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GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR 



DESCENDANTS 



Oapt. William Fowler, 



or 



NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT. 




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GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR 



DESCENDANTS 

IF 



Capt. William Fowler, 



NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, 



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BEPRINTED WITH ADDITIONS, FROM MEMOIRS OF HON. JAMES FO 

FIELD, MASS., AND FROM THE NEW ENGLAND IIISTORJ^CAL AJJD 
GENEALOGICAL REdis9?Ex2«5A JJrJty.'jfer? -/:?-: 







MILWAUKEE: 
STARR & SON, BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS, 412 AND 414 EAST WATER STREET. 



1870. 



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Prefatory Remarks. 



'* By an instinct of our nature, we all love to learn the places of our 
birth, and the chief circumstances in the lives of our progenitors." — 
James Savage. 

"Genealogy is the name applied to the science of the origin, sequence, 
and affinities of families. * * * 'Yht earliest traces of 

genealogy are to be found in the ancestral catalogues of the heroes of the 
old world. Among the Hebrews there were parties specially appointed 
to draw up genealogical tables The absence of criticism, and desire to 
flatter the great, were the causes of introducing after the fourteenth cen- 
tury, the most ridiculous fables into genealogy. Ancestors were fabricated 
in the most impudently false manner, and families carried back in an 
unbroken line, not only to the age of Charlemagne, but even in many 
cases to the heroes of the Trojan war. 

The fact however, is, that hardly any family however distinguished, 
can trace its ancestors even to the middle of the eleventh century" — the 
period of the Norman conquest of England. James Savage, in his Gen- 
ealogical Dictionary of New England, says, that "nineteen-twentieths of 
the residents of New England in 177 5,. were descendants of those found 
there in 1692 (the era of the arrival of the new charter,) and probably 
seven-eighths of those, of settlers before 1642. From time of the settle- 
ment of American Colonies, to 1776, a purer Anglo-Saxon race could be 
seen on this side of the ocean, than on the other. From long and care- 
ful research, I have judged the proportion of the whole number living 
here in 1775, that deduce their origin from the kingdom of England, i. e. 
the southern part of Great Britain, excluding Wales, to exceed 98 in 100." 

Owing to the great influx of foreigners of other races, to our shores, 
this statement no longer holds true in any portion of the United States. 
The time is perhaps not far distant when a knowledge of a pure lineage 
running back to the puritan emigrant of the first half, or even last half of 
the seventeenth century will be impossible of attainment, except to the 



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A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 



very few, who have been careful to keep and preserve family records, 
since the emigration of their families from New England, to other States, 
and since the period when the law became inoperative requiring the regis- 
tration of births, marriages, and deaths. 

It is perhaps to be regretted that so little interest is manifested in keep- 
ing up family records, and histories, for the benefit of those who are to 
come after us. What one who by chance may be personally interested in 
the "emigrant ancestor" mentioned hereafter, but would willingly give a 
good price, for a dozen lines of his early history, written by his own 
hand giving his birth-place, his ancestral traditions, and the leading inci- 
dents of his career ? Such a contribution for the benefit of posterity is 
not beyond the ability of .the most humble man or woman in our land. 

Because ourselves or our ancestors are, or have been, humble, or igno- 
ble need not prevent us ; the spirit that would scoff at such efforts, 
would doubtless consider the history of mankind as needless, and blot out 
the records of human experience as well. 

The compiler of this pamphlet has expended some time and labor in 
completing the record in his own line of descent, simply for his own 
pleasure, and that of his immediate relatives and friends. For the benefit 
of others, however, he has caused to be printed entire, the contents of 
Hon. James Fowler's pamphlet relating to the descendants of Captain 
William Fowler, which the writer supposes to be but a reprint from the 
New England Historical and Genealogical Register of July, 1857. To 
this has been added all the descendants (so far as known to the writer,) of 
Gurdon Fowler of the fifth generation from William Fowler the magis- 
trate, and the tenth child, and youngest son of "Jonathan Fowler, the 
Giant," all mention of which has been omitted in the record above 
referred to. Gurdon Fowler died in Pennsylvania in 1 809 ; his son Aus- 
tin Fowler, (grand-son of the Giant,) is yet living in Pennsylvania at the 
advanced age of 83, and through whom many of these facts and traditions 
have been obtained. The family bible of Gurdon Fowler is still in 
existence, containing a record, possibly from his own pen, of his father, 
brothers and sisters, the dares of their births, marriages, and deaths, all of 
which have been copied into this work, and will doubtless be accepted as 
good authority on this subject. 

To the descendants of this ancestor, this work has been more particu- 
larly devoted, and the writer presents to them in the results of his labors. 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 



what he believes to be, their correct lineage for eight generations, and 
hopes that they will take as much pleasure in its perusal, as he has taken 
in compiling the same. 

For the purpose of bringing more clearly to view the reasons and 
causes which induced the emigrant ancestor William Fowler, to come to 
America, together with the part he doubtless took, in common with the 
others of his cotemporaries, in founding, and subsequently in forming the 
polity of the New Haven colony, I introduce the following from Dwight's 
History of Connecticut, Chap. VIII. and IX., as being the most concise, 
and at the same time, thorough statement of any with which I am familiar : 

*' Mr. Davenport, Samuel 'Eaton, Theophilus Eaton, Esq., Edward 
Hopkins, Esq., Mr. Thomas Gregson, and a considerable number of per- 
sons besides, who had left England to escape persecution, and to take up 
their abode in America, arrived in Boston from London, England, in the 
month of June, 1637. (Two large ships arrived at this time, one named 
the Planter, but we are not informed if the company came in one or 
both.) 

Mr. Davenport had been distinguished in England as a Minister of 
9 great learning and piety. Messrs. Eaton and Hopkins had been success- 
ful merchants in London, and the former had resided at the Court of 
Denmark as agent of the King of England, 

Great exertions were made in Massachusetts to induce this wealthy 
company to remain in that colony. The people of Cambridge proposed 
to relinquish to them their whole town, and the General Court to give 
them any place which they might select ; but they preferred to penetrate 
farther into the interior of the country. * * * * That 
highly respectable company appear to have had several reasons for not 
remaining in Massachusetts. Mr. Davenport held the opinion that no 
reformation in the Church had ever been carried farther than where it 
was left by those who introduced it ; and he probably thought that the 
system adopted in the new colonies was defective in some points not 
likely to be improved. He was a decided opponent of Antinomian doc- 
trines, which at that time had progressed in Boston. Besides, he and his 
associates were apprehensive that the King would soon send out a Gover- 
nor-General of New England, to whose authority they did not wish to 
be subject 

Fully resolved on making a new settlement at a distance from the others. 



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6 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

in the autumn of 1637 Mr. Davenport, with several of his friends, visited 
the shores of Long Island Sound, with the commercial and other advan- 
tages of which they were much pleased. They selected the place called 
Quinnipiac by the Indians, and by the Dutch Rocabert ; and, having 
built a hut there, a few of their number spent the winter in it. This 
was the first habitation known to have been erected there, and, indeed, on 
any part of the Connecticut coast west of Say brook fort. The settlement 
of New Haven, however, did not really begin until the following year. 
On the 30th of March, 1638, Messrs. Davenport, Prudden, Theophilus 
and Samuel Eaton, sailed from Boston with their companions They 
reached Quinnipiac in about two weeks. On the 1 5th of April they 
spent their first Sabbath there, and in a truly christian manner, viz.: in 
the worship of God, and the strict observance of His holy day. The 
people assembled in the shade of a large oak tree, at the place where 
George street now crosses College street ; and Mr. Davenport preached 
an appropriate sermon from the 6th chapter of Matthew, ist verse: 
''Take heed that ye do not your alms before men, to be seen of them, 
otherwise ye have no reward of your Father which is in Heaven." . 

Shortly afterward, a day of fasting and prayer was observed ; and at the ' 
close of it they formed what they called the "Plantation Covenant," in 
which they solemnly bound themselves " that, as in matters that concern 
the gathering and ordering of a Church, so also, in all public offices which 
concern civil order, as choice of magistrates and ofiicers, making and 
repealing laws, dividing allotments of inheritance, and all things of like 
nature, they would, all of them, be ordered by the rules which the Scrip- 
ture held forth to them." This was intended to be their rule until they 
should form a more intimate mutual acquaintance, and then they designed 
to covenant together as christians. * * * * 



Chapter IX. 

* * * Tj^e first Constitution of Connecticut was 

formed in Hartford, after mature deliberation at a meeting of the free 
planters of all the towns, who assembled on the 14th of January, 1639. 
The preamble states, in substance, that they formed one public State or 
Commonwealth for the establishment of order and government, and that 
they confederated, for themselves and their successors, to maintain the 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 



liberty and purity of the Gospel, and the discipline of the Churches, 
according to its institution. * * * jj declared all to be 

freemen who had been received as members of towns, and taken the oath 
of fidelity to the Commonwealth. The Governor was r«q.uired to be a 
member of a regular Church and to have been a magistrate ; and he could 
not be elected more than once in two years. To be a candidate for a mag- 
istrate, a man was required to be a freeman, and to be nominated by the 
freemen or the General Court. * * * <c These pure and 
sincere men, the founders of Connecticut, denied the divine right of 
Kings, and had been led by their observations, experience, and reflections 
in England, to the conclusion that man is too frail in judgment and virtue 
to be safely trusted with the uncontrolled government of others." * * 



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Introduction. 



The family of Fowler, now quite numerous in this country, is derived 
from different emigrant ancestors, from various parts of England, arriving 
at different times, of no relationship, or quite remote if any. Tradition 
would seem to favor a connection, but in most cases it is probably the old 
story of the "three brothers." 

fijillip SowltXf is the ancestor of the Ipswich family of that 
name. He was a freeman, Massachusetts Colony, 3d Sept., 
1634; settled at Ipswich, where he was a " clothmaker," and where he 
died 24th of June, 1679, ^g^^ ^^> leaving a numerous posterity. His 
name is on a patent or charter from Lord Sheffield, 1623, to a body of 
settlers at Cape Ann. These planters afterwards removed to Salem and 
Boston " for a better soil." 

jQEOB^pi) SowltXf is mentioned as a first settler near " Mespatkill," 
^Ib Newton, Long Island, 1655. The "purchasers" gave accord- 
ing to his possessions at the rate of one shilling per acre ; Joseph is down 
for £1. "This place was founded by colonists from New England." 
[Riker's History of Newtown.] 

