph Dudley from England, bringing a commission as presi- 
dent of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, and Rhode Island, 
a new form of government, consisting of a president and a man- 
damus council of fifteen, to be appointed by the crown, was estab- 
lished. The House of Deputies was abolished. The president 
and council had the whole control and management of all public 
affairs. So fell the House of Deputies in Massachusetts under the 
old colonial charter! It had first assembled in 1634. For fifty- 
two years the town of Roxbury had been represented in it. In 
the later years, when other towns faltered in their resolution to 
maintain the charter, and failed to send deputies to the court, 
Roxbury continued staunch in the maintenance of colonial rights, 
and never failed to be represented there. One of the two depu- 
ties in 1634 — the first year — was Lieutenant Richard Morris. 
The last deputy was Edward Morris. Eleven persons had filled 
the ofiice of deputy during the fifty-two years. Of these, only two 
had filled it longer than he. Roxbury, unlike towns in these later 
times, was satisfied with the faithful discharge of public duties by 



FIRST GENEHATIOX. 



their servants, and retained them in office. Deacon William Park 
represented tlie town for thirty-six years. Captain John Johnson, 
who was a deputy the first year, represented it for twenty-one 
years, nearly all of them consecutively. Griffin Craft was a dep- 
uty for six years. Neither of these gentlemen represented the 
town alone, but Edward Morris was the sole representative for 
eight years, with the exception of seven out of thirty-one sessions 

Nowhere had the charter been more strongly upheld than m 
Roxbury. In October, 1664, after the arrival of Col. Richard 
Nichols, George Cartwright, Sir Robert Carr, and Samuel Mav- 
erick — the commission which the king sent over to demand the 
surrender of the charter — a petition signed by John Eliot, John 
Bowles, Edward Bridge, Phillip Torrey, Robert Pepper, Samuel 
Wilhams, Samuel Scarbrow, Joseph Griggs, Samuel May, William 
Lyon, Moses Crafts, Samuel Ruggles, Isaac Curtis, and many 
other inhabitants of Roxbury, was sent to the General Court, 
requesting both magistrates and deputies to "stand fast in our 
present hberties," and assuring them that they will pray the Lord 
to "assist them to stere right in these shaking times." 

The most prominent of the inhabitants of Roxbury during the 
later years of the charter, was Joseph Dudley. He had been 
associated with Edward Morris as one of the selectmen of the 
town; and in 1673 was chosen deputy to the General Court. In 
1676 he was chosen magistrate or assistant, and was succeeded by 
Edward Morris as deputy. Dudley seems to have forecast the 
result of the contest for the preservation of the chartei', and while 
assistant joined the moderate party which was for acquiescence in 
the surrender of the charter rather than continue the contest with 
the king. He was, however, sent, in 1682, with Major John 
Richards, as agent to England to petition for the restoration of 
the charter, trailing in this mission, he soiight favor with the 
king for his own advancement, rather than the interests of his 
native land. He returned to Boston the next year, but liis course 
having proved so unsatisfactory to the people, he lost his election 
as assistant in 1 684. Returning to England, he again played the 
courtier and obtained from the king his commission as president 
of the new form of government. Nowhere was Dudley now held 
in greater reproach, or more unpopular, than in his native town. 
This could hardly have been otherwise with people true to their 
love of liberty, and who had hstened for more than fifty years to 



MOBlilS FAMILY. 



the toachino; of John Eliot, who, as the author of "The Christian 
Commonwealth," had doubtless often expounded the principles of 
true civil as well as religious liberty. 

Ip contrast with the conduct of Dudley was that of Edward 
Morris, as he continued year after year in his place as deputy in 
the Court. We must beheve that he was in full sympathy with the 
sentiment of his townsmen and the party which stood in defense 
of popular liberty in the conflict against the arbitrary power of 
the King and his instruments: Randolph, Andros, Dudley, and 
others. Dudley's government at this time was brief. King 
James II. was proclaimed in Boston, April 20, 1686. Dudley 
arrived with his commission on the 15th of May. On the 20th 
the House of Deputies adjourned until the second Monday in 
October, " at eight of ye clock in ye morning." It never met. The 
new government went into operation May 25th. On the 2()th of 
December Sir Edmund Andros arrived, bringing a commission as 
governor of New York and New England — a reign of tyranny 
began, and lasted until the revolution in Boston and the overthrow 
of Andros in April, 1689. 

Meanwhile a new field opened for the. services of Edward 
Morris. In 1682 Massachusetts became the proprietor, by pur- 
chase from the Indians, of a tract of land fifty miles long and 
twenty miles wide, for the sum of fifty pounds. This tract of land 
included nearly the whole of the Nipmuck Country, from the con- 
fluence of the Quinnebaug and French rivers, in Thompson, in 
Connecticut, nearly to the northern part of Worcester County in 
Massachusetts. This purchase was made from Black James, the 
principal chief of the Nipmucks, who reserved for liimsclf and 
forty of his tribe a portion of land five miles square, lying in two 
sections — one at "Myanexit" on the Quinnebaug; the other at 
Quinnatissett in the south part of Thompson. Colonel William 
Stoughton and Major Joseph Dudley, who had been the agents of 
Massachusetts in the purchase fi'om the Indians, became the pur- 
chasers, for ten pounds, of half of the two reservations, and oflered 
it for sale. Dudley sold to Thomas Freak of Hampton, in the 
County of Wilts, England, two thousand acres for £250. Stough- 
ton sold to Robert Thompson of North Newington, Middlesex 
County, England, two thousand acres at "Quinnatissett" for £200. 
Massachusetts disposed of portions of her land to various parties. 
The Wappaquassett Indians belonged to the Nipmuck tribe. Their 



FIRST GENERATION. 7 

territory extended from the Quinnebaug River on the east to 
j\l oshennpsuc (Snipsic) Pond in Tolland, on the west, and from 
the ]\loliegan Country on the south to beyond the Connecticut 
Hne on the north; their principal villages were within the borders 
of Woodstock, 

Kor many years before the breaking out of the Indian War in 
1675, there had been a disposition among a number of the towns 
in Massachusetts " to enlarge their borders " or form new settle- 
ments. The land in the Nipmuck Country was looked upon as the 
most desirable, and as early as 1 653 a township had been granted 
to some Watertown people at "Nashua," and a settlement begun 
there under the name of Lancaster. Some Braintree and Wey- 
mouth people formed a settlement, in 1664, at -'Nipmuck," or 
"Quinshepaug." which they called Mendon. In 1660, some Ips- 
wich people obtained a grant of the Indian town of "Quaboag," 
and a charter for a town there in 1673 as Brookfield. Another 
small settlement was begun at " Quinsigamond," or Worcester, in 
1675. These four settlements were all which had been made in 
the large county of Worcester before the war in which they were 
all destroyed — events which made the Enghsh people more cau- 
tious for several years after the war was over. 

The southern part of the Nipmuck Country had suffered less than 
the rest of it, and having been the home of some of the "praying 
Indians," the natives were regarded as more peaceful, so that after 
the war, when new settlements were contemplated, this section was 
looked upon as being less hazardous than those formerly settled. 

The first grant of land by the General Court, after the purchase 
of the Nipmuck Country, was made May 16, 1683, to Major Robert 
Thompson, WilHam Stoughton, Joseph Dudley, and others, for a 
tract in any free place, containing eight miles square, for a town- 
ship, they settling in said place, within four years, thirty families 
and "an able, orthodox minister." The town was freed from 
"country rates " for four years from the time of the grant. 

Very soon after the grant was made to Thompson, Dudley, and 
Stoughton, the spirit of emigration took hold of the people of 
Roxbury, who for a long time had been compressed within narrow 
hmits: their seven thousand acres did not "afford accommodation 
for their cattle "; for this and other reasons they needed "enlarge- 
ment of their borders." In earlier years numbers of their inhab- 
itants had left them to settle Connecticut towns. The subject was 



8 MORKIS FA^fILY. 

discussed in town meetings held on tlie 6th and 10th of October, 
16.S3, and resulted in a petition of the selectmen to the General 
Court for a grant of land for a township The result of this action 
is recorded in the " Proprietors' Records" of Woodstock: 

"At a Geueral Court lield at Boston the 7th of November 1683 in 
answer to the Petition of William Parl<e, John Boulds, Joseph Grip^gs, 
John Rnggles and Edward Morris, Selectmen of Roxbury and in their 
behalf Dated October 10, and 17, 1688 for a tract of land seven miles 
square, the Court grants the Request prouided that the grant to Maj' 
Thompson Mr Stougliton Mr Dudley and company have the first choyce — 
they making tlieir choyce before the tenth of June next and prouided that 
thirty families be settled on the said plantation within three yeares of that 
time and maintaine amongst y'" an able and orthodox Godly minister." 

By the 1 0th of June, Messrs. Thompson, Stoughton, and Dudley 
had made their choice of land at "Manchaug" — now Oxford. 
They afterwards petitioned for an extension of the time of settle- 
ment. The Court granted them three years from the 28th of 
January, 1 684-5. 

On the 27th of October, 1684, the town of Roxbury, in prosecu- 
tion of the grant, empowered Lieutenant Samuel Ruggles, John 
Ruggles, Senior, John Curtis, and Isaac Morris, ''to view the 
wilderness and find a convenient place where they might take up 
the aforesaid grant." At the same meeting "Joseph Dudley, John 
Bowles, Deacon Parke, Leftenant Ruggles, and Edward Morris 
were appointed to draw up on consideration, propositions that may 
be most equable and prudent for the settlement of the place and 
submit them to the town at the meeting to be holden the 18th of 
November after lecture." 

The Roxbury people, as well as the grantees of '' Manchaug." 
seem to have apprehended that they would have difficulty in 
effecting the settlement of the new plantation within the four 
years allotted them, as we find in the files of the General Court 
which convened January 28, 1684-5, the following petition: 

"To the Iloiib'" Gen" Court now assembled in Boston 

"The Humble Pilition of Edward ]\Iorris Deputy, in behalf of The- 
Tovvn of Roxbury. 

"Sheweih that whereas in the Year 1683, the Hon''' Court Granted to 
tlie Town of Roxburj^ a certain tract of laud of Seven Miles Square for a 
village to be taken up in the Niprauk County. Provided they settle thirty 
families in s'' Plantation within three yeares after the date thereof &c. ;. 
find in regard of y difficulties of tlie times they cannot accomplish the 



FIRST GENERATION'. 9 

same yC petitioner Doth hurablj^ pray that this Hon'"' Court will be 
pleased to grant three years more to be added from the end of that time 
that Ihey may be in a more comfortable capacity to accomplish the desired 
end, and that for their encouragement therein the said town or village 
may the first three years of the settlement be freed from Country Rate 
" And yo"' Pef shall pray &c " 

The endorsement of the original petition, as well as the record 
of the Court, reads, "Granted from this date January 31, 1684, 
(0. S.)." 

Meanwhile, the exploring party, after due time spent in search- 
ing, found a convenient place in the " Wappaquassett Country, 
westward of the Myankesit River.'' The Wappaquassetts had a 
village on or near Woodstock Hill; they also had one at " Myan- 
exit" on the Quinnebaug, five or six miles away; and another one 
at ''Quinnatisett," or Thompson Hill. These Indians had been 
visited by the apostle Eliot, and many of them had been converted 
to Christianity and become known as "praying Indians," as had 
those at Natick. They had become mild and tractable, and had 
assumed some habits of civilization: they cultivated their lands, 
and kept the Sabbath, and there seemed a bright prospect of 
permanent good results from the missionary efforts of Eliot and 
Gookm; but a year had hardly gone by when Phillip's war broke 
out, into which the Nipmucks were swept and almost annihilated. 

The Wappaquassetts left their lands and villages, moved south- 
ward, and joined the ]\Iohegans under Uncas, as allies of the 
English — they never returned to their own country; so that 
when the four Roxbury spies entered it they found it nearly 
iminhabited. 

Other meetings were held in furtherance of the new settlement. 
At a general one of the town, July 13, 1685, the committee 
appointed in October made their report, as follows: 

"It is agreed and ordered that if there shall appear to the selectmen 
thirty persons or upwards who shall give in their names to plant and to 
settle on said lands so as to fulfill the conditions of the grant of the Gen- 
eral Court referring to the same, they shall have to themselves and their 
heirs the full half of the whole tract in one square at their own choice to 
be proportiouably divided among them; and further the town do engage 
to assist the goers and planters with £100, money to be paid in equal por- 
tions in five years, to be laid out in public buildings and charges as the 
old town of Roxbury (the grant being known at this time as New Rox- 
bury) shall annually determine. The rest of the inhabitants of the town 
2 



10 MORKIS FAMILY. 

shall have the rem a in inn' half to be equally and proportion,il)ly divided to 
them; to be to them and their heirs forever." 

The meeting adjourned to September 8th — eight weeks, — when, 
the agreement in every article and particular having been read, it was 
consented to without a single dissenting voice. Other liberal pro- 
visions were adopted, such as exempting the estates of the "'goers" 
from taxation, for raising the aforesaid sum to the extent of thirty- 
five persons, and to spend the £100 on the half of the plantation 
taken by the "goers," and that the annual payment of £20 should 
be made to such persons as the "goers " should depute, and that the 
money should be spent for the meeting-house, mill, minister's 
house, bridges, etc. The meeting further adjourned to September 
22d, when it was unanimously declared by the people of Eoxbury, 
for the encouragement of such as were willing to go into the Nip- 
muck country in the spring in order to a settlement, " that they 
shall have liberty to break up land and plant where they please for 
the present year without being bound thereby to accept what they 
plant or otherwise improve as their share or part of the half of the 
Court's grant to the town, and that they should have liberty at any 
time between this day and the 29th of September next, 1686, to 
make and declare their choice of the said Court's grant according 
to articles agreed in public town meeting July 13, 1685." A sur- 
veyor was also granted them. 

With the following spring of 1686, the movement for the actual 
settlement of the new plantation began. The records of Wood- 
stock show the following entry: 

"April 5, 1686. 
•'These are the thirteen who were sent out to spy out Woodstock as 
planters and take actual possession: Jonathan Smithcrs, John Frissell, 
Nathaniel Gary, John Marcy, Benjamin Griggs, John Lord, Benjamin 
Sabin, Henry Bowen, Matthew Davis, Thomas Bacon, Peter Aspinwall, 
George Griggs, and Ebenezer Morris." 

It thus appears that at the above date they had taken possession 
and begun the work of breaking ground and planting. A few 
weeks later, May 14th, a committee was sent out from Roxbury 
"to view the land granted by the General Court for our enlarge- 
ment and to settle the southern bounds upon or near the Colony 
line and to determine the length and breadth of the town." 

At a general town meeting, June 15, 1686, the committee made 
report " that on the 25th of May they went to the place where 



FIRST GENERATION. 11 

several of the inhabitants of Roxbury had set up a house and 
planted several acres of corn and that they had laid out the 
bounds of the town." At the same meeting the first day of May, 
1687, was fixed upon as the hmit of time for entering any more 
names as settlers in the part of the new town which the "goers " 
had made choice of and for "their going to dwell there"; the 
number of names not to exceed fifty, ten of whom might be inhab- 
itants of other towns if the selectmen and the " goers " approved 
of them. All the settlers were to be twenty-one years of age by 
June 10, 1688. The meeting also decided that those who had 
already gone to the new plantation "should have the choice of 
their home-lots forthwith." 

Lieutenant Samuel Ruggles, Sergeant Timothy Stevens, and 
Samuel Williams, senior, were appointed a committee for the new 
town till the last of May, 1687, "to decide any differences that 
might arise among them." 

A certain number of the inhabitants having decided to go to the 
new town, a meeting was held by them under the denomination of 
"Goers," July 21st, for the purpose of adopting rules for their 
government. The following agreement was adopted: 

" I. That every man should take up what number of acres he pleaseth 
in his home-lot not exceeding thirty — and after rights and divisions of 
land shall arise according to the properties of his home-lot; and all after- 
changes to arise proportionably upon the home lots for the tirst six years. 

" II. That whoever shall neglect the payment of rate two months after 
a rate made and demanded, shall forfeit for every five shillings, two acres 
of his home lot with all proportionable rights, and so consequently more 
or less according to his failure ; always provided that they take not his 
house nor orchard — this forfeiture shall be to those chosen by the com- 
pany as selectmen to be improved by them for the use of the public, 
which rates shall be paid by the public, the person forfeited excepted, 
which agreement shall stand the first six years. 

"III. If any meadows should fall out to be in any one's home-lot it 
shall be accounted as so much of his proportion of meadow, and his home- 
lot made up with upland. 

"IV. That all persons that have planted in the year 1686 shall have 
two acres of his home-lot free for the first three years and shall enjoy the 
land they plant in 1687 and '88 though it fall out in any other person's 
home-lot. 

"V. That within one month they will go personally to their new 
plantation and there make further agreements, division and settlements." 

Miss Larned, in her "History of Windham County," gives the 



12 



MOUKIS FAMILY. 



names of those who fulfilled the agreement and took personal 
possession of the new plantation, in the fuJ lowing order: 



Edward Morris, 
Ebcnt'zer Morris, 
James Corbin, 
Benjamin Sabin, 
Thomas Bacon, 
Joseph Bacon, 
Henrj^ Bowcn, 
John Bowen, 
William Lyon, Sen., 
AVilliam Lyon, Jun., 
Thomas Lyon, 
Mathew Davis, 
Ebenezer Cass, 
John Chandler, Sen., 



Peter Aspinwall, 
John Frizzel, 
Joseph Frizzel, 
Jonathan Smithcrs, 
John Butcher, 
Jonathan Davis, 
Jonathan Peaks, 
Joseph Peake, 
John Hubbard, 
George Griggs, 
Nathaniel Gary, 
Nathaniel Johnson, 
John Leavens, 
Nathaniel Sanger, 



Samuel Scarborough, 
Samuel Crafts, 
Samuel May, 
Samuel Peacock, 
Joseph Bugbee, 
John Bugbee, 
Arthur Humphrey, 
John Ruggles, 
Andrew Watkins, 
John Marcy, 
John Holmes, 
John Chandler, Jun. 



Of the exact date when the party left Roxbury and when they 
arrived at their destination, we have no account. We can only 
imagine them on their long, dreary, and unbeaten path through 
the wilderness, not unlike yet not as long as the journey made by 
the settlers of the Connecticut Valley fifty years before. They 
were probably four or five days on the way. Some provision for 
their shelter and entertainment had been made for them in " Wap- 
paquassett Hall," a rude structure built by the thirteen pioneers 
who had preceded them and had settled upon Woodstock Hill, or 
the " Plaine Hill," as they called it. On the 26th of August they 
held their first public meeting, and decided that they would take 
the south half of the grant for their portion, and that their home- 
lots should begin upon the "Plaine Hill." The next day they met 
again, and chose a committee to lay out the town, stake out the 
highways needed for the time, consider what land the planters 
should take, where the meetingdiouse should stand, and where the 
minister's lot should be. The lots were located, and it was decided 
that they should be drawn by lot. The committee chosen for 
these arrangements consisted of seven men, of whom Edward 
Morris was one. 

They met again August 28th, for the purpose of drawing their 
lots. And "after solemn prayer to God who is the disposer of all 
things," they drew lots "according to the agreement; every man 
being satisfied and contented with God's disposing." 

The lots had been located in three places — the "Plaine Hill,'' 



FIRST GEXERATION. 13 

the "Westward Hill," and the "Eastward Vale," and although 
the lots were drawn, it would seem from the record that the two 
oldest of the settlers, "William Lyon and Edward Morris, were 
given the privilege of selecting their lots, for in the apportionment 
the thirty-seventh lot was granted to Edward Morris " on the east 
side of the ' Plaine Hill,' bounded west by the great highway; 
south partly by land of Samuel Craft and Samuel Scarborough; 
east by common land; north upon the highway that goeth to the 
Great Pond." This was a thirty-acre lot with thirty-acre rights, 
and the same advance as the other nine lots allowed, namely, three 
acres for two — "which he hath desired, and was consented to 
by the Company of Planters." This lot was on the east side of 
Woodstock Street, and south of the road which leads from the 
street by the church to Woodstock Lake, as it is at this day. 
" William Lyon Senior desired to have the last or ninth lot on the 
west side of Plaine Hill which was allowed." The same day — • 
September 20, 1686 — "there was granted to Mr. Edward Morris 
a 20 acre lot lying on the east side of the Hill commonly called the 
Plaine Hill with all the rights and priviledges by a unanimous 
vote." 

The greater part of the early settlers of Roxbury came from 
the county of Essex in Old England ; a county noted in all the years 
of English history for the honest and fearless character of its meti — 
men who, during the time of the Reformation, endured the fagot 
and the rack for the sake of truth, and in after years contended 
with Prelacy for rights of conscience and private judgment, and 
when overborne sought a home across the seas in these western 
wilds. They were the highest type of Puritans, 

" Whom King and bishop's ban 

Drove to this shore, 
Whose prayer for Heaven's grace 
Rose in the tempest's face, 
Whose praises swelled the base 

Of Ocean's roar." 

It was said of the Roxbury people " they were the best that 
came from England," and of Roxbury an eye-witness said, "One 
might dwell there from year to year and not see a drunkard, hear an 
oath, or meet a beggar." Four of the Woodstock settlers were born 
in England: AVilliam Lyon, Edward Moi'ris, Henry Bowen, and 
John Chandler. Four others were from other towns than Rox- 



14 MORRIS FAMILY. 

buiy: Aspinwall, Butcher, Corbin, and Holmes. With the excep- 
tion of tliese four, all of them had sat under the teaching of Rev. 
John Eliot, and wore mostly, if not all of them, members of his 
church and l)r()ug]it to Woodstock that zeal and devotion for the 
moral and religious welfare of their fellow-men which character- 
ized the people of Roxbury in Eliot's time, and which has come 
down the generations. 

The Woodstock settlers at their first coming called their planta- 
tion by its Indian name, '■ Wappaquassett," but shortly, in com- 
memoration of their former home, they called it "New Roxbury." 
The next thing done after laying out and choosing their lots was to 
make provision for their spiritual welfare, and at their next meet- 
ing — November '.Id — three of their elders ; Edward Morris, 
John Chandler, and William Lyon, were chosen "to treat with 
young Mr. John Wilson of Medfield, to come and preach to them 
with a view to a settlement." but the negotiation was not success- 
ful. Meanwhile they held religious services in the open air around 
a rock on Plaine Hill known to this day as "Pulpit Rock." 

In the spring — the 29th of April, 1687 — they turned their 
attention toward means for supplying material food, and Edward 
Morris, Nathaniel Johnson, and Joseph White were appointed "to 
treat and agree for the building of a corn-mill." They found a 
miHer in the person of William Bartholomew, a former resident of 
Roxbury, but who had removed to Branford. His wife — Mary 
Johnson — was sister of Nathaniel Johnson, and second cousin of 
Edward Morris. The records of Woodstock for the year 1 688 are 
not complete. We however find that on March r2th, of that year, 
Edward Moi-ris was appointed chairman of a committee of seven, 
to lay out such highways as might be considered then necessary or 
needful in the future for the good of the town. The committee 
reported seventeen highways; their report was accepted and the 
highways laid out and constructed. 

In 1689, Edward Morris was chosen to fill for New Roxbury 
the office he had so long filled in Old Roxbury — that of select- 
man. The record is as follows: 

'•New Pio.\l)ury, July 8, 1689. — At a meeting of the inhabitants, tiiere 
was chosen as Selectmen, Edward Morris, William Bartholomew, John 
Chandler, Senior. Benjamin Sabin, and Joseph Bugbee, to manage the 
prudential affairs for the year ensuing." 

It may be thought singular that he was not earlier chosen to 



FIKST GEXEKATION. 15 

this position. The reason may undoubtedly be found in the fact 
that many of the magistrates and deputies in the General Court 
met with the disfavor and enmity of Andros and Randolph on 
account of their strong opposition to the surrender of the charter. 
Edward Morris may not have been as conspicuous in his opposition 
as some of them, but he had represented a town where the opposi- 
tion had been the strongest, and now as Andros had proclaimed 
that the inhabitants of towns should exercise no power, nor hold 
any meeting except for the purpose of choosing town ofBcers, and 
as the affairs between the towns and the government could only 
be transacted through the officers, it was undoubtedly best for the 
interest of the new settlement that Edward Morris should be in 
retirement. Hence, since his arrival in the settlement, he had 
been charged only with the duties of laying out lots, roads, etc. ; 
but no sooner was the government of Andros fallen and Governor 
Bradstreet recalled to his old position, than he was called to fill 
his old office. 

Up to this time the people of New Roxbury had possessed their 
plantation in peace. They had been disturbed, neither by the 
Indians nor by what was worse than Indians, the minions of 
Andros; but there arose apprehensions of trouble for which 
they in a measure endeavored to be prepared. The compiler, in 
searching the archives of Massachusetts, found the following peti- 
tion, concerning which nothing is found on the records of Wood- 
stock, although it bears the same date as the election for selectmen: 

" New Roxbury July y« 8 1689. 
"The Inhabitants of New Roxbury being mett together In y" sence of 
our great hazard and danger and our uncapacitie to defend ourselves, 
having no man Impowerd to order j^ Souldiers for our defence in case of 
y^ inimie should assault us and also understanding there was an order 
came forth from y« Gouvernour and Counsell and Representatives of y" 
Collony in case of vacancy of officers in any towne or villidg that might 
proceed to choyce of such officers as needfull, the Company presenting 
the men so chosen to y^ Gouvernour and Counsell for approbation, there- 
fore y' Souldiers on y aforesaid day make choyce of Edward ^lorris for 
Lef tenant and William Bartholomew Jr Ensign if authority approve them." 

The paper is endorsed as follows: 

" This is y« act and desire of y^ Soulgers of New Roxbury as attest 

"John Chakdler, 
"Joseph Bug bee, 
"BeiSiamin Sabin. 



16 MORRIS FAMILY. 

"The Representatives do allow and confirm the above nomination of 
officers in their respective offices. 

"Attest. EBENEZER PROUT, CTerA;. 

"July 13. 1689. 
" Consented to by y" Goiivernor, July 13, 1689. 

"ISA ADDINGTON, Secy." 

Hitherto Edward Morris appears on the records with the then 
very honorable and distinctive title of "Mr." Hereafter he 
appears as " Lieutenant." Just what the apprehended trouble was 
we have no account. History tells no story of it — doubtless it was 
the first muttering of the trouble with the Indians which a few 
years later — in 1696, — culminated in the destruction of the neigh- 
boring settlement of Oxford. 

Among the arbitrary acts of Governor Andros was his decla- 
ration of the invalidity of all land titles received from the Indians 
— titles which he said were "not worth the scratch of a bear's 
paw." Under this ruling of Andros many settlers of Massachusetts 
were obliged to pay heavily for new deeds for their lands which 
they had held possession of for many years. During Andros' ad- 
ministration, the settlers in New Roxbury had several times en- 
deavored to obtain a confirmation of their grant, but had en- 
deavoi^ed in vain. Even after the downfall of Andros they felt 
uneasy in regard to the matter, as appears by the following record 
of December 23, 1689: 

" At a meeting of the inhabitants there was chosen Leut. Edward Morris, 
Wm. Bartholomew Senior, John Chandler Senior and Nathaniel Johnson 
to go to the Court in behalf of the planters to get a confirmation to Or 
land; they to act according to their discretion, we being willing to stand to 
what they shall doe: this passed by a clear vote." 

"With the strong desire for the confirmation of their grant, there 
had also grown a desire for a change of name for their settlement, 
and at a meeting of the inhabitants held January 1, 1689-90, the 
committee appointed on the 23d of December to go to the General 
Court to obtain the confirmation of the grant were empowered to 
petition for a new name for the town. The memorial was signed 
by the committee "in behalf of themselves and the rest of the 
inhabitants of the plantation granted to Roxbury; that having 
fulfilled the conditions of the grant, Your Honors would please to 
grant us the confirmation according as it is already taken up West 
of the Quinabaug River, and grant us the priviledge of a town- 



FIRST GENEEATIOX, 17 

ship and give the town a name and grant it to be rate free for 
five years and appoint us a committee to regulate us in case of any 
difference that we cannot issue ourselves." The memorial was 
accompanied by one from Roxbury in behalf of the same purpose. 

The General Court granted the petition March 18, 1689-90, and 
Voted " That the name of the plantation granted to Roxbury be 
'Woodstock,' and that Captain Thomas Thui-ston, Lieutenant 
Samuel Barber of Medfield, and Josiah Chapin of Mendon, be a 
committee to advise and assist." 

Judge Samuel Sewell was at this time one of the Magisti-ates and 
suggested the name for the town, as appears from an entry in his 
diary : 

"March 18, 1689-90. I gave New Roxbury the name of Woodstock 
because of it nearness to Oxford, for the sake of Queea Elizabeth and the 
iiotal)le meetings that have been held at the place bearing the name in 
England." 

This mission of Edward Morris to the General Court was proba- 
bly his last appearance in that body of which he had formerly for 
so long a time been a member. 

A meeting of the inhabitants of New Roxbury was held March 
4, 1639-90, at which it was voted — "That every man shall bring 
in his accounts to the Selectmen." A record of March 31, 1690, 
is as follows: 

"We the Selectmen of Woodstock formerly called New Roxbury being 
met together have made a rate for levying the whole charge of s'' place on 
each inhabitant according to a voat of the town on March 4"' 1689, the 
sum of which amounts to £124, 10s, Od, in pay, the other part amounts 
to £31, 7s, 4id, in money which whole rates is delivered to Constable 
John Holmes to gather forthwith for the towns use as the Selectman shall 

order. 

"Edward Morris, 
•'John Chandler, 
"Benjamin Sabin." 

This was one of the last official acts of our ancestor which ap- 
pears of record. Again and for the last time he was chosen to 
head the affairs of the town. The record^says: 

" May 26, 1690. At a town meeting orderly called, there was chosen as 
Selectmen to order the prudential affairs of the town, Edward Morris, 
Benjamin Sabin, and John Leavens, for the year ensuing." 
3 



18 MORRIS FAMILY. 

The useful life of Edward Morris was now drawing to its close. 
In September following he died. We have no record of the date 
or cause of his death. "We may suppose it was after a short illness 
only, as he left no will, which he probably would have done had 
prolonged ill health foreshadowed death. 

The record of a town meeting held October 27, 1690, reads, 
"John Chandler is chosen Selectman in the room of Edward 
Morris lately deceased." 

A small rude stone in the burial-ground on Woodstock Hill, 
bears this inscription : 

HERE LIES BURIED THE 

BODY OF LEU' EDWARD MORIS 

DEOEAS'D SEPTEM*"- 

1689 

For many years this grave -stone was supposed to be the oldest 
one in Windham County, and the compiler believed this to be 
the fact until October, 1884, when on examining the records of 
Woodstock he found the evidence of the election of Edward Morris 
to office and of his discharge of official duties several months 
after the date on the grave-stone. This fact led him to believe 
that the stone was placed at his grave several years after his death, 
the exact time of which had been forgotten by those who had 
placed it there. In fact, the similarity of the lettering on this 
stone to that of the one next to it, that of Deacon Edward 
Morris, who died in 1727, leads to the belief that both were done 
by the same hand, if not at the same time. 

It is believed by many that Edward Morris was the first of the 
"Woodstock settlers to die. His death certainly is the first one 
mentioned in the records, and that only in the record of the town 
meeting held in October, 1690. There is no record of deaths 
before 1695. 

Time and the elements having nearly obliterated the inscription 
on the little stone, the compiler has had it recut; and in addition, 
that the name and memory of our ancestor may be perpetuated 
long after the ancient stone shall have perished, he has also placed 
over the grave a large and heavy granite tablet with a polished 
surface and bearing the following inscription : 




GRAVESTONE OF LIEUT. EDWARD MORRIS. 



FIRST GENERATION. 19 

HERE LIES BURIED THE BODY OF 

LIEU' EDWARD MORRIS, 

DECEAS'D SEPTEM''^ 

1690. 

SELECTMAN OF ROXBURY, 1674 TO 1687. 

REPRESENTATIVE, 1677 TO 1687. 

SELECTMAN OF "WOODSTOCK 1688, '89, '90. 

A LEADER OF THE SETTLERS OF WOODSTOCK, 

AND THEIR FIRST MILITARY OFFICER. 



Mrs. grace MORRIS 

DIED AT ROXBURY, JUNE 6, 1705. 



Woodstock was in Suffolk County, Mass., until the fonuation of 
Worcester County in 1731. The estate of Edward Morris was 
settled in Suffolk County. The following is from the probate 
records of that county: 

"At a County Court holden in Boston January 27,1690-1 Power of 
adraiaislration to all and singular the Goods. Chattels, rights, or debts of 
Edward Morris late of Roxbury, Dec'd intestate, is granted unto Isaac 
Morris his Eldest Son he bringing an inventory of the amt Estate and 
giving bonds to administer the same according to Law. 

"Attest JOSEPH WEBB Clerk:' 

There is no record of inventory or of the settlement or division 
of the estate to be found; possibly for the reason that under the 
administration of Andros the forms for proving wills and granting 
letters of administration on estates were not only changed, but 
were accompanied by exorbitant fees and charges, so that many 
estates were mutually settled by the heirs rather than to have 
them settled in court. Andros having been overthrown in April, 
1689, the charter having been temporarily resumed, and William 
and Mary having ascended the tlu'one, those conditions could 
hardly have existed at the time of the death of Edward Morris, 
but custom having once obtained, private settlements of estates 
may have for some time followed — it may therefore be presumed 
that his estate was so settled. We know that very soon after his 
death, his second son, Edwai'd,. came from Roxbury and sue- 



20 MORRIS FAMILY, 

ceedcd to his father's homestead in Woodstock, and that his old 
homestead in Koxbury passed into the hands of his two married 
daughters, Grace the wife of Benjamin Child, and Elizabeth the 
wife of Joshua Child, and subsequently, by purchase from them in 
1694, into the hands of Samuel Morris, his youngest son. 

How long our good but distant grandmother, Grace, the widow 
of Edward Morris, remained in Woodstock we do not know. We 
find her death, June 6, 1705, recorded in Roxbury, where, perhaps, 
she may have returned either to visit or make her home with her 
married daughters, the Childs, or with her son Samuel. The 
place of her burial is not known. The compiler supposes it to 
have been in the ancient burying-ground at the corner of Wash- 
ington and Eustis streets in Roxbury, or possibly in the burying, 
ground at West Roxbury Village; but no stone marks it in either 
place. 

Edward Morris was admitted to the church in Roxbury, Sept. 
12, 1658. His wife was admitted May 22, 1659. He was the 
oldest in church membership of the Woodstock settlers, and oldest 
but one in years. 

The children of Edward and Grace Morris, all of them born in 
Roxbury, and all of them baptized by Rev. John Eliot, the 
"blessed apostle," were as follows: 

3. Isaac', b. Sept. 16, 1656; bap. Sept. 19, 1658. 

4. Edward^, b. March — 1658-9; bap. March 13, 1658-9. 

5. Grace', b. Feb. Y, 1660-1; bap. Feb. 17; admitted to the 

church, Aug. 21, 1681; m. Benjamin Child, March 7, 
1682-3, and d. Dec. 10, 1723, in her 63"* year. Mr. 
Child d. Jan. 20, 1723-4, aged 66. They were buried 
in the old burial-ground, on Walter street. West 
Roxbury. 

6. Ebenezer', b. April 14, 1664; bap. April 17. 

7. Elizabeth", b. March, 1666; bap. March 25; m. March 9, 

1685, Joshua Child (bro. of Benj.); d. March 6, 1752, 
aged 87. Joshua Child, d. Jan. 18, 1729-30, aged 
73, — buried at West Roxbury. 

8. Margaket", b. Sept. 25, 1668; bap. Sept. 27; m. John John- 

son, son of Nathaniel Johnson, April 4, 1689. They 
settled in Woodstock. 

9. Samuel^, b. March 19, 1670; bap. April 19. 



FIRST GENEBATIOX. 21 

10. Martha^ b. Nov. 30, 1674; bap. Jan. 3. 1674-5; m. Dea. 
William Lyon, Jan. 6, 1714-15. Tbey lived in 
Woodstock. 
Ebenezer, Margaret, Samuel, and Martha, removed with their 
father to Woodstock. 

2. ELIZABETH MORRIS, sister of Edward (1), married 
Edward Cartwright of Boston, mariner, probably as early as 
April, 1663, as on the 16"* of that month he bought a house and 
lot at the north end of Boston. July 15, 1664, he gave to Edward 
Morris of Roxbury, and John White of Muddy Brook, as trustees 
for his wife, a deed of his property, "in consideration of consider- 
ble estate in money and household stuff, which I had with my wife 
when I married with her, who before marriage was called by the 
name of Elizabeth Morris." 

Edward Cartwright was supposed to be dead August 10, 1671, 
as the record of the Probate Court says he was ''miscarried in a 
boat at sea and is supposed to be drowned." 

Mrs. Cartwright died at Roxbury, Oct. 6, 1673, leaving an estate 
of £241 15s. 8d. which she bequeathed by will, Sept. 26, 1673, to 
her brother, Edward Morris and his family, and other relations; 
making her brother her executor. See Appendix "D" for copy 
of her will and inventory. 

The death of Mrs. Cartwright is recorded by Rev. John Eliot 
as follows : 1673, moneth 8, day 6, Ehzabeth Cartwright, sister to 
Edw*^ Morrice. 

Note. — John White was a connection of Elder Isaac Heath and so 
probably of Edward and Elizabeth Morris. 



SECOND GEa;eEATIOK 



3. Lieutenant ISAAC MORRIS, 1st son of Lieut. Edward 
(1), was born in Roxbury, Sept. 16, 1656; baptized Sept. 19. 1858. 
He married, March 2, 1680, Hannah, daughter of Jolm and Han- 
nah (Graves) Mayo. She was born Oct. 16, 1660; baptized Feb. 
24, 1660-1; admitted to the church. Aug. 4, 1689. She died Nov. 
5, 1701, and was buried in the old burial-ground, on the corner of 
Washington and Eustice streets. Her husband was admitted to 
the church in December following. 

John Mayo, the father of Hannah, was brought from England 
in 1633, when a child, by his step-father, Robert Gamblin. He 
married, May 24, 1654, Hannah, daughter of John Graves of 
Roxbury. He died in 1688. His widow died in 1699. 

Isaac Morris married 2d, Nov. 3, 1702, Mary (Ruggles) Pier- 
pont, widow of Ebenezer Pierpont, whom she married Oct. 20, 
1692. They had three children — John, Ebenezer, and Mary. 

Ebenezer Pierpont died in Dec. 1696. He was brother of Rev. 
James Pierpont of New Haven. Their father, John Pierpont, was 
born in England, and died in Roxbury in 1682. 

Mary Ruggles, born Dec. 8, 1666, was daughter of Samuel 
Ruggles of Roxbury, son of Thomas Ruggles, who came from 
England in 1637. 

Isaac Morris was an husbandman. He was a soldier in Captain 
Isaac Johnson's Company in the great Narragansett fight, in Dec. 
1675. He had previously served the same year in March, June, 
August, and November, under both Captains Johnson and 
Henchman. 

He was constable for Roxbury in 1687 and 1695; was 
selectman in 1696-7, and afterwards, from 1700 to 1705 — eight 
years. He was one of the exploring party of four sent out from 
Roxbury to the Nipmuck country in Oct. 1684, "to view the 
wilderness" and find a convenient place where the Roxbury people 
miglit take up their grant of land; but he never joined in the set- 



SECOND GENERATION. 23 

tlement. He was, however, an owner of land in the Roxbury or 
north part of Woodstock. His farm in Roxbury lay on the 
Dedham road, next east to that of his father's. He lived here 
until 1712, when, in August of that year, he sold his home and six 
and a half acres of his land to John Griggs and others represent- 
ing the newly organized Second Parish of Roxbury. The house 
became the first parsonage of the society. He removed to the 
"town street," where he lived until his death, Oct. 21, 1715. He 
left an estate of £501, 7s, Od, (see appendix E), on which his widow 
was administrator, Nov. 24, 1715. No record of the death of his 
widow is found, but her son Ebenezer Pierpont was appointed 
administrator on her estate Aug. 4, 1741. 

Isaac Morris had no children, unless one daughter. 

9. Hannah, who married Samuel Hemingway at Woodstock, 
Nov. 12, 1707, by Rev. Josiah Dwight. Hemingway died in 1720, 
and his wife probably died leaving no children, as there is found 
on the records of Worcester County the following, under date of 
May 25, 1742: "Samuel Morris of Killingly, Elizabeth Child of 
Brookline, County of Suffolk, widow; Edward Morris, oldest son 
and heir of Edward Morris; Ephraim Child, oldest son and heir of 
Benjamin Child, all of Woodstock: and Ebenezer Morris, oldest 
son and heir of Ebenezer Morris, being heirs of Isaac Morris, late 
of Roxbury, appoint Joshua Child of Brookline, County of Suffolk, 
attorney to sell land in Woodstock." 

There is no record of the death of Hannah Hemingway; but a 
small stone in the Morris family plot in the burial-ground on 
Woodstock Hill bearing the initials " H. H." may, perhaps, mark 
her grave. 

4. EDWARD MORRIS, 2d son of Lieut. Edward. [See First 
Branch.] 

5. GRACE MORRIS, 1st daughter of Lieut. Edward Mor- 
ris (1), born at Roxbury Feb. 7, 1660-1; bap. Feb. 17, admitted to 
the church Aug. 21, 1681. Married Benjamin Child, Jun., of 
Roxbury, March 7, 1681-2. Died Dec. 10, 1723, in her 63'' year. 

Benjamin Child was the son of Benjamin and Mary Child, who 
came to Roxbury about 1645, it is supposed, from Bury St. 
Edmunds, Lincolnshire, Eng. He was born in Roxbury in 1656, 
and with his brothei's, Ephraim and Joshua, was baptized by Rev. 
John Eliot, Feb. 27, 1659. He died January 20, 1723-4, aged 



24 MORKIS FAMILY. 

66, and with his wife was buried in the old burial-ground on 
Walter street, West Roxbury. 

CHILDREN. 

Ephraim Child, b. March 7, 1683; m. Priscilla Harris. 

Benjamin Child, b. July 19, 1685; m. Patience Thayer. 

Edward Child, b. Nov. 1, 1687; ra. Margaret Weld, Jan. 21, 
1712. 

Grace Child, b. Oct. 27, 1689; m. Timothy Walker of Rehoboth. 

Mary Child, b. Oct. 25, 1691 ; m. Peter Walker of Rehoboth. 

Ebenezer Child, b. Sept. 7, 1693; m. Elizabeth Bacon, Jan. 25, 
1720. 

Martha Child, b. Oct. 5, 1695; d. unmarried. 

William Child, b. Oct. 14, 1697; m. Deborah Goddard. 

Penuel Child, b. Sept. 3, 1699; m. Dorothy Dwight. 

Richard Child, b. Oct. 22, 1701. 

Thomas Child, b. Nov. 10, 1703; m. Anna Morris. 

Margaret Child, b. May 26, 1706; d. unmarried. 
The above had at least seventy-seven children, viz. : 

Ephraim Child had ten. 

Benjamin Child had seven. 

Edward Child ha,d Jive. 

Grace Child had seven. 

Mary Child had twelve, including two pairs of twins. 

Ebenezer Child had eleven. 

William Child had three. 

Penuel Child had ten. 

Thomas Child m. Anna Morris (his cousin), and had tivelve, — 
these, of course, had a double descent from Edward Morris. 

Of the above, Ephraim, Benjamin, Ebenezer, William, Penuel, 
and Thomas Child all removed to Woodstock, where their families 
became among the most numerous and prominent in Woodstock. 
Their descendants are almost innumerable, but it may be said of 
them and of the Child family generally, they have constituted a 
most respectable body of people, embracing every trade and pro- 
fession, some of them attaining high positions and noted fame. 

Grace (Child) Walker had tliirty-eight grandchildren, and Mary 
(Child) Walker had forty-seven. Both lived in Rehoboth, Mass., 
and llu'.'w posterity is numerous. 



SECOND OENERATION. 25 

Prominent among the descendants of Grace (Morris) Cliild have 
been the following : 

Sarah Child, daughter of Benjamin and Patience (Thayei-) Child, 
was born in Woodstock, Nov. 19, 1Y22. She married Feb. 19, 
1746, Jedediah Morse of Woodstock, a man of strong individual- 
ity of character. He was chosen selectman of Woodstock in 1763, 
and the same year was made deacon of the church. In 1764 he 
was chosen town clerk and representative to the General Assembly 
of Connecticut, and was re-elected for the following thirty years. 
In 1774 he was appointed a justice of the peace, which office he 
held for twenty-one years. He died in 1819, aged 93 years. His 
wife died April 5, 1805, aged 83. They had nine children. 

Rev. Jedediah Morse, the seventh son of Deacon Jedediah 
and Sarah (Child) Morse, was born in Woodstock, Aug. 23, 1761. 
He was graduated at Yale College in 1783, licensed to preach in 
1785, and, in 1786, after being for a short time a tutor in Yale Col- 
lege, was ordained a minister of the Gospel. In 1789, he was or- 
dained pastor of the First Congregational Church in Charlestown, 
Mass. In 1794 he received the degree of D.D. from the Univer- 
sity of Edinburgh. He was an active member of the Massachu- 
setts Historical Society, and of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, and other literary and scientific bodies. He was a strong 
and earnest advocate of the old Puritan character, and of the doc- 
trines of Congregationalism, and labored actively and earnestly in 
writing and preaching against the innovation of Unitarianism. In 
1805, he opposed the election of Rev. Henry Ware, D.D., to the 
Hollis Professorship in Harvard College; but was unsuccessful in 
his opposition. In that year also he established the Panoplist ; an 
orthodox religious monthly magazine which was continued for five 
years. He was prominent in the establishment of Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

Dr. Morse is however best known as " the father of American 
Geography." In 1784, while in New Haven, he published for the 
use of schools for young ladies, an 18mo geography ; the first work 
of the kind published in America. This was succeeded in 1789, 
by a larger work, " The American Geography," a volume of 534 
pages; 1793, the work was enlarged to 1,250 pages, and published 
in two volumes, 8vo, under the title of " The American Universal 
Geography," as it embraced a description of the whole world. In 
1796, a new edition appeared enlarged to 1,500 pages. Many 

4 



26 MORRIS FAMILY. 

other editions followed, and for more than thirty years " Morse's 
Geography" was the text-hook of all the schools. In 1797, he 
published " The American Gazetteer." the first work of the kind in 
this country, and which was conceived by him as early as 1786. 
His health failed on account of these hterary labors in addition to 
his pastoral duties, and in 1820 he resigned his pastorate and re- 
moved to New Haven. He was commissioned that year to visit 
the Indians in the Northwest, and in 1822 published an account of 
his missions in an 8vo volume of 400 pages. He also published 
" Annals of the American Revolution; " a " Compendium History 
of New England; " and a volume of " Sermons." 

Dr. Morse married, March 14, 1789, Miss Elizabeth Ann Breese, 
daughter of Samuel Breese of Shrewsbury, N. J. Her mother was 
the daughter of Rev. Samuel Finley, D.D., President of the Col- 
lege of New Jersey, a very distinguished clergyman of his time, 
who died in 176G. 

Doctor Morse died in New Haven June 9, 1826. He had seven 
children — five sons and two daughters — the daughters and one 
son died in infancy. 

Professor Samuel Finley Breese Morse, the eldest son and 
child of Rev. Dr. Jedediah Morse, was born in Charlestown April 
27, 1791. He was graduated at Yale College in 1810. In 1811 
he went to England with Washington Alston to study painting 
with that eminent artist, and the more celebrated Benjamin West. 
In 1813, he entered a picture, -'The Dying Hercules," in the exhi- 
bition of the Royal Academy, for which he was given the gold 
medal of the Adelphi Society of Arts. He returned to the United 
States in 181 i, and spent several years in portrait painting. In 
1826 he, with other artists, estabhshed the National Academy of 
Design. He was chosen the first president of that society, and 
held the office for sixteen years. In 1829, he again went to Europe, 
and studied his art in the principal cities of the continent. 

While in Yale College he devoted much time to the study of 
chemistry and natural philosophy, and in 1826 he turned his atten- 
tions to the subject of electro-magnetism. In 1832, while on his 
passage home from Europe, in the packet ship SuUy, the relation 
of electricity to magnetism (a topic which was at that time 
attracting the attention of scientific men in Europe) became the 
subject of discussion among some of the passengers, one of whom 
was Dr. Charles T. Jackson. The idea of a recording telegraph 



,r»s'l 'ihtit. 



4Slf 




SAMUEL F. B. MORSE. 



SECOND GENERATION. 27 

was suggested, and Mr. Morse made drawings to illustrate the sub- 
ject; from this dates the time of the conception of the electric tele- 
graph. In 1837, Dr. Jackson contested the originality of the in- 
vention, but that it did originate with Professor Morse, and was 
illustrated by him on board the Sully was proved in court by all the 
passengers on that vessel with one exception. On reaching home 
Mr. Morse began the construction of apparatus for a telegraph, and 
in 1835 he had so far completed it as to exhibit it in successful 
operation during that and the following year; the apparatus, how- 
ever, was rude, and the telegraphic circuit brief, only half a mile in 
extent, but not back again to the other point. He duplicated his 
instrument, and so completed his plans that in September, 1837, 
he exhibited the working of his system to many people at the New 
York University. 

Mr. Holmes Ammidown in his " Historical Collections " gives this 
anecdote relating to Professor Morse. A gentleman looking for a 
room to rent in the University, was taken by the janitor into one 
that had the appearance of an artist's studio, but which boi-e the 
evidence of untidiness and great neglect; everything in the room 
was covered with dust and cobwebs; dusty canvases faced the wall, 
and stumps of brushes and scraps of paper littered the floor. The 
only signs of industry were a few masteiiy drawings and studies of 
color pinned to the wall. 

"You will have an artist for your neighbor," said the janitor, 
<' though he is not here much of late; he seems to be getting rather 
shiftless ! he is wasting his time over some silly invention — a ma- 
chine by which he expects to send messages from one place to 
another. He is a very good painter, and might do well if he would 
stick to his business; but Lord," he added, with a sneer of con- 
tempt, " the idea of telling by a little streak of lightning what a body 
is saying at the other end of it ! His friends think he is crazy on 
the subject, and are trying to divert him from it; but he persists 
in it until he is almost ruined." 

I'he shiftless man was then President of the National Academy of 
Design, and was shortly to be known as the inventor of the won- 
derful electric telegraph. 

In October, 1839, Mr. Morse filed a caveat in the patent office to 
secure his invention, and in 1840 he obtained a patent covering the 
improvements he had then made in the apparatus. He applied to 
Congress at its session of 1837-8 for an appropriation to construct an 



28 MOHKIS FAMILY. 

experimental line of telegraph from Washington to Baltimore; but 
though the experiments made before a committee of Congress were 
successful, it could not be impressed with the conviction of the 
practical utility of the invention, and Congress adjourned without 
voting the appropriation. Failing with Congress, Mr. Morse then 
visited England and France, but could gam no exclusive privileges 
or any remuneration for his invention in those countries. He 
returned home disappointed but not disheartened. He again made 
application to Congress, and after a persistent struggle of four 
years. Congress, at the close of the session of 1842-3, placed 
$30,000 at his disposal for the experimental line from Washington 
to Baltimore. The line was completed in 1844, and the first mes- 
sage sent over the wire was, "What has God wrought! " 

Fifty years have passed since the first feeble but successful 
attempt was raade in 1835 of sending a telegraphic message over a 
circuit of half a mile. Now — in 1886 — more than five hundred 
tliousand miles of telegraph lines are in operation throughout the 
world. 

Titles, honors, and degrees were conferred upon Professor 
Morse from nearly every civihzed country, and a few days after 
his death, which occurred April 2, 1872, national honors in his 
memory were accorded him in the House of Kepresentatives at 
Washington. 

Professor Morse was a true American. He loved his country 
and its institutions, and held in esteem the principles of his New 
England ancestors. He was twice married; first to Miss Lucretia 
Walker, daughter of Mr. Charles Walker of Concord, N. H., Oct. 
6, 1818. By her he had three children : 

Susan Walker Morse, b. Sept. 2, 1819; married in 1839, 
Edward Lind, a merchant and planter of Arroyo in Porto Rico, 
W. I. They had one child, Charles Walker Lind, b. 1840. 

Charles Walker Morse, b. March 17, 1823. 

James Finley Morse, b. June 20, 1825. 

Mrs. Morse died Feb. 7, 1827, and he married 2d, Miss Sarah 
Griswold, Aug. 10, 1828. They had four children: 

Samuel Arthur Breese Morse, b. July 24, 1849; d. July 17, 1876. 

Cornelia Livingston Morse, b. April 8, 1851. 

William Goodrich Morse, b. Jan. 31, 1853. 

Edward Lind Morse, b. March 29, 1857. 

Sidney Edwauds Mokse, 3(1 son of Rev. Dr. Jedediah Morse, 



SECOND GENERATION. 29 

was born in Charlestown, Feb. 7, 1794. He graduated at Yale 
College in 1811. In 1815 he established the Boston Recorder, the 
first distinctively religious paper published in this country. His 
connection with that paper, however, was short. In 1823. in con- 
nection with his younger brother, Eev. Richard Gary Morse, he 
established the New York Observer, the first paper of the kind 
established in the State of New York. He possessed much of the 
geographical taste of his father, and compiled works upon physical 
and political geography. In 1829 he produced maps by a new art 
called cerography. He was also associated with his brother, Pro- 
fessor Morse, in the development of his inventions. 

Mr. Morse married April 1, 1841, Miss Catherine Livingston, 
daughter of Dr. Gilbert R. Livingston, of Philadelphia. Mr. 
Morse died Dec. 23, 1876. Children: 

Gilbert Livingston Morse, b. Feb. 8, 1842. 

Lucretia Morse, b. Dec. 28, 1843. 

Rev. Richard Cary Morse, 4th son of Rev. Dr. Jedediah Morse, 
was born in Charlestown May 6, 1797. He graduated at Yale 
CoUege in 1812, studied for the ministry, and was licensed to 
preach, but left the pulpit to join his brother in the publication of 
the Observer. He married in 1828, Lucretia Davis, and had three 
children : 

Elizabeth Morse, b. Aug. 5, 1827; m. Samuel Colgate. 

Charlotte Morse, b 1831; m. Rev. J, AspinwaU Hodge. 

Sidney E. Morse, b. Nov. 25, 1835; m. Nov. 1, 1859, Annie 
Church, daughter of John B. Church of New York. Her mother 
was daughter of Professor Benjamin Silliman of New Haven, and 
a descendant of the two Governors Jonathan Trumbull of Conn. 

For a further account of the descendants of Grace (Morris) 
Child, see ''Genealogy of the Child Family," by Ehas Child, Utica, 
N. Y. 

6. EBENEZER MORRIS, 3d son of Lieutenant Edward (1). 
[See Second Branch.] 

7. ELIZABETH MORRIS, 2d daughter of Lieutenant Ed- 
ward (1), b. March, 1666; bap. March 25; married, March 9, 1685, 
Joshua Child of Muddy Brook (Brookline). He was brother of 
Benjamin, and lived very near the Child homestead. He was a 
man much respected, and held numerous offices in the town. His 



30 MORRIS FAMILY. 

health became mucli impaired, and he became entirely blind. He 
died Jan. 18, 1729. His wife died March 6, 1754. aged 88. They 
were buried in the old burying-ground on Walter street, West 
Roxbury. Children: 

Joshua Child, b. June 20, 1687; m. Deborah Weld, Sept. 6, 1715. 

Isaac Child, b. Dec. 20, 1688; m. Sarah Newell, 1713; m. 2d, 
Ehzabeth Weld, 1716. 

Elizabeth Child, b. July 20, 1691; m. John May, Dec. 18, 1711. 
They removed to Woodstock, Conn. 

Mehitable Child, b. Oct. 27, 1693. 

Joseph Child, b. Jan. 7, 1696; m. Nov. 29, 1722, Abigail Bridges. 

Abigail Child, b. March 15, 1698; m. Nov. 12, 1719, James 
Draper. 

Ann Child, b. April 8, 1700; m. Joshua Murdock of Norton. 

Dorothy Child, b. May 5, 1701; m. May 2, 1723, Ebenezer 
Draper. 

Prudence Child, b. July 22, 1703. 

Samuel Child, b. Nov. 7, 1705; d. young. 

Samuel Child, b. Feb. 4, 1707. 

Caleb Child, b. Sept. 16, 1709; m. Rebecca Dana, Oct. 17, 1728. 

Of the above-named children of Joshua and Elizabeth (Morris) 
Child, the following had children: 

Joshua, Jr., five. 

Isaac, eight. 

Elizabeth (Child) May, twelve. 

Joseph, nine. 

Dorothy (Child) Draper, tioo. 

Caleb, seven. 

For a further account of this family, see "Child Genealogy." 

8. MARGARET MORRIS, 3d daughter of Lieut. Edward (1), 
born in Roxbury Sept. 25, 1668; bap. Sept. 27th; married April 
4, 1689, Deacon John Johnson, son of Nathaniel Johnson of Rox- 
bury and Woodstock, and grandson of Capt. Isaac Johnson. He 
was bap. March 21, 1669; admitted to the church April, 1693. 
He died Nov. 20, 1742. Margaret Morris was admitted to the 
church May 10, 1685. She died Sept., 1708. Children: 

Maroakkt Johnson, b. Dec. 27, 1689; m. Samuel Hemingway, 
May 5, 1714. 

John Johnson. 1). June 29, 1692. 

Mauy Johnson, b. July 28, 1695. 



SECOND GENERATION. 31 

Isaac Johnson, b. Dec. 23, 1697; ni. Abigail Peake, April 28, 

1720. 
Edward Johnson, b. Sept. 6, 1700; m. Sarah Manning, Feb. 

20, 1728. 
Anna Johnson, b. April 14, 1703. 

Mehitable Johnson, b. March 13, 1706-7, d. May 3, 1707. 
Mehitable Johnson, b. Sept. 6, 1708, d. Jan. 28, 1708-9. 

0. SAMUEL MORRIS, 4th son of Lieut. Edward (1). [See 
Third Branch.] 

10. MARTHA MORRIS, 4th daughter of Lieut. Edward (1), 
born in Roxbury Nov. 30, 1674; died in Woodstock May 9, 1756; 
married Dea. William Lyon of Woodstock, Jan. 6, 1714-15. She 
was his second wife. Deacon Lyon was son of John Lyon and 
grandson of William Lyon of Roxbury, the lifelong friend and 
neighbor of Edwin Morris, in both Roxbury and Woodstock, and 
who came to America at the age of fourteen in company with 
Elder Isaac Heath in the "Hopewell" in 1635. Deacon Lyon 
by his first wife, Debor&,h Colburn of Dedham, had eight children; 
by Martha Morris he had one son: 

Nehemiah Lyon, b. Oct. 16, 1720. He m. 1st, Mehitable Child, 
July 3, 1741. She was the daughter of his cousin, 
Ephraim Child, and was two years older than her 
husband; one was the grandson, the other the great- 
granddaughter, of Edward Morris. They had the 
following children: 
Martha Lyon, b. April 24, 1742; m. Eliakim May. 
Elisha Lyon, b. Feb. 11, 1744; killed on a training day. 
Amasa Lyon, b. July 23, 1745; m. Martha Dana. 
Aaron Lyon, b. Dec. 7, 1747; m. Elizabeth May. 
Levina Lyon, b. Aug. 17, 1750; m. Perley Corbin. 
Lyman Lyon, b. March 10, 1753; m. Hannah Corbin. 
Eliakim Lyon, b. Nov. — , 1755; d. unmarried. 
Mehitable Lyon, b. Aug. 14, 1756; m. Samuel Corbin. 
The descendants of these children are numerous. 
As instances of the industrious habits of this family, Miss 
Larned, in her "History of Windham County," quotes from the 
Cnnnecticuf. Courant of Jan. 9, 1766, that Miss Levina, above men- 
tioned, with Miss Molly Ledoit, spun and carded in one day twenty- 



32 MORRIS FAMILY. 

two skeins of good tow yarn. Miss Levina was then "sweet six- 
teen." . A few days afterward, her sister Martha, the oldest child 
of the family, then twenty-four years of age. not to be outdone by 
her younger sister, spun one hundred and ninety-four knots of 
good linen yarn in one day. Perhaps this inspiration of labor 
came from the double quantity of Morris blood in their veins. 

Deacon William Lyon died Sept. 27, 1741, in his 66th year. 
Mrs. Martha (Morris) Lyon, died May 9, 1756, in her 8 2d year. 



First Branch. 



DEACON EDWARD MORRIS, 



AND HIS 



DESCENDANTS. 



FIRST BRANCH. l.xb4:rOO 



4. Deacon EDWARD MORRIS, 2d son of Lieut. Edward 
(1), born Marcli, 1658-9, baptized by Rev. John Eliot March 13, 
1658-9, at Roxbury. 

Married May 24, 1683, Ehzabeth, daughter of Henry and BUza- 
beth (Johnson) Bowen of Roxbury; a descendant of Griffith 
Bowen, or ap Owen who came to Boston from Llanganydd in Gla- 
morganshire, Wales, and who was made freeman in 1G38. He 
Hved some years in Roxbury, but returned to England and was 
living in London in 1670. 

Elizabeth Bowen was born in Roxbury, Jan. 26, 1660-1, and bap- 
tized the next day. She joined the church Oct. 28, 1688. 

Edward Morris did not remove to Woodstock until after the 
death of his father in September, 1690. After his arrival there 
he seems very soon to have taken his father's place in the aiiairs 
of the town. He was chosen selectman as early as November, 
1G91, and appears to have held that office most of the time there- 
after, until 1722, having been chosen twenty -four times; his brother 

Note. Elizabeth Johnson was daughter of Captain Isaac Johnson of 
Roxbury, bora in England, came to New England with his father in 1630, 
made freeman March 4, 1635. Married Elizabeth Porter January 20, 1637, 
member of Artillery Company in 1645 and captain of it in 1667. Was rep- 
resentative in 1671. lie was killed by the Indians, at the head of his com- 
pany while storming their stronghold in the great Narragausett tight, Dec. 
19. 1675. 

Capt. John Johnson, father of Isaac, came over with Winthrop in Julj', 
1630, with his wife Margery, who died or was buried June 9, 1655. He 
married for his second wife Grace, widow of Barnabas Fawer. He was 
admitted to the church, Oct. 9, 1630, and made freeman May 18, 1631. 
He was a man of estate and distinction. He and Lieut. Richard Morris 
were representatives from Roxbury to the first General Court in 1634. 
He was a member of the Artillery Company in 1638, and Surveyor General 
of arms and ammunition, lie was called an " undaunlcd spirit." Iledied 
Sept. 27, 165U. 



36 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Ebenezer being associated with him for several years. He was 
frequently moderator of the town meetings, and of the meeting of 
the town proprietors ; he was also assessor, surveyor, town 
auditor, etc. 

For many years after the settlement of Woodstock the mother 
town of Roxbury continued to own the north half of the town, and 
its survey and division was never fully accomplished until 1707, 
when the two towns joined in the work. John Gore of Roxbury, 
was appointed surveyor. Roxbury appointed Edward Morris and 
Benjamin Griggs to act in behalf of that town in the survey and 
instructed them in regard to the marking of the trees on the 
boundary line — "R." for Roxbury and '* W." for Woodstock — and 
to keep an account of them to be entered on the records of the 
towns. After the completion of the survey the Roxbury portion 
of the town was divided into ranges and lots, and the lots offered 
for sale. Edward Morris was appointed by Roxbury to receive 
the money paid for the sale of the lots and was himself a purchaser 
of some of them. 

There is no accurate date on which to fix the organization of the 
Woodstock Church, its early records being lost. It has however 
been seen that one of the first acts of the pious settlers of Wood- 
stock was to negotiate for the settlement of a preacher, — in this 
act they failed, and it was not until 1690 that they were able to 
comply with the terms of their grant that they should settle and 
maintain an "able, orthodox, and godly minister," — whom they 
then found in the person of Rev. Josiah D wight of Dedham. He 
was the grandson of John Dwight, the ancestor of a family noted 
for its many clergymen and educators. Mr. Dwight was born in 
1761 ; graduated at Harvard College in 1687, and oi-dained in 
1690, at the age of 19. As there is no record of the organization 
of the church, there is also none of Mr. Dwiglit's installation, and 
it is to be presumed that several years passed before the church 
was organized — for although Mr. Dwight was preaching at Wood- 
stock in 1 690, we find several residents of the town joining the 
church at Roxbury as late as 1693, and Mr Dwight himself joined 
that church in ] 692. Although Mr. Dwight did not marry until 
169o, a house was built for him and partly finished as early as 
169'-'. In 1691 tlie town appointed Edward Morris, Jonathan 
Peake, John Levons. and Jolm Chandler, junior, a committee to 
superintend the building of a meeting-house. Its dimensions were 



[first branch.] second generation. 37 

to be thirty-feet long, by twenty-four feet wide, with fourteen feet 
stud. This edifice was doubtless of the plainest character ; and 
with occasional repairs it supplied the wants of the devout pioneers 
for nearly thirty years. 

The first deacons of the church were John Chandler and Benja- 
min Sabin. The former died in 1703; the latter removed to 
Pomfret in 1705. John Carpenter was appointed to succeed 
Deacon Chandler, and Edward Morris to fill the place of Deacon 
Sabin ; he was therefore the fourth deacon of the church. He 
joined the Eoxbury church May 1, 1691, doubtless on the eve of 
his removal to Woodstock. 

Mr. Dwight was an able man, with much energy of character. 
He was, however, eccentric in some of his ways, and possessed an 
infirmity of temperament which manifested itself on occasions of 
individual differences. He had, however, been settled nearly 
twenty years before much unharmony between pastor and people 
became manifest, although he had occasion at times to call the 
attention of his parish to the fact that arrearages of salary were due 
him. 

During the Indian troubles from 1690 to 1700, the growth of 
the town was greatly hindered, indeed it had fallen behind, so that 
the people deeply felt the burden of the support of the war and 
the church and minister. During all these times Mr. Dwight stood 
at his post and ministered to his people and bore his share of hard- 
ships with them. Later on came differences which opened breaches 
never to be repaired. Both pastor and people seemed to be at 
fault, but Mr. Dwight's temperament was not calculated to heal the 
troubles. At last in 1726, after a connection of thirty-six years, the 
relation was severed, and Mr. Dwight was dismissed by a vote of 
the town. He removed to Thompson, taking away with him all the 
records of the church, which were afterwards destroyed by the burn- 
ing of his house. 

In the meantime the old meeting-house had become so dilapi- 
dated that by 1717 a new one was found to be necessary. The 
question of locality was one difficult to decide, some of the people 
were in favor of the old site or one near it. Some were in favor of 
a spot near the burial ground, others were in favor of its removal 
more to the north, others more to the west ; some desired to have 
it placed by the pond in the "eastward vale " ; some had no choice 
in the matter. Two years were spent in wrangling over the mat- 



38 MORRIS FAMILY. 

ter. Finally it was left to a committee of three persons from out 
of town, who decided, December 28, 1719, in favor of the spot by 
the burial ground. A building committee was chosen. — William 
Lyon, Eliphalet Carpenter, and John Chandler, Jun. The frame 
of the house was raised in April, 1620, — Miss Larned says, '' with 
due feasting and hilarity," the committee being charged "to use 
their best prudence in the provision they make that it be done 
with frugality and honor " ; the charge to be borne by the public. 

The work went on rapidly to completion. The committee were 
instructed to give special attention to style and ornament. The 
pulpit was to be of suitable size, with quarter-round wainscot and 
fluted pilasters each side of its window. The deacon's seat, sound- 
ing board, and minister's pew were of the same work as the pulpit. 
The minister's pew was at the east end of the pulpit ; at the west 
end were the stairs with banisters, and the communion table. In 
front a body of seats was placed in the center of the house, the 
fore part quarter-round wainscot, and the hind part plain. The 
lower windows were cased after the present fashion ; the walls 
ceiled with boards to the lower windows. Six pillars were turned 
and set under the gallery. A breast work of timber was put in 
front of the gallery ; the stairs were half jilastered and wholly 
banistered. The space around the walls was reserved for pews. 
As soon as the house was covered the old meetinghouse was 
pulled down and its materials used in the new one. 

April 13, 1721, the committee reported the house in a fair way 
to completion ; the town voted liberty to the following sixteen per- 
sons to build pews; taking the minister's pew as a standard — Cap- 
tain John Chandler, "next the pulpit stairs." Then Samuel Morris, 
John Chandler, Jun., Samuel Perrin, Jabez Corbin, John Marcy, 
Deacon Edward Morris, Deacon John Johnson, James Corbin, 
Eliph. Carpenter, Jonathan Payson, Joseph Bartholomew, Edward 
Chamberlain, Joseph Lyon, Zechariah Richards, and John Morse. 

The house when finished was found to be expensive and its cost 
to weigh heavy on the inhabitants, and a petition was sent to the 
General Court through Captain Chandler, praying that the lands 
in the north, or Roxbury part of the town, might be assessed in 
the sum of £250, in order to relieve their burden. The petition was 
opposed by the Roxbury people on the ground that they were not 
consulted in the matter at the time the meeting-house was built, and 
tliat it ill no wise accuniniudatcd the land of the proprietors in the 



[first branch.] second generation. 39 

north part of the town, and that although "they were glad to hear 
that the Woodstock people had built a handsome and convenient 
building for the public worship of God afid believe that such a 
work could not be carried on without considerable charge — they 
could but think four or five hundred pounds at most, well laid out, 
might have built a very sufficient meetinghouse for Woodstock, 
and are surprised that the petitioners should mention the sum of 
six hundred and seventy pounds. Since many large meeting-houses 
in the country, especially in the remote towns had been built for a 
much less sum, and it had better become the good people of 
Woodstock to have first sat down and counted the cost before they 
had begun so great and chargeable a work." 

The petition was rejected, and the Woodstock people were left to 
bear their own burden. Fortunately a distribution of public money 
coming at this time, Woodstock appropriated her share — sixty- 
three pounds — towards the meeting-house. 

Samuel Morris was the deacon's youngest brother. In 1714, he 
had come to the banks of the Quinabaug, where he had purchased 
fifteen hundred acres of land on the Woodstock line and estab- 
lished himself as trader ; his wealth and position soon brought 
him into prominence. 

In 1723, Deacon Morris was appointed "to look after the meet- 
ing house, see that it be swept, and to keep the key, and take care 
of the cushing for twenty shilhngs a year." He was probably 
chosen for this purpose for the reason that his home was nearest the 
meeting-house, being a few rods south of it. These duties were in 
those days held in no little esteem or importance. 

This account of Deacon Morris is necessarily brief for the reason 
of the loss of the records of the church for the whole time with 
which he was connected with it, with the exception of the last year. 

Mr. Dwight was dismissed by a vote of the town which was 
almost unanimous, — fifty-seven to one. The town had requested 
him to unite in calHng a council, but he had refused. 

In December, 1726, the town voted, seventy-four out of ninety - 
five votes, in favor of callmg the Rev. Amos Throop on the follow- 
ing terms, — £300 for settlement, £100 salary, and £10 for fire- 
wood. Mr. Throop accepted the terms. The town was in haste 
for the ordination, as the ordinances had not been administered for 
nearly a year, and children born, continued unbaptized. The cove- 
nant and records being in the hands of Mr. Dwight, a new covenant 



40 MORRIS FAMILY. 

and agvecment, based upon the Cambridge Platform, was adopted, 
and Mr. Throop was ordained pastor, May 24, 1727. Deacon Mor- 
ris's association with the new pastor was very brief. He died 
August 29, 1727 — three months after the installation — at the age 
of 69. A year before his death he settled his estate by deed and 
gift, with the exception of some of his lands. He gave his home- 
stead of thirty acres with twenty-five other acres of land to his 
only son Edward, for the sum of £300, upon certain conditions, 
mainly the support of himself and his wife during their lives, and 
the payment of £30 each, to his daughters Abigail and Susanna, 
so as to make a sum equal to what he had given his other children. 
(See appendix F.) 

Mrs. Elizabeth (Bowen) Morris survived her husband sixteen 
years. She died Nov. 20, 1743, aged 83, Children : 

11. Elizabeth,^ b. Feb. 12, 1684, at Roxbury ; d. Feb. 19. 1685. 

12. Elizabeth', b. Feb. 9, 1686, at Roxbury ; m John Barthol- 

omew, Jan. 28, 1702-3, and died March 17, 1704, 
leaving no child. 

13. Edward^*, b. Nov. 9, 1688, at Roxbury. 

14. Grace^, b. Nov. 14, 1692, at Woodstock; m. Joseph Peake, 

Jan. 9, 1717-18, and had one child — Huldah Peake. 

15. Abigail^ b. Oct. 25, 1694 ; m. John Frizzel. 

16. SusAKNA^, b. Aug. 16, 1698 ; m. John Chm-ch. 

17. Prudence^', b. Aug. 9, 1702 ; m. Joseph Belknap. 

The grave of Deacon Morris in the burial ground on Woodstock Hill, 
is marked by a simple stone with the following inscription, 
HERE LIES BURIED THE 
BODY OF DEACON EDWARD MORRIS AGED 69, 
DECEAS'D AUGUST y« 29, 
1727. 
The compiler has also placed over this grave a heavy granite tablet 
bearing the following inscription: 

HERE LIES BURIED THE BODY OF 
Dea. EDWARD MORRIS 

AGED 69. 

DECEAS'D AUGUST Y- 29 

1729. 

HORN IN ROXBURY, MAR. 10, 1658, CAME TO WOODSTOCK IN 1G91. 

SELECTMAN TWENTY-FOUR YEARS, AND 

TWENTY-TWO YEARS DEACON OF THE CHURCH. 



Mrs. ELIZABETH (BOWEN) MORRIS 

BORN IN ROXBURY JAN. ,26, 1661, 
DIED, NOV. 20, 1743. 



^s. 



H.. Jk^ 4 





m 




^1^ » ■•— 






:jft 



jii^ 



^ 



^ > 



*. .^.' 






GRAVESTONE OF DEACON EDWARD MORRIS. 



[first branch.] third generation. 41 

13. Lieutenant EDWARD MORRIS, only son of Deacon 
Edward (4), born at Roxbury, Nov. 9, 1688, and baptized by Rev. 
Nehemiah Walter. He was married by John Chandler, Esq., Jan. 
12, 1715, to Bithiah Peake, daughter of Jonathan Peake, Jun., 
and Hannah (Leavens) Peake, and great granddaughter of Chris- 
topher Peake, who was made freeman at Roxbury, March 4, 1635. 
She was born in Woodstock, Feb. 20, 1697-8. Her father was one 
of the settlers of Woodstock under the grant of 1683. 

Edward Morris was chosen surveyor of Woodstock in 1718, 
constable in 1721, and assessor for the years 1738, and 1739. In 
the latter year he was chosen selectman, and annually thereafter 
until 1748. He lived with his father until the death of the latter 
in 1727, and continued to occupy the old homestead until Feb. 22, 
1732, when he sold the place to Joseph Wright, for the sum of 
£1300. The homestead was the spot where his grandfather set- 
tled in the beginning of the settlement in 1686, and was originally 
but thirty acres. It bad now become one hundred acres through 
additions made by his grandfather, his father, and himself. 
Immediately after his purchase Mr. Wright conveyed the property 
to John Chandler, but continued to occupy it. The mansion house 
was burned a few years afterward — March 16, 1737, at night — 
with the furniture and provisions which it contained, and Mrs. 
Wright, her son, and a negro servant perished in it. 

The same day on which Edward Morris sold the homestead he 
bought of John Chandler, as executor of Daniel Abbot for £1,100, 
a mansion house, and forty-nine acres of land adjoining on the 
east, the property of Joseph Bacon (which was the first lot drawn 
at the time of the settlement). The property purchased lay at a 
distance of a half mile or more from the main street, on Woodstock 
Hill, and on the road to West Woodstock. Here he lived until 

Note. Hannah Leavens was daughter of John and Hannah (Woods) 
Leavens of Roxbury. She was born Oct. 17, 1666, and died at Woodstock, 
Oct. 16. 1756, aged 90. 

John Leavens was son of John and Elizabeth Leavens, who came from 
England in 1632, in the William and Francis, and settled at Roxbury. 
His wife died and was buried Oct. 10, 1638. He married 3d, Rachel 
Wright, "a godly maid," says the Church record. He died Nov. 15, 
1646. John Leavens Jun. was born April 27, 1640. He married Hannah, 
daughter of John and Mary Woods of Sudbury, who probably came from 
England in the Hopewell in 1635. 
6 



42 MORRIS FAMILY. 

February 1, 1748, when he sold the place with several other parcels 
of land containing in all about one hundred acres, to Col. Nathan 
Payson, and removed to West Woodstock and settled about one 
and a half miles west of the village, between Bungee Brook and 
Still River, where he had long been in possession of land — some 
two hundred acres — half of which had once been his father's. 
This farm ran back to the line of the town of Union, Still River 
running through it. West Woodstock had been made a distinct 
parish in 1743, under the name of New Roxbury. After his 
removal there he became active in its affairs. 

The following votes are recorded in the records of the first 
parish : — April 21, 1745 : " Voted: that Edward Morris, wnth his 
wife and family sit in the pew which was his father's." 

March 13, 1748 : " Voted: that John Frizzel and his wife 
(Abigail Morris, sister to Edward) sit in Lieut. Edward Morris's 
pew till something further shall be done.'' 

In November, 1739, he was appointed by the town on a com- 
mittee of three to act as agents for and in behalf of the town to 
attend and wait upon the Commissioners appointed by the General 
Court of the Province of Massachusetts Bay and the Colony of Con- 
necticut, to settle the bounds of Woodstock. These agents were 
instructed to manage the affairs " according to their best judgment 
and discretion." 

Woodstock at its first settlement was supposed to have been 
within the territory of Massachusetts. This was also the case with 
the towns of Somers, Enfield, and Suffield. This was according to 
a survey made by Woodward and Saffery in 1642. A new survey 
made in 1713, threw nearly the whole of the territory of these 
towns into Connecticut, which had claimed the right to this terri- 
tory under the Warwick charter, the right of which she had pur- 
chased in 1644. In 1713 the two colonies made an agreement by 
which these towns should remain under the jurisdiction of Mas- 
sachusetts, under the conditions of a grant of land to Connecticut 
equivalent to the territory included witliin the bounds of the four 
towns. The land given as the equivalent, consisted of 107,793 
acres, embraced in the towns of Belchertown, Pelham, and part of 
Prescott, and Ware; being at that time ungranted and unsettled ter- 
ritory. In 1727 Connecticut sold these "equivalent" lands, or a 
large part of them, to individuals in Boston and that vicinity. This 
arrangement wus satisfactoi'y at tlu; lime, but in after years, on 



[first branch.] third gkneration. 43 

account of the increased expenses of Massachusetts and the taxa- 
tion consequent thereon, many of the inhabitants of Woodstock, 
Somers, and Enfield became desirous of annexation to Connecticut 
where the taxes were less burdensome. The matter began to be 
agitated in 1747, and in May of that year, the first meeting was 
held in Woodstock toward effecting the desired change of govern- 
ment. On September 12, 1749, the town voted to secede from 
Massachusetts and to come under the jurisdiction of Connecticut. 
The freeman's oath was administered to seventy-four persons, 
among whom was Edward Morris. At the same meeting, Henry 
Bowen and Colonel Thomas Chandler were chosen to represent the 
town in the General Assembly of Connecticut. This was the first 
representation of Woodstock in the legislation of that colony. 
Woodstock was now completely annexed to Connecticut and 
became a town in Windham County. This change fo government 
was not made without opposition on the part of a number of the 
leading men of the town who were still loyal and avowed their 
allegiance to the mother colony. 

Edward Morris seems to have taken no active part in these pro- 
ceedings, and it may be doubted if they met with his hearty appro- 
bation, though it doubtless received his acquiescence through the 
fact that opposition was useless. 

We have httle account of his hfe during its closing years. Of 
his fourteen children he had buried six — one son and five daugh- 
ters. One son and four daughters had married and removed from 
the town, two sons and one married daughter were yet at home or 
in his immediate neighborhood. He died Aug. 12, 1769, aged 
nearly 81 years, and was buried in the burial-ground on the west 
side of Bungee Hill in West Woodstock. His wife survived him; 
but how long, or when or where she died, the compiler has not 
been able to learn. His will, dated May 26, 1769, was proved at 
Pomfret May 1, 1770. By it he gave the use of his household 
goods and furniture to his wife; he also gave her his horse, a cow, 
and six sheep. He gave to his five daughters the household goods 
and furniture after the decease of their mother. He gave to his 
three sons all his tools and agricultural instruments; to his eight 
children he gave all his lands in Woodstock which he had not 
previously given away; also all personal property not bequeathed, 
and all his rights as proprietor in Woodstock, all to be equally 
divided between them. To his grand-daughter, Jemima Nichols, 



44 MORRIS FAMILY. 

he gave a small bequest. He appointed his son, Jonathan, sole 
executor. His children were: 

18. ELIZABETH^ b. Oct 12, IVIG; d. Aug. 9, 1745. 

19. Hannah', b. March 9, 1718-19; d. Sept. 2, 1736. 

20. Edward^ b. July 28, 1719. 

21. Grace\ b. July 4, 1721; admitted to the church July 4, 

1742; m. John Johnson. 

22. BITHIAH^ b. July 6, 1723; m. Hezekiah GoS. 

23. Isaac*, b. March 26, 1725. 

24. AsA^ b. Feb. 21, 1726-7; bap. 1727. 

25. Eunice^ b. Jan. 12, 1728-9; bap. same day; m. Hezekiah 

Smith. 

26. Martha^ b. April 4, 1731 ; bap. April 8; m. Comfort Rice. 

27. Mary*, b. June 1, 1733; bap. June 3; d. July 29, 1759. 

28. Jonathan^ b. May 13, 1735; bap. 1735. 

29. Priscilla\ b. April 28, 1737 ; bap. Aug. 14; m. Zebediah 

Marcy. 

30. Dorothy^ b. June 29, 1739; d. April 2, 1740. 

31. Hannah^ b. March 28, 1741 ; d. Aug. 14, 1745. 

15. ABIGAIL MORRIS, 4th daughter of Deacon Edward (4), 
born Oct. 25, 1694. Married John Frizzel, Nov. 10, 1726. He 
was born in "Woodstock Sept. 12, 1692. His father, Joseph Friz- 
zel, was one of the original settlers there. Children — all born in 
Woodstock: 

32. John Frizzel, b. July 13, 1727. 

33. Ebenezer Frizzel, b. Dec. 12, 1728; d. in the army, at 

Albany, Dec. 23, 1755. 

34. Joseph Fkizzel, b. April 5, 1731. 

35. Abigail Frizzel, b Nov. 19, 1733. 

36. Sarah Frizzel, b. Sept. 12, 1736; d. March 6, 1756. 
John Frizzel, Jr., m. Sarah , and had 

Ephraim Frizzel, b. July 5, 1751. 
John Frizzel, b. May 19, 1753. 

Joseph Frizzel, m. Huldah , and had 

Sarah Frizzel, b. Dec. 4, 1760; d. April 3, 1764, 
David Frizzel, b. April 10, 1762; d. Dec. 19, 1764. 

NoTR. — Sarah Peake, a younger sister of Bithiah (Peake) Morris, mar- 
ried Jolin Morse of Woodstock, Feb. 7, 1725. He was great-grandfather 
of Prof. Samuel F. B. Morse, the inventor of the electric telegraph. 



[first branch.] third generation. 45 



Priscilla Frizzel, b. May 4, 1764; d. Dec. 18, 1764. 

David Frizzel, b. Sept. 16, 1765. 

Sarah, 

Priscilla, 



[twins, b. July 22, 1767. 



16. SUSANNA MORRIS, 5tli daughter of Deacon Edward 
(4), b. Aug. 16, 1698. Married John Church of Killingly, Oct. 1, 
1736. KilUngly Churcb records say Dec. 25, 1736. The follow- 
ing baptisms are from those records: 

37. Abner, son of John Church, June 11, 1738. 

38. Asa, son of John Church, June 18, 1738. 

39. Susanna, wife of John Church, May 4, 1740. 

40. Anna, dau. of John and Susanna Church, Aug. 31, 1740. 

41. Samuel, son of John Church, Dec. 7, 1755. 

42. Jacob, son of John Church, March 5, 1758. 

The baptism of Susanna, \oife of John Church, would seem to be 
an error, as in all probabiHty she was baptized in her childhood. 
It is to be presumed that Susanna was a child. 

17. PRUDENCE MORRIS, 6th daughter of Deacon Edward 
(4), born in Woodstock Aug. 9, 1702. Married Joseph Belknap 
March 17, 1724-5. Children: 

43. John Belknap, b. Sept. 21, 1725. 

44. William Belknap, b. March 7, 1726-7; d. Sept. 17, 1727. 

45. Hannah Belknap, b. Oct. 21, 1728; and perhaps 

46. Sybil Belknap, d. June 8, 1739. 

Joseph Belknap received from his father-in-law by a deed, dated 
April 1, 1726, twenty acres of land. In the deed he is described 
as a "corwainer." In 1742, he sold his farm in Woodstock, and 
removed to Brimfield, Mass., where perhaps he had other children. 
He settled in that part of Brimfield which is now the town of 
Holland- 



FOUETH GE:i^EEATIO]Sr. 



20. EDWARD MORRIS, 1st son of Lieut. Edward (13), born 
July 28, 1719. Died Aug. 14, 1745; aged 26. Married, May 31, 
1744, Jemima Draper. One child : 

47. Jemima^ b. June 1745, bap. Oct. 18, 1747; m. 

Nichols. Widow Jemima Morris was admitted to the 
church, Oct. 11, 1747, and married Benjamin Chapin 
Jan. 3, 1750. 

21. GRACE MORRIS, 3d daughter of Lieut. Edward (13), 
born at Woodstock, July 4, 1721. Married, Oct. 31, 1743 (by 
Rev. Abel Stiles), John Johnson of Middletown, son of John and 
Mai-y (Davis) Johnson. They were fourth cousins. He was born 
Oct. 21, 1722. He owned lands in Middletown bordering on 
Haddam and Durham. He is called "Deacon" in the records. 
He was living in 1779, after which time there is no further record 
of him. Children — and perhaps others : 

48. JoHX Johnson\ b. Aug. 6, 1748. 

49. Lemuel Johnson^ b. March 14, 1750. 

50. Asa Johnson', b. Feb. 25, 1752. 

51. Maky Johnson^, b. 

52. Edward Johnson', b. 

22. BITHIAH MORRIS, 4th daughter of Lieut. Edward (13), 
born July 6, 1723. Married, by Rev. Abel Stiles, Oct. 31, 1743, 
Hezekiah Goff of Killingly. He removed to Middletown as early 
as 1 749, and settled on the west side of Connecticut River. Accord- 
ing to the Middletown records he had the following children : 

53. Betty Goff', b. Feb. 7, 1747. 

54. Asa Goff^ b. Jan. 7, 1749-50; d. June 26, 1751. 

55. Bitiiiaii Goff^ b. Feb. 2, 1752; m. Asa Morris. 
50. IIezekiau Goff^, b. June 26, 1754. 

57. Jonathan Goff\ b. March 4, 1757. 



[first branch.] fourth generation. 47 

58. William GoffS b. May 14, 1759. 

59. David Goff^ b. Oct. 16, 1761. 

60. Hannah Goff^ b. Feb. 26, 1764; m. Michael Bi'addock. 

61. Sarah GoFF^ b. July 3, 1766. 

62. Elizabeth Goff^ b. April 26, 1769. 

There may have been other children born in Killingly or Wood- 
stock. Mr. Goff died before 1787. His widow was living in 
December, 1793. The Genealogist of the Strong family says he 
was great-grandson of Major- General Wm. Goffe, the regicide. 

Hezekiah Goff, Jun. (56), removed to Vermont in 1802, and set- 
tled on Mill Creek, in the southwest part of Richford. He, with 
his son Hezekiah and his cousin Asa Morris (who married his 
sister Bithiah), and his son Edward Morris, were among the early 
settlers of Richford. He built a saw -mill and grist-mill on Mill 
Creek. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and when the 
war of 1812 broke out, he enlisted in the army for five years, with 
his sons Seth and Jonathan; John Parker, his sister's son, and 
Elias Corlis, a grandson. During his absence from home, his prop- 
erty ran down and he lost his land. He died Feb. 1848, aged 
nearly 94. His wife died in 1815, while he was in the army. 
They had eighteen children, of whom were Hezekiah, Jun. — who 
died in 1819, leaving a widow and eight children — Seth, Jonathan, 
Wilham, — who was in his 86th year in 1869 — and Clarissa, who 
married Bradford Powell of Richford, in 1803. 

23. ISAAC MORRIS, 2d son of Lieut. Edward (13), born 
on Woodstock Hill, March 26, 1725. Intention of marriage with 
Sarah Chaffee of Woodstock, published Oct. 18, 1748. She was 
the only daughter of Joseph and Hannah (May) Chaffee, formerly of 
Barrington, Mass., and was born there Jan. 18, 1729. Isaac Morris 
was a farmer. At the time of his marriage he lived at New Rox- 
bury — afterwards West Woodstock — to which parish his father 
had removed early in that year, probably in March; for on the 
8th of that month his father gave him a deed of one hundred acres 
of land in that parish, being a part of his then homestead; the 
consideration was £400 old tenor, and was to be accounted as part 
of his portion of his father's estate. He had other land, also The 
one hundred acres subsequently appears as part of his father's 
estate, and was deeded to his brother Jonathan. Ho probably 
re-conveyed it to his father on his removal frum Woodstock to 



48 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Springfield, Mass., in 1761. The part of Springfield to which he 
removed was then an unorganized district not belonging to any 
town, and known as "Wales." It was a territory lying between 
Somers on the south and Springfield on the north, and after the 
organization of Wilbraham, was annexed to that town. The spot 
wliere Isaac Morris settled was in the extreme southeastern part of 
" Wales," and on the iVIonson line. The probable cause of his 
removal to " Wales " was that his wife might be near her mother 
— then a widow — who, with her husband, Joseph Chaffee, had 
removed to this section about 1754. Joseph Chaffee died in 17 60. 
Two deeds from Hannah Chaffee — widow — and Joseph Chaffee, 
administrators of the estate of Joseph Chaffee, dated Aug. 18, 
1761, convey to Isaac Morris ninety-two acres of land, sixty of 
which was within the limits of Monson, then Brimfield. He 
subsequently bought other land. His farm contained in all one 
hundred and thirty-one acres, eighty-five of which were within the 
Monson limits The spot where he located was a romantic one at 
the base of Rattlesnake and Sheep Mountains, overlooking the 
Scan tic Valley, to Pine, Ball, and South Mountains on the west, 
at the foot of which lay the farm of his father-in-law. A large 
part of the cultivated land has grown up to woods, and the house 
in which he lived, and also that of his son Darius, have long since 
disappeared. Nothing remains to indicate the locality of the habi- 
tations but a portion of the walls of the cellars, and a few nearly 
dead trees of the orchard. 

Isaac Morris died Jan 10, 1778, at the age of 53. His wife, 
after a widowhood of twenty-six years, married Hon. John Bliss, 
Sept. 10, 1804. She survived him, and was a second time a widow. 
She died April 27, 1818, aged 89. She was a tall, fine looking 
woman, with dark complexion, hair, and eyes, probably the features 
of the Chaffee, and perhaps of the May family. The descendants 
of Isaac Morris of this complexion derive it from her. 

Tlie records of the first church in AVoodstock liaving been 
destroyed, we have no record of Isaac Morris' admission to the 
church. His wife, however, joined the West Woodstock church, 
April 30, 1750. Wliile in Woodstock, Isaac Morris held several 
parish offices. Children: 

(;?>. Hannah-', li .laii 13, 1750, in Woodstock; bap. ]\Iay 1.'!. 

64. Darius', b. .^'ept. 15, 1751, " ■' •' Oct. 20. 

65. Lsaac", b. Sept. 10, 1753, " " " Oct. 14. 



[first bran'ch.] fourth generation. 49 

6(5. Joseph'^ b. March — , 1755, in Woodstock; bap. March 30. 

67. Edward^ b. Dec. 12. 1756, " " 

68. Elizabeth^ b. July 10, 1759, " " " Aug. 19; 

died in Wilbraham, March 24, 1764. 

69. Sarah^, b. July 23, 1761, in Woodstock, m. Stephen Pease 

of Somers, had one child, Sarah Pease, b. 1786, d. July 
10, 1820. 

70. Eunice^ b. May 13, 1763, in "Wales." 

71. Chester^, b. April 16, 1765, in " Wales." 

72. Ebexezer\ b. March 15, 1767, in "Wales" 

73. Elizabeth^ b. Feb. 17, 1769, in "Wales." 

74. Ephraim', b. March 17, 1772, in " Wales." 

The records of the Probate Court of Hampshire County, state 
that Sarah Morris was appointed administratrix on the estate of 
Isaac Morris, Sept. 1, 1778, and was also made the guardian of 
Chester, Elizabeth, and Ephraim, minor children. By the inven- 
tory returned to the court, Nov. 1, 1778, the amount of the estate 
was £9'99 7s. 6c/., of which £850 was in land. The debts were 
£130 2s. 2d. Among the items of personal estate mentioned are 
"one black straight bodied coat 40/, 1 Vest 10/, a pair of old 
leather breeches, 6/." The distribution of the estate made Nov. 

Note. Joseph Chaffee was born in Swanzy, Mass., Jan. 17, 1705. He 
was a son of John and Sarah (Hills) Chaffee, and grandson of Joseph and 
Anne (Martin) Chaffee; Joseph Chaffee being the son of Thomas Chaffee, 
who settled in Hingham in 1637, and who had i-emoved to Swanzy in 1660. 
He was living in 1080. Joseph Chaffee married Hannah May, a daughter 
of Ephraim May of Rehoboth, sou of John May of Roxbury, and grand- 
son of John May of Mayfield, County of Essex, England; born in 1590, 
and came to New England in 1640, and settled at Roxbury. In 1729, 
Joseph Chaffee removed from Barrington, Mass., to Woodstock, and set- 
tled in the West parish. While living here he filled several parish offices. 
In Dec. 1751, he bought of the heirs of Peter Tufts of Ashford, one 
hundred and ninety-one acres of land in the district of Wales, on the 
southern border of Springfield, and lying on the Springfield line. In 1754 
he bought of Ebenezer Jones of Wales, one hundred and fifty acres more, 
and in 1756, he bought of Rev. Stephen Williams of Long Meadow, one 
hundred and fifty acres lying east of and adjoining his first purchase, and 
bounded by the lines of Springfield and Brimfield (Monson). He had ten 
children. He died of small pox, March 15, 1760, in his 59th year. His 
widow married Ensign Joseph Sexton, and died May 26, 1784, in her 80th 
year. He left an estate of £423 2s. 9rf., with an indebtedness of £246 14s. 
Qd. His widow and son Joseph were administrators. 
7 



50 MORRIS FAMILY. 

3, 1778, gave Sarah the widow, one-third during life, £283 5.?. Sd. 
Darius, two-elevenths, or a double portion, £103 6s.. Hannah 
Da\as, Isaac, Edward, Sarah, Eunice, Chester, Ebenezer, Elizabeth, 
and Ephraim, one-eleventh each, £51 IO5. .3r/. Mrs. Morris, 
hardly satisfied with the distribution, petitioned the court that as she 
was '' left under something of Low and Indigence circumstances " 
she might be allowed something out of the personal estate, and 
was allowed the amount of £22 lis., viz.: "one bed and clothing, 
£6 lOs. ; one ditto, £3; 4 black chairs 24/; 3 old chairs; 1 table, 
10/; 1 pewter platter, 20/; 1 ditto, 8/; warming pan, 10/; slice 
and tongs, 22/; tramill, 4/; 3 knives and forks, 15/; 3 old ditto. 
2/; 5 plates, 20/; 9 spoons, 6/; spoon, 3/; 1 large wheel; 1 foot 
wheel." 

24. Lieutenant ASA MORRIS, 3d son of Lieut. Edward (13), 
born Feb. 2, 1726. Published Dec. 19, 1747. Married Jan. 
14, 1747-8, Anna Child, daughter of Samuel and Kiziah Child of 
Woodstock. He joined the West Woodstock church, Feb. — , 
1755. He was a volunteer in Capt. Nathaniel Marcy's company, 
in the march from Woodstock for the relief of Boston at the time 
of the Lexington alarm in April, 1775. He enlisted again May 
1 St, and was appointed 2d Lieut, of the 7th company — Capt. 
Ephraim Manning — in the 3d regiment, under the command of 
General Putnam, and was with him in the battle of Bunker Hill, 
and died while in the service, on the 30th July following. He 
left an estate of £500, on which his widow was administratrix, 
Sept. 5, 1775. His widow, who was born in Woodstock, Jan. 8, 
1729, removed in 1799, with her two remaining sons, Asa and 
Wyman, to Pomfret, Vt., where she died, March 24, 1811, aged 
82. Children: 

75. Edward'', b. Sept. 25, 1750; bap. Oct. 28, 1750; d. Nov. 

18, 1756. 

76. Wymax*, b. Oct. 17, 1753; bap. Oct. 28, 1753; d. Nov. 29, 

1756. 

77. AsA^ b. Dec. 4, 1755; bap. Dec. 14. 

78. Patta*, b. March 16, 1761; bap. March 22; d July 28, 1766. 

79. AsENATH^, b. Feb. 6, 1763; bap. April 3; d. April 30, 1766. 

80. Wyman\ b. Feb. 21, 1771; bap. March 7. 

25. EUNICE MORRIS, 5th daughter of Lieut. Edward (13), 
horn Jan. 12, 1728-9; baptized the same day. Married Lieut. 



("FIRST BRANCH.] FOURTH GEXERATION. 51 

Hezekiah Smith of Woodstock, Jan. 14, 1747-8; admitted to the 
church Dec. 27, 1745. Chiklren: 

Hannah Smith^ b. March 19, 1749; died soon. 

81. Abigail SM1T^^ b. Dec. 5, 1749; bap. Dec. 10, 

82. Oren Smith^ b. March 10, 1751; bap. May 24. 

83. Hezekiah Smith^, b. Dec. 2, 1752; bap. Jan. 7, 1753. 

84. Hannah Smith^ b. Feb. 11, 1756; bap. March 28. 

85. Sabina Smiths, ^^ ]vjqv_ iq, ]762; bap. Nov. 21. 
85^. Calvin SMITH^ b. 1764; bap. Aug. 12. 

Lieut. Smith was appointed 2d Lieut. 6th Co., 3d Reg't, in 1758, 
and 1st Lieut, in 1761. He had served in the French and Indian 
war. This family is supposed to have removed to Coleraine, Mass. 

26. MARTHA MORRIS, 6th daughter of Lieut. Edward (13), 
born April 4, 1731. Married Jan. 1, 1755, Comfort Rice, son 
of Gershom Rice of Worcester (now Auburn). He was born 
Aug. 10, 1729. He died Aug. 1, 1816, aged 87. Mrs. Rice died 
June, 1812, aged 81. Children: 

86. Esther Rice^ b. Dec. 29, 1755; m. Daniel Gale of Peters- 
ham. She died in 1848, in her 93d year. 

87. Jonathan RICE^ b. July 24, 1757; d. April 22, 1759. 

88. Mary RiceS b. Feb. 27, 1761; m. Timothy Bancroft of 

Auburn. She died in 1844, in her 84th year. 

89. Nancy Rice', b. Oct. 27, 1762; m. John Stone, and removed 

to Worthington, Mass. She died Feb., 1849, in her 87th 
year. 

90. Jonathan Rice^ b. March 7, 1764; m. Mary Stephens; d. 

aged 71. 

91. Darius Rice^, b. Nov. 2, 1766; m. Anna Stephens; d. aged 

34. 

92. Betsey Rice', b. May 27, 1768; m. Thomas Hart. 
92i. Peter Rice^, b. July 22, 1771; m. Mary Hart. 

93. Edward Rice*, b. March 27, 1773; m. Miriam Gleason. 

94. Martha Rice'*, b. ; m. James Hart; d. aged 

68. 
The Rice family settled at Packachoag Hill in Worcester m 
1755. The above family was one of rare longevity. Betsy Hart 
was living in 1856, at the age of 88. Edward was also then living 
at the age of 83. 



52 MOHUIS FAMILY. 

2S. Captain JONATHAN MORRIS, 4th son of Lieut. Edward 
(13), born May 13, 1735, died at Sturbridge, Mass., March 8, 1813, 
in his 79th year. Married, Jan. 12th or 26th, 1758, Mary Skinner 
of Woodstock, daughter of Abraham Skinner, and sister of Deacon 
William Skinner of Woodstock; natives of Maiden, Mass. She 
died at Sturbridge in 1818, and was buried beside her husband in 
the center burying-ground, south of the church, so the compiler 
was told; but he never succeeded in finding the grave of either of 
them. He joined the West Woodstock church, June 10, 17G4. 
Jonathan Morris received from his father, Sept. 12, 1757, four 
months before his marriage, a deed of "one-half of my housing 
and land in AVoodstock," consisting of 110 acres; this land was in 
West Woodstock. Oct. 4, 1765, his father gave him a deed of 
the remaining half of his farm, and also fifty acres of other land. 
In 1759, he was chosen surveyor, and afterward held school and 
society offices. He was appointed Lieutenant in Oct., 1774, and 
was in Captain Nathaniel Marcy's company which marched from 
Woodstock at the Lexington alarm, and also lieutenant of a com- 
pany in the 11th Connecticut Regiment, in the campaign in West- 
chester County, Sept., 1776, and was afterwards appointed captain. 
July 11, 1780, he sold his farm, then consisting of two hundred 
acres, to Ebenezer Coburn, and on April 3, 1781, he brought of Ben- 
jamin Town of Sturbridge, for £400 in silver, 125 acres of land 
which had been sold for taxes, and which originally was part of a 
large tract of land owned by Governor Winthrop of Connecticut, 
and removed to Sturbridge. He was the executor on his father's 
estate. In person he was tall, with a large and erect frame. His 
complexion was light, his eyes blue, his hair brown; at the time 
of his death he had become gray and bald. His granddaughter. 
Miss Thankful Allen of Worcester, from whom the compiler 
received this personal description, said that in his old age he was 
bright and cheery. He was fond of music and singing, and was 
himself "a great singer." He died of a throat disease, something 
like quinsy, after an illness of two or three days. Children: 

95. Jonathan-^ b. , 1758; bap. July 8, 1764. 

96. Polly5, b. Oct. 28, 1760; bap. July 8, 1764. 

97. BITnIAIl^ b. March 9, 1763; bap. July 8, 1764; d. Oct. 15, 

1766. 

98. Cylenda*, b. May 6, 1765. 

99. BiTniAH\ b. Aug. 13, 1767; bap. Oct. 11. 



[first branch.] fourth generation. 53 

100. Patty', b. Dec. 2, 1767. 

101. W alters, b. July 15, 1772; bap. Sept. 6. 

102. Axna^, b. July 28, 1775; bap. Aug. 20; m. Feb. 15, 1801, 

Stephen Pierce, and removed to Sullivan, N. H. 

103. Esthers, -^^ . j^^p. May 16, 1777. 

104. Betsey^, b. Aug. 20, 1781; d. unmarried. 

29. PRISCILLA MORRIS, 8th daughter of Lieut. Edward 
(13), born April 28, 1737. Married Zebediah Marcy of Wood- 
stock, Aug. 21, 1754. Mr. Marcy was a farmer. He removed to 
Stafford in 1779, and to Willington in 1782. He died in 1806. 
Children: order of birth not known. 

105. Zebediah Marcy^, b. Feb. 15, 1756; d. young. 

106. Molly Marcy^, b. 1757. 

107. Priscilla Marcy^, b. Jan. 6, 1760; m. Jedediali Converse. 

108. Zebediah Marcy^, b. July 21, 1761; d. 1851. 

109. Aden Mabcy^, d. young. 

no. Laura Marcy^, ra. Dustin of Willington. 

111. Hannah Makcy*, m. Daniel Dimock. 

112. Dorcas Marcy*, m. Joseph Lamb of Vt. 

113. Martha Marcy^, m. Thomas Knowlton of Willington, 

son of Col. Thomas Knowlton, killed at battle of 
Harlem, 1777. 

114. Thomas Marcy^, d. 2 years old. 

115. Aden Marcy*. 

116. Polly Marcy*, m. James Curtis, Marcellus, N. Y. 
Zebediah Marcy was son of Samuel, and grandson of John 

Marcy, the first of that name in Woodstock. 



FIFTH GEIN^EEATIOIS. 



63. HANNAH MORRIS, 1st daughter of Isaac (23), born in 
"Woodstock, Jan. 13, 1750; bap. May 13th. Married John Davis of 
Wilbraham. He died Feb. 25, 1826, aged 75. She died August 
18, 1825, a very triumphant Christian death, after years of great 
trial. Children: 

117. RoxAXNA Davis", b. ; m. Richard Firmin. 

118. Betsey DAVIS^ b. 1779; m. Richard Firmin March 25, 

1803. 

119. Joseph Davis", b. 

120. John Davis", b. 

121. Asa Davis", b. August, 1785. 

122. Sally Davis", b. 1791; d. Aug. 30, 1860, aged 69. 

64. DARIUS MORRIS, 1st son of Isaac (23). bom Sept. 15, 
1751, in Woodstock; bap. Oct. 20, 1751; died in South Wilbra- 
ham Feb. 6, 1793. Married (1st) Elizabeth Fisher of Woodstock; 
she died in South Wilbraham Dec. 27, 1777, aged 24. Married 
(2d) — published Aug. 8, 1779, — Rebecca Chandler of Wood- 
stock; she died in South AVilbraham, Aug. 13, 1835, aged 78. 

CHILDREN BY ELIZABETH: 

123. Sylvester", b. Aug. 24, 1775. 

124. AsENATH", b. Aug. 27, 1777; m. Henry Cady of Stafford, 

and removed to Butternuts, Otsego Co., N. Y. 

CHILDREN BY REBECCA: 

125. Betsey", b. Aug. 13, 1780; m. Dr. Isaac S. Wood of 

Wilbraham, March 13, 1803. 

126. Joseimi", b. Feb. 27, 1782. 

127. Rebecca", b Jan. 21, 1784; m. Jesse Merwin. 

128. Darius", b. March 18, 1786; d. July 10, 1786. 

129. Fanny C", b. April 27, 1787; m. Oct. 26, 1806, Elisha 

Bowen of Reading, Vt. 



[first braxch.] fifth generation. 55 

130. Sylenda'', b. Aug. 19, 1789; m. Noah Merwin, 

131. Hannah", b. July 10, 1791; m. James Adams. 

132. Sarah*', b. June 25, 1793; m. Increase Clapp of South 

Windsor, Conn. 

Darius Morris' will was dated Jan. 16, 1798. The appraisal of 
his estate was £426 lis. dd. His debts were £129 Os. Id. The 
records of the court state that the widow was appointed guardian 
of Asenath, and Martha, more than 14 years of age, Elizabeth 13, 
Rebecca 9, Irene 6, Silenda 3, Hannah 1. Edward Morris was 
appointed guardian of Edward Sylvester 17, and Joseph 11. It 
appears from the above that there was a daughter Martha, of whom 
there is no other account. By Irene, Fanny probably is intended 
or substituted. Irene in the record is spelled luereny. 

Darius Morris held several town offices in Wilbraham; was con- 
stable, highway surveyor, etc. 

65. ISAAC MORRIS, 2d son of Isaac (23), born in Wood- 
stock, Sept. lOth; bap. Oct. 14, 1753. Married in 1776, Irene 
Johnson of Stafford, Conn. House carpenter; lived in South Wil- 
braham and Longmeadow. He volunteered at the Lexington 
alarm in April, 1775, and also at the Bennington alarm in Septem- 
ber and October, 1777. He was a man of sincere piety and of 
great purity and excellency of character. He died in Long- 
meadow June 26, 1805, aged 51. By his will, dated Oct. 8, 1803, 
his wife, Irene Morris, was appointed executrix. Jonathan Torry 
of Wilbraham, was appointed guardian of his three younger chil- 
dren, Feb 4, 1808. Mrs. Morris died of small-pox in Monson, 
Aug. 14, 1842. Children: 

133. Polly", b. Dec. 19, 1781; m. Roswell Davis of Stafford, 

Conn. 

134. Sally®, b. 1783; m. John Hitchcock of Monson. 

135. Eunice®, b. Aug. 4, 1786; m. Albon Comstock of West- 

field. 

136. Isaac®, b. April 8, 1792. 

137. Irene®, b. May 19, 1793; m. Arnon Comstock of West- 

field. 

138. RoxANA®, b. June 22, 1795; m. Joel Hitchcock of Monson. 

66. JOSEPH MORRIS, 3d son of Isaac (23). born March, 
1755, in Woodstock. He was in the army of Canada under Gen- 



56 MORHIS FAMILY. 

eral Thomas, in its retreat from Quebec in the summer of 1776, 
and after much suffering and sickness, died at Lake George, Aug. 
10th. that year, while in the service, in the 2 2d year of his age. 

67. EDWARD MORRIS, 4th son of Isaac (23), born in 
Woodstock, Dec. 12. 1756. Married March 28, 1782, Lucy, daugh- 
ter of Hon. John Bhss of Wilbraham, a descendant of Thomas 
Bliss and Margaret Bliss of Hartford, Conn., 1639. 

