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Full text of "Genealogical and personal history of the upper Monongahela valley, West Virginia, under the editorial supervision of Bernard L. Butcher ... with an account of the resurces and industries of the upper Monongahela valley and the tributary region"

V.2 
1233384 



©gNEA!_C3Y COL.L-ECTIOM 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY . 

Ill |||i|!i': :i II i|i: |:i; T I 

3 1833 02263 5756 



Genealogical and Personal History 

OF THE 

Upper Monongahela Valley 

WEST VIRGINIA 



UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION OF 

BERNARD L. BUTCHER 

Member of West Virginia Historical Society; Organizer and Corresponding Secretary 

of Marion County Historical Society; former State Superintendent 

of Free Schools of West Virginia 

With an Account of the Resources and Industries of the Upper 
Monongahela Valley and the Tributary Region 

— BY — 

JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN 

Professor of History, West Virginia University 

Together with Various Historical Articles by Staff Writers 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



NEW YORK 

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1912 



Copyright, 1912 
Lewis Historical Publishing Company 



1233384 



UPPER MONONGAHELA VALLEY 



GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL 




^ ej^ 




UPPER MONONGAHELA VALLEY 



The Fleming family has occupied a prominent place 
FLEMING in the history of Virginia and West Virginia for more 
than a hundred years, and Aretas Brooks Fleming is 
one of its most prominent members. 

As legislator, judge and governor of the state, he has served the state 
and his native country with fidelity, and reflected credit upon himself and 
the people whom he served. Public-spirited as a citizen, he carried his 
enthusiasm for righteousness and efficiency into the offices he has held. He 
attracted the attention, especially while governor, of the whole country to 
the, then, almost undeveloped mineral and timber resources of West Vir- 
ginia, by pubhc addresses and published articles in trade and other papers. 

The fact that he was engaged, with others, in the active develop- 
ment of the natural resources of his state, in his own county and other 
counties of the state, gave his words and writings as governor great 
weight with strangers looking for investments and new locations; and, 
with other causes, was the beginning of the great industrial development 
which has followed in the state, especially of the Upper Monongahela 
Valley. He has been stockholder and director in many of the industrial 
enterprises in Fairmont, Marion and other counties, and says as a rule 
he has lost money in the investments made in other states, but has never 
lost money on an investment in Marion county. His natural dignified 
simplicity and cordiality of manner has won and held hosts of friends, 
making him welcome wherever he goes. 

Governor Fleming is a man of medium stature, and has been hearty 
and vigorous all his life, taking no vacations from his work, but about 
five years ago his doctor prescribed a vacation on account of his health, 
and he traveled several months abroad; but since his return he has fol- 
lowed the advice of his old physician (as often as he could think of it) 
who directed him to work when he felt like it and to quit early. 

He has always had a youthful appearance, and tells a good story on 
himself when he first went to Pruntytown to hold court after his appoint- 
ment in February, 1878, as judge. He wrote the hotelkeeper to reserve 
him a room with fire. Mr. Rogers, the hotel man, was not acquainted 



402 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

with him personally. So when he reached the hotel and applied for a 
room with fire Mr. Rogers, who was expecting a large elderly man, said 
he had no room with tire except the room reserved for the new judge, 
whom he was then expecting, and inquired if the new guest was 
acquainted with the new judge. When assured that he was and would 
answer for any objection on the part of the judge for using his room, 
Mr. Rogers said, "Well, young fellow, if you make it all right with 
the new judge, you can have it." 

Governor Fleming was born on a farm near Middletown, now Fair- 
mont, in Harrison, now Marion county, Virginia, now West Virginia, 
on October 15, 1839, being the eldest son of Benjamin F. (q. v.) and 
Rhoda (Brooks) Fleming. He was reared on his father's farm, and 
attended the private and select schools of the neighborhood and in the 
town of Fairmont, acquiring a thorough preparatory education. After 
this, beginning in 1859, he completed the course of law lectures under 
the famous Dr. John B. Minor, at the University of Virginia. He taught 
school in Marion and Gilmer counties, in which last-named county he 
located for the practice of law in 1861, after being admitted to the bar 
in Marion county. He opened a private school at Glenville, the county 
seat, while waiting for clients. Clients came faster than usual to so young 
a lawyer, and he sOon called on his brother, Robert F. Fleming, to take 
charge of the school while he attended to his practice. This brother after- 
wards was elected judge of the circuit court in that circuit. The war 
between the states, however, came on, and the future governor returned 
to Fairmont, "the courts being silent in the presence of the flagrant 
war." He was elected prosecuting attorney in 1863, under the new state 
of West Virginia, for Marion county, and at the close of his term in 1865 
was reelected and served a second term of two years. After the war closed, 
he formed a law partnership with the late Judge Alpheus F. Haymond, 
who afterwards, in 1872, was elected one of the judges of the supreme 
court of appeals of the state. The same year, 1872, Mr. Fleming was 
elected to the house of delegates from Marion county, and again in 1875, 
serving on the judiciary committee and on other important committees, 
in 1872; and in 1875 as chairman of committee on taxation and finance. 

From the time he began to practice until 1878, a period of about fif- 
teen years, he became attorney for one or the other parties in many of 
the important cases pending in Marion, Monongalia and Harrison 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 403 

counties, and held a leading position at the bar of these and adjoining 
counties. About this time the judge of the second judicial circuit, the 
Hon. Charles S. Lewis, died, and Mr. Fleming was in February, 1878, 
appointed by Governor Henry M. Matthews to fill the vacancy. At the 
ensuing election in the fall of 1878, he was made the nominee of his 
party and was elected by a large majority, carrying every county, 
although the circuit was largely Republican. In 1880 he was again 
nominated for the same office and carried his old circuit, consisting of 
six counties, four of which were Republican; he was also elected as can- 
didate for judge of the new circuit composed of Marion, Monongalia 
and Harrison counties, provided for by the amendment to the constitu- 
tion ratified at that election. Both circuits were largely Republican, and 
he carried them both by large majorities. 

This very flattering approval and testimony to his efficiency as a 
public servant was very unusual at that time in our political history, and 
especially in a presidential year. Judge Fleming continued to occupy 
the bench in the new circuit until the fall of 1888, completing more 
than ten years of service on the bench. In August, 1888, at Hunting- 
ton, he was nominated for governor of the state by the Democratic state 
convention, and accepted the nomination and resigned his place on the 
bench, September 1,1888. His opponent for governor on the Republican 
ticket was General Nathan Goff, now a judge in the United States circuit 
court of appeals, who had then been In congress several terms from 
the first district of West Virginia, and candidate for governor in 1876, 
a brilliant orator and the idol of his party. The result of the election 
showed a small margin in favor of General Goff on the face of the 
returns, with the balance of the Democratic ticket elected. The Demo- 
cratic state executive committee was dissatisfied and instituted an investi- 
gation; they charged that there had been a large number of illegal votes 
cast for the Republican candidate, especially in the new mining regions 
on the Norfolk & Western railroad. At the request of this state com- 
mittee, and numerous other prominent citizens. Judge Fleming Inaugu- 
rated a contest for the office of governor before the legislature. A joint 
committee of both houses was appointed by the legislature, and after 
taking a vast amount of testimony, reported a majority of votes in favor 
of Judge Fleming, having excluded a large number of votes both for 
General Goff and for Judge Fleming, which were found by the joint 



404 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

committee to be illegal. After discussion before the legislature by emi- 
nent counsel, the legislature on February 4, 1890, declared Judge Flem- 
ing duly elected, and on the 6th day of the same month he was inaugu- 
rated governor. The contest, carried on with utmost vigor by both 
parties, developed no personal animosity between the contestants them- 
selves, who were in fact personal friends long before the contest and 
have been ever since. 

Governor Fleming, as a leader of his party during his term of office, 
was very successful in holding his party together, and rendering it 
valuable service; but his greatest service to his party, as well as to his 
state, was in his efficient administration of the duties of his office and 
economical character of his administration, also his constant effort to 
induce capital to enter the state for investment, and aid in the building 
of railroads, opening of mines, developing timber lands and oil and gas 
fields. 

During the most of Governor Fleming's business life from about 
1874 he has been identified with the coal development of the Upper 
Monongahela Valley, with his father-in-law, the late James Otis Wat- 
son, who was the pioneer coal operator in this region. Together with 
the sons of Mr. Watson, he was interested in the organization of the 
early coal companies, which have acquired coal acreage on the Monon- 
gahela and West Fork rivers. One of the first was known as the Gas- 
ton Gas Coal Company, which was reached by a branch railroad, built 
by the coal company, from the Baltimore & Ohio railroad at the head 
of the Monongahela river up the West Fork, which mine is still oper- 
ated as a part of the Consolidation Coal Company. 

He has been identified with all the coal operations of the Watsons 
under the various names of the Montana Coal & Coke Company, West 
Fairmont Coal Company, New England Coal Company, Briar Hill 
Coal & Coke Company, and others. He was also identified with the 
late Senator Johnson N. Camden in the building of the Monongahela 
River railroad, along the West Fork to Clarksburg, resulting in the 
opening of the big Monongah and other mines along the West Fork, 
most of which are now operated by the Consolidation Coal Company. 

As the coal, oil and gas business developed and railroads were built, 
he was actively identified in all of the efforts for advancement, both in 
the Upper Monongahela Valley and other parts of the state. When 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 405 

the Fairmont Coal Company was organized in 1 901, he was one of its 
directors and its attorney in the purchase and consohdation of other 
companies into it, largely owned by the Watsons, who purchased nearly 
all the active coal companies in the Fairmont region about the year 
1 90 1. This company in turn has since developed into the Consolidation 
Coal Company, owning vast properties in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, 
Maryland and Kentucky, the governor maintaining his place on the 
board of directors, and as general counsel for the company in West 
Virginia. He is a director in the Cumberland & Pennsylvania and in 
the Monongahela River Railroad companies. Governor Fleming has 
been identified and interested in the building of the traction lines in 
Fairmont and Clarksburg, and the connecting lines between these cities, 
and to other points, in recent years. He has been identified with the 
National Bank of Fairmont from its beginning, in which he is a 
director. He is a stockholder and director in the Watson Company, 
which owns the fine stone ten-story bank and office building known as 
the Watson building, which was recently erected in the city of Fairmont. 

Governor Fleming has also been identified with the educational 
interests, both state and local institutions, and was one of the founders 
of the State Normal School at Fairmont, originally organized as a 
private institution, and afterwards turned over, in 1863, to the state as 
a gift from the owners, in consideration of the establishment of a State 
Normal School at Fairmont. This institution has for many years justi- 
fied both the state and its liberal founders in its establishment. He has 
had many formal honors and has served local constituencies as faith- 
fully in small offices as he has the state in the larger places. In the year 
1 88 1 the State University conferred on him the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws. 

Governor Fleming's father and mother were Presbyterians; for 
many years he has been a trustee of the First Presbyterian Church of 
Fairmont. 

Governor Fleming married, September 7, 1865, Carrie M., eldest 
daughter of James Otis and Matilda Watson. He says his wife and 
mother are largely entitled to the credit for whatever success he has had 
in life. His children are: i. Gypsy W., married Charles E. Ward, of 
Charleston, West Virginia, January 18, 1894; two children: Mar- 
garet F., bom in 1895, and Caroline B., bom in 1897. 2. Ida W., 



4o6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

married Walton Miller, cashier of the National Bank of Fairmont, 
April 23, 1896, and died in 1906, leaving one child, Helen. 3. George 
W., and 4. Virginia W. Fleming, twins, born 1874; Virginia unmar- 
ried; George W. married Doris Underhill, December 1 1, 1905 ; is one 
of the vice-presidents of the Consolidation Coal Company, and resides 
in Baltimore, Maryland. 5. Brooks, born in 1882; married (first) 
Amy Dodson, in 1906, who died in 1907; (second), 1910, Marie 
Antoinette Boggess, to whom one child, Caroline, was born in 191 1. 
He is assistant manager of the West Virginia division of the Consolida- 
tion Coal Company. 



The name of Fleming is as old as any of the 
FLEMING many time-honored family names of Scotland, and 

has worthy connection and honorable mention in 
numerous important events in Scottish history, that have passed into 
song and story. During the stormy political and religious times of 
Scotland during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, persecution, 
on account of religion, was prevalent, and it was during one of these 
periods when reason and justice were supplanted by prejudice and 
wrong, four brothers of this family, William, Robert, Archibald and 
John, were driven by church tyranny to the North of Ireland, where 
the wonderful Scotch-Irish race was passing the nursery stage of its 
existence, ere being transplanted to this country to attain its full develop- 
ment in the pathless forests of the new world. The four Fleming 
brothers above named emigrated to this country, settling in 1741 in 
Penn's colony, on the Delaware, taking up lands in what is now known 
as Mispillion Hundred, Kent county, Delaware. This land is still own- 
ed by their descendants. In 1789, John, with three of his brother Will- 
iam's sons — Nathan, Boaz and Benoni — removed to western Virginia 
and settled on lands along the Monongahela river. 

Of John Fleming (one of the four brothers) there is but little 
account. After a few years the brothers Nathan, Boaz and Benoni, 
were joined by their sister Mary and family, and their stepmother (Ann 
Hudson) and her son Thomas. Gradually their children scattered 
until now almost every state and territory in the union boasts of some 
of the name as worthy citizens. As a family they are notably upright 
and trustworthy. Their history shows the guiding hand of a kind 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 407 

Providence. "Their lines are fallen unto them in pleasant places; Yea, 
they have a goodly heritage." The Flemings have been known for 
more than a century as one of the steady, industrious and progressive 
families of western Virginia, and many of its members have held with 
credit and honor prominent and responsible positions in both Old and 
West Virginia commonwealths. 

The following concerning its ancient history was published in Den- 
ver, Colorado, December, 1893, in "The Great Divide," from the pen 
of Henry Dudley Teetor, M. A.: 

The statue of an armed knight with a fret upon his shield, hands elevated 
in a praying posture, sword by his side, and legs across, may be seen in 
Fumess Abbey, Lancashire, England, an ancient burial place of the Fleming 
family. It was placed there generations ago in memory of Sir John Le 
Fleming, a Crusader. 

One branch of the Flemings still bears a shield charged with a fret — a 
heraldic composition of the cross and Norman mascle indicating that the 
family had a founder, one or more, in the holy wars. 

The surname of this illustrious family, according to the sentiments of 
the most approved historians and antiquarians, was at first assumed from a 
person of distinction, who in the days of King David I. (1124), a Fleming, 
by nation, transplanted himself into Scotland and took the surname Flander- 
ensis, or Le Fleming, from the country of his origin. 

Robert Le Fleming, the direct and immediate earl of Wigton, was one 
of the great barons of Scotland under King Edward I., of England (1272- 
1309). It was this Sir Robert who repaired to the standard of Robert the 
Bruce, and with a few trusty friends, all brave men, accompanied him whom 
they thought their lawful sovereign in adventure at Dumfries where they 
killed Sir John Cuming, and never rested until they set the crown upon the 
head of the immortal monarch, on the Feast of Annunciation, A. D., 1306. 
He was succeeded by his son, Sir Malcom Fleming, Lord of Fulwood, also 
in great favor with the king, who made him a large grant of land in Wigton- 
shire, and also governor of Dunbarton Castle and sheriff of the county. 

He was succeeded by his son. Sir Malcom Fleming, who was a forwarder 
and assister of the right and title of David II., Brucian line. He succeeded 
his father as governor of Dunbarton Castle, and discharged the trust with 
the utmost fidelity. During the whole of the usurpation of Baliol, this castle 
was a place to which the royalist did flee and with great security resort. Here 
Sir Malcom had the honor to shelter and protect, in that evil time, Robert 
Lord High Stewart of Scotland, afterwards King Robert II. (1371). His 
highness was graciously pleased in reward of Sir Malcom's signal loyalty 
and fidelity in his service to create him Earl of Wigton. The good earl fell 
sick and died soon after. He left his estates and title to his grandson, 
Thomas Fleming, second earl of Wigton. 



4o8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Malcom Fleming, Earl of Wigton, was in great favor with James V. by 
whom he was constituted Lord High Chamberlain of Scotland. He was 
slain in the service of his country at the battle of Pinkey, September lo, 
1545. He married Janet, daughter of King James IV., and by her had a son, 
James Fleming, who being a nobleman of fine and polite parts, by special 
favor of Mary, Queen of Scots, made her Lord High Chancellor. He 
accompanied Queen Mary to Scotland, and died in Paris, December i, 1558. 
He was governor of Dunbarton Castle and distinguished himself for his zeal 
and loyalty to his queen. 

The Flemings, who became Lords of the Barony of Slane, county Meath, 
Ireland, descended from Archibald Fleming, who went from England to 
Ireland, A. D., 1173, with Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Pembroke, and took part 
in the Norman invasion and Conquest of Ireland. The Lords Fleming, of 
Slane Castle, numbered, successively, twenty-three. This branch of the 
family came also originally from Flanders, with William the Conqueror, 
whose wife is known in history as Matilda of Flanders. 

Sir Thomas Fleming, son of the Earl of Wigton, emigrated to Virginia 
in 1616. Many of the family followed him to the same colony, one of whom 
was Colonel William Fleming, and another, the father of James Fleming, 
who was born in Iradell county. North Carolina, in 1762. He served in the 
revolutionary war ; afterwards removed to Ohio, where he died in 1832. He 
was the great-grandfather of Hon. Josiah Mitchell Fleming, of Denver, 
Colorado. 

Another descendant of these Wigtonshire Flemings was Colonel John 
Fleming, who emigrated from Virginia to Kentucky in 1790. He was the 
grandfather of Hon. John Donaldson Fleming, late United States district 
attorney for Colorado. 

The marriage of Lord James Fleming, governor of Dunbarton Castle, to 
the daughter of Lord Ross, took place in Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh. A 
banquet was spread in the park adjoining the palace. There is still a dam 
traceable which held the water back to make an artificial lake. Queen Mary 
graced the occasion with her presence. It was a highly esteemed privilege to 
me personally to walk around upon the scene of this historic marriage. The 
incident is so pleasantly picturesque and associates Queen Mary so agreeably 
with one of her subjects, that it is gratifying to reflect on Lord Fleming 
proving a steady friend to the Queen throughout her subsequent troubles. 
He stoutly maintained Dunbarton Castle in her favor against the regents and 
against Elizabeth's general, Sir William Drury. 

Archbishop Richard Fleming, founder of Lincoln College, Oxford, was 
bom in Crofton, county York. He was educated at University College, 
Oxford, and in 1407 was appointed proctor of the University. In his early 
days he was an ardent disciple of Wyclifife, but recanted and espoused the 
cause of the Pope. In 141 5 he was prebendary of Langford, Church of 
York, and in 1420 bishop of Lincoln. In 1428 he carried into efifect the 
decree of the Council of Constance, which ordered that the bones of Wycliffe 
should be disinterred and burned to ashes. It is remarkable that the endow- 
ments which he gave to the University have contributed to educate more 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 409 

than one celebrated opponent of the opinions he so vehemently espoused; 
among them it is sufficient to name John Wesley, who was sometime fellow 
of Lincoln College. 

Major General James Fleming was buried in Westminster Abbey where 
I saw his monument, of which an illustration is given. He was born in 1633, 
died in 1751, spending forty years of his life in the British army. 

Gleaston Castle was the seat of the Flemings after the Norman Conquest, 
being a special grant by William the Conqueror to Sir Michael Le Fleming, 
Knight. 

The ruins of Furness Abbey, founded in the twelfth century, are among 
the most picturesque and extensive in England. The finest feature of the 
ancient remains are the chapter house and the triplet of grand Norman 
arches. In the Abbot's chapel are two effigies of Norman Knights, twelfth 
century, said to be the only ones of the kind in England; and the allusion in 
the opening sentence to this article, is the one to them — the effigy of Sir John 
Le Fleming. 

Dunbarton Castle is built on a rock two hundred and forty feet high and 
one mile in circumference — a rock trodden by Roman soldiers two thousand 
years ago. When Queen Mary as a child was sent to France to be educated 
at the French court, she was brought from the monastery of Inchmahome, in 
the Lake of Menteith, to the Castle of Dunbarton on the 28th day of Febru- 
ary, 1547, and on the 17th of March embarked from it to the palace of St. 
Germans. 

As a royal-fortress-residence it was entrusted to the custody of the Flem- 
ing family for generations — from Sir Malcolm Fleming, time of the Bruces, 
to Lord James Fleming, time of Queen Mary. I stood under its walls and 
listened to the sermons its stones have been preaching during the lapse of 
centuries : 

"One generation passeth away and another generation cometh, but the 
earth abideth forever." 

"Tell ye, your children of it, and let your children tell their children, and 
their children another generation." 

In the article is the Fleming coat-of-arms and ensign with the motto: 
"Pax Capia Sapicntia." "Fleming A. D. 1066." 

The following is the genealogy of the Fleming family lines, espe- 
cially of those inhabiting the Virginias, including all of the Marion 
county branches and those residing in and around the city of Fairmont, 
West Virginia : 

(I) William Fleming, one of the four brothers who emigrated to 
this country from the North of Ireland, in 1741, was born in Scotland, 
January 5, 1717, died May 5, 1784. He married (first) Jean Frame, 
bom July 26, 1726, died March, 1768; married (second) Ann Hud- 
son. Children by first wife : Mary, born 1745, married Matthew Flem- 
ing; Andrew, born 1748, record unknown; Nathan, see forward; Will- 



4IO Upper Monongahela Valley. 

iam, born 1755, died 1772, unmarried; Boaz, see forward; Beniah, 
born 1762, married Elizabeth Turner; Benoni, see forward. Children 
by second wife: Thomas, see forward. 

(II) Nathan, third child of William and Jean (Frame) Fleming, 
was born February 23, 1750. He held a commission in the military 
service dated July 10, 1814. He married Lydia Russom. Children: 
Mary, married Alexander, son of Matthew Fleming; William, see for- 
ward; Elizabeth, married Henry Hayes; Rachel, married Joshua Hart; 

Lydia, married Matthew, son of Matthew ; Nathan, married 

Mary Wood; Leven, married Mary Willey; Thomas, married (first) 
Ann Martin, (second) Mary Lothan; Beniah, drowned at the age of 
twenty-two years, in 18 13; Archibald, see forward. 

(II) Boaz, fifth child of William and Jean (Frame) Fleming, was 
born January 3, 1758. He married (first) Elizabeth Hutchinson, 
(second) Eliza Laidley. Children: Clarissa, married James Hamil- 
ton; William, married (first) Elizabeth Hutchinson, (second) Sarah 
Miller; Mary, married Samuel, son of Andrew Fleming Sr. ; Elizabeth, 
married Benjamin Bartlett; David, married Sarah Fox; Sarah, married 
Joseph, son of Nathan Fleming; Lemuel, married Hulda Tonkrey; 
Jean, married George Richardson; Joanna, married Nathan, son of 
Andrew Fleming Sr. ; Margaret, married Andrew Cummins; Eliza 
Drexa, married George Hunsaker. 

(II) Benoni, child of William and Jean (Frame) Fleming, was 
born February 17, 1768. He married Mary Stephenson. Children: 
Boaz, married Ann Wilcott; John S., see forward; Matthew, see for- 
ward; Fielding, married (first) Mary Hopkins, (second) Lizzie Lear; 
Alfred, see forward; Benjamin, see forward; Margaret, married Dr. 
James Davies; Rhoda, married John W. Kelley; Nancy, married Sam- 
uel Courtney; George; Edward; Stephenson; last three unmarried. 

(II) Thomas, child of William and Ann (Hudson) Fleming, 
was born in 1777. He married Anna Wood. Children: Amanda, 
married Benjamin, son of Benoni Fleming; Malinda, married Frederick 
Ice; Marshall, married Catherine Ebert; John, married Angeline Sell- 
ers; Amelia, married Isaac, son of William Fleming. 

(III) William (2), son of Nathan and Lydia (Russom) Fleming, 
was born April 24, 1775. He married Ann, daughter of Matthew 
Fleming. Children: Lydia, married Ferrell Dunn; Isaac, married 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 411 

Amelia Fleming; Amelia, married (first) G. W. Price, (second) W. B. 
Halbert; Joseph, married Nancy Bigler; Benjamin F., see forward; 
Mary Ann, married Albert Shore; Solomon S., see forward; Franklin 
J., see forward. 

(Ill) Thomas, son of Nathan and Lydia (Russom) Fleming, 
married (first) Ann Martin, (second) Mary Lothan. Children : John 
M., married Delilia Hammers; Ehzabeth, married Octavius Haymond; 
Allison, see forward; Eliza, twin of Allison, married Matthew, son of 
Benoni Fleming; James; Stephen, married Mary Harold. 

(Ill) Archibald, son of Nathan and Lydia (Russom) Fleming, 
married Eliza Gamble. Children: Perry; Joseph; Maria, married 
Festus C. Pitzer; Harrison, see forward; Nathan. 

(Ill) John S., second child of Benoni and Mary (Stephenson) 
Fleming, married Ann, daughter of Alexander Fleming Sr. Children: 
Julius, deceased; James Riley, see forward; Benjamin D., see forward; 
Joseph M.; Edgar W., deceased, married Jeenie Meyers; Eunice, mar- 
ried James W. Boggess; Lexina, married John W. Everhart; Joseph 
Minor, see forward; Edgar W., married Mary Thomas. The father 
was a Presbyterian, first, and later a Methodist Episcopalian in church 
faith. Politically he was an old line Whig and stood high in his county 
for integrity. 

(Ill) Matthew, son of Benoni and Mary (Stephenson) Fleming, 
married Eliza, daughter of Thomas Fleming Jr. Children : Thomas 
A., married Clarissa Lott; Ann Elizabeth, married Dr. J. H. Brown- 
field; Benjamin Alvin, see forward; Henry Thornton, married Jennie 
Irwin; Mary E., married John B. Crane; George I., married Agnes 
Wells; Lydia Jane, married Sylvanus Watson. 

(Ill) Alfred, was a son of Benoni and Mary (Stephenson) Fleming, 
was born on the homestead, October 15, 1804. He was reared on the 
farm, and received the limited education of that day. He followed the 
occupation of farming, and the product of his labor was disposed of in 
the neighboring markets. He was an active factor in the development 
of the section wherein he resided, and was chosen to serve as a director 
of the First National Bank of Fairmont. He was a consistent member 
of the Methodist church, and his political affiliations was with the old 
line Whigs and later with the Republican party. He married Marjory 
Vandervort, born March 15, 18 13, daughter of Paul Vandervort. 



412 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Children: John Coleman, see forward; Fielding Marshall, who died 
while serving In the union army during the civil war; Mary Ellen, be- 
came the wife of George Mayers, a business man of Fairmont; Martin 
Luther, a prosperous farmer, residing near Fairmont; Martha A. The 
father of these children died September 29, 1883, and the mother Au- 
gust 29, 1887. 

(III) Benjamin, son of Benoni and Mary (Stephenson) Fleming, 
was born in Middletown (now Fairmont), West Virginia, September 
17, 1806. When fifteen years old he went to Zanesville, Ohio, to learn 
the hatter's trade and completed it at Bowling Green, Kentucky. Chang- 
ing his plans, somewhat, he took passage on a flatboat down to New 
Orleans and thence up the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, engaging in 
hunting and trapping with the famous scout, "Kit" Carson. He re- 
turned to Marion county. West Virginia, however, in 1828, and De- 
cember II of that year married Amanda Fleming, born January 28, 
1806, after which he settled down and erected the building on the cor- 
ner of Main and Jefferson streets, where he engaged in the manufacture 
of hats, continuing the remainder of his days. He also engaged in store 
boats down the river Ohio to the ocean. During the construction of the 
Baltimore & Ohio railroad he supplied meats for the laborers, fre- 
quently killing six hundred hogs at one time. He was a member of the 
legislature of West Virginia, In 1867-68, and served as the first justice 
of the peace under the new state organization. He was president of the 
board of trustees in Fairmont, when known as Middletown. Politically 
he was first a Whig, then a Republican. He died February 12, 1891. 
His wife died December 12, 1900. Children: Mary Matilda, born 
February 14, 1833, died August 14, 1839; Frederick H., married 
Rachel Manear, was sergeant of Company A, Sixth West Virginia 
Volunteer Infantry In the union army, died April 27, 1882 ; Edward S., 
died December 3, 1873; Thurston Worth, see forward. 

(IV) Benjamin F., son of William (2) and Ann (Fleming) Flem- 
ing, was born In 18 10, died October 28, 1876. He was a prosperous 
farmer and a leading citizen of Marlon county. West Virginia. He 
married Rhoda Brooks, of Puritan ancestry, daughter of Rev. Asa 
Brooks, a Presbyterian minister, who came to the old Redstone presby- 
tery, including western Pennsylvania and northwestern Virginia as a 
missionary from the Society of Home Missions in Massachusetts about 




I^enlamin ^lemina 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 413 

18 1 8. He became a noted figure in the early religious history of the 
Monongahela Valley, and was an earnest and eloquent preacher, dying 
as its pastor about the time of the completion of the old Presbyterian 
church at Clarksburg, and is buried under its pulpit leaving a good 
name as the inheritance of his children and their descendants. Chil- 
dren of Benjamin and Rhoda (Brooks) Fleming: Aretas Brooks, whose 
sketch proceeds this article; Robert F., of Gilmer, judge of the Jackson 
circuit; George M., a prominent attorney of Buckhannon, West Vir- 
ginia; Lucy, who was a prominent teacher in the State Normal School 
at Fairmont, from 1873 to 1882, married in the latter noted year 
Frank E. Stewart, and had one child, Nannie, who with her mother 
died in 1903, in Montana, where they resided. 

(IV) Solomon S., son of William (2) and Ann (Fleming) Flem- 
ing, born October 19, 18 12, near Fairmont, West Virginia. He spent 
his life mostly at Shinnston, where he located in 1840. Politically he 
was an old line Whig; belonged to the Presbyterian church. He was 
public-spirited and held many positions of responsibility and trust. He 
was a delegate to the convention at Clarksburg, April 22, 1 861, and the 
Wheeling constitutional conventions in 1862 and 1863. He was a mem- 
ber of the state legislature and helped divide the old state in 1863 when 
the western portion became West Virginia. He served six years in the 
legislature, being the speaker in 1869. He was also mayor of Shinnston 
and conducted a general store there from 1841 to 1872. His store was 
robbed by rebel raiders under General Jones in 1863 in April, and again 
that year by other lawless characters. He married, July 2, 1835, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Henry and Amelia (Tice) Ebert. Children : Ann Re- 
becca, Isabel Sophia, Mary Ann, Louise Lowry, William Henry, see for- 
ward; Florence A., John A., see forward; Robert Bruce. The father, 
Solomon Fleming, had been adjutant in the militia of Virginia, a member 
of the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Regiment, and his father, Will- 
iam Fleming, was commissioned captain in the war of 18 12, although 
the war ended before he got to the scene of action. The family have thus 
shown their patriotism in all the wars of the country, in the various 
generations. Solomon S. Fleming died March 2, 1901, and his wife De- 
cember 6, 1899. 

(IV) Franklin J., son of William (2) and Ann (Fleming) Flem- 
ing, was born on Cheat river. He served an apprenticeship to the mill- 



414 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Wright's trade, which he followed during his active years. It was he 
who built the mill on Decker's Creek in Morgantown, known as Rod- 
gers Mills; the old Palatine Mill (now in first ward, Fairmont) ; the 
Jackson Mills at Fairmont; the Jackson mill at Burton; another at 
Cameron, also at Wheeling. Later in life he engaged in the mercantile 
business, and in all his undertakings he succeeded remarkably well. He 
was first a Whig, later a Republican ; he was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He married Loretta, daughter of Samuel Jackson. 
Children: Anna Bell, Henry, Isabell, Louisa, Oliver J., see forward; 
Roger, Charles F., Jennie, and one that died in infancy. 

(IV) Allison, son of Thomas Fleming, was born on the west bank 
of Taggart's Valley Run, three miles above the present city of Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, July 25, 18 14. He remained on the old home 
farm until ten years of age, then moved with the family to Middletown 
(now Fairmont) and learned the marble worker's trade; early in life 
he conducted a large shop which supplied a large territory in West Vir- 
ginia. He followed his father to Indiana, but after a year or so return- 
ed to Fairmont to resume the marble work business. He was county 
treasurer of Marion county in 1867-68. During the civil war he was a 
staunch supporter of the union cause. He was mayor of his town for 
a number of years, taking a deep interest in local politics. He was a 
leader in the Methodist Protestant church, trustee, class leader and 
superintendent of the Sunday school many years. He married (first), 
January 19, 1837, Mary Vandervort. Children: i. Louisana, born 
May 19, 1838, died in infancy. 2. Celinda, born June 15, 1840, mar- 
ried E. R. Hall, October 27, 1859. 3. John E., born November 15, 
1842; was a soldier in Company A, Sixth West Virginia Infantry, 
served three years, reenlisted in the Seventh Regiment of Virginia and 
took part in the great engagement before Richmond, when that city fell. 
By trade he was a marble cutter, and died several years since. Mrs. 
Fleming, the mother of the above family, died November 2, 1842. 
Allison Fleming married (second), April 11, 1844, Martha Louchery, 
born July 30, 1822, daughter of James and Margaret (Keefore) 
Louchery. Children: 4. Emily B., born January 25, 1845; married 
Nathaniel C. Cochran; died November 16, 1903. 5. Thomas Walter, 
see forward. 6. James L., born February i, 1849, died in childhood. 
7. Margaret Ann, born June 22, 1851 ; married Charles M. Shinn, city 




C/* f L^-Vci^-^^^t^V-X^L^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 415 

editor of the JFashiugton (D. C.) Star. 8. Mary Martha, born Feb- 
ruary 17, 1854, died in infancy. 9. Curtis B., born November 17, 
1857; married R. Belle Howell. 10. Allison Howard, born August i, 
1859; married Carrie E. Barnes, March 15, 1883. 11. Lawrence 
Sands, born June 17, 1862; married a Miss Hough. 12. Frederick 
Chisler, born April 5, 1865. Allison Fleming, father, died July i, 
1 87 1, and his second wife April 17, 191 1. 

(IV) Harrison, son of Archibald and Eliza (Gamble) Fleming, 
was born on the old Fleming homestead, now within Marion county. 
West Virginia, in February, 1826, died December 29, 1891. He was 
reared on his father's farm, attended the common schools of his time, 
and voted the Democratic ticket. He was a faithful member of the 
Presbyterian church. For many years he was president of the First 
National Bank of Fairmont. He married, October, 1871, Rehuma 
Criss, born February 21, 1843, died April 9, 1907, daughter of Lewis 
Criss. Children: Helen V., born August 5, 1872, wife of Dr. Albinas 
Poole, and they have one child, Helen Fleming, born July 11, 1901; 
Belle, born November 12, 1873, wife of H. C. Fetty; Arch, see for- 
ward; Lawrence, born December 2, 1876. 

(IV) James Riley, son of John S. and Ann (Fleming) Fleming, 
was born just above Fairmont, on the Monongahela river, in Marion 
county, West Virginia (then in Virginia), November 6, 1824, died 
April I, 1912. He obtained his education at the typical old-time log 
school house, and in order to avail himself of even this limited educa- 
tional privilege, he had to walk three miles morning and evening. 
Early in youth he left school to learn the trade of a hatter with his 
uncle, Benjamin Fleming, of Fairmont. After following this ten years 
he became a partner of his uncle. In 1850 he was married and engaged 
in general merchandising, in company with his brother-in-law, James S. 
Barnes. They also operated a grist mill and saw mill at that point, the 
mill having been erected by Thomas Barnes. In a few years they sold 
a half interest in the saw and grist mill to John S. Barnes and E. Hamil- 
ton, with whom they also formed a partnership to erect the Barnesville 
woolen mills which were operated many years by them. It was twice 
burned, but each time rebuilt, first in 1886 and last in 1892. In this 
factory were manufactured flannels, skirts and jeans. Mr. Fleming also 
engaged in general merchandising at Fairmont, continuing for eight 



41 6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

years. When the above-named mills were first erected the county was 
new and the first postoffice was located at Barnesville. Politically Mr. 
Fleming is a supporter of the Republican party, and is a member of the 
Methodist Protestant church. He is a member of the Odd Fellows 
order and is the oldest member of the fraternity in the county. He 
married, March, 1850, Caroline M., daughter of Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Barnes. Children: James H., died aged nine years; Clara R., died 
aged five years; Margaret Virginia, married (first) George Watson, 
(second) Clarence L. Smith, whose children are : Earl H., Clarence Ed- 
mond, Elizabeth, deceased, Caroline, deceased. 

(IV) Benjamin D., son of John S. and Ann (Fleming) Fleming, 
was born two miles above Fairmont, West Virginia, on the old Benoni 
Fleming homestead, September 28, 1827. He was reared a farmer's 
son and attended the schools common in that early day in West Virginia. 
In business life he first turned his attention to lumbering, continuing 
actively in that for thirty years. Leaving the river and forest life, he 
engaged in the fruit culture with farming. Later he became a scientific 
dairyman in Marion county, and in April, 1893, organized the Marion 
County Creamery Company. He was accounted an excellent business 
man and was made a director in the First National Bank of Fairmont, 
which position he held for thirty-six years. He has been first vice-presi- 
dent of the same banking house for many years. Served as school com- 
missioner and road surveyor; president of the board of trustees in the 
Methodist Protestant church for twenty years, and is a member of 
Lodge No. 9, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Fairmont. He 
married, November 7, 1865, Jennie R., daughter of John Mayers. 
They have one son, Horace Glen, born October 5, 1866, a graduate of 
Michigan University; he married Hattie Trumble. 

(IV) Joseph Minor, son of John S. and Ann (Fleming) Fleming, 
was born on the farm where he now resides, near the limits of Fairmont, 
Marion county. West Virginia, June 25, 1832. He attended the old 
log subscription school house, obtaining a practical education which 
thoroughly equipped him for the active pursuits of life. Possessing 
little inclination for the occupation of farming, he turned his attention 
to the details of a saw mill, and continued along that line until 1856, 
during which time he made a good living. Being of an adventurous 
turn of mind, he determined to join the large army who went to Cali- 





r^^ 




^^-^V^^^'^'^^^^?^'^'^^^^^-^^^^^^'^-^^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 417 

fornia in quest of fortune by means of seeking for gold, and choosing 
the Panama route, after twenty-six days of wearisome travel, he arrived 
in California, in which state he remained seven years, serving as a miner, 
during which time he witnessed the wonderful development of gold 
mining. In 1863, upon his return to his native county, he erected an 
extensive saw and planing mill at Fairmont, which was in successful 
operation for more than two decades. In the meantime he became 
identified with the Barnesville Manufacturing Company, a leading 
industry of that section, in which he is still serving as a member and 
director. He is the owner of a fine farm, a portion of which lies within 
the present limits of the city of Fairmont, and this is in a high state of 
cultivation, producing a large line of general produce. He is an active 
and consistent member of the Methodist church, contributing of his 
time and money towards the furtherance of its usefulness, and his polit- 
ical party choice is the Republican organization. He has never sought 
or held public office, with the exception of serving as member of the 
board of education of Fairmont. He has been an active factor in the 
development of the community, his personal exertions contributing 
towards its material and commercial prosperity and no man is more 
worthy of the respect of his fellowmen than Mr. Fleming. 

Mr. Fleming married, January 18, 1866, Pleasant, daughter of 
Josephus Eakin. Children: i. Lovie H., born March 28, 1869, died 
March, 1891; she was the wife of Frank Shore. 2. Harold S., born 
April 17, 1 871; married, August 27, 1891, Annie Brown; children: 
Harold Edwin, died aged seven years; Douglas Riley, bom December 
27, 1894; Helen Loretta, born May 31, 1897; Lillian Martha, bom 
May II, 1900, died September 17, 1905; Paul Wade, born March 7, 
1902; William Franklin, born December 17, 1906. 3. John W., see 
forward. 4. Forest H., born November 21, 1875 ; married Ora Fort- 
ney; child, Mary. 5. Achsah Maud, born April 26, 1877; married 
Archibald Fleming; one son, Joseph Archibald. 6. Chauncey Brooks, 
born February 17, 1880; a farmer; married lona Burton, 1901; chil- 
dren: Edwin Forest, born 1902; Madeline, 1904; Lillian Pleasant, 
191 1. 7. Eva L., born June 3, 1881 ; married Emery Jackson Snyder. 
8. Joseph Coleman, born August 9, 1884. 

(IV) Benjamin Alvin, son of Matthew and Eliza (Fleming) 



41 8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Fleming, was born in Monongahela county, Virginia, now Marion 
county, West Virginia, June 20, 1836. He was reared in Fairmont 
and educated in the common schools. In early life he engaged in the 
mercantile business which he successfully followed for a period of fifty- 
six years, and being scrupulously honorable in all his dealings with man- 
kind, he bore a reputation for public and private integrity second to no 
man in this section of the state. At the opening of the civil war, while 
riding through the country, he was shot by a sharpshooter, the ball pass- 
ing through his hip into the saddle, and he was compelled to ride to 
Fairmont, a distance of nine miles, before he received medical assist- 
ance. This incapacitated him for further active service. Mr. Fleming 
attended the Presbyterian church, cast his vote with the Republican 
party, and was a member of the National Union and the Knights of 
Honor. He married, November 19, 1863, Mary Frances, born July 
22, 1843, daughter of Francis C. and Bridget (Carney) Christie. One 
son by this union, William Moore, see forward. Mr. Fleming died 
June 10, 1903, and his wife died July 4, 191 1. 

(IV) John Coleman, son of Alfred and Marjory (Vandervort) 
Fleming, was born on the old homestead in Monongahela county, Vir- 
ginia, now Marion county. West Virginia, the home of his grandfather, 
Benoni Fleming, September 23, 1832. He was reared on the old home- 
stead, which is located in the center of the residential section of Fair- 
mont, and he has in his possession at the present time ( 191 1) six acres 
of the original tract. He attended the old subscription schools, and the 
knowledge thus obtained was increased considerably in later years by 
observation and reading. Being inured to the labor of the farm, he 
turned his attention to that line of work upon arriving at suitable age 
to engage upon an active career, and by perseverance and untiring activ- 
ity became the owner of one hundred acres, which he cultivated to a 
high degree of perfection, and which he later disposed of, with the 
exception of the aforementioned six acres, to the Fairmont Develop- 
ment Company, and streets and dwellings, both for business and resi- 
dential purposes, soon replaced the fields and meadows. Mr. Fleming 
purchased another farm, located near Farmington, which he improved 
and cultivated, and which is now a fair source of income, being operated 
on business principles and along progressive lines. As a citizen he is 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 419 

universally esteemed, always sustaining the character of a true man, 
being generous in his feelings and conduct towards all. He holds mem- 
bership in the Methodist church, to which he contributes of his time and 
money, and is a staunch adherent of the Republican party. 

Mr. Fleming married, April 24, 1879, Fannie Conway, born May 
8, 1859, daughter of George and Christina (Fortner) Conway, who 
resides near Fairmont. Children: Fred A.; Joseph M., deceased; 
NeUie, deceased, was the wife of Dr. Lee Boyer; William Coleman; 
Frank Odell. 

(IV) Thurston Worth, son of Benjamin and Amanda Fleming, 
was born October 8, 1846, at Fairmont, now West Virginia, on the 
block, where he still resides. He was educated at the old-fashioned sub- 
scription schools and finished at the Monongahela Academy, now the 
University of West Virginia; later attended select school in New York. 
He remained with his father one year after finishing his studies, then 
in 1868 went to California, by way of the Isthmus of Panama, sailing 
from New York City. He was twenty-seven days in reaching San Fran- 
cisco. There he worked in a hat store and at various things for a short 
time, but soon found his way to a ranch. Later he went to mining, fol- 
lowing this and other occupations until the fall of 1875, when he re- 
turned to the city of his nativity. He is vice-president of the Monta 
Rico Copper Company and of EI Progreso Banana Company of Hon- 
duras. He is now engaged in looking after his real estate interests. 
He is a Presbyterian in religion and a Republican in politics. He mar- 
ried, November 4, 1875, Florence C, daughter of Melton and Cynthia 
(Long) Bliss. Melton Bliss was born in Salem, Massachusetts, son of 
Obediah Bliss. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Fleming: Florence Thurs- 
ton and Laurie McDonald. 

(V) William Henry, son of Solomon S. and Elizabeth (Ebert) 
Fleming, was born October 23, 1842, at Shinnston, West Virginia (then 
Virginia) . He commenced merchandising when quite young, but after 
his marriage his health failed and he went to a farm a mile to the south 
of Shinnston, Marion county, and remained there until 1907 when he 
retired to the town of Shinnston, where he still resides. Politically Mr. 
Fleming is a Republican, and in church connection is of the Methodist 
Episcopal denomination, and is now trustee of this church at Shinnston. 



420 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

During the civil war he was a member of the Third West Virginia 
Regimental Band, serving seven months. He married Mary Columbia, 
born February 9, 185 i, in the Simpson Creek, district, Harrison county, 
now West Virginia, daughter of Isaac and Margaret (Jarvis) Morris. 
Children: i. Mabel, bom September 19, 1870; married Claude S. Ran- 
dall, a farmer; they have two children: George Fleming and Estelle. 
2. Estelle, born July 25, 1872; married Lawrence E. Hawkins, cashier 
of the Farmers' Bank of Shinnston; they have one child, Lawrence F., 
bom February 19, 1909. 3. Donald H., see forward. 

(V) John A., son of Solomon S. and Elizabeth (Ebert) Fleming, 
was born in Harrison county, Virginia, June 22, 1850, at the town of 
Shinnston, where he still resides. He obtained his education at the com- 
mon schools of his native place and later attended the State Normal 
School at Fairmont, graduating with the class of 1873. He then en- 
gaged in farming and stock raising which he has since followed success- 
fully. He was elected sheriff of his county in 1900, served four years 
with credit to himself and the citizens of Harrison county. Politically 
he is a staunch Republican. He is a member of the Odd Fellows fra- 
ternity at Shinnston. He was connected with the organizing of the 
First National Bank of Shinnston and was its first president. He is an 
excellent business man and has sustained well the high reputation of the 
Fleming families, of whom there are so many in this section of West 
Virginia. He married, June 21, 1877, in Harrison county, West Vir- 
ginia, Sallie Gallahu, of the same county, born June 19, 1858, daughter 
of William H. Gallahu, a farmer, who died in 1888. His wife was 
Maria Righter, still living in Clarksburg, West Virginia. Children: 
Alice, born July 3, 1878; Frederick H., December 12, 1879; Henry 
L., February 7, 1882; Boyd S.., February 25, 1885. 

(V) Oliver Jackson, son of Franklin J. and Loretta (Jackson) 
Fleming, was born near Morgantown, September 5, 1848. He was 
educated at the subscription schools taught by Mrs. Corina Shaw, Mary 
Jane Steel and Professor William R. White. Later he had the advan- 
tage of a course at the State Normal at Fairmont. After leaving 
school he worked in a sawmill for a time, then learned the trade of a 
millwright with his father, and followed that work a number of years, 
assisting in the building of about ten mills in Marion county. West Vir- 



1233384 

Upper Monongahela Valley. 421 

ginia. He then engaged in the lumber trade at Fairmont, establish- 
ing a planing mill, which he operated a number of years. In 1890 he 
established his present business on Jefferson street, where he handles 
all kinds of lumber, he being the oldest and most extensive dealer in 
the county. He has various other interests in connection with this. 
He is a member of the Odd Fellows' Order, and also of the Knights 
of Pythias. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
he is a steward. Politically Mr. Fleming is an avowed Prohibitionist. 
He married, in 1877, Alice Ingman, of Fairmont, daughter of William 
H. and Leticia (Gallaghue) Ingman. One child, Ethel, wife of Levi 
B. Harr, and they have one child, Harry Ingman Harr, born July 
29, 1907. 

(V) Thomas Walter, son of Allison and Martha (Louchery) 
Fleming, was born in Fairmont, now West Virginia, December 16, 
1846. He was reared at Fairmont where he received a good educa- 
tion in select and private schools. Leaving the schoolroom he made 
a choice of business pursuits for life. He commenced as a clerk in a 
store, and after ten years' experience at handling goods for others, he 
became a partner in February, 1871, in the mercantile firm of Ridgley 
& Fleming, which contmued until 1876, when Mr. Ridgley retired, 
and the firm was changed to T. W. Fleming & Brothers, which was 
conducted until August, 1 890. Mr. Fleming then sold out and retired 
from the business. But this was not to retire him from business circles, 
for he at once engaged in the real estate business, dealing in coal and 
oil lands on the large scale in Marion and adjoining counties in West 
Virginia. Opening up the Fairview oil fields placed him in the front 
rank of business men in his state. His long business training behind 
the counter had peculiarly fitted him for the successful transaction of 
large business propositions. He was the original organizer and se- 
cured the franchise for the first street car line In Fairmont, now the 
Fairmont & Clarksburg line of electric road, and was president of 
the same. He organized and constructed the Fairmont & Mannington 
Street Railway Company; has been connected with several banks; was 
one of the promoters of the People's Bank at Fairmont; was presi- 
dent of the Farmers' Bank and a director in the People's Bank. He 
was one of the organizers of the Fairmont Ice Company, of which he 



422 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

is the vice-president; also vice-president of the West Chester Realty 
Company. In 1891 he assisted in organizing the Fairmont Develop- 
ment Company, of which he is a director. He was made a Mason in 
1884, belongs to Lodge No. 9, at Fairmont, and is its past master; 
also belongs to the Chapter and Commandery; is past eminent com- 
mander. He was made an Odd Fellow in 1 870 and is past grand mas- 
ter of the State of West Virginia, and also past grand representative 
of the Sovereign Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and has many times represented his fraternities in the state 
grand lodges of both orders. Politically Mr. Fleming is a Republican, 
and has been chairman of the Republican committee for eighteen 
years. He was offered his choice of three ministerships abroad, in- 
cluding that of Venice, but on account of personal business interests 
declined. In 1891 he was elected mayor of Fairmont on the progres- 
sive independent ticket, and during his administration constructed 
roads, improved parks, built a $20,000 fresh water cistern; second 
year in office constructed the massive viaduct between wards three and 
four in the city and improved the streets and sidewalks, etc. He was 
influential in the slack-water navigation schemes on foot at that time. 
He served one term in the legislature (1904-5), serving on the rail- 
way committee, and by joint resolution of the two houses of the leg- 
islative body was appointed as inspector to examine the several state 
institutions. 

He married, February i, 1877, Annie E. Sweeney, of Wheeling. 
Children: Allison Sweeney, born January 28, 1878, unmarried; Jean 
Farran, born October 26, 1881, married, March 3, 19 10, George M. 
Wilshire, one son, Thomas Fleming Wilshire, born October 3, 191 1; 
Thomas W., who died aged ten months. The following relates to 
Mrs. Fleming: Her maternal grandfather, Lieutenant John McFar- 
ran, whose sword she treasures as a relic of great value, was one of the 
heroic defenders of Baltimore when that city was attacked by the Brit- 
ish at Fort McHenry in 18 14. Mrs. Fleming is the daughter of 
Colonel Thomas Sweeney, a prominent man in West Virginia ; he was 
born at Armagh, Ireland, March 6, 1806, died March 9, 1890. He 
was the second lieutenant of the Pittsburg Blues that received General 
Lafayette in 1824, when he visited that city. He brought the first 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 423 

colony of glass blowers that ever came into West Virginia. He oper- 
ated large iron works and had as many as one thousand men in his 
employ. He was mayor of Wheeling, served in the state senate and 
was widely known. He had to do in the senate with granting fran- 
chises for the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. He married (first), Ro- 
sanna Matthews, who died in 1844; (second), Jane McFarran; 
(third), Annie E. How, of St. George's, Delaware. 

(V) Arch, son of Harrison and Rehuma (Criss) Fleming, was 
born June 19, 1 875, on the home farm. He was educated in the nearby 
country schools also the State Normal and high schools. When eight- 
een years of age he engaged in the profession of a telegraph operator 
for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, serving there four years, 
then for three years conducted a hotel at Fairmont. Following this 
for three years he farmed, but on June i, 1909, he purchased an im- 
plement house, which he now conducts in connection with flour and feed 
with a large assortment of seeds. His place of business is the largest 
of its kind in Marion county. Mr. Fleming is a Democrat and a 
member of the Presbyterian church. He married, October 19, 1898, 
M. A., daughter of Joseph M. Fleming. One son by this marriage, 
Joseph Arch, born February 4, 1900. 

(V) John W., son of Joseph Minor and Pleasant (Eakin) 
Fleming, was born in Flemingsburg, now known as Johnstown, a 
suburb of Fairmont, September 8, 1873. He was reared on a farm, 
educated in the schools of Fairmont, and at an early age began to 
earn his own livelihood, developing traits which go to the making of 
fine manhood. His first employment was in his father's sawmill, 
where he learned thoroughly the details of that occupation. He then 
turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, and in connection with this 
followed road surveying in Marion county, from both of which he 
derived a lucrative living. In 1903 he was elected to fill the office of 
road surveyor of Marion county, a position for which he was well 
qualified and the duties of which he performed in a thorough and sys- 
tematic manner, and he continued as such for a period of four years. 
At the expiration of this time, in 1907, he purchased the Fairmont 
Feed Mills, and since then has conducted an extensive trade in feed 
and flour, wholesale, which furnishes employment to a number of peo- 



424 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

pie. In connection with this he is actively engaged in the real estate 
business, his transactions being on an extensive scale, they being the 
means of materially increasing the population of that section of the 
county. He casts his vote for the candidates of the Republican parry, 
the principles of which he believes to be for the best form of govern- 
ment. Mr. Fleming is a member of Eureka Lodge, No. 15, Knights of 
Pythias, of Watson; Marion Lodge, No. 11, Mountain City Encamp- 
ment and the Daughters of Rebeckah, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, in both of which orders he has passed through all the chairs, 
also the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Fleming married, March 24, 1904, Emma Mclntire, born 
October 27, 1875, daughter of Joseph H. and Mary Bennett (Wal- 
lace) Mclntire, of Harrison. They were the parents of one child, 
who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Fleming are members of the 
Methodist church. 

(V) William Moore, son of Benjamin Alvin and Mary Frances 
(Christie) Fleming, was born in Fairmont, Marion county, West Vir- 
ginia, March 30, 1865. He attended the public school adjacent to his 
home, and later completed his studies at the State Normal School at 
Fairmont. While a student, during his leisure time, he served as 
clerk in his father's store, thus becoming familiar with every detail of 
the work, and continued with his father after his education was com- 
pleted, remaining with him until his death, a period of thirty-one 
years. He then engaged in the real estate business, being the owner 
of considerable valuable property, and this has proved both a pleasant 
and highly remunerative occupation. He is a Presbyterian in religion, 
a Republican in politics and holds membership in the Modern Wood- 
men of America. Mr. Fleming married, October 30, 1890, Julia 
Moore, born in Delaware county, Indiana, March 31, 1869, daughter 
of Jesse and Mary (Cochran) Moore. Children: Mary Christie, bom 
July 30, 1891; Ruth Elizabeth, February 9, 1900; Martha Moore, 
February 18, 1902. 

(VI) Dr. Donald H. Fleming, son of William Henry and Mary 
Columbia (Morris) Fleming, was born in Shinnston, Harrison county. 
West Virginia, December 22, 1881. He was educated at the public 
schools and at the University of West Virginia, after which courses he 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 425 

entered the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, graduating from that 
institution with the class of 1908, since which time he has followed his 
profession, first at Morgantown in 1908, and opened his present office 
at Shinnston in June, 1909. He has succeeded remarkably well in his 
dental practice and has already a large number of regular patrons on 
his list. He is skillful and painstaking, hence makes friends over a 
large section of country. He is a Republican, and takes an interest in 
the upbuilding of his town and county, doing his full share so far as 
his time will permit in aiding any worthy enterprise. He makes his 
home with his parents, who a few years since moved to Shinnston from 
the nearby farm where Dr. Fleming was reared. 

(VI) Joseph Perry Fleming, whose Une of descent from the early 
founders of the family was as follows: Francis Marion (V), William 
B. (IV), Alexander (III), Matthew (II), John (I), who came with 
his brother William (I) to this state at an early day. He was born 
in Fairmont, West Virginia, died in the city of his birth, November 
18, 19 1 1. The father, Francis Marion, was born in Fairmont, 1821; 
he learned the shoemaker's trade with his father, and after he attain- 
ed manhood he engaged in the retail shoe business and continued in 
it through his life. He married, in Cumberland, Maryland, Sarah 
A., daughter of Henry and Mary Pugh. Children: i. Isabell, wife 
of E. M. Anderson; she died May 20, 1908; two children died in in- 
fancy, William and Emma. 2. Joseph P. 3. Margaret, wife of 
James G. Baker, who died June, 1908. 4. Nettie, wife of David 
Ridgley. 5. Lucy. 6. Mary. 7. Bessie, died April 23, 1905. 
Francis M. Fleming was a member of the Methodist Protestant church; 
voted the Republican ticket, and during the civil war enlisted as a 
member of the Sixth West Virginia Regiment of Volunteers as a mu- 
sician. He died October 28, 1892, and his wife passed away in the 
month of July, 1900. 

Joseph Perry Fleming was educated in the public schools of Fair- 
mont. He went into his father's store for a time, after which he en- 
gaged In the same business for himself, continuing ten years. In 1898 
he was elected city clerk of Fairmont and served his two year term 
acceptably and well. He then became associated with Charles E. 
Reed as state agent for J. M. Guffey, which he followed for nine 



426 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

years, and in 19 10 became secretary for the Monongahela Industrial 
Company, which position he held at the time of his death. Politically 
he was a Republican, and in church connection was of the Methodist 
Protestant denomination. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias 
and Ancient Order of United Workmen. He married, October 23, 
1889, Cora D. Fisher, a native of Fairmont, West Virginia, daughter 
of Captain John Fisher. One child, Carter S., born April i, 1891. 

Colonel Rufus Edward Fleming was born August 14, 1840, on a 
farm near Fairmont, Virginia. At the breaking out of the civil war 
he was in Indiana, where he had gone to engage in business, but the 
news of the firing upon Ft. Sumter brought him back to Virginia, where 
he enlisted May i, 1861, in Company G, Third Regiment Infantry 
Volunteers, United States service. He passed through the various 
promotions to the position of colonel in his regiment. He participated 
in many hard-fought battles and was twice wounded at the engagement 
at Bull Run, August 29, 1862. In May, 1865, he was sent to Ft. 
Leavenworth, Kansas, with his regiment and had command of that 
post until ordered to the western plains to assist in subduing the sav- 
age Indian tribes. Several severe battles with the redskins were then 
added to his war record. Detachments of his regiment went to Col- 
orado and Wyoming, and on May 26, 1866, it returned to Ft. Leaven- 
worth, where it was mustered out of service. Colonel Fleming was 
finally discharged at Wheeling, West Virginia, having been actively 
engaged in warfare for five years and a month. After the close of the 
war he resided on the old Fleming homestead, near Fairmont, Marion 
county, where he followed the peaceful calling of a fanner. Colonel 
Fleming was always a Republican, having cast his first vote for Abra- 
ham Lincoln in 1864. He married, February 28, 1883, Margaret L. 
Dickey, daughter of ex-Congressman Jesse C. Dickey, of Chester, 
Pennsylvania. One child, Katherine. 



Stephen White, immigrant ancestor of this family, came 
WHITE to Maryland in 1659. Under date of December 23, 
1663, James Southeard demands land for the transpor- 
tation of Ralph Castle in the year 1657, James Phillips in the year 
1654, Stephen White and Robert Saunders in the year 1659, Thomas 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 427 

Mallard in the year 1660, and a number of other persons, his claim 
amounting to seven hundred acres, for which he duly received a war- 
rant (Land Office, lib. 5, fol. 488). On January 16, 1666-67, a war- 
rant was granted to one John Dixon upon six rights assigned to him 
from Richard Lealce, among them being Robert Saunders and Stephen 
White (Land Office, lib. 10, fol. 599). How Stephen White became 
possessed of this second right is not stated. He lived on the south 
side of Patapsco river, near the line between Baltimore and Anne 
Arundel counties, and is sometimes designated as of the former, some- 
times of the latter county. In October, 1674, a patent issued to Stephen 
White, of Anne Arundel county, of a tract called White's Addition, 
in Anne Arundel county, on the south side of Patapsco river, adjoining 
the tract Radnage, formerly laid out for George Yates, and containing 
one hundred and eighty acres, due the said Stephen White by assign- 
ment from Robert Wilson of part of a warrant for two thousand acres 
formerly granted to said Robert Wilson (Land Office, lib. 18, fol. 
225). In the same year Stephen White is designated as of Baltimore 
county. 

On August 3, 1674, Stephen White and Anne, his wife, of "Balti- 
more county," convey to Joseph Symons, of the same county, planter, 
one hundred acres, part of tract Radnage, on the south side of the Pa- 
tapsco, "opposite the rocks" (Balto. Co., lib. T. R., No. R. A., fol. 
224). How Stephen White acquired Radnage does not appear. The 
deed was probably recorded in Anne Arundel county and was de- 
stroyed when the Annapolis court house was burned in 1707. In the 
rent-roll for 1707, by a change in the county line, both tracts are found 
in Baltimore county, and are thus described: 

Radnage, 160 acres — Surveyed 3 October, 1667, for Geo. Yates on ye S. 
side Potapsco opposite to ye Rocks at a sound locust by ye river side. Pos- 
sessors :-— 60 a. Wm. Hawkins, 50 a. Xtopher Cox, 50 a. Thos. Knighthead. 

White's Addition, 180 acres, surveyed 3 Nov. 1678 (sic'.) for Stephen 
White on ye S. side Potapsco at a bound poplar by a pocoson. Possessor sd. 
White's orphan. (Balto. Co. Rent Roll, p. 150). 

The date given for the sur\-ey of White's Addition is manifestly 
erroneous, as the patent was issued in 1674. "The Rocks" opposite 
Radnage must, of course, have been the well-known "White Rocks" 



42 8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

at the mouth of Rock Creek. The will of Thomas Jones, of Baltimore 
county, dated i8 August, and proved 13 November, 1675, leaves int. 
al. to testator's friend Sarah Gray, "one cow and calve at Stephen 
White's" (Testam. Proceedings, lib. 7, fol. 152). 

Stephen White died late in 1676 or early in 1677, more probably 
the latter, and the following is an abstract of his will: Stephen White, 
of Anne Arundel county, will dated i Sept., 1676, proved 19 March, 
1676-7 (Annapolis lib. 5, fol. 208). To my son Stephen White, one 
feather bed with its appurtenances, and my two gims, being a fowling 
piece and a musket. All the rest of my real and temporal (sic) estate 
to my loving wife Anne, "only my land and cattle to be sold to pay 
my debts"; my said wife sole executrix. Witnesses: Matthias Steven- 
son, Joshua Meorrikin. 24 April, 1677, Anne White, "widow and 
executrix of Stephen White, late of Anne Arundel county, deceased," re- 
turned an inventory of his estate (Test. Proc. lib. 9, fol. 95). It is 
recorded in Inventories and Accounts, lib. 4, fol. 13, as an "Inventory 
of the estate of Stephen White deceased" appraised by Ralph Haw- 
kins and Ralph Duncalfe, 7 April, 1677, "as it was brought to our 
sight knowledge & View by Anne White, wife of the deceased & execu- 
trix of the aforementioned Stephen White". Before 1679 the widow 
married William Hawkins, of Anne Arundel county, as we find from 
the following: 13 August, 1679; Account of William Hawkins and 
Anne his wife, of Anne Arundel county, administratrix (sic'.) of Ste- 
phen White, late of same county, deceased (Inventories & Accounts, 
lib. 6, fol. 441). 

Anne White, wife of Stephen White, was evidently a sister of 
John Rockhold, of Anne Arundel county, who in his will, dated 17 
February, 1698, mentions "my two cousins (i. e., nephews) Stephen 
White and William Hawkins Jr. (Annapolis, lib. 6, fol. 202), these 
being Anne's sons by her two marriages. Her second husband, Wil- 
liam Hawkins, then designated as of "Baltimore county," left a nun- 
cupative will dated 25 June, 171 1, wherein he left bequests of person- 
alty to "my three grandsons John, Stephen, and William White", and 
to "my sons-in-law Edward Smith and Charles Baker". To his son 
William he leaves rights for one hundred and fifty acres at Magothy 
River (Annapolis, lib. 13, fol. 215). The "grandsons" were, of course. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 429 

the sons of Stephen White, the testator's stepson. Stephen and Anne 
(Rockhold) White had issue: Stephen, of further mention. 

(II) Stephen (2) White, son of Stephen (i) and Anne (Rock- 
hold) White, is mentioned in the will of his father, and in that of his 
uncle, John Rockhold, both cited above. He appears in a list of tax- 
ables for 1692 as living in South side of the Patapsco Hundred (Balto. 
Co., lib. F., No. I, fol. 225), and also in similar lists for the years 
1 699-1 706 (Ms. at Maryland Hist. Soc). He inherited the tract, 
White's Addition, and reacquired Radnage. On June 8, 17 10, Chris- 
topher Cox, of Baltimore county, innkeeper, and Mary his wife, convey 
to Stephen White, of the same county, planter, "all their right, title and 
interest of a tract of land" called Radnage, in Baltimore county, on the 
south side of Patapsco river, "opposite to the Rocks," containing one 
hundred and sixty acres as per certificate of survey dated January 10, 
1667 (Balto. Co., lib. T. R., No. A, fol. 76). Stephen White died 
about 17 17, as witness the following: 17 February, 17 17-18, adminis- 
tration bond of the estate of Stephen White, late of Baltimore county, 
in the sum of £150, the administrators being John Cornelius and Sarah 
his wife, with William Jones and Richard Hampton, their sureties, all 
of Anne Arundel county (Baltimore Co., Admin. Bonds, lib. 4, fol. 
51). The administrators were the widow of the deceased and her 
second husband. 

The register of St. Anne's Parish, Annapolis, records the marriage, 
February 6, 1718, of John Cornelius and Sarah White, of Westminster 
Parish, and the same Sarah, with her second husband, John Cornelius, 
resigns, July 31, 1731, her dower rights in White's Addition by deed 
recorded in Anne Arundel county. The "Account of John Cornelius 
and Sarah his wife, administrators of Stephen White, late of Baltimore 
county, deceased," dated July 13, 17 19, shows an inventory of £73 9s. 
and accounts for £32 4s. 5d. thereof. At the end it has the following: 
"John White & Hannah, Stephen, Anne, Sarah, Joshua White, or- 
phans," i. e., of the deceased (Balto. Co., Accounts, lib. 5, fol. 360). 

Stephen (2) White and Sarah his wife had issue: John, Hannah, 
Stephen, William (mentioned in William Hawkins' will, 171 1, died in 
17 19), Anne, Sarah, Joshua (married, July 8, 1740, Mary Ashley, 
children: Nilkiah, born December 7, 1742; Samuel, born December 4, 



430 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

1744; Thomas, born September 8, 175 i) (Westminster Parish Rec- 
ords ) . 

(Ill) John White, son of Stephen (2) and Sarah White, is named 
(1711) in the will of WiUiam Hawkins, and (17 19) in the account of 
his father's estate, both cited above. He seems to have been twice mar- 
ried. The register of St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore county, records the 
marriage in 1722 (day and month not given) of John White and Mary 
Rencher (i. e. probably Renshaw), and the birth, March 23, 1722-23, 
of their daughter Anne, and there are no further entries. The adjoin- 
ing parish of Westminster in Anne Arundel county records the births 
of the following children of John and Mary White, viz. : Stephen, born 
January 26, 1723-24; Mary, born January 16, 1726-27; John, born 
December 25, 1727; Comfort, born March 31, 1729; Sarah, born 
March 31, 173 1. It also records that "John White and Mary Wood 
were married in January, A. D. 1726." There is no evidence that any 
other John White was living in the parish, so that it would seem that 
the first wife died, perhaps at the birth of her son Stephen, and that 
John White married his second wife, Mary Wood, in January, 1726, 
i. e. doubtless in 1725-26. 

In 173 I John White sold the land he had inherited from his father. 
On April 6, 1731, John White, of Anne Arundel county, planter (with 
consent of Mary his wife), conveys to Thomas Cockey, of said county, 
two tracts, viz. : ( i ) Radnage, one hundred and sixty acres, on the 
south side Patapsco river, opposite the Rocks, and (2) White's Addi- 
tion, one hundred and eighty acres, on the south side Patapsco adjoin- 
ing Radnage. The said John White warrants against all persons 
claiming by, from or under Stephen White, late father of said John, the 
grantor (Anne Anmdel Co., lib. J. H. and T. I., No. i, fol. 252). 
After disposing of his property John White seems to have removed with 
his family to St. John's parish, Baltimore county, which lay along the 
Gunpowder river and centered at Joppa, then the county town. 

The register of St. John's records the birth of Joshua White, son of 
John and Mary White, born November 4, 1735, and the death of John 
White, November 14, 1737. It also records the marriage (given be- 
low) of Stephen, Comfort, and Sarah White, who are clearly the chil- 
dren of this John White, their births being recorded in the register of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 431 

Westminster parish. The connection with the Baker family affords 
further evidence of this John White's identity. Children of John and 
Mary (Rencher or Renshaw) White, his first wife: Anne, born March 
23, 1722-23 (St. Paul's Parish Register) ; Stephen, born January 26, 
1723-24 (Westminster Parish Register) . Children of Mai^ Wood, his 
second wife: Maiy, born January 16, 1726-27; John, born December 
25, 1727; Comfort, born March 31, 1729, married, February 21, 1747, 
John Brown (St. John's Parish) ; Sarah, born March 31, 1731, mar- 
ried, January 8, 1756, Francis Ingram (St. John's Parish); Joshua, 
born November 4, 1735 (St. John's Parish). The dates of birth of 
the children of second wife, with the exception of Joshua, were from 
Westminster Parish Register. 

(IV) Stephen (3) White, son of John and Mary (Rencher or Ren- 
shaw) White, was born, according to Westminster Parish Register, 
March 23, 1723-24, and accompanied his father when the latter re- 
moved to St. John's Parish. He married, January i, 175 1, Hannah 
Baker (St. John's Register), daughter of Maurice and Christian (Graf- 
ton) Baker, the latter a daughter of William Grafton. Stephen White 
died in 1754, leaving two children. On December 4, 1754, adminis- 
tration bond of Hannah White as administratrix of Stephen White, late 
of Baltimore county, deceased, in £100, with Maurice Baker and Will- 
iam Grafton Jr. as her sureties (Balto. Co., Admin. Bonds, lib. 4, fol. 
175). The sureties were respectively the father and uncle of the 
widow. About a year later she married again, the St. John's Register 
recording the fact that Samuel Everett and Hannah White were mar- 
ried December 9, 1755. Samuel Everett and Hannah his wife, admin- 
istrators of Stephen White, late of Baltimore county, deceased, filed an 
account in January, 1756, which has at the end the following: "The 
deceased left two children, Grafton about 3 years old, Stephen about 
I year old" (Balto. Co., Accounts, lib. 5, fol. 515). The Balance 
Book at Annapolis (lib. 2, fol. 21) shows that, May 28, 1756, Samuel 
Everett and Hannah his wife, "administratrix of Stephen White," re- 
turned a balance of £151 6s. i^d., to the widow one-third and the 
residue equally divided between Grafton and Stephen White." Stephen 
and Hannah (Baker) White had Issue: Grafton, of whom further; 
Stephen, born 1754. 



432 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(V) Grafton White, son of Stephen (3) and Hannah (Baker) 
White, was born about 1752, in St. John's parish, Baltimore county, 
Maryland, and went to West Virginia in 1774. He settled on a farm of 
three hundred acres at Maidsville, near Morgantown, Monongalia 
county, and resided there until his death, which occurred July 15, 1829. 
Family records state that he was then aged seventy-nine years and seven 
months, but as the records cited above show that he was born in 1752, 
this is evidently to be corrected to seventy-seven years. Grafton White 
was twice married. His first wife, Margaret, daughter of Simon Din- 
ney, was born December 11, 1760, died in 1801. His second wife, 
Ehzabeth, survived him and died February 18, 1849, aged ninety years, 
one month and thirteen days. Children by first wife : Simon, born Octo- 
ber 15, 1 78 1 ; William, August 15, 1783 ; Hannah, September 8, 1785; 
Ann, March 21, 1788; Rebeckah, July 16, 1790; Stephen, October 31, 
1792; Michael, June 16, 1795; Grafton, October 29, 1797. Child by 
second wife : Margaret, bom 1804, died at age of eight months. 

(VI) William White, son of Grafton and Margaret (Dinney) 
White, was born August 15, 1783. He married Mary Darling, and 
settled in the western portion of Monongalia county, on the land where 
Maple postofiice is now situated, and where Simon L. White, his son, 
resides. Children: Stephen, John, James, Michael, Thomas, Joseph, 
William, Richard, Lydia, Simon and Daniel. All but one of these 
(William) married, and settling in the vicinity of Maple formed what 
was known as the "White Settlement." 

(VII) Michael White, son of William and Mary (Darling) 
White, married Mary Anne Russell (probably Rischel originally, since 
her ancestors were all from Holland) and settled on a farm of two hun- 
dred acres about three miles below the head of the Pennsylvania Fork 
of Dunkard, and the same distance above the village of Jollytown, 
Pennsylvania. Children: Henry Solomon, William Thomas, Lydia 
Anne, Catharine, Israel C. and John. John and Catharine died during 
childhood. The mother of these children died in 1852. 

(VIII) Israel C. White, son of Michael and Mary Anne ( Russell) 
White, was born at the old homestead in Battelle district, in the western 
portion of Monongalia county, West Virginia, November i, 1848. He 
grew to manhood (19) on the farm with only such educational advan- 




yyyM^^iJj^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 433 

tages as the "subscription schools" of the time, previous to 1865, afford- 
ed. His father had a high appreciation of the value of education, how- 
ever, and made many sacrifices to give to his children the advantages of 
the best "subscription schools" available. His father was a strong, 
virile citizen, a born leader of men, and one of the five persons selected 
to divide the county into districts and give names to the same after the 
formation of West Virginia. He gave the name "Battelle" to the most 
western district, in which he also resided, naming it after Rev. Gordon 
Battelle, a talented Methodist Episcopal minister of Wheeling, West 
Virginia, who through a series of newspaper articles accomplished more 
than any other one man in crystalizing the public sentiment of Western 
Virginia in favor of separation from the mother state. 

It was while attending one of these "subscription schools" taught by 
Dr. George Fletcher, a graduate of Allegheny College, at Meadville, 
Pennsylvania, that Israel C. White conceived the idea of securing a 
college education. Hence, when the West Virginia Agricultural Col- 
lege was established at Morgantown and opened its doors for the higher 
education of the young men of the state in September, 1867, Israel C. 
White became one of its matriculates at the opening, through the en- 
couragement of his intelligent and appreciative father, who, although 
one of the strongest men physically the county ever produced, never 
having been outdone in wood chopping, rail making, or lifting contests, 
sickened and died at the end of 1868, during the middle of the son's 
second college year. Thrown upon his own resources at the age of 
twenty, the son determined to carry out his father's wishes and graduate 
from the state's highest institution of learning. He taught school, 
worked on the farm during vacations, sold his small contingent interest 
in the farm, and graduated with honor in the class of 1872, not owing 
any one a dollar, but with only about ten dollars in cash ahead for 
future capital. He received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from West 
Virginia University in the aforementioned year, and that of Master of 
Arts from the same institution in 1875. Soon after his graduation in 
June, 1872, he married Emma Shay, a talented teacher of the Morgan- 
town public schools. Both taught school for the first and second years 
of their married life, and in 1874 Mr. White was elected principal of 
a private school at Hunterdon, New Jersey, where they went to reside. 



434 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Soon after the birth of his oldest daughter (now Mrs. Joseph H. 
Mills), Mrs. White died of puerperal fever, November 24, 1874, and 
Mr. White relinquished the profession of teaching to take up the study 
of geology, having secured an appointment as aid to his old teacher in 
geology, Dr. John J. Stevenson, on the Second Geological Survey of 
Pennsylvania, beginning work thereon in May, 1875. He was made 
full assistant in 1876, and remained in connection therewith until that 
survey came to a close in 1 884, and was also the author of eight volumes 
of the reports of that survey. 

Dr. White took a post-graduate course in geology and chemistry at 
Columbia University in 1876-77, and received the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy from the University of Arkansas in 1882. In addition to 
his service in the Second Geological Survey, mentioned in the foregoing 
paragraph, he served as professor of geology in the West Virginia Uni- 
versity from 1877 to 1892; was one of the assistant geologists of the 
United States Geological Survey from 1884 to 1888, during which 
time he prepared and published Bulletin 65, on the Stratigraphy of the 
Appalachian Coal Field; in 1892 he assumed charge of a large petro- 
leum business, which he had developed for himself and associates, 
through scientific discoveries made In connection with his studies of the 
occurrence of petroleum, natural gas, and coal, in all of which he Is an 
expert specialist. 

Dr. White was treasurer of the Geological Society of America from 
1892 to 1907; vice-president of the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, Sec. E. (Geology), 1896-97; delegate to the 
International Geological Congress held In St. Petersburg, 1897, and In 
Paris, 1900. Dr. White has been State Geologist of West Virginia 
since 1897, and has prepared and published five of the volumes of the 
reports, viz. : Vols. I. and I. (A) on Petroleum and Natural Gas; Vols. 
II. and II. (A) on Coal, and Bulletin Two, on Levels and Coal Ana- 
lyses. He has also supervised and edited the publication of nine other 
volumes published by the West Virginia Geological Survey which were 
prepared by his assistants. In 1904 to 1906 he visited Brazil at the re- 
quest of the Brazilian government to make studies and an official report 
on the coal fields of South Brazil. His report, a large quarto volume 
with numerous illustrations on the Brazilian coal fields, was published 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 435 

in both English and Portugese in 1908. He was invited by President 
Roosevelt to be the second speaker on the program at the White House 
Conference of Governors in May, 1908, where he delivered an address 
on "The Waste of Our Fuel Resources," and this, in connection with 
an address before the American Mining Congress at Pittsburgh, De- 
cember 6, 1908, on "The Barren Zone of the Appalachian Coal Field," 
has greatly aided the conservation movement inaugurated by President 
Roosevelt. 

Dr. White, although an exceedingly busy man, finds time to take 
an active interest in civic affairs, being vice-president for West Virginia 
of the International League for Highway Improvement, president of 
the West Virginia State Board of Trade, and ex-president of the 
Morgantown Board of Trade. During the recent visit of President 
Taft to Morgantown, in connection with the inaugural ceremonies of 
Dr. Hodges, Dr. White was unanimously selected by his fellow citizens 
to entertain President Taft and his party for breakfast and introduce 
his distinguished guest to the two thousand school children assembled 
on his private lawn. 

Dr. White married (first) Emma Shay, who bore him one child: 
Emma, wife of Joseph H. Mills, of Morgantown, West Virginia; one 
child, Joseph H. Jr. Dr. White married (second) , in December, 1878, 
Mary Moorhead, of New Castle, Pennsylvania, who bore him five chil- 
dren: I. Nell, wife of C. W. Maxwell, of Elkins, West Virginia; chil- 
dren: May and C. W. Jr. 2. Fanny, wife of H. P. Brightwell, of 
Charleston, West Virginia ; children : Frances, Elizabeth and H. P. Jr. 
3. Edith, wife of Karl L. Kithil, of Morgantown, West Virginia; chil- 
dren: Karlos and Richard. 4. Charles. 5. Gertrude. 



The Hodges family from which President Thomas Ed- 
HODGES ward Hodges, of the West Virginia State University, 
comes, is of an old and highly intelligent line of Vir- 
ginia ancestry, a vigorous stock from which have almost always sprung 
superior men and women, in all lines of useful professions and vocations 
in this republic, so noted for its push, energy and practical accomplish- 
ments. 

(I) John R. Hodges, who for a time had been Dolly Madison's 



436 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

overseer, about 1845 emigrated from Albemarle county, Virginia, and 
settled west of Buckhannon, Upshur county, near what is now Lorentz 
postoffice. He followed farming and trading for his livelihood, and 
was of the Methodist Protestant church faith, while politically he was 
a Democrat. He died at about the age of sixty-five years, and was 
buried near Buckhannon. 

(II) John Henry Hodges, son of John R. Hodges, above referred 
to, was born in 1 836 and died in 1905. He was one of a family of thir- 
teen children: Thomas Edward, John Henry, Charles Kelley, James 
Fife, Oscar Fitzalan, George Noble, Theophilus Edgar, Bushrod 
Brown, Sarah Jane, Lucy Catherine, Martha Elizabeth, Mildred Simp- 
son and Malinda Ann. In 1856 John Henry Hodges married MeHssa 
Margaret Humphreys, born in 1829, and still hving (1911). She had 
been his teacher in the subscription schools in his neighborhood. Her 
father was Meriwether Humphreys, who married into the Thurston 
family, and also migrated from Albemarle county, Virginia, going to 
Upshur county in 1844 and settling east of Buckhannon, on Sand Run. 
John Henry Hodges in earlier life followed the trade of saddler, but 
later became a dealer in cattle. Politically he was a Democrat, and in 
his religious faith was of the Methodist Protestant denomination. His 
children were: Thomas Edward, of whom further mention will be 
made; Liona Lloyd (Boram), and Susan Ehzabeth (Miles). 

(III) Thomas Edward Hodges, son of John Henry and Melissa 
M. (Humphreys) Hodges, was born December 13, 1858, in Upshur 
county, Virginia, and obtained his primary education in district schools 
and at French Creek Academy. In 1877, six years after his father had 
moved to French Creek, young Hodges left the family circle for 
Morgantown, West Virginia, to attend the State University, graduating 
from that institution in June, 1881. President Hodges has had a most 
remarkable and interesting history during his educational career. After 
his graduation at the University he was principal of the Morgantown 
schools from 1881 to 1886. The year last named, he was elected prin- 
cipal of Marshall College, the State Normal School at Huntington, 
West Virginia, which position he held ably for ten years. While in 
this work, he extended his acquaintance over the entire state, visiting 
almost every county, becoming popular through his lectures to teachers, 




^/wma.i ^. Jlof/^t 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 437 

at institutes and other meetings, as well as through other relations and 
activities which indicated his earnest and constant interest in civic and 
social life. In 1896 he was elected professor of physics at the West 
Virginia University, a position he held until he was appointed member 
of the State Board of Control in 1909. While performing his duties in 
that office, he kept in touch with the problems of education, as well as 
the industrial and business life of the commonwealth. An active mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church from youth up, he has been honored in 
later years with influential positions in its councils, and in 1905 became 
a member of its College Board. In 1909 he was given the honorary 
degree of D. Sc. from Waynesburg College, and in 191 1, in recognition 
of his ability and service, Washington and Jefferson College conferred 
upon him the degree of LL. D. In 19 10 he was elected president of 
the University of West Virginia, to begin his service, October, 191 1. 
He was formally installed November 3, 191 1, with imposing cere- 
monies, at which leading representatives from various colleges were 
present and took part. His well known executive ability doubtless 
caused him to be selected as the head of the greatest institution in the 
state. 

He married, on October 5, 1882, Mary A. Hayes, daughter of 
Manhff and Alice (Berkshire) Hayes. She was born December 25, 
1855. Children: Grace Mabelle, bom April 24, 1890, and Charles 
Edward, born September 27, 1892. 



This Lewis family originally resided in Maryland, and 
LEWIS one branch immigrated to West Virginia and settled in 

what is now Harrison county, where the name is common, 
and where it stands for industry and integrity of character. 

(I) David Lewis, whose wife was named Johanna, came from 
Monocacy, Maryland, where his family all originally lived. The 
father of this David Lewis named the famous "Maryland" variety of 
apples so extensively grown in Harrison county at this time. In this 
family there have been several nurserymen and fruit experts, known to 
the horticultural world for the fine quality of fruit they have produced 
after scientific methods of culture. In the family of David and Johanna 
was a son named Jonathan, of whom the following will speak in detail. 



438 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(II) Jonathan Lewis, son of David Lewis, was born March 25, 
1793. He lived his life in the vicinity of Johnstown, Harrison county. 
West Virginia, and died April 30, 1848. He was both a farmer and 
veterinary surgeon. He was a volunteer in the war of 18 12. He left 
children. 

(III) Elmore Dow Lewis, son of Jonathan Lewis, was born De- 
cember 28, 1 841, at Johnstown, West Virginia, and died May 3, 1889. 
By occupation he was a farmer. At the age of eighteen years he enlist- 
ed in the Thirty-first Regiment of Virginia troops, in the cause of the 
confederacy, and was honorably discharged from service on account of 
ill health in 1862. He later reenlisted in the Seventeenth Virginia 
Cavalry Regiment. He saw much severe fighting, and was present at 
the surrender at Appomattox. He died May 3, 1889. He married 
Sarah Post, born April 6, 1845, died April i, 1880. She was from 
Upshur county, Virginia. Children: i. Mrs. Clara Lewis Davis, wife 
of James M. Davis; lives on a farm at Johnstown. 2. Ernest Daniel, 
of whom further. 3. Mrs. Diadema Strader, wife of Ira C. Strader, a 
farmer, near Buckhannon. 4. Mrs. May Casto, wife of David D. 
Casto, a merchant of Buckhannon. 5. Mrs. Mollie Reger, wife of 
Robert C. Reger, a contractor and farmer of Buckhannon. 

Daniel Post, father of Mrs. Elmore D. Lewis, was born in West 
Virginia. He followed farming. He volunteered for service in the 
Mexican war in 1 847, but was not called out, the war soon ending. He 
died at Johnstown, West Virginia, in 1881, aged about eighty-one years. 

(IV) Ernest Daniel Lewis, son of Elmore Dow and Sarah (Post) 
Lewis, was born March 5, 1873, in Upshur county, West Virginia, on 
his father's farm, near Johnstown. He received his schooling in the 
common schools and at the old academy at Buckhannon two years, and 
two years more at the old Seminary, graduating from the latter in 1 898, 
taking the normal course of study. He then entered the University of 
West Virginia at Morgantown, where he received the degree of A. B. 
in 1 90 1, and the degree of LL. B. the year following. He went to 
Clarksburg in the summer of 1902 and opened his law office, which is 
now in the Goff building, and here has successfully practiced law. In 
politics he is a Democrat; he has been chairman of the county com- 
mittee for six years; also chairman of the Democratic senatorial com- 




c^^w'^S^UAi^^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 439 

mittee for four years. He is identified with the local lodge of Elks; is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias of Johnstown and is associated 
with the college fraternity, Sigma Chi, and also Delta Chi, a Greek 
letter law fraternity. 



The immigrant ancestors of the Watson family, so 
WATSON numerous in West Virginia and in the vicinity of Fair- 
mont, Marion county, at this time, were James Wat- 
son and John Haymond. The Watsons and Haymonds have been 
conspicuous names in Maryland and West Virginia and have had much 
to do with the development of the country and in making laws and 
enforcing the same in several commonwealths in this country. Among 
its members have been revolutionary soldiers, Indian fighters, and those 
who went forth to do battle in the days of the civil war. In each posi- 
tion in which they were placed with responsibility resting upon them, 
they have proved themselves worthy the name of pioneer, soldier and 
statesman. 

(I) James Watson, immigrant, was born in Scotland, and with 
three brothers came to this country prior to 1740 and settled in St. 
Mary's county, Maryland. He married Mary Greene, a relative, 
family tradition says a sister of General Nathaniel Greene, of revolu- 
tionary fame. 

(II) James Greene, son of the Scotch emigrant, James Watson, 
was born in St. Mary's county, Maryland, February 23, 1756, died in 
Monongalia county, Virginia, March 8, 1834. He married, about 
1785, Ann (Dyson) Swan, a widow (daughter of John and Lydia 
Dyson), born September 6, 1759, died in Monongalia county, August 
27, 1 8 17. Children: Margaret (Cox), born 1787; Thomas, men- 
tioned below; Henry, 1790; Mary Greene, 1792; James Dent, 1794. 
The father of this family was a planter and slave owner, and a noted 
Indian fighter. He was a member of the Church of England. 

(III) Thomas, second child and first son of James Greene Wat- 
son, was born October 2, 1788, near Port Tobacco, Charles county, 
Maryland, died near Smithtown, Monongalia county, Virginia, Sep- 
tember, 1857. He married Rebecca Haymond, born in Harrison 
county, Virginia, March 21, 1796, died in Monongalia county, Virginia, 



440 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

April 4, 1 845. Children : James Otis, mentioned below ; William Hay- 
mond, 1 8 18, died 1862; Thomas Greene, 1821, died 1865; Cynthia 
Ann, 1824, died 1882; Margaret Cassandria, 1826, died 1835; Joseph 
Calder, 1832, died 1887; Frances Rebecca, 1834, died 1883, married 
a Moderwell; Martha Dent, 1837, died 1905; Herain Augustus, 1839, 
died 1887. The father, Thomas Watson, was a civil engineer and 
county surveyor. In his religious faith he adhered to that of the Epis- 
copal church. The mother, Rebecca (Haymond) Watson, was the 
daughter of William and Cynthia Carroll Haymond. William Hay- 
mond was born near Rockville, Maryland, June 11, 1771, died at 
"Palatine Hill," Virginia (now West Virginia), July 8, 1848. Mar- 
ried, March 13, 1793, Cynthia Carroll, born March 29, 1774. Her 
mother was a Miss Heath, of Virginia, and her father was James Car- 
roll, of Maryland. William Haymond was the son of William Hay- 
mond, born January 4, 1740, in Frederick county, Maryland, near 
Rockville, died at Quiet Dell, Harrison county, Virginia, November 
12, 1 82 1, and Cassandria (Clelland) Haymond, born October 25, 
1741, died December 23, 1788. William Haymond Sr., when only 
fifteen years of age, was with General Braddock's army on the march 
to Fort Duquesne (defeated on Monongahela river, July 9, 1755); 
was with General Forbes in 1758, in successful expeditions against Fort 
Duquesne. In 1759 he enlisted in Virginia in a company commanded 
by Colonel George Washington. Company was disbanded at Fort 
Lewis, near Staunton, Virginia, February 24, 1762. In May, 1773, he 
moved from Maryland to the district of West Augusta, Virginia, set- 
tling near what is now Morgantown. Upon the formation of Monon- 
galia county, in 1776, he was a justice of the peace, deputy surveyor, 
coroner and sheriff. At the beginning of the revolution he was appoint- 
ed captain of mihtia, serving at Prickett's Fort, 1777, promoted to 
major in 1781, which office he held until the close of the war. The 
father of William Haymond was John Haymond, born in England, 
coming to America prior to 1734. 

(IV) James Otis, eldest child of Thomas and Rebecca (Haymond) 
Watson, was born May 17, 18 15, near Benton's Ferry (now Marion 
county), Virginia, died at Fairmont, June 12, 1902. He was educated 
by teachers at home, later attending private school in Morgantown. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 441 

He was the real pioneer in West Virginia coal development and will 
certainly always have a place in history as the "Father of the Coal In- 
dustry" of the Upper Monongahela Valley. After the first railroad 
was constructed through Fairmont, in 1852, he immediately opened up 
the first coal mine, called the American Coal Company, in what is now 
the city limits of Fairmont. He pushed the enterprise along by his 
energy, tact and iceen foresight, and finally before his death witnessed 
the formation of the Fairmont Coal Company. In 1852 Mr. Watson 
built a suspension bridge over the waters of the Monongahela river, 
connecting Fairmont and Palatine. When asked by a large coal cor- 
poration's representative from Baltimore, then competitors of the Wat- 
son coal mining industry, how it was that he could make money and 
successfully operate his mines, when they had difficulty in making a 
profit in their large mining operations. Father Watson remarked that 
while "You have large offices in the east, a salaried president, secre- 
taries, clerks, and a mule boss and mine boss, I am my own president, 
my own secretary and my own mule boss and mine boss, and carry my 
office in my hat." This but illustrates the sturdy, practical character of 
Mr. Watson, who knew every department of his large coal industry, 
from the lowest to the highest, and by dispensing with unnecessary 
clerks and officers, he was enabled to realize a handsome profit annually, 
in other words he cut expenses to the minimum. Politically Mr. Wat- 
son was a Democrat and held the offices of clerk of the circuit court, 
county surveyor and other local positions, always taking keen interest 
in the general welfare of his city, county and state. He was not a mem- 
ber of any clubs or secret fraternities, but in church connection was of 
the Episcopal denomination. 

He married, July 7, 1841, in what was then called Middleton, but 
now Fairmont, Matilda Lamb, born July 13, 1822, daughter of Leon- 
ard and Donaldson Lamb, who were married February 13, 

1 8 18. Leonard Lamb came from Massachusetts to Monongalia county, 
Virginia, to contract iron ore furnaces. Children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lamb: Sylvanus, Matilda (Watson), Verlinda (Guseman), James D., 
Ann (Higginbotham), John B., Henry C, Mary Virginia (Westfall), 
Caroline and Moses E. Lamb. Children of James Otis and Matilda 
(Lamb) Watson: i. William Henry, mentioned below. 2. Caroline 



442 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Margaret, born April 25, 1844; married Aretas Brooks Fleming, Sep- 
tember 7, 1865; children: Robert Willie Fleming, deceased; Gypsy F. 
(Mrs. Ward) ; Ida Watson (Mrs. Miller, deceased) ; Virginia Wat- 
son; George Watson; Brooks Fleming. 3. Ida May, born July 25, 
1846. 4. Sylvanus Lamb, mentioned below. 5. George Thomas, born 
June 29, 1851, deceased; married Margaret Virginia Fleming, October 
17, 1872. 6. Lucy Lee, born February 9, 1854. 7. Mary Rebecca, 
born September i, 1856; married Conrad Albert Sipe, November 28, 
1878; children: Frances Hogue (Mrs. Hutton), Lucy Anderson, Mary 
Watson. 8. James Edwin, mentioned below. 9. Frank Ellsworth, 
born February 18, 1861. 10. Clarence Wayland, mentioned below. 

(V) William Henry, son of James Otis and Matilda (Lamb) Wat- 
son, was born August 11, 1842. He received a practical education, 
and in later life turned his attention to farming, in which line of work 
he has been highly successful. He married, April 29, 1869, Molly 
Grove. Children: Frederick, deceased; Anna Grove (Mrs. Rohr- 
baugh) ; Margaret; Mary (Mrs. Lowe) ; Henry W. ; Caroline (Mrs. 
Peddicord) ; Ruth, deceased. 

(V) Sylvanus Lamb, son of James Otis and Matilda (Lamb) 
Watson, was born in Fairmont, West Virginia, December 27, 1848. 
He obtained a public school education and was reared on a farm, his 
first work off of the farm being in the mines known as the American 
Mine, owned by his father, the first operated in West Virginia. He 
was also engaged five years in the cattle business on his own account. 
The better years of his life, however, have been spent in the coal min- 
ing industry. He is now treasurer of the Consolidation Coal Company, 
which is the largest bituminous coal company in the world. He is also 
interested in the electric lines, being president of the Fairmont & Clarks- 
burg Railroad Company, the greatest electric line in the state. He is 
president of the Fairmont Gas Company, which does an extensive busi- 
ness. He has always been active in politics, being a leader in West 
Virginia in many movements of his party, the Democratic, but has 
always refused public office. In his church relation he is an Epis- 
copalian. He married, March 25, 1875, Lydia Jane, daughter of 
Matthew Fleming, of Fairmont, West Virginia (see Fleming genealogy 
in this work). Children: James Otis, mentioned below; Albert Thur- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 443 

man, mentioned below; Elizabeth Crane (Mrs. Randall) ; George 
Thomas, mentioned below; Ida Watson, deceased. 

(V) James Edwin, son of James Otis and Matilda (Lamb) Wat- 
son, was bom at Fairmont, West Virginia, January 8, 1859. He 
secured his education at the Fairmont public schools and Eastman's 
Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. He is a coal operator. 
He spent the major part of his life in the coal industry. In 1885 he 
took charge of the J. O. Watson coal interests which practically con- 
tained all the coal operations in this district, at that time, and was at 
the head of same until his health failed in 1899, about which time he 
gave up the active management of the coal business. He was one of 
the original stockholders and promoters of the Montana Coal & Coke 
Company and before the F. M. & P. railroad was completed he with 
others purchased small tracts of coal at Montana, and on July 7, 1886, 
with a few men, with J. C. Gaskill in charge, commenced grading 
for necessary side tracks. This mine was the first to successfully make 
coke in this field, and the development of same was practically the 
beginning of the development and making of the Fairmont region. 
On July I, 1890, he bought at forced sale in front of the court house 
the entire property belonging to the West Fairmont & Marion Con- 
solidated Coal & Coke Company which then owned the West Fair- 
mont, Marion and Shaft mines, all three of which had been abandoned 
at that time, and the Marion and Shaft mines allowed to fill up with 
water. He then organized the West Fairmont Coal & Coke Company, 
and these mines have been worked successfully since. This same com- 
pany purchased in August, 1894, what is known as the New England 
Mine, from the New England, Fairmont & Western Gas Coal Com- 
pany. An expensive railroad and bridge across West Fork river had 
been built by this company who worked the mines a short time and then 
abandoned them, allowing the railroad and mine improvements to go 
to wreck; when bought by the West Fairmont Coal & Coke Company, 
the railroad was rebuilt, mines newly opened up, necessary and expen- 
sive improvements made, the town of New England built, and this 
mine now has the largest capacity of any single mine in Marion county. 

He was also interested and a director in the Gaston Gas Coal Com- 
pany and the Briar Hill Coal & Coke Company. These four companies 



444 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

were the nucleus for the formation of the Fairmont Coal Company 
(now the Consolidation Coal Company). He was one of the organ- 
izers of the Bank of Fairmont (now the National Bank of Fairmont) 
in 1895, and has been president of the institution since its organization. 
He is president of the Watson Company, which company owns the 
Watson Building in which is located the National Bank of Fairmont, 
the offices of the Consolidation and other coal companies and corpora- 
tions, including the Fairmont & Clarksburg Traction Company, Fair- 
mont Gas & Light Company, and Fairmont Chamber of Commerce. 
The Watson Company also own a large acreage of valuable real estate 
in the suburbs of the city of Fairmont. He is president of the Fair- 
mont Development Company, Fairmont, West Virginia; Watson, Ma- 
lone & Miller Company, Fairmont, West Virginia; the Watson Coal 
Company, which company owns valuable coal lands in the "Pocahontas 
District," on hnes of the Norfolk & Western railroad, in McDowell 
county, West Virginia, and are being operated by two different com- 
panies under lease, on royalty basis, from the Watson Coal Company. 
He is director in the following companies: The Ohley Coal Company 
(which company own a large tract of coal lands on the Cabin Creek 
branch of the Chesapeake & Ohio railroad, in Kanawha county. West 
Virginia, and is now being operated by four different companies, operat- 
ing seven mines, on a royalty basis, under lease from the Ohley Coal 
Company), Fairmont & Clarksburg Traction Company, Fairmont De- 
velopment Company, South Side Land Company, Watson Coal Com- 
pany, Watson Company, Fairmont Gas & Light Company, the Con- 
solidation Coal Company. Politically he is a Democrat. In church 
connection is of the Episcopal denomination. 

He married Mattie Elizabeth Moderwell, September i, 1890. 
Children: Sue Kearsley, Virginia Fleming, deceased; James Edwin, 
Otis Moderwell, deceased; Robert Lamb. 

(V) Hon. Clarence Wayland Watson, present United States sena- 
tor, son of James Otis and Matilda (Lamb) Watson, was born May 
8, 1864, at Fairmont, West Virginia. He received a good education, 
beginning with the public schools of his native city, and next at the Fair- 
mont State Normal School. He was busily engaged in coal mining and 
dealt in coal lands until 1893, when he commenced opening mines in 



(1 / 



^ Id/acZ^Tr'*^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 445 

conjunction with his brothers, which fact fitted him to take the place 
occupied by his brother, J. E. Watson, when his health failed. In 1900 
he formed the Fairmont Coal Mining Company for the purpose of sell- 
ing the output of the district, and in 1901 he with his associates pur- 
chased the companies forming the Fairmont Coal Company and later 
purchased a control of the Consolidation Coal Company from the 
Baltimore & Ohio Company, merging the Fairmont Coal Company 
and the Somerset Coal companies into the Consolidation Coal Com- 
pany. He also bought a controlling interest in the Northwestern Fuel 
Company's docks at Duluth and St. Paul; also the Metropolitan Coal 
Company's docks, giving facilities on the Great Lakes as well as on the 
Atlantic seaboard, Boston, Providence, etc. He has many other busi- 
ness interests, including a stock farm with some of the finest horses in 
the world. Politically Mr. Watson is a Democrat and was elected to a 
seat in the United States senate in 19 10 from West Virginia. His 
having been engaged all of his active life in business of great import- 
ance and used to dealing with corporations and associated with men 
high in authority and influence in the industrial world, he was naturally 
selected for this high position where he can best represent the interests 
of West Virginia, his native state. 

Mr. Watson married, October 10, 1894, Minnie Lee Owings. Mr. 
and Mrs. Watson occupy the old Watson homestead whereon stands 
the original log house erected more than one hundred years ago, and 
still in a fine state of preservation. Nearby is their magnificent mansion 
within immense grounds. 

(VI) James Otis (2), son of Sylvanus Lamb and Lydia Jane 
(Fleming) Watson, was born March 25, 1875. He was reared in 
Fairmont, where he attended the public schools, graduating from the 
high school and the State Normal of Fairmont. Later he entered the 
University of West Virginia and still later Harvard University. His 
youth was spent on his father's farm, and when sixteen years of age he 
commenced working in vacations at the coal mines, and continued with 
the coal company as superintendent and assistant to president until 
1903, when he engaged in business for himself, including some time 
ranching on plains of Colorado, continuing until 1909. Since the last- 
named date he has been the general manager of the Fairmont & Clarks- 



446 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

burg Traction Company, as well as one of its directors and stockholders. 
He is a director of Fairmont Trust Company and other companies. He 
married, in June, 1902, Ella Brandon, daughter of Charles E. Bartlett, 
of Fairmont. Children: EUnor Bartlett, born May 20, 1903; Mary, 
March 10, 1905; James Otis Jr., June 11, 1906; Bartlett, February 
10, 1910. 

(VI) Albert Thurman, son of Sylvanus Lamb and Lydia Jane 
(Fleming) Watson, was born January 22, 1877. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools in Fairmont, later attending the State Nor- 
mal School. Before finishing school in 1893 he spent some time in the 
engineering corps of the coal company, later, after finishing school in 
1895, in the merchandise department, and in the auditing department, 
and in 1900 became assistant purchasing agent, and January i, 1901, 
was promoted to purchasing agent, which position he still occupies, for 
the Consolidation Coal Company, Cumberland & Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company, Fairmont & Clarksburg Traction Company, Fairmont 
Gas & Light Company, and a large number of subsidiary companies. 
For a number of years his offices were located in Baltimore, but in 1908 
he brought his offices to Fairmont, where all purchases for the com- 
panies mentioned are made. 

In 1903 he married Florence Davis, of Montclair, New Jersey. 
They have one son, Albert Thurman Jr., born October 18, 1904. 

(VI) George Thomas, son of Sylvanus Lamb and Lydia Jane 
(Fleming) Watson, was born February 12, 1880. He was educated 
in the Fairmont public schools. State Normal School and State Univer- 
sity. His vacations were spent at work in the different departments of 
the coal company. Upon leaving school he started working at New 
England Mine, going from there to Murray and Beechwood mines as 
superintendent, and In 1901 returned to Gaston and New England Mine 
as superintendent. When the power and mechanical department of the 
coal company was formed he was made superintendent, and In 1907 
was made general manager of the Fairmont & Clarksburg Traction 
Company, giving that up In 1909 to become vice-president of the Con- 
solidation Coal Company, in charge of West Virginia, Maryland, Penn- 
sylvania and Kentucky operations, with offices at Fairmont. Mr. Wat- 
son also continues as stockholder and director in the traction company. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 447 

and is a stockholder and official in a number of subsidiary companies, 
at the present time president of the First National Bank, Jenkins, Ken- 
tucky; director in the Fairmont Trust Company; director Chamber of 
Commerce, Fairmont Building & Investment Company; president Fair- 
mont Mining Machinery Company. 

He married, October 15, 1901, Elizabeth Bussing, of Cincinnati. 
Children: Sylvanus Lamb Jr., born April 12, 1903, Rose Bussing, July 
23, 1906; Elizabeth Jane, April 3, 1911. 



The history of this large family reaches back to the 
BOYERS period of the revolutionary war, and has included many 

eminent men. From the best information obtainable it 
is believed that Leonard and Catherine Boyers, probably of German 
origin, were the American ancestors of this family. Many of their de- 
scendants now reside in West Virginia and adjoining states. 

(I) Leonard Boyers, a settler in Pennsylvania, married Catherine 
, and in their family was a son, Jacob. 

(II) Jacob, son of Leonard and Catherine Boyers, was born De- 
cember 7, 1782, during the war for independence in America, and died 
January 22, 1836. He was a Democrat, a Methodist, and by occu- 
pation a miller. He married Elizabeth Lock, in 1805, as shown by 
records in the family Bible of descendants now living at Fairmont, 
West Virginia. Elizabeth Lock, daughter of Simon Lock and wife, 
was born August 30, 1787. Children: Josiah, born February 22, 
1806; Catherine E., March 13, 1807; Harriet, August 28, 1808; 
WiUiam G., July 15, 18 10; Morgan Lock, see forward; Hycanus J., 
March 3, 1813; Hezekiah, July 25, 1815; Julianna, February 18, 
1817; Mary, October 18, 1818; Jacob, April 22, 1820; Simon L., 
August 17, 1823; Henry G., October 28, 1824. 

(Ill) Morgan Lock, fifth child of Jacob and Elizabeth (Lock) 
Boyers, was a native of Greene county, Pennsylvania, born December 
19, 181 1, and died February 22, 1892, at Jimtown, West Virginia. 
He was a Methodist minister for the greater part of his life, and reared 
his family in the way a Christian man should, making them useful men 
and women in many avenues of life, including the home circles of West 
Virginia. He married, August 28, 1838, Julianna, born March 9, 



448 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

1822, daughter of William T. and Keziah Bright. Juhanna (Bright) 
Boyers died November 5, 1853. Children: Elyisis, born September 
2?) 1839; Keziah, February 28, 1841; Cyrus F., see forward; Ehza- 
beth M., December 4, 1843; Elbatine, February 5, 1846; Julia, Febru- 
ary 23, 1849; William T., August 18, 1851. 

(IV) Dr. Cyrus Fletcher Boyers, third child of Morgan Lock and 
Julianna (Bright) Boyers, was born October 22, 1842, at Jimtown 
(now Randall), West Virginia. He went to the old-fashioned sub- 
scription schools, common in his youthful days. Later he attended the 
academy at Morgantown for two years, and decided to become a physi- 
cian. He then entered the Columbus (Ohio) Medical College, where 
he studied medicine in 1865-66; the Berkshire Medical College, Pitts- 
field, Massachusetts, in the summer of 1867, and graduated from the 
Baltimore Medical College, Baltimore, Maryland, where he studied in 
1881-82. He has been in active medical practice during a period of 
over forty years, in the following towns : Boothsville, Marion county, 
West Virginia, 1866-68; Sistersville, 1868-69; Boothsville, again, 
1869-73; Palatine (now Fairmont), from 1873 to the present time 
(19 1 2). Dr. Boyers has been engaged not only in medical work, but 
has been also a true promoter of local industries in his locaHty. He has 
dealt extensively in real estate, engaged in the drug trade, been con- 
nected with the hospital work of his city, and assisted in building up the 
pottery industry in Marion county. Politically Dr. Boyer is a Demo- 
crat. He has been identified with that ancient and honorable fraternity, 
the Masonic order, since 1868, and is now a worthy Shriner, having 
advanced to that degree in 1900. He is a member of the Marion 
County Medical Society, West Virginia State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. Since 1866 he has been connected 
with the Baptist church. 

He married, at Boothsville, West Virginia, February 12, 1867, 
Ehzabeth Jane Rymer, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, bom 
March 8, 1850, daughter of Henry A. Rymer, born in 1821 or 1822, 
died 1898, who had been a Methodist minister, school teacher and 
medical practitioner from 1849 to 1898, in Marion and Taylor coun- 
ties, Virginia, and had served in the West Virginia legislature for two 
terms in the seventies. The children of Henry A. Rymer were: Cath- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 449 

erine M., married Harter, died 1897; Elizabeth Jane, mar- 
ried Dr. C. F. Boyers, as aforesaid; Jessie E., born December 3, 1852, 

married Smith; Susana M., born March 3, 1854; Ina B., bom 

September 6, 1856, died December, 1907; Frank S., born September 
9. 1859. 

The children born to Dr. and Mrs. Cyrus F. Boyers are: i. Lillie 
Myrtle, born December 2, 1868; educated in public schools and the 
Fairmont State Normal School; married, June 25, 1888, Virgil New- 
ton Jones, D. D. S. ; children: Edna Hazel, born May 27, 1889; Velma 
Pauline, born June 5, 1893. 2. Henry Morgan, born October 17, 
1870, died October 15, 1898; educated in public schools and the Fair- 
mont State Normal School; graduated from the Baltimore Medical 
College, 1 891; practiced at Grafton and Fairmont, West Virginia; 
married Emma Rector Reynolds, June 12, 1894, and had one child: 
Lawrence Howard, born December 28, 1896. 3. William Frank, see 
forward. 4. Cyrus Fletcher Jr., born March 12, 1874; educated in 
public schools, Fairmont State Normal School, Baltimore Medical 
College, and graduated from Barnes Medical College, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri; married Rosa Katherine Holland, October 26, 1898, and has one 
child: Frederick Earl, born April 21, 1903. 5. Charles Leslie, born 
January 10, 1877; educated in public schools and Fairmont State Nor^ 
mal School, and graduated from Maryland Medical College in 1900; 
married, June 12, 1902, Naomi Bell Riggs, born April, 1880, daugh- 
ter of Andrew J. and Jeannette (Israels) Riggs; children: Charles 
Eugene, born August 31, 1903; Paul Elston, born May 12, 1907. 6. 
Lee Bernard, see forward. 7. Elbatine Beatrice, born August 22', 
1882; educated in public schools and Fairmont State Normal School; 
married James Albert Justis, December 25, 1907; children: Catherine 
Beatrice, born May 18, 1909; James Albert, born December 6, 19 10. 
8. James Walter, born October 28, 1884; educated in public schools, 
Fairmont State Normal School and Maryland Medical College; mar- 
ried Bessie Nelson, October 8, 1909. 9. Lawrence Luther, born Octo- 
ber 14, 1886; educated in grammar school, Fairmont State Normal 
School, Maryland Medical College; married Delia M. Jenkins, De- 
cern 21, 191 1. 10. Dark Catherine Matilda, born February 8, 1888; 
educated in the grammar school and State Normal School in Fairmont. 



450 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(V) Dr. William Frank Boyers, son of Dr. Cyrus Fletcher and 
Elizabeth Jane (Rymer) Boyers, was bom at Boothsville, West Vir- 
ginia, April 19, 1872. He obtained a fine education. He commenced 
in the public schools, later attending the Fairmont Normal School. 
Being of a family of physicians, he decided also to follow this pro- 
fession and prepared himself accordingly. He then attended a sub- 
scription school, and the schools at Palatine (now a part of Fairmont) ; 
in 1892 he entered the Baltimore Medical College, remaining until 
1895, and the last two years in Baltimore took a special course in the 
Maryland General and Maryland Lying-in Hospitals. He graduated 
in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1896. When attending college, he took up 
carpentry during vacation; and also worked on the old home farm; at 
the same time practicing nights in order to complete his college course, 
which was accomplished by his own efforts. He has practiced medicine 
since 1891, and has confined his attention to general medical and sur- 
gical work in Fairmont. He passed the State Board of Pharmacy in 
December, 1898; and has been medical inspector for the Union Inde- 
pendent Schools of Marion county. He owns and speculates in real 
estate, and is alive to every modern improvement and advancement that 
is offered the community. He is a member of the Marion County and 
the West Virginia State Medical societies and of the American Medical 
Association. He also has membership in the Modern Woodmen of 
America. In politics he is a Democrat, and in church relationship a 
Baptist. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce at Fairmont. 

Dr. Boyers married, October 8, 1901, Louana Riggs, born in Adlai, 
Pleasants county, West Virginia, September 5, 1878. Mrs. Boyers is 
the daughter of Andrew Jackson Riggs, a resident of Adlai, West 
Virginia, and a farmer by vocation, who died January, 1902. Mr. 
Riggs was a man of great courage, strength and endurance, yet strange 
to relate he met death by being tripped by a small boy on a hand-sled. 
He served in the Union army in civil war days, and was a member of 
Company F, Fourteenth West Virginia Regiment. He married Jeannette 
Israels, who is still living at the old homestead, and they were the parents 
of ten children: John Allen, born i860; Le Roy, 1863, died in child- 
hood; Manown Barrickman, April 25, 1866; Perry H., 1868; Samuel, 

1870; Dolly O., 1872, married Stanley; Sylvester V., 1874; 

Rutherford B. Hayes, 1876; Louana, married Dr. William F. Boyers, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 451 

see above; Naomi Bell, born April, 1880, married Dr. Charles L. 
Boyers, see above. Children of Dr. William F. and Louana (Riggs) 
Boyers: Ruth, born April 25, 1903; William F. Lewis, July 23, 1904; 
Naomi Beatrice, October 23, 1907; Pauline Jeannette, July 18, 19 10. 



(V) Dr. Lee Bernard Boyers, son of Dr. Cyrus Fletcher 
BOYERS Boyers (q. v.), was born October 30, 1879. He attend- 
ed the schools and graduated in the academic course 
at the Fairmont State Normal. The years 1897-98 he spent in the 
Baltimore Medical College, and graduated from the Maryland Med- 
ical College, May 15, 1900, at the age of twenty years. Before he 
reached the age of twenty-one he had full charge of the Franklyn 
Square Hospital of Baltimore City. In 1902 he commenced the prac- 
tice of medicine In Fairmont. He makes a specialty of gynecology, 
having obtained a special diploma on that branch of medicine. He 
already has a gold medal awarded him for special work in this line of 
work in women's diseases. He belongs to various medical societies. 
Including the Marion County Medical Society, West Virginia State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He is an 
honored, progressive member of Fairmont Lodge, No. 9, Masonic 
fraternity, and also holds membership and is the examiner of risks In 
the Woodmen of the World. Politically he votes an Independent 
ticket, and in church connection Is a member of the Methodist Prot- 
estant denomination. 

He married, June 2, 1908, Jessie Pearl, born In Roaring Springs, 
Pennsylvania, May 9, 1886, daughter of John Dilliny Soyster. She 
graduated at the high schools of Altoona, Pennsylvania. Her father 
is the manager of a large wholesale flour and feed establishment in 
Altoona. Dr. Boyers and wife have one child: Elizabeth Lee, born 
January 14, 191 1. 



This family is of Welsh origin and is numbered 
MEREDITH among the most prominent in Marion county. West 
Virginia. 
Thomas Meredith was the founder of the family In America. He 
was a wealthy silversmith of South Wales, who with his family emi- 
grated to the United States about 1800, locating at Hagerstown, Mary- 



452 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

land. He remained diere but a short time and moved to what is now 
Paw Paw district, Marion county, West Virginia, where he settled on 
a farm, but soon removed to another tract of farming land, near Smith- 
town, Monongalia county, where he followed farming and stock rais- 
ing. Becoming dissatisfied with that section of the state, he went on a 
prospecting tour to Canada, expecting to remove his family there. 
While thus home-seeking he sickened and died. Children : Hester, be- 
came the wife of William Brown; Thomas, who was a prominent busi 
ness man of Morgantown; Margaret, married James Ross; William 
of whom further; Mary, married John Riggs; Catherine, wife of E. B 
Ross; John, who was a farmer and justice of the peace for many years 
and who in 1870 removed to Bates county, Missouri, where he died 
three years later. 

