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Full text of "Genealogical and personal history of western Pennsylvania;"

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GENEALOGICAL 



AND 



PERSONAL HISTORY 



OF 



Western Pennsylvania 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 



JOHN W. JORDAN, LL. D. 

Librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Editor of "Penn- 
sylvania Magazine of History and Biography" ; author of various historical works. 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME III 



NEW YORK 
LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 



I915 



v),3 



A 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1089 

boat commanded by Captain Robert Cochran, son of the farmer for whom 
Frank H. Kummer had worked for eight years. Mr. Kummer passed nine- 
teen years on the river, and in 1867 purchased the farm in McCandless town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, that is his present home, having rented 
the tract, fifty-five acres in extent, for five years previous to that time. A 
poorly built house and a log barn were the buildings that then stood thereon, 
which Mr. Kummer replaced with substantial and attractive structures, 
which were but a part of the many improvements he made in the property. 
He set out orchards of various kinds of fruit trees, and specialized in their 
culture, the products of his orchards never failing to bring the highest market 
price and being noted throughout the region for their unvarying excellence. 
At this time Mr. Kummer, after a life of ceaseless activity well rewarded, 
lives almost retired, giving his personal attention to the cultivation of but 
two acres of his land and having disposed of fifteen acres of his original tract. 
For twelve years while engaged in farming he was a fertilizer salesman, and 
for more than the past thirty years has been a director of the McCandless 
Mutual Fire Insurance Association. He served the township for five years 
in the capacity of school director, and is a communicant of the Lutheran 
church. Mr. Kummer has a wide circle of friends throughout the locality in 
which he has passed so many of his seventy-eight years, and is a familiar 
figure in McCandless township, where he holds the cordial liking and regard 
of all. 

He married, in 1862, Sarah, born in Deer Creek township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, daughter of William and Anna Elizabeth (Rocken- 
seis) Miller, natives of Germany, who settled in Deer Creek township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania. Children of Frank H. and Sarah (Miller) 
Kummer: i. William, a farmer of Butler county, Pennsylvania. 2. John, 
a gardener, lives in Los Angeles, California. 3. Frank H. Jr., a grocer of 
Perrysville avenue, Wildwood, Pennsylvania, partner of his brother, Harry. 
4. Ida, lives at home. 5. Emma, deceased. 6. Charles, of Los Angeles, 
California, associated in business with his brother, John. 7. Anna, lives at 
home. 8. George, a salesman, lives at home. 9. Harry, a partner of his 
brother, Frank H., as previously mentioned. 



August Keil, deceased, for many years a contractor, builder and 
KEIL farmer of McCandless township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 

was a son of John Adam Keil, and grandson of Peter Keil, the 
latter a miller and farmer of Germany, who never left his native land, but 
on his farm and in the mill spent his entire life. He married and left issue : 
Peter (2), John Adam, of further mention; Christina. August Keil was a 
life-long resident of McCandless township, there erected a house and reared 
a family, his widow and sons now cultivating the farm his industry and 
thrift secured. Mr. Keil was well known in the township, was president of 
the local Mutual Fire Insurance Company and prominent in local politics. 
(II) John Adam Keil was born in Germany, January 8, 1807, obtained 
a good education, and remained in his native land until June, 1836. He then 



logo 



WESTERN PENxNSYLVANIA 



came to the United States, settled in Butler county, Pennsylvania, where 
he conducted a hotel and operated a farm. Later he sold his Butler county 
•possessions and tnoved to McCandless township, Allegheny county, there 
purchasing a farm of seventy acres, upon which he lived until his death. 
He married Margaret Hoffman and had issue: i. Henry, now a farmer 
of McCandless township; married Louisa Netzkey ; children: Philip L., 
married Margaret Woods ; Harry G., married Bell Mclntyre ; Ada, married 
Samuel Anderson. 2. John Adam (2), born July 9, 184.2, now a farmer of 
McCandless township; married Anna Ehrhart ; children: Carrie, Albert, 
Elmer, Leonard. 3. August, of further mention. 4. Margaret Louisa. 5. 
Philip, moved to Ohio, engaged in business as a merchant, but died when 
about twenty-one years of age. 

(HI) August Keil, son of John Adam and Margaret (Hoffman) Keil, 
was born in McCandless township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, July 3, 
1845, died June 26, 1913. He was educated in public schools, learned the 
carpenter's trade, and from the age of seventeen to thirty-four years, fol- 
lowed that occupation, becoming a fine workman and a well known and re- 
liable contractor, erecting some of the largest and best buildings in the sur- 
rounding community. In 1879 he purchased a farm of ninety-four acres in 
the township and thereafter devoted himself to its cultivation. He wonder- 
fully improved his purchase by the erection of good substantial farm house 
and buildings, doing this work in the intervals between crops. He was as 
good a farmer as he was a builder, prospered, bore his full share of public 
responsibility and won for himself honorable standing in the community. 
He was a Republican in politics, served as assessor, school director, road 
supervisor and township auditor, and was an active member of St. John's 
Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Keil married Elizabeth Sarver, born October 31, 1858, daughter of 
Philip and Elizabeth (McCullough) Sarver, deceased, her father a farmer of 
McCandless township. Philip and Elizabeth Sarver had a large family: i. 
Lettie, married Christopher Kolbaugh. deceased. 2. Elizabeth, now widow 
of August Keil. 3. John, married Mary Callahan. 4. Samuel, married Anna 
Prosser. 5. William, married Martha McKinney. 6. Thomas, deceased ; 
married Mary Yingling. 7. George, married Cora Parker. 8. Matilda, mar- 
ried George Hoffman. 9. Martha, married George Sickles, both deceased. 
ID. Amanda, died unmarried. Children of August and Elizabeth ( Sarver) 
Keil: t. Philip, born 1880, died 1881. 2. Elizabeth. 3. William. 4. Bessie, 
born and died in 1885. 5. John, born 1887, died 1891. 6. Bertha. 7. Frank, 
attended Pittsburgh Academy, graduated in 1912. 8. Edna, attended Pitts- 
burgh Academy, graduated in 1913. 9. Winifred. Since the death of her 
husband, Mrs. Elizabeth Keil has managed the home farm with the aid of 
her sons and daughters, none of whom are married. 



From Fulda, a city of Prussia, in Hesse-Nassau, on the river 

KEITZ Fulda, came Joseph M. Keitz, son of Andrew Keitz, who died 

there, and father of Ernest R. Keitz, now a farmer of Stowe 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ick)i 

township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Fulcla is of historic interest 
from its Abbey, founded in the early part of the middle ageS, which became 
known as a seat of learning. Out of this abbey aro§e the old Episcopal 
principality of Fulda. The city from 1734 to 1803 was the seat of a uni- 
versity. Among the interesting edifices of the city are the beautiful Cathed- 
ral, erected in 1704-12, the Ancient Chapel of St. Boniface, restored in 1892, 
the extensive buildings of the old Benedictine Convent, now a clerical semi- 
nary, the Church of St. Michael, consecrated in tlie year 822, and other 
famous buildings of the Catholic church. Here educated in the exceptional- 
ly fine institutions controlled by the church, lived Andrew Keitz, secretary of 
the prince bishop of the diocese or province, a Roman Catholic. 

He was well connected by family ties and was a person of consequence, 
living on his farm adjoining the city. He died aged sixty years, his wife 
preceding him to the grave. The men of the family were as a rule short in 
stature but well built and intellectual. Children: i. John, a prosperous, 
influential lawyer, died in Germany. 2. Joseph M., of further mention. 3. 
Julia, died in Germany, unmarried. 4. Johanna, died in Germany, unmar- 
ried. 5. Wilhelmina, died in Germany, unmarried. 6. Ottilia, married a 
Herr Embach, a government attorney-at-law in Germany. 

(H) Joseph M. Keitz, second son of Andrew Keitz, was born at the 
ancestral estate at Fulda, Hesse-Nassau, Prussia, in 1812, died at Chartiers 
Creek, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1891, having suffered a stroke of 
paralysis in 1871 and being an invalid for the twenty years preceding his 
death. He was finely educated in the excellent schools of his native city, 
and after his marriage lived on the paternal estate, managing its large farm- 
ing operations. In 1858 he came to the United States, going to St. Marys 
in Elk county, Pennsylvania. He had been brought up in the Roman 
Catholic church and on arriving at St. Marys secured a position as teacher 
in one of the church schools. He taught there for two years, then sent to 
Germany for his family and on their arrival in i860 located at Phillipsburg, 
in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, now known as !Monaca. He there taught a 
German school connected with the church, remaining two years before re- 
moving to Chartiers Creek, Allegheny county. There he rented a farm and 
for ten years or more taught school and managed the farm. Suddenly 
stricken with paralysis, his activities ceased and for nearly twenty years he 
was an invalid. He was a man of gentle, quiet nature, scholarly and refined, 
and highly esteemed as an educator. He married, in Fulda, Prussia, Fred- 
erika Dernbach, born in the village of Hofachenbach. Hesse-Cassel, Prussia, 
August 2, 1823, died January 11, 1905, daughter of Anthony and Sabina 
Dernbach, her father a farmer and inn keeper of her native village. The 
Dernbachs were also members of the Roman Catliolic church. Children: 
I. Casimer. a farmer of Germany, died aged thirty-five years, leaving three 
sons. 2. Charles, was a farmer of Germany, deceased. 3. Ignatz. was a 
farmer of Germany, deceased. 4. Francisca, married Michael Joseph Hauck, 
a merchant of Fulda, both deceased. 5. Frederika. married Joseph M. 
Keitz, of previous mention. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Keitz: i. Mary, 



1092 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

married Theodore Frank, and died in Germany. 2. Eugene, died young. 3. 
Wilhelmina, married Laurence Hanaur, a farmer of Robinson township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, both deceased. 4. Ernest R., of further 
mention. 5. Charles, married Mary Coy, of Meigs county, Ohio, and resides 
in Columbus, Ohio. 6. Antonia, married Louis Burkhart, and resides at Mc- 
Kees Rocks, Pennsylvania. 7. Theodore, married Gertrude Weaver, and 
resides on the farm in Kennedy township with his brother, Ernest R. ; he 
has two children, Edward and Theodore (2). 

(Ill) Ernest R. Keitz, son of Joseph M. and Frederika (Dernbach) 
Keitz, was born near the city of Fulda, Hesse-Nassau, fifty-four miles from 
Cassel, Prussia, March 30, 1848. He attended the church schools of Fulda 
until twelve years of age, then in i860, with his mother, brothers and sisters, 
joined his father in St. Marys, Elk county, Pennsylvania, continuing his 
education in the schools taught by his honored father in Allegheny county. 
After they moved to the farm at Chartiers Creek, he helped in its cultivation 
until beginning an apprenticeship at the tinner's trade, going to Pittsburgh 
for that purpose. He worked at his trade several years, then began teaching 
in tbe parochial schools connected with St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 
at McKees Rocks. He continued teaching seven years, then purchased a 
small farm in Kennedy township, where since about 1884 he has been en- 
gaged in market gardening. He was elected justice of the peace in 1896 
and still holds that office, having his office in McKees Rocks, where he also 
conducts an insurance and real estate business. He is highly regarded in 
his community and no man there is better known than "Squire" Keitz, nor 
one more worthy of the public respect he commands. He is a Democrat 
in politics, a member of St. Mary's Roman Catholrc Church, and of the 
Knights of St. George. Squire Keitz is unmarried. 



The Redmans are of Irish descent, and while they have only 
REDMAN come to this country in recent years, they have already 
proven their worth as desirable citizens. 

John Redman was born in county Down, Ireland, in 1824, died in 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1899. He emigrated to America in 1849, 
and at once proceeded to Pittsburgh, where he lived at the corner of Liberty 
and Canal streets. He removed to Braddock Fields in 1856. He was a 
Democrat, and a member of tlie United Presbyterian church. He married 
Lucinda Kelly, also born in county Down, Ireland, in 1828, died in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1895. They had children : i. William J., of further 
mention. 2. Robert, born in what is now the Ninth Ward of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in 1852. 3. Anna, born in Braddock, Pennsylvania, in 1861 ; 
married James L. Black. 4. Malinda, born December 7, 1863 ; married John 
L. Lightner, of Braddock. 5. Emma, born March 10, 1869 ' ^'^es at Swiss- 
vale, Pennsylvania. 6. Agnes, born January 5, 1872 ; lives at Swissvale. 

William J. Redman was born at Dramore, county Down, Ireland, Oc- 
tober 19, 1848, and was brought to Pittsburgh by his parents, April 10, 1850. 
In 1856 he was brought to Braddock, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, which 




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WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1093 

town has been his liome since that time. lie was educated in the pubhc 
schools of Braddock, North Braddock and Swissvale, one of his teachers 
being Sarah Holland, who later became the widow of John McKim, and the 
mother-in-law of Professor Samuel Hamilton, superintendent of the county 
schools. It was while he was at this school that the first shot was fired 
at Fort Sumter, and he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Twelfth 
Pennsylvania Artillery, and served until 1864. He was in service during the 
battles of the Wilderness and Antietam, and was taken prisoner at Cold 
Harbor, June 2, 1864, and taken to Richmond, \ irginia. He was then sent 
to Libby Prison, and was honorably discharged, January 29, 1866. For 
some years he was engaged in river work and as a coal miner, and was one 
of the engineers engaged in the construction work for the Edgar Thompson 
Steel Plant, and was engineer at Homestead at the time of the strike of 
1892. He assisted in starting the steel works at New Castle, Pennsylvania, 
and was engineer there in 1896. He returned to the works at Homestead 
and remained there until 1900, was then janitor of the Third Ward School 
for four years, and in 1906 was appointed sergeant of police, an import- 
ant office he is filling at the present time. He is a Republican, and he and 
his wife are members of the United Presbyterian church. He is past com- 
mander of the A. N. Harper Post, of Braddock, Grand Army of the Re- 
public, Department of Pennsylvania, and national delegate to the National 
Convention held in 1913, and was on the national staflf at two of the 
National Conventions held at Rochester, New York. 

Mr. Redman married (first) Josephine Mitchell, of Bentleysville, 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, who died June 28, 1878; he married 
(second) April 9. 1880, Elizabeth Murphy, of Pittsburgh. Qiildren, all by 
first marriage: i. John P., of Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 2. George, of Brad- 
dock, married Ella Sullivan, and has child, Dorothy. 3. Anna L., married 
John F. Ford, and has children: Gertrude. James W., Lucinda, Naomi. 
William T- 



The Hosack family, of which John F. Hosack, of Bridge- 
HOSACK ville, Pennsylvania, was representative, settled in Mercer 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1803. Henry Hosack, grandfather 
of John F., was the original settler, there working at his trade, shoemaker, 
until his death in i86t. He was a soldier of the War of 1812, a good soldier 
and citizen. His wife, Elizabeth Paxton, survived him; both members of 
the United Presbyterian Church and both are buried in Mercer. 

(II) Dr. John P. Hosack, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Paxton) 
Hosack, was born in Mercer, Pennsylvania, in 1822, died November 16, 
1894. He obtained his classical education in Mercer Academy and JefTerson 
College. Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, then entered Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, whence he was graduated M. D. He began practice in Mercer, 
and with the exception of the years spent in the army practiced his profes- 
sion in that city and county. He enlisted as surgeon in the 51st Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving two years. He; took to the war 



1094 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

with him his favorite horse, "Fannie," both passing through the war un- 
scathed, "Fannie" living in pampered luxury after the return home, sur- 
viving to an unusual age for a horse. Dr. Hosack was a member of the 
county and state medical societies, the Grand Army of the Republic, and 
was one of the eminent members of his profession in Mercer county. 

He married Margaret Forker, born in Mercer, in 1826, died April 16, 
1896, daughter of John and Isabella (Graham) Forker, both born in Penn- 
sylvania, John Forker, in 1800, in Adams county ; Isabella Graham in Mer- 
cer county in 1801. John Forker was a gunsmith, a large landowner, a gen- 
eral of Pennsylvania militia, died in 1865. Children of Dr. John P. and 
Margaret Hosack: i. Henry, died in infancy. 2. John Forker, of whom 
further. 3. Jane, married Dr. W. E. Slemmons and resides in Washington, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Mary, resides in Mercer, her home on the old Hosack 
homestead, but the house a new one. 5. George Z., a Carnegie (Pennsyl- 
vania) coal dealer and ex-county treasurer. 6. Isabel, a missionary nurse in 
Egypt. 

(Ill) John Forker Hosack, son of Dr. John P. and Margaret (Forker) 
Hosack, was born in Mercer, Pennsylvania, September 7, 1847, died No- 
vember 30, 1907. He was educated at the New Wilmington (Pennsylvania) 
Academy and began business life at an early age. He was a weigher of coal 
and connected with coal operations in Mercer county until 1876, when he 
located at Scott Haven, having charge of mining operations for Mr. Scott. 
In 1896 he located in Allegheny, purchasing a mine at Bridgeville, making 
that town his home. This mine, previously owned by Mr. Schulte, he worked 
for several years. Later he was in the employ of the Pittsburgh Coal Com- 
pany, then became interested in West Virginia coal mines and lands. He 
was one of the organizers of the Bridgeville Trust Company and the first 
president of that prosperous institution, resigning on account of poor health 
and living retired until his death in 1907. He was a Republican, a member 
of the Masonic Order and a member of the Presbyterian church. 

He married, in 1868, Caroline (Carrie) B. Smith, born in Mercer, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of James W. and Emmeline (Painter) Smith, both 
life-long residents of Mercer county. James Smith was a harness manu- 
facturer until 1849, then went to California, where he died soon afterward. 
Emmeline Painter, his widow, never again married, dying when past sixty 
years of age. Children of John F. and Caroline Hosack: i. Harry, de- 
ceased. 2. James. 3. Joseph, deceased. 4. Margaret, married William 
Koch: child: Hosack Koch. 



Peter Ignatius Immekus, who was born in Westphalia, 
• IMMEKUS Germany, never left his native country. He married Anna 
Maria Hunold, and they had children, as follows: Mat- 
thias Joseph, of further mention ; Peter, who died in Germany. 

(II) Matthias Joseph Immekus, son of Peter Ignatius and Anna Maria 
(Hunold) Immekus, was born in Westphalia, Germany, May 9, 1812, and 
died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 27, 1866. He learned the lock- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1095 

smith's trade in his native land, and after his marriage came to the United 
States with his wife, in 1846. He followed his trade in Pittsburgh and its 
vicinity until his death while still a young man. He and his wife were 
devout Catholics, and liberal contributors to the support of St. Michael's 
Church. Mr. Immekus married Anna Catherine Kemper, born in West- 
phalia, September 13, 1820, died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 8, 1890, 
a daughter of Frank and Maria Anna (Bonger) Kemper, both natives of 
Westphalia, who came to America in 1846 and spent their declining years 
with their children in Pittsburgh, whose names were: Anna Catherine, 
mentioned above ; Regina, died in Pittsburgh ; Joseph, died in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania ; Bernard, died in Butler county, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. 
Immekus had children: Frank, who lives on South Side, Pittsburgh ; Joseph 
and Ignatius, twins, died in infancy ; Theresa, married William Meis, and 
resides at Mount Oliver, a suburb of Pittsburgh; Mary, born in 1849, died 
unmarried in 1893; Elizabeth, who was Sister Veronica, of the Order of St. 
Francis, died in Buffalo, New York, in 1885 ; Henry, now Father Ferdinand, 
rector of St. Michael's parish, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ; Frederick W., of 
further mention ; Anna and Peter Joseph, died in infancy. 

(Ill) Frederick W. Immekus, son of Matthias Joseph and Anna 
Catherine (Kemper) Immekus, was born in Lower St. Clair township, now 
part of the city of Pittsburgh, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 28, i860. 
He was the recipient of an excellent education, the earlier part being 
acquired in St. Michael's Parochial School, and this was supplemented by 
attendance at DuiT's Business College, after which he entered upon his 
business career. Up to the age of twenty-five years he was employed at 
the iron mills, and then decided to establish himself in business independ- 
ently. He accordingly opened a store for the retail sale of books and 
stationery at No. 8 Pius street. South Side, and conducted this for a period 
of three years. In 1888 he removed to No. 84 Twelfth street, also on 
South Side, continuing in the same line of business for a period of ten 
years. Some further years were spent in this line in the vicinity of this 
place, and during these years he had added the sale of wall papers to his 
original stock, this in the course of time becoming the most important 
feature of his business. He finally removed to his present location at Nos. 
1317-19 Carson street, where his entire stock now consists of wall paper, 
carpets and floor coverings of all kinds. He has, without doubt, the largest 
stock of this class of furnishings on the South Side, and employs from 
eight to ten employees constantly, and at times a larger number. He is 
interested in a number of other business enterprises, among them being: 
Stockholder in the Fibre Barrel Machine and Manufacturing Company ; 
the Marquette Fire Insurance Company, at Chicago. Illinois; and the New 
World Life Insurance Company, at Spokane, Washington. Politically Mr. 
Immekus is a Democrat, took an active part in the organization of St. 
Clair borough, and was elected its first burgess. Prior to this time, while 
still living at Mount Oliver, he had been a member of the common council 
and of the school board. He has now lived in St. Clair borough for the 



I096 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

past ten years. In religious affairs Mr. Immekus has always displayed a 
commendable and beneficial activity. He and his wife have for many years 
been members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church. He is a director of St. 
Francis' Hospital ; an active member of the Knights of St. George and the 
Catholic Mutual Benefit Association. He is commonly referred to as the 
father of the Allegheny County Branch of the American Federation of 
Catholic Societies, for he was one of the organizers of this branch and its 
president for the first seven years of its existence; for the last ten years 
he has been a member of the executive board of the National Federation 
of Catholic Societies and he is now the treasurer of the German Roman 
Catholic Central Verein of the United States. 

Mr. Immekus married, July 13, 1886, Ida Weil, born in Pittsburgh, 
died March 20, 1893. On November 22, 1893, he married Elizabeth Drost, 
also born in Pittsburgh. Children by first marriage : Charles and Ferdi- 
nand, deceased; Raymond, in the employ of his father, married Rose 
Hueber, and has a son, Eugene Frederick ; Cecelia, lives with her parents. 
Only child by second marriage : Henry, now is a student at St. Vincent's 
College, Beatty, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 



John Henry Hohmann, of Bellevue, Pennsylvania, is a 
HOHMANN grandson of John Hohmann, who came with his family 
from Germany, his son, Henry, having preceded him. 
John Hohmann was a shoemaker, following that trade in Germany and 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Later he owned a farm in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, on which he resided until death. He married 
Gertrude Fritz. Children : Henry, Adam, Katherine and John. The 
family were members of the German Lutheran church. 

(II) Henry Hohmann, son of John and Gertrude (Fritz) Hohmann, 
was born in 1827 in Germany and there was educated in the public schools. 
He came to the United States when a young man of twenty-five years, set- 
tling in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where for several years he was a 
riverman, running the Ohio and tributary rivers. Later he purchased a farm 
in Ross township, thence moving to Ohio township, Allegheny county, where 
he cleared land and manufactured charcoal. During the Civil War he 
enlisted and served with a Pennsylvania regiment in the Union army. He 
married Elizabeth Rhuel. Children: i. John Henry, of further mention. 
2. John, see sketch in this work. 3. Elizabeth, married Augustus Blank, of 
Beaver county. 4. Ernest, of further mention. 3. Emma Matilda, married 
Fred Trust. 6. Kate. 7. William, died aged fourteen years. 8. Frederick, 
married Anna Yost. 9. Charles T. The family were members of the 
German Lutheran church. Henry Hohmann, the father, was a Republican 
in politics, serving for many years as constable and collector of taxes. 

(III) John Henry Hohmann, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Rhuel) 
Hohmann, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, December 18, 1853. 
He attended public schools of Ohio township, Allegheny county, learned the 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1097 

trade of carpenter and followed that occupation for many of his younger 
years. He abandoned his trade in 1894 and since that date has been engaged 
in farming. In 1905 he bought his present farm of sixty-five acres, near 
Bellevue, Ohio township, where he conducts general farming operations. He 
is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics is a Repub- 
lican. Mr. Hohmann married Rosa, daughter of Frederick Upperman. 
Children: i. Emma Margaret, married John Stuart. 2. Wilhelmina, mar- 
ried Harry Anderson. 3. Anna Elizabeth, married Alvin Montgomery. 
4. Edward Charles, married Sarah Crawford. 5. Theodore Elmer. 

(Ill) Ernest Hohmann, third son and fourth child of Henry and 
Elizabeth (Rhuel) Hohmann, was born in Ohio township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, October 3, i860. He attended public schools and remained 
at home, his father's assistant, until of legal age. He then began farming 
for himself in Ohio township, then entered the employ of the La Belle Steel 
Company as a spring fitter. He then began a period of temporary sojourn- 
ing in various places — McCandless. Johnstown. Mt. Union Church, Pine 
township, finally in December, 1883, settling at Perrysville, Pennsylvania, 
his present home. There he bought a farm of seventy-four acres on which 
he started a small dairy, his first herd consisting of but three cows. He 
put forth every effort to increase his business, drove his own wagon over 
the route daily and so energetically did he work and to such good purpose 
that he increased his herd to fifty cows and marketed their entire product. 
He purchased additional land in 1909. to the amount of one hundred and 
twenty-five acres, but since 1894 has not engaged in dairying, devoting his 
time since that date to fruit and market gardening and teaming. He is one 
of the successful men of his section and it is doubtful if any farmer of the 
township has caused a similar number of acres to produce larger cash 
results than has Mr. Hohmann. Certainly no man has more faithfully 
prosecuted his business, his energy and endurance being tremendous, nor 
can better results be shown than is displayed on his one hundred and 
ninety-five acres of valuable land in McCandless township. Perhaps no 
better illustration of his energy and grit can be given than to relate how 
when a young man with but one dollar in his pocket he walked from 
Emsworth to Pittsburgh, carrying his trunk on his back. He markets an 
enormous amount of fruit and produce in the nearbv towns and cities, 
receiving the best prices, as his products are carefully handled and are of 
the highest grade. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, and a 
Republican in politics. 

Mr. Hohmann married Fanny, born Februarv 26, 1865, daughter of 
Frederick and Amelia (Miller) Miller, whose children were: Molly, 
Fanny, May, Daniel and Frederick (2). Children of Ernest and Fanny 
Hohmann: i. Emma, born February 18, 1885; married John Miller and 
has a son, Henry Raymond, born August 26, 1913. 2. George, deceased. 
3. Henry, born January 17, 1889; married Minnie Wayne and has a 
daughter, Ruth May. 4. Clara, born July 8. 1892; married W'illiam Whitt- 



1098 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

mer, Jr. 5. Frederick Daniel, born May 10, 1895; resides at home, his 
father's assistant. 6. Myrtle, born August 12, 1897. 7. Fanny Gertrude, 
born March i, 1904. 



The American ancestor of the McMillens was of Scotch 
McMILLEN descent, his descendants known as Scotch-Irish because of 
the residence of the family in Ireland, whence came he 
who settled the line in Hopewell township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
He married Martha J. Jeffrey, daughter of an old pioneer of Jeffreystown, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, who survived him. One of their children 
was Charles, the father of John McMillen, of whom further. 

(Ill) John McMillen, son of Charles McMillen, was born in Moon 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, March 17, 1836. Leaving the 
school in which he had obtained his youthful education, he learned the 
carpenter's trade, and after working for three years as a journeyman he 
entered the contracting field. To these operations he added lumber dealing, 
later admitting his son, Frederick J., to partnership. The original name of 
the concern was "John McMillen," and after the forming of the partnership 
it was known as John McMillen & Son, and still later, after the death of 
the founder, business was transacted as John McMillen's Sons. He 
established a business prosperous in its day, whose welfare has become more 
secure with the passing of the years. John McMillen met an accidental 
death in 1904, his flourishing business a monument to the thoroughness with 
which he laid his plans and the excellent judgment that directed his actions. 
Throughout nearly all of his mature life he was a member of the Presby- 
terian church. 

He married, in December, 1862, Cecelia Ann, born near Franklin, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Benjamin and Frances (Martin) Davidson, her 
father born in Ireland, her mother near Franklin, Pennsylvania. Frances 
Martin was a daughter of Rev. John and Frances (Foster) Martin. Her 
father, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, taught the first Sunday 
school in Franklin, Pennsylvania, and held religious meetings in a private 
house, which is still standing, before the congregation were of sufficient 
numbers to erect a place of worship. The ancestors of Frances Martin 
were early settlers near Franklin, Pennsylvania, and experienced many of 
the adventures that so often fell to the lot of the pioneers, the most exciting 
being those with the original inhabitants of the locality, the Indians. Chil- 
dren of John and Cecelia Ann (Davidson) McMillen: i. Alberta Louise, 
married a Mr. Cunningham. 2. Martha Frances, married a Mr. Murdock 
and resides in Sewickley, Pennsylvania. 3. Edward D., of whom further. 
4. Frederick J., of whom further. 5. Lucy Alice, died aged sixteen years. 

(IV) Edward D. McMillen, son of John and Cecelia Ann (Davidson) 
McMillen, was born in Sewickley, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June 20, 
1869. After obtaining a public school education, he was employed in the 
commercial bank, later entering the service of the Westinghouse Electrical 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1099 

and Manufacturing Company, and upon leaving this concern went west. 
In that section of the country he engaged in retail deaUngs in carriages and 
wagons, being located in El Paso, Texas, for six years, then returning to 
Sewickley, where, in partnership with his brother, Frank J., he has con- 
ducted the business inherited from John McMillen, their father. Lumber, 
coal, limestone and various makes of roofing are the lines handled by the 
firm, which holds a prominent place among organizations of its kind in that 
part of the county. The two partners guard zealously the reputation gained 
while the business was under the direction of their father, and it is to their 
credit that the same high standard, both in goods handled and in business 
dealings, is maintained. During the Spanish-American War Mr. McMillen 
enlisted in the Fourteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
serving as a private until just prior to his discharge, when he was promoted 
to the rank of sergeant. 

(IV) Frederick J. McMillen, son of John and Cecelia Ann (Davidson) 
McMillen, was born in Sewickley, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1874, 
and obtained a general education in the public schools. When he was twenty 
years of age he was admitted to his father's business, and since, as junior 
partner, has conducted the same, continuing his father's policy of honorable, 
upright dealing to his financial benefit. His firm holds the confidence of its 
many customers, its wide patronage a tribute to those at its head. Mr. 
McMillen has ever supported the Republican party, in religion is a Presby- 
terian, and holds membership in the Young Men's Christian Association. 
He married, January 26, 1904, Annie Cook Stewart, daughter of David 
Boyde and Lillie Rodgers (Cook) Stewart, her father born in New Con- 
cord, Ohio, May 31, 1843, died November 18, 1913; her mother a native 
of Carnegie, Pennsylvania. David Boyde Stewart was a soldier in the 
Union army during the Civil War, and in business was connected with the 
Tide Water Oil Company. He had one brother and possibly two sisters. 
one of the latter living at the present time. His wife was a daughter of 
Jacob W. and Elvira (McKowan) Cook, her father having come from 
Pliiladelphia to Pittsburgh in 1832 to accept a position with his brother. 
George A. Cook, in the First National Bank of Allegheny. He became 
cashier of this institution, later its president, an office he held until his death, 
many years later, at which time his son, George A., was cashier. Children 
of David Boyde and Lillie Rodgers (Cook) Stewart: i. Elmer Cook, 
deceased. 2. Lillie Hamilton, married Harry Thompson, of Sewickley, 
Pennsylvania. 3. Byron David, deceased. 4. Annie Cook, of previous 
mention, married Frederick J. McMillen. 5. Marie, deceased. Children of 
Frederick J. and Annie Cook (Stewart) McMillen: Elizabeth Cook and 
Frederick J., Jr. 



Ireland is the land whence came the ancestors of Andrew S. 

HOGAN Hogan, of this chronicle, county Kilkenny the district of that 

country in which the family lived. The first of the line to 



iioo WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

immigrate was not he who founded the Pennsylvania branch, but the 
father of Andrew W. Hogan, and grandfather of Andrew S. Hogan, who, a 
native of county Kilkenny, married an English woman, and lived on his 
farm in his homeland until their eight children were grown to maturity, 
after which he and his wife immigrated to Canada, buying a fertile farm at 
Chatham, Ontario, there residing until their deaths, their youngest son still 
living on the farm. They were the parents of: i. Dennis, lived in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 2. Sylvester, deceased; was a jeweler of Cleveland, Ohio. 3. 
Andrew W., of whom further. 4. James, a grocer of St. Louis, Missouri. 
5. John, deceased ; was a tinner of St. Louis, Missouri. 6. Patrick, resides 
on the home farm near Chatham, Ontario, Canada. 7. A daughter, married 
a Mr. Ball, and lived in Montreal, Canada. 8. A daughter, resides in Dublin, 
Ireland. 

(II) Andrew W. Hogan was born on a farm near the river Barrow, 
county Kilkenny, Ireland, in 1843, died in Steubenville, Ohio, in 1901. He 
was reared on the home farm and educated in the schools nearby, and when 
fourteen years of age, filled with the adventurous spirit of youth, he ran 
away from the paternal home and went to sea on a merchant vessel. For 
several years he was a sailor, his voyage taking him to nearly every port 
in the world to which commerce penetrated, and during the war with Mexico 
he was in the navy of the United States, our ships then, in comparison with 
the fleet recently in Mexican waters, forming a navy hardly worthy of the 
name. Abandoning the pursuit of the sea, he made his home in Beaver, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania, at the time that the Fort Wayne Railroad was 
in the course of construction, becoming a contractor in work on that road. 
When the line was completed he moved to Allegheny City (Pittsburgh 
North Side) and was baggage master on the first train that traveled the 
newly-laid tracks of the road, remaining in that service and attaining the 
rank of conductor, a position he held until 1870, when he went to Steuben- 
ville, Ohio. In this city he established in grocery dealing, being for twenty 
years a merchant of that place, his death there occurring. Like his parents 
he was a member of the Roman Catholic church, politically adhering to the 
Democratic party. 

He married Elizabeth Stanley, born in Steubenville, Ohio, in 1844, 
died in 1894, daughter of Casper (2) and Sophia (Mueller) Stanley. 
Casper Stanley was a son of Casper Stanley, a native of Germany, where 
he married, in middle life immigrating with their son Casper (2) to Ohio, 
he and his wife both dying when more than ninety years of age, being 
buried at East Liverpool, Ohio. Casper (2) Stanley was born in Stuttgart, 
Wurtemberg, Germany, and was educated in the homeland for the Lutheran 
ministry. Coming to the United States with his parents, he met the young 
lady whom he made his wife, Sophia Mueller, of Catholic faith. This 
wide difiference in their religious beliefs and his ecclesiastical intentions he 
remedied by giving up his intention to enter the ministry of the Lutheran 
church and learning the baker's trade. He prospered in this line and 



WESTERN PENXSYLVAKIA iioi 

became the proprietor of a shop, which he later enlarged to include a 
grocery department, a venture that met with the most favorable success. 
In the evening of life Mr. and Mrs. Stanley moved to Denver, Colorado, 
the home of their youngest son, Joseph E., there purchasing property and 
living there until their deaths. Sophia Mueller was born in Alsace, then 
French territory, her parents locating in Steubenville, Ohio, after emigrating 
from their native land, her mother living to the wonderful and unusual age 
of one hundred and four years, being buried at Waynesburg, Ohio. Chil- 
dren of Casper (2) and Sophia (Mueller) Stanley: i. Casper, deceased, 
a grocer of Steubenville, Ohio. 2. Elizabeth, of previous mention, married 
Andrew W. Hogan. 3. Caroline, deceased, married James McGinnis, 
deceased, and lived in Steubenville, Ohio. 4. Mary, married a Mr. Stager, 
a wholesale cigar dealer of Leavenworth, Kansas. 5. Joseph, a curio and 
antique merchant of Seattle, Washington. Children of Andrew W. and 
Elizabeth (Stanley) Hogan: i. Casper, a hotel proprietor of Denver, 
Colorado. 2. Andrew S., twin of Casper, of whom further. 3. Caroline, 
unmarried, lives in Florence, Italy. 4. James, an invalid, died aged thirty- 
five years, unmarried. 

(Ill) Andrew S. Hogan, son of Andrew W. and Elizabeth (Stanley) 
Hogan, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, September 8, 1862, and 
as a youth was a student in the public schools of Steubenville, Ohio, gradu- 
ating from the high school in that place in 1881. He became a bookkeeper 
and for several years was employed by firms in Steubenville, Ohio, in 1888 
entering the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad, in which he has remained 
to the present time, a period of twenty-six years. He was transferred to 
the general freight office in Pittsburgh in 1895, and has been there stationed 
since, his present capacity being that of chief clerk. Mr. Hogan's record 
of over a quarter of a century continuance in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad contains no items in which he may not take pride, for his 
advancement has come through the merit of the work that he has performed 
in minor capacities and lower positions, and his present office is one for which 
he has shown eminent qualifications. Since July, 1901, Greentree borough 
has been his home, and in the fall of 1910 he built an attractive residence, 
designed along modern, simple, lines, where he has since lived. He is a 
Republican in politics, and for seven years has served as a member of the 
local school board. Mr. Hogan is a citizen who does not let his responsi- 
bility as such end with the casting of his ballot, but is ever on the alert for 
an opportunity to divert some practical benefit to his community. He has 
found an admirable manner of so doing in the organization and superintend- 
ing of boys' clubs in the locality, maintained at the expense of the citizens, 
which have proven finely effective in their entertainment and amusement 
as a substitute for street lounging. To work of this nature Mr. Hogan 
devotes a great deal of his time, and being a man to whom youths are at- 
tracted he has been the instrument for much good to the boys and the 
communities that later shall claim them as citizens, as well as to that in 



II02 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

which he lives. Extensive fraternal associations are not a part of his 
activities, his home life and the companionship of his family holding far 
more charms for him than such social gatherings. 

He married, October i6, 1897, Elizabeth McCabe, born in Scott town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Thomas Fife and Mary 
Jane (Richardson) McCabe. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Hogan: i. 
Norma Stanley, born December 20, 1898. 2. Dorothy Lee, twin of Norma 
Stanley. 3. James Edward, born August 29, 1904. 

This is one of the numerous prominent names of Welsh 
RICHARDS origin which are found largely represented in the United 
States, and has been identified with progress along all 
lines of human endeavor from a very early period in the settlement of the 
American colonies. It is one of those names which originated in the Welsh 
custom of making the possessive form of the father's name a surname, and 
is equivalent to Richard's son. The name as a Christian name is very 
ancient and is found among the early annals of the present English nation, 
and so developed into a surname along with others in common usage. Books 
of heraldry give no less than seventeen distinct coats-of-arms connected 
with the name of Richards, enough of which point back to Wales to justify 
the general belief that there was the original hive from which issued the 
founders of illustrious families of that name in different counties of 
England. 

William Richards was born in Wales in 1824, died at Dravosburg, 
Pennsylvania, June 30, 1889. He eloped with Mary A. Williams, and 
immediately after their marriage they emigrated to America, where they 
settled at Bradys Bend, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, remaining for a 
time. They then removed to South Side, Pittsburgh, where he found 
employment as a coal miner, and later other employment on the river. 
Removing to Dravosburg about i860, he continued in his river work until 
his death. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias. His wife was born 
in Wales in 1821, died at Dravosburg, October 26, 1910. They had chil- 
dren : James S. ; Charlotte ; William B. ; Lizzie. ; Thomas A., who was a 
grocer in Clairton, Pennsylvania, died in January, 1912; John G. ; Harry E., 
of further mention ; George W. ; Charles Edward. 

Harry E. Richards, son of William and Mary A. (Williams) Rich- 
ards, was born at Dravosburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, ]\Iay zj, 
1865. He attended the public schools, and upon the completion of his 
studies found employment in the coal mines. Later he established himself 
in the grocery business, with which he has been identified for upward of 
• twenty years. In 1905 he erected a three-story brick building, with a front- 
age of seventy-seven feet, on McClure street, having a part of it arranged 
for hotel purposes, and three stores on the street floor, and in 1907 opened 
this as a hotel, and has conducted this personally since that time with a very 
satisfactory amount of success. At the present time he is one of the oldest 



WESTERN PENNSYLXAXIA 1103 

business men in the borougli. He is connected witli otlier business enter- 
prises, one of them being the State Bank, of which he is one of the directors. 
He is a Republican in his pohtical opinion, and a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 

Mr. Richards married, April 7, 1887, Jennie L. Lewis, born in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, across the river from Homestead, a daughter of John 
H. and Margaret A. Lewis. They have had children : Howard, a clerk 
in the employ of the Duquesne Steel Works : Frank, a student at the Mc- 
Keesport High School ; James Harrison, attends the public schools of 
Dravosburg. 



John Hervey, proprietor of a grist-mill in Tarentum, Alle- 
HERVEY gheny county, Pennsylvania, was the American ancestor of 

his line, his birthplace probably having been the north of 
Ireland, from which district he came to the state of Pennsylvania. His 
death occurred when he was in middle age, his religious faith being the 
United Presbyterian. He married Margaret McQuiston, and had children : 
I. John, deceased, a minister of the United Presbyterian faith. 2. 
Joseph, an oil operator, resides in Cleveland. Ohio. 3. William, 
deceased, an oil operator, lived at Middlebourne, West Virginia. 4. Robert, 
of whom further. 5. Mollie, married a Mr. Shoup, and lived in Tarentum, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 

(H) Robert Hervey, son of John and Margaret (McQuiston) Hervey, 
was born in Tarentum, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1855, died 
March i, 1902. He grew to mature years in his birth-place, there attending 
the public schools, and in young manhood began to follow the oil fields as 
an operator, an occupation in which he continued all his life. It was while 
he was engaged in this business near Bradford, Pennsylvania, that he was 
married, and for the twelve following years was employed in that vicinity. 
He then opened the Moon Oil Field near Coraopolis, beginning work on 
that property in 1888, and subsequently conducted operations near Oakdale, 
Pennsylvania, and at Sistersville and New Martinsville. West Virginia, 
where he was working at the time of his death. The greater part of his 
operations were in partnership with his brother, Joseph, under the name 
Hervey Brothers, and he was the founder of the Jacob's Farm Oil Com- 
pany, of West Virginia. He was a staunch Republican and was frequently 
urged to allow his name to be advanced as a candidate for political prefer- 
ence, but always refused, preferring to wield private influence rather than 
the sceptre of office. His church was the United Presbyterian. He married 
Estella E. Corwin, born in New York state, November 25, 1854, died 
January i. 1907, daughter of Seymour S. and Hannah (Hobart) Corwin. 
Her father was a carpenter and cabinet-maker by trade, also doing consider- 
able contracting, and died in 1890. aged sixty-two years. He had come to 
Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, for the purpose of building the house in which 
Robert S. Hervey now lives, his death occurring soon a^ter its completion. 



II04 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

His home was near the Pennsylvania state line in Bradford county, and 
Corwin Center, Pennsylvania, was named in honor of a member of the 
family. His religious belief was the Methodist Episcopal. His wife was 
the only one of her parents' diildren who attained mature years. Children 
of Robert and Estella E. (Corwin) Hervey: i. Winifred, married R. J. 
Watson, and lives on Fourth avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. 2. 3. 4. 
Robert Seymour, of whom further ; Stella M., and Edgar J. D., Hve together 
in Corapolis, Pennsylvania. 

(HI) Robert Seymour Hervey, son of Robert and Estella E. (Corwin) 
Hervey, was born in Bradford, Pennsylvania, October 21, 1883. In his 
youth he attended the public schools of Bradford and Coraopolis, Pennsyl- 
vania, later enrolling in Lindsey Institute. He completed his studies by a 
course in Duff's Business College, of Pittsburgh, and began his business 
career as an ofifice boy in the employ of the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Rail- 
road. Various positions have opened before him as he has worked with 
industrious application at the task at hand, and he has progressed through 
various grades to the important and responsible position of assistant travel- 
ing auditor of the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad. This has been his title 
since November i, 1913, his previous position having been the chief clerk- 
ship of his division. His entire business experience has been in railroad 
work, and there is scarcely a detail of the system with which he has not a 
working familiarity, while of those departments in which he has been em- 
ployed his knowledge is minute and finely accurate, it having been his 
capacity for completely mastering his work that has won him his successive 
advancements. Politically he is allied with the Republican party, and he is 
a member and trustee of the United Presbyterian church, also belonging to 
the Improved Order of Heptasophs. Mr. Hervey married, June 28, 191 1, 
Sarah Pauline, born in Charlotte, North Carolina, daughter of Rev. W. W. 
and Louise (Hunter) Orr, her father a minister of the Evangelical church. 



Among the residents of Shaler township, Allegheny county, 
HASER Pennsylvania, who take pride in German birth and ancestry is 

Sebastian Haser. He is a grandson of Frank Haser, a native 
of Prussia. Frank Haser was for the greater part of his life a charcoal 
burner, in young manhood felling the trees that fed this industry. He 
married in Prussia, and there passed his entire life. His wife was Gertrude 
Sterbrinecht, and they had children, one of their sons, Henry, of whom 
further. 

(II) Henry Haser, son of Frank and Gertrude (Sterbrinecht) Haser, 
was born in Prussia, Germany, died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He 
learned the puddler's trade in the iron and steel mills of his native land, 
and coming to the United States in 1854 he settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he immediately obtained employment in the Etna Mills. He 
was engaged in this calling until his death. He was a member of the Roman 
Catholic church. Mr. Haser married Magdalena Gref, a native of Prussia, 



WESTERN PEXXSYLVANIA 1105 

Germany, and was the father of: Sebastian, of whom further; Lena, John, 
Henry, Amelia, Mary, Catherine, Nicholas, the only child born in the 
United States. 

(Ill) Sebastian Haser, eldest of the eight children of Henry and Mag- 
dalena (Gref) Haser, was born in Prussia, Germany, August 13, 1838, and 
after attending the schools of his birth-place, accompanied, when sixteen 
years of age, his father to the United States. He had begun labor in the 
mills of his native land, and in 1855, when seventeen years of age, began 
puddling in the mills of Pittsburgh, being placed in full charge of a furnace 
at an extremely youthful age. For thirty-two years he was employed in the 
mills of Pittsburgh, twenty-six years of this time in the service of the 
Spang Chalfonte Company. In 1875 Mr. Haser bought the ten-acre place 
that he now occupies at Millvale, Pennsylvania, and has there since resided, 
building on this place a comfortable and excellent appearing house. Since 
coming to Shaler township as an agriculturist, that locality having been his 
home all during his residence in this country. Mr. Haser has been a suc- 
cessful gardener. He has found the tilling of the soil an occupation at 
once enjoyable and profitable, and has found therein a calling more pleas- 
urable and healthful than the guardianship of vats of molten metal, his 
former business. 

He married, in 1862, Lena Werner, born in Alsace, Germany, daughter 
of Lawrence and Catherine (Veichoshof) Werner, whom she accompanied 
to the United States, her parents locating first at Troy Hill, Pennsylvania, 
later moving to Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Children 
of Sebastian and Lena (Werner) Haser: John. Lena, Joseph, Henry. 
Mary, Edward, Stella, William, Charles. 



Prior to the immigration to the United States in 1845 of 
HARBUSCH William Harbusch, the history of the family of Harbusch 

was confined to German limits. William Harbusch was 
a native of that country, and was educated in German schools, and after 
coming to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was there engaged at various occu- 
pations, finally moving to McCandless township, Allegheny county, there 
beginning farming. For five years he rented the land that he cultivated, 
and in 1867 purchased fifty-six acres of land in that township, in 1889 
adding thirty-five acres to this tract, and here he died in 1897. ^^ the time 
of his original purchase the property was in an unimproved and uncultivated 
condition, but so regular has been its cultivation and so thorough the care 
bestowed upon it that it now ranks with the best farms in the region. 
William Harbusch was a man of steady industry, who devoted himself 
entirely to his work, deriving therefrom an excellent living for himself and 
his family. The family faith was the Lutheran. He married Fredericka, 
born in Germany, died in 1904, daughter of John Fuss, a native of Germany, 
who came to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, about 1843, being employed in the 
foundries of that city until his death. John Fuss was the father of : John, 



iio6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Christian, Louisa, Fredericka, of previous mention, married William Har- 
busch. Children of William and Fredericka (Fuss) Harbusch: Louisa, 
Anna, Christian, of whom further ; Minnie. 

Christian Harbusch, son of William and Fredericka (Fuss) Harbusch, 
was born on the farm where he now lives in McCandless township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, March lo, 1868, and was educated in the 
schools of the locality. He was reared to a farmer's life, and after the 
death of his father continued the cultivation of the home place, making his 
operations general in character. Outside of his agricultural operations his 
only business relation has been as director of the McCandless Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, a position he has held for the past ten years. He has 
been road supervisor of McCandless township, and at the present time is a 
member of the board of supervisors of that township. He is a citizen 
highly regarded, and holds place among his neighbors as an agriculturist of 
proven ability, his success in that line comparing favorably with that of 
others of the township engaged in the same line. 

He married, in 1894, Catherine Kuhlber, born in McCandless township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Peter Kuhlber. Children of 
Christian and Catherine (Kuhlber) Harbusch: Wilbert Christian, Arthur 
William, Carolina Fredericka, Charles Herbert. 

Hugh Owens, born in Ireland and there educated and mar- 
OWENS ried, founded his line in Pennsylvania, coming to that state 
while a young man and locating in Pittsburgh. His trade 
was that of bricklayer and stone mason, and this he followed throughout his 
active years, his death occurring in Pittsburgh. He married a Miss Ray, a 
native of Ireland, and was the father of four sons and two daughters, 
among the former being John, of whom further, William and Robert. 
The two last named were respectively the fathers of John D. and William, 
who were soldiers in the Union army in the Civil War. 

(II) John Owens, son of Hugh Owens, was born in Pittsburgh, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, and died in Pine township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. He was educated in the schools of his native city, learning 
afterward the trade of bricklayer, which he followed for several years. In 
later life he moved to Pine township, purchasing a farm and making agri- 
culture his calling until his death. He was a member of the Cross-roads 
Presbyterian Church and a regular attendant at its services. He married 
Nancy McNary, born in Pine township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of James and Jennie McNary, her parents natives of Ireland. 
James and Jennie McNary were early settlers of Pine township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, there owning two hundred acres of land, which James 
McNary cleared and improved. They were the parents of four daughters 
and one son, one of the former marrying a McCombs and becoming the 
mother of three sons, James, Alexander and Thomas, all of whom were 
soldiers in the Union army in the war between the states, all surviving that 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1107 

conflict. Children of John and Nancy (McNary) Owens: James, deceased ; 
William, deceased; Nancy, married a Mr. Crozier; Elizabeth Rush; Mattie, 
married a Mr. Grubbs; Sarah, married a Mr. Dunlap; Anna, married a Mr. 

Gibson; Brice Ray, of whom further; , married H. F. Hannah. 

(Ill) Brice Ray Owens, son of John and Nancy (McNary) Owens, 
was born in Pine township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, December 31, 
1855, and was educated in the public schools of that locality. As a youth 
he learned the bricklayer's trade under the instruction of an uncle, William 
Owens, of Pittsburgh, and was thus employed in that city for several 
years. He then became a farmer near Valencia, Pine township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, conducting operations general in nature on a tract 
of one hundred and ten acres, a part of which he has since sold. He was 
successful in this line, and for the past five years has made his home in 
the village of Valencia, his son, Ray, managing the farm. Mr. Owens is a 
member of the Cross-roads Presbyterian Church, a citizen of high standing, 
and a man of lofty principles to which he has steadfastly clung. He married, 
April 8, 1880, Margaret Douthitt, of Mars, Pennsylvania, and is the father 

of: Eva M., married Freeman, and resides in Pittsburgh North 

Side ; Ray, lives, as previously stated, on the farm in Pine township. 



In the long ago John and Dorcas Neel came from the North 
NEEL of Ireland to the Province of Pennsylvania, settling in Lan- 
caster county. They were both members of the Presbyterian 
church and in their new home connected with a church of that faith. John 
Neel was a farmer, owning the acres he cultivated, with the aid of his sons, 
most of whom later crossed the mountains into Western Pennsylvania, 
although both John and Dorcas Neel died in Lancaster county. Children : 
I. Adam, married ]\Iolly Snodgrass, had six children and always remained 
in Lancaster county. 2. \\^illiam, married Jane Snodgrass, later moved to 
Western Pennsylvania, where he was killed by the Indians ; children : 
Dorcas, Mary, Jane, John, Margaret and William (2). 3. John, married 
Mary Cooper, a sister of James Fenimore Cooper, the noted American 
novelist ; they also moved to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where it is 
believed that John was slain by the Indians; children: Colonel John, 
Archibald, Tabitha, William, Thomas, James and Samuel. 4. James, of 
further mention, grandfather of James Flavel Neel. of Dravosburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 

(II) James Neel, son of John and Dorcas Neel. was born in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, who crossed the mountains with their belongings in 
wagons drawn by horses. They settled in Versailles township at what is 
known as "Long Run Place," but later James Neel moved to Mifflin town- 
ship, where he took up a large tract of land on Thompson's Run and there 
ended his days, a farmer and a strict Presbyterian. He married Rachel 
McClure and had children: i. Dorcas, born December 20. 1775, married a 
"Mr. Cockran. 2. John F., born May 29, 1778, died in infancy. 3. Jane, 
born October 17. 1780, married a Harrah. 4. Thomas, born February 17, 



iio8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

^7^3- 5- James Harvey, of further mention. 6. Grizella, born November 8, 
1788, married a Mr. Cockran. 7. Reuben, born June 22, 1791, lost his life in 
a shipwreck, his career having been an adventurous one; unmarried. 8. 
Rachel, born October 19, 1795, married a Mr. Finley. 9. Hiram, born 
November 5, 1799, a mechanic and pioneer coal operator, died aged sixty 
years, unmarried. 

(HI) James Harvey Neel, third son and fifth child of James and 
Rachel (McClure) Neel, was born in Mifiiin township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, September 30, 1785. He grew up amid the rude surround- 
ings of that pioneer period, helped to clear and cultivate the "Thompson's 
Run" farm, owned by his father, and at the latter's death inherited one- 
half of the estate. He was a very progressive, energetic character, and in 
addition to his farming and lumbering operations conducted a tannery on 
his farm and had an interest in a wholesale grocery business in Pittsburgh. 
For many years his house was the government postoffice for the neighbor- 
hood and he the regularly appointed postmaster. He prospered in all his 
undertakings and left behind a goodly estate and honored name. He was a 
devout Presbyterian, the family all being members of the Lebanon congre- 
gation. He married Elizabeth Brierly, born in Mifflin township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, and there died, daughter of Robert and Belle Brierly, 
and granddaughter of John and Ann (Jackson) Brierly, both born in the 
North of Ireland. John Brierly and Jane Jackson were married in Ireland, 
December 13, 1743, and in 1750 came to Pennsylvania, settling in Lancaster 
county, where John engaged in farming. Children: i. Margaret, born 
March 23, 1745. 2. Elizabeth, born March 12, 1747. 3. Robert, see for- 
ward. 4. Henry, born January 21, 1750. 5. Jean, born May 16, 1753. 6. 
George, born February 22, 1755. 7. Isabella, born December 2, 1759. 8. 
John, born January 16, 1762. 9. Richard, born April 22, 1764. 10. Thomas, 
bom January 22, 1770. Robert Brierly, son of John and Ann Brierly, 
was the first settler of the name to come to Mifflin township and there 
passed into after life, engaged in farming. Children of Robert and Belle 
Brierly: Elizabeth, married James Harvey Neel, of previous mention; 
Jane, Thomas, Presley, died young : Mary and Eleanor. Children of James 
Harvey and Elizabeth Neel: i. Jane, bom March 23, 1823, married Dr. 
O'Brien, deceased. 2. John Flavel, of further mention. 3. Robert, born 
April 16, 1828, died in Mifflin township; was a wheelwright and black- 
smith. 4. James Harvey (2), born April 28, 1830, died young. 5. Hiram, 
born April 21, 1832, now a retired farmer living in Mifflin township. 6. 
Rachel, born June 21, 1833, died in infancy. 

(IV) John Flavel Neel, eldest son and second child of James H. and 
Elizabeth (Brierly) Neel, was bom at the home farm on "Thompson's 
Run," Mifflin township. Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 9, 1825, and 
died August 31, 1914, in his nintieth year. He was living in good health 
in Dravosburg, Pennsylvania, prosperous, contented and influential. He 
grew to manhood on the home farm and obtained his education in the 



WESTERN PENNSYL\ANIA 1109 

district schools near b}'. He was his father's assistant for years, then 
he and his brother Hiram worked the farm together. Later they 
divided the farm, but John F. did not long retain his share. He had a well 
developed capacity for business affairs, and selling his inheritance for cash, 
he invested his money in different enterprises, with such good results that 
for many years he had lived a retired life. He was one of the organizers 
of the First National Bank of McKeesport and was a member of its board 
of directors at the time of his death. At various times and at various 
places he had been interested financially in enterprises of magnitude and in 
his active years was regarded as one of the most capable and reliable of 
business men. In 1872 he purchased a small farm on the Monongahela 
river at Dravosburg, fifteen miles south of Pittsburgh, which was his home 
at the time of his death. He was an ardent Democrat and had held many 
local offices. He had always been careful in all his habits and while nearly 
a nonegenarian, might easily have passed for a much younger man. He 
prospered abundantly but his success was earned and was not the result of 
lucky circumstances. He was one of the best known men in his locality, 
was highly respected and had many warm friends. 

Mr. Neel married (first) February 10, 1857, Susanna Forsythe, who 
died December 21, 1857, leaving her son, James Benjamin, born ten days 
previous to the mother's death. He now resides in Riverside, California, 
a banker, his wife formerly Sarah Risher. Mr. Neel married (second) 
September 18, 1873, Mary Ann Ramsey, born in Columbiana county, Ohio, 
May 16, 1848. Children: i. John Flavel (2), born July 16, 1878, met his 
death by drowning, June 27, 1891. 2. Harry Campbell, born March 9, 
1882; he is a graduate of Pennsylvania State College agricultural course, 
Yale School of Forestry, two years course, spent three and a half years in 
the United States Forestry Service and now cultivates the home farm. 3. 
Jessie Ramsey, born July 6, 1884; married George F. Lloyd, and resides in 
Homestead, Pennsylvania. 4. Frances Folsom, born January 13, 1887; 
now residing at home. 5. Hiram Alexander, born January 7, 1889; now 
metallurgist for a steel company, and resides at Middletown, Ohio ; he mar- 
ried Elizabeth Van Gundy. Mary Ann (Ramsey) Neel, mother of the 
above five children, is a daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth (Work) Ram- 
sey, her father a farmer of Columbiana county, Ohio, his native county, 
where in his younger days he taught school. Elizabeth (Work) Ramsey, 
his wife, was born in Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
both members of the Presbyterian church. Children: i. Susanna, mar- 
ried Alexander Rhodes. 2. Mary A., married John Flavel Neel. 3. Wilson 
S., living in Hanoverton, Ohio. 4. Margaret, married Frederick Baker, 
and lives in Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 5. Jessie, 
died aged twenty-five years. 6. Nettie, married Joseph Osborne. 



The Stuckslager family has been in America for 

STUCKSLAGER some generations, and they came originally from 

Germany, where they were a highly respected family. 



mo WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Charles Stucklager was born in the state of Pennsylvania, and was 
among the early settlers of Fayette county, locating near Brownsville, where 
he founded the homestead, and followed farming during all the active years 
of his life. He was a Republican in political matters, and a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Susan Robinson, also a 
native of Pennsylvania, and they became the parents of children : Harrison, 
Johnson, Henry, William, John, Daniel, Cyrus Robinson, of further mention ; 
Catherine, and several other daughters. 

Dr. Cyrus Robinson Stuckslager, son of Charles and Susan (Robin- 
son) Stuckslager, was born on the homestead in Fayette county, Pennsyl- 
vania, February 27, 1829, died April 7, 1904. His early years were spent 
on the homestead, and he attended the public schools in the vicinity of his 
home, and received his preparatory university education at Allegheny Col- 
lege, Meadville, Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated. He then 
matriculated at the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, and was 
graduated from this institution in the class of 1852 with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. For a time he was engaged in the practice of his 
profession at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, but upon the outbreak of the Civil 
War enlisted in the Twelfth Regiment Kansas Volunteer Infantry, and 
served three years. At the close of the war he located in Monongahela 
City, Pennsylvania, remained there for some years, then removed to Mc- 
Keesport, Pennsylvania, in 1873. He organized the People's Bank of Mc- 
Keesport, was in office as the cashier for a long time, and at the time of 
his death was president of this institution. He was a man of many sided 
ability, did excellent and effective work in the cause of religion, and was a 
member of the Order of Free and Accepted Masons. 

Dr. Stuckslager married (first) Martha Carson Strawn, of Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, who died in November, 1885. He married (second) 
November 15, 1888, Eleanor Foster Huffman, of Jefferson township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, who was a teacher for some years prior to her 
marriage in McKeesport. Children by first marriage: i. Lulu B., who died 
in 1889; married E. S. Thomas, of McKeesport, left one daughter. Lulu, 
who married Robert Leyda, of Washington county, Pennsylvania, now liv- 
ing in Spokane, Washington. 2. Harrison Robinson, of McKeesport. 3. 
Florence M., married W. L. Crubaugh, of Cleveland, Ohio. Children by 
second marriage : Sarah Huffman, Helen Beam, Eleanor Foster and Eliza- 
beth Robinson, all talented young women. 

Lewis Huffman, grandfather of Eleanor Foster (Huffman) Stuck- 
slager, was born in Germany, and with his wife was among the pioneer 
settlers of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where their deaths occurred. 

Henry Huffman, son of Lewis and Eleanor (Foster) Huffman, was 
born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, was at first a shoemaker, later a 
farmer, and at the time of his death was the owner of a large farm in 
Baldwin township. He was a Republican politically, and he and his family 
were members of the Methodist church. He married Sarah Beam, born in 




"^ i^. jluc^.Ua,a&i' 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA nil 

Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Elijah and Nancy (Snee) 
Beam, the former born in Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, the latter born in Ireland, a daughter of John and Nancy (Kay) 
Snee, who on their voyage to this country with their children buried their 
daughter Polly at sea. Children of Henry and Sarah (Beam) Huffman: 
Nancy, married Dr. W. V. M. Taylor, of McKeesport ; Benjamin Franklin, 
deceased ; William W., of Butler county, Pennsylvania ; Eleanor Foster, who 
became the wife of Dr. Stuckslager, of this sketch ; Sarah B., deceased ; 
Esther, died in infancy. 



Frederick Pershing, the founder of this branch of the 
PERSHING Pershings in the United States, was born near Berlin, 
Germany. When a young man he settled in Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania, and there owned a good farm on which he resided 
until his death at the age of eighty-five years. He married and reared a 
family. Three of his sons served in the Union army, Joseph N., a captain; 
Hugh H., a lieutenant, and John H., a private, the latter dying soon after 
the war closed. 

(II) Daniel Pershing, son of Frederick Pershing, was born, lived and 
died in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, a farmer. He married (first) a INIiss 
Hice, (second) Martha Ann Fisher, of German descent, daughter of Abel 
and Mary (Stewart) Fisher, of early Westmoreland county families, the 
Fishers locating there in 1775. Daniel and Martha Ann Pershing were the 
parents of seventeen children, all but two living to maturity ; thirteen by 
the first wife and four by the second wife. 

(III) Dr. Frank Stewart Pershing, son of Daniel and Martha Ann 
(Fisher) Pershing, was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania. He pre- 
pared in public schools, then entered Mount Union College, Ohio, later 
pursuing a course of medical study at Jefferson Medical College at Phila- 
delphia, whence he was graduated M. D., class of 1879. He at once located 
at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, and has practiced his profession continu- 
ously in that city until the present date. He has built up a very large 
practice and is one of the leading physicians of his section of the country. 
He is a member of various professional societies, including the Allegheny 
County Medical Society and the Wilkinsburg Medical Club. Dr. Persing 
has acquired important business interests, although all are subordinate to 
his professional interests. He is vice-president of the First National Bank 
of Wilkinsburg, director of the Wilkinsburg Realty and Trust Company 
and director of the Wilkinsburg Furniture Company. He married, Sep- 
tember 3, 1885, Katherine L. Endley, of Mansfield, Ohio. 



All the Gallaghers in America, whether they came to 
GALLAGHER this country in Colonial days or in mire recent years, 

have had a common origin. The ancient Irish clans and 
chieftains of Triconnell descended from a warrior named O'Gallchobdair, 
and were located in the baronies of Raphoe and Ter Hugh, where they had 



1 1 12 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a castle at Ballyshannon. They also possessed the castle of Liftord. They 
were commanders of O'Donnell Cavalry. Sir John O'Gallagher is mentioned 
in the wars of Elizabeth. Triconnel was formed into a county about 1585 
by the Lord Deputy Perrot and called Donegal. In the Irisli language it 
was Dunna-ngall, signifying "Fortress of the foreigners," so named, it is 
said, from a fortress erected there by the Danes. The ancient Irish name 
Gallchobdair became in more modern times O'Gallagher and finally Galla- 
gher. They are of very ancient lineage. Anmire, who was the one hun- 
dred and thirty-eighth monarch of Ireland, and the brother of Fergus, w^s 
the ancestor of Gallchobdair of previous mention. The Gallaghers have 
been noted in the armies of other than their own land and of England. 
The Irish Legion, formed by the First Consul of France, Napoleon, was 
composed of exiled Irishmen and sons of Irishmen born in France. There 
were two officers of the Legion by name Gallagher, Captain Patrick, who 
was a lieutenant in 1803, and a captain in 1804, and T-ieutcnant Thomas 
Gallagher. The Irish Legion followed the fortunes of Napoleon in his wars 
in Holland, Portugal, Spain and Germany. In our own Civil War there 
served two of the name as officers in General Thomas Francis Meagher's 
Irish Brigade: Captain ]\Iichael Gallagher, of the Eighty-eighth New York 
Regiment, and Lieutenant James Gallagher, of the Sixty-third New York 
Regiment. 

Timothy Gallagher was born in Ireland in 1825, and died in Braddock, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1904. He emigrated to the United 
States in 1857, with his wife and family, and made his home at Port Perry, 
where he followed his calling as a stone mason. In political matters he was 
a staunch Democrat, and in religious, a devout member of the Catholic 
church. He married, in Scotland, Sarah Fitzsimmons, born in Ireland in 
1825, died at Braddock, and they had children : John, deceased : Mary ; 
Sarah ; Margaret, James and Patrick, deceased ; James W., of further men- 
tion ; William and Agnes, deceased ; Alice ; Timothy, deceased. 

James W. Gallagher,- son of Timothy and Sarah (Fitzsimmons") Gal- 
lagher, was born in Port Perry, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. October 
24, 1858. When he was three years of age he came to Braddock, Pennsyl- 
vania, with his parents, and there he acquired his education in the public 
schools. He learned the trade of painting, but for twenty-eight years has 
been an engineer, and altogether has been with the Carnegie Steel Company 
for thirty-five years, and is now with the United States Steel Corporation. 
He owns a beautiful home at No. 732 Fourth street, North Braddock. 
From being a poor lad, who hunted rabbits on the present site of North 
Braddock, he has worked his way upward to a position of influence and 
affluence. He takes an active interest in the political aflfairs of the com- 
munity, giving his strong support to the Democratic party, and has served 
as a member of the common council of North Braddock for six years. 
His religious affiliation is with the Catholic church. Mr. Gallagher married, 
March 4, 1886, Catherine, born in Pittsburgh, March 8, 1865, a daughter of 
Thomas and Julia (Kane) Dolan, both natives of Ireland. Both were un- 



WESTERN PENNSYL\AX!A 1113 

married when tliey came to this comitry. Mr. Dolan found employment in 
the Lippincott Axe Factory, then went to Bellefonte, Center county, Penn- 
sylvania, then returned to Pittsburgh, and finally purchased a farm in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1877, and his wife, 
to whom he had been married in the old cathedral by Bishop O'Connor, 
died in 1909. They were the parents of children as follows: Mary; Ida; 
Michael ; Jennie, deceased ; Catherine, who married Mr. Gallagher, as above 
stated; Ella; Alice. Mr. and Mrs. Gallagher have had children: Blanche. 
deceased ; Julia Grace, was educated in the public schools of North Brad- 
dock, was graduated from the high school there, and is now teaching in 
the public schools of that town ; Helen, received her education in North 
Braddock and in Curry's Business College, and is now a bookkeeper in the 
employ of the Braddock Furniture Company ; Mary, a student at the high 
school; James Leo, attending public school ; Thomas Paul, also in the public 
schools. 



The Phillips family of North Braddock, Pennsylvania, is 
PHILLIPS typical of the best character of the English race, that race 

which in the early days of American history was most 
prominently concerned with the formation of the institutions of the new 
republic in the west, and which became the social foundation for that vast 
and composite fabric of American citizenship which has subsequently been 
reared in safety. The Phillips have been stone cutters for generations in 
their native land of Devonshire. Certainly the present Mr. Phillips' father, 
grandfather and great-grandfather all followed this trade, to say nothing 
of the present generation. Satisfied with conditions in their English home, 
the family had lived there from time immemorial, until in the days of 
Samuel Phillips, the father of the Mr. Phillips of this sketch, there was 
born that spirit of enterprise that has made the English the greatest race 
of navigators in the history of the world. 

To Samuel Phillips the opportunities ofifered by the new world held out 
a temptation not to be resisted, and in 1883, when forty-four years of age, 
he left his family in Devonshire and migrated to the new world to estab- 
lish for them there a new home. His travels first led him to Canada, 
where he arrived the same year with his oldest son. John C. Phillips, and 
after remaining there a year he finally made his way to the United States 
and to North Braddock, Pennsylvania. In this Pennsylvania town he and 
his son John C. established themselves in business, and here they were 
gradually joined by the members of their family. Gilbert B. Phillips 
arrived in 1890, and finally the remainder of the household, with Mrs. 
Phillips in 1893. They lived in their new American home for ten years, 
and the family had already begun to take a prominent position in the affairs 
of the town when Mrs. Phillips died in 1903. She was survived by her 
husband until 1905, when his death occurred also. To them were born ten 
children, all but two of whom came to America, namely: i. John C. who 
came with his father to America, settling in North Braddock in 1884. and 



III4 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

he has since had a most successful career in this country ; his birth occurred 
in Devonshire, England, April 14, i860, so that though he spent his child- 
hood and early youth in his native land, and there received his education, 
he was nevertheless a very young man when he began his active life in the 
United States; he at once took up his father's occupation and became a 
stone cutter and mason, and soon developed a large business as contractor 
in that line ; he was extremely successful in his business, which he pursued 
uninterruptedly for a space of twenty years, finally retiring to a life of 
leisure in his beautiful home at No. 306 Hawkins avenue. North Braddock, 
and there continues to live at the present time ; he has been extremely 
active in the life of his community, particularly in church work and politics ; 
his religious affiliations are with the United Brethren church, while politic- 
ally he is a Republican; he has served three times as a member of the com- 
mon council of North Braddock, and is still one of that body; in 1888 he 
married Martha Jane Meredith, a native of Braddock, Pennsylvania ; they 
have no children. 2. Minnie. 3. Rhoda, who is now a resident of Plymouth, 
England. 4. Harry. 5. Maud Mary. 6. Jessie, still resides in England. 7. 
Gilbert B., of whom further. 8. Elizabeth Ann, now a resident of Jiamil- 
ton, Ontario. 9. William E., also a successful brick contractor of Brad- 
dock, Pennsylvania; he was one of the children who came to this country 
in 1893 with Mrs. Phillips, and now owns a handsome residence at No. 199 
Lobinger avenue. North Braddock ; he is a member of the United Presby- 
terian church ; he married, in 1899, Margaret Fife, of Braddock. 10. 
Robert E., deceased. Mrs. Phillips, the wife of Samuel Phillips and the 
mother of his ten children, just enumerated, was before her marriage Ann 
Alford, and like her husband, a native of Devonshire, and like him born 
in the year 1839. She was the daughter of Robert Alford, of that region, 
where he followed the trade of shoemaker. 

Gilbert B. Phillips, the seventh child of Samuel and Ann (Alford) 
Phillips, was born in the ancestral home of his family, Devonshire, England, 
July 31, 1874. He obtained his education in the public schools of his native 
region, remaining with his mother and the rest of the family when his 
father and eldest brother set out for the New World in 1883. Eight years 
later, when he was but sixteen years of age, he joined his father in North 
Braddock, Pennsylvania, and there apprenticed himself to learn the trade of 
stone mason, with John C. Phillips, his brother. He had already done some 
work as brick mason, before lea-ving England, and this, together with his 
natural aptitude, gave him a quick mastery of his trade. This he worked 
at as a journeyman until the year 1900, when he was able to realize his 
wish to set up in the contracting business for himself. The firm of Phillips 
& George, general contractors, was established in North Braddock, and at 
once met with great success in that rapidly growing community. Among 
the most important buildings erected by Phillips & George have been the 
United Brethren church, the large apartments known as the Smith Flats, 
and ten of the handsome brick residences on Braddock avenue. Eight 
years ago Mr. Phillips built a beautiful house for himself at No. 1005 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1115 

Spring street, North Braddock, and still resides there with his family. 
While the duties in connection with his business as contractor are none of the 
lightest and absorb much of his time and attention, Mr. Phillips by no 
means confines his efiforts to these personal interests. On the contrary, he 
is keenly interested in all aspects of the life of the busy community of 
which he forms a part, and takes a prominent part therein. He is a keen 
observer of the course of political events, and has identified himself with 
no party, preferring to remain independent of such association, and free to 
cast his ballot and exert his influence in any direction and for any cause 
which his reason dictates. Mr. Phillips is a staunch member of the Calvary 
Presbyterian Church, and a generous supporter of the many benevolences 
connected with its work. 

Gilbert B. Phillips married, December i, 1901, Nellie Louise Wilks, a 
native of New York City, born December 21, 1881, daughter of Joseph and 
Sarah (Bowdler) W'ilks, of that city. Mr. Wilks was a native of England 
and his wife of Ireland. They came to this country in early youth and 
were later married here. He was a machinist in the employ of the West- 
inghouse Company, East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and died in the year 
1912 at the age of sixty-seven years. His wife survives him. To them 
were born seven children, as follows : Emily, deceased ; Sarah ; William ; 
Nellie L., now Mrs. Gilbert B. Phillips, of this sketch; Joseph; Frances; 
Isabel. Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert B. Phillips are the parents of three children, 
all sons, as follows: Fernley Barrington, born January 31, 1903; John 
Charles, born October 12, 1913: Gilbert Francis, twin of John Charles. 



This name has been known for many generations in Germany, 
KUEHN and the qualities it expresses — bold, keen, aggressive, pro- 
gressive — have characterized its bearers both in Germany and 
in this country. 

(I) Ludwig Kuehn was born in Prussia, Germany, July 24, 1822, and 
died in 1866. He was the owner of a brick yard. He married Augusta, 
born June 22., 1830, a daughter of William Schmidt. Children: Carl, of 
further mention; Matilda, now deceased, married William Greenburg, and 
lived at West End, Pittsburgh; Friedrich ; Ludwig; Augusta; Bertha, 
married August Schmidt ; Henrietta, married John Speelman, lives at South 
Side, Pittsburgh; Julius. Mrs. Kuehn married (second) John Steinberg, 
and had one child, Edward. 

(II) Carl Kuehn, eldest child of Ludwig and Augusta (Schmidt) 
Kuehn, was born in Prussia, Germany, June 18, 1852. He received a sub- 
.'-tantial and practical education in his native country, and emigrated to the 
United States at the age of twenty years, arriving in this country January 
30, 1872. He settled at Swissvale, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where 
he was engaged in gardening for a period of fourteen years. July 3, 1889, 
he purchased his present place, and removed to it November 18, 1891. 
The original purchase was one hundred and three acres, but Mr. Kuehn has 
added to it so that the entire farm now consists of two hundred and four- 



ni6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

teen acres, a part of which is cultivated as follows : Eight acres for grape 
culture, two for raspberries, two for currants, four for peaches, one for 
gooseberries, two for cherries, three for plums, and two for apples. In 
addition to this he cultivates a large tract for general garden truck, and 
finds a ready sale for all his output at the nearby markets, by reason of the 
excellent quality of all of his products. He has made many improvements 
on his land, conducting everything in the most modern and up-to-date 
manner. He has erected a fine large barn, and remodeled the dwelling 
house entirely, fitting it up with all modern improvements and conveniences. 
His farm is considered by those competent to judge of such matters as one 
of the finest and most prosperous in Allegheny county. Politically Mr. 
Kuehn is a Republican, and his religious affiliation is with the German 
Lutheran church, to which he is a liberal contributor. 

Mr. Kuehn married. May 3, 1877, Christiana, born February 18, 1859, 
a daughter of George and Margaret (Taylor) Shaller, and they have had 
children : Margaret, married Herman Rush and lives in Patton township ; 
Frank L., unmarried, lives in Patton township; Matilda, married Edward 
Koch, lives in Pitcairn, Allegheny county ; Charles, married Verna Moose, 
lives in Patton township; Bertha, married Eniil Kaus; Emma, Frederick 
and Marie, living with parents. 



The Foltz family has for many years been identified with the 
FOLTZ varied interests of the sections of the state of Pennsylvania in 

which are located the counties of Bucks and Westmoreland, 
the earlier members of the family being among the pioneers, enduring the 
hardships and danger of that troubulous period, and also participating in 
the early wars, in which they displayed great bravery and prowess. 

(I) Henry Foltz, great-grandfather of Heister Clymer Foltz, of Turtle 
Creek, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where he was reared and 
educated, and where he resided until 1776, when he removed to Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, in company with Daniel Boone, and took up 
land on Indiana creek, some of his descendants still residing on the same. 
He improved and cultivated his land, under his careful management it 
changing from an almost wilderness to fertile fields which yielded an 
abundant harvest. Among his children was Henry Walters, of whom 
further, and John, who was a well known naturalist, and died in Central 
America. 

(II) Henry Walters Foltz, son of Henry Foltz, was born in West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, and there spent his entire lifetime, engaged 
in the occupation of farming. He married Mary Elizabeth Smitley, a 
native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and among their children 
was William Gcflden, of whom further. 

(III) William Golden Foltz, son of Henry Walters Foltz. was born 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1898, aged sixty-two 
years. Fie was a farmer, but retired after spending many years as a mer- 
chant in the village of Kecksburg. He was successful in his business, and 



WESTERN' PENNSYLVANIA 1117 

took an active part in public affairs, holding several local offices, the duties 
of which he performed in a highly creditable manner. He married Eliza- 
beth Griffith, a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, daughter of 
John and Sina (Newell) Griffith. 

(IV) Heister Clymer Foltz, son of William Golden Foltz, was born 
at Mammoth, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, June 25, 1866. He at- 
tended the public schools of his native place, Curry Institute and the Sixth 
Avenue Business College at Pittsburgh. He began his active career as a 
hod carrier, and later served an apprenticeship at the trade of carpenter, 
and after serving some time as a journeyman was appointed to the position 
of foreman for the firm of William Miller & Sons, building contractors. 
In 1908 he took up his residence in Turtle Creek, and in partnership with 
C. W. Palmer engaged in the building contracting business under the style 
of Palmer & Foltz, which later was changed to H. C. Foltz, the present 
style. In addition to this, which has proven a successful enterprise, he has 
dealt extensively in real estate, from which he derives a good income. He 
is one of the organizers, a director and a member of the executive committee 
of the First National Bank of Turtle Creek. He has served as treasurer 
of the borough of Turtle Creek, and for two years was a member of the 
Union High School Board, his influence bringing about the erection of the 
Union High School, which has proven a valuable addition to the school 
system in that place. He is well read, especially along the lines of phil- 
osophy, travel, politics and economics, to which he has devoted considerable 
time and study. Mr. Foltz is unmarried. 



From the German Empire there has come to this country many 

LEAX men whom we now claim as our citizens, men who are willing 

if necessary to lay down their lives to preserve the Union, men 

who are conscientious in the performance of each and every duty, and 

among these are the members of the Leax family. 

(I) John Leax was born in Saxony, Germany, and there spent his 
entire life. He was a farmer and gardener by occupation, and from these 
lines of work he provided a comfortable home for his family. He married 
Wilhimina George, a native of Saxony, Germany, who bore him nine 
children: William, of whom further; Paulina, became the wife of Frank 
Trommer, a native of Germany, a painter by trade, and they emigrated to 
the United States in 1880, locating in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and they 
were the parents of four children : Thomas, Anna, Lena, Francis ; John, 
of whom further ; Hattie, who married James Avery, of Pittsburgh, Penn- 
^^yl\•ania : Earnistina. Wilhimina. .\nna, Linda, Ida, all remained in Germany. 