Farmer. Lived at the Bliss homestead in South Wilbraham. 
He served in the Revolutionary War, principally in the army of 
Canada. He and his brother Joseph were in it on its retreat from 
Quebec under General Thomas in 1776. The following account 
of the retreat is given by Dr. Samuel J. IMerrick of Wilbraham. 
who was a surgeon in the army: 

"On the 21st of May tbe army was at Sorel; on that day General 
Thomas broke out with the small-pox. We soon retreated up the river to 
Cliambly, forty-five miles, and ten miles from St. Johns. General 
Thomas was carried with us. On the 2d of June he died. On tbe 20th 
of June we marched to St. Johns; and about sunset we went in boats for 
the Isle au.K Noix. Orders were peremptory not to stop a moment. 
There were but two rowers to a boat. They rowed until I thought tliey 
■would fall from their seats. I, who was not ou fatigue duty, could not 
see the men so worried, tooli an oar myself and rowed half the night. "We 
arrived at Isle aux Noix about two hours before day; the sick were thrown 
ashore, and in five minutes the boats were on the return. I was left with 
the sick. I had tents but could not pitch them in the night. I covered 
the sick up as well as I could, and waited for the day. I determined not 
to lie down myself. I attempted to walk, but could not without running 
over the sick. Stand still, I could not, for so great was my fatigue that I 
was afraid I should fall asleep. I was obliged to lie down on the wet 
grass, and slept about an hour. As soon as it was light I sprang up.- 
examined my sick, found them asleep I left them and walked around 
the island, and found the sick of the whole army in the same situation — 
amounting to thousands, some dead, others dying. Great numbers could 
not stand, calling on us (the physicians) for help, and we had nothing to 
give them. It broke my heart, and I wept till I had no more power to 
weep. I wiped my eyes, pitched my tents; others did the same; so that 
in abf>ut an hour the sick were out of sight. On the 18th the whole army 
arrived, and the island was full of men. On the 19th I was ordered with the 
sick to Crown Point, but did not start till the next day at 12 o'clock. We 
passed over the lake. On the 2.5th we arrived at Crown Point, and on the 
2d of July, at night, the whole army arrived. On the lOtli I was ordered 
forward again with the sick to Fort George. We took as much porli and 
Hour as we thought wc should want; but the pork was bad, and we were 



[first branch.] fifth gexeration. 57 

obliged to throw it overboard; so that we had nothing but flour, wet with 
the lake water, and baked on flat stones. We expected to be but two 
days in going, but the wind was against us and we were four days. I 
thought I could eat a tenpenny nail; but we got in and were supplied. 
The next day we went back, and soon arrived in camp. 

It may be thought by some that I make more of the sickness than I 
need. Who has not read of thousands being sick ? But that is not like 
seeing it! Perhaps such a sight did not occur during the whole war. I 
believe that at no time was sickness so prevalent." 

For three days, during the passage over the lake, the only food 
which Edward Morris had was a bit of pork as large as one of his 
fingers, which he found in the bottom of the boat. Joseph was 
one of the sick, and on the 10th of August he died at Fort George. 
The evening that Joseph died Edward left the camp for the pur- 
pose of getting some milk for his brother. Xight had fallen 
before he returned. On his way to the quarters he stumbled over 
the body of a man lying on the ground; entering the tent, he 
found Joseph was not there; taking a light, he went in search of 
him, and found that the body over which he had stumbled was 
that of his brother — he was dead. As he returned home soon 
after this campaign he did not communicate the fact of Joseph's 
death to his parents. On his way home, as he neared the house, 
he left the road to take a nearer way across the fields. As he was 
descending a hih a short distance from the house, his mother saw 
him coming alone, and stood waiting for his approach. As he 
reached her she said to him, " Where is Joseph ? " Bursting into 
tears, the young soldier fell into his mother's arms, and as soon as 
he could control his grief, he replied, " Joseph is dead! " 

After his marriage Edward Morris took up his residence with 
Colonel Bliss, his fatherin-law, who had no son H^dng, and took 
charge of his farm; Colonel Bliss being away from home much of 
the time, engaged in public business. He died April 29, 1801, at 
the age of 44 years. His constitution was somewhat undermined 
by his service in the army. 

Lucy (Bliss) Morris was above medium height, and light com- 
plexion. She survived her husband thirty-five years, and died 
April 15, 1836. Children: 

139. Oliver Bliss^ b. Sept. 22, 1782. 

140. Edward'', b. July 21, 1784. 

141. IsAAC^ b. Aug. 2, 1786. 

142. Joiix Bliss'', b. Jan. 15, 1789. 

8 



58 MORRIS FAMILY. 

143. Lucy", b. Feb. 23, 1791; m. Dr. D. Ufford. 

144. Abby«, b. Mar. 10, 1793; m. Dec. 15, 1836, Ralph R. 

Rollo, of South Windsor, Conn. She d. Oct. 10, 1850. 

145. Thirza«, b. April 26, 1795; d. June 15, 1802. 

146. Richard Darius", b. Aug. 30, 1797. 

147. Lydia«, b. Mar. 20, 1799. 

148. Edward Alonzo', b. Mar. 14, 1801. 

Edward Morris held several town ofBces in Wilbraham. He 
was constable, warden, highway surveyor, etc. He and his wife 
were members of the Congregational church in South Wilbraham. 

Note. — The compiler, in his boyhood, often heard the following inci- 
dent alluded to, but never knew the particulars of it until a few years 
since, while examining the tiles of the Connecticut Courant; he found the 
following account of it in the number of that paper issued July 25, 1791, 
in a letter written from Springfield. His grandmother was twenty-nine 
years old at the time, and lived to be seventy-four. 

" On Tuesday evening of the 12th inst., the house of Col. John Bliss, of 
Wilbraham, was struck with lightning. It seems tliat part of the electric 
fluid went down the inside of the chimney, and part the outside; that on 
the outside went down to a cupboard in the front room, as appears from 
its there shivering a board; — at that instant, Mrs. Morris, one of the fam- 
ily, coming out of the kitchen, nigh to the cupboard, was struck down. 
The lightning, it is supposed, first struck her on the back side of her head 
and run down to her foot, leaving a streak upon her flesh about as big as 
a large knitting needle; some of the family immediately coming to her, 
took her up, and using means, she soon came to her senses, and, though 
exercised with pain in her leg and foot, it is to be hoped she is in a likely 
way to recover. The rest of the family, though greatly surprised, were 
unhurt." 

Colonel John Bliss, first son of John and Lydia (Field) Bliss, was 
born at Longmeadow Feb. 1, 1727. He married, Nov. 8, 1749, Abiel, 
daughter of Josiah and Margaret (Pease) Colton. She was a descendant of 
" Quartermaster" George Colton, one of the early settlers of Springfield, 
and the first planter at Longmeadow. zVbout the year 1750 he removed 
to the "Fourth Precinct" of Springfield, or "Springfield ^Mountains," 
now Wilbraham, and settled on the east side of the mountains, on the 
"middle road," about three-fourths of a mile up the hill, south of the 
Scantic River. His occupation was that of a farmer and trader. He was 
a self-taught man and possessed of high native talents, and a man of great 
influence. He was a soldier in the French war. In 1773 he was chosen 
a representative to the General Court, and again the next year; the last 
Provincial General Court. He was an ardent Whig in the Revolution, 
was a delegate to the three Provincial Congresses, in which he served on 
important committees. On the 8th of April. 1775, he was appointed sole 
committee " to repair to Connecticut to request that colony to co-operute 



W-°\ 



■<k^. 







[first BRAXCH.J fifth GENERATION'. 59 

TV'ith Massachusetts in furnishiDg quotas for the general defence, and the 
raising and establishing an army." On the 23d of April he was again 
sent to Connecticut. He continued to be a representative during the 
interregnum from the time of the last Provincial Court dissolved by 
General Gage, in May, 1774, until the adoption of the Constitution in 
1780. He had held the office of major, and was appointed lieutenant- 
colonel in the militia, Feb. 8, 1776. Under the new organization of the 
Continental army, concluded at this time, Massachusetts was to furnish 
eleven regiments. To the command of one of these, — the First Hamp- 
shire County Regiment, — Mr. Bliss was appointed by the Council, Oct. 
7, 1777. He served some time in Westchester county but resigned on 
account of "age and great infirmity," which made it impossible to 
undergo " the fatigues of a military life." " Yet," he says in his letter of 
resignation, "at no time will I refuse to share in the dangers incident to 
any station in which my country shall be pleased to place me." 

Under the Constitution he was chosen to the first Senate and to several 
succeeding. In 1786 he was chosen executive councillor, but declined the 
office for the reason "that he lived at so great a distance from the metrop- 
olis of the Commonwealth he could not attend to the duties of that office 
with the punctuality requisite to the faithful discharge thereof without 
too great inattention to his own private and domestic concerns." 

He had early been appointed a Justice of the Peace for the county of 
Hampshire by the House of Representatives and Council during the 
interregnum. In 1795 he was appointed by Governor Hancock, Judge of 
the Court of Common Pleas. In person Colonel Bliss was tall and spare, 
and of light complexion. His wife was short in person, and also of light 
complexion. She died Sept. 30, 1803. They had the following children: 

Oliver, b. Sept. 15, 1751, d. Jan. 13, 1757, aged 6 years. 

Lydia, b. May 9, 1752, d. Jan. 29, 1755. She was the first person 
buried in the burial ground at South Wilbraham. 

Lydia, b. June 19, 1756, m. Rev. Moses Warren, of South Wilbraham. 

Abiah, b. June 1, 1758, m. Josiah Cooley, Mar. 13, 1777. 

Lucy, b. March 1, 1761, d. March 81, same month. 

Lucy, b. March 28, 1762, m. Edward Morris, March 28, 1782. 

Colonel Bliss married, 2d, Sept. 10, 1804, Mrs. Sarah (Chaffee) IVIorris, 
widow of Isaac Morris and mother of Edward Morris, who had married his 
daughter Lucy, twenty-one years before. He was then in his 77th year, 
and she in her 76th. The story is told that on this occasion he had brought 
Mrs. Morris from her home in a remote part of the town to his own house, 
to be married there. Edward Morris, after his marriage with Lucy, had 
remained at his father-in-law's, to assist him in carrying on his farm, and 
here, at this time, all their children had been born, — indeed the property 
was now Lucy's, her father havinir deeded the homestead to her six years 
before; so the house was well filled with children and granil-children. 
The vehicle in which he had brought his intended bride was a chaise — a 
rare thing in those days, perhaps the only one in town, on which the tax 
bills say he paid the government an annual duty of $3. After alighting 



fiO MOKKIS FAMILY. 

from the chaise, he turned to hitcli his horse, leavint; j\[rs. jMorris stand- 
ing. TiirnuLTh tlie infirmity of age lie was rather slow in the operation, 
during which he observed Mrs. Morris, and in the familiarity of the 
relationship which had existed between them for more than twenty 3-ears 
hurriedly addressed her: "Walk in! Sister Morris. Walk in! don't wait 
for me! " He died Nov. 3, 1809, aged nearly 83. Sarah (Chaffee) Morris- 
Bliss survived him nearly nine years, and died April 21, 1818, aged 89. 



The will of Colonel John Bliss was made Feb. 2, 1 809. He 
appointed his grandsons, Edward and John Bliss Morris, his 
executors, and disposed of his estate as follows: "To my wife 
Sarah, all the property she had from her first husband, and a 
home 'with my daughter Morris.' To daughter Lydia, one half 
of Scantic meadow, one acre of my little orchard, part of my 
homestead next Comfort Chaffee's land, and $350. To my 
daughter Abigail, wife of Josiah Cooley, all my land in Long- 
meadowfield and S250. To my daughter Lucy, one-half of home- 
stead, except the little orchard, also one half of buildings thereon, 
one-quarter of Scantic meadow, and one-half of my personal estate 
after the legacies aforesaid. To my grandson Edward Morris, the 
Jones place, so-called, near the meeting-house. To my grandson 
John B. Morris, one half of the homestead, except the little 
orchard, and one half of the buildings thereon, one-quarter of 
Scantic meadow, one-half of my personal estate after the aforesaid 
legacies are paid." Eneas Clark, William Clark, and Betsey 
Clark, Witnesses. 

70. EUNICE MORRIS, 3d daughter of Isaac (23), born at 
South Wilbraham, May 13, 1763. Married Joshua Clark of 
Windsor, Mass., May 27, 1784. She died at Riga, N. Y., Sept. 5, 
1824. Joshua Clark was born at Rochester, Mass., March 17, 
1748, and died at Riga, April 6, 1840. Children — all born in 
Windsor: 

149. Chester Morris Clark", b. Dec. 9, 1784; d. Mar. 26. 

1829, at Sangerfield, N. Y. 

150. Ebenezer Clark", b. Feb. 27, 1787; d. Oct. 8, 1849, at 

Riga. 

151. William Clark", b. July 23, 1788; d. Mar. 10, 1870, at 

Hinsdale, Mass. 



[first branch.] fifth generation. 61 

152. Joshua Clark", b. Aug. 15, 1790; d. Aug. 21, 18G8, at 

Ionia, Mich. 

153. Robert Cutler Clark", b. July 4, 1792; d. April 17, 

1870, at Royalton, N. Y. 

154. LoRiN Clark«, b. July 18, 1794; d. June 7, 1843, at 

Byron, N. Y. 

155. Prudence Clark'', b. April 8, 1796; d. Sept. 9, 1858, at 

Royalton, N. Y. 

156. Eunice Clark", b. June 16, 1798; d. May 11, 1857, at 

Janesville, Wis. 

157. Maria Clark", b. Nov. 21, 1801; living in 1885. 

158. Edward Morris Clark*, b. June 14, 1807; d. Aug. 29, 

1852, at Janesville, Wis. 

71. Major CHESTER MORRIS, 5tli son of Isaac (23), born in 
Wilbraham, April 16, 1765; died in Malone, N. Y., Jan. 10, 1845. 
He was a soldier in the Revolution, serving for a while in the 
Continental army. He was a pensioner of the United States. He 
married, in 1786, Betsey Wales, daughter of Oliver Wales of 
South Brimfield, Mass., and sister of James Lawrence Wales, for 
whom the town of Wales (formerly South Brimfield) was named. 
Major Morris was a tanner by occupation. He lived in South 
Brimfield, and while there kept a tavern. In 1797 he was living 
in Stafford, Conn. About 1800 he removed to Rochester, Vt., 
and afterwards to Malone. His wife died in 1833. He married a 
second time. Children: 

159. Betsey^ b. Sept. 4, 1787; m. Butler; she d. in 

Essex, Vt. 

160. Sarah", b. March 4, 1790; m. Rose; d. in Pier- 

pont, N. Y. 

161. Oliver", b. Jan. 14, 1792; d. in United States army in 

1813. 

162. EPHRAIM^ b. , 1793; d. in Bangor, N. Y., April 2, 

1832. 

163. Annis", b. , 179-; m. Lawrence; d. in 

Bangor. 

164. Esther", b. 179-; d. when 3 years old. 

165. James", b. , 1800. 

166. Chester", b. , 1804; d. Sept. 6, 1818. 

167. Timothy F.", b. , 1806. 

168. Emily", b. ; m. McFarland. 



G'2 MOKIUS FAMII.Y. 

BY SECOND WIFE. 



169. Betsey'', b. . 

170. Chakles", b. ; was a clerk in Malone post- 

office, 1873. 

72. EBENEZER MORRIS, 6th son of Isaac (23), born in 
Wilbraham, March 15, 1767; died in Holland, Mass., Dec. 23, 
1831. Blacksmith; lived in Holland. Married, March 1, 1789, 
Ryndia May of Holland. She was born Oct. 7, 1769, and died 
Feb. 1, 1841. Congregationalist; Federalist. Children: 

171. Leonard M.«, b. Jan. 10, 1790. 

172. Anna", b. Oct 14, 1794; m. May 8, 1817, Augustus Moore 

of Union. 

173. Laura", b. Feb. 5, 1798; m., 1840, William P. Sessions 

of Union; d. April 22, 1872. No children. 

78. ELIZABETH MORRIS, 4th daughter of Isaac (23), born 
in South Wilbraham, Feb. 27, 1769; died at Windsor, Mass., Oct. 
23, 1837. Married, Sept. 3, 1788, David Hume* of Windsor. He 
died Jan. 13, 1827. Children: 

174. Betsey Hume\ b. Sept. 21, 1789; d. Oct I, 1789. 

175. Samuel Hume«, b. Sept. 12. 1790; d. March 9, 1792. 

176. Eunice Hume', b. Nov. 5, 1792; m. Philander Packard of 

Cummington, Mass. ; d. May 12, 1854, without chil- 
dren. 

177. Clarissa Hume", b. June 2, 1795. 

178. Eliza Hume«, b. Aug. 27, 1797. 

179. Bathsheba West Hume^, b. Sept. 3, 1799. 

180. David H. Hume--, b. Nov. 11, 180L 

181. PniLENA Hume", b. June 5, 1804. 

182. Julius M. Hume", b. Oct. 7, 1806. 

183. Thikza H. Hume«, b. March 25, 1809; d. June 6, 1872. 

184. LoDoisKA A. Hums'*, b. Sept. 29, 1812. 

74. EPHRAIM MORRIS, 7th son of Isaac (23), born at South 
Wilbraham, March 17, 1772. His father died when he was in his 
sixth year, and he was left in the care of his older brother, Lsaac, 
of whom he often spoke with the highest regard, and from whom 

* David Hume was son of Richard Hume of Douglass, Mass. 



[first branch.] fifth generation. 63 

he imbibed principles which formed his own character. He 
married, Oct. 16, 1796, Pamela, daughter of Jesse Converse of 
Stafford, Conn. She was born Feb. 23, 1777, and died at Bethel, 
Vt., Feb. 2, 1846. 

Mr Morris was a tanner. He removed from Stafford to Rox- 
biiry, Vt., in Sept. 1804. Here he experienced many of the hard- 
ships and reverses incident to a settlement in a new country. In 
1812 he removed to Bethel, Vt. By diligence and economy he 
acquired a competence sufficient for the support of his family and 
the wants of old age. His business was transacted on economical, 
yet wise and generous principles, which commanded the respect of 
all who knew him and understood his motives of action. In 1822 
he and his wife made a profession of their religious faith, and 
united with the Congregational church in Bethel. The beauty and 
strength of his religious character are described in the following 
extract from a sermon preached at his funeral: "In the support 
of tlie ordinances of the gospel, in the erection of the house of 
worship where he was accustomed to meet with the people of God, 
in the punctuality of his attendance at the public and social gath- 
erings of the friends of the Redeemer, and in reference to all of 
those ways in which his influence might be salutary he was no 
uncertain character. Possessing a clear and. discriminating mind 
and an uncommon degree of energy, regulated by his knowledge 
of men and things and by those Puritanic principles which he 
early imbibed, he proved himself a man of sterling worth. His 
plans in reference to his own property and that of the cause of 
Christ were successful because they were wise and far-seeing. His 
plans and efforts for the good of the community in which he lived, 
and particularly for the church and society with which he was 
connected, were always characterized by that energy and prompt- 
ness which made him a conspicuous member. If he moved at all, 
it was in the first rank, and seldom did any laudable and benevo- 
lent undertaking call in vain at his door. As a father and citizen 
he was kind and affable in his intercourse. The nobler, as well as 
the more delicate and refined sensibility of Christian character, 
were particularly prominent to the last. Few, very few have 
manifested, at such an advanced age, all that interest in the family 
circle and society of friends, together with that high and devoted 
regard for the things of Christ's kingdom which he cherished. 
His decline being greatly protracted was, nevertheless, of such a 



Gl MORRIS FAMILY, 

character as to leave his mental energies in the main nnabated. 
He was enabled to exercise that firm and implicit confidence in the 
character and promises of God through faith in Christ, which was 
' an anchor to his soul both sure and steadfast, entering into that 
within the veil.'" He died at Bethel, Oct. 7, 1852, aged eighty. 
In politics Mr. Morris was a Federalist and Whig. Children: 

185. Sylvesters, b. Sept. 23, 1797, in Stafford, Conn. 

186. Amanda", b. Sept. 20, 1/99, in Stafford, Conn. 

187. Edward", b. Sept. 15, 1801, in Stafford, Conn. 

188. Parmela", b. Oct. 6, 1803, in Stafford, Conn. 

189. Jesse Converse'^, b. Aug. 7, 1805; d. March 6, 1806. 

190. Jesse Converse", b. March 7, 1807, in Roxbury, Vt. 

191. Polly Converse", b. Nov. 27, 1809. in Roxbury, Vt. 

192. Joseph Converse", b. Feb. 24, 1812; d. July 21, 1813. 

193. Julia", b. March 14, 1814, in Bethel 

194. Eliza", b. Dec. 24, 1816. 

195. Joseph", b. Feb. 16, 1819. 

77. ASA MORRIS, 3d son of Lieut. Asa (24), born at Wood- 
stock, Dec. 2, 1755; died at Richford, Vt., May, 182G. Married, 
Dec 7, 1775, Bithiah Goff, his cousin. She died at Richford, June 
10, 1803, aged 53. He married (2d) Penelope Thomas of Rich- 
ford, Feb. 5, 1816. Farmer. Removed to Pomfret, Vt., in 1793, 
and from thence to Richford, Vt., in 1802. He settled in the 
southwest part of the town. 

CHILDREN by BITHIAH: 

196. Susanna", b. March 16, 1777, at Woodstock; m. John 

Richards of Richford, Nov. 2, 1809. 

197. Edward", b. ; d. at Richford; unmarried. 

198. Sally", b. June 30, 1795, at Pomfret. 

Edward Morris taught the first singing-school in Richford. 

80. WYMAN MORRIS, 4th son of Lieut. Asa (24), born in 
Woodstock, Feb. 21, 1771; died at Westford, Vt., Nov. 1, 1862. 
Married, Dec. 29, 1791, Zilpah Holman of Woodstock; she died 
March 22, 1792, aged 20. Married (2d), Oct. 13, 1796, Mrs. Try- 
phena Perrin of Pomfret, Vt. ; she died Sept. 5, 1825, aged 52. 
Married (3d) Mrs. Dorothy Richardson; she died Oct. 26, 1856, 
aged 77. Farmer; Congrogationalist. Removed to Pomfret, Vt., 



[first branch.] fifth generation. 65 

1793, thence to Westford, Vt. He was a man of strong mind and 
sound judgment, upriglit and honest in all his dealings. '•Honesty- 
is the best policy," was a maxim he both taught and practiced. 
He had many prominent traits of character which made him a 
noble man. His word was always sacred; once given, it was 
most faithfully kept, even in the most trivial matters. He would 
sooner have wronged himself than his neighbor. He had no chil- 
dren of his own. Mrs. Kichardson had five when he married her; 
to these he was always kind and indulgent, and clung to them as 
though they had been his own. 

95. JONATHAN MORRIS, 1st son of Capt. Jonathan (28), 

born in Woodstock, , 1758; bap. July 8, 1764. He was a 

private soldier in the War of the Revolution in a company of 
which his own father was lieutenant. Married Hannah Lincoln 
of Taunton, Mass. He removed from Woodstock to Sturbridge, 
where his children were born. In 1806 he removed to Brookfield, 
and in 1822 to De Peyster, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., where he died, 
Aug. 25. 1837, aged 78. His wife died Jan. 26, 1853, aged 94. 
Children: 

199. Timothy^, b. Aug. 6, 1782. 

200. Hannah^, b. Dec. 26, 1783; m. (1st) Dr. Freeman Allen, 

April 18, 1802; m. (2d) Peter Boyden of Sturbridge, 
April 20, 1808. 

201. Matilda*, b. Feb. 23, 1786; m. Jesse McCurdy of Boston, 

June 2, 1811. 

202. Jonathan^ b. Dec. 30, 1787. 

203. LINCOLN^ b. Jan. 28, 1790. 

204. William^, b. July 15, 1792. 

205. HARVELIN^ b. May 20, 1794. 

206. Anxa«, b. , 1797; m. Levi Fay of Brimfield; she d. 

at De Peyster, May 24, 1864, aged 67. 

207. Laura«, b. ; d. October, 1800. 

208. Laura', b. 1801; m. James Converse of Brookfield, 1829. 

209. Lovell", b. June 3, 1803. 

96. POLLY MORRIS, 1st daughter of Capt. Jonathan (28), 
born Oct. 28, 1760. Married, about 1780, Asa Lincoln of Taunton, 
Mass. The following record from the Taunton books is Mr. Lin- 
coin's own: 

9 



66 MORRIS FAMILY. 

"CHILDREN OF ASA LINCOLN. 

210. "Asa Lincoln, Jh., b. June 29, 1782; Saturday, 

211. "Morris Lincoln, b. Nov. 7, 1784; Sunday. 

212. "Polly Lincoln, b. June 30, 1787; Saturday, 

213. " Cylenda Lincoln, b. Aug. 30, 1789; Sunday. 

214. "Ichabod Lincoln, b. July 9, 1791; Saturday. 

215. "Patty Lincoln, b. July 16, 1793; Sunday. 

216. "Pallestia Lincoln, b. April 7, 1796; Thursday. 

217. "Christina Lincoln, b. Aug. 28, 1798; Tuesday. 

218. "Clarissa Lincoln, b. Feb. 26, 1801; Thursday. 
"Polly Lincoln, my wife, bom in "Woodstock, Conn., Oct. 28, 

1760, departed this life Jan. 4, 1802." 

Asa Lincoln died Dec. 29, 1830. He was a Revolutionary 
soldier. 

Christina Lincoln m. Nov. 18, 1831, Josiah Blake of Medway. 

98. CYLENDA MORRIS, 3d daughter of Capt. Jonathan 
(28), born May 6, 1765. Married Elisha Allen of Sturbridge. She 
died in 1831. They had nine children: 

219. Owen Allen, b. April 10, 1785. 

220. Walter Allen, b. March 20, 1787. 

221. Thankful Allen, b. July 22, 1789. 

222. Cylenda Allen, b. April 7, 1792. 

223. Calista Allen, b. Nov. 9, 1794. 

224. Almira Allen, b. Nov. 13, 1797. 

225. Martha Allen, b. 

226. Elisha D. Allen, b. 

227. Caroline Allen, b. 

99. BITHIAH MORRIS, 4th daughter of Capt. Jonathan (28), 
bom Aug. 13, 1766. Married Sept. 2, 1788, David Emory Boyn- 
ton of Sturbridge. Children: 

228. Chloe F. Boynton«, b. Oct. 7, 1790. 

229. David Boynton', b. July 26, 1792. 

230. Alpheus C. BoyntoxV", b. Nov. 13, 1794. 

231. Mary Boynton*, b. Feb. 7, 1797. 

232. Thirza Boynton", b. 

This family removed to Sulhvan, N. H. 



[first branch.] fifth generation. 67 

100. PATTY MORRIS, 5th daughter of Capt. Jonathan (28), 
born Dec. 2, 1769. Married Feb. 14, 1796, Daniel Briggs 3d of 
Taunton, Mass. She died before 1802. Children: 

233. Randolph Briggs'', b. 

234. Lemuel Briggs^, b. 

235. Morris Briggs", b. 

101. WALTER MORRIS, 2d son of Capt. Jonathan (28), 
born in Woodstock, July 15, 1772; bap. Sept. 6th; died at Palmer, 
Mass., December, 1818. Married, Nov. 18, 1798, Sally Warner of 
Sturb ridge. Children: 

236. Oril", b. Oct. — , 1800. She was a deaf mute and a 

pupil in the American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb 
at Hartford in 1825. She was burned to death March 
13, 1860. 

237. An infant, b. d. July, 1804. 

238. Walter Bostwick", b. Dec. 15, 1804. 

239. Sarah", b. , 1807; m. Otis Twitchell of Brookfield. 

102. ANNA MORRIS, 6th daughter of Capt. Jonathan (28), 
born July 28, 1775; bap. Aug. 20th. Married, Feb. 15, 1801, Ste- 
phen Pierce. They removed to Sullivan, N. H. Children: 

240. Mary Pierce", b. 

241. Lucretia", b. 

103. ESTHER MORRIS, 7th daughter of Capt. Jonathan 
(28), born May 17, 1777. Married (1st), Aug. 6, 1801, Abner 
Blodgett of Sturbridge. Children: 

242. Morris BL0DGETT^ b. Dec. 2, 1801; d. Feb. 18, 1804. 

243. Patty Blodgett'', b. Jan. 1, 1805. 

244. Abner Blodgett^ b. Dec. 22, 1806. 

Mr. Abner Blodgett died June 9, 1807. Mrs. Blodgett married 
Daniel Copeland, March 13, 1814. Children: 

245. Charles R. Copeland", b. June 19, 1815. 

246. Waldo Copeland", b. 



SIXTH GEl^EEATIOK 



117. ROXANNA DAVIS, 2d daughter of Hannah Morris 

(63) and John Davis, b. . Married Richard Firmin, 

March 25, 1803; died June 13, 1807, aged 31. Children: 

247. Philander Firmin", b. Aug. 6, 1803. 

248. Philena Firmin^, b. April 30, 1805. 

118. BETSY DAVIS, 3d daughter of Hannah Morris (63) 

and John Davis, born , 1779. Intention of marriage with 

Richard Firmin published Aug. 19, 1809. She died Feb. 5, 1826, 
aged 47. Children: 

249. RoxANNA Firmin', b. June 1, 1810; m. Ralph Fuller. 

250. Elizabeth Firmin', b. Oct. 8, 1811; m. John Amidon. 

251. Richard Darwin Firmin'', b. Jan. 24, 1814; m. 

Hendricks. 

252. James Lawrence Firmin", b. June 22, 1816; m. Sopbronia 

Davis. 

119. JOSEPH DAVIS, son of Hannah Morris (63) and John 

Davis, born . Mai'ried, about 1806, Diana, daughter 

of Nathan Wales of Plymouth, Chenango County, N. Y., and pre- 
viously of Union, Conn. Children: 

253. Asa Davis^ b. 

254. Morris Davis', b. 

255. John Davis', b. 

256. Philander Davis', b. 

257. . Nathan Davis', b. 

258. Andrew Davis', b. 

259. Sally Davis', b. 

260. Hannah Davis', b. 

120. JOHN DAVIS, son of Hannah Morris (63) and John 

Davis, born . Married Sally Wales, daughter of 

Nathan Wales. Children: 

261. Danford Davis^, b. 



[first branch.] sixth generation, 69 

262. SoPHRONiA Davis", b. 

263. Olive Davis", b. 

264. Diana Davis", b. 

Joseph and John Davis removed to Plymouth, N. Y.; lived and 
died there. 

121. ASA DAVIS, son of Hannah Morris (63) and John 
Davis, born in AVilbraham, Aug. — , 1785; died in Somers April 
25, 1869. Married Selinda AUard of Somers, March — , 1810. 
She was born Sept. — , 1782, and died Oct. 20, 1840. Children: 

265. Anna Colton Davis", b. Mar. 1, 1811; m. Sumner Root, 

Sept., 1841. 

266. Roxanna Davis", b. July 24, 1812; m. Nahum Dunbar, 

Mar. 21, 1836. 

267. Diana Davis", b. Mar. 13, 1814; unmarried. 

268. Harriet Davis^, b. Nov. 23, 1816; m. Samuel A. Wood, 

April 4, 1837. 

269. Sophronia Davis'', b. May 21, 1817; m. J. Lawrence Fir- 

min. Oct. 20, 1840. 

270. Andrew J. Davis^, b. April 25, 1819. 

271. Sarah Maria Davis", b. Feb. 20, 1821; m. Simeon Cum- 

mings, April 12, 1845. 

272. Calvin Pitkin Davis", b. Oct. 25, 1822; m. Ann Judson, 

, 1857. 

273. Asa Littleton Davis'', b. Aug. 15, 1824; m. Harriet 

Hitchcock. 

274. Elizabeth Selinda Davis'', b. June 26, 1826; m. John 

Austin Bowdoin, May 7, 1848. 

275. John Allard Davis'', b. June 4, 1828; m. Theah Boyd, 

Jan. 16, 1853. 

276. Erwin Davis^ b. Nov. 4, 1830; m. Emily Burt, 1860. 
276|. Henry Davis", b. April 4, 1836; d. 1870. 

123. SYLVESTER MORRIS, 1st son of Darius (64), born in 
South Wilbraham Aug. 24, 1775. In 1796, when twenty-one 
years old, he left home for Butternuts, N. Y., and in the same 
year went to Whitestown, Oneida Co., where, in 1798, he married 
Elizabeth Smith, whose parents came from Brim field, Mass. In 
1805 he joined the Methodist Church, in which communion he 
remained for several years, during which he was licensed as a pub- 



70 MORRIS FAMILY. 

lie exhorter. and labored in various places; first, in 1799, at Water- 
town, Jefferson Co., being one of the earliest settlers there; then 
in Chittanning, Madison Co. ; in New Woodstock; in Victor, Ontario 
Co., and Henrietta. In 1817 he joined the Western Christian 
Conference, and was ordained a minister in that denomination. 
The next year he removed to Groveland, Ontario Co., now Cone- 
sus, Livingston Co., where he died April 8, 1865, aged 89. His 
wife died Feb. 18, 1857, aged 77. Mr Morris was a sincere Chris- 
tian, highly respected, and of great influence. 

In pontics he called himself a Jeffersonian Democrat, and adhered 
to the Democratic party until 1860, when he voted for Abraham 
Lincoln. 

He was of small stature, but compactly built, and possessed 
great muscular strength. After going to New York, he tauglit 
schools. On the occasion of one of his earliest applications to teach, 
the committee made an objection to him as not being suitable on 
account of his size. The boys, they said, were some of them 
pretty stout fellows, and unless the teacher was a pretty stalwart 
man they generally got the advantage of him and broke up the 
school. Morris replied that he had experience in keeping schools, 
and had never had any serious trouble. "No! " said the commit- 
tee, "you won't do; we want a stouter man than you are." He 
replied, "I think I can keep your school; take me on trial; give 
rae my board while I stay, and pay me if I succeed. If I don't 
succeed I'll leave." The committee assented to the arrangement, 
and he took the school. At the morning recess on the day the 
school opened, a file of the largest boys came into the room, each 
bearing a large stick of four-foot wood, and ranged themselves in 
front of the teacher's desk. " Shoulder arms! " shouted the leader.. 
Morris sprang out in front of them. "No! " said he, "that's not 
the order. It's cjiound arms! " and in a moment, by a blow from 
Morris's fist, the leader lay sprawling on the floor. "Boys," said 
Morris, "you see I know something of military tactics myself, and 
I'll command here ! " He kept the school. In another town 
where he had been hired to take a school, he learned that other 
teachers had been thrown out of the windows, and that threats had 
been made that if he tried to teach there he would be thrown out 
also. Going to the school-house early in the morning that the 
school was to be opened, he boarded up the windows. When the 
school had assembled he stationed himself in front of his desk and 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 71 

said, " Boys, I learn that you have a custom of throwing your 
teachers out of the windows. It is a custom which I never have 
been used to, and one which I don't approve of and won't have 
practiced while I am here. If any of you want to throw me out, 
now is the time for the experiment, before the school exercises 
begin." Several of the boys left their seats to go towards him, 
but as soon as they were within his reach he knocked them down 
one after the other. As they rose they took their seats, satisfied 
that for that winter this custom would have to be abandoned. 
Children : 

277. John Chandler'^, b. Nov. 8, 1799, at Whitestown. 

278. Sylvester", b. Nov. 30, 1801. 

279. Eliza E.", b. April 27, 1803; m. Hiram May in 1821, and 

had eight children. 

280. James S.\ b. June 8, 1805, at Watertown; d. 1857; un- 

married. 

281. Mashall S.\ b. Feb. 21, 1808, at Whitestown. 

282. Darius^, b. May 15, 1811, at New Woodstock. 

283. Adeline'^, b. , 1814, at Victor; m. Ira King in 

1837. She died in 1848, leaving three children. 

284. Emeline'^, b. , at Conesus; m. Mordecai McKay 

in 1847. They had ten children. 

285. Caroline', b. , at Conesus. 

286. Daniel M.'', b. , 1817, at Henrietta. 

124. ASENATH MORRIS, 1st daughter of Darius (64), born 
Aug. 27, 1777. Married Henry Cady of Stafford, Conn. They 
removed to Butternuts, Otsego Co., N. Y. 

125. BETSY MORRIS, 2d daughter of Darius (64), born 
Aug. 13, 1780. Married March 13, 1803, Isaac S. Wood, M.D., of 
South Wilbraham. They removed to Rodman, Jefferson Co., N. Y. 
Children : 

287. Darius Morris Wood'', b. May 7, 1804, in So. Wilbraham. 

288. Isaac S. Wood^, b. April 1, 1807; d. at Rodman Jan. 2, 

1833; unmarried. 

289. Ornaldo D. Wood^, b. Dec. 24, 1811. 

290. Elizabeth Wood^, b. May 7, 1816. 

126. Captain JOSEPH MORRIS, 2d son of Darius (01), born 
in Wilbraham Feb. 27, 1782; died at Elliugtou, Conn., Feb. 20, 



72 MOIUilS FAMILY. 

1847. Married Nov. 26, 1807, Lydia Russell of Wilbraham. She 
died at Ellington, Feb. 23, 1855. Farmer. Removed from South 
AVilbraham to Ellino-ton, April 27, 1837. While in Wilbraham he 
held several town offices: Assessor, School Committee, Selectman, 
etc. He was a man of good judgment, and had the confidence of 
the community. Congregationalist. Children: 

291. Louisa^, b. Sept. 6, 1808; m., (1st,) David McCray of 

Ellington; m. (2d,) John Langdon of Wilbraham. 
One child: John W. Langdon. 
291^. Delia, b. July 29, 1810; m. Solomon C. Spelman of Yfil- 
braham. She died . No children. 

292. Abigail', b. Nov. 6, 1812; m. Luther Colton of Long- 

meadow Two children — Henry Moi-ris and Emma 
Colton. 

293. Darius', b. April 6, 1815. 

294. Sylexda'^, b. Nov. 6, 1817; m. Lucius Beebe of South 

Reading, Mass. 

295. Robert Russell", b. April 2, 1821. 

296. Sylvester", b. Jan. 30, 1824. 

297. Joseph Chandler'', b. April, 1827. 

127. REBECCA MORRIS, 3d daughter of Darius (64), bora 
Jan. 21, 1784. Married, Jan. 22, 1810, Jesse Merwin of Pinck- 
ney, N. Y., a native of Durham, Conn. He removed to Pinckney 
about 1804-5, and to Rodman, N. Y., in 1832. Mr. and Mrs. 
Merwin both died in 1861. Children: 

298. Sylexda Merwin'^, b. Oct. 1 2, 181 1; m. Almanson Alverson. 

299. Betsy Merwin^ b. Jan. 3, 1813. 

300. Talcott Merwin^ b. July 27, 1815; m. Saphronia Hill of 

Rodman. 

301. Mary Merwin^ b. May 3, 1817. 

3(»2. Fanny Merwin', b. Feb. 14, 1820; m. Geo. W. Smith. 

303. Mills Merwin'', b. April 7, 1823; d. young. 

304. Harriet R. Merwin'', b. April 14, 1827; unmarried. 

129. FANNY CHANDLER MORRIS, 4th daughter of 
Darius (64), born April 25, 1787. Married, Oct. 20, 1806, 
Elisha Bowen of Reading, Vt. He was born at Woodstock, 
Conn., Feb. 20, 1779. Children: 

305. Lydia Fowler Bowen^, b. Nov. 17, 1801, at Reading. 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 73 

306. Fanny Chandler Bowen'', b. Jan. 21, 1810, at South 

Wilbraham. 

307. Darius Morris Bowen', b. March 28, 1812, at Reading. 

308. Henry Sylvester Bowen", b. Dec. 1, 1814, at Reading. 

309. Otis Erastus Bowen'', b. Sept. 30, 1817, at Reading. 

310. Elisha Chandler Bowen'', b. April 22, 1820, at Reading. 

311. Harriet Sophia Bowen'', b. July 3, 1823, at Reading. 

130. SYLENDA MORRIS, 5th daughter of Darius (64), 
born Aug. 19, 1789. Married Noah Merwin, Feb. 17, 1813. He 
was a native of Durham, Conn., and with his brother Jesse 
removed to Pinckney, N. Y., in 1804, and to Rodman in 1835. 
His wife died July 10, 1817, at Pinckney. He died at Rod- 
man in 1866. One child: 

312. Nancy Merwin", b. Aug. 26, 1814. 

131. HANNAH MORRIS, 5th daughter of Darius Morris 
(64), born July 10, 1791, in So. Wilbraham. Married, Sept. 28, 
1815, James Adams of Rodman, N. Y. He was born in Sullivan, 
N. H., and is supposed to have died at Charleston, So. Carolina, 
at the age of 52. Mrs. Adams died in So. Wilbraham, Nov. 12, 
1862. Children: 

313. Mary Adams', b. Oct. 6, 1816, at Rodman, N. Y. 

314. Sarah Adams'', b. Sept. 1819, at Adams, N. Y. 

315. Delia Adams'', b. Aug. 6, 1821, at Adams, N. Y. 

316. Lafayette Adams'', b. Jan. 18, 1825; d. Feb. 1825. 
Delia married Oliver Cooke ; d. at So. Windsor. No children. 

Sarah m. Norman Lyon Feb. 27, 1844, one child, Sarah Amelia, 
b. Dec. 12, 1849; m. Robert Hall of Sacket's Harbor, N. Y., 
now of Lander, Wyoming Ter. ; two children, Elsie Claire and 
Alice Roberts. 

133. POLLY MORRIS, 1st daughter of Isaac (65), born 
Dec. 19, 1781. Married Roswell Davis of Stafford, Conn., Aug. 
20, 1800. They removed to Boonville, N. Y., where Mr. Davis 
d. July 24, 1848. Children: 

317. Laura Davis^, b. June 18, 1801, in Stafford. 

318. Morris Davis', b. March 9, 1803, in Springfield, Mass.; d. 

May 17, 1882. 
While the family was living in Springfield, and Laura was two 

10 



74 MORRIS FAMILY. 

years old, she wandered into the woods and was lost over night. 
She is still living (1885) in Boonville, and in her 84th year. 

134. SALLY MORRIS, 2d daughter of Isaac (65), born in 
1783 or 4. Married John Hitchcock of Monson, Aug. 29, 1802 ; 
after their marriage they removed to Boonville, N. Y., where 
they lived for several years, but on account of the poor health of 
Mrs. Hitchcock they returned to Monson where both died; Mr. 
Hitchcock first, and Mrs. Hitchcock in June or July, 1858. 
Children: 

319. Thirza Morris Hitchcock'', b. June 2, 1802; died April 3, 

1815. 

320. Isaac Morris Hitchcock'', b. March 13, 1807, in Boonville; 

d. Nov. 2, 1809. 

321. Alanson Hitchcock'', b. June 20, 1809, in Boonville; 

d. July 21, 1810. 

322. John C. Hitchcock'', b. , ; d. in Monson, Oct. 

1820. 

323. LucETTA Hitchcock'', b. Nov. 15, 1813; m. Asa Robbins 

of Monson, and had three children: John Henry, b. 
1835, George H., b. 1848, and a daughter, b. 1851. 

135. EUNICE MORRIS, 3d daughter of Isaac (65), born 
Aug. 4, 1786, at So. Wilbraham. Died in Rome, N, Y., March 1, 
1868. Married, at Monson, Sept. 11, 1811, Alban Comstock of 
Western, Oneida Co., N. Y. He was born in Westfield, Mass., 
Jan. 18, 1781. After marriage they settled on "Webster Hill in 
"Western, and lived there for several years previous to their removal 
to the adjoining town of Lee, where Mr. Comstock died, Oct. 14, 
1822, in the triumph of Christian faith, leaving his wife with 
three little children, the eldest but nine years old. Mrs. Comstock 
managed her farm successfully; reared her children, inculcating 
correct principles, and educated and fitted them for usefulness in 
life. In 1841 she removed to Rome, to make her home with her 
son, Calvert, at whose house she died. Children: 

324. Calvert Comstock'', b. July 2, 1812. 

325. Elon Comstock'', b. July 14, 1814. 

326. Minerva Comstock'', b. June 27, 1817; d. Jan. 30, 1856, 

of consumption, at the house of lier brother Calvert, 
in Rome. She was a most estimable lady. 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 75 

Mrs. Comstock was tall and ei'ect in figure, and of commanding 
presence and superior endowments. She possessed good business 
qualifications and excellent judgment. She made the acquaintance 
of her husband in Boonville, while visiting her sister, Mrs. Roswell 
Davis. Mr. Comstock was a man of excellent character. His 
family was of the Society of Friends. Mrs. Comstock was a 
Presbyterian. 

136. ISAAC MORRIS, only son of Isaac (65), born in Wil- 
braham, April 8, 1792. Died at New Baltimore, Mich., Nov. 12, 

1877. Married, , 18 — , Fanny Wood of Monson. She 

was born Oct. 13, 1794, and died at New Baltimore, Mich., April 
22, 1869. Farmer. Removed from Monson to Lysander, N. Y., 
in 1813, thence to Pennsylvania, in 1836; to Ohio, in 1846; to 
New Baltimore, Mich., the same year. Mrs. Morris was a Free- 
will Baptist; Mr. Morris did not belong to any church. He was 
Republican in politics. Children : 

327. Elvira', b. March 2, 1813, in Monson; m. Feb. 24, 1847, 

Humphrey H. Smith of Cottrellville, Mich. 

328. Irene^ b. Feb. 7, 1814; m. Feb. 18, 1851, James W. 

Dudley, Shelby, Mich. 

329. IsAAC^, b. May 19, 1816; d. March 10, 1817. 

330. Albern Comstock', b. March 19, 1818. 

331. Oliro^, b. April 2, 1820; m. Dec. 12, 1840, David Swift. 

332. Lydia^ b. Feb. 18, 1822. 

333. George Alexander^, b. April 19, 1825. 

334. HiRAM^, b. April 11, 1828. 

335. Sally", ) Twins, b. Dec. j m., July 1, 1849, E. L. Webster. 

336. SiLAS^ \ 30, 1831); ( unmarried March, 1885. 

337. Elsa Ann', b. June 11, 1833; m. June 14, 1848, Henry 

Shirky. 

137. IRENE MORRIS, 4th daughter of Isaac (65), born May 
13, 1793, at South Wilbraham; died at Western, N. Y. Married, 
Jan. 19, 1818, Arnon Comstock of Western, N. Y. When her 
sister Eunice was married to Alban Comstock in Monson, in 1811, 
she accompanied them to Western, and remained there. She was 
then eighteen. She did not return to visit her mother until 1835. 
Mrs. Comstock resembled lier Morris relatives in her features; 
she was of medium height, slender in early life, but very fleshy 



76 MORRIS FAMILY. 

in later years; she was called lianclsome in hor youth, ami retained 
her good looks until her death, and also her mental faculties. 
She belonged to a Presbyterian church, was a woman of great 
sympathy and kindness, a friend of the poor and sorrowing, and 
was greatly beloved by all who knew her. 

Arnon Comstock was boi'n in Westfield, Mass, Nov. 15, 1779. 
His parents were Friends or Quakers. In 1782 the family re- 
moved to Williamstown, Mass , and in 1796 he removed to Western. 
He was then 17. He was an ardent Democrat in early life, and 
retained his connection with that party all his life. He held the 
highest town offices for years; was postmaster, member of the 
General Assembly in 1830 and 1831, and for ten years was a 
judge. He held his offices without seeking them. During the 
war of 1812 he held a custom-house position on Lake Ontario. 
He was of good height, well proportioned, and erect. He had 
light complexion, blue eyes, and red cheeks. He was a man of 
energy and decision, and possessed great kindness of heart. He 
was connected with, but did not belong to the Society of Friends. 
He died March 8, 1850; his funeral was conducted by Friends. 
Mrs. Comstock survived her husband thirty-two years, and died 
in 1882, aged 89 years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Comstock were married JajU. 19, 1818, by Elder 
Douglass of Whitestown, a Baptist minister. They were farmers, 
and after their marriage went at once to their farm in "Western, 
where they lived their remaining years. Children: 

338. Caroline Comstock", b. Oct. 25, 1818. 

339. Samuel Comstock'', b. March 4, 1820. 

340. Calvin Smith Comstock'', b. Feb. 24, 1822. 

341. Eunice Comstock^ b. Sept. 18, 1823. 

342. Mary Comstock', b. Sept. 13, 1833; m. Addison BrilL 

138. ROXANNA MORRIS, 5th daughter of Isaac (65), born 
at South Wilbraham, June 22, 1795. Married Joel Hitchcock of 
Monson, in 1820. He died Feb. 19, 1856. aged 62. Children: 

343. Harriet Emeline Hitchcock', b. Sept. 26, 1822, in Mon- 

son; m. Asa Davis 

344. Isaac Morris Hitchcock', b. Jan. 28, 1824. 

345. Thirza Malina Hitchcock'', b. March 21, 1826; d. l8-'8. 

346. Sarah Ann Hitchcock'', b. Feb. 22, 1828; m. Daniel 

Leonard. 




OLIVER BLISS ^aORRIS. 



[first branch.] sixth genkration. 77 

347. David H. Hitchcock^, b. May 4, 1831. 

348. Mary Jake Hitchcock', b Jan. 7, 1837; m. W. R. King. 
Mrs. Hitchcock celebrated her ninetieth birthday June 22, 1885. 

All but three of her children, grandchildren, and great-grandchil- 
dren were present on the occasion: two grandchildren, and one 
great-grandchild not being able to attend. The ages of the five 
children present amounted to 280 years; the ages of the grand- 
children to 109 years, and the ages of the great-grandcliildren to 
22 years. 

139. Judge OLIVER BLISS MORRIS, 1st son of Edward 
(67), born at the Bliss-Morris homestead in South Wilbraham, 
Sept. 22, 1782. Died in Springfield, April 9, 1871 — Easter Day 
— in his 89th year. He was named for the oldest child and only 
son of his grandfather Bliss, who died in 1757, aged six years. He 
fitted for college under Rev. Moses "Warren of South Wilbraham, 
who had married Lydia Bliss, his mother's sister. He entered 
Wilhams College in 1797, at the age of 15; making his journey 
there on horseback. He was graduated in 1801. He studied 
law in Springfield with Hon. Geo. Bhss, and was admitted to the 
bar of Hampshire County, in 1804. He entered upon the practice 
of his profession in Springfield, which became large and profitable. 
He became intensely interested in the cause of his clients, and 
labored for them with impulsive efforts. In 1812, after the form- 
ation of Hampden County, from Hampshire, he was appointed 
prosecuting attorney, and held that office again from 1821 to 
1832. In 1813 he was appointed Register of the Court of Pro- 
bate, and held the office until 1829, when, on the death o:^ Judge 
John Hooker of that court, he was appointed his successor. He 
held this office until 1858 — twenty-nine years — when the court 
was reorganized. He represented Springfield in the Legislature 
in 1809, 1810, 1811, and 1813. In 1820 he was a delegate in the 
convention called to revise the constitution of the State, He had 
been brought up in and was strongly attached to the Federal 
party. He was also strongly attached to the Whig party, and 
was an admirer of Henry Clay, and an earnest advocate of his 
election to the Presidency, and greatly regretted his defeat. He 
was naturally an anti-slavery man, although not an abolitionist. 
When a boy he had witnessed a conflict between his father and 
the pursuers of two runaway slaves from Connecticut, who had 



78 MORKIS FAMILY. 

souglit refuge in his father's house, and in wliich his fatlier 
received a serious injury. On the passage of the fugitive-slave 
Law. in 1850, he did not hesitate to denounce it. and openly- 
declared his purpose of protecting, with all his power and influ- 
ence, any slave who should api>eal to him for aid. 

He was an advocate of the benevolent causes of his time; 
especially those of the Bible and missions. When the temperance 
reformation first took its rise, about 1826, under the lead of Dr. 
Hewit and others, and spread rapidly through Connecticut and 
Massachusetts, awakening in its progress the consciences of large 
numbers of people in regard to the prevailing social custom in 
the use of intoxicating drinks, he at once threw himself into the 
cause with the greatest zeal, publicly advocating and speaking for 
it in Springfield and the neighboring towns. One of the earliest 
recollections which the compiler has of him is on one of theses 
occasions. It was on a summer day; he had taken off his coat, 
and in the zeal and enthusiasm of his effort he left the platform 
on which he was standing, and seemingly unconscious of his 
position wandered half way up the passage way in front of him. 

His habits of life were simple and democratic; he abhorred 
show and ostentation. He was exceedingly social and fond of 
company, and exceedingly enjoyed that of a few friends who were 
wont to assemble frequently at his house; generally on Sunday 
evenings; keeping up, as he did, the old New England custom of 
observing Saturday evening as holy time. 

He was fond of historical study, especially that of local history 
and genealogy. He delivered the address on the occasion of the 
celebration of the two-hundredth anniversary of the settlement of 
Springfield. May 24, 1836. He was a member of the Massachu- 
setts Historical Society, and also of the N. E. Historic-Genealog- 
ical Society. He had treasured in his memory a vast number of 
historical facts, and facts relating to family history. He often 
interested and astonished people with his knowledge of their 
ancesti-al lines. He was accustomed to say: "In my youth I saw 
an aged man who remembered seeing persons who came over in 
the Mayflower." He loved and revered the good which had come 
down from the past. He disliked innovation on many old cus- 
toms, and new ones had little control over him. A late writer, 
sketching the okl members of the Hampden bar, recounting some 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 79 

reminiscences of the life and character of Judge Morris, said of 
him: 

Judge Morris was an old Whig and his sentiment was strongly anti- 
slavery. At the same time he was a very good representative of that 
portion of the community which opposed any reform not attained by 
due process of law. He therefore often found himself opposed on prin- 
ciple to the merisures which seemed to him to ride rough-shod over the 
letter of the law. At the time of the New York draft riots of 18G3 Gov. 
Buckingham of Connecticut was visiting his brother, Dr. Buckingham, 
in this city. It had been arranged that two Connecticut regiments should 
be forwarded to the metropolis. A dispatch from Mayor Opdyke was 
sent here to the governor, asking that the sending of the troops be 
delayed. Judge Morris met Dr. Buckingham on the street and asked, 
"Has the telegram been received?" It had been. "And would the 
governor have forwarded the regiments? " Morris asked. " Indeed he 
would," was the reply. " Did not New York city send more than two 
regiments into Connecticut in 1861, when my brother was running for 
governor?" This was a reference to the swarm of illegal voters who 
attempted unsuccessfully to swamp the Republican ticket by means of 
voters' certificates under the old law. Morris saw the point and did not 
argue further. It might be considered unjust to drop the matter here, 
allowing the reader to make too free use of his inferences as to Morris's 
broadest political convictions. Below the lawyer-like halit of action 
within constitutional and statute limits was a ground-work of patriotism 
and love for our institutions which is full explanation for his influence 
over his fellow-citizens. Rev. Mr. Parsons, in his sermon delivered at 
the funeral of Judge Morris, put this fact in quite as clear light when he 
said: "These early convictions were so positive and pronounced with 
him that in later life he persisted in applying them to others in similar 
places of responsible trust. Judging them by' their deeds he severely 
condemned the least abuse of power, perversion of law or deviation from 
the cardinal principles of national purity and life." During the very 
year of the New York draft riots Judge Morris was called upon to preside 
over the ceremonies attending the centennial celebration of Wilbraham, 
his native town. The rural picture that must have had such attractions 
to him could not shut out the thought of war, and he was moved to say: 
"Especially do I welcome as the organ of the town those of her children 
who have come from abroad. Though civil strife fills the land and the 
voice of war sounds through all our borders, we meet in these quiet 
scenes to forget for the hour the distress and tumult around us, and to 
exchange congratulations that we have so goodly a heritage." And the 
octogenarian dismissed the gathering with the words, "May the civil war 
raging with such fury soon cease, and may our posterity never be called 
to rescue the altars of freedom from the pollution of treason." And this 
is a reminder that in the days of the Thom])son riots over the slavery 
question Judge Morris stood for free speech and the privilege of listeuiug 



80 MOURIS FAMILY. 

to whoinsoovor he pleiisod. Gov. Trask, tlien l)ocoming promiticnt niid 
active, well remembers the aid and comfort which the iutiuence of Judge 
Morris gave the struggling Abolitionists in 1851, when both public lialis 
and the church edifices were mostly shut against an anti-slavery orator. 
It cannot be said that the Judge was an abolitionist, law or no law, but 
a believtfr in fair play and an advocate of free discussion. 

He was a man six feet tall and very muscular; aside from the special 
consideration that judicial honors inspire, he was held in wholesome fear 
by the unruly younger elements of the community, and his services were 
never demanded in vain. It is told of Landlord Dillon, who kept what 
was afterward known as "Uncle Jerry's tavern," that the j'oung men 
gathered in the bar-room in such numbers that a reform was instituted. 
When Dillon refused to furnish unlimited potations an exciting scene 
followed. The crowd proposed to mob Dillon, and he sent for Judge 
IMorris. Some young lawyers were watching operations from across the 
way with perhaps an eye for business. The Judge did not ask any escort 
but stood for a moment unnoticed near the door, and seeing that there 
was a vacant space in the center of the bar-room, he advanced thither and 
faced the crowd. He was an eloquent man and a brave man, and more- 
over knew how to handle himself in a rough-and tumble fight. These 
are qualities which j^oung men admire, and in a very few minutes the 
Judge and the landlord stood alone before the bar. In the town meeting, 
where Morris used often to officiate as moderator, the younger speakers 
who did not have the gift of being severe and parliamentary at the same 
time, often produced a deal of confusion, especially when the school and 
the liquor issues were up. Once a loud talking individual had been at 
it for some time in town-meeting under Moderator Morris's frowns, and 
at length the latter interrupted him with the crushing words: "Young 
man, you do not know anything about the school question. Sit down." 
He sat. 

The qualifications of Judge Morris as a public speaker are admitted by 
all who ever heard him. He had a fine phj^sique, a good voice, a nervous 
impetuosity of expression when in his prime, and an unbending perti- 
nacity which carried an audience with him. 

When distinguished men visited Springfield the judge was quite apt to 
be selected for the speech of welcome. He introduced John Quincy 
Adams to the people in the First church, and was also chosen to welcome 
Henry ('lay at the ovation given him at the old town hall. 

He was a well-read man, and in his age was very fond of going over his 
Virgil and repeating Greek. With all his solid study, too, he had time to 
take in all the current fiction, which he devoured with the greatest eager- 
ness. His taste for the classics, together with an extensive vocabulary 
and ready diction, contributed to the graces of his oratory, which was so 
famovis in those days. 

Judge Morris was in every way a village man. He knew everybod}', 
and everybody knew him. All the ways of rural New England life were 
pleasing to him; he enjoyed its leisurely village streets, its thrift, its town 



[first branch.] sixth genekatiox. 81 

democracies, and its deference paid to social dignity and importance; and 
it was his distinction to be for manj^ years ttie object of mucl-i of that 
deference in Springfield. But the satisfaction he felt for this local promi- 
nence was not personal pride. lie came by his local patriotism in the 
study of local history. He thought much of the past, and loved to talk of 
the plantation of Springfield, to reproduce the pioneer scenes when every 
yoeman was a defender of the gospel, a tiller of the soil, and at times a 
fighter of Indians. Morris never wanted to live to see the time when the 
town meeting would adjourn forever, when stages would be taken from 
the old turnpikes, and the town brook buried in the Main-street sewer. 
But he did, — and he lived also to be the oldest inhabitant, and to see 
city wards spring up where once were open fields; but his heart was buried 
in the past. " I do not like to see so many strangers," he once remarked to 
a minister here, " I used to know every voter." This lament was not the 
result of a natural desire to oppose progress, but a deep affection for the 
quiet, quaint old days of Springfield. He had been looked upon for 
nearly two generations as the antiquarian of Springfield. He was familiar 
with more genealogies than any one else, could give more facts about old 
buildings, the transfers of property, the historic spots, the traditions, the 
stories, anecdotes, and lore of the place. Law was his profession, but 
Springfield village his life. 

Judge Morris would not and did not grow in sympathy with any move- 
ment that put a blotch upon the past, and his Roman struggles with the 
introduction of stoves and organs into the church, and the extension of 
the means of communication with the outside world afforded much enter- 
tainment to the more radical elements, but only increase at this day the 
natural admiration one has for old-fashioned manners and morality. 
When age began to tell its old story of lessening powers and ambition, the 
venerable judge was in the habit of dropping in at the " Old corner book- 
store" and chatting and arguing with both old and young, and he never 
failed to paint the glories of the village of Springfield, especially when 
young men were about. 

When the First National Bank was organized a chair was provided for 
the judge, and he divided his time when he came down street at that bank 
and the bookstore reading-room and conversing room. The passing away 
of Oliver B. Morris in his 89th year was no small event. He was a man 
of principle — strong, self-as.sertive, and true. When he passed away it 
was like the falling of an ancient pillar, and Springfield will not neglect 
his memory." 

The foUowang obituary of Judge Morris, which appeared in the 
Sjjringfidd Republican, was written by the late Samuel Bowles, then 
editor of that paper: 

DEATH OK JUDGE MORRIS. 

Oliver B. Morris, who died on Sunday morning, represented more fully 
and for a longer period the life of Springfield than any man who remains 
11 



82 MORRIS FAMILY. 

amoiiu us. He was born in our nciiili boring villa;::^ of South V,";ibrabam, 
September 22, 1782, and was consequently in liis SDiii year, and the oldest 
man in Springfield. Ilis father, Edward Morris, had been a soldier in the 
lievohitionary War, serving principally in Canada, and his mother was 
the daughter of John Bliss of Wilbrahani, who was an officer in the Mas- 
sachusetts militia that served at White Plains, and, after the war, a county 
judge and representative to the General Court. Judge Moriis prepared 
for college with Rev. Moses Warren, the South Wilbraham clergyman, 
and at the age of 15 went to Williams College. He graduated in 1801, 
and at the time of his death was the oldest living graduate of that institu- 
tion. He came from college to Springtield, and began the study of the 
law with Mr. George Bliss, father of the present Mr. George Bliss, then a 
leading lawj-er in the Connecticut valley. Mr. Bliss resided in the house 
next below the old Universalist church, on Main street, opposite tlie 
Union House, and his office was in the wing of the same building. Judge 
Morris boarded with Mr. Bliss's family during his studies, and in 1813 
married his daughter, Caroline Bliss. -He became a member of the bar in 
1804, and had his first office in the wooden building then standing on the 
southeast corner of Main and State streets, but afterward removed to a 
building nearly opposite on State street, owned by ]\Ioses Bliss, on the site 
of the present Savings Bank building, where he continued until he gave 
up active practice in 1835. In 1813, very soon after the division of the 
old county of Hampden, he was appointed Register of Probate for Hamp- 
den County, and Jield the office until 1829, when he was appointed Judge 
of the same court, and continued to hold that place until the court itself 
was reconstructed in its present form in 1858. From 1820 to 1832, he also 
held the office of County Attorney, the local prosecuting officer. During 
the years 1809, 1810, 1811, and 1813, he represented Springfield in the 
Legislature, and in 1820, he was a member of the Convention which 
revised the Constitution of the Commonwealth. 

For at least fifty ja-ars, or from the time of his becoming a member of 
the bar, until about 1855, Judge Morris, as is largely proven by these sta- 
tistics, bore a prominent share in all the public life of Springfield. It was 
something more, socially and politically, in those days, to be a lawyer 
than it is now, and the offices he held were such as the people gave only 
to their most respected, influential, and able citizens. His long continu- 
ance in them, his frequent re-election to the Legislature, the character he 
has left behind him. all testify that he discharged tlieir duties in a way to 
satisfy the demands of his fellow-citizens, and to prove himself a con- 
stantly growing power in the community. He was a man of strong feel- 
ings and positive convictions. A Federalist originallj' in politics, he was 
afterward a Whig, and finally a Republican, though never wholly recon- 
ciled to tlie decay of the Whig party, to which, through all its career, he 
was most ardently attached, and of which he was an influential local leader. 
No speaker was more welcome, or more potent, at its public meetings, 
and in the private councils of its leaders few carried greater weight than 
he. In the town meetmgs, too. Judge Morris always took a prominent 



[first bkaxch.] sixth generation. 83 

part; no importaut questions of appropriations, schools, bridge-building, 
or road-making were passed upon without first hearing bis impassioned 
protest or appeal. He was always dead in earnest, to which great element 
of power he added a good voice, a fine presence, and a full vocabulary. 
Our ears are grown more critical, or modern public speakers are duller, 
for there never have been such speeches since, to our mind, as those w^e 
used to listen to on the evenings just before election, or at the yearly town 
meetings in April, from Judge Morris. Of his efforts at the bar, his 
defense of a young murderer, son of Francis Elliot, who had killed, by 
design or accident, another boy, named Buckland, is the best preserved 
in the traditions of Springfield. He threw himself into the case of the 
young lad with all the enthusiasm and even passion of which he was capa- 
ble, and made an argument which won the sympathy of the jur\' and their 
verdict of acquittal. 

No man, who has lived among us during the last generation of time, 
was so familiar as Judge Morris with the early history of Springfield, and 
with all its old families and business men. About 1847 he wrote a series 
of interesting local reminiscences for the Springfield Gazette, and it is a 
matter of great regret that he did not put on paper, with greater fullness 
and form, more of these recollections of our town and our people in their 
ancient estate, with which he was so intimate. No one can now supply 
in tliis respect what he has carried with him to his grave. 

For the past fifteen or twenty j^ears Judge Morris has been gradual!}" 
withdrawing from our local life. Many of our later residents, indeed, 
were not aware of the continued presence among us of such a hero of the 
past. But until within two or three years he has made the familiar round 
of his little circle, and could be seen every pleasant daj* at the " old corner 
bookstore," chatting with his friends, and criticizing, with all of youthful 
positiveness, the course of public affairs and public men. For the last 
five or six months he has been confined by decay of physical and 
mental powers to his house and grounds, and during this time has slept, 
when at all, wholly in his chair. But he was out of doors on Saturday, 
and while at the dinner table on that day, he was stricken with paralysis, 
became immediately insensible, and died at 5 o'clock Sundaj' morning. 

His wife died many years ago. His brothers, Edward, Richard D., and 
John B., — the latter remaining at the old home at Wilbraham, the otheis 
following their elder brother to Springfield, — all had preceded him to the 
grave ; and of his immediate family, a sister, his niece, who has been for 
a long time his housekeeper, and his two children. Judge Henry Morris, 
and George B. Morris, clerk of the courts of this county, only survive 
him. To them, and to a wide circle of old friends, and to the town of 
whose history he has made so prominent a part, there remain grateful 
memories of a long and useful and honorable life. His funeral will be 
attended on Wednesday afternoon, at the First Church, of which he was 
for many years a prominent member, a constant attendant, and a leading 
supporter. 



84 MORRIS FAMILY. 

FUNERAL OF JUDGE MOHRIS. 

The funeral of Judge Oliver B. Morris, at the First church, on Wednes- 
day, called out a notable representation of the elderly citizens of the 
county, including President Chapin of the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
and Cliief Justice Chapnuin of the Supreme Court. The pall-bearers were 
Caleb Rice, Elijah Blake, Elijah W. Bliss, Benjamin Day, Dr. Pynchou, 
J. D. Brewer, Edmund Freeman, Isaac Mills, George Dwight, A. W. 
Chapin, and Otis Childs. Rev Dr. Buckingham of the South Church 
assisted in the services; and the funeral discourse, which was brief and 
warmly appreciative, was preached by Rev. Mr. Parsons of Boston, for- 
merly pastor of the First Church. The Psalmist's words, " Mark the per- 
fect man," was the appropriate text selected, and the speaker, in alluding 
to Judge Morris's religious life of fifty-four years, classed him as a thor- 
oughly evangelical Christian, a regular attendant at public worship, a 
devoted reader of the Bible, and a teacher for years in the Sunday-school. 

]SfoTE.— The case with which the name of Jfidge Morris is most com- 
monly associated in the minds of the older iijliabitants, is the famous 
Elliot-Buckland murder trial in September, 1834. Not only the town but 
the whole county round about, and in a sense, the State itself were inter- 
ested in the criminal proceedings. Moses Elliot, the accused, was a lad of 
12, and Josiah Buckland, his victim, but a year older. These boys had 
made up their minds to run away, and on a Saturday, in April, 1834, had 
repaired to a hop-house on the Rice farm on the Wilbraham road to divide 
their clothing and to make some preparations for their journey. They 
had an old flint lock pistol with them, and had been practicing at a mark. 
The upshot was that in the middle of the day Elliot fled home and was 
subsequently seen going in the direction of the hop-house with a spade, 
presumedly to bury the dead. On IMonday morning young Buckland was 
found exhausted from blood some distance from the hop-house, and lie 
declared before his death that Moses Elliot had intentionally shot him. 
The Elliot boy told numberless lies about his movements after the shoot- 
ing, and the whole blush of things was against him. No boy so young 
had ever been tried for murder in the commonwealth, and the greatest 
excitement prevailed, when Chief Justice Shuw and Judges Wilde and 
Putnam opened the extra session in the autumn of that year. Attorney- 
General Austin and District Attorney Dev/ey presented the case for the 
State, and Judge Morris was assisted by the brilliant and eloquent George 
Ashmun, who was then just coming into notice. People neglected their 
business, in order to hear the evidence. The Elliot boy's name for 
mischief-making confirmed the popular belief in his guilt, and Judge 
Morris was set to confront a desperately strong tide of circumstances. 
His plea was over two hours long. The old court-house (Odd Fellows' 
building) was packed to the doors; crowds hung about the building, and 
conntry teams were standing in all tlie approaches to the Springfield hall 
o\' justice. Hundreds had driven into the village many miles to hear 



[first BRAXCn ] SIXTH GENERATION. 85 

Morris's defeuse. The lawyer had first to sweep aside prejudice and a 
popular feeling of guilt, and then to offer explanations of the stern facts 
of blood, death, and of the secretive acts of Elliot. 3Iorris had a rotund, 
sweeping and impetuous style of oratory. His powerful arms would 
sweep through the air, and he would pose, or stamp his foot, or stride to 
and fro before the twelve jurymen, as was the wont of the profession half 
a century ago. His plea was masterly and logical, and not a little 
watered with his own tears. The boys were not enemies, but playmates 
and copartners in a scheme of adventure. The Buckland boy had com- 
plained that Elliot had often shot too soon after the former had fixed the 
target, so that he heard the whistle of the bullets. How preferable then 
was the tlieorj- of accident to :he charge of deliberate murder with no 
motive suggested ! Judge Morris used the visit of Elliot to the scene of 
the shooting with spade in hand and his various untruths as arguments in 
favor of his innocence. They were, he claimed, the natural things for a 
frightened boy to do. The crowd in the court-room had been gradually 
drawn to the prisoner's side, and under the skillful handling of Morris the 
jurj^ too, were affected, and when the lawyer sat down, women were in 
tears, and the whole body of listeners deeply moved. The jury acquitted 
Elliot after an absence of two hours, and a memorable scene of relief and 
congratulation followed. 

The compiler was a seatmate in school with Elliot about a year 
or two before the trial. 

That Judge Morris had a memory peculiarly retentive of persons, 
dates, and events is shown by the following incident quoted from 
the Spiingfield Republican : 

"As a number of people, many j'ears ago, were standing near the corner 
of State and Main streets, and among them Judge Morris, Rev. Dr. Osgood 
came along. Says the judge, ' Doctor, is it 15 or 16 years since you gave 
us that discourse that you preached last Sunday?' 'Confound your, 
memorj',' was the reply, and the doctor passed on." 

Judge Morris in his prime was six feet in height; his weight 
somewhat more than 200 pounds. He had a firm, solid step; his 
complexion was hght, he had brown hair and bluish grey eyes. 
Married, Sept. 15, 1813, Caroline, daughter of Hon. George Bliss 
of Springfield ; a descendant of Thomas Bliss, one of the early 
settlers of Hartford. She was born in Springfield, Dec. 28, 1791, 
and died Feb. 9, 1842. She was a woman of most amiable and 
estimable character and greatly beloved by all. , Her father was a 
member of the celebrated Hartford Convention in 1814. Children : 

349. Henry'', b. June 16, 1814. 

350. George Bliss', b. Nov. 12, 1818. 



86 MOUIUS FAMILY. 

UO. EDWARD MORRIS, 2d son of Edward (67), and tlio 
sixth of this name in lino, was born at the Bliss-Morris homestead in 
South Wilbraham, July 21, 1784. Married May 15, 1806, by Rev. 
Moses Warren, to Sally, daughter of Jonathan and Mercy (Leonard) 
Flynt of Wilbraham. She was born in Greenwich, Mass . Sept. 1 0, 
1784, and died in South Wilbraham, June 24, 1807, aged 23. 
Jonathan Flynt was a descendant of Thomas Flynt of Salem, Mass., 
1640. He was born in Windham, Conn., Nov. 13, 1747, and died 
in Monson, Mass., Nov. 6, 1814, aged 67. He married June 18, 
1782, Mercy, daughter of Ensign Ezra Leonard of Hardwick, 
Mass., a descendant of Solomon Leonard of Duxbury, Mass., 1637. 
He was a clothier by occupation, and had mills in Hardwick, 
Greenwich, Monson, and Wilbraham, in which towns he lived at 
various times. His wife was born in Hardwick, Sept. 18, 1751, 
and died in Monson, Jan. 4, 1823, aged 71. 

Edward Morris married, 2d, June 27, 1808, Mercy Flynt, 
sister of Sally. She was born in Monson, Mass, Aug. 1, 1788, 
and died there of consumption, Aug. 17, 1831, aged 43. 

Mr. Morris was a merchant in South Wilbraham, at first of the 
firm of Clarks, Flynt & Morris, his associates being William and 
Eneas Clark, and Jonathan Flynt, Jr., his brother-in-law; the latter 
died in 1808, and the firm became Clarks & Morris. In 1816 they 
sold their business in Wilbraham and removed to Belchertown, 
where the firm became Clark, Parsons & Co. In 1819 Mr. Eneas 
Clark left the firm, which was then changed to Morris & Parsons. 
In 1820 Mr. Parsons left the firm on account of ill health, and re- 
moved to Alabama, where he soon died of consumption He had 
married Nancy Flynt, a sister of Mercy. 

The years following the War of 1812 were disastrous to busi- 
ness generally, and in August, 1821, Mr. Morris failed It was in 
the time of imprisonment for debt. He was arrested, and for a 
short time was confined in the limits of the county jail in North- 
ampton. As soon as he could arrange his affairs he retired to a 
farm, the "Kentfield place," so-called, owned by his brother-in-law, 
Rufus Flynt. Subsequently he removed to another farm, near the 
village of Belchertown, and soon afterward, Aug. 16, 1824, while 
bathing in Swift River, was seized with cramps and drowned. 
His age was 40. During the last war with Great Britain he was a 
quartermaster in the first brigade, 4th divisicm of Massachusetts 



[first braxch.J sixth generation. 87 

militia, Gen. Jacob Bliss, stationed near Boston for coast defense 
in 1814-15. 

In 1819, during a revival of religion in Belchei'town, Mr. and 
Mrs. Morris united with the Congregational Church on profession 
of their faith in Christ. Their wedded life was one of the com- 
pletest love and harmony. There is no recollection among all 
their children of the least exhibition of temper, passion, or inhar- 
mony between them. 

In politics Mr. Morris was a Federahst. He was also a member 
of the Masonic order. While living in Wilbraham he held the 
offices of Constable, Surveyor, Collector, etc. Children: 

BY SALLY. 

351. Edward Flynt", b. March 24, 1807; d. Feb. 14, 1830. 

BY MERCY. 

352. Sally Flynt". b. June 19, 1810; m. Daniel D. Chaffee. 

353. Charles", b. June 6, 1812. 

354. George Flynt", b. May 6, 1814. 

355. Maria Melissa", b. Nov. 2, 1816. 

356. Henry^, b. Feb. 25, 1819. 

357. Jonathan Flynt', b. March 20, 1822. 

14:1. ISAAC MORRIS, 3d son of Edward (67), born in South 
Wilbraham Aug. 2, 1786; died in the house in which he was born 
April 2, 1827; unmarried. Farmer For many years he was one 
of the constables of Wilbraham. In 1819, having removed to 
Belchertown. he was appointed Deputy SherifE of Hampshire 
County. He afterwards returned to Wilbraham. 

14:2. Deacon JOHN BLISS MORRIS, 4th son of Edward 
(67), born in South Wilbraham Jan. 15, 1789. Married Nov. 26, 
1817, Lucia, daughter of Capt. Justin Granger of West Spring- 
field. Farmer. Lived at the old Bliss- Morris homestead in South 
Wilbraham. Deacon Morris filled nearly every town office. He 
was a Justice of the Peace. He represented the town of Wilbra- 
ham in the Legislature in 1856, and was a member of the Conven- 
tion held that year to amend the Constitution of the State. In his 
politics he was a Federalist, Whig, and Republican, For more 
than forty years he was deacon of the Congregational Church. 



88 MORKIS FAMILY. 

Ho was a kind luisband, au indulgent fatlior, and a genial friend, 
and a consistent, exemplary Christian. His integrity of cliaracter 
and kindness of heart endeared him to ail who knew him. 

He died of pai-alysis, June 7, 1866, aged 77, leaving a memory 
most precious to those who knew him best. 

Mrs. Morris died in the city of New York, Feb. 27, 1872. She 
was a woman of great amiability of disposition and character. 
Children: 

358. Carolixe", b. Sept. 9, 1818. 

359. Frances Granger', b. March 28, 1821; m. I. P. Olmstead. 

360. William Pierpont', b. Oct. 11, 1822. 

361. Elizabeth Lucia', b. Dec. 25, 1832; m. Oct. 4, 1871, 

James E. Mclntire, lawyer of Springfield, Mass. 

U3. LUCY MORRIS, 1st daughter of Edward (67), born at 
South Wilbraham, Mass., Feb. 23, 1791. Married Oct. 27, 1812, 
Dr. Daniel Ufford of Wilbraham, a native of Chatham, Conn. 
She died Aug. 10, 1871, at the home of her son-in-law, Milo Chapin, 
at ''Sixteen Acres," in Springfield. "Aunt Lucy" was greatly 
beloved by all who knew her. Dr. Ufford died . Children : 

362. Dixon DeForest Ufford", b. Sept. 3, 1813. 

363. Lucien Moreau Ufford', b. Aug. 9, 1816. 

364. Lucy Morris Ufford', b. Aug. 3, 1821; d. Sept. 11, 1842. 

365. Mary Goodrich Ufford', b. April 22, 1823; m. Luke 

Pease. 

366. TiiiRZA Morris Ufford', b. April 13, 1825; m. Milo 

Chapin. 

367. Edward Wyatt Ufford^, b. May 31, 1831. 

140. Major RICHARD DARIUS MORRIS, 5th son of Ed- 
ward (67), born at South AVilbraham Aug. 30,. 1797; died at 
Springfield June 4, 1870. Lawyer. Lived in Springfield Mar- 
ried Sept. 10, 1828, Sybil Pease, daughter of Daniel Bontecou, 
merchant, Springfield, a descendant of Pierre Bontecou of New 
York, a Huguenot refugee from Lyons, France, on. the revocation 
of the edict of Nantes. She died Nov. 22, 1851. Congregation- 
alist — Federalist — Whig. Children : 

368. Richard Bontbxou'', b. Aug. 3, 1833. 

369. Edward", b. Feb., 1837; d. same month. 

370. IlARXiiET", b. May 19, 1840. 



[first BRAXCH.j SIXTH GENERATIOX. 89 

371. Catherine Sybil", b. Nov. 18, 1851. 
The following notices of Mr. Morris appeared in tlie Sprmgfield 
Republican : 

AN OLD citizen GONE. 

Richard D. Morris, the general wood agent of the Boston & Albany- 
Railroad, and brother of the venerable Judge Oliver B. Morris, died sud- 
denly at his home on North Chestnut street, early Tuesday morning, at 
the age of 73 years. He was a son of Edward Morris, and, we believe, a 
native of South Wilbraham, where his father lived many years. There 
was a family of ten children; eight sons, of whom Oliver B. is now the 
sole survivor; and two daughters, both of whom remain; one of them, 
Mrs. Lucy Ufford, resides at " Sixteen Acres," and the other. Miss Lydia 
Morris, lives with Mrs. John B. Morris, widow of one of the brothers, on 
the old homestead at South Wilbraham. Richard D. Morris was a mem- 
ber of the Hampden County Bar for several years previous to 1837, when 
he became connected with the Boston & Albany Railroad corporation — 
then the Western — as agent to procure for them the right of way through 
this section. In that capacity he early became known to all the farmers 
along the route, an acquaintance that has since been kept up, as these land- 
holders have sold their wood to the company to be measured by " Squire 
Morris," as they familiarly called him. He dined at many of their houses, 
and was an accepted sole arbiter in such disputes as Yankee farmers will 
raise over a wood pile, especially with a corporation. Of late he has been 
compelled, on account of lameness, to resign the more active duties of his 
position to his assistant, Walter Green of Wilbraham; but still occasionally 
came down to his office, and was there on the 11th. Tuesday morning he 
arose in usual health, passed a half hour in his garden, came in, laid down 
on the sofa, and shortly after died. Mr. Morris's wife died years ago. 
Two daughters and a son, Richard Morris, survive him. He leaves a com- 
fortable estate of about $50,000. 



The funeral of Richard D. Morris, the wood agent of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad, who died on the 21st, was held at the First Church, Fri- 
day afternoon. Rev. H. M. Parsons, the pastor, officiating. A large num- 
ber of the older citizens of the town were in attendance, and the venerable 
Judge Oliver B. Morris, brother of the deceased, was expected, but his in- 
firmities would not allow him to brave the terrible heat of the sun. Many 
railroad men were present, including station agents, conductors, and labor- 
ers, and the bearers were Superintendent C. O. Russell, Master Mechanic 
Eddy, Paymaster Holt, Auditor Ritchie. Mr. Morris, as a representative 
from Springfield, engineered the bill for the Western Railroad's charter 
through the Legislature, and he was the oldest man on the Boston & 
Albany pay-rolls. He measured about 1,500,000 cords of wood for the 
road in his lifetime. His successor will be appointed in September. 
12 



90 MORRIS FAMILY. 

148. EDWARD ALONZO MORRIS, 5tli son of Edward 
(67), born in South Wilbraham, March 14, 1801. Died in Spring- 
field. Sept. 2, 1858. Unmarried. Dry goods merchant in 
Springfield. Congregationalist. During the administration of 
Andrew Jackson he was a "Jackson man." In 1840 he voted 
for General Harrison for President, and always after acted with 
the Whigs. The following notices are from tlie Springjhld 
Repuhlican : 

DEATH OF EDWARD A. MORRIS. 

Springfield mourns the loss of another of her old and respected and 
useful citizens. Edward A. Morris, president of the Springfield bank, 
died at the residence of his brother, Judge Oliver B. Morris, early Thurs- 
day morning, after a short but severe illness with dysentery. He was 
born in Wilbraliam, this county, in 1801, but early in life removed to 
Springfield, and entered the service of Moses Bliss, merchant, on State 
street. Samuel Reynolds was at the same time a clerk for Daniel Bonte- 
cou on Main street; and the two young men, after attaining majority, 
united in business under the name of Reynolds & Morris, and for twenty- 
five years or more were among the leading merchants of the town, occu- 
pying the stand now held by Mr. A. W. Lincoln. Industry and integrity 
in a high degree marked their business conduct, and these achieved their 
due reward. Some ten years since, they gave up trade, and Mr. Reynolds 
became president of the Chicopee Bank, and while in that position died. 
Mr. Morris, several years later, followed him in a bank presidency, suc- 
ceeding Mr. Benjamin Day in the Springfield Bank, and now at a similar 
remove, has followed his old friend and partner to the grave. Both were 
often alike called to service in our municipal affairs, and Mr. Morris was 
the leading member of the board of assessors for some years. Intelligent 
and sensible in all business and public affairs; conscientious in the dis- 
charge of every duty; just to friends and generous to all; kind and genial 
in temperament; pure and pious in all his life, —few men were more 
widely known or better beloved in this community than Mr. Morris. His 
death is a public loss. Not only from the private circles of relatives and 
friends has a light gone out. We shall all miss his smiling face and 
pleasant greeting, and cheerful words from the street, and turn in vain 
for his fellow. Mr. Morris was never married, but through the families 
of his brothers had a wide range of relatives, by all of whom he was held 
in esteem and love. The expression of his associates in the direction of 
Springfield Bank is but the voice of all our business community upon his 
life and death. 

OBITUARY. 

Edward A. Morris, president of the Springfield Bank, died on the 
morning of the second day of September, 1858. 

At a meeting of the directors of the Springfield Bank, held on the 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 91 

afternoon of the same day, the following resolutions were unanimously 

adopted: 

AVhereas Edward A. Morris, for nine years a director, and for nearly 

three years president of this bank, has been removed by death ; 

therefore, 

Resolved, That while he has by a long and useful life won high respect 
as a valuable citizen and a Christian gentleman; and while his death is 
therefore an affliction in which all our citizens must have part, it calls 
upon us who have been associated with him in the discharge of common 
duties, for a special expression of our share in the general sorrow. 

Resolved, That by a long and honorable performance of many and vari- 
ous business trusts, he was entitled to the respect awarded to unquestioned 
integrity and fidelity in such duties: 

That by faithful attention to his duties while a director, and by special 
devotion to the interests of the bank since he was elected president, he 
has won our highest confidence, and is entitled to a grateful remembrance 
from the stockholders of this bank. 

Resolved, That we tender to the relations of the deceased, our sympathy 
and condolence in their afliiction, and that as a testimony of our esteem, 
we will unitedly attend his funeral. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be signed by the senior 
director, and communicated to the relatives of our late president, and 
published in the Springfield Republican. Benjamin Day, 

Senior Director. 

FUNERAL OF THE LATE EDWARD A. MORRIS. 

The funeral services of our lamented fellow-citizen, Mr. Edward A. 
Morris, were attended at the South Church on Saturday afternoon, by a 
large number of people, including many of our oldest citizens, and some 
from neighboring towns. Rev. Mr. Parsons of the First Church assisted 
the pastor, Rev. Mr. Buckingham, in conducting them. The latter spoke 
at some length and with interest and propriety of the character of the 
deceased, his usefulness in society, and the prominent and efficient part 
lie had taken in the affairs of that church. To no one, said Mr. Bucking- 
ham, was the South Church so much indebted for its comfortable financial 
condition, as to Mr. Morris. He was one of the founders of the society, 
and alike in its worldly prosperity and its religious life had he taken a 
deep and active interest. 

U9. CHESTER MORRIS CLARK, 1st son of Eunice 
(Morris) (70) and Joshua Clark, born at Windsor, Mass., Dec. 9, 
1784. Died at Sangerfield, Oneida County, N. Y., March 26, 
1829. Married Bilhah Terry, March 26, 1808. Children: 

372. George Morris Clauk', b. Feb. 9, 1809; d. Sept. 6, 1812. 

373. Mary Ann Clark^, b. April 9, 1810. 



92 MORRIS FAMILY. 

374. Morris Clark-, b. April 24, 1812; d. April 30. 1875, at 

Whitewater, Wis. 

375. Henry R. CLARK^ b. Sept. 14, 1814; d. Oct. 30, 1884, in 

N. Y. city. 

376. George H. Clark^, b. June 20, 1818; d. Sept., 1855, in 

Riclimond, Va. 

377. Eliza J. Clark^, b. Sept. 3, 1820; d. Sept. 13, 1848, in 

Sangerfield. 

151. WILLIAM CLARK, 3d son of Eunice (Morris) (70) 
and Joshua Clark, born at Windsor, July 23, 1788. Died at Hins- 
dale, Mass., March 10, 1870. He married, May 31, 1810, Olive 
Cady, daughter of Eleazer Cady of Hinsdale, and settled in Hins- 
dale. OHve Cady was born in Hinsdale, Aug. 8, 1788. Children: 

378. Orlando C. Clark'', b. March 8, 1811. 

379. George M. Clark^, b. Nov. 14, 1812. 

380. SoPHRONiA A. Clark'', b. March 23, 1814. 

381. Elizabeth Clark^, b. May 31, 1815. 

382. Eunice Clark^, b. Oct. 8, 1816. 

383. LoREN C. Clark^, b. April 26, 1818. 

384. William Clark'', b. June 30, 1819. 

385. John Clark", b. March 24, 1824. 

386. Edmund Clark", b. Jan. 8, 1826; d. Feb. 12, 1826. 

387. Olive Clark^, b. June 17, 1828. 

Mrs. Olive (Cady) Clark died and Mr. Clark 

married, 2d, Amanda Wentworth of Hinsdale, Feb. 14, 1833. 
She was born July 25, 1798. Children: 

388. Edward W. Clark^, b. Jan. 24, 1834. 

389. Amanda M. Clark', b. Dec. 14, 1835. 

390. Daniel C. Clark^, b. Aug. 18, 1839; d. March 16, 1841, 

391. Jane L. Clark-, b. Sept. 20, 1841. 

152. JOSHUA CLARK, 4th son of Eunice (Morris) (70) and 
Joshua Clark, born Aug. 15, 1790. Died Aug. 24, 1868, at Ionia, 
Mich. Married, Aug. 15, 1811, Polly Andrews of Sangerfield, 
392-394. Three children; one of whom, Edward Orlando Clark, 
lives in Ionia. 

153. ROBERT CUTLER CLARK, 5th son of Eunice (Morris) 
(70) and Joshua Clark, born July 4, 1792, at Windsor, Mass. 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 93 

Died at Royalton, Niagara County, N. Y., April 7, 1870. Married 
Mary Adams, at Riga, N. Y., where she was born Sept. 28, 1804. 
Children: 

395. Myron Homer Clark', b. Sept. 24, 1837. 

396. LoREN Newton Clark", b. Feb. 5, 1840. 

397. Racine Cutler Clark', b. Sept. 4, 1842. 

398. Donald Cullen Clark', b. Aug. 30, 1845. 

165. JAMES MORRIS, 3d son of Major Chester (71), born 
in Rochester, A^t., in 1800. Removed to Bangor, N. Y. He was 
twice married; 1st, to Amy Clark of Rochester. The name of 
second wnfe is not known to compiler. Mr. Morris died at Battle 
Creek, Mich., Sept. 12, 1851. Children: 

BY FIRST WIFE. 

399. Chester Wales', b. July — , 1826. 

400. Esther', b. June, 1827; m. Henry Howe, Rochester, Vt. 

401. Charles Green', b. Sept — , 1832. 

402. Jane E.^, b. Oct. — , 1834; m. Wilbur Ford, Jan. 28, 1855. 

403. Jedediah C.\ b. 1838. 

BY SECOND WIFE. 

404. James", b. Dec, 1840. 

405. Nancy J.^ b. , 1842; m Rolfe. 

406. Harriet^, b. , 1844; m. Fish. 

407. Susan^, b. , 1846; d. 1858. 

167. TIMOTHY MORRIS, 5th son of Major Chester (71), 
born 1806. Married. Farmer, or laborer; hved at Malone, N.Y.; 
a poor but an honest and much respected man. Children: 

408. Betsey'^, b. ; m. Henry Andrews 

409. Charles D.', b. , 1852; was a clerk in the post oflSce 

at Malone in 1875. 

171. Captain LEONARD M. MORRIS, son of Ebenezer (72), 
born in Holland, Mass., Jan. 10, 1790. Married Mary Paddock 
of Holland, Mass., Dec. 2, 1812. She was born Jan. 22, 1789, 
and died at St. Johnsbury, Vt., Oct. 27, 1835. Married, 2d, 
Martha Brown of Springfield, Vt., in 1836. She was born 
March 20, 1805. 



94 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Captain Morris lived some years in Holland, and was prominent 
in the affairs of that town. He was a selectman and captain in 
the State mihtia. In 1828 lie represented the town in the Legis- 
lature. He removed to St Johnsbury in 1834, and was for some 
years traveling agent for the Fairbanks, the celebrated scale- 
makers; afterwards he was a farmer. He died Feb. 16, 1882, 
aged 92. He had been blind for twelve years previous to his 
death. He was always a great reader, and interested in every- 
thing pertaining to the general welfare. After losing his sight, 
and while obliged to have others read to him, he could converse 
more readily and intelligently on the current news of the day than 
many who could see and read for themselves. At his funeral 
three generations of his descendants were present, and a large 
gathering of friends and neighbors testified to the esteem in which 
he had been held in the community where he had Hved so long. 
In his church relations he was a Congregationalist ; in politics he 
had been a Federalist, Whig, and Republican. Children: 

410. LiNDORF^ b. Sept. 17, 1813. 

411. Walstein L'., b. Nov. 1, 1816; d. Sept. 28, 1818. 

412. Lavater^ b. May 21, 1818; d. Aug. 7, 1830. 

413. Walsteix F.^, b. Oct. 13, 1817. 

414. Hannah P.", b. Sept. 27, 1822; m. Geo. P. Stebbins of 

Springfield, Mass. 

415. Leonard C.'', b. July 1, 1827. 

One child by Martha Brown. 

416. Edwin L.'', b. Aug. 6, 1837; d. in Springfield, Mass., 
March 29, 1863. 

172. ANNA MORRIS, 1st daughter of Ebenezcr (72), born 
Oct. 14, 1795. Married Augustus Moore of Union, Conn., May 
18, 1817. Children: 

417. Ebenezer Morris Moore", b. March 29, 1818; d. Sept., 

1848. Married Maria M. Truax, 1845. One son, 
Henry, b. May, 1847; died Sept., 1848. 

418. RiNDA MooRE^, b. Aug. 22, 1820; m. Merrick Marcy of 

Union, Nov. 18, 1842. Children: 
Merrick Augustus Marcy, b. Aug. 29, 1843. 
Laura A. Marcy, b. Nov. 28, 1845. 
Morris H. Marcy, b. Oct. 18, 1848; d. Jan. 2, 1884. 
Rinda M. Marcy, b. Dec. 21, 1850. 
George C. Marcy, b. April 3, 1852; d. July 8, 1885. 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 95 

William P. Marcy, b. Aug. 21, 1856. 

Harriet L. Marcy, b. June 5, 1861. 
Merrick Marcy died in 1864. He was a shoe manufacturer in 
Union. His sons are engaged in the same business in Hartford, 
under the firm name of Marcy Brothers & Company. 

177. CLARISSA HUME, 3d daughter of Elizabeth (Morris) 
(73) and David Hume, born in Windsor, June 2, 1795. Died Jan. 
10, 1869, at Xenia, O. Married, Dec. 6, 1816, Erastus Pease of 
Somers, Conn. He was born Aug. 30, 1789, and removed to 
Wayne, Mich., in 1847, and to Xenia in 1864. Children: 

419. Francis W. Pease", b. Jan. 23, 1818; m. John Kislen of 

Wayne. 

420. Theodore 0. Pease'^, b. Aug. 26, 1819; m. Lydia J. Russell, 

of Ellington, Conn., April 26, 1846. Farmer. Re- 
moved to Excelsior, Minn. No children. 

421. Morris H. Pease'', b. Jan. 4, 1821; m. Mary B. Jones of 

Excelsior, Minn. Music teacher; d. Nov. 21, 1870. 
Three children. 

422. Lorenzo E. Pease^, b. Sept. 25, 1824; d. in Somers, 1843; 

unmarried. 

423. David H. Pease'', b. Nov. 7, 1826; m. 1st, Anna M. Lewis, 

of Sharpsburg, Pa., May 6, 1852; m. 2d, Mary Burton, 
of Cleveland, 0., Sept. 1, 1857. Merchant; d. Jan. 
13, 1872. Five children. 

424. Stephen O. Pease'', b. Jan. 22, 1829; m. Francis J. Goos 

of Berea, O., Feb. 14, 1856. Railroad superintendent, 
at Cleveland, O. Six children. 

425. MiLo S. Pease^, b. April 22, 1831. Railroad conductor; 

d. unmari"ied. 

426. Theodora C. Pease^, b. April 19, 1834. Lives in Detroit. 

Teacher; unmarried. 

427. Charlotte C. Pease'', b. Oct. 7, 1837. Lives in Detroit; 

unmarried. 

179. BATHSHEBA west HUME, 5th daughter of Eliza- 
beth (Morris) (73) and David Hume, born Sept. 3, 1799. Died at 
Somers, Jan. 11, 1821. Married Azel Pease of Somers, Nov. 20, 
1820. No children. 



96 MORRIS FAMILY. 

178. ELIZA HUME, 4tli daughter of Elizabeth (Morris) 
(Y3) and David Hume, born at Windsor, Mass., Aug. 27, 1797. 
Married Julius Bartlett, harness-maker, Hinsdale, Mass., Julj'^ 31, 
1817; died at Wayne, Mich., Aug. 30, 1839. Children: 

428. Charles E. Bartlett", b. June 2.5, 1820. 

429. AzEL Eliot Bartlett', b. ; d. in infancy. 

430. William Howard Bartlett'', b ; d. Nov. 7, 1852. 

431. AzEL Eliot Bartlett^, b. Nov. 27, 1827, in Hinsdale. 

Lives in Kalamazoo, Mich. 

432. Harriet E. Bartlett^, b. Feb. 11, 1831, at Williamsburgh, 

Mass. Lives at Port Huron, Mich. 

433. Isaac Morris Bartlett", b. July 7, 1833, at Cummington, 

Mass. 

434. Elizabeth Morris Bartlett", b. Oct 10, 1837. Lives in 

Port Huron. 

179. PHILENIA E." HUME, 6th daughter of ElizabetH 
(Morris) (73) and David Hume, born June 5, 1804. Died May 6, 
1850. Married Samuel Dawes of Cummington, Mass., Feb. 9, 

1830. Children: 

435. Harriet Philenia Dawes", b. Dec. 24, 1830; m. Dr. 

Charles Bowker, Bernardston, Mass., March 23, 1853. 

Children: 
Deley Harriet, b. Feb. 21, 1854. 
Alphonso Varrian, b. June 17, 1857. 
Charles Willett, b. July 10, 1860. 
Samuel Dawes, b. Jan. 22, 1863. 
Arthur Hume, b April 14, 1867. 
Effie Louise, b. Sept. 13, 1868. 
Rosie Evelyn, b. March 16, 1870. 

436. LucELiA Eveline Dawes", b. Jan. 10, 1834. 

180. DAVID HARLOW HUME, 2d son of Elizabeth 
(Morris) (73) and David Hume, born at Windsor, Nov. 11, 1801. 
Married Catharine Penniman of Wilhamstown, Mass., Jan. 25, 

1831. Farmer. Removed to Battle Creek, Mich., where he died, 
April 29, 1858. Children: 

437. Samuel Morris Hume'', b. . 

438. Elizabeth J. Hume'', b. ; m. Samuel Muiiger. 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 97 

182. JULIUS MORRIS HUME, 3d son of Elizabeth (Morris) 
(73) and David Hume, born at Windsor, Oct. 7, 1806. Married, 
1st, Elizabeth Ingraham, of Oberlin, 0., Jan. 13, 1843. Married, 
2d, Emala Gaston, of Oberiin, Sept. 26, 1849. Physician. Wayne, 
O. Three children: 

439. Edward Morris Hume'^, b. 

440. Julius H. Hume'', b. 

441. LoREN Clark Hume^, b. 

183. THIRZA HARTSHORN HUME, 6th daughter of 
Elizabeth (Morris) (73) and David Hume, born at Windsor, March 
25, 1809. Died at Wayne, 0., Jan. 5, 1872. Married Henry 
Kilborn, Blacksmith, Wayne, Jan. 13, 1843. No children: 

184. LODOISKA ADALINE HUME, 7th daughter of 
Elizabeth (Morris) (73) and David Hume, born Sept. 29, 1812. 
Married Milton Porter of Cummington, Mass., Feb. 8, 1838. 
Died March 29, 1857. Children: 

442. Morris H. Porter^ b. April 28, 1839. 

443. Ralph M. Porter^, b. June 2, 1842. 

444. Julia B. Porter'', b. June 7, 1852. 

185. Deacon SYLVESTER MORRIS, 1st son of Ephraim 
(74), born in Stafford, Conn., Sept. 23, 1797. Married, Aug. 1, 
1822, Susan Jackson Weston of Randolph, Vt. She was born at 
Randolph, Nov. 27, 1801, and died a very triumphant Christian 
death at Norwich, June 12, 1867. 

Mr. Morris lived in Norwich, Vt. His occupation was that of 
a tanner. He was a Congregationalist and a man of strong 
rehgious convictions and character. He was an early and ardent 
advocate of the cause of temperance and anti-slavery. He died 
at Hanover, N. H., Sept. 12, 1886. Children: 

445. HuLDA Weston^, b. April 20, 1823, at Randolph; died 

Oct. 11, 1849. 

446. Susan Jackson'', b. July 23, 1825, at Randolph. 

447. Joseph^ b. May 24, 1827, at Barnard; d. March 9, 1833. 

448. Edward Weston^, b. Dec. 5, 1829, at Strafford. 

449. Ephraim^, b. May 11, 1832, at Strafford. 

450. Lucy Pamela', b. Feb. 5, 1835, at Strafford; d. May 27, 

1870. 

13 



98 MORRIS FAMILY. 

451. Joseph Sylvester", b. April 23, 18.38; d. Oct. 17, 1839. 

452. George Sylvester', b. Nov. 15, 1840. 

The following obituary is from the Vermont Chronicle of Sept. 
24, 1886: 

DEACON MORRIS. 

Deacou Sylvester ]\Ioriis of Norwich, Vt., died on Sunday, September 
12th, having • nearly completed his eighty-ninth year. Mr. Morris was 
born in Stafford, Conn., the eldest of a family of eleven children. While 
he was yet a boy bis father came to Vermont, then a comparatively new 
and unsettled region, and made his bome in Betbel. Soon after attaining 
ills majority ]\Ir. Morris went to Randolph and married Miss Susan J. 
"Weston. He afterwards lived for a sbort time in Barnard and in Straf- 
ford. In 1837 he became a resident of Norwich and so continued for 
forty-nine years. In bis boyhood he was not strong in body and was, 
according to the custom of those days, assigned to a college course and 
the ministry. But as he grew be became vigorous and was obliged to 
give up his expectations and go to work. His father was a tanner and 
the son followed tbe same business. He built a tannery in Strafford and 
another in Norwich, which still stands. Afterwards, with shrewd fore- 
sigbt, he put up a mill at Hartford, Vt. , for grinding plaster, and estab- 
lished a business which he banded over to his sons when he was sixty-live 
years old. He did not enter again into active work. As a business man 
he was bold, enterprising, and sagacious. He made money, but he did 
not accumulate it. He was too generous. Intent on fulfilling all right- 
eousness, he was rather careless of self-interest. Deacon Morris was a 
man of uncommon individuality and force. In his mental habit he was 
absolutely straightforward and single-eyed. He could not question bis 
own convictions and he could not tinderstand whj' any one else should 
question them. There was no middle ground with him. Riyht was right 
and wrong was inrong, and he could not compromise. He became a Chris- 
tian at the age of twelve and thereafter the claims of righteousness were 
supreme. He took the Bible literallJ^ Said a friend: "1 have many a 
time heard him, as he walked out of his gate, saying over to bimself, ' Go 
preach, go preach, go preach the gospel,' and then he would address the 
first man he met, asking his name and condition and whether he was a 
Christian, and exhorting him." Naturally he was an abolitionist, and in 
the days of the fugitive slave law many a dusky stranger was warmed 
and fed beneath his roof. He was a leader in the temperance cause. He 
feared not the face of man and found a satisfaction in tbe struggle. When 
others shrank and hesitated, he moved directly on. His opponents — 
the liquor-dealers — recognized the disinterestedness of the man and 
respected him. But the baser sort hated him, and at one time bis house 
was defaced and his grounds injured by a rum-loving mob. Intellectual 
toleration he was not capable of. He could not sympathize with tbe 
habits or opinions of those who differed from him. But he was full of 
deeds of charity and kindness. He was a peace-maker who settled many 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 99 

a quarrel and prevented many a lawsuit. He was sought and trusted as 
a counselor and manager of the affairs of others. In one instance a poor 
colored woman in Norwich had lost her eyesight by cataracts. Deacon 
Morris took her to Hanover and kept her there, at his own expense, while 
her eyes were under treatment at the medical college. In another case a 
shrewd old lady, who had saved a little money, opined that it would 
be to her advantage to place her property in Deacon Morris' hands, he 
assuming the responsibility of her support and her husband's during the 
rest of their lives. He accepted the trust against his wife's protest. The 
old gentleman soon died, but the old lady, who was something of a terma- 
gant and very difficult to please, lived on and on, and long after her small 
property was gone he cheerfully supported her, sparing no pains or 
expense to secure her comfort. He had a sense of humor and was quick 
and caustic in repartee. In his later years, after his wife's death, a 
younger man, himself a bachelor, playfully advised him to marry again. 
" When I marry," said he, " it will be to your widow." During the elec- 
tion campaign of 1880 the democrats in Norwich wished to raise a flag 
and came to him for a subscription. He promised to give five dollars if 
they would allow him to inscribe on the flag a motto which he should 
select. They accepted his offer and the flag was spread to the breeze 
with the following couplet lettered on it: 

" Great streams from little fountains flow, 
Great eots from moderate drinkers grow." 

It happened the words "great sots," in large letters, were close after the 
names of Sej'mour and Blair, which were painted on the banner. This 
circumstance, which at once arrested the eye, afforded much amusement 
to republicans and democrats alike. Deacon Morris was gifted by nature 
witli a grand voice. In the summer season, when windows were open, 
his family devotions were shared by his neighbors in their homes. The 
vigor and emphasis with which he used to read a sermon, in the occa- 
sional absence of the pastor, never failed to impress the audience. He 
was an embodied conscience to those about him. Men were inclined to 
conceal their small vices — such as the tobacco habit — in his presence, 
and would not dare to venture an excuse for larger ones. Even the delin- 
quent in the household who failed to attend a church service took care to 
avoid the old man's question and criticism. There was a sincerity and 
absolute earnestness in him which made his voice like the voice of Sinai. 
For man}^ years he had said that it was his daily desire to join the dear 
companion who left him twenty j'ears ago. A little more than a week 
before his death he made his last pilgrimage to her resting-place, where 
many of his hours of reading and musing had been spent. "The right- 
eous Lord loveth righteousness; his countenance doth behold the up- 
right." Right and duty were his watchwords. "What doth the Lord 
require of thee but to do justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly 
with thy God? " was a verse often on his lips. That venerable form and 
noble head will be missed by his fellow-townsmen. His very presence, 



100 MORRIS FAMILY. 

SO full of niggod manliness, was a silent protest against all wrong and an 
incentive to virtue. " The memory of the just is blessed." 

186. AMANDA MORRIS, 1st daughter of Ephraim (74), 
born in Stafford, Conn., Sept. 20, 1799. Married March 27, 1823, 
Asa Child Flynn of Bethel, Vt. Farmer. He died Aug. 30, 1849, 
at Columbus, Wis. Mrs. Flynn at Bethel, March 9, 1873. 
Children : 

453. Julia Amanda Flynn'', b. April 7, 1824; m. March 29, 

1846, Amos Hayden of Bethel. Removed to Clinton, 
Iowa, in 1870. 

454. Eliza Pamela Flynn'', b. Nov. 15, 1825; m. Oct. 26, 1847, 

Hezekiah Parmelee of I^ockport, N. Y. 

455. Ellen Frances Flynn^ b. July 9, 1827; m. Feb. 29, 1848, 

Franklin B. Salisbury, West Randolph, Vt. 

456. Sarah Augusta Flynn'', b. Oct. 4, 1830. 

457. Julius William Flynn'', b. Nov. 28, 1833; d. at Columbus, 

Wis., Sept. 8, 1849. 

458. Laura Morris Flynn'', b. Aug. 13, 1835, 

187. EDWARD MORRIS, 2d son of Ephraim (74), born 
Sept. 15, 1801, in Stafford, Conn.; died at West Lebanon, N. H., 
April 17, 1881. Married Nov. 18, 1821, Lucetta Kinstry of Bethel. 
She died May 19, 1829, at Barnard, Vt. Married 2d, Dec. 8, 1830, 
Harriet Bowman of Barnard, Vt. Agent for sale of iron safes. 
Congregationalist. Children: 

459. Harriet Lucetta^, b. Dec. 31, 1831, at Barnard; d. June 

4, 1849. 

460. Sarah Parmelee'', b. Oct. 17, 1837, at Norwich; d. July 

13, 1852. 

461. Delia'', b. Sept. 15, 1840, at Norwich; m. John D. Strong, 

June 6, 1865. 

462. Mary Converse'', b. Aug. 14, 1842, at Norwich. 

463. Edward Crosby", b. June 18, 1844, at Norwich. 

John D. Strong had one child, Beulah, b. at New Orleans, Dec. 
20, 1866. Mr. Strong d. at Lawrence, Kan., in 1866. 

Mrs. Harriet (Bowman) Morris, was born at Barnard, Jan. 15, 
1812, and died at West Lebanon, N. H., Jan. 1, 1885. 

VM). JESSE CONVERSE MORRIS, 4th son of Ephraim (74), 
born March 7, 1807, at Roxbury, Vt. ; died at Brooklyn, N. Y., 



[first branch.] sixth gexeration. 101 

Jan. 25, 1875. Married Sept. 11, 1836, Angeline Frary, Bethany, 
Genesee Co., N. Y. She died at Brooklyn, Feb. 20, 1871. Agent 
for iron safes. Lived for many years at Lockport, N. Y. Con- 
gregationalist. Children: 

464. Mary Angelina'', b. Aug. 26, 1843, at Lockport. 

465. Joseph Converse', b. July 23, 1845; d. Dec. 27, 1878. 

466. RoswELL Frary'', b. Jan. 1, 1851; d. May 13, 1855. 

191. MARY MORRIS, 3d daughter of Ephraim (74), born 
at Roxbury, Vt., Nov. 27, 1809. Married May 13, 1834, Lewis 
Lillie of Bethel, Vt. He was born in Bethel, Oct. 24, 1808. He 
was a machinist, and the inventor and maker of " Lillie's Iron 
Safe." He lived at Troy, N. Y., Newark, N. J., and died at 
Elizabethtown, N. J., Oct. 1, 1877. Children: 

467. Lewis Converse Lillie'', b. March 22, 1837, at Wood- 

stock. Vt. 