(II) William, son of Thomas Meredith, was three years of age 
when brought to this country by his parents. He was reared midst the 
scenes of pioneer life in Monongalia county. He took up agricultural 
pursuits, beginning on a farm which he cleared from the wild forests 
along the Monongahela river, below the present site of Smithtown, but 
subsequently removed to Marion county, locating on a farm of three 
hundred acres on Pickett's creek, where he spent the remainder of his 
days, dying February 13, 1869, at the age of seventy-two years. He 
did not have good opportunities for gaining an education, but was pos- 
sessed of a vigorous mind, strong moral feelings, and was highly re- 
spected by the entire community, as a man of excellent judgment and a 
good heart. He served fifteen years as justice of the peace, at a time 
when such officers had to hold court in the county. He was a Whig 
until just prior to the civil war when he became a Democrat. He 
served as deputy sheriff a number of years, and was president one term 
of the county court of Marion county. He married Hannah, daughter 
of John Powell, a native of Monongalia county. Children : i . Thomas, 
deceased; was a carpenter; served in the First Virginia Cavalry during 
the civil war. 2. Mary, deceased wife of Jefferson Gilpin. 3. William, 
of whom further. 4. Catherine, deceased wife of John N. JoHff. 5. 
John Q. A. 6. D. Clifford, deceased; was a teamster in the army in 
civil war days. 7. Louisa, deceased wife of John C. Jenkins. 8. 
Amanda, widow of John Hawkins. 9. Marquis Lafayette, a farmer. 




r 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 453 

blacksmith and wagon-maker of Winfield district, Marion county. lo. 
Francis M., of whom later. 

(Ill) William (2), son of William (i) and Hannah (Powell) 
Meredith, was born November 17, 1824, near Smithtown, Monongalia 
county. West Virginia. His education was received in the old type 
subscription schools. After leaving the dingy school room he learned 
the wagon-maker's trade and followed it for a number of years, first at 
Senecaville, Guernsey county, Ohio, and later in Palatine and Fairmont, 
West Virginia. He was engaged in several other enterprises. From 
1866 to 1887 he was extensively engaged in the manufacture of lumber 
in Harrison and Ritchie counties. He also built and contracted in addi- 
tion to conducting farming operations. Politically he was a Republican, 
and served as a justice of the peace from 1878 to 1882 in Wirt county, 
West Virginia. In the Virginia state militia he was commissioned a 
lieutenant by Governor Pierpont. Early in life he joined the Methodist 
Episcopal church, being a class leader and steward several years. He 
married, April 13, 1845, Harriet, daughter of William H. Wilson, a 
farmer of Marion county; her father was a soldier in the war of 18 12. 
Children: i. Amanda Jane, deceased; was the wife of Leroy Hender- 
son. 2. Sarah H., wife of Thomas Carter. 3. Clinton B., a Method- 
ist minister. 4. Emma, wife of T. J. Coffman. 5. Winfield Scott, of 
whom further. 6. Mary Olive, wife of Francis M. Davis. 7. Ameri- 
cus Wirt. 8. Thomas G., a minister of the Methodist church. 9. Mel- 
vin Clayton. 10. Waitman T., who became a carpenter and lumberman. 

(Ill) Francis M., son of William (i) and Hannah (Powell) 
Meredith, was born on the old Meredith homestead, March 11, 1842. 
His educational advantages were but meager, and the greater part of 
his mental training came from self-study and general reading. In 1864, 
through inheritance and purchase, he became owner of his father's 
farm, which contained over two hundred acres of well-improved land. 
Up to 1893 he made a specialty of stock raising and dealing; later he 
directed his attention to dairying. From 1870 to 1882 he was engaged 
in lumbering on the Monongahela river, transporting lumber from this 
county to the Pittsburgh market. He organized and was president of 
the Marion County Creamery Company of Fairmont. He followed, in an 
extensive manner, stock shipping to Baltimore, Philadelphia and New 
York. In his various enterprises and lines of work he proved himself 



454 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

highly successful and readily accumulated property, more than is the lot 
of the ordinary man. Politically he was a Democrat; served as a mem- 
ber of the county board of Marion county from January, 1881, to 
January i, 1889. He was one of the members of the first board pro- 
vided for by the new state constitution which stipulated that one mem- 
ber should be elected each two years. It was determined by lot who 
should hold the long term of six years to begin with and he was the 
successful man. In church relations he Is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church; he is a member of Marion Lodge, No. 9, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, at Fairmont. 

He married, March 26, 1863, Louisa, born in Monongalia county, 

Virginia, February 5, 1847, daughter of Morgan and (Steel) 

Clelland. Children: i. Mary, born June 6, 1864, died September 27, 
1900. 2. Charles C, born December 13, 1866; a graduate of the 
Allegheny Medical College, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 3. Harry Brady, 
born October 23, 1869; married Myrtle Hill, and they have six sons: 
Hugh, Archie, Russell, Harper, Marion, John. 4. Desire, born April 
7, 1872 ; married Bruce Hill, whose three children are: Hershal, Grace, 
Louisa. 5. Ellen, born February 8, 1879; married Andrew Benny, and 
their children are: Berbeck, Madline, Catherine, Edward, Irene. 6. 
Ruby, born October 12, 1881; married Howard Jones. 7. Maude, 
died in infancy. 

( I V ) Hon. Winfield Scott Meredith, son of William ( 2 ) and Har- 
riet (Wilson) Meredith, was born in Marion county. West Virginia 
(then Virginia), August 13,1855. He received a liberal education in the 
Salem Academy, Harrison county. West Virginia, and at the Fairmont 
Normal School, from which he graduated with the class of 1879. Later 
he took a post-graduate course in his alma mater, under the instruction 
of Dr. J. G. Blair. Before he graduated he had taught one year in the 
Normal and one year as principal of the public schools of Cherry Camp, 
Harrison county. Upon the death of Dr. Blair, in 1879, he was select- 
ed by the board to take care of those classes until they were graduated. 
Subsequently he was principal three years at Palatine, now a ward of 
Fairmont, and served two years as principal of the graded school at 
Mannington. Among his pupils are now the leading citizens of Marion 
county. But with all the flattering success as an instructor, he had an 
ambition to study law, in which he prepared himself during the last few 




C(/ 



^pUj6^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 455 

years he taught, and hence we find that he registered as a law student 
in the office of Judge James Morrow Jr., a prominent attorney of Fair- 
mont, and after a thorough course was successful in his examination 
and admitted to the bar in 1881, and a year later began the legal prac- 
tice. In 1888 he was admitted to practice in the supreme court of the 
state. 

He started out in young manhood as an ardent, active Republican, 
and in 1882, soon after he was admitted to the Marion county bar, he 
was elected prosecuting attorney to fill the unexpired term of L. B. 
Haymond. At the end of that time he was reelected for the full term 
of four years. He has been tendered the nomination, if he "would but 
say the word," as a candidate for congressman and also for intermediate 
judge of the courts, but in each instance refused, preferring to attend 
strictly to his law practice. Having a clear and distinctly legal mind, 
he has frequently been called upon to preside over the circuit court 
during the absence of the judge. In this role his judgment and dignity 
have always been remarkable. Besides being a thoroughly read lawyer, 
he is gifted with fluent speech and is pleasing in his address and general 
manner. Politically he is a Republican, standing firm by his party in 
all that its fair and honorable policies stand for in state and national 
administrations. In the autumn of 1908 he was elected to a seat in the 
state senate, taking his seat January i, 1909, for the term of four 
years. This was during the memorable "dead-lock" year, when there 
were fifteen Republican senators and fifteen Democrats who failed to 
agree on the admission of some of the Republican members. In the 
Republican caucus over the affair, Mr. Meredith championed the side 
of his party members as chairman of the caucus, which body was in 
session fifteen days, the members finally being threatened with arrest 
for not appearing In their seats and trying to organize for business. 
The issue was largely over the election of president of the senate, both 
parties claiming the right to such office. Only by making their way out 
of the state over into Cincinnati, Ohio, did they escape being arrested. 
The contest was a very spirited, bitter one, but after remaining away 
more than a week a compromise was effected by which the Republicans 
succeeded In securing the president of the senate and one of the mem- 
bers over which the contest was held. In this prolonged fight Mr. Mere- 
dith displayed much sagacity and political generalship. He was made 



4S6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

chairman of the most important committee in the senate, that of the 
judiciary. At the special session of the legislature, held in May, 191 1, 
he again was conspicuous in several particulars, not already named. 

Mr Meredith married (first), in 1883, Dora, daughter of B. F. 
Swisher, of Fairmont. She died in 1886. He married (second) Lola 
B., daughter of S. W. Hall, of Fairmont. She died January 31, 19 10, 
without issue (see Hall IV). By his first marriage the children were: 
I. Dana S., born in 1884, died at Lake Placid, New York, March 17, 
19 10, unmarried. 2. Aubrey W., born November 5, 1885; married, 
in March, 19 10, Stella Stevens, of Fairmont; child, Winfield Scott 2d, 
born September 2, 191 1, died January i, 19 12. Aubrey W. Meredith, 
the father, graduated from the high schools of Fairmont, the State 
Normal School of the same city, graduated from the law department 
of the University of West Virginia, 19 10, and is now practicing law 
with his father. 



Among the representatives of the legal profession in 
CONLEY Fairmont who have attained prominence at the bar as 

the result of a thorough and comprehensive knowledge 
of the law in all its branches, may be mentioned Rollo J. Conley, a 
native of Fulton, Illinois, whose birth occurred March 27, 1874, a son 
of Joseph X. and Marietta (Gay) Conley, a grandson of Joseph and 
Mary (McRoberts) Conley, and a great-grandson of Hugh Conley. 

(II) Joseph, grandfather of Rollo J. Conley, was a resident of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he engaged successfully in the drug 
business, and where his death occurred in 1854. His wife, Mary (Mc- 
Roberts) Conley, bore him one child, Joseph X. (of whom further). 

(III) Joseph X., father of Rollo J. Conley, was born in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, April 21, 1851. After completing his education, he de- 
voted his attention to the drug business, mastering the details thereof, 
and in young manhood he migrated west and there followed the same 
line of business. Later he returned to his native city and there establish- 
ed a drug store which he still conducts in a highly successful manner, 
ranking among the foremost men of the community in which he resides. 
He is a member of the Masonic Order, and of the Royal Arcanum. 
While residing in the west, he married Marietta, born in Connecticut, 
daughter of the Rev. William Gay, who was a minister in the Presbyter- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 457 

ian denomination for fifty-nine years. Children: Rollo J. (of whom 
further) ; Frank, engaged in the real estate business in Pittsburg; 
Bessie, principal of the Shorthand School in the East End, Pittsburg. 

(IV) Rollo J. Conley attended the public schools of Pittsburg, and 
the Slippery Rock State Normal School in Butler county, Pennsylvania, 
where he completed his literary education. He then entered the rail- 
way mail service, continuing in the same for fourteen years. During 
the last years of his service under the government, he took up the study 
of law in the office of Senator W. S. Meredith, after which he attended 
the Law School of the University of West Virginia. He was admitted to 
the bar of West Virginia in 1909, and at once began the active practice 
of his profession in Fairmont, where he has since built up an extensive 
and lucrative clientage. During the Spanish-American war he enlisted 
in Company D, Tenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served in 
the Philippines for fifteen months, having a leave of absence from the 
railway mail service. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and 
a Repubhcan in politics, but has never held or sought public office, pre- 
ferring to devote his time to his professional work. He is a member of 
Fairmont Lodge, No. 9, Free and Accepted Masons; of the Mountain 
City Lodge, Knights of Pythias ; and of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

Mr. Conley married, November 21, 1899, Georgia E. Hall, born 
in Fairmont, West Virginia, August 28, 1875, daughter of Sylvanus 
W. Hall. Children: Virginia, born April 23, 1901, died July 12, 
1901 ; Joseph, born August 28, 1902 ; Frank, born January 1 1, 1907. 



The remotest ancestor of this family, of whom anything 
HALL definite is known, is Thomas Hall, who was descended 
from Scotch-Irich ancestors. There is a tradition in the 
family that this branch was started from a marriage between a Hall 
and a Spencer, one of whom was Scotch, the other Irish. Thomas Hall 
was born September 24, 1724, and he had two brothers, Moses, whose 
son Jesse was a soldier in the revolution, and David, an old sea captain. 
Early representatives of the Hall family settled at Snow Hill, Mary- 
land, and in Delaware. Thomas Hall died at or near Duck Creek 
Cross Roads, Delaware, May 29, 1772. He married Rebecca Story, a 



458 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

woman of English birth, who long survived her honored husband, her 
death having occurred December 15, 1812. 

After the death of Thomas Hall, in 1772, his widow remained with 
her children in Delaware until the close of the revolutionary war. In 
1 78 I Isaac Mason, who had married the eldest child, and Jordan Hall, 
the third child, emigrated westward, and in the following year, 1782, 
the family followed to the forks of Cheat river, a few miles below 
Morgantown, West Virginia. Those who left Delaware were Re- 
becca Hall, Asa Hall, with his wife and the latter's mother, Mrs. 
Margaret White, Nathan, Jordan, Rynear, Allen and Rebecca. Chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hall: Parthena; Asa, mentioned below; 
Jordan, Rynear, Nathan, Allen, Rebecca. 

(II) Asa, second child and eldest son of Thomas and Rebecca 
(Story) Hall, was born in Delaware, January 20, 1758, died suddenly, 
June 9, 1815. As noted above he accompanied the family to West 
Virginia. Shortly after arriving at Cheat river he purchased a tract of 
land containing five hundred acres at the mouth of Buffalo creek. For 
this land he paid at the rate of twenty-five cents an acre, the payment 
consisting of a horse, a gun, a pair of leggings and a pair of saddle 
bags. Asa Hall and several neighbors met and studied the Bible, in 
addition to which they taught each other to read and write. They 
met in an old house, known as the Beall schoolhouse, on Sundays. He 
married, March 26, 1778, Sophia, daughter of James and Margaret 
White. She died August 25, 1 81 8. Children : Thomas, born January 
II, 1779; Reuben, September 18, 1780, died April 19, 1791; Elisha, 
September 29, 1782; Nathan, July 25, 1784; Elizabeth, September i, 
1786; John, mentioned below; Silas, December 14, 1790, died May 5, 
1807; Allen, June 3, 1793; Phebe, September 28, 1798. 

(III) John, son of Asa and Sophia (White) Hall, was bom in 
Monongalia county, Virginia, April 22, 1788. He owned a large 
farm on Buffalo creek, which is now owned by his grandchildren. He 
was a man of industry and thrift and through his own efforts became 
the owner of extensive lands, which he cleared and cultivated. He was 
retired and reserved in disposition, yet was possessed of a warm heart 
and a generous nature, always helping those less fortunately situated in 
life than himself. He was originally a Whig in politics and later trans- 
ferred his allegiance to the Republican party. His religious faith was 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 459 

in harmony with the teachings of the Presbyterian church, in which he 
was reared. In the winter of 1841 he was stricken with palsy, from 
which he never fully recovered. He died October 12, 1863, at the 
age of seventy-five years. For twenty years he suffered ill health and 
during all that period was unable to mingle in the outdoor world. He 
retained a cheerful disposition to the last, in spite of his sickness, and 
brightened the household with his kind counsel and gentle words. 

He married (first), April 14, 18 14, Dorcas Snider, who died June 
19, 1815. He married (second), February i, 1821, Maria C. Hare, 
born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, July 26, 1794, died at the home 
of her son, S. W. Hall, February 17, 1881, in her eighty-seventh year. 
Mrs. Maria C. Hall united with the Presbyterian church in September, 
1820, and lived such an exemplary Christian life that her influence for 
good was felt long after she had passed to the spirit world. Child by 
first wife: Aseneth, married Scott Hess; is now deceased. Children by 
second marriage: James Alvah, born December 21, 1822; Silas War- 
wick, November 16, 1824; Martha Eleanor, September 26, 1826; Ash- 
bel Green Fairchild, November 15, 1829; Ozias Wilber, October 25, 
1831, died September 14, 1868; Ellery Robinson, February 27, 1834; 
Festus Brooks, May 6, 1836; Sylvanus Wilson, mentioned below; John 
Lowry Smith, May 2, 1842. 

(IV) Sylvanus Wilson, son of John and Maria C. (Hare) Hall, 
was born in Monongalia county, Virginia (now Marion county. West 
Virginia), June 21, 1838, died at Fairmont, March 12, 1908. He 
was reared to adult age on his father's farm on Buffalo creek, near 
Bamesville, and his educational training consisted of such advantages 
as were offered in the subscription schools of the time and locality. He 
later supplemented his early education with extensive reading, self study 
and critical observation. Leaving school he entered the office of the 
clerk of the circuit court at Fairmont, May i, i860, and there was 
actively engaged in clerical work for one year, at the expiration of 
which all public as well as private business was in a manner suspended 
on account of the civil war agitation. For the ensuing two years he was 
variously engaged, and on December i, 1862, under the restored 
government of Virginia, he received the appointment of clerk of the 
district court of appeals, which held its session in Fairmont. When the 



460 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

state of West Virginia was formed the district court, under the restored 
government, passed out of existence. Mr. Hall was assistant clerk of 
the convention that formed the first constitution of the new state and 
also served as assists it clerk one session each in the house of delegates 
and the state senate. When the supreme court of appeals of West 
Virginia was organized, July 9, 1863, Mr. Hall was appointed clerk 
of that important tribunal, and he continued the efficient incumbent of 
that office until August 18, 1874, when he resigned. At the time of 
Mr. Hall's resignation the judges caused to be entered on record a 
statement of their confidence in the ability and promptness with which 
he had conducted the business of the office of clerk of that court. 

For a number of years Mr. Hall was engaged in the drug business 
at Fairmont, but for ten years preceding his demise he did not engage 
in active business but devoted his time to looking after his real estate 
holdings. In 1 895 he built the Hall Block, at the comer of Adams and 
Monroe streets; this was one of the first large business office buildings 
erected in Fairmont. In politics Mr. Hall was a Republican, and he 
was alternate to the National Republican Convention in Chicago in 
1880 that nominated James A. Garfield. In religious belief he was a 
Presbyterian. He was a thorough business man, active, prompt and 
reliable, and all his dealings were characterized by fair and honorable 
methods. Bound up in the interest and welfare of his municipality, he 
ever sought for the advancement of her material and educational inter- 
ests. As business man and as public official he was accorded the un- 
alloyed confidence and esteem of all with whom he came in contact. 

He married, April 14, 1862, Mary Isabella, daughter of Daniel 
Gantz. She died October 28, 1878, at the comparatively early age of 
thirty-eight years. Children: i. Lola Bird, born February 9, 1863; 
married, November 5, 1894, W. S. Meredith, a prominent lawyer of 
Fairmont; she died January 31, 19 10. 2. Willey Harrison, born Janu- 
ary 31, 1864; was graduated in the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 
in 1885, and is now ( 1912) engaged in the drug business at Fairmont. 
3. Mary Isabella, born February 14, 1868. 4. Charles Wilson, bom 
July 9, 1870, died December 7, 1875. 5. Georgia Ella, bora August 
28, 1875; married, November 21, 1899, Rollo J. Conley. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 461 

James A. Meredith, a descendant of a sturdy and 
MEREDITH thrifty ancestry, and a highly reputable citizen, an 

attorney-at-law by profession, residing in Fairmont, 
was born at Centreville, now Alma, Tyler county, West Virginia, Janu- 
ary 27, 1875. 

(I) The first of the line here under consideration was Davis Mere- 
dith, a Welshman, who came to this country and located in what is now 
Marion, formerly Monongalia county, about 1796, building his home 
just above Hoodsvllle on Little Paw Paw creek. He was a prominent 
factor in the upbuilding and improvement of the section wherein he 
resided. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. He died in 1825. He 

married (first) , and his children were: i. Thomas, 

married MilHe, daughter of Richard and Susanna (Stull) Morris; they 
settled in Marietta, Ohio, where many descendants reside. 2. Job, 
removed to Ritchie county, West Virginia. 3. Davis, see forward. 4. 
William, settled in Ritchie county, West Virginia. Davis Meredith 

married (second) Nancy , and their children were: 5. Millie, 

married James Arnett. 6. Nellie, married WilHam Arnett. 

(II) Davis (2), son of Davis (i) Meredith, was born on the old 
home farm near Hoodsville, now Marion county. West Virginia. He 
was reared on a farm, and in early manhood settled at Hoodsville, 
where he cleared and improved a farm adjoining the old Morris farm. 
Subsequently he became a minister of the old Methodist Episcopal 
church. He removed to Noble county, Ohio, and about 1857 to Tyler 
county, now West Virginia, where he spent the last years of his life. 
His career was an active and useful one, and he strove most earnestly 
to fulfill every duty and responsibility. He was formerly an old line 
Whig in politics, joining the Republican party upon its organization. 
He married, near Rivesville, Marion county, West Virginia, Naomi 
Snodgrass. Children : William N. ; John W. ; Absalom P., see for- 
ward; James Alva; Thomas P.; Alexander; Nancy, married 

Beatty; Luverna, married Thomas Nenton Watkins; Jennie, married 
Thomas Ripley; Emily, married William Gleen; Martha. The father 
of these children died in 1895, surviving his wife several years, her 
death occurring in 1885. 

(III) Absalom P., son of Davis (2) Meredith, was bom in Noble 
county, Ohio, in 1843. He was reared to agricultural pursuits, educated 



462 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

in the common schools, and at the age of fourteen years accompanied 
his parents to Tyler county, now West Virginia. Upon attaining young 
manhood he settled on a farm in his native county, which he cultivated 
and improved, and this occupation claimed his attention throughout 
his active career. At the breaking out of the civil war he enlisted in 
Company C, Seventh West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, with which he 
saw considerable severe service; he served for three years, at the expira- 
tion of which time he was honorably discharged. After his marriage 
he removed to the state of Illinois, where he remained one year, and 
then returned to West Virginia, settling on a farm in Tyler county, 
from which he derived a lucrative livelihood. His church membership 
was with the Methodist Episcopal denomination, and his political 
allegiance was given to the Republican party. He was a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He married, in 1864, Catherine Riley, of Sistersville, West 
Virginia, born in Tyler county, Virginia, 1837, daughter of Turner 
Riley, a pioneer settler of that region. She was a school teacher prior 
to her marriage. Children: i. Charles S., born in 1869; a merchant 
of Spencer, West Virginia. 2. Laura, twin of Charles S. ; married John 
Kelley, of Ritchie count)'. West Virginia. 3. Gilbert B., born in 1873; 
foreman for Hope Natural Gas Company, at Smithfield, West Virginia. 
4. Jennie A., married John W. Hornor, of Ritchie county. West Vir- 
ginia. 5. Rufus, twin of James A., connected with the oil business in 
Oklahoma. 6. James A., see forward. 7. William H., engaged in 
real estate business at Middlebourne, West Virginia. 8. Emma, mar- 
ried Campbell Martin, of Ritchie county. West Virginia. 9. Emery 
D., connected with the South Penn Oil Company, at Lynch, Harrison 
county, West Virginia. Absalom Meredith died in 1904, survived by 
his wi f e, who is II ving at the present time ( 1 9 1 1 ) . 

(IV) James A., son of Absalom P. and Catherine (Riley) Mere- 
dith, was educated in the common schools of Tyler county, taught school 
at sixteen, graduated from the Normal and Classical Academy of Buck- 
hannon in 1895, and from the West Virginia University in 1900, re- 
ceiving his B. A. and LL. B. degrees at the same time. He was immedi- 
ately admitted to the bar at Middlebourne, West Virginia, and entered 
active practice of the law. In January, 1903, he located in Fairmont, 
where he acted as cashier of Fairmont Trust Company for about a year. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 463 

resigning to resume the practice of his profession, and has built up a 
successful and lucrative practice. He is in every way thoroughly 
equipped for his work, and his reputation is fully established in the 
community in which he resides. He holds membership in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and is an active member of the Republican 
party. He is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He married, September 17, 1902, Gillian, born May 
25, 1877, daughter of James M. and Elizabeth (Boyers) Jamison, 
who resided in Morgantown, West Virginia, both of whom are now 
deceased. They are the parents of one child, Jamison, born August 
5. 1903- 



The American ancestry of the Brownfield family 
BROWNFIELD is traced back to the pioneer period of the his- 
tory of Pennsylvania, when Thomas Brownfield, 
one of the early settlers, crossed the Allegheny mountains, when Indians 
and wild animals held undisputed possession of the beautiful Monon- 
gahela Valley. 

(I) Thomas Brownfield, pioneer ancestor, married and reared a 
family, including several sons, one of whom was Rev. William Brown- 
field, a learned and eminent divine of the Baptist church, who became 
the great rival of Alexander Campbell, founder of the Disciple or 
Christian church. Another son was Squire Brownfield, whose Christian 
name was James, who came into possession of the home farm and 
passed his life peacefully in the pursuit of agricultural work and de- 
velopment of the country in which he was a native. He served as a 
justice of the peace many years. 

(II) James, son of Thomas Brownfield, of Fayette county, Penn- 
sylvania, married Hannah Bowell, by whom he had children, including 
Judge John Brownfield, of whom later. James Brownfield remained 
a farmer throughout his active years in Fayette county, Pennsylvania. 

(III) Judge John Brownfield, son of James and Hannah (Bowell) 
Brownfield, was born December 28, 1808, died January 23, 1885. He 
left the farm, on attaining his majority, to engage in general mercan- 
tile business, which occupied his thought and attention during all his 
years of activity. He had a good education, was broad-minded and 



464 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

had most excellent judgment, hence his services were always in de- 
mand among his neighbors. In 1851 he was elected as associate judge 
of Fayette county, Pennsylvania, serving two terms, which period 
expired in 1861. On the bench he was known as one of the most 
efficient and useful associate judges in all the state. He was a member 
of the Baptist church, and politically a Democrat. He married Belinda, 
daughter of John Hustead, and she died July 2, 1882, aged seventy-one 
years. Children: Dr. James H., of whom further; John H., who be- 
came an active business factor near Smithfield, Pennsylvania; Sarah, 
widow of Simeon Dunn; Mary B.; Alceste J., widow of E. J. Feather, 
a merchant of Smithfield. 

(IV) Dr. James H. Brownfield, son of Judge John and Belinda 
(Hustead) Brownfield, was bom July 5, 1836, in Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania. He received his education at the home schools and at 
Lewisburg (now Bucknell) University, Union county, Pennsylvania. 
At the end of his college life he became a medical student in the office 
of Dr. H. B. Mathiot, after which he entered Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, where he took one course of lectures. Then with the coming of 
the civil war, he gave his services to his country. He was a contract 
surgeon at Fairmont, now West Virginia, for a time; then was appoint- 
ed assistant surgeon of the Fourteenth West Virginia Infantry Regi- 
ment, serving in the latter capacity until the close of the war. After the 
war closed he returned to Fairmont which had been his home since 
i860. He soon built up a large practice which has increased with the 
passing decades, and is now the oldest practicing physician in Marion 
county. West Virginia. After becoming a physician, he returned to his 
alma mater and in 1877 received the degrees which he had expected to 
obtain when the war changed his plans. It is related of him that he 
had the honor of performing the first amputation in the civil war. He 
was in the Eighth Army Corps, and under General Philip Sheridan. 
After a half century Dr. Brownfield retired from the general medical 
practice. He was one of the organizers and charter members of the 
West Virginia State Medical Society in 1867; also has belonged to the 
American and International Associations, and the National Association 
of Railroad Surgeons, and is an honored member of the American 
Public Health Association. He is connected with the Masonic order, 
being a member of the Royal Arch Masons and the Shriners, and has 




JAty^V^'^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 465 

long since been a Thirty-second degree Mason. Politically Dr. Brown- 
field is Republican, and has labored with zeal in many a well-fought 
political campaign. He held the position of pension examiner for his 
district from 1867 until the Cleveland presidential administration in 
1884. In the autumn of 1894 he was elected a member of the house 
of representatives from Marion county, and ranked as one of the fore- 
most lawmakers in West Virginia. 

Dr. James H. Brownfield married, October 18, 1866, Ann Eliza- 
beth Fleming, who died in 1903, daughter of Matthew Fleming of 
Marion county (see Fleming). Children: John M., cashier of the 
People's National Bank at Fairmont; Clark B., died January, 1909, 
married M. D. Nuzum, and had one child, James H. ; George H., 
practicing physician at Fairmont, married Ida L. Bartlett; and Archie 
F., conducting a jewelry business at Fairmont. 



James Allen, immigrant ancestor, very likely came to 
ALLEN Dedham, Massachusetts, with his uncle, the Rev. John 
Allen, about 1637. He was a grandson of Reginald 
Allen, of Colby, Norfolk, England. The first mention of him in the 
records is dated April 6, 1632, when "Jeames Allin accepted to haue 
sixe acres layd out for him in yt corner by Jeffery Myngey yf ther it may 
be found fitt." He received other grants at various times. He was ad- 
mitted to the church, October 2, 1646, and made a freeman. May 26, 
1647. In 1648 his estate was valued at two pounds and his tax was 
rated at three shillings five pence. In 1649 some of the inhabitants of 
Dedham made a company in order to form a settlement at Boggestow, 
upon the Charles river, now known as Medfield, and he was one of the 
first thirteen proprietors, and the fifth to be granted land in the new 
town. The committee which carried on the affairs of the town at first 
granted him land, June 19, 1650, when they laid out the thirteen house 
lots. His lot was on South street near the present residence of Mr. 
Rhodes. In 1650 his estate was valued at one hundred and thirty-nine 
pounds. He was again granted land in 1653, near the land of his son 
Joseph. He received other grants of land and owned tracts on both 
sides of the river. His will was dated September 23, 1676. He left his 
house, barn, etc., to his son-in-law, Joseph Clerk, and as he had given 



466 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

his house on South street to his son Nathaniel he must have owned two 
places. 

He married, in Dedham, March i6, 1638, Ann Guild, who died in 
Medfield, March 29, 1673, and he died there, September 27, 1676. 
Children, all born in Dedham except the youngest : John, December 4, 
1639; Martha, twin, December 11, 1641; Mary, twin of Martha; 
Sarah, May 4, 1644; James, April 28, 1646; Nathaniel, August 29, 
1648; Joseph, mentioned below. 

(II) Joseph, son of James Allen, was born in Medfield, June 24, 
1652. He settled in the northern part of the town on Castle Hill, 
known as the Allen place afterwards. He was granted two lots of land 
in 1673, one between the road leading to "Goodman Morse's" and land 
owned by his father, below Samuel Wight's land. The other lot was 
between his father's land and that owned by Samuel Wight, bounded 
on the east by the highway leading to Natick. He was a cooper by 
trade, and his house and shop were built before King Philip's war. On 
February 21, 1676, the Indians determined to burn the town, and his 
property was among the first to receive their attention. They took 
shavings from the shop and piled them on the kitchen floor. They 
applied the torch and set them on fire, but the shavings had been piled 
on a trap door which fell into the cellar when burnt and extinguished 
the flames. No other damage was done, although all of the other 
houses in that part of the town were destroyed. On September 21, 
1676, he received from his father six acres of upland and one acre of 
meadow land, and this was probably his share in his father's will, as his 
name was not on the will which was dated two days later. In 1675 and 
1 701 his name is on the list of proprietors, and he was made a freeman, 
October 11, 1682. In 1688 he was sealer of weights and measures, 
and he and his wife were admitted to the first parish in 1697. He 
married, in Seakonk (Rehoboth), November 10, 1673, Hannah, born 
there, October 23, 1654, died in Medfield, in 1730, daughter of Will- 
iam Sabin. He died in Medfield, January 14, 1703. Children, all 
born in Medfield: Joseph, December 19, 1676; Hannah, June 23, 
1679; Daniel, April 21, 1681; David, March 22, 1683; Noah, April 
21, 1685; Eleazer, August 25, 1688; Jeremiah, August 5, 1690; Heze- 
kiah, November 3, 1692; Abigail, October 24, 1694; Nehemiah, men- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 467 

tioned below; Thankful, probably died young; Mary, probably died 
young. 

(III) Nehemiah, son of Joseph Allen, was born in Medfield, April 
22, 1699. He sold his right of inheritance to his brother Noah, and 
settled in Sherbourn, Massachusetts. About 1745 he moved to Stur- 
bridge, Massachusetts. He married, about 1722, Mary Parker, who 
died in Sturbridge, January 27, 1771, and he died there November i, 
1785. Children, born in Sherbourn: Timothy, September 5, 1723, 
died young; Nehemiah, July 22, 1724, died young; Hannah, July 29, 
1725; Eliphalet, August 24, 1727; Nehemiah, October 17, 1729; 
John, February 13, 1731-32; Jacob, February 24, 1733-34; Abel, Feb- 
ruary 20, 1735-36; Mary, April 16, 1738; David, mentioned below; 
Abigail, December 23, 1741; Timothy, in Sturbridge, March 25, 
1744; Abner, in Sturbridge, August 22, 1746. 

(IV) Deacon David Allen, son of Nehemiah Allen, was born at 
Sherbourn, Massachusetts, December 23, 1739. With the remainder of 
the family he removed to Sturbridge, Worcester county. He married 
(first), at Charlton, March 10, 1763, Experience Streeter, of Charl- 
ton. This marriage is recorded both at Sturbridge and Charlton. He 
is called of Halifax, presumably Vermont, when he married (second), 
at Sturbridge, September 22, 1783, Eunice Colburn or Colman (inten- 
tion gives one spelling, marriage record the other) . Probably should 
be Colburn, which was after perpetuated as a family name. She was 
a widow. Two children are recorded as born in Charlton, viz : David, 
mentioned below; Jonathan, March 5, 1766. 

(V) David (2), son of Deacon David (i) Allen, was born at 
Charlton, April 24, 1764. He settled In Vermont. The history of 
Middlebury, Vermont, says that David Allen, brother of Theophilus, 
settled on the farm north of his brother, now or lately owned by Alfred 
Stowell, and that he died In 1805, aged forty-three. Theophilus deed- 
ed his farm to Joshua Henshaw in 1797. He married, about 1790, 
Abigail Goodenough. She married (second) Elijah Keeler. Chil- 
dren : Asa ; Ezra, mentioned below. 

(VI) Ezra, son of David (2) Allen, was born in Middlebury, 
Vermont, March 22, 1795, died April 7, 1849, '" East Smithfield, 
Pennsylvania. He married Lydia Chamberlln, at Marlborough, Sep- 
tember 10, 1 8 17, grandniece of General Warren. Children: Warren; 



468 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Rev. Cyrus, a pioneer preacher in Kansas; Marinus Newton, of Titus- 
ville, Pennsylvania, was prominent in early oil development, editor of 
Titusville Courier for years, postmaster under President Cleveland; 
E. Pascal, a leading surgeon of Athens, Pennsylvania; Harrison, of 
Waverly, New York; Henry, a leading attorney of Mansfield, Tioga 
county, Pennsylvania; Judson W., mentioned below; a twin brother, 
George; Louisa; Lucinda. 

(VII) Judson W., son of Ezra Allen, was born September 7, 
1838, in Bradford county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools. By profession he is a civil engineer and surveyor. From 
1869 to 1 88 1 he was county superintendent of schools and he had been 
previously the principal of the graded schools. In 1865 he located at 
Coudersport, Pennsylvania, and since then has been a prominent and 
influential citizen of that town. For many years he was the general 
agent of the Bingham Estate, which owned two hundred and seventy- 
five thousand acres of land, a large part of which was oil land and the 
whole was heavily timbered. Mr. Allen sold most of this vast property 
to good advantage. He is a prominent Free Mason, a member of 
Eulalia Lodge, of which he is a past master. He has always been an 
earnest supporter of the temperance movement, and is an active and 
zealous member of the Baptist church, of which for many years he has 
been a deacon. In his younger days he was a lay preacher and filled 
the pulpit often in the absence of the pastor. 

He married, August 15, 1866, Mary Bowen, of Academy Corners 
(Knoxville), Pennsylvania. Children: i. John Bowen, mentioned be- 
low. 2. Ezra, professor of biology in the School of Pedagogy, Phila- 
delphia; married May M. , of New York. 3. Laura L., born 

1877; graduate of Bucknell College, Pennsylvania; was a preceptress in 
the high school of Coudersport; now Mrs. C. M. Kinkle, of Vander- 
grift, Pennsylvania. 

(VIII) John Bowen, son of Judson W. Allen, was born in Cou- 
dersport, Pennsylvania, June 24, 1867. He attended the public schools 
of his native town and the State Normal School at Mansfield and the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology of Boston. In 1890 he began 
to practice his profession of civil engineer and has continued to the 
present time, except during 1898 when he was in active service in the 
Spanish-American war in the Twelfth Regular Infantry Regiment in 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 469 

Cuba, under General Chaffee. He took part in the battle of El Caney, 
July I, 1898, and remained with his regiment before Santiago until the 
surrender. After the war he resumed his business as civil engineer. 
In 1909 he located in Fairmont, West Virginia, and is associated with 
Wilkie C. Rohr in civil and mining engineering. He is a member 
of Fairmont Lodge, No. 294, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and of Benezette Lodge, No. 988, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. In politics he is an Independent. In religion he is a Baptist. 
He married, April 19, 1903, Edith, born in Olean, New York, 
April 17, 1883, daughter of James Doyle, a lumberman, who died in 
November, 1908. They have two children: Mary Bowen, born at 
Pennfield, April 7, 1904; John Bowen Jr., born at Fairmont, West 
Virginia, September 23, 191 1. 



The Smoot family, known to have been for more than a 
SMOOT century resident in Virginia, and prominently identified 

with the best interests of West Virginia ever since the 
beginning of its independent history, is, there is reason to suppose, 
identical with the Smoot family which was planted in Maryland during 
the early years of the colony, the first Smoot will recorded in Maryland 
being dated 1676. 

(I) John Smoot died in 1808, in Hampshire county, Virginia, 

leaving a large number of descendants. His wife was Mary , 

and according to his will his children were: "Barton, eldest son;" 
"Solomon, second son;" "James, deceased;" "Children and wife of 
deceased James;" also, William, Jacob, Joshua, mentioned below; 
Joseph, Mary Cornet, Susanna Haize, Lucrecy, and two youngest 
daughters. Charity and Priscilla. The fact that Barton is a common 
family name in this line seems an additional reason for connecting the 
Smoots of Virginia with those of Maryland who are known to have 
intermarried with the Bartons. 

(II) Joshua, son of John and Mary Smoot, was a farmer, owning 
land in Hampshire county. The acres which had been his home he sold 
in 1835, having moved the year before to Preston county, now West 
Virginia, where he was the first settler of Newburg. The house in 
which he lived is still standing in good condition and is owned by the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. In religious belief Mr. Smoot 



470 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

was a Baptist, and on moving to Preston county made his home in a 
Baptist community. He married, In Hampshire county, Mary Haines, 
born In March, 1794, in Maryland. They are known to have been 
married previous to 1 8 1 7 by the fact that in that year they executed a 
deed to property In Hampshire county. Their children were : Samuel, 
Walker, Henry, William, Minor Barton, Sarah, Eveline, James Rea- 
son, mentioned below ; Julia, Harriet. Joshua Smoot at the time of his 
death was a member of the Baptist church and is interred in a burying 
ground of that denomination. 

(III) James Reason, son of Joshua and Mary (Haines) Smoot, 
was born June 23, 1834, in Hampshire county, Virginia. He was a 
merchant, lumber manufacturer, stockman and financier. He organ- 
ized the First National Bank of Newburg, and from that time until 
the close of his life was Its president. He was a member of the Meth- 
odist Protestant church and gave to the society at Newburg to which he 
belonged the site for their edifice, in the building of which he was 
largely Instrumental. He married (first), March 5, 1854, in Pres- 
ton county, Susan Howard (see Howard III), and their children were: 
Mary E., born April 27, 1856; Ethel O., April 22, 1862; John W., 
April 25, 1864; Charles Howard, mentioned below; Hattie D., Sep- 
tember 21, 1868. In 1885 he married (second) Susan Powell, and of 
this union the following children were born: J. Ray, Grace, Clara, Cal- 
vin, Cora, Earl and Edgar. All these are at home or In school, with 
the exception of J. Ray Smoot, who Is cashier and director of the First 
National Bank of Newburg, founded by his father. J. Ray Smoot 
married, in 1908, Mollle Fromhart, of Newburg, and they have one 
child, J. Ray Jr. James Reason Smoot died in 1905, leaving a record 
of many years of usefulness and honor. 

(IV) Charles Howard, son of James Reason and Susan (Howard) 
Smoot, was born March 23, 1866, In Newburg, Preston county. West 
Virginia. He received his preparatory education In the graded schools 
of his native place, afterward spending three years at Adrian College, 
Adrian, Michigan. After completing his course of study he entered 
mercantile life and for nine years was in partnership with his father at 
Newburg. In 1896 he moved to Webster county, West Virginia, and 
there conducted the lumber manufacturing business of his father and 
himself under the firm name of C. H. Smoot & Company. This enter- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 471 

prise of Mr. Smoot resulted in the founding of a business colony, and 
for its benefit he caused a postoffice to be established which he named 
Prestonia, in honor of the county, he himself being appointed the first 
postmaster. In 1900 the lumber firm of C. H. Smoot & Company was 
moved to a point in Nicholas county. West Virginia, where Strouds 
creek empties into Gauley river. This point was sparsely settled and 
had no postoffice, so once more Mr. Smoot, with characteristic energy 
and public spirit, established another post village, which was named 
Allingdale, and of which he became, as in the case of Prestonia, the 
first postmaster. At Allingdale he has since carried on a thriving lum- 
ber business in connection with farming and cattle raising, the land in 
this vicinity affording good grazing after the removal of the timber. 
In 1904 James Reason Smoot withdrew from the firm and Charles 
Howard Smoot has since been sole head of the organization. In addi- 
tion to this responsible position he also holds the office of president of 
the Lanes Bottom Bank, at Lanes Bottom, West Virginia. In politics 
Mr. Smoot is a Republican and was once elected mayor of Newburg, 
but did not qualify, preferring to remain a private citizen, as such ren- 
dering always strong support to the government. He is a thirty- 
second degree Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He is an official member of the Methodist Protestant 
church at Newburg, and has twice served as a delegate to the general 
conference. His family are members of the First Presbyterian Church 
in Fairmont. 

Mr. Smoot married, June 12, 1890, at Newburg, Alice L. Paul 
(see Paul). Children: Raphael, born March 22, 1891; Charles 
Howard Paul, January 17, 1893, died, as did his elder brother, in 
infancy; Bithiah, January 7, 1901; Ralph Omar, February 17, 1907. 
The comfortable and attractive dwelling which the family occupied 
during the years of their residence at Allingdale has been, since 1907, 
their summer home, Mr. Smoot having purchased in that year the beau- 
tiful house at Fairmont which is their place of abode during the winter 
months. 

(The Howard Line). 

(I) John Howard, grandfather of Mrs. Susan (Howard) Smoot, 



472 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

was born in 1780, in Kent county, Delaware. He married Martha 
McCracken, of Scotch parentage. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) and Martha (McCracken) 
Howard, was a man of large influence in his community, holding the 
office of justice of the peace, and serving as a delegate to the first and 
second conventions which met at Wheeling to consider the formation 
of the new state of West Virginia. It was Mr. Howard who named 
the town of Independence, in Preston county. He married Elizabeth, 
born in 1803, daughter of Daniel and Susan (Davis) Thompson. 
Daniel Thompson was a son of James and Sarah (Wood) Thompson, 
who came before 1790 from Belair, Harford county, Maryland, to 
Monongalia county. West Virginia. 

(III) Susan, daughter of John (2) and Elizabeth (Thompson) 
Howard, was born February 18, 1830, in Preston county, Virginia. 
She became the wife of James Reason Smoot (see Smoot III). 

(The Paul Line). 

Nicholas Paul, founder of the Virginia branch of the family, was a 
native of Germany and emigrated in 1754 to the American colonies. 
He served in the French and Indian and also in the revolutionary war; 
his son, Jacob Paul, was an officer in the war of 18 12, and his grand- 
son, Washington Paul, held a commission in the union army during the 
civil war. Henry Miller, of Pennsylvania, a revolutionary soldier, was 
allied to this branch of the Paul family, as was Henry Snider, who 
came about 1800 to Monongalia county, Virginia, and was the pro- 
genitor of many descendants who are at the present time among the 
sturdy citizens of this state and of other parts of the country. 

John Emory Paul, a lineal descendant of Nicholas Paul and father 
of Mrs. Alice L. (Paul) Smoot, served several terms as recorder of 
Newburg and was at one time mayor of the city. He also served a 
term as mayor of Monongah, West Virginia. His business has been 
that of builder, merchant and secretary. Mr. Paul married Bithiah 
McCool, born seven miles from Glasgow, Scotland, at Kirkintilloch, 
Dumbartonshire, and at the age of three years was brought by her 
parents to the United States, thus leaving the place where four genera- 
tions of the family had resided. Following are the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul: Alice L., mentioned below; James W., graduate of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 473 

West Virginia University, student two years in Columbia College, New 
York City, was twelve years at head of mining department in West Vir- 
ginia as chief mine inspector, now at Pittsburgh under the federal gov- 
ernment as chief of the mine rescue work of the United States, often 
going abroad in interest of this work, married, in 1901, Nell Wilson, 
of Beaver, Pennsylvania, two children, James W. Jr. and Margaret; 
Margaret Jane; William Emory. 

Alice L., daughter of John Emory and Bithiah (McCool) Smoot, 
was born at Newburg, West Virginia. On her seventeenth birthday 
she graduated from the Fairmont State Normal School. For five con- 
secutive years thereafter she taught in the graded schools of her home 
town, and during that time was elected a member of the teachers' 
examining board of Preston county. In association with Professor 
F. B. Trotter, now of the West Virginia Association, and with the late 
W. B. Squires, then county superintendent, she served in this capacity 
for one year, but refused to be considered as a candidate for a second 
term. This was the first and remains the only instance of a woman's 
serving on the teachers' examining board of Preston county. In 1889 
she was appointed postmistress of Newburg, then the largest postoffice 
in Preston county. On June 12, 1890, she became the wife of Charles 
Howard Smoot (see Smoot IV). Mrs. Smoot is a member of the 
William Haymond Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, 
of the Fairmont Woman's Club and of the First Presbyterian Church 
and its missionary society. Mrs. Smoot has followed the religious tra- 
dition of her maternal ancestry, not her mother only, but also the 
latter's parents, Muir and Margaret McCool, and their progenitors, 
having been identified with the Scotch Presbyterian church. 



Among the military characters in West Virginia, who 

HARR served his country almost three years during the civil war, 

under Generals Milroy and Sheridan, is Rufus E. Harr, 

born in Marion county, Virginia, May 22, 1846. He is the son of 

Merrick R. and Sophia (Stark) Harr. The father was a farmer who 

died when his son was only six years of age. The mother died in 1871. 

Thus early in life Rufus E. Harr was thrown on his own resources, 

being tenderly cared for by his mother, and both had a struggle to 

maintain themselves after the passing away of the father and husband. 



474 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

After attending the common schools in his native county, Rufus E. 
Harr worked at various things until the civil war came on, when he 
tendered his services to his country. He enlisted when only sixteen 
years of age in Company F, Twelfth Regiment, West Virginia Infan- 
try, under Colonel Curtis. He was with Hunter during his raid, and in 
December, 1 864, was removed to the front of Richmond where his com- 
mand remained until the following March. They were later engaged 
at Hatcher's Run. April i, he was present at the storming of Fort 
Gregg, in front of Petersburg, considered the key to the mihtary situa- 
tion. Their corps commander was General Gibbons, and soon after the 
Twelfth Regiment was presented with a golden eagle, mounted on a 
globe, with the following inscription on the globe: "Presented to the 
Twelfth West Virginia Infantry, by Maj-Gen. Gibbons who was their 
corps commander, for gallant conduct in charging Fort Gregg, in front 
of Petersburg, on April 2, 1865." The regiment (what there is left of 
it) are very proud of this globe and inscription and preserve it with 
great care. Before Mr. Harr had reached his nineteenth birthday he 
had passed through that great war for the preservation of the union and 
been honorably discharged from the service of his country. He had 
three sons in the late Spanish-American war, and has safely placed the 
five honorably discharges (his own and his sons papers) in the safety 
vaults of his bank. 

After his return from the war Mr. Harr followed farming during 
the summer and taught school in winter, continuing thus for thirteen 
years. After that he devoted all of his time to farming and stock rais- 
ing up to 1 89 1, when he removed to the city of Fairmont, where he 
erected several residences. Later he engaged In the mercantile business 
under the firm name of Thomas & Harr, continuing until April i , 1 9 1 1 . 
In 1903 he assisted in organizing the Monongahela Bank of Fairmont, 
with a capital of $50,000. He was selected as one of the directors and 
also Its president at the date of its organization, and still holds such re- 
sponsible position. This banking house is in a flourishing condition, 
paying a three per cent, semi-annual dividend. At the election In No- 
vember, 1906, Mr. Harr was elected as one of the delegates from 
Marlon county to the West Virginia legislature and served In the regu- 
lar session of 1907 and in the called session of 1908. He is a Repub- 
lican In politics. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 475 

Mr. Harr married, August 29, 1867, Mary L., daughter of Rich- 
ard and Hannah Thomas, of Marion county, West Virginia. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Harr are: i. Albert. 2. Maggie, wife of Mr. 
Gilhart, residing in Fairmont. 3. Fred S., of Fairmont. 4. Frank R., 
unmarried, at home. 5. Annie, Mrs. Hall, of Fairmont. 6. Hugh, a 
druggist on Main street, Fairmont. 7. Ella, Mrs. Henry, of Fair- 
mont. 8. B. Filmore, assistant chief of police at Fairmont. 9. Lillian, 
Mrs. Parks, of Fairmont. 10. Evie S., Mrs. Swearnger, died about 
1 890, leaving one child. Two more of the issue of Mr. and Mrs. Han- 
died in infancy. Fred S., Frank R. and Hugh Harr, served in the 
Spanish-American war in 1898-99, and B. Filmore later spent three 
years in the signal service of the United States army. 



The ancestors of this branch of the Nichols family 
NICHOLS came from England and settled in Pennsylvania many 
years before the revolutionary war. 

(I) Thomas Nichols married Margaret Morgan and they had the 
following children: William, see forward; Thomas, killed at the battle 
of Brandywine; James, died at Catfish Falls, Pennsylvania; Isabella, 
married Michael Beary; Mary, married John Snider; Margaret. 

(II) William, son of Thomas and Margaret (Morgan) Nichols, 
was born in Pennsylvania, and died near Fairmont, Virginia, now West 
Virginia, November 30, 1843. He was a member of the Pennsylvania 
Rangers from 1778 to 1783, during the revolutionary war; this organ- 
ization furnished its own guns and ammunition. He married Jane, 
daughter of Henry McClelland, who emigrated from Scotland, and she 
was born on the ocean. She died May 16, 1838. Children: Henry, 
see forward; Thomas, married and settled in Pittsburgh; Margaret, 
married James Fitzmorris; Anna, married Reason Fowler; Priscilla, 
married Patrick Clelland; Mary, married Matthew Gilmore; Isabella, 
married George McCray. 

(III) Henry, son of William and Jane (McClelland) Nichols, 
was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, October 11, 1791, died Janu- 
ary 5, 1873, and is buried in the cemetery near the Baptist church of 
which he and his wife were very devout members, at Barrackville, about 
three miles from Fairmont, West Virginia. He moved to a farm on 
Buffalo Creek, in what was then Monongalia county, Virginia, which 



476 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

is now Marion county, West Virginia, about the year 1826, but con- 
tinued his occupation as an iron moulder at OHphant Furnace, leaving 
there Saturday evening and returning Sunday night, for several years. 
He married, July 3, 18 15, Nancy McClelland, born January 15, 1796, 
in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, died June 8, 1865, buried in the same 
cemetery with her husband. She was no relation to the above-named 
persons of same name. Children: James William, see forward; Jane 
Isabella, born October 24, 18 19, married Felix S. Wilcox; Ann Eliza, 
born December 26, 1820, married John M. King; Mary Collins, Janu- 
ary 14, 1823, married James Shriver; Sarah Ann, April 2, 1825, mar- 
ried John A. Heck; William Alexander, November 23, 1827, married 
Mary Ann Pindel; Priscilla McClelland, September 23, 1829, married 
Jesse Sharp; Larken McClelland, May 9, 1831, married Mary Sin- 
clair; Henry McClelland, February 20, 1833, ^^^ married, killed in the 
civil war; John Robinson, May i, 1835, married Laretta Wilson; 
Thomas Luther, May 12, 1840, died in infancy; Elsey Steenrod, June 
II, 1 841, never married. 

(IV) James William, son of Henry and Nancy (McClelland) 
Nichols, was born in Fayette county, near Oliphant Furnace, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 24, 1816, died in Fairmont, West Virginia, March 

17, 1871. He was a miller by trade and followed this all his life in 
and around Fairmont. He was a member of the Methodist Protestant 
church, and taught a class in its Sunday school from early manhood 
until his death. In politics he was a Republican. He married, April 

18, 1843, Mary B. Fleming, born July 9, 1825, died August 18, 1906, 
daughter of William B. and Hannah (Miller) Fleming, and grand- 
daughter of Alexander and Mary (Hays) Fleming, who were married 
March 27, 1793. Hannah Miller was the daughter of Peter and Mary 
Miller; they were married February 5, 1785, in Goshen, New York. 
Peter Miller was born in Woodbury, New Jersey, May 15, 1759, en- 
listed in the continental army, and participated in the battles of White 
Plains and Long Island, New York. It is not known when he moved 
to Virginia, but at the time of his death he owned the land now com- 
posing the fifth ward of the city of Fairmont. 

Children of James William and Mary B. (Fleming) Nichols: i. 
William Henry, died in infancy. 2. Francis Edmond, see forward. 3. 
Ella P., married John Fenton Clajrton; died February 4, 1879, in Gree- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 477 

ley, Colorado, buried at Grafton, West Virginia ; had two sons : Edward 
Rowland, now manager of the Maryland Coal Company in Harrison 
county, West Virginia, and Frank Wilson, died in infancy. 4. Laura 
Emma, married Charles L. Maulsby, now residing in California; chil- 
dren: Anna Clayton and Thomas Nichols Maulsby. 5. Minnie, mar- 
ried Charles W. Walker; died August 8, 1888; children: Kephart 
Nichols, and one daughter, died in infancy. 6. Anna Pratt, died May 
5, 1898. 

(V) Francis Edmond, son of James W. and Mary B. (Fleming) 
Nichols, was born September 20, 1 846, about one mile from the city of 
Fairmont, West Virginia. He received his education at the only schools 
in existence in this section at that day, the private subscription schools, 
one of which was taught by Dr. W. R. White, and it was a most ex- 
cellent educational institution for those days. Later Dr. White was 
made state superintendent of public schools in West Virginia. He was 
also a noted Methodist Episcopal minister. After leaving the school 
room, Mr. Nichols followed bookkeeping for many years, and was 
with several well known business houses. His next step in business life 
was his appointment as mail clerk, on the line of the Baltimore & Ohio 
railroad, his regular run being between Grafton and Chicago. He fol- 
lowed this work for twelve years, until he resigned in 1884 to take up 
a more independent work, that of insurance. He was in various rail- 
road wrecks during his services as mail clerk, but fortunately was never 
injured. At times he was surrounded on all sides with wrecked cars, 
and many of his comrades lost life and limb, but kind Providence seem- 
ed to spare him from injury. He is still engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness. At first he handled both fire and life insurance, but at present 
confines himself to fire exclusively. His spacious, well-fitted oflices are 
in the new Masonic Temple. He has now twenty-six companies for 
which he is agent, doing both city and farm insurance business. He is 
director in the Home Savings Bank and the National Bank of Fair- 
mont. Politically he is a Republican, but has never aspired to nor been 
induced to hold public oflice, preferring to attend strictly to his private 
business. He is a far advanced Free Mason, having reached the thirty- 
second degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. He has held 
all the chairs in the local lodges. Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
chapter and commandery, and been the secretary of the local bodies at 



478 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Fairmont for more than thirty years, except the Blue Lodge, of which 
he has been the secretary since 1904. He belongs to Crusade Com- 
mandery, No. 6, Knights Templar, and the Scottish Rite bodies at 
Wheeling. He is now holding the office of grand recorder of the 
Grand Commandery of West Virginia, having held this important 
office since 1904. Mr. Nichols is charter member of the newly organ- 
ized Country Club of Fairmont, and he with his family holds member- 
ship in the Methodist Protestant church, of which society he is trustee. 
He also belongs to the Sons of the Revolution, of which he is the state 
treasurer. 

He married (first) Emma V. Steele, September 25, 1889; she died 
August 9, 1893, leaving one daughter, Mary Louise, born January 12, 
1892, graduated at the high schools of Fairmont, her native city, and 
later attended Walnut Lane School, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
from which she graduated in 191 1. He married (second), August 30, 
1899, Laura, born September 22, i860, daughter of R. C. and Mary 
(Lott) Dunnington, of Fairmont, West Virginia. Mrs. Nichols' 
father was in the mercantile business, but during the latter part of his 
life in the insurance business, died in 1904; his wife died at Fairmont, 
in the spring of 191 1. Mrs. Nichols is one of seven children. Mary 
Louise, only child of Francis E. Nichols, is now an enthusiastic mem- 
ber of the Daughters of the American Revolution, being eligible by 
connecting back to men of service in that great struggle, both on her 
paternal and maternal sides. Her connection with this body is at Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, being a worthy member of William Haymond 
Chapter. The Fleming genealogy is given elsewhere in this work, and 
will complete the connection between the Nichols and Fleming lines. 



This family is an old one in Pennsylvania and 
WHITEHILL has more recently been an important factor in the 
states to the west and south. The paternal grand- 
father of Dr. Alexander Reid Whitehill, of the University of West 
Virginia, as well as his maternal grandfather, Henry Reed, resided 
many years on the south side of the Ohio river, in Beaver county, Penn- 
sylvania. Both were men of marked prominence in their respective 
communities. 

(I) James Whitehill was a farmer by occupation, and was a man 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 479 

of intelligence and influence in his section of the country. In his relig- 
ious faith he was of the Presbyterian church. He married Deborah 
Stephens, and they reared a family, including Stephen, of whom further. 

(II) Stephen, son of James and Deborah (Stephens) Whitehill, 
was born October 4, 18 13, died in January, 1892. By occupation he 
was a farmer. He was a Republican in politics and his religious faith 
was that of the Presbyterian denomination. He married. May 18, 
1837, Margaret McCandless Reed, born November 18, 18 18, died in 
April, 1905. Children: Henry R., James R., D. C, J. M., W. W., 
A. R., T. R., C. B. 

(III) Dr. Alexander Reed Whitehill, son of Stephen and Mar- 
garet McCandless (Reed) Whitehill, was born in Hookstown, Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania. When a mere youth he manifested a strong de- 
sire to secure a good educational training that he might be the better 
equipped for the carrying out of Hfe's plans, as pictured by his ambition, 
even at that tender inexperienced age. This was pleasing to his parents, 
who gave him every possible aid and encouragement. He attended the 
public schools of his native town, where he showed an unusual aptness 
and quickness of perception in everything he undertook. At an early 
age he entered Princeton College (now University) as a freshman. 
Dr. E. M. Turner, afterwards president of West Virginia University, 
was one of his examiners. Four years later he graduated in the class 
of 1874, taking rank among the first ten in his class that graduated one 
hundred members. Having entered the list as a competitor for the 
Experimental Science Fellowship, valued at six hundred dollars, he was 
awarded the prize on graduation. Dr. Brackett, author of "Brackett's 
Physics," and Dr. Arnold Guyot being his examiners. To broaden his 
views and pursue his favorite studies he went to Europe the year follow- 
ing his graduation. For a time he studied at the School of Mines at 
Freiberg, Germany, and afterwards at the University of Leipsic. 
While abroad he traveled extensively, visiting nearly every country and 
large city on the continent. 

In 1876, our centennial year, he returned to the United States, 
accepting a position as professor of physical science in one of the best 
institutions on the Pacific coast. He held this place four years. In 
1 88 1, while on a visit to his home he was offered the principalship of 
Linsly Institute at Wheeling, West Virginia, which he accepted, and he 



48o Upper Monongahela Valley. 

then determined to make West Virginia his place of residence. He 
remained in Wheeling until 1885, when he was elected to the chair of 
chemistry and physics in the West Virginia University, and with this 
institution he has remained until the present. With the growth of the 
University his chair was divided, and he elected to remain at the head 
of the department of chemistry, while Dr. Thomas E. Hodges, now 
president of the university, was assigned to the department of physics. 
From this time the growth of the department of chemistry was rapid 
and steady, and in the number of students and equipment it soon became 
one of the most important departments of the university. In addition 
to his other duties he assisted in the organization of the West Virginia 
Agricultural Experimental Station, and Dr. Whitehill was the author 
of the first scientific bulletin published and distributed by that institu- 
tion. Apart from the work, in his classroom he has been by no means 
idle, and for several years after graduating at college he was almost 
constantly engaged in newspaper work. For four years he was the 
regular Pacific coast correspondent of the Chicago Tribune, and also 
wrote for the San Francisco Chronicle, Philadelphia Press and New 
York Tribune. In 1889 he wrote for Hon. W. T. Harris, United 
States commissioner of education, a history of education in West Vir- 
ginia. This included a history of all the principal educational institu- 
tions of the state. In the "Columbian History of Education in West 
Virginia," published in 1893 by the State Board of World's Fair Man- 
agers for West Virginia, no fewer than thirteen articles are from Dr. 
Whitehill's pen. His life has been a studious one, he having aimed at 
all times to keep fully abreast with the age in which he is permitted to 
live and labor. Education has been his theme. In scientific work he 
ranks high as a thinker and writer, and his work at the university is 
everywhere commended. He was one of the founders of the Princeton 
University Association of Pittsburgh, which is now one of the largest 
alumni associations of this country. 

Dr. Whitehill is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and also 
of the American Chemical Society. By appointment of Governor Will- 
iam E. Glasscock, he is the official member for West Virginia of the 
organizing committee of the Eighth International Congress of Applied 
Chemistry which will meet in New York in September, 19 12. It is 
expected this will be the largest and most representative assembly of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 481 

chemists and allied business and professional men that has ever been 
brought together. In 1877 Princeton University conferred upon Dr. 
Whitehill the degree of Master of Arts, and in 1887 Washington and 
Jefferson College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy. 

Dr. Whitehill married, in 1882, Anna, daughter of S. B. Wilson, 
Esq., of Beaver, Pennsylvania, one of the most distinguished lawyers 
of his state. Their only daughter, Elizabeth Wilson, married, Febru- 
ary 20, 19 1 2, Dr. J. Carl Hill, of Boise, Idaho. Their son, Charles 
Alexander, died November 2, 1897, at the age of eleven years. 



Four or more generations of the Offner family have 
OFFNER resided on Virginia soil. They have produced many 

distinguished men and women in the various profes- 
sions and callings of life. Dr. John Edward Offner, of Fairmont, 
West Virginia, comes of this stock, and well represents the medical 
profession in his section of the commonwealth of West Virginia. 

(I) Reuben Offner was born in Old Virginia in 1804, at Wood- 
stock, died at Romney, West Virginia, April 21, 1889. He was a 
shoemaker. Politically he was a Democrat, and in church faith a 
Methodist Episcopalian. He married Matilda Jane Cummins and they 
had children: Isaac Henry, of whom further; John Edward, Mary 
Frances, Hannah Catherine, Annie Elizabeth. 

(II) Isaac Henry, son of Reuben and Matilda Jane (Cummins) 
Offner, was born at Romney, Virginia, July 11, 1844. He followed 
teaching for his profession; was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church; politically a Democrat; served under "Stonewall" Jackson's 
command, in Company K, Thirty-third Virginia Regiment of Infantry. 
He married Mary Jane Kalbaugh, born at Cross, Virginia, September 
23, 1854. Children: John Edward, of whom further; William Porter, 
bom September 22, 1879; Walter Lee, May 12, 1882; Catora Bell, 
August 29, 1883; Martha Virginia, October 4, 1887; Mary Frances, 
May 17, 1889; Orlando Earl, October 30, 1890; Margaret Kalbaugh, 
May 24, 1893. Mary Jane Kalbaugh was of German descent on the 
paternal side, and Irish on the maternal side. Alexander Kalbaugh, 
father of Mrs. Isaac H. Offner, was born in Mineral county, West 



482 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Virginia, then in Hampshire county, September 11, 1829. He was a 
farmer, a Republican and a Methodist. Margaret Catherine (Tasker) 
Kalbaugh, wife of Alexander Kalbaugh, was born September 2, 1829. 
Alexander Kalbaugh and wife had children: George Mason, Isaac W., 
Mary Jane, Nancy S., William G., Joseph A., Martha J. and Dr. 
Zedock L. Kalbaugh. 

(Ill) John Edward Offner, M. D., son of Isaac Henry and Mary 
Jane (Kalbaugh) Offner, was born April 15, 1877, at Piedmont, Min- 
eral county, West Virginia. He was educated in the West Virginia 
public schools, and graduated at Maryland Medical College, Baltimore, 
Maryland, May 4, 1908. He was reared in the country, and labored 
on public works around the mines and railroad machine shops, and later, 
when fitted, served in the hospital corps of the United States army 
during the late Spanish-American war. He also at one time worked in 
the civil engineers corps for the Dry Fork Railroad Company, was 
assistant foreman for the Parsons Pulp & Paper Company, and served 
as assistant in a nursery and childs' hospital, while on vacation in his 
college days, thus showing that he has always been an active man. 
Politically he votes the Democratic ticket. He was the first Democratic 
councilman to be elected in the first ward of the city of Fairmont, West 
Virginia, the term being from 191 1 to 1913. He is a member of the 
Marion County and West Virginia State Medical societies, also the 
American Medical Association. He is an advanced Free Mason, be- 
longing to the Knights Templar Commandery and Mystic Shriners, 
and holds membership in the Woodmen of the World, holding import- 
ant offices in each. He is also connected with the Woodmen of Amer- 
ica and the Moose Order. He is an honorary member of Alpha Chap- 
ter, Kappa Psi, and is connected with the Fairmont Moose Club. 

Dr. Offner married, July 8, 1901, at Oakland, Maryland, Effie 
Blanche Taylor, born at Kerns, Randolph county. West Virginia, July 
I, 1880, daughter of Hays H. Taylor, who served in the confederate 
army, and whose children by his wife Deborah were: Sunrise, Gordon 
W., Effie Blanche (Mrs. Offner), Eugenie Clair. Dr. Offner and wife 
have children: Mildred Ruth, born March 23, 1902; Edward Taylor, 
May 18, 1903, both students in school at the present time (19 12). 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 483 

This article will consider the families of the Irvins and 
IRVIN Samsells, who are related by intermarriage, and who have 
for many years borne well their part in the upbuilding of 
the city of Fairmont. 

John W. Irvin, present proprietor of the Manley Hotel at Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, was born in Pennsylvania, October 10, 1855. He 
received a common school education, but was only permitted to attend 
school one winter, and then studied at home nights for the remainder 
of his education. At the early age of ten years he began to care for 
himself, and has since been variously engaged, chiefly in the hotel and 
livery business, with the exception of a few years as contractor and 
builder, as will presently be seen. He engaged in hotel business in the 
eighties at Fairmont, West Virginia, continued fourteen years, then 
sold out and became a general contractor, doing railroad work as well 
as house building. He followed this five years, during which period he 
erected the post office building at FIndlay, Ohio, in 1905. He is again 
engaged In hotel business at Fairmont, where In addition to running the 
Manley Hotel he carries the largest livery stock in the city. He Is vice- 
president of the Home Savings Bank of Fairmont, belongs to the Pres- 
byterian church, and is connected with the Knights of Pythias order. 
Politically he votes the Democratic ticket. Mr. Irvin is a self-made 
man, has succeeded against great hinderances, and has now reached an 
independent state in life, winning the respect of all with whom he comes 
In contact. 

He married Mary Cornelia Ray Samsell, born December 23, 1856. 
The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin is George Samsell, born June 1 1, 
1895; Is now (19 12) In the eighth grade in the Fairmont high schools, 
and like his grandfather (maternal) Is a natural musician; he plays by 
ear as readily as by note. 

William Henry Samsell, father of Mrs. Irvin, was born In Old 
Virginia, April 27, 1825. His first important work in life was that of 
making high grade ladies' shoes, which trade he was forced to abandon 
on account of ill health. For a time he was engaged at the mines, but 
the latter part of his life was clerk in the hotel of Mr. Irvin, his son-in- 
law. He was superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday school many 
years, also led the choir. He was a genius in music, and was band 
master at Morgantown. He was a soldier in Company H, Second 



484 Upper Monongahela Valley, 

Regiment, West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, and was leader of the 
regimental band all through the civil war. Politically he was a Re- 
publican, and in church faith a Presbyterian of strict rule of life and 
deep seated convictions. He married, November 18, 1852, Anna E. 
Black, born in Middletown, now Fairmont, West Virginia, February 
5, 1835. Children: John Henry, born September 3, 1853, now resides 
in Fairmont; Mary Cornelia Ray, December 23, 1856, now Mrs. John 
W. Irvin; Charles W., December 12, 1861, died May 20, 1866; Kate 
Virginia, October 12, 1864, now Mrs. Dr. Thayer, of Grafton, West 
Virginia; Sally Bell, November, 1869, died November 14, 1877; 
Anna Lee, July 15, 1875, now Mrs. Lynn Yeoder, residing at Hunt- 
ington, West Virginia. 



Hugh Evans, born 1769 in Monongalia, Preston county, 
EVANS Virginia, died in Evansville, West Virginia, 1873. He 

founded the town of Evansville. He was a man who 
was honored and respected by every one who knew him. He mar- 
ried , and had children: James, Samuel, of whom fur- 
ther; Nancy, Hugh, Sarah, Rolley, William. 

(II) Samuel, son of Hugh Evans, born at Evansville, Virginia, 
1807, died at Evansville, 1889. He followed the occupation of farm- 
ing and stock dealing. He married Sarah Carroll. Children: Eliza- 
beth, married William Keener; Hugh, born 1823, died 1892, married 

(first) Shroyer, (second) Jane Jones, child by first wife, John 

S., by second wife, Mollie; Isaac, of whom further; John; William; 
James; Samuel; Nancy. 

(III) Isaac, son of Samuel Evans, was born in Evansville, Pres- 
ton county, Virginia, February 9, 1833, being one of eight children. 
He spent his early days on his father's farm, and later was employed 
by the contractors in the construction of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad 
across the mountains east of Grafton, and after the completion of the 
road to Wheeling was made a conductor, which position he held for a 
number of years. The life of a railroader did not appeal to him and he 
retired to Fetterman, West Virginia, where he turned his attention to 
butchering and tanning, and also carried on farming operations in the 
immediate vicinity of this town. Politically he was a Democrat, and 
was always active in the political affairs of his county, and though often 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 485 

urged to accept office himself he always declined. He was a trustee in 
what is now called the West Main Street IVIethodist Episcopal Church 
from its organization prior to the war. 

April 12, i860, he married Sarah, daughter of Samuel Jones, of 
Knottsville. Children: Nathan, Fannie, Martha J., Charles W., of 
whom further; George W., Elizabeth A., Joseph Lee, Sallie, Hugh, 
Clark. 

(IV) Charles W., second son and fourth child of Isaac Evans, 
was bom at the old town of Fetterman, Taylor county. West Virginia, 
December 18, 1867. He attended the public schools of this place 
where he received his first preparation as a teacher. He taught his first 
school, known as the Poe School, in Fetterman district in 1885-86. He 
later attended the Fairmont State Normal School, from which he 
graduated in 1887, and finished his education in the West Virginia 
University at Morgantown. He taught school for thirteen years, three 
years as principal of the Fetterman graded school, seven years as 
teacher of mathematics in the Fairmont State Normal School, and in 
the summer of 1897 was elected city superintendent of schools at Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, which position he held for three years. During 
this period of school work, he was prominent in the educational affairs 
of West Virginia, and assisted in conducting Teachers' Institutes in 
several counties of the state. In the year 1900 he entered the field of 
fire and casualty insurance, in which business he continues at the present 
time. At the general election of 19 10, ten years after retiring from 
teaching, he was nominated and elected to the position of county super- 
intendent of public schools of Marion county, but owing to his large 
business interests he resigned this position, believing that it was a posi- 
tion which required the undivided attention of the man who attempted 
to fill it. In June, 191 1, after a reorganization of the Fairmont Board 
of Trade under the name of Fairmont Chamber of Commerce, Mr. 
Evans was elected its secretary, which position he still holds. Mr. 
Evans has always been a public-spirited citizen. In addition to his 
being secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, he was one of the first 
directors of the Fairmont Business Men's Association, and a director 
in the Fairmont Young Men's Christian Association. Mr. Evans is a 
charter member of Mountain City Lodge, No. 48, Knights of Pythias; 
belongs to Fairmont Lodge, No. 9, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 



486 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

and is one of the officials of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Fairmont. He has always been identified with church and religious 
movements, and while yet in his teens was superintendent of his home 
Sunday school in the town of Fetterman for several years, and is now 
serving his eighteenth year as superintendent of the First Methodist 
Episcopal Sunday school in Fairmont. In the year 1908 he had the 
honor of being elected to represent the lay electoral conference of West 
Virginia as delegate to the general conference of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church which convened in Baltimore, Maryland. 

He married, August 15, 1894, Lillie, daughter of Isaac Newton 
and Sarah (Pritchard) Lough. Children: A son, born March 9, 1907, 
died in infancy, and Sarah Elizabeth, October 3, 1909. Lillie (Lough) 
Evans is of revolutionary ancestry being a lineal descendant of William 
Pritchard who served in that war, enlisting as private in 1776, for three 
years, in Captain Alexander Lawson Smith's company. General Daniel 
Morgan's regiment. The line of descent is as follows: William Pritch- 
ard married Amelia Knotts; their son, William Pritchard, married 
Hannah Meredith; their son, Davis Pritchard, married Millie Dawson; 
their daughter, Sallie E. Pritchard, born July 20, 1848, married Isaac 
Newton Lough, bom July 7, 1849; their daughter, Lillie, married 
Charles W. Evans. 



Among the artisans connected with the plumb- 
WIEDEBUSCH ing trade in Fairmont is William A. Wiede- 

busch, who is a thorough master of his trade. 
He is the son of A. L. Wiedebusch, a farmer by occupation, a civil war 
soldier who distinguished himself on many a hard-fought battlefield, 
though he was a native of Germany. He came from Germany when 
but three years old. He died June 8, 19 10. His father was Henry, 
as was his grandfather on the paternal side. Both were well-to-do, 
thrifty farmers. The great-grandfather, Henry Wiedebusch Sr., was 
also a shoemaker; he died at the age of eighty-four years, and while in 
his eighties would frequently walk from Powhattan, Ohio, his home, to 
Wheeling and return, a distance of fifty miles, in one day. He was a 
man of wonderful vital powers. A. L. Wiedebusch enlisted in the 
Twenty-fifth Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry, being a member of 
Company A. He was in many severe and lesser engagements. After 




♦ rTi 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 487 

the war ended he engaged at stone-cutting, and assisted in cutting the 
stone for the West Virginia penitentiary at Moundville. Later he fol- 
lowed the stone contracting business, but having received a severe 
wound at the battle of Gettysburg he was partly disabled from doing 
hard work; consequently he took up the work of making cigars, having 
a store and shop of his own. Subsequently he sold out his business and 
was made superintendent of the great cigar works of August Pollock, 
using convict labor at the penitentiary. His health failed and he re- 
moved to Colorado, where he mined gold, and after nearly two years 
regained his health, enough at least to return home and engage in the 
butchering business. He next joined the large number of traveling 
salesmen then on the road for the McCormick Reaper and Mower 
Works, of Chicago, which position he filled a number of years, then 
retired to a small farm in this county. Politically he was a Democrat, 
and in church connection was an Episcopalian. He married Mary 
Bryan, who now resides at Moundville, West Virginia; she was a native 
of Port Stanley, province of Ontario, Canada. Their children were: 
William A., of whom further; Edward C. W., residing in Morgan- 
town, West Virginia; Ella M., residing at Moundville; Clara A., mar- 
ried Dr. Hoy McCusky, and lives in Oklahoma, in the village of 
Muskogee. 

William A. Wiedebusch was born in Moundville, West Virginia, 
September 16, 1870, son of A. L. and Mary (Bryan) Wiedebusch. 
He obtained a fair common school education at his native village and 
at Linsly Institute, Wheeling. He then learned the plumbing trade at 
Bellaire, Ohio, commencing business for himself at Piedmont, West 
Virginia, in 1893, remained there two years, and located at Scranton, 
Pennsylvania, where he remained five years, then removed to Fairmont, 
West Virginia, in August, 1899. He established the firm of the Fair- 
mont Plumbing Company, of which he is now the chief owner. He is 
a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, votes an 
independent political ticket, and is a member of the Episcopal church. 
He married, January 25, 1899, Birdie E. Tonry, of Western Port, 
Maryland, born May 4, 1876, daughter of Charles Tonry, general 
manager for the Fredlock Manufacturing Company. They have no 
children. 



488 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

This sketch considers the De Bolt family of which 
DE BOLT George W. De Bolt, of Fairmont, is a member. The 

father was John Hamilton De Bolt, born in Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1830. He was a farmer, and was killed in the 
civil war while acting as a messenger in West Virginia, 1861. Politically 
he was a Republican, and in church faith of the Presbyterian denomina- 
tion. He married, in 1855, Abigail Howard, born in Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1837. Children: Emma, born 1856; George W., 
1858; Sarah, 1861, died 1902. Mrs. De Bolt was the daughter of 
Denune Howard, who married Sarah Haught; the grandfather was 
Absalom Howard, born in Pennsylvania, married Mary Smith, and his 
parents, Absalom and Sarah (Denune) Howard were born in Eng- 
land, from whence they came to America, settling at Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

(II) George Washington, son of John Hamilton and Abigail 
(Howard) De Bolt, was born October 30, 1858, at Masontown, Fay- 
ette county, Pennsylvania. He received his education at the public 
schools of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and at the Southwestern State 
Normal, of California, Pennsylvania. He has been engaged as fol- 
lows: An accountant for the Dunbar Furnace Company, at Dunbar, 
Pennsylvania, for four years; accountant for the Montana Coal and 
Coke Company, Fairmont, West Virginia, 1887 to 1901 ; secretary and 
treasurer of Fairmont Coal Company, 1901-05 ; secretary and treasurer 
for the Red Rock Fuel Company, Fairmont, 1906-10; president of Red 
Rock Fuel Company, Fairmont, 19 10, and still serving. Politically 
Mr. De Bolt is a Republican; has been councilman in the city of Fair- 
mont for two terms; belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Chapter, Consistory, Shriners ; and Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He has been grand commander in the Knights Templar degree 
of Masonry, for West Virginia. He is a member of the Fairmont 
Country Club, a new organization. In church relations he is a member 
of the Episcopal church. 

He married (first), in 1883, at Masontown, Pennsylvania, Lida 
Miller, born at Masontown, Pennsylvania, 1859, daughter of David 
and Elizabeth Miller; (second), in Chicago, Illinois, Mary Watson 
Moderwell, born 1867, at Geneseo, Illinois, daughter of Erastus and 
Frances (Watson) Moderwell. The father was a lawyer; member of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 489 

the state legislature ; captain and major in the Twelfth Ohio Volunteer 
service in the civil war. Their children were : Mary Watson, Mattie 
Elizabeth, Louisa Frances and John Otis Moderwell. Mr. De Bolt's 
children are: i. Gladys, born in 1884, educated at the public schools, 
Fairmont Normal School, Girl's Latin School at Baltimore, Maryland, 
Dwight School, Englewood, New Jersey; married Henry Shaw Lively, 
and they have one child, Mildred De Bolt Lively. 2. George Wash- 
ington Jr., born 1891, graduate of the Fairmont, West Virginia, high 
school, now in Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. 



The Yeager family now to be considered is the one 
YEAGER made quite famous through its connection with steam- 
boating through this section of the country. 

(I) George Yeager, who was many years connected with the manu- 
facture of hats for men and boys, at Greensboro, Pennsylvania, was a 
native of Reading, Pennsylvania, died at Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 
He married a Miss Fennimore. Children: Alfred, John B., George, 
Louisa, James, Rebecca, Polly, James, Samuel S. 

(II) Captain Samuel S. Yeager, youngest son of George Yeager, 
was born in Greensboro, Pennsylvania, July 25, 18 19. He obtained 
an ordinary education, and engaged in the hat-making business with his 
father. While yet in his twenties he engaged in the steamboating 
business, he being a pioneer in such mode of transportation, along the 
Monongahela river from Pittsburgh down. In 1847 he ran a steam- 
boat, the "John B. Gordon," to Fairmont, with seventy tons of freight. 
The second steamer to land at Fairmont was always recorded as being 
this boat. Samuel Ellis sailed from England, out of the city of Lon- 
don, landed at New Orleans and from there took a boat up the Missis- 
sippi river to Pittsburgh, and from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, took 
passage on the "John B. Gordon," with her captain, Samuel S. Yeager, 
and safely landed in Fairmont. This was in 1847, ^"d at that date he 
was the only passenger coming from England to Fairmont by water. 
Mr. Ellis made his home in Fairmont, where he died and was buried 
in the city cemetery. Near Fairmont Captain Yeager established a 
mercantile business in 1856, and in 1880 established a general store in 
Fairmont, in which he carried on an extensive trade until his death, 
February 11, 1893. He was a prominent business factor of the city 



490 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

in which he died. After his death his son, George G. Yeager, carried 
forward the well-established trade until March i, 1906, when he dis- 
posed of the business. Politically Mr. Yeager was a Democrat, and in 
church faith a Presbyterian. 

He married, January 25, 1857, Margaret E. Dent, born near 
Morgantown, West Virginia, January 19, 1840. One child, George 
G., born near Morgantown, November 15, 1858. Mrs. Yeager is the 
daughter of Rolley Evans Dent, born near Morgantown, on the old 
Captain John Dent farm. Captain John Dent was the grandfather of 
Mrs. Yeager. Captain Dent received his title by service and commis- 
sion in the war of 18 12. He was of English ancestry. Mrs. Yeager's 
grandmother, Mrs. Barker, came from England when only six jjpars of 
age and when a young lady wedded Captain Barker. Mrs. Yeager's 
parents had seven children, including the two brothers now living, and 
a half-sister of Mrs. Yeager, a Mrs. Christy, now of Mannington, 
West Virginia, the others being deceased. The Dent family of which 
Mrs. Yeager is a descendant is the same as the one from which the wife 
of the lamented U. S. Grant, Julia (Dent) Grant, came. Through the 
whole line of ancestry Mrs. Yeager is closely allied with the best fam- 
ihes of the Old Dominion State. Her grandmothers, on more than one 
occasion, had to flee to the forts and blockhouses during the Indian 
warfare, while at other times were compelled to leave on account of 
savage animals. 



The family now under consideration has for one of 
DURRETT its members Dr. James J. Durrett, of Fairmont, 

West Virginia, and there is much of historic interest 
connected with various members in the family, which stood high in Vir- 
ginia and other states many years ago, while the younger generations 
are filling the important positions in several legitimate callings. 

(I) B. B. Durrett, grandfather of James J. Durrett, was by occu- 
pation a farmer, and a man of considerable importance; he was a jus- 
tice of the peace for many years, when that oflice was of more legal 
consequence than at present, was also president of the county court, 
and an early pioneer of Barbour county. Assisted by a large number 
of negroes, he cleared up a large farm. About 1840 he went on horse- 
back to Albermarle county, Virginia, a distance of between three and 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 491 

four hundred miles, for apple scions, which he brought home with him 
and there did his own grafting. Some of the varieties were Albermarle 
pippins, Rhode Island greenings. Northern spys, Baldwins, Russets, 
Seek-no-furthers, etc. His orchard comprised about three hundred 
acres, the finest, best kept and among the largest in the state. Some of 
these trees are still bearing fruit. He also had many fine varieties of 
plums and ox-heart cherries. He married Ann Williams, born in Char- 
lottesville, Virginia, and is now eighty-four years of age, and able to 
ride horseback easily. This worthy old couple were well educated and 
stood high in their community for the many excellent traits of character 
they possessed. He died in 1900. He was in sympathy with the south 
in the time of the civil war, hence his property was confiscated for the 
union cause, and he was taken prisoner and confined at Wheeling, from 
which place he escaped and swam the river in the darkness of the night, 
making good his escape and was never recaptured. 

(II) John H., son of B. B. Durrett, resides in West Virginia. He 
married Hettie Groves. 

(III) Dr. James J. Durrett, son of John H. Durrett, was born in 
Barbour county. West Virginia, November 22, 1872. He was edu- 
cated primarily at the country school, known as Watercamp school 
house. Later he attended school at the Fairmont Normal School, be- 
ginning his medical career at the University of Maryland, in 1894, 
graduating in 1897. Since then he has attended lectures at various col- 
leges of medicine, including McGuire College of Richmond, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, etc. He commenced his practice in Fair- 
mont in 1897, with Dr. Cook, with whom he was associated about ten 
years, since which time he has been alone in his practice. He makes 
surgery his specialty. He is the physician and surgeon for the follow- 
ing corporations : The Consolidated Coal Company of West Virginia, 
also the Fairmont & Clarksburg Traction Company, the Fairmont 
Machinery Company, the Virginia & Pittsburgh Coal & Coke Com- 
pany, and is a member of the surgical staff of the Cook Hospital, be- 
sides delivering lectures before the nurses of this hospital at Fairmont. 
He is a member of the Marion County Medical Society and the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. Politically he is a Democrat, and in his 
church affiliations is a Baptist. He holds membership in the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 



492 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

He married (first), February 22, 1899, Lady M. Johnson, and 
four children were born to them: Edith Margery, March 10, 1902; 
Ethel C. and Eleanor Jeane (twins), March 13, 1903; James Jr., 
October 13, 1908. He married (second), November 26, 1910, EUza- 
beth Cardwell, a native of West Virginia, daughter of John C. Card- 
well. 



Mr. McDaniel holds the important position of as- 
McDANIEL sessor of Marion county, and has assessed the county 

several times, giving the best of satisfaction among 
the critical taxpayers. 

The grandfather of Mr. McDaniel, on the paternal side, was Aaron 
McDaniel, whose son, Presley McDaniel, was born near Shinnston, 
West Virginia. He was reared on a farm and followed farm life 
throughout his days. During the civil war he served as a major in the 
state militia, and was a justice of the peace. He was an active member 
in the Methodist Episcopal church, and politically an ardent Repub- 
lican. He married Malissa, daughter of Andrew Moore and wife, 
who were early emigrants from Pennsylvania. Presley McDaniel and 
wife had eight children: Mary M., married Charles T. Martin; Charles 
A.; Elmer E.; Anna, wife of Carson Martin, of Seattle, Washington; 
W. A., of Kentucky, manager of the Consolidated Steel and Coal Com- 
pany; Henry C, of Barnestown; A. J., of whom further. Presley Mc- 
Daniel died in 1879, and his wife died in 1885. 

A. J., son of Presley McDaniel, was born in Harrison county. West 
Virginia, October 8, 1869. He spent his youth on his father's farm. 
He obtained a fair education at the common schools, after which he 
engaged in mercantile pursuits with his brother, Elmer E. McDaniel, at 
Enterprise, commencing in 1893 and continuing two years, when he sold 
to his brother, W. A. McDaniel, and removed to Worthington, where 
he purchased a general store which he operated until 1897, when he 
sold out his business. He was postmaster for a number of years, receiv- 
ing his appointment under President William McKinley. In 1904 he 
was elected assessor for the Western district of Marion county, and 
was reelected for 1908 for the work of assessing the entire county, 
under the new provision of the law. He is still holding such position. 
In his political choice he is a Republican. He has held numerous local 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 493 

offices at Worthington, and all have been filled with credit to himself 
and to the liking of his fellowcitizens. He is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and Modern Woodmen fraternities, and is a devoted mem- 
ber in the Christian church. 

He married, April 29, 1896, Blanche M., daughter of Benjamin 
Robey. Children: George M., James Bruce, Garnett, the eldest died 
at the age of two years. 



This Reed family includes numerous excellent business 
REED men and at least one civil war soldier who made a record 

for himself in that hard-fought conflict. They were early 
settlers in Ohio and had to do with the development of that common- 
wealth. 

(II) Benjamin F. Reed, son of Robert Reed, was bom in the city 
of Steubenville, Ohio, May 17, 1842. He has been an extensive buyer 
and shipper of horses nearly all of his active years, and one time had 
large stables in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He has resided in Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, forty-five years. Politically he is a Republican, 
and in church relations is of the Presbyterian denomination. He en- 
listed as a member of Company A, Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry, in 
the Union cause, at the time of the civil war. His first captain was he 
who later was Colonel Cromwell ; his next captain was John T. Bowen. 
The date of his enlistment was August 17, 1862, and he was mustered 
out of service in 1864. During his two years army hfe he was con- 
stantly on the move and participated in many engagements, including 
the siege of Vicksburg, and was all through the Yazoo Pass campaign. 
He married, in May, 1864, Mary Virginia Moore, born in Fairfax, 
Virginia, 1843. Children: i. John R., resides in Wheeling, West 
Virginia, where he is interested in the IVheeling Evening News. 2. 
Charles E., of whom later. 3. Thomas Frank, now chief of the Fair- 
mont fire department. 4. William T., resides in Lewis county. West 
Virginia, employed by the South Penn Oil Company. 5. Lillian M., 
wife of Morris Miller, resides at Fairmont, West Virginia. 

(III) Charles E., son of Benjamin F. and Mary Virginia (Moore) 
Reed, was born at Fairmont, West Virginia, November 26, 1866. He 
was educated at Fairmont high school, and at the age of eighteen years 
commenced life's work on his own account, in the engineering depart- 



494 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

ment of the Monongahela River railroad (now a division of the Balti- 
more & Ohio) . He was later inspector of the masonry of this company, 
from Clarksburg to Fairmont, also a member of the engineering work 
and inspector of masonry on the Piedmont & Cumberland railroad. 
Under the administration of President Benjamin Harrison he was ap- 
pointed as assistant to the chief clerk in the United States census bureau, 
continuing in that capacity six years, then returned to Fairmont. Four 
years later he became secretary and treasurer as well as general manager 
of the Electric Light Company at Fairmont. Two years later he re- 
signed and took the position of agent for the J. M. Guffy Coal Land 
and Investment Company, in which capacity he is serving at the present 
time; he assisted in the purchase of two hundred thousand acres of coal 
land in West Virginia. He is a member and director on the advisory 
board of the Fairmont Trust Company. He is a Republican in politics. 
In 19 lo, while away from his home, a few days before an election for 
the office of mayor, his name, unknown to him, was placed on the ticket 
by the citizens of Fairmont. Municipal matters were in a badly mixed 
condition there at that date, with factions in both parties, yet with a 
Democratic majority of between three and four hundred. With all 
of this to contend with, Mr. Reed made the race for mayor and was 
only defeated by thirty-four votes. At the general election he was the 
Republican candidate for the legislature, but was defeated, owing to the 
Democratic landslide and split in his own party. He is a member of 
the Episcopal church at Fairmont, and is a Mason advanced to the 
commandery, being a member of Fairmont Lodge, No. 9. 

He married, in Washington, D. C, June 20, 1897, Jennie Lindsay 
Hawkins, born in Wilmington, Delaware, November 13, 1876, daugh- 
ter of Colonel James L. Hawkins, of Wilmington, Delaware. He was 
colonel of the First Delaware Battery Volunteers and saw much severe 
fighting in the civil war. His duties were mostly south through the 
Peninsula district. He married Mary Flowers in Washington, D. C, 
and immediately entered the army, being absent from his wife two 
years. After the war he was sergeant-at-arms in the senate, and was 
mayor of Wilmington, Delaware, and served one term as state detective 
for Delaware. He had been United States marshall for a time, but 
resigning that to become state detective. He was influential in finding 
the body of the Marvin boy in the swamps of central Delaware, about 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 495 

which there was so much excitement a few years since. The Flowers 
were wealthy landowners in and near the city of Washington, D. C. 
Mr. and Mrs. Reed have no children. 



The family with which this Thomas line is allied were 

THOMAS many years known in Maryland, near Baltimore. But 

few records have been preserved, hence it is impossible 

to trace back, to the remote ancestors of this particular Thomas family. 

(I) George C. Thomas was a native of Baltimore, Maryland, 
born in 1846, and now resides in Berryville, Virginia, where he is en- 
gaged in the manufacture of carriages. He is a successful business 
man of his city. In church faith he is of the Episcopal denomination. 
Politically he votes the Democratic ticket. He married Mary Smith, 
born in Smithton, Maryland, in 1849. 

(II) Clarence S., son of George C. and Mary (Smith) Thomas, 
was born at Berryville, Virginia, May 19, 1875. He was educated in 
his native town. He chose the profession of a veterinary surgeon and 
fitted himself for this useful calling at Cincinnati, Ohio, and goes to 
that city each autumn to attend the clinics, during the sessions of the 
same. He has attained high rank among the finest in his profession In 
his state. He has performed many difficult operations, some of which 
were altogether new in the treatment of animals, and in his fifteen years 
of experience has built up a large practice. He is now permanently 
located at the city of Fairmont. He is a registered druggist of Man- 
nington. Politically Dr. Thomas votes an independent ticket, and 
belongs to the Episcopal church. He married, January 3, 1900, Wllla 
Hough, born in Mannlngton, West Virginia, April i, 1879, daughter 
of James A. and Mary Jane (Beatty) Hough, of Mannlngton, West 
Virginia. Children: James Summerfield, born March 13, 1903; Mary 
Eliza, July 14, 1907. 



This family originally lived in Ireland. The genea- 
HENNEN logical line down to the present generation is as fol- 
lows: Matthew — William — Enoch — William H. — 
Earl Malcolm, representing the fifth generation In America. 

(I) Matthew Hennen, great-great-grandfather of Earl M. Hen- 



496 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

nen, came from county Downs, Ireland, and it is believed settled in 
Pennsylvania, where later members of the family resided. 

(II) William, son of Matthew Hennen, married and reared a fam- 
ily including a son called Enoch. 

(III) Enoch, son of William Hennen, was bom in 1812, died 
1888. He was a cabinetmaker by trade, and later in life conducted a 
hotel at Jollytown, Pennsylvania. He married (first) Lucinda Stafford, 
of near Stafford's Ferry, Cheat River, Monongalia county. Children: 
Martha Jane (White) ; Mary Anne (White) ; William Harrison, de- 
ceased; Seth Stafford, deceased. He married (second) Eliza Ann Du- 
vall, and had a son, Robert Downey. He married (third) Susan Kiger; 
the latter still lives, as his widow, near Hoovers Run, Greene county, 
Pennsylvania. 

(IV) William H., son of Enoch and Lucinda (Stafford) Hennen, 
was born in Jollytown, Greene county, Pennsylvania, February 18, 
1 841, died June 27, 1897. He engaged in the farming and lumbering 
business. He was politically a Republican. He belonged to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. He married, about 1863, Lydia Anne, bom 
September i, 1844, died April 4, 1897, daughter of Michael and Mary 
Anne White. Children of Michael White are: Henry Solomon, Will- 
iam Thomas, Lydia Anne (Hennen), deceased; Catherine, died in 
infancy; Israel Charles; John, died in infancy. Children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hennen: Ida (Renner), deceased; Charles Everett; Frederick 
Herman; Alice Belle (Lemmon), deceased; Winona Estella (Shough) ; 
Ray Vernon; Mary Lizzie (Lemmon) ; Cassie Dora (Taylor) ; Earl 
Malcolm, of whom further. 

(V) Earl Malcolm, youngest child of William H. and Lydia Anne 
(White) Hennen, was born in Monongalia county. West Virginia, near 
St. Cloud, July 12, 1882. He obtained his education at the public 
schools, Lebanon Valley Business College, West Virginia University, 
commercial department, and Elliott's Business College. April 7, 1902, 
he enlisted in the Signal Corps of the United States army for three 
years. From April 7, 1902, to July i, 1902, he was at Fort Myer, 
Virginia, receiving military training, schooling, etc. He was ordered 
to foreign service in Alaska, June 24, 1902; sailed from Seattle, Wash- 
ington, July 8th ; arrived at Fort Liscum, Alaska, July 1 8th of the same 
year, and reported for duty to Captain Wilson. He was appointed 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 497 

orderly and operator to General Greeley, chief signal officer, United 
States army, during his trip of inspection from Fort Liscum to Copper 
Center, Alaska, over military telegraph lines, from July 19, 1902, to 
July 31, 1902, serving two years and nine months in Alaska, along the 
Valdez section of the military telegraph lines. He was promoted from 
the rank of private to first class sergeant. He received an honorable 
discharge at the expiration of his three years enlistment, and returned 
to West Virginia, April 24, 1905. He was then employed as private 
secretary to Hon. H. L. Swisher, manager of the Acme Publishing 
Company and Swisher Theatre, for seven months. He then secured a 
position with the Standard Oil Company at Coalinga, California, as 
chief clerk of the field department, where he remained twelve months 
and a half; resigned February i, 1908, to accept a position with the 
West Virginia Geological Survey as chief clerk, and private secretary to 
Dr. I. C. White, state geologist of West Virginia, which position he 
still ably fills. Politically Mr. Hennen votes the Republican ticket, and is 
of the Methodist Episcopal faith. He belongs to the Sons of the Revo- 
lution in West Virginia; Morgantown Lodge, No. 411, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks; West Virginia State Automobile Asso- 
ciation; Monongalia Automobile Club, and Turn Verein Concordia. 

He married, August 15, 191 1, Josephine Marie Stenger, of Morgan- 
town, West Virginia, daughter of Anthony and Elizabeth Theresa 
Stenger. 



This family is comparatively new in West Virginia, 
PHILLIPS but has forged to the forefront as a family possessed 
of intelligence and business ability. They are helping 
to develop the vast industries of the state and have through their manu- 
facturing enterprise become quite widely known. The father and his 
two sons conduct a large business, with their headquarters at the thriv- 
ing city of Mannington, West Virginia. 

(I) James Phillips was a native of England, was a blacksmith and 

an excellent workman in his line. He married Margaret , and 

in their family was a son Charles. 

(II) Charles, son of James Phillips, was born in London, Eng- 
land, December 18, 1838. He was educated in London, where he 



498 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

learned his present business under the instruction of his capable father. 
Believing he could better attain his object in life, in 1868 he came to 
America where he joined his brother David, who had preceded him to 
this country and succeeded in establishing a machine shop in Armstrong 
Run, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania. Charles remained with his 
brother one year, then engaged in the foundry and tool-making trade 
at the last-named place, where he remained ten years, then removed his 
works to Richburg, New York, where he followed the same line of busi- 
ness for fifteen years, coming to Mannington, West Virginia, in 1893. 
Here he incorporated the business with a capital of $20,000, which has 
grown to be a large manufacturing plant, covering about a full city 
block of ground. Thirty men are employed as expert forgers and tool- 
makers. The goods produced in this shop include well-drilling tools, 
drills for general purposes, "fishing" tools of all kinds connected with 
oil well drillings, etc. The products of this shop find ready sale in 
almost every part of the civilized world, where deep well drilling for 
water, oil and gas are found. They have various government and 
large oil company contracts and in 191 1 were filling a hundred thousand 
dollar order for the United States government in the Philippine Islands. 
Besides their regular line of work, they also make cast and forged parts 
of engines and boilers with repairs for such articles. The corporation is 
styled the Charles Phillips Tool Company and they are preparing to 
erect a new and larger plant at Mannington in 19 12. Mr. Phillips Sr. 
spends about half of his time in looking after large oil properties, wells 
and drilling developments in the vicinity of Richburg, New York. 
Politically Mr. Phillips is a Republican, but in no sense a politician. 
In Masonry he has advanced to the thirty-second degree, his member- 
ship still retained at Buffalo and Bolivar, New York. He and the 
family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, May 10, 1867, Helen A. Gough, of London, Eng- 
land, daughter of Richard and Caroline (Cooper) Gough. Living 
children are: Charles R., of whom later; Nellie C, a graduate of Rich- 
burg, New York, high school, at home; James I., of whom later. The 
children were all born in Queenstown, Pennsylvania, and educated at 
Richburg, New York. 

(Ill) Charles R., son of Charles and Helen A. (Gough) Phillips, 
was born in Queenstown, Pennsylvania, April 28, 1874. He was well 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 499 

schooled at Richburg, New York. Since his school days he has been 
associated with his father in business and is now the secretary and gen- 
eral manager of the Charles Phillips Tool Company of which he is a 
member. Politically Mr. Phillips like his father votes the Republican 
ticket, believing that party best serves the interests of the masses. He is 
a member of the Masonic and Elks fraternities. He married Mary 
Hearons. Children: Kenneth, bom May 17, 1898; Charles, Novem- 
ber 9, 1901; James, July 20, 1907. The family attend St. Patrick's 
Roman Catholic Church. 

(Ill) James I., son of Charles and Helen A. (Gough) Phillips, 
was born at Queenstown, Pennsylvania, April 12, 1877. He received 
his education at the schools in Richburg, New York, to which place his 
father removed when James I. was young. After graduating from the 
high school he associated himself with his father and brother in the tool 
manufacturing business, and is now thus engaged. Politically he votes 
the Republican ticket. He belongs to the Masonic and Elks fraternities. 
He married Ortha Miller. Children: Helen, born March 15, 1899; 
Catherine, August 7, 1902. 



But little is known of the Smith family of which Henry 
SMITH F. Smith, the secretary and treasurer of the extensive 
Smith-Race Grocery Company, of Fairmont and Morgan- 
town, West Virginia, is a member. 

Charles L. Smith, father of Henry F. Smith, was born in Fairmont, 
when the territory was yet a part of old Virginia, in 1837. He mar- 
ried Cordelia Richey, a native of Fairmont, born in 1839. They had 
seven children, including Henry F., see forward. Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
L. Smith celebrated their golden wedding, February 27, 19 12, all of 
their children being present on this occasion. 

Henry F., son of Charles L. and Cordelia (Richey) Smith, was 
born at Fairmont, then Virginia, May 3, 1863. He was educated at 
the common schools at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia 
University. He came back to Fairmont in 1886, and in 1893 ^^^ °"^ 
of the organizers of the West Virginia Grocery and Candy Company. 
In 1906 the company was reorganized as the. Smith-Race Grocery Com- 
pany, with a capital of $200,000, which subsequently was increased to 
$300,000. Mr. Smith is the secretary and treasurer of this company, 



500 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

which concern also has a branch plant at Morgantown, West Virginia, 
equally as extensive as the one at Fairmont. Mr. Smith is president of 
the Monongahela Industrial Company and vice-president of the First 
National Bank of Fairmont. Politically Mr. Smith is a supporter of 
the Republican party, and in church affiliations is a Presbyterian. In 
Masonic circles he is far advanced in its ancient mysteries and history. 
He is a member of the fraternity to the thirty-second degree. He holds 
a membership in Fairmont Lodge, No. 9, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Orient Chapter, No. 9, Royal Arch Masons; Crusade Com- 
mandery, No. 6, Knights Templar; and has filled all the offices in these 
bodies. He also belongs to the Consistory, Scottish Rite Masons, of 
West Virginia; is a member of Osiris Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Wheeling, West Virginia. He is pres- 
ent grand generalissimo of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar, 
of West Virginia. He has been a Mason since 1888. He is a member 
of the Association of the Sons of the Revolution of West Virginia. 

He married, June 6, 1889, Anna M. Gould, born in Fairmont, 
West Virginia, February 28, 1865. Mrs. Smith is a member of Fair- 
mont Chapter, Daughters of the Revolution. 



The recent development in the coal fields of West Vir- 
CLARK ginia have brought into Marion county a number of men 
who have been schooled along similar lines of business in 
the industrial centers of this and adjoining states. The central figure 
of this family is John A. Clark, president of the Clark Coal & Coke 
Company at Fairmont, where he is financially interested in a number of 
important business enterprises of prominent order. 

Mr. Clark was born in the city of Cumberland, Maryland, January 
22, 1855, son of Andrew and Ellen (Colvin) Clark. The father was 
born in Ireland, and left his native land when quite young to seek a 
home and fortune in the new world. He came to America and first 
located at Mount Savage, Maryland, but later settled in Louisville, 
Kentucky, where he died. 

Mr. Clark's parents were only in moderate circumstances and for 
that reason, at the early age of eleven years, he was thrown largely 
upon his own resources. He first found employment in a store in the 
George's creek region, at Lonaconing, in which locality he was con- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 501 

stantly employed from 1866 to 1880. In the latter year he accepted a 
position as clerk and manager of the store of the Orrel Coal & Coke 
Company at Newburg, Preston county, West Virginia, where he re- 
mained until 1889, in which year he removed to Marion county as man- 
ager of the store of the Monongah Coal & Coke Company at Mo- 
nongah. He filled this position until November, 1 890, when he became 
superintendent of the Linden Coke Company at Clements. After two 
years at Clements he resigned his position In order to engage in business 
on his own account. In January, 1892, he organized a stock company, 
known as the Clark Coal & Coke Company. The plant of this concern 
was situated at Prichard, on the Monongahela River railroad. His 
next plant was located at Anderson, on the same railroad, and a little 
later he began to operate a plant at Chiefton, likewise on the Monon- 
gahela River railroad. In 1899 he developed property at Ocean, on 
the Parkersburg branch, the same being known as the Cleveland & Fair- 
mont Coal & Coke Company. In 1899 he gave his attention to de- 
veloping the Columbia Coal & Coke Company mine at Columbia, and 
the Fairmont & Baltimore Coal & Coke Company at Adamston, West 
Virginia. The above mentioned concerns were all successfully worked 
and eventually sold to the Fairmont Coal Company, In April, 1901. 

In 1 90 1 Mr. Clark began to develope a mine at Wilsonburg, known 
as the Waldo Mine, and about this time he also opened up the Golf, 
the New Chiefton and the Randolph mines, the same being known as 
the Madera Hill-Clark Coal Company's properties. In 19 10 he took 
over the Pitcairn Coal Company's mine, known as the Pitcairn mine, 
and organized a company under the style of the Harry B. Coal & Coke 
Company. In the latter project he has as his partners his two sons, 
Harry B. and John A. Jr. These mines which are being successfully 
worked at the present time have an annual output of one million tons. 
In addition to his mining interests Mr. Clark Is president of the Smith- 
Race Grocery Company, president of the Miller-Clark Grain Company, 
and vice-president of the Citizens' Dollar Savings Bank, all at Fair- 
mont. In his political adherency Mr. Clark is a stalwart supporter of 
the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stands sponsor. 

In 1880 Mr. Clark married Nannie E. Clark, daughter of Andrew 
Jackson and Rebecca (Cresop) Clark, of Cumberland, Maryland. 



502 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Children: i. Harry B., born 1882; married, in 1909, Anne Nolan, of 
Pittsburgh. They have one child, Mary, born April 26, 191 1. 2. 
John A. Jr., born 1888; married, June 29, 191 1, Annette Murphy, of 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 3. Kenna, bom 1893; named in honor of 
Senator John E. Kenna. 



Among the younger physicians now practicing medi- 
HOWARD cine at Fairmont is Dr. Edward W. Howard, a native 
of Masontown, Pennsylvania, born October 30, 1870, 
son of J. M. and Susanna (Miller) Howard. The father was born in 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, in 1840. He served as treasurer of 
Fayette county, and is now actively engaged in the manufacture of car- 
riages and wagons. He married, in 1861, Susanna Miller, born in 
Masontown, Pennsylvania, in 1845. Children of J. M. and Susanna 
(Miller) Howard: Charles H., now residing in Masontown, Pennsyl- 
vania: William G., of the same place; Thomas L., of Uniontown, 
Pennsylvania; George L., of Waynesburg, Pennsylvania; a daughter, 
Mrs. L. W. Lewellen, of Tarentum; Paul, of Masontown, Pennsyl- 
vania, and Dr. Edward W., of Fairmont, West Virginia. 

Dr. Howard received his education at Masontown and at the Cali- 
fornia Normal School, of Pennsylvania, entering Jefferson Medical 
College, Philadelphia, in 1891. He graduated there in 1894, and com- 
menced his practice at Point Marion, Pennsylvania, remaining there 
until December, 1895, when he removed to Fairmont, West Virginia, 
where he is still practicing successfully. He is a member of the Marion 
County Medical Society, West Virginia State Medical Society, and the 
American Medical Association. He holds a membership in the Ma- 
sonic, Elks and Woodmen of America lodges. Politically he is a Re- 
publican. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Fair- 
mont. 

Dr. Howard married, August 27, 1896, Lilly Conn, born at Mills- 
borough, Pennsylvania, July 14, 1870, daughter of Jacob and Mary 
Conn, of Point Marion, Pennsylvania; the father is deceased. Chil- 
dren: Dorothea C, bom at Fairmont, West Virginia, July 18, 1898; 
Mary Katharyn, born at Fairmont, August 10, 1902. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 503 

This family is counted among the many Scotch-Irish 
McNEELY lines who settled in Pennsylvania and Virginia and 

have left the impress upon the communities in which 
they have lived, by reason of their sturdy, temperate and law-abiding 
traits of character. This will treat and trace the family history of the 
three generations of the McNeely family who have lived in America. 

(I) Robert McNeely, a native of Scotland, died in Greene county, 
Pennsylvania, aged seventy-one years. His wife, Katherine, also bom 
in Scotland, died in Greene county, Pennsylvania, aged seventy years. 
Among their children was a son John, of whom further. The father 
followed farming for his livelihood, and was highly respected in Greene 
county. 

(II) John, son of Robert and Katherine McNeely, was born in 
Greene county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1869. He was a farmer. 
He married (first) Lucinda Coen, who bore him eleven children, five 
being deceased. Married (second) Katherine Stockdale, who died in 
1888; they had five children, four of whom still survive. The parents 
of Katherine (Stockdale) McNeely were born in Ohio, of Scotch ances- 
try. Her father died in Pennsylvania in 1876, and his wife, whose 
maiden name was Scott, died in 1874. 

(III) Dr. Jacob Owen McNeely, son of John and Katherine 
(Stockdale) McNeely, was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, April 
27, 1865. He was educated in Waynesburg College, and graduated 
at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. He commenced the 
practice of dentistry in 1889, the same year of his graduation. He 
chose Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, as the place in which to start in prac- 
tice. He there continued until 1 894 when he moved to Fairmont, W^est 
Virginia, where he is still located, being next to the oldest dentist in 
Fairmont. He was elected mayor of West Fairmont in 1897-98, and 
in 1899, when the city of Fairmont was incorporated, he was elected 
and became its first mayor. He made an excellent official in both cases. 
In 1903 he was elected delegate to the house of representatives for 
West Virginia. He has been in the council many years, showing the 
interest he takes in public affairs. Politically he votes the Republican 
ticket. In church faith and profession he is a Methodist Episcopalian. 
He is a member of the Elks, Modern Woodmen and Royal Arcanum 
societies; also holds membership in the West Virginia State Dental 



504 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Society and the Monongahela Valley State Association of Dentistry. 
He takes pleasure in outdoor sports and is numbered among the mem- 
bers of the Fairmont Gun Club. 

He married, August 26, 1890, Dora Belle Clovis, born January 20, 
1868, daughter of WiUiam Clovis, who died in 1899; he was a success- 
ful and quite extensive farmer as well as stock buyer and shipper 
throughout his life. Children: Ehzabeth E., bom in Greene county, 
Pennsylvania, July 23, 1891 ; Alta R., born in Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania, May 20, 1893; Olive K., born in Fairmont, West Virginia, 
January 4, 1895; Dorothy C, born in Fairmont, January 5, 1899; 
Jacob O. Jr., born in Fairmont, October 27, 1903. 



Coming from old and honorable revolutionary 
BLACKSHERE stock, the family of Blackshere now to be con- 
sidered was an early family in Pennsylvania. 
The revolutionary soldier, who it is said served seven years seven 
months and seven days during the struggle for national independence, 
was named Ebenezer Blackshere. It is believed that this revolutionary 
soldier came with his family with a government land warrant to what 
is now Marion county. West Virginia, for the purpose of utilizing his 
script. 

(II) Elias, son of Ebenezer Blackshere, was born either in Greene 
or an adjoining county, Pennsylvania. He married Eliza Ramer, born 
in Greene or Fayette county, Pennsylvania. Children: i. Jacob Ramer, 
born September 3, 1834; married Melissa A. Martin; children: Carl, 
Cora, Earl, Frank, Ramer and Harold Blackshere. The father, Jacob 
Ramer Blackshere, died on his six thousand acre cattle ranch, "Clove 
Cliff," near Cottonwood Falls, Kansas. 2. Rebecca, born September 7, 
1836, died when aged about twenty-one years. 3. John, of whom later. 
4. Francis, born January 25, 1841. 5. Benjamin Franklin, bom March 
I, 1844; now a director of and vice-president of the Exchange Bank 
of Mannington, West Virginia. 6. Elias A., born October 22, 1846; 
graduated from Yale College and practiced law in Virginia until he lost 
his library by fire, when he went to Baltimore and engaged in live stock 
commission business in which he succeeded remarkably well. He mar- 
ried Harriet Gray, of Greene county, Pennsylvania, and they were the 
parents of two children : William, who died aged six months, and Cath- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 505 

erine, married Albert Donaldson, a Baltimore lawyer. 7. Margaret 
A., born March 25, 1849; married Newton S. Beaty, deceased, of 
Mannington, where she still resides. 

(Ill) John, third child of Elias and Eliza (Ramer) Blackshere, 
was born in Marion county, Virginia, December 19, 1838. He was 
educated at the old-fashioned subscription schools common in his day. 
He also attended Professor White's Academy, at Fairmont, after which 
he associated himself with his father in his mercantile business at Man- 
nington until his father died, when he sold his entire business to Newton 
S. Beaty, and then engaged in banking business himself. He was one 
of the organizers of the Exchange Bank of Mannigton, which concern 
he built up to become a strong financial institution. He also had 
large farm property holdings at the time of his death, the same being 
in the Mannington district. He developed a number of paying oil wells 
on his property and left a very large estate. He was well advanced in 
the order of Free Masonry, being a thirty-second degree Mason. He 
was buried after the impressive rites of that order. He also held mem- 
bership with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, but was not 
active in the workings of that society. Politically he was a Democrat, 
but never cared for office in his party, but did consent to serve as mem- 
ber of the city council in Mannington. He was liberal hearted and gave 
many a man a start by aiding him to get into an independent business 
of his own. He loaned money where others would not, but never lost 
by it and never distressed his creditors. He died December 31, 1899, 
and was buried in the cemetery at Mannington. Of such noble char- 
acters the world has none too many. He married, January 28, 1874, 
Zana V., daughter of Thomas L. and Eleanor (Hunt) Sanders. Chil- 
dren : I. Jessie, married Edward G. Smith, an attorney; children: John 
Blackshere and Jill. 2. Eleanor, married A. C. Free, who died in Okla- 
homa, January, 191 1. 

Concerning the Sanders family, to which Mrs. John Blackshere 
belongs, it may be said that they are of Scotch-English ancestry and are 
entitled to a coat-of-arms according to family tradition, but the mem- 
bers of the present day are too democratic and American in their views 
to even look the matter up. Her father, Thomas L. Sanders, was bom 
near Morgantown, West Virginia, June 5, 1822. His father was from 
Delaware where the Sanders were very prominent people. One of the 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 507 

Lindsay G., John C, resides in Uniontown, Pennsylvania; Dr. Le- 
Roy D. 