(II) William Leax, son of John and Wilhimina (G«orge) Leax, was 
born in Saxony, Germany. After completing his studies in the common 
schools of his home town, he served an apprenticeship at the trade of 
butcher, becoming expert in that line and was engaged in the same in his 
native land until 1879, in which year he emigrated to the United States 
and settled in Wilkins township, .Allegheny county. Pennsylvania, on what 



iii8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

is called No. 3 Hill. He secured employment in the digging of coal, at 
which he worked until 1898, when he rented some land and conducted 
gardening operations thereon for two years. He then purchased eighteen 
or twenty acres in Turtle Creek, where his son, William Leax, now lives, 
and he continued his gardening operations there until his death, on Easter 
Sunday, 191 1. During his residence there he re-built the house, making 
it more commodious and comfortable, and since his death his son has 
erected a new barn, thus adding greatly to the appearance of the place. 
Mr. Leax married Anna Meuschke, born in Saxony, Germany, died in 
Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania, July 29, 1913. They were the parents of eight 
children : Lena, married John Roehn ; Anna, deceased ; Mary, married 
Henry Myers ; Emma, married Charles Mains ; William, of whom further ; 
Flora; Henry; Paul. The family are members of the German Lutheran 
church of Braddock. 

(H) John (2) Leax, son of John (i) and Wilhimina (George) Leax, 
was born in Saxony, Germany, March 20, 1853. In 1882 he left his 
native land for the New World, locating in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
where he has since resided. His first occupation was digging coal in the 
section of the state in which he located, and he continued at the same until 
1900, in which year he purchased ten acres of land in the vicinity of Turtle 
Creek and there successfully conducts gardening operations. He is the 
owner of an attractive residence, which he has fitted up in excellent shape 
for the use of his family. He is well known and respected in the community 
as a man of upright character, leads a quiet and unassuming life, spending 
his leisure time in his home. Mr. Leax married, in 1876, Anstina Scheerer, 
in Germany, where she was born, daughter of August and Fredericka 
Scheerer. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Leax: William, John, Ada, Minnie, 
Anna. 

(Ill) William (2) Leax, son of William (i) Leax, was born in 
Wilkins township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1885. He 
was a student in the public schools of that locality, and since entering upon 
his active business career has conducted the homestead farm, performing 
all kinds of gardening work. He is thorough and painstaking, active, pro- 
gressive and enterprising, and therefore deserves the success which is sure 
to crown his eiTorts. He is popular in the community, and has a wide 
circle of friends. He is unmarried. 



The Duffs were among the earliest settlers of Allegheny county, 
DUFF Pennsylvania, and have always borne their share bravely as good 
citizens and patriotic supporters of the rights of their country. 
(I) John Duff, a farmer of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, married 
Mary Shakeley, and had children: James, born August 4, 1782; married 
Kitty Fisher; William, born October 11, 1784, married Mary Johnston; 
Mary, born October 22, 1786, married Frank Wilson ; John, of further 
mention; David, born January 8, 1791. married Nancy Henderson; Mar- 
garet, born September 15, 1792, married John Park; George, born Febru- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1119 

ary 6, 1894, married Jane Morrow, Alexander, born January 26, 1796, 
married Mary Bright; Esther, born July 14, 1801, married John Richard- 
son; Elizabeth, born November 3, 1803, married James Park; Samuel, 
born February 15, 1807, married Jane Wilson; Matilda, born June 12, 1813. 

(II) John Duff, son of John and Mary (Shakeley) Duff, was born in 
what was then Wilkins township, and is now Penn township, April 25, 
1789. He was a farmer and stone mason, and in 1840 purchased fifty acres 
of land in Penn township. Politically he was a Democrat, and he was a 
member of the United Presbyterian church. Mr. Duff married, May 2, 
1824, Isabelle Fisher, and they had children : Mary Ann, deceased, born 
April 4, 1827; Matilda, deceased, was born April 18, 1829, married Matthew 
Long; George, deceased, born October i, 1831, died young; Eliza Jane, 
deceased, born August 20, 1834, married James Morrow ; Margaret, born 
November i, 1834; John A., of further mention; Morrow, of further men- 
tion; Sarah J., born November 21, 1843, married John H. Morrow; a 
son, who died in infancy. 

(III) John A. Duff, son of John and Isabelle (Fisher) Duff, was born 
in Penn township, November i, 1837. He was educated in his native town- 
ship, and in 1856 commenced farming operations independently. October 
3, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and First Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until May 17, 1865, when he 
was honorably discharged. He was actively engaged at Yorktown, Williams- 
burg and Fair Oaks. He was captured at Plymouth, North Carolina, April 
20, 1864, and released at Jacksonville, April 28, 1865. He is a prominent 
member of the local post at Wilkinsburg of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
After the war he went west for a time, then returned to Penn township, 
where he cultivates a fine farm of eighty-five acres. 

(Ill) Morrow Duff, son of John and Isabelle (Fisher) Duff, was born 
January 21, 1841, and has spent all his life in Penn township. He married 
Anna F., born November 16, 1853, a daughter of William Mays, a veteran 
of the Civil War, during which he attained the rank of captain. Children: 
Fanny Gertrude, born October 17, 1881, now deceased; Mary Isabel, born 
September 25, 1883, married Bennett Beswarick, has children: Frances and 
James; Hester Irene, born July 17, 1886; John \\'alter, born July 27, 1890, 
died at the age of thirteen years. 



Frank L. Ober is a member of an old and highly respected 

OBER French family, and a type of the best character of that strong 

race, which, though it has not contributed as largely as many 

other European peoples to the population of this country, has nevertheless 

grafted upon American citizenship its own splendid qualities of steadfast 

purpose and intelligent thrift. 

His grandfather, Peter Ober, was born and lived his entire life in 
France, where he held the responsible position of game warden in the 
forests of his native region. 

George Ober, son of Peter Ober, the father of our subject, was the 



II20 ' WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

emigrant ancestor of the family in this country. Of an enterprising nature, 
he came as a mere boy to the United States, seeking for greater oppor- 
tunity than was to be found at home. He settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, and there took up stone masonry and carpentry, both of which 
trades he learned, working at them the while. His natural aptitude soon 
established him firmly in his new home, and he was able to engage in busi- 
ness on his own account. He tried many different lines, and was successful 
in a greater or less degree in all. He engaged in the grocery and oil trades 
at different times, but his chief venture was the founding of the large 
brewery which for many years was known as the Koenig & Ober Brewery 
His success in brewing was great and he became a man of large substance 
and a prominent figure in the community. His business interests were con- 
stantly widening and he became the president of the Venango, Central and 
Dutch Creek Oil Company. He was also active in politics, a strong Demo- 
crat, and represented the old Seventh Ward of Pittsburgh, situated on the 
north side of the city, in the Pittsburgh city council. George Ober was 
born in 1823, was but seventeen years of age when he came to this country, 
and in 1878 retired entirely from active business, his valuable brewery 
interests passing on to his sons. He was married to Mary Vogel, a daughter 
of Bernard Vogel. To them were born fifteen children, as follows : George 
L., deceased, who married a Miss Minzer and was engaged in the drygoods 
business in Pittsburgh ; John P., deceased, who married Sarah Eberhart, 
and was engaged in the brewing business; Frank L., the subject of this 
sketch ; William A., who married Philomena Kuhnele, and now lives in 
Portland, Oregon; Elizabeth, who is now Mrs. Phillip Biedenbach, of Pitts- 
burgh; Mary, now Mrs. Christopher Brecht, of Franklin, Pennsylvania; 
Charles F., who married Mary Amelia Sauer; Henry F., who married 
Miss Heid ; Joseph A., deceased ; Matilda, deceased ; Edward R., who 
married Minnie Noll; Rosa, widow of John Kraft; Albert E.. deceased, 
and Alexander B., a resident of Pittsburgh ; a child died not named. 

Frank L. Ober, the third child of George and Mary (Vogel) Ober, 
was born January 2, 185 1, in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, and there 
passed the early years of his life. He was educated in the local schools, 
in all the elementary branches, and then matriculated in the Iron City 
College, from which, after distinguishing himself in his studies, he was 
graduated with the class of 1869. Having thus completed his education, he 
took up the machinist's trade, remaining in this line for a time, until he 
entered his father's brewery. When in the year 1878 his father retired 
from the business, the concern passed into the hands of Mr. Ober and his 
younger brother, Charles F. Ober, and the two continued it under the 
name of F. L. Ober & Brother Brewery. The business continued to flourish 
and grow under their intelligent management for a period of twenty years, 
when, in 1898, they sold out their interests to the Pittsburgh Brewing 
Company. Mr. Ober at the j,ame time retired from active business and 
removed to Penn township, Allegheny county, where he purchased a fine 
farm. The tract itself is small, but it is a valuable property, even apart 
from the handsome residence which Mr. Ober has had erected there. In 



WESTERN PExNNSYLVANIA 1121 

this attractive spot, amid charming rural surroundings, Mr. Ober finds it 
possible to gratify his taste for a country life and farming. He has a 
model chicken ranch on his, place and makes a specialty of breeding the 
Rhode Island Red stock of fowl. He exhibits in all the fairs of the region, 
as well as in all the important poultry shows in the country. He has won 
many first prizes, including forty-seven silver cups, the various scenes of 
his triumphs being laid in New York City, Chicago, Cleveland and Pitts- 
burgh, as well as many other places of less importance. His Rhode Island 
Reds are noted all over the country. It adds to the credit of his achieve- 
ment to learn that all the forty-seven silver cups have been won within a 
period of the last four years. 

Mr. Ober does not confine his activities to his farm, however. On the 
contrary, though retired from business, he still leads an active life and 
keeps his sympathies broad. He is a keen and intelligent observer of the 
political issues which agitate the country, and a staunch member of the 
Republican party. He served his fellow citizens with great efficiency as a 
member of the council of Allegheny City, to which office he was elected in 
a Democratic ward. He is also a member of the local lodge of the Order 
of Elks. Like his ancestors, Mr. Ober is a member of the Catholic church, 
and is rearing his children in that faith. 

Mr. Ober married (first) Mary E. Stadelman, June 13, 1876. To them 
were born six children, three of whom, two boys and one girl, are deceased. 
Those living are Elizabeth, now Mrs. J. J. O'Leary, of Oakmont, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Matilda, who resides at home ; Robert, who married Edith Fair, and 
now resides in Verona, Pennsylvania. Mr. Ober married (second) Isabel 
Sauer. 

Charles F. Ober, the younger brother of Frank L. Ober, who was 
associated with him in the brewery business, is also a prominent figure in 
that region. At the time of the sale of the Ober Brewery to the Pittsburgh 
company, Charles F. Ober did not, as his elder brother did, withdraw 
entirely from the business. On the contrary he accepted the oflfer of super- 
intendency of the concern from the new owners, in which capacity he is 
still employed by them. He began his business career in 1873, with a 
position in the German Savings and National Bank of Allegheny, continuing 
with that institution until he entered the brewing business in partnership 
with his brother in 1878. Besides his superintendency in the Pittsburgh 
Brewing Company, he now holds a membership in the directorate of the 
Provident Trust Company, of the North Side, Pittsburgh. 

Charles F. Ober married Mary Amelia Sauer, a native of Allegheny. 
Pennsylvania. To them have been born five children, as follows : Amelia, 
now Mrs. Joseph Rooney, of Pittsburgh, North Side ; Lucy ; Emma, now 
Mrs. Leo Spuhler, of Pittsburgh, North Side; Elmer C, a resident of 
Allegheny City, and employed in the German National Bank ; Arthur A. 



1122 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The McMurrays are of Scotch-Irish ancestry, some of 
McMURRAY the bearers of this name coming to America toward the 
latter part of the eighteenth century, others coming at a 
later date. 

Edward McMurray, born in the North of Ireland. February 26, 1799, 
emigrated to America in 1857 and settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He 
was a man of superior attainments, and found no difficulty in obtaining em- 
ployment in the city departments, with which he was identified the remainder 
of his life. He was a Republican in political opinion, and an active worker 
in the interests of the United Presbyterian church. Mr. McMurray married 
in Ireland Anna McCullough, born in that country in 1808, and they had 
children : Margaret, died in Ireland ; John, married Jane Bole, is an oil 
refiner in Pittsburgh; James, in the plaster business in Pittsburgh, married 
Eliza Gutherie; Mary, married Hugh Bole, a brother of the wife of her 
brother John, and also lives in Pittsburgh ; Eliza, married John Rainey, 
lived in Pittsburgh ; Sarah, married John McKee, a mechanic of Pittsburgh ; 
Rebecca, married Alexander Gorman, a contractor of Pittsburgh ; Thomas, 
of further mention. Edward McMurray was a member of the Masonic 
Order. 

Thomas McMurray, son of Edward and Anna (McCullough) Mc- 
Murray, was born in the North of Ireland, May 19, 1849. He was a 
young lad when he came to this country with his parents, and acquired his 
education in the elementary and high schools of Pittsburgh. In early man- 
hood he started in the hardware business with Whitmore, Wolf, Dufif & 
Company, remaining with this firm for a period of four years. He then 
went to Lindsay, Sterritt & Euwer, remaining with them until the firm was 
changed to Lindsay, Sterritt & Company. Subsequently he became a partner 
of James C. Lindsay & Company, which still later became the Lindsay 
Hardware Company, of which Mr. McMurray has now been president 
continuously since his election to this office in 1896. For the past twenty- 
five years he has lived with his family in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. He 
has been an active worker in the interests of the Republican party, and is 
now serving his second term as a member of the borough council. For 
many years he has been a member of the United Presbyterian church and 
has held official position in it for the past ten years. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter. Consistory, and Veterans, of the 
Order of Free and Accepted Masons ; also a Knight Templar and member 
of the Order of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. McMurray married, December 12, 1877, Charlotte, daughter of 
Thomas and Jane Barkley, and they have had children: Alfred B., born in 
August, 1879, lives in Charleston, West Virginia, married Mary E. Grear; 
Thomas E., born in 1883, is a physician in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, mar- 
ried Mary Emmett, of Hagerstown, Maryland ; Wesley Gordon, born in 
1887, is a traveling salesman and unmarried; Lewis S., born in 1891, is a 
student in the University of Pennsylvania: Walter Roy. born in 1895;, 
attends the Wilkinsburg high school; Earl Kenneth, born in 1899, a pupil 
in the public schools. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1123 

The Beattys came to the North of Ireland from Scotland, 
BEATTY and from thence emigrated to America, where they have been 
resident for a number of generations, and have been highly 
respected citizens. 

(I) Robert Beatty, who was one of the pioneer settlers of Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, was a civil engineer, and did almost all the surveying 
of the section in his time. He owned a farm of about three hundred acres, 
of which he cleared the greater part. In political sentiment he was a Whig, 
and his religious affiliation was with the Presbyterian church. He married 
Rebecca, a daughter of Judge Colter, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and had 
children : William ; Samuel, of further mention ; Priscilla ; Robert ; John ; 
James ; Jonathan ; Henry ; Elizabeth ; Mary ; Rebecca ; Margaret ; Richard ; 
Eli. 

(II) Samuel Beatty, son of Robert and Rebecca (Colter) Beatty, was 
born on the Beatty homestead in Allegheny county, in 1812. He was 
educated in the district school of Patton township, and was a very young 
man when he commenced farming on the homestead, on which he spent his 
entire life. He was active in the cause of religion, and assisted in building 
the Cross Roads Presbyterian Church in 1836. In political matters he was 
Republican. Mr. Beatty married Anna Jane Glen, a daughter of Squire 
David Boggs, of Patton township, and they had children : Lavinia, who died 
at the age of four years ; Henry, a veteran of the Civil War, married Emma 
Colcleser, and lives in Monroeville ; David, now deceased, married Rachel 
Tilford, and lives on the Beatty homestead ; William, married Lenora 
Greerson, and lives in Patton township; Cyrus B., of further mention; 
Samuel, married Clara McCallister, and lives in Patton township. 

(III) Cyrus B. Beatty, son of Samuel and Anna Jane Glen (Boggs) 
Beatty, was born on the Beatty homestead. October i, 1854. He was 
educated in the public schools of Patton township, and lived on the home- 
stead until he was about thirty years of age. He now owns a farm of 
sixty-six acres in Patton township, and is actively engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. He is also interested in a number of other enterprises, chiefly 
connected with coal and gas, and operates a coal bank of his own. He is a 
staunch supporter of the Republican party, and has served as a member of 
the school board and as auditor. His religious affiliation is with the Presby- 
terian church, of which for the past twenty years he has served as elder 
and is now serving as secretary of the sessions. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, belonging to Valley Lodge, No. 613, of Turtle Creek; 
Pittsburgh Consistory, Thirty-second Degree Scottish Rite; Syria Temple, 
No. I, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Mr. Beatty mar- 
ried, November 28, 1889, Emma J., a daughter of James Atkinson, of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. They have no children. Mrs. Beatty is a member of 
the Eastern Star and other bodies connected with the Masonic Order. She is 
a United States Daughter of 1812. 



II24 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The name of Duff has been a familiar one in this country for 
DUFF many generations, and it has always been found in connection 
with matters which were for the benefit of the communities in 
which the various bearers of it have resided. 

(I) Alexander Duff was born on the Duff homestead in Penn township, 
and owned about one hundred and fifty acres of land. He was engaged in 
general farming and stock raising. He married Mary Bright, and they 
had children : John, a farmer of Penn township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, married Sarah B. Morrow; Bright, went to California in 1849 
and died there of typhoid fever; Margaret, married Henry Sniveley, and 
lived near Milltown ; Barbara, died unmarried in May, 191 1, having spent 
her entire life on the homestead; George, died at the age of twenty-two 
years ; Elizabeth, died at the age of twenty years ; Rebecca, married Harrow 
Johnston, a farmer of Wilkins township, and died a year after her marriage ; 
Parry, of further mention ; Wilson, married Elizabeth Wilson, and lives in 
Penn township. 

(H) Parry Duff, son of Alexander and Mary (Bright) Duff, was born 
on the Duff homestead, August 14, 1846, and died December 19, 1879. He 
was a farmer on the homestead all his life, was a supporter of Democratic 
principles in political matters, and was a Presbyterian in religious views. He 
married, March 14, 1872, Elizabeth, born July 10, 1848, a daughter of 
Thomas F. and Mary M. (Burchfield) Butler, whose other children were: 
John B., born March 19, 1850, married Jane Garriet; Mary Amanda, born 
October 20, 1852, married Isaac N. Carpenter; Lydia Jane, born December 
17, 1854, died October 19, 1876; Adah P., born March 22, 1857, married 
Dr. William H. Wills; Daniel, born December 3, 1859, died at the age of 
twelve years; Margaret A., born May 26, 1862; Isabel, born March 30, 
1865, married Wilson Mill, a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Duff had one child. 

(Ill) Alexander Duff, son of Parry and Elizabeth (Butler) Duff, 
was born on the Duff homestead, Penn township, July 7, 1874. He was 
educated in the public schools of his native township, in those of Wilkins- 
burg, and in the Wilkinsburg Academy. In early manhood he commenced 
following farming, and has made this his life work. He has a fine farm of 
seventy acres, on which he raises fruits and vegetables, and also has a 
fine herd of dairy cows. He is one of the prosperous farmers of his section, 
owing to the progressive methods he applies to all his undertakings. Po- 
litically he is Independent, and in religious belief, a member of the Presby- 
terian church. Mr. Duff married, in 1893, Nellie B., born April 27, 1874, 
a daughter of Oliver and Harriet (Shaffer) Duff, the former a Civil War 
veteran, and they have had children: Ruth, born August 3, 1894; Lester, 
born July 13, 1896; Eleanor, born February 24, 1898; Hazel, born August 
25, 1900; Alexander, Jr., born July 7, 1911. 



This was a name of frequent occurrence among the Scotch- 

GILMORE Irish immigrants who settled in this country throughout 

the eighteenth century. It was carried from Scotland to 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1125 

the Nortli of Ireland about a century prior to its arrival here, and has con- 
tributed many excellent citizens to the United States. 

(I) John Gilmore was born in Ireland, and emigrated to the United 
States in 1833, accompanied by his wife and only child. His wife died at 
sea, and Mr. Gilmore with his son settled in Penn township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1840. The name of his wife before 
marriage was Ann McCune. 

(II) Francis Gilmore, son of John and Ann (McCune) Gilmore, was 
born in county Down, Ireland, March 29, 1801, and in 1843 purchased 
forty-seven acres of land in Penn township, near Wilkinsburg. This was 
covered with timber, and he cleared the land and erected a number of 
buildings on it. The fine brick house in which his children are now living 
was erected by him. He was a staunch supporter of Republican principles, 
and was for many years an elder in the United Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Gilmore married Jane, who died September 6, 1890, a daughter of John 
Johnston, Esq. Children : John Hastings, of further mention ; Martha 
Ann, who lives with her brother ; James and Margaret, who died in infancy. 

John Johnston, father of Mrs. Jane (Johnston) Gilmore, was born in 
Ireland in 1745, and died in Pennsylvania, in July, 1810. He was the 
recipient of an excellent education in his native land, and came to this 
country at the age of seventeen years. He readily found employment in 
the Land Office, at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and, upon the outbreak of 
the Revolutionary War, became the private secretary of General Washing- 
ton. For the services he rendered in this capacity, he received, as part 
payment, six hundred and twenty acres of land in Wilkins township, Alle- 
gheny county. Three hundred acres are in what in now Penn township. 
On this he settled, and suffered greatly from the depredations of the 
Indians. While living there he farmed the Two Mile Bottom where Pitts- 
burgh now stands. He was a strong Whig in political affairs, and served 
as justice of the peace for many years being in office at the time of his 
death. He was a ruling elder of the Beulah Presbyterian Church, and 
called her first pastor. He married Martha, a daughter of William and 
Jane Mishkimans, both born in Ireland, and they had children: James M. 
and Nancy, twins ; Jane, who married Francis Gilmore, as above stated. 

(III) John Hastings Gilmore, son of Francis and Jane (Johnston) 
Gilmore, was born on the Gilmore homestead, Penn township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, May 29, 1846. He was educated in the public schools 
of Penn township and Wilkinsburg, and then became identified with agri- 
cultural pursuits. He farmed in association with his father, until the death 
of the latter in 1893. from which time he cultivated the farm alone until 
1899, when he retired from its active cultivation. He and his sister live in 
the home built by his father. Politically Mr. Gilmore is a Republican, and 
has served as school director for a period of eleven years. His religious 
affiliation is with the United Presbyterian church. 



II26 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

This name undoubtedly originated with a person tall of stature. 
LONG An account of its origin in England, which may be regarded as 

more or less authentic, asserts that one of the family of Preux, 
who was an attendant on the lord treasurer of Hungerford, acquired the 
soubriquet of Long Henry, on account of his great height. Having mar- 
ried a lady of quality, he adopted the prefix as a surname, changing the 
appellation to Henry Long, and thus becoming the founder of the Longs of 
Wiltshire. The name is also to be found in Cambridgeshire, Oxfordshire, 
Norfolk and Suffolk, and is known to have existed in the reign of Edward 
L Several Americans of this name have won national distinction, including 
the Hon. John Davis Long, secretary of the navy. 

(I) Matthew Long was born in England, and came to America prior 
to the Revolutionary War. He was a young man at that time, and fought 
bravely in the ranks of the Continental army. He was a member of Beulah 
Church, and is buried in the old churchyard. 

(H) John Long, son of Matthew Long, the immigrant, was born on 
the homestead founded by his father in Penn township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and married Rebecca Brown. Children : Matthew ; Sarah ; 
Rebecca ; Samuel, was a member of the One Hundred and First Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War; Elizabeth M. Mr. 
Long was a member of the L^nited Presbyterian church. 

(III) Matthew Long, son of John and Rebecca (Brown) Long, was 
born on the Long homestead, November lo, 1827, and died November 6, 
1904. He was educated in the public schools of Penn township, and all his 
life was engaged in farming operations. He married, in 1858, Matilda 
Dufif, and had children : John, Frank and Harry, died in infan-^y : Ella 
M.. married Benjamin Harrison; Araminta, married John W. Harrison; 
Samuel Morrow, of further mention : Matilda B., married James Morrow ; 
Margaret J., married Harry Swisshelm. Mr. Long was a Democrat and a 
member of the United Presbyterian church. 

(IV) Samuel Morrow Long, son of Matthew and Matilda (Dufif) Long, 
was born on the Long homestead, Penn township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, April 8, 1865. He was educated in the public schools of his native 
township, and, like his father, has been identified with farming all his life. 
He has made many improvements on the homestead, among them being the 
erection of a fine brick dwelling house in 1910. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the United Presbyterian church, and he has served as treasurer of 
the church and Sunday school. Mr. Long married, January 12, 1895, Sadie, 
a daughter of James and Mary (Donald) Donaldson, and they have had 
children: Mary, born October 8, 1899; Harry, born May 6, 1901 ; Frances, 
born April 20, 1903; Warren, })orn July 2, 1906; Alice Isabel, born June 8, 
1912. In political matters Mr. Long is a Prohibitionist. 



Frank D. Gibson is a member of an old and highly regarded 

GIBSON Pennsylvania family, a family which furnished the pioneers 

of the western part of that state, the men upon whose courage 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1127 

and energy the great development of that section of the country is founded. 
When they went into that region they found a wilderness, peopled by 
savages, hostile to themselves, and looking with suspicion upon their every 
advance. Yet in spite of these difficulties they cleared the country, cultivated 
the land, and built houses which, though rude and primitive, were yet the 
forerunners of all the mighty industrial growth which has come after. 

f I) Anthony Gibson, grandfather of Frank D. Gibson, came to Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, a pioneer, bringing with him his wife, and settling 
there permanently, clearing his land and farming until his death. After 
that his wife removed to Braddock, Pennsylvania, where she continued to 
live until the year 1902, when she died at the venerable age of eighty-nine 
years. They were the parents of three children, as follows: George, of 
whom further; Caroline and Lester, all of whom are now deceased. 

(II) George Gibson, eldest child of Anthony Gibson, was born in 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, in the year 1842, and there passed his child- 
hood, attending the local public schools, and learning the trade of brick 
making. About 1865. when he was twenty-three years of age, he removed 
from his native place to Braddock, Pennsylvania, and there engaged in 
brick manufacture for a considerable period of years. At the time of the 
breaking out of the Civil War, Mr. Gibson joined the Union army, enlisting 
at Pittsburgh, in 1861, in Company A, Sixty-third Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry. He was later transferred to Company D, One Hundred 
and Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until the 
close of that historic struggle, seeing much active campaigning during the 
time, and undergoing many hardships and perils. His lyother Lester also 
enlisted in the Union army, and gave up his life for his country, dying 
while in camp from an injury. George Gibson, however, survived the 
ordeal, and returned to his home in Pennsylvania, to enjoy many years of 
honored and honoraMe citizenship. His death finally occurred on February 
23, 1907, at the age of sixty-five years. He was a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic and of the Union Veteran Legion. He was a staunch 
member of the Republican party, and a man who gave much thought and 
attention to the great political questions agitating the country in his day. He 
married, April 16. 1865, Rebecca Dick, a native of Pittsburgh, born in 1847. 
Mrs. Gibson was a daughter of John and Rebecca (Bart) Dick, he a native 
of Ireland, whence he came to Braddock, Pennsylvania, and there followed 
the trade of carpenter for a number of years, and then moved to Pittsburgh. 
where he finally died in the year 1848. His wife, who had been Rebecca 
Bart, was born in England, but came with her parents in the early days to 
the United States and to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where she met and mar- 
ried Mr. Dick, and eventually died two years after his death. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Dick were born three children, as follows : Fannie Louisa ; Frank, 
deceased ; Rebecca, the wife of George Gibson. To Mr. and Mrs. George 
Gibson were born seven children, as follows: Annie, died in 1913 : Frank D., 
of whom further ; George P., of Mill street, Braddock, Pennsylvania ; 
Harry H., who lives in Ohio; Katie, who lives at home with her mother; 



II28 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

twins, who died in infancy. Mrs. George Gibson survives her husband, and 
is at present a resident of Braddock, Pennsylvania. She is, and her husband 
was, a member of the Christian church, and in this belief reared their 
children. 

(Ill) Frank D. Gibson, the second child of George and Rebecca (Dick) 
Gibson, was born January 21, 1868, in Southside, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania. Very early in life his parents removed to Braddock, and there the 
boy was reared, attending the local public schools, where he obtained an 
excellent general education. Upon completing his studies, he applied him- 
self with his usual aptitude and industry to learn the trade of bricklayer, 
and quickly secured employment in that line. He continued in this work for 
upwards of twenty years, and then embarked upon an enterprise of his own. 
He had by dint of hard work and frugality saved a sufficient capital to 
engage in a contracting business on his own account, and naturally chose 
brick construction to specialize in, as the line in which he had had a practical 
training and experience. Since that time he has done a large and successful 
business in brick contracting, and in 1907 he erected a fine brick residence 
for himself at No. 833 Kirkpatrick avenue, Braddock, Pennsylvania. Like 
his father before him, he is a devoted member of the Republican party, and 
a close and intelligent student of politics. 

Mr. Gibson married (first) Jessie Frances Hurrell, a native of Brad- 
dock, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Gibson was the daughter of Richard and Anna 
(Phillips) Hurrell, both natives of Devonshire, England, and both bom in 
the year 1832. Mr. and Mrs. Hurrell were married in their native land, 
and later emigrated from there, coming to the United States in the year 
1873, and settling in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, and later in Braddock, where 
they spent the remainder of their lives. Mr. Hurrell was a stone 
contractor and did a successful business. He was a Republican in 
politics, and a member of the United Presbyterian church. As Mr. and 
Mrs. Hurrell were born in the same year, so they died, both in 1902, she in 
March and he in December. Mr. Hurrell and his wife were the parents 
of eight children, as follows: Elizabeth, now Mrs. Thomas Thomas, of 
DuBois, Pennsylvania ; Susannah, now Mrs. Charles Powell, of Braddock, 
Pennsylvania ; Jessie, deceased ; Richard Edward ; Esther, deceased, was Mrs. 
Charles Powell, of Braddock, Pennsylvania : Uriah, who married Dolly Wise. 
of Braddock, Pennsylvania; Jessie Frances, deceased, tlie wife of Mr. 
Frank D. Gibson, of this sketch ; and Flora, now the wife of Harry Phil- 
lips, of Braddock, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Gibson's brother, Richard E. Hur- 
rell, is a prominent man in Braddock, where he has charge of the mason 
department of the American Steel and Wire Company of that town. To 
Mr. Gibson and his wife was born one child, a son, Lee Hurrell Gibson, born 
February 26, 1893. He was educated in the public schools of Braddock, 
and is now a mechanic and plumber by trade. Mrs. Gibson died in February, 
1895. Mr. Gibson married (second) Rosetta McGeary, a native of Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, daughter of John McGeary, a distinguished citizen 
of Butler county. The second Mrs. Gibson died November 11, 1907, after 




J(>€::^-m^ /^ /j£yCeyt.y/fCc:t^^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1129 

bearing to Mr. Gibson four children, as follows : Rebecca, Frank, Ralph 
and Edwin, all of whom are living. 



He of this line of Peterman with whom this record opens, 
PETERMAN Jacob Peterman, great-grandfather of John H. Peterman, 

of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, was a soldier in the 
American army in the second war with Great Britain. He married and 
was the father of a family, one of his sons, Jacob (2), of whom further. 

(II) Jacob (2) Peterman, son of Jacob (i) Peterman, was born in 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, died in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, 
at his farm on Cherry Run, aged more than ninety years. He became a 
blacksmith and farmer in his native county, in later life moving to Arm- 
strong county, where he pursued these callings until his death. He was a 
first lieutenant in an army sent out against a band of allied Indian tribes, 
and remained in the service until the savages had been forced from the 
warpath and compelled to make peace from fear of annihilation. Jacob 
Peterman married Sarah Weldt, three of whose family met their deaths at 
the hands of marauding savages in the raid upon Blanket Hill, Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania. Children of Jacob and Sarah (Weldt) Peterman: 
Jacob (3), George, Michael, of whom further; Mary Jane, Savilla. 

(III) Michael Peterman, son of Jacob (2) and Sarah (Weldt) Peter- 
man, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, and was educated in the 
schools of Armstrong county. In young manhood he became a riverman, 
having first operated a distillery, and for many years was a member of the 
crew of the "Advance II," leaving the river to support the Union cause in 
the Civil War. Surviving the two remaining years of this conflict, his 
enlistment having been made in 1862, he became connected with the manu- 
facture of guns in the Fort Pitt Works, afterward finding employment at 
his former calling, that of riverman. Subsequently he worked in the lumber 
woods of western Pennsylvania, and then became a carpenter, continuing 
at that trade until his death. He was a man of industrious habits, kindly 
natured, and made friends in all places. Michael Peterman married Bridget 
Dufify, born in Ireland, her parents passing their entire lives in that country, 
although their children immigrated to the United States. Children of 
Michael and Bridget (Dufify) Peterman: Margaret, Anna, John H., of 
whom further; Catherine, George, Michael. 

(IV) John H. Peterman, son of Michael and Bridget (Dufify) Peter- 
man, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, August 16, 1862. As a 
youth he attended the public schools of Penn township. Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, his parents moving to that place when he was young, and 
here he grew to maturity. Adopting farming as his calling, he added to 
his operations in this field coal dealing and contracting in stone masonry, 
continuing in these lines. His farm is about sixty-five hundred acres in 
extent, land formerly owned by his father, and he is one of the prosperous 
agriculturists of the locality, success uniformly attending his operations. He 
is a communicant of the Roman Catholic church. 



II30 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. Peterman married, in September, 1893, Ella B., daughter of David 
F. and Catherine (Burns) Evans, her father a native of Path Valley, Penn- 
sylvania, her mother of Belfast, Ireland. David F. Evans was a son of 
David Evans, who married a Miss McKenzie, and died in Path Valley, 
Pennsylvania, and the wife of David F. Evans, Catherine (Burns) Evans, 
was a daughter of Edward Burns, who passed his life in the homeland. 
Ireland, attaining the wonderful age of one hundred and eight years. David 
F. Evans moved to Allegheny City (Pittsburgh North Side) about 1835, 
and married four years later, subsequently purchasing a farm at Wexford, 
Allegheny county, and there building a comfortable house. He owned 
ninety-five acres of land, and besides cultivating this was for many years 
proprietor of a grocery store, at different times throughout his life following 
the trade of carpenter, which he mastered in early manhood. He was a 
prominent and influential citizen of the locality, holding the offices of 
justice of the peace, school director, postmaster, and entering the public 
service in numerous other capacities, always giving willingly of the best of 
his time and labor when he felt that his duty lay in that direction. Children 
of David F. and Catherine (Burns) Evans: Sarah, William, Arthur, 
Mary, Frank, Theresa, Margaret, Harry, Kate, Ella B., of previous mention, 
married John H. Peterman. The family of David F. Evans were among 
the first members of the Wexford Roman Catholic Church, which Mr. 
Evans built, and they afterward attended St. Peter's at Allegheny. Children 
of John H. and Ella B. (Evans) Peterman: Catherine Evans, Robert 
James, William Burns, John Clement, Ella Savilla. The family are members 
of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church of Verona, Pennsylvania. 



The family bearing this name has been represented in this 
DRAIN country for a number of generations, and they have borne their 
share nobly and bravely in the various walks of life to which 
they have been called. 

(I) James Drain was born in the United States, and was a pioneer 
settler of Center county, Pennsylvania, later removing to Clarion county, 
in the same state, where he died at Leatherwood. The name of his wife is 
not known, but he had a family of six children that grew to maturity, 
namely : Rachel, married a Mr. Hosey ; Samuel ; Mary Ann, married a 
Mr. Harriger, lived in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, where both died ; 
Robert, of whom further ; Eliza, was killed in an accident by being thrown 
oS a riding horse when a young girl ; Hugh, was a large land owner in 
Macon county, Missouri, where he died. 

(II) Robert Drain, son of James Drain, was born in Center county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1814, and was killed in a railroad accident in 1877. He was 
a charcoal burner by occupation and also a farmer, owning his own farm. 
In political matters a Democrat, and in religious, a member of the Baptist 
church. He married Elizabeth Payne, born in Center county in 1817, died 
in 1875. She was a daughter of William and Rachel Payne, and a grand- 
daughter of pioneer settlers of Center county. William Payne was born in 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA. 1131 

Center county, lived in Armstrong county, and died in Clarion county, 
Pemisylvania. His wife died while living in New Bethlehem with her son, 
Alexander Payne ; husband and wife died in the same year, but a few 
months apart. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Drain : Mary Ellen, died in New 
Bethlehem in 1912; John Alfred: Samantha, died in infancy; Martha, 
lives in Peoria, Illinois ; Maria, lives in Pittsburgh ; Olive, died young ; 
Phiana, lives in Pittsburgh ; Robert, died in infancy. 

(Ill) William H. Drain, son of Robert and Elizabeth (Payne) Drain, 
was born in Madison township, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, September 
17, 1844. His early years were spent in Armstrong county, where he 
acquired his education in the public schools, and worked as a coal miner. 
He removed to Braddock, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1874, and 
engaged in the general contracting business, with which he has been suc- 
cessfully identified since that time. He has built a fine house at No. 102 
Camp avenue, in which he now resides. During the Civil War he served 
three months as a member of Company K, Fifty-seventh Regiment Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry. He is a strong supporter of the Republican 
party, and a generous contributor to the Lutheran church, of which he is 
a member. Mr. Drain married, at South Side, Pittsburgh, Caroline, born at 
South Side, August 17, 1855, a daughter of Andrew and Rosa Eppert, the 
former a native of Germany, and an early resident of Pittsburgh. Children : 
Charles L. ; John, superintendent at Ford's, Erie county, Pennsylvania ; 
Mary ; Robert, with the American Steel Wire Company, lives in North 
Braddock ; Jesse Cyrus, was graduated at West Point, is a first lieutenant 
in the United States army, and has been in China two years ; Esther ; 
Henry ; Caroline ; George. 



The family of Katz was founded in the United States by three 
K.-\ TZ brothers, who came thither from Germany, the homeland, one, 
Peter, settling in Pennsylvania, and from him is descended the 
line herein recorded. The two others went south, Isaac marrying, both 
prospering and becoming wealthy, some of the descendants of Isaac serving 
in the Confederate army in the war of the rebellion. Peter Katz settled on 
the South Side of Pittsburgh, the locality known as Cole Hill, and was there 
the owner of a farm, later disposing of his property and moving to Spring 
Mills, ^Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, now Unity. He "located in this latter 
place in 1813, and the tract of one hundred and forty acres of land that he 
purchased cost him twelve hundred and fifty dollars; while at the present 
day that land is the site of Unity and the lots made from that tract have a 
value of fifteen hundred dollars per acre, a wonderful increase. Peter Katz 
married Mary Braddy, daughter of early settlers of Sharpsburg. Pennsyl- 
vania, who died aged eighty-two years, his death occurring when he was a 
young man, in 1833. One of the sons of Peter and Mary (P.raddy) Katz 
was Presley, of whom further. 

(II) Presley Katz, son of Peter and Mary (Braddy) Katz, was born 
on Pittsburgh South Side, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1808, died in 



1132 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

1892. He was reared to the life of a farmer and that was his Hfe-long 
occupation, his land being at Unity, Allegheny county, where he died. He 
and his wife were members of the United Presbyterian church, of Unity, 
and he was a Democrat in politics. He married Margaret, daughter of John 
McDowell, her father an early settler of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
She died in 1861, both being buried in the family burial lot at Unity, Penn- 
sylvania. Children of Presley and Margaret (McDowell) Katz: i. Alex- 
ander, a soldier of the Union army in the Civil War, died in the course of 
that conflict, in 1861. 2. Alvin B., a Union soldier in the Civil War, a 
resident of Butler county, Pennsylvania. 3. Mary Jane, married John Huey, 
of Monroeville, Pennsylvania. 4. Oliver P., of Allegheny City (Pittsburgh 
North Side), Pennsylvania. 5. Presley George, of whom further. 6. 
Margaret Lavina, deceased. 

(HI) Presley George Katz, son of Presley and Margaret (McDowell) 
Katz, was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, September 21, 1852, and 
was educated in the public schools of Unity, Pennsylvania. In young man- 
hood he engaged in farming, in 1880 moving to Verona and there estab- 
lishing as an undertaker, a line in which he continues to the present time, 
bearing an excellent reputation in his business. Mr. Katz owns property in 
Verona, in which he has invested since taking up his residence in that 
place, and also holds title to a portion of the old family homestead at 
Unity. His political party is the Democratic, and as the successful candi- 
date of that party he has served as a member of the Verona council. His 
church is the United Presbyterian. 

He married, in 1874, Margaret, born in Mifflin township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, in July, 1854, daughter of Joseph and Maria (Irwin) 
Woods, both deceased, early residents of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
Children of Presley George and Margaret (Woods) Katz: i. Joseph Irwin, 
born in 1876, educated in the public schools and a Pittsburgh commercial 
college, also a graduate of a school of embalming, was admitted to partner- 
ship by his father, the firm now P. G. Katz & Son ; Joseph Irwin Katz 
married, in 1907, Minnie Banser, and has one child, Presley George (2). 
2. Bessie, born in 1878, married A. R. Kidd, of Connellsville, Pennsylvania, 
and has one daughter, Margaret Kate. 3. George Lawrence, born in 1881, 
engaged in insurance dealing in New Kensington, Pennsylvania, married 
Christina Price. 4. Dale H., born in 1891, lives at home. 



The name of Drennen, sometimes spelled Drennan, lias 

DRENNEN been an honored one in Scotland and Ireland for many 

generations, and since its advent m this country it has been 

no less honored, the various members of the family having discharged 

faithfully the duties falling to them. 

(I) Thomas Drennen, who was born in the North of Ireland about 
1756, emigrated to America at the age of fourteen years, and settled in 
the eastern part of Pennsylvania. Imbued with the true spirit of patriotism, 
he became a soldier in the Continental army, and served bravely during the 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1133 

Revolution. He met his wife in the Susquehanna Valley, and married there, 
later removing to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he settled on a 
farm in Elizabeth township. He married Isabella Moore, and they had 
children: Martha, married David Drennen, both deceased, and buried at 
Pittsburgh ; Isabella, died unmarried on the old homestead, at the age of 
forty years ; Priscilla, married William Cooper, removed to Ohio with her 
sister, Jane, and died there ; Jane, married Llewellyn Howell, died, and is 
buried in Ohio; Nancy, married Robert Hewey, died near Turtle Creek, 
Pennsylvania; John, was a planter in Van Buren, Arkansas, and died some 
years ago; William Moore, of further mention. 

(II) William Moore Drennen, son of Thomas and Isabella (Moore) 
Drennen, was born on the Drennen homestead in Elizabeth township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, October 10, 1803, and died in the fifty-fourth 
year of his age after a lingering illness. He was a farmer all of his life, 
and won prominence for the excellent breed of horses he raised. At the time 
of his death he was affiliated with the Republican party, and he and his 
wife were members of the United Presbyterian church, in which he was 
also an elder. Mr. Drennen married. May 17, 1827, Margaret Pollock, 
born on the Pollock homestead in Elizabeth township, in February, 1802. 
They became the parents of children: Martha, married (first) Finley 
Powers, (second) a Mr. Dean, also now deceased, and is living in Kansas 
at the age of eighty-six years ; Thomas Henry, of further mention ; Isabella 
J., married Thomas Fergus, deceased, a merchant in Elizabeth, where she 
is still living at the age of eighty-one years : Margaret, died at the age of 
four years ; Esther Mary, married David Pearse, of Ohio, both buried in 
Ohio; David, died in infancy; Emily, unmarried, is still living on the old 
Drennen homestead, in Elizabeth township ; Violet, died in infancy. 

(Ill) Thomas Henry Drennen, son of William Moore and Margaret 
(Pollock) Drennen, was born about four miles east of Elizabeth, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, December 17, 1830. His education was acquired in 
the old Wild Cat Hollow District School, and his earlier years were the 
usual ones of a farmer's son. He was engaged in farming until 1886, 
when he commenced operating a grist mill in Elizabeth, and was identified 
with this industry for many years, but is now living retired in Elizabeth. 
He is a Republican in politics, taking an active interest in whatever con- 
cerns the welfare of the community, and he and his wife are members of 
the United Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Drennen married, October 16, 1876, Elizabeth J., a daughter of 
John and Isabella (Lyle) White, who were of a, prominent family in West 
Virginia for many years, were engaged in agriculture, and continued this 
occupation when they removed to Elizabeth, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Drennen's 
maternal great-grandfather, a Mr. Rea, was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War. Mr. and Mrs. Drennen have no children. 



1 134 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The name of McKinley is one which is known throughout 
McKINLEY the length and breadth of the land, and it has had many 
strong-minded and intellectual sons and daughters, who 
have added distinction to its luster. 

(I) Andrew McKinley was a native of Ireland, and died in Elizabeth 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1844. He emigrated to the 
United States in 1792, and for a time made his home in Chester county, 
Maryland. He then removed to Forward township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and from that place to near McKeesport, in the same county. 
In 1817 he purchased a farm in Elizabeth township, on which he spent the 
remainder of his days. Mr. McKinley married Barbara Reed, who died in 
1842, and they became the parents of nine children. 

(II) Andrew (2) McKinley, son and youngest child of Andrew (i) 
and Barbara (Reed) McKinley, was born on what is now Calhoun farm, 
in 181 1. He was for a long time engaged as the general agent for the D. 
M. Osborne Company, of Albany, New York, and was auditor of Elizabeth 
township for many years. He was active in the interests of the Democratic 
party, and served as supervisor of Elizabeth township. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian church of West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania. Mr. McKinley 
married (first) in 1837, Maria Wilson. He married (second) Martha J. 
Fife, who died May 10, 1863, a daughter of Andrew Fife, of Elizabeth 
township. He married (third) Mary E., a daughter of Michael Ventress, 
of Elizabeth, Pennsylvania. There were three children by the first marriage, 
of whom Andrew is living in Forward township, Allegheny county. Chil- 
dren by the second marriage: John G., a merchant in Monongahela City, 
Pennsylvania ; George, of further mention ; Clara M., married Frank Haney, 
of McKeesport, Pennsylvania ; Noah F. ; Belle, married Charles Wylie, lives 
in McKeesport. 

' (III) George McKinley, son of Andrew (2) and Martha J. (Fife) 
McKinley, was born on the farm on which he is now living, in Elizabeth 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, March 7, 1856. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools near the family homestead, and his life was the 
usual one of a farmer's son in those days. He very naturally took up 
farming as his life work, and has always been identified with it. The 
house which was erected by his father is still in excellent condition, owing 
to the care bestowed upon it by Mr. McKinley, and the farm is a very 
productive one, owing to the same cause. For many years has made a 
specialty of dairy farming, and was very successful in this enterprise. He 
is a Democrat in politics, and he and his wife attend services at the Round 
Hill Presbyterian Church. His fraternal association is with Elizabeth Con- 
clave, No. 198, Improved Order of Heptasophs. Of a social disposition, 
and always ready to make friends, he is noted for his open-handed hospi- 
tality. 

Mr. McKinley married, in 1893, Gertrude, a daughter of Jonathan 
and Eliza (Ryan) Wycoff. They have no children, but a niece of Mrs. 
McKinley, Yeurith VVestbay, makes her home with them. She is at present 




cSf^ t / ^^P^2^l^ 



WESTERN PENXSYL\ AXIA 1135 

a student at Bucknell College, a member of the class of 1917, a member of 
the Delta Delta Delta Sorority, and takes a prominent part in college 
activities. 



Daniel J. Tarr, whose death on February 15, 1913, when but 
TARR forty-eight years of age, deprived Pitcairn, Pennsylvania, of one 
of its most distinguished citizens, was a member of an old 
Westmoreland county family. His paternal grandfather, Collins Tarr, was 
an early settler in that region, he and his wife, Catherine, having taken up 
their abode there in their youth. They were the parents of nine children, 
five sons and four daughters, as follows: Daniel. Alexander, Collins Jr., 
Jacob, of whom further ; John, Maria, Catherine, Bettie and Sallie. He was 
a man well known and highly respected in his neighborhood, and his sun, 
Jacob Tarr, followed in his footsteps, and held an enviable reputation 
throughout the region. 

(H) Jacob Tarr accompanied his parents when still very young on 
their migration from the east to Westmoreland county, where he passed the 
remainder of his long life, dying there on June 18, 1906, at the age of 
seventy-five years. He married Martha Hobaugh, of Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Cline) Hobaugh. Mrs. 
Jacob Tarr survived her husband precisely one year, dying June 18, 1907, at 
the age of seventy-two. To them were born seven children, as follows: 
William C, a resident of Vandergrift, Pennsylvania ; George H., now of 
Newlonsburg, Pennsylvania; Daniel J., of whom further; Robert A., of 
Orchard Island, Ohio; Margaret, who became the wife of Jacob W. Wilson, 
and the mother of two daughters, Martha Tarr and Isabella Hall ; Anna 
and Jennie, now deceased. 

(Ill) Daniel J. Tarr was born in W^estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
June 18, 1865. He was the third child of the family of seven children born 
to his parents, and was reared in his native place, and passed his young 
manhood there up to the age of twenty-eight years. He obtained his educa- 
tion at the local public schools and graduated from the Murrysville High 
School. Upon completing this course of studies, he engaged in the busi- 
ness of butcher and established a substantial trade at Pitcairn, Pennsylvania, 
in the year 1893. His establishment prospered greatly in the new locality, 
and he was successful in working up a large and remunerative business 
there. Mr. Tarr bought himself a large, handsome residence on the corner 
of Second street and Highland avenue, Pitcairn, and there spent the re- 
mainder of his life. Mr. Tarr married, in the month of January. 1893. 
Nettie Shields, a native of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, born in the 
year 1868, daughter of William R. and Rebecca (Nipple) Shields, of that 
region. To Mr. and ^Mrs. Tarr were born five children, as follows : Will- 
iam J., Irene J., Walter D., Russel J., Meredith O. Mrs. Tarr and her 
five children survive Mr. Tarr. 

Mr. Tarr was not a man to confine his activities entirely within the 
limits of his personal business. On the contrary, he was most public- 



1 136 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

spirited, and he was a keen and intelligent observer of the course of public 
events. Though he never took an active part in politics, he was a consistent 
member of the Republican party, voting its ticket for many years. Always 
ready to assist with effort of financial aid any measures for the advance- 
ment and development of the community of which he was a member, he 
stood a model of public-spirited citizenship, and his death was felt as a 
keen loss, not only by his family and the host of personal friends his affable, 
frank nature had won, but by the community at large which had benefitted 
so greatly by his life and activities. 



Space is here given for the chronicle of the American life 
MARTIN of the branch of the Irish family of Martin to which John 

Martin, of Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
belongs. It is a brief record, covering a period of but little more than half 
a century, yet it contains the story of two lives that have been usefully and 
honorably lived, and did it include the narrative of past generations in the 
homeland the pride of race and family would be well understood. John 
Martin was born in Ireland, and after coming to Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, engaged in trade as a clothing merchant, building up a business 
large and profitable. He was a member of the Baptist church, and an 
active worker in all organizations connected therewith, contributing freely 
of his labors and means to its undertakings. His political party was the 
Democratic. He married Jane Potts, born in Ireland, and was the father of: 
Jane, Hugh, William, Thomas, John, of whom further; James, Samuel, 
Maria, Margaret, all deceased with the exception of John. 

John (2) Martin, son of John (i) and Jane (Potts) Martin, was 
born in Penn township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in January, 1858. 
He was educated in the public schools, and for the first twenty-five years 
of his life as a bread-winner he was a mine worker. In 1888 he purchased 
his present farm of fifty-six acres at Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, and 
has there since resided, his agricultural operations successfully profitable. 
With his wife he is a member of the Presbyterian church, and is a Repub- 
lican in political belief. He has served two terms in the office of township 
commissioner, giving to his duties in that capacity time and careful atten- 
tion. Mr. Martin married, in 1878, Margaret, daughter of William and 
Susan (Hershey) Soles. William and Susan (Hershey) Soles were the 
parents of : Nancy, Margaret, of previous mention, married John Martin, 
and Jane. Children of John and R-Iargaret (Soles) Martin: Mary, Taylor, 
John, Charles, Susan, Norman, Francis, Olive, Jessie May, Roy, deceased ; 
Margaret. The family are members of the Presbyterian church. 



The Ireland family has been resident in this country for a 
IRELAND number of generations, and they have thoroughly proven 
their worth as citizens of merit and ability in the various 
walks of life. 

(I) Wallace Ireland, who was a carpenter by trade, was also the owner 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ii37 

of a small farm, which he cultivated successfully. He was a Whig iu 
political opinion, and an earnest member of the Methodist church. 

(II) James Ireland, son of Wallace Ireland, was born in 1808, and died 
August 16, 1864. He owned the tract of land back of his house, and later 
the railroad company bought a strip of this next to the river. He was a 
carpenter by trade, a Republican in political matters, and a member of the 
Methodist church. He married Mary, a daughter of William Boyd, who 
was a horse jockey in his earlier years, came to Penn township in 1832. and 
there bought a farm. Mr. and Mrs. Ireland became the parents of children 
as follows : William W., deceased ; John T. ; James B., of further mention ; 
Samuel, deceased; Robert Simon; Alfred C. ; Mary Martha; Frank; Joseph 
D., deceased. 

(III) James B. Ireland, son of James and Mary (Boyd) Ireland, was 
born in Penn township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 16, 1847. 
His educational advantages were acquired in the common schools of his 
native township. He was engaged in hauling coal for fourteen years and 
then became a checkman at the coal tipple for the Dixon-Stewart Company, 
later the John Foster Company, and still later for the Kier-Foster & Kier 
Company. He is a member of the Methodist church. He married, April 
21, 1880, Rebecca, daughter of Henry Beers, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, 
and they have five children: Clyde, Richard B., Mary L., Carrie, Jennie. 



George C. Reiter was born in Goettingen, Germany, where 
REITER he received his education and lived until he had attained 

manhood. He then emigrated to America. He was married, 
at the Cape of Good Hope, to Dorothy Cook, born near Goettingen, Ger- 
many, and they came to America together. Children : Andrew, George, 
Sophia, William, Henry. 

(II) Henry Reiter, son of George C. and Dorothy (Cook) Reiter. 
was born at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and died in 1901. For a time he 
was a merchant with a store in Allegheny, then moved to Turtle Creek, and 
in 1844 removed to a farm at what was then known as Anthony Postoffice, 
and conducted a store there. Still later he purchased a farm, and was the 
owner of one hundred and twelve acres at the time of his death. He was 
a Republican in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Reiter married Isabelle, who died in 1899, a daughter of John Patterson, and 
they had children : i. Mary, unmarried. 2. Elizabeth, deceased. 3. Isabelle. 
married F. M. Johnston, lives in Pittsburgh, and has children : Sadie and 
Emma. 4. John, deceased. 5. Sophia. 6. Emma, deceased. 7. George, 
lives at Butler, and married (first) Ida Kistler, (second) Sarah Hughy ; 
children by first marriage : Sophia, Murray, Harry, Maggie ; children by 
second marriage: Edna, Ralph, Francis, Nellie, Clarence, I^urence, Helen. 

8. Harry, lives in East Liberty, Pittsburgh ; married Emma Armstrong. 

9. Robert, of further mention. 

(HI) Robert Reiter, son of Henry and Isabelle (Patterson) Reiter, 
was born in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, December 25, 



1 138 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

1859. He has always lived on the home farm, which he cultivates very 
successfully. He married (first) Mary Toner, of Plum township, (second) 
Naomi Brinton. Children by first marriage: John, Isabelle, Robert, Glen, 
Rose. Only child by second marriage: James. 



The Pickford family is an old one of England, where they 
PICKFORD have, for the greater part, been engaged in manufacturing 
interests. They were of the Quaker denomination. 
Joseph Pickford, whose father was a woolen manufacturer, was born 
in Sheffield, England, September 15, 1798, and died August 24, 1886. He 
also became a manufacturer of note, and while he commenced on a small 
scale, his business grew from an initial force of ten workmen to one of 
large proportions. He was one of the founders of the Stockbridge Band of 
Hope Industrial Co-operative Society in England. He married Hannah 
Birkenshire, born January 14, 1798, died December 27, 1882, a daughter 
of William Birkenshire, a stone mason and a contractor. Children : Ben- 
jamin P., born April 6, 1822, sailed to America with his wife and children, 
April 18, 1844; Henry P., born January 24, 1824, died February 16, 1844; 
Thomas, born June 6, 1826, died June 8, 1851 ; Mary, born February 24, 
1827, died in November, 1830; Ann, born February 7, 1830, died in Febru- 
ary, 191 1 ; John, born March 19, 1832, died in 1912; Elizabeth, born June 
8, 1837; James, born January 17, 1839, died in 1910; Joseph, born December 
21, 1841, died November 17, 1872; William, of further mention; Walter, 
twin of William, is inspector of the Chicago Wire Works. 

William Pickford, son of Joseph and Hannah (Birkenshire) Pickford, 
was born in Sheffield, England, December 18, 1846. He was educated in 
the common schools of his native county, then became an engineer on a 
steamship. In 1871 he had charge of steel blowing blast furnaces; in 1882 
was superintendent of the blast furnaces at Carnegie, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania ; manager for eleven years. He was rail inspector for the 
railroad company for a period of nine years. He purchased one hundred 
and forty-two acres of land, and in 1900 removed to this farm, which he 
cultivates for general products. He is a staunch supporter of Republican 
principles, and a devout member of the Methodist church. Mr. Pickford 
married Rebecca, daughter of Michael McGann. She came to America 
alone at the age of eighteen years, in 1866, and was married at Chicago, 
July 22, 1870. They have had children : Joseph H., lives in Irwin, Penn- 
sylvania, married Matilda McCune, of Turtle Creek; John W., superintend- 
ent of steel works at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and lives in Wilkinsburg; 
married Emma Chester ; Annie Elizabeth, married J. A. Phillips, of Somer- 
ville, Florida ; Celia, deceased ; Delia, married David Beatty, and lives near 
the home farm; Edith, married Thomas G. Beatty, a farmer; Ethel, mar- 
ried David Long, who owns the adjoining farm. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1139 

The name of Barnett, or Barnet, as it is also spelled, has 

BARNETT been found in the state of Pennsylvania many years, and 

the families bearing it have been founded here at various 

periods of time. They have invariably proved themselves possessed of those 

qualities which are most to be desired in the citizens of any community. 

(I) William Barnett was born in 18 18, and emigrated to America in 
1866. While still living in England, he was a member of Forester Lodge. 
Upon his arrival here, he lived for a time at Sandy Creek, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, removed to Plum Creek in 1872, and spent the last 
years of his life at Verona, Pennsylvania. He was a coal miner by occupa- 
tion, and when he came to America he joined his brother Thomas, now 
deceased. In political matters he joined the Republican party, and was a 
member of the United Presbyterian church. He married Katherine Whiel, 
and they had children : Daniel, born in 1853, lives at Pittsburgh, and mar- 
ried Bridget Rogers; William M., of further mention; Elizabeth, born in 
1859, married (first) Joseph Woods, of Plum Creek, (second) Augustus 
Wooster, of Plum Creek; Thomas, born in i860, unmarried; Mary, born 
in 1862, married William Clark, and lives at New Kensington, Pennsylvania. 

(II) William M. Barnett, son of William and Katherine (Whiel) Bar- 
nett, was born in South Wales, England, September 16, 1856. The common 
schools of his native place furnished his education, and at an early age he 
commenced working in the coal mines. Upon attaining manhood he emi- 
grated to the United States, and for seventeen years followed coal mining 
at Plum Creek coal mines, and for a period of thirteen years was engaged 
in the meat business at Unity Station. In igo8 he removed to his farm of 
one hundred and thirty acres at Unity Station, Pennsylvania, where he 
also owns two houses. Mr. Barnett married Mary B. Ferdon, and they 
have had children: Sarah Jane, born September 14, 1879; Robert, born 
March 10, 1881, deceased; Ida M., born December 2, 1882; Minnie, born 
May II, 1884. deceased; j\Iary Katherine, born December 9, 1889; Clara 
Agnes, born December 30, 1892; William Lawrence, born April 11, 1895; 
Anna Augusta, born February 22, 1896; Harry Clemens, born January 2, 
1901 ; Grace Lenore, born September 8, 1905. 



This name, first a forename and later a surname, is derived 
GEORGE from two Greek words and signifies "earth worker," or 

"farmer." The families of this name are of widely different 
origin and are scattered throughout the United States. The branch under 
discussion here had its origin in Wales, a country which has furnished 
many energetic and highly valued citizens. 

(I) David George, who was born in Wales in 1789. died in his nati\e 
country in 1866. He emigrated to America and made his home in Brooklyn. 

New York, but later returned to Wales. He married Mary , and 

they had children : David and Evan. 

(II) Evan George, son of David and Mary George, was born in 
Brooklyn, New York, March 20, 1837, and died in Braddock, Allegheny 



II40 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

county, Pennsylvania, February lo, 1904. When he was about six years 
of age he was taken to Wales by his parents, and there learned the mill- 
wright's trade, which he followed all his life. He returned to the United 
States about 1890, and settled in Braddock, where he lived at No. 11 15 
Kirkpatrick avenue. He married, in Wales, Mary Stockham, born in 
Wales, April 28, 1844, now living in Braddock. She is the daughter of 
Thomas and Mary Stockham, both natives of Wales, where the former 
died at the age of seventy-two years. They had children : Mary, mentioned 
above; David, deceased; William, of Wales; Elizabeth, lives in England; 
Sarah Anna; Esther, married William Griffiths, and lives in Braddock. Mr. 
and Mrs. George have had children: David, Thomas, of further mention; 
Mary, Jane, William, deceased. 

(HI) Thomas George, son of Evan and Mary (Stockham) George, was 
born in Wales, January 6, 1869. There he received a thorough and prac- 
tical education in the public schools, and lived until he had attained the age 
of twenty years. He then decided to come to the United States, and upon 
his arrival here in 1889, found employment with the Edgar Thompson 
Steel Company, with vi^hom he remained for a number of years. During 
the earlier years of this period he supplemented his education by attend- 
ance at the night schools. In 1899 he organized the firm of Phillips & 
George, general contractors, which has become one of the important firms 
of the city. They have executed extensive contracts, and are noted for 
their thorough reliability. Among the well known buildings which they 
have erected are the United Brethren church, a fine specimen of the archi- 
tecture of its class ; the Smith Flats, which have been constructed with a 
masterly attention to detail ; and in 1914 erected a row of ten brick houses, 
which are models of their kind. Mr. George is a self made man, as he came 
to this country a poor boy, and has risen to a position of wealth and influ- 
ence. He is the owner of a fine residence at No. 11 33 Bell avenue. A 
man of strong opinions and a deep thinker, he will affiliate with no political 
party, but prefers to form his opinions independently. He and his wife are 
members of the United Presbyterian church. He married, January 7, 1914, 
Minnie Rowlands, born in England, where her parents are still living; she 
is a daughter of Harry and Elizabeth (Simkins) Rowlands, of Birming- 
ham, England, but a resident of Braddock for five years prior to her 
marriage. 



This record opens with Harry McComb, great-grandfather 
McCOMB of William McComb, of Unity Station, Pennsylvania, who 

passed his entire life in Ireland, the seat of the family. He 
was a soldier in the wars into which Ireland was plunged through religious 
diflferences, as a Protestant, and during his active years was a farmer. He 
married and had children: i. Dallie, remained in Ireland. 2. Robert, came 
to the United States and fought in the Mexican War. 3. William, settled 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 4. Alexander, remained in Ireland. 5. 
Thomas, of whom further. 




r^^mf^h^a^^^-'^^^^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1141 

(II) Thomas McCoinb, son of Harry McComb, was born in Ireland, 
and after coming to the United States passed his remaining years in 
Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He was the owner 
of property on the South Side of Pittsburgh. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thomas Todd, and had children: i. Henry, of whom further. 
2. Marjorie. 3. John T., a soldier in the Union army during the Civil 
War. 4. Robert, a Union soldier in the Civil War. 5. Thomas. Of the 
five children previously named, dhly one, Marjorie, is living at the present 
time. She is now living at Sheridan, Pennsylvania, aged ninety years. 

(III) Henry McComb, son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Todd) McComb, 
was born in Ireland, August 2, 1822, died December 14, 1909. He became 
the owner of a two hundred acre farm, the cultivation of which he entrusted 
to his sons, while he continued at his employment in a rolling mill. He 
was for fifty-five years active in the work of the Unity United Presbyterian 
Church, holding in its organization the office of trustee, and as a Repub- 
lican filled the position of supervisor of roads. He married Christine, 
daughter of William Smith, and had children: i. Thomas, resides in Dela- 
ware. 2. William, of whom further. 3. Mary Ann, lives in Pittsburgh. 4. 
John T., deceased. 5. Robert A., deceased. 6. Harry S., deceased. 7. Wil- 
son C, deceased. 8. James, lives in Denver, Colorado. 

(IV) William McComb, son of Henry and Christine (Smith) McComb, 
was born in Plum township, Allegheny county. Pennsylvania, April 10, 
1849. After the completion of his education he became a farmer, a calling 
he has followed all of his life, his home having been on the farm where he 
now lives since he was eight years of age. His operations have been uni- 
formly successful, their results gratifying, and Mr. McComb is known as one 
of the most able agriculturists of the region. He has been in the past 
greatly interested in National Guard work, and for four years was president 
of the local organization of the state body at New Texas. He is a Repub- 
lican in political affiliation. Mr. McComb married. May 22, 1873. Sarah 
J., daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Patterson) Porter, granddaughter of 
Andrew and Sarah (Quinter) Porter. Children of William and Sarah J. 
(Porter) McComb: i. Annie Margaret, married George M. Hamilton, 
and has one daughter, Florence. 2. John T., lives at home. 



Coming to the United States from Germany, his native 
HOCHBERG land, Jacob Hochberg founded his family in Pennsylvania, 

making his home in Pittsburgh, where he resided until 
his death, February 20, 1913. His calling was that of gardener and he 
pursued it successfully and profitably during his active years. He married 
Caroline Unger, born in Germany, who survives him to this time (1914). 
Both belonged to the Presbyterian church. Children of Jacob and Caroline 
(Unger) Hochberg: William H., of whom further; Louis G., John J., 
Charles F., Walter, Albert G., Matilda Caroline. 

William H. Hochberg, son of Jacob and Caroline (Unger) Hochberg, 
was born in the twenty-second ward of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 18, 



1 142 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

1874, and as a boy attended Colfax School No. i. In youthful years he 
began gardening, in March, 191 1, purchasing six acres of land in Penn 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he erected an attractive 
house the following year, and where he continues in business with success- 
ful results. In 1893 he was township assessor, but other than as the 
incumbent of this office has never entered the public service, always, how- 
ever, recognizing his every obligation as a private citizen. His church is 
the Lutheran, and he is identified with the Masonic order, he and his wife 
belonging to the Order of the Eastern Star, his other fraternal connection 
being with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Hochberg married, September 28, 1898, Anna C, daughter of 
August and Theresa (Helmerich) Miller, her parents natives of Germany. 
August Miller was educated in his native land, and as a youth of nineteen 
years came to the United States, locating in Penn township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, where he followed the blacksmith's trade. He after- 
ward moved to Plum township, in the same county, there continuing at his 
trade until his accidental death, July 10, 191 1. With his wife, whose parents 
passed their lives in the homeland, he was a member of the Lutheran 
church. Children of August and Theresa (Helmerich) Miller: Emma, 
August A., Mary R., Emelia, Elizabeth, Tracy, John, Anna C, of previous 
mention, married William H. Hochberg. Children of William H. and Anna 
C. (Miller) Hochberg: Clara Belle, Homer William, Ruth Caroline, Hazel 
Freda, Grace Miller. 



John Duf?, the American progenitor of this branch of the Dufif 
DUFF family, was born in Ireland, and came to this country prior to 

the War of the Revolution. He joined the American forces, 
fighting bravely in the Continental army, and at the battle of Brandywine 
his whiskers were cut off by a bullet. After the war he purchased land in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and at the time of his death was the 
owner of two hundred acres, in Penn township, whither he had removed 
prior to 1800, and died there in 1822. He was engaged in general farming 
and stock raising, and took an active part in the wars with the Indians. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Duff married Mary 
Shakley, and had children: James married Catherine Fisher; David; Will- 
iam; George; Samuel, of further mention; Mary; Hetty; Betsey; John; 
Margaret. 

(II) Samuel Duff, son of John and Mary (Shakley) Duff, was born 
on the Duff homestead in Penn township, in 1807, and was educated in 
the public schools of Beulah. In early manhood he became a tanner, later 
a mason; he made a trip to Philadelphia and New York with a drove of 
horses, returning by way of canal. He also went down the Mississippi 
river on coal boats. Politically he was a Democrat, and a member of the 
United Presbyterian church. He married Jane B. Wilson, born December 
2^, 1820, died March 23, 1901, and they had children: Priscilla ; Alvira, 
died young; Mary Martha, married John Turner; Lucinda, married James 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1143 

Wilson ; Jane B., married Albert Smith ; Samantha ; Alma, married Austin 
Jack; Harry, of further mention; Francis, married Jennie Morrow, of 
Wilkinsburg ; Liberty, died at the age of eight years. 

Thomas Wilson, grandfather of Jane B. (Wilson) Dufif, was born in 
Ireland, and emigrated to this country in 1767. He settled in what is now 
Penn township, in 1770, and there erected the first cabin in that section. 
The depredations of the Indians compelled him to leave this section for a 
time, and he went to Pittsburgh ; it was seven years before it was safe 
enough for him to return to his clearing. He was in active service in the 
Continental army during the Revolution. He married Agnes Murray, born 
in Ireland, died in Pennsylvania in 1832, at the age of ninety-eight 
years. They had children : Mary, Betsey and James, born in Ireland ; 
Francis, Jane, Thomas and George, born in America. George, son 
of Thomas and Agnes (Murray) Wilson, and father of Mrs. DufT, 
was born in Pennsylvania, January 22, 1779, and married Mary Morrow, 
born August 9, 1783. Children: Eliza, born June 20, 1809; Thomas, born 
March 17, 181 1, died young; Francis, born October 15, 1812; Henry M., 
born April 18, 1815; Nancy, bom February 12, 1818; Jane B., mentioned 
above as the wife of Mr. Dufif ; Sarah Anna, born July 17, 1823 ; Mary, 
born September 19, 1826; Thomas, born October i, 1832. 

(Ill) Harry Dufif, son of Samuel and Jane B. (Wilson) Dufif, was 
born on the old Dufif homestead, in Penn township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, May 26, 1858. The public schools of his native township furnished 
him with an excellent and practical education, and he has always been 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. He has a fine farm of sixty-two acres, 
richly underlaid with gas and coal. He gives his political support to the 
Democratic party, and has served as commissioner of Penn township. His 
religious afifiliation is with the LTnited Presbyterian church. Mr. Dufif mar- 
ried, April 9, 1891, Margaret J., born April 8, 1865, daughter of James and 
Jane (Mitchell) Finley, and sister of: Sarah Elizabeth, married George 
Sampson ; Rachel A. ; Mary H., married Frank Wilson ; John S., married 
Grace Elder; Belle; J. Reed, married Bessie Kingan. Mr. and Mrs. Dufif 
have had children : Ethel R., born January 15, 1892 ; Chalmer H., born June 
15. 1893; Russell R., born December 12, 1894; Marlin J., born October 27, 
1906. 



The Potter family, represented in the present generation by 
POTTER Frederick Sheridan Potter, tax collector of the borough of 

Turtle Creek, is well known in the section, they taking an 
active interest in the enterprises that have for their object the improve- 
ment and advancement of the community. 

Levi George Potter, father of Frederick Sheridan Potter, was born in 
Paris, Oneida county. New York, January 31, 1822. He there grew to 
manhood, attended the early schools of that region, and later gave his at- 
tention to the tilling of the soil in Jeflferson county. New York, from whence 
he removed to Charlotte county, Virginia, where both he and his wife 



1 144 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ■ 

passed away, after having resided there for many years. He married 
Harriet Almeda Prescott, born in Oneida county, New York, daughter of 
Anson and Hannah (Paddock) Prescott, he having been one of the pioneers 
of Oneida county. Hannah Paddock was of East Haddam, Connecticut, 
and she and Anson Prescott were married October 21, 1820. The Prescott 
family was of Scotch origin, and the ancestors were among the early 
families of New England. Anson Prescott was a relative of William 
Prescott, who served as a colonel in the Colonial army, under General 
John Winslow, in the expedition against Cape Breton, 1754, against Acadia, 
I755> aid was promoted captain. In recognition of his gallantry he was 
offered a commission in the regular army, but declined. He was also 
related to William Hickling Prescott, the historian, born in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, May 4, 1796, died in Boston, Massachusetts, January 28, 1859; 
he was graduated at Harvard, A. B., 1814, A. M., 1817, and entered his 
father's office to study law, but owing to the accidental loss of one eye, 
which seriously impaired the sight of the other, he devoted himself to 
historical writing, and to accomplish this employed an assistant who served 
as a secretary, amanuensis and reader, and in writing used an ingenious 
instrument for the blind, called the poctograph. Mr. and Mrs. Potter were 
the parents of nine children : William, deceased ; Burton ; Mary, deceased ; 
Homer; Adeleine ; Elmira; George J.; Frederick Sheridan; Ernest Lincoln. 

Frederick Sheridan Potter was born in Jefferson county. New York, 
October 27, 1862. He was a student in the public schools of his native 
place, afterward serving an apprenticeship at the trade of blacksmith with 
Mr. Leonard, of Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania, whither he removed in 1884. 
He worked as a journeyman for many years, and also with the New York 
& Cleveland Railroad. In 1898 he was elected to the office of tax collector 
of Turtle Creek borough, and has served in that capacity ever since, a 
period of sixteen years, his present term to end at the expiration of four 
years, and this long tenure of office amply testifies to his ability and effi- 
ciency. For three years prior to his election as tax collector he served as 
secretary of the school board, during the erection of the new school. He was 
a member of the Turtle Creek Board of Trade as long as it was in exist- 
ence, and is vice-president of the East Pittsburgh Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation, of which he was one of the organizers. He is a member of Mc- 
Master's Methodist Episcopal Church, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, Lodge No. TJJ, and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Potter married, October 22, 1893, Maggie Burgess, of Wilkins- 
burg, Pennsylvania, daughter of William and Mary (Scott) Burgess. 
Children: Edith Prescott, William Dewey, Herbert Chamberlain, Mary 
Margaret. 



The name of Colonel Philip Howell is a well remembered 

HOWELL one in Western Pennsylvania, where he was numbered 

among the brave pioneers who fought back the Indians and 

blazed a trail for civilization to enter. He was the grandfather of Elisha 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1145 

Peairs Howell, of Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, and resided for a time in 
Eastern Pennsylvania. Colonel Philip Howell was born in Pennsylvania, 
and prior to the year 1800 crossed the mountains, settling in now Elizabeth 
township, Allegheny county. There he bought two hundred and eighteen 
acres of wild land, adding later forty adjoining acres, which he cleared and 
brought under cultivation. In 1812 he built a brick residence on his farm 
that, though still standing, is rapidly falling into ruins. He was a noted 
Indian fighter, and derived his title of colonel in the militia service of the 
state and worthily bore the title. Both he and his wife died on the Eliza- 
beth township farm, and are buried in Round Hill Cemetery. He died 
November 17, 1837, aged seventy-nine years; she died November i, 1852, 
aged eighty-three years. Children: i. Llewellyn, a farmer of Ohio, where 
he died. 2. John P., died at the old homestead, a farmer. 3. Andrew, a 
farmer, died in Westmoreland county. 4. Robert Cooper, of further men- 
tion. 5. Philip, a school teacher and justice of the peace, last heard from as 
living in Calhoun county, Iowa. 6. James, was last heard from as living in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, engaged in the lumber business. 7. Hester, married 
Hugh Drennan, a farmer, and died in Illinois. 8. Mary, married John 
Power, and died on a farm in Elizabeth township. 9. Jennie, lived with 
her sister Fannie until very old, unmarried. 10. Fannie, died in Boston, 
Pennsylvania, aged eighty-seven, unmarried. 

(II) Robert Cooper Howell, son of Colonel Philip and Margaret 
(Cooper) Howell, was born on the Howell homestead farm in Elizabeth 
township, Allegheny county, his birth place being the original log house, 
occupied by the family prior to the erection of the more substantial one of 
brick. This log house stood near the present home of John C. Howell, a 
bachelor, who resides on the old homestead with his maiden sisters, Mar- 
garet S. and Sarah F. Howell. Robert Cooper Howell was born in 1804 
and died at the homestead in 1877. He was a farmer all his life, inheriting 
one hundred and twenty-two acres of the homestead farm, on which he 
lived and died. He was a Republican in politics, served as road supervisor, 
and both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. He 
married Ehza Jane Peairs, born in 1814, died in 1883. daughter of Elisha 
and granddaughter of Joseph Peairs, of Dutch parentage, who, with his wife, 
Susan Allen, lived near Dunbar in Fayette count)', Pennsylvania. 

Joseph Peairs bought in 1778 from the state of Pennsylvania, a farm 
in now Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, and there both he and his wife 
died in 1808. Their farm adjoined the old Round Hill church grounds and 
the Round Hill Cemetery property, both of which were originally part of 
the old Peairs farm. Joseph Peairs left seven sons: Elisha, grandfather 
of Elisha P. Douglass, a lawyer of McKeesport (mentioned in this work ) ; 
David, John, Joseph, William and Isaac, all later farmers of the state of 
Ohio, except Elisha, who inherited the homestead and always lived there. 
He also left three daughters, Nancy, Susan and IMary. Nancy married 
William Fulton, whom she survived many years and died in Warsaw, 
Illinois, aged over ninety years. Susan married John Wychoff. Mary mar- 



1 146 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ried John Plummer, of a very old Western Pennsylvania family, a Plum- 
mer said to have been the first white child born west of the Allegheny 
mountains. 

Elisha Peairs, son of Joseph and Susan (Allen) Peairs, died in 1844, 
at the old homestead, which he inherited. He married Sarah Wychoff, who 
died about 1831, leaving a family of nine children, eight of whom lived to 
mature years. Eliza Jane Peairs, daughter of Elisha and Sarah (Wychoflf) 
Peairs, married Robert Cooper Howell, of previous mention: Children: i. 
Philip Llewellyn, married and died in McKeesport without issue. 2. Elisha 
Peairs, of whom further. 3. Sarah Frances, unmarried, resides with her 
brother, John C, at the homestead. 4. Margaret Susanna, unmarried, 
resides with her brother and sister at the homestead. 5. John Cooper, a 
bachelor, resides at the old homestead. 6. Oliver WychofT, a physician, died 
at Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania, where he practiced for several years. 7. 
Flora Caroline, married Dr. John McCune, who practiced medicine for many 
years at Sutersville, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. She survives 
him, a resident of McKeesport, and has daughters, Mrs. J. A. Caughey, 
Mrs. George Hopkins and Mrs. Thomas Russell, all of McKeesport. 

(HI) Elisha Peairs Howell, second son of Robert Cooper and Eliza 
Jane (Peairs) Plowell, was bom on the Howell homestead in Elizabeth town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 8, 1839. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and old Elizabeth Academy, the latter school 
held in the basement of the Presbyterian church. He spent his earlier 
years on the farm, but after leaving school taught a few terms, then entered 
mercantile life as clerk for John Walker, Jr. After two years in that posi- 
tion, he was with Van Kirk & Walker for one year, then went West. He 
was clerk in a Minneapolis shoe store for several years, then moved to Red 
Wing, Minnesota, where for six years he was a retail shoe merchant, as 
partner of the firm, Heffelfinger, Howell & Kingman. After this partner- . 
ship dissolved, Mr. Howell returned to Minneapolis, where for about five 
years he was manager of a retail shoe store, owned by C. A. Heffelfinger. 
He finally yielded to the persuasions of his brother, Philip L. Howell, and 
returned to Elizabeth township and has there since resided on one hundred 
and thirty-seven acres of the old Colonel Philip Howell farm, which he 
owns. He devotes his farm to stock raising and general farming purposes 
and is rated one of the prosperous men of the township. He is a member 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, belongs to the Presbyterian 
church and in politics is a Republican. • 

Mr. Howell married, May 3, 1882, Jessie Virginia, daughter of David 
and Pamelia Sibley (Drake) Roberts, of Livingston county, New York. 
Mrs. Howell died October 14, 1909. Children: i. Lulu Virginia, deceased. 
2. Corinne Frances, married Fred Wolfe; children: Anthony Beach, died 
in infancy, and Virginia Margaret. 3. David Cooper, residing at home, his 
father's assistant. 