468. Mary Cornelia Lillie", b. April 29, 1843, at Pittsford, Vt. 

469. Ephraim Morris Lillie', b. April 12, 1847, at Troy, N. Y. 

470. Samuel Morris Lillie', b. April 26, 1851, at Troy, N. Y.; 

d. May 2, 1851. 

193. JULIA MORRIS, 4th daughter of Ephraim (74), b. 
March 11, 1814. Married Irving Weston, Sept. 12, 1841. He was 
born Oct. 24, 1808, at New Braintree, Mass., and died at Bethel, 
Oct. 7, 1877. Carriage-maker, Bethel, Vt. Congregationalist. 
Child : 

471. Ephraim Morris Weston'', b. Nov. 5, 1850. 

194. ELIZA MORRIS, 5th daughter of Ephraim (74), born 
Dec. 24, 1816. Married June 2, 1851, Thomas H. Pease, New 
Haven, Conn. Bookseller. Congregationalist. No children. 

195. JOSEPH MORRIS, 4th son of Ephraim (74), born Feb. 
16, 1819. Married June 2, 1855, Clara Elizabeth Seymour, who 
was born at Paris, N. Y., in 1830, daughter of Salmon Seymour. 
Dealer in iron safes in Chicago. He has lived at St. Louis, Mo., 
and Utica, N. Y. Presbyterian. Children: 

472. Seymour'', b. April 19, 1858, at St. Louis, Mo.; d. June 7, 

1858. 

473. Tyler Seymour', b. Feb. 15, 1863, at Utica. 



102 MORRIS FAMILY. 

199. TIMOTHY MORRIS, 1st son of Jonathan (95), born 
at Sturbridge, August 6, 1782. Married May 13, 1S04. Augusta 
Shaw of Sturbridge. Farmer. Removed to Depeyster, St Law- 
rence Co , N. Y., where he died Jan. 30, 1842. On the organiza- 
tion of Depeyster as a town, in 1821, he was chosen town clerk. 
Mrs. Morris died at Ogdensburgh, March 1, 1880, aged 92. 
Children: 

474. Emeline', b. Dec. 18, 1804; m. 1830, Socrates Hopkins. 

She died in California in 1867. 

475. Augusta", b. , 1807; m. 1827, Isaac H. Gray; d. 1857. 

476. Julia A.', b. , 1810; m. 1838, John Barber of Og- 

densburgh. 

477. Susan S.^ b. , 1812; m. 1857, R. Fisher. 

479. Charles Lixcolx", b. 1815. 

480. Haxnah^ b. 1817; d. 1820. 

481. Timothy Dwight", b. 1819; m. 1840, Ellen M. Emerson. 

482. George A.'', b. 1824. 

483. Isaac H.', b. 1827: d. July, 1870. 

[From the St. Lawrence RepiiMican, March 3, 18S0.] 

Our columos to-day contain a notice of the death of Mrs. Timothy 
Morris. Augusta Shaw was born in 1778, at Sturbridge, Mass. She was 
married in 1804 to Timothy Morris. Ten children were born of the mar- 
riage, three of whom, Jolin Barber of this place, Mr. George A. Morris, 
and ]\Irs. Susan Fisher of Wisconsin, survive her. In 1816 Mr. and Mrs. 
Morris removed to Depe^^stcr, where they resided until the death of Mr. 
Morris in 1842. 

Since his death Mrs. Morris has resided with her children. The last 
years of her life' were passed with Mrs. Barber, where she received the 
utmost kind and filial regard and care. Mrs. Morris well deserved it. 
She was a sociable, kind, and good woman. She had an uncommon mem- 
ory, and the numerous anecdotes she would occasional!}" relate of the 
earlier settlers of the countj^ were amusing and entertaining. She was 
endowed with excellent sense and judgment. Her great age and feeble 
strength has for several years kept her confined to the house, but she knew 
and fully appreciated all that was passing, and loved and highl}- enjoyed 
the society of young people. 

Another of the sturdy earlier settlers of St. Lawrence County is gone. 
How rapidly their ranks are broken and pass away. 

200. HANNAH MORRIS, 1st daughter of Jonathan (95). 
born Dec. 26. 1783, in Sturbridge. Married, 1st, Dr. Freeman 
Allen of Sturbridge, April 18, 1802. One child: 



[first branch.] sixth generation. 103 

484. Walter Morris Allen'', b. Aug. 10, 1802. Dr. Allen 

died . 

Mrs. Allen married, 2d, Peter Boyden of Stiirb ridge, April 20, 
1808. One child. 

485. Eliot E. Boyden^, b. April 4, 1810. 
Mrs. Boyden died Oct. 16, 1811. 

201. MATILDA MORRIS, 2d daughter of Jonathan (95), 
born Feb. 23, 1786. Married Jesse McCurdy of Boston, June 2, 
1811. She died Feb. 16, 1871, at Depeyster, N. Y. 

202. JONATHAN MORRIS, 2d son of Jonathan (95), born 

in 1789. Married ; died in N. Y. city, May, 1826, leaving 

one daughter. 

203. LINCOLN MORRIS, 3d son of Jonathan (95), born at 
Sturbridge in 1790; died at Ogdensburgh, Jan. 7, 1860, aged 70, 
Married Ehza W. Dallison of Lancaster, Mass. She died at Ogdens- 
burgh, May 16, 1869, aged 79. Druggist. Lived at Ogdensburgh. 
Presbyterian. Whig. Children: 

486. Lincoln', b. 1812. 

487. George R.^ b. 1814. 

488. Eliza Ann', b. 1817; m. Dr. Hewitt, 1844; died m 1855. 

One child, Morris Hewitt, b. 1853; d. 1866. 

489. Esther M.'', b. 1818; m. Simeon Fitch, 1837. 

490. Caroline Augusta', b. 1821; m. AndrW J. Field, 1850. 

491. John C.^ b. 1824; d. at Toledo, O., 1842. 

492. Henry M.', b. 1825. 

493. William B.', b. 1827. 

494. Walter^, b. 1829. 

204. WILLIAM MORRIS, 4th son of Jonathan (95) born in 
Sturbridge, Mass., July, 1792. Married Emma C, daughter of 
John Rice of Brookfield, Mass. He removed from Brookfield to 
Lebanon, Madison County, N. Y., in 1820. He lived in Lebanon 
forty years; in 1861 he removed to Johnson's Creek, Niagara 
County. His wife died Feb. 19, 1836. Shoemaker. Democrat. 
Children : 

495. John Rice^ b. Jan. 20, 1816 ; d. July 25, 1817. 
496 William W.^, b. April 18, 1817. 



104 MORRIS FAMILY 

497. Catharine', h. May 20, 1819. 

498. Mary Ann", b. May — , 1821. 

499. John", b. Aug. —, 1 823. 

500. WiLLARD^, b. June— , 1825. 

501. Cornelia', b June, 1827; m. T. H. Foster. 

502. Jonathan", b. April — , 1829. 

205. HARVLIX MORRIS, 5th son of Jonathan (95), bom 
at Sturbridge, May 20, 1794. Married, Feb. 22, 1822, Clarissa 
Bullard of Fairfield, Herkimer County, N. Y. She was born 
Sept. 6, 1796. Farmer and shoemaker. Lived atDepeyster, N. Y. 
Children : 

503. Adeline A.'', b. Oct. 27, 1824, at Depeyster; m. Cephas 

Smitli, , 1824. 

504. VoLNEY ^V.\ b. June 2, 1826. 

505. Jonathan B.^, b. Feb. 27, 1828. 

506. Merrick D.", b. March 4, 1830. 

507. FranklinW.', | twins, b. Aug. 25, 1823. 

508. Frances A.^, ) d. June 13, 1854. 

509. Orville 0.', b. Aug. 22, 1835. 

510. Lewis H.", b. April 28, 1837. 

206. ANNA MORRIS, 3d daughter of Jonathan (95), born 

in Sturbridge, , 1797. Married Levi Fay of Brimfield, 

Mass., April 24, 1815. Died at Depeyster, N. Y., June 1, 1865, 
aged 69. 

Mr. Fay was a native of Bx'imfield. In the winter of 1819 he 
removed to Depeyster, N. Y., and settled on a farm on which he 
lived fifty years. He was appointed Postmaster of Depeyster by 
President Jackson, and held the office for eighteen years, when he 
resigned. He was also a supervisor of the town. In 1869 he 
removed with his son Frederick to Springfield, 111., where he died, 
Dec. 27, 1872, aged 81 years and 6 months. He was a Univer- 
salist in his religious belief, and a Democi'at in his politics. 
Children — all born in Depeyster: 

511. Harvlin Fay", b. Sept. 1, 1819; died at Terre Haute, Ind., 

in 1859, at the age of 40 years. He was a professor 
of music. 

512. Laura Fay", b. Feb. 18, 1822; m. B. 0. Hathaway. 



[fikst branch.] sixth generation. 105 

513. Jane M. Fay', b. Nov. 19, 1824; m. Schuyler Judd of 

Ogdensburg. Died March 4, 1845. 

514. Levi L. Fay", b. Nov. 1, 1826; d. May 24, 1844. 

515. Emeline E. Fay^, b. Feb. 14, 1829; ra. L. D. Dean of 

Depeyster, Dec. 24, 1846; d. April 10, 1876. 

516. Pkederick W. Fay'', b. J une, 1832; m. Nov., 1856; removed 

to Springfield, 111., 1869; now lives in Kossuth, Kan. 

517. Mary E. Fay-, b. Feb. 16, 1835; m., Dec. 25, 1855, Edward 

C. Rowe. 

518. Ada Fay^, b. June 8, 1841; d. April 10, 1852. 

208. LAURA MORRIS, 4th daughter of Jonathan (95), born 
1801. Married James Converse of Brookfield, in 1829. Children: 

519. James E. Converse', b. 

520. Sarah Converse'', b. 

521. Emeline Converse'', b. 

209. LOVELL MORRIS, 6th son of Jonathan (95), born 
1803. Married Alice Rounds of Depeyster. He is a farmer and 
lives in Depeyster. Children: 

522. Walter Eliot', b. , 1827; m. in Cahfornia in 1863. 

523. Miner'', b. , 1829. 

524. HoMER^, b. ,1831. 

525. George', b. , 1833. 

526. Hannah', b. , 1835; m. Todd. 

527. Julia^, b. , 1844. 

238. WALTER BOSTWICK MORRIS, son of Walter (101), 
born March 4, 1810, Died July 22, 1885, at Hartford, Conn. 
For many years he lived in Springfield, Mass. Married (1st) 
Phebe Cary. She died March 13, 1856, aged 36. Children: 

528. John W.^, b. May 26, 1844, in Sturbridge. 

529. Julia J. C.'', b. Sept. 17, 1854, in Springfield; m. June 

27, 1872, W. H. Barnard, of Hartford. Printer. 

They have one child, Julia J. C, b. May 16, 1873. 

Mr. Morris married 2d, Susan A. Hawley. She died Sept. 17, 

1859, aged 40. He married 3d, Julia Stebbins. She died June 

25, 1875, aged 44. 

14 



106 MORIUS FAMILY. 



239. SARAH MORRIS, 2d daughter of Walter (101), born 
1817. Married Otis Twichell of Brookfield. Children: 



530. George Warner TwICIIELL^ b. March 16, 1835; d. July 

1, 1835. 

531. Sarah Ann Twichell', b. Feb. 7, 1840. 



SEVENTH GEI^EEATION^. 



277. JOHN CHANDLER MORRIS, 1st son of Sylvester 

(123), born at Whitestown, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1799. Married, , 

1821, Abigail L. Amsden, who died in 1853. Farmer. Lived at 
Conesus Center, Livingston County, N. Y. Republican. Liberal 
religious views. Children: 

.532. LuciA'^ b. Dec. 17, 1821; m. April 8, 1858. 

533. William C.^ b. Aug. 23, 1823. 

534. Minerva'', b. June 15, 1825; d. April 25, 1865. 

536. Adeline", b. Feb. 8, 1828; m. 1855; d. 1868. 

537. Benjamin F.«, b. Feb. 21, 1830. • 

538. George M.^ b. Oct. 2, 1836. 

539. Joel", b. Nov. 7, 1838; d. in infancy. 

540. Phebe«, b. May 11, 1842; d. 1846. 

278. SYL\^ESTER MORRIS, 2d son of Sylvester (123), born 
at Whitestown, Nov. 30, 1801. Died of apoplexy at Conesus, 
Feb. 14, 1877. Married, , 1833, Mary Alger. Children: 

541. Sylvester B.", b. Oct. 17, 1833. 

542. Ornaldo W.^ b. Aug. 18, 1835. 

543. Davenport A.'', b. July 18, 1837. 

544. Joseph B.^ b. June 30, 1839; d. 1840. 

545. Mary E.«, b. Jan. 20, 1841. 

546. John D.", b. May 29, 1842. 

281. MARSHALL S. MORRIS, 4th son of Sylvester (123), 
born at Watertown, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1809. Married, in 1833, 
Sarah Hoard of Conesus. Farmer. Lived at Conesus; removed 
to Jackson, Mich., in 1835; returned to Conesus in 1838. Enlisted 
in the Thirteenth Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers, in the fall of 1861. 
He was kihed in the Second Battle of Bull Run, Aug. 30, 1862. 
His widow removed to Doylestown, Columbia County, Wis. Mr. 
Morris was a Democrat. Children: 



108 MORRIS FAMILY. 

54V. James H.«, b. Nov. 21, 1833. 

548. Elizabeth', b. Feb. 22, 1S36. 

549. Helen- N.^ b. Feb. 27, 1838. 

550. Lester B.", b. Feb. 24, 1841. 

551. Joseph S.^ b. April 22, 1843. 

552. Fulton R.^ b. Nov. 21, 1845. 

553. Sarah C.^ b. Jan. 8, 1848. 

554. Delos R.^ b. April 30, 1850. 

555. JoHX C.^ b. May 3, 1852; d. Sept. 15, 1854. 

556. Charles M.", b. Feb. 7, 1855. 

282. DARIUS MORRIS, 5tli son of Sylvester (123), born at 
New Woodstock, N. Y., May 15, 1811. Died in 1867. Married, 
, 1837, Clarissa Jobnson. One child. 

557. Mary E.", b. May 16, 1847. 

287. DARIUS MORRIS WOOD, 1st son of Betsey (Morris) 
(125) and Isaac S. Wood, born May 1, 1804. Died at Rodman 
April 19, 1849. Married . Had six children. 

289. ORNALDO D. WOOD, 3d son of Betsey (Morris) (125) 
and Isaac S. Wood, b. Dec. 24, 1811. Died in Rodman in 1855. 
Married Harriet Urann of Boston, 1845. Mrs. Wood died in 
1861. Two children. 

290. ELIZABETH WOOD, daughter of Betsey (Morris) (125) 
and Isaac S.Wood, b. May 7, 1816. Died Sept. 30, 1873. Mar- 
ried Dr. A¥illiam Christie of Watertown, N. Y. He died in 1843. 
Two children. 

293. DARIUS MORRIS, 1st son of Captain Joseph (126), 
born at South Wilbraham, April 6, 1815. Graduated at AVesleyan 
University in 1841 ; passed two years at the Theological Institute 
of Connecticut; declined calls from churches at Willoughby and 
Toledo, O., on account of ill health. He went to California in 
1849, and served as minister, conducting funerals and religious 
services in various places before the advent of any home mission- 
ary. He made extensive geological surveys in California and the 
Rocky Mountains, and published an outline of a system of geology. 
Congregationalist. He died at Ellington, Conn., August 31, 1864. 
Unmarried. 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 109 

294. SYLENDA MORRIS, 4th daughter of Captain Joseph 
(126), born m South Wilbraham, Nov. 19, 1817. Died in Wake- 
field, March 19, 1869. Married Lucius Beebe of South Reading 
(Wakefield), Mass. He was born in Hebron, Conn., March 2, 1810, 
and died in Wakefield, April 15, 1884. Mr. Beebe was a tanner 
and leather merchant in Boston. Children: 

558. Lucius Morris Beebe'', b. Sept. 25, 1837, in Ellington, Conn. 

559. William Beebe®, b. Aug. 24, 1839, in Marietta, O.; d. Aug. 

30, 1839. 

560. Charles Stewart Beebe®, b. May 1, 1842, in Wilbraham. 

561. Louisa Beebe^, b. July 15, 1844, in Cambridgeport, Mass.; 

d. July 30, 1866. 

562. Joseph Morris Beebe^, b. Dec. 17, 1846, in Cambridgeport; 

d. Jan. 18, 1857. 

563. Cyrus Gilbert Beebe'^, b. Jan. 16, 1850, at Cambridgeport. 

564. Marcus Beebe^, 



^ T^ o 1 Twins, b. May 2, 1852, at Melrose, Mass. 

565. Decius Beebe^ ) . j > ; > 

566. Junius BEEBE^ b. Oct. 8, 1854, at South Reading. 

567. Frederic Beebe', b. Sept. 1, 1857, at South Reading. 

568. Alice Beebe'^ b. Sept. 1, 1860, at South Reading. 

569. Sylenda Beebe'^, b. Nov. 23, 1863, at South Reading. 

295. ROBERT RUSSELL MORRIS, 2d son of Captain 
Joseph (126), born April 2, 1821, at South Wilbraham. Died 
Dec. 10, 1845. Married, June 18, 1845, Martha Lewis of Farm- 
ington, Conn. No child. 

296. SYLVESTER MORRIS, 3d son of Captain Joseph (126), 
born at South Wilbraham, Jan. 20, 1824. Married, May 23, 1848, 
Frances K. Carpenter of Wilbraham. Farmer. Lives in Elling- 
ton, Conn. Congregationalist. Democrat. Children: 

570. Abby Frances®, b. Oct. 20, 1849. 

571. Delia Maria^, b. March 2, 1852; m. July 4, 1877, Fred- 

erick Pease, tutor in Yale College, now (1885) chemist 
for Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Altoona, Pa. 

572. Fanny King®, b. Oct. 28, 1855. 

573. Joseph CARPENTER^ b. March 19, 1858. 

574. Sarah Louisa^ b. Aug. 10, 1860. 

575. Robert RussELL^ b. May 7, 1863. 

576. Harry Sylvester", b. Nov. 11, 1865. 



110 MORRIS FAMILY. 

577. Sylenda Beebe^ b. Oct. 6, 18G7. 

578. Mary Robbins", b. Jan. 21, 1870. 

297. JOSEPH CHANDLER MORRIS, 4th son of Captain 
Joseph (126), born at South Wilbraham, Nov. 19, 1827. Married 
March 10, 1863, Elizabeth C, daughter of Capt. Junius Beebe of 
New Orleans, La., a noted steamboat captain on the Mississippi 
River, who was killed in an accident on the river, Dec. 13, 1850. 
His age was 41. Mrs. Morris died , . Age 28. 

Mr. Morris was for many years a merchant in New Orleans. Of 
late years he has been a prominent banker in that city. He is a 
Presbyterian. Children — all born in New Orleans: 

579. Jexnie^ b. Jan. 6, 1864. 

580. Louisa*', b. Sept. 16, 1865. 

581. Joseph Chandler", b. Dec. 4, 1867. 

582. Sophia", b. April 20, 1869. 

583. Junius Beebe'*, b. July 21, 1870. 

298. SYLENDA MERWIN, 1st daughter of Rebecca Morris 
(127), and Jesse Merwin, born Oct. 12, 1811, at Rodman. Married 
Mar. 8, 1832, Almanson Alverson of Hermon, N. Y. He died 
Aug. 29, 1879. Children: 

584. Miles T. ALVERS0N^ b. Jan. 26, 1833. 

585. Milo D. Alversox'', b. July 22, 1834. 

586. Harrison S. AlversonS b. Oct. 17, 1837. 

587. Charles W. Alverson", b. Dec. 1, 1840. 

588. Harriet E. Alverson^, b. May 5, 1844. 

589. Anna S. Alverson'', b. July 29, 1846. 

590. George A. Alverson^ b. April 24, 1848. 

302. FANNY MERWIN, 3d daughter of Rebecca Morris 
(127) and Jesse Merwin, born Feb. 14, 1820. Married Oct. 23, 
1840, George W. Smith of Rodman. He died Feb. 15, 1869. 
Children : 

591. Zelia Smith^ b. Oct. 13, 1841. 

592. Reuben Smith", b. Feb. 17, 1844. 

593. Emma Smith", b. June 11, 1851. 

594. Ora T. Smith^ b. April 6, 1857; d. Dec. 18, 1881. 




CALVERT COMSTOCK. 



[first branch.] seventh generation. Ill 

318. MARY ADAMS, 1st daughter of Hannah (Morris) 
(131) and James Adams, born at Rodman, Oct. 6, 1S46. Married 
May 24, 1838, Carson R. Cone of South Wilbraham. He died 
Aug. 8, 1883. Children: 

595. Sarah Elizabeth Cone", b. Aug. 25, 1839. 

596. Amelia Brown Cone^ b. Aug. 17, 1841. 

597. Mary Jane Cone', b. Aug. 27, 1843. 

598. Tartillo Cone", b. May 15, 1845. 

599. Nathan CoNE^ b. Sept. 10, 1847. 

600. Lucy Amelia Cone^ b. July 30, 1850. 

601. Millie Addie Cone^ b. Jan. 30, 185S. 

602. Herbert Carson Cone^ b. Feb. 14, 1859. 

317. LAURA DAVIS, daughter of Polly (Morris) (133) and 
Roswell Davis, born June 18, 1801, in Springfield, Mass. She was 
lost in the woods when about two years old, and not found until 
the next day. Married Feb. 2, 1820, Gilbert Brinkerhoof of 
Boonville, N. Y. He was born Jan. 9, 1800. Children: 

603. Alonzo Brinkerhoof^ b. Feb. 2, 1822. 

604. Sarah Thirza Brinkerhoof^ b. July 11, 1823; m. Silas 

Erwin of Boonville. 

605. John Brixkerhoof", b. Aug. . 

318. MORRIS DAVIS, son of PoUy (Morris) (133) and Ros- 
well Davis, born March 9, 1803. Married 1st, Anna Miller of Con- 
stableville, N. Y. 

606. One daughter, ANNA^ 

Married 2d, , and has a son. 

324. CALVERT COMSTOCK, 1st son of Eunice (Morris) 
(135) Comstock and Albon Comstock. born in Western, N. Y., 
July 2, 1812. His father died when he was nine years old. He 
received his eai-ly education under the excellent training of his 
mother, and bravely began to make his way in the world from the 
first, beginning as a school teacher at the age of sixteen. In the 
interval of teaching and labor on the farm he fitted himself for 
Hamilton College, which he entered in 1831. After spending two 
years in college, he was compelled by his circumstances to leave 
and begin the active work of life. He began and finished his law 
studies with his cousin, Ichabod C. Baker, in Whitestown, with 



112 MORKIS FAMILY. 

whom, after his admission to the bar, in 1835, he formed a partner- 
ship for the practice of law, which continued until 1838, when Mr. 
Comstock was invited to Rome to fill a vacancy in the firm of 
Foster & Stryker, then, and after the admission of Mr. Comstock, 
the most famous and successful firm of lawyers in Oneida County. 
On the first of January, 1855, Mr. Comstock retired from the prac- 
tice of law to assume, at the earnest solicitations of his friends, the 
charge of the Albany Argns. Those who urged him to this step 
were Horatio Seymour, Edwin Croswell, Erastus Corning, and other 
prominent leaders in the democratic party. The Argus had for 
many years been conducted by Edwin Croswell, who had for his 
great political antagonist in the Whig party the noted Thurlow 
Weed. Previous to going to Albany Mr. Comstock had gained a 
large editorial experience in his native county. From 1838 to 
the close of the exciting political campaign of 1840, which resulted 
in the election of General Harrison as President of the United 
States, Mr. Comstock had charge of the Rome ^Sentinel, discharging 
all the duties of its editorship while at the same time engaged in a 
large law practice. He became one of the proprietors of the Senti- 
nel in 1847, the paper being edited by his brother Elon, who in 
1852 became the sole proprietor. In July, 1852, Calvert and Elon 
Comstock started the Rome Daily Sentinel, the first daily paper 
published in Rome. This they conducted for three years and then 
sold it. While practicing law in 1845, Mr. Comstock was appointed 
District Attorney, and in 1847 was elected to that ofiice under the 
new Constitution of the State. He held the office until 1850, 
when his large and increasing law practice compelled him to resign. 
In the winter of 1845 he served a term in the Assembly. Horatio 
Seymour was then Speaker of that body. A friendship was 
formed between the two which remained unbroken until the death 
of Mr. Comstock. While in the Assembly, Mr. Comstock won a 
State- wide reputation in connection with the Constitution of 1846. 
He was chairman of the select committee on that siibject. He 
made an elaborate report, in which he took the ground that under 
the Constitution of 1821 the Legislature had no x-ight to submit to 
the people the question of calling a Constitutional Convention. He 
framed such ameadinents to the Constitution as in his judgment 
were demanded, and urged their adoption by the Legislature, and 
their subsequent submission to the people. He was defeated by a 
combination of Whigs and Democrats, but in the end his judgment 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 113 

was justified by the admission of statesmen and lawyers that the 
new Constitution, as a whole, was inferior to that of 1821. Mr. 
Comstock remained in connection with the Argus until 1866, when 
he was compelled by the sudden breaking down of his constitution 
to return to his old home at Rome. Here, as health permitted, 
he • engaged in various enterprises. He had always shown the 
greatest interest in the prosperity of Rome, and gave largely of 
time and means to that end. He became interested in the plank 
roads leading from Rome in various directions, and in the build- 
ing of the Rome, Watertown & Cape Vincent Railroad, and for 
twenty years he was a director of the Rome & Oswego Railroad. 
About 1870 he was chosen President of the Boston, Rome & Oswego 
Railroad, projected for the purpose of connecting with the Hoosic 
Tunnel, and personally superintended the entire survey of the line. 
He became interested in the purchase of suburban property and 
developing the growth of the town. He was chiefly instrumental 
in securing a city charter for Rome, and in 1872, in acknowledgment 
of his long services as a citizen, he was elected the first Mayor of 
the city of Rome. He also served some years as member and 
president of the Rome Board of Education. The following tribute 
to the memory of Mr. Comstock is fi'om the pen of Mr. Ellis H. 
Roberts, editor of the Utica Mormnr/ Herald, a strong political 
opponent : 

" Mr. Corastock's life was singularly active and singularlj' unobtrusive. 
He was a clear-headed lawj'er, strong in bis points and arguments before 
courts, convincing and influential before juries. One of bis former law 
partners said of bim that he was profoundly earnest and profoundly hon- 
est in his professions, — remarkable as a lawyer who never made any mis- 
takes. Had he remained in his profession he would have stood at the 
bead of the bar of Oneida County. As an editor be was crisp, direct, 
logical, caring little for ornate appeal, and never permitting any partizan 
emergency to carry him one inch outside of a profound regard for the 
rights and feelings of his opponents. As a politician, his counsels were 
sought by the Democratic leaders of the entire State. They were wise and 
moderate always; and be was willing that others should reap the advant- 
age of his sagacity and forethought. As a citizen, he set an example of 
self-sacrifice and disinterested endeavor, and was alw^aj's ready to drop his 
personal associations to labor for the good of the community. As a man, 
Mr. Comstock was above all reproach. He led a life of singular purity 
and simplicity. He hated all ostentation, shrank from all publicity, cov- 
eted no public station, countenanced no obliquity in business, was charit- 
able in all judgment of men, was generous with all he had — too generous 
15 



114 MORRIS FAMILY. 

for his own worldlj'- welfare — and made all men who came in contact 
with iiim love and respect him. No man could have been taken out of the 
city of Rome, or the County of Oneida, who will be more generally 
missed or more sincerely mourned. " 

He died Oct. 10, 1876. Mr. Comstock married, April 27, 1836, 
Eliza Mann Sill, eldest daughter of General Theodore Sill, of 
"Whitesboro. She died Nov. 23, 1868. She was a lady greatly- 
admired. Childi-en : 

608. Theodore Sill Comstock'', b. 

609. Eloise R. Comstock", b. 

610. Elinor Comstock'', b. 
Oil. Cornelia Comstock'*, b. 

612. Calvert Comstock", b. 

613. Edward Comstock*, b. 

614. Lillian Comstock", b. 

325. ELON COMSTOCK, 2d son of Eunice (Morris) (135) 
and Albon Comstock, born at Western, July 14, 1814. Died at 
Albany, , 1864. In early life he was a farmer after im- 
proved methods. He began literary work by editing the agricul- 
tural column of the Rome Sentinel^ of which he afterwards became 
editor and proprietor in connection with his brother Calvert. 
After the sale of that paper in 1855, he became connected with 
other papers, one of which was the New York Jcmrnal of Commerce.^ 
of which he was political editor. He was a fluent writer and 
talker. He married, June 25, 1838, Eliza Allen of Floyd, N. Y. 
After Mr. Comstock's death she married again. Mr. Comstock 
had one child, a daughter: 

615. Eliza Comstock*. b. ; d. of consumption at Clifton 

Springs, N. Y. 

327. ELVIRA MORRIS, 1st daughter of Isaac (136), born in 
Monson, Mass., March 2, 1812. Married, Feb. 24, 1827, Humph- 
rey H. Smith of Cottrellville, St. Clair County, Mich. Children: 

016. Cornelia SMITH^ b. Aug. 20, 1827; d. Oct. 31, 1827. 

017. Andrew Smith«, b. Dec. 1, 1828. 

018. Sylenda Smith", b. Oct. 21, 1831. 
619. Harriet Smith*, b. Sept. 28, 1833. 

020. Charles M. Smith", b. May 4, 1835. 

021. Edwin Smith", b. Sept 30, 1837. 



[first braxch.] seventh generation. 1 15 

622. Louisa SMITH^ b. Oct. 5, 1839. 

623. Aramantha Smith'', b. Dec. 14, 1843. 

624. VioLETTE Smith\ b. Feb. 6, 1846. 

625. Leonard P. Smith", b. July 22, 1850. 

626. Laura M. SmithI )^. .t^,,„,„.^ 

^ ' ^Twms, b. Feb. 17, 1856. 
62/. Jane M. Smith"^, ) 

328. IRENE MORRIS, 2d daughter of Isaac (136), born Feb- 
1, 1814. Died at Shelby, Mich., Feb. 1, 1860. Married James 
W. Dudley, Feb. 8, 1831. He died at Shelby, Oct. 14, 1854. 
Children : 

628. Fanny J. Dudley^ b. March 9, 1832. 

629. Sally M. Dudley^ b. July 1, 1833. 

630. Jared Dudley^ b. Nov. 5, 1834; d. Feb. 13, 1835. 

631. Ezra Dudley^ b. Dec. 4, 1835. 

632. Laura J. DuDLEY^ b. Nov. 5, 1837. 

633. Lucy E. Dudley^ b. Oct. 5, 1839. 

634. James D. Dudley*, b. Sept. 9, 1841. 

635. Levi Dudley*, b. May 4, 1843. 

636. David Dudley*, b. Jan. 19, 1848; d. Feb. 27, 1848. 

637. AsEL L. Dudley*, b. Nov. 6, 1850. 

638. AuRiLLA M. Dudley*, b. Aug. 10, 1854; d. Feb. 26, 1855. 

330. ALBERN COMSTOCK MORRIS, 2d son of Isaac (136), 
born March 18, 1818. Died March 4, 1884. Married, April 19, 
1841, Mary A. Root. Farmer. Lived at Casco, St. Clair County, 
Mich. Free Will Baptist. Republican. Children: 

639. SARAH^ b April—, 1843; m. George Reeder. 

640. Fanny', b. Sept. 5, 1844; m. Norman Newbury. 

641. Isaac', b. Dec. 2, 1845. 

642. Nancy*, b. Feb. 5, 1847; m. George Palmer, Sept. 8, 1861. 

643. Miles*, b. May 24, 1849; d. young. 

644. Polly", b. June 9, 1851; d. young. 

645. Elisha", b. May 23, 1856. 

646. Alta", b. Jan. 24, 1861. 

331. OLIVE MORRIS, 3d daughter of Isaac (136), born 
April 2, 1840. Married, Dae. 12, 1840, David Swift. Children: 

647. Fanny E. Swift'', b. Feb. 6, 1842. 

648. Caroline A. Swift', b. March 8, 1844. 

649. Emma M. SwiFr, b. Dec, 1848. 



1 16 MORUIS FAMILY. 

333. GEORGE ALEXANDER MORRIS, 3d son of Isaac 
(136), born April 19, 1825. Married, July 22, 1849, Cynthia 
Webster. Farmer. Lives in Clay, St. Clair County, Mich. 
Methodist. Republican. Children: 

650. Silas", b. Sept. 4, 1850. 

651. Chauxcey', b. Nov. 10, 1854. 

652. Fanny^ b. Sept. 10, 1857. 

'653. Martha'', b. June 1, 18G0; in. Lorra Smith, Aug. 7, 1880. 

334. HIRAM MORRIS, 4th son of Isaac (136), born April 
11, 1828. Married, in 1864, Jane Richards. Lives in Lenox, 
Macomb County, Mich. Methodist. Repuljlican. Children: 

654. Genett', b. June 25, 1865. 

655. Robert H.", b. March 23, 1867. 

656. George W.^ b. Dec. 11, 1868. 

657. David D.', b. Jan. 21, 1870. 

658. Mary A.^, b. Jan. 4, 1874; d. April 20, 1874. 

659. Manley a.", b. April 16, 1877. 

660. Gertrude A.^ b. Nov. 20, 1882. 

335. SALLY MORRIS, 5th daughter of Isaac (136), born 
Dec. 30, 1830. Married, July 1, 1849, Eliphalet L. Webster. 
Farmer. Lives in Lenox, Macomb County, Mich. Children: 

661. Eli A. Webster", b. July 23, 1850. 

662. George L. Webster^ b. Oct. 12, 1856. 

663. Ida A. W^ebster^, b. July 17, 1870. 

337. ELSA ANN MORRIS, 6th daughter of Isaac (136), 
born June 11, 1833. Married Henry Shirky, June 14, 1848. 
Children: 

664. Levi H. Shirky*, b. March 9, 1850. 

665. Josephine Shirky*, b. April 11, 1851; m. Geoi'ge Brake 

of Marine City, in the town of Cottrellville, Mich. 

Henry Shirky died in Marine City. Dec. 27, 1858. Mrs. Shirky 

married 2d, Smith Campbell, May 16, 1859. He died Nov. 20, 
1870, at Marine City. 

338. CAROLINE COMSTOCK, 1st daughter of Irene (.Morris) 
(137) and Arnon Comstock, born Oct. 25, 1814. Married William 



[fifist branch.] seventh genekatiox. 117 

C. Field of De Pew, Wis., Feb. 16, 1857. She died Feb. 5, 1878, 
at De Pew. One child: 
66G. Arnon Frederick Field", b. Aug. 26, 1858. 

339. SAMUEL COMSTOCK, 1st son of Irene (Morris) (137) 
and Arnon Comstock, born in Western, March 4, 1820. He was 
kicked by a horse Oct. 8, 1869, and died in three hours from the 
accident. He was a farmer and always lived on the farm on 
which he was born. He was an intelligent and successful farmer 
in easy pecuniary circumstances. He had in a large measure the 
esteem and confidence of the people among whom he had grown 
up. He was amiable and gentle in temper, genial in his personal 
and social relations, of strict integrity in business, kind and gen- 
erous to those needing his sympathy and aid ; liberal in all public 
enterprises; a valuable counselor and peacemaker among his 
neighbors and townsmen. Few men in the community in which 
he lived could have been more missed than he. Large numbers 
of people from his own and neighboring towns gathered at his 
funeral. His last words were: "I hope we all shall meet in heav- 
en." He was unmarried, but was soon to have been married to 
Miss Margaret Bliss Goodrich of Waterville, formerly of Spring- 
field, Mass. 

340. CALVIN SMITH COMSTOCK, 2d son of Irene 
(Morris) (137) and Arnon Comstock, born Feb. 24, 1822. Mar- 
ried, March 12, 1845, Hannah Comstock Lyon of Sherburne, 
N. Y. She was born Sept. 21, 1823, and died at her maiden 
home in Sherburne, Feb. 15, 1872. Children: 

666^. Arnon Comstock", b. Dec. 13, 1845, in Western. 
667. Fkedekick Follett Comstock'^, b. May 14, 1849, in Western. 
Mr. Comstock married 2d, June 19, 1873, Rachel F. Bentley of 
Sherburne. She was born March 30, 1853. Arnon Comstock 
was a physician. He died in Illinois, Dec. 10, 1879, unmarried. 
Frederick Follett Comstock is a physician in Illinois. He married 
Alice Brande, June 3, 1874, and has two children: 
Charles Hart Comstock^, b. April 12, 1875. 
Arnon Lyon Comstock", b. Feb. 27, 1880. 

341. EUNICE COMSTOCK, 2d daughter of Irene (Morris) 
(137) Comstock and Arnon Comstock, born in Western, Sept. 14, 



118 MORRIS FAMILY. 

18". 3. She lives, unmarried, at the old homestead in Western, an 
intelligent and most excellent and useful woman, to whom the 
compiler is greatly indebted for facts in relation to his Comstock 
relatives. 

342. MARY COMSTOCK, 3d daughter of Irene (Morris) 
(137) and Arnon Comstock, born Sept. 13, 1833. Married Addison 
Brill of Western, May 5, 1858. After marriage they continued to 
reside for several years in Western. Mr. Brill was a merchant, 
first in general business, then a lumber merchant. In 1866, he 
removed to Ilion, where he still lives, a prosperous business man. 
They are Methodists. One child: 
667^. Charles Comstock Brill^, b. Jan. 1, 1862; now a student 
m Syracuse University. 

340. Judge HENRY MORRIS, 1st son of Judge Oliver B. 
(139). born in Springfield, June 16, 1814. Married May 16, 1837, 
Mai-y, daughter of Colonel Solomon and Mary (Bliss) Warriner of 
Springfield, a descendant of William Warriner, one of the early 
settlers of the town. She was born Feb. 11, 1814. Lawyer. 
Lives in Springfield. He was graduated at Amherst College in 
1832. He represented Springfield in 1846 and '47. He was 
elected to the 34th Congress, Nov.. 1854, but resigned before 
taking his seat, having been appointed Judge of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas, which office he held until the reorganization of the 
cnurts of the State in 1859. While at the bar, Judge Morris was 
considered an able lawyer and a candid and sincere counselor, and 
while on the bench, an upright and popular judge. 

From two preceding generations he inherits a genuine historical 
taste. He has delivered addresses on various occasions and writ- 
ten a number of papers of great historical interest and value. He 
delivered the address on the occasion of the two hundred and fif- 
tieth anniversary of the settlement of Springfield, May 24, 1886. 
His father had delivered the address at the two hundredth anni- 
versary, May 24, 1836. He is a member of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society, and the New England Historic-Genealogical 
Society, and President of the Connecticut Valley Historical Society. 
He has held the ofSce of Deacon in the First Congregational 
Church. In politics he has been a Whig and a Republican^ 
Children: 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 1 1 9 

668. Mary^ b. June 29, 1839 ; m. C. K. Calhoun. 

669. Edward\ b. Jan. 16, 1841. 

670. Henry OLIVER^ b. July 9, 1844; d. May, 1845. 

671. Charles Henry^ b. April 5, 1846; d. Jan. 4, 1868. 

672. Frederick William", ) . b. May 2, 1850. 

673. William Frederick^ \ *^"^^' W. F. died March 20, 1856. 

674. Helens, b. April 12, 1857; m. W. W. Gay. 

A recent writer, sketching the members of the Hampden County 
bar, gives the following account of Judge Morris in the Springfield 
Repuhlican of Feb. 20, 1887: 

" Henry Morris, but recently retired from the active practice of bis pro- 
fession, is tbe most prominent link between the earlier and later history 
of the Hampden County bar. A Springfiekler by birth and by life4ong 
residence, he also links tlie present city with the village of Springfield, 
and through his family with earlier days, on which his historical researches 
have thrown so much light. The son of Judge Oliver B. Morris, he inher- 
its from his distinguished father the antiquarian and historical tastes, tlie 
cultivation of which has specially distinguished his later years. Born in 
1814, be studied at Monson Academy, entered Amherst, and graduated in 
1833, in the class with Judges Lord and Perkins, with whom he was des- 
tined to be subsequently so much thrown. He and young Lord came to 
Springfield together and entered themselves as law students in the office 
of Judge Oliver B. Morris, in the little white, two-story building on Stale 
street, where the Institution for Savings now stands, and next the town 
hall, which was then the center of the political life of the town of Spring- 
field, and where young Morris cnrae afterward to preside over stormy 
town meetings as his father bad done before him. Young Morris supple- 
mented his studies in his father's office with a course at the Harvard law 
school, again meeting both his classmates and friends, Lord and Perkins. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1835, and began the practice of law in the 
State-street office of bis father. From that date for fifty years there was 
DO time except for his four years' service upon the bench of the Court of 
Common Pleas that he could not have been found for professional service 
within a stone's-throw of that spot. 

"Such a man becomes intimately associated with the business and 
domestic life of his town, and under the conditions of Judge Morris's 
earlier career, of his county. Judge Morris has numbered among his 
clients many men whom he has known his whole life through, and men 
have sought his advice to whose fiithers his father had rendered the same 
servipe. He has drawn more wills than any other lawyer in Hampden 
County, both for people in Springfield and in other towns, and it became 
the conventional joke in Wilbraham that no man there was willing to die 
unless he knew that Henry Morris would be the lawyer to settle his estate. 

"There were giants in those days when Judge Morris began making his 



120 MOUKIS FAMILY. 

way at the b ir. Chupman, Ashmuti, IMortoa, Biitca, and Beach were in 
the full tide of success, and in practicing against them Morris became a 
good law\'er. He was a good lawyer rather than a great advocate. He 
had a judicial mind and a comprehensive knowledge of the law, so that 
his opinions were much sought in the stages of dispute before litigation 
begins. While he argued his cases well, it was always the case he argued 
and not extraneous matter calculated to influence court or jury. This 
made his work before the Supreme Court notable, and his service upon the 
Common Pleas bench, from 185" to 1859, of much value. His judgeship 
ended then because the Court of Common Pleas was abolished, the Superior 
Court taking its place, and none of the judges from the old being appointed 
upon the new tribunal. The change created much feeling and criticism 
at the time. It was currently said to be a dodge to get rid of the judges 
of the Court of Common Pleas, of whom Chief Justice Mellen had made 
himself unpopular by peculiarities of manner. The cunning hand of Ben- 
jamin F. Butler, who hated Mellen, is said to have been in the plan, and 
lawyers anywhere in the State who disliked any of the judges turned in 
and helped the move along. Morris had little if any of this sort of per- 
sonal animosity to meet, his rulings and attitude on the bench having 
been distinguished by impartiality and patience in the trial of cases, but in 
order to veil somewhat the real object of the move, and perhaps to make 
places for waiting men on the new court, a clean sweep was made. The 
friends of the old court protested vigorously, and, as its last sessions were 
held, resolutions of respect for judges, and sometimes only half concealing 
the opposition to the change, were adopted throughout the State. Judge 
Morris presided at the last term of the Court of Common Pleas held in 
this county in June, 1859. At its close resolutions were offered by Mr. 
Vose in a speech testifying the esteem in which the judge was held by the 
bar, and in the course of which he said: 

" ' Whatever changes may occur in the administration of justice in the 
State, either in the mode of conducting it, or those who are to administer 
it, I am sure the Commonwealth will be fortunate in finding judicial offi- 
cers hereafter whose retirement from public life will cause such sincere 
regrets as are manifested at the close of your official career. The pride 
and satisfaction which your brethren in this county feel in your judicial 
life will cause them to welcome you back among them to a position in 
society as honorable, and 1 doubt not as satisfactory to you, as the one 
you now hold.' 

" The resolutions read: 

Whereas, by reason of a change in the construction of the courts of the 
Commonwealth, the Hon. Henry Morris is about to retire from the 
bench; and the members of the bar of Hampden County wish that their 
appreciation of his merits as a judicial officer be made a matter of record ; 
therefore, 
Resolved, That the Hon. Henry 3Iorris, by his uniform courtesy, patience, 

and urbanity, in the discharge of his official duties, has merited and has 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 121 

won the esteem of all who have been called to appear before him in 
practice. 

Resolved, That by the correctness of his decisions and his discriminatinij^ 
ability, by his manifest impartiality and steady regard for justice, he has 
earned the title of a wise and upright judge. 

Resolved, That as a gentleman and as a jurist, he has adorned the respon- 
sible station which he has filled; and that, though he is about to pass from 
public office to a private post, he will carry with him all the attainments 
and qualities which have made his judicial career at once honorable to 
himself and useful to the State. 

"In speaking to these resolutions, E. B. Gillett, District Attorney, said: 

" 'In reference to your judicial administrations, so far as it relates to 
that branch of jurisprudence with which I am officially connected, I can 
speak confidently and with unstinted encomium. While the officers of 
government have never failed to receive any reasonable co-operation and 
facility at your hands, not one word of accusation or remonstrance have I 
ever heard from any defendant; but both parties were always assured that 
an even and impartial hand held the equilibrating balances. And when 
Justice has been most sternly vindicated, Mercy, mild and attempering, 
has stood silent by. All parties in court have uniformly borne willing 
testimony to your learning, integritj^ fidelity, patience, courteousness, 
and varied judicial ability.' 

" In reply Judge Morris said: 

" ' During the four years that I have held a place upon this bench, it 
has been my ambition and my aim to understand my duty and to perform 
it according to the best of my understanding and ability. If I have ever 
failed to do this, it has been a failure of the head and not of the heart. If 
any measure of success has attended my efforts, it has been in no small 
degree owing to the courtesy and kindness with which I have been treated 
by members of the bar in every part of the Commonwealth to which duty 
has called me. In all my intercourse with them I have nothing to remem- 
ber in the slightest degree of an unpleasant character. To you, gentlemen 
of the bar of Hampden, I am under peculiar obligations, and shall ever 
cherish for you, individually and collectively, a peculiar regard. This 
county is endeared to me by the associations of my whole life Here I 
was born, and here has always been my home. Here J studied my pro- 
fession, and here, for twenty years before I was called to a seat upon this 
bench, I pursued the practice of it. I shall go next week to a distant 
county, there to complete my brief remaining term of judicial duty, and 
then I hope to return to meet you as brethren, — to resume again the prac- 
tice of our profession in that sphere of duty which constitutes, after all, 
the truest field for the exercise of professional talent. In anticipation of 
a speedy reimion with you, and thanking you again for the expression of 
your regard, I bid you for the present, and this bcncli forever, farewell.' 

" Similar resoluticms were adopted by the bar of Bristol County two 
weeks later, when Judge Morris held his closing term of court there. The 
closing resolution ra*: 
16 



122 MORRIS FAMILY. 

" 'That we heartily ronciir in tlie feeling of regard recently manifested 
toward the judge now presiding by our brethren of the Hampden bar. 
We remember that his first term of court was held with us, and now that 
his hist term is closing with us we wovdd express our ai)preciatiou of his 
high character, ability, and impartiality. We offer him our best wishes 
on his return to the bar, and trust that his career there may be as success- 
ful and distinguished as it has been upon the bench ' 

"Judge Morris has never been an active politician or office-seeker, and 
yet during the more active part of his career he has held many offices of 
trust, both political and other, among them the chairmanship of the com- 
mittee on admissions to the Hampden bar for many years. In that capac- 
ity he has passed upon the qualifications of many men v/ho are to-day the 
leaders of the bar, and though their hair is now as much touched with 
silver as his own, he not unnaturally regards these men as "boys" in the 
light of their earlier associations. He was chairman of the selectmen in 
18-^5 and '46; representative to the Legislature in 1846 and '47, meeting at 
the State House his early friends Lord and Perkins; trustee of the lunatic 
hospital at Worcester in 1854 and '55. He was a Whig during liis early 
life, but joined the American or " Know-nothing" party, and was by thera 
elected to Congress with a rush in 1854. That was the big year for 
Know-nothings, and their Governor, Gardner, appointed Morris to the 
Court of Common Pleas before the session of Congress opened. Accept- 
ing the judicial office, Judge Morris never took his Congressional seat. 
In the same year, too, '54, he was made a trustee of Amherst College, and 
was made an LL.D. by that institution in 1869. 

"Judge Morris has been connected witli two criminal trials of special 
prominence, one as attorney for the defense and one as judge. The first 
was that of Eliza Norton of Monson, in 1840, who was twice tried for 
poisoning James P. Stanton, a .young man who boarded with her, the jury 
failing to agree in both instances. Morris appeai'ed as junior counsel with 
George Ashmun for the defense, making a speech of some three hours in 
length, which elicited warm praise from a correspondent of the Boston 
Notion, who came up to attend the trial, and reported it at great length. 
Of Morris he wrote, prefacing that he was not acquainted with the young 
lawyer personally: — 

" ' He is a very young m;m, and this was probably his first argument in 
a criminal case of much importance. His countenance is fair, open, and 
manly. His figure is good and his gestures easy and natural. His tone of 
voice is rich and agreeable. His mind ajipears to be capable of close, 
continuous thought and of severe analysis or light and ornate efforts. In 
the present case he was fully and carefully prepared for the task before 
him and performed the work in the most successful manner. I have prob- 
ably heard as many good public speakers as any person in the country 
who has not heard all of them, and I assert unequivocally that the. argu- 
ment of Mr. Morris would bear a comparison, in all desirable points, with 
the speeches of the best of them. Few men conduct themselves so judi- 
ciously' — few u.se such choice and elegant language.' 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 123 

" That is very remarkable praise for the speech of a young man of 26. 
"When Judge Morris was on the bench he tried the case of Lyman W. and 
James B. Aldrich at Greenfield, for manslaughter in killing A. J. Potter. 
Potter was a tenant of the Aldriches, whom they sought to dispossess. 
They obtained possession of the tenement peaceably, but by a trick, and 
imderiook to keep Potter out. The latter attacked them viciously, and 
one of the Aldriches shot him, as the jury found, in self-defense. Rufus 
Choate appeared for the defense and George T. Davis for the State. Mr. 
Bowles reported the trial fully for the liep'uNican. His abstract of Judge 
Morris's charge shows it to have been a singularly clear presentation of the 
legal principles applying to the case, and in commenting he said: 'The 
charge of Judge Morris was clear, comprehensive, and ably stated.' 

"At the death of his father, who had been the leading historian and 
antiquarian of the town. Judge Morris inherited a valuable collection of 
publications and manuscripts bearing upon local history, and he has devo- 
ted much time and study during his recent years to historical research, 
becoming indeed the principal historical authority of the city. On June 
22, 1875, he delivered an address on the history of the Fir.st Church of 
Springtield, which was, at the request of many leading men of the city, 
published in book form by his son, Frederick W. Morris, then a bookseller 
here. On the 16th of October in the same year he delivered an address 
upon the two hundredth anniversary of the burning of the town by 
Indians. This covered not only the burning but a careful history of the 
town from its foundation in 1636 down to 1675. and likewise was published 
in a volume. Judge Morris was also a prime mover in the formation of 
the Connecticut Valley Historical Society in 1876, its first chairman and 
president, which latter office he has ever since retained. He read at the 
first meeting. October 2, 1876, an introductory address on the objects of 
the society, in which he pointed out that, though the history of the wars 
and some of the more momentous events through which Springtield had 
passed had been written, the society had a legitimate field in clearing up 
less known, though perhaps not less important, points of local history. 
' I apprehend,' said he, ' that there are many interesting details to be gath- 
ered and localities to be marked which have never yet been preserved in a 
form that shall insure their transmission to those who shall come after us.' 
To the volume of the proceedings of this society, published in 1881, Judge 
Morris was the most frequent contributor, furnishing papers on 'The Old 
Main Street Jail and House of Correction in Springtield," ' Elizur Hol- 
yoke,' 'The Old Pynchon Fort and its Builders,' 'The Old Whipping- 
Post and Stocks,' and on 'Miles Morgan.' He fittingly rounded out his 
historical labors by his able and careful historical address on the two hun- 
dred and fiftieth anniversary of the settlement of Springfield, which is still 
fresh in the memory of the local public. He married, in 1837, Mary, the 
daughter of Col. Solomon Warriner of Springfield, and later established 
his present well-known home rm Maple street, on the lot .so long occupied 
by his father. Four of his chiiiiren are living, — Edward Morris and Mrs. 



124 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Calhoun of this citj% Frederick W. in New York, and Mrs. W. W. Gay 
of Chicago." 

350. GEORGE BLISS MORRIS, 2d son of Hon. Oliver 
Bliss Morris (139), born Nov. 12, 1818; died July 7, 1874, of con- 
sumption. He was a graduate of Amherst College and Cambridge 
Law School; admitted to the Hampden bar in 1840. Married, 
Aug. 23, 1842, Elizabeth, daughter of Wells and Catherine (Bon- 
tecou) Lathrop of South Hadley, Mass., a great granddaughter of 
Rev. Joseph Lathrop, D.D., of West Springfield. She was born 
April 28, 1821. Children: 

675. George Bltss\ b. Nov. 5, 1843. 

676. Robert Oliver\ b. Oct. 18, 184 6. 

677. Caroline\ b. Sept. 18, 1848. 

The following notice is taken from the Springfield Republican : 

"death of GEORGE B. MORRIS. 

" Mr. George B. Morris, for almost twenty years Clerk of the Courts in 
this county, died quite suddenly, Sunday morning, at his home on School 
street. He has been more or less an invalid for a year or two, although 
able, until within a few months, to attend most of the time to his official 
duties. Recently, however, he fell a prey to quick consumption, but so 
lately as Wednesday of last week was able to return from Branford, Conn., 
where he had spent a week in the hope of being benefited by the sea air. 
While eating his breakfast, Sunday, he was attacked by hemorrhage from 
the lungs, and in five minutes was dead. j\Ir. Morris was a native of 
Springfield, and Springfield has always been his home. He was one of 
the two sons of the late Judge Oliver B. Morris, Mr. Henry Morris being 
the other. He fitted for college in this city, was graduated at Amherst in 
1837, studied law with liis brother, and was admitted to the bar in 1840. 
After that time he practiced law, in partnership with his brother or sepa- 
rately, until 1853, when he was appointed Clerk of the Courts p?-o tempore 
on account of the ill-health of the clerk, Richard Bliss. On Mr. Bliss's 
resignation, a few months later, IVIr. Morris was appointed l)y the Supreme 
Court to hold the oflice for life. In 1H50 the office was made an elective 
one, and Mr. Morris was chosen by the people to fill it. He has also been 
thrice reelected, and was chosen last year for another term of five years. 
His courtesy and efficiency in the transaction of all the business of his 
office have made him popular alike with the bar and the people, and his 
death is the county's loss of a faithful officer. Mr. jMorris was 54 years of 
age, and leaves a wife, two sons, and a daughter. Of the sons, the elder, 
Mr. George B. Morris, Jr., is a lawyer at New York, and the younger, 
]Mr. Iv'obcrt O. Morris, is Clerk of the Courts pro tempore, having been 
appointed since his father's illness." 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 125 

352. SAKAH FLYNT MORRIS, 1st daughter of Edward 
(140), born in South Wilbraham (now Hampden), June 19, 1810, 
and died there June 4, 1884, aged 74. She was a woman of great 
amiability of character and possessed a great love for her family 
and friends. Married, May 9, 1833, Daniel D. Chaffee of Wilbra- 
ham, a descendant of Thomas Chaffee, Hingham, 1637. He died 
Sept. 26, 1870, aged 70. Children: 

678. Catherine Newell Chaffee'', b. Jan. 25, 1835; d. Nov. 

12, 1873. 

679. Lucy Morris Chaffee^ b. Nov. 20, 1836. 

353. Deacon CHARLES MORRIS, 2d son of Edward (140), 
born in South Wilbraham, June 6, 1812; died at Keeseville, N. Y., 
Jan. 25, 1875. Married in New York city, by Rev. Charles G. 
Finney, April 6, 1837, to Sarah Maria, daughter of Isaac Smith, 
ship chandler, formerly of Huntington, L. I. She was born Oct. 
13, 1815, and died at Keeseville, N. Y., Jan. 26, 1852. Married, 
2d, at Springfield, Mass, Dec. 1, 1859, Harriet (Bontecou), widow 
of Henry Morris; she died Jan. 28. 1872. Merchant tailor in New 
York from 1834 to 1843; removed to Keeseville October, 1843. 
Congregationalist. Whig, original Abolitionist, and Republican. 
Children : 

680. Sarah Maria^ b. March 22, 1838. 

681. CHARLES^ b. Oct. 12, 1842. 

The following notice is from the Essex County Republican : 

"DEACON CHARLES MORRIS. 

"Deacon Morris has been ill at the Ausiible House for some weeks, with 
varying prospects from day to day. On Monday inquirers were informed 
that he had had a good night, and appeared to be improving. Tuesday 
morning when we came on to the street we learned he was dead. 

"He was a most amiable man, and a true and consistent Christian gen- 
tleman. At all times and on all occasions he illustrated his worth and 
steadfastness in the prompt discharge of every known duty, and gave the 
world an example of what Christian love and purity of character will do 
in making ^our earthly homes and pilgrimages happy. Few such men 
have lived among us. None would be more missed." 

The funeral services took place at two o'clock p. m. on Sunday, 
January 31st. Prayer was offered in the room which Mr. Morris 



126 MOnitlS FAMILY. 

had occupied at the Adirondac House, hy Rev. II. E. Butler, 
pastor, after which the body of the deceased was borne to the 
Presbyterian Church, followed by the relatives present: Charles 
Morris of Memphis, Tenn., J\lrs. Sarab M. Adams of Warren, 0., 
the only son and daughter of Mr. Morris; a sister from Massachu- 
setts, a brother and nephew from Connecticut, and a number of 
intimate and clierislisd friends. 

A congregation which filled the church had assembled to pay 
their tribute of respect to the memory of their dead brother and 
friend. 

The services in the church were conducted by the pastor, 
assisted by Rev. M. A. "Wicker of the Methodist Church, and Rev. 
S. D. Moxley of the Baptist Church. A discourse was given by 
the pastor, from which the following extracts are taken: 

* ' We are followhig to the grave to-day a rare spirit. We are surrounded 
to-day with memories as sweet, and fragrant, and holy as ever clustered 
about the men of whom we have learned to speak as saints. If this man 
had lived in mediaeval times I should not fear to place his name among 
the sainted, nor sliould I now, though in this exceedingly dusty, busy 
world tlie material of which saints ai'e made is voted to be very rare. 

"I almost fear to express my own feelings in regard to him, it seems- 
and sounds so very extravagant. I surely mean at such a solemn hour as 
this to say only what is clearly within bounds. Not merely to honor the 
man, but to honor the thing which gave him honor, I say that in qualities 
of goodness, he of all men whom I ever knew stands facile princeps. 

" We were startled the other morning when we were told that at the 
midnight hour the soul of our brother had taken its flight from the body. 
Then we began to talk of our loss and of his worth. We went to his room, 
and it was to look upon a prince among men, — a hero slain with all his 
armor on, — dead with his face to the foe, and a smile upon his lips, as if 
he had just sang victory and died. 

"It was not, however, because the head of an old and honored family 
was taken that our mourning became almost too deep for tears. Not a 
drop of his blood runs in the veins of one whose home is permanenlly 
with us. There were no bitter tears at his bedside from devoted child and 
loving wife, and faithful sister and dutiful brother. The wife was dead, 
the son was ignorant of the lonely hour and the dying struggles; the 
daughter could not wipe the falling dews and kiss the stiffening lips. 

"At no fireside in our midst would there be a vacant place, at no glad 
home would there be one less that morning to six'ak good cheer. Mis 
home was a public inn, his dearest many miles away. 

"It was not tliat a king of business, with numerous dependents and 



[first branch.] seventh CxENERATION. 127 

manifold alliances, was stricken. There is mourning when these are 
taken, and their place is sometimes hard to fill. It was not that great 
riches had lost their master, great enterprise its head, great power in civil 
life its hand and tongue and heart. Politicians did not crave his name to 
put upon their tickets as an element of success, even for the poorest office. 
His character, by the rules which govern such matters, was not held to 
balance the shrewdness of unscrupulous plotting for success. Bankers 
did not seek his name for their directing boards, or upon their notes. 
Capital did not kneel to him with petition that he would take and use its 
hoards. 

"No, not these, but what is more, what is better, what lasts through 
life, what has not been lost and never will be, wliat staid when alone he 
sought his room, and what held when all else crumbled, faded, died, — 
his goodness. 

"There is no reason but that, why we so peculiarly should grieve. 
There is nothing but that which so marks him off from a thousand others 
for observation. There is no claim to pre-eminence, no reason for which 
we should so honor him with our respect, our reverence, our love, none 
for which the bitter sense of loss should come to us with such wave-like 
power and depth, in comparison with this. If we weep it is because the 
godly man has ceased; if we mourn it is because the halo of that example 
shall live only in memory; if we are dumb from the paralyzing of our 
hearts, it is because this poor, poor, lost world, wants — Oh! how sadly — - 
the light and power, the sweet influence, the ho\y reproof, the benign 
blessing which comes from godly living. It is not because of the man, 
but because of the character in and by which the man expressed himself. 

" His life as it has gone on among us is well understood. In all those 
qualities which make one a wise father, a devoted husband, a forbearing 
friend, a conscientious citizen, he was pre-eminent. 

"Nor were these, as some have supposed, the result of mere physical 
temperament and absence of temptation. Possibly in these respects he 
was to a little degree more fortunate than some, but not more than thou- 
sands of others who have not as yet won his godly reputation, by adding to 
the grace of natural character, which of itself is a grand possession, that 
grace of religion which completes the grandeur of human character. His 
patience was not stoicism. He had tears for pains, grief for afflictions, 
and confessed repentance for the uprisings of a sinful disposition. He 
felt keenly. Nor was it the absence of trial. Business ventures gave him 
trouble, and the long and severe sickness of his loved, tested the substance 
of which he was made. 

" It was the heart anchored to God, which gave him patience amid the 
furnace heat. No man ever said that he was cold, and tlierefore did not 
feel, or complain. 

"It was the Lord, felt to be his shepherd, the Lord whom he knew, 
and in whom he had believd, it was the endurance proceeding from the 
seeing of things unseen, and eternal, that enabled him to feel the smart 



128 MORRIS FAMILY. 

but to meet it willi patience, and amid the fires of aflliction to praise God 
for His mercy. 

"Nor was his goodness a disposition merely; where there is no tire 
there may be no heat, but in such a case goodness is. merely negative. It 
was self control, the heart holding itself to the right, and determined that 
the good should rule. 

"I have seen the fires in his soul; I have marked the keenness with 
which he felt the uprisings of passion, but I have seen at the same time 
the control of the Christian who resolutely sets his face toward Zion and 
will not be betrayed even by himself. 

" It is the testimony of those who had been in his emplo}' or associated 
with him for a score of years, that while they have seen him in positions 
that were a severe trial, and great source of annoyance, they never heard 
a single rough, passionate word from his lips. 

********* 

"At the age of sixteen he made a profession of religion. When he 
went to New York, his piety, instead of being relaxed and frittered away, 
as is the case with so manj'' young men when thej^ go to the city, Avas 
deepened and made more intense. 

"He connected himself with the Chatham Street Chapel, then under 
the care of the celebrated Dr. Charles G. Finney, and afterward with the 
Broadway Tabernacle, so famous for awhile in the history of New York 
churches, and then with the Allen Street Church, of which Rev. Dr. Geo. 
B. Cheever was pastor. In those early years the church was a main 
object of interest and affection. Whatever else was neglected, the churcih 
and its needs were sure to be remembered. 

"In 1844 his church relation was removed to this place, where it has 
since remained. In 1853 he was elected a deacon of the church, and in 
that capacity, or as Superintendent of the Sabbath-school, or member of the 
Standing Committee, or Trustee, he gave his strength, and thought and 
prayer, to every extent within his power. 

"In the earlier period of his life he became associated with men whose 
memory lives in the nation's history in connection with the movement 
which subsequently resulted in the emancipation of the slave and his ele- 
vation to political rights. He imbibed the opinions and became the friend 
and associate of such men as Arthur and Lewis Tappan, Theodore Weld, 
and Joshua Leavitt, and became known along with these as an Abolitionist, 
when that name was one full of the keenest reproach. At first these men 
were crowned with thorns, now they are crowned with gold, and the gems 
grow brighter with growing years." 

354-. Deacon GEORGE FLYNT MORRIS, 3d son of Edward 
(140), born at South Wilbraham, May 6, 1814. Married, May 15, 
1839, Sarah Ann Morse, davighter of Daniel and Polly (Wood) 
Morse of Belchertown, Mass, originally of Foxhoroiigh, Mass. 




CAPTAIN HENRY MORRIS. 



[first branch.] sevexth generation. 129 

Mr. Morris is a wagon-maker, and lives in Monson, Mass. He is 
a man greatly respected for his moral worth. Children: 

682. Edward Flynt', b. July 25, 1840. 

683. Henry^U. Oct. 30, 1849; Hves in Monson, unmarried. 

684. Frank EvERErT\ b. Aug. 2, 1853. 

685. Arthur^ b. March 2, 1859; d. Sept., 1859. 

356. Captain HENRY MORRIS, 4th son of Edward (140), 
born in Belchertown, Feb. 25, 1819. When he was five years old 
his father died, and he went with his mother and younger brother 
to live with his maternal uncle, Rufus Flynt, in Monson, and after- 
wards with his grandmother in Wilbraham. At the age of ten he 
went to live with his uncle Richard Morris in Springfield. After 
being at school a few years he was placed in the bookstore of G. & 
C. Merriam, — the well-known publishers of Webster's Dictionary, 
where he remained for two or three years. He had entertained for a 
long time a strong desire to go to sea, but his wishes were strongly 
opposed by all his friends. His desire became uncontrollable, and, 
at last, on a cold day in March, 1835, he ran away from home to 
accomphsh his long-cherished purpose. He took the direction of 
Hartford, intending to go to New York. His absence was discov- 
ered, and its purpose suspected. One of his uncles started in pur- 
suit, and overtook him at Hartford. Approaching him without 
being seen by him, he placed his hand on his shoulder and said, 
" Henry, had you rather go to sea now, or go home and be fitted 
out ? " He replied, " I had rather go home and be fitted out ? " 
He went home and was "fitted out," and sent to New York, 
and a berth found for him. He shipped as cabin-boy on the ship 
Vesper, Captain Hunt, bound to Belfast, Ireland. While in that port 
he was often sent on errands to the office of the consignees of the 
vessel. These gentlemen noticed Henry's appearance and manner, 
and offered him a position in their counting-room. He decHned it ; 
he had not yet seen enough of the sea to cause him to abandon his 
cherished purpose. After this he made voyages to the Gulf of 
Mexico, to Europe, South America, and the West Indies, during 
which he passed through every grade of seamanship, until at the 
age of twenty yeai-s he became a shipmaster. He was a thorough 
seaman, and fond of his profession. He made navigation his 
study from the day he first went to sea. The writer recalls an 
incident to which he was a most gratified witness. Henry had 
17 



130 MORRIS FAMILY. 

returned to New York from a voyage on whicli lie had been mate, 
and was looking for another bertli. Just at this time the Vesper 
arrived in port. Henry proposed to make a call on his old com- 
mander, and invited the writer to accompany him. On boarding 
the ship, the mate happened to be on deck and near the cabin. 
On being asked if Captain Hunt was on board, he replied that he 
was in the cabin. Henry went down there. Hardly a minute 
passed before Captain Hunt came up on deck, and calling to the 
mate said, "Mr. Adams, Mr. Adams, come here! here's Harry, the 
boy I've told you about, who knew more about navigation at six- 
teen than half the mates that ever sailed ! " 

He was a seaman for several voyages on the barque Isaac Ellis, 
Captain John H. Spring, a brother of the Rev. Gardiner Spring, 
D.D., of New York. One of these voyages was from New York 
to Edenton, N. C. ; from thence to Liverpool, with a cargo of cot- 
ton. When about a thousand miles from Edenton, the vessel 
encountered a terrific gale at night. Henry was sent aloft, with 
others, to take in sail; he was out on the end of a yard, when the 
sail was split by the force of the wind, making a tremendous 
report, and nearly capsizing the vessel. The concussion threw him 
oif the foot rope; he lost his hold and fell; but, throwing out liis 
hands at random in the darkness, he fortunately caught the bolt 
rope of a sail and was saved. His last voyage in the Isaac Ellis 
was from New York to the Mediterranean and to Monte Video, 
South America, and back to New York, where the vessel was 
chartered again for a like voyage. Not caring to make the voyage 
again, he decided to leave the vessel and find another berth. He 
had made the voyage as second mate. 

Captain Spring was noted not only for seamanship, but also for his 
high character as a gentleman, and he appreciated these qualities 
in others. As Mr. Morris was about to take away his sea-chest 
from the vessel and to take leave of Captain Spring, the latter met 
him on deck and handed him a pa'per, at the same time remarking, 
"Mr. Morris, here is a paper for you. It is what I never gave 
any one before; but you deserve it." It was a recommendation — 
certifying to his ability as a seaman and his character as a man. 

Captain Morris was a skillful navigator, and had the full confi. 
dence of his owners. On the occasion of a prolonged voyage, and 
his vessel was anxiously looked for, the owners expressed their 
confidence that all was right on saying, " If it was anybody else 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 131 

but Captain Morris we should be alarmed for the vessel's safety." 
He was also a strict disciplinarian; but he was not in the habit of 
beating his crew with either a capstan bar or a belaying-pin. He 
was a stout, broad-chested man, and possessed great muscular 
power; few men could handle him. Crews generally liked him and 
made consecutive voyages with him; but on one voyage — the 
writer thinks it was when he assumed command of the William 
Neilson — a strange crew had been shipped; a portion of them 
were inclined to insubordination, and one day, as the writer was 
informed by the steward of the vessel, who was a witness to the 
scene, came aft in a body to make some demand of the captain. 
The leader made his complaint and demand. Without making any 
reply, Captain Morris seized the leader by his shirt-collar and the 
slack of his trowsers and threw him overboard, and turning to the 
astonished crew, gave the order, " Man the boat and pick him up ! " 
The order was obeyed with alacrity, and in a few minutes the man 
was on board again. The sea was still at the time, and the vessel 
nearly becalmed, so the man had not drifted away, and was easily 
reached. This summary and singular way of treating insubordina- 
tion put an end to any further manifestations of it. 

Captain Morris was a gentleman in all his ways and manners, 
uniformly kind and courteous. He was liked and beloved by all 
who knew him. He had established a high character; he had 
grown up into manhood free from the petty vices and follies of 
youth. He had always a rebuke for profanity or any indecency. 
On the occasion of his marriage he told the writer the story of his 
life; his great desire to go to sea; the opposition of his friends; 
their fear that his going to sea would be at the risk of loss of 
character; that, like too many sailors, he might become dissolute, 
and profligate '"But," said he, "I had no idea of that result. I 
had taken all that into consideration; I thought I should like the 
sea, and should like navigation ; I should see something of the 
world; besides, I had my aspirations. Now I have been to sea 
since I was fourteen ; I have passed through every grade of seaman, 
ship and was in command of a vessel before I was twenty-one 
years old, and during aU this time 1 have never drank a glass of 
grog; never smoked a cigar or pipe; never chewed a quid of 
tobacco, nor sworn a profane oath." He was indeed a model 
man. Had he lived and continued in his profession he would 
have reached a high position and obtained a wide fame; but 



132 MORRIS FAMILY. 

he was cut off from life just at the age of twenty-five. His first 
command was tlie schooner Julia Ann, in tlie New York and Hay- 
tian trade. He afterward commanded tlie brigs IJenry Dc'afield and 
William Neilson in the same trade, making voyages to Port au 
Prince. He was part owner in the latter vessel, but left it in July, 
1843, to engage in trade for himself. He chartered the schooner 
Mary Bright, Capt. Bright of Baltimore, and loaded it with a cargo 
for Port de Paix, Hayti. The vessel made three voyages to that 
port, and on the third voyage sailed from there January 22, 1844, 
for New York. The vessel encountered a heavy gale in the Gulf 
stream, in which it was nearly lost. Captain Bright, alarmed at 
the situation, requested Captain Morris to take command of the 
vessel. He did so, and took the helm, ordered the vessel under 
proper sail, weathered the gale, and took the vessel in safety into 
Norfolk, Ya. Here he left the vessel for New York, overland, 
Capt. Bright taking the vessel around to New York. The Mary 
Briglit was a "Baltimore clipper," built for bay and coast naviga- 
tion. Captain Morris was dissatisfied with lier as not fit for ocean 
voyages. He sought for another vessel, but they were scarce, and 
charters high. He again chartered the Mary Briglit for the fourth 
voyage, and sailed from New York on the 29th of February, 1844, 
Captain Bright in command. Tlie vessel was never afterwards 
heard from. A severe storm raged along the coast the day after 
she sailed, in which she was probably capsized and lost with all on 
board. In the month of August following, a Provincetown vessel 
fell in with a capsized vessel, bottom up, which, from its peculiarity 
of build, was supposed to be the Mary Bright. 

Captain Morris was at Port au Pi'ince in the William Neilson at 
the time of the great earthquake in Hayti, May 7, 1842, in which 
so many towns were ruined and so many lives were lost, and was 
the first one to bring the news to the United States. 

He married, August 23, 1842, Harriet, youngest daughter of 
Daniel Bontecou of Springfield. She was half-sister of the wife 
of his uncle Richard Morris. She was born in Springfield, Oct. 9, 
1818, and was a descendant of Pierre Bontecou, a Huguenot refu- 
gee from France to New York in 1GS4. After the loss of her 
husband, Mrs. Morris remained a widow until December 1, 18r)9, 
when she married Charles Morris, her husband's brother. She 
died at Keeseville, N. Y., Jan 28, 1872, and was buried there. 

Captain Morris had one child: 
68G. John Emery«, b. Nov. 30, 1843. 




JONATHAN FLYNT MORRIS. 



[first braxch.] seventh generation. 133 

357. JONATHAN FLYNT MORRIS, 5th son of Edward 
(140). born March 20, 1822, at " Kent field place," Belchertown, 
Mass. After the death of his father in 1824, he lived with his 
maternal uncle, Rufus Flynt, in Monson, until 1836. In April of 
that year he went to New York City, where he attended school, 
and filled clerkships until October, 1843, when he went to sea as 
supercargo of a vessel engaged in the Haytian trade. He sold 
his cargo at Port de Paix, and went around to Gonaives, and took 
in a cargo of coffee and logwood for New York. In January, 
1 844, he returned to Hayti and engaged as clerk in the commercial 
house of Elie & Coles, afterwards Charles J. Coles & Co., at Port 
de Paix, an English house, in which he became chief and confi- 
dential clerk, with full power of attorney. A branch house having 
been established in Gonaives in 1846, he went there in April, 1847. 
In July he was taken down with yellow fever; before he had fully 
recovered, a fellow clerk was taken with the fever, and he was 
compelled to return to the counting room. He suffered a relapse, 
which left him in such a weak condition that he was compelled to 
seek a change of climate, and returned to New England. 

In 1844, while with Coles & Co. at Port de Paix, he made a 
voyage to New York, on business for the house, and on his return 
took passage, December 1st. in the brig James A. Marple, at Phil- 
adelphia for Port au Prince. A Mr. Barrett was also a passenger. 
On the night of the IGth of December, while making the-Caicos 
passage, the vessel was wrecked on a reef, about three miles off 
the north Caicos. At daybreak the wreck was discovered by a 
few people on shore, who at once came to the aid of the vessel. 
All hands were saved, and eventually a good portion of the cargo, 
and some of the sails and rigging. The officers, crew, and the 
two passengers, Morris and Barrett, foimd their way to Turks 
Island, a distance of ninety miles. From here all the crew but 
one were sent back to the United States by the U. S. consul, 
who at the same time refused to do anything in aid of the passen- 
gers, Morris and Barrett. They not finding any way of prosecu- 
ting their voyage or of getting away from Turks Island, except 
by returning to the States, bought the small boat which belonged 
to the brig, and provisioned it with the purpose of sailing over to 
San Domingo or Hajrti, one hundred miles to the south, intending 
if possible to put in to Cape Haytian. They hired a sailor to go 
with them, and started on their voyage. They were three days 



13 4 MORRIS FAMILY. 

and nights on the passage, during- which thoy encountered a severe 
gale, a " norther," in which Morris and the sailor were kept busy 
bailing the boat. For thirty-six hours no land was to be seen, nor 
did they see a single sail. After passing through three stormy, 
gloomy nights and suffering from wet and cold, and barely escap- 
ing shipwreck on some one of the numerous islets and reefs which 
hne the northern coast of Hayti, they finally landed on it about 
two leagues westward of Port de Paix. 

It was a foolhardy undertaking, for which Morris was afterwards 
severely rebuked by an old sea-captain who had navigated these 
seas for many years. They had however been somewhat incited 
to it by the statement of the black captain of a sloop to whose 
family they were indebted for hospitalities after being wrecked on 
the Caicos: that in the days of slavery some slaves had taken boats 
and were known to have obtained their freedom in that way. 
Doubtless it was a feasible and safe thing to do in fine weather, 
by taking time and putting into the harbors of some small islands 
on the route, as the captain instructed them to do, but as the 
" norther " came on suddenly after they left Turks Island, and the 
gale blew so fiercely, that '• when the ship was caught they could 
not bear up into the wind, they let her drive." 

After his return to New England, and he had recovered his 
health, he sought temporary employment. This he found in the 
cashier's department of the "Western Railroad, — now Boston & 
Albany, at Springfield. Here he remained until March, 1850, 
when he was offered the teller's position in the Tolland County 
Bank at Tolland, Conn., which he accepted. He remained at 
Tolland until chosen cashier of the Charter Oak Bank at Hartford, 
September 13, 1853. He entered upon the duties of his new 
position on the first opening of the bank, October 3, 1853, and 
remained in it until chosen president, September 3, 1879, which 
position he continues to fill. 

In his church connection he is a Congregationalist; in politics he 
has been a Whig and a Republican. With the latter party he con- 
tinues to act. He was one of the nine persons who met in Hart- 
ford, February 4, 1856, to take the first step towai'd the formation 
of the Republican party in Connecticut. The others were Hon. 
John M. Niles, ex-Senator of the United States; Hon. Gideon 
Welles, afterwards Secretary of the Navy during the administration 
of Abraliam Lincoln; Messrs. Joseph R. Hawley, Calvin Day, 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 135 

Mark Howard, David F. Robinson, James M. Bunco, and Nathaniel 
SMpman. Of these gentlemen, only General Hawley, now Sen- 
ator of the United States, Judge Shipman of the United States 
District Court, and Mr. Morris are now living. 

Mr. Morris is a member of the Connecticut Histoiical Society, 
and for many years has been its treasurer. 

He married, May 8, 1855, Harriet, youngest daughter of Samuel 
and Alpha (Gillett) Hills of Springfield, Mass. Mr. Hills was a 
descendant of William Hills and Phillis Lyman, daughter of Rich- 
ard Lyman, both of whom wei-e settlers of Hartford under Rev. 
Thomas Hooker, in June, 1636. 

Mrs. Morris, for many years an invalid, died March 3, 1879. 
Children : 

687. ANNA^ b. Jan. 24, 1856. [See Addenda.] 

688. Alice^ b. Nov. 18, 1858; m. Rev. Charles S. Mills. 

358. CAROLINE BLISS MORRIS, 1st daughter of Deacon 
John Bliss Morris (142), born Sept. 9, 1818, at the old Bliss-Morris 
homestead, where six generations have lived and where she still 
lives, unmarried, keeping the old home as the resort of numerous 
nieces, grandnieces, and grandnephews. for whom its doors are 
always ojDen. 

359. FRANCES GRANGER MORRIS, 2d daughter of Dea- 
con John BHss Morris (142), born March 28, 1821. Married, June 
7, 1848, Isaac P. Olmstead of New York City; now lives in 
Hampden. Children: 

689. Elizabeth Morris Olmstead", b. July 18, 1849. 

690. Lucia Granger Olmstead®, b. April 10, 1851. 

691. Henrietta Flower Olmstead'', b. Nov. 22, 1852; d. Sept. 

12, 1868. 

692. John Morris Olmstead", b. March 24, 1855; d. Sept. 5, 

1855. 

693. Annie Morris Olmstead", b. Oct. 1, 1857; d. Jan. 4, 1874. 

694. Louisa Frances Olmstead", b. April 1, 1860. 

695. Charlotte Raymond Olmstead'', b. Feb. 3, 1864; d. June 

30, 1864. 

360. WILLIAM PIERPONT MORRIS, son of Deacon John 
Bliss Morris (142), born Oct. 11, 1822. Married, Dec 4, 1868, 



136 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Helen B. Pressey of Mercer, Me. She died Jan. 25, 1887. Far- 
mer. Lives in Hampden. No children: 

361. ELIZABETH LUCIA MORRIS, 3d daughter of Dea- 
con John Bliss Morris (142), born Dec. 25, 1832. Married, Oct. 
4, 1872, James E. Mclntire. Lawyer, of Springfield, Mass. No 
children : 

362. DIXON Deforest UFFORD, Ist son of Dr. Daniel 
and Lucy (Morris) Ufford (143), born Sept. 3, 1813. Married 
Harriet Gould of Ridgefield, Conn. Children: 

696. Charles Ufford'', b. 

697. Edward Ufford*, b. 

698. Josephine Ufford'*, b ; m. — Sessions, Worcester, 

Mass. 

363. LUCIEN MOREAU UFFORD, 2d son of Dr. Daniel 
and Lucy (Morris) Ufford (143), born Aug. 9, 1816. Married 
Esther Kellogg of South Hadley, Mass., — , 1834. Manufacturer. 
Lived at Amherst, Mass. Children: 

699. Amasa Ufford', b. . 

700. Josephine Ufford", b. ; d. 

701. Isaac LTFF0RD^ b. . 



702. Ldgy Morris Ufford'', b. 

703. Henry Ufford\ b. 



365. MARY GOODRICH UFFORD, 2d daughter of Dr. 
Daniel and Lucy (Morris) Ufford (143), born April 22, 1823. 
Married, Dec. 1, 1847, Luke Pease of Longmeadow. Farmer. He 
died May 4, 1885. Mrs. Pease now lives in Hampden. Children: 

704. Mary Eleanor Pease", b. Nov. 14, 1848. 

705. Edward L. Pease", b. Jan. 17, 1850; d. Dec. 5, 1864. 

706. Frank G. Pease", b. Oct. 13, 1855. 

707. RoLLO C. PEASE^ b. July 10, 1858; d. Dec. 5, 1864. 

366. THIRZA MORRIS UFFORD, 3d daughter of Dr. 
Daniel and Lucy (Morris) Ufford (143). born April 13, 1825. 
Married, Jan. 14, 1846, Milo Chapin of Springfield. Farmer. 
Lives at "Sixteen Acres," in Springfield. Children: 

708. Lucy Morris Chapin", b. Nov. 7, 1846; m. Amasa Gardner. 

709. Abbie Rollo Chapin", b. Sept. 21, 1850; m. Farnsworth 

Sawin. 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 137 

367. EDWARD WYATT UFFORD, 3d son of Dr. Daniel 
and Lucy (Morris) Ufford (143), born May 31, 1S31. Died Jan. 
15, 1871. Married Mary Williams of New York City. No 
children. 

368. RICHARD BONTECOU MORRIS, son of Richard D. 
(146), born Aug. 3, 1833. Married, June 20, 1859, Mary, daugh- 
ter of John B. Ripley of Adrian, Mich. Civil engineer. Begin- 
ning in Ohio in 1849, and afterwards connected with railroads in 
Connecticut, Massachusetts, Missouri, and Kansas. He removed 
to Kansas in 1866, and settled at Atchison. In 1883, was 
appointed Insurance Commissioner for Kansas. Democrat. Dele- 
gate to Democratic National Conventions in 1872, 1876, and 1880. 
Member of Democratic State Central Committee since 1870. Vest- 
ryman in Trinity Church, Atchison, Children: 

710. Richard Hunt**, b. April 4, 1860, at Adrian, Mich. 

711. Edward Ripley^, b. Nov. 20, 1861, at Springfield, Mass. 

712. John Bakewell'', b. Dec. 7, 1868, at Atchison. 

713. Mary LEE^ b. Oct. 6, 1870, at Atchison. 

370. HARRIET MORRIS, daughter of Richard D. (146), 
born May 19, 1840. Married, Dec. 25, 1862, Ransom W. Dunham 
of Chicago, -formerly of Springfield, Mass. Mr. Dunham is of the 
firm of Wm. Young & Co., grain brokers. He has been president 
of the Chicago Board of Trade. In 1882, he was elected repre- 
sentative to Congress from the first district in Illinois, and reelected 
in 1884 and 1886. One child: 

714. William Dunham^ b. Oct. 13, 1865. 

371. CATHERINE SYBIL MORRIS, 2d daughter of Rich- 
ard D. (146), born Nov. 18, 1851. Married Frank Reed, Feb. — , 
1870. They have lived in Springfield, Mass., Bridgeport, Conn., 
New York city, and at present (1885) live in Chicago, where Mr. 
Reed conducts a large clothing house. Children: 

715. Raymond Reed*, b. July, 1871. 

716. Kitty Reed^ b. Dec. 31, 1875. 

717. Charles Bliss Reed\ b. Feb. 1, 1882; d. July 30, 1882. 

373. MARY ANN CLARK, 1st daughter of Chester Morris 
Clark (149), born April 9, 1810. Married, Feb. 11, 1835, Otis 

18 



138 MORRIS FAMILY 

Webster of Sangerfield, N. Y. He was born March 4, 1807, at 
Burlington, Otsego County, N. Y. Now lives in Sangerfield. 
Children: 

718. Helen Clark Webster^ b. Aug. 1, 1839; d. Jan. 29, 1840. 

719. Ella Clark Webster^ b. April 3, 1840; m. April 5, 1865, 

Edward Mott. Children: 
Annie W., b. Aug. 25, 1866. 
William E., b. Sept. 16, 1870. 
Otis Webster, b. Aug. 6, 1871. 

399. CHESTER WALES MORRIS, 1st son of James (165), 
born July 6, 1826. Lives in Melmore, Seneca Co., O.; unmarried. 

400. ESTHER MORRIS, 1st daughter of James (165), born 
June, 1827. Married Henry Howe, Rochester, Vt. Farmer. 
Lives in Granville, Vt. Children: 

720. May Howe^ b. Oct. 15, 1862. 

721. HowE^ b. June 14, 1867, 

401. CHARLES GREEN MORRIS, 2d son of James (165), 
born Sept. — , 1822. He is a grocer, and lives in Leroy, Calhoun 
Co., Mich He is married, and has one son; 

722. , b. June, 1872. 

402. JANE E. MORRIS, 2d daughter of James (165), born 
Oct., 1834. Married Wilbur Ford of Rochester, Vt. Children: 

723. Wilbur Ford", b. 

724. Julius Ford", b. 

725. Minnie Ford^ b. 

726. Nellie Ford,^ b. 

410. LINDORP MORRIS, 1st son of Leonard M. (171). born 
at Holland, Mass., Sept. 17, 1813. Married Lavinia M. Snow, 
Dec. 22, 1840. He settled at St. Johnsbury, Vt., in 1836. He is 
a sash and blind maker. Congregationalist. Whig and Republi- 
can. Children: 

727. Nancy J.", b. Dec. 13, 1841; m. George Bonett of Water- 

ford, A^t., Sept. 4, 1865. 

728. Walstein L.", b. Jan. 2, 1843; m. Jane Bouett of Water- 

ford, May 1, 1870. 

729. Julia M.«, b. Feb. 7, 1848. 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 139 

411. WALSTEIN F. MORRIS, 4tli son of Leonard M. (171), 
born Oct. 13, 1817. Lives in St. Johnsbury. Millwright. Mar- 
ried 1st, Aug. 29, 1842, Isabel Shearer of Barnet, Vt. She died 
April 19, 1859. Married 2d, Oct. 18, 1861, Ellen Shearer, sister 
of Isabel. One child by Isabel : 

730. Ellen'^ b. July 21, 1853. 
Congregationalist. Whig and ilepublican. 

414. HANNAH PADDOCK MORRIS, daughter of Leonard 
M. (171), born Sept. 22, 1822. Married March 1, 1848, George P. 
Stebbins of Springfield, Mass. Printer. Foreman for the Sp-ing- 
field Republican. He represented Springfield in the Legislature in 

1882. Democrat. Children: 

731. George Morris Stebbins", b. Nov. 30, 1848. 

732. Louise Fieder Stebbins^ b. Dec. 7, 1850; d. Sept. 21, 1874. 

733. Emma Jane Stebbins", b. Oct. 13, 1859; d. Sept. 13, 1863. 

734. Leonard Samuel Stebbins", b. April 'i, 1861. 

415. LEONARD C. MORRIS, 5th son of Leonard M. (171), 
born in Holland, Mass., July 1, 1827. Married May 21, 1850, 
Lucy H. Snow of St. Johnsbury. She died Dec. 17, 1862. Sash 
and blind maker, St. Johnsbury. Congregationalist. Whig and 
Repubhcan. Children: 

735. Lillian L.", b. May 31, 1852; d. at Springfield, Mass., in 

1872. 

736. Abbie J.^ b. Dec. 9, 1855. 

737. George S.«, b. June 23, 1858. 

738. Katie L.", b. Aug. 5, 1862. 

416. EDWIN L. MORRIS, 6th son of Leonard M. (171), 
born Aug. 6, 1837. Married Mary Collyer of Springfield, Mass. 
He died March 29, 1863, in Springfield. Millwright and armorer. 
One child: 

739. Leonard D.«, b. Jan. 18, 1861. 

446. SUSAN JACKSON MORRIS, 2d daughter of Sylvester 
(185), born at Randolph, Vt., July 23, 1825. Married July 13, 
1847, Edmund B. Kellogg, civil engineer. Mr. Kellogg was em- 
ployed in the construction of railroads in Illinois, and died at 



140 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Galesburgli. Mrs. Kellogg lives at Norwich, Vt., taking tlie care 
of her father, now (1886) in his 89th year. Children: 

740. Arthdr Morris KELLOGG^ b. May 24, 1848 ; d. May 9, 1859. 

741. Susan "Weston Kellogg**, b. July 11, 1852; m. Jan. 14, 

1885, Dr. William T. Smith of Hanover, N. H., where 
they reside. 

742. Edmund Brush Kellogg*, b. Jmie 10, 1854; m. Josephine 

Martin, May 11, 1881. He is a bookseller in New 
York. 

448. EDWARD WESTON MORRIS, 2d son of Sylvester 
(185), born in Strafford, Vt., Dec. 5, 1865. Married May 31, 1865, 
Martha Frye. Mr. Morris is a chair manufacturer at White River, 
Vt. Congregationalist. Republican. One adopted child — 
Grace Bowen. 

449. EPHRAIM MORRIS, 3d son of Sylvester (185), born 
in Strafford, May 11, 1832. Married Alice M. Nickerson, Sept. 14, 
1854. Mr. Morris is a woolen manufacturer at White River, 
Hartford, Vt. Congregationalist. Republican. Children: 

743. Kate Eugenie^, b. Sept. 9, 1857; m. Feb. 16, 1883, Charles 

M. Cone of Hartford, Vt. 

744. Annie Louise^, b. March 1, 1870. 

452. Professor GEORGE SYLVESTER MORRIS, 5th son 
of Sylvester (185), born Nov. 15, 1840. He was graduated at 
Dartmouth College in 1861. Took the degree of A.M. in 1864, 
and Ph.D. Honorary from University of Michigan in 1881. He 
served as Corporal in Company K, Sixteenth Regiment Vermont 
Volunteers, in nine months' service in 1862 and '63. After leaving 
the army he was tutor in Dartmouth College. From September 
1864, to February, 1866, he was a student in Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. Studied Pliilosophy in Europe from 
February, 1866, to August, 1868. Professor of Modern Languages 
and Literature in the University of Michigan from September, 
1870, to February, 1880. Appointed non-resident lecturer in 
Etliics and History of Philosophy in Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, in 1878. Appointed Professor of Ethics and History 
of Philosophy and Logic in University of Michigan, in 1881. 
He has published translations of Ueberwegs' " History of Philoso- 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 141 

phy" (2 vols, octavo, 1872-4). " British Thought and Thinkers." 
1880. Kants' "Critique of Pure Reason " — a critical exposition 
— 1882. "Philosophy and Christianity," 1883; and articles in 
Bih. Sacra, New Englander, Princeton Review, etc., and papers for 
Victoria Institute, London. 

Married, June 2, 1876, Victoria, daughter of Charles and Mary 
Rogers Celle of Newburgh, N. Y. She was born June 1, 1850. 
Children : 

745. Roger Sylvester'', b. Sept. 24, 1877, at Ann Arbor, Mich. 

746. Ethel Celle«, b. March 31, 1880, at Ann Arbor, Mich. 

453. JULIA AMANDA FLYNN, 1st daughter of Amanda 
Morris (186) and Asa C. Plynn, born April 7, 1824. Married, 
March 29, 1846, Amos Hayden of Bethel, Vt. He is a sash and 
blind maker. Lives in Clinton, Iowa. He is a Congregationalist. 
Children: 

747. Laura Amanda Hayden^, b. Dec. 13, 1847. 

748. William Flynn Hayden", b. Aug. 13, 1849. 

749. Prank Morris Hayden^, b. Aug. 5, 1857; d. Nov. 15, 1869. 

750. Flora Augusta Hayden**, b. Dec. 30, 1861. 

751. Arthur Harry Hayden^ b. Dec. 23, 1863. 

752. Carrie Anna Hayden", b. Oct. 24, 1866. 

Laura A. Hayden m. April 29, 1867, Edwin C. Stewai't, book- 
seller, Clinton, Iowa. One child, Bertha, b. Oct. 22, 1869. 

454. ELIZA P. FLYNN, 2d daughter of Amanda Morris 
(186) and Asa C. Plynn, born Nov. 15, 1825. Married, Oct. 26, 

1847, Ezekiel Parmelee of Lockport, N. Y. Children: 

753. Jane "Wisner Parmelee", b. Jan. 4, 1852. 

754. William Hezekiah Parmelee", b. Jan. 10, 1854; d. Sept. 

2, 1855. 

755. Eliza Flynn Parmelee", b. Jan. 21, 1858. 

756. William Hezekiah Parmelee^, b. Dec. 10, 1860. 

757. Laura Bellan Parmelee", b. Oct. 25, 1863. 

455. ELLEN FRANCES FLYNN, 3d daughter of Amanda 
(Morris) (186) and Asa C. Flynn, born . Married, Feb, 29, 

1848, Franklin Belcher Salisbury of West Randolph, Vt. Fur- 
niture manufacturer. Children: 

758. William Franklin Salisbury", b. Sept. 2, 1849. 



142 MORRIS FAMILY. 

759. Albert Philander Salisbury", ) ■ ^ r io loc- 

}- Twins, D. June 12, 185/. 

760. Hubert Belcher bALiSBURv", ) 

761. Edgar Thojuas Salisbury", b. Nov. 13, 1870. 
William F. Salisbury m. Mary Bass, Oct. 5, 1869. 

463. EDWARD CROSBY MORRIS, son of Edward (187), 
born June 18, 1844, at Norwich, Vt. Married, Nov. 2, 1872, Julia 
M. Porter of Boston, Mass. She was born in Boston, Dec. 12, 
1849, and died there April 6, 1878. Mr. Morris is of the well 
known firm of Morris & Ireland, manufacturers of iron safes, 
Boston. Children : 

762. Walden Porter^, b. March 20, 1874; died at West Leba- 

non, N. H., July 27, 1875. 

763. Helen BillIxNgs^, b. Nov. 11, 1875. 

467. LEWIS CONVERSE LILLIE, 1st son of Lewis and 
Mary (Morris) Lillie (191), born at Woodstock, Vt., March 22, 
1837. Married, May 8, '1861, Julia Fry of Troy, N. Y. Safe 
and iron dealer, Newark, N. J. Children: 

764. Mary Amelia Lillie**, b. April 2, 1862, at Troy. 

765. Lewis Lillie^, b. Oct. 13, 1863, at Troy. 

766. George R. Lillie*, b. March 9, 1865, at Troy. 

767. Julia Lillie*, b. July 26, 1866; d. at Newark, July 31, 

1867. 

468. MARY CORNELIA LILLIE, daughter of Louis and 
Mary (Morris) Lillie (191), born at Pittsford, Vt., April 9, 1843. 
Married, Feb. 13, 1866, William Wahace Baxter of Troy. Whole- 
sale grocer, Norfolk, Va. Children: 

768. Louis Sidney Baxter'^, b. Jan. 29, 1867, at Salem, N. Y. 

769. Mattie Maria Baxter", b. Oct. 1, 1869, at Castleton, Vt. 

474. EMELINE MORRIS, 1st daughter of Timothy (199), 
born in 1804. Married Socrates Hopkins in 1830. She died in 
California in 1857. Children: 

770. Charles Morris Hopkins**, b. 1831. 

771. Bmeline Hopkins^, b. 1834; d. 1837. 

772. George Hopkins«, b. 1840; d. 1843. 

475. AUGUSTA MORRIS. 2d daughter of Timothy (199), 
born in 1807. Married Isaac H. Gray in 1827. Died in 1857. 
( 'liililreii: 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 143 

773. LuMON M. Gray^ b. 1829. 

774. Timothy Gray*, b. 1832. 
7 75. Isaac H. Gray^, b. 1834. 

776. Francis A. Gray^, b. 1836. 

777. Frances Adgusta Gray"*, b. 1838; m. Andrew Jones; d. 

, 1859. 

778. Virginia Gray*, b. 1840; d. 1860. 

779. Sylvester Gray*, b. 1842; d. I860. 

780. Preston King Gray*, b. 1844; d. 1865. 

476. JULIA A. xMORRIS, 3d daughter of Timothy (199), 

born at Sturbridge, , 1810. Married, , 1838, John 

Barber of Ogdensburg. Mr. Barber died April 11, 1875. No 
children. 

The following notice is from the St. Laivrence Repuhlican : 

JOHN BARBER. 

Died at his residence in this city, Sunday morning, John Barber, aged 
sixty-four years. Mr. Barber has been a resident of Ogdensburg for the 
hist forty-three years, and one of its most enterprising and successful 
business men. He was born at Wardsboro, Windham Countj% Vt. He 
learned the baking business at Boston, Mass. He came to Ogdensburg in 
1833, and worked two years for A. W. Woolley. He commenced business 
on his own account on the stand now occupied by the Ogdensburg Bakery, 
fort}--one years ago. By industry, economy, enterprise, and integrity, he 
won a good name, the respect of his fellow-citizens, and a competency. 
He always kept a large number of men employed, and belonged to the 
class of whom it may truthfully be said, "He left our city and the world 
the better for having been in them." His enterprise was not confined to 
the bakery business. He had a decided taste for improvements and 
invested his means in the purchase of lots and erection of buildings. He 
built the Ogdensburg Bakery, the stores occupied by F. B. Baldwin & 
Company, and E. Spooner, that occupied by the Montreal Telegraph 
Company and Grand Trunk Railway office, the new block of three stores 
on the south side of Ford street, near Caroline street, the brick building 
in which he was doing business at the time of his death, and at least half 
a dozen dwellings, all of which stand as monuments of his eiforts to make 
Ogdensburg a more respectable appearing place. He was modest, aspir- 
ing to no public position, though once compelled by the people to serve 
as an alderman, and satisfied to mind his own business. He led an 
honest, upright, and consistent Christian life. He was a member of St. 
John's Episcopal church, and one of the vestry at the time of his death. 

His disease was pneumonia, and his illness of but short duration. His 
funeral services will take place at St. John's church at 2 p. Ji. to-morrow. 



144 MORRIS FAMILY. 

To Mrs. Barber the compiler is indebted for much of the 
information concerning the family in St. Lawrence County. 

471). CHARLES LINCOLN MORRIS, 1st son of Timothy 
(199), born at Depeyster in 1815. Married, in 1867, Hannah J. 
Parshall of Tannersville, N. Y. Died at Caledonia, Wis., January, 
1874. She died March 27, 1875. Children: 

782. JuLiA\ 

783. Mary Augusta^ 

481. TIMOTHY DWIGHT MORRIS, 2d son of Timothy 
(199), born at Depeyster in 1819. Married Ellen M. Emerson m 
1843. Farmer. Lives at Racine, Wis. Children: 

784. George S.«, b. 1844. 

785. Henry«, b. 1846. 

786. Frank^ b. 1848. 

787. Harvey*, b. 1850. 

788. JoHX«, b. 1852. 

789. Byron S.«, b. 1854. 

790. Ellen Augusta*, b. 1857. 

791. William^ b. 1861. 

482. GEORGE A. MORRIS, 3d son of Timothy (199), born 
at Depeyster in 1824. Married in 1854. Farmer. Lives in 
Berlin, Wis. Children: 

792. Orville*, b. 1860. 

793. Homer^ b. 1862. 

483. ISAAC HENRY MORRIS, 4th son of Timothy (199), 
born at Depeyster in 1827. Married Jane Secor of Racine, Wis., 
in 1848. He was a farmer, and lived at Berlin, Green Lake 
County, Wis., of which place he was a pioneer settler. He held 
the ofBce of Sheriff. He was said to have borne a character 
"without spot." He died July 7, 1870. Children: 

794. Charles^, b. 1849. 

795. Delos^ b. 1851. 

796. BuRT«, b. 1853. 

797. Mary*, b. 1859. 

798. A sonl b. 1868. 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 145 

486. LINCOLN MORRIS, 1st sou of Lincoln (203), born in 
1812, at Ogdensburgli. Died July 19, 1858. Married in 1840, 
Miss Morrison of New York city. Druggist. Lived at Ogdens- 
burgli. No children. 

487. GEORGE R. MORRIS, 2d son of Lincoln (203), born in 
1814, at Ogdensburgli. He was killed by Indians while engaged 
in locating lands in Lower California, in 1857. Unmarried. 

492. HENRY M. MORRIS, 4th son of Lincoln (203), born 
at Ogdensburgh, March 4, 1825. Married Feb. 8, 1858, Eliza 
Park Howie of Washington, D. C. She belonged to an old Mary- 
land family which once owned a large part of the land now in the 
city of Washington. Mrs. Morris died at Denver, Col., Nov. 19, 
1874. Mr. Morris is an importer of Spanish tobacco in New York 
city. In religion he is a Roman Cathohc; in politics, Democrat. 
Children : 

799. Henry Ignatius^, ) . Henry I. d. July 22, 1859. 

800. HowLE George^, \ ^^^^^' b. June 12, 1859. 

801. Rebecca M.^', b. March 14, 1862. 

802. Henry D.«, b. Sept. 18, 1863. 

803. Cazenave L^ b. Jan. 4, 1865; d. Nov. 10, 1866. 

804. May I.«, b. Aug. 7, 1867. 

805. Anna Z.*^, b. March 6, 1869. 

806. LouisiN F.^ b. June 13, 1871. 

493. WILLIAM B. MORRIS, 5th son of Lincoln (203), born 
in 1827. Merchant at Tahiti, Pacific Ocean. Unmarried in 1874. 

494. WALTER MORRIS, 6th son of Lincoln (203), born 
1829. Died at Silver City, California, 1853. 

496. WILLIAM W. MORRIS, 2d son of William (204), 
born April 18, 1817, at Brookfield, Mass. Married Jan. 16, 1844, 
Sarah L. Stafford, who was born at Solon, N. Y., April 19, 1821, 
Farmer. Lives at Lyndon, Whiteside County, 111. Children: 

807. Emma M.^ b. Oct. 7, 1844, at Lebanon, Madison Co., N.Y. 

808. Adon S.**, b. Feb. 8, 1846, at Hamilton, Madison Co., N. Y. 

d. May 1, 1855. 
19 



146 MORRIS FAMILY. 

809. George C.^ b. Feb. 25, 1849; d. May 1, 1855. 

810. LiLLiE S.**, b. June 11, 1858, at Lyndon; d. Juno 20, 1870. 

4-99. JOHN morris' 3d son of William (204), born at Leb- 
anon, N. y., Aug., 1823. Lives in Munnsville, N. Y. Married 
Feb. 23, 1848, Laura Ann Taylor of Eaton, N. Y. Children: 

811. Laura MARIA^ b. Aug. 23, 1851; m. Sept. 21, 1870, John 

H. Watkins of Lenox, N. Y. 

812. Clara Akn', b. Feb 27, 1853; m. March 22, 1872, John 

Hamilton of Vernon, Oneida Co. 

813. Adox Smith^ b. March 23, 1855. 

814. Jexxie Belle^ b. July 26, 1866. 

815. Emma Rice^ b. Nov. 24, 1869. 

500. WILLARD MORRIS, 4th son of William (204), born at 
Lebanon, N. Y., June 1825. Married Sept. 25, 1856, Adaline 
C. Leonard of Lebanon. Farmer. Removed to Lyndon, White- 
side Co., III., in 1847, and to Mount Pleasant in the same county 
in 1861. Children: 

816. Addie L.«, b. Aug. 5, 1858, at Lyndon. 

817. Ella M.^ b. May 24, 1860, at Lyndon. 

818. Josephine E.*, b. May 27, 1862, at Mt. Pleasant. 

819. Walter L.^ b. May 23, 1864, at Mt. Pleasant. 

820. Prank E % b. July 31, 1867, at Mt. Pleasant. 

821. Gertrude N.^ b. Feb. 2, 1869, at Mt. Pleasant. 
821|. Lynn R.^, b. Nov. 27, 1871, at Mt. Pleasant. 

502. JONATHAN MORRIS, 5th son of William (204), born 
at Lebanon, April — , 1829, Married Nov. 17, 1855, Frances D. 
Grain. She died in 1859. Married 2d, Nov. 24, 1864, Sarah A. 
Hildebrant, who died in 1869. Children: 

822. Frederick D.", b. Dec, 1865. 

823. Dwight'*, b. March, 1867. 

Married 3d, Mrs. Mahalia Lane. One child : 

824. Edward J.«, b. Feb. 3, 1871. 

504. VOLNEY ^V. MORRIS, 1st son of Harvlin (205), 
born June 2, 1826. Married Olive A. Barrel, Jan. 1, 1850. She 
was born in 1828. Children: 

825. Bower Jay', b. June 9, 1852. 



[first branch.] seventh generation. 147 

826. Walter A.^, b. 1855; d. 8 months old. 

827. Frances J.*, b. July 7, 1856. 

505. JONATHAN B. MORRIS, 2d son of Harvlin (205), 
born Feb. 27, 1828. Married Abby J. Carter, 1855. She was 
born in 1831. Children : 

828. Frank D.«, b. 1856. 

829. Frederick H.", b. 1861. 

506. MERRICK DUANE MORRIS, 3d son of Harvlin (205), 
born March 4, 1830. Married April 23, 1856, Maria H. Sheldon. 
She was born Nov. 12, 1832. Farmer. Lives in Gouverneur, 
N. Y. Children: 

830. Grace N.«, b. Jan. 6, 1868. 

831. May C.^ b. Sept. 8, 1872. 

507. FRANKLIN W. MORRIS, 4th son of HarvHn (205), 
born Aug. 25, 1832. Married April 10, 1860, Lucina Flack. 
Lives in Brownville, Nebraska. Children: 

832. Clara Belle^ b. April 7, 1861; m. Wm. Bailey, April 4, 

1881. 

833. CoRA«, b. Feb. 29. 1864. 

834. Frances S.^ b. July 30, 1866; d. Nov. 30, 1872. 

835. Emma L.^, b. Jan. 7, 1871; d. Dec. 10, 18/2. 

509. ORYILLE 0. MORRIS, 5th son of Harvlin (205), born 
Aug. 22, 1835. Married 1st, Feb. 22, 1864, RandiUa Whitford. 
She was born in 1836, and died April 5. 1870. Married 2d, Cor- 
nelia Whitford, born in 1844, Miller. Lives in Peoria, 111. 
Children : 

836. Lewis 0.\ b. July 4, 1873. 

837. Gertie^, b. 1876; d. 1880. 

838. A son', b. 

510. LEWIS H. MORRIS, 6th son of Harvlin (205), born 
April 28, 1837. Married Calista Sheldon, July 3, ISGO. She was 
born March 19, 1841. Live near Brownville, Neb. Children: 

839. Dora A,«, b. June 17, 1861; d. 1870. 

840. Walter^ b. Aug. 31. 1862. 

841. Willie Y.^ b. 1864; d. 1866. 
842. 



148 MORRIS FAMILY. 

843. Ida Mary«, b. 1869. 

844. FRED^ b. 1871. 

845. Frances^ b. 1873. 

846. Kate«, b. 1879, 

512. LAURA PAY, 1st daughter of Anna (Morris) (20G) 

and Levi Fay of Depeyster, N. Y., born Feb. 18, 1822. Married 

in Ogdensburgh, Dec. 2, 1844, to B. Othniel Hatheway of Ogdens- 

burgli. One child: 

8461 Emma Hatheway, b. June 22, 1851. Married J. T. Newell, 

dentist, Jan. 23, 1879; d. March, 1880. 

523. MINER MORRIS, 2d son of Lovell (209), born in De- 
peyster in 1829. Married Josephine Witherell, Feb., 1861. Far- 
mer. Lives in Depeyster. Children: 

847. Thomas', b. d. 

848. LuLA', b. Jan. 12, 1864. 

849. BenjamIxN*, b. May 25, 1866. 

850. Frank*, b. Aug. — , 1868. 

851. Flora^ b. , . 

524. HOMER MORRIS, 3d son of Lovell (209), born at De- 
peyster in 1831. Married 1st, Huldah Henning. Married 2d, 
Emily Nelson. Farmer. Lives in Depeyster. Children: 



852. Delia^ 

853. Addie^ 



BY HULDAH, 

twins, b. in 1866. 