(II) Dr. LeRoy D. Howard, son of Absalom and Rebecca Jane 
(Core) Howard, was born October 19, 1882. He attended the public 
and private schools of his native county. In 1902 he entered Jeffer- 
son Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from which he grad- 
uated in 1906, and immediately commenced the practice of medicine at 
Fairmont, West Virginia. After one year there, he entered the Jeffer- 
son Medical College Hospital, remained one year, then returned to 
Fairmont, where he formed a partnership with Dr. E. W. Howard, 
his cousin, and together they are conducting a large medical practice at 
that place. Besides carrying his license to practice medicine in West 
Virginia, he also has the right to practice in Pennsylvania. Dr. Howard 
is a member of the Marion County, West Virginia, State Medical 
societies, belongs to the Masonic and Modern Woodmen fraternities, 
also the Protective Home Circle order. Politically he is a Republican, 
while in religious faith he is of the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
married, June 23, 1909, Edna Pearl, daughter of T. J. and Martha 
Sturgen, who resided in Fayette county, Pennsylvania ; the father died in 
1904. One child has been born to Dr. Howard, Martha Rebekah, 
bom November 23, 19 10. 



Among the professional men now located at the city of Fair- 
LEPS mont. West Virginia, Is a member of the Leps family, in the 
person of Clay W. Leps, a skillful dental surgeon. He is 
the son of George Edwin and Susan (Athey) Leps. 

( I ) George Edwin Leps was bom in Hampshire county, near Rom- 
ney. He married Susan Athey, born at Burlington, Mineral county. 
West Virginia. 

(II) Clay Whitshell Leps, D. D. S., son of George Edwin and 
Susan (Athey) Leps, was bom October 26, 1886, in Keyser, West 
Virginia. He was educated In the high school of Keyser and prepara- 
tory branch of West Virginia University, after which he entered the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, from which he graduated with 
the class of 1909, with the merited degree of Doctor of Dental Sur- 
gery, and immediately opened an office in the Fairmont Trust Building 
at Fairmont, West Virginia, and is building up a lucrative dental prac- 



5o8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

tice. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity at Fairmont, of the 
Monongahela Valley Dental Society and the West Virginia Dental 
Association. During his college days he was connected with the Harris- 
Hayden Odontographic Society and still keeps up his interest and 
membership in the same, as well as in the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery Alumni Association. The Theta Nu Upsilon fraternity and 
the Psi Omega fraternity held him as a worthy member, while in col- 
lege life, and he was secretary of the latter society, and in both of these 
he still takes considerable interest. Politically he is a Democrat, and 
belongs to the Presbyterian church. He is unmarried. 



The Black family to which the present clerk of the circuit 
BLACK and intermediate courts of Marion county, William S. 

Black, belongs, is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. 
William Stephen Black, of whom this treats, was born in Brooklyn, 
New York, August 29, 1868, son of William Walter and Catherine T. 
(Martin) Black. He was educated in Brooklyn, and at the age of 
fourteen years commenced to earn his own living. In June, 1896, he 
came to Fairmont, West Virginia, and there secured employment with 
the Montana Coal and Coke Company, which company then operated 
the majority of the mines in Fairmont district. He remained with that 
company and its successor, the Fairmont Coal Company until June, 
1905, when he engaged in the general insurance and real estate business. 
He followed that until 1908 and during the period was elected city 
clerk of Fairmont in 1907, and in the autumn of 1908 was elected clerk 
of the circuit and intermediate courts of Marion county. Mr. Black is 
a member of the Masonic order, belonging to the Blue Lodge, Chapter, 
Commandery and Shrine, of this most ancient and honorable fraternity; 
is also a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Elks and Wood- 
men of the World. He married, November 7, 1900, Mary Rebekah, 
born in Maryland, daughter of Andrew Jackson Clark. 



Among the progressive type of foreign population 
SCHWANER now residing in Fairmont, West Virginia, at this 

date, may be mentioned that excellent photographer, 
Ernst Schwaner, a native of Marburg, Germany, born February 13, 
1876. He was educated in the Fatherland, finishing his education at 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 509 

Frankfort-on-thc-Main, then came to Baltimore, Maryland, where he 
also received American ideas as to his profession as a photographic 
artist. In 1906 he located at Fairmont, West Virginia, where he 
intends to make his permanent home. In his profession he ranks among 
the best, and his business is steadily increasing, which in these days of 
critical notions proves his ability as well as popularity as a man and 
artist. He has had no one to assist him through life, but pressed his 
own way steadily to the position he now holds. He is a member of the 
German English Lutheran Church, independent in politics, and much 
interested in the welfare of his adopted state and city. 



Among the quite early families who settled in Pennsyl- 
SWIGER vania were the Swigers, of whom this narrative will 
treat. The earliest member of this family, of whom 
anything definite is now recalled, was John Swiger. 

(I) John Swiger resided in Pennsylvania and emigrated to Harri- 
son county, Virginia (that part now within West Virginia), In a most 
unique, though by no means pleasant manner. He moved his earthly 
effects and brought his wife on horseback the entire distance. The wife 
rode the trusty horse and he walked. It goes without saying that they 
were early farmers, for that was about the only occupation of the pio- 
neers at that date. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) Swiger, the emigrant from Penn- 
sylvania, was born in Harrison county. Clay district, Virginia. He 
entered government land and made for himself a comfortable home. 
This farm is now owned by his grandson, Charles O. Swiger, born in 
1866. John Swiger married and had a number of children, including 
a son named Edmond. 

(III) Edmond, son of John (2) Swiger, was born in Clay district, 
Harrison county, Virginia, May 23, 1840. He was reared to and 
always followed agriculture. He was a rugged man and is still in per- 
fect health, living at Fairmont. Politically he is a Republican; and in 
his religious faith he Is a Baptist. He married Romanza Criss, born 
in Harrison county, Virginia, In November, 1843; she removed when 
but a child with her parents to Parkersburg. She died August 4, 1894. 
She was a devout Christian woman, ever doing church and charitable 
work; was a loving mother and model wife; all who made her acquaint- 



5IO Upper Monongahela Valley. 

ance were her friends. The father of Romanza Criss was Reason W. 
Criss, who died when she was about eight years old. Her paternal 
grandfather was Vincent Criss. A brother of Romanza (Criss) Swiger, 
named Swazy Criss, now resides in South Auburn, Nebraska, where he 
practices law and has held several important positions in that state. 
He served in the Union cause during the civil war and was wounded at 
Spottsylvania Court House, by reason of which he lost a leg. 

(IV) Charles O., only son of Edmond and Romanza (Criss) 
Swiger, was born in Harrison county, West Virginia, October lo, 1866. 
He was educated in the public schools of Shinnston, and when sixteen 
years of age commenced assisting his father in buying and selling horses, 
and in his farming operations. When twenty-one years of age he took 
the lands to work on his own account, but still continued to buy and sell 
horses for the market. He also dealt in cattle. Believing that better 
things than stock and farming were in store for him, Mr. Swiger sent 
teams and machinery into the fields in 1908, and December 15th of 
that year, on the old farm, he struck an oil well, now known as "Swiger 
No. I," flowing at first twelve thousand barrels each twenty- four hours 
of high class oil. They dug trenches and placed vats in the ground to 
receive the oil. This was considered the best oil well in the state of 
West Virginia. It took twenty-five two hundred and fifty barrel tanks 
and two twelve hundred and fifty barrel tanks to hold the reserve oil, 
and was still running six thousand and eighty barrels daily. At first 
they dug vats in the ground to hold the oil, but later provided perma- 
nent tanks. He now has five other oil wells producing good results on 
the old homestead, which contains one hundred eighty-three acres, one 
hundred and forty of which have not yet been developed. In February, 
1 9 10, Mr. Swiger removed to Fairmont and is there engaged in the 
shoe business. Politically he votes the Republican ticket, and is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. 

He married, March 18, 1888, Verna E. Bolton, born in Harrison 
county, West Virginia, in Clay district, February 26, 1865, daughter 
of J. W. Bolton, who removed to Iowa and died in 1890, after which 
his family returned to Harrison county, this state. Children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles O. Swiger: Mabel Ross, born April 22, 1890; Nettie 
Lee, February 3, 1892, married Seymour Anderson and resides in 
Shinnston, Clay district, Harrison county; Gertrude, August 4, 1894; 







JSyA-Xy 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 511 

Russell R., April 4, 1896; Harrold E., May 3, 1901 ; Ruba Cleo, June 
I, 1904. The two eldest children completed their education at the 
State Normal School at Fairmont, and Mabel Ross taught two terms 
of school, giving great satisfaction. Mr. Swiger having faith in good 
educational qualifications is doing all in his power to provide such for 
his family. The changes of the times when Mr. Swiger's great-grand- 
father and his bride emigrated to these parts, on horseback, are indeed 
marked. Then it was little else than a wilderness, infested with wild 
and dangerous beasts, but now it is within the great and highly de- 
veloped oil and natural gas fields of West Virginia. 



Among the brave men who were in full sympathy with 
SNIDER the south at the time of the civil war, and who served 

in the confederate army, was David Newton Snider, 
now residing in Fairmont, West Virginia. He was born in Monon- 
galia county at the town of Georgetown, June 6, 1837, son of David 
R. and Maria (Miller) Snider. By trade David R. Snider was a tan- 
ner, and died at the age of seventy- four years. His wife died at the age 
of seventy-five years. 

David Newton Snider was educated in the district schools, and 
when a mere youth learned the tanner's trade of his father, and worked 
at it until 1861, when he enlisted in the Eighth Kentucky Regiment, 
under Colonel Lyons, a graduate of West Point. His enlistment was 
at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, February i, 1862. He went to Fort Donald- 
son (formerly Dover, Tennessee), and was present at its surrender, 
and from there went to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, as a prisoner-of- 
war, and there remained in military prison until the following July, 
when he was exchanged and sent to Cairo, Illinois, then ordered to 
Berg's Point, opposite Vicksburg, where he went into active service 
again. His command was sent to Corinth, covering the retreat back to 
Grenada, Mississippi, where a stand was made, and a six hour engage- 
ment followed. There he remained until Jefferson Davis and Joseph 
E. Johnston came there to review the southern army, commanded then 
by Pemberton. The command was then removed to Jackson, Missis- 
sippi, where they remained until General Grant crossed the river, when 
Mr. Snider's regiment was called down there to reenforce, but arrived 
too late, as they were at Corinth. They were then placed to cover the 



512 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

retreat back to Baker's Creek, sometimes called Champion Hill; there 
they were cut off, and a portion of the regiment went to Jackson, and 
another section to Vicksburg. Two days out they were permitted to 
mount on horses ; they slipped away in the night, crossed the big black 
river, by fording it, and then joined the other portion of the regiment 
at Jackson. They acted as mounted guards for the infantry during the 
next few months when they were transferred to General Forest's com- 
mand and followed him through Tennessee and Kentucky, falling back, 
fighting their way back towards the sea, being the last regiment to make 
their surrender at Selma, Alabama. 

The following is in part a few well-chosen remarks by their general, 
N. B. Forest, at the time of their disbanding: 

In bidding you farewell, rest assured that you carry with you my best 
wishes for your future welfare and happiness and without in any way 
referring to the merits of the cause in which we have been engaged, your 
courage and determination as exhibited on many hard-fought fields, has 
elicited the respect and admiration of friend and foe. And I now cheerfully 
and gratefully acknowledge my indebtedness to the officers and men of my 
command, whose zeal, fidelity and unflinching bravery has been the great 
source of my past success in arms. I have never on the field of battle sent 
you where I felt myself unwilling to pursue. You have been good soldiers ; 
you can be good citizens. Obey the laws, preserve your honor, and the 
government to which you have surrendered can afford to be and will be 
magnanimous. N. B. Forest, 

Lieutenant-General. 

Soon after his enlistment he was made a sergeant, and after the 
regiment became mounted he was sent to Clinton, with a squad of men, 
and there took typhoid fever which disqualified him for a long period. 
At the time of Sherman's second raid he was still ill, and was gathered 
up with others and sent back to Fort Morton, this being his second term 
in the same prison; he was held there until the end of the war. He 
received his final discharge at Fort Morton, April, 1865. Mr. Snider 
relates that he received the best of treatment at the keeper's hands in 
the Union prisons, under Colonel Owens. So well were prisoners treat- 
ed by him that a strong effort is now being made to raise money for the 
erection of a monument to his memory. 

After returning from the war Mr. Snider again engaged in the tan- 
ning business with his father, continuing until the date of his marriage, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 513 

when he settled on a farm, remaining until 1872, then removed to Fair- 
mont, going overland by team. He engaged in the grocery business 
for a few years, then went into the hardware business, with W. R. Ing- 
man, following the same until 1904, when he retired from his active 
pursuits. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church (South). 

He married, October 31, 1867, Mary Cunningham, born October 
2, 1836, in Monongalia county, Virginia, daughter of Ezekiel Cunning- 
ham, who was born in mid-ocean during a voyage of his parents to 
America. Mrs. Snider's grandmother, Ann (Prickett) Dragoo, was 
born at an Indian fort, near Holt, Marlon county. Her mother was 
Charity (Taylor) Prickett, said to be the first white child born in 
Monogalla county. 



The Virginia branch of this ancient and numerous 
MORGAN Welsh family was founded more than two centuries 

ago, and during the successive periods of our colonial, 
revolutionary and national history has given to our country many use- 
ful and able citizens, distinguished both as soldiers and as members of 
the learned professions. 

(I) Colonel Morgan Morgan, the first ancestor of record, was 
born in the principality of Wales, and received his education In London 
during the reign of William the Third. He came, during the reign of 
Queen Anne, to the province of Delaware, and engaged in business in 
what is now the town of Chrlstianna. He married Catharine Garrison, 
of Delaware, and their children were: Morgan, Anne, Zackwell, Evan, 
David, mentioned below; Charles, Henry, James. Colonel Morgan 
was an ordained clergyman of the Church of England, and soon after 
his marriage removed from Delaware to the Valley of Virginia and set- 
tled at Winchester where he established a church of which he and his 
son, Morgan Morgan Jr., were pastors for many years. Colonel Zack- 
well Morgan, the second son, moved to the mouth of Decker's creek, 
and was the founder of Morgantown, Monongalia county. His son 
Zackwell fell in the defense of Washington City, at the battle of Blad- 
ensburg, August 24, 18 14. Charles, the fifth son of Colonel Morgan 
Morgan, lived In Berkeley county, and his brother Henry, next in age, 



514 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

removed to South Carolina. The two brothers, Charles and Henry 
Morgan, married sisters. James, youngest son of Colonel Morgan 
Morgan, was a captain in the continental army, and while on a fur- 
lough was captured by a Tory named Lewis and shot at a place in 
Berkeley county, Virginia, which was afterward called Torytown. The 
Rev. Morgan Morgan remained in Berkeley county on his father's 
farm. 

(II) David, fifth child and fourth son of Colonel Morgan and 
Catharine (Garrison) Morgan, was born at Christianna, Delaware, 
May 12, 1 72 1 (old style), and removed with his father to the Valley 
of Virginia, where he bought a farm near Winchester. He was a sur- 
veyor and was appointed by the colonial government of Virginia to 
assist Steven Holsten in making surveys and explorations of the south- 
western part of that state, and he was later appointed one of the com- 
missioners on the part of the colony of Virginia to assist Mr. (after- 
ward Colonel) Washington, in 1748, in discovering and establishing 
the northern boundary of Lord Fairfax's estate, which boundary was 
to constitute the dividing line between Maryland and Virginia. The 
historic monument erected at the head of the North Branch of the 
Potomac, known as the "Fairfax Stone," commemorates the consumma- 
tion of their labors. David Morgan was pleased with the country west 
of the Alleghenles, and, foreseeing its great future, removed to the 
mouth of Red Stone creek, Pennsylvania, in 1769, remaining two years, 
and in 1771 migrating into what is now Marion county and settling 
about six miles north of Fairmont, on the banks of the upper Monon- 
gahela. There he passed the remainder of his life and that beautiful 
region has ever since been the home of his descendants. He married 
Sarah Stevens, of a Pennsylvania Quaker family. 

(III) Francis, son of David and Sarah (Stevens) Morgan, mar- 
ried and had a son Zackwell. 

(IV) Zackwell, son of Francis Morgan, married and had a son 
John Perrymont. 

(V) John Perrymont, son of Zackwell Morgan, was born near 
Milford (now Rivesville), West Virginia, and followed the calling of 
a farmer. He was a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He married Helen M. Fast, nee Ross, and their chil- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 515 

dren were: Sophia, Catharine, David Ogden, Zackwell Gideon, men- 
tioned below; Mary Frances, Malinda E., Breckinridge. 

(VI) Zackwell Gideon, fourth child and second son of John Perry- 
mont and Helen M. (Ross) (Fast) Morgan, was born January 13, 
1850, in Marion county, and like his ancestors has engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits. He has taken an active part in public affairs, and from 
1902 to 1906 was sheriff of Marion county. He married Emily La- 
verna, born in Monongalia county, daughter of Nelson and Helen M. 
Fast. Nelson Fast is a son of the Hon. Richard Fast, of Monongalia 
county, who was a member of the Virginia legislature. The following 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Morgan: John Ogden, mentioned 
below ; Frank R., Rose, Brooks, Katharine. 

(VII) John Ogden, eldest child of Zackwell Gideon and Emily 
Laverna (Fast) Morgan, was born April 7, 1878, near Rivesville, 
Marion county. West Virginia. He received his education in the com- 
mon schools and at the State Normal School. Ever since completing 
his course of study he has been engaged in the banking business. For 
twelve years he was with the Bank of Fairmont, now the National 
Bank of Fairmont, and he is at the present time cashier and director in 
the First National Bank. In politics Mr. Morgan is a Democrat. He 
affiliates with the Knights of Pythias, the Mystic Shrine, the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks and is a thirty-second degree Mason. 
He is a member of the Methodist Protestant church. Mr. Morgan 
married, September 8, 1908, at Mountain Lake Park, Maryland, 
Myrtle Knotts, and they are the parents of one daughter, Jane, born 
September 14, 1909. 



The history of this family of Orrs traces back to the trying 
ORR days of the revolutionary war when one of its number served 
in the American army, and fought for freedom. 
The Orr who is the first known in the line now under consideration, 
but whose Christian name is unknown, was the father of John D. Orr, 
who became the grandfather of Morgan D. Orr, now residing at Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, of whom later account will be given. 

(II) John D., son of the Orr named above, was born in Maryland, 
and after serving as a substitute for his father in the struggle for 
national independence, removed with the family to Pennsylvania, where 



5i6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

John D. saw service in the Indian campaigns and was wounded at 
Crawford's Depot. He went to Preston county, Virginia (now West 
Virginia), in 1798, and married a Miss Johns and by her had children: 
John, a stockman of Preston county; Hiram, born October i, 1804; 
George, a Preston county farmer; James, a Preston county farmer; 
Catherine, married Joshua Fortney, of Shinnston, West Virginia, a 
farmer; Ruth, married William Menear, a Preston county farmer. 

(III) Hiram, son of John D. Orr, was born in Preston county, 
Virginia, October i, 1804. He was educated in the primitive schools 
of Preston county, and followed farming and school teaching all his 
life, dying April 24, 1855, at Independence, Preston county. West Vir- 
ginia. Politically he voted the Whig ticket, and in his church faith was 
of the Baptist denomination. He married, February 19, 1829, Keziah, 
born November 13, 1809, daughter of John and Katherine (Fortney) 
Menear. Children: Eugene J., bom December 30, 1831, died in Tay- 
lor county. West Virginia, in 1867, a farmer; Major Uriah N., born 
April 24, 1832, a retired Preston county lumberman and banker at 
Kingwood; Martha, born September 10, 1836, married a Mr. Menear; 
Morgan D., of whom further; Hugh N.; Miles H., a Preston county 
farmer. Mrs. Keziah (Menear) Orr died March 21, 1846. Hiram 
Orr married (second) Mrs. Charlotte (Hartley) Holt, daughter of 
Edward Hartley, and by this union was born Waitman L., a dealer in 
lumber, cooperage, etc., in Baltimore, Maryland, where he died in 1904. 

(IV) Morgan D., son of Hiram and Keziah (Menear) Orr, was 
born in Preston county, Virginia, March 21, 1841. He was educated 
at the subscription schools, after which he was employed in the New- 
burg Coal Company, beginning as coal weigher, and remained with 
this company thirty-five years, holding many responsible positions, until 
they sold to the Consolidation Coal and Coke Company, when he retired. 
He went to Fairmont in 1864 and has lived in that city ever since; has 
served on the school board; has been mayor of the city, being elected in 
1900 and served one term acceptably. Politically Mr. Orr votes the 
Republican ticket. Of his military career it should be recorded in this 
connection that he wore the loyal blue during the trying years of the 
civil war. June 21, 1861, he enlisted at Newburg, Preston county, 
Virginia, as a member of Company D, Third West Virginia Infantry 
Regiment, serving in all the West Virginia campaigns; was at the battle 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 517 

of McDowell, under Colonel Milroy; wounded at the battle of Cross 
Keys, June 8, 1862, and confined in hospital until April 17, 1863, when 
he was honorably discharged. In Grand Army of the Republic circles 
he stands eminent. He is an ex-commander and now adjutant of the 
post at Fairmont. He also holds membership in Palatine Lodge, No. 
27, Knights of Pythias, as well as belonging to the Masonic fraternity, 
holding a membership with Blue Lodge, No. 9, and Chapter, No. 3. 

Mr. Orr married Isabella, daughter of Lawrence and Mariam 
(Holmes) Henry, of Preston county. West Virginia. Mrs. Orr was 
born in Scotland. Children: i. Lawrence Henry, born January 29, 
1865. 2. Charles H., July 26, 1868, residing in Colorado. 3. Mary, 
April 24, 1871 ; married Frank Ellis, and died in 1900. 4. Alice D., 
September 7, 1876; married Garrett McCafferty, of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Marion Isabella, August 13, 1878; married Charles 
Gould, of Fairmont, West Virginia. 



Of good Scotch-Irish blood, this McDonald fam- 
McDONALD ily was first represented in America by William 

McDonald, bom in Ireland about 1820. He came 
to America when eleven years of age and settled in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, but subsequently removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and was there 
apprenticed to a large furniture concern, and became foreman and 
superintendent. He remained there until 1862, then went to West 
Virginia, where he spent many years making mouldings for the new 
blast furnaces. He was possessed of a wonderful mathematical brain. 
He died in 1887. He married, in 1846, Harriet Smith, born in Brown 
county, Ohio, 1829. 

(II) J. W. McDonald, M. D., only living child of William and 
Harriet (Smith) McDonald, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, September 
21, 1 86 1. He was educated in West Virginia in the public schools and 
a two year course of private instruction, after which he entered and 
graduated from the Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. He 
commenced the practice of medicine in March, 1884, at Brilliant, Ohio, 
and remained there five years, then spent two years out of the pro- 
fession, on account of blood poison, and in 1891 went to Benwood, 
West Virginia, where he practiced medicine ten years, and in 1901 
removed to Fairmont and opened up and is now the superintendent of 



5i8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

the Miners' Hospital, No. 3, at that place. In his profession Dr. Mc- 
Donald makes a specialty of emergency surgery. He has served as the 
secretary of the Marion County Medical Society for eight years, has 
been its president two years and chairman of the committee of pubhc 
pohcy and legislation of the West Virginia State Medical Association 
for ten years, and is still in that position. He has been one of the Balti- 
more & Ohio Railroad Company's surgeons for eighteen years, and 
president of the Baltimore & Ohio Railway Surgeons, during the year 
1903. Politically he votes the Republican ticket, and in church faith 
is a Presbyterian. 

He married, April 23, 1884, Mary Scheetz, born in Jefferson 
county, Ohio, January 18, 1866. No children. Mrs. McDonald is 
a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is the 
daughter of James Scheetz, and he was the son of Major-General Henry 
Scheetz, of the war of 1812. He served as a private under General 
Muhlenburg in the war of the revolution, his father (grandfather of 
Henry Scheetz) also served in the war for independence and it was on 
his farm that the American army encamped after the battle of German- 
town. The soldiers remained on this farm during the winter, suffering 
great privations and extreme suffering. Henry Scheetz ( 2 ) as well as 
the father, were of great assistance in procuring supplies for the army. 
Henry (2) was judge of the court of common pleas; he was the son of 
a Mennonite, who came from Greyfeldt, on the Rhine, and who at the 
solicitation of William Penn settled at what is known as Germantown, 
Pennsylvania. They were persuaded by Penn to come to this country 
on account of their religious principles. 



This Carr family four generations back was represented by 
CARR Richard Carr who married Abigail Longacre and among 

their children was Hugh H. The favorite profession in 
this family seems to have been the medical, while other members have 
been engaged in mercantile and other business callings. 

(II) Hugh H., son of Richard and Abigail (Longacre) Carr, 
was born March 29, 1817, near Woodstock, Virginia. He commenced 
his business career as a druggist and tobacconist, which lines of trade he 
pursued through his entire life. He was engaged in business at Fair- 
mont, Morgantown and Wheeling under the firm name of Logan, Carr 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 519 

& Company. The business thus continued until the death of Mr. Carr, 
September 15, 1854. He married Lydia E. Pitcher, born June 25, 
1826, died February 28, 1906, daughter of Jonathan J. and Eliza 
Pitcher. Jonathan J. Pitcher was born in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. He 
was a Democrat, and in church faith a Methodist Episcopalian. Their 
children were : Earned Pitcher and Lloyd Logan. 

(Ill) Lamed Pitcher, son of Hugh H. and Lydia E. (Pitcher) 
Carr, was born in Fairmont, Virginia, March 21, 1849. He was edu- 
cated in Fairmont common schools, began life's career as a newsboy, then 
clerked in a dry goods house, later became a commercial traveler, and 
after twenty years on the road established a drug business with his 
brother. Dr. Lloyd L. Carr, under the firm name of Carr Brothers, 
continued until 1886. He was postmaster in President Cleveland's 
administration, and at present is engaged in the coal and land business. 
He married (first) Alice Hough, born in Fairmont, Virginia, May 29, 
1849, died January 22, 1892. (Second), September 22, 1896, Maude 
Wiles, born in Monroe county, West Virginia, November 17, 1878. 
The children by Mr. Carr's first marriage: Mamie Pitcher, born in 
Fairmont, June 9, 1 879, married J. Burt Martin and resides at Atlanta, 
Georgia; Abby Graham, born April 30, 1888, unmarried, resides at 
Atlanta with her sister. 

(III) Dr. Lloyd Logan Carr, son of Hugh H. and Lydia E. 
(Pitcher) Carr, was born in Fairmont, Virginia, April 26, 1854. He 
graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 1876, and 
commenced his practice at Fairmont, West Virginia, remained until 
1 89 1, then removed to New York City and there continued in practice 
until 1909 when he retired, since which time he spends the most of his 
time in traveling. He is a member of the Odd Fellows order, and in 
church affiliation is a Methodist Episcopalian. He married (first) 
Mary C. McCoy, bom in Fairmont, Virginia, died in 1884; (second) 
Linda Bergen, in 1897. By his first marriage the issue included Dr. 
Hugh H. Carr, of Fairmont, West Virginia, mentioned below. 

(IV) Dr. Hugh Holmes Carr, son of Dr. Lloyd Logan and Mary C. 
(McCoy) Carr, was born December 3, 1882, at Fairmont, West Vir- 
ginia. He was educated in the public schools of his native city and gradu- 
ated from Greenwich Academy, Connecticut, 1897, after which he enter- 
ed Pennington Seminary, New Jersey, graduating in 1900. He then 



520 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

took up medicine and graduated from Cornell Medical College, 1904. 
The following two years he spent in Bellevue Hospital, New York 
City ; then spent six months in Vienna, Austria, and from there went to 
Berlin and later visited and studied in Berne, under Professor Kocher, 
of Switzerland. Having finished his studies at home and abroad, he 
returned to Fairmont, West Virginia, in 1907. He now makes a spe- 
cialty of surgery, attending, however, to a large general medical prac- 
tice. But few physicians and surgeons in this state are better posted 
along advanced medical and surgical lines than Dr. Carr. He is a 
member of the Marion County Medical Society and the American Med- 
ical Association, Bellevue Alumni Society, Cornell Medical Society, 
Phi Alpha Sigma medical fraternity, and is identified with the order 
of Elks at Fairmont. Politically he votes the Democratic ticket, and is 
a member of the Methodist church. He married, October 17, 19 10, 
Helen Kirkland, born in Warren, Pennsylvania, in 1886, daughter of 
J. L. and (Alexander) Kirkland. 



This account of the numerous Arnett family which 

ARNETT sprang from the German ancestor, John Arnett, who 

first located on the "Eastern Shore," Virginia, at a very 

early date, but later removed to West Virginia, will be confined to the 

careers of Hon. Ulysses N., his son Jonathan T., and the latter's son, 

Thomas W. Arnett. 

Ulysses N. Arnett was born in Marion county, Virginia, and fol- 
lowed farming for his livelihood. He was a state senator for two 
terms, and died in December, 1882. He married Miss E. Cunning- 
ham. Child : Jonathan T., of whom further. 

Jonathan T. Arnett, son of Ulysses and E. (Cunningham) Arnett, 
was born in Marion county. West Virginia, July 6, 1843. He was 
educated at Fairmont. His early years were spent in ill health, but 
when he had reached manhood he was quite rugged, and settled on a 
farm where he gradually improved in strength and health. For this 
reason alone did he remain on the farm until 1901, when he removed 
to Fairmont and led a retired life, dying February 10, 1903. When 
young he studied medicine, but abandoned the profession on account of 
ill health. During the civil war he was a lieutenant in the confederate 
army, under General Robert E. Lee. He entered the service when but 




^X^-T^L. ^^. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 521 

seventeen years of age and remained until the close of the war. In 
1865 he married Flora Leigh Watson, born in Fairmont, West Vir- 
ginia, July 21, 1845. She was the daughter of Thomas Watson. A 
history of the Watson family will appear in this volume, hence will 
not be referred to at length in this connection. The children of Jon- 
athan T. and Flora L. (Watson) Arnett were: Thomas W., of whom 
further; Mary Kate, born October 23, 1869; Nellie G., January 19, 
1872; Ehzabeth L., January 28, 1874; Ulysses N., June i, 1876; 
Alpha H., September 3, 1879. Four of this family were born on the 
farm, and T. W. and Mary K. were bom in Fairmont. 

Thomas W. Arnett, son of Jonathan T. Arnett, was born in Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, August 29, 1867, and educated at the Fairmont 
State Normal School, and engaged at twenty-one years of age in the 
coal and real estate business. He is now a coal mine operator. He has 
always been active in politics, helping others to office, but has not cared 
to hold it himself. Politically Mr. Arnett is a Democrat, and in church 
faith an Episcopalian. He takes much interest in lodge affairs, and is 
a member of the Masonic fraternity to the thirty-second degree, and 
has held nearly all offices in the order. 

He married Lillie J. Hutchinson, born in Monongalia county, West 
Virginia, in 1864. They were united in marriage in 1891. Mrs. Ar- 
nett is the daughter of J. J. and Catherine A. Hutchinson, of Monon- 
galia county; both are now deceased. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Ar- 
nett: Susan Watson, born July i, 1895; Bernard Hutchinson, bom 
March 7, 1898; Katherine Leigh, born March 14, 1901. Susan Wat- 
son Arnett is being educated thoroughly; she graduated from the Fifth 
Ward School, Fairmont, 19 10, and is now a student of Notre Dame 
College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



The family history which here follows includes a well 
FISHER known civil war soldier, Captain John Fisher, of Fair- 
mont, West Virginia. The facts have been gleaned by 
research in the military records, as given at Washington, and from 
personal memoranda furnished in his lifetime by himself to the Sol- 
diers and Sailors Historical and Benevolent Society, of Washington, 
D. C. The "Certificate of Record" will be appended in full, pertaining 
to Captain Fisher. 



522 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Captain John Fisher, third son of Jacob and Mary Fisher, was 
bom at South Easton, Pennsylvania, January 22, 1838, died at Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, June 16, 19 10. The military record, etc., as 
shown by the official reports of the above-named society, is as follows: 

This certifies that Captain John Fisher enlisted from Marion county, 
West Virginia, to serve three years, or during the war, and was mustered 
into the United States service on the 6th day of August, 1861, at Wheeling, 
West Virginia, as first lieutenant of Captain John H. Showalter's company 
"A" Sixth Regiment West Virginia volunteer infantry. Colonel Nathan 
Wilkinson, commanding, and on July 22, 1862, was honorably discharged at 
Weston, West Virginia, by reason of promotion being again mustered the 
same day as captain of his company. 

The regiment was organized in August, 1861, under Colonel Nathan 
Wilkinson, by authority from the war department, and under instructions 
from the Federal governor of Virginia, and General Rosecrans commanding 
the department. By special authority it was recruited to fifteen companies, 
and having been organized for the purpose of guarding the Baltimore and 
Ohio railroad, it was stationed in detachments, along the line of that road, 
which was a necessity to the Union army, in the moving of troops and sup- 
plies, east and west, and throughout the war was a special object of attack 
by the enemy. After this regiment was placed on duty, along the line, the 
good results of its service were apparent in the security of Union citizens, 
and the improvement of business. The command was in constant and active 
service, protecting this great thoroughfare, through territory infested with 
the enemy, scouting the country, and fighting bands of guerillas and 
prowling rebels, defending the right of way, bridges and stations, repelling 
numerous attacks, and protecting the lives and property of Union citizens. 
May 23, 1862, while a detachment of twenty-three men, under Captain 
Showalter, was escorting a wagon train, from Ravenswood to Spencer, it 
was attacked by one hundred Confederates, but succeeded in defending the 
train, while two messengers dashed through the rebel lines, amid a shower 
of bullets, and returned with reinforcements, when the enemy were driven 
ofif, with a number killed and wounded, the valuable train being brought safely 
into camp. August 31, 1862, companies "A" and "G" at Weston fought the 
enemy under Jenkins. August 23, 1863, Major Showalter, with two hundred 
and twenty men, was attacked by one thousand cavalry, under Jones, the 
battle raging until after dark, when the enemy retired, leaving his dead and 
wounded. At the same time other detachments were repelling attacks made 
on the iron trestle bridge and other points on the road. October 13, 1863, 
two companies took part in the defeat of rebel General W. L. Jackson, with 
severe loss, at Bulltown, West Virginia. August 4, 1864, companies "A" 
"G" and "L" bore a conspicuous part in the battle, with three thousand under 
McCausland, at New Creek, West Virginia. November 28th, 1864, the small 
garrison at New Creek, was surprised by a large force and nearly all cap- 
tured, including fifty-seven of company "L" and on the same day Captain 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 523 

Fisher with thirty-five men repulsed a fierce attack upon Piedmont, West 
Virginia, on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, being highly complimented by 
General Crook, in special orders (as shown below). The regiment suflFered 
severe losses, in killed and wounded, in the numerous engagements, and 
encounters with guerillas, bushwhackers, and roving bands of the enemy, and 
from death caused by diseases caused by the exposure and hardships of the 
service, and there were no more faithful defenders of the Union than the 
Sixth West Virginia Infantry. 

The said Captain John Fisher was constantly with his command, bearing 
a loyal part in all the battles and compaigns as above outlined, and achieving 
a gallant record as an officer and soldier. He was wounded by gunshot in 
the left hand. 

He received a final discharge with his company at Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, June 10, 1865, by reason of the close of war. 

He is a member of Meade Post No. 6, Department of West Virginia, 
Grand Army of the Republic ; also of Lodge, Chapter, Royal Arch, and Com- 
mandery, Free and Accepted Masons. He served two terms as mayor of 
Fairmont, West Virginia; also a member of the Council and Justice of the 
Peace. 

These facts are thus recorded and preserved for the benefit of those 
interested. 

Compiled from official and authentic sources by the Soldiers and Sailors 
Historical and Benevolent Society, in testimony whereof I hereunto set my 
hand and cause to be affixed the seal of said Society. Done at Washington, 
D. C, this 15th day of May, 1903. (No. 100,115). 

H. W. Kellogg, 

Historian. 

The following special order will explain how "Fort Fisher" at 
Piedmont, West Virginia, came to be named in his memory, and it 
stands as a lasting monument to his loyalty and bravery in the civil war : 

Head-quarters Department, West Virginia. 
Special Orders No. 62. Cumberland, Maryland, Dec. 9, 1864.. 

Extract * * * * 

9. Captain John Fisher, Sixth West Virginia Infantry, and the men 
under his command, having particularly distinguished themselves during the 
late rebel raid upon the line of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, by their hand- 
some defence of the Post of Piedmont, by which the destruction of a large 
amount of valuable property was prevented ; the Major-General commanding 
the Department desires to thank them for their gallantry and soldierly 
bearing. By command of Major General Crook, 

Robert P. Kennedy, 
Official. Assistant Adjutant General. 

Captain John Fisher married, November 5, 1863, at Pittsburgh, 



524 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Pennsylvania, Dorothy F. Gould, born June 7, 1840, in Fairmont, 
West Virginia, first daughter of Harrison and Hannah (Maderia) 
Gould. Children: Virginia S., born May 30, 1865; Frank C, August 
14, 1866; Willard N., June 27, 1868; Cora D., March 13, 1871; 
William H., October 3, 1875; Fred G., November 16, 1878; Robert 
E., December 4, 1881. 



The Beaty family is an old one in this country and ante- 
BEATY dates the revolutionary period. For the purpose at hand 

Alexander Beaty will be considered the earliest American 
ancestor, but it is possible that he represented at least the second genera- 
tion in America. The family has now numerous branches scattered 
throughout many states and territories, especially are they common in 
the states of Pennsylvania and the two Virginias and Maryland. 

(I) Alexander Beaty was born in the North of Ireland, May 12, 
1772. He came from that excellent people, the Scotch-Irish, that has 
given so many men of worth, industry and eminence to the United 
States. He was a weaver by trade in his native country, and it has 
been related that he was banished from that country for inventing and 
trying to introduce in the weaving industry a shuttle loom. After com- 
ing to this country and settling on the West Fork river, in Marion 
county, Virginia, he engaged in agricultural pursuits. He also coupled 
with it successful stock raising. After a number of years thus engaged 
he retired to Mannington, where he died. He married, July 27, 1797, 
Sarah S. Carter, born November 16, 1779. Children: i. Priscilla, 
born June 9, 1800, died early in life. 2. William M., bom October 
6, 1802. 3. Alexander, bom March 18, 18 12. 4. James C, of whom 
further. 5. Sarah M., born January 14, 1817, married George Dent. 
6. Jane Belle, born February 14, 1820, married James Dent. 7. Laura 
May. 8. John W., married Susanna Farrell. 9. Mary, married a Mr. 
Sandy. 10. Jeremiah. 

(II) James C, fourth child of Alexander Beaty, was born July 6, 
1 8 14. He was educated at the subscription schools common in his 
youth. He became an extensive farmer and stock raiser, also dealt 
heavily in stock, buying and selling. He was bom on his father's farm 
a mile out of Mannington, West Virginia, and there imbibed the free 
and independent air of a true agriculturist. He purchased the first 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 525 

mowing machine used in Mannington district, as well as other advanced 
and improved implements to lighten the toil of the fanner. At his 
death he was known as the heaviest taxpayer in the county. He held 
liberal and advanced views politically, and wa^ among the first in his 
section to espouse the cause of the Republican party. He gave the 
ground on which stood the first Methodist church in Mannington and 
donated the first church and school building, built of logs, and which 
stood near the town of Mannington many years. He was a strong and 
very ardent Methodist, and was originally a Whig in politics. Early 
in the civil war he was a heavy investor in oil lands and drilled for oil 
in Wirt county, but on account of secession was forced to abandon his 
enterprise in oil speculations. After his death these same lands proved 
very valuable in the production of oil. Each and every human life 
seems as but a tragedy, and such indeed was that of this successful man. 
While seeking to save another he gave his own life, when it had just 
reached its best, most pleasing years. While driving a drove of cattle, 
with other men, one of the company was taken ill and left at a farm 
house. That night Mr. Beaty went back to give him aid and found 
that he had by that humane act exposed himself to smallpox, and from 
the effects of that dread disorder, after all that could be done, he passed 
away January 22, 1863. His death occurred on Dent's Run. 

He married Myra Berkshire Dent (cousin of Julia Dent Grant, 
wife of President Grant) , born at Parkersburg, West Virginia, Febru- 
ary 15, 1 8 17, daughter of Dudley and Mahilla (Berkshire) Dent, of 
Morgantown. The late Judge Berkshire of that city was her brother. 
Children of James C. and Myra Berkshire Beaty: i. Captain Newton 
S., of whom further. 2. Mahilla Berkshire, married John Henry 
Brown. 3. William D., married Sarah, daughter of James Farbee. 
4. Mary Jane, married James A. Hough. 5. Alexander Evans, mar- 
ried Belle Myers, of Missouri. 6. Alpheus Lindsley, married Anna 
Metz. 7. Sarah H., died when young. 8. Marshall W., married 
Laura Scott, of Butler, Missouri. 

(Ill) Captain Newton S. Beaty, son of James C. and Myra B. 
(Dent) Beaty, was born in Mannington district, Marion county. West 
Virginia, January 10, 1838. He distinguished himself in the civil war 
as an officer under General Phil Sheridan in his famous battle month 
campaign in the Shenandoah valley. He reached maturity on his 



526 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

father's farm, attended the common schools of his native county, and in 
1859, when full grown, engaged in the general mercantile business at 
Mannington, but ere long he was called upon to change that peaceful 
vocation to take up arms in defense of his country's flag. In 1862 he 
enlisted in Company H, Fourteenth Regiment, West Virginia Infantry, 
serving until the last months in 1864, when he received an honorable 
discharge from the federal service in West Virginia. After his com- 
pany had been organized and sworn into service, he was elected first 
lieutenant, served two years, participated in all the engagements of his 
regiment, enduring all of the cold and hunger coincident to camp life 
and long marches, through a stretch of rough and broken country. He 
took part in the battle of Cloyd Mountain, and was with Sheridan at 
Carter's Farm, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. Returning from the 
army, he operated a saw mill eight months, then opened a dry goods 
store at Mannington, which he conducted for three years, when he asso- 
ciated John Blackshere with him in the business, under firm name of 
Blackshere & Beaty. This relation existed up to 1885, when Mr. 
Beaty purchased his partner's interest and continued in the dry goods 
business until 1888, when he disposed of his establishment. He then 
had supervision of his extensive farm and dealt in coal and oil lands. 
He was a devoted member of the Presbyterian church, and politically 
was a Democrat. He was a prominent secret society man, belonging to 
the Masons in all degrees in this section. He fought well the conflict 
of life and succeeded in a great measure in accomplishing what he aimed 
to do for himself, his family and the great world about him. He was 
one of the organizers of the Exchange Bank at Mannington, of which 
he was an officer. He was also interested in the Fairmont Develop- 
ment Company. He owned many fine farms in this section of West 
Virginia. 

He married, December i, 1870, Margaret A. Blackshere (see 
Blackshere II). Children: i. Harriet, born September 12, 1871 ; edu- 
cated in Mother Superior School, Emmitsburg, Maryland; resides with 
her mother. 2. Harry B., born January 23, 1875 ; educated at Oberlin 
College, Ohio, and at the Pittsburgh Business College; is now conduct- 
ing a clothing store at Mannington, succeeding his father; married 
Edna, daughter of John Solly, of Parkersburg, and they have a son, 
John Newton. 3. James F., born August 16, 1876; educated at Oberlin 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 527 

(Ohio) College, graduating with the degree of A. B.; then graduated 
from the law department of the University of Virginia, at Charlottes- 
ville, with the degree of LL. B.; he now resides in Mannington, en- 
gaged in the real estate business; married Blanche, daughter of Jesse T. 
Koen, of Mannington, and they have a son, James Frederick. 4. Eliza, 
born December 19, 1878; educated at Oberlin (Ohio) College and at 
the Pennsylvania College for Women at Pittsburgh; wife of Dr. 
Charles Cockran. 5. Carlton, born July 6, 1884; educated in West 
Virginia University, and studied pharmacy at Ada, Ohio; now a farmer 
in Mannington district; married Charlotte, daughter of Thomas De- 
veny, of Fairmont, and they have one son, Thomas Deveny, born April 
2, 1911. 6. Lawrence, born January 19, 1886; educated at Washing- 
ton and Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, and is now teller in the Ex- 
change Bank, Mannington; he is unmarried. 7. Margaret A., born 
November 3, 1889; educated at Pennsylvania College for Women, 
Pittsburgh; wife of H. H. Clark; no children. 



The Haymond family, through its five generations 
HAYMOND in America, has been one whose different lines have 
furnished many men of national and state fame, and 
especially is this true of the second generation to which Major William 
Haymond Sr. belonged. The sturdy pioneer band felt the touch of 
their hands; the early American armies knew of their bravery and tact 
in handling men at critical times in war ; they were known, too, in days 
of peace as lawmakers, surveyors and county officials. They left the 
impress of true manhood and womanhood upon their fellow country- 
men. 

(I) John Haymond was the first to come from England, the native 
country of the family, to American soil, the date of his settlement in 
Maryland being prior to 1734. 

(II) Major William Haymond, son of the English emigrant, John 
Haymond, was born January 4, 1740, in Frederick county, Maryland, 
near Rockville, died at Quiet Dell, Harrison county, Virginia, Novem- 
ber 12, 1 82 1. At the age of fifteen years William Haymond Sr. was 
with General Braddock's army on the march to Fort Duquesne (de- 
feated on the Monongahela river, July 9, 1755), and was with General 
Forbes in 1758, in a successful expedition against Fort Duquesne. In 



528 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

1759 he enlisted in a Virginia company commanded by Colonel George 
Washington (later general). The company disbanded at Fort Lewis, 
near Staunton, Virginia, February 24, 1762. In May, 1773, he moved 
from Maryland to District of West Augusta, Virginia, settling at what 
is now Morgantown, West Virginia. When Monongalia county was 
formed in 1776, he was justice of the peace, deputy surveyor, coroner 
and sheriff. He remained in that county until 1784, when he removed 
to Clarksburg, Harrison county, and served as county surveyor from 
that time until his death. At the commencement of the revolution he 
was appointed captain of a militia company, serving at Prickett's Fort, 
1777, promoted to major, 1781, which office he held until the close of 
the war. His title of major came through his service in the French and 
Indian war. The following is a copy of the army discharge granted to 
Major Haymond, in 1762, by Colonel Adam Stephen, commander of 
the Virginia regiment : 

These are to certify that William Haymond, sergeant in Captain Byrd's 
company is hereby discharged according to an act of the assembly, made for 
that purpose. He has duly served for three years, and has behaved like a 
good soldier and a faithful subject. 

Given under my hand at Fort Lewis, this twenty- fourth day of February, 
1762. Adam Stephen, Colonel, V. R. 

Major Haymond married (first) Cassandria Clelland, born October 
25, 1 741, died December 23, 1788, who bore him four sons: John, 
died in Kanawha county; William Jr., of whom further; Thomas, died 
near Clarksburg; Daniel, died in Ritchie county, this state. He mar- 
ried (second) Mrs. Mary Powers, nee Pettyjohn. 

(III) William (2), son of Major William (i) Haymond, was 
born in 1771, near Rockville, Maryland, died at "Palatine Hill," Mar- 
ion county, now West Virginia, July 8, 1848. He was engaged in the 
latter part of the Indian wars, along the Monongalia frontier. He 
married Cynthia Carroll, born March 29, 1774, near the Bull Run 
battlefield at Manassas, daughter of James and (Heath) Car- 
roll, of Maryland, and was a relative of Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, 
signer of the Declaration of Independence. They had seven sons: 
Thomas S., of whom further; William Calder, Hiram, Jonathan, Oc- 
tavius, Augustus, Marcus, all deceased. 

(IV) Thomas S., son of William (2) and Cynthia (Carroll) 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 529 

Haymond, was a member of congress. He married Harriet Franklin, 
and had issue including Alpheus F., of whom further. 

(V) Judge Alpheus F. Haymond, son of Thomas S. and Harriet 
(Franklin) Haymond, was born at what is known as "Palatine Hill," 
in Marion county. West Virginia (then Virginia), December 15, 1823, 
died in Fairmont, December 15, 1893. He was reared in his native 
county, and after attending the common schools and Monongalia Acad- 
emy at Morgantown, entered William and Mary's College at Williams- 
burg, which he left at the end of one term, to engage in the study of law 
with Edgar C. Wilson, of Morgantown. After completing his required 
course of reading, he was admitted to the bar in 1842. Upon the very 
threshold of the practice of his profession he was called into politics, 
and ten years later was sent as a representative of his county to the gen- 
eral assembly at Richmond. He served a second time in that respon- 
sible body, in 1857 ^nd in 1861, was a member of the convention called 
to determine what part the state of Virginia should take in the impend- 
ing struggle between the states. Throughout the stormy session of 
that memorable convention, Mr. Haymond by voice and vote opposed 
the plan of secession, but finally that body was carried in favor of with- 
drawal from the Union, and the protests from the minority were un- 
availing. When the great war came on, Mr. Haymond, like "Stone- 
wall" Jackson and General Lee, was impelled by a sense of allegiance 
due his state and a duty of obedience due her laws, and entered the 
military service of Virginia in 1862. For nearly four years he served 
as field commissary in Early's brigade, Jackson's army corps. His 
family had been compelled to leave Fairmont, and became refugees 
within the confederate lines, while the husband and father endured 
suffering, privations and hardships, as all southern soldiers endured, yet 
was more anxious for his family than he was to escape hunger, thirst 
and nakedness, that was his lot in common with the men of North Vir- 
ginia. When the war closed he was paroled and returned to Marion 
county, to find nearly every avenue to obtain a livelihood closed against 
him. The lawyer's test oath debarred him from practice, but his old- 
time friends and many others who desired his legal service, in 1868, 
united in a petition to the legislature asking a passage of an enabling 
act in his favor. It was passed and was the first of the special acts 



530 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

adopted for this purpose, prior to 1870, when the test oath was repeal- 
ed. He soon regained his extensive practice of former years, and when 
the Democratic party came into power Mr. Haymond was elected a 
delegate to the constitutional convention from the second senatorial 
district. He served as chairman of the committee that prepared the 
article on the legislative department and no member of the convention 
had greater influence in shaping the constitution of 1872 than Mr. Hay- 
mond, whose legal ability and extensive civil and political experience 
rendered him especially fit to devise the many excellent provisions which 
he suggested and which were embodied in the different articles of the 
instrument. At the election which resulted in the adoption of the new 
constitution he was elected as one of the four judges of the supreme 
court of appeals, and by lot was assigned one of the four terms. At 
the expiration of his term Judge Haymond was reelected for the full 
term of twelve years, over his highest competitor, by a majority of fif- 
teen thousand and four hundred votes. For six years of his second 
term he served upon the bench of the court of last resort in the state, 
and at the close of 1882 resigned his office to return to the private prac- 
tice of his profession at Fairmont. But public life closed not for Judge 
Haymond with his withdrawal from the bench, and two years later, in 
obedience to the wish of the people of his county, he allowed the use of 
his name as a candidate for the legislature, being elected and served as 
chairman of the judiciary committee. 

Never defeated as a candidate, he always enjoyed the confidence of 
his fellow citizens with whom he was popular on account of his integrity 
and many intellectual and social qualities. He never disappointed pub- 
lic expectation and was always true to every private trust reposed in 
him, measuring up to the highest standard in every field in which he 
labored, yet his influence in the constitutional convention and his opinion 
on the supreme bench will constitute the chief impression to be left by 
Judge Haymond on the state of West Virginia. While on the bench 
he was president of the supreme court of appeals for several years, and 
his opinion on many new questions arising out of the adoption of the 
constitution of 1872 and its code of laws will settle the practice and 
establish the rule in the state as long as the constitution and the code 
endures. Cautious and firm as a legislator, righteous and able as a 
judge, of highest honor as a man, Alpheus F. Haymond was of signal 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 531 

ability in his profession and rich in experience, while large-hearted, of 
great energy, and faithful in all his relations, being above fear and 
beyond reproach. 

He married, November 18, 1847, Maria Frances, bom in Marion 
county, Virginia, November 25, 1828, daughter of Thomas Lindsey 
Boggess, bom at Fairfax Court House, Old Virginia, and came to 
Marion county in what is now West Virginia, in 18 10, with his father, 
Lindsey Boggess, of Fairfax Court House. Thomas L. Boggess was 
clerk of the court in Marion county for sixteen years. In 1862, during 
the great civil war period, Mrs. Maria F. (Boggess) Haymond went 
alone to Richmond to interview Jefferson Davis for the discharge of 
Colonel Roberts, of Roane county, who was held a prisoner. Davis 
granted the pardon, and remarked, "Mrs. Haymond, you are the first 
woman who has been strong enough to get a prisoner his discharge." 
Mrs. Haymond brought Colonel Roberts back with her. Later she 
rode over several battlefields on horseback, seeing the dead and wound- 
ed in all conceivable conditions. She has seen and realized more of 
the horrors of war than any other living woman of West Virginia. 

Children of Mr. and Mrs. Haymond: i. Helen M. (Mrs. Peddi- 
cord), born August 30, 1848, resides at Atlantic City. 2. Lindsey B., 
deceased. 3. William S., resides at Fairmont, West Virginia. 4. 
Laura Lee (Mrs. Jackson), resides with Mrs. Haymond. 5. Lucy 
May, of Morgantown. 6. Alpheus Franklin, died aged eight years. 
7. Harriet Elizabeth, died at the age of nine months. 8. Mary Vir- 
ginia (Mrs. Hill), resides at Fairmont. 9. Julia Caroline, died aged 
nineteen years. 10. Thomas S., residing at Fairmont. 11. Lilly Bell, 
died a widow at the age of thirty-two years. The wife and mother, 
Mrs. Maria F. (Boggess) Haymond, is still residing at Fairmont, sur- 
rounded by a large circle of friends and admirers. 



William and John Hayden, brothers, came to America 
HAYDEN in the ship "Mary and John" with the company under 
Rev. John Warham and Rev. Samuel Maverick, land- 
ing at Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1630. It is known that they came 
from England, but little more is definitely known. The Hayden family 
are of frequent and honorable mention in English history, but the Eng- 
lish ancestry of William and John Hayden has not yet been traced. 



532 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

John Hayden remained in Massachusetts; William settled at Hartford, 
Connecticut. John Hayden was made a freeman, May 14, 1634, was 
of Dorchester, later of Braintree; he married Susanna, who was living 
in 1695; his will dated October 31, 1678, was proved July 26, 1684. 
Children : John, married Hannah Ames; Joseph; Samuel, married Han- 
nah Thayer; Jonathan, married Elizabeth Ladd; Hannah, living in 
1678; Ebenezer, born September 12, 1645; Nehemiah, of further men- 
tion; William. 

(II) Nehemiah, son of John Hayden, "the immigrant," was bom 
February 14, 1647, or 1648, died January 12, 1717, or 1718. He 
was a wealthy, influential citizen of Braintree, Massachusetts; served 
ten years as selectman and was active in the church. He married Han- 
nah, daughter of Henry Neale. Children: Nehemiah, born May 16, 
1680; Hannah, July 16, 1681; Mary, married her cousin, Samuel 
Hayden; Samuel, of further mention; Benjamin, born February 22, 
1685; Rachel, married Samuel Paine; John, married Mrs. Margaret 
(Curtis) Hayden; Ebenezer, married Mary Hollis; Jonathan, mar- 
ried Sarah Copeland; all the above children are mentioned in his will 
except Mary. 

(III) Samuel, son of Nehemiah Hayden, was born about 1683. 

He married Priscilla , and lived in what is now Randolph ; she 

joined the Braintree church in 1733. Children: Samuel, died young; 
Samuel, born January 20, 17 13, married Esther Allen; Amy, died 
young; Christopher, born February 18, 17 19; Richard, January 29, 
1720; Jeremiah, December 29, 1722; Nehemiah, January 3, 1724; 
Nathaniel, February 21, 1725 ; William, of further mention. 

(IV) William, youngest child of Samuel Hayden, was bom in 
Massachusetts, October 5, 1727. He married Lydia Nicholson, of 
Philadelphia, and settled in Morris county. New Jersey. 

(V) John (2), son of William Hayden, was born in Morristown, 
New Jersey, October 26, 1749, died in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, 
July 24, 1836. He settled in Georges township in the latter county in 
1778; served in the revolutionary army, enlisting first, May i, 1776, 
for a term of six months, and at its expiration reenlisted for a like 
period, serving in all one year. The settlement in Fayette county be- 
came known as Haydentown, and in 18 10 more iron was made there 
than in Pittsburgh. He married, March i, 1798, Mary Snider, bom 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 533 

September 26, 1773, in Georges township, Fayette county, Pennsyl- 
vania, died October 14, 1863; she was in receipt of a revolutionary 
pension granted September 5, 1849, o" account of her husband's service 
in that war. 

(VI) Benjamin, son of John (2) Hayden, was born in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1 800, died in 1 877. He was a merchant all his 
active years; in politics a Democrat. He married, 1823, EHza Springer, 
born 1805, died 1877. Children: Albert Springer, deceased; Eliza- 
beth Ann, deceased; Emily, deceased; Jacob S., of further mention; 
Sylvester Clay, deceased; Albina S., married Milford Shipley; Napo- 
leon Bonaparte, married Jennie Skiles; Mary Adelaide, widow of Fred- 
erick Martin; Chauncey Brooks, deceased; Helen M., died in infancy. 

(VII) Jacob S., son of Benjamin Hayden, was born in Hopwood, 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, February 24, 1831. He received his 
early education in the public school at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, later 
entered Madison College, Pennsylvania, but a year before graduation 
decided that a business career was more in accord with his ambition and 
left college ; at age of nineteen years he located at Fairmont, West Vir- 
ginia, where for two years he was engaged in the hardware business on 
his own account. In March, 1852, he sold his store and with five 
others from Fairmont and five from Pennsylvania formed a party and 
started with ox teams, by the overland route, for the "golden land of 
promise," California. They arrived at Rabbit Creek, Sierra county, 
California, the following August and began prospecting; their money 
and provisions gave out and for three weeks their sole diet was musty 
cornmeal made into a porridge; water was plentiful and they pulled 
through, although sickness attacked some of the party. Mr. Hayden 
spent fifteen years in California, working in the mines at first, later 
owned and operated his own mines with much success. He made sev- 
eral trips home during that period, returning permanently in 1867, and 
located at Fairmont, West Virginia, his present home. During his 
California life he took part in an amateur theatrical performance in 
the old log theatre at La Porte. In the same play Lottie Crabtree 
(afterwards famous the world over as "Lotta"), then aged seven years, 
made her first appearance on the stage ; although she became later very 
wealthy, she at that time was in need of kindly assistance, and as part 
of her stage costume Mr. Hayden donated a pair of shoes. After 



534 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

returning to Fairmont he engaged in real estate and lumbering, but for 
many years has lived retired from active life, attending to his own 
private estate. He is vice-president of the National Bank of Fairmont, 
and has given much time to the public service and upbuilding of his 
city. While in California he served four years as justice of the peace, 
and in Fairmont held the same office several terms; he served the city 
of Fairmont seven years as mayor and was a most capable efficient 
executive. He is a lifelong Democrat. 

He married, November 27, 1862, Elizabeth Ann, born in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, December 9, 1836, daughter of Solomon Smith. 
Children: i. Emma L., bom September 14, 1863; married M. A. 
Jalliff; children: Zoe and Vaughn. 2. Molly E., born January i, 
1874, died October 13, 1895; married, October 10, 1894, Hugh F. 
Smith; child. Gazelle, bom October 8, 1895. 



A history of the Dudley family written by Judge H. C. 
DUDLEY Mc Dougal, on the "Early Dudleys of Dunkard Mill 

Run," contains the following genealogy of this illus- 
trious family: "History shows that the Dudley family originated at the 
town of Dud, in England, in the seventeenth century, and that since 
that early day through the veins of the Dudleys there coursed the purest 
and tenderest blood of nobility of their native land. The early history 
of the family is filled with song and story; they led in thought and action 
both in old England and in early colonial days in New England as well, 
and from remote times may be traced in the historic books of the day 
the prominent name of Guilford Dudley." Just what year or how they 
migrated from Dud, England, is not known, but the direct descent of 
the particular family which ultimately located on Dunkard Mill Run 
(now in Marlon county, West Virginia) is as follows: 

(I) William Dudley was born at Richmond, formerly Sheen, in 
Surrey, England, and from the town of Guilford, some thirty miles 
south of London, in county of Surrey, came to Guilford, Connecticut. 
He married Jane Lutman, by Rev. Henry Whitfield, rector at Oakley, 
in Surrey, England, August 24, 1636, as shown by the parish register 
of Oakley. In the good ship "Hector," William and wife Jane, in com- 
pany with said Rev. Whitfield, and as a part of the Eaton Hopkins 
expedition to the colony of Connecticut, sailed from London, England, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 535 

May 20, 1639, and thereafter settled at Guilford, Connecticut, so 
named after Guilford, England. William Dudley was a member of 
Whitfield's church in England and readily joined with him in the emi- 
gration. When William Dudley and wife arrived at Guilford, Con- 
necticut, they established their home on what is now Fair street. Will- 
iam Dudley was a prominent man in his day, was representative to the 
general court at Guilford, and held other public offices. He died there 
March 16, 1683, and his wife Jane died there May i, 1674. 

(II) William (2), son of William (i) and Jane Dudley, the 
emigrants, is known in history as "Deacon William Dudley." 

(III) Samuel, son of "Deacon William Dudley," was bom at 
Guilford, Connecticut. 

(IV) Samuel (2), son of Samuel (i) Dudley, was born at Guil- 
ford, Connecticut, February 12, 17 — , died there. May 18, 1783. He 
married Mary Parker, born 1732, died 1821. Children: i. Mary 
bom 1 76 1, married James Brand; died in Marion county, Virginia 
1843. 2. Samuel, mentioned below. 3. Elizabeth, born July 9, 176 — 
died in Marion county, Virginia, April 15, 1837. 4. Asa, born Febru 
ary 17, 1767, died April 7, 1845. 5. Jonathan, born 1769, died 18 10 
6. Desire, bom 1 7 8 1 ; married James Brown ; died November 15, 1 843 
in Marion county, Virginia, at the old "Desire House," leaving no de 
scendants. These children were all bom in Saybrook, Connecticut, and 
came from there with their mother, Mary (Parker) Dudley, in the 
year 1796, and located on a large tract of land on Dunkard Mill Run 
in what is now Marion county. West Virginia, mainly for the reason 
that Mrs. Dudley wished to wean her son Samuel away from the ocean, 
which he loved. The facts relating to the early history of this branch 
of the family were collected by Mrs. Caroline Dudley Barnett, from 
the writings of Samuel and Asa Dudley, above mentioned. 

(V) Samuel (3), second child of Samuel (2) Dudley, was bom 
at Saybrook, Connecticut, Febmary 24, 1763, died at his home farm 
on Dunkard Mill Run in 1854. He is worthy of more than passing 
notice. The revolutionary war was in progress, and at the age of fif- 
teen he enlisted as a soldier in its ranks under the direct command of 
George Washington in 1778, and there served his country on land in 
the patriotic troops commanded by Colonels Mead, Bibee and Wells. 
Then he took service in the revolutionary navy, first on the privateer 



536 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

"Sally," Captain Seth Warner; then the "Lively," under Peck as mas- 
ter; and still later under Elisha Hart as commander. On both land 
and sea he served, and for this he did not apply for a pension until he 
was nearly seventy years of age, August 28, 1832. His pension shows 
the government credited him with fifteen full months service. "He was 
the only patriot soldier the writer recollects ever to have known, and 
with the memory of a small boy I now recall the fact that I attended 
his funeral at the old home in 1854. Two different and distinct recol- 
lections concerning my personal relations with Samuel Dudley are with 
me to-day: One is that while in a winter's storm, on the ocean as a 
sailor, in the revolutionary war, the great toe on his right foot (I think) 
was so frozen that it had to be amputated and more than once he told 
me the story of how this happened and showed me that foot. The 
other is that for some months in the summer of 1848, after my father, 
John Fletcher McDougal, sold his farm just above Bethel church and 
prior to our removal to Rivesville, on the Monongahela river, we occu- 
pied the old 'Desire House,' not far from the home of Samuel Dud- 
ley. While playing about my father, near that house, saw Samuel 
Dudley coming up the public road, one evening, riding on horseback 
alone, with a bag of flour or meal on his pack-saddle, and evidently 
laboring under some great mental strain, as he was gesticulating wildly 
with his cane, and muttering to himself. My father went to the gate 
and helped him off his horse, but as the old man still talked tO' himself, 
and jabbed his cane into the ground, father finally said to him 'You 
seem excited, uncle Sam, what's the trouble?' The old man said 'May- 
be I am excited; I have been down to Barnes mill and there met one of 
the damned Hessian hirelings I saw at the battle of Trenton in the war. 
My blood just boiled and I wanted to cut his damned heart out.' Small 
as I was I knew that Uncle Sam was a strict member of the Gilboa 
Methodist church and a pious good man, and to hear from him such 
fervid profanity was so startling that reared as I had been, I wouldn't 
have been a bit surprised to see the ground open up and swallow him ; 
but it didn't. Then as a boy I recollect too that old-timers in the 
neighborhood used to tell me that on each recurring Independence Day, 
it was for long years his custom, in company with his brother Asa, to 
have a brotherly reunion at Samuel's home, discuss their early trials 
and triumphs, and from a friendly gourd there drink cider oil (made by 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 537 

boiling down five barrels of apple cider into one) until both were com- 
fortably drunk." 

"Of this old revolutionary soldier and sailor of whom I now write, 
after coming to Dunkard Mill Run in 1796 with his mother and 
brothers and sisters and locating near what was later Gilboa church, 
married Margaret ("Peggy") McDougal, born where now stands 
Morgantown, West Virginia, June 17, 1781, daughter of Rev. Will- 
iam McDougal by his first marriage and the full sister of my grand- 
father, John McDougal, the date being in 1801. To this Samuel 
Dudley and wife Margaret were born eleven children." 

(V) Asa, fourth child of Samuel (2) Dudley, was born February 
17, 1767, died April 7, 1845. He came from Connecticut and settled 
on what is known as Dunkard Mill Run, Marion county. West Virginia, 
where he followed farming. He married Hannah Ballard. Children : 
Ehas, Asa, Hannah, Lucy, Enoch. 

(VI) Enoch, son of Asa Dudley, followed farming on the old 
homestead. He married Annie Drague, a native of Marion county, by 
whom he had seven children : Fleming, Arthur, Amelia, Gustavus, Will- 
iam, Mary, Elizabeth. 

(VII) Fleming, son of Enoch Dudley, was born July 11, 1835, 
died December 26, 19 10, in Fairmont. He resided on the old family 
farm which he tilled until the age of twenty-one, then moved to Fair- 
mont where he followed the carpenter's trade, retiring only a few years 
prior to his death. He enlisted in the civil war as a member of the 
First West Virginia Cavalry, Company A, in 1861, serving three years, 
and reenlisted after his first term had expired in the same regiment and 
company, making four years in all. He was finally discharged at 
Wheeling, West Virginia, from the union army, where he proved him- 
self a soldier true and brave. He was mustered out as sergeant. He 
later joined the Grand Army of the Republic, Post No. 6, at Fairmont, 
and was its commander. He belonged to the Methodist Episcopal 
church in which he was an officer and class leader. Pohtically he was 
a Republican. He married, in 1858, in Marion county, Sarah A. Bog- 
gess, born in Marion county, March 6, 1839, daughter of Lindsey and 
Ann (Cunningham) Boggess, both parents being natives of this coun- 
ty, born in 1805; he died aged seventy-five years, and she died aged 
seventy-eight years. Lindsey Boggess was a son of Lindsey Boggess, 



538 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

born in Virginia, who married Millie Janes. Fleming Dudley and wife 
had five children: i. Dora Hempfield, married Alvah Kuhn and had 
one child, Russell, born in Marion county. 2. Benjamin Franklin, mar- 
ried Minnie Caylor, of Kansas, and they reside in Louisiana; they have 
one child, Marion, born in Kansas. 3. Albert L. B., married Dove 
Pitzer. 4. Cora A. 5. Ota Blanche, married Harry Gaston and their 
children are: Dorothy Ruth, Robert Dudley, Lewis Herbert, Sarah 
Helen. 



This is an age of specialties, and this includes the pro- 
JOHNSON fessions. At an earlier date in the history of this 
country the family physician was expected to treat all 
diseases, chronic and special cases, as well as the ordinary complaints of 
men and women, but in latter years the profession sees the necessity of 
special training for special diseases, and Dr. Johnson was educated 
along the special line of caring for the ailments of the eye, ear and nose. 
Dr. Johnson was born May 28, 1866, in Marion county. West Vir- 
ginia, son of J. H. and Elizabeth A. (Nickell) Johnson. The father 
was a native of Stanton, Virginia, the son of Robert Johnson, who was 
a native of Caroline county, Virginia. He was a cabinetmaker and 
followed undertaking also, and these two occupations he followed 
throughout his active life. The father of Dr. Johnson followed mer- 
cantile pursuits, and during the civil war served in the confederate 
army, and was in General Early's division. After the war closed he 
engaged in business at Lewisburg for several years, then at Nickell's 
Mills, Monroe county, West Virginia, where he continued for the re- 
mainder of his life. He was devoted to the work of the Presbyterian 
church, and voted an independent political party ticket usually. His 
secret society connections were with the Masonic and Odd Fellows 
orders. He married Elizabeth A. Nickell, a native of Nickell Mills 
neighborhood, daughter of J. N. Nickell and wife, old settlers of that 
region. Children: Dr. Henry R., James R., Charles Smith. The 
father died October 16, 1908, and the mother August 21, 1901. 

Dr. Henry Russell Johnson was educated at the common schools, 
primarily, and attended private schools also to some extent. This was 
in Greenbrier county, West Virginia. He graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Medicine at Baltimore, and is also a post-graduate of the Med- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 539 

ical School of New York. He was house surgeon at the Manhattan 
Eye and Ear Hospital in 1892. He commenced his practice at Ronce- 
verte, West Virginia, where he remained five years, and in 1903 located 
in Fairmont, where his practice has become very extensive. He very 
naturally finds a home within the numerous medical societies, including 
the chief ones, the Marion County Medical Society, the West Virginia 
State Medical Society and the American Medical Association; also 
belongs to the Association of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Sur- 
geons. In these societies he gives out and receives back much valuable 
medical information. In civic society matters he is connected with the 
Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen fraternities. In his church 
relations he is a member of the Presbyterian church at Fairmont. Polit- 
ically he votes the Democratic ticket. 

He married, December 12, 1899, Elizabeth M., daughter of Rob- 
ert and Elizabeth Crockett. Children: Russell Ruddell, Ruth, Louise, 
Elizabeth Mozelle. 



A Pennsylvanian by birth. West Virginian by adoption 
LILLEY and choice, George M. Lilley is widely known in this 

section of the state as a leading contractor in sand and 
stone. He was born near Fairchance, Pennsylvania, July 27, 1862. His 
father was a Marylander who was born at EUicott Mills, near Balti- 
more; his mother was a native of West Virginia, born in Barbour county. 
Like many another successful man, Mr. Lilley was reared to farm labor, 
and in his youth saw the pleasures as well as the hardships of rural life. 
Both his parents were extremely desirous of giving their son an educa- 
tion, but they were not in a position to do for him as they wished. 
Early in life he had to "hustle," as he said in an interview, and this 
trait of character has sent him "hustling" through the busy world. 

When he left the farm he engaged in digging coal. He made an 
excellent miner, and not like others of this calling, saved his earnings 
and put them to good account. After a time he conceived the idea that 
a tradesman always stood a better chance of getting on in the world 
than a man without a trade, hence, after looking the field over, he de- 
cided to learn the stonemason's trade, and made as good a mason as 
he had a coal miner. Coming to Fairmont in 1892, he engaged in the 
general contracting business in stone work. The scores of structures 



540 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

which he laid the foundations for in this community are lasting monu- 
ments to his excellent workmanship. Among other buildings, he was 
awarded the contracts for the works later operated by the National 
Glass Company; the Fairmont Brewing Company; the Fairmont Coal 
Company, at Murray; and the Virginia & Pittsburgh Coal & Coke 
Company, at Kingmont; and many other pieces of work of importance. 
His stone quarry on Washington street, Fairmont, possesses an inex- 
haustible bed of blue sand stone, ever in good demand for building pur- 
poses. 

It was in 1900, by a keen, farsighted business eye, that Mr. Lilley 
purchased what has proven to be the best sand bank in all this or adjoin- 
ing states. It covers about forty acres, and is situated only a few miles 
out from Fairmont. The average thickness of the excellent sand is 
about thirty feet. In fact, this sand bank has proven to be worth as 
much as many small gold mines to its owner. Machinery has been 
placed in position by this clear-headed man of affairs. The most im- 
proved appliances in way of sand-washer, sand-screener, elevating and 
conveying machinery, a part of which Mr. Lilley invented himself, 
makes the plant a model one. Some of his inventions for handling 
sand have been bought and put into use by others in distant parts of the 
country. About six hundred cars of sand are shipped to points within 
a radius of three hundred miles from his sandpit, each year. Besides 
this industry, Mr. Lilley owns a large storage and supply house, located 
in the city of Fairmont, where he keeps a stock of builders' and con- 
tractors' supplies. He is a man who has forged his way to the front 
rank by sheer pluck and good judgment, with plenty of hard work 
thrown in, and possesses the qualities such as are only found in men of 
sterling worth, and to which the world generally gives due credit. The 
world loves a man who can surmount every obstacle in his way, and rise 
to a plane of success. 

While he is a busy man, yet he takes time to mingle with his fellow- 
men. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a 
member of Palatine Lodge, at Fairmont. He is noted generally for 
his charity and true benevolence, although his work is never heralded 
abroad by himself. He is always willing to assist the needy, if they are 
willing to do their part, but has no time or money for mere idle triflers. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, and ever ready to further the cause 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 541 

of his party. He does not care for public office, but has served from 
his ward as councilman, during which administration he fully satisfied 
the citizens and taxpayers in his section of the city of Fairmont. In 
November, 1909, he was elected county commissioner for a term of six 
years, and in 191 1 was elected president of the county court, which 
office he is now filling. 

Of his home life it may be said that his first wife, whose maiden 
name was Celia Lowe, a native of Fayette county, Pennsylvania, lived 
but a few years after their marriage. She left three small children, and 
Mr. Lilley decided to bring them up himself. Some years later he mar- 
ried Rebecca Tucker, of Marion county, West Virginia. By this union 
were born three children, one of whom is deceased. The living children 
are: Earl Smith and Edna Pearl. 



The Rogers family of which this article treats was 
ROGERS originally from Pennsylvania and included Dr. Timothy 

Ross Rogers, who was born in Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 27, 1833, son of John and Susan (Penn) Rogers. The 
father was a millwright and the inventor of the Rogers' turbine water- 
wheel. He was the first postmaster at Rogersville, Pennsylvania. He 
was bom in 1800, died in 1879; his wife died in 1873. Both were 
members of the Methodist Protestant church. They had a famliy of 
nine children. 

(II) Dr. Timothy Ross Rogers, was born in Rogersville, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1833. He attended college at Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, 
and then read medicine with Dr. Braden, of Rogersville, and attended 
the Medical College of New Yoric University, under Dr. Alexander 
Mott. He began practice when twenty-two years of age at Davistown, 
Pennsylvania; then practiced two years in Des Moines, Iowa, and later 
for several years at Harnedsville, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, from 
which place he removed to Selbysport, Maryland. At the breaking out 
of the civil war he moved to Rogersville, Pennsylvania, and nine years 
later to Waynesburg, where he practiced fifteen years, removing thence 
to Moundsville, West Virginia, in 1 883. His practice covered a period 
of thirty years. He married, in 1856, Emeline Frantz, bom at Selbys- 
port, Garrett county, Maryland, in 1837. The grandfather of Eme- 
line Frantz was Joseph Frantz, who died in 1859, in his eighty-first 



542 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

year. His sons were John, William, Thomas and George ; his daugh- 
ters were Rachel and Elizabeth. John Frantz, the eldest son, came 
from Germany with John Jasper Wirsing, and they all settled in Balti- 
more, Maryland, as did Helen, daughter of John and Katherine Wir- 
sing. Helen became the mother of Emeline Frantz, who married Dr. 
Timothy Ross Rogers, above mentioned. 

(Ill) Professor Harold Frantz Rogers, son of Dr. Timothy Ross 
Rogers, was born in Waynesburg, Greene county, Pennsylvania. He 
graduated in 1896 from the high school at Moundsville, West Virginia; 
from West Virginia University, A. B., 1901; Harvard University, 
graduate courses in chemistry, 1906-07, 1907-08, A. M. Harvard, 
1908. He engaged in the drug business with his father and brothers 
in Moundsville, West Virginia, in his early manhood. He taught 
in Fairmont State Normal School, 1903-04, 1908-12, and at the Glen- 
ville State Normal School, 1904-06. He had a military training in 
the corps of cadets, West Virginia University, and belongs to Delta 
Tau Delta fraternity. He is a member of the American Chemical 
Society and Association of Harvard Chemists. Since 1888 he has been 
identified with the Methodist Episcopal church as one of its members. 
He Is still connected with the State Normal School at Fairmont as one 
of the instructors. 



The Smith family of which this sketch treats originally 
SMITH lived in Pennsylvania, but for many years was connected 
with the history of West Virginia. 

(II) Timothy S. (2) Smith, the first of this line of whom we have 
definite information, was son of Timothy S. ( i ) Smith. In 1803 he 
married Esther, born 1785, died 1870, daughter of Hugh Shotwell, 
born 1764, died 1854. In 1820 Esther (Shotwell) Smith married 
(second) Major Seaton. 

(III) Captain John S. Smith, son of Timothy S. (2) Smith, was 
born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 25, 1804, died 
March 2, 1894. He was a saddler by trade, having mastered it at 
Greensboro, Pennsylvania. He removed to Fairmont, West Virginia, 
about 1826, and was among the pioneers of the place. He continued 
to conduct the saddlery and harness business until some time in the fifties 
when he engaged in farming pursuits, continuing for many years. He 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 543 

served as captain of the Middletown and Fairmont Blues, military com- 
panies. He was originally an old line Whig in politics, held numerous 
offices of public honor and trust, and promoted the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry in this section of the country. In his religious faith he was of 
the Presbyterian church, of which he was an honored and faithful mem- 
ber for sixty-three years, being an elder in that church sixty-one years 
of his life. 

He married (first), in 1826, Rebecca Ebert, born January 22, 
1805. Children: Henry Ebert, born April 7, 1827, died September 3, 
1853; Benjamin Franklin, October 3, 1828, died February 25, 1899; 
James John, March 20, 1830, died April 9, 1901 ; Esther Ann, Febru- 
ary 28, 1832, married William Zumbro, August 24, 1865, died 1890; 
John Brown, April 9, 1834, died October 24, 1899; Harriet A., July 
II, 1836, married Marshall M. Mortin, April 8, 1858; Charles L., 
June 24, 1838; Rosetta Johnson, September 13, 1840, married John 
T. Janes, in 1868, died July 15, 1897; George Seaton, September 30, 
1843; Margaret Elizabeth, September 7, 1845, died September 12, 
1863; William G., October 29, 1849, died August i, 185 1. The 
mother of this family died November 24, 1864. He married (second) 
Keziah P. Davis, bom April 23, 1829, died September 7, 1902, widow 
of Caleb Davis, and daughter of Jesse and Nancy (Parrish) Rex. 
Jesse Rex was a son of a revolutionary soldier. Child of Captain and 
Mrs. John S. Smith; Hugh F., mentioned below. 

(IV) Hugh F., son of Captain John S. and Keziah P. (Davis) 
Smith, was born in Fairmont, West Virginia, July 15, 1869. He was 
reared on his father's farm in Marion county, West Virginia, and edu- 
cated in the excellent public schools, graduating from the State Normal 
at Fairmont in 1887. He taught school two years, clerked in stores in 
his native city for a short time, after which he became ticket agent's 
clerk for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company at Fairmont, con- 
tinuing for two years. He then entered the Bank of Fairmont as teller, 
and in 1903 became the cashier of the Monongahela Bank, which posi- 
tion he still holds with credit to himself and the banking house so well 
known in this section. Of his fraternal affiliations it may be stated that 
Mr. Smith is a worthy member of Fairmont Lodge, No. 9, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; also of Orient Chapter, No. 9, Royal Arch 
Masons. He is a member of Lodge No. 27, Knights of Pythias; the 



544 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Woodmen of the World, 
beneficiary orders. He is of the religious faith of his father, and is an 
elder in the Presbyterian church. Politically Mr. Smith is a Republican, 
believing in the cardinal principles of that political party. 

Mr. Smith married (first), October i, 1894, Mollie E., bom in 
Fairmont, West Virginia, January i, 1874, daughter of Jacob S. Hay- 
den. Child, Gazelle, born October 8, 1895. Mrs. Smith died October 
I3> 1895. Mr. Smith married (second) Alice Brannon, born in Glen- 
ville. West Virginia, November i, 1876, daughter of M. T. and Kate 
(Linn) Brannon. The father was born in Glenville, 1841, son of John 
Brannon. Kate Linn was born September 3, 1845, '" Marion county, 
daughter of Robert and Saphrona (Newcomb) Linn. The latter was 
born September 16, 18 16, daughter of Gleazon Newcomb, bom Octo- 
ber 22, 1785, died October 19, 1852. His father was born in 1754, 
and was a soldier in the revolutionary war. The Linn family were 
from Scotland and had many representatives in the revolutionary strug- 
gle. Robert Linn, father of Robert Linn, above mentioned, was born 
October 20, 1781, died September 7, 1834. He married in 18 10, 
Catherine Lyon, born 1788, died 1856. The children by Mr. Smith's 
second marriage are: Katherine Louise, born September 19, 1903; 
Margaret Maud, April 7, 1905; Hugh Shotwell, born January 18, 
1908, died Febmary 6, 1908. 



The Amos family are from Germany, the forefathers com- 
AMOS ing from the Fatherland near the middle of the seven- 
teenth century, but the authentic and connected history of 
the family begins prior to the revolutionary war when Henry Amos Sr. 
came from Delaware and located near the head of Indian creek, Mo- 
nongaha county, Virginia (now West Virginia). He was a native 
of Delaware. There in the midst of a vast almost impenetrable 
wilderness he established for himself a home, and cleared up a farm 
from out of the immense forests. This was no small task, for savage 
tribes of Indians and wild beasts were on every hand, but by his bravery 
and courage he succeeded in performing the great task and ever after- 
wards followed the peaceful and independent pursuit of agriculture. 
In 1790 he married, in Monongalia county, Dorcas Hall, of Pennsyl- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 545 

vania ; her parents came from Delaware. They had a son George, of 
whom further. 

(II) George, son of Henry Amos, was born on the old homestead, 
where he was reared. Shortly after his marriage he removed to Paw 
Paw district, in Marion county, where he became one of the pioneer 
settlers. He was a farmer. He entered the service of his country in 
Colonel Thomas Haymond's regiment in the war of 1812. He mar- 
ried Idney Hawkins, of English descent, whose grandfather came 
from England to Virginia as early as 1750, was loyal to the colonies, 
and became a soldier in the war of 1812. They were the parents of 
fourteen children, eight sons and six daughters, among whom was Ste- 
phen H., of whom further. 

(III) Stephen H., son of George and Idney (Hawkins) Amos, 
was born December 30, 1825, in Paw Paw district, Marion county, in 
what is now known as West Virginia. There he was educated in the 
subscription schools, held in the old-time log house. When seventeen 
years of age he apprenticed himself to a blacksmith for the purpose of 
learning that trade, then a very useful one. As a mechanic he displayed 
rare genius, and in connection with his trade manufactured scales that 
were largely used throughout his region of the country. For thirty 
years prior to 1888 he followed his trade at Rivesville, where he also 
carried on carriage-making and kindred branches. Politically he was a 
Whig, but at the birth of the Republican party he united with it and 
was made postmaster at Rivesville. He was a licensed Methodist 
Episcopal minister. He moved to Fairmont in 1888 and there follow- 
ed carriage work as long as able to attend actively to the duties of a 
manufacturer. He married Rebecca Engle, who died June 5, 1906, 
aged seventy-nine years. He died December 23, 1906, aged eighty-one 
years. Children: Edna M., Theresa Virginia, Serena Frances, Luther, 
Ida M., Stephen F., three who died in infancy, and George E., of whom 
further. 

(IV) George E., son of Stephen H. and Rebecca (Engle) Amos, 
was born September 15, 1856, near Rivesville, Marion county, West 
Virginia. He obtained his education at the public schools, learned the 
trade of blacksmith of his father who stood by the glowing forge so 
many years, and has always followed that and carriage-making. In 



546 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

1888 he built a large factory in Fairmont, which was well equipped with 
all necessary machinery for the production of fine work. From fifteen 
hands to a larger number were here constantly employed. In 1900 the 
firm was known as George E. Amos & Brother. He then drifted into 
agriculture, and established a hardware store at Fairmont in 1902, the 
firm being styled George E. Amos & Company, which still exists. In 
1908 he was elected sheriff of Marion county. West Virginia, and held 
the office four years. He attends the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
in politics is a Republican. He is connected with the Knights of 
Pythias. In 1889 he married Fannie, daughter of Madison and 
Amanda (Jolliff) Carter, of Marion county. Children: Clay D., born 
January 22, 1891, a graduate of the University of West Virginia in 
191 1, and George Merle, born December 25, 1893. 



Job Musgrave, son of Elijah Musgrave, ancestor 
MUSGRAVE of that branch of the Musgrave family of which 

Eli Musgrave, a prominent and enterprising citizen 
of Fairmont, is a representative, was a resident of Virginia and a farmer 
by occupation. He served as a soldier during the war of 1812, and 
while making preparations to return home to spend Christmas day was 
taken sick with the black fever and died at Norfolk, Virginia, Decem- 
ber 24, 1 8 14. His wife, Isabel (Watts) Musgrave, after the death 
of her husband, emigrated across the mountains and settled in Monon- 
galia county, where she married William Smith, a farmer, and they 
later removed to Marion county, where she died at the age of seventy- 
five years. Their children were: Zebulun, of whom further; James; 
John. 

(II) Zebulun, eldest son of Job and Isabel (Watts) Musgrave, 
was born in Hampshire county, Virginia, now West Virginia, June 2, 
1 808, died April 23, 1882. He was reared on a farm, and received the 
limited education afforded by the common schools of that day, supple- 
mented in later years by persistent study at home during his leisure 
hours. Thus by reading and observation he became one of the best 
informed as well as one of the most prominent men of the community. 
He followed agriculture as a means of livelihood, and in addition to 
this served as sheriff of the county, and clerk of the board of super- 
visors. He also served as president of the First National Bank of Fair- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 547 

mont, and for more than forty years was a director in the same insti- 
tution. He held membership in the Baptist church, of which he was 
clerk for many years, and was an old line Whig in politics, later trans- 
ferring his allegiance to the Republican party. He married (first), in 
1830, Elizabeth, daughter of John C. McGinty, of Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, who bore him twelve children: Isabel; Lydia; Luverna; 
John C, who served as a soldier in the civil war; Job, who also served 
as soldier; Edgar; Eli, of whom further; Matilda; Sarah J.; Nathan 
W.; Elizabeth; Martha E. Mrs. Musgrave died February 24, 1853. 
Mr. Musgrave married (second) Julia Bradley, and (third) Sophronia 
Linn. 

(Ill) Eli, son of Zebulun and Elizabeth (McGinty) Musgrave, 
was born in Marion county, Virginia, now West Virginia, July 30, 
1842. He was brought up on his father's farm, attending the common 
schools of the neighborhood, and obtaining a practical education which 
prepared him for the activities of life. During the progress of the civil 
war he served in the quartermaster's department, after which he enlisted 
as a sergeant in Company D, One Hundred and Seventy-ninth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, Army of the Tennessee, and participated in the 
battles of Nashville, Franklin, and in many skirmishes. He served until 
the cessation of hostilities, and was then honorably discharged from the 
service. Subsequently he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
continuing in that occupation until 1890, when he removed to Fair- 
mont and engaged in the undertaking business, which has proved highly 
successful and remunerative. He is a member and trustee of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church of Fairmont, a Republican in politics, and a 
member of General Mead Post, No. 6, Grand Army of the Republic, 
and of the Knights of the Golden Eagle. 

Mr. Musgrave married, November 28, 1867, Maggie E. Tumey, 
born in Monongalia county, Virginia, January 14, 1843, but brought 
up in Marion county, daughter of Daniel and Narcissa H. (Lowman) 
Turney. Children: i. Clarence L., born July 18, 1869, engaged in 
business with his father. 2. Howard, born January 7, 1871, died aged 
ten months. 3. Arthur W., born September 30, 1872 ; engaged in busi- 
ness with his father; married, September 20, 1905, Grace Moats, of 
Ritchie county. West Virginia. 4. Lulu Maude, bom August 20, 
1874; married August 20, 1899, Roy A. Lough, now of Morgantown, 
West Virginia. 



548 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(The Turney Line). 

Mrs. Musgrave traces her ancestry to Holland, where the name was 
then spelled Dorney, but like many others it underwent a change and 
for many years has been spelled Turney. The first of the line here 
under consideration immigrated to this country prior to the middle of 
the eighteenth century, and settled in the eastern part of Pennsylvania, 
where his son, Daniel Turney, was born, one of a large family of chil- 
dren, four brothers of whom left their home in eastern Pennsylvania 
at about the same time for western and southern counties. One settled 
in Ohio where his descendants are now numerous; another In Ten- 
nessee where he reared a large family, one of his descendants being 
Chief Justice Peter Turney, afterwards governor of Tennessee; an- 
other went to North Carolina and permanently located there, the name 
being very prominent. In young manhood Daniel Turney crossed the 
Allegheny mountains to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, settling 
near the site of ancient Hannastown, now Greensburg, which was the 
first county seat of the county, and there followed farming as an occu- 
pation. He was the father of six sons and two daughters. Jacob 
Turney, son of Daniel Turney, was born in 1788. In early life he set- 
tled in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and later held the offices of county 
commissioner, county treasurer, and other positions. He was an active 
Democrat, and upon his return from a state convention at Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, to which he had been sent as a delegate, he contracted a 
cold while crossing the mountains, from the effects of which he died 
some years later, January 4, 1827. 

He married, January 23, 18 10, Margaret Singer, of Carlisle, Penn- 
sylvania, born May 11, 1792, daughter of Simon and Mary (Clouser) 
Singer, natives of Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Children: Daniel; Nancy; 
Samuel S. ; Lucian B.; Lucinda; Robert William; Jacob. Daniel Tur- 
ney, son of Jacob Turney, and father of Mrs. Musgrave, was born in 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to what is now 
West Virginia, settling first in Monongalia county, later removing to 
what is now Marion county. He married Narcissa H. Lowman. Chil- 
dren : I. Gustavus L., married Anne C. Wilty; deceased. 2. Charlotte 
M., married James F. Hough; deceased. 3. Maggie E., married Eli 
Musgrave. 4. Hattie J., married Captain Thomas Reed; deceased. 5. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 549 

Jane D., deceased. 6. Caroline B., widow of Thomas B. Carpenter; 
children: Una V., wife of Walter Show, of Pittsburgh; Carney C; H. 
Jane, wife of John H. Cavander, of Chicago; Samuel M., deceased, 
married Mary Cafferty, one son, Rev. Walter L., of London Mills, 
Illinois. 



William Harvey Brand, the popular and efficient sheriff 
BRAND of Monongalia county, is numbered among the men 

whose lives and personal exertions have contributed ma- 
terially toward the growth and development of Monongalia county, 
and it may be well doubted if any deserve a more honorable mention in 
its annals than he. Scrupulously honorable in all his dealings with man- 
kind, he bears a reputation for public and private integrity, and being 
sociable and genial, he has a host of friends among all classes of society. 

(I) John Brand, the first of the line here under consideration, mar- 
ried Jane McCray, who bore him eight children, as follows: Mary, 
born December 5, 1779; George, May 19, 1781 ; Margaret, December 
24, 1782; Jean, May 10, 1784; John, April 26, 1786; James, of whom 
further; William, June 3, 1790; Agnes, July 27, 1792. 

(II) James Brand, son of John and Jane (McCray) Brand, was 
bom October 5, 1788. He married Elizabeth Wade. Children : Sarah 
Jane, born February 26, 1821 ; Mary Elizabeth, July 24, 1822; Alex- 
ander Wade, December 7, 1823; John McCray, April 16, 1826; Hosea 
Moore, April 3, 1828; William Kooval, February 10, 1830; Margaret 
Alcinda, October 26, 1831; George Thomas, July 31, 1833; James 
Harvey, April 18, 1835; Edmond Warren, of whom further; Eliza, 
March 23, 1840; Caroline Rosina, December 8, 1841. 

(III) EdmondWarrenBrand, son of James and Elizabeth (Wade) 
Brand, was born at Laurel Point, Grant district, Monongalia county. 
West Virginia, January 20, 1838, died December 25, 1899. During 
the civil war he served as deputy sheriff, acted as justice of the peace for 
a number of years, and was a member of the county court two terms. 
He was a member of the Baptist church, and also of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob 
Shafer; she died September 2, 19 10. Children: Frank M.; Anna B., 
married S. D. Furman; Ella M., married James W. Scott; William 
Harvey, of whom further. 



550 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(IV) William Harvey Brand, son of Edmond Warren and Eliza- 
beth (Shafer) Brand, was born at Laurel Point, Grant district, Monon- 
galia county, West Virginia, October 23, 1867. He attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native county, and worked upon his father's farm until 
he attained his majority. For several years thereafter he was employed 
in selling farm machinery in Monongalia county, in this way gaining a 
wide acquaintance throughout that section of the state, and by his hon- 
est and straightforward methods won their respect and confidence. In 
1897, upon relinquishing this position, he was appointed deputy sherifF 
under M. S. Garrison, the sheriff, and served until 1901. He then 
purchased a farm in Union district, which he cultivated and improved, 
bringing it to a high state of perfection, and resided thereon until 1908, 
when he was a candidate on the Republican ticket for the office of 
sheriff. He was elected in November, 1908, and is serving at the pres- 
ent time (191 1 ). He has five deputies, and the manner in which the 
work is carried on cannot be improved, it being conducted to the entire 
satisfaction of all concerned. He is a member of the First Baptist 
Church of Morgantown, has been a member of the Knights of Pythias 
for two decades, and also belongs to the Maccabees. 

Mr. Brand married, June 14, 1893, Inez, daughter of Ellery J. 
Lough. Children: Everett W., born December 19, 1894; Dessie, 
April I, 1898; Archibald, September 16, 1902; Willis, January 22, 
1904. 



The lineage of Judge Frank Cox, of Morgantown, is traced 
COX to the Highlands of Scotland, from whence members thereof 
emigrated to the new world about the middle of the eight- 
eenth century, locating in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, where they 
acted well their part in all the affairs of life. 

(I) Abraham Cox, the first member of the family of whom we 
here treat, was one of the emigrant ancestors above referred to. He 
removed from Maryland to near Morgantown, Monongalia county. 
West Virginia, then Virginia, where he purchased a farm consisting of 
three hundred acres. His intention had been to go to Kentucky, but he 
was led to change his mind on account of the Indian troubles that then 
existed in that state. 

(II) Moses Cox, son of Abraham Cox, was bom in Hagerstown, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 551 

Maryland, in 1780, and in young manhood located on Indian creek, a 
short distance from M organtown, in what is now known as Grant 
district. He served in the war of 18 12, served his town as justice of 
the peace and his county as sheriff, was a farmer by occupation, a Pres- 
byterian in religion, and a Whig in politics. He married (first) Jane 
Musgrave, and (second) Mrs. Charlotte Foster (nee McDermott). 
He died at his home near Morgantown, in 1861. 

(III) Henry L. Cox, son of Moses and Charlotte (Foster) Cox, 
was born in Monongalia county. West Virginia, then Virginia, in Octo- 
ber, 1836, and died July 8, 1908. He attended the Monongalia Acad- 
emy, where he prepared himself for the profession of teaching. In 
early manhood he went to Greene county, Pennsylvania, and there acted 
in the capacity of teacher, and for two summers, during vacation, pur- 
sued a course in Waynesburg College. Upon his return to Monongalia 
county he engaged in agricultural pursuits during the summer months, 
devoting his attention to teaching during the winter months. In 1867 
he was elected to the position of county superintendent of public schools, 
and was reelected for two more terms, and was appointed to fill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of Rev. Jeremiah Simpson, who was 
elected in May, 1873, ^"^ resigned in July of the same year. He also 
held the position of principal of the Morgantown graded school, and 
after six years service was appointed on the board of examiners of the 
county. In 1880 he was elected on the Republican ticket to represent 
Monongalia county in the legislature of West Virginia, and at the end 
of his first term was reelected. He married, February 28, 1861, Eliza- 
beth Matilda, daughter of Boaz Boydston, of Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

(IV) Frank Cox, only child of Henry L. and Elizabeth Matilda 
(Boydston) Cox, was born in Grant district, Monongalia county. West 
Virginia, June 18, 1862. He attended the Morgantown schools and 
West Virginia University, graduating from the law department of the 
latter institution in June, 1883. He at once began the active practice of 
his profession in Morgantown, continuing the same with a large degree 
of success until 1888, when he was elected prosecuting attorney, in 
which capacity he served until January i, 1893, when he was succeeded 
by George C. Baker, his partner, who appointed Mr. Cox his deputy. 
On January i, 1889, a partnership was formed between Mr. Cox and 



552 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

George C. Baker, under the style of Cox & Baker, which connection 
existed until 1904, when Mr. Cox was elected judge of the supreme 
court of appeals of West Virginia, and was elected president of the 
same in 1907. During the latter year he resigned from office and re- 
turned to the practice of law at Morgantown, the firm of Cox & Baker 
being reestablished, and which is still in effect. He is a member and 
vice-president of the Board of Trade of Morgantown, and is largely 
interested in the growth and development there, being an extensive 
owner of real estate. He served as judge advocate general under Gov- 
ernor Atkinson, and was a member of the Morgantown school board 
for a number of years. He was a member of the World Fair Commis- 
sion for West Virginia in 1904. He is a member and trustee of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and a Republican in politics. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Free and Accepted Masons, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Monongalia Lodge, No. 10, and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. This brief resume of Mr. Cox's many spheres of 
activity proves the broadness of his mental vision, and whether consid- 
ered as a professional man, as a public servant, as a churchman or as a 
clubman, he is ever found to be a man true to himself and true to his 
fellows. 

Mr. Cox married, March 8, 1885, Mattie J. Weaver, daughter of 
George and Margaret Weaver. Children: Stanley Rhey, born March 
23, 1889; Margaret Elizabeth, bom June 15, 1898. 



It may well be doubted if there is in the world to-day 
STEWART another family at once so well known and possessing 
so ancient a history as the Scottish house of Stewart, or 
Stuart. Starting from Alan, the Norman, the companion of William 
the Conqueror in 1060, we find that one of his immediate descendants 
went to Scotland, where he was ennobled and appointed in the twelfth 
century grand steward or Stewart of the realm, whence the name. One 
of the line ascended the Scottish throne as Robert II., having married 
the heiress of the Bruces, and as kings, nobles and commoners the Stew- 
arts have well maintained their own from that very day to this. 

The name of the first American ancestor of this particular line of 
Stewarts has not been ascertained. The first of whom we have any 
knowledge was John S. Stewart, born in Jefferson county, Virginia, who 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 553 

served in the Confederate army, in the famous Stonewall Brigade. His 
wife was a Hall. 

John Thomas Stewart, son of John S. Stewart, was born in Jefferson 
county, Virginia, December 24, 1843. He was in early life a mill con- 
tractor, being engaged in building flour mills, but in later life gave his 
attention to agricultural pursuits. He too was a soldier in the Stone- 
wall Brigade, serving four years in the Confederate army. He has 
served a number of terms as member of the board of education of his 
district. He married Alcinda Sophia Cunningham, born February 25, 
1849, died January 29, 1905. Children: Edgar B., further mentioned 
below; William C, born October 24, 1876. 

Edgar B., son of John Thomas and Alcinda S. (Cunningham) 
Stewart, was born at Bunker Hill, Berkeley county, West Virginia, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1 873. He was educated in the pubhc schools, by private tutors, 
and at West Virginia University, where he took both elective and law 
courses, and graduated in the class of 1896. He was admitted to the 
bar the same year, and after practicing two years by himself, in Morgan- 
town, in 1898 formed a partnership with I. G. Lazzelle. In 1900- 
he was elected mayor, and has since served two terms on the council, and 
four years as assistant prosecuting attorney. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian church, serving on the board of finance of that church. 
He was one of the early members of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 
He is also a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Knights 
of Pythias, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Commercial Law 
League of America, American Bar Association, and West Virginia State 
Bar Association. He was one of the first five commissioners from West 
Virginia to serve on the National Commission on Uniform State Laws. 
He is also a member of the National Civic Association, and the Na- 
tional Geographic Society. 

He married, December 19, 1899, Mary Nelson Wisner, daughter 
of J. Nelson and Johanna K. Wisner. Children: i. Mary, born Octo- 
ber 14, 1900. 2. Thomas Nelson, born July 16, 1903. 3. Edgar B. 
Jr., bom December 15, 1909. 



554 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Hon. John Morton Gregg, now serving his second term 
GREGG as clerk of the Monongalia county court, in which capac- 
ity his services are highly proficient and satisfactory, is a 
native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, born November i8, 1865, 
son of Thomas M. and Margaret M. (Cooper) Gregg, and grandson 
of John B. Gregg, who was a farmer and blacksmith in Washington 
county, Pennsylvania. 

Thomas M. Gregg (father) was born in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1836. He was reared and educated there, and followed the 
occupation of farming. In 1876 he removed to Morgantown, West 
Virginia, where for a number of years he tilled the soil, later engaged in 
the mercantile business, deriving considerable profit from both lines of 
work. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He mar- 
ried Margaret M., daughter of Lemuel Cooper; she died June i, 191 1. 
Children: Oscar C, Charles F., Ira L., Mary E., married Taylor M. 
Dawson; Jesse W., Roma P., Bessie, married R. A. Wilbourn; John 
Morton, of whom further. 

John Morton Gregg attended the public schools of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, and Monongalia county. West Virginia, and later 
this was supplemented by attendance at the West Virginia University. 
He accompanied his parents upon their removal to West Virginia. In 
1888 he was appointed deputy clerk of the circuit court under Colonel 
R. E. Fast, and served in that office for four years, familiarizing him- 
self with the details of the work. In 1 889 he was elected city recorder 
of Morgantown and served in that office five terms. In 1890 he was a 
candidate for the Republican nomination for circuit clerk, but was de- 
feated by William E. Glasscock, for whom he served as deputy for two 
and a half years. In 1893 he accepted the position of bookkeeper with 
the Union Improvement Company, now the Union Utilities Company, 
of Morgantown, and remained with them until January i, 1898, when 
he received the appointment of secretary of the State Geological Survey, 
in which capacity he served until January i, 1903, when he was elected 
county clerk, his present incumbency, having been reelected in 1908 for 
a term of six years, receiving a very large majority over his Democratic 
opponent. The excellent condition of affairs at his office has been 
favorably commented upon by people who have had occasion to consult 
the records, and a bright future is predicted for him. He was one of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 555 

the incorporators and promoters of the Bank of Morgantown, in which 
he is now serving as a director. He is a member of the First Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church of Morgantown, of which he is the treasurer. 
He holds membership in the Free and Accepted Masons, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics. 

Mr. Gregg married, in 1889, Elizabeth M. Berkshire, daughter of 
Nicholas W. and Virginia (Morgan) Berkshire. Children: Lucile C, 
John Morton Jr., Margaret Virginia. 



This is an old Lancaster county, Pennsylvania family, 
BOWMAN dating back to many years before the revolutionary 

war, five generations being known to the present de- 
scendants, one of which is represented in the present postmaster at 
Morgantown, West Virginia, Frank L. Bowman, who is of the fifth in 
line of descent. The heads of the various generations from Lancaster 
county are: (I) Father of John ; (II) John; (III) James; (IV) Josiah, 
born 1 85 1 ; Frank L., born 1 879, being the fifth. 

(II) John Bowman, probably born about 1790, in Lancaster coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, was by occupation a farmer, who tilled the fertile 
fields of that most excellent agricultural section of Pennsylvania. He 
married and had children, including a son, James. 

(III) James Bowman, son of John Bowman, was a native of Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania. He was by trade a stonemason and con- 
tractor at Masontown, Pennsylvania. He married Hulda Walters. 
Children: Morgan H. ; Josiah A., of whom further; John F., and 
Aaron W. 

(IV) Josiah A. Bowman, second child of James and Hulda (Wal- 
ters) Bowman, was born in Masontown, Pennsylvania, February 13, 
1851. He came to Morgantown, West Virginia, in 1908, and engaged 
in the mercantile business. He was a contractor and manufacturer of 
superior building brick at Charleroi, Pennsylvania, before coming to 
Morgantown. Politically he votes the Republican ticket, and in his 
church faith is of the Presbyterian denomination. He married Sue 
Llewellyn, daughter of James Llewellyn and wife. Child: Frank L., 
of whom further. 

(V) Frank L. Bowman, son of Josiah A. and Sue (Llewellyn) 



556 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Bowman, was born in Masontown, Pennsylvania, January 21, 1879, 
but has spent much of his earlier life in Charleroi, Pennsylvania. He 
received his early education at the public schools at Masontown, Penn- 
sylvania, after which he entered the State University of West Virginia, 
where in 1902 he took the degree of A. B. In the meantime he was 
elected teller of the Farmers' and Merchants' Bank, which position he re- 
signed from two years later and began the study of law at the Univer- 
sity of West Virginia. Subsequently he was admitted to the bar by the 
supreme court. He entered the law offices of Glasscock & Glasscock, 
where he began the practice of law, and has been associated with them 
ever since. He is looked upon as one of the cleanest, brightest young 
attorneys practicing at the local bar. He devotes his efforts to a general 
law practice. While at the University, Mr. Bowman won the Inter- 
Society oration and debate prize. He was chosen as one of the directors 
of the Bank of Morgantown, when it was newly organized not long 
since, and has other varied interests. He was appointed postmaster of 
the city of Morgantown, West Virginia, May 25, 191 1, and is filling 
well that important government position. He is a member of Morgan- 
town Lodge, No. 4, Free and Accepted Masons. 

He was married, June 3, 1904, to Pearl Silveus, of Pittsburgh, 
a daughter of one of the most prominent divines in that city, the pastor 
of the Presbyterian church, Rev. W. F. Silveus. Children : Marjorie 
Virginia, born January 16, 1908, and Frank L. Jr., born May 15, 191 1. 



Franklin Marion Brand, one of the active, enterprising 
BRAND and progressive citizens of Morgantown, now serving in 

a public capacity as assistant to T. Sutton Boyd, the prose- 
cuting attorney of Monongalia county, was born in Cass district, Mo- 
nongalia county. West Virginia, March 13, 1880, son of James Clark 
and Mary Alice (Fleming) Brand, grandson of Hosea Moore and 
Emaretta (Weaver) Brand, great-grandson of James and Elizabeth 
(Wade) Brand, and great-great-grandson of John Brand, the last two 
named being mentioned in sketch of William Harvey Brand, which 
appears in this work. 

Hosea Moore Brand (grandfather) was born near Laurel Point, 
Monongalia county. West Virginia, April 3, 1828, and died very sud- 
denly, June 27, 1904. In his early life he learned the trade of car- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 557 

penter, but did not follow it as a means of livelihood, devoting his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits, as did most all other members of the fam- 
ily. He married, October 14, 1852, Emaretta, daughter of Jacob 
Weaver, whose death occurred before that of her husband. Children : 
James Clark, of whom further; Josephine, Elmer G., Charles H., all 
of whom lived to adult age, and one child who died young. 

James Clark Brand (father), was born September 16, 1853, ^^ 
Cass district, Monongalia county. West Virginia. He was reared on 
his father's farm, and has devoted his entire active career to farming 
and stock raising, never seeking or holding public office, preferring to 
follow the even tenor of his life. Of late years he has been a breeder of 
fancy Hereford cattle, owning several thoroughbreds of that breed. He 
now resides on the farm he purchased of David W. Morris, located 
about six miles from Morgantown, West Virginia. In the spring of 
1877 he married Mary Alice, daughter of John T. Fleming, who was 
sheriff of Monongalia county prior to the civil war. Children, all of 
whom are living at the present time ( 191 1 ) ; Melville Hosea, Franklin 
Marion (of whom further), Retta Isaphene, wife of Otis R. Grandon, 
of Marshall county, West Virginia; George Fleming, John T., Nellie 
Grace, Elmer Clyde, Hazel Leora. 

Franklin Marion Brand spent the greater part of his early life in 
Grant district, Monongalia county, his parents having removed there 
in 1885, purchasing one hundred and sixty-two acres of land on the 
headwaters of Dent's Run. He attended the Sugar Grove school until 
he had attained the age of nineteen, after which he took the teacher's 
examination in the fall of 1899, being the only applicant in the county 
who had never taught to secure a No. i certificate. The following 
winter he taught school at Pleasant Valley, in his home district. The 
following spring he entered the West Virginia University at Morgan- 
town, and while a student there won five different prizes for scholar- 
ship aggregating in amount $185. He was a member of the Signa Nu 
fraternity and the Parthenon Literary Society, representing the latter 
in a joint debate with the Columbian Literary Society in the spring of 
1906. In the fall of 1902, taking Greek and mathematics, he made the 
highest average of any student in the institution. His summer vacations 
were mostly spent in canvassing for the Keystone View Company, and 
in this manner he earned the greater part of the money required to meet 



558 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

his expenses through school. At graduation he was In debt to the 
amount of $206, having spent seven years In securing his educational 
advantages. During the vi'Inter of 1 90001 he served as teacher at his 
home school at Sugar Grove, after which he returned to the West Vir- 
ginia University, from which he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1906, and that of Bachelor of Laws in 1907. During the sum- 
mer of that year, while visiting In Nebraska, he received notice of his 
election to the princlpalship of the Smithfield School in Pennsylvania, 
and on November 2, 1907, while serving In that capacity, was admitted 
to practice law In Morgantown, he entering upon the active duties of 
that profession at the close of the school term. On January i, 1909, 
when T. Sutton Boyd became prosecuting attorney of Monongalia 
county, Mr. Brand was chosen as his assistant, and in this capacity he 
is serving at the present time, his abUItles being recognized and appre- 
ciated. Mr. Brand is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of 
Morgantown, the lodge and encampment of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 

Mr. Brand married, November 12, 19 10, Myrtle Otella Core, of 
Monongalia county. West Virginia, daughter of Benjamin and Cath- 
arine Core. 



Charles W. FInnell, of Morgantown, one of its lead- 
FINNELL Ing business men, Is one who by the successful prose- 
cution of different industries has fully demonstrated 
his capacity to manage any business, however extensive or complicated. 
Charles W. FInnell (father) was born in the state of Virginia in 
1792, died in 1887. He was the owner of a large farm which he culti- 
vated and Improved, cultivating It for a number of years. In 1848 he 
removed to Morgantown, Virginia, now West Virginia, and purchased 
the Franklin House, where he resided until his death. He was a soldier 
in the war of 18 12, and served as lieutenant in Captain Shackleford's 
company. He married Luclnda Hoffman, who died in April, 1909, 
aged one hundred and one years and twenty-four days. Children: 
Isaac N. ; Reuben E. ; Lucy, married P. B. Criser; Sarah, married James 
Hopkins; Margaret, married Jesse J. Fitch; Catherine, married George 
W. Johnson; Anna R., married H. S. Hayes; Charles W. (see for- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 559 

ward) . The father of Charles W. Finnell was a preacher in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

Charles W. Finnell was born in the state of Virginia, June 25, 
1846. His parents removing to Monongalia county, West Virginia, 
when he was two years old, his education was acquired in private schools 
there, slabs being used for seats, and in the Old Monongalia Academy. 
In 1862 he entered upon his active career in the capacity of clerk, in a 
drug store, where he remained for two years. The following two years 
he filled the office of chief clerk under Colonel James Evans, and at the 
expiration of this period returned to Morgantown where he was ap- 
pointed deputy clerk of the circuit and county court, which office he held 
for ten years. In 1872 he formed a partnership with John H. Hoff- 
man, who was engaged in the banking business, and this was known as 
the Hoffman Bank. Three years later he formed a joint stock company 
under the name of Farmers' Bank of Morgantown, of which he was 
cashier and teller. This institution absorbed the Hoffman Bank, and in 
1876 the name was changed to the one now in use. Second National 
Bank. In the latter named year he severed his connection with the 
bank, and then went to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in 
the wholesale carpet and matting business, continuing the same until 
1883, when he disposed of it. He then returned to Morgantown and 
engaged in mercantile business, in which he engaged for three years and 
then disposed of his partnership interest. He then turned his attention 
to the insurance business, representing twenty companies, which he con- 
ducted successfully until 1886, when he sold the same. He then re- 
moved to Southwest, where he traveled for a mercantile house. In 
1892 he returned to Morgantown, purchased the old homestead, and 
conducted the Franklin House as a hotel until 1895, '" which year it 
was demolished, it being then one hundred and nineteen years old. He 
then erected the present Hotel Madeira, which he managed until i 899, 
when he sold the same to Madeira Brothers. On January i, 1900, he 
engaged in the real estate business, which has steadily increased in 
volume and importance with the passing years, and in 19 10 he erected 
fifteen houses, deriving therefrom a goodly income. He was the organ- 
izer of the first Building and Loan Association in Morgantown, in the 
year 1872. A keynote to his success in his many undertakings is his 
executive force and mastery of detail in whatever engages his attention. 



560 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons and the Knights of 
Honor. 

Mr. Finnell married, in 1872, Lucy E., daughter of John H. Hoff- 
man. Children : Louisa E., married Dr. P. A. Gibbons, and Harry W., 
assistant general salesmanager of the Carbon Steel Company in their 
New York office. 



There are few names more widely diffused among English- 
JONES speaking peoples than that of Jones. Nor is its common 
occurrence a cause for wonder, when we recall how com- 
mon is the Christian name John — Jones signifying originally "son of 
John," the same as Johnson. 

A host of immigrants bearing the Jones surname have come to our 
country, chiefly from England and Wales. It has been impossible to 
connect this family with any one of them. There was a Thomas Ander- 
son Jones, the first known ancestor in direct line, who had a son of the 
same name. 

James Robinson Jones, son of Thomas Anderson Jones, was born in 
Smithton, West Virginia. As a boy he worked on the farm, later took 
up the trade of carpenter, and for a number of years was engaged in 
the manufacture of flour. Then he removed to the west and was in the 
butcher business, and later went to Vinita, Oklahoma, and installed the 
entire gas system of that place. Still later he returned east, worked at 
tool dressing in the oil fields, and is at present working again at his trade 
of carpentry. He married (first) Columbia, daughter of Valentine 
and Caroline Langfitt; she died in 1889. He later married Elizabeth 
Ann Paine Armstrong. 

James Clyde Jones, son of James R. and Columbia (Langfitt) 
Jones, was born in Smithton, West Virginia, July 16, 1887. He was 
educated in the public schools in Smithton, and after serving one year 
as clerk in a store, attended the Doddridge county high school. He 
next went to Smithton, and worked on the pipe line. In 1907 he enter- 
ed the West Virginia University, where he graduated in the spring of 
19 10. He was admitted to the bar January i, 191 1, receiving a certi- 
ficate from the supreme court in February. 