S).(?.>l<rui^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ii47 

The Treser family is of German origin, and its descendants 

TRESER have inherited in marked degree the excellent characteristics 

of that thrifty race, contributing in large measure to the 

upbuilding and advancement of the various communities in which they 

located. 

George Treser, grandfather of George Treser, was a native of Ger- 
many, where he was reared, educated and married, and in the fifties, after 
the death of his wife in Germany, he emigrated to the United States and 
located near the Block House, known as Fort Pitt, Pittsburgh, from whence 
he removed to Allegheny City, residing on Madison avenue, where his death 
occurred. He was a butcher by trade, and worked at the same during his 
entire active career, being one of the pioneer meat men in that section of 
the state of Pennsylvania. 

Anton Treser, father of George Treser, was born in Germany, accom- 
panied his father to this country, was educated in the schools of Allegheny 
City, after which he learned the trade of butcher, at which he is engaged 
at the present time (1914) in Butler, Pennsylvania, but shortly expects to 
return to Allegheny City. He married Katherine Degenhardt, born in 
Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, daughter of Fred and Barbara Degenhardt, 
natives of Germany ; he a butcher and among the early settlers of Allegheny 
City. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Treser, two of whom 
died in infancy, the others being as follows : Minnie, George, William, 
Edward, Walter, Lizzie, Lewis, Elsie, Elmer. 

George Treser was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, September 
19, 1876. After completing his studies in the schools of his native city, 
while still a boy, he began work in a brick yard, and later was employed 
in various concerns, namely: In the Glass House; later with E. M. 
Winter, on Hare's Island, meat packer; with W. H. Walker & Company, 
in their candle factory ; in a hinge factory, and with William Zeller & 
Company, pork packer, Allegheny City ; with Henry Lohery, on East street, 
Allegheny City, pork packer, and while in his employ he assisted in killing 
sheep and calves, at night, for George Eckert, and for S. W. Hill, receiving 
no remuneration for his services, his object being to perfect himself in his 
trade. After leaving the employ of Henry Lohery he secured employment 
with the Pittsburgh Provision Company ; then entered the employ of 
Armour & Company, assisting in killing the first sheep and calves for that 
concern in Pittsburgh, and then worked with his father, thus becoming 
proficient in all branches of the business. In 1895 he engaged in the meat 
business on his own account on Center avenue, Pittsburgh, operating there 
until 1902, then removed to Carnegie and engaged in the same business, 
continuing to operate the store for some time after his removal to Turtle 
Creek, in September, 1905, but finally sold the business in Carnegie, and 
is now conducting a meat business in Turtle Creek. He has been successful 
in his various enterprises, and ranks among the prosperous and influential 
citizens of his adopted city. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and 
of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 



1 148 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. Treser married (first), in 1897, Minnie Cox, daughter of Robert 
M. Cox. One child, Esma. Mr. Treser married (second) February 5, 
1908, Jane Lupton, born in Yorkshire, England, daughter of John and 
Jane (Hill) Lupton, and granddaughter of Henry and Elizabeth Lupton, 
and of John and Elizabeth Hill. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lupton were natives 
of England, lived and died there, he a hotel keeper; Mr. and Mrs. John 
Hill were also natives of England, he the owner of a brick yard in York- 
shire. John Lupton, father of Mrs. Treser, was born in England, in 
September, 1850, and is an inspector of goods on the railroad in England ; 
he and his wife had eight children, as follows : John ; Herbert, came to the 
United States in January, 1906, and located at East McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
vania, he now holding a clerical position with the Westinghouse Air Brake 
Company, at Wilmerding, Pennsylvania; Oliver; Jane, aforementioned as 
the wife of Mr. Treser, accompanied her brother Herbert to this country; 
Fannie ; Henry, deceased ; William ; Philip, came to the United States in 



The name of Burkhard, Burkhardt or Burghart, is a 

BURKH.YRD very ancient one in Germany, and is probably derived 

from Burg, meaning castle or fort, and Hart, meaning 

hard or difficult ; in other words, a castle difficult to be taken. Many of 

the name are now established in this country, and have proved their worth 

as patriotic and law-abiding citizens. 

Joseph Burkhard was born in Germany, and came to this country in 
early manhood, after receiving a good education in his native land, and 
there learning the trade of shoemaker. He followed this calling very suc- 
cessfully after his arrival in America, first settling in Rochester, New 
York. After his marriage he located in Buflfalo, New York, where he 
remained a number of years, and upon leaving Buffalo he spent several 
years in the oil fields of Pennsylvania. He died in Butler county. Pennsyl- 
vania, about 1908. His religious faith was that of the Catholic church. 
Mr. Burkhard married, his wife being still living. Seven children were the 
fruit of this union : Jacob J., John C, Louisa, Joseph W., William, Barbara, 
Charles. 

John C. Burkhard, son of Joseph Burkhard. was born in Buffalo, 
New York, August 24, 1864. He was educated in the local public 
schools, and for considerable number of years was a traveling salesman 
for a furniture house. He then established himself in business in- 
dependently, being now the owner ■ of the Alexandria Bowling & 
Billiard Parlors, located at 6011-6013 Penn avenue. East Liberty, 
Pittsburgh East End, Pennsylvania. He has always taken an active 
part in political affairs in the interests of the Republican party, and 
at the present time is serving as township commissioner of Penn town- 
ship. His religious affiliation is with the Catholic church, to which he is a 
generous contributor. Mr. Burkhard married (first) Emma, a daughter of 
John Hamilton, of Pittsburgh. He married (second) Walburga J. Wolf. 




S^'n-Zky, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1149 

Children by first marriage: Walter and Irene, deceased; Clarence, Marie 
and Charles. Children by second marriage: Louis Wolf and Walburga 
Josephine. Mrs. Burkhard is the owner of considerable real estate in the 
city of Pittsburgh, and a farm of sixteen acres in Penn township. 

Anton Wolf, father of Walburga J. (Wolf) Burkhard, was born in 
Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1841, and died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 
1892. He was educated in his native land, emigrated to the United States 
in 1857. He was a brewer and worked at this trade for a time, then 
became owner of a brewery at West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania. In 1870 
he came to Pittsburgli and engaged in the hotel business on Penn avenue. 
East Liberty. He was a Republican in politics. He was twenty years of 
age at the time of the outbreak of the Civil War, and filled with enthusiasm 
for the cause of his adopted country, he enlisted in the First Pennsylvania 
Cavalry Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, serving as flag sergeant of 
Company M., re-enlisted as a veteran volunteer, and received his honorable 
discharge from the government, June 20, 1865. He fought bravely, being 
actively engaged in sixty-six general battles, and was injured in one of his 
knees, from the effects of which he suffered throughout the remainder of 
his life. He was a member of McPherson Post, No. 117, Grand Army of 
the Republic, and was a member of the Union Veteran Legion. Mr. Wolf 
married Josephine, daughter of Adam Schneider. She died in 1900. She 
was the mother of thirteen children, six of whom died in infancy, the 
others as follows: i. Joseph M.. married Martha Lenz, two children: 
Josephine, a Sister of Divine Providence, and Elizabeth. 2. Walburga J., 
aforementioned as the wife of John C. Burkhard. 3. Louis A., deceased. 
4. Josephine, married Walter E. Friday, three children: Jacob, Walter E.. 
Anthony. 5. Margaret, married H. G. Dresler, seven children : Harry, 
Anthony, Dorothy, Charles, Joseph, Josephine, Walburga. 6. Mary, married 
L. B. Saupp, four children : Josephine, Frank, Louis B., Mary L. 7. 
Fred A., married Walburga Lenz, three children: Anton, Mary, Walburga. 



Of German birth, Henry Garlow established his line in the 
GARLOW United States, making his home in Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania. He was born March 17, 1829, and after coming 
to this country was first employed as a miner, in 1869 purchasing a farm 
near Unity Station, Pennsylvania, where he resided until his death, August 
16, 1886. He was a member of the German Lutheran church, and sup- 
ported the Republican party. Henry Garlow married Rosena Spintler, 
bom January 9, 1830, died July 21, 1896, and had children: i. Henry, 
born March 17, 1854, lives with his brother. Christian. 2. John, bom 
December 17, 1855, died March 24, 1910. 3. Christopher H., of whom 
further. 4. Louis, born April 14, 1861, lives in McKeesport. Pennsylvania. 
5. Rosie, born February 21, 1863, married Frank Andrews. 6. Carrie, born 
April 29, 1866, married, July 28, 1890. William Yourd. 7. Catherine, born 
June 19, 1867, married Adam Flicker. 8. Frederick, born November 25, 



II50 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Christopher H. Garlow, son of Henry and Rosena (Spintler) Garlow, 
was bom September 20, 1858, and as a boy attended the public schools. 
For several years, in young manhood, he was employed at coal mining, 
after which he became a farmer. He is now the owner of a one-third 
interest in a tract of eighty acres near Unity Station, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and has there lived for a period of thirty years. He is a 
strong Republican in political conviction. Mr. Garlow married (first) 
Martha McLoughlin, who died June 30, 1881. He married (second) 
Catherine, daughter of Samuel Arnold, a miner, who married Philomena, 
daughter of Casper Pelkey. Children of Samuel and Philomena (Pelkey) 
Arnold: I. Napoleon, deceased; married Sarah Ann Forrest. 2. Lewis, 
unmarried. 3. Alexander, married (first) Mary Swaney, and after her 
death married a second time. 4. John, married (first) Minnie Douglas, 
(second) Agnes Mellott. 5. Julia, married (first) Francis Jeffers, (second) 
Finley Crosby. 6. Josephine, married Martin Bennington, and lives in 
Ohio. 7. Matilda, married (first) Thomas Rector, (second) James Burge, 
(third) Thomas Ishewood. 8. Bella, accidentally burned to death when 
twenty years of age. 9. Mary, died when seventeen months old. 10. 
Catherine, of previous mention, the second wife of Christopher H. Garlow. 
Children of Christopher H. and Martha (McLoughlin) Garlow: i. Flor- 
ence, married Lewis Arnold, and lives in Center, Pennsylvania. 2. Effie, 
married Amos Matthew, and lives in Penn township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. 3. Bessie, married William Winkler, and resides in Unity 
Station, Pennsylvania. Children of Christopher H. and Catherine (Arnold) 
Garlow: i. Jennie, born June 27, 1891, married Charles Kiser. 2. Tracy, 
born June 30, 1893, married Charles Kuhn, and lives in Unity Station, 
Pennsylvania. 3. Irene, born February 10, 1896. 4. William, born March 
13, 1898. 5. Andrew, born July 8, 1902. 6. Ethel, born July 10, 1905. 
7. Clarence, born April 20, 1909. 8. James Walter, born February 19, 
1912, died January 8, 1913. 



Immigration to the United States by a member of this line of 
FREY the German family of Frey did not occur until 1868, when 

Michael Martin Frey, son of Leonhardt Frey, settled in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. He had, however, been preceded to this country by 
another bearing the family name, Morris Frey, a cousin of Leonhardt Frey, 
who had emigrated in 1835, locating in Pittsburgh, returning to the homeland 
in 1848. One of his sons served imder appointment from President Lincoln 
in the commissary department of the Union army, his jurisdiction extending 
from New Orleans to San Francisco. He later settled in Idaho, and there 
resides to the present time, interested in the management of the Morris 
Canal in that state. 

(I) Leonhardt Frey, grandfather of Michael Martin Frey, was a life- 
long resident of his native land, Germany, where he followed the saddler's 
trade. He and his wife Margaret were the parents of a large family, one 
of their sons Leonhardt (2), of whom further. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1151 

(II) Leonhardt (2) Frey, son of Leonhardt (i) and Margaret Frey, 
was born in Baden, Germany, and during his active years was occupied at the 
trade of his father, saddler. He married Margaret Fast, born in Baden, 
Germany, daughter of John Michael and Margaret Fast, and had issue: 
Barbara, Jacob, Mary, Leonhardt (3), a resident of Oakmont, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Martin, Margaret, Michael Martin, of whom further. 

(III) Michael Martin Frey, son of Leonhardt (2) and Margaret 
(Fast) Frey, was born in Baden, Germany, December 23, 1849, and there 
attended school, after the completion of his general education becoming 
proficient in the callings of saddler, upholsterer and paper-hanger. As a 
youth of eighteen years he came to the United States, the vessel "America" 
on which he had engaged passage docking at New York on January 16, 
1868, and he proceeded to Pittsburgh on the first of the following month 
For a short time he was engaged in the sale of notions under the instruc- 
tions of Mr. Max Kauffman, and he then obtained a position as a painter. 
For this work he had unusual talent and within a year he was made fore- 
man by his employer, although prior to his coming to the United States he 
had never performed work of that kind and possessed the additional handi- 
cap of an imperfect and faltering knowledge of English. Mr. Frey was 
for two years afterward employed at the St. Charles Hotel, and for one 
year at a similar house of entertainment, subsequently returning to the St. 
Charles to accept a position as steward. In 1912. after having been pro- 
prietor of a hotel on Harron Hill for seven years. Mr. Frey retired to a 
farm of one hundred and forty-two acres in Penn township, where he 
has erected a handsome country house, finely furnished and equipped with 
all modern conveniences. Mr. Frey has traveled extensively over the 
United States, and in the course of his travels has acquired many articles 
of beauty and of value as curiosities, with which he has ornamented certain 
of the rooms of his home. Those which have personal association he has 
augmented with others brought from all corners of the globe, some simple, 
some costly, all forming an unusual and interesting collection. Mr. Frey 
has dealt widely in real estate in the city of Pittsburgh, and has prospered 
in this line, directing his investments with wise foresight and shrewd 
caution. He has for twenty years been a member of Solomon Lodge, No. 
231, Free and Accepted Masons, and is quartermaster of Regiment Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias. He is also an honorary member of the Turn Verein. 
Mr. Frey is the oldest quartermaster in the organization of the Knights of 
Pythias in the United States, his Uniform Rank that of captain, and he has 
attended many encampments throughout the Lfnited States. 

Mr. Frey married, in September, 1880, Mary Neuhauser, born in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and is the father of: Leonhardt, died aged 
thirty-one years; Charlotta, lives at home. 



Adam Ackerman came of a family representative of the 

ACKERMAN best type of French character, which, while it has not 

formed so large an element in the composite citizenship 



1 152 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

of the United States, has added a leaven of its own pecuHar virtues, of an 
unusual degree of industry and thrift, and the power of adapting prac- 
tical ideas to life. His parents were Nicholas and Annie Ackerman, both 
bom in the old French province of Alsace, where, too, they passed their 
childhood and youth, and were eventually married. In the year 1850 they 
emigrated to the United States, and coming directly to the western part of 
Pennsylvania, settled on the hill now occupied by Whittaker borough, near 
Homestead, Allegheny county, in that state. There Mr. Ackerman pros- 
pered, and soon became the owner of a tract of land consisting of eighty 
acres, which he operated as a farm. He was also an operator in the coal 
mines. Like most of the early settlers in that region, he first built upon his 
land a simple log cabin, and here he and his family lived. This old struc- 
ture is still standing. Mr. Ackerman Sr. died about 1889, at the age of 
seventy-two years. He and his wife were the parents of five children, as 
follows: George, who is still living at the age of eighty-five years, in 
Whittaker, Pennsylvania; Adam, the subject of this sketch; Frank, also a 
resident of Whittaker; Christina, deceased, became Mrs. George Forest, of 
Whittaker ; Magdalena, deceased, who became Mrs. Frank Shoup, of Whit- 
taker, Pennsylvania. 

Adam Ackerman, the second child of Nicholas and Annie Ackerman, 
was born in September, 1834, in the old French province of Alsace. He was 
educated in the local schools, and there passed his childhood. At the time of 
his parents' emigration to yVmerica, our subject was a youth of sixteen years, 
and he joined them on their venture into the new land. He found employ- 
ment soon after his arrival in the United States, in the coal mines, and in- 
deed, remained in the coal business until his death, which occurred Sep- 
tember 12, 1909. Mr. Ackerman was successful in his business and did con- 
siderable building in the neighborhood. He erected the excellent house which 
still serves Mrs. Ackerman as a home, and a number of other dwellings, 
which have, however, mostly been given away by his wife. Mr. Ackerman 
was a prominent figure in his community, and one who did not confine his 
energies to the conduct of his business and personal affairs. He was a mem- 
ber of the Democratic party, and took a keen interest in all political questions, 
and an active part in the local politics of his neighborhood. He served his 
fellow citizens effectively and well on the Whittaker Council. 

Mr. Ackerman was married in May, 1858, to Annie Kramer, herself a 
native of Alsace, where she was born November 10, 1833. Mrs. Ackerman's 
parents were John and Regina (Koehler) Kramer, who came from Alsace to 
the United States in the early days and settled in Braddock, Pennsylvania, 
where Mr. Kramer followed his trade as carpenter until the time of his 
death. To them were born seven children, all of whom came to this country 
with their parents. They were as follows : Annie, now Mrs. Ackerman, the 
widow of our subject ; Andrew, who lived in Homestead, Pennsylvania, until 
the year 1912, when he met with a railroad accident which caused his death ; 
Nicholas, who lives retired from business at Braddock. Pennsylvania ; 
George, retired, a resident of Homestead; John, retired, a resident of Brad- 




O^t^^i^t' C-f.-e'Se4y^i4fyn' 



WESTERN PENXSYLVANIA 1153 

dock ; Mary, deceased, became Mrs. Frank Shearer, of Braddock ; and Philo- 
mena, deceased, became Mrs. John Bost, of Braddock. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ackerman were the parents of twelve children, five of 
whom died in early youth. Those who reached the age of manhood and 
womanhood are as follows : John, a mill worker, is unmarried and resides 
with his mother ; Frank, a mill worker, and resides at Whittaker, Pennsyl- 
vania ; George, also a mill worker, with residence at Whittaker ; Theresa, now 
Mrs. Nicholas Wiesen, of Whittaker; Mary, now Mrs. John Rushe, of Cleve- 
land, Ohio; Anna, deceased, became Mrs. George Steiner, of Whittaker; 
Jacob, deceased, was a resident of Whittaker and by trade a carpenter. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ackerman were both members of St. Francis Catholic Church of 
Whittaker, and in that faith their children were all reared. 



Originally a family of France, the Bedell ancestor, Abner 
BEDELL Bedell, came to the United States colony with the French 

soldiers, who accompanied General Lafayette. He remained 
in this country and eventually settled in Western Pennsylvania. Through 
intermarriage, the Bedell family is connected with the French Huguenot 
family of Ferree. founded in Lancaster county by Jacob Ferree, who after- 
wards settled in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, at the mouth of Peters 
creek, where he bought land about the year 1800. From the union of these 
two ancient French families sprang William Bedell, now deceased, of Large, 
Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 

(I) Abner Bedell, grandfather of William Bedell, of Large, served with 
General Lafayette in the American Revolution, and a tradition concerning 
his military career is that he assisted Lafayette from the field of battle when 
the general was wounded. For a time he lived in New Jersey. About the 
year 1790 he moved to Western Pennsylvania, locating at Horseshoe Bottom, 
above Monongahela City. In 1809 he became owner of the farm in Jeiiferson 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, originally patented by Zadoc 
Wright. He lived on that farm until 1824, when he moved to Elizabeth 
township with his wife and there both died, leaving sons : Andrew, of whom 
further; William, died unmarried; Daniel, a farmer of Jefferson township. 
who was twice married and left descendants. 

(H) Andrew Bedell, son of Abner Bedell, the Revolutionary soldier, 
was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, about the year 1800, and died 
in 1874. He grew to manhood on the Jefferson township farm owned by the 
father, married, and in the spring bought a farm in the same township, 
originally patented by Zadoc Wright. There he lived, and died in 1874. He 
married Rebecca Ferree, who died in 1879. daughter of Joel and Qiristina 
(Kuykenthal) Ferree, of Jefferson townhip, Allegheny county. Pennsyl- 
vania, and granddaughter of Jacob Ferree, a French Huguenot, who settled 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and had by his first wife sons: Joel, a 
colonel in the War of 1812; Benjamin and Jacob. By a second wife, Alice 
(Powell) Ferree. he had also sons and daughters. After the Revolution he 
ninved to \\'estern Pennsvlvania. settling in Alleghenv countv. and in the 



II54 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



year 1800 settled on a farm of three hundred and thirty acres, on which the 
town of CoraopoHs now stands. In the fall of that year he and his sons 
built a house upon the farm and in the following spring moved there. He 
had a brother, Joel, who visited him there about that time and during his 
visit was murdered by Indians. Jacob Ferree was a gunsmith and it is said 
made powder in Lancaster county. Andrew and Rebecca (Ferree) Bedell 
had sons and daughters: i. Abner Washington, married Rebecca Aber. 2. 
Mary, married Lewis Hoffman. 3. Joel, lived in Charleston, West Virginia. 
4. Calvin, lived in Jefferson township. 5. Amanda, married James McKeown. 
6. William, of whom further. 7. Sarah, married Frederick Rhodes, and is 
yet Hving in Pittsburgh. 8. Andrew. 9. Rebecca. 10. Melinda. 

(Ill) William Bedell, son of Andrew and Rebecca (Ferree) Bedell, 
was born on the homestead in Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, December 3, 1831, his birthplace a log house built by his father. He 
died August 26, 1912, at the same farm which he had greatly improved and 
modernized. He attended "Calamity Hollow" school in the old stone building 
and grew up a well informed and healthy boy. He worked the home farm 
as boy and man for his parents, but after his father's death bought out the 
other heirs and became the sole owner of one hundred and sixty-five acres of 
good land on which his father had built a brick house that is still standing in 
good condition. There William Bedell brought his bride and there he lived 
until his death. He was a good farmer, prospered and stocked his farm with 
high grade cattle that for fifteen years supplied Elizabeth City with milk. He 
always kept the best stock of every kind, but only ran his farm for dairy- 
ing purposes during the fifteen years named. He brought the farm to high 
state of fertility, general farming being his permanent business. He became 
well known in the township, was assessor and school director, and with his 
wife was active in church work, both Presbyterians. 

He married, July i, 1858, Lydia Ann Large, who survives him. She 
was born at the Large homestead in JeiTerson township, daughter of Thomas 
and Anna (Stevens) Large, the latter dying when her daughter was a 
small child. Thomas Large was born in Mifflin township, son of John and 
Nancy (Low) Large, the latter born east of the mountains, of German 
parents. John Large was a Revolutionary soldier, born in New Jersey, of 
German parentage. He came to Allegheny county prior to 1790, settling in 
Mififlin township. Later he left his farm there to the management of his 
son Henry and moved to Jefferson township and bought a tract of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, now the site of the town of Large, named in his honor. 
He operated distilleries in both townships, being the first to operate a still 
in either Mifflin or Jefferson. He was a very tall man, straight, strong and 
powerful. Thomas Large, his son, purchased the interest of the other heirs 
in the Jefferson township farm and there lived until his death. He had by his 
first wife, Anna (Stevens) Large, eight children: i. Nancy, married Tweed 
Morrison, and lived at the Jefferson township farm. 2. Rebecca, married 
Thomas Stewart, a farmer of Jefferson township. 3. Margaret, married 
Frank Mayo. 4. John, a farmer. 5. Henry, enlisted in the Union army and 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA Ii55 

never returned. 6. Lydia Ann, widow of William Bedell and the last sur- 
vivor of the children of Thomas Large. 7. Isaac. 8. Gilbert. By his second 
wife, Hannah (Moore) Large, Thomas Large had three children. 9. Sarah 
married Robert Cannon. 10. William. 11. Samuel, a farmer. Children of 
William and Lydia Ann (Large) Bedell: i. Andrew, died aged twenty-two 
years. 2. Isaac, now residing at Duquesne, Pennsylvania. 3. Milton, also a 
resident of Duquesne. 4. Margaret, a storekeeper of Clairton, unmarried. 
5. Mary, married John W. Wray, a Jefferson township farmer. 6. 
Elizabeth, died aged eighteen years. 7. W. Seymour, a teamster, residing at 
Clairton. 8. Anna Rebecca, died aged two years. 9. John Harvey, deceased. 
10. Leroy, a farmer of Jefferson township. 11. Arminta, residing at home 
with her aged mother and sister Fannie L. 12. Charles Henry, a transfer 
agent at Duquesne. 13. Fannie L., residing at the old homestead with mother 
and sisters. 



John Duff, a native of Ireland, came to America prior to the 
DUFF Revolution, and tradition has it that he took part in the battle of 

the Brandy wine. He was a farmer, and in 1794 obtained a tract 
of land in Penn township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, which is still in 
the possession of the Duff family. His death occurred December 2, 1823, 
at the age of sixty-nine years. He married Mary Shakel, of Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, and had children : James, William, Mary, John, Margaret, 
George, Alexander D., of further mention ; David, Esther, Elizabeth, Samuel, 
Matilda. 

(II) Alexander D. Duff, son of John and Mary (Shakel) Duff, was 
born on "Orchard Farm," Penn township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
June 26, 1796, and died March 9, 1866. He also was a farmer on the Duff 
homestead. He married Marie, born May 19, 1803, died September 5, 1868, 
a daughter of Michael Bright, born in Nargebasen, France, a son of John 
Bright, born in Germany, May 28, 1706, died May 21, 1778. Children: John, 
of further mention ; Bright, Alexander, Mary Margaretta, Barbara A., Eliza- 
beth, George, Rebecca, Parry, Wilson, the only one of the family now living, 
was a soldier in the Civil War, and resides at Sandy Creek, Allegheny county, ' 
Pennsylvania. 

(III) John Duff, son of Alexander D. and Marie (Bright) Duff, was 
born on the "Orchard Farm," September 6, 1825, and died February 3, 1909. 
He was educated in the public schools. He was a farmer, and the owner of 
sixty-five acres of land. Politically he was a Democrat, and served as 
treasurer of the school board for a period of sixteen years. His religious 
affiliation was with the Hebron United Presbyterian Church, in which he 
served as elder many years. He married Sarah Boyd, a daughter of John 
and Jane (Johnston) Morrow, of Southeastern Pennsylvania, who came there 
from Ireland. Children: Mary Jane, Bright, Elizabeth Mary. John Alex- 
ander, of further mention ; Charles Henry, of further mention ; Anna, George 
W.. Robert Parry, whose sketch follows ; Sarah. 

(IV) Rev. John Alexander Duff, son of John and Sarah Boyd (Mor- 



1156 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

row) Duff, has been a Presbyterian minister for the past twelve years, and is 
now located at Aspinwall, near Pittsburgh, lie married Fanny, a daughter 
of Morrison Lewis, a soldier of the Civil War, and has had children ; John 
Morrison, Helen Clara, Paul McGill, all of whom are at home. 

(IV) Charles Henry Duff, son of John and Sarah Boyd (Morrow) 
Duff, was born on the Duff homestead in Penn township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, December 10, 1859. He was educated in the common schools. 
He has worked on the home farm all his life, and is now the owner of about 
sixty-nine acres of the original homestead. He is a member of the United 
Presbyterian church, serving as elder and superintendent of the Sunday 
school. He is an Independent in politics. He married Tillie Snyder. Children : 
David W., born August 14, 1896; Mildred C, March 3, 1900; George A., 
June 22, 1907; Jean I., July 15, 1909; John W., March 6, 1912. 



(IV)Robert Parry Duff, son of John (q. v.) and Sarah Boyd 
DUFF (Morrow) Duff, was born in Penn township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, February 23, 1867. The public schools of his na- 
tive township furnished him with a sound, practical education, and he as- 
sisted his father in the cultivation of the home farm until he was twenty-five 
years of age, thus acquiring a practical knowledge of what was to be his life 
work. He then established himself independently, and has a fine farm of 
sixty-five acres, on which he has made many improvements. He is engaged 
in general farming, and conducts this along the most modern and scientific 
lines, with the success which is certain to come to earnest and unremitting 
effort. Politically he is independent in his opinions, and he is a member of 
the United Presbyterian church. Mr. Duff married, in July, 1892, Bessie P., 
a daughter of James and Mary Beswarick, and they have had children : Parry 
L., born July 20, 1894; Mary Edna, born June 6, 1896; Charles Bennett, born 
September 10, 1904; Alan Dale, born October 8, 1906. 



The Corbetts of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, are 
CORBETT-FRY of English descent, the line founded in this region by 

Thomas Corbett, a native of England, who came to 
Pennsylvania about 1855, locating in Temperanceville. For a number of 
years he was foreman of a section gang on the railroad. His wife, Mary 
Ann (Chambers) Corbett, a native of England, in which country they were 
married, died in Temperanceville, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Thomas 
Corbett's death occurred in McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania. 

Joseph Corbett, son of Thomas and Mary Ann (Chambers) Corbett, 
was born in England, and in his American home has been engaged in mining 
all of his life. For thirty years he was in the service of the New York and 
Cleveland Mining Company in the capacity of mine boss, and is now engaged 
in independent operations. He is the owner of a mine, the working of which 
he directs in winter, and during the summer season cultivates the farm owned 
by his daughter, Mary E. (Corbett) Fry. He is an experienced agriculturist, 
but in mining has found his most profitable field of endeavor and has a wide 



WESTERN PEN N SYLVAN I A 1157 

knowledge of that industry. He married, in 1871, Rebecca, daughter of 
Thomas and Rebecca (Johnston) Wilson. Thomas Wilson was a son of 
Frank Wilson, of Irish descent, who at an early date became a "squatter" 
on land in Penn township known as the Morgan tract, which his son farmed. 
Frank Wilson experienced numerous thrilling adventures with the savage in- 
habitants of the locality, two of the brothers of his wife, Mary (Duf?) Wil- 
son, meeting their deaths at the hands of Indians. Children of Thomas and 
Rebecca (Johnston) Wilson: Margaret, Anna Elizabeth, Virginia, Rebecca, 
of previous mention, married Joseph Corbett. Children of Joseph and 
Rebecca, ( Wilson ) Corbett : Thomas, William Francis, Anna Elizabeth, 
Marietta, Margaret Jane, Virginia, James, Howard, George Andrew, Ralph 
Morrow, Mary E., of whom further. 

Mary E. Corbett, daughter of Joseph and Rebecca (Wilson) Corbett, 
was bom at Sandy Creek, Pennsylvania. She married, in 1898, Joseph H. 
Fry, son of Samuel Fry, born at W'ilkinsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1870. He was educated in the public schools of the vicinity, 
and in youthful years became a farmer, owning sixty-four acres at 
Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. During the last year of his life he was em- 
ployed as carpenter at the cement factory, his death the result of injuries 
sustained in an accident at that place, July 12, 1907. He was held in high 
favor by his neighbors, and was universally known as a man of honorable 
principles, from which he never deviated. In religious belief he was a 
Presbyterian, as is his family. He was a Republican in politics. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fry were the parents of two children : Grace Alma, Howard Raymond. 



The Frichtel family of Haffey, Pennsylvania, was founded 
FRICHTEL by Nicholas Frichtel. born in Germany, who came to this 

country in 1861 and located in East Liberty. He was edu- 
cated and was taught the shoemaker's trade in his native land, but his first 
work in his new home was working for the United States government on the 
fortifications erected for the defence of Pittsburgh. He then worked at his 
trade in East Liberty for four years before renting a small farm in Plum 
township, Allegheny county. This farm he cultivated for twenty-nine years, 
then bought a small tract near Clarksville, known as the "Freshwater" prop- 
erty. He married Elizabeth Spindler, also born in Germany. Children: 
Lizzie, Hattie, Anna. Henry, of further mention : Frederick. 

Henry Frichtel, son of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Spindler) Frichtel, was 
born in East Liberty, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh East End), October 9, 1864. 
Soon after his birth his parents moved to Plum township, Allegheny county, 
and there he attended public school until fifteen years of age. At that early 
age he began running a threshing machine and for thirty-five consecutive sea- 
sons he has been similarly engaged in the harvest fields of the county. His 
aptitude for machinery has stood him in good stead and between seasons he 
is employed in running the township steam roller and in aiding in the con- 
struction of the macademized roads of Penn township. He also farms fifty- 
eight acres and engages in teaming. He also operates a grocery store and 



1 158 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

meat market. His energy never allows him to be idle and in these various 
ways he has successfully spent his years. He is a member of the United 
Presbyterian church, and is a Republican in politics. He married (first) in 
June, 1889, Mary Brisco. Children: Albert and Marshall, the latter de- 
ceased. He married (second) March 28, 1901, a widow, Mrs. Mary J. 
Colgan. 



Merle D. Salyards is an excellent example of that capable 
SALYARDS type of man, whose descent comes down from the first stal- 
wart pioneers of Western P^ennsylvania, who are continu- 
ing the great work their fathers so successfully began, and have lost none 
of the hardy virtues and abilities of those same fathers, however they may 
have been softened and refined by the influence of civilization and culture. 
His great-grandfather was a. native of England, and with his wife came 
to this country, settling first in Maryland. While on the voyage between 
England and the United States there was born to them a son, Reuben Sal- 
yards, who became the founder of the Salyards family in Western Pennsyl- 
vania, where they have since become so closely identified with the life and 
traditions of the region and so prominent in the regard of their neighbors. 
Reuben Salyards, the native of the high seas, was taken by his parents to 
Maryland, when they went thither to find a home in the new land of their 
adoption, but while still young, possessed of the same enterprising and 
adventurous spirit as his father, he pushed on into what was then the scarcely 
tried west, the wilderness of Western Pennsylvania. He settled in Clarion 
county and there met and married Mary Fox, a native of Clarion, and a 
daughter of George Fox. born in 1772, died aged eighty-two years, an earlier 
pioneer of the region. Reuben Salyards made his home in Porter township. 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and there passed the remainder of his life, both 
his wife and himself dying in the little home they had made for themselves 
in that wild country. She died in 1853 ^n<i li^ about 1864. One of their 
children was Dtennis E. Salyards, the father of Merle D. Salyards, of this 
sketch, who was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, in the home of his 
parents, in the year 1848. He received his education in the primitive schools 
of his native region, and upon completing his studies took up stone cutting as 
a trade. Always of an enterprising cast of mind, he secured the agency of 
the Singer Sewing Machine people in that part of the country and succeeded 
so admirably in his effort to introduce that type of machine that he retained 
the position for twenty years. He was so successful that, at the end of 
twenty years, he was able to retire from active business of the sort, and 
betake himself to farming, an occupation he had always been fond of. This 
he continued for a number of years in Clarion county, where he owned a fine 
farm, but in 1908 he gave up even this occupation, and removed to Pitcairn, 
Pennsylvania, where he is now making his home. Mr. Dennis E. Salyards 
married Martha Bell Miller, also a native of Clarion county, daughter of 
Charles and Drucilla (Thompson) Miller, of that place. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Salyards were born eight children, as follows: Alerle D,, of \\liom further; 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ii59 

Charles L., Dostie F., Frances Augusta, Jesse W., Daisy Bell, deceased, 
Dennis Thoburn, deceased, and Drucilla. Dennis E. Salyards is a man of 
considerable importance in the community, and one who takes a keen interest 
in all public affairs. He is a member of the Democratic party, and an intelli- 
gent observer of the political issues. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and in that persuasion reared their children. 
Merle D. Salyards, the eldest child of Dennis E. and Martha Bell 
(Miller) Salyards, was born June 30, 1875, in Clarion county, Pennsylvania. 
He was reared on his father's farm and received that training which fewer 
and fewer young men of the day are being subjected to, unfortunately for 
the maintaining of American character. This is the training of the young 
farmer, which bringing him at the most impressionable age into that close con- 
tact with the simple realities and relations of nature, and the circumstances of 
creative labor, fit him, as but few other lives may, with that quality of calm, 
self-possessed patience, one of the highest marks of courage and virtue. It 
was Mr. Salyards' good fortune that he experienced this training in youth, 
in addition to which he, of course, attended the local public schools, the 
schools of the same region as those to which his father had gone before him. 
In 1898 he left the old homestead and came to Pitcairn, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and there took up his abode and engaged in business for him- 
self. He has from that day continued to live in Pitcairn, which has been the 
scene of his very successful business career also. Ten years after his arrival 
in the town his father also came to Pitcairn, and he is now living there as 
well. The business which Mr. Salyards engaged in in Pitcairn was hardware, 
and from the start it was a success. The trade grew steadily, until in 1910 he 
built his present quarters, a large building, fifty by ninety feet, in which he 
has continued his success, and he is now regarded as one of the most promi- 
nent figures in the business world in that quarter. But Mr. Salyards has not 
narrowed himself by a too complete absorption of his powers and interests in 
his business, as so many of our successful business men are tempted to do. 
On the contrary, he has always retained a naturally wide outlook upon life, 
and takes a prominent part in the activities of his town. Like his father 
before him, he has a keen interest in all matters political, and, like the elder 
man also, is a staunch member of the Democratic party. To his mind also 
the questions of the day are ever present, but it is not merely the matters of 
national importance, the issues that affect the country at large, which interest 
him, it is also the local affairs and the conduct of these in such a way as will 
redound most to the advantage of his neighbors and fellow townsmen. He is 
of a mental calibre to make his words felt in the local councils of his party, 
and was sent from his district as a delegate to the National Democratic Con- 
vention, which met in Baltimore in 1912. He wields great influence through- 
out the whole of eastern Allegheny county, and has sat for seven years on 
the council. Besides this he is active in fraternal circles in his town, and is a 
prominent member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the 
Junior Order of American Mechanics. Mr. Salyards was appointed post- 
office master of Pitcairn, Pennsylvania, by President Wilson, July i, 1914, 



ii6o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

and is ably assisted by Miss Drucilla Salyards, whom he appointed as 
assistant. 

Mr. Salyards married, in 1902, May Matson, a native of Pitcairn, Penn- 
sylvania. Mrs. Salyards is the daughter of Joseph and Emma (Wolf) Mat- 
son, who came from Darlington, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, where Mr. 
Matson was a farmer. To Mr. and Mrs. Salyards have been bom two 
children: Charles Alton, October 9, 1904; Emma Belle, December 9, 1910. 
Mr. and Mrs. Salyards are both devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, attending the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Pitcairn. They 
are both active in the work of the congregation and in the many benevolences 
and charities which exist in connection therewith. 



Rev. John Gamble, the American progenitor of the Gamble 
GAMBLE family, was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1777, and died in his 

home in Pennsylvania in 1844. He was educated for the 
ministry, and emigrated to the United States about the year 1807. Here he 
engaged in the profession of teaching, and was an instructor for many years 
at the academies in Jamestown and Greenville, making a specialty of the 
classics and mathematics. His religious faith was that of the United Presby- 
terian church. He married, in Ireland, Eliza Parr, born in county Down, 
Ireland, 1785, died in America in 1866, a descendant of the famous Parr 
family of England. They had nine children. 

(II) Dr. William Jenks Gamble, son of the Rev. John and Eliza 
(Parr) Gamble, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, December 23, 1824, 
and died in Mosiertown, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, February i, 1888. 
His preparatory education, which was an excellent one, was acquired in 
the Jamestown Seminary and the Franklin Academy, and at the early age 
of nineteen years he was engaged in teaching the English branches, math- 
ematics, and the Latin and Greek languages. Four years later he com- 
menced the study of medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. Gibson, of 
Jamestown, and he was graduated from the Eclectic Medical College, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1854. Prior to taking his degree as Doctor of Medicine 
he had already established himself in Mosiertown, in which place he was 
engaged in a successful practice for many years. He became a member of 
the National Eclectic Medical Association, July 14, 1877, and was a phy- 
sician of note in the western part of Pennsylvania. Politically he was a 
strong supporter of the Republican party, and filled a number of public 
offices among these being: Treasurer of the township for two terms and 
school director for many years. He was a man of magnificant physique, 
being six feet three and one-half inches in height, and broad in proportion. 
Dr. Gamble married (first) December 12, 1865, Helen M. Beebe, of Pleas- 
antville, Venango county, Pennsylvania, who died May 25, 1873. They 

had children : William M. ; Robert Bruce, see forward ; , deceased. He 

married (second) December 18, 1876, Esther J., born in Mercer county, 
Penn.sylvania, 1846, daughter of Rev. Bingham. Children: Eleanor, John 
K., Elizabeth. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1161 

(111) Dr. Robert Bruce (jamble, son of Dr. William Jenks and Helen 
M. (Beebe) Gamble, was born in Mosiertown, Crawford county. Pennsyl- 
vania, June 28, 1871. After attending the elementary schools, he was 
graduated from the Meadville High School in the class of 1890, and from 
the Allegheny College in the class of 1893, receiving his degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from the latter institution. He then commenced his studies in the 
medical department of the University of Bufifalo, and was graduated from 
that institution in the class of 1896 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
He was the resident surgeon of the Rochester City Hospital, 1896-97, and 
located in Meadville, Pennsylvania, in September, 1897, opening an office 
in the Phoenix Block, where he was located until January, 1903. He ac- 
quired an extensive and lucrative practice, and has won the affection as 
well as the confidence of fiis numerous patients. In 1903 he purchased 
the property at Chestnut and Park avenues, and opened an office there 
which he continued until his removal to Diamond Park, where he has 
resided since that time. His political allegiance has always been with the 
Republican party, in whose interests he has been active. He served five 
years as health officer for Meadville, nine years as county physician, and 
one term as school controller. In 1889 he enlisted as a private in Company 
B, Fifteenth Infantry National Guard of Pennsylvania, and rose through 
the various grades until he was appointed captain in 1897. He served as 
captain of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry during the Span- 
ish-American war, and was mustered out with his regiment at Athens, 
Georgia, January 31, 1899. In 1913 he was major of the Sixteenth Infantry 
National Guard of Pennsylvania. He is a member of Crawford Lodge, 
No. 234, Free and Accepted Masons. He holds the rank of past exalted 
ruler in Meadville Lodge, No. 219, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He is a member of Crawford Lodge, No. 734, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows ; Iroquois Boating and Fishing Club ; Meadville Country 
Club. 

Dr. Gamble married, in Dunkirk, New York, July 5, 1900, Nella M., 
born in Fredonia, New York, July 4, 1879, ^ daughter of Charles F. and 
Jane Elizabeth (Millen) White, the former a publisher. They have no 
children. 



The name of Hughes has been known for many generations 
HUGHES in England, Scotland and Ireland, and from them was 

brought to the shores of America. Many bearing the name 
have also come to us from Wales. 

(I) Edward Hughes, born in Wales, came to the United States with 
his family in 1845. At first he located at Pine Run, Allegheny county. 
Pennsylvania, where he worked as a miner, and accumulated a sufficient 
amount of money to enable him to purchase a farm of about fifty acres 
in Penn township. He improved this in many directions, putting up new 
buildings, etc., and died there in 1861. He and his wife were members of 
the Welsh Baptist Church of Pittsburgh. He married, in Wales, Jane 



ii62 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Pierce, and they had children: Thomas, of further mention; Humphrey, a 
miner, died in the West; Jane, married Captain William Williams, and died 
in Kentucky ; Mary, married Hopkin Thomas, and lives in Oakmont ; Annie, 
married Alfred Thomas, and lives in the state of Washington; John, a 
miner, died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania ; Edward, an engineer on the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, lives in Oakmont; a son, died in infancy; Kate, 
married E. Murphy, lives in Pittsburgh. 

(II) Thomas Hughes, son of Edward and Jane (Pierce) Hughes, was 
born in 1835, in Wales, died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 14, 
1 89 1, and is buried in Penn township cemetery. At first he was a farmer, 
and bought out the other heirs to the homestead at Sandy Creek, and lived 
there until 1876. Removing to Clarion county, he worked in the oil fields for 
about three years, having sold the farm. In 1879 he came to Washington 
county, and later removed to Logue's Run, in Allegheny county, where he 
worked at the coal boat landing until his death. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the United Presbyterian church, and he was a staunch Republican. 
Mr. Hughes married, March 8, 1866, Mary Jane Adams, born December 15, 
1842, and now lives at Duquesne, Pennsylvania. They had children : Eliza- 
beth, died in infancy; Harry N., a mill worker at Coal Valley, died in 1907; 
Amelia, died young; Samuel, died at the age of five years; an infant, died 
unnamed ; Joseph A., of further mention ; an infant, who also died unnamed. 

John Adams, grandfather of Mary Jane (Adams) Hughes, was born in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, his family having lived there many years. 
He was a farmer by occupation, and moved to Allegheny county with his 
family more than one hundred years ago, settling at Logan's Ferry, where 
he and his wife died. He married Eve . 

Joseph Adams, son of John and Eve Adams, was born at Logan's Ferry, 
Pennsylvania, in 1816, and died about 1887. After his marriage he settled 
at Tarentum. For some years he was a miner, then captain of a canal boat 
plying between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. Later he became a farmer, 
owning a small farm near Hannastown, behind the Monongahela Cemetery. 
He was for a time captain of a fire company in Pittsburgh, and a man of 
considerable prominence. He was a Republican in politics, and he and his 
wife were members of the United Presbyterian church. He married Hettie 
Ross, born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, about 1820, died in 1900. They 
had children: John, a miner, married and died in Allegheny county; Mary 
Jane, who married Mr. Hughes, as above stated ; Margaret Ann, married 
William Jones, and lives in Wheeling, West Virginia ; Samuel Louis, a boat 
builder, died at Brown's Station : Joseph, Jr., who died at Sandy Creek, 
Pennsylvania ; Mrs. Matilda Campbell, resides in Braddock, Pennsylvania ; 
Mrs. Eva Brown, resides in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania ; Mrs. Harriet Bar- 
ratt, died at Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania : George Washington, died at the 
age of fourteen years ; Frances, died at the age of three years ; Elizabeth, 
died at the age of four years; three died in infancy. 

(HI) Joseph A. Hughes, son of Thomas and Mary Jane (Adams) 
Hughes, was born in Penn township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1163 

17, 1S72. He ^vas educated in the public schools of his native county, and 
upon the completion of his studies became watchman of a coal fleet on 
the river. His occupations were varied. He drove a mule in the coal mines; 
spent four months in the machine shops of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
Company; was in the employ of the Homestead Steel Works, 1890-1892; in 
November, 1892, he entered the employ of the Duquesne Works, of the 
Carnegie Steel Company, in their railroad yards, and alternated between this 
and the mine work for a period of three years. After two years of continu- 
ous work he was appointed to the position of conductor, which he held about 
three years, and was then made night yardmaster and general labor foreman, 
serving five years. In 1900-1901 he was put on the day turn, having charge 
of the men engaged in the construction work of the first forty-inch mill and 
the first open hearth, also the fourteen-inch Number i. One year later he 
was appointed day yardmaster and general labor foreman. Five years later, 
April I, 1906, he was advanced to the position of superintendent of trans- 
portation and general labor, the duties of which office he is still discharging, 
having about three hundred and fifty men under his control. He has been 
a director of the Carnegie Free Library since 1907. His political opinions 
are those of the Republican party, and he has served four years as a mem- 
ber of the borough council. He and his wife are communicants of the Pres- 
byterian church, and he is a member of the following fraternal organiza- 
tions: Aliquippa Lodge, No. 375, Free and Accepted Masons; McKeesport 
Chapter, No. 282, Royal Arch Masons ; a charter member of McKeesport 
Commandery, No. 86, Knights Templar ; Pittsburgh Consistory, Ancient and 
Accepted Scottish Rite ; Mount Moriah Council, Royal and Select Masons ; 
Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine ; a charter 
member of the local lodge of the Royal Arcanum, and a charter member of 
Duquesne Chapter, No. 128, Eastern Star Order. 

Mr. Hughes married, June 5. 1901, Edna Pearl Anderson, born in 
Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1876, a daughter of Robert and Mary 
(Bracken) Anderson, both born in Wilkins township. The latter died in 
W'ilkinsburgh, where the former is still living. For a period of forty-seven 
years Mr. Anderson was in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany, and just retired to private life. He was more than ordinarily careful, 
never had a wreck, and brought the first eighteen hour train from Altoona to 
Pittsburgh. This train ran in eighteen hours from New York to Chicago, 
and Mr. Anderson took the train from Altoona to Pittsburgh, being an 
engineer. He always had through trains. He is a member of the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers and of the Veterans' Relief Association. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hughes have had children : Mary Josephine, born October 
15. 1902; Robert Anderson, born January 7, 1907. 



Johnston is an old Scotch name, a modification of the 

JOHNSTON English name of Johnson, and wherever this spelling is 

found it marks its bearers as of Scotch lineage. It is very 

widely represented in this country, especially in TVnnsylvania, by descend- 



ii64 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ants who came from the North of Ireland and are known as Scotch-Irish. 

(I) Robert Johnston, one of the pioneer settlers of Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, died about 1828. He served bravely under General Greene 
in the War of the Revolution, and for his services in this direction received 
a large grant of land from the government. He cleared about five hundred 
acres of this land. He married and raised a family. 

(II) John Johnston, son of Robert Johnston, was born on the Johnston 
homestead in Patton township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried Jane McMillin and had children : Robert ; William R., of further men- 
tion ; Margaret, married William Lenhart. 

(III) William R. Johnston, son of John and Jane (McMillin) John- 
ston, was born on the Johnston homestead in Patton township, in 1840, and 
died in 1901. He was educated in the public schools in the vicinity of his 
home, and in early manhood took up farming on the land of his father, and 
followed this occupation all his life. He was Republican in his political 
opinions, and a consistent member of the Presbyterian church. He married 
Viola, a daughter of James Perhamous, of Ohio, and they had children: 
Belle, married Andrew Lott, and lives in Center, Pennsylvania ; Jane, mar- 
ried Richard McDowell, a pit boss in a mine, and lives at Ligonier, Penn- 
sylvania; Mary A., died at the age of nineteen years; Lenore, married Ira 
Lang, and lives in Patton township; Margaret, married John West, lives in 
Patton township ; John H.. of further mention ; Harry T., married Lula 
Bumgard, lives in Patton township; William R., married Lena Shafer, lives 
in Patton township; Elmer, unmarried, lives in Pitcairn ; Olive, unmarried. 

(IV) John H. Johnston, son of William R. and Viola (Perhamous) 
Johnston, was born on the Johnston homestead, in Patton township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1878. There he received his educa- 
tional training in the public schools, and upon the completion of his educa- 
tion commenced to work on his father's farm. In association with his 
brother he is now the owner of a fine farm of fifty-four acres, which is 
cultivated for general products, and they are making alterations at the 
present time in order to convert a part of this to dairy farming purposes. 
He takes an active interest in all that concerns the welfare of the community, 
and casts his vote in the interests of the Republican party. His religious 
membership is with the Presbyterian church, at Pitcairn, and he is a member 
of the Knights of Malta, and the Farmers' Association of Patton tovi'nship. 
Mr. Johnston married Mary A., a daughter of William Miller, of Penn 
township, and they have children : Gladys Clara, Zella Irene, Floyd Russell, 
Esther Eleanor. 



The American record of this line of the German family of 
MILLER Miller begins with Joseph Miller, a native of Germany, who 

emigrated to the United States. His calling was that of 
farmer, and he was thus engaged all of his life. He affiliated with the 
Roman Catholic church, and was a Democrat in politics. He was twice mar- 
ried, having issue from each union, one of his sons being Joseph H., of 
whom further. 



WESTERN PENNSYL\ANIA 1165 

loseph H. Miller, son of Joseph Miller, was born in Dutch Creek, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, November 22, 185 1. He was educated in the 
public schools. Early in life he began his training for the calling of his 
father, and now rents and cultivates ninety-five acres of land near New 
Texas, Pennsylvania. The land is well-improved and Mr. Miller has 
acquired many of the modern farming appliances, likewise owning consider- 
able live stock. Joseph H. Miller married Annie, daughter of Vitus and 
Margaret (Bamej Schwab, and has children: i. William H., born June 21, 
1878, married Blanche Wolford. 2. John V., born May 6, 1880, lives at 
home. 3. Charles A., born October 2, 1882, married Jennie Wilson, and lives 
in Markle, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 4. James A., born Decem- 
ber 2, 1883, married Florence Ashbaugh. 5. Margaret, born July 11, 1886, 
married Joseph A. George, and lives at Murraysville, Pennsylvania. 6. 
Elizabeth J., born May 24, 1887, lives at home. 7. Joseph D., born July 31, 
1892, lives at home. 8. Robert L., born May 7, 1894. 9. Ida Catherine, 
born August 20, 1896. 10. Mary Elizabeth, died aged eighteen months. 
Mrs. Miller is a member of the Baptist church and Mr. Miller is an attend- 
ant of the same denomination. In political belief he is a Republican. 

Among the number who claim Ireland as the birthplace of 
O'NEILL their ancestors, that land that has contributed to this country 

so many of her most patriotic and public-spirited citizens, 
must be mentioned John G. O'Neill, of Pitcairn, one of its representative 
business men. 

John O'Neill, father of John G. O'Neill, was born in county Queens, 
Ireland, as were also his parents, who lived and died there. John O'Neill 
spent the early years of his life in his native land, emigrating to this country 
prior to attaining his majority, settling at New Alexandria, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, and there resided until his death. His first work was 
on the construction of the Pennsylvania Railroad, and later he operated a 
paper mill and also farmed to some extent, achieving a certain degree of 
success. His love of patriotism prompted him to enlist his services in behalf 
of his country during the Civil W^ar, and he received a wound from which 
he suffered considerably during the remainder of his life. He married Sarah 
C. Taylor, born in Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, whose parents were 
among the early settlers of New Alexandria, where the father cleared land 
and conducted farming operations which proved successful. Mr. and Mrs. 
O'Neill were the parents of nine children : James A., who conducted a 
general store in Southern Indiana ; Martha B., deceased ; John G., of whom 
further; Mary E., deceased; Rosella, wife of William G. Miller, of Pitcairn ; 
Katherine E., deceased ; Harry A. ; Maggie B.. wife of Elmer E. Tilbrook ; 
Emma M., wife of George A. Mather. All of these children were educated 
in Union School, Independent District. 

John G. O'Neill was born in New Alexandria. W^estmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, December 26, 1862. Upon the completion of his studies he 
served an apprenticeship at the trade of carpenter, which line of work he 



ii66 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

followed for a number of years. In 1890 he removed to Pitcairn, Pennsyl- 
vania, the place containing at that time only six houses, and he therefore had 
considerable difficulty in finding a lodging, and from that time to the present 
(1914) he has witnessed its constant growth. In the same year he secured 
employment in the Pitcairn shop of the Pennsylvania Railroad as a car 
repairer, after which he was made gang foreman and later car inspector, 
his services proving valuable in all these capacities. In 1907 he established 
a meat business in Pitcairn, which he later disposed of to good advantage, 
and then engaged in the manufacture of ice cream, opening a confectionery 
store, which he is successfully operating at the present time. His ability and 
integrity have been recognized by his fellow townsmen, who appointed him 
a member of the council of Pitcairn, which he filled satisfactorily for three 
years. He is a member of the United Brethren church, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Workmen of tlie World. 

Mr. O'Neill married, October 18, 1891, Laura Reichard, of Pitcairn, 
Pennsylvania, born at Sandy Creek, Pennsylvania, daughter of Louis A. 
and Martha (Taylor) Reichard, natives of Sardis, Pennsylvania, and grand- 
daughter on the paternal side of Michael John and Martha Reichard, of 
Sandy Creek, Pennsylvania, the former named having been one of the 
early peddlers in farm produce; on the maternal side of John and Martha 
(Masters) Taylor, the former named a farmer of Sardis, Pennsylvania. 
Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill are the parents of one child, Mary Martha, who mar- 
ried Roy H. De Witt, and they have two children : John Harrison and 
Amberson De Witt Virgil. 



Stephen Pangburn, the first of this name in America of 
FANGBURN whom we have definite information, was a resident, in 

1774, of "The south end of Perth Amboy, County of 
Middlesex, Province of New Jersey." His death occurred in the spring of 
1778, and his will was probated at Trenton. It is reprinted in full in a little 
volume entitled, "Randolph-Pangburn — William Pangburn and his wife 
Hannah FitzRandolph — Their Ancestry and Descendants." Little is known 
of Stephen Pangburn except that he was a mill owner in Dover township 
from 1750 to 1760. The first name of his wife was Anna, and they had 
children: Lines, a soldier during the Revolution, was killed by the Tories, 
or, as tradition says, while doing guard duty over a party of refugees; 
William, of further mention; Rebecca. 

(II) William Pangburn, son of Stephen and Anna Pangburn, was born 
about 1744- He, also, was a soldier of the Revolution, and his name appears 
in the "Official Roster of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolu- 
tionary War." In 1778 he and his wife removed to Western Pennsylvania, 
lived for a short time in the "Jersey Settlement," now known as Forward 
township, then removed to Mercer county. It is thought that he was a 
millwright. He married, December 30, 1770, Hannah Fitz Randolph, born 
January 5, 1746, died at the home of her son Samuel, in Brown county, 
Ohio, June 11, 1835, and is buried at Red Oak Cemetery. She was a 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1167 

daughter of Nathaniel and Rebecca Fitz Randolph, who had a long and 
noble lineage from Norman, English and early American ancestors. Mr. 
and Mrs. Pangburn had children: Nathaniel, twin of Stephen; Stephen, of 
further mention; John, William, Elizabeth, Abigail, Anna, Lines, James, 
Samuel, Randolph. A few years after the death of Mr. Pangburn, his 
widow and children removed to the state of Ohio. His burial place is not 
known. 

(III) Stephen (2) Pangburn, son of William and Hannah (Fitz 
Randolph ) Pangburn, was born in Middlesex county, New Jersey, November 
9, 1 77 1, and died in what is now Forward township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1797, and is buried in Taylor's Graveyard. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Walter and Alice (Applegate) Wall, and they had 
children: Isaac, of further mention; John. Mrs. Pangburn married (sec- 
ond) in 1799, Job Egbert, had nine children, and died May 10, 1850. 

(IV) Isaac Pangburn, son of Stephen (2) and Elizabeth (Wall) Pang- 
burn, was born January 4, 1794, died November 23, i86g. The family 
removed to Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and then to Brown county, Ohio, 
but Isaac and his brother returned to Mercer county, and sought to estab- 
lish themselves independently. Isaac learned the millwright's trade with 
Amos Robbins, bought out his employer, and commenced operating mills on 
his own account, at the same time carrying on the building business. He 
built the Walker Mill at Elizabeth, and many others in Allegheny and Wash- 
ington counties. About 1822 he purchased and completed the famous 
Pangburn Mill, near Lock No. 3, and carried on an extensive milling and 
cooperage business. He also erected a fine residence near the mill, and 
there spent his last days. He and his wife were members of the Baptist 
denomination, organized the Baptist church at Elizabeth, and he was a mem- 
ber of the first board of deacons, holding this office until his death. Mr. 
Pangburn married, November 2, 1820, Susan, born March 5, 1802, died 
May 13, 1865, a daughter of John and Nancy Hill, and both are buried at 
Curry's Graveyard. Children : Elizabeth, Stephen, John, James, of further 
mention ; Nancy, Samuel, Margaret, Rebecca, Isaac, Noah H., Cicero. 

(V) James Pangburn, son of Isaac and Susan (Hill) Pangburn, was 
bom April 2, 1826, and died August i, 1865, from the effects of a fever he 
had contracted while serving in the Civil War. He learned the milling busi- 
ness thoroughly, being both milhvright and mill operator, and was for many 
years the head operator of the Pangburn Mills. In January, 1865, he and 
his brother Samuel enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and First Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the 
war. He is buried at Curry's Graveyard. He was a Republican in politics, 
and he and his wife were members of the Baptist church. Mr. Pangburn 
married, December i, 1853, Martha Findlay, born in Pittsburgh, October 8, 
1835, a daughter of Joseph and Eleanor (Canon) Findlay. He was a native 
of county Cork, Ireland, and was an infant when brought to this country by 
his parents. He was a shoemaker by trade, being located on W^ater street, 
near Wood and Smithfield, and there his death occurred. They had children : 



ii68 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Martha, mentioned above ; Eliza, married Joseph Flowers, and died in 
Latrobe, Pennsylvania ; Ellen, married Robert T. Lee, and lives in Westmore- 
land county; Joseph, a foreman in a brush factory, died in Pittsburgh. Mr. 
and Mrs. Pangburn had children: A daughter, born August 27, 1854, lived 
one day; Luella M., born March 30, 1856, died in 1914, married John Sitman 
Schumaker, and had ten children; Laura, born May 17, 1859, married Edgar 
Messenger, and had two children ; Elmer Ellsworth, of further mention ; 
Nancy, born October 18, 1862, died November 2},, 1865. 

(VI) Elmer Ellsworth Pangburn, son of James and Martha (Findlay) 
Pangburn, was born on the Pangburn homestead in Forward township, 
June 3, 1861. He was educated at Mount Pleasant Academy, and com- 
menced learning the planing mill business at Elizabeth. About 1887 he 
engaged in this business with his cousins, E. H. Pangburn and C. L. Elliott, 
the business being conducted under the name of the Elizabeth Planing Mill 
Company, and is now owned by the two Pangburns, Mr. Elliott having sold 
his interest to them. Their products consist mostly of contracting and 
building material, etc. In 1909 Mr. Pangburn was elected cashier of the 
State Bank of Elizabeth, a position he is still holding. The bank was re- 
organized in 1902, and since that time he has been a member of its board 
of directors. He is a strong Republican in political matters, and is now 
serving his third term as a member of the council. He is a trustee and 
deacon, as well as treasurer of the Baptist church, of which his wife is also 
a member. He is a member of the organization known as the Sons of 
Veterans. Mr. Pangburn married, September 7, 1887, Annie M., born in 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Jacob and Julia Swagler, 
and they have one child, James Alfred, born September 30, 1896, a student 
at Bucknell University. 



The name of Mills is one of frequent occurrence in this country, 
MILLS and was brought here from different lands, and in varied form 

of spelling. The form of Mills is the most common one. 
Stephen Mills, son of Isaac Mills, was born in Braddock, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, May 23, 1855. He acquired an excellent education in 
the public schools and the Middlesex Academy, and his education was com- 
pleted at Bethany College. He and his brother, James Mills, engaged in the 
manufacture of brick, and were also the owners of a quarry. Later Stephen 
Mills went to Ohio, where he owned a farm, and where he died. May z6, 
1907, six months after his removal to that State. Politically he was a 
Republican, and a member of the Knights of Malta. His religious affiliation 
was with the Christian church, while his wife was a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. Mr. Mills married, in 1878, Barbara Etta Margaret 
McCleary, a native of Braddock, Pennsylvania, whose ancestral line fol- 
lows. Children: James Clay, died at the age of two years; William W., a 
physician of Duquesne, Pennsylvania, married Louise Rhodes ; Elizabeth, 
married Clarence Ray Baldridge, and has children : John, Clarence Ray, 
William, and an infant; Mabel, married Lewis Roscoe James, of Parnas.sus, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1169 

Pennsylvania, and has children : Lewis Roscoe and Elizabeth Gertrude ; Dr. 
Stephen Roy, of Braddock ; Eliza Laird, a student in Braddock, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

(The McCleary Line.) 

Thomas McCleary and his wife lived in East Liberty, Pennsylvania. 
He was a prominent politician in his earlier days, and owned extensive 
property at Hull, Pennsylvania. 

James McCleary, son of Thomas McCleary. was born in East Liberty, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, about 1825, and died in 1869. He was a wheel- 
wright and carpenter by occupation, and prominent in the community. His 
influence in the councils of the Republican party in his district was a marked 
one. He moved to Braddock about 1850, and held the office of justice of 
the peace for many years. He married Elizabeth, born in 1830, died in 
1902, daughter of George and Barbara (Mitchell) Sutch. Her brothers and 
sisters were : James, William, Mary, Maria, Margaret and Andrew. Mr. 
and Mrs. McCleary had children : Hannah ; George, deceased ; Barbara 
Etta Margaret, who married Mr. Mills, as above stated ; Mary Elizabeth ; 
William, of Braddock ; Joanna, deceased ; Sophia. 



William McRoberts, of Fairhaven, Pennsylvania, is a 
McROBERTS grandson of James McRoberts, of Scotland, who came to 

America with an English army during the Revolution. 
He never returned to his native land, having at the first opportunity joined 
the forces under General Washington. After the war he obtained a large 
holding of land in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, there married and died. 
He married Nancy Nishart and had children : James, a justice of the peace 
for MifHin township, Allegheny county, for forty-two years ; Jennie ; John, 
of further mention ; Mary ; Annie ; Elizabeth. 

(H) John McRoberts, son of James and Nancy (Nishart) McRoberts, 
was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1806, died in Mifflin town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, July 16, 1891. He early journeyed 
westward, settling in Mifflin township, near what is now Hayes borough, and 
there worked at his trade, blacksmith. There also came his widowed mother, 
with her family. She bought one hundred acres of land near her son, 
paying therefor one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, and there lived 
until her death. The other sons also became land owners in Mifflin town- 
ship and there founded families. John McRoberts conducted a profitable 
blacksmithing business, and as he prospered bought land until he possessed, 
in addition to his homestead, several other farms. He became wealthy, his 
riches all coming from smithy and land. He was a Democrat in politics, and 
a strict member of the Presbyterian church. He married Eleanor Mc- 
Cutcheon, born in Salem township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 
1817, died April, 1856. Children: Samuel, deceased; James H., a civil 
engineer; William, of further mention; Mary; Susan, deceased; Emma; 
Margaret; Nancy A., born in Mifflin township, February 13. 1840, married, 
October 6, 1864, George C. Smith, born in Allegheny county, September 9, 



II70 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

1842, now deceased, son of William and Sarah Hayes (Cunningham) Smith, 
both of pioneer Allegheny county families, Mrs. Smith resides on her farm 
at Castle Shannon, in Baldwin township, but has sold one hundred acres to 
a golf club, her children: Richard L., Eleanor, Frank, deceased; Sarah E., 
Ida, William. 

(Ill) William McRoberts, son of John and Eleanor (McCutcheon) 
McRoberts, was born in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
January 20, 1846. He was educated in the public schools, and all his life has 
been engaged in farming. Since 1859 he has resided on his farm of seventy- 
three acres, bought by his father in that year and later inherited by his son, 
William, the present owner. There for many years he has conducted gen- 
eral farming operations, but is now living retired from active business. 
The nearness of the farm to Fairhaven makes it very desirable, and quite 
recently Mr. McRoberts laid out his farm in building lots, which have found 
a ready sale and on which several houses have been erected. He is a 
Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

He married (first) in 1869, Amanda Castor, of Elizabeth township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, who died in 1878, leaving children: Walter, 
Sarah, Harry and William. He married (second) in 1880, Martha May, 
born in county Antrim, Ireland, August 30, i860, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Montgomery) May, both of Irish birth and parentage. Her 
maternal grandfather, William Montgomery, came from Ireland to the site 
of the present city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, at a very early day, settling 
in that part known as the "Hog Pond." He was buried on his own land, the 
present Monongahela House covering his burial place. One of his daughters, 
Martha, married Andrew Mulholland, a soldier of the Revolution, and died 
in Versailles township, Allegheny county, on his way back from the war. 
Martha Mulholland had two children, Catherine and Andrew, the latter kept 
a boot and shoe store on Fifth avenue, Pittsburgh, was very prominent in 
Masonry and went especially to Europe to have conferred upon him the 
thirty-third degree. Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, not then conferred 
in this country. Children of William and Martha (May) McRoberts, his 
second wife: James May, a civil engineer; Samuel, deceased; Elizabeth 
Montgomery, married Edward Hammel ; Samuel, married Elsie Mortimer; 
Estella, deceased; Martha May; Ruth Cleveland, married Robert Lee; 
Linda ; David ; Eleanor ; Richard Smith. 

John May, father of Martha (May) McRoberts, born in Ireland, 
located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1862, and for a time lived on Bedford 
avenue. Later he bought a farm in Baldwin township and there resided 
until his death, May 30, 1902. His widow yet survives him. They had 
children: Elizabeth, died in 1914; Mary; Martha, married William Mc- 
Roberts ; Samuel, died in infancy : Jane ; Samuel ; John, deceased ; Linda ; 
Anna Grace ; James ; Carrie ; William, deceased. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1171 

This name in the transition from foreign to American 
HOUSHOLDER shores has undergone, as have so many other names, 
a transformation that, while it simpHfies the spelhng 
and pronunciation, leaves it far from its original form. 

(I) The founder of this branch in the United States was Henry 
Housholder, born in Germany, who came to the United States single, mar- 
ried Catherine Alius, also born in Germany, and with her settled on a farm 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where both died, members of the 
Lutheran church, he a Democrat, hard working, thrifty, and of quiet and 
retiring nature. Children: John, of further mention; Joseph, Mary, 
Catherine. 

(II) John Housholder, son of Henry and Catherine (Alins) Hous- 
holder, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1824, died in 
1883. He worked on the farm and in the coal mines until the outbreak of 
the Civil War, in 1861 enlisting in Company G, One Hundred and First 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving nearly three years, seeing hard 
service and receiving honorable discharge. After the war he returned to 
Pennsylvania, settling in Allegheny county and resumed work as a coal 
miner. He was a Republican in politics, a man of quiet life and correct 
habits. He married Hannah Elizabeth Mansfield, born in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1830, daughter of William and Catherine (Mc- 
Donald) Mansfield. William Mansfield by a first wife had a son, William. 
His second wife, Catherine (McDonald) Mansfield, was born in Ireland and 
was brought when young to the United States by her parents. Children by 
his second wife : Jane, Mary, Hannah Elizabeth, who married John Hous- 
holder. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Housholder : Joseph Michael, of further 
mention; William, deceased; Henry; Mary Jane, deceased; John A., of 
further mention; Herbert G., deceased; George B., deceased; Troversa, 
deceased ; Rebecca ; Catherine, deceased ; Edward ; Frank. 

(III) Joseph Michael Housholder, eldest son of John and Hannah 
Elizabeth (Mansfield) Housholder, was born October 15, 1848. He was 
educated in the public schools, and until 1879 worked at coal mining, and 
then established a furniture store in the thriving town of West Elizabeth. 
Later he sold this and for nine years was engaged in the confectionery 
business, and subsequently opened a general store. On August 27, 1894. he 
was elected postmaster and has since held that office. He is a Republican 
in politics, and both he and his wife are members of the Baptist church. 
He married, September 10, 1868, Anna Miller, born in Elizabeth in 1848. 

(Ill) John A. Housholder, fourth son of John and Hannah Elizabeth 
(Mansfield) Housholder, was born in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in that part of Elizabeth now Lincoln township. June 17, 
1857. He was educated in public schools, and until he was twenty-three 
years of age worked in the coal mines. He then bought teams and until 
1906 was engaged in teaming and contracting, conducting a very successful 
business and accumulating a capital that later he invested in a farm of one 
hundred and seven acres in Forward township. Allegheny county. He is a 



1 172 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Republican in politics, and a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Hous- 
holder married, October 9, 1879, Mary Elizabeth Actor, born in Elizabeth, 
now Lincoln township, in 1861, daughter of Samuel and Mary (McCracken) 
Actor, who came to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, from Canada. Samuel 
Actor and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and for 
many years he was township supervisor. Children : Robert, deceased ; Will- 
iam Samuel, deceased; Mary Elizabeth, married John A. Housholder; Anna 
Belle. Children of John A. and Mary Elizabeth Housholder : William, died 
aged two years; Anna May, Margaret B., Elizabeth, Dora, Charles B., 
Joseph J., Nellie, Walter, Ward, died October 14, 1912, aged fifteen years; 
Edward, John. 



First resident in eastern Pennsylvania and settled in the 
\\'ILSON western part of the state prior to 1782, this branch of the 
Wilson family has long been connected with Pennsylvania 
history, altliough the line to which John McConnell Wilson, of Elizabeth, 
Pennsylvania, belongs, for a time was identified with Indiana and Ohio, 
through the residence in those states of the family of John P. Wilson. 
Settlement in Western Pennsylvania was first made by this branch of the 
family of Wilson by two brothers, Aaron and James, before 1782. They 
first resided in Elizabeth, now Forward, township, Allegheny county, where 
they became the owners of a large tract of land, their first home being a 
cabin of logs, hastily constructed and devoid of floor and windows. Aaron 
was the ancestor of the following line, and had several children, one of his 
sons Alexander, of whom further. 

(II) Alexander Wilson, son of Aaron Wilson, was born in Elizabeth, 
now Forward, township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1782, died in 
1868. Upon attaining manhood he inherited a portion of the homestead, a 
large part of which was still in its original wild state, and which he cleared 
and improved. He continued in its cultivation during his entire life and there 
died. Both were members of the Convenanter church, and are buried in 
the Round Hill Cemetery. He married Margaret Paxton, born in eastern 
Pennsylvania, died in 1868. Children of Alexander and Margaret (Paxton) 
Wilson: i. John P., of whom further. 2. James A., a farmer, died in 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania. 3. Alexander, a farmer, died in Columbiana 
county, Ohio. 4. Mary, died unmarried in Forward township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania. 5. Jane, married Samuel Roseberg, and died in 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 

(III) John P. Wilson, son of Alexander and Margaret (Paxton) Wil- 
son, was born in Elizabeth, now Forward, township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1807. He was reared on the home farm and after his 
marriage resided on a part thereof until about 1836, when he moved to Jeffer- 
son county, Indiana, purchasing two hundred acres of partially improved 
land. This he raised to a profitable state of cultivation, there making his 
home for thirteen years, then returning to the homestead in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, where he resided until 1853. In that year Mr. Wilson moved 




'W^^/z^M/^-'^i&<y7^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1173 

to Washington county, Ohio, becoming the owner of a two hundred acre 
farm, where he remained until his death which occurred about 1895. He was 
a prosperous agriculturist, his industrious and upright life gaining the favor 
and respect of his fellows. He and his wife were members of the Covenanter 
church, and in early life he supported the Democratic party, later affiliating 
with the Republican organization. John P. Wilson married Elizabeth, born 
in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1807, died in 
Washington county, Ohio, in October, 1885, daughter of Andrew and Sarah 
(Wilson) Boyd. Andrew was a son of Nathaniel Boyd, of Scotch-Irish 
descent, who came to America in young manhood and became the owner of 
land now occupied by the city of Philadelphia. He and two sisters later 
moved westward to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, purchasing a large 
farm in Elizabeth township, where he lived until his death. He married, in 
Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, in 1776, Dinah, daughter of Isaiah 
Brown, and had three sons : Andrew, of whom further, Samuel and John. 

Andrew Boyd, son of Nathaniel and Dinah (Brown) Boyd, was born 
in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and grew to man- 
hood on the homestead. He fell heir to a portion of the home farm, and 
after his marriage cultivated this until his death. By his marriage with 
Sarah Wilson he had children: i. Dinah, married Robert McConnell and 
died in Forward township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 2. Wilson, a 
farmer, died in Jefferson county, Indiana. 3. Morrow, a soldier in the 
Second Regiment, West Virginia Cavalry, in the Union army during the 
Civil War, was killed in the fighting near Winchester, Virginia. 4. John, 
died in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in young manhood. 5. Andrew, 
died on the homestead in 1876, a farmer. 6. Elizabeth, of previous mention, 
married John P. Wilson. 7. Isabel, married James Withrow, and died in 
Lincoln township. Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 

Children of John P. and Elizabeth (Boyd) \\'ilson : i. Alexander, a 
carpenter and owner of a grist mill, died in Noble county, Ohio. 2. Sarah, 
died unmarried, aged twenty years. 3. Samuel died in Jefferson county, 
Indiana, aged five years. 4. Andrew, formerly a school teacher, now pro- 
prietor of a grocery store at Sistersville, West Virginia. 5. Margaret, died 
unmarried on the old homestead. 6. John McConnell, of whom further. 7. 
Elizabeth, married Dr. J. A. Minney, and lives in Topeka, Kansas. 8. 
James Patterson, lives retired on the old homestead. 

(IV) John McConnell Wilson, son of John P. and Elizabeth (Boyd) 
Wilson, was born near Madison, Jefferson county, Indiana, September 19, 
1843. He was educated in the public schools, and passed his youthful years 
on the home farm. After leaving home he was for twenty-five years em- 
ployed as a ship carpenter in Pittsburgh and Elizabeth. Pennsylvania, retir- 
ing from active life in 1904. Since that time he has lived retired in Eliza- 
beth, in which locality he owns considerable property. Mr. Wilson is a 
veteran of the Civil War, having enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and 
Eightieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, on September 6, 1864. He 
was engaged in the battle of Kingston, North Carolina, and received his 



1 174 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

honorable discharge from the Union service June lo, 1865. His poHtical 
sympathies are strongly Republican. 

Mr. Wilson married, in November, 1866, Helen F., born in Wheeling, 
West Virginia, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Rickards) Hill, and has 
children: i. Elizabeth Morrow, married H. H. Snee, and resides in Jeffer- 
son township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 2. Mary Ellen, married J. 
B. Large, and lives in Jefferson township, Allegheny county. 3. Sarah, died 
aged twenty years. 4. Uriah Burton, died in infancy. 



William McClelland, the earliest known ancestor of 
McClelland William Henry McClelland Sr., of this review, was 

born in county Antrim, Ireland, in 1733, and died in 
Pennsylvania, July 12, 1815. He was a son of John McClelland. In his 
early manhood William McClelland emigrated to America and settled in 
Maryland or Virginia, from whence he removed to South West Pennsyl- 
vania. McClellandtown, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, was founded by 
John McClelland, great-great-uncle of William Henry McClelland Sr., of 
this sketch. Soon after its settlement the Indians became very troublesome, 
and the United States government sent out an expedition to suppress the 
uprising; Colonel William Crawford was at the head of this command and 
John McClelland was an officer of the regiment; all the members of the 
expedition were massacred by the Indians ; the incident has gone down into 
history as the Upper Sandusky (Ohio) Massacre. 

(II) Arthur H. McClelland, son of William McClelland, was born in 
McClellandtown, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, in 1809. In his early man- 
hood he removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where the greater part of his 
life was spent. He was a bricklayer by trade, later became a contractor, 
and twice did the brick work of the Monongahela House, before and after 
the "big fire" of 1845. It was a noted house in its day. He held a number 
of township offices as a representative of the Republican party, and was a 
member of the Baptist church. He married Margaret Torrence, born in 
1812, at Mount Joy, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and they had children: 
Elizabeth and Mary, died in infancy ; William Henry, of this sketch ; Sarah 
McGregor, married Joseph W. Anderson, and lives in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia ; and Charles Albert, died unmarried. 

(III) Wilham Henry McClelland, of this sketch, son of Arthur H. and 
Margaret (Torrence) McClelland, was born on Clark street, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, March 9, 1839, and in that city was educated in the old Sixth 
Ward, now Franklin, School. In 1858 he began his business career, .his first 
position being as night clerk with the Pittsburgh Dispatch, and while with 
this paper he posted the first war bulletin in Pittsburgh, the firing of Fort 
Sumter, in 1861. He afterwards became bookkeeper for White, Orr & 
Company, a leading dry goods house, and finally formed a connection with 
the Pittsburgh Gas Company, being treasurer of the company for about five 
years, then a director and secretary for twenty-eight years, continuing in this 
latter office until his retirement in 1898. He then took up with the Penn 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 117S 

Gas Coal Company of Philadelphia as a director and its secretary, which 
positions he held until 1905, when he retired. He enlisted in 1864 in Com- 
pany K, Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, and was mustered out with 
the rank of a first lieutenant at the close of the war. During his war service 
he became a close friend of Sergeant Boston Corbett, who shot Booth, the 
assassinator of President Lincoln, and being in the same brigade he was a 
close friend of the commanding officer, Captain E. P. Doherty, Company L, 
Sixteenth New York Cavalry, who was in command of the detail sent out 
to capture Booth. He is a Republican in politics, and has served as school 
director. His religious afifiliation is with the Episcopal church. He is a 
member of General Alexander Hays Post, No. 3, Department of Pennsyl- 
vania, Grand Army of the Republic, being a past commander of the same. 

Mr. McQelland has been twice married; (first) to Mary E., daughter 
of Benjamin Teller, a cousin of United States Senator Teller, of Colorado, 
and (second) to Sarah Louise, daughter of Thomas and Louise (Scheldt) 
Cross, of Baltimore, Maryland. Children by first marriage : i. Arthur Teller, 
a paper hanger and contractor, resides in Pittsburgh, married Mamie Finley, 
deceased, and has had children : Laura, deceased ; Arthur, Charles, War- 
ren, deceased. 2. Edwin Bridge, .deceased, lived in Wilkinsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania ; married Anna Pentland Stewart, and had children : Pentland and 
Mary. Children by second marriage. 3. Blanche Cross, married Finley 
Litrel Walton; resides in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 4. William Henry, 
of whom further. 5. Margaret Louise. 