3^ tf l)arb JTotDler, was one of the proprietors of Rye, N. Y., 
^\, 1662, and signed a letter to the Court at Hartford, 1663, from 
the inhabitants of that town. 

itXiX^ SowltXi was one of the first settlers at East Chester, 
West Chester County, N. Y. The original grantees were 
fiom Fairfield, Conn., and the articles of agreement are dated 1665. The 
descendants of Henry, are quite numerous in Orange and Westchester 
Counties, N. Y. One of them Dr. Samuel Fowler, of Hamburg, N. J., 
a member of Congress, now deceased; another is Rev. P. H. Fowler, D. 
D., of Utica, N. Y. ; another is Isaac V. Fowler, once a postmaster of 
New York City, now dead. It is probable that the first settlers of the 



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DESCENDANTS OF OAPX. WILLIAM FOWLER. 



9 



name in New York, went from Connecticut, but whether related to the 
Fowlers of New Haven, Windsor and Massachusetts, we have not been 
able to ascertain, although a tradition in the family intimates that they were. 

jtnrg -f^OtDler, one of the first settlers of Rhode Island, and 
according to tradition, related to the New Haven Fowlers, was 
married in Providence, about 1655. He was a representative in General 
Assembly, 1672, and left descendants. 

QpO0tpi) SoVoltXf who died before 1850, in New Orleans, was a 
^|[) native of Maryland, and his ancestors from England. His real 

and personal estate, was appraised at over one million and a half of dollars. 

He was never married, and his sisters — three of them — one in District of 

Columbia, and two in Maryland — inherit his estate. 

I tnbtO0£ ^OtDlCt) whose genealogy has been given by Hon. 
James Fowler, of Westfield, Mass., (one of his descendants,) 
was one of the first settlers of Windsor, Conn., and is supposed to be a 
son of William Fowler, one of the first Magistrates of the New Haven 
Colony, and a first settler at Milford. Mr Judd, one of the most accurate 
antiquarians of the Connecticut River Valley, says, «*it is possible that 
Ambrose Fowler, of Windsor and Westfield, was a son of the first William 
Fowler of Milford ; but I have never found any evidence whatever of his 
relation. Very likely they were related to each other, if they were not 
father and son." 

4llt(ttn ^Otolct, the Magistrate, was the emigrant ancestor of all 
or most of the Fowlers of Connecticut. He arrived in Boston 
from London, England, June 26th, 1637, in company with Rev. John Daven- 
port, Theophilus Eaton, Peter Prudden, and "others of good character and 
fortunes." Whether he was the "William Fowler" mentioned in NeaPs 
"History of the Puritans," chap. 8, as- imprisoned with others in Bridewell, 
London, 1592, is not entirely certain. About that time a Puritan congre- 
gation was discovered in Islington, a part of London, and fifty-six persons 
were imprisoned. As families bearing the name of Fowler reside in that 
locality, he may have been one of the prisoners, though at that time a 
very young man. He is spoken of as an old man when he settled in 
Milford. He may have come from Yorkshire or thereabouts, as his minis- 



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10 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

ter Rev. Peter Prudden, came from Edgerton^ in that county. There is 
nothing improbable in the supposition however, that he was the puritan 
prisoner mentioned, if so, he was probably from Islington, or near London. 
In this connection we introduce the following from "Weever's Funeral 
Monuments," of "Monumental remains at Islington, near London." 
"Here — ^John Fowler — 1538," and * Alis Fowler, wife of Robert Fowler, 
Esquire, who d. — , 1 540 ;" "Divers of this family lie here interred ; the 
ancestors of Sir Thomas Fowler y Knight and Baronet, living 1630." 

Mr. Davenport was born in Warwickshire, and removed to London, 
where he was vicar of St. Stephen's Church. Mr. Eaton, another of the 
New Haven company, was a member of this church, and also from 
Worwickshire — the ancestors of both being originally from the county of 
Chester. 

Mr. Fowler, in company with* Mr. Davenport and others, sailed from 
Boston, March 30th, 1638, for Quinnipiac, the Indian name for New 
Haven, and arrived in about a fortnight. Here he resided a year or more, 
and was at the famous meeting in Mr. Newman's barn, June 4th, 1639, 
when the peculiar constitution and policy of Mr. Davenpoit, which after- 
wards characterized the New Haven Colony, was agreed upon. Mr. 
Fowler subscribed to that agreement. 

In the spring of 1639, the settlement of Milford had been arranged, 
and Mr. Fowler, is the first named of the trustees, and the only one bearing 
the honorable prefix of **Mr,^^ At the first meeting of the Milford 
Company, he was chosen one of the *'Judges." The church was organ- 
ized in 1639, and he was elected one of the ''seven pillars." — Mr. Peter 
Prudden, Pastor. Mr. Fowler was elected magistrate, and reappointed 
yearly to 1654. 

The deed of Milford was given to William Fowler, Edmund Tapp, 
Zachariah Whitman and Alexander Bryan, in trust for the body of 
planters. It was executed on the 12th of February, 1639. The consider- 
ation was 6 coats, 10 blankets, i kettle, besides a number of hoes, knives, 
hatchets, and glasses, (mirrors.) 

The instrument was signed by Ansantawae, the Sagamore, by Anacou- 
SET, Anchuta, Mantaque, and others. 

On November 20th, 1639, "William Fowler, Edmund Tapp, 
Zachariah Whitman, John Astwood and Richard Miles, were chosen 
Judges in all civil affairs, to try all causes between man and man ; and 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT WILLIAM FOWLER. 11 



as a Court to punish any offence and misdemeanor, and to admit inhabi- 
tants, and divide lands." 

At the second General Court, in Milford, held March 9th, 1640, **it 
was agreed between William Fowler and the Brethren, that he 
should build a mill and have her going by the last of September; when 
the town was to take it off his hands if they saw proper, for £100; or 
else the Brethren should elect five Judges, who should appoint what toll he 
should take." For his encouragement the town made him a grant of thirty 
acres of land, which long bore the name of the mill lot. . 

They afterwards granted him the permanent use of the stream. The 
agreement had reference to a grist-mill, but he afterwards added a saw-mill. 
It was iYit first mill erected in the "New Haven Colony." 

''Fowler's Mill" was of so much importance to the community, that 
upon its being injured by a freshet, in December, 1645, it was voted at the 
General Court, "that all the town should help Mr. Fowler upon his mill, 
and he was to call for them, each man, a day, till he should have gone 
through the town. And if he should not go through the town in one 
year, the same liberty was granted till he had been through." 

On the 26th, of October, 1643, William Fowler and Edmund 
Tapp of Milford, were chosen magistrates of the Colony of New Haven ; 
and on the succeeding day the articles of the confederation for the juris- 
diction were drawn and passed. The magistrates present, were Theophilus 
Eaton, Govenor; Stephen Goodyear, Deputy Governor; Thomas 
Gregson, William Fowler, Edmund Tapp, Thurston Raynor ; Tho- 
mas FuGiL, Secretary ; Thomas Kimberly, Marshall. 

William Fowler, and others who were the members of the church, 
were enrolled as "Free Planters" in Milford, Nov. 29th, 1639. Those 
who were not members, were not thus enrolled, and had not the privilege 
of voting in civil matters. The method of forming the Church of Mil- 
ford, was the same as forming that of New Haven. It appears that they 
were both formed on the same day, namely, August 22d, 1639. The 
"seven pillars" of the Milford church, were Peter Prudden, William Fow- 
ler, Edmund Tapp, Zachariah Whitman, John Astwood, Thomas 
Buckingham, Thomas Welch. Of these, Zachariah Whitman, Wil- 
liam Fowler and Edmund Tapp, were deputed for the imposition of hands 
upon the Rev. Peter Prudden, at his installation. 



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12 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 



Mr. Fowler died in 1660. His will presented in 1661, to the 
General Court of the Colony, by his son William Fowler, was not 
recorded and cannot be found. He was enrolled at New Haven as 
having property to the amount of £800, and a family of "three persons." 
His house-lot at Milford, was 7 acres 2 quarters. He left three or four 
children namely, William Fowler, John Fowler, Mary Fowler, and 
perhaps Ambrose Fowler, who removed to Windsor. His children were 
born before his removal to America, he at the time of his settlement 
being an old man, and his family of "three" were doubtless himself, wife 
and one child. The child may have been Mary, who married John 
Caffing. There is nothing inconsistent in the supposition and tradition 
that Ambrose of Windsor, and John who settled in Guilford, were brothers 
of William* Fowler, Jr., (who settled at Milford,) and sons of William 
Fowler the magistrate. 

It is probable that Mr. Fowler was one among those of the first settlers 
who had received a classical education in his native country. He is 
reported to have enjoyed a high reputation for wisdom and piety, and had 
the confidence of the Colony as a magistrate. 

Qpol)n ^OE)Ut, the second son of William Fowler, Senior, had a 
^f^ "home lot" assigned him at Milford, and was in the list of 
planters there in 1639, but about ten years afterwards removed and settled 
at Guilford. He was a man of note in the Colony, a deacon and a deputy 
to the Colonial Court, and died 14th of September, 1676. This branch 
is now said to be very numerous, and an effort is being made by Prof, 
John W. Fowler, the distinguished phrenologist of New York, and Prof. 
William C. Fowler, of Amherst, to collect their genealogy. 

For an account of Ambrose Fowler, and his descendants, see memoir of 
Hon. James Fowler, of Westfield, Mass. 



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GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR 



OP THE DESCENDANTS OF 



CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 



apt. tDilliam' Sowltt, the son of William^ Fowler, the 
"magistrate," did not participate with his father in the settle- 

' ment of Milford, but remained at New Haven, where he took the oath of 

i fidelity, 1644, and was admitted to the General Court, 1645. He was a 

' land holder at New Haven, where he was living, 1655. East Haven, 
"Fowler's Cove," and "Fowler's Creek," now so-called, were named from 
him. About two miles from New Haven, now the village of Whitney- 
ville, and on the site of the establishment for the manufacture of fire-arms, 

I erected by Eli Whitney, the inventor of the cotton gin, Mr. Fowler 
built a mill, 1645, which the town bought of him, 3d of January, 1659, 

I for one hundred pounds. He was chosen successively, "Sergeant," "Lieu- 
tenant," and "Captain," of the "Town Company," and is mentioned in the 

' Colonial Records of Hartford and New Haven, as one to raise troops as a 

I defence against a threatened incursion of the Dutch. 