Mr. Jones served as assistant editor of the Daily New Dominion 
for eight months, and was for a time district manager of the New Eng- 



cScl^ ^^£S~- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 561 

land Mutual Life Insurance Company, and district manager of the 
Casualty Company of America. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Smithton, and assistant superintendent of the Sun- 
day school, serving also several years as secretary of the same. In 
politics he is a Democrat. He is a member of the American Order of 
United Workmen, of the Modem Woodmen of America. 

He married, January 28, 1912, Ina Edith Clark, a native of Star 
City, West Virginia, daughter of George M. and Mary E. Clark. Mr. 
Clark is deceased. 



This family came from Maryland to West Virginia. 

POTTER One of its descendants is Eric Potter, now residing at 

Morgantown, West Virginia. Three generations have 

been citizens of this state, and borne well their part in the development 

of the agricultural and industrial resources. 

(I) Henry Potter, a native of Maryland, immigrated to West 
Virginia in 1852, and there engaged in farming and continued in that 
vocation until his death, October 3, 1865. He married Susan Ander- 
son. Children : Ella, Harriet Ann, Elizabeth, Virginia, John L., Cor- 
nelia, Belle, Mary E., Everett M. and Henry, who died young. 

(II) John L. Potter, son of Henry and Susan (Anderson) Potter, 
was born in Monongalia county. West Virginia, December 27, 1854. 
He received his education in the public schools common at that day in 
his locality, and after leaving school engaged in farming. Politically, 
he was a Republican, and In church faith he was a believer in the 
teachings of the Methodist church. He married. In 1883, Elizabeth 
F. Coombs, daughter of Joseph G. Coombs. Children : Eric, of whom 
further; Belle, wife of Russell Powell; and Clarence. The wife and 
mother, Elizabeth F. (Coombs) Potter, died in Monongalia county. 

(III) Eric Potter, eldest child of John L. and Elizabeth F. 
(Coombs) Potter, was born near Laurel Point, West Virginia, August 
3, 1884. He was educated in the public schools of his native county, 
and at the West Virginia State University, which fitted him for an 
active, successful business career. He engaged in leasing and buying 
and selling oil and gas land property until 1897, when he engaged in 
the insurance business at Morgantown; in 19 10, he added real estate 



562 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

business to insurance, and has been successful in his undertakings in both 
branches. He is largely interested in and manager of the Morgantown 
Realty Company. Mr. Potter is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church (North), and of the Knights of the Maccabees, also the Pa- 
triotic Order Sons of America. 

June 18, 1907, he married Llllie Guthrie, of Mt. Morris, Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of James P. Guthrie and wife. 



Muta U. Swiger, a successful and enterprising business 
SWIGER man of Shinnston, whose success has been attributable 
to those sterling qualities which he possesses, sound judg- 
ment, quick perception, activity and integrity, is a descendant of a Ger- 
man ancestry. 

(I) Christopher Swiger, the first of the line here under considera- 
tion, was born in Germany about the year 1740. In early manhood he 
emigrated from his native land to seek his fortune in the new world, 
and upon his arrival here settled in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. He was 
a merchant, and on his return to Germany to purchase goods it was 
supposed that he was lost at sea, as he never returned. 

(II) John, son of Christopher Swiger, was born at Uniontown, 
Pennsylvania, April 25, 1764. He was reared and educated there, and 
continued his residence there until about twenty-five years of age, when 
he removed to Harrison county, Virginia, where he spent the remainder 
of his days. 

(III) Henry, son of John Swiger, was born in Harrison county, 
Virginia, February 2, 1 8 1 2, and was assassinated in his own house on the 
night of December 16, 1864, for his strong Abolitionist belief. He was 
a man of courage and determination, as evidenced by the manner of his 
decease, a reader and thinker, and one of the leading men of the com- 
munity. 

(IV) John B., son of Henry Swiger, was born in Harrison county, 
Virginia, January 3, 1846, died January 27, 1907. He was one of the 
early settlers of Grant district, Marion county, West Virginia, being 
interested in the planing mill business there, and being a man of strict 
integrity, uprightness of character and sound common sense, possessed 
in an eminent degree the confidence and respect of all who knew him. 
He was a soldier in the union army during the civil war, thus displaying 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 563 

his patriotism and valor. He married, May 25, 1 869, Mary A. Roads, 
born in Highland county, Ohio, November 14, 1846, living at the pres- 
ent time ( 191 1 ) at Shinnston. Among their children were : Muta U., 
see forward, and Minnie E., wife of Charles L. Harmer, a farmer of 
Shinns Run. 

(V) Muta U., son of John B. and Mary A. (Roads) Swiger, was 
born in Grant district, Marion county, West Virginia, August i, 1871. 
At the age of thirteen he accompanied his parents to Harrison county. 
West Virginia, and completed his studies in the common schools of that 
section. He studied his profession of watchmaker at La Porte, Indi- 
ana, thoroughly mastering all its details, and becoming a proficient 
workman. In 1884 he located in Shinnston, Harrison county. West 
Virginia, where in December, 1892, he established his present business, 
that of jeweler, his being the only regular jewelry establishment in that 
city. He is the owner of the building, has stock in both of the banks in 
Shinnston, also the Opera House Company, and owns a half interest in 
the Hartley & Swiger building, a business block of Shinnston. He pos- 
sesses that wonderful perseverance and that remarkable capacity for 
work, which enables a man to accomplish much in life, and which wins 
the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens. He is an Independent 
Republican in politics, but has never sought or held elective oflEce. 



Thomas L. Swiger, now retired from active business 
SWIGER pursuits, a resident of Shinnston, where for many years 

he has taken an active interest in all that pertains to its 
welfare, was bom in Harrison county, now West Virginia, September 
24, 1838, son of Jacob Swiger, whose birth occurred on the old home- 
stead in Harrison county. His mother was Nancy (Watkins) Swiger; 
Jacob Swiger was a farmer. 

Thomas L. Swiger attended the local schools, and after completing 
his studies engaged in farming, conducting his operations on the farm 
he still owns at Laurel Run, consisting of seventy-two acres, which Is 
now in a high state of cultivation. He continued in this occupation until 
his retirement in 1890, when he removed to Shinnston and purchased 
the house he now resides in, one of the most comfortable and attractive 
there. The homestead farm of Mr. Swiger is in the center of a very 
productive oil field, and there have been eleven wells sunk on the place, 



564 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

all good producers, none less than one hundred barrels per day and as 
high as nine hundred. He Is a stockholder in the First National Bank 
of Shinnston. He is a Baptist in religion, and a Republican In pohtics. 
He married, January i, 1861, Amanda, born In Harrison county, now 
West Virginia, December 7, 1840, daughter of George W. and Rebecca 
(RIggs) Janes, the former of whom was an old settler In this section 
of the state. They were the parents of two children, one of whom died 
at birth, and the other, George A., died at the age of twenty-two years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Swiger celebrated their golden wedding on January i, 
19 1 1, and this pleasant occasion was the scene of much enjoyment, 
many friends and relatives offering their congratulations. 



Dr. Charles Oliver Henry, a leading physician of Falr- 
HENRY mont. West Virginia, who enjoys an extensive and rapid- 
ly increasing practice, the result of the ability and skill 
which he has brought Into his practice of medicine, was bom December 
3, 1856, In Fairmont, the son of Lawrence and Mary Ann (HoLnes) 
Henry. 

Lawrence Henry, father of Dr. Henry, was born in Ayrshire, Scot- 
land, July 22, 1810, died March 7, 1887. He was the eldest of eight 
children, five sons and three daughters. When eighteen years of age 
his father died, and the support of the family devolved largely upon 
him, he being the eldest child. In 1837 he was given charge of a shaft 
In which four different veins of coal were worked, the thickness of the 
veins being five feet, three feet and ten inches, three feet, and twenty- 
eight Inches. At this time he was employed by a Mr. Finnic, a large 
owner of coal lands in Scotland, who prized his services very highly, 
and when he decided to emigrate to the United States his employer 
told him if he ever felt Inclined to return he would give him a far more 
lucrative position, a fact which amply testifies to his character and abil- 
ity. On July 4, 1845, Mr. Henry left his native land, and after a 
voyage of six weeks In a sailing vessel, arrived In New York City, Au- 
gust 7, locating at once In Mount Savage, Maryland, where he engaged 
In working a two-foot vein of bituminous coal which was then used at 
the Mount Savage furnaces, remaining in this employment for about 
two years. After the failure of the company, through which he was 
deprived of pay for four months, he obtained employment In the old 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 565 

Elkhart mines, two miles from Cumberland, and worked in the "Big 
Vein" for four years. While employed there he was seriously injured 
by a fall of slate, and this incapacitated him from active work for nine 
months. In 1851 he was employed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
Company to prospect for coal in the Hampshire hills, and he opened 
up for their use a vein near Piedmont. On March 18, 1852, he began 
the superintendence of McGuire's tunnel, looking after the arching of 
it for the last-named company, and in May of that year opened a vein 
of coal just over the Kingwood tunnel, which suppHed them with coal 
until the completion of that tunnel. In August, 1852, he opened the 
Palatine mines, and in the following May shipped an eight-ton gondola 
of coal to General Columbus O'Donnell, of Baltimore, who was then 
president of the Baltimore Gas Company, it being the first shipment of 
coal from West Virginia. During the winter of 1853 he furnished 
coal for the third and fourth divisions of the Baltimore & Ohio Com- 
pany, and also made shipments to Baltimore. In 1854, when the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company sold the Palatine mines to Gen- 
eral Columbus O'Donnell, who retained Mr. Henry as superintendent, 
and two years later when General O'Donnell purchased the coal prop- 
erty at Newburg, West Virginia, Mr. Henry assumed charge of the 
same, in which capacity he served for about thirty years. On March 
16, i860, he was run over by a twelve hundred and fifty pound coal car, 
which accident almost cost him his life. After a long and tedious ill- 
ness he recovered in a measure, being crippled, but not so badly, how- 
ever, as to prevent his active management of the works. At the age of 
seventy-five years he was a well-preserved man. The success he attained 
in his active career was due in a great measure to the fact that he person- 
ally superintended all the work devolving upon him. He was one of 
the founders and an elder of the Presbyterian church at Newburg, and 
a charter member of Orrel Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Mr. Henry married, June 16, 1837, Mary Ann Holmes, born in 
Irvine, Scotland, December 16, 18 17, died October 9, 1899. She sur- 
vived her husband many years, his death occurring March 7, 1887. 
Children: i. John Holmes, born in Scotland, March 15, 1838, died 
March 26, 1908; married, March 18, 1862, Eliza L. Marker, born 
May 6, 1844; children: i. Lawrence, born February 9, 1863, died 
March 23, 1863; ii. Marian Cockburn, born September 18, 1864; iii. 



566 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Hannah Mahama, born January i6, 1866; iv. Ann Holmes, born 
January 2, 1869; v. Janet McKenzie, born December 12, 1870; vi. 
Alberta, born March 31, 1873; vli. Blanch, born March 25, 1882. 2. 
Marian, born in Scotland, May 6, 1840; married, September 22, 1868, 
Charles Morgan, bom November 4, 1836; children: i. Thomas, born 
June 28, 1869; ii. Lawrence Henry, born April 16, 1871; iii. John, 
born December 6, 1872; iv. Charles, born April 22, 1875; v. Francis, 
born May 19, 1877; vi. Isabella, born October 17, 1879, died October 
23, 1879; vii. Mary Elvira, born December 17, 1880. 3. Mary, a 
twin of Marion, died in June, 1840. 4. Isabelle, born in Scotland, 
July 21, 1842; married, September 22, 1863, Morgan Dale Orr, born 
March 21, 1841 ; children: i. Lawrence Henry, bom January 29, 1865; 
ii. Charles Hiram, born July 26, 1868; iii. Mary Ann, born April 26, 
1871, died July 2, 1900; iv. Alice Dale, born September 7, 1876; v. 
Marian Isabelle, born August 13, 1878. 5. Mary, born in Scotland, 
November 4, 1844; married, October 10, 1865, Thomas CHnton 
Frazier, born March 28, 1844, died April 4, 1871; children: i. Mary 
Ann, born August 19, 1866; ii. William, born February 22, 1868; iii. 
Lawrence Henry, born May 12, 1870. 6. David, born at Mount Sav- 
age, Maryland, March 9, 1847; married, January 15, 1872, Annie 
Galentine, bom April 2, 1849; children: i. Lawrence Holmes, bom 
October 23, 1872, died November 6, 1872; ii. Lawrence Reese, born 
January 17, 1874; iii. John Holmes, bom April 2, 1876; iv. Theresa 
Maude, born April 15, 1880. 7. Elizabeth, born near Cumberland, 
Maryland, November 3, 1849; married, March 16, 1872, James Wil- 
son, born November 11, 1836; children: i. James Morgan, bom July 
3, 1873; ii. Mary Cameron, born May 12, 1875; iii. Lawrence Henry, 
born February 7, 1877; iv. Rebecca Elizabeth, born January 13, 1880; 
v. John, born March 19, 1882; vi. Marian Isabel, bom February 28, 
1884. 8. Francis Lawrence, born February 16, 1852, died November 
22, 1879. 9. Margaret Allison, bom July 5, 1854; married, July 10, 
1873, Joseph Alexander Gibson, born January 5, 1851; children: i. 
Lawrence Henry, born August 30, 1874; ii. Sarah McCombe, bom 
February i, 1876; iii. Robert, born October i, 1878; iv. Mary Ann, 
born March 21, 1884; v. John, died at age of ten years; vi. Samuel. 
10. Charles Oliver (of whom further). 11. James, born August 5, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 567 

1859, died November 27, 1905 ; married, July 27, 1882, Sarah Hough, 
born July 4, 1864; one child, Lawrence, born February 12, 1883. 

Charles Oliver Henry attended the common schools of the neigh- 
borhood, the State Normal School at Fairmont and the University of 
West Virginia. Choosing the profession of medicine for his life work, 
he placed himself under the preceptorship of Dr. H. W. Brock, of 
Morgantown, and the knowledge thus acquired was supplemented by 
attendance at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, where 
he graduated in 1882 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He 
began the active practice of his profession at Shinnston, Harrison 
county. West Virginia, in May, 1883, and continued until 1903, when 
he removed to Fairmont, where he has now an excellent practice, which 
is steadily Increasing year by year. He keeps In touch with the ad- 
vanced thought along the line of his profession by membership In the 
American Medical Association, in the West Virginia Medical Asso- 
ciation, in which he has served as first vice-president, and In the Marlon 
County Medical Society. In October, 191 1, at the annual meeting of 
the West Virginia Medical Association, he was elected president for a 
term of one year. For six years he served as county health officer, and 
In addition to his professional labors is acting in the capacity of presi- 
dent of the Lambert Run Coal Company, and is Interested In the Fair- 
mont Dairies. He Is a member of the First Baptist Church of Fair- 
mont, of which he Is a deacon; of St. John's Lodge, No. 24, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Shinnston, In which he has passed all the chairs; 
of Orient Chapter, No. 9, Royal Arch Masons; of the Royal Arcanum ; 
and In political belief Is a Republican. 

Dr. Henry married, May 6, 1885, Virginia Lee Hood, born in 
Marion county, Virginia, August 4, 1862, daughter of William and 
Hannah (Coombs) Hood, the former of whom was a native of 
Grenada, Pennsylvania, and served as a soldier In the Confederate 
army during the civil war, being a prisoner for a short period of time. 
Children of Dr. and Mrs. Henry: Edith Holmes, born July 6, 1886 
Agnes Lee, August 28, 1887; Ruth O'Donnell, August 16, 1890 
Mary Ellen, January 16, 1894; Robert McKenzie, August 22, 1896 
Andrew Luke, August 6, 1899. 



568 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

One of the popular educators of Marion county, Joseph 

ROSIER Rosier, was born in that county, West Virginia, January 

24, 1870, the son of John W. and Rebecca (Miller) 

Rosier. His father was born in Harrison county, West Virginia, 1844 

and foUowed farming all his active life, dying in 1904. His mother 

bom in 1847, was the daughter of David Miller. She died in 1873 

Joseph Rosier was educated in the common schools of West Vir- 
ginia and at Salem Academy, later graduating from Salem College 
His early years were spent on his father's farm. He took, some spe 
cial courses while at college, and taught his first term of school in a 
country district, at the age of twenty years. Since then he has made 
teaching his profession, and dating from 1900, has been superintendent 
of public schools in Fairmont. He was principal of the Salem graded 
schools for three years; member of the Harrison board of examiners 
for one year; county superintendent of free schools in Harrison county 
two years; instructor in the Salem College two years; member of the 
faculty of the Glenville State Normal School one year; member of the 
Fairmont State Normal School faculty three years, and has held other 
educational positions that have made his a busy life. 

But by systematizing his time, he manages to attend to his duties as 
a member and an officer of his church; as a member of the Knights of 
Pythias; and as a member of the Young Men's Christian Association 
at Fairmont. As a means of providing for his family in case of his 
death, Mr. Rosier is connected with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. Politically he supports the Democratic party, and in church 
affiliation is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Among 
the numerous societies to which he belongs may be named the National 
Educational Association, the National Society for the Study of Edu- 
cation, etc. He has been the president and secretary of the West Vir- 
ginia Educational Association, and has conducted institutes for teachers 
for fifteen years in thirty counties of his state. In his determination to 
acquire an education, he has made a strenuous fight with unfavorable 
circumstances and has had the satisfaction of accomplishing his aim. 

He married, August 14, 1895, Iva Randolph, a native of Salem, 
West Virginia, born October 15, 1872. She is the daughter of Pres- 
ton Fitz Randolph, a teacher for twenty-seven years, who graduated 
at Alfred University, Allegany county. New York. He had followed 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 569 

the profession of teaching in the counties of Harrison, Ritchie and 
Doddridge, West Virginia. He instructed many pupils and prepared 
them for teaching. His father was William Fitz Randolph, who aided 
his children in gaining an education by holding a private school at his 
own home. Mr. and Mrs. Rosier have children as follows: Nellie, 
born May 29, 1898; Robert, born April 10, 1902; Mary Josephine, 
born December 8, 1905. 



Hon. William E. Arnett, ex-mayor of Fairmont, and 
ARNETT one of its progressive and enterprising citizens whose 
success Is the result of his own persevering efforts, is a 
native of ArnettsvIUe, Monongalia county, Virginia, now West Vir- 
ginia, born December 20, 1846, son of William M. and Elizabeth 
Ann (Hess) Arnett, and grandson of James and Rachel (Meredith) 
Arnett. 

(II) William M. Arnett was born at ArnettsvIUe, Virginia, No- 
vember 25, 1 8 19, died October 27, 1903. He was brought up on a 
farm, educated in the common schools of the day, and after attaining 
manhood engaged In farming on his own account, also dealing in live 
stock, and was eminently successful along both lines. He was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, a Democrat in politics until 
the civil war period and after that a Republican, and a member of the 
Free and Accepted Masons. He married (first), November 7, 1837, 
Elizabeth Ann Hess, born March 20, 1820, daughter of WiUiam 
Hess. Children: Enos, born December 12, 1838, deceased; James H., 
April 17, 1841; Selina, December 21, 1843; William E. (of whom 
further); Mary Emellne, June 12, 1850, deceased; Tilly Ann, De^ 
cember i, 1852; Margaret Helen, May 5, 1855; Rachel Caroline, 
December 25, 1857. Mrs. Arnett died April 22, i860. Mr. Arnett 
married (second), June 2, 1861, Mrs. Drusilla (Price) Cox, who 
bore him four children: Susan A., William M., Richard T., and Flor- 
ence. Mrs. Arnett died September 16, 1892. 

(III) William E., son of William M. Arnett, was brought up on 
his father's farm, and acquired a practical education in the common 
schools of the neighborhood. Being inured to farm labor he chose that 
occupation for his active career, and followed that line successfully until 
1880. Six years later he removed to Fairmont and engaged in the real 



570 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

estate business, handling coal and timber lands, from which he derived 
a lucrative livelihood, building up an extensive trade. In 1907 he was 
elected to serve in the responsible capacity of mayor of Fairmont, con- 
tinuing in office two years, during which time he proved both faithful 
and efficient. He was a member of the board of education during the 
building of the magnificent school houses in all parts of the city, and he 
took a deep interest with his associates in providing the well-equipped 
and commodious buildings as he took a keen and active interest in the 
cause of education. He holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, the Encampment and Canton of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and his political affiliation is with the Republican party. 

Mr. Arnett married, February 10, 1867, Margaret Almira Cox, 
born in Marion county, Virginia, May 12, 1849, daughter of Dr. Boaz 
Burris Cox and Drusilla (Price) Cox. Children: i. Olive, bom No- 
vember 4, 1867; married, September 19, 1891, John William Pepper 
and they have four children: Nellie, Chester, deceased; John, and 
Mary Frances. 2. Luther Calvin, born March 21, 1869; married, 
June 2, 1 89 1, Sally Swindler and they have two children: Luther C, 
married, July 4, 191 1, Margaret Reel; and James Gilbert; the father 
is a civil and mining engineer of Fairmont. 3. Drusilla J., born No- 
vember 30, 1 871; married, July 2, 1889, Charles B. Chancelor, and 
they have children: Bessie Arnett, Victor Fleming, Charles William, 
Nelson Benjamin, Jennette Emeline, Margaret, deceased; Norvall, 
Olive Estelle, Almira Drusilla. 4. Jennette E., bom May 13, 1882; 
married, October 20, 1906, Samuel Luper. 



The following is concerning three generations of the 
PARKES Parkes family, as now represented in Fairmont, West 
Virginia. Ireland was the original country from which 
this family emigrated. 

(I) James J. Parkes was a native of England. He became stew- 
ard of the New Hall Convent, near London, and remained there 
throughout his life, having served faithfully for sixty-five years in the 
same capacity and in the same convent. He married and reared a 
family of five sons and four daughters. 

(II) Thomas J., son of James J. Parkes, was the third boy born 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 571 

in the New Hall Convent, London, England, and emigrated to Amer- 
ica when about thirty years of age. He died in April, 191 1, and was 
buried in Pine Hill cemetery, Buffalo, New York. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Emily Leadbeater, died December 24, 1909, and 
was buried in the same cemetery. The family are Roman Catholic in 
their religious faith. Thomas J. Parkes followed the trade of black- 
smith for his livelihood after emigrating to this country. He and his 
wife were parents of five children, as follows: Maud, Alice, James J., 
Lucy, Enos. The family resided in Bradford, Pennsylvania, at one 
time. 

(Ill) James J. (2), son of Thomas J. and Emily (Leadbeater) 
Parkes, was born in Bradford, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1875. He was 
educated in his native city at St. Joseph's School, and when sixteen 
years of age commenced working out life's problems for himself; he 
being employed in the glass furnaces of Bradford, where he served as 
a "flatner." He followed this until 1898, then became manager of 
the Manhattan Hotel at Mannington, West Virginia, remained there 
until 1900, then removed to Fairmont and engaged in the restaurant 
business. In 191 1 he sold out and became proprietor of the Jackson 
Hotel of Fairmont. This is a well-known hotel and is up-to-date in its 
appointments, having hot and cold water in each of the numerous 
rooms, also bath accommodations. Everything is of the sanitary order 
about the entire premises. In this new role Mr. Parkes is succeeding 
in a remarkable degree. His hotel is situated next to the chief street in 
the city and is directly opposite the new opera house. Politically Mr. 
Parkes is an Independent, and in church faith a Catholic. 

He married, August 26, 1903, at Clarksburg, West Virginia, by 
Father O'Conner, Nellie McNally, bom in Salamanca, New York, 
December 26, 1876, daughter of Patrick and Hannah (White) Mc- 
Nally. Mr. McNally was a railroad inspector in Salamanca for more 
than forty years; he lost his life in the railroad yards of that city, while 
on duty, being caught between two cars and killed in the year 1894. 
His widow resides at the old homestead in Salamanca, New York, a 
well preserved lady. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Parkes: James J. Jr., 
born June 2, 1904; Charles France, July 26, 1906; Helen Madeline, 
December 1 1, 1907. 



572 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

But two generations have been known of this fam- 
JOHNSTON ily in America, except the children born of recent 

years to the second generation. John Johnston was 
a native of Tyrone county, Ireland, died at about the age of seventy- 
three years, in 1894. He came to America in 1853, first locating at 
Moorefield, Hardy county, West Virginia, but soon thereafter remov- 
ing to Petersburg, in the same county. There he spent the remainder 
of his days. He was a minister of the Presbyterian church at Peters- 
burg for more than forty years. He married, at Petersburg, in 1854, 
Sarah C. Welton, now living at Keyser, West Virginia, at the ripe old 
age of seventy-nine years. Her mind is bright and clear. Children: 
Joseph E., deceased; William S. ; Job Welton, of whom later; Mar- 
garet A., John E., Felix S., Henry F., Sally McCarty, all living in 
West Virginia. Mrs. Johnston had seven brothers in the confederate 
army, showing the family's loyalty to the southern cause. 

(II) Job Welton Johnston, M. D., son of John Johnston, the 
clergyman who emigrated from Ireland, was born in Petersburg, 
Hardy county, West Virginia, on the South Branch of the Potomac 
river, in what is now known as Grant county, West Virginia, March 9, 
1859. He attended the local public schools and later entered the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, Maryland, graduating 
in 1885. He then practiced medicine at Davis, West Virginia, for 
fifteen years, and in 1900 removed to Clarksburg where he has resided 
since. In March, 191 1, he moved into his present spacious and well- 
equipped offices at Nos. 301-302 Goflf Building. Dr. Johnston is a 
thorough-going and uncompromising Democrat, and takes an active 
part in politics. He was nominated for the state legislature from 
Tucker county, but declined the honor. He is a Mason, and is alive 
to every local interest of his town and state. He married, December 
21, 1887, Mary P. Bye, a native of Chester county, Pennsylvania, 
born in April, 1861. Her father, John Bye, died in 1869; he was a 
farmer; his wife was Sallie W. (Woolens) Bye, a native of Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, died 1889, aged about seventy-five years. Dr. 
Johnston and wife have children, two deceased and two living; the 
living are: Margarette, born August 2, 1897; Sarah E., June i, 1900. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 573 

This is an Ohio family of Scotch descent, of whom one 
BLACK member, James Morton Black, especially made a fine 

military record in the civil war, and in business enter- 
prises has been very successful. By intermarriage the family is con- 
nected with the Hamilton and Bogardus families who have been known 
for their patriotism in three wars, and have proven their executive abil- 
ity and business capabilities in more than one branch of trade. In 
church, as well as state, many of these three families have been a bless- 
ing to the world. 

(II) The first American member of the family was William (2), 
eldest son of William ( i ) Black, of Scotland. WiUiam (2) Black was 
born in Scotland, March 4, 18 17, and became a farmer in his native 
land. He emigrated to America when twenty-one years old and locat- 
ed on a farm at Brownsville, Licking county, Ohio. A few years after 
the civil war he removed to Malvern, Iowa, and engaged in the hard- 
ware trade. He died in the year 1900 and he and his wife, Martha 
( Reed) Black, were buried at Malvern. James Morton Black was one 
of their six children. 

(III) James Morton, son of William (2) Black, was born in 
Brownsville, Licking county, Ohio, December 18, 1846. He was 
educated in his native town, finishing at Concord College. When only 
sixteen years of age, he. enlisted in the Ninth Ohio Cavalry Regiment, 
and accompanied General Sherman on his "March to the Sea," serving 
his country almost two years, during which time he saw much hard 
fighting and general army service, on both marches and actual engage- 
ments. He was in General Kilpatrick's command. After his return 
from the army he engaged in farming in which he continued until 1 892, 
since which time he has been variously engaged. He now resides at 
Fairmont, West Virginia; is president of the Wall Plaster Company 
of that city. At Hanover, Licking county, Ohio, he was president of 
the school board many years, and assisted in securing the graded school 
there. He was also president of the Licking County Agricultural Soci- 
ety, and of the State Agricultural Society of Ohio, during the Centen- 
nial at Columbus. He has always been prominent in the work of the 
Presbyterian church. Politically he is a Republican. 

Mr. Black married (first) Mary Elizabeth Hamilton, bom at 
Brownsville, Ohio, in 1850, died September 7, 1880, in her native 



574 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

town, daughter of Robert Hamilton, of ThoroU, Lanarkshire, Scot- 
land, and his wife, Mary (Ibbotson) Hamilton, of Cornwall, Eng- 
land. The Hamiltons were the parents of eight children, four of their 
sons entering the civil war, and three were killed. Mrs. Hamilton was 
a remarkable woman, possessed a wonderful mind, and a kind Chris- 
tian spirit. She lived to the ripe old age of ninety-one years. Mr. 
Black married (second) Anna Bosworth McGaw, in 1882. She is a 
Daughter of the American Revolution, and assisted in organizing Will- 
iam Haymond Chapter, at Fairmont, West Virginia. Children of 
James Morton Black and his first wife: William Thomas, of whom fur- 
ther; Arthur R., resides at Port Clinton, Ohio, and is associated with 
the American Gypsum Company; married Gertrude, daughter of Hon. 
William Bense. Mr. Black's only daughter, Helen Dean, married 
J. R. Spease, and died February 19, 1906, without issue. 

(IV) William Thomas, eldest son of James Morton and Mary 
Elizabeth (Hamilton) Black, was born in Brownsville, Ohio, October 
19, 1 87 1. He obtained his education at the high school at Hanover, 
Ohio, and later at Dennison College in the same state. He then en- 
gaged in farming with his father. In 1890, with his father, he organ- 
ized the Dresden Rock Wall Plaster Company, in which business he 
continued ten years and then sold out. For the following four years 
he was employed at Mt. Vernon, Ohio, with the Cooper Corliss Engine 
Works. In April, 1 904, he removed to Fairmont, West Virginia, and 
joined in business with his father, James Morton Black, who establish- 
ed the Fairmont Wall Plaster Company in 1901, William T. Black 
becoming secretary of the concern. They now have a large business 
with an annual increase. Politically Mr. Black is a Republican, and 
in church faith a Presbyterian. While in college he became a member 
of the Beta Theta Pi order, and is a member of Mount Zion Lodge, 
No. 9, of the Masonic fraternity, at Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 

Mr. Black married, June 22, 1904, Belinda Bogardus, born in Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio, January 12, 1874, daughter of William Penn Bogardus, 
of Mt. Vernon, Ohio. She was educated at Harcourt Seminary, Gam- 
bier, Ohio, and was graduated from Wellesley College, Wellesley, 
Massachusetts. She Is a member of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. Her father, William Penn Bogardus, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, born August 26, 1841, and is now engaged In the hard- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 575 

ware trade at Mt. Vernon. He has always taken a very active interest 
in the National Retail Hardware Dealers Association and was several 
times reelected president of this organization. He enlisted In the 
union cause in 1864, as a soldier, and was a member of President Lin- 
coln's bodyguard, and later became a lieutenant in a colored regiment. 
He was stationed at Burkeville, Virginia, where he remained until his 
final discharge. He has long been a member of the local board of 
education, and has also served on the Mt. Vernon city council. Will- 
iam Penn Bogardus married Elizabeth Buckingham Sperry, a native 
of Thornville, Perry county, Ohio, born July 15, 1845, daughter of 
Jerrad and Belinda C. (Miles) Sperry. The great-great-grandfather, 
on the paternal side, was Benajah Fuller, who served as a private sol- 
dier in the revolutionary war. The great-great-grandfather on the 
maternal side, Benjamin Miles, was a captain in the same great war. 
After the close of that struggle. Captain Benjamin Miles removed his 
family with an ox team and cart from Massachusetts, locating in Mari- 
etta, Ohio, of which he was one of the founders. General Rufus Put- 
nam was associated with him in laying this first city in Ohio. Captain 
Miles died in Ohio in 1 8 1 7, and was buried in Belpre, that state. Chil- 
dren of William Thomas and Belinda (Bogardus) Black are: Mary 
Elizabeth, born April 3, 1906; William Bogardus, April 28, 1908. 



The Robinsons have been settled in England many 
ROBINSON centuries, and before that, as the name indicates, 

were of Norse origin. The head of the family in 
England is the Marquis of Ripon. Those Robinsons who came to 
Virginia in colonial times were from Yorkshire and claimed more or 
less relationship. 

John Robinson, who died at Cleasby in Yorkshire, 1661, was the 
father of John Robinson, minister to Sweden, bishop of London, etc. 
Another son, Christopher, came to Virginia in 1666. John Robinson, 
son of Christopher, was president of the council of Virginia, 1720-40, 
and for a time governor. President John had sons Christopher, Will- 
iam, Henry, John, etc. John was many years treasurer of the colony 
and speaker of the house of burgesses. When Washington was before 
the house and could not find words to reply to a vote of thanks, the 
speaker said "Sit down, Major Washington, your modesty is excelled 



576 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

only by your valor and that Is beyond the power of words to express." 
The genealogy of this family has been given quite fully in the mag- 
azine of the Virginia Historical Society. 

The line of Paul M. Robinson is John, Christopher, John, Will- 
iam, John, John C, John T., Joseph Lewis, Paul Monroe. 

(VI) John C. Robinson was an overseer for Dr. Robert Berkeley, 
near White Post, Clarke county, Virginia, 1818, after the Robinsons 
were Impoverished by the revolution and war of 1 812. A brother of 
Dr. Berkeley, Nelson Berkeley, of "Airewell," Hanover county, mar- 
ried Lucy Robinson, granddaughter of Henry Robinson, before men- 
tioned. 

(VII) John Thomas, son of John C. Robinson, was born In Han- 
over or Prince William county, Virginia, 1781. He married Eliza- 
beth Emerson, whose mother was a Flood. Their children were: 
William, Richard, Beverley W., Samuel and Joseph Lewis. 

(VIII) Joseph Lewis, son of John Thomas Robinson, was bom In 
Frederick county, Virginia, 1827. He came to Harrison county in 
1849. He was a shoemaker and merchant, sometime associated with 
E. W. Tinsman as TInsman & Robinson, and for many years conducted 
the principal shoe store in Clarksburg. He married Mary E. Waters, 
born February 25, 1829, in Montgomery county, Maryland. One 
child by this union, Paul Monroe; the mother died May 12, 1864. Of 
the parentage of Mary E. (Waters) Robinson it may be said that she 
was the daughter of Edward B. and Lucretia (Gardner) Waters. The 
Waters family is numerous and has been of some prominence in Fred- 
erick and Montgomery counties, Maryland, since the formation of the 
counties. The parents of Mary E. Waters both died when she was a 
child and she was reared by her uncle, James Waters, of Frederick 
county, Maryland. 

(IX) Paul Monroe, son of Joseph Lewis and Mary E. (Waters) 
Robinson, was born at Clarksburg, West Virginia, October 20, 1863. 
He was reared by his aunt, Annie (Waters) Monroe, wife of James 
Monroe, who was sheriff of Harrison county In 1869; also in 1872- 
76. Mr. Monroe was clerk of the county court, 1878-90. He re- 
ceived his education at the Clarksburg public schools. His active 
career has been made up of the following positions of importance and 
public and private trust: Treasurer of the Monongahela River Rail- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 577 

road Company, 1890-91 ; cashier of Traders' National Bank of Buck- 
hannon, 1891-92; cashier of West Union Bank, West Union, West 
Virginia, 1893-1900; vice-president of Traders' National Bank, Clarks- 
burg, 1904; vice-president of Union National Bank, Clarksburg, 1905, 
still serving; president of Clarksburg Realty Company; vice-president 
of Clarksburg Ice and Storage Company; director of Travis Glass 
Company. Politically he votes the Democratic ticket; has been deputy 
clerk of the county court of Harrison county, 1880-87; clerk of the cir- 
cuit court of Harrison county, 1887-88. He is now actively employed 
as vice-president and director of the Union National Bank of Clarks- 
burg. He married, at Clarksburg, November 12, 1901, Willa Jarvis, 
bom in Harrison county. West Virginia, September 14, 1864, daugh- 
ter of Lemuel Davisson and Martha (McCann) Jarvis. Mr. Jarvis 
was a farmer, cattle dealer and sheriff of Harrison county from 1876 
to 1880. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson: Janet, born January 
4, 1903; Paul Monroe, October 11, 1904; Jarvis Beverley, August 
26, 1908. 



Jesse S. Maloy, a progressive and enterprising citizen of 
MALOY Shinnston, who has recently completed one of the finest 
and most costly residences there, was born in Highland 
county, Virginia, March 12, 1873. 

(I) Patrick Maloy, father of Jesse S. Maloy, was a native of Ros- 
common county, Ireland, from whence he emigrated to the United 
States in young manhood. He devoted his attention to agricultural 
pursuits and also to that of teacher, serving in the latter capacity In the 
schools of Highland county, Virginia. He married Susan Jane Lane, 
bom and reared in Highland county, Virginia, daughter of Joseph 
Lane, who was a native of eastern Virginia. Patrick Maloy died Au- 
gust 28, 1893, ^^ McDowell, Highland county, Virginia, aged seventy- 
eight years. 

(II) Jesse S., son of Patrick Maloy, attended the public schools of 
Highland and later the Shenandoah Normal School, after which he 
matriculated at the Medical College of Virginia, located at Richmond, 
from which institution he graduated in 1898. He began the practice 
of his profession in Lorentz, Upshur county, West Virginia, where he 



578 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

remained two years, gaining for himself a wider knowledge of his call- 
ing, and in 1903 removed to Shinnston, where he has since remained, 
being recognized as one of the leading practitioners. As a citizen he 
is universally esteemed, always sustaining the character of a true man, 
and his professional transactions are conducted on the principles of 
strict integrity, he fulfilling to the letter every trust committed to him. 
He adheres to the tenets of the Presbyterian church, gives his political 
allegiance to the candidates of the Democratic party, and is a stock- 
holder in the Farmers' National Bank of Shinnston. He is a member 
of Harrison County Medical Society, the State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association. He is a member of St. John's 
Lodge, No. 24, Free and Accepted Masons; Orient Chapter, No. 9, 
Royal Arch Masons; Crusade Commandery, No. 6, Royal and Select 
Masters; Wheeling Consistory, No. i, Knights Templar; Osiris 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Maloy married, at Fairmont, February 28, 191 1, Gertrude 
Wyckoff, then of Fairmont, but born and reared at Pruntytown, daugh- 
ter of Claude Wyckoff, a resident of Pruntytown. 



West Virginia is naturally filled up largely with 
SOUTHERN people who emigrated from Old Virginia, or who 

resided in what since 1863 has been known as West 
Virginia, long before the war of 1812 and the civil conflict of 1861-65. 
This family originally resided in Old Virginia. 

(I) Samuel Southern, born February, 1804, died February 18, 
1878. He lived in eastern Virginia — over the mountains — and was 
the first man to plant out a nursery in what is now West Virginia, now 
so famous for its excellent fruit, especially fine varieties of apples. He 
immigrated to Harrison county early in the nineteenth century. He 
married and reared a family, including a son named John, of whom 
further. 

(II) John, son of Samuel Southern, was born in 1829, died at the 
age of thirty years, in 1859. He followed farming which has usually 
been the vocation of the Southern family. He married Edith Ann 
Heanstead, who lives at the age of seventy-five years. Their children 
were : Annetta, James R., George C, Lora Belle, the last two the only 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 579 

ones living. Mrs. Southern's father was Robert Heanstead and her 
mother, Elizabeth (Corbin) Heanstead; they were farmers of Harri- 
son county, Virginia. 

(Ill) George Cornelius, son of John and Edith Ann (Heanstead) 
Southern, was born August 6, 1857, on Coons Run, Harrison county, 
Virginia. After receiving a common school training, at the age of 
twenty years, in March, 1878, he began in the mercantile business in 
Clarksburg. August 12, 1879, he established a meat market, continu- 
ing until November 20, 1886, and in 1890 began to operate in the real 
estate business, which he still pursues successfully under the name of 
Southern & Southern, his son, John C, being associated with him. 
They also conduct a sand bank enterprise, by which an excellent grade 
of building sand is shipped. He is a stockholder in the Clarksburg 
Window Glass factory, at Adamson. He is a director in the West 
Virginia Central Agricultural and Mechanical Society. Politically he 
is a Republican. He held the office of justice of the peace one term in 
1892 and was mayor of Adamson three terms, and is called the "father 
of Adamson." He moved from Clarksburg to Adamson in March, 
1886, and while at Adamson did more than any other man towards 
its upbuilding; he aided in securing its charter, October 3, 1903. In 
1891-92 he was appointed commissioner of lands of lower assessment, 
district of Harrison county, and in all his appraisals he was reversed in 
only two or three cases. 

He married, December 23, 1883, in Harrison county. West Vir- 
ginia, Elizabeth C. Gaines, born in Harrison county, March i, 1857, 
daughter of Eli Gaines, who was a native of the county, and a farmer, 
as well as a local Baptist minister. He died in 1891, aged seventy 
years. The wife and mother was Martha (Morrison) Gaines, who 
died before her husband. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Southern 
is John Cornelius, bom October 17, 1884, and is now an active member 
of the firm of Southern & Southern, also attorney-at-law, office in the 
Goff Building. He married, October 2, 1909, Ida Jackson Gerst, of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and they have one son, John C. 



580 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Charles Fletcher Lucas, actively and prominently identi- 
LUCAS fied with the varied interests of Shinnston, in the vicinity 

of which city he has spent his entire lifetime, was born in 
Harrison county, West Virginia, one mile from Shinnston, June 14, 
1868. 

(I) George R. Lucas, grandfather of Charles Fletcher Lucas, was 
born in the vicinity of Baltimore, Maryland, September 26, 1806, died 
December 5, 1892. In 1818, at the age of twelve years, he removed 
from his native state to what is now West Virginia, where he spent the 
remainder of his days. He followed the tilling of the soil, his opera- 
tions proving both successful and remunerative, and in addition to this 
raised considerable cattle for the market, being assisted by his three 
sons, continuing this business up to the time of his death, after which 
the sons conducted it for many years. He was a man of ability and 
enterprise, honest and conscientious in his dealings, and therefore was 
respected and honored in the community. In 1830 he married Amelia 
Rogers, who bore him three sons and four daughters. Among the sons 
was James E., see forward. 

(II) James E. Lucas, father of Charles Fletcher Lucas, was born 
July 26, 1 84 1, living at the present time (1911) in Shinnston. He 
was reared and educated in his native state, now West Virginia, and 
was interested with his father and brothers in business for many years, 
now engaged in the milling business with his son, Charles Fletcher 
Lucas, under the style of C. F. & J. E. Lucas, the mill being one of the 
leading industries of that section. During the civil war he was em- 
ployed as teamster by the union army, serving as such throughout the 
entire period of that great conflict. His life has been one of useful- 
ness and activity, and the success he has attained is attributable to the 
sterling qualities which he possesses, sound judgment, quick perception, 
activity and integrity. He married (first) Minerva, daughter of John 
Chalfant, of Harrison county, West Virginia. She died in 1869. He 
married (second) Virginia Robinson. 

(III) Charles Fletcher Lucas was reared on the farm where his 
birth occurred, received a practical education in the local schools of 
Shinnston, and his business experience was first gained in a saw mill 
at West Shinnston, where he was employed for many years. In 1902, 
under the firm name of C. F. & J. E. Lucas, his father and he, as part- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 581 

ners, purchased the flour mill in Shinnston, this mill being the only one 
in the valley between Fairmont and Clarksburg, remodelled the same 
and installed new machinery, making it one of the most completely 
equipped for that line of work in the county, and are now in receipt of 
an extensive and lucrative trade. He is the vice-president of the 
Clarksburg Automobile Company, is a director of the Opera House 
Company of Shinnston, also of the banks of that city, in both of which 
he is a large stockholder, and a stockholder in the gas and water com- 
panies of Shinnston. He takes an active interest in all that pertains to 
the welfare of Harrison county, and ranks among the substantial and 
influential men of his community. 

Mr. Lucas married, May 8, 1902, Sarah Marie, born January 22, 
1875, daughter of Van B. Fowler, of Pittsburgh, a paper manufac- 
turer of that city. Children: William Edward, born March 10, 1903; 
Van Buren, born January 17, 1907. 



Among the progressive and enterprising citizens of 
HAWKINS the Monongahela Valley, resident in Shinnston, is 

Lawrence E. Hawkins, whose birth occurred in Man- 
nington, Marion county. West Virginia, October 28, 1874, son of 
Abraham and Sarah M. (Haught) Hawkins, the former of whom is 
a resident of Marion county, engaged in the plumbing business at Man- 
nington. 

Lawrence Elbert Hawkins obtained a practical education in the 
public schools of his native place, and at the age of fifteen years began 
his active career in mercantile business at Mannington, continuing along 
that line until he attained the age of twenty-five. He then entered the 
employ of the First National Bank at Mannington in the capacity of 
bookkeeper, and later was appointed cashier of the Bank of Farming- 
ton, West Virginia, remaining for a short period of time. In 1905 he 
took up his residence in Shinnston, and at once accepted the cashiership 
of the Farmers' Bank of that place, which office he is filling at the pres- 
ent time ( 191 1 ) to the satisfaction of all concerned. He is a man of 
influence in the community, public-spirited and faithful to all trusts com- 
mitted to him. He is a stockholder in the local Opera House, having 
been one of the originators of the plan, a stockholder in the Gas & 
Water Company, owner of several lots and a house in connection with 



582 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

C. A. Short, and also owner of his own residence located on Station 
street. Mr. Hawkins and his family attend the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which they take an active and keen interest. In politics he 
is a Democrat, and holds membership in Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, being a member of Orient Chapter, No. 9, of Fairmont, West 
Virginia; Clarksburg Commandery, No. 13, Knights Templar, of 
Clarksburg, West Virginia; and the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Hawkins married, June 5, 1906, at Shinnston, West Virginia, 
Estelle Fleming, born in Shinnston, August 25, 1873, daughter of 
William H. and Mary C. (Morris) Fleming. Child, Lawrence Flem- 
ing, born February 19, 1909, at Shinnston. 



This is one of the many families that emigrated from 
SHORT Pennsylvania to West Virginia, and whose coming add- 
ed to the sturdy settlement at a time when active, honor- 
able men and true-hearted women were in great demand as state 
builders, and this family bore well its part in the development of 
this country along the waters of the Monongahela river. 

( I ) Samuel Short was born in 1 807, near Brockton, Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, died August 18, 1865. By occupation he was a steam- 
boat carpenter, but later in life became a farmer. He moved to Harri- 
son county, Virginia, in 1847. He married Elizabeth Everson, who 
died March 14, 1850; she was a native of Pennsylvania. 

(II) John, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Everson) Short, was 
born June 18, 1836, died December 17, 1864, being killed while on 
duty on a farm on Laurel Run by northern soldiers; it was no more 
nor less than a cold-blooded murder. He was a farmer, residing on his 
farm four miles from Shinnston, West Virginia. He married Mary 
Ellen Tetrick, born in 1838, died August 30, 1876. Children: i. 
Samantha Jane, born December 23, 1861, wife of Robert R. Hardesty; 
they have two children, Blanche Opel and Guy Ashby. 2. Charles 
Ashby, see forward. 

(III) Charles Ashby, son of John and Mary E. (Tetrick) Short, 
was born October 22, 1863, in Clay district, Harrison county. West 
Virginia. He there obtained a fair common school education, after 
which he learned the carpenter's trade and followed it for twenty-nine 
years, and has been a successful contractor for twenty-three of these 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 583 

years. He is one of the directors in the Farmers' Bank at Shinnston, 
having been connected with the bank, since he leased the building 
in which it was first kept. Politically he votes the Democratic ticket 
and was a candidate for commissioner and sheriff, but was defeated. 
He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He dates his 
coming to Shinnston from March 24, 1883, and has had the largest 
business as a carpenter and builder in this section of the country. He 
built the college building at Salem, West Virginia; the public school 
building at Adamson; one at Clarksburg, other buildings at Wilsons- 
burg and Enterprise, and was the architect of the new school house at 
Shinnston, and a large number of residences at Shinnston and other 
towns. In his church relations Mr. Short is of the Methodist Prot- 
estant denomination and he is an officer in this church, having served 
as such for upwards of a quarter of a century. 

He married, March 26, 1892, Minnie M. Smith, born near 
Meadowbrook in 1872, daughter of Jefferson Johnson and Emily 
Margarette (Hoff) Smith. Children: John Jefferson, died aged 
five years; Zilla Grace, born January 18, 1898; George Ashby, bom 
April 18, 1904. The Smith family descends from the Aaron Smith 
stock, related to James Madison and Patrick Henry. Elias Smith, 
grandfather of Mrs. Short, was bom in Harrison county, Virginia, 
September 11, 1798, died Febmary 19, 1880. He was the son of 
Aaron Smith, who came from the east about 1780. Elias Smith mar- 
ried Mary A. Johnson, born February 14, 1802, came to Harrison 
county, in 1816, died February 5, 1890. Jefferson Johnson Smith was 
bom March 13, 1827, died October 9, 1892; his wife died February 
i3i 1903- Mrs. Short's grandfather on her mother's side was Samuel 
Hoff, born in Pendleton county. West Virginia, came to Harrison 
county, when two years of age; the date of his birth was October 2, 
1802. He married Catherine Fans, born August 19, 1806, in Harri- 
son county, Virginia, and died March 17, 1872. 



Three generations or more of this Price family resided in 
PRICE Lowell, Ohio, and that vicinity, but finally members of 
the same removed to Clarksburg, West Virginia. 
(I) John Price, grandfather of Dr. Price, the dentist of Clarks- 
burg, lived and died near Lowell, Ohio; he was by occupation a farmer 
and he married and reared a family, including a son Sanderson. 



584 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(II) Sanderson, son of John Price, was born in 1833, in Lowell, 
Ohio, died in 1902. He was a contractor, and resided all his life in 
Lowell. He was an active Republican and was of the Congregational 
church faith. He married Charlotte Lucinda Fleck, bom December 
23, 1842, at Lowell, Ohio, and is now living at Clarksburg, West Vir- 
ginia, with her son, John E. Children, four sons and four daughters, 
four of the eight being now deceased. The living are : Helen A., born 
1 86 1, now conducting a millinery store at Clarksburg, lives with her 
brother, John E.; Blanche E. and Warren McGee (twins), born 1874, 
reside at Crystal, Idaho, where Warren McGee is a ranchman; John 
Everette, born 1881, see forward. George Fleck, father of Charlotte 
L. (Fleck) Price, was born and died near Lowell, Ohio; he was a 
cattle man and an extensive farmer in that section of Ohio; also served 
as a justice of the peace. 

(III) John Everette Price, D. D. S., youngest child of Sanderson 
and Charlotte Lucinda (Fleck) Price, was born at Belpre, Washing- 
ton county, Ohio, December 5, 1881. He graduated from the high 
school of his native place in 1897, after which he went to Parkersburg, 
West Virginia, for the purpose of studying dentistry. He remained 
one year with Dr. Minx. He entered the Ohio Dental College of Cin- 
cinnati, in 1900, graduated in 1903, and began his practice at Macks- 
burg, Ohio, where he continued until August, 1905, when he removed 
to Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he now has a lucrative dental 
practice, with offices, well situated, in the Odd Fellow's building. Polit- 
ically he is a Republican, and in church faith a Presbyterian, belonging 
to the First Church. He is identified with the Woodmen of the World, 
a fraternal insurance society. 



This is a family that emigrated from Switzerland 
KESSLER about a half century ago and located in Maryland. 
The grandfather of Dr. Kessler, of Clarksburg, with 
his family, consisting of wife and one son, came to this country to better 
their circumstances, but unfortunately the Swiss emigrant did not live 
long after arriving in America. For the purpose of this article he will 
be known as representing generation (I) of the family now to be con- 
sidered. 

(II) Peter Kessler, only child of the emigrant Kessler, was born 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 585 

in Switzerland, and was but a small boy when the family emigrated to 
America from their native land. He married Kate Merryman, still 
living in Baltimore county, Maryland, aged seventy-one years, daugh- 
ter of John Merryman, who was a miller in Baltimore county, Mary- 
land. Peter Kessler lives at Butler, Maryland, and is by occupation 
a canner and farmer, and is the same age as his wife. His has been 
an industrious life, and he has given his family the best possible chance 
of obtaining an education suitable to his means and the times in which 
he has lived. 

(Ill) Dr. Calvin Merryman Kessler, son of Peter and Kate 
(Merryman) Kessler, was born at Butler, Maryland, January 27, 
1880. He attended the local schools of his native county, entered 
Maryland Medical College at Baltimore, Maryland, in 1906, coming 
to Gassaway, Paxton county, West Virginia, where he remained until 
19 10, then relocated at Clarlcsburg, his offices being situated in the new 
Gore building. Politically he votes the Democratic ticket, and is a 
member of Knights of Pythias fraternity and the Elks order. While 
the family are of the Baptist church faith, he and his family usually 
attend the Methodist church at Clarksburg. The practice that he has 
built up in two years at Clarksburg is indeed remarkable, and only 
shows that the modern medical education is far superior to that of the 
long-ago-years. 

He married, at Clarksburg, August 17, 1909, Caroline Cole, a 
native of Clarksburg, West Virginia, daughter of William L. Cole, 
retired. He was an extensive coal dealer, and Is a native of Washing- 
ton, D. C, coming to Harrison county, West Virginia, when a mere 
lad. He worked at the butcher's trade for the union army during the 
civil war. He married Mary A. Peck, a native of Clarksburg, and Is 
still living. 



Pennsylvania was the former home state of this 
RUMBAUGH family, now represented in West Virginia. (I) 
Simeon Rumbaugh was born in East Brady, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1825, died aged seventy-four years. In 1899. He was a 
lumberman nearly all of his active life. He married and had a son 
John, see forward. 

(II) John, son of Simeon Rumbaugh, was also born in East 



586 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Brady, Pennsylvania, the date of his birth being 185 i. He now has 
charge of the South Penn Oil Company's business in the north part of 
West Virginia. He is politically a Democrat, and in religious faith is 
of the Methodist denomination. He married Anna M. Thompson. 
Children: Roy Duffy, see forward; Guy Neely, now of Shinnston, 
West Virginia. 

(Ill) Roy Duffy Rumbaugh, D. D. S., son of John and Anna M. 
(Thompson) Rumbaugh, was born at Bradford, Pennsylvania, De- 
cember 16, 1884. He attended the Pittsburgh high schools, from 
which he graduated in 1904, when he entered Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege and from that institution to the University of Pittsburgh, from 
which he graduated in 1909. He took a thorough course in dental 
surgery and located at Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he now has 
offices in the Emoire building. His practice is already regarded by his 
fellow dentists as being remarkable, and he has all the work possible 
for him to attend to. Politically he is an independent voter. He be- 
longs to the Masonic order; Psi Omega and the Theta Psi, college fra- 
ternities. Having provided himself with all necessary modern office 
equipment, and being a thorough master of his profession in which he 
takes great interest, he cannot fail of holding a large and lucrative 
dental practice at Clarksburg. 



A man whose force of character and business ability 
BENTLEY would make him a leader in any community is Sam- 
uel Richard Bentley, of Clarksburg, West Virginia, 
agent for the New York Life Insurance Company. Mr. Bentley has 
been for a dozen years a resident of Clarksburg and is prominently 
identified with its best interests. 

(I) John Bentley, the first of the line, was born in England and 
there spent his entire life engaged, as his father had been before him, 
in the woolen mill business. At the time of his death Mr. Bentley was 
a man of middle age. 

(II) Joseph, son of John Bentley, was born in Bradford, York- 
shire, England. As a young man he emigrated with his wife to the 
United States, settling at Jacksonville, Illinois. Throughout the active 
years of his life he was engaged, like his father and grandfather, in 
the woolen mill business. His wife, Jane Brown, is also a native of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 587 

England, and the following children have been born to them: Albert 
W., of Hamilton, Kansas, editor and proprietor of the Hamilton Grit; 
James, died in Infancy; a daughter, also died in infancy; and Samuel 
Richard, mentioned below. In June, 1899, Mr. and Mrs. Bentley 
came to Clarksburg, where they have since resided, Mr. Bentley is now 
seventy years old and has retired from business. 

(Ill) Samuel Richard, son of Joseph and Jane (Brown) Bentley, 
was born November 12, 1877, in Spencersburg, Missouri. He was but 
two years old when his parents moved to Warsaw, Illinois. It was in 
the public schools of that place that he received his education, and as a 
boy he was employed by the J. C. Geitz Furniture Company of St. 
Louis, Missouri. He possessed no small share of histrionic ability, and 
on reaching manhood studied elocution, afterward reading for two 
seasons in the Mozart Symphony Club of Des Moines. In 1899 he 
went to Pittsburgh and joined the Grand Opera House Stock. Company 
of that city, appearing, during the time he remained with them, in com- 
pany with some of the leading dramatic artists of the United States. 
In November, 1899, he came to Clarksburg and associated himself as 
traveling salesman with the Ruhl-Koblegard Company, wholesale gro- 
cers, retaining the position until December, 1903, when the company 
retired from business. It was during this period that his remarkable 
business abilities were first manifested, rendering the connection so thor- 
oughly satisfactory to his employers, that Mr. Koblegard took the 
young man on a European trip in recognition of his valuable services. 

In June, 1904, Mr. Bentley established his present agency for the 
New York Life Insurance Company, in the conduct of which he has 
been singularly successful. Owing to his discretion and foresight in 
selling insurance very few of his policies lapse, and a number of his 
clients place their insurance with him year after year without any solici- 
tation, the majority of his policies being on the lives of bankers, law- 
yers and business men. He holds the position of leader for February, 
191 1, being entitled to the honor of having produced the largest 
volume of business for that month and year. Since the date of his 
identification with the company Mr. Bentley has each year qualified as 
a member of the One Hundred Thousand Dollar Club. In politics 
Mr. Bentley is a Republican, but has never taken active part in public 
affairs, preferring to concentrate his energies on his business. He be- 



588 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

longs to the United Commercial Travellers' Association, A man of 
fine appearance and genial nature, he is a popular member of the local 
lodge of Elks with which he affiliates and in which he holds the rank of 
past exalted ruler. 



Among the successful business men of Shinnston, whose 
LOWE success has not been achieved solely from mere activity, 
perseverance, and judicious action, but personal virtue, 
combined with these, may be mentioned Orville L. Lowe, born near 
Clarksburg, Harrison county, West Virginia, August 29, 1863, on his 
father's farm. He is a son of John and Hattie (Higginbotham) 
Lowe, natives of Harrison county, West Virginia. 

Orville L.Lowe obtained an excellent rudimentary education in the 
schools of the vicinity, and upon the completion of his studies assisted 
his father with the duties of the farm, remaining until he attained his 
twenty-sixth year. He then took up his residence in Shinnston and for 
one year was engaged in the hardware business, after which he estab- 
lished his present business, that of livery, and has conducted it success- 
fully for twenty-one years. He has presented in his quiet and unob- 
trusive way a phase of successful business Hfe which we do not often 
see, one that illustrates the fundamental principles of a true life, what- 
ever the forms its enterprise assumes. He holds membership in the 
Baptist church, casts his vote for the candidates of the Democratic 
party, and is a stockholder in the Farmers' National Bank of Shinns- 
ton. Mr. Lowe is the owner of three hundred and fifty-five acres 
located one and a half miles southeast of Shinnston, and also owns one 
of the finest residences in Shinnston, just completed, situated on a bluff 
overlooking the entire city, whereby a magnificent view is obtained. 

Mr. Lowe married. In Shinnston, November 13, 1889, Virginia 
Shinn, a native of Shinnston, born In February, 1867, daughter of 
David Mahlon and Rebecca (Fleming) Shinn, the former of whom 
was born in Shinnston, was a farmer and tlmberman, and died about 
the year 1906. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Lowe: Esther, born April 
18, 1 891; Robert, August 10, 1897; David, March 10, 1900. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 589 

One of the leading members of the dental profession in 
ELDER the Monongahela Valley is Dr. John Andrew Elder, 
who enjoys the distinction of being the oldest (in point 
of service) dentist in Shinnston, whose success in his chosen calling has 
been the result of activity, perseverance and a thorough knowledge ot 
the work to which he has devoted himself. He was born in Taylor 
county, West Virginia, April 23, 1876, son of George Washington 
and Mary (Hertzog) Elder, natives of Taylor county, and grandson 
of John Rilery Elder, whose birth occurred in Taylor county, and 
whose death occurred in the year 19 10. George Washington Elder, 
now residing in the vicinity of Boothsville, Harrison county, devotes 
his attention to agricultural pursuits. During the civil war he served 
in the capacity of teamster for the union army, remaining throughout 
the entire period. 

Dr. John Andrew Elder attended the local schools and the knowl- 
edge thus obtained was supplemented by attendance at the Normal 
School at Fairmont. After completing his studies he turned his atten- 
tion to the profession of teaching, and was employed for three years 
in the public schools of Taylor county, achieving a certain degree of 
success along that line. He then began the study of dentistry, pursuing 
his studies in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland. He 
took up his residence in Shinnston, West Virginia, October 14, 1901, 
and at once engaged in active practice, which has steadily increased in 
volume and importance during the intervening years. He resides on 
the west side of Shinnston, being the owner of the property, and being 
public-spirited to the highest degree, is ever forward in promoting 
every project which has for its object the welfare of the city and the 
community in which he has made his home. He is a stockholder in the 
First National Bank of Shinnston, a Baptist in religion, a Democrat in 
politics, and a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Dr. Elder married in Taylor county, West Virginia, October i, 
1902, Stella Stark, a native of Taylor county, bom February 26, 1882, 
daughter of H. L. and Mary (Scranage) Stark; the former of whom 
is a farmer of Taylor county, residing north of Flemington. Chil- 
dren of Dr. and Mrs. Elder: Grace Ernestine, born October 23, 1903; 
Mary Gladys, August 8, 1907. 



590 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

The following genealogical narrative will treat of 
COFFMAN three generations of the Coffman family, of West 

Virginia, the several heads of these generations being 
George W., the grandfather, died in 1869; Truman James, born 1848; 
Ira Wade, born 1877, now of Clarksburg, where he is clerk of the cir- 
cuit court in and for Harrison county. 

(I) George W. Coffman was born and lived in the upper portion 
of Harrison county. West Virginia, all his life, dying in 1869. He 
was a farmer throughout his entire life. Also followed teaming at 
times with considerable profit. 

(II) Truman James, son of George W. Coffman, was born at 
Salem, West Virginia, February 21, 1848. He was reared and edu- 
cated there and became a merchant. He still resides at Salem, near 
where he was born. He married Emma Meredith, born near Salem, 
April 13, 1853. Children: Harriet Lurenna, died in infancy; Clarence 
W., bom January, 1871, now living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Pittsburgh Machine and Tool Company; 
Ira W., of whom presenriy. Mrs. Coffman's father, William Mere- 
dith, was born in Marion county. West Virginia, where he resided all 
his life. He was a carpenter and contractor and erected many houses 
in his section of West Virginia. He died in 1909, aged about eighty 
years. 

(III) Ira Wade, son of Truman James and Emma (Meredith) 
Coffman, was born November 24, 1877, on his father's farm, near 
Bristol, Harrison county. West Virginia. He attended the local pub- 
lic schools at Bristol, after which he attended the Salem College. Hav- 
ing fitted himself for a successful business man, he went Into trade with 
his father in a general store, and later a feed store enterprise, which 
he carried on about nine years, then went to Salem and purchased the 
Salem Herald, which local newspaper he conducted as a Republican 
organ, full of Interesting local and political news. Two and a half 
years later he went to Clarksburg, January i, 1909, having been elect- 
ed to the office of clerk of the circuit court, while still publishing his 
paper at Salem. Politically he has ever been a Republican. He Is a 
member of the local Elks lodge and Is also a member of the Masonic 
fraternity. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. He mar- 
ried, November 21, 1901, Sadie Williams, born in 1881, a native of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 591 

Salem, West Virginia, daughter of John Williams. Her father is now 
a farmer of Bridgeport, but is a native of Salem. The mother's maiden 
name was Martha Davidson; she is still living. Children: Mildred 
Louise, born in 1902; Myron Truman, 1904; Helen Virginia, 1907; 
Clarence William, 1909. 



Luther H. Coffman, an extensive and prosperous 
COFFMAN farmer of Shinnston, and one of the public-spirited 

and enterprising citizens of his section of the county, 
was born in Harrison county, now West Virginia, April 29, 1859, son 
of John G. Coffman and grandson of Henry Coffman. 

(I) Henry Coffman, was bom in 1785, died November 12, 1862. 
He was a man of honor and integrity, and took a deep interest in all 
movements for the material development of the section wherein he 
resided. He married Elizabeth Robinson, born in 1778, died August 
19, 1855, daughter of Captain Benjamin Robinson. Among their chil- 
dren was John G., see forward. 

(II) John G., son of Henry Coffman, was born in the state of 
Pennsylvania, whither his parents removed at an early day, when 
the land was still in a state of wilderness, and his death occurred in 
1892, at the age of seventy-seven years. He located in the state of 
West Virginia in the early part of its existence as a state, cleared and 
cultivated the land on which he resided for many years, and ranked 
among the prominent men of the community. He married Achsah, 
daughter of Stringer and Eleanor (Stringer) Boggess, and her death 
occurred in 1900 at the age of eighty years. Children: Alonzo P., 
Benjamin F., John M., Theophilus, Frederick W., Francis M., Jesse 
F., Elizabeth E., Jasper N., Elmore L., Luther H., James T., George 
B. and Charles T., ten of whom are deceased. 

(III) Luther H., son of John G. Coffman, was reared and edu- 
cated in his native county. Being accustomed to farm duties he chose 
that line of work for his active career, in which he has been highly suc- 
cessful, owing to his habits of industry and thrift, coupled with pru- 
dence and forethought, characteristics which go far toward making a 
success of any undertaking. He is the owner of two hundred and fif- 
teen acres of productive land located at Robinson's Run, which is now 
in a state of high cultivation and which he conducts in an able and 



592 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

scientific manner, reaping large returns from labor expended. He is 
also the owner of twenty acres In West Shinnston, in the vicinity of his 
home, which is also under cultivation and highly productive. He took, 
up his residence in Shinnston, November 6, 1902, and later erected his 
present residence. Being a man of influence in the community, he was 
chosen to serve in the directorate of the Shinnston Gas Company and 
the Opera House Company of Shinnston. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist church, a Republican In politics, and affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 16, Shinnston, West Virginia, also 
Encampment, No. 170. 

Mr. Coffman married, In Harrison county, West Virginia, Novem- 
ber 6, 1884, Ida L. Cunningham, born January 4, 1866, daughter of 
Frederick W. and Emily J. (Mason) Cunningham, of Harrison 
county. West Virginia. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham, all 
of whom are living at the present time ( 191 1 ) : Ida L., Allie, Chester, 
Howard, Willard, Gilmore and Byron. Mr. and Mrs. Coffman have 
one child, Dessie Dawn, resides at home. 



Among the enterprising, progressive and prosper- 
ANDERSON ous agriculturists of the Monongahela Valley may 

be mentioned Benjamin Franklin Anderson, born 
on his father's farm, four miles southeast of Boozeville, now West 
Virginia, September 16, 1847, son of Robert R. and Julia (Hill) An- 
derson, the former of whom was a farmer, a soldier in the union army, 
died about the year 1906, and the latter a native of Marion county, 
now West Virginia. 

(II) Benjamin Franklin Anderson deserves especial credit for the 
success he has attained In his active career from the fact that it Is assert- 
ed that he was self-educated. His first occupation was that of farming, 
along which line he worked up to 1875, when he disposed of his farm 
and removed to Shinnston, where he worked at the trade of shoemaker 
for twenty-seven years, then turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, 
continuing for a period of eight years, conducting a general store at 
Shinnston, after which he returned to his first occupation, that of farm- 
ing, owning two farms, one of thirty-five acres one mile east of Shinns- 
ton, one of one hundred and fifty acres, and in addition to this a lot and 
two houses In Shinnston, one of which is a business block, a large red 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 593 

brick structure, he and his family occupying the upper part for their 
residence. Mr. Anderson has gained the esteem and confidence of his 
fellow townsmen, and was chosen by them to act in the capacity of 
mayor of Shinnston in 1902, being the Republican candidate. His love 
of country was so great that he offered his services in her behalf, act- 
ing as a private in the union army during the civil war, and now is in 
receipt of a pension from the United States government. He holds 
membership in The Saints of God Church. 

Mr. Anderson married (first), March 17, 1867, in Marion county, 
West Virginia, Julia Jackson, who died in 1875. Married (second), 
about 1878, Rockey Jackson, sister of his first wife. Children of first 
wife: George Washington, see forward; Benjamin, born May, 1871. 
Children of second wife: Boyd, Laura, Arthur, Frank, Rachel, all of 
whom are living at the present time ( 191 1 ) . 

(Ill) George Washington, son of Benjamin Franklin and Julia 
(Jackson) Anderson, was born in Marion, West Virginia, June 28, 
1869. He obtained a practical education in the local schools, then 
learned the trade of shoemaking, which he followed for nearly two 
decades in Shinnston, and since then has been engaged in farming, con- 
ducting his operations on a fine farm of one hundred and eight acres, 
located two miles east of Shinnston. He was formerly the owner of a 
farm where oil was struck, but he disposed of this to good advantage, 
still retaining an interest in the oil, from which he derives a goodly 
income. He is progressive in his methods, careful and painstaking in 
his labors, and his entire property clearly demonstrates this fact. He 
is a Baptist in religion, a Republican in politics, and a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. He married, at Shinnston, December, 1886, 
Minnie Ogden, born near Worthington, Marion county. West Vir- 
ginia, daughter of Jonathan and Rachel (Nay) Ogden, residents of 
Harrison county, the former of whom died about the year 1896. Chil- 
dren : Georgia and Delpha. 



Charles Harry Higinbotham, of Shinnston, 

HIGINBOTHAM was born in Fairmont, Marion county, West 

Virginia, February 17, 1873, son of Charles 

and Ellen (Roach) Higinbotham, the former of whom was born at 



594 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Fairmont, died about the year 1907, served as supervisor of construc- 
tion work on the railroad, as mayor of Fairmont, and was employed in 
the war department at Washington, D. C, under President Harrison. 

Charles H. Higinbotham attended the public schools of Fairmont 
and the Fairmont Normal School, and entered upon his active career in 
the treasury department at Washington, D. C, remaining about three 
years. The following three years he was employed with the Fairmont 
Coal Company, at the expiration of which time he offered his services 
as a volunteer in the Spanish-American war, thus displaying his love 
of country, and upon his return entered upon his present position with 
the Consolidation Coal Company. Scrupulously honorable in all his 
dealings with mankind, he bears a reputation for public and private 
integrity, and being of a sociable and genial nature, he has a number of 
friends who estimate him at his true worth. He is a Republican in 
politics, and has just completed a term as president of the board of 
education of Shinnston. He is the owner of considerable real estate 
in Shinnston, and a stockholder in the Home Petroleum and Natural 
Gas Company. He holds membership in the Free and Accepted 
Masons and the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Higinbotham married, at Shinnston, September 4, 1901, Rose 
Randall, a native of Harrison county. West Virginia, daughter of 
George F. Randall, a sketch of whom appears in this work. Children : 
Margaret, born November 22, 1902; George Randall, February 12, 
IQ04; Ellen Caroline, September 18, 1906. 



This particular Smith family is of French-English-Scotch 
SMITH ancestry, traced down to the present members, now resid- 
ing in Clarksburg, West Virginia. Down through the 
genealogical lines of the paternal and maternal sides there have been 
many aged people and quite a number of interesting and historic char- 
acters have been found. 

(I) William Smith was born in Windsor, Nova Scotia, and was 
of the shipowners firm of Bennett & Smith Bros. He died at the age 
of eighty-one years, in his native country. 

(II) John Lea Richmond, son of William Smith, was also a native 
of Nova Scotia, where he lives at the present time (1912), leading a 
retired life at Middleton, aged seventy-three years. First he was a 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 595 

wholesale dry goods merchant, and later in life became an Episcopal 
clergyman, which profession he followed for thirty years, in Nova 
Scotia. He married Mary Lavinia Rice Smallwood, a native of Hali- 
fax, Nova Scotia, who is still living at Middleton, aged sixty-four 
years. Seven children, four of whom are still living: Charlotte Eva; 
Maude Lavinia, of Nova Scotia; Frederick, a dentist at Grafton, West 
Virginia; William Richmond, see forward. Mrs. Smith's father was 
Rev. Frederick Smallwood, a Methodist minister, bom in Birmingham, 
England, came to Nova Scotia at the age of twenty-four years, having 
been sent there as a missionary by the Methodist Missionary Society 
of London, England. He died in Charlottetown, Prince Edward 
Island, at the age of eighty-four years. Her uncle on the maternal side 
was General Atkin, of Sheffield, England; he was commander of the 
Queen's forces in Singapore, India. Another one of her uncles was 
Admiral Smallwood, of the Royal EngHsh navy. 

(Ill) William Richmond Smith, D. D. S., son of John Lea Rich- 
mond and Mary Lavinia Rice (Smallwood) Smith, was born April 
24, 1875, at Windsor, Nova Scotia. He attended a collegiate school 
at Windsor, after which he entered the University of King's College at 
Windsor, from which institution in 1897 he received his diploma and 
degree of A. M., and from there went to the Baltimore College of 
Dentistry, graduating in 1900, fully equipped for the duties of a mod- 
ern dental surgeon. He first began the practice of his profession at 
Baltimore, Maryland; he remained there one year and then went to 
Meyersdale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, where he practiced two 
years, up to 1903, when he removed to Charleston, West Virginia, 
where he and his brother, Frederick Smith, opened offices at the same 
time, also having offices at Grafton, this state. They continued thus to 
operate in dentistry until 1909, when they went to Dallas, Texas, later 
to Waco, that state, but were not satisfied with their location and the 
country in general, so Dr. William R. Smith opened an office at Cleve- 
land, Ohio, in 19 10, which office he still maintains. He located in 
Clarksburg, West Virginia, in November, 191 1. Politically Dr. Smith 
is a Republican. He holds membership with the Xi Psi Phi fraternity, 
a college dental and medical society. He is a member of the Episcopal 
church, in which his father was for so many years a minister. When 
Dr. Smith first entered King's College it was for the purpose of becom- 



596 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

ing a minister and he graduated in theology, but concluded finally to 
practice dentistry. His Grandmother Smith's maiden name was Maria 
Godfrey; she was a French lady, a descendant of Pouzants, and a direct 
descendant of General Montcalm, who commanded the French forces 
at Quebec, hence it is that Dr. Smith has the blood of three nations In 
his veins, the English, Scotch and French. 



Among the numerous Morgan families in West Vir- 
MORGAN ginia is the one residing in Wetzel county, scions of 
which now reside in Preston county. 

(I) The earliest ancestor of which we have any definite account 
was Aaron Morgan, born in Marion county, Virginia, 1790, died 
1825. He married a Miss Massey, and among their children was a 
son named Achilles. 

(II) Achilles, son of Aaron Morgan, probably a native of Marion 
county, Virginia, married a Miss Heineman, and among their children 
was Francis A., of whom further. 

(III) Francis A., son of Achilles Morgan, was bom February 28, 

1 86 1. He married Margaret, daughter of Washington and 

(Liston) Snodgrass, the latter of whom was a daughter of Allen Lis- 
ten, of Preston county. West Virginia. They now reside in Jackson 
county, where he is a prominent farmer and an influential Democrat. 
He moved from Wetzel county to his present location in 1900. In 
religious faith he is of the Methodist denomination. They are the 
parents of four children: C. Ray, of whom further; Bruce; Frank; 
Sena M., wife of George W. Hogg, superintendent of schools of Cairo, 
West Virginia. 

(IV) C. Ray, son of Francis A. and Margaret (Snodgrass) Mor- 
gan, was born near New Martinsville, Wetzel county, West Virginia, 
July 28, 1883. He was educated at New Martinsville, in the city 
schools, and at Ravenswood high school, graduating in 1902, after 
which he attended the West Virginia State University for two years, 
when he was elected principal of the Mason City (West Virginia) 
high school, and held that position for three years, then became the 
principal of the Tunnelton (Preston county) high school, serving in 
that capacity three years. He then chose law and entered the law de- 
partment of the West Virginia State University, at Morgantown, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 597 

graduating from the law department in 19 10, since which time he has 
been engaged in the active practice of law in the state and federal 
courts. It may be stated that Mr. Morgan started to study law while 
yet teaching at Tunnelton and passed examination in the University in 
advance of the regular class, going direct to the senior class. From all 
indications he has a bright and successful professional career before 
him. His law offices are situated in the First National Bank, building 
at Terra Alta, Preston county. He belongs to the Preston County Bar 
Association, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, 
Free and Accepted Masons, affiliating with Clifton Lodge, No. 23. 
He is an active Republican in politics. He married, in 1907, Nellie 
Greenlee, of Mason City, West Virginia. Child, Raymond, born July 
22, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, where Mrs. Morgan is an active worker in different 
branches of the work. 



The family of which this sketch will treat is a Penn- 
ALLENDER sylvania line, of which nothing positive is known 

earlier than John AUender, who lived in Washing- 
ton county, Pennsylvania. He married Jane, whose maiden name is 
unknown to the present generation. The ancestors were of that sturdy 
and self-reliant people of whom Pennsylvania owes so much in its mak- 
ing of past and honorable history — the Scotch-Irish. 

(I) John Allender, of Washington county, Pennsylvania, above 
mentioned, reared a family among whom was a son called George. 

(II) George, son of John Allender, was born in Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, April 27, 18 19, died in 1897. He was a car- 
penter and joiner of the old type and counted a superior worker in 
wood. He followed his trade throughout his entire life, but in his later 
years bought a farm, as his health would not permit of steady carpenter- 
ing. He was a United Presbyterian in religion, and a Republican in 
politics. He married Margaret Adams, born in Ohio, died in 1889. 
Children: William, Annis, Ella, George Martin. 

(III) George Martin, son of George Allender, was born in Bruns- 
wick county, Ohio, October 22, 1876. He was educated at the com- 
mon schools, his early life being spent on a farm, beginning at the age 
of fourteen years. He spent some years at the carpenter's trade which 



598 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

he learned of his father. In 1890 he commenced at the humblest posi- 
tion in the oil fields, and at the present time he is looked upon as one of 
the numerous safe and conservative contractors in the great oil and gas 
fields of West Virginia. When he is operating in full force he employs 
twenty-five men to assist him in his work. He has full charge of three 
companies — the Moon Oil & Gas Company, at Salem, Harrison county; 
the Bradley-Allender Company, which controls three properties; and 
another large corporation. He is the president and manager of the 
Moon Oil & Gas Company. This company was organized in 1907 
and the others since that date. These properties are all on a paying 
basis and more wells are soon to be put in operation at Salem on the 
Moon property. Mr. Allender is a wide-awake, intelligent citizen and 
takes much interest in the workings of Free Masonry, being a member 
of the order as high as the thirty-second degree. He holds member- 
ship in Mannington Lodge, No. 31, Orient Chapter, No. 9, at Fair- 
mont; Crusade Commandery, No. 6, at Fairmont; Osiris Temple, at 
Wheeling, West Virginia; and belongs to Augusta Chapter, No. 6, 
Mannington. Politically he votes the Republican ticket, and in church 
faith is of the Methodist Episcopal denomination. 

He married Lydia Orrill, born in Derbyshire, England, February 
17, 1867, daughter of George Orrill, whose wife's maiden name was 
Edwards, of English ancestry. Mrs. Allender came to America when 
four years of age and returned once since her coming here. Her father 
was at one time engaged in the oil production business; he died In 
Pennsylvania In 1906; the mother still survives and resides in Penn- 
sylvania. 



Everal J. Whiteman, a leading citizen of Shinns- 
WHITEMAN ton, active in promoting its welfare and advance- 
ment. Is a native of AdamsvIUe, Harrison county. 
West Virginia, born March 3, 1854. He Is the son of Jacob B. White- 
man, still residing at AdamsvIUe, a farmer by occupation. 

Everal J. Whiteman acquired a practical education In the schools 
adjacent to his home. He was reared on his father's farm, and there 
gained habits of thrift and perseverance, which became active factors 
in the success attained later in his business career. He learned the 
trades of carpenter and builder, which occupations he followed ever 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 599 

after. His income, derived therefrom, has been wisely invested in 
West Virginia real estate, he being the owner of five houses in Shinns- 
ton, two adjoining his own and two others, as well as a thirty-acre tract 
located three miles east of Shinnston. He is a stockholder in the 
Farmers' Bank and the First National Bank, both of Shinnston, in the 
Water Works company and the Opera House company, all leading 
enterprises of Shinnston. His political allegiance is given to the Demo- 
cratic party, by whom he was appointed a member of council for several 
terms. He holds membership in the Methodist Protestant church, and 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Whiteman married (first), in Worthington, Marion county. 
West Virginia, 1890, Maud Delia Sturm, who died May 18, 1892; 
married (second), February 11, 1900, Columbia G. Smith, who was 
born at Meadowbrook, West Virginia, daughter of Marian and Fran- 
ces M. Smith. Child of first wife, Byrd, born June i, 1891, resides at 
home. 



John W. Carder, a venerable and highly-esteemed citl- 
CARDER zen of Shinnston, was born in Simpson district, near 

Bridgeport, West Virginia, January 9, 1838, son of 
Cincinnatus and Mary (Golden) Carder, who were the parents of nine 
children, two sons and seven daughters, seven of whom are living at 
the present time (1911), and John W. is the eldest. Cincinnatus 
Carder was a farmer by occupation, an old line Whig in politics, and a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

John W. Carder pursued his studies in the schools of the neighbor- 
hood, after which he worked on his father's farm, and throughout an 
active career has followed that occupation, deriving therefrom a com- 
fortable livelihood. He is the owner of the property on which he 
resides, and of a number of town lots from which he expects to derive 
some benefits. He is also a stockholder in the Home Petroleum Gas 
Company, a leading enterprise of the town. He served as justice of 
the peace of Shinnston for a period of twelve years, and also as notary 
public, the duties of which he performed in an acceptable manner. He 
is a Methodist in religion, a Republican in politics, and affiliates with 
the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He displayed his patriotism 
by enlisting in the union army, August 9, 1862, in the Twelfth West 



6oo Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Virginia Volunteer Infantry, Company E, and was honorably dis- 
charged as sergeant at Richmond, Virginia, when hostilities ended, 
June i6, 1865. 

Mr. Carder married, at Shinnston, March 26, 1866, Sarah A. 
Morris, born in Marion county, West Virginia, three miles from Fair- 
mont, September 29, 1842, daughter of James R. and Lovina (Patter- 
son) Morris. James R. Morris, who was a farmer by occupation, died 
in February, 1852. His wife was a native of Marlon county. West 
Virginia. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Carder: i. Quillen M., born 
December 3, 1868, resided in Shinnston; married Estelle P. Morrison, 
who died February 27, 1908, leaving a son, John T. 2. Ida M., born 
May, 1870, died July 12, 1888. 3. Lucius L., born August 14, 1872. 
4. Harry H., born July 2, 1874, is a baker; married (first) Abble 
Harmer, (second) Geha Lee. 



This Ogden family is one of large numbers and great 
OGDEN strength throughout the entire country. It is believed 

that all Ogdens in this country come of the same original 
English stock. They may be found in almost every part of America, 
and among them are many bright illustrious characters in civil, mili- 
tary and professional life. Other accounts of this family will be found 
within this work. 

(I) Nathan Ogden, of whom but little is known, was a resident, 
possibly a native of Port Tobacco, Maryland. He emigrated to the 
Monongahela Valley about the beginning of the nineteenth century. 

(II) William R., son of Nathan Ogden, the Maryland emigrant, 
was born In Port Tobacco, Maryland. He came to what is now West 
Virginia when a mere boy. He was born in 1804, died In 1884. He 
married and among his children was the son Robert S., of whom fur- 
ther. 

(III) Robert S., son of William R. Ogden, was born in 1836, in 
Harrison county, now West Virginia, and still survives, residing at 
Clarksburg. He was postmaster at Sardls during the civil war and on 
up to 1890. For many years he was a leading merchant at Sardls, and 
is now looked upon as the pioneer merchant of Harrison county. He 
married Jane Rittenhouse, born In Harrison county, Virginia, January 
2, 1842, died at Clarksburg, Harrison county. West Virginia, February 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 6oi 

28, 1900, daughter of Bennett and Zilpha (Shinn) Rittenhouse. Chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Ogden: Mrs. Anna Garrett; Zilpha, 
deceased; James, deceased; Dr. George R., practicing at Flemington, 
West Virginia; Robert S. Jr., of Clarksburg; Daniel Miller, of whom 
further; Charles G., of Salem, West Virginia; Dr. C. R., of Clarks- 
burg; Mrs. Bessie Ogden Hornor, of Illinois; Mrs. Virginia Ogden 
Garrett, of Clarksburg; Henry Clay, of Wheeling; Nathan Hale; 
Mary, resides in Clarksburg with her father; Horace, deceased. The 
grandfather, Bennett Rittenhouse, was born in Norristown, Pennsyl- 
vania, and went with the family to Louisa county, Virginia, and later 
came over the mountains to Harrison county in what is now West Vir- 
ginia. 

(IV) Daniel Miller, son of Robert S. and Jane (Rittenhouse) 
Ogden, was born at Sardis, Harrison county. West Virginia, January 
21, 1870. He attended the public schools and one term at the old 
West Virginia College, at Flemington, and then entered Salem Col- 
lege. In a business way Mr. Ogden commenced by working in a 
wholesale hardware store at Parkersburg, where he remained for a year 
and a half. He had some experience in his father's store at Sardis, and 
remained there assisting his father until he reached the age of twenty- 
one years, when he engaged at Parkersburg with R. L. Neal & Com- 
pany, and after he left that firm he worked for another year for his 
father at Sardis, and in 1895 entered the employ of McKinney & Dils, 
of Parkersburg, a retail dry goods house, where he was in charge of 
the dress goods department. In 1896 he resigned there and accepted 
a position with a wholesale dry goods firm of Pittsburgh, with whom 
he remained until 1899, then went to Clarksburg and opened a store 
in the Annex building on Main street, where he carried a full line of 
dry goods. It was then known as D. M. Ogden, dry goods and notions, 
and in 1904 the business was legally incorporated as the D. M. Ogden 
Company, which title it still carries. January 20, 191 1, the entire 
store was totally destroyed by fire, but two months later business was 
being conducted as before. He belongs to the Baptist church, and in 
politics is a Democrat. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

He married, June 30, 1896, at Galesburg, Illinois, Florence Bog- 
gess, a native of Harrison county. West Virginia, daughter of Dr. Ben- 
jamin Boggess, who for many years practiced medicine at Lumberport, 



6o2 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

West Virginia. He married Matilda A. Shinn, born at Shinnston, 
daughter of Resin K. Shinn, a merchant of Shinnston for many years, 
but who emigrated to La Harpe, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Ogden have 
no children. 



The Shinn family to which this relates has long resided in 
SHINN Harrison county, in what is now West Virginia. Many 
excellent characters are here noted as coming from the 
Shinns and intermarried families connected with them. 

(I) Abel W. Shinn was probably a native of Harrison county, at 
least his life was largely spent there. He was both farmer and mer- 
chant, doing business at Adamsville. He died in 1888, aged sixty 
years. He was imprisoned at Camp Chase during the civil war for 
aiding the confederate soldiers. He married Elizabeth Ann Gowthrop, 
who bore him a large family, among whom was Joseph Melville, of 
whom further. 

(II) Joseph Melville, son of Abel W. Shinn, born born at Adams- 
ville, West Virginia (then Old Virginia), in 1847, and died in Octo- 
ber, 1898. He was engaged in the real estate business both in Iowa 
and at Chicago at different times. He published a real estate journal 
in Creston, Iowa, back in the seventies, returning to West Virginia in 
1875, and ever after made this his home. Concerning an earlier period 
in his life it should be said that when but sixteen years of age, and while 
attending the old Monongahela Academy at Morgantown, he was 
given the position of instructor of Latin in that institution. He was 
burned out twice in great fires in the city of Chicago, losing a good for- 
tune each time. He married Ella Short, born near Shinnston, and she 
now resides with her son, Fred L., at Clarksburg, West Virginia, aged 
fifty-four years. 

(III) Fred Lawrence, only child of Joseph Melville and Ella 
(Short) Shinn, was bom May 23, 1881, at Adamsville, Harrison 
county. West Virginia. He attended the public schools there and then 
entered the State Normal at Fairmont, later attended the public schools 
at Farmington and Shinnston public schools, entering the University 
of West Virginia in the autumn of 1901, graduating in 1906. The 
first half of the time spent in the University was in the preparatory de- 
partment, then entered the law department, receiving his legal diploma 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 603 

in 1906. He served one year, from the fall of 1906 to that of 1907, 
on the Clarksburg Daily News as a reporter. In the autumn of 1907 
he opened his law office, the present location of which is No. 222 Court 
street, Clarksburg. In 1909 he formed a partnership in law with 
Frank M. Powell, which exists now (19 12). He is engaged in the 
promotion and development of new oil fields in Maryland. He has 
twice been a candidate on the Democratic ticket for city clerk. He is 
now secretary of the central Democratic committee of his county, and 
ever on the alert to advance the interests of his party. He is commis- 
sioner of accounts for Harrison county. He has been a member of the 
West Virginia National Guards since 1904, was commissioned second 
lieutenant, July 17, 1907, and assigned to Company K, First Infantry, 
and March 12, 1908, was promoted to first lieutenant. He is an ardent 
Odd Fellow, and also holds membership with the local order of Elks 
at Clarksburg. His college fraternity is Phi Sigma Kappa. He be- 
longs to the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the Harrison 
County Bar Association. 



Three generations of this family have resided 
PICKENPAUGH in the vicinity of Morgantown, West Virginia. 

Nicholas Pickenpaugh, born in 1804, settled 
in Morgantown at an early day and followed mechanics for his liveli- 
hood. His wife's maiden name was Abigail Chadwick. They were 
the parents of five children, including a son, Thorton, of whom later. 
The father died November 5, 1853, ^'^^ was buried at Morgantown, 
West Virginia, in Oak Grove Cemetery. 

(II) Thorton Pickenpaugh, son of Nicholas and Abigail (Chad- 
wick) Pickenpaugh, was born at Morgantown, in what is now known 
as West Virginia, in 1838. He was educated at the common schools 
of his native place, and when old enough engaged in business, conduct- 
ing a dry goods store, commencing in 1865 and continuing until his 
death in 1902, when his son James C. took the business. Besides his 
mercantile pursuits he was engaged in farming and the timber business. 
Politically Thorton Pickenpaugh was a Republican, and in church 
faith he adhered to the Methodist denomination. He was public-spirit- 
ed, and was a member of the Morgantown city council and school 
board. He married Mary F. Wagner, daughter of William Wagner 



6o4 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

and wife. Their children were: Lillie, who married Rev. J. L. Roe- 
mer; and James Claric. 

(Ill) James Clark Pickenpaugh, son of Thorton and Mary F. 
(Wagner) Pickenpaugh, was born May lo, 1874, at Morgantown, 
West Virginia. He obtained a good education in the public schools of 
his native city, and attended the West Virginia University at Morgan- 
town. He started his business career as a clerk in his father's dry goods 
store, and upon the death of his father he succeeded to the business, 
which he has since conducted. He is an excellent business man, and 
bears the same relation as to respect of the people of Morgantown that 
was enjoyed by his father and grandfather. He belongs to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and in politics votes the Republican ticket. 

He married, in 1903, Mary Evans, daughter of Thomas P. and 
Delia (Allen) Evans. 



Max Mathers, a substantial, thrifty and intelligent 
MATHERS citizen of Morgantown, is a native of that city, son 
of Eugene L. Mathers, grandson of Dr. Joseph R. 
Mathers, and great-grandson of Rev. E. Mathers, a native of Somer- 
setshire, England, who married Sarah Ray, of the Isle of Jersey, and 
whose children were: Waitman T. ; William R., killed at Pittsburgh 
Landing; Mrs. Clara Dunnington, and Joseph R. (see forward). 

Dr. Joseph R. Mathers served as a surgeon in the Union army 
during the civil war, and after his return from the field of battle prac- 
ticed the profession of medicine at Buckhannon, and in connection 
therewith conducted a drug store. He was a man of honor and integ- 
rity, and his influence for good was felt in the community. He married 
(first) Drusilla Morgan, daughter of Enos D. and Mattie Morgan. 
Children: Eugene L. (see forward) ; William H., born May, 1856. 
He married (second) Alsinda Rohrbaugh, who bore him one child, 
George. Dr. Mathers died April 9, 1897, after a life of usefulness 
and activity, lamented by all who knew him. 

Eugene L. Mathers, son of Dr. Joseph R. Mathers, was born in 
Morgantown, August 19, 1854. He attended the public schools of 
Morgantown and the old Monongalia Academy, obtaining a practical 
education which qualified him for the duties of life. He served an 
apprenticeship at the trade of printing in the printing office of his uncle, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 605 

Henry M. Morgan, where he was employed for twenty years. He 
then worked for the Morgantown Weekly Post, and in 1909 entered 
the printing office conducted by his son, Max Mathers, where he is 
engaged at the present time ( 19 1 1 ) . By his straightforward and hon- 
orable actions he has won and retained in a large degree the esteem and 
respect of all with whom he is brought in contact. He married, in 
1876, Arthelia Morgan, daughter of Johan E. Morgan; she died No- 
vember 3, 1908. Children: Fay, born December 26, 1877, married 
George Welsh; Max (see forward) ; Carrie, born August, 1883, mar- 
ried Homer Hoffman; Harry, born November, 1890; Mattie, born 
1 89 1, married George D. Rust; Carl, born 1893. 

Max Mathers, son of Eugene L. and Arthelia (Morgan) Mathers, 
was born December 28, 1880, in Morgantown, West Virginia. He was 
educated in the public schools of Morgantown, and later learned the 
trade of printer, thoroughly mastering all of its details. In November, 
1905, after serving as a journeyman for some time, he established a 
printing office of his own, and is now conducting a successful and lucra- 
tive business. He is one of the public-spirited and progressive citizens 
of Morgantown, taking an active interest in aU that pertains to its wel- 
fare and growth. He is a member of the Sons of the Revolution, gain- 
ing his admission through the services of Colonel Zacquil Morgan (see 
forward), and Colonel John Evans Sr. ; of Modern Woodmen of 
America, Knights of the Maccabees, Shield of Honor, and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. He married, July 31, 1902, Anna 
Mary, daughter of Joseph and Clara DeGant. One child, Margaret 
May, born April 27, 1903. 

Drusilla (Morgan) Mathers, wife of Dr. Joseph R. Mathers, 
traces her ancestry to Colonel Morgan Morgan, who was born in the 
principality of Wales, England. He was educated in the city of Lon- 
don, England, in the reign of William III. When a young man, prior 
to his marriage, he came to the province of Delaware, during the reign 
of Queen Anne, and was one of the successful merchants at the place 
now known as Christiana. He was an ordained minister of the Church 
of England, and shortly after his marriage moved from Delaware to 
the Valley of Virginia and established a church at Winchester, of which 
he and his son, Morgan Morgan Jr., were pastors for many years. 
Through the influence of Colonel Morgan, General Washington estab- 



6o6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

lished Ice's Ferry, on Cheat river, in 1770, with Christian Ice as ferry- 
man. Lord Dunmore, the English governor of the colony of Virginia, 
made Colonel Morgan a land grant of all the territory on the east side 
of the Monongahela river between Cheat river and the mouth of the 
West Fork, and extending back to about the present county line of 
Preston. Previous to the revolutionary war, Morgan's block house 
stood on the northwest corner of Main and W^alnut streets, Morgan- 
town. Colonel Morgan married Catherine Garretson, of Delaware. 
Children: i. Morgan, remained in Berkeley county, Virginia, on his 
father's old farm; he was an Episcopal minister of great piety and 
moral worth, and some of his productions, still in possession of the 
family, are of the finest order in penmanship, diction and moral senti- 
ment. 2. Anne. 3. Zacquil (see forward) . 4. Evan. 5. David. 6. 
Charles, died in Berkeley county. 7. Henry, moved to South Carolina. 
8. James, was chaplain in the continental army, and while at home on 
furlough was captured by the Tories and shot at Torytown, Berkeley 
county. 

Colonel Zacquil Morgan moved to the mouth of Decker's creek, 
and was the proprietor and founder of Morgantown, Monongalia 
county. In the revolutionary war he commanded the Virginia minute- 
men, a regiment raised in Monongalia and what is now Marion county. 
His barracks and recruiting office were in a building which stood on a 
lot of the late John H. Hoffman property. Main street, Morgantown. 
He, with about six hundred troops, was with General Gates at the 
battle of Saratoga, in October, 1777, and in that battle lost nearly half 
his men. He served all through the war with distinction, and died 
several years after peace was declared. He lived in the old Morgan 
homestead occupied by his granddaughter, Drusilla Morgan, until her 
death, and now owned by Eugene L. Mathers, mentioned above. He 
married Drusilla, daughter of Count Carl Christopher Springer, a 
Swedish nobleman, who was the founder of Christiana, Delaware. 
Their son. Captain Zacquil Morgan, fell in the defense of Washington, 
at the battle of Bladenburg, Maryland, August 24, 18 14. He had his 
barracks and recruiting office, during the war of 18 12, in the old 
"Grandmother Watts" house, which stood on the lot later owned by 
Major W. C. McGrew, Main street, Morgantown. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 607 

The family of Lockwoods at Clarksburg, this 
LOCKWOOD state, came from Ohio, where Ephraim Lockwood 
was born in 18 18, near New Bremen, showing 
that the family was an early one in the Buckeye State. After his mar- 
riage he lived at Chillicothe, his death occurring there in 1906. He 
had an extensive fruit farm near Chillicothe, and was a man of sterling 
worth in his community. He married Cinderella King, born and rear- 
ed in the same place in which her husband was. She was born Febru- 
ary I, 1822, died in 1907. Eleven children, the living being: Theo- 
dore E., born 1842; Lyman George, 1848; Lovina (Mrs. Keaton), 
1850; William F., 1855. 

(II) Lyman George, son of Ephraim and Cinderella (King) 
Lockwood, was born at Chillicothe, Ohio, July 29, 1848. He attend- 
ed the local schools of his county, and when old enough he engaged in 
business in New Jersey for one year, after which he went west and 
spent one year, and then returned to the oil fields of Pennsylvania, 
where he worked for the Union Oil Company. Subsequently he was 
in the employ of the South Penn Oil Company, being with the former 
corporation twelve years and with the latter five years, as their fore- 
man. In 1897 he came to the West Virginia oil fields, first locating at 
Parkersburg, as foreman for the South Penn Company, remaining 
four years, and in 1900 went to Clarksburg and purchased a half inter- 
est in the Palace Furniture Company, which he sold in 1901 and estab- 
lished his present business, known as the Irwin-Lockwood Company, 
the stock of which Mr. Lockwood now owns, Mr. Irwin only being 
connected a short time. This business enterprise consists of a complete 
stock of everything that women need for wearing apparel except shoes. 
It is located at No. 327 West Main street. Mr. Lockwood is a Repub- 
lican in politics. He is a Free Mason and also holds membership with 
the order of Maccabees, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

He married, at Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, October 21, 1881, 
Julia Graf, born in the place just named, April 15, 1855, daughter of 
John G. Graf, a native of Germany, who came to America when a 
mere boy and died in Punxsutawney in the spring of 1876, aged fifty- 
four years; he was a grocer and baker by occupation. He married Wil- 
himina Muller, who died in 1905. The children of Mr. and Mrs. 



6o8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Lockwood are four deceased, and George E., bom October 3, 1882, 
now associated with his father in the mercantile business at Clarksburg, 
he being the general manager. He graduated from the public schools 
of Clarksburg In 1901 and then attended the Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, at Delaware, Ohio. 



The Newlon family was among the early Scotch-Irish 
NEWLON families to brave the storms of the wild Atlantic and 

seek a home on American soil. Their children and 
children's children have become pioneers in almost every section of the 
United States. Thrift, industry and integrity have marked the course 
of the succeeding generations of this family the first immigrant ancestor 
of which landed on our shores in 1686. 

(I) Nathaniel Newlln, as the name was then spelled, immigrated 
from county Cork, Ireland, to America, In 1686, locating in Delaware 
county, Pennsylvania, in the town of Concord. He descended from 
one of the Newlands of Carroll, England, who owned large landed 
estates In the northern and southern portions of Ireland. At the date 
of this Newland's death his descendants Inherited his estates In Ireland 
and removed to their possessions, some to the north and others of the 
family to the south. Those In the south intermarried with the Irish 
natives, and the name soon became known as Newlln, while those mov- 
ing to the north of Ireland soon intermarried with the Scotch people 
and the name was then styled Newlon. This accounts for the several 
ways of spelling the name. It Is commonly spelled Newland in Eng- 
land at the present time. Nathaniel Newlln had a large family who 
grew to maturity In Delaware county, Pennsylvania, hence many of this 
name still reside in that state, as well as in New York state. This is all 
that can now be positively ascertained of the settlement of the family 
in America, but one J. S. Newlin, a descendant of Nathaniel above 
referred to, resides in Philadelphia and Is at the head of the firm of 
Newlin, Knight & Company, extensive wholesale hardware dealers, 
and on authority of mercantile books In his possession, belonging to his 
forefathers, It seems that the business has been continually kept by one 
or more members of the family to this time. His books show that 
Nathaniel Newlin, In 1700, imported more than twenty head of fine 
horses to this country from Europe, and several packs of blooded 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 609 

hounds. There seems little doubt that the Newlins, Newlands and 
Newlons of this continent are one and the same, when traced back to 
Europe. It is further thought from the facts known, that the present 
generation represented at Grafton, Taylor county. West Virginia, by 
Creed O. Newlon, is the seventh in line of descent from the American 
ancestor, Nathaniel Newlin. Of the second and third generations 
nothing definite is known, save that they seem to have been connected 
with the same hardware trade now conducted in Philadelphia by New- 
lin, Knight & Company, above mentioned. 

(IV) William Newlin removed with his family, in 1799, from 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, to Fauquier county, Virginia. He 

married Martin, supposed to have been a native of Lancaster 

county. Children: i. James, of whom further. 2. Elijah, married, 
lived and died in Iowa, near Bentonsport, where sons are still living 

(1912). 3. William, married Turner, of Loudoun county, 

Virginia; some of their descendants still reside in that county and Cul- 
peper county. 4. John, deceased. 5. Tamer, died unmarried. 6. 

Debby (Sarah), married Carter, of Loudoun county, where 

she lived and died. 

(V) James Newlon (as he spelled it) , son of William and 

(Martin) Newlin, was born in Shepherdstown, Maryland, August 14, 
1782; died March 29, 1867, aged eighty-five years. He married, in 
Fauquier county, March i, 1807, Jane Adams, bom February 18, 
1791, in Fauquier county, died February 12, 1882. Her father was a 
native of North Carolina. They located in Culpeper county, near the 
famous Culpeper court house, where they resided and succeeded well 
until 1824, during which year the family removed to Harrison county, 
afterwards Taylor county. West Virginia, locating near Pruntytown, 
and finally moved into the village, where the parents died. Children, 
born in Culpeper county: i. Tamer Ann, born June 13, 1808, died 
April 9, 1884. 2. Lampkin Adams, born May 15, 18 10; married and 
reared a large family. 3. Charles Washington, of whom further. 4. 
James William, bom February 5, 18 19. 5. John A., September 16, 
1 82 1. 6. Mary Jane, August 23, 1824. Born in Taylor county, Vir- 
ginia: 7. David Marshall, bom March i, 1827. 8. Edwin Eastham, 
March 22, 1831. 



6io Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(VI) Charles Washington, son of James and Jane (Adams) New- 
Ion, was born September i6, 1816. His family removed to Harrison 
county, as stated above, but about 1835 he returned to Culpeper county 
and remained there until 1836 or 1837, when he went to Beverly, Vir- 
ginia. In the latter place he was engaged in the tailoring business. In 
1839 they removed to Pruntytown, where he engaged in the same line. 
A year or two after his arrival there he embarked in the mercantile 
business, which he followed until 1859. During that period he was 
twice elected clerk of the county court, once to the house of representa- 
tives from Taylor county, and twice to the state senate. 

In the spring of 1859, Charles W. Newlon with his family removed 
to Webster, West Virginia, where he engaged in the milling and mer- 
cantile business, in company with David Elliott and G. H. A. Kunst, 
under the firm name of Elliott, Newlon & Company. After the civil 
war broke out in the spring of 1861, Mr. Newlon and his family, 
excepting Granville A., moved to Brownsburg, Virginia, where they 
lived until the war ended in 1 865. After the war Mr. Newlon returned 
to Pruntytown, where he remained until the fall of 1866, when with 
his family (excepting again Granville A.) moved to Fort Worth, 
Texas. They traveled by water down the rivers to New Orleans, 
thence up Red river to Jefferson City and from there by wagon to Fort 
Worth, where they remained until the spring of 1867, then traveled 
south through the state by wagon to Galveston, then crossed the gulf 
to New Orleans, thence returned to Barbour county. West Virginia, 
where he remained till that fall. He next moved to Grafton, engaged 
in mercantile business, continuing a number of years. During that time 
he was made mayor of the city and served one term in the state senate 
of West Virginia. In 1883 he removed to Buckhannon, where he 
embarked in the banking business, which he followed until his death, 
February 18, 1889, aged seventy-two years. 

Mr. Newlon married, September 21, 1837, at Beverly, Virginia, 
Christina M., died September 7, 1891, daughter of Colonel Archibald 
Earle. Children: i. Granville Austin, born July 20, 1838, at Beverly. 
2. Charles W. Jr., born April 6, 1845, at Pruntytown; died September 
8, 1906, at Grafton, West Virginia; married Lou Funk, January 12, 

1 87 1, at Charleston, West Virginia; children: James Franklin, July 2, 

1872, died March 10, 1881; Edwin Earle, May 10, 1874, at Grafton; 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 6h 

Christina Halley, July 2, 1876, died March 10, 1881; Charles F., 
October 9, 1888, Grafton; the last two sons are still living with the 
mother at Grafton, their father having died July 26, 1892. 3. J. E. 
Newlon, born December 22, 1846, at Pruntytown; died September 8, 
1906, at Buckhannon; married Mollie V. Creel, November 24, 1874, 
at Grafton; they lived at Buckhannon and had two children, both 
deceased. 4. Mary J., born January 20, 1850, at Pruntytown; deceased. 
5. Creed O., of whom further. 6. J. Lee, born July 30, 1855, at 
Pruntytown; died October, 1898, at Grafton. 7. George D., bom 
January 26, 1857, at Pruntytown; deceased. 8. Meigs A., bom in 
Webster, West Virginia, October 6, 1859. 9. Ida May, born in 
Brownsburg, 1862. 

(VII) Creed O., son of Charles W. and Christina M. (Earle) 
Newlon, was born February- 17, 1851, at Pruntytown, Taylor county, 
now within West Virginia, then old Virginia. He attended the schools 
of his native place until nine years of age, when the family removed to 
Webster, and the following year to Brownsburg, Rockbridge county, 
where he attended an academy. He finished his education after the 
family returned to Pruntytown, after which he learned the machinist's 
trade at the Baltimore & Ohio railway shops in Grafton, and followed 
railroading on that road and on the Louisville & Nashville line, as a 
machinist and other positions for fifteen years. Subsequently he became 
the manager of the Grafton Gas and Light Company, which position 
he held nineteen years. In 1902 he founded and became manager of 
the Newlon Foundry and Machine Company of Grafton, which posi- 
tion he still holds. He was chairman of the first water works board 
which installed the water works plant in Grafton. Politically he is a 
Democrat. He is a member of Mystic Lodge, No. 75, Masons, of 
Grafton, and is its secretary, a position he has held fifteen years; Cape- 
stone Chapter, No. 12, Royal Arch Masons; Knights of Pythias order, 
uniform rank, and has held all offices in that lodge at Grafton. He 
belongs to the Elks fraternity of Grafton, and is one of the trustees and 
on the building committee. 

He married (first), October 29, 1873, Kate Barbee, at Grafton, 
West Virginia, by Rev. J. H. Flanagan. Children : Owen Eugene, 
September 6, 1874; Floyd Andrew, October 22, 1876; Ethel J., June 
30, 1879; Maude Earle, June 5, 1882, died May 14, 1893; Bertha 



6i2 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Kate, February 3, 1890, married, August 24, 191 1, Allen Hodges; 
Ella-May, April 27, 1894; Albert Joseph, March 8, 1897. Kate 
(Barbee) Newlon died at Grafton, West Virginia, August 16, 1899. 
Mr. Newlon married (second), October i, 1901, Katie Belle Miller, 
of New Hope, Kentucky. 



This, not a common name, has, however, been 
BARNCORD known in Maryland for over a century at least. 

Most of the early members of the Barncord family 
were farmers and highly successful in their undertakings as agricul- 
turists. Later many chose a profession and others engaged in industrial 
pursuits. 

(I) John Barncord, the earliest of whom anything is positively 
known, was a farmer in Maryland, and died in the prime of his man- 
hood, leaving his wife, Catherine, to rear and educate his nine children. 
The wife and mother still survives, and although more than four score 
years, is bright, cheerful and active, in the enjoyment of good health. 
She resides at the little village of Corriganville, and is a prominent, 
devout member of the Methodist church. She is widely known and 
universally beloved for her many charitable deeds. She is possessed 
of a handsome fortune. 

(II) Oliver Price, one of the nine children of John and Catherine 
Barncord, was born in Corriganville, Maryland, August 17, 1864. 
He is now a retired farmer of Corriganville. He resides on and owns 
the "Old Barncord Estate," a valuable property that has been owned 
in the family many generations. In his stables will be found that 
famous thoroughbred, "Fannie," living a life of ease and luxury. This 
old animal is now over twenty eight years of age, and is almost as well 
known in the community as her master. She was the first horse that 
Attorney Barncord, of Morgantown, West Virginia, ever rode or drove. 
Mr. Barncord was manager for several years of the County's Stone 
Quarries. He is a prominent Free Mason. He is a Democrat of the 
old staunch, uncompromising type. It seems that the deepest regret of 
his life is in the fact that his son, Norman R., is a Republican, as will 
be observed by the following, one of his sentences on the subject of 
politics : "My son Norman has left the good old state of Maryland and 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 613 

is now a stand pat Republican and I do not understand how it ever hap- 
pened for I always did all that I could to bring him up right." 

He married Agnes, one of two children of Andrew A. Bough. 
Before marriage she lived with her parents in Moss Cottage, near 
Frostburg, Maryland. She is a devout member of the Lutheran church, 
highly educated, loved and respected by all. She is known as a "home 
body" and takes delight in fashioning the home for pleasure and com- 
fort for her family. Andrew A. Bough, Mrs. Oliver P. Barncord's 
father, came from Germany to America as a minister of the gospel. 
While a student in a German university he became acquainted with and 
married his professor's daughter and immediately came to America, 
first as a minister, but later became a teacher in the public schools of 
Mt. Savage. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver P. Barncord are : 
Delia, at home; Norman R., of whom further; Henry T., a telegraph 
operator; Catherine, a public school teacher; Raymond; Francis and 
Elfrieda, in school. 

(Ill) Norman Roland, son of Oliver P. and Agnes (Bough) 
Barncord, was born in Corriganville, a small village near Cumberland, 
Maryland, November 23, 1888. He was educated in the public schools 
and at West Virginia University. He is an attorney at Morgantown 
and equipped for his legal profession as but few other young lawyers 
are, and this is a practical knowledge as well as purely a theoretical 
knowledge of the law. At the age of fourteen years he left his father's 
comfortable home and productive farm, beginning the conflict of life's 
career alone. The first year away from home he worked in a stone 
quarry at one dollar a day, and then entered the employ of the Standard 
Oil Company as one of their line workers, between State Line, Penn- 
sylvania, and Sideling Hill. After a short time he turned his attention 
to the study of telegraphy, continued the same for five months, and then 
entered the employ of the Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany. He remained two years and he was promoted five times; he 
commenced at the bottom of the ladder as a freight hustler at Eckhart 
Mines, Maryland, and after occupying various other positions, before 
the first year had elapsed was general agent for the company at Alle- 
gany, Maryland, and the youngest man who ever occupied a like posi- 
tion anywhere on the system. He also had experience with the Adams 
Express Company and with other railroad work not here mentioned. 



6i4 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

While attending the university at Morgantown he was employed in the 
local ticket office of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. He was 
admitted to the bar and has succeeded remarkably well. His offices are 
located on Chancery Row, Morgantown, and his practice is large and 
constantly increasing. He has been appointed a notary public, and is a 
member of the Railroad Telegraphers, Knights of Pythias and Turn 
Verein Concordia. Politically he is a Republican. This, with his con- 
nection with the general interests of the laboring classes, makes him one 
of the strongest possible friends to labor in its true organized condition. 



The branch of the Ogden family to which Dr. Ogden, 
OGDEN of Shinnston, belongs were originally from England, 
but for many generations have been residents of Mary- 
land and Virginia, while others reside in Pennsylvania and New York. 

(I) Thomas Ogden, grandfather of Dr. Ogden, was born in Vir- 
ginia. He married and had children, including a son William. 

(II) William, son of Thomas Ogden, was born in Virginia. He 
married Sarah Mclntire, of near Enterprise. They then took up their 
residence on the West Fork river. William Ogden was a farmer and 
school teacher by occupation and profession. He had nine children, 
including Dr. Presley B. Ogden, who with one brother, Osborne Ogden, 
are the only surviving children of the family. Sarah Mclntire was the 
daughter of James Mclntire, born in Virginia and came to what is now 
Enterprise, West Virginia. He spent three years hunting and fighting 
Indians, while land looking. He finally took up a large tract of land, 
by a "tomahawk right" or warrant, as it was called, and defended it 
against the Indians. 

(III) Dr. Presley B. Ogden, son of William and Sarah (Mcln- 
tire) Ogden, was born April 29, 1839, in Marion county, now West 
Virginia. He was educated at a literary school at Morgantown, and 
then pursued a medical course at Starling Medical College, later at 
Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He began the 
practice of medicine in 1 860, at West Union. He then moved to Dodd- 
ridge county. West Virginia, thence to Marion county and practiced 
forty-four years, when he moved to Shinnston, beginning his practice 
at that place in 1909. Dr. Ogden was educated in medicine at Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, graduating in 1866, and has taken a 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 615 

half dozen post-graduate courses since then. He is a member of the 
State Medical also the American Medical Association. He is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. 

He married (first), in Monongalia county, in 1863, Ellen Coombs. 
Children: Howard N., W. C, H. C, Cora V. He married (second), 
in 1908, Alice E., daughter of Allison Sapp, of Shinnston. 



One of the proprietors of the well-known grocery house, 
RACE conducting an extensive business at Fairmont and Morgan- 
town, West Virginia, and which wholesales over a large 
territory, is Less G. Race, a member of the Smith-Race Grocery Com- 
pany. This is an English-Scotch family. But three generations are 
represented in this country. 

(I) Rev. James Lee Race was bom in England in 1829, died at 
the home of his son. Less G. Race, October 15, 19 10. He entered the 
pulpit at the age of sixteen years, and was actively engaged in the 
ministry until called by death. He was pastor of the Cedar Avenue 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Scranton, Pennsylvania, at the time of 
his decease. Politically Rev. Race voted the Republican and Pro- 
hibition tickets. The church of his choice and in which he labored so 
many years was that of the Methodist Episcopal denomination. He 
married Jane Humble, a native of Scotland, born in 1832, died when 
her son Less G. was only four years of age. Other children in the 
family were : Jabez ; Wesley, bom in England, died in Poughkeepsie, 
New York, October 5, 19 10; Dr. John H., president of the University 
of Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

(II) Less G., son of Rev. James Lee and Jane (Humble) Race, 
was born at Damascus, Pennsylvania, May 10, 1864. He received a 
moderate education, being his own educator, as he was thrown upon 
his own resources at the age of thirteen years. He began as a newsboy, 
followed it four years, and then engaged as a railroad man and con- 
tinued it in various capacities until twenty-two years of age, then entered 
the wholesale grocery business as an assistant clerk at Clarksburg. 
Being faithful to every trust imposed upon him, he gradually rose 
round by round until he was master of the business. It was in 1896 
that he became a partner in the wholesale house of Smith-Race Grocery 
Company, at Fairmont, West Virginia, which concern now has an ex- 



6i6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

tensive branch house at Morgantown, the two houses conducting an 
annual business of about one million dollars. Politically Mr. Race 
votes an independent ticket. In Masonry he has advanced to the high 
degree known as the thirty-second. He also holds membership with 
the Elks order. 