(IV) William Henry McClelland, son of William Henry and Sarah 
Louise (Cross) McClelland, was born at No. 59 Marion street, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, October 29. 1880. He was educated in the public elementary 
and high schools of Pittsburgh, and began his business career in the year 
1900 as draftsman, and now (1915) holds the position of assistant chief 
draftsman for the Union Switch and Signal Company, of Swissvale. Penn- 
sylvania. He is a Republican in his political opinions. He resides at No. 
651 Trenton avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 



William Wightman, born in county Down, Ireland, came 
WIGHTMAN to the province of Pennsylvania, prior to the Revolution- 
ary War, and making his way to the westward of the 
mountains finally settled in what is now Baldwin township, Allegheny 
county. There he cleared a farm in part and erected a stone house, in which 
he died. This old house stood for over one hundred years and was then 
taken down. William Wightman was a soldier of the Revolution, and both 
he and his wife were devout members of Lebanon Presbyterian Church. 
(II) William H. Wightman, son of Wilham Wightman, the pioneer 
settler of the family in Pennsylvania, was born on the Baldwin township 
farm owned by his parents. There he grew to manhood, married and lived 
in the old stone house built by his father. Later he became sole owner of 
the farm, inheriting in part and acquiring the balance of its three hundred 
acres by purchasing the rights of the other heirs. Later he sold the greater 



1 176 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

part of the homestead farm and bought the Grierson farm near Pittsburgh. 
But he yearned for the old home and in a few years sold his farm near 
Pittsburgh and returned to the unsold portion of their homestead farm, but 
not to the old stone house, that being in the possession of others. He con- 
tinued his residence in Baldwin township until death ended his labors. He 
was a Democrat in politics, held the office of township supervisor, and with 
his wife was a member of Lebanon Presbyterian Church, both being buried 
in the burial ground of that church. He was a man of quiet, industrious 
habits and bore an excellent reputation. He married Olivia Carroll, whose 
parents came from New Jersey after the birth of their daughter and settled 
in Butler county, Pennsylvania. Children of William H. Wightman: i. 
Martha Jane, married Alexander Chambers, and died in Pittsburgh. 2. 
William, died in one of the western states. 3. Daniel, a lumberman, died in 
Newark, New Jersey. 4. Joseph, a lumber dealer, now living in Newark, 
New Jersey. 5. Elizabeth, married Andrew McKee, and died at McKees 
Rocks, Pennsylvania. 6. John, died in the West. 7. James, now living in 
Washington, D. C, a retired minister of the Presbyterian church. 8. Henry 
Baldwin, of further mention. 9. Mary, married Robert G. Jones ; she is 
still living, a resident of Pittsburgh. 10. Caroline, married George W. Blair, 
who died in Pittsburgh, where she still resides. 11. Frank, died at the home- 
stead. 12. Albert, also died at the homestead, 

(HI) Henry Baldwin Wightman, son of William H. and Olivia (Car- 
roll) Wightman, was born on the Wightman homestead farm in Baldwin 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1839, and yet resides 
there, sixteen acres of his farm being part of the original farm. He was 
educated in the public schools and Hazlett Academy, and remained at home 
until August 14, 1862, when he enlisted in Company F, Fifteenth Regiment 
Pennsylvania Cavalry. On fhe reorganization of the regiment, after heavy 
losses, he was placed in Company I and served until disabled by a wound in 
the wrist, received at the battle of Holstone River, East Tennessee. He 
fought at the battles of Antietam, Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission 
Ridge, Holstone River and others, besides doing much scouting and raiding 
duty. He returned to Baldwin township after leaving the army and for a 
few years engaged in farming. The postoffice at Option was established on 
the old Wightman farm and for twenty-nine years he was the postmaster. 
He then resigned and has since lived a quiet retired life, devoting himself to 
his orchards of peaches, pears, apples and the culture of small fruits. His 
home and sixteen acres surrounding it are a part of the old homestead farm, 
where both his father, himself, brothers and sisters were born. He is a 
Republican in politics, has held the office of township supervisor, and both 
he and his wife are members of Lebanon Presbyterian Church, which he 
has served as elder. He is a well-preserved man, quiet and neighborly, 
well-known and highly esteemed. He carries his seventy-five years well and 
is interested in all the topics of the day. 

Mr. Wightman married Cornelia Castor, born in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and there died in 1906, daughter of Gabriel Castor. Children: 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1177 

1. Olivia May, now postmistress at Option, residing with her father. 2. A 
son died at birth. When the postoffice was established on the old farm 
there was much discussion over a name. Many were suggested to the post- 
office department, but all were rejected on account of there being other offices 
of the same name in the state. Finally Mr. Wightman submitted the name 
"Option," which was accepted by the department. 



This is an English family of ancient lineage, whose mem- 
FAWCETT bers have frequently earned honorable mention in public 
and private records. 

(I) Thomas Fawcett was a stone mason by trade, and spent his entire 
life at Ravensdale, Westmorelandshire, England. He married Elizabeth 

, and had children : Thomas, James, Anthony, George, of further 

mention; Miles, Clement, Robert, Elizabeth, William, Ann, John, Ellen, an 
infant. Of these, James, George, William and John came to America at 
the time. Miles and ^Anthony following. 

(II) George Fawcett, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Fawcett, was born 
in Ravensdale, Westmorelandshire, England, about 18 10, died at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-four. In July, 1832, in company with his brothers 
James, William and John, he sailed from Liverpool, England, in the ship 
"Ajax," which was considered a large one for that day, and carried seven 
hundred passengers. They were one day less than eight weeks on the 
water, the passage being an exceedingly rough and stormy one, but were 
finally landed safely at New York City, from whence they went to Buffalo. 
They remained there but a short time, then went on to Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, and located in a section which they called Birmingham, now South 
Side of Pittsburgh. William returned to Buffalo and there married, Febru- 
ary I, 1834, Margaret Robinson. The four brothers followed the same 
calling as their father for a time, but soon invested money in some coal 
lands at Braddock on the Monongahela river. They also purchased the 
fir.st stern paddle-wheel steamer on the Monongahela river, and called it 
"The Traveler." During the day they utilized this steamer for hauling 
freight for other people up and down the river, and at night they hauled the 
coal which they had had mined from their own lands. William Fawcett 
was the pilot and engineer, and as boats were not equipped with pilot 
houses in those days, he suffered greatly from exposure. In 1853 William 
Fawcett removed to a farm near McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he 
spent the remainder of his days. He and all his brothers and sisters who 
came to America joined the Primitive Methodist church in England, and in 
Pittsburgh they united with the Methodist Episcopal church, the place of 
meeting at that time being an old school house on the "Diamond," South 
Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but shortly afterward the "Little Brick 
Church" was built, and in this the brothers filled the offices of class leader, 
steward, trustee and Sunday school superintendent. .^11 were very active in 
church work. They named the village Soho. after a place in England, and 
the planing mill they erected there was known as the Soho Planing Mill. 



II78 WESTERN PENiNSYLVANIA 

This planing mill, which was called into existence by George Fawcett, was 
situated where the Twenty-second street bridge is now located, and they did 
an extensive lumber business. In association with bis son, Williain J., he 
organized the Second Avenue Street Car Line, horses being the motive 
power at that time, and also became interested in other car lines in the city. 
He was prominent in all projects concerning the public welfare, and served 
as school director in the Fourteenth Ward of Pittsburgh for many years. 
His brother James became the first president of the First National Bank of 
Birmingham, Pittsburgh. George Fawcett married Esther Anderson, and 
they had children: George, a chicken farmer, lives in Hamilton, New 
Jersey; Margaret and Mary, live at Hamilton, New Jersey; Esther Jane, 
married William Collingwood, lives at Hamilton, New Jersey ; James, super- 
intendent in a tin plate mill, lives in Oakland, Pennsylvania ; William Jona- 
than, of further mention ; Sarah, now deceased, married George Thompson. 
(HI) William Jonathan Fawcett, son of George and Esther (Anderson) 
Fawcett, was born on Congress street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 
23, 1844, and was educated in the public schools of his native city and at 
Dufif's Business College. He also studied law, but never was engaged in 
the practice of his profession, as business demands of another nature were 
made upon him. He became interested with his father in the street car lines, 
the wholesale and retail coal enterprise, and assisted in organizing the 
Armstrong, Fawcett & McKelvey Company, a white lead and paint concern, 
whose plant was located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Later he sold his 
interest in this company. Subsequently he became a public accountant and 
auditor, and was appointed receiver for the Knoxville & St. Clair Street 
Car Line, and was connected as accountant and auditor with a number of 
important enterprises. He now lives retired at No. 1133 Walnut street, 
Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, where he and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Protestant church. He is a member of the Select Knights of 
America and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Fawcett mar- 
ried Magdalene Heuber, born in the Fourteenth Ward, Pittsburgh, December 
3, 1851. She is a daughter of Michael and Elizabeth (Shide) Heuber, both 
born in Hessen, Germany, where they were married, and then came to 
America and settled in Pittsburgh. There he followed his trade as a molder 
until he died of sunstroke in i860. He was a Catholic and his wife was a 
Lutheran. They had children : Anna, still lives in Germany ; Matilda, mar- 
ried John Webster, lives at North Side, Pennsylvania ; Magdalene, mentioned 
above as the wife of Mr. Fawcett ; Michael, a grocer living in Pittsburgh ; 
Theodore, retired, lives in Pittsburgh; Charles, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fawcett had children: William E., a physician in Bedford, Pennsylvania; 
Albert Edgar, a pharmacist of Pittsburgh, married Mary E. Frank, of 
■ Newport, Pennsylvania; James K., in the lumber business in Pittsburgh; 
George T., twin of James K., in the lumber business in Pittsburgh, married 
Helen Wyse, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Charles Emerson, of further 
mention; Walter H., a musician; Elizabeth H. ; Esther M., the three latter 
named residing at home. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ii79 

(IV) Dr. Charles Emerson Fawcett, son of William Jonathan and 
Magdalene (Heuber) Fawcett, was born in the old Fourteenth Ward, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, September 17, 1885. He attended the common schools 
and then the high school of Pittsburgh, after which he matriculated at the 
Pharmaceutical Department of the University of Pittsburgh, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1905. Pursuing his studies at the Medical 
Department of the same university, he was graduated from this in the class 
of 1909 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. While in the School of 
Pharmacy, he was a member of the Kappa Psi fraternity, and while in the 
Medical Department, he joined the Phi Rho Sigma fraternity. He was 
still a student at college when he spent one year at the Reineman Maternity 
Hospital, now the Elizabeth Mayer Memorial Hospital, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
svlvania, and after his graduation he served an internship of one and half 
years at the Passavant Hospital of Pittsburgh. In the summer of 1910 he 
went to McKeesport in order to commence the practice of his profession, 
but in the same year located at Dormont borough, in the suburbs of Pitts- 
burgh, and now has a fine medical and surgical practice. He lives at No. 
1539 Hillsdale avenue, Dormont. He is Republican in political matters. 
His fraternal affiliation is as follows : The Allegheny County Medical 
Society; Pennsylvania State Medical Society; American Medical Associa- 
tion ; American Pharmaceutical Association ; Lodge No. 650, Free and 
Accepted Masons ; Scottish Rite Masons, thirty-second degree ; Royal Arch 
Masons ; Knights Templar ; Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine ; and several others. 

Dr. Fawcett married, June 28, 1907, Bessie Olive Bosmeyer, born in 
the Fourteenth W^ard, Pittsburgh, a daughter of William and Mary (Miller) 
Bosmeyer, both living in Pittsburgh, where he is a master plumber. Child 
of Dr. and Mrs. Fawcett: Robert Miles, born November 20, 1912. 



The Freeds of Western Pennsylvania are descendants of Hans 
FREED Friedt, whose name appears as a trustee of the Mennonite con- 
gregation of Bedminster township, Bucks county, to whom 
William Allen deeded ground for a church building and fifty acres adjoining 
under date of March 24, 1746. This is one of the oldest Mennonite congre- 
gations in Bucks county, the meeting house standing on a knoll in the south- 
east corner of the township, on the north side of Deep Run. From Friedt 
the name was Anglicised into Freed, but the German emigrant and some of 
his descendants used the form Friedt. A branch settled in Richland town- 
ship, Bucks county, that included Peter Freed, the direct ancestor of Judson 
B. Freed, of Carnegie, Pennsylvania, who was quite young when he left 
Bucks county and went to \'irginia, whence after a short residence he re- 
turned to Pennsylvania. He settled in 1785 on Mounts Creek. Bullskin 
township, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, secured land, and there lived until 
his death at the age of eighty-four years, leaving four sons and three daugh- 
ters : Jacob, see forward ; Peter, lived and died in Tyrone township, Fayette 
county ; John, moved to McLean county, Illinois ; Henry, lived on the home- 



ii8o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

stead until his accidental death about 1870. The three daughters married 
respectively Joseph Beidler, a farmer of Bullskin township, whose land 
adjoined the Freed homestead, Jacob Overholt, and Joseph Johnston. 

(II) Jacob Freed, eldest son of Peter Freed, was bom in Bullskin town- 
ship, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, was a farmer all of his life and died at 
the homestead. His farm was part of the original tract owned by Peter 
Freed, and after the death of Jacob Freed it passed to the ownership of his 
son, Joseph. Jacob Freed married Susan, daughter of Martin Garver, a 
pioneer of Bullskin township. Children: Joseph, Henry G., of whom 
further; Samuel and Jonathan. In a list of property owners in Bullskin 
in 1823, Henry, Jacob, Abraham and John Freed are named as farmers, 
Peter as a saw mill owner. The Moyer Coke Works in later years operated 
their furnaces on Henry Freed's land, the entire farm being underlain with 
coking coal of great value. The Freeds were members of the Mennonite 
church, the homestead for several years being the scene of the annual June 
gatherings of those holding that faith in the Bullskin township section of 
Fayette county. 

(III) Henry G. Freed, son of Jacob and Susan (Garver) Freed, was 
born in Bullskin township, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, April 30, 1833, 
died April 20, 1898, and there attained mature years, in boyhood attending 
the public schools. He worked on his father's farm until his marriage and 
then rented a farm at Connellsville, whither he took his bride. In 1867 he 
bought one hundred acres of land in Bullskin township, Fayette county, 
about three miles from Mount Pleasant, and here passed his remaining years, 
making improvements upon his property and cultivating with the most par- 
ticular care until it was one of the finest farms in the neighborhood. His 
operations were general in nature and he realized from his successful efforts 
a generous income. He was strong in his faith in the Republican party, and 
with his wife belonged to the Baptist church, having for twenty-five years 
been active in the official body of the Green Lick Sunday School. He mar- 
ried (first) Anna Bechtel, her father, Martin Bechtel, of Dutch descent, 
having been one of the earliest settlers of that locality. His wife, a member 
of the Miller family, was a Baptist, Martin Bechtel's ancestors having been 
known as "Campbellites." Martin Bechtel owned, besides his farm in the 
valley, about twelve hundred acres of mountain land, and it was in this 
timber land that he conducted the greater part of his business dealings, only 
exercising a general management over the farm. He died in 1890, aged 
eighty-two years, having married again after the death of his first wife, his 
second wife being Christina Grimm. Children of Henry G. and Anna 
(Bechtel) Freed: i. Smith, died aged twenty-eight years, unmarried. 2. 
Jacob, a machinist in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad, lives in 
Pitcairn, Pennsylvania, married Laura Barnhart. 3. Tillman, a farmer of 
Ewing, Missouri. 4. Martin, a machinist, resides at Marion, Indiana. 5. 
Judson B., of whom further. 6. Rice B., an electrician in the employ of the 
H. C. Frick Company, lives at Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania. 7. Susan, 
married James N. Burkeholder, a stationary engineer of Latrobe, Pennsyl- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1181 

vania. 8. Iva, married Logan Frye, a steel mill worker, and lives in Latrobe, 
Pennsylvania. After the tieath of his first wife, Henry G. Freed married 
(second) Catherine Stauffer, who died in 1905. 

(IV) Judson B. Freed, son of Henry G. and Anna (Bechtel) Freed, 
was born in Connellsville, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, September 17, 1865. 
He obtained his early education in what was known as the "Mud" district 
school in Bullskin township, his duties on the farm leaving but about four 
months a year in which he was free to pursue his studies. After the death 
of his mother he took up a man's work in farming, although he was then 
but fifteen years of age, and was employed at home and by the neighboring 
farmers until he was twenty-one years of age, when he became associated 
with tlie H. C. Frick Company at the Standard Mines as checkman and 
weighmaster at the tipple, remaining there for five years. In 1893 he entered 
the employ of the PanhantUe Railroad in the freight department at Carnegie, 
and in 1903 was transferred from the freight to the passenger service as 
ticket agent, a position he lias held continuously. He is held in high regard 
as a courteous, obliging official by the regular patrons of the road, and bears 
an e.xcellent record as an employee of loyalty and faithfulness. A staunch 
Republican, the lure of office has never attracted him, and he has sup- 
ported his party as a private citizen, and he and his family hold mem- 
bership in the Methodist Episcopal churcli, which he has served as 
steward for the past twelve years, having also been treasurer of the church 
for several years. His fraternities are the Masonic Order, in which he 
belongs to Centennial Lodge, No. 544, Free and Accepted Masons, the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, and the Knights of the Maccabees. His home 
is at No. 455 Broadway, Carnegie, Pennsylvania, where he built a comfort- 
able residence in 1896. 

Mr. Freed married, September 25, 1888, Hannah VVasherbaugh, born in 
Bullskin township, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, daughter of William and 
Sarah (Andrews) Washerbaugh, both deceased, her father a farmer, his 
family one of the first to settle in Fayette county, her mother of Irish 
descent. Mrs. Freed and her husband were schoolmates, both having at- 
tended the "Mud" district school. Children of Judson B. and Hannah 
(Washerbaugh) Freed: i. Olive, born in June, 1889, married Homer 
Martin and lives on Washington avenue, Carnegie, Pennsylvania ; her hus- 
band is foreman of the Keystone Lumber Company, of Pittsburgh, and they 
are the parents of three children. 2. Violet, born in 1899. 3. Virginia, born 
in 1908. 4. Paul, born in 191 2. 



The Pattersons of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
PATTERSON herein considered, descend from the Virginia family that 
early settled in Campbell county, Virginia. 
(I) The pioneer of the name in Allegheny county was Nathaniel Pat- 
terson, of Scotch-Irish descent, wlio with his wife, Elizabeth (Bell) Patter- 
son, came from Campbell county to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1758, 
settling in Mifflin township. He was accompanied by his sons and with their 



ii82 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

aid erected a log house and began clearing a farm. Soon afterward the 
Indians became hostile and for safety's sake the family returned to Virginia, 
where they remained two and a half years. They then returned to the 
Mifflin, Allegheny county, home, which they found standing intact, the 
Indians having passed it by. There Nathaniel Patterson and his wife lived 
until death, both members of the Lebanon Presbyterian Church. He died in 
1790, leaving three sons and a daughter: Andrew, lived in Pittsburgh; 
Thomas B., a farmer of Mifflin township ; James, of further mention ; Ellen, 
married Samuel Cunningham. 

(II) Hon. James Patterson, youngest son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth 
(Bell) Patterson, was born in Campbell county, Virginia, and came with his 
parents to Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1758, and 
shared all the dangers and privations incident to pioneer life in Western 
Pennsylvania. He lived on the farm many years, but is best known for the 
active part he took in public affairs. He was colonel of militia, justice of 
peace and filled many township offices; from 1814 until 1825 was collector of 
internal revenue for the seventeenth Pennsylvania district, and in 1828 was 
elected a member of the Pennsylvania house of assembly. He was one of the 
most influential Democrats of the district, and a leading member of Lebanon 
Presbyterian Church, giving the latter substantial aid in erecting their church 
edifice. He married Catherine, daughter of Joseph and Mary A. (Connolly) 
Livingston, both born in Ireland. Children: James T., lived on part of the 
old homestead, a bachelor ; Livingston Bell, of further mention ; Cornelius D., 
died aged twenty-two years ; Mary, never married, but was home keeper for 
her bachelor brother, James T. ; Eliza T., died in infancy; Eleanor, married 
Dr. J. F. Wilson, and lived in Philadelphia. 

(Ill) Hon. Livingston Bell Patterson, son of Hon. James Patterson 
and his wife, Catherine (Livingston) Patterson, was born in Mifflin town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, at the old Patterson homestead, in 
1815, died May i, 1887. He obtained his early education in the district 
school and then took a course in civil engineering and surveying in Pitts- 
burgh under the instruction of Mr. Twining, an eminent engineer of that 
city. He inherited one hundred and fifty acres of the old homestead from his 
father and this he improved and cultivated, erecting the farm house yet in 
use. He also followed his profession and was engaged in surveying at times 
during his entire life. He took an active part in public affairs, serving js 
justice of peace for thirty-two years, was a member of the Pennsylvania 
house assembly in 1855-56, and like his father was one of the stalwart and 
influential Democrats of the township. He was a frequent delegate to county 
and state conventions, his advice and counsel being listened to and followed 
by party leaders when matters affecting his district were under discussion. 
He retained possession of his farm all his life, although he disposed of the 
coal underlying it when a fair price was offered. Like his forbears he was 
a pillar of Lebanon Presbyterian Church and was ever ready to aid in all 
good works. 

He married Mary Jane Butler, her father born in Clearfield county. 




/^^.^,lF^UZy^.zs^. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1183 

Pennsylvania, her mother in Jefferson township, Allegheny county. Ben- 
jamin Butler was a boat builder, having a yard on the Monongahela river. 
While returning from a trip to Philadelphia, the stage coach overturned and 
rolled down a steep hill, Mr. Butler having his neck broken in the descent. 
His widow married (second) John Parker. Children of Benjamin and 
Mary (Cochran) Butler: William, residing in Petersburg, Virginia, and 
during the Civil War served in the Confederate army; Eliza, married James 
Moore, and lived in the Valley of the Rappahannock in Virginia; Mary Jane, 
married Hon. Livingston Bell Patterson, of previous mention ; James Parker 
Boyd, mentioned below. 

(IV) James Parker Boyd Patterson, only child of Hon. Livingston 
Bell and Mary Jane (Butler) Patterson, was born on the Mifiilin county 
farm, inherited from his father, December 25, 1856, and there yet resides. 
This old farm is part of the original Nathaniel Patterson tract and has 
never been owned outside the family. James P. B. Patterson attended the 
Lebanon public school for several years, completing his studies at Millers- 
ville State Normal School. After finishing his school years he returned to 
the home farm and has ever since cultivated the fertile acres, inheriting the 
property as the sole heir. Like his honored forbears he is a Democrat, but 
unlike them, takes little part in public affairs. He is also a member of 
Lebanon Presbyterian Church, being the fourth generation of Pattersons to 
worship within its sacred walls. He is also a member of the Junior Order of 
United American Mechanics. Mr. Patterson married, in October, 1883, 
Emma Jane Butler, born in Monongahela City, Pennsylvania, daughter of 
William and Asenath (Davis) Butler, the latter born in West Newton, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, died aged thirty years, the former 
still surviving. Children of James P. B. and Emma Jane Patterson: Robert, 
born August 3, 1884, now residing at home; Mary Jane, born October 18. 
1888, a graduate of Allegheny College of Meadville, Pennsylvania, now 
residing with her parents. 

Emma Jane (Butler) Patterson is a great-great-granddaughter of Noble 
Butler, who, born in Bristol, England, came to the United States in 1716. 
Under the provisions imposed by the Penns he took up one thousand acres 
of land in Chester county, about thirty-four miles from Philadelphia. He 
settled on this tract, a single man, but soon afterward married Rachel Jones, 
of Welsh parentage. They were the parents of twelve children, the youngest 
of these Benjamin. Noble Butler died on his farm in 1804. 

Benjamin Butler, born in Chester county, married and had eleven 
children, nine of them sons. He was a man of wealth and lived in a 
mansion in the midst of his many fertile acres. He was not content, how- 
ever, but sent two of his sons west to spy out the land and report. After an 
extended journey they returned and advised the purchase of land on the 
Great Bend of the Ohio river, below Cincinnati. Benjamin thought their 
advice good and sent them back to purchase the tract selected. He disposed 
of his large farm and beautiful stone mansion and started west in a two- 
horse carriage, with his household goods packed in two wagons, one drawn 



ii84 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



by six horses, the other by five, with two extra horses. They passed through 
Lancaster and Harrisburg and over the mountains by the regular route, 
crossing the Monongahela river at Parkinson's Ferry on Sabbath evening, 
October 6, 1805, putting up for the night at the tavern kept by George Trout 
at Monongahela City. In the morning Benjamin Butler was stricken with 
palsy. There was no doctor nearer than Greensburg, so a horse and cow 
doctoT, who appeared on the scene, was allowed to prescribe for the dying 
men. He pronounced the case one of yellow fever and gave a powder that 
was afterward found to be of brick dust only. He caused quite a scare in 
the settlement and disposed of many of his fake powders at fifty cents each. 
The death of Benjamin Butler overturned the plan for going to Ohio and 
Monongahela City became the family home instead. 

Captain Ira R. Butler, one of the nine sons of Benjamin Butler, was 
born at the Chester county family mansion, November 15, 1792. He married, 
June 14, 1822, Mary Boyd, born at New London Cross Roads, Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, October 23, 1801. After the death of his father he 
lived in Monongahela City, a merchant, in parternership with his brother 
Benjamin (2). After a few years he sold out and for one year was super- 
cargo of the Lake Erie sailing vessel "Union," of Grand river, then for two 
years was her master, thus acquiring the title "Captain." In 1815 he re- 
turned and was engaged in boat building at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, 
and from 1837 until his death, July 18, 1884, lived in Monongahela City. 
Children: Sarah, Benjamin P., William, Mrs. Keochline, of Webster, Penn- 
sylvania; Mrs. Richard Pratt, Mrs. Blythe, of Monongahela City; Mrs. Dr. 
Keyes, of Monongahela City; Ira R., Jr. 

William Butler, son of Captain Ira R. Butler, learned the trade of 
caulker and boat builder after leaving his father's farm at the age of twenty- 
one years. He resided in Monongahela City until his first wife's death, but 
after his return from the Civil War located in Webster, Pennsylvania, where 
he now lives retired. He served three years in a regiment of Pennsylvania 
infantry, with the hard fought Army of the Potomac and in battle received 
a bayonet thrust through his knee. He worked at his trade until advancing 
years warned him to desist and for several years has lived a quiet, retired 
life. He married (first) Asenath Davis, born in West Newton, Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth (Budd) Davis, the former a wealthy 
land owner and boat builder, who constructed the first large boat that went 
down the Monongahela river. Children of William Butler by his first wife: 
Mary, married W. P. McMasters, and resides at Munhall, Pennsylvania; 
Jo.sephine, married John Binley, and resides in Webster, Pennsylvania; 
Emma Jane, wife of James Parker Boyd Patterson. William Butler mar- 
ried (second) Sarah Golt, now deceased. 



The Gilmore family, for more than three-quarters of a 
GILMORE century actively and prominently identified with the inter- 
ests of the section of Pennsylvania in which Wilkinsburg is 
located, traces its origin to Ireland, where the members in the various gen- 
erations performed well the duties and obligations of every day life. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVAXIA 1185 

( I ) James Gilmore, grandfalher of James Gilmore, of this review, was 
born in Ireland, was reared and educated there, spent his entire life there, 
and there died. His widow, Mary (McKee) Gilmore, and her children, 
James, William, Charles, Mary, Nancy, emigrated to the United States in 
the year 1827 and located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, arriving there by 
wagon from Philadelphia. In 1832 they settled on the farm in Wilkins 
township, Pennsylvania, where the grandson, James Gilmore, now resides. 
Here the Widow Gilmore spent the remainder of her days. 

(II) James (2) Gilmore, son of James (i) Gilmore, was born in Bel- 
fast, Ireland, attended the schools of that famous city, and at a suitable age 
began farming operations. He accompanied his mother to this country, and 
in due course of time acquired a farm consisting of one hundred and five 
acres, which he cultivated and improved and on which he resided until his 
death. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church at Turtle 
Creek, and for a number of years served as a member of the school board. 
He married Ann Jane Waugh, born in Belfast, Ireland, daughter of John 
and Flora (McKee) Waugh, natives of Ireland, living and dying there. 
Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Gilmore : David, deceased ; 
James, deceased ; David, deceased ; James, of whom further ; William John, 
deceased ; Flora Jane, deceased ; Joseph, deceased. 

(III) James (3) Gilmore, son of James (2) Gilmore, was born on the 
farm where he now resides in Wilkins township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, March 14, 1839. He attended the common schools adjacent to his 
home, Turtle Creek Academy and Iron City College, deriving an education 
from this course. Later he assisted with the work on the home farm, and 
this work was interrupted in the year 1861 by the hostilities between the 
North and South, he entering the army in October of that year, becoming 
a member of Company A, One Hundred and First Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, and he served until the close of the war, and although 
his clothes were struck by bullets, he escaped unhurt. He was confined in 
Andersonville Prison, from which pest house he escaped, October 4, 1864, 
with six other prisoners, and after being recaptured several times, John 
Shaffer and James Gilmore were the only ones to finally reach the Union 
lines at New Berne, North Carolina, November 17, 1864. After being mus- 
tered out of the service of the government, Mr. Gilmore returned to his farm, 
where he has since lived, made many improvements thereon, and cultivated 
it to a high state of perfection. For the long term of thirty-five years he 
served in the capacity of school director, being president of the board for 
many years. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church. His work 
in the neighborhood is such as will be felt for many years to come, and 
his example is well worthy of imitation. 

Mr. Gilmore married. April 25, 1867, Mary E. Plumer. daughter of 
Tames and Elizabeth (Criswell) Plumer. Children: i. Elizabeth P., died 
aged twelve years. 2. Anna, wife of Samuel A. Taylor, of Wilkinsburg. 
Pennsylvania, and mother of one child, Mary Elizabeth. 3. Charles, a 
resident of Cadiz, Ohio, a preacher in the United Presbyterian church. 



ii86 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

married Josephine Rippey, and they are the parents of two children : Joseph- 
ine R. and Marion L. 4. Elizabeth P., resides at home. 5. James L., an 
M. D., graduate of Westminster College and University of Pennsylvania. 

After the death of the mother of Charles Koch, father of Edward 
KOCH Koch, in his German home, the father of Charles Koch married 

a second time, the family then emigrating to the United States, 
where they settled first in New York City, six years later migrating to Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, where they made their home in the East End. At 
that time Charles Koch, who was born in 1851, was but a lad, and in his 
new home he continued the studies begun in the schools of his native land. 
His first occupation, in young manhood, was as a baker and confectioner in 
New York City. Upon coming to Pittsburgh he engaged in the flour busi- 
ness, supplying bakeries, and so continued for thirty-two years, located on 
Liberty street, Pittsburgh. Charles Koch married Rebecca Goodhart, born 
in Germany, daughter of Jacob Goodhart, also born in Germany. They had 
children: i. Philip, deceased; married Emma Trusch ; one child, Emma. 
2. Edward, mentioned below. 3. Molly, married William Barnhart ; one 
child, Nevin. 4. Herman, carrying on the business founded by his father; 
married Etella Brennamen ; no children. 5. Marie, married Ward Black; 
no children. 6. Anna G.. a nurse in the Allegheny General Hospital. 7. 
Charles, at home, unmarried. 

Edward Koch, son of Charles and Rebecca (Goodhart) Koch, was born 
in the city of New York, and when six years of age came with his parents to 
Pittsburgh, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he attended the public 
schools. In choosing an occupation he decided upon the baker's trade, and 
was so employed in Pittsburgh until 1897, when his father, Charles Koch, 
opened a bakery and confectionery business in Pitcairn, a successful enter- 
prise that he conducted until 1902, when Edward Koch succeeded to the 
business and continued until his retirement from ill health in 1908. Mr. 
Edward Koch is the owner of the most modern brick block in Pitcairn, 
which was erected at his direction, and is a prominent citizen of Pitcairn, 
having for thirteen years filled the office of assistant postmaster. He is a 
communicant of the Lutheran church. Mr. Koch married, December 4, 
1901, Matilda Kuehn, her father a gardener of Patton township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, where he has resided since 1883. Children of 
Edward and Matilda (Kuehn) Koch: Edna, Charles. 



The McElroys, herein recorded, descend from an old 
McELROY family of Patton township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, the original founders coming from Ireland. They 
acquired a large tract of land then covered with timber. This they cleared 
and where they wrought with axe and plow in the early days are now 
the Cunningham, Gill and Brinton farms. There Robert McElroy was 
born, the house in which he first saw the light standing on that part of the 
original tract now comprised within the bounds of the Cunningham farm. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1187 

There he grew to manhood and built his house on the home farm, his 
share being now known as the Brinton farm. He married (first) Miss 
McCahb, who bore him Susan and James. He married (second) Mar- 
garet Gibson McGahey and had issue: Sarah, John, Maria and Robert 
Graham. 

(H) Robert Graham McElroy, son of Robert and Margaret G. (Mc- 
Gahey) McElroy, was born in Patton township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, at the old McElroy homestead, now known as the Brinton farm. 
His mother died when he was eight months old and his baby wants became 
the greatest concern of the maiden ladies, Maria and Susan Cole, who 
lived at what is now the Cunningham farm, part of the original McElroy 
tract. He was tenderly and lovingly cared for by the sisters until he was 
no longer in need of their assistance. He grew to manhood at the farm and 
there resided until many years after his marriage. He then moved suc- 
cessively to Ligonier, Turtle Creek and Pitcairn, ending his days, January 
18, 1902. He married, March 29, 1854, Elizabeth Donald, daughter of 
James and Phoebe (Collins) Donald, the latter a daughter of Joseph and 
Abby (By ram) Collins. 

Abby (Byram) Collins was a daughter of Edward Byram, who with 
his daughter, Abby, was taken prisoner by the Indians, April 7, 1779, at his 
newly established home in Western Pennsylvania. Edward Byram after- 
ward escaped but Abby, then a child, was sold to the French and did not 
return to her home until she was a young woman. This Byram family, of 
Western Pennsylvania, descended from Nicholas Byram, an Englishman of 
Bridgewater, Massachusetts, whose career was a strange one. He was born 
about 1610, son of an English gentleman of Kent, England, who left his 
estate and family in charge of a trustee who proved faithless. Instead of 
educating the lad he sent him to the West Indies in charge of a sea captain, 
the boy's only fortune consisting of a few gold coins sewed by his mother 
within his coat lining. Arriving at Barbadoes, he was sold to a planter 
for his passage and seven years were required to work out this indebted- 
ness, the gold given by his mother remaining untouched. After gaining 
his freedom he took passage for Boston, there arriving in 1633 or 1634. 
In 1635 he married Susan Shaw and settled at Weymouth, later becoming 
one of the proprietors of the town of Duxbury. He died in Bridgewater, 
Massachusetts, in 1688, leaving issue. The line of descent to Abby (Byram) 
Collins was through Nicholas (2) and Mary (Edson) Byram, of Bridge- 
water, Massachusetts, he a soldier of King Philip's war; Ebenezer and 
Hannah (Hayward) Byram, of Bridgewater. he born 1692; Ebenezer (2), 
born 1716, and Abigail (Alden) Byram, the latter a great-granddaughter of 
John and Priscilla Alden, of the original Plymouth colony; Ebenezer (2) 
moved from Bridgewater to New Jersey. His son, Edward Byram, was 
the father of nine children, among them Abby, the Indian captive, wife of 
Joseph Collins and grandmother of Elizabeth Donald, wife of Robert 
Graham McElroy. 

(Ill) Robert Dunlap McElroy, son of Robert Graham and Elizabeth 



ii88 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(Donald) McElroy, was born in Patton township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, near Monroeville, April 29, 1864. He was educated in Monroc- 
ville public schools and spent his early life at the home farm. He tlien 
left home and worked a farm for an uncle. In October, 1890, he moved to 
Pitcairn, where he was teaming for a time, then began taking contracts for 
excavation and concrete work, a business that grew to large proportions 
with satisfactory returns. He also bought and sold considerable real estate. 
Later he purchased a farm of one hundred and fifty acres in Patton town- 
ship where he now resides (1915) and ranks among the prosperous farmers 
and stock raisers of that section of the county. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian church, the Knights of Maccabees and the Modern Woodmen 
of the World. In political faith he is a Republican, having served Patton 
township as supervisor and Pitcairn as school director. 

Mr. McElroy married, April 29. 1891, Mary Frances (Bebout) Mc- 
Gahiey, daughter of Samuel Bebout and descendant of a prominent pioneer 
family of Washington county, Pennsylvania. Her paternal grandfather, 
John Bebout, was born in Somerset county. New Jersey, June 20, 1752, 
died in 1835. He served as a "Minute man" of the Revolution, 1775 and 
1776, in Somerset county militia, under Captain Piatt Boyle, Colonel 
Stephen Hunt's battalion, of Brigadier-General Nathaniel Green's brigade, 
of New Jersey troops. He also served in the Continental army and was 
engaged at the battle of Monmouth, with Somerset county troops of Cap- 
tain Garvin M. E. Coy's battalion and served later under Captain John 
Parker in the first battalion, commanded by Colonel Benjamin Coy. John 
Bebout married, in 1777, Mary Agnew, born October 23, 1757, died Janu- 
ary 6, 1830. Children: Peter, John, Ira C, Israel and several daughters. 

Ira C. Bebout, son of John and Mary (Agnew) Bebout, was bom in 
Washington county, Pennsylvania. February 3. 1800, died March 28, 1891, 
in Washington county, Ohio, a farmer. He married, February 23, 182 1, 
Maria Howley, who came from New Jersey in early days to Washington 
county. Children of John and Mary Howley: Samuel, Ebenezer, Maria, 
Jane, Ann, Sarah. Children of Ira C. and Maria (Howley) Bebout: John, 
Israel, Samuel M. H., see forward; Jonathan L, Sarah, Mary Ann, Cath- 
erine, Elizabeth. 

Samuel M. H. Bebout. son of Ira C. and Maria (Howley) Bebout, 
was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1832, and for 
twenty-two years conducted a drug store in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. 
He served in the Civil War in Company A. Eighty-fifth Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, his brother, Jonathan L., serving in the same 
company, his brother Israel in an Illinois regiment. Samuel M. H. Bebout 
married, August 14, 1856, Sarah Jane Van Enan, born February 17, 1834, 
died October 4, 1909, daughter of Joseph and Isabella (Logan) Van Enan, 
of Van Enan Station, near Canonsburg; Joseph Van Enan, the original 
settler there, born December 12, 1790, died September 22, 1873, Isabella 
(Logan) Van Enan, born September 15. 1791. died May 21, 1870. She was 
a daughter of Samuel Logan, born in county Antrim, Ireland, in 1759, died 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1189 

in Pennsylvania in 1845, a soldier of the American Revolution, serving in 
the Pennsylvania Line nnder General Lafa\ette. He married Rebecca 
Walker. Children of Samuel M. H. and Sarah Jane ( \'an Enan) Bebout: 
Mary Frances, of further mention ; George Van Enan, born August 14, 
1862, now an engineer, residing in Sheridan. Pennsylvania ; a son born 
January 17, 1866, died unnamed. 

Mary Frances Bebout, born July 27, i860, married (first) February 
3, 1880, Thomas McGahey. Children: i. Estelle, born November 17, 
1881, married F. P. Kunkle, a veteran of the Spanish-American war; 
children: Sarah Estelle, born February 8, 1905, and Mary Elizabeth, May 
13, 1908. 2. Elsie Lenhardt. born February 18, 1884, married William P. 
Kunkle. Mary Frances (Bebout) McGahey married (second), April 29, 
1891, Robert Dunlap McElroy, of previous mention. 



The name of Burgunder probably originated in the 
BURGL'NDER province of Burgundy, France, and from thence was 
brought to Alsace, Germany. 

(I) Diebold Burgunder, a native of Alsace, Germany, was a laborer 
there. He came to America at an early date, took part in the ^^'ar of 
1812, and then returned to his native land. 

(II) Sylvester Burgunder, son of Diebold Burgunder. was born in 
Alsace, Germany, and there received his education. He took part in the 
revolution of 1848, and after that came to this country, where he worked in 
steel mills, having followed this calling in his native land. He died in 
Alsace. He married Regina Schmidt, born in Alsace, who emigrated to 
America with her parents in 1853. Children: Regina, lives in Alsace: 
Remy, of further mention; Dominick, and Richard, live in McKees Rocks, 
Pennsylvania; Cecelia and Joseph, deceased. 

(III) Remy Burgimder, son of Sylvester and Regina (Schmidt) Bur- 
gunder, was born in Alsace, Germany, October 29, 1857. He was educated 
in the schools of his native province, and at a suitable age commenced to 
work in the steel mills with his father. About 1882 he emigrated to 
America, after having served three years in the German army. At first 
he made his home at McKees Rocks, and for a period of four years was in 
the employ of an ice company. He then rented a small place near McKees 
Rocks, where he engaged in gardening, with a very satisfactory amount of 
success. In 1903 he purchased a piece of land of fifteen acres in Schaler 
township, and has been located there since that time. He cultivates the 
place for general market gardening, has made many improvements on it. 
and is doing an excellent business. He is a member of the St. Anthony's 
Catholic Church, at Millvale. Mr. Burgunder married, February 21, 1887, 
Catherine HofTer, who emigrated to America, remained here two years, 
then returned to her native province of Alsace, and later came back to 
America. She is a daughter of Joseph and Kate (Munch) Hofifer, who 
came to America later, and located at McKees Rocks. Children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Burgunder: Joseph, Paul and Richard. 



II90 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The Briggs family, of Western Pennsylvania, represented by 
BRIGGS James Briggs, of the village of New England, Mifflin town- 
ship, Allegheny county, have been for many generations resi- 
dents of the village of Kenninghall, county of Norfolk, England. James 
is a favored name in the family and no generation lacks one or more of 
the name. 

(I) James Briggs, great-grandfather of James Briggs, of Mifflin town- 
ship, was a gardener and on his tombstone there is carved two implements 
of his craft, a hoe and a rake. He was a member of the Church of England. 
He is buried in Kenninghall church yard. 

(H) James (2) Briggs, son of James (i) Briggs, also lived and died 
in county Norfolk, England, as did his wife, Jane (Young) Briggs. Chil- 
dren : I. James, a fanner, enlisted in the British army and lost his life in 
India. 2. William, of further mention. 3. Robert, a merchant dealing in 
mason's materials. 4. Charles, a farmer. 5. David, a manufacturer of 
brick and tile and one of the first manufacturers of tile for drainage pur- 
poses in England. 6. Mary, married in Suffolk. 7. Sophia, married Job 
Fuller, and lived at Kenninghall. 

(III) William Briggs, son of James (2) and Jane (Young) Briggs, 
was born in Kenninghall, Norfolk, England, in 181 1, died in 1884. He 
was employed as a farmer on the Kenninghall estates all his life, his death 
resulting from a kick from his horse. He married Maria Youngs, born 
in King Lynn, Norfolk, England, in 1813, died in 1861, daughter of Thomas 
and Jane (Oliveur) Youngs. Her father, Thomas Youngs, and all his 
family were solid, well built, powerful men, over six feet in height, and all 
farm workers on the Kenninghall estates. Jane (Oliveur) Youngs was a 
daughter of Thomas Oliveur, an English Gypsy, who with his outfit traveled 
all over England. Thomas and Jane (Oliveur) Youngs had children: 
Thomas and Harry, farmers ; John and William, seamen in the English 
naval service; Robert, a soldier of the English army for twenty-one years 
and was never called into battle ; Maria, married William Briggs ; Sarah, 
married Thomas Whip, and lived in Banham, England. Children of Will- 
iam and Maria Briggs: i. Mary, married Charles Gregory, and resides at 
Tottenham, London, England. 2. Elizabeth, married William Land, and 
lives at Lapham, England. 3. James, of further mention. 4. William, died 
aged forty years in Bolton, England, leaving a family. 5. Robert, a farmer 
in England, holding the position on the Kenninghall estate that his father 
held ; married Mary Potter. 6. George, died in New England, Pennsylvania, 
in 1912, a coal miner. 7. Charles, died in England. 8. Sophia, twin witli 
Charles, now residing in England, unmarried. 9. Sarah, died in infancy. 
10. Maria, married and residing at Tottenham, England. 11. Emma, mar- 
ried John Alderson, a brick layer, has resided in the United States, but is 
now living in Australia. 

(IV) James (3) Briggs, son of William and Maria (Youngs) Briggs, 
was born in Kenninghall, county of Norfolk, England, December 25, 1835. 
He never attended school a day in his life, but secured early education from 




'u/yyit^ /^^^^^ -€K^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1191 

his mother, who taught him to read in the evenings when his day's tasks 
were ended. He learned rapidly, the Bible being his text book and ere long 
he was able to read any part of that holy book intelligently. At six years 
of age he was employed in the fields of the estate of the Earl of Albermarle 
to drive crows oiif the newly planted crop. The Earl maintained a library 
for tlie use of his tenants and men and the lad availed himself to the extreme 
limit of the opportunity to obtain good books and further education. He 
read a great deal of history, modern and ancient, obtaining a perfect founda- 
tion for a subsequent, continuous course of reading that has made him an 
authority among his neighbors on all historical questions. He has added to 
this an extensive knowledge of the geography of the world and by a course 
of scientific reading has mastered the works of such writers as Darwin. To 
continue the story of how this uneducated boy has developed into a cul- 
tivated and cultured man, strong in history, geography and science, solely 
through self study and reading would be to spend an interesting hour. 
After he had grown too large for his crow driving job he became driver of 
a delivery wagon for a local merchant, then learned the art of thatching 
roofs for houses and stacks, then for three years worked on a farm for 
John Coleson. All this before he was seventeen years of age. At that age 
he left Norfolk and went to the coal mines in Shipley, Derbyshire, and 
there mined five years for Squire Munday and five years for Richard 
Barrow. 

On March 4, 1862, he took passage for the United States on a sailing 
vessel, arriving in New York, May 7, following. He made his way west, 
finally settling in New England village, Mifflin township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, where he worked in the Aliquippa coal mines for forty-five 
years. In 1873 he bought a house in the village, and in 1894 bought twenty 
acres of land in addition to what he had. In 1885 he was county tax 
collector, but altliough many offices have been offered him he has never 
accepted but that one. He has a wonderful memory and thus treasures the 
contents of the many books he has read. In a spelling contest at which 
college graduates and well informed men and women participated, he 
spelled down the entire class. Although Mr. Briggs is in his eightieth year, 
he is a clear-headed, quick thinker and so well informed in general history, 
geography and science that he is a local authority on these subjects. He is 
a Republican in politics and served as a Republican county committeeman. 
He was early trained in the Church of England and was dean of that com- 
mittee of Allegheny county and attended the convention held in Harrisburg. 

He married, December 25, 1854, Maria Fretvvell, born in Derbyshire. 
England, November 28, 1838, died January 10, 1909, thirteenth of the four- 
teen children of James and Maria (Henshaw) Fretwell. Children of James 
and Maria Briggs: i. Charles, born in Derbyshire, England, September 25, 
1855, now a resident of Jefiferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
2. James, born December 23, 1858, died young. 3. William, born in April. 
i860, died in September, 1863. 4. Henry, the first of the children born in 
the United States, was born at Rock Run, Pennsylvania, March 12, 1863, 



1 192 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

now a resident of Washington county, Pennsylvania. 5. James, Jr., born 
September 30, 1864, now storekeeper of New England, Pennsylvania. 6. 
George, born March 15, 1866, was injured in the coal mines, and died in 
1894. 7. William, died young. 8. Hengist, born January 4, 1869, now resides 
at Meadow Lands, Pennsylvania. 9. Mary Belle, born August 13, 1871, 
married William Minford, superintendent of mines. Rich Hill, Pennsylvania. 
10. Pauline, born February 2, 1873, married John A. McGowan, and resides 
in the village of New England. 11. Millicent, died young. 12. Elmina, 
born March 20, 1875, married B. H. Forsythe, a hero of the Spanish- 
American War, injured in the Philippines and now deceased; she now 
resides with her father. 13. Louisa, born June 27, 1877, married Thomas 
Winklevoss, and resides at Large, Pennsylvania. 14. Darwin V., bom 
December 9, 1879, killed by the kick of a horse, October 28, 1905; was 
unmarried. 



Many communities in the state of Pennsylvania are com- 
McGINNIS posed of Scotch-Irish people and their descendants, and 

among this number is included the McGinnis family, the 
present representative of which is John C. McGinnis, a prominent citizen 
of Pitcairn. 

(I) Roderick AIcGinnis, grandfather of John C. McGinnis, was a 
native of Ireland, of Scotch-Irish origin, and after his marriage he emigrated 
to the United States and settled in Baltimore, Maryland, where he followed 
the shipping business, subsequently removing to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
His wife, also a native of Ireland, bore him a number of children, among 
whom were John, of whom further; Edward, who served in the War of 
1812, participated in the battle of Lundy's Lane, he being among the sur- 
vivors, and Charles, entered the war between Mexico and Texas and never 
came back. 

(II) John McGinnis, son of Roderick McGinnis, was born in Balti- 
more, Maryland, 1798, died in Pitcairn, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1874. He 
was the first manufacturer of tobacco and cigars in the city of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, this proving a successful enterprise, and he continued the 
same for a number of years, then purchased a farm consisting of seven 
hundred acres, which is now the town of Pitcairn, but which was then 
mostly timber land, the houses of today taking the place of the cabins of 
that day. He cleared a portion of his land, and the remainder of his days 
were spent in farming and stock raising. He also purchased extensive 
tracts of land in Illinois. He married Ellen Ramsey, born in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, her parents, who were natives of Ireland, being 
among the early settlers on the Monongahela river, settling near Pittsburgh, 
where her father followed the occupation of farming. Ten children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. McGinnis, among whom were William R., and John 
C., of whom further. 

(III) John C. McGinnis, son of John McGinnis. was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, September 4, 1831. The knowledge 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1193 

acquired in the common schools of his neighborhood was supplemented by 
attendance at an academy in Wilkinsburg and an academy in Turtle Creek. 
For some time thereafter he followed agricultural pursuits, after which he 
studied civil engineering and followed that profession for many years. 
He has also been actively interested in the real estate business, in which he 
has been successful. Mr. McGinnis served for nine years as a councilman of 
Pitcairn and ten years as a justice of the peace of the same place, and was 
also school director in Patton township for twelve years. Although ad- 
vanced in years, he takes a keen interest in community affairs, and keeps 
well informed on current events. 

Mr. McGinnis married, May 21, 1896, Susan Brinton, born February 
21, 1857, daughter of George M. and Susana (Funk) Brinton. Children: 
John C, Jr., born May i, 1897: George Brinton, born February 16, 1900. 
They reside with their parents, John C. having graduated with first honors 
from the local high school. 



The derivation of this surname of frequent occurrence is 
DAVIDSON evident on sight. Many surnames were at first patrony- 
mics, and the original Davidsons were simply sons of 
David. Several other names, equally often met with, have the same mean- 
ing, as Davison, Davis, Davies, also, probably, Dawson. These names are 
found in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland, and have been borne by 
a great number of emigrants to America. 

(I) EHas Davidson, son of Colonel Hugh and Catharine (McDowell) 
Davidson, the former of Revolutionary fame, the first of this branch of 
the Davidson family of whom we have definite record, was born February 
10, 1788, in Pennsylvania, and died May i, 1840. He was of Scotch-Irish 
descent. He married Martha Meanor. 

(II) Samuel Davidson, son of Elias and Martha (Meanor) Davidson, 
was born in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1831, 
and died October 25, 1889. He was engaged in general farming in Plum 
township, where he owned a farm of one hundred and ten acres. At the 
outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and 
Thirty-sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until 
1864. He was wounded in the foot by a bullet at the battle of Fredericks- 
burg, and at that time lay in the hospital for several weeks. He gave his 
political support to the Republican party, and was a devout member of the 
Methodist church. Mr. Davidson married, on September 24, 1874, Susanna 
Wright, born May 29, 1855, daughter of William and Eva (Sarver) Wright, 
the former named having been a farmer in Plum township. Children: 
Anna Eva, bom November 26, 1876; William Franciss, born December 4, 
1878, died in infancy; Samuel, of whom further; James Abram Garfield, 
born November 25, 1881, lives in East Pittsburgh, married Katherine Wiant, 
and has two children, James Wiant and Katherine Roberta ; Elias Bedford, 
born March 31, 1886; Harrison, born January 30, 1889, now a senior of 
the University of Pittsburgh. 



1194 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(III) Samuel (2) Davidson, son of Samuel (i) and Susanna (Wright) 
Davidson, was born in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
January 17, 1880. He and his brothers cultivate the homestead farm, in 
which enterprise they attain the success which their energetic methods well 
merit. He takes a deep interest in all matters that concern the welfare of 
the community in which he lives, is Republican in political opinion, and the 
family are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Davidson is unmarried. 



The Cornelius family is a very ancient one of Holland, 
CORNELIUS where the father of the American progenitor of the 
family had charge of the standard time in Amsterdam, 
a very responsible position, as the time throughout the country was regu- 
lated by this clock. 

(I) Cornelius, born in Amsterdam, Holland, where, as stated 

above, he had charge of the official Government Clock of Holland. 

(II) Christian Cornelius, son of Cornelius, was born in Holland, 

but in early life emigrated to the United States, settling first near Lancaster, 
but soon moved to Philadelphia, and started there the manufacture of 
lamps. 

(III) Robert Cornelius, son of Christian Cornelius, was born in Phila- 
delphia, where he became one of the most prominent business men. He 
associated himself with his father in the manufacture of lamps and gas 
fixtures, and his eight-story factory became well known throughout the 
country, being the first complete fire-proof building built in that city. He 
married Harriet Comley, and both died in Philadelphia. 

(IV) Robert C. Cornelius, son of Robert and Harriet (Comley) 
Cornelius, was bom in Philadelphia, and there acquired his education, 
graduating at the University of Pennsylvania. He became associated with 
his father in the manufacture of lamps and gas fixtures, and carried on the 
manufacturing and retail end of the business. The family was formerly of 
the Presbyterian denomination, but are now members of the Episcopal 
church. In political matters he gave his consistent support to the Repub- 
lican party until his death. Mr. Cornelius married Elizabeth Cox, born in 
Philadelphia, now living in McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
She is a daughter of Justice and Mary (Malony) Cox, the former born in 
Philadelphia, and a descendant of an old family of Sweden, who settled in 

■ Philadelphia in the early Colonial days. Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius had chil- 
dren: Harriet Comley, deceased; Henry Robert; Justice Cox; William 
Albert, of further mention ; Edith Maud. 

(V) William Albert Cornelius, son of Robert C. and Elizabeth (Cox) 
Cornelius, was born in Philadelphia, December 22, 1867. His early years 
were spent in the city of his birth and in Stamford, Connecticut, and he 
acquired his education at the Germantown Academy, and H. U. King's 
private school, in Stamford. Having been thus thoroughly prepared, he 
matriculated at the Lehigh University, and was graduated from this insti- 



WESTERN' PENNSYLVANIA ii95 

tution in the class of \88g with the degree of Mechanical Engineer. His 
first appointment was with the Homestead Steel Works, where he remained 
twelve years, starting in the drawing office and advancing till he became 
superintendent of the Structural Mills. He left Homestead in 1900, and 
came to McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and became superintendent of the steel 
works and furnaces. He then became superintendent of the steel works, 
furnaces and rolling mills, and assistant manager of the National Works 
of the National Tube Company, and later manager of the National Tube 
Company, National Works, and general manager of the McKeesport Con- 
necting Railroad. He is a director of the First National Bank of McKees- 
port and interested in other enterprises. Politically he is a Republican, and 
in religion a member of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church of McKeesport. 
His home is owned by the National Tube Company and known as the man- 
ager's residence, and situated at No. 1121 South Park street, McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania. The fraternal affiliations of Mr. Cornelius are as follows: 
Franklin Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; McKeesport Commandery, 
Knights Templar ; is a Thirty-second Degree Mason ; and a member of the 
Psi Upsilon College fraternity. 

Mr. Cornelius married, in 1900, Eleanor Roberts W^agner, of Phila- 
•delphia, and they have had children : George E. W., William Albert, Jr., 
Robert Comley III, Eleanor Roberts, John De Benneville. 



Family tradition says that David Patton (sometimes spelled 
PATTON Patten), the emigrant ancestor of the line herein recorded, 

was born in Ireland, from whence he emigrated to this coun- 
try, settling in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he married Nancy Anne 
or Anne Stokley (sometimes spelled Stockley and Stokely), bom in 1770, 
in Philadelphia, died July 30, 1841. They removed from Philadelphia to the 
state of Ohio, lived for a time at a place called Scotch Ridge, in Belmont 
county, Ohio, but after he inherited the estate of his brother, Matthew 
Patton, he moved to the old Patton farm on Patton's Run, Belmont county, 
Ohio, in 1822. He was a farmer by occupation, and a Baptist in religion. 
He died October 20, 1848. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Patton: i. John, 
bom 1799, died March 3, 1864; married Sarah V. Dutton. 2. Jane, mar- 
ried William Goodhue. 3. David. 4. Anne, married John Stewart. 5. 
Maria. 6. Robert, of whom further. 7. Elizabeth, born August 10, 1806, 
■died, unmarried, May 16, 1841. 8. Mary, married Michael Ziegler. 9. 
Hannah, married Stanley Givens. These dates were taken from the old 
Patton Graveyard in Patton's Run, Ohio. 

(II) Robert Patton, son of David and Nancy Anne or Anne (Stokley) 
Patton, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1804, died 
January 31, 1864. His education was acquired in a school in Philadelphia. 
Later he became a distiller, operating a distillery on his own account, and in 
connection with this he cultivated a farm, giving special attention to the 
raising of hogs, and also operated a coal mine, floating coal in flats or boats 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, and Covington, Kentucky. He amassed a fortune and 



II96 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

became the possessor of an estate that, when administered upon his deatli, 
was the largest ever settled in Belmont county, up until that date. He 
combined unusual talents with a personality so pleasing and a cordiality of 
manner so unusual that none thought of grudging him his success, and his 
friends were innumerable. He was a Democrat in politics, a Baptist in 
religion, and a member of the Order of Free and Accepted Masons, affili- 
ating with the lodge at St. Clairsville, Belmont county, Ohio. He married, 
October 12, 1828, ceremony performed by Edward Smith, recorded in the 
Court House at Wellsburgh, West Virginia (then Virginia), Mary Vast- 
binder, born in the year 1795, daughter of and Sarah Vastbinder, 

who were the parents of three other children, namely : John, Ephraim, Asa. 
Mrs. Vastbinder by her first marriage had a daughter, Mrs. Margaret Bell, 
of Bells Mills, Brooke county, Virginia, in the vicinity of Wellsburgh, and 
Mary Vastbinder was residing with her at the time of her marriage to Mr. 
Patton. Her mother and brothers resided at Belvidere, Warren county, 
New Jersey, but it is not certain whether her birth occurred there or not. 
The Vastbinders also resided in Eastern Pennsylvania, and were connected 
by marriage with the families of Dewitt, McClain and Everitt, of Pennsyl- 
vania and New Jersey. Sarah Vastbinder was said to have been over one 
hundred years old at the time of her death. Children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Patton: i. Eliza Jane, born June 14, 1829, married Benjamin Franklin 
West; all their children died in early life with the exception of Mary, who 
married David Garden. 2. Matthew, of whom further. 3. Sarah Vast- 
binder, born August 22, 1832, died May 16, 1908: was educated at West 
Alexander Academy, West Alexander, Pennsylvania. 4. Nancy Anne, born 
April I, 1833, married, March 7, 1854, John Alexander Armstrong; chil- 
dren: Robert Patton, William Donaldson, Ida May, Eugene Hildreth, John 
Alexander, Jr., Sarah Alice, Amos Wright; Mrs. Armstrong was educated 
at West Alexander Academy. 5. Clarinda, born January 29, 1836, died May 
20, 1848. 

(Ill) Matthew Patton, son of Robert and Mary (Vastbinder) Patton, 
was born in Belmont county, Ohio, January 6, 1831, died May tr, 1888. 
He was educated at West Alexander Academy, West Alexander, Pennsyl- 
vania, and at Duflf's Business College, Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania. His busi- 
ness interest, after attaining man's estate, was association with his father 
in operating the distilley, in mining and shipping coal, and as time pro- 
gressed he took charge of all his father's business; owned and operated a 
tow-boat, towing coal down the Ohio river, also operated a coal vard at 
Covington, Kentucky. Shortly after his father's death he bought and 
moved to a farm on Wheeling creek, near St. Clairsville, in the same 
county ; on this farm he raised a family and in later years operated a coal 
mine, shipping coal to Cleveland, Detroit and other destinations. He was 
a large, spare man, weighing 220 pounds, of very few words, but well 
liked and known for his honesty. His interest in politics was as a friend of 
the Democratic party, which received the benefit of his influence and of 
his vote. In religion he was a Presbyterian. Mr. Patton married Catherine 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ii97 

Ferguson, born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Samuel 
Ferguson ; children : Robert, Samuel, George, William, deceased ; Albert, 
of whom further. 

(IV) Albert Patton, son of Matthew and Catherine (Ferguson j Pat- 
ton, was born near St. Clairsville, Belmont county, Ohio, March 13, 1868. 
He passed his youthful years in his native county, attending public and 
night schools until he was eighteen years of age. His business career began 
as an employee of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, with which concern he 
remained for nine months. At tlie end of that time, at the very beginning 
of his career, Mr. Patton began a connection with the iron and steel manu- 
facturing industry that has continued to the present time. His service in 
relation to this industry has been varied and in association with many com- 
panies, until the present time (1915) as superintendent of the steel plant of 
the National Tube Company, he has arrived in a worthy place, competently 
and faithfully discharging his important duties as head of the plant. Prior 
to accepting this position with the National Tube Company, Mr. Patton 
was with the Riverside Iron and Steel Company, of Benwood, West Vir- 
ginia, for one and one-half years ; the Wheeling Steel Company ; the Carnegie 
Steel Company, of Duquesne, Pennsylvania, from December, 1889, until 
January, 1892; the West Superior Iron and Steel Company, West Superior, 
Wisconsin ; the Carnegie Steel Company from August, 1893, to January, 
1895 ; the Ohio Steel Company, of Youngstown, Ohio, until 1904 ; the 
Lackawanna Steel Company, of Buflfalo, New York, for a short time ; the 
Republic Iron and Steel Company, of Youngstown, Ohio, from March, 
1905. to August 10, 1906. It was on the latter date that he became affiliated 
with the National Tube Company. Mr. Patton is a member of the American 
Iron and Steel Institute, and is learned in all of the scientific aspects of 
the business he has followed during his active life and practical in his 
application of this knowledge to the operation under his daily supervision. 
He holds membership in Vesta Lodge. No. 352, Knights of Pythias, of 
Duquesne. Pennsylvania, of which he is a charter member, and fraternizes 
with the Masonic Order, belonging to McKeesport. Pennsylvania, Lodge, 
No. 641, Free and Accepted Masons, and McKeesport Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons. He is a communicant of the Central Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Patton married, July 12. 1893, Sadie B. Brown, born in Fond Du 
Lac. \\'^isconsin. October 25. 1874, daughter of William A. and Sarah E. 
(Hunter) Brown, her father born in Hunter's Mills. Maine, February 10. 
1840. her mother born there July i. 1842. William A. Brown was a son 
of Jacob and Elizabeth (Brooks') Brown, and Sarah E. Brown was a 
daughter of Actor and Harriet (Cole) Hunter, the latter named a daughter 
of Noah and Hannah Cole. Actor Hunter was a son of David Hunter, 
born in 1786, died in Benton, Maine, in 1870, whose name is perpetuated 
in Hunter's Mills, Maine. David Hunter was a son of James Hunter, born 
in Topsham, Maine, in 1735, died in 1809. He was the first white child 
born in Topsham, was colonel in Washington's army and commanded a 
regiment most of the time of the Revolutionarv War. He was a son of 



II98 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Adam Hunter, who came to New England from Ireland in 1718. Margaret, 
a daughter of Adam Hunter, married Robert Patton, of Saco, Maine, born 
in 1743, who passed the greater part of his life in Topsham, Maine. He 
was the eldest son of John Patton, born in Ireland in 17 17, he in turn the 
eldest son of Actor Patton, born 1693, a son of an ancient English branch 
of the family, who came from Ireland to America in 1727. He was a 
descendent of Richard Patton, of Waynefleet, who was Bishop of Win- 
chester, and sometimes Loi-d High Chancellor, temp. Henry VI., and 
founder of Magdalen College, Oxford; this Richard Patton was a de- 
scendent of Richard Patton, who lived at Ratline near Chelinsford in 
Essex county, England, year 11 19, whose son Richard married the daughter 
and co-heiress of Dagenham, of Dagenham in same county, and became 
proprietor of Dagenham Court. Children of Albert and Sadie B. (Brown) 
Patton: i. Paul B., bom April 14, 1894; a graduate of the McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania, High School, now in the junior year in Wooster University, 
Wooster, Ohio; in August, 1914, he was superintendent of the municipal 
playgrounds of McKeesport. 2. Actor Hunter, born June 25, 1902. 3. 
Dorcas Cole, born November 9, 1907. 



The exact date of the arrival of the Michael family in this 
MICHAEL country is not a matter of record, but it is a fact that they 
have been here for a number of generations, and have 
proved their worth as citizens. 

(I) George Michael was a carpenter and lumberman at an early date 
in Northeastern Pennsylvania, being especially well known at Delaware 
Water Gap, Monroe county. 

(II) Nathan Michael, son of George Michael, was born near Honey 
Hole, Pennsylvania, and was also a lumberman. He was actively identified 
with the construction of the National Pike between Pittsburgh and Phila- 
delphia. He was always active in local affairs, and was a pioneer in the 
Prohibition party. He was the proprietor of the Mountain Grove Temper- 
ance House, at Mountain Grove, Luzerne county, where he died at the 
age of about seventy-four years, having retired from business affairs about 
one year prior to his death. He and his wife were members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. He married, July 28, 1855, Dorcas Cavanee, who 
also died at Mountain Grove. They had a son, Franklin F. 

(III) Franklin F. Michael, son of Nathan and Dorcas (Cavanee) 
Alichael, was born at Honey Hole, Pennsylvania, September i, 1856, and 
died November 29, 1912. After his marriage he settled at Mahanoy Plane, 
and later removed to Drums, formerly Honey Hole. He engaged in the 
lumber business and became one of the largest lumber dealers in Eastern 
Pennsylvania. He had three or four saw mills in operation all the time, 
and employed upward of one hundred men. Subsequently he became a 
general merchant at Mountain Grove, where he was a justice of the peace, 
the postmaster and express agent. In 1893 he removed to Homestead, 
where he entered the employ of the Carnegie Steel Company, an employ- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1199 

ment with which he was connected until shortly before his death. He was 
an ardent Republican, and served as school director while living at Moun- 
tain Grove. He and his wife were members of the Lutheran church at 
Mountain Grove in which he was a trustee. He married Elizabeth A. Pugh, 
born in Carbon county, Pennsylvania, January 28. 1856, and is now living 
with her son, Harry N. They had children: Thomas, died in infancy; 
Harry N., of further mention; Guy W., employed in the office of the 
treasurer of the Standard Oil Company, and lives in Denver, Colorado ; 
Gertrude L., married (first) Edward Harry, (second) George Jackson, and 
lives in \Vilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania ; Joseph Clark, in the employ of the 
state of Pennsylvania, lives at Mont Alto ; Walter F.. a lawyer, lives at 
Homestead. 

(IV) Harry N. Michael, son of Franklin F. and Elizabeth A. (Pugh) 
Michael, was born in Mahanoy Plane, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, 
June I, 1879. He received a sound, practical education in the public schools 
of Mountain Grove and those of Homestead, which he attended until he 
had reached the age of fifteen year^. He then entered the employ of the 
Carnegie Steel Company as messenger boy, and his connection with this 
corporation has never been interrupted. He was advanced from one posi- 
tion to another until he reached his present one, that of manager of the 
shipping department at Howard Axle Works, a branch of the Carnegie 
Steel Works, and he has now held this for a period of ten years. He is 
connected officially and otherwise with several other important enterprises, 
among them being: The Cambria Lumber Company and the Pennsylvania 
Lumber Company, of which he is secretary. These companies control small 
tracts of timber lands in Central Pennsylvania, and have their offices at 
Homestead. In 1910 Mr. Michael erected a set of flats, "Tlie Wesley Apart- 
ments," on Fifteenth avenue. In 1912 he erected the "Michael Flats" on 
Thirteenth avenue. For these he drew the plans, hired the men, and super- 
intended the construction work. The buildings were erected with a view 
of giving the workman with an average income, the same living conditions 
and conveniences usually enjoyed only by persons with large incomes. 
Large rooms, modern equipment, sunshine and good \entilation prevail 
and here the ordinary workman can live well within his earnings and enjoy 
all the pleasures and comforts generally to be had only in the costly man- 
sion. The workingman here enjoys the living conditions that he justly 
deserves and according to Mr. Michael's theory will eventually require 
and demand under pressure of public opinion. Buildings like these are a 
great help to those who are engaged in stamping out the underlying causes 
of tuberculosis and the erection of these fine buildings instead of shacks 
from which more profit could be acquired is an example, if followed gen- 
erally, which would bring much happiness to our people. 

He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and of numerous 
organizations of varied character and purpose. He is a member of the 
Ancient Order of Knights of the Mystic Chain, the Owls, Homestead 
Business IMen's Association. Before the advent of a paid fire department 



I200 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

in Homestead, he was a member of the Volunteer Fire Department, and 
still retains his interest in this form of good work. He is a member of 
the Pennsylvania Firemen's Association, of the Western Pennsylvania 
Firemen's Association, and is secretary of the local Firemen's Relief Asso- 
ciation. In politics Mr. Michael is inclined to be liberal, and while he has 
never believed in radicalism, he believes in the cause of temperance. Na- 
tionally he is usually allied with the Republican forces and is a great be- 
liever in the principles laid down by Theodore Roosevelt. He is a member 
of the St. John's Lutheran Church in religious faith, while his wife is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Michael married, September 6, 1904, Lenore I., born in Hays, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of Henry Wesley and Louisa ( Birch j Kirkland. 
They have no children. The Kirklands were old settlers in the county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael are great friends of the children and are busy at all 
times trying to make them happy. Many small hearts are gladdened when 
the little ones receive an unexpected invitation to take an automobile trip 
or join a party going to the theatre, small show house or the annual circus. 
Both are great lovers of the outdoors, being especially enthusiastic on auto- 
mobiling, fishing and hunting. Their summer vacation is spent in the 
great north woods of Canada and the week ends are taken up with automo- 
bile trips. Mr. Michael has at all times a stock of thoroughbred dogs for 
hunting purposes and at sunrise on the first day of the hunting season can 
be found in the woods with his gun and dogs. Mrs. Michael is an expert 
with the rifle and is a boon companion of her husband in all of these out- 
door activities. 



Matthew Drennen Craighead, a fruit and dairy farmer 
CRAIGHEAD of Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 

is a maternal grandson of Matthew Drennen and son of 
Andrew Craighead and Sarah Drennen, his wife. After his marriage, 
Andrew Craighead settled in Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, where he lived until 
his death, at Hazelwood, Pennsylvania, interred at Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, 
aged sixty years. He engaged in the operation of a saw mill and in the 
real estate business all his active years. He was a robust man, but was 
in poor health during his later years, his service in the Union army during 
the Civil War undermining his not naturally strong constitution. He was 
a Republican in politics, and a member of the Grand Army of the RepubHc, 
He married Sarah Drennen, a member of the United Presbyterian church, 
daughter of Matthew Drennen. Children: i. John, died in infancy. 2. 
Samuel, killed on the railroad at Elizabeth, sexton of Elizabeth Cemetery. 
3. Charles, died in Elizabeth township, a bookkeeper in Philadelphia. 4. 
Annie, married George Horner, and resides at Avalon, Pennsylvania. 5. 
Joseph, died at Woodville, Pennsylvania, steward of the Woodville Hos- 
pital of the Allegheny County Home. 6. William, a traveling salesman, 
resides qt Avalon, Pennsylvania. 7. Jennie, married Emerson McWharter, 
and died at Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 8. Matthew Drennen, of further 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1201 

mention. 9. Donald, a doctor of dental surgery, located in Philadelpiiia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Matthew Drennen Craighead, eighth child and fifth son of Andrew 
and Sarah (Drennen) Craighead, was born in Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, 
February 18, 1872. He was educated in the public schools, and has en- 
gaged in farming all his life since leaving school. He rented farming 
properties for several years, but in 1902 purchased the old Harvey Patter- 
son farm in Elizabeth township, which he had previously rented. This 
farm, containing seventy-five acres, he devotes to fruit and dairy farming, 
having three acres of orchard and maintaining a dairy herd of ten cows 
on the remainder, disposing of the product of his herd at retail in Buena 
Vista, Industry and elsewhere. Mr. Craighead is an elder of the United 
Presbyterian church of Buena Vista, of which his wife is also a communi- 
cant. In political faith he is a Republican. He married Emma Patterson, 
born on the farm where they now reside, daughter of Harvey Patterson, 
from whom Mr. Craighead purchased the farm. Children : Martha, resid- 
ing with her parents; William, a student at Bucknell University; Raymond, 
residing at home. 



In 1881 Herman Gartner came to the United States from 
GARTNER Dortmund, a city of Prussia, in Westphalia, on the Emster 

river, twenty-seven miles from Arnsburg. Dortmund was 
a place of importance in the middle ages, became a free imperial city, and 
was one of the most active cities of the Hanseatic League. It is situated in 
the midst of a great coal field and in a highly productive region, and in a 
century has risen from a town of 5,000 to a city of 150,000 and is one of the 
greatest industrial and commercial centres of Western Germany. The coal 
mines in the immediate vicinity furnish fuel for the vast iron and steel in- 
dustry of the city, the largest establishment being the Dortmund Union, 
employing over ten thousand hands in the manufacture of railroad and 
bridge building materials, rolling stock, etc. The brewing business of Dort- 
mund is also one of magnitude. The architectural attractions of Dortmund 
center in its churches, one of which, the Reinhold Kirche, is a splendid monu- 
ment of mediaeval architecture. The old town hall, recently restored, is an 
interesting edifice and some of the modern public buildings are noteworthy 
structures. The city also has a number of modern monuments erected to 
members of the Prussian royal family. From this hive of industrial activity 
came Herman Gartner, a boy of seventeen years, and to a still greater manu- 
facture center of iron and steel, situated in a greater coal field. The transi- 
tion was not a startling one and in his new home little was strange e.xcept 
speech and customs. 

He is a son of Herman and Fredericka (Von Oepen) Gartner, his father 
a manufacturer of vinegar until his death in 1878. His widow married a 
second husband, William Heide, and in 1881 the family came to the United 
States, settling first in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, later moving to 
Somerset county, where Fredericka died in 1883, her husband surviving her 



I202 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

several years. Herman Gartner was a soldier of the German army, and a 
member of the Roman Catholic church; his wife was a Lutheran. Children: 
Herman, died in infancy; Annie, yet living in Germany; Henry, died in 
Germany; Elizabeth, married Henry Larrison, and resides in Sheriden, 
Pennsylvania, a widow; Herman (2), of further mention; Emma, married 
John Vetzel, and resides at Mt. Oliver, Pennsylvania ; Alfaretta, married 
Max Hellman, and resides in Berlin, Germany; Clara, resides in Edgewood, 
Pennsylvania, unmarried ; Carl, died aged three years. Two other children 
died in infancy. 

Herman (2) Gartner was born in Dortmund, Westphalia, Prussia, now 
a part of the great German Empire, August 20, 1864. He was well educated 
in the excellent city schools, and was attending the gymnasium, when in 1881 
emigration to the United States was decided upon by his mother and step- 
father. He accompanied the family to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
but after one year left home and for twelve years worked in the coal mines 
of Somerset county. He then located in Pittsburgh, where for ten years he 
was engaged in the liquor business as an employee. In 1903 he opened his 
own hotel at the corner of Fifth avenue and Magee street, Pittsburgh, con- 
tinuing there several years. In 1912 he purchased the Point View Hotel, 
on the Brownsville road, in Baldwin township, Allegheny county, a place 
of public entertainment for the past seventy-five years, situated about three- 
quarters of a mile from the borough of Carrick. 

Mr. Gartner is a Republican in politics, and with his family attends the 
Lutheran church. He married, in 1886, Cicelia, daughter of John W. Ringler, 
of Somerset county, Pennsylvania. Children: i. Charles F., his father's 
assistant. 2. Frank Allen, married Grace Pbilson. 3. Harry, died infancy. 
4. Osepha, died in infancy. 5. Alfaretta. 6. Esther Beatrice. 7. John 
Herman. 



Settled in Streets Run, now Hays, Allegheny county, Penn- 
RISHER sylvania, by Daniel Risher, that locality has since been the 
home of this line of the Risher family. Daniel Risher was born 
June 21, 1792, died December 31, 1880. He married Sarah Cready, born 
May 7, 1791, died May 11, 1875, both dying in Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Children of Daniel and Sarah (Cready) Risher: Maria, John C, of 
whom further; Elizabeth, Mary, Ann, Ithamer, Louisa. They were also the 
parents of two other children, whose names are not recorded. 

(II) John C. Risher, son of Daniel and Sarah (Cready) Risher, was 
born at Streets Run, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, September 14, 1815, 
died in Allegheny city (Pittsburgh North Side) January 29, 1889. In 1845 
he was engaged in mercantile trade in Pittsburgh, and in the gold rush of 
1849 joined a party journeying to California, afterward returning, having 
met with no sensational good fortune. When he came east, he settled in 
Dravosburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was there a coal merchant 
until his death, gaining a substantial trade and conducting profitable opera- 
tions. He married Nancy Denny McClure, born in Allegheny county, Penn- 




.e^iy^y .^^S^^ </^^^^-t^^ — N 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1203 

sylvania, November 6, 1808, died May 11, 1875, and had children: Rev. 
Levi, of whom further; Agnes, married Stephen S. Crump, her death oc- 
curring in 1894, his in 1912 ; Daniel, died on the homestead in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania; Sarah Cready, born October 10, 1845, married Wil- 
liam Snodgrass, deceased, of Dravosburg, Pennsylvania ; John M., bom in 
1849, ^ resident of California. 

(Ill) Rev. Levi Risher, son of John C. and Nancy Denny (McClure) 
Risher, was born in Hays, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 18, 1836. 
His early education was obtained in the public schools of Streets Run (the 
former name of Hays) and under private instruction, and after a course 
in Washington and Jefferson College he entered the Allegheny Theological 
Seminary. He was graduated from this institution when twenty-six years 
of age. He first preached in Montour Church, seven miles from Pittsburgh, 
and also at Martinsburg, Pennsylvania, his first charge after his ordination 
being the Amity Church, in Dravosburg, Pennsylvania. The ground upon 
which this church stood and the building had been the gift of his father, 
his mother naming the edifice, and he ministered to the congregation of this 
church for seven years. Another of his charges was the Plains Church, in 
Butler county, Pennsylvania, of which he was pastor for six years, and 
another was the Fairmount Church. He was throughout his life devoted 
to his duties as a minister of the Gospel, conducting his own ways in ac- 
cordance with the principles that he taught, and the agent of great good, and 
was a credit to the ministry of the Presbyterian church. In matters of politi- 
cal import he was a Republican sympathizer. Rev. Levi Risher died Septem- 
ber 23, 1894, meeting his I\Iaker as one who has served faithfully and well. 
Rev. Risher married, June 17, 1862, Elmira Painter Alexander, born 
in Callensburg, Clarion county, Pennsylvania, May 2. 1838, daughter of 
Major Henry and Nancy Ann (Hays) Alexander, her father born in West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, March 22, 1801, died in Callensburg, Penn- 
sylvania, January 2, 1894, her mother born in Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 31, 1818, died October 16, 1906. Major Henry Alexander and 
his wife were early settlers in Clarion county, she a daughter of Jacob and 
Jane (Harden) Hays, pioneers of Allegheny county. Children of Major 
Henry and Nancy Ann (Hays) Alexander: i. Elmira Painter, of previous 
mention, married Rev. Levi Risher. 2. Alvin Hays, of Callensburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 3. Mary Jane, deceased, married Peter Young. 4. Sarah Elizabeth, 
married A. B. Klingensmith, of Callensburg, Pennsylvania. Children of 
Rev. Levi and Elmira Painter (Alexander) Risher: i. Alvin Daniel, born 
October 15, 1863; his birth-place was the Montour Parsonage, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, and he was baptized at Callensburg, Pennsylvania, now 
residing in Charlottesville, Virginia ; he married Martha Cordelia Griffin, and 
has : Mary Lou, deceased, Ruth, Daniel S., and John Calhoun. 2. Mary 
Agnes, born October 6, 1865, married James Harvey Dunlevy, and has : 
Risher A. and Elmira. 3. John Henry, born at Dravosburg, Pennsylvania, 
February 28, 1868, died October 6. 1896; married Mary Ann Bryant, of 
Dravosburg, Pennsylvania, and was the father of Margaret and Elmira 



I204 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Agnes. 4. Percy Alexander, born at Sewickley, Pennsylvania, March 31, 
1871, died February 27, 1896; married Jennie McCallister, and has a daugh- 
ter, Annie. 5. Dr. Frank Osburne, born in Dravosburg, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ary 2, 1880, married Beatrice Chadock; Dr. Risher prepared for his profes- 
sion in Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, and Magill Univer- 
sity, Canada, and is now engaged in active practice at Shell Lake, Wisconsin ; 
he is the father of one daughter, Kate Elmira. 