I He first m., as early as 1645, Mary, dau. of Edward and Ann Tapp, 
sister of Jane Tapp, wife of Govenor Treat, by whom were born to him 
all his children. He m. 2d, Nov. ist, 1670, at Milford, widow Elizabeth 

I (Alsop) Baldwin. She was living at the date of his death, and as we 
learn from his will, was a "tender, dutiful and loving wife," and he desired 

I that she might continue to "live with his children, to be a guide and help 
to them as a mother, and head of a family." He removed and settled at 
Milford, about the time of his father's death, 1660, where a portion of 
his children were born and baptized. 

His will is dated 3d, October, 1682, and probated, June, 1683. He 

, gives property to "his eldest son John, to encourage him to tend the mill 

I 3 



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14 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

built by his father." Children (lo mentioned in will) born at New Haven, 
and Milford. 

(2) I. Sarah,* b. , m. John Smith, "ye Smith," 19th July, 

1665. 

(3) II. Hannah,' b. , m. Daniel Buckingham, 21st November, 

1 66 1. He was an elder in' the church at Milford. Had 
Hannah ^^h. nth October, 1663; Daniel,*' h, 28th Feb- 
ruary, 1665. He was an associate executor to his father- 
in-law's will, and d. 2d May, 1711-12. 

(4) III. John,* (12) m. Sarah Welch. 

(5) ^^ Jonathan,* (14) b. at New Haven, 8th February, 1650-51, 

m. Elizabeth Reynolds. 

(6) V. Mark,* (18) bap. at New Haven, 17th January, 1655-56, 

wife, Mary . 

(7) VI. Deborah,* bap. at New Haven, ist June, 1658, m. Jesse 

Lambert loth May, 1685, recently from England; eight 
children. 

(8) VII. Abigail,* b. at Milford, 27th November, 1660, m. at Nor- 

wich, 1685, John Elderkin; had seven children. She 
died March, 17 13-14. 

(9) VIII. William,* (21) b. at Milford, 1664. 

(10) IX. Mary,* b. , d. unm. 1685-6; mention is made in her 

father's will of her "lameness and weakness." 

(11) X. Mercy,* b. ist April, 1669, m. John Bills, settled in New 

London, afterwards Lebanon, Ct. 

(12) XI. Temperance,* was probably another dau., though not in 

father's will, m. Nathan Burwell, son of Lieut. Samuel B., 
and grandson of John B., one of the first planters. 

j0pol)n,* (4) m. Sarah, dau. Thos. Welch; was one of the "young 
^|) men" of Milford who, in 167 1, destroyed the Indian Fort; vide 
following paragraph. He d. previous to 1695, as, in a deed executed at 
that date by Sarah Fowler, "widow and executor" of John F., her hus- 
band is named as executor of his father, William' Fowler's will His will 
is probated 1693, and mentions his "only son, John," his wife to "take 
care to bring him up and educate him in the fear of God." He also men- 
tions *'my honorable uncle, Robert Treat, Esq., the Governor." From 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 15 



the records we find " Mrs. Sarah Newton, alias Fowler, d. 5th August, 
1723." This was John's widow, m. subsequently to his death to a 
Newton. 

(13) I. Margaret,* bap. 8th April, 1688, d. 1691. 

(14) II. John,* (26) bap. 5th April, 1691, m. ist, Susannah Burwell; 

2d, Abigail Prince. 

3Bonatl)an,' (5) the ancestor of the Fowlers of Windham Co., Ct., 

^|) had lands from his father, at New Haven, where he resided in 
1 66 1. He, with his brother John, wa* one of the ** young men" of Mil- 
ford who, in 1 67 1, destioyed the fort built by the Indians for their defence 
against the Mohawks. What their object was in destroying it, does not 
appear, but it was done "with the utmost secrecy, at dead of night," as 
the records tell us. 

The Indians complained of the act, whereupon civil process was issued 
against them. They were tried before the General Court at New Haven, 
and fined ten pounds each. 

In 168 1 or '82 he sold out at New Haven, and was of Norwich, 1683 
to 1693, when he removed to Windham with his family, Bnd there died 
loth June, 1696. 

He m. at Norwich, 3d August, 1687, Elizabeth, dau. of John Reynolds, 
of Norwich. She was born November, 1666, of a family of eight children. 
He mentions in his will four children, all recorded at Norwich, as is also 
his death. 

(15) I. Elizabeth,* (10) March, 1688-9, m. 8th January, 171 3, 

Thomas Loomis, who was b. at Windsor, and who was 
an original member of the second church at Lebanon, at 
its first formation, 1729. She united with this church in 
^ 17^0, They had, besides others. Desire,^ b. loth July, 

1754, ^- *^ Lebanon, Dea. John, son of Ichabod Bartlett, 
8th December, 1774, who settled at East Windsor, and 
whose son. Rev. Shubael Bartlett, deceased 1855, was for 
fifty years a minister at East Windsor. 

(16) II. Joseph,* b. 28th September, 1691, m. Elizabeth Powell, 8th 

January, 1712-13. He was a magistrate and a man of 
worth. He was deputy from Lebanon from 1726 to 1759. 
He had a farm of 150 acres at Lebanon, and removed 



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16 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

to East Haddam, 1763, where he was a **corporal" 
and a "constable," &c., and where he d. 23d June, 1768, 
and his wife the same year. He had no children, but 
brought up and educated his nephew, Joseph, son of Jona- 
than, who was afterwards an eminent clergyman at East 
Haddam. 

(17) III. Sarah,* b. 20th December, 1693, church at Goshen, 1730. 

(18) IV. Jonathan,* (30) b. 20th May, 1696, wife, Hannah Clark. 

'CXtk,' (6) was a proprietor at New Haven, 1685, where he d. 
1686, leaving a widow, Mary, and three children; will pro- 
bated in 1687, and in 1702 their father's property was divided among 
these children, about which time they settled in Lebanon. His widow d. 
at New Haven, July, 1688, children b. at New Haven. 

(19) I. John,* (39) b. ist March, 1681, bap. 29th May, 1681, wife, 

Sarah. 

(20) II. Thomas,* b. 8th January, 1683, removed to Lebanon. His 

wife was Elizabeth; they probably had children, for at 
Lebanon was born " Thomas^ son of Thomas," " 19th 
April, 1714;" also, "Thomas Fowler d. 10th November, 
1706." 

(21) III. Mary,* mentioned in father's will, and named in 1702, in 

division of property. 



if 



UltClin,' (9) who was born at Milford, 1664, made a will, 
which was probated 1729. His wife was Anna; she d, 25th 
June, 1740, aged 76, at Milford, at which place ''he d. 23d February, 
1728-29, aged 65." 

(22) I. Elizabeth,* b. , m. Nathan Clark, of Milford, 29th 

June, 1 7 10. 

(23) 11. Hannah,* m. Ebenezer Smith, of Milford, 9th January, 

1719. 

(24) III. Margaret,* b. 4th October, 1698, m. Samuel Smith. 

(25) IV. William,* b, 17th March, 1700, m. Eunice Hays, ist 

April, 1724. They had Eunice^ b. 1726. He d. 7th 
March, 1726-7, aged 26, and his widow m. 2d Stephen 
Baldwin, 15th September, 1730. 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT WILLIAM FOWLER. 17 



(27) 


I. 


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(26) V. Jonathan/ (44) b, 27th October, 1704, m. Hannah Clark. 

§apt. lol)n/ (14) m. ist, Susannah Burwell, 28th February, 
1711-12; she d. 1 8th March, 1744, and ^^ ^* ^^' Abigail, 
widow of Capt. Josiah Prince. He d. 30th August, 1756. He was 
chosen town clerk of Milford 171 8, which office he held until his death, 
1756, when his son succeeded him. 

Susannah,* b. 8th December, 17 12, drowned 13th Decem- 
ber, 1727. 
Margaret,*^ b. 8th June, 17 15, m. Joseph Merwin; lived in 

New Haven; three children. 
JoHN,^ (48) b. 7th February, 17 17, m. Mary Newton, 9th 

December, 1742. 
Sarah,* b. 1st August, 1723, .m. Richard Bryan, jr., 13th 
January, 1742; s. in Milford, and had thirteen children. 

flRonatl)an,* {18) called *' Sergeant," and the one so celebrated for 
^1^ his extraordinary size and strength as "Fowler, the giant." See 
" Fowler's Hereditary Descent," and other works, where wonderful stories 
arc recorded of his contests with bears in the woods, and bullies from 
Boston, who came to test his strength. The land records of Coventry 
show that he settled in Coventry, from Lebanon, in 17 19. His will is 
dated 1753; probated 1756. His wife, Hannah, d. at Coventry, 8th 
October, 1756, aged 59; he d. same year, aged 61. Children ten; the 
first three born at Lebanon, the others at Coventry. According to the 
traditions of the Bradford Co , Pa., Fowlers, among whom his youngest 
son died within the memory of men now living, (1870,) Jonathan Fowler, 
the giant, was seven feet in height, and weighed something over four hun- 
dred pounds. His muscular powers were something enormous. It is 
reported that he could lift a barrel of cider by the chines and drink out of 
the bung-hole; that on one occasion a champion of Boston, having heard 
of his reputation for great strength, came to wrestle with him; he being 
indignant at his presumption, (being a man of probity,) pitched him over 
a stone fence near by, and then lifted the horse which he rode and tumbled 
it over after him ; after which feat the Boston gentleman expressed himself 
satisfied and retired. It is also related that he could lift and throw clear 
' over a cart, a stone so heavy that two strong men were unable to lift and 
4 



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18 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

place within it. There is, probably, little doubt of the truth of the story 
"that he attacked and killed ^ bear with a club," not having any other | 
weapon at the time. His fame spread abroad, and it is reported that 
George XL, then Monarch of England, had a painting made, on the margin 
of which were these words: — "Jonathan Fowler, the Giant of America, 
in the act of killing a bear." The painting is supposed to be still in exist- 
ence at the Whitehall Gallery, in London. Children lo in number. 

Joseph,^ (52) b. 1722, m. Sarah Meicalf. 

Jonathan,* (60) m. Abigail Bissell. 

Hannah,* b. 24th August, 1725, d. before 1753. 

Mary,* b. 30th October, 1727. 

Daniel,* b. 3d June, 1729, m. Temperance Rogers, i8th 
June, 1752; s. at Coventry. 

IcHABOD,* (64) h, 28th January, 1731, m. Ruth Grover. 

GuRDON,* b. 8th March, 1753, d. 24th May, 1737. 