He married, February 13, 1890, Genevieve May Stuart, born in 
Clarksburg, West Virginia, October 21, 1869, daughter of James H. 
and Agnes (Summer) Stuart, of Clarksburg, West Virginia. Mrs. 
Race belongs to the Daughters of the American Revolution. Children : 
I. Agnes Katherine, born at Clarksburg, May 20, 1891; graduated 
from Fairmont high school, spent one year at the University of Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee, sailed on the steamer "Lapland" for Germany in 
191 1, being chaperoned by Mrs. Edith Cooper Hartman, to complete 
her studies in French and German, which will require about a year's 
time; then from Paris she intends going to Munich, Germany, to remain 
until March, 19 12, then on to Florence, Italy, to remain until she 
returns to her home in America. 2. James Stuart, born at Clarksburg, 
June 17, 1893; graduate of Fairmont high schools; in September, 
191 1, he entered the West Virginia University, where he is fitting him- 
self for a general business career. 3. Joseph Noel, born at Clarksburg, 
November 22, 1895; has completed his course at the graded schools, 
and is now attending the Randolph Macon School of Front Royal, Old 
Virginia, studying for an electrical engineer. 4. Genevieve Mary, born 
at Clarksburg, August 20, 1899. 5. John Andrew, born in Fairmont, 
West Virginia, May 6, 1904. 6. Less G. Jr., born May 22, 1907, in 
Fairmont, West Virginia. 



This is an old family in New England, the interesting 
GREEN history of which reaches back to the period before the 

war for independence. Soon after the close of that 
struggle Jared Green moved from Dutchess county. New York, to a 
farm in Litchfield county, Connecticut, which place is still in the hands 
of the family of Greens. Jared Green will be known as (I) in the line 
of descent to the West Virginia branch. 

(II) Seymour Bennett, son of Jared Green, was a native of Con- 
necticut. He followed agriculture for his living. He married Rhoda 
M. Strong. Children : Ethiel Stillson, William Bennett and Mary. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 617 

(III) Ethiel Stillson, son of Seymour Bennett and Rhoda M. 
(Strong) Green, was born in 1825, died in 1907. He received a fair 
education, and during young manhood taught school. He then followed 
farming for his vocation. He was a Republican and held some local 
official positions, but usually preferred to attend strictly to his farming 
operations. In church faith he was of the Congregational denomina- 
tion. He married Mariette Seeley. Children: Seymour Seeley, born 
in 1 851; Henry Sherwood, of whom further; William Gregory, born 
in i860. 

(IV) Professor Henry Sherwood Green, LL. D., son of Ethiel 
Stillson and Marietta (Seeley) Green, was bom November 12, 1854, 
at New Milford, Litchfield county, Connecticut. He lived and labored 
on the old home farm of his father, in New England, until he went 
away from home to prepare for college. Through his paternal grand- 
mother, Mr. Green is connected with the Strong family, prominent in 
the early history of Litchfield county, Connecticut. He was prepared 
for college at Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Massachusetts; gradu- 
ated at Yale with degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1879; teacher in Latin 
and Greek, Hillman Academy, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 1879-81; 
principal, same place, 1881-86; teacher in Preparatory School, Rich- 
mond, Kentucky, 1889-92; acting professor of Greek, Central Univer- 
sity, Richmond, Kentucky, 1892-93; principal of Harrodsburg Acad- 
emy, Kentucky, 1893-96; professor of the Greek language and litera- 
ture, Bethany College, West Virginia, 1896-1900; associate professor 
of the Greek language and literature, West Virginia University, 1900- 
01; professor of Greek language and literature, same place, 1901-11. 
Received degree of LL. D. from Bethany College in 1901. Became 
proprietor and manager of the Acme Press and actively associated in 
the conduct and management of the Morgantown Post-Chronicle in 
191 1, and is still interested in the publishing business at Morgantown, 
West Virginia. Professor Green votes the Republican ticket, and in 
religious faith is a Presbyterian. 

He married, in 1880, Martha Seeley, of Woodbury, Connecticut. 
Children: Robert R., born July 25, 1882; Ethel A., born July 30, 
1885 ; Sherwood S., born October 15, 1890; all reside in Morgantown, 
West Virginia, at the present time ( 1912) . 



6i8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Virgil L. Highland, president of the Empire Na- 
HIGHLAND tional Bank of Clarksburg, and actively and promi- 
nently identified with numerous other successful 
enterprises, all of which contribute to the general welfare of the state, 
is a native of West Milford, Harrison county, West Virginia, bom 
August 31, 1870, son of John E. and Lucy E. (Patton) Highland, and 
grandson of Jacob Highland, a farmer of West Milford. 

(II) John E., son of Jacob Highland, was born in West Milford, 
now West Virginia, October 19, 1832, died May 4, 1903. He was a 
farmer by occupation, served as teamster for the union army during 
the civil war, was a Methodist in religion, a Republican in politics, and 
was a member of the Masonic fraternity. He married Lucy E., daugh- 
ter of Ebenezer W. Patton, a resident of Clarksburg, a merchant, also 
justice of the peace. He has always taken an active part in politics, 
public improvements, and in all that pertains to the general upbuilding 
of the community, and has exerted a wide influence for good. 

(III) Virgil L., son of John E. Highland, pursued a business 
course at Delaware, Ohio, and attended college at Scio, Ohio. For the 
first seven years of his active career he served as bookkeeper for R. T. 
Lowndes, the following six years was spent as clerk of county court, 
and since 1903 has served in his present position, that of president of 
the Empire National Bank, which he then organized, and which has 
since increased materially in strength and power. The strength of a 
financial institution is in its capital, its assets, its honorable record, and 
the ability, character and standing of the men who conduct its affairs. 
Possessing these essential qualities, the Empire National Bank is now 
recognized among the leading financial institutions of the state. Mr. 
Highland is also a director in the Merchants' National Bank, the 
Southern States Mutual Life Insurance Company, the Hutchinson Coal 
Company, the Wilbur Coal and Coke Company, the Clarksburg Lum- 
ber and Planing Mill Company, the Penfield Coal and Coke Company, 
Union Gas and Carbon Company, the Columbia Gas Company, the 
Blinko Antique Art Glass Company, the Union Land Company, the 
Chevy Chase Land Company at Washington, D. C, the West Virginia 
Fair Association, and the Tuna Glass Company. In addition to these 
he is the owner of the Clarksburg Telegram, and the owner of two 
excellent farms. He is a Republican in politics, served as delegate to 




[.^^■,S mstor^^C^l F^XCo 





Upper Monongahela Valley. 619 

the Republican national committee in Chicago, when Roosevelt was the 
presidential nominee (1904), and at the present time (1912) is the 
chairman of the Republican state committee. He is a member of the 
Free and Accepted Masons, having attained the thirty-second degree; 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows; the local lodge of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and is a director of the Elk Club. He is 
a Baptist in religion. 

Mr. Highland married, at Clarksburg, December 31, 1902, Ger- 
trude E. Morgan, bom March 14, 1871, daughter of Dr. D. Porter 
Morgan, of Clarksburg, who was one of the oldest and best known 
residents there. Children: Stephen Lee, bom April 30, 1905; Anita, 
August 23, 1907. 



This is an old Maryland family and sometimes the name 
LAZIER is spelled Lozier. The family have always been consid- 
ered as among the intelligent and industrious citizens of 
the section of Maryland and Virginia where many of the Laziers reside. 

(I) Henry Lazier, a native of France, married and among his 
children was John, see forward. 

(II) John, son of Henry Lazier, was born in Pennsylvania. He 
emigrated to Ohio about 1820. He was a farmer, first in Guernsey 
county, then in Licking county, and later in Muskingum county, near 
Zanesville. He married twice and reared a family by both wives, in- 
cluding Elza Crosby, see forward. 

(III) Elza Crosby, son of John Lazier, was bom in Ohio in 1822. 
He received a common school education, and early in life became a 
merchant. He came to Morgantown in 1840 and there opened a gen- 
eral merchandise store. He married Jane McClure, of Wheeling, 
West Virginia, daughter of John McClure, who built the McClure 
Hotel in Wheeling, West Virginia, and had children: Mary, wife of 
Elisha H. Coombs; John W. ; Josephine A., wife of Henry Morgan, 
deceased; Albert Ewing, see forward; Elizabeth, wife of John T. 
Harris; Ada Maggie; Foreman; Fanny M., wife of James M. Bell; 
Harry, deceased. The father died about 1890. He was a member of 
the Masonic order and a Methodist. His wife died February 11, 
1903. 

(IV) Albert Ewing, son of Elza Crosby and Jane (McClure) 



620 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Lazier, was born at Morgantown, Virginia, October 14, 1847. He 
obtained a subscription school education and attended the old Monon- 
gahela Academy. He clerked in his father's store for eight years, until 
1868, when he married and moved to Illinois, remaining for a few 
months, but returned and purchased his father's dry goods store, which 
he conducted for two years, then sold the same and removed to Mis- 
souri, to the town of Ferguson, where he had a general store. From 
there he went to Arkansas, In which state he had a store, farm, saw mill 
and flouring mill combined. But still liking his old haunts in West Vir- 
ginia, he sold his property and returned to Morgantown, where for 
fourteen years he was engaged in the Ice and ice cream business, retir- 
ing in 1903. In 1904 he was a member of the city council, and in 
1905-06 mayor of that city. He holds membership in the Odd Fellows 
and National Union lodges. He married, in 1868, Olivia, daughter of 
Jacob and Elizabeth KIger, of Morgantown. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Kiger are both deceased; they had eight children: Olivia, wife of A. E. 
Lazier; Fielding, Lizzie, Norvill, Gordan, Harry, Maggie, Nye. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lazier have no children. 



Scotland has sent forth many sturdy families to 
McVICKER American soil, to assist in developing our republic. 

They came, many of them long before the British 
yoke was thrown off, and aided In securing our national independence 
in the war of the revolution. Among such Scotch people was the one 
now to be considered — the McVIckers. 

(I) Duncan McVicker, born In Scotland, at the age of eighteen 
years came to this country, accompanied by three brothers. They set- 
tled at Trenton, New Jersey. He was a lieutenant in the Second Regi- 
ment, Sussex County Militia. He married and had seven sons, Includ- 
ing James, see forward. 

(II) James, son of Duncan McVicker, settled In Monongalia 
county, Virginia, and died October 31, 1852. He married Permelia 
McNamar, who died August 23, 1847. They had a son named James 
Madison, see forward. 

(III) James Madison, son of James and Permelia (McNamar) 
McVicker, was born November 5, 1808, died December 23, 1899. He 
married Katherine Castelo, born November 16, 1809, died December 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 621 

19, 1895. They had children, including a son George Washington, 
see forward. 

(IV) George Washington, son of James Madison and Katherine 
(Castelo) McVicker, was born October 20, 1831. He married (first) 
Alcinda Rude, bom 1835, died 1871, daughter of John and Matilda 
(Collins) Rude. Children: Maud; Ella A., married C. A. Reed; 
Clark; John Clarence, see forward. George W. McVicker married 
(second) Mattie Clear, and had one child, Albertha, married Blair 
Widden. Francis Collins, father of Matilda Collins, married Anna 
Maple. Gabel Rude, father of John Rude, married Mary Roberts, 
and resided at Georgetown, Virginia. 

(V) John Clarence, son of George Washington and Alcinda 
(Rude) McVicker, was born in Monongalia county, Virginia, May 5, 
1859. He secured a good common school education, after which he 
attended the West Virginia University and the College of Pharmacy, 
at Philadelphia, from which he graduated in 1884. He went to 
Morgantown and there engaged in the drug trade in company with 
J. M. Reed. They dissolved in 1893, when Mr. McVicker opened a 
drug business on his own account. He votes the Republican ticket, and 
in church relation is of the Methodist Episcopal denomination. He 
was deputy sheriff of his county one term. He belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias fraternity. He married, in 1903, Alice, daughter of Peter 
and Mary McGinty. 



This family is a new one in West Virginia, and nothing 

MOORE can be learned of its ancestors back very far except that 

it was originally in Ohio. Three family heads are all 

that are known to the writer — Samuel, Robert and William Howard 

Moore. 

(II) Robert Moore, son of Samuel Moore, was born in Ohio, in 
1832, died in 1902. He became a prosperous farmer, and worked at 
the carpenter's trade in his immediate neighborhood considerably. In 
civil war days he enlisted as a member of the One Hundred and 
Twenty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regiment, and received an 
honorable discharge at the close of that war. In his politics he was a 
Democrat. He married Sophia, daughter of William and Lydia 



622 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Moore. Children : A. Floyd, Samuel Mathew, John E., Frank, Lidia 
A., Laura J., William Howard. 

(Ill) William Howard, son of Robert and Sophia (Moore) 
Moore, was born in Harrison county, Ohio. He received his education 
at the public schools in his native state, graduating from Scio College 
of Pharmacy in 1898. The same year he moved from Ohio to Cam- 
eron, West Virginia, where for four years he was engaged in the drug 
trade. He then located at Monongah where he conducted his business 
until February i, 191 1, then removed to Morgantown, where he pur- 
chased the Myers Drug Store, in which he is now carrying on a flourish- 
ing business. Mr. Moore is a Democrat. He has served four years 
as mayor of Monongah, and takes a lively interest in all public matters. 
He belongs to the Odd Fellows, Elks, Improved Order of Red Men 
and is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. In 1904 
he married Olive Bertha, daughter of William and Elizabeth Parriott. 



This is a Brownsville, Pennsylvania, family and fur- 
DEMAIN ther back than that it has not been traced, as the 

records of that state and adjoining ones have been 
carefully gone over without the discovery of the name in the various 
genealogical works and public records. The only outline now obtain- 
able Is this: 

(I) Robert Demain, whose wife's Christian name was Alice, came 
from England and settled at Brownsville, Pennsylvania, or vicinity. 

(II) Edward, son of Robert and Alice Demain, was a steamboat 
engineer and resided at Brownsville, Fayette county, Pennsylvania. 
He followed steamboating throughout his active life. 

(III) Robert Lewis, son of Edward Demain, was born in Browns- 
ville, Pennsylvania, in 1847. At the age of thirteen years he com- 
menced working on the steamboats running between Pittsburgh and 
Geneva, and is now a pilot and captain running on the same stream, be- 
tween Pittsburgh and Fairmont, two points on the Monongahela river. 
He votes the Democratic ticket, and in church relations is of the Epis- 
copal denomination. He married (first) Alice E. Demain. Children: 
Frank Aurentz, of whom further; Jennette, married C. William 
Cramer; she died April 25, 1900. Mrs. Demain died in the month of 
August, 1896. Robert Lewis Demain married (second) Jane Sprague. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 623 

(IV) Frank Aurentz, son of Robert Lewis and Alice E. (Demain) 
Demain, was born in Morgantown, West Virginia, August 25, 1871. 
He was educated in the Morgantown public schools, including the old 
Monongalia Academy. He was taught telegraphy at the Western 
Union telegraph office, and in 1905 became the manager of the Postal 
Telegraph Company at Morgantown, which position he held for sev- 
eral months, when he resigned. He belongs to the Episcopal church, 
and in politics is a Democrat. The Demain family have seen many 
changes along the navigable streams since their early ancestor came 
west in the pioneer days. 



This is a family that came from England, but was 
DEMAIN doubtless of French ancestry originally, as the name 

would indicate. 
(I) Francis Demain was born in England and came to America 
with his father, Robert Demain, and in 1842 came to Morgantown, 
Virginia, in which city he was a silversmith and storekeeper the remain- 
der of his life. When the Baltimore & Ohio railroad was being con- 
structed through the state, he furnished provisions for the workmen, he 
being the leading merchant in Morgantown at that date in its history. 
He acquired considerable valuable real estate in Morgantown. During 
the civil war he conducted a grocery store there, and upon one occasion 
the Confederates broke into his store and helped themselves to the sup- 
plies on hand. In breaking in the doors they used the butt end of their 
guns and the marks can be seen on the doors of the house in which the 
store was kept even to this day. It is now used as a printing office by 
the Post Printing Company. At that time Mr. Demain lived on a 
farm on the Kingwood Pike just over South Park Hill. He married 
Annie E., daughter of Henry J. Rigden, of Brownsville, Pennsylvania. 
Children: Edward R., chief of the weather bureau at Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania; Robert Henry, of whom further; Catherine Alice; Alice 
E., married Captain Robert L. Demain, who died in 1889, and left two 
children, Frank A. and Jennette, who married C. William Cramer, and 
is now deceased. The children were all educated at the Seminary at 
Morgantown. The "Noisy Nine" Ball Team, in 1876, had Francis 
Demain as one of its members, at Dunkard, Pennsylvania. Fifteen 



624 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

members of that club still survive. Francis Demain died and was 
buried at Oak Grove cemetery. 

(II) Robert Henry, son of Francis and Annie E. (Rigden) De- 
main, was born at Morgantown, Virginia, now West Virginia, May 6, 
185 I. He received his education at a subscription school and at Mo- 
nongahela Academy, finishing at the West Virginia University. He 
worked on his father's farm and later in life learned the carpenter's 
trade. He built some of the best buildings in Morgantown, including 
some of the university structures. He also constructed the county jail, 
continuing at such work until he retired in 1903. He was a council- 
man from South Morgantown three times. Member of the Odd Fel- 
lows, of which fraternity he was noble grand. He married, October, 
1902, Catherine Shanklin. Child, Catherine Hope, born April 12, 
1904. 



Among the Smith families who formerly lived in Penn- 
SMITH sylvania was the one of which Alfred Smith was an hon- 
ored member. He resided in Fayette county, married 
there and had a son, John H., of whom further. 

(II) John H., son of Alfred Smith, was born in Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, September 20, 1830. He worked in a foundry and brick 
yard until he decided to learn the tailor's trade, serving his apprentice- 
ship in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. He worked at that trade in Pitts- 
burgh until he came to Morgantown in 1854. He carried on a success- 
ful business in his line until 1900, when he turned the business over to 
his son. He belonged to the Aid Society of Morgantown. He mar- 
ried Margaret Sparks. Children: Alfred K., of whom further; Ella 
M., married Morlland Gilmore. Mr. Smith died in 1907; his wife 
died in 1905. 

(III) Alfred K., son of John H. and Margaret (Sparks) Smith, 
was born in Morgantown, now West Virginia, October 5, 1858. He 
received a good common school education, and when but a small boy 
delivered the daily Morgantown Post. When old enough he went to 
work in his father's tailor shop, but later took up painting, but again in 
1885 and on to 1889 he followed the tailoring trade, then went to 
New York to attend a "cutting school." In 1900 he took over the 
business which he is still conducting with merited success as a merchant 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 625 

tailor in the city of Morgantown. Mr. Smith votes the Republican 
ticket; he has served two terms on the city council and has been treas- 
urer one term. Since 1883 he has been a member of the Odd Fellows 
order; also belongs to the Elks, the Eagles and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. He married, October 3, 1889, Ida M., daughter 
of John and Abbie Choen, of New Castle, Pennsylvania. Children: 
Edith and Margaret. 



About the time of the war for independence in 
DOUTHAT America, there came the first of the Douthat family 

to this country. The name of the original emigrant 
is not established by the family records now extant. Snatches of the 
history of the family contain the substance of this narrative which, as 
will be observed, shows the lineal connection between four generations 
to the present. 

(I) Robert Douthat was born in 1777, either in Ireland or Amer- 
ica, the emigrant ancestors coming here about that date. There are 
authentic records tracing the family to Coleraine, Ireland. Robert 
Douthat married Mary Yost, bom in Staunton, Virginia, 1780. Among 
their children was a son named David Griner, of whom further. 

(II) David Griner, son of Robert and Mary (Yost) Douthat, 
was born December 25, 1804, in Fincastle, Virginia. He married 
Mary Ann Adams, bom in Bedford county, Virginia, February 10, 
1 8 13. They had a son, Robert William, of whom further. 

(III) Robert William, son of David Griner and Mary Ann 
(Adams) Douthat, was born April 13, 1840, in Christiansburg, Vir- 
ginia. He was educated in private schools and in the ante-bellum 
Academy of Montgomery county, Virginia, finishing in Emory and 
Henry College, Virginia. He was an instmctor in the academies of the 
older type and in the high school of a later date; also in collegiate 
institutes, as both president and professor at different times, in different 
places. He was professor in the University of Missouri School of 
Mines and Metallurgy; also as professor in the West Virginia Univer- 
sity from 1895 to 1908, in all teaching more than forty years; he is 
now on the "Carnegie Foundation." He took part in the rebellion, 
from 1 861 to 1865, and was an officer in General R. E. Lee's army. 



626 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

participating in most of Lee's battles. He now gives much of his time 
to public lectures on the civil war, and is the only officer of Pickett's 
division who makes it a business to lecture on "Gettysburg." He has 
always been a great Sunday school worker and is now the teacher of the 
largest woman's class in West Virginia, if not in the world. Politically 
he is a Democrat, and in church relations is a Methodist Episcopalian. 

He married Mary Jane, born May 6, 1844, in Floyd county, Vir- 
ginia, daughter of Job and Elizabeth Wells. Their children are: 
Claudius David, born August 12, 1866, in Floyd county, Virginia; 
Lucy Emma, July 5, 1868, in Floyd county, Virginia; Mary Elizabeth, 
May 14, 1870, in Christiansburg, Virginia; Leland Wells, April 20, 
1872, in Christiansburg. The following were all born in Rolla, Mis- 
souri: Rudenz Sharpies, December 27, 1873; Luther Lee, March 13, 
1876; Robert Marvin, of whom further; Dana Glenn, December 3, 
1879; Genevieve Lane, May 16, 1884. 

(IV) Robert Marvin, son of Robert William and Mary Jane 
(Wells) Douthat, was born in Rolla, Missouri, March 2, 1878. He 
acquired his education by attending the common schools and Barbours- 
ville College, finishing at the West Virginia University. After leaving 
his school room duties, he put in some time with the Morgantown Tele- 
phone Exchange, of the Central District, and Printing Telegraph Com- 
pany. He graduated in shorthand and typewriting in 1894. In 1902 
he took up the art of printing and in the Acme Publishing Company's 
offices turned out the first piece of job work ever issued from their 
presses, now so famous for artistic work. After two years he went with 
the Daily Dominion, with which paper he remained one year. Novem- 
ber 28, 1905, he purchased Moreland's Electric Supply Store of 
Morgantown, where he is now conducting a successful business. He 
votes the Democratic ticket. He is a member of the Methodist church. 
He is associated with the Methodist Brotherhood, Business Men's 
Association and the Retail Business Men's Association of West Vir- 
ginia. In 1909 he married Evelyn M., daughter of James P. and 
Delia Robinson. One son, James Robert, born January 15, 19 10. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 627 

This Brown family, with many representatives living in 
BROWN West Virginia at this time, is truly among the illustrious 

and first families of Virginia, as the records show that 
they were inhabitants of Virginia in the early years of the seventeenth 
century, about 1632. Jefferson SlideU Brown, a resident of Kingwood, 
West Virginia, is a hneal descendant of William Brown, of Prince 
William county, Virginia, whose name is mentioned in Hotten's List 
of Pilgrims to America, under date of February 16, 1632. The name 
of William Brown is mentioned also in King James I.'s time, in the 
second charter to the treasurer of the Virginia Company, dated May 
23, 1609. William Brown was a burgess for Surrey county in the 
Virginia assembly of 1660. 

(I) The earliest ancestor of whom there is definite information 
was William Brown, who purchased lands of Leonard Barker, in Staf- 
ford county, Virginia, deeds bearing date of April 12 and April 13, 
1726. This was for a tract of land on Powell's Run, then Stafford, 
but now Prince William county, Virginia. The deed of this tract of 
two hundred and twelve and three-fourth acres, was under date of De- 
cember 29, 1732, to William Brown Jr. 

(II) William (2) , son of William (i) Brown, was born between 
1724 and 1729, died January, 1807. About the year 1756 or 1757, he 
married Elizabeth Buckner. Among their children was Thomas, see 
forward. 

(III) Thomas, son of William (2) and Elizabeth (Buckner) 
Brown, was born September 7, 1760, died in August, 1844. He was 
a soldier in Captain John Britt's company, under Colonel William 
Lucas, of the Virginia troops, and marched south joining General 
Greene's army in South Carolina. He was twice on duty at the cele- 
brated battle of the Cowpens, South Carolina, January 17, 1781. On 
pages 85 and 86 of "Safford's Records of the Revolutionary War," 
Captain William Brown, of Colonel Charles Harrison's regiment of 
artillery, is mentioned on the payroll, under date of December 26, 
1780, at which time he called for the pay of his company which then 
amounted to $15,100. It is supposed that this William Brown was the 
father of Thomas Brown now under consideration. In 1832 Thomas 
Brown received a pension, by act of congress, as evidenced by the rec- 
ords of the pension office at Washington. 



628 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Thomas Brown married, October 20, 1785, Anna, daughter of 
George and Mary (Byrne) Ash, and Hved for a time near what is now 
Rectortown. This is in Fauquier county, Virginia. April 2, 1803, an 
inventory of his possessions was taken, which showed that he owned 
eight slaves about sixteen years of age, four slaves about twelve years 
of age, and four horses. The year before this inventory was taken, 
through Colonel John Fairfax, he purchased five hundred and seventy- 
eight acres of land of William McClery, of Morgantown. This land 
is situated nine miles west of Kingwood, West Virginia, and is now 
known as the "Stone House" property. In the spring of 1805 Thomas 
Brown moved to this place, and the year afterwards his wife Anna 
died, on May 4, 1806. Thomas Brown is described as a man rather 
small in stature, but of extra sound body and healthy ; very kind to his 
servants and negro slaves, as well as to his dogs and horses. He dis- 
inherited his son, John Buckner, because he whipped a slave against his 
orders. The negro had run away, but had returned of his own accord. 
The children of Thomas and Anna (Ash) Brown were: Elizabeth; 
John Buckner, of whom further; George; Lydia; Samuel Byrne; Will- 
iam; Mary Ann; Thomas Francis, of whom further. 

(IV) John Buckner, son of Thomas and Anna (Ash) Brown, was 
born January 28, 1788, in Prince William county, Virginia. In the 
spring of 1805 he removed with his father's family to the "Stone 
House" property, above mentioned. In 181 1 he journeyed westward 
to Wayne county, Ohio, and in the fall of 18 13 removed his family to 
that state. He died at the town of Shreve, Wayne county, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 15, 1855. In 1 8 10 he married Mary Morgan, who lived on 
the east side of Cheat river, near Kingwood. She was the daughter of 
Hugh Morgan, a pioneer of Preston county, and was bom May 12, 
1790, died July 12, 1850. She was the fourth child in a family of ten 
children. 

(IV) Thomas Francis, son of Thomas and Anna (Ash) Brown, 
was born May 4, 1801, died May 4, 1843, '" Virginia. He was only 
four years old when the family crossed the mountains from Prince Will- 
iam county to Preston county, and five years old the day his mother 
died. His father gave him the best schooling the country then afforded 
and during his youth sent him to some of the better schools in the east- 
ern part of Virginia. He became a quite noted teacher in Mononga- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 629 

hela and Preston counties, and was long remembered because of his beau- 
tiful penmanship and fine scholarship. Later he became deputy sherift 
of Preston county, and was noted for his readiness in preparing legal 
instruments. He married Elizabeth Zinn, in 1830, daughter of John 
Zinn, who lived on the old Gandy farm, near Gladesville. She was 
bom October 17, 1810, and died March 11, 1851, of consumption, as 
did her husband. Six children were bom to them, who by the will of 
Thomas Brown, the grandfather, received in 1844 half of the original 
"Stone House" estate. Thomas F. Brown, it is said, was one of the 
most courteous, affable men of his day. Children: i. Adahne, born 
June 9, 1 83 1, and died June 13, 1868, at Independence, Preston county. 
West Virginia; married William J. Morgan. 2. Buckner, born No- 
vember 6, 1832, died June 24, 1877; married, December 29, 1853, 
Jane Freeburn. 3. William T., born January 7, 1835; married (first), 
March 6, 1862, Sarah C. Hamilton, who died June 29, 1875 ; married 
(second), November 20, 1877, Margaret C. Swindler, now living in 
Grafton, West Virginia. 4. Charles Mercer, of whom further. 5. 
Virgil S., born October 15, 1838, died October 18, 1896; married, 
October 26, 1870, Sarah Jenkins, born January 17, 1848. 6. Chloe 
N., born August 5, 1849, died and was buried at Independence, Octo- 
ber, 1865, unmarried. 

(V) Charles Mercer, fourth child of Thomas Francis and Eliza- 
beth (Zinn) Brown, was born January 29, 1837, died November 26, 
1868. He became a bright, energetic lawyer, and engaged in the ac- 
tive practice of law at Harrisville, Ritchie county, West Virginia. His 
death was caused by hemorrhage of the lungs, caused by contracting a 
severe cold. Politically he voted the Democratic ticket, and in relig- 
ious faith was of the Presbyterian denomination. He married Har- 
riet Virginia Fairfax, of the well-known Virginia family. In their 
family the birth and marriages were on noted days of the year: His 
wife was born July 4, 1840, daughter of Franklin B. F. Fairfax, and 
granddaughter of Colonel John Fairfax, of Virginia, who came to 
Preston county from eastern Virginia in 1790. Colonel John Fairfax 
had been the superintendent of Washington's Mt. Vernon estates; had 
represented Monongalia in the house of delegates and in the year of 
Thomas Brown's arrival was sheriff of the county. Besides being born 
on Independence Day, Harriet V. Fairfax was united in marriage with 



630 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Charles M. Brown on Washington's Birthday, February 22, 1861. 
Her eldest child, Jefferson Slidell, was bom November 28, 1861; her 
second child, Benjamin Lodd, March 17, 1863, which was St. Pat- 
rick's Day. By her second marriage to Charles R. Morgan, of Marion 
county, in 1872, she had a daughter. May Fairfax, her youngest child, 
born on May Day, 1874. She died December 27, 1897. 

(VI) Jefferson Slidell, son of Charles Mercer and Harriet Virginia 
(Fairfax) Brown, was born at the old Fairfax Manor House, erected 
by his great-grandfather. Colonel John Fairfax, in 1818, situated two 
miles west of Kingwood, West Virginia. He received his education, 
beginning with the good common schools, after which he taught school 
five years in Preston county, after his graduation from the Cleveland 
College, Ohio. He then served as clerk and secretary to the board of 
directors of the State Institution for the Insane, at Weston, West Vir- 
ginia. Having already determined upon becoming a lawyer, he re- 
signed his position, but things frequently change one's plans for life, 
and such was the case with Mr. Brown, who purchased the Argus, at 
Kingwood, in 1889, and he has ever since been at its helm. He is a 
brilliant, forceful writer, and his editorials are widely read and copied. 
He also contributes for other publications. Politically he is a Demo- 
crat, and his party, knowing his capability, has kept him constantly in 
their service. He was chairman of the Democratic committee sixteen 
years; he served on judicial, senatorial, congressional and state com- 
mittees. He was twice a candidate for state senator. In April, 1893, he 
was appointed postmaster of Kingwood and served over four years. In 
1896 he was a delegate from West Virginia to the national convention 
at Chicago for the nomination of William Jennings Bryan, and subse- 
quently served eight years as a member of the board of regents of the 
State School for the Deaf and Blind, at Romney, West Virginia. He 
also served as president of the State Editorial Association five terms, 
which was the longest ever served by any one man. He positively de- 
clined another term. He served as captain of Company G in the Na- 
tional Guards, having had many an exciting experience, and was called 
out on two occasions to suppress mob violence. On one occasion his 
company was ordered to Charleston by the governor to guard a negro 
on trial for rape on a white woman. He succeeded in suppressing the 
violence of a mob composed of five hundred men, who attempted to 





■■>5&/^^/^. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 631 

storm the jail one night and lynch the negro. Hard and unpleasant 
as was his task, Captain Brown at once arrested the leaders of the mob, 
one by one, until he had fourteen of them in jail, by which time the mob 
was quieted down, and all was done without the shedding of blood. 
The negro was afterward tried by a fair and impartial jury, was sen- 
tenced to death by the court and properly executed. Mr. Brown is 
socially connected with about every order calculated to better the con- 
dition of his fellowmen. Among these may be mentioned the Masonic, 
Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias fraternities. 

On October 15, 1902, Mr. Brown married Stella Maud, daughter 
of Captain J. W. Parsons, who served in the Confederate army under 
General Robert E. Lee. Children: Fairfax, born September 22, 1903; 
Hazel Ewing, bom June 25, 1905; Keith Parsons, born January 19, 
1907; Leland Dickson, born March 15, 1909; Linden Warren, bom 
June 2, 191 1. 



This family originally came from Wales, and was repre- 
DAVIS sented first on this continent in New Jersey. Descendants 
have lived in many parts of the country, and the family 
name has always stood for character and uprlghcness. 

(I) Rev. John Davis, the Welsh emigrant to New Jersey, married 
and had numerous children In his family, as did most of the early 
Welsh families who settled in this country. But little is now obtain- 
able concerning this minister of the Gospel other than that among his 
children was a son named James, of whom further. 

(II) James, son of Rev. John Davis, was bom In Monongalia 
county, Virginia, November 15, 1798. Hence it would appear that 
the American ancestor soon removed from New Jersey to Virginia, 
where he reared his children. James Davis was a carpenter and 
erected some of the largest buildings in Morgantown, West Virginia. 
He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married., 
June 22, 1826, Nancy, born July 16, 1803, daughter of William 
Reed. Children: Lucinda, married William Sinclair; Alstopheus; 
John C. ; Elizabeth A., married George W. Lalshley; Melissa A., mar- 
ried Samuel McVicker; Fench E.; May J., died In infancy; James N., 
of whom further. The father died in 1882, and the mother, Nancy 
(Reed) Davis, died June 20, 1876. 



632 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(Ill) James N., son of James and Nancy (Reed) Davis, was bom 
at Morgantown, West Virginia, September 8, 1840. He was edu- 
cated at the subscription schools and at the old Monongahela Academy. 
He followed farming until 1864, when he enlisted in the Seventeenth 
West Virginia Regiment of Volunteers as a corporal. He was mus- 
tered out at Wheeling, and resumed his labors as a farmer, continuing 
until 1877, then moved to Morgantown, where at first he engaged in 
the slate and tin roofing business, also did cornice and gas fitting work, 
under the firm name of Davis & Huston. He was chief of police and 
street commissioner at Morgantown. Mr. Davis is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and identified with the Grand Army of 
the Republic. He married, December 21, 1870, Helen M., daughter 
of Thomas Hare. Children: George W., born October 9, 1871; 
Fred A., May 19, 1876; Ralph K., September 21, 1899. Mrs. Davis 
died January 17, 1909. 



But little can now be gleaned from records concerning 
LOUGH this family and its origin. It has had among its mem- 
bers several worthy farmers and merchants in West Vir- 
ginia. Four generations and possibly more have lived and labored for 
the welfare of Monongahela Valley. 

(I) Robert Lough and wife had children, among whom a son, 
Matthew W., of whom, further; Elizabeth, Sarah A., Julia. The 
father was a farmer by occupation. 

(II) Matthew W., son of Robert Lough, was a native of Monon- 
galia county, Virginia, born in 18 10. He followed farming through- 
out his days of activity, and had the respect of all in the community. 
He married Elizabeth Cordray, of the same county, born in 18 12. 
Children: Juretta, Jane, Linnie, Calvin, Hesekiah, Matthew, Isaac 
Newton, of whom further. 

(III) Isaac Newton, son of Matthew W. and Elizabeth (Cord- 
ray) Lough, was born in what is now Marion county. West Virginia, 
June 7, 1849. He attended the common schools of his native county, 
and aided his father on his farm. His earlier years were spent at 
farming for himself. After his marriage he became a merchant at both 
Farmington and Fairmont, West Virginia, continuing in business for a 
period of thirty years. Later in life he engaged in the real estate busi- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 633 

ness. He is a Republican, a worthy member of the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He married, October 17, 1872, at Barrackville, Marion county, West 
Virginia, Sarah Ellen, daughter of David Prichard, of Marion county, 
a miller by occupation, whose children were: Newton, Charles E., 
Mary E., Caroline, Sarah Ellen. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Lough: 
Lillie S., married Charles W. Evans; Roy Arthur, of whom further; 
Hattie B., Mary Z., married Amor B. Cole; Elizabeth M., W^alter 
Gay, William F. The deceased children are: Franic M., died July 11, 
1908; Elizabeth, died June 10, 1909. 

(IV) Roy Arthur, son of Isaac Newton and Sarah Ellen (Prich- 
ard) Lough, was born July 16, 1876. When twelve years of age he 
moved to Fairmont with his family, and there received most of his 
early educational training, both in the public schools and at the State 
Normal School, from which he graduated in 1896. The three years 
succeeding his graduation from the normal he clerked in his father's 
store in Fairmont. In 1899 he engaged in business for himself at 
Farmington. He returned to Fairmont and was bill clerk in a whole- 
sale grocery house one year, later accepted a position in the auditor's 
office of the Fairmont Coal Company, which position he filled for a 
year and a half. He returned to the grocery company, with whom he 
was employed as salesman for two years. November 19, 1905, he was 
made manager of the Armstrong Crislip Day Company, wholesale 
grocers at Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he was employed until 
February 15, 1906, when he was made manager of the Smith-Race 
Company at Morgantown, remaining until April i, 191 1, when he 
organized the Lough-Simpson Grocery Company, a wholesale grocery 
corporation, at Morgantown, and is now its manager and treasurer. 
He has served as director of the Morgantown Board of Trade, and is 
fully abreast with all local enterprises tending to advance the interests 
of his city and county. Mr. Lough is Republican, and in church faith 
is of the Methodist denomination. He holds membership in the Ma- 
sonic order, being a member of Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery, 
and is also a member of the Knights of Pythias. In 1899 he mar- 
ried Lulu Maude, daughter of Eli and Margaret (Turney) Musgrave. 



634 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

This family, claiming to be descendants of that well- 
ALLEN known historic character, Ethan Allen, has been long 

identified with the Virginias. The branch of the family 
now to be considered is the one to which Dr. Silas B. Allen, of Mor- 
gantown, belongs. 

(I) Joshua Allen was bom November 24, 1787, in Harrison 
county, Virginia. He was an industrious, prosperous farmer. He 
married Rebecca Whiteman, born January 15, 1799. 

(II) Osburn, son of Joshua and Rebecca (Whiteman) Allen, was 
born in Harrison county, Virginia, March 21, 1826. He received the 
common education of his day and generation, and followed his father's 
occupation, that of a farmer. He was a member of the Board of Ed- 
ucation, in church relations was of the Baptist denomination and voted 
the Democratic ticket. He married Jane Langfitt. Children: Valen- 
tine L., born January 13, 1851 ; Stephen and May B. (twins), August 
2, 1853; Silas Benton and William (twins), February 28, 1856; Co- 
lumbus J., May 2, 1858; Robert E. L., November 28, 1867; Orilous 
O., January 26, 1871. The father died December 5, 1908, and the 
mother, Jane (Langfitt) Allen, February 8, 1899. 

(III) Dr. Silas Benton Allen, son of Osburn and Jane (Langfitt) 
Allen, was bom in Salem, Virginia, February 28, 1856. He received 
his education at the public schools and University of Maryland. He 
graduated from the dental department in 1905, after which he prac- 
ticed for three years at Parkersburg, West Virginia. He sold out his 
business there and removed to Morgantown in 1908, and there he is 
still enjoying a large practice in dental surgery. He is a member of 
the State Dental Society and belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons 
and the Knights of Pythias. He married, in 1892, May Julia, daugh- 
ter of William Wright, of Parkersburg, West Virginia. Children: 
R. Wayne, born November 23, 1899; Harold Edson, March 15, 1904. 



Edward Miller Grant, actively and prominently iden- 
GRANT tified with the development and prosperity of Morgan- 
town, where he has resided for almost a quarter of a cen- 
tury, is a native of Cleveland, Ohio, born February 3, 1853, son of 
William and Hannah (Turner) Grant, and grandson of William 
Grant, a resident of England. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 635 

(II) William (2) Grant was born in Great Grinsby, Lincolnshire, 
England, December 8, 18 13, died in 1896. He was reared, educated 
and spent his early manhood in his native country, emigrating to the 
United States in 1850, locating in Cleveland, Ohio, where he resided 
until 1862. He removed to Whitefield, Indian Territory. He was a 
man of integrity and ability, and performed the duties devolving upon 
him to the best of his knowledge. He married Hannah Turner. Chil- 
dren: John, William, deceased; Thomas, Jane, Edward Miller, Azu- 
bah, George. 

(III) Edward Miller, son of William (2) Grant, was educated 
in the public schools of his native city, including the high school. His 
first position was that of office boy for the firm of Hussey & McBride, 
oil refiners, who promoted him from time to time as a reward for his 
diligence and thrift, first to position of clerk and then to that of book- 
keeper, remaining with them in the latter capacity until the business was 
sold to Clark, Payne & Company, with whom he took a similar posi- 
tion. Later he purchased the interests of his employers in the Pennsyl- 
vania oil fields at Foxburg, where he remained from 1868 to 1872, 
during which time he assisted in erecting the town building, the water- 
works, which he managed for a number of years, and was engaged in 
the producing of oil and gas, organizing in 1885 a company and fur- 
nishing gas for Foxburg and St. Petersburg, which was known as the 
Union Light and Heat Company. In 1880 he engaged in the crucible 
steel business in Cleveland, Ohio, as secretary and treasurer of the 
Crucible Steel Company, continuing until 1884, then returned to the oil 
business. In January, 1889, he came to Morgantown, and in connection 
with others organized the Union Improvement Company, now Union 
Utilities Company, the object of which was to supply water and natural 
gas to Morgantown, and they also built the electric railroad. Mr. Grant 
was manager of this for fifteen years, during which time he organized 
the Morgantown Building and Investment Company, serving as sec- 
retary, treasurer and general manager, said company purchasing land 
and starting the general development of Morgantown, which In the 
past ten years has increased In population four hundred and eighty per 
cent. He is also largely interested in real estate and manufacture of 
brick, serving as secretary and treasurer of the Morgan Brick Com- 
pany; he Is also president of the Federal Savings Trust Company and 



636 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

a director in the Pressed Prism Plate Glass Company, Crystal Tumbler 
Company and Monongalia Valley Bank, serving in the latter institution 
for fifteen years. He also served as manager for the Fairmont and 
Grafton Gas Company, which was organized in 1892 for the purpose 
of supplying gas to those cities. In 1899 and 1901 he was a member of 
the legislature, rendering highly efficient service. He is a member of 
Morgantown Union Lodge, No. 4, Free and Accepted Masons; Orient 
Chapter, No. 9, Royal Arch Masons, of Morgantown; Morgantown 
Commandery, No. 18, Knights Templar; Versailles Council, No. 238, 
Royal Arcanum, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania; Fidelity Council, No. 
31, Knights of the Maccabees; Valley Lodge, No. 51, American Or- 
der of United Workmen, and Monongalia Lodge, No. 10, Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Grant married, June 13, 1876, Florence Mary, daughter of 
Colonel Frank and Mary (Pike) Dale, of Pennsylvania. Children: 
I. Edith Mary, bom December 3, 1878; married Harry John Zevely; 
one child, John Grant. 2. Dale, born March i, 1879, died during 
the Spanish- American war; he enlisted in the First Virginia Regi- 
ment and was transferred to the Reserved Ambulance Corps. 3. Han- 
nah Elizabeth, born January 30, 1880; married Charles Everett Casto; 
two children: Dale Grant and Florence. 4. Frank, died in infancy. 
5. Edward, died in infancy. 



Samuel Edmondson, the first of the line here 
EDMONDSON under consideration of whom we have definite 

information, was born in 1750, died about 1830. 
He served in the revolutionary war as quartermaster in the continental 
army, as quartermaster in the Fourth Maryland Battalion of the Fly- 
ing Camp, June, 1776; as hospital surgeon's mate from June, 1777, to 
June 20, 1780, and as hospital physician and surgeon from September 
20, 1 78 1, to the close of the war. He married Martha Elmore, and 
among their children was Richard Coleman, see forward. 

(II) Richard Coleman, son of Samuel and Martha (Elmore) 
Edmondson, was born in 1789, died November 6, 1859. He was 
active in the affairs of the community in which he resided, and was 
highly esteemed and respected by all with whom he was brought in 
contact. He married. May 15, 1823, Susan Howell, bom Decem- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 637 

ber 23, 1803, died November 14, 1891, daughter of Isham and Sallie 
(Howell) Chastain, the latter-named his first wife. Among the chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Edmondson was Richard Howell, see forward. 

(III) Richard Howell, son of Richard Coleman and Susan Howell 
(Chastain) Edmondson, was born February 2, 1829, died June 23, 
1910. He was a resident of Halifax Court House, Virginia, where 
his parents also resided, and later removed to Richmond, Virginia, and 
then to Austin, Texas, where he engaged in business, from which he 
derived a comfortable means of livelihood. He married, July 2, i860, 
Mary Missouri, daughter of Price and Elizabeth (McMurtry) Mont- 
gomery, born February 6, 1840, died September 2, 1868. Among their 
children was Richard Henry, see forward. 

(IV) Richard Henry, son of Richard Howell and Mary Missouri 
(Montgomery) Edmondson, was born in Richmond, Virginia, May 
22, 1 867. When three years of age his parents moved to Austin, Texas, 
where his boyhood was passed. He attended a private school until he 
was fifteen years of age, when he was sent to the University of the 
South at Sewanee, Tennessee, where he remained three years, grad- 
uating with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Upon his return to his 
home in Texas he accepted a state position in the General Land office, 
and worked at the adjoining desk to William H. Porter, who later be- 
came the noted author of short stories under the nom-de-plume of O. 
Henry. Having an earnest desire to become a member of the medical 
profession, he pursued a course of special preparation for one year and 
then matriculated at the Hahnemann Medical College in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, graduating from that institution in the class of 1890. 
Returning to Texas he engaged in the practice of his chosen profession 
at his former home, Austin, but later went to Arizona and New Mex- 
ico. For ten years, in addition to his private practice, he served as sur- 
geon to the Caledonian Coal Company, to Senator W. A. Clarke's 
mines and to the Crescent Coal Company. In 1902 Dr. Edmondson 
returned east and pursued a course of study at the Post-Graduate Med- 
ical School in New York City, and in June of the same year located in 
Morgantown, West Virginia, where he is engaged in successful prac- 
tice at the present time (1912). He is thorough and painstaking in 
the diagnosis and treatment of disease, takes an interest in his patients, 
and therefore fully merits the patronage enjoyed by him. In 1903-04 



638 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

he served in the capacity of county and city health officer, discharging 
these onerous duties with promptness and fidelity. He was one of 
the incorporators of the Morgantown City Hospital Association, in 
which he also served as secretary; ex-president of the Monongalia 
County Medical Society, and delegate to the State Medical Association 
at the meeting of this association held at White Sulphur Springs, Sep- 
tember, 191 1, at which time he was elected counsellor of the second 
district. He is a consistent and active member of the Episcopal church. 
Dr. Edmondson has traveled extensively throughout the United States, 
but derives his greatest pleasure in the home circle, where he spends all 
of his leisure time. He is a member of Free and Accepted Masons, 
Union Lodge, No. 4, of Morgantown; Improved Order of Red 
Men, and Sons of the Revolution. Politically he is a Democrat. Mrs. 
Edmondson is ex-state regent and present vice-president-general of the 
National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

Dr. Edmondson married, October 27, 1897, Harriette Frances Cod- 
wise, of Kingston, New York, daughter of Edward B. and Emma 
(Snyder) Codwise, of Kingston, New York. Children: Helen Louise, 
born in Gallup, New Mexico, October 23, 1898 ; Gladys Chastain, born 
in Gallup, New Mexico, May 22, 1900; Harriette Codwise, born in 
Morgantown, West Virginia, July 16, 1905 ; Richard Edward, born in 
Morgantown, West Virginia, April 20, 19 10. 



This is one of the oldest family names in America, 
ROGERS dating from the arrival of the "Mayflower" in 1620, 
Thomas Rogers and his son Joseph being passengers 
on that historic craft. Writing in 1650 Governor Bradford says 
"Thomas Rogers died in the first sickness, but his son is still living 
and is married and has six children — the rest of his children came 
over and are married and have many children." The name is a very 
common one in the United States — emigrants of that name having 
come from England, Scotland and Ireland. There is no connection 
traced between the New England families and those of the south and 
west, there being no record of this particular branch that is discov- 
ered beyond Thomas Rogers, of Fayette county, Pennsylvania, a de- 
scendant of ancestors who settled in Maryland. 

The earliest record found of this branch of the Rogers family in 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 639 

Pennsylvania is in Fayette county, Dunbar township. Thomas Rogers 
and his five brothers are said to have come from Maryland to Mount 
Braddock accompanied by their widowed mother. They took up lands 
in Dunbar township, under what was commonly styled "Tomahawk 
Claims," but becoming dissatisfied soon disposed of their interests to 
Samuel Work. The Rogers families then moved to Washington 
county, and in the Indian aggressions that befell that region three of 
the brothers lost their lives. The others then moved to the mouth of the 
Beaver, but shortly returned to Dunbar township and located in what 
is now known as the Cross Keys school district. One of the brothers 
opened a blacksmith shop on the Uniontown road and soon built a 
tavern nearby. It is said he set a pair of cross keys over his shop as a 
sign that he was a locksmith as well as a blacksmith, and when he 
opened his hotel he conceived the idea of calling it the Cross Keys 
Tavern, by which name it was long known. There is a tradition that 
the Rogers brothers founded a Masonic lodge in that neighborhood 
and that for a time the mysterious meetings of the brotherhood in the 
Cross Keys school house periodically excited the awe and wondering 
curiosity of the people of that vicinity, who were accustomed to gather 
regularly on lodge nights and exert themselves to a painful degree 
in their fruitless efforts to penetrate into the awful secrets and amazing 
performances which they were convinced were hidden within the 
school house walls. 

Daniel Rogers, a son of the early family, married a daughter of 
Colonel Isaac Mason, a Virginian by birth and an important figure in 
the early history of Fayette county. Daniel Rogers died in 1873 at 
New Haven, Fayette county, at the great age of ninety-five years. 

(I) Thomas Rogers' name appears in a list of the taxpayers of 
Dunbar township, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, under date of 1799, 
as owner of one slave, five cattle and three hundred acres of land. He 
married and among his children was a son William. 

(II) William, son of Thomas Rogers, was born in Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, about the year 1790. He was a farmer and woodsman. 
There is little record to be found of him in Fayette county. 

(III) Thomas (2), son of William Rogers, was born in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, December 20, 1812. He was a farmer of Fay- 
ette county until 1866, when he moved to Morgantown, West Vir- 



640 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

ginia, where he engaged in looking after his farm and milling prop- 
erties. He was a man of good business ability and bore an unblem- 
ished reputation. He was a member of the Episcopal church and a 
Republican in politics. He died in Morgantown, March 4, 1894. 
He married Mary M., born September 14, 18 18, died April 27, 
1887, daughter of John Rogers, born March 3, 1795, died 1833, 
in Hagerstown, Maryland; his wife was Mary (Squibb) Rogers; she 
was born in 1796, died October 28, 1822. Children: George, William, 
Daniel E., Anna P., deceased. 

(IV) George, son of Thomas (2) Rogers, was born in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, May 26, 1857. He attended the public school 
of his town until the removal of the family to Morgantown in the au- 
tumn of 1866; he completed his preparatory studies in the schools of 
that city, and later entered the University of West Virginia. After 
completing his course of study he engaged in agriculture and stock 
raising. He owns a well-improved farm of one hundred and sixteen 
acres and conducts a business in cattle, buying, selling and breeding. 
He is a Republican in politics, and a vestrjrman of the Episcopal church. 
His fraternal order is the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He 
married, in 1895, Louise C, daughter of Thomas Brown, of Charles- 
ton, West Virginia. Children : Mary W. and Louise C. 



Germany produced this industrious, intelligent Smith 
SMITH family. The generations have been active in this coun- 
try, the heads of two of which were natives of the 
Fatherland, as is shown by the following genealogical line : 

(I) Henry Smith, the first of the family to seek for himself a 
home in the New World, made his settlement in the state of Pennsyl- 
vania about the year 1820. His family accompanied him to America 
and they resided in Pennsylvania. By occupation he was a farmer. 
He married, and among his children was a son, named Henry N. 

(II) Henry N., son of Henry Smith, was born in Germany in 1839. 
He came to this country when about ten years of age and received his 
education at the public schools of York county, Pennsylvania. He 
learned the carpenter's trade, and later followed agricultural pur- 
suits. He was tax collector for his county at one time. In 1890 he 
moved to Huntington, West Virginia, where he engaged in contracting 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 641 

and building. In 1898 he removed to Newport News, Virginia, still 
following his trade as a builder. Subsequently he formed a partnership 
with his sons. In 1901 he removed to Morgantown, West Virginia, 
where he met his death by falling from a building that he was con- 
tractor for in 1902. In his church faith he was a Lutheran, and voted 
the Republican ticket. He married Mary A. Hildebrand. Children: 
Milton A., born 1867; Edward H, 1869; Cora, 1871, deceased; Carl 
H., of whom further; Charlotte, 1875; William W., 1877; Jesse B., 
1879; August, 1882; Charles J., 1888, died in 1909. 

(Ill) Carl Harrison, son of Henry N. and Mary A. (Hildebrand) 
Smith, was bom in York county, Pennsylvania, November 3, 1873. -^^ 
an early age he came with his family to West Virginia, settling at 
Ceredo. His father being an excellent carpenter and builder, the son 
had a very good opportunity to master the same trade, which he took 
advantage of. For a number of years he was a diligent student at Mar- 
shall College State Normal School at Huntington, from which institu- 
tion he graduated in 1897. He then turned his attention toward teach- 
ing school, but later returned to the college named and took up book- 
keeping and shorthand. Being well equipped in those professions, he 
became bookkeeper and stenographer for the Emmons-Hawkins Hard- 
ware Company at Huntington, with whom he remained for three years. 
In 1902 he went to Morgantown, and since that date has been exten- 
sively engaged in contracting and building, at first with his father, then 
with his brother, W. W. Smith, a prominent lawyer of Kenova. The 
test of his skill as a master builder is the large number of massive and 
well-built structures which stand as monuments to his credit, including 
the Grafton public school building; a $25,000 residence for Samuel 
W. Schrader; the $7,000 portico for Mrs. Bishop, at Kingwood; the 
Sigma Chi and Phi Kappa Psi chapter house; the Star Glass plant, at 
Randall; the new White Block, at Morgantown, and the Lutheran 
church, at Charleroi, Pennsylvania. These and many more all attest 
his excellency as a contractor and builder. Mr. Smith supports the 
Republican party. In his religious faith he favors the Presbyterian 
denomination. 

He married, December 27, 1906, Helen Barrett, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Ballard Smith, of Charleston, West Virginia. They 



642 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

have one daughter, Helen Virginia, born May 7, 1909. As a means 
of protection to his family, Mr. Smith is a member of the Woodmen of 
the World, a beneficiary insurance and fraternal society, so universally 
popular at this age of the world. 



The name Price, originally Ap Rhys, son of Rhys, is 
PRICE borne by various families in Wales, some noble, some not. 

As a settled surname, however, it is of recent adoption. 
The name has several forms, including Apreece, Pryce, Prys. The 
names Rice and Rees are also derived from Rhys. In America the 
names Price and Rice are widely spread. 

(I) Michael Price, the founder of this family, was born in Wales 
about 1767, died July 9, 1853. He was a brewer by trade, but after 
coming to America lived on a farm, settling in Greene county, Penn- 
sylvania. He married, in Wales, Mary Evans, born in 1770, died in 
June, 1870, one hundred years and thirteen days old. She was a mid- 
wife. They had six children, including: William, of whom further; 
Michael, Jeremiah, born September 7, 18 15, married, August 14, 
1855, Mary J. Goslin. 

(II) William, son of Michael and Mary (Evans) Price, was bom 
in Greene county, Pennsylvania, November 21, 1803, died May 14, 
1 88 1. Removing to Dunkard Creek, Clay district, Monongalia coun- 
ty, Virginia, he was a large landowner and a farmer. For twenty 
years he was justice of the peace, and he seized in the state legislature. 
He married Catharine Brown, bom December 22, 18 13, died April 
27, 1869. Children: George, Abraham Brown, Elizabeth, Mary, 
Michael, killed in the civil war; John Evans, of whom further; Ger- 
aldine O., Albert Clay, Mariah L., Thomas H., Christine, Jane B., 
Sarah V. 

(III) John Evans, son of William and Catharine (Brown) Price, 
was born in Clay district, September 24, 1840. He was educated in 
the public schools, old Monongalia Academy and the West Virginia 
University. At the outbreak of the war he was a student at J. R. 
Moore's school at Morgantown; he enlisted in August, 1862, In Com- 
pany A, Third West Virginia Infantry; later he served in the cavalry; 
his service ended with the close of the war. In May, 1865, he returned 
home and commenced farming and surveying. From 1881 to 1888 he 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 643 

was a deputy sheriff, and rode on the west side of the Monongahela 
river. In 1884 he was elected to the legislature; he favored Prohibi- 
tion and co-education in the State University. In 1897 he was elected 
county clerk, and he served six years in this capacity. Mr. Price moved 
to Morgantown, his present home, in 1886. He has been a member of 
the Methodist church since 1875, and for a number of years he was a 
notary public. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and of the Free and Accepted Masons. 

Mr. Price married, in 1869, Elizabeth A., daughter of Peter Chal- 
fant. Children: Otella; Virginia, married Charles W. Kennedy; Will- 
iam C. 



The name Holland was brought into America from 
HOLLAND Holland or Wales, and is found at an early date in 
the state of Virginia. Widely differing explanations 
of the origin and meaning of this name have been given. The most 
obvious suggestion, but not approved by all, places it among the names 
taken by the descendants of the Dutch traders who settled in Great 
Britain. The name is not common in England or America, and the 
materials for tracing the family history are but scant. Three of this 
name settled in Clinton district, Monongalia county, Virginia, in the 
colonial epoch. One of these, Jacob, served for four years as a non- 
commissioned officer in the war of the revolution. He came from 
Berkeley, Virginia. 

(I) Capell Holland, the first member of this family concerning 
whom we have any definite information, was born August 8, 1733, 
died October 22, 1823. He came to Clinton district at a very early 
date and settled near where the Goshen Baptist church now stands. He 
married Mary Wilson, born in 1747, died December 10, 1830. Chil- 
dren : Brice and Rezin, mentioned below., 

(II) Rezin, son of Capell and Mary (Wilson) Holland, was born 
in 1776, died in September, 1851. He is said to have erected the first 
mill in Monongalia county. He married Joan Wilson. Children: 
Rezin (2), mentioned below; Elizabeth, married Hamilton G. West; 
Eli, Capell, John, Sarah, Millie, Solomon, Hannah, Margaret, Mary. 
(Ill) Rezin (2), son of Rezin (i) and Joan (Wilson) Holland, 
was born June 28, 1820, died December 29, 1879. He was a farmer 



644 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

by occupation, and was a valiant soldier in the Union army in the civil 
war, serving from 1861 to the close of that conflict. He was wounded 
in the battle of Gettysburg. He married Leah Way, whose birth oc- 
curred February 21, 1822, died November 9, 1891. Children: James 
Way, mentioned below ; Hannah J, George and Anna. 

(IV) James Way, son of Rezin (2) and Leah (Way) Holland, 
was born in Monongalia county, Virginia, May 8, 1845. He was 
educated in the subscription schools and in the Morgantown Academy. 
He initiated his independent career by engaging in the lumbering and 
grazing business, devoting some forty-two years to the former line of 
enterprise and handling large amounts of timber on the river. He 
was also interested extensively in cattle raising. For sixteen years he 
was a member of the board of directors of the Monongalia Valley 
Bank at Morgantown; was a member of the school board for many 
years; county commissioner for five years, and in January, 19 10, be- 
came president of the county court. He has been a devout member of 
the Baptist church for forty-five years. He married Elbertina Boyers, 
who was born February 5, 1846. Children: Isa, bom September 21, 
1868, married John F. Keener, they have one child, Paul H; Walter 
F., born May 19, 1879, married Grace Jacobson, of Lakeside, Ohio; 
they have three children : Virginia, James and Agnes E. 



Robert Bailey, the first member of this family about 
BAILEY whom we have definite information, was bom in Fayette 

county, Pennsylvania, in 1831. His trade was that of 
blacksmith. In the civil war, from 1862 to 1865, he served in the 
mechanical department. After the war he engaged in farming. He 
married Sarah Hall. Children: i. William Henry, mentioned below; 
Frances, married Lindsay Cox; Anna, married George Boyd. 

(II) William Henry, son of Robert and Sarah (Hall) Bailey, was 
born in Monongalia county. West Virginia, December 31, 1854. He 
was educated in the public schools and worked on his father's farm. 
He also attended the University of West Virginia, and subsequently 
taught school for eight years. From 1885 to 1889 he was jailor and 
deputy sheriff of the county, and in the fall of the latter year he en- 
gaged in the hardware business, the firm being Baker & Bailey. Fif- 
teen years later, in 1904, he purchased Mr. Baker's interest, and he has 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 645 

conducted the business individually to the present time, selling hard- 
ware, farm implements and builders' supplies. He is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; for ten years was a member of the 
school board, of which he has been president, and for six years has 
been one of the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
he is a member. He is a Republican in politics. He is one of the 
prominent and highly respected residents of Morgantown, where he 
has so long resided. 

Mr. Bailey married, in 1880, Rosa Vandervort. Children: i. Mary 
E., born August 12, 1881, died December 18, 1885. 2. Gertrude, 
bom June 12, 1883; married H. E. Webb. 3. Edith, born August 
2, 1886, died July 4, 191 1. 4. Ruth, bom September 29, 1888. 5. 
Guy, born June 29, 1890. 6. Nicholas, bom October 9, 1892. 



Originally this family came from Spain, and was 
MADEIRA sometimes spelled "Madori." They owned the three 

islands of Madori, off the coast of Spain. They 
were usually artificers in filigree jewelry. During the reign of Charles 
V, the day of the persecution by the Inquisition, in the sixteenth cen- 
tury, they, being Protestants, removed to Holland, and some time in 
the seventeenth century, three brothers, Peter, Jacob and John Daniel, 
came to America, locating on the shores of Delaware Bay and at 
Gwynedd, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, where they became 
owners of large tracts of land. To-day the family is scattered through- 
out the United States, writing their names Madori, Madeira, Mad- 
ery, Madera, Madara, etc. In 1754 they were generally members 
of the German Reformed church of Germantown, Pennsylvania, and 
later Jacob Madeira contributed to the erection of the German Re- 
formed church at Frankford, Pennsylvania. John Daniel Madeira, of 
the three who emigrated from Holland, settled in Virginia, and from 
him have descended all the Madeiras of both Virginia and West Vir- 
ginia, including the branch at Morgantown, the seat of the family being 
Woodstock, Shenandoah Valley. Later they removed to Chillicothe, 
Ohio. 

(I) John Daniel Madeira, of the three brothers who sailed from 
Holland in the seventeenth century, and after a time located in the 
Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, had posterity at Chillicothe, Ohio. A 



646 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

station of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad is situated about thirteen 
miles from Cincinnati, and called Madeira, after this family. 

(II) Jacob Madeira, one of the founders of the German Reformed 
church above mentioned, was born and died in Frankford, Pennsyl- 
vania. He married Hester , and had children : Jacob, Sebastian, 

Ester, George, Christian ( ?) and Christopher. 

(III) Sebastian Madeira, son of Jacob and Hester Madeira, was 
born in 1737; he was killed near Pottsville, Pennsylvania, by the fall- 
ing of a tree in clearing up a tract of land. He married, in 1784, 
Catherine Frost, born 1747. Children: Jacob, born 1766, baptized in 
the German Reformed church at Germantown, Pennsylvania, July 14, 
1766; Mary, born 1769; Catherine, born 1771; Sarah, bom 1773; 
John, born 1774. At the time of the Indian massacre of Wyoming, 
the widow of Sebastian, with her son Jacob and the remainder of the 
family escaped down the Schuylkill river and settled somewhere west of 
Fairmount, Pennsylvania. She subsequently married a Mr. Dunbar, 
and they had children: James, bom 1777; Joseph, born 1779; James, 
born 1 78 1, and Jane, born 1784. Her husband evidently left her a 
widow, as she lived with her son Jacob up to 1837, and was buried in 
the Hood Cemetery, Germantown, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) Ester Madeira, third child of Jacob and Hester Madeira, 
was born January i, 1744, died 1833, married December 23, 1761, to 
Jacob Zebley. Their daughter Hester married Jacob Mower, and their 
daughter married John F. Lewis, whose seventh son is G. Albert Lewis. 

(Ill) George Madeira, fourth child of Jacob and Hester Madeira, 
was born in 1746, died June i, 1801, in Warrington, Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania; married Barbara Benther, March 13, 1777, in German- 
town Reformed church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Their son Jo- 
hannes, or John, was born January 21, 1778. Barbara Benther died 
in 1813. 

(Ill) Christopher Madeira, sixth child of Jacob and Hester Ma- 
deira, was bom in 1750 and died February 19, 1828; married Eliza- 
beth Neff, bom November 4, 1756, died December 21, 1821. The 
date of their marriage was April 30, 1776, and Elizabeth NefF was the 
daughter of Jacob and Anna (Briser) Neff. Children of Christopher 
and Elizabeth Madeira: Jacob, born 1777; Christopher, bom 1779; 
Elizabeth, married Arnold Baker; Hester, bom 1788, married Wil- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 647 

liam Ross; Ann, married Francis Asbury; David, born January 21, 
1797, married a Miss Cassidy; John, bom January 12, 1800, died 
February 4, 1824. 

There is a record in the Nesheminy Presbyterian church stating that 

"March 12, 1794, Jacob Madeira was united in marriage to 

Harris," and it is thought this Jacob was the first child above named 
(born 1777). 

(III) Christian Madeira, fifth child of Jacob and Hester Madeira, 
is believed to be the Christian Madeira named as a private in Captain 
David Harris' company, continental army, First Pennsylvania Regi- 
ment of the line, of May 27, 1776. He died in Monongalia county, 
Virginia, March 15, 1822, aged sixty-five years. Other members 
of this family who served in the war for national independence were : 
Samuel, a private in the Third Pennsylvania line, of the Continental 
army, and Nicholas Madeira, a private in the Seventh Pennsylvania 
line, in Captain Samuel Kennedy's company of seven months' men. 

(IV) Francis Madeira, son of Nicholas Madeira, the revolution- 
ary soldier above referred to, married Ann Watts; children: John W., 
Nicholas B., Mary and Ann. Francis Madeira published the Monon- 
gahela Farmer. 

(V) John W. Madeira, son of Francis Madeira, was bom in Mor- 
gantown, West Virginia (then Virginia), in 1844. He was by trade 
a marble cutter and followed this business with his brother at Morgan- 
town and Martinsburg, West Virginia. He later abandoned his trade, 
having been elected to a position in the county clerk's office, which he 
held a number of years, acting as deputy clerk. He was also county re- 
corder four years, until he took over the newspaper business, which 
he conducted until his death in 1891. He married Miss Colebank, 
who resided near Stewartstown, West Virginia. Children: Marshall, 
Elizabeth Florence, who married O. Z. Morgan; James Nicholas, 
Walter and Bernard Haymond. 

(VI) Walter Madeira, son of John W. Madeira, was born in Mor- 
gantown, West Virginia, January 25, 1868. He received his education 
In the common schools, and when thirteen years old he went into the 
New Dominion office to learn the printer's trade, serving a four year 
apprenticeship. After working at Wheeling three months on a paper 
he returned to Morgantown, and In 1882 established the first news de- 



648 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

pot in the city in which he was reared. He carried on this business 
two years, when he turned the business over to his father, John W. 
Madeira, and went to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in 
the newspaper business for six years. After the death of his father 
in 1 89 1 he returned to Morgantown and formed a partnership with 
his brother, Bernard Haymond Madeira, and they continued the news- 
paper and confectionary business until 1900, when they bought the old 
Franklin House, established in 1774. He is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Order of EUcs at Morgantown. He married, June 
30, 1899, Minnie Mahler, daughter of William Mahler, of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. Children: Irene Elizabeth, born February 7, 
1894, and William Bernard, born March 7, 1897. 

(VI) Bernard Haymond Madeira, son of John W. Madeira, was 
bom November 4, 1872. He married, October 12, 1897, Bessie Mary 
Protzman, daughter of Thomas and Anna Protzman, of Morgan- 
town. Children: Dorcas, born November 20, 1900, and Martha, born 
September 7, 1905. 

Nicholas B. Madeira, brother of John W. Madeira, was a lieu- 
tenant in the Union army during the civil war, and was in Anderson- 
ville prison, which later caused his death. He was employed in the 
Pension Department at Washington a number of years. He died and 
was buried at Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

At Galena, Illinois, prior to 1850, the name of Colonel George 
Madeira appeared a resident of that city. He was a brother of the 
father of Will and John D. Madeira, of Chillicothe, Ohio. During 
the gold excitement in California in 1849 Colonel George Madeira 
conceived the idea of going to the new land of gold, so in 1851 he took 
his family, consisting of his wife, three sons, Frank, Dan and George, 
and settled at Volcano, Amador county, California, where they went 
into the mining and storekeeping business; they also had a store at 
Carson City, Nevada, where he finally died. His sons, Dan and 
Frank, married sisters — Dora and Charlotte Ives. Frank and wife 
had no children. Charlotte died at Healdsburg, Sonoma county, Cali- 
fornia, in 1896. Frank A. is now living at Healdsburg. Dan Ma- 
deira and wife settled at Santa Cruz, California, having ten children. 
The mother Dora (Ives) Madeira, died in December, 1887. Chil- 
dren: I. Eleanor (or Nellie), bom December, 1858. 2. Charles, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 649 

born i860, now with G. I. Mix & Co., Yalesville, Connecticut. 3. 
Alice. 4. Frank, deceased. 5. Dora. 6. Donald (Dan). 7. Eu- 
gene, died in July, 1895. 8. Will. 9. Mabel. 10. Ethel. Of this 
family Dora married Ambrose Jones, now of Santa Cruz; child: El- 
mer Madeira Jones, born May 5, 1897. Dan (or Donald) married 
Clara Rider, of Watsonville, California, and is engaged in the lumber 
trade at Noyo, California. 

George Madeira, youngest son of Colonel George Madeira, mar- 
ried, and his wife is deceased. Children: Mary, married, living at 
Healdsburg, California ; Lulu, married to Ransom Powell, of Healds- 
burg; George, married and lives at the above place; Will died 1896; 
James, married and resides at Healdsburg; Delia, adopted by Mr. and 
Mrs. Bray, of Wheatland, Cahfornia; Chester, living at Healdsburg. 



Many years ago this family resided in Barbour county, 
KELLAR Virginia, the great-grandfather of James U. Kellar, 

now of Morgantown, West Virginia (his name not 
known), lived there and reached the extreme age of one hundred and 
seven years. 

(II) John, son of the ancestor above named, died at the age of six- 
ty-one years, and the family was scattered and the family records not 
preserved. It is known that his father was bom, lived and died in 
Barbour county, near New Philippi. He married and among his chil- 
dren was a son, James C. Kellar, of whom further. 

(III) James C, son of John Kellar, was born in 1827. He fol- 
lowed farming and lumbering with his father. He enlisted in the 
Twelfth Regiment of Virginia troops, being a member of Company F, 
served three years and was captured at the battle of Winchester and 
taken to Libby and Belle Isle prisons. He married Miss Hobbs and 
they had one child, after which she died, and later he married Miss 
Ruanna Taggart. Children: Francis M., Neal C, of Buckhannon; 
Benjamin W., now on the home farm at Teverbaugh, West Virginia; 
Emma C, married A. F. Gilmer, at Hundred, West Virginia. The 
mother died March 19, 1908. 

(IV) James U., son of James C. and Ruanna (Taggart) Kellar, 
was bom in Marion county. West Virginia, December 12, 1862. He 

received his education in the public schools and worked on his father's 



650 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

farm until rwenty-two years of age. In 1884 he entered the employ 
of a mercantile company at Round Bottom, where he remained two 
years, then spent a year at school teaching. His next work was clerk- 
ing in a store at Hundred, West Virginia, later clerking at Manning- 
ton in J. T. Koen's store. In 1896 he engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness for himself at Mannington, remaining there until 1900, when he 
removed to Morgantown and engaged in the mercantile business for 
himself. October, 1906, he united with the Acme Book Store, and 
formed the Acme Department Store, of which he is president and gen- 
eral manager, the only department store in the city. He is a director 
in the Bank of Morgantown, and a steward and one of the members of 
the official board in the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a 
member. He belongs to both the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias 
orders at Morgantown. 

In 1897 he married Myrtle Hall, daughter of W. H. Hall. One 
child: James W. Kellar, born July 9, 1902. 



Some time about the beginning of the nineteenth cen- 
WARMAN tury Thomas Warman located in what is now West 

Virginia, and reared a family in Monongalia county, 
and among his children was a son named Thomas. By occupation the 
father was a carpenter. He emigrated to this country from England. 
He died and was buried in his own private graveyard. 

(II) Thomas Warman, son of Thomas Warman, was bom in 
Monongalia county, Virginia, April 20, 1826, and followed farm life 
the most of his active career. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He served as a member of the Second West Vir- 
ginia Cavalry Regiment during the civil war, and was wounded at 
Lynchburg, Virginia. He was what might be termed, in many ways, 
a representative citizen. Politically he was a Republican. He never 
held office. He died August 29, 1906. He married Sarah Margaret, 
daughter of Benjamin Wells and wife. Children: Sarah, Altha, 
Harlie, Isabel, Russell M., Winnie. 

(III) Altha Warman, son of Thomas and Sarah M. (Wells) 
Warman, was born near Morgantown, West Virginia, September 3, 
1870. He had the advantages of the public schools of Morgan dis- 
trict and the University of West Virginia. In 1893-94 he taught 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 651 

school in Mississippi, and for two years was assistant principal at 
Keyser, West Virginia. From 1898 to 1901 he was instructor in the 
preparatory branch of the State University at Montgomery. He fin- 
ished his course and graduated in 1893 ^s A.B. and as LL.B. in 1902. 
He was the same year admitted to the bar and commenced to prac- 
tice law as one of the firm of Warman & Gorman, which later was 
changed to Snee, Warman & Gorman, until about 1904, when he 
was appointed assistant clerk of the court of appeals for West Vir- 
ginia for the term of two years. In 1893 ^^^d 1895 he was a member 
of the House of Delegates of Monongalia county. He is now engaged 
in the practice of law at Morgantown. Politically Mr. Warman is a 
Progressive. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, and is 
accounted a worthy member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons and the Knights of Pythias orders. He belongs to the Kappa 
Alpha fraternity, Alpha Rho Chapter, West Virginia University. 

November 10, 1894, he married Alice, daughter of the late San- 
ford Cobun. Children: Thomas, born December 26, 1905; Adelia, 
born September 8, 1907; Robert, bom June 12, 1909; Leila Ruth, 
bom January 8, 191 1. 



This family traces its ancestry back to the days of the 
FISHER revolutionary struggle. The Morgantown branch of 
this family have descended as follows: Great-grand- 
father, John Fisher; grandfather, William Fisher; father. Parks 
Fisher; Dr. Robert Fisher, of Morgantown. 

(II) William Fisher married Jane Aldrich Boggs, daughter of 
Alexander Boggs, of Pennsylvania. His wife was Miss H. Parks, of 
West Virginia. Alexander Boggs' father enlisted January 26, 1776, 
as a private soldier in the American army, from Pennsylvania. 

(III) Parks Fisher, son of William and Jane Aldrich (Boggs) 
Fisher, was born in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, in 1844. He was 
a stock-broker at Baltimore, of the well-known firm of William Fisher 
& Sons, bankers and brokers at Baltimore. He married Marie Anto- 
niette Schley, in 1865; she was a sister of Admiral Schley, of the 
United States Navy, connected with the Spanish-American war. Chil- 
dren: Frank S., Parks Jr., Charles McClure, David Gustave, deceased; 
and Dr. Robert W. Fisher. 



652 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(IV) Robert W. Fisher, M. D., of Morgantown, West Virginia, 
was born September 15, 1880, at Baltimore, Maryland. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, private schools, and the University of 
Maryland, graduating from the latter institution in 1903. For one 
year after graduating he entered the University Hospital, going from 
there to Morgantown, West Virginia, in 1904, where he now enjoys a 
large practice in medicine and surgery. He belongs to the Monongalia 
County Medical Society, West Virginia Medical Society and the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. He is a member of the Episcopal church 
of Morgantown, and is identified with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Turners and the Modern Woodmen of the World. 



The Hatfields of Morgantown descend from Mat- 
HATFIELD thias Hatfield (also written Heathfield and Het- 

field), of New Haven, Connecticut, and Elizabeth, 
New Jersey, son of Thomas Hatfield, of Leyden, a member of John 
Robinson's church and a native of Yorkshire, England. Matthias Hat- 
field came to Elizabeth from New Haven, where he took the oath of 
fidelity, May i, 1660. In the record of surveys at Elizabeth, August 
29, 1676, he is called "Hatfield" and in his will "Hattfield." His 
house lot contained five acres and he had in addition twenty-two acres 
of upland "In a triangle," twelve acres of land, one hundred and 
twelve acres of upland, forty acres of upland, seventeen acres of 
meadow — in all two hundred and eight acres. He was a weaver by 
trade, also a boatman, and seems to have been a man of considerable 
means. "For twelve hundred gilders secured to him by bill" (a large 
sum in those days), he purchased, December 5, 1673, of "Abraham 
Lubberson of New Orania in the New Netherlands, his dwelling house 
and home lott with all other accommodations belonging to a first lott 
within the bounds of Elizabeth both upland and meadow." This was 
undoubtedly the oldest house in Elizabeth and stood in good repair 
for two hundred years and was never out of the family name during 
that period. (Perhaps it is yet standing and in the family). Mr. 
Hatfield was the original owner of the land upon which the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Elizabeth stands, and it was donated by him for 
church and burial ground. He died December, 1687, his wife Maria, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 653 

of Dutch parentage, surviving with her three sons, Isaac, Abraham and 
Cornehus. 

(II) Abraham, son of Matthias Hatfield, was born in 1670, died 
July, 1706. He was chosen an associate in 1693, and was the signer of 
a petition to the King, purporting to be from "The Freeholders Inhab- 
itants and owners of land of and belonging to Elizabeth-town or town- 
ship in the Province of East New Jersey in America." He married 
and left four sons, Abraham (2), Matthias, Jacob, Joseph. 

(III) Abraham (2), son of Abraham (i) Hatfield, was born in 
Ehzabeth, New Jersey, 1695, died 1745. His wife Margaret died 
the same year. Children: Abraham (3), John, Sarah, Samuel, Elias, 
Joseph, Jacob, Phoebe, David, Matthias, William. 

(IV) William, son of Abraham (2) Hatfield, was bom in Eliza- 
beth, New Jersey, December 28, 1736. He married (first) May 29 
1756, Annie Wright, of Woodbridge, New Jersey, who died April i 
1762. He married (second) 1764, Sarah Kimball, born April 11, 
1743, died September 19, 1799. Children by first marriage : i. Abra 
ham, born October 20, 1757, died young. 2. William (2), born Janu 
ary 6, 1759; moved with his wife Charity near the site of Washington 
Pennsylvania. 3. Elias, bom March 11, 1760; served in the revolu 
tionary war, then settled in Georges township, Fayette county, Pennsyl 
vania; married Ann Lindsay. 4. Samuel, born July 20, 1761 ; settled 
near his brother William, near Washington, Pennsylvania. Children 
by second marriage: 5. David, of further mention. 6. Sarah Ann, 
born October 27, 1767; married Robert Mackey, and moved to the 
Miami section of Ohio. 7. Abraham, born March 25, 1769; settled 
in Dutchess county. New York. 8. Jacob, born July 27, 1775; mar- 
ried in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and settled in the Miami Valley. 
9. Phoebe, born November 10, 1779; married, June 19, 1799, Joseph 
Tunis and lived in New York City. 10. Jesse Kimball, born December 
I, 1781; married, November 17, 1803, ; was a mer- 
chant of New York City, where he died July 18, 1861. 

(V) David, son of Wilham Hatfield, was born March 2, 1765. 
He settled in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where he married and had 
male issue: Samuel, Jacob, Abraham, William, George W. He was a 
farmer and later moved to Virginia, now West Virginia. 

(VI) George W., son of David Hatfield, was born in Fayette 



654 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

county, Pennsylvania. He settled in Greene county, Pennsylvania. 
He married Mary Ritchie, a native of Masontown, Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, and she bore her husband the following children: Will- 
iam; Hiram, of further mention; Madison; James; Jacob, a physician 
of Mt. Morris, Pennsylvania; Elizabeth, married Lindsey Stephens; 
Frank. 

(VII) Hiiram, son of George W. Hatfield, was bom in Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, 1834. He was a prosperous farmer in both 
Pennsylvania and West Virginia, owned considerable property which he 
devoted to agricultural pursuits and grazing, and dealt extensively in 
coal lands, etc. For twenty-five years he was justice of the peace in 
Morgantown, West Virginia, now living retired. He is a member of 
the Methodist Protestant church, and in politics a Democrat. He mar- 
ried Hannah Leumley. Children: i. William K., now general man- 
ager of the Mount Morris & Morgantown Railroad Company, director 
of the Farmers' and Merchants' Bank, of Mount Morris, director of 
the People's Bank of Waynesburg, and a large owner and operator in 
coal and coal lands. 2. John L., of further mention. 

(VIII) John L., son of Hiram Hatfield, was born in Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, April 19, 1874. He was educated in the public 
school, passed three years at Waynesburg College, one year at the 
Ohio State Normal University, finishing his collegiate study at the 
University of West Virginia, whence he was graduated from the legal 
department with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, class of 1899. He 
was admitted to the bar the same year, and at once began the practice 
of his profession as junior member of the law firm of Donley & Hat- 
field, at Morgantown, West Virginia. He has been very successful in 
his law practice, ranking with the leaders of the bar. He has important 
business Interests outside his profession; is president of the Citizens' 
National Bank, director of the Federal Savings & Trust Company, 
director of the Athens Building & Loan Society, president of the Main 
Street Building Company, director of the Decker Valley Lumber Com- 
pany, director of F. W. Crane Lumber Company of Pittsburgh, and 
has holdings in other companies with which he has no official connec- 
tion. He is a member of the Local and State Bar associations; past 
exalted ruler of Morgantown Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks; is a Knight of Pythias; member of the Ancient Order United 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 655 

Workmen and first vice-president of the Elks Reunion Association of 
West Virginia. His college fraternity is Phi Kappa Sigma. His club, 
the Pittsburgh Athletic. In political faith he is a Democrat; in 1906 
was elected mayor of Morgantown, giving that city a wise and con- 
servative business administration. In religious belief he is a Methodist 
Episcopalian. 



Three generations of this family have resided in 
WILLIAMS what is now known as West Virginia. Farmers and 
professional men, as well as industrial workers, have 
come from the scions of this Williams family tree. 

(II) Jeremiah, son of William and Sophia (Foresham) Williams, 
was born on Katyslick, Harrison county, now West Virginia, in 18 16, 
died at the age of eighty-six years, in 1902. He married Susan Ann 
Morrison. Children: Elizabeth, Margaret, Alpheus, Jonathan, Ruth, 
Hester, John Wesley, George W. 

(III) John Wesley Williams, born on Katyslick, Harrison county, 
now West Virginia, March 26, 1850, is living at Marshville, same 
county, and follows farming for his livelihood. He votes the Repub- 
lican ticket, and In his religious faith is of the Methodist Episcopal 
denomination. He married Victoria Virginia Chldester, born at Ro- 
mines Mills, Harrison county. West Virginia, 1858. Children: i. Mrs. 
Minnie May Jones, born 1876, wife of Howard Jones, of Indian Run, 
Harrison county. He is a farmer by occupation. 2. Harvey C, born 
1878, studying for a veterinary at Indiana College, Indianapolis, In- 
diana. 3. Jesse Frank, of whom further. 4. Amy V., died aged six 
years. 5. Mary E., born 1891, at home, unmarried. James J. Chldes- 
ter, father of Mrs. Williams, was bom in Harrison county, now West 
Virginia; was a farmer and died aged about thirty-six years, in 1866. 

(IV) Jesse Frank Williams, M. D., of Clarksburg, West Virginia, 
son of John Wesley and Victoria V. (Chldester) Williams, was born 
March 17, 1882. He graduated from the public schools at Marsh- 
ville, at the age of sixteen years, then graduated from West Virginia 
Wesleyan College, in 1904, after which he entered Baltimore Medical 
College, from which he graduated In 1908. He spent one year as resi- 
dent physician in Maryland General Hospital at Baltimore, and then 
went to Clarksburg, West Virginia, in the autumn of 1909 to begin his 



656 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

medical practice in an office of his own. He is located in the Goff build- 
ing, sharing reception rooms with Drs. Davis & Davis. He is a mem- 
ber of Harrison County Medical Association, State Medical Associa- 
tion and the American Medical Association. Dr. Williams is a Repub- 
lican. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and is a Methodist in 
church membership. 

He married, July 17, 1907, at Sutton, West Virginia, Anna Morri- 
son, a native of Braxton county. West Virginia, bom January 7, 1883, 
daughter of Senator James Wesley Morrison, still residing near Sutton, 
at the age of sixty-eight years. He it was that introduced Republican- 
ism into Braxton county, and was a very prominent man in his county 
at an early day. His wife was Martha (McClung) Morrison, a native 
of Nicholas county; she died in 1902, aged fifty-two years. Only child 
of Dr. Williams and wife is: Jesse Frank. Jr., born February 14, 1909. 
Dr. Williams loves out-of-doors sports, and when at college at the 
Wesleyan was a member of the football club in 1902-03. 



Of an old Virginia family comes the three generations 
POWELL represented by the three several family heads here to 
be considered. 

(I) Joseph Powell was a native of Winchester, Virginia, born in 
1800, died in 1840. He was a thrifty farmer. He married Eliza 
V/iseman and among his children was a son named Samuel R., see for- 
ward. 

(II) Samuel R., son of Joseph Powell, was bom in 1847, at 
Pruntytown, Taylor county. West Virginia, died at the age of thirty- 
seven years, in 1884, lived at Grafton all his life. He was county 
superintendent of schools two terms, and was deputy sheriff of Taylor 
county. He was studying for a lawyer's profession when overtaken 
by death. He had worked his own way through school, his father hav- 
ing died when the son was but seven years of age, and he was scant of 
means with which to educate himself. He became an active Demo- 
cratic party worker, and placed in nomination, the first time, John T. 
McGraw for prosecuting attorney. He married Mary Jane Martin, 
born and reared on Horner's Run, Harrison county. West Virginia, in 
1856, died at Boothsvllle, in 1886. Children : Frank Martin, of whom 
further: Nellie Virginia, bom in 1884, now of Boothsvllle, West Vir- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 657 

ginia. Robert Martin, the maternal grandfather of Frank M. Powell, 
was born in 1821, on Horner's Run, Harrison county, and died on his 
old homestead where he was born. He followed farming all his life. 
He was the father of four daughters who grew to womanhood: Al- 
myra, remained single, died in 1883; Bashie A. Elliott, nee Martin; 
Mary Jane Powell, nee Martin. 

(Ill) Frank Martin, son of Samuel R. and Mary Jane (Martin) 
Powell, was born August 18, 1880, in Grafton, Taylor county. West 
Virginia. After completing his studies in the public schools, he attend- 
ed Broaddus Institute, at Clarksburg, and then entered Lebanon Uni- 
versity, Ohio, graduating in 1907, with the degree of LL. B., and in 
1909 attended the West Virginia University, taking a law course, and 
after being admitted to the bar commenced practicing law, April 23, 
1909, at Clarksburg, in partnership with Fred Lawrence Shinn. He 
has succeeded well at law and now owns considerable valuable property 
in Clarksburg, including three houses on West Main street. He re- 
ceived the degree of Ph. B. in 1907. He votes the Democratic ticket; 
belongs to the Masonic, Odd Fellows and Elks fraternities and also 
holds membership in the college fraternity. Phi Sigma Kappa. 



In recording the history of counties and states, there are 
HOUGH always names and families to which there are more im- 
portance attached than to others. This is necessarily so, 
for all individuals do not possess the merit, intelligence and ability 
found in a certain few whom nature has peculiarly gifted with special 
genius and whose characters stand out boldly above the ordinary men 
and women of a community. This signally applies to members of the 
Hough family now to be considered. The earliest knowledge we have 
of the family is that connected with Thomas Hough. 

(I) Thomas Hough was a native of Loudoun county, Virginia, 
born 1785. He emigrated to Harrison county, in that section of the 
commonwealth now known as West Virginia, where he resided for a 
time and then moved on toward the setting sun, locating at Rushville, 
Schuyler county, Illinois, his home at the time of his demise, he dying, 
however, in 1835, at Louisville, Kentucky, while on his way to Harri- 
son county, Virginia, to visit friends and relatives. His trade was that 



658 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

of a cabinetmaker, and at the time of his death he was following that 
occupation. In politics he was an old line Whig. He married Sarah 
Bartlett, by whom he had four sons and four daughters. Among the 
sons were James F. and Joseph Hough. 

(II) Joseph, son of Thomas and Sarah (Bartlett) Hough, was 
born at Clarksburg, in what is now West Virginia, December 10, 18 18, 
died at Mannington, October 26, 1883. He became a large real estate 
owner near and in Mannington. He was a prominent high-minded 
citizen. For many years he was worthy master in the Masonic lodge 
and well up in the mysteries and history of that ancient and honorable 
body. He moved to Fairmont between the years 1830 and 1840, and 
to Mannington in 1850. There he embarked in mercantile pursuits, 
continuing thirty years as a well known and ever honorable merchant. 
He retired from active business operations in 1880. Up to 1850 he 
had been known as a painter of much superiority, and many houses in 
his section of the country had been brightened up by the artistic touch 
of his paint brush. He voted the Whig ticket, later the Republican, 
and during the civil war was appointed United States marshall, an office 
he held several years. He married Elizabeth Van Zant, born May 18, 
1822, died June 10, 1865. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Hough was James A., of whom further. 

(III) James A., only son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Van Zant) 
Hough, was bom at Fairmont, West Virginia, July 18, 1842, died 
December 24, 1905, and was buried in the private Beaty-Hough ceme- 
tery, near Mannington, West Virginia. He lived in that city until nine 
years of age, when the family moved to Mannington, where he received 
his education in the graded schools. At the age of eighteen years he 
became a telegraph operator, and three years later, 1863, engaged in 
the general merchandising business at Mannington in company with his 
father. Ten years later he retired from mercantile business, and 
opened a hotel and livery barn which he operated until 1879, then 
went to Oakland, Maryland, remained one year, then, to southwestern 
Missouri, where he remained three years. In 1884 he returned from 
the west and engaged in farming. Joining the city plat of Manning- 
ton, he owned a fine farm of one hundred acres, and he made as good a 
farmer as he had a merchant. At the death of his father he took charge 
of the large estate and remained there until his death. He was an 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 659 

active Republican in politics, and public-spirited. For a number of 
years he held the office of constable, serving in that capacity at the date 
of his demise. He developed the property left by his father, and in 
1894 platted "Hough Addition," a property owned by his widow now. 
He had several civil war experiences as telegraph operator at Fairmont. 
At the time of the famous "Jones Raid" he and Governor Fleming 
were interested and instrumental in preventing Jones' men from seizing 
some valuable horses, by hiding them away. Mr. Hough was a mem- 
ber of the Masons, Elks, Red Men and the Knights of Pythias. 

He married, December 31, 1863, Mary Jane Beaty, daughter of 
James C. and Myra (Berkshire) Dent. Children: i. Clara Elizabeth, 
born September 7, 1865; married Philip Dietz, deceased, of Manning- 
ton, and their children are: i. Norma D., born March 13, 1885, mar- 
ried, December 29, 1905, Carl Busby, of Mannington; children: Carl 
Deitz, born November 3, 1906; Joseph Carter, February 5, 1909; ii. 
Nellie Hough Dietz, born May 24, 1887, married Guy S. Clayton, of 
Mannington, and they have one child, Philip Dietz Clayton, born 
January 9, 1906; iii. Edna Josephine Dietz, born February 12, 1889. 
2. Sarah Carter, born January 15, 1867; married A. J. Simon, oil 
operator, Marietta, Ohio, and they have children: i. Louis Hough 
Simon, born September 24, 1885; ii. Mary Ada, born September 30, 
1887; iii. Harry Albert, born March 16, 1889; iv. Margaret Catha- 
line, born June 24, 189 1. 3. Willa Edna, bom April i, 1879; married 
Dr. Clarence S. Thomas, of Fairmont, and they are the parents of two 
children: James Summerfield, born March 13, 1902 ; Mary Eliza, born 
July 14, 1907. Mrs. Hough resides at Mannington, surrounded by 
her many friends who value her for her womanly graces. 



This is a family which has been for several generations 

MOORE identified with the agricultural and commercial interests 

of Virginia and West Virginia, and has given to both 

states useful and respected citizens, loyal to every trust, both as soldiers 

and civilians. 

(I) Michael Moore was a farmer of Old Virginia, and was the 
father of two sons and two daughters: Solomon, mentioned below; 
John, Rhoda, Katherine. 

(II) Solomon, son of Michael Moore, was born June 16, 1804, 



66o Upper Monongahela Valley. 

at Jake's Run, Clay district, Monongalia county, Virginia, now West 
Virginia. Throughout his active life he engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. As a young man he affiliated with the Whigs, but in his later 
years was identified with the Republican party. He was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Sarah, born November 
4, 1810, at Jake's Run, daughter of James and Prudence (Jones) 
Eddy, and their children were: Phoebe, born January 20, 1828; Ehza, 
February 21, 1830; Delilah; Simon; Levi; Emmanuel, mustered into 
the Union army, October 11, 1862, killed at the battle of Winchester, 
July 24, 1864, being then about twenty-one years of age; Perry W., 
mentioned below; Drusilla; David, born June 7, 1849; Julina; Sarah 
Jane, born April 12, 1858, died September 28, 1865. 

(Ill) Perry W., son of Solomon and Sarah (Eddy) Moore, was 
bom May 28, 1845, at Jake's Run, Clay district, Monongalia county, 
West Virginia. He received his education in a subscription school. 
Until twenty years of age he led the life of a farmer, but after that 
followed the carpenter's trade until his fifty-fifth year, and from that 
time forth was engaged in mercantile business. He is connected with 
the Bank of Morgantown, Morgantown, West Virginia, and the Farm- 
ers' and Merchants' Bank, Amos, West Virginia. In politics he is a 
Republican, and filled with credit to himself and satisfaction to his 
constituents the offices of township collector of school funds, road sur- 
veyor, postmaster and notary public. He is secretary of the Order of 
Grangers, and a member of the Christian church. 

Mr. Moore married, November 2, 1867, Sarah Margaret, born 
May 21, 1849, at Day's Run, daughter of Daniel and Priscilla (Ten- 
nant) Moore, whose other children were: Anna B., Gilbert, Louisa 
Jane, Peter B., Rebecca, Louama, Jacob Richard, Nimrod Adam, Enos 
E. and Ida Belle Moore. Daniel Moore was a well-known farmer. 
Children of Perry W. and Sarah Margaret (Moore) Moore: i. Savan- 
nah Ellen, born August 24, 1868; married, January 19, 1889, James 
H. West, a farmer. 2. Willie Furman, born March 9, 1871 ; farmer; 
married, March 10, 1892, Sarah E. Varner. 3. Armina Alice, born 
June 26, 1874; married, April 18, 1898, Henry S. Sutton, an oil well 
worker. 4. Alpha Hayes, born September 22, 1877; oil well worker; 
married, January 5, 1901, Eva Davis. 5. Sarylda Maud, born May 
23, 1880; married, February 5, 19 10, John W. Yost, oil well worker. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 66 i 

6. Enos Ervin, born June 19, 1882; married, March 3, 1910, Solda 
M. McCord, died February 16, 191 1. 7. Noah Alvadore, mentioned 
below. 8. Freddie Harrison, born November 3, 1888; married, Au- 
gust 3, 1910, Jessie Wilson. 

(IV) Noah Alvadore, son of Perry W. and Sarah Margaret 
(Moore) Moore, was born May 19, 1885, at Statler's Run, West 
Virginia. He received his education in the common schools. At the 
age of fourteen he entered upon his business career, doing pipe-line 
work in the oil industry. His next step was that of doing oil land lease 
work and in course of time he became field foreman, and later foreman, 
which responsible position he still holds for the J. H. McDermott Com- 
pany, with which he has now been associated ten years. He has the 
general superintendence of affairs, and this includes the company's 
teams and general business. He has duties in connection with each one 
of the twenty-eight profitable oil wells owned by the company. His 
position as superintendent, involving as it does responsibility for much 
valuable property, he fills in the most admirable manner, honorable to 
himself and satisfactory to the company. He is looked upon as one of 
the coming men connected with the great oil industry. Politically Mr. 
Moore is an Independent. He belongs to the Christian church, and 
holds membership in the Masonic fraternity, the Eagles and the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. 



The progenitors of this family were from Ireland, 
CLIFFORD where Philip Clifford, a merchant of county Mayo, 
was born and died. He married Ann Loughney, 
having a son, James, of whom further. 

(II) James, son of Philip and Ann (Loughney) Clifford, was 
born in county Mayo, Ireland, in 1827, died in America in 1892. He 
came to this country in 1847, locating at St. John's, New Brunswick, 
and in 1850 settled in Harrison county, now West Virginia, when the 
railroad was put through to the place upon which he became employed. 
Afterwards he went into the general merchandise business at Bridge- 
port, five miles from Clarksburg, in Harrison county, and in 1858 came 
to Clarksburg, establishing a general merchandise and coal business in 
which he continued until his death in 1892. In the year 1855 he mar- 
ried in Gallatin, Teruiessee, Sarah Ruddy, who was there resident with 



662 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

her mother, Mrs. Ceciha (Farrell) Ruddy, widow of Michael Ruddy, 
a farmer, who was born and died in Ireland. Mrs. Ruddy, who was 
also a native of Ireland, came over to this country with her daughter 
after her husband's death, arriving here in the year 1850; she died in 
Nashville, Tennessee, during the cholera epidemic in that city. Mrs. 
Clifford, her daughter, died in Clarksburg, December 8, 1909, at the 
age of eighty years. Mr. and Mrs. Clifford were the parents of eight 
children, three boys and five girls, of whom two daughters and one son, 
all married, are now living; the names of the children being as follows : 
I. James Philip, deceased. 2. Mrs. Anna Clifford Brennan, living in 
Clarksburg. 3. Mrs. E. Stringer Boggers, deceased. 4. Mrs. John 
McManaway, deceased. 5. Mrs. John J. Dolan, living in Clarksburg. 
6. Mrs. C. P. Stout, deceased. 7. Michael, died in infancy. 8. John 
Henry, of whom further. 

(Ill) John Henry, son of James and Sarah (Ruddy) Clifford, 
was born in Clarksburg, June 24, 1871. He was educated in the local 
public schools and at Rock Hill College. He then entered business, 
becoming superintendent of the Pinnickinnick Coal Company, in which 
position he continued for a period of six years. In the year 1900 the 
Clifford-Osborne Undertaking Company was established and incor- 
porated, the firm succeeding the pioneer concern in this line and being 
now the largest establishment of this kind here. Mr. Clifford has con- 
tinued with this business ever since. He is also a director in the Home 
Bank for Savings, and is prominent as a member of the Democratic 
party. He served all through the late war as second heutenant in Com- 
pany I of the Second West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. He is a 
member of the Local Order of Elks, and belongs to the Catholic church. 

Mr. Clifford married, August 19, 1901, in Baltimore, Maryland, 
Mary Tully, a native of that city, daughter of Mark Tully, who was 
in the boot and shoe business in Baltimore, and who died at the age of 
sixty years; her mother died in the same year. Mr. Tully was a native 
of Ireland, coming to America in his early youth. Children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Clifford: Agnes, Francis, James, John, Rose. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 663 

This Moore family, so well and favorably known 
MOORE throughout north central West Virginia, is an old Mary- 
land family, whose history dates back, to the war for our 
national independence. Directly, and indirectly by intermarriage with 
other important families, the history of the Moores is replete with 
events of interest, living as they have at times and in communities 
wherein have been enacted many scenes of national importance. 

(I) Samuel Preston Moore was a native of Anne Arundel county, 
Maryland, son of Dr. Mordecai Moore, who came from England with 
Lord Baltimore as his private physician. At a very early day Samuel 
P. Moore emigrated into what is now known as Harrison county, West 
Virginia. He owned immense tracts of land in this county. He also 
owned a beautiful homestead at Wilmington, Delaware, which is now 
Eden Park, Wilmington. He was foreman of the first United States 
court grand jury after he settled in Harrison county. He was a man of 
much more ability than most of his neighbors and took the leadership in 
the community in more ways than one. He married Susan Pierson, of a 
noted "Quaker" or Friend family, of Philadelphia. In the family of 
Samuel P. and Susan (Pierson) Moore was a son Richard W., see 
forward. 

(II) Richard W., son of Samuel Preston and Susan (Pierson) 
Moore, was born in Wilmington, Delaware, in 1792, died in 1857. 
He came to Clarksburg, Harrison county, Virginia, about 1802, with 
his parents, and lived and died there. He was a superior man and held 
the office of clerk of the United States court. He was an attorney-at- 
law. He was also clerk of the United States district court and the 
United States circuit court at another period in his career. He mar- 
ried, in 1820, Sallna W. Easter, who came to Harrison county, Vir- 
ginia, from New Kent county, Virginia, where she was a native. She 
was born In 1798, died in 1876. Her father was a noted Methodist 
minister. Rev. Thomas Easter. Richard W. and Sallna W. (Easter) 
Moore had children as follows: Thomas L., Theodore E., Alfred A., 
Eugene, Fred W., Jasper Y., Alexander C, Martha S., who resides in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, widow of Captain Charles Allen. 

(III) Alexander Caldwell, son of Richard W. and Salina W. 
(Easter) Moore, was born August 26, 1837, at Clarksburg, West Vir- 
ginia, died December 29, 191 1. He attended the Northwestern VIr- 



664 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

ginia Academy, after attending the local schools. He was clerk of the 
county court for Harrison county in 1857, and the first work he did was 
clerk in the county clerk's office there. While deputy clerk he studied 
law, and was admitted to the bar when twenty-one years of age. His 
brother, Thomas L. Moore, became county clerk in 1858 and with him 
he remained until he joined the Union army. He enlisted in 1861 and 
became captain of Company G, Third Virginia Volunteer Infantry. 
In September, 1862, he was commissioned captain of a battery in the 
First Virginia Light Artillery. He saw much severe fighting, and went 
through the entire civil war. He went to South Branch Valley; was in 
Mulligan's division and from there went to the Valley of Virginia, 
under General Crook's command. He took part in Jenkin's raid, at 
Buckhannon, and was at Snicker's Ferry and Berryville. After endur- 
ing the many hardships of a bitter fought civil strife, where brother 
fought against brother, he came home and entered the practice of law 
at Buckhannon, where he remained one year, and in the latter part of 
1866 went to Clarksburg and was immediately elected prosecuting 
attorney for Harrison county and was reelected several terms, holding 
that important office eighteen years in all. He had charge of the 
French spoliation claims, at Washington, under President Harrison's 
administration, for three years. Prior to this, however, he was ap- 
pointed by President Harrison United States consul to St. Thomas, 
later minister to Siam, both of which he declined. He served three 
years as assistant attorney general. He was member of the West Vir- 
ginia state legislature for two winters, during the Goff and Fleming 
contest. He was first a Whig, then entered the Republican ranks in 
which he has ever labored in earnest. He belongs to the Grand Army 
of the Republic and has been from post commander to department 
commander. He served as a delegate to the national conventions — 
three in number; at the second convention Garfield was nominated and 
at the third convention Harrison was nominated. He is a member of 
the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Moore married (first) Ada Haymond, April 26, 1866, at 
Brookville, Indiana, where she was born. Children : George H., born 
1873, now private secretary to Judge Goff, Clarksburg; Charles W., 
born 1876, now an attorney at Clarksburg; Edgar R., born 1879, a 
bookkeeper at Clarksburg, for R. T. Lownders. The first wife and 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 665 

mother of these children died May 3, 1895. Mr. Moore married 
(second), October 19, 1897, Mary V. Hursey, of Clarksburg, daugh- 
ter of John A. Hursey, granddaughter of John Hursey. The mother 
of Mrs. Moore was Susan V. (Steel) Hursey, daughter of James and 
Anna Steel. 



This family had its origin in Germany, and 
WHITESCARVER is Weisgerber in German, meaning "White 

Tanner," and in its German form is as old 
as the Roman Empire, when the Germanic tribes were opposed to the 
mail-clad legions of JuUus Caesar. It furnishes another illustration of 
how names were originally derived from occupations and later became 
common among the descendants. This name was evidently derived 
from fine tanning of delicate skins, used in the housings and trappings 
of ancient warfare. 

(I) The first of the family under consideration to set foot on 
American soil was Frederick Whitescarver, who left the Fatherland and 
came to this country prior to the revolutionary war, settling in Rappa- 
hannock county, Virginia. He was a man of means and high standing 
and was thus enabled to purchase a large tract of land on the Rappa- 
hannock river, where he lived in a style befitting a man of wealth and 
good ancestry. He married and had sons, including Frederick W., 
mentioned below. 

(II) Frederick W., son of Frederick Whitescarver, American an- 
cestor of the family, was born on his father's new-world farm, and 
there spent the most of his early life. He followed the occupation of 

farming all of his life. He married Browning, a cousin of 

President Zachary Taylor. Children: John S., mentioned below; G. 
Harmon; Winston; Addison; Joseph; Rev. William, a Baptist min- 
ister; Caroline; Robert; Charles; Connor; Franklin, and Bathina. 

(III) John S., eldest son of Frederick W. and (Brown- 
ing) Whitescarver, was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, October 12, 
1804, died in April, 1897. After 1852 he resided in Harrison county, 
Virginia, where he owned a large and valuable farm. He was a staunch 
defender of Democratic party principles, cast his first vote for Andrew 
Jackson, but was never an office holder. In church faith he was a Bap- 
tist, with which denomination he united in 1835. He married (first) 



666 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Elizabeth Griffin, born in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1811, died in 
1841, daughter of Henry and Grace (Cobbege) Griffin. Grace Cob- 
bege's mother was a Ball, and lived to the age of one hundred and 
nine years. Henry Griffin was a soldier in the revolutionary war. Mr. 
Whitescarver married (second) Celia Bartlett. The children of John 
S. and Elizabeth (Griffin) Whitescarver were: i. Mary, deceased; 
married Charles W. Creel. 2. Frederick, died young. 3. George M., 
mentioned below. 4. John Thadeus, married Sarah Sinclair; eleven 
children: Grace, a somewhat noted Sunday school worker; George 
Henry; James; John S., a physician; Elizabeth, who married Floyd 
Willis; Charles; Frank; Robert, deceased; Mary; FrankHn, and one 
died in infancy. 5. Frances O., died unmarried. 6. Virginia, deceased; 
married Josiah Roller. 7. Cornelia R., died unmarried. 8. Thomas 
W., died young. 

(IV) George M., son of John S. and Elizabeth (Griffin) Whites- 
carver, was born December 18, 1831. He grew to manhood in his 
native county, attending the common and private schools and then 
entering Rector college, at Pruntytown, Taylor county, Virginia. When 
fifteen years old he went to Taylor county, where he followed carpenter- 
ing a number of years then engaged with the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road Company, with whom he spent twenty-five years of constant 
service in construction work. In 1882 he became real estate agent for 
John W. Garrett, president of the Baltimore & Ohio system, and had 
charge of all his realty. After two years he resigned on account of ill 
health and engaged in lumbering business at Valley Falls, Taylor coun- 
ty, Virginia. Soon after this he became general manager of what has 
now come to be the Baltimore & Ohio line from Grafton to Philippi, 
and built the extension from Grafton to Belington. He held this posi- 
tion until 1886, and in 1887 constructed the Tunnelton & Kingwood 
line, a distance of eleven miles. He was also interested in building the 
Morgantown & Kingwood railroad with George C. Sturgiss and others. 
In 1 89 1 he, in connection with other capitalists, purchased a large tract 
of timber land in Randolph county and founded the town of Pickens, 
where they erected a saw mill of the capacity ten million feet per year, 
and several well equipped planing mills. Mr. Whitescarver made, in 
large quantities, the vitrified brick which took the premium at the 
World's Fair at Chicago in 1893. He with others surveyed the rail- 




J 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 667 

road line from Pickens to Addison, a distance of thirty miles, for the 
purpose of developing that section. He is liberal and progressive, and 
it may be said that for thirty years he has been identified with the real 
estate and coal land business. He is a director in the First National 
Bank of Grafton, and for twenty years has been a director in the 
Parkersburg First National Bank, holding this office at the present 
time (19 1 2). He erected the boy's dormitory for the college at 
Philippi, known as Whitescarver Dormitory. Politically he is a Dem- 
ocrat. He belongs to the Baptist church, and has been thus identified 
since fourteen years of age. 

He was married in 1854, in Taylor county, Virginia, to Henrietta 
A. Sinclair, daughter of James and Rebecca (Yates) Sinclair. They 
have no children. 



For about a century and a half this Reed family has been 
REED known on Virginia and West Virginia soil. The ancestor, 

David Reed, was born in 1792, in Virginia, and during 
the greater part of his life resided in Upshur county, in what is now 
West Virginia. He was a farmer, and a volunteer in the war of 1812. 
He died aged seventy-four years, in 1866. Among his children was a 
son Thomas A., see forward. 

(II) Thomas A., son of David Reed, was born in Upshur county, 
Virginia, at Peel Tree, February 8, 1832, died March 8, 1904. He 
was a carpenter by trade and followed it nearly all of his active life. 
He resided at Grafton from 1850 to 1888, when his son removed to 
Clarksburg, the father assisting him in the work of carrying on his 
store at that point. He was a staunch supporter of the Democratic 
party. He married Rebecca A. Crites, born in Upshur county, Vir- 
ginia, November 13, 1832, died April 21, 1907, daughter of Onias 
Crites, who resided in Upshur county. West Virginia, died in Ran- 
dolph county; he was noted especially for his considerable traveling 
from one part of the country to another. Children: Olive E., born in 
1854, wife of George T. Spring, a carpenter of Clarksburg; David 
Kennedy, see forward. 

(III) David Kennedy, son of Thomas A. and Rebecca A. (Crites) 
Reed, was born in Grafton, West Virginia, February 25, 1863. He 
had the advantage of the high school training at Grafton, after which 



668 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

he entered the State University at Morgantown. For one year, after 
leaving the studies at the university, he vi'orked for the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad Company, in its machinery department, and in 1885 
went to Clarksburg and engaged in the express business, at first for the 
Baltimore & Ohio Company, later the United States Express Company, 
where he remained six years. The following year he was employed by 
the Monongahela River Railroad Company. Next he worked with the 
Monongah Coal Company, returning to Clarksburg in 1892, and 
bought the old Spates hardware store, which he conducted for twelve 
years. He was next a traveling salesman for the Simmons Hardware 
Company of St. Louis for two years. The next three years were spent 
in running a feed business at Clarksburg. He then established his pres- 
ent insurance business, beginning in 1906. His offices are in the Reed 
building, Nos. 341-343 West Pike street. The building is his property 
and was erected in 1900. He has stock in the Union National Bank 
of Clarksburg, the Farmers' Bank, the Grafton Bank and other finan- 
cial enterprises. Politically he votes the Democratic ticket, and is a 
member of the Masonic order, Knights of Pythias, Red Men and the 
Elks. He is secretary of the Grand Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of 
the state. He is of the Methodist Episcopal church faith. 

He married, in Grafton, in 1894, Addie M. Fordyce, a native of 
Morgantown, but lived in Clarksburg nearly all of her life, bom in 
1 865, daughter of A. G. Fordyce, now retired at Clarksburg. Mr. and 
Mrs. Reed have two children: Roland, bom in 1895; Maurice, born 
1897. 



For a century or more this family has been prominent in 
AVIS what is now known as West Virginia. The genealogical 
line runs thus: John, born 1821; Braxton Davenport, bom 
1848; Braxton Davenport Jr., born 1876. 

(I) John Avis was a native of Charlestown, Virginia, now West 
Virginia, born about 1821, died in 188 1. He was in the Mexican war 
and was a confederate soldier in the civil war. He was a high-minded 
gentleman of more than ordinary intelligence and ability. 

(II) Braxton Davenport, son of John Avis, was bom at Charles- 
town, Jefferson county, Virginia, now West Virginia, in 1848; now 
resides in Washington, D. C, and is in the employ of the department 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 669 

of the interior. He, too, was a soldier in the confederate army in civil 
war days when brother was pitted against brother in a terrible conflict. 
He joined the southern army when less than fourteen years of age. 
He married Hattie Elizabeth Wilson, born in Harrisonburg, Virginia, 
now residing in the Capitol City, daughter of John Wilson, born in 
Harrisonburg, died when a young man. He was a slave owner in his 
native county. Children: Samuel B., born 1873, Hves at Charleston, 
West Virginia, where he is prosecuting attorney; Braxton D., of whom 
further; Harry W., born 1878, resides in New York City, where he is 
acting as private secretary; Mrs. Margy Thompson, born 1883, lives 
in New York City, the wife of William A. Thompson; Hattie, deceased 
in infancy. 

(Ill) Braxton Davenport (2), son of Braxton Davenport (i) 
and Hattie Elizabeth (Wilson) Avis, was born August 15, 1876, at 
Harrisonburg, Rockingham county, Virginia. He received his educa- 
tion at the schools of Washington, D. C, having removed thither with 
his parents when a child. He later attended the University of Mary- 
land, at Baltimore, where he graduated in 1897, as a dental surgeon. 
He began his practice as a dentist at Clarksburg, West Virginia, in 
19 10, having practiced one year at Charleston prior to that. Politically 
Dr. Avis is an Independent. He belongs to the Episcopal church. 



Among the Germans who have furnished excellent set- 

HEINZE tiers in Pennsylvania and West Virginia the Heinze 

family have been quite prominent in several callings In 

life. Three generations have lived in America and each have carried 

out their own special part in the role of good citizenship. 

(I) George Peter Heinze, a native of the German Empire, came 
to America when yet a young, vigorous man, locating In Schuylkill 
county, Pennsylvania. He was a coal miner and died about 1906. He 
married Wilhelmina Dombach, who died at Ashland, Pennsylvania, as 
did also her husband. The husband died at the age of eighty-one years 
and the wife was about that age when she died. In their family there 
were ten children, among whom was Henry, see forward. 