Shortly prior to the American Revolution there immigrated to 
REED Pennsylvania from the north of Ireland two brothers, Samuel 

and Archibald Reed, founders of their line in Western Pennsyl- 
vania. They made settlement near Erie, Pennsylvania, and acquired title 
to a vast extent of land lying in Erie, Crawford, Mercer, Lawrence, and 
Beaver counties, which they soon afterward disposed of to purchasers of 
small farms. The line of which Archibald Reed was ancestor centers 
mainly in Beaver county, the descendants of Samuel Reed being more 
widespread. After selling his large landed holdings, Samuel Reed moved 
to Allegheny county, later taking up his residence in Washington county, 
where he died. He was the father of a large family by his marriage with 
a Miss Brice. One of his sons was Matthew, of whom further. 

(II) Matthew Reed, son of Samuel Reed, was born in 1812, died in 
McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1851. He was reared in 
Washington county, and becoming a farmer, there inherited land, which he 
cultivated. This property he later sold, moving to West Virginia, where 
he purchased a farm near Moundsville, afterward returning to Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, and making his home in McKeesport. His death 
occurred six months later, caused by an attack of typhoid fever. Matthew 
Reed married Mary Lang, a descendant of "Mayflower" ancestry. After 

his death she married a second time, her husband being Myers Stotler. 
They settled on a farm near Verona, in Penn township, Allegheny county, 
where she died in 1901, aged eighty-six years, having survived her second 
husband. Children of Matthew and Mary (Lang) Reed: i. W"illiam, of 
whom further. 2. Samuel, a soldier in the Union army during the Civil 
War, lives in Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania. 3. Emily, married William 
Hylands, and died in Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania. 4. Harriet, married 
John Edwards, and died in Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania. 5. Elizabeth, mar- 
ried John Thompson, deceased, and resides at New Alexander, Pennsyl- 
vania. Children of Myers and Mary (Lang-Reed) Stotler: i. Oscar, un- 
married, resides at Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania. 2. Amanda, married James 
Waddell, and lives in East McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 

(III) William Reed, son of Matthew and Mary (Lang) Reed, was 
born in St. Clair township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, December 5, 
1839, died in that county, January 21, 1907. After his marriage he made 
his home on the old Peter Miller farm in Jefferson township, Allegheny 
county, later selling this property and purchasing the Lowry farm of one 
hundred and sixtv-seven acres, located near his former home. From this 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1205 

latter place he moved to Wilson Station, and there engaged in real estate 
dealing until 1901, in which year he moved to Coal Valley. His home in 
this place was situated upon an eminence overlooking the Monongahela 
river, affording a wide view of the upper and lower valley. This beautiful 
home, in which William Reed passed his latter years, is now occupied by 
his children, Harry, Samuel, Matthew, Blanche and Mary. Mr. Reed was 
active in real estate dealings until his death, his operations of generous 
dimensions and successful in result. With his wife he was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a loyal adherent to Republican 
principles. In local public affairs he played a prominent part, for twenty- 
three years serving as a school director in Jefferson township, and was a 
recognized leader among his fellows, whose recognition of his superior 
qualities was accompanied by liking and respect. William Reed was for 
three and one-half years a soldier in Company C, One Hundred and 
Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and participated in 
numerous important campaigns, his regiment being engaged in some of the 
hardest fought battles of the war between the states. His war record is 
free from any marks of which a soldier and a patriot might not be proud, 
and is a credit both to the line that bore him and to those who honor his 
memory. 

Mr. Reed married Caroline Miller, born in Jefferson township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, May 17, 1845, died at Wilson Station, Penn- 
sylvania, October 22, 1898, daughter of William John and Sarah (Snee) 
Miller. William John Miller was a son of Peter Miller, a native of Ireland, 
a farmer by calling, who, upon immigrating to the United States, made 
settlement to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, owning land first in Snowden 
and later in Jefferson townships. He died in the latter locality and is there 
buried. He was the father of two children, William John and Ann. Wil- 
liam John Miller was born in Ireland, and was brought to the United States 
when eighteen months old by his parents. He grew to manhood in Alle- 
gheny county, and there passed his entire life, his death occurring at Gill 
Hall in 1890. During most of his active life he was a merchant at this 
place, and with his wife belonged to the United Presbyterian church. His 
wife. Sarah (Snee) Miller, was born and died in Jefferson township, where 
all of her days were spent. Children of William John and Sarah (Snee) 
Miller: i. Harvey, a blacksmith and wagonmaker. died in Jefferson town- 
ship in 1913. 2. Andrew, a mechanic, died in Braddock, Pennsylvania. 
3. Amanda, married Thomas Snee, a cousin, and died at Gill Hall, Penn- 
sylvania. 4. Caroline, of previous mention, married William Reed. 5. Ella, 
married William Weller, and lives in West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania. 6. 
Elvira, died in girlhood. Children of William and Caroline (Miller) Reed: 
I. Harry, a farmer of Jefferson township. 2. Annie, deceased; married 
Abraham Cutright, and lived in Parkersburg, West Virginia. 3. Blanche, 
lives in the family home at Coal Valley. 4. Samuel, a farmer, resides in 
Coal Valley, at the old home. 5. William E., of whom further. 6. Frank 
McClure, of whom further. 7. John Chamberline. of whom further. 8. 



i2o6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mary, lives in the family home at Coal Valley. 9. Matthew, a practicing 
dentist of Clairton, Pennsylvania, lives at home. William and Caroline Reed 
had two other children, Fannie and Milton, who died in ^infancy. 

(IV) William E. Reed, son of William and Caroline (Miller) Reed, 
was born in Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 
18, 1872. He was educated in the public schools and the Indiana State 
Normal School, after completing his studies in the latter place teaching 
schools for a period of one year. He was for two years following a student 
in Washington and Jefferson College, and in 1898 enlisted in Company H, 
Tenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, when war with Spain 
became an actuality. He was in the United States military service from 
May 22, 1898, until August 22, 1899, stationed in the Philippine Islands, 
and took part in the battle of Manila. For a large part of this time his 
company was engaged in almost daily skirmishes in the guerilla warfare 
that characterized the tactics of the natives. 

Returning to Pennsylvania after the close of the war Mr. Reed became 
a shoe merchant at Wilkinsburg, where he remained for eight months, 
then pursued the same line of business in Duquesne for five years. After 
disposing of his interests in this business he was elected borough clerk, filling 
this office until April i, 1914. While the incumbent of this position, which 
he held for eight years, in 1907, Mr. Reed began real estate and fire in- 
surance dealings, at the same time devoting a part of his time to agricultural 
operations. At the present time he is representative of eight of the leading 
fire insurance companies, and through wide and extensive handling of real 
estate has established a reputation as a business man, reliable and capable. 
He is a Republican sympathizer, and fraternizes with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Reed married, in 1902, Mary E. Bradshaw, born in Coal Valley, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Robert and Mary Bradshaw. They are the 
parents of: Robert, Donald, Gerald, Margaret, Mary, and Jean, died in 
infancy. 

(IV) Frank McClure Reed, son of William and Caroline (Miller) 
Reed, was born in Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
September 26, 1874. He attended the Lowry District School in his native 
township, and from this he went to the First Ward School in McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania. In succession he was then a pupil at the Indiana State 
Normal School, Slippery Rock Normal School, and Grove City College. 
While a student he achieved prominence as a football player, holding the 
position of center rush. In 1895 he obtained a clerical position in the county 
commissioner's office, at Pittsburgh, remained there two years, and while 
there played on the Pittsburgh Athletic Club Football Team. In 1896 he 
was employed by William J. Morris, of Pittsburgh, to act as assistant super- 
intendent of the Morris & Bailey Steel Mills at Wilson, Pennsylvania, and 
with the exception of one and a half years, has been connected with the 
company since that time. During this year and a half he was in the employ 
of the Clairton Steel Company as cashier and real estate manager, and 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1207 

lived at Clairton, Pennsylvania. In 1903 he was appointed manager and 
superintendent of the entire Morris & Bailey Steel Works at Wilson, and 
is still the incumbent of that position. He has about three hundred men 
and boys in his employ and they manufacture cold rolled steel for stamping 
and drawing purposes. He owns and lives in the fine old William Payne 
homestead, near Wilson. He is Republican in political matters, and served 
as a member of the borough council at Clairton. He was the first president 
of the council when the borough of Wilson was organized. Mr. Reed is a 
life member of McKeesport Lodge, No. 136, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, of McKeesport. 

Mr. Reed married, April 22, 1896, Jessie, born in Mifflin township, a 
daughter of William and Margaret Forsythe, both still living on a farm in 
MifHin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where the family has 
long been resident. Mrs. Reed is a member of Lebanon Presbyterian 
Church. Children : Paul Chambers, born June 28, 1897 ; Cleopatra, born 
December 5, 1898; William, born February 13, 1900; Helen, born October 
II, 1901 ; Blanche, born January 16, 1903, died February 20, 1903; Thomas 
B., born December 12, 1907; Homer John, born July 3, 1910. 

(IV) Dr. John Chamberline Reed, son of William and Caroline (Miller j 
Reed, was born in Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
June 26, 1877. After the completion of his youthful studies he entered 
the Slippery Rock Normal School. Pie was graduated from this institution 
in 1898, and for two years was a school teacher in Mifflin township, Alle- 
gheny county. He then enrolled in the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Western Pennsylvania, where he was awarded his M.D. in 1907. 
For a time he was an interne in St. Francis' Hospital, and since January, 
1908, has been engaged in active practice at Duquesne, Pennsylvania. His 
medical societies are the Duquesne, County, and State, and he is also identi- 
fied with the American Medical Association. His political tendencies are 
Republican. Dr. Reed has become firmly established in the good favor 
of a large practice, for attendance upon which he is ably qualified, and fills 
a responsible position in the medical profession in Duquesne. 

Dr. Reed married, in 191 1, Emma, born in Sharon. Pennsylvania, 
daughter of Charles and Mayme (McClure) Phillips, and has one son, 
John Chamberline Jr. 



Of the two lines of this family founded in Pennsylvania by 
GRAHAM William and Matthew Graham, this chronicle deals with 
the latter. Matthew Graham was born in Scotland, and 
prior to the War for Independence came to the colonies, locating in Phila- 
delphia and there becoming a merchant. He was a loyal friend of American 
independence, and during the Revolutionary War aided the Colonial cause 
in substantial measure, at its close moving west of the mountains to Alle- 
gheny county. He and one of the McKees became involved in a suit over 
title to the land upon which the city of McKeesport was later built, 
adjudication being against Mr. Graham, and he located on Brush Creek, 



i2o8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

near Warrendale, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, entering several hundred 
acres at the junction of Beaver, Butler and Allegheny counties. This 
property has descended in the family through succeeding generations, and 
is now in the possession of the children of O. P. Graham. 

(II) William Graham, son of Matthew Graham, was born in Butler 
county, Pennsylvania. He was a soldier under Commodore Perry in the 
second war with Great Britain, and soon after the great victory of that 
famous commander on Lake Erie returned to his home. He was, as were 
all who witnessed the gallant bravery of Perry in that battle, a strong 
admirer of the young Commodore, and a son born to him soon afterward 
was named in honor of his former commander, bearing the name Oliver 
Hazard Perry Graham. 

(III) Oliver Hazard Perry Graham, son of William Graham, was 
born in Butler county, Pennsylvania. He passed his life on the farm that 
had been the home of his father and grandfather, cultivating its acres, and 
also followed the trade of shoemaker. He married Elizabeth Morgan, 
one of his sons, Oliver Hazard Perry Jr., becoming a minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, another, Orin P., of whom further. 

(IV) Orin P. Graham, son of Oliver Hazard Perry Graham, was born 
in Butler county, Pennsylvania, and lived on the homestead farm all of his 
life. He was a successful agriculturist, a man held in high esteem by his 
neighbors, and served for ten years as a member of the school board. His 
political party was the Republican. He married Mary Allan, a native of 
Butler county, Pennsylvania, and had children : Allan, of whom further ; 
Park P., lives on the home farm; Frank P., a missionary of the Presbyterian 
church, stationed in the interior of Brazil, South America; Mary V., mar- 
ried William J. Rowan, and resides near Ogle, Butler county, Pennsylvania. 

(V) Allan Graham, son of Orin P. and Mary (Allan) Graham, was 
born near Evans City, Butler county, Pennsylvania, March 31, 1873. When 
he was sixteen years of age he was graduated from the public schools, and 
he completed his education in the Slippery Rock State Normal School, and 
was graduated from that institution in the class of 1900 with the degree of 
A.M. Prior to his entrance at the Slippery Rock State Normal School he 
had for five years taught school, and after his graduation he accepted a 
position with the Stirling Steel Company, with which concern he remained 
for two years, at the same time attending the Douglass Business College, 
completing his course there in 1902. The following six years he passed in 
the employ of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, 
and in 1908 he assumed charge of the Long Run School in Versailles town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, retaining this position for three 
years. He then became associated with the school at East McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania, and holds his place there to the present time. Mr. Graham is 
an instructor of experience and ability and has met with favorable success 
in each position he has been called to fill. He is popular with his pupils, 
his fair, open treatment compellng respect, and his teaching, combining 
scientific methods with the realities impressed by experience, is forceful and 
effective. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1209 

He has been a resident of East McKeesport since 1896, the houses of 
East McKeesport then numbering less than a dozen, and he has been 
closely connected with the growth it has experienced in that time. Active 
in the organization of the borough, he served for six years as a member 
of the council, and the two years that he passed as a member of the school 
board extended over the period in which the commodious new building was 
erected. Mr. Graham's familiarity with the methods of procedure in the 
school board, and his appreciation of the difficulties under which such a 
board must always labor, have lent a new value to his connection with the 
school as a teacher, insuring a degree of co-operation that is most desirable. 
He is a Republican in affairs of national import, but in matters of local 
politics acts independently of such affiliation. He is a communicant of the 
Presbyterian church, and fraternizes with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Order of Independent Americans. 

Mr. Graham married (first) September 10, 1900, Mary Russell; 
(second) January 25, 1904, Sarah Holler, daughter of John M. and Mary 
(May) Holler, of Bedford county, Pennsylvania. John M. Holler was a 
son of George Washington and Louisa (Metzgar) Holler, natives of Bed- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, George Washington Holler was a farmer, and 
with his son, John M., was a soldier in the Union army in the Civil War. 
Harry, one of the sons of John M. and Mary (May) Holler, was a soldier 
in the Spanish-American war, serving a three-year enlistment in the Philif>- 
pine Islands, surviving his service, as did his father and grandfather in 
the Civil War. Mary (May) Holler was a daughter of Jacob and Sarah 
(Woolford) May, natives of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, members of 
families long resident in that region. By his first marriage Allan Graham 
was the father of one son, Orin Russell. By his second he has six children : 
John Holler, Floyd Fleming, Reba May, Ruth Leota, Grace Leona, Oliver 
Perry. 



About the time of the Revolutionary War three brothers, of 
GRAY Scotch-Irish descent, came from England to America. They 

were William and David Gray, and their brother, whose name 
is no longer of record. The tradition is that David Gray, who had settled 
with his brothers in what is now Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
while clearing a farm from the dense forests in that section, was captured 
by the Indians and tied to a tree while they deliberated what should be 
done with him. They finally decided to carry him into their camp, which 
they did, and the story goes that he married a squaw, but further than 
that nothing is related of him. 

(I) William Gray, one of the three brothers, and progenitor of the 
family of which this memoir treats, also settled in Westmoreland county. 
He was among the pioneers of Western Pennsylvania, cleared a farm at 
Brush Creek, near Irwin, Westmoreland county, and died there in 1794. 
He married Mary Borland, who married (second) Hugh Torrance, and 



I2IO WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

lived in that section for some years longer. Mr. and Mrs. Gray had children : 
James, born in 1788; George, of further mention; John, born in 1792. 

(II) George Gray, son of William and Mary (Borland) Gray, was 
born June 25, 1791, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and died Sep- 
tember 7, 1876, in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Upon attaining a suit- 
able age he learned the blacksmith's trade, and followed this for many 
years in North Versailles township, between East McKeesport and Turtle 
Creek. The shop was still standing in 1907, although in a dilapidated con- 
dition. Later in life he became an extensive land owner and engaged in 
farming. He married Jane Hope, March 9, 1813, and they had children: 
James, born in 1815, died in 1891, was a farmer in Penn township, near 
New Texas; William, born in 1817, was a blacksmith all his life on the old 
homestead, and died on the Greensburg Pike ; Oliver Perry, born 1819, 
died 1821 ; Mary Jane, born 1822, married John Drennan, and died in 
Irwin, Pennsylvania ; George, born 1824, who was merchant at Meadville, 
died there; Richard Hope, of further mention; John Borland, born 1832, 
who removed to Iowa, then to Maryville, Missouri, where he is now living 
retired; Robert, born 1834, removed to Awasso, Michigan, where he died; 
Margaret Ann, born 1837, married Robert Boyd, and lives near Webster, 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania. 

(III) Richard Hope Gray, son of George and Jane (Hope) Gray, was 
born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 7, 1830, and died in 
Braddock, Pennsylvania, October 6, 1898. He was apprenticed to learn 
the trade of wagon making, later becoming a carpenter and builder, occupa- 
tions he followed for about twenty-five years at the present town of Wil- 
merding. He then entered the employ of Carnegie, Phipps & Company, 
Limited, at Homestead, as storekeeper and timekeeper, a f)osition he held 
until about one year prior to his death at the home of his son in Braddock, 
Pennsylvania. He was in active military service during the last year of 
the Civil War, being a member of Company E, One Hundred and Fourth 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Fifth Heavy Artillery. He 
was a Republican politically, and served one term as justice of the peace in 
North Versailles township. He and his wife were life-long members of 
the United Presbyterian church, and he served as ruling elder both at Turtle 
Creek and at Homestead, Pennsylvania. He married, May 8, 185 1, Martha 
E. Shaw, born July 3, 1832, died in Braddock, April 4, 1898. They had 
children : Rachel Hughey, born August 24, 1852, is unmarried, and lives 
with her brother ; George Eddy Franklin, of further mention ; Ida Lizzie, 
born June 2, 1866, died May 6, 1875. Mrs. Gray was a daughter of Robert 
E. Shaw, born November 30, 1793, and Rachel (Hughey) Shaw, born 
February 22, 1799, who were married November 10, 1825, and both of 
whom were early residents of Allegheny county in Patton township near 
Wilmerding, where they were members of the United Presbyterian church 
of Turtle Creek, being buried at Brush Creek. Mr. Shaw was at one time 
a member of the Turtle Creek Home Guards. They had children : Dorcas 
Jane, born April 29, 1830, who died unmarried, March 17, 1904, in Wil- 




_-», J^J-itrXai^'-rJSrrXl-- 




WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1211 

kinsburg, while living with her sister Elizabeth ; Martha E., mentioned 
above; David, born November 23, 1834, died in Braddock, September 17, 
1906, while living with his nephew, Mr. Gray ; Elizabeth born September 
6, 1838, died in Braddock, March 24, 1914, married James B. McDonough, 
of Scott township, Allegheny county. 

(IV) George Eddy Franklin Gray, son of Richard Hope and Martha 
E. (Shaw) Gray, was born in Wilmerding, then called Spring Hill, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1856. He received a practical 
education in the common schools of North Versailles township and Duff's 
College, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. January 18, 1873, he entered the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, as passenger brakeman, and re- 
mained with this corporation until October, 1879. Two years were then 
spent in the employ of the Dithridge Chimney Company of Pittsburgh, as 
invoice clerk and paymaster. On September 14, 1881, he entered the employ 
of the Carnegie Steel Company, Edgar Thomson Works, at that time operat- 
ing under the name of Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited, as a rail 
inspector in the finishing department, and at the end of three months was 
made a record clerk, and in October, 1886, was advanced to the position 
of chief clerk of the Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pennsylvania. In 
January, 1888, he went to the Allegheny Bessemer Steel Company, at 
Duquesne, in a similar capacity. In November, 1890, Carnegie Brothers 
& Company, Limited, bought out the latter, but Mr. Gray remained in 
charge of the office of said works until March i, 1895, when he was trans- 
ferred to the Edgar Thomson Works, and has remained there since, as chief 
clerk in the accounting department. Mr. Gray has shown executive and 
financial ability ; was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of 
Duquesne, of which he was a director for several years, and also served 
as a director of the McKeesport National Bank. He has always given his 
allegiance to the Republican party. He served as a member of the board of 
health of Braddock for two years, and was elected to the town council from 
the third ward, October 3, 1904. to which office he has been elected succes- 
sively since, and during the past eight years has served as president of that 
honorable body. He was elected a member and treasurer of the board of 
trustees of the Carnegie Free Library, Braddock, on April 15, 1902, which 
position he holds at the present time. His religious affiliation has always 
been with the United Presbyterian church ; he was ordained in Homestead, 
February 22, 1893. and is now ruling elder in the First United Presbyterian 
Church, Braddock. His fraternal membership is with Conclave No. 89, 
Improved Order of Heptasophs, of Pittsburgh. 

Mr. Gray married, January 14, 1886, Sarah W. Boyd, bom September 
16, 1862, in Patton township, died in Braddock, January 27, 1897, a daugh- 
ter of Eli W. and Sarah (Shaw) Boyd, and they have had children: 
Martha Shaw, born March 24, 1891, attended public schools of Braddock 
and was graduated from the Northfield Seminary, East Northfield, Massa- 
chusetts, June, 191 1, married to George W. Weller Jr., February 16, 1915; 
Sarah Boyd, born December 24, 1895, died June 19, 1896. 



I2I2 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

At an early day John Lougeay, a locksmith, came to West- 
LOUGEAY em Pennsylvania from Maryland, settling in Birmingham 
(Pittsburgh). He married Wilhelmina Ehmson and left 
issue. 

(II) William Anthony Lougeay, son of John and Wilhelmina (Ehm- 
son) Lougeay, was born in Birmingham, Pennsylvania, and obtained a good 
education in the public schools. When young he began working in a glass 
house for his uncle. Christian Ehmson, and when of suitable age apprenticed 
himself to the blacksmith's trade, serving his time with Abraham Goch- 
eneaur. Later he bought out his employer's business and conducted a 
successful smithy for many years. From 1853 until i860 he was engaged 
as a bookkeeper. WiUiam A. Lougeay served as a member of the school 
board of the town for several years and was always interested in school 
improvement. He was a well read rhan and was held in high esteem by his 
neighbors. He married Crissy Ann Ensel, born in Birmingham, daughter 
of John and Mary Ensel, of an early family, John Ensel having been the 
first man to hold the office of justice of the peace in old Birmingham. Chil- 
dren : John, deceased; Robert Patterson, of further mention; Phoebe, mar- 
ried Alexander Frew, and resides in Pittsburgh. 

(III) Robert Patterson Lougeay, second son of William Anthony and 
Crissy Ann (Ensel) Lougeay, was born in Birmingham (Pittsburgh) No- 
vember 15, 1851. He was educated in the public schools, and after com- 
pleting his studies became his father's apprentice, working with the latter 
at blacksmithing for seven years. About 1875 he began as a general con- 
tractor and has been continuously engaged as a contractor until the present 
date with office at 1882 Douglass avenue, Pittsburgh. In 1898 he purchased 
a farm of fifty acres in Penn township and there since 1913 he has resided, 
operating his farm in connection with his contracting business. His resi- 
dence in Pittsburgh was in the twenty-second ward and as a representative 
of that ward he served four terms in the city as alderman, twice by election 
and twice by appointment. For nearly a quarter of a century he served on 
the local board of education and for thirteen years was a member of the 
central board. He has always taken a deep interest in the schools and all 
that pertained to their betterment. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and in politics is a Republican. 

Mr. Lougeay married (first) in 1873, Anna Irwin, who bore him Wil- 
liam, Susan I., Robert and Anna Elizabeth, the latter dying in infancy. 
He married (second) in 1887, Rebecca Kelly McCombs. Children: John 
McCombs, and Mary, who died aged eight years. 



Ohio was the home of the members of this branch of the 
MORRIS Morris family prior to the settlement in Pennsylvania of 

Leander Milton Morris. His father, William Morris, was 
born in East Liverpool. Ohio, and there passed his entire life, becoming 
prominent in local affairs and a justice of the peace. He married Maria 
Bradfield, who died in the same place. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1213 

Leander Milton Morris, son of William and Maria (Bradfield) Morris, 
was bom in Wellsville, Ohio, August i, 1832. He was educated in Beaver 
College, located at Beaver, Pennsylvania. After completing his studies he 
was for a time a bookkeeper, then traveled in the interest of Bennett, 
Potter & Birmingham, a Pittsburgh firm. He subsequently accepted a 
position in Alliance, in his native state, as ticket agent and train dispatcher 
on the Fort Wayne & Pittsburgh railroad, afterward returning to Pitts- 
burgh and entering Dixon Marshall's foundry at the corner of Twenty- 
second and Penn avenues. In 1886 he made his home at Oakmont, on the 
bank of the Allegheny river, and in 1899 he retired to this place, where he 
afterward lived a life of ease and quiet. Mr. Morris was one of the 
organizers of the Oakmont Bank, and was the president of this institution 
until his death. His political principles were always Democratic, and 
he served as a member of council, being largely instrumental in secur- 
ing for Oakmont a Carnegie Library, Mr. Morris using his influence with 
Andrew Carnegie for this purpose. Mr. Morris had a long, busy and useful 
life, passed in the favor and approbation of his fellows, the prominence that 
he gained being the attribute to an upright character and a forceful per- 
sonality. With his wife he was a member of the First Baptist Church, of 
Pittsburgh. He died November 7, 1910. 

Mr. Morris married, in 1856, Mary Jane, daughter of Morando and 
Mary (Metcalf) Bliss, of Pittsburgh- South Side, her father a native of 
Sing Sing, New York, her mother born in Manchester, England. Morando 
Bliss was one of the most expert workers at his trade, that of glass cutter, in 
the United States, and died in Pittsburgh South Side. Living children of 
Leander Milton and Mary Jane (Bliss) Morris: Harry E., Fred, Edward 
D., Cora B., Mary B., and George Ehiflf. 



The grandparents of H. R. McPherson, of the village 
McPHERSON of Frank, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, came to the 

United States from county Antrim, Ireland, bringing a 
son, John, then a lad of eight years. The family settled in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, where the lad, John McPherson, began working at the age 
of eleven years at the first foundry ever operated in that city. This foundry, 
owned by Glass & Philips, was built at Fifetown, a suburb, now Second 
street, Pittsburgh. There he served an apprenticeship of seven years, be- 
coming an expert foundryman. At the end of his first year at his trade, 
he molded and cast an iron bootjack that is yet preserved by his son, H. R. 
McPherson, as a memento of his honored father. He was not only a 
skillful workman but also an inventor of local note, one of his inventions 
being a process of chilling iron, that was an important step forward. He 
remained in the employ of Glass & Philips for eleven years, broadening 
and expanding in mechanical skill and understanding with each year. After 
leaving Glass & Philips, he installed a system of water works and supply 
for the growing city of Wlieeling, West \'irginia. and later installed 
similar svstems in Cleveland, Oliio. and Dover. Delaware, gaining additional 



I2I4 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

reputation as an engineer of public works. He also erected and put in 
operation the engines and machinery for manufacturing plants, the shops 
at Economy, Pennsylvania, being equipped by him for the use of that 
singular sect, the Economites. About 1848 he purchased an interest in the 
Kittanning Rolling Mill and moved his family to that town. He retained 
his interest in the rolling mill and resided in Kittanning until his death. He 
was buried with his wife in the Catholic Cemetery there. 

He married Catherine O'Malley, who bore him nine children, among 
whom were: i. James S., enlisted with the three months' men called for by 
President Lincoln, serving in Company A, Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry; he died in Elderton, Pennsylvania, in 1890. 2. John 
B., also a veteran Union soldier, serving three years in Company B, Forty- 
Sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; he now resides in Doug- 
lass, Alaska, aged seventy-eight years. 3. Josephine, married McConnell 
Naughton, and died in Kittaiming. 4. William, deceased, was a puddler in 
the rolling mills of Kittanning. 5. Rachel A., married Robert Woodward, 
and died in Ottawa, Kansas. 6. Joseph, for fifteen years a justice of peace 
in Kittanning, where he died in April, 1907. 7. Catherine, married Frank 
Kerner, and died in Canton, Ohio. 8. H. R., of whom further. 

H. R. McPherson, eighth child and fifth son of John and Catherine 
(O'Malley) McPherson, was born in Kittanning, Pennsylvania, September 
22, 1852. He grew to manhood on his father's farm at that town. He 
attended the school nearby, kept in an old log school house, and remained 
at home, his father's assistant, until attaining the age of nineteen years. 
He then determined to learn a trade and going to Emlenton, Pennsylvania,, 
appreticed himself to a stone cutter. Later he returned to Kittanning and 
worked at his trade, helping to erect the Kittanning jail. After three years 
working there at his trade he drifted into the Pennsylvania oil field where 
he remained variously engaged until 1882. He then located in Allegheny 
county where he secured a contract from the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Rail- 
road Company for the erection of three miles of masonry between Douglass 
and Buena Vista. After the completion of that contract he entered the 
employ of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, as superintendent of 
three of their stone quarries. In all these wanderings and driftings he had 
not accumulated capital, but on April 8, 1884. with but sixty-eight dollars 
in cash he purchased a lot at Industry, Pennsylvania, built a house and there 
resided for several years while superintendent of the quarries previously 
mentioned. He finally resigned his position with the Baltimore & Ohio 
railroad and for a short time resumed his trade, stone cutting, soon after- 
ward engaging in masonry construction. He located in the town of Frank, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where in 1890 he was elected justice of 
the peace, an office he yet holds by continuous re-elections. He also works 
at his trade and has acquired considerable farm property in Elizabeth town- 
ship, the village of McPherson being located on land he owned. He is a 
Democrat in politics, and a man highly respected by all. In religious faitb 
he is a broad-minded and liberal, not connected with any denomination. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1215 

Mr. McPherson married, May 23, 1888, Amanda, daughter of Elias 
and Mary E. Hennage, of Centerville, Pennsylvania. Children: i. Mabel, 
married William H. Rupert, and resides in Filmore, Califomia. 2. Roy R., 
an electrician, resides in Frank, Pennsylvania. 3. Earl Elias, an oil well 
driller, now in Venezuela, South America. 4. Helen, a graduate of Penn- 
sylvania State Normal School at Indiana, now teaching in California. 



Joseph Lytle, of Monongahela City, is a great-grandson of Rob- 
LYTLE ert Lytle, the American founder of the family, a native of Scot- 
land, who on coming to this country, at the age of fifteen years, 
settled in Western Pennsylvania, where on February 26, 1780, he entered 
land in what is now Jefferson township, lying along the line between Alle- 
gheny and Washington counties. He married Ann Mason, of the early 
historic Mason family of Western Pennsylvania, whose family, except 
herself and a little brother, was killed by the Indians on Sewickley Creek; 
those two children were left homeless and went to the Markle Block House 
and were reared by the Markle family. Mr. and Mrs. Lytle had children : 
Thomas, James, William, David, Abraham and Isaac, twins, John, Joseph, 
Samuel, Elizabeth, Robert, George, Henry and Benjamin. 

(II) Isaac Lytle, son of Robert and Ann (Mason) Lytle, was born in 
Mififlin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1783. He married 
Martha Penny, born in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
April 19, 1787, daughter of John Penny, a "minute-man" of the Revolution, 
who fought at Lexington and Concord. Later he came to Western Penn- 
sylvania and founded a numerous family. After their marriage Isaac and 
Martha Lytle moved, in 1807, to Forward township, Allegheny county, and 
there settled on the farm now owned by their grandson, James P. Lytle, a 
brother of Joseph Lytle. Isaac Lytle died May 24, 1854 ; Martha, his wife, 
died November 26, 1854. Oiildren : Eliza, born August 25, 1808; Rutli, 
February 1, 181 1; Robert, August 5, 1812; Margaret. August 11, 1814; 
Isephena and Perry A., twins. May 27, 1821 ; Samuel, January 27, 1827. 

(HI) Perry A. Lytle, son of Isaac and Martha (Penny) Lytle, was 
born on the Forward township (then Elizabeth township), Allegheny 
county, farm of his parents. May 27, 1821, died there December 11, 1893. 
He aided in bringing the farm under good cultivation and there lived and 
died. He was a Republican in politics, and he and his wife members of 
the Baptist church. He married Sarah Catherine Wycoff, born at the 
Wycofif homestead in Elizabeth township, October 15, 1826. Children: 
Hannah ; Joseph, of whom further ; William G., deceased ; George G., de- 
ceased ; James P., of whom further; Gertie W. 

Sarah Catherine (Wycofif) Lytle was a descendant of Cornelius \\'y- 
cofT, of EHitch descent, through his son, John, and his wife Sarah WycofT. 
John and Sarah Wycofif had a son, Jonathan, born October 15. 1764, died 
January 17, 1845. He married, July 28, 1788, Catherine Lefevre, bom 
December 27, 1761, died May 19. 1842. They were botli of early New 
Amsterdam (New York) families, but after their marriage came to Western 



I2i6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Pennsylvania and settled in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, where 
they purchased land, founded a home, died and are buried in Round Hill 
Cemetery. Children: i. Elizabeth, bom May 20, 1789, married a Mr. Irwin 
and had children: John, Robert, Elisha, who was born October 15, 1826. 
2. Sarah, born March 5, 1791, married Elisha Peairs, who died in Elizabeth 
township, November 11, 1831. 3. John, born March 6, 1793, moved to Ohio. 
4. Isaac, see forward. 5. James M., born March 4, 1798, married (first) 
February i, 1828, Mary Ann Wintermute, born October 12, 1806, died 
January 18, 1840 ; married (second) Dinah Scott. 6. Lewis, born August 
19, 1799, died November 20, 1831. 7. Elijah, twin with Lewis, moved to 
Ohio. 8. Lydia, born May 7, 1801, married John Watson. 

Isaac Wycoff, son of Jonathan and Catherine (Lefevre) Wycoff, was 
born November 11, 1794, in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, died May 22, 1884. He was a farmer all his life. He married ' 
Gertrude Van Kirk, born in Elizabeth township, March 22, 1802, died 
March 21, 1880. Children: i. Llannah, born February 8, 1821, died Janu- 
ary 18, 1840; married James Patterson Wiley. 2. Jonathan, born July 31, 
1822, married Mary Rine. 3. Sarah Catherine, born October 15, 1826, 
married Perry A. Lytle. 4. Harriet, born October 18, 1828, died June 12, 
1859; married Joseph Hornish. 5. Joseph Van Kirk, born September 27, 
1831, married Gertrude Foster, who died in July, 1896. 6. Isaac (2), born 
December 6, 1833, killed at the battle of Gettysburg, July 3. 1863. 7. Wil- 
liam Van Kirk, born October 31, 1835, died in 1914; married Anna Speer. 
8. Matilda Gertrude, born April 17. 1840, died December 13, 1865; married 
Calvin Powers. 

(IV) Joseph Lytle, son of Perry A. and Sarah Catherine (Wycoff) 
Lytle, was born on the old Lytle farm in Forward township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, November 25, 1848. He was educated in the public 
schools and at Elizabeth Academy, remaining at the home farm with his 
parents until 1876. Then he rented the Ketchum farm, which he worked 
for twelve years before purchasing the present farm of three hundred and 
eighty-eight acres, in 1887. The following year he moved to his new farm 
and there resided until April i, 1900, when he moved to Monongahela 
City, where, since the organization of the First National Bank, of that 
city, November 30, 1901, he had been its honored and efficient president 
until January, 1915. He has other interests of importance, serving as vice- 
president and director of the Courtney Fire Brick Company, and from 
December. 1900, to December, 1903, was engaged with D. E. Gamble in the 
feed implement business. He stands high in the business and financial 
world, is conservative and well-balanced in judgment, qualities that render 
him a valuable executive head of the institution which he guided most suc- 
cessfully from its organization until his retirement from office. The family 
are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Lytle is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and was master of Forward 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. In political faith he is a Republican, and 
has served as Forward township school director. 




Q^i^ o2^^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1217 

Mr. Lytle married, September 28, 1875. Mary Jane McKinney, born 
at the McKinney liomesttad in Forward township, in 1853, daughter of 
Robert and Nancy (Marshall) McKinney (see McKinney family in this 
workj. Children: 1. Edna Bell, born July 9, 1876, educated in Beaver 
Seminary and Indiana State Normal, a graduate of the latter institution. 
2. Luella May, born in 1877, died in 1901 ; was a graduate of the State 
Normal at Indiana, Pennsylvania. 3. Georgie H., born in 1882, died April 
5. 1897. 

(IV) James P. Lytle, son of Perry A. and Sarah Catherine (Wycoff) 
Lytle, and brother of Joseph Lytle, was born on the homestead. May 19, 
i860. He was educated in public schools and at Monongahela Academy, 
and has devoted his life to farming, owning one hundred and forty-five 
well cultivated acres. He is a Republican, and in religious belief a Baptist. 
He married, in 1889, Flora Pierce, born in Forward township, October 2"/, 
1876, daughter of Joseph T. and Harriet (Wall) Pierce, granddaughter of 
Daniel and Elizabeth ( Ketchum ) Pierce, and great-granddaughter of Louis 
and Cassandia (Pennick) Pierce, of Forward township. 



The earliest ancestor of this family in America, as far as 
ALDRICH known, was Welcome Aldrich, a Methodist minister, whose 

brother, William, was a colonel in the Revolutionary army 
at the time of the battle of Bunker Hill. Welcome Aldrich removed from 
Connecticut to Massachusetts, thence to Rhode Island, and from there to 
Pennsylvania, buying property in Main township, Erie county, where he 
resided until his death, in 1839. His wife was Rowena (Hamilton) Aldrich, 
who died in April, 1861. Children; Welcome, mentioned further; Miranda 
Harick, Prusha Clark, Maria Crosby, Sarah Raymond, Ruth Brown, Carohne 
Terrell, Mary. Rowena. 

(II) Welcome (2) Aldrich, son of Welcome (i) and Rowena (Hamil- 
ton) Aldrich, was born in 1810. died May 17, 1851, in Vernon township, and 
was buried at Titusville, Pennsylvania. He was a farmer, dealing also 
extensively in lumber and shingles, near Corry, and residing many years 
in Wayne township, Erie county. He married Mrs. Lydia Palmer, a widow, 
and had four sons and four daughters : Levillo ; Jefiferson, died at Mohegan, 
Michigan ; Elerton, of further mention ; Frank, lived at Titusville ; Olive 
Cassandra, who became Mrs. Hartman ; Ida Dorothea, who became Mrs. 
Collone ; Henrietta Hortense. who became Mrs. Pool ; Josephine Viola, who 
became Mrs. Webb. 

(III) Dr. Elerton Aldrich, son of Welcome (2) and Lydia (Palmer) 
Aldrich, was born June 2, 1843. i" ^^ ayne township. Erie county, Pennsyl- 
vania, died in Los Angeles. California, May 4. 1902. where he was buried. 
He was reared on the farm, passing his early life in Erie county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and receiving his education in the common schools and at private 
institutions. He was an expert penman, writing a beautiful Spencerian hand. 
A'^ a young man he devoted himself to agriculture first, afterwards becoming 
interested in the oil fields where he did pumping and general work. He 



I2i8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

continued thus for a few years, when he removed with his family to Michi- 
gan where he remained for a year or more, returning to Pennsylvania and 
taking up the study of medicine. After his graduation he went West, 
practicing his profession in Omaha, Nebraska ; Dallas, Texas, and finally 
in Los Angeles where he resided until the time of his death. He was mar- 
ried in Hayfield township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, on October 30, 
1862, to Sarah Jane Dunham, a native of that place, born August 13, 1834, 
daughter of William and Mary Ann (Ikeler) Dunham (see Dunham VIII). 
Mr. and Mrs. Aldrich had one son, Leon Welcome, of further mention. 
After the death of her husband, Mrs. Aldrich was married to Lewis Vaughn, 
a civil engineer, who was a graduate of Hiram College, Ohio, and a class- 
mate of President Garfield. He is now deceased, and his widow resides on 
the homestead in Vernon township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania. She 
has been a life-long member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

( IV) Leon Welcome Aldrich, son of Dr. Elerton and Sarah Jane 
(Dunham) Aldrich, was born January 31, 1867, in Woodcock township, 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania, passing his early years there and in Vernon 
township. He received his education in the local schools, after which he 
became employed in the lumber business in which he continued until the 
fall of 1908. He then entered the Pennsylvania Institute of Embalming 
and Sanitary Science, fitting himself for his present profession. He was 
graduated from the institute with the highest honors ever received by any 
of its students. Locating in Meadville, he purchased the Aldrich Block, 
No. 851 Market street, and established himself in business as a funeral 
director with finely equipped offices and an able assistant. His license to 
do business covers both the states of Pennsylvania and Ohio. He is a mem- 
ber of the local, State, and National Funeral Directors associations, and 
has become one of the leading citizens in Meadville. In politics Mr. Aldrich 
is an Independent, voting for the man whom he considers best qualified 
for the office. He owns the old Aldrich homestead in Vernon township 
which he makes his summer residence. He is an active member of the 
First Presbyterian Church in Mead\ille, to which his wife and family also 
belong. 

Mr. Aldrich married, March 26, 1891, at Meadville, Letetia Chase, born 
in W'est Mead township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, March 12, 1870, 
daughter of Newell and Elizabeth (McNamara) Chase. She has passed her 
entire life in Crawford county, being educated in the graded schools, and 
she spent some time in the millinery business prior to her marriage. She 
is an ardent Presbyterian, taking great interest in the First Presbyterian 
Church of Meadville, and in Sunday school work, and is popular in social 
circles. She is quiet and refined, devoted to her husband and children. 
She belongs to the Priscillas of the Church, tlie Ladies of the Maccabees 
and Tribe of Ben Hur. Mr. and Mrs. Aldrich have three children: i. 
Percy, born in Vernon township, June 11, 1893, educated in Business Col- 
lege, now in the employ of the Erie Railroad Company as bookkeeper; 
married, September 3, 1914, Lottie Brown. 2. Ralph Raymond, born Au- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1219 

gust 8, 1895, a shipping clerk in the employ of the J. J. Shryock Company 
at Meadville. 3. Burton Rush, born February 28, 1898, a student in the 
high school. 

(The Dunham Line.) 
This family was founded in England by Rychert Donham, who was 
born in the year 1294, and at an early date settled in Devonshire, England. 
He was probably a Spanish adventurer, but little is known of his ancestry. 
He engaged in raising sheep and in manufacturing woolen goods, becoming 
a person of great importance in his time and founding a family that became 
connected with the English royal line and was interwoven with English 
history for the following several centuries. The name has been variously 
spelled, Donham, Dunham and Denham; and the coat-of-arms adopted by 
Sir John Dunham, in 1498, was : Azure, on chief indented, or, a label gules. 

(I) Two grandsons of Rychert Donham, Geoff ryde and John, born 
respectively in the years 1350 and 1351, removed from Devonshire to Nor- 
folk, England, and founded the city of Norwich. Their descendants were 
influential in that section of England down to the time of the civil wars, 
when John Dunham, son of Thomas, born at Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, in 
1589, became identified with the Separatists. During the religious persecu- 
tion in the early part of the seventeenth century, he escaped to Holland 
with others of the same religious views, and became a promient member 
of the colony at Leyden that subsequently came over to America in the 
"Mayflower," landing at Plymouth in 1620. His name appears on the pas- 
senger list of the "Mayflower" as "John Goodman," the cognomen which he 
assumed in Holland for the sake of safety; and this name he still retained 
in America for ten or twelve years. It was not until 1632 or 1633 that the 
name "John Dunham" appears on the records of Plymouth colony, when 
he was chosen a deacon in the church. He was married at Leyden in 1619, 
to Abigail Wood, a distant cousin, and there his eldest child was born just 
prior to sailing for America. There were eleven children : John, born 1620, 
in Leyden, Holland, died at Wellsfleet, Eastham, Massachusetts, in 1692, 
having many descendants; Abigail, born 1623; Thomas, 1626; Samuel, 1628; 
Hannah, 1630; Jonathan, 1632; Persis, 1635; Joseph, 1636; Benjamin, 1637; 
Daniel, 1639 ; Benajah. mentioned further. 

(II) Benajah Dunham, son of Deacon John and Abigail (Wood) Dun- 
ham, was born in 1640, and died December 24, 1680, at Piscataway, New 
Jersey. He was a linen weaver by trade; was made freeman in 1664; 
removed to Eastham and became court officer in 1669; and in 1672 settled 
at Piscataway, New Jersey, where he purchased a hundred acres of land 
and became a planter. He was a captain of militia. October 25, 1660, he 
was married to Elizabeth Tilson, of Scituate, Massachusetts. Children : 
Edmund, mentioned further; John, born 1663; Elizabeth, 1664; Hannah, 
1666; Benjamin. 1667; Mary, 1669; Elizabeth, 1670. 

(III) Rev. Edmund Dunham, son of Benajah and Elizabeth (Tilson) 
Dunham, was born July 25, 1661, at Plymouth, Massachusetts, died March 
17. 1734. He was ordained at W'esterly, Rhode Island, in 1705, became 



I220 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

pastor at Piscataway, and was founder of the Seventh Day Baptist Church 
in New Jersey. He married, July 15, 1681, Mary Bonham. Children: 
Benajah, born 1684; Elizabeth, 1689; Edmund, 1691 ; Jonathan, mentioned 
further; Ephraim, 1696; Ruth, 1698; Mary, 1700; Hannah, 1704. 

(IV) Rev. Jonathan Dunham, son of Rev. Edmund and Mary (Bon- 
ham) Dunham, was born March 4, 1693, died March 10, 1777. He suc- 
ceeded his father in the ministry, and preached in Pennsylvania, at Westerly, 
Rhode Island, and at Newport; he served also in the militia in 1715. In 
1714 he married Jane Pyatt. Children: Elizabeth, born 1715; Azariah, 
1718; Jonathan, 1721 ; David, mentioned further; Isaac, 1725; Ruth, 1727; 
Samuel, 1730; Jane, 1734. 

(V) David Dunham, son of Rev. Jonathan and Jane (Pyatt) Dunham, 
was born March 14, 1723, died October 6, 1806, and was buried at Stelton, 
New Jersey. He married, October 14, 1750, Rebecca Dunn, who died 
August 30, 1734. Children: Jonathan, born 1751 ; Sarah, 1752; David, 
1755; Jeremiah, 1758; Azariah. 1760; Phineas, mentioned further. 

(VI) Phineas Dunham, son of David and Rebecca (Dunn) Dunham, 
was born December 11. 1764, died February 10. 1844. He married, No- 
vember 13, 1788, Zeniiah Dimham, born July 14, 1767, daughter of David 
Dunham, cousin of Phineas, died July 16. 1864, in Vernon near Meadville, 
Pennsylvania. Both are buried in (ireendale Cemetery at Meadville. Chil- 
dren: Rebecca, born September 11. 1789, married Samuel Lord, died in 
Meadville; Lewis, mentioned further; Lot Parent, born November 27, 1793, 
married, October 27, 1825, Catherine H. Mead, daughter of General David 
Mead, and died in Meadville; Jeremiah Stelli, born October 31, 1795, mar- 
ried, March 30. 1820, Cynthia Bradley, and died in Detroit, Michigan; 
Simeon, born April i. 1798, died in Baton Rouge; Maria, born April 28, 
1800. married, August 9. 1821. Edward Augustus Reynolds; Eliza, born 
September 28. 1802, in Crawford county. Pennsylvania, married, June 7, 
1827, Hon. James Miles, and died near (lirard, Pennsylvania. 

(VII) Lewis Dunham, son of Phineas and Zeruiah (Dunham) Dun- 
ham, was born November 3. 1791. in Piscataway, New Jersey, died Novem- 
ber 7, 185 1, in Vernon township, two miles north of Meadville, Pennsyl- 
vania. He married, February 20, 1812, Jane McGrady, born 1793, died 
1870. Children: William, mentioned further; Zeruiah, married William 
Tucker and had three children. Harriet, Jane, and Lydia ; Phineas ; Au- 
gustus ; Eliza, married John McFarland ; Susan ; Rebecca, married L. F. 
Morgan ; Alexander, married Mary Yates whose mother was sister of 
President Buchanan. 

(VIII) William Dunham, son of Lewis and Jane (McGrady) Dunham, 
was born April 13, 1813, died February 7, 1862. He married, December 
30, 1837, Mary Ikeler. Children: Harriet, deceased; Lewis, deceased; Sarah 
Jane, born August 13, T834, married Dr. Elerton Aldrich (see Aldrich III) ; 
Marv Ellen; Eliza Ann. deceased; Phineas, deceased; Clara; Margaret. 

(The Chase Line.^ 
(1) The first ancestor of the Chase family, Christian name unknown, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1221 

of the line herein recorded, was a native of Massacluisetts, and after the 
Revolutionary War he enlisted in the army engaged in the Indian War, 
and having served his term of five months reported at Pittsburgh and was 
honorably discharged. He then came to Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
where he led the life of a pioneer, leveling the mighty forest, clearing and 
cultivating the ground, depending upon the fruit of his own labor for the 
sustenance of his family and herds. He was the father of eight children, 
a daughter and seven sons, among whom was Samuel G.. of whom further. 

(II) Samuel G. Chase, the eldest son, was born in December, 1804, in 
Mead township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, died there, November 10, 
1887. In later life he purchased a farm nearer Meadville, and there spent 
the remainder of his life. In early life he became a Christian and united 
with the old State Road Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he and his 
wife were consistent members for many years, later uniting with the Meth- 
odist church in Meadville, in the communion of which he remained until 
his death. One of his most prominent and commendable characteristics 
was his indefatigable industry, always toiling, always doing something to 
bring comfort and the necessaries of life to his family. In a letter from a 
nephew, living in Kansas, to his mother, he wrote as follows about Samuel 
G. Chase: ''I can only remember him now as the patient, kind-hearted 
uncle, who for so many years toiled and buflfetted through a little prosperity 
and much adversity, and who amid all his many trials, never was known to 
lose that gentleness of disposition which you know was his. Dear, kind 
old uncle; small and meagre were his opportunities in life, yet how broad 
and rich was the goodness of his nature." The crowning goodness of his 
long life was his firm adhesion to his duty to the Master, and he delighted 
to meet with the disciples of Girist in the house of God and in the prayer 
meeting. He married Ursula Sacket, who, with three sons and one daughter 
survived him. A second daughter, Mrs. Almena Hibbard, died in 1887. 
His funeral services were conducted in the Wayland Baptist Church, Rev. 
M. Miller, preaching the sermon, and the remains were interred in Oakland 
Cemetery. 

(III) Newell Chase, son of Samuel G. Chase, was born in Mead 
township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, April 24, 1837, died September 
27, 1912. He learned the trade of stone mason, which he followed, deriving 
therefrom a comfortable livelihood. He is an upright and energetic man, 
in his daily life adheres to the "Golden Rule," and he casts his vote for 
the candidates of the Republican party. He married Elizabeth McNamara, 
born May 15, 1836, and they are the parents of eight children, as follows: 
Lydia, now Mrs. Braymer; Mary, now Mrs. Roberts; Olive, now Mrs. 
Monin ; Oren W. ; Marguerite, now Mrs. McMahan ; Letetia, wife of Leon 
W. Aldrich ; Harriet, now Mrs. Scowden; Minnie B. Melvin, deceased. 



This branch of the Irvin family has been identified with the 

IRVIN commercial and financial interests of the state of Pennsylvania 

for some generations. William Irvin died July 4. 1862. For 



1222 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

many years he was successfully engaged in business as a merchant. He 
married Elizabeth Beatty, died at Sharon, Pennsylvania, October, 1912, 
daughter of James and Ann Beatty. Children : Edmond Lintner, see for- 
ward; Albert, of Conneaut, Ohio; William, died at the age of eight years. 

Edmond Lintner Irvin, son of William and Elizabeth (Beatty) Irvin, 
was born in Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, July 16, 1854, and 
died April 23, 1903. His grandmother, Mrs. James Beatty, had charge of 
him during the early years of his life. After completing the course of 
study at the public schools he became a pupil at the Academy in Jamestown, 
Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated. His first business position 
was that of clerk in a dry goods store, but he was obliged to 
resign this by reason of impaired health and went west. For some time 
he lived in Denver, Colorado, and also in Leadville, then returned to Mead- 
ville, Pennsylvania, where he embarked in the coal business in association 
with John Irvin, and this was continued for almost a quarter of a century. 
The contracting business also engaged his time and attention, and he paved 
the first streets in the town of Meadville. His partner, John Irvin, having 
died, this interest was purchased by Albert Nisbet, with whom Mr. Irvin 
remained in partnership until 1883, after which Mr. Irvin carried on the 
business alone. He purchased a fine residence at No. JTJ Park avenue, 
which he had almost entirely rebuilt in accordance with his own ideas. 
Broad and liberal-minded in all his ideas, he was held in the highest esteem 
in all circles. As a member of the Park Avenue Congregational Church, 
he contributed liberally toward the support of that institution, as he did 
also toward the support of the jNIeadville City Hospital, of which he was 
one of the directors. In financial circles he was honored with election to 
the ofiice of director in the Meadville Chamber of Commerce, and his 
active interest was also displayed by his membership in the Taylor Fire 
Hose Company. His fraternal connections were with the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen ; Royal Arcanum ; Crawford Lodge, No. 234, Free 
and Accepted Masons; King Solomon Chapter, No. 191, Royal Arch 
Masons ; North Western Commandery, No. 25, Knights Templar ; Zem 
Zem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Irvin married, at Meadville, September 23, 1885, Mary Reynolds, 
born December 21, i860 (see Reynolds V). Children: i. William Edward, 
born in Meadville, September 26, 1886; received his education in his native 
city ; he went to New York, where he was the bookkeeper for the United 
States Mortgage & Trust Company; next he was employed by the Screw 
and Bolt Company, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and at the present time 
he is in the employ of the Pittsburgh Railway Steel Company. 2. Katherine 
Kellogg, born in Meadville. April 17, 1891; was educated in the Meadville 
schools, Allegheny College, Meadville, and the Girls' Finishing School, Den- 
ver, Colorado; she married, January 8, 1913, H. Jones, and they reside in 
Braddock, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 3. Louise Reynolds, born at 
Meadville, July 25, 1893 ; is a student at Allegheny College. 4. Robert 
Lintner, born at Meadville, April 5, 1898 ; is now a pupil in the high school. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1223 

(The Reynolds Line.) 
Members of the Reynolds family have been identified with the early 
history of Crawford county, Pennsylvania, as well as with that of the 
present day. No family in the country has a cleaner or more honorable 
record, and they have contributed to every cause that had for its purpose 
the upbuilding of the national prosperity. Education, religion, civic better- 
ment, all alike met with their approval and were benefited by the assistance 
readily given. Among those members of this family not in the direct line 
of descent we are tracing in this sketch, yet worthy of at least a brief 
mention is the late Hon. William Reynolds, cousin of Edward Augustus 
Reynolds, mentioned hereinafter. He was one of the prime movers in 
many projects which brought about improved conditions, making Meadville 
one of the finest inland cities of Western Pennsylvania. He was a leading 
spirit in that body of men who, in 1853, succeeded in securing the construc- 
tion of a railroad through what was then the borough of Meadville. His- 
torian and writer as well as promoter and financial genius, it is to his faith- 
ful pen that we owe much of the data incorporated in this article. His 
son, the Hon. John Reynolds, follows closely in the footsteps of his father, 
and ably represents his family in the present generation. 

(I) John Reynolds, born and died in England, inherited a large, en- 
tailed estate in Worcestershire, England. He married Sarah Fox, of Lon- 
don, and had nine children. Among them were: John, who inherited 
the estate as the eldest son ; William, see forward. 

(H) William Reynolds, the American progenitor of the family, was 
a son of John and Sarah (Fox) Reynolds, and was bom in England. He 
came to America in the winter of 1794-95, having been ninety days at sea, 
bringing witli him his wife and family, and settled at Cherry Tree, Venango 
county, Pennsylvania. It is possible that he remained for a time in New 
York and Brooklyn prior to settling at Cherry Tree, where he purchased 
a large tract of land. Although the Reynolds family of England had been 
strict Church of England people, William Reynolds, when a young man, 
had united with the Baptist denomination. The immediate cause of his 
emigration was to be found in the fact of his sympathy with the French 
Republic movement, as a direct result of which his house and landed prop- 
erty was destroyed during the period known as the Birmingham Riots. 
They had removed to Birmingham prior to this disturbed period, during 
which the property of the celebrated Joseph Priestly was also destroyed 
and he also emigrated to America. With his family William Reynolds 
settled on a tract of land purchased from the Holland Land Company, at 
Cherry Tree. He married Lydia, daughter of Rev. John Thomas, of the 
Baptist church, and had children, the first eight born in England: i. John, 
born July 18, 1782, died July 23, 1871. 2. Eliza, born October 5, 1783, 
died May 11, 1804. 3. Mary, born September 18, 1785, died January 3, 
1854. 4. Lydia, born August 23, 1786, died April 19, 1864. 5. Sarah, born 
November 29, 1787, died August 14, 1852. 6. Anne, born June 4, 1789, 
died September 17, 1830. 7. Eleanor, born October 27, 1790, died April 



1224 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

4, 1893. 8. William, born November 24, 1792, died February 16, 1868. 
9. Joshua, born at sea, October 11, 1794, died August 4, 1873. 10. Edwara 
Augustus, see forward. 11. Louisa, born at Cherry Tree, September 15, 
1802, died February 10, 1885. 

(III) Edward Augustus Reynolds, son of William and Lydia (Thomas) 
Reynolds, was born in Brooklyn, New York, October 18, 1797, and died 
October 6, 1876. He was but one year of age when his parents removed 
to Veiiango county, Pennsylvania, and at the age of fourteen years he 
came to JNIeadville, and attended the school conducted by the Rev. Johnson. 
In 1818 he was a clerk in the county commissioner's office, and in 1830 
he was appointed protlionotary of Crawford county by Governor Wolf, and 
served two terms in this office. He was elected brigade inspector by the 
military division of Crawford county, with the rank of major, and served 
for a period of seven years. He was engaged in the mercantile line of 
business, and owned and conducted personally a dry goods store. Later 
he was connected with the iron industry, built and operated a furnace in 
Venango county, and was subsequently manager of the Eagle l-'urnace and 
a partner of the firm. Still later he established a hardware and tm store 
in which he was personally active. It was only a very short time prior 
to his death that he retired from the active personal conduct of his busi- 
ness affairs. For forty-six years he served as a ruling elder in the Pres- 
byterian church, and in political matters he was also active in the in- 
terests of the Democratic party. At one time he was the owner of the 
fine residence of the late Mrs. Craighead, but his latest residence was at 
No. 371 Walnut street, and is now occupied by his daughters, Eliza and 
Anna. 

Mr. Reynolds married, August 9, 1821, Maria Dunham, born in New 
Jersey, April 28, 1800, died September 2, 1880 (see Dunham VII). Chil- 
dren: I. Simeon, born July 25, 1822, died June, 1880. 2. Rebecca, born 
May 17, 1824, died in December, 1906. 3. Mary Louise, born March 10, 
1828. 4. Edward Augustus, see forward. 5. Joshua Thomas, born October 
ID, 1834. 6. Eliza Zeruiah, born September 25, 1837. 7- Anna Maria, born 
January 22, 1840. 

(IV) Edward Augustus (2) Reynolds, son of Edward Augustus (i) 
and Maria (Dunham) Reynolds, was born November 25, 1830. He has 
been a resident of Crawford county throughout his life, and has been en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. His present farm is the old Dunham home- 
stead, which he keeps in a fine state of cultivation. He is a man of the 
highest type of citizenship, and is always one of the first in line when a 
projest is afoot for the betterment of existing conditions. As a member 
of the Congregational church he has done excellent service, and in his 
political relations, which are with the Democratic party, he has also been 
active, and has served as a school director of the township. 

Mr. Reynolds married, at Meadville, November 25, 1858, Catherine 
Law Kellogg, born January 28, 1835. They have had children: i. Affin 
Kellogg, born August 21, 1859. 2. Mary, see forward. 3. Katherine, born 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1225 

April 7, 1863. 4. Charles Torbett, bom December 7, 1864. 5. Edmund 
Augustus, born September i, 1866. 6. Anna Maria, born March 7, 1868. 
7. Jane Hayes, born February 14, 1870. 8. George, born August 18, 1871. 
9. William, born December 31, 1873, died October, 1875. 10. Louise Mc- 
Clintock, born September 29, 1875. 11. Arthur Dunham, bom January 
14, 1877. 12. Frank Neuman, born December 23, 1880. 

(V) Mary, daughter of Edward Augustus (2) and Catherine Law 
(Kellogg) Reynolds, was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, December 21, 
i860. She was graduated from the Meadville High School, and has been 
a life-long resident of Crawford county. She is a member of the Con- 
gregational church and of the societies connected with this institution, and 
takes an active part in furthering their interests. As a member of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution her national number is 60,032. She 
is a direct descendant of Captain William Bell and of John Foster, Revolu- 
tionary soldiers (see Foster Line forward). She married, September 23, 
1885, Edmond Lintner Irvin (see Irvin H). 

(The Dunham Line.) 

(I) Deacon John Dunham was born in the village of Scrooby, Not- 
tinghamshire, England, 1588-89. He came from Leyden, Holland, in the 
"Mayflower," sailing under the name of John Goodman, and was registered 
as an unmarried man. This was necessary to effect his escape to the New 
World'in safety, owing to the religious persecutions of those times. He 
settled at Plymouth, Massachusetts, where he was an honored member of 
the community. Deacon John Dunham married, in Leyden, Holland, Octo- 
ber 17, 1619. Abigail Wood, who was distantly related to him. His son 
John was born about the time of the sailing of the vessel, and tlie young 
mother and her child were not permitted to accompany him. She, how- 
ever, managed to rejoin her husband in Plymouth. Children: i. John, 
born in Leyden, Holland, 1620. 2. Abigail, born at Plymouth, Massachu- 
setts, 1623. 3. Thomas, bom in 1626. 4. Samuel, born in 1628. 5. Hannah, 
born 1630. 6. Jonathan, born 1632. 7. Persis, born 1635. 8. Joseph, born 
1636. 9. Benjamin, born 1637. 10. Daniel, born 1639. 11. Benajah, see 
forward. 

(H) Benajah Dunham, son of Deacon John and Abigail (Wood) 
Dunham, was born in 1640, and died at Piscataway, December 24, 1680. 
He was a court officer, served as captain of the militia, and in 1672 pur- 
chased one hundred acres of land. He married, October 25, 1660, Eliza- 
beth Tilson. Children : Edmond, see forward ; John, born 1663 ; Eliza- 
beth, 1664, died 1667; Hannah, 1666; Benjamin, 1667; Mary, 1669; Eliza- 
beth, 1670. 

(Hi) Rev. Edmond Dunham, son of Benajah and Elizabeth (Tilson) 
Dunham, was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, July 25, 1661, and died 
March 4, 1734. He was ordained at Westerly, Rhode Island, in 1705, and 
in the same year founded the Seventh Day Baptists in New Jersey. He 
married, July 15, 1681, Mary Bonham, and had children: Benjamin, bom 



1226 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

1684; Elizabetli, 1689; Edmond, 1691 ; Jonathan, see forward; Ephraim, 
born 1696; Ruth, 1698; Mar)', 1700; Hannah, 1704. 

(IV) Rev. Jonathan Dunham, son of Rev. Edmond and Mary (Bon- 
ham) Dunham, was born March 4, 1693, and died March 10, 1777. In 
1715 he was a member of the Fourth company. Colonel Thomas Flamer's 
regiment. He succeeded his father in the ministry. He married, at Pis- 
cataway. New Jersey, August 4, 17 14, Jane Pyatt, who died September 
^5' 1779) ^t the age of eighty-four years. Children: Elizabeth, born 
1715; Azariah, 1718: Jonathan, 1721 ; David, see forward; Isaac, born 
1725; Ruth, 1727; Samuel, 1730; Jane, 1734. 

(V) David Dunham, son of Rev. Jonathan and Jane (Pyatt) Dun- 
ham, was born March 14, 1723, died October 6, 1806, and was buried at 
Stelton, New Jersey. He married, October 14, 1750, Rebecca Dunn, who 
died August 30, 1734. Children: Jonathan, born 1751 ; Sarah, 1752; 
David, 1755; Jeremiah, 1758; Azariah, 1760; Phineas, see forward. 

(VI) Phineas Dunham, son of David and Rebecca (Dunn) Dunham, 
was born December 11, 1764, died February 11, 1848, and was buried near 
Stelton, New Jersey. He came to Crawford county, Pennsylvania, in 1802, 
and settled on a farm twelve miles north of Meadville. He married, No- 
vember 13, 1788, his cousin Zeruiah, born July 14, 1767, died July 16, 1864, 
a daughter of David Dunham. She died in Vernon township, Crawford 
county, Pennsylvania. Children: Rebecca, born 1789; Lewis, November 
3, 1791 ; Lot Parent, 1793: Jeremiah Stelli, 1795; Simeon, 1798; Maria, 
see forward; Eliza, born 1802. 

(VII) Maria, daughter of Phineas and Zeruiah (Dunham) Dunham, 
was born at Piscataway, New Jersey, April 28, 1800. She married, August 
9, 1821, Edward Augustus Reynolds (see Reynolds III). 

(The Foster Line.) 

(I) Arthur Foster, May 6, 1738, owned a tract of two hundred and 
fifty acres of land near the city of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

(II) John Foster, son of Arthur Foster, was born in Paxton town- 
ship, near the city of Pennsylvania, September, 1759, on his father's home- 
stead. He enlisted as a private, and served, 1776, in Captain William Bell's 
company. Fourth Battalion of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, under the 
command of Colonel James Burd. The officers of this company were 
William Bell, captain ; Andrew Stewart, first lieutenant ; Conrad Jontz, sec- 
ond lieutenant ; Samuel Simpson, ensign. 

(III) Dorcas, daughter of John Foster, married Captain William Be». 

(IV) Jane, daughter of Captain William and Dorcas (Foster) Bell, 
married Samuel Hayes. 

(V) Jane, daughter of Samuel and Jane (Bell) Hayes, married George 
Kellogg. 

(VI) Catherine Law, daughter of George and Jane (Hayes) Kellogg, 
married Edward Augustus Reynolds (see Reynolds IV). 

(VII) Mary, daughter of Edward Augustus and Catherine Law (Kel- 
logg) Reynolds, was born in Vernon township, Crawford county, Penn- 




>- 




a/^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1227 

sylvania, December 21, i860. She married Edward Lintner Irvin (see 
Irvin II). 



Hazzard Schuyler Jackson is of Scotch and EngHsh descent. 
JACKSON His paternal grandfather, Stephen Jackson, was a native 

of Scotland. In 1800 he was married to Statiria Drake, a 
native of England. They migrated from Scotland to the United States of 
America and came to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in the early days 
of its development. He secured a farm in the then sparsely settled region, 
and there resided the remainder of his life, successfully operating it. His 
death occurred in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in the eighth ward of the city. 
(II) Andrew Jackson, a son of Stephen and Statiria (Drake) Jack- 
son, and father of Hazzard Schuyler Jackson, was born in Allegheny 
■county, Pennsylvania, in the year 1823. He was educated in the local 
public schools, and upon reaching his manhood and completing his studies, 
settled in the city of Allegheny, and went into the lumber business. He 
■was married to Charlotte Kelley, of Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, where 
she was born in the year 1824, her father being Abner Kelley, a life-long 
resident of Shelocta, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania; his wife was Mary 
(Richardson) Kelley. After a few successful years of business and the 
death of his wife, which occurred in 1859, Andrew Jackson married Re- 
"becca McClaran, of Indiana county, Pennsylvania, and moved to Sewickley 
on the Ohio river, a few miles from Pittsburgh, where he continued in the 
lumber business for some time. Failing in health he purchased a planta- 
tion in Kentucky in the year 1874, living there only a short time, his wife 
■dying in the spring of 1875, and his health failing rapidly, he left his plan- 
tation to return to Pennsylvania, but died on his way home the latter part 
•of May, 1875. 

(Ill) Dr. Hazzard Schuyler Jackson, fourth son of Andrew and Char- 
lotte (Kelley) Jackson, was born in Allegheny City, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, March 6, 1856. While very young his parents removed to a 
farm in Armstrong county, where he spent much of his childhood. His 
mother died in 1859. His father, after his second marriage, moved back 
to Allegheny City, remaining there a few years as a successful lumber mer- 
chant. In 1865, Andrew Jackson moved to Sewickley, where Hazzard 
Schuyler Jackson grew to manhood. In the year 1875 he was married to 
Sarah Ellen Hart, daughter of John William and Sarah (iMcNamee) Hart, 
of Wheeling, West Virginia. It was at Sewickley that Hazzard S. Jackson 
received the major portion of his education, and where, after completing 
the more general studies, he took his course to fit him for his professional 
■career. His pursuance of this was under the direction of Dr. Robert Jen- 
nings, State Veterinarian for Western Pennsylvania. In 1884 Dr. Jackson 
received his degree as veterinary surgeon, and since that time has been 
steadily engaged in the practice of his profession, in which he has made a 
success. In 1894 Dr. Jackson opened a liverj' stable and has flourished 
•greatly in his new enterprise. In 1905, his old quarters proving too small 



1228 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

for his expanding business, he erected a fine building at No. 417 Beaver 
street, Sewickley, and with this as headquarters he carries on an extensive 
business. In politics, Dr. Jackson is a Republican, and he takes a keen 
and vital interest in the affairs of his community. Indeed it is more than 
mere interest that he gives, for he has played an active part in the conduct 
of local affairs and has served his fellow citizens on the board of health for 
a period of about three years. He owns his own home at No. 204 Fred- 
erick avenue, Sewickley, Pennsylvania. He and his family are members 
of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, Sewickley. 

Three children have been born to Hazzard Schuyler and Sarah Ellen 
Jackson. The first child, John Hart, died at the age of eleven years. 
The second child, Ida Belle, was married, June 4, 1907, to William James 
McCann, son of Robert H. and Lucy (Hadley) ?^IcCann, of Zanesville, 
Ohio; they live in their own home. No. 721 Hill street. Sewickley: two 
children have been born to William James and Ida Belle AlcCann : Robert 
Hadley, now six years of age; and John Hart, aged two years. The third 
child. Joe Ringley, is in business with his father ; he was married Septem- 
ber 28, 1913, to Jeannette M. Browne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
Stephen Browne, of Hasson Heights, Oil City. Pennsylvania: they are 
now living in their own home, No. 312 Thorn street, Sewickley. Penn- 
sylvania. 



The origin of the name of Forbes, like that of most family 
FORBES names, is surrounded by mystery. It is of Scotch origin. 

and has been spelled in the town records of New England. 
Ffarrabas, Fferebas, Farrowbush. Fforbus. Forbes, Forbus, Forbush, Fur- 
bush, Fforbes, Farabas, Fobes. Farebush and Fawbush. It is stated in 
Burke's Heraldry that the surname Forbes was assumed from the lands 
of Forbes in the county Aberdeen, Scotland, granted by Alexander II 
(1249) to the progenitor of this noble family. John de Forbes, the first 
upon record, was a man of rank and importance in the reign of King 
William the Lion (1214). Following him was a long line of descendants 
of whom William Forbes, of Tullickerne, Scotland, wrote in 1580: "In 
all ages since our first aryse, we myght compair with neighbors, for greater 
loyalty and valor for pietie (which we think truely ennobleth a families) : 
witness the many bishops and doctors att home and renowned divines 
abroad. Like as the root has ever done, so the several branches of the 
house thought it their greatest honour to honour God in their generations. 
As to their loyaltie, it was never stained." 

(I) Robert Forbes lived and died on a small farm in Aberdeenshire, 
Scotland, and was prominent there in the establishment of the local Pres- 
byterian church. He was of robust physique and six feet in height. He 
married, and had children : Robert, of further mention ; James, deceased, 
lived on a farm in Scotland ; Andrew, who was a stone cutter in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, for a period of twenty years, returned to Scotland 
in 1903, and died there the following year; John, deceased; William, de- 
ceased, was a flour miller in Scotland. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1229 

(II) Robert (2) Forbes, son of Robert (i) Forbes, was born in 
Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in the Parish of McMarron, in 1827, and died 
in 1905. He inherited the homestead, and lived on it all his life. Like 
his father, he was of tall stature. He married Annie Abel, born in the 
Parish of McMarron in 1820, died in 1892, a daughter of AVilliam Abel, 
who was born in the same parish, and died there at a very advanced age. 
He had other children : George and William, farmers in Scotland : Ra- 
chael, who married James Davidson. Mr. and Mrs. Forbes had children: 
William, lives on a farm in the Parish of Banchory ; Robert, a farmer in 
the same parish in Aberdeenshire; George, a grocer in Ayr, Ayrshire, Scot- 
land; Annie, unmarried, lives with her brother William; John, of further 
mention; Isabelle, also lives with William. 

(III) John Forbes, son of Robert (2) and Annie (Abel) Forbes, was 
born at Pansk Bank, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. October 31, 1858. He 
acquired a substantial education in the public schools in his native country, 
attending them until he was fourteen years of age, and then became a clerk 
in a general store in the village of Dorfins, remaining there four and a 
half years, and during this time acquiring a thorough knowledge of all the 
details of the retail mercantile business. He then went to Glasgow, where 
he found employment in the dry goods store of John Anderson for two 
years. In 1882 he emigrated to the United States, going directly to Pitts- 
burgh, and during the next seven years had charge of the carpet depart- 
ment of Mr. Sample's store on Federal street. By this time he had 
amassed considerable capital, and associated himself with John Mackey, 
under the firm name of Mackey & Forbes. They opened a dry goods store 
on Butler street, Pittsburgh, Mr. Forbes selling out his interest at the end 
of seven years. In March, 1896, he removed to Homestead, Pennsylvania, 
and established himself in the dry goods business there in a small way, 
on Sixth avenue, where he was located seven years, and then moved to 
Eighth avenue. In 1907 he erected a fine store building at No. 137 East 
Eighth avenue, and now conducts a large, modern business there. He has 
gradually increased the size and scope of his stock, until he now carries a 
most varied assortment of high class wares. He is a director of the Monon- 
gahela Trust Company, and has an interest in other enterprises. At the 
age of fifteen years he joined the church, and is now an elder of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Homestead. In National political matters he gives 
his support to the Republican party, but in local affairs prefers to cast an 
independent vote. His fraternal connection is with Lodge No. 582, Free 
and Accepted Masons. 

Mr. Forbes married, January 9, 1894, Annie Richie, who was born in 
Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and was ten years of age when she was brought 
to this country by her parents. She is a daughter of Archibald and Isabella 
(Coots) Richie, the former an architect, and the family lived for many 
years at Mount Forrest, Ontario, Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Forbes have had 
children: John Coots and Jennie R., the latter born in 1900, and both at- 
tending the Homestead High School. 



I230 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The first of his line to leave the Ireland home, Thomas Ash made 
ASH his new home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He had been edu- 
cated in his native land and had there been trained in the car- 
penter's trade, which he followed in Pittsburgh. He died soon after the 
birth of his fifth child, Charles H., his widow marrying again, her second 
husband being John McNeal, the family home continuing on the farm in 
Hampton township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, bought by Thomas 
Ash. Mr. Ash married Mary Ellen Collins, her family an early one io 
the Pittsburgh district, and had children : Mary Ann, Catherine, Sara 
Fresie, James, Charles H., of whom further. Children of the second mar- 
riage of Mary Ellen (Collins) Ash, that with John McNeal: Margaret, 
William, Edward. 

Charles H. Ash, youngest of the five children of Thomas and Mary- 
Ellen (Collins) Ash, was born in Hampton township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, July 14, 1845. He was educated in the public schools of 
Hampton township, and has made the place of his birth his life-long home, 
owning fifty acres of land, his principal operations being in the raising 
of grain and hay. The house that he and his family occupy was first built 
by his father, additions and alterations having been made by Mr. Ash as 
necessary. Mr. Ash married, December 14, 1872, Margaret Beet, of Hamp- 
ton township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and has children: Evaline, 
Margaret, Eleanor, Viola, WiUiam, Genevieve, deceased, Charles, Richard. 



Albert Clififord Packer comes of an old Allegheny county 
PACKER fjuuily, who through long residence has become intimately 

associated with the life and traditions of the region. His 
father, William Henry Packer, was a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
who left that city about the time of the great railroad strike there, and 
came to Verona, Pennsylvania. He was a painter by trade, and upon reach- 
ing Verona engaged in a contracting business for himself. Mr. Packer, 
Sr. was a member of Company D, One Hundred and Ninety-eighth Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served during the Civil War, when he 
was wounded in the shin. He married Sarah Jane Talent, of Pennsyl- 
vania, where she was born. To Mr. and Mrs. Packer were born six chil- 
dren, as follows: Charles W., now a railroad man of Terre Haute, Indiana; 
John T., now a resident of Mount Alto, Pennsylvania; Clara, died in 1891 ; 
Edwin J., a glassworker of Greensburg, Pennsylvania; and Albert C. and 
Cora, twins, of whom Cora died when but a few days old. Mrs. William 
H. Packer died when her son, Albert C, was but two years old. 

Albert Clifford Packer was born April 14, 1881, at Verona, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, and received his education in the local public schools. 
When only twelve years of age he left school and found employment at a 
number of different tasks, continuing thus until sixteen, when he applied 
himself with great diligence to mastering the machinist's trade in the 
Verona Tool Works. Having accomplished this end, he followed the same 
for a period of seven years, by which time he had saved, by dint of in- 




c^^!^C^^£^i^ -^ L/^c^^/^yt^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1231 

dustry and frugality, enough money to build for himself a bowling alley 
and pool parlor at No. 742 Front street, Verona, in which he now con- 
ducts a flourishing and lucrative business. He is also the owner of a half 
interest in the firm of Packer & Clark in the Pleasant Hour Theatre, 
established in 1913. Mr. Packer is a self-made man in the best sense of 
the word. He does not confine his time and attention to his personal in- 
terests, but gives generously of both to a public-spirited participation in 
the general life of the town. He is a member of a number of fraternal 
and social organizations, among these being the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and the Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the Republican 
party and takes a keen interest in all political questions, whether of local 
or general significance. Mr. Packer married, May 3, 1909, Lillian Kerns, 
of Murrysville, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Albert Clififord Packer is a member 
of the Presbyterian church, while her husband worships in the United Pres- 
byterian church. 



The name of Davies is one which has been honored in many 
DA VIES countries. In the present instance it was brought to America 
from Wales. 

(I) Rees Thomas Davies was born in Wales, and emigrated to the 
L^nited States in 1879. He went directly to Pennsylvania, where he located 
at Irwin, and there became a miner, an occupation with which he had been 
identified in his native land. Later he removed to Homestead, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1903, after a residence there of 
twenty-two years. He married (first) Elizabeth Davies, who died at Home- 
stead in 1883, and they had fourteen children, of whom the following 
named grew to maturity: Thomas R., of further mention; Eleanor; Mary, 
married Daniel L. Price, and died at the age of twenty-seven years ; Rees, 
deceased; David; Isaac. Mr. Davies married (second) Ann Watkeys, 
and they had one child: Elizabeth. Mr. Davies was a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he and his wife were members 
of the Congregational church. 

(II) Thomas R. Davies, son of Rees Thomas and Elizabeth (Davies) 
Davies, was born in Glamorganshire, Wales, May 19, 1865. He received 
his education in the public schools of his native country. At the age of 
thirteen years he commenced working in the mines, and was thus occupied 
until he was sixteen years of age. He then came to this country in the 
company of his parents, and in 1881 entered the employ of the Carnegie 
Steel Company at Homestead, finding a position in the bessemer department, 
which he filled until 1888. He was then transferred to the rolling depart- 
ment, in which he has been occupied since that time. His political affilia- 
tions are with the Republican party, and he and his wife are members of 
the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity up 
to the Thirty-second degree, a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and also of the Royal Arcanum. He takes a deep interest in 
educational work of all kinds, and has for a long time been one of the 



1232 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



board of directors of the Carnegie Library. All his life he has been a 
devoted patron of the art of music, and he is a charter member of the 
Pittsburgh Male Chorus. Mr. Davies married, in 1889, Edith W., a 
daughter of David and Mary Francis, of Elmira, New York. They have 
had children: Elizabeth, who was graduated from the Pennsylvania Col- 
lege for Women at Pittsburgh, is now a teacher in the public schools ; 
Ellsworth, is a student in the commercial department of the University of 
Pittsburgh ; Evangeline, died at the age of two years. 