BY EMILY, 



854. Charles^ b. 1871. 

855. George*, b. 

856. LucY«, b. 

525. GEORGE MORRIS, 4th son of Lovell (209), boni at 
Depeyster in 1833. Married Frances Austin in 18.56. Farmer. 
Lives in Depeyster. Children: 

857. Clarissa*, b. 1858. 

858. Walter*, b. 1860. 
.859. Mary^ b. 1865. 
860. Raleigh*, b. 1873. 



EIGHTH GEI^EEATIOK 



533. WILLIAM C. MORRIS, 1st son of John Chandler 
(277), born at Conesus, Aug. 23, 1825. Married Sarah Washburn, 
April 28, 1853. Farmer. Lives in Conesus. L^niversalist. 
Republican. Children : 
86 L Hem AX Wright", b. March 3, 1854. 

862. ADDIE^ b. March 12, 1858. 

863. Jessie F.^ b. June 25, 1861. 

864. LiLLiAX G.^ b. Sept. 9, 1866. 

865. Mabel', b. May 15, 1869. 

866. Vivian^, b. Dec. 18, 1871. 

537. BEXJAMIX F. MORRIS, 2d son of John Chandler 
(277), born Feb. 21, 1830, at Conesus. Married June 25, 1862, 
Mary Annis. Farmer. Lives in Salt River, Mich. Universalist. 
Democrat. Children: 

867. Jennie^ b. Dec. 28, 1867; m. 1886, All^ert Struble of 

Salt River, Mich. 

868. Carrier b. Sept. 15, 1871. 

538. GEORGE M. MORRIS, 3d son of John Chandler (277), 
born in Conesus, Oct. 21, 1836. Died Feb. 24, 1868. He enlisted 
April 12, 1861, in the 13th Regiment, N. Y. Vols. 

541. SYLVESTER B. MORRIS, 1st son of Sylvester (278), 
born in Conesus, Oct. 17, 1833. Married June 1, 1868. Lives in 
President, A^enango Co., Pa. 

542. ORNALDO W. MORRIS, 3d son of Sylvester (278), 
born in Conesus, Aug. 18, 1835. Teacher and surveyor. 

543. DAVENPORT A. MORRIS, 3d son of Sylvester (278), 
born July 18, 1837. Married in 1872. Lives in Mitchellville, 
Polk Co., Iowa. 



150 MORIUS FAMILY. 

546. JOHN D. MORRIS, 5th son of Sylvester (-iVS), born 
May 29, 1842. Married Feb. 11, 1872. Fanner. Lives in 
Conesus. 

547. JAMES H. MORRIS, 1st son of Marshall S. (281), born 
Nov. 26, 1833. Married, 1872, Susan Parshall of Andover, Alle- 
gany Co., N. Y. Went to California in 1857. Returned to 
Andover, 1871. Harness-maker. Methodist. 

548. ELIZABETH MORRIS, 1st daughter of Marshall S. 
(281), born in Conesus, Feb. 22, 1836. Teacher Went toTomah, 
Wis., 1867. Married L. J. Kenyon of Tomah, in 1869. Congre- 
gationalist. 

549. HELEN N. MORRIS, 2d daughter of Marshall S. (281), 
born Feb. 27, 1838. Teacher. Went from Andover to Michigan, 
1865. Married Wilham Mansfield of Chnton, Macon Co., Mich., 
Oct. 10, 1865. Farmer. Methodist. Children: 

Two sons and two daughters. 

550. LESTER B. MORRIS, 2d son of Marshall S. (281), 
born in Conesus, Feb. 24, 1841. Married, 1863, Augusta Bond of 
Andover, N. Y. Blacksmith and machinist. Lives in Canisteo, 
Steuben Co., N. Y. He enlisted in the 13th N. Y. Vols, at the 
breaking out of the Rebellion, and was at the first battle of Bull 
Run. Methodist. Has two daughters. 

551. JOSEPH S. MORRIS, 3d son of Marshall S. (281), born 
April 22, 1840. Unmarried in 1875. He served the LTnited 
States in several of the Sovithern States during the Rebellion. 
Hardware merchant in Doylestown, Wis. 

552. FULTON R. MORRIS, 4th son of Marshall S. (281), 
born Nov. 21, 1845. Married, 1874, Elenora Austin. He served 
in the Commissary Department in Tennessee duiing the Rebellion. 
Grain and produce deakir in Doylestown, Wis. Episcopalian. Has 
one son and one daughter. 

553. SARAH C. MORRIS, 3d daughter of Marshall S. (281), 
born Jan. 8, 1848. Unmarried, 1875. Lives with her mother in 
Doylestown. 



[rraST BRANCH.] EIGHTH GEXERATION. 151 

554. DELOS R. MORRIS, 5th son of Marshall S. (281), born 
April 30, 1850. Machinist in Wausau, Wis. Unmarried in 1875. 

556. CHARLES M. MORRIS, 7th son of Marshall S. (281), 
bom Feb. 7, 1855. Produce dealer, Doylestown. Unmarried in 
1875. 

608. THEODORE SILL COMSTOCK, 1st son of Calvert 

Comstock (321), born , . Married Nov. 23, 1864, Anna 

W. Wright. Children: 

869. Theodore Sill Comstock^, b. 

870. Marie Comstock^ b. 

871. AxxE Comstock'-', b. 

611. CORNELIA COMSTOCK, 1st daughter of Calvert 

Comstock (324), born , . Married John H. Wardwell, 

Oct. 20, 1859. Children: 

872. Emily Wardwell^, b. 

873. Gertrude Wardwell^, b. 

874. Lewis AVardwell^, b. 

875. Cornelia Wardwell^, b. 

876. Calvert Wardwell", b. 

877. Theodore W^ardwell'', b. 

613. Major EDWARD COMSTOCK, 2d son of Calvert Com- 
stock (324), born at Rome , . Married IMary F. Hulett, 

Jan. 25, 1871. He was graduated at Amherst College in 1861. 
Entered the service of the United States as Adjutant of the 146th 
N. Y. Vols. Served two years in infantry and cavalry. Breveted 
Major. 

He was elected mayor of Rome, N. Y., 1881, and again in 1885. 
Lumber dealer. Children: 

878. Edward Hulett Comstock", b. 

879. Frances Eloise Comstock", b. 

880. Margery Comstock", b. 

881. Richard Morris Comstock", b. 

882. Grace Sill Comstock", b. 



152 MORRIS FAMILY. 

614. LILLIAN C(JMSTOCK, 3d daughter of Calvert Corn- 
stock (324), boru , . Married S. N. D. North, July 8, 

1875. Children: 

883. Edward Nobth^, b. 

884. Gladys North^, b. 

885. Eloise North^, b. 

650. SILAS MOERIS, 1st son of George A. (333), born 
Sept. 4, 1850. Married Sophronia Swartwout, Dec. 24, 1874. 
Children : 

886. Adelia L», b. Nov. 15, 1875. 

887. Homer A.^ b. April 2, 1877. 

888. Archibald B.^ b. April 1, 1879. 

889. George A.^, b. Jan. 25, 1881. 

668. MARY MORRIS, 1st daughter of Henry (349), born at 
Springfield, June 29, 1839. Married, June 21, 1876, Charles K. 
Calhoun, son of Hon. WilHam B. Calhoun of Springfield, member 
of Congress and Secretary of State of Massachusetts. Mrs. Cal- 
houn and her sister, Mrs. Gay, are distinguished for their accom- 
pHshments, fine social qualities, and musical attainments. Children : 

890. Charles Morris Calhoun^ b. July 20, 1877. 

891. Margaret Calhoun^ b. Sept. 16, 1879. 

669. EDWARD MORRIS, 1st son of Henry (349), born Jan. 
16, 1841. Lawyer. Lives in Springfield. Admitted to the 
Hampden bar in 1864. He served in the 49th Reg., ^Mass. Vols., 
in the Rebellion. 

672. FREDERICK WILLIAM MORRIS, 4th son of Henry 
(349), born May 2, 1850. Bookseller. Lives in New York city. 
Married, Nov. 18, 1886. Lucy Gray, daughter of George M. Ryer- 
son of Newton, N. J. 

674. HELEN MORRIS, 2d daughter of Henry (349), boru 
April 12, 1857. Married, June 3, 1885, WiUiam W. Gray, son of 
Theodore Gay, M.D., of Malone, N. Y. He is a graduate of Mid- 
dlebury College, Vt. Mr. Gay is a journalist, and has been con- 
nected with the Springfield Rejviblican and Chicaf/o Tribune. Child: 

891^. Eleanor Gay, b. March 12, 1886, at Chicago. 

675. GEORGE BLISS MORRIS, 1st son of George BUss 
(350), born Nov. 5, 1843. Graduated at Amherst College in 1864. 



[first branch.] eighth genekatiox. 153 

Studied law at Cambridge Law School. Admitted to the Hamp- 
den bar in 1867. Eemoved to New York city, where he prac- 
tices his profession. Republican. 

676. ROBERT OLIVER MORRIS, 2d son of George Bliss 
(350), born Oct. 18, 1846. Married, Nov. 27, 1872, Elizabeth, 
daughter of George Cad well of Springfield. Lawyer. Lives in 
Springfield. Admitted to the bar in 1873. Succeeded his father 
as clerk of the courts of Hampden County in 1874, which office 
he has continued to fill. A courteous, popular, and efficient public 
officer. No children. 

680. SARAH MARIA MORRIS, daughter of Charles (353), 
born in New York city, March 22, 1838. Married, at Keeseville, 
N. Y., Aug. 25, 1863, Charles Chnton Adams, of Warren, Trum- 
bull County, 0., a cousin of Horace Greeley. He was born at 
LeRoy, N. Y., May 27, 1838. He has been in the clothing trade in 
Warren. Mrs. Adams possesses by inheritance from both father 
and mother the most amiable traits of character. Children: 

892. Jennie Maria Adams', b. April 2, 1866. 

893. Mary Adams^ b. Aug. 26, 1869. 

681. CHARLES MORRIS, son of Charles (353), born in 
New York city, Oct 12, 1842. Married, Aug. 31, 1865, Fannie 
Haywood Cox, of Clinton ville, N. Y., daughter of Edward B. and 
Arvilla (Bruce) Cox of Fair Haven, Vt. Accountant. Lived a 
number of years at Memphis, Tenn. Now lives in St. Louis, Mo. 
Congregationalist. Republican. No children. Minnie (Daniels) 
adopted, b. Dec. 25, 1867, at Alton, 111. 

682. EDWARD FLYNT MORRIS, 1st son of George Flynt 
(354), born at Monson, Mass., July 25, 1840. Married, Oct. 25, 
1866, Louise Brown, adopted daughter of Isaac B. Clapp of East- 
hampton, Mass. Banker. Cashier of Monson National Bank. 
Congregationalist. Republican. Children: 

894. Alice Amelia', b. July 7, 1866. 

895. Louise', b. April 1, 1869. 

896. Ebward Lyman», b. Oct. 23, 1870. 

897. Flora Edith', b. July 22, 1876; d. March 8, 1877. 

20 



154 MORRIS FAMILY. 

684. FRANK EVERETT MORRIS, 3d son of George F. 
(354), born Aug. 2, 1853, in Monson. Married, Sept. 5, 1877, 
Jennie F. Davis, daughter of Benjamin and Mary Davis of Enfield, 
Mass. She was born in Ware, Mass., Dec. 17, 1856. Mi-. Morris 
is teller of the Monson National Bank, and also engaged in the 
insurance business. Congregationalist. Republican. Children: 

898. Frank Arthur", b. Oct. 8, 1878. 

899. Ralph^ b. March 19, 1882. 

GS(). JOHN EMERY MORRIS, son of Captain Henry (35G), 
born Nov. 30, 1843. Married, May 15, 1867, Mary Pamelia Felt, 
daughter of Festus C. and Sarah (Lincoln) Felt, and granddaugh- 
ter of Levi Lincoln of Hartford. She was born in New York City, 
Jan. 1, 1848. Mr. Morris is assistant secretary o^ the Travelers 
insurance Company of Hartfoi^d. He served as corporal in Com- 
pany B, Twenty-second Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, in the 
Rebellion. Congregationalist. Republican. Children: 

900. Henry Lincoln^ b. Feb. 6, 18G8. 

901. Edward Bo^TECou^ b. Aug. 16, 1875. 

902. John Felt», b. Oct. 29, 1877. 

Mr. Morris has compiled genealogies of the Bontecou and 
Resseguie families. 

687. ANNA MORRIS, 1st daughter of Jonathan F. (357), 
born at Hartford, Jan. 24, 1856. Married, April 13, 1887, Rev. 
Alfred Tyler Perry of Ware, Mass. He is the son of George 
Bulkley Perry and Louisa (Tyler) Perry of North Adams, Mass., 
and was born at Geneseo, 111., Aug. 19, 1858, to which place his 
grandfather, Alfred Perry, a physician of Stockbridge, Mass., 
removed in 1838. Mr. Perry graduated at Williams College in 
IhSO; practiced civil engineering in Pennsylvania; studied theology 
four years at Hartford Theological Seminary; supplied the pulpit 
in Bristol, Conn., 1885; assistant pastor at Memorial Church, 
Springfield, Mass., 1886, and was ordained and installed pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Ware, Dec. 29, 1886. He is a 
descendant of Arthur Perry, one of the early settlers of Stratford, 
Conn., and of William Pynchon the first settler of Springfield, Mass. 
His great-grandfather. Rev. David Perry, was for forty years 
minister at Richmond, Mass. He is also a descendant of Rev. 
Charles Chauncey, the second president of Harvard College, also of 



[first beaxch.] eighth generation. 155 

Rev. Peter Bulkeley, first minister of Concord, Mass., through his 
son, Rev. Gershom Bulkeley of New London and Wethei'sfield, 
noted not only for his abiHty as a preacher, but also for his skill as 
a physician, and his grandson. Rev. John Bulkeley of Colchester, 
Conn., a distinguished scholar, noted in his time as one of the 
three men most distinguished for genius and mental power which 
New England had produced. 

Miss Morris was an early member of the "Saturday Morning 
Club," a society of young ladies of Hartford, formed in 1876, for 
literary and social culture, and was for three years successively 
its president. 

688. ALICE MORRIS, 2d daughter of Jonathan F. (357), 
born at Hartford, Conn., Nov. 18, 1858. Married, June 17, 1885, 
Rev. Charles Smith Mills of Andover, Mass. He was born at 
Brockton, Mass., Jan. 17, 1861, and was graduated at Amherst 
College in 1882. Studied theology at Hartford and Andover 
Seminaries, and was ordained to the ministry, and installed pastor 
of the Congregational Church in Springfield, Vt., July 2, 1885. 
His maternal grandfather was the late Peter Smith of Andover, 
Mass., a native of Brechin, Scotland, who came to this country in 
early manhood, and by his industry and integrity accumulated a 
large estate. He was a self made, self educated man, with the 
most sterling qualities of character, and universally respected. A 
man of true piety and benevolence, and a great benefactor of 
Phillips Academy and Andover Theological Seminary. His 
father, Rev. Charles L. Mills, was born in Morristown, N. J., in 
1812, was graduated at Yale College in 1835. He was an 
earnest and effective preacher, a laborer in and pastor over a num- 
ber of churches. He died at Andover, Oct. 3, 1884. Rev. Charles 
S. and Alice Morris Mills have one child: 

903. Margaret Morris Mills', b. March 22, 1886, at Springfield. 

689. ELIZABETH MORRIS OLMSTEAD, 1st daughter of 
Frances Granger (Morris) (359) and Isaac P. Olmstead, born July 
18, 1849. Died at Hampden, Mass., Feb. 21, 1882. Married, 
July 26, 1869, John Potter Stockton, junior, grandson of Commo- 
dore Robert F. Stockton of the United States Navy, and great- 
great-great-grandson of Richard Stockton of New Jersey, signer 
of the Declaration of Independence. Mrs. Stockton and her sisters 



156 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Lucia and Henrietta, in their girlhood were noted for their great 
beauty of features and persons, and when together were styled by 
many of their admiring friends as " the three Graces." Mr. Stock- 
ton lives in New York city. Democrat. Children: 

904. Henrietta Stockton^, b. Aug. 26, 1870. 

905. Elizabeth Olmstead Stockton'', b. April 14, 1872. 

906. Annie Morhis Olmstead Stockton^, b. Oct. 27, 1873. 

907. Richard Stockton'', b. Oct. 30, 1875. 

908. Amy Caroline Stockton^ b. Feb. 13, 1877; d. Aug. 27, 

1877. 

909. Frances Louise Stockton^, b. Jan. 23, 1879. 

910. John Potter Stockton 3d», b. Jan. 30, 1881. 

690. LUCLA. GRANGER OLMSTEAD, 2d daughter of 
Frances Granger (Morris) Olmstead (359) and Isaac P. Olmstead, 
born April 10, 1851. Married, Nov. 28, 1876, Carlton Walworth 
Nason of New York. She died in the city of New York, Dec. 
7, 1885. No children. 

Mrs. Nason was a woman of great beauty of person and char- 
acter, and was universally admired and beloved. 

694. LOUISA FRANCES OLMSTEAD, 5th daughter of 
Frances Granger (Morris) Olmstead (359) and Isaac P. Olmstead, 
born April 1, 1860. Married, Oct. 22, 1879, Frank Stockbridge 
Smith, woolen manufacturer, Hampden, Mass. Children: 

911. Raymond Stockbridge Smith", b. Dec. 24, 1881. 

912. Hinsdale Stockbridge Smith', b. June 29, 1883. 

710. RICHARD HUNT MORRIS, 1st son of Richard B. 
Morris (368), born April 4, 1860, at Adrian, Mich. Married, Feb. 
16, 1885, Nellie Brown of Atchison, Kan. He is engaged in the 
wholesale hardware trade in Atchison. 

741. SUSAN WESTON KELLOGG, daughter of Susan 
Jackson (Morris) Kellogg (446), born July 11, 1852. Married, 
Jan. 14, 1885, William T. Smith, M. D., of Hanover, N. H., son of 
Rev. Asa 1). Smith, foriiuirly president of Dartmouth College. 
Child. 

913. MoRKis Kellogg Smith'', b. March 18, 1886. 



E'll^TH GEI^EEATIOK 



861. HEMAN WRIGHT MORRIS, 1st son of William C. 
(533), born at Conesus, March 3, 1854. Married, May 31, 1883, 
Emma Hobart, daughter of John H. H. and Emma (Tindall) 
Perkins of Utica, N. Y. Mr. IMorris was graduated at Sp-acuse 
University in 1872; taught in Gouveneur Seminary in 1873; 
studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1876, and is of the 
firm of Sullivan & Morris in Rochester, N. Y. His church con- 
nection is with the Universalists. In politics he is a Republican. 
Children: 

914. Edward Ernest'", b. May 4, 1884. 

915. George William'", b. Jan. 15, 1887. 

862. ADDIE MORRIS, 1st daughter of William C. (533), 
born March 12, 1858. Married, March 23, 1883, Charles Swarts, 
Sparta, Livingston County, N. Y. Child: 

916. Morris Swarts'", b. Oct. 1, 1884. 



Second Branch. 



LIEUT. EBENEZER MORRIS, 



AND HIS 



DESCENDANTS. 



[SECOND BRANCH.] 

SEOOI^TD GE^ERATIO]Sr. 



6. Lieutenant EBENEZER MORRIS, 3d son of Lieutenant 
Edward (1), born at Roxbmy, April 14, 1664. He was one of 
the thirteen pioneers which left Roxbury in the spring of 1686, 
for the settlement of Woodstock. In the division of land he 
drew lot No. 7, on the west side of "Plaine Hill," and lot No. 4, 
in the meadow land. He was associated with his brother Edward, 
as selectman, for nine years, viz.: 1703, 1705, 1706, 1707, 1709, 
1712, 1713, 1715, and 1716. During some of these years he 
was also assessor. A record of March 2, 1701-2, says he was 
"appointed to look after the meeting-house, and keep it clean for 
the benefit of the town," — a duty which, after his death, seems 
to have been performed by his widow, as on Jan. 4, 1720-1, the 
town voted " 8 shillings to Widow Morris for looking after the 
meeting-house." He was married by Captain Sewell, Sept. 1, 1692, 
to Sarah, daughter of Joseph Davis of Roxbury. She was bap- 
tized Feb. 22, 1673, and admitted to the church in September, 
1690. He was admitted in May, 1693; probably before the 
formation of the church in Woodstock. He died at Woodstock, 
Feb. 26, 1717-18, aged 54. He left an estate of £605 I65. 
5f?., as appears by the Probate records of Suffolk County. [See 
Appendix G.] Mrs. Morris died April 18, 1741, aged 70. The 
gravestones to both are standing in the grave yard at Woodstock. 
They had the following children : 

1. Sarah^, b. June 29, 1693; living in 1731, unmarried. 

2. Mary^ b. March 23, 1694-5; m. Seth Paine. 

3. Margaret'', b. March 22, 1696-7; m. Joseph GrifTm. 

4. Ebenezer^, b. Feb. 26, 1697-8. 

5. Joseph^ b. Nov. 6, 1701. 

6. Joshua^ b. Sept. 6, 1703; d. Nov. 2, 1703. 

7. Joshua^ b. Oct. 7, 1704; d. Dec. 10, 1731. 

8. Elizabeth^, b. Dec. 25, 1706; m. Amos Sexton. 

9. Mehitable^', b. Dec. 23, 1709; was living in 1731, unmarried. 
10. Anna^, b. Dec. 18, 1711; m. Thomas Child. 

21 



THIRD GEI^ERATIOI^. 



2. MARY MORRIS, 2d daughter of Lieutenant Ebenezer (6), 
born March 23, 1694-5. Married, April 16, 1718, Seth Paine of 
Pomfret, son of Samuel Paine of Rehoboth and Woodstock, and 
a descendant of Stephen Paine, one of the early settlers of Reho- 
both. Seth Paine was born in Rehoboth, Aug. 20, 1690. He was 
one of the leading men in Pomfret; a patron of schools, and also 
of Yale College, at which his son Joshua graduated in 1759. He 
was a subscriber to the Pomfret Library. He died Jan. 18, 1772, 
in his 82d year. His wife died May 7, 1762, inter 68th year. 
They were buried in Pomfret grave-yard. Children: 

11. Seth Paixe<, b. May 21, 1719. 

12. Mary Paine*, b. May 31, 1721; m. Colonel Ross; d. 1805. 

13. Haknah Paine^ b. June 10, 1722; m. Thomas [?] Bass. 

14. Elijah Paine", b. Sept. 13, 1724. 

15. Joseph Paine-", b. Feb. 9, 1726. 

16. Sarah Paine^ b. June 14, 1728-9; d. Jan. 17, 1778. 

17. Margaret Paine^, b. March 28, 1733; m. Deacon Isaac 

Bennett of Hampton, Sept. 9, 1784, his 2d wife; she tlicd 
in 1815. 

18. Joshua Paine\ b. March 18, 1734. 

19. Judith Paine', b. Feb. 18, 1737-8; m. Stephen AVilliams 

3. MARGARET MORRIS, 3d daughter of Lieutenant Eben- 
ezer (6), born in Roxbury, March 22, 1696-7. Married, March 
15, 1721, Joseph Griffin of Pomfret. He was born in Roxbury, 
Jan 21, 1695, and died at Pomfret, Dec. 3, 1731. His father, 
Joseph Griffin of Roxbury, was one of the twelve original pur- 
chasers of Pomfret, May 1, 1686. This purchase was 15,100 
acres of land on the Mashamoquet river at " Wabbaquasett Hills," 
in the " Nipmuck Country, south of Woodstock." The settlement 
was called Mashamoquet until it was made a town in 1713 under 



[second branch.] third generation. 163 

the name of Pomfret. Joseph Griffin, senior, was a soldier under 
Captain Turner in the Falls fight in 1676. He removed to Pom- 
fret about 1720, and died in 1723. He is said to have iDeen the 
first person buried in the burial ground in Pomfret. The children 
of Margaret (Morris) and Joseph Griffin, junior, were: 

21. Joseph Griffin^ b. Jan. 23, 1722; probably died early. 

22. Sarah GRIFFIN^ b. July 7, 1724; d. Oct. 27, 1740. 

23. Joseph GRIFFIN^ b. Nov. 24, 1727. 

24. Samuel GRIFFIN^ b. March 15, 1729; d. Nov. 12, 1740. 

25. Mary GriffinS b. March 16, 1731; d. Nov. 10, 1740. 
The three children died within sixteen days of each other. 

4. Sergeant EBENEZER MORRIS, 1st son of Lieutenant 
Ebenezer (6), born Feb. 26, 1698-9. Married Sarah, daughter of 
James Killam of Somers. Intentions published April 19, 1725. 
Husbandman. Lived on his father's place in Woodstock, which 
he sold March 13, 1728-9, "Mansion House, and 40 acres of 
land " to John Chaffee of Barrington, Bristol County, for £700, 
"money paid," and removed to Somers. He also sold, March 4th, 
the same year, 100 acres of land to his brother Joshua. Dec. 28, 
1730, he was chosen one of a committee to build the meeting- 
house in Somers. Dec. 27, 1731, the town voted to pay him "8 
shillings for rum provided at the raising of the meeting-house." 
He was chosen selectman in the years 1731, 1734, and 1738, and 
sometimes was moderator. He was assessor in 1741, 1742, 1745, 
and 1746. Jan. 26, 1746, he sold land to Amos Sexton and 
Charles Sheldon of Deerfield, and April 9, 1753, he again sold 
land, to James Dickman of Somers, after which time no further 
record is found of him, and he is supposed to have removed from 
Somers, but whither is unknown, his wife, however, was, living 
Feb. 14, 1761, as appears by her father's will of that date, but 
perhaps she was then a widow. Children: 

26. Ebenezer^ b. April 19, 1726, at Woodstock. 

27. James", b. Feb. 28. 1727-8, at Woodstock; bap. March 3. 

28. Sarah', b. June 27, 1730, in Somers; bap. Aug. 9, 1730. 

29. Joshua^ b. Oct. 10, 1732; bap. Oct. 16; d. Oct. 17. 

30. JosHUA^ b. Oct. 19, 1733; bap. Oct. 28; d. Sept. 10, 1753. 

31. MARY^ b. April 5, 1736; bap. April 18. 

32. Joseph*, b. Oct. 25, 1738; bap. Dec. 31; d. April 21, 1739. 

33. Huldah*, b. March 3, 1741; bap. May 3. 



164 MORRIS FAMILY. 

34. RHODA^ b. July 15, 1743; bap. Aug. 9. 

35. Anna*, b. Oct. 23, 1745; bap. Feb. 9, 1746. 

"With the exception of James and Sarah, there is no further 
record found of this family. 

5. JOSEPH MORRIS, 2d son of Lieut. Ebenezer Morris (6), 
born Nov. 6, 1701. Married and settled in Boston, He was a 
tailor. There are several entries of cases in the records of the 
courts in Boston, in which he appeared either as plaintiff or 
defendant, mostly petty cases. One curious case the compiler 
quotes: In February, 1727, Thomas Armstrong, a shopkeeper, 
brought a suit against him for assault. The complaint was that 
" said Morris, on the 1 0th of November last past, at Boston, with 
force and arms entered into plaintiff's house, assaulted and beat 
his wife, and so terrified her that he had lost her good company 
and help ever since, through illness of body occasioned thereby, 
and took and carried away the plaintiff's ' Flyer of his Jack ' and 
< Flute ' of the value of six pounds, against the peace and to the 
damage of s'' Thomas Armstrong (as he saith) to the value of 
Twenty pounds." The defendant appeared by Robert Auchmuty, 
his counsel, and made defense that "the assault was on the part 
of the plaintiff's wife, he only gently threw her from him, and 
that he had a good right to take and carry away the things." 
The judgment of the court was that he should deliver the things 
in good order, within six days, or in default thereof Armstrong 
should receive the sum of £2 lO.s. and costs. The case was 
appealed to the higher court, where the judgment was sustained: 
Costs, £10 10s. 6d, and execution ordered. 

The date of his death is unknown, but it was before April 1, 
1734 ; §bS on that date Thomas Child of Woodstock was appointed 
guardian of his daughter Sarah, aged seven years. One child. 

36. Sarah*, b. about 1727. 

7. JOSHUA MORRIS, 4th son of Lieutenant Ebenezer (6), 
b. Oct. 7, 1704; died Dec. 10, 1731 ; leaving an estate of £500. 
By his will, proven in April, 1734, he made his mother his execu. 
trix, and gave her £120 for life. He gave to his brother Eben- 
ezer, and his sisters, Sarah Morris, junior; Elizabeth (Morris) 
Sexton; Mehitable Morris; Anna (Morris) Child ; Dorothy Morris; 
and his niece, Sarah Morris, the only child of his brother Joseph, 
£38 each. 



[second branch.] third generation. 165 

8. ELIZABETH MORRIS, 4th daughter of Lieut. Ebenezer 
(6), born Dec. 25, 1706. Married Amos Sexton of Enfield, Oct. 28, 

1731. Children, all born in Somers: 

37. Lucy Sexton\ b. Feb. 17, 1735. 

38. Mehitable Sexton", b. April 24, 1738. 

39. Mary Sexton", b. Feb. 6. 1742. 

40. Dorothy Sexton^ b. July 30, 1740. 

41. Margaret Sexton", b. Jan. 19, 1744. 

42. Elizabeth Sexton', Feb. 15, 1746. 

43. ExsKiE Zeroviah Sexton", b. June 8, 1 749 (Somers' records). 

44. Ebenezer Sexton", b. June 27, 1751. 

45. Amos Sexton", b. Sept. 27, 1753. 

10. ANNA MORRIS, 6th daughter of Lieut. Ebenezer (6), 
born Dec. 18. 1711. Married Nov. 24, 1729, her cousin. Deacon 
Thomas Child of "Woodstock, by John Chandler, Esq. He was 
one of seven brothers who emigrated from Roxbury to Woodstock. 
He died July 19, 1762, aged 59. She died Aug. 11, 1806, in her 
95th year. Children, all born in Woodstock: 

46. Alithea Child", b. Aug. 12, 1730; bap. Aug. 20; d. Aug. 

26, 1730. 

47. Margaret Child", b. July 28, 1731; bap. Aug. 29, 1731; 

d. July 26, 1742. 

48. Sybil Child", b. March 3, 1733; ra. March 16, 1756, 

Edward Ainsworth of Woodstock. 

49. Anna Child", b. Aug. 17, 1734; bap. Aug. 18, 1734. 

50. Alithea Child", b. Aug. 4, 1736; m. Thos. Peake, Nov. 

19, 1761. 

51. William Child", b. May 15, 1738; bap. July 4, 1738; d. 

Feb. 6, 1752. 

52. Dorothy Child", b. April 3, 1740; m. 1st, Solomon Ather- 

ton, 1763; m. 2d, Joshua Child, Feb. 26, 1766. 

53. Lois Child'', b. June IS, 1742; m. Joseph May, Nov. 17, 

1768. 

54. Thomas Child", b July 15, 1744; m. Lucy Gage, Jan. 26, 

1775. 

55. Lemuel Child", b. July 17, 1747; m. Nov., 1768, Dorcas 

Perry. 

56. HuLDAH Child*, b. Nov. 9, 1749; m. Stephen Skinner, 

April 28, 1769. 

57. William Child", b. Dec. 4, 1752; m. Susanna Corbiu, Dec. 
* 29, 1784. 



FOUETH GEI^EEATIO:i^r. 



11. SETH PAINE, 1st son of Seth and Mary (Morris) Paine 
(2), born May 21, 1719. Married Mabel Tyler of Pomfret, Nov. 
1, 1749. He was a leading man in Pomfret, and represented 
the town in the General Assembly several years. He was a mem- 
ber of the Convention, called in January, 1788. to ratify the Con. 
stitution of the United States, and voted in favor of that instru- 
ment. He was a merchant and farmer. 

He and his wife were admitted to the Congregational Church, 
Jan. 1, 1758. He died Feb. 24, 1762, in his 72d year. His wife 
died Feb. 21, 1762, in her 68th year. Both were buried the same 
week in the old Brooklyn grave-yard. They had six sons and 
three daughters. 

14. Dr. ELIJAH PAINE, 2d son of Seth and Mary (Morris) 
Paine (2), born Sept. 13, 1734. Married Mary AVliite of Hadley, 
who died in 1804, aged 74. He settled in Williamsburgh, Mass., 
where he died in 1814, in his 90th year. He liad three sons and 
six daughters. 

15. JOSEPH PAINE, 3d son of Seth and Mary (Morris) 
Paine (2), born Fob. 9, 1726. Married June 7, 1750, Sarah Mor- 
ris (36) in Pomfret. He was a captain in the French war in 1756-7. 
He died March 18, 1761. He had three sons and one daughter. — 

See 3G. 

i 

19, Rev. JOSHUA PAINE, 4th son of Seth and Mary (Mor- 
ris) Paine (2), born March 18, 1734. Graduated at Yale College, 
1759. He was ordained and installed minister at Sturbridge, Mass., 
June 17, 1761. He was greatly esteemed and beloved for his con- 
sistent Christian life, for his ardent patriotism during the Revolu- 
tionary War, serving as chaplain two years, and relinquishing a 
poi'tion of his salary at that time for the relief of the people and to 



[SECOXD BRANCH.] FOURTH GENERATION. 167 

set them an example of self-sacrifice for the cause. He made 
efiorts to promote the cause of education, and on an annual salary 
of $222 he exercised a rigid economy in order to carry his two 
sons through Harvard College. One of these sons became a min- 
ister at Cambridge; the other a lawyer. During his ministry of 
more than thirty-eight years he wrote more than three thousand 
sermons. He was of a most industrious, genial, hopeful, and happy 
temperament. 

He married Xov. 11, 1762, Mary Mosely, daughter of Rev. 
Samuel Mosely of Hampton, Conn. She was born Nov. 13, 1743, 
and died May 28, 1810. He died Dec. 28, 1799. Both were 
buried in the grave-yard in Sturbridge. Children: 

58. Joshua Paine', b. Dec. 5, 1763. 

59. Mary Paine^, b. July 29, 1765. 

60. Amaryllis Paine^, b. July 5, 1767. 

61. Elizabeth Paine=, b. Oct. 30, 1769. 

62. John PAINE^ b. July 2, 1778. 

27. JAMES MOPtRIS, 2d son of Ebenezer (4), born in Som- 
ers Feb. 28, 1728-9. Married Deborah . Children: 

63. Ebenezer*, b. Aug. 23, 1752; d. Oct. 19, 1752. 

64. Egitha^ (daughter), b. Aug. 26, 1753, in Brookfield, Mass. 
James Llorris removed from Somers to Brookfield, Mass., in 

1753, and was living there in 1754, since which date the compiler 
has found no trace of him or of his family, nor of his brother 
Ebenezer, or his sisters Mary, Huldah, Rhoda, and Anna. 

28. SARAH MORRIS, 1st daughter of Ebenezer (4), born at 
Somers, June 27, 1730. Married May 23, 1752, Joseph Hitch- 
cock, son of Ebenezer and Mary (Sheldon) Hitchcock. Children, 
all born in Ludlow, Mass. : 

65. Anna Hitchcock^, b. March 7, 1759. 

66. Joseph Hitchcock*, b. Sept. 17, 1760. 

67. Ebenezer Hitchcock*, b. Nov. 13, 1762. 

68. Sarah Hitchcock*, b. Oct. 27, 1764. 

69. Ambrose Hitchcock*, b. July 16, 1767. 

70. Clay Hitchcock*, b. June 17, 1770. 

36. SARAH MORRIS, only surviving child of Joseph (5), 
born in Boston about 1727. Married June 7, 1750, her cousin, 
Joseph Paine, 3d son of Seth and Mary (IMorris) Paine of Pomfret. 



168 MOKRIS FAMILY. 

He was born in 1720, and died March 18, 1761, in his 35th year. 
His estate was appraised at £168 16s. 9d. He was a captain in 
the French War. Children: 

71. Joseph Paine^, b. Oct. 6, 1750; bap. Dec. 27; d. before 

1778. 

72. Asa PAIXE^ b. Dec. 28, 1752. Supposed to have removed 

to Windsor County, Vt., and to have been living in 
1778. 

73. Solomon Paine', b. July 20, 1755; bap. Dec. 27. Sup- 

posed have died before 1778. 

74. Hannah Paine', b. Aug. 29, 1759; bap. Sept. 2. Living, 

1778. 

54. THOMAS CHILD, Jr., 2d son of Anna (Morris) (10) 
and Deacon Thomas Child, born July 15, 1744. Married Lucy 
Gage, Jan. 26, 1755. Children, all born in Woodstock: 

75. Walter Child^ b. Nov. 15, 1776. 

76. Anna CHILD^ b. Sept. 1, 1778. 

77. Asa C^ILD^ b. Sept. 17, 1780. 

55. LEMUEL CHILD, 3d son of Anna (Morris) (10) and 
Deacon Thomas Child, born July 12, 1747. Married Dorcas Perry, 
Nov. 16, 1768. He died May 6, 1808. Children: 

78. HuLDAH Child', b. Aug. 19, 1769; d. Feb. 27, 1855. 

79. Thomas Perry Child', b. Dec. 20, 1770; d. Nov. 27, 1773. 

80. Stephen Child', b. Feb. 24, 1772; d. Oct. 19, 1783. 

81. RowEXA Child', b. Dec. 3, 1775; m. Alba Abbott, Nov. 

26, 1795. 

82. Nancy CHILD^ b. May 20, 1778; m. Willard Abbott, Jan. 

7, 1799. 

83. Perry Child^ b. Oct. 6, 1780. 

84. DoLPHUS Child', b. Maixh 25, 1785; m. Chloe Jackson, 

Dec. 1, 1808. They had three sons and three daugh- 
ters. 



Third Branch. 



SAMUEL MOEKIS, 



AND HIS 



DESCENDANTS. 



22 



[THIRD BRANCH.] 

SECOND GE^EEATIOK 



9. SAMUEL MORRIS, 4th son of Lieutenant Edward Morris 
(1), born at Roxbury, April 19, 1671. Died at ''Myanexit 
Farm" in Thompson, Conn., Jan. 9, 1745, aged 74. 

He was fifteen years old at the time of his father's removal to 
Woodstock, where he accompanied him. Of his life in Woodstock 
at this time we have no account. We only know that after his 
father's death, in September, 1690, he became possessed of lands 
in Woodstock, which, in part at least, he received from his father's 
estate. 

In 1694, we find him back in Roxbury, having, on October 24th 
of that year, bought his father's old homestead of his sisters, Grace 
and Elizabeth Child, and their husbands, Benjamin and Joshua 
Child, for £120, To this homestead of twenty-four acres he added 
by purchase of adjoining property thirty-six acres, making in all 
sixty acres. He also bought of the Childs twelve acres more of 
swamp and upland, which had probably also been a part of his 
father's estate, as had also four other acres of land which he 
owned. In January and March, 1706-7, he bought land in Marl- 
borough, to which town he may have already removed, as we find 
him described in those purchases as "of Marlborough." He did 
not, however, dispose of his property in Roxbury until some years 
later. 

In 1682, Governor Joseph Dudley and Colonel William Stough- 
ton, as has been stated in the sketch of Edward Morris, bought of 
the Indians a part of their reserve of five square miles of land in 
Killingly. Three thousand acres of this land lay on the banks of 
the Myanexit, or Quinnebaug River, and was divided equally 
between them. Governor Dudley held his share of tiiis land — 
fifteen hundred acres — until December 18, 1714, when he sold it 
to Samuel Morris. The items of the deed are as follows : 



172 MORRIS FAMILY. 

" The Honourable Joseph Dudley of Roxbury in the county of Suffolk, 
in Ilis ]\Iajesties Province of Massachusetts Bay in New P^ngland, Escjuior. 
In consideration of the sum of Five hundred pounds current money in 
hand paid by Samuel Morris of Marlborough in the County of Middlesex, 
yeoman, gives, grants, bargains, sells &c to said Morris, a certain quantity 
or parcel of land lying in the Collony of Connecticut near Woodstock 
containing by estimation Fifteen Hundred acres lying upon a certain river 
called by the name of Myanexit river bounded by land of Colonel William 
Tailor on the north, on land of Colonel William Dudley on the East, on land 
laid out to Josiah Colton on the South partlj^ and partly on land of John 
Chandler, and on the West by the east line of the Tovrn of Woodstock, 
being the moiety or half of the Three Thousand acres of land formerly 
laid out by Mr. John Gore to the said Joseph Dudley and the Honourable 
William Stoughton Esq and since divided by Josiah Chapin and John 
Chandler by order of the said Joseph Dudley " — this 18th day of Decem- 
ber 1st year of our sovereign Lord George by the Grace of God and Great 
Britain and so forth; King; Defender of the Faith, Anno Domini 1714. 
Thomas Bacon ) J. Dudley. 

John Chandler \ Witnesses Rebekah Dudley." 

On the same day with the foreg-oing transaction Samuel Morris 
and Dorothy, his wife, gave a deed of the old homestead in Rox- 
bury to Colonel William Dudley for £500 "current money." The 
property is described as " a certain messuage or tenement of land 
containing a dwelling, outhouse, and, by estimation, sixty acres of 
land upon or near a certain place commonly called Weedy Plaine, 
bounded Northwest by country road from Roxbury to Dedhani, 
Northeast by Town highway, Southeast by Capt. John Bowles, 
partly, and partly by Jamaica school land. Southwest by Isaac 
Newell, Thomas Mayo, and Jamaica school land." The deed also 
includes two acres of marsh land at "Gravelly Marsh," and two 
acres of marsh land " at a place called the " Salt Pans." 

The price named in each transaction, "£500," current money, 
indicates "an even trade," Samuel Morris exchanging the old 
homestead of his father in Roxbury with Governor Dudley for 
fifteen hundred acres of land at Myanexit. The transaction was 
probably made at Roxbury, as the deed to Colonel Dudley was 
recorded in Boston the day following. The purchase was proba- 
bly made by Governor Dudley for his son Colonel William Dudley 
— then twenty-eight years of age — who, within a few years after 
the transaction, built upon the property a fine mansion, in which he 
live<l until his death, in 1743. In January, 1775, both of Colonel 
Dudley's sons having died, the property was sold. It was then 



[third BRANCn.] SECOND GENERATION. 173 

described as '' a mansion house and thirty acres of land both sides 
of the road to Dedhani, seven miles from Boston Town House." 
It has since been in the possession of the Bradford family. To 
the banks of the Myanexit, or Quinnebaug, Samuel Morris soon 
removed. His land lay on the west side of the river. Here, 
opposite where now is the village of New Boston, or Quinnebaug, 
he built a house with fortifications. The Nipinuck Indians still 
remaining in the \dcinity made precautions and defenses necessary 
for a time. Mr. Morris soon gained influence and authority over 
them, and was dignified by the title of " Governor." A blast of a 
conch-shell, it was said, could rally an hundred Indians to the aid 
of ''Governor" Morris. He was a man of much public spirit, and 
won the respect of the inhabitants of the surrounding country. In 
1718, he built the first bridge ever built over the Quinnebaug 
River; this he kept in repair for many years. It was located at 
the fording place on the old Connecticut path. More than a mile 
of this road ran through his land, and was kept in order by him. 
He also built two bridges over smaller streams in the vicinity. 
For these public services he petitioned the General Assembly, ip 
1721, to be exempt from taxation so long as he should keep the 
bridge in repair, and also for the privilege of attending public 
worship at Woodstock, where he had ah'eady contributed toward 
the building of the meeting-house and the support of the minister; 
there being no other place within the Colony nearer tlian Killingly 
or Pomfret. The Assembly granted his petition, and he was freed 
from taxes for ten years. [See Appendix I.] In 1730, he peti- 
tioned again for the same privileges, which were granted. 

In 1728, the parish of Thompson, in Killingly, was created, and 
a new meeting-house built, and Mr. Morris being within the parish 
limits, was assessed parish rates; but he had protested against the 
location of the meeting-house as not being placed so as to accom- 
modate himself and his neighbors. In 1732, the town of Dudley 
was organized, and a meeting-house built toward which he had 
contributed. In 1737, he petitioned the General Assembly again, 
and says '-the old bridge is carried away," and he "has got out 
timber for another one," and asks for release from taxes and church 
rates, and leave "to go to Dudley two and a half miles; or to 
"Woodstock four and a half miles to meeting." He says " the old 
bridge has cost me £100." His petition was not granted. In 
1742, he again petitioned the Assembly for relief, and was released 



174 MORRIS FAMILY, 

from paying county rates and one half of parish rates, on condition 
that lie and his heirs shall maintain and keep the bridge in good 
repair. 

The story of the trouble with Thompson parish is told as follows 
in Miss Larned's History of Windha7n Comity: 

"The remarkable harmony eiijo5'cd by Thompson Parish during this 
period was only interrupted by an unfortunate controvers}' with Mr. Sam- 
uel Morris, the builder of the first bridge across the Quinebaug, agent for 
Thompson and other non-residents, and nominal ' governor ' of the 
remaining Nipmucks. Mr. Morris had settled on a tract of land, bought 
of Governor Dudley before its assumption by Connecticut and united 
with the church in Woodstock, and for many years was allowed to wor- 
ship there without molestation; but after the erection of Thompson Par- 
ish he was l)Ound by Colony laws to do his part in establishing and main- 
taining religious worship in that society. The heavy land-tax first assessed 
was paid bj' him without remonstrance, but when the society committee 
proceeded to call upon him as a resident for the minister's salary and 
ordinaiy expenses Mr. Morris demurred. All his associations and inter- 
ests were with the Massachusetts Colony, and at his time of life he could 
not think of leaving the church of his fathers to worship with a new peo- 
ple at so great a distance. To pay for religious services which he could 
not attend seemed to him a great injustice, but the collector of Thompson 
Parish, unmoved by his protestations and refusal, took forcible possession 
of sufficient goods to satisfy his demand. The only remedy for this 
grievance was from the General Assembly, and thither Mr. Morris 
resorted, IVIay 13, 1731, with his neighbors, William Chandler, Edward 
Bugbee, and others, showing: — 

" 'That we were laid out to Thompson Parish; live seven miles away; 
way very rough; have never attended service there, and never shall; live 
some miles nearer Woodstock, and have attended there till last winter, 
when we, with some others, obtained a young gentleman to preach with 
us, and cheerfully went through with the great charge thereof, that so our 
families might have the benefit of christian instruction, and not live like 
heathen; that we have paid a full tax and helped build a meetinghouse in 
Thdinpson, which house does not accommodate us, being vcr}' much one 
side of the parish, and pray to be excused from paying anything more.' 

"This request was refused, on the ground that Thompson had not been 
properly notified. In October, ]\Ir. Morris further represented to tlic 
Assemblj': — 

"'That he could not, even in summer, attend worship in Thompson 
with any tolerable convenience, nor in the winter without extreme peril; 
that he had lu'lpcd contribute generously to the meetinghouse in Wood 
stock, and paid charges there; that he had kept up bridges and roads to 
great public benefit, yet, notwithstanding all these public services, the 
Korth Society of Killingly iiow cunie upon him for great sums of money 



[third branch.] second generation. 175 

to support the charges of said society, where it was impossible for him to 
secure any benefit, they having placed their meeting-house so far east that, 
in process of time, it would be inevitably necessary to build another.' 

"Mr. Simon Bryant and Joseph Cady were summoned to answer these 
charges, and a slight abatement ordered. Encouraged by this, Mr. Morris 
continued his pleas in October, 1783: 'That to be obliged to travel such a 
distance over bad waj'^s to Thompson meeting house would have a tendency 
to discourage religious inclinatious; that a great part of holy time would 
be spent in very servile labor, both to man and beast, by the practice, and 
that the great public charges he liad borne in making bridges ought to 
exempt him from further payment.' Again were Bryant and Cady sum- 
moned, and, having considered the circumstances, the Assembly decided, 
that though the attendance of Mr. Morris upon public worship in Thomp- 
son would be ' very difficult in the winter part of the year, yet it is not 
farther than many people live from the place of public worship in other 
parishes, and he must therefor pay half rate.' 

"Against this decision Mr. Morris most indignantly protested. He 
could not go to Thompson even in summer, because of mountains and 
rocks to go over and many swamps to go through. He had a verj^ great 
regard for the excellent Mr. Cabot, and would like to sit under his niin- 
istrj% but it was not possible, and were there no other place of worship 
he should count it a less evil to stay at home and read good books than to 
go through so much difficulty and hazard to attend at Thompson Parish. 
The General Court says: ' Others go as far to church, but,' continues Mr. 
Morris, ' I durst challenge the whole Government to find another person 
in like circumstances in two respects. I. In not being annexed with 
Woodstock to the Bay. II. In being annexed to Thompson, where I 
have not, nor cannot receive any benefit, and count it very hard to be 
annexed to a parish, to do deeds of charity, and maintain the gospel where 
it is impossible for me to attend, and if I cannot be allowed, with my 
family, to worship out of Connecticut, allow me to hire preaching in my 
own house, with those of my neighbors in like circumstances; that I, 
with those on my farm, may pay my ministerial dues where we may have 
the Word preached to us.' 

"Despite the urgency of this plea,- and many following, the Govern- 
ment persistently refused to release Mr. Morris from his parochial obliga- 
tions. Annexation to some accessible Connecticut parish would have been 
acceded, but to remit lawful ' ministerial dues ' in favor of Massachusetts, 
was a height of magnanimity not then attained by the Connecticut 
Assembly. 

"That Thompson authorities should refrain from collecting this tax 
was equally out of the question. Laws, they supposed, were made to be 
enforced, and the half-rate allowed must be secured to the uttermost 
farthing. The character and standing of Mr. Morris only made the duty 
more imperative, and thus the young parish was involved in a contro- 
versy with its most distinguished inhabitant. 

"Again and again were the people called together, 'to consider how to 



176 MORRIS FAMILY. 

proceed in our dilliculties with Samuel Morris.' Simon Bryant, Joseph 
Cady, Sampson Howe, and other leading men were sent successively to 
represent the society, and answer the memorials. Attorneys were cm- 
ployed to plead their cause at great expense, and so unwelcome was the 
service of collecting this obnoxious tax that the society was obliged to 
enact: ' That every person chosen collector and refusing to serve should 
be prosecuted in the law.' As Mr. Morris refused to pay, his goods or 
lands must be distrained, and so the contest went on year after year, to 
the great annoyance and expense of both parties. 

" At length, after Mr. Morris had connected himself with a new church 
in Dudley, much nearer his residence than Woodstock, he again peti- 
tioned. May, 1742, ' that he might be exempted from paying parish rates 
to Thompson, where he never had and never could attend worship, and 
be allowed to pay where he did attend, at Dudley, and had helped build 
a meeting-house there and maintain a minister, being sensible that Thomp- 
son was more able to maintain their own minister than the memorialist to 
help maintain Una, and for him to pay so much money to Thompson for 
nothing was more than God does, or more than man can, reasonably, 
require of their fellow creatures.' Release from the payment of county 
taxes and one-half oi all parish taxes, provided he maintained a good and 
suflBcient bridge over Quinnebaug River, and allowed a free road to pass 
through his farm over this bridge, was thereupon granted. 

"No further exemption was ever attained, but Mr. Morris was com- 
pelled through life to submit to this unjust taxation." 

In "seating" the meeting-house in Woodstock, according to 
rank and dignity, as was the custom of those days, Mr. Morris 
was assigned to the second seat, Mr. John Chandler, the greatest 
dignitary of the town, having the first one. How he was seated 
in the Dudley meeting-house is shown by the following record of 
that town. At a town meeting held on the 20th day of February, 
1738-9, it was "Voted that Mr. Samuel Morris Sen' shall have 
that pewe adjoining to the east end of the pulpit, upon Cornol 
Dudley refusing the same, the s"^ Mr. Morris and his heirs enjoy 
this pewe upon there paying what is behind toward the charges of 
our meeting-house in proportion to what another has paid that has 
a pewe of like Dignity, and also so long as they shall pay toward 
the charges referring to finishing the meeting-house and the min- 
isters rates; and if the said Mr. Morris or his heirs shall neglect 
or refuse to pay these proportions of the s^ charges then the s"* pewe 
is to return to the town again." 

"Mr. george robinson, James corbin, Joseph putney, nathan 
Denis, Sam" Corbin, paul robinson, and Nathan ramsdill, these 
persons abovenamed, now at this meeting, do hear enter tlioi'c 



[third beaxch.J second generation-. 177 

desent against this vote relating to the Morrises having a pewe in 
our meeting-house." On the 13th of September, 1739, the town 
voted, "not to reconsider the vote in regard to Mr. Morris's hav- 
ing a pewe for himself and heirs." 

Samuel Morris's troubles in regard to the worship of God seem 
now to be ended. Through the remainder of his declining years 
he probably traveled the short distance to the top of Dudley Hill 
and worshiped undisturbed. He died at " Myanexit Farm," Jan. 
9, 1745, aged 74. He was twice married. His first wife was 
Mehitable Mayo, daughter of John and Hannah (Graves) Mayo, 
and sister of Hannah Mayo, who married his brother Isaac Morris. 
She was born in Roxbury, Jan. 6, 1669, and baptized the 28th of 
February following, and admitted to full communion in the church 
Oct. 28, 1688. She died in Roxbury, Feb. 8, 170*2-3. The^place 
of her burial is not known, but was most probably in the old 
burying-ground at the corner of Washington and Eustis streets. 
By her Samuel Morris had the following children: 

1. Samuel^, b. Aug. 13, 1695, in Roxbury. 

2. Benjamin', b. Oct. 18, 1696, in Roxbury. 

3. Mehitable'', b. June25, 1698, in Roxbury; m. Philip Newell. 

4. Rebecca'^, b. Sept. 15, 1699, in Roxbury. 

5. Hannah", b. Nov. 9, 1700, in Roxbury; m. Clement Corbin. 

6. Dorothy', b. Feb. 7, 1 701-2, in Roxbury ; m. Samuel Perrin. 

7. Prudence^, b. Jan 31, 1702-3, m Roxbury, m. Moses Marcy. 
Nothing is known of the second marriage of Samuel Morris 

other than that the name of his wife was Dorothy, who died at 
''Myanexit Farm," July 28, 1742 She was probably a Roxbury 
woman. By her Samuel Morris had one child: 

8. Abigail^, b. Feb., 1704-5, in Roxbury; m. John Perrin. 
The death of Samuel Morris, as also that of his second wife, is 

recorded in the Woodstock records, but the place of their burial 
is unknown; it was probably at Dudley, but it may have been at 
•' Myanexit Farm," possibly at Woodstock Hill. 

By the will of John Mayo of Roxbury, brother of the first wife 
' of Samuel Morris, her children were to receive one-third of his 
estate after the marriage, or death of his wife, out of which por- 
tion Rebecca Morris was to have £100. The reason for this 
special gift was probably that Rebecca was named for a sister, 
perhaps a favorite, who died at the age of twenty-one. Little is 

23 



178 MORRIS FAMILY, 

known as to tlie manner of the settlement of the estate of Samuel 
Morris, as the records of Killingly, where the settlement would 
have been made, were very early destroyed by fire. Probably his 
oldest son, Samuel, was executor or administrator, and received 
his "double portion," but in whatever way it may have been 
settled, it was followed by litigation, suits having been brought 
against the executor by the other heirs for partition of certain 
lands. [See Samuel Morris. Third Generation and Appendix K.] 



[THIRD BRANCH.] 
THIRD aEIsTEEATIOE'. 



1. SAMUEL MORRIS, 1st son of Samuel (9), born in Rox- 
bury, August 13, 1695. Intended marriage witli Abigail Bragg 
of Bristol, R. I., published Sept. 7, 1728. He succeeded his father 
at " Myanexit Farm," and established business as a "trader," buy- 
ing up the produce of the neighboring country and exchanging it 
for goods in Boston. The contest in regard to taxation, so long 
maintained by his father, was renewed and continued by hun. 
[See Appendix J.] In 1751, he petitioned the General Assembly 
for relief. He said in his petition that he had kept up the bridge 
over the Quinnebaug, and that it had cost him £300. His petition 
was not granted, and he petitioned again the next year, and was 
released from paying rates to Thompson parish, and allowed to 
unite with the first society in Woodstock, that town now having 
come under the jurisdiction of Connecticut. 

He seems to have had considerable htigation in order to collect 
the debts due to him, and many suits brought by him are recorded 
in the court records of Suffolk, Worcester, and Windham counties. 
He had also litigation in regard to his settlement of his father's 
estate. In May, 1 749, he petitioned the General Assembly, represent- 
ing that Samuel Perrin of Pomfret (his brother-in-law), and Doro- 
thy, his wife, Benjamin Morris of Killingiy (his nephew), and 
divers others of the children and heirs of his father had by their 
writ, dated June 11, 1746, brought an action against him demand- 
ing the partition of sundry tracts of land lying in Thompson Par- 
ish, in such sort that there should be set out to him (the petitioner) 
|, and to the said Benjamin Morris, who was the only child and 
heir of Benjamin Morris, deceased (his brother), ^, and to the rest 
of the plaintiffs ^ each of said lands, and that the action came to a 
final trial at the Superior Court, lield in Windham in September, 
1747, upon the general issue; and that there was a verdict found 



180 MORRIS FAMILY. 

and judgment for the plaintiffs, partition to be made as demanded, 
■which was carried into execution and pai'tition made. He com- 
plained that he was sick at the time of the court and unable to 
attend it or to confer with his attorneys, or to give in any evidence 
in his defense; that injustice had been done him, especially as his 
father had given to his son Benjamin 500 acres of land, and said 
Benjamin (nephew) ought not to have set out to him any part of 
said land; he prayed for a reverse of judgment and for a new trial. 
A new trial was ordered at Windham the third Tuesday of Septem- 
ber, 1749. At this trial the decision of the court was reversed, 
with costs in his favor, and there is found on record, under date of 
Sept. 13, 1Y50, a quit-claim deed from Samuel Perrin and his wife 
and all the heirs of Samuel Morris (the father), of all the property, 
real and personal, belonging to his estate. And on Nov. 30, 1750, 
Benjamin Morris gave his uncle a quit-claim of the 500 acres of 
land. Another suit growing out of the settlement of the forego- 
ing, was brought by Mr. Morris against his brother-in-law, Moses 
Marcy, in October, 1755. [See Appendix K.] Marcy also brought 
suits against him for the payment of sundry notes. 

In the fall of 1755, he sold a large part of " Myanexit Farm" to 
Benjamin Wilkinson of Smithfield, R. I., for £20,000 (old tenor), 
and removed to Smithfield, where he soon died, June 13, 1756, 
aged 61. He widow, Abigail Morris, and Andrew Waterman 
were appointed to administer on his estate, which contained a 
large amount of personal property as well as land. [See Appen- 
dix L.] It is probable that all his family did not remove with 
him to Smithfield. It was the period of the French and Indian 
war, and in 1756 his two* oldest sons, Samuel and Henry, were 
soldiers in Lieut -Col. Nathan Payson's company from Woodstock, 
at Lake George. Soon after the death of Mr. Morris his widow- 
removed to Woodstock, where she died July 29, 1790. She was 
buried in the old burial-ground on Bungee Hill, West Woodstock. 
Children: 

9. Mehitable', b. Dec. 25, 1729; d. Jan. 7, 1729-30. 

10. Samuel^ b. March 18, 1730-1; bap. March 31. 

11. Mehitable', b. Feb. 17, 1731-2; d. May 17, 1750. 

12. Henry^ b. April 18, 1734; bap. April 24. 

13. JoHN^ b. Sept. 5, 1735. 

14. Lemuel^ b July 29, 1737; bap. July 31. 

15. Anne\ b. Marcli 13, 1739; bap. March IS; m. J. Bugbee. 



[third BRAXCH.] . THIRD GENERATION. 181 

16. William', b. Nov. 28, 1740; bap. Nov. 30. 

17. Abigail^, b. April 29, 1742; bap. May 2; m. E. Lillie. 

18. SusANNA^ b. Sept. 1, 1743; ba[3. Sept. 4; d. before 1768. 

19. Edward^ b. Aug. 19, 1745. ' 

20. Elizabeth^ ) b. May 16, 1747 [town record]. 

21. Hannah^, ( bap. May 31, 1747 [church record]. 

22. LucRETiA^ b. , ; bap. June 4, 1749; d. June, 1750. 

2. BENJAMIN MORRIS, 2d son of Samuel (9), born at Rox- 
bury, Oct. 18, 1696. Married Jan. 3, 1727-8, Hannah Hosmer of 
Killingly. He lived at Myanexit Farm with his father. He was 
deputy sheriff of New London County before the formation of 
Windham County in 1726. A few days before his marriage his 
father gave him a deed of one-third of the farm — 500 acres. The 
tenor of the deed is as follows: 

" Samuel Morris living on a farm called Or known by the name of My- 
anexit in the county of Windliam and Collony of Connecticut in the con- 
sideration of my good will and affection which I have for ray well beloved 
son Benjamin Morris of the aforesaid farm and Colony, yeoman, and also 
in consideration of his settlement and advance in ye world and a part of 
his portion of such worldly estate as it may please God to bestow upon 
me and in consideration of the good service he has done for me in sundry 
years past with which I freely acknowledge myself fully satisfied and con- 
tented — part of Myanexit Farm five hundred acres — January 10, 1728. 

Samuel Morris 
Dorothy Morris." 

Benjamin Morris died April 15, 1729, leaving a posthumous 
child: 

23. Benjamin, b. June 3, 1729; for whom his uncle Samuel 

Morris was guardian. 
Benjamin Morris was buried in the old burial-ground in Wood- 
stock. His widow married Capt. Thomas Amsdell of Dudley, 
whom she probably survived. She died Dec. 8, 1786, at the home 
of her son Benjamin Morris, in Dudley, aged 88, and was buried 
in the burial-ground on Dudley Hill. 

3. MEHITABLE MORRIS, 1st daughter of Samuel (9), born 
June 25, 1698, at Roxbury. Intention of marriage published in 
Woodstock records, October, 1728, as follows: -'Philip Newell 
and Mehitable Morris, both of the parish of Woodstock." The 
record of marriage is as follows: "Philip Newell of Kekamoo- 



182 MORRIS FAMILY. 

chaug and Mcliitable Morris near Quinebaug, Connecticut, Dec. 
25, 1728." 

Mehitable Morris was the person mentioned in the introduction 
as having been brought before the Court of Windham County, 
charged with "unseemly conduct," and sentenced to pay a fine of 
ten pounds or be whipped ten stripes on her naked body," as stated 
in the introduction. The compiler does not know the nature of 
the offense, but believes it to have been contempt of authority. 
Philip Newell was a companion of her childhood. He was the son 
of Isaac Newell of Roxbury, and was born March 26, 1G93. His 
father's farm in Roxbury and that of her father joined, and now 
they had both settled near each otlier in the Indian territory 
between the bounds of Woodstock and Dudley. 

Mehitable (Morris) Newell did not long survive her marriage, 
and probably died without child. There is no record of her 
death; but the records of Woodstock contain the notice of the 
intention of PhiUp Newell's marriage to Hannah Edmonds of 
" Kekamooad chaug," Oct. 15, 1731, and their marriage Nov. 19, 
1731; and again the marriage of Philip Newell of Dudley [that 
town having been organized in 1732] to Abigail Scarborough of 
Woodstock, March 13, 1743, 

5. HANNAH MORRIS, 3d daughter of Samuel (9), born at 
Roxbury, Nov. 9, 1700. Married Clement Corbin of Woodstock, 
by Rev. Josiah Dwight, Nov. 7, 1726. They removed to Dudley. 
Children : 

24. Hannah Corbin^, b. June 17, 1727, in Woodstock. 

25. Mehitable Corbin", b. July 3, 1728, in Woodstock. 

26. Dorcas Corbin*, b. June 8, 1731, in Woodstock. 

27. Clement Corbin", b. May 1, 1733, in Dudley. 

28. Margaret Corbin", b. Jan. 2, 1734-5; m. Benj. Morris, 

July 16, 1755. 

29. Ezra Corbin\ b. Aug. 17, 1736, in Dudley. 

30. Elijah Corbin", b. Dec. 1, 1738, in Dudley. 

31. Lucy Corbin", b. March 9, 1740; d. Dec. 1, 1740. 

6. DOROTHY MORRIS, 4th daughter of Samuel (9), born 
at Roxbury, Feb. 7, 1701-2. Married Ensign Samuel Perrin of 
Pomfret, July 14, 1724. She. died May 8, 1790, in Pomfret, 
where he also died, Dec. 7, 1765. He was of the third descent 
from John Perrin, who came from England in the ship "Safety" 



[third branch.] third generation. 183 

in August, 1635, and settled first at Braintree, Mass., and then at 
Relioboth, where, with the Rev. Samuel Newman and his church 
from Braintree, he was one of the earliest settlers, and where he 
died. His wife's name was Ann. 

Samuel Perrin was born in Woodstock, March 13, 1697. He 
removed with his father to Pomfret in 1714. His father built a 
fine mansion, long known as the "old Perrin House." The place 
is still in the possession of one of his descendants. Mrs. Perrin 
was said to have been of strong mind and body, and that one 
season, during her husband's absence in military service in the 
French and Indian wars, she raised a crop of carrots, with which 
she kept a stock of cattle from starvation, during a long and 
severe winter. Children: 

32. Samuel Perrin*, b. Aug. 20, 1725. 

33. Lucy Perrin^ b. Nov. 1, 1726; d. Dec. 5, 1736. 

34. Hezekiah Perrin\ b. April 4, 1728; d. May 31, 1766. 

35. Jedediah Perrin*, b. Oct. 22, 1729; was living in 1794. 

36. Dorothy Perrin*, b. Sept. 10, 1731; m. Benjamin Leavens. 

37. Prudence PERRIN^ b. Sept. 28, 1733; d. Dec. 5, 1736. 

38. Chloe Perrin*, b. June 8, 1735. 

39. Hannah Perrin*, b. Aug. 8, 1738. 

40. Abraham Perrin", b. March 16, 1740; d. May 2, 1798. 

41. Daniel Perrin*, b. July 26, 1741. 

7. PRUDENCE MORRIS, 5th daughter of Samuel (9), born 
Jan. 31, 1702-3, in Roxbury. Married, Aug. 19, 1 723, Moses Marcy, 
son of John Marcy of Woodstock. Their intentions of marriage 
were published Aug. 3, 1723, and they were married by John 
Chandler, Esq. Mrs. Marcy died at Sturbridge, March 28, 1779. 
Children : 

42. Dorothy Marcy*, b. Nov. 18, 1723; probably died in 

Woodstock. 

43. Jedediah Marcy*, b. Sept. 1, 1725; m. Mary Healy of 

Dudley, Dec. 31, 1747. 

44. Martha Marcy*, b. July 1, 1727; d. Sept. 11, 1736. 

45. Moses Marcy*, b. July 1, 1730; d. unmarried. 

46. Elijah Marcy*, b. July 1, 1732; m. Sarah Stacy, Feb. 19, 

1754. 

47. Prudence Marcy*, b. Sept. 9, 1734; m. Wm. Plyinpton, Jr., 

Nov. 23, 1754. 



184 MORRIS FAMILY. 

48. Mary Marcy^ l3. Aug. 23, 173G; m. Meshach Remington, 

July 9, 1755. 

49. Danikl Marcy*, b. June 14, 1737; m. Hannah Morris, 

March 3, 17G8. 

50. Martha MarcyS b. Aug. 27, 1741 ; m. Gershoni Plympton, 

March 2, 1758. 

51. MiRRiAM Makcy\ b. Nov. 20, 1743; m. Timothy Newell, 

Jan. 1, 1767. 

52. Mehitable Marcy\ b. Aug. 1 7, 1745; m. Jonathan Newell, 

May 12, 1771. 

Colonel Moses Marcy was the son of John Marcy, one of the 
earliest settlers of Woodstock. He was born April'lS, 1702. He 
removed to Sturbridge in 1732, which town was then an unorgan- 
ized district, called "New Medfield," and settled on the banks of 
the Quinnebaug River, where now is the Central village of South- 
bridge. Here he acquired four hundred and fifty acres of land 
and built the first saw-mill on the river. He became the most 
prominent man in that section of the country. He filled the office 
of town treasurer eight years; town clerk, eighteen years; and 
selectman, thirty-one years, sometimes holding all these offices at 
the same time. He was moderator of seventy town meetings, and 
was the first representative chosen by the town to the General 
Court. He was also the first justice of the peace in the town and 
kept a list of the persons married by himself, which, in twenty-one 
years, ending in 1762, numbered fifty -five, some of whom were 
his own children. During the French War he fitted out men, 
several times, at his own expense; but was remunerated after- 
wards by the town. He died, Oct. 9, 177 7, aged 72 years, leaving 
an honorable name, a large estate, and a numerous posterity. 

8. ABIGAIL MORRIS, 6th daughter of Samuel (9), born at 
Roxbury, Feb. 1704-5. She was the only child of his 2d wife, 
and married John Perrin of Woodstock. The notice of intention 
of marriage is as follows: "John Perrin of Woodstock and Abi- 
gail Morris of Myanexit. Dec. 28, 1725." He was brother of 
Samuel Perrin, who married her sister Dorothy. Children: 

53. Benjamin Perrin^ b. April 7, 1726. 

54. Elizabeth Perrin", b. April 23, 1728. 

55. John Perrin^ b. Aug. 11, 1729. 

56. Abigail Perrin', b. Sept. 11, 1731. 



[third branch.] third generation. 185 

56^. Joseph Perrin*, b. Dec. 10, 1733. 

57. Elijah Perrin^ b. March 28, 1738. 

58. Moses PerrinS b. Feb. 16, 1739-40. 

59. Isaiah Perrin*, b. Feb. 8, 1741-2. 

60. Stephen Perrin^, b. Feb. 19, 1743-4. 

61. Peter Perrin^ b. April 21, 1749. 

Mr. John Perrin was born March 18, 1701, and died April 5, 
1770. Mrs. Perrin died. June 14, 1787. Both were buried in the 
old burying ground in West Woodstock. 



24 



[THIRD BRANCH.] 

FOURTH GEJSTERATIOK 



10. SAMUEL MORRIS, 1st son of Samuel (1), born at 
"Myanexit Farm," March 18, 1731. Died at Woodstock, Dec. 20, 
1801. Married Hannah Child, May 3, 1754. She died, Feb. 27, 
1823. One son. 

62. Haviland^, b. Sept. 17, 1770, in Dudley. 

Samuel Morris seems in some way to have been connected with 
the settlement of his father's estate. The Smithfield, R. I., records 
say that, Nov. 24, 1756, he conveyed to Andrew Waterman "a 
Mansion House and improvements with 113 acres of land, situated 
in the township of Glocester; also another tract, situated in 
Smithfield, containing by estimation 200 acres, in consideration 
of £16,000, in consequence of contract previously entered by him 
with my father, Samuel Morris deceased." Another deed of same 
date conveyed to said Andrew Waterman, for £1,000, all the 
interest he had as heir to his father's estate. He served in both 
the French and Indian and Revolutionary wars. In October, 
1756, he was clerk of Lieutenant-Colonel John Payson's Company 
in General Phineas Lyman's regiment, at Fort William Henry. 
His brother Henry was in the same company. He joined in the 
march from Woodstock at Lexington alarm in April, 1775, and 
served twenty-two days. He enlisted again. May 10th, as Sergeant 
in the Seventh Company, Third Regiment, and was discharged 
Dec. 12th. He served again in 1777. He was familiarly known in 
Woodstock as "Master Morris," from his having taught school 
for many years. He was for some time teacher at the school at 
Jamaica Plains, Roxbury. His gravestone in the burying-ground 
at West Woodstock bears the following inscription: 

"In memory of Mr. Samuel Morris, who departed this life Dec. 20, 
A.D. 1801, in the 71st year of his age. 

"He fought honorably, and bled for his country in the war, and was 
also an approved instructor of youth in morals and the rudiments of 
learning. 

" Enough that nature tills the space between 
Proved by the end of being been." 



[third branch.] fourth generation, 187 

12. HENRY MORRIS, 2d son of Samuel (1), born April 18, 
1734, at "Myanexit Farm." He served in the French and Indian 
War; was Corporal in Colonel John Payson's Regiment, in the 
same company in which his brother Samuel was clerk. In 1758 
he was a sutler at Lake George. He and one Cary contracted to 
supply the troops under Colonel Putnam in the campaign against 
the Indians, but in consequence of the exorbitant prices paid for 
army stores in New York they failed. May 7, 1775, he enlisted 
and was made Corporal in the Seventh Company, Third Regiment, 
Connecticut troops, and afterwards Sergeant, and was discharged 
December 3d. He served afterwards in the Continental Army. 
He was a great pedestrian and jumper. It was said of him that 
while in the army he was sent with a message from Crown Point 
to "No. 4," Charlestown, N. H., and accomplished the feat in 
twenty-four hours, a distance of sixty-five miles. At the age of 
seventy he could clear an ordinary fence at a bound without 
touching his hand. Married Hannah Frizzell of Woodstock. He 
removed about 1790, to Concord (now Lisbon), N. H., where he 
died in 1808, and where Mrs. Morris died in 1828. He was a 
Congregationalist and a good man. Children: 

63. LucRETiA^, b. Sept. 2, 1762; d. at the age of 13. 

64. Lucinda'*, b. Sept. 27, 1763; m. David Young, and removed 

to Minerva, N. Y. Had several children, none of 
which lived to adult age. 

65. Henry^, b. ; died a prisoner of war on the Jersey. 

66. Simeon P.'', b. ; was a midshipman on the Randolph. 

67. Benjamin^, b. ; disappeared in the war of 1812. 

68. William^, b. ; d. young. 

69. ADOLPHus^ b. ; d, young. 

70. Samuel^ b. May 19, 1774. 

71. Ebenezer^ b. April 19, 1778. 

13. JOHN MORRIS, 3d son of Samuel (1), born at " Myanexit 
Farm," Sept. 5, 1735. Married Rebecca Gore, daughter of Elijah 
Gore of Dudley, June 16, 1763. Children: 

72. Rebecca^, b. June 3, 1764, in Dudley; m. Silas Hayden in 

1785. 

73. Elijah Gore^, b. April 7, 1767, in Dudley. 

74. Marvin^ b. Sept. 14, 1769, in Dudley. 

The time of the death of John Morris is unknown; but his 
widow probably married Lieutenant Wilham Smith, Feb. 27, 1799. 



188 MOKKIS FAMILY. 

U. LEMUEL MORRIS, 4th son of Samuel (1), born July 
29, 1737, at " Myanexit Farm." Married, Jan. 14, 1762, Lydia, 
daughter of Benjamin Wilkinson, great-grandson of Captain Law- 
rence Wilkinson, of Lancliester county, Durham, England. He 
was an officer in the royal army during the civil war in Eng- 
land; taken prisoner at the fall of Newcastle. His estates were 
sequestered by order of Parliament, and he came to America about 
1644, and died at Providence, R. I., in 1692. Lydia Wilkinson 
was born in Scituate, R. 1., Sept. 3, 1744. In 1755, her father 
was living in Smithfield, R. I. In that year he bought " Myanexit 
Farm " of Samuel Morris, removed to, and lived upon it about 
ten years. The house had always, since built by the first Samuel 
Morris, been kept as a tavern or place of entertainment for trav- 
elers. In 1765, an apparent "straggler" of that time, or tramp 
of these later days, stopped at the house, and, while there, casually 
asked Mr. Wilkinson what he would sell his farm for. Mr. Wil- 
kinson named the price. A few days afterwards the "straggler," 
who proved to be John Holbrook of Woodstock, reappeared with 
a bag of gold and silver, and claimed a deed of the property. Mr. 
Wilkinson removed to Thompson Hill, and there kept an excellent 
tavern for many years. He was an enterprising man, and left 
many tokens of his public spirit. Lemuel Morris Hved some 
years in Thompson, then removed to Scituate, and afterwards to 
West Woodstock, where he was made a freeman, or voter, m 1777. 
His wife died June 18, 1794, in her fiftieth year, and was buried 
in the old graveyard in West Woodstock. In 1792, he probably 
became embarrassed in his affairs and mortgaged his farm to 
Brown, Rogers & Brown of Providence, to secure a debt of £370, 
payable in gold and silver. Dec. 17, 1793, he sold his farm to his 
brother-in-law, Ebenezer Lillie, and after the death of his wife 
removed to the State of New York, where he made his home with 
his son Samuel, who had settled at Fly Creek, about six miles 
west of Coopertown, in Otsego County. He died March 16, 
1813, and was buried in the family buryingground on the farm. 
Children. 

75. Charles'', b. April 24, 1763, at Thompson. 

76. Geokge^ b. Dec. 29, 1764, at Gloucester, R. I. 

77. Samuel^, b. Aug. 3, 1767, at Thompson. 

78. RuFus', b. Feb. 4, 1772, at Scituate, R. L 

79. NoADiAH', b. June 5, 1774, at Scituate. 



[third branch.] fourth generation. 189 

80. PARDON^ b. Oct. 4, 1776, at Thompson. 

81. Lydia^, b. April 4, 1779 ; d. June 22, 1793, at West 

Woodstock. 

82. Kobert\ b. Oct. 23, 1781, at Woodstock; d. Aug. 25, 1782. 

83. Lemuel^, b. Aug. 11, 1783, at Woodstock. 

84. MaryS b. March 22, 1786, at Woodstock; m. Ezek Steere. 

15. ANNA MORRIS, 3d daughter of Samuel (1), born at 
Myanexit Farm, March 13, baptized March 18, 1739. Married 
James Bugbee, Junior, of Woodstock, Jan. 16, 1765. They 
removed to New Hampshire, where it is supposed the following 
children were born, as there is no record of any children on the 
records of Woodstock. The order of birth is not known: 

85. Morris Bugbee\ b. 

86. Haviland Bugbee', b. 

87. Nehemiah Bugbee'*, b. 

88. Polly Bugbee\ b. 

89. Anna BuGBEE^ b. 

90. Susan Bugbee\ b. 

Morris Bugbee had five children, viz.: George Washington 
Lafayette, Willard, Charles, Caroline, Eliza. 

Haviland Bugbee had two sons, who lived at Springfield, Mass., 
viz.: David and James. 

Nehemiah Bugbee had three sons. 

Charles Bugbee the son of Morris, was said to have been the 
most bold and successful express rider in the war with Mexico 
in 1846-7. He was killed by Mexican guerrillas, having been 
shot in the groin while sitting on the seat of a stage. 

16. WILLIAM MORRIS, 5th son of Samuel (1), born Nov. 28, 
1740, at Myanexit Farm. Married Feb. 5, 1778, Sarah Bowman. 
He was clerk of the company which marched from Woodstock at 
the Lexington alarm, in April, 1775, and afterwards served in the 
war in Captain B. Lyon's company. He removed to West Kairlee, 
Vermont, where he died. Children: 

91. Paraclete', b. Feb. 7, 1779. 

92. Letitia^ b. Oct. 2, 1780; m. Darius Child. 

93. Helotia'-, b March 17, 1782. 

94. William Muxroe^, b. Aug. 25, 1783. 

95. PARK^ b. Sept. 22, 1785. 

96. Augustus^ b. July 11, 1787 



190 MORRIS FAMILY. 

97. GoDFREY^ b. April 7, 1789. 

98. Sally SumnekS b. Feb. 21, 1791. 

99. RoYAL^ b. April 30, 1793. 

100. Betsey*, b. Dec. 20, 1795. 

17. ABIGAIL MORRIS, 4tli daughter of Samuel (1), born 
April 29, 1742; bap. May 2 Married Dr. Ebenezer Lillie of Dud- 
ley, Dec. 9, 1762. No children recorded. They, however, adopted 
and had baptized, Feb. 14, 1768, Susanna, an illegitimate child of 
Susanna Morris, next younger sister of Mrs. Lillie, the unfortunate 
mother being dead — a most loving. Christian act. 

19. Lieut. EDWARD MORRIS, 6th son of Samuel (1), born 
Aug. 19, 1745, at Myanexit Farm. Died in Southbridge, Aug. 10, 
1821, aged 75. Married March 23, 1771, Dorcas Corbin of Dud- 
ley. She died in Southbridge, March 10, 1817, aged 66. Mr. 
Morris was a farmer. He lived in Dudley and Southbridge. He 
was an honest, hard-working man, and maintained the respect of 
his townsmen. Children: 

ALL BORX IN DUDLEY. 

101. ELISHA^ b. Feb. 3, 1772; d. 

102. Sally^ b. Dec. 9, 1776; d. Oct. 8, 1794. 

103. EL1SHA^ b. May 11, 1778. 

104. William*, b. Sept. 5, 1779. 

105. Edward*, b. , 1783. 

106. Lyman*, b. Sept. 27, 1784. 

107. Alfred*, b. , 1786. 

108. Moses*, b. , 1788. 

eo. HANNAH MORRIS, 6th daughter of Samuel (1), born 
May 16, bapt. May 31, 1747. Married Daniel Marcy of Sturbridge, 
March 3, 1768. He was her cousin, and was the son of Col Moses 
Marcy. He died at Sturbridge, Dec. 31, 1806, aged 68. The 
time and place of Mrs. Marcy 's death has not been ascertained. 
Children : 

109. Susanna Marcy^ b. Dec. 20, 1767; d. July 28, 1768. 

110. Dorothea Marcy*, b. Oct. 4, 1770. 
HI. Daniel Marcy*, b. April 28, 1772. 

112. DoLPHUS Marcy*, b. Dec. 14, 1775. 

113. Morris Marcy*, b. ; m. Sully Morse. 



[third branch.] fourth generation. 191 

114. Maria Marcy^, b. ; m. Richards of Boston. 

115. David Marcy^, b. ; lost at sea. 

116. Mehitable Marcy', b. 

117. Abigail Marcy^, b. ; m. Jacob Mason of Craftsbury, Vt. 

118. Betsey Marcy', b. 

23. Captain BEXJAMIX MORRIS, only child of Benjamin 
(2), born at Myanexit Farm, June 3, 1729, forty-nine days after 
his father's death. His uncle, Samuel Morris, was appointed his 
guardian. He married July 16, 1755, Margaret Corbin of Dudley, 
daughter of Clement and Hannah (Morris) Corbin, and therefore 
his cousin. He died at Dudley, Sept. 1, 1791, aged 62. She died 
Feb. 11, 1825, aged 90. Children: 

FROM KILLIXGLY RECORDS. 

Benjamin, b. Jan. — , 1757. 
John Hollowell, b. Sept. 24, 1758. 

FROM THE FAMILY BIBLE. 

119. Thomas\ b. Jan. 28, 1760; bap. Feb. 10. 

120. Benjamin^, b. Feb. 26, 1762. 

121. John Hollo way", b. Feb. 13, 1764; bap. Feb. 19. 

122. Hannah^, b. March 3, 1766; bap. March 16; m. Thomas 

Larned. 

123. Rebecca^ b. Oct. 23, 1767; bap. Nov. 1; m. Silas Hayden, 

Feb. 10, 1785. 

124. Zebulon-, b. Jan. 28, 1770; bap. Feb. 11. 

125. Hezekiah^, b. Aug. 24, 1771; never married. 

126. Mercy^ b. June 23, 1776. 

Benjamin Morris, on the 30th of November, 1750, soon after he 
had attained his majority, gave to his uncle, Samuel Morris, a quit- 
claim deed of the five hundred acres of land — part of Myanexit 
Farm — which his father had received by deed of gift from his 
father, the first Samuel Morris. 

43. JEDEDIAH MARCY, 1st son of Colonel Moses and 
Prudence (Morris) Marcy (7), born in Woodstock, Sept. 1, 1725. 
Married Dec. 31, 1747, Mary, daughter of Col. Moses Healy of 
Dudley, and located there. Children: 

127. Joseph MARCY^ b. Oct. 21, 1849; d. Oct. 25, 1779. 

128. Jedediah Marcy^ b. July 23, 1751; d. Jan. 20, 1756. 



192 MOHKIS FAMILY. 

129. Mary Marcy-', bap. Feb. 9, 1755; d. 

130. Jedediah Mabcy\ bap. July 13, 1757; m. Rvith Learned. 

131. Mary Marcy^ bap. Jan. 27, 1760; m. Healy. 

132. Rhoda Marcy^ bap. May 16, 1761. 

133. Daniel MARCY^ b. April 27, 1765; m. Betsey Learned. 

134. Hannah Marcy*, bap. Oct. 23, 1772. 

46. ELIJAH MARCY, 2d son of Colonel Moses and Pru- 
dence (Morris) Marcy (7), born July 1, 1732. Married Sarah 
Stacy, Feb. 19, 1754. Children: 

135. Lemuel Marcy^ b. Jan. 10, 1755; d. Nov. 8, 1756. 

136. Prudence Marcy', b. Nov. 21, 1756. 

137. Sarah Marcy*, b. Nov. 14. 1758; d. Dec. 1, 1762. 

138. Elljah Marcy^ b. Aug. 6, 1761. 

139. Lemuel Marcy', b. Sept. 10, 1763; d. March 29, 1767. 

140. Sarah Marcy', b. May 26, 1766. 

141. Lemuel Marcy*, b. May 23, 1768. 

47. PRUDENCE MARCY, 3d daughter of Colonel Moses 
and Prudence (Morris) Marcy (7), born Sept. 9, 1734. Married 
William Plympton, Nov. 23, 1754. Children, all born in Stur- 
bridge : 

142. KiAs Plympton*, b. Oct. 7, 1755; d. Jan. 15, 1756. 

143. Nathan Plympton*, b. Nov. 24, 1756. 

144. Caroline Plimpton*, b. June 30, 1759. 

145. Prudence Plympton*, b. June 24, 1761; d. May 30, 1762. 

146. William Plympton*, b. March 16, 1763. 

147. Prudence Plympton*, b. May 26, 1765. 

148. KiAS Plympton*, b. Aug. 4, 1766. 

48. MARY MARCY, 4th daughter of Colonel Moses and 
Prudence (Morris) Marcy (7), born Aug. 23, 1736. Married Dr. 
Mesheck Remington of Sturbridge, July 9, 1755. One child on 
record : 

149. Lucretia Remington*, b. March 1, 1756; d. Nov. 13, 
1758. 

50. MARTHA MARCY, 5th daughter of Colonel Moses and 
Prudence (Morris) Marcy (7), born Aug. 27, 1741. Married Ger- 
shom Plympton, March 2, 1758. Children: 

150. Chloe Plympton*, b. March 23, 1760. 



[third braxch.] fourth generation. 193 

151. Moses Plympton', b. Dec. 14, 1761; d. Oct. 4, 1782. 

152. Patte Plympton', b. March 29, 1764; m. Jonatliau Janes 

of Brimfield, March 4, 1781. 

153. Anx Plympto.V, b. Jan. 28, 1766. 

154. Gershom Plympton*, b. Feb. 16, 1768. 

155. Kezia Plymptox=^, b. Aug. 29, 1770. 

156. Mary Plymptox', b. April 3, 1774. 

157. Rebecca Plymptox^, b. Dec. 27, 1775; m. Charles Grosve- 

nor. 

158. Seth D. Plymptox\ b. July 30, 1777. 

51. MIRIAM MARCY, 6th daughter of Colonel Moses and 
Prudence (Morris) Marcy (7), born Nov. 23, 1743. Married Gen- 
eral Timothy Newell of Sturbridge, Jan. 1, 1767. Children: 

159. Mehitable Newell^, b. Oct. 27, 1767; m. Thomas Upham, 

Feb. 4, 1794. 

160. Miriam Newell\ b. Sept. 7, 1769. 

161. Submit Newell^, b. June 13, 1771. 

162. Rachel Newell^, b. Aug. 3, 1772. 

163. Rebecca Newell^, b. June 3, 1774; d. Oct. 18, 1774. 

164. Rebecca Neavell^ b. Dec. 26, 1776; m. John. P. Reynolds 

of Salem, N. Y., June 24, 1808. 

165. Haxxah Ne^ell^, b. Jan. 15, 1778; m. Dr. Abraham Allen 

of Sturbridge, Sept. 28, 1806; removed to Salem, N. Y. 

166. LucixDA NEWELL^b. Feb. 6, 1781 ; m. Rev. Alfred Ely, D.D., 

of Monson, Jan. 25, 1814. 

167. Timothy Newell^ b. Dec. 21, 1782; graduated at Harvard 

College in 1802, and died at Salem, N. Y., Dec. 4th, 
same year. 

168. Mary Newell*, b. Sept. 2, 1784; m. John Kennedy of 

Salem, N. Y., Sept. 15, 1812. 

169. Esther Newell*, b. June 3, 1787; m. Judge C. J. Savage 

of Salem, N. Y. 
General Timothy Newell was born in Needham, Mass., in 1742. 
He removed to Sturbridge about 1763. He was a mechanic, 
without means. He made chairs, rakes, spinning-wheels, etc. He 
was industrious and economical, and soon accumulated a small 
capital, which enabled him to open a store. He enlarged his 
business until he became an extensive trader, and accumulated a 

25 



194 MORRIS FAMILY. 

large estate for the time. His early education was limited; but 
by reading and study he acquired a varied intelligence and famil- 
iarity with many of the sciences, to which he added a genei-al 
knowledge of history and politics, w^hich brought him before the 
public and gave him great influence in society. He entered the 
army as brigade-major and left it as colonel. About the time of 
Shay's rebellion he was made a major-general of militia. He was 
also a senator, and was also sometimes chosen council to the 
Governor. He was a man of noble actions and dignified manner. 
He contributed liberally to all good objects. He was influential 
in placing a steeple on the church in Sturbridge, and furnished a 
clock for it at his own expense. He was for many years a leading 
man of the town. He died Feb. 5, 1819, aged 76. Mrs. Newell 
died, March 19, 1812, aged 69. 



[THIRD BRAXCH.] 

FIFTH GIE:^EEATI0K 



62. Dr. HAVILAND MORRIS, only son of Samuel (10), 
born Sept. 17, 1770, in Dudley. Died, January, 1845, aged 75. 
He was for many years the principal physician at West Woodstock 
and vicinity, and continued in practice until about ten years before 
his death. He was said to have possessed a strong and well- 
balanced mind, a good education, and a retentive memory. He 
was fond of reading and was familiar with both ancient and mod- 
ern history. He was a logical reasoner, and firm and unyielding in 
his opinions. In conversation he was social, easy, and instructive. 
He was active in society; was inspector of schools, and examiner of 
teachers. He was one of the first to engage in the establishing of 
the public library in West Woodstock. In personal appearance 
he was about five feet four inches in height,- his legs short, his 
body large in proportion to his feet and legs; which were small. 
He was a little inclined to corpulency and to a little stooping at 
the shoulders. His eyes were light-blue, and not very prominent; 
hair light-brown. His countenance stern and intelhgent. He 
seldom laughed, and never loud. He never married, and once 
told an acquaintance the following story of his only attempt in a 
matrimonial direction. In his younger days he paid attention to a 
young lady of his acquaintance, living in the adjoining town of 
Sturbridge, and on one of his visits tarried through the night. 
The next morning, after breakfast, his hoi-se, saddled and bridled, 
was led to the door preparatory to returning home. Looking for 
a good place to mount, he observed some barrels in the dooryard, 
one of which stood on its end ; he got up and stood on the head of 
it, and as he sprang to mount his horse, the head of the barrel 
dropped in and be with it, much to the merriment of the whole 
family. He was soon out of it with his fine clotlies and ruffles, 
thoroughly saturated with new cider. He repaired to the house, 



196 MORRIS FAMILY. 

and, after borrowing a change of clothing, started for Woodstock. 
The chagrin and mortification caused by this occurrence dampened 
his courage for making any further attempt in the line of matri- 
mony. At the time of his death he was the last of the descendants 
of Edward Morris, Hving in Woodstock, who bore the name of 
Morris. 

70. SAMUEL MORRIS, 6th son of Henry (12), born at 
Woodstock, May 19, 1774. Died at Lisbon, N. H., Aug. 27, 1850. 

Married Anna B. Whitcomb, , 1801. She was daiighter of 

Major Benj. Whitcomb, and was born Oct. 5, 1781. Children. 

170. Hexry«, b. Oct. 27, 1801; d. young. 

171. Benjamin^, b. Feb. 20, 1802; m. Mead of Salina, 

N. Y. He died in Lisbon, 1873. One daughter. 

172. Ruth W.«, b. June 4, 1804. 

173. HoRACE^ b. Feb. 16, 1806; d. at Marshall, Mich., 1857, 

unmarried. 

174. HANNAH^ b. Oct. 6, 1807; m. Hunter, of White- 

field, N. H. 

175. George W.«, b. Jime 13, 1809. 

176. Samuel^ b. Dec. 21, 1810; d. in childhood. 

177. John W. H.«, b. March 27, 1813; d. at the age of 21, an 

invalid. 

178. Sela«, b. June 5, 1815. 

179. Anna M.«, b. March 23, 1818; m. May 24, 1842, Wm. 

Rich of Maidstone, Vt. He d. in 1848; m. 2d, Jesse 
Mason, and lives in Lisbon. Four children by Wm. 
Rich. 

180. Helotia', b. Dec. 25, 1819; m. Frederick D. Smith, Clare- 

mont, N. H. 

181. Mary Emory", b. Feb. 20, 1821; m. Adam Streeter, Nov. 

24, 1846. Had six girls and one boy. 
George W. Morris is living in Landaff, N. H. He is a deaf 
mute, and was a pupil in the American Asylum for deaf and dumb 
at Hartford, Conn., for four years, from 1825 to 1829, and while 
there learned the trade of cabinet making. Samuel Morris was a 
public spirited man and held various town offices: selectman, school 
committee, etc. His father, himself, and his wife all died in their 
87 th year. 



[third branch.] fifth generation. 197 

71. EBENEZER MORRIS, Vtli son of Henry (12), born in 
Woodstock, April 29, 1778. Died at Lisbon, N. H., Aug. 16, 
1842. Farmer. Lived at Lisbon. He was a Methodist, and 
noted for his humble character, purity of life, and devoted piety. 
He was twice married: 1st, by Rev. Ozias Savage, to Miss Hannah 
Moore, by whom he had three children: 

182. Henry", b. , 1811. 

183. LucRETiA", b. , 1813; m. 1st, Phineas Titus of 

Boston, in 1842; m. 2d, PHny Bartlett, in 1872. 

184. Alage«, b. , 1814; m. C. C. Kimball of Haverhill, 

N. H., in 1841. 
Married 2d, Dec. 1846, Alice Swan, and had, 

185. Harriet", b Dec, 1817; ra. Ethan Willoughby of Nashua, 

N. H., in 1863. 

186. Clarissa^, \ -p^-^^g j m. T. P. Frost. 

187. Ozias S.« ] ^"^^' ( b. April 21, 1821. 
! 188. Charles W.*', b. Dec. 7, 1824. 

73. ELIJAH GORE MORRIS, 1st son of John (13), born in 
Dudley (or Charlton), April 7, 1765. Married, Nov. 26, 1790, 
Tam ma Davis of Dudley. Schoolteacher. Removed to Wethers- 
field, Conn., about 1800. Died there Sept. 24, 1835, aged 70. 
His wife died Jan. 10, 1840, aged 70. Children: 

189. Marinda«, b. Aug. 24, 1792; m. George Rhodes of Weth- 

ersfield. 

190. Davis^ b. March 17, 1794. 

191. Tamma", b. March 9, 1 7 9 6 ; m. S. T. Walker of Glastonbury, 

Jan. 31, 1831; d. April 15, 1874. Had one child, 
Sifonette. 

192. Moses", b. Aug. 21, 1797. 

193. Nancy", b. Oct. 29, 1799; m. Elisha Bigelow of Hanford. 

194. RuFus", b. Nov. 5, 1801. A sailor; lost at sea; unmarried. 

195. Mary", b. Feb. 22, 1813; m. George Pratt of East Hart- 

ford, and died, June 26, 187 6. 

74. MARVIN MORRIS, 2d son of John (13), born Sept. 14, 
1769, in Dudley. Died in Providence, R. I., about 1809. Mar- 
ried, May 9, 1793, Sarah, daughter of Capt. William Potter of 
Smithfield, R. I. She was born Nov. 7, 1771. She died in 
Cranston. Merchant. Lived iu Providence. Children: 



198 MORRIS FAMILY. 

]9G. Mary Potter", b. Aug. 5, 1794, in Dudley; d. in Albany, 
N. Y., unmarried. 

197. Julia Ann'', b. June 3, 1796, in Providence; d. at North 

Adams, Mass., Aug. 23, 1813. 

198. Milton Marquis", b. Aug. 2, 1798. 

199. William Potter', b. June 21, 1801. 

200. Alexander Hamilton", b. Dec. 24, 1804. 

75. Captain CHARLES MORRIS, 1st son of Lemuel (14), 
born in Thompson Parish, Killingly, April 24, 1762. Married 
Nov. 20, 1783, in Woodstock, by Rev. Eliphalet Lyman, to Miss 
Miriam Nichols. She was the daughter of Captain Jonathan and 
Sarah (Bassett) Nichols of Mansfield, Conn. She was born in 
]\Iansfield, Feb. 21, 1764, and died of pleurisy at Sharon Springs, 
N. Y., March 12, 1809. Her parents were married in Mansfield, 
May 23, 1749. Mrs. Nichols was the daughter of Nathan Bassett. 
Captain Morris, after his marriage, settled in Woodstock, where he 
was made a freeman in 1785. At the ages of sixteen and seventeen 
he was a soldier in the Continental army, serving part of the time 
in Rhode Island under the command of General LaFayette. On 
one occasion, while in the fort or trenches at Newport, a shell 
thrown by the British struck a comrade and blew his brains in the 
face of young Morris. He was frightened, and started to leave 
the spot. LaFayette, who occupied an exposed position near by 
saw hira start and called out to him, " Why for you run boy ? you 
can't go so fast as missile ! " The reasonableness of the remark 
arrested his attention and recalled him to his duty. He never 
attempted to run afterwards. After leaving the army he was for 
some time on a privateer. Once he was a prisoner of war, and 
confined in the hulk or prison ship at New York (probably the 
Jersey), and was employed by the officers as a clerk. After the 
war he was engaged in commercial pursuits. He sailed a vessel 
of which he was half owner from New York to the West Indies 
and South America. On a voyage up the Orinoco River, liis vessel, 
cargo, and crew, were captured by revolutionists at a point six 
hundred miles up that river. He was detained two years, when 
he was enabled to escape; he and his mate going by canoe at 
night and laying by during the day until they got out of the river, 
when they were picked up by an English cruiser. He lived at 
West Woodstock until about 1791, when he removed to Warwick, 



[third braxch.] fifth generation. 199 

R. I. In 1793 or 1795 he removed to Providence, and soon after 
returned to Woodstock. He was appointed a purser in the old 
navy of the United States. Feb. 4, 1799, and was assigned to duty 
on the ship Baltimore, Captain Samuel Barron. In September he 
was assigned to the frigate Congress at Portsmouth, N. H. The 
" Congress " was a new vessel, just launched, and under the com- 
mand of Captain Sever. He remained in the "Congress" until 
Nov. 1, 1801, when he was discharged under the Peace Establish- 
ment Act. He returned to Woodstock and bought a small place 
on Woodstock Hill, but Lived there a short time only. His brother, 
Rufus, had several years before removed to Canajoharie, N. Y. 
He decided to follow him there. He sold his place in Woodstock 
to Theodore B. Chandler, Aug. 16, 1802, and bought a small farm 
in the village of Ames, near his brother, to which he removed in 
the following October. 

Captain Morris had a practical education rather superior to the 
average business man of his time. He was well informed, and was 
personally acquainted with many of the prominent men of his day. 
He was frank in the expression of his opinions, hearty and bluff in 
his manner, and detested all insincerity, sham, or pretense. In 
the later years of his life he was a Whig in politics. In personal 
appearance he had blue eyes, brown hair; he was broad-shouldered, 
and stood erect in stature five feet and ten inches. 

Captain Morris married for his second wife, Oct. 4, 1810, Mrs. 
Sarah (Eliot) Graves of Ames. Her father was Rev. George Ehot, 
pastor of the First Free- Will Baptist Church, organized at Ames 
1796-7. Her mother was a daughter of Richard Kimball of Pom- 
fret, Conn. 

Captain Morris died at Ames, June 7, 1838, and was buried in 
the family burial-ground in that village. He had the following 
Children : 

BY MIRIAM XICHOLS. 

201. Charles", b. July 26, 1784, in West Woodstock. 

202. LucY^ b. Feb. 17, 1787, in West Woodstock; m. Da\nd J. 

Hopkins of Middlebury, Vt. She d. Dec. 26, 1812. 

203. Horace^ b. Jan 28, 1789; d. West Woodstock. 

204. George", b. Oct. 20, 1790; d. West Woodstock. 

205. Robert^ b. Oct. 15, 1792. 

206. Maria", b. , , 1802, at Ames; m. Ben. Lear of 

Washington, D. C. She had no children. 



200 MOREIS FAMILY. 

BY SARAH (eLIOt) GRAVES. 

207. Samuel Eliot", b. Aug. 10, 1811. 

208. Lydia", b. Dec. 15, 1813; m. Adam Bullockof Canajoharie, 

and died March 16, 1846. 

209. Harriets, "b. Feb. 16, 1818; m. Rollin Read of Troy, N. Y., 

died March. 20, 1840, without children. 

7C. GEORGE MORRIS, 2d son of Lemuel (14), born Dec. 29, 
1764, in Glocester, R. I. Little is now known of his life or 
employment. He went to England, and married there. Intending 
to return to the United States on a visit — it is supposed — he 
embarked at Liverpool on a vessel which was never heard from 
after her departure from that port. He left a wife and two child- 
ren in Livei'pool. The tradition is that during the Revolutionary 
AVar he was at one time a prisoner on one of the British prison 
ships. 

77. SAMUEL MORRIS, 3d son of Lemuel (14), born Aug. 8, 
1767, in Thompson. Married Jan. 31, 1793, Betsey Bradford of 
Woodstock, a descendant of Governor Bradford of Plymouth, and 
soon removed to Fly Creek, in the town of Otsego, N. Y., and set- 
tled on a farm about one and a half miles southwest from that vil- 
lage, and about six miles from Coopertown. Here he cleared up 
a heavy growth of pine, hemlock, and maple trees. He and his 
wife were two of fourteen persons who united and helped organize 
the first society of Universalists in the State of New York west of 
the Hudson River, now known as " Christ's Church." 

Mr. Morris died May 7, 1838, aged 71. INIrs. Morris died Sept. 
21, 1861. They were buried in the family burial-ground — a 
stone-wall enclosure on the Morris farm. Children: 

210. Lydia«, b. Nov. 8, 1793; m. James Wells, Dec. 29, 1812. 

211. Haxnah', b. Aug. 23, 1795; m. Oliver Bishop, Jan. 12, 

1818. 

212. Au'RELiA Content", b. July 3, 1797; m. Chester Jarvis, Oct. 

15, 1818. 

213. Betsey', b. Sept. 24, 1799; m. George Partridge, Nov. 4, 

1824. 

214. Almiua", b. Nov. 9, 1802; d. May 16, 1805. 



[third branch.] fifth generation. 201 

78. Deacon RUFUS MORRIS, 4th son of Lemnel (14), born 
at Scituate, R. I., Feb. 4, 1772. Died at Canajoharie, N. Y., 
Sept. 26, 1848. Married Aug. 9, 1795, Matilda, daughter of Leb- 
beus and Sarah (Crafts) Kimball of Pomfret, Conn. She was 
born Nov. 20, 1780, and died Feb. 1, 1848. 

Mr. Morris was a farmer, and lived at Woodstock. Soon after 
his marriage he removed to Florida, Montgomery County, N. Y. 
From Florida he removed to Bowman Creek (now the village of 
Ames), in the town of Canajoharie. He held at various times the 
oflBces of Town Clerk and Supervisor. In the War of 1812, he 
was an officer in the State troops, and was stationed for most of 
the time of his service at Sackett's Harbor. He was a deacon in 
the Free- Will Baptist Cluirch. In politics he was a Federalist and 
Whig. Children: 

215. Oran Wilkinson", b. Feb. 5, 1798, at Bowman's Creek. 

216. Sarah Crafts'^, b. Feb. 12, 1802, at Bowman's Creek; m. 

Silas Huntley of Florida, Sept. 25, 1822. They had 

two sons: 
Morris Huntly, b. Nov. 23, 1823; d. Jan. 3, 1848. 
George Huntly, b. May 31, 1825; d. Oct 13, 1842. 

217. MARY^ b. June 12, 1806; m. Isaac Orr of New Hampshire. 

They had: 
Edward Orr, b. Feb. 26, 1825. 
Henry Orr. b. 1827; d. 1844. 
Morris Orr, b. 1830; d. 1835. 

218. NoADiAH Hart'^, b. Nov. 18, 1810, at Bowman's Creek. 

79. NOADIAH MORRIS, 5th son of Lemuel (14), born at 
Woodstock, June 5, 1784. Married Sept. 9, 1807, Prudence Clark 
Hartt of Boston. He entered the navy as secretary to Commo- 
dore Talbot, and was with that officer in the Constitution on a 
cruise in the West Indies in 1800 and 1801, during the war with 
France. On the appointment of Commodore Preble to the com- 
mand of the squadron sent to Tripoli in 1803, he was appointed 
secretary to that officer, and sailed with him from Boston in 
1803, in the "Constitution." His nephew, Charles Morris, was a 
midshipman on the "Constitution," soon to distinguish himself 
by his heroic action in tlie destruction of the Philadelphia. Mr. 
Morris was appointed chaplain in the navy, July 5, 1803, and on 
December 10th, the same year, he was appointed purser, — those 

26 



202 MOKKIS FAMILY. 

two positions being sometimes combined in the early days of the 

navy. 

Mr. Morris accompanied Commodore Preble at his avidience with 
the Emperor of Morocco, at Tangier, on VN^hich occasion a renewal 
of the treaty with that power was obtained, and peace secured. 
In September. 1804, Commodore Preble having been superseded 
by Commodore Barron, he returned to the United States in the 
John Adams. In 1805, he was for some time in the Navy Depart- 
ment. In 1806, he left the navy to engage in commercial opera- 
tions. He bought a schooner, and freighted it for Liverpool and 
the Mediterranean. The voyage was a sucesssful one, and on its 
return to Boston, in September, he loaded it on his own account 
and sailed for the Mediterranean, taking his younger brother, 
Lemuel, with him. What the result of this voyage was does not 
appear. In the meantime he had formed a partnership with other 
parties for trade in the Mediterranean. In 1807, he appears to 
have been engaged in trade with parties in Monte- Video, S. A., 
and expected to be appointed consul for the River Plate, and to 
go there after his marriage; but probably did not. Very likely 
the embargo frustrated his plans, as under it no vessel could leave 
any port in the United States for foreign ports. Early in 1808 
his health began to fail. In the meantime other misfortunes befell 
him; his partnership affair was a failure, and through it he lost 
his entire fortune. In June, 1808, he wrote from Boston to his 
brother Lemuel, then at Providence, who had applied to him 
for some assistance: " Since I have received your letter I have 
been devising in my mind how I can oblige you in money matters, 
but can fix on no plan but the selling my horse and chaise; for as 
for money I am not worth fifty dollars in the world. This fact 
will be as painful to you as myself. The company business just 
broke me up. I am struggling with a painful and incurable dis- 
ease, and as for borrowing in this state of health, I should think it 
dishonesty. I shall go to Newport very soon, and if I can at that 
place dispose of my horse and chaise to any advantage, you shall 
have a part." His disease — consumption — increased. In 
November, 1808, he took passage in the ship Minerva, Captain 
Burdick, from New York for Charleston, S. C, accompanied by 
a colored boy as his servant. He was in a very feeble condition 
when he embarked, and gradually failed, until he expired at half- 
past one o'clock on the od of December — five days before the 



[third branch.] fifth generation. 203 

arrival of the ship at Charleston. He was entii^ely conscious of 
his situation, and within a few moments of his death spoke of his 
wife in language of the strongest affection ; expressing his anxiety 
for her health, which had become impaired by her unceasing 
devotion to his comfort. He died without pain or struggle. He 
had as fellow passengers Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Sturgis of Boston, 
from whom he received attention and care. Mr. Sturgis was 
brother of the late eminent Russell Sturgis of Boston. From all 
that can now be gathered concerning Mr. Morris, we learn that he 
was a good man, of great purity and excellence of character; a 
man of great kindness and generosity; loving his friends and 
beloved by them His attachment to his younger brother, Lemuel, 
and his sister, Mary, was most devoted, and the greatest interest 
which he had at heart seemed to be their welfare and advancement. 
He was a wise counselor, as is evidenced by his letters, and also 
attested by Commodore Charles Morris in his autobiography. He 
was probably named for Rev. Noadiah Russell, the minister at 
Thompson, as in the record of his intention of marriage at Boston, 
Sept. 9, 1807, his name is recorded as Noadiah R. Morris. This 
is, however, the only instance where the compiler has found his 
name written with the middle initial. 