Elizabeth,* b. 12th November, 1735.*- >t--\7/rt-.Cv ''':j^^^J^ 

Israel,* (71) b. 3d June, 1736, m. 16th September, 1655, |i 
Eunice Bissell. 
(40) X. Gurdon, 2d, (75) b. 1 6th April, 1739, *"• ^^^' Sarah 
Rogers, 15th February, 1758; m. 2d, Mary Chapman, 
28th December, 1775 



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3Bol)n,* (19) b. at New Haven, ist March, 1680-81, was among 
^|) the first settlers at Lebanon, about 1702. He purchased of John 
Mason, in the "five mile purchase," land in what is now called Goshen 
Society. Five generations have lived on the spot, and it is now the prop- 
erty of Gen. Amos" Fowler. The old house, built by the first settler, 
was replaced in 1839, by a new one erected on the spot, and on its com- 
pletion it was made the occasion of some interesting dedicatory ceremonies, 
and a discourse was delivered by a descendant, the Rev. and Hon. Orin 
Fowler, who was born on the spot, — a discourse filled with interesting 
historical and genealogical incident. His will is dated 5th April, 1743, 
and probated 1751, and gives to son John 100 acres of land in Coventry. 
His widow's will is probated 1774, in which year she d., aged 88. Mr. 
Fowler d. 8th May, 175 1, in the 7 2d year of his age, "having served God 
and his generation faithfully, being very skilful and successful in the throat 
distemper." 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 19 



(41) I. JoHN,'^ b. 31st October, 1708; removed from Lebanon to 

Coventry, and d. about 1771. His first wife, Dorothy, d. 
loth March, 1751, and he m. 2d, widow Elizabeth Shaw, 
1 6th November, 1753. His children were: Jerusha^h. 
26th July, 1732; ThomaSf^h, 17th December, 1733, m. 
Rhoda Clark, 17th April, 1766, at Lebanon, and lived at 
the "Crank," Columbia; Mary,^ b. 9th January, 1735; 
Sarahy^h, nth February, 1738; Abraham^ b. ist No- 
vember, 1745; Hannah^ b. 26th May, 1749. 

(42) IL Mary,^ b. 13th November, 17 10. 

(43) IIL Mark,* b. 7th November, 171 2, m. Hannah Chubb, of 

Ashford, 18th November, 1746, and removed to Salisbury, 
Ct,, where Rev. Joseph Parsons, the first minister at Leb- 
anon, had settled in 17 18. He leased 100 acres of land 
at Salisbury, "for 900 years," "in consideration of 291 
ounces of coined silver." He d. previous to 1768, for at 
that date Rachel Fowler is described as his wife and 
executrix, probably his second wife. 

(44) IV. DijAH,* (88) b. loth June, 1717, m. Abigail Bigelow. 

(45) V. Sarah,* b. 28th December, 1718, m. Mr. Clark, of Lebanon. 

jGEonCttijCtn/ (26) m. Hannah, dau. Nathan Clark, 9th January, 

®|[) 1728; lived at Milford, where he d. 5th May, 1773, aged 70. 

He was one of the Dissenters from the Established Church, at Milford, 

who professed themselves to be Presbyterians, according to the Church of 

Scotland. Children, — 

(46) L Hannah,* b. 27th November, 1729, m. Capt. Isaac Clark. 

(47) II. William,* b. 22d July, 1732, m. Eunice Baldwin, and had 

William^ b. 1762, d. unm. 1785; Elixabeth^ Emma^ 
Catharine^ Susan ^ Mary.^ 

(48) III. Jonathan,* (95) b. nth August, 1735, m. Content Baldwin. 

(49) IV. Nathan,* (103) b. 22d July, 1741, m. Susan Miles. 

liictlt. JJol)n,* (29) who m Mary, dau. of Fletcher Newton, suc- 
ceeded his father as town clerk, in 1756, and his wife's death, | 
28th March, 1774, is the last death recorded by him. He served his I 
country in the Revolution. His will is probated December, 1781. 



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20 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 



(50) I. Susannah,® b. 12th August, 1744, m. Daniel Buckingham, 

15th May. 1788, and d. without children. 

(51) II. John,' (108) b. 21st August, 1748, m. Mary Ann Harpin. 

(52) III. FLETCHER,®b. 8th March, 175 1, d. same day. 

1^^ tV. 3oBtfl)f^ (31) Congregational minister at East Haddam, 

J^\, where he s. in 1751; m. 3d February, 1747, Sarah, dau. of 

Rev. Joseph Metcalf, of Lebanon. Mr. Fowler graduated at Yale College 

in 1743, and after a ministry of twenty-one years, d. at East Haddam 10th 

June, 1 77 1. Children, — 

(53) I. Joseph,* b. 31st December, 1747, m. Margaret Hull, 21st 

October, 1771, and had, at East Haddam, Exra^ b. 20th 
May, 1774, ^* young; David! d. young; Elixabeth^ b. 
30th June, 1779, m. Solomon Huntington, of East Had- 
dam, and had children. 

(54) II. Elizabeth,* b. 19th January, 1750, d. 13th February, 1750. 

(55) III. Elizabeth,® b. 17th October, 1751, d. 19th September, 

1762. 

(56) IV. Sarah,® b nth November, 1753, m. ^1^ October, 1780, 

Rev. Joseph Vaill, of Hadlyme, where she d. July, 1832, 
and he 21st November, 1838, aged 88. Of eight children, 
four lived to adult age, viz: Rev. William Fowler Vaill, 
of Illinois ; Mrs. Sarah Norcross, of Monson, Mass.; Rev. 
Joseph Vaill, D.D., of Somers, Ct.; and Mrs. Amanda V. 
Everts, of Killingworth, Ct. 

(57) V. Elisha Adams,® (132) b. 29th September, 1755, m. Mary 

Burr. 

(58) VI. WiLLiAM,8 b. 27th December, 1757, d. 1759. 

(59) VII. William,® b. 27th September, 1761, d. young. 

(60) VIII. Electa,® b. 7th July, 1767, m. Dea. Thomas Harvey, of 

Hadlyme, and had four children. 

^Onatt)an,^ (32) of Coventry, m. Abigail, dau. of John Bissell, 24th 
^t) September, 1740, and had, — 

(61) I. Sarah,® b. 24th July, 1741, d. young. 

(62) II. Tabitha,® b. 6th September, 1743. 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT- WILLIAM FOWLER. 



21 



(63) III. Joseph B.,* b. 28th September, 1749, m. Sarah Baldwin, 

28th November, 1771, and had, at Coventry, Lavina^ 
Silas B,^ b. i8th May, 1774. 

(64) IV. Sarah,* b. 9th June, 1753. 



i 



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cljabob/ (36) of Coventry, m. Ruth Grover, 4th October, 1753, 
and had, — 

Betta,* b. 2d November, 1754. 
Hannah,' b. 20th October, 1757. 
Ruth,* b. 9th February, 1761. 
Anna,* b. 9th April, 1764. 
Jemima,* b. 30th August, 1766. 
Jesse,* b. 31st, August, 1768. 
AsiL,* b. 9th February, 1771. 

fsrcicl,* (39) of Coventry, a son of the *• Giant," was six feet seven 
inches in height, and weighed upwards of 300 pounds; he m. 
1 6th September, 1755, Eunice, dau. of John Bissell. He d. at Coventry, 
1 2th June, 1805, and she d. 9th February, 1801, aged ']'], Children, — 
Abigail,* b. 17th September, 1758. 
Esther,* b. 2 2d August, 1760, d. 2d January, 1776. 
Eunice,* b. 25th September, 1762, m. Nathaniel Jeffers, and 

s. in Luzerne, Pa., and had children. 
Joel,* b. 18th May, 1764, and removed, in 181 7, to Aurora, 
N. Y., where he d., and where his children live. 



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S" 



tltbon,* (40) of Coventry, Ct., b. i6th April, 1639, m. ist, 
Sarah Rogers, 15th February, 1758, by whom he had seven 
children; m. 2d, Mary Chapman, 28th December, 1775, by whom he 
had six children. 

Gurdon Fowler emigrated to Pennsylvania, to what is now Monroe 
Township, Bradford Co., in September, 1 800. He and his sons Jonathan 
and Rogers bought lands under Connecticut titles, which afterwards proved 
worthless, as the lands were claimed by Pennsylvania, together with all the 
improvements, consisting (besides others) of a saw and grist-mill. Nothing 
daunted by such adverse fortune, they again purchased lands, on long credit, 
of the ." Holland Purchase Company," and this time were more fortunate ; 
5 



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but it required the most stubborn energy and perseverance to bring forth 
the fruits of husbandry from a wild and densely wooded region, like that 
of Northern Pennsylvania. 

After nine years of struggle and privation, incident to the settlement of 
& new country, "the father, Gurdon Fowler, was called to his eternal 
rest, — freed from hardship and toil." He d. 1 1 th November, 1 809. 
Children, thirteen in number, all b. in Connecticut: 

Jonathan,® ^141) b. 2d March, 1759. 

Daniel,' (141 A) b. 9th September, 1761. 

Elijah," (149) b. 20th July, 1763. 

Rogers,* (155) b. 8th July, 1766. 

Asa,® (155 B) b. 15th May, 1769. 

GuRDON,« (155 C) b. 2ist April, 1772. 

Sarah,' (155 D) b. I5ih December, 1774. 

Children by 2d wife, Mary. Chapman, who was b. 21st July, 1750: 

(83) Vnr. Polly,' (155 E) b. 31st March, 1777. 

(84) IX. Hannah,' (155 F) b. 7th April, 1780. 

(85) X. Russell,' (155 G) b. 15th September, 1782. 

(86) XI. RoxEY,' (155 H) b. 1 6th July, 1786. 

(87) XII. Austin,' (155 K) b. 31st May, 1787. 

(88) XIII. Betsey,' (155 L) b. 14th April, 1792. 

apt. lUijCXl),^ (44) m. Abigail, dau. of serg't Isaac Bigelow, of 
Colchester, i8th December, 1745. She was b. 13th April, 
1723, and d. 9th June, 1796, the grand-daughter of Samuel Bigelow, of 
Watertown, Mass. Capt. Fowler belonged to the military, was a man 
much in public life, and held high in public estimation for his social and 
generous nature, and strictly moral character He d. 14th December, 
1804, in his 88th year. Children, b. at Lebanon: 

(89) I. Abigail,' b. ist March, 1747, m. Mr. Skinner, of Wood- 

stock; he d., and she m. 2d, Mr. Dean; descendants in 
Providence, R. I. 