The name of Ludwig is a fairly common one in this country, 

LUDWIG and was brought here from Germany, where it was probably 

first adopted as a surname as a mark of respect for the kings 

of some of the provinces, many of these bearing the name of Ludwig, or 

its English and French equivalent, Lewis and Louis. 

John Ludwig, whose entire life was spent in Germany, was engaged 
in business as a general contractor, and was fairly successful in this enter- 
prise. He married Caroline \^ogt, also born in Germany, and of their si.x 
children, those now living are : John, of further mention ; Martin, of Col- 
fax, Pennsylvania. 

John (2) Ludwig, son of John (i) and Caroline (Vogt) Ludwig, was 
born in Heilbronn, Wiirttemberg, Germany, in 1859. He obtained an ex- 
cellent education in his native town, and then entered upon a business 
career, filling the position of clerk for some years. Finding that there was 
but little opportunity for advancement in his native land, and being energetic 
and ambitious, young Ludwig determined to try his fortune in the New 
World, and accordingly emigrated to the United States in 1882, being at 
the time about twenty-two years of age. He made his home at Braddock, 
Pennsylvania, for one year, then worked in a glass factory in Sharpsburg 
for another year, having charge of the furnace for Tribby Brothers, and 
after his marriage in Sharpsburg, 1884, removed to Creighton, and worked 
for the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company for twenty-six years. In 1886 
he removed to Brackenridge, Allegheny county, and there built a small 
house for the use of himself and family. This house, which is located on 
Fourth street, has been more than doubled in size since it was first put 
up, is in excellent condition, and the Ludwig family is still living in it. He 
also owns three other houses in Brackenridge. At the present time he Is 
in the employ of the Tarentum Glass Company. His religious affiliation 
is with the Lutheran church, and he is a member of the Protective Home 
Circle. Mr. Ludwig married Sophia Entenman, born in Stuttgart, Germany, 
came to this country in 1884. and they had six children, the three first 
named living at the present time (1915): i. Herman, a mill worker at 
Brackenridge; married Mina Schmidt, and has a daughter, lona.-. 2. Wil- 
liam, a glass worker in tlie employ of Emerson, in Baltimore, Maryland ; 
married Ella Vetters, of that city. 3. Sophia, lives with her parents. 4. 
Alfred, born 1890, died in July, 1890. 5. Pauline, born 1893, died July 
26, 1893. 6. Ella, born 1898, died September 16. 1898. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1233 

John Braun is one of a family representative of the best type 
BRAUN of German American character, which has introduced into 

the complex warp and woof of American citizenship an ele- 
ment of its own peculiar virtues, those of unwearied pursuit of an objective 
and great endurance in effort. His grandparents on both sides of the house 
passed their entire lives in the "Fatherland," and his father and mother also 
spent their youth in their native land. 

It happened, however, that during the years in which Mr. and Mrs. 
Braun were growing to manhood and womanhood, a cloud was hanging over 
Germany, threatening that land and, indeed, almost the whole of continental 
Europe, with the gravest disturbances. The approaching struggle between 
the masses of the people, whom a period of political enlightenment and the 
awakening of democratic ideals, was beginning to arouse to a sense of their 
own rights and power, and an aristocracy firmly entrenched in the customs 
and usages of the past, was giving pause to the legitimate projects of sober, 
peaceful men, who were, accordingly, turning their eyes elsewhere in 
search of more stable conditions amid which to continue their lives. It is 
natural that under these circumstances, America, where the fruits of a more 
democratic regime were already assured, should appeal strongly to the 
imaginations of a large portion of the great peace-loving populations of 
Europe, and result in the immense immigration to the United States which 
the middle decades of the past century exhibit. One of this great band, 
which poured in a continuous flood from Europe upon the shores of this 
country, ever weakening the old nations in the same measure with which 
it strengthened the great Republic in the west, was Henry J. Braun, who 
brought with him also the wife he had married in his native land. The 
date of their sailing was 1844, just four years prior to the culmination of 
the great democratic movement in Germany in the revolution of 1848-49. 
Upon their arrival in the United States, they went at once to the city of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, making their home in tlie section known as the 
"South Side." Just after arriving at the new home, Mr. Braun Sr. se- 
cured employment in a mill, and afterwards worked in an oil refinery, and 
in the butcher business, for a time, until his removal to Sharpsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, which has ever since been the family home. Mr. Braun Sr. was 
married in Germany to Mary Smitli, also a native of Germany, and by her 
had nine children, as follows: Katherine, Margaret, Henry J., Mary, Jacob, 
John, of whom further, William, and two others who died in infancy. 

John Braun, the sixth child of Henry J. and Mary (Smith) Braun. 
was born January 31, 1859, in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. Here he was 
educated in the local public schools, and upon completing his studies, se- 
cured employment in the iron mills, where he was given the position tech- 
nically known as "heater." In this occupation Mr. Braun is still engaged. 
Besides his business, Mr. Braun is otherwise active in the life of his com- 
munity. A staunch member of the Republican party, he takes a keen in- 
terest in all political questions, whether of local or general application. He 
is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



1234 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. Braun married, December 22, 1881, Maggie Hays, a native of 
Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, daughter of David Hays, of Sharpsburg. Mrs. 
Braun is a devout member of the CathoHc church. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Braun have been bom ten children, as follows : Sherman J. ; Mamie ; 
Sylvia, deceased; Harry; David; Nellie; Charles; Katie, deceased; Mar- 
garet and William. 



Stevenson Cassidy Beissinger is of German descent on 
BEISSINGER his father's side of the house and of Irish on his 
mother's, a union of races which often results, as in the 
case of Mr. Beissinger, in an extremely capable type of manhood. 

His paternal grandparents were Michael and Christina Beissinger, who 
were born and passed their whole lives in the Fatherland. Their son, John 
George Beissinger, father of Stevenson C. Beissinger, was born in Ger- 
many, February 19, 1812, but came to the United States when but six years 
of age, and went to live in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, where he was 
educated in the local public schools. He continued to live in Chambersburg 
during his school years and after, learning tliere the trade of harness mak- 
ing, and following the same with a high degree of success. He was a man 
of great inventive genius and a master of his craft, and he invented and 
made the form of knapsack which was adopted by the United States govern- 
ment for the use of its soldiers in the Civil War. Mr. Beissinger prospered 
so well in his trade that he was able to buy a farm in Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania, but later gave this life up and went to Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, and recommenced work at his old trade. He finally took up his 
residence at Oakmont, Pennsylvania, and there spent the remainder of his 
life, his death occurring February 4, 1897. Mr. Beissinger, Sr., was a 
Democrat in politics and took an active part in the affairs of his com- 
munity. He married Ann Cassidy, a daughter of James and Jane Cassidy, 
of Irish descent, but natives and life-long residents of Chambersburg, Penn- 
sylvania, where also Mrs. Beissinger was born, October 7, 1818. Mr. and 
Mrs. Beissinger were members of the Episcopal church and brought up 
their children in this belief. To them were born seven children, as fol- 
lows: Jane, deceased; Bushrod Fairfax, who served four years on a gun- 
boat during the Civil War ; Hiram, died in early youth ; Cornelia ; Laura 
Helen, married Bratton Wolfe, and had a family of six children; Stevenson 
Cassidy, of whom further ; Alice. The Armstrong county farm is still in 
the possession of the family. 

Stevenson Cassidy Beissinger, the sixth child of John George and 
Ann (Cassidy) Beissinger, was born December 6. 1856, in the log house 
on his father's old farm in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, and there 
lived until the age of sixteen years. He obtained the elementary portion 
of his education in the local public schools, and later attended the Sew- 
ickley Academy, studying there under the direction of Professor Anderson. 
He secured employment as a telegraph operator and later removed to 
Nebraska where he was appointed clerk in the Government School for 
Indians at Genoa in that state. He also took up a homestead there and 




i^/io^i€^ tyiic^ciiia/Ui/n 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1235 

went into stock raising. In 1894, however, he returned to Sewickley, Penn- 
sylvania, having prospered to such an extent that he has been able to live 
retired since that time. But though no longer engaged in business, his re- 
tirement must not be understood to mean a withdrawal from the general 
life of his community. On the contrary, Mr. Beissinger, is most active in 
all matters of public concern, and is prominent in fraternal circles. He is a 
Republican in politics, and is now serving his fellow citizens in the capacity 
of school director. He is a member of the Masonic Order and of the 
Knights of Pythias, having entered both these organizations when in Genoa, 
Nebraska. 

Mr. Beissinger married, September 29, 1892, Virginia Ann Linn, a 
daughter of Hugh Linn, of Sewickley, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this work. Mrs. Beissinger was born in Sewickley Heights township, on 
the old Linn homestead, where now Mr. Beissinger, his wife and their 
family are living. She was educated in the Sewickley public schools and 
the Sewickley Academy. Mr. and Mrs. Beissinger are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and have reared their child in that persuasion. 
To them has been born one son, Linn DePutron, June 2, 1899, who is now 
attending the Sewickley public schools. 



Edward McLaughlin, founder of this line of the Mc- 
McLAUGHLIN Laughlin family in the L^nited States, came from his 
home in Ireland to this country and settled on a rarm 
later known as the Wade McLaughlin farm, obtaining the original grant 
from the government, and there resided for the remainder of his life. He 
cultivated the land to a high state of perfection, and there reared his family 
of seven children, namely : Robert, John, Edward, James, Lydia, Eliza- 
beth and Mary. He was a man of good education. 

(II) Robert McLaughlin, son of Edward McLaughlin, was born on 
the old McLaughlin homestead, September 25, 1786, and was a fanner 
throughout the active years of his life. In 1812 he enlisted in the American 
army against England, serving as drum major and recruiting sergeant for 
one year. He died August 28, 1849. He married Barbara Latshaw, in 
1814, who bore him seven children, namely: Robert, John, William, Riley, 
and three daughters who died in girlhood. 

(III) Robert (2) McLaughlin, son of Robert (i) and Barbara (Lat- 
shaw) McLaughlin, was born October 3T, 1817, was educated in the public 
schools, and upon arriving at man's estate he inherited a farm from his 
father in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, whereon he 
erected a house, his home until his death, December 26, 1901, his daughter, 
Mrs. Andrew Albert Johnston, residing there at the present time (1915). 
He married, December 14, 1864, Adeline McGinnis, born in Patton town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 5, 1836, died at Unity, 
Pennsylvania, July 29, 1912, daughter of John and Eleanor McGinnis. her 
father dying June 17, 1874, aged seventy-seven years, her mother dying 
February 15, 1891, aged eighty-three years, on the old McGinnis property. 



1236 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

known in Revolutionary times by the soldiers as "The Dirty Camp," hence 
called The Dirty Camp farm. The town of Pitcairn is now located on the 
site. Children of Robert and Adeline (McGinnis) McLaughlin: i. Bar- 
bara Ellen, born February 16, 1868; married, September 13, 1888, Beatty 
Ralston Wright, and has three living children : Ella, Agnes, Beatty, and 
two children deceased : Sidney and Robert William. 2. Agnes, of whom 
further. 3. Sidney Ann, born April 13, 1873 ; married, August 23, 1906, 
Clifford Arthur Caldwell, and had one son, Robert Washington, born 
October 25, 1907, died December 21, 191 1. 

(IV) Agnes McLaughlin, daughter of Robert (2) and Adeline (Mc- 
Ginnis) McLaughlin, was born April 13, 1870. She married, June 30, 
1910, Dr. Andrew Albert Johnston, son of Andrew Johnston. Dr. Johnston 
received his professional training in the University of Pittsburgh, and since 
his marriage has been engaged in practice at Unity, Pennsylvania, and is a 
well-known and highly-regarded physician of that locality. Dr. and Mrs. 
Johnston make their home on the old McLaughlin homestead in Plum 
township. 



Among the prosperous and progressive business men of 
HECKMAN Avalon, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, noted for their 

integrity, perseverance and up-to-date methods of con- 
ducting afifairs, must be mentioned Arthur Heckman, a worthy representa- 
tive of a German lineage. 

Peter Heckman, father of Arthur Heckman, was born in Rhine Falce, 
Bavaria, Germany, May 24, 1842, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Roschi) 
Heckman, natives of Bavarian Rhine Falce. Henry and Elizabeth (Roschi) 
Heckman died on the farm in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and are 
buried in that vicinity. Peter Heckman acquired a very limited education 
in the schools in the neighborhood of his home, and in 1853, in young man- 
hood, emigrated to this country, located on a farm in the vicinity of Mead- 
ville, Pennsylvania, with his father and mother and brothers and one sister, 
the farm still in the possession of one son, brother of Peter Heckman. He 
worked for the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, later the New York, 
Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad, now the Erie Lines, assisting in the build- 
ing of railways and in the making of oil barrels, during the discovery of oil 
at Titusville, Pennsylvania, for transportation and served in the capacity of 
machinist for the railway for a number of years. He married, at Mead- 
ville, Pennsylvania, 1863. Bina Kircher, the ceremony being performed by 
Rev. Leberman, a German Reformed minister. She was a daughter of 
Henry and Elizabeth (Weidman) Kircher, of Mosback, Bavaria, Germany, 
where her birth occurred. Her father was a farmer of that place, also a 
raiser of grapes from which he made wine, disposing of the same. Mr. 
and Mrs. Heckman were the parents of seven children, the last two men- 
tioned living at the present time (1914) : Henry, Frederick. Frank, Harry. 
Charles, Arthur, Lena. 

Arthur Heckman was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, May 8, 1873. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1237 

He was educated in the public schools of that city, and began his business 
career in the meat line, with which he became thoroughly familiar, and in 
May, 1902, removed to Avalon and there continued in the same line up to 
the year 19 12, when he engaged in the automobile business, serving in the 
capacity of vulcanizer. He is an Independent in politics. He married, 
October 22, 1903, Minnie May Wassum, born in Clarion county, Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of John and Mary (Lang) Wassum, of Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania, who came from Germany to this country prior to their mar- 
riage, which occurred December 5, 1861. John Wassum emigrated about 
the year 1859 or i860, and worked in mills and built boats or barges for 
river transportation, and rafted same to Pittsburgh for market, loaded with 
lumber, etc., and in the latter years of his life, lived as a retired farmer 
in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, until his death, April 8, 1914. He was 
born in Philbrunen, Hessian-Darmstadt, Germany, February 7, 1837; his 
mother's maiden name was Eva Elizabeth Weirich, his father's name was 
John Wassum. Mrs. John Wassum, his wife, was Mary Barbara Lang 
before her marriage, born September 12, 1842, at Messengen, Wiirttemberg, 
Germany, died November 11, 1914; they lived a married life of over fifty- 
two years, celebrating a golden wedding at the fifty year period. The wife 
of Mr. Wassum accompanied her parents, Gottlieb and Anna Barbara 
(Fell) Lang, to this country, in 1854, they locating in Piney, Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Wassum were the parents of eleven children, 
namely: Charles Augustus, Edward C, George C, Frank G., John M., 
Anna Barbara, died in 1885, aged twelve years ; Oscar, Minnie May, afore- 
mentioned as wife of Arthur Heckman ; Laura Blanche, Harry A., Roy 
Claude. The members of this family first attended the Lutheran church, 
later the Reformed church. Mr. and Mrs. Heckman are members of the 
Reformed church. 



No nationality has come to our shores which has con- 
WELLINGER tributed more to the general prosperity and development 

of the country than the German. This is true of them 
from the time of their first appearance here, and has been especially mani- 
fested in the state of Pennsylvania, with which they identified themselves 
to a large extent. While the family under discussion in this review has only 
been in the United States a few generations, the various members have 
shown their sterling worth in many directions. 

John G. Wellinger was born in Germany and came to the United 
States, at the age of seventeen years. He at once made his home in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, where he started in the ice business, in which he re- 
mained until about 1899. He then bought out the Anchor Brewery, which 
was at that time located on the hiH to the rear of its present location. In 
1897 the plant was removed to its present site on North Canal street, 
Brackenridge, the business was incorporated, and Mr. Wellinger was chosen 
president of the corporation. He took an important part in the public 
affairs of the community, served as a member of the common council of 



1238 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Pittsburgh in his earlier years, and was the first commissioner in the borough 
of Brackenridge. He was an active worker in the interests of the Re- 
pubHcan party. His wife, Margaret WelHnger, bore him ten children. 

John C. Wellinger, son of John G. and Margaret Wellinger, was born 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in March, 1868. He received an excellent 
education in the public schools of his native city, and then became the 
assistant of his father in the ice business, and was identified with this in- 
dustry until 1895, when he became connected with the brewery interests. 
Upon the death of his father, he was chosen to succeed him as president 
of the Anchor Brewing Company. Mr. Wellinger is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles. 



Ohio was the destination of the band of travelers with whom 
CURRY Robert, John, Moses and Joseph Curry, crossed the Allegheny 
Mountains in 1804, New Jersey their birthplace, but the death 
of one of the brothers, John, and a combination of circumstances caused 
them to settle in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. The four brothers were 
sons of the American ancestor of the line, who came to this country from 
Scotland, and is buried in the graveyard of the Mifflin Church, in Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania. The possessions of each brother amounted 
to about seven hundred dollars in value, and this they invested in timber 
land, building houses after clearing a sufficient space and then undertaking 
its cultivation. 

(I) Robert Curry was the grandfather of Hiram G. and Samuel P. 
Curry, of this record, and was an expert artisan, being master of the trades 
of cabinetmaker, gunsmith and blacksmitli, at which he worked when not 
engaged at his farming. He married Nancy Barnes, a native of Delaware, 
and had issue, one of his sons, Robert G., of whom further. 

(H) Robert G. Curry, son of Robert and Nancy (Barnes) Curry, was 
born in New Jersey, in 1802, died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 
February, 1865. He was a child of two years when his parents came to 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and in the schools of that locality obtained 
his education. In manhood he became the operator of a grist mill, and 
was also for a time a distiller, abandoning the latter calling in later life. 
His death occurred in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
and he is buried in the grave-yard of the Mififlin Church. He married Eliza- 
beth W. Moore, born in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of William and Nancy (Wallace) Moore, her parents natives 
of Ireland, her mother having come to the United States with her family 
when three years of age. William Moore left his native land because of 
political and religious disturbances, and made his American home in Bald- 
win township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Among his sons were 
James, Samuel and William. Children of Robert G. and Elizabeth W. 
(Moore) Curry: Hiram G., of whom further; Nancy Jane, Robert Bruce, 
Martha Bell, Anna E., James W., Samuel P., of whom further; John. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1239 

(IH) Hiram G. Curry, son of Robert G. and Elizabeth W. (Moore) 
Curry, was born in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Jan- 
uary 25, 1844. As a youth of seventeen years he left the school-room to 
join the Union army, enlisting first in Company C, One Hundred and Sec- 
ond Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, receiving an honorable 
discharge, July i, 1863, and then re-enlisting in the same company, serving 
until the close of the war, his regiment known as "Rowley's Regiment." 
In the battle of Chancellorsville he was severely wounded in the leg, his 
knee-cap being split, and he was disabled for some time, being next wounded 
in the "Seven Days' Fight'' around Richmond. On this occasion a bursting 
shell was the agent of his misfortune, Mr. Curry being hurled high into 
the air when it broke. 

Returning to his home upon the restoration of peace, Mr. Curry was 
employed at farming, mining, and boat-building, and after spending some 
time in Westmoreland county, returned to Allegheny county, becoming a 
farmer and miner in North Versailles township, where he resided for fifteen 
years. In 1894 he assumed the duties of postmaster at East McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania, although not under his own appointment, and fulfilled the 
responsibilities of that position until 1898, when he was appointed post- 
master at East McKeesport by President McKinley. Since that date he 
has remained in office, an efficient public servant, managing the business 
of the East McKeesport Post Office in an ably competent manner. For 
eight years he was proprietor of a grocery store in this place, retiring from 
business upon his wife's death in 1902. Mr. Curry is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and a communicant of the United Presby- 
terian church. On one occasion he was a member of the East McKeesport 
council, filling that position faitli fully and well. He is well known and 
liked in the vicinity of his residence, and as a merchant and public servant 
has filled an honorable position in the East McKeesport community for 
many years. 

He married (first) in the fall of 1865, Amanda Beam, daughter of 
Jacob and Margaret (Livingston) Beam. Mrs. Curry died March 22, 1902. 
Children: Margaret E., John M., Minnie B., Harry W., served for three 
years in the Philippine Islands as a member of Company I, Seventeenth 
Regiment United States Infantry, having enlisted at the beginning of the 
Spanish-American War, returned to the United States on the transport 
"Mead," the trip from Manila to San Francisco consuming thirty-five days, 
and was subsequently killed in a railroad accident ; William G., Robert B., 
died in infancy, H. Edward, George D. Mr. Curry married (second) 
May 26, 1910, Mary A. Walthour, widow of J. F. Walthour, by whom he 
had three children, who lived to maturity: Burton B., Camilla C. and Eva 
E. Walthour. 

(Ill) Samuel P. Curry, son of Robert G. and Elizabeth W. (Moore) 
Curry, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, April 15, 1857. He 
attended the public schools of his native place and in Irwin, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, to which latter place his parents moved when he was 



I240 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a boy, and in Irwin he began to learn the painter's trade when a lad of 
sixteen years. Completing his apprenticeship he began independent opera- 
tions as a painter in Irwin, and was so engaged until May 13, 1890, on 
which date he moved to Wilkinsburg, Allegheny county. To his original 
line Mr. Curry has added paper-hanging, and in his joint business has 
acquired a wide patronage, which he has steadily increased by virtue of ex- 
cellent service rendered. To these he has added real estate dealing, and has 
erected numerous houses in Wilkinsburg, all of which have proved excel- 
lent investments. He is known as one of the solid business men of Wil- 
kinsburg, and bears an unassailable reputation for straightforwardness and 
honor in all transactions. He is a citizen of public spirit, a staunch sup- 
porter of all projects and movements of desirable end, and has been identi- 
fied with the Republican party throughout his entire life. In affairs of 
local importance he is indep)endent in political action, and while a resident 
of Irwin, Pennsylvania, served for two terms on the council. Mr. Curry 
is a member of Oriental Lodge, No. 590, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
with his wife belongs to the South Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Curry married, March 27, 1883, Sarah Margaret Cunningham, of 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and has children: i. Lydia R., mar- 
ried Torrence Stiffler, of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 2. Olive C, married 
John H. Lybarger, of Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 3. John D., lives at home. 
4. Samuel Howard, lives at home. 5. Albert, a student in Allegheny College. 
6. Margaret R. 7. Robert P. 8. Ellen. 



Nathan Jones of HafiFey, Pennsylvania, after an active life of 
JONES eighty-six years, now lived a retired life on his forty-three 
acres of well improved land at Hafifey, Allegheny county. He 
is a grandson of William and Rebecca Jones, of Welsh ancestry, who lived 
on their Bedford county, Pennsylvania, farm, where they early settled. 
They reared a large family, nearly all of whom lived and died in Bedford 
county. 

(II) William (2) Jones, son of William (i) and Rebecca Jones, was 
bom at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, moved early to Bedford county, resided, 
married and lived there until 1835. In that year he moved to Pittsburgh 
and there worked as a drayman, but later returned to the old homestead in 
Bedford county, where he prepared to resume farming, his death, however, 
occurring while still at the old home. He married Catherine Grover, born 
in Virginia, daughter of Valentine and Rebecca Grover. Valentine Grover 
served in the Revolutionary army when a young man fresh from Ger- 
many, whence he came as a "redemptioner." After the war he worked m 
Virginia, where he married his wife, Rebecca. After marriage they came 
to Pennsylvania, settling on a farm in Bedford county. Children of Wil- 
liam and Catherine Jones: John, Benjamin, Margaret, Valentine, Nathan, 
of further mention; William (3), a soldier of the Union army. Sixty-third 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry ; James, also a Union soldier, 
serving in the cavalry; Henry, Catherine. Of these children Nathan is the 
last survivor. 




^lainan Jfone-i 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1241 

(III) Nathan Jones, son of William (2) and Catherine (Grover) 
Jones, was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, January 15, 1829, and 
there resided until 1835, when he was taken by his parents to Pittsburgh, 
the journey being made with six horses drawing the household goods in a 
large covered wagon. He did not return to Bedford county with his parents, 
but after finishing a course of public school study learned the book binders' 
trade, at which he worked seven years. He then became second steward 
on an Ohio river steamboat, later was first steward, continuing until enter- 
ing railroad employ. During the Civil War he was in the government 
railroad service as brakeman, his last service being on the Aquia Creek 
Railroad in Virginia. After the war he returned to Pennsylvania and again 
entered railroad employ, becoming conductor on the Allegheny Valley Rail- 
road. At the time of the big railroad strike and riot in Pittsburgh in 1877 
he resigned, having spent twenty-five years of his life as brakeman and 
conductor. He then bought a small tract of land, which he afterward sold 
to a company on which to erect a powder house and was employed in it 
four years. The house was then torn down, Mr. Jones also being employed 
in its destruction, as he was in its erection. He then began farming his 
present tract of forty-tliree acres in Penn township, near Haffey, con- 
tinuing until his retirement. When a young man he turned out with the 
men of Pittsburgh on the first alarm sent in for what has passed into his- 
tory as the "big fire" and fought until it was under control. His span of life 
covers all the wonderful development of the Pittsburgh section which in its 
greatness bears little resemblance to the desolate region through which he 
passed when first coming from Bedford county, a lad six years of age, 
seventy-nine years ago. 

Mr. Jones married, in 1864, Mary Reno, who died in 1879, a member 
of the Presbyterian church. Children: i. Thomas, a glass blower, now 
living in Greensburg ; married Blanche Cass and has children : Laurence, 
Charles, Harry. 2. Laurence, deceased. 3. William Nathan, deceased. 4. 
Cora, deceased. 



Samuel Milligan was born in Scotland, March 2, 1710, 
MILLIGAN and was a very young child when his parents migrated 
* to the North of Ireland, because of tlie religious persecu- 
tions they were called upon to endure. They located in county Down, and 
there Samuel was raised and married. In 1754 he emigrated with his 
family to America, settling in what is now Sayville, Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, at that time a part of Cumberland county. Samuel Milligan 
bought a farm there, and was engaged in its cultivation until his death. • 

He and his entire family were strict Presbyterians. He married Sarah . 

(II) David Milligan, son of Samuel and Sarah Milligan, was born in 
county Down, Ireland, in 1750, and died in Slippery Rock, Lawrence county, 
then a part of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, in 1834, while visiting a daugh- 
ter. He was four years of age when he was brought to this country by his 
parents, and was reared in Perry county, where he became a farmer. In 



1242 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

1813 he removed to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, vi^here he purchased 
a farm of one hundred and fifty acres where Swissvale borough is now 
located. The following year he returned east in order to get his family, 
and resided on the farm, for which he received a patent from the govern- 
ment in 1830. He married, July i, 1794, Sarah Wallace, and had children: 
I. Samuel, born August 17, 1795, died in early manhood in Washington, 
District of Columbia. 2. Sallie, born December 26, 1797; married John 
Swissholm, a farmer, of Malvern, Ohio. 3. Robert, of further mention. 
John, born March 29, 1803; a merchant, at Waveland, Indiana. 5. James, 
twin of John, died in infancy. 6. Hannah, born August 28, 1805 ; married 
William White, of Perry county, Pennsylvania, where they lived many 
years and then removed to the state of Indiana. 7. Peggy W., born Feb- 
ruary I, 1808; married Robert Graham, a wagon builder and owner of a 
farm ; lived in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania. 8. Eleanor, born November 
13, 1809; married Thomas Falkner, a physician, who settled in the state 
of Illinois. 9. Joseph, born March 3, 1814; a merchant, who settled in 
Waveland, Indiana; married (first) Jane Hawkins, (second) Harriet Ful- 
lenwider. 10. Thomas Stewart, born November i, 1816; was a Presby- 
terian minister and home missionary, his field of labor being chiefly Green- 
castle, Indiana. 

(Ill) Robert Milligan, son of David and Sarah (Wallace) Milligan, 
was born near Duncannon, Perry county, Pennsylvania, October 29, 1800, 
and died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 18, 1887. He re- 
ceived the limited education which the common schools of that day aflforded, 
and was about fourteen years of age when he removed with his parents 
to Allegheny county. He assisted in clearing the farm, and in its cultivation, 
and upon the death of his father he bought out the shares of the other 
heirs, and resided on it until his death. He was a quiet and unassuming 
man, taking no active part in public affairs, but giving his staunch political 
support first to the Whig party, and later to the Republican. He and his 
wife were of the Methodist Protestant denomination, but as there was no 
church of this sect in the vicinity, they attended Divine worship at the 
Beulah Presbyterian Church. He married Mary Ann Shortess, bom Feb- 
ruary 16, 1801, died May 14, 1890. She was a woman of very strong 
character, a devout Methodist, and very decided in her beliefs. They had 
children: i. Alexander Shortess, born April 3, 1830, died March 12, 1867; 
was a dry goods merchant in Greencastle, Indiana; married (first) Anna 

Hawkins, (second) . 2. Thomas A., born September 22, 1832, died 

September 14, 1854, of the cholera. 3. Emmeline Ellen, married Rev. 
Robert Carrothers, a Presbyterian minister, now deceased; lives at Grand 
Forks, North Dakota. 4. John Wesley, of further mention. 5. Mary Mar- 
garete, born September 9, 1841 ; married Dr. Samuel P. Shaw, a retired 
dentist, and they live at Atlantic City, New Jersey. 6. Joseph Robert, born 
May 25, 1844; a Presbyterian minister, living at St. Georges, Delaware; 
married Mary Marchant. 

Mrs. Mary Ann (Shortess) Milligan was a daughter of Alexander 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1243 

Shortess, born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, February 25, 1759, 
a son of Thomas and Mary Shortess, of Irish birth. He was a millwright 
by trade, building many of the mills in Cumberland and Perry counties, 
and was also the owner of a large farm, probably in Perry county, and he 
lived to the advanceji age of ninety years. He was a devout Methodist. 
One of his brothers was a participant in the Revolutionary war. Alex- 
ander Shortess married in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, September 
10, 1790, Margaret, born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, a daughter 
of Levi and Ann Owen, both natives of Wales. Children: i. Levi, born 
October 29, 1795, deceased; removed to Iowa where he was a farmer. 2. 
Thomas, born March 7, 1798; lived in Lexington, Ohio, where he was a 
local Methodist Episcopal preacher, and died February 24, 1851. 3. Mary 
Ann, who married Mr. Milligan, as above stated. 4. Emily, born June 9, 
1804. 5. Wesley, bom December i, 1807, died January 10, 1838. 6. John, 
born April 25, 1810; of Richland county, Ohio, was in the lumber business 
and the owner and operator of a saw mill. 

(IV) John Wesley Milligan, son of Robert and Mary Ann (Shortess) 
Milligan, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in Wilkins township, 
now a part of Swissvale, May 15, 1838. He still lives in the fine old man- 
sion on the farm on which he was born, and owns that part of the original 
farm which has not been sold as the needs of the city required this proceed- 
ing. His earliest education was received in the brick country school in 
Wilkins township, near Braddock, and from this he went to the Wilkins- 
burg Academy. One winter was spent in a preparatory school in Illinois. 
He next matriculated at Dartmouth College, from which he was graduated 
in the class of 1862 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. While in this 
institution he was a member of Kappa Kappa Kappa Fraternity. Taking 
up the study of law in Pittsburgh in the office of John Hampton, he was 
admitted to the bar of Allegheny county in 1865, and then for a short time 
practiced independently. He then formed an association with the Bessemer 
plant of the Carnegie Steel Company, with which he remained for a period 
of thirteen years. His first ten years there were connected with the re- 
ceiving and shipping department, and he was then given complete charge 
of the real estate department, with a free hand to buy or build houses for 
the numerous employes. Since then his own large private interests have 
claimed all of his time and attention. As the town of Swissvale grew he 
developed a large real estate business, selling the old farm oiif in building 
lots, and has been the promoter of Milligan Manor, a sub-division, and 
three "additions" to Swissvale. He is a Republican in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. Personally he is a courteous gentleman 
of the old school, and he finds his chief recreation in his fine library, which 
contains many rare books and editions de luxe. 

Mr. Milligan married (first) July 18, 1867, Mary Agnew. born at 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, died March 27, 1891, a daughter of Smith and 
Mary (Graham) Agnew, he a saddler by trade. He married (second) 
December 10, 1910, Mary H. Ecford, born at Greenville. Georgia. Mr. 



1244 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Milligan has had children: i. Robert, born August 28, 1869; a physician 
who speciahzes, living in Pittsburgh. 2. Joseph Frederick, born November 
13, 1871 ; lives in Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he owns and manages a large 
sheep ranch. 3. Edwin Irwin, died at the age of six months. 4. Mary 
Graham, born September 14, 1872; married William W. Coleman, an elec- 
trician, and lives in New York City. 5. Matilda Carrothers, born April 9, 
1877; married Gordon Fisher, Esq., a lawyer, and lives in Pittsburgh. 6. 
Margarete Belle, born April 9, 1878, died March 9, 1881. 7. James Car- 
rothers, born September 22, 1884; a real estate and bond broker of Pitts- 
burgh ; married Edith McFarland. 



The Lowmans, a German family, originally settled in 
LOWMAN Indiana county, Pennsylvania, where Thomas Lowman, 

grandfather of William S. Lowman, of Braddock, Penn- 
sylvania, was born, lived and died. He was a farmer by occupation, own- 
ing a farm in Young township, Indiana county, which he cultivated. He 
was a member of the United Presbyterian church. Both he and his second 
wife, Rachel (Neal) Lowman, lived to be quite old. Thomas Lowman 
died in Young township, and his wife died in Center township. His first 
wife died in 1838, two years after the birth of her youngest son, Alexander. 
Children of Thomas Lowman by first wife: i. William, a physician and 
surgeon, died in the Union army during the Civil War, in which he served 
as surgeon of a Pennsylvania regiment. 2. Scott, deceased ; was a farmer. 
3. Nancy, deceased; married a Mr. Marshall, a farmer of Young township, 
Indiana county. 4. A daughter, married a Mr. Graham, a farmer of 
Indiana county. 5. Alexander, of further mention. Children of Thomas 
Lowman by second wife: 6. John, deceased; was a farmer of Young town- 
ship; married a Miss Miller. 7. Hugh, a contracting carpenter, now living 
in Clarksburg, Pennsylvania. 8. A son, who died in the Union army. 9. 
Elizabeth, married John Graham, a farmer of Center township, Indiana 
cotmty. 

(II) Alexander Lowman, youngest child of Thomas Lowman by his 
first wife, was born in Young township, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
June 2, 1836, died May 27, 1894. He served nine months in a Pennsylvania 
regiment of the Union army during the Civil War, then returned to Center 
township, where he followed his trade and engaged in farming, owning a 
good farm of one hundred and fifteen acres, and was a man held in high 
esteem. He was a Republican in politics, and for fifteen years served as 
school director of the township. His building operations were principally 
conducted in the country, farm houses and barn buildings of the better class. 
In his later years he owned several portable saw mills, which converted 
many acres of timber into mercantile lumber. He was a devout Christian 
and an active worker in the United Presbyterian church. 

He married Elizabeth Gilmore, born in Young township, Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, November 5, 1837. daughter of William Gilmore and his 
wife, who was a Miss Gray, both of Scotch-Irish descent. William Gil- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1245 

more, born in Scotland, came to the United States in 1804, then a young 
man of nineteen years of age. He settled in Young township, Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania, in that locality known as "Scotland." The Gilmores, 
one of the war-like clans of Scotland were Covenanters in religion and in 
this country their descendants joined with the United Presbyterian church. 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. Gilmore: i. Margaret, married John Clements, 
a farmer of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, both deceased. 2. Mary, 
now residing in Blairsville, Pennsylvania, unmarried. 3. Elizabeth, married 
Alexander Lowman, of previous mention. 4. Martha, married William 
Lucas, who died in 1913: she survives him, a resident of Homer City, 
Pennsylvania. 5. William, died December 23, 1914; was a retired farmer 
of Blairsville, Pennsylvania. 6. John, was a contracting carpenter of Blairs- 
ville, now deceased. Four other children of William Gilmore died in infancy. 
Children of Alexander and Elizabeth Lowman: i. Ada, married J. R. 
Robbins, of White township, died in El Paso, Texas. 2. Louella, married 
Milton Graham, a farmer of Blackwell township, Indiana county, where 
she died. 3. Elizabeth, married William McCurdy, of Blairsville, where 
she died. 4. William S., of further mention. 5. John G., a carpenter now 
living in El Paso, Texas. 

(Ill) William S. Lowman, eldest son and fourth child of Alexander 
and Elizabeth (Gilmore) Lowman, was born in Center township, Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania, May 4, 1868. He attended the public school near 
his home and worked on the home farm until nineteen years of age. then 
began the carpenters' trade under Hugh Lowman, his paternal uncle, a 
contractor and builder, who had learned his trade with Alexander Lowman. 
William S. worked with his uncle as apprentice for three years, then worked 
at his trade around the county until 1890, in which year he moved to Brad- 
dock, Pennsylvania, where he worked as a journeyman carpenter for nine 
years. In 1899 he began contracting on his own account and so continues, 
having built up with the many houses he has erected a reputation for skilled 
workmanship, honest materials and unswerving integrity. He employs 
many men in his contracting operations, is always busy, having to his credit 
twenty-five buildings erected in one year. He is himself a skilled mechanic. 
the skill of his father having descended to the son. He is a member of the 
United Presbyterian church, served his church as trustee and in 1910 was 
elected elder. He is a Republican in politics, and is now a member of 
Braddock City council. 

Mr. Lowman married, October 30, i8go. Bertha M. Sandels, born at 
Qarksburg, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Marshall and 
Lavinia Sandels, the former deceased. Children: i. Albert, died aged nine- 
teen months. 2. Elizabeth Pearl, born February 5. 1894. a graduate of 
Braddock High School, class of 1914. 3. Hazel, died aged five years. The 
family residence is at Fourth street and Comrie avenue, Braddock, which 
Mr. Lowman erected in 1905. 



1246 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

John Max Hugo Schran is one of a family representative of 
SCHRAN the best type of German character, which has contributed so 

desirable a leaven to the cosmopolitan citizenship of the 
United States. His paternal grandfather was Andrew Schran, a mason 
by trade, who, with his wife and family, lived and died in his native land. 
The father of our subject has not remained so close to the hearth stone of 
his ancestors as did his father. Although a cabinet maker by trade, Ludwig 
Schran has also been a soldier, serving in the Prussian army during the 
Franco-Prussian war. He has never crossed the seas to this country, and 
now lives retired in the "Fatherland." He was married to Caroline Meiss 
and had by her children, among whom was John Max Hugo. 

John Max Hugo Schran, son of Ludwig and Caroline (Meiss) Schran, 
was born June 14, 1874, in Germany. He received a portion of his educa- 
tion in the local volkeschule, and in 1889, when he was but fifteen years 
of age, came to the United States, to seek his fortune amid those opportuni- 
ties which are peculiar to a young country. Upon his arrival here, the 
youth very wisely continued his studies in so far as he might, and for a 
time attended a school in the region he had chosen for his new home. This 
was the town of Sharpsburg in the western part of Pennsylvania, whither 
he had travelled upon first arriving in this country. Besides his school 
work, he also applied himself with all diligence to mastering the carpenter's 
trade, and in this made such good headway that he was able in 1895, but 
six years after his arrival, to establish a contracting business in Sharpsburg. 
In this venture he has greatly prospered and is now a man of substance and 
a prominent figure in the community of which he is a member. But Mr. 
Schran does not confine his activities to his business or personal interests 
exclusively. On the contrary he gives most liberally of his time and atten- 
tion to many aspects of the town's life. He plays an important part in 
the social and fraternal circles of Sharpsburg, and is a member of the 
Lodge No. 752, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and a life member 
of Lodge No. 932, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is also 
prominent in the work connected with St. John's German Lutheran Church 
of Sharpsburg. 

Mr. Schran married, December 12, 1896, Anna M. Fugh, a daug'hter 
of John and Elizabeth Fugh, of O'Hara township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, where she was born. Mr. and Mrs. Schran are the parents of 
four children, one son and three charming daughters, their names as follows : 
Walter J., bom September 2, 1898 ; Elizabeth Caroline, born November 2, 
1906; Helen Mary, born May 14, 1909; and Dortha Louise, born January 
21, 1914. Mr. and Mrs. Schran are members of the German Lutheran 
church and in that faith are rearing their children. 



Frederick Rehner was born in Germany, and emigrated to 
REHNER America in the year 1872. He located in Saxonburg. Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade of weav- 
ing for a time, then retired. He married Wilhelmina Schriner. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1247 

(II) August Rehner, son of Frederick and Wilhelmina (Schriner) 
Rehner, was born and educated in Germany, and there learned the trade 
of weaving. He also came to America in 1872 and located at Saxonburg, 
and there followed the occupation of farming for some years. In 1884 
he removed to Brackenridge, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he 
was employed in the glass works for a time, then established a grocery 
business with which he was identified until his death, November 24, 1913. 
About 1904 he established a wrapping paper business in Brackenridge, which 
he sold later to his sons, E. C, Elmer and Arthur, who conduct it under 
the firm name of Rehner Brothers. He and his wife were members of the 
Lutheran church. He married Anna, daughter of Karl and Johanna 
Schneider, and they had children: E. C, of further mention; Wallie, Mil- 
dred, Selma, Arthur, Elmer, Hattie, Clara, Agnes, and four who died in 
childhood. 

(III) E. C. Rehner, son of August and Anna (Schneider) Rehner, 
was born in Germany, June 8, 1869. He was but three years of age at the 
time he was brought to this country by his parents, and received his educa- 
tion at the public schools of Natrona, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Upon 
the completion of his education, he became associated with his father in the 
grocery business, of which he had taken charge for some time before the 
death of his father. He is a member of the Lutheran church. 



Sweden, although a small country in area, has furnished to 

NELSON this great land many of its most patriotic citizens, men who 

possess the courage of their convictions, who develop the 

lands on which they locate, and who do all in their power to promote the 

welfare of the various communities in which they settle, and among this 

number is Andrew P. Nelson, a representative resident of McKeesport. 

Hans Nelson, father of Andrew P. Nelson, was a native of Sweden, 
where he spent his entire life, attending the common schools in boyhood 
and later following the occupation of saw mill operator. He died at the 
age of fifty-two in 1894. His wife, Katharena (Olsen) Nelson, who was 
also born and died in Sweden, bore him three children : Johanna, Alvera, 
Andrew P. 

Andrew P. Nelson was born in Sweden, May 16, 1868. He obtained 
a practical education in the common schools near his home, and remained 
under the parental roof until the year 1883, when he emigrated to the 
United States, landing in New York City, and remained there and in New 
York state about six years, at the expiration of which time he removed to 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in which city he resided until 1892, when he took 
up his residence in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and there engaged in the 
trade of plumber, being employed in the water works department of that 
city. His business career has been successful, and during the many years he 
has toiled long and faithfully he has been able to lay aside sufficient funds 
to erect a residence for hi? own use in 1906. located at No. 806 South 
Union avenue, which is equipped with everj'thing needful for the comfort 



1248 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

of its inmates. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and Iiis political 
allegiance is given to the Republican party. 

Mr. Nelson married, in 1892, Clara Dahlgrin, a native of Sweden, 
whose father died during her childhood, and whose mother, Mrs. Susannah 
Johnson, came to this country from Sweden about a quarter of a century 
ago, locating in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where she is now (1914) living 
at the age of seventy-two years. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Nelson, as follows: i. Lillian, graduated from public and high schools of 
McKeesport, now a student at Allegheny College at Meadville, Pennsyl- 
vania, a graduate of the class of 1915. 2. Ruth, attended the public and 
high schools of McKeesport, now pursuing a course in art. 3. Anna, a 
student in the high school of McKeesport. 4. Herbert, died aged two years, 
twenty-eight days. 5. Roy, a student in the public school of McKeesport. 



The Younkins family has been resident in the state of 

YOUNKINS Pennsylvania for a number of generations, and the earlier 

members of this family were generally engaged in farming. 

(I) Michael Younkins was born in Pennsylvania, in Westmoreland 
county, and after his marriage settled near Tarentum, but still in West- 
moreland county. He was a farmer and became an extensive land owner. 
He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
both died in Armstrong county. Fie married Mary Locke, born near Grove 
City, and they had children : William, of further mention ; Jacob, a farmer, 
died in Armstrong county; Benjamin, deceased, was of Westmoreland 
county ; Michael, died in Armstrong county ; Samuel, lives in Armstrong 
county; Sophia, married John A. Shearer, and died in Armstrong county; 
Nancy, married Henry Ditman, and died in Armstrong county ; Mary Ann, 
married John Montgomery, and lives in Armstrong county; John, died in 
early manhood. 

(II) William, son of Michael and Mary (Locke) Younkins, was born 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, June 9, 1822, and died in Armstrong 
county, in the same state, in 1902. He settled in the last mentioned county 
after his marriage, and was a farmer there for many years. He married 
Sarah Hawk, born August 30, 1821, is now living at Worthington, Penn- 
sylvania. She is a daughter of Conrad and Esther (Slonecker) Hawk, both 
born and died in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he was a farmer 
and land owner. He was a stone cutter in his earlier years on the old 
Pennsylvania canal. A Democrat politically, and both members of the 
Lutheran church. They had children : Michael, a wagonmaker, died in 
Salem, Pennsylvania : John, a carpenter, and later a farmer, died in Ami- 
strong county ; George, a farmer, also died in Armstrong county ; Daniel, a 
farmer, died in Butler county ; Sarah, who married Mr. Younkins, as above 
stated ; Hettie. married Michael Kunkle, and lives on the old homestead. 
Mr. and Mrs. Younkins have had children : John, an oil operator and finan- 
cier, married Naomi C. Campbell, and lives in Butler, Pennsylvania ; Eliza- 
beth, married Robert Jackson, and died at Braddock. Pennsylvania ; Mary, 



WESTERN PEXXSYLVANIA 1249 

died unmarried; Daniel, of further mention; James B., died in the Klondike, 
in lyii; Jennie, married William O. Sutton, and lives in Worthington, 
Pennsylvania ; McClellan, was burned to death near Herman, Pennsylvania, 
in August, 1894. Air. and Mrs. Younkins were members of the Baptist 
church until his death, and he was a Democrat and served for a time as 
school director. 

(Ill) Daniel, son of William and Sarah (Hawk) Younkins, was born 
in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, June 27, 1854. His education was 
acquired in the public schools and at the Worthington Academy, and he 
spent all his earlier years on the farm. In 1876 he went to Petrolia, Penn- 
sylvania, as a tool dresser on the oil fields, later became a driller, then a 
contractor, and finally an oil producer. Occasionally he and his brother 
John worked in association, and in 1893 ^ partnership was formed, known 
as Y'ounkins Brothers, and this has been continued up to the present time 
(1914). The two brothers have operated extensively in West Virginia, 
Ohio and Pennsylvania and employ from one to six sets of workers. Mr. 
Younkins is a director in the Farmers' National Bank and the Guaranty 
Safe Deposit & Trust Company, treasurer of the Craigsville Woolen Manu- 
facturing Company, and a member of the board of managers of the Evans 
Manufacturing Company. As a representative of Democratic interests he 
has been a member of the city council fourteen years, and has served as 
chairman of this honorable body two years. He is a member of the Knights 
of Malta, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of the 
World. He and his wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, 
in which he is an elder. 

Mr. Younkins married, September 10, 1884, Eva E., born at Worth- 
ington. Armstrong county. Pennsylvania, September 12, 1857, a daughter 
of Joseph and Sarah B. (Kalp) Minteer. They have had children: Sarah 
Josephine, born February 15, 1887, was graduated from the Butler High 
School and from the Western College for Women ; Mabel Viola, born No- 
vember 10, 1888, was educated at Irving College ; William Minteer, born 
June 6, 1890, was graduated from the Washington and Jefferson College in 
the class of 1914, a Phi Gamma Delta; Victor Daniel, born April 7, 1892, 
a student in the Washington and Jefiferson College, a Phi Gamma Delta ; 
Florence Evelyn, born June 12, 1894, was graduated from the Butler High 
School in the class of 1913, and is now a student at the Pittsburgh College 
for Women; Delma Elizabeth, born January 11, 1897, is a student in the 
Butler High School ; James Kenneth, born May 3. 1900, is a student in the 
Butler High School. 

William Minteer, grandfather of Mrs. Eva E. (Minteer) Younkins, 
was a farmer, and one of the early settlers in Franklin, Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania, where he was the owner of about four hundred acres of land 
which is still in the possession of some of his descendants. He was a Whig 
in politics, he and his wife were both Seceders in religious matters, and 
they are buried at Slakelick, Pennsylvania. He married Mary Nicholson, 
and they had thirteen children, of whom twelve lived to have children : 



I250 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

James, a farmer, died in Worthington, Pennsylvania ; William, a farmer, 
died near Worthington ; Mary, married Matthew Reyburn, died at Slake- 
lick, Pennsylvania ; Andrew, a shoemaker, died at Newcastle, Pennsylvania ; 
Alexander, was frozen to death in young manhood ; Jennie, married William 
Smith, and died in Verona, Pennsylvania ; Nellie, married John Smith, died 
in Slakelick; Margaret, married Anthony Williams, died in Worthington; 
Elizabeth, married Robert Galbraith, died at Worthington; Nancy, married 
John Milligan, died at Worthington; Thomas, died in infnacy; John, a 
farmer, died in Worthington ; Joseph, of further mention. 

Joseph, son of William and Mary (Nicholson) Minteer, was born in 
Worthington, Pennsylvania, February 14, 1828. He learned the carpenter's 
trade, and followed this calling at W^orthington until the outbreak of the 
Civil War, when he enlisted in Company L, Fourteenth Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry, and was an active participant in the battles of Bull Run, 
Rocky Gap and Lookout Mountain, serving altogether for a period of three 
years. He then returned to W^orthington and resumed his trade, but he 
never regained the strength which the hardships he endured while in service 
had caused him to lose. In 1872 he removed to Craigsville, and there bought 
a farm which his sons cultivated, and he died there February 19, 1878. Hfe 
was a Republican, and a very devout member of the United Presbyterian 
church. He had six children who attained maturity. He married Sarah B., 
who is now living in W^ilkinsburg, a daughter of Adam and Rachel (Lorimer) 
Kalp, and a sister of Mary Martha, married (first) Carl Truxal, who was 
killed during the Civil War; she married (second) John Mullen, and she 
died in August, 1892. Adam Kalp was born in Germany, and came to 
America in early manhood. He taught school near Mount Pleasant, West- 
moreland county, and there he married Rachel Lorimer, and both were 
members of the Baptist church, and both died about 1843. After the death 
of the parents, their two young daughters came to Butler, Pennsylvania, 
and were there raised by uncles and aunts. 



.Andreas Benzenhoefer was born in Bohrbrue, 

BENZENHOEFER Wuerttemberg, Germany, and died in 1853. He 

was a worker in the vineyards in his native land, 

and a contractor in the city. He married Deiner, who died in 1848. 

They had eight children: Jacob, born 1830; Mary; George; Frederick; 
Fredericka; John G., of further mention; Katherine; Christina. 

John G. Benzenhoefer, son of Andreas and (Deiner) Benzen- 
hoefer, was born in Wuerttemberg, Germany, November 16, 1842. He re- 
ceived a sound, practical education in the schools of his native land, and 
at the usual age was examined for fitness for military duty. He was ac- 
cepted but kept on reserve duty as his section of the country had already 
furnished its full quota of men for the army at that time. At the age of 
twenty-two years he emigrated to America. In his native country he had 
worked in vineyards and upon arriving here, not finding employment of 
this sort at once, he accepted a position in the Laughlin Rolling Mills, in 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1251 

Brownstown, Pennsylvania, where he received one dollar and seventy-five 
cents per day for exceedingly hard work. In March, 1865, he went to Dix- 
mont, where he had accepted a position as gardener, receiving twenty-five 
dollars per month and his board, lodging and laundry. Later he had a vine- 
yard of his own in Glenfield, Pennsylvania, which he cultivated successfully. 
Mr. Benzenhoefer married, October 27, 1867, Katherine Dorothea Baessler, 
also born in Wuerttemberg, Germany, a daughter of Jacob and Dorothea 
(Eberle) Baessler, who had four children: Jacob, Charles, Mary and Kath- 
erine Dorothea. Mrs. Baessler died in Germany, and Jacob Baessler came 
to America with his three children in 1865, Katherine Dorothea coming in 
1866. Mr. Baessler had charge of a vineyard for Dr. Wayne, of Glenfield. 
Mr. and Mrs. Benzenhoefer had children: i. Anna, who married Louis 
Landensloger and has children : Edna, Esther, Hilda and Wallace. 2. 
Sophia, unmarried. 3. John, died at the age of five years. 4. Emma, mar- 
ried Sherman Skees, and has children : Raymond, Thelma and Stanton. 5. 
Albert, of Glenfield, married Elizabeth Gangloff and has children: Elizabeth, 
Dorothea, Frederick and Leon. 



Ernst Meyer was one of a family representative of that fine 

MEYER type of German character which has added a leaven of its 

own peculiar endurance, industry and thrift to the cosmopolitan 

citizenship of the United States. His father, also Ernst Meyer, lived and 

died in the "Fatherland." 

Ernst Meyer, of this review, was born February 25, 1842, at Zelle, Han- 
over, and there received his education at the local volkeschule. There, too, 
he learned the trade of tailor, which he plied by traveling from place to 
place. When he had arrived at the age of twenty-six years, he set sail 
for the United States, and, upon reaching this country, went to Pittsburgh. 
Pennsylvania, and made his home on Pike street in that city. He at once 
sought for employment in his trade and soon secured a position with a Mr. 
Elate, with whom he remained a considerable time. He later went to Alle- 
gheny and there worked in succession for a Mr. Omert, a Mr. Thompson 
and for C. C. Heckel. For the last named person, Mr. Meyer worked until 
the year 1900, when ill health forced him to discontinue work altogether. 
After this date he was taken with a trouble which continued for four years 
and eventually caused his death. 

Mr. Meyer was married twice. His first wife was Johanna Wilhelmina 
Allers, a young orphan girl who had accompanied him and his sisters on 
their voyage to America. Mr. Meyer married her shortly after their arrival 
in the United States. There were no children by this union, but Mr. Meyer 
adopted a little girl. Mr. Meyer's second marriage took place Novembev 
1, 1883, to Amanda Hedwig Schendel, a native of Berlin, Germany, and a 
daughter of Rudolph and Rosamond (Langhans) Schendel, who came to 
the United States about the year 1870 and settled in the Oakland section 
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, then known as Jack's Run. The Schendels 
lived in this section for twenty-seven years in the same house. Mr. Schendel, 



1252 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

who was a saddler by trade, is now dead, and Mrs. Schendel died in Novem- 
ber, 1898. To them were born children, as follows: A child who died in 
infancy; Julius Charles, Amanda Hedwig, Emma Adeline, Otto France, 
Hugh, Paul, Olga Adeline and Edward. The six older children were born 
in Germany, Hugh dying there, while the three younger were born after 
their parents had settled in Pittsburgh. Although known as simple Schendel 
in this country, the family name was in reality Von Schendel, this prefix 
only existing in the case of noble blood. The Von Schendels were large 
land owners in the "Fatherland" and bore their coat-of-arts. Herr Von 
Schendel, Mrs. Meyer's father, was engaged in the Franco-Prussian War. On 
her mother's side Mrs. Meyer was descended from Carl Langhans, who 
stood high as forester in the government service. To Mr. Meyer as the 
fruit of his second marriage have been born six children, as follows : Ella 
Mary, who married E. J. Ripper, of Glenfield, Pennsylvania, living at seventy- 
four, and they now reside on Pennsylvania avenue, Emsworth, with their 
three children, Edward Ernest, Regnalt Sloan and La Vernge Vincent; 
Ernest and George, twins, both deceased ; Herman, deceased ; Ernest George, 
deceased ; Ernest, deceased. 



Thompson M., son of George Kirkpatrick and Martha Foster 
BAKER (Russell) Baker (q. v.), was born near Homewood Station, 

Beaver county, Pennsylvania. April 24, 1862. His preparatory 
education was acquired in the public schools and at Sunbury Academy, from 
which he was graduated, and he then became a student at Grove City Col- 
lege. Between his terms of study he taught school, and then took up the 
study of law, being registered with the late John M. Russell. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1888, and for fifteen years practiced in association 
with H. E. Coulter. In 1903. one year after the organization of The Guar- 
anty Safe Deposit and Trust Company, Mr. Baker was elected treasurer of 
this corporation, a position he filled with great executive ability. Until 
October i, 1914, when he resigned to give his time to his varied interests. 
He is a director of the People's Telephone Company and of seven other 
corporations. In political opinion he is Republican, and is a member of the 
city council, and on a former occasion served as secretary of that body. 
He has also served as treasurer of the school board. He and his wife 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is a member 
of the board of stewards. His fraternal affiliation is with the Knights of 
Pythias, Knights of the Maccabees, and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. 

Mr. Baker married, in 1887, Nannie E.. born in Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania, a daughter of Simon P. and Loas Painter. Children : Clarence D., 
was graduated from the Allegheny College, then a student at the University 
of Pennsylvania, and the Pittsburgh Law School, and is now a lawyer at 
the local bar. married Ruth Bartholemew ; Stella G., married L. S. Hoon, 
Tr., and lives in Aspinwall, Pennsylvania. 




r^="r:67::?g;i^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1253 

While the Krill family has only been in the United States a 
KRILL little more than half a century, the various members have thor- 
oughly identified themselves with conditions here, and have 
proved their worth in more than one instance as reliable and valuable citizens. 
John Adam Ktill was born in Bavaria, Germany, and emigrated to this 
country with his wife and children, about 1857. He soon made his home 
at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he entered the employ of the Singer 
Nimick Steel Company, with which he was connected until his death, which 
occurred at the South Side in 1864. He and his wife were members of St. 
Michael's Catholic Church. He married, in Germany, Barbara Snyder, 
bom in Bavaria, Germany, and died in Pittsburgh, in 1909, while at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Diebold. They had children : Adam, a roller, 
who died at Milwaukee, Wisconsin ; Frank, a roller, lives at Mount Wash- 
ington, Pittsburgh ; Elizabeth, married Michael Diebold. lives in Pittsburgh ; 
John, a roller, lives in Milwaukee ; Catherine, married Frank Wulpert, and 
lives in Steubenville, Ohio; Joseph L., of further mention: Marie, married 
John Vondreau, and lives in Cleveland, Ohio. The four eldest were boni 
in Germany, the others in America. 

Joseph L. Krill, son of John Adam and Barbara (Snyder) Krill, was 
born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 25, i860. He received his school 
education in St. Michael's Parochial School, at South Side, Pittsburgh, and 
was then apprenticed to learn the barber's trade. He worked in the steel 
mills until he was twenty-three years of age, then spent a number of years 
in the west. He went to Fort Denton, Montana, where he conducted a 
restaurant successfully for some time, then a hotel for one year ; we next 
find him at Mayersville, twenty miles from Helena. Montana, where he had 
a hotel one year, after which he was in the same line of business in Mil- 
waukee for a period of thirteen years. Butte, Montana, was the next scene 
of his activities, and he remained tliere three years, and then returned to the 
east to visit his people. In 1902 he came to Clairton, Pennsylvania, and there, 
at the corner of Miller and Park avenues, erected the Park Avenue Hotel, 
of which he is still the proprietor, and which is a model hotel of its size, 
and is one of the oldest in the town. ■ He is independent in his political 
opinions, and he and his wife are members of St. Clair's Roman Catholic 
Church. He has been a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters for 
twenty-eight years, and is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and 
the Order of the Moose. 

Mr. Krill married (first) in 1880, Rosa Haney. a resident of Mil- 
waukee, who died in 1887; he married (second) 1894, in Milwaukee, Matilda 
Weisenbacher. Children by first marriage: Clarence William, a miner 
living in Montana ; Joseph D., employed by his father. Children by second 
marriage: Winfred John, and Millard Thomas, students at St. Vincent's 
College ; Ethel Marie, a student at the Sisters of St. Joseph ; Francis Xavier; 
Sylvester Lawrence ; Mercedes Margaret. 



1254 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The Best family, of which Wesley Benson Best, a lawyer of 
BEST Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, is a member, is now 
in its fourth generation in this country, having come here from 
Ireland. 

(I) David Best, who was born in county Antrim, Ireland, emigrated 
to the United States and made his home in Hope, New Jersey, the active 
years of his life being spent in the occupations of a minister of the Methodist 
denomination. He married, September 24, 1823, Lydia De Witt, born in 
that town, the Rev. Thomas Davis officiating. Children born of this mar- 
riage: James, who studied for the ministry, and died at the age of twenty- 
three years; Elizabeth; David, Jr., see forward; Margaret, was graduated 
from Wilmington College, and died at the age of twenty-seven years; Rev. 
Wesley C, a minister whose pastorate was in Philadelphia, now deceased; 
Rev. Silas Benson, deceased ; Emeline, married the Rev. T. M. Griffith ; 
two others, who died in infancy. 

(II) Dr. David Best, son of Rev. David and Lydia (De Witt) Best, was 
born in Hope, Warren county. New Jersey, April 15, 1828, and died at his 
home in Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, May 20, 1887. He 
received his degree as Etoctor of Medicine in 1850, from the University of 
Pennsylvania, and was engaged in the active practice of his profession from 
that time until his final illness. In i860 he received the Adeundem degree 
from the Pennsylvania Medical College, and in 1870 became a member of the 
Sydenham Society. During the last mentioned year he was requested by the 
secretary of the American Academy of Medicine to become a member of that 
body, but the demands of his professional work were so numerous that he 
was unable to comply with this request. He was, however, for a number of 
years prior to his death, a member of the American IMedical Association. 
His professional career was marked by distinguished success, and his kindly 
ministrations carried comfort to many beds of pain and sickness. In com- 
menting upon the death of Dr. Best the morning after it had occurred, the 
Meadville Tribune-Republican said in part: "Loved by all who knew him, 
Dr. David Best leaves many behind who will mourn his death and feel deep 
sympathy for his afflicted family. In closing, there is but little to say, and 
yet much might be written to the honor of the deceased. But few men were 
better known in Crawford county, and none more fully filled the measure of 
their professional duties than he. The bereaved family have indeed lost a 
friend — a husband and father in the full meaning of the words, and yet 
they are not alone in their mourning, for he whom they loved so well was 
loved by all our people, and all who knew him are made mourners in his 
death." In its issue of May 25, 1887, the same paper had the following: 

"In Memoriam — At a meeting of the resident physicians, held at the office of 
Dr. Cotton, on yesterday afternoon, the following preamble and resolutions were 
adopted : 

Whereas, Doctor David Best has fallen in our midst by the hand of death, we, 
his professional friends and co-laborers, would record our estimate of him as a man 
and a physician. Therefore, 

Resolved, That in Dr. Best we recognize the upright, honorable man, the good 
citizen, the kind husband, unassuming associate, whose natural instincts never per- 
mitted him, under any circumstances, to forget that he was himself a gentleman. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1255 

Resolved, That as a friend he never hesitated, when personal sacrifice was de- 
manded for another's welfare, and as a philanthropist his chief delight was sought 
and found in doing deeds of kindness to those in need of his professional ministra- 
tions — often without hope of fee or reward. 

iResolved, That the charity for all and malice toward none which characterized 
his life, was an exemplification of one of the grand doctrines of the religion that 
he professed. 

Resolved, That his amiable qualities have enshrined his memory in our hearts 
as a perpetual reminder of what a true physician should strive to become. 

Resolved, That we recognize in our late brother a successful physician, whose 
culture, scientific attainments, clear pathological views and correct diagnosis of 
disease have gained for him an enviable reputation in the profession. 

Resolved, That the life and character of David Best has thrown a luster around 
the profession of medicine in which we all may take an honorable pride. 

Resolved, That in his death we have lost a friend, a brother and counselor, en- 
deared by many years of association, by intimate knowledge of his character, and 
true appreciation of the motives by which his life was actuated. 

Resolved, That upon his bereaved family we would not intrude the poor words 
of our condolence, but commend them to the source of all consolation, to Him 'who 
hath borne our griefs and carried our sorrows,' which consolation sustained him 
through his protracted sufferings. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the county papers and a copy 
be presented to the family in manuscript. 

C. P. WooDRiNG O. M. Evans 

D. M. Calvin T. B. Lashells 
Mrs. Eagleson E. H. Dewey 
Susan Duncan E. H. Pond 

B. Brown Williams J. D. Stoneroad 

L. A. Carver J. M. Pond 

J. C. Cotton C. W. Thompson 

D. W. Hamaker" 

Dr. Best married, in 1849, Elizabeth Lockhart, born May 8, 1824, died 
July 19, 1892 (see Lockhart line forward). Children: i. Flora Lydia, 
' died September 7, 1909; married Merriman C. Harris, now Bishop of Japan 
and Corea, in the Methodist Episcopal church. 2. Emily S., married Rev. 
J. W. Miles, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 3. Lizzie Virginia, married Robert 
G. Graham, and has one son : Rev. Roy, a minister of the Methodist church 
at West Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who married (first) Alberta Montrose, 
who died July, 1908, (second) Grace McCafferty; by the first marriage he 
■had one child: Virginia Best. 4. Dr. Mary Luella, married Dr. Amos 
Jesse Newell. 5. Wesley Benson, see forward. 6. Dr. Margaret Blanche, 
now engaged in the practice of medicine at Meadville, Pennsylvania. 

William Lockhart, grandfather of Mrs. Best, was the emigrant ancestor 
of this branch of the Lockhart family, and came to America about 1812. 
There is a tradition that he came to this country as early as 1808, but the 
first record of him is to be found at Philadelphia, where he settled with 
his wife and five children, whose names were : Henry, John, Agnes, James 
(of further mention) and David. Three other children, bom in America, 
were : William, Catherine and Samuel. 

James, son of William Lockhart, the emigrant, was born in county 
Antrim, Ireland, August 16, 1802, and died in November, 1855. He mar- 
ried, Mary, born October 13, 1802, died September 17, 1879, a daughter of 
James and Mary Shrauger. Children: Elizabeth (of further mention), 
Margaret, Catherine, Anna, Samuel, Henry S., Daniel W. 



1256 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Elizabeth, daughter of James and Mary (Shrauger) Lockhart, married 
Dr. David Best, as above stated. 

(Ill) Wesley Benson, son of Dr. David and Elizabeth (Lockhart) 
Best, was born in Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, January 12, 
1862, and has been a lifelong resident in that town. His earlier education 
was acquired in the public and high schools of Meadville, from which he 
was graduated in due course. He then became a student at Allegheny Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in the class of 1883. Having decided 
upon the profession of law as his life work, he commenced its study in the 
office of William R. Bole, of Meadville, and was admitted to the bar as an 
attorney. May 11, 1886. Subsequently he was admitted to practice in the 
supreme and superior courts of Pennsylvania, and he opened offices at 
No. 899 Park avenue, Meadville. He has been active in the public affairs 
of the community, having held a number of public offices. Elected district 
attorney of Crawford county in November, 1890, he served three years ; was 
appointed to fill a vacancy in this offiice in 1901, and served one and one- 
half years at that time. Later he did good service in the office of city 
solicitor. He served as a member of Company B, National Guard of Penn- 
sylvania, for many years, and had risen to the rank of captain of the com- 
pany when he resigned. His fraternal and social affiliations are as follows : 
Crawford Lodge, Independent Order Odd Fellows, of Meadville; a member 
Hope Hose Fire Company, of Meadville ; and formerly a member of Iroquois 
Boating and Fishing Club, at Conneaut Lake, Pennsylvania. He and his 
family are members of the Methodist Stone Church and Christ Church 
(Episcopal). 

Mr. Best married in Meadville, June 30, 1891, Emma Louise Fowler, 
born in Meadville, January 23, 1865. She is the daughter of Daniel and 
Lydia Emeline Fowler, whose other children are : Margaret Richmond, 
John, Alfred, Daniel G. and Frank C. Mr. and Mrs. Best have one child : 
Josephine Elizabetlb, born April 18, 1894. She was graduated from the 
Meadville high school, and at the present time is a student at Allegheny 
College. Mr. Best has served as a trustee of Allegheny College for many 
years, has been a director of the Meadville City Hospital for a long period 
of time, was elected corporator of the Greendale Cemetery Association 
in 1913, and has served as a member of the board of health of Meadville. 
Wesley B. Best died January i, 191 5. 



Honorable Almond Benson Richmond, a complete sketch 
RICHMOND of whose ancestry appears elsewhere in this work, was 

the son of Lawton and Sarah (Townsend) Richmond, 
and was born in Switzerland county, Indiana, on April 26, 1825. He re- 
moved with his parents to Crawford county, Pennsylvania, where Hie entered 
Allegheny College; afterwards taking a medical course in which he was 
duly graduated. He practiced medicine for three years, engaging at the 
same time in tlie study of law for which he manifested a preference as his 
ultimate work in life. In 1848 he was admitted to practice before the courts 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1257 

of Crawford county, and became recognized as a criminal lawyer of unusual 
promise ; this promise he more than fulfilled in later years, being a re- 
markably eloquent speaker and an orator of unusual attainments. Mr. 
Richmond's talents and interests were varied, and in every line of his achieve- 
ments he excelled. He was greatly interested in philosophy and the natural 
sciences, upon which subjects he delivered many public lectures which were 
illustrated with apparatus of his own construction. His mechanical in- 
genuity was marked, and in 1853 he was appointed assistant director of 
machinery at the Crystal Palace. He was also state commissioner at the 
World's Fair. Beside his lectures on science and philosophy, Mr. Richmond 
delivered lectures on temperance before crowded audiences, his great interest 
in the subject making him a most effective speaker in this movement for 
reform. As an author he won considerable celebrity ; among his pub- 
lished volumes having been "Leaves from the Diary of an Old Lawyer," 
treating of such subjects as "Intemperance and Crime," and "Court and 
Prison ;" "A Hawk in an Eagle's Nest" is also a title of one of the treatises 
in this able volume written in the interest of the great temperance movement. 
His latest published work was his "Review of the Seybert Commis- 
sioners' Report," a critical dissection of the work accomplished by the com- 
missioners appointed by the University of Pennsylvania, in accordance with 
the bequest of the late Henry Seybert, to investigate the phenomena of 
spiritualism. Mr. Richmond was also one of the prime movers in arranging 
for the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the foundation of the 
city of Meadville : in all matters of historical moment he was deeply in- 
terested, and his knowledge in this line was wide and varied. He died in 
Meadville, August, 1906. On September 7, 1848, Mr. Richmond was mar- 
ried to Miss Mary Morris, born January 27, 1828, died February 5, 1894, 
daughter of Levi and Nancy (McKnight) Morris. Children: Lewis Law- 
ton, born in 1849, mentioned further; Hiram M., born in 1852, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work ; Charles E., born in 1859, became 
major in the National Guard of Pennsylvania, and is now deceased. 

(11) Lewis Lawton, son of Almond Benson and Mary (Morris) Rich- 
mond, was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, June 7, 1849. His education 
was received in Meadville, where, with the exception of a few years spent 
in Pittsburgh, his entire life was passed. Upon completing his education and 
settling down in Meadville, he entered business life as a jeweler; and was 
senior member of the firm of L. L. and H. M. Richmond, with which firm 
he was connected for over twenty years. He was prominent in social and 
fraternal circles as well as in commercial life, and was a member of the In- 
dependent A-der of Odd Fellows, in which he was held in high regard. He 
was a RepuDlican in his political opinions, and a great admirer of President 
Roosevelt. In his religious affiliations Mr. Richmond belonged to the Episco- 
pal church, being a man of much dignity and reserve of disposition. He 
prospered in his business career, and erected a beautiful residence on Water 
street in the year 1907; this being now the home of his widow and daughter. 
Mr. Richmond died on November 28, 1912. His wife, to whom he was 



1258 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

married on April 6, 1875, was a Miss Mary Winifred Day, born April 4, 
1853, daughter of Henry Lewis and Winifred Gelston (Coffin) Day (see 
Day family) ; she is also a descendant of Sir Isaac Coffin on the maternal 
side. Descended thus from two of the oldest and best families in the country, 
Mrs. Richmond is a woman of unusual refinement and charm. She has had 
the benefit of an excellent education and is a communicant of the Episcopal 
church in Meadville; it is due to her that many family records and items 
of genealogical interest have been preserved. Mr. and Mrs. Richmond were 
the parents of three children, two sons and a daughter: i. Mary W. Rich- 
mond, their eldest child, was born February 11, 1876, and has been twice 
married. Her first husband, to whom she was married in August, 1898, was 
James Gardner, by whom she had two children: Gertrude M., born March 16, 
1901 ; James George, born November 22, 1905. Mr. Gardner died in April, 
1905 ; and in May, 1909. his widow married Harry Somers McFarland, a 
member of one of the oldest families of Meadville, and now in the employ of 
the Phoenix Iron Works. There are no children by this marriage. 2. Henry 
C, born April, 1877, died August, 1877. 3. George W. Richmond, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewis Lawton Richmond, was born January 22, 1880; died in 
October, 1905. He was educated at Allegheny College, after which he en- 
tered the employ of the Westinghouse Company at Pittsburgh as an electrical 
draughtsman. He served ten months during the Spanish-American War, 
having enlisted in Company B, Pennsylvania Volunteers. Like his father he 
was a member of the Episcopal church. 

(The Day Family.) 

(I) Robert Day, immigrant ancestor of the Meadville family of this 
name, came over to America in the bark "Elizabeth," which sailed from 
Ipswich, England, in April, 1634, and arrived at Boston, Massachusetts. 
He was born in about the year 1604, being thirty years of age at the time 
of sailing. His wife, Mary, aged twenty-eight years, accompanied him. 
He was made freeman May 6, 1635, settling first at Newtown, now Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts. His wife, Mary, died soon after reaching America, 
in all probability; and he married (second) Elizabeth Stebbins. Children: 
Thomas, of further mention ; John, Sarah and Mary. 

(II) Thomas, son of Robert Day, the immigrant, was born October 27, 
1659; died December 27, 171 1, at Springfield, where he had passed his life. 
His will was proved March 25, 1712. He married Sarah, daughter of 
Lieutenant Thomas Cooper, her father being killed by the Indians when 
Springfield was burned. Children: Thomas, born March 23, 1662; Sarah, 
June 14, 1664; Mary, December 15, 1666; John, February 20, 1669, died 
1670; Samuel, May 20, 1671 ; John, September 20, 1673; Ebenezer, Feb- 
ruary 18, 1676, died June 12, 1676; Ebenezer, September 5, 1677, men- 
tioned further; Jonathan, August 8, 1680; Abigail, died October 6, 1747. 

(III) Ebenezer, son of Thomas and Sarah (Cooper) Day, was born 
September 5, 1677, died September i, 1763; married, April 18, 1700, Mercy 
Hitchcock, who died September 29. 1761, aged eighty years. Children: 
Ebenezer, born October 23, 1701 ; Mercy, November 4, 1703 ; Luke, July 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1259 

2, 1706; Sarah, November 3, 1709; Thankful, December 24, 171 1 ; Timothy, 
June 15, 1714; Editha, August 20, 1715; Miriam, March 4, 1718; Timothy, 
September 5, 1720, mentioned further; Caleb, September 15, 1723; Elinor, 
December 10, 1725. 

(IV) Timothy, son of Ebenezer and Mercy (Hitchcock) Day, was bom 
September 5, 1720; died September 29, 1797; married, February 6, 1747, 
Sarah Munn, who died October 4, 1800, aged seventy-six years. They re- 
sided at West Springfield, Massachusetts. Children : Sarah, born June 24, 
1748; Timothy, March 13, 1750; Roswell, September 2, 1752; Lewis, July 
19, 1754; Thankful, August 10, 1756; Asa, November 19, 1759; Rebecca, 
August 20, 1761 ; Edmund, January 17, 1767, mentioned further. 

(V) Edmund, son of Timothy and Sarah (Munn) Day, was born 
January 17, 1767; died September 2, 1831. He was a resident of West 
Springfield, and married, January 16, 1794, Bede Hitchcock. Children: 

Adah, born November 10, 1794; Bede, born ; Julia, May 10, 1797; 

Harriet, March 23, 1799; Sarah Munn, December 17, 1800; Edmund, Octo- 
ber 27, 1802; Maria, June 28, 1804; Diadema, March 22, 1806; Ralph, Feb- 
ruary 21, 1808; Julia Ann, February 24, 181 1; Lucy, 1812; Henry Lewis, 
December 22, 1814, mentioned further. 

(VI) Henry Lewis, son of Edmund and Bede (Hitchcock) Day, was 
•born December 22, 1814, at West Springfield, Massachusetts ; died December 
16, 1873. His early years were passed in Massachusetts, and when about 
twenty years old he went West and engaged in the dry goods business at 
Ravenna, Ohio. He became a very successful and prominent citizen of his 
adopted city, and was twice elected mayor. He was a member of the Con- 
gregational church; and belonged to the F. and A. M., and to the K. T. 
of Cleveland, Ohio. He married, May i, 1838, Miss Winifred Gelston 
■Coffin, born at Nantucket, Massachusetts, died in June, 1901, at Meadville, 
Pennsylvania. Children: Henrietta G., born July 8, 1839, died May 15, 
1864; Henry Lewis, born May 6, 1841, died August, 1871 ; Roland G., born 
May 13, 1843, died April, 1898; Florence M., born in 1850, now deceased; 
Mary Winifred, born April 4, 1853, married, April 6, 1875, Lewis Lawton 
Richmond (see Ridbmond II) ; George, born in 1859; Winslow W., born in 
1863. 



In the early annals of Sugar Loaf township, Luzerne county, 
MINICH Pennsylvania, the records of Christ Church, jointly built by 

the Reformed and Lutheran congregations, are important. 
This church was organized about 1800 and their old log church was built 
in 1826. In a list of members of the church, the name of Abraham Minig, 
(Minnich) heads the list. In 1822, his name is on a list of taxables in Sugar 
Loaf township, furnished the tax collector. Richard Allen. He had a son, 
Abraham (2), whose name is found on an election list, of date of March 
2.0, 1835. This Abraham (2) Minnich, born about the year 1800, was the 
father of Henry A. Minich and grandfather of John Crawford Minich, post- 
masters of Saegerstown, Pennsylvania. Abraham (i) MinnicJi, also had a 



i26o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

son, Jolin, who married I'olly Klase and was the father of Jacob Minnick 
and grandfather of Edward Minnick of Conyngham, Pennsylvania, that 
branch spelling the name with a "k'' in many instances. 

(III) Henry A. Minich, a son of Abraham (2) and grandson of Abra- 
ham (i) Minich, was bom in Sugar Loaf township, Luzerne county, Penn- 
sylvania, October 8, 1839, died August 25, 1893. He grew to manhood in 
'his native township, then journeyed West to Crawford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he located at Saegerstown. Later he went to Ohio, but did 
not remain long, returning to Crawford county, and locating in the borough 
of Venango. There he engaged in mercantile life which he continued until 
the establishment was destroyed by fire. He then purdhased the roller 
process flouring mills at Saegerstown, where he was in successful business 
until his death. He was a Republican in politics and a member of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He was married in Kingston, Luzerne county, 
April 16, 1863, by Rev. Reuben Nelson, to Matilda Bennett Roat, born at 
Forty Fort, Luzerne county, April 5, 1843, died at Venango, Pennsylvania, 
April 26, 1890; children: Callie, born October 7, 1868, died at Perry, Ohio, 
July 8, 1870; Elva, born at Perry, Ohio, May 14, 1873, died May 27, 1893; 
Leon Russell, born September 26, 1876, died July 2, 1899; Arthur H., who 
died April, 1914, at Saegerstown ; John Crawford, of wihom further. 

(IV) John Crawford, youngest child of Henry A. and Matilda Bennett 
(Roat) Minich, was born in Venango, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, May 
15, 1882. He was educated in the public schools and is a graduate of 
Saegerstown high school, class of 1900. His parents moved to Saegers- 
town when he was nine years of age and from that time until the present, 
that borougth has been his home. He began business life as clerk in the 
freight office of the Erie Railroad Company, continuing in that employ four 
years. In 1910 he was appointed postmaster of Saegerstown by President 
Taft, a position he now holds (1915). He is a Republican in politics, 
and since 1908, has served as borough auditor. He was made a Mason in 
Coventry Lodge, No. 473, Free and Accepted Masons, and is now a past- 
master of his lodge. He is also a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is a young man of progress and public spirit ; very 
popular with his fellow men and held in high esteem. 