Captain Edmund Hartt, the father of Mrs. Prudence Clark 
Morris, was a noted ship-builder in Boston. His ship-yard (long 
known as Hartt's navy-yard) was where the old "Constitution 
wharf" stood, before its extension was made necessary by the 
filling in of the slips and the extension of Atlantic Avenue. His 
dwelling-house was in front of it. In the early days of the 
United States Navy the Government had no shipyards of its own. 
All its vessels were built in the yards of ship-builders. Captain 
Hartt built the United States frigates "(Constitution " and Bo.-.ton, 
and the brig Argus. The building of the " Constitution " there gave 
name to the wharf. A history of the building of that famous 
vessel with which the name of Morris is connected with so much 
honor, renown, and heroic bravery, by the deeds of its most distin- 
guished representative, may be most appropriately given here: 

The ■' Constitution " was built under an act of Congress, approved 
by the President, March 27, 1794, authorizing the purchase or 
building of four ships, to carry forty-four guns each, and two to 
carry thirty-six guns. The " Constitution " was designed by Joshua 
Humphreys of Philadelphia, and constructed under the superin- 



204 MORRTS FAMILY. 

tendence of Colonel George Claghorne of New Bedford. Captains 
Barry, Dale, and Truxton. with Mr. Humphreys, decided upon her 
dimensions. Mr. Humphreys prepared the drafts, moulds, and 
building instructions. The frame was to be of hve oak and red 
cedar; the keel, keelson, beains, planking, etc., the best white oak; 
the decks of the best Carolina pitch pine; but under the guns, of 
oak. John T. Morgan, a master shipwright of Boston, was sent 
to Charleston and Savannah to procure the live oak, red cedar, and 
pitch pine for all the frigates. The original draft of the " Constitu- 
tion " was changed at the suggestion of Colonel Claghorne, to whom 
her construction had been confided. A portion of the timber was 
taken from the woods of Allentown, N. H., on the Merrimac, fifty 
miles away from the ship-yard. Paul Revere furnished the copper 
bolts and spikes, drawn from malleable copper by a process then 
new. Ephraim Thayer of the South End of Boston, made her 
gun carriages. Her first battery was of English origin, and bore 
the monogram " G. R." She carried it through and long after 
the war of 1812. The anchors were made in Hanover, Plymouth 
County. Mass., and her sails were made in the old granary on the 
corner of Park and Tremont streets. No other building was large 
enough. The duck for the sails was made in the factory of an 
incorporated company, on the coi'ner of Tremont and Boylston 
streets. Mr. Hartley of Boston, assisted Colonel Claghorne in the 
superintendence. Captain Samuel Nicholson exercised a general 
supervision, aided by General Henry Jackson and Major Gibbs of 
Boston. Edmund Hartt was the master carpenter. Her keel was 
laid by Mr. Hartt in November, 1794. The first official mention 
of her name is in a report from a committee on the state of naval 
equipments, etc., to the United States House of Representatives, 
dated Jan. 25, 1797, which says: ''The frigate, building at Boston, 
called the " Constitution," is in such a state of forwardness that it is 
supposed she can be launched in July." She was not ready for 
launching until September 20th. On the morning of that day, 
Captain Nicholson left the yard to get his breakfast, leaving orders 
not to hoist any flag over her until his return, intending to have 
the honor of hoisting the flag with his own hands; but during his 
absence Samuel Bently, a shipwright and calker, assisted by a 
comrade named Harris, hoisted the Stars and Stripes, which thus, 
for the first time floated over this historic ship. Captain Nicholson, 
on his return, expressed himself in words more strong than polite 



[third branch.] fifth C4ENERATI0N. 205 

at this disobedience of his commands. People from all quarters 
poured into the town to see the launch. Several hundred went 
over to Noddle's Island to get a better view. They were, however, 
to be disappointed. At high water, twenty minutes after eleven 
o'clock, the signal was given, but the ship would not start until 
screws and other machinery had been applied, and then she only 
moved about twenty-seven feet. It was found on examination 
that the ways had settled about an inch, which, with some minor 
causes had caused the obstruction. Delay was necessary to remedy 
the matter, and the colors were hauled down and the multitude 
dispersed, disappointed and anxious. The vessel was raised the 
next day two inches, and other defects remedied. On the 22d 
she was ready for another attempt. She moved about thirty-one 
feet and then stopped. On examination it was found that the 
ways, erected on the new wharf which had been built for her to 
pass over, had settled one and five-eighths of an inch. The vessel 
might have been forced off, but the constructor deemed the attempt 
too hazardous. A greater descent to the ways was made and the 
vessel ready for launching at the next high tide. The third 
attempt at launching the vessel was made on Saturday, October 
2 1st, a day noted as the anniversay of the discovery of America by 
Columbus. The day was cold and unpleasant, and but few people 
assembled. Some, specially invited, gathered in the yard; a 
smaller number with some ladies were on her deck. At half-past 
twelve, all being ready. Captain Nicholson stood at the heel of the 
bowsprit with a bottle of choice Madeira, from the cellar of the 
Hon Thomas Russell. At a given signal the ship slid along the 
ways and glided into and rested gracefully upon the water, amid 
a chorus of cheers. As she did so Captain Nicholson broke over 
her bow, according to time honored usage, and baptized her as 
the good ship " Constitution." She cost, when ready for sea, $302,- 
718.84.* She first moved under canvas July 20, 1798, and pro- 
ceeded to sea on her first cruise, under command of Captain 
Samuel Nicholson, August 13th, of the same year. Commodore 
George H. Preble, from whose article in the ''Memorial History of 
Boston " the above facts are taken, says the " Constitution " gained 
her well-known soubriquet of " Old Ironsides "in her cruise in 

*Tbe cost of repairs upon her up to 1850, was $495,236, which, of 
course, included the rebuilding of her in 1832, at Charlestown. She was 
again repaired iu Philadelphia in 1874. She is now laid up in New York. 



206 MORHIS FAMILY. 

the Mediterranean, in 1803— t, under Commodore Edward Preble, 
on which cruise Noadiali Morris was purser, and Charles Morris a 
midshipman. 

80. PARDON MORRIS, Gth son of Lemuel (14), born Oct. 4, 
1776, in Thompson. At about the age of 18 he left Woodstock 
and settled m Norwich, Chenango County, N. Y.- He was a far- 
mer. In 1812, he married Aner Haight of Norwich. She was 
born at or near Poughkeepsie, Oct. 19, 1789. Her parents removed 
to Norwich when she was quite young. She died at Hamilton, 
N. Y., March 25, 1842. Children, all born in Norwich : 

219. iiois", b. Oct. 19, 1814; d. at Utica, 0., March 17, 1856. 

220. Helen", b. May 7, 1816; m. in 1846, Samuel O. Herndon 

of Groveport, Frankhn Co., ()., where she died. Feb. 23, 
1876. She had five children — three sons and two 
daughters ; four of them died in infancy or youth. A 
son, AYilliam A. Flerndon, ishvijigat Groveport, where 
he was born Sept. 1, 1849. His father — an invalid — 
is living with him. 

221. JuLiA«, b. Dec. 7, 1818; d. July 30, 1877, at Mr. Herndon's 

in Groveport. She had lived some years at Hamilton, 
taking the care of her aunt, Mrs. Steere. 

222. MAEY^ b. March 3, 1821 ; m. Alexander Shields, Sept. 12, 

1844, at Utica, She died at Upper Sandusky, 0., 
Jan. 26, 1850. She had two children: 

Anna Shields, b. July 3, 1846. 

Mary Shields, b. in 1 849 ; both died when about a year old. 

223. Frances", b. June 20, 1824; m. John B. Shipman in Law- 

rence, Kas., Jan. 14, 1872. They now live at Cotton- 
wood Falls, Chase Co., Kansas. Mr. Shipman is an 
insurance agent. The compiler is greatly indebted to 
Mrs. Shipman for valuable information concerning the 
family. 
For some years previous to the death of his wife Pardon Morris 
lived in the village of Hamilton, N. Y. In the faU of 1842, he 
removed to Utica, 0., where he again married. He died at Ham- 
ilton, F'eb. 26, 1855, at which place he was on a visit. He was 
buried beside his first wife in the cemetery lot of his broth er-in- 




CAPTAIN LEMUEL MORRIS. 



'[third branch.] fifth generation. 207 

law, Capt. Ezek Steere. When at the age of tliirty, Mr Morris 
was considered far gone with consumption; but he lived to the age 
of seventy-nine, though always an invalid. Mrs. Morris, his first 
wife, was at one time a member of a Baptist Church. 

83. LEMUEL MORRIS, 7th son of Lemuel (14), born at 
Woodstock, Aug. 11, 1783. He was twelve years old when his 
father left Woodstock to find a new home in Otsego County, N. Y. 
He was placed under the care of his maternal uncle, Wilham 
Wilkinson, at Providence. Mr. Wilkinson was a graduate of 
Brown University, and at the head of the College Latin and Gram- 
mar School. He was an excellent teacher, and at his hands Lem- 
uel received a more than ordinary education, and was fitted for a 
clerical position. In 1806, he was offered the position of Secretary 
to Commodore Barron in the navy, but declined it to accept a 
more lucrative position as supercargo of a ship about to sail for the 
Mediterranean, in which his brother, Noadiah, was interested, but, 
unfortunately, he broke his leg, and was obliged to give up the 
situation. 

In 1808, he was at Monte Video, S. A. In 1809-10, he was on 
the U. S. frigate, Presidtnt, as secretary to Captain Bainbridge, 
and chaplain. In May of that year he left the ''President" to 
engage in commercial business in Rio de Janeiro, S. A., with the 
expectation of a residence there of several years; but after living 
there a year or so he was compelled, by sickness, to make a change 
of climate, and returned to the United States. In 1813, he was 
in some capacity on the U. S. frigate, Adams, then under the com- 
mand of his nephew, Captain Charles Morris. In August of that 
year he was appointed a Captain of Sea-Fencibles, — a branch of 
military service connected with the army organized that year for 
coast defense in the war with Great Britain. He was stationed 
for some time at Fort Gates, Sandy Hook, at the entrance of New 
York Bay. The Sea Fencibles were disbanded in June, 1815, at 
the close of the war. Soon after tliis we find him at sea again, 
and on January 29, 1816, tie wrote his sister, Mary, then at Coop- 
erstown, from Bordeaux, France, that he had just arrived at that 
port, after a passage of twenty-three days from Charleston, S. C. — 
"perhaps the finest passage ever made by any vessel across the 
Atlantic at that season of the year," and "although in the month 
of January, and in the same latitude as Albany, the sailors went 



208 MORRIS FAMILY, 

barefoot until the day of our ai-rival. You may judge of our good 
fortune when I tell you that in two hours after coming to anclior. 
the wind changed to the northward and was so cold as to freeze 
boiling water thrown into the air before it struck the deck." 
From Bordeaux he was to sail for South America; from thence, in 
May, the vessel was to sail for India. In this letter he states: "I 
now experience the benefit of having learned different languages; 
for the captain, being totally unacquainted with them, I am able 
to render him much service." It is probable that he did not con- 
tinue the voyage to India, as he wrote from Rio de Janeiro, Oct. 12, 
1816: "Fortune is not yet propitious. I have been sick again in 
this unhappy climate. I wish not to disturb you, but there is a 
probability of your not seeing me again." However, he did not 
die in Rio de Janeiro; he returned to the United States, probably 
with impaired health, which he may have sought to recover in the 
Southern States. His whereabouts, and the time and place of his 
death, seem to have been unknown to his friends for some years. 
In May, 1824, his brother, Rufus, received a letter from a gentle- 
man in Goshen, Ga., in reply to one which he had written some 
months before, making inquiries concerning Lemuel, in which the 
writer stated that "a gentleman of the name of Lemuel Morris 
taught a school in his neighborhood one or two years; that he was 
well acquainted with him; that he was frequently at his house; 
that he was in ill health, and appeared to labor under a heavy cold. 
and that for two or three months before he left that place he could 
not speak above a whisper; that he left that place for Savannah, 
he thought, in the beginning of the year 1820, and that in two or 
three months after he had left news came that he had died, and he 
thought in Savannah." Mr. Morris was fond of his relatives, and 
devotedly attached to his sister, Mary, and, although an excellent 
and fluent correspondent, it is supposed that the business disap- 
pointments of his life, combined with his ill health, produced a 
morbid mental condition in which he failed to inform his friends 
of his situation. At the age of twenty-four, he had formed a 

strong attachment for a young lady in Providence — a Miss L . 

The attachment was as strongly reciprocated; but he complained 
that his "poverty" and unsettled condition in lif(>. prevented him 
from forming an engagement. 

The early years of Lemuel Morris were passi;d in his native vil- 
lage of West Woodstock. Here he had for a companion and play- 



[third brakch.] fifth generation. 209 

mate his nephew, Charles Morris, who was about a year younger 
than himself. These early relations were broken up by the 
removal of Lemuel to Providence, when he was about twelve years 
of age. The meetings of the two friends were at rare intervals 
after this, until Lemuel was appointed secretary to Captain Bain- 
bridge of the frigate, President, of which sliip Charles, who had 
entered the navy at the age of fifteen, was now First Lieutenant. 
Here the early friendship was renewed, and Lemuel formed the 
most exalted opinions of his former companion. Li January, 1810, 
he wrote to his sister, Mary, then at Canajoharie: "Charles is 
indeed the finest young man I ever met with, and you may calcu- 
late upon seeing him an admiral." In May following, as he was 
about to leave the " President," he again wrote his sister: " Charles 
has had command of the ' President ' for a short time. Such 
another young man this world never produced. I can truly say 
that I love him far better than I do myself." 

84. MARY MCRRIS, 2d daughter of Lemuel (14), born in 
Woodstock, March 22, 1786. She was eight years old at the time 
of her mother's death, soon after which her father removed to 
Otsego, N. Y., and she was placed under the care of her aunt, 
Mrs. Daniel Larned, in Thompson. She was the pet of her 
brothers Noadiah and Lemuel, and each seems to have made her 
the special object of his care and devotion. Their letters manifest 
the strongest affection for her, and their great solicitude for her 
welfare and happiness. After the death of Noadiah, and while 
Lemuel was a wanderer in foreign lands, Mary left Thompson to 
make her home with her older brothers in Otsego and Canajoharie. 
She was a beautiful and attractive girl, and while in Thompson 
received the adoration of many admirers, and on her departure 
left behind many broken hearts, long to carry the memory of 
"Pretty Polly Morris," and soon to envy the success of Captain 
Ezek Steere of Otsego, who won and wed the beautiful prize, Oct. 
21, 1816, and shortly afterwards removed to Hamilton, N. Y., 
where he died, June 6, 1846. He was a native of Rhode Island 
and a tanner by occupation. During his hfe in Hamilton, Captain 
Steere was known as an active and enterprising citizen and identi- 
fied with the growth and prosperity of that town. 

Mrs. Steere remained a widow for nearly twenty years, during 
the latter part of which time she was an invaUd and in the care 
27 



210 MORRIS FAMILY. 

of her niece, Julia Morris. As old age came on and her outward 
beauty faded away, her inward life was made manifest by her 
exemplary character and her distinguished acts of charity and benev- 
olence. M rs Steere attended a Baptist Church, but was not in 
communion with it, or of any church. She was a liberal supporter 
of the Madison (Baptist) University. She died March 2, 1865, 
lacking twenty days of completing seventy-nine years. She had 
three ch.ildren, all of whom died in infancy. 

91. PARACLETE MORRIS, 1st son of William (16), born 
Feb. 7, 1779, died at Webster, Mass.. Sept. 8, 1870. Married a 
daughter of Josiah Brown of Oxford. Farmer; died in Oxford 
"South Gore," now Webster. No children. One adopted — Al- 
mira. The story was that before this child was born a stranger 
called on M r. Morris and made a bargain with him to take a child 
from one to three weeks old without asking any questions in 
regard to it; the child to be clothed by its friends for a number 
of years, and Mr. Morris to be paid three hundred and fifty dol- 
lars, a simi sufScient to pay off the mortgage upon his farm. 

92. LETITIA MORRIS, 1st daughter of Wilham (16), born 
at Woodstock, Oct. 2, 1780. Married Darius Child, Feb. 11, 1802, 
and soon removed to Fairlee, Vt. Mr. Child was a descendant of 
Edward Morris in the 5th generation, being a descendant of 
Grace Morris, who married Benjamin Child, March 7, 1683. He 
was a large portly man, weighing two hundred pounds, and of 
fine personal appearance. He possessed a strong mind and a 
powerful physical constitution. He was a man of influence and 
popularity, and filled various offices in the town and State. He 
died at his home in Fairlee, Dec. 10, 1862, at the age of 85. He 
was born in Woodstock, Dec. 26, 1779. Mrs Letitia (Morris) 
Child died Nov. 17, 1859, aged 79. Children: 

224. Alpha Child«, b. Nov. 15, 1802; d. Aug. 21, 1824. 

225. Almira Child«, b. May 28, 1805; d. July 13, 1805. 

226. William Child", b. June 15, 1806. 

227. Mary May CHILD^ b. May 3, 1809; m. Hon. Alex. Gilmore. 

228. Pamelia Child", b. March 21, 1811; m. Rev. David 

Blodgett. 

229. Edwin S. Child", b. Oct. 20, 1814; m. Juliette Richmond. 

230. Ephraim M. Child'"', b. March 8, 1824; d. April 17, 1830. 



[third branch.] fifth GKNKRATION. 211 

93. HELOTIA MORRIS, 2d daughter of William (16), born 
March 17, 1782. Married Horatio Walker of Woodstock. They 
had ten children. 



94. WILLIAM MUNROE MORRIS, 2d son of William (IG), 
born at Woodstock, Aug. 28, 1783. Died at Vershire, Vt, Feb. 
9, 1873. Married, May 11, 1815, Esther P. Southworth. She was 
born April 30, 1792, and died April 28, 1868. Parmer. Lived 
in AVest Fairlee. In 1819 he removed to Wentworth, N. H., 
where he lived ten years, then removed to Vershire. While in 
Wentworth he was for several years one of the Selectmen of the 
town. He was a man of ability and good judgment and of great 
influence. He was known as a peacemaker: questions of differ- 
ence, disputes, etc., were referred to him for settlement. He 
served in the war of 1812, for which he received a grant of land 
and a pension. He was a man of medium size and height; straight 
and well proportioned. He had a bright, fresh complexion; blue 
eyes and dark hair, with the Morris features strongly marked. 
He became bald in early life. He and his wife were both members 
of a Congregational Church. In pohtics he was a strong Democrat. 
He was never ill until the time of his death, in his 89th year. On 
his 80th birthday he made a visit to his children in Bradford, 
Fairlee, and Thetford, and returned home the same day. He 
walked the entire distance, forty-eight miles. His son, living in 
Thetford, desired to carry him home, but he declined the offer, 
preferring to walk. Fearing that he would not be able to accom- 
plish his purpose, his son followed him in a wagon, but could not 
induce him to ride. He got home in safety, and the next morning 
at five o'clock, was up and pitching of! hay. C'hildren: 

231. Lorenzo G.", b. April 18, 1816. 

232. Sally S.^ b. Oct. 9, 1817; d. in infancy. 

233. Ann Maria«, b. Feb. 11, 1819; m. Oct. 17, 1843, Chauncey 

G. Colton of Vershire. 

234. Myra P.«, b. May 23, 1821; m. June 18, 1850, Jabez J. 

Goodhue of Vershire. 

235. William H.«, b. March 23, 1823. 

236. George F.", b. May 30, 1825. 

237. JosiAH S.«, b. Oct. 10, 1832; d. July 21, 1871. 

238. Cyrus M.^ b. Feb. 13, 1837. 



212 MORRIS FAMILY, 

95. PARK MORRIS, 3d son of William (16), born at Wood- 
stock, Sept. 22, 1785. Died at Lawrence, Mass., April 14, 1854, 
Married, Nov. 14, 1812, Sophia Morse of West Fairlee. She was 
born Feb. 17, 1793, and died at Lebanon, N. H., Oct. 12, 1862. 
Farmer. Lived at West Fairlee, Congregationalist. Whig, 
Children: 

239. Caroline S,^ b. Sept. 15, 1813; d. at Lowell, Mass., Aug, 

19, 1847. 

240. William Moxroe«, b. Dec. 22, 1814, at West Fairlee, 

241. Calvin Morse", b. Dec. 22,J814 ; d. April 4, 1815. 

242. Lewis Eoyal^, b. Feb. 4, 1816. 

243. James Elias", b. May 14, 1819. 

244. Elmira J.«, b. May 14, 1819; m. Jan. 6, 1839, Simeon B. 

Titus of Vershire. 

245. Harriet S.^ b. May 31, 1822; d. at Lowell, Mass., Jan. 

21, 1864. 

246. Hannah M,*^, b. June 24, 1825; d, at Lowell, Mass,, 

Sept. 14, 1850. 

247. Lydia a.", b. July 9, 1828; m, Feb, 4, 1849, Isaac Locke. 

248. Julia A.", b. Oct. 20, 1830; m. July 21, 1852, Moses 

Emerson, Nashua, N. H.; d. Dec. 30, 1879. No 
children. 
Lydia A. Locke died in San Francisco, Cal., in 1882. She had 
four children. Nathan, Raymond, Hollis, and James, 

96. AUGUSTUS MORRIS, 4th son of William (16), born 
in Woodstock, July 11, 1787. Died in Fairlee, May 29, 1860. 
Married, Jan. 6, 1820, Susan Langley. Stone mason. Lived at 
Fairlee. Children : 

249. George Langley", b. Oct. 2, 1820. 

250. Lucy M.«, b. May 24, 1822; in. Asa C, Cushman, Jan, 

25, 1843, 

251. Mary A.«, b. July 20, 1824; m. S. L. Worsley, Jan, 14, 1849, 

252. Martha J, «, b. Jan. 7, 1826; m. BenJ. Franklin, Jan, 18, 

1847, 

253. Ellen M.«, b. March 29, 1828; m. J. M. Lucas, March 9, 

1851. 

254. William R,", b. April 12, 1830. 

255. Silas Q «, b. Nov, 24, 1832, 

256. Lyman IL", b. May 20, 1838, 



[tihrd branch.] fifth genekatiox. 21. '5 

257. Royal A.", b. Sept. 17, 1S40; d. in 22d Regt.. War of 

Rebellion. 

258. Charles A.«, b. May 11, 1844; d. July 4, 1849. 

97. GODFREY MORRIS, 5th son of William (IG), born in 
Woodstock, April 7, 1789. Died at W^ebster, Mass., Sept. 6. 1870. 
Married, April 6, 1830, Lucy Rawson of Oxford. She died Jan. 
23, 1850, aged 55. Farmer. Lived in Webster. Children: 

259. Lydia", b. March 12, 1831; m. Dec. 31, 1848, John Davis 

of Dayville, Conn 

260. Augustus^, b. Nov., 1832; d. Aug., 1853. 
John and Lydia (Morris) Davis had two children: 

Nettie, b. Aug. 30, 1849; d. Sept. 17, 1870. 
John F., b. Sept. 11, 1851. 

98. SALLY SUMNER MORRIS, 3d daughter of William 
(16), born Feb. 21, 1791.^ Married Dr. William Abbott. She 
died not long after the biith of her only child. 

261. William R. Abbott"., b. . 

Mrs. Abbott was a woman of great refinement of manners and 
culture, and is remembered by her friends as one of the best of 
women. On her dying bed she wrote a letter to her little boy, to 
be kept for and opened by him on his 16th birthday. It had 
result in the formation of an excellent character. 

99. ROYAL MORRIS, 6th son of WilUam (16), born at 
Woodstock, April 30, 1793. Married, Feb. 11, 1820, Lucinda 
Dayton. She was born May 27, 1804. Died June 31, 1843. 
Hatter. Lived in Orford, N. H. Children: 

262. Lucinda Dayton", b. Feb. 14, 1821; d. Jan. 10, 1841, 

unmarried. 

263. James D. F.", b. Dec. 15, 1823; d. April 12, 1863, un- 

married. 

264. Charles H.«, b. Dec. 9, 1825; d. July 31, 1851, unmarried. 

265. George Royal", b. March 29, 1828. Lives at Orford, 

unmarried. 

103. ELISHA MORRIS, 1st son of Edward (19), born in 
Dudley, May 11, 1778. Died in Sturbridge, Oct. 28, 1846. 
Married Prudence Nichols, Aug., 1814. Lived in Southbridge. 
Farmer. Democrat. No children. 



214 MORRIS FAMILY. 

104-. WILLIAM MORRIS, 2d son of Edward (19), born 
Sept. 5, 1779. Married, Oct. 7, 1799, Betsey Lamb of Charlton. 
Farmer. Lived in Southbridge. Democrat. He died June 9, 
1837. His wife died July 19, 1842, aged 62. One child. 

266. Sally", b. Sept 16, 1800; m. Nov. 24, 1823, Capt. Samuel 

Baylis. Millwright. Removed to Clinton, _N. Y., in 

1824. Children: 
William M. Baylis", b. Oct. 7, 1825. 
Edward Baylis-, b. May 7, 1827; d. May 19, 1829. 
Charles Baylis^, b. May 7, 1832. 
Frederick Baylis^, b. Nov. 20, 1833. 
Edwin Baylis^, b. Aug. 25, 1839. 

105. Captain EDWARD MORRIS, 3d son of Lieutenant 
Edward (19), born Sept. 15, 1783. Died at Southbridge, March 
25, 1864. Married, March 22, 1811, Jerusha Walker of Stur- 
bridge. She died Sept. 28, 1817. Married 2d, Betsey Martin 
of Southbridge. Blacksmith and barrelmaker at Southbridge. 
Children: 

BY JERUSHA. 

267. SoPHRONIA^ b. Aug. 18, 1811; m. Nov. 27, 1831, Alex. 

Townsend of Boston. 

268. Warren", b. Aug. 17, 1814. 

269. Saloma", b. , 1816; m. March 29, 1839, Dr. Alfred 

Albee. He died in 1850; two children. Married 2d, 
Lyman L. Kingsley, Dec. 24, 1873. 

BY BETSEY. 

270. Jerome", b. Nov. 17, 1821; d. July 12, 1874. 

271. Lucien", b. May 29, 1823. 

272. Oscar", b. May 26, 1826; d. July 7, 1867. 

273. Nelson", b. Oct. 5, 1828; d. March 20, 1874. 

274. Edwin", b. April 17, 1830; d. May 21, 1832. 

275. Jerdsha", b. April 5, 1831. 

276. Edwin", b. June 27, 1834. 

277. Angenette", b. Feb. 25, 1837. 

106. LYMAN MORRIS, 4th son of Edward (19), born Sept. 
27, 1784. Died at Charlton, Mass., Dec. 10, 1860. Married, April 
11, 1814; Mary Bacon of Charlton. Farmer and shoemaker. 
Livfd at Southbridge and Charlton. Democrat. Children: 



[third branch.] fifth generation. 215 

278. Arabella^, b. Jan. 17, 1S17; d. Feb. 24, 1836. 

279. Lerema«, b. Nov. 13, 1818; m. 1st, Stephen Marble of 

Sutton; he d. Jan. 13, 1845. M. 2d, Lebbeus G. Park- 
hurst of Charlton; he d. April 5, 18G1. M. 3d, 
Alpheus Davis of Charlton. 

280. Ella Cornelia", b. Nov. 27, 1820. 

281. Bainbridge", b. Dec. 23, 1821; d. May 8, 1864. 

282. Van Rensselaer", b. March 29, 1823; d. May 5, 1830. 

283. Elbridge Gerry", b. Feb. 25, 1825. 

107. ALFRED MORRIS, 5th son of Captain Edward (19), 
born in 1786. Died Sept. 4, 1841. Married 1st, Sept. 2, 1810, 
Sally W. Wilson of Southbridge. She died in 1820. Married 
2d, Isabella Williams of Maine, March 5, 1824. She was born 
Jan. 8, 1795, and was living in 1875 at Xenia, 0. Farmer. 
Lived at Southbridge. Children: 

by sally. 

284. FiTz Henry", b. June 7, 1811; d. in Providence, R. I. 

285. Elizabeth", b. Jan. 20, 1815; m. Aug. 20, 1835, Isaac 

Fisk of Boonville, N. Y. 

286. Eveline", b. March 20, 1815; m. Dec, 1833, Dr. Aaron 

Barrows of Attleborough, Mass. 

287. William", b. Jan. 17, 1818. 

BY ISABELLA. 

288. Sarah", b. Feb. 12, 1828; m. May 14, 1840, Cre- 

ators of Xenia, 0. 

289. Alfred", b. Sept. 11, 1829; d. April 10, 1873. 

108. MOSES MORRIS, 6th son of Edward (19), born , 

1788; died at Fiskdale, in Sturbridge, Nov. 10, 1870, from over- 
exertion in helping to raise his fallen horse. Married 1st, Lucy 
Corey of Craftsbury, Vt. Married 2d, Orril Blanchard of Stur- 
bridge, Sept. 5, 1855. Children: 

290. DiANTHA J.«, b. ; m. Boyd. 

291. Mary L.", ; m. Dr. Alfred Woolworth of Den- 

marck, N. Y., Jan. 28, 1842. 
293. Serome", b. ; m. A^an Ness. 

119. THOMAS MORRIS, 3d son of Captain Benjamin (23), 
born Jan. 28, 1760, at Dudley. Married June 3, 1784, Margaret 



216 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Warren of Dudley. She was born Sept. 22, 1761. Farmer. In 
1796, he removed to Hamilton (now Eaton), N. Y., and purchased 
the tract of land where now stands the village of Morrisville, the 
county seat of Madison County. He built the first house in the 
place which derives its name from him. His family grew up and 
settled mostly in the neighborhood of their father, and were good 
citizens and neighbors, and respected by every one. He died 
April 27, 1824. Mrs. Morris died at Manlius, N. Y., March 29, 
1845. Children: 

294. Jacob'=, b. March 23, 1785, in Dudley. 

295. Darius", b. Aug. 20, 1788, in Dudley. 

296. Haxxah^, b Aug. 24, 1790, in Dudley; m. Lawrence Still 

well. 

297. Harvey", b. Jan. 30, 1795, in Dudley. 

298. Abigail^, b. March 11, 1797. 

299. Thomas", b. April 10, 1800. 

1'20. BENJAMIN MORRIS, 4th son of Captain Benjamm (23), 
born in Killingly, Conn, Feb. 26, 1762. Died Jan. — , 1804, in 
New Hartford, Oneida County, N. Y. His death was caused by 
his being crushed by a falling tree. He married, 1st, Sylvia Car- 
ter of Dudley, Oct. 15, 1786. She died Nov. 20, 1791. He mar- 
ried,"2d, Lucy Butler, Jan., 1797. Farmer. Removed to Hamil- 
ton, Madison Co., N. Y., in 1794, and in a few years afterward to 
New Hartford, Oneida County. Children: 

BY SYLVIA. 

300. William", b. March 27, 1787. 

301. Cuarles", b. March 12, 1789. 

302. Sylvia", b. March 5, 1791. 

The three children were baptized Nov. 15, 1791, at their moth 
er's request, five days before her death. 

BY LUCY. 

303. George W.«, b. Sept. — , 1799, at New Hartford. 

304. Harriet", b. April — , 1801; m. W. G. Stone of Vernon, 

Oneida Co., Dec, 1822. 

305. Caroline", b. Dec, 1803; d. at Utica, Dec, 1829. 

306. Benjamin B.", Sept., 1804. 



[third branch.] fifth generation. 217 

1-21. JOHX HALLO WAY MORRIS, 5tli son of Captain 
Benjamin (23), born in Thompson, Feb. 13, 1764. Died there 
Nov. 21, 1839. Married May 23, 1788, Silence Perrin of Pomfret. 
She was born Feb. 5, 1769, and died in Pomfret March 13, 1833. 
In 1794, Mr. Morris removed to Hamilton (now Eaton), Madison 
Co., N. Y., being one of the earliest settlers in that place. In 
1799, he returned to Pomfret. Teamster and butcher. Whig in 
politics. Children: 

307. WoLCOTT«, b. Sept. 8, 1788; d. in Dudley, May 25, 1789. 

308. Lucys, b. July 20, 1790; d. in Putnam, July 22, 1867. 

309. Benjamin^, b. March 19, 1792; d. in Thompson, Feb. 21, 

1822. 

310. Mary*', b July 30, 1794; m. Arthur Tripp. 

311. Samuel*, b. Aug. 8, 1797; d. in Hamilton, Mar. 23, 1798. 

312. JEDEDrAH^ b. Jan. 13, 1800. 

313. John H.", b. Jan. 10, 1802. 

314. Silence", b. March 15, 1804; d. in Thompson, Mar. 10, 1840. 

She married William Lanphier and had a daughter, 
Sarah, who m. William Wallace of Baltimore. 

316. George^ b. Jan., 1807. 

317. Sarah", b. Aug. 30, 1809; d. in Pomfret, April 5, 1814. 

V2'2. HANNAH MORRIS, 1st daughter of Captain Benjamin 
(23), born at Dudley, Mass., March 3, 1766. Married Thomas 
Larned, May 12, 1785. They lived at Dudley. Children: 

318. Morris LARNED^ b. May 3, 1786; d. Nov. 6, 1878. 

319. William Larned^ b. Dec. 7, 1789; d. May 7, 1875. 

320. Hannah Larned", b. May 13, 1794; was living in Dudley 

in 1885. 

321. Dolly Larned", b. May 2, 1797; d. Sept. 4, 1883. 

322. Eliza Larned", b. Nov., 16, 1804; d. Nov. 21, 1856. 

Morris Larned m Elizabeth Eaton. 

William Larned m. Hannah Hancock. 

Hannah Larned m. Loring Leavens. 

Eliza Larned m. Moses Barnes. He d. July 8, 1883. 

124. ZEBULON MORRIS, 6th son of Captain Benjamin (23), 
born Jan. 28, 1770. Died at Dudley, July 9, 1806, leaving an 
estate of £4,941. Intended marriage with Mary Brown of Dudley, 

28 



218 MORRIS FAMILY. 

published March 6, 1797. She again married Jacob Barker of 
Dudley, Sept. 22, 1811. Children: 

328. Sanford«, b. Sept. 14, 1798. 

329. Margaret«, b. Feb. 24, l.SOO. 

330. Clarissa', b. March 15, 1802; m. 1st. John D. Thompson. 

He d. in 1839. M. 2d, John Webster. 

331. Schuyler', b. Jan. 3, 1804. 

332. Zebulon«, b. Nov. 7, 1806. 

130. JEDEDTAH MARCY, Jr., 2d sou of Jedediah (43), 
born July 26, 1753. Married Ruth Lamed of Dudley, March 1, 
1782. Died Aug. 14, 1811. Children: 

333. Rhoda MARCY^ b. Aug. 21, 1782; m. Stephen Healy. 

334. Joseph Marcy®, b. June 10, 1784; m. Abigail Shumway. 

335. William Larned Marcy'^, b. Dec. 12, 1786. 

336. Hannah Marcy", b. Jan. 14, 1789. 

337. Jedediah Marcy', b. Oct. 19, 1791; m. Esther Healy. 

338. Caroline Marcys, b. Oct. 11, 1798; d. at 4 years of age. 

166. LUCINDA NEWELL, 8th daughter of General Timo- 
thy Newell, born in Sturbridge, Feb. 6, 1781. Married Rev. 
Alfred Ely, D.D., of Monson, Jan. 25, 1814. She was his second 
wife. She was a woman of deep piety, large benevolence, and of 
great usefulness; a most affectionate and tender mother, and a de- 
voted companion to her husband. She died at Monson Dec. 29, 
1823. Children: 

339. LuciNDA Newell Ely", b. Oct. 18, 1814. 

340. Alfred Brewster Ely", b Jan. 30, 1817. 

341. Esther Ely^ b. April 14, 1819. 

342. William Newell Ely'', b. July 17, 1821. 

Rev. Alfred Ely was born in West Springfield, Nov. 8, 1778. 
He was graduated at New Jersey College in 1804, and ordained 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Monson, Dec. 17, 1806. 
He had three wives — 1st, Nancy Hinsdale, married Feb. 16, 1806, 
by whom he had three children, one of whom, Nancy Hinsdale 
Ely, b. April 11, 1808, married Jonathan R Flynt, and died April 
12, 1831. His third wife was Susan Gridley of Watertown. 
They were married July 13, 1825, and had one child, Susan Grid- 
ley Ely, who married Rev. Frederick Alvord of Bolton, Conn. 



[THIRD BRANCH.] 

SIXTH GEl^EEATIOI^. 



182. HENRY MORRIS, 1st son of Ebenezer (71), born at 
Lisbon, N. H., in 1811. Died in Boston, April 3, 1845. Married 
in Boston, , 1835, Minerva . Children: 

343. Charles H.', b. ; d. in California. 

344. Isaac B.^ b. . Lives in Guilford, Vt. 

187. Rev. OZIAS S. MORRIS, 2d son of Ebenezer (VI), born 
in Lisbon, April 21, 1821. Married Nov. 8, 1847, Rebecca C. 
French of Hardwick, Vt. Died at Willington, Conn., December, 
1885. 

He began to preach as a Methodist minister, and labored in 
that connection for ten years. He tlien entered the Congrega- 
tional ministry, and supplied churches in Westminster, Vt., West 
Cummingham, Mass., and in Ashford and Willington, Conn. He 
afterwards engaged in evangelistic work for the Connecticut Bible 
Society. The monuments of his success in that most difficult labor 
are to be found in the various fields he visited. His health gave 
way under the toils and exposure incident to that service, and he 
returned to the pastorate. Children: 

345. O. Manly^, b. Dec, 1849. 

346. EllaE.'^, Aug., 1851. 

347. Anna R.^ b. Sept., 1853. 

348. Clara^, b. Dec, 1855; d. 1857. 

349. Lizzie R.^ b. Feb., 1858. 

350. Charles F.'', b. Feb., 1851. Lives in Springfield, Mass. 

Unmarried in 1885. 

188. CHARLES W. MORRIS, 3d son of Ebenezer (71), 
born at Lisbon, N. H., Dec. 7, 1824. Married Feb. 1, 1853, 
EKza French, Hai'dwick, Vt. Real estate agent. Lives in Bos- 
ton, Mass. Children: 



•>'1() MOltRIS FAMILY. 

351. Clara E.^ b. Jan. 8, 185S. 

352. Charles W.^, b. Feb. 28, 18G2. 

353. Edward E.^ b. May 27, 18G5. 

189. MARINDA MORRIS, 1st daughter of Elijah Gore Mor- 
ris (73), born Aug. 24, 1792, in Dudley. Died at Wethersfield, 
Oct. 10, 18C0. Married George Rhodes of Wethersfield, October, 
180S. He died Aug. 31, 1870. Children: 

354. Chadxcey Rhodes^, b. Aug. 24, 1809; d. Oct. 16, 1810. 

355. George Rhodes^, b. Feb. 16, 1811; m. Nancy Holland. 

He died Jan. 28, 1860. 
350. Marinda Rhodes^ b. Sept. 24, 1813; m. Oct. 17, 1833, 

Jared Caswell. Settled in Glastonbury. 
337. Chauncey RHODES^ b. Jan. 18, 1815; m. Oct. 18, 1841, 

J ulia Tryon. Lives in Hartford. 

358. Prudence Rhodes^ b. Sept. 24, 1817; m. Nov. 20, 1836, 

Asa B. Baker, at Glastonbury. Lived at Plainville. 
He d. April 19, 1857. 

359. Hexry B. Rhodes^ b. Jan. 8, 1819; m. 1st, Sept. 15, 1845, 

Julia P. Bailey. She d. June 21, 1854. M. 2d, Maria 
L. Hills. She d. Oct. 7, 1872. M. 3d, May 14, 1874, 
Sarah G. Francis. He d. in 1884. He was a grocer; 
lived in Hartford. 

360. Carolixe Rhodes", b. June 6, 1820; m. June 16, 1862, 

Nathaniel Billings. Lives at the old homestead in 
Wethersfield. 

361. Nancy D. Rhodes", b. Nov. 13, 1828; d. unmarried. 

1<)0. DAVIS MORRIS, 1st son of Elijah Gore Morris (73). 
born at Dudley in 1794. Died in Wethersfield, Conn., May 4, 
1876, aged 82. He was a farmer. A man of great piety, and 
very much respected ; he had not an enemy. Married Sept. 1 6, 
1816, Widow Martha Hale of Wethersfield. They had one child: 

362. Martha Davis', b. Dec, 31, 1821; she married and went 

to the South, and there died without children. 
Mrs. Martha Hale Morris died July 29, 1829, aged 39. 
Mr. iM orris m. 2d, Dec. 3, 1832, Harriet Risley. 

l<)e. MOSES MORRIS, 2d son of Ehjah Gore Morris (73), 
born at Dudley, in 1798. LMed in Wethersfield, May 25, 1849, 




COMMODORE CHARLES MORRIS. 



[third RRANCII.] sixth GENERATIOX. 221 

from injuries caused by falling from a wagon. He was a joiner. 
Married Oct. 26, 1826, Laura Welles of Wetliersfield. She died 
Jan. 17, 1860, aged 60. Children: 

363. Samuel Welles^ b. Nov. 15, 1827. 

3631 Franklin Davis^ b. Feb. 27, 1830. 

364 John Moses'', b. April 27, 1837. 

198. MILTON MARQUIS MORRIS, 1st son of Marvin (74), 
born Aug. 2, 1798. Married Olive West of Herkimer Co., N. Y. 
She died in April, 1823. He married, 2d, Deborah Hawkins, and 
removed to Sylvania, 0., in 1831. He died in July, 1864. He 
had two children by his 1st wife: 

365. Mary Ann', b. April 1, 1823; d. in 1833. 
365|. Eleanor^ b. Aug. 17, 1826; m. James Bertholf, Oct. 8, 
1856. and had these children: 
Mary C, Olive L., Wm. Hamilton, Peter Manly, xMilton 
Marquis, James Franklin, Eleanor Amy, Elmer Ells- 
worth, Frederick Floria. 
Mr. Bertholf died June 5, 1879. Mrs. Bertholf is living at 
West Toledo, 0. She and her children are the only living 
descendants of Marvin Morris (74), 

199. WILLIAM POTTER MORRIS, 2d .son of Marvin (74), 
born June 21, 1804. Married Susan R. Bosworth. Died in 
Providence. He had three children, who died young. His widow 
married Denman B. Harris of Providence. 

200. ALEXANDER HAMILTON MORRIS. 3d son of Mar- 
vin (74), born Dec. 24, 1804. He lived many years at North 
Adams, Mass. He died June 25, 1864, by his own hand, after 
long and excruciating suffering from rheumatism. Unmarried. 
He was the author of a history of the town of Adams. 

201. Commodore CHARLES MORRIS, 1st son of Captain 
Charles (75), was born in the village of West Woodstock, July 26, 
1784. Here he passed his boyhood. From the age of ten to 
fifteen years his time was spent mainly in work on a farm, his 
father, a sea-faring man, being away from home much of the time. 
In February, 1799, his father was appointed a purser in the Navy, 
and assigned to the U. S. Ship Baltimore, Captain Samuel Barron. 



222 MORRIS FAMILY. 

then lying at Norfolk, Va. Here lie requested Charles to join 
him. with the view of securing for him an appointment as acting 
midshipman. In obedience to this request, and with the consent 
and advice of his mother, though contrary to the advice of other 
friends, he left Woodstock, June 1st, for Norfolk. He traveled 
on foot to Providence, where he had relatives, and where he 
remained until he found passage in a sloop for Norfolk, where, 
upon his ai'rival. he received from Captain Barron the appointment 
of acting midshipman on the " Baltimore," with orders to enter 
upon his duties July 1st. From this date until the day of his death 
he was in the service of the United States. His entire time of ser- 
vice was fifty-six years, six months, and twenty-seven days, a time 
devoted to the service of his country unsurpassed in length by that 
of few, if, indeed, by any other person. Of this time thirty-two 
yeai's and four months were spent in duty on shore; twenty-two 
years and three months in duty at sea; two years of this time he 
was unemployed. 

The following sketch of his services is taken from various 
sources: 

After serving two months in the United States ship Baltimore, 
he was, in September of that year, ordered to the United States 
frigate Congress, and remained on that ship until June, 1801, when 
he was ordered to the United States frigate Constitution, with the 
rank of midshipman, from which vessel he was detached in 1802, 
and placed on furlough. In 1803-4 on frigate ''Constitution" as 
midshipman, on the brig Scourge as acting master, and on the 
United States brig Argus as acting lieutenant. Oct. 28, 1804, as 
acting lieutenant on frigate President. February, 1806, as acting 
lieutenant on brig Hornet. Jan. 28, 1807, appointed lieutenant. 
Aug. 1, 1808, as lieutenant at Portland, Maine, in charge of gun- 
boats. May, 1809, to May, 1810, as lieutenant of United States 
frigate " President." May, 1810, to February, 1 812, as lieutenant of 
frigate '' Constitution." From March to June, 1812, as lieutenant 
at Boston navy-3rard. From June 25th to September 1, 1812, as 
lieutenant United States frigate " Constitution." From Oct. 5, 
1812, to Sept. 2, 1814, as captain United States frigate Adams. 
In 1814-15 employed at Portsmouth, N. H., and Boston. In 
1815-16 as captain frigate "Congress." From April to June, 
1816, in command of Newport station. In 1816-17 as captain 
frigate "Congress," and in command of naval forces in the Gulf 



[third branch ] SIXTH GENERATIOX. 223 

of Mexico. In 1817-18 on board frigate Java. In 1818-19 in 
command at Portsmouth navy-yard. In 1819-20 in command of 
a squadron to Buenos Ayres. In 1820-23 in command of Ports- 
mouth na\^-yard. In 1823-25 as Navy Commissioner at Wash- 
ington From September to October, 1825, in command of frigate 
Ih-andyivine, carrpng LaFayette on his return to France, after his 
visit to the United States, in 1824-25. In 1825-26 in examining 
dock-yards of France and England. In 1826-27 as Navy Commis- 
sioner at Washington. In 1827-32 in command of navy-yard at 
Boston. From 1832 to 1841 as Navy Commissioner at W'^ashing- 
ton. From 1841 to 1844 in command of squadron on coast of 
Brazil and in the Mediterranean Sea. From 1844 to 1847 Chief 
of Bureau of Construction, Equipment, etc. From 1847 to 1851 
as Inspector of Ordnance, during which period he was ordered to 
Cuba on special service. From 1851 to the time of his death, 
Jan. 27, 1856, as Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydro- 
graphy. 

From the beginning of his career as an officer, he was distin- 
guished for his professional entJiusiasm and his aspirations for the 
highest attainments and honors of his profession. The earhest 
achievement which won for liim tlie special notice of liis com- 
manders, was during the war with the Barbary States on the 
occasion of the re-capture and destruction of the frigate Pliiladel- 
jjlua, in the harbor of Tripoli, in 1804. The '-Philadelphia," 
which the Corsairs had taken, was then in the harbor of Tripoh, 
already fitting for sea, and designed to cruise against our com- 
merce. She was surrounded by Turkish gunboats, Corsairs, and 
batteries; yet the daring project was conceived of running into 
the harbor and destroying the ship, and a plan to do it was formed 
and entrusted by Commodore Preble to the command of the gal- 
lant Decatur, then a lieutenant and destined soon to become the 
most illustrious hero of that most righteous though inglorious war. 
The expedition was completely successful, and Midshipman Morris, 
then a young man of nineteen, was the first to stand on the deck 
of the " Philadelphia," and commence the work of destruction. 

Morris was. one of the five midshipmen selected from the '-Con- 
stitution," and hence one of the brave seventy-four of the party in 
the ketch Intrepid. This vessel, under the convoy of the Siren, 
Commodore Stuart, arrived before Tripoli in the afternoon of the 
9th of February, 1804. The night was dark, the weather was 



224 MOKias FAMILY. 

threatening, and Morris was sent with a pilot in a boat to recon- 
noitre. With muffled oars Morris passed close up to the western 
passage, saw the sea breaking entirely across the entrance, and, on 
his return, reported to his comniander that it would be hazardous 
to go in and impossible to get out. A violent gale ensued almost 
immediately, but both the " Siren " and the " Intrepid " fortunately 
were able to run to sea. On the 1 5th both ships again neared 
Tripoli, but the weather was again so unpropitious that they again 
hauled off. On the 16th the circumstances were all favorable, and 
Decatur made his dispositions for the attack. These were arranged 
with admirable sagacity. So precisely were all these parts executed 
that the " Intrepid " was placed completely alongside the •' Phila- 
delphia " before the Turks in it raised the cry of '• Americanos ! " 
So perfect was the discipline that even at this critical moment the 
men on board the " Intrepid " continued to remain concealed, while 
Decatur, with Morris and Laws quite near him, was standing ready 
for a spring. As soon as the " Intrepid " was close enough, he 
jumped at the frigate's chain plates, the two midshipmen were at 
his side; and while all three were hanging in the frigate's chains, 
Decatur gave the order to board. Laws dashed at a port, but got 
tangled in his armor; Decatur sprang at the rail above him; Morris 
also sprang at the rail, made a sure step, and thus was the first of 
the " Intrepid " band who stood on the deck of the " Philadel[)hia." 
In an instant Decatur and Laws were at his side. In another 
instant heads were seen coming through the ports and over the 
rails in all directions. A group of Turks was on the opposite 
side of the deck near the mizzenmast. toward whom Morris made 
a dash, but as the alarm was given at the same time, they did not 
await his approach, but at once disappeared over the side into the 
water, and as Morris turned he encountered Decatur with uplifted 
sabre about making a blow at him, taking him in the dark for an 
enemy. The exclamation of the talismanic password, " Philadel- 
phia," however, arrested the descending weapon, with a "Ilello! 
Morris; is that you?" from Decatur. Both officers immediately 
descended the after-hatchway ladder to assist in clearing the gun 
deck of the enemy, and in the chase there in the gloom Decatur 
was about making the same mistake with Morris, and was again 
checked by the latter shouting " Philadelphia." The Turks were 
completely surprised, and the constant splash showed the rapidity 
with which they were taking to the watei-, leaving the captoi's in 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 225 

undisturbed possession of tlie frigate. The crew of the ketch had 
been divided into different parties, each under an officer, for the pur- 
pose of firing tlie frigate in different parts at once. To Midshipman 
Morris, with eight men, was assigned the cockpit, and he was first 
there, cahing on his men to bring or throw down tlie combustibles. 
These consisted of pieces of dry pine and shavings well covered 
with soft turpentine and several demijohns of spirits of turpentine. 
The former were in canvas sacks, two or three of which were 
thrown down into the cockpit, and Morris had commenced empty- 
ing them when he was joined by his men. All were emptied and 
properly distributed, and a dark-lantern produced to fire them. 
Morris told his men to clear out, and he would apply the fire; but 
they refused to go until he was ready to leave with them. The 
fire was kindled and they all scrambled up to the gun deck, from 
which they threw down on the burning materials the demijohns of 
spirits, which, breaking as was intended, not only added to the 
fierceness of the flames, but, penetrating in burning streams in 
every direction, rapidly extended the conflagration. 

So promptly and effectively had the orders for firing the frigate 
been executed, and so rapidly had the flames extended, that Morris 
and his little party were unable to reach the spar deck by the after 
hatchway ladder, and only saved themselves by running along the 
gun deck and up through the forward hatchway, and from thence 
to the deck of the ketch, which was with difficulty cleared from 
the burning frigate in time to avoid being involved in her fate. 
In ten minutes Decatur was master of the "Philadelphia." In 
thirty minutes the different parties about the ship had effected 
their purpose. The noble frigate was in flames and the party were 
in their boats. Then three rousing cheers proclaimed their victory. 
Tripoli was soon in an uproar. Turkish cannon roared from the 
gunboats, corsairs, and batteries. As the flames reached the 
"Philadelphia's" guns, she, too, joined in a sort of answering 
cannonade, while the gallant band, having safely gained the " In- 
trepid," merrily rowed down the harbor. This was one of the 
most brilliant achievements of our navy. It is a high honor to 
have been one of the " Intrepid's " crew. It was a glory to have 
been the first man on the '■ Philadelphia's " quarter deck. 

From this period till the close of the war with Great Britain, 
he was almost constantly in active service at points where such 
service was the most arduous and most attended with perils. On 

29 



226 MORRIS FAMILY. 

the 1)roaking out of the war he held tlie rank of Heutcnant and 
and was soon attached in the capacity of executive officer of the 
frigate "Constitution," Captain Hull, the most important post in 
a man-of-war next to the commander. The frigate sailed from the 
Chesapeake in July, 1812, and on the morning of the 17th of that 
month, when but a few leagues from the coast, she found herself 
in the presence of a fleet of the enemy, comprising a ship of the 
line, four frigates, and two smaller vessels, under the command of 
Commodore Broke. The ocean was nearly calm, and as the morn- 
ing mist rose from it the enemy were already sure of an easy prize. 
But the "Constitution," by a feat of seamanship, which, for the 
skill with which it was conceived, and the performance with which 
it was executed, has never been paralleled in our naval annals, 
eifected her escape after an incessant chase of sixty hours from all 
the ships of the enem}^. The noble frigate behaved admirably, 
and on her decks, even when the enemy pursued the hardest and 
the crisis was the most critical, nothing was hurried, or was con- 
fused or slovenly; but there reigned the utmost steadiness, order, 
and discipline. This extraordinary escape was accomplished by a 
combination of towing and warping by means of the " Constitu- 
tion's " boats and anchors, which, as Captain Hull stated at the 
time, was conceived by Lieutenant Morris, whose consummate 
skill and ability on this occasion was honorably acknowledged by 
Commodore Hull by a complimentary card posted in the Exchange 
at Boston.'* Its successful execution commanded the admiration 
of his countrymen, and won the applause even of the British 
officers, who, by it, were foiled of their anticipated victory. Some 
years previously he had been a lieutenant in one of our frigates in 
the Mediterranean which frequently visited Malta. Her captain 
would never venture to take her in or out of that harbor under 
canvas, but always had her kedged in and out, to the great morti- 

* " Ciiptivin Hull, finding his friends in Boston are correctly inforn.ed of 
his situation when chased by the British squadron, off New York, and 
that tliey are good enough to give him credit for having escaped them, lie 
ouglit to claim this opportunity of requesting them to make a transfer of 
a great part of their good wishes to Lieutenant Morris and other brave 
officers and the crew under his command, for their many great exertions 
and prompt attention to orders while the enemy was in chase. Captain 
Hull has great pleasure in saying that notwithstanding the length of the 
cha^e, the officeis and crew being deprived of sleep and allowed but little 
refreshment during the time, not a murnuir was heard to escape them." 




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[third branch.] sixth generation. 227 

fication of the ward-room oflBcers, who felt and knew they could 
naanoeuvre and handle the vessel under canvas as well as the British 
ships, wliich always came in and went out in that mode. Though 
the British officers would smile at this cautious mode of proceeding, 
they were obliged to admire the promptness and dexterity with 
which the thing was done; and it was the experience then and 
thus obtained on the subject which enabled Lieutenant Morris to 
practice it so successfully in covering the ''Constitution" from 
her pursuers. He frequently observed in after life that he little 
thought when he was learning what to him was so mortifying a 
lesson he would ever have occasion to make such a practical appli- 
cation of it. 

One of the ships which chased the " Constitution " was the 
Guerriere ; and Captain Hull, after sailing from Boston (August 
2d), fell in (August 19th) with that British frigate. An action 
ensued between them. , In the hottest of it the two vessels came 
for a few minutes into close quarters, and as their sides touched 
each other, Lieutenant Morris with his own hands lashed them 
together; they soon parted, but in the fierce fights of musketry 
and short swords that ensued, the gallant Lieutenant at the head 
of his boarders, fell pierced by a ball that passed through his body, 
jiist missing the essential organs of life. The wound he received 
was very serious, and for some days his recovery was doubtful. 
He was apprised of his condition by the surgeon, but retained 
entire unconcern for himself. The '* Constitution " arrived at Bos- 
ton early in September, and for several weeks thereafter he was 
obliged to keep to his bed. 

The fight between the " Constitution " and the " Guerriere " was 
the 'first naval engagement of the second war with England, and 
one which dissipated her boasted claim to the supremacy of the 
seas. The bloody conflict was crowned with victory, and Lieuten- 
ant Morris in September, 1812, was promoted for special services 
over the heads of some of his seniors in the navy to the rank 
of post-captain, passing the intermediate grade of master com- 
mandant, and receiving his commission dated from the day of the 
surrender of the "Guerriere," August 19th. In October, after his 
promotion, he was placed in command of the Adams sloop of war, 
which was then undergoing repairs at "Washington. 

The Chesapeake was so blockaded by British ships that the 
"Adams" was not able to get to sea until Jan. 18, 1814; then 



228 MORRIS FAMILY. 

passing out of the bay, in spite of the enemy, Captain Morris 
cruised to the Cape de Verdes and the coast of Africa, meeting 
with some success in the capture of merchant vessels. Returning 
to American waters he entered the Savannah River on the 1st of 
May, and obtaining supplies, proceeded on another cruise across 
the Banks of Newfoundland to the coast of Ireland and back, 
with the purpose of making a harbor at Portsmouth, N. H. A 
number of vessels were taken and destroyed on this cruise. On 
the 1 6th of August, after prolonged foggy weather, during which 
no accurate observations could be taken, the ship struck on a ledge 
of rock on Isle au Haut on the coast of Maine, off the mouth of 
Penobscot Bay, and became disabled and was obliged to run into 
Penobscot Bay, and up the river for repairs, and was with great 
difficulty kept afloat until she reached Hampden, where she was 
moored at a wharf with several feet of water in her hold. On the 
1st of September, while the ship was dismantled and undergoing 
repairs, a British force, consisting of two sloops of war and two 
transports containing six hundred infantry and artillery, eighty 
marines, and as many seamen, entered the river for the purpose of 
cutting out the " Adams." The news of the expedition was sent 
to Captain Morris by express, and he at once sent the information 
to General Blake at Bangor, ten miles up the river. A force of 
six hundred raw militia and some thirty regulars which had come 
up from Castine, were marched to Hampden, and Captain Morris 
began preparations for defense. The militia were poorly sup- 
plied with arms and ammunition. These Captain Morris supplied 
as far as possible. Nine of the large guns of the "Adams" were 
dragged up a high bluff about fifty yards from the wharf, and 
another battery of fourteen guns was mounted on the wharf. 
These were to protect the vessel from the approach by the river. 
In the rear ran tlie Soadabscot Creek, crossed by a bridge three- 
quarters of a mile away. The militia were stationed on and 
across the road half a mile in front of the battery on the bluff. 
Captain Morris' force consisted of two hundred seamen, forty 
marines, and twenty invalid men. The enemy landed their mili- 
tary force during the night of the 2d, which was dark and rainy. 
The morning of the 3d was very foggy and the movement of the 
enemy was not discovered until daylight, when their launches 
appeared on the river at a point a little beyond gunshot. Shortly 
after, the enemy's bugles were heard in the direction of the militia, 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 229 

followed soon by three discharges of one of the guns in the hands 
of the regulars. Very soon news came that the militia had broken 
and were in rapid retreat, and the position of the batteries would 
soon be flanked by the enemy and the reti-eat of Captain i\I orris 
and his men cut off. It therefore became necessary for him to 
retire. He discharged his guns and spiked them, ordered the ship 
to be fired and made his retreat. The enemy's advance had 
reached the hill battery before all those at the wharf had left. 
All retreat by the bridge was cut off, so they were obliged to ford 
the creek. Captain Morris was the last to leave the wharf. He 
dashed into the stream, armpit deep, under a galling fire from the 
British, and escaped unhurt. Joining his men on the other side of 
the stream, he made his retreat to Bangor. The "Adams" was 
entirely destroyed. Neith-er Captain Morris nor his officers and 
men saved any of their personal effects. From Bangor he 
attempted to march his men through the woods of Maine to 
Portsmouth, but finding from the season and the difficulty of 
obtaining sufBcient supplies, that he could not do so by keeping 
them in a body, he directed them to disperse and each man to 
make the best of his w^ay and rendezvous at Portsmouth. It is 
alike creditable to officers and men that at the end of two weeks 
every man reported himself at the appointed place — not a single 
one missing. 

Soon after this event the war with England came to an end, hav- 
ing proved the energy and heroism of our infant navy and crowned 
with laurels many of its gallant officers. 

Up to this period the naval life of Captain Morris is written on 
a conspicuous page in the annals of his country, and he was now 
occupying a proud and honorable place among the heroes who had 
nobly vindicated the honor of the American flag in the presence 
of a contemptuous and insulting foe. 

On the return of General La Fayette to France, after his visit to 
the United States in 1825, Commodore Morris was appointed to 
the command of the national ship, " Brandywine," that bore 
him to his native land ; and in 1841, when our foreign relations 
were seriously disturbed, he sailed upon a cruise in the Delaware^ 
ship of the line, and commanded for the customary period the 
squadron on the coast of Brazil, and afterwards that in the Medi- 
terranean. This was his latest service at sea, and the cruise was 
distinguished, according to the testimony of all his officers, for the 



230 MORRIS FAMILY. 

higli spirit of discipline and for the thoroiigh naval training which 
pervaded the squadrons under his command. He returned from 
this cruise in 1844, and was afterwards, almost without respite or 
leisure, attached to one or another of the administrative bureaus 
of the navy department at Washington. 

He died at his residence in Washington, on Sunday afternoon, 
January 27, 1856, after an illness of nearly three weeks of pneu- 
monia combined with pleurisy and acute bronchitis ; at the time 
of his death he occupied the post of Chief of the Bureau of 
Hydrography and Repairs, and until withdrawn by the disease that 
terminated his life he was in the full discharge of all its duties. 

His death was ofBcially announced in the following general order 
from the navy department : 

Navy Department, January 28, 1856. 

The Navy Department announces to the navy and the marine corps the 
death of Commodore Charles Morris. He died at his residence in the city 
of Washington, on Sunday afternoon, the 27th inst., at 4.30 o'clock, in 
the seventy-second year of his age. He met his " inevitable hour" with 
the composure of a Christian. 

Rarely, indeed, has a nation to mourn the loss of so distinguished, so 
useful, so good a citizen ! His name is associated with the most brilliant 
achievements which have illustrated the American Navy ! No fulsome 
eulogium can magnify it ! No "storied urn" uor "animated bust" is 
needed to perpetuate it ! The recollection of his gallant actions on the 
ocean, which cheered the drooping spirits of his countrymen at a memo- 
rable crisis in our history, will ever be gratefully cherished. As an admin- 
istrative officer he was signally successful. His integrity was incorrupti- 
ble ; his diligence untiring. He was inflexibly just. He was candid and 
frank. He was an honest man. 

As a mark of respect, it is hereby ordered that the flags at the several 

Navy-yards and Stations, and on board of all vessels of the United States 

Navy in commission, be hoisted at half-mast, and thirteen minute guns 

fired at meridian, on the day after the receipt of this order ; and that 

officers of the Navy and Marine Corps wear crape on the left arm for 

thirty days. ^,^ 

^ J. C. DOBBIN, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Many of the newspapers of the day contained extended notices 
of the death of this distinguished and veteran officer of the United 
States. There is place here for only one or two of them. The 
Providence Journal of January 29, 1856, said of him : 

"Brilliant and honorable as was his career as a naval commander, it 
must be added that the most useful — and by no means the least honorable 
— of his services have been performed in those less conspicuous posts in 



[third branch.] sixth GEXERA.TION. 231 

which, with the exception of two brief intervals at sea, the last twenty- 
five or thirty years of his lite have been passed. For the greater part of 
this long period he has resided at the seat of government, enjoying the 
intimate confidence of every siiccessive administration, and relied upon 
by his fellow officers of every rank as their acknowledged chief in admin- 
istrative wisdom and in varied professional attainments. He was, in 
truth, the statesman of the American navy, as well us one of its most 
accomplished and gallant captains. He contemplated the naval service 
not only as an arm of national strength, but in its high relations to other 
departments of the government, and in its important bearings upon every 
interest of the country ; and from him often proceeded the plans and 
measures whicli presidents and secretaries have recommended, and which 
senators and representatives have enacted for its increased efficiency. His 
unobtrusive modesty claimed no credit for the measures which he thus 
originated ; but could the great improvements which have been made in 
the service be traced to their origin, a large proportion of them would be 
foimd to have sprung from the suggestions of his sagacious and compre- 
hensive mind. Several of his gallant confreres have had greater oppor- 
tuuities in war, or more conspicuous positions in distant seas, and have 
won, it may be, a more brilliant renown as champions of the quarter-deck; 
but to no one, we believe — of his own generation, at least — is the country 
so largely indebted for the wisdom that has guided the policy, dictated the 
discipline, and formed the character of the American navy as to Commo- 
dore Morris. He was a noble model of self-sacrificing zeal for his profes- 
sion, and he gave it, through his entire career, all his large abilities, all his 
patient, persevering industry, all his varied attainments. 

"At the time of his death, though ranking second in the list of captains, 
he was in reality the oldest officer who, by the recent action of the Retir- 
ing Board, was deemed by the government to be competent for every kind 
of service, whether at sea or on shore. Of his character as an officer, and 
his precise place among the gallant men with whom he was associated, it 
is not ours to speak. We are confident, however, that this character and 
place, when awarded by impartial history, can be only among the highest 
and most honorable recorded in the annals of the navy. We can only 
speak of him as he appeared in social life, at the family board, or in the 
wider circle of general society. Hospitable, communicative, and spright- 
ly in his intercourse with others, he combined in his manners, to a rare 
degree, unaffected simplicity and manly dignity, a just self-respect, and a 
benevolent heart to contribute to the happiness of those around him. 
Though belonging to the older school of naval officers, and trained in 
early life amid the daring enterprises of war, he was wholly free from 
anything like bravado, arrogance, or conceit. He estimated honors accord- 
ing to no exaggerated appreciation of their value, and conceived it greater 
to have done his duty than to have won applause. None could know him 
without perceiving that there was much in him which his profession did 
not and could not reach. His interests and sympathies were liberal and 
comprehensive, and they who mingled in his society forgot the distin- 



232 MORRIS FAMILY. 

guislied officer, tlie hero of battles, and the confidant of senators and 
statesmen, in the intelligent, affable, and high-minded man, in the true- 
hearted kinsman, the faithful friend, the genial and instructive comjianion. 
His ideals of character were, of necessity, lofty and severe, but he \vas 
always lenient and indulgent in his judgment of others, whether in his 
own profession or in the common walks of men. 

"That his natural talents were of a superior order is sufficiently proved 
by the eminence which he obtained, and the success with which he dis- 
charged so many important and responsible public trusts. But that which 
distinguished him more than original endowments was the earnest indus- 
try with which at every period of his life he devoted himself to intellectual 
improvement and the acquisition of useful knowledge. He trusted to no 
inspiration of genius, and reposed on no laurels of the past, but was con- 
stantly passing on to larger and larger attainments. Though his early 
education was limited, he became no mean adept in general science, and 
in the use of language he attained a style of unusual simplicity, precision, 
and clearness. Though wholly removed from academic experience, he 
was entrusted by the government with the supervision of the naval acad- 
emy at Annapolis — a trust which, for several years before his death, he 
had so discharged with admirable judgment, and with the most liberal 
views of what should constitute the preliminary education of a naval 
officer. 

"Thus, after a long and honorable career in the service of his country, 
in the unabated vigor of all his powers, and in the full brightness of a rep- 
utation tarnished by no spot of either public or private reproach, has this 
distinguished officer and illustrious man passed from among the living, 
leaving behind him only here and there a surviving name associated with 
his own in the early achievements and renown of the American navy. 
His death was marked with the same equanimity as his life. With the 
exception of his youngest son, a lieutenant in the service — absent on a 
distant cruise — his family were all around him, and with tender watching 
and affectionate assiduity sustained the calm serenity with which he 
approached the inevitable hour. A life thus faithfully spent in the ful- 
fillment of every relation and the discharge of every duty, and thus 
serenely closed, is greater than a hundred victories. The morning gun 
booming from every naval post in the land will proclaim the honors due 
to his rank, history will associate his name among the most illustrious of 
those who have contributed to the naval glory of the country, while 
admiring friendship in a multitude of saddening hearts will cherish, with 
still higher and truer appreciation, the memory of his rare virtues and his 
exalted worth." 

[From the National Intelligencer, February 1, 1856.] 

COMMODORE CHARLES MORRIS. 

"Verily a Rreat man haa this day fallen in Israel." 

"The remains of this distinguished officer and courteous gentleman 

have just been committed to their mother earth amid the tears of a 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 233 

bereaved family, and the deepest regrets, not only of all who personally 
knew him and could therefore more properl}- appreciate him, but also of 
the entire American people. 

Commodore Morris was born in Connecticut in 1784, and was therefore 
in his seventy-second year, nearly fifty-seven of which he had passed in the 
service of his country, as he entered the navy on the 1st of July, 1799, at 
the age of fifteen, and after passing through the subordinate grades, he 
died the senior officer on the active list. 

During the whole period of his long service he was off duty less than 
three years, and consequently was in active employ about fifty-four years, 
afloat or ashore, fulfilling his various duties, and, for the larger part of 
the time, highly important and responsible ones, with ability, zeal, intel- 
ligence, and sterling integrity, to the entire satisfaction of his superiors, 
whether of the navy or the department. Four times he commanded 
squadrons on foreign stations, the first time when only thirty-two years 
old, and the whole of them occupj'ing a period of six years. He was for 
eleven years one of the Navy Commissioners at Washington, previous to 
the present organization of the department, after which he served eight 
years at the head of the bureau. He commanded eight years at different 
navy-yards, and saw twenty-one years of sea service. 

During his entire connection with the navy he never refused to obey, nor 
even asked to be excused from obeying, an order of the department; but 
whatever duty was assigned to him, no matter how inconvenient or inop- 
portune the order might have been as regarded his own private arrange- 
ments, no matter how desirous he might have been to remain in the posi- 
tion in which that order found him, a prompt and cheerful obedience was 
given to it without a syllable of complaint or remonstrance. Nor did he 
ever apply for employment or importune the department for appointment 
to those desirable stations, abroad or at home, which were and are eagerly 
sought after, thought doubtless he was as anxious for such stations as 
others. So far as is known, no ofiicial complaint was ever lodged against 
him at the department ; and in his long career he was never arraigned 
before a court martial or court of inquiry except when, during the war of 
1812, he was in the "Adams," chased by a British squadron into the Pen- 
obscot, where, after landing his crew, he burned his ship to prevent her 
falling into the hands of the enemy. In all cases which a national ship is 
lost, no matter under under what circumstances, a court of inquiry is 
held, and on this occasion Captain Morris immediately asked for one, and 
was promptly and honorably acquitted. 

The courage of Commodore Morris was of the most cool and unostenta- 
tious, but at the same time of the most decided character. He performed 
his duty under the most trying circumstances, with perfect self-possession 
and collectedness, as well as Avith sound judgment and discretion. The 
severe wound he received in the action with the Guerriere was entirely 
owing to a fearless exposure of himself. The British ship attempted to 
board the " Constitution," and ran her bowsprit over the taff rail of the 
latter vessel, with her forecastle crowded with her marines and boarders. 
30 



234 MORRIS FAMILY. 

The order was given to lash the bowsprit to the "Constitution," and while 
some of her crew were thus employed, Lieutenant Morris jumped upon 
the taffrail to assist in the operation, and in this situation a seri^eant of 
marines took deliberate aim at him from the forecastle of the " Guerriere" 
and shot him through the body. He was not only seen to do it, but suh- 
sec^uently acknowledged the fact himself when a prisoner on board the 
" Constitution." 

"Commodore Morris was remarkable for the influence he possessed 
over those under his command, and also for the respect they entertained 
for him. 'How is it,' asked a former Secretary of the Navy, 'that it so 
frequently occurs, on the expiration of the term of service of a squadron 
on a foreign station, there are complaints made against the commanding 
ofBcer, complaints by him again.st his subordinates, and complaints by the 
latter against each other, with demands for court martials or courts of 
inquiry? 'This,' he added, 'has never been the case with Commodore 
Morris, though he has commanded some of the largest squadrons. He 
has alwaj's come home Avithout a complaint being pressed against him, or 
by him against any of his ofhcers, and without any even among the 
officers against each other. Neither has there been any court martial 
during the terms of service, nor any demand for one on their return.' 
The fact was, that though differences doubtless occurred occasionally 
among his officers as well as those of other squadrons, yet by his tact, 
influence, and discretion he brought about personal explanations and 
settled those little matters in a manner satisfactory and honorable to all 
parties. 

"During his command on the Brazil station he was on intimate terms 
with the British admiral then in command there, who subsequently stated 
that he considered Commodore Morris had no superior as a naval officer 
in the world. Among other things, in his intercourse with him, he was 
astonished at the perfect knowledge he possessed as to the organization, 
system, details, and facts connected with the British navy, which was 
far, very far, beyond what he (the admiral) had previously known himself, 
and, as he believed, beyond what was known by any flag officer in Her 
jSIajesty's service. 

"He was indefatigable in the discharge of his public duties; always 
watchful and jealous for the public interest, whether in command of a 
navy-yard or squadron, or at the head of a bureau, ever showing an 
incorruptible integrity which the breath of slander never even attempted 
to sully. 

" Active and energetic, immovable in purpose when conscious of right, 
yet considerate of the feelings of others, conciliating in manners and 
temperate in language, with great self-control and dauntless courage, he 
possessed all the qualities necessary to a commanding officer. When on 
shore, his stead}'' attention to business, his correctness of judgment, his 
practical good sense and perfect uprightness rendered him a most efficient 
and valual)le executive officer. 

"Order and system were marked features in the character of Commo- 



[third BRANCU.] SIXTU GENERATION. 235 

(lore Morris, not only in his public, but also in bis private relations; 
simple in bis tastes and unobtrusive in bis babits, a liberal economy 
governed bis expenditures and cbarities, "witbout parade or ostentation in 
eitber. 

' ' From the time be was fifteen years of age be kept a regular diary, in 
wbicb almost everytbing connected witb bis public and private life is 
fully noted. The last entry is on the day previous to tbe attack of bis 
fatal sickness. As a specimen of tbe details in wbicb be kept tbis record, 
on tbe 1st of January be noted, among otber tbings, that as usual be paid 
bis respects on tbe New Year to tbe beads of tbe departments and called 
upon some special friends and more immediate neigbbors, all of whom be 
mentioned by name. 

" Tbe calmness and foretbougbt which has always distinguished Com- 
modore Morris through life did not leave him in his last moments. Two 
days previous to bis death he requested a member of his family who was 
alone with him to take pen and paper and note down some directions be 
wished to give regarding bis funeral. The reply was that be hoped there 
would be no occas^ion for anything of that kind, to which the Commodore 
replied, 'Perhaps not; but at anj' rate it will do no harm to have it done.' 
He then stated that he wished no military parade at bis funeral; tbe 
customary number of guns due to bis rank, to be fired at tbe navy-yard 
when bis body was buried, was all he desired. He designated his pall- 
bearers — Commodores Shubrick, Smith, and Perry, General Henderson 
of tbe marines. General Totteu of tbe engineers, and Colonel Cooper of 
the army — all old and valued friends, and if Commodore Perrj' (tbe only 
absent one) should not be in the city, some otber officer to be substituted. 
If any address should be made over his body, be desired it to be very 
short He wished arrangements made at the gate of the cemeterj' for tbe 
reception of his body, so that tbe accompanying friends should not have 
to walk to and be exposed around the grave; and if tbe weather should be 
inclement, did not wish any ladies to attend bis funeral. Some otber 
little directions were given, and when thej' were written down he asked 
that they might be read to him. He suggested several small alterations, 
and when tbe amended copy was read, said, ' That is all right, now.' 

"A short time before his last attack be had attended the funeral of a 
friend and was much exposed, and to this fact maj' be traced tbe con- 
siderate and kind thoughtfulness on bis part which led him to guard 
against similar exposure to bis friends at his own obsequies." 

One who was present during mucli of his sickness and at the 
time of his death, said, '• There were times in the three weeks he 
lived when the doctor thought he might recover. He said himself 
if good nursing would cure him he should get well. He, however, 
anticipated the result and gave directions for his funeral, and 
forgot nothing that would save troulDle to others — all his life he 
endeavored to give as little trouble as possible. He was surely 



236 MORRIS FAMILY. 

prepared. A more grateful, thankful, patient spirit I never saw. 
As soon as the last of his sons arrived — all his children but one 
were there ; George, his youngest son, was in Oregon — he requested 
to have thanksgiving offered for so many blessings. His mind 
was clear to the last moment. He was spared a severe struggle; 
he covered his shoulders, turned over, and breathed his life away 
as gentle as an infant." 

Commodore Morris left an autobiography which he had pre- 
pared, not for the purpose of publication, but to tell his children 
the story of his life. It, however, was obtained for publication in 
1880, under the supervision of Professor J. R. Soley of the U. S. 
Naval Academy. 

In his personal appearance Commodore Morris was about five 
feet nine or ten inches in height, with erect body and broad 
shoulders which indicated great physical strength. He had light 
blue eyes, and soft, silky, brown hair. 

He married, Feb. 4, 1815, Miss Harriet Bowen, youngest 
daughter of Dr. William Bowen of Providence, R. I., a descend- 
ant of Richard Bowen, one of the earliest settlers of Rehoboth, 
Mass., in 1643. Dr. Bowen was an eminent physician, and in 
practice at the age of eighty years. His father, Dr. Ephraim 
Bowen, was also eminent in his profession. He died in Provi- 
dence, Oct. 21, 1812, at the age of ninety-six. The only brother 
of Mrs. Morris, Dr. William Corhs Bowen, was graduated at 
Union College in 1803. He studied medicine with an uncle, 
Dr. Pardon Bowen of Providence, and afterwards went to Europe 
and studied in the schools of Paris, London, and Edinburgh. He 
turned his attention to chemical pursuits, and in 1811 returned to 
this country. He greatly impaired his property and lost his life 
in experiments, the results of which were of great benefit to the 
manufacturing interests of the country. 

Mrs. Harriet (Bowen) Morris was born in Providence, Oct. 12, 
1791, and died at her residence on H street, in Washington, July 
21, 1878, in the 87th year of her age, having survived her husband 
twenty-two years and six months. In her youth she was distin- 
guished for her beauty and accomplishments, and through life was 
beloved and respected by a wide circle of friends. 

Commodore Charles and Harriet (Bowen) Morris had tlie follow- 
ing; cliildrcn: 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 237 

366. Charles William^, b. Sept. 5, 1815, at Jamaica Plain, 

Roxbury, Mass. 

367. Harriet Bowen'^, b. April 8, 1817, in rrovidonce, R. I. 

368. Louise Amory^, b. Dec. 19, 1818, at Portsmouth Navy- 

yard, N. H. 

369. Elizabeth Amory', b. March 2, 1821, at Portsmouth Navy- 

yard, N. H. 

370. Helen Maria'', b. Sept. 26, 1822, at Portsmouth Navy- 

yard, N. H.; d. Dec. 12, 1843. 

371. Robert Murray^ b. May 12, 1824, at Washington, D. C. 

372. William Bowen'', b. March 4, 1826, at Washington, D. C; 

d. March 16, 1878. 

373. Maria Lear^, b. May 31, 1828, at Charlestown Navy- 

yard, Mass. 

374. George Upham', b. June 12, 1830, at Charlestown Navy- 

yard, Mass. 

375. Julia Howe', b. Dec. 15, 1832, at Georgetown, D. C. 

203. Lieut. HORACE MORRIS, 2d son of Captain Charles 
(75), born in Woodstock, Jan. 28, 1789. Married Dec. 24, 1815, 
Sarah, daughter of Robert Wilhams of Wilmington, N. C. He 
was appointed sergeant in the 11th regiment of infantry, LT. S. 
Army, Dec. 2, 1812, and 3d heutenant March 13, 1813, but, having 
challenged a superior officer, he resigned Aug. 1 3th the same year. 
He afterward had some minor office in the navy for a short time. 
He was a courageous man, and while at sea, the vessel which he 
was on was boarded by a British cruiser, and he was ordered on 
board of her; he refused to go, and, arming himself, he sprung 
into the rigging and threatened death to any one who might follow 
him. Ho was at Valparaiso in the U. S. frigate United Stales in 
1826, when Callao was destroyed by an earthquake, and, with the 
officers and crew of that vessel, went to the assistance of the 
injured and suffering of that city, and spent three weeks there in 
their relief and in the burial of the dead. He also spent six 
weeks on the island of Juan Fernandez. His home was in the 
village of Ames, N. Y., where his father had lived. On the 30th 
of April, 1857, he and his wife left Ames to make their home with 
their married daughter, Mrs. Swan, at Matagorda, Texas. A foot 
of snow was on the ground at Ames when they left. In 1858, 
they removed with the Swans to Escambia County, Fla., where he 



238 MORRIS FAMILY 

died of pneumonia, May 4, 1862. He had a fine personal appear- 
ance. He was six feet and two inches in height. He had fine 
black hair, but became bald. He wore side whiskers. He was said 
to have resembled the families of his mother and grandmother — 
the Nichols and Wilkinsons. He had an active temperament, and 
was a studious reader, well informed on the topics of the day, but 
not much of a talker. 

Mr. Morris died at Pensacola, Feb. 6, 1866. Children: 

376. Miriam'^, b. Dec. 22, 1817, in Cherry street. New York city. 

377. Lucy", b. May 16, 1820, at Cape May, N. J. 

378. Sarah Maria'', b. March 14, 1832, at Ames. 

204. Captain GEORGE MORRIS, 3d son of Captain Charles 
(75), born at Woodstock, Oct. 20, 1790; died in Philadelphia, 
March 2, 1825. Married Sarah Mumford of New York city. He 
was appointed 2d lieutenant. Light Artillery, U. S. A., March 13, 
1813, and 1st lieutenant in December foUowmg, and captain Jan. 
15, 1817. Transferred to 3d artillery, June 1, 1821. In 1814, he 
was stationed for some time at Port Independence, in Boston har- 
bor. He was fine looking, with blue eyes and brown hair. He 
had an aifection of the knee, which at times gave him much 
trouble. One son: 

379. Robert S.', b. , , 1822. 

205. Lieutenant ROBERT MORRIS, 4th son of Captain 
Charles (75), born Oct. 15, 1792. Appointed lieutenant 13th 
infantry, U. S. A., March 12, 1812. At the battle of Queenstown, 
Oct. 13, 1812, he was wounded in the arm while crossing the river, 
but kept on with his company until he was killed in the attack on 
Queenstown Heights. He was unmarried. 

207. Colonel SAMUEL ELLIOT MORRIS, 5th son of Captain 
Charles (75), born at Ames, Montgomery Co., N. Y., Aug. 10, 1811. 
Married Feb. 21, 1835, Adaline Dorr, daughter of Matliew and 
Ann (Mudge) Dorr of Chatham, Columbia Co , N. Y. The father 
of Mr. Dorr was Judge Mathew Dorr of the Court of Common 
Pleas for Columbia County, before whom Martin Van Buren made 
his first plea in court. The Dorrs were engaged in woolen manu- 
facturing. The Mudge family were among tiie early settlers of 
the towns of Canaan and New Lebanon. 



[third branch.] sixth GEXERiTION, 239 

Mr. Morris is a farmer. He removed from Ames to Providence, 
Bureau Co., 111., in October, 1836. From Providence he removed 
to Greenfield, Adair County, Iowa, in May, 1SG8, and now resides 
there. While living in Providence he held the office of Supervisor 
of Bureau County for five years. 

At the outbreak of the rebellion Mr. Morris was so situated that 
he could not enter the army; he, however, became connected with 
the Provost Department of the Fifth District of Illinois as enrolling 
officer, and at times performed very valuable and perilous services 
both at home and at the front, and was almost always charged with 
matters of trust, and performed many of them under the private 
orders of Governor Yates, the war Governor of Illinois. Many of 
these duties were of a delicate nature, and required a quick dis- 
cernment and a ready knowledge of men. A part of his district 
was composed of a population opposed to the promotion of the war, 
and in the discharge of his duties he was often bullied and threat- 
ened with assassination. Twice he was fired iipon from ambush, 
but his coolness, nerve, and courage carried him through those 
dangers harmless. In one instance, when fired upon, he turned 
his horse in the direction from which the shot was fired and 
bravely dashed into the bush and nearly rode the villain down. 
He identified the fellow, who immediately sent him word that if he 
would not prosecute him he would enter the army. Mr. Morris 
most generously accepted the terms. 

In person Mr. Morris stands six feet in height, with broad 
shoulders. He has blue eyes and brown hair. In his prime he 
possessed great muscular strength, endurance, and activity, and in 
these qualities few could match him. He never sought contro- 
versy, and he never fl.inched if it was forced upon him. Whoever 
was indiscreet enough to attack him in any way generally 
regretted it. 

In politics Mr. Morris has been Whig and RejiubHcan. His 
church connection is with the Congregationalists. Children: 

380. George Eliot', b. Nov. 22, 1835, at Ames. 

381. Charles Dorr", b. May 2, 1840, at Providence. 

382. Harriet Elizabeth", b. June 14, 1842, at Providence ; m. 

George W, Leonard. 

383. Edward", b. Feb. 29, 1845. 

384. Caroline Louise', b. Dec. 18, 1849; m. John C. Stevens. 



240 I MORRIS FAMILY. 

Since tlie above was written the deatli of Col. Morris has occurred. 
The following obituary is from the Adair County Reporter : 

" Died, — June 4, 1886, Samuel E. Morris, aged 75 years. Col. Morris, 
by which title he was universally known, was born in Montgomery 
County, New York, August 10, 1811. He was among the early settlers of 
Illinois, coming to that State in the autumn of 1836, and settling in what 
was known as Providence Colony. During his residence in Illinois the 
rebellion took place. He took an active and patriotic part in raising 
troops, and furnished himself three of his sons, who bore an honorable 
part in the conflict. 

He acted during the rebellion as a provost marshal, and also in special 
service under Governor Yates, the famous war governor of that State. 
He held several offices in Bureau County in that State. He and his family 
came to Iowa in the spring of 1868, settling upon the farm near Greenfield 
until the disabilities of advancing age required him to retire from the 
active cares of life, when he sold his farm and moved to Greenfield. He 
was descended from an old family, that from an early period was repre- 
sented almost continuously by some of its members in the military or 
naval service, occupying honorable and important positions. 

The acquaintances of Col. Morris of ten or fifteen years ago remember 
him as a man of fine presence, tall, shapely, graceful, and dignified. 
While not liberally educated, we believe, his attainments were good, and 
he was an extensive and intelligent reader. In his better days he was a 
fine conversationalist, and an exceedingly pleasant companion. He 
always took an active interest in national, state, and county affairs, and 
his views on such topics were worthy of respect. For several years past 
his mental powers have gradually failed, leaving him but a wreck of his 
former self." 

210. LYDIA MORRIS, 1st daughter of Samuel (77), born 
Nov. 8, 1793, at Otsego, N. Y. Married, Dec. 27, 1812, James 
Wells. Children: 

386. Marcus M. Wells^ b. 

387. Almika Wells'', b. 

388. Samuel Morris Wells"', b. 

389. William Wells', b. 

390. Edwin Wells", b. 

James Wells died March 18, 1827. Mrs. Lydia (Morris) Wells 
married 2d, O. Edson. Had one child: 
390^. Mary Edsox'', b. 

211. HANNAH MORRIS, 2d daughter of Samuel (77), born 
Aug. 23, 1795, at Otsego. Married Oliver Bishop, June 12, 1818. 
Children : 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 241 

391. Andrew J. Bishop', b. ' 

392. Robert Morris Bishop'', b. 

393. Owen Bishop^ b. 

394. John Bishop'', b. 

395. Laura Bishop'', b. 

396. Oliver Bishop'', b. 

397. William Bishop'', b. 

398. Malcom Bishop'', b. 

399. Samuel Morris Bishop'', b. 

400. Ferdinand Bishop', b. 

401. Marion Bishop', b. 

212. AURELIA CONTENT MORRIS, 3d daughter of Sam 
uel (77), born at Otsego, July 3, 1797. Married Chester Jarvis, 
Oct. 15, 1818. Children: 

402. Francis Griswold Jarvis'', b. 

403. Frederick Tiffany Jarvis'', b. 

404. Henry Keat Jarvis'', b. 

405. AuRELiA Content Jarvis', b. 

213. BETSEY MORRIS, 4th daughter of Samuel (77), born 
at Otsego, Sept. 24, 1799. Married George Partridge, Nov. 4, 1824. 
Children: 

406. Eveline Partridge'', b. 

407. George W. Partridge', b. 
(Perhaps three others.) 

215. ORAN WILKINSON MORRIS, 1st son of Rufus (78), 
born at Bowman's Creek in the town of Canajoharie, N. Y., Feb. 
5, 1798. Died in New York city, Aug. 9. 1S77, in his 80th year. 
Married, March 1, 1823, Selina P. Patrick, daughter of Dr. Wil- 
liam and Patience (Benjamin) Patrick of Stillwater, Saratoga 
County, N. Y. Mr. Morris had only a common school education 
until 1815, when he entered Albany Academy with the intention 
of pursuing a collegiate course, which circumstances prevented 
his completing. He was a teacher in common schools from 1817 
to 1832. He was a student of botany, geology, and mineralogy, 
which sciences he taught in classes, in the intervals of his school 
terms. In 1832 he spent a session in the New York Institution 
for the Deaf and Dumb, and tJieu took charge of the Central Deaf 
31 



242 MORRIS FAMILY. 

and Dumb Asylum at Canajoharie. This institution was merged 
with the New York Institution in 1835, and Mr. Morris was a 
professor there iintil 1851, in which year he went to Knoxville, 
Tenn., to resuscitate and take charge of the State Asylum for the 
Deaf and Dumb at that place. In 1853 he returned to the New 
York Institution and remained in it until 1869, when he was 
appointed librarian for the Cooper Union Free Library; which 
position he held until April, 1877, when he resigned on account of 
failing health. He commenced, in 1845, a meteorological register 
for the reports of the New York University, the Smithsonian 
Institute, and the Army Signal Office at Washington, and continued 
it until April 30, 1877. The following notice of Mr. Morris is 
from the New York Sim : 

"Professor Morris was the first to teach deaf mutes labial expression, 
or the language of the lips, in order that they might converse with each 
other, and understand from the movements of the mouth what others were 
saying. His method was an innovation on the old system of conversing 
by tinger motions, and met with great opposition in the beginning. His 
theory was that persons who had become dumb could be taught to speak 
again by imitating the motions of the lips in talking. His first pupil 
was William Howell, nephew of General Wade Hampton, Governor of 
South Carolina. IMr. Howell was deaf, but had the use of speech, and 
under Professor Morris' tuition he was enabled to converse and under- 
stand what persons were saying to him. He grew so proficient in reading 
the motions of the lips that few suspected him to be deaf. Professor 
Morris was the meteorological recorder in this city for the Smithsonian 
Institute from the time of its formation. He kept a daily record of the 
weather, extending back fifty years, the oldest meteorological record in 
the country. 

Children : 

408. MoREAu'^, b. June 19, 1825, at Stillwater. 

409. Charlotte^ b. Dec. 16, 1826; d. next day. 

410. Louisa^ b. Nov. 16, 1827; d. Nov. 3, 1829. 

411. William Henry'', b. Nov. 2, 1829, at Albany. 

412. Mary\ b. Sept. 9, 1832, at Ames. 

413. Ada Byron'', b.<^ 3 € Hvd 14, 1835, at Canajoharie. 

414. Caroline^, b. June 13, 1838, at New York; d. July 7, 1840. 

415. Elizabeth Scott', b. April 25, 1840; d. Nov. 23, 1865. 

416. RuFus^, b. Feb. 8, 1845. 

218. NOADIAH HARTT MORRIS, 2d son of Rufus (78), 
born at Canajoliarie, N. Y., Nov. 18, 1810. Married, Feb. 20, 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 243 

1839, Susan Mills of Lowville, N. Y. Farmer. Eemoved to 
Tiskilwa, Bureau County, 111., Sept., 1850. In 1881, removed to 
Princeton, III. Congregationalist. Eepublican. Children: 

417. Howard Harding'', b. May 28, 1842, at Canajoharie. 

418. George Huntley'', b. Dec. 27, 1843, at Canajoharie. 

419. Hemry Orr'', b. Feb. 11, 1847, at Canajoharie. 

420. Norman Foot^, b. March 4, 1849, at Canajoharie. 

421. Willis Moreau'', b. Sept. 27, 1853, at Tiskilwa. 

422. Ada Maria^, b. Aug. 21, 1859, at Tiskilwa. 

226. Judge WILLIAM CHILD, 2d son of Darius and Letitia 
(Morris) Child (92), born at Fairlee, Vt., June 15, 1806. Married, 
Jan. 1, 1821, Lucretia Fulton. Judge Child lives in Fairlee, and 
is a farmer. He has represented Fairlee in the Legislature for 
three years, and was a Judge of Orange County Court two years, 
and a Justice of the peace for more than forty years. He is a 
very influential citizen in his town, county, and State, and is 
esteemed for his excellent qualities of heart and mind. Children: 

423. Alpha Child^, b. , 1831; d. 1852. 

424. Lucy Jane Child'', b. Nov., 1833; m. Charles Hartshorn. 

425. Darius G. Child^, b. , 1836; d. July 20, 1862, at 

New Orleans. He was a Lieutenant in the service of 
the United States. 

426. Lewis Child'^, b. , 1838; m. Sarah F. Mathewson, 

Dec, 1865. He was a Lieutenant in the Union army. 

427. William H. Child^, b. , 1840; m. Julia A. Mann, 

Dec. 25, 1866. 

428. Elias S. Child^, b. 1848; d. 

231. LORENZO GODFREY MORRIS, 1st son of William 
Monroe (94), born in West Fairlee, April 18, 1816. Married, 
Nov. 9, 1856, Sarah Giles of Deerfield, N. H. He was educated 
at Bradford Academy and Thetford Seminary, and commenced 
teaching at sixteen, then learned the trade of a mason. He taught 
winters and worked at his trade the rest of the year, principally 
in Boston and Lawrence, Mass. In 1853 he was appointed a clerk 
in the post office at Lawrence. In 1859 his health failed and he 
removed to Limestone, Aroostook County, Me., and settled there 
as a farmer. He has been chosen several times Selectman and 
Supervisor of Schools. He is a Universalist in his reUgious belief. 



244 MORRIS FAMILY. 

and in politics a Democrat — a ""War Democrat" during the 
rebellion. In person lie is of the Morris build and features, of 
medium height, and of light complexion. No children: 

235. WILLIAM H. MORRIS, 2d son of Wilham Monroe 
(94), born March 23, 1823, at Wentworth, N. H. Married, Nov. 
27, 18.^.0, Sarah P. Church. House painter. Lives in Lebanon, 
N. H., an active business man and respected citizen. Congrega- 
tionalist and Republican. Children: 

429. Nellie L.^, b. Nov. 23, 1855; d. Oct. 11, 1871. 

430. Emma M.^, b. Oct. 23, 1858. 

Mr. Morris is tall in stature — six feet — and has a dark com- 
plexion, taking it from his mother. 

236. GEORGE FRANKLIN MORRIS, 3d son of William 
Monroe (94), born May 30, 1825, in Wentworth. Married, Teb. 
3, 1853, Lydia M. Fuller. Mason. Lives in Bradford, Vt., a 
much respected and trusted citizen. He is of medium height and 
has a light complexion. Republican. Attends a Congregational 
Church. One son: 

431. Chauncey Colton", b. Jan. 13, 1859. 

237. JOSIAH S. MORRIS, 4th son of William Monroe (94), 
born Oct. 10, 1832. Died in Vershire, July 21, 1871. Married, 
Aug. 28, 1864, Lucinda C. Merrill. Farmer. Lived in Vershire. 
When he became of age he went to Lawrence, Mass., to work in 
the Pemberton Mill, and soon became an overseer. At the time 
of that terrible disaster — the falling of the mill, Jan. 10, 1860, — 
lie was in the fourth story. He fell beside a large timber, which 
protected him, so that he had room to crawl. He got out of the 
ruins with but slight injuries. He was very much respected by 
his townsmen, and died lamented. In personal appearence he was 
of medium height and of dark complexion. He attended a Con- 
gregational Church and in politics he was a Republican. One son: 

432. George P.'', b. April 13, 1866. 

238. CYRUS M. MORRIS, 5th son of William Monroe (94), 
born Feb. 13, 1837. Married, Sept. 28, 1863, Ellen M. Prescott. 
Jle served in the Union Army during the rebellion, and afterward 



[third BRANCn.] SIXTH GENERATION. 245 

removed to the West; first to Wisconsin, then to Sibley, Osceola 
County, Iowa. Congregationalist. Republican. Children: 

433. AuTHUR BJ, b. April 17, 1865. 

434. Laura", b. 

435. Adrian', b. 

2-1:0. WILLIAM MONROE MORRIS, 1st son of Park (95), 
born at West Fairlee, Dec. 21, 1814. Married, May 4, 1841, 
Sylvia Button of Concord, Mass. She was born at Greenfield, 
N. H., April 15, 1819. Farmer. Lives in Billerica, Mass. Has 
lived in Concord, Dracut, and Tewksbury. Repubhcan. Children: 

436. George Henry'', b. April 25, 1842, in Concord; d. Dec. 

28, 1871. 

437. James Monroe'', b. March 1, 1846, in Dracut; d. July 

21, 1848. 

438. Charles Edward'^, b. Feb. 1, 1848, in Dracut; lives at 

home; unmarried. 

439. Flora Sylvia^ b. Oct. 12, 1851, in Dracut; d. Aug. 30, 

1853. 

440. Sarah Alice'', b. Nov. 8, 1854, in Tewksbury; unmarried. 

242. LEWIS ROYAL MORRIS, 3d son of Park (95), born 
at West Fairlee, Feb. 4, 1806. Died Dec. 30, 1876. Married, 
May 7, 1847, Lucinda Bliss, daughter of Ellis Bhss of Bradford, 
Vt. Lawyer. Lived at Lebanon, N. H. He fitted for college, 
but did not enter. He was a man of excellent character, benevo- 
lent disposition, and quiet unassuming manner. In politics he was 
a Democrat, but not a partizan. He never held any office, always 
declining nominations. No children. 

243. JAMES ELIAS MORRIS, 4th son of Park (95), born 
at West Fairlee, Vt., May 14, 1819. Married, in 1848, to Mary 
Almira, daughter of Captain Daniel and Anna Wyman of Chelsea, 
Vt. Mr. Morris was living in Dracut, Mass., at the time of his 
marriage. He removed to Lawrence, Mass., in 1850, where he 
carried on a grocery business. In 1871 he removed to Boston, 
where he remained one year, then removed to Billerica and lived 
on a farm until 1875, when he removed to Des Moines, la. In 
1886 he returned to Chelsea, where he now resides at his wife's 
old home. Children: 



d. 

lives in Thetford, Vt. 

m. 0. A. Clogston. 

m. Frank W. Hall of Balti- 



246 MORRIS FAMILY. 

441. Caroline E.", b. May 6, 1849, in Dracut; d in Boston, July 

1, 1872. 

442. Frederick Winslow", b. Feb. 21, 1859, in Lawrence; 

removed to Des Moines; in 1 886 removed to Chelsea, Vt. 

244:. ELMIRA J. MORRIS, 2d daughter of Park (95), born 
May 14, 1819. Married, Jan. 6, 1839, Simeon B. Titus of Ver- 
shire. Farmer. Lives in Ely, Vt. Children: 

443. Fanny T. Titus\ b. ; m. Charles Hazen, Cambridge, 

Mass. 

444. Josephine A. Titus'', b. ; m. 0. A. Clogston, Straf- 

ford, Vt. 

445. Melvin J. TiTus^, b. 

446. Morris P. Titus', b. 

447. Carrie S. Titus'', b. 

448. Jennie E. Titus^ b. 

more, Md. 

449. CiiAiiLES M. Titus'', b. ; lives in Boston, Mass. 

450. Frank E. Titus"', b. ; lives in Vershire, Vt. 

451. Frederick L. Titus'', 1). ; d. 

452. Myra T. Titus', b. . 

453. Susan H. Titus', b. ; d. 

249. GEORGE L ANGLE Y MORRIS, 1st son of Augustus 
(96), born in Fairlee, Oct. 2, 1820. Died at Taunton, Jan. 19, 
1878. Married, Oct. 25, 1847, Martha P. Bailey. Mechanic. 
Lived in Taunton, Mass. He was an inventor of a valuable iron 
screw. He had dark complexion and black eyes; height, six feet. 
No children. 

254. WILLIAM RODNEY MORRIS, 2d son of Augustus 
(96), born April 12, 1830. Moulder. Lives in . Unmar- 
ried in 1875, 

255. SILAS QUIxMBY MORRIS, 3d son of Augustus (96), 
born Nov. 24, 1832. Machinist. Light complexion; blue eyes; 
height, five feet eight inches. "Unmarried in 1875. 

250. LYMAN HINCKLEY MORRIS, 4th son of Augustus 
(96), born May 20, 1838. Married, Oct. 4, 1864, Malvina Hart- 
well, Southboro, Mass. 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 247 

268. WARREX MORRIS, 1st son of Captain Edward (105), 
born in Southbridge, Aug. 17, 1814. Removed to Alden, Erie 
County, N. Y., in 1838. Married, May 28, 1840, Nancy Freeman 
of Alden. She died, Oct. 28, 1841. Married 2d, Nov. 5, 1844, 
Charlotte Beaman. Carpenter. Lives at Alden. Presbyterian. 
Democrat. Children: 

BY NANCY. 

454. Edwin F.^, b. April 31, 1841. He was a soldier in Com- 

pany D, Thirteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volun- 
teers in the Rebellion, and was killed in the second 
battle of Bull Run, Aug. 30, 1862. 

BY CHARLOTTE. 

455. George B.", b. Sept. 15, 1845; d. 1847. 

456. George B.", b. Aug. 9, 1850. 

270. JEROME MORRIS, 2d son of Captain Edward (105), 
born in Southbridge, Nov. 17, 1821; died there July 12, 1874. 
Married Ann Sophia Reed. Children: 

457. Lizzie'^, b. 

458. Frank'', b, 

459. Jennie'', b. 

460. Charles'', b. 
And two others. 

271. LUCIAN MORRIS, 3d son of Captain Edward (105), 
born in Woodstock, May 19, 1823. Married Lucy Hoyt. 
Children : 

461. Belle^, b. 
46 U. Vine^, b. 

And three others. 

272. OSCAR MORRIS, 4th son of Captain Edward (105), 
born May 26, 1826; died at Southbridge, July 7, 1867. Married 
Martha Ann Leland. Children: 

Loella'', b. 



Tiif 7 u i hoth dead. 

Medora', b. 

273. NELSON MORRIS, 5th son of Captain Edward (105), 
born in Woodstock, Oct. 5, 1828; died in Southbridge from acci- 



248 MORRIS FAMILY. 

dentally shooting himself while hunting. Married . 

Children: 
4 62. , George", b. April 12, 1851. 

463. Fanny", b. Dec , 1855. 

464. Marian'', b. , 1859; m. Lewis B. Hooker, March 21, 

1876. 

281. BAINBRIDGE MORRIS, 1st son of Lyman (106), born 
Dec. 23, 1815. Died at West Millbury, May 8, 1864. Married, 
Feb. 1, 1845, Irene Marble of Millbury, Mass., who was born 
March 21, 1824. Wheelwright. Lived at West Millbury. Uni- 
versahst. Republican. Children: 

465. Bertha^ b. April 2, 1851; m. Nov. 1, 1871, Stephen A. 

Olney of Scituate, R. I. Live in Providence. 

466. Loubert'', b. Nov. 4, 1852. He was killed in a railroad 

accident at Elmira, N. Y., July 18, 1874. 

467. Freelove'', b. Sept. 4, 1854. 

468. Norman'^, b. April 3, 1858. 

469. Arthur^ b. Sept. 12, 1864. 

282. SARAH MORRIS, 3d daughter of Alfred (107), born 
Feb. 12, 1828. Died at Xenia, 0., Oct. 2, 1867. Married May 14, 
1850, Cretors. House -painter, Xenia, 0. Children: 

470. Ella S. Cretors", b. March 13, 1851. 

471. Morris L. Cretors'', b. Dec. 25, 1852, 

472. Cheney F. Cretors^, b. Oct. — , 1855. 

473. Jennie B. Cretors", b. Dec. 22, 1859. 

474. Elmer Cretors'', b. Oct. 14, 1866. 

289. ALFRED MORRIS, 3d son of Alfred (107), born in 
Southbridge, Sept. 11, 1829. Died at Indianapolis, Ind., April 10, 
1873. Married Feb. 14, 1851, Irene Welsh. House-painter. 
Lived in Springfield, O. Children: 

475. Alfred W.'', b. Dec. 26, 1851. 

476. Kimber^, b. March, 1854; d. 1864. 

477. Frederick^, b. , 1861; d. 1864. 

478. Claude^,) • . xt i , o^p d. Feb., 1867. 

479. Maude^ 1 ^™'' ^- ^^^- 1' ^^^^• 

294. JACOB MORRIS, 1st son of Tliomas (100), born in 
Dudley, March 23, 1785. Died near Poutiac, Mich., Aug. 4, I860. 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 249 

Married 1st, Polly Holt. She died Oct. 10, 1816. Married 2d, 
Eliza Williams, Feb., 1817. She died Aug. 29, 1830. Farmer. 
Removed to Michigan 1833. Baptist. Democrat. Children: 

BY 1st wife. 

480. Benjamin", b. Oct. 24, 1809. 

481. Nancy'', b. , ; m. John W. Farwell. 



BY 2d wife. 



482. PoLLY^, b. 



295. DAEIUS MORRIS, 2d son of Thomas (119), born at 
Dudley, Mass., Aug. 20, 1788. Died at Syracuse, N. Y., Aug. 22, 
1846. Married Mary Gardiner, Oct. 8, 1815. Merchant and hotel 
keeper. Lived at Morrisville and Syracuse, N. Y. Children: 

483. Mortimer D.^, b. Jan. — , 1817; d. Aug. 2, 1843; un- 

married. 

484. Hervey E.^, b. Feb. 14, 1818; d. Aug. 2, 1873. 

485. Vestatia I.^, b. Sept. 12, 1825. 

486. Henry S.\ b. Jan. 13, 1828. 

487. Carrie G.', b. Feb. 25, 1830. 

296. HANNAH MORRIS, 1st daughter of Thomas (119), 
born in Dudley, Aug. 24, 1790. Married Lawson Stillwell. Died 
at New Woodstock, N. Y., Jan. 12, 1855. Children: 

488. Warren Stillwell'', b. d. 

489. Emeline Stillwell", b. 

490. Mary Stillwell'', b. 

491. William Stillwell', b. 

492. Lawson Stillwell', b. 

493. Hannah Stillwell', b. d. 

494. Hiram Stillwell'', b. 

297. HARVEY MORRIS, 3d son of Thomas (119), born in 
Dudley, Jan. 30, 1795. Married Lovina Gurley of Bridgewater, 
N. Y., Jan. 8, 1823; died at New Woodstock, Nov. 25, 1842. 
Merchant. Lived at New Woodstock. Children: 

495. Thomas G.^ b. Dec. 8, 1823; d. March 27, 1846. 

496. Margaret E.", b. Oct. 19, 1825; d. Nov. 20, 1870. 

497. James H.', b. March 8, 1829. 

32 



250 MORRIS FAMILY. 

298. ABIGAIL MORRIS, 2d daughter of Thomas (119), 
born at Morrisville, N. Y.. March 11, 1797. Died at Oak Park, 
Cook Co., 111., March 8, 1873. Married 1st, Oren S. Avery, Feb. 
28, 1819. Married 2d, Thaddeus Stoddard, July 23, 1837. 
Children: 

BY 1st husband. 

498. Thomas Morris Avery^, b. Oct. 12, 1821. 

499. William W. Avery^ b. Jan. 1, 1827; d. Dec, 1, 1869. 

BY 2d husband. 

500. Oren S. Stoddard^, b. Dec. 4, 1839; d. Aug. 13, 1840. 

299. THOMAS MORRIS, 4th son of Thomas (119), born at 
Morrisville, April 10, 1800. Died at Chicago, 111., April 26, 1865. 
Married 1st, Tillinghast. Married 2d, Susan Russ. Mer- 
chant. Lived at Sherburn, Chenango Co., N. Y. Removed to 
Chicago, 1855. Rehgious opinions, Orthodox. Political, Union 
Democrat. One son: 

501. Clark T.'', b. Oct. 6, 1840, at Sherburn. 

300. WILLIAM MORRIS, 1st son of Benjamin (120), born 
in Dudley, March 27, 1787; died at Bloomfield, Mich., Sept. 20, 
1844. Married, 1819, Mary Ann Bagley of Bloomfield. Farmer. 
Lived in Whitestown, N. Y. Removed to Michigan April 20, 1844. 
Methodist. Republican. Children: 

502. Zeolide B.^, b. Oct. 20, 1820; m. Aug. 1, 1836, Rev. Oscar 

F. North, Methodist. 

503. Orville C.', b. Feb. 20, 1822. 

504. Robert B.^ b. Feb. 18, 1824. 

505. Sylvia C.^, b. 1825; m. Jan., 1845, Theron A. Flower. 

506. William', b. Jan. — , 1830; d. March, 1862. 

301. CHARLES MORRIS, 2d son of Benjamin (120), born 
in Dudley, Mass., March 12, 1789; died at Quincy, III, Aug. 8, 
1875. Married Dec. 29, 1813, at Pompey Hill, Onondaga Co., 
N. Y., Betsey Colton, from Connecticut. She died at Springville, 
N. Y., July 14, 1859. Mr. Morris was a merchant at Pompey Hill 
and at Utica. Removed to Quincy, HI. Presbyterian. Anti- 
slavery man and Republican. Children: 



[third BRANCn.] SIXTH GENERATION. 251 

507. Charles E.^, b. Oct. 16, 1814, at Pompey Hill. 

508. William'', b. July 16, 1816, at Jamesville. 

509. Henry Colton', b. April 28, 1826. 

510. Cornelia E. T.', b. July 11, 1829, at Utica. 

511. Catherine C.', b. 

302. SYLVIA MORRIS, 1st daughter of Benjamin (120), 
born in Dudley, March 5, 1791. Married Nathan Davis, Jan. 10, 
1812. Children: 

Jane M. Davis^, b. Feb. 12, 1813; m. Dec. 7, 1841, M. 