(90) II. Dijah,' b. 14th August, 1748; wife, Mary; had Benjamin 

Beach i LyJia? He d. at Goshen, 29th August, 1777. 

(91) III. Sarah,' b. 17th June, 1^750, m. Samuel Colt, of Lyme, and 

had Martin,'^ Samuel,^ Dijah^ Sarah? 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 



23 



(92) IV. 



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Lydia/ b. 7th February, 1753, m. Mr. Bowen, of Wood- 
stock, and had Arms^ John ^ • Mar k,^ and others. 

John,* b 5th December, 1754, "^* Anna Skinner; lived at 
Lebanon, and was a soldier of the Revolution, at the battle 
of Bunker Hill ; drew a pension, and d 1834, aged 80, A 
Woodstock, and where his widow d. October, 1850, 
aged 97. 

Mark,* (hi) b. 9th May, 1756, m. Miriam Warner. 

Amo8,« (120) b. 19th March, 1758, m. Rebecca Dewey. 



(96) 



Onatl)an/ (48) m. Content Baldwin. She was b. 12th Septem- 
ber, 1740, and d. 19th June, 1821. They had b. at Milford: 
I. Content,* m. Elijah Bryan, 22d August, 1784, and moved 
to Ohio. Children: Elihu^ Content ^ Lucy,^ Amanda^ 
Betsey! Elijah! Patty? 

Comfort,' m. Benjamin Fehn; s. in Talmadge, O.; had 
nine children. 

Abigail,' m. Samuel Fenn; s. in Plymouth, Ct.; had two 
children. 

Martha,* m. Barnabas Woodcock, Milford, Ct.; had eight 
children. 

Hannah,* m. John Bryan, Orange, Ct. 

Jonathan,* b 31st August, 1771, d. unmarried, 1829. 

JosiAH,* b. 21st April, 1777, m. Rebecca Clark, 1801; s 
at Orange, Ct., and d. 17th February, 1829. Had 
Sarah! m. Ashael Clark ; Josiah Wales! b. 8th Decem- 
ber, 1804; Nathan Clark! b. 26th March, 1807, m, 
Hetty Lambert; Mary Emeline! m. ist, Samuel Clark, 
and 2d, Benjamin Higby; Jonathan S.! b. 1813; Re- 
becca fF,;'' Charlotte C! m. David Beecher, of Orange, 
Ct. 

(103) VIII. ELiHu,«b. 1780, d. 1784. 

^J^(Xtl)(tn,^ (49) who m. Susan Miles, s. at Milford, and d. 181 8. 
2i«I, Children,— 

(104) I. Nathan,* b. 24th February, 1762, m. Sarah Piatt, 1788, 

and had three children. 



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A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 



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Joseph/ b. 13th July, 1775, m. ist, Abigail Baldwin; 2d, 
widow Sarah Hull; 3d, Maria Harris; and had Joseph!^ 
who graduated at Yale College, 18 17, and d. 1825, be- 
sides others. 

Hannah/ b. 9th December, 1763, m. Miles Newton. 

SusAN,« b. 7th March, 1766, m. foseph Smith. 

Margaret,® b. 21st March, 1768, m. Richard Piatt. 



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apt. 3ol)n/ (51) who m. Ann Harpin, 22d October, 1767. 
She was descended from Dr. John Harpin, who was born in 
Rochefort, France, about 1690, came to America, s.. at Milford, 1710, 
and m. Mary Camp, 8th January, 171 8, and d. 1765. John Harpin, 
their eldest child, m. Mary Read, and had Mary Ann, (above,) b. 1752, 
and d. 1798. Mr. Fowler d. 17th August, 1787, aged 39. Children, 
b. at Milford: 

(109) I. |oHN,^ b. 7th October, 1769, m. Lucy Mallet. He d. 13th 

October, 1790. They had John^ (lost at sea,) m. 
Elizabeth Curtis, who had a son which d. in infancy; 
Luke^ lost at sea. 
Anthony William Harpin,' b. 29th October, 1775, m. 
Sally, dau. of Charles Pond, i8th December, 1796. She 
was b. 2d June, 1774, and they had ist, Mary^ b. i6th 
September, 1697; 2d, Martha,^ b. 16th May, 1799; 
3d, Susan^ b. 23d August, 1802, m. Jesse G. Smith; 
4th, Sarah,^ b. 28th April, 1804, m. Jonah Piatt; 5th, 
John William,^ b. 5th August, 1807, m. Jane Hyde, of 
Bridgeport, and they had Franklin H.^ Lucille A,? Mary 
Jane^ Frances Susan ;^ 6th, Charlotte^ b. 9th June, 
1810, m. O. B. Sherwood; jth, Jnn Harpin,^ b. 2 ist 
March, 1813, m. C. W. Cornwall. 
Mark,'' b. loth November, 1782, m. Abigail Carpenter, 
and he d. 28th April. 181 5, at Brooklyn, N. Y. She d. 
9th January, 1850. They had fivt chileren. 



(Ill) III, 



atk,* (94) removed from Lebanon, Ct., to Herkimer Co., N. 
Y., then the Far West, and, with his numerous family of sons, 
were the pioneers in clearing the forests and laying the foundations of the 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT WILLIAM FOWLER. 25 



present thriving cities of Central New York. He m. Miriam (Sterling), 
the widow of Reuben Warner, and d. 27th April, 1813, his widow survi- 
ving him to 1843. Children, — 

(112) I. Reuben W./ b. 13th August, 1778, m. Sybil Sawyer, 

1806, s. in Ontario Co., and had Anna',^ Harvey,^ m, 
Fanny Blair, — six children; Hervey,^ m. Mary Page, — 
seven children ; Thomas Melvin^ m. Harriet, dau. Judge 
Everett, — three children. 

(113) II. David,^ b. 9th June, 1780, m. widow Lavina (Palmer) 

Hatch, 1803; had, in Steuben Co., Buel^ Jerusba^ 
Edmund^ all m. and have children. 

(114) III. DijAH,' b. I2th March, 1782, m. Lydia Guild, 1801 ; had 

eight children : Almira^ Norman^ Emily^ Maria^ Oris- 

ville^ Mary^ Samuel G.,^ John,^ all m. and have families. 
Philena,' b. 1784, m. ist, George Bunday, and 2d, Lyman 

Kinney; eight children. 
Amos,' b. 15th November, 1786, m. Achsa Rymond, s. at 

Litchfield, N. Y., and had Jddism M.,' fFarren R.,^ 

Leroy Z.,^ and four daughters, all m., with families. 
Fanny,' b. 21st December, 1789, m. ist, Jesse Baker, and 

2d, Jacob Madole ; seven children. 
Polly,' b. 9th May, 1792, m. ist, Josiah Fuller, and 2d^ 

Charles Ensign; six children. 
Alvin,' b. 24th January, 1795, m. Olive Lord, 1819; had 

Amos,^ Emily; Dwight,^ John N,' 
Abigail,' b. 2d June, 1798, m. James Barnard; went to 

Michigan; nine children. 

^apt. ^mO0,^ (95) m. Rebecca, dau. of John and Rhoda (Gillet) 
Dewey. She was b. 4th July, 1759, *"^ ^* ^^^^ August, 
1850. Her father d. 1830, aged 95; the grand-son of Josiah Dewey, the 
purchaser of Lebanon in 1 700, and who came from Windsor, where his 
grandfather, Thomas,^ settled in 1639, with Rev. Mr. Huit. Capt. Fow- 
ler was a corporal in the Revolutionary Army, was one of Washington's 
Life Guards, and was in the retreat from Long Island. He served with 
honor until near the close of the war. He d. 30th November, 1837. 
Children, b. at Lebanon, Ct.: 

6 



(•»5) 


IV. 


(116) 


V. 


(•17) 


vr. 


(118) 


VII. 


('«9) 


VIII. 


(120) 


IX. 



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26 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

(i2i) I. Clarissa/ b. 1781, m. Ozias Williams, of Cooperstown, 
N. Y.; six children. 

(122) II. Fanny/ b. 28th June, 1783, m. David Otis, of Colchester, 

Ct., and had Alfredy Clarissa^ Erne line ^ Orin^ a clergy- 
man, Benjamin F.,^ Harriet,^ Horatio N,,^ Sarahs 

(123) III. Sally,' b. 1785, m. Abial Bingham, of Canajoharie, and 

had four children. 

(124) IV. Rhoda,' b. 1787, d. young. 

(125) V. Rhoda,' b. 1789, m. Ruel Royce, of Lyme, Ct. ; had 

eight children. 

(126) VI. Orin,' b. 29th July, 1791; graduated at Yale College, 

1 8 1 5 ; became a clergyman, at Plainfield, Ct ; s. in Fall 
River, pastor of the Congregational Church for twenty 
years; elected to the State Senate of Massachusetts in 
1 847, and in 1 848 was elected to the Thirty-First Con- 
gress, where he served two terms, and where he d 3d 
September, 1854. He m. Amaryllis, dau. of John Howe 
Payson, and had one child, which d. in infancy. 

(127) VII. John,' b. 1793, m Mary C Bacon, and had, at Woodstock, 

Ct., six children. 

(128) VIII. Amos,' b. 1795; was a Major General in the military; m. 

Lydia*C. Backus, and had, at Lebanon, nine children. 

(129) IX. Henry,' b. 1797, m. Mary Saxton, at Lebanon; five 

children. 
(130J X. Harriet,' m. Edmund Harding, of Lebanon. 

(131) XI. DijAH,' b. 1799, d. aged 15. 

(132) XII. Anson,' b. 1803; is s. in Lebanon with his fourth wife. 

351 ea. (SUelja ^baniB iTotDler/' (57) m. 7th June, 1781, Mary 
5(jl Burr, at East Hadam; removed to East Bethel Vt., and there d. 
20th February, 1 840, aged 84. He served three campaigns in the Revo- 
lutionary War; "A stout, athletic man, of good mental and physical organ- 
ization, and not confined by disease till past 80 years of age." His wife 
d. 6th February, 1842, aged 87. They had, — 
(^3) ^* William,' b. 15th August, 1782, d. 1784. 
(134) IL Mary,' b. 23d July, 1784, m. John F. Pierson, 1803, d. 
1 817; seven children. 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 27 



(135) III. Elizabeth/ b. 2 2d October, 1786, d. 1806. 