(II) Henry, son of George Peter, the German ancestor, was bom 
at Ashland, Pennsylvania, June 16, i860. He attended the public 
schools of his native place, and worked in the breakers of the coal 



670 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

mines where his father worked. His duty was that of separating the 
coal from the slack and slate stone, preparing the coal for the market. 
Later, when he became old enough and strong enough, he worked in 
the mines, proper, in all for a period of fifteen years. This was in the 
neighborhood of Ashland, Pennsylvania. When he had worked under 
ground, shut out from the light of day all those years, he thought to 
better his condition, so embarked in the grocery trade at Ashland, where 
he owned a store which he conducted twelve years. He then sold out 
and commenced jobbing in candy and confectionery goods, which he 
followed for three years, and in 1903 went to Clarksburg, and the 
following year bought the old Clarksburg Pressing Company's busi- 
ness, which he still continues to operate. His is the largest and best 
patronage in the city in his line. Politically he is a Republican, but of 
the independent type of voter, especially in local politics. He is a 
member of the Elks order, also of the Patriotic Sons of America, Amer- 
ican Mechanics, and member of the Board of Trade. He married, at 
Ashland, Pennsylvania, December 24, 1882, Isabella Mayer, a native 
of Ashland, born in 1868, daughter of Elias Mayer, who was a carpen- 
ter of Ashland, died in 1903. Children: Henry Arthur, of whom fur- 
ther : Edith I., now Mrs. R. B. Parrott, of Washington, D. C. 

(Ill) Henry Arthur, son of Henry and Isabella (Mayer) Heinze, 
was born in Ashland, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, September 14, 
1883. He there attended the local public schools, acquiring a good 
common school education. He entered the employ of the Lehigh Valley 
Coal Company, as one of its engineering corps, and he still resided at 
Ashland for one year after finishing his schooling. He went to Clarks- 
burg, West Virginia, in November, 1901, and there entered the engineer- 
ing department of the Clarksburg Fuel Company, upon its organization, 
and remained with that corporation a year, when he shifted to the 
Milnes and Sansbury Civil and Mining Engineers, remaining for a 
year and a half, up to December, 1903, then went to Cambria, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he had charge of the Cambridge Bituminous Coal Com- 
pany for another year and a half, then to Pittsburgh, with the Monon- 
gahela River Consolidated Coal and Coke Company, as a draftsman, 
for something less than one year. In August, 1905, he returned to 
Clarksburg, where he again entered the employ of the Clarksburg Fuel 
Company, with whom he remained a year, and in July, 1906, became 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 671 

assistant engineer for the Madeira Hill Clark Coal Company. Janu- 
ary I, 1909, he was promoted to chief engineer of the same company, 
with whom he is still engaged, with his offices at 602 Goff building, 
Clarksburg. He also does a general civil engineering business, which 
is no small part of his present work. He is the chief engineer of the 
Kroger Gas Coal Company and the Gilmer Fuel Company, both hav- 
ing main offices at Cincinnati, Ohio. He is a stockholder in the Mas- 
cott Oil and Gas Company, of which he is secretary and treasurer, also 
director and board member. He is a stockholder in the Parkersburg 
and Buckhannon Oil and Gas companies. Politically Mr. Heinze is a 
RepubHcan. He is identified with the order of Elks at Clarksburg, and 
at the present time (19 12) exalted ruler of Clarksburg Lodge, No. 
482, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, also member of the 
board of directors of the Elks Company and member of the board of 
governors of the Elks Club. He is a member of the Board of Trade. 



Delaware furnished this family to West Virginia, and three 
COLE generations only will here be considered. The line to the 
present family at Clarksburg is thus — John, William Lloyd 
and Will H. Cole. 

(I) John Cole was a native of Wilmington, Delaware, and died 
at the age of fifty-five years, at Georgetown. He was by trade a shoe- 
maker. He married Elizabeth Goulden, born in Delaware, died at 
Wilmington, that state. There were seven children in his family, 
William Lloyd being the only one living. 

(II) William Lloyd, son of John and Elizabeth (Goulden) Cole, 
was born in Wilmington, Delaware, September 17, 1840. He now 
resides at Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he was for many years a 
hardware merchant. At the time of the civil war he had charge of the 
local quartermaster's department, as a butcher, killed the first and last 
beef for the Union army at Clarksburg, and in 1864 acted as com- 
missary. He came to Clarksburg when but a youth and soon establish- 
ed himself in the butchering business, which for years he continued, 
until with his son, Fred Wade Cole, he established himself in the hard- 
ware trade, in which he was successful. Politically he is a Republican. 
He is a Methodist Episcopalian in church membership. He married, at 
Clarksburg, November 16, 1864, Mary A. Peck, a native of that city, 



672 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

daughter of John and Nancy Peck, both now deceased, but lifelong resi- 
dents of Clarksburg. Children: Sallie W., born November 15, 1865, 
now Mrs. W. E. Hursey, of Clarksburg; John, born October, 1867, 
died May 17, 1870; Fred Wade, born January 14, 1872, now of 
Clarksburg; Will H., of whom further; Carolyn, born September 10, 
1878, now wife of Dr. C. M. Kessler, of Clarksburg; Fannie, bom 
October 27, 1881, died May 2, 1889. 

(Ill) Will H., son of William Lloyd and Mary A. (Peck) Cole, 
was born at Clarksburg, West Virginia, November 27, 1875. He had 
the advantages of the public schools of his native city, and then master- 
ed the art of a job printer, which trade he followed for nine years, up 
to 1901, when he was elected assessor and served two years — 1901-02, 
continuing his printing business for a time. He was elected city clerk 
in 1903, and has served continuously ever since. He is third owner in 
the Warren undertaking business, established in 1908, at Clarksburg, 
he being one of founders of that business. Politically Mr. Cole sup- 
ports the Republican party, county, state and national ticket. He has 
been the secretary of the local lodge of Elks three years and is still 
holding the position. 



This family was among the real pioneers of the Monon- 
OGDEN gahela Valley in West Virginia. In the dark and perilous 

days succeeding the great revolutionary struggle, Thomas 
Ogden left the comforts of a pleasant home in eastern Virginia, and 
became a pioneer of civilization in Harrison county, when it was a 
dense wilderness, inhabited by wild beasts and frequented by wilder 
men — the Indians. He cleared a home spot in the forestland and had 
many an encounter with the red men of the forest. The family tree 
has spread with the passing of the years until it now covers a large 
territory, and members of the family are to be found in almost every 
portion of the country. The stock, which originated in England, has 
representatives in New York City, Philadelphia, and in the far west. 
One of the same line was the first mayor of the city of Chicago, another 
was the first president of the great Chicago & Northwestern railroad, 
and had to do with the construction of the Union Pacific railroad. The 
city of Ogden, Utah, on that line, was named for him. There have 
been many professional men in the family from early days to the pres- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 673 

ent, lawyers and physicians especially. For the purpose of this narra- 
tive, the history of this line of Ogdens will begin with William R. 
Ogden. 

(I) William R. Ogden was born in 1804, at Port Tobacco, Mary- 
land, died January 25, 1885. He accompanied his father to Virginia 
in 1808. He was a physician and surgeon of note in his day. He mar- 
ried Mary Shinn, born in Harrison county, Virginia, 1808, died in 
1864. Child: Robert S. Ogden, of whom further. 

(II) Robert S. Ogden, son of William R. and Mary (Shinn) 
Ogden, was born November 9, 1836, in Harrison county. West Vir- 
ginia. He conducted a prosperous mercantile business at Sardis, West 
Virginia, for a period of about forty years, during which time he was 
generally postmaster of the town in which he lived. In the early years 
of his settlement there he had to carry the mail himself. He is now 
living retired at Clarksburg. He has always been a Democrat polit- 
ically, and in church affiliations is a Baptist. He married Jane Ritten- 
house, born in Harrison county, Virginia, January 21, 1841, died Feb- 
ruary 28, 1900. They were the parents of twelve children : Anna Gar- 
rett; George R., a physician in Taylor county. West Virginia; Robert 
S., traveling salesman; Daniel M., a merchant; Charles G., traveling 
salesman; Henry Clay, traveling salesman; Elizabeth Horner; Vir- 
ginia Garrett, widow; Mary, single; Chester R., of whom further; two 
sons deceased. 

Mrs. Ogden's father, Bennett Rittenhouse, was born in Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1800, and at his death in 1877, was a promi- 
nent farmer of Harrison county. West Virginia. When but a small boy 
he came there with his parents, and before his death became one of the 
most extensive farmers in his county. Out of eight votes cast at Shinns- 
ton for President Abraham Lincoln, four were cast by Rittenhouses. 
This Rittenhouse was descended from the ancestor who came with 
William Penn to Pennsylvania, in 1682. Bennett Rittenhouse married 
Zilpha Shinn, a direct descendant of the earliest settlers of West Vir- 
ginia, and of the same family of Shinns that founded Shinnston. 

(III) Chester Ruhl Ogden, M. D., son of Robert S. and Jane 
(Rittenhouse) Ogden, was born November 9, 1873, at Sardis, Harri- 
son county. West Virginia. After attending the public schools of his 



674 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

native county, he entered Salem College, at Salem, in 1892, graduating 
from this institution in 1894. He then took a normal course in 1897, 
receiving the degree of Bachelor of Science. He entered the Univer- 
sity of West Virginia in 1897, and remained there that year and 1898, 
taking a post-graduate literary course and preparatory in medicine. He 
was granted his medical diploma by the University of Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, in 1902, and immediately began medical practice at Clarksburg, 
where he has remained until the present time. In the meantime he has 
taken several post-graduate courses in both medicine and surgery. He 
is now enjoying an excellent practice, is surgeon to the Baltimore & 
Ohio railroad company, the National Carbon Works, and other im- 
portant concerns where many laborers are constantly employed and 
subject to illness or accident. Dr. Ogden has succeeded in his financial 
undertakings as well as his profession. He is a stockholder in the 
Union National Bank of Clarksburg, and in the Artificial Ice Plant at 
Clarksburg. He is also one of the promoters of the Point Comfort Oil 
and Gas Company, the Curtis Oil and Gas Company, and has other 
financial interests. Politically he is an Independent Democrat. He has 
attained the highest degree in Free Masonry, is a member of the local 
Elks lodge, the Odd Fellows, Woodmen of the World, Woodmen of 
America, is ex-secretary and member of Harrison County Medical 
Society, the West Virginia State Medical Association, Mississippi Val- 
ley Medical Association, the Clinical Congress of Surgeons of North 
America, the Association of Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Surgeons, 
American Gynecological Society, and American Medical Association. 
He is a communicant of the Baptist church, his wife being a Methodist 
in religious faith. 

He married, August 21, 1902, at Columbus, Ohio, Edna E. Louch- 
ery, born in Clarksburg, West Virginia, January 24, 1877, daughter 
of Dr. Louchery, a physician. She is a graduate of Salem College, 
having secured her degree of Bachelor of Arts with the class of 1897. 
She then took a post-graduate course in 1908-09, at the State Univer- 
sity at Columbus, Ohio. Mrs. Ogden's mother was Mary Lynch, who 
is still living. The children of Dr. and Mrs. Ogden are: Mary Eliza- 
beth, born August 2, 1903; Virginia Jane, born March 30, 1906. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 675 

The name Bailey is derived through the French BalUe, 
BAILEY from the Middle Ages; later ballium, which is a corrup- 
tion of the Latin vallum, a rampart. The bailie was the 
whole space enclosed within the external walls of a castle, with the 
exception of that covered by the keep. This space was variously dis- 
posed of, and of course differed greatly in extent. Sometimes It con- 
sisted of several courts, which were divided from each other by em- 
battled walls so as to form a series of fortifications. When these courts 
were two in number, they were known as the outer and Inner bailie. 
The entrance to the bailie was usually by a drawbridge over the ditch, 
and through a strong and embattled gateway. The bailie was often of 
great extent, containing the barracks for the soldiers, lodgings for the 
workmen and artificers, magazines, wells and sometimes even a mon- 
astery. In towns the bailie had even a wider significance, and was often 
retained after the castle or keep had long disappeared, as in the case of 
the "Old Bailie" in London, and the "Bailey" in Oxford, England. 
BalUe is a Scotch term with several legal applications. It chiefly and 
popularily, however, signifies a superior officer or magistrate of a 
municipality or corporation in Scotland, with judicial authority within 
the city or borough. 

(I) John Bailey, was born in Virginia in 1768. He settled In 
Taylor county (now West Virginia), about 1792. This settlement 
was on Simpson creek, at what is now known as Flemington. Here he 
took up a tract of land and followed agriculture, taking out patents on 
the land named. He was active and industrious, and at his death, about 
1840, aged seventy-two years, was buried In the old Bailey burying 
ground or church yard. His wife was Elizabeth FInley, who lived to 
the advanced age of almost, If not quite, eighty years. Children, all 
born on Simpson creek, West Virginia: Joseph, William, Silas P., of 
whom further; John W., Ellen, Elizabeth, Sarah, Ann, all now de- 
ceased. 

(II) Silas P., third child of John and Elizabeth (FInley) Bailey, 
was born February 27, 1816; died November 6, 1888, at Fall Run, 
near Flemington, West Virginia, and was buried in the old Bailey bury- 
ing ground in Taylor county. He followed farming all of his life. 
He married (first) Lydia Hustead, who died in 1861. Children, all 
born on Simpson creek; Elizabeth, married D. C. J. Brake; Sarah, 



676 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

never married; John H., died single; Rebecca, deceased, married James 
G. Pepper; Daniel H., deceased; James E. ; Thomas M. Silas P. 
Bailey married (second) Almira Kelley, born December 11, 1837, 
died November 23, 191 1, buried in the old Bailey burying ground on 
Simpson creek. Children: Amanda, married F. B. Haller; Benjamin 
F., of whom further; Grant, unmarried; Alta, deceased, married Will- 
iam Lanhan; Carl, married Blanche Nestor; Harriette, married Dr. 
C. R. Peck; Bruce. 

(Ill) Benjamin F., son of Silas P. and Almira (Kelley) Bailey, 
was born in Taylor county. West Virginia, November 10, 1864. He 
was educated in the public schools and at West Virginia University, 
receiving the degree of LL. B. in the class of 1891, and in that year 
commenced the practice of law in Grafton, where he has ever since been 
very successful as an attorney. He has been prosecuting attorney for 
Taylor county and member of the city council at Grafton. Mr. Bailey 
is president of the Webster Woolen Mills Company of Grafton, of 
which he was one of the promoters and organizers; member of the 
board of directors as well as one of the promoters of the Crystal Ice 
Company; was among the original stockholders of the Thornton Fire 
Brick Company, and the Hen-e-ta Bone Company, of which he was one 
of the organizers; member of the State Bar Association; the Knights of 
Pythias and Elks fraternities, was district deputy for the last-named 
order two terms. In politics Mr. Bailey is a Republican, and served 
his district as senator in 1906. 

He married, November 23, 1892, Sarah Ellen Faris, of Harrison 
county. Of their four children only two survive: Arline Byrd, aged 
seventeen years, a graduate of the Grafton high school; George Silas, 
aged thirteen years. 



This Burdett family, one of more than ordinary 
BURDETT prominence in the history of this county, is of French 

origin, and possesses that type of manhood and 
womanhood that will not stand oppression and tyranny at the hands of 
individuals or heads of governments. The earliest Burdett in the 
American line of which we have any knowledge was named Frederick. 
The place and date of his birth in France is not positively known. How- 
ever, it is certain that he, with a brother James Burdett, made his escape 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 677 

from Frai*ce where they had displeased the government, and succeeded 
in getting over into Holland, from whence they succeeded in crossing 
over to this country, landing in Virginia early in the eighteenth century. 
They settled in Culpeper county, where some of their descendants stiP 
reside. The West Virginia family of this narrative traces descent from 
Frederick Burdett, one of these brothers. 

(II) Frederick (2), son of Frederick Burdett, was born at Cul- 
peper, Virginia, December 24, 1787, died at Pruntytown, October 27, 
1865. He lived there until his marriage, when the newly married 
couple started immediately, with the bride's father and his family, for 
their future home west of the Allegheny mountains. They were accom- 
panied by several Culpeper families and all were more than two months 
on their journey. The trip was a tedious and wearisome one; most of 
the company were obliged to walk, as there were no roads and the 
horses were all heavily loaded with the household goods of the party, 
but in time they reached Pruntytown, then known as Williamsport, 
Virginia. After Mr. Burdett's arrival at Pruntytown, Virginia, he 
engaged in mercantile pursuits, and by reason of his ability, soon pros- 
pered and became a man of influence. For years he and Abraham 
Smith had the only store in that part of the country, Clarksburg being 
the nearest point at which goods could be obtained. Merchandise was 
purchased but twice during the year, in the spring and fall, and when 
the goods arrived it was considered quite an event among the people 
of the community, and there was a great rush to obtain the "first pick" 
of them. Mr. Burdett bought his goods at Baltimore from which city 
they were hauled in wagons as far west as the roads were completed, 
and for a long time they were carried the last two hundred miles on 
horseback. After the building of the canal to Cumberland, Maryland, 
goods were brought to that place in canal boats and then carried on 
west over the mountains to Pruntytown, through an almost unbroken 
forest and over the roughest roads. 

Mr. Burdett was twice married, his first wife being Susan SInsel, 
daughter of Harmon Sinsel, a native of Hesse-Hamburg, one of the 
German states that furnished his majesty, King George III., with a 
number of troops during the revolutionary war. These troops were 
raised by conscription, and it was much against their will that they were 
forced to fight against those struggling against oppression, and when 



678 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

the fortunes of war placed him in power of Americans as a prisoner of 
war, he readily accepted his parole, and shortly after recrossed the At- 
lantic and obtained an honorable discharge from the army of his native 
prince, and returned to the United States. He did not obtain his dis- 
charge papers until after he had undergone many hardships, for it was 
only after repeated failures that he finally obtained the precious docu- 
ments, and was allowed to depart for America. The return voyage 
was made in mid-winter, and was a long and perilous one, lasting over 
six weeks. The little sailing vessel on which he had taken passage had 
many narrow escapes from foundering. Frederick and Susan (Sinsel) 
Burdett had eight children, four of each sex, two of the daughters died 
young. The sons were: James W., of whom further; John S. ; Fred- 
erick E., and Benjamin F. The daughters who lived and married 
were: Mary J. and Anna. Mary J. married Leonidas S. Johnson; 
Anna married Stephen Blue, both of whom died in 1850 of typhoid 
fever within a few hours of each other. 

(Ill) James W., son of Frederick (2) and Susan (Sinsel) Burdett, 
was born at Pruntytown, Virginia, November 8, 1817. For many 
years he was associated with his father in the mercantile business, and 
also conducted a very extensive tannery for several years. For some- 
time prior to his death, he gave his entire time to the tannery business 
which had become one of the largest in its section of Virginia. Besides 
being an active and successful business factor in his community, he also 
took a deep interest in political issues. He was a prominent Whig and 
later a Republican leader. Notwithstanding the fact that his family 
had owned many slaves and he had been brought up to believe in slav- 
ery, yet he became an open and radical Abolitionist and cast his vote 
for President Lincoln when he was first a candidate. 

He was twice married, first to Harriet Kemble, daughter of Samuel 
Kemble, a pioneer of this country. She died leaving four children: 
Frances Victoria, Susan Virginia, Mary Florence, and Samuel George, 
who was a mail clerk on the main line of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, 
and was killed in a collision after having left the service, April 28, 
1891. 

Mr. Burdett married (second) Harriet Warder, bom on the farm, 
near Pruntytown, August 6, 1832, died in March, 1903, daughter of 
Noah E. Warder. She was one of a very large family. Her father 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 679 

was the son of Henry Warder, who came at an early day from Fauquier 
county, Virginia, settling near Pruntytown. Henry Warder was a son 
of Henry Warder Sr., of an English family who came over to Virginia 
with Lord Fairfax. He was a soldier in the revolution. At that time 
the name was spelled Wardour, but long since changed. Noah E. 
Warder married Mary Jones, daughter of Samuel Jones, another hardy 
pioneer of this part of Virginia. Samuel Jones settled near Morgan- 
town about 1770. While working on his farm one day, in 1777, 
Indians attacked the settlers, and captured a son and daughter of Sam- 
uel Jones. These two children, Mary and John Jones, aged ten and 
twelve years, were taken by the Indians to Detroit, where they remain- 
ed many years. Mary Jones finally made her escape from the Indians, 
went to Detroit, and there married Pete Malotte. Many years later, 
she came to visit her old home, coming from Grosfield, Canada, across 
Lake Erie to Sandusky, where she with two children, small boys, cross- 
ed Ohio and thence through Virginia to her father's home. He lived 
on Three Fork creek, Taylor county, two miles from Grafton. She 
was then fifty years of age and her father was still living, aged seventy- 
eight years. She remained three months and returned to Canada on 
horseback. Mary Jones, wife of Noah E. Warder, was a niece and 
name sake of this Mary (Jones) Malotte. Noah Warder was the 
eldest of six sons, all of whom married and lived near their father's 
home. He was born March 17, 1796, and when sixteen years old 
entered the American army in the war of 1812. He wintered in the 
vicinity of Detroit following the surrender of General Hull. He was 
a distinguished soldier and was several times promoted, but at the close 
of the war returned home, married Mary Jones, and settled on a farm 
near his father, where he remained until his death, January 19, 1880, 
being noted far and near as an exemplary Christian citizen and a model 
father, bringing up a family of thirteen children. 

James W. and Harriet (Warder) Burdett had six sons and one 
daughter: Frederick Jones, of whom further; James Guy, died March, 
1902 ; Lucy Maude, wife of George H. A. Batson, who was postmaster 
at Pruntytown; William Noah, died August, 1906; Abraham Warder, 
of whom further; Luke Edward, who became master mechanic of the 
shops of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, at Martinsburg; Richard 
Clyde, who married Hellena Mueller. 



68o Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(IV) Frederick Jones, son of James W. and Harriet (Warder)- 
Burdett, was reared in his native town and finished his education in the 
high school of that place, and when sixteen years of age, in 1875, be- 
gan to make his own way in life. He taught school a few terms, when 
his health failed and he was compelled to abandon it for a time, but on 
his recovery followed this profession fourteen years. In 1884 he was 
appointed deputy assessor for Taylor county, and in 1886, when the 
county was divided into two districts, he was appointed chief assessor 
for the western district, filling the position until 1888. At the Repub- 
lican convention held in 1888, he was nominated by acclamation as 
assessor for the western district, and was elected by a large majority; 
September 23, 1890, was appointed deputy clerk of the circuit court 
for Taylor county; in 1890 he was nominated for the office of county 
clerk of the circuit court, and in November was elected for the term of 
six years. He died February 27, 1899. 

(IV) Abraham Warder, son of James W. and Harriet (Warder) 
Burdett, was born at Pruntytown, West Virginia, March i, 1869. He 
received his education in the public schools, after which he was made 
clerk in the city clerk's office in Grafton, a position he filled six years, 
being deputy clerk of the circuit court from 1891 to 1897. He served 
as assistant assessor of the county two years. He studied law and prac- 
tically educated himself in that profession. In 1897 he was examined 
for the bar, admitted to practice that year, and has been a successful 
lawyer located at Grafton ever since. He is one of the directors of the 
Grafton Bank and Trust Company and its secretary, as well as its 
attorney. He was mayor of Grafton in 1904-05, being elected on the 
Republican ticket. He is member of State Bar Association; the Ma- 
sonic order, having been advanced in the mysteries of that ancient and 
honorable fraternity to the thirty-second degree and is also a Shriner; 
holds membership in the Odd Fellows order, is a past noble grand and 
member of the encampment; is also an Elk. In religious belief he is 
of the Lutheran church. 

He was married, April 20, 1899, at Grafton, to Sallie Kunst, born 
September 16, 1872, at Pruntytown, West Virginia, daughter of John 
H. and Florence M. (Rizer) Kunst. They have one child: John 
Kunst, born September 30, 1905, at Grafton, West Virginia. 




^s.C?U1^1^lC Xp^ ^Oyt/^^fiLCUd LH> ^- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 68 i 

This narrative treats of the Flanagan family to 
FLANAGAN which Rev. James H. Flanagan, D. D., belongs. 
The original home of this branch of the family was 
in Ireland, where Patrick Flanagan was born. He came to America in 
1804. He sought and obtained employment on the construction of the 
National Pike, saved his money and soon owned a horse and cart, after 
which he took small contracts on the pike. Thus he started in business, 
and finally decided to purchase a farm, which he did in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania. He died in 1874. He was a farmer, belonged 
to the Presbyterian church and politically voted the Democratic ticket. 
He married Nancy Hastings, born in Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Chil- 
dren: Mary, Elizabeth, John, William, Margaret and James H. 

(II) James H. Flanagan, D. D., son of Patrick and Nancy (Hast- 
ings) Flanagan, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 23, 1832. He obtained his education at the common schools 
then attended West Alexandria, Pennsylvania, Academy, after which 
he entered Washington College (now Washington and Jefferson), in 
1 85 1, and then the Western Theological Seminary. He was licensed 
to preach in 1856 and ordained a regular minister in 1857. His first 
work was at Kingwood, Virginia, after which he was pastor of the 
Presbyterian church at Fairmont, West Virginia, from 1862 to 1872, 
and pastor of the church at Grafton, West Virginia, from 1872 to 
1902. Since the date last named, he has been pastor emeritus of the 
Grafton church. He has been enabled to do much good for the cause 
of Christianity in West Virginia, where his labors have been continu- 
ous since before the civil war period. At Grafton the Presbyterian 
church has been built up, the property kept free of debt, and the 
spiritual interest kept alive to a marked degree during the passing of 
these multiplied years. Dr. Flanagan was the organizer of the Synod 
of West Virginia in 1904. On June 10, 1891, West Virginia Univer- 
sity conferred the honorary degree of D. D. upon him. The Presby- 
terian church of West Virginia owes much to Dr. Flanagan for his 
constant and ceaseless efforts in its behalf, and even at his advanced age 
he continues his labors, averaging at least one sermon for each Sabbath. 
He is a Mason. 

Rev. J. H. Flanagan married May 17, 1864, at Wheeling, West 
Virginia, Isabella H. Hervey, daughter of a faithful minister. Rev. 



682 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

James Hervey, D. D. Mrs. Flanagan was born in Wheeling, February 
23, 1832, and died in 1907. Her mother's maiden name was Jane Mc- 
Kinley. Rev. James Hervey was pastor of Forks Presbyterian Church 
for forty-seven years, and was greatly beloved by thousands who heard 
him preach the word during the almost half century of his pastorate. 
The number of persons baptized, married and buried under the pastor- 
ates of both Dr. Flanagan and Dr. Hervey was very large. 



This is a German family, first represented in America by 
ERNST Marcus John Ernst, a native of Germany, who emigrated 

alone, when eighteen years of age, locating at Mounds- 
ville, Marshall county, Virginia. He was forty-five years old at the 
date of his death in 1871. He was a baker by trade and lived most of 
his life at Moundsville, coming to Clarksburg in 1865. He worked 
for the union army as a baker, during the civil war in this country, at 
Buckhannon, Upshur county, Virginia. He married Fannie Hine, a 
native German woman, an orphan when she came unaccompanied to 
this country and located at Moundsville. She died in 1894, aged sixty- 
four years. Children: Charles M., of whom further; William H., of 
Salt Lake City, Utah, where he is engaged in the transfer business; 
Philip, died aged forty-six years; Mrs. Nettie Lambricht, died aged 
thirty-six years. 

(II) Charles Marcus, son of Marcus J. and Fannie (Hine) Ernst, 
was born at Moundsville, Marshall county. West Virginia, November 
7, 1858. He came to Clarksburg with his parents, when but five years 
of age, and was there educated at the public schools. He assisted his 
mother with the bakery and confectionery business, in a building for- 
merly located where the Waldo Hotel now stands, continuing until he 
was twenty-two years of age. He then established a confectionery 
store on his own account on Third street, Clarksburg, and conducted 
it for five years. He has had charge of the Donahue & Johnson boot 
and shoe and hat store, located at 328 Main street, for over twenty- 
five years. Politically Mr. Ernst is a Republican. He is a member of 
the city council, being elected to such position in 1902, and holding it 
ever since by reelection. He belongs to the Elks order at Clarksburg, 
and the Knights of Pythias fraternity; and is a member and clerk of 
the Woodmen of the World. He is a member of the Lutheran church. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 683 

Charles M. Ernst married, at Hamilton, Ohio, February 16, 1893, 
Katherine Small Rittweger, born in Oxford, Ohio, November 16, 1870, 
daughter of W. A. Rittweger, who was born about 1843, ^"d lived 
retired at Oxford, Ohio, where he formerly conducted a barber shop. 
His wife was Mary Long, who is still living at the age of sixty-three 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Ernst have an adopted son, Phillip Charles, now 
nineteen years of age, who is the son of Mrs. Nettie Lambricht, Mr. 
Ernst's sister. 



Many years ago this was known as a pioneer name in 
JACOBS Maryland where at least three generations of the family 
had resided. Later the family was well known and quite 
numerous in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. 

(I) John Jacobs, of English origin, was born in Maryland and 
lived to an advanced age. He had a son, Daniel B., of whom further. 

(II) Daniel B., son of John Jacobs was born in Maryland, and 
like his father lived to be an old and successful agriculturalist in that 
state. He married and had children, among whom was William. 

(III) William, son of Daniel B. Jacobs and wife, was a native 
of Greene county, Pennsylvania, born August 18, 1835, died September 
28, 1908. He followed farming the greater part of his life and also 
handled real estate at Waynesburg. Politically he was a Democrat, 
and in his church faith was of the Methodist Protestant denomination. 
He married Hester Jane Loar, bom in Greene county, Pennsylvania, 
November 25, 1836, died March 21, 19 10. John Loar, the father-in- 
law of William Jacobs, was by occupation a farmer. But two children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Jacobs are now living: Daniel Warren, of whom 
further; and Anna Belle, now Mrs. Robert R. Hadley, of Waynesburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

(IV) Daniel Warren, son of William and Hester Jane (Loar) 
Jacobs, was born in Rich Hill township, Greene county, Pennsylvania, 
March 16, i860. He attended the local common schools and then 
entered Waynesburg College, Pennsylvania. He taught school for a 
time, and was then deputy treasurer of the county, under his father for 
three years. He then engaged in the business of general merchandising 
at Harvey's postoffice, GraysviUe, Pennsylvania, owning a large store 
which he conducted for ten years. After this he went to Clarksburg, 



684 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

West Virginia, in September, 1897, ^"'l purchased Colonel T. S. Spates' 
dry goods store, operating for two years. He then moved the stock to 
another location and ran the business two years longer before he sold 
out and erected the Jacobs Building, in 1902, one of the substantial 
structures of the city of Clarksburg. In this building he fitted up ex- 
cellent real estate offices and is now engaged in a large realty business. 
This building has the largest single storeroom in West Virginia. He 
also purchased the old Colonel Spates residence at No. 443 West Main 
street. He also owns the Monticello Garage, an immense building on 
Monticello avenue and Main street. He is president of the Fairground 
Improvement Company. Politically Mr. Jacobs votes the Democratic 
ticket. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Eastern Star, the 
Knights Templar, and the Odd Fellows. He is a Baptist. 

Daniel W. Jacobs married, in Greene county, Pennsylvania, No- 
vember, 1884, Lucy Webster, a native of that county, born September 
22, 1864. She was the daughter of Samuel K. Webster, a farmer, who 
is still living, at the age of seventy-nine years, in Greene county, Penn- 
sylvania. Mr. Webster married Nancy Higginbotham, now aged 
seventy-eight years. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Jacobs are: John 
W., born September 6, 1885, now in the Monticello Garage Company, 
owned by his father; Hallie E., born August 31, 1888, with the Monti- 
cello Garage Company; William Samuel, born May 21, 1894, at 
school. 



At least four generations of this Davis family have been 
DAVIS residents of Harrison county, Virginia, and West Vir- 
ginia. The heads of such families have been: James B., 
born about 1821, in Harrison county; Granville H., born in 1839; 
Hannibal Hamlin, born in 1862. 

(I) Rev. James B. Davis, born in Harrison county, in what was 
then Old Virginia, in 1821, died at the age of eighty-five years in 1906. 
He was a minister of the Seventh Day Baptist church, and preached at 
New Milton, Doddridge county, and later at Salem, Harrison county. 
He married (first) Jane Hopkins, a native of Ohio, and (second) 
Emily V. Davis. Children by first wife: Abner; Granville H., of 
whom further; William Henry; Jane; Moses H., and Augustus, died 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 685 

young. Children by second wife: Anderson; Virginus L.; Viola C; 
Alvena; Ora A.; A. H., and Pertima. 

(II) Granville H., son of James B. and Jane (Hopkins) Davis, 
was born in Greene county, Ohio, on New Year's Day, 1839. He is 
now leading a retired life at Salem, West Virginia. He has followed 
agricultural pursuits all of his active years and been highly successful 
in his undertakings as a tiller of the soil in Doddridge county, this state. 
He participated in the great civil war, being a member of Company A, 
Fourteenth West Virginia Regiment Infantry. He was at the battle 
of Bull Run and in eight other heavy engagements. He married 
Minerva R. Randolph, born in 1841, daughter of Jephtha F. Ran- 
dolph, now deceased, who was a farmer of Doddridge county. West 
Virginia. Mrs. Davis now resides at Salem. This worthy couple were 
the parents of ten children, of whom one son and one daughter are de- 
ceased. Living children : Resin Filmore, now employed by the Burma 
Oil Company, in India, has been around the world; the remainder of 
the family all reside in Harrison county. West Virginia: Herbert L. ; 
Darwin J.; Erastus B.; Dow C; Cedona B., who married Thomas J. 
Snyder; Atha, who married John McLaughlin; and Hannibal Hamlin, 
of whom further. 

(III) Hannibal Hamlin, son of Granville H. and Minerva R. 
(Randolph) Davis, was born February 11, 1862, in Doddridge county. 
West Virginia, on his father's farm, known as Wolf's Penn Run Farm. 
He attended school in his native district. New Milton. He began work 
for Judge Steward, of West Union, with whom he remained a short 
time. In August, 1883, he entered the Oxford University, Allegany 
county. New York State, where for two years he supported himself 
while attending the University, working mornings and nights. He 
then served an apprenticeship with A. A. Shaw, a jeweler of that town, 
where he remained three years. In June, 1888, he went to Harrison 
county and started a jewelry store at Salem, with a capital of one hun- 
dred dollars. There he remained twenty-one years. In 1898 his store 
was burned with the great conflagration of that town, and he thus lost 
all, about six thousand dollars; but always having been prompt, his 
credit was excellent. He was advanced at once all the credit he needed 
to enter business again, and that with only his personal note. He thus 
stocked up again and commenced business. He owes much of his sue- 



686 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

cess in the latter business venture to Dr. D. C. Louchery, then of 
Salem, but now of Clarksburg, a practicing physician, who advanced him 
the necessary credit with which to return to business. In 1898 he 
purchased the Nutter property of Clarksburg, having confidence in the 
coming prosperity of that city. He still owns this property, and also 
Nos. 238 to 448 East Pike street, of more than a hundred foot front- 
age, valued at three hundred dollars per foot. His jewelry store is 
located at 122 Fourth street, and he there carries the highest grade of 
goods, his trade being among the best people in the vicinity. He owns 
five pieces of valuable property in Clarksburg, including one lot on 
Pike street, one on Pike and Depot streets, one on Jefferson street, and 
one at 2 1 1 East Pike street, where his residence is situated, together 
with the lot adjoining his residence. He is numbered among the stock- 
holders in the Empire National Bank and has other financial interests. 
Politically Mr. Davis is a Republican. He holds a membership in the 
Knights of Pythias, Eagles and Maccabees fraternities, and in church 
connection is a Baptist. 

He married, at Salem, West Virginia, July 3, 1890, Osee Belle 
Hoover, born in Taylor county. West Virginia, in 1873, daughter of 
John W. and Virginia (Talbert) Hoover. Mr. Hoover, now aged 
sixty-two years, lives at the Soldiers' Home, Dayton, Ohio, and is a 
Grand Army man. Mrs. Hoover now resides with Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Davis are: Dana Lowell, born 
February 27, 1892, in the high school; Charles Lawrence, born Janu- 
ary 27, 1894; Alfred Lysle, born March 17, 1896; Laura Minerva, 
bom August 16, 1898; Clara Aneta, born August 25, 1904; Bernard 
Carson, born April i, 1907. 



Three generations of this family have been residents of 
DAVIS Shinnston, West Virginia. The first of this line was Dr. 
Peter Davis, who was born near Morristown, Monongalia 
county, West Virginia, September 16, 18 11. He removed to Shinns- 
ton, in 1855, and lived there the remainder of his life, dying April 30, 
1887, aged seventy-six years. He married Maria Billingslea, born 
near Morristown, June 9, 1809, died September 9, 1892. Their child, 
Samuel Benton Davis, is mentioned below. 

(II) Samuel Benton Davis, son of Dr. Peter and Maria (Billings- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 687 

lea) Davis, was born in 1837, died in January, 1873, aged thirty-six 
years. By trade he was a blacksmith. He was among the soldiers of 
the civil war who went from West Virginia and saw severe service, for 
at the outbreak, of the war he enlisted in Company G, Twelfth West 
Virginia Regiment, and served three years. He participated in many 
hard fought battles, and was captured at Cedar Creek, and held a 
prisoner ten months. Politically he was a Democrat, and in his relig- 
ious views favored the Methodist denomination. 

He married Mary A. Foreman, and they were the parents of one 
son, Samuel Benton, mentioned below. 

(Ill) Samuel Benton (2), named for his father, Samuel Benton 
( I ) Davis (who died before the son's birth) , was bom August 7, 1 873, 
at Shinnston, Harrison county. West Virginia. He was educated in the 
public schools, after which he engaged in railroading as agent for the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, at Shinnston. Since 19 10 Mr. 
Davis has been in the miUing business as manager for C. F. Lucas & 
Company, at Shinnston. He is a stockholder in both the Farmers' and 
the First National banks of Shinnston. Among the valuable pieces of 
property he owns may be mentioned the one on the corner of Pike and 
Main streets. His residence Is located on Charles street. He belongs 
to the Masonic fraternity, and politically he is a Republican. 

Mr. Davis married, February 5, 1907, Virginia Pearl Anderson, a 
nadve of Shinnston, West Virginia, born May 4, 1882. They have 
one child, Samuel Benton Jr., born November 6, 19 10. 



For several generations this family has resided in Harri- 
DAVIS son county, now West Virginia, where generally they have 
followed agriculture for a livelihood, the later members, 
however, being in the professions. 

(I) Resin Davis was born in Harrison county, Virginia, about 
1836, died about 1886. He was a farmer as was his father, in the 
county and state last named. He married Mary Williams, by whom 
one child was born, Francis M., see forward. 

(II) Francis M., son of Resin and Mary (Williams) Davis, was 
born In Harrison county, now West Virginia, 1852. He is now a re- 
tired farmer residing in the city of Clarksburg, the scenes of which 
have been familiar to him from childhood. For many years he was 



688 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

assessor of Harrison county. He still owns a large farm on Sycamore 
creek, this county. He is politically a Republican, and in his religious 
faith is of the Methodist church. He married Mary O. Merideth, a 
native of West Virginia. Their children are Cecil W., Bertha V., Isa 
A., Claude Melvin, Dorsey B., Emma G., deceased; Paul F. 

( III ) Claude Melvin Davis, D. D. S., son of Francis M. and Mary 
O. (Merideth) Davis, and now of the dental firm of Davis & Davis, 
Clarksburg, was born April i8, 1880, on his father's farm, on Syca- 
more creek, Harrison county. West Virginia. He had the advantage 
of the public schools of his native county after which he entered Pitts- 
burgh Dental College, from which he graduated in 1903. He immedi- 
ately commenced his practice as a dentist in the city of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, and at Altoona, that state. He also practiced for three 
years in Chicago, Illinois, then returned to Clarksburg, West Virginia, 
in December, 1908, first taking charge of Dr. Timberlake's practice 
and finally established offices with his brother, Dr. D. B. Davis, in the 
Goff building. As a dental firm the Davis brothers have made a suc- 
cess at Clarksburg, proving that they are both well fitted for the prac- 
tice of their profession. Politically Dr. Davis votes the Republican 
ticket. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and holds 
membership in the Modern Woodmen of America. 

He married, January 6, 1904, Lena A. Reynolds, a native of Wood 
county. She was born April 17, 1880. 

(Ill) Dorsey Boatman Davis, D. D. S., son of Francis M. and 
Mary O. (Merideth) Davis, was born in West Milford, West Vir- 
ginia, May 10, 1884. He attended the local common schools of Harri- 
son county after which he took a course at Salem College, and then hav- 
ing decided to become a dentist studied at the Pittsburgh (Pennsyl- 
vania) Dental College for two years. After a course at the University 
of Illinois, from which he graduated in 1907, he commenced his prac- 
tice of dentistry at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. He also practiced at 
Washington, Pennsylvania, at Chicago and at Pittsburgh, finally re- 
moving to Clarksburg, West Virginia, in August, 19 10, where he and 
his brother, Claude Melvin Davis, formed a partnership. In his polit- 
ical preference he favors Republican party principles. He is a member 
of the Delta Sigma Delta college fraternity, and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 689 

Mr. Davis married, in February, 1907, at Chicago, Dora Frances 
Reynolds (sister of his brother's wife) . She was born in Wood county. 
West Virginia, in 1888, daughter of W. F. and Florence (H'ill) 
Reynolds, both living at Walker, Wood county, the former by occupa- 
tion a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have two children : Robert H. and 
John B. 



George Lee Duncan, actively and prominently identi- 
DUNCAN fied with many of the leading industries of Clarksburg 
and vicinity, is a native of Clarksburg and a member 
of a representative family of that section. 

(I) Judge Edwin S. Duncan came to this country in early man- 
hood, having in his possession old Virginia patents for land, and was 
the owner of large tracts in that state, from which he derived a fair 
income. He represented this country in England under President 
Monroe, and was prominent as a judge, administering the duties of the 
office in a highly efficient manner. 

(II) James, son of Edwin S. Duncan, died in early manhood, at 
the age of twenty-seven years, leaving one child, James Jackson, see 
forward. He married Columbia, daughter of Judge John G. Jackson, 
who was the prime factor in securing the appointment of Stonewall 
Jackson at West Point, he being a relative of that famous character. 
He was the owner of iron and salt mines, was a member of congress, 
and one of the first federal judges. 

(III) James Jackson, son of James Duncan, is a resident of Clarks- 
burg, now leading a retired life, having practiced law for a number of 
years. He is a graduate of the University of Virginia. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and takes an intelligent interest but no active part in 
political affairs. He married Maud Lee, a native of Clarksburg, 
daughter of Judge George H. Lee, of the Virginia supreme court of 
appeals prior to the civil war. After the war Judge Lee was the chief 
counsel of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, was very prominent, and his 
abilities were recognized and appreciated. 

(IV) George Lee, son of James Jackson Duncan, was born No- 
vember 30, 1872. He attended the local schools, and at the early age 
of fifteen began his business career. For a quarter of a century he was 

19-2M 



690 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

in the employ of Mr. Lowndes, and is now ( 1912) secretary and treas- 
urer of the Lowndes Savings Banic and Trust Company, president of 
the West Virginia Bank, director of the Merchants' National Bank, 
the Clarksburg Gas & Electric Company, the Commercial Coal & Coke 
Company, the Independent Oil Company, and is interested in other cor- 
porations. He is a member of the vestry of the Episcopal church of 
Clarksburg, and a Democrat in politics, serving as president of the 
Board of Trade of Clarksburg in 1909-10. He is the owner of a two 
hundred acre farm located on Elk creek, seven miles from Clarksburg. 
Mr. Duncan is a member of the Sons of the Revolution, the Free and 
Accepted Masons, and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
Mr. Duncan married, at Philadelphia, July 27, 1898, Gertrude 
Smith, a native of Clarksburg, daughter of Ashbel G. and Anna (Ran- 
kin) Smith, the former of whom was a native of Preston county, Vir- 
ginia, merchant of Clarksburg, died in 1898; and the latter a native of 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania. Children: George Lee Jr., born May 27, 
iSqq: Elizabeth Rankin. 



The family of Ruhl is very clearly of German extraction, 
RUHL its home being the German principality of Hesse. At 

least there has long been a family of that name established 
there, and as investigations do not show the race to be a large one in 
the old or new countries, the statement seems to be a correct one. In 
the United States the immigrants of the name seem to have all come to 
Pennsylvania, as far as the records show. It is well known that the 
most of the English colonies, north and south, extended a rather cold 
welcome to those of different race and language. The Penns alone 
welcomed all alike to their province, and Germans especially formed a 
large, if not the principal element, in the population of Pennsylvania. 
The records of immigration have fortunately been preserved in 
part, and it is found that several Ruhls arrived at different times in the 
eighteenth century. One and all seemed to have sailed from the port 
of Rotterdam, and here it is interesting to note the various forms of 
the name which occur in the early records: Ruhl, Riihl, Riihle, Ruil, 
Rull, Riehl and even Reel, all evidently variations of the same name. 
This sort of diversity is the despair of historical and genealogical in- 
vestigators, and springs in part from what may be termed the evolution 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 691 

of the name, but at least as often from the ignorance or carelessness ot 
recording officers. It has so far been impossible to connect the Ruhls of 
to-day directly with the fatherland. 

(I) The first of the line traceable in direct descent was Johannes 
Ruhl, who, as the family recora shows, was born in 1739, in Virginia. 
It is perhaps significant that a Johannes Ruhl took, passage September 3, 
1742, in the ship "Loyal Judith," from the port of Rotterdam. Ident- 
ity of name is held by genealogists as fairly good presumptive evidence 
of kinship. Too much importance should not be laid on the birth in 
Virginia. As far as our researches go the Ruhls are not, and never 
have been, a Virginia family. Two points in geographical history may 
help to explain the matter. The Shenandoah Valley of Virginia was 
largely settled by Germans and Scotch-Irish from Pennsylvania, and 
had few pioneers from the Virginia seaboard. The immigrant Ruhls 
may have gone up the valley with friends or kindred of other names, 
and later returned to Pennsylvania. Or they might never have left the 
limits of the modern Pennsylvania, and still have called themselves resi- 
dents of Virginia, as all the portion of the former state, south and 
southeast of the modern Pittsburgh, was claimed by Virginia, and 
actually administered by that state till after the revolution. But what- 
ever the precise place where Johannes Ruhl first saw the light, most 
of his life was spent in York county, Pennsylvania, where were also 
located others of his name, presumably kindred. There he married, 
August 14, 1764, Helena Schenck, daughter of Andreas and Rosina 
(Billmyer) Schenck. It is curious to note that this Andreas Schenck 
came to Philadelphia from Rotterdam, September 25, 1732, just ten 
years earlier than that other Johannes Ruhl, of whom we have spoken. 
Andreas Schenck settled in York county, and besides Rosina, born April 
14, 1744 (wife of Johannes Ruhl), had Helena, born September 22, 
1745, and John Michael Matthew, born February 17, I747» all of 
whom are recorded in the First Lutheran Church of York, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Johannes Ruhl or John Ruhl, as the name seems to have been spell- 
ed in later life, was a fanner in Codorus township, York county, Penn- 
sylvania. On the outbreak of the revolutionary war, he took the side 
of the colonies and is found enrolled in Captain George Hoover's com- 
pany, of the First Battalion of York County Associators, Colonel James 



692 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Smith, commander. In 1776 this organization marched to Perth Am- 
boy, New Jersey, where a part later enlisted in the First Regiment of 
the Flying Camp, under Colonel Michael Swope. We find no further 
record of service. It is interesting to note that one Peter Ruhl, very 
probably a relative, was a prominent figure in the public life of York 
county in revolutionary days. 

The county tax lists show John Ruhl's increasing prosperity: In 
1779 he was taxed for thirty acres of land; 1780, for eighty acres; and 
1783, for two hundred twenty-five acres, all within the county. In 
religious belief he was a Lutheran. He died in York county, January 
23, 1825, aged eighty-six. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) (Johannes) and Helena 
(Schenck) Ruhl, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, August 22, 
1769. He was an extensive farmer In Codorus township, York county, 
Pennsylvania, near Shrewsbury. Later the family moved to Ohio, and 
he died at Gallon, Ohio, February 24, 1845. He married, March 24, 
1793, Maria Margaretha, daughter of Michael Gerbrlch Jr., who 
served In the revolutionary army under Captain John Miller, in the 
Third Company, Seventh Battalion of York county militia. His father, 
Michael Gerbrlch Sr., came from Rotterdam in the ship "Duke of Bed- 
ford," September 14, 175 1. 

Children of John and Maria Margaretha (Gerbrich) Ruhl: i. 
John Michael, born February 9, 1794, died July 21, 1802. 2. Jacob, 
bom March 23, 1796. 3. Adam, born July 12, 1799, died July 13, 
1802. 4. Lydia, born December 11, 1801, died January 31, 1802. 
5. Eva, bom May 18, 1804, died August 20, 1808. 6. Margaret, 
born May 9, 1806. 7. Katherine, born January 24, 1808, died Decem- 
ber 27, 1833. 8. Levi, born January 12, 181 1. 9. Henry, mentioned 
below. 10. Peter, born December 15, 1815. 

(III) Henry, son of John (2) and Maria Margaretha (Ger- 
brich) Ruhl, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, June 12, 1813, 
died in Springfield, Ohio, January 9, 1903, In his ninetieth year. He 
was like his father, a farmer and member of the Lutheran church. In 
early life he removed to Ohio. He was successively a Whig, Free^ 
soller, and Republican, In political opinions. He married in Mansfield, 
Ohio, December, 1839, Mary Sentz, born in York county, Pennsyl- 
vania, December 25, 18 15, died in Springfield, Ohio, November 28, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 693 

1893, daughter of John and Mary Anne (Lewis) Sentz. Her father, 
John Sentz, was born in York, county, Pennsylvania, May 30, 1786, 
died in Galion, Ohio, 1832; her mother, Mary A. Lewis, was born in 
Baltimore, Maryland, May 11, 1785, died in Richland county, Ohio, 
December 5, 1850. 

Children of Henry and Mary (Sentz) Ruhl: i. Louisa Maria, 
born December 24, 1840; married Henry W. Potter. 2. Rebecca Ann, 
born October 17, 1842, died February 21, 1888. 3. Michael Me- 
lanchthon, born March 27, 1844. 4. John Luther, mentioned below. 
5. Martha Tabitha, bom November 17, 1849; married J. Edward 
Meyers. 6. Charles Spener, born January 22, 1852; married Emma 
. 7. Mary Florence, born December 18, 1856; married Will- 
iam Muir. 

(IV) John Luther, son of Henry and Mary (Sentz) Ruhl, was 
born in Galion, Crawford county, Ohio, January 9, 1846. He attend- 
ed the public schools of Springfield, Ohio, and then took, a special two 
years' course at Wittenberg College, Springfield, Ohio. In the civil 
war he served in Company B, One Hundred and Ninety-sixth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, enlisting March 7, 1865, serving in Virginia, but 
participating in no battles; was mustered out September 11, 1865, at 
Baltimore, Maryland. After the war he removed to Clarksburg, West 
Virginia, where he was in the produce business from March, 1869, to 
January, 1872. He was then for three years in Chicago in the same 
business, but returned to Clarksburg in 1875, where he conducted a 
wholesale grocery business until 1904. Mr. Ruhl is now president of 
the Koblegard Company, wholesale dry goods, and vice-president of 
the Standard Milling Company, and the A. Radford Pottery Com- 
pany, and director in the Williams Wholesale Hardware Company, of 
all of which he was one of the organizers. From 1904 to 1906 he was a 
director in the Union National Bank, Clarksburg, and since 1905, has 
been president of the Home Bank for Savings. He is also a director 
and stockholder in numerous other important concerns. In politics Mr. 
Ruhl is an Independent Republican, and was chairman of the Repub- 
lican executive committee of Harrison county for four years in the 
"eighties," and a member of the West Virginia house of delegates, 
1 882-1 884, declining a renomination. He and his family are members 



694 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

of the First Presbyterian Church of Clarksburg. Mr. Ruhl is a mem- 
ber of Custer Post, No. 8, Grand Army of the Repubhc. 

He married, at Groton, Connecticut, November lo, 1890, JuHa 
Slocum Walker, daughter of David and Mary (Fitch) Walker, who 
was born in Groton, Connecticut, June 17, 1861, graduate of Mt. 
Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, class of 1881. Her 
father, David Walker, was a sailor, captain of sailing vessels in the 
merchant marine and whaling service, sailing all seas for fifty years. 
His children were: i. Laura Almy. 2. Julia Slocum. 3. Mary Eliza- 
beth, wife of Robert F. Raymond. 4. William Edward. 5. Isabel 
Fitch. No less than seven of Mrs. Ruhl's ancestors came over in the 
"Mayflower," 1620. She is one of the most prominent women in West 
Virginia, a leader in literary and social circles. On October 19, 191 1, 
she was elected president of the Federation of Women's Clubs of West 
Virginia, and at the same time chosen delegate to the biennial conven- 
tion of the National Federation of Women's Clubs at San Francisco, 
and was appointed one of the women managers of the Buffalo Exposi- 
tion. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ruhl have the following children : i. Rebecca Louisa, 
born March 30, 1892, a former pupil at Wheaton Seminary, Norton, 
Massachusetts, now student of Goucher College, Baltimore, Maryland. 
2. Mary Latimer, born November 8, 1893, a former pupil at Wheaton 
Seminary, Norton, Massachusetts, now student at Mt. Holyoke Col- 
lege, South Hadley, Massachusetts. 3. Henry Walker, born June 26, 
1895, now student at Jacob Tome Institute for Boys, Port Deposit, 
Maryland. 



The founder of this family in America was John Mc- 
McGUIRE Guire, born in Ireland, came to this country with his 

parents when a boy, locating in Blair county, Penn- 
sylvania. He became a locomotive engineer, and on April 24, 1880, 
was killed while on duty, he being at that time forty-six years of 
age. He was the son of Philip McGuire, born in Ireland in 1 800, died 
in Altoona, Pennsylvania, in 1884. John McGuire married Mary 
O'Reilly, born in Ireland, daughter of Miles O'Reilly, also a native of 
Ireland, in which country he died at the age of ninety-four. Mary 
O'Reilly came to this country alone; she survived her husband's death 





G/^^ 




M"^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 695 

and is now living in Huntington, West Virginia, at the age of sixty- 
three years. Mr. and Mrs. McGuire had seven children, six boys and 
one girl, of whom four of the sons and the one daughter are still living; 
the names of the children are as follows : Thomas J., resided at Parkers- 
burg, West Virginia; Philip P., living in Baltimore, Maryland; John 
Patrick, of whom further; William C, a resident of Huntington, West 
Virginia; Mary B., now Mrs. Krugh, living in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania; Edwin, died in infancy; Francis, died in infancy. 

(Ill) Dr. John Patrick McGuire, son of John and Mary 
(O'Reilly) McGuire, was born November 13, 1873, '" Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania. He was educated at the high school of Altoona, and at St. 
Michael's College, Toronto, Canada, from which he went to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, at Baltimore, and was graduated in medicine in 
the year 1905. He then came to Clarksburg, West Virginia, where 
he has remained ever since in the practice of his profession. Dr. Mc- 
Guire occupies a high rank in the community, not only professionally, 
but among social circles as well; he is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus, and the Woodmen of the World; and in his political con- 
victions is an adherent of the Democratic party. He is a member of 
the Catholic church. 

Dr. McGuire married, at the Church of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion, in Clarksburg, September 21, 1908, Anna (Mulheran) Sommers, 
born in Clarksburg, June 20, 1878, daughter of Thomas Mulheran, a 
native of Ireland, who came to this country with his parents when he 
was six years of age, settling in Harrison county; he became a teamster 
in the union army during the civil war, and died July 3, 1887. Mrs. 
McGuire's mother, Margaret Mulheran, was born in Kingwood, West 
Virginia, June 20, 1853, and is now a resident of Clarksburg. Dr. and 
Mrs. McGuire have no children. 



It is from this family that Brandonsville, Preston 
BRANDON county, West Virginia, took its name. The first 

American ancestor was an emigrant from England, 
prior to 1732. Egle's "Pennsylvania Genealogy" says: "William 
Brandon, of Adams county, Pennsylvania, was the son of William and 
Isabella Brandon, of Hanover; died 1753, leaving a wife Isabella and 
children, James, Catherine, Ann and William Brandon." It appears 



696 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

that members of the Brandon family removed from Adams, or some 
other county, in Pennsylvania, to what is now known as West Virginia, 
then Virginia, and there made settlement and reared families. Hon. 

Eugene Brandon, of whom later, was the son of and 

Brandon, who had children. Including these: Eugene, of whom further; 
one daughter who married James Everly, of Preston county, Virginia; 
Jane, married Thomas King, of the same county; and Elizabeth, mar- 
ried a Mr. Horner, who removed to Moravia, Iowa, where both died. 
One of Mrs. Horner's daughters married B. F. Hough, and they reside 
in Cerro Gordo, Illinois. 

(II) Hon. Eugene Brandon was born about 1825, at Brandons- 
ville, died 1876. He was of the Democratic party and was a member 
of the Virginia legislature from Preston county before the state was 
divided in 1863. He was a man of influence and great sense of honor. 
He married Clara, daughter of John and Nancy (Carroll) Turner. 
John Turner served in the union army during the civil war and was 
wounded, returned home and died at Fairmont, Marion county, West 
Virginia. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Brandon were: Anna, 
Mary, Charles W., of whom further; Frank V., Eugene B. and Leroy. 

(III) Charles W., son of Eugene and Clara (Turner) Brandon, 
was born at Parkersburg, Harrison county. West Virginia, October 12, 
1866. He was educated at the public schools and at the West Virginia 
University, and taught in the public schools and in the high school at 
Elkins a number of years. He then returned to the West Virginia Uni- 
versity and finished his course in the law department. Just prior to 
completing this course he was elected clerk of the circuit court and 
when his term of office expired in 1908, was reelected to the same posi- 
tion. His present term will expire in 19 14. He makes an acceptable, 
energetic and careful official of Barbour county. He is among the 
popular county officers and the entire people have confidence in his 
ability to perform the many important duties devolving on such an 
official. Mr. Brandon is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Lodge No. 59, at Philippi, his home town. He also holds 
membership with the Maccabees, Valley Tent, No. 19; Modern Wood- 
men of the World and Woodmen of America. 

He married, October 28, 1900, Blanche, daughter of James and 
Johannah (Budinger) O'Brien. The O'Briens were natives of Will- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 697 

iamsport, Pennsylvania. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Brandon: Charles 
W. Jr., born September 18, 1901; J. Blanchard, born April 7, 1903; 
Harry O'Brien, born April 11, 1910. 



This is an old Pennsylvania family, whose early records 
RAINEY are quite obscure at the present time. The numerous 

Pennsylvania and New York archives do not possess 
publications giving the family genealogy. Egle's "Genealogy of Penn- 
sylvania" speaks of a Rev. William Ralney as the husband of Mar- 
garet Fisher, daughter of George Robinson, of Cumberland, Pennsyl- 
vania. This would indicate that the family formerly lived near Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

William R. Rainey, father of William Wallace Rainey, of Philippi, 
West Virginia, was born near Stormstown, Centre county, Pennsyl- 
vania, about 1809, died at Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1 89 1. He had two brothers and one sister. The sister was named 
Hannah; she married Thomas Wasson, and for a number of years 
resided at Stormstown, Pennsylvania. The eldest brother of the two 
above named was John C. Rainey, who settled at Lancaster, Ohio, and 
there reared a large family of children. The father attained consider- 
able prominence in public life, and was clerk of the courts for several 
years. His son Charles was a writer of some note, and compiled a 
history of Lancaster county, Ohio. The other brother was Samuel 
Rainey, who located at Lafayette, Indiana, and was the father of two 
children — Thomas and Jane Rainey. Thomas was a banker, and Jane 
married James Ward, a merchant of Lafayette. 

(II) William R. Rainey was born near Stormstown, Centre county, 
Pennsylvania, about 1809, died at Meadville, Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1 89 1. He was by occupation a farmer and progressive in 
all his methods. He was an educated, industrious man of frugal, tem- 
perate habits and highly esteemed. He was looked up to by the com- 
munity as one in whom all confidence could be placed. He was accom- 
modating and capable, hence had many call upon him to make out legal 
instruments and to give general business suggestions. He settled wills 
and estates and arbitrated disputes between his neighbors. In his 
church faith, he was of the Presbyterian denomination, rather stern in 
discipline. In politics he was a staunch Democrat. He married Char- 



698 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

lotte Darby, a native of Mayville, New York. Children: Caroline, 
married a Mr. Baker; Marian, married Joseph Nodine; Sarah, mar- 
ried LeGrand M. Drake; Henrietta, married Jerome Richardson; 
Helen, married Warren Shotwell; Melodia, married a Mr. Ross; 
Mary, married Delos Archibald; William Wallace, of whom further. 
(Ill) William Wallace, son of William R. and Charlotte (Darby) 
Rainey, was born at Meadsville, Pennsylvania, June 18, 1861, in the 
first months of the civil war. He obtained his education at the public 
schools; the normal school at Edenborough, Pennsylvania, and at Alle- 
gheny College. After he left school life, he engaged in mercantile 
business at Cams City, Butler county, Pennsylvania, and at Du Bois 
City, Clearfield county, of the same state. In 1890 he disposed of his 
business and also of the real estate he held, to take up a different line of 
work. He commenced to deal extensively in coal lands and timber 
tracts in West Virginia, Kentucky and other states. Mr. Rainey is 
possessed of fine business foresight and ability to make large profitable 
deals. Among his other interests he holds considerable stock in the 
Fiberton Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The 
products of this factory consist of chemically treated paper, stronger 
than leather, and absolutely water proof. Neither hot or cold water, 
salt water or steam has any effect upon it. Politically Mr. Rainey votes 
the Democratic ticket. 



This name, spelled Harmer and Harmar, is found in 
HARMER Virginia and Pennsylvania at an early day. The rec- 
ords show no Harmer beyond Jacob ( i ) , the revolu- 
tionary soldier, who was probably the first of his family to settle in 
Pennsylvania, or a son of the emigrant. 

(I) Jacob Harmer, progenitor of the Harmers of Harrison coun- 
ty, West Virginia, served as a revolutionary soldier and was probably 
discharged December 23, 1780. He settled in Germantown, Pennsyl- 
vania, after the war. When applying for a license as architect, he pro- 
duced, for the inspection of the court, a paper signed by George Wash- 
ington, certifying as to his character and faithful service. This proved 
amply sufficient, and the old veteran received the necessary papers. He 
married and had two sons: Jacob (2), of whom further, and Joseph, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 699 

who became editor of the New York Citizen, a popular newspaper of 
the day. 

(II) Jacob (2), son of Jacob (i) Harmer, was bom in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, January 23, 1794, and died, in Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, March 8, 1868. When a child he removed with his parents to 
Winchester, where he spent the remainder of his life, and followed the 
trade of hatter. He married Eliza Tyson Ham. Children: Benjamin 
Tyson, of whom further; Peter Ham; Emily Susan; James Albert; 
Theoderick S. ; John R. ; Edgar R. ; Mary J., married a Mr. Cum- 
mings of New York state; Anna Virginia; Joseph J., and William 
H. H. 

(III) Benjamin Tyson, son of Jacob (2) Harmer, was born Janu- 
ary I, 1824, died December 4, 1890. He was a wagon-maker and 
undertaker, and was in business at Shinnston for many years, starting 
in 1852. He was a man of influence and high character, and served as 
president of the county court. He was a Republican in party affili- 
ations. As a Methodist he was one of the most active members of the 
church, and was one of the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church 
in Shinnston from 1854 until his death. He also belonged to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and was one of the oldest, as well as 
one of the most active, members In the state at the time of his death 
He married Margaret Shepler, born in Front Royal, Virginia, May 10 
1828. She survives her husband, is a resident of Shinnston, and, al 
though in her eighty-fourth year, is exceptionally active and well pre 
served. Children: i. Benjamin Tyson, a farmer, living in Shinnston 
2. William J. S., living in Shinnston, a wagon-maker and undertaker 
successor to his father who established the business in 1852, the oldest 
business in town. 3. James Albert. 4. Lloyd M. 5. Mary Virginia, 
married F. K. Dawson, of Clarksburg. 6. Harvey Walker, of whom 
further. 7. Charles Leslie, farmer, of Shinnston. 8. Elizabeth, mar- 
ried S. T. RIttenhouse, of Dola, West Virginia. 

(IV) Harvey Walker, son of Benjamin Tyson Harmer, was born 
in Shinnston, West Virginia, July 25, 1865. He was educated In the 
public school and at Fairmont State Normal School, whence he was 
graduated In 1889. After teaching In the public schools four years he 
entered the law department of the University of West Virginia, and 
was graduated LL. B. in 1892. He at once began the practice of law 



700 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

in Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he still continues firmly establish- 
ed in a lucrative practice. He is a director of the Farmers' Bank, of 
Clarksburg, and is interested in several other banks in his city and 
county. As a Republican, he has given much time to the public service. 
He was secretary of the Clarksburg board of education for nineteen 
years, ending 1910; was deputy clerk of the circuit court, 1890, 1891; 
member state board of regents for normal school, 1895 to 1901 ; mem- 
ber house of delegates, 1894 to 1896; state senator, 1900 to 1904; 
supervisor of the United States census in 1900, and again in 19 10; 
referee in bankruptcy, 1899 to 1901; mayor of Clarksburg, 1906 to 
1907. His record as a public official is an honorable one and has 
brought him well deserved commendation. He is an active member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and a trustee of the same, as well as 
of the West Virginia Wesleyan College. He was elected lay delegate 
from West Virginia to the general conference of his church held in 
Baltimore in 1908. His fraternity is the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Mr. Harmer married, July 18, 1901, Nellie Marten, born in Shep- 
ardstown, West Virginia, daughter of Henry C. and Dora (Britner) 
Marten, both living in Shepardstown, where Henry C. Marten is a 
hardware dealer, the oldest merchant of that city in point of continuous 
years in business. 



Fauquier county, Virginia, has sent forth many ex- 
MORRISON cellent families as settlers on the western and north- 
ern borders of Old Virginia, in West Virginia and 
Ohio. Among these may be mentioned the Morrison family, especially 
three or four generations, some of whom now reside in West Virginia. 

(I) James Morrison, a cabinet-maker, came to West Virginia dur- 
ing the early years of the nineteenth centiu^, and settled at Boothsville, 
near Bridgeport, Harrison county. 

(II) Andrew Jackson, son of James Morrison, was a native of 
Fauquier county, Virginia, and was a carpenter by trade. His wife was 
Susan Roach, who came from Virginia. She bore him five children : 
Otto Lewis, of whom further; Almira, Marian, Anna and Herman. 

(III) Otto Lewis, son of Andrew Jackson and Susan (Roach) 
Morrison, was born in 1856 in Harrison county, West Virginia, to 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 701 

which locality his parents had removed. He learned the carpenter's 
trade of his father, and worked at it in Salem, where he makes his 
home. He is an industrious, honorable citizen; in politics is a Demo- 
crat ; while in his church relations he is a Baptist. He married Dora 
Pepper, born at Salem in 1862. Mrs. Morrison's father, Marshall 
Pepper, was born in Barbour county, Virginia, about 1826, and lives 
in Harrison county, aged eighty-six years, having followed a farmer's 
career. Children: Arphad Paul, of whom later; Oren F., born 1884, 
now bookkeeper in the First National Bank of Salem; Aubrey Carl, 
1886, a teacher at Salem; Beulah, 1888, a teacher at Salem; Beatrice, 
1890, living at home; Marshall Jackson, 1892; Tascar Bruce, 1894, 
at school; Blanche, 1899, at school; Walter J., 1901, at school; Edwin 
C, 1903. 

(IV) Arphad Paul, son of Otto Lewis and Dora (Pepper) Morri- 
son, was born in Wilsonburg, Harrison county, West Virginia, Decem- 
ber 18, 1882. He received a common school education, near Salem, 
then attended Salem College, later going to Valparaiso University, 
Indiana. After his studies there he attended West Virginia Wesleyan 
College, at Buckhannon, graduating from the seminary course in 1908. 
Previous to this he had taught school four years in country schools and 
after his graduation he became principal at North View, in a coal dis- 
trict, and was soon transferred to Adamson as principal, finishing out 
the year there. In 1909, he was elected principal of the high schools 
and superintendent at Salem for one year. He was elected county 
superintendent, November 22, 19 10, filling out an unexpired term, and 
is now serving on his first full term in the same office, which began July 
15, 191 1. He is a Democrat in politics, and belongs to the Baptist 
church. 

Arphad Paul Morrison married, October 15, 1905, Florence, born 
at Marshallville, Harrison county, West Virginia, April 15, 1883, 
daughter of George W. Williams, now living at Bristol. By occupa- 
tion Mr. Williams is a farmer and stockman. His wife Delia (Martin) 
Williams, was bom in 1858. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Morrison: 
Willard Paul, born December 14, 1906; William Warren, born Febru- 
ary, 1909; Marjorie, born July, 191 1. 



702 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

The grandfather of Stingley F. Hoffman was John 
HOFFMAN Hoffman, a native of the state of West Virginia, who 

died about 1885. He followed farming throughout 
his days, and married Osa Kelly, whose death occurred during the 
seventies. Children: Sanford, Granville, Isaac, Robert J., of whom 
later; Ebenezer, Peter, Jacob, Clarinda, Samantha, Elizabeth, Nancy 
and Rachel. 

(II) Robert J., son of John and Osa (Kelly) Hoffman, was born 
May 9, 1840, died October 21, 1904. Like his father he was a farmer 
of industrious habits, temperate in all things. Politically Robert J. 
Hoffman was a Republican. He was of the United Brethren faith. 
As a member of the West Virginia Home Guards, he took an active 
part in the organization. He married Nancy Nestor and reared a 
family of three children : Jonas W., Stingley Francis, of whom further, 
and Minnie E. Hoffman. 

(III) Stingley Francis, son of Robert and Nancy (Nestor) Hoff- 
man, was born in Cove district, Barbour county. West Virginia, Septem- 
ber 13, 1870. Educated at the public and normal schools and the 
Classical Academy at Buckhannon, he afterwards took a course at the 
Mountain State Business College at Parkersburg, graduating 1893, in 
stenography and typewriting. After leaving his studies in the various 
schools and colleges, he taught for a number of years. From 1899 to 
1 90 1, with E. H. Compton, he engaged in merchandising, at Moats- 
ville, Barbour county. West Virginia, under the firm name of Compton 
& Hoffman. When they disposed of their stock and site of trade at 
the end of two years, Mr. Hoffman accepted a position with the Balti- 
more & Ohio Railroad Company, as manager of the company's store 
and wareroom at Benwood Junction, remaining there one year. In 
1903, E. H. Compton having been elected clerk of the county court 
for Barbour county, Mr. Hoffman was appointed his deputy, serving 
in that capacity six years. At the Barbour county primaries in 1908, 
he was nominated himself for the office of clerk of the courts and that 
fall was elected by a substantial majority on the Republican ticket. 
Aided by none, he has won positions in life by dint of industry and self- 
reliance. He makes an excellent county official and studies to please, 
knowing that he is but a servant of the people who elected him. Mr. 
Hoffman attends the United Brethren church. Politically a Repub- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 703 

lican, he takes much interest in the welfare of his party. In Masonry 
he is identified with Bigelow Lodge, No. 52, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Philippi, having filled the chair of junior deacon. He also 
holds membership with the Odd Fellows order, Lodge No. 59, at 
Philippi; the Knights of Maccabees, Valley Tent, No. 17; the Uni- 
formed Rank of Maccabees and the Modern Woodmen Camp, No. 
12,735, ^t Philippi; and the Royal Neighbors and Junior Order of 
American Mechanics. He is a director in the Citizens' National Bank 
of Philippi, and also of the Philippi Amusement Company. He is a 
stockholder and director in the Peterson Gas Alarm Company. 

Mr. Hoffman married, in 1896, Alcinda C, daughter of Edward 
H. and Jemima E. (Myres) Compton. Mrs. Hoffman died Novem- 
ber 21, 1904. 



More than two hundred years ago, Robert Latham, 

LATHAM founder of this family, emigrated to America from 

Europe, in 1700, locating on Long Island, New York. 

He married and had children: John, Dickey, Joseph, Robert and a 

daughter who became the wife of Mr. Robertson. 

(II) Robert, fourth child of the first Robert Latham, married 
Miss Newman. They were the parents of nine children : John, Thomas, 
Abner, Robert, William, Elizabeth, Mary, Susanna and Ann. 

(III) Robert, son of Robert and (Newman) Latham, 

was born 1769, either in Prince William or Fauquier county, Virginia; 
died 1833. He was a Baptist minister; also a house carpenter for 
many years, while preaching. He married and had children : Robert, 
Thomas, Lucy and John. 

(IV) John, youngest son of Robert Latham, born, either in Fau- 
quier or Prince William county, Virginia, November 24, 1794; died 
November 15, 1878, in Grafton, West Virginia. In 1849 he removed 
with his family to Taylor county, West Virginia, locating at what is 
now known as Simpson. He followed farming and was surveyor of his 
county at one time. He married Juliet Ann Newman, born in Prince 
William county, Virginia, died at the age of eighty years. Children : 
Elizabeth; James; George R., of whom further; John Thomas, of 
Fairmont, West Virginia; Abner O., of Washington, D. C; Benjamin 
Franklin; Hattie White, living in Australia. 



704 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(V) Col. George Robert Latham, son of John and Juliet Ann 
(Newman) Latham, was born on Bull Run battlefield. Prince William 
county, Virginia, March 9, 1832. He accompanied his parents who 
moved to Taylor county, West Virginia, in 1849, ^rid remained on the 
farm with his father. Being of a studious mind, he gained, by hard 
study and work, an excellent education, as he had limited means. In 
1850 he was afflicted with a severe case of pleurisy which disabled him, 
and for three years kept him from all farm work. In 1852 he com- 
menced teaching school in Taylor and Barbour counties, and taught 
until the winter of 1859. While teaching he had also been studying 
law, and in 1859 passed an examination which admitted him to the 
bar. He opened the first law office in Grafton. In i860 he published 
the Western Virginian, in the interest of the Bell-Everitt presidential 
ticket. At the outbreak of the civil war, he hoisted a United States flag 
over his law office and turned it into a recruiting station. By May 20, 
1 86 1, he had a full company enrolled, which later became known as 
Company B, Second Virginia Infantry, and was the first union company 
recruited in the interior of the state. Under Mr. Latham's command 
this company remained at Grafton to vote on the ordinance of secession. 
May 23, 1 86 1, after which it marched across confederate state territory 
at Fetterman and struck a three o'clock morning train for Wheeling. 
The company was ordered back to Grafton, then sent to Philippi, and 
took part in the three months' campaign to Carrick's Ford, where the 
confederate General Gamett was killed. In the fall of 1864, Colonel 
Latham was elected a member of the thirty-ninth congress, for the 
second district of West Virginia, serving from March 4, 1865, to 
March 4, 1867. He was mustered out of the military service at 
Wheeling, March 10, 1865, and was brevetted brigadier-general of 
volunteers. In congress he was an eminent representative as shown by 
his speeches delivered in the house on January 8 and May 28, 1866. 
On account of ill health he refused a renomination ; but, at the request 
of the secretary of state, agreed to accept the position of United States 
consul at Melbourne, Australia. He was stationed at that post from 
1867 to 1870. In 1875 he was elected superintendent of the public 
schools of Upshur county. West Virginia, and in 1880 was appointed, 
by President Hayes, supervisor of the census for the first district of 
West Virginia. As result of a wound received at Lee's Springs, on the 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 705 

Rappahannock river, in August, 1862, he still has frequent and severe 
pains in his left foot. Politically he is a Republican, and in church 
faith is a Baptist. 

Col. Latham married, in Grafton, West Virginia, December 24, 
1857, Caroline A. Thayer, born in Monongalia county. West Vir- 
ginia, April 22, 1834, daughter of Franklin and Mary Thayer. The 
Thayer family is an old and prominent one in New England, and the 
line of descent to Mrs. Latham is: (I) Richard, (II) Richard, (III) 
Nathaniel, (IV) Zachariah, (V) Captain Abel, (VI) Stephen, (VII) 
Franklin, (VIII) Caroline A. Thayer, wife of Col. Latham. Col. 
Latham and his wife are the parents of nine children, eight of whom 
still survive: i. Charles O., born at Grafton, married Maud Fisher; 
has a child, Gertrude. 2. Juliet Amelia, born at Grafton. 3. Annie 
Virginia, born at Grafton; married Leondus Bartlett; children: Edna, 
married Dr. Carl Trippet, and has one child, Carl Hasson; and Frank. 
4. Hattie Lee, born at Buckhannon, West Virginia; married Charles 
Darlington. 5. John Franklin, born in Australia. 6. Mary Elizabeth, 
born in Buckhannon; married William Flannigen, and they have chil- 
dren : Frank, Harrold, Amelia, Latham and Thayer, the last two being 
twins. 7. George Robert Jr., born in Upshur county, West Virginia; 
married Winfred Brown, and they have children: Juliet, Jean, George 
Robert (3) and Frank. 8. William Thayer, born in Upshur county, 
West Virginia; married Lila Winchester, and their children are: Willa, 
Lois, Winchester, Enoch and Robert. 



In this family is seen a truly representative German 
STOCKERT line of frugal, painstaking men and women. They 

have only been residents in this country a little more 
than half a century. It was in 1847 that Julius F. and Edward F. 
Stockert emigrated from the Fatherland, landing in New York City 
and from there went to Richmond, and thence on to Staunton, Virginia. 
(I) Julius F. Stockert, one of the two original emigrants just men- 
tioned above, was born in Plowen, Germany, died in Lewis county, 
West Virginia, in 1905. Mr. Stockert's occupation was that of a shoe- 
maker. Politically he voted the Democratic ticket and in church faith 
was of the Baptist denomination. He was an excellent adopted citizen 



7o6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

and during his residence in this country, proved himself a good and 
honorable man, making friends with all his associates. He married 
IVIaryland Virginia Davis, born in 1835, died in Lewis county. West 
Virginia, in 1903, daughter of Hezekiah and Frances (Kidd) Davis, 
both natives of Louisa county, Virginia. Hezekiah Davis died while 
in the employment of the government, at Washington, D. C. 

(II) Gustavus F. Stockert, son of Julius F. and Maryland Virginia 
(Kidd) Stockert, was born in Waynesborough, Augusta county, Vir- 
ginia, September 3, 1854. He received no common school education, 
and in 1871 started west with his parents to Lewis county, West Vir- 
ginia. He was employed on his father's farm until he reached the age 
of twenty-three years, and put in his spare time reading pamphlets and 
newspapers, thus gaining a fair knowledge of affairs to help him in 
after life. In 1877 he engaged in lumbering, and rented a saw mill. 
He has been engaged in the same business ever since and with much 
success financially. In 1886, he removed to Buckhannon, Upshur coun- 
ty, West Virginia, for his lumber trade which was then beginning to 
assume large proportions. In his political belief he is in sympathy with 
the Democratic party. He is of the Baptist faith. 

He married, September 23, 1877, Pooce Bailey, daughter of James 
M. and Amanda (McCue) Bailey, born August 28, 1857, in Janelew, 
Lewis county. West Virginia. Her mother is of Scotch-Irish descent, 
being related to the McCues of Nicholas county. Seven children were 
born of this marriage, one of whom still survives: Michael F., born 
June 29, 1884. 



The Swisher family is of Swiss-German descent, and 
SWISHER its descendants are now scattered in almost every state 

of the union, and in nearly every instance their habits 
of industry and perseverance have won for them the respect of their 
fellow citizens and an honorable place in society. The name, at differ- 
ent times, has been spelled in various forms, namely — Schweiber, Sweit- 
zer, Switzer, and Schweighiger. About the year 1750, four brothers 
named Schweiber set out from Switzerland for America in order to 
better their condition. It is positively known that they reached the new 
world, but from that period the history of three of the brothers is lost. 
The supposition is that one settled near Winchester, while two of the 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 707 

other three went northward into Pennsylvania, and their descendants 
afterwards migrated Into what are now the counties of Marion, Mo- 
nongalia and Harrison, West Virginia. 

(I) John Schweiber, the progenitor of the branch of the family 
here under consideration, was born in 1730, and was one of the four 
brothers aforementioned. He became an Indian trader and merchant, 
making extensive trips into the interior of the state and returning to 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, heavily freighted with valuable furs. 
These trips were made about once in six weeks, and the value of the 
merchandise brought back varied from two hundred to seven hundred 
dollars, as shown by receipts given at that time, the oldest one of which 
is dated at Philadelphia, July 24, 1767, and is for thirty-nine pounds 
two shillings nine pence. It seems his trading in Philadelphia was 
largely with two persons, named Daniel and William Wister, as their 
names are attached to many of the receipts. Shortly after his marriage 
in Philadelphia to Anna Warner, he moved to McGaheysville, Rock- 
ingham county, Virginia, where he engaged in merchandising, and later 
moved to Augusta county, Virginia, where he died in 1802 and was 
interred on what is known as the Spring Hill Farm. Children : John, 

Jacob, Henry, Samuel, Daniel, George, Nancy, married Pence; 

Elizabeth, married Fauber; Mary, married Philip Thurman, 

of Illinois. 

(II) John Switzer, or Swisher, son of John (i) Schweiber, mar- 
ried (first), in 181 1, Catherine Trout, who bore him the following 
named children: Mary, married John Koiner; Anna, married Joseph 
Spore; Elizabeth, married William Henderson; John; Sarah, mar- 
ried Jacob Swisher; Jacob; Margaret, married Stuart Bennett; David 
Warner (see forward); George; Henry; Samuel; Rebecca, married 
Taylor Parker; William. John Switzer or Swisher married (second) 
Mary Grow, who bore him two children: Daniel and James. 

(III) David Warner Swisher, son of John (2) Switzer, or Swish- 
er, was born in Augusta county, Virginia, April 29, 1822. He was 
reared on a farm, and received the meagre education afforded by the 
common schools of the time, but what he lacked in book knowledge he 
made up in other ways, by the exercise of common sense and by shrewd 
observation of men and events. About the year 1838 he removed to 
what is now Preston county. West Virginia, but after a short residence 



7o8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

there removed to Hampshire county, West Virginia, where he pur- 
chased land in the vicinity of Higginsville, in the year 1841. When 
the free school system was inaugurated it had his hearty sympathy, 
although he was strongly Southern in feeling, and many of his neigh- 
bors ridiculed the new educational system, branding it as a "Yankee" 
institution. He was a member of the first board of education in his dis- 
trict under the new system, and had as his associates "Jackey" Thomp- 
son, Joseph Parker and Zeiler Chadwick, and he also served as trustee 
of the Lower Levels school, to which place he removed after his mar- 
riage. As a farmer and business man he was exceptionally successful, 
and as a citizen he was universally esteemed, always sustaining the char- 
acter of a true man. In religion he was a Methodist Episcopalian, and 
in politics a Democrat. He married, in February, 1846, a daughter of 
Dr. Arnold Bonnifield, of St. George, West Virginia, who was a school 
teacher prior to her marriage, teaching in a school near Higginsville. 
Children: i. Silas Newton, born in Hampshire county, March 26, 
1848 ; taught school during the winter of 1868-69, and for ten consecu- 
tive winters following; during the year 1871 he made an extended trip 
to the west, visiting the states of Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Missouri and 
Kansas; he removed to Tucker county. West Virginia, in 1873, where 
he has since resided. He has held the office of president of the board 
of education, county commissioner, road commissioner and assessor in 
his adopted county. He married, October 7, 1875, Mary S., daughter 
of Jesse and Catherine Parsons, of Tucker county. Children : Minnie 
B., Scott N. and Glenn T. 2. Anzalettie. 3. Addie. 4. John Arnold, 
born in Hampshire county, September 4, 1857; for some years he 
taught school in his native and adjoining counties; he attended the Fair- 
mont State Normal School in 1879-80; he is now a fruit grower, and 
resides in Tucker county. He married Ella C, daughter of Edward 
W. and Mary E. McGill, October 17, 1883 ; children: Wallace, NeUie, 
Belle, Lee and Virgil. 5. Mary Isabel. 6. David. 7. Edward. 8. 
Franklin. 9. Howard Llewellyn (see forward). 

(IV) Howard Llewellyn, son of David Warner Swisher, was born 
in Hampshire county, West Virginia, September 21, 1870. He attend- 
ed the public schools of his native county and the Fairmont Normal 
School, graduating from the latter in 1892. The following two years 
he served as school teacher in California, and then became a student in 




m^^^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 709 

the West Virginia University, graduating from that institution with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1 897. In the same year he establish- 
ed a book and stationery business in Morgantown, which he later dis- 
posed of to the Acme Store. In 1898 he organized the Acme Pubhsh- 
ing Company, was an active factor in the erection of their extensive 
building in 1900, and was president of the company for several years. 
In 1904-06 he organized the Main Street Building Company, and erect- 
ed the Swisher Theatre, a large seven-story structure, from which he 
derives a goodly income. In addition to this he is the owner of coal, 
timber, oil and gas lands, and is largely interested in fruit growing in 
Hampshire county. West Virginia. Mr. Swisher is reliable, responsi- 
ble, and of thorough integrity and unquestionable honor. His business 
hfe is one of success, attributable to those sterling qualities which he 
possesses, sound judgment, quick perception, activity and perseverance. 
He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks and Sigma Chi. Mr. Swisher married, in 
1897, Mary, daughter of Edward S. Bering, of Morgantown. Her 
mother was Cordelia Walker before her marriage to Edward S. Ber- 
ing, and was a member of a prominent old Virginia family, as was 
also Mr. Bering. 



The Carter family has a very interesting history, run- 
CARTER ning back through the years and generations to the days 

of the revolution that tested men's character and love 
of liberty as well as tried their very souls. Virginia has been the home 
of this branch of the family for many generations back. 

(I) William Carter was a soldier in the war for national independ- 
ence. Once he found a chest of gold buried in a box that had become 
imbedded in a ravine. When discovered the water had so washed 
away the dirt as to expose the box. At one time, during his soldier 
days, he paid the extreme price of fifty dollars for a pint of beans. At 
another time he, with four comrades, went to a house for something to 
eat and found nothing but some dough the lady had just placed in the 
oven to bake. So hungry were the men, they would not wait for the 
bread to bake, but took the dough from the oven and ate it raw. At 
another time, three soldiers had a narrow escape when they had got 
into a log hut, and saw ten British redcoats coming their way. They 



7IO Upper Monongahela Valley. 

escaped by running. Mr. Carter was between his two comrades, each 
one having his head severed from his body by the British soldier's 
swords. These were some of the incidents and hardships connected 
with Mr. Carter's life in revolutionary days. He married and reared 
a family in Virginia. 

(II) Robert, son of William Carter, was born in Virginia, but 
lived and died in that portion now known as Harrison county, West 
Virginia. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and lost a finger on his 
right hand during an engagement. His life as a farmer aided him in 
reaching the age of one hundred years. Among his children was a son, 
William Harrison. 

(III) William Harrison, son of Robert Carter, the centenarian, 
was born on a farm in Harrison county, now West Virginia, March, 
1 8 16, died about June, 1902, aged eighty-six years two months and 
twenty-one days. He followed farming all of his life. Politically he 
voted the Democratic ticket; in religious faith he held that of the Bap- 
tist denomination. He married Elizabeth Maxwell, a native of Harri- 
son county, born in 18 16, died when past sixty years of age. Her 
father, Bedwell Maxwell, was killed while erecting a mill. Children: 
Amos N., of Clarksburg; David M., a farmer of Harrison county; 
Nancy R., married a Mr. Rogers, of Marshville; Hulda R., married a 
Mr. Hanna, on a farm in Harrison county; Jackson Van Buren, of 
whom later; Edith L., married a Mr. Smith, residing in Mitchell 
county, Kansas; and two children died in infancy. 

(IV) Jackson Van Buren, son of William Harrison and Elizabeth 
(Maxwell) Carter, was born in Harrison county, West Virginia, No- 
vember 2, 1857, on his father's old homestead. This place is situated 
ten miles west of Clarksburg. He attended the public schools at Marsh- 
ville and assisted on his father's farm until he reached his majority. 
When he married, he purchased a farm on Indian Run, twelve miles 
west of Clarksburg, where he lived twenty-four years. Then he rented 
his farm of one hundred and thirty-eight acres, which he still owns, and 
removed to Clarksburg in 1904. For three years he was engaged in the 
oil and natural gas business. He still owns his drilling machinery and 
is engaged in well drilling at the present time. He was appointed by 
the county court, September 11, 191 1, as justice of the peace for the 
Clarksburg district. His justice's office is on the ground floor of the 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 711 

courthouse at Clarksburg and he is fulfilling well the duties of his 
office. Politically he votes the Democratic ticket. He is connected 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is by membership in 
his church a Methodist Episcopalian. 

Mr. Carter married, at Fairmont, February 26, 1879, Louisa C. 
Johnson, born in 1859, who, like her father, Alpheus W. Johnson, was 
a native of Marion county. West Virginia. Mr. Johnson had been 
engaged in farming all of his life, dying, in 1893, aged sixty year*. 
His wife, Mrs. Carter's mother, was Hannah (Radcliffe) Johnson, 
who passed away in 1901. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Carter: Elma I., 
died in infancy; M. Pearl, died May 11, 191 1 ; Bessie N., wife of Ray 
Sees, of Broad Oak, Clarksburg; William O., of Grand Bay, Alabama, 
married Mamie Baker, of Parkersburg, West Virginia; Ethel B., wife 
of Guy Zinn, aged twenty-two years, of Broad Oak; A. Bryan, bom 
1896, at home in the graded schools; John S., aged thirteen years, at 
school. 



This is an old and honorable family of Winchester, 
GORDON Virginia, and counts among its members many intelli- 
gent and active men and women, who have aided in 

developing their section of the union into its present excellent condition. 

They have been earnest workers in various callings, never shirking a 

known duty. 

(I) John Gordon, born in Old Virginia in 18 10, was a farmer 
throughout his days, in the vicinity of Winchester. He died at the age 
of about sixty years, in 1870. Of his domestic history, but little can 
be learned, except that he married early In life and reared a family 
including a son: Samuel W. Gordon, of whom further. 

(II) Samuel W., son of John Gordon, was born at Frederick, 
Winchester county, Virginia, in 1843. He has resided in the city of 
Clarksburg, West Virginia, since 1882, and served as a justice of the 
peace there for twelve years. Politically, he has been always a Repub- 
lican. He Is now living on his farm, retired from active duties and in 
the enjoyment of the fruits of his labors, free from the cares of public 
life. His farm is situated three miles northeast of Clarksburg, on 
Buckhannon Pike. Mr. Gordon was a union soldier in the civil war, 
as a member of the Army of the Potomac for three years, having en- 



712 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

listed in the Sixtieth Ohio Regiment at Barnesville. He was in many 
important battles, including the Wilderness and Petersburg, and served 
under the command of General Grant. At the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, he was injured, and also contracted measles, and was sent to York, 
Pennsylvania. While in hospital he had the smallpox. Mr. Gordon 
married (first) Ursula Waters, born in Loudoun county, Virginia, Sep- 
tember, 1843, died December 3, 1889. Nacy Waters, father of Ursula 
(Waters) Gordon, was a farmer, and a native of Loudoun county, 
Virginia; but died before the civil war, in Harrison county where he 
had just removed. Children: John W., born February 23, 1867, now 
a stone contractor at Clarksburg; George Harry, of whom further. 
Mr. Gordon married (second), September, 1892, Mary Hoff, and they 
have one daughter: Helen U., born August, 1893. 

(Ill) George Harry, younger son of Samuel W. and Ursula 
(Waters) Gordon, was bom March 21, 1870, at Barnesville, Ohio, in 
what is now Belmont county. When he was three years of age, his 
father removed to Old Virginia, and again moved during his twelfth 
year to Clarksburg, West Virginia, where George H. Gordon's edu- 
cation was largely obtained at the public schools of that place. Having 
received his schooling, he being of an industrious, ambitious turn oi 
mind, wanted to do something in the great busy world for himself. 
Hence we find him clerking in the store of R. T. Lowndes with whom 
he remained three years. After this for three years more he embarked 
in mercantile pursuits with his cousin, J. W. Gordon, at Salem. Sell- 
ing out, he entered the oil fields, first in the employ of the South Penn 
Oil Company, with whom he remained ten years. The following five 
years connected with its drilling department, under various contractors, 
he did drilling for both the Hope Natural Gas Company and the South 
Penn Oil Company. In December, 1905, he was appointed by the 
county court to fill an unexpired term as justice of the peace, which 
position had been resigned by his father, Samuel W. Gordon. George 
H. Gordon still holds the oflUce, at No. 1 10 North Third street. Up to 
January, 19 10, he was a stockholder in the Fuel City Furniture Com- 
pany, of Clarksburg. He is a member of the Clarksburg Board of 
Trade, and a stockholder in the Board of Trade Land Company. 
Politically, he is a Republican, and was elected when the entire ticket 
besides himself was defeated. He is a well advanced Free Mason, 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 713 

having received sometime ago the thirty-second degree. He is also a 
member of the Knights of Pythias and Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Ellcs. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 

George H. Gordon married at Ludlow, Vermont, September 29, 
1 89 1, Mary Pollard, born August, 1868, daughter of Joseph P. Pol- 
lard. Mr. Pollard was born in Vermont, but later was in the nursery 
business at Clarksburg, West Virginia, and died there March, 1899, 
aged sixty years. He was buried by the Odd Fellows order after their 
impressive rites. He married Myra Barton, now living at Ludlow, 
Vermont, aged seventy-three years. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Gor- 
don are: Joseph P., born September 9, 1893, died December 22, 1897; 
Susan W., December 9, 1895, now in her second year in the high 
school; Ruth A., April 19, 1900, now in the public schools; George 
Samuel, born July 15, 1905. 



Among the Old Virginia families which naturally find place 
DUFF in a work of this character, may be named the Duffs who 
have, as a rule, succeeded well in their agricultural pursuits 
in the two Virginias. 

(I) John Duff, a native of Virginia, farmed all of his active years, 
and died in the Old Dominion State, respected by all who knew him on 
account of his excellent traits of character. He married and reared a 
family, among them a son : William. 

(II) William, son of John Duff, was born in Shenandoah county, 
Virginia, and died at the age of sixty years. He followed farming pur- 
suits, as had his ancestors, living in Harrison county, in what is now 
West Virginia. He was independent in his political views. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Hoover, born in Bath county, Virginia, who died in 
1856 at Clarksburg, West Virginia, aged fifty-nine years. The father 
of Mrs. Duff was Jacob Hoover, born in Germany, coming to this coun- 
try when a young man. He was in the battle of Bunker Hill and 
wounded at Brandywine, serving with a Virginia regiment in the revo- 
lutionary war. William Duff's children were ten in number, all now 
deceased except: Alexander, of whom further, and Margaret Jane, 
who is eighty-one years of age, living with her brother and unmarried. 

(III) Alexander, son of William and Elizabeth (Hoover) Duff, 
was born in Bath county, Virginia, December i, 1834. He came with his 



714 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

parents when a baby, first stopping in Randolph county, then moved 
to Harrison county, where Alexander received his early training and 
education. When sixteen years of age he left his father's farm and 
worked at cabinet-making, and also was apprenticed to Elmer Hursey, 
for carpenter's work. After a few years thus engaged, he started out 
on his own account as a carpenter, at the age of twenty-six years. He 
began contracting and followed it several years. In 1865, he enlisted 
in the union army; but even before this he had been employed in the 
army as a teamster and on railroad construction. At the end of the 
war, returning home to Clarksburg, he formed a partnership with 
Hezekiah Hoskinson, as contract carpenters, which continued until the 
death of his partner in 1879. He has been, virtually, a carpenter all 
his active years. In 1869, he, with R. T. Lounds, built a planing mill, 
of which he was manager for thirty years. It was sold to its present 
owners in June, 1909. Mr. Duff is a director in the West Virginia 
Bank, and stockholder in the West End Land Company; but is leading 
a quiet, retired life, at his beautiful home, built over a third of a cen- 
tury ago, at 787 West Pike street, Clarksburg. Politically, he was a 
Republican, but is now a Prohibitionist. He has been a member of 
Herman Lodge of Free Masonry for forty-six years. In religious life, 
he is associated with the Baptists, while his wife is a Methodist Epis- 
copalian. 

He married, November 31, 1875, Sarah S. Peck, daughter of John 
'Peck, a native of Harrison county. West Virginia, long since deceased, 
who was a well-known blacksmith for many years. John Peck's wife, 
Nancy (Hoskinson) Peck, died many years ago. Mr. and Mrs. DufF 
have no children. 



See KlrkavaU's History of the Shenandoah VaUey ot Virginia for early 
of the Duft family. 



The family now to be considered is an old and 
McClelland honorable one in Pennsylvania and in later years 
in West Virginia. Franklin and Westmore- 
land counties, Pennsylvania, have both had numerous branches grow- 
ing from this family tree. The following will treat on three genera- 
tions of one branch of the family. 

(I) William McClelland, of an old Franklin county, Pennsyl- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 715 

vania, family, was by trade a miller in Westmoreland county, that 
state, where he died at his mill, aged sixty years. He married Mary 
Craig, and had children, including a son, James Harvey, see forward. 

(II) James Harvey, son of William McClelland, was bom in 
Derry township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in May, 1828, 
died in 1874. By trade he was a tanner, which he followed in a suc- 
cessful manner in Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, where he lived many 
years and where he finally died. Politically he voted the Republican 
ticket, and in church faith was of the Presbyterian denomination, being 
an elder for many years. He married Margaret Howard Thom, bom 
in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, February 14, 1828, and is still living 
in Tarentum, Pennsylvania. They had eight sons and four daughters, 
nine of whom still survive. They are : i . Henry Thom, see forward. 
2. and 3. William Craig and Mary Jane (twins), both of whom are 
living; William Craig is professor of English literature at Washing- 
ton and Jefferson College; Mary Jane, born February, 1852, widow of 
Rev. Albert Barrett. 4. Emma Lavinia, living in Massillon, Ohio, 
widow of Mahlon Stacy. 5. John Culbertson, an engineer on the Penn- 
sylvania railroad, living at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 6. Freeman, 
died in infancy. 7. Alice B., single, lives with her mother. 8. Ulysses 
Grant, of Tarentum, Pennsylvania. 9. Margaret, died at the age of 
eighteen years. 10. Wray, died in Virginia. 11. Joseph Elder, now 
of Oklahoma. 12. Jesse Fair, of Oklahoma. The maternal grand- 
father of this family, John Thom, was born in Westmoreland county, 
died aged seventy-six years, in Indiana county, Pennsylvania. He was 
a farmer and was the son of Josiah Thom, a revolutionary soldier. 

(III) Rev. Henry Thom McClelland, son of James Harvey and 
Margaret Howard (Thom) McClelland, was born June 7, 1849, in 
Derry township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He accom- 
panied the family to Jefferson county, that state, when a boy, and there 
he received his primary education at the common schools ; then attend- 
ed Glade Run Academy, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, where he 
received his preparatory education for entering college and for teach- 
ing school, by which he might work his own way through college. In 
1871 he entered Washington and Jefferson College, at Washington, 
Pennsylvania, graduating an A. B. in 1875. He then entered the 
Western Theological Seminary, at Allegheny City, in the autumn of 



7i6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

1875, graduating from that institution in 1878, and his first charge as 
a Presbyterian minister was at Montours church, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, a country church, in which he served faithfully for three 
years; he was then called to the Sixth Presbyterian Church in Pitts- 
burgh, where he served five and a half years, and was elected professor 
of theology in the Western Theological Seminary, his alma mater, 
where he served from 1886 to 1891, and was then given a call to the 
Belfield Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, where he was pastor for 
thirteen years. His next work was that of field secretary for the Pres- 
byterian Board of Missions for Freedmen. He traveled four years in 
that work. On Easter Sunday, 1908, he preached his first sermon to 
a Clarksburg audience, and was immediately called to the First Presby- 
terian Church of that city to become its pastor and has been there ever 
since. He was given the degree of Doctor of Divinity by Washington 
and Jefferson College in 1887. His church at Clarksburg now has two 
hundred and seventy communicants and is in a prosperous condition. 
Dr. McClelland votes the Republican ticket. He belongs to the Greek 
letter fraternity, known as Phi Kappa Psi. He is trustee for Washing- 
ton and Jefferson College and vice-president of the board. He is a 
director in the Western Theological Seminary, North Side, Pittsburgh. 
He was nominated and elected trustee in Davis Elkins College, and is 
chairman of the Presbyterian Home Missionary Work in the state of 
West Virginia. 

Rev. Dr. McClelland married (first), in May, 1878, Euphrasia P. 
Marshall, of Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, daughter of James 
Guthrie Marshall, a farmer of that county. Rev. Dr. McClelland 
married (second), in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February i, 
1883, Lizona D. Ewing, a native of that county, born September 3, 
1854, daughter of William Ewing, who was born in 18 10, died Octo- 
ber, 1875. He was a farmer. Child of Rev. Dr. McClelland and first 
wife: Margaret Marshall, born August 7, 1879, now Mrs. George P. 
Herriatt, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Children of second wife: i. 
Mary Beacom, born November 21, 1883, graduate at Wooster Uni- 
versity, Wooster, Ohio, and is now teaching English and history at 
Clarksburg, West Virginia, in the high school. 2. Henry Thom, bom 
February 8, 1887; graduated at Washington and Jefferson College 
with the class of 19 10, and is now employed with the Hope Gas Com- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 717 

pany, of Clarksburg. 3. Elizabeth Ewing, bom August 8, 1891; 
graduated at Washington Seminary, and is now taking a normal course 
at the Pennsylvania State Normal at Indiana, Pennsylvania. 



The McGrew family is of Highland Scotch origin. 
McGREW The records of the family are said to reach back to 

about the year 1000. The original immigrant. Chris- 
tian name not known, came to America before the revolution, and set- 
tled first in the valley of Virginia, removing thence to Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, where he died. He had a son Patrick, of whom 
further. 

(II) Patrick McGrew was born in Cumberland county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He removed to Virginia and settled in 1786 with the Brandon 
family, near what is now Brandonville, Preston county, West Virginia. 
All his children removed to the West, except James, of whom further. 

(III) Colonel James McGrew, son of Patrick McGrew, lived in 
Preston county. In the war of 18 12 he commanded a regiment of 
Virginia militia. He married Isabelle, daughter of James Clark. Her 
father came from Ireland and was one of the earliest settlers in Preston 
county; his wife, Mary (Ramsey), dying in 1770, he returned to 
Ireland, but three years later he married Eleanor Kirkpatrick, and set- 
tled finally in America. Children of Colonel James and Isabelle 
(Clark) McGrew: James Clark, of whom further; Isaac. 

(IV) James Clark, son of Colonel James and Isabelle (Clark) 
McGrew, was born near Brandonville, September 14, 18 13, and died 
September 18, 19 10. He received a practical English education, and 
worked on his father's farm until he was nineteen. He then became 
clerk in a general store at Kingwood, Preston county, in which place he 
made his permanent residence. In 1861 he was a delegate to the Vir- 
ginia state convention, and he was one of those who opposed to the last 
the ordinance of secession. He was also one of the group of about 
twenty whose opposition to secession finally resulted in the creation of 
the new state of West Virginia. It was only with difficulty and danger 
that he made his escape from Virginia and returned to his home. He 
was a member of the house of delegates, the first legislature of West 
Virginia, and served in the legislatures of this state, and was a director 
of the State Hospital for the Insane. In the forty-first and forty-second 



7i8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

congresses he represented the second district in the house of representa- 
tives, but declined another nomination. He was one of the organizers 
of the National Bank of Kingwood, and became its president. He was 
an earnest Methodist, and in 1 88 1 a delegate to the Methodist Ecumen- 
ical Conference in London, England; he was a trustee of the Ohio Wes- 
leyan University. In 1881 and 1882 he traveled in Europe, Asia and 
Africa. He married, in 1841, Persis, daughter of Hon. Harrison 
Hagans, of Brandonville, one of the most active and influential men 
in persuading congress to accept West Virginia as a state. Children: 
William Clark, of whom further; George H., and Sarah M. 

(V) William Clark, son of James Clark and Persis (Hagans) 
McGrew, was born at Kingwood, April 21, 1842. He was educated 
in the select schools and Preston Academy. In 1862 he entered into 
mercantile business. Eight years later he removed to Morgantown, 
Monongalia county, where he continued in mercantile life until 1890. 
He was mayor of Morgantown for five terms, and in 1878 was elected 
to the state senate, being reelected in 1882, and served eight years. 
He was noted as a parliamentarian, often presided over the senate, and 
held responsible committee appointments. In 1907 he was elected to 
the house of delegates. He was one of the builders of the Fairmont, 
Morgantown and Pittsburgh railroad, and for fifteen years its vice- 
president and agent. For five years from 1900 he was treasurer, vice- 
president and president of the Economy Glass Company. He married, 
in 1864, Julia E., daughter of Waitman T. and Elizabeth E. (Ray) 
Willey. Her father was one of the first United States senators from 
West Virginia. Children: James H., of whom further; and Julia M., 
wife of F. C. Flennlken. 

(VI) James H., son of William Clark and Julia E. (Willey) 
McGrew, was born at Morgantown, October 31, 1873. He was edu- 
cated at the public schools and the University of West Virginia. In 
1 89 1 he was appointed clerk of the Bank of the Monongahela Valley 
at Morgantown, in 1893 made teller, afterward assistant cashier, and 
from 1903 to the present time he has been cashier. He has also been 
treasurer and director of the Monongalia Building and Loan Associa- 
tion and of the Globe Fuel Company. He is also general receiver of 
the circuit court of Monongalia county. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 719 

Matthew Hennen, the first member of this family 
HENNEN about whom we have definite information, hved in 
Monongalia county, Virginia. Child: Robert P., of 
whom further. 

(II) Robert P., son of Matthew Hennen, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania; he died in 1873. He was a cabinet-maker and undertaker from 
i860 to 1863, and again in 1868; he was a councilman of the borough 
of Morgantown. He married Elizabeth Wilklns, who was born in 
New Jersey, and who died in 1 87 1 . Children : Malinda, married L. K. 
Hall; Catharine, married Isaac Hite; Helen, married Alexander Mes- 
trezat; Matthew, married Louisa Pickenpaugh; Sarah I., married 
D. E. Holmes; Frederick A., of whom further. 

(III) Frederick A., son of Robert P. and Elizabeth (Wilkins) 
Hennen, was born at Morgantown, February 26, 1844. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools. He learned the trade of a cabinet-maker, 
and in 1886 entered into the furniture and undertaking business. For 
twelve years he was on the board of council of Morgantown. He has 
been for twenty-five years an Odd Fellow. 

He married, in 1882, Ella E. Coyl. Child: Robert, bom August 
17, 1884, now a civil engineer forthe county. 



This is distinctively an English family. It was first 
CHURCH represented in America by Henry Church, who lived 

to the extreme old age of one hundred and eleven 
years, and his wife was one hundred and nine years of age at the time 
of her death. He settled in Wetzel county, Virginia, about the time 
of the revolutionary struggle. 

(II) William, son of the English immigrant, Henry Church, was 
born in Wetzel county, Virginia, became a successful agriculturist in 
Virginia, where he lived and died. 

(III) Henry (2), son of William Church, was a native of Wet- 
zel county, Virginia, bom it is supposed about 1835, died aged seventy 
years. Two of his children are still living — George and Robert — both 
farmers of Wetzel county. He was a sturdy and successful farmer in 
Virginia. 

(IV) George, son of Henry (2) Church, was born in Wetzel 
county, Virginia, in i860. He lives in his native county and is a well- 



720 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

known sheep ranchman of that county. He married Lulu Jackson, who 
died in 1889, aged twenty-five years. She was also a native of Wetzel 
county, Virginia. Children: Clyde Porter, of whom further; Clarence 
Benjamin, now attending the University of Pittsburgh; Joseph, de- 
ceased; Clara, deceased. Garrison Jackson, father of Mrs. George 
Church, was born in Wetzel county, Virginia, died at the age of fifty 
years in 1894. He was a farmer. 

(V) Clyde Porter Church, D. D. S., son of George and Lulu 
(Jackson) Church, was born in Wetzel county. West Virginia, August 
21, 1887. He attended the public schools of his section, later entered 
the State University at Morgantown, and subsequently went to the 
University of Pittsburgh, graduating from the dental department in 
191 1. He at once went to Clarksburg, West Virginia, and began the 
practice of dental surgery, with his offices in the Goff building. He 
is a Democrat, and in church faith a Methodist. He is an Odd Fellow 
and popular among the citizens of his newly adopted city. 



In looking over the history of families who were old 
PAYNE residents in the state of Virginia, as now understood, but 

then in what was the colony, the name of Payne is noted 
as conspicuous. There seems to have been a strain of excellent blood 
flowing in the veins of the various branches and scions of the family 
tree now to be considered, more especially as relates to that branch 
who are now represented in and about Salem, Harrison county, West 
Virginia. 

(I) Thomas Payne, great-grandfather of the present generation 
living in this state, was a well-known and highly-respected citizen and 
slave owner of Fauquier county, Virginia, where he was born about 
1765. 

(II) Turner, son of Thomas Payne, the Old Dominion farmer 
and slave owner, was born about 1785, in Fauquier county, Virginia. 
After his marriage to Lucy Payne and after living in Fauquier county 
some years, they emigrated to Harrison county, locating at first on 
West Fork, but subsequently on Limestone Creek, where he died in 
i860, and his wife in 1848. He served as a soldier in the war of 
18 12-14. Turner and Lucy Payne were the parents of four children, 



^^ 



-'€y^^'L^£'<.-4X^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 721 

all long since deceased, the last dying in August, 1899. They were: 
Francis B., Susan, Thomas T., Sarah. 

(III) Thomas T., son of Turner and Lucy Payne, was bom in 
1814, in Fauquier county, Virginia, on the old plantation, so long in the 
family name, and so well tilled by the slaves, and died in August, 1899. 
He accompanied the family when they removed to Harrison county. 
He resided on his farm about half a century, and was an active, strong 
man at the age of eighty-five years. He there married (first) , in 1 842, 
Henrietta Smith, by whom four children were born : Genius, of whom 
further; Amos, Olivia and Lucy. Mrs. Payne, the mother of this 
family, died in 1853. The following year Mr. Payne married (sec- 
ond) Elizabeth, daughter of Hugh Thompson, by whom four children 
were born: Mary, Maggie, AHce, Byrd. Mary and Alice died young. 

(IV) Genius, son of Thomas T. and Henrietta (Smith) Payne, 
was born in Harrison county, on what is now the Gore farm, near 
Clarksburg, November 25, 1844. He attended the district schools, 
and he has by constant reading and mingling with men of educational 
qualifications obtained a good practical knowledge of men and their 
business movements. He served as president of the State Bank from 
its organization in October, 1897, and when the First National Bank 
was supplanted for it he became its president. He has accumulated 
considerable property; he owns three hundred and forty acres of land 
in Doddridge county, nine hundred and eighty-two acres in Harrison 
county, has purchased lands for his son, Thomas G., other lands he has 
given to his son, Truman, and has aided his children in various financial 
ways, all of which is to be placed to his credit as a kind, considerate 
father. He has labored and accumulated a fortune, and is now one of 
the most extensive landowners in Harrison county. His home is situ- 
ated on the heights, overlooking the beautiful valley and the thriving 
city of Salem. He remembers the time when there were but two stores 
in Clarksburg, and when a cord of wood was hauled to Clarksburg 
before the discovery or development of the coal mines. He commenced 
life on his father's farm and remained with him until of age, then went 
forth for himself. Politically Mr. Payne votes the Democratic ticket, 
and in church membership is of the Baptist denomination. One feature 
of the Payne family is that it is the only one of the name in Harrison 



722 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

county, and none of the Payne children have had more than two sons 
born to them for three generations. 

Mr. Payne married Amanda Catherine, daughter of Joseph Ham- 
mond, now residing in the Eagle district, where he owns three hundred 
and eighty acres. Mrs. Payne was born on Lambert's Run, six miles 
north of Clarksburg, February 7, 1847, ^nd is the second in a family 
of eight children, the others are: John, who farms near the old home- 
stead; Margaret, died at the age of fourteen years; Joseph A., died 
January 20, 191 1, in his sixtieth year; Peter H., of California; Andrew 
Jackson, died February, 1895; Etta, widow of G. W. Elliott; David 
W., who remains on the old home farm. Mrs. Payne's great-grand- 
father, Adam Ash, came from Germany and founded the family in 
America. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Payne removed to Jarvis- 
ville, Harrison county, where he purchased one hundred and forty-one 
acres, and from time to time has added to his landed estate. His hold- 
ings are now one thousand three hundred and twenty-two acres of land. 
He has always been a large stock raiser. The children bom to Mr. and 
Mrs. Genius Payne are: i. Alice H., proprietor of the Bon Ton store 
at Salem. 2. Truman, a farmer and teacher in Harrison county; mar- 
ried Anna Morrison and they have two children, John H. and Anna A. 
3. Susie, wife of E. T. Young and they have two children, Jessie 
Maude and Dorothy Catherine. 4. Thomas G., of Miami county, 
Kansas; married Millie A. Turner and they have three children. Genius, 
Pearl, George B. 5. Emma Joanna, married Karl Carpenter and they 
have three children, Harold P., Clarence H. and Elmer K. 



West Virginia is largely settled by people who emi- 

STEELE grated from the Old Dominion State and Maryland. 

Among the former inhabitants of Virginia, whose scions 

are now active factors in the business affairs of West Virginia, may be 

named the Steele family, now to be considered in a genealogical way. 

(I) Louis H. Steele, a farmer, came from old Virginia to Preston 

county, in what is now West Virginia, at an early day. He was killed 

by the falling of a tree in the dense forests in which he had settled for 

the purpose of making a comfortable home, in Doddridge county, 

West Virginia, and was an old man at the time of his accidental death. 

He married and among his children was William H., of whom further. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 723 

(II) William H., son of Louis H. Steele, was bom in 1839, died 
in 1899, aged sixty years. He followed farming. He was politically 
a Republican, and of the Baptist church faith. He married Abigail 
Bartlett, born in Barbour county, Virginia, died at the age of twenty- 
two years, in 1872. John C. Bartlett, the father of Mrs. Steele, was 
born in Barbour county in 1823, died in 1888, at the old Bartlett home- 
stead, two and a half miles south of Salem, where he had followed 
farming all his active life. He was a pioneer in that section, and a 
staunch Republican. The only child of William H. and Abigail (Bart- 
lett) Steele was Wesley L., of whom further. 

(III) Wesley L., only son of William H. and Abigail (Bartlett) 
Steele, was born July 20, 1869, on his grandfather's farm, known as 
the Bartlett homestead, near Salem, Harrison county. West Virginia. 
He attended the common country schools and those of Salem. He 
worked for his grandfather until he was eighteen years of age, when the 
grandfather died, after which he and his grandmother conducted the 
farm. He was married at the age of twenty-three, when he purchased 
a sixty-eight acre farm, one mile south of Salem, which property he still 
owns, and operates. He also owns another tract of seventy acres two 
and a half miles south. He also is the owner of several pieces of prop- 
erty in the city of Salem, West Virginia. In 1903 he removed to Salem 
and the following year established his present feed business, in which 
he carries a full stock of hay, corn, oats, mill feed, salt and grass seed. 
He is a director in the First National Bank of Salem. He is a Repub- 
lican, and was elected and served a short time as president of the board 
of education. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, 
Knights of Pythias and Woodmen of the World, and is a Baptist in 
church faith and profession. 

He married, in Barbour county, June i, 1892, Rosetta Carlin, born 
in Barbour county, in 1869, daughter of John G. Carlin, now a farmer 
residing in Barbour county, and Hester (O'Neal) Carlin. Children: 
One son, died in infancy; Carlin Wesley, born October 28, 1908. 