Lamont Bagg; no children. 
Benjamin Morris Davis^, b. March 19, 1815. 
James H. Davis^, b. April 29, 1817; m. Sarah Wilcox, 

Dec, 1864; no children. 
William Davis", b. Dec. 12, 1820; d. May, 1823. 
Harriet E. Davis^ b. Aug. 19, 1823; m. May 13, 1858, 
John Henderson; children: 

Sylvia Henderson, b. July, 1859; d. Jan. 1871. 
John Henderson, b. Nov. 11, 1861. 
Mary Morris Henderson, b. June 6, 1865. 
William C. Davis", b. Sept. 17, 1825; m. Margaret Had- 
ley, Feb. 18, 1864; children: 

Robert Morris Davis, b. April 13, 1865. 
Elizabeth Davis, b. Nov. 1, 1869. 
Charles Morris Davis', b. Jan. 28, 1828; m. June, 1856, 

Eliza Voorhies; no children. 
Alfred Davis", b. Sept. 5, 1831; m. Jan. 12, 1859, Fran- 
ces J. Swift; children: 

William Morris Davis b. Dec. 18, 1860. 
Edward G. Davis, b. Nov. 1, 1862. 
Henry Davis, b. Aug. 7, 1866. 
Sylvia C. Davis, b. Jan. 2, 1853. 

303. GEORGE W. MORRIS, 3d son of Benjamin (120), born 
at New Hartford, N. Y., Sept. — , 1799. Married in Dec, 1826. 
Eemoved to Bloomfield, Oakland Co., Mich., 1820, and to Benning- 
ton, Shiawassee Co., in 1865. Congregationalist and Republican. 
No children. 

304. HARRIET MORRIS, 1st daughter of Benjamin (120), 
born in New Hartford, N. Y., April, 1801. Married Dec. — , 



2,') 2 MORRIS FAMILY. 

1822, "William G. Stone, Vernon, Oneida Co. Removed to Mich- 
igan, Sept., 1833. Mr. Stone died Feb., 1858, aged 59. Children: 

512. Hakriet Stone'', b. Oct., 1824; m. Josephus Smith, Sept., 

1848, and died Sept., 1849, leaving a daughter. 

513. Emily Stone^ b. Sept., 182G; m. Alex. Wattles, Battle 

Creek, March, 1849. 

514. Caroline Stone'', b March, 1828; m. 1853, Pliny Smith, 

Grand Rapids. 

515. Irene Stone'', b. Aug., 1829 ; m. Jan., 1861, Josephus Smith, 

Troy, Mich. 

516. Julia Stone'', b. Dec, 1831; m. Sept., 1858, J. Sterling 

Bristol, Maple Rapids. 

517. Cornelia Stone'', b. Dec, 1833; m. Lewis Halloway, Lan- 

caster, Wis. 

518. William Jay Stone'', b. Dec, 1835. 

519. Mary Stone', b. Nov., 1837; m. Aug., 1857, George Tay, 

Detroit. 

520. Sarah Stone'', b. Jan., 1839; d. Nov., 1858. 

521. George Stone'', b. June, 1841; d. June, 1843. 

522. Edward Stone^ b. Oct., 1843; d. Jan., 1856. 

306. BENJAMIN B. MORRIS, 4th son of Benjamin (120), 
born at New Hartford, Sept. 21, 1804. Married, Aug., 1836, Mary 
Cox Morris, 3d daughter of Lewis Lee Morris, of Butternuts, 
Otsego County, N. Y., granddaughter of General Jacob Morris, 
and great-granddaughter of General Lewis Morris, signer of 
the Declaration of Independence. She died at Pontiac, Oakland 

County, Mich., June, 1850. Married 2d, Mrs. Abby S. , 

who died Aug. 19, 1881, aged 64, and was buried at Saratoga. 
Merchant. Lived at Pontiac, Mich., now — 1875 — lives in New- 
ark, N. J. Episcopalian. Republican. Children: 

Two sons died in early infancy. 

525. A daughter died aged four years. 

526. William Truxton'', b. June 19, 1846; Died at Geneva, 
N. y., March 18, 1880, aged 33. He had been a stockbroker in 
New York. 

300. BENJAMIN MORRIS, 2d son of John H. (121), born 
at Dudley, March 19. 1792. Died in Thompson, Feb. 21, 1822. 
Married, Deborah Richmond. Parmer. One child: 

527. Sarah'', b. ; d. . 



[third branch] sixth generation. 253 

310. MARY MORRIS, 2d daughter of John H. (121), born 
July 31, 1794; died Nov. 7, 1875. Married Arthur Tripp of 
Providence, R. I., Jan. 10, 1813. Children: 

528. Arthur Tripp\ b. Sept. 14, 1813. 

529. Edwin Tripp', b. Sept. 28, 1816. 

530. Elisha H. Tripp", b. Oct. 23, 1818. 

531. Mary K. Tripp^, b. Jan. 17, 1821. 

532. Benjamin M. Tripp^, b. May 15, 1823; d. March 7, 1824. 

533. Lucy P. Tripp', b. Nov. 12, 1825. 

534. George W. Tripp", b. Feb. 29, 1828; d. Sept. 1, 1829. 

535. Alfred H. Tripp^, b. Jan. 27, 1830. 

536. William P. Tripp\ b. March 18, 1832; d. Sept. 7, 1837. 
Arthur Tripp was born April 10, 1790, and died Dec. 11, 1834. 

This family lived in Killingly. 

312. JEDEDIAH MORRIS, 4th son of John H. (121), born 

Jan. 13, 1800. Died at , N. Y., April 9, 1841. Married 

Olive Congdon. Cotton carder and mill superintendent. Children: 

537. '', b.; d. in infancy. 

538. Frank'', b. ; d. young. 

539. Maria'', b. ; m. Swift, 

313. JOHN H. MORRIS, 5th son of John H. (121), born 
Jan. 10, 1802. Died in Illinois, Jan. 1, 1872. Farmer. Married 
Nancy Stanley. No children. 

316. GEORGE MORRIS, 6th son of John H. (121), born 
Jan. 30, 1809. Died in Oxford, Mass., June 14, 1862. Cot- 
ton carder and mill superintendent. Married Eliza Faulkner. 
Children: 

540. Sarah E.^, b. ; d. 

541. George E.^, b. 

542. Henry F.", b. 

543. William W.'', b. ; m. ; lives in Oxford. 

544. Ellen A.'', b. ; m. Henry Maffit of Oxford. 

328. SANFORD MORRIS, 1st son of Zebulon (124), born in 
Dudley, Sept. 14, 1798. Married, May 10, 1829, Polly Corbin of 
Dudley. She died May 12, 1836. Married 2d, Aug. 17, 1845, 
Mrs. Rachel Albee. Children: 



254 MORRIS FAMILY. 

BY FIRST WTFE. 

545. Mary Ann'', b. Feb. 5, 1830; m. B'rancis 0. Goddaixl, March 

9, 1873. 

546. Benjamin", b. Nov. 10, 1831; unmarried. 

547. Charles", b. Aug 26, 1833; unmarried. 

548. William", b. Nov. 8, 1835; d. Dec. 14, 1853. 



BY SECOND WIFE. 

Twins, b. Dec. 29, 1845. 



549. Sophia", 

550. Maria'', 

551. Mary Lucy', b. Nov. 23, 1847. 

552. Caroline'', b. Jan. 15, 1851. 

330. CLARISSA MORRIS, 2d daughter of Zebulon (124), 
born March 15, 1802. Married John Di'esser Thompson of Charl- 
ton, April 14, 1827. They had the following child I'en: 

553. Zebulon Morris Thompson'', b. Nov. 21, 1828. 

554. Maria Thompson'', b. Oct. 7, 1832. 

555. John Windsor Thompson'', b. April 21, 1834. 

Mr. John Dresser Thompson died, Sept. 29, 1839. Mrs. Clarissa 
(Morris) Thompson married John Webster, Nov. 8, 1840. They 
had one son. 

556. Henry Webster'', b. . He enlisted in the war for 

the defense of the Union, and died in the army. 

331. SCHUYLER MORRIS, 2d son of Zebulon (124). born 
in Dudley, Jan. 3, 1804. Died in Charlton, Jan. 26, 1870. 
Married, March 29, 1838, Susan Comins of Charlton. Farmer. 
Lived in Charlton. Universahst. Democrat. No children. 

332. ZEBULON MORRIS, 3d son of Zebulon (124), born in 
Dudley, Nov. 7, 1806. Died Aug. 22, 1882. Married, April 8, 
1829. Martha B. Congdon. Harness maker. Lived in Dudley. 
Children: 

557. Mary Congdon'', b. Feb. 22, 1830; m. Dr. Ambrose Eames. 

558. Andrew J.'', b. April 2, 1845. 

353. General WILLIAM LARNED MARCY, 2d son of 
Jedediah Marcy, Jun. (130), born at Southbridge, Mass., Dec. 12, 
1786. Died at Albany, N, Y., July 4, 1857. Mr. Marcy's educa- 
tion was begun in the common school, where he was considered a 




GENERAL WILLIAM L. MARCY. 



[thikd branch.] sixth generation. 255 

dull boy; but through the encouragement of a kind teacher he 
made such progress that his parents were induced to send him to 
the academy in Leicester, where he made favorable progress. 
While in Leicester he developed a strong taste for political affairs, 
which followed through and characterized his future hfe. His 
poHtical bias was strongly democratic. He wrote and delivered a 
Fourth of July oration strongly expressive of tliis inclination, 
which with more ardent discussions with his fellow students 
brought upon him the admonitions of the head of the academy. 
This had the effect to induce him to leave Leicester and enter the 
academy at Woodstock, where he finished his academical studies 
and entered Brown University, from which he was graduated with 
distinction in 1808. He settled in Troy, N. Y., where he studied 
law, was admitted to the bar, and began the practice of his pro- 
fession. When the war with England broke out, in 1812, he was 
a lieutenant of a military company in Troy, which volunteered for 
the defense of the country. While stationed at " French Mills," 
on Salmon River, in Northern New York, on the night of October 
22, 1812, Lieutenant Marcy was sent with a detachment to capture 
a party of Canadian militia, posted at St Regis. He led the 
attack; broke open the door of the block -house with his own hands. 
and captured the enemy. They were, it was reported, the first 
prisoners taken in the war. Lieutenant Marcy served through 
the war. In 1816 he was chosen recorder of the city of Troy. 
This was the beginning of his public life. He was still a Repub- 
lican, which was then the name of the Democratic party, and 
which they retained until about 1820, when the present name was 
more generally assumed. Governor DeWitt Clinton was chosen 
to his office as a "Republican," and Mr. Marcy had voted for and 
supported him as such ; but, becoming dissatisfied with his admin- 
istration, openly opposed him, and for his opposition was removed 
from his office. He became the editor of The Tmy Budget, a daily 
paper, and made it, by his ability as a political writer, a prominent 
organ of the Democratic party. In January, 1821, (jiovernor 
Yates appointed him Adjutant-General of the State militia. In 
February, 1823, he was elected by the Legislature Comptroller of 
the State, and he removed from Troy to make his residence in 
Albany. At this time the State had undertaken the construction 
and completion of the Erie and Champlain canals, and the State 
debt had largely increased, and it required talents of no ordinary 



256 MORRIS FAMILY. 

kind to manage the finances of the State. Mr. Marcy, however, 
met and overcame the difficulties of his position, and so skillfully- 
managed his office that no opposition was offered to his reelection 
in 1826. He introduced the system of collectino: tolls upon the 
canals, and accountability for the interest on the State funds, and 
prepared a plan for a sinking fund for the redemption of the State 
debt. He was early a friend and co-operator with Martin Van 
Buren in poHtical matters, and with Mr. Van Buren and others 
constituted that noted combination of politicians which, for so 
many years, controlled the political affairs of the State known as 
<' The Albany Regency." The method of making political nomi- 
nations had, until now, been controlled by the members of the 
Legislature and of Congress. This method was, by the " Regen- 
cy," changed to that of party conventions. By this new method 
of managing parties Mr. Van Buren, Mr. Marcy, and their friends 
defeated the friends of President John Quincy Adams in the elec- 
tion of 1828, and carried the State for General Jackson, and thus 
secured his election as President. On the 15th day of January, 
1829, in reward for his political services and in acknowledgment of 
his great ability, Mr. Marcy was chosen Associate Justice of the 
Supreme Court, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation 
of Judge "Woodworth. He filled the office with great impartiality 
and acknowledged ability. He was on the bench during the trial 
of the abductors of William Morgan, at Lockport, in 1830. The 
urbanity, firmness, and impartial decision made by Judge Marcy 
in this exciting trial, won for him the commendation of all parties. 
His duties, while on the bench, gave great satisfaction to his friends 
and the members of the bar. He resigned his j;idgeship in Jan- 
uary, 1831, for the purpose of forwarding the political aspirations 
of his friend, Mr. Van Buren, who, at this time, was secretary 
of state in the Cabinet of President Jackson, but was looking 
forward to the time when he should be his successor in the Presi- 
dential office. To effect this purpose Mr. Van Buren desired the 
presence of Judge Marcy in the United States Senate, to succeed 
Mr. Sanford, whose term as senator would expire on the 4th of 
March. Mr. Marcy was nominated for Senator in a caucus of the 
Democratic members of the Legislature, held Jan. 31, 1831. On 
being informed of this action of his political friends, he immedi- 
ately resigned his seat on the bench of the Supreme Court, and on 
the next day was chosen Senator. On taking his seat in the 



[third branch.] sixth generation. 257 

Senate, he was made Chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary 
and a member of the Committee on Finance. In tlie meantime 
Mr. Van Buren was appointed minister to England, and his 
appointment came up in the Senate for confirmation; the action 
on the case was wholly partisan, and Mr. Van Buren failed to be 
confirmed — a result which, it is claimed, as effecting the election 
of Mr. Van Buren as President. In the debate on the confirma- 
tion of Mr. Van Buren, Mr. Marcy strongly supported his friend. 
One sentence of his speech on this occasion has ever since been 
quoted as detrimental and contrary to honest politics and true 
statesmanship, viz.: "To the victor belongs the spoils of the 
enemy." The confirmation of Mr. Van Buren was strongly op- 
posed by Mr. Clay, and on the ground that Mr. Van Buren was 
responsible in a great measure for the great number of removals 
from office which had been made by the administration, and that 
the offices had been filled by its friends and partisans, a system of 
rewards for party services which had been introduced from New 
York by Mr. Van Buren. In reply Mr. Marcy said that the attack 
of Mr. Clay had gone beyond the nominee and had reached the 
State of New York. He said: "I know, sir, that it is the habit 
of some gentlemen to censure the politics of New York. Like 
other States, we have contests, and triumphs, and defeats. The 
State is large, with diversified interests; commerce in one section 
and agriculture and manufactures in others. We have men of 
enterprise and talents who aspire to public distinction, and it is 
natural to expect from these and other circumstances that politics 
should excite more interest at home and attract more attention 
abroad than those of many of the other States. 

'' It may be, sir, that the politicians of New York are not so 
fastidious as some gentlemen are as to disclosing the principles on 
which they act. They boldly preach what they practice, when 
they are contending for victory. They avow their intention of 
enjoying the fruits of it. If they are defeated, they expect to 
retire from office; if they are successful they claim, as a matter of 
right, the advantages of success. They see there is nothing wrong 
in the rule that to the victor belongs the spoils of the enemy." 

Mr. Marcy said further, "that the policy which the Senator 
from Kentucky had so strongly condemned had been put into 
practice before Mr. Van Buren had appeared on the public stage, 
33 



258 MORRIS FAMILY. 

and further, it liad been practiced by Mr. Clay's own political 
friends in New York, and tliat toleration and forbearance toward 
political opponents in office was beautiful in tlieory, but was never 
put in practice. He further charged Mr. Clay himself with having 
violated, while Secretary of State, the principle of toleration which 
he advocated, by withdrawing the patronage of the publication of 
the laws from newspapers which were not openly opposed, but 
were simply neutral in their position toward the administration of 
Mr. Adams." 

Mr. Marcy was not a polished speaker, but his speeches were 
pointed, close, and logical. His state papers were of the same 
character as his speeches ; he excelled as a writer. 

In the contest in Congi-ess over the re-chartering of the United 
States Bank Mr. Marcy agreed with President Jackson in his oppo- 
sition to the charter, and voted against it. 

His stay in the Senate was short. In 1832, he was elected Gov- 
ernor of New York by ten thousand majority over Francis Gran- 
ger. In 1834, he was reelected Governor by a majority of thirteen 
thousand over William H. Seward, then a young man of thirty- 
four years. In 1836, he was again reelected by a majority of 
nearly thirty thousand votes over Jesse Buel. He was a candidate 
for the fourth time in 1838, but was defeated by William H. 
Seward. 

He favored the annexation of Texas, and gave his support to 
Mr. Polk for President, and received the appointment of Secretary 
of War, and exhibited his administrative ability in conducting that 
department during the war with Mexico. In the adjustment of 
the Oregon boundary question with England he showed great di- 
plomatic power and ability as a statesman. 

He supported General Cass for President against General Taylor, 
and on the inauguration of the latter he retired to his home in 
Albany, and remained in private life until the election of General 
Pierce as President, when he was called to the department of state. 
In this position he greatly distinguished himself as a wise states- 
man in the case with Austria in sustaining Captain Ingraham of 
the navy in the question of Martin Koszta. When Mr. Buchanan 
became President, Mr. Marcy retired to private life. He died 
suddenly while engaged in reading, July 4, 1857, just four months 
after his retirement. 



[third BRANCn.] SIXTH GENERATION. 259 

General Marcy was above the ordinary height, stout and muscu- 
lar. His forehead, face, and eyes indicated a man of ability. His 
appearance generally was impressive; he possessed great self-con- 
trol, and was free from pretense, yet he had dignity of manners. 
Socially he was pleasant and attractive. He was twice married; 
his first wife was Dolly Newell, daughter of Captain Samuel New- 
ell of Southbridge; his second wife was Cornelia Knower, daugh- 
ter of Benjamin Knower of Albany, a strong personal and political 
fi'iend, and a man of great influence. 

The foregoing sketch is quoted mainly from Amidon's -'Histori- 
cal Collections.'' 



[THIRD BRANCH. I 

SEYEI^TH GE]^ERATI0:N". 



345. 0. MANLY MORRIS, 1st son of Rev. Ozias S. (181), 

born Dec. — , 1849. Married , 1874, Abbie French, Milton, 

111. Lives in Lathrop, Cal. Children: 

559. Emma M.«, b. 1880, in Cal. 

560. Leona", b. 1883, in Cal. 

346. ELLA E. MORRIS, 1st daughter of Rev. Ozias S. (181), 
born Aug, 1851. Married Nov. 12, 1872, C. H. Robinson of 
Providence, R. I. Children: 

561. MiXNiE R. RoBINsoN^ b. Oct. 4, 1873. 

562. Allie RoBI^-so^-^ b. March 14, 1876. 

347. ANNA R. MORRIS, 2d daughter of Rev. Ozias S. (181), 
born Sept., 1853. Married Sept. 7, 1880, C. L. Taylor of Holyoke, 
Mass. Children : 

563. Harry M. Taylor, b. Dec. 30, 1882. 

363. SAMUEL WELLS MORRIS, 1st son of Moses (192), 
born in Wethersfield, Nov. 15, 1827. Died in Newington, Sept. 8, 
1880. Married May 27, 1856, Jane H. Savage of Wethersfield. 
Farmer. Lived in Wethersfield. Children: 

564. Frank S.^, b. March 23, 1857; d. 

565. William S.^ b. July 19, 1858. 

566. Charles H.«, b. Sept. 9, 1859. 

567. Laura L.^, b. July 30, 1861; d. 

568. Harhiet E.^ b. Oct. 19, 1862; d. 

569. May J.", b. Sept. 27, 1864; d. 

570. John R.«, b. July 27, 1867; d. Aug. 7, 1870. 

364. FRANKLIN DAVIS MORRIS, 2d son of Moses (192), 
born in Wethersfield, Feb. 27, 1830. Married Dec. 25, 18§6, 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 261 

Martlia A. E. Greenwood. Blacksmith. Lives in Columbia, S. C. 
Children: 

571. Fanny^ b. 

572. Lydia*, b. 

365. Rev. JOHN MOSES MORRIS, 3d son of Moses (192), 
born in Wethersfield, April 27, 1837. Died at Washington, D. C, 
Nov. 27, 1873. 

In I860, he graduated from Yale College at the head of his 
class, delivering the valedictory. His classmates included William 
Walter Phelps, member of Congress from New Jersey, Marcus P. 
Knowlton, a distinguished lawyer and judge in Massachusetts, and 
Mason Young of Chicago. Among the noted collegians who 
were at Yale with him were Eugene Schuyler, Rev. Joseph H. 
Twichell, Professor Thomas R. Ijounsbury, Professor Franklin B. 
Dexter, Professor Peck, ex-United States Marshal John C. Kinney, 
and Joseph L. Shipley of The Springfield Unirn were also in col- 
lege with him, though not members of his class. After graduation 
he pursued a course of theological study, and was commissioned 
Chaplain of the Eighth Regiment, April 26, 1862. He was known 
as one of the fighting chaplains. He resigned September 29, 1863, 
after eighteen months' service. He engaged in preparing a history 
of Connecticut soldiers after the war, and Crofut & Morris's His- 
tory, which becomes more and more valuable as the years of the 
war recede from view, was the result of the undertaking. In 1865, 
he was elected assistant clerk of the Connecticut House of Repre- 
sentatives. In 1866 Mr. Morris M^as clerk. In 18G7, he was pro- 
moted to the clei'kship of the Senate. 

A few years later he became editor of the Charleston, S. C, 
Republican^ which he left to go to Washington, where he has 
remained, either as editor of the Chrofiide or as executive clerk in 
the United States Senate, occupying a position of responsibility. 
A number of instances of his personal courage and heroism might 
be related, but only a couple need be mentioned. He was with 
his command at Antietam, and early in the engagement was 
wounded in the arm. It was thought best that he should retire 
from the field, but he persisted in remaining, remarking that he 
should stay with the men, sharing with them the dangers and per- 
ils of the day. With the wounded arm suspended across his 
breast he remounted, and remained at what he considered his post 



2G2 MORUIS FAMILY. 

of duty through the long and fearful carnage that prevailed from 
sunrise until nightfall on the field at Antietam. From that time 
until his resignation during the fall of 1863 he was the idol of his 
men. At Fredericksburg he was one of the forlorn hope engaged 
in laying the pontoon bridge across the Rappahannock in front of 
the city, under a disastrous rebel fire. Volunteers were called for 
the work, and Chaplain Morris was one of the first to offer his ser. 
vices in the perilous mission. The confederate soldiery were 
entrenched in cellars and rifle pits along the river bank on the 
Fredericksburg side, and received the band of Union heroes with 
a destructive fire, repeUing them at first with severe loss. But 
they gallantly returned to the task under the protection of the 
Union artillery, and succeeded at length in completing the bridge. 
General Burnside made his advance and retreat over this structure. 
Chaplain Morris seldom if ever referred to his services in the field, 
bfilliant and meritorious though they were. He rendered them 
because it was in his heart, and the heroism there was bound to 
manifest itself in some way. He was a man of broad, earnest 
Christianity, and his career as chaplain of the Eighth was in every 
way consistent with the noblest piety and faith. One night during 
the encampment of the Connecticut brigade under General Edward 
Harland of Norwich, at Pleasant Valley in Maryland, a couple of 
weeks or so after the battle at Antietam, he was visiting some old 
Wethersfield friends in the Sixteenth regiment, and the conversa- 
tion drifted towards the question concerning what effect the army 
life would have on the morals and manners of young men. Chap- 
lain Morris, with that charming earnestness and sincerity which 
always characterized his intercourse with friends and companions, 
assured the young men around him that the army life need not of 
itself diminish in any degree the courtesy, the kindness, the good 
manners and good morals which had been developed in their lives 
at home. The talk possessed a singular fascination, and is remem- 
bered to tliis day with delight by one at least who listened to it. 
And what Chaplain Morris said there that night under the stars, 
cheering and helping a half dozen fellow townsmen, if young men 
18 or 19 years of age could be spoken of in that way, he preached 
in his daily life and intercourse with hundreds of veteran troops. 

His death was the occasion ot deep bereavement to thousands of 
hearts which had learned to love him, and though twelve years 
have passed since his work was completed, the remembrance of 



[third branch.] seventh ge::eration. 263 

him is still bright and helpful. He was a man of superb intellect, 
and an able orator. Had his life been spared he would have won 
a foremost place in the State. 

He died of consumption, and was buried at Cedar Hill cemetery 
in Hartford. Post No. 66 of the Grand Army of the Republic at 
AVethersfield is named for him. Married Dec. 31, 1863, Augusta 
Elizabeth Griswold of Wethersfield. Children: 

573. Arthur Franklin'', b. July 29, 1865; d. Aug. 21, 1866. 

574. Emily', b. Jan. 11, 1872; d. Sept. 15, 1873. 

366. Lieutenant CHARLES WILLIAM MORRIS, 1st son 
of Commodoi'e Charles (201) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born, 
Sept. 5, 181 5, at Jamaica Plain, Roxbury. Mass. He was appointed 
midshipman in the United States Navy, Sept. 12, 1829 ; passed 
midshipman, July 3, 1835; lieutenant, Feb. 25, 1841. During the 
war with Mexico, in 1846, he was engaged in an expedition against 
Tobasco. When in Tobasco River, "and in a boat under a flag of 
truce, going to the a'ssistance of a brother ofiicer, he was sliot in 
the neck and mortally wounded. He was taken to Center Ligado, 
where he shortly after died, Nov. 1st, on the flag-ship of the 
squadron. He married, Sept. 3, 1840, Caroline, daughter of Rich- 
ard and Jane Devens of Charlestown, Mass. Children: 

575. Caroline', b. Oct. 5, 1841, in Charlestown. 

576. Charles', b. May 3, 1844, in Charlestown. 

367. HARRIET BOWEN MORRIS, 1st daughter of Com- 
modore Charles (2Ul) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born April 8, 
1817, in Providence, R. I. Married, Sept. 30, 1841, James S. 
Ringold, M.D., surgeon in the United Statee Navy. He was born 
in 1810, at Charlestown, Md., and died Dec. 27, 184 4, without 
children. Married 2d, Feb. 28, 1854, Richard Hoffman Coolidge, 
M.D., surgeon in the United States Array. He was born at Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y., March 10, 1820. He was appointed assistant sur- 
geon, Aug. 10, 1841 ; major and surgeon, June 23, 1860 (lieuten- 
ant-colonel and medical inspector, June 11, 1862, to Oct. 31, 1865). 
Brevet rank : — brevet Ueuten ant-colonel, March 13, 1865, for faith- 
ful and meritorious services during the war. Pie died Jan. 23, 
1866. By a former marriage he had two children: 

Catherine Alice Coolidge, b. Sept. 25, 1845; d. Dec. 19, 

1867. 
Helen Elizabeth Coolidge, b. May 15, 1850. 



264 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Mrs. Coolidge lives in Washington. The compiler is indebted 
to her for much information in regard to her fatlier's family. 

368. LOUISE AM(3RY MORRIS, 2d daughter of Com- 
modore Charles (201) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born Dec. 
19, IS 18, at Providence, R. 1. Died, Nov. 21, 1840, in George- 
town, D. C. Married. Dec. 23, 1835, William Wilson Corcoran. 
Children: 

577. Harriet Louise Corcoran", b. Sept. 22, 1836, at George- 

town; d. Sept. 5, 1837, at Charlestown, Mass. 

578. Louise Morris Corcoran^, b. March 20, 1838. 

579. Charles Morris Corcoran'', b. July 16, 1840; d. Aug. 11, 

1841, at Georgetown. 

The name of William Wilson Corcoran, like that of George Peabody, 
whose intimate personal friend he was, will go down to posterity as that 
of one of the greatest benefactors to his race to which the American 
Republic has given birth. His father, Thomas Corcoran, emigrated from 
Ireland and came to this country in 1783. He seitled at Georgetown 
while Washington was a country gentleman at Mount Vernon, before he 
was called to the presidency. His son William was born at Georgetown, 
Dec. 27, 1798, and, after receiving the meagre education which was avail- 
able in those early times, was placed in a humble position in a dry goods 
store. He soon attracted the attention of Gen. John Mason, the President 
of the Georgetown Bank, who gave him a position as a clerk in the bank. 
He proved an apt student in the science of finance, and, after serving 
three years in Mason's bank, was transferred to the branch Bank of the 
United States, which was opposite the Treasury Building. Here he gained 
the confidence of the President so thoroughly that, upon the suspension 
of the Georgetown Bank, he was delegated to dispose of the real estate 
which the United States Bank, as a creditor, was obliged to take. He 
served with great efhciency in the United States Bank until the final dis- 
solution of that institution. Then he opened a modest banking-house 
nearly on the spot where Jay Cooke & Co. closed their doors about three 
years ago. His business was moderately successful, and he was enabled 
to save a small capital, with which, in 1837, he formed the partnership of 
Corcoran & Riggs, his partner being a sou of Elisha Riggs, the partner of 
George Peabody. His business method and fine manners and appearance 
gained him the supjiort of Elisha Riggs, who contributed largely to the 
capital of the new firm, and business was begun under the best of auspices. 
Two years previous to the founding of this firm, whose name is now 
world-wide, Mr. Corcoran was married to Miss Louise Amory Morris, a 
daughter of Commodore Charles Morris, and a lady of marked personal 
charms, united with accomplishments of no common order. Their brief 
married life, which was very happy, was terminated by the death of Mrs. 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 265 

Corcoran in 1840, at the early age of twenty-three, leaving a son, who 
died soon after, and a daughter, Louise Corcoran. This was a sad blow 
to the now rising banker, and he commemorated his wife afterward by 
bestowing her name on one of the noblest of his many public chanties. 

In 1841, the Government was seriously embarrassed in its finances, and 
its income was not sufficient to meet its expenses. "Walter Forward, Sec- 
retar\- of the Treasury, after several vain attempts to raise money at home, 
went abroad to effect a loan, but was forced to return without accomplish- 
ing his object. Daniel Webster, an intimate friend of Mr. Corcoran, was 
then Secretary of State, and through him the firm of Corcoran & Riggs 
offered in this crisis to take a Government loan of $5,000,000. at 101. The 
offer was accepted by the Secretary of the Treasury, and the loan was, 
from the beginning, a success. Had it been otherwise, Mr. Corcoran's 
whole capital would have been absorbed by the expenses of advertising 
and negotiating. The profit on the loan and other resulting receipts 
enabled Corcoran & Riggs to establish a credit at home and abroad which 
was never shaken in the most calamitous times, in war or peace, and a 
prestige which still continues, twenty-eight j'ears after the retirement of 
Mr. Corcoran, This was the beginning of the colossal fortune amassed 
by the house, but its great opportunity came with the outbreak of the 
^Mexican war, in 1846. Robert J. Walker, Secretary of the Treasury, gave 
to Mr. Corcoran the Government loans to negotiate. He went to London 
to place a large loan on the market there. It was a hazardous experiment 
at that time, as the repudiation of their debts by several of the States was 
still fresh in the minds of capitalists. But Mr. Corcoran was warmly 
welcomed by George Peabody and the Barings, and through their friend- 
ship and kind offices he was enabled to place a loan of about ^40,000,000 
on the London market. How much the house made in these transactions 
between 1840 and 1849 it is impossible to guess, but the profits were enor- 
mous, and the result showed that Mr. Corcoran was capable of transacting 
his business on the largest scale. 

Having made his money in Washington, Mr. Corcoran determined to 
spend it in Washington, where he could control his investment and benefit 
his neighbors. The city was then a beggarl}- place of about 80,000 inhab- 
itants, and the lots which the Government acquired by division with the 
owners of the soil were being sold at auction, with few or no takers. A 
building lot at the present time, in almost any part of the city, will bring 
$3,000, but at the time when Mr. Corcoran bought there are found sales 
of thirty-six lots for $126 in all. He purchased in the West End of the 
city, near the Executive Mansion, where wealth and fashion were certain 
to concentrate, and he also bought several of the neighboring farms, and 
nursed them for years. One of these, called "Trinidad," he afterward 
presented to the Protestant University, and another, which he named 
" Harewood," was purchased a few years ago for $200,000, and the money 
turned over to the Corcoran Galler}'. ilr. Corcoran's investments were 
all judicious, and large as were his profits in the banking business, it is 
safe to say that they were quadrupled in his real estate transactions. In 
34 



2G6 MOUHIS FAMILY. 

1852 be retired from tlie firm of Corcoran & Riggs, one of the wealthiest 
gentlemen in the Republic, and has devoted his lime, like bis friend Peu- 
bodj-, ever since to doing good with the fortune which he had acquired. 
His private charities were numberless, and thousands of young men and 
deserving ladies carry their record graven on grateful hearts. The history 
of these can never be written, but his public acts of benevolence will 
render his name immortal in the annals of the American licpublic. 

The most noted of the monuments which he has erected to his memory 
is the Corcoran Art Galleiy, which stands just opposite the War Depart- 
ment Building at Pennsylvania Avenue and Seventeenth Street. Its pro- 
jector had a great taste for art, and delighted in the company of artists, 
and be determined to establish a gallery at his own expense which should 
be a credit to his native land. The building is fire proof. It was begun 
in 1859, is constructed of brick dressed with freestone, and cost $600,000. 
It is in the style of the Renaissance, 124A feet long and 104 feet wide. Be- 
fore it was finished the civil war broke out, and Mr. Corcoran, whose 
sympathies inclined toward the South in that struggle, left the country 
and went to Europe, where he remained until hostilities ceased. His 
friends claim that he never had sectional feelings, and that his journey to 
Europe was induced by declining years, aversion to seeing his neighbors 
at warfare, and particularly by the exile of his grandchildren, whose 
mother, his only daughter, had married George Eustis of Louisiana, an 
ex-Congressman and the secretary of Slidell, the Confederate emissarj^ to 
England. However this maybe, his absence was construed into hostility 
to the Government, and the Quartermaster-General seized the unfinished 
art building and occupied it as an office. Mr. Corcoran's house, opposite 
the Executive Mansion, would have been confiscated also, but for its 
prompt occupation by the French Minister, who claimed that he had 
rented it. At the close of the war Mr. Corcoran returned, and the Art 
Gallery was completed. Mr. Corcoran removed to it his own private col- 
lection, valued at $100,000, including the original " Greek Slave" which 
made Power's reputation, endowed it with !};9flO,000, and then presented 
it to the Government, on Washington's Birthday, 1872. Since then, in 
addition to this princely endowment, he has added many famous paintings 
and pieces of sculpture to the collection, paying for them out of his private 
purse. The gallery now has an income of neai'ly $60,000 a year, and 
already contains the finest collection of casts from the antique in this 
ccmntry. Not the least valuable portion of the collection is a portfolio of 
1,800 engraved portraits by St. Menin and Valdemont, two French noble- 
men who came to America in 1793, and from that time to 1806 made like- 
nesses of nearly all the prominent persons in the Aiiantic States. 

Simultaneously with the endowment of the Art Gallery Mr. Corcoran 
erected and endowed the " Louise Home," by an expenditure of $400,000. 
The Home is named after his deceased wife and dauiihler, and is for the 
use of "ladies wlio liave seen better days." In this beautiful retreat from 
the storms of ill-fortune 40 ladies find a delightful home. Among them 
are widows of naval ollicers, of eminent clergymen, and of lawyers, with 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 267 

daughters of prominent merchants of a former generation, and of planters, 
orphaned and made homeless by the late civil war. The Home is in Mas- 
sachusetts Avenue, between Fifteenth and Sixteenth streets, on elevated 
ground, surrounded by gardens and commanding a wide view of the city 
and the wooded heights to the northward, with the full sweep of the 
Potomac to Fort Washington. The endowment fund to this magnificent 
charity is $250,000. Not long after the erection of this Home Mr. Corco- 
ran endowed Columbian College with the valuable and beautiful estate of 
Trinidad, in the immediate environs of Washington. He gave also to the 
Protestant Orphan Asylum the large estate in Fourteenth Street on which 
their present edifice stands, and to Columbian University its Medical Hall 
on H street. Toward the erection of the new Church of the Ascension on 
Massachusetts Avenue he contributed $80,000. To his native town of 
Georgetown he presented the beautiful cemetery of Oak Hill. This cem- 
etery is situated on the Heights, and for beauty of situation and taste in 
adornment challenges comparison with any in the world. It has been ex- 
tended until, from the original ten acres, it now embraces thirty, and 
within the inclosure rest the bodies of Chief-Justice Chase, Secretary 
Stanton, and many more of the Nation's distinguished dead. Since 1865, 
when he returned from Europe, Mr. Corcoran's life has been devoted to 
giving of his wealth to the needy. His donations to the University of Vir- 
ginia amount to $80,000, and he has also given largely to the College of 
William and Mary, the Virginia Military Institute, Washington and Lee 
University, and the Virginia Theological Seminary of the Episcopal 
Church. It is estimated that in the last ten years he has given at least 
$3,000,000 for the benefit of his fellow-men. 

Mr. Corcoran has not been activel}^ engaged in any business since his re- 
tirement from the banking-house of Corcoran & Riggs, in 1854. He has 
lived to acquire a fortune, enjoj^ it, distribute it, and make his peace with 
all ranks and parties of men. He is a man of genial disposition, and has 
always been a welcome addition to any society. At his hospitable table in 
Washington Presidents and their Cabinets have been entertained, and vis- 
itors to the city have evinced quite as much eagerness to penetrate to his 
house as to enjoy the hospitality of the Executive Mansion. In appearance 
he is large and straight, corpulent, but not gro.ssly so. He has a beauti- 
fully clear skin, fine liquid eyes, and luxuriant white hair, which covers 
every part of his head. He dresses like a gentleman in polite life, carries 
a gold-headed cane, and always wears gloves in the street. He has the 
reputation of being the neatest old man in Washington. — iV". Y. Times, 
July 12, 1880. 

Mr. Corcoran was 87 years old Dec. 28, 1885. The following 
notice is from a paper of the next day : 

"Sunday was Banker AV. W. Corcoran's 87th birthday, and there was 
such a stream of distinguished callers at his house that he couldn't get to 
church. Among them were Historian Bancroft, Secretary Bayard, Secre- 



268 MORRIS FAMILY. 

tary Endicott, and Senator Eustis. Telegrams of congratulation from all 
over the countrj^ even from San Francisco, and several from Europe, 
were received in the course of the day. Miss Cleveland sent with her 
compliments an urn-shaped basket of roses and orchids from the White 
House. Mr. Corcoran was a year old when Washington died, and he has 
seen and remembered every President since Washington. To one who 
Sunday expressed a friendly hope that he might outlive the century he 
said: ' If I do I shall have lived in three centuries.'" 

369. ELIZABETH AMORY MORRTS, 3d daughter of Com- 
modore Charles (201) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born March 2, 
1821, at Portsmouth Navy-yard, N. H. Married June 15, 1847, 
Jolin L. Fox, M.D., of HolHs, N. H., surgeon U. S. Navy. He 
was born in Salem, Mass., Jan. 8, 1811. He was appointed Assist- 
ant Surgeon U. S. N., Feb. 9, 1837; Passed Assistant Surgeon, 
June 6, 1842, and Surgeon Aug. 16, 1847. He died Dec. 17, 1864. 
Children : 

580. Charles E. Fox", b. Sept. 20, 1851; lieutenant U. S. navy. 

581. William H. Fox^ b. Nov. 18, 1857. 

582. Helen Louise Fox^ b. March 16, 1848; d. Oct. 26, 1854. 
582^. Elizabeth Morris Fox^ b. Jan. 24, 1853; d. Oct. 11, 1880. 

371. Colonel ROBERT MURRAY MORRIS, 2d son of Com- 
modore Charles (201) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born May 12, 
1824, at Washington, D. C. He entered the U. S. Military Acad- 
emy at West Point, and was graduated in 1842. He was appointed 
2d Lieutenant of Mounted Rifles, May 27, 1846; Brevet 1st Lieu- 
tenant "for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battle of Con- 
treras, Aug. 20, 1847." He commanded his company and was 
breveted captain "for gallant and meritorious conduct in the bat- 
tle of Chepultepec, Sept. 13, 1847 "; appointed 1st lieutenant June 
8, 1848, captain June 14, 1858, major brevet Feb. 21, 1862, "for 
gallant and meritorious conduct in the battle of Valverde, New 
Mexico, March 11th"; Major 6th Cavalry, March 11, 1863; Brevet 
Lieutenant-Colonel, March 31, 1865, "for gallant and meritorious 
service in the battle of Dinwiddie Court House, Va." He was 
retired Feb. 21, 1873. Unmarried in 1880. 

372. WILLIAM BOWEN MORRIS, M.D, 3d son of Com- 
modore Charles (201) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born March 4, 
1S26, in Washington, D. C. Died in Charlestown, Mass., March 
it;, l,s7.S. Ihimarried. 




COMMANDER GEORGE U. MORRIS. 



[thikd branch.] seventh generation. 269 

Dr. Morris was graduated from Brown University in 1846. He 
received his degree of M. D. from Harvard University in 1849, 
and settled in Charlestown for the practice of his profession. He 
obtained a higli reputation, especially with the officers of the navy. 
He had very pleasing manners, and was popular with a wide circle 
of friends. 

373. MARIA LEAR MORRIS, 5th daughter of Commodore 
Charles (201) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born May 31, 1828, at 
Charlestown Navy-yard, Mass. Married May 26, 1847, Rev. Thomas 
Duncan of Washington, D. C, a native of Philadelphia, and for 
some years a resident of Louisiana. Now, 1886, is living at 
Elyria, 0. Episcopalian. Children: 

583. Murray Morris Duncan", b. May 10, 1858, at Washington. 
684. William Stephen Duncan**, b. Dec. 9, 1859; d. Dec. 9, 
1876 — his 17th birthday. 

585. Louis Duncan", b. March — , 1861. 

586. Richard Coolidge Duncan", b. Dec. 10, 1868. 

Louis Duncan was appointed midshipman, from Kentucky, Sept. 
11, 1876. He is now ensign. 

374. Commander GEORGE UPHAM MORRIS, 4th son of 
Commodore Charles (201) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born at 
Charlestown Navy yard, Mass., June 12, 1830. Died of consump- 
tion at Jordan, Alum Springs, Va., Sunday, Aug. 15, 1875. 
Married, August, 1857, Martha Thorburn, daughter of Captain 
Robert D. Thorburn, United States Navy, of Fredericksburg, Va, 
She died Feb. 18, 1858, aged 24. Married 2d, July 2, 1864, Miss 
Mary C Steele, daughter of Franklin Steele of St. Paul, Minn., a 
lady of exceeding grace of manners and dignity of character. 
She is still a resident of Washington. Commander Morris was 
about five feet and ten inches in height, with an erect and rather 
slender figure. His hair was dark brown, his eyes hazel, and his 
complexion naturally fair. His manners were graceful and pleas- 
ing, and he was a favorite in society. He was appointed midship- 
man, Aug. 14, 1846, from New York; passed midshipman, June 
8, 1852; master, Sept. 15, 1855; lieutenant, Sept. 16, 1855; lieu- 
tenant-commander, July 16, 1862, and commander, July 25, 1866. 
He served on the coast of Mexico, during the war with that 
country, in 1846-7, and in squadrons in the Pacilic. During the 



270 MOKKIS FAMILY. 

first year of the rebellion he was assigned to the sloop Cumherland, 
and served with the North Atlantic blockading squadron. When 
the navy-yard at Gosport was destroyed by Union officers to pre- 
vent the vast amount of material stored there from falling into 
the hands of the rebels, several ships of war were burned, one of 
them being the Merrimac. The "Cumberland" was there, but was 
brought away in safety. After the taking of Norfolk by the 
rebels, the hull of the " Merrimac " was converted into the iron- 
clad ram of that name, made famous by the following described 
event, and the subsequent battle with the like famous Monitor: 
On the 8th of March, 1862, while the "Cmnberland" was at 
anchor off Newport News, and under the temporary command of 
Lieutenant Morris, she was attacked by the " Merrimac," and after 
an engagement, the most singular in the history of naval warfare, 
went down with her colors flying. 

The "Cumberland" was known to have the heaviest ordnance 
in the fleet, and the Confederate commodore, for that reason, 
determined to capture or sink her before she could injure the 
" Merrimac " with her heavy guns. The following accounts of this 
celebrated action are taken from the matter presented to Congress: 
Starting from Norfolk about 11 a.m. the Merrimac steamed 
down the Elizabeth River and across Hampton Roads towards 
Newport News, heading directly for the "Cumberland." Passing 
the Congress she gave her a broadside, which was promptly re- 
turned by that vessel, and kept on for the "Cumberland." As 
the " Merrimac " approached she was received with a full broad- 
side from the "Cumberland's" heavy guns, which would have 
sunk a wooden vessel. The effect of that broadside settled the 
fate of the " Cumberland." Everything outside of the Merrimac's 
shield was shot away — boats, anchors, chains, were swept away; 
but against the inclined iron roof, that covered the ship itself, the 
heavy shot of the "Cumberland" fell as rubber balls against a 
brick wall, glancing off and ricochetting into the water. Two 
shots from the "Cumberland," however, entered the ports of the 
"Merrimac" as her guns were run out for firing, and they disa- 
bled two guns and killed two men and wounded nineteen. The 
" Merrimac " came on under a full head of steam, and running 
for the fated ship rammed her iron prow into the bow of the 
"Cumberland" below the water line. Lieutenant Commander 
Morris (in the absence of Captain Radford on court-martial 



[third branch.] sevexth generation. 271 

duty) at once took in the situation, and met the emergency with 
a coolness, courage, and jiidgment that stamped him the hero of 
that day. He knew full well there was no escape for his ship. 
The " Cumberland " was a sailer; the " Merrimac " was a steamer. 
He must either surrender or sink. To surrender his wooden 
ship, already gored by the prow and perforated by the shot of 
his invulnerable adversary, involved no dishonor. It would have 
been justified by all the rules of war and by any coiu't -martial. 
But Morris knew that if he surrendered the "Cumberland," the 
noble ship and her heavy armament would fall into the hands of 
the enemy; the "Cumberland" would be at once towed up to 
Norfolk, there to be refitted and come out a second ''^Merrimac." 
Better that she should sink, she and the five hundred men that 
were in her. And so, when called on by the Confederate com- 
modore to surrender and avoid useless loss of life, the reply of 
Morris was: "I'll sink alongside, but I'll never surrender." If 
he could not save his ship for the Union, he would at least save 
her from the enemy. He would fight her to the last and go down 
with her. In this resolve he was seconded by his brave officers 
and men, and the " Cumberland " fought on while she sunk, 
firing her guns as long as they were above water, untD finally 
the good ship was engulfed in sixty feet of water, but her flag 
still flew at the peak, " the emblem of the bravest, most daring, 
and yet most hopeless defense that has ever been made by any 
vessel belonging to any navy in the world." Such was the 
heroism of these men that it challenged the admiration of their 
adversaries, extorted cheers from the crews of the Confederate 
vessels, and received their applause in the official reports of their 
officers. Over one hundred men went down and perished with 
the ship; but the survivors had not yet finished the glorious 
record of that day. Not content with the services they had 
rendered on board the "Cumberland," as soon as they reached 
the shore they volunteered to serve the land batteries, and did 
efficient service in that capacity, preventing the enemy from haul- 
ing off and capturing the " Congress," which had gone ashore. 

ACCOUNT OF THE FIGHT. 

[From the Baltimore American. — Moore's Rebellion Record, 18G2, vol. 4, 

pp. 273-4. 
The "]Meirimac" made her appearance, coming out from Elizabeth 
River about uoon on Saturday. She stood directly across the roads toward 



272 MORIUS FAMILY. 

Newport News. As soon as she was mude out and her direction ascer- 
tained, the crews were beat to quarters on both the " Cumberhiud "' and 
"Congress," and preparations made for what was felt to be an almost 
hopeless fight, but the determination to make it as desperate as possible. 
The "Merrimac" kept straight on, making, according to the best esti- 
mates, about eight miles an hour. As she passed the mouth of Nanse- 
nioiul River the "Cumberland" threw the first shot at her, which was 
immediately answered. The "Merrimac" passed the "Congress" dis- 
ciiarging a broadside at her (one shell from which killed and disabled 
every man except one at gun No. 10), and kept on toward the " Cumber- 
land, which she approached at full speed, striking her on the port side 
near the bow, her stem knocking port No. 1 and the bridle port into one, 
Avhilst the ram cut the " Cumberland " under water. Almost at the 
moment of collision the " Merrimac" discharged from her forward gun an 
eleven-inch shell. This shell raked the whole gun-deck, killing ten men 
at gun No. 1, among whom was Master's Mate John Harrington, and cut- 
ting off both arms and legs of Quarter gunner Wood. The water rushed 
in from the hole made below, and in five minutes the ship began to sink 
by the head. Shell and solid shot from the " Cumberland " were rained 
on the " Merrimac" as she passed ahead, but the most glanced harmlessly 
from the incline of her iron-plated bomb-roof. As the "Merrimac" 
rounded to and came up she again raked the "Cumberland" with heavy 
fire. At this fire sixteen men at gun No. 10 were killed or wounded, and 
were all subsequently carried down in the sinking ship. Advancing with 
increased momentum, the "Merrimac " struck the " Cumberland" on the 
starboard side, smashing her upper works and cutting another hole below 
the water-line. The ship now began to rapidly settle, and the scene 
became most horrible. The cockpit was filled with the wounded whom 
it was impossible to bring up. The forward magazine was under water, 
but powder was still supplied from the after magazine, and the firing kept 
steadily up by men who knew that the ship was sinking under them. 
They worked desperately and unremittingly, and amid the din and horror 
of the conflict gave cheers for their flag and the Union, which were joined 
in by the wounded. The decks were slippery with blood, and arms and 
legs and chunks of flesh were strewed about. The " Merrimac" laid off 
at easy point-blank range, discharging her broadsides alternatelj' at the 
" Cuml)erland " and the "Congress." The water by this time reached the 
berth or main gun-deck, and it was felt hopless and useless to continue 
the light longer. The word was given for each man to save himself, but 
after this order gun No. 7 was fired when the adjoining gun, No. 6, was 
actually under water. This last shot was fired by an active little fellow 
named Matthew Tenney, whose courage had been conspicuous throughout 
the action. As his port was left open by the recoil of the gun, he jumped 
to scramble out, but the water rushed in with so much force that he was 
washed back and drowned. When the order was given to cease firing, 
and to look out for their safetj^ in the best way possible, numbers scam- 
pered through the port-holes, while others reached the spar-deck by the 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 273 

companion-ways. Some were incapable to get out by either of these 
measures, and were carried down by the rapidly sinking sliip. Of those 
who reached the upper decli some swam off to tlie tugs that came out 
from Newport News. The "Cumberland" sank in water nearl}^ to her 
cross-trees. J^he went down with her flag still flying, and it still flies from 
the mast above the water that overwhelmed her, a memento of the bravest, 
most daring, and yet most hopeless defense that has ever been made by 
any vessel belonging to any navy in the world. The men fought with 
a courage that could not be excelled. There was no flinching, no thought 
of surrender. 

[From Frank Moore's Rebellion Record, Vol. IV, Doc. 82, page 272.] 

EXTRACT FROM STATEMENT OF A. B. SMITH, PILOT OP THE UNITED 
STATES SHIP "CUMBERLAND." 

On Saturday morniug, the United States frigate CatniieHand h\y off in 
the roads at Newport News about three hundred yards from the shore, the 
Omgress being two hundred yards south of us. The morning was mild 
and pleasant, and the day opened without any noteworthj" incident 
About 11 o'clock a dark looking object was discovered coming round 
Craney Island, through Norfolk Channel, and proceeding straight in our 
direction. It was instantly recognized as the Merrimac. We had been on 
the lookout for her for some time, and were as well prepared then as we 
could have been at any other time, or as we have been during the last six 
months. 

As she came plowing through the water right onward toward our port 
bow, she looked like a huge, half-submerged crocodile. Her sides seemed 
of solid iron, except where two guns pointed from the narrow ports, and 
rose slantingly from the water like the roof of a house, or arched back of 
a tortoise. Probably the extreme height of the apex from the water's 
edgfi, perpendicularly, was ten feet. At her prow I could see the iron 
ram projecting straight forward, somewhat above the water's edge, and 
apparently a mass of iron. Small boats were slung or fastened to her 
sides, and the rebel flag floated from one staff, while a pennant was fixed to 
another at the stern. There was a smoke-stack or pipe near lier middle, 
and she was probably a propeller, no side-wheels or machincr}' being vis- 
ible. She is probably covered with railroad iron. 

Immediately on the appearing of the ".Merrimac," the command was 
given to make ready for instant action; all hands were ordered to their 
places, and the " Cumberland " was sprung across the channel, so that her 
broadside would bear on the "Merrimac." The armament we could 
bring to bear on the " Merrimac " was about eleven 9 and 10 inch Dahlgren 
guns, and two pivot guns of the same make. The gunners were at their 
posts, and we waited eagerly for her approach within range. She came 
up at the rate of four or five knots per hour. When the " Merrimac " 
arrived within about a mile, we opened on her with our pivot guns, and 
as soon as we could bear upon her, our whole broadside commenced; still 
35 



274 MORRIS FAMILY. 

she came on, the balls bouncinjr upon her mailed sides like India rubber, 
apparently making not the least impression, except to cut off her flagstiiff 
and thus bring down the Confederate colors. None of her crew ventured 
at that time on her outside to replace them, and she fought, thenceforward, 
with only her pennant flying. She appeared to obey her helm, and be 
very readily handled, making all her movements and evolutions with 
apparent facility and readiness. 

We had probably fired six or eight broadsides, when a shot was received 
from one of her guns which killed five of our marines. It was impossible 
for our vessel to get out of her way, and the "Merrimac" soon crushed 
her iron horn or ram into the "Cumberland" just starboard the main 
chains, under the bluff of the port bow, knocking a hole in the side near 
the water line, as large as the head of a hogshead, and driving the vessel 
back upon her anchors with great force. The water came rushing into 
the hold. The " Merrimac " then backed out and discharged her guns at 
us, the shot passing through the main bay and killing five sick men. The 
water was all the while rushing in the hole made by the ram, so that in 
five minutes it was up to the sick-bay on the berth-deck. In the mean- 
time her broadsides swept our men away, killed and maimed, and also set 
our vessel on tire in the forward part. The fire was extinguished. I can- 
not tell how many were wounded. The sick-bay, berth-deck, and gun- 
deck were almost literally covered with men killed and wounded, but the 
surviving ones still fought well, and every one, oflicers and men, displayed 
the utmost heroism. 

The fight lasted about three-fourths of an hour, the " Cumberland " firing 
rapiitly, and all the time the water pouring in the hold, and by and by the 
ports, as her bow kept sinking deeper and deeper. Near the middle of 
the fight, when the berth-deck of the "Cumberland" had sunk below 
water, one of the crew of the " Merrimac " came out of a port to the out- 
side of lier iron-plated roof, and a ball from one of our guns instantly cut 
him in two. That was the last and only rebel that ventured within sight, 
the rest remaining in their safe, iron-walled inclosure. 

We fired constantly, and the "Merrimac" occasionally, but every shot 
told upon our wooden vessel and brave crew. Her guns being without the 
least elevation, pointed straight at us along the surface of the water, and 
her nearness, she being much of the time within three hundred yards, 
made it an easy matter to send each ball to its exact mark. Probablj' her 
guns would be useless at a considerable distance, as it appears impossible 
to elevate them. Finally, after about three-fourths of an hour of the most 
severe fighting, our vessel sank, the stars and stripes still waving. That 
flag was finally submerged, but after the hull grounded on the sands, fifty- 
four feet below the surface of the water, our pennant was still flying from 
the topmast above the waves. None of our men were captured, but 
many were drowned as the vessel went down. We had tibout four hun- 
dred on board, and I suppo.-<e from one hundred and fifty to two hundred 
were killed during the engagement and drowned at the sinking. Lieut. 
George U. Morris was in command of the vessel, Captain Radford being 
absent on the Hoanoke at a court of inquiry. 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 275 

[From the Philadelphia Weekly Times of September 30, 1883.] 

SINKING OF THE "CUMBERLAND." AN ACCOUNT, BY A PARTICIPANT, OF 
THE FAMOUS ACTION IN HAMPTON ROADS. 

By Joseph W. Wiiitehukst. 



The morning of the 8th of March, 1862, dawned finely. Not a ripple 
broke the surface of the bay as it sparkled in the sun. All was calm and 
peaceful. A light rain had fallen the day previous, and the sails were 
loosened to dry, and the men were engaged at their different duties about 
the decks, cracking jokes among themselves. Little they thought how 
soon their noble ship would end her career in the hottest naval engagement 
that was fought during the rebellion. The " Cumberland " was under the 
command of Captain Radford, but he being ashore at Fortress Monroe on 
official duties, the ship was left under Lieut. Commander George U. Mor- 
ris, and if the American Navy had been searched over, the " Cumberland " 
could not have been more nobly commanded. At 12 o'clock all hands 
were piped to dinner, but hardly had the men been seated before the calls 
of the boatswain and his mates were heard, fetching all hands up to furl 
sail. 

Soon everything was snug aloft, and then there was heard in the direc- 
tion of Craney Island a loud boom and instantly every eye was bent 
towards that quarter. We knew at a glance why we had been so hurriedly 
called from dinner, for there, heading for Fortresa Monroe, could be seen 
the "Merrimac." She was steaming slowly as if undecided what course 
she would take. She hauled around, headed up river, and made directly 
for the "Congress," which vessel lay farther down the stream. It was a 
good move, for by so doing she could obtain the assistance of the Confed- 
erate steamers Yorktown and Jamestown, which were now seen approach- 
ing from up the river, both keeping a respectful distance from the " Cum- 
berland." We could have sent them to the bottom in ten minutes could 
we have got near them. In the mean time we were not idle. A spring was 
put out from our port quarter and the ship hove broadside to the stream. 
Then the drum beat to quarters, the decks were cleared for action, the 
battery was cast loose, and every man and boy was at his station. We 
were ready for the fray. My station was powder-boy for the first division 
on the forward part of the gun deck, and as I stood forward and looked 
aft a scene met my view that will never be erased from my memory. 
Some of the men had their overshirts off and were bare-headed, ready to 
fight. There were no faint hearts among them. Every face was set with 
a stern resolution, and well might the brave Morris have had confidence 
in his crew. 

The "Merrimac" was fast approaching, and, nearing the "Congress," 
she fired a shot of defiance. Our after pivot rang out sharp and clear in 
answer, sending a shot crashing against her iron sides. Running up along- 
side of the " Congress," she delivered a terrific broadside that spread death 
ami destruction. A sheet of Uanie belched from the " Congress's " side. 



276 MOKKIS FAMILY. 

and the thunder of her guns was heard in response. But the ' ' Merrimac " 
paid no further attention to the "Congress"; she passed her, and, sliecr- 
ing to starboard, came on, heading directly for the "Cumberland." 
Nearing us, she sent a sliell through our port quarter, killing four 
marines and wounding or killing five seamen. As she closed in on us we 
opened with our port battery — eleven 9-iiifh guns, one 11-inch, and one 
80-poun(l rilled Dahlgren. The heavy metal fell like hail on the " Merri- 
mac's" sides, but made no more impression than so many rubber balls. 
Broadside followed broadside, yet she did not slacken her speed, but kept 
right on, so close to us that a man could have sprung on board of her. 
Then she delivered a murderous broadside, at point blank range, that 
swept everything before it and sent many of our men down. 

Passing us, she went a mile or so up the river, then, putting about with 
her prow down stream and under a full pressure of steam, she came on as 
if shot from a cannon. She struck us on the starboard bow, right under 
the cat-head. The shock was so great that it took nearly every m;m off 
his teet and straightened our heavy chain cable out like so much whip- 
cord. Indeed our ship was heeled over so that her yard-arms nearly 
touched the water. As the " Merrimac " attempted to back she broke off 
her prow and left it in the "Cumberland." She then swung alongside 
and delivered a broadside, afterwards firing leisurely and with terrible 
effect. 

We fired broadside after broadside with a rapidity and precision that 
would have sent the " Merrimac " to the bottom in fifteen minutes had she 
been a wooden vessel. She fell astern, firing as she went, until she got 
under our starboard quarter. Then she lay to, and her commander asked 
Lieutenant Morris if he would surrender. Morris answered, "No, I 
won't; I will never surrender, but will sink alongside," and lie turned on his 
heel and ordered Quartermaster Murray to hoist the red pennant at the 
fore-truck. That means, on board of an American man-of-war, "No 
surrender." That flag and the ensign flew until the "Cumberland" was 
sunk. After receiving the answer the "Merrimac" steamed around, and 
getting in good position, she struck us amidships, but having lost her 
prow, she did no damage that way. With her guns, however, she did 
terrible execution. Our decks were slippery with gore, and the scuppers 
ran red. On the gun-deck all the horrors of war could be seen. The 
heaviest of the fighting was done by the first division. As fast as one 
gun's crew would be killed another crew from one of the after divisions 
would take its place. 

A shell entered the ship's galley and exploded in the coppers, scattering 
small fragments in every direction, killing and woundingnearly every man 
in that immediate neighborhood. In the forward part of the ship, from 
the galley to the manger, lay heaps of the dead anil dying. In nearly 
every part of the ship the form of some shipmate could be seen still in 
death or mangled in a horrible manner, gasping for breath. A man by 
the name of Burns, the captain of No. 7 gun, had both his legs shot off 
below the knee, but he hobbled to his guu aud seizing the lock string he 



a. 




[tiiikd branch.] seventh genekation. 277 

fired. But what a fate was his ! His gun recoiled on liim and cruslied 
him to death. The noble old ship was fast settling. Already the water 
was up to our knees on the gun-deck, yet our broadsides kept thundering 
until the water poured in the port-holes. Amid the roar of the pivot-guns 
was heard the voice of Morris shouting to those on the gun-deck, "Up, my 
brave boys, and save yourselves the best you can. Everj' man for himself 
and God for us all ! " Many of the wounded and the ship's chaplain were 
in the after-cockpit. They all perished with the ship. Many of the men 
came to the surface of the water and were shot. Others that could swim 
reached the shore in safety. 

All of our boats except one were shot away, and that was a large boat, 
being the second launch. She was filled by those who were fortunate 
enough to reach her. Lieutenant Morris sprang overboard off the port 
quarter, was rescued by some of his own men, and was taken ashore in 
the launch. The writer of this article had his arm broken, but managed 
to swim about one hundred yards and was picked up by those in the 
launch. The number of officers, seamen, and marines on board at the 
time of the engagement was 410, and after the engagement, we mustered 
173. As the old ship made her final plunge the after-pivot gave the 
"Merrimac" a parting shot ; then water closed over the ship and crew. 

Philadelphia. 1883. 



[From Moore's Eebellion Record, vol. IV, p. 268.] 
COMMANDER RADFORD'S OFFICIAL REPORT. 

Fortress Monroe, Va., March 10, 1862. 

Sir: It is my painful duty to report the loss of the United States 
ship " Cumberland," under my command, on the 8th instant, at Newport 
News, Va. 

I was on board the United States frigate "' Roanoke," by order of the 
Hon. Secretary of the Navy, as member of a court of inquiry, when the 
" Merrimac " came out from Norfolk. I immediately procured a horse 
and proceeded with all dispatch to Newport News, where I arrived only 
in time to see the " Cumberland " sunk by being run into by the rebel iron- 
clad steamer " Merrimac." Though I could not reach the " Cumberland " 
before the action was over, I have the satisfaction of reporting that so long 
as her guns were above water every one on board must have done his duty 
nobly. 

I send with this the report by Lieut. George U. Morris of the action, 
he being, in my absence, the commanding otBcer, and also the surgeon's 
report of the wounded and saved. The loss was very large in killed, 
wounded, and drowned, though the number cannot be ascertained. 
Enough is known, however, to make the loss one hundred. I send also a 
list of the men known to have been saved, but have no accurate means of 
giving the names of those lost or killed, as no officer or man brought any- 



278 MORRIS FAMILY 

thing on shore save what he stood iu, consequently I liave no ninsterroll 
of the crew. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. RADFORD, 

Commander, 
llou. Gideon Welles, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Moore's Rebellion Record, vol. IV, p. 269.] 
LIEUTENANT MORRIS'S OFFICIAL REPORT TO CAPTAIN RADFORD. 

Newport News, Va., March 9, 18G2. 

Sir: Yesterday morning at9 A. m., I discovered two steamers at anchor 
off Smithfield Point, on the left hand or western side of the river, distant 
about twelve miles. At 12, meridian, I discovered three vessels under 
steam, standing down the Elizabeth River towards Sewall's Point. I beat 
to quarters, double-breeched the guns on the main deck, and cleared ship 
for action. 

At 1 P. M. the enemy hove in sight, gradually nearing us. The iron-clad 
steamer "Merrimac," accompanied by two steam gun-boats, passed ahead 
of the " Congress" frigate and .steered down toward us. We opened fire 
on her. She stood on and struck us under the starboard fore-channels. 
She delivered her fire at the same time. The destruction was great. We 
returned the fire with solid shot, with alacrity. 

At thirty minutes past 3 the water had gained upon us, notwithstanding 
the pumps were kept actively employed, to a degree that, the forward- 
magazine being drowned, we had to take powder from the after-magazine 
for the 10 inch gun. At thirty-five minutes past 3 the water had risen 
to the main hatchway, and the ship canted to port, and we deliv- 
ered a parting fire, each man trying to save himself by jumping over- 
board. 

Timely notice was given, and all the wounded who could walk were 
ordered out of the cockpit; but those of the wounded who had been car- 
ried into the sick bay and on the berth deck, were so mangled that it was 
impossible to save them. 

It is impossible for me to individualize. Alike the oflScers and men all 
behaved in the most gallant manner. Lieutenant Sel fridge and Master 
Stuyvesant were in command of the gun-deck divisions, and tlicj' did all 
that noble and gallant officers could do. Acting Masters Randall and Ken- 
nison, who had charge each of a pivot-gun, showed the most perfect cool- 
ness, and did all they could to save our noble ship, but I am sorry to say 
without avail. Among the last to leave the ship were Surgeon Martin and 
Assistant-Surgeon Kershaw, who did all they could for the wounded 
promptly and faithfully. 

The loss we sustained I cannot yet inform you of, l)ut it has been vciy 
great. The warrant and steerage officers could not have been more i)rompt 
aud active than they were at their dillereut stations. Chaplain Lcuhart is 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 279 

missing. Msister's M;ite John Harrington was killed. I should judge we 
have lost upwards of one hundred men. 

I can only say, in conclusion, that all did their duty, and we sank with 
the American flag flying at the peak. 

I am, sir, etc., 

GEO. U. MORRIS, 

Lieutenant and ExectUive Officer. 



THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY TO LIEUTENANT MORRIS. 

Navy Department, March 21, 1862. 

Sir: In the calamitous assault of the armored steamer "Merrimac" 
upon the sloop " Cumberland " and frigate " Congress," on the 9th instant, 
which were comparatively helpless, the Department has had occasion to 
admire the courage and the determination of yourself and the ofiicers and 
crew associated with you, who, under the most disastrous and appalling 
circumstances, boldly fought your formidable assailant. Exposed as you 
were to an opponent secure in his armor while attacking the "Cumber 
land," to your honor and that of those associated with you, the guns were 
coolly manned, loaded, and discharged while the vessel was in a sinking 
condition, and your good ship went down with the flag at the gaff, and its 
brave defenders proved themselves worthy of that renown which has im- 
mortalized the American Navy. 

The gallant service of yourself and the brave men of the "Cumber- 
land " on that occasion is justly appreciated by a grateful country, and 
the Department, in behalf of the Government, desires to thank j'ou and 
them for the heroism displayed, and the fidelity with w-hich the flag was 
defended. 

I am, respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES. 

Lieut. Geo. U. Morris, 

United States Navy, Washington, D. C. 



RECEPTION TO THE CREW OP THE "CUMBERLAND" IN NEW YORK CITY. 

At a meeting held on the 10th of April, 1862, in honor of these brave 
men, in the city of New York, at the Academy of JMusic, the hall was 
densely crowded by thousands of citizens anxious to express their grati- 
tude to the heroes. The meeting was presided over by Pelatiah Pei-it, 
Esq., and was addressed by the most eminent men of the country. 
The chairman paid the following tribute to these gallant men : 
"Fighting to every disadvantage, they stood to their guns until, sub- 
merged in water, they could be fired no longer, and then escaped with 
their lives, with the loss of everything but their honor. The flag of the 
'Cumberland' was never struck, and still floats in the face of the 
enemy. " 



"280 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Rev. Dr. Ilitchonck said : 

" VV'e liave met to resolve that the widows and children of tlie brave 
men who fell in Ilumptou Roads should not suffer. Those men fought 
not for glory, but for duty's sake , but glory they should have." 

The chairman read a letter from Captain Radford, which contained at 
the close a complimentary mention of Lieutenant Morris, who was in 
command when the "Cumberland " went down. Three cheers were given 
for Lieutenant Morris. 

A sailor of the " Cumberland," who was introduced for the purpose, 
gave the following account of the action : 

"It was about eight o'clock on Saturday morning, the 8th of March, 
when we first saw the ' Merrimac' We beat to quarters, and so did the 
' Congress ' She went on the passage down to Fortress Monroe instead 
of coming toward our ship ; afterward she stood for the ship. As she 
passed the ' Congress ' the brave ship poured two or three broadsides at 
her, but they were not any more than throwing peas or apples at her, 
when she came at us. Could we have kept her off at arm's length she 
never would have taken us ; but she ran her steel prow into us, when 
Mr. Buchanan, the man who commanded her, asked our commander, 
'Will you surrender?' He answered, 'Never will I surrender.' Then 
he (Buchanan) took his infernal machine off, and ran it into us again. 
He then asked again, 'Mr. Morris,' calling him by name, 'will you sur- 
render that ship?' 'Never!' said he, 'if you sink her.' Well, my 
friends, the ' Cumberland ' had to go ; and we tried to do our duty, as I 
hope that every seaman that has to come after us will do his duly in 
like manner." 

In response to loud cheers for "Morris!" the chairman stated that 
Lieutenant Morris had been ordered to Washington. It was proposed 
to give three more cheers for Lieutenant Morris. The cheers were given 
with a will — the crew joining in them. 

Mr. Evarts was the next speaker. He read an extract from a Southern 
paper which paid high tribute to the heroism of the "Cumberland's" 
crew [three cheers for them]. "After this," said he, "who was there 
who could not give new meaning to the cry ' Don't give up the ship ' ? It 
meant something. It meant 'Don't give up the ship, although you go to 
the bottom in her. ' " 

The Hon. George Bancroft then spoke. He said : "We must remem- 
ber the wonderful condition in which these brave men were placed — 
not face to face with an equal enemy, but met by a new and untried 
power, that proved itself vastly superior to anything with which they 
were acquainted. And not only were tlu^y unable to resist the iron, but 
the ' Cumberland ' was so badly wounded that they could see how many 
sands might yet flow out before she was destined to go down. It was 
under these circumstances that our friends who were with us manifested 
that extraordinary self-possession that led them even to the last to con- 
tinue the combat. These men were entitled to congratulation and to the 
gratitude of every one who had regard for the cause of liberty. Yes, they 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 281 

were the champions of humanity, the champions of the great cause of the 
people, and their names should be imperishable, their glory should never 
fade. In the name of this vast assembly he gave thanks to them all. Let 
us rejoice that these men went down fighting to the last, and that when 
they went down they left the star-spangled banner of the * Cumberland ' 
flying at her peak ; the emblem that no dangers, no perils, no enemies, 
not ocean itself could destroy our liberty." 

The meeting adopted resolutions that a recognition of their gallant con- 
duct was due these men from the Government. 

The only reward they ever received was one month's pay under a gen- 
eral law, which did not begin to reimburse them for their clothing and 
personal effects lost on board the " Cumberland," when she went down, 
including the money they had in their chests, having been paid off for the 
previous month a few days before. 

MESSAGE OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN RECOMMENDING A VOTE OF THANKS TO 

LIEUT. COMMANDER GEORGE V. MORRIS FOR VALOR 

AND HEROISM, ETC. 

To the Senate and House of Representatives : 

In conformity to the law of July 16, 1S63, I most cordially recommend 
that Lieut. Commander George U. Morris, United States Navy, receive a 
vote of thanks from Congress for the determined valor and heroism dis- 
played in his defense of the United States sloop-of-war "Cumberland," 
temporarily under his command, in the naval engagement at Hampton 
Roads, on the 8th of March, 1863, with the rebel iron-clad steam frigate 
"Merrimac." ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 

Washington, D. C, 

December 10, 1862. 

joint resolution 

Tendering the thanks of Congress to Lieut. Commander George U. Morris 

of the United States Navy. 

Resolved hy the Senate and House of Representatives in Congress assembled : 
That, in pursuance of the recommendation of the President of the United 
States, and to enable him to advance Lieut. Commander George U. Morris 
one grade, in pursuance of the ninth section of the act of Congress of 
16th July, 1863, the thanks of Congress be and they are hereby tendered 
to Lieut. Commander George U. Morris, for highly distinguished conduct 
in defense of the United States sloop-of-war "Cumberland," at Hampton 
Roads, on the 8th of March, 1863, from the attack of the rebel iron-clad 
steam frigate "Merrimac." 

Passed the House of Representatives December 19, 1863. 

Attest. EM. ETHEREDGE, Clerk. 

Introduced in the Senate December 23, 1863, and referred to Committee 
on Naval Affairs. 
36 



282 MOUKIS KAMILY. 

Tlie liornic Morris never received "the thanks of Congress," 
which would have entitled him under the law to promotion one 
grade, though warmly recommended therefor by President Lincoln. 
The resolution of thanks passed the House, went to the Senate, 
was referred to the Naval Committee, and there slept until Morris 
died. Scores of officers were promoted for less conspicuous ser- 
vices. No American officer ever deserved so much of his country 
and received so httle. A bill for the relief of the officers and 
crew of the "Cumberland" was introduced into Congress in Feb- 
ruary, 1884, in which the greater part of the matter just related 
and that which follows was presented as a "Statement of facts" 
in the case, and which also included the affidavits of officers and 
men in the Confederate service; principally those attached to the 
"Merrimac," concurring in their statements in regard to the 
injury done to that vessel by the shot from the " Cumberland," 
and testifying to the bravery of its officers and crew. The evi- 
dence submitted showed all the facts in the case and established the 
following: 

That the "Cumberland" in her fight with the "Merrimac" 
inflicted great damage on that vessel and entirely destroyed her 
efficiency as a ram. The loss of the " Merrimac's " prow in the 
" Cumberland " diminished her aggressive power at least fifty per 
cent., while the disabling of two out of her ten guns diminished 
the power of her ordnance twenty per cent., making the net loss 
of her aggressive power in this encounter sixty per cent., and 
leaving her only forty per cent, of her original power with which 
to meet the Monitor on the next day. This is not stated for the 
purpose of depreciating the splendid service rendered by the 
" Monitor " on the 9th, when she certainly saved the whole Fed- 
eral fleet, but simply to show how largely the gallant fight of 
the "Cumberland" contributed to the final result. The evidence 
showed that the officers of the " Merrimac " were of opinion th<';t 
but for the loss of her prow she would have sunk the "Monitor" 
in the second day"s fight. If the "Cumberland" had sunk the 
" Merrimac " she would have been entitled, under the prize law, 
to her full value, over $1,000,000. Is it not within the spirit of 
the law, and right, under all the cfrcumstances of this extraordi- 
nary case, that she should be entitled to the amount of damage 
she did to an iron-clad that it was impossible for her to sink ? 
The bill appropriates not more than one-third of that amount. 



[third brakch.] seventh generation. 283 

The officers and crew of the " Cumberland " lost all of their per- 
sonal effects, motley, and clothing, save what they stood in, and 
have received no reimbursement for these save one month's pay 
under a general law giving that much in case of ships sunk in 
service. When it is remembered that an officer's regulation outfit 
costs from $300 to $500, and that the outfit of a seaman bears a 
corresponding proportion to his pay, it will be seen how inade- 
quate this compensation was. After the fight was over, the gov- 
ernment failed to give them transportation, and they were allowed 
to get home the best way they could, and at their own expense, 
being "furloughed" instead of "ordered home," which latter 
would have entitled them to transportation. Although the whole 
country was electrified with the heroism of these men, and meet- 
ings, held in the principal cities of the country, pledged them the 
grateful recognition of their services, they have never received 
compensation for their losses, much less reward for their services. 
As a matter of dollars and cents the men of the " Cumberland ' 
are entitled, if not by the letter at least by the spirit of the prize 
law, to the value of the damages they inflicted on the " Merrimac." 
But in such a case a great nation cannot afford to count dollars 
and cents against the blood of its heroes. The example of the 
men of the "Cumberland," fighting their good ship gun by gun 
until the last gun was under water, then going down with cheers 
while the flag flew at the peak, is worth more to this country than 
can be told in dollars. Most of the survivors of the "Cumber- 
land " are now poor and needy in their declining years. A sailor's 
life is not a provident or a profitable one. When they were in 
the vigor of their manhood and their country in its hour of need, 
they freely offered their lives for the honor of the flag. In her 
hour of prosperity will she forget or neglect them ? Congress, at 
its 47th session, gave $75,000 to the officers, owners, and crew of 
the brig General Armstrong for the gallant defense made by that 
vessel against the attack of the boats from a British squad i-on 
in 1814. If the government thus recognized the gallantry of a 
wooden vessel fighting wooden boats seventy years ago, should it 
not recognize the desperate courage of the men of the " Cumber, 
land," who fought in wooden walls against impenetrable iron? 



284 MORRIS FAMILY. 

[Extract from the AMrginia City Fnferprm.'] 

This paper, commenting on the faihire of the contractors in 
their attempt to raise the "Cumberland," after the war, used the 
following language: 

We are glad the jealous sea has thus far refused to give up its most 
glorious -wreck, and hope it will forever baffle the impious hands who 
seek to despoil it of its noblest treasure. The "Cumberland" is the sep- 
ulchre of scores of heroic hearts; let not that sepulchre be violated. 
Among the grand events of the war there is nothing that compares with 
the acts of the men who went down to death in that immortal frigate. 
Even the foe that crushed in and sank the ship gave a cheer of admiration 
for the dauntless souls that peopled her rent decks. When the ship was 
sinking, so that the presuming waters were running into the guns, like a 
dying gladiator's cry they rang out in a full broadside of defiance; and 
that broadside was taken up in a cheer by the crew, which nothing but 
the engulfing waters could still. When all else had disappeared, the top- 
mast still remained above the flood, and upon its peak the old flag hung 
out against the sky, a symbol for the astonished rebels to read, that though 
fleets might fall before thtm and brave men might be overcome, the flag 
would still remain unstained and immortal, to be borne by other hands 
and above other decks to certain victory. The whole world held its breath 
to hear the story of the last deeds of the " Cumberland's " crew. History 
was sought for a parallel to their acts, but no parallel was found. It was 
the Thermopyla3 of the sea, sometimes equaled by an individual but never 
by a ship's crew. When the ship was sinking a summons to surrender 
was answered as the remnant of the Old Guard answered at Waterloo, 
and the world asked in awe and wonder, "What manner of men were 
they who could laugh death to scorn in broadsides and with cheers ? " 
AVe raise monuments to the illustrious dead upon earth. Let us not per- 
mit this grandest of tombs to be desecrated. Let the sea heave and swell 
above that sunken deck; let the tides ebb and flow over the stilled hearts 
below; let the winds, as they go and come, on their wild harps sing 
funeral requiems above them — but keep from them the mere money- 
seeker; for when at last the sea gives up its jewels at the final summons, 
then we fancy the great "Cumberland" will spring from its bed. every 
white sail spread, every gun in place, the old flag at the peak, the old 
crew in full ranks upon the restored decks, and all the universe beside 
will have no such resurrection picture. No, no! While we reverence 
patriotism and dauntless courage — while our hearts throb faster at the 
memory of deeds which have no equal in the records of the ages — let us 
protest against despoiling hands touching that sacred .«epulchre of the 
ocean. No other sea holds sucli a prize; no other nati(m can claim such 
dead. Their dying acts lifted American manhood up the world over, and 
ill the palaces of kings it was whispered, " Surely there is some enchant- 
ment in this thing called freedom, or men could not die for a principle as 
tiie.^c men died." 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 285 

375. JULI.-V HOWE MORRIS, 6th daughter of Commodore 
Charles (201) and Harriet (Bowen) Morris, born at Georgetown, 
D. C, Dec. 15, 1832. Married, Sept. 21, 1852, S. Ridout Addi- 
son, M.D., surgeon in the United States Navy. He was born Jan. 
17, 1814, at Prince George, Maryland, and died at Washington, 
Aug. 28, 1860. He was appointed assistant surgeon in the navy 
June 20, 1838; passed assistant surgeon, Nov. 15, 1844, and sur- 
geon. Sept 22, 1854. Children: 

587. Charles Morris Addison^, b. July 16, 1856. 

588. Sarah Elizabeth Addison^ b. Aug. 22, 1860; d. Oct. 

15, 1861. 

876. MIRIAM MORRIS, 1st daughter of Lieutenant Horace 
(203), born Dec. 22, 1817, in Cherry Street, New York city. In 
1851 Miss Morris left Ames for Pass Christian, Miss., where her 
sister Lucy had married and settled. In 1854 she removed with 
her sister to Goliad, Tex., where she married Mr. Zachariah Can- 
field, a wealthy planter, and removed to his plantation on the San 
Antonio River. In 1861 she went with her husband to Escambia 
County, Pla., to visit her sister, Mrs. Swan, who had removed from 
Texas. Here she fell sick with consumption, and was unable to 
return to Texas. Mr. Canfield, however, returned, in order to close 
up some business matters, with the expectation of returning to his 
wife. In the meantime the Union army had taken New Orleans 
and held control of the Mississippi. Mr. Canfield twice endeav- 
ored to cross the river, but was unable to do so. To escape the 
dangers of the war Mr. Swan removed his family into Alabama; 
Mrs. Canfield went with them. Her health continued to fail, and 
she died, Sept. 18, at Sparta, Conecuh County, and was buried at 
Beulah Church. 

377. LUCY MORRIS, 2d daughter of Lieutenant Horace 
(203), born May 16, 1820, at Cape May, N. J. Married, June 16, 
1849, James L. Swan of Pass Christian, Miss He died, March 
15, 1866. His grandfathers Swan and Lee were signers of the 
Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. Married 2d, July 13, 
1877, Peter James of Bryan, Tex., being his third wife. Mrs. 
James has had an eventful life. As her father was possessed of 
but little means, she early began to teach school for her support. 
In 1840, when at the age of twenty, her uncle. Commodore Morris, 



286 MORRIS FAMILY. 

gave her a small piece of land which he possessed in tlic village 
of Ames, on the condition that slie should build a house upon it. 
By teaching, and the purchase and sale of sheep and cattle, she 
obtained the means to build a small house, which became the home 
of her parents, while she, in the province of teaching, made her 
way to the South, where she made the acquaintance of and mar- 
ried Mr. Swan. In 1854 Mr. Swan removed to Goliad, Tex., and 
in 1856 to Matagorda Island. In 1858 he removed to Pensacola, 
h'la., where he remained until the breaking out of the rebellion. 
On the taking of Pensacola by the Union forces, in May, 1861, he 
removed his family, live stock, and negroes to Alabama, hoping to 
get beyond the reach of danger to his family and property. At 
Sparta the whole family were taken sick with chills and fever and 
diphtheria. Here Mrs. Canfield died. Fearing raids, Mr. Swan 
made another move to a point more remote; but the raiding of a 
wide circuit had begun, and reached this place, and he was stripped 
of nearly everything. Soon after this, j\lrs. Swan harnessed a 
yoke of cattle to a buggy, and taking what few effects they had, 
after selling their furniture, started for the coast of Florida At 
Milton they found a vacant house. Here Mrs. Swan supported 
her family by taking boarders, until they could return to Pensa- 
cola. Their old home had been entirely destroyed. At Pensacola 
they began housekeeping, taking boarders. In February, 1866, 
her mother died. Friends at Tampa Bay, having advised them 
of the advantages of that place for business, Mr. Swan determined 
to go there. They left Pensacola, March 14. 1866, on a govern- 
ment steamer from the navy-yard, both of them in excellent health 
and spirits. During the night a severe storm came up, which 
threatened the loss of the vessel. At five o'clock Mr. Swan told 
his wife that he felt very sick. She at once arose to help him, but 
in five minutes he was dead. Mrs. Swan, with the body of her 
husband, was landed at Apalachicola, where he was buried. He 
had been a kind and affectionate husband. Mrs. Swan found 
refuge for a while in the house of a friend. "While there the 
small-pox broke out. The whole family had it. As Mrs. Swan 
recovered from it she assumed the care of the rest, but her health 
broke down, and she determined to go to the North, to recover, if 
possible. She found a passage in a sailing vessel, and landed in 
New York, July 4, 1866. After visiting some friends she sought 
employment, by which she could support herself. She found a 



[third branch.] skvknth generation. '287 

room and a sewing-machine, and was doing well when she was 
taken sick, and laid up for three months, at the end of which all 
her means were gone. She started anew, sewed for a while, then 
nursed, and gathered quite a sum of money, which she lost by 
having her pocket picked in a street car. On the way to the house 
of a friend she found a dollar. Her friend lent her five dollars, 
and she started again in her efforts to live. Soon after this she 
was thrown from a street car and broke her right httle finger, and 
badly bruised her leg and foot, and was obliged to stop work. 
She had at this time accumulated a hundred dollars. She was 
offered the rent of a room for the use of the money. She made 
the loan and lost the money. After she became able to work, and 
had got about forty dollars, she took a small laundry, advertised, 
hired help, and was successful, so that she was obliged to take a 
larger place. She made money, but her health failing again, she 
sold the laundry for $250, disposed of her furniture, and took a 
child to care for. The child died, and she was again obliged to 
seek employment, which she found in nursing. In the winter of 
1872 she received information that, by returning to Texas, she 
could recover a large amount due her husband there. She went 
to Texas, but did not succeed in collecting the claim. Thrown 
upon her own resources once more, this courageous woman opened 
a hotel, which she kept for a year, at the end of which, finding 
she could not collect the amount due her from some of her 
boarders, she gave up the hotel and spent some time with some 
friends at Ampstead. Then she went to Bryan, and opened a 
millinery shop, in which she was successful, and remained until 
she made the acquaintance of Mr. James, and thus after so long a 
series of toils and misfortunes, which she had kept from the knowl- 
edge of her nearest relatives, she again found all the necessary 
comforts of life except health. She is now an invalid, and living 
with her husband on his plantation near Hearne, Robertson 
County. 

378. SARAH MARIA MORRIS, 3d daughter of Lieutenant 
Horace (203), born at Ames, N. Y., March 14, 1832. Married 
July 4, 1850, Lester Dingman, the son of a wealthy farmer of 
Montgomery County, and well educated. He was by trade a 
blacksmith. In September, after tlieir marriage, they removed to 
Bureau County, 111. The place which they had selected for their 



288 MORRIS FAMILY. 

residence proving unhealthy, tliey determined to rtimovo from it. 
In March, 1852, Mr. Dingman accepted an offer to goto California. 
Leaving his wife behind he started on his journey. At Camden, 
Mo., he was taken sick and died. The news of her liusband's 
death so shocked Mrs. Dingman that she fell into a decline and 
died June 10th following. She had one child: 

588. Sarau Louise Dixgman'^, b. ; d. in infancy. 

379. EGBERT S. MORRIS, only child of Captain George 
(204), born in New York in 1822. He was a pure-minded youth, 
and fond of botanical study. He died at Honolulu, S. I., Nov. 16, 
1839. He was appointed midshipman in the U. S. Navy, Dec. 28, 
1837, and assigned to the sloop-of war John Adams. That vessel 
made a cruise to the coast of Africa, Muscat, Bombay, the coast of 
Sumatra, Singapore, Manilla, and to the Sandwich Islands. 
While at U acao young Morris was taken sick and put into the 
doctor's hands. From this illness he was fast recovering when, 
through subsequent exposure, he was taken with an affection of 
the lungs which proved fatal to him. Gn the arrival of the " John 
Adams " at Honolulu, he was put on shore on a sick ticket. The 
following extract from a letter from Rev. S. Judd, a missionary of 
the American Board, at Honolulu, to Benj. A. Mumford, N. Y., 
describes his last days: 

Honolulu, Nov. 18, 1839. 

"Before this letter reaches you you will have received the intelligence 
of the dangerous illness of your nephew, Robert S. Morris. I received 
him into my family on the 12lh of October, at the request of the American 
consul and the surgeon of the 'John Adams,' on his arrival in port, with 
the understanding that he was to remain with us as long as he lived. He 
was soon made aware of his dangerous situation and consequently turned 
bis attention to a preparation for death, and employed much of his time in 
reading the Bible and praj'er, in which exercises he seemed to find much 
comfort. The squadron sailed on the 4th inst. Mrs. Judd and myself 
formed for him a sincere attachment, and we endeavored to supply all his 
wants and make his last days comfortable and peaceful. We found our 
sympathies appreciated, and enjoyed his confidence. We spent much 
time in reading to and praying with him. After these exercises it was 
bis invariable custom to say, ' 1 am very much obliged to you, sir.' He 
expressed a calm resignation and a confidence that he was prepared to die, 
resting his faith on the blessed Savior. He .spoke freely of his trust in 
Christ, and his willingness to l)e entirely at God's disposal. He died Nov. 
IG, 1839, at 11 o'clock v. m. Nature gave way like au expiring lamp. He 



[tuIKD BRANCII.J SKVENTII GENEKATION. 289 

was buried in a plot of ground beside our own little boy. Rev. Mr. Bing- 
ham officiated. Mrs. Judd, myself, and our five children followed as 
mourners. The consul, a discharged midshipman of the 'John Adams,' 
a long train of foreigners, mostly Americans, and the different members 
of the mission and their families, attended. Nothing of the kind could 
have given Mrs. Judd and myself greater pleasure than to receive into our 
bosoms the orphan boy, who, we are happy to say, was very gentlemanly, 
correct, and an interesting person, and, as far as we could judge, a sincere 
Christian." 

380. GEORGE ELIOT MORRIS, 1st son of Samuel Eliot 
(207), born at Ames, N. Y., Nov. 22, 1835. Married Jan. 28, 
1864, Emma Kellogg of Princeton, 111. He was a volunteer in 
the 93d Illinois Regiment in the Civil War, and was in the battles 
of Franklin and Nashville, Tenn, but served only a short time 
afterward on account of health. He lives in Greenfield, Adair Co., 
Iowa. In the fall of 1884 he was seriously hurt in a railroad 
accident while taking cattle to Chicago; his upper jaw was broken, 
his front teeth knocked out, his right shoulder injured, the mus- 
cles of the arm and shoulder detached, and the spinal column 
injured. The accident was caused by the carelessness of the 
employees of the road. Children: 

589. Kate Lee", b. Nov. 2, 1864. 

590. Louise Kellogg'', b. April 1, 1866. 

591. Frederick Eliot", b. Aug. 12, 1868. 

381. CHARLES DORR MORRIS, 2d son of Samuel Eliot 
(207), born May 2, 1840, at Providence, Bureau Co., 111. Married 
March 28, 1872, Emma Wilson of Columbus, Kansas, formerly of 
Chester County, Pa. He volunteered July, 1861, in the 33d Regi- 
ment Illinois Vols., in the Civil War. He was offered the oflice of 
lieutenant, but declined it, and carried a musket through the entire 
war. He was taken prisoner at Big River Bridge on the Iron 
Mountain Railroad, Missouri, with forty-one others, in October, 
1861, after fighting a full brigade for six hours and surrendering 
only after their ammunition gave out. All of them were paroled 
at the time, and exchanged in the following spring. The 33d reg- 
iment formed a part of the 13th and 16th corps in the Western 
Department. In the famous march of General Grant against 
Vicks])urg, in 1863, the regiment was the first to cross the Missis- 
sippi, and, ;it daylight on the morning of the 2d of May, Morris 

37 



290 MOKRIS FAMILY. 

fired the first gun in that memorable campaign, getting a button 
cut off from his coat in return. In the assault on the works at 
A^icksburg, on the 22d of May, he received a slight bayonet wound 
in the knee, warding off the attack by his expert use of the bayo- 
net. Having good clerical capacity he was sometimes clerk at 
headquarters and court-martials. Mr. Morris has been a bank 
clerk, but now is a lumber merchant at Girard, Kansas. Children: 

592. Claude^, b. Dec. 25, ]872. 

593. Adlyn H.«, b. Nov. 15, 1874. 

594. Mark S.^ b. Nov. 18, 1876. 

595. Edward Elmer«, b. April 29, 1879. 

382. HARRIET ELIZABETH MORRIS, 1st daughter of 
Samuel Eliot (207), born at Providence, 111., June 4, 1842. 
Married 1st, George Learned. He d. . Married 2d, Mont- 
calm Baines, Guthrie Co., Iowa. 

383. EDWARD MORRIS, 3d son of Samuel Eliot (207), 
born Feb. 20, 1845. Married Oct. — , 1873, Miranda P., daughter 
of Rev. F. P. Nash. Children: 

596. Henry Eliot", b. Aug. 29, 1874. 
. 597. Edna L.^ b. July 30, 1875. 

Edward Morris was killed by railroad cars at or near Geneseo, 
111., in June, 1875, while on his way to Chicago with cattle. He 
served -as volunteer in the 208th Illinois Regiment, with the three 
months men, and was with his brother George in the battles of 
Franklin and Nashville, Tenn. 

384. CAROLINE LOUISA MORRIS, 2d daughter of Sam- 
uel Eliot (207), born Dec. 18, 1849. Married John C. Stevens, 
Nov., 1872, and died Nov. 2, 1873, without child. 

408. MOREAU MORRIS, 1st son of Oran W. (215), born at 
Stillwater, N. Y., June 19, 1825. Married April 6, 1848, Lydia 
Caroline Thayer, N. Y. Physician, N. Y. city. Dr. Morris has 
held the positions of Port Physician, N. Y. Harbor, and Superin- 
tendent of Inebriate Asylum, Binghamton, N. Y., Health Inspec- 
tor, N. Y. city. Children: 

598. Frank Moreau^, b. April 8, 1850; d. Aug. 21, 1850. 

599. Selina Vose^ b. Aug. 31, 1853. 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 291 

600. MoREAU^ b. Feb. 6, 1851; d. Nov. 10, 1878, at Bingham- 

ton. He had been a bank clerk in Brooklyn, and was 
a young man of fine promise. 

411. WILLIAM HENRY MORRIS, 2d son of Oran W. 
(215), b. Nov. 2, 1829, at Albany. Married Jan. 10, 1849, Eliza- 
beth CaroHne Cable of N. Y. She died . Married 2d, 

Sept. 15, 1869, Anna Dalrymple. Children: 

601. Caroline^ b.'Sept. J^, 18&1. 

602. Ada«, b. Jan. i^, 1853. 

603. Augusta Henrietta"^, b. ; d. . 

BY 2d wife. 

604. Anna Wilcox^ b. Jan. 30, 1871. 

605. May«, b. Sept. 21, 1872. 

412. MARY MORRIS, 3d daughter of Oran Wilkinson (215), 
born at Ames, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1832. Died Feb. 1, 1867. Married, 
Septr 30, 1856, Theron P. Skeel Knapp of Honesdale, Pa. One 
child: 

606. Mary M. Knapp'', b. April 8, 1866; d. Feb. 15, 1867. 

413. ADA BYRON MORRIS, 4th daughter of Oran Wilk- 
inson (215), born Jon^ 14, 1835. Married, Jan. 12, 1859, Jesse 

ijj Estm Congdon of Binghamton, N. Y. ghe died Sept. 30, 1869. 
One child. 

607. Sarah Selina Congdon*, b. 

417. HOWARD HARDING MORRIS, 1st son of Noadiah 
Hart (218), born May 25, 1842, at Canajoharie, N. Y. Married, 
May 24, 1870, Mary Haskell. Children: 

608. BERTHA^ b. Jan. 30, 1871. 

609. Ida^ b. , 1875. 

Mr. Moi'ris was a volunteer in the 33d Illinois Regiment, and 
made a splendid soldier. He still suffers from wounds received 
in battle at Vicksburg. He lives at or near Grinnell, Iowa, and 
is a deacon in a Congregational church. 

419. HENRY ORR MORRIS, 3d son of Noadiah Hart (218) 
born at Canajoharie, Feb. 11, 1847. Married, May 5, 1875, Cola 
L. Kelloo-o;. 



292 MORRIS FAMILY. 

420. NORMAN FOOT MORRIS, 4th son of Noadiah Hart 
(218), born at Canajoharie, March 4, 1849. Married, Nov. 25, 
1875, Lizzie Stuchel. 

475. ALFRED W. MORRIS, 1st son of Alfred (289), born 
Dec. 26, 1851, at Springfield, O. Married, Mollie . House- 
painter. Lives in Indianapolis. 

610. One son**, b. March, 1874. 

480. BENJAMIN MORRIS, only son of Jacob (294), born 
at Morrisville, Oct. 24, 1809. Married, April, 1834, Rachel A. 
Haines. She died Jan. 15, 1869. Farmer. Removed to Bir- 
mingham, Mich., 1833. Baptist. Democrat. Children: 

611. George W.^, b. March 22, 1835. 

612. Mary E.^ b. Oct. 2, 1837. 

613. Caroline M.«, b. Sept. 27, 1839; d. July 2, 1842. 

614. Isabel C.^ b. July 11, 1843. 

484. HERVEY E. morris, 2d son of Darius (295), born 
Feb. 14, 1818. ' Died at Utica, N. Y., Aug. 2, 1873. Married, 
June 17, 1842, Helen Chandler of Cazenovia. Children: 

615. Ella J.«, b. July 10, 1843. 

616. Darius'^, b. June 23, 1845. Instantly killed by a gunshot, 

while making a cavalry charge at or near Piedmont, 
West Va., June 5, 1861. 

617. Carrie V.», b. March 29, 1847; d. Jan. 27, 1850. 

618. Charles G.^ b. March 6, 1849. 

485. VESTATIA I. MORRIS, 1st daughter of Darius (295), 
born Sept. 12, 1825. Married, Sept., 1845, Dr. J. S. Hyde at 
Syracuse, N. Y. Children: 

619. Frederick A. Hyde'', b. May, 1847, at Richford, N. Y. 

620. Marcus D. Hyde", b. May, 1849, at Jamaica, N. Y. 

621. Carrie K. HYDE^ b. Dec, 1852, at Hinsdale, N. Y.; m. 

March, 1875, Rev. J. H. Merrill of Vallejo, Cal. 

Dr. Hyde died . Mrs. Hyde married 2d, Capt. A. Gove 

of San Francisco, Nov. 29, 1859. One son. 

622. Henry M. Gove', b. April, 1861, at Olympia, W. T. 

486. HENRY S. MORRIS, 3d son of Darius (295), born Jan. 
13, 1828. Married, Nov. 4, 1855, Mary P. Conrad. Banker, 
Clean, N. Y. Children: 

623. Henry C% b. Nov. 8, 1856. 



[third branch.] seventh generation. 293 

624. Carrie G.', b. Oct. 7, 1858. 

487. CAERIE G. MORRIS, 2d daughter of Darius (295), 
born Feb. 25. 1830. Married, May 3, 1865, H. P. Penniman. 
Farmer. Lives at Seminary Park, Cal. Children : 

625. Bessie N. Penniman'', b. June 16, 1872. 

41)5. THOMAS G. MORRIS, 1st son of Harvey (297), born 
in Morrisvllle, Dec. 8, 1823. Died, March 27, 1846, at Charleston, 
S. C. Married, Aug. 23, 1845, Harriet M. Wilbur of Smyrna, 
N. Y. Merchant. One son. 

626. Thomas G.^ b. May 20, 1846. Lumber dealer. Chicago. 

496. MARGARET E. MORRIS, 1st daughter of Harvey 
(297), born in Morrisville, Oct. 19, 1825. Died Nov. 20, 1870. 
Married, April 14, 1847, Thomas Morris Avery. Merchant in 
New York City. He removed to Chicago in April, 1851, and 
engaged in the lumber trade. President of the National Watch 
Company, and vice-president of Prairie State Savings Bank. 
Children: 

627. Charles 0. Avery^ b. July 7, 1854. 

628. Frank Morris Avery^ b. May 27, 1863. 

497. JAMES H. MORRIS, 2d son of Harvey (297), born in 
Morrisville, March 8, 1829. Married, Sept. 15, 1852, Caroline E. 
Stone of New Woodstock, N. Y. She died in Chicago, Oct. 25, 
1861. Married 2d, Lucia E. Savage, Aug. 26, 1863. Removed 
from New Woodstock to Chicago in 1851, and engaged in the 
lumber trade. Gave up business in 1872, and removed to Dixon, 
la. Children: 

BY CAROLINE. 

629. AViLLiE E.^ b. Dec. 13, 1855; d. Aug 19, 1857. 

630. George A.^ b. May 27, 1858. 

BY LUCIA. 

631. Willie S.^ b. Nov. 24, 1866. 

501. CLARK T. MORRIS, son of Thomas (299), born Oct. 6, 
1840, at Sherburne, N. Y. Married, Nov. 9, 1871, Alice Beery 

of New York city. She died . Child : 

631. Victor Beery', b. June 21, 1872, at Kalama, W. T.; d. 
1883. 



294 MORRIS FAMILY. 

503. ORVILLE C. MORRTS. 1st son of William (300), l)orn 
in Bloomfield, Mich., Feb. 20, 1822. Married, July 30, 1850. 
Hardware mercliant at Pontiac. Republican. Children: 

632. Frank H.^ b. 

633. Frederick 0.^ b. 

634. ]\Iarion C.«, b. 

635. Charles J.", b. 

504. ROBERT B. MORRIS, 2d son of William (300), born 
in Bloomfield, Mich., Feb. 18, 1824. Died at Pontiac in 1862. 
Hardware merchant. Married, 1854, . Children: 

636. George", b. 

637. William^, b. 

638. Robert', b. 

507. CHARLES E. MORRIS, 1st son of Charles (301), born 
at Pompey Hill, N. Y., Oct. 16, 1814. Married at Lexington, Ky., 
Sept. 8, 1840, Margaret A. McGinnis of Newark, N. J. Lawyer 
and merchant, Quincy, 111.; removed to Wilmington, 111., 1878. 
Now lives in Chicago. Broad Church. Republican. Children: 

639. William H.^ b. Sept. 4, 1841. 

640. Charles Edward^ b. Nov. 21, 1844. 

641. Frederick C", born Aug. 24, 1847. 

642. Amelia E.", b. Feb. 2, 1852. 

643. Liela H.^ born June 29, 1856. 

644. Horace Spencer*', b. Feb. 18, 1862. 

508. WILLIAM MORRIS, 2d son of Charles (301), born at 
James ville, Onondaga Co., N. Y., July 16, 1816. Married July 16, 
1845, Emma E. Miller of Mobile, Ala. Merchant, Mobile. Went 
to Alabama in 1840. Removed to Quincy, 111., in 1857. Returned 
to Mobile, Nov., 1874. Formerly Presbyterian. Now attends 
the Methodist Church. Children: 

645. Emma Colton", b. June 5, 1847; m. April 9, 1872, at 

Quincy, J. E. Shuman of Mobile — one daughter — 
Maud. 

646. Clara Elizabeth*, b. March 22, 1850; d. Oct. 22, 1851. 

647. Cornelia Elizabeth^ b. Feb. 6, 1853. 

648. Robert Baker", b. Aug. 15, 1855. 

649. William BENJAMmVb. Nov. 21, 1857. 



[third branch.] seventh ge:;eration. Ii95 

650. Kate Spencer*', b. April 18, 1860. 

651. Margaret Eliza^ b. June 27, 1861. 

652. Fannie^, b. Jan. 4, 1S64; d. June 13, 1864. 

653. Carrie Spencer^ b. Feb. 9, 1867. 

509. HENRY COLTON MORRIS, 3d son of Charles (301), 
born at Utica, N. Y., April 28, 1826. Died at Porterville, Ala., 
May 22, 1861; unmarried. An incident in his life is here quoted 
from a newspaper of the date of May, 1877 : 

a life insurance romance. 

Another interesting life insurance case, embodying no small amount of 
romance, is progressing in St. Louis Circuit Court, No. 3, in wiiich L. J. 
Hancocls, administrator of Hemy C. Morris, is the phiintill, and the 
American Life Insurance Company (formerly Life and Trust Company) of 
PhiladelpJiia is the defendant. The alleged circumstances of the case, as 
set forth in the pleading and as stated to the jury in the opening address 
of the counsel plaintiff, are substantially as follows: 

In 1860 Mr. Henry C. Morris removed to New Orleans from Porterville, 
about eighteen miles from Mobile, Ala. On the 8th day of June in that 
year, he took out a policy of insurance on his life for $5,000, in the Amer- 
ican Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia, which had an agency in 
New Orleans, paying in advance the premium of $150. Shortly after- 
waids he made a Western trip, visiting Quincy, 111. , where he had brothers 
and sisters living. He left with a brother at that place a trunk and a 
considerable sum of money, and then went to New York, expressing his 
intention of returning home by way of Quincy. In New York he boarded 
with a Dr. Scott, a magnetic physician, and was under his treatment, 
being in bad health. There he made the acquaintance of a man named 
Pepper, who had some " Silica radiator," and went into partnership with 
him, opening an office for the display of the apparatus. On the 1st day of 
March, 1861, he left his office in the evening to go to his boarding-house, 
but never reached there, disappearing entirely*, and nothing being heard of 
him for several years. Dr. Scott wrote to the brother, Wm. Morris, at 
Quincy, giving information of the disappearance, and the brother started 
out to hunt up the missing man, visiting New York and other places, and 
would have gone to New Orleans, but that the blockade, incident to the 
war, prevented him. In 1865 he visited New Orleans, but could learn 
nothing of his long-lost brother. The policy of insurance, which his 
brother had told him was deposited at a certain place iu that city, had also 
disappeared, and has never been found. He called at the insurance office 
from which the policj' was issued and was informed that a man had to be 
missing for seven years before he could be presumed to be dead, but that 
if nothing was heard of the missing man inside of thirty days from 
that time the insurance would be [)aid. At' the expiration of the lime, they 



296 MORRIS FAMILY. 

professed to have beard intelligence that the assured had been seen alive 
more than a year after the policy was issued, and that as another year's 
premium was at that time overdue and unpaid, the policy was thereby by 
its terms vacated and rendered null and void. The company therefore 
refuses and has ever since refused to pay the insurance. Suit was brought 
and a judgment obtained for plaintiff, but on appeal to the Supreme 
Court the judgment was reversed on the ground of insufficient proof of 
the death of the assured. In the spring of 1876, Mrs. Mason, si.ster of the 
missing man, was visiting her niece, Mrs. George, in Mobile, and learned 
from her that Mr. Henry C. Morris had died at her house in Porterville on 
the 22d of May, 1861. Mrs. George and Mr. William Morris are among 
the witnesses in the case at the present trial. 

Judgment was obtained for an amount largely in excess of the 
claim, but the matter was finally compromised for $6,000 and 
costs. 

510. CORNELIA E. MORRIS, 1st daughter of Charles (301), 
born at Utica, July 11, 1829. Married Dec. 10, 1849, Zebulon P. 
Mason of Jordan, N. Y. Lives in Chicago, 111. Congregationalist. 
No children. 

511. CATHERINE C. MORRIS, 2d daughter of Charles (301), 

born at Utica . Married Dec. 7, 1853, Horace C. Spencer 

of Springville, N. Y. Lives in Flint, Mich. Episcopahan. One 
child: 

654. Carrie Spexcer', b. May 3, 1865. 

543. WILLIAM W. MORRIS, 3d son of George (316), 
born . Married . Divorced . 

655. One child. 

557. MARY CONGDON MORRIS, only daughter of Zebu- 
lon (332), born in Dudley, Feb. 22, 1830. Died Sept. 16, 1882. 
Married Dr. Ambrose Eames, May 2, 1850. Children: 

656. Sarah C. Eames*, b. July 2, 1851 ; m. Osro W. Haynes, 

Nov. 5, 1873. They have four children. 

657. Harriet E. EAMES^ b. Feb. 21, 1853; m. Charles W. 

Johnson, Jan. 14, 1882; d. Aug. 19, 1883. 

658. Jennie B. Eames", b. Jan. 2, 1858; m. Geo. S. Street, Jan. 

17, 1883. Thev have one child. 



[third branch.] seventh generation. '297 

558. ANDREW J. MORRIS, only son of Zebulon (332), 
born in Dudley, April 2, 1845. Married, May 30, 1877, Helen M., 

widow of Dyer, and adopted daughter of Wm. Litchfield 

of Southbridge. No children, Mrs. Morris had one child, Adah, 
by her first husband. 

Mr. Morris is a harness-maker, and lives in Southbridge. 



38 



[THIRD BRANCH.] 