(136) IV. Electa/ b. 16th October, 1788, d. 1848. 

(137) V' liUciNDA,^ b. 29th March, 1792, d. same year. 

(138) VI. Joseph,^ b. 27th December, 1793, m. Cynthia GifFord, 

29th August, 1817, and he d. 1849; had Norman^ m.. 
Charlotte Marshall; Lucinda^ Alonxoy Edwin^ George 
A,y^ Joseph L} 

(139) VII. Elisha,^ b. 1 6th April, 1796, m. ist, Edith Gifford, 1821. 

She d. 1 842. He m. 2d, Mary Gifford, and had Exray 
m. Louisa Abbott; James G.,® m. Laura Rogers; Charles 
E.,^ Elisha A,,^ Solon,^ Emeline,^ John //.« 

(140) VIII. LuciNDA,^ b. 3d April, 1798, m. Samuel Woodsworth, 

1821. 

(141) IX. Sara,^ b. 5th January, 1801, d. 1806. 

QpOUatl)an/ (76) b. March 2d, 1759; emigrated to Bradford Co., 
^K) Pennsylvania, in September, 1800. He was a soldier of the 
Revolution, and was one of the unfortunates who suffered imprisonment 
in the "Sugar House," in New York. He d. December 4th, 1834, 
leaving no descendants in the male line. One dau. living, — Mrs, Fox^ 
Towanda, Pa. 

§amcl,' {-j-j A) b. 9th September, 1761. Known as "Major 
Fowler." He was a man of liberal education, fine personal 
bearing and address, and extremely fond of military displays. Resided for 
many years at Hudson, N. Y., where he taught a school, the late ex- Presi- 
dent Martin Van Buren being one of his pupils. He died at the residence 
of his daughter Roxey, ^Watson,) in Wolcott, Wayne Co., N, Y., 1 8th 
April, 1847, his wife having died a few years previous. 

The writer takes pleasure in appending here a letter from Col. Rogers 
Fowler, of Chicago, his nephew, who was his personal friend and ac- 
quaintance during the latter part of his life : 

"Daniel Fowler, when a boy, enlisted in the Revolutionary Army, and 
was taken prisoner and kept for some months in the noted 'sugar house,' 
in New York, where he suffered untold miseries from both filth and star- 
vatioi^, and barely came out alive ; but went into the ranks again with 
renewed vigor, and was promoted to the rank of Major before the close of 



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28 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

the war, at twenty years of age. He afterwards married and settled in 
the city of Hudson, N. Y., where he started the first school of importance 
at that place, called the * City Academy of Hudson,' and where he reared 
and educated a family that has done honor to his name. Among his pupils 
was the late Martin Van Buren, placed under his care, when quite young, 
by Aaron Burr. The writer had the pleasure of. knowing Mr. Fowler 
intimately during the last fifteen years of his life. Although quite advanced 
in years, he was hale and vigorous, — a gentleman of the old school, — whig 
in political principles, and had been an old and intimate friend of Alexan- 
der Hamilton. I can say, truthfully, that he was one of the most intelli- 
gent and agreeable gentlemen that it has ever been my fortune to meet. 

" Chicago, April Stb, 1869." 

Major Fowler was m. 23d November, 1785, to Rachel Loomis, who 
wag b. 23d November, 1762. Names of children: 

(142) I. RoxEY,' b. 8th September, 1786, m. Joseph Watson; she 

is still living, and has one son, George Z).® Watson. 

(143) II. Achsah/ b. 1 8th December, 1789, m. Jona Frary, d. 

Two children. 

(144) III. SYLVESTER L.,^ b. 10th November, 1790, at West 

Otis, Mass. ; s in Mobile, Ala. ; afterwards went to 
New Orleans, where he resided many years, and carried 
on business as a "Commercial Broker." During the 
Rebellion, and since, he has resided at Demopolis, Ala., 
with his nephew. Daniel Prout. Was never married. 

(145) IV. LESTER,' b. 14th December, 1792, d. unm. 

(146) rV. DANIEL, jr.,' b. 9th February, 1795, in Otis, Mass.; s. 

in Mobile, Ala, 181 8; m. Mary A. Coan, and had, — 
Charles S.,® b. 26th March, if 27, m. 1st, Miss Vin- 
cent; 2d, Miss Graham; no children. John D.,® b. 20th 
March, 1829, m Miss Russell; no children; cotton mer- 
chant; resides at Mobile. Williai^i P. ® b. 19th No- 
vember, 1833; unm. Mary C,® b. 23d March, 1839, 
m. Kinney Cleveland; no children. Julia Z).,® b. 3d 
October, 1842, m. Amedio F Hurtel; one child. Em- 
ma,^ b. 22d July, 1848, m. J. Fleetwood Foster; one 
child. Mr. Fowler is still living, (1870.) His wife 
died in 1859. 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 29 

(147) VI. CHARLES S./ b. 30th June, 1797, m. Miss Poor; no 

children. Charles S. Fowler was a banker at Baltimore 
and Washington, in 1836. He was a man much beloved 
for his generosity and nobility of character. He died at 
Washington City in 1865. 

(148) VII. George D.,' b. 14th September, 1799, ^* ^^^* 

(149) VIII. Rachel S.,^ b. 13th August, 1802, m. William Prout, and 

had William D.,^ b. , m. Lizzie Waugh, three chil- 
dren; Daniel F.,^ b. , m. Laura D. Glover, five 

children; Mary C.,' b. ; Fannie^ b. , m. 

Thomas Vinson, four children, 

3\|^^. (flijCll),' (78) b. 20th July, 1763, m. Hannah M. Bird, about 
^)|jl 1796-7. His early history is somewhat obscure, but it is 
known that he was born in Coventry, Ct., and studied for the profession 
of medicine with Dr. Kingsbury, and succeeded him in Tyringham, 
Mass., (now Monterey,) in the year 1794, where he continued to reside 
until his death, 21st March, 181 2. He died of an epidemic fever which 
raged violently in that part of the country at the time. On his tombstone 
in the "old church" cemetery of Monterey, Berkshire Co., Mass., can 
still be read these words: 

*' Ripe for heaven, his loul ascending flew, 
And early bid this sinful world adieu; 
Short was his stay, the longer is his rest, 
In the eternal mansions of the blest." 

After his death, his widow, together with her four eldest children, emi- 
grated, in 1 8 14, in company with her father. Col. Bird, to the vicinity of 
Westfield, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., where she continued to reside until 
1833, when she sold her farm and went to live with her sons, Hiram and 
Henry, who had settled in Dupage Co., 111. She died in 1834, and is 
buried at Naperville, 111. Names of children: 

Hiram,' (155 M) b. 9th February, 1798. 

Charles,' d. young. 

Albert,' (155 N) b. 7th September, 1802. 

Henry,' (155 O) b. 26th February, 1804. 

Amelia,' (155 P) b. 4th October, 1807, d. 20th August, 
1859. 
(155) VI. Elijah Gurdon,' (155 Q) b. i8th November, 181 1. 



(ISO) 


I. 


(«Si) 


II. 


(15*) 


III. 


053) 


IV. 


(1 54) 


V. 



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80 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

3^ OgCt0,* (79) b. 8th July, 1766. Participated with his father in 
JJDjL ^^^ settlement of Bradford Co., Pa. He was a Free Mason of 
note, and a man of prominence in that County ; was elected Colonel of a 
regiment, at the breaking out of the war of 1812, but did not enter the 
army, as he died soon after, (12th May, 1812.) He left no family. On 
his tombstone can be read these words, expressive of his religious faith: 

"Bound to no sect. I took no private road, 
But walked through nature up to nature's God." 

I 0a,* (80 S) b. 15th May, 1769, d 5th December, 1840, m. 
Lavina Forsyth, and s. in Berkshire Co., Mass., where he 
died. Children: Gilbert,'' d. young; Silvester! now a* resident of San 
Francisco, Cal. ; Caroline^ Harriet! Lucinda^ Laura? 

Urbon/ (8i C) b. 21st April, 1772, d. 1854. His wife d. in 
1868, aged 92. They had: Ackley,' b. 1800, d. 1831, who 
had George //.,* resides at New Haven, and Samuel,^ died in the army; 
Samuel^ and Asa/ lost at sea, 1844; Sarah,' d. 1831 ; Aseneth,' m. Z. 
S. Hungerford, and resides at East Haddam, Ct. ; William L.,' resides at 
East Haddam, Ct., and has William L.,® Hbwry M.,® and Leonora,® m. 
to Clark Edwards. 

arCll),* (82 JD) b. 15th December, 1774, d. 1812, m. 

Sage ; two children, Syivester,'' Russell^ reside in Connecticut. 

follg/ (83 E) b. 31st Marcb,'' 1 777, m. John Fox, and had: 
Miller? John M,? who reside at Towanda, Pa. She d. 1855. 

|annal)/ (84 JP) b. 7th April, 1780, m. Daniel Miller, d. 
1844-45 

tl00cU,* (85 6r) b. i'5th September, 1782, d. 22d August, 
1 85 1, Bradford Co., Pa. Children: 5^c^//(?/? Z.,' b. 9th June, 
1809; resides near Cahokia, Clark Co., Mo., and has three children; 
ROGERS,' (155 R) b. 1 6th May, 1812; Samantba? b. April, 1814, m. 
James Ridgway; lives at Monroeton, Bradford Co., Pa,, and has children; 
Ellen My b. , m. Judge Elwell; resides at Beaver Dam, Wis., and 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 31 

has children; Hiram^ b. loth January, 1826, d. 7th May, 1863, at Mene- 
icaunee Wis.; left one or two daughters; Russell^ h, March, 1828; re- 
sides at Jacksonville, 111., and has a family; Adeline M.^ b, 1831, m. 
Lewis -G. Kellogg. 

O^eg," (86 jET) b, 1 6th July, 1786, d. 1852, m. Eliphalet 
Mason; one son, CoL Mason, Towanda, Pa. 

itlBtin/ (87 JK.) b. 31st May, 1787, living 1870. He m. ist, 
Betsey Lawrence, 18 14, by whom he had: Franklin^ Gurdon^ 
William;'^ and by his 2d wife. Clarence;"^ has also three daughters; fam- 
ily resides in Bradford Co., Pa. 