Mr. Minich married. May 29, 1914, Miss Margaret A. David, a daugh- 
ter of Albert and Kate (Hunter) David. Previous to her marriage Mrs. 
Minich taught school in Meadville two years. 



The Rhodes family was among the pioneer settlers of Rhode 
RHODES Island and begins with Zaohary Rhodes, who was born in 
1603, and settled in Rehoboth in 1643. I" 1644, with other 
settlers, he signed an agreement forming a town government. In 1646 
he left Rehoboth, crossed the river and bay to Rliode Island, and with others 
settled at Pawtuxet, where he became a large owner of land. His reason 
for leaving Massachusetts appears to have been of a religious nature, as 
records show he refused to comply with the Massachusetts law which 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1261 

sought to compel him to contribute for the support of preaching. In re- 
ligious sentiment he was an Independent or Baptist. Without doubt he 
was banished from the colony because of his peculiar views, but he be- 
came a man of strength and influence in Rhode Island. From 1664 10 
1665 he was treasurer of the town of Providence, and at the same time was 
a member of the town council. In 1658 he was admitted a freeman. He 
was a member of the general court at Portsmouth, in August, 1659, and 
in 1662 and 1663. In 1661 he attended as commissioner from Providence, 
the general court at Newport, and was appointed member of a committee 
to adjust difficulties existing between Rhode Island and Massachusetts, 
and he was also appointed, with Roger Williams and others, to draw up 
and sign an address to His Majesty, King Charles II. In March, 1663-64, 
as deputy from Providence, he attended the General Assembly of Rhode 
Island held at Newport, and again in 1665. In 1653 he, with five others, 
signed an address to the Court assembled in Boston asking that Pawtuxet 
might be dismissed from the government of the Massachusetts Colony. 
He made his will in 1662, and died in 1665. In 1646 Zachary (or Zach- 
ariah) Rhodes, married Joanna Arnold, born February 27, 1617, died in 
1692. Their children were: Jeremiah, Malachi, Zachariah;, Elizabeth, 
Mary, Rebecca, John, Peleg, and it is from one of these sons that the family 
mentioned below is descended. 

(I) Jonathan Rhodes, with his wife and nine children, left Rhode 

Island, and came by wagon to land north of where Cambridge Springs, 

Crawford county, Pennsylvania, is now located. Following is an extract 

from an old ledger now in the possession of Young J. Rhodes : 

"Tuesday, February J4, 1834', starting for Rockdale township, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania. The outfit consists of two horses, wagon, one one horse wagon. A 
dog was of the party but was lost at Albany. They had on the start cold weather 
and good wheeling. Got to Richfield Friday 2 P. M., March 6. Left there March 9. 
Snow came up and made much mud and made one knot per hour. Cross Cayuga 
Free Bridge Saturday. Drove until 9 o'clock. Thence for Parker in Byron, got 
there the 19. Snowed Sunday all day. left Monday, no bottom to roads. Ebenezer 
came to Batavia with horses and sleigh. Gave man there 50 cents to help 1/2 mile 
with Oxen. Made Ischerwoods Corners Wed. morning 3 P. M. Hauled in on 
Premises just sun Set. A farm 3 1/2 north of Cambridge. Settled on 200 acres 
Rockdale Township." 

A portion of this land was cleared, and a log house erected one-half 

mile from the public road. Prior to coming to Pennsylvania, Jonathan 

Rhodes was a merchant, and in the same old ledger mentioned above there 

are entries relative to his dealings in this line of business. One entry is as 

follows: "To taping & heel taping one pair Shoes for Z. 17c." The Z. 

means Zadock. 

(II) Zadock, son of Jonathan and Mary (Young) Rhodes, was born 
in Sterling, Connecticut, August 25, 181 1, and died July 12, 1870. He 
was a strong supporter of the Democratic party, and served as road com- 
missioner and .school director of the township several terms. He married, 
January 21, 1841, Elizabeth, daughter of William and Rebecca (Isher- 
wood) Watenhouse, of Le Boeuf township, Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
and had children : Amy ; Lewis ; Almina F. ; Young J., of further inention ; 
Ida M.. married Eugene Drake; Allen. 



1262 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(111) Young J., son of Zadock and Elizabeth ( Waterhouse) Rhodes, 
was born in Rockdale township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, August 8, 
1852. His preparatory education was acquired at the public schools iu 
the vicinity of his home, and he then matriculated at Mount Union College, 
Alliance, Ohio, from which he was graduated, after an attendance of two 
years, in the class of 1874. In the following year he located in Cambridge 
township, and there commenced the manufacture of lumber, a line of 
business with which he was actively identified until 1909. In 1904, how- 
ever, he also engaged in the wholesale liquor business in Cambridge Springs, 
and still continues to carry on this business. He has taken an active interest 
in the political affairs of the township for many years, and his influence has 
been felt for good in the interests of the Democratic party. He was in 
office as justice of the peace in Cambridge township from about 1876 to 
1886. Mr. Rhodes married, May 31, 1875, Aurelia, a daughter of Philander 
G. and Clarissa (Mitchell) Porter, of Cambridge township, and they have 
had children : Dolly, Horace and Robert. 



In the fifth American generation the Irish family of Christy 
CHRISTY is represented in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, by James 

H. Christy, members thereof being numerous in Ohio and 
in \Vestmoreland county, Pennsylvania. James Christy, son of the emi- 
grant ancestor, passed his entire life in Ohio, married and had children, 
one of his sons James, of whom further. 

(III) James (2) Christy, son of James (i) Christy, was born in Ohio, 
and was there reared. In manhood he came to Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, accompanied by his wife, Polly (North) Christy, and there 
they both died. His calling was that of farmer, and the land that he cul- 
tivated during his active years is still in the possession of the family. Chil- 
dren of James and Polly (North) Christy: Sarah, James, of whom further; 
Nancy, Thomas, Margaret, Rachel, Andrew, Joseph. 

(IV) James (3) Christy, son of James (2) and Polly (North) Christy, 
was born in \Vestmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1813, died in 1868. 
After finishing his youthful studies he became apprenticed to the millwright's 
trade, and after mastering the same was employed thereat for several 
years, afterward engaging in farming. He was a skillful and able 
workman at his trade, prospering in that as he did in ihis later occupation. 
In politics he was ever allied with tlie Republican forces, and belonged to 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Mary Jane Case, born in 
Forward township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1821, died in 1896, 
daughter of Butler and Elizabeth (Newlon) Case, her father born in Ohio, 
her mother in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Children of James and 
Mary Jane (Case) Christy: Butler Case, deceased; James H., of whom 
further; Elizabeth, deceased; Thomas North, deceased; Anna Belle, de- 
ceased. 

(V) James H. Christy, son of James (3) and Mary Jane (Case) Christy, 
was born in Sewickley townsihip, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 




^^^..^i^^^^^^^i^ ^?V^/f^fe^^^< 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1263 

January y, 1845. ^^i^ youthful home was near McGrew's Mill, Sewickley 
township, and he attended the public schools of that locality, completing his 
studies in Elizabeth Academy. Reared to farm life, that was the calling he 
chose upon attaining manhood, and he is now the owner of seventy-one 
acres of land near Elizabeth, Forward township, to which locality his 
parents moved in 1858. He is a successful farmer, cultivating his land 
upon the most approved of modern methods and winning from the soil a 
comfortable existence. Mr. Christy has always been active in public afifairs 
in Forward township, and as the candidate of the Republican party has 
been elected to all of the local offices with the exception of school director. 
For nine years he has been township assessor, and in that office, as in the 
others to which he Jias been elected, has shown a reliability and efficiency 
that have made him the best of public servants. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Christy married, August 28, 1868, Myra D. Smith, born in Forward 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, July 21, 1846, daughter of Rob- 
ert M. and Caroline (Black) Smith, of Revolutionary ancestry. Children 
of James H. and Myra D. (Smith) Christy: Alvin Black, deceased; James 
Case; Irene; Robert Smith, deceased; Caroline Grace; Mary; William, de- 
ceased ; Edwin F., deceased ; Thomas, deceased ; Ross, deceased, twin of 
Thomas; Hattie Belle; Delia, deceased; Ida, deceased; Frank; Nellie, 
deceased. 



//^ One of the third generation of his line in the United States, 

McLANE L. O. McLane, of Linesville, Pennsylvania, is a twentieth 
century representative of an ancient Irish line, his grand- 
father having come from the north of Ireland to Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, at the beginning of the nineteenth century. After the birth of 
Joseph, father of L. O. McLane, the family moved to the western part of 
the state, where both of the grandparents of L. O. McLane died. 

Joseph McLane was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1822, 
died in Oil City, Venango county, Pennsylvania, in 1878. As a youth he 
accompanied his parents to Pittsburgh, obtaining his education in this city 
and in the place of his birth, and in your manhood he learned the trades 
of tinner and coppersmith. Subsequently he was employed on steamboats 
plying the rivers of the region, and wlhen about thirty years of age was 
placed in charge of the Muck Rolls of the Brady's Bend Mills, Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania, where were then manufactured the only steel rails 
made west of the Allegheny mountains. For several years he made that 
place his home, being there married, and during the height of the oil excite- 
ment moved to Oil City, Pennsylvania, where he became proprietor of a 
hardware store, and at his death was a prosperous and considered highly 
rated merchant. In addition to his activities in the line previously men- 
tioned, he conducted oil operations upon a small scale, preferring the less 
spectacular but more certain methods of established trade to the chance 
and fortune of oil investment, which, while it brought fortune to many, 



1264 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

did not thus favor all who followed it. Joseph McLane was a member 
of the Pennsylvania Reserves during the Civil War, and with his wife 
belonged to the Methodist Episcopal churoh. He married Patience Moody, 
born near Red Bank, Clarion county, Pennsylvania, member of a family that 
claims Dwight L. Moody, the famous evangelist and preacher, as a member. 
Children of Joseph and Patience (Moody) McLane: i. Spurgeon Melang- 
than, a locomotive engineer, resides in Oil City, Pennsylvania, 2. L. O., of 
whom further. 3. Jennie, deceased, married John Vaughan, deceased, and 
resided in Oil City, Pennsylvania. 4. Alpine W., deceased, a locomotive 
engineer of Oil City, Pennsylvania. 5. James S., department head of a 
gas engine manufacturing company of Oil City, Pennsylvania. 6. Daniel 
D., a hardware merchant of De Soto, Missouri. 

(II) L. O., son of Joseph and Patience (Moody) McLane, was born 
in Brady's Bend, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1854. His 
youthful education was obtained in the public schools of Oil City, and he 
mastered the plumber's and tinner's trades under the preceptorship of his 
father, afterward becoming associated with the elder McLane in business. 
Following the death of Joseph McLane he formed a connection with another 
hardware concern of Oil City, and in 1879 he was sent to Bradford, Penn- 
sylvania, and placed in charge of a tinning shop, remaining in this place 
until he resigned from the company's service and established in independent 
dealings. He made Richburg, New York, a town that derived its imme- 
diate importance from its proximity to the oil fields, the scene of his first 
venture, there opening a hardware store, in connection therewith conducting 
a business in general tinning and plumbing. For two years he remained in 
Richburg, at the end of that time moving to Garfield, Warren county, 
Pennsylvania, there operating a store for a like term of years, also having 
a hardware store at Gusher for two years. In 1884 Mr. McLane came to 
Linesville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, purchasing the main interest 
in the Schanck Hardware Company, and has here since resided and has had 
his business interests in company with G. C. Schanck, when it was then 
incorporated as the McLane, Schanck Hardware Company, and to this time 
retains that title, the business having enjoyed prosperous growth from 
year to year until it has attained its present state of vigorous independence. 
In 1892 the store in which the McLane, Schanck Hardware Company was 
housed was destroyed by fire, since which time it has been located in com- 
modious quarters in a building forty by one hundred and ten feet. In addi- 
tion to handling a full line of hardware and implements of various uses, 
the company conducts a plumbing, heating and tinning trade, this branch 
of the business no small part of its activities. Adjoining the hardware 
store is a garage, under the same management, and the company likewise 
has the agency for several well-known makes of automobiles. ■ This depart- 
ment, really an independent business, has been a decided success, and is 
generously patronized by the motoring element of the borough and the 
neighboring region. Mr. McLane's business career is one of almost un- 
interrupted success, attained through diligent application and tireless in- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1265 

dustry, for he has ever appreciated the value of hard, conscientious labor 
in the gaining of worthy results. 

Public life and politics have always witnessed a large share of Mr. 
McLane's activities, and, formerly a Republican, he is now identified with 
the Progressive party. For two terms he served Linesville as burgess, and 
was four times elected to represent his district in the state legislature, a 
responsibility that he discharged with distinction to himself and satisfaction 
to his constituents. In 1912 he was a delegate to the Republican National 
Convention at Chicago, pledged for Roosevelt, and in the same year he 
became a presidential elector, one of the twenty-six electors from Pennsyl- 
vania, who withdrew from the Republican support and became Roosevelt 
electors. Since its birth, Mr. Mcl^ne has been an ardent and enthusiastic 
member of the Progressive party, and in 1914 was a candidate for the state 
legislature on the ticket of that party, advocating a platform that he stated 
in thirteen bold, outspoken clauses. Mr. McLane was appointed by the 
legislature of 1905 a member of the Jamestown Tercentennial Commission, 
and served with credit in that body. Mr. McLane is a member of the 
Masonic order, belonging to Linesville Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Conneautville Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Meadville Commandery, No. 
25, Knight Templar; and Zem Zem Temple, of Erie, Pennsylvania, An- 
cient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. With his family he is 
a member of the United Presbyterian church, of which he has long been 
a trustee. Mr. McLane is a member of the board of directors of the 
Linesville State Bank. 

He married, January 18, 1882, Nina, born in Woodcock township, 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Garrett C. and Sarah (Britton) 
Sdianck, both deceased, her father a farmer and later a hardware dealer 
of Linesville, Pennsylvania. Mr. McLane has no children. 



John Kingsley, who was born in Hampshire, England, 
KINGSLEY was descended from Randulphus de Kyngesleigh, of 

Chester, England, 1120. Arms: Vert a cross engrailed 
ermine. Crest: In a ducal coronet gules a goat's head argent. John 
Kingsley, also Kyngesley and Kinsley, according to Savage, was of "Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts, 1635, came probably with some other friends of 
Mather, and was here before him. At any rate was one of the seven 
pillars on formation of the new church for him, August 23, 1636, and was 
the last survivor. He removed to Rehoboth after 1648, when he was in 
office and in 1658, there lived and suffered the Indian hostilities, in which 
in a letter of supplication for relief under date of May 5, 1676. a most sad 
picture is given (see Trumbull Colonial Records, vol. ii, p. 445). His will 
of November 2, 1677, mentions only three children : Edward, Enos, Free- 
dom." 

(ID A John Kingsley, in all probability a son of the preceding, died in 
Rehoboth, January 6, 1678, and Mar}', his wife, on the 14th of the same 
month. 1673. They had children: Eldad. of further mention; Renewal, 



1266 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

born March 19, 1644; a daughter, married John French, of Northampton; 
probably another daughter, who married Timothy Jones, from Massachu- 
setts. (Ill) Eldad, son of John and Mary Kingsley, was born 1638. (IV) 
John, was a son of Eldad Kingsley. 

(V) Amos, son of John Kingsley, married, and had: Isaiah, of fur- 
ther mention; Nathaniel, who came from Connecticut, and shared the 
fortunes of his brother. 

(VI) Isaiah, son of Amos Kingsley, with other se,ttlers, came from 
Connecticut to Becket about the year 1755, and there founded a permanent 
settlement. He was the first deacon chosen to that position in the Becket 
Congregational Church, and was appointed March 8, 1759, when he was 
thirty-five years of age. In this station he served the church thirty-seven 
years, and died December 29, 1796. 

(VII) Seth P., son of Isaiah Kingsley, was born June 13, 1761, and 
removed from Becket to Otis. 

(VIII) Erastus, son of Seth P. Kingsley, was torn June 20, 1788. 
About 1824 he removed to Venango township, Crawford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, locating on the farm now occupied by Lynn Kingsley. He brought 
his father with him. The farm he purchased from one of the Rockwells, 
the first settlers in this section. It was about two hundred acres at that 
time, and Mr. Kingsley added to it by purchase until it now consists of 
more than four hundred acres. When he came almost the entire tract was 
covered with timber, and there was a small log cobin near the site of the 
present buildings. Mr. Kingsley erected a new home, and about 1848, 
built the house which is still in use by his descendants. He married, Febru- 
ary 18, 1817, Elizabeth Marion Marcy, and they had children: Albert 
Eldridge, of further mention; Orville Ostrander ; Harmony Angeline; Re- 
becca Rice; Esther Elizabeth, born on the homestead in Crawford county; 
Emily Lucinda, born on the homestead ; Nathaniel Erastus, born on the 
homestead. 

(IX) Albert Eldridge, son of Erastus and Elizabeth Marion (Marcy) 
Kingsley, was born in Genesee county. New York, December 8, 18 17, and 
came to Venango township, Crawford county, in 1824, with his father and 
grandfather. The day before he was forty-five years of age he was drafted 
for military duty, but, upon reporting the following day, was excused from 
service as having reached the age limit. Mr. Kingsley married, October 
II, 1842, Hannah Marilla Rockwell, who was born in Rockdale township, 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania. They had children: Orson E. ; Ogden E. ; 
Alta A. ; Albert Alonzo, of further mention ; and two who died in infancy. 
Mr. Kingsley was educated in Venango township, and followed farming 
from early years. Later he took up a farm adjoining the homestead, and in 
1862 acquired the farm now in the possession of his son, Albert Alonzo. 
This consisted of one hundred acres, and Mr. Kingsley made many im- 
provements on it. He and his family were of the Presbyterian denomina- 
tion. 

(X) Albert Alonzo, son of Albert Eldridge and Hannah Marilla 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1267 

(Rockwell) Kingsley, was born in Venango township, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, March 22, 1856. After completing the course at the public 
schools in the vicinity of his home, he attended the Edinboro Normal 
School and the Allegheny College, but left the last mentioned institution 
shortly before his graduation, because of the necessity of his taking charge 
of the home farm and taking care of his parents in their declining years. 
Returning to his home he devoted himself to farming, and since that time 
has been engaged in cultivating his land for general products. He is an 
active member of the local grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and of the order 
of Free and Accepted Masons, and he and his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Kingsley married, September 14, i88z, 
Hettie C. Dauchey, of Spring Borough, Crawford county, and they have 
had children: Ogden R., married Elizabeth Cole, June 12, 1912, one child, 
Ruth L. ; Wilbur L., married Florence Goshorn, June 28, 1911, one child, 
Robert G. ; Charles Albert, died June 16, 1901 ; Anita Vere. 

Hannah Marilla (Rockwell) Kingsley was a daughter of Eleazer and 
Keziah (Spring) Rockwell, of Rockdale township, where he was a farmer, 
and an active church member. It was largely due to his personal efforts 
and energy that the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Cambridge Springs 
was erected. 



The Straw family is among the pioneer families of the United 
STRAW States and one of those which have enabled her to attain and 

to maintain the proud supremacy she now holds in the world. 
This family has been well and prominently represented in the professions 
and in all honorable callings of life. When our country needed men to 
defend her just rights, the members of the Straw family were ever ready 
to lay aside their personal afifairs and respond to the call to arms, and in 
this way, help build up the glorious history of our land. 

(I) John Straw, who was an early settler in Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, acquired land in Woodcock township, which he cleared of timber 
and cultivated. He had learned the potter's trade, and followed this calling, 
as well as farming, and was a very successful man. He married Christina 
Blystone, and they had children: Christian, of further mention; Jacob; 
Caroline ; Sarah. 

(II) Christian, son of John and Christina (Blystone) Straw, was born 
in Hayfield township, Crawford county, January i, 1820, and was educated 
in the district schools near his home. He took up farming in Venango 
township, Crawford county, and followed this occupation until his death, 
at which time he was the owner of one hvmdred acres near Cambridge 
Springs. He married Jane Mitchell, born in Le Boeuf township, Erie 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1824, and they were the parents of children : Isabel, 
who married the late O. E. Kingsley; Frank P., of further mention; Charles 
P. Henry Mitchell, father of Mrs. Jane (Mitchell) Straw, was born in 
Massachusetts, and settled near \\'aterford, Erie county, Pennsylvania, at an 
early date, and was engaged in farming until his death. He was an active 
participant in the war of 18 12. 



1268 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(III) Frank P., son of Christian and Jane (Mitchell) Straw, was 
born in Venango township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, April i8, 1850. 
The public schools of his native township furnished his early education, 
and this was supplemented by attendance at the Edinboro Normal School. 
Until 1913 he was actively engaged in farming, having a fine farm of one 
hundred and thirty-seven acres, two and a half miles northwest of Venango 
borough. He was also largely engaged in the raising of horses and cattle, 
making a specialty of draft horses. He made many improvements on the 
farm ,and increased its value greatly. In 1913 he removed to Venango 
borough, and in 1914 erected his new home there. He is very prominent 
in the township, and his influence for good is felt in many ways. Politically 
he is a staunch supporter of Democratic principles, and he has filled a 
number of township offices, among them being : Supervisor, auditor, judge 
of election, inspector of elections, and school director, filling the last men- 
tioned ofifice fifteen years. He is a member of the First Lutheran Church 
of Venango borough. 

Mr. Straw married, in 1879, Caroline Burnhardt, born in Venango 
township, and they have had children: Harry M., a postal clerk on the Pitts- 
burgh & Lake Erie railroad, married Clara Bickford, of Erie, Pennsylvania, 
no issue; Gertrude May, married Ross Root, of Cambridge Springs, no issue. 



The Rockwell family is one of the oldest in Hartford 
ROCKWELL county, Connecticut, having been identified with its in- 
terests for almost two hundred and seventy-five years. 
(I) William Rockwell, the first of the line in America, was born in 
Dorchester, England, and came to America with his wife and two children 
in 1630. He located first at Dorchester, Massachusetts, where he was one 
of the twenty-four freemen who took the oath of fidelity on May 18, 1631. 
He was a deacon in the church there, and was one of the jurors in the 
first manslaughter case tried in the colony. In 1637 he removed with his 
family to Windsor, Connecticut, where he passed the remainder of his 
days, his death occurring. May 15, 1640. He was also a deacon in the 
church at Windsor. He married in England, April 14, 1624, Susanna, a 
daughter of Bernard Chapin. She married (second), May 29, 1645, Mat- 
thew Grant, and died November 14, 1666. William and Susanna (Chapin) 
Rockwell had children: Joan, born in England, April 25, 1625, married 
Jeffrey Baker; Samuel, born in England, July 18, 1627, of further mention; 
John, born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, March 28, 1631 ; Ruth, born in 
Dorchester, in August, 1633, married, October 7, 1652, Christopher Hunt- 
ington, removed to Saybrook and, in 1660, to Norwich, where they were 
among the earliest settlers; Sarah, born in Windsor, Connecticut, July 21, 
1634, married Walter Gaylor. 

(II) Sergeant Samuel Rockwell, son of William and Susanna (Chapin) 
Rockwell, was born in England, July 18, 1627, and died in East Windsor, 
Connecticut, in 1711. He came with his parents from England and re- 
moved with the familv from Dorchester. Massachusetts, to Windsor, Con- 



WESTERN PENNSYL\A>;:A 1269 

necticut. lie was among the earliest .settlers in East Windsor, where he 
was engaged in farming until ihis death. He was admitted to membership 
in Windsor church, April 6, 1662. He married, April 7, 1660, Mary, a 
daughter of Thomas and Grace (Wells) Norton, of Guilford. Children: 
Mary, baptized in January, 1661, married, October 23, 1683, Josiah Loomis ; 
Abigail, baptized, October 23, 1664, died May 3, 1665; Samuel, baptized 
October 19, 1667; Joseph, baptized May 22, 1670; married Elizabeth, a 
daughter of Job and Elizabeth (Alvord) Dirake, and died June 26, 1733; 
John, of further mention; Abigail, baptized April 11, 1676, was married, 
November 9, 1704, to John Smith, and died October 12, 1741 ; Josiah, bap- 
tized, March 10, 1676. 

(HI) John, son of Sergeant Samuel and Mary (Norton) Rockwell, 
was baptized May 31, 1673-74. 

(IV) Joel, was a son of John Rockwell. 

(V) Ephraim, son of Joel Rockwell, was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
war. He married (first) Sarah Moore, January i, 1773; he married (sec- 
ond) Hannah Coon, of the family who donated the first burying ground in 
Cambridge Springs, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, this being now known 
as the Hill Cemetery, and in April, 1820, was the first person to be buried 
there. 

(VI) Zerah, son of Ephraim and Hannah (Coon) Rockwell, was born 
in Windsor, Connecticut, March 6, 1787, and was about twelve years of 
age when he came with his father and the other members of the family to 
Berkshire, Massachusetts. His father had bought a farm there and was 
also a manufacturer of rakes. In this his son assisted him until 1816 when, 
in association with his brother Bernard, he went to Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, to investigate conditions there. He was well pleased with condi- 
tions and purchased a tract on French creek. In the summer of 1818, he 
transported his family to this region, making the journey by means of an 
ox team, and during first year, occupied the log school house, which was 
located on what is now known as Yankee Hill. In the course of time they 
cleared about one hundred acres of land, put up saw and rake mills, and 
prospered in a satisfactory manner. He married, prior to coming to Penn- 
sylvania, Phoebe Carter, of Otis, Massachusetts. In 1825 he and his wife 
joined the Presbyterian church. 

(VII) Abner Otis, son of Zerah and Phoebe (Carter) Rockwell, was 
born at Yankee Hill, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, May 10, 1819, and 
died at Cambridge Springs, May 19, 1906. He received his middle name 
in honor of the native town of his mother. He was the recipient of an 
excellent education, was graduated from Jefiferson College in the class of 
1843, and from the Western Theological Seminary in 1846. He was 
licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Beaver, April 10, 1845, the day 
on which occurred the great fire in Pittsburgh. He was the minister at a 
number of churches, among them being Middlesex and Sharon; Huber, 
Ohio; Mingo and Lebanon, Pennsylvania; for many years at Frankfort 
Springs, Pennsylvania, and later a missionary in ^^^est Virginia. He was 



I270 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

one of the pioneer Presbyterian ministers of Pennsylvania, and organized 
congregations in many sections. Many who owed their religion training 
to Mr. Rockwell grew up to become prominent members of the communi- 
ties in which they resided. He was earnest and devout in his ministrations, 
and was actively identified with his calling until his death. At the time of 
his death he was the oldest minister of any denomination in the state of 
Pennsylvania. For many years he considered Pittsburgh his home, but 
two years prior to his death removed to Cambridge Springs. He married, 
January 15, 1846, Sarah Greer, of North Side, Pittsburgh, and they had 
one child : Emma, who married George A. Swoger, and lives at 454 Venango 
avenue, Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania; no issue. Mrs. Rockwell died 
February 4, 1899. 



Bartholomew Erhardt is a fine example of the best type of 
ERHARDT German character which has contributed so large and valu- 
able an element to the citizenship of the United States 
and leavened that great and complex mass with many of the German virtues, 
patient industry, and unswerving pursuit of an object. His father, Andrew 
Erhardt, was born May 2, 1814, at Rheinfalls, Germany, and there spent 
the greater part of his life engaged in farming and cattle raising. In 1880, 
though at that time sixty-six years of age, he left the country of his birth 
and came to America and settled at Squirrel Hill, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, whither his son, Bartholomew Erhardt, had preceded him. An- 
drew Erhardt married Mary Abt, their union being blessed with three chil- 
dren, as follows: Bartholomew, of whom further; Joseph, who married 
Mary Minekus, resided in Germany, and is now deceased ; Mary, w.ho 
became Mrs. Jacob Minekus and is now residing in Germany. 

Bartholomew Erhardt, the eldest child of Andrew and Mary (Abt) 
Erhardt, was born September 26, 1842, in Rheinfalls, Germany, and passed 
his childhood and youth in his native region. He was educated in the 
local volkeschule, and upon the completion of his studies assisted his father 
in the operation of his farm. On July i, 1869, while in his twenty-seventh 
year, Mr. Erhardt set sail for the United States to seek the great opportuni- 
ties which he had heard ofifered there. He was the pioneer member of his 
family and it was not until eleven years later, after he had established a home 
in the New World, that his father joined him. He first settled in Morning- 
side, Pennsylvania, but did not remain there long, going thence to Squirrel 
Hill where he engaged in gardening, an occupation which his early training 
in the Fatherland had fitted him for. His first residence in Squirrel Hill 
lasted about four years, between 1872 and 1876, and in the latter year he 
removed to Homestead, Pennsylvania, and gardened the site where the 
great steel works are situated today, and where he remained for two years. 
He then returned to Squirrel Hill and continued his residence there for 
six years, from 1878 to 1884. In 1884 he went to Pittsburgh, and there 
made ihis home on Dallas avenue, for a period of ten years. During that 
time he began to long more and more, as time went on, for the rural life 




Oii,-£;s^T,<z>^;^l:x.-.^^ /^^^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1271 

which his early training and a natural taste had rendered dear to him, and 
it thus happened that in 1894 he purchased sixteen acres of fine farm land 
in Penn township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and removed there to 
the hamlet of Wilkinsburg. There he has made his home for the past 
twenty years, and occupied himself with his beloved gardening. On his 
sixteen acres he has developed a model farm where he raises for the large 
and growing markets in the community all manner and variety of garden 
truck and practically every kind of fruit grown in this climate. As his 
sons have grown to an age to make it possible, they have turned to and 
helped their father in running the place, until they have developed it to 
the point where it may well claim to be the finest garden farm in the town- 
ship. Upon it they have erected a beautiful house and installed every 
modern improvement, both for their personal comfort and convenience and 
for the more effective growing of their divers crops. Mr. Erhardt himself 
and all his sons are heart and soul in the work, a fact which undoubtedly 
accounts for the high degree of success they have achieved. Mr. Erhardt 
is not so absorbed by his work, however, that he has no time or attention 
to spare for other matters. On the contrary he is actively interested in all 
aspects of the life of the community, and is himself a prominent figure in 
many of its departments. He is a member of the Democratic party, and an 
intelligent and keen observer of the political issues of the day, and though 
he takes no active part in local affairs, and avoids rather than seeks public 
office, his influence in these affairs is by no means slight, and, exerted as 
they are purely in a private capacity, are the result of the weight of his 
personality and the prominent place which he holds in the community. Mr. 
Erhardt is a communicant of the Roman Catholic diurch, as his fathers have 
always been, and in that faith is rearing his children, and has been a mem- 
ber of S. S. Peter and Paul Church of East End, Pittsburgh, since 1869. 
He served six years of military service and fought in the Prussian-Austrian 
war of 1866. Mr. Erhardt's love for the Fatherland has not waned through 
all the long years in which he has lived in the New World. A true American 
in feelings and professions, he nevertheless has never forgotten the land 
with which the associations of his youth are inseparably bound up, and 
accordingly some years ago he developed a strong desire to see the old 
sights and renew the old friendships once more. It was a desire that he could 
very well indulge, and he straightway went on an extended trip to his native 
place during the course of which he visited many friends and relatives ; in 
1891 he recrossed again, also in 1906, this time in company with Mrs. 
Erhardt. 

Bartholomew Erhardt married, October 15, 1871, Mary Hochberg, a 
native of Germany, born September 17, 1848, daughter of John and Kath- 
erine Hochberg, of that country. Mrs. Erhardt's maternal grandfather, 
John Nansmann, was a distinguished man in the region of Germany in 
which he lived, and gave his long life in the service of education. He 
taught for fifty years in the German State Schools, and at the expiration 
of that period was pensioned by the government. He died at the venerable 



1272 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



age of eigihty-four years. To Mr. and Mrs. Bartholomew Erhardt there 
have been born eight children, as follows: Mary Ann, who died in early 
youth; Jacob; Elias; Mary, married Albert Snyder, of Hundred, West 
Virginia, July 6, 1898, and is the mother of four children: Ora, Phelma, 
Harold and George; Minnie, lives at home with her parents; Peter H. ; 
Rose; Bartholomew J. On November 18, 191 4, Bartholomew Erhardt 's 
four sons purchased a farm of sixty-two acres adjoining the present farm 
of their father. 



The Boyle family was originally resident in Scotland, but at 
BOYLE the time of the religious persecutions, they migrated to the 

North of Ireland, and lived there for some generations, before 
any of the family came to this country. They were living in the vicinity 
of Ballyney Hinch, county Down, Ireland, and the family was noted for 
their erudition, a number of the men being school teachers, and others 
following other lines of professional work. 

(I) Alexander Boyle, the progenitor of the line under discussion here, 
was a farmer and miller near Ballyney Hinch, county Down, Ireland, and 
is buried in the graveyard near ihis home. He was a Seceder and very 
strict in his religious views. Among his seven children we find the follow- 
ing names, the others not being of record at present : John ; Thomas ; Nancy ; 
Elizabeth ; Francis, of further mention. 

(II) Francis, son of Alexander Boyle, was born at Ballyney Hinch, 
and received an excellent education. For a time he was a school teacher, 
and he was the leader in athletic sports among the young men of his neigh- 
borhood. About 1795, while his children, all of whom were born in Ire- 
land, were still small, he emigrated to America with his family, and pur- 
chased a fine farm at Glade Mills, Butler county, Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried, in Ireland, Ann Scott, and they had children : John, of further men- 
tion; David, inherited the homestead in Butler county; Alexander, was a 
school teacher, later a river pilot and surveyor, and wrote a book of great 
value upon the navigation of the Mississippi river; there were also three 
daughters. 

(III) John, son of Francis and Ann (Scott) Boyle, was born in the 
north of Ireland, and there received the rudiments of his education. He 
was still a child when he came to this country in 1795 with his parents, and 
his education was completed in this country. He was an especially fine 
scholar in Latin, Greek and German. He also studied the higher math- 
ematics, and fitted himself successfully for the profession of surveying, and 
was considered the best educated man in Butler county. He owned a farm 
in Worth township, taught for many years, and was for many years a 
surveyor. A Democrat in political matters, and a Seceder in religion. He 
married Martha Boyd, and had children : John, a wagon maker in Worth 
township, later moved to Bennington, Kansas, where he died and is buried ; 
Nancy, married (first) John Stoughton, (second) Jonathan Vogan, also 
deceased ; Jennie, married William Stewart, a farmer, lived in Worth town- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1273 

ship, both now deceased; Martha, married (first) J;inies Atwell, (second J 
Samuel Irwin; Thomas, of further mention. 

(IV) Thomas, son of John and Martha (Boyd) Boyle, was born in 
Worth township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, December 15, 1815, and died 
June 9, 1865. He was eleven years of age when his mother died, and his 
father soon bound him out to learn the blacksmith's trade. He was a 
natural mechanic, and in these days would have been called a skilled ma- 
chinist. For years he had a shop in Jacksville, Pennsylvania, and later at 
Bovard, where his death occurred. His widow returned to Jacksville, and 
died there. He married Jane Stoughton, born in Worth township, Decem- 
ber 6, 1822, died June 19, 1889. She was a daughter of John and Catherine 
(Covert) Stoughton, both born in Pennsylvania. Mrs. Stoughton was of 
Holland descent, her mother's maiden name being Van Zant, a family that 
had settled on Manhattan Island, New York. Mr. Stoughton was of Eng- 
lish descent, became a farmer, and owned three hundred and fifty acres of 
land, in three farms. He had a brother, Samuel Stoughton, who was a 
Baptist minister, and the entire family was very strict in its religious ob- 
servances. Mr. and Mrs. Stoughton had children : William, a farmer, lived 
in Clay township; Luke, a farmer in Worth township, was in active service 
in the war of 1812 ; Andrew, a wealthy and prosperous farmer of Clay 
township ; Jacob, a farmer, who died unmarried ; John, also a participant 
in the war of 1812, lived on a part of the homestead, and married Nancy 
Boyle; Barnard, a farmer, died in Kansas; Jane, who married Mr. Boyle, 
as above stated ; Hannah, married John Patterson, and lived in Worth 
township ; Eflfie, married Robert Logan, a farmer, who was killed during the 
Civil War ; Polly, died young. Mr. and Mrs. Boyle had children : Catherine, 
who died August 11, 1914, married Enoch Varnum, and lived in North 
Washington, Pennsylvania; Martha, died in infancy; Martha Jane, now 
deceased, married Edward Hagan, a farmer and carpenter, and lived in 
Missouri ; Nancy, deceased, married Robert Hampson Book, and lived in 
Worth township ; Hannah, unmarried, lives with her brother, James Clyde ; 
John, deceased, lived in Worth township; Bernard and Thomas, died in 
infnacy ; Christian, died in infancy ; Cornelia, died unmarried ; James Clyde, 
of further mention. 

(V) Dr. James Clyde Boyle, son and youngest child of Thomas and 
Jane (Stoughton) Boyle, was born at Bovard, Cherry township, Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, November 14, 1864. His elementary education was 
acquired at the public schools of Worth township, and he then attended the 
Witherspoon Institute, at Butler, Pennsylvania. He taught school for two 
terms in Worth township, after which he became a student at the State 
Normal School at Edinboro, Pennsylvania, and was graduated from this 
institution in the class of 1889. He spent one year in teaching and reading 
medicine under a preceptor, after which he matriculated at the Western 
Pennsylvania Medical College, now the University of Pittsburgh, and was 
graduated in the class of 1892 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. For 
a short time he practiced in association with Dr. Beatty. at Leeper, Garion 



1274 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

county, Pennsylvania, then three years at Taylorstown, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania. In 1896 he located in Butler, Pennsylvania, and has been in 
continuous practice there since that time. He took a course at the Philadel- 
phia Polyclinic College for Graduated Physicians, in 1902-03, and in 1905 
took a special course in diseases of the eye, at the Royal London Ophthalmic 
Hospital, and at the Westminster Ophthalmic Hospital, London, England. 
He also took a special course on the ear, nose and throat at the Central 
London Ear and Throat Hospital. With this fine equipment he is now 
considered one of the ablest specialists on these diseases in the entire state. 
He has established a hospital at No. 121 East Cunningham street, Butler, 
Pennsylvania, in 1908, and his patients come to him from all over the 
country. He is a member and ex-president of the Butler County Medical 
Society ; a member of the State Medical Society ; member of the American 
Medical Society; and a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Dr. Boyle married, January 31, 1894, Kathleen McNair, born in Butler, 
Pennsylvania, died March 5, 1913, a daughter of Thomas and Jane McNair, 
the former, now deceased, was a miller, and was born near Morgantown, 
West Virginia, the latter was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania. Dr. 
Boyle has one child : James Clyde Jr., born April 7, 1906. 



This is an old family of Austria. Toward the latter part of 
RABELL the eighteenth century two brothers, Michael and Ferdinand 

Rabell, left their native land in order to make a home for 
themselves in America. Both were evidently lost at sea, as they were never 
heard from again. 

(I) Anthony Rabell, a brother of Michael and Ferdinand, mentioned 
above, was born at Rhona, Austria. He also sailed for America, landed 
here in safety, and was a baker in the city of New York during the re- 
mainder of his life. He was prosperous in his business affairs, and pur- 
chased several farms in Westchester county, in the vicinity of New York 
City. He married Maria Deal, a widow, and had children: Michael, of 
further mention ; Anthony ; Ferdinand ; Maria ; Eliza. 

(II) Machael, son of Anthony and Maria (Deal) Rabell, was born in 
New York City, December 18, 1792, received an excellent education, and 
was graduated from the City College. About 1863 he owned and conducted 
a bakery in Meadville, Crawford county, on the present site of the Stone 
church. In 1868 he removed to the farm in Woodcock township, Crawford 
county, which consisted of about three hundred and sixty acres, mostly 
heavily timbered. He cleared a large portion of this land and placed it under 
cultivation very successfully. He was a man of many-sided activities, was 
active in the interests of the Democratic party, and belonged to a company 
of militia. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. 
Rabell married Harriet, a daughter of Samuel and Ann (Wiseman) Nodine, 
and had children: i. Anna Eliza, now eighty-five years of age. lives at 
Warsaw, New York ; she married Chester Richardson, who died in March, 
1913, and had children: Harriet, who died in 1914; Louise; William; 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1275 

Charles; George. 2. Anthony, wlio died in 1902; he lived on Long Island, 
and married Eliza Valentine ; children : Winfield, Lida, Ada, Lelia and Lee. 

3. Michael, of further mention. 4. Wiseman, who died in 1909, lived at 
Richmond, Pennsylvania ; he married VVilla A. Pulman, and had children : 
Raymond and Mary. 5. James, who died in March, 1909, married Minerva 
Purse, and had : Natena, Mary, Harry and Theresa. 6. Sarah, married 
(first) George Greenlee, (second) David Gibson; children by first marriage: 
Clayton and George ; child by second marriage : Ora. 7. Martina, died in 
1867, married William S. Skelton. 

(Ill) Michael, son of Michael and Harriet (Nodine) Rabell, was 
born in New York City, December 5, 1834. He received his education in 
the public schools, and has been engaged in agricultural pursuits all his 
life. He has been living in Woodcock township, Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, for the past fifty-one years, and has a fine farm of one hundred and 
eighty-six acres, which he has under cultivation for general products. He 
is an active member of the Presbyterian church of Woodcock township, 
and gives his political support to the Democratic party. During the Civil 
War he was drafted, but was unable to go and furnished a substitute. Mr. 
Rabell married, April 8, 1862, Rachel Price, and they have had children: 
I. Clara, born November i, 1863, died in infancy. 2. Frank, born in 1866, 
lives at Duncansville, Pennsylvania ; he married Maud Orr, and has chil- 
dren : Ildra and Blanche ; he is a painter and decorator. 3. Arthur, born in 
April, 1874, is unmarried and engaged in farming in Woodcock township. 

4. Mary B., born in 1877 ; married Albert Greenlee, of Woodcock township, 
and has one child : Marion. 

Nathan Price, grandfather of Mrs. Rachel (Price) Rabell, was a resi- 
dent of New Jersey. He married Mary Wilson, and had children : Wilson 
John; James V.; Francis A., of furtlier mention; Anna S. ; Rachel Y. 
Later Mr. Price removed to Woodcock township, and became the owner 
of the farm now in the possession of Michael Rabell. 

Francis A., son of Nathan and Mary (Wilson) Price, and father of 
Mrs. Rachel (Price) Rabell, was educated in the common schools, and 
was a staunch supporter of the Democratic party. He also was a farmer. 
He married Harriet Stone, and had children : Rachel, who married Michael 
Rabell, as above stated ; Margaret, now a widow ; Mary A., who died at the 
age of thirty-nine years ; Alfred W., married Elizabeth Heathcote, had 
children: William and Margaret, and his widow married (second) Samuel 
Rabell, a cousin of Michael Rabell, and had children : Harriet and Otho L. ; 
George K., married (first) Edna Ford, had children: Nina and Anna B., 
married (second) Sylva Byham; James W., married Hattie Coats, and 
had children: Nettie and Ernest. 



The name of Williams is very ancient, and probably ex- 
WILLIAMS tends throughout the civilized world. Most of the original 
members of the family were doubtless of Welsh extrac- 
tion. They form a large part of the principality of Wales in England, some- 



1276 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

what like the Os in Ireland and the Macs in Scotland. "Burke's Peerage" 
says of Sir Robert Williams, the ninth baronet of the House of Williams 
of Penrhyn, that "His family is lineally descended from Marchudel of Cynn, 
Lord of Abergelen in Denbighshire, of one of the fifteen tribes of North 
Wales, who lived in the time of Roderic Mann (Roderic the Great), King 
of the Britons, about the year 849. From him was descended the royal 
House of Tudor. The lineage of Marchudel is traced from Brutus, the 
first King of the Britons." The family is one of the most notable ones 
in England, where over forty families of the name settled prior to 1700. 
In Wales it was formerly Ap Williams, and it is worthy of note that Mor- 
gan ap Williams, of Glamorganshire, gentleman, married a sister of Lord 
Thomas Cromwell, afterward Earl of Essex, who was an ancestor of the 
famous Puritan reformer, Oliver Cromwell. Roger Williams, the founder 
of Providence, Rhode Island, is descended from the same source. 

(I) Captain "Billy" Williams was born in Massachusetts, and came to 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania, about the year 1800. He bought eight 
hundred acres of land in Greenwood township, in which the present home- 
stead is included, cleared ofif the timber, and put up a log house. He served 
in the Continental army during the Revolution, and he and his family were 
members of the United Brethren church. He married, and had children : 
Samuel, of further mention ; Washington and Perry, twins ; John Penn ; 
James ; Darius ; Peter ; Arthur, died young. All lived in Greenwood 
township. 

(II) Samuel, son of Captain "Billy" Williams, was born on the Wil- 
liams homestead in Greenwood township, in 1808, and died in 1856. He 
was an active member of the United Brethren church. He married Nancy 
Jane Taylor, born in the state of New Jersey, and they had children : Jona- 
than, lived in Greenwood township, died in 1905 ; Abigail, married John 
Simmons, lived in Jefferson county, Ohio, both deceased ; Joseph, of further 
mention ; William, a farmer of Greenwood township ; Almira, married James 
Bramer, lived at Blackash, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, both deceased; 
Jesse, now deceased, lived in Greenwood township; Nancy; married E. E. 
Potter, a carpenter, lives in Geneva, Ohio ; Samuel, now deceased, lived in 
Greenwood ; Elizabeth, was pushed from a window at school, sustaining 
a broken back, and died at the age of seven years. 

(III) Joseph, son of Samuel and Nancy Jane (Taylor) Williams, was 
born on the Williams homestead, in Crawford county, August 8, 1838, and 
died December 23, 1906. He grew to maturity on the homestead, and in 
the course of time bought out the other heirs. He finally had one hundred 
and thirty acres, all under successful cultivation, and built the present 
dwelling house in 1874. He was a Republican in political matters, taking 
a deep and active interest in all public matters. He married, November 23, 
1865, Helen Lavina Phillips, born in Trumbull county, Ohio, November 27, 
1846. They became the parents of children : George H., of further mention ; 
Alice, married L. D. Vogan, a farmer, and lives in Fairfield township. 

Samuel Phillips, grandfather of Mrs. Helen Lavina (Phillips) Wil- 



WESTERN' PENNSYLVANIA 1277 

Hams, was born in Wales, and emigrated to this country in his early youth. 
He was among the very early settlers in Trumbull county, Ohio; he mar- 
ried Elizabeth Kline, born in Germany, who was also young when she came 
to this country, and they had children : Joseph ; Samuel ; Jacob ; Charles ; 
William; Elizabeth; Nancy; David J., of further mention. All lived in 
Trumbull county, Ohio. 

David J., son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Kline) Phillips, and father 
of Mrs. Williams, was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, August 17, 1821, 
and died in Greenwood township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, June 3, 
1873. ^^ 1850 he moved with his family to Salem township, Mercer county, 
Pennsylvania, and lived there on a farm until 1855, when he removed to 
Greenwood township, where he spent the remainder of his life. He mar- 
ried Huldah, born July 1, 1824, died November 23, 1896, a daughter of 
Isaac and Elizabeth (Delong) Winans, who were probably born in Trum- 
bull county, Ohio, about 1770, being among the earliest farmers and settlers 
there. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips had children: D. Riley, born February 19, 
1848, now deceased, was a farmer of Greenwood township; Helen Lavina, 
mentioned above as the wife of Mr. Williams ; Henry, born September 7, 
1850, was a gold miner and cowboy for some time in South Dakota, lives 
in Greenwood townsliip, retired; Crawford, born October 31, 1853, now 
deceased, was a physician at Milton, Wisconsin. 

(IV) George H., son of Joseph and Helen Lavina (Phillips) Williams, 
was born in Greenwood township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, August 
9, 1868, on the farm on which he lives at the present time. He attended 
the Williams district school near his home, and from the time that he was 
a young lad, assisted his father in the work on the farm. He now owns 
the homestead, and has added to the original tract, from time to time, 
until it now consists of more than two hundred and fifty acres. He has 
been very successful in his farming operations, and is very up to date in 
his methods. He has been an active supporter of the Republican party, 
has served as school director, and is a member of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

He married, December 28, 1892, Myrtie B. Loper, born in Greenwood 
township. She is a daughter of Kennedy Loper, born in Greenwood town- 
ship, a farmer, and now living retired in Geneva, Penns)'lvania. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Williams, born in Greenwood township in 1853, died October 
6, 1894. Mr. and Mrs. Williams have had children : Evata, born May 19, 
1896, attends high school in Meadville, Pennsylvania ; Elizabeth, born De- 
cember 7, 1897; Goldie, born November 4. 1900; Alice, born May 13, 1902; 
Vance, born June 26, 1904; Raymond, born February i. 1907. 



The Reitze family has not yet been resident in this country 
REITZE a full century, yet they have made the presence of the family 

beneficially felt in the various communities in which members 
of it have resided. In 1851, John, Conrad and Mary Reitze came from their 
native land, Germany, and made their home at Meadville, Crawford county, 



1278 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Pennsylvania. John lived there many years, and died in the spring of 1909. 
Mary, who also died in 1909, married John Kahler, and located in Union 
township, Crawford county. 

(I) Conrad Reitze, the youngest of the three, was born in Hessen, Ger- 
many, March 26, 1837, and died September 9, 1899. He was about fifteen 
years of age when he came to this country, went at once to Meadville, 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania, where he learned the carpenter's trade 
with Rice Brothers. Later he became a contractor, and subsequently re- 
moved to Stoneboro, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, where he was superin- 
tendent of a coal mine for some years. He then purchased seventy-five 
acres of land in Union township, Crawford county, on which he lived 
twelve years, and then bought one hundred and sixty acres along French 
creek, in the same township, and lived there until his death. In addition 
to the farm on which he lived he purchased four others, one for each of his 
sons. He built a large business block in Meadville, at the corner of Market 
and Chestnut streets, in which the Commonwealth Bank is now located. 
One of the fine buildings he erected was the Dunn carriage factory, which 
his son, George C, bought again after the death of his father, and tore 
down. All this prosperity he owed to his own unaided efforts, natural 
ability and indomitable energy. He was one of the directors of the Farmers' 
Bank of Meadville. He was very prominent in local politics, aiifiliating with 
the Democratic party, and at various times, held almost all the township 
offices. He and bis family belong to the Reformed church. Mr. Reitze 
married Catherine Frantzman, born in Erie, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1839, 
died August 2, 1901. She was a daughter of Michael and Catherine Frantz- 
man, both natives of Germany. He was a shoemaker by trade in Erie, Penn- 
sylvania, an early settler in Crawford county, locating on a farm in Union 
township. Mr. and Mrs. Reitze had children : Anna, married Jacob Fry- 
muth, lives in Mead township ; Ella, married William Hall, lives in Green- 
wood township; Katie, married John Kahler, lives in Union township; 
Henry M., of further mention ; Cora, married Daniel Kleppel, lives in Union 
township; George C, now county commissioner of Crawford county, lives 
on the Reitze homestead ; Arthur J., bom September 10, 1873, married 
Margaret Kelx)rt, lives on a farm in Union township; Barbara, married 
John Kebort, a telegraph operator on the Erie railroad, lives in Meadville. 

(II) Henry M., son of Conrad and Catherine (Frantzman) Reitze, 
was born in Union township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, January 13, 
1866. At various times he attended the district schools of Center and 
Kebort, but as he was the eldest son and the mainstay of his father in the 
cultivation of the farm, his opportunities for doing so were necessarily lim- 
ited. After his marriage his father gave him a farm in Union township, to 
which he has added from time to time, and is still engaged in general farm- 
ing. The Democratic party has always had his strong support, and he has 
served as supervisor and school director. He and his family are members 
of the Reformed church. 

Mr. Reitze married, March 21, 1889, Bertha S., born in Union town- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1279 

ship, a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Freeman) Barber. Thomas 
Barber was born in Lincohishire, England, and came to this country in his 
early youth. He became a carpenter and farmer, occupations he followed 
until his death in Union township. His wife was a native of Germany, and 
also came to America when young. Mr. and Mrs. Barber had children: 
Frederick, lives in Meadville ; William, unmarried, has the homestead ; 
Anna, married Charles Power, a merchant of Cochranton ; Lyda, married 
Joseph Fox; Bertha S., who married Mr. Reitze, as above stated; Ella, 
married George Schaffer; George, foreman in a machine shop, lives in 
Buffalo, New York; Jessie. Mr. and Mrs. Reitze had children: Earl, a 
carpenter, lives in Meadville; Irene and Donald, at home. 



The Stotler family is one of the pioneer families of the 
STOTLER state of Pennsylvania, they having obtained grants of land 
from the government at an early date for services rendered. 
This land has always remained in the possession of the family. 

(I) Henry Stotler, who was born in 1779, removed from Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania, to Penn township, Allegheny county, in 1790, and 
died there in 1852. He was a son of Henry Jacob and Nancy (Fair) 
Stotler. He married Catherine, a daughter of Rudolph Stotler, and they 
had children : Parthenia, married John Walters ; John, married Mary Her- 
shey ; Andrew, of further mention ; Harry. 

(II) Andrew Stotler, son of Henry and Catherine (Stotler) Stotler, 
born November 9, 1809, died in February, 1859. He was a farmer on the 
homestead, a Republican in politics, and a member of the United Presby- 
terian church. He married Elizabeth, born in 1813, died in 1886, a daughter 
of Abraham Bush, and they had children : Henry Harrison, enlisted in the 
Fifty-eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was wounded at 
the first battle at Fredericksburg, and died in Washington, District of Colum- 
bia ; Abraham B., deceased, married Catherine Kistler ; John Stoner, of 
further mention; Alevia Ann, deceased, married William Wilson; Samuel 
B., married Margaret Bush ; Andrew P., married Margaret Pahlman, lives 
in Penn township ; Martha E., married John A. Pahlman, lives in Penn 
township; David, died at the age of four years; George B., deceased, mar- 
ried Ellen Kistler; Archibald L., unmarried; Alexander S., married Sadie 
Hilty. 

(III) John Stoner Stotler, son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Bush) 
Stotler, was born on the Stotler homestead, September 22, 1843. He was 
educated in the public schools of his native township, and from his sixteenth 
until his thirty-ninth year assisted his mother in the cultivation of the home- 
stead farm. He then established himself independently as a farmer, and 
has been very successful. He has been active in the public affairs of the 
community as an upholder of Republican principles, and has served as road 
supervisor for Penn township for a period of three years ; has been school 
director, and was elected assessor, but refused to serve in this office on ac- 
count of ill healtli. His religious affiliation is with the United Presbyterian 



i28o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

church, of which he is a member. Mr. Stotler married Fanny R. Kistler, 
born March 8, 1862, and they have children : Olive M., born October 18, 
1885, married (first) Joseph Lovett, deceased, (second) John Wagner; 
James E., born April 24, 1887; Susanna I., born January 25, 1889, mar- 
ried Edward G. Young; Verde L., born December 27, 1895; Emma E., 
born January 21, 1900. 

Samuel Kistler, father of Mrs. Stotler, was born January 25, 1802, 
died in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 3, 1884. He married 
(first) Anna C. Fink, (second) Susannah Laughner. Children by first 
marriage: i. Elizabeth, born November 5, 1821, died November 30, 1827. 
2. Anna !Mary, born September 19, 1822, died December 10, 1907; married 
a Mr. Flennman, of St. Joseph, Missouri. 3. Michael F., born April 27,* 
1824, now deceased; he was twice married, his second wife being Margaret 
(Frisell) Kistler. 4. Samuel T., born July 31, 1825, died January i, 1892; 
married Ann Collins. 5. Jacob B., born December 12, 1826, died June i, 
1892. 6. Josiah B., born December 31, 1827. died December 2^, 1911; 
married Margaret Elliott. 7. Catherine, born May 15, 1829, died May 21, 
1829. 8. Henry J., born May 22, 1830, died March 10, 1908. 9. Infant, 
born March i, 1831. 10. Paul S., born April 18, 1832, died in September, 
1912; the name of his third wife was Mattie (Gardner) Kistler. 11. Mar- 
garet M., born October 4, 1833, died November 25, 1899 ; married Jackson 
Kistler. 12. Catherine C, born June 25, 1835, died April 20, 1891 ; married 
Jesse Waugaman. 13. Lydia S., born May 22, 1837, married Peter Frisell. 
14. Sarah L., born October 8, 1838, died March 11, 1893; married J. Calvin 
McCormick. 15. Agnes M., born March 12, 1840, died April 10, 1910; 
married Levi Glunt. 16. Elizabeth L., born July 7, 1841 ; married Henry 
Oburn. 17. An infant, born in September, 1842. 18. Anna H., born De- 
cember 23, 1843 ; married John Carroll. Children by second marriage : 19. 
Jonas M., born August 29, 1858 ; married Edith Spear. 20. Phoebe J. S., 
born February 27, i860; married James Heckman. 21. Fanny R., married 
Mr. Stotler, as above stated. 22. Emma E., born April 5, 1864 ; married 
Jesse Klingensmith. 23. Eli L., born April 25. 1866; married Emma 
Brinker. 



This well known English surname has been found in all parts 
BROWN of America since the early days of the colonial period. Sev- 
eral of the immigrant ancestors who came over during that 
period were in some manner kin, but generally the families were not related, 
although having the same name. It will be remembered that Brown is one 
of our common English surnames which antiquarians tell us are derived 
from a color. However, the family here under consideration, appears to 
have come into this country independent of any other family bearing the 
same name, and has proved its worth since its arrival. 

(I) Theodore Brown was born in England in 1807, and died in Buflfalo, 
New York, in 1900. He was brought to this country in childhood by his 
parents, and became a carpenter and contractor. His family lived for a 



WilSTEkX I'EXXSYLXANMA 1281 

time in Connecticut Ijefore they settled in Western New York. He and 

his family were members of the Baptist church. He married Vine, 

who was also a child when brought to this country by her parents, and 
died at the age of fifty years. Children: i. James A., of further mention. 
2. William, born in Buflfalo, New York, died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
in 1909. He was a veteran of the Civil War, and after the close of that 
struggle became an oil operator in the Creek and Bradford oil fields. 3. 
Theodore, who died in 1913, in Buffalo, New York, vvihere he had spent 
his entire life, was a brick manufacturer and hotel proprietor. 4. A daugh- 
ter, who married, and died soon after marriage. 

(H) James A., son of Theodore and (Vine) Brown, was born 

in St. Louis, Missouri, December 25, 1839, and died May 28, 191 1. In his 
early youth he learned the carpenter's trade under the supervision of his 
father. During the Civil War he went into the oil region, and there en- 
gaged in teaming when four dollars per barrel was paid for hauling oil to 
Titusville. He managed a large number of teams and was very successful 
in this enterprise. He then engaged in the hotel business in Titusville, 
owning and operating several hotels there. A cooperage plant was also one 
of his industries, and he carried on this business until oil was hauled by 
tank cars. In Titusville he was also engaged in oil production, and was 
foreman of the first volunteer fire company in the borough. This was in 
the middle sixties, and he was prominent in all the political affairs of the 
community, in the interests of the Democratic party. He served as city 
and county committeeman, and as city chairman. He was a member of the 
council in 1885, 1886, 1889. He was a man of fine physique, weighed one 
hundred and eighty-five pounds, was five feet eight inches in height, and 
always enjoyed excellent health. Until six days prior to his death he attended 
personally to his real estate and other interests of a business nature. He 
married Mary Nash, born in Rochester. New York, March 24, 1857, and 
they had children: George Frank, of further mention; Daisy, married Wil- 
liam J. Wagner, a machinist, and lives in Titusville, Pennsylvania. 

James Nash, father of Mrs. Mary (Nash) Brown, was born in county 
Clare, Ireland, and there grew to maturity. He then emigrated to the 
United States, and upon his arrival here worked as a laborer. He soon 
rose to the rank of a sub-contractor in the construction of the Erie railroad 
from Corr)' to Meadville, Penn.sylvania. and was killed in an accident 
while in charge of a gang of men on this work. He was a Roman Catholic, 
and had made his home in Rochester, New York. He married Mary Car- 
roll, born in Rochester, New York, a daughter of James and (Lynch) 

Carroll, who left Maryland after the Revolutionary War, made their home 
in Southern New York for a time, then settled at Rochester, and were 
among the pioneers of that section. Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, Marv- 
land, was a paternal great-uncle of Mrs. Brown, and she had brothers and 
sisters as follows : Margaret, married Henry Extine, deceased, and lives in 
Tensing, Michigan ; Patrick J., in the employ of the city as an engineer at 
the City Power Plant, lives in Titusville ; Anna, married Felix A. Doherty. 



1282 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a paint contractor, and lives in Franklin, Pennsylvania; James, a house 
painter, married Catherine Coleman, and lives in Titusville. 

(Ill) George Frank, son of James A. and Mary (Nash) Brown, was 
born in Butler, Butler county, Pennsylvania, August 19, 1873. He was 
about three weeks old when his parents removed to Titusville, Pennsyl- 
vania, and has lived in that town since that time. He received his elemen- 
tary education in the public schools, being graduated from the high school 
in 1891, and then commenced reading law in the office of Roger Sherman, 
of Titusville, and was admitted to the bar, February 25, 1895. He has 
been in the active practice of his profession ever since. March 10, 1897, 
he was admitted to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, to the Superior 
Court in 1899, and to the Supreme Court of the United States in 1902, upon 
the motion of Governor Little, of Arkansas. Mr. Brown has served as 
city solicitor of Titusville continuously, commencing with the term, 1898- 
1902. He is a Democrat in politics, and has taken an active part in political 
affairs for many years. He was Democratic chairman for Titusville for 
six years, was county chairman of Crawford county, and has served as 
chairman of the Northwestern Pennsylvania District. He is a member of 
St. Titus Roman Catholic Church of Titusville, and belongs to the American 
Bar Association. 



The name of Quay is one which has earned distinction in many 
QUAY lines in this country, especially in those of statesmanship and 
in military affairs. 

( I ) Samuel Quay was born in Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, and 
later removed to Crawford county, in the same state, where he purchased 
a farm of one hundred acres. He was a Democrat, and a forceful agent in 
local political affairs. His religious connection was with the Methodist 
church. He married Mary Carpenter, of the same town, and had children: 
Samuel, of further mention ; John ; Robert ; Archibald, of further mention. 

(II) Samuel, son of Samuel and Mary (Carpenter) Quay, was born in 
Venango, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and was educated in the com- 
mon schools in the vicinity of his home. He was a farmer by occupation, but 
later sold his farm and made his home with his son, Frank. He married 
Mary Angeline, who died in 1885, a daughter of Jacob Himebaugh, both 
born in Germany. Jacob Himebaugh, after his arrival in this country, set- 
tled in Hayfield township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, where he pur- 
chased a farm, and cultivated this to advantage. The entire fanjily belonged 
to the Methodist church. Mr. and Mrs. Quay had children: i. Frank, of 
further mention. 2. William R., who married Mary Clark, and had chil- 
dren : Nettie and Charles. 

(III) Frank, son of Samuel and Mary Angeline (Himebaugh) Quay, 
was born in Venango, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and attended the 
public schools, leaving those in Edinboro about 1880. During the first 
twenty years of his business career he was in the employ of the Sherwood 
Lumber Company, and after leaving this, engaged in the hotel business at 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1283 

Cambridge Springs, Crawford county, with which he has since been suc- 
cessfully identified. His political affiliation is with the Democratic party, 
in whose interests he has been an active worker, and he is a member of 
the Methodist church. He is a member of the order of Free and Accepted 
Masons. Mr. Quay married Lovina, a daughter of James Gannon. 

(11) Archibald, son of Samuel and Mary (Carpenter) Quay, married, 
and had children: Robert Clark, of further mention; Sarah Jane; Mary 
J.; William. All deceased. 

(HI) Robert Clark, son of Archibald Quay, was born in Venango 
township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, December 8, 1835, ^"d •^'^'^ 
May 7, 1913. For some years he was in the employ of the Erie Railroad 
Company, later became a carpenter, and finally turned his attention to car- 
riage and wagon building. He had a shop at Cambridge Springs, and em- 
ployed an average of ten men. He was a Presbyterian in religious belief, 
and a member of the Knights of Pythias for forty years. Mr. Quay mar- 
ried Leora, a daughter of Archibald Torrey, and they had children : Maude, 
Marguerite, Blanche and Burnett. 



The surname Caldwell dates back to the first use of sur- 
CALDWELL names in England and Scotland. It is a place name, 

meaning simply "cold well," and localities bearing the 
name are found in various counties of the United Kingdom. The family 
is found, and has achieved some prominence, in the counties of Stafiford, 
Berks, Worcester and Gloucester, in England, in Meath, Ireland, and in 
London. It is also frequently found in Scotland. In that country the 
history dates back to before 1300 in Renfrewshire and Ayrshire. The 
coat of arms of the Caldwell family of Caldwell, Scotland, is: Argent three 
piles issuing from the chief sable and in base four bars waved gules and 
vert. All the American Caldwells come from Great Britain. 

William A. Caldwell, a son of William, was born at Watkins, Schuyler 
county. New York, October 13, 1877. After an excellent preparatory train- 
ing, he matriculated at Cornell University, from which he was graduated 
in the class of 1900 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Immediately 
afterward he became a member of the reportorial stafif of the old "Phila- 
delphia Times." then under Colonel McClure, and at the expiration of two 
years, accepted a similar position with the St. Louis "Post-Dispatch." After 
the death of his father he was with the "Butler Eagle" for one year, then 
for a short time with the "Meadville Star." In 1908 he came to Titusville, 
Pennsylvania, in order to take charge of the "Titusville Morning Herald." 
The "Titusville Morning Herald" was organized June 14, 1865, by W. 
W. Bloss, under its present name. It was the first daily paper in the great 
Pennsylvania oil district. A small weekly paper had been published in 
Titusville prior to the establishment of the daily paper by Mr. Bloss, and 
this was the one purchased by that gentleman and remodeled as a daily. 
The success was an immediate one, and the high standard established from 
the outset has always been upheld. It is acknowledged, by all competent to 



1284 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

judge in such matters, that the information contained in its pages is ab- 
solutely reliable, and may be used as a guide by those in need of advice with 
the utmost confidence. Later, H. C. Bloss, a brother of W. VV. Bloss, and 
Colonel J. H. Cogswell, a cousin, formed a partnership, and this was in 
force until W. W. Bloss sold bis share. In 1892 H. C. Bloss died, and for 
some years his widow, Sarah Ann Bloss, was the sole owner of the paper, 
and her son, Joseph M. Bloss, was the business manager, an office he is 
filling at the present time. During the last four years the circulation of 
the paper has grown from three thousand seven hundred to six thousand, 
and they cover the counties of Crawford, Venango, Forest and Warren. 
The chief feature of the paper is to chronicle all important events concerning 
oil production and the oil country. Together with the Oil City Derrick, its 
files make a very complete history of oil production and everything con- 
nected with it. The paper employs twelve people regularly, and in the job 
printing and book binding department connected with it, eight more. The 
efficient work done by Mr. Caldwell in connection with this paper cannot 
be overestimated, and his personal efforts are in a great measure responsible 
for the present success achieved by it. 

The political opinions of Mr. Caldwell are those of the Republican 
party, but he is held in such high esteem by all classes that he was elected 
on a non-partisan ticket to membership in the City Commission under the 
new Commission Government Act. He is a member of the City Club, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Cornell Club of New York City. Mr. Caldwell married, June 22, 1904, 
Johanna DeLeuw, of Jackson, Pennsylvania, and they have had children: 
Elizabeth, William, Robert, Eleanor and Charles. 



Kelly or Kelley is one of the most ancient surnames. Burke 
KELLY states in his "Landed Gentry," that the Kelley family may 

look back beyond the Conqueror, and derive themselves from 
the ancient Britons. The earliest mention of the name in Irish history was 
A.D. 254, when Ceallach MacCorniac is recorded as a son of the monarch 
Cormac Nefedha. The King of Connaught had a son Ceallach in 528. The 
Irish Archaeological Society in 1843 pnblished "The Tribes and Customs 
of Hymany," in which is mention of a chief of Hymany who lived A.D. 
874, and bore the name Ceallaigh ; his grandson Muechadlo O'Callaigh was 
the first to use this surname, the law being made by the celebrated Irish 
King Brian Boroimbe that "everyone must adopte the name of his father 
as a surname." Thus the grandson of Callaigh became O'Callaigh, and the 
name was simplified to Kelley or Kelly about 1014. Queen Elizabeth re- 
quested Colla O'Kelley to discard the "O." as it tended, by keeping up the 
clanship in Ireland, to foster disaffection in England. The most probably 
signification of the name is: War, debate, strife. The spelling has been 
much varied, but its origin is undoubtedly as given above. Many of the 
name who have come to this country, and their descendants, are proud of 
the connection with the ancient Iri-;h rather than the Ennlish lines. The 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1285 

arms given in Ireland are: A tower triple-towered, supported by two lions 
rampant or. Crest : A greyhound statant ppr. Also : Gules on a mount 
vert, two lions rampant ; and azure in chief three estoiles argent. Crest : 
A hand holding by the horn a bull's head erased, or. 

(I) Oliver Kelly was born, lived and died in county Antrim, Ireland, 
where he followed the occupation of farming throughout the active years 
of his life. He was a man of wealth and substance at one time, but having 
given security on a note for a friend, lost almost everything, and when his 
children grew up, they were scattered in various directions. He married 
Isabelle Fitzgerald, also a native of county Antrim, and died there, and 
they had children: John, emigrated to the United Slates, settled in Pitts- 
burgh, where he was a school teacher all his life; William, of further 
mention; Mary, died young; James and Hugh, remained in Ireland and 
joined the English army. 

(II) William, son of Oliver and Isabelle (Fitzgerald) Kelly, was born 
near Belfast, county Antrim, Ireland, January i, 1793, and died February 
4, 1861. He was the recipient of an excellent education, and about 1818 
emigrated to the United States, whither his brother John had preceded 
him. Shortly afterward he came to Titusville, Pennsylvania, and for some 
time was engaged in teaching in the public schools. After his marriage 
■he purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, on what is now known 
as Kelly Hill, above Titusville, where his death occurred. In 1852 he 
built the large country house now standing on the farm. He was a staunch 
supporter of the Wliig party, and an elder for many years in the Presby- 
terian church. 

Mr. Kelly married, in 1822, Mary Mclntyre, born in Oil Creek town- 
ship, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, December 24, 1803, died April 9, 
1885. She was a daughter of John and Hannah (Sweeney) Mclntyre. 
both born in county Donegal, Ireland, along the shores of Loch Swilley. 
They were of the Roman Catholic faith. They were married in 1795, and 
at once emigrated to the United States, making this their wedding trip. 
They located on the farm in Oil Creek town&hip, and had children : Patrick, 
lived on farm in Oil Creek township; Susanna, married William Gilson, 
and lived on a farm in Oil Creek township ; Daniel, died in early manhood ; 
James, lived on the Mclntyre homestead; Mary, who married Mr. Kelly, 
as above stated ; Anne, married John Gilson, and lived on a farm in Oil 
Creek township; Hannah, died at an advanced age, unmarried. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kelly had children : John, was a saddler by trade, lived in Pleasantville 
and Erie, Pennsylvania, and died in 1906; James, lived on a farm at Magec- 
town, Pennsylvania, and died in June, 1914, at the age of eighty-nine years ; 
Hannah, unmarried, lived on the homestead, and died in January, 191 1; 
Oliver, unmarried, died on the homestead in 1895 ; Mary, a lady of admirable 
character, lives on the homestead near Titusville ; Susan, who died in 190S, 
married Amos Newton, a farmer, and lived in Fredonia, Pennsylvania ; 
Isabelle, married Senaea Gee, and lives on a farm near Titusville ; William, 
died at the age of six years. 



1286 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

As the first, and present, cashier of the Union National 
BALDRIDGE Bank of McKeesport, which he also assisted in organiz- 
ing, Robert M. Baldridge fills an important position in 
the business of his native city. He is a son of Robert S. and Anna J. Pat- 
terson (Martin) Baldridge, both born in Westmoreland county, Pennsyl 
vania, of families long and well known. 

(I) Robert S. Baldridge was educated in medicine, but ill health pre- 
vented his practicing his profession. In the early fifties he spent several 
years in teaching school in McKeesport. He located in McKeesport, was 
married there, and later served four years as postmaster. After his term 
expired, be began the manufacture and sale of medicines prepared from 
his own prescriptions which, for many years, had a large sale. He was a 
Republican in politics, and a member of the United Presbyterian church 
until his death. He married (first) Amanda Carson, (second) Anna J. 
(Patterson) Martin, who survives him. By his first wife he had two sons: 
Thomas C, connected with the Fidelity Title and Trust Company, of Pitts- 
burgh, and Charles Crawford Sumner, a real estate dealer, of Pittsburgh, 
and lives on the North Side. Children by second marriage : Robert M., of 
further mention ; Mary, resides in McKeesport ; Harry, died in childhood ; 
Joseph S., an employe of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, at Mc- 
Keesport ; Annie, died in youthful womanhood, aged twenty-one years. 

(II) Robert M. Baldridge, son of Robert S. and Anna J. Baldridge, 
was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, May i8, 1871. His early education 
was obtained in the Long Run District School of Versailles township. He 
was early obliged to become a wage earner, but he improved every oppwr- 
tunity for self-education, and after a term of service in Lovatt Brothers' 
brickyard, and W. D. Woods' sheet iron mill, he became clerk for the 
National Tube Company. During this period he attended night sessions 
of the Gressley, and later the Douglass Business College, then held a posi- 
tion with the E. H. Leizure Company, and later with the Gilbert F. Myer 
Company, real estate dealers. He next became a bookkeeper in the Citizens' 
National Bank, where he won his way to the teller's window. His next 
promotion was to the position of assistant cashier of the National Bank 
of McKeesport, holding that position until chosen cashier of the Union 
National Bank of McKeesport, an institution which he helped to organize, 
and with which he is still connected as cashier and director. His rise has 
been steady and each upward step has been won on merit. He is highly 
regarded in banking circles and esteemed wherever known. He is a director 
of the Daily News Publishing Company, and is Independent in politics, has 
served for a number of years as city school director. 

Mr. Baldridge is prominent in the Masonic Order, holding all degrees 
in Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council and Commaqdery; is a thirty-second degree 
Mason of Pittsburgh Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, and is a 
member of Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is an elder of the United Presbyterian church, and a director 
in the Young Men's Christian Association. He is a director of the Mc- 




^ol^ert 9. ^a/</ri</^e 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1287 

Keesport Chamber of Commerce, is active and aggressive, and a member 
of the Youghiogheny Country Club. 

Mr. Baldridge married Margaret M., daughter of Beriah and EHza- 
beth (Crawford) Amberson, of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, both well 
known Pennsylvania families. Children : Robert Reed, a high school stu- 
dent ; Thomas Donaldson ; Matilda. 



Several theories are offered as to the origin of this 
ELLSWORTH name, but certain it is that it is English. One authority 

says that it derives its origin from a small village near 
Cambridge, England, which is built beside a rivulet which formerly abounded 
in eels ; as "worth" is the Saxon word for place, the village was originally 
called Ealsworth, and as it was customary for the first settler to take th<» 
name of the place where he lived, this became the name of the family. It 
has been changed gradually to Ellsworth, and is also spelled Aylsworth, 
Elsworth, and in a variety of other forms. There have been many lawyers, 
ministers, doctors and other professional men in the family. 

(I) John Ellsworth was a farmer in the State of Pennsylvania, at a 
very early date. He married, November 9, 18 18, Fanny, eldest daughter 
of the Rev. E. White, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a 
descendant of Bishop White, who came from England in the "Mayflower." 

(II) Ebenezer Russell, son of John and Fanny (White) Ellsworth, 
was born at North East, Erie county, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1837, and 
died in Meadville, May i, 1905. He was a farmer in Linesville and Mead- 
ville, and is buried in Greendale Cemetery, in the last mentioned place. 
During the Civil War he served from 1861 to 1864, holding the rank of 
corporal in Company H, Eighty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry. He married, December 29, 1864, Maria Smith, born in Summit 
township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania. April 11, 1841, died in Mead- 
ville, April 5, 1909, after residing there eighteen years. Previously she had 
lived in Linesville three years and in Conneautville two years. She was 
a daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Close) Smith, and a granddaughter of 
John Jr. and Anna (Depue) Smith. John Smith Jr, was born in Craw- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, December 4, 1779, died in Summit township, 
August 12, 1849. and is buried at Harmonsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was 
a farmer and a Methodist. He married, April 9, 1805. Daniel Smith, father 
of Mrs. Ellsworth, was born in Summit township, April 6, 1806, and died 
October 28, 1846. He is also buried at Harmonsburg. He was a physician 
in Summit township, Crawford county, and affiliated with the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He married, March 15, 1831. Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth 
had children : Henry Edgarton. of further mention ; Archibald Clyde, born 
November 9, 1870, is superintendent of the dining car service for the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company, and lives in Jersey City, New Jersey; Raleigh 
Leo, born April ' o, 1873, is a clerk in the employ of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany, and lives at Franklin. Pennsvlvania. 

(III) Hen- ' Edgarton, son of Ebenezer Russell and Maria (Smith) 



1288 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Ellsworth, was born in Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, August 
7, 1866. He attended the public schools at Conneautville and from them 
went to the high school at Linesville, from which he was also graduated. 
Three years were spent as news agent on the Erie & Pittsburgh Railway, 
after which he became a brakeman on a passenger trqin for the same com- 
pany. In 1887 he established himself in the photographic business in Con- 
neautville, after having been in the employ of someone in this line of busi- 
ness, for one year. At the end of a year he sold this business, and in behalf 
of the Keystone View Company, traveled through the country, taking pic- 
tures of notable groups and buildings, and continued this employment five 
years. He then started in this line independent, employing six men who 
traveled for him. At th€ end of seven years he sold this business, and in 
1897 took up studio work at Meadville, with which he has been identified 
since that time. While he commenced this on a very modest scale, owing 
to a lack of the necessary funds, his excellent and reliable work has enabled 
him to build up a business wihich is second to none of its kind in that section 
of the country. He is now the owner of several buildings in Meadville, the 
result of his indefatigable industry and skill. He is a member of the Sons 
of Veterans, having successively filled the offices of sergeant, second lieu- 
tenant, first lieutenant and captain in this body. His religious affiliation is 
with the Baptist church, to which many of the Ellsworths have belonged 
in earlier generations. 

Mr. Ellsworth married, June 2, 1909, at Meadville, Ella Josephine, 
born at Round Bottom, Monroe county, Ohio, March 10, 1888. youngest 
child of Richard Ernest and Mary Ann Schamback, whose other children 
are: Charles Ernest, William Henry, James Alfred, George Albert and 
Edward Samuel. Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth have Had children: Fanny 
Lucile, bom July 29. 1912, and Jessie Doris, born September 28, 1913. 



Philip McGuire, a native of Ireland, married Catherine 
McGUIRE Higgins in that country, and then emigrated to America. 

He made his home in Pennsylvania, in which state his chil- 
dren were born. Children : James, who was a soldier in active service 
in the War of i8iz; John; Philip; William; Francis; Thomas, of further 
mention. All now deceased. 

(II) Thomas McGuire, son of the preceding, was born near what is 
now Conneaut Lake, Crawford county, Penn.sylvania, December 24, 1807, 
and died January 25. 1888. He was the owner of a fine farm of two hun- 
dred and twenty-four acres, which .he cultivated very successfully. He 
married Margaret, also born near Conneaut Lake, a daughter of Connell 
Tinney, They had children: Bernard, born July 14, 1838, died in No- 
vember, 1903, married Eliza Hay; Mary E.. born July 21, 1840, died 
young; Sylvester, of further mention; Edward, born December 19, 1846, 
lives in Chicago, is unmarried, and engaged in the confectionery business; 
Joseph, born August 12, 1849, proprietor and manager of a hotel at Lines- 
ville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania; Amelia, born September 8, 185 1, 
married William Ralph, and is a resident of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 



WESTERN IMCXXSYLVANIA 1289 

(III) Sylvester, son of Thomas and Margaret (Tinney) McGuire, 
was born September 12, 1844, and died July 23, 1903. He received a simple 
but practical education in Chestnut Corners School, then worked on dredges, 
on the farm and in the lumber business. After his marriage he took up 
farming. About 1880 he and a brother-in-law established picnic grounds 
where the Oakland Hotel is now located, on the east side of Conneaui 
Lake. They erected a dance hall, sixty feet in length, and later added a 
kitchen and dining room. Mr. McGuire soon purchased the interest of 
his partner, and conducted affairs alone, bought more land along the lake 
shore, and in 1894 built the Oakland Hotel, one of the five summer hotels 
on the lake front, known as Oakland Beach. Since the time of his death 
his family resided here except during the winter months, when their home 
is in Meadville. Formerly Mr. McGuire also sold nursery stock during the 
various seasons, but had no longer engaged in this line of business. In 
connection with the hotel Mrs. McGuire cultivates a 325 acre farm on 
which is also located a valuable deposit of shell marl, a natural fertilizer, 
which is also in course of development. He married, in 1872, Cymanthia 
A., born at Harmonsburg, a daughter of Almon and Caroline (Doud) Whit- 
ing, both born in Wyoming county. New York, and a granddaughter of 
John W'hiting, of Wyoming county. New York. John Whiting came to 
Pennsylvania in the early days of settlement, and took up land near Har- 
monsburg, where he engaged in farming. Mr. and Mrs. McGiiire have 
had children : Blanche Marion, a sister of St. Joseph's Convent, Erie, 
Pennsylvania ; Minnie Agnes ; Claude Vincent, deceased ; Don Leo, now 
manager of the Oakland Hotel, married Mae Jones, a native of Franklin, 
Pennsylvania, and they have one child, Elizabeth Jane ; Thomas Paul. The 
family attends the Catholic church. 