EIGHTH GEISTERATIOK 



575. CAROLINE MORRIS, only daughter of Lieutenant 
Charles W. (366) and Caroline (Devens) Morris, born Oct. 5, 1841. 
Married, April 24, 1867, Lieutenant Arthur L. Watson, United 
States Marine Corps, of which he was appointed second lieutenant, 
March 9, 1865; first lieutenant, May 18, 1871; and was retired, 
March 29, 1878. He died at Charlestown, Mass., June 30, 1882, 
in his 43d year. His father. Rev. John L. Watson, was chaplain 
in the United States Navy from August, 1865, to Dec. 1861. His 
mother, before marriage, was Elizabeth West. One child : 

659. Charles Morris Watson^ b. May 28, 1868, at Portsmouth, 

N. H., navy-yard. 

570. Captain CHARLES MORRIS, only son of Lieutenant 
Charles W. (366) and Caroline (Devens) Morris, born at Charles- 
town, Mass., May 3, 1844. Married, May 18, 1867, Maria Ger- 
trude, eldest daughter of Commodore John S. Missroon of the 
United States Navy, and granddaughter of Commodore John 
Downes of the United States Navy. Children: 

660. Maria Gertrude^, b. April 2, 1868, at Santa Fe, N. M. 

661. CHARLES^ b. Aug. 15, 1873, at Newport, R. I. 

662. Effie Verplaxck", b. Nov. 8, 1879, at Amherst, Mass. 

663. Frank Bowen^, b. Sept. 21, 1880, at Amherst, Mass. 
663f John Missroon^, b. Jan. 28, 1884, at Fort Monroe, Va. 

Captain Morris entered the United States Military Academy at 
West Point, July, 1861, and was graduated June, 1865. He was 
appointed second and first lieutenant of the Nineteenth Infantry, 
June 23, 1865, and stationed at Augusta, Ga., and Newport Bar- 
racks, Ky. In 1866 he was stationed at Little Rock, Ark., as 
adjutant of the third battalion, Nineteenth Infantry. He was 
transferred to the Thirty-seventh Infantry, Sept. 21, 1800, and 



[thiri) branch.] eighth generation. 299 

stationed at Fort Leavenworth, as adjutant, in 1867, in which year 
he was also in Hancock's Indian expedition. In 18G7-68 he was 
at Santa Fe, N. M., as adjutant same regiment. In 1869 he was 
at Boston, Mass., as first heutenant of the Thirty-seventh Regiment 
and recruiting officei-. He was transferred to the Fifth Infantry, 
May 19, 1869, and was at Fort Harker, Kan., as adjutant. He 
was transferred to the Fifth Artillery, April 15, 1870, and was 
first lieutenant at Newport, R. I., until 1872. In 1872-73 he was 
at Plattsburg, N. Y.; in 1873-74, at Fort Monroe, Va ; in 1875- 
1878. at St Augustine, Fla. , From 1878 to 1881 he was professor 
of military art and science in Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
at Amherst, Mass. In 1881 at St. Augustine, Fla. He was sta- 
tioned at Fort Schuyler, New York harbor, in 1882, and while 
there, March 6th, was appointed Captain of the Fifth Artillery. In 
1883-84 he was at Fort Monroe, and in 1885 at Fort Columbus, 
New York harbor. 

578. LOUISE MORRIS, 2d daughter of William Wilson 
a.nd Louise Amory (Morris) (368) Corcoran, born in Washington, 
D. C, March 20, 1838. Married George Eustis of Louisiana, April 
5, 1859, and died at Cannes, France, Dec. 4, 1867. Children: 

664. William Corcoran Eustis'', b. July 28, 1860, at No. 27, 

Rue Faubourg St. Honor6, Paris, France. 

665. George Peabody EusTIS^ b. July 21, 1864, at Pare au 

Prince, between Paris and the Bois de Boulogne, 
France. 

666. Harriet Louise Marie EusTIs^ b. Jan. 21, 1867, at the 

Villa Luxembourg, Cannes, France. 
George Eustis was a native of Louisiana. He was educated at 
Harvard University, and practiced law in New Orleans. He was 
chosen to the XXXIVth Congress in 1855 as a " Whig." Chosen 
again to the XXXVth Congress, in 1857, as an "American." 
When the rebellion broke out he took sides with his native State 
in the Southern Confederacy, and became the secretary of John 
Slidel, the Confederate envoy to France, and was with him on the 
British steamer Trent, when that vessel was captured in October, 
1861, by the United States steamer San Jacinto. Captain Wilkes, 
and was taken with Slidel and Mason to Boston and confined in 
Fort Warren. 



300 MORRIS FAMILY 

583. MURRAY MORRIS DUNCAN, 1st son of Maria Lear 
Morris (373) and Rev. Thomas Duncan, born May 10, 1858, at 
Washington, D. C. Married, Dec. 28, 1881, Henriette de Witt 
Coppee of Bethlehem, Pa. One child: 

667. Morris Coppee Duncan", b. June 25, 1883; d. June 30, 

1883. 

587. Rev. CHARLES MORRIS ADDISON, son of Julia 
Howe Morris (375) and S. Ridout Addison, M.D., born July 16, 
1856. Married, Jan. 7, 1886, Ada, daughter of James B. Thayer 
of New York city. He took the degree of B. D. at the Episcopal 
Theological School in Cambridge, in 1882, and was ordained in 
1883. He has been Rector of St. John's Church, Arlington, Mass., 
and also of the Church of the Epiphany in Winchester, and in 
1885 was called to Christ Church, Pitchburg. One son: 
667^. James Thayer Addison^ b. 1887. 

619. FREDERICK A, HYDE, son of Vestatia I. Morris (485) 
and Dr. J. S. Hyde, born May 6, 1847, at Richford, N. Y. Mar- 
ried, Sept., 1869, Philena T. Sherman of San Francisco, Cal. Law 
attorney. Lives in Seminary Park, Cal. Children: 

668. Alice R. Hyde', b. June, 1870. 

669. Florence Hyde«, b. Oct., 1871. 

620. MARCUS D. HYDE, son of Vestatia I. Morris (485) 
and Dr. J. S. Hyde, born May, 1849, at Jamaica, N. Y. He was 
graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1870; appointed 
ensign in 1871; master in 1874; resigned, 1877. 

627. CHARLES 0. AVERY, son of Margaret E. Morris 
(496) and Thomas Morris Avery, born July 7, 1854. Married, 
Nov. 26, 1873, Mary Swansdale of Greenwich, S. C. Lumber 
merchant, in the firm of T. M. Avery & Son, Chicago. 

639. WILLIAM H. MORRIS, 1st son of Charles E. (507), 
born at Jordan, N. Y., Sept. 4, 1841. Died in 1879. He was a 
man of excellent character. Married, Oct. 13, 1863, Caroline New- 
comb of Sheboygan, Mich. Banker, at Cairo, 111. Broad Church. 
Democrat. Children: 

670. Caroline W.^, b. 

671. Frederick^, b. 



[third branch.] eighth generation. 301 

640. CHARLES EDWARD MORRIS, 2d son of Charles E. 
(507), born at Battle Creek, Mich., Nov. 21, 1844. Accountant, in 
Chicago. Methodist. Republican. Unmarried in 1875. 

641. FREDERICK C. MORRIS, 3d son of Charles E. (507), 
born at Sheboygan, Mich., Aug. 27, 1847. Accountant, at Weath- 
erford, Tex. Unmarried in 1875. 



APPEIsTDIX A. 

[See Introduction.] 



THE NORMAN MORRISES. 

That there were persons of the name of Morris, or from whom 
tlie name of some families is derived, who came to England 
with William the Conqueror and who were in the battle of 
Hastings, Oct. 14, 1066, there can be no doubt, for certain it 
is that their names are enx'olled on the list of the Roll of 
Battle Abbey — an abbey built by William on the battle-field of 
Hastings. Tliose who fought under the ducal banners of William 
took every possible means to have their names well known and 
remembered by future ages, not only because their descendants 
would be enabled by it to obtain or plead for favors from the 
reigning family and insuring to themselves the estates they had 
gained, but also from the pride inherent in human nature as foun- 
ders of families in a country they had won by their prowess. For 
these reasons the name of every person of any consideration was 
written upon a roll and hung up in the Abbey of Battle. The 
persons there mentioned were the patriarchs of most of the English 
gentry for many ages, and many of the chief nobility of the pres- 
ent day. The number of these names is variously given. Holing- 
shed mentions more than six hundred names. Stow mentions only 
four hundred and seven, Thomas Scriven still less. John Foxe, in 
his "Acts and Monuments," has given a list of William's great 
men and officers. Leland has a copy also. He saw and transcribed 
the original. In his copy the following names are analogous to 
Morris; the orthography is of little consequence, as the spelling of 
names was not fixed at that period, nor for ages afterwards, every 
one writing his name as he pleased — "Mourreis," "Marre," "De 
la Mare," " Fitz Morrice." In Hollingshed's copy are found 
"Murres," "Morreis," and "Fitz Morrice." Foxe, in his list of 
" Normans who remained alive after the battle and advanced 
rights to the land," mentions '• Le Sire De la Marr," "Le Sire de 
Maire." '-H. De Morreys " The Norman De Marisco's or Moriis's 
made two settlements, one principally in Somersetshire, at Hunts- 



APPENDIX A, 303 

pyle, Bath, etc., the other at Beau-Marais (bo-morris) in Wales. 
According to Chevalier Henry De Mont-morency these families are 
from Normandy, and are the same as Mont-Morency, the most 
eminent family of Prance, " which has furnished more constables 
and admirals than any other." 

THE INVASION OF IRELAND. 

In the year 1169, a little more than a century after the arrival 
of the De Mariscos in England, King Dermot McMorrogh of Ire- 
land, made request of Richard de Clare or Strongbow, Earl of 
Chepstow, Pembroke, for aid to shield him from the revenge of 
his enemy. Hervey de Montmorency — Marisco, Robert Fitz 
Stephen de Marisco were sent over to Ireland from Beau-Marais, 
and landed on the 11th of May. The barons and knights who 
followed them were from Somersetshire, or the neighboring dis- 
tricts, where their possessions were. They were followed on the 
21st of August by Strongbow himself with 200 knights and 1,200 
soldiers. 

Hervey de Montmorency, Lord de Marisco, was Marshal to 
Henry II, and Seneshal of Leinster for Earl Strongbow, and Con- 
stable of Ireland. He obtained from King Dermot McMorrogh ex- 
tensive grants of land in the baronies of Forth and Bagie and the 
greater part of Shelburne. He finally retired from the world and 
took the cowl in Christ Church, Canterbury, where he died 
without issue. He had nephews. Robert Fitz Stephen, Geoffrey 
De Monte, Herlewin De Maris or Marisco, and a niece Isabella, who 
married Richard De Clare. He probably built Kilkenny Castle ; 
Robert Fitz Stephen built Carrick Castle in Wexford; Geoffrey 
built Moyroth Castle in 1219, and Castle Kilhill. Herlewin built 
the Church of the Abbey of Dunbrody about 1216, and became 
Bishop of Leinster. 

Of those of this race which settled in Somersetshire, most prob- 
ably Richard De Marisco, Lord Chancellor of Durham from 1217 
to 1228, was among the most distinguished. Richard De Morris, 
master of the College of St. Mary de Valentia, or St. Paul, Pem- 
broke Hall, Cambridge, in 1342-3, was probably of the same 
family. 

Maurice was one of William's cliaplains, to whom he gave the 
Bishoprick of London in lOSG, and this Bishop Maurice, some say, 
crowned Henry I in 1100. 



APPENDIX B. 

[See Introduction.] 



THE WELSH MORRISES. 



Welsh pedigrees are proverbially bewildering, but the Morris 
families seem to have clearly established theirs. 

To quote again from Burke, "The Commoners of England": 
MoRRiCE, a name of great antiquity, can be traced in lineal 
descent from Elystan or Athelstan Glodrydd, i. e., Athelstan "the 
illustrious," born in 933 and died early in the eleventh century — 
Prince of Ferlys, betwixt the Wye and Severn, who sprung from 
the old princes of Powys, and who, through his mother Rheingar, 
daughter and heir of Grono ap Tudor Trevor, was eighth in a 
direct line from Caradoc Weichfras, Lord of Hereford, one of the 
knights of King Arthur's Round Table. Athelstan was godson 
to Athlestan, King of England, the founder of the fourth royal 
tribe of Wales. He wedded Groladys, daughter and heir of 
Rhyn, Lord of Regain, and was father of Kydwgan ap Elystan, 
Prince of Ferlys, who married Elen, daughter of Brock- 
well, Lord of Powys. He had a son Idneth ap Kydwgan, Prince 
of Ferlys, Lord of Radnor, who was father by Gwentlian, daugh- 
ter of Poreth ap Owen, Lord of Keveliog of Gwrgenay ap Idneth, 
Lord of Radnor Prince of Ferlys, who married Elen, daughter 
and heir of Rhys ap Aron, Lord of Langethen. They had a son 
Howel ap Madoc, who married Elinor, daughter of Warren ap 
David Voel, and from whom came Phillip dordy of Llinwent in 
Radnorshire, who married Eva, daughter and heir of Kin Cygdryn, 
Lord of Hampton. Their second son, David, married Joan, daugh- 
ter and heir of Owen ap Ringchar ap Lowden ; their son, levan Phil- 
lip of Caron. married Margaret, daughter of levan ap Merydeth ; 
their son, Reos ap levan, married Maloth, daughter and licir of Icvan 
Gwrgan; their son Morgan ap Rees married Gwillian, daughter 
of David a}) Gttan Icvanddy, and their son, Morys ap Moi-gan, 



APPENDIX B. 305 

wedded Ellen, daughter of levan ap Guffdday, who sprang from 
a common ancestor with himself. Morys had: 

William, 1st born and heir. 

Grulfyth, 2d son, died without issue. 

Phillip, 3d son, died without issue. 

levan, 4th son. 
William was captain in the Royal Navy, supposed to have mar- 
ried one of the Martyn family of Devonshire. He had a son 
William, who married Jane, daughter of John Castell of Ashbury, 
Devonshire. They had three sons: 

William, born in 1670; captain. Royal Navy. 

Salmon, Admiral of the White, Royal Navy. 

Bezaliel. 
The descendants of WilKam constitute the Betshanger family. 

THE WERRINGTON FAMILY. 

levan Morys, 4th son of Morys, married Mary, daughter of John 
Castel of Ashbury in Devonshire. He was fellow of All Souls 
College, Oxford, LL.D., and Chancellor of Exeter in 1594. He 
died, May, 1605. Sir William Morrice. son of levan Morris, was 
born in 1602. He was a member of Parliament in Cromwell's 
time. He married a daughter of Humphrey Prideaux. He was 
knighted by Charles II. on his landing at Dover, and made Secre- 
tary of State and Privy Councilor in consequence of his great 
services in bringing in the Restoration by liis influence with Gen- 
eral Monk. He had sons: 

1. William, born in Exeter. 

2. John; married Mary Lowther of Wliitehaven, Cumberland, 

and he had a son John, who lived at Walthamstow, 
Essex, and a daughter Mary, who married Captain 
John Bansell. 

3. Sir Nicholas Morris; married, 1704, Lady Catherine, daugli- 
ter of the Earl of Pembroke. 

In 1651 Sir William Morris bought of Sir Francis Drake the 
burton of Werrington, Devonshire, and in 16G7 Sir Francis Wise 
sold him Stoke-Damarell or Morrice-town, on the road to Fal- 
mouth and the Lands End, for ,£11,000. On the death of Sir 
William Morrice, Bart., in 1749, the estate passed by will to liis 
nephew, Sir John St. Aubyn, Bart. In 1775 the estates were sold 

39 



306 MOUKIS FAMILY. 

by the representatives of tlie family to tlic Duke of Nortliumbcr- 
land. Humphrey Morris, the last of the Morrises of Werrington, 
died in 1763, and the family is now extinct. The burial place of 
the family is the parish church, Werrington. 

Sir William Morris was a learned man. He had a fine library, 
and wrote several religious treatises. 

MORRIS OF THE HURST, SHROPSHIRE. 

John Morris, Alderman of Clun in 1587. son of Morris ap David, 
who was descended from Hoedlin ap Cadwgan, 4th son of Cadw- 
gan ap Elystan, Lord of Builth and Radnor, married Margaret, 
daughter of Cadwalader ap Owen ap John of Madoc Lloyd of 
Rystack, and had, with other sons, Robert Morris, father of 
Thomas Morris of Abscot Clungerford, County Salop (died in 
1596), and Anthony Morris of the Hurst, who married, in 1585, 
Ann, daughter of Henry Macklin of Abcot. They had: 

John Morris of the Hurst, living in 1659. 

Thomas Morris, died in 1681. 

MORRIS OF YORK. 

This family, in common with Morris of Werrington, Morris of 
Betshanger, Kent, Morris of the Hurst, Morris of Pentenavent, 
and the houses of Cadogan, Pryces of Newton, and others, claim 
descent from Elystan Glodrydd, a powerful British chieftain, 
founder of the 4th royal tribe of Wales, born in 933. 

Colonel Roger Morris, the competitor of Washington for the 
hand of Mary Philipse, belonged to this family. He was son of 
Roger Morris, born in 1695, and grandson of Owen Morris, born 
in 1670. 

THE MONMOUTHSHIRE MORRISES. 

About the middle of the fifteenth century a branch of the Morris 
family settled in Monmouthshire and became possessed of estates 
at Tintern, Denham, and Penterry, etc. This branch claimed 
their descent from Mawr-Rhys (an appellation for Rhys or Rhice 
Fitz Gerald), a Cambrian chieftain, who was one of the successful 
invaders of Ireland in 1171, in the reign of Henry II. The 
king having recalled Rhys from his conquests and appropriated 
them to himself, gave him in compensation a large domain in 



APPENDIX B. 307 

Wales, where the family flourished for many generations, having 
dropped the name of Pitz-Geraid and adopted that of Maur-Rhys, 
or Mawr-Rhice In the seventeenth century the descendants of 
the Great-Rhys were a considerable people in Monmouthshire, and 
were called Maurices, or sometimes Morrice. In 1635 the family 
at Tintern was represented by three brothers — sons of William 
Morris — Lewis, William, and Richard. Lewis Morris, who lived 
on the paternal estate at Tintern, raised a troop of horse in sup- 
port of Parliament, for which King Charles I. confiscated his 
estates in Monmouthshire. In return for his losses Cromwell sub- 
sequently indemnified him. At the attack upon Chepstow Castle, 
which was defended by Sir Nicholas Kemish, the king's general, 
Lewis Morris was the second in command, and, after an obstinate 
resistance, the garrison was reduced by cutting off the supply of 
water which ran through the estate of Piercefield, then owned by 
Colonel Morris, son-in-law of John Walters, and setting fire to the 
castle. From this circumstance the family assumed as their crest 
a castle in flames, with the following motto: "Tandem Vincitur," 
— at length he is conquered. In 1654 Lewis Morris was sent by 
Cromwell to the Spanish West Indies, with orders to make himself 
master of those seas. In this undertaking he was aided by his 
nephew. Captain John Morris, who had long been settled in Bar- 
badoes, while in this service he purchased a large estate in that 
island and settled there in 1662. 

William Morris, who was living on his estate at Denham, also 
took an active part against the king. After the defeat of the 
popular party he determined to absent himself till the storm 
should blow over, but he was lost at sea. 

John Morris, son of William, received a captain's commission 
from Parhament in 1651. He also perished at sea off Dover 
Castle, in 1688. His body was found under the walls of the castle 
and buried with military honors. His descendants are numerous 
in Barbadoes. 

THE MOXMODTH MORRISES IN AMERICA. 

Richard Morris, the younger of the three brothers, held a cap- 
tain's commission in his brother Lewis' regiment. On the Restora- 
tion he retired to Barbadoes, where he married a wealtliy lady by 
the name of Pole. In 1670 he transferred himself to New York. 
He purchased a large estate in Westchester County, uu the llarloui 



308 MORKIS FAMILY. 

River, and obtained a grant from Governor Fletcher wliicli erected 
his domain of more than three tliousand acres into a manor, under 
the name of Alorrisania, with all the customary manorial privileges. 
He died in 1673. leaving an only child, Lewis, born in 1672, who 
inherited his father's estate. His mother having died before his 
father, he was left an orphan without any relatives in the country. 
The government of the colony appointed a guardian to take care 
of him and his property. By a contract made between his father 
and his Uncle Lewis, still living in Barbadoes, the latter was to 
come to New York and settle on a part of the manor. On his 
arrival not long after the death of Richard, he took charge of his 
nephew, and made him his heir. Young Lewis entered early into 
public life, and rose into prominence. He was a member of the 
council of New Jersey and judge of the Supreme Court. He was 
also chief justice of New York. When New Jersey was made a 
separate province, he was appointed governor of it, which office he 
held until his death in May, 1746. He was a man of letters, of 
grave manners, though somewhat whimsical disposition. He had 
a penetrating mind and is said to have had no equal in knowledge 
of the law and in the art of intrigue, and was able and unyielding in 
debate. He possessed a large estate in Monmouth, N. J., which was 
named for his ancestral home in Wales. He married, Nov. 3, 
1691, Isabella, daughter of James Graham, attorney -general of 
New York, and had four sons and eight daughters. He was 
buried in the vault at Morrisania. 

Lewis Morris, the eldest son of Governor Lewis Morris, was 
born Sept. 23, 1698, and died July 3, 1762. He lived at the 
manor of Morrisania. He was early a member of the Assembly, 
and won popidarity by his support of the rights of that body, and 
the interests of the people. He was judge of Oyer and Terminer, 
and also of Vice- Admiralty. He married 1st, Cathoi-ine Staats, 
and had the following children: 

General Lewis, b. April 8, 1726. 
General Staats Long, b. Aug. 27, 1728. 
Hon. Richard, b. Aug. 15, 1730. 
Mary, b. Nov. 4, 1734; m. T. Lawrence. 

Ho married 2d, Sarah Gouverneur, and had: 
Gouverneur, b. Jan. 30, 1752. 
Isabella, b. Feb. 17, 1748; m. Isaac Wilkins, D.D. 



APPENDIX B. 309 

Sarah, b. Nov. 23, 1749. 

Eupliemia, b. Sept. 10, 1754; m. Samuel Ogxlen. 

Catherine, b. Jan. 7, 1757; m. V. P. Ashfield. 

In his will, dated Nov. 19, 1760, occurs the following very 
singular passage ; the record of a strongly prejudiced mind: " It is 
my desire that my son Gouverneuk Morris may have the best 
education that is to be had in England or America; but my express 
wiU and directions are that he be never sent for that purpose to 
the Colony of Connecticut, least he should imbibe in his youth 
that low craft and cunning so incident to the people of that Coun- 
try, which is so interwoven in their Constitutions that all their art 
Cannot disguise it from the World, tho' many of them under the 
Sanctifyed Garb of Eehgion have Endeavored to Impose them- 
selves on to the world for honest men." And yet, his eldest son 
Lewis had graduated at Yale College. General Lewis Morris, son 
of the foregoing, married Mary Walton, and settled down to 
domestic Hfe at Morrisania, and devoted his time to agriculture. 
He took an early and decided part with the advocates of freedom. 
He was a member of the Continental Congress, and voted for and 
signed the Declaration of Independence, for which act his beauti- 
ful manor of Morrisania was bombarded and destroyed by British 
ships lying in the East River. His thousand acres of woodland 
w^as destroyed, and his family driven into exile. He was a brig, 
adier in the Continental Army after his resignation from Congress 
in 1777. He died in 1798. He had ten children; six sons and 
four daughters. 

Staats Long Morris, 2d son of Hon. Lewis Morris, became a 
general in the British Army, and a member of the British Parlia- 
ment. He married the Duchess of Gordon, and lived and died in 
England. 

Richard Morris, the 3d son of Hon. Lewis Morris, married 
Sarah, daughter of Henry Ludlow. He became judge of Vice 
Admiralty, and chief justice of New York. 

Gouverneur Morris, 4th son of Hon, Lewis Morris, by his second 
marriage, was born Jan. 31, 1752. He was graduated at Kings 
College in 1768. He studied law with Wilham Smith, an eminent 
lawyer in New York, and was admitted to tiie bar in 1771, before 
he was twenty years of age. He became a member of the first 
Provincial Congress of New York in 1775, and was a member of 



310 MORRIS FAMILY, 

the successive Congresses till 177S. when he became a member of 
the Continental Congress, of which body he was a member for two 
years. In 1780 he removed to Philadelphia, and in 1787 was a 
member of the Constitutional Convention. He was one of the 
committee for the revision of the Constitution, and by his hand 
that great instrument was written. It is said that at a critical 
period in the Convention, when all efforts toward harmonizing 
the views of the delegates upon some form of government seemed 
failures, and fears prevailed that the Convention would dissolve, 
Mr. Morris, who had been absent for awhile, learning the situation, 
entered the Convention and made a speech of such eloquence and 
power on the necessity of union and self-sacrifice that it contrib- 
uted much to make a change in the feelings of the members, and 
ultimately to the adoption of the Constitution. He was the original 
projector of our decimal system of currency, and also of the Erie 
Canal. He was a sincere and ardent patriot and an able and wise 
statesman. He possessed brilliant powers, an astonishing memory, 
a melodious voice, and graceful speech. He was open and frank 
in his ways, of great simplicity of manners, a lover of truth, and 
without dissimulation. He acquired wealth, and lived freely with- 
out ostentation. In his person he was tall, well proportioned, and 
of commanding figure, with oval, regular, handsome, and expres- 
sive features. He was minister to France in 1792. In 1800 he 
was chosen United States Senator from New York. In 1786 
he purchased the estate of Morrisania from his brother, General 
Staats Morris, and made it his home thereafter. He died at Mor- 
risania in 1816, He married, at the age of fifty-eight, Anne Carey, 
daughter of Thomas Randolph of Virginia, a lineal descendant of 
Pocahontas, and left a son, Gouverneur Morris, the well known 
farmer of Morrisania. His Hfe and works, in three volumes, 
edited by Jared Sparks, were published in 1832. 

Robert Hunter Morris, the 2d son of Governor Lewis Morris of 
New Jersey, was, for thirty-six years one of the council of that 
province, and from 1754 to 1756 was also Lieutenant-Governor of 
Pennsylvania. He died in 1764. He had a vigoi'ous mind, and 
was liberally educated. He was an impartial and upright judge, 
and a stout adherent to legal forms. He had an easy address and 
was commandine: m influence and manners. He was free from 



APPENDIX B. 311 

avarice, and generous and manly, though sometimes inconsiderate 
in the relations of Kfe; often singular and whimsical; always 
opinionated and inflexible. 

The Morris families of "Westchester and Otsego Counties in New 
York, and in New York city, and also most of the name in New 
J ersey, are the descendants of Richard and Lewis Morris. 



APPENDIX C. 

[See Introduction.] 



MORRIS OF ESSEX. 

This family claims descent from Gryffyth ap Cynan, King of 
North Wales, and last King of Wales, 1078-1099. One of its 
ancestors who lived in the eleventh century, in the time of Henry 
II., accompanied Strongbow in 1172 in the invasion of Ireland, 
and having distinguished himself by his warlike achievements, 
was, for pre-eminence, called Mawr-Rhys, or Maur-Rice: i. e., the 
"Great-Rhys," and his descendants forever after thought it an 
honor to keep the addition, and thus the name became Mawr-Rhys 
or Maur-Rice. 

About the year 1350 John Morys, one of his descendants, 
settled in the vicinity of Royden and Nazing, in the County of 
Essex. In 1383, he gave lands in Waltham, Nazing, and Roydon 
to Waltham Holy Cross Abbey. In 1377 his son, John Morys, 
also gave the abbey forty acres of land. In 1371 Nicholas Morys, 
who was probably the son of John Morys, Senior, became abbot 
of Holy Cross Abbey. He was one of the persons appointed to 
inquire into the miscarriages of the reign of Richard II. He was 
Abbot from 1371 to 1390. Among the descendants of John Morys 
was James Morys, Esq., whose son and heir John Morys, Esq., of 

Roydon, born in 1440, married a daughter of Buckbeard, 

Esq., and had a family of five sons and two daughters: William, 
Ruaffe or Rolfe, Henry, Oliver, Phillip, Anne, and Margaret. His 
son, William Moryce, became the possessor of the castle and 
manor of Ongar in Essex in 1543. He married Anne Isaack; 
perhaps a daughter or sister of Edward Isaack of Wells in Kent, 
son of William Isaack of Patrixton. He died June 17, 1553, 
leaving sons: James, his heir, born in 1548, and who died Feb. 2, 
1596, aged forty-eight, and Thomas, another son, a daughter Mar- 
garet, and perhaps other children: 

James Morice — the son and heir of WilUam — of Middle 
Temple, member of Parliament for Colchester in the twenty. 



APPENDIX C. 313 

seventh, twenty-eightli, thirty-first, and thirty-seventh of Eliza- 
beth; chancellor of the Duchy; attorney for the Court of Wards, 
and recorder of Colchester. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
George Medley, Esq. He possessed besides the family estate, 
Parsons-acre; and the manor of Sutton in Essex. He took down 
the old castle at Ongar — part of which is said to have been built 
during the Roman occupation — on account of its dilapidated state, 
and erected near the keep an entirely new mansion, which, by 
reason of its lofty situation and pleasant walks, became one of the 
finest seats in the County of Essex. Of this last edifice a consid- 
erable portion has been destroyed, but some of the adjacent 
ancient fortifications may be distinctly traced. Here, Mr. Morris 
was honored by a visit from Queen Elizabeth in 1579. He was a 
most able and learned barrister, a man of great piety, a zealous 
opposer of vice, an assured friend of the Reformation, and a zeal- 
ous defender of the rights of the people against all oppression. 
In the Parliament of 1592, he moved the House to inquire into 
the proceedings of the bishops in the spiritual courts, and how 
far they could justify their inquisition, their subscriptions, and their 
binding the queen's subjects to their good behavior contrary to 
the laws of God and the realm; their compelling men to take oaths 
to accuse themselves; and to deprive, degrade, and imprison them, 
and keep them in prison during their own pleasiire. He offered 
two bills to the House, one against the oaths ex officio, and the 
other against the illegal proceedings of the bishops, in which he 
was supported by Sir Francis Knollys and other great statesmen. 
On the 10th of February, 1593, he was, by Her Majesty's order, 
seized and committed to prison in Tutbury Castle, where he was 
confined for some time, and removed from his office of Chancellor 
of the Duchy. Accounts differ as to the length of his imprison- 
ment ; but it was probably for a short time, as in October, 1593, 
the Earl of Essex, in a letter to Anthony Bacon, Esq.. after 
stating that he had importuned the Queen, though unsuccessfully, 
to appoint Francis Bacon her attorney-general, he says: "She 
bade me name any man of worth whom others had not named. 
1 named Mr. Morrise, and gave him his due. She acknowledged 
his gifts; but said his speaking against her as he had done, sliould 
be a bar against any preferment at her hands; but seemed to 
marvel that others had never thought of him." ^ 

In a letter to Lord Burghley, March 1, 1592, justifying "the 

40 



314 MORRIS FAMILY. 

cause he had preferred " that " as heretofore wc praid from the 
tyranny of the Bishop of Rome 'Good Lord deliver us,' we be 
compelled to say from the tyranny of the clergie of England 
' Good Lord deliver us,' by God's grace whilst life doth last, 
which I hope now after so many cracks and crazes may not be 
long, I stand for the maintainance of the honor of God and my 
prince, and will stryve for the freedom of conscience, the preser- 
vation of public justice, and the liberties of my country against 
wrong and oppression." He died February 2, 1596, aged forty- 
eight. He had children: Anne, born 1567; John, his son and 
heir, born 1568; Edward, born 1670; Elizabeth and Henry, born 
1581. His sister Margaret married George, 3d son of Sir Bryant 
Tuke — secretary to Cardinal Woolsey — who possessed Layer 
Marney Manor, Essex. 

Sir John Moryce, son of James, knighted May 20, 1603, 
married Catherine, daughter and sole heir of Sir Gabriel Pointz of 
North Okenden, who brought him the Manor of North Okenden, 
or North Okenden Hall; the Manor of Pointz in South Okenden, 
and several other estates and messuages of land^. He took the 
name of Pointz. He died January 31, 1 617-18 and was succeeded 
by his son Sir James Pointz, alias Morice, who died August 31, 
1623. He married ]\lary, daughter of Sir Richard Smith, of 
Leeds Castle, Kent. His only son, Sir Richard Pointz, alias 
Morice, died at Montauban, France, in 1643, unmarried, and 
was buried at Montauban. His monument is in North Okenden 
Church, and has this inscription: "I have trusted in the Lord all 
the days of my life." The Castle and Manor of Chipping Ongar, 
bought by William Morice, continued exactly a century in his 
male line and then passed into the hands of the sister of Richard 
Pointz, alias Morris. 

Rev. Thomas Moryce, 2d son of William Moryce of Chipping 
Ongar, married, Dec. 15, 1570, Margaret, daughter of Oliver 
Lynde of the County of Warwick. He was rector of Layer 
Marney in Essex. He died in 1602, leaving a son Thomas Mor- 
ice, Esq., of Woodford, Essex, who married Anne, daughter of 
Ralph Bagle, Esq., of London, and had a son Thomas Morris, Esq , 
M. P. for Harlimor, County of Surrey, fifteenth of Charles II. One 
of his descendants in the 3d generation, Rev. Thomas Morris, pre- 
bendary of Limerick, Ireland, 1749, built Attlebury House, near 
Springfield, County of (Hare, now in the possession of the family. 



APPENDIX C. 315 

From the Essex Morris family of Roydon the Morrises of Mas- 
sachusetts and Connecticut are without doubt descended. 

TUE '-GREAT RYCE." 

The following account of the "Great Rhys," the ancestor of the 
several Morris families, is found in Camden's Britannia : 

"Reynulph, in his 7th book and 31st chapter, maketh mention 
about this time (1200) of a Prince of Wales whom he called Rees 
or Rice died, in whose prayse this that folloi^ eth is written by the 
said author: 

'•0 blisse of battaille, chylde of chivalrie, defence of countrie, 
worship of aimes, arme of strength, hande of largeness, eye of 
reason, brightness of honestie, bearing in breast, Hector's prow- 
ess, Achilles' sharpness, Nestor's soberness, Eurilaus' swiftness, 
Tydeus' hardiness, Sampson's strength, Hector's worthiness, Ulixes' 
faire spaech, Solomon's wisdom, Ajax's hardiness. clothing of 
naked, the Hungries meat, fulfilling the request of all that desyred. 
eloquence, fellow in service, honest of deeds, and sober in words. 
Glad of semblance and love in face, goodly to every man and 
rightful to all, The noble diadem and beautie of Wales is now 
fallen, that is, Ryce is dead! All Wales groneth: Ryce is dead! 
The enemie is here for Ryce is not here. Now Wales helpeth not 
itself. Ryce is dead and taken away, but his noble fame is not 
dead, for it is always new in the worlde-wyde! If a man ask what 
is the end? it is ashes and dust ! there is he hid; but he is unkilled, 
for fame dureth evermore, and suffreth not the noble duke to be 
hid from speeche. His prowess passed his manners. His wisdom 
passed his prowess. His eloquence exceeded his wisdom, and his 
good counsayles passed his eloquence." Hitherto Reynulph. 

Griff yth ap Cynan died in 1137 at the age of eighty -two years. 
He was the last who bore the title of king in Wales. He had 
three sons and five daughters by his wife Engharad, daughter of 
Owen ap Edwyn, Lord of Englfield. 



APPENDIX D. 

[See page 21.] 



WILL OP ELIZABETH CARTWRIGHT. 



[Made ten days before her death; original in the handwriting 
of Captain Isaac Johnson.] 

The last will and Testament of Elizabeth Cartwrit of boston in 
New England 26 of September 1673. 

it having pleasd God to visit me with much weakness yet hav- 
ing nay perfect memory and understanding; I do commit mysoule 
into the hand of Jesus Christ; and my body I leave to my deare 
brother Edward Morris and other of my frends to be desently 
buried and my funerale expenses to be discharged; the rest of my 
worldly goods I dispose of as followeth, 

first, My will is that cousin' Elizabeth Morris shall haue all my 
land in boston and the housing upon it when she comes to be of 
the age of eighteen yeares — or on her marriage day unless her 
father se cause to give his said daughter Ehzabeth aforesaid one 
hundred pounds in money at the time above appointed, that so, his 
sou Isaac Morris may in joy the said land and housing upon it, the 
which hberty I do by this my will give to my brother Edward 
Morris their father ; and my will is that the said Elizabeth except 
of the hundred pounds in the roome of the above said land and 
housing upon it her father giving the said Elizabeth an Equal 
portion of his estate with the rest of her brothers and sisters and 
so the said land and housing upon it shall be the said Isaac Morris 
by virtue of tliis my will. 

'indly. My will is that the above said Elizabeth shall haue my 
best bed with all its furnitur and two paires of my best sheets 
and two paires of my best pillow beers and all my plate and aU 
my pewter and brass and iron things and my table cloathes and a 
dusson of napkins and two of my best shifts and a suit of linin 
of the best linin at the time appointed, but if the said Elizabeth 
die before marriage or be eighteen yeares old then my will is that 



APPENDIX D. 317 

all the portions expressed in this several particulars in my will 
shall go to her two sisters Grace and Margaret Morris. 

3rdly. My will is that the rents of the above said housing and 
land be improued for the education and bringing up of the said 
Elizabeth Morris till the time above mentioned. 

4thly. My will is that my cousin^ Isaac Morris above men- 
tioned shall have my second best bed with its furniture and two 
pairs of sheets and two paires of pillow beers. 

5thly. My will is that my cusin'* Grace Morris shall have two 
pairs of my sheets and two shifts and a sute of linin. 

6thly. My Will is that my cusin" Margaret Morris shall have 
two paires of sheets and two shifts and a sute of hnin. 

Tthly. My will is that my cusin^ Edward Morris my couzin^ 
Ebenezer Morris my cousin'^ Samuel Morris have either of them 
a paire of sheets. 

8th. My will is that my cousin" Isaac Johnson's wife have 
one quaife and one dressing and one hand shoo and as much linin 
as will be equal to an apron. 

9thly. My wiU is that my deare friend John Weld's wife have 
one quaife and one dressing and one handcacher and one apron. 

lOthly. My will is that my cousin'' peper have one quaife and 
one dressing and one handcacher and one apron. 

llthly. My will is that my cousin'" bowin have one quaife and 
one dressing and one handcacher and one apron and my best 
mohair coat, 

12thly. My will is that my cousin" bartholomew have one 
quaife and one dressing and one handcacher and as much linen as 
will be equal to an apron. 

18th. My will is that my cousin'- Nathaniel Johnson's wife 
have one quaife and one dressing and one handcerchef and an 
apron: all the aprons mentioned my will is that they shall be good 
white linen aprons and those two that are mentioned to have the 
linen instead of or equal to an apron it is to be equal to such aprons. 

14thly. My will is that my brother Edward and Grace Morris 
his wife have all my movables that are not before disposed of, 
only what money is left all just charges being discharged, my will 
is that it be divided equally among all their children. 

15thly. My will is that my brother Edward Morris above men- 
tioned be my sole executor and I instruct my cousin Isaac 



318 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Johnson and my loving friend John Weld both of Roxbury to be 
my overseers. 

Lastly my will is that my two overseers be satisfied for what 
time they spend in this behalf. 

To this present will I have set my hand this day and date above 
written 

the (^ mark of 

Elizabeth Cartwrite. 
Witness 
Isaac Johnson 
John Weld 
Margaret Weld. 

Capt. Isaac Johnson and John Weld appeared and made oath in 

court this 10:0:73 that they were present and subscribed their 

names as witnesses to this Instrument and then sav7 Elizabeth 

Cartwright sign and pubhsh it to be her last^wiU and testament 

and y' she was then of disposing mind to the best of their knowledge. 

this then done as attested 

ffreegrace Bend all, rec. 

Note — The relationship termed "cusin " or cousin, in the will, 
was, at this period, rather indefinitely used, and often implied mere 
kinship and is difficult of explanation. In this will the term em- 
braces, as the compiler thinks, three degrees of relationship, as fol- 
ows: Numbers 1, 3, and 4, nieces; numbers 2, 5, 6, and 7, nephews ; 
number 8, Elizabeth (Porter) Johnson, cousin's wife; number 9, 
Elizabeth (Johnson) Peper, cousin — wife of Robert Pepper; num. 
bers 10 and 11, cousin's children — Elizabeth (Johnson) Bowen, 
wife of Henry Bowen, and Mary (Johnson) Bartholomew, wife of 
William Bartholomew; number 12, daughter of Captain Isaac 
Johnson; number 12, Mary (Smith) Johnson, wife of Nathaniel 
Johnson, son of Captain Isaac Johnson. 

When the will was made the children of Edward Morris were 
of the following ages: Isaac, 17; Edward, 15; Grace, 12; Eben- 
ezer, 9; Elizabeth, 7; Margaret, 5; Samuel, 3; Martha was not 
then born. 

The signing by mark was no evidence of inability to write. It 
was a very prevalent custom even at a later day. 



APPENDIX D. 



319 



INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF ELIZABETH CARTWRIGHT. 

An inventory of the goods or estate of Elizabeth Cartwrite, 
late of Boston, deceased the 4th of October, 1673: 

£ s. d. 
In land and housing ...... 150 - 00 - 

5-15-0 
3-11-8 
2-00-0 



one fether bed fether bolsters & one pair of blankets 
in curtaines & valences one rugg two pillows & a bolster 
m seavn parcels of pewter. Six saucers five porringers 
in two candlesticks, one salt, two pints pots & a cup 
& other small things, ..... 

in brass & iron things, as trammells & such things 
as appertain to the fire, iron wages, two axes, hand- 
saw, beetle rings, smoothing irons, & such . 
in a scarft and plate, in one fether bed, most & a 
fether bolster ..... 

in one rugg, two blankets two pillows 
in money ...... 

in another bed bolsters and pillows 

in one florl bed & coverlid and one blanket, 

in cloath and stockings .... 

in a trunk and chests and small desk 
in linin and woolin cloathes 

in linin & earthn ware & gloves & chaires and other 
small things, ..... 

in a table and plates & in lumber, . 

in eleven pairs of sheets, .... 



18-0 



3-10-0 

4-16-0 
5-14-0 

21-00-0 
1 -13-0 
1-13-0 
8-01-8 
1-00-0 

29-03-0 

1 - 15-0 
2- 18-0 
8-05-0 



246-15-8 



Edward Morrise Executor to the last will and testament of his 
sister Elizabeth Cartwright deceased made oath in court Oc*" 28 
1673 that this is a true inventory of ye estate of Elizabeth Cart- 
wright to the best of knowledge and that when he knows more he 

will give itt. 

this then done as attes"^' ffreegrace Bendall 

Recorder. 



APPENDIX E. 

[See page 23.] 



SUFFOLK COUNTY PROBATE RECORDS. 

Inventory of Isaac Morris Estate apprized 26 January 



House, Land & Barn on the town street 
Five acres pasture land on the- Dedham Road 
a lot of land at Woodstock in the old towns half 
Wearn apparell and arms 
Plate . . . . 

2 tables 6 chairs a looking glass 2 pair andirons 
Several beds & furniture 
Sheets & napkins & pillow bears . 
Tables Trunk Drawers chairs & chest 
Pewter and brass . 
Iron ware 
Earthen ware and lumber 

3 barrels cider 
a Tobbaco engine . 
a mare, 2 cows, 2 shoats 
2 small jags of coarse hay 

Widow for debts . 



1715-16: 

£ s. 

220-00 

50-00 

30-00 

10-19 

3-14 

4-07 

26-00 

10-00 

3-00 

8- 13 

2-00 

-10 

1 -04 

5-00 

19-00 

1 - .. 

395-07 

77-00 



APPEl^DIX F. 

[See page 40.] 



DEED OF DEACON EDWARD MORRIS TO EDWARD MORRIS JUNIOR. 

This Indenture made this sixth day of April in ye twelfth year 
of His Majestys Reign Annoqiie Domini 1726, by and between 
Edward Morris of Woodstock In ye County of Suffolk Province 
of Massachusetts Bay in New England, Yeoman & Eliz» Morris 
his wife on the one part and Edward Morris Jun^ of Woodstock 
afore"* yeoman on j" other part, Witnesseth that whereas they, 
y^ said Edward Morris and Eliz^ Morris being grown so aged as not 
to be capable of Improving ye place they now dwell in Woodstock 
afore^** near y" meeting house so as to gett a Comfortable subsist- 
ence thereon & being Willing to Dispose of ye same to their 
only well beloved son afores** Edward Morris Jun"' for ye sum of 
three hundred Pounds to be paid as hereinafter shall be Expressed 
and for sundry other Services and Reservations to be Done & 
Complyed with on ye part of ye said Edward Morris Jun' his 
heirs Execu''' & Adras% all which Render ye Lives of ye said 
Edw"* Morris & Eliz^ Morris more Comfortable, than otherwise 
they could be. With which as with a Valuable consideration 
they ye said Edward Morris & Eliz" Morris Do hereby acknowl- 
edge and themselves fully satisfied, Have Given, Granted bar- 
gained, sold & by these presents for themselves Tlieir Heirs, 
Executors & Admr' Doe fully freely & absolutely Give, Grant, 
bargain & sell Aliene, Enfeoffe, Convey Confirm & Deliver to him 
ye said Edward Morris Jun' & to his heirs and assigns forever all 
their certain messuages or Tenements afores"" as it Lyes in Two 
pieces both containing by Estimation thirty acres of Land, a 
Mansion house, Barn & orchard thereon, one part thereof contains 
by Estimation Twenty five Acres, & bounds Westerly and North- 
erly on highway & Elsewhere on land of said Edward Morris 
Jun". the other piece contains by Estimation live acres, & bound.s 

41 



322 MORRIS FAMILY. 

Easterly & Northerly on high ways, Elswhere on land of said 
Edward Morris Jun' to have & to hold all and singular s"* mes- 
suage or Tenements of housing & Land with all its appurtenances 
To him ye s'' Edward Morris Jun' and his heirs & Assigns for 
ever, To his and their only proper use & belioof & profitt for 
Euer more, & ye said Edward Morris and Ehz' Morris for them- 
selves their Execu"'" & admr' to & with ye said Edward Morris 
Juu'' Doe covenant, Grant & Agree that ye aforesaid messuage & 
Tenements & Every part thereof is free & clear from all encum- 
brance whatever & that ye premises & Every part thereof with all 
its appertenances to him ye said Edward Morris Jun"' his heirs & 
Assigns they will forever Warrant, Secure & Defend against all 
Legal Claims & Demands Whatsoever — Provided Always and 
these presents are upon the following conditions. That During 
ye Lives of ye Grantors Eespectively the said Edward Morris 
Jun' Doe not presume to sell or Dispose of ye premises nor any 
part thereof, That during the life of ye said Edward Morris he 
is to have ye sole use & Improvement of ye whole of said bar- 
gained premises and it is hereby Reserved to him any thing herein 
to ye contrary not with standing & if it should so happen that 
ye said Elizabeth Morris shall survive ye said Edward Morris that 
then and in such case she is to have use and Enjoy During her 
Life one half of ye Dwelling house with a suitable garden spot 
well fenced, & one half ye cellar & well, with Liberty of passing 
to & from ye same, and it is hereby Reserved to her That said 
Edward Morris Jun', his heirs, Execu" & Admr' Doe pay unto ye 
said Edward Morris sucb sum or sums of money as part of ye 
aforesaid three hundred pounds as he ye said Edward Morris shall 
from time to time Want During his Life for ye support of himself 
and his afore"' Wife and as ye same shall be reasonably Demanded 
and also upon ye Demand of ye afore sd Edward Morris ye 
s'' Edward Morris Jun"" his heirs &c shall pay to his Sisters, viz, 
to Abigail Morris ye sum of thirty pounds and to Susannah 
Morris ye sum of thirty pounds to make them Equal with 
what was Divided by ye said Edward Morris and Eliz" Morris to 
their other children, wliich said sums to Susannah & Abigail when 
paid to gether with what shall be paid by ye said Edward Morris 
Jun' to ye said Edward Morris from time to time for & towards 
his and his wifes support as afore s'' is to be upon Lawful Interest 
at ye Rate of six p ct p annum Simple Interest only from ye 



APPENDIX F. 323 

Respective Times of Payment which Interest is to be accounted as 
part of ye said three hundred pounds, and in case ye said Edward 
shall Dye befoi-e his Wife Eliz^ Morris, that then it sliall be law- 
full and for ye said Edward Moi-ris Jun"' his heirs Execu" and 
Admr' to Enter into, possess, Enjoy & Improve ye said premises, 
Except as before Reserved to ye said Eliz" Morris & to pay her 
the yearly Interest at the Rate of six p ct p annum if so much of 
s** three hundred pounds shall Remain unpaid according to ye 
afore^^ agreement During her Life for & toward her support 
Either in Money or in provisions at money price as she shall want, 
which Interest is not to be accounted any part of said three hun- 
dred pounds, but if ye said Elizabeth Morris shall Incline Instead 
of ye use of ye Remainder of s'^ three hundred pounds to have 
one third of ye Yallue thereof sett off in Land in part of ye said 
premises for her to Improve in some sutable and convenient place 
which she may have if she please, that thus & in such case ye 
said Edward Morris Jun' is to pay only the Interest of ye other 
two thirds that shall Remain unpaid of said three hundred pounds 
as afore'^ During her Life, and Finally it is agreed by and between 
the s*^ partys that so much of said three hundred pounds that shall 
Remain unpaid at ye Death of ye s'' Edward Morris In case he 
should not live his s"^ wife Eliz^ is & shall be accounted as Intes- 
tate Estate of said Edward Morris, and as such suffer a Division 
among his children or their Lawfull Representatives according to 
Law, Including the s'^ Edward Morris Jun'' and his heirs, or if it 
should happen that ye s'^ Eliz'» Morris shall survive ye s"* Edward 
Morris that then upon her decease so much of s"* three hundred 
pounds as shall Remain unpaid at the Death of s** Edward Morris 
afore'<^ is and shall be accounted as Intestate Estate as afore'^ and 
suffer a Division in all Respects as aforesaid Expressed. In Wit- 
ness Whereof the parties to these presents have hereunto Inter- 
changeably sett their hands & seals the Day & Year first above 

written. 

EDWARD MORRIS & a [seal] 
ELIZABETH MORRIS her J mark & a [seal] 

Signed Sealed Delivered in presence of us 
Daniel Abbott, 
John Chandler Jun*. 



324 MOIiRIS FAMILY. 

Suffolk: ss. AVoodstock, Feb. 1, 1730-1 

Elizabeth Morris then acknowledged this Instrument to be her 

act & Deed before me. 

John Chandler, Just. Pads. 

The foregoing is a true copy of ye original Deed ReC* Sept. 

22, 1731. 

Examined by John Chandler Jr Reg"". 

Woodstock Sept. 28, 1727. ReC of our Brother Edward 

Morris ye within mentioned sum of Sixty pounds Refered to as a 

part of our portion of our fathers Estate. I say reC* per John 

Frissell. 

ABIGAIL FRISSELL lier + mark 

SUSANNAH MORRIS 
"Witneses — 
Samul Morris 
John Chandler Jr. 

Worcester, s.s. 

Att a Court of General Sessions of ye Peace held at Worcester 
by adjournment Sept. 22, 1731 John Chandler Jr one of ye Wit- 
nesses to ye within Instrument came into Court and made solemn 
oath that he saw Edward Morris one of ye within subscribers. 
Sign, Seal & Execute ye same as his act & Deed to gether with 
Daniel Abbott Dec'd sett their names as witnesses thereof at ye 
same time. 

Attest John Chandler Jun, Clerk Pacis. 



APPEJSTDIX G. 

[See page 161.] 



INVENTORY OF LIEUT. EBENEZEB MORRIS ESTATE. 

Dwelling house and homestead .... £200 - 00 - 
Upland & Meadow at a place called the intervale 

near muddy Brook 35 _ 00 - 

1 ps 2d Division land & West Division land 110 

acres 100-00-0 

1 ps out Division 90 acres 35 _ 00 - 

18 acre rights South Division . . . . 54 _ OO - 

Apparel & Armes 20-00-0 

Neat Cattle Horses Sheep & Swine . . . 82-00-0 

Utensils for husbandry . . . . . 10-08-04 

Bed & table linen & childrens linen . . . 13-01-0 
Beds & Bolsters Coverlids, Blankets, Bedsteads 

cords & pillows 26-15-06 

Table, chairs, chests & boxes . . . . 5-16-0 

Pewter & Brass 7-16-03 

Utensils for housewifery &c . . . . 6-16-08 

A right in ye common 30/ . 
3 logs at Sawmill 22/6 . 

£805 -16-05 

appraised, March 25 1718. 

SARAH MOBRIS administrator Mav 2!) 171S 



£603 - 


- 03 - 


11 


1 - 


-10- 





1 - 


- 02 - 


06 



APPENDIX H. 

[See page 164.] 



WORCESTER PROBATE RECORDS. 

Will of Joshua Morris proved April 1734. Sarah Morris — his 
mother executrix; appointed April 27. 1732— no children. 

To Sarah Morris his mother — £120 for hfe. 

To Ebenezer Morris, Sarah Morris Jr, Elizabeth Sexton, Mehit. 
able Morris, Anna (Morris) Child, Dorothy Morris, and Sarah- 
Morris, only child of Joseph Morris, late of Boston, Taylor, £38 
each. 

Thomas Child of Woodstock made guardian to Sarah Mo rris d 
of Joseph Morris late of Boston April 1 1734, aged 7. yrs 

Sarah Morris (mother of Joshua) estate Aug 17 1742, £41. 17-6. 



APPENDIX 1. 

[See pcage 173.] 



PETITION OF SAMUEL MORRIS. 

To the HonouraUe Gurdon Salstonstall Esq Governor of His Muj'*" 
Colony of Connecticut and to the Hon'''-' assistants and House of 
Deputy's in Gen' Court assembled at Hartford May 11, 1721. 

The memorial of Samuel Morris most humbly showeth, That 
your memorialist with his family is settled upon a Farm (now with- 
in this colony) formerly accounted to ly within the Massachusetts 
Province, and belonged to the Hon" Joseph Dudley Esq late Gover- 
nor of said Province, and is situate between Woodstock and Oxford, 
upon the Road from Connecticut to Boston where it crosses the 
Great River called Quinabaug River. 

That your memorialist soon after his coming to settle there, 
which is now near six years, undertook and accomplished the build- 
ing a great Bridge over said River and two other bridges near to 
it, which by a modest computation amounted to (at the least) the 
sum of Sixty pounds, and he has annually been at considerable 
charge to secure and Repair said Great Bridge, its having suffered 
by the floods every year since it was built, So that said Bridge has 
never failed to be very beneficial to Travailers and Drovers, more 
especially at such times of the year when without the advantage of 
these there could have no passing. 

That your memorialist has ever since he lived upon said Farm, 
sat free from Publick Taxes, although he has made Improvement 
of some of his Land for more than four year: Notwithstanding 
which as he is not unwilling to do his duty, so is humbly of opinion 
he has not been unprofitable to the Government hitherto, inasmuch 
as he allowed a Country Road thro his land for more than a mile 
without any recompense for the same, whereby his chax'ge in fen- 
cing is very much augmented as well as erected and maintained 
said Bridcres without charge to the Government. 



328 MOUKIS FAMILY. 

Tliat the circumstances of your memorialist and his family is 
also very particular in another Regard: namely, they can have no 
advantage by going to meeting within the Government for the 
Public worship of God on Lord's daies nearer that Pomfret, which 
is nine miles; yet it is far easier and better going there than to Kil- 
lingly meeting house, but so it may please your Honours that if your 
memorialist and family must go to Pomfret for that service, they 
must pass by Woodstock meeting house which is at least five miles 
nearer to them, and as going to Woodstock meeting saves a great 
deal of Travelling on the Sabbath, so that is the place they have 
hithertoo constantly attended and not only constantly contributed 
towards the ministers maintainence there to General Satisfaction, 
but your memorialist has also been at considerable charge in the 
building their new meeting house that he might have accommodation 
for himself and family with the Inhabitants of Woodstock without 
being burdensome; all of which will be readily acknowledged by 
the people there. 

Your memorialists circumstances being so very particular and sin 
gular, and because he would not in anything willingly offend, doth 
now most humbly submit them to the Great Wisdom, Justice and 
Goodness of this Honourable Assembly, and most humbly prays 
(if it be not a great Impropriety) that himself and family may con • 
tinue to attend the Publick worship of God in Woodstock, and pay 
their proportion of such charge there where it will be so very Con- 
venient on all accounts. He also further prays, if it may be, that 
they may be freed from Public Charges within for so long a time 
as s'' bridges shall be Kept up in good repair, or such other time 
as your Honours shall seem most meet and take such bridges into 
your own hands. 

And your memoriahst shall as in Duty bound ever pray &c. 

SAMUEL MORRIS. 

His petition was granted for ten years. 

May 14, 1730, petitioned again. " Samuel Morris of Mianexit not 
belonging to any town." Extended ten years. 

P' Repairs, £30, 2'' £10, 3'^ £60, to rebuild. 

May 12, 1737. "Samuel Morris of Thompson Parish, County of 
Windham " says " the old Bridge is carried away and he has got 
timber for a new one" (the old one cost £100) asked for release 
from tax and church rates to go to Dudley to meeting 2| miles or 
to Woodstock 4i milcy. l'ciiiJ(jn iici^atived. 



APPENDIX I. 329 

1742, Petitioned again, — granted; exempt from county rates and 
one half parish rates. " Provided said Samuel Morris and his heirs 
that shall Hve on said farm shall maintain and keep in good Repair 
a good and sufficient bridge over the river easterly from his house 
where the bridge now is and also allow a free road tlirough his 
farm over said bridge where it now is or hereafter be found con- 
venint." 

1751. Samuel Morris (son) petitions — "bridge cost £300 the 
past year." Negatived. 

1752. He petitions again and is annexed to AVoodstock. 



42 



APPENDIX J. 

[See page 179.] 



PETITION OF SAMUEL MORRIS [jUNIOR]. 

To the Inhahitants of the Town of KilUngly at their Annual Meeting 
on Deceinher y" 4"' Day 1750 — 

The Memorial of Samuel Morris of Thompson Parish In Kil- 
lingly, Humbly Showeth — that whereas a certain traveller many 
years past In a Clandestine manner Left a certain Negro man at 
the House Late in possession of my Hon*^ Father Samuel Morris 
Late of s'' Thompson Deceased, named Mingo, which negro was at 
that time so Dimsighted as to be incapable of any service whereby 
he could pay and satisfy In any manner for the means of his sup- 
port and for several years last past has been actually blind and by 
Reason of his Great Age together with his bhndness is & hath been 
for many years a Great Charge to my s^ Hon"* Father as well as to 
me and the Infirmities of Old Age Daily Increasing upon him 
Render him more and more a charge & Burthen — Likewise where- 
as your memorialist (although now laid to the Town of Killingly) 
cannot with any manner of convenience Reep any benefit of ye 
Gospel Ministry in s** Town; or of the School money belonging 
thereto, by Reason of the Great Distance of his Situation from any 
Meeting House, or from any Regular School In s** Town; though 
his Taxes toward the Ministry are very Great. — 

And also considering the vast Expense your memorialist hath 
been (of late especially) In Repairing or building the Great Bridge 
over Quanebaug River neer his House (which Bridge is now neer 
finished) There foi-e your memorialist Humbly prays that In Con- 
sideration of the Great Cost & charge ho hath been att Respecting 
the s"* negro man that you would Grant to your poor memorialist 
the sum of Five Hundred Pounds in Bills of Credit of the Old 
tenour for his care & provision for him since the Decease of his 



APPENDIX J. 331 

s'' Hon'' Father; and that you would Provide means for his the 
s'' negro's support & maintainance for the time to come — Likewise 
in Consideration of the Great Taxes Paid as aforesaid without Pro- 
fit to your Memorialist, and also In consideration of His costs & 
charge He hath been att of Late In Repairing s"* Bridge which is 
between two & three Hundred pounds Laid out upon s** Bridge 
only. 

Your memorialist Humbly prays that you would in your Great 
Wisdom Devise some means whereby he may be Relieved of his 
Burthen, and particularly that you would Grant him One Hundred 
pounds In Bills of Credit according to the old tenour & your me- 
morialist will be satisfied (with the favor of the Government already 
allowed) which if you In your Great Wisdom & Goodness will 
please to Grant; your memorialist as In Duty Bound Shall Ever 
Pray &c 

SAM^ MORRIS. 
Dated In KilHngly Dec^ y^ 3'^ 
A. D. 1750— 

The petition was rejected. 



APPEISTDIX K. 

[See page 180.] 



SAMUEL MORRIS VS. MOSES MARCY, OCTOBER, 1755. 

Upon the petition of Samuel Morris of Thompson Parish, in 
the town of Killingly, representing that on the 13th of September, 
1750, one Moses Marcy of Sturbridge, in the county of Worcester, 
and Province of Massachusetts Bay, at the request of the petitioner 
and for his debt, become bound unto Samuel Perrin and John 
Perrin in the sum of £1,140, old tenor bills, that at the same time 
he made and executed to said Moses Marcy, a conveyance of sev- 
eral pieces of land in said Thompson Parish, being parcel of the 
farm whereon the petitioner now lives, and are those parts lately 
set out to the said Perrins in the partition of the estate of Mr. 
Samuel Morris, deceased, the petitioner's father, that the said Moses 
Marcy was by his bond of even date with said deed obliged to 
reconvey said lands to the petitioner upon his paying the said sum 
of £1,140, old tenor, and interest, in one year then next, that the 
petitioner not being able to pay said monies at the time, the said 
Moses Marcy agreed further to wait, and had taken further secu- 
rities for forbearance of said monies; that the petitioner had since 
tendered to pay said monies, and that the said Moses Marcy refused 
to accept the same, or on any reasonable terms to reconvey said 
lands to the petitioner according to the real intentions of the par- 
ties, and the equitable right of redemption which yet remained to 
the petitioner, and praying for relief, etc., which matter being by 
this Assembly referred to John Chester, David Rowland, and Eli- 
sha Sheldon, Esqrs., as a committee thereof to enquire, and they 
having reported that there is remaining due to said Moses Marcy 
the sum of £1,701 I65. 2^d. old tenor (exclusive of what securi- 
ties he had taken for interest on the monies), to make good the 
principal, discount, and interests of said £1,140, for which the said 
Moses became bound as aforesaid, which said sum of £1,701 IGs. 



APPENDIX K. 333 

2^d., old tenor, is supposed to be equal to £141 1 7s. 5d., lawful money. 
It is therefore resolved by this Assembly that the said Samuel 
Morris hath right to redeem said lands, and upon the tendency of 
payment of the aforesaid sum of £141 17s. 5^f/., lawful money, 
with the lawful interest for the same, from this day till the time of 
tending of payment to be made by the said Samuel Morris unto 
him, the said Moses Marcy, at his, the said Moses dwelling-house, at or 
before the 20th day of April next; he, the said Moses Marcy, do and 
shall duly execute and acknowledge a good ample deed of release 
and quit-claim unto him, the said Samuel Morris, his heirs, assigns, 
with covenant of warranty against the heirs and all others claim- 
ing under him, the said Moses, of the two parcels of land conveyed 
to him by the petitioner, aforesaid, and that on the failure of said 
Moses Marcy to execute and deliver said deed unto the said Sam- 
uel Morris, or to lodge the same with the said Secretary for the 
use of said Morris, some time before the 1 0th day of May next, he, 
the said Moses Marcy, shall forfeit and pay to the petitioner the 
sum of £500, lawful money, to be levyed of the goods or estate of 
him, the said Moses Marcy. — [Court Records, in Office of Secretary 
of State. "^ 



APPENDIX L. 

[See page 180.] 



Smithfield June ye 30th day A. D. 1756. this is an true In- 
ventory taking of the Goods and Chattels of Mr Samuel Morris 
late of Killingsly Resident in Smithfield who departed this life on 

the 13 of June last is as follows 

£. s. d. 

£270- 05-0 

113 -00-0 

156 - 00 - 

205 - 00 - 

066 - 15 - 

022 - 09 - 

014 -09-0 

009 - 15 - 

035 - 15 - 

045-10-0 



To his Wearing Apparel 

to a Libra .... 

to 3 Cows and 5 young Cattel 

to 3 hors Kind . 

to 4 hogs and 3 pigs . 

to old Iron and Sundyres . 

to a plow Irons and Sundyres 

to Skillet Irons and Sundyres 

to some Copper pains and Sundries 

to Chains and tramels and Sundries 

to Cart and Wheels and Carpenters tools and 
dyres .... 

to tramels and Irons and Chains 

to a Warming pan and Irons and Sundyres 

to 3 hatchels and Stilyeards and Sundyres 
to kniefs and forks Skails and Weights 
to one pot and Cittel and old Calk lumber 
to 3 bushel of Rie and old Cakes and Sund 
to a Loom and tacklen and old lumber 
to bages and lumber and Sundries 
to tubs and pails and Sundyres . 
to Chees press trays and Sundyres 
to a high Case of Drawers and one table 
to Low Case of Drawers and trunk 7 chears 
to one Looking Glass and Sundries 
to 6 Chears 2 trunk and 2 tables 



Sun 



ries 



116 - 10 - 

019 - 10 - 
028 - 10 - 
043 - 00 - 
008 - 00 - 

027 - 16 - 
056 - 00 - 
072 - 10 - 
035 - 15 - 

028 - 02 - 
031 -00-0 
080 - 00 - 
042 - 00 - 

020 - 10 - 
038 - 00 - 



APPENDIX L. 



335 



to a Chest and trunk and 2 Tables and Sundries 

to a Desk and Libra Case 

to 2 tables and Sundyres 

to a Silk bed quilt 

to a Cotton Coverled . 

to a sute of Curtens . 

to 1 1 table Cloths 

to towels and napkins and table Cloths 

to 8 pair of Cotton Sheets 

to 11 Sheets 

to 6 pair of pillow Cases 

to pillow Cases and four Coverlids 

to Coverlids 

to Sundyres bed blankets . 

to pillow Cases and Sundyres 

to Sheets and Sundyres 

to 6 hard melted plaits 

to 4 Silver Spoons and 3 pillow Cases, 

to Glasses and Sundries 

to a Brass and puter and Sundyres 

to puter 

to one bed and ticken 

Ditto . 

Ditto . 

Ditto . 

Ditto . 

Ditto . 

Ditto . 

to 2 Feather beds 

to five beds Stads and Cords and under bed 

Ditto .... 

to 2 bed Steads and Cord 

to 4 Notes of hand 

to 8 barriels of Syder . 

to 20 pounds of Sheeps Wool and Ropes 



Taken by us the Subscribers 



027 -15-0 
070 - 00 - 
032 - 10 - 
050 - 00 - 
035 - 00 - 

035 - 00 - 
046- 05-0 
046 - 05 - 
080 - 00 - 
045 - 00 - 

036 - 00 - 

059 - 00 - 
070 - 00 - 
068 - 00 - 
030 - 00 - 
040 - 00 - 
008 - 00 - 

023 - 00 - 
008 - 05 - 
024-12-0 
036- 04-0 
077 - 00 - 
079 -00-0 
056 - 05 - 

060 - 05 - 
060 - 00 - 
079 - 10 - 
068 - 00 - 
073 - 00 - 
028 - 00 - 

024 - 00 - 
007 - 10 - 
175 -02-0 
016- 00-0 
014 - 00 - 

£3,284 - 10 - 



JOHN ALDRICH, 
BENJ*' SLACK, 
ABRAHAM WINSOR, 



APPENDIX M. 



WOODSTOCK BURYING-GROUND. 

"Go where the ancient pathway guides, 

See where our sires laid down 
Their smiling babes, their cherished brides. 

The patriarchs of the town ; 
Hast thou a tear for cherished love ? 

A sigh for transient power ? 
All that a century left above, 

Go, read it in an hour." — Holmes. 

The Woodstock settlers chose for the burial-place of their dead 
a spot near the place selected for their meeting-house, and although 
we have no account of the choice of the locality before 1694, yet 
it is quite certain that it was the spot where some of the earliest 
dead had been buried. 

The first death in the settlement was that of Joseph Peake, who 
was dead before March 1, 1688. It is not known where he was 
buried; but the place was most probably in the ground subse- 
quently chosen for the burial-ground. Here certainly Edward Mor- 
ris was buried. The first death recorded in the town records bears 
the date of September 18, 1695, The first birth recorded is on 
March 26, 1690, and the first marriage April 9, 1690. 

The accompanying view of the burial-ground is taken from the 
extreme southern end, and shows the graves of the Morris family 
in the foreground; behind them are the graves of their allied 
families — the Peakes and the Perrins. 

Besides the grave-stones of Lieut. Edward Morris and Deacon 
Edward Morris, are others, bearing the following inscriptions: 

Heur Lies the Body op Lieut. 

Ebenezer Morris. 

He died ye 26, of 

FEBRy A. D. 1717 

Aged 54 years. 



APPENDIX M. 



337 



Sakah Morris. 
Only the name is legible. She was Sarah (Davis), wife of Lieut. 
Ebenezer Morris. She died April 18, 1741. 



Here Lies Beneath the Body 

OF Hannah Morris Daughter op 

Edward Morris by Bithiah 

his wife aged 18 years 

Deceased Sept. ye 2 

1736. 



In Memory of 

Edward Morris Jun"" 

Dec* August y" 14, 1745 

In y" 27 YEAR OP HIS age 

AND 

Hannah Morris daughter op 
Edward Morris Senior & 

BiTHYAH HIS WIPE DeC* YE 14''' 

Day op August 1745 in t« 

Sth YEAR OP HER AGE. 



Here 

Lies Buried. 

The Body op M' 

Benjamin Morris 

Aged 33 Years Deceased 

April y« IS'i^ 

1729. 



HEfeE Lies Buried the 

Body op Joshua Morris. 

Aged 27 years Deceased 

December 10"". 

1731. 



43 



338 morris family. 

Here Lies the Body op 

Mrs Martha Lyon wife of 

Dea. William Lyon. 

She died May y» 9"" 

1756 IN YE 81^' 

YEAR OP HER AGE. 

In 1870 there was standing in the ground a stone bearing the 
following inscription: 

Here Lies Beneath the Body op 

Joshua Morris who died 

September 10, 1753. 

The stone is now missing. It was the gravestone of Joshua, 
son of the second Ebenezer Morris in the second branch of the 
family. 

The graves of the following are also probably in this ground, 
although unmarked: 

Margaret Morris, wife of Dea. John Johnson. 

Elizabeth Morris, wife of John Bartholomew; d. Mar. 12, 1704. 

Grace Morris, wife of Joseph Peake. 

Abigail Morris, wife of John Frizzel. 

Dorothy Morris, daughter of Lieut. Edward; d. April 2, 1740. 

Ehzabeth Morris, d. Aug. 9, 1745, aged 29. 

Joshua Morris, son of Lieut Ebenezer; d. Nov. 2, 1703. 

"When the compiler first visited this ground in 1869-70, it was 
overgrown with large bushes and underbrush, and the graves were 
found with difficulty. On his second visit, ten years later, some 
improvement had been made; the large bushes had been cut away, 
but a new growth had begun. On his third visit these had disap- 
peared, and coarse and rank weeds had taken their place. On a 
late visit in October, 1885, the mar-ch of cemetery improvement had 
begun in earnest; the ground was being plowed and graded, the 
fallen stones replaced, many perishing inscriptions recut, and 
other work done, showing that at last the good people of Wood- 
stock had entered with zeal in the task of the restoration and 
preservation of the "God's acre" of their fathers. 

BURYING-GROUND, WEST WOODSTOCK. 

Tlie old burial-ground at "West Woodstock was laid out in 8ep- 
t<^nilK'r, 1744. The spot chosen was a central one for the piirii^li. 



APPENDIX M. 339 

on the west side of and near the foot of Bungee Hill, and about 
three-fourths of a mile northwest of the meetino;-house. It is 
the resting place of all those of the Morris family who died at 
West Woodstock. 

The inscriptions on the stones are as follows: 

In memory op Edward, son op 

Asa Morris and Mrs Annah Morris 

Died, Nov. 1Q'^ 1756 Aged 7. 



In memory of Wiman, son of 

Mr Asa & Mrs Annah Morris. 

He died Nov. 29"" 1756 Aged 4 years. 



In memory op Asenath Morris, daughtek 

op Lieut Asa Morris and Mrs Annah Morris 

HIS wipe. She died July the 30^'' 1766, in the 

4th year op her age. 



Here Lies the body op 

Mr Edward Morris. 

He departed this life Aug. 12"' 1769 in 

ye 80*11 year op his age. 



In memory op Miss Lydia Morris 

DAUGHTER OP Mr LeMUEL & MrS LyDIA MoRRIS 

who died June 22, 1793 in y« IS'*- year op her age. 



In Memory op Mrs Lydia Morris 

Wipe op Mr Lemuel Morris, who died June 18"", 

1794 in the 50"* year op her age. 



In Memory op Mr Samuel Morris, 

WHO DEPARTED THIS LiPE DEC. 20"^ A.D. 1801 

In THE 71^' YEAR OF HIS AGE 

He FOUGHT HONORABLY AND BLED FOR HIS COUNTRY 

IN THE War and was also an APPROVED INSTRUCTOR 

OP YOUTH IN morals AND THE RUDIMENTS OF LEARNING. 

"Enough that nature pilled the space between 
Proved by the enp op being been" 



340 MORRIS FAMILY. 

There are indications of other graves marked by stones without 
inscriptions. 

The following members of the Morris family are believed to 
have been buried in this ground: 

Mary Morris, daughter of Lieut. Edward, d. July 29, 1759, 
aged 26 years. 

Patta Morris, daughter of Lieut. Asa, d. July 28, 1766, aged 
5 years. 

Bithiah Morris, daughter of Capt. Jonathan, d. Oct. 15, 17G6, 
aged 3 years. 

Abigail, wife of Samuel (No. 1, Third Branch), died July 29, 
1790. 

Abigail Morris, wife of John Perrin, daughter of Samuel Morris 
(No. 8, Third Branch), d. June 14, 1787 [gravestone]. 

Hannah (Child) Morris, wife of Samuel (No. 9, Third Branch), 
d. Feb. 27, 1823. 

Robert Morris, son of Lemuel (No. 14, Third Branch), d. Aug. 
25, 1782. 



APPENDIX K 



OLD AXD NEW STYLE DOUBLE DATING. 

The computation of time by the Christian Era, was commenced 
in the sixth century, by taking out as many years as had elapsed 
since the birth of Christ, and dating events back to that time. The 
year during this period, and up to the time of Pope Gregory XIII 
in 1582, was known as the Julian year, and consisted of 365 days 
and 6 hours ; making a year eleven minutes too long. From the 
time of the Council of Nice to the year 1582, the excess of eleven 
minutes amounted to ten days. To obviate this it was ordained 
that the year 1582 should consist of 365 days only, and that ten 
days between the 4th and 14th of October should be thrown out 
of the Calendar for that year, and to prevent any further irregu- 
larity, no year commencing a century should be leap-year, except 
each 400th year, whereby three days are abated evezy 400 years, 
that being equal to eleven minutes for every year during that 
period, leaving an error of only one day in 5,200 years. The Cal- 
endar up to this time is called Old Style, and the new or Gregorian 
Calendar adopted is called New Style. The Julian year began on 
the 25th of March, supposed to be the day of the Incarnation of 
Christ, and in England called " Lady day." The new style was at 
once adopted by Catholic countries, but not by Great Britain or her 
colonies until 1751, when by act of ParUament eleven days were 
stricken from the month of September, calling the 3d the 14th, 
and one day added to February every 4th year, so as to compare 
with the time of other nations. Previous to this act of Parhament 
two methods of beginning the year prevailed in England; the 
Ecclesiastical and Legal year, beginning on the 25th of March, and 
the Historical year, beginning on the 1st of January. By the same 
act of Parliament the year thereafter was to begin on the 1st of 
January. 

The difference in the commencement of the year which liad 
existed, led to a system of double dating from the 1st of January 



342 MORRIS FAMILY. 

to the 25th of March, thus: the Gth of January, 1705-6, or 170§, 
the 5 denoting the ecclesiastical or legal year, and the 6 the his- 
torical year, the last number being the correct date. By the eccle- 
siastical or legal year, March was computed as the first month of 
the year. The year 1751 had no January, February, or March up 
to the 21st, and September wanted eleven complete days. 

From 1582 to 1699, New Style is ten days in advance of Old 
Style: that is, January 1 (0. S.) is January 11 (N. S.). So to 
commemorate events which happened prior to 1700, ten days must 
be added to present time. From 1700 to 1800 the difference is 
eleven days; so to celebrate events which happened between 1700 
and 1752, eleven days must be added to present time. 



APPEInTDIX o. 



COATS OF ARMS. 



In feudal times, when armies were composed of knights and 
their retainers, it certainly was a proper thing for them to adopt 
and put on their banners and shields some one or more devices by 
which they might be then distinguished, and which their descendants 
for years afterwards continued to display with pride as family 
arms; the propriety of which display seems long since to have 
passed away. As stated in the introduction, the personal taste 
of the compiler forbids the display of any arms for the Morris 
family, believing with the early settlers of New England — many 
of whom, although they were entitled to the fullest share of this 
kind of family possession, discarded its use — that the custom is 
more honored in the breach than in the observance. If, how- 
ever, there are any of his kin who care to display the family 
ensign, he thinks they would be justly entitled to that of Elystan 
Glodrydd, the founder of the fourth royal family of Wales, which 
was: Gules (red), a hon rampant (on his hind feet), reguardant 
(looking back), or. (gold); or pei'haps more directly through the 
Morris family of Essex, that of Gryffyth ap Cynan, as given by 
Heylin: Gules and or., four hons passant (going on all fours), 
reguardant ; other authorities give three lions. 

Of an hundred Morris families in Great Britain who display 
arms, the larger number of them have one or more lions in differ- 
ent positions, but many of them have no lion. 

Three or four of the most noted Morris families in Great Britain 
wear the following arms: 

MORRIS OF BETSHANGER AND WERRINGTON. 

Quarterly. 1st, Gules, a lion rampant, reguardant, or., for 
Morrice. 2d, Prebend, ermine and ermine all over a lion rampant, 
for Tudor Trevor. 3d, Argent, three boars' heads coupled, two 
and one for Cadogan. Gules, an escutcheon with an orle of 



344 MORRIS FAMILY. 

martlets for Chadwick, quartering tlie ensigns of forty -six families, 
Okenden, Carwarden, Myron, Westcott, Lyttleton, Quartermain, 
Grey, Fitz-Osborne, Young, Vernon, Venables, Avenal, Baliol, 
Cornhill, Marmion, Tuberville, Meyrick, Morgan, Gue, Penley, 
Bayal, Muloy. 

Crest. — On a rest a falcon proper beaked and hooded, or. 

MORRIS OF YORK. 

Arms. — Sable, a lion rampant, reguardant, or, quarterly with 
three boars' heads, couped sa. 

Crest. — A lion rampart, reguardant, or. 

Mottoes. — " Marte et mare faventibus " and " Irrupta copula." 

MORRIS OF CHIPPING ONGAR, ESSEX. 

Az. on a fess between three boys' heads couped at the shoulders 
and wound around the neck with snakes, ppr. a cock, gules, beaked 
and legged, or., between two pheons of the third. 

Crest. — A cock, gules, beaked and combed and wattled, or., 
wound around the neck with a snake, ppr. 

THE MONMOUTHSHIRE MORRISES. 

As a crest in addition to the Morris arms, lions, boars' heads, 
etc., a burning tower to commemorate an event in the civil war in 
England; the taking of Chepstow Castle, in which some mem- 
bers of the family participated. 



A golde:^ avedding. 



[From the Spnnrifidd Union, May 16, 1887.] 

WEDDED FIFTY YEARS AGO. 



Golden Anniversary of Judge Henry Morris and "Wife. 



THE wedding fifty YEARS AGO THIS EVENING — SOME OF THE 

INCIDENTS OF THEIR LONG AND USEFUL LIVES IN 

THIS TOWN AND CITY. 

The evening of May 16, 1837, saw a large and mciTV gathering 
of relatives and friends and neighbors at the homestead of the late 
Col. Solomon Warriner, who then lived on the southwest corner of 
Main and Howard streets. The occasion of this gathering was the 
wedding of Henry Morris and Mary Warriner, the former being 
the oldest son of Judge Oliver B. Morris and the latter the 
youngest but one of Col. Warriner's eight children. Among those 
present on that occasion who are now living in Springfield are 
Charles Merriam, Maj. Edward Ingersoll, Mrs. Richard Bliss, and 
Miss Maria Morris. Mrs. George Walker, daughter of the late 
George Bliss and sister of Col. George Bliss of New York, was also 
present, and so also were the elder daughters of Rev. Dr. Osgood. 
Richard Bliss and Sarah Pynchon Eastman " stood up " with the 
young couple as Rev. Dr. Osgood performed the ceremony, and 
the following week Mr. and Mrs. Morris went to Longmeadow and 
performed the same kindly office for Mr. Bliss and Miss Eastman. 
It was not customary for married people to '-stand up "at wed- 
dings, but these two couples were attached and faithful friends 
then and have always remained so, and, as Judge Morris smilingly 
remarks, •' we were not considered so old in tlie married life as to 
prevent us from standing up with our friends " Mr. Bliss died in 
this city some years ago. 

After the wedding at Col. Warriner's, Mr. and Mrs. Morris 
walked down Howard street to Charles Merriam's bouse, and began 
their wedded hfe there as boarders, Mr. Merriam's wife by his first 
marriage being Mrs. Morris's eldest sister, Sophia Warriner. They 
boarded with Mr. and Mrs. Merriam until Septembei", 1838, when 
they began housekeeping in the house where they have lived ever 
since, and where they have received their friends and congratula- 
tions, this afternoon. This house was built for their occupancy in 
what had been Judge 0, B. Morris's garden. The house in which 
44 



346 MOKRIS FAMILY. 

the senior Judge Morris lived, and in which Judge Henry Morris 
was born, stood north of the new house, and where Temple street 
now is. Judge Morris has therefore spent his entire life, with the 
exception of his absence from home during his academical and 
professional studies, and the first year of his married life, upon the 
same lot whei'e his father lived and died. There hang in Judge 
Morris's library two photographs of his old home, one giving a 
view from the front, and the other, which is most prized, a view 
taken from his own lot. In the woodshed stands the vacant arm- 
chair in which the senior judge was accustomed to sit, and close 
at hand is the saw-horse and wood-saw which he used almost to 
the very day of his death. Judge Oliver B. Morris's lot extended 
from Maple to School street, his northerly line being a little north 
of Temple street, and his southerly line being the extension thi'ough 
to School street of the southerly line of Judge Henry Morris's lot. 
Later on than the building of Judge Henry Morris's house, a house 
was built on the eastern end of the home lot for Judge Oliver B. 
Morris's other son, Geoi'ge B Morris, father of Robert 0. Morris. 
Judge Oliver B. Morris, who died some fifteen years ago, came to 
Springfield from Hampden, and was one of the leading and promi- 
nent men of his time in the Connecticut valley. His wife was 
Caroline Bliss, daugliter of George Bliss, and sister of George Bliss, 
who built on Chestnut street the house now used as the Episcopal 
rectory. Col. Warriner's wife was also of the great Bliss family, 
her father living near the corner of Main and State streets. 

At the time of his marriage Henry Morris was 23 years old, 
and although only five years out of college, he had been admitted 
to the bar for two years and was doing a brisk law business in his 
father's ofSce, corner of Main and State streets. He had studied 
law with his father, and at Cambridge, and one of his fellow stu- 
dents, both in Springfield and in Cambridge, was the late Judge 
Otis 1'. Lord of Salem, who was also one of his college classmates 
at Amherst. Few men, in any community, have commanded more 
universal confidence and respect than Judge Henry Morris as citi- 
zen, lawyer, and Christian gentleman. Before Springfield became 
a city he was several times chairman of her board of selectmen, 
and twice represented her in the Legislature, and when she became 
a city he was president of her first common council. In 1854 he 
was elected to Congress from this district by a very large majority, 
but his tastes were judicial rather than political, and before Con- 
gress met he resigned his place as representative in Congress to 



A GOLDEN WEDDING. 347 

accept appointment as judge of tlie Court of Common Pleas from 
Governor Henry J. Gardner. He lield that judgeship for four 
years, until the court was abolished and the Superior Court estab- 
lished in its place. Promises of the reappointment of Judge Mor- 
ris, who was an able and acceptable judge, have always been under- 
stood to have been made by Governor Banks, but finally a clean 
sweep was made and none of the common pleas judges were reap- 
pointed. Judge Morris has always manifested much interest in 
Amherst college, and in 1854 he was appointed one of its trustees. 
In 1869 the college conferred upon him the hororary degree of 
Doctor of Laws. Judge Morris became a member of the First 
church in 1833, uniting by letter from the Amherst college church, 
and Mrs. Morris had been a member of the First church ten years 
when she was married. She had been one of the singers in the 
choir, and when the two-hundredth anniversary of the founding of 
Springfield was celebrated, in 1836, the singing by Mary Warriner 
of 

" The breaking waves dashed high," 

was one of the features of the public exercises in the First church. 
Both Judge and Mrs. Morris have been among the most devoted 
and faithful members of the First church, and there are few more 
regular attendants Sunday morning now than Mrs. Morris. As 
teacher and Sunday-school superintendent, and as deacon. Judge 
Morris served the church until the condition of his health obliged 
him to give up all official positions. 

Judge and Mrs. Morris have not felt able to go through the ex- 
citement iacident to a large gathering of friends in connection with 
their golden wedding anniversary, and so no invitations at all were 
given out; but they have received many informal and hearty con- 
gratulations this afternoon, and they can rest assured that the 
whole community holds them in loving respect and wishes them 
many years of life beyond this golden wedding day. Judge Mor- 
ris's sister. Miss Maria Morris, Mrs. Morris's only surviving sister, 
Miss Elizabeth Warriner, are with them to-day, and so also are 
their four surviving children, and other relatives. The four sur- 
viving children are, Mrs. Mary W. Calhoun and Edward Morris 
of this city, Frederick W. Morris of New York city, and Mi-s. 
Helen Gay of Chicago. Three sons have gone before: Henry, the 
third child and second son, dying in mfancy; Charles H., the third 
son, dying in 1868, at the age of 21; and William F., twin with 
Frederick W., dying in childhood. 



CELEBKATIOI^ AT WOODSTOCK. 



[From the Hartford Daily Courant, September 8, 1886.] 

WOODSTOCK'S BT-CENTENNIAL. 



INTRODUCTORY SERVICES ON SUNDAY TUESDAY'S EXERCISES AT 

ROSELAND PARK. 

The bi-ceutennial of Woodstock was celebrated on the first 
three days of tliis week with much enthusiasm and interest. The 
celebration opened on Sunday with services at Pulpit Eock, famous 
for being the location where John Eliot preached to the Indians. 
There was a large gathering of the sons and daughters of Wood- 
stock. The sermon was preached by the Rev. John S. Chandler, 
and the Hon. E. H. Bugbee read an interesting paper on the liis- 
tory of Pulpit Rock and its surroundings. The singing on this 
occasion, as during the public exercises at Roseland Park on Tues- 
day, was by the United choirs of the local churches, under the 
conductorship of Professor Carlos May. The old-fashioned hymns 
were sung, accompanied in the old-fashioned way, by violin and 
double bass, in addition to a cabinet organ. The string instruments 
were played by veterans in the profession, and among the singers 
were many whose ancestors, for genei-ations back, had sung in the 
galleries of Woodstock's time-honored churches. 

JMonday a very interesting exhibition of objects of historical 
and aboriginal interest was held in the hall of the old brick store 
on Woodstock Hill. A very creditable showing was made, which 
was greatly enjoyed by those who had returned to the scenes of 
their boyhood and girlhood. Many passed the day in reviewing 
old memories by visiting the cemeteries and other places of historic 
interest. The articles exhibited at the hall included a chair owned 
by Miles Standish, a trunk belonging to Rose Standish, which was 
brought over in the Mayjlower, a china pitcher belonging to the 
grandmother of Ohver Wendell Holmes, a piece of the first calico 
made in New England, lace cap worn by Jedediah Morse when an 



CKLEBRATIOX AT WOODSTOCK. 349 

infant, 160 years ago, mirror frames 100 years old, carved with a 
pen-knife, canteen used by General Putnam at the battle of Bunker 
Hill, Lowestoff china formerly owned by descendants of John 
Eliot, shovel made of Woodstock iron, in 1760, silver shoe buck- 
les worn b}'- Nemiah Holt during the Revolutionary war, etc. 

Tuesday morning opened somewhat misty, but the sun soon 
burned the clouds away, and a perfect summer day followed, 
although a trifle too warm for comfort. There were many pleas- 
ant reunions among long absent residents of the town during the 
early part of the day, and when the exercises at Roseland Park 
opened the gathering was large, probably reaching 2,000 during 
the day and thoroughly representative of the goodly old town. 
The charming park was looking its best, and the assembled multi- 
tude found ample shade under the spreading trees. Mr. Henry C. 
Bowen of the Independent, who has done so much to beautify his 
native towna, took no active part in the exercises of the day. But 
he was worthily represented in the persons of the three near rela- 
tives to whom were assigned prominent parts of the programme. 

The order of the day was pleasantly varied by the planting of 
three memorial trees, donated by citizens of Roxbury. They were 
a poplar, an elm, and an oak, taken respectively from the old home- 
steads of John Eliot and Generals Warren and Heath. This gift 
from the mother town of the original colony of Woodstock was 
thoroughly appreciated as an appropriate and graceful act Eai-ly 
in the morning the poplar was planted at Pulpit Rock, and the 
oak on the common near Mr. Bowen's house. The elm was 
planted on Roseland Park, near the speaker's stand, during the 
noon intermission, appropriate remarks being made. After the 
morning tree-planting the speakers, invited guests, etc., formed in 
procession, headed by St. Mary's band of Putnam, and marched to 
the park. The speakers' stand, on which were seated the officers 
and invited guests, was tastefully decorated with flags, garlands, 
and bouquets. 

The assemblage was called to order at 10 o'clock by Mr. Henry 
T. Child, chairman of the committee of arrangements. Mr. J. F. 
Morris of this city was chosen president of the day, with the follow- 
ing additional officers : 

Vice-Presidents — Henry C. Bowen, the Hon. E. H. Bugbee. 
Dr. John McClellan, Joseph McClellan, Paraclete Skinner, Deacon 
Amasa Chandler, Deacon Abel Child, William R. Arnold, John 



350 MORKIS FAMILY. 

Paine, Leonard M. Dean, Charles C. Potter, Heartwcll Lyon, and 
ninety others. 

Secretaries — Sidney N. Morse, Charles H Potter, Louis R. 
Southworth, Henry M. Bradford, Oliver A. Hiscox, and John A. 
Morse. 

In introducing Mr. Mon-is as presiding officer, Mr. Child grace- 
fully alluded to the fact that he was a direct descendant of Edward 
Morris, one of the most honored and distinguished of the first 
settlers of Woodstock. 

Mr. Child said : — Two hundred years ago a httle band of 
pioneers came over the old Connecticut Path, a long journey 
through the wilderness to the land of the Wabbaquassetts. Fore- 
most among them was a man who was ever brave and active in 
the public good, whose wisdom and prudence were most highly 
valued in the administration of the new colony. His dust was 
the first to mingle with mother earth in AVoodstock. This man 
was Edward Morris. The committee of arrangements for the 
celebration of the 200th anniversary of the settlement of Wood- 
stock, have invited a worthy descendant of his to preside on this 
occasion. I have the honor, and now introduce to you Hon. J. F. 
Morris of Hartford, President of the day. 

On taking the chair Mr. Morris spoke substantially as follows: 

Ladies and Gentlevien: — We have been brought together by an 
occasion of the deepest and most joyful interest. We have come 
to celebrate the coming of our fathers to this most beautiful region. 
Some of us have come to visit the places where once stood their 
homes which have long since crumbled away and disappeared 
We have come to view these beautiful hills and fields, these 
charming vales, cleared by their labor and toil. We have come to 
view the spot where they worshiped, to bow with reverence over 
the graves of the honored dead, and to hear the history of their 
lives and the record of their deeds; to learn anew of their piety, 
their principles, and their purposes ; to hear the story of their folly 
and their weakness as well as that of their wisdom and their 
strength; to recount their toils, their trials, their privations, and 
their sufferings. 

Some of us have come back to our early homes to greet our 
kinsmen, whose fortune it is to dwell under the shade of ancestral 
trees and hold in possession ancestral lands. 

We shall note the growth of this good old town from the time 



CELEBRATION AT WOODSTOCK. 351 

our ancestors founded it in an almost unbroken wilderness, deserted 
by its original inhabitants. 

We shall hear the record of families, of their dwelUng here, and 
the departure of many to settle other communities, and to found 
other States. 

We shall note the changes of time, from the ruileness and dark- 
ness of the days in which our fathers lived, to the culture and 
light of our own. 

We shall be inspired anew with an enthusiasm for the preserva- 
tion of their memories, their principles, and their history. 

And when we shall separate at the close of these joyous festivi- 
ties, shall it not be with devout gratitude to Almighty God, that 
the lines have fallen to us in such pleasant places and that we have 
so goodly a heritage from such a worthy ancestry? Shall it not be 
with a determination that by the rectitude of our own lives we will 
hand down this heritage to remote generations? 

Mr. Morris concluded as follows: "Our Woodstock fathers 
were no agnostics — they believed and trusted in God, and in His 
p.rovidence and giiidance. It is in their record of 20(1 years ago 
to-day that when they met on yonder hill to choose the lots where 
their future homes should be, they first ' addressed themselves to 
Almighty God, who is the disposer of all things.' It becomes us 
therefore on this occasion to follow this pious example." 

Mr. Morris then called upon the Rev. J. W. Trowbridge of West 
Woodstock to offer prayer, after which "Auld Lang Syne" was 
sung by the audience, led by the choir. 

Dr. George A. Bowen delivered the address of welcome. After 
alluding to the historic importance of the two centuries which have 
passed since the settlement of Woodstock, and the great transfor- 
mation which has taken place in the surrounding country, he dwelt 
briefly upon the bold and intrepid character of the early settlers, 
and remarked that the history of the people of Woodstock had 
been but a reiteration of the qualities which characterized those 
early settlers. The sturdy independence thus inherited impelled 
them to seek new localities till now every State westward to the 
broad Pacific has numerous representatives of Woodstock families. 
AVe to-day welcome all those who have remained with us, tliose 
who have sought new homes, all are welcomed home to the family 
circle which we open to-day. 

The historical address was delivered by Clarence Winthrop 



.>02 MORKIS FAMILY. 

Bowon, Ph.D. Dr. rk:>\ven booan by tracing tlic iiitiniato connec- 
tion of the early settlement at Woodstock with that at Massachus- 
etts Bay, glanced at the condition of the region when tlie settlement 
was made in 1G8G under the name of New Roxbuiy, being an 
olTshoot from Roxbury in Massachusetts, quoted at some length 
John Eliot's account of his visit to the place and his preaching to 
the Indians, told of the thirteen original planters, described the 
early days of the settlement, the change of name from New Rox- 
bury to Woodstock, reviewed its early military history, its services 
in the war of the Revolution, Washington's visit, the patriotism of 
General Samuel McClellan, who, when no money could be had to 
pay the soldiers advanced $1,000 from his own pocket, and the 
town's record in the war of 1812. At this time Major William 
Flynn of Woodstock Hill hearing of British ships hovermg about 
New London he rode all night to warn officers and men to assemble 
on the common at noon, but when he returned at sunrise he found 
them there ready to march. In speaking of the war of the Rebel- 
lion, he paid a warm tribute to the memory of General George B. 
McClellan, the great-grandson of General Samuel McClellan, before 
mentioned. 

In recalling the names of prominent men of AVoodstock descent 
Mr. Bowen said: — 

Citizens of Woodstock, listen while I call the roll of some of tlie 
distinguished men who have lived or were born in the town. Of 
the first settlers was Colonel John Chandler, probal)ly the most 
distinguished citizen that Woodstock had during its first century, 
the man who made Woodstock known and respected tliroughout 
New England. His descendants include the Rev. Thomas Bradbury 
Chandler. D.D., Wintlirop Chandler, the artist, the Hon. John 
Church Chandler, Judge John Winthrop Chandler, and others, 
who have been prominent in Woodstock and throngliout the 
country. No one of the first settlers was more distinguished 
than Edward Morris, who died three years after the town was 
settled. His family was prominent in the history of old Roxbury, 
and all through the last century in Woodstock. Commodore 
Charles Morris, a native of Woodstock, and well known in the war 
of 1812, and his son, Commodore George U. Morris, commander 
in the Civil war of the United States sloop-of-war Cumberland in 
Hampton Roads, belong to the same family, as well as the Hon. 
J. F. Morris of Hartford, whom I am sure we are glad to welcome 



CELEBRATION AT WOODSTOCK. 353 

as our presiding officer to-day. John Marcy. a first settler, was 
the ancestor of the Hon. William Lamed Marcy, governor of the 
State of New York, secretary of war under President Polk, and 
secretary of State under President Pierce, Abiel Holmes, D.D., 
LL.D., author of " Annals of America," and his father. Dr. David 
Holmes, a surgeon in the French and Revolutionary wars, were 
born in Woodstock, and were descendants from John Holmes, a 
first settler. Abiel Holmes's son, Oliver Wendell Holmes, though 
not born in Woodstock, will be remembered, I am sure, for the 
beautiful tribute he paid his ancestors in the poem he read in this 
very park in 1877. The name of Morse has always been identified 
with Woodstock. Deacon Jedediah Morse held about all the 
offices in town that he could lawfully hold, and was deacon of the 
First church for forty-three years. His son, the Rev. Jedediah 
Morse, D.D., a graduate of Yale College, and the father of American 
geography, was also born in Woodstock. His grandson was Pro- 
fessor Samuel F. B. Morse, who was more widely known as the 
inventor of the electric telegraph. Another Woodstock boy was 
General William Eaton, who ran away from home at the age of 
sixteen, to enter the Revolutionary war, and was distinguished 
during the first years of the century as the protector of American 
commence in the Mediterranean. Amasa Walker, too, was born 
in Woodstock, the father of political economy in this country, or, 
better still, the father of Gen. Francis A. Walker, the respected 
president of the School of Technology in Boston. Another honored 
name in Woodstock is that of Williams, including Samuel Williams, 
Sr., the Commissioner of Roxbury in the settlement of New Rox- 
bury, the Rev. Stephen Williams, the first pastor of the church of 
West Parish, and Jared W. Williams, the governor of Vermont, 
and a native of this town. Governors, members of Congress, men 
distinguished in law, theology, and medicine, in trade, and on the 
farm, have been born in Woodstock. The roll of honor could be 
multiplied; but in speaking of the distinguished men it would be 
impossible to forget the lessons taught, the struggles endured, and 
the sacrifices made by the mothers of Woodstock, who all througli 
these two centuries have inspired their sons with feelings that have 
made them industrious, honored, and religious. Praise be, there- 
fore, to the women of Woodstock ! This town has the right to be 
proud of such noble sons and daughters, and we have the right to 

45 



354 MORRIS FAMILY. 

be proud that such a town as old Woodstock has nourished us and 
blessed us with such memories and influences. 

Toward the close the speaker said: " But the chief glory of the 
town of Woodstock has been its love of local law. The source of 
the power of the continental nations of Europe may be traced back 
through the centuries to the village communities and Teutonic 
townships. In the mark, tithing, and parish of England the same 
principle of local self-government may be seen ; and so in our own 
nation's greatness, through Anglo-Saxon inheritance has its source, 
not in the State, city, or county, but in the little school districts, 
villages, and towns of New England. Woodstock has been like a 
miniature republic, and has always believed in the supremacy of 
local law. . . . What it consciously believed the town has 
never been slow to proclaim. Tenacious as Woodstock has always 
been of its privileges and its rights, its loyalty to this country, 
from the day the thirteen colonies became a nation, has never been 
questioned. . . . What Woodstock's history shall be remains 
for you, men and women of Woodstock, to develop. The fathers 
have kept bright the honest traditions and stout independence, the 
industrious thrift, and religious faith which their Puritan fathers 
brought to the new settlement. The sons of this generation can be 
trusted to preserve and transmit them to their descendants." 

John Eliot Bowen, Ph. D., read an original historical poem, 
"The Founders of Our Town," and the morning exercises closed 
with the singing of "Jerusalem, My Happy Home," by the choir, 
after the reading of a historical paper on the First Congregational 
church, prepared from the history by the Kev. E. B. Bingham, 
read by Mr. A. McC. Mathewson. 

During the intermission a bountiful dinner was provided by tlie 
committee, on the piazza of the boat house, for the invited guests. 
The large crowd present, either by bringing lunch baskets or by 
patronizing the restaurant in the "bungalow," fully satisfied the 
wants of the inner man, while an enjoyable concert was given by 
St. Mary's band. 

The first speaker after dinner was Librarian Justin Winsor of 
Harvard College. He was introduced by Pr(>sident Morris as a 
builder of history. He began by saying that he could no more 
recognize himself by this designation, than he could recognize his 
name when written by a foreigner "Ouinsau." When the invita- 



CKLEBRATION AT WOODSTOCK. 355 

tion of the committee had reached him he was wandering around 
in a neighboring State, like a little nebulous body, and assured his 
hearers he only shed upon them a brief gleam just to assure them 
of the warm sympathy which Massachusetts feels for those of her 
children who had wandered down into Connecticut to found this 
goodly town of Woodstock. 

Dr. Edward Channing, also of Harvard College, made a brief 
address, dwelling upon the great influence of the New England 
town meeting, treating it as the legitimate successor of the tribal 
gatherings of ancient Germany and the parish meetings of 
England. 

After the singing of " Coronation " by the audience, Mr. Augus- 
tus Parker of Roxbury, gave a few entertaining reminiscences of 
Roxbury and Woodstock, stating that his wife was a grand- 
daughter of one of the early clergymen of Woodstock, who, Mr. 
Parker understood, had not got along very well with his people, 
owmg to a slight difficulty with one of his deacons concerning a' 
trade in oxen. That clergyman's granddaughter now came with 
a peace-offering in the shape of a young elm, to be kno\vn as the 
" Dwight " elm. The gift was accepted on behalf of the town by 
the Hon. E. H. Bugbee. 

Following a brief address by Mr. W. F. Craft of Roxbury, the 
history of the Second Congregational Church, prepared by Deacon 
Ezra Hammond, was read. The Hon. J. W. Patterson of New 
Hampshire, who was principal of Woodstock Academy from 1848 
to 1851, read a long but interesting history of that institution. 
Colonel Alexander Warner gave a history of the Woodstock 
Agricultural Society. 

On motion of the Hon. E. H. Bugbee, it was voted to form an 
organization of the descendants of the settlers of 1 G86. 

The audience having become somewhat restless, Mr. H. C. 
Bowen soon put them in good humor by a selection from his 
inexhaustible fund of local stories. 

A recess was taken from 6 to 7 p. m., after wliich two or three 
local histories were read, the celebration terminating with a fine 
display of fireworks. Thus closed a very enjoyable day, the only 
drawback which seems to call for mention being the large number 
of inordinately long historical paper's on the programme. 



356 MORRIS FAMILY. 



LETTERS OF REC4RET. 



DR. J. HAMMOND TRUMBOLI>. 

Hartford, August 31, 1886. 

Mil Dear Mr. Bowen : For the last two weeks I have been too ill for 
writing, yet I should have managed to reply to your favor of the 18th, 
had it not been for a faint hope that I might be well enough to accept 
your obliging invitation to visit your Woodstock home and be present at 
the bicentennial celebration next week. I am now assured that — 
though not seriously ill — it will not be prudent for me to leave home at 
present, and I must relinquish, with sincere regret, all anticipations of a 
visit which it would have given me much pleasure to make. 

It occurs to me, as I write, that it is now more than fifty years since I 
passed a night in Woodstock — or even spent an hour in the town; and 
there has been scarcely a year in the last twenty-five that I have not been 
intending to see again that part of the State. For this year, at least, I 
must be contented to bide at home. 

I am, my dear sir, very truly yours, 

J. H. Trumbull. 



THE REV. INCREASE N. TARBOX. 

West Newton, Mass., Sept. 3, 1886. 

To the Woodstock Co/mnittee of Arrangements: As a member of the 
committee appointed by the New England Historic Genealogical Society 
of Boston, it would give me great pleasure to attend upon the celebration of 
the 200th anniversary of the founding of your goodly town of Wood- 
stock. But on examination such difficulties seem to be in the way, that 
I feel compelled to deny myself the pleasure of a personal attendance. 

As a Connecticut man, I think I can understand and appreciate that 
ancient longing which the town had while it was held within the Massa- 
chusetts jurisdiction, to escape therefrom, and enjoy the advantages of 
Connecticut society. To an average Massachusetts man of this genera- 
tion, it would doubtless seem a very strange thing that this ancient and 
highly intelligent township should ever really have desired to separate 
itself from the old Bay State and incorporate itself with Connecticut. 
But such was the fact, not only in this town, but along all the line of the 
disputed territory on the northern Connecticut border. 

If the people of this town had been closely questioned for their reasons, 
they might not have been ready to unfold all the grounds of their 
preference for Connecticut over Massachusetts, but would perhaps have 
contented themselves with the general reason given by a South Carolina 
man when, by a change of the State line, he found himself in North 
Carolina. He remarked quietly that he was glad of the change, for he 



CELEBRATION AT WOODSTOCK. 357 

had always thought that North Carolina was healthier than South Caro- 
lina. Taking the word healthier in the broad sense, that statement may 
very well cover the Woodstock joy and satisfaction when it was once 
fairly within Connecticut borders. Very truly yours, 

Increase N. Tarbox. 



THE HON. HENRY MORRIS. 

Springfield, Mass., August 31, 1886. 
Gentlemen : As a lineal descendant of Edward Morris, one of the early 
settlers of Woodstock, I feel a deep interest in the celebration of the 
200th anniversary of the founding of the town. If I had the necessary 
health and strength it would give me great pleasure to participate in the 
exercises of the occasion. But health and strength have failed me, and 
now, at the age of seventy-two, with many infirmities incident to that 
period of life, I am compelled to deny myself the gratification of being 
present. Very truly yours, 

Henry Morris. 



Letters of similar purport were also read from Dr. Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, the Rev. E. E. Hale, the Hon. Marshall P. 
Wilder, General F. A. Walker, WiUiam B. Trask, Moses G. 
Leonard, and Judge William Child, the latter inclosed an original 
historical poem. 



"We are his children ! We 
Sprung from that glorious tree 

AVhose healthful root 
The frosts and heat defied, — 
Whose trunk towers up in pride, 
Whose branch shoots far and wide, — 

We are the fruit. 

"Better than mines of gold, 
The legacy of old 

Which he hath given ; 
The birth-rights of the free, 
To children's children we 
Bequeath ; so they may be 
Favorites of Heaven." 

Wm. B. Tappan. 

" I say to you as was said to a young prince that was going to a charge: 
remember your ancestors; remember your posterity!" — Sir William 
Morris's speech in Parliament, March 7, 1658-9. 



ADDENDA. 

[FIRST BRANCH.] 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

541. SYLA^ESTER B. MORRIS. Married Rhoda McCal- 
niont, June 1, 1868. Lives in President, Venango Co., Pa. Chil- 
dren : 

Maiid^ b. 
Grace", b. 
Ralph", b. 
Electa", b. 

542. ORNALDO W. MORRIS. Married Sarah Harrison, 
May 3, 1881. Lives in Scottsburgh, Livingston County, N. Y. 
Children: 

Emma F.", b. Oct. 12, 1882. 
Lewis S.^ b. Feb. 27, 1886. 

543. DAVENPORT A. MORRIS. Married Kate Ford in 
1872. Lives in Fairfield, Clay County, Neb. Children: 

Frederick^, b. ; d. at 3 years of age. 
Louise", b. 

546. JOHN D. MORRIS. Married Josephine Trescott in 
1872. Children: 

Lola M.", b. Feb. 7, 1876. 
Edith", b. Nov. 29, 1881. 

547. JAMES HUMPHREY MORRIS, died at Greenwood, 

Steuben County, N. Y., in 1885. No children: 

548. ELIZABETH (MORRIS) KENYON has four children: 

Edith Kenyon", b. 
Ida Kenyon", b. 
Myrtel Kenyon", b. 
Daisy Kenyon", b. 



360 MOBRIS FAMILY. 

549. HELEN MAR MORRIS. Married William Mansfield. 
Children : 

Eva Mansfield^, b. 
James Mansfield^, b. 
Bertha Mansfield', b. 
Leroy Mansfield', b. 

550. LESTER BRADNER MORRIS. Children: 
Bertha VelP, b. Dec. 19, 1865. 

Blanche Edna', b. May 28, 1870. 

Robert Bundy^ b. July 31, 1883; d. Dec. 28, 1885. 

Bertha V. graduated and took the degree of B. E. from the 
National School of Elocution and (Oratory in Philadelphia, and 
has received many very flattering notices of her accomplishment 
in the Art. She married, May 19, 1886, Thomas S. Smith. 

Blanche E. is a stenographer. 

551. JOSEPH SYDNEY MORRIS died in October, 1884, 
unmarried. 

552. FULTON ROBERT MORRIS. Lives in Sussex, Wis. 
Children: 

Harry Fulton', b. 
Mabel', b. 
Paul Marshall'. 
Charles Cassius'. 
Josie'. 

554. DELOS ROMATNE MORRIS. Married Emma Smith, 
1881. Lives in Rio, Wis. Children: 
Eugene', b. 
Frederick', b. 

556. CHARLES MELVIN MORRIS, 7th son of Marshall 
S. (281). Married AHce Davidson in 1884. Born in Andover. 
Lives in Rio, Wis. Produce dealer. No children: 

687. ANNA MORRIS. See page 154. 



ADDENDA. 361 

[THIRD BRANCH.] 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

549. SOPHIA MORRIS, 2d daughter of Sanford (328), born 
Dec. 29, 1845. Married, Aug. 25, 186G, George Henry Nichols. 
Children: 

Emory Anson Nichols'', b. Aug. 12, 1867. 
Elmer George Nichols'^, b. Jan. 25, 1870. 

550. MARIA MORRIS, 3d daughter of Sanford (328), born 
Dec. 29, 1845. Married David Elmer Partridge, May 3, 18G4. 
Children : 

Herbert Elmer Partridge^ b. Sept. 4, 1865. 
Edith Maria Partridge^ b. June 3, 1868. 
Eugene Prank Partridge*', b. June 4, 1873. 

552. CAROLINE MORRIS, 5th daughter of Sanford (328), 
born Jan. 15, 1871. Married Elijah Marshall Partridge, Dec. 21, 
1871. No children: 



ERRATA. 