)Ct0Cg,* (88 L) b. 14th April, 1792, d. 1866, m. Abner C. 
Rockwell; four sons and one dau., now Mrs. Joseph de la 
Montanyee, Towanda, Pa. 



|itant/ (150 JUT) b. 9th February, 1798, in Tyringham, Mass., 
s. in Dupage Qo., 111., 1833, and m. Mrs. Laird, i6th Jan- 
uary, 1844; no children living. 

ilbcrt,^ (152 N) b. 7th September, 1802. The father of the 
writer of this memoir came to Chautauqua Co., N. Y., with his 
mother in 1814, where he remained until 1832, when he determined to 
remove and settle in the then ** Far West." He came by water to De- 
troit, and from thence by land to St. Joseph, where he took passage in a 
schooner for Chicago, reaching there in the month of June, of that year. 
A week or so after he arrived. Gen. Scott and his troops came in the 
steamboat Sheldon Thompson, from Buffalo, bringing the Asiatic Cholera 
with them, a scourge until that time unknown in this part of the world. 
The greatest panic prevailed among the citizens of the place, every one 
leaving that could get away, and he again took passage on the same 
schooner that had brought him to Chicago, for St. Joseph; but not being 
allowed ^to land there, they proceeded to Mackinac, where they were 
again refused permission to land, and only after much solicitation could 
they obtain provisions (which were finally handed to them on the end of 
a long pole) to enable them to proceed on their voyage to Detroit. 



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32 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

Mr, Fowler again came to Chicago in the spring of 1833, and engaged 
in speculations in real estate, from which he realized a small sum of mone^ 
with which he proceeded to Buffalo, and purchasing a stock of Indian 
goods, he returned in September, in season to attend the great Indian pay- 
ment of that year. That being over, he concluded to try his fortunes 
elsewhere, and emigrated to Milwaukee, reaching that place on the i8th 
November, 1833, finding there Solomon Juneau, its founder, and the only 
white man residing there at the time of his arrival. He went into Mr, 
Juneau's employ, and was engaged in trading with the Indians for some 
time afterwards. He acquired their language, and was known among 
them as Mis-kee-o-qu6nen, which signified red cap. He was the first 
Justice of the Peace, and first Register of Deeds in Milwaukee ; was a 
member of the Convention which formed the present Constitution of the 
State of Wisconsin. He resided in Milwaukee County until 1853, when 
he removed to Rockford, 111., where he was elected Mayor, in 1864-65, 
and again in 1867, and where he still continues to live, much respected 
and beloved by his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Fowler m. ist, nth August, 1836, Emily, dau. of Daniel Wilcox, 
of Great Barrington, Mass. She died 12th January, 1851, at Milwaukee. 
They had Daniel W.,^ b. 25th February, 1839, at Milwaukee, where he 
still resides; Hannah M.,® b. 21st February, 1841, m., 14th June, 1863, 
Edward H. Griggs; resides at Rockford, 111.; one child, Ella Frances? b. 
2 2d June, 1864. He m. 2d, 1852, Lucy Bosworth Fargo, (widow,) of 
Monterey, Mass. She d i8th April, 1854; no children. He m. 3d, 
Emeline Munroe, of Wauwatosa, Milwaukee Co., Wis., 7th June, 1855. 
Children: Emily Edith,* b. 19th December, 1857, d. January, i860; 
Rogers,® b. 19th December, 1861. 

I^ttrg,' (153 O) b. 26th February, 1804; s. in Dupage Co., 111., 
1833, and still resides at Warrenville; m. Esther Carey, 2d 
November, 1840. Children: Ferdinand,® b. 5th September, 1841, d. 
19th March, 1863; Daniel,® b. nth April, 1844, d. 21st March, 
1863; Nettie,® b. 22d February, 1847. Ferdinand and Daniel were 
both members of the 105th Regiment Illinois Volunteers, and participated 
in the campaign against Gen. Bragg, during his retreat from Kentucky, in 
1862. Ferdinand died at home, (having been discharged from the army 
for disability,) after a lingering and painful illness. His brother died two 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 88 

days after, in hospital, at Gallatin, Tenn, Their demise overwhelmed 
their aged parents with sorrow, and taught all who witnessed it, how 
vastly great are the sacrifices of war. 

intcHci,'' (155 jP) m. Edward Sherman Winslow; one child, 
Mary,^h, 25th May, 1843. He d. 1848-50; she 20th Au- 
gust, 1859. 

lijal) ®ttrbon,^ (155 Q) b. i8th November, 1811, m. Julia, 
dau. of Daniel Wilcox, of Great Harrington, Mass., 2d April, 
1835; s. in Milwaukee Co., Wis., in 1836, where they still reside. 
Children,— 

I. Maurice W.,® b,, Monterey, Mass., 14th January, 1836; unm. 
II. Charles Bird,® b., in Wisconsin, 17th January, 1841. 

III. fuLiA Amelia,® b., in Wisconsin, loth August, 1843. 

IV. Emily A.,® b. 22d September, 1846, d. 4th August, 1850. 
Charles Bird,® m., January, 1868, Addie Brown; one child, Charlotte,^ 

Maurice served in the 45th Wisconsin Volunteers, during the late war, 
Charles, first in the 20th Wisconsin Volunteers, afterwards as 2d Lieut, in 
the 48th Regiment. 

^Bol. Hogcr0 JotDlcr/ (155 JB) son of Russell,* (85) of Bradford 
JV^ Co., Pa., was born i6th May, 1812, on the same day, and 
in the same house from which his uncle, Rogers,® was buried. The co-in- 
cidence gave him his name. He engaged in business on his own account 
at an early age, and being possessed of rare business qualifications, and 
immense energy, soon achieved success. He was engaged in merchandi- 
sing and lumbering in Bradford Co., for many years, but meeting with 
reverses, he concluded to go West. In 1854-55 he organized the 
New York Lumber Company, and, purchasing a large amount of pine 
lands in the vicinity of the Menomonee River, of Green Bay, he built 
near the mouth of it, where stands the present flourishing village of Mene- 
kaunee, a mill which had capacity for cutting 1 50,000 feet of lumber 
every twenty-four hours. 

He soon after opened one of the then largest lumber yards in Chicago. 
The financial revulsion of 1857 coming on soon afterwards, affected the 
enterprise disastrously, and he sold out his interest in 1858. Having taken 
8 



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84 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

up his residence in Chicago in 18U55-56, he became one of its most enter- 
prising citizens, and at the breaking out of the war of the rebellion, was 
appointed by Gov. Yates, Commissary General of the State of Illinois, and 
was instrumental in bringing troops to the defence of Cairo in season to 
anticipate, and thereby prevent, its intended capture by the rebel forces 
He was afterwards commissioned a Colonel by Secretary Cameron, of 
the War Department, at Washington, and sent West to look after certain 
interests of the Government in that direcion. 

In 1865 he went to Texas, and, with others, purchased the franchises of 
the Memphis and El Paso R. R., and has since labored to effect its com- 
pletion, with fair prospects of success. The enterprise is one of the 
grandest in conception of any in the United States ; is one of the connect- 
ing links of the Great Southern Pacific R. R., which is already commenced 
and will eventually be completed. 

Mr. Fowler is six feet three inches in height, of noble bearing, and fine 
personal address; of most genial and pleasant manners; has hosts of warm 
personal friends; and still possesses, at the age of 58, the fire and energy 
of his most vigorous manhood. Unfortunately, his health has become 
somewhat impaired, from great exposures, which restrict his opportuni- 
ties. Mr. Fowler m. 19th September, 1838, H. Almeda, dau. of Judge 
Morgan, of Pa., and had, — 

I. Clarence M.,® b. 6th January, 1840, d. ist January, 1841. 

II. Ella M ,^ b. 13th August, 1843, m. George W. Adams, loth 
January, 1867. 

III. Harriet M.,® b. 19th June, 1846, m. Wm. H. Cutler, ist May, 

1869, 

IV. Mary Amanda,^ b. 8th April, 1851. 
V. Jessie Lind,^ b. 9th March, 1857. 



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ADDENDA 



An old and rare book, published in the early days of type-setting, con- 
tains what I have not seen elsewhere, viz: the origin and signification of 
all the family names in England. This book said that a Saxon chief, fond 
of the chase, and being a daring hunter, was called Fowler. This Fowler, 
accompanied by a numerous band of retainers and followers, went to Eng- 
land about a hundred years before the destruction of the Heptarchy, and 
the union of all the kingdoms of England into one, under Egbert. He 
settled in Sussex, and according to this old chronicle, the Fowler family 
had never failed to have a representative member from the eighth century 
to that present time of writing, to wit : in the early part of the sixteenth 
century. 

Although the early chronicles of the country speak of several members 
of the Fowler family as being distinguished for conduct in arms in the 
local wars of the times, it will be seen that the professions of law, litera- 
ture and the Church, have been mostly chosen as fields of labor and useful- 
ness, by the descendants of the Hunters and Fowlers. 

Dr. Edmund Fowler, 

New Tork, 



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Jonathan Fowler and his Descendants.* 



J6NATHAN Fowler, of Coventry, Ct., was the son of an immensely 
large woman, of about 300 pounds' weight, and endowed with extraordi- 
nary strength, which her son Jonathan inherited, as the following bear 
story, copied from the Vermont Republican, of Sept. 29th, 1817, and 
originally taken from the Hartford Times, fully attests : 

"The history of Gen. Putnam and the welfare too well known to 
need any elucidation. The writer of his life, David Humphreys, has 
fully delineated the heroism ancl courage of that veteran, and the many 
bold and daring enterprises which characterized it, in war and peace. 
About the same time, as bold and daring an attempt to destroy another 
savage monster of the forest, was undertaken and accomplished by Mr. 
Jonathan Fowler, of Coventry. As this uncommon act of bravery has 
never appeared in print, I will give a short narrative of the afiair, so that 
the youthful part of the community may see what feats of valor their fore- 
fathers were capable of performing. Mr. Fowler being on a visit to East 
Windsor, between seventy and eighty years ago, and walking out one day 
with several of his friends, they were suddenly surprised by a huge bear, 
who rushed upon them from his place of concealment. His associates, 
like a band of choice modern Pettipaug spirits, fled without trying to make 
the least opposition. The bear came up to Mr. Fowler, who, although a 
m.an of great bodily vigor, yet rather inclined to corpulency, did not hap- 
pen to be quite so nimble-footed as his brave friends were. Finding that 
he should soon be overtaken, and determining not to be attacked in the 
rear, very resolutely faced about just as the bear rose on his hind legs to 
give the sweet Indian hug. 