The family of Davis is undoubtedly of Welsh origin, trac- 

DAVIS ing back, tradition says, to the prince of Powys, who 

fought the Saxon king of Northumberland in the bloody 

battles of Chester and Bangor in the seventh century. The Welsh are. 



724 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

by common consent, conceded to be the purest in blood of all the In- 
habitants of the British Isles. They are the direct descendants of the 
old Britons who opposed Julius Caesar at his landing, in the first cen- 
tury B. C, and who, forced back by the later inroads of Roman, Saxon 
and Dane, finally took refuge in the mountains of Wales. David ha» 
ever been a favorite name among the Welsh; which accounts for the 
family name of Davis, Davids or Davies, meaning "the son of David." 
The original form of the name was curious and awkward: Owen, son 
of David, son of Griffith, would write his name, Owen ap David ap 
Griffith, and probably use "ap" with the names of half a dozen of his 
still more remote ancestors, if he chose; but finally the simple, modern 
form became fixed in usage. 

The Davises constitute a very large family both in Wales and in 
England, and many of the name came to the American colonies in the 
seventeenth century. In Maryland especially, they were prominent 
citizens in early time, holding extensive land grants. The revolution- 
ary rolls of the state show one colonel, one lieutenant colonel, four cap- 
tains (including Captain Rezin Davis of the Rawlings continental regi- 
ment), sundry other commissioned officers and no less than fifty pri- 
vates. In more recent times the stock has produced such men as Henry 
Winter Davis, the distinguished statesman; David Davis, justice of the 
United States supreme court, and Henry Gassaway Davis, senator and 
Democratic nominee for vice-president of the United States. 

(I) From one of these Maryland families descended, though the 
exact line has not been ascertained, Caleb Davis, born in Oldtown, 
Allegany county, Mar)'land, who later lived in Woodstock, Shenan- 
doah county, Virginia. It is not unlikely that he was a near relative, 
perhaps a son, of one Caleb Davis, of Prince George county, Mary- 
land, who served on two or more occasions with the state forces in the 
revolution. Caleb Davis's family consisted of two sons, John and 
Rezin, and four daughters. 

(II) John, the elder son of Caleb Davis, was born in Woodstock, 
Virginia, and died December 9, 1863. He removed in his youth, about 
the year 1825, to Clarksburg, where he learned the saddlery business 
of Colonel Charles Lee. Later he and his brother engaged in mercan- 
tile pursuits in Clarksburg. Mr. Davis was twice married, his second 
wife being Eliza Arnold, daughter of James and Jane (Small) Steen. 




v/Tio. y7S6w^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 725 

Both of her parents were Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, born in Ulster, 
Ireland, whence they emigrated to America. Mrs. Davis was a pioneer 
school teacher in Harrison county. Seven children were born to John 
and Eliza A. (Steen) Davis, including: Rezin C, a prominent lawyer 
of Louisville, Kentucky, now deceased; Anna E., widow of R. A. 
Blackford, of New York City; and John J., of whom further. 

(III) Hon. John J. Davis, son of John and Eliza A. (Steen) 
Davis, was born in Clarksburg, Virginia, now West Virginia, May 5, 
1835. He was educated at the Northwestern Virginia Academy. At 
the early age of seventeen he began the study of law under Judge 
George H. Lee, of Clarksburg, also attending Brockenbrough's Law 
School at Lexington, Virginia. He was admitted to practice at the 
early age of twenty. Within a few years, in 1861, his ability secured 
his election to the Virginia house of delegates; but this was the period 
of the civil war, and northwest Virginia refused to abide by the decision 
of the eastern part of the state, namely to secede from the union and 
join the confederacy. Mr. Davis was a member of the second West 
Virginia convention of 1861, which was instrumental in organizing the 
new state. In 1870 he was chosen a member of the West Virginia 
legislature. His Democratic constituents so far approved his legisla- 
tive career that he was nominated and elected to the national house of 
representatives, forty-second congress, and again in the forty-third 
congress. Twice he has served as presidential elector from West Vir- 
ginia, with General McClellan and Grover Cleveland as candidates. 
He has served on the board of visitors of West Point Military Acad- 
emy, and as regent of the West Virginia University, and a director of 
the State Insane Hospital. He is at present in partnership with his son, 
and they have an extensive law practice. Mr. Davis is an elder in the 
Southern Presbyterian church, and a Free Mason. 

Mr. Davis married, August 21, 1862, Anna Kennedy, of Balti- 
more, a member of the well-known Maryland family of that name. 
Children: Lillie, wife of John A. Preston, of Lewisburg; Emma; 
Anna, wife of Rev. H. G. Richardson, of Clarksburg; Moselle, who 
died in infancy; John William, of whom further; Estelle, died at the 
age of six. 

(IV) John William, son of Hon. John J. and Anna (Kennedy) 
Davis, was born at Clarksburg, West Virginia, April 13, 1873. He 



726 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

was educated in the local schools, at Pantops Academy, Charlottesville, 
Virginia, and Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia, 
where he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1892. In 
1895 the degree of Bachelor of Law was conferred upon him, and he 
was at once admitted to the bar; but returned to his alma mater in 
1896, as assistant professor of law, remaining, however, but one year. 
Like his father, he affiliated with the Democratic party. He was elect- 
ed to the state house of delegates in 1 899, where he became chairman of 
the judiciary committee. In 1900 he was the Democratic candidate for 
presidential elector at large. Four years later he was a delegate to the 
Democratic national convention at St. Louis. November 8, 19 10, he 
was elected a member of the house of representatives, sixty-second con- 
gress, receiving twenty thousand three hundred and seventy votes 
against sixteen thousand nine hundred and sixty-two cast for his Re- 
publican opponent. Mr. Davis is a stockholder and director in the 
Union National Bank of Clarksburg. He has served as president of 
the State Bar Association in 1906, and in 1909 was appointed a mem- 
ber of the state commission on uniform state laws. He is a member of 
several college fraternities, and of the Masons, Elks and Modern 
Woodmen. 

John W. Davis married (first), June 20, 1899, at Charlestown, 
West Virginia, Julia McDonald, a native of Kentucky, daughter of 
Edward H. and Julia T. (Leavell) McDonald, and granddaughter of 
Angus McDonald on the one side and Rev. William T. Leavell on the 
other. She died in 1900 leaving one daughter: Julia McDonald Davis. 

On January 2, 19 12, he married (second) Ellen G. Bassel, daugh- 
ter of John and Martha (Lewis) Bassel, of Clarksburg, West Virginia. 



Originally this family resided in Pennsylvania, but 
MANOWN for many years has been represented in West Vir- 
ginia by Dr. James H. Manown, for more than half 
a century of Kingwood, Preston county. 

(I) James Manown was a native of Ireland. At an early day he 
came to America, settling in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and died 
on the old homestead, after reaching the advanced age of ninety- four 
years. He was a farmer and a successful mechanic. He married Cass- 
andria Devore, born in Pennsylvania. Children: Franklin, a manu- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 727 

facturer of glass, also a merchant, who later retired to the old home- 
stead to spend the remainder of his days in retirement and quiet, dying 
at the age of eighty-six years; Dr. James H., of whom further; Cass- 
andria, and Letitia. 

(II) James H. Manown, M. D., son of James and Cassandria 
(Devore) Manown, was bom in 1822, in Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania. His earlier years were spent in his native county, where he 
enjoyed unusually good educational advantages. He first received a 
common school education, then completed a course at the academy of 
Monongahela City, supplemented with a collegiate course of instruc- 
tion at Washington, Pennsylvania, and then studied medicine with Dr. 
David Beard, of Franklin, Warren county, Ohio. He next completed 
a course at the Jefferson Medical College, at Philadelphia, taking the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1844. His first venture at the pro- 
fession was in Vincennes, Indiana, but a year later he removed to 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, where he remained four years. In 1854 he 
went to Kingwood, Virginia, now West Virginia, and there successfully 
followed his profession until 1863, when he enlisted in the Fourteenth 
West Virginia Infantry, as first surgeon of that regiment. He held 
this position until mustered out at the close of the civil war. Resuming 
medical practice at Kingwood, he was appointed in the autumn of 
1884, by Governor Wilson, as physician for the male department of 
the State Asylum. This place he ably filled four years, then again 
returned to Kingwood to continue general practice until his retirement 
a few years since. He served on the board of pension examiners for a 
number of years and has filled other positions equally important; but 
always ignoring political offices. Dr. Manown has preferred to keep 
within the radius of his honored profession. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the West Virginia Medical Society. Now in his ninetieth year. 
Dr. Manown is the oldest physician in West Virginia, having been in 
practice in Preston county almost sixty years. His practice has been 
one of marked success professionally, and his honor and manliness have 
ever been notable. He has tfaveled over Preston and adjoining coun- 
ties in all kinds of weather, and over roads that none but a faithful 
family doctor would think of going over. He has always labored for 
the upbuilding of his county and state. Coming of a longlived race^ 
he is now more advanced than any of his aged relatives. Politically he 



728 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

is a Democrat and a true follower of Jackson, but in 1864 voted for 
Lincoln and in 1868 for Grant as president. He is one of the charter 
members of Kingwood Blue Lodge of Masons and Chapter and is one 
of its oldest members. Both he and his wife are members of the Pres- 
byterian church. 

James H. Manown married, in Kingwood, in 1856, Mary L Arm- 
strong, of Frederick county, Maryland, where she was reared and edu- 
cated. Children: James F., cashier of the Philippi Bank; Edward C, 
who resides in Baltimore, Maryland, where he holds a responsible posi- 
tion; Letitia, died when seven years of age. 



Among the many families from Pennsylvania who emi- 
LAZEAR grated to West Virginia is the Lazear family. Some 
of the members of this family now reside in Marion 
county, this state. 

(I) Joseph Lazear, of Greene county, and his wife, Mary Gray, 
are mentioned as the parents of John W., mentioned below. 

(II) John W. Lazear was a native of Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania, son of Joseph and Mary (Gray) Lazear, of Greene county. 
He married Nancy Straus, born in Sistersville, West Virginia, daugh- 
ter of William and Margaret (Oliver) Straus, of Greene county. For 
many years William Straus was mate on one of the Ohio river steam- 
boats. The Lazear and Straus families were engaged in farm pursuits 
in Tyler county. West Virginia. 

(III) Joseph S., son of John W. and Nancy (Straus) Lazear, 
was born near Sistersville, Tyler county. West Virginia, May 18, 1866. 
He obtained his education in the public schools of Tyler county. West 
Virginia, and at an early age engaged in freighting and teaming in 
Tyler county. In 1894 he removed his business to Mannington, Mar- 
ion county, and in 1901 added his present livery business. He is now 
the owner of considerable real estate in and near Mannington. In his 
various enterprises Mr. Lazear has succeeded to a degree seldom accord- 
ed to the ordinary man who has had to make his own way through life. 
He is a member of the Mannington Masonic lodge, the Fairmont chap- 
ter and commandery and the Wheeling shrine. He is an active worker 
in the ranks of the Republican party, and served one term as member 
of the Mannington council. The family attend the Christian church. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 729 

He married Lina, daughter of Jacob and Mary (McNeeley) Tustin, 
of Greene county, Pennsylvania. Their children are: Arza Glenn, 
born November 10, 1898, now in city school; Elise E., born Septem- 
ber 10, 1902, attending the city schools of Mannington. Mrs. Lazear 
is an active worker in the various branches of church work in the Chris- 
tian church society of Mannington. 



Among the German settlers in Wheeling, West Vir- 
WENDEL ginia, were the Wendels, one of whom was named 

Jacob. The name of Jacob Wendel's wife was Eliza- 
beth Zimmer, before marriage. Both were born in Germany. Jacob 
died at Wheeling in 1878, aged about forty-four years. They emi- 
grated to this country in 18 — , locating at Wheeling. By occupation 
the father was a groceryman. In his religious belief he was of the 
German Lutheran church. Children : Jacob, Katie, and Conrad F., 
now of Mannington, West Virginia, of whom later. 

(II) Conrad F., son of Jacob Wendel, was born at Wheeling, 
West Virginia, August 13, 1871. He was educated in his native city. 
After his school days had ended he engaged in work at the nail factory 
in Wheeling, remaining there some time; shifting to the sheet iron mills 
of that city, where he was employed until 1902. Then he removed to 
Mannington, Marion county. West Virginia, with his family and there 
purchased the well-known "Palace Cafe," which place he has since suc- 
cessfully and profitably operated. It was formerly owned and operated 
by J. McDonald, of Fairmont, who sold it to Mr. Wendel. At Wheel- 
ing Mr. Wendel joined the Knights of Pythias fraternity, also the 
order of Eagles of Wheeling. He has never voted other than the Repub- 
lican ticket, but is not a radical partisan in his politics. He is public- 
spirited always giving fully his share to every worthy public enterprise 
which looks to the advancement of the welfare of his home community. 
He married at Wheeling, In 1900, MoUIe Hall, born in 1887, at 
Wellsville, Ohio, daughter of John Hall. Mrs. Wendel was reared in 
and is now a member of the Baptist church. Children : Thelma May, 
bom October 13, 1901, in Wheeling, West Virginia, now in the Mann- 
ington public schools as a student; Herbert Hector, born August 6, 
1903, in Wheeling, West Virginia; Lillian Hall, bom April 30, 1907, 
in Mannington, West Virginia. Their home is at No. 133 Bluff street, 
Mannington, and is a desirable property. 



730 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

The Brand family to be considered in the following 
BRAND paragraphs is an old one of the two Virginias, and of 

Monongalia county. Its pioneer ancestors settled there 
long years before the separation of the two Virginias was thought of. 
The father of James Elliott Brand was probably the first of the family 
to come to this section of Virginia. 

(II) James Elliott Brand was bom in Monongalia county. He 
became a prosperous farmer, as did most of the sons of the early pio- 
neers, for that was the chief means of support in that long-ago period. 
He married Susan Rice. Children : Vina, Rachel, Sisson, Emma, Silas, 
Marshall, James, John Jerome, of whom further. 

(III) John Jerome, son of James Elliott Brand, was born in Mo- 
nongalia county, Virginia, September i, 1854. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools, and taught school for three years. He then 
moved to Fairmont, Marion county, where he followed the carpenter- 
ing business for five years, and five years longer operated a planing 
mill. In 1898 he returned to Morgantown and engaged at his trade 
as a carpenter and builder again. He married (first) Mary A. Barbe 
and had children as follows: Leonard L., Ira C, Harmon Roscoe, J. 
Goff, Clyde, of whom further. Mrs. Brand died about 1892. Mr. 
Brand married (second) Hattle M. Lloyd, by whom were born: John 
D., Donald, Esther M. 

(IV) Clyde, son of John Jerome and Mary A. (Barbe) Brand, 
was born In Monongalia county. West Virginia, August 15, 1880. He 
was educated in the public schools in Fairmont, after which he worked 
in the John's Bottling Works of that city, where he remained four 
years. After he went to Morgantown he worked for a Mr. Wiles in 
the real estate business, but later saw greater possibilities in learning a 
trade and chose that of a plumber. He worked at that for two years 
and then left Morgantown for Philadelphia and Atlantic City, where 
he followed plumbing. He returned, however, to Morgantown and 
was employed by J. H. Kennedy a year, and then formed a partnership 
under the firm name of Kennedy & Brand. In 1904 he established a 
plumbing business of his own. In 1907 he erected a fine building and 
Is now carrying on the business on an extensive scale. Mr. Brand is a 
member of the Presbyterian church, and holds membership with the 
Masonic order, belonging to the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Command- 





c6c-(pb^^^>^^. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 731 

ery; also is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Junior Order of Amer- 
ican Mechanics, and Morgantown Lodge, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. In April, 1903, he married Flora Gertrude, daughter 
of A. M. Neill, of Philadelphia. Children: Richard Clyde, born June 
16, 1907; Dorothy Virginia, December 19, 1909. 



The Stocktons were originally from Meadville, Penn- 
STOCKTON sylvania, and were well known as old settlers of 

Crawford county, that state, where Fred E. Stock- 
ton was a farmer. He married Augusta, daughter of Rolling K. and 
Charlotte (Stedman) Kennedy. The Stedmans were from Syracuse, 
New York state. 

(II) Claude E. Stockton, a veterinary surgeon of Mannington, 
Marion county. West Virginia, is the son of Fred E. and Augusta 
(Kennedy) Stockton. He was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, 
March 25, 1876. He received the common school education of his 
native city. In 1900 he entered the Chicago Veterinary College from 
which he graduated three years later. He practiced his profession in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, three years, then settled in Morgantown, 
West Virginia. He occupied there the chair of anatomy and physiology 
for one year at the West Virginia University. He then located at 
Mannington, Marion county, where he has a large practice and owns a 
livery barn. His veterinary hospital is well equipped with all modem 
appliances for veterinary surgery. He is a thorough student in his 
chosen profession; and therefore is an up-to-date veterinary surgeon. 
The doctor takes but little interest in politics; but is foremost in local 
affairs and a real promoter of the best commercial and social interests 
of Mannington. He is a member of the Alumni Association of the 
Chicago Veterinary College, and several other veterinary associations. 
He is still unmarried. 



This is an old Upshur county, Virginia, family. From 
VANCE it has descended Dr. Fred W. Vance, now of Manning- 
ton, West Virginia. 
(I) John Eldred Vance was born in Highland county, Virginia. 
His father died when he was four years of age. John E. Vance follow- 
ed blacksmithing throughout the active years of his life, but is now 



732 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

retired from business pursuits. He resides at French Creek, where he 
and his wife are enjoying the fruits of their labors. Politically he votes 
the Prohibition ticket, and in religious faith he favors that of the Pres- 
byterian denomination. He married Annie L., daughter of Colonel 
Morgan A. Darnell. Children: Fred W., see forward; Nellie, wife of 
Professor E. W. Brooks (of Brooks-Henning family), state inspector 
of entomology; Ethel, wife of Dr. D. E. Bronson, of Olathe, Kansas; 
Mabel, assistant librarian of Fairmont State Normal, a student of that 
school in 1912 ; Beulah May, at home; Harry W., student in Wesleyan 
College, at Buckhannon ; Glenn V., superintendent of bridge engineer- 
ing in Alaska. 

(II) Fred W. Vance, M. D., son of John Eldred and Annie L. 
(Darnell) Vance, was born at French Creek, West Virginia, February 
23, 1 874. He was educated at the public schools of French Creek, and 
later entered the Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, from 
which he graduated in 1905 with the degree of M. D. He passed the 
state board examination one year prior to his graduation; served one 
year as interne at Seton Hospital, and in 1909 took a general post- 
graduate course in New York Post-Graduate Medical School. He 
now makes a specialty of diseases of women and children. He is a 
member of the National and State Eclectic associations; member of 
Mannington Medical Society; member of Alumni Association of Eclec- 
tic and Post-Graduate Medical colleges, and is a frequent contributor 
to medical journals. Dr. Vance belongs to the Knights of Pythias and 
Modern Woodmen of America. He has always supported the Repub- 
lican party on national issues, while he is independent of party in local 
politics. He has traveled quite extensively. 

He married Mabel, daughter of Adolphus Brooks, of French Creek, 
West Virginia. One daughter by this union: Mary Eugenia, born Au- 
gust 24, 1905, now attending the public schools of Mannington. Mrs. 
Vance is an active member and zealous worker in the Presbyterian 
church ; superintendent of the Sunday school ; belongs to the Woman's 
Civic Club and is eligible to membership in the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 733 

Among the younger professional men of Mannington, Mar- 
HITE ion county, West Virginia, is Dr. Ralph Mason Hite, who 
has forged his way to the front rank as a dental surgeon 
within the last few years. 

His father, Thomas R. Hite, was the son of George W. Hite, of 
Marion county. West Virginia, and followed the vocation of a railroad 
locomotive engineer. He married Katharine Mason. 

Dr. Ralph M. Hite, son of Thomas R. and Katherine (Mason) 
Hite, was born at Grafton, Taylor county, October 26, 1882. He 
graduated from the high school at Cameron and the Linsly Institute, 
at Wheeling, West Virginia. He then entered Baltimore College of 
Dentistry from which he graduated in 1905 with the degree of Doctor 
of Dental Surgery, and the same year opened an office in Mannington. 
He is a member of the West Virginia State Dental Association and is a 
great reader on medical and dental subjects. He is also a member of 
the Mannington Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 
388. In his political belief he is a Republican, but takes no active part 
in politics, preferring to attend strictly to the duties and responsibilities 
of his practice. Dr. and Mrs. Hite are members of the Presbyterian 
church. Mrs. Hite is a member of Augusta Chapter of the Daughters 
of the Revolution. 

Ralph M. Hite married, in 1908, Gipsy Prichard, daughter of A. L. 
Prichard, of Mannington, West Virginia. Children: Mary Prichard, 
born June 9, 1909; Arthur Thomas, November 6, 191 1. 



West Virginia has many native-born physicians who 
CONAWAY are making great advancement In the science of medi- 
cine. The present generation are studying special 
work and features In medical practice and are succeeding well. Mann- 
ington Is well supplied with physicians, and one of their number Is Dr. 
Benjamin Franklin Conaway. 

Alfred Conaway, the doctor's father, was a native of Barracksville, 
Marlon county. West Virginia. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
John and Susanna Clayton, of Gray's Flats. 

Dr. Conaway, son of Alfred and Elizabeth (Clayton) Conaway, 
was born December 21, 1877, in Mannington, West Virginia. The 
doctor was educated at the Mannington schools and attended the Fair- 



734 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

mont State Normal School and the University of West Virginia. At 
the latter institution he studied both medicine and surgery for two years. 
He then attended Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, and graduated with the class of 1908 of Maryland Medical 
College, of Baltimore, Maryland, with the coveted degree of Medical 
Doctor. The same year he commenced his active medical practice at 
Fairview and has been highly successful. He owns a fine professional 
library, has a laboratory and all the necessary office equipments for 
handling the most difficult cases that come under the care of a physician 
and surgeon. He is a member of the Phi Kappa Sigma at Morgantown, 
West Virginia; the Phi Alpha Sigma, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the 
Marion County and Mannington Medical societies; and the American 
Medical Association, which brings him in touch with the best talent in 
the medical world. The doctor is unmarried and devotes all his time 
and attention to his chosen profession, taking but little part in politics 
or secret societies, not being a member of any of this kind of fraternities. 



This family is of Holland origin, the first mem- 
VANDERVORT ber coming to America was Nicholas Vander- 

vort, who emigrated to this country when a 
young man, becoming a thrifty Virginia farmer, and married and rear- 
ed a family in which was one son named Paul. 

(II) Paul, son of the emigrant ancestor, Nicholas Vandervort 
was born in Virginia. He was a soldier in the war of 18 12 and was at 
Fort Meigs. He married Mary Jenkins, and died in Marion county 
West Virginia, and with his wife was buried in the old Fleming bury 
ing ground at Fairmont, near where they owned a good farm, which is 
now known as the Peabody place. They lived in Fairmont at one time 

(III) James G., son of Paul and Mary (Jenkins) Vandervort 
was born in Monongalia county, Virginia, now in West Virginia, in 
1827, died July 22, 1907. He came to Weston, Lewis county, in 1849 
He received his education in the primitive schools of West Virginia, 
After his few years in the school room he learned the then popular trade 
of hat-making under Benjamin Fleming, at Fairmont. In 1849 he 
went with P. M. Hale to Weston, and there they opened a hat factory 
and later added shoemaking, continuing until i860, when Mr. Vander- 
vort bought a farm where he resided thereafter, depending on the tilling 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 735 

of the same for a livelihood. In 1864 he was appointed deputy sheriff 
by A. C. Hale, continuing in that office under Sheriff Allen Simpson. 
From 1877 to 1881 he was sheriff of Lewis county, and was for many 
years an active real estate dealer, laying out numerous additions to 
Weston. 

He married (first), in 1855, Nancy Butcher, bom in Weston, 
daughter of the old pioneer, Jacob Butcher, and wife, whose maiden 
name was Barbara Flesher; she was a descendant of the Flesher family 
who located Flesherville (now Weston). Nancy (Butcher) Vander- 
vort died in 1861, and her husband then married (second) Cordelia 
Horner. The Vandervort family were strong Union people in the 
days of the civil war. Politically James G. Vandervort was a Repub- 
lican and always active in the conventions and other councils of his 
party. His children by his first marriage were: Emery M., of whom 
further; Jacob Scott, of whom further. By his second wife: Mary, 
wife of James Pickens; John, residing at Weston; Melissa, now Mrs. 
W. R. Smith, of Weston; James, who died in December, 1905; Mar- 
garet, now Mrs. Roy R. Hale, of Weston; Lulu, now Mrs. D. H. 
Dent, of Roanoke, Virginia; Thomas, died in March, 1908. 

(IV) EmeryM. Vandervort, son of James G. and Nancy (Butcher) 
Vandervort, was born December 29, 1855. He obtained a good com- 
mon school education, and after he grew to manhood he served as 
deputy sheriff under his father. For twenty years he was the station 
agent at Weston for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. After 
this he accepted the management of the famous Bailey House in Wes- 
ton, owned by his mother-in-law, Mrs. L. S. Tunstill. He was con- 
ducting this house at the date of his death, December 3, 19 10. He 
was a director in the Citizens' Bank of Weston, and treasurer of the 
Weston Fuel and Light Company. He married Sallie Tunstill, and 
had two children: Lacy, died in infancy, and Stokes. 

(IV) Jacob Scott, son of James G. and Nancy (Butcher) Vander- 
vort, was born in Weston, February 28, 186 1. He attended the com- 
mon schools of Weston, and the Fairmont State Normal school two 
years, with a two-year course at Adrian College, Michigan. In 1882 
he returned to Weston and was connected with the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad Company until 1892, when he was elected assistant cashier of 
the Citizens' Bank, remaining in such position until 1902, when the 



7^6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Lewis County Bank was organized and he became cashier of it. The 
position he still holds and to his good business ability is due largely the 
present success and popularity of the bank. Mr. Vandervort is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Weston Lodge No. lo, 
Bigelow Chapter No. 4, St. John's Commandery No. 8, and is a mem- 
ber of the Shriners at Wheeling. He also holds membership in the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. Politically he is a Repubhcan. 
He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, and his wife is active in 
church and society matters. He married, in 1885, Belle Saltsman, 
daughter of Jefferson Saltsman and wife, of Toronto, Ohio. Children : 
Lottie L., born August 10, 1888, educated at Wilson College, Cham- 
bersburg, Pennsylvania, now at home; Harry S., born December 17, 
1894, now in the Weston high school. 



For five generations this family has resided in West 

HARTLEY Virginia, as the territory is now called, originally 

Virginia. They were early pioneers, and as a family 

have seen the transformation from a wilderness in the "Mountain 

State" to a land now rich in its mineral development. 

(I) Edward Hartley, the earliest member of whom any definite 
knowledge is known, was born in Monongalia county, Virginia, near the 
present city of Fairmont. He was a blacksmith, a farmer and operated 
a mill. He married Mary Miller. Children: Peter M., of whom 
further; Elizabeth Mary, Charlotte, Joseph M., Henry, Nancy, Amos, 
James. 

(II) Peter M., son of Edward and Mary (Miller) Hartley, was 
bom at Fairmont, June 9, 1809, on a farm; died in October, 1882. 
He was educated in the pioneer schools which were not of the best type. 
He purchased a farm which he tilled and upon which he raised stock, 
following this vocation all his active years. He was a man of some 
influence in the community, was a justice of the peace, a member of the 
county court, also a school commissioner one term. When the state 
seceded from the Union, in 1863, he was one of the commissioners to 
lay out the boundary line. He again became a member of the county 
court, under the new state government. He belonged to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He voted the Whig and later the Republic ticket. 
Mr. Hartley married Susan, daughter of Drake Swindler. She died 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 737 

December 22, 1872. Children: Edgar M., Henry Amos, Joseph M., 
Lydia Kathem, Sylvanus C, Luther E., Homer P., Samuel W., of 
whom further. 

(III) Samuel W., son of Peter M. and Susan (Swindler) Hartley, 
was born in Preston county, Virginia, June 5, 1845. He obtained his 
education at the common schools of his county, and then engaged in 
farming and stock raising. For four years he was deputy sheriff of 
Preston county, and a member of the board of education, being its presi- 
dent for four years. In 1893 he sold out his property interests and 
removed to Ohio, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1904 
he returned to Morgantown, West Virginia, as superintendent of the 
street car lines. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
was a delegate to the general conference and a member of the official 
board twelve years. Mr. Hartley votes the Republican ticket. He is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity. He married. May 18, 
1869, Wilhemina, daughter of Lemuel and Hannah Menear. Chil- 
dren : Alva C, born March 12, 1870; Lowrie C, December 29, 1 87 1 ; 
Carrie M., February 16, 1874, wife of Levi Lancaster; Samuel M., 
September 10, 1875; Guy B., of whom further. 

(IV) Guy B., son of Samuel W. and Wilhemina (Menear) Hart- 
ley, was born June 26, 1885, at Masontown, Preston county. West 
Virginia. He was educated in the public schools of his native county, 
and attended the West Virginia State University. He took a course in 
civil engineering and completed his course in 1908. In February, 1909, 
he opened an office in Morgantown, in which city he still carries on his 
profession, doing much mining engineering for the surrounding district. 
May I, 191 1, he was elected city engineer; he is also engineer for 
several large coal mining companies. May i, 191 1, he formed the 
G. B. Hartley Company, engineers, with branch offices at Elkins, West 
Virginia. In 19 10 he published an atlas of Belmont county, Ohio. 
Mr. Hartley is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church; also holds 
membership in the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. 



The Schwenck family now under consideration is 
SCHWENCK of German ancestry. The grandfather of Law- 
rence S. Schwenck, an attorney at Mannington, 
Marion county. West Virginia, was Heironimus Schwenck, a native of 



738 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Germany, who came to Ohio at the age of seventeen years with his 
parents. In his family was a son named Samuel S., a native of Craw- 
ford county, Ohio, who married Lovina Fralic. The Fralic family 
came from Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, where they were residents 
at an early day as a distinct family, near Harrisburg. 

Lawrence S. Schwenck was born in Bucyrus, Crawford county, 
Ohio, on a farm owned by his parents, April 7, 1877. His grand- 
father, on the maternal side, was a merchant and postmaster at Porters- 
ville, Crawford county, Ohio, for many years. Lawrence S. was edu- 
cated in the schools of his native place and at St. Mary's, Ohio, high 
school, to which place his parents removed when he was aged nine 
years. After his graduation from the St. Mary's high school, he at once 
engaged in school teaching, until he concluded to enter the Northern 
Ohio University, from which he graduated in 1899 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. He was a careful, studious pupil and active in 
scholastic work, being a member of Franklin Literary Club. For one 
year after he graduated with his degree he taught school in West New- 
ton, Pennsylvania, in the graded schools of that city. The following 
two years he was instructor in mathematics and English in East Hunt- 
ington, Pennsylvania, high school. During the period he was at the 
last-named place he devoted considerable time to the private reading of 
law, an4 resigned his position there to enter the law department of the 
West Virginia University. After pursuing his legal studies there for a 
short time, he was admitted to the West Virginia bar at Morgantown, 
West Virginia, April 28, 1903, and immediately opened a law office 
in Mannington, Marion county, where he is still a successful lawyer. 
At the commencement in 1905 his alma mater conferred the degree of 
Master of Arts upon him for his educational work and attainments 
since graduation. He is an honored member of the Northern Ohio 
University Alumni Association, of the Marion County Bar Association, 
and stands high among his fellow lawyers. Mrs. Schwenck is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church and its numerous auxiliary 
organizations; also a member of Augusta Chapter, Daughters of the 
Revolution, and Mr. Schwenck attends the church of which his wife 
is a devoted member. Among the able lawyers of this section of the 
state with which Mr. Schwenck has been intimately associated in legal 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 739 

work may be named Mr. B. L. Butcher, of Fairmont, so well and 
favorably known to the county and state bar. 

Mr. Schwenck married, August 5, 1903, Leila, daughter of Francis 
M. and Phoebe Sloan, of Ruff's Dale, Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where the father is district superintendent of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company. Mr. and Mrs. Schwenck have no issue. 



This family is probably of Welsh origin. David Jen- 
JENKINS kins, who came from Wales about 1700 and settled 
in Chester county, Pennsylvania, may be the immi- 
grant ancestor. 

(I) Ezekiel C. Jenkins, the first member of the family about whom 
we have definite information, died in 1899. He came to Fairmont, 
West Virginia, about 1845, and was a farmer in Marion county. He 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Lavelle. Children : Edward, 
living at Fairmont; Mar>% married West; Nancy Baker, mar- 
ried West; William Riley, living at Salem, West Virginia; 

Freeman, living at Grafton, West Virginia; John C, of whom further. 

(II) John C, son of Ezekiel C. and Elizabeth (Lavelle) Jenkins, 
was born at Fairmont in 1855. He was identified with the coal mining 
industry, and for a long time was superintendent of the Lynch Mining 
Company. He now lives at Indianapolis, Indiana, and is a concrete 
block manufacturer and building contractor. He married Elizabeth 
Holland, who is also living. Children: Charles E., an undertaker at 

Morgantown; Frederick L., of whom further; Jeanette, married 

FauUcner; Blanche, married Fitch; Mabel, married Chad- 
wick. 

(III) Frederick L., son of John C. and Elizabeth (Holland) 
Jenkins, was born May 4, 1879, in Upshur county. West Virginia, his 
parents being there for a short stay. He attended the Fairmont schools 
and afterward entered the employment of the Fairmont Coal Com- 
pany. When he resigned after thirteen years' continuous employment, 
he was store manager for this company at Lynch. Purchasing a farm, 
he conducted it for one year and then sold it. He took up at Monon- 
gah, Marion county, West Virginia, the study of undertaking and 
embalming and passed the Embalmers' State Board examination with 
high honors. Since 1905 he has owned a complete and modern estab- 



740 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

llshment at Fairmont. He owns a farm and some city property besides 
his business buildings. Mr. Jenkins is an active member of Marion 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias; Palatine Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; the Improved Order of Red Men; and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is a past sachem of the Red Men and past 
chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is independent. 
Mr. Jenkins is a member of the Palatine Baptist Church, and for some 
years has been musical director, having complete charge of the choir. 

He married Clarabelle, daughter of Sylvester and Mary Elizabeth 
(Ellsworth) Drummond. She is a member of the Central Christian 
Church. Her mother's mother was of the Shinn family of Shinnston, 
Harrison county. West Virginia, which family has been in Harrison 
county since 1778. Children: Beryl Genevieve, born August 6, 1903; 
John, September 2, 1905, died November 8, 191 1 ; Frederick L., Octo- 
ber 16, 1907; Hugh Drummond, March 12, 19 10; Lloyd George, 
born February 6, 19 12. 



The Tates were among the pioneer families of Harrison 
TATE county, Virginia (now West Virginia). As farmers, in- 
dustrial workers and military characters this family have 
been foremost. 

(I) Thompson Tate, who by trade was a hatter, was a native of 
Harrison county, Virginia, and lived to the age of sixty years. He mar- 
ried a Miss Shuttlesworth, by whom three children were born : Mary, 
William, and Oscar Hudson, of whom further. 

(II) Oscar Hudson, son of Thompson Tate, the pioneer hat-maker 
of western Virginia, was born at Clarksburg, Virginia, in 1827, died 
In February, 1899. He was a blacksmith throughout his active years 
and a splendid worker in iron. He was public-spirited and held many 
positions in his town and county. He served on the city council of 
Clarksburg several terms, was chief of police six years, and served as 
town collector. He was prominent in politics, affiliating with the Re- 
publican party. When the civil war came on between the north and 
south, he enlisted as a member of the Sixth Virginia Cavalry In the 
Union army and served throughout the entire conflict. He married 
Hannah L. Bailey, who died December 27, 1861. She was born in 
Harrison county, was but twenty-seven years of age at her death. Chil- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 741 

dren : Edward Scott, now at Adamson, West Virginia, a teamster ; Will- 
iam Ernest, of whom further; Frank Lee, an engineer at the Clarksburg 
brick works. The deceased children were named: Mary, Emma, 
George B. Joseph Bailey, father of Mrs. Oscar Hudson Tate, was a 
large landowner in Harrison county. West Virginia, where he lived and 
died, his occupation always being that of a farmer. He served in the 
war of 1 8 1 2 and was crippled for life by having his horse fall upon him. 
He married a Miss Hickman. 

(Ill) William Ernest, son of Oscar Hudson and Hannah L. 
(Bailey) Tate, was born in Clarksburg, Virginia, now West Virginia, 
i'^pril 18, 1853. He received his education at the free schools of his 
native place. He early turned his attention to mechanical pursuits, 
which he has followed thus far in his career and with success. He 
manufactured artificial gas for two years, then went with Hart Bros., 
machinists, where he remained two years and four months, after which 
he was employed at Baltimore, Maryland, for a year with T. C. Bashor 
& Company. For the last two years he has held the position of in- 
spector for the Clarksburg Water and Sewerage Board. For about a 
dozen years he operated a plumbing shop at Clarksburg, commencingi 
in April, 1899. Politically Mr. Tate Is a Republican. He is a Master 
Mason, and identified with the Presbyterian church. He married, in 
Hartwell, Ohio, November 6, 1889, Lucy Fuller Vandervort, born in 
Morrow, Ohio, in 1858, daughter of Joseph Vandervort, who died 
about 1 89 1. He was a well known druggist of Morrow, Ohio, and 
was a veteran of the civil war. He married Anna James, who died in 
1892. Mr. and Mrs. Tate have no living children — they lost an 
infant. 



In this connection will be given some of the more interest- 
SHAW ing and Important facts and incidents connected with the 
Shaw family of which ex-Sheriff Leroy Shaw, of King- 
wood, West Virginia, Is a member. 

(I) Benjamin Shaw, the first of whom anything can be learned in 
this country, was made a sheriff in one of the East Virginia counties by 
reason of his having been justice of the peace longer than any other in 
his county. He had children : Edgar, Celia and William Shaw. 

(I) Samuel, the brother of Benjamin Shaw, settled near Sand 



742 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Creek, on the Scott farm. He married Elizabeth , who died at 

the age of seventy years. 

(II) Alexander, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Shaw, became a 
very successful farmer before his death, which occurred at the age of 
about sixty-five years. He owned a large farm near Kingwood and was 
one of the most successful, progressive agriculturists in Virginia in his 
generation. Later he removed to Ohio and there continued his farm- 
ing operations in Darke county. Subsequently he returned to Preston 
county, West Virginia, locating near Tunnelton, where he died. As a 
stock grower he was considered an authority and contributed to the 
material prosperity of his county and state. He married Sarah Money- 
smith, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. Children: i. Benjamin, 
who died by an accident when seventy years old. 2. Minerva H., wife 
of Daniel Anderson, of Mississippi. 3. John W., who died young. 
4. Alexander W., a large farmer in Oklahoma. 5. Rev. William H., a 
retired minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, residing at Point 
Pleasant, West Virginia. 6. Elizabeth, deceased. 7. Joseph M., lived 
near Morgantown, but now residing near Los Angeles, California. 8. 
Leroy, of whom further. 9. Sarah, of Atlanta, Georgia. 10. George 
C, in business in Grafton, West Virginia. 

(III) Leroy, son of Alexander and Sarah (Moneysmith) Shaw, 
was bom January 5, 1844, in Preston county. West Virginia. He had 
but about two months' schooling each year until seventeen years of age. 
But by close application, observation and self-study, he has obtained a 
knowledge of affairs and of men. He is a real and practical leader 
among men in his section of the state. He enlisted in the Seventh West 
Virginia Infantry Regiment, July 4, 1861, serving as a private until 
promoted to rank of corporal. He was wounded at the battle of Antie- 
tam, then discharged, because of his wound; but again enlisted, the 
second time as sergeant in the Sixth West Virginia Cavalry, serving as 
a member of Company G until the close of the war. After the assassi- 
nation of President Lincoln, he served as provost guard in the city of 
Washington, D. C, a number of months, and was able to see the 
famous Grand Review, one of the greatest military pageants in the 
world, which occurred at the close of the civil war. He then crossed 
the plains in pursuit of warring tribes of Indians, and in 1865-66 was 
at Fort Casper, Dakota. In May, 1866, he received his discharge at 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 743 

Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and returned to Preston county, West Vir- 
ginia. Since that time, he has been steadily engaged in agriculture and 
has been much interested in the departments of farm life. As a stock 
raiser, a producer of grains and fruits along the latest lines of improved 
culture, his efforts have been highly successful. He has been interested 
in various agricultural societies and helped raise the standard of digni- 
fied fanning. He is secretary of the Farmers' Institute of the Univer- 
sity of West Virginia, and is secretary also of the Corn Association of 
Preston county. Politically he is an independent Republican. His first 
presidential vote was cast for President Lincoln in 1864. In official 
life he has been prominent; was constable five years; census enumer- 
ator, in 1880; deputy assessor, eight years; member of the county court, 
four years; and president of that body, one year. He is a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic; a past commander of George H. 
Thomas Post; and belongs to the Odd Fellows order at Kingwood. He 
was for four years a director of Spencer Hospital. Perhaps the most 
important official place Mr. Shaw has ever held was that of sheriff of 
Preston county. To this office he was elected in 1892, and during his 
term of office met with many exciting experiences, some of which proved 
serious and almost fatal, but his duty was always discharged. The 
Preston County Journal of April 25, 1895, relates the subjoined of one 
of his trying experiences: 

"On Thursday evening, at about 9 130 o'clock, a telephone message 
from Albrightsville, three miles east of Kingwood, announced that two 
horse thieves had passed through there, and were headed towards 
Kingwood, and requested the sheriff to start with a posse to arrest 
them. Sheriff Shaw started in a few minutes, accompanied by ex-Sheriff 
D. R. Jackson and E. M. Menear, all on foot. They had little thought 
of the desperate characters they were to encounter, and believed the 
three officers could easily capture two men, but in fact there were four 
of the outlaws. John Elliott, Cloyd M. Crane, Marcellus Taylor, Bert 
Feather and Cline Bishop left Albrightsville immediately after the out- 
laws passed through the town and followed closely behind them. At 
Benoni Jordan's barn the sheriff and his party met Bert Feather who 
had passed the outlaws on the pike, near Charlie Stone's place and was 
halted by Jackson, who tied his horse and went back with them. From 
him they learned that they were near the gang, and they proceeded 



744 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

cautiously down the pike, past Mr. Jordan's house, about a hundred 
yards, when they met them and commanded them to halt. The sheriff 
and Menear walked on one side of the pike and ex-Sheriff Jackson and 
Feather on the other side. The outlaws were riding in single file — 
George Smithley in front, William Smithley and George Harvey in the 
center, and Archibald Patterson in the rear. William Smithley and 
Harvey were on one horse. Sheriff Shaw commanded the boys to sur- 
render. Both commands were given at about the same time and the 
officers at the command covered the outlaws with their revolvers. Will- 
iam Smithley and Archibald Patterson threw up their hands and were 
seized by Feather and Menear, making no resistance. When Sheriff 
Shaw commanded George Smithley, he answered the command by firing 
on the sheriff. At the flash of his revolver, the sheriff fired, both shots 
being almost simultaneous. The instant he fired, Smithley whirled on 
his horse to shoot at Jackson who instantly fired at Smithley. Smithley's 
shot took effect in the sheriff's right breast. Jackson's shot struck the 
horse. The ball from the sheriff's revolver went straight to Smithley's 
right breast. These three shots were fired rapidly in succession and all 
within less than ten seconds. When the horse was shot, it fell forward 
with great force and threw Smithley violently over its head to the 
ground, badly bruising his face and stunning him. The officers thought 
him dead, and the horse died instantly. Smithley's escape was miracu- 
lous, as the ball from Sheriff Shaw's revolver struck a package of four 
cigarette photographs in his upper vest pocket and fell into the pocket 
below, where it was afterwards found. As Smithley fell. Sheriff Shaw 
cried, 'Boys, I am shot, but give attention to the capture of the thieves.' 
Mr. Jackson supposing Smithley to be dead, turned his attention to the 
rest of the gang. During the melee with George Smithley, they were 
being securely held by Menear, Feather, Crane and Elliott, who by the 
sheriff's direction closed in, pulled them from their horses, and began 
to disarm and handcuff them. By this time George Smithley had re- 
covered and was searching for his revolver which had dropped as he 
fell, but Sheriff Shaw, standing over him, called out, 'Boys, this fellow 
will get away; I can't do anything as I'm shot, and shot bad.' Jackson 
then caught Smithley, found his revolver and handcuffed him. They 
soon had the entire gang disarmed, handcuffed and ready to march to 
Kingwood. By this time the sheriff's wounds were becoming very 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 745 

painful and he was growing sick, so he started to walk to Mr. Jordan's 
house. He went about half-way, when he sank down and was carried 
to the house and made as comfortable as it was possible. Mr. Taylor 
rode rapidly to Kingwood, summoned Drs. Manown, Pratt and Mc- 
Millen, who promptly responded and his wife and friends were soon at 
his side. After the sheriff was taken to the house, Jackson, Menear 
and Feather took the prisoners to jail; Bishop took charge of the 
horses, and Crane and Elliott remained to assist Mrs. Jordan and fam- 
ily in the care of the wounded man. All this occurred In three-quarters 
of an hour after the sheriff and posse left the sheriff's residence in King- 
wood." 

Mr. Shaw was taken slowly to town and suffered greatly. When 
it was generally made known in the community, feeling ran high and 
mob law was talked strongly, but better judgment prevailed and the 
men were given a fair trial and sentenced to five years' Imprisonment. 
Fortunately the sheriff recovered and Is still living, though shot through 
the lung. The ball still remains there, and will doubtless go to the 
grave with him. When searched, there were found on the prisoners, 
eight revolvers, a bag of cartridges, a lot of jewelry, screw-drivers, 
wire cutters, watches, clothing, etc.; also a large dirk knife and brass 
knuckles. This was a portion of the Cooley gang from Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania. They called themselves the "Wandering Star Order," 
and claimed they were organized for hunting and fishing. After serving 
time in the penitentiary, they were rearrested and served another term 
for crimes previously committed in Pennsylvania. Later the county 
court passed resolutions and placed them on the county records, In 
which they gave Mr. Shaw great credit for bravery and sagacious con- 
duct In this affair, with a vote of thanks from the court. 

Leroy Shaw married, July 4, 1866, Nancy M., daughter of Israel 
Schaeffer, an old pioneer of Preston county, grandson of Benjamin and 
Susan Schaeffer of Scotch-Irish descent, who were residents in Virginia, 
in colonial days Mrs. Shaw holds membership in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 



This was an old revolutionary family that locat- 
ROHRBOUGH ed in Upshur county, Virginia, in the revolution- 
ary war period, where at least one generation 
was bom after the settlement and prior to 1794, as the record shows a 



746 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

son Jacob was bom in the family during that year in that county. He 
is the direct ancestor of the West Virginia family of this name to-day. 

(I) Jacob Rohrbough, born in Upshur county, Virginia, in 1794, 
died in 1869, at the age of seventy-five years. He spent his entire life 
as a farmer in this county. He married and reared a family, including 
a son, Commodore Perry, named for Commodore Perry, the hero of 
Lake Erie in the war of 18 12. 

(II) Commodore Perry, son of Jacob Rohrbough, was born in 
Buckhannon in 1825, died soon after his retirement from business life, 
in 1892, aged sixty-seven years. He was a merchant and had been a 
wholesaler of fruits for a few years after the civil war. He served as 
deputy sheriff of Upshur county, and was postmaster at Buckhannon 
under President Lincoln's administration. He was a Republican, and 
in church faith a Methodist Episcopalian. He married Martha, daugh- 
ter of David Hazelton, who came from England when he was but 
twelve years of age, and became a pioneer in Upshur county, where he 
was sheriff and a very prominent man in his day. He was a merchant 
and later in hfe went to Illinois where he engaged in farming until 
called by death in 1901, at the age of eighty-five years. Commodore 
Perry Rohrbough had a brother, Captain Calvin Rohrbough, who 
fought under General U. S. Grant at Vicksburg, during the civil war. 
He was a merchant at Kinmundy, Illinois, until his death in 1909, 
when he was sixty-nine years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Commodore 
Perry Rohrbough had five children: AUie, died in infancy; May, wife 
of James L. Smith, of Ashland, Kentucky; Lloyd, died in 1883; Orr 
Lawson, of whom further; Rev. A. B. Rohrbough, a minister of Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, a member of the West Virginia conference, 
who died at Salem in 1907. The great-grandfather of the above 
named family of children, Mr. Burr, was born in Connecticut, and 
was a soldier in the war for national independence. He died in New 
England. He was a cousin of Aaron Burr, so famous in the history of 
this country. 

(III) Orr Lawson, son of Commodore Perry and Martha (Hazel- 
ton) Rohrbough, was born at Buckhannon, Upshur county, Virginia 
(now West Virginia), April 15, 1862. He obtained his education at 
the public schools of Buckhannon and Clarksburg. At the age of fif- 
teen years he entered the telegraph office at Clarksburg as a messenger 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 747 

boy and was taught telegraphy; he became night operator at Salem, 
where he remained one year, and went to Doddridge county, this state, 
where the central dispatcher's office was then located. There he re- 
mained five years and then went to Grafton, as the dispatcher's office 
had then been removed to that point. He was employed there four 
years, then was transferred to Salem again, in 1889, since which time 
he has resided there. He is now one of the directors of the board 
of trade; was mayor in 1907, and inaugurated several improvements 
under his administration. Politically he is a Republican. He belongs 
to the Masonic order, being raised to a Knight Templar and Shriner. 
In religious faith he is a communicant of the Baptist church. 

He married, at Grafton, September 8, 1886, Hattie Ware, born at 
Grafton. Children: i. Lottie L., born September 8, 1887; at home, 
assisting her father in his office as clerk. 2. Gay, bom July 5, 1889; 
now Mrs. Charles Hathaway, whose husband is in the United States 
navy, on the battleship "Vermont"; they reside at Norfolk, Virginia; 
he is highly esteemed by his fellow comrades. 3. Robert, born May 
27, 1898; attending school. 



The name of Arnett is an old and honorable one in 
ARNETT West Virginia and the Monongahela Valley. This 

article refers more particularly to the representatives 
of the family who are located at Clarksburg and vicinity, one branch 
of a very large family tree. 

(I) Solomon Arnett, born in 1807, at Arnettsville, now in West 
Virginia, married Mary Cordrey. He died in his native place at the 
age of forty-five years; his wife died in 1886, aged seventy-nine. He 
was a farmer, and among his children was Thomas Calvin, of whom 
further. 

(II) Thomas Calvin, son of Solomon and Mary (Cordrey) Ar- 
nett, was born August 28, 1834, died at Fairmont, November 3, 1905. 
He was by occupation both farmer and carpenter. He served in the 
confederate army in civil war days from his native county. Politically 
he was a Democrat, and his church relations were of the Methodist 
Episcopal faith. He married Hannah Trippett, born in Lowesville, 
Monongalia county, Virginia, January 15, 1839, and died December 
18, 1907. She was a daughter of Topliff Trippett, who was a miller 



748 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

in both Monongalia and Marion counties, born May, 1807, died No- 
vember 8, 1902; his wife was Catherine Keenan, who died in 1869. 
Children of Thomas C. and Hannah (Trippett) Arnett: May Cath- 
erine, Dennis S., Lydia Belle, Parris, Curtis T., of whom further; 
Lillian B., Lucy A. 

(Ill) Dr. Curtis Topliff Arnett, son of Thomas C. and Hannah 
(Trippett) Arnett, was born March 14, 1870, at Arnettsville, West 
Virginia, on the old homestead of the family. He obtained his edu- 
cation at the local schools and graduated in medicine at the Hospital 
College of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, 1897. He also took sev- 
eral courses as post-graduate at the Polyclinic of New York. He 
immediately began practice at Marshville, Harrison county. West 
Virginia, in 1897. In 1903 he left that place for Riversville, where he 
practiced medicine about a year and a half, then removed to Clarks- 
burg, in 1905, and has been in active practice there ever since. He 
treats both medically and surgically and carries on a general practice. 
Dr. Arnett has been a member of the militia company; is a member of 
the Harrison County Medical Association; the State Medical Associa- 
tion; the American Medical Association; Masonic fraternity, and polit- 
ically is a Democrat. He is a stockholder and treasurer of the Curtis 
Oil and Gas Company; director of the Marshville Oil and Gas Com- 
pany; director of Point Comfort Oil and Gas Company. He holds 
some real estate and this includes his fine home at Clarksburg. He also 
has a royalty from 627 acres of oil producing lands. 

Dr. Arnett was married at Marshville, January i, 1900, to Lucy 
C. Morrison, born in Harrison county, September 9, 1877, daughter of 
Thomas David Morrison, who still resides on his farm three miles 
from Adamson, Harrison county; his wife was Matilda Southern. The 
children of Dr. and Mrs. Arnett are: Basil, born March 23, 1901; 
Belle Marie, June 13, 1903, died May 14, 1909; Thomas Morrison, 
August 13, 1906; Lucy E. V., December 3, 191 1. 



Among the pioneer merchants to locate at Clarksburg, 
DESPARD West Virginia, was Richard Despard, who, accom- 
panied by his family, emigrated from his native land, 
Ireland, and became a merchant in New York City, where he at one 
rime owned a considerable portion of Murray Hill. Later he came to 




/pf- — 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 749 

West Virginia and began merchandising there. He lived to a good old 
age, highly respected by all who traded with him. 

(II) Burton, son of Richard Despard, was a prominent lawyer 
in Clarksburg for many years, and up to his death, October 2, 1874, 
when he was about sixty years of age. He was a director in many 
enterprises, banks, etc. He also had a coal mine called the "Despard 
Coal Company." He married (first) Emily Smith, born in Prunty- 
town, Virginia, died in the fifties. Children by this union: Charles S., 
deceased; Laura E., born in Clarksburg, wife of Judge Nathan Gofi; 
Wheaton Braddish, deceased; Burton McMahon, of whom later; Em- 
mett, died in infancy. He married (second) Gertrude Lee, still living 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and by whom were bom: Diana Mc- 
Mahon, deceased; Flora H., deceased; Duncan L., a practicing physi- 
cian of Philadelphia. Abraham Smith, father of Emily (Smith) Des- 
pard, lived and died in Pruntytown, Virginia, where he was a pioneer 
and carried the mail through the mountains when a boy. He became a 
well-to-do merchant. 

(III) Burton McMahon, son of Burton and Emily (Smith) Des- 
pard, was born in Clarksburg, Virginia, November 20, 1855. He 
received his education in the public schools, including the high school, 
after which he attended Washington and Lee University, at Lexing- 
ton, Virginia. He then engaged in merchandising at Clarksburg, under 
the firm name of Thorn & Despard, which relation existed a number of 
years, and terminating about 1877, since which time he has been en- 
gaged in the real estate business, and speculated in oil and coal lands, 
etc. He is the owner of much valuable realty, including many resi- 
dences and town lots. He belongs to the Elks fraternity, in church 
profession is an Episcopalian, and in politics an Independent. 



This Walker family is of Scotch origin, but has been 
WALKER known in Pennsylvania, in the vicinity of Somerset 
county, for generations. The American ancestor was 
Donald Walker. The name was originally spelled Walter, but inad- 
vertently changed in recording deeds in Edinburg, as in shown by the 
deeds themselves. The later generations have intermarried with the 
well known Lane family. 

(II) Peter Walker, son of Donald Walker, the ancestor, was bom 



750 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

in Washington county, Maryland, but in 1746 left his native county 
and located in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, where he became for his 
time a wealthy farmer. The Walkers have all remained in Somerset 
county except John P., of whom further. 

(III) John P., son of Peter Walker, left Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1839, removing to Loudoun county, Virginia, where he re- 
mained a short time, then moved to Ohio county in what is now West 
Virginia, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. Later he retired 
and lived in the city of Wheeling, where he died in 1852. He mar- 
ried Margaret, daughter of John and Catherine (Devlin) Lane. Mar- 
garet Walker died in 1874. She was a noted linguist and continued the 
study of languages until overtaken by old age. Children of John P. 
and Margaret (Lane) Walker are: William, a physician of Mon- 
mouth, Ohio, now deceased; Alexander, a civil engineer in the railway 
service of Newark, Ohio, now deceased; Mifflin, a farmer of Ottawa, 
Kansas, deceased; Kephart D., of whom further. 

(IV) Kephart D., son of John P. and Margaret (Lane) Walker, 
was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, February 14, 1838. When 
sixteen years of age he entered the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad Company, in 1853, as construction camp clerk, remaining in 
such position eighteen months, during which time he picked up enough 
in telegraphy to enter the telegraph department of the company. Later 
he became a brakeman, then rose to conductor. At the breaking out 
of the civil war he joined the secret service of the confederate army 
and had an exciting and varied experience; was under "Stonewall" 
Jackson and General John B. Walker (a relative). After the war 
ended he resumed work for the Baltimore & Ohio Company. He was 
made station agent at Fairmont, holding the position ten years. He 
was then promoted to superintendent of the Fairmont division, and 
when the Fairmont, Morgantown & Pittsburgh line was undertaken, he 
was assigned the duty of securing the right-of-way between Fairmont 
and Morgantown, and during the construction of this line was pur- 
chasing agent. He was in charge of the first train that ever run over 
the line to Pittsburgh. He then became passenger conductor and 
served until 1906. In 1870 Mr. Walker became a member of the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, uniting with Lodge No. 9, at Fair- 
mont, and in 1875 was elected grand master of the West Virginia 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 751 

Lodge. He has held all the chairs to past grand priest. He is now 
one of eight men in West Virginia who have advanced in the mysteries 
of Masonry to the thirty-third degree, taking the degree in Washing- 
ton, D. C, under his personal friend, General Albert Pike. He is con- 
sidered authority in the workings of Masonry. He has made a study 
of the Indian races which once inhabited West Virginia; has donated 
to the Smithsonian Institution many exhibits — skeletons, pipes, arrows, 
etc. These he had exhumed from mounds and other Indian burying 
grounds. 

He married, in 1859, Josephine, daughter of Presley and Sarah 
Wigginton, of Loudoun county, Virginia. Presley Wigginton was born 
in Virginia, a son of Benjamin Wigginton, who came to America at a 
very early date. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Walker: i. Charles W., 
deceased; was with the Penn Oil Company. 2. Mifflin Presley, died 
young. 3. Ettie Franklin, wife of E. J. Thomas, of Mannington, 
West Virginia. 4. Hattie Brownfield, wife of Fred W. Bartlett, of 
Mannington. 5. Amy Long, wife of George C. Jeffreys, of Grafton, 
West Virginia. 6. Gertrude Pike, wife of F. B. Jenkins, of Grafton, 
West Virginia. 7. Lillian Davisson, wife of J. J. Dorsey, of Fairmont. 
8. Carlotta Roome, wife of W. B. Rector, of Belington, West Vir- 
ginia. 9. Edna Whiting, wife of F. S. Thompson, of Clarksburg. 

(The Lane Line). 

The history of this Lane family is traced genealogically back to 
about 1655, and has been identified with the American continent since 
1680, after a record of some five years near London in England. The 
family has been represented in almost every state in this country, and 
eminent members have appeared in nearly every vocation through the 
various generations, in the professions and trades, in the old and new 
world. 

(I) John Lane, the earliest member of whom there is an authentic 
account, was born at Cleaves, near the river Rhine, on the northern 
border of Prussia, A. D., 1655. In 1675 he, with his three brothers, 
Abraham, Nicholas and Richard, moved to London, England. In 1680 
all three, still unmarried, came to America, all locating in Pennsylvania. 
Abraham, Nicholas and Richard settled in Lancaster county, and John 
near Berlin, Somerset county. At the age of ninety-nine years, the last- 



752 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

named died in 1754. His wife's name and nationality are unknown. 
They had two sons: John, settled at Pipe Creek, Maryland; Peter, see 
forward. 

(II) Peter, son of John Lane, was born 17 19, died at Berlin, 
Pennsylvania, 1787, aged sixty-eight years. He married a Miss Irwin, 
of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Children: i. John, see forward. 2. 
Samuel, settled in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. 3. Abraham, died 
at Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 4. Thomas, died at Berlin, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Seth, settled in Hagerstown, Maryland; children: 
John, Carlisle, Samuel, Mary (the names of the others not known). 
6. Hannah, married a Captain Seabrook, of Hanover, Maryland. 7. 
Catherine, married Jacob Seylor, of Adams county, Pennsylvania, where 
she died in 1866, aged eighty-eight years, surviving all of her brothers 
and sisters. 8. Mary, married a Mr. Curry, of Spring Garden, near 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

(III) John (2), oldest child of Peter Lane, was bom at Berlin, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, October 21, 1757, died in the same 
place, September 6, 1843. He married Catherine Devlin, born at Mt. 
Joy, near Armagh, Ireland (Scotch-Irish), in 1760, died November 
28, 1840, at Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, to which locality 
they removed in 1802. Her father, John Devlin, came to America 
and settled at Carlisle, where he died and is buried. John and Cath- 
erine Lane had children: i. Peter, born near Berlin, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, January 17, 1782, died In the same county, June 14, 
1864; married Maria HoU, born near Berlin, 1787, died at Berlin, De- 
cember, 1866. Her father, Walter Hoil, was born in southwestern 
Prussia, near Kirkshire, about 1732, died at Berlin, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, March, 1806, aged seventy-four years. He married 
Mary Barbary Martin, born In western Shinirk, Bavaria, 1739, died 
March 30, 1830. Her father, Michael Martin, was born and died in 
Bavaria. His widow Angellne, whose maiden name was Krestmars, 
came to America about 1735 and died in Berlin, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, 1800, aged eighty-five years. Peter and Maria (Hoil) Lane 
had thirteen children. 2. John, born in Berlin, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, 1783, died in 1835, aged fifty-two years; married Catherine 
Mantel; after living in Somerset county for thirty-five years, he re- 
moved to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he died; had eight 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 753 

children. 3. Samuel, married Rachel Montel, and had four children. 
4. Thomas, died at Johnston, Pennsylvania, in 1863, aged seventy-eight 
years; married (first) Elizabeth Lohr, of Baltimore, by whom he had 
two daughters; married (second) Elizabeth Brown, of Baltimore, by 
whom he had four sons and three daughters. 5. Nancy. 6. Catherine. 
7. Sarah. 8. Polly. 9. Amy. 10. Margaret, see forward. 11. Han- 
nah. 12. Harriet, died about 1875, aged near seventy-six; married 
Daniel Landis, who died soon after she did; they had one son. 

(IV) Margaret, daughter of John (2) and Catherine (Devlin) 
Lane, died in 1874. She married John P. Walker, and had four sons 
(see Walker III). 



This is the Jackson family from which the famous 
JACKSON "Stonewall Jackson" was descended, and has long re- 
sided in what is now West Virginia. The early an- 
cestors were of Scotch-Irish descent and moved to this part of the state 
immediately after the revolutionary war and became landowners in the 
vicinity of Clarksburg as early as 1791. The line covering the families 
of this name to be considered in this connection is as follows: 

(I) Edward Jackson, a captain in the revolutionary war, living 
then in New Jersey, near the Delaware river. After the war ended he 
emigrated from there with his family to Virginia, locating near Clarks- 
burg. He reared a family, including a son, Stephen, see forward. 

(II) Stephen, son of Edward Jackson, was between eighteen and 
twenty years of age when the family came to Virginia from New Jersey. 
He was also a revolutionary soldier and a soldier in the war of 1812. 
He served several years as an Indian scout from the West Fork river 
to the Ohio river. He Is described as having been an unusually fine 
looking man, of wonderful physique and great strength. He was a 
splendid marksman with rifle and pistol. He married a Miss Pomeroy, 
of Pomeroy, Ohio, and among their children was a son, Stephen Pom- 
eroy, see forward. 

(III) Stephen Pomeroy, son of Stephen Jackson, was born in 
1796, near Clarksburg, In what Is now West Virginia. He was reared 
on Brown's creek, at the old Jackson homestead, purchased In 1792. 
He remained there until about 1838, and removed to Janelew, Virginia, 



754 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

where he bought the first hotel, and was also a merchant and trader. 
He bought cattle, horses and hogs, as well as droves of sheep, all of 
which animals he was accustomed to drive over the mountains to Rich- 
mond, Virginia. He had a race course back of his hotel, and his horses 
often raced against the horses of Cummings Jackspn, and his nephew, 
Thomas Jackson, who became the great civil war character known as 
"Stonewall Jackson." At that time he was a young man about eighteen 
years of age, and used to ride his uncle's horses in the swift races. Isaac 
Jackson, a son of Stephen Jackson, was a chum of his in boyhood days. 

(IV) James W., son of Stephen Pomeroy Jackson, was born Feb- 
ruary I, 1833, near Clarksburg, Virginia. He was vice-president of 
the Citizens Bank of Weston for years, and was also a stockholder in 
the first railroad that was built between Clarksburg and Weston. He 
was also engaged in farming and mercantile business. He was a Dem- 
ocrat, and in his church faith was of the Baptist denomination. He 
married, January 3, 1856, Sarah Ann Goodloe, of Albemarle county, 
Virginia, by whom six children were born, including a son, John Good- 
loe, see forward. 

(V) John Goodloe, son of James W. and Sarah Ann (Goodloe) 
Jackson, was born in Janelew, Lewis county, Virginia, March 7, 1857. 
He obtained his education in the free schools of his native place and at 
private schools in Weston and Buckhannon, after which he united with 
his father in business operations, with which he was actively connected 
for over thirty-five years. In 1903 he aided in organizing the Bank of 
Janelew, which opened for business, December 7, 1903, with Mr. Jack- 
son as its president, which position he still holds. He is also interested 
in the Bank of Lost Creek, Harrison county. West Virginia, the Citi- 
zens' Bank and the Lewis County Bank at Weston, and the Farmers' 
Bank and Union National Bank of Clarksburg. He is also a director 
in a number of other institutions. He belongs to the West Virginia 
Bankers' Association. He has never sought public office, but is an 
active and influential member of the Prohibition party, having been its 
delegate to various national conventions. He is an Odd Fellow, and 
also holds membership in the Knights of Pythias fraternity. 

Mr. Jackson married (first) in 1880, Martha Jane Bassell, daugh- 
ter of Henry Bassell and wife, of Byron, and a twin sister of Mrs. Lee- 
man Maxwell. Her father was a well-known farmer and cattle raiser 
of Harrison county. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson had two sons. James H., 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 755 

born November i, 1881; graduated from Wesleyan College, Buck- 
hannon, also from State University (A. B.), and was a student in the 
Episcopal Theological Seminary at Alexandria until ill health prevent- 
ed his further work. Stephen Goodloe, see forward. Mrs. Jackson, 
the mother of these children, died in 1908. Before her marriage she 
was a successful teacher, and in church and charitable work was a life- 
long worker for others. In Sunday schools and Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union work, she was especially prominent. Mr. Jackson 
married (second) October 19, 1910, Annie Neeley, of Janelew, daugh- 
ter of Howard Neeley and wife. She is an active worker in the Bap- 
tist church. 

(VI) Stephen Goodloe, son of John Goodloe and Martha Jane 
(Bassell) Jackson, was bom at Janelew, West Virginia, March 6, 
1884. He began his education in the public schools, and later attended 
the State University, taking the degrees of Bachelor of Science and 
Bachelor of Law, the former in 1907, and the latter in 1908, after 
which he entered Yale, graduating with the degree of LL. B. in 1909. 
He then went to Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he entered the 
offices of Edward G. Smith, and became his junior partner in 191 1. 
He is especially well fitted for a large law practice, having first equip- 
ped himself for such work by ten years of college life in three institu- 
tions, including Yale. His firm occupies fine law offices at Clarksburg 
in the Merchants' National Bank building, and possesses a large law 
library. Mr. Jackson is a Prohibitionist, but when that question is 
finally settled, he says, "Then I will vote the Democratic ticket." He 
is of the Methodist Protestant faith, and holds membership with the 
Sigma Chi fraternity of West Virginia University and Phi Alpha Delta 
of Yale. He is one of the three trustees of this law fraternity at Yale. 

He married, September 4, 1907, Jessie J. Moorhead, of Morgan- 
town, born in Morgantown, December 27, 1877, daughter of William 
Moorhead, a merchant and banker of that city, of Scotch-Irish descent, 
and Alice (John) Moorhead, a native of Morgantown, born in 1852, 
still living, and a direct descendant of Governor Greenbury, one of the 
early governors of Maryland. Mrs. Jackson is a Colonial Dame and 
is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, being a 
descendant of Governor Greenbury and Captain Duncan McVicar, a 
captain in the American revolution. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jackson is Alice Moorhead, born November 8, 1908. 



756 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

The laundry business at Weston, Lewis county, West 
BAILEY Virginia, is well represented by the Weston Steam Laun- 
dry, conducted by James H. Bailey Jr., who is the son of 
James H. Bailey, who' married Amanda McCue. Young Bailey was 
born at Leading Creek, Lewis county. West Virginia, January 15, 
1874. He received his education at the free schools of his native 
county and assisted his father in the management of his farm until 
1902, when he undertook, the management of a sawmill for two years, 
at the end of which time he moved to Weston and for the next three 
years was connected with the Weston Milling Company. In 1905 he 
purchased the plant and goodwill of the Weston Steam Laundry which 
had been established six years previous. It is a modern laundry in all 
respects and the work turned out is of a superior quality. The building 
is thirty-four by sixty feet with a large boiler room attached. Mr. 
Bailey is a member of the National, Virginia and West Virginia Laun- 
drymen's Association. He belongs to Troy Lodge, No. 156, of the 
Odd Fellows order, and Weston Lodge, No. 10, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. 

He was married, September 15, 1896, Grace Farnsworth, of Gil- 
more, West Virginia. Children: Russell Brooks, born October 17, 
1897; Ethel, born November 12, 1902; Lottie Grace, bom May 26, 
1907. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey are consistent members of the Baptist 
church, and politically he is a Republican and takes a lively interest in 
all local measures and interests of his county and city. 



This is an old and honored Virginia family of Marshall 
CLARK county, where Hezekiah Clark was born at about the 

close of the revolutionary period. He operated an old- 
fashioned horse mill for grain grinding, and by its crude machinery 
was killed. He married and reared children, including a son Joseph 
Clark. 

(II) Joseph, son of Hezekiah Clark, was born in Marshall 
county, Virginia (now West Virginia), in 1820, and died in i860. 
He was by occupation a farmer, and in church faith a Wesleyan Meth- 
odist. Politically he was a Whig and a strong Abolitionist. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Clouston for his first wife. Children: Jane, Margaret 
A., William H., Asa (deceased), and Lucinda. After the death of the 





W<5>t^ (2^ay^<:_^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 757 

first wife, Mr. Clark married Mary Ann Cox, daughter of Joseph Cox. 
Children: Jason, of whom later mention will be made; Francis M., 
Thomas A., Absalom, deceased ; Hannah, Phebe A. The mother died 
March 4, 1909. 

(Ill) Jason, son of Joseph and Mary Ann (Cox) Clark, was born 
in Marshall county, West Virginia, November 19, 1850. He secured 
his education in the common schools and at Waynesburg College. He 
farmed summers and taught school winters for quite a period. In 1876 
he was a clerk in a Grange (Patrons of Husbandry) store, continuing 
there a year and a half, when he purchased the store from the Grange 
Company and conducted it two years, then sold and went to St. Joseph, 
Missouri, where he engaged in a soap factory for one year, but then 
sold out and went to railroading. Having had enough of the West, he 
returned to his old home and followed farm life a short time, and then 
engaged in clerking in a general store, where he remained until Febru- 
ary, 1890, when he went to McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and there en- 
gaged in the flour and feed business under the firm name of Louden- 
slager & Co. Here he remained four and a half years, then sold his 
interest in the business and went to Morgantown, West Virginia. In 
August, 1894, he engaged in the flour and feed trade at Morgantown, 
continuing until 1901, when he retired. He is a member of the Chris- 
tian church, of the Odd Fellows, Heptasophs, No. 31, of McKeesport, 
and Elks Lodge No. 411, of Morgantown. 

He married, October 19, 1887, Virginia A. Wolvington, daughter 
of William Wolvington. Children : Frederick H., who died in infancy; 
Raymond Earl, born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, in 1891. 



This relates to the Bumgardner family of 
BUMGARDNER which James Andrew Bumgardner, of Salem, 
belongs. 

(I) David Bumgardner was bom about 1848. He married Julia 
Carter, born in 1857, daughter of David Carter, who lived and died 
a farmer on Indian Run, Ten Mile district. He was eighty years of 
age at his death. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Bumgardner: Mary Jane, 
now Mrs. V. Bramer, born 1874, living at Adamson, West Virginia; 
James Andrew, see forward. 

(II) James Andrew, only son of David and Julia (Carter) Bum- 



758 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

gardner, was born in Harrison county, West Virginia, August 5, 1875, 
on his grandfather's farm. He was reared by his grandfather and 
attended the public schools in Ten Mile district. He continued to work 
on the farm until fifteen years old, when he learned the barber business, 
in a thorough manner, at Wilsonburg. In 1898 he went to Salem and 
the year following established a first class barber shop at that place, on 
the corner of Water and Main streets, where the First National Bank 
is now situated. In 1902, after being burned out by the disastrous fire 
of Salem in 1901, he opened his present shop in the Merchants' and 
Producers' Bank building, where he has an excellent business in his line. 
Besides his shop he owns one of the most attractive houses in Salem. 
He is a thorough-going, highly-respected, public-spirited citizen, pur- 
suing a useful trade in a satisfactory manner to a large number of cus- 
tomers. He is one of the directors in the Merchants' and Producers' 
Bank. He is a Democrat ; attends the Baptist church and is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity. 

He married, in Salem, October 5, 1899, Sylvia Randolph, born in 
Salem, March, 1875, daughter of Camden F. Randolph, who died in 
1900, aged sixty-five years, and his wife, Adaline (Davis) Randolph, 
sister of Squire Davis. Only child of Mr. and Mrs. Bumgardner: 
James Paul, born September 20, 1902. 



This relates to the Cunningham family who 
CUNNINGHAM settled In Ohio at an early day, with one of its 

number as John Cunningham, born in that 
state In 1826, died August 9, 1880. He was a carpenter by trade and 
resided at Wilsonburg, five miles distant from Clarksburg, West Vir- 
ginia, at the time of his death. He was a Democrat, and in church 
faith of the Methodist (South) denomination. He married Susan A. 
Hardy, born in Hampshire county, Virginia, died aged sixty-eight 
years in 1891. Children: William J., born November 7, 1848, died 
October 25, 1864; Ivy E., November 24, 1852, died October 18, 1877; 
Martin G., August 28, 1856; Melissa, November 20, 1861, died No- 
vember 2, 1864; Alexander M. T., of whom further. 

(II) Alexander Monroe Truman, son of John and Susan A. 
(Hardy) Cunningham, was born in Hampshire county. West Virginia, 
August 5, 1865. He received his education at the Harrison county 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 759 

schools, having accompanied the family there when a mere boy. At 
the age of nineteen years he began as a telegraph operator, and later 
became manager of the Western Union offices at Clarksburg. He re- 
mained in that company's employ for thirteen years. He leased the 
West Virginia and Pittsburgh Railway lines for a term of five years, 
from 1895 to 1900. At Clarksburg he conducted a drug store from 
1893 *^o 1900, and was the proprietor of a shoe store from 1895 to 
1900. He is now extensively engaged in real estate and erected the 
first apartment houses in the city of Clarksburg, two of which he still 
owns. "The Cunningham Apartment House," named for his mother, 
is a five-story structure. These buildings are modern throughout. He 
obtained the idea of these buildings while in New York City. He was 
general manager of the Consolidated Telephone Company for a period 
long enough to rebuild the lines. He founded the Roberts Hardware 
Company in 1905, the same being a wholesale and retail store, which 
business has so rapidly increased that extra wareroom has to be fre- 
quently added to the buildings originally employed. It is the largest 
business of its line in all the Upper Monongahela Valley. Mr. Cun- 
ningham is also president of the Cunningham Shoe Company, estabhsh- 
ed in the spring of 191 1. Having great faith in the fruit growing 
qualities of West Virginia, he is developing an orchard of fifty acres. 
His farm is nine miles west of Clarksburg, and contains one hundred 
and twenty-five acres of valuable land. He is a stockholder in the 
Union National Bank of Clarksburg. His financial interests are varied 
and many, but all seem successful. He is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, is past eminent commander of the Knights Templar, and 
past high priest of the Royal Arch Chapter. In his church faith he is a 
Presbyterian. 

He married, at Staunton, Virginia, September 10, 1900, Hattie, born 
in 1865, daughter of Samuel A. Shuttleworth, merchant and farmer, a 
native of Harrison county, Virginia; he died in 1901. 



This old English family is now represented in 
CARPENTER Salem, West Virginia, by John Woodward Car- 
penter, a prosperous farmer and much respected 
citizen. On his mother's side Mr. Carpenter descends from German 
and Scotch-Irish ancestors, thus combining four ancestral strains of 



760 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

exceptionally fine and vigorous quality. The Carpenter family traces 
its origin from John Carpenter, who in 1300 was town clerk of Lon- 
don. From him descend the numerous Carpenters of the intervening 
six centuries. 

(I) John W. Carpenter came as a, youth to Virginia from London, 
England. In his new home he engaged in farming, and for forty years 
was postmaster at Bridgeport, where for nearly one hundred years that 
office has been held by a member of this family. He married Elizabeth 
Woodward, born on the banks of the James river, near Richmond, and 
they became the parents of three sons and one daughter. Mr. Car- 
penter died in 1852, aged about fifty-five, and his widow passed away 
jn Bridgeport at the age of seventy-three. 

(II) John W. (2), son of John W. (i) and EUzabeth (Wood- 
ward) Carpenter, was born in Bridgeport. He was a house carpenter 
and cabinet-maker. He married Sarah R., born in Virginia, daughter 
of Reuben and Elizabeth (Perrell) Taylor, the former a native of 
Germany and the latter of Scotch-Irish parentage. Mr. and Mrs. 
Carpenter had three sons: Franklin, who was distinguished as a metal- 
lurgist and civil engineer, some of the foremost business men of the 
United States availing themselves of his services, he died two years ago 
in Chicago; John Woodward, mentioned below; William Andrew, em- 
ployed by the South Pennsylvania Oil Company of Salem. The father 
of these three sons passed away in 1852, at the early age of thirty-one, 
his death being the result of a fall from a house in Parkersburg on 
which he was at work. His wife, thus early left a widow, survived to 
the age of seventy-three years. 

(III) John Woodward, second son of John W. (2) and Sarah R. 
(Taylor) Carpenter, was born June 10, 1850, at Clarksburg. Owing 
to the early death of his father, he enjoyed but meager advantages of 
education, the entire period of his school attendance being only eighteen 
months. In 1863, though but thirteen years of age, he was inspired by 
military enthusiasm to run away from home in order to join the Union 
army, but his services were refused on account of his youth. His 
patriotic zeal, however, was not abated by what would have served to 
discourage most boys of his age, and he availed himself of the oppor- 
tunity to become a teamster for the army. At the age of sixteen he went 
to Kansas, where for three years he was employed on a farm, going 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 761 

thence to Chillicothe, Missouri, and there for eighteen months serving 
as a stage driver. From these wanderings Mr. Carpenter returned to 
his mother In Bridgeport, and for three years worked on the railroad, 
after which he was for nine years employed by farmers in the vicinity. 
At the end of that time he purchased a farm in the Grant district, which 
he cultivated for three years, and then transferred his attention to the 
timber business, in which he was engaged for four years in Lewis 
county. In 1900 he moved to Salem, becoming once more a team- 
ster, and he is now for the second time an independent farmer, his 
farm and residence being situated on the outskirts of Salem. He was 
one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Salem, also one 
of the organizers of the Industrial Land Company, which donated 
forty acres to the Industrial Home at Salem, this institution being for 
girls. He is largely interested in the Bayer Copper Mine in Church- 
hill county, Nevada. He is a member of Salem Lodge, No. 84, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Adoniram Chapter, No. 11, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons; Clarksburg Commandery, No. 13, Knights Templar; Wheeling 
Consistory, No. i ; Osiris Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles Mystic 
Shrine; he is the first Scottish Rite Mason as well as the oldest in Har- 
rison county. West Virginia. He is a member of the Methodist church. 
In politics he has always been a staunch Republican. 

Mr. Carpenter married, August 3, 1871, In Bridgeport, Rachel, 
born in March, 1849, daughter of Jonathan and Ellen (Hall) Stout. 
Jonathan Stout was of Bridgeport, the owner of a farm on which he 
and his children were born and on which he died in 1873, at the age of 
seventy, his widow surviving him a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Carpenter became the parents of the following children : Charles Fred- 
erick, died in 1873; Jed Taylor, superintendent of the team department 
of the Hope Gas Company and living in the house next to his father's; 
Luther Stout, an oil well driller of Salem; Sarah Ellen, at home; Fan- 
nie Susan, at home; John Herman, who is still living on the farm with 
his parents. 



This is an old Harrison county family. It is known that 

DAVIS Jacob Davis was the son of a Mr. Davis whose given name 

is now unknown to his descendants. This man lived near 

Janelew, on Hacker's Creek. He married and resided on the old home- 



762 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

stead, until, while still a young man, he was killed by being thrown 
from a horse. 

(II) Jacob Davis was bom about 1798. He married, and in his 
family was a son Samuel D. 

(III) Samuel D., son of Jacob Davis, was born in 1823, on the 
old family farm in Harrison county, died at the age of eighty-three 
years in March, 1906. He was a Seventh Day Baptist minister who 
did missionary work all over West Virginia. At one time he was 
pastor of the church at Salem for three years. He married (first) 

Ford. He married (second) Elizabeth Randolph, born in 

Salem, died at the age of seventy-eight years in 1905. Children by 
first wife: S. Orlando, living on the old homestead; and two other sons. 
By second wife: Boothe C, president of Alfred University, New 
York; M. Wardner, of whom later; Samuel H., of Westerly, Rhode 
Island, a lawyer; and Simeon G., twin of Samuel H., who died at the 
age of seven years. 

(IV) M. Wardner, son of Samuel D. and Elizabeth (Randolph) 
Davis, was born at the old homestead in Harrison county. West Vir- 
ginia, April 12, 1865. He attended the Janelew schools, later taking a 
course in the business department of Alfred University, New York. 
He aided his father on his farm until twenty-five years old. In 1 890 
he went to Salem and engaged in a mercantile business with J. A. Ran- 
dolph, under the firm name of Davis & Randolph. After one year Mr. 
Randolph withdrew and M. H. Van Horn went in, changing the firm 
name to Davis & Van Horn. This partnership existed for twelve years, 
when Mr. Davis withdrew, on account of ill health, and took charge 
of the Salem Brick plant for two years. Then with E. O. Davis, he 
engaged in a department store business, which continued three years. 
On January i, 19 12, Mr. Davis succeeded to the Salem Concrete Com- 
pany at Salem, taking over a one-half interest of the same, and becom- 
ing the manager. This company deals in all kinds of concrete work, 
handling lime, sand, cement, wall plaster, crushed stone and concrete 
blocks. The firm is composed of E. M. Randolph, M. Wardner Davis 
and E. O. Davis. Mr. Davis has served for several years as member 
of the city council of Salem. He is a director of the Merchants and 
Producers Bank of Salem. He is also a member of the board of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 763 

directors of Salem College. Politically Mr. Davis is a Prohibitionist 
and in his church faith is one of the Seventh Day Baptists. 

He married, August 13, 1891, at Lost Creek, Harrison county, 
Ivie Alverda, born at Lost Creek, February 11, 1870, daughter of 
William B. Van Horn, born at Lost Creek, died in 191 1, aged sixty- 
three years. Mr. Van Horn followed farming all his life. He married 
Elsie Kennedy, born at the last named place in 1850, died May 24, 
1904. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have had three children: Nina Lorena, 
died seventeen years ago, in her infancy; Courtland Van Horn, born 
September 3, 1895, is attending Salem College at Salem; Alberta, born 
March 21, 1899. 



Distinctively a family who emigrated from Ireland, 
LEONARD the Leonards became citizens of America and, faith- 
ful to every trust and duty imposed, they have been 
a blessing to the land of their adoption. It was only three generations 
ago that William Leonard, when but a young and vigorous man, emi- 
grated to this country with his young wife to seek out a home free from 
the tyranny of the British government. He never lived in West Vir- 
ginia, however; but settled in Ohio about 1820. 

(II) William (2), son of William (i) Leonard, was born in 
Highland county, Ohio, in 1824, died at Center Point, Doddridge 
county. West Virginia, in 1881. After the civil war he resided at 
Cherry Camp. He enlisted under Captain Alexander C. Moore, in 
Battery E, First West Virginia Regiment, Light Artillery Volunteers, 
and served throughout the conflict between the north and south from 
1 86 1 to 1865. By trade he was a blacksmith. Politically he voted the 
Republican ticket, while in religious faith he was of the Methodist 
church. He married Prudence Bennett, who died in 1896, aged sixty- 
nine years. Children, of whom five still survive: Elizabeth, widow of 
A. G. Kiddy, now deceased, resides at Buckhannon, West Virginia; 
Martha J., now Mrs. M. N. Campbell, of Missouri; Alice, Mrs. 
George V. Brown, widow; Kate, Mrs. J. H. Bailey, residing in Lewis 
county, this state; and William Edward, of whom presently. 

(III) William Edward, youngest child of William (2) and Pru- 
dence (Bennett) Leonard, was born January 14, 1858, in Upshur 
county. West Virginia. When ten years of age his parents removed to 



764 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Harrison county, this state, settling at Cherry Camp, now Bristol, 
where young Leonard was educated. He learned the blacksmith's 
trade of his father who had a shop at Bristol. He worked away at the 
glowing forge until he was twenty-one years old; then went to Salem, 
West Virginia, in 1880, and started a shop on his own account, which 
he conducted twenty-three years. In 1903, he gave his attention en- 
tirely to his present business of handling buggies and wagons, which 
business he had purchased in December, 1 898. He sold his blacksmith 
shop in 1903, but still owns the building. He has a fine residence prop- 
erty. Politically Mr. Leonard is a Republican. He belongs to the 
Masonic, Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias fraternities; in church 
affairs holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal society. 

He married December 28, 1882, Fannie Keesy, who was born, at 
Boothsville, 1856, daughter of Noah Keesy, who died in 1904, aged 
seventy-four years. Mr. Keesy was a soldier in the Union army during 
the civil war, and was a carpenter and cabinet-maker, following these 
trades at Bristol all his active life. His wife was Casander Harden, 
who died about 1901. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard 
were: Pearl, born 1884, at home, unmarried; Eva, bom 1886, died at 
six years of age; Hallie K., born 1888, at home, teaching In public 
schools at Salem; Maggie, died aged two years, at the same time as 
Eva, and both of scarlet fever; Willa A., born 1892, a teacher at Wil- 
sonsburg, 1912; Charles C, born 1895, attending the public schools 
in 1912; Valma, born 1898, at school. 



Joseph Martin Wood, a well-known, active and experi- 

WOOD enced business man of Morgantown, who may feel justly 

proud of the success he has attained, and who enjoys the 

confidence and respect of his many employees in a large degree, is a 

son of John S. Wood and grandson of Joseph Wood, a resident of 

Juniata county, Pennsylvania. 

John S. Wood, mentioned above, was born In Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 18 1 8. He was a bridge builder by occupation, and located 
at Parkersburg, West Virginia. He married Elizabeth Smith, of 
Parkersburg, and their children were : Edward V., John W., George S. 
and Joseph Martin (see forward). 

Joseph Martin Wood, son of John S. and Elizabeth (Smith) 




.^^b'Ti^c^-^-z^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 765 

Wood, was born in Tyler county, near Sistersville, West Virginia, April 
12, 1855. He attended the common schools in the neighborhood of his 
home, and at the early age of eleven years began his active career. His 
first position was as errand boy in a dry goods store in Wheeling, West 
Virginia, and later he was clerk with Bloch Brothers, engaged in the 
tobacco business. In 1876 he took up his residence in Morgantown, 
West Virginia, and engaged in mercantile business with G. W. John & 
Company, continuing until 1880, when he removed to Scottdale, Penn- 
sylvania, where he engaged In the same line of trade, establishing a 
store which he conducted until 1890, when he removed the stock to 
Morgantown and continued conducting it for four years. In April, 
1894, he was one of the Incorporators of the Morgantown Planing 
Mill Company, and in the following year purchased the interests of the 
other incorporators and became sole owner. He remained alone until 
1 901, when he took his son, George W. Wood, Into partnership. The 
business was successful from the beginning, and in August, 19 10, when 
he disposed of the plant to the Crystal Tumbler Company, it was num- 
bered among the largest enterprises In the city. It was the oldest plan- 
ing mill in the city, was equipped with the most modern machinery for 
turning out every kind of work in the line of wood for house building 
and construction, and gave constant employment to a number of men, 
whom he treated with the utmost consideration, keeping the old hands 
employed during depressing periods even at a personal loss, which fact 
endeared him to many oi them. Being a man of strict integrity, up- 
rightness of character and strength of purpose, he was chosen to fill Im- 
portant offices, and served as president of the Freeland Oil Company, 
vice-president of the Athens Building & Loan Company, and director 
of the Citizens' National Bank, the Federal Savings & Trust Company, 
and as president of the Crystal Tumbler Company. He was also select- 
ed to serve in the responsible position of mayor of Scottdale, Pennsyl- 
vania, and was a member of the council of Morgantown. He Is a mem- 
ber and trustee of the Methodist Episcopal church, and also holds mem- 
bership in the Free and Accepted Masons, lodge and chapter, and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Wood married, December 29, 1875, Ella John, daughter of 
Dr. George W. John; she died in June, 1902. Children: i. Blanche, 



766 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

married Harry D. Wintringer; one son, Harry D. Jr. 2. Daisie W., 
married Lewis D. Bell; died September i8, 191 1. 3. George W., 
engaged in the fire insurance and real estate business; married Mary 
Wintringer, and they have one son, John W. 



This family originally emigrated from Germany to Amer- 
POST ica, the earliest member of the family being George Post, 

a native of Germany, born during the last half of the eight- 
eenth century, who evidently came to this country when yet a young 
man. He married and had a son named Jacob. 

(II) Jacob, son of the German ancestor, George Post, was born 
in what is now West Virginia. He followed farming pursuits and died 
in the seventies near Good Hope. He married and reared a family of 
ten children, among whom one son was John Burnside, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(III) John Burnside, son of Jacob Post, was born March 26, 
1842, near Good Hope, West Virginia, died November 23, 1890. He 
served as a teamster in the Union army during the civil war; but was a 
farmer by general occupation. He also conducted a general store at 
Jarvisville with his son M. R. Post, who still runs the business. He 
married Mary Adams, a native of Harrison county. West Virginia, 
born June 19, 1846, who is still living on the old homestead, situated 
near Jarvisville. John Adams, her father, lived on Kinchelow creek, 
Harrison county, and died at the same place. He was a soldier in the 
Union army from 1861 to 1865. Children: M. Luther, died Novem- 
ber, 1899; Mrs. Ella Jarvis, of Springdale, Arkansas; M. R. Post, of 
Jarvisville, this state; Mrs. Edith May Farris, living in Doddridge 
county. West Virginia; William S., of Cannon City, Colorado; Mrs. 
Sophrona Summerville, lives at Buckhannon, West Virginia; Howard 
Benjamin Franklin, of whom further; Hiram O., of Clarksburg; Tru- 
man A., on a farm, near Jarvisville; A. Earl, living on the old home- 
stead with his mother and wife. 

(IV) Howard Benjamin Franklin, son of John Burnside and Mary 
(Adams) Post, was born June 23, 1 874, near Jarvisville, West Virginia, 
on the old Post homestead still belonging to the family. He attend- 
ed school until eighteen years of age and then went to the academy at 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 767 

Buckhannon for three years. He then taught the "Post School" at 
Sycamore, Harrison county, for two years. In 1896 he went to Clarks- 
burg where he took a position as manager of the grocery department 
of the big Lounds store. After two years in that position, he opened a 
general store at West Milford, Harrison county, with his father-in- 
law, John W. Gaston, and remained there three years; then sold out 
and traveled one year for the Armstrong, Crislip, Day Company 
wholesale grocers. Resigning, he went back with the Lounds Com 
pany again as their manager in the grocery department; also having 
charge of hardware and queensware goods in the department house 
and was there seven years. In May, 1909, having resigned from the 
Lounds Company, he established himself in the real estate business 
He also does insurance work, and his offices are at 307-308 Goff Build 
ing. In 19 12 Mr. Post, with his brother, M. R. Post, and Lee Stout, 
organized the Post-Stout Land Company, and purchased the old Craw- 
ford homestead, consisting of one hundred and three acres, adjoining 
the town of North View, a suburb of Clarksburg. This property they 
have laid out in town lots, reserving a portion for factory sites. They 
also donated a large strip of this land along the West Fork of the 
Monongahela river to the board of trade, for free factory sites. This 
beautiful suburb is called Arlington, adjoining the city on the north, 
and promises to become one of the attractive suburbs of the city. The 
Baltimore & Ohio railroad borders the property over one mile. Polit- 
ically Mr. Post is a Republican. He is a member of the Odd Fellows, 
and belongs to the First Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In 1896, he married, near West Milford, West Virginia, Mary E. 
Gaston, born October 20, 1875, in Harrison county, a daughter of 
John W. and Maria (Burnside) Gaston, both natives of Harrison 
county. Mr. Gaston died March 29, 19 10, aged seventy-two years. 
Mrs. Gaston is living at West Milford, aged seventy-two years. Mr. 
Gaston was a farmer and from an old and prominent family. Chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Post are: Harold, born May 9, 1897; Lena 
Virginia, May 25, 1898; Rachel Adelia, March 26, 1902; George Ed- 
ward, July 5, 1906. All are at home and three are attending the public 
schools of Clarksburg. 



768 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Of German origin, this Coffman family have been 
COFFMAN residents of America since the Colonial days, just 

prior to the Revolutionary war. The line to James 
Miller Coffman, of Clarksburg, West Virginia, runs as follows: Abra- 
ham, the German emigrant — David, born in Pennsylvania, about 1789 
— Samuel, born 1823 — and James Miller Coffman, bom 1858. 

(I) Abraham Coffman, emigrated from Germany when a young 
man, before the war for independence in this country, and located in 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania. There he married and had children, 
including a son David. 

(II) David, son of Abraham Coffman, was born in Pemisylvania, 
died at the age of eighty-two years, in 1871. He became a well-to-do 
farmer. He married and had children among whom was a son Samuel. 

(III) Samuel, son of David Coffman, was born in Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, July 10, 1823, and is still residing in the county in which 
he was born, leading a retired life. He has been by occupation a farm- 
er, and hired a substitute during the civil war. Politically he votes the 
Republican ticket. In his church faith he is of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian denomination. He married (first) Margaret Core, a native of 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, who died when her son James M. was 
but an infant. John Core, the father of Mrs. Margaret (Core) Coff- 
man, was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania ; was a farmer and died 
in his native county, aged seventy-five years, about 1867; he had a 
large family. Mr. Coffman married (second) Hannah Ace, who 
is still living. By the first marriage, Mr. Coffman had four children, 
all now living: Mary, wife of William Milyard; Loretta, wife of Wal- 
ter Rowan; James Miller; and Elizabeth, single. By the second mar- 
riage, there were seven children: George, deceased; David, of Dawson, 
Pennsylvania; Isaac, deceased; Gibson, deceased; Rebecca, wife of 
Isaac Balsinger; Frank, living with his father; William, deceased. 

(IV) James Miller, son of Samuel and Margaret (Core) Coff- 
man, was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, August 13, 1858, on 
his father's farm. He received a common school education. He assist- 
ed on his father's farm until he reached his majority, when he was em- 
ployed in the Ludington Brick Works, at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, 
for three years. In 1880, he went to Clarksburg, West Virginia, where 
he worked as a journeyman brick-maker for a number of years. In 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 769 

1888, he commenced as a contractor in brick work, in building struc- 
tures, such as the courthouse in Spence and Roane, as well as several 
of the asylums in Roane county ; also the well-known armory building at 
Morgantown. The Baptist church, the Louchery building, the Homer 
building, and many other structures of an imposing and massive char- 
acter, are all his handiwork as a mason and contractor. He established 
his present extensive brick plant at Clarksburg, on West Pike street, in 
19 10, and now employs eighteen men in the production of a superior 
quality of building brick. He is a stockholder in the Union National 
Bank of his home city; president of the Broad Oak Development Com- 
pany and in many other avenues of industry is materially interested. He 
votes the Republican ticket. He is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias fraternity and is in church faith a Methodist Episcopalian. 

He married in Clarksburg, December 23, 1881, Emma M. Tate, 
a native of Clarksburg, West Virginia, who died February 22, 1909, 
aged forty-nine years. Her father was O. H. Tate, a well-known 
blacksmith, who died in 1901. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Coffman : 
Elsie D., born in 1882, wife of Dr. Halterman, of Clarksburg, whose 
sketch follows; Oscar S., died in infancy; William Ray, born 1891, 
assists his father and attends school at Swarthmore Preparatory; Jessie 
Lottie, died aged eleven years; Margaret Louise, born in 1896, attend- 
ing the Bristol School, at Washington, D. C. 



This family originally lived in Old Virginia, but 
HALTERMAN this branch of it is now represented at Clarks- 
burg by Dr. Charles W. Halterman. 
(I) William Halterman was born at Monterey, Highland county, 
Virginia, about 1830, and died 1890. By occupation he was a farmer 
and by profession a school teacher. In his religious faith, he was of 
the United Brethren church, while politically he voted the Whig and 
Republican tickets. He married, in Freemansburg, Lewis county, West 
Virginia, Nellie Simmons, daughter of David and Sarah Simmons, born 
in Highland county, Virginia, in 1839, died in 1889. The children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. William Halterman were: Andrew Columbus, 
deceased; James B., of Freemansburg; Sarah E., single; Thomas J.; 
Martha, deceased; Peter Grant, of Freemansburg; Dr. Charles W., of 



770 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

whom later; William G., of Wolf's Summit, West Virginia; W. Scott, 
of Harrisburg, Ohio; Benjamin Franklin, Freemansburg; Joseph 
Clark, New York City; one died in infancy. 

(II) Charles Warner Halterman, M. D., the seventh child and 
fifth son of William and Nellie (Simmons) Halterman, was born April 
30, 1868, at Freemansburg, Lewis county. West Virginia, and remain- 
ed at home on the farm until seventeen years of age. He obtained his 
education at the public schools, the Normal School and Classic Acad- 
emy, Buckhannon, West Virginia, and he graduated in 1889 from the 
Electic Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio. He then attended the New 
York Post-Graduate Medical School; and took at the Harvard Medical 
School, Boston, the post-graduate course in neurology. These various 
institutions of higher and professional learning have peculiarly fitted 
the doctor for the manifold duties of a successful physician and sur- 
geon. He began the practice of medicine when twenty-one years of 
age, at Jarvisville, Harrison county, West Virginia, remaining there 
in practice twelve years. In January, 1901, he went tO' Clarksburg 
where he has been practicing ever since with well-equipped offices, in 
the Knights of Pythias building, on South Third street. He was the 
health officer for Harrison county, from 1903 to 1909; served as a 
member of the city council of Clarksburg; has been a member of the 
state board of health since 1909, his term ending in 19 13; member of 
the board of education, Clarksburg Independent district, 1910-11; 
medical inspector, schools of Clarksburg, 1911-12. Among profes- 
sional societies he has been an ex-president of the Harrison County 
Medical Society; vice-president West Virginia Society of Social Hy- 
giene. He is connected with the following civic orders : Jackson Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Adoniram Royal Arch Chapter, 
No. 11; Clarksburg Commandery, No. 13, Knights Templar; Osiris 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles Mystic Shrine, of Wheeling; 
Clarksburg Lodge, No. 482, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
He and the family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at 
Clarksburg. 

He married, July 17, 1902, at Clarksburg, Elsie Dinsmore Coff- 
man, born at Clarksburg, April 16, 1882. She is the daughter of 
James M. and Emma Coffman. Mr. Coffman is a manufacturer of 
brick and engaged in real estate business. (See Coffman IV). Mr. 
and Mrs. Halterman have no children. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 771 

This is the family to which Dr. Frederick M. Boso, of 
BOSO Weston, Lewis county belongs. His parents, Monroe A. 
and Mary C. (Flinn) Boso, were both natives of West 
Virginia. Monroe A. Boso was the son of John A. and Serena (Smith) 
Roseau (as they spelled the name). Monroe A. was reared in his 
native state and is an extensive oil operator (independent) residing at 
Parkersburg. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Monroe A. Boso were: 
Frederick M., of whom further; Lowell; Delma. Politically Mr. Boso 
is a Democrat, and in church choice he favors the Methodist Episcopal. 
Dr. Frederick M. Boso was born February 18, 1882, at Parkers- 
burg, West Virginia. He was educated at Parkersburg, attended the 
high school of that city, and later entered the University of St. Louis 
from which he graduated in 1902 with the degree of A. B. While in 
college he was active in his student activities, being captain of the sopho- 
more football team and later a member of the Varsity team. After he 
graduated he matriculated in the medical department of the same insti- 
tution, graduating as a doctor of medicine in 1906. He then spent one 
year as the clinic's assistant — Professor Goldstein — in ear, nose and 
throat diseases. He still continues his studies in this line, making this 
branch a specialty. Upon leaving St. Louis he was appointed relief 
physician for the Coal and Coke Railroad Company of West Virginia, 
which position he accepted and filled until he resigned to locate in the 
general practice of medicine at Weston, in 19 10. He belongs to the Uni- 
versity of St. Louis Medical Alumni Association, the American, West 
Virginia, Lewis-Upshur counties medical associations and societies. 
He Is now president of the board of health, and surgeon of the West 
Virginia National Guard. He is a member of Bennett Lodge, No. 46, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Bigelow Chapter, No. 4, Royal 
Arch Masons; the Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America, Mod- 
ern Woodmen of the World, and the Eagles, he being the examining 
physician of all these fraternities. He manifests a true and loyal public 
spirit In all local affairs, both city and county. 

He was married in 1905 to Leola Law, of Lewis county, daughter 
of A. D. Law and wife. One daughter by this marriage: Luclle, born 
February 23, 1908. 



772 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Dr. Melville Logan Casselberry, a successful 
CASSELBERRY and esteemed member of the medical fraternity 

of Morgantown, who is well known for ability, 
skill and success, was born at Evansburg, Montgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania, November 29, 1830. 

(I) William Casselberry, the first of the line here under consid- 
eration, resided in the vicinity of Norristown, Pennsylvania, where he 
was engaged in the tilling of the soil, from which he derived a remuner- 
ative living. After a life of activity and usefulness, he passed away in 

the year 1850, in his eighty-fifth year. He married Catherine , 

and among their children was John, see forward. 

(II) John, son of William Casselberry, was born on his father's 
farm in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, in 1802, died there Sep- 
tember 7, 1834. He was reared upon the farm, attended the common 
schools of the neighborhood, and in early life served an apprenticeship 
at the trade of tanner, which line of work he followed throughout the 
active years of his life, owning and operating quite an extensive plant 
for that day. He married Rebecca, daughter of Daniel Morgan, a 
farmer of Montgomery county, Pennsylvania; she died October 15, 
1893. Children: Daniel M., born 1825; David, 1827; Melville 
Logan, see forward; Catherine Jane, 1833, married Harry Bonsall. 

(III) Dr. Melville Logan, son of John Casselberry, attended a 
school in Germantown conducted by Professor William Collum, and 
after completing his studies there entered the Collegeville College of 
Pennsylvania, from which institution in 1850 he went to the Homoeo^ 
pathic College of Pennsylvania, graduating with degree of M. D. in 
1853, having previously read medicine in the office of Dr. William A. 
Gardner, of Philadelphia. He began the active practice of his pro- 
fession at Millville, New Jersey, where he remained for a short period 
of time, and then attended a course of lectures at the Pennsylvania 
Homoeopathic Medical College, thus supplementing the knowledge 
gained in his alma mater. In March, 1855, he located in Morgan- 
town, West Virginia, and after a residence of one year there, during 
which he practiced his profession, removed to Moline, Illinois, where 
he remained for two months, and then took up his residence in Norris- 
town, Pennsylvania, where he practiced for two and a half years, and 
in November, 1859, returned to Morgantown, where he has since built 




y..^-m^f-)C\ ( ^ 



Tp^Jxi C ^k^>~^ 




hi. ^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 773 

up an extensive practice, which increased steadily year by year, and his 
kind and sympathetic nature, coupled with his accurate Icnowledge of 
disease and its cure, has won for him the esteem of his patients, espe- 
cially is this true in the treatment of children's diseases. He is a mem- 
ber of the Homoeopathic Medical Society of West Virginia and Ohio 
and of the American Institute of Homoeopathy. Since 1855 he has 
been affiliated with the Free and Accepted Masons, being a member 
of Morgantown Lodge, No. 4, of which he has been treasurer for the 
past forty-three years, and was one of the organizers and charter mem- 
bers of Morgan Lodge, No. 1762, Knights of Honor. Mr. Cassel- 
berry is a Presbyterian, as is also Mrs. Casselberry. 

Dr. Casselberry married (first), May 10, 1859, Mary Ellen, 
daughter of Senator Waitman T. Willey. She died without issue, in 
August, 1862. He married (second), October 4, 1866, Margaret, 
daughter of John Protzman, of Morgantown, West Virginia. Chil- 
dren: I. Mary, married Louis Lindemuth; one child, Marian B. 2. 
Byron W., married Frances Ethel Lucas; four children: Frances E., 
Byron W. Jr., Melville Logan, Ellen Brown. 3. John L., married 
Cora May Templeton, of Waterville, New York; children: Margaret 
Amelia and Janet. 



A family of English descent, as far as we 
HIGGINBOTHAM know the first of the family arrived in this 

country in 1634. He was thirty-four years 
old and came out in the "Bonaventure." We next hear of a John 
Higginbotham with his wife and servants living in the town of St. 
Michaels, Barbadoes Isle. As there is a lapse of time between their 
emigration and Charles II., we conclude that they went back and came 
out again. These are probably the two previous generations to the 
John Higginbotham, of Charles the Second's time. 

(I) John Higginbotham, probably the third in line from the 
original English emigrant, and the direct ancestor of those now living 
in the two Virginias at this time, was sent out by Charles II. to prospect 
for government lands. He came to America in the winter, and con- 
tracting a severe cold while land prospecting, he died the following 
spring. He brought with him from England his wife and five children. 



774 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

His wife was Frances Riley (or Raleigh) . His children were: Moses, 
Aaron, John, of whom further; James, and Anne. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) and Frances (Riley) Higgin- 
botham, married Rachel Banks, whose mother was a Staunton. They 
had twelve children: i. Thomas, born June 10, 1769; died unmarried. 
2. James, born September 22, 1770. 3. John, of whom further. 4. 
Anne Staunton, born December 20, 1773; died unmarried. 5. David, 
born October 17, 1775 ; married Mary E. LaGariques. 6. Mary, born 
November i, 1777; died unmarried. 7. Jesse, bom December 23, 
1778; died single. 8. Daniel, born March 27, 1781; died single. 9. 
Tersa, born February 17, 1782; married John London. 10. Frances 
Riley, born May 10, 1785; married Major Reuben Coleman. 11. 
Eugene, born March 10, 1787; died single. 12. Reuben, bom August 
2, 1789; married Miss Vaughn, of Kentucky. 

(III) John (3), son of John (2) and Rachel (Banks) Higgin- 
botham, was born April 12, 1772, in Amherst county, Virginia. He 
became a noted Virginia merchant and he, with his brother, was of the 
"Seven prince merchants" of Virginia in their day. He was born too 
late for service in the war for independence, and probably saw no mili- 
tary service. On December 7, 18 15, at "Soldier's Joy," Nelson county, 
Virginia, he married Margaret Washington Cabell, daughter of Colo- 
nel Samuel Jordan Cabell, of revolutionary fame, and his wife Sarah 
(Syme) Cabell, a half sister of Patrick Henry. The children of John 
and Margaret W. (Cabell) Higginbotham were: William Thomas, 
see below, and Laura. 

(IV) William Thomas, son of John (3) and Margaret W. 
(Cabell) Higginbotham, was bom at "Soldier's Joy," Nelson county, 
Virginia, in 18 19; died November 25, 1892. He became a prosperous 
farmer and also followed surveying. Politically he was a Democrat, 
and in church faith an Episcopalian. In 1848 he immigrated to Lewis 
county, in what is now known as West Virginia, locating six miles west 
of Buckhannon. He married, August 22, 1839, at "Soldier's Joy," 
Nelson county, Virginia, Mary Frances Coleman, born in East Vir- 
ginia, died July 31, 1871. She was a daughter of Reuben Coleman, a 
Virginian, of English and Scotch descent, who during the war of 18 12 
held the rank of major. Children born to William T. and and Mary 
Frances (Coleman) Higginbotham: John Carleton, of whom further; 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 775 

Hon. Coleman Cabell, of whom further; Frances, deceased; Margaret 
Emeline, deceased; Ella, deceased; Lucy C, living at "Glen Esk," 
Upshur county, Virginia; Rosalie Anne, deceased. 

(V) John Carleton Higginbotham, son of William T. and Mary 
Frances (Coleman) Higginbotham, was born in November, 1842. 
When the Civil war broke out he was eighteen years of age. He raised 
a company known as the "Upshur County Grays," of which he was 
immediately elected captain. They were located at Philippi, West Vir- 
ginia, at the time of Porterfield's retreat, and his was the only com- 
pany that carried off its baggage. He was under fire at the skirmish at 
Middle Fork Bridge, and was later in the battle of Rich Mountain and 
Allegheny Mountain. In the spring of 1862 he was promoted to 
major of the Twenty-fifth Virginia Infantry and was at the battle of 
McDowell and Cedar Creek. At the battle of Manassas he was 
wounded three times. For gallantry on the field, he was promoted to 
Colonel, being at that time but twenty years of age. At the battle of 
Gettysburg he was commanding his regiment and there wounded. In 
the spring campaign of 1864, his regiment fired the first guns in the 
battle of the Wilderness. He was in that series of fierce battles until 
May 10, 1864, when the brave Confederate officer having been pro- 
moted to brigadier general, was killed at the age of twenty-one years, 
at the battle of Spottsylvania Court House. 

(V) Hon. Coleman Cabell Higginbotham, second son of William 
Thomas and Mary Frances (Coleman) Higginbotham, was born in 
1850, at "Glen Esk," Upshur county. West Virginia. He attended the 
public schools and also had the advantage of the best private instructors. 
He then read law and went to Bowling Green, Missouri, where he 
continued his legal studies, and was admitted to the Missouri bar when 
only nineteen years of age. This was in 1869, and the following year 
he returned to Buckhannon, West Virginia, where he has ever since con- 
ducted a large law practice. Politically, Mr. Higginbotham is a Dem- 
ocrat, and is a communicant of the Episcopal church. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Blue Lodge, Chapter and 
Commandery. He is one of the directors of the Peoples Bank of West 
Virginia, at Buckhannon. 

He married Mary Ida Day, bom in Buckhannon, West Virginia, a 
descendant of Hon. Samuel Mathews, captain-general and governor of 



776 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Virginia from 1624 to 1660, when he died; also a descendant of Jacob 
Warwick and Richard Bennett of colonial fame. Mrs. Higginbotham's 
father was Richard Henry Blount Day, physician and surgeon, and her 
mother was Martha Jane Woods, daughter of Captain George Woods, 
of Albemarle county, Virginia, and his wife, Jane (Mathews) Woods. 
Children of Mrs. Higginbotham's parents: Mary Ida, Fannie Lee, 
Edward Leslie and Millie. Mr. and Mrs. Higginbotham's children 
are: Mary Frances, Jessie Woods, Lula Coleman, Lotta Lee, Virginia 
Day, all at home. 



This family came from Pennsylvania, and is not numer- 
FERRY ously represented in West Virginia. The proprietor of 
the Ferry Printery and the Fairyland Theatre, of Weston, 
Lewis county. West Virginia, is James W. Ferry, a native of Punx- 
sutawney, Pennsylvania, born August 30, 1872. He is the son of 
Andrew Jackson and Mary Caroline (Rishell) Ferry. The father 
was a sturdy Pennsylvania farmer and conducted a temperance hotel 
at Punxsutawney for many years. 

James W. Ferry was educated at the public schools, and served as 
a soldier in the late Spanish-American war, from Ohio. He came to 
Weston, January 6, 1892, and engaged in the restaurant business which 
line he followed three years, then sold out and opened a bowling alley, 
which he soon brought to paying condition, and sold to engage in the 
wholesale manufacture of ice cream. After building up a good busi- 
ness in this line he sold at a profit and engaged next in the job printing 
business, also conducting the Fairyland Theatre, of which he is the 
owner. Fraternally he is a member of Lodge No. 322, of the Junior 
Order of United Mechanics, and Cameron Lodge, No. 17, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons. He with his family attends the Methodist 
Episcopal church. In political matters, he is a Republican, and is active 
in party work, having been sent as a delegate to various conventions. 
Since coming to Weston this energetic young business man has accumu- 
lated considerable property and now has a good home and an interest- 
ing family about him. 

Mr. Ferry was united in marriage to Flora Andrews, in Clarks- 
burg, and they are the parents of James Frederick Ferry, born August 
14, 1902, and Thomas Andrews Ferry, born November 10, 19 10. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 777 

The family of which Dr. George Snyder, of Weston, 
SNYDER West Virginia, is a worthy member, came from Harri- 
sonburg, Virginia, at an early date and the members 

were generally farmers. George Snyder was the pioneer of the family 

in these parts. 

(I) George Snyder, of Harrisonburg, Virginia, married Elizabeth 
Dean. Children: Robert S., of whom further; Thomas M., Aljourn, 
Luverna, Simon, George L. In politics the father, George Snyder, was 
a Democrat and in his church faith adhered to the creed of the Southern 
Methodists. 

(II) Robert S., eldest child of George and Elizabeth (Dean) 
Snyder, was a native of West Virginia, and followed farming for a 
livelihood. Politically he was a Democrat, and in religion was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Lucinda Fisher, 
daughter of David and Lydia (Springston) Fisher, of Weston, West 
Virginia. Their children were: David, born January 5, 1858; Mary 
E., born February 14, i860; George, mentioned below. 

(III) Dr. George Snyder, youngest child of Robert S. and Lu- 
cinda (Fisher) Snyder, was born in Weston, West Virginia, October 
24, 1 863. Owing to the death of his parents when he was a child about 
two and one-half years of age, he went to live with his Grandmother 
Fisher, who was a widow, and grew up on her farm, two and one-half 
miles out of Weston. He worked on this farm and attended the public 
schools of his native place until he was about twenty years of age, 
when he commenced teaching school and preparing to enter the medical 
profession. He attended the Glenvllle State Normal School and enter- 
ed the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating In 
1889, since which time he has been a successful physician at Weston. 
He was appointed first assistant in the West Virginia Hospital for the 
Insane, and served two years, 1 897-99. He Is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias lodge; the Woodmen of America; the Lewis County Med- 
ical Society; the West Virginia Medical Society, and has been a mem- 
ber of the West Virginia board of pension examiners since 1889. He 
has been and is now on the surgical staff of the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road Company; examining physician for several leading Insurance com- 
panies, and the Weston Knights of Pythias lodge. He Is a stockholder 
in the Citizens' Bank at Weston, also a stockholder and director in the 



778 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Lewis County Bank of Weston. Politically the doctor is a Republican, 
and was member of the city council in Weston, 1901-02. In church 
matters he and his family are of the Baptist church. 