The Younkins family has been resident in the state 
YOUNKINS of Pennsylvania for a number of generations, and 

the earlier members of this family were generally 
engaged in farming. 

(I) Michael Younkins was born in Pennsylvania, in Westmoreland 
county, and after his marriage settled near Tarentum, but still in West- 
moreland county. He was a farmer and became an extensive land owner. 
He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
both died in Armstrong county. He married Mary Locke, born near Grove 
City, and they had children : William, of further mention ; Jacob, a farmer, 
died in Armstrong county ; Benjamin, deceased, was of Westmoreland 
county; Michael, died in Armstrong county, Samuel, lives in Armstrong 
county ; Sophia, married John A. Shearer, and died in Armstrong county ; 
Nancy, married Henry Ditman, and died in Armstrong county; Mary Ann, 
married John Montgomery, and lives in Armstrong county ; John, died in 
early manhood. 

(H) William, son of Michael and Mary (Locke) Younkins, was born 
m \A''estmoreland county. Pennsylvania, June 9, 1822, and died in Arm- 



I290 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

strong county, in the same state, in 1902. He settled in the last mentioned 
county after his marriage, and was a farmer there for many years. He 
married Sarah Hawk, born August 30, 1821, is now living at Worthington, 
Pennsylvania. She is a daughter of Conrad and Esther (Slonecker) Hawk, 
both born and died in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he was 
a farmer and land owner. In his earlier years he was a stone cutter on the 
old Pennsylvania Canal. He was a Democrat, and both were members of 
the Lutheran church. They had children: Michael, a wagonmaker, died 
in Salem, Pennsylvania ; John, a carpenter, and later a farmer, died in Arm- 
strong county ; George, a farmer, also died in Armstrong county ; Daniel, 
a farmer, died in Butler county ; Sarah, who married Mr. Younkins, as 
above stated ; Hettie, married Michael Kunkle. and lives on the old home- 
stead. Mr. and Mrs. Younkins have had children: John, of further men- 
tion ; Elizabeth, married Robert Jackson, and died at Braddock, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Mary, died unmarried ; Daniel, an oil producer, lives in Butler, 
Pennsylvania: James B., died in the Klondike in 191 1; Jennie, married 
William O. Sutton, and lives in Worthington, Pennsylvania; McClellan, 
was burned to death near Herman, Pennsylvania, in August, 1894. Mr. 
and Mrs. Younkins were members of the Baptist church until his death, 
and he was a Democrat, and served for a time as school director. 

(Ill) John, son of William and Sarah (Hawk) Younkins, was born 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, May 5, 1848. He was educated in 
the public schools of Armstrong county, and his early years were spent on 
the farm. He then commenced to learn the oil business, commencing at 
the very bottom of the ladder, in order to become thoroughly familiar with 
all its details. He gradually worked his way upward, and in 1876, started 
as an oil operator in Butler county, at first as part owner of an oil well, 
and continued in this line of business twenty years, the name of his firm 
being Younkins Brothers, the other member being his brother Daniel. They 
operated largely in Bradford and Butler counties, Pennsylvania, and also 
in West Virginia. In 1900 he was one of the organizers of the Farmers' 
National Bank, and has been its president since that time. Since the date 
of its organization, in July, 1900, the deposits have grown to six hundred 
and eight thousand dollars, with two thousand four hundred individual 
depositors. He gives his political support to the Democratic party, and 
has served as collector of taxes in Butler borougli for three years. He is 
a trustee of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a. member of the local 
lodge and encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. 
Younkins married, in 1876, Naomi C, born in Butler county, a daughter, 
of Robert and Lavina Campbell. Children : Edith, married John G. Wil- 
liams, lives in North Side. Pittsburgh, has a son, Harold ; Myrtle, married 
John L. Grant, lives in Butler, Pennsylvania : Earl, connected with Butler 
Plaster and Concrete Company : Vera G., married F. C. Anderson, lives 
in Butler, has a daughter, Dorothy. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1291 

Timothy T. Root was born September 13, 1837, on a farm three 
ROOT miles south of Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania. He was the 
son of Sylvester and Mercy (Thomas) Root, both born in 
Massachusetts. 

Sylvester Root was educated in Massachusetts. He came, as a young 
man, and took up land. He and his brother had 200 acres. Sylvester 
Root the next year went back to Massachusetts, where he was married and 
he brought his bride overland by ox team. They settled on the farm he 
had taken up. He cleared the ground, built a log house, then a large com- 
fortable residence, and lived there until his death. He was a Baptist. His 
■children were: Martha, Sallie, Harmony, who died in 1852, aged twenty-one 
years; Sylvester B., Justin, Morton, who fought in the Civil War; Timothy 
T. and Lucy A. 

Timothy T. Root was educated in the local schools. When he left the 
home farm he went to Richmond, Ohio, where he engaged in the manu- 
facture of staves for three years. He then returned to the home farm, 
and was there for several years, later buying lands in Cambridge Springs. 
He built a large house and barn in the town and still owns this place of one 
hundred and forty acres. In 1906 he built his present home in the down 
town section, and retired from active business. He built thirty-seven 
houses in Cambridge Springs, some of which he still owns, as well as two 
business blocks. He married Nancy Hart, January i, 1868. Their children 
are: Clarence C, of Cambridge Springs; Claude E., also of the Springs; 
and iMartha L. Root, now on the editorial staff of the Pittsburgh Post. 

Timothy T. Root and family are Baptists. He has been identified with 
the building of the town in a business way, morally and socially. He has 
served on the borough council, has been school director, and an ardent 
worker on all the progressive movements for the community. The family 
is the oldest and one of the most prominent in that section of the country. 



Many of this name are to be found in the United States, and 
SMALL they have come here from England and from Germany. In 
the latter country the name is spelled "Schmal," meaning scant 
•or narrow. 

Oiristian Small was born in Germany in 1827, and died in Cumber- 
land. Maryland, in 1890. Early in life he was a huckster by occupation, 
tut later followed various lines of industry. He was a Democrat, and an 
active member of the Reformed church. He married Catherine Engel, 
born in Germany in 1827. died in 1904, whose mother lived to be ninety- 
three years of age. They had children : Henry, deceased ; Mary ; George, 
of further mention ; Martha ; Anna, deceased ; John ; Henry ; Mary, de- 
•ceased. 

George Small, son of Christian and Catherine Small, was born in Cum- 
berland county, Maryland, April 4, 1855. He was educated in the public 
schools of his native county, and at the age of seventeen years learned the 
trade of brick laying. He came to Braddock in 1879, and for twenty-six 



1292 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



years held the position of foreman in the Edgar Thompson Steel Works. 
He is the owner of a tine house at No. 126 Camp street, which he built in 
1902. In political matters he holds independent views, and has the courage 
of his convictions. He is a member of Kinsman Congregational Church, 
and of the Order of Ben Hur. Mr. Small married, December 28, 1879, 
Anna Elizabeth, born in Cumberland, Maryland, June 22, 1856, a daughter 
of Herman and Emma Elizabeth (Snyder) Baake. both born in Germany, 
came to America unmarried and married in Maryland, where she died in 
1910, and he is living in Cumberland at the age of eighty-two years (1915). 
They had children: Anna Elizabeth, who married Mr. Small, as above 
stated ; Conrad, Anna Catherine, George Adam, Lina Dora, W. Harman, 
John Milton. Mr. and Mrs. Small had children: i. Nellie Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Clyde Cotter, of Braddock, and had : Nellie Thelma and Hazel Esmer- 
el'da. 2. Blanche Kate, married Ira T. Snyder, and had : Earl George, 
Ira W^aldorf, and Milton Frank, deceased. 3. Jennie Edna, married Harry 
W. Martin, and had : Jennie Eleanor ; Irene Ethelinda, deceased ; Harry 
William. 4. Harman George. 5. Esmerelda Amelia. 6. Anna Ethelinda. 



Henry Heckman was born near Kaiserslautern, Bavaria, 
HECKMAN Germany, in 1808. and died February 28, 1883. He be- 
came a linen weaver by trade, and also owned and cul- 
tivated a quantity of land in his native land. He was in the army for a 
period of six years, but during this time his country was not engaged in 
any war. In 1863 he sold his farm, and emigrated to .America, being fifty- 
four days making the passage. He went to Crawford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and there purchased seventy-five acres of land in Union township, 
on which his son Michael is now residing, and there his death occurred. He 
and his family were members of the German Reformed church. Mr. Heck- 
man married Madeline Rosche, born in the same town as her husband, in 
180S. died February 23, 1878. They had children: Jacob, died unmarried 
in 1874; Henry, a machinist, of Meadville, Pennsylvania, now deceased, 
married Elizabeth Veith; Peter, deceased, was a blacksmith and lived in 
Meadville ; Michael, of further mention ; Adam, an engineer on the Erie 
railroad, lives in Meadville ; Catherine, lives with Michael. 

(II) Michael, son of Henry and Madeline (Rosche) Heckman. was 
born near Kaiserslautern, Bavaria, Germany, November 10, 1848. From 
his sixth to his thirteenth year -he attended the schools in his native country, 
and after his arrival here he had but one month's attendance at school. 
Nevertheless, he acquired a very fair English education. During his boy- 
hood years he assisted his father in the cultivation of the homestead farm, 
and this passed to him by the will of his father, the only condition being 
that he should purchase the shares which would have fallen to the other 
heirs. He erected a fine house on the farm in 1874. and still lives in this. 
He was a staunch supporter of the Republican party, and served for a time 
as school director. He is a member of Zion's Evangelical Church, a 
trustee of this institution. He is a member of the Independent Order of 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1293 

Odd Fellows ; the local grange, Patrons of Husbandry ; and of the State 
Police. Mr. Heckman married, November 15, 1873, Margaret, born in 
Union township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Peter 
and Elizabeth (Baugh) Kebort, early German settlers in the township. 
Children: Jacob Henry, of further mention; John, born on the homestead, 
November 26, 1878, was educated in the Center district school, has always 
lived on the homestead, and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Patrons of Husbandry, and the State Police ; he is unmarried. 

(Ill) Jacob Henry, son of Michael and Margaret (Kebort) Heck- 
man, was born in Union township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, August 
25, 1874. He attended the Center District School near his home, and there 
acquired a sound, practical education, which he has greatly amplified in later 
years by earnest and well chosen reading. In 1902, some years after his 
marriage, he purchased the Leighty farm in Union township, and he is resid- 
ing on this at the present time. He carries on general farming very success- 
full)', and applies the latest and most improved methods. He is a strong 
Republican, but has never desired to hold public office. He and his family 
are members of St. John's Reformed Church, and he is also a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Patrons of Husbandry and the 
State F'olice. Mr. Heckman married, June 22. 1899, Helen Phillips, born 
in Union township. Crawford county, Pennsylvania. They have children : 
Charles Phillips, born November 24, 1902 ; Frances Margaret, born June 4, 
1910. 

Jonathan Phillips, grandfather of Helen (Phillips) Heckman, was born 
in Rhode Island and after his marriage settled in Chautauqua county. New 
York, and in 1838, in Union township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania. He 
taught school for t\venty-seven consecutive years in Crawford county, and 
later bought a farm which he managed personally. A number of years 
were also spent as a river pilot. He and his family belonged to the religious 
sect known as the "Christians." His parents were Jonathan and Ann 
(Palmer) Phillips, the name of Jonathan occurring in the family for four 
successive generations. They were early arrivals in New England. Mr. 
Phillips married Ruth Perkins, born near Mystic, Connecticut. They had 
children: Orrin : Frank, died in R-Ieadville. Pennsylvania, in 191 1; Mary, 
married David Johnson, both deceased; Delilah, died unmarried; Cordelia, 
died young; Ruth, married James Larkins ; Jonathan, twin of Ruth, lives 
in Union township ; Palmer, of further mention. 

Palmer, son of Jonathan and Ruth (Perkins) Phillips, was born in 
Union township. Crawford county, September 3. 1843. He married Frances 
Henry, born in Meadville, Crawford county, August 17, 1844, died June 
15, 1905. They had children: Arthur, a contractor living at Farrell, Penn- 
sylvania, married Evelyn Cummings ; Helen, who married Mr. Heckman, 
as above mentioned; Harry, has a vineyard supply store in Los Angeles. 
California, married Ella Connell ; Charles, a pattern maker, living at Oil 
Citv. married Marie Kahle ; George, unmarried, at home ; Mabel, also un- 
married. 



1294 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Jeremiah L. Henry, father of Mrs. Frances (Henry) PhiUips, was 
born in Western New York, was of Irish descent, and became orphaned at 
an early age. He married Jane F. Randolph, born south of Meadville, 
Pennsylvania, November 4, 1819, died in May, 1903. She was a daughter 
of Taylor F. Randolph, who was one of several brothers, and was among 
the first settlers of Crawford county, Pennsylvania. His father, Robert 
F. Randolph, served as a minute-man from Middlesex county in the New 
Jersey militia in the Revolutionary War ; and his brother Edward Fitz 
Randolph, was first lieutenant of the troop of light horse from Philadelphia, 
enlisting in 1777, and resigning May 10, 1779. Ajiother close relation was 
James F. Randolph, who was a private in Colonel Samuel Miles' regiment, 
in the company of which C. Weitzels was the captain. 



The Hafer family is one which has been identified with agri- 
HAFER cultural pursuits for many generations, both in this country 
and in Germany, from which they originally came. They be- 
came the owners of large tracts of land here, some of which are still in 
the possession of their descendants. They early settled in Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, where they bore their share bravely in developing the re- 
sources of the fertile country in which they lived, and left it in a greatly 
improved condition. 

(I) John Hafer was born in East Fallowfield township, Crawford 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1836. His father had been the owner of five 
hundred acres of land there, and he lived on his share of this for a time 
and cultivated it. Later he was a farmer in Greenwood township, and in 
1912 he retired and removed to Greenville, Pennsylvania, where he lives 
on Wilbur street. For a time he was a Republican in political opinion, then 
supported the Democratic party, and served for a time as constable. He 
married Julia Sprague, born in East Fallowfield township, in 1837, and 
they had children : Clarence M., of further mention ; Belle, who married 
Harry First, lives on Wilbur street. Greenville, Pennsylvania, where he is 
a line foreman for the Erie Railroad Company. 

(II) Clarence M., son of John and Julia (Sprague) Hafer, was born 
in East Fallowfield township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, July 23, 1862. 
His earlier education was acquired in the public schools of his native town- 
ship, and this was supplemented by attendance at the schools of Geneva 
borough. At the age of seventeen years he left home, going to the oil 
region of the state of Pennsylvania, where he was for a time engaged in oil 
rig building. He then went to Potter county, Pennsylvania, where he found 
employment in the woods, in connection with the lumber industry, became 
a lumber contractor, and for eighteen years was connected with the Good- 
year Lumber Company. He handled a gang of from fifty to one hundred 
and twenty-five men, and liis specialty was that of stocking the woods. In 
1908 he returned to his old home in Crawford county, and there at various 
times purchased three farms, which he still owns. Two of these are located 
in Greenwood township, and the third in East Vernon township. He lives 



WESTERN PEXXSYLVAXIA 1295 

on the old John Gelvin farm adjoining the village of Geneva, Pennsylvania. 
In 1908 he had a large, modern barn erected on this farm, fitted up com- 
modiously for the housing of his valuable horses and other stock. He is a 
connoisseur in horses, loves them, and keeps a stable of twenty racing 
horses, raising fine colts from his registered brood mares. Some of his 
best horses are: i. Patrick Pointer, sired by Star Pointer, pacer, mark 
208 Yi, has raced three seasons. 2. Glory Review, sired by Byron Review, 
dammed by Axtell Green, a trotter. Green, has no mark. 3. Birchwood 
Maid, by Birchwood. Mark 2.23, now a brood mare. In political opinion 
he is a Republican, has served as a member of the school board and as its 
president. His fraternal affiliation is with the Order of Free and Accepted 
Masons. 

Mr. Hafer married (first) in 1895, Molly, born at St. Mary's, Elk 
county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of George and Mary Lecker, the former 
a farmer. She died and he married (second) February 25, 1903, 
Edith, born in Potter county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Joseph and Emma 
Lucas, the former also a farmer. By the first marriage there were children : 
Norbert, born May 28, 1898, who lives in Cleveland, Ohio; Marion, born 
February 4, 1900, lives with her grandmother at St. Mary's. Children by 
the second marriage: Joseph, born October 21, 1905; Clarence, May 12, 
1909; Leon, February 12, 191 1; Helen, June 4, 1913. 



The American progenitor of the family under discussion here 
DAVIS was probably Christopher Davis, or Davids, who was born in 

England, and he was also known as "Kit" Davis. He came 
to Massachusetts Bay Colony prior to 1636. The only public record we 
find of him there, however, is one showing that he was bondsman for John 
Davies (Davis) before the general court, December 13, 1636. Later he 
went to New York and settled at Hellgate, Manhattan, where he was known 
as "The Englishman" by his Dutch neighbors. He sold his land here and 
removed to Fort Orange, but in 1654 went down the river and settled at 
Redoubt Kill, opposite what was afterwards called Kit Davis Kill. He 
married (first) Cornelia Vedos, who died in 1657. He married (second) 
Maria Martens, also a Dutch woman. Davis was a noted trapper and acted 
as a mediator and Indian interpreter. Governor Stuyvesant at one time 
put him in jail "for spreading false reports among the Indians," but his 
wife secured his release "to provide for a poor famished and disconsolate 
wife and children." Indian hostilities eventually caused him to remove to 
New Amsterdam, but afterward he located at Esopus, and finally at Marble- 
town. He had a number of children. Owing to destruction of early records 
it is not an easy matter to trace lines in an unbroken descent, but there 
appears no reason to doubt that the family herein recorded is descended 
from Christopher Davis. 

(I) Alva Clark Davis lived on a large farm near Woodstock. Ulster 
county, New York, and died there at an advanced age. He was an active 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married , and raised 



1296 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a family of children : Reuben, a farmer and drover, went to California 
for gold, and never returned ; Gaston, a farmer in Ulster county, New 
York, died at the age of eighty years; Martin, of further mention; Charles, 
a farmer at Woodstock, New York; Mary; Jane. 

(II) Martin, son of Alva Clark Davis, was born in Woodstock, Ulster 
county, New York, in 1807, and died in 1847. He grew to manhood in his 
native county, and became a farmer near Stoneridge. He died at middle 
age, and his widow continued the management of the farm until her death. 
This farm adjoined that of her father, and she relied upon his opinion and 
counsel, whenever occasion arose. She was very prosperous at the time of 
her death, which occurred at Marbletown, New York, and was an active 
worker in the interests of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Davis 
married Caroline Lockwood, born in Ulster county, New York, in 1810, 
died February 14, 1880. She was a daughter of Abijah Lockwood, a 
wealthy farmer near Marbletown, Ulster county, New York. He was a 
Whig, later a Republican, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His other children were: Linus, married a Miss Strobridge ; Green; Em- 
meline, married C. T. Tapin, and lived at Kingston, New York; Asenath, 
died unmarried ; Susan Anne, married a Mr. Ostrander, and lived at Kings- 
ton, New York; Delia, married Clinton Winchel, an undertaker 
at Stoneridge, Pennsylvania; Eliza, died unmarried. Mr. and Mrs. Davis 
ihave had children : Clark, of further mention ; Thomas Winchel, lived 
in Ulster county. New York; Charlotte E., born April 10, 1839, married 
Hiram Vandemark, a farmer at Stoneridge, Pennsylvania, both deceased ; 
Green C, born February 15, 1842, lives at Stoneridge, where he owns three 
farms. 

(III) Clark, son of Martin and Caroline (Lockwood) Davis, was born 
in the city of Woodstock, Ulster county. New York, June 27, 1835. He 
grew up on a farm, and attended the schools of Stoneridge. He was ap- 
prenticed to learn the trade of carriage building with Isaac Rose, with 
whom he remained three and a half years. For this he received as wages, 
the sum of $105. August 22, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, 120th New 
York Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel George H. Sharp, and served until 
he received his discharge at Cincinnati, Ohio, July 5, 1865. His company 
was in the Second Division, Third Corps, Army of the Potomac, and fought 
at the second battle of Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and all the 
other engagements in which the Army of the Potomac participated. At 
the close of the war, Mr. Davis located at the city of Kingston, Ulster 
county, New York, and soon established a carriage and wagon making shop 
of his own. He was an expert workman, and carried on his business suc- 
cessfully there until 1885, when he removed to Geneva, Pennsylvania, and 
opened a similar establishment there. He conducted it until 1900, when 
he retired and returned to Kingston, New York. In 1902 he again came 
to Geneva, Pennsylvania, where he has since that time lived, retired from 
business responsibilities. He has a pleasant little home, with a fruit, vege- 
table and flower garden, and proudly says that he has never lived in a rented 



WESTERN" PENNSYLVANIA 1297 

ihouse. He is a Republican in politics. In religious matters he is of very 
liberal views. He contributes generously to a number of churches, attends 
regularly, but is not a member of any. Mr. Davis married (first), May 
20, 1858, Lucinda, born July 29, 1841, died April 11, 1866, a daughter of 
James Smith, a farmer of Ulster county. New York. He married (second), 
August 12, 1868, Rebecca, born April 13, 1850, died August 28, 1908, 
daughter of Alva and Margaret Lowe, farmers of Ulster county. New 
York. Children by the first marriage: Caroline Etta, born August 13, 
1859, died December 26, 1864; Eudora, born July 6, 1861, died December 
28, 1864; Ulysses Grant, born February 15, 1866, died April 15, 1866. 
Children by the second marriage: Sanford, born August 23, 1869, died 
June 25, 1870; Bertha, born August 23, 1869, died November 6, 1874, of 
scarlet fever; Charlotte C, born April 13, 1874, died November 6, 1874, 
of scarlet fever ; Minerva B., born August 28, 1877, married Bert Seeley, 
lives at -Youngstown, Ohio, where he is a bricklaying contractor; Maud, 
born February 17, 1880, married John Marsh, a farmer of Greenwood 
township, Crawford county. Pennsylvania; they have one child, Mary 
Eleanor: Arthur, born November 16, 1883, married Flossie Tanner, and 
lives in Meadville, Pennsylvania. 



This well known English surname has been found in all parts 
BROWN of America since the early days of the colonial period. Sev- 
eral of the immigrant ancestors who came over during that 
time were in some manner of kin, but generally the families were not re- 
lated, although having the same name ; and it will be remembered that 
Brown is one of our common English surnames which antiquarians tell 
us are derived from a color. However, the family here under consideration, 
appears to have come into this country independently of any other of the 
name. 

(I) John Brown emigrated to America in 1844, and settled in Mead 
township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania. He cleared his land of timber 
and engaged in general farming, with which he was successfully identified 
until his death. He was a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Cath- 
olic church. He married Geneveive Veneoux, and had children : Sophia ; 
Leona ; Joseph, of further mention ; Anne ; Francis. 

(H) Joseph, son of John and Geneveive (Veneoux) Brown, was born 
in France, and came to America with his parents. He acquired his educa- 
tion in the parochial schools, and followed in the footsteps of his father 
as a farmer. He settled at East Mead, and became the owner of one hun- 
dred acres of land. His religious affiliation is with the Catholic church. 
He married Julia Mair, and had children : Joseph, a farmer and carpenter 
of Beaver county, Pennsylvania, married Emma Smith ; Elvina, married 
Edward Rouchey, now deceased, and lives at Meadville; Julius, living in 
Massachusetts, married Elizabeth De Fossey; Xavier, a farmer of East 
Mead township, married Elizabeth Alzinger ; Stella, married Oiarles, a 
brother of Elizabeth (Alzinger) Brown; Louis S.. of further mention; 
Edward, living in Pittslnirn^li. married Amelia Coffee. 



1298 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(III) Louis S., son of Joseph and Julia (Mair) Brown, was born in 
Mead township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, November 7, 1873. He 
was educated in the public schools, and upon the completion of his studies 
was apprenticed to learn the blacksmith's trade, and followed this occupa- 
tion for a period of fifteen years. In 1900 he came to Saegerstown, where 
he bought a farm of one hundred and forty-one acres, on which he is still 
engaged in general farming. He has been an active worker in the interests 
of the Democratic party, and is at present in office as supervisor of roads. 
His religious belief is that of the Catholic church, and he is a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Loyal Order of Mpose and 
the local Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. Mr. Brown married, in 1897, 
Orpha, a daughter of M. B. Walton, of East Mead township, and has 
children : Luella, Laura, Hilda, Helen, twins, and Edward, all living at 
home. 



The Qiase family is of ancient English origin, the name being 
CHASE undoubtedly derived from the French word "chasser," to hunt. 

The ancestral seat of the branch of the family from which the 
American line is descended, was at Chesham, Buckinghamshire, England, 
through which runs a rapidly flowing river, the Chess, which gives the 
name to the place. There is a coat-of-arms as follows : Gules four crosses 
patence argent (two and two), on a canton azure a lion rampant or. The 
Chase family came to New England in early Colonial days. 

(I) Rev. Amos Chase was the recipient of an excellent education, and 
became a minister of the Presbyterian church. At that time a great deal 
of money was spent by the churches in the conversion of the Indians, or 
heathen, as they were called, and Mr. Chase decided to devote himself to 
this branch of church activity. In 1813, with his young family, he left Con- 
necticut, going westward. He had inherited $10,000 in cash, and this he 
took with him. He purchased almost a full township of land, on which the 
village of Centerville is now located, and in 1815 they located at Centerville, 
and spent the remainder of their lives there. The church gave him a 
circuit of one hundred miles square, and he rode over this on horseback, 
preached in all the pioneer churches, did excellent missionary work among 
the Indians, and lived to the advanced age of ninety years. Litchfield, Con- 
necticut, was his birthplace. He married Joanna Lanman, also born in 
Litchfield, a sister of William Lanman, once United States senator from 
Connecticut, later chief-justice of that state, and also a sister of Charles 
Lanman, admiral in the United States Navy, stationed at New London, 
Connecticut. The Lanman family was very wealthy, and was one of the 
leading families of New England. Rev. Amos and Joanna (Lanman) Chase 
had children : Joseph L., of further mention ; James, a physician in Toledo, 
Ohio, where he was one of the pioneer settlers ; Edward H., lived in Titus- 
ville, and was associate judge in Crawford county; Daniel, a colonel in 
the regular army, was stationed in California during the gold excitement 
of 1849, became very wealthy, and died unmarried in Toledo, Ohio; Charles, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1299 

was a merchant in Painesville, Ohio; Juhus, lived on the old farm at Ccn- 
terville, Pennsylvania; Joanna, married Thomas Sill, the congressman, of 
Erie, Pennsylvania, and she died at the age of ninety-two years; Rebecca, 
became the second wife of Jonathan Titus. 

(II) Joseph L., son of Rev. Amos and Joanna (Lanman) Chase, was 
born in 1799, and died April 23, 1879. He was about seventeen years of 
age when the family removed to Titusville, and he engaged in trading with 
the Indians, sending the furs he received to Philadelphia. At the age of 
twenty-four years he had already amassed a fortune of $25,000, which 
was comparatively as much as twenty-five millions would be at the present 
time. He was the first merchant and the first postmaster in Titusville, and 
retired for a time in 1842 from business pursuits. He again established 
himself in business in 1859, and continued until 1865, the firm name being 
J. L. Chase & Company, and his partner, his brother-in-law, Thomas Sill, 
a congressman. They were extensively engaged in the lumber business, 
buying large tracts of timber land, which they converted into lumber, and 
at all these lumber camps they had co-operative stores. He had a chain 
of saw mills all over the country, and built the first grist mill in Titusville. 
In his later years he was also largely interested in oil production in that 
region. He became president of the first gas company that operated at 
Titusville. He was a strong supporter of Whig principles, and he was the 
second burgess of the Borough of Titusville, his father-in-law, Jonathan 
Titus, having been the first. Joseph L. Chase and Jonathan Titus donated 
land upon which the first church in Titusville was erected, this being at 
the head of Franklin street, and they were always generous contributors 
to the support of this Presbyterian church. In this he was a communicant 
sixty years, and an elder for a long period. He purchased from his father- 
in-law, what is now the central part of the city of Titusville. Upon the 
formation of the Republican party, Mr. Chase joined its ranks, but was 
never a politician in the accepted sense of the word, although he always 
took a deep interest in all matters concerning the public welfare of the 
community. He was six feet in height, and a very active man all his life. 

Mr. Chase married Susan J. Titus, born in 1801, died December 28, 
1878; she was born at a place in Titusville, just back of where the Titus- 
ville Herald office is now located, and she was the first white child born 
in that part of Crawford county, Pennsylvania. They had children: Joseph 
T., now deceased, was a member of the state legislature from Titusville 
and county prothonotary of Crawford county, and married a Miss Adrain; 
Cornelius S., captain of Company K, 57th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, was wounded at the battle of Fair Oaks, and died in the hos- 
pital ; Thomas S., deceased, was the proprietor of the Coudersport Journal, 
at Coudersport, Pennsylvania; William Wirt, died in 1910, was sergeant- 
major of the 57th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and lived in 
■Boston, Massachusetts; Edward B.. died in 1900, was a dry goods merchant 
in Titusville ; George A., of further mention ; Mary, married Samuel Tor- 
bett, a prominent business man of Meadville, Pennsylvania, both now de- 



I300 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ceased; Joanna, married Jonathan Watson, an extensive lumber dealer and 
oil producer, lived in Titusville, both now deceased ; Adelaide, married Jolm 
11. Dalzell, of Pittsburgh, a wealthy oil producer; Susan Emma, died in 
girlhood. 

Jonathan Titus, father of Mrs. Susan J. (Titus) Chase, was born in 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and studied surveying in his earlier 
years. In 1790 he was employed by the United States government as a 
civil engineer in surveying the Susquehanna Valley. During this trip 
through northwestern Pennsylvania he decided to locate there. He went 
to Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, but, the Indians becoming 
troublesome, he removed to Fort le Boeuf, where Waterford is now located. 
After a few weeks he went to Spring Creek, and in October, 1790, came to 
the spot on which Titusville is now located, and as he looked over the broad 
valley 'he was much impressed by the general aspect. He pitched his camp 
there, and the following morning everything was covered with snow, al- 
though it was but October. He built a log house just back of where the 
Titusville Herald is now located, and thus became the first settler and the 
founder of Titusville. He bought many hundreds of acres of the surround- 
ing country. He was a very tall man, being six feet two inches in height. 
His father died in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, at the unusually advanced 
age of one hundred and ten years. Peter Titus, a brother of Jonathan, 
settled in Hydetown, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and took up a large 
tract of land there. A frequent visitor at the home of Jonathan Titus was 
"Cornplanter," chief of the Seneca Indians. As Titusville grew up, Mr. 
Titus sold off a part of his land, retiring to private life, and at his death 
his property was divided among his children. That portion now known 
as the Second Ward of Titusville, was a portion of the estate which fell to 
Mrs. Joseph L. Chase. Mr. Titus married Mary Martin, who was born in 
Maryland, near the Pennsylvania line. Children: Susan J., who married Mr. 
Chase; Sarah, married E. H. Chase, a brother of Joseph L. Chase; Lavinia, 
married Parker McDowell, a merchant, of Franklin, Pennsylvania; John, 
went to California in 1849, and died soon afterward; Maxwell, was an in- 
valid, and lived in Titusville ; Peter, died at an early age. 

(Ill) George A., son of Joseph L. and Susan J. (Titus) Chase, was 
born where the Chase and Stewart block is now situated, at the corner of 
Spring and Franklin streets. Titusville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
December 6, 1844. He acquired his elementary and preparatory education 
in the public schools of Titusville, being graduated from the high school. 
After this he attended the Allegheny College, at Meadville, Pennsylvania, 
from which he was graduated in 1865. He then took up the study of law 
in the office of Alexander Miller, an attorney of Pittsburgh, and at the 
end of three years, in 1868, was admitted as an attorney to the bar of 
Pittsburgh, and has been engaged in general practice since that time, in 
Titusville, to which he returned in that year. In 1873 he was appointed 
United States commissioner, and is still the incumbent of this office. After 
the death of his father, he was given control of the valuable estate, which 





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"WESTERN PENNSYLXANIA 1301 

he lias managed to the entire satisfaction of all the others who were inter- 
ested. He served as city solicitor of Titusville for a period of thirteen 
years, and is a member of the Presbyterian church at Pittsburgh. He is 
also interested in oil production in Warren county, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Chase is not married. 



The antiquity of the name of Hutchison, or Hutchinson, 
HUTCHISON as it is frequently spelled, is very great. Its origin has 

been assigned to one, Uitchensis, said to have been a 
Norwegian, who came from Normandy with William the Conqueror, but 
there is no record of the family after the Conquest until 1282, after which 
the history of the family is definitely known. The coat-of-arms of the Eng- 
lish family is: Per pale gules and azure semee of cross-crosslets or, a 
lion rampant argent. Crest: Out of a ducal coronet or a cockatrice with 
wings endorsed azure, beaked combed and wattled gules. From England 
members of the family migrated to Scotland, then to the North of Ireland, 
and thence to America. 

(I) Thomas Hutchison was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, and emi- 
grated to this country with his parents when he was a young child. They 
settled in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, about 1785, where he grew to 
manhood. Some years after his marriage he removed with his family to 
the west bank of the Allegheny river above Bradys Bend, settled on a farm 

there about 1810. He married , and had children : William, of further 

mention; Samuel, migrated to Kansas and took up land there; David, born 
in 181 1, died in 1883, a stone mason by trade, had a farm in Parker town- 
ship, Butler county, Pennsylvania, sold this and purchased one in Perry 
township, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, and married Mary Porter; 
Sallie, married James Wilson, and lived in Butler county. Pennsylvania ; 
Jennie, married (first) Armstrong Wilson, (second) John Campbell, lived 
in Butler county, Pennsylvania ; Polly ; two who died young. 

(II) William, son of Thomas Hutchison, was born in the eastern part 
of the state of Pennsylvania, and followed the occupation of farming. He 
was killed in young manhood by a fall from a horse. His widow never 
remarried, but continued living on the farm of one hundred acres in Parker 
township. Mr. Hutchison married Esther Gibson, born in Parker town- 
ship, died there in 1900, at the age of ninety-one years. Children : James 
Gibson, of further mention ; William, died in infancy ; Rebecca Jane, died 
unmarried, December, 1915. 

(III) James Gibson, son of William and Esther (Gibson) Hutchison, 
was born in Parker township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1836, and 
died in December, 1863. He was educated in the public schools of his 
native township, and upon the death of his father, took charge of the home- 
stead farm for his widowed mother. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War 
he enlisted in Company G, 134th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
served nine months, and upon his return to Ijis home died as the result of 
the hardships he had endured. He married Susan Daubenspeck, born in 



I302 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Parker township, in December, 1836, now living at Freedom, Beaver county. 
They had children: Emma, died at the age of three years; James William, 
of further mention. Mrs. Hutchison married (second) Shryock Harper, a 
merchant of North Washington, Butler county, where the family lived until 
his death. They had children : Edgar P., a preacher at Freedom, Penn- 
sylvania, married a Miss O'Neal ; Curtis M., died at the age of twenty-one 
years ; Orie Pearl, married Rev. H. O. McEtonald, a Presbyterian minister 
at Monessen, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Hutchison comes of an old family, whose 
history will be found forward. 

(IV) James William, son of James Gibson Hutchison and Susan 
(Daubenspeck) Hutchison, was born in Parker township, Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, June 17, 1864. For a time he attended the public 
schools of Washington township, and after the death of his father made 
his home with his grandmother Hutchison, and attended the schools of 
Parker township. He was prepared for entrance to college at an academy 
in North Washington, matriculated at Westminister College, and was grad- 
uated from this institution in 1887. Locating in Butler, Pennsylvania, he 
read law in the office and under the preceptorship of the Hon. S. F. Bowser, 
and was admitted to the bar December 2, 1889. Since that time he has 
been engaged in an uninterrupted successful practice, and has never had 
a partner. For a number of years he has served as referee in bankruptcy. 
He is aggresive and energetic in his legal practice, and enjoys great pop- 
ularity. He is an excellent man of business, and had he chosen to devote 
his attention to business afifairs altogether, would undoubtedly have made 
a decided success along those lines. As it is, his counsel is highly valued 
as president of the East Butler Water Company. He lives in a beautiful 
home at No. 628 Walker avenue, which he had erected in 1907. Politically 
he is a Republican, and his fraternal affiliations are with the following or- 
ganizations : Knights of Pythias, and is past grand chancellor of the state 
of Pennsylvania ; Sons of Veterans ; Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; 
and the Knights of Malta. 

Mr. Hutchison married (first) in November, 1889, Ida May, who died 
August 3, 1900, a daughter of John H. and Sidney Jane Campbell, the 
former an oil producer, living at Kittanning, Pennsylvania. He married 
(second) in November, 1903, Helen Victor, born in Lancaster, New York. 
Children, all by the first marriage: Aileen, born August 5, 1890; Carl, 
died at the age of three years ; Paul, born April 10, 1897, a pupil at the high 
school. 

(The Daubenspeck Line.) 

In 1681 members of the Daubenspeck family left Hesse Kassel, 
Prussia, going to England, because of religious persecution. They joined 
the colonists under William Penn, came to America, and assisted in the 
settlement of Philadelphia. They located on a large farm in the vicinity 
of Philadelphia. For about one hundred years after this period we have 
no definite information as to the fortunes of this family, but shortly after 
the Revolution, we again have an uninterrupted record. At that time, and 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1303 

even yet, there were many members of this family located in Lehigh, 
Northumberland and Luzerne counties, and they were all unusual in stature. 
The family characteristics were large blue eyes, erect figure, and large, 
sinewy bodies. They often weighed more than two hundred pounds, and 
were from six feet to six feet seven inches in height. 

(I) Jacob Daubenspeck left his home in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, 
and migrated to what is now Butler county, then a part of Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania. He had served from Luzerne county, during the 
Revolutionary war, as a Continental Ranger. He bought a farm in Parker 
township, Butler county, in 1796, which is now owned by Euphemia Dauben- 
speck. Later, with two of his sons, Louis and John, he settled at Red 
Bank Creek, Clarion county, Pennsylvania, where he died and is buried 
in Squirrel Hill churchyard. Mr. Daubenspeck married (first) Barbara 
Geiger, who died in Parker township, and he married (second), in Clarion 
county, a widow. Children by the first marriage : Louis and John, men- 
tioned above, who remained in Clarion county, where their descendants still 
live, some of whom have changed the spelling of the name of Doverspike 
and Debenspike ; Henry, located on Mahoning creek, Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania, and his descendants still live in that section ; George, who 
received the home buildings and the southern portion of the homestead in 
Parker township ; Philip, of further mention. The only child by the second 
marriage was a son who died at the age of eighteen years in Indiana, Penn- 
sylvania. 

(II) Philip, son of Jacob and Barbara (Geiger) Daubenspeck, lived 
and died on the homestead in Parker township, having inherited for his 
share, the northern half, consisting of about six hundred acres. He was 
in active service during the War of 1812. He married, and had four children : 
George, of further mention ; Philip ; John ; Lewis. 

(HI) George, son of Philip Daubenspeck, was born in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, and was six feet in height. He died on the homestead, on 
which his entire life had been spent. He married Elizabeth Barnhart, also 
born in Parker township, and they had children : Philip, a retired farmer 
of Butler county, married Nancy Scott, and died in 191 1; Andrew, a Civil 
War veteran, died in middle age ; Abraham, a Civil War veteran, is a farmer 
in Parker township ; David, deceased, was a farmer in Parker township ; 
Lavina, married Christian Daubenspeck, of W'ashington township, both now 
deceased; Susan, who married Mr. Hutchison, as above mentioned; Mary 
Jane, now residing in Butler, Pennsylvania, married James H. Gibson, now 
deceased, a merchant in North Washington, Pennsylvania ; George F., lives 
in Butler, married Elizabeth Perry ; Jacob D., a farmer of Bruin, Pennsyl- 
vania, married Martha Campbell. 



The Jameson family has been a noted one in England for 
JAMESON many generations, and has been well represented in pro- 
fessional life, especially in the field of medicine and surgery. 
(I) Rev. James Jameson, son of a physician, was a clerg}-man of the 
Church of England. 



1304 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(II) George Bernard, son of Rev. James Jameson, was born in England 
in 1806, and died in 1890, at Holton Park, Lincolnshire, England. He was 
a physician in active practice for many years. He married (first) Margaret 
Swan, born in England, who died at the age of si.xty-two years. He mar- 
ried (second) Amelia Dixon, who died at Holton Park, the estate she had 
inherited from her ancestors, in 1906. They belonged to the Church of 
England. They had children: William Hugh, of further mention; George, 
who was a physician in Essex, England. 

(III) Dr. William Hugh Jameson, son of Dr. George Bernard and 
Margaret (Swan) Jameson, was born in the town of Caistor, Lincolnshire, 
England, March 14, 1839, and died April 14, 1879. After excellent prepara- 
tory tuition, he matriculated at Oxford LIniversity, from which he was 
graduated with honor. He took highest honors in a severe examination 
for surgeon of the royal army, passed tliis successfully, and was duly 
appointed. After his marriage he was sent to. India as a surgeon of the 
Royal Artillery, and was stationed at various points in India, practically 
covering this entire country. He was in active service twice, one being 
the "Black Mountain Rebellion." He served fifteen years in India, being 
soon appointed surgeon major, and at the time of his death was the youngest 
holder of this title in the sei-vice. He died in England, while visiting that 
country on a furlough, in order to restore his health, which had been under- 
mined by intermittent fever. Dr. Jameson married Eliza Georgina Roberts, 
born in Edinburgh, Scotland, September 19, 1848, a daughter of William and 
Catherine (Ogilvy) Roberts, of ancient families. They had children: Hugh, 
of further mention ; Charles W., living in New Zealand, was engaged in the 
stock business in 1886. 

(IV) Dr. Hugh Jameson, son of Dr. William Hugh and Eliza Georgina 
(Roberts) Jameson, was born at Agra, British India, January 29, 1867, and 
was sent home to the town of Caistor, England, in 1875. There he attended 
the elementary public schools, and from them went to Stewart's College, 
in Edinburgh, Scotland, his mother having taken up her residence there with 
her two children in 1880, some months after the death of her husband. He 
next attended the University of Edinburgh, from the Medical Department 
of which he was graduated in 1889. In 1888 he had acted as assistant and 
locum tenens for another physician at Peebles, Scotland, for nine months. 
After his graduation he was assistant to another physician in London for 
another period of nine months. He then practiced independently for one 
year, after which he decided to try his fortune in the new world. He 
arrived at Titusville, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1890, and has been engaged 
in general practice there since that time. He, however, gives especial atten- 
tion to diseases of the eye, and also abdominal surgery. He is a member of 
the medical stafif of the local hospital. His political support is given to the 
Republican party, and he has served twice as a member of the city council, 
once on the school board, twice on the board of health, having been chairman 
of the last mentioned body, and is now a member of it. He is a member of 
the board of directors of the Young Men's Christian Association of the town. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1305 

In association with A. W. Bronson he organized the Men's Club of Titus- 
ville, which is now a flourishing body. He is a member of the Royal 
Obstetrical Society of Edinburgh, and of the Country Club, and lives at 
No. 105 North Washington street, where he bought a fine residence in 1895. 
He and his family belong to St. James Episcopal Church, of which he is a 
vestryman. 

Dr. Jameson married, December 28, 1893, Helen, a daughter of Robert 
W. and Sophia (Dane) Kernochan, the latter deceased, the former, formerly 
an oil well supply merchant, lives in Titusville, at the age of eighty-one years. 
Children: Margaret Ogilvy, born November 3, 1897, attends "Elmhurst," 
a school for girls at Connersville, Indiana ; Hugh Kernochan, born September 
28, 1900, attends high school at Titusville, Pennsylvania. 



The Theobalds were for many generations farmers in the 
THEOBALD Rhine Province, and were devout members of the Roman 
Catholic church. 

Nicholas Theobald was born about three miles from the village of 
Winderbach, in 1794, and died in 1866. He inherited a fine farm, but sold 
this when he married, and bought a piece of property in the town in which 
his wife lived. In 1852 he emigrated to the United States, with his wife 
and children, and settled at Wellsville, Allegany county, New York, where 
he bought a farm, on which he lived until his death. They, also, were Roman 
Catholics. Mr. Theobald married Katherina Leist, born in Germany, in 
1798, died at Wellsville, New York, in 1883. Her parents were well-to-do 
farmers, and Catholics. Children : Elizabeth, Jacob, Anna, John, deceased ; 
Peter, of furtlier mention ; Wendal, retired from business, lives at Corry, 
Pennsylvania. 

Peter, son of Nicholas and Katherina (Leist) Theobald, was bom near 
the town of Winderbach, Germany, November 11, 1838. He acquired his 
education in his native land, and was fourteen years of age at the time he 
emigrated to America with the others of his family. For some years he 
worked on the homestead farm, but he was yet in early manhood when he 
walked to Titusville, Pennsylvania, in order to carve out his fortune himself. 
He was of a strong and robust constitution, and an excellent walker, on one 
day covering forty miles. Titusville was at that time the center of the oil 
industry, and he became associated with others in the putting down of oil 
wells, but they were not successful in this line of enterprise. They then 
started in the oil refining business, in which they met with the success which 
their well directed efforts merited. At this time the Standard Oil Company 
was buying up all the smaller concerns, and the approach was also made to 
Mr. Theobold. He, however, seeing the possibilities of this industry, refused 
to sell. But his partners who together held the larger part of the interests, 
sold out, and Mr. Theobald was obliged to make the best of it. Undaunted, 
he started an independent refining company, of which he was elected presi- 
dent, this being known as the Independent Oil Refining Company of Oil 
City, Pennsylvania. As tlie executive head of this company he raised it to 



i3o6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a high standard, and it was a well paying corporation. In 1906 he retired 
from business affairs, and lives in Titusville, where he has a comfortable 
home, at No. 69 West Walnut street. He is a Democrat, and a member of 
the Masonic order. Mr. Theobald married Minnie Schwartzcop, born in 
Wellsville, New York. Among their children is a son, Edward T., who is 
the present head of the Refining Company founded by his father. 



The late Dr. Edgar C. Parsons, numbered for more than a 
PARSONS quarter of a century among the leading medical practitioners 
of Western Pennsylvania, and throughout that period an 
honored citizen of Meadville, was of ancient New England lineage and in 
his character and career strikingly illustrated the sturdy virtues of the stock 
from which he sprang. The Parsons family was founded in this country in 
the earliest period of our colonial history, the immigrant ancestors being 
among the first settlers of Massachusetts and owning what was called the 
"Northampton Meadows," situated not far from Boston. In the course of 
time representatives of this ancient stock migrated to various parts of the 
country, many of their descendants achieving distinction in business and in 
the learned professions. 

(I) Luther Parsons, grandfather of Dr. Edgar C. Parsons, belonged to 

the original Massachusetts branch of the family and married Hadassah 

with whom after some years he removed to Naples, New York, where he 
died, leaving the following children, of whom the first and second were born 
at Northampton, Massachusetts, and the others at Naples, New York : Mary, 
born April 25, 1807; Esther, born May 26, 1809; Persis, born August 7, i8ri ; 
Almira, born October 3, 1814; Hiram G., mentioned below; and Luther, 
born December 7, 1825. After the death of the father of the family, his 
widow, with her son Hiram G. and, perhaps, others of her children, removed 
to Alexandria, Ohio. 

(II) Hiram G., son of Luther and Hadassah Parsons, was born 

May 31, 1817, in Naples, New York, and was a child when his mother re- 
moved to Ohio. He received a good education and during the early part 
of his life was engaged in agricultural pursuits. He later learned the black- 
smithing trade, which he followed during the remainder of his active life. 
He married (first) Dorothy Page, of Alexandria, Ohio, and the following 
children were born to them : Edgar C., mentioned below ; Electa, married 
E. P. Robb, of Kansas ; and Jerusha, married William H. Banner, of Illinois. 
Mr. Parsons married (second) Nancy Trout, and they became the parents 
of five children : Horace A. ; Orlena ; Wilbur ; Luther ; and Elizabeth. 
Hiram G. Parsons died March 3, 1877, at Alexandria, Ohio, leaving the 
memory of an upright man and a highly esteemed citizen. 

(III) Edgar €., son of Hiram G. and Dorothy (Page) Parsons, was 
born November 19, 1847, ^^ Alexandria, Ohio, where he received his pre- 
liminary education in the public schools, later graduating from the Johnstown 
(Ohio) Academy. Thereafter he was engaged for two winters in teaching, 
and in 1868 went to Knoxville, Iowa, teaching for several terms in the 




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WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1307 

schools of Marion and Mahaska counties. In 1870 he accepted the charge 
of the intermediate department and later that of the grammar school at 
Knoxville, filling these positions until June, 1873. Imparting instruction was 
not, however, despite his manifest fitness for it, regarded by Dr. Parsons 
as his life-work. His inclinations led him to another field — one for which 
he had received from nature exceptional endowments. About 1871 he took 
up the study of medicine under the guidance of Dr. A. B. Wilder, and in 
the autumn of 1873 attended lectures at the Hahnemann Medical College, 
Chicago. After completing the regular course he began practice at Rantoul, 
Illinois. In the autumn of 1876 he entered Hahnemann College, Philadel- 
phia, graduating March 8, 1877. He then established himself at Meadville, 
where, during the remainder of his life, a period of more than a third of a 
century, he was continuously engaged in active practice. Profound and com- 
prehensive knowledge, an unusual degree of skill and tireless devotion to 
duty combined to insure his rapid advancement to a leading place among 
the members of his profession not only in his home city but throughout the 
western part of Pennsylvania. In 1883 he was appointed health officer of 
Meadville, serving two terms with the greatest efficiency, his administration 
of the office being fruitful in results beneficial to the city. 

In all concerns relative to the city's welfare, Dr. Parsons' interest was 
deep and sincere and wherever substantial aid would further public progress 
it was freely given. Every movement which, in his judgment, tended toward 
the betterment of Meadville received his hearty co-operation and support and 
no good work done in the name of charity or religion appealed to him in vain. 
He was instrumental in organizing the Crawford County Homoeopathic 
Medical Society in which he held the office of secretary, and he also belonged 
to the Homoeopathic Medical Society of Pennsylvania. He affiliated with 
the Masonic bodies at Meadville and he and his family were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Dr. Parsons married, October 14, 1874, at Irwin, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, Amanda Boyd, whose ancestral record is appended to this 
sketch, and they became the parents of the following children : Page Waters, 
born July 19, 1875, at Rantoul, Illinois; Evangeline, born April 11, 1882, in 
Meadville ; and Lenore, born May 27, 1885, in Meadville. 

Page Waters Parsons graduated from the Meadville high school and 
was in his sophomore year in Allegheny College when his health failed, and 
he died October 28, 1896, only three months after attaining his majority. 
He anticipated entering the medical profession and his endowments were 
such as to encourage the brightest expectations of his parents and friends. 
He was a young man of sterling qualities and endearing personal attributes 
and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Evangeline Parsons graduated from the high school, and in 1903 from 
Allegheny College. During two years she was engaged in teaching — one 
year at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, and another in Meadville. On June 25, 
1908, she married the Rev. Joseph Emil Morrison, a graduate of Alle- 
gheny College and Drew Theological Seminary, and since 1906 pastor of the 



i3o8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Methodist Episcopal church on Cahfoniia avenue, Pittsburgh. Mr. and 
Mrs. Morrison are the parents of two children : Joseph Parsons, born Octo- 
ber 22, 1910; and Marion, born February 12, 1912. 

Lenore, youngest of the three children of Edgar C. and Amanda (Boyd) 
Parsons, was educated in the schools of Meadville so far as her preliminary 
studies were concerned, but on account of delicate health took the finishing 
course at home under private instruction, bestowing special attention on 
music and literature. The study of history has always held much attraction 
for her and she takes particular interest in preserving for future generations, 
the record of her father's services to medical science and sufifering humanity. 
Miss Parsons now enjoys perfect health and is a favorite in the social circles 
of Meadville. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mrs. Parsons is a woman of winning personality, and her husband, a 
man to whom the ties of family and friendship were sacred, ever found in 
her a true helpmate. She is active in her church membership and enjoys 
the love and esteem of a large circle of friends. The residence of Dr. Par- 
sons, on Walnut street, one of the most modern and atractive in the city, is 
now the home of his widow and daughter. 

The death of Dr. Parsons, which occurred June i, 1911, was a distinct 
loss to his profession and to the community at large, and is still mourned as 
that of a learned, skillful, devoted and beloved physician and an honored, 
public-spirited citizen. 

(The Boyd Line.) 

The l)0yd family of Western Pennsylvania is extremely numerous, and 
should the different branches which are of old Presbyterian stock be traced 
back into Ireland and Scotland they would be proved to have sprung from 
a common ancestor. The progenitor of the American Boyds settled first 
in Maryland, subsequently coming to Pennsylvania and residing in Dauphin 
county and later in Northumberland county. 

( I ) John Boyd, grandfather of Mrs. Amanda (Boyd) Parsons, was born 
near Pittsburgh and followed the calling of a farmer. He married Rachel, 
(laughter of the Reverend Samuel Waters, who was ordained by John Wes- 
ley, founder of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd were 
the parents of the following children: John; Eliza; Nancy; Charlotte; 
William ; Jane ; Samuel ; Andrew ; Stephen ; and James Gray, mentioned be- 
low. . 

(in James Gray, son of John and Rachel (Waters) Boyd, was born 
April 2, 1 82 1, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and spent his early 
life in West Newton, in the same state. He learned and followed the trade 
of a carpenter, but in later life was engaged in agricultural pursuits near 
Madison. He eventually disposed of his farming interests and removed to 
Knoxville, Iowa, where, for four years, he gave his attention to the f^ouring- 
mill business. Returning to his native county he settled at Irwin Station 
and there, in partnership with Cyrus Billhammer, conducted a hardware 
business for twenty years, and upward, finally disposing of his interest and 
migrating to Cleveland, Ohio, where he passed the remainder of his life. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1309 

He was a Republican and an active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mr. Boyd married, April 12, 1844, Mary, daughter of Benjamin 
and Magdalena (Baker) Keefer, and they became the parents of three 
daughters: Catherine Jane, born June 21, 1845, married D. P. Highberger; 
Amanda, mentioned below; and Elizabeth K., born April 21, 1856, married 
H. F. Fulton and resides in Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Boyd died March 10, 
1895, in Cleveland, Ohio, and his widow passed away December 8, 1903, at 
the advanced age of eighty-one. Both were regarded by all who knew them 
with the sincere respect and affection inspired by their many virtues. 

(Ill) Amanda, daughter of James Gray and Mary (Keefer) Boyd, 
was born April 21, 1847, and became the wife of Dr. Edgar C. Parsons, as 
mentioned above. 



Luther De Long was born in the eastern part of the state 

DE LONG of Pennsylvania, where he followed his calling as a carpenter 

for many years. Later he removed to Ripley, New York, 

where his death and that of his wife occurred. He married Anna Babcock. 

William Orson De Long, son of Luther and Anna (Babcock) De 
Long, was born in North East, Erie county, Pennsylvania, July 15. 1837. 
Lie was educated in the public schools near his home and at Binghamton, 
New York, and was then graduated from the Law Institute at Albany, New 
York. He was admitted to the bar, and established himself in the practice 
of his profession at Ripley and Westview, New York, where he remained 
some years. He then removed to Titusville, Crawford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and while living there became connected with the Second National 
Bank, a connection which remained uninterrupted for a period of fourteen 
years. Mr. De Long then resigned his office and retired to private life 
about two years prior to his death, May 10, 1901. He became affiliated 
with the Masonic fraternity at Jamestown. Mr. De Long married, in 1851, 
Helen S. Towne, a native of North East, Erie county, Pennsylvania, who 
was taken in infancy to Elgin, Illinois, by her parents. They had children : 
Edward ; Bessie, married Thomas Joseph Powers, a banker of Titusville, 
September 11, 1906. 

Bester Coleman Towne, paternal grandfather of Mrs. De Long, was a 
director of the Bank of Erie, Pennsylvania. His family had been connected 
with banking interests for a number of generations. He married Betsey 
M. Martin. His descent from his Puritan ancestor is as follows : Joseph 
and Hannah (Coleman) Towne; Ozias and Huldah (Brewster) Coleman; 
Ichabod Brewster: William Brewster; Deacon William Brewster; Levi 
Brewster: Elder William Brewster, who came over in the "Mayflower." 

Morris C. Towne, son of Bester Coleman and Betsey M. (Martin) 
Towne, was a banker. He was president of the National Bank of Elgin 
and of a bank in Chicago. He was very successful in his enterprises, and 
was active in business life until he was more than seventy years of age. 
His fraternal affiliation was with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He married (first) Hannah S. Oviatt. He married ("second) Maria Selk- 
regg. 



I3IO WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Timothy Babcock, grandfather of Airs. Anna (Babcock) De Long, 
was of Rhode Island, and died December 3, 1795. He married Thankful 
Reed, who died in Rliode Island, in April, 1795. 

John Babcock, son of Timothy and Thankful (Reed) Babcock, was 
born in 1766, and died in Sherburne, New York, March 27, 1821. He 
married Mercy Whitford, who died March 23, 1843, a daughter of Christo- 
pher and Sarah (Howard) Whitford, the former a Revolutionary soldier 
from the state of Rhode Island, later of Sherburne, New York. 

Anna (Babcock) De Long, daughter of John and Mercy (Whitford) 
Babcock, was born in May, 1810, died August 19, 1880. 



The name Richard or Richards, like most of the surnames 
RICHARD derived from Christian names, is the common possession of 

several different nationalities, and can be traced back to 
the English, and from them to the Irish, to the Welsh, Dutch, French and 
German. 

(I) James Richard was born in Ireland, emigrated to America, and 
arrived at Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, in August, 1819. For 
one or two years he was in the employ of Mr. Van Home, then, having 
amassed a small capital by dint of thrift and industry, he purchased forty 
acres of the Van Home tract and later another twenty-five acres. This land 
he improved and cultivated until his death. He married Anna Hutchison. 

(II) William Richard, son of James and Anna (Hutchison) Richard, 
was born in Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, on the Richard home- 
stead, and acquired his education in the district schools. He has been a 
farmer all his life, and is now located near Sugarlake, Crawford county. 
At one time he affiliated with the Baptist church. He married (first) Ellen, 
born in Vernon township, Crawford county, a daughter of Isaac Warner. 
Mr. Richard married (second) Louisa Henry. Children by first marriage: 
Anna, Ella, James, Charles A., of further mention ; children by second mar- 
riage : George, John, Frank, Harry, Estella and Lillian. 

(III) Charles A. Richard, son of William and Ellen (Warner) Richard, 
was born in Bloomfield township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, June 
4, 1870. His education was acquired in the public schools of Vernon town- 
ship and Smith's Commercial College of Meadville, Pennsylvania, and he 
then commenced an exhaustive study of the methods of gardening and fruit 
culture. For many years after his marriage he cultivated the farm of his 
grandfather, and in April, 1901, removed to the farm on which he is now 
located, purchasing it in 1903. It consists of twelve acres, and he has set 
out two hundred trees, and makes a specialty of gardening and fruit growing. 
He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Meadville. Mr. Richard 
married, April 5, 1899, Estella Doctor, bora in Cambridge township, and 
they had children : Margaret Arline, Geraldine Emma and Dorothy Agnes. 
Mrs. Estella (Doctor) Richard was a daughter of Jackson and Agnes 
(Richard) Doctor, natives of Crawford county, and granddaughter of James 
and Mary (Humes) Doctor, the latter born in Ireland, from which her 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1311 

parents came when Alary was seven weeks old, and located in this section, 
where they have become substantial farmers. James Doctor was probably 
born in Germany, and it is believed he was one of the Hessian soldiers that 
came to America during the Revolutionary War. Mr. and Mrs. Doctor had 
children : Estella, mentioned above, and Emma. 



Nathan Gill, a prosperous farmer of Vernon township, Crawford 
GILL county, Pennsylvania, was born in Virginia, August 22, 1857. He 

was still a young lad when he went to Ohio, and there settled in 
Ross county. After working on several farms in that section, he engaged 
in the raising of small fruits, having purchased a tract of forty-eight 
acres. In 1909 he removed to a farm of one hundred and ten acres near 
Union City, Erie county, Pennsylvania, where he remained until November 
2, 1912, when he settled on the farm he occupies at the present time in 
Vernon township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania. This consists of almost 
one hundred and seventeen acres, and he cultivates it for general products. 
He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Meadville. Mr. Gill married 
Araminta, born in Ohio, a daughter of Chesley and Arabella (Brandon) 
Pettiford, both born in Virginia, and removed to Ohio in childhood : and a 
granddaughter of Jesse and Parthenia Brandon, who were farmers in Ross 
county, Ohio. The marriage took place December 26, 1878. Children: 
George R., married Myrtle Smith, no children ; Vossie R., married Eliza- 
beth Haskell, no children ; Frederick B., married Irene GatlifT, no children ; 
Edward L., married Myrtle Mathews, two children, Minnie L. and Edward 
M. ; Arthur, deceased ; Elma N. ; Isabel ; Alice ; Minnie M. 



Shaw is a very common English surname, used also as a termina- 
SHAW tion. It means a small wood, from tlie Anglo-Saxon "Scua," 

a shade or place shadowed or sheltered by trees. Several par- 
ishes and places bear the name, and from these doubtless the families of 
Shaw took their surnames. We also find the name in combination, as Aber- 
shaw, Bagshaw, Cockshaw, Henshaw, Bradshaw, Longshaw and Eldershaw. 
The coat-of-arms of the Shaw family of Kilmarnock, Scotland, is: Azure 
three covered cups two and one or ; on a chief argent a merchant ship under 
sail proper, a canton gules charged with the mace of the city of London 
surmounted by a sword in saltire, also proper pommel and hilt of the second. 
Crest : A demi-savage aflfrontee, wreathed about the head and waist proper, 
in the dexter hand a key or, the sinister resting on a club reversed also 
proper. Supporters : Dexter a savage wreathed about the head and waist 
with laurel, his exterior hand resting on a club all proper (emblematical of 
fortitude), the sinister hand presenting an escroll, thereon inscribed "The 
King's W^arrant of Precedence" sinister, an emblematical figure of the city 
of London, the de.xter arm supporting the shield, the sinister extended to re- 
ceive the escroll presented by the other supporter. Motto : I mean well. 

(I) Robert Shaw, of Scotch-Irish descent, may have been born in 
Scotland. He emigrated to America, and settled in Venango county, Penur 



I3I2 , WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

sylvania, at a very early date. There he took up land, and was eng 

in its cultivation until his death. He married Isabella White, a native of 

England. 

(II) James Shaw, son of Robert and Isabella (White) Shaw, was born 
in Venango county, Pennsylvania, and was an active participant in the War 
of 1812. He married Margaret Irwin, who was born in Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania. 

(III) Robert (2) Shaw, son of James and Margaret (Irwin) Shaw, 
was born in Venango county, Pennsylvania, November 28, 1804, and died 
December 23, 1884. He was a tanner by trade, but abandoned this line of 
industry in favor of farming and oil production. He was the owner of a fine 
farm near Oil City, Venango county, and his death occurred at Saegers- 
town, Crawford county, Pennsylvania. He married Frances Bartholomew, 
born at Mill Hall, Clinton county, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1819, died July 19, 
1887. She was a daughter of Windell and Sarah (McGill) Bartholomew, 
a granddaughter of John Peter and Frances (Ebe) Bartholomew, and a 
great-granddaughter of Casper Bartholomew. She was also a granddaughter 
of James and Lena (Bums) McGill. The Burns were Scotch Highlanders, 
and the McGills were Irish. Mr. and Mrs. Shaw had children: James W., 
who served during the Civil War and lost his right arm in one of the en- 
gagements in which he participated; Robert L., of further mention; Adelia 
Elvira, Sylvester I., Ann Jane, Emeline Eretta, Sarah Elizabeth, Frances 
A., Marjorie, William Parker. 

(IV) Robert L. Shaw, son of Robert (2) and Frances (Bartholomew) 
Shaw, was born in Venango county, Pennsylvania, February 8, 1842. He 
acquired his education in the public schools of his native county, and at 
a suitable age was apprenticed to learn the trade of carpentering. This he 
followed for some time and then engaged in oil production. In 1888 he 
purchased a farm of one hundred and thirty acres in Vernon township, and 
he has since been located there, his farm yielding satisfactory results under 
his capable management. He is a member of the Presbyterian church. He 
has always taken an active interest in the public welfare of the community, 
and has served as supervisor of Vernon township with great executive 
ability. Mr. Shaw married, December 25, 1866, Rebecca Jane Neely, born 
near Baden, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of George and Bar- 
bara (McNorton) Neely, of Ireland, who were pioneer farmers of Baden. 
Children : James A., of Vernon township, married Sarah Tritt and they have 
two children, Robert W. and Alberta E ; Robert Edwin, died in infancy ; 
Frank Elmer, died at the age of five years ; Charles L., of further mention. 

(V) Charles L. Shaw, son of Robert L. and Rebecca Jane (Neely) 
Shaw, was born at Franklin. Venango county, Pennsylvania, March 23, 
1880. His education was commenced in the public schools, and completed 
at Smith's Business College, in Meadville, and Reese's School of Engraving, 
at Elmira, New York. He followed engraving in its various branches, in 
different sections of the country, finally returning to his father's farm, where 
he now has charge of a dairy business. Mr. Shaw married, in June, 1904, 




/^^i^^v^'. 



U<xr 



WESTERN' l'E.\.\SVL\ AXIA 1313 

Leda P.eardsley, of Elmira, i\'ew York, and they had children : Bessie May, 
Robert L., Florence Eleanor and Leda Anna. The last mentioned died in 
infancy. The family attends the Presbyterian chnrch. 



Daniel Alter, the founder of this family in America, was of 
ALTER Washington county, Pennsylvania. He married, and had chil- 
dren: Joseph, Nancy, Jacob, of further mention ; Samuel, John, 
David, Henry, Daniel, Jeremiah, Elias, Samson. 

( II) Jacob Alter, son of Daniel Alter, was born in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, April 27, 1802, and died August 7, 1883. He was a black- 
smith and farmer, owning a farm of one hundred and eighty acres. He 
was a major of the militia, and filled many local public offices in Plum town- 
ship. He lived to celebrate his golden wedding, on which occasion there were 
ninety-six children, grandchildren and great-grandcliildren present. He 
married Jane Bratton, born January 18, 1802, died October 28, 1880, and 
they had children : George B., of further mention ; Eliza, married Thomas 
King; Mary, married William Brown; Sarah Jane, married Crawford 
Brown ; Lucinda, married George Rose ; Margaret Ann, married John 
Weaver; Samuel, married Nancy Beal ; Susan, married M. K. Armstrong; 
Jacob, married Jane Hamilton ; William D., married Alley Gray ; Rebecca, 
married John Hughes. Jacob Alter was a Republican in political opinion, 
and an active member of the Presbyterian church. 

(III) George B. Alter, son of Jacob and Jane (Bratton) Alter, was 
born in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Jane 22, 1822. He 
was educated in the public schools of Plum township, in which his entire 
life was spent. He was an influential farmer, owning two hundred and 
thirty acres of land, which he commenced cultivating in young manhood. He 
was a Republican in politics, and a most active member of the Presbyterian 
church, in which he was an elder for many years, and sang in the choir for 
a period of forty years. He married Eve Stotler, born in 1824. She was 
a granddaughter of Jacob Stotler, who emigrated to this country from Ger- 
many, and died in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. His widow came to 
Penn township with her children : Emanuel, of further mention ; Henry ; 

John; Jacob; Elizabeth, married — — Reamer; Martha, who married 

Coon. Emanuel Stotler. son of Jacob Stotler, and father of Mrs. Alter, 
was a farmer of Penn township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Bowman, and had children : Jacob ; Mary, married 

Snively ; Elizabeth, married Stoner; Barbara, married - — — Bright; 

Henry B. ; David; Ann, married Alter; Martha; Margaret, married 

Coon ; Eve, married George B. Alter, as above stated ; Catherine, mar- 
ried Coon. Mr. and Mrs. Alter had children : Emanuel, deceased, 

married Susan Kuhn, and lived in Plum township ; Elizabeth J., married Dr. 
James Mcjunkin ; three who died in infancy; Samuel Crawford, of further 
mention ; Harry, died at the age of twenty-two years ; Ella, married W. W'. 
Alter, lives in Kirkwood ; ^largaret, married Rev. John Kistler. 

(IV) Samuel Crawford Alter, son of George B. and Eve (Stotler) 



I3I4 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



Alter, was bom in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June 
12, 1857. He was educated in the public schools there, and like his father 
and grandfather he followed the occupation of farming. He commenced in- 
dependently with a farm of one hundred acres, making a specialty of grow- 
ing grain, and of stock raising. He is considered one of tlie prosperous and 
influential farmers of the section. Politically he is a Republican, and has 
served as road inspector. For the past eight years he has been an elder 
in the Presbyterian church, of which he has been a member many years. 
He married Priscilla Jane, a daughter of Alexander and Mary Jane (Stew- 
art) McMath ; granddaughter of James and Jane (Enwer) McMath ; and 
granddaughter of Andrew and Priscilla (Beale) Stewart. Mrs. Alter had 
sisters : Jennie, married S. I. Swank, now deceased ; Belle, married Samp- 
son Alter ; Mary Margaret, married George G. Glass, of Pittsburgh. Mr. 
and Mrs. Alter had children: Irene, married William ]\r. Hazellett; Grace, 
married J. V. Booth, lives in Plum township; ]\Iinnia, married Robert Mc- 
Machen, and has one child, Alargaret ; George; Evelyn. 



The name of Cricks is recorded as among the early settlers of 
CRICKS Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and they have always proved 
themselves valuable, industrious and patriotic citizens. 

(I) Cricks, settled in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, at an early 

date, but in later life removed to Washingtonville, Ohio, where his death 
occurred. He was a farmer. 

(II) Levi Cricks, a son of the preceding, was born in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and there followed agricultural pursuits. He married Griselda 
Holmes, also a native of Allegheny county. She was of Irish descent, her 
parents having emigrated from Ireland in their youth and settled near Talley 
Cavey, Allegheny county. 

(III) Joseph H. Cricks, son of Levi and Griselda (Holmes) Cricks, was 
born near Bakerstown, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1845, 
and died April 25, 1914. He acquired a plain but substantial education in 
the public schools of his district, and for a time followed the occupation of 
farmer. In later life he became both a carpenter and a sheet heater. He 
commenced the latter occupation as a puddler, and worked up to a higher 
position. Subsequently he purchased a farm of forty acres near Talley 
Cavey. then went to Pittsburgh, where he lived twenty-five years. While 
living there he followed his occupation as a carpenter, then returned to sheet 
heating at Scottdale. After another short residence in Pittsburgh he went 
to Brackenridge, March 27, 1900, with the intention of working in the steel 
mills, but went to Canal Dover instead, where he worked as a sheet heater 
six years while his family remained in Brackenridge. He then returned, 
and himself built a house, in which his widow is residing at the present time. 
For a few months he was employed as a sheet heater in Beling^on, West Vir- 
ginia, then entered the employ of the Penn Salt Works, of Natrona, Penn- 
sylvania, where he met with a serious accident, December 3, igo8, and this 
was the direct cause of his death some years later. Being, however, of a 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1315 

very ambitious nature, he was actively occupied until a very short time prior 
to his death. Before going to Scottdale, he had also served five years as 
a policeman. When the Civil War broke out, Mr. Cricks enlisted in the 
Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, and was wounded and captured at Fair 
Oaks, May 31, 1862; paroled, August 6, 1862; again wounded at Antietam, 
September 18, 1862; honorably discharged, January 16, 1863; re-enlisted, in 
Company I, February 20, 1865; mustered out, June 28, 1865. An honorable 
record, indeerl. .A.11 his life he had been a member of the United Presby- 
terian church, and for some years a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Cricks married, May 29, 1866, Esther Elizabeth Stoup, born at 
Pakerstown, Pennsylvania, died in 1886, a daughter of John and Esther 
( Saddler ) Stoup, both natives of .Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. She was 
a granddaughter of Louis and Drusilla (Tucker) Saddler, both born in 
Allegheny county, where he was a farmer on Kittanning Pike, between 
Brackenridge and Pittsburgh, and she died at the age of one hundred and 
one years. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Cricks were John and Mary 
fCubbage) Stoup, he a native of Germany, who settled near Perrysville 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Cricks was a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church from the time she was thirteen years of age until her 
death. Mr. Cricks was a member of Natrona Post, Grand Army of the Re- 
public, and of Loyal Circle, No. 113, Protective Home Circle, of Pittsburgh. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cricks had children: Carrie Mary, now deceased, married 
Harry E. Skiles, and had : Berdell, Elmer and Joseph ; John Orin, married 
Emilie Walters, of Canton, Ohio: Esther Grace, died in infancy; Ida Lillian, 
married George Heckendorn, of Detroit, Michigan; Harriet Amanda, mar- 
ried Oliver F. Beet, and resides with Mrs. Cricks : Henderson W., lives at 
Steubenville, Ohio, married Emma Katz, and has one child, Audria; Charles, 
married Mapleton jMcFarlin, and has: Mervin, Charles Joseph, Oliver F. 
and Nina ; Molly Belle, died in infancy. 



The name of Kennedy has existed both in Ireland and Scot- 
KENNEDY land for centuries, but its origin cannot be accurately ascer- 
tained. Its bearers in the Emerald Isle are still numerous 
in the interior counties, although many of them have established homes in 
America, and through their habits of industry and frugality have for the 
most part become prosperous. 

Rev. Joseph Kennedy was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
and studied for the ministry. He was ordained in the Methodist Episcopal 
denomination, and preached in Pennsylvania and Ohio, his death occurring 
at Lancaster, Ohio, and he and his wife are buried there. He married Anna 
Keeley, also born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and they had 
children: John, who died at the age of seventeen years: David, died as a 
result of the hardships endured in the Civil War : Daniel, superintendent of 
coal mines, died in 19TI, at Charleroi, Pennsylvania; Joseph S., of further 
mention ; Jane ; Catherine : Clara ; Melissa. 



13 16 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Joseph S. Kennedy, son of Rev. Joseph and Anna (Keeley) Kennedy, 
was born on a farm in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, October 9, 1830, 
and died while on a vacation trip to Atlantic City, New Jersey, June 11, 
19 10. After acquiring an education ii. -he public schools, he learned garden- 
ing, and followed this occupation at Squirrel Hill until 1866, when he came 
to Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and there purchased 
eighty-nine acres of land, now the heart of Duquesne borough. This farm 
extended from Germantown to the Monongahela river. He gardened and 
farmed here many years, and built a comfortable house, which now stands 
on Fourth street, and is occupied by his daughter, Mrs. Annie M. Black. 
When the Carnegie Steel Company decided to locate a new steel mill on 
the banks of the Monongahela river, they purchased a considerable portion 
of land from Mr. Kennedy, and as this naturally caused a demand for prop- 
erty in that vicinity, Mr. Kennedy commenced parceling oiT his lands into 
lots and sold these to excellent advantage. He also sold the plots on which 
the fine new Carnegie Library is located, and that on which the high school 
building stands. Finally he abandoned gardening altogether, and spent the 
last twenty years of his life in retirement. Mr. Kennedy was very public- 
spirited and did a great deal to further the interests of the community in 
many directions. In appreciation of this two streets of this new section 
were named Kennedy avenue and Priscilla street, in honor of himself and 
his wife. 

He married Priscilla Birch feld, who died in 1907, a daughter of Joseph 
and Tane (McFarland) Birchfeld, both of Scotch descent, and early settlers 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he was a farmer and land owner. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Birchfeld died young, after having had children: John, 
died in 1894; Charles, killed at the age of eighteen years by a falling tree; 
Mary, died young; Elizabeth, married Archibald Robinson, and died at 
Carnegie, Pennsylvania ; Priscilla, mentioned above, and two others. Mr. 
and Mrs. Kennedy had children: i. Joseph, stock dealer, lives in Chicago. 
2. David, died at Lancaster, Ohio, in 1914. 3. Annie M., married H. L. 
Black, and lives in the old home on Fourth street, as above stated ; Mr. Black 
is a successful real estate dealer; they have had children: Fannie P., at 
home; Norman, a tax collector of Duquesne; Bessie, married Ralph Emery, 
and lives in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania ; Joseph, Floward and Priscilla, at 
home. 4. Catherine Jane, married Samuel Kelly, and died in East Liberty, 
Pennsylvania, in 1896. 5. William H., a wholesale liquor dealer, lives in 
Duquesne. 6. Charles C, a stock dealer in Chicago. 7. Lili, married Charles 
Immel, and lives in Jackson, Michigan. 8. John C, a roller, in Cincinnati. 
9. Fannie, died at the age of eight years. 10. Frank, died in infancy, ir. 
Arlies, lives in California. Mr. Kennedy was a strong supporter of 
Republican principles all his life, and he and his wife were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. They were active workers in the cause of 
religion, and contributed liberally in that direction, one of their gifts being 
the ground on which the ^lethodist Episcopal church stands. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^v ^^^^^'^^ISSqB^^^^^^^^H 






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^oi^i/t t/. C/Ce^iyJi^d/U' 



WESTRRX PENNSYLVANIA 1317 

Tile immigrant ancestor of tliis line of iiokermanns is 
BOKERMANN now living retired, the business that he founded and in 
which his sons were associated witli him has now ceased 
to exist, one of the sons of (iodfried Hokermann, jolin Hermann, is now a real 
estate dealer of Aspinwall. Godfreid Bokermann was born at Beilfield, Ger- 
many. January 9, 1856, there living until his sixteenth year, when he came 
to tlie United States, settling in Pittsburgh and there marrying. For thirty- 
five years he was a meat dealer of that city, in that business acquiring a 
competence, now living retired in Pittsburgh East End. His political party 
is the Republican, and he and his wife are members of the German Lutheran 
church. He married Amelia Ender, born in Cassel, Germany, June 10, 1855, 
and is the father of: Henry G. ; John Hermann, twin of Henry G., of whom 
further; Edward, died in infancy. 

John Hermann Bokermann, son of Godfreid and Amelia (Ender) Boker- 
mann. was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, December 23. 1875. and 
was reared in the city of Pittsburgh, there attending the public schools. 
For twelve years he was engaged in business with his father, the proprietor 
of a meat market, as was his brother, Henry G., under the firm name. G. 
Bokermann & Sons, and in 1909 entered the field of real estate and fire 
insurance, dealing in Aspinwall as a member of the firm. Darby & Boker- 
mann. This association now continues, the firm bearing a well-deserved 
reputation in Aspinwall, where they have transacted a pleasing amount of 
business, being known as honorable and upright in all dealings. Mr. Boker- 
mann was, like his brother, an organizer of the Allegheny Valley National 
Bank, of Pittsburgh, an institution strong and flourishing, and is a stock- 
holder therein. Mr. Bokermann is a member of the German Lutheran 
church. He married, October 25, 1900, Anna Margaret, daughter of Fred- 
erick Heinz. 



The Bickertons of Western Pennsylvania are of English 
BICKERTON descent, although the family originally were Scotch High- 
landers, who crossing that natural barrier between Scot- 
land and England, Cheviot Hills, settled on the English side of the hills, in 
Northumberland. They were a race of hardy men. tall and powerful, de- 
voted adherents to the Established Church, earnest in their religious belief 
and life. 

Robert Bickerton, of Clairton, Pennsylvania, is a grandson of Thomas 
(1) Bickerton, who died in Lancashire, England, his