**He, at this instant, with that degree of courage which was ever a pre- 
vailing characteristic of our forefathers, seized the bear by the throat with 
one hand, and held him off. In the scuffle which ensued, the bear had 



♦ From "Fowler's Hereditary Descent." 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 37 

partly got him down, while he begged his friends to get a club and kill 
the bear, but, like fixed statues, they remained insensible to his entreaties. 
At this time the old proverb, * fortune favors the brave,' was completely 
verified, for, happening to cast his eyes around, he espied a pine knot on 
the ground near him, which, with one hand he reached and took, while 
the other was fast hold of the bear's throat, and with it very deliberately 
beat out his brains. His brave comrades, after being fully satisfied that 
the dead bear would not hurt them, ventured to come to the spot. 

'* His Majesty, the King of England, was so highly pleased with one of 
his subjects performing so great a feat of valor, that he ordered him to be 
drawn in the act of killing the bear, in one of the rooms of his palace, 
where he remains to this day. He was nearly seven feet high, and 
weighed about 300 pounds. Though very large, he was not fat, most of 
his flesh being muscle,^^ 

The bear story is backed by such living and incontestible evidences, as 
fully to prove its authenticity. The identical pine knot mentioned in the 
story, and also the skin of the bear killed — and an immensely large skin it 
is — together with the original painting of Fowler, drawn in the act of 
killing the bear, and headed "Jonathan Fowler, the Giant of Amer- 
ica," have all recently been seen in the British Museum, by a friend of 
the Bradford, Pa., branch of this bear-killing ancestor, and can doubtless 
still be seen by any who will make the requisite search for them. 
Unless a most extraordinary feat of strength and valor had been performed, 
it would probably neither have reached the ears of the King of England, 
nor, if it had, been deemed worthy of a historical painting. This identi- 
cal story, without any material variation, is also in the memories of every 
old inhabitant of the Connecticut Valley, and of the Northern and Middle 
States, and told of Jonathan Fowler, of Coventry, Ct. One of the partic- 
ulars told by the old people, but not mentioned in the extract, is that the 
father-in-law of Jonathan had found and killed the bear's cubs, and thus 
enraged her, so that she pursued him with apparent vengeance, when he 
called to Jonathan to "come and take off this filthy beast." 

So renowned was this bear-killer as a wrestler, that those who thought 
themselves too strong to be thrown by any one, often came hundreds of 
miles to wrestle with him, but all returned Jlooredy while he never found 
the man who could beat him. As he was about to join issue with one of 
these wrestling applicants, he invited him to the cider mill to drink cider 
9 ^__ 



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88 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

with him ; when, knocking out the bung of a full barrel, he took hold of 
its chines, lifted it to his mouth, drank, and held it at arm^s length, and 
told the other to help himself. The latter gave up beat without the wrestle. 

An Irish bully, who thought he could whip all before him, on hearing 
of Fowler's far-famed strength, traveled from Boston to Connecticut — then 
quite a journey — to challenge the giant to a fight. His rap at the door 
was answered by Fowler's sister — a very large and strong woman — who 
informed him that her brother wrestled, lifted, &c., but never fought. 
Disappointed, but still determined to provoke the giant to fight, he met the 
latter on the highway, and impudently challenged him to fight, which 
Fowler declined, as contrary to his principles, meanwhile proffering a 
wrestle. The bully answered that he had come all this distance to have a 
fight, and a fight he would have, and upbraided him as a "contemptible 
coward," in order to provoke him to fight. Fowler still declining, the 
bully threatened that he would make him fight, at least in self-defence, and 
at the same time wrung his nose. Jonathan, always remarkably cool, still 
remained self-possessed, and bore all patiently, while the Irishman, becom- 
ing perfectly enraged, made at him, determined to knock him down. 
Fowler, being very tall and long-armed, caught him by the shoulder as he 
came up, and holding him in spite of his struggles in one hand, as in a 
vice, far enough off to avoid his blows, with the other snapped him in the 
face till he cried " enough ! " when he let the conquered bully go, saying 
to him, " Tell your Boston friends, not that I flogged you, for I will not 
fight, but that I snapped you." 

A strong man, who was loading stones into a cart, had been some time 
vainly endeavoring to load one too heavy for his strength, when Fowler 
coming along, caught it up and tossed it clear over the cart, as if it had 
been a mere pebble, and then loaded it. 

An immense shark had been left in a pool near the shore, at Guilford 
Ct., by the retiring tide, still alive, though weakened by scarcity of water. 
Fowler captured, shouldered, and brought it, through mud and water, to 
shore It weighed five hundred pounds — quite a load for so slippery a 
commodity and bad a road. 

Other stories are told af his wrestling with an Indian, lifting one corner 
of a small house, which several men tried in vain to do, and many other 
like feats of strength, all showing that he was one of the strongest men on 
record. 



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DESCENDANTS OF CAPT. WILLIAM FOWLER. 



39 



The bear story is a free-mason's sign, by which all his descendants 
identify each other. And what confirms our hereditary doctrine is, that 
these descendants generally have been remarkable, throughout the States 
and Canada, as the strongest men of their times and places. Thus, Eli- 
phalet Fowler, of Bradford, Canada, who died some thirty years ago, was 
reputed in his prime, the strongest and most able-bodied man of his time. 
His nephew, Levi Fowler, formerly of Pompey, N. Y., had the name of 
being able to roll more logs, and clear more new land in a day, as well as 
handle larger logs, than any other man in town. He was also % great 
wrestler while young. The father of Wm. Fowler, of Bradford, Vt., a 
great-grandson of Jonathan, broke a large iron bar while screwing down a 
press— -the bar having been made and used expressly for turning the screw. 
And this Wm. F. and also his son William, are very stout men. The 
Fowlers in Bradford, Pa., are also equally lemarkable for their strength 
and size. So are those of Litchfield, Mass., and in the Connecticut Valley 
generally." ^ 

Henry and Hiram Fowler, of Dupage Co., 111., Gurdon, of Milwaukee, 
all brother^, and great-grandsons of Jonathan, are six feet three, six feet 
two, and six feet one inches in height respectively, and their average 
weight not less than 175 pounds. Col. Rogers Fowler, of Chicago, an- 
other great-grandson of the giant, is six feet three inches tall, and the 
writer, a great-great-grandson, is two inches taller than his father, Albert 
Fowler, and measures six feet one. 



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Israel Fowler. 



Israel Fowler, a son of the giant, seems to have inherited his father's 
physical powers, as well as stature, and a number of incidents are related 
of his prowess. The most interesting one, however, is the following: 
During the early part of the Revolutionary war, he was engaged in hauling 
supplies for the army in the vicinity of Boston, and while in the discharge 
of his duties, he met a neighbor, who was a soldier in Captain (afterwards 
General) Putnam's company, who was weeping, and who stated that he 
had been drawn by lot to stand guard at a certain picket post, from which 
the sentry had mysteriously disappeared for several nights in succession ; 
he bewailed his sad fate, as being one of certain death. Israel listened to 
his story, and told him if permission could be got, he would take his 
place. The privilege was granted, and he was stationed in the vicinity of 
a reedy marsh. During the night following, he was suddenly surprised by 
two British soldiers springing upon him from behind, who had quietly 
approached him under cover of the reeds and tall grass, and who thought 
to make him an easy prisoner, as they had doubtless done with the others 
previously. He instantly grasped them about the waist, one with each 
arm, and his great strength and height (six feet seven inches) enabled him 
to lift them off their feet and carry them, despite their struggles, to Capt. 
Putnam's headquarters. They scratched, bit, and pulled his hair severely, 
but, to use his own words, "they had to come!" 

It is told of him that he struck with his fist, killing him at the first blow 
a negro slave, who was in the act of taking his master's life. 



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Daniel Wilcox 



Daniel Wilcox, of Great Barrington, Mass., the maternal grandfather 
of the writer, was born in Sandisfield, Mass, 26th October, 1774. His 
ancestors were among the early settlers of Middletown and Berlin, Ct. 
His father was a soldier at the age of fourteen, under Putnam, in the old 
French war, and among the first to enlist in the Revolution, as he fought 
at the battle of Bunker Hill. He died soon after, of disease contracted in 
camp, and is reported to have been buried in the old cemetery at Roxbury, 
now part of Boston. He died at the age of 32, leaving a family of young 
-^'hildren He was a religious and God-fearing man, and in his letters to 
his wife, from *• Camp, near Boston," (some of which are still extant,) he 
commends his wife and little children to His care and protection. 

The grandfather of Daniel Wilcox died in the year 1776, at Berlin, 
Ct , and his great-grandfather, about the year 1700; at Middletown, Ct. 

Mr. Wilcox married Mehitabel Wright, of Sandisfield, Mass., 8th Sep- 
tember, 1797, and settled at Winsted, Ct., where he became the owner of 
a water-power, and engaged in the manufacture of cloths. His mill being 
destroyed by fire in 1805, he rebuilt it, but sold out his property there in 
1 81 3, and removing to Great Barrington, Mass., he purchased what is now 
known as the " Brookside " farm, the present residence of the Hon. David 
Leavett, President of the Housatonic R. R. 

Here he resided for forty years, engaged in agricultural pursuits and im- 
proving and beautifying his estate, which consisted of between three and 
four hundred acres of mountain, ijiterval and meadow land, altogether 
forming one of the most charming and picturesque of New England country 
homesteads His house was situated a half mile or more from the road, and 
the avenue thereto was shaded on either side by maples and wide-spreading 
elms, all of which had been planted by his own hands. The house itself 
stood on the brow of a hill overlooking the Housatonic river, which poured 
10 



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42 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR OF THE 

its annual floods over his 'meadows, constantly increasing their fertility. 
His orchards, after furnishing the household supply, and those of his poorer 
neighbors, gratis, furnished apples for from one to three hundred barrels of 
cider annually, a plentiful supply of which always graced the side-board, 
in "olden time." Here he led the life of an independent, industrious, 
honored and useful citizen ; and for better titles he did not care. 

He had a family of four daughters and one son. The two eldest daugh- 
ters married brothers named Beckwith, who settled in Great Barrington; 
the two youngest also married brothers, (Fowler,) and settled at Milwaukee. 
Mr. Wilcox sold out his farm in 1853, to its present proprietor, Mr. Lea- 
vett, for $20,000, and spent his remaining years in the family of his 
daughter, Mrs. Barzillai Beckwith. 

His wife, born 17th July, 1776, died 28th September, 1856, after a 
married life of almost 60 years. Mr. Wilcox died 20th November, 1859, 
aged 85. — Beatoe memoriae. 



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