He married (first), October 2, 1891, Lulu May Gibson, born 
September 30, 1869, died 1905. Children: Ava Rill, bom April 3, 
1893; Laura Madge, born September 30, 1896; Robert G., born No- 
vember 26, 1899; Wilma, born September 29, 1902. He married 
(second), March 28, 1907, Irene Belle, born January 13, 1883, daugh- 
ter of Marshall and Mary E. Turner, of Weston, West Virginia. 



This is an old family of the Shenandoah valley, Vir- 
CONRAD ginia. The following paragraphs give what is now 

obtainable regarding the line of which the present 
clerk of the circuit court of Lewis county. West Virginia, John H. Con- 
rad, Is a representative, as well as the genealogy on his mother's side — 
the Skidmore and Corley families, connected by intermarriage. 

(I) Joseph Conrad is supposed to have been the Immigrant ances- 
tor of the Conrads. He married Rebecca Sonnar and had children, 
including a son George. 

(II) George, son of Joseph and Rebecca (Sonnar) Conrad, was 
born In Shenandoah county, Virginia, October 3, 1800, died Decem- 
ber 18, 1876. With his family, he came from Rappahannock county, 
Virginia, In 1846, and resided near Bridgeport, Harrison county, now 
in West Virginia, until 1852, when he purchased land and settled on the 
headwaters of Freeman's Creek, Lewis county. A few years later he 
purchased and moved to a farm on the West Fork river, near Bush's 
Mills, which was afterwards called Roanoke, In Lewis county, where 
he resided until the time of his death. George Conrad was by trade a 
shoemaker. He married, September 20, 1825, In Culpeper county, 
Virginia, Marianne, born In Frederick county, Virginia, June 7, 1807, 
died March 26, 1893, daughter of Peter and Rebecca (Rout) Priest. 
Children: Rebecca Elizabeth, born May 12, 1827; Joseph Peter, born 
September 21, 1829; George Washington, born May 31, 1832; Isaac 
Newton, born September 24, 1834; James Franklin, mentioned below; 
Thomas Francis, September 10, 1839; Mary Catherine, born August 
19, 1842; William Edward, bom January 25, 1846. 

(III) James Franklin, son of George and Marianne (Priest) 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 779 

Conrad, was bom October 27, 1836, died October 15, 1887. He was 
a farmer and politically was a Republican. He took, sides with the 
Union cause during civil war days and was employed by the United 
States government in the capacity of dispatch bearer and teamster 
while the war lasted. While bearing a dispatch, he was wounded 
severely, being shot by the bushwhackers at Bulltown, West Virginia, 
while delivering his message at that point. He married, September 23, 
1868, Virginia Corley, died July 24, 1892, daughter of James Madison 
and Edith (Skidmore) Corley. Children: John Henry, mentioned be- 
low; Edith, born January 19, 1871; Cecil Corley, born December 2, 
1874; Mary Ann, born December 20, 1878; Deborah, born October 
25, 1880. 

(IV) John Henry, eldest child of James Franklin and Virginia 
(Corley) Conrad, was born July 14, 1869, in Lewis county, West 
Virginia, and obtained his education in the common schools of his 
native county. He has spent his years thus far at farming, teaching 
school, clerking in stores, and serving as postmaster at Roanoke for six 
years. He is at present the clerk of the circuit court of Lewis county, 
having been elected to this office in 1908. Politically Mr. Conrad 
votes the RepubHcan ticket. He is unmarried. He is capable and pains- 
taking as an official of Lewis county, where he can number his friends 
by the one word — legion. He comes of a prominent family, both the 
paternal and maternal sides having been pioneer settlers in this country, 
who left their impress upon the succeeding generations as they came 
upon and passed from the scenes of action. 

(The Skidmore Line). 

Of the Skidmore genealogy it may be said that Joseph Skidmore 
and wife Rachel moved with their family, from near Norfolk, Virginia, 
to what is now Pendleton county. West Virginia, some years before 
the revolutionary war. He was originally from Holland. Their old- 
est son, John Skidmore, was born 1725, and was captain under General 
Lewis in the battle of Point Pleasant, where he was seriously wounded 
by being shot in the hip. He left a family of seventeen children, three 
of whom were older than his father's younger children, and mosf of 
the Skidmores of Webster, Barbour and Braxton counties are descend- 
ants of his family. Some of the other sons of Joseph and Rachel Skid- 



780 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

more were Benjamin, Samuel, James, and Andrew, mentioned below. 
One of their daughters was the wife of Joseph Friend, the Indian 
fighter, who lived near where the town of Elkins, West Virginia, now 
stands, and they had a son Joseph. There are several children of 
Joseph and Rachel Skidmore other than the above named. 

(II) Andrew, son of the immigrants, Joseph and Rachel Skid- 
more, was born November 8, 1750, and was the youngest in the fam- 
ily. He was at the battle of Point Pleasant, West Virginia (as now 
understood), as a private in his brother John's company, and was also 
wounded at that battle. He married Margaret Johnson, daughter of 
Andrew Johnson, who was of German ancestry. Margaret had six 
brothers, John, Robert, Oliver, Jacob, Levi Johnson. John went west, 
probably across the Ohio river, then known as the west. Robert died 
on the Little Kanawha river, in what is now Calhoun (or Gilmore) 
county, where some of his descendants still reside. Charles lived and 
died, in what is now Barbour county. West Virginia, and many of his 
descendants are in that location now. Jacob Johnson went to Raleigh, 
North Carolina, where he married Mary McDonald (or McDonough) ; 
he died there in 1812, leaving a child four years old named Andrew, 
who afterward became the seventeenth President of the United States. 
Andrew Skidmore died at Sutton, now in Braxton county. West Vir- 
ginia, November 15, 1827, and his grave is plainly marked in the 
"Skidmore Graveyard." His wife Margaret died at their old home at 
what is now South Elkins, West Virginia, and is buried at what is now 
the Odd Fellows Home for West Virginia ; her grave is there to be seen, 
and is plainly known. She died in 1 808 and her son Andrew Skidmore 
cut and placed a stone at her grave in 181 1, which now is in a bad state 
of preservation, having withstood the elements for a century. Children 
of Andrew and Margaret (Johnson) Skidmore: James, mentioned be- 
low; Andrew; Joseph; Jesse; John; Benjamin; Mary, who married 
John Chenoweth; Eleanor, who married Jehu Chenoweth; Edith, wife 
of Robert Chenoweth; Elizabeth, wife of Jesse Jackson; Margaret, 
wife of John Crites; Rachel, who married Robert Jackson; Nancy, who 
married Thomas Scott. 

(III) James, son of Andrew and Margaret (Johnson) Skid- 
more, married Sarah Kittle, daughter of Jacob and Mary (Hender- 
son) Kittle, who were of Scotch ancestry. Jacob Kittle was one of the 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 781 

justices and early officers of Randolph county, Virginia. Children: 
William; Hickman; Edwin; Edith, who married James Madison Cor- 
ley; Mary, who married John Daly; Elizabeth, who married Isaac 
Harris; Margaret, who died in infancy; Rachel, who married John K. 
Scott, and is the mother of the famous "Big Scott family of West Vir- 
ginia" ; Sarah Ann, who married William F. Corley. 

(The Corley Line). 

(I) Minoah Corley, with his own family and three of his brothers, 
came from Cork, Ireland, about 1765, settled in Fauquier county, Vir- 
ginia. One brother settled near Lexington, South Carolina, one on the 
James river below Richmond, and the other brother went farther west. 
The descendants of the one who went to South Carolina are very 
numerous in that state and in Texas. Many who' sprang from the 
brother who settled on James river are in the locality of Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. One was James B. Corley, on General Lee's staff in the Civil 
war; and one, James A. Corley, was an aide to General Garnett at 
Laurel Hill, and wrote what he believed to be General Garnett's last 
dispatch before he was killed at Carrack's Ford, on Cheat river. It 
was Colonel Scott to whom the message was sent and it reached him 
near Huttonsville, while eating breakfast, July 12, 1861, and read as 
follows: "General Garnett has concluded to go to Hardy county and 
toward Cheat River Bridge. You will take advantage of a position 
beyond Huttonsville and draw your supplies from Richmond and re- 
port for orders there." 

Minoah Corley married Fogg, and their children were: 

Richard, who lived to the age of one hundred and five years; John, 
Gabriel, Garland, William, see below; Hezekiah, Agnes, wife of Jon- 
athan Poe; Mrs. Blagg, Mrs. FIshback and Mrs. Lewis. Three of the 
sisters lived to be over one hundred years of age. One lived to the ad- 
vanced age of one hundred and eight years. 

(II) William, son of Minoah and (Fogg) Corley, mar- 
ried Catherine Whitman, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Wilson) 
Whitman. Her brothers and sisters were: William; Matthew, at one 
time sheriff of Randolph county. West Virginia; Nancy, who married 
Henry Moats; Mrs. Eckard; Mrs. Harold; Mrs. Day; Mrs. Moyers, 
and Mrs. Ward. Children of William Corley and wife Catherine: 



782 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Noah Edwin; James Madison, of whom later; Henry Whitman; John 
Marshall; William Fogg; Allen Lewis; Jane, who married Archibald 
Wilson; Caroline, who married William J. Boner; Catherine, who died 
In infancy; Patsy, who married Rev. Solomon Engle. 

(Ill) James Madison, son of William and Catherine (Whitman) 
Corley, served In the capacity of sheriff and deputy sheriff, of Braxton 
county, then Virginia, for twenty-four consecutive years, from the for- 
mation In 1836, and did the active work of the office during that period. 
When the civil war broke out, he espoused the cause of the Union, and 
he and his son, John Corley, enlisted in that army and were assigned to 
service In Company F, Tenth Virginia Volunteer Infantry. 

He married (first) Edith Skldmore, and had children: John Cor- 
ley, who enlisted In Company F of the Tenth West Virginia Volunteer 
Infantry, was killed in the battle of Kernstown, Virginia, March 23, 
1862; Virginia Corley, married James Franklin Conrad, of Lewis 
county. West Virginia. He married (second). In 1851, Deborah Cam- 
den Sprigg, daughter of John and Elizabeth Sprigg, descendants of the 
Sprigg family of Maryland, of revolutionary fame. Children of James 
Madison Corley and his wife Deborah were: Henry Sprigg; Elizabeth, 
who married Warren Otho Gandy; Emma, died In childhood; Cath- 
erine, who married George Woodard, of Montgomery, Michigan; 
James, who died in early childhood, and Is buried in the old Hill Ceme- 
tery, at Weston, West Virginia. The later years of James Madison 
Corley were spent In farming, near Clarksburg, Harrison county, West 
Virginia, where he died in 1881. 



Pennsylvania has furnished many useful and Intelligent 
CURE people for citizenship In West Virginia, both within and 

without the professions. Dr. Cure, one of the successful 
physicians of Weston, Lewis county, West Virginia, Is a native of 
Pennsylvania, where the family name Is far better known than in West 
Virginia. 

Dr. Mortimer D. Cure, one of the progressive physicians of Wes- 
ton, was born October 5, 1867, at Jermyn, Pennsylvania, a son of 
Mortimer D. ( i ) and Susan R. (Travis) Cure. The senior Cure was 
born in Tompkinsville, Pennsylvania, and the mother of the doctor 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 783 

was a native of West Nicholson, Pennsylvania. Mortimer D. Cure 
Sr., always followed the life of a farmer. 

After attending the common schools in his native place, Dr. Cure 
prepared for and entered the academy at Easton, Pennsylvania, and 
from there went to Wyoming Seminary, where he finished his academic 
course, then graduated from Baltimore Medical College in 1901 with 
the degree of M. D. He served one year as interne at the Maryland 
General Hospital, Baltimore, when he was appointed resident physi- 
cian of that institution. This position he held one year, since which 
time he has been actively engaged in general practice at the city of 
Weston, West Virginia. He is a member of the Lewis County Med- 
ical Society, and is its treasurer; also a member of the West Virginia 
Medical Society and of the American Medical Association. He be- 
longs to the Alumni Association of the Baltimore Medical College; is 
president of the Lewis County Board of Health and is county physi- 
cian of Lewis county. He is also the present coroner of his home 
county (1911). The doctor belongs to the Masonic, Elks, Eagles, 
Maccabees and Modern Woodmen of America fraternities, and is 
ex-physician in several of these orders; also for the Prudential Life, 
Northwestern Mutual and West Virginia Life Insurance Companies. 
Politically the doctor is a Republican and is chairman of the Weston 
city committee. 

Dr. Cure married, July 3, 1902, Agnes B. Green, born at Church 
Hill, Maryland, daughter of Dr. Thomas H. and Maria B. 
(Mitchell) Green. 

Children: Mortimer D., 3d, born October 2, 1903; Thomas G., 
born May 2, 1906. The family attend the Episcopal church. 



The Loving family is an old one in Virginia, many 
LOVING branches residing in Louisa county. The genealogical 
line to James Francis Loving, of Morgantown, West 
Virginia, runs as follows: 

(I) William Loving, the first of the line here under consideration, 
married Sallie Williams, and among their children was a son Rich- 
ard S. 

(II) Richard S., son of William Loving, was a farmer by occu- 



784 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

pation. He married Isabell K. Fisher and had children: Robert, 
George, Lewis, Bettie and Richard S. 

(III) Richard S. (2), son of Richard S. (i) Loving, was born in 
Louisa county, Virginia. He followed farming for his general occu- 
pation. He married Pattie H. Lemford and their children were: 
James Francis, of whom further; Vergie, married John M. La whom. 
The father died March, 1874, and the wife and mother died March 
6, 1910. 

(IV) James Frances, eldest child of Richard S. (2) and Pattie 
H. (Lemford) Loving, was born in Louisa county, Virginia, October 
I, 1 87 1. He obtained his education in the public schools, after which 
he conducted a farm near Charlottesville, Virginia, until 1898. He 
then worked on the Chesapeake & Ohio railroad for three years as a 
brakeman and was promoted to conductor, which place he faithfully 
filled for five years. In 19 10 he engaged in the furniture business at 
Richmond, the firm being Jonas, Beams & Company. He came to 
Morgantown, West Virginia, January 15, 191 1, and now has the 
most extensive furniture store in the city. Politically Mr. Loving is 
a Democrat, and in his religious faith is of the Baptist church. He is 
a member of the O. R. C. of Charlottesville, Virginia, and the Wood- 
men of America. He married, September 26, 1907, Nale V. Orno- 
hundro, of Keswick, Virginia, daughter of Charles F. Ornohundro. 
They have one daughter, Frances Sydnor, bom June 10, 191 1. 



This family emigrated from Pennsylvania, as did so 
HUGHES many of the citizens of West Virginia. It was three 

generations ago that the first of this Hughes family 
came west. The first to break away from Pennsylvania society and as- 
sociations was Stephen J. Hughes, who married Mary Westfall, and 
came to Upshur county. West Virginia, when all was new and unde- 
veloped, about 1825. In 1840 he removed to Harrison county. He 
was a farmer and a minister of the Methodist Protestant church. He 
died on the old Hughes farm in Lewis county, West Virginia, in 1883. 
(II) Houston J., son of Stephen J. and Mary (Westfall) 
Hughes, was born in Upshur county, West Virginia, died in February, 
1905. He followed agricultural pursuits. He was a prominent man 
in Republican politics, and was always in advance of the masses in his 




C^. £coiunn 





-Ajul^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 785 

political thoughts and policies. Before the war of the rebellion he 
was first lieutenant in a Virginia militia company, and at the outbreak 
of that fearful struggle enlisted as a sergeant in Company D, Fifteenth 
West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, doing service for four years. He 
fought at Gettysburg, Lookout Mountain and Bull Run; was with 
General Grant at Vicksburg and participated in many thrilling and 
dangerous raids against the enemy. He was twice married (first) to 
Elizabeth Thornhill, by whom the following children were bom: i. 
William Lincoln, a farmer on the old Hughes homestead in Harrison 
county. 2. Mary E., wife of Taylor Martin, a furniture dealer and 
undertaker of Enterprise, West Virginia. 3. Sarah E., widow of 
Scott Martin, who was associated with Taylor Martin in business at 
Enterprise. 4. John Henry, deceased; a school teacher. Elizabeth 
(Thornhill) Hughes died in 1872, and Mr. Hughes married (sec- 
ond) Amanda E. Thompson, and had issue: 5. AUin Carl, mentioned 
below. 6. Stephen R., who died at the age of two years. Mrs. 
Amanda E. (Thompson) Hughes now resides at Jane Lew, West 
Virginia. 

(Ill) Allin Carl, son of Houston J. Hughes by his second mar- 
riage, was born June 12, 1875, in Harrison county. West Virginia. 
He is now a lawyer and justice of the peace at Weston, Lewis county. 
After attending the common schools, he entered Glenville (West Vir- 
ginia) Normal School, and later attended the Wesleyan College, at 
Buckhannon, graduating from the law department of the University 
of Northern Indiana, at Valparaiso, in 1903, after which he practiced 
law a year at Holdenville, Indian Territory, then came east and located 
at Weston, Lewis county. West Virginia, where he has since resided 
and built up an excellent law practice. He is ever on the alert to en- 
hance the interests and stand by the principles of the Republican party; 
has been a delegate to numerous conventions and was made chairman 
of some of these political bodies. He made the race and was defeated 
for the office of representative in 19 10, going down with the Demo- 
cratic landslide. In 1908 he was elected justice of the peace, which 
office he still holds. Aside from his legal business and the duties of his 
office as justice of the peace, he finds time to attend to the many duties 
he finds in looking after his personal interests as a farm owner in 



786 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Lewis county, and his stock-raising interests thereon. He also has mer- 
cantile interests in Shadybrook; is connected with the People's Tele- 
phone Company, etc. He also conducts a general insurance business. 

Mr. Hughes belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
and Woodmen of the World, being past councillor for both orders; is 
clerk of the Modern Protective Association; clerk of the Woodmen of 
the World Lodge, No. 34; commander of General J. A. J. Lightburn 
Camp, No. i. Sons of Veterans, and is a member of the executive com- 
mittee of the West Virginia Frat Association; also member of Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Western Lodge, No. 90. During the 
Spanish-American war he was a member of Company F, Second West 
Virginia Volunteer Infantry, serving one year as sergeant. He is sec- 
retary of the People's Electric Light, Ice & Water Power plant, also 
director and on the executive committee of the above. 

The early generations of the Hughes family were of the Methodist 
Protestant religious faith, while the more recent members are of the 
Baptist faith. 

Mr. Hughes was married June 28, 1903, to Evadney E., daughter 
of John Mathews, a lumberman of Putnam county, West Virginia. 
Children: i. Houston J., deceased. 2. M. Carlton, born August 3, 
1906. 3. AUin I., born November 28, 1908. 4. Charles Frederick, 
born August 6, 19 10. 



Rush J. Ward, D. D. S., son of Duncan Ward, D. D. S., 
WARD and wife, Sarah (Dew) Ward, was born in West Mil- 
ford, West Virginia, October 23, 1878. He gradu- 
ated at the Weston high school in 1898, then entered Ohio Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery at Cincinnati, from which he graduated in 
1902, with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Since that time 
he has been practicing his profession in Weston, West Virginia. He 
is a member of the Psi Omega Dental Fraternity and the Weston Ma- 
sonic lodge. Politically the doctor is a Democrat. Having suitably 
equipped himself for the profession in which science has made such 
wonderful strides in recent years, he is thoroughly acquainted with all 
the latest methods and has already built up a lucrative practice at Wes- 
ton. His offices are well planned for the convenience of his many 
patients. Dr. Ward is unmarried. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 787 

Among the leading industries of Weston is the Gregg 
GREGG Grocery Company, of which W. R. Gregg was one of 

the incorporators. Mr. Gregg is the son of Thomas and 
Martha (Sprout) Gregg, of Tyler county, West Virginia. He was 
born September 2, 1856. His father was a merchant and tanner of 
Tyler county. After obtaining a good common school education he 
was ambitious to embark in some legitimate calling, and chose that of 
a merchant. In 1872 he entered the employ of T. T. Wallace Produce 
Company, at Clarksburg, West Virginia, remained there three years 
when, he joined Ruhl Koblegard, wholesale grocers, of Clarksburg, 
and in 1906 came to Weston, Lewis county, and established his present 
business house, known as the Gregg Grocery Company, which he is 
still associated with. It was incorporated In October, 1906, under the 
laws of the state, with a capital of $85,000, by W. R. Gregg, W. R. 
Smith, A. D. Miller, A. R. Weber and J. B. Smith. It has been a 
successful concern since its first inception in 1906, and now enjoys a 
large trade within a wide circle of trade territory in West Virginia. 
Their business house Is located with warehouses on a private switch of 
the Baltimore & Ohio railroad line In West Weston. The main build- 
ing occupies twenty-eight thousand square feet of floor space. Mr. 
Gregg has always been the president of the company, as well as treas- 
urer and manager of the business, while W. R. Smith has always acted 
as secretary and A. R. Weber as vice-president. As a wholesale grocery 
company there are few Its equal in the state of West Virginia. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Gregg Is a member of the I. O. O. F., B. P. O. E., M. W. 
of A., and U. C. T. 

He married, October 20, 1881, Mary V. Smith, and they have one 
child, Guy F., born November 20, 1882, associated with the Gregg 
Grocery Company. 



Scotland has sent forth to this country thou- 
DUNNINGTON sands of sturdy, God-fearing, industrious men 
and women, whose descendants are now scat- 
tered throughout the length and breadth of the land, and among them 
may be Included the Dunningtons. Weston, West Virginia, has long 
been the home and business place of members of this family. 

(I) Noah Dunnington, was born in 1807, in Dumfries, Virginia. 



788 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

He came to Taylor county about 1828 from Farquier county, Virginia, 
and settled at Pruntytown, where he remained a short time, then re- 
located at Clarksburg, where he engaged in the tailoring business and 
became one of the leading citizens of the place. Before the formation 
of the Republican party he was a member of the Whig political party. 
He was a member of Herman Lodge of Odd Fellows at Clarksburg, 
where he died in October, 1885. He married Catherine W. Ferguson, 
of Dumfries, Virginia. The children of this union were: William L., 
of whom further; James, died young; Charles, was a resident of 
Clarksburg, West Virginia, now deceased; Philip, formerly associated 
with his brother John in the mercantile business in Wichita Falls, 
Texas, now a resident of Abilene, Texas; John, deceased; Hugh, of 
the firm of Dunnington & Dennison, merchants at Weston; Isophine 
(Mrs. Harry McArdle), now deceased; Flora, wife of Frank Zimmer- 
man, residing in California. Mrs. Catherine (Ferguson) Dunning- 
ton, who was a member of the Methodist church, died at Clarksburg 
in 1 89 1. 

(II) William L., son of Noah and Catherine (Ferguson) Dun- 
nington, was born in Clarksburg, West Virginia, June 13, 1832. He 
was educated in the old-fashioned subscription schools after which he 
learned the mercantile business, first as a faithful clerk in Clarks- 
burg and Fairmont, going to Weston in 1849, where he clerked one 
year, then to Baltimore, spending one year in that city; going from 
thence to Pennsboro, West Virginia, where he was in business himself 
for three years. After a short time at Weston he again made his home 
at Pennsboro for a period of three years. In i860 he came to Weston 
again and soon opened up a large store and continued as a leader in 
trade until 1896. His place of business, so long and well known, is 
now in the hands of Dunnington & Dennison, and is a large department 
store. William L. Dunnington has retired from all active business ex- 
cept his connection with the bank known as the Citizens' Bank, of 
which he has been president ever since its organization in 1891. He is 
an exceptionally well-read gentleman, possessing rare and mature judg- 
ment in business affairs. He is a devout member of the Presbyterian 
church. He has been twice married, (first) to Mary Martin, in 1856, 
by whom he had children: i. James, born in Pennsboro, died in 1885; 
was in business with his father. 2. Flora, died in infancy. 3. Edith, 




'J^mu^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 789 

now of Clarksburg; widow of N. B. Newlin. 4. Clarence, now a fac- 
tory superintendent in Columbus, Ohio. 5. William, born 1866; a 
photographer at Webster Springs, West Virginia. 6. Mary, wife of 
Owen Kraft, of Clarksburg; died leaving daughters, Mary and Helen. 
Mrs. Mary (Martin) Dunnington died in Weston, March 31, 1889. 
Mr. Dunnington married (second) Mrs. Ella Blanche Arbuckle, 
widow of Captain Arbuckle. She died March 16, 19 12. 



Of the families now residing in West Virginia, 
MITCHELL who originally lived in Maryland, is the Mitchell 

family of Weston, Lewis county. 
John Stillwell Mitchell, present secretary and superintendent of 
the Weston Electric Light, Power & Water Company, is the son of 
Benjamin and Eleanor (Stillwell) Mitchell. His father was a ship- 
builder by occupation and lived in Hancock, Washington county, Mary- 
land, where John S. was bom March 2, 1853. He obtained his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native county, after which he joined 
his father in business, remaining there until 1881, when he went to 
Weston, West Virginia, to accept a position of trust at the State Hospi- 
tal for the Insane. He held this position until he engaged in his present 
business enterprise, with which he has been prominently connected. 
The Weston Electric Light, Power & Water Company was organized 
and promoted by Mr. Mitchell and incorporated November 9, 1899, 
with J. S. Mitchell, W. G. Bennett, Messrs. Ralston, Lewis and Kitson 
as incorporators. The capital stock was $100,000, all of which is now 
paid up. The present officers are: Lewis Bennett, president; Andrew 
Edmiston, vice-president; J. S. Vandervort, treasurer, and J. S. 
Mitchell, secretary and superintendent. The water company was or- 
ganized in October, 1896, and became a part of the original corpora- 
tion. The present plant is a large modern establishment, with an un- 
developed gas well property connected. Mr. Mitchell gives much of 
his time and attention to the administration of the concern, but has 
numerous other interests in and about the city of Weston. Politically 
he is "Gorman" Democrat of the Maryland stripe. In his younger 
days he took a leading part in politics, but since removing to Weston 
has not been active, further than to help along his party in campaigns 
and to stand by his political colors at the ballot box on election day. He 



790 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

is a member of several secret orders, the first with which he was iden- 
tified was the Knights of Pythias. He now belongs to that as well as 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and Royal Arcanum. In later 
years he has been made a Mason and now has reached the advanced 
stage of a thirty-second degree Mason, belonging to Weston Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Bigelow Chapter No. 4, St. 
John's Commandery No. 8, Parkersburg Rose Croix, Wheeling Con- 
sistory and Osiris Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles Mystic Shrine. 
In 1874 he married Clara Johnson, of Cumberland, Maryland, a 
daughter of John F. and Phoebe (Harper) Johnson, the former a 
prominent merchant of Cumberland, Maryland, now deceased. Chil- 
dren of John F. Johnson and wife are Judge Thomas Johnson, of the 
Orphans' Court of Allegany county, Maryland; James S., a plumber; 
Joseph, Annie, wife of J. W. Fallon, of Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell: Phoebe E., a teacher in the Wes- 
ton schools; John D., now assistant cashier in the National Exchange 
Bank of Weston, married Lucy Gabriel; Beulah, at home; James R., 
who' was associated with his father at the time of his death, which 
was caused by being run over by a train in the Weston yards June 28, 
1910. The only grandchild is Clara M. Mitchell, daughter of John 
D. and Lucy (Gabriel) Mitchell. 



This family was founded in the United States about 
KINCAID the year 1840 by Joseph Kincaid, a native of Ireland, 

who came to this country as a young man nineteen 
years of age. He was, therefore, born about 1821, and died in 1894. 
He was reared and educated in Ireland, where he had been engaged in 
farming. On coming to the United States he settled in the state of 
Indiana. How long he remained there is not stated, but by 1850 he 
was living in what Is now West Morgantown, West Virginia, was 
married and had a son bom in that year. In West Virginia he was 
engaged in farming. He seems to have prospered in his new surround- 
ings and to have been a man of energy and thrift. He married, in In- 
diana, Martha Miller, born in that state. Children : Margaret, Joseph, 
George and John W., of whom further. 

(II) John W., youngest son of Joseph and Martha (Miller) Kin- 
caid, was bom in what is now West Morgantown, West Virginia, Au- 




/Ta^.-^^j^f^ 



--nn^-y-ca^dC^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 791 

gust 5, 1850, died there November 4, 1898. He was educated in the 
public schools and, on arriving at a suitable age, left the farm and 
served his full years of apprenticeship at blacksmithing. He followed 
that trade in West Virginia all his active years, being an expert worker 
in metal and well known for industry and uprightness. He ran his 
own business in Morgantown and had a prosperous and popular shop. 
He was an active, devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
with which he was connected for twenty-five years. In politics he was 
a Republican. He belonged to the fraternal orders Knights of Pythias, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the United Order of American 
Mechanics. He married a widow, Mrs. Elma (Simkins) Arnett, 
daughter of John and Nancy Simkins. Children : Joseph R., born Au- 
gust 22, 1872; Mary Belle, 1875, married Marshall L. Sturm; John 
C, of further mention; Clark, March 10, 1880, died November 2, 
1910; Lida, February 3, 1882, died May 8, 1903; Catherine A., Au- 
gust 5, 1884. 

(Ill) John Clarence, son of John W. and Elma (Simkins-Arnett) 
Kincaid, was born at Morgantown, West Virginia, August 19, 1877. 
He was educated in the public schools, and at the age of seventeen 
years, in 1894, began business life as manager of a flour and feed store 
for the firm of Jason & Clake. He continued in that position until 
1900, becoming thoroughly conversant with every detail of the feed 
business. In 1900 he resigned his position and formed a partnership 
with C. N. Ray, operating as Ray & Kincaid, in the flour and feed busi- 
ness. He soon bought his partner's interest and continued successfully 
until 1904, when he became senior partner of the firm of Kincaid & 
Arnett, a large and most prosperous flour and feed firm of Morgan- 
town, West Virginia. He is a man of activity and energy, thoroughly 
modern in his business principles and quick to seize a favorable oppor- 
tunity. He is a Repubhcan in politics, and in 1904 was elected a 
member of the city council, succeeding himself the following term. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and of the following 
societies : Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen of America. 
He married, in 1907, Ethel, born November 24, 1884, daughter of 
N. H. McElroy. Children: Elma, born December 21, 1909, and Gail, 
November 18, 191 1. 



792 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

With the advancement and development of West Vir- 
HEFNER ginia there have grown up professional men of un- 
doubted skill and character, coming from out the 
sturdy families living in the rural districts. Prominent among these 
of later days is Henry S. Hefner, D. D. S., practicing at Weston, 
Lewis county. He is the son of Henry J. and Rhoda E. (Gould) 
Hefner, and was born in Upshur county. West Virginia, October 29, 
1887. His father was a well-known farmer and stockdealer and one 
of the progressive citizens of that section of the state. Dr. Hefner 
was educated in his native county, attending the public schools, and the 
city schools of French Creek and Buckhannon, finishing with a year's 
course in the University of Cincinnati, Ohio. He entered the dental 
department of that institution, from which he graduated with the 
class of 1909, holding the well-earned degree of D. D. S. Since then 
he has practiced dentistry at Weston, with offices in the Bank of Wes- 
ton Building. He is a member of the national organization of Psi 
Omega Dental Fraternity and the Alumni Association of Cincinnati 
University Dental School; also belongs to the West Virginia State 
Dental Association and fraternally affiliates with the order of Elks. 
Politically he is independent. He is thoroughly posted in all that per- 
tains to modern dentistry and is fast building up a first-rate dental 
practice in the vicinity of Weston. 



Among the older settlers in the neighborhood of Shinn- 
HURSEY ston was the Hursey family. Three generations ago 

this family was represented there first by John A. Hur- 
sey, who came from Maryland and settled at Clarksburg as a furniture 
dealer. He had a family, among whom was a son named Lloyd R. 
Hursey, now aged and retired from active duties of life, living at 
Shinnston. He was born in 1836 and followed the business of furni- 
ture dealer, later the marble and monumental business. Politically he 
is a Democrat, and in church faith of the Baptist denomination. He 
married Mary Sangston, of Wheeling, in 1865, by whom he had two 
children: Walter S., of whom further; Elizabeth, widow of Lee H. 
Vance, of Clarksburg, has one child, Amelia. 

(Ill) Walter Sangston, son of Lloyd R. and Mary (Sangston) 
Hursey, was bom at Clarksburg, West Virginia, October i, 1867. He 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 793 

received his education in the local schools of Shinnston, to which place 
he came with his parents when seven years of age. When but a youth 
he lived with an uncle, Alexander Martin, after whom "Martin's 
Hall," in the State University, was named. He, therefore, had good 
training in educational ways, better than most of the youth of his 
neighborhood. In 1883 he set his face towards the task of doing 
for himself in life, and wisely chose a useful trade, that of a harness- 
maker. He began this with H. Gould, at Mannington, West Virginia, 
later becoming a journeyman harness-maker, working at the trade 
which he had thoroughly mastered, through the South and West. In 
1896 he established his present business, which is the most extensive in 
his town today. He is a member of the American Poultry Associa- 
tion, having been engaged in the raising of poultry for the past twelve 
years, breeding only the barred Plymouth rock, and his birds are known 
throughout the United States and Canada, having appeared at some of 
the largest poultry shows in the country. His breeding is done purely 
for exhibition and stock purposes. Mr. Hursey's greatest interest, 
however, is centered in educational work, in building up the standard of 
the schools and providing the facility for the conduct of the same. 
Politically he is a Democrat. He is now (1911) serving his third 
term as mayor of Shinnston. During his incumbency of the mayorality 
many up-to-date improvements in Shinnston have been brought about, 
he being the leading factor. His last election was carried by a major- 
ity of 298 over his opponent, and when the fact is considered that the 
district is loyally Republican and he being a Democrat, it shows in what 
estimation he is held by his townsmen. He is a member of the Odd 
Fellows' fraternity, also Free and Accepted Masons and Knights of 
Pythias, and is president of the board of education. 

Mr. Hursey married in Shinnston, December 22, 1897, Ella A. 
Lowe, born at Simpson Creek, in October, 1876, daughter of John 
Lowe, of Shinnston. Children by this marriage: Warren, born March 
12, 1899; George, August 5, 1900; Arthur, February 19, 1903; Mary 
Esther, December 22, 1904; Walter Andrew, March 10, 1907; John, 
April 26, 1908. 



794 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

This is the family to which belonged the late, dis- 
LIGHTBURN tinguished General J. A. J. Lightburn, who was 

born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 
1825. He removed from there to western Virginia (now West Vir- 
ginia) where he spent his early years on a farm near Weston. He was 
educated in the common schools of the county and when the Mexican 
war broke out in 1846 he enlisted, serving 1846 and 1847. He then 
returned home and engaged in the milling business, and also carried on 
his farming operations, until Fort Sumter was fired upon by secession 
guns, when he was appointed colonel of the Fourth Regiment Virginia 
Volunteers, by Governor Pierpont, as will be seen by the following 
commission : 

To the Commonwealth of Virginia, to J. A. J. Lightburn greeting: 

Know you, That for special trust and confidence reposed in your fidelity 
and courage and good conduct, our Governor, in pursuance of the authority 
vested in him by the Constitution and laws of the Commonwealth, doth com- 
mission you Colonel of the Fourth regiment of Virginia volunteers in the 
service of the United States to rank as such from the fourteenth day of 
August, 1861. F. H. Pierpont, 

Henry J. Samuels, Governor. 

Adjutant General. 

After his appointment he was ordered to Charleston and engaged 
in the battles of Charleston and Gauley Bridge. From the Kanawha 
valley he was sent to Ohio, saving the government supplies, which con- 
sisted of a train of freight wagons over seven miles in length. After 
that he was ordered to Vicksburg, Mississippi, under General W. T. 
Sherman. He was then a member of the Second Brigade, Second 
Divsion, and Fifteenth Army Corps, in the Army of the Tennessee, 
which participated in the battles of Missionary Ridge, Chattanooga, 
Knoxville, Chickamauga and Jackson, Mississippi, the hardest fought 
battles in many ways of the civil war. At Vicksburg he was wounded 
and as soon as able was transferred to the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, 
where he took part in numerous engagements. In 1863 President Abra- 
ham Lincoln recognized his gallant conduct for which he commissioned 
him (same being ratified by the senate) as a brigadier general. He 
was in various engagements such as those at Shiloh, Fort Donaldson, 
Nashville, Chattanooga and Vicksburg, and was mentioned in Grant's 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 795 

Memoirs on account of his daring bravery. June 22, 1865, he resign- 
ed as brigadier general and his friends in Lewis county, West Virginia, 
presented him with a handsome sword of great value, the same being 
now in possession of his son. Upon the advent of peace, he returned 
home and entered the ministry in which he labored until his death. May 
18, 1900. He never ceased to mourn the loss of his old friend and 
neighbor, "Stonewall" Jackson. He married Harriet Whittlesey, 
daughter of Stephen and Nancy Whittlesey, by whom five children 
were born, all of whom survived their father: L. G. and Johanna E., 
on the old homestead farm in Lewis county, West Virginia; Mary R.; 
B. W., prosecuting attorney at Kansas City, Missouri, and Harry W., 
of whom further. 

Harry W. Lightburn, son of General J. A. J. and Harriet (Whit- 
tlesey) LIghtburn, was born in Lewis county, West Virginia, May 9, 
1858. He was educated In the public schools of his native county and at 
Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania. After completing his schooling he became 
the agent for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company at Weston, a 
position he held for about fifteen years, after which he engaged In mer- 
chandising and brokerage business, with offices at Weston and Fair- 
mont. He continued in the latter business until elected clerk of his 
county In 1902, an office he still holds. He has always been an ardent 
Republican and was chairman of the Republican executive committee 
two years. He owns a fine farm near Lightburn which his son conducts 
and where his family resides. He Is connected with the Masonic fra- 
ternity, being a member of Lodge No. 10, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, and is now Its junior deacon; also Chapter No. 4, of the Royal 
Arch Masons, and St. John's Commandery, No. 8, of Knights Temp- 
lar. He holds membership with General J. A. J. Lightburn Camp of 
the Sons of Veterans, which camp was named for his father. 

He married, October 28, 1888, Catherine C. Banner, daughter of 
George and Elizabeth Banner. Children: Grace W., a graduate of 
Broadus College, Clarksburg, at home; George H., attended Staunton 
Military Academy and Broadus College, now conducting the home 
farm, near Lightburn; Mary Ruth, married, October 16, 191 1, Jason 
Jackson Bailey, of Janelew, West Virginia, a bookkeeper in the Citi- 
zens' Bank at Weston; Catherine B., at home. The Lightburn family 
are members of the Baptist church. 



796 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Among the number of excellent physicians in the city of 
KING Weston, Lewis county, West Virginia, is Dr. Wessie P. 
King, who was born at Salem, Harrison county, West Vir- 
ginia, March 14, 1870, a son of John H. and Martha J. (Price) King. 
His father was a large railroad contractor and builder of bridges. Dr. 
King attended the schools at Clarksburg, West Virginia, and then 
entered the University of Maryland, taking the medical course, grad- 
uating in 1 89 1 with the degree of M. D. He at once commenced 
the practice of his profession in Upshur county, continuing there until 
1895, when he remced to Weston, Lewis county, where he has since 
been in the active practice of medicine. 

He belongs to the various medical societies, including the Lewis 
County Medical Society of which he is an ex-secretary; member of the 
West Virginia State Medical Society and much interested in all that 
pertains to advanced medical science. He is a member of Weston 
Lodge, No. 10, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Bigelow Chapter, 
No. 4, Royal Arch Masons; St. John's Commandery, No. 8, Knights 
Templar. Politically he is a Republican. He is at present on the staff 
of surgeons for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. He with his 
family attends the Baptist church, of which his wife is a faithful 
member. 

Dr. King was married, in 1902, to Bertha Nicholes, of Lewis 
county, daughter of William J. Nicholes and wife. Her father is a 
prominent politician and a substantial farmer of Lewis county. 



West Virginia industries have forged to the front phe- 
GRANT nomenally, since the discovery and development of 

natural gas wells. Among the great industries which 
have for a number of years enriched the state is that of the glass pro- 
ducing plants found here and there in the Mountain State. 

One of the best of these factories is conducted by Joseph Grant, 
who was born in England at the city of Leeds, October 17, i860, a 
son of John and Ellen (Watkinson) Grant. The parents came to 
America with their family in 1870, settling in Berkshire county, Massa- 
chusetts, where young Grant completed his education in the public 
schools. He is one of a family of three children and early showed an 
inclination to make his own way in this, his adopted country, and his 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 797 

business ability has been proved by the glass plant of which he is the 
founder and present head. In 1874 he entered the glass factory at 
'Norristown, Pennsylvania, where he mastered the glass-cutter's trade. 
When the plant there became unable to compete with natural products 
of other factories and closed down on account of gas, he went to An- 
derson, Indiana, where he was identified with the same industry until 
natural gas failed in 1903. He then went to Weston, West Virginia, 
and at once organized the Crescent Window Glass Company, with a 
capital of $60,000. He broke ground for his factory April i, 1903, 
and put in operation a plant of only twelve pot furnace capacity. Octo- 
ber I, 1903, it began operations and was run until about the end of the 
first year, when the success of his efforts justified the enlargement of 
the works and a twenty-four pot plant and blower-tank were added to 
the original works. In 1907 the capital stock was increased to $125,000 
and the second plant was erected. The success of this business venture 
has been wonderful. Mr. Grant's knowledge of the glass business in 
every minute detail has been the central moving feature of advance- 
ment. It is now a well-recognized, incorporated concern having a trade 
in superior window glass from ocean to ocean and lakes to gulf. High 
grade work and honest dealing have built up an enviable business repu- 
tation. The present directors of the company are: Samuel Hinkle, 
president; J. H. Brewster, vice-president; Jacob Koblegard, treasurer; 
Joseph Grant, secretary and manager, and George C. Lynch. The 
present, or very recent, production of this plant is seven hundred boxes 
or thirty-five thousand feet of glass every twenty-four hours. It is one 
of the best concerns making window glass in the state. 

Mr. Grant holds membership with the Masonic lodge at Anderson, 
Indiana, never having transferred to Weston yet. He belongs to the 
Episcopal church; is active in local politics, and awake to every interest 
for improving the city and county in which he has so recently settled. 
He married Emma C. Richie, of Franklin, Indiana. One child has 
been born of this union, Donald W., born August 27, 1902. 



This White family comes from Albemarle county, Vir- 
WHITE ginia, and probably was an early family in that section 
of the state. For the present only the heads of three 
generations are known, as follows : 



798 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(I) Isaac White was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, died at 
the age of seventy-six years. He was a farmer in his native county. 
He married and had a family, among which was a son John, see for- 
ward. 

(II) John, son of Isaac White, was born in the same county in 
which his father was, and was killed when his son Thomas C. was but 
five years of age. He kept a hotel at Buckhannon many years. He 
married Martha Bassel, born in Harrison county, Virginia, and now 
resides at Buckhannon, aged seventy-eight years. They had one 
child: Thomas Christian, see forward. Mrs. White married (second) 
William C. Carper, and by him had three sons: William, Adam and 
Alvin. 

(III) Thomas Christian, son of John and Martha (Bassel) White, 
was born in Upshur county, West Virginia, July 14, 185 i, when that 
was included in old Virginia. His birthplace was on the old White 
homestead. He received a common school training up to ten years of 
age, when he ran away with Jackson's army, with which command he 
remained for three years, and was clothed and fed by the soldiers of 
the Confederacy, they taking him in as a sort of mascot. His father 
was killed by a runaway team of horses when the son was only five years 
old, hence he had to make his own way through life as best he could. 
The boy-soldier came back to Clarksburg at the end of the war and 
worked for an uncle, George Bastable, who was a merchant of the town. 
He remained there until 1876. He married and purchased a farm of 
one hundred and ninety-seven acres, a mile and a half east from Clarks- 
burg, from which he recently sold one hundred and fifty-six acres to the 
Fair Ground Association. He owns two meat markets, operated under 
his name, but run by his sons and sons-in-law, under the firm name of 
White Brothers & Company. These meat markets are said to be the 
finest in all West Virginia. The market between West Pike and West 
Main streets is a palace indeed and is visited by strangers who have 
heard of its beauty and utility. Politically Mr. White is a Democrat, 
and in church relation is a Baptist. 

He was married on the farm on which he now lives, April 9, 1876, 
to Malissa C. Franks, bom in Harrison county, died January 30, 1908, 
at the age of fifty-two years. Her father, Benjamin Franklin Franks, 
deceased, had the farm where Mr. White resides. His wife, Nancy E. 




'o^Ar 




JL^o..^. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 799 

Franks, is also deceased. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
White: Burton D., manager of the store at Clarksburg; Bertha M., 
Mrs. L. Tracy, of Clarksburg; Lillie, Mrs. Lester E. Veirs, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Benjamin F. White, of Denver, Colorado; John T., 
engaged in the meat business at Clarksburg; Mattie B., Mrs. O. L. 
Douglass, of Clarksburg; Pearl A., Mrs. W. O. Tyson, of Clarksburg; 
Genevieve, who keeps house for her father. 



The immigrant ancestor of this family was Jacob 
KOBLEGARD Koblegard, born in Denmark, that picturesque 
country of Northern Europe. While he was yet 
a young man he came alone to seek a home and a fortune in the New 
World, and he has succeeded far beyond the lot of most men in attain- 
ing his desires. He was born in 1848, and crossed the ocean in 1866, 
finally locating near Fostoria, Ohio, where he worked at farm labor, at 
the same time acquiring an English education. He farmed but a short 
time, and in 1870 went to Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he wisely 
engaged in the commission business. In 1872 he established a branch 
house at West Union, the same state, and in 1880 still another house 
at Weston. He then removed to Weston, and remained until he retired 
from business. He now resides at Springfield, Ohio, where he is re- 
puted to be worth a half a million dollars. He is president of the 
Springfield Bank, and retains large property interests in Lewis county. 
West Virginia. He is president of the Crescent Glass Works and other 
concerns of lesser importance. 

He married Isophine Powell and their children are: Bert A., of 
whom later; R. N. Koblegard, born at West Union, West Virginia, 
September 17, 1878, now at St. Lucie, Florida; Mrs. Mamie Minshall, 
born at West Union, July 10, 1876, now residing in Oklahoma; Thorn 
F., born at Weston, West Virginia, December 31, 1880, now secretary 
and treasurer of the Weston Fuel and Light Company. 

(II) Bert A., son of Jacob and Isophine (Powell) Koblegard, 
was born at Weston, West Virginia, March 11, 1874. He was edu- 
cated in the schools of his native city and at Gettysburg College, later 
he graduated with the degree of A. B., in 1893, from the Ohio Wes- 
leyan University, after which he joined his father in the Ruhl-Koble- 
gard Grocery Company, at Weston, where he remained until 1904 



8oo Upper Monongahela Valley. 

when the business was sold. He then opened his present office. He is 
the owner of much valuable real estate in Weston and other sections 
of West Virginia; has large interests in oil and natural gas lands and 
wells in Harrison and Lewis counties; also near Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mr. 
Koblegard is highly educated in many directions, and is very practical in 
all of his methods. He loves good literature and is noted for numerous 
articles from his own pen, which have from time to time appeared in the 
popular periodicals of this country. He is a keen observer of men and 
passing events, and a lover of nature, ever seeing the true and beautiful 
instead of the sordid things of life. Politically he votes the Democratic 
ticket. He is now (1911) serving his third term as councilman in 
Weston municipality. He belongs to the Modem Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, the Eagles fraternity, and is ever interested in the benevolences of 
the great busy world around him, doing his full share with tongue and 
pen to make the world the better for having lived in it. 

He married, in 1907, Flora Davisson, daughter of Captain George 
I. Davisson, now deceased, who was a prominent Lewis county citi- 
zen. Children: Jacob, born October 23, 1898; Edwin D., born Janu- 
ary 31, 1900. 



This family was living at Pittsburgh (Ft. Pitt) during 
YOUNG the revolutionary war, where the family records say was 

bom John T. Young, in 1775. This narrative will treat 
of the four generations from that time to the present, especially as they 
may relate to the West Virginia branch of the family tree. 

(I) John T. Young, a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, when 
grown to man's estate, moved to Clarksburg, Virginia, where he was 
engaged in the fulling mill business and sheared and fulled cloth of the 
homespun variety of goods, then in common use. He also had a grist 
mill on Sycamore creek which was an old landmark In that section of 
the country for many years. He died in 1859, aged eighty-four years. 
He married and reared a family, among whom was John W., of whom 
further. 

(II) Captain John W. Young, son of John T. Young, was bom 
on Sycamore creek, Harrison county, Virginia, in 1828, died in 1864. 
He was a soldier in the confederate army, under Jackson, was com- 
missioned captain, and was wounded at Droop Mountain in 1864; he 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 8oi 

died from the effects of the wound and was buried from the church at 
Lewisburg. He married Dorothy Cowell, a native of Greene county, 
Pennsylvania, who came to the state of Virginia with her parents. She 
died in 1904, at the age of seventy-three years. Children: Sarah E., 
died 1892; Ralph W., of whom further; Mathias, living at Green- 
wood, a merchant by occupation ; Euphemia, unmarried, lives at Green- 
wood; Edward T., lives in Salem; Catherine H., lives at Greenwood, 
unmarried ; John, a cabinet-maker and carpenter, lives with two unmar- 
ried children of the family above named. Mathias Cowell, father of 
Mrs. John W. Young, was bom in Permsylvania, went to Harrison 
county, Virginia, after his marriage and there followed farming the 
remainder of his active days, on Sycamore creek; he died at the age of 
eighty years in Ritchie county. 

(Ill) Ralph W., son of Captain John W. and Dorothy (Cowell) 
Young, was born December 15, 1853, on his father's farm in Harrison 
county, Virginia. He attended Cherry Camp school under Dr. D. C. 
Louchery, and worked on his father's farm until sixteen years old, then 
clerked in the store of D. W. Boggess, of Cherry Camp, for eight 
years. Having thus well fitted himself for merchandising, by working 
for others, he purchased an interest in a general merchandise store in 
Salem in 1881, in company with his father-in-law, D. W. Boggess, and 
in 1 883 bought the entire stock. He was successful until the year 1901, 
when his store was entirely burned, after which he went into the timber 
business in Randolph county. He has made a success of his business 
career and is now practically retired. He is a director and stockholder 
in the First National Bank, having served ever since the organization 
of the bank. In politics he is a Democrat; he has taken considerable 
interest in educational matters in his county; has served as member of 
the board of education for Salem independent district for twenty years, 
except a period of three years. He has numerous valuable town lots in 
Salem, and is in comfortable financial circumstances, all through his 
own business sagacity. He is much interested in Free Masonry; be- 
longs to Salem Lodge, No. 84, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
also is affiliated with the Chapter and Commandery in Clarksburg, as 
well as the Shriners at Wheeling. He belongs to the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 



8o2 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

He married, September 26, 1882, at Bristol, Harrison county, 
Clara Emma Boggess, born at Bristol, September 26, 1861, died in 
1898, daughter of D. W. Boggess, who died in 1895, and his wife, 
Sarah (Hardin) Boggess, who died in 1904. Children: Bertha B., 
now Mrs. Dr. F. R. Dew, of Salem; Boggess, died in infancy; John 
Paul, unmarried, a dentist at Salem; Edward Stanley, engaged in the 
automobile business; Chester, died in infancy; Ralph Cecil, a book- 
keeper in the First National Bank at Salem. The children all reside at 
home with their father. 



This is a family of true Scotch ancestry, the first 
McGregor member of which, John McGregor, emigrated from 
Edinburgh, Scotland, with his wife in 18 12, locat- 
ing in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

(II) William, son of John McGregor, the Scotch emigrant, was 
born in Philadelphia in 18 18, died January 29, 1904, in Salem, West 
Virginia. At the age of six months, he was removed with his father's 
family to Ritchie county, West Virginia, according to present state 
geography. Here he opened up the homestead now so well known to 
the family and the community at large as the old McGregor farm. He 
was an industrious farmer his entire active life. He held to the faith 
of his fathers and belonged to the Presbyterian church. Politically he 
voted the Republican ticket. He married Elizabeth Hall, born in 
Doddridge county, West Virginia, 1825, and died May 3, 1910. Chil- 
dren: Harland Page; Virginia, Mrs. Cottrell, died in 1906; Anna, 
Mrs. Carroll, living in Fairmont; Samuel Homer, a minister, died in 
1884; William Burns, living at Fairmont; Rosa, Mrs. Furbee, of 
Tyler county, West Virginia ; Winfield Scott, a hardware merchant of 
Cairo, West Virginia; Mary, Mrs. Chestnut, of Bremen, Ohio; and 
James Clyde, of whom further; John Bosler, living in Pennsborough, 
who was the fourth child in the family. 

(III) James Clyde, son of William and Elizabeth (Hall) Mc- 
Gregor, was bom August 12, 1866, in Ritchie county, West Virginia, 
on his father's farm, the old McGregor homestead. This Is still owned 
by the grandson, James C, and other heirs, it having been in the fam- 
ily since 18 18 when the grandfather purchased it. Of his grandparents 
Mr. McGregor knew but little, aside from the fact that his maternal 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 803 

grandfather, Samuel Hall, was a millwright, born in Harrison county, 
Virginia, and also followed school teaching. He died, aged forty years, 
in Indiana. James Clyde McGregor received his education at the local 
public schools in Ritchie county. West Virginia, and began as a travel- 
ing salesman for James F. Barnes & Company, Wheeling, dealers in 
queensware. He commenced at this when twenty-one years old, before 
which time he assisted his father on the farm. He continued on the 
road as a salesman for five years, covering West Virginia entirely. He 
next embarked in a general store enterprise at Hebron, Pleasants 
county. West Virginia, and in company with his brother, W. B. Mc- 
Gregor, conducted it three years. Going back, to the farm, he remained 
a tiller of the soil for five years, going to Salem, January i, 1901, to 
start a general store, also carrying feed. The business he continued 
for five years and in 1907 he was joined by L. E. Williams to conduct 
it four years longer. October 20, 191 1, he purchased his present ex- 
tensive department store known as the "Salem Department Store"; 
J. C. McGregor and James Chestnut are its proprietors. Here four 
active clerks and the owners care for a large increasing trade. The 
present stock is worth fully $15,000. Mr. McGregor votes the Pro- 
hibition ticket, believing that this issue is paramount to all others polit- 
ically. He is connected with the Masonic fraternity and is a member 
of the Presbyterian church. 

He married in Ritchie county. West Virginia, April 10, 1895, Flora 
McKinney, a native of Ritchie county, born October 3, 1866, daughter 
of Joseph M. McKinney, living in Tyler county, this state, a retired 
farmer, aged seventy- four years in 19 12. The mother of Mrs. Mc- 
Gregor is Margaret (Carlin) McKinney, now aged seventy-two years. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. McGregor are : Lelia, bom July i, 1 896, 
now attending Salem high school; Harold E., born April 22, 1898, in 
school. 



The Haymond family is an old and honorable one 
HAYMOND in this country, as well as in England, whence the 

family originally emigrated. Several members set- 
tled in Monongalia and Harrison counties, Virginia, as early as 1773, 
two years prior to the "Lexington Alarm," the forerunner of the great 
revolution which resulted in giving this nation its independence. This 



8o4 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

narrative of the West Virginia branch of the family will treat only of 
the generations to which belong the two Daniel Floyds and Dr. Hall 
Herbert Haymond, of Salem, West Virginia. Other sketches of the 
family appear elsewhere in this work on West Virginia genealogy. 

(I) Daniel Floyd Haymond was born in Virginia, and served in 
the war of 1812. He lived to a ripe old age at Mole Hill, Ritchie 
county, where he spent his days as a farmer and stock raiser. He 
married and had among other sons and daughters, a son named for him, 
Daniel Floyd. 

(II) Daniel Floyd (2), son of Daniel Floyd (i) Haymond, was 
born in 1848, at Mole Hill, Ritchie county, Virginia, now West Vir- 
ginia, and died at Harrisville, West Virginia, in 1893, aged forty-five 
years. He was a merchant and was elected sheriff for Ritchie county 
on the Republican ticket; and was serving as sheriff at the time of his 
death. In church relation he was of the United Brethren church. He 
married Laura Anna, daughter of George Ford, born in Doddridge 
county, West Virginia, now living at the home of her son, Hall Her- 
bert Haymond, at Salem, aged fifty-seven years. George Ford lived and 
died at Garwin, Iowa; he was a farmer. After the death of Mr. Hay- 
mond, his widow married, in 1904, John Webster Williams Sr., who 
was killed by a train in October, 191 1. Children, now living: Homer 
Clyde, bom 1876, an oil inspector in Detroit, Michigan; Price Law- 
rence, born 1878, assistant cashier of a bank, at Bowling Green, Vir- 
ginia; Ada Minnie, born 1883, wife of George Harrington, lives in 
Texas where her husband is in the oil business; Nellie, born 1885, wife 
of R. T. Smith, lives at Jackson, Michigan, from which city her hus- 
band travels for an oil company; Hall Herbert, of whom further; 
Floyda Helen, bom 1891, lives at home. Children deceased: Guy, 
died aged thirteen years in 1 898 ; Hattie, died aged eight years in 1 884. 

(III) Hall Herbert Haymond, D. D. S., son of Daniel Floyd (2) 
and Laura Anna (Ford) Haymond, was born at Harrisville, Ritchie 
county, West Virginia, September 11, 1886. He attended first the 
Harrisville schools. The family removed to Salem in 1900 and he 
graduated from the Salem high school. May i, 1906. After leaving 
the schoolroom young Haymond entered the employ of the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad Company, as a telegraph operator at Clarksburg. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 805 

Two years after that he, in 1908, entered the dental department of the 
Baltimore Medical College. Graduating from the same on June i, 
191 1, he immediately located at Salem in the dental business. In July, 
191 1, his offices were located in the Merchants and Producers Bank 
building, and thoroughly equipped to practice dentistry after the most 
improved and advanced stages of the profession. Politically the doctor 
is in general sympathy with the Democratic party. He belongs to the 
Order of Railway Telegraphers and was president of the college Greek 
letter fraternity, Xi Psi Phi, during his senior year at college. He be- 
longs to the Baptist church and is unmarried. 



Singleman Atchison, the first known member of this 
ATCHISON family, was born in Pennsylvania in 1835; but has 

resided in Weston, West Virginia, the greater part 
of his long life of seventy-seven years. Before his retirement he was 
an architect. He married Julia Marsh, born in Louisville, Kentucky, 
and died about 1892. Their children were: Cora Marsh, born 1866, 
living with her brother, Herbert W., and unmarried; Gertrude, born 
1872, now wife of William E. Ruthrauff, living in Georgia; Emma, 
born 1875, now wife of O. F. Hunter, living in Washington, D. C; 
Gordon, died in infancy; Herbert Wood, of whom presently. 

(II) Herbert Wood Atchison, D. D. S., son of Singleman and 
Julia (Marsh) Atchison, was born in western Lewis county. West Vir- 
ginia, September 26, 1885. He was educated at the common schools 
of Weston; after which school life he entered Broadus College, and 
from there went to the University of Maryland, at Baltimore, where 
he graduated in dentistry in June, 1908. Immediately he went to 
Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he has been ever since in the practice 
of dentistry, with offices in the Lounds building. He belongs to that 
class of young professional men who have had the advantages of our 
modem schooling and has fitted himself for his useful profession. He 
belongs to the Masonic fraternity and the order of Elks. In church 
relations he is of the Episcopalian denomination. The doctor is un- 
married. 



8o6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

For a man to have settled in Western Virginia in 1780 
NUTTER made him a pioneer of pioneers. Such was the distinc- 
tion of the ancestor of the present Nutter family of 
this state. Getting back into revolutionary days, and before is to glean 
many interesting features of the Nutter family in this country, as well 
as to trace the line of descent in the families with which this one has 
intermarried during the last one and a third centuries. It will be ob- 
served that the Christian name Mathew is found all along down the 
line in this family, three generations having had such a name among 
the branches who have resided in Harrison county, Virginia, now within 
the territory styled West Virginia. 

(I) Mathew Nutter came from the east about 1780 and located 
with his family in what is now Harrison county. West Virginia. He 
was a farmer and a sturdy pioneer home-builder in a wilderness land, 
where but few white men and women had ever settled when he arrived, 
with a determination to do and to dare. He married a Miss Goodwin, 
and among their children was Mathew, see forward. 

(II) Mathew (2), son of Mathew (i) Nutter, was born in 
Harrison county, Virginia, in 1786, died in 1861, during the civil war. 
By occupation he was a farmer. But little is known by his descendants 
of his life, which was perhaps in keeping with the majority of men in 
his day and generation, who passed through many perplexities in caring 
for their families at a time when there were no rapid transit methods 
of conveying products of the soil to and from markets and when people 
had not many of the luxuries of life. He married Affa Webb. Chil- 
dren: Betsey, married John Ross; William W. ; Mathew H., of whom 
further; Levi C. ; Alvina, married Cornelius Lawson; Maggie, mar- 
ried Abner Lawson; Jane, married Benjamin Stout. 

(III) Mathew H., son of Mathew (2) and Affa (Webb) Nutter, 
was born in Harrison county in 1824, died June 29, 1873. He made 
agriculture his vocation throughout life's active years, rearing his family 
to become useful and true citizens of their commonwealth. In his 
politics Mr. Nutter was a Democrat, and in his religious faith he was 
a Methodist. He married Julia, daughter of Thomas McDonald, of 
Bath county, Virginia, who died in 1868, aged eighty years; he re- 
moved to Harrison county, Virginia, in 1846; he married Nancy 
Steward, whose father served in the revolutionary war, as did her hus- 




^y^^J^-^^^--^ c:^C^ 3^^^^^ 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 807 

band's father who received wounds at the hands of the British soldiers. 
The children born to Mathew H. and JuHa (McDonald) Nutter were: 
Rebecca J., married Frank Wolf; Emma D., died in childhood; Nancy 
E.; Affa V., married William Smith; Martha, married Clark. Roy, she 
• is deceased; Mathew L., married Myrtle Cofindaffer; Thomas Levi, 
of whom further. 

(IV) Thomas Levi, son of Mathew H. and Julia (McDonald) 
Nutter, was born at Grassland, Harrison county, West Virginia, Sep- 
tember 30, 1872. He obtained a good education by attending the local 
public schools of his home district, at the Normal School at Fairmont, 
and under private instructions of Professor Overfield, of Columbia 
College. Having determined to become a physician he studied medi- 
cine under his uncle, Dr. McDonald, commencing at the age of seven- 
teen years. At the age of twenty-three years he entered Louisville 
Medical College, graduating in 1898. He then located as a physician 
at Enterprise, West Virginia, as physician for the coal company at that 
point. He remained there thus employed for eight years, and in 1906 
took a post-graduate course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Baltimore, Maryland, and April i, 1907, located in Clarksburg 
where he is enjoying a good general practice. He is also interested in 
the growth and development of Clarksburg and has large real estate 
interests. He is also interested as owner and stockholder in several 
other interests, including coal lands and real estate in Washington, 
D. C, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He has erected a house dur- 
ing every month since his residence in Clarksburg, which is probably 
one of the greatest records in the state. He is also president of the 
Clarksburg & Philippi Traction Company. Dr. Nutter is a Democrat. 
He belongs to the Masonic, Odd Fellows, Maccabees, Elks and Wood- 
men lodges, and is a member of the Methodist church (South). He 
is a linguist, speaking three languages fluently, in addition to his native 
one. 

He married, August 9, 1896, at Grassland, Harrison county, West 
Virginia, Hattie Virginia Hornor, born September i, 1874, daughter 
of Squire James Hornor, retired farmer at Grassland; he is now seven- 
ty-three years of age (19 12). The mother, Viola (Lang) Hornor, was 
a native of Harrison county, and is now sixty-nine years of age. The 
only child born to Dr. Nutter and wife is one daughter, Merritt Vir- 
ginia, born March 18, 1899. 



8o8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

(I) Minter Johnson Holden was born in Clarksburg, 
HOLDEN West Virginia, March 21, 1844, and is now a mer- 
chant doing business at Bristol, Harrison county, with 
his eldest son. He received a common school education, and married 
Mary F. Harbert, born in 1847. Children: Arden J., Hattie L., 
Grace, Estella, Hezekiah J., and Wilson Browning. 

(II) Wilson Browning, son of Minter Johnson and Mary F. 
(Harbert) Holden, was born January 17, 1881, at Flinderation Run, 
live miles northeast of Salem, on his father's farm, long years known 
as the Holden homestead. He acquired his education at the rural 
schools of his neighborhood, where he was reared and spent his youth- 
ful days. He aided his father in his labors on the farm until nineteen 
years of age, when he took a course at the Clarksburg Commercial 
College. In February, 1905, he accepted a position as bookkeeper with 
the Merchants and Producers Bank at Salem. In 1908 he became 
cashier, which place he still holds acceptably to all interested. In poli- 
tics, he is a Democrat, but supports the best men for local offices. He 
is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; and in church 
relations he is of the Baptist faith. 

He was united in marriage, at Clarksburg, Harrison county, Sep- 
tember 22, 1909, to Nina Lee Fittro, born September 20, 1887. Mrs. 
Holden is the daughter of Noah and Josephine (Brooks) Fittro, both 
now deceased. Mr. Fittro served for many years as policeman at 
Grafton, West Virginia, where the family resided at the time of his 
death. Mr. and Mrs. Holden have one child: Wilson Browning Jr., 
born June 11,1910. 



Of this family, to which Dr. Frank V. Langfitt, of 
LANGFITT Salem, Harrison county, belongs, four generations 
will be noticed here in a genealogical way. 

(I) William Langfitt, the grandfather, was a native of one of the 
counties of Virginia, which is now within West Virginia territory. He 
was a successful farmer and died in Harrison county, at the age of 
sixty-five years. He married and had a son Valentine, of whom fur- 
ther mention is made. 

(II) Valentine, son of William Langfitt, was born in Brooke county, 
Virginia, February 14, 1833, and died in 1904, aged seventy-one years. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 809 

He spent his life on a farm, near Morgansville, where he died. He 
was a Democrat in politics and served two terms as member of the 
state legislature. He married Caroline Davis, born in Harrison county, 
this state, who now lives at West Union, aged seventy-five years. Will- 
iam Davis, the father of Mrs. Valentine Langfitt, was a native of West 
Virginia, and followed farming on Flint Run, where he died January 
21, 1865, aged seventy-four years. Children: Elizabeth, wife of Lewis 
Bond, deceased January 13, 1891 ; Silas W., born 1861, cashier of the 
bank at West Union; Belle, born 1862, now Mrs. M. A. Summers, re- 
siding at Parkersburg; Columbia, deceased August 30, 1889, married 
James Jones; Ila M., deceased April 7, 1892, married J. E. Trainor, 
present sheriff of Doddridge county; John H., born 1867, living at 
West Union, and assistant cashier in the bank; Samuel E., bom 1869, 
a dentist at Huntington, West Virginia; W. Creed, bom 1871, a hard- 
ware merchant at Berkeley Springs, West Virginia; Effie M., deceased 
September 16, 1903, aged thirty years; Bruce B., born 1874, is a mer- 
chant at Jacksonsburg, West Virginia; Mona G., born 1875, wife of 
Dr. C. L. Parks, of Middlebourne, West Virginia; Dr. Frank V., of 
whom further. 

(Ill) Frank Valentine Langfitt, M. D., youngest child of Valen- 
tine and Caroline (Davis) Langfitt, was born at Morgansville, Dodd- 
ridge county, West Virginia, March 24, 1883. He attended the local 
public schools and later went to Salem College. Then he entered the 
school at Buckhannon, and from that place entered the West Virginia 
State University. Having well prepared himself for the professional 
life he was to lead, he entered Baltimore (Maryland) Medical College, 
in 1903, and graduated in 1907. He was appointed resident physician 
at the Maryland General Hospital in Baltimore, and was there one 
year. In the autumn of 1908, he went to Salem and commenced to 
build up the fine medical practice which he now owns. The doctor is 
giving much attention to surgery, although his practice is general. He 
belongs to the Baptist church; is politically a Democrat. He is con- 
nected with the Blue Lodge and Eastern Star degrees in Free Masonry; 
also holds membership with the college fraternity, Delta Mu ; and is a 
member of the Harrison County Medical, State Medical and the Amer- 
ican Medical Associations. He is unmarried. 



8io Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Originally this family came from Wales; the Welsh an- 
DAVIS cestor, Jesse Davis, a farmer, lived and died at Lost 
Creek, Virginia. In his family of children was a son, 
Edgar S. 

(II) Edgar S., son of the Immigrant ancestor, Jesse Davis, was 
born at Lost Creek, Harrison county, this state, in 1842, died at Salem, 
January 12, 1905, aged sixty-three years. He was a farmer and 
merchant at Lost Creek and also operated a broom factory at Salem. 
Politically he was a Democrat, and In his church faith was a Seventh 
Day Baptist. He married Jane Mearns, now residing In Shinnston 
with Mrs. Stella Thompson, aged sixty-five years. Mrs. Davis was the 
daughter of Andrew and Melinda Mearns. He has been deceased 
many years, and his wife, living at Lost Creek, is now (1911) aged 
over ninety years. Children: Genevieve, deceased; Stella, wife of 
Cyrus Thompson, of Shinnston; Ernest O., of Salem, a merchant; Earl 
William, of whom further. 

(III) Earl William, youngest child of Edgar S. and Melinda 
(Mearns) Davis, was born at Lost Creek, Harrison county. West Vir- 
ginia, September 27, 1876. His parents removed to Salem when he 
was six years of age and there he was educated, first in the high schools 
and then at Salem College which he attended three years. He became 
a clerk In his brother Ernest's store when quite young, and remained 
there three years. In 1902 the present firm, the West Virginia Cloth- 
ing and Furnishing Company, was formed with E. O. Davis and 
Charles A. F. Randolph, proprietors, and Okey W. Davis and Earl W. 
Davis as managers. Politically Mr. Davis is a Democrat. He is a 
member of the order of Maccabees, and in church faith is of the Sev- 
enth Day Baptist denomination. 

He was married. May 15, 1903, at Salem, to Candace Queen Low- 
ther, born December 3, 1877, at New Milton, Doddridge county. West 
Virginia. She is the daughter of Johnson Lowther, still living at New 
Milton, a farmer, whose wife's death occurred about 1901. Children: 
Miriam L., born March 15, 1905; Eleanor Wlllametti, born October 
II, 1908. 



Four generations, at least, of this family have resided in 
FERINE Harrison county, in what is now West Virginia. The 
ancestors (paternal) of these generations have all been 
well known and industrious citizens. 

(I) Richard Ferine, the first of the hne of whom we have definite 
information, was a native of Harrison county, and died at West Mil- 
ford, aged eighty-one years. By occupation he was a tanner. He mar- 
ried Annie Tingler, and had children including a son Isaac. 

(II) Isaac, son of Richard Ferine, was born in Harrison county, 
Virginia, July 26, 18 17, died at the age of eighty-nine years, of cancer. 
In his early years he followed farming, but later was a tanner at West 
Milford. He was a Democrat, and in his religious faith a member of 
the Methodist Frotestant church. He married Nancy Lewis, of the 
well-known Lewis family of this county, who is now living at Clarks- 
burg, at the extreme old age of eighty-eight years. Children : Sarah, 
now Mrs. Hon. Lloyd Washburn, of Good Hope; Doctor Lewis, of 
whom further; William L., living at Janelew, a farmer; Richard Irvin, 
of Buckhannon, an undertaker; Emma L., now Mrs. James Johnson, 
of Clarksburg. Jonathan Lewis, father of Mrs. Ferine, was born on 
Newton Creek, Harrison county, now West Virginia; practiced medi- 
cine at a time when no diploma was required; he also farmed. 

(III) Doctor Lewis Ferine, son of Isaac and Nancy (Lewis) 
Ferine, was born at West Milford, July 26, 1849. He received his 
education at the local private schools. Later he taught school in his 
home county for four years, commencing his work at teaching when 
nineteen years of age. His next engagement was that of trading in live 
stock, which he followed four years, after which he commenced mer- 
chandising, at the town of Good Hope, where he was a leading mer- 
chant for twenty-eight years, going to Salem, where he now resides, in 
1905 as a partner with F. D. Bassett, which connection continued for 
one year, when he and his son became partners under the present firm 
name of D. L. Ferine & Son, and they are engaged in the gent's furnish- 
ing business. He has been president of the Merchants' Association in 
Salem ever since it was formed in 1906. He is interested in the oil and 
gas industries of Harrison county. He is also a director in the board 
of trade; was secretary of the board of education in Union district, 



8 12 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Harrison county, for eight years; was member of the council at Salem 
from 1908 to 1910. Politically he is a Democrat. In 1880 Mr. Ferine 
was a candidate on the Greenback ticket for the legislature. He has 
ever sought to build up the interests of his county and state, both polit- 
ically and commercially. In his church relations he is of the Meth- 
odist Protestant faith. 

He married, at Good Hope, West Virginia, October 2, 1882, 
Louisa J. Davis, born at Johnstown, Harrison county, West Virginia, 
May, 1863, daughter of William H. Davis, now living in Calhoun 
county, West Virginia, at the age of seventy-two years. He was a 
soldier in the confederate army, and saw service during the entire civil 
war period; was a prisoner at Camp Chase, Ohio, where he was near 
the point of death. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Perine : Icie, bom 1883, 
now Mrs. H. N. Burnside, living at Good Hope; Claudius Weaver, 
born June 6, 1884, a partner with his father; Vida Emma, born Sep- 
tember 24, 1887, now Mrs. L. C. Washburn; Harley D., born Febru- 
ary 23, 1893, ^t home. 



Among the sturdy Scotch families who settled in 
MORELAND parts of Pennsylvania, prior to and immediately 

after the revolutionary war, were the Morelands, 
one branch of whom traces as follows : Alexander — William — John — 
Joseph of the present day generations. As civilians and military char- 
acters many of the Morelands have been well and favorably mentioned 
in the history of this country. 

(I) Alexander Moreland, with his family, emigrated about 1770 
from Hamilton Bann township, York county, Pennsylvania, to the vicin- 
ity of Connellsville, then in Bedford county, in the province of Penn- 
sylvania, now within Fayette county. After this they acquired several 
hundred acres of valuable land on the left bank of the Youghiogheny 
river, three miles from the present site of Connellsville, where they 
permanently located. The name of Alexander Moreland appears in 
the published list of Scotch-Irish who settled in York county and Adams 
county in 1767-68. It also appears in a list of the earliest settlers in 
Fayette county and contiguous parts of Greene, Westmoreland and 
Washington counties, given in Judge Veeche's book entitled "The Mo- 
nongahela of Old," which with another publication shows the names of 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 813 

only sixty individuals. The names "Alex. Morelin," "David Morelin" 
and "William Morelin," no doubt the same as Moreland, are found 
in the history of Fayette county, Pennsylvania. In the "Chronicles of 
Border Warfare," by Withers, the following passage is given: "About 
this time (early in the eighteenth century), a pedlar traveling from 
Williamsburg to Winchester, resolved, in conjunction with John Sail- 
ing, a weaver, also from Williamsburg, to prosecute an examination of 
the country beyond the limits which had hitherto bounded the explor- 
atory excursions of other adventurers. With this view they travelled 
up the valley Shenandoah and crossing James river and some of its 
branches, proceeded up as far as Roanoke, when Sailing was taken 
captive by a party of Cherokee Indians. Morlin was fortunate enough 
to elude their pursuit and make a safe retreat to Winchester." This 
Thomas Moreland was not an ancestor of the line under consideration 
in this genealogy, but is supposed to be a relative of Alexander More^ 
land. The first person of the name is said to have come over from 
Great Britain to the American colonies at Jamestown, Virginia, about 
1620. The name appears both in England and Ireland, but the More^ 
lands are supposed to be of original English descent. 

(II) William, son of Alexander Moreland, above named, was 
born 1740, and was about thirty years of age when he came to Fayette 
county. He acquired by patent about three hundred acres on the bank 
of the Youghiogheny, where he made his home until his death in 1830. 
He married, January 17, 1777, Agnes, daughter of Captain Joseph 
Huston, a soldier of the revolution, who resided in the vicinity. Their 
married life extended over a period of fifty-one years, half of a century, 
fraught with important events in the history of this country, when won- 
derful changes were going on. He served in the struggle for national 
independence, his name appearing in the "List of Non-Commissioned 
officers and soldiers of the Virginia Line, on Continental Establish- 
ments, whose name appears on the Army Register, and who have not 
received Bounty Lands." It also appears in the "List of Soldiers of the 
Virginia Line on Continental Establishment who have received Cer- 
tificates for the balance of their full pay agreeable to an Act of Assem- 
bly passed November Session 1781." It appears in the Auditor's offi- 
cial record at Richmond, as certified by W. G. Stanard of that office, 
corroborating the traditions of the family that he was a member of one 



8 14 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

of the regiments raised and commanded by Col. William Crawford, 
who at the time resided but a short distance from the lands whereon the 
Morelands were domiciled. 

(Ill) John, son of William and Agnes (Huston) Moreland, was 
born, reared and spent practically all of his life on the lands patented 
to his father, a considerable parcel of which passed to him by inherit- 
ance. He died in 1866. These lands were all underlaid by the cele^ 
brated Pittsburgh coal, to-day valued at from three to five thousand 
dollars per acre. Here as early as the year 1840 he was engaged in the 
business of manufacturing coke and shipping it, by way of flatboats on 
the Youghiogheny river, to Cincinnati and Louisville. He thus became 
the pioneer in the coking business In this section. He was called Cap- 
tain Moreland, not by virtue of any military service, but by reason of 
his being In command of men employed and boats laden with coke and 
conducted by him over the only thoroughfare then in existence for ship- 
ping coke from that region. Politically he was a Democrat ; and in his 
religious faith was a Presbyterian. He married Priscilla, who died 
In 1875, daughter of William Rodgers, and the granddaughter of 
Thomas Rodgers. The Rodgers family for several generations has 
lived in and near ConnellsvIUe, Pennsylvania, and is one of the earliest, 
largest, and best known in that community. Ellis' "History of Fayette 
County" says: "Thomas Rodgers and his five brothers are said to have 
come from Maryland to Mount Braddock, accompanied by their 
widowed mother. They took up lands under what was commonly 
styled 'tom-a-hawk' claim, but becoming dissatisfied soon disposed of 
their interests to Samuel Work. The Rodgers family moved to Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, and In the Indian aggression that befell 
that region three of the brothers lost their lives. The others then re- 
moved to the mouth of Beaver, but shortly returned to Dunbar town- 
ship and located in what Is known as the Cross-Keys District. One oi 
the brothers opened a blacksmith shop on the Unlontown road, and 
soon built a tavern near by. It is related that he set a pair of cross-keys 
over his shop as a token that he was a lock-smith, and when he opened 
his tavern, he conceived the notion of calling it the 'Cross-Keys Tav- 
ern,' by which it was long known." The same county Historical work 
says: "The Act erecting the county declared 'that it shall be lawful to 
and for Edward Cook, Robert Adams, Theopholus Phillipps, James 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 815 

Daughtery and Thomas Rodgers, all of the aforesaid county, or any 
three of them, to purchase and take assurance to them and their heirs 
of a piece of land situate in Uniontown, in trust, and for the use of the 
inhabitants of said county and thereon to erect and build a courthouse 
and prison sufficient to accommodate the public service of said county.' 
In pursuance of this Act they purchased the ground whereon the court- 
house of Fayette county is now located, in the city of Uniontown." 
John, a son of Thomas Rodgers, came to and located at Morgantown 
at an early date and purchased from Michael Kern the land known as 
the Kern Survey, on which stood the old "Kern Fort." The survey 
extended from the Monongahela river, up along Decker's Creek, to the 
"Harner Bottoms," embracing all the first and second wards and most 
of the fifth ward of the city of Morgantown. He built a paper mill at 
the peninsula, five stories in height, of fine masonry, where he manu- 
factured paper for many years, his plant being of such proportions as 
to compare favorably with the large plants of the present day. He also 
built a flouring mill on the site where now stands the power plant of 
the U. U. Company and extensive saw and wooden works down on the 
creek. He was trustee of the Morgantown Female Seminary, and of 
the old Academy, a noted school for young men, which institutions were 
merged later into the State University. He was a director in the old 
Merchants and Mechanics Bank, and at various times elected to petty 
offices. He built and resided in the house where Hon. John A. Dille 
died. He died about 1864, leaving no children, and a considerable 
portion of his large estate went to the children of his brother, William 
Rodgers. 

John and Priscilla (Rodgers) Moreland were the parents of chil- 
dren as follows: William R.; Anna Maria, married Alix Armor; 
Mary Agnes, married Dr. Henry B. Lazier; Joseph, of whom further; 
Daniel R. ; Rebecca, married George M. Murphey; Sarah H., married 
Rev. Dr. S. A. Hunter; Elizabeth R., unmarried. Sarah H., Elizabeth 
and Joseph are the only ones living. 

(IV) Judge Joseph Moreland, son of John and Priscilla (Rod- 
gers) Moreland, was born near Connellsvllle, Pennsylvania, May 26, 
1842. His earliest recollections are associated with the labor and pleas- 
ures found in farm life, at times given a change by such diversions as 
pumping boats and loading them with the product of probably a half 



8i6 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

dozen coke ovens, called a magnificent plant in those days. He was at 
Morgantown as a student in i860. He remained at the Monongahela 
Academy until the breaking out of the civil war in 1861, when he re- 
turned to his home in Pennsylvania. He then entered Dunlap's Creek 
Academy and later Washington and Jefferson College, from which he 
graduated in 1866. The following year he settled in Morgantown 
with his mother, three years after the death of John Rodgers. He then 
pursued the study of law in the offices of Brown & Hagans, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1869. Since that time he has practiced his pro- 
fession in Monongalia and adjoining counties, and in the supreme court 
of West Virginia. He has served Morgantown about a half dozen 
terms as its mayor, besides having been a member of the city council. 
In 1887 he was appointed, by the judge of the second judicial district, 
as prosecuting attorney to serve an unexpired term. In 1888 he was 
sent as a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at St. Louis, 
when Cleveland and Sherman were nominated. In 1882, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Jacob B. Jackson, as a member of the board of 
regents of the West Virginia University. He held this position many 
years, until he resigned upon being made auditor of accounts for the 
institution. On several occasions he has been appointed special judge to 
hold terms of court to try certain cases in Monongalia and adjoining 
counties. Recently, during the illness of Dean Hogg of the University, 
he was employed temporarily to lecture to the Dean's class in common 
law pleading. A local newspaper says: "Judge Joseph Moreland 
closed a period of five or six weeks as an instructor in the University 
College of Law yesterday. During the illness of Dean Hogg, Judge 
Moreland instructed the young men in common law pleading, one of 
the most interesting and difficult subjects in the school. During his 
brief period of work, he won the respect and esteem of the young men 
who are preparing themselves for the practice of the legal profession." 
Atkinson and Gibbons' "Prominent Men of West Virginia" says: 
"The two peoples along either side of the border line of Pennsylvania 
and West Virginia, are of the same characteristics, and may be spoken of 
as one people. The same persevering energy in business, integrity of 
character, patriotism and courage, mark each, and in daily habits and 
social manners the same. One from the Pennsylvania side has been a 
resident of West Virginia since 1867, a lawyer in our courts, and an effi- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 817 

cient ofEcer in our civil service — Joseph Moreland, anativeof Connells- 
ville, Pennsylvania." 

Mr. Moreland is the author of a pamphlet entitled "Jokes and 
Thrice-Told Tales." It was contributed at the centennial anniversary, 
when citizens were invited to furnish all they could relating to the his- 
tory of Morgantown. It has much of real history, including the tragic 
side of life there; also jokes and stories galore, all valuable to preserve 
for future generations. He frequently refers to the years from 1873 
to 1884, during which period he was a law partner of Hon. Waitman 
T. Willey, as being among the pleasant days in the summertime of his 
life. Few men are more congenial, and at the same time more discreet 
in their dealings with others. Joseph Moreland is a member of Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Honor, Sons of Revo- 
lution and State Bar Association. 

Judge Moreland was happily married, October 26, 1875, to Mary 
E., daughter of Thomas Brown, Esq., of Kingwood, West Virginia. 
Children: i. Eleanor Brown, born 1877. 2. James Rodgers, born 
1879; graduating from the University of West Virginia and the Uni- 
versity Law School; admitted to the bar in 1902; now in the law busi- 
ness with his father; married Ethel Finnicum, of Hopedale, Ohio; has 
two children : Joseph A. and James R. 



The Allen family of Preston county. West Virginia, are 
ALLEN of Scotch descent. Joseph Allen, of colonial days, accom- 
panied his widowed mother from Scotland. They land- 
ed at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, when Joseph was probably about 
eight years of age, and later lived in Delaware. The mother remarried 
and took the name of Frum, and the family removed to Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, and later purchased lands near Morgantown. There 
young Joseph reached man's estate, and married. In his family were 
two sons: Joseph, of whom further; and John, who was a bachelor, 
died in Morgantown, and is buried with his mother in the family plot. 
( II ) Joseph ( 2 ) , son of Joseph ( i ) Allen, the boy emigrant from 
Scotland, died in 1848, and lies buried in Taylor county. West Virginia, 
in the old family graveyard two miles west of Morgantown. He served 
in the war of 1812 and was an adjutant of his regiment. He married 



8i8 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Elizabeth Dorsey, and they reared a family of five sons and three 
daughters, who also had large families of their own, some of the mem- 
bers of which were eminent in their day and generation, and all highly 
respectable. Many of their descendants still live in the Monongahela 
Valley. Children: i. John J., of whom further. 2. William, married 
Barbara Clay, and removed to Illinois. 3. Joshua, moved to Iowa. 4. 
George, moved to Ohio. 5. Eaton, settled in Taylor county. West 
Virginia. 6. Nancy, married William Bailey, both now deceased. 7. 
Isabel, married Samuel B. Wells, and they reside on the Ohio river. 8. 
Maria, married John Newland, and they are deceased. 

(III) John J., son of Joseph (2) Allen, born in 1802, located in 
Taylor county, West Virginia, where he died March 2, 1884. He was 
a farmer, owning his own property at one time. He was also a brick- 
moulder, and was a prominent man in his day. He married, in 1830, 
Nancy Powell, who died in July, 1849. Children: Maria E., bom 
April 14, 1 831; Martha Ann, born May 29, 1833; William Marcell, 
born January 13, 1834; Joseph Milton, of whom further; Waldo Por- 
ter, bom July 1 7, 1 839 ; Sarah Jane, born September 23, 1 844 ; Thomas 
Alvan, born November 27, 1847. -^^l ^i"^ dead except Joseph and 
Thomas. 

(IV) Joseph Milton, son of John J. and Nancy (Powell) Allen, 
was born August 12, 1837. He may justly be termed a self-made man, 
as he left home after his mother's death, when but twelve years old, 
and has seen many a struggle while climbing to prosperity and a com- 
fortable position in life. When he was fourteen years of age he began 
an apprenticeship at the carpenter's business, which trade he carried on 
until recently. In the meantime, he built houses and superintended other 
large structures, all the way from Cumberland, West Virginia, to the 
Ohio river. He also operated a planing mill at Elkins for eight years; 
but In 1870 went to Preston county and there purchased property in 
Kingwood and erected the house in which he now resides. About 1 892 
he became afflicted with asthma, since which time he has gradually quit 
work at his trade. As a loyal, true citizen of his commonwealth, he has 
ever wielded an influence, both in church and state affairs. His interest 
in the civil war struggle was shown by his enlistment. May 4, 1861, in 
Company B, Second West Virginia Infantry, his period of military 




/f y^^ 



^^C^l^-t-^K 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 819 

service extending over three years. He belongs to the Presbyterian 
church, and politically is a staunch Democrat. 

Joseph M. Allen married Luvila, daughter of Elijah and Mary 
Schaeffer, belonging to one of the oldest and most universally respected 
families of Preston county. Elijah Schaeffer was bom April 2, 1803, 
and died June 30, 1883. His wife Mary was born June 11, 1805, and 
died in September, 1856. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Allen: Edward, 
born May 29, 1872, still living; Addie B., born June 13, 1875, died 
December 16, 1884, of diphtheria; Marie, her twin, born June 13, 
1875, died December 13, 1884, also of diphtheria; Harry E., born 
May 2, 1878, died April 20, 1879. 



This is an old Doddridge county, West Virginia, family, 
DAVIS among whose descendants are found numerous soldiers 
and lawyers, as well as later day true captains of industry, 
all going to show that "blood will tell," and that strict, intelligent 
training in the home circle will usually bring good fruit to the third and 
fourth generations. In this connection but three generations of the 
Davis family will be considered, and only the direct lines of descent in 
these three generations whose numerous scions go toward making up 
the large, flourishing family tree. 

(I) Captain William B. Davis was a native of Doddridge county, 
Virginia (now West Virginia), born in 1807. He was a farmer, of 
industrious, frugal and temperate habits, died in Salem at the home of 
his son, Marion H. Davis, in June, 1895. He married Martha 
Hughes, born in Doddridge county, died at the same place her husband 
did. She was born in 1809 and passed away in 1883. Children: Five 
sons and five daughters, three of whom are still living: Marion H., of 
whom further; Jonathan H., of Knoxville, Tennessee, superintendent 
of a large marble quarry, where he has been engaged for a quarter of a 
century; Minerva L., temporarily residing at Salem with her brother, 
Marion H. 

(II) Marion Hela, son of Captain William B. and Martha 
(Hughes) Davis, was born in Doddridge county. West Virginia, as 
now known, September 18, 1840, on his father's farm. He attended 
the local schools of his native neighborhood, and assisted his father 
in his farm work until nineteen years of age, when he engaged in farm- 



820 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

ing on his own account on Long Run, Doddridge county. At the age 
of twenty years he was married and he remained on his farm ten 
years, when he left it on account of ill health and removed to Salem, 
April 14, 1870, and engaged in mercantile pursuits, in which he con- 
tinued for three years, when he sold out and purchased a store at West 
Union, Doddridge county, in which he handled general merchandise 
which, with a store at Bristol, he continued to operate. He finally sold 
out again and commenced the study of law, and was admitted to the 
bar in June, 1885, in Harrison county. The certificate of authority 
to practice was signed by the following circuit judges: A. B. Fleming 
(afterward governor of West Virginia), Thomas J. Stealy and Wil- 
liam T. Ice. He began the practice of law at Salem and has been con- 
stantly at the same ever since. Mr. Davis is also engaged in the fire in- 
surance business, representing some of the best companies. He is a 
member of the Harrison county bar. Politically Mr. Davis is a Dem- 
ocrat, and he has held numerous public positions, including that of 
mayor of Salem three terms, when he first began the practice of law 
there. He was also town recorder for six terms. As early as 1866 
he was elected treasurer of Grant township, Doddridge county, and 
was re-elected to that office three terms in succession, and resigned 
April I, 1870, when he removed to Salem. He received a commission 
as notary public, signed by John J. Jacob, governor of West Virginia, 
September, 1874, an office he has retained ever since. He was a civil 
engineer and practiced surveying for a time. On the day he was 
eighteen years of age he was commissioned a first lieutenant, the paper 
being signed by Henry A. Wise, then governor of Virginia, and was 
again re-elected to this office in 1864, receiving his commission from 
Arthur I. Boreman, then governor of West Virginia. He is a member 
of the Free and Accepted Masons and Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and belongs to the Seventh Day Baptist church. 

He married, January 10, 1861, at Clarksburg, Emily J., daughter 
of Adam C. Rider, a Methodist minister of Quiet Dell, Harrison 
county, where she was born. Her father died in 1884, but the mother 
still survives at the age of seventy years. The children bom to Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis are: Wellington O., of Salem, employed by the South Penn 
Oil Company; Alden R., engaged in the street car business at Parkers- 
burg; Edgar G., a painter, lives at Detroit, Michigan; Maude H., now 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 821 

Mrs. E. B. Robinson, lives on a farm near Salem, her husband being 
superintendent of several oil companies; Clayton M., resides in Salem, 
engaged in the business of drilling oil wells; Dorsey C, serving his 
third term in the volunteer cavalry of the United States, enlisted last 
time during the Mexican outbreak in 191 1. 



This is an old Pennsylvania family that resided in and 
STEEL near the city of Philadelphia in the eighteenth century, 
at least. It has furnished many good citizens in the Key- 
stone and adjoining states. Some have served their country in the 
various wars; some have been captains in the industrial world and 
others have been tillers of the soil, with now and then one entering the 
professions. 

(I) James Steel was born in the neighborhood of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, died at Clarksburg, West Virginia, suddenly in 1840 of 
cholera. He with his children went to the vicinity of Clarksburg be- 
fore the construction of the railroad and purchased a thousand acres of 
land, where now rests the famous oil, gas and coal fields of West Vir- 
ginia, but by reason of a defective title they lost their possessions. James 
Steel was a practical, active miller throughout his years, in fact, the 
family are noted for having many members engaged in the flour milling 
business. He married, and among their children was Samuel R., see 
forward. 

(II) Samuel R., son of James Steel, was born in 1820, in the 
vicinity of Philadelphia, died July 16, 1901. He followed milling 
throughout his active years, and when advancing to old age retired 
from active pursuits. He was mayor of Clarksburg, elected to that 
office four terms in succession. He was also' a commissioner of the 
county court, which was then equivalent to a judgeship. He served in 
the fifth army corps during the civil war as chief of the commissary de- 
partment, being in the Army of the Potomac in the Union army. His 
rank was major, but he was familiarly known at home as "Captain" 
Steel. He was in the service throughout the entire struggle. He was 
a highly respected citizen. He married Margaret Fittro, who still 
lives and resides with her son at Clarksburg, in her eighty-second year. 
They were the parents of ten children, seven of whom are living at 
this date (191 2). They were: Edwin D.; Lloyd, see forward; Sam- 



822 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

uel C, in Cincinnati, Ohio; Charles L., at Philippi; WiUiam, in the 
mill at Clarksburg; Harry, deceased; Alice Sonora, deceased; Anna 
Winslow, deceased; Nellie Virginia, residing in Washington, D. C. ; 
Margaret, widow of Thomas T. Wallace, she resides in Asheville, 
North Carolina. 

(Ill) Lloyd, son of Samuel R. and Margaret (Fittro) Steel, was 
born in the city of Clarksburg, West Virginia, January 3, 1858. His 
education was received at the public schools of his native town and 
county. When old enough he became his father's engineer in the flour- 
ing mills at Clarksburg, which place he filled ten years. At the end 
of that period, his father having leased a mill in the Shenandoah Val- 
ley, the son went ther*^ to assist in operating the same. He remained a 
year and returned to Clarksburg, and then rented the limestone mills 
at Adamson for one year. He learned the trade of miller with his uncle 
in Edwards county, Illinois, after which he ran a mill a short time in 
Webster, Taylor county. West Virginia. He returned to Clarksburg 
in 1886 and operated the mill in which he is still located for J. E. 
Staley & Company for one year. He then took charge of the Lounds & 
Courtney milling plant and conducted It ten years, and In 1898 he and 
his brother purchased the present Anchor Mills. They remodeled the 
same, putting in a full process of new flour-making machinery. Here 
he has been successfully located ever since, the firm now being Lloyd 
Steel Brothers; they manufacture full roller process flour, corn meal, 
feed and deal in wheat, corn and oats. He and his brothers are stock- 
holders in the Union National Bank at Clarksburg. He is a member 
of a fraternal insurance order; belongs to the Christian church and is 
fully alive to the interests of his home city. He votes the Republican 
ticket. 

He married, March 7, 1901, Bertha Ogden, born at Independence, 
Preston county West Virginia, in 1880. Her father, Albert Ogden, 
died when she was a mere child, killed while at work in the mines at 
Newburg. Her mother was Florence (Fortney) Ogden, a native of 
Shinnston, Harrison county. West Virginia, and is still living in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. She married for her second husband Harry Chromister, a 
well-known politician of Cincinnati. The children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd Steel are: Samuel R., bom January 17, 1902; Margaret, born 
September 9, 1903; Lloyd Jr., born December 23, 1904; Katherine, 
born April 4, 1905; Richard, born April 29, 191 1. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 823 

Patrick Glancy, grandfather of Patrick John Glancy, 
GLANCY now of the city of Clarksburg, was a native of the 

county of Roscommon, Ireland, where he became a 
tenant farmer. He married Catharine Toolin, and among their chil- 
dren was a son Michael, of whom further. 

(II) Michael, son of Patrick Glancy, was born in the vicinity of 
the town of Elphin, Ireland, in 1825. He came to America in 1853, 
his wife following two years later. A child died while on the ocean. 
At first Mr. Glancy found employment on the railroad near Albany, 
New York, and before the arrival of his wife located in Virginia, in 
which state he subsequently became a tenant farmer of some promi- 
nence. He was the first man to assist in unloading railroad rails on 
the Clarksburg division of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, and dur- 
ing war times was engaged in railroading; after that he engaged in 
farming for some nine years in the vicinity of Wolf Summit and Bridge- 
port, all in Harrison county. The remainder of his life was spent in 
Clarksburg. He died aged seventy-two years. He voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket, and in his church faith he was of the Catholic denomina- 
tion. He married Mary Dolan, born in Roscommon county, Ireland, 
a sister of Patrick and Thomas Dolan, old settlers of Clarksburg, West 
Virginia. She died November 20, 1909, aged eighty-one years. Chil- 
dren: Patrick John, Bridget, Margaret J., Mary A., became the wife 
of Thomas Stanley; Catherine, wife of Patrick Greaney. 

(III) Patrick John, son of Michael Glancy, was born at Grafton, 
Taylor county, West Virginia, March i, 1856. He attended the com- 
mon schools of Harrison county, to which location he moved with his 
father when but six months old. When eighteen years of age young 
Glancy went to Clarksburg with the family and there he conducted a 
retail grocery store on Main street, which stock his father had pur- 
chased. He continued a merchant for fifteen years, and then removed 
to his thoroughly up-to-date storerooms at the corner of Fourth and 
Pike streets, which was the old Strother-Prim tavern originally, and 
was an old-time landmark in Clarksburg. Mr. Glancy is a stock- 
holder in the two banks of Clarksburg, and has other property inter- 
ests. He votes the Independent ticket, and in his religious faith is 
of the Catholic church. He is a member of the Knights of St. John, 



824 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Ancient Order of Hibernians. He married, at Clarksburg, September 
8, 1909, Alice Cook, a native of Newburg, Preston county. West Vir- 
ginia, born April, 1879, daughter of Thomas Cook, who died in 1882. 
He was a miner, of English descent, and his widow still resides at 
Newburg. 



This family has many illustrious men and women con- 

CARTER nected with its history, some of whom held places of 

trust and great responsibility in the days that tried 

men's souls when the foundation stones of this republic were being 

laid for the good of future generations. 

(I) The Right Hon. Thomas Carter, the American ancestor of 
this family, was master of rolls of Ireland and was killed during the 
revolutionary war. 

(II) Robert, son of Thomas Carter, was born during the struggle 
for national independence. Nothing is known of his personal history 
other than that he married and had a son named David, of whom 
further. 

(III) David, son of Robert Carter, was probably born in Old 
Virginia, for he emigrated from Richmond, Virginia, to what is now 
within West Virginia. He was born in 1818. By occupation he was a 
farmer, and was the owner of two thousand seven hundred acres of 
land on Indian Run, Harrison county. West Virginia. He married 
Mellison Maxwell; children: Robert Marion, of whom further; Rob- 
ert, James, Mary, Elizabeth and Julia Ann. 

(IV) Robert Marion, son of David and Mellison (Maxwell) 
Carter, was born in 1856 on a farm about two miles above Marshville, 
in Harrison county. West Virginia, where he now resides. He is the 
owner of a good farm. He is, however, engaged in other pursuits, 
being a stockholder in the Merchants' and Producers' Bank of Salem. 
He is a member in the Odd Fellows fraternity, and votes the Demo- 
cratic ticket. He married Mary Rebecca Ritter, a native of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, born in i860. Children: One died in infancy; David J., 
of whom further; Marietta, Albert Fleming, Ollie Mellison, John 
H., James. 

(V) David J., son of Robert Marion and Mary Rebecca (Ritter) 
Carter, was born August 19, 1879, in Harrison county, West Virginia. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 825 

He received a good common school training, later attended Salem Col- 
lege and from that school went to the State Normal School at Fair- 
mont. He then studied law in the West Virginia University and was 
admitted to the bar in March, 1906, immediately beginning the prac- 
tice of his profession at Clarksburg. He is interested in several enter- 
prises. He is a Democrat, but is, however, an independent voter. 
He holds membership with the Elks lodge at Clarksburg, and is a 
member of Harrison County Association. He married October 19, 
19 10, Blanche Opal Hardesty, born May 23, 1885, daughter of Rob- 
ert R. Hardesty, of Shinnston. 



(I) John Davis, who settled in Virginia four generations 
DAVIS ago, was of that good substantial Welsh stock that con- 
tributed so much physical hardiness and energy to the 
American type. It was to men of his stamp, men of brawn as well as 
men of brain, that the new world with its hardships and its hard-won 
freedom appealed a few generations ago. They brought what the 
young country needed of pioneer pluck and force of body, mind and 
character upon which to raise the American commonwealth. His an- 
cestors were people of worth, the records saying that they were men 
of solid character, intellectual and of high reputation. John Davis 
married a young Englishwoman and their son was named William. 

(II) William, son of John Davis, was born in Prince William 
county, Virginia. He was a farmer in that portion of Virginia that 
attracted the early settlers by the apparently inexhaustible fertility of 
the soil. Here and there, through Prince William and adjoining coun- 
ties, remain belts of that original timber whose growth attests the rich- 
ness of the soil and the wisdom of those making their homes in that re- 
gion. William Davis married, in 1789, Jane Bromley, and they had 
nine children: William Mortimer, mentioned below; Peyton, John, 
Isaac F., Jane, Mary, Margaret, Susan, Amanda. 

(III) Rev. William Mortimer Davis, the son of William Davis, 
was bom August 31, 1846, in Loudoun county, Virginia. He has 
been for forty years a minister of the Baptist church. He has always 
taken a large-hearted interest in public affairs, especially of an educa- 
tional character, serving as county superintendent of schools in Grant 
and Hardy counties, West Virginia. As editor he has had charge of 



826 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

the South Branch Gazette, West Virginia. His pastorate is at Prunty- 
town, West Virginia, and he also preaches in adjoining places. Mr. 
Davis married Margaret A. Wyckoff, born May i8, 1850, in Loudoun 

county, Virginia, died March 27, 191 1, daughter of and 

Louisa Catherine (McPherson) Wyckoff. The Wyckoff family had 
come from Germany at an early date. They were people of sterling 
worth and probity, and their descendants are now widely scattered 
over the Union. Mrs. Louisa Catherine (McPherson) Wyckoff was 
the daughter of William and Sarah McPherson, of Scotch-Irish de- 
scent. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Davis were: Ella Prudence, 
born February 15, 1873; Minnie Blanche, October 18, 1874; War- 
ren Maynard, mentioned below; Guy Wyckoff, November 27, 1881; 
Cornelius Carter, mentioned below; John Raymond, August 26, 1886; 
Joseph Harper, March 10, 1890; WiUiam Mortimer, September 
18, 1892. 

(IV) Warren Maynard, eldest son of the Rev. William Morti- 
mer and Margaret (Wyckoff) Davis, was born February 14, 1879, 
at Petersburg, West Virginia. His early education was acquired at 
the Bridgeport high school, but later he went to the University of 
West Virginia. After a course in that institution he decided to devote 
his life to the practice of medicine and entered the Medical College of 
Virginia, at Richmond, graduating from it in due time. In early life 
.Mr. Davis worked on a farm, gaining those invaluable lessons of in- 
itiative and industry thus so frequently acquired, even if reluctantly. 
Later his incHnations drew him toward teaching and he held for a 
time a position in the public schools of the neighborhood. Through his 
devotion to medical practice he has become prominent as a physician 
and surgeon in Bridgeport, West Virginia. In politics, like all the men 
of his family before him, he is a Democrat. He is a member of the 
Masonic Lodge at Bridgeport, the Knights of Pythias and the Order 
of the Eastern Star of Bridgeport. He is also connected with the 
Bridgeport Bank. He Is a member of the Simpson Creek Baptist 
church. 

Warren M. Davis married, October 11, 191 1, Josie Laurlne, 
daughter of Abner S. and Mary (Castllow) Stout. Abner S. Stout 
was a farmer of Harrison county. West Virginia, and had seven chil- 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 827 

dren : Strawther, Cletus, Etta, Byrdie, Bertha, Josie, who married Mr. 
Davis; Dora. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have no children. 

(IV) Cornelius Carter, third son of the Rev. William Mortimer 
and Margaret (Wyckoff) Davis, was bom at Petersburg, West Vir- 
ginia, January 26, 1884. He was educated at the local schools; then 
entered the State Normal School at Fairmont, and the same type of 
school at Huntington, West Virginia; going from these to the Uni- 
versity of West Virginia. Later he matriculated at Washington and 
Lee University, at Lexington, Virginia, and graduated from that 
famous old institution in 1909 with the degree of LL.B. He then 
entered the practice of law in the city of Clarksburg, West Virginia, 
where he has met with success and has an important practice. His offices 
are in the Goff Building. Politically Mr. Davis is a Democrat. He is 
a member of the Masonic order; in church affiliations he is a Baptist. 



Thomas Williams, the earliest known member of 
WILLIAMS this family, originally lived in Westmoreland 

county, Pennsylvania, and followed agricultural pur- 
suits. Later members of the family have entered the legal profes- 
sion and held important county offices. 

(II) Samuel, son of Thomas Williams, was born in Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, in 1840, died February 17, 1910. He 
made farming his life work and was also a soldier in the Union army 
during the civil war. Politically Samuel Williams was a Republican, 
and in religious faith of the Methodist Episcopal denomination. He 
married Jemimah Martin, a native of West Virginia, still living at the 
age of fifty-four years. Children: Homer Willis, of whom further; 
Ernest G., Alfred T., John E. and Joe D. Three of the sons are 
prosperous farmers. 

(III) Homer Willis, oldest child of Samuel and Jemimah (Mar- 
tin) Williams, was born October 18, 1876, in Harrison county, where 
his parents moved in 1852. He was reared on his father's farm and 
assisted in the work, attending public schools in his neighborhood. 
Later he entered Wesleyan College at Buckhannon, West Virginia, 
graduating in 1899; then went to Morgantown to enter the State Uni- 
versity and take a course in law, graduating in 1901. He immediately 
located in his chosen profession at Clarksburg. He was elected soon 



828 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

after as clerk of the circuit court, beginning his duties January i, 1903, 
and serving until January i, 1909, when he resumed law practice. His 
present offices are situated in the Williams Building, erected by Mr. 
WiUiams in 1908. He is a director in the Home Bank for Savings at 
Clarksburg; has numerous financial interests, including that of stock in 
various local corporations; and is a director in the Home Gas Company, 
of which he is secretary. In 19 1 1 he erected a fine residence at No. 673 
Mulberry street, Clarksburg, where he now resides. Politically Mr. 
Williams is a Republican. Since 1908 he has served as chairman of 
his county for this party. He is a Free Mason and a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Williams married. May 12, 1909, Pansee Ramage, born Feb- 
ruary 19, 1888, in Fairmont, West Virginia. Her father, Benjamin 
Franklin Ramage, Is an attorney at Fairmont, whose wife was, before 
her marriage, Allie Hefner. They were both natives of Harrison 
county. West Virginia, but removed to Fairmont in 1888. Mr. and 
Mrs. Williams have one child, Roger, born November i, 19 10. 



Exclusively German in its origin this family of Haynes 
HAYNES has preserved its original orthography pure and un- 
changed through the long line of ancestry in Germany. 
Only two others, besides the German botanist, Frederich Gottlob 
Hayne, 1763-1832, have not added the final "s," making the name 
"Haynes," instead of Hayne — these two were Isaac Hayne, a revolu- 
tionary officer, 1 745-1 78 1, and Robert Young Hayne, the American 
statesman and orator, of 1790- 1840. 

(I) Isaac Hayne was the father of seven sons who were soldiers 
in the war for independence. Just who preceded him in this country, 
and what Hayne was the original German ancestor here the records 
are silent in the oblivion of colonial days, when men fought instead of 
preserving records of their daring deeds. 

(II) William Haynes, progenitor of the Monroe branch, emerged 
from the revolution with an additional "s" to his name, and right here 
it is best to mention some things concerning his brothers: Charles is 
really without history except the one item of his marriage, November 
24, 1 78 1, with Mary Dixon, of Greenbrier. Benjamin belonged to 
General Morgan's legion of riflemen, and by tradition is recalled as a 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 829 

hardy, stout young man. After the revolution he lived and died on 
Jackson's river, about nine miles below Covington, Virginia. Joseph 
also lived and died on Jackson's river. April 5, 1782, he married 
Barbara Riffe, of Greenbrier. The late Major Haynes, who lived near 
Oakland, in Alleghany county, was a son, and Colonel Charles Haynes, 
of the "Stone\vall Brigade," who died a few years ago, was a grandson 
of Joseph Haynes. Moses settled in Tennessee at an early day, but 
nothing of his later history is now known. 

Returning now to William Haynes, it may be stated that he was 
born December 18, 1763, settled in Monroe county (then Greenbrier), 
on a farm lying between "Gap Mills" and the Sweet Springs. He mar- 
ried Catherine Shanklin, of Botetourt county, Virginia. About 1795 
Mr. Haynes removed to another farm (now Robert McNutt's) at 
the foot of Little Mountain, near Gap Mills. At this point he farmed 
until his death. May i, 18 19. Here, too, his wife died in June, 18 12. 
In early life Mr. Haynes was a merchant. He was a prominent citizen 
of Monroe county. His entire family, four sons and one daughter, 
were all well educated at Lewisburg Academy. The daughter, Agnes 
D., was born April 2, 1797, married, in 18 19, Michael Erskine, of 
Monroe ; she later removed with her family to Texas, where she died. 

(Ill) James Madison, son of William and Catherine (Shanklin) 
Haynes, was born February 17, 1794. For many years Mr. Haynes 
was a magistrate of Monroe county; frequently commissioner of the 
county court; was appointed as an arbitrator in estate and will cases. 
He followed farming and declined to be sent to the Virginia legislature. 
In the autumn of 1840 he removed to Greenbrier river, five miles 
below Alderson, where, after years of intense suffering from inflam- 
matory rheumatism, he died January 4, 1858. He married, September 
21, 1 82 1, Isabelle Dunlap. They had six children, who grew to man- 
hood and womanhood, among whom were : i. Captain William Haynes, 
of Summers, held many offices of trust, both before and after the civil 
war, having been a member of the West Virginia convention in 1871 
to revise the constitution. 2. Alexander D., a successful merchant at 
Red Sulphur; represented his county in the legislature in 1856; died 
November 14, 1857. 3. Robert P., was a major of the militia before 
the war, but entered the regular service of the Confederate army in 
the Twenty-sixth Battalion of Virginia Infantry; he was captured at 



830 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

Cold Harbor, and a few days after the battle was killed by a railroad 
wreck, July 16, 1864, while on his way to Elmira, New York, as a 
prisoner of war. 4. James, of whom further. 

(IV) Rev. James Haynes, son of James Madison and Isabelle 
(Dunlap) Haynes, was born August 16, 1833, died April 25, 1900. 
He entered Washington College, 1855, graduated in 1859; entered 
Union Theological Seminary in 1859, graduated in 1862. He was 
licensed the same year at Muddy Creek and ordained in the Lewis- 
burg Presbyterian church, 1863. After preaching one year at An- 
thony's Creek, he entered the Confederate army as chaplain in the 
spring of 1863, and continued as such until the close of the war. He 
preached at Muddy Creek from 1865 to 1870, when he was placed 
in charge of the evangelistic work in Fayette county for two years, 
making his home at Gauley Bridge. He was a faithful member of 
Greenbrier Presbytery. He married. May 22, 1862, Susan Elizabeth 
Shanklin, born December 13, 1841, died November 24, 19 10, only 
child of Andrew Davidson and Rebecca (Thomas) Shanklin. Andrew 
Davidson Shanklin was of Monroe county, Virginia; a farmer; voted 
the Democratic ticket, first the "old line Whig," and in church faith 
was a Presbyterian. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Haynes: James Madi- 
son, born November 5, 1863, died August 12, 1896; Davidson Shank- 
lin, born June 20, 1865; Robert Alexander, born July 22, 1867; Re- 
becca Isabella, born May 24, 1869; Agnes Catherine, born June 9, 
1871; William Mitchell, born June 9, 1873, died August 12, 1908; 
Andrew Nelson, bom July 26, 1874, died November 5, 1876; Mary 
Jane, born August 4, 1876; Herbert Hodge, born March 21, 1878; 
Susan Sims, born May 7, 1880; Aurelia Brown, bom May 2, 1882; 
Ella Byrd, born July 21, 1884. 

(V) Robert Alexander Haynes, M. D., son of Rev. James and 
Susan Ehzabeth (Shanklin) Haynes, was born July 22, 1867, '" 
Greenbrier county, West Virginia, near Alderson. He attended the 
public and private schools of Fayette county, and choosing the medical 
profession entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, 
Maryland, graduating in April, 1896. He located at Weston, West 
Virginia, in May of that year, practicing until November i, 1897, 
when he removed to Clarksburg, where he is still a practicing physician 
and surgeon. He is a stockholder in the West Virginia Bank and is 




/?U^' d. c/^^^^^^^.d. 



Upper Monongahela Valley. 831 

one of its directors. He votes an independent Democratic ticket. He 
is president of the Harrison county Medical Society, belongs to the 
Masonic and Elk orders and his family are members of the Presby- 
terian church. 

He married, October 14, 1896, at Weston, West Virginia, Hattie 
Gaylord, born November 28, 1873, in Weston, daughter of James 
and Harriet Arnold (Butcher) Gaylord. Mr. Gaylord was a mer- 
chant; he is now deceased. His children are: Lydia M., Charles 
Moore, died April 9, 191 1; Etta Davisson, died aged six years at 
Weston; Frank Chalifant, William Arnold, Hattie (Mrs. Haynes). 
Children of Dr. and Mrs. Haynes: Aurelia Christine, bom September 
15, 1897, at Weston; Harriet Jean, born November 15, 1900, at 
Clarksburg, West Virginia. 



For many years this family resided in Greene and other 
SUPLER counties within the state of Pennsylvania. Originally 
they came from England. 

(I) John Supler, the first to locate in this country, settled in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, later moved to West Alexander, Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, where he died about ninety years of age. He 
was a farmer by occupation. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) Supler, was bom in Greene 
.county, Pennsylvania. He followed farming for his livelihood. He 
married and had children: William, of whom further; John, Isaac, 
Rachael, Elizabeth. 

(III) William, son of John (2) Supler, was born in Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1818, died about 1870. He was a farmer in 
his native county. He was a Democrat in politics and in his religious 
belief a Methodist. He married Ann Gary, who is still living in 
Greene county, where she was bom. She is now (1912) eighty years 
old. Children: James Buckhannon, of whom further; Jane, Nancy, 
Maggie, Elizabeth, Mary. 

(IV) James Buckhannon, son of William and Ann (Gary) Supler, 
was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, August 20, 1857. He ob- 
tained his education at the public schools, assisting his father on his 
farm the earlier years of his life. In 1 88 1 he engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness at Bridgeport, Harrison county, West Virginia, and continued in 



832 Upper Monongahela Valley. 

this for five years. He then engaged in the hardware business, having a 
store at both Bridgeport and Clarksburg. These he conducted two 
years, and then built the Glen Elk Hotel. After conducting this hotel 
three years he engaged in the natural gas business, and now controls 
over seventy thousand dollars interest in that industry in Harrison 
county. In 1907 he purchased a farm of three hundred and sixty-five 
acres four miles east of Clarksburg upon which he erected a twelve 
thousand dollar residence in 1911-12, which is modem in all particu- 
lars, as