No. 331, page 75, for Oliro read Olive. 
No. 419, page 95, for Francis read Frances. 
No. 529, page 105, "one child" instead of Julia ./. (I read 
Mabel A. Barnard. 

No. 645, page 294, instead of /. E. Shuman read /. E. Sherman. 
No. 654, page 296, birth of Carrie E. Spencer, read 1855. 



46 



Hf^r Simtlei^. 



(^S^o/7^ ???trmrif 



I 



CWnu 




CrO^tJ 



n/rcfj) J^torrf/ €6em^c^o^^^rr:j 



f^ 



CLV^ 777 07^)-/<i 




Jl<rr-r^^ 



t rr - r/ ^ 



rr 






'i^^-dT^if 



EDWARD MORRIS 

Dea EDWARD MORRIS 

Lieut EDWARD MORRIS 

ISAAC MORRIS 

Capt. JONATHAN MORRIS 

OLIVER B. MORRIS 



1686. 

1720 

1732 

1765. 

1776 

1830. 



SAMUEL MORRIS 
EBENEZER MORR'S 
SAM^ MORRIS 
Capt L. MORRIS 
LieutC MORRIS JR 
Com C. morris 



173! 

1718 

1750 

1808 

1808 

1853 



INDEXES. 



The Indexes are compiled according to the several branches, genera- 
tions, and families. The compiler believes that by this method it is 
easier to find any particular name than it is to look through a long list of 
pages. 

Married persons and heads of families are in small capitals; the child- 
ren of the families following. The figures against the name represent its 
number except when the page is mentioned. 



FIRST AND SECOND GENERATIONS. 



Number. 

Cartwright, ELIZ'B'TH MORRIS, 2 

EDWARD, 2 

Child, Grace Morris, 5 

Ephraim, 5 

Benjamin, 5 

Edward, 5 

Grace, 5 

Mary, 5 

Ebenezer, 5 

Martha, 5 

William, 5 

Penuel, 5 

Richard, 5 

Thomas, 5 

Margaret, 5 

Elizabeth Morris, 7 

Joshua, 7 

Isaac, 7 

Elizabeth, 7 

Mehitable, 7 

Joseph, 7 

Abigail, 7 

Ann, 7 



Nu 


aibcr. 


Child, Dorothy, 


7 


Prudence, 


7 


Samuel, 


7 


Samuel, 


7 


Caleb, 


7 


Johnson, Margaret Morris, 


8 


Margaret, 


8 


John, 


8 


Mary, 


8 


Isaac, 


8 


Edward, 


8 


Anna, 


8 


Mehitable, 


8 


Mehitable, 


8 


Lyon, Martha Morris, 


10 


Nehemiah, 


10 


Martha, 


10 


Elisha, 


10 


Amasa, 


10 


Aaron, 


10 


Levina, 


10 


Lyman, 


10 


Eliakim, 


10 



364 


MORRIS FAMILY. 






Number. 1 




Page. 


Lj'on, Mebitable, 


10' 


Church, Annie, 


29 


Morris, THOMAS. 


1 


Corbin, Hannah, 


31 


GRISSIE (HEWSONE), 1 


Dana, Rebecca, 


30 


EDWARD, 


1, 


Dana, Martha, 


31 


GRACE (BETT), 


1 


Davis, Lucretia, 


29 


Isaac, 


3 


Dwight, Dorothy, 


24 


Edward, 


4i 


GrLswold, Sarah, 


28 


Grace, 


5 


Goddard, Deljorah, 


24 


Ebenezcr, 


6 


Harris, Priscilla, 


24 


Elizabeth, 


7 


Livingston, Catherine, 


29 


Margaret, 


8 


Manning, Sarah, 


31 


Samuel, 


9 


May, Elizabeth, 


31 


Martha, 


10 


Mayo, Hannah, 


No. 3 




Page. 


Morris, Anna, 


24 


Morse, Rev. Jedidiah, 


25 


Newell, Sarah, 


30 


Samuel F. B., 


26 


Peake, Abigail, 


31 


Susan W., 


28 


Pierpont, Mary (Ruggles), 


No. 3 


Charles W., 


28 


Walker, Lucretia, 


28 


James F., 


28 


Weld, Deborah, 


28 


Samuel A. B., 


28 






Cornelia L., 


28 


DAUGHTERS' HUSBANDS. 


William C. 


28 


Child, Benjamin, 


23 


Edward L., 


28 


Child, Josluia, 


29 


Sydney E., 


28 


Colgate, Samuel, 


29 


Gilbert L., 


29 


Corbin, Perley, 


31 


Lucretia, 


29 


Corbin, Samuel, 


31 


Richard Cary, 


29 


Draper, James, 


30 


Elizabeth, 


29 


Draper, Ebenezer, 


30 


Charlotte, 


29 


Hemingway, Samuel, 


80 


Sydney E., 


29 


Hodge, J. Aspinwall, 


29 






Lind, Edward, 


28 


SONS' WIVES, 




May, John, 


30 


Bacon, Elizabeth, 


24 


May, Eliakim, 


31 


Breese, Elizabeth, 


26 


Morse, Jedediah, 


25 


Bridges, Abigail, 


30 


Walker, Timothy, 


24 


Child, Mehitable, 


31 


1 Walker, Peter, 


24 



INDEX. 



365 



FIRST BRANCH. 

DESCENDANTS OF DEACON EDWARD MORRIS. 



Sixtii (jretieration. 




Number. 


Number. 


Bartlett, William H., 


430 


Adams, Hannah Morris, 


131 


AzelE.. 


431 


Mary, 


313 


Harriet E., 


432 


Sarah, 


314 


Isaac M. , 


433 


Delia, 


315 


Elizabeth M., 


434 


La Fayette, 


316 


Seventh Generation. 




Eighth Generation. 




Baxter, May Lillie, 


468 


Sarah Morris, 


680 


Louis S., 


768 


Jennie M., 


892 


Mattie M. , 


769 


Mary, 


893 


Barber, Julia Morris, 


476 


Fifth Generation. 




Barnard, Julia J. C. (Morris), 


529 


Allen, Ctlenda Morris, 


98 


JMabel A. , page 


347 


Orren, 


219 


Third Generation. 




Walter, 
ThankfuU, 


220 

221 


Belknap, Prudence Morris, 


17 






John, 


43 


Cylenda, 


222 


William, 


44 


Calista, 


223 


Hannah, 


45 


Almira, 


224 


Sybil, 


46 


Martha, 


225 






Elisha D., 


226 


Seventh Generation. 




Caroline, 


227 


Beebe, Sylenda Morris, 


294 


Sixth Generation. 




Lucius M., 


558 


Hannah Morris, 


200 


William, 


559 


Walter M. , 


484 


Charles S., 


560 






Louisa, 


561 


Set^etith Generation. 




Joseph M., 


562 


Alverson, Sylenda Morris, 


298 


Cyrus G., 


563 


Miles T., 


584 


Marcus, 


564 


Milo D., 


585 


Detius, 


565 


Harrison S., 


586 


Junius, 


566 


Charles W., 


587 


Frederick, 


567 


Harriet E., 


588 


Alice, 


568 


Anna S., 


589 


Sylenda, 


56i» 


George A., 


590 










Fiftli Genenition. 




Sixth Generation. 




Briggs, Patty Morris, 


10(1 


Bartlett, Eliza Hume, 


178 


Randolph, 


233 


Charles E., 


428 


Lemuel, 


234 


Azel E., 


429 


Morris, 


235 



366 



MORRIS FAMILY. 



Seventh Generation. 

Number. 

Brinkerhofl, Laura Davis, 317 

Alonzo, 603 

Sanih T., 604 

John, 605 

Seventh Generation, 

Brill, Mary Comstock, 342 

Charles C, 6671 



Fifth Generation. 




Bo3'ntoii, BiTHiAH Morris, 


99 


Chloe F., 


228 


David, 


229 


Alpheus C, 


230 


Mary, 


231 


Thirza, 


232 


Blodgett, Esther Morris, 


103 


Morris, 


242 


Polly, 


243 


Abner, 


244 


Sixth Generation. 




Bowen, Fanny Morris, 


129 


LydiaF., 


305 


Fanny C, 


306 


Morris D., 


307 


Henry S., 


308 


OtisE., 


309 


ElishaC, 


310 


Harriet S., 


311 


Bowker, Harriet Dawes, 


435 


Harriet, 


435 


Alpheus v.. 


435 


Charles W., 


435 


Samuel D., 


435 


Arthur H., 


435 


EffieL., 


435 


Rosie E., 


435 


Boyden, Hannah Allen, 


200 


Eliot E., 


485 


Fifth Generation. 




Clark, Eunice Morris, 


70 


Cliester M., 


149 


Ebc'uuzer, 


150 


William, 


151 



Clark, Joshua, 

Robert C, 

Lorin, 

Prudence, 

Eunice, 

Maria, 

Edward M. 



Number. 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 



Sixth Generation. 

Chester M., 149 

George M., 372 

Mary A., 373 

Morris, 374 

Henry R., 375 

George H., 376 

Eliza J., 377 

William, 151 

Orlando C, 378 

George M., 379 

SophroniaA., 380 

Elizabeth, 381 

Eunice, 382 

Loren C, 383 

William, 384 

John, 385 

Edward, 386 

Olive, 387 

Edward W., 388 

Amanda M., 389 

Daniel C, 390 

Jane L., 391 

Joshua, 152 

Edward O., 392 

RORERT C, 153 

Myron H., 395 

Lorin N., 396 

Racine C, 397 

Donald C, 398 

Seventh Generation. 

Chaffee, Sarah Morris, 352 

Catherine N., 678 

LucyM.. • 679 

Chapin, Thirza Ufford, 366 

LucyM., 708 

Abbie R., 709 



INDEX. 



361 



Eighth Generation. 

Number. 

Calhoun, Mary Morris, 668 

Charles M., 890 

Margaret, 891 

Sixth Generation. 

Comstock, Eunice Morris, 135 

Calvert, 324 

Elon, 325 

Minerva, 326 

Irene Morris, 137 

Caroline, 338 

Samuel, 339 

Calvin S., 340 

Eunice, 341 

Mary, 342 

SeventJi Generation. 

Calvert, 324 

Theodores., 608 

Eloise, 609 

Elinor, 610 

Cornelia, 611 

Calvert, 613 

Edward, 613 

Lillian, 614 

Elon, 325 

Eliza, 615 

Calvin S., 340 

Arnon, 6661 

Frederick F., 667 

Charles H., 667 

Anion L., 667 

Eighth Generation. 

Theodore S., 608 

Theodores., 869 

Marie, 870 

Anne, 871 

Edward, 613 

Edward H., 878 

Frances E., 879 

Margery, 880 

Richard M.. 881 

Grace S.. 882 



Seventh Generation. 





Number. 


Cone, Mary Adams, 


313 


Sarah E., 


595 


Amelia B., 


596 


^lary J., 


597 


Tartello, 


598 


Nathan, 


599 


Lucy A. , 


600 


Millie A., 


601 


Herbert C, 


602 



Sixth Generation. 

Converse, Laura Morris, 208 

James E., 519 

Sarah, 520 

Emeline, 522 

Fifth Getieration. 

Copeland, Esther Morris, ^ 103 

Charles R, 245 

Waldo, 246 

Third Generation. 

Church, Susanna Morris, 16 

Abner, 37 

Asa, 38 

Susanna, 39 

Anna, 40 

Samuel, 41 

Jacob, 43 

Fifth Generation. 

Davis, Hannah Morris, 63 

Roxanna, 117 

Betsey, 118 

Joseph, 119 

John. 120 

Asa, 121 

Sally, 122 

Sixth Generation. 

Joseph, 119 

Asa, 253 

Morris, 254 

John, 255 

Philander, 256 



368 



MORRIS FAMILY. 



Number. 




Sixth Generation, 




Davis, Nathan, 


257 




Number. 


Andrew, 


258 


Fay, 


Anna Morris, 


206 


Sally, 


259 




Harvelin, 


511 


Hannah, 


2G0 




Laura, 


512 


John, 


120 




Jane M., 


513 


Danford, 


261 




Levi, 


514 


Sophronia, 


262 




Emeline E., 


515 


Olive, 


263 




Frederick W., 


516 


Diana, 


264 




Mary E., 


517 


Asa, 


121 




Ada, 


518 


Anna, 


265 








Roxanna, 


266 




Third Generation. 




Diana, 


267 


Frizzel, Abigail Morris, 


15 


Harriet, 


268 




John, 


32 


Sophronia, 


269 




Ebenezer, 


33 


Andrew J., 


270 




Joseph, 


34 


Maria, 


271 




Abigail, 


35 


Calvin, 


272 




Sarah, 


36 


Asa, 


273 








Elizabeth, 


274 




Siocth Generation. 




John A., 


275 


Firmin, Roxanna Davis, 


117 


Erwin, 


276 




Philander, 


247 


Henry, 


2761 




Philena, 


248 


Polly Morris, 


133 




Betsey Davis, 


118 


Laura, 


317 




Roxanna, 


249 


Morris, 


318 




Elizabeth, 


250 


Anna, 


606 




Richard Darwin, 


251 


Dawes, Philena Hume, 


179 




James Lawrence, 


252 


Harriet Philena, 


435 








Lucelia E., 


436 




Seventh Generation. 








Fielc 


, Caroline Comstock, 


338 


Seventh Generation. 






Arnon F., 


666 


Dudley, Irene Morris, 


328 


Ford 


, Jane Morris, 


402 


Fanny J., 


628 




Wilbur, 


723 


Sally M., 


629 




Julius, 


724 


Jared, 


630 




Minnie, 


725 


Ezra, 


631 




Nellie. 


726 


Laura J. , 


632 








Lucy E., 


633 




Sixth Generation. 




James D., 


634 


Fly nil, Amanda Morris, 


186 


Levi, 


635 




Julia A., 


453 


David, 


636 




Eliza P., 


454 


Asel L., 


637 




EllaF., 


455 


Aurilla M., 


638 




Sarah A., 


456 


Dunham, Harriet Morris, 


370 




Julius W., 


457 


William, 


714 




Laura M., 


458 



IXDEX. 



369 



Seventh Generation 




Xumber. 


Number. 


Hitchcock, Isaac M., 


320 


Gray, Augusta Morris, 


475 


Alanson, 


321 


Lumon M., 


773 


John C, 


322 


Timothy, 


774 


Lucetta, 


323 


Isaac H., 


775 


RoxANNA Morris, 


138 


Francis A. , 


776 


Harriet E., 


313 


Frances A., 


777 


Isaac M., 


344 


Virginia, 


778 


ThirzaM., 


345 


Sylvester, 


779 


Sarah A., 


346 


Preston K. , 


780 


David 11., 


347 






Mary J. , 


348 


Eighth Generation. 








Gay, Helen Morris, 


674 


Seventh Generation. 




Eleanor, 


89H 


Howe, Esther Morris, 


400 






"Mary, 


720 


Fourth Generation. 




Hopkins, Emelixe Morris, 


474 


Goff, BiTHiAH Morris, 


22 


Charles Morris, 


770 


Betty, 


53 


Emeline, 


771 


Bithiah, 


55 


George H., 


772 


Hezekiali, 


56 






Jonathan, 


57 


Fifth Generation. 




William, 


58 


Hume, Elizabeth Mokhis, 


73 


David, 


59 


Betsy, 


174 


Hannah, 


60 


Samuel, 


175 


Sarah, 


61 


Eunice, 


176 


Elizabeth, 


62 


Clarissa, 


177 


Seth, page 47 


Eliza, 


178 


Jonathan, " 


47 


Bathsheba W. , 


179 


Clarissa, " 


47 


David H., 


180 






Philena S., 


181 


Seventh Generation. 




Julius M., 


182 


Hayden, Julia Flynn, 


453 


Thirza H., 


183 


Laura A. , 


747 


Lodoiska A., 


184 


William F., 


748 






Frank M., 


749 


Si.rJh Generation. 




Flora A., 


750 


David Harlow, 


ISO 


Arthur H., 


751 


Samuel M., 


437 


Carrie A., 


752 


Elizabeth J., 


438 


Hatheway, Laura Fay, 


512 


Julius M., 


182 


Emma, 


846i 


Edward M., 


439 






Julius H., 


440 


Sixth Generation. 




Loreu C, 


441 


Hewitt, Eliza Morris, 


488 






Morris, 


488 


Fourth Gcner<ttion. 




Hitchcock, Sally Morris, 


134 


Johnson, Gkace Mouius, 


21 


ThirzaM., 


319 


John, 


48 


47 









370 



MORRIS FAMILY. 



Number. | 


Number. 


Johnson, Lemuel, 


49 


Marcy, Molly, 


106 


Asa, 


50 


Priscilla, 


107 


Mary, 


51 


Zebediah, 


108 


Edward, 


52 


Aden, 


109 


Seventh Generation. 




Laura, 
Hannah, 


110 
111 


Kellogg, Susan ]\Iokris, 


446 


Dorcas, 


112 


Arthur M., 


740 


Martha, 


113 


Susan W., 


741 


Thomas, 


114 


Edward B., 


742 


Aden, 


115 


Eighth Generation. 

Kenyon, Elizab'h (Morris^*") 


Page. 
359 


Polly, 
Sixth Generation. 


116 


Edith, 


359 


RiNDA Moore, 


418 


Ida, 


359 


Merrick A., 


418 


Myrtel, 


359 


Laura A., 


418 


Dai.sy, 


359 


Morris H., 


418 


Fifth Generation. 

Number. 


RiudaM., 
George C., 


418 
418 


Lincoln, Polly 3Iorris, 


96 


AVilliam P., 


418 


Asa, 


210 


Harriet L., 


418 


Morris, 

Mary, 

Cylenda, 

Icbabod, 

Martha, 

Palestia, 


211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 


Eighth Generation. 

Mansfield, Helen (Morris''"), 
James, 
Bertha, 
Leroy, 


Page. 
360 
360 
360 
360 


Christiana, 


217 




Clarrissa, 


218 


Sixth Generation. 




Sixth Generation. 




Number. 

Merwin, Rebecca Morris, 127 


Lillie, Mary Morris, 


191 


Sylenda, 


298 


Lewis C, 


467 


Betsey, 


299 


Mary C, 


468 


Talcott, 


300 


Ephraim M., 
Samuel M. , 


469 
470 


Mary, 
Fanny, 


301 
302 


Seventh Generation, 

Lewis C, 
Mary A. , 

Lewis, 


467 
764 
765 


Mills, 
Harriet R., 
Sylknda ^Iorris, 

Naucy, 


303 

304 
130 
312 


George, 


766 


Sixth Generation. 




Julia, 


767 


Moore, Anna Morris, 


72 


Fourth Generation. 




Ebenezer M., 


417 


Marcy, Priscilla Morris, 


29 


Henry, 


417 


Zebediah, 


105 


Rinda, 


418 





INDEX. 


371 


Second Generation. 


1 




Number. 


Numbor. ] 


Morris, Asa, 


77 


Morris, Dea. Edward, 


4 


Patta, 


78 


Elizabeth, 


11 


Ascnath, 


79 


Elizabeth, 


12 


Wyman, 


80 


Edward, 


13 


Jonathan, 


38 


Grace, 


14 


Jonathan, 


95 


Abigail, 


15 


Polly, 


96 


Susanna, 


16 


Bithiali, 


97 


Prudence, 


17 


Cylenda, 


98 






Bithiah, 


99 


Third Generation. 




Patty, 
Walter, 


100 


Edward, 


13 


101 


Elizabeth, 


18 


Anna, 


103 


Hannah, 


19 


Esther, 


103 


Edward, 


20 


Betsey, 


104 


Grace, 


21 






Bethiah, 


23 


Fifth Generation. 


Isaac, 


23 


Darius, 


64 


Asa, 


24 


Sylvester, 


123 


Eunice, 


25 


Ascnath, 


124 


Martha, 


26 


Betsey, 


125 


Mary, 


27 


Joseph, 


126 


Jonathan, 


28 


Rebecca, 


127 


Priscilla, 


29 


Darius, 


128 


Hannah, 


30 


Fanny C, 


139 


Dorothy, 


31 


Sylenda, 


130 






Hannah, 


131 


Fourth Generation. 




Sarah, 


133 


Edward, 


20 


Isaac, 


65 


Jemima, 


47 


Polly, 


183 


Isaac, 


23 


Sally, 


134 


Hannah, 


63 


Eunice, 


135 


Darius, 


64 


Isaac, 


136 


Isaac, 


65 


Irene, 


137 


Joseph, 


66 


Roxanna, 


138 


Edward, 


67 


Edward, 


67 


Elizabeth, 


68 


Oliver Bliss, 


139 


Sarah, 


69 


Edward, 


140 


Eunice, 


70 


Isaac, 


141 


Chester, 


71 


John Bliss, 


143 


Ebenezer, 


72 


Lucy, 


148 


Elizabeth, 


73 


Abby, 


144 


Ephraim, 


74 


Thirza, 


145 


Asa, 


24 


Richard D.. 


146 


Edward, 


75 


Lydia, 


147 


Wymau, 


76 


1 Edward A., 


148 



372 



Morris, Chester, 
Betsey, 
Sarah, 
Oliver, 
Epbraim, 
Annis, 
Estlier, 
James, 
Chester, 
Timothy F., 
Emily, 
Betsy, 
Charles, 
Ebenezer, 
Leonard M., 
Anna, 
Laura, 
Ephraxm, 
Sylvester, 
Amanda, 
Edward, 
Parmela, 
Jesse C, 
Jesse C, 
Polly C, 
Joseph C, 
Julia, 
Eliza, 
Joseph, 
Asa, 
Susanna, 
Edward, 
Sally, 
W'i'^rAN, 
Jonathan, 
Timothy, 
Hannah, 
Matilda, 
Jonathan, 
Lincoln, 
William, 
Ilarvelin, 
Anna, 
Laura, 
Laura, 
Lovell, 



MORRIS 


FAMILY. 




Number. 




Number. 


71 


Morris, Walter, 


101 


159 


Oril, 


236 


160 


Walter B,, 


238 


161 


Sarah, 


239 


162 






163 


Sixth Generatio 


n. 


164 


Sylvester, 


123 


165 


John Chandler, 


277 


166 


Sylvester, 


278 


167 


Eliza E., 


279 


168 


James S., 


280 


169 


Marshall S., 


281 


170 


Darius, 


282 


72 


Adeline, 


283 


171 


Emeline, 


284 


172 


Caroline, 


285 


173 


Daniel M., 


286 


74 


Joseph, 


126 


185 


Louisa, 


291 


186 


Delia, 


291i 


187 


Abigail, 


292 


188 


Darius, 


293 


189 


Sylenda, 


294 


190 


Robert R., 


295 


191 


Sylvester, 


296 


192 


Joseph C, 


297 


193 


Isaac, 


136 


194 


Elvira, 


327 


195 


Irene, 


338 


77 


Isaac, 


329 


196 


Albern C, 


330 


197 


Olive, 


331 


198 


Lj'dia, 


333 


80 


George A., 


333 


95 


Hiram, 


334 


199 


Sally, 


335 


200 


Silas, 


336 


201 


Elsa A., 


337 


202 


Oliver B., 


139 


203 


Henry, 


349 


204 


George B., 


350 


205 


Edward, 


140 


206 


Edward F., 


351 


207 


Sally F., 


352 


208 


Charles, 


353 


209 


George F., 


354 



INDEX. 



373 



Number. 

Morris, Maria M., 355 

Henry, 356 

Jonathan F., 857 

Isaac, 141 

JohnB., 142 

Caroline, 358 

Frances G., 359 

William P., 360 

Elizabeth L., 361 

Richard D., 146 

Richard B., 368 

Edward, 369 

Harriet, 370 

Catherines., 371 

James, 165 

Chester W., 399 

Esther, 400 

Charles G., 401 

JaneE., 402 

JedediahC, 403 

James, 404 

Nancy J. , 405 

Harriet. 406 

Susan, 407 

Timothy, 167 

Betsey, 408 

Charles D., 409 

Leonard M., 171 

Lindorf, 410 

WalsteinL., 411 

Lavater, 412 

WalsteinF., 413 

Hannah P., 414 

Leonard C, 415 

Edwin L., 416 

Sylvester, 185 

lluldahW., 445 

Susan J.. 446 

Joseph, 447 

Edward W., 448 

Ephraim, 449 

Lucy P., 450 

Josephs., 451 

George S., 452 

Edward, 187 

Harriet L., 459 



Morris, 



Sarah P., 
Delia. 
Mary C, 
Edward C, 
Jesse C, 
Mary A. , 
Joseph C, 
Roswell F., 
Joseph, 
Seymour, 
Seymour, 

Tl.MOTHY, 

Eraeline, 
Augusta, 
Julia A., 
Susan S. , 
Charles L. , 
Hannah, 
Timothy D., 
George A., 
Isaac H., 
Lincoln, 
Lincoln, 
George R., 
Eliza A., 
Esther, 
Caroline A., 
John C, 
Henry M., 
William B., 
Walter, 
William, 
John K., 
William W., 
Catharine, 
Mary Ak, 
John, 
Willard, 
Cornelia, 
Jonathan, 
Hauvelin, 
Adeline, 
Volney W., 
Jonathan 13.. 
]\rerrick U., 
Franklin \V. 



Kumbcr. 
460 
461 
462 
403 
190 
404 
465 
466 
195 
472 
473 
199 
474 
475 
470 
477 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 
203 
486 
487 
488 
489 
490 
491 
492 
493 
494 
204 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
205 
503 
604 
505 
506 
.".U7 



374 



IMorris, 





MORRIS 


family. 






Number. | 




Number. 


Frances A., 




508 


Morris, Ahby F., 


570 


Orville 0., 




509 


Delia M., 


571 


Lewis H. , 




510 


Fanny K. , 


572 


LOVELL, 




209 


Joseph C, 


573 


Walter E., 




522 


Sarah L. , 


574 


Miner, 




523 


Robert R., 


575 


Homer, 




524 


Henry S., 


576 


George, 




525 


Sylvester, 


577 


Hannah, 




526 


Mary R., 


578 


Julia, 




527 


Joseph C, 


297 


Walter B. , 




238 


Jennie, 


579 


John W., 




528 


Louisa, 


580 


Julia J. C, 




529 


Joseph C, 
Sophia, 


581 
582 


venth Generation. 




Junius B., 


583 


John C, 




277 


Albern C, 


330 


Lucia, 




532 


Sarah, 


639 


William C, 




533 


Fanny, 


640 


Minerva, 




534 


Isaac, 


641 


Adeline, 




536 


Nancy, 


642 


Benjamin F., 




537 


Silas, 


643 


George M., 




538 


Polly, 


644 


Jose, 




539 


Elisha, 


645 


Phebe, 




540 


Alta, 


646 


Sylvester, 




278 


George A., 


333 


Sylvester B. , page 


359, 


541 


Silas, 


650 


OrnaldoW., 




542 


Chauncy, 


651 


Davenport A., ' 




543 


Fanny, 


652 


Joseph B., ' 




544 


Martha, 


653 


Mary E., 




545 


Hiram, 


334 


John D., page 


359, 


546 


Genett, 


654 


Marshall S., 




281 


Robert n.. 


655 


James H., 




547 


George W. , 


656 


Elizabeth, page 


359, 


548 


David D., 


657 


Helen M., 


360, 


549 


Marj"^ A., 


658 


Lester B., 




550 


Manly A., 


659 


Joseph S., 




551 


Gertrude A., 


660 


Fulton R, page 


360, 


552 


Henry, 


349 


Sarah C, 




553 


Mary, 


668 


Delos R , page 


360, 


554 


Edward, 


669 


John C, 




555 


Henry 0., 


670 


Charles M., page 


360, 


556 


Charles H., 


671 


Darius, 




282 


Frederick W., 


672 


Mary E., 




557 


William F., 


673 


Robert R., 




295 


Helen, 


674 


Sylvester, 




296 


George B., 


350 



INDEX. 



375 







Number. 




Number. 


Morris, 


George B., 


675 


Morris, IVIary A., 


783 




Robert 0. , 


676 


Timothy D., 


481 




Caroline, 


677 


George S., 


784 




Charles, 


353 


Henry, 


785 




Sarah M., 


680 


Frank, 


786 




Charles, 


681 


Harvey, 


787 




George F., 


354 


John, 


788 




Edward F., 


682 


Byron S.. 


789 




Henry, 


683 


Ellen A., 


790 




Frank E., 


684 


William, 


791 




Arthur, 


685 


George A., 


482 




Henry, 


356 


Orville, 


792 




John E., 


686 


Homer, 


793 




Jonathan F., 


357 


Isaac IT., 


483 




Anna, 


687 


Charles, 


794 




Alice, 


688 


Delos, 


795 




Richard B., 


368 


Burt, 


796 




Richard H., 


710 


]Mary, 


797 




Edward R., 


711 


Henry M. , 


492 




John B., 


712 


Henry I., 


799 




]\Iary L. , 


713 


Howie 6., 


800 




LiNDORF, 


410 


Rebecca M., 


801 




Nancy J., 


727 


Henry D., 


802 




Walstein F., 


728 


Cazenave I., 


803 




Julia M., 


729 


MayL, 


804 




Walstein L. , 


411 


Anna L., 


805 




Ellen, 


730 


Louisin F., 


806 




Leonard C, 


415 


William W., 


496 




Lillian L., 


735 


Emma M., 


807 




Abbie J., 


736 


Aden S., 


808 




George S., 


737 


George C, 


809 




Katie L., 


738 


Lillie S., 


810 




Edwin L., 


416 


John, 


499 




Leonard D., 


739 


Laura M., 


811 




Edward W., 


448 


Clara A., 


812 




Ephraim, 


449 


Aden S., 


813 




KateE., 


743 


Jennie B., 


814 




Annie L., 


744 


Emma R., 


815 




George S., 


452 


WiLLAKD, 


500 




Roger S. , 


745 


Addle L., 


810 




Ethel C, 


746 


Ella M., 


817 




Edward C, 


463 


Josephine E., 


818 




Walden P., 


762 


Walter L., 


810 




Helen B., 


763 


Frank E., 


820 




Charles L. , 


479 


Gertrude N., 


821 




Julia, 


782 


Lynn R. , 


82H 



376 



MOHHTS FAMILY. 



Morris, 





Number. 


Number. 


Jonathan, 


502 


Morris, Mary, 


859 


FrcHlcrick D., 


823 


Raleigh, 


860 


Dwiiiht, 


823 






EdwardJ., 


824 


Eighth Generation. 




VOLNEY W., 


504 


William C, 


533 


Bower J., 


825 


Heman W., 


861 


Walter A., 


826 


Addie, 


862 


Frances J., 


827 


Jessie F., 


863 


Jonathan B., 


505 


Lillian G., 


864 


Frank E. , 


828 


Mabel, 


865 


Frederick H., 


829 


Vivian, 


866 


Merrick D., 


50G 


Benjamin F., 


537 


Grace N. , 


830 


Jennie, 


867 


May C, 


831 


Carrie, 


868 


Franklin W., 


507 


Ornaldo W., 


543 


Clara Belle, 


832 


Lester B., 


550 


Cora, 


833 


Silas, 


650 


Frances S. , 


834 


Adelia I., 


886 


Emma L., 


835 


Homer A. , 


887 


Orville 0. , 


509 


Archibald B., 


888 


Lewis 0., 


836 


George A., 


889 


Gertie, 


838 


Edward F , 


683 


Lewis H. , 


510 


Alice A., 


894 


Dora A., 


839 


Louisa, 


895 


Walter, 


840 


Edwin L., 


896 


Willie v.. 


841 


Flora E., 


897 


Duane, 


842 


Frank E., 


684 


IdaM., 


843 


Frank A., 


898 


Fred, 


844 


Ralph, 


899 


Frances, 


845 


John E., 


686 


Kate, 


840 


Henry L., 


900 


Miner, 


523 


Edward B., 


901 


Thomas, 


847 


JohnF., 


903 


Lula, 


848 


Ninth Generation. 




Benjamin, 


849 






Frank, 


850 


Heman W., 


861 


Flora. 


851 


Edward E. , 


914 


Homer, 


524 


George W., 


915 


Delia, 


852 


Eighth Generation. 




Addie, 


853 




Page. 


Charles, 


854 


Sylvester B., 


359 


George, 


855 


Maud, 


359 


Lucy, 


856 


Grace, 


359 


George, 


525 


Ralph, 


359 


Clarissa, 


857 


Electa, 


359 


Walter, 


858 


DAVENrORT A. , 


359 



INDEX. 



77 



Page. 

Morris, Frederick, 359 

Louise, 359 

JoukD., 359 

LolaM.. 359 

Edith, 359 

James H., 359 

Ornaldo W., 359 

EmmaF., 359 

Lev/is S., 359 

Lester B., 360 

Bertha V. , 360 

Blanche E., 360 

Robert B. , 360 

Joseph S., 360 

Fulton R. , 360 

Harry F., 360 

Mabel, 300 

PaulM., 360 

Charles C, 360 

Josie, 360 

Delos R. , 360 

Eugene, 360 

Frederick, 360 

Charles M., 360 



Eighth Generation. 

Mott, Ellen Webster, 719, 138 

Annie W., 138 

William E., 138 

OtisW., 138 

Eighth Generation. 

Number. 

North, Lillian Comstock, 614 

Edward, 883 

Gladys, 884 

Eloise, 885 

Seventh Generation. 

Olmstead, Frances Morris, 359 

Elizabeth M., 689 

Lucia G., 690 

Henrietta F., 691 | 

John M., 692 

Annie M., 693 

Louisa F., 694 

Charlotte R.. 695 
48 



Seventh Generation. 

Number. 
Parmelee, Eliza Flynn, 

Jane W., 

William H., 

Eliza F., 

William H., 

Laura B., 

Second Generation. 

Peake, Huidah, 



Siji-th Generation. 

Pease, Clarrissa Hume, 
Frances W.. 
Theodore O., 
Morris H., 
Lorenzo E., 
David H, 
Stephen O., 
Milo S., 
Theodore C, 
Cliarlotte C, 
Batiisiieba W., 
Eliza Morris, 

Seventh Generation. 

Mary Uffokd, 
Mary E. , 
Edward L., 
Frank G., 
Rollo C, 

Fifth Generation, 

Peirce, Anna Morris, 
Mary, 
Lucre tia. 

Sixth Generation. 

Porter, Lodoiska A., 
Morris H. 
Ralph H., 
Julia B., 

Seventh Generation. 

Reed, Catueuine .Moukis, 
Raymond, 
Kitty, 
Charles B., 



454 
753 
754 
755 
756 
757 



14 



177 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
425 
426 
427 
179 
1!)4 



305 
704 
705 
706 
707 

102 
240 
241 

184 
442 
443 
444 

371 
715 
716 
717 



378 MORRIS 


FAMILY. 




Fourth Generation. 




Nnraber. 


Nu 


mher. 


Smith, Cornelia, 


016 


Rice, Martha Morris, 


26 


Andrew, 


017 


Esther, 


8G 


Sylenda, 


018 


Jonathan, 


87 


Harriet, 


619 


Mary, 


88 


Charles M., 


020 


Nancy, 


89 


Edwin, 


621 


Jonathan, 


90 


Louisa, 


022 


Darius, 


91 


Aramantha, 


623 


Betsey, 


92 


Violette, 


624 


Edward, 


93 


Leonard P., 


625 


Martha, 


94 


Laura M., 


6-26 






Jane M. , 


627 


SeventJi Generation. 








Salisbury, Ellen Flynn, 


455 


Eighth Generation. 




William F., 


758 


Louise Olmstead, 


094 


Albert P., 


759 


Raymond S., 


911 


Herbert B., 


760 


Plinsdale S., 


912 


Edgar T., 


761 


Susan W. Kellogg, 


741 






Morris Kellogg, 


913 


Eighth Generation. 








Swarts, Addie M. , 


862 


Seventh Generation. 




Morris, 


916 


Swift, Olive Morris, 


331 






Fanny E., 


047 


Seventh Getter ati on. 




Caroline A., 


048 


Stebbins, Hannah Morris, 


414 


Emma M., 


649 


George M., 


731 


Shirky, Elsa IMorris, 


337 


Louis F., 


732 


Levi, 


664 


Emma J. , 


733 


Josephine, 


665 


Leonard S., 


734 


Eighth Generation. 




Fonrtii, Generation. 




Stockton, Elizab'th Olmstead 


,689 


Smith, Eunice Morris, 


25 


Henrietta, 


904 


Abigail, 


81 


Elizabeth 0., 


905 


Oren, 


82 


Annie M., 


906 


Hezekiah, 


83 


Richard, 


907 


Bithiah, 


84 


Amy C, 


908 


Sabina, 


85 


Frances S., 


909 


Calvin, 


85^ 


John P., 


910 


Seventh Generation. 




Seventh Generation. 




Fanny Merwin, 


302 


Strong, Beulah, page 100 


Zelia, 
Reuben, 


591 
592 


Sixth Generation. 




Emma, 


523 


Twichell, Sarah Morris, 


239 


OraT., 


595 


George W., 


530 


Elvira Morris, 


327 


Sarah A., 


531 



INDEX. 



379 



Sixth Generation. 

Number. 

Uffoid, Lucy Morris, 143 

Dixon D., 362 

Lucien M., 363 

LucyM., 364 

MaiyG., 365 

Thirza M., 366 

Edward W., 367 

Seventh Generation. 

Dixon D., 362 

Charles, 696 

Edward, 697 

Josephine, 698 

Lucien M., 363 

Amasa, 699 

Josephine, 700 

Isaac, 701 

Lucy M., 702 

Henry, 703 

Eighth Generation. 

Wardwell, Cornelia Comstock, 611 

Emily, 872 

Gertrude, 873 

Lewis, 874 

Cornelia, 875 



Wardwell, Calvert, 

Theodora, 



Number. 
876 
877 



Sixth Generation. 

Weston, Julia Morris, 193 

Ephraim M., 471 

Seventh Generation. 

Webster, Sally Morris, 335 

Eli A., 661 

George L., 662 

Ida A., 6(53 

Mary Clark, 373 

Helen C, 718 

Ella C, 719 

Sixth Generation. 

Wood, Betsey Morris, 125 

Darius M., 287 

Isaac S. , 288 

Ornaldo D., 289 

Elizabeth, 290 

Seventh Generation. 

Darius M., 287 

Ornaldo D. , 289 

Elizabeth, 290 



F[RST BRANC^JI. 



MARRIAGES. — SONS' WIVES. 





Number. 




Number. 


Allard, Belinda, 


121 


Bently, Rachel F., 


667 


Andrews, Polly, 


152 


Bliss, Luc}', 


67 


Adams, Mary, 


153 


Caroline, 


ijy 


Amadon, Abigail L., 


277 


Boweu, Elizabeth, 


4 


Alger, Mary, 


278 


Bonet, Jane, 


728 


Allen, Eliza, 


325 


Bond, Augusta, 


5.^)0 


Annis, Mary, 


537 


Boyd, Theah, 


27r» 


Austin, Frances, 


525 


Bontecou, Sybil, 


140 


Elenora, 


552 


Harriet, 


35iJ. 8*»0 


Barren. Olive A., 


504 


Bowman, Harriett, 


ia7 


Brand, Alice, 


667 


Brown, Louise, 


OSJ 


Beebe, Elizabeth C, 


297 


Nullif, 


710 



380 



MORIilS FAMILY. 



Number. 

Brown. ]\rartha, 171 

Billiard, Clarrissa, 205 

Burt, Emily, 276 

Burton, Mary, 423 

Cballee, Sarah, 23 

Chandler, Rebecca, 64 

Child, Anna, 24 

Cadwell, Elizabeth. 676 

Cady, Olive, 151 

Clark, Amy, 165 

Cary, Phebe. 238 

Carpenter, Frances K., 296 

Crain, Frances D., 562 

Carter, Abby J., 505 

Celle, Victoria, 452 

Converse, Pamela, 74 

Cox, Frances H., 681 

Collyer, Mary, 416 

Davis, Jennie F., 684 
Davidson, Alice, page 346 

Draper, Jemima, 20 

Dallison, Eliza W., 203 

Emerson, Ellen M., 481 

Frary, Angeline, 190 

Flack, Lucina, 507 

Felt, Mary P., 686 

Fi-sher, Elizabeth, 64 
Ford, Kate, page 359 

Flynt, Sally, 140 

Mercy, 140 

Frye, 3Iartha, 448 

Fry, Julia, 467 

Granger, Lucia, ' 142 

Gaston, Emala, 182 

Gleason, Miriam, 93 

Golf, Bethiah. 77 

Gould, Hannah, 363 

Goos, Frances J., 424 
Harrison, Sarah, page 359 

Ilawley, Susan A., 238 

Hart, Mary, 92^ 

ITenning, Iluldah, 524 

Hill, Sophrouia, 300 

Hills, Harriett, 857 

Hildebrandt, Sarah A., 502 

Hitchcock, Harriet, 273 



Number. 

Ilolman, Zilpah, 80 

Hoard, Sarah, 281 

Howie, Eliza P., 492 

Hulett, Mary F., 013 

Ingraham, Elizabeth, 182 

Jones, Mary E., 421 

Johnson, Irene, 65 

Clarissa, 282 

Judson, Ann, 272 

Kellogg, Esther, 363 

Kinstry, Lucetta, 187 

Lathrop, Elizabeth, 350 

Lewis, Martha, 295 

Leonard, Adeline C, 500 

Lincoln, Hannah, 95 

Lewis, Anna M., 423 

Lyon, Hannah C, 340 

Mayo, Hannah, 3 

May, Rinda, 72 
McCalmont, Rhoda, page 359 

Miller, Anna, 318 

Morrison, Miss, 486 

Morse, Sarah A., 354 
Newell, Sarah, page 30 

Nickerson, Alice M., 449 

Paddock, Mary, 171 

Parshall, Hannah J., 479 

Susan, 547 

Perkins, Emma H., 861 

Pierpout, Mary (Ruggles), 3 

Peake, Jiithiah, 13 

Perrin, Trj'phena, 80 

Penniman, Catherine, 180 

Pressy, Helen B., 860 

Porter, Julia M., 463 

Rice, Emma C, 204 

Richards, Jane, 334 

Ripley, Mary, 368 

Rounds, Alice, 209 

Root, Mary A., 330 

Richardson, Dorothy, 80 

Russell, Lydia, 126 

Russell, Lydia J., 420 

Ryerson, Lucy G., 672 

Shaw, Augusta, 199 

Stafford, Sarah L., 496 



INDEX. 



381 



Swfirtwout, Sopbronia, 


Number. 
650 


Trescott, Josephine, 


Number, 
page 359 


Seymour, Clara E., 


195 


Terry, Bilhah, 


149 


Secor, Jane, 


483 


Truax, Maria M., 


417 


Shearer, Isabel, 


411 


Urann, Harriet, 


289 


Sheldon, Maria H., 


506 


Warner, Sally, 


101 


Calista, 


510 


Warriner, Mary, 


349 


Stebbins, Julia, 


238 


Wales, Betsey, 


71 


Stephens, Mary, 


90 


Diana, 


119 


Anna, 


90 


Sally, 


120 


Skinner, Mar^', 


28 


Washburn, Sarah, 


533 


Sill, Eliza M., 


324 


Webster, Cynthia, 


333 


Smith, Elizabeth, 


123 


Weston, Susan J., 


185 


Sarah M., 


353 


AVilliams, Mary, 


367 


Emma, 


page 360 


Whitford, Randilla, 


509 


Suow, Lavinia M., 


410 


Cornelia, 


509 


Lucy H., 


415 


Witherell, Josephine, 


523 


Tracy, Bilhah, 


149 


Wright, Anna W., 


608 


Taylor, Laura A. , 


499 


Wood, Betsey, 


136 



FIRST BRANCH. 
MARRIAGES. — DAUGHTERS' HUSBANDS. 





Number. 




NumbiT. 


Adams, James, 


131 


Bonett, George, 


727 


Charles C, 


680 


Boynton, David E., 


!ti» 


Allen, Freeman, 


200 


Blodgett, Abner, 


103 


Elisha, 


98 


Bowdoiu, John A., 


274 


Alverson, Almanson, 


298 


Bowker, Charles, 


435 


Amidon, John, 


250 


Butler, , 


159 


Barber, John, 


476 


Clapp, Increase, 


132 


Bancroft, Timothy, 


88 


Clark, Joshua, 


70 


Bartlett, Julius, 


178 


Cady, Henry, 


124 


Braddock, Michael, 


60 


Chapin, Milo, 


366 


Barnard, Wm. H., 


529 


Chaffee, Daniel D., 


352 


Baxter, Wm. W., 


468 


Calhoun, Charles, 


668 


Brake, George, 


665 


Campbell, Smith, 


337 


Bebee, Lucius, 


294 


Christie, William, 


290 


Belknap, Joseph, 


17 


Colton, Luther, 


292 


Briggs, Daniel, 


100 


Converse, Jedcdiah, 


107 


Brill, Addison, 


342 


James, 


208 


Brinkerhoof, Gilbert, 


317 


Comstock, Albon, 


135 


Bowen, Elisha, 


129 


Aruoii, 


137 



382 



MORRIS FAMILY. 





Number. 




Number. 


Coue, Carson R., 


313 


Hun)e, David, 


73 


Copelaud, Daniel, 


103 


Johnson, John, 


21 


Cooke, Oliver, 


815 


Jones, Andrew, 


777 


Cone, Charles M., 


743 


Judd, Schuyler, 


513 


Church, John, 


16 


Kellogg, Edmund B. 


446 


Cummings, W., 


271 


Kenyon, L. J., 


548 


Curtis, James, 


116 


Kilbourn, Henry, 


183 


Davis, John, 


63 


King, Ira, 


283 


Roswell, 


133 


Kislen, John, 


419 


Dawes, Samuel, 


179 


Knowlton, Thomas, 


113 


Dimock, Daniel, 


110 


Lamb, Joseph, 


112 


Dean, L. D., 


515 


Langdon, John, 


291 


Dudley, James W., 


328 


Lawrence, , 


163 


Dunbar, Nahum, 


266 


Lillie, Lewis, 


191 


Dustin, , 


110 


Lincoln, Asa, 


96 


Dunham, Ransom W., 


370 


Lyon, Norman, 


314 


Erwin, Silas, 


604 


May, Hiram, 


279 


Fuller, Ralph, 


249 


Mansfield, William, 


page 3G0, 549 


Fay, Levi, 


206 


Marcy, Zebediah, 


29 


Field, Wm. C, 


338 


Merrick, 


418 


Andrew, Jr., 


490 


McKay, Mordecai, 


284 


Firmin, Richard, 


118 


McCurdy, Jesse, 


201 


Frizzel, John, 


15 


McFarland, , 


168 


Fish, , 


406 


Merwin, Jesse, 


127 


Fisher, R., 


477 


Noah, 


130 


Fitch, Simeon, 


489 


McCray, David, 


291 


Ford, Wilbur, 


402 


Mclntire, James E., 


361 


Foster, T. H., 


501 


Mills, Charles S., 


688 


Flynn, Asa C, 


86 


Morris, Asa, 


55 


Gale, Daniel, 


86 


Moore, Augustus, 


172 


Gardner, Amasa, 


708 


Mott, Edward, 


719 


Gray, Isaac H., 


475 


Munger, Samuel, 


438 


Gay, William W., 


674 


Nason, Carlton W., 


690 


GoU, Hezekiah, 


22 


Newbury, Norman, 


640 


Hart, Thomas, 


92 


Nichols, , 


47 


James, 


91 


North, S. N. D., 


614 


Hamilton, John, 


812 


Olmstead, Isaac P., 


360 


Hall, Robert, 


314 


Packard, Philander, 


176 


Hayden, Amos, 


453 


Palmer, George, 


642 


Hathaway, B. 0., 


512 


Parmelee, Hezekiah, 


454 


Hendricks, , 


251 


Peake, Joseph, 


14 


Hewitt, Dr., 


488 


Pease, Stephen, 


69 


Hitchcock, John, 


134 


Luke, 


265 


Joel. 


138 


Erastus, 


177 


Howe, Henry, 


400 


Azel, 


179 


Hopkins, Socrates, 


474 


Thomas 11., 


194 



INDEX. 



383 





Number. 




Number. 


Pease, Frederick, 


571 


Shirky, Henry, 


337 


Pierce, Stephen, 


102 


Smith, Hezekiah, 


25 


Perry, Alfred T. , 


687 


George W., 


302 


Powell, Bradford, 


22 


Humphrey H., 


327 


Porter, Milton, 


184 


Lorra, 


653 


Reed, Frank. 


371 


Wra. T., 


741 


Reeder, George, 


639 


Frank S., 


694 


Richards, John, 


196 


Thomas S. , 


page 360 


Rice, Comfort, 


26 


Swarts, Charles, 


862 


Rollo, Ralph R., 


144 


Swift, David, 


331 


Rose, , 


160 


Stone, John, 


89 


Root, Sumner, 


265 


Strong, John D., 


463 


Robbius, Asa, 


323 


Stockton, John P., 


689 


Rolfe, 


405 


Twichell, Otis, 


239 


Rowe, Edward C, 


517 


Ufford, Daniel, 


143 


Salisbury, Franklin B., 


455 


Watkins, John H., 


811 


Sawin, Farnsworth, 


709 


Wardwell, John H., 


611 


Spelman, Solomon C, 


291 


Webster, Eliphalet, 


335 


Sessions, AVm. P., 


173 


Otis, 


373 


Stebbins, Geo. P., 


414 


Weston, Irving, 


193 


Sessions, , 


698 


Wood, Isaac S. , 


125 


Stewart, Edwin C, 


747 







SECOND BRANCH. 



DESCENDANTS OF LIEUT. EBENEZER MORRIS. 



Third Generation. 






Number. 


Number. 


Lemuel, 




55 


Child, Anna Morris, 


10 


Huldah, 




78 


Sybil, 


48 


Thomas P. 




79 


Anna, 


49 


Stephen, 




80 


Alithea, ~ 


50 


Rowena, 




81 


William, 


51 


Nancy, 




82 


Dorothy, 


52 


Perry, 




83 


Lois, 


53 


Dolphus, 




84 


Thomas, 


54 


Griffin, Margaret Morris, 


3 


Lemuel, 


55 


Sarah, 




22 


Huldah, 


56 


Joseph, 




23 


William, 


57 


Samuel, 




24 


Thomas Jr., 


54 


Mary, 




25 


Walter, 
Anna, 


75 
76 


Fourth G4 


neration. 




Asa, 


77 


Hitchcock, Sarah 


^lOKUIS, 


28 



384 



MORRIS FAMILY. 



Hitchcock, Anna, 
Joseph, 
Ebenezer, 
Sarah, 
Ambrose, 
Clay, 



Number. 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 



Second Generation. 

Morris, Ebenezer, 6 

Sarah, 1 

]\Iary, 2 

Margaret, 3 

Ebenezer, 4 

Joseph, 5 

Joshua, 6 

Joshua, 7 

Elizabeth, 8 

Mehitable, 9 

Anna, 10 

TJiird Generation. 

Ebenezer, 4 

Ebenezer, 26 

James, 27 

Sarah, 28 

Joshua, 30 

Mary, 31 

Joseph, 32 

Huldah, 33 

Rhoda, 34 

Anna, 35 

Joseph, 5 

Sarah, 36 

Fourth Generation. 

James, 27 

Ebenezer, 63 

Egitha, 64 



Third Generation. 

Number. 



Paine, Mary Morris, 

Seth, 

Mary, 

Hannah, 

Elijah, 

Joseph, 

Sarah, 

Margaret, 

Joshua, 

Judith, 



2 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



Fourth Generation. 




Joshua, 


19 


Joshua, 


58 


Mary, 


59 


Amaryllis, 


60 


Elizabeth, 


61 


John, 


62 


Sarah Morris, 


36 


Joseph, 


71 


Asa, 


72 


Solomon, 


73 


Hannah, 


74 


Third Generation, 




Sexton, Elizabeth Morris, 


8 


Lucy, 


37 


Mehitable, 


38 


Mary, 


39 


Dorothy, 


40 


Margaret, 


41 


Elizabeth, 


42 


Exskie Z., 


43 


Ebenezer, 


44 


Amos, 


45 



INDEX. 



38i 



SECOND BEANCII. 
MARRIAGES. — SONS' WIVES. 





Number. 




Number. 


Davis, Sarah, 


6 


Tyler, Mabel, 


11 


Gage, Lucy, 


34 


White, Mary, 


14 


Killam, Sarah, 


4 


Mosely, Mary, 


11) 


Perry, Dorcas, 


55 


Jackson, Chloe, 


79 


Corbin, Susanna, 


57 







SECOND BRANCH. 
MARRIAGES. — DAUGHTERS' HUSBANDS. 





Number. 




Number. 


Griffin, Joseph, 


3 


Peake, Thomas, 


50 


Paine, Seth, 


2 


Atherton, , 


52 


Sexton, Amos, 


8 


May, Joseph, 


53 


Child, Thomas, 


10 


Skinner, Stephen, 


56 


Ross, , 


12 


Hitchcock, Joseph, 


28 


Bass, , 


13 


Abbott, Alba. 


76 


Bennett, Isaac, 


18 


Abbott, Willard, 


77 


Williams, Stephen, 


20 


Child, Joshua, 


53 


Ainsworth, Edward, 


48 


Paine, Joseph, 


36 



THIRD BRANCH. 

DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL MORRIS. 



Sixth Generation. 




Eighth Generation. 




Number. 


Ni 


imbrr. 


Avery, Abigail Morris, 


298 


Addison, Cn a ui.es M., 


587 


Thomas M., 


498 


James T., 


667 i 


William W., 


499 


Fifth Generation. 




Seventh Generation. 




Abbott, Sally Morris, 


98 


Margaret Morris, 


496 


William R., 


261 


Charles 0. , 


627 


Baylis, Sally Morris, 


266 


Frank M. , 


028 


William M., 


266 


Addison, Julia Morris, 


375 


Edward, 


206 


Charles M., 


587 


Charles, 


266 


Sarah E., 


688 


Frederick. 


266 






Edwiu, 


2(Jft 



49 



386 MORRIS 


FAMILY. 




Seventh Generation. 


1 


Sixth Generation. 




Number. | 


Number. 


Baines, Harriet Leonard, 


382 


Cretors, Sarah Morris, 


282 






EllaS., 


470 


Sixth Generation. 




Morris L., 


471 


Bertholf, Eleanor, 


198 


Cheney F., 


472 


Mary C, 


198 


Jennie B., 


473 


Olive L., 


198 


Elmer, 


474 


William H., 


198 






Peter M., 


198 


Fifth Generation. 




Milton M., 


198 


Child, Letitia Morris, 


92 


James F., 


198 


Alpha, 


224 


Eleaaor A., 


198 


Almira, 


225 


Elmer E., 


198 


William, 


226 


Frederick F. , 


198 


Mary M. , 


227 


Bishop, Hannah Morris, 


211 


Pamelia, 


228 


Andrew J. , 


391 


Edwin S., 


229 


Robert M., 


392 


Ephraim M., 


230 


Owen, 


393 






John, 


394 


Sixth Generation. 




Laura, 


395 


William, 


226 


Oliver, 


396 


Alpha, 


423 


William, 


397 


Lucy J., 


424 


Malcom, 


398 


Darius G., 


425 


Samuel M., 


399 


Lewis, 


426 


Ferdinand, 


400 


William H., 


427 


Marion, 


401 


Elias S., 
Seventh Generation. 


428 


Fourth Generation. 




Coolidge, Harriet B., 


367 


Bugbee, Anna Morris, 


15 


Congdon, Ada Morris, 


413 


Morris, 


85 


Sarah S., 


607 


Haviland, 


86 






Nehemiah, 


87 


Third Generation . 




Polly, 


88 


Corbiu, Hannah Morris, 


5 


Anna, 


89 


Hannah, 


24 


Susan, 


90 


Mehitable, 


25 


G. W. L., 


15 


Dorcas, 


26 


WUlard, 


15 


Clement, 


27 


Charles, 


15 


Margaret, 


28 


Caroline, 


15 


Ezra, 


29 


Eliza, 


15 


Elijah, 


30 


David, 


15 


Lucy, 


31 


James, 


15 


Seventh Generation 




Seventh Generation 




Corcoran, Louisa Morris, 


868 


Canficld. Miriam Morris. 


376 


Harriet L., 


577 



INDEX. 



38; 



Corcoran, Louise M., 


nniDer. 

578 


Ni 
Eustis, C4eorge P., 


imber. 
605 


Charles M., 


579 


Harriet L., 


6f36 


Fiftli Generation. 




Fifth Generation. 




Davis, Lydia Morris, 


259 


Ely, LuciNDA Newell, 


IGG 


Nettie, 


259 


Lucinda N. , 


339 


John F., 


259 


Alfred B., 


340 






Esther, 


341 


Sixth Generation. 




William N., 


342 


Sylvia Morris, 


302 






Jane M. , 


302 


Seventh Getierafion. 




Benjamin M., 


302 


Fox, Elizabeth Morris, 


309 


James H., 


302 


Charles E., 


580 


William, 


302 


William U., 


581 


Harriet E., 


302 


Helen L., 


582 


William C, 


302 


Elizabeth M. , 


583 


Charles M., 


303 


Gove, Vestatia Hyde, 


485 


Alfred, 


302 


Henry M., 


GJ2 


Seventh Getieration. 




Fifth Generation. 




Robert M., 


302 


Herndon, William A. , 


220 


Elizabeth, 


302 


Seventh Generation. 




William M., 


302 


Henderson, Harriet Davis, 


302 


Edward G., 


303 


Sylvia, 


302 


Henry, 


303 


John, 


302 


Sylvia C, 


302 


Mary M., 


302 


Dingman, Sarah Morris, 


378 






Sarah L., 


588 


Fift/i Gent-ration. 




Duncan, Maria Morris, 


373 


Huntly, Sarah Morris, 


21(1 


Murray M., 


583 


Morris, 


216 


William S., 


584 


George, 


216 


Louis, 


585 


Seventh Generation. 




Richard C, 


586 






Murray M., 


583 


Hyde, Vestatia Moukis, 


•IN.") 


Morris C, 


667 


Frederick A., 


619 


Eames, Mary Morris, 


557 


Marcus D., 


(I'JO 


Hattie E., 


657 


Carrie K. , 


O-'l 


Jennie B., 


658 


Frederick A., 


61U 






Alice R., 


668 


Sixth Generation. 




Florence, 


669 


Edson, Lydia (Morris), 


210 


Marcus D., 


620 


]\Iary, 


390i 


James, Lucy 3Ioriiis, 
Jarvis, Amelia Morris, 


377 
212 


Eighth Generation. 




Francis G., 


403 


Eustis, Louise Corcoran, 


578 


Frederick T., 


403 


William C, 


6G4 


Ileury K., 


•i(>4 



388 MORRIS FAMILY. 




Number. | 


Nnmbcr. 


Jarvis, Aurelia C, 


405 


Marcy, Jedediah, 


128 


Knapp, Mauy Mokris, 


412 


Mary, 


129 


Mary M., 


606 


Jedediah, 


130 






Mary, 


131 


Fifth Generation. 




Rhoda, 


132 


Lamed, Hannah Morris, 


122 


Daniel, 


133 


Morris, 


318 


Hannah, 


134 


William, 


319 


Elijah, 


46 


Hannah, 


320 


Lemuel, 


135 


Dolly, 


321 


Prudence, 


136 


Eliza, 


222 


Sarah, 


137 


Seventh Generation. 




Elijah, 
Lemuel, 


138 
139 


Learned, Harriet Morris, 


382 


Sarah, 


140 


Fourth Generation. 




Lemuel, 


141 


Lillie, Abigail Morris, 


17 


Fifth Generation. 




Susanna, 


17 


Jedediah, 


180 






Rhoda, 


333 


Third Generation. 




Joseph, 


334 


J^Larcy, Prudence Morris, 


7 


William L., 


335 


Dorothy, 


42 


Hannah, 


336 


Jedediah, 


43 


Jedediah, 


337 


Martha, 


44 


Caroline, 


338 


Moses, 


45 






Elijah, 


46 


Seventh Generation. 




Prudence, 


47 


Mason, Cornelia Morris, 


510 


Mary, 
Daniel, 


48 
49 


Second Generation. 




Martha, 


50 


Morris, Samuel, 


9 


Miriam, 


51 


Samuel, 


1 


Mehitahle, 


52 


Benjamin, 


2 






Mehitable, 


3 


Fourth Generation. 




Ri^becca, 


4 


Hannau Morris, 


20 


Hannah, 


5 


Susanna, 


109 


Dorothy, 


6 


Dorothea, 


110 


Prudence, 


7 


Daniel, 


111 


Abigail, 


8 


Dolphus, 


112 






Morris, 


113 


Third Generation. 




Maria, 


114 


Samuel, 


1 


David, 


115 


Mehitable, 


9 


Mehitable, 


116 


Samuel, 


10 


Abigail, 


117 


Mehitable, 


11 


Betsey, 


118 


Henry, 


12 


Jedediah, 


43 


John, 


13 


Joseph, 


127 


Lemuel, 


14 



INDEX. 



389 



Number. 




Number. 


Morris, Anna, 


15 


Morris, Sally S. , 


98 


William, 


16 


Royal, 


99 


Abigail, 


17 


Betsey, 


100 


Susanna, 


18 


Edward, 


19 


Edward, 


19 


Elisha, 


101 


Hannah, 


21 


Sally, 


102 


Lucretia, 


22 


Elisha. 


103 


Benjamin, 


2 


William, 


104 


Benjamin. 


23 


Edward, 


105 


Fourth Generation. 




Lyman, 


106 






Alfred, 


107 


Samuel, 


10 


Moses, 


108 


Haviland, 


62 


Benjamin, 


23 


Henry, 


12 


Thomas, 


119 


Lucretia, 


62 


Benjamin, 


120 


Lucinda, 


64 


John H., 


121 


Henry, 


65 


Hannah, 


123 


Simeon P., 


66 


Rebecca, 


123 


Benjamin, 


67 


Zebulon, 


124 


William, 


68 


Hezekiah, 


125 


Adolpbus, 


69 


Mercy, 


126 


Samuel, 


70 






Ebenezer, 


71 


Fifth Generation 




John, 


13 


Haviland, 


G2 


Rebecca, 


72 


Samuel, 


70 


Elijah G., 


73 


Henry, 


170 


Marvin, 


74 


Benjamin, 


171 


Lemuel, 


14 


Ruth W., 


172 


Charles, 


75 


Horace, 


173 


George, 


76 


Hannah, 


174 


Samuel, 


77 


George W., 


175 


Rufus, 


78 


Samuel, 


176 


Noadiah, 


79 


John W. H., 


177 


Pardon, 


80 


Sela, 


178 


Lydia, 


81 


Anna M., 


179 


Robert, 


82 


Helotia, 


181) 


Lemuel, 


83 


Mary E., 


181 


Mary, 


84 


Ebenezer, 


71 


William, 


16 


Henry, 


182 


Paraclete, 


91 


Lucretia, 


183 


Letitia, 


92 


Alice, 


184 


Helotia, 


93 


Harriet, 


185 


William M., 


94 


Clarissa, 


1^6 


Park, 


95 


Ozias S., 


187 


Augustus, 


96 


Charles W., 


If^ 


Godfrey, 


97 


Elijah G., 





390 


MORRIS 


family. 






Number. 




Number. 


Morris, Marinda, 


189 


Morris, Myra P. , 


234 


Davis, 


190 


William IL, 


235 


Tamma, 


191 


George F., 


236 


Moses, 


192 


Josiah S., 


237 


Nancy, 


193 


Cyrus M., 


238 


Kufus, 


194 


Park, 


95 


Mary, 


195 


Caroline S., 


239 


Makvin, 


74 


William M., 


240 


Mary P., 


196 


Calvin M., 


241 


Julia A., 


197 


Lewis R., 


242 


Milton M., 


198 


James E., 


243 


William P., 


199 


Elmira J., 


244 


Alexander H., 


200 


Harriet S., 


245 


Charles, 


75 


Hannah M., 


246 


Charles, 


201 


Lydia A., 


247 


Lucy, 


202 


Julia A., 


248 


Horace, 


203 


Augustus, 


96 


George, 


204 


George L., 


249 


Robert, 


205 


Lucy M., 


250 


Maria, 


206 


Mary M., 


251 


Samuel E., 


207 


Martha J., 


252 


Lydia, 


208 


Ellen M., 


253 


Harriet, 


209 


William R., 


254 


George, 


76 


Silas Q., 


255 


Samuel, 


77 


Lyman H., 


256 


Lydia, 


210 


Royal A., 


257 


Hannah, 


211 


Charles A., 


258 


Aurelia C, 


212 


Godfrey, 


97 


Betsy, 


213 


Lydia, 


259 


Almira, 


214 


Augustus, 


260 


RUFUS, 


78 


Royal, 


99 


Oran W., 


215 


Lucinda D., 


263 


Sarah C, 


216 


James D. F., 


263 


Mary, 


217 


Charles H., 


264 


Noadiah H., 


218 


George R., 


265 


NOADrAH, 


79 


Elisha, 


103 


Pardon, 


80 


William, 


104 


Lois, 


219 


Sally, 


266 


Helen, 


220 


Edward, 


105 


Julia, 


231 


Sophronia, 


267 


Mary, 


222 


Warren, 


268 


Frances, 


223 


Saloma, 


269 


William M., 


94 


Jerome, 


270 


Lorenzo G., 


231 


Lucien, 


271 


Sally S., 


233 


Oscar, 


273 


Ann M., 


233 


Nelson, 


273 



INDEX. 



391 







Number. 




Number. 


Moi'i'is 


Edwin, 


274 


Morri.s, George, 


310 




Jerusba, 


275 


Sarah, 


•Ml 




Edwin, 


276 


Zebulox, 


124 




Angenette, 


277 


Sanford, 


328 




Lyman, 


106 


Margaret, 


329 




Arabella, 


278 


Clarissa, 


330 




Lerema, 


279 


Schuyler, 


331 




EllaC, 


280 


Zebulon, 


332 




Bainbridge, 


281 


Sixth Generati 


on. 




Van Renssalaer, 


282 


Henry, 


182 




Elbridge G., 


283 


Charles H., 


343 




Alfred, 


107 


Isaac B., 


344 




Fitz Henry, 


284 


OZIASS., 


187 




Elizabeth, 


285 


0. Manly, 


345 




Eveline, 


286 


EllaE., 


346 




William, 


287 


Anna R., 


347 




Sarah, 


288 


Clara, 


348 




Alfred, 


289 


Lizzie R., 


349 




Moses, 


108 


Charles F., 


350 




Diantha J., 


290 


Charles W., 


188 




Mary L. , 


291 


Clara E., 


351 




Serome, 


29'6 


Charles W., 


352 




Thomas, 


119 


Edward E , 


353 




Jacob, 


294 


Davis, 


1!)0 




Darius, 


295 


Martha D., 


302 




Hannah, 


296 


Moses, 


193 




Harvey, 


297 


Samuel W., 


363 




Abigail, 


298 


Franklin D., 


363i 




Thomas, 


299 


John M., 


304 




Benjamin, 


120 


Milton M., 


1U8 




William, 


300 


Mary A. , 


365 




Charles, 


301 


Eleanor, 


365i 




Sylvia, 


302 


William P., 


199 




George W., 


303 


Charles, 


201 




Harriet, 


304 


Charles W., 


366 




Caroline, 


305 


Harriet B., 


367 




Benjamin B., 


306 


Louise A., 


368 




John H., 


121 


Elizabeth A., 


369 




Wolcott, 


307 


Helen M., 


370 




Lucy, 


308 


Robert M., 


371 




Benjamin, 


309 


William B.. 


372 




Mary, 


310 


Maria L. , 


873 




Samuel, 


311 


George V., 


374 




Jedcdiah, 


312 


Julia H., 


375 




JohnH., 


313 


Horace, 


203 




Silence, 


314 


Miriam, 


H76 



392 


MORRIS 


family. 






Number. 




Number. 


Morris, Lucy, 


377 


Morris, Frederick AV., 


442 


Sarah M., 


378 


Wajujen, 


268 


George, 


204 


Edwin F., 


454 


Robert S., 


379 


George B., 


456 


Samuel E., 


207 


Jerome, 


270 


George E., 


380 


Lizzie, 


457 


Charles D., 


381 


Frank. 


458 


Harriet E., 


382 


Jennie, 


459 


Edward, 


383 


Charles, 


460 


Caroline L., 


384 


Lucian, 


271 


Oran W. , 


215 


Belle. 


461 


Moreau, 


408 


Vine, 


46U 


Charlotte, 


409 


Oscar, 


272 


Louisa, 


410 


Loella, 


272 


William H., 


411 


Medora, 


272 


Mary, 


412 


Nelson, 


273 


AdaB., 


413 


George, 


462 


Caroline, 


414 


Fanny, 


463 


Elizabeth S., 


415 


Marian, 


464 


Rufus, 


416 


Bainbridge, 


281 


NOADIAH HaRTT, 


218 


Bertha, 


465 


Howard H., 


417 


Loubert, 


466 


George H., 


418 


Freelove, 


467 


Henry 0. , 


419 


Norman, 


468 


Norman F. , 


420 


Arthur, 


469 


Willis M., 


421 


Alfred, 


289 


AdaM., 


422 


Alfred W., 


475 


William H., 


235 


Kimber, 


476 


Nellie L., 


429 


Frederick, 


477 


EmmaM., ^ 


430 


Claude, 


478 


George F., 


236 


]\Iaude, 


479 


Chauncey C. , 


431 


Jacob, 


294 


JOSIAH S., 


237 


Benjamin, 


480 


George F. , 


432 


Nancy, 


481 


Cyrus M., 


238 


Polly, 


482 


Arthur D., 


433 


Darius, 


295 


Laura, 


434 


]\Iortimer D., 


483 


Adrian, 


435 


Henry E. , 


484 


William M., 


240 


Vestatia L, 


485 


George H., 


436 


Henry S., 


486 


James M., 


437 


Carrie G., 


487 


Charles E., 


438 


Harvey, 


297 


Floras., 


439 


Thomas G., 


495 


Sarah A., 


440 


Margaret E. , 


496 


James E., 


243 


James H., 


497 


Caroline E., 


441 


Thomas, 


299 



INDEX. 



393 



Number. 

Morris, Clark T., 501 

William, 300 

Zeolide, 502 

OrvilleC, 503 

Robert B. , 504 

Sylvia C, 505 

William, 506 

Charles, 301 

Charles E., 507 

William, 508 

Henry C, 509 

Cornelia E. T., 510 

Catherine C, 511 

Benjamin B., 306 

William T., 526 

Benjamin, 309 

Sarah, 527 

Jedediah, 312 

Frank, 538 

Maria, 539 

George, 316 

Sarah E., 540 

George E., 541 

Henry F., 542 

William W., 543 

Ellen A., 544 

Sanford, 328 

Mary A., 545 

Benjamin, 546 

Charles, 547 

William, 548 

Sophia, 549 

Maria, 550 

Mary L. , 551 

Caroline, 552 

Zebulon, 332 

Mary C, 557 

Andrew J., 558 

Seventh Generation. 

O. Manly, 345 

EmmaM., 559 

Leoua, 560 

Samuel W., 363 

Frank S., 564 

William S., 565 
50 



Morris, 





Nunihor. 


Charles H., 


566 


Laura L. , 


567 


Harriet E., 


568 


Mary J., 


569 


John R., 


570 


Franklin D., 


364 


Fanny, 


5T1 


Lydia, 


572 


John M., 


365 


Arthur F., 


573 


Emily, 


574 


Charles W., 


366 


Caroline, 


575 


Charles, 


576 


George E., 


380 


Kate L. , 


589 


Louise K., 


590 


Frederick E., 


591 


Charles D., 


381 


Claude, 


592 


Adiyn H., 


593 


Marks.. 


594 


Edward E., 


595 


Edward, 


383 


Henry E., 


596 


Edna L., 


597 


Moreau, 


408 


Frank M., 


598 


SelinaV., 


59!) 


Moreau, 


COO 


William H., 


411 


Caroline, 


(>0l 


Ada. 


(i02 


Augusta H., 


603 


Anna W., 


601 


May. 


605 


Howard H.. 


417 


Bertha, 


(-.08 


Ida, 


(509 


Henry Our. 


419 


Norman Foot, 


420 


Alfred W., 


475 


Ben.iamin, 


480 


George W.. 


611 


MaryE., 


612 


Caroline M., 


613 



394 



MORRIS FAMILY. 







Numbor. 




Number. 


SI orris, 


Isabel C, 


614 


Morris, Marie G., 


660 




Hervey E. , 


484 




Charles, 


601 




Ella J., 


615 




Effie v.. 


662 




Darius, 


616 




Frank B., 


663 




Carrie V. , 


617 




John M., 


663 i 




Charles G., 


618 




William H. , 


639 




IIenuy S., 


486 




Carrie W., 


670 




Henry C, 


623 




Frederick, 


671 




Carrie G. , 
Thomas G., 


624 
495 




Fourth Generation, 






Thomas G., 


626 


Newell, Mehitable Morris, 


3 




James 11., 


, 497 




Miriam Marcy, 


51 




Willie E., 


629 




Mehitable, 


159 




George A., 


630 




Miriam, 


160 




Willie S., 


631 




Submit, 


161 




Clark T. , 


501 




Rachel, 


162 




Victor B., 


634 




Rebecca, 


1G4 




Orville C, 


503 




Hannah, 


165 




Frank H., 


632 




Lucinda, 


166 




Frederick 0., 


633 




Timothy, 


167 




Marion C, 


634 




Mary, 


168 




Charles J., 


635 




Esther, 


169 




Robert B., 

George, 
William, 


504 
636 
637 


Seventh Geiteration. 

Nichols, Sophia (Morris), page 361 




Robert, 
Charles E., 


638 
507 




Emory A., 
Elmer G., 


361 
361 




William H„ 
Charles E., 
Frederick C, 
Amelia E., 
Lielall., 
Horace S., 


639 
640 
641 
642 
643 
644 


Orr 


Fifth Generation. 

Mary Morris, 

Henry, 

Morris, 

Edward, 


217 
217 
217 
217 




William, 


508 




Sixth Generation . 






Emma C. 
Clara E. , 
Cornelia E., 
Robert B., 


615 
646 
647 

648 


Partridge, Betsey Morris, 
Eveline, 
George W. , 


213 
406 

407 




William B., 


649 




Seventh Generation. 






KateS., 


650 




Maria Morris, page 361 




Margaret E., 


651 




Herbert E., 


361 




Fannie, 


652 




Edith SI., 


361 




Carrie S., 


653 




Eugene F., " 


361 




William W., 
Andrew J., 


543 
558 




Third Generation. 






Charles, 


576 


Per 


rin, Dorothy Morrjs, 








INDEX. 


395 




Number. 


Seventh Generation. 




rin, Samuel, 


32 


Number. 


Lucy, 


33 


Ringold, Harriet Morris, 


367 


Hezekiah, 


34 






Jedecliah, 


35 


Sixth Generation. 




Dorothy, 


36 


Rhodes, ]\rARiNDA Morris, 


189 


Prudence, 


37 


Chauncey, 


354 


Chloe, 


38 


George, 


355 


Hannah, 


39 


Marinda, 


356 


Abraham, 


40 


Chauncey, 


357 


Daniel, 


41 


Prudence, 


358 


Abigail Morris, 


8 


Henry B., 


359 


Benjamin, 


53 


Caroline, 


360 


Elizabeth, 


54 


Nancy D., 


361 


John, 


55 






Abip:ail, 


56 


Seventh Generation. 




Joseph, 


56i 


Robinson, Ella Morris, 


346 


Elijah, 


57 


Minnie R., 


561 


Moses, 


58 


Allie, 


563 


Isaiah, 


59 


Swan, Lucy Morris. 


377 


Stephen, 


60 






Peter, 


61 


Fifth Generation. 








Steere. Mary Morris, 


84 


Seventh Generafi 


on. 


Sliiolda. Anna. 


222 



Penniman, Carrie Morris, 487 

Bessie V., 625 

Fourth Generation. 

Plympton, Prudence Marct, 47 

Nathan, 143 

Caroline, 144 

Prudence, 145 

William, 146 

Kias, 148 
Martha Marcy, 58 

Chloe, 150 

Moses, 151 

Patte, 153 

Ann, 153 

Gershom, 154 

Kezia, 155 

Mary, 156 

Rebecca, 1 57 

SethD., 158 

Remington, Mary Marcy, 48 

Lucretia, 149 



Mary, 

Sixth Generation. 

Stephens, Caroline ]Morris, 

Seventh Generation. 

Spencer, Catherine Morris. 
Carrie, 

Sixth Generation. 

Stilhvell, Hannah Morris, 

Warren, 

Emeline, 

Mary, 

William. 

Lawson, 

Hannah. 

Hiram, 
Stoddard. Arioail Avkrv, 

Orrcn S., 
Slone, Harriet Morris. 
Harriot, 



222 



384 



"ill 
6.')4 



296 
488 
4.S9 
490 
491 
•192 
493 
394 
298 
5<K) 
:50| 
513 



396 MOKKIS 


FAMILY. 




Number. 




Number. 


Stone, Emily, 


513 


Tripp 


, Edwin, 


529 


Caroline, 


514 




Eli.sha H., 


530 


Irene, 


515 




Mary H., 


531 


Julia, 


516 




Benjamin M., 


533 


Pamelia, 


517 




Lucy P., 


533 


William J., 


518 




George W., 


534 


Mary, 


519 




Alfred H., 


535 


Sarah, 


520 




William, 


536 


George, 


521 


Thorn 


pson, Clarissa Morris, 


330 


Edward, 


523 




Zebulon M., 


553 


Sevetith Generation. 

Taylor, Anna Morris, 


347 




Maria, 
John W., 


554 

555 


Harry M. 


563 




Fifth Generation. 




Siocth Generation, 




Walker, Helotia Morris, 


93 


Titus, Elmira Morris, 
Fanny T., 
Josephine E., 
Melvin J., 


244 
443 
444 
445 


Eightli Generation. 

Watson, Caroline Morris, 
Charles M., 


575 
659 


Morris P. , 
Carrie S., 


446 
447 




Sixth Generation. 




Jennie E., 


448 


Wells 


, Lydia Morris, 


210 


Charles M., 


449 




Marcus M. , 


386 


Frank E., 


450 




Almira, 


387 


Frederick L., 


451 




Samuel M., 


388 


MyraT., 


452 




William, 


389 


Susanna H., 


453 




Edwin, 


390 


Tripp, Mary Morris, 


310 


Webster, Clarissa Thompson 


330 


Arthur, 


528 




Henry, 


556 



THIRD BRANCH. 



MARRIAGES. -SONS' WIVES. 





Number. 




Number. 


Albee, Rachel, 


328 


Beery, Alice, 


501 


Bragg, Abigail, 


1 


Bliss, Lucy, 


243 


Bradford, Betsey, 


77 


Bowman, Sarah, 


16 


Bacon, Mary, 


106 


Brown, Mercy, 


124 


Blancliard, Orril, 


108 


, 


91 


Bailey, Julia P., 


359 


Bosworth, Susan R., 


198 


Martha F., 


249 


Bowen, Harriet, 


201 


Bagley, Mary A., 


300 


Butler, Lucy, 


120 


Beaman, Charlotte, 


268 


Carter, Sylvia, 


120 





INDEX. 


397 




Number. 




Number. 


Cable, Elizal)ctb C, 


411 


Healey, Mary, 


44 


Chaudler, Helen, 


484 


Esther, 


337 


Child, Hannah, 


10 


Hills, Maria L., 


359 


Corbin, Dorcas, 


19 


Hosmer, Hannah, 


2 


Marfiaret, 


23 


Holland, Nancy, 


355 


Polly, 


328 


Holt, Polly, 


294 


Corey, Lucy, 


108 


Hoyt, Lucy, 


271 


Col ton, Betsey, 


301 


Kellogg, Emma, 


380 


Congdon, Olive, 


312 


Cola S., 


419 


Martha B., 


332 


Kimball, Matilda, 


78 


Comins, Susan, 


331 


Knower, Cornelia, 


335 


Conrad, Mary P., 


486 


Langley, Susan, 


90 


Coppee, Henrielte de W., 


583 


Lamb, Betsej', 


104 


Church. Sarah P., 


120 


Learned, Ruth, 


130 


Davis, Tamnia, 


73 


Betsey, 


133 


Dalrymple, Anna, 


411 


Leland, Martha A., 


272 


Dayton, Lucinda, 


99 


Martin, Betsey, 


105 


Devens, Caroline, 


366 


Mann, Julia A., 


427 


Dorr, Adelaide, 


207 


Marble, Irene, 


281 


Dutton, Sylvia, 


240 


Malthewson, Sarah F. , 


426 


Dyer, Helen, 


558 


McGinnis, ^largaret A., 


507 


Eaton, Elizabeth, 


318 


Mead, , 


71 


Francis, Sarah C. , 


359 


Merrill, Lucinda C, 


237 


Faulkner, Eliza, 


316 


Miller, Emma E., 


508 


Freeman, Nancy, 


268 


Mills, Susan, 


218 


French, Rebecca C, 


187 


]\Iissroon, Gertrude, 


576 


Eliza, 


188 


Morse, Hannah, 


71 


Abbie, 


345 


Sophia, 


95 


Frizzel, Hannah, 


12 


Morris, ^lary C, 


306 


Fulton, Lucretia, 


226 


Hannah, 


49 


Fuller Lydia M. , 


236 


Mumford, Sarah, 


204 


Gardiner, Mary, 


295 


Nash, IMiranda P., 


383 


Greenwood, Martha, 


346 


Newell, Dolly, 


335 


Giles, Sarah, 


231 


Newcomb, Caroline, 


039 


Griswold, Augusta E., 


365 


Nichols, Miriam, 


75 


Gore, Rebecca, 


13 


Prudence, 


103 


Gurley, Lovina, 


297 


Patrick, Selina P., 


215 


Hartt, Prudence C, 


79 


Perrin, Silence, 


121 


Hancock, Hannah, 


319 


Prescott, Ellen M., 


238 


Hartwell, Malvina, 


256 


Potter, Sarah, 


74 


Haight, Aner, 


80 


Rawson, Lucy, 


97 


Haines, Rachel A., 


480 


Reed, Sophia, 


270 


Hale, Martha, 


190 


Richmond, Dcborali. 


309 


Hawkins, Deborah, 


198 


Risley, Harriet, 


19<) 


Haskell, Mary, 


417 


Russ, Susan, 


299 


Hadley, Margaret, 


802 


Stacy, Sarab, 


16 



398 



MOHHIS FAMILY. 





Number. 




Number. 


Stanle5% Nancjs 


313 


Voorhies, Eliza, 


302 


Swan, Alice, 


71 


Walker, Jerusha, 


105 


Swandale, Mary, 


627 


Warren, Margaret, 


119 


Savage, Jane H., 


363 


West, Olive, 


198 


Lucy E. , 


497 


Welles, Laura, 


192 


Sherman, Pbilena T., 


619 


Welch, Irene, 


289 


Steele, Mary C, 


374 


Wilcox, Sarah, 


302 


Swift, Frances J. , 


302 


Wilkinson, Lydia, 


14 


Southworth, Esther P., 


94 


Wilbur, Harriet M., 


495 


Stone, Caroline E., 


497 


Whitcomb, Anna B., 


70 


Shumway, Abigail, 


334 


Wilson, Sally W., 


107 


Stuchel, Lizzie, 


420 


Emma, 


381 


Thayer, Lydia C, 


408 


WilliauiB, Isabella, 


107 


Ada, 


587 


Sarah, 


203 


Tillinghast, , 


299 


Eliza, 


294 


Thorburn, Martha, 


374 


Wyman, Mary A., 


243 


Tryon, Julia, 


357 







THIRD BRANCH. 



MARRIAGES. — DAUGHTERS' HUSBANDS. 



Allen, Abraham, 
Albee, Alfred, 
Avery, Oren S. , 

Thomas M., 
Addison, S. Ridout, 
Amidon, Rufus, 
Abbott, William, 
Bartlett, Pliny, 
Barnes, Moses, 
Baylis, Samuel, 
Barrows, Aaron, 
Baker, Asa B., 
Baines, Montcalm, 
Bagg, Lamont, 
Bertholf, James, 
Bigelow, Elisha, 
Bishop, Oliver, 
Billings, Nathaniel, 
Bristol, J. Sterling, 
Blodgett, David, 

Boyd, , 

Bugbee, James, 



Number. 




Number. 


165 


Bullock, Adam, 


208 


269 


Caswell, Jared, 


356 


298 


Canfield, Zachariah, 


376 


496 


Creators, , 


282 


375 


Child, Darius, 


92 


320 


Corbin, Clement, 


5 


98 


Colton, Chauncey G., 


233 


183 


Clogston, 0. A., 


444 


322 


Coolidge, Richard H., 


367 


266 


Corcoran, William W., 


368 


286 


Congdon, Jesse H., 


413 


358 


Cushman, Asa C, 


250 


382 


Davis, John, 


259 


302 


Alpheus, 


279 


198 


Nathan, 


302 


193 


Dingman, Lester, 


378 


211 


Duncan, Thomas, 


373 


360 


Eames, Ambrose, 


587 


516 


Emerson, Moses, 


248 


228 


Eustis, George, 


578 


290 


Ely, Alfred, 


166 


15 


Franklin, Benjamin, 


252 



399 





[Number. 




Number. 


Farwell, John W., 


481 


Mason, Jesse, 


179 


Fisk, Isaac, 


285 


Zebulon P., 


510 


Frost, T. P.. 


186 


Merrill, J. H., 


621 


Flower, Therou A., 


505 


Morris, Benjamin, 


28 


Fox, John L.. 


369 


Newell, Philip, 


3 


Gilmore, Alex., 


227 


Timothy, 


51 


Grosvenor, Charles, 


157 


Jonathan, 


52 


Goodhue, Jabez J., 


234 


Nichols, George II. , 


page 347 


Goddard, Francis 0., 


545 


North, Oscar F., 


502 


Gove, A., 


485 


Orr, Isaac, 


217 


Hall, Frank W., 


448 


Olney, Stephen A., 


465 


Hartshorn, Charles, 


424 


Pratt, George, 


195 


Hayden, Silas, 


72 


Partridge, George, 


213 


Hazen, Charles, 


443 


David E., 


page 347 


Haynes, 0. W., 


656 


Elijah M., 


" 347 


Healey, , 


131 


Parkhurst, Lebbeus G., 


279 


Stephen, 


333 


Penniman, II. P., 


487 


Hernden, Samuel O., 


220 


Perrin, Samuel, 


6 


Henderson, John, 


302 


John, 


8 


Hooker, Lewis B., 


464 


Plympton, William, 


47 


Halloway, Lewis, 


517 


Gershom, 


50 


Hunter, , 


174 


Read, Kollin, 


209 


Huntley, Silas, 


216 


Remington, Meshach, 


48 


Hyde. J. S., 


485 


Reynolds, John P., 


164 


Janes, Jonathan, 


152 


Richards, , 


114 


James, Peter, 


377 


Rich, William, 


179 


Jarvis, Chester, 


212 


Ringold, James S., 


367 


Johnson, Charles W., 


657 


Rhodes, George, 


189 


Knapp, Theron, 


412 


Robinson, C. H., 


34« 


Kennedy, John, 


168 


Savage, C. J., 


1(>9 


Kimball, C. C, 


184 


Swan, James L., 


377 


Kingsley, Lyman L., 


269 


Sherman, J. E., 


615 


Lanphier, William, 


314 


J. E., 


page 347 


Learned, Thomas, 


122 


Street, George S., 


658 


Lear, Benjamin, 


206 


Streeter, Adam, 


181 


Leavens, Loring, 


321 


Steere, E/.ek, 


84 


Benjamin, 


36 


Stephens. John C. 


384 


Learned, George W., 


382 


Spencer, Horace C, 


511 


Lillie, Ebenezer, 


17 


Shipman, John B., 


223 


Locke, Isaac, 


247 


Shields, Alexander, 


222 


Lucas, J. M., 


253 


Smith, Frederick D., 


180 


Marcy, Moses, 


7 


Josephus, 


512 


Daniel, 


20 


Pliny, 


514 


Maffit, Henry, 


544 


Stillwell, Lawson, 


290 


Marble, Stephen, 


279 


Stone, W. G., 


804 


Mason, Jacob, 


117 


Stoddard, Thadeus, 


298 



400 



MORRIS FAMILY. 



Tay, George, 
Taylor, C. L., 
Titus, Pbineas, 

Simeon B., 
Tripp, Arthur, 
ToAvnsond, Alex., 
Thouipsou, John D. 
Upham, Thomas, 

Van Ness, , 

AValker, IS. T., 



Number. Xtimbcr. 

5iy WalluT, Horatio, 93 

347 Wallace, William, 3U 

183 Wattles, Alex., 518 

244 ! Watson, Arthur L., 5:5 

310 Wells, James, 210 

267 Webster, John, 330 

330 Willoughby, Ethan, 185 

159 Worsely, S. L., 251 

293 Wadsworth, Alfred, 291 

191 Young, David, 64 



INDEX OF OTHER NAMES. 



Page. 
Adams, John Quincy, 80, 256 

Allen, Thankfull, ' 52 

Amsdell, Capt. Thomas, 181 

Aspiuwall, Peter, 10, 12, 14 

Addington, Isaac, 16 

Ammidown, Holmes, viii, 27 

Andros, Sir Edmund, 6, 15, 16, 19 
Abbott, Daniel, 41, 323 

Armstrong, Thomas, 164 

Arnold, Wm. R., 349 

Ashman, George, 120 

Bacon, Thomas, 10, 12, 172 

Joseph, 12 

Sir Francis, 313 

Anthony, 313 

Bartholomew, William, 14, 16, 317 
Joseph, 38, 41 

Barber, Lieut. Samuel, 17 

Bradstreet, Gov., 15 

Bates, William G., 120 

Barron, Capt. Samuel, 199, 207, 221 
Bradford, Gov. William, 200 

Henry M.. 350 

Barry, Capt. John, 204 

Bainbridge, Capt. William, 209 

Bancroft, Hon. George, 280 



Page. 

Bett, Grace, 2 

Bell, Thomas, 2 

Breese, Samuel, 26 

Beebee, Capt. Junius, 110 

Bently, Samuel, 204 

Bendall, Freegrace, 319 

Bridge, Edward, 5 

Bliss, Hon. John, 48, 56 

Thomas and Margaret, 56 

Hon. George, 82, 346 

Gen. Jacob, 87 

Ellis, 245 

Richard, 346 

Bright, Capt. Thomas, 132 

Bingham, Rev. E. B., 354 

Bowles, John, 5, 8, 172 

Samuel, 81 

Bontecou, Daniel, 88, 132 

Pierre, 88, 132 

Brown, Rogers & Brown, 188 

Josiah, 210 

Broke, Commodore, 226 

Bowen, Henry, 10, 12, 13, 35, 317 

John, 12 

Griflith, 35 

Henry C, 349, 355 



INDEX. 



401 



Bo wen, Clarence W., 


Page. 
351 


Cliandler, William, 


Page. 
174 


Dr. George A., 


351 


Theodore B., 


1!»'J 


John Eliot, 


353 


Chapin, Josiuh, 


17 


Dr. William, 


236 


Benjamin, 


46 


Dr. Ephraim, 


236 


Carpenter, John, 


37 


Dr. Pardon, 


236 


Eliphalet, 


38 


Dr. William C, 


236 


Canute, King, 


xvi 


Burr, 


2 


Chaffee, Joseph, 


47, 48. 49 


Bulgar, Richard, 


xii 


Thomas, 


49, 135 


Butcher, John, 


12, 14 


Chauncey, Rev. Charles, 


154 


Bugbee, John, 


12 


Clark, Eneas and Williau 


60 


Joseph, 12, 14, 15 


Chamberlain, Joseph, 


38 


Hon. E. H., 348, 


349, 355 


Cady, Eleazer, 


93 


Buckingham, Gov. William, 79 


Joseph, 


175, 176 


Rev. Samuel G.,D.D., 


Chapman, R. A., 


130 




[79 


Channing, Dr. Edward, 


355 


Buel, Jesse, 


258 


Calhoun, Hon. William B 


152 


Bunce, James M., 


135 


Cadwell, George, 


153 


Bulkley, Rev. Peter, 


155 


Clapp, Isaac B., 


153 


Rev. Gershom, 


155 


Cabot, Rev. M., 


175 


Rev. John, 


155 


Claghorne, Col. George, 


204 


Burnside, Gen., 


262 


Clay, Henry, 


257 


Buchanan, Capt. F., 


280 


Clare, Richard de. 


303 


Burghley, Lord, 


313 


Cheever, Rev. George B., 


D.D., 128 


Bryant, Simon, 


175, 176 


Celle, Charles and Mary, 


141 


Charles II, King, 


3 


Chester, John, 


333 


Charles I, King, 


307 


Child, Benjamin, 


23 


Craft, Griffin, 


5 


Mary, 


23 


W. F., 


355 


Elias, 


29 


Moses, 


5 


Judge William, 


357 


Samuel, 


12, 13 


Henry T., 


349 


Cartwright, Edward, 


21 


Deacon Al)el. 


349 


Elizabeth, 


316 


Clinton, Gov. DcWitt, 


355 


George, 


5 


Corbiu, James, 


12, 14, 38 


Carr, Sir Robert, 


5 


Clement, 


191 


Cass, Ebenezer, 


12 


Colburn, Deborah, 


31 


Chandler, John, 13, 13, 14 


15, 16, 


Coburn, Eben, 


53 


[37, 38 


41, 172 


Colton, George, 


58 


John, Jun., 12, 


36, 38, 


Cooley, Josiah, 


59, 60 


[323, 


334, 352 


Converse, Jesse, 


63 


Rev. John S., 


348 


Corning, ErastU3, 


113 


Col. Thomas, 


43 


Croswell, Edwin, 


113 


Deacon Amasa, 


349 


Co.K, Edward B., 


153 


Rev. Thomas B., 


352 


Colton, Josiah, 


173 


Hon. John C. , 


353 


Corcoran, Thomas. 


364 


Judge Johq W. , 


352. 


Corcoran & Rigga, 


265 


51 









402 


MORKIS 


FAMILY. 








Page. 




Pase. 


Curtis, Isaac, 




5 


Fitz Gerald, Rhys, 


306, 307 


Church, John B., 




29 


Foxe, John, 


302 


Cynan, Gryffth ap, 




312 


Flynt, Jonathan, 


86 


Davis, William, 




3 


Thomas, 


86 


Matthew, 




12 


Rufus, 


129 


Jonathan, 




12 


Flynn, Major William, 


352 


Benjamin, 




154 


Gamblin, Robert, 


2, 22 


Joseph, 




162 


Gary, Nathaniel, 


10, 12 


Day, Benjamin, 




91 


Gage, General, 


59 


Calvin, 




134 


Graves, John, 


22 


Dale, Capt. Richard, 




204 


Granger, Capt. Justin, 


87 


Drake, Sir Francis, 




305 


Francis, 


258 


Decatur, Commodore Stephen 


223, 


Grant, Gen. U. S., 


289 






[234 


Graham, James, 


308 


Dexter, Franklin B. , 




261 


Gardner, Gov. Henry J., 


347 


Devens, Richard, 




263 


Greely, Horace, 


153 


Dean, Leonard M., 




350 


Gregory XIII, Pope, 


341 


Dwight, John, 




36 


Griggs, Joseph, 


5, 8 


Rev. Josiah, 


36, 37, 39 


Benjamin, 


10, 36 


Dobbins, J. C, Secret 


ary Navj 


^230 


George, 


10, 12 


Dorr, Judge ]\Iatthew 




238 


John, 


23 


Downes, Commodore 


John, 


298 


Gillett, E. B., 


121 


Dudley, Joseph, 4, 5, 


6, 7, 171 


172, 


Griffin, , 


162 






[327 


Gore, John, 


86, 172 


Rebecca, 




172 


Elijah, 


187 



Col. William, 172 

Evarts, William M., 280 
Edward, King, The Confessor, xvi 

Eastman, Sarah P., 346 

Eaton, Gen. William, 353 

Etheridge, Emerson, 281 
Eliot, Rev. John, 5, 6, 14, 20, 23, 35, 
[348, 349, 352 

Rev. George, 199 

Elizabeth, Queen, 313 

Edmonds, Hannah, 182 

Elystan, Cadwgan ap, 306 

Farrar, Canon, xiii 

Fawer, Barnabas, 35 

Fairbanks, Erastus, 94 

Freak, Thomas, 

Felt, FestusC, 154 
Frissell, John, 8, 12 

Joseph, 12 

Finley, Rev. Samuel, 26 

Finney, Rev. C. G., D.D., 128 



Goffe, Maj.-Gen. William, 47 

Goodrich, Margaret B. , 117 
Glodrydd, Elystan, 304, 306, 343 

Gordon, The Dutchess of, 309 
Gryffyth ap Cynan, xiv, 312, 315-343 

Hall, Rev. Joseph, 1 

Hancock, Gov. John, 59 

Harrison, Gen. W. H., 90 

Hawley, Gen. J. R., 134 

Hartt, Capt. Edmund, 203 

Hampton, Gen. Wade, 242 

Harland, Gen. E., 261 

Harrington, John, 279 

Hammond, Dea. Ezra, 355 

Hale, Rev. E. E., 357 

Heath, Elder Isaac, 1, 21 

Elizabeth, 1 

Henchman, Capt., 22 

Healy, Col. Moses, 191 
Henry II, King, 302, 306 

Hills, Samuel, 135 



INDEX. 



403 







Page. 




Pa;,'e. 


Hills, William, 




135 


Lafayette, General, 


229 


Hitchcock, Rev. Dr., 




280 


Leverett, Governor, 


4 


Holmes, John, 12 


, 14 


, 353 


Leavens, John, 


12. 17. 36 


Abiel, 




353 


Ledoit, Molly, 


31 


Oliver Wendell, , 


348, 


353, 


Leonard, Ezra, 


86 






[357 


Solomon, 


86 


Dr. David, 




353 


Moses G. , 


357 


Howard, Mark, 




135 


Leavitt, Joshua, 


128 


Hooker, Rev. Thomas, 




135 


Lenhart, Chaplain Jolin S. 


278 


Howe, Sampson, 




176 


Livingston, Dr. G. R., 


29 


Holbrook, John, 




188 


Lincoln, Abraham, 


281 


Hubbard, William, 




3 


Levi, 


154 


John, 




12 


Litchfield, William, 


297 


Humphrey, Arthur, 




12 


Lord, John, 


10 


Hume, Richard, 




62 


Judge Otis P., 


346 


Humphreys, Joshua, 




203 


Lounsbury, Thomas R., 


261 


Hull, Capt. Isaac, 




226 


Lower, Mark Anthony, 


\i 


Ingraham, Capt. D. N., 




258 


Ludlow, Henry, 


309 


Isaac, Edward, 




312 


Sarah, 


309 


Anne, 




312 


Lyou, AVilllam, Sen., 1, 5, 


12,13,14. 


Ingersol, Edward, 




346 




[31 


James II, King, 




4, 6 


William, Jun., 


12 


Jackson, Doctor Charles T. 




26 


Thomas, 


12 


Pres. Andrew, 


104 


,256 


Ilcartwell, 


350 


Johnson, Capt. John, 




1, 5 


Lyman, Richard, 


135 


Capt. Isaac, 28, 30 


.35 


,316 


Phil lis, 


135 


Nathaniel, 12, 14, 


16 


20,. 


Gen. Phincas, 


186 






[317 


Rev. Eliphalet. 


19!S 


Mary, 




14 


May, John, 


1. 2. 49 


Jones, Ebenezer, 




49 


Ephraiin, 


49 


Judd, Rev. S., 




288 


Samuel, 


5. 12 


Kershaw, Surgeon, 




278 


Mayo, John, 


21. 177 


Kennison, Master, 




278 


Tliomas, 


172 


Killam, James, 




163 


Marcy. Jolm, 10, 12. 53 


184. 353 


Kimball, Richard, 




199 


Capt. Natiianiel, 


4!i. 52 


Lebbeus, 




201 


Maverick, Samuel. 


5 


Kinney, Major J. C, 




261 


Manning, Capt. E.. 


49 


Koscta, Martin, 




258 


Mason, Gen. John, 


264 


Knower, Benjamin, 




259 


Martin. Surgeon, 


278 


Knowlton, Marcus P., 




216 


MarLsco, Richard De, 


302 


Knollys, Sir Francis, 




313 


Mason and Slidcl. 


299 


Larned, Mi?s Ellen D., viii. 


11, 


174 


Maurice, Bishop, 


8(»3 


Gen. Daniel, 




20!) 


Mawr-Hhys. 306. 


307, 312 


Lathrop, Wells, 




124' 


McMalhewson, A.. 


3.VI 


Rev. Joseph, D. I). 




124, 


McMorrogli, King Dtrnint. 


;{ii3 


Laws, Midshipman, 




224 ! 


Merrick, Dr. Sannn 1 .1.. 


56 



404 



MORRIS FAMILY. 



Mellen, Cliicf Justice, 

]\Iedley, George, 

Merriam, G. & C, 

McClellan, Dr. John, 
Joseph, 
Gen. Samuel, 



Page. 
120 
313 
129-346 
349 
349 
352 



Gen. George B., 352 

Mills, Rev. Charles L., 155 
Missroon. Cominodore John S., 298 
Morris, Lieut. Richard, vii, xii, 4, 35 

Robert, ix 
Thomas, New Haven, x 

John, Hartford, x 

Evar, Topsfield, x 

William, Boston, x 

Thomas, Boston, xiii 
Thos.,Waltham Abbey, xiii 

Gen. Lewis, ix, 252 

Gen. Jacob, 252 

Lewis Lee, 252 

Capt. William, R. N., 305 
Admiral Salmon. R. N., 305 

Chancellor levan, 305 

Richard De, 303 

Sir AVilliam, 305, 358 

Sir Nicholas, 305, 358 

John, 305, 358 

Alderman John, 306 

Robert, 306 

Thomas, 306 

Anthony, 306 

David ap, 306 

Col. Roger, 806 

William, 307 

Lewis, 307 

Richard, 307 

Capt. John, 307 

Slaats Long, 308 

Mary, 308 

Gouverneur, 308 

Isabella, 308 

Sarah, 309 

Enphemia, 309 

Catherine, 308 

Robert Hunter, 309 

Morys, John, xiv, 312 





Pa','e. 


Morys, Nicholas, 


312 


William, 


312 


Rolfe, 


312 


H(mry, 


312 


Oliver, 


312 


Phillip, 


312 


Anne, 


312 


Margaret, 


312 


Moryce, James, 


312 


William. 


312 


Thomas. 


312 


Margaret, 


312 


Sir John, 


314 


Morse, Deacon Jedediah, 


25, 349 


John, 


38, 44 


Sydney N., 


350 


John A., 


350 


IMosely, Rev. Samuel, 


167 


Morocco, Emperor of. 


202 


Morgan, John T., 


204 



Mont-Morency, Chevalier De, 302 

Hervey De, 302 

Henry De, 308 

Mudge, Family, 238 

Murray, Quartermaster, 276 

Mumford, Benjamin A., 288 

Nash, Rev. F. F., 290 

Newell. Isaac, . 172 

Gen. Timothy, 193 

Capt. Samuel, 259 

Newman, Rev. Samuel, 183 

Nichols, Col. Richard, 5 

Capt. Jonathan, 198 

Niles, Hon. John M., 134 

Nicholson, Capt. Samuel, 204 

Owen, Cadwalader ap, 306 

Ogden, Sanuiel, 309 

Owen, ap Edwin, 315 

Osgood, Rev. Samuel, D.D., 346 

Park. Deacon William, 5, 8 

Parker, Augustus, 355 

Payson, Jonathan, 38 

Col. Nathan, 42, 180 

Col. John, 186, 187 

Parsons. Philo, 86 

Paine, Samuel, 162 



INDEX. 



4o; 





Page. 


Paine, John, 


350 


Patrick, Dr. William, 


241 


Patterson, Hon. J. W., 


355 


Peacock, William, 


1 


Samuel, 


12 


Pepper, Robert, 


5, 317, 318 


Peake, Jonathan, 


12, 36 


Joseph, 


12, 336 


Sarah, 


44 


Perry, George B. , 


154 


Alfred, 


154 


Arthur, 


154 


Rev. David, 


154 


Perkins, John H. H., 


157 


Phelps, William Walter, 


261 


Peabody, George, 


264 


Perit, Pelatiah, 


279 


Preble, Commodore Edward, 201, 




[202, 223 


Commodore George H., 205 


Pierpont, Ebenezer, 


22, 23 


John, 


22 


Rev. James, 


22 


Mary, 


22 


Prideaux, Humphrey, 


305 


Pierce, President, 


353 


Polly, John, 


1 


Porter, Elizabeth, 


35 


Prout, Ebenezer, 


16 


Potter, Capt. William, 


197 


Charles C, 


350 


Polk. President, 


258, 353 


Pointz, Sir Gabriel, 


314 


Putnam, Gen. Israel, 


49. 187 


Pynchon, William, 


154 


Randolph, Edward, 


4, 6, 15 


Thomas, 


309 


Radford, Capt. Wm., 


270, 280 


Randall, Master, 


278 


Revere, Paul, 


204 


Rees, 


315 


Richards, Major John, 


5 


Zechariah, 


38 


Rice, Gershom, 


51 


John, 


103 


Riply, John B., 


137 



Riggs, Elisha, 
Roberts, Ellis H., 


Page. 
264 
113 


Robinson, David F., 
Rowland, David, 


135 
332 


Ruggles, Samuel, 5, 
John, 
Thomas, 


8, 11, 23 

8, 12 

23 


Russell, Rev. Noadiah, 


203 


lion, Thomas, 
Rhys, The Great, 
Scarborough, Samuel, 


205 

312 

5, 12. 13 


Abigail, 


182 


Sabin, Benjamin, 10, 12, 14, 


15.17,37 


Sanger, Nathaniel, 
St. Aubin, Sir John, 


12 
305 


Salstonstall, Gov. Gurdon, 


327 


Standish, Miles, 


348 


Rose, 


348 


Stevens, Timothj', 
Sewell, Judge Samuel, 


11 
17, 163 


Sexton, Joseph, 


49 


Seymour, Salmon, 


101 


Horatio, 


112 


Sever, Capt. James, 
Seward, AVm. H., 


199 
258 


Steele, Franklin, 


269 


Self ridge, Lieut., 
Sheldon, Elisha, 


278 
332 


Smithers, Jonathan, 


10, 12 


Silliman, Prof. B., 


29 


Stiles, Rev. Abel, 


46 


Skinner, Abraham, 

Dea. William, 


62 

52 


Paraclete, 


349 


Sill, Gen. Theodore. 


114 


Smith, Isaac, 
Peter. 
Rev. A.sa D., 


125 
155 
150 


Spring, Capt. John U., 
Shipman, Judge Nathaniel 
Shipley, Joseph L.. 
Smith, Lieut. Wm., 
William, 


130 

i:r> 

2(51 
1S7 
309 


Stoughton, Col. William, 
Stockton, Com. Hobirl F., 
Hichurd, 


6. 7. 171 
i:ifi 
i;i5 



406 



MORRIS FAMILY. 



Page. 

Soley, Prof. J. R., 236 

Strongbow, Earl. 303 

Soutbworth, Louis R., 350 

Sturgis, Joseph, 203 

Stuart, Commodore Charles, 223 

Scliuyler, Eugene, 261 

Tappan, Arthur and Lewis, 128 

Tailor, Col. William, 172 

Talbot, Commodore S., 201 

Thayer, James B., 300 

Tarbox, Rev. Increase, 356 

Trask, Wm. B., 356 

Twichell, Rev. J. H., 261 

Thomas, Hugh, 3 

Gen. John, 56 

Thompson, Robert, 6, 7 

Torrey, Phillip, 5 

Throop, Rev. Amos, 39 

Thorburn, Capt. Robert D., 269 

Trowbridge, Rev. J. W., 351 

Thurston, Capt. Thomas, 17 

Trumbull, Gov. Jonathan, 29 

Dr. J. Hammond, 356 

Truxton, Capt. Thomas, 204 

Tufts, Peter, 49 

Van Buren, Martin, 256 

Watkins, Andrew, 12 

Walter, Rev. Nehemiah, 41 

Ware, Rev. Henry, 25 

Warren, Rev. Moses, 77, 82 

Wales, Oliver, 61 

James L , 61 

Nathan, 68 

Warriner, Col. S., 118, 345 

William, 118 

Elizabeth, 347 

Waterman, Andrew, 180, 186 



Page. 

Watson, Rev. John L., 298 

Walton, Mary, 309 

Walker, Robert J., 265 

George, 345 

Amasa, 353 

Gen. Francis A., 353, 357 

Warner, Col. Alex., 355 

Webb, Joseph, 19 

Weld, Theodore, 128 

John, 317, 318 

Welles, Hon. Gideon, 134, 278, 279 

Webster, Daniel, 264 

Wheelwright, Rev. John, xii 

Williams, Gov. Jared W., 353 

Samuel, 5, 11, 353 

Rev. Stephen, 49, 353 

Robert, 237 

Wilson, John, 14 

White, Joseph, 14 

John, 21 

Winthrop, John, 35 

Wright, Joseph, 41 

Wilkinson, Benjamin, 180, 188 

Lawrence, 188 

William, 207 

Wbitcomb, Mayor Benjamin, 196 

Whitehurst, Joseph W., 275 

Wilkes, Captain Charles, 299 

William, The Conquerer, 302 

Wilkins, Isaac, D.D., 308 

Winsor, Justin, LL.D., 354 

Wilder, Hon. Marshall P., 357 

Woods, John and Mary, 41 

Wood, Daniel and Polly, 128 

Wyman, Capt. D., 245 

Yatos, Governor, 239, 240 

Young, Mason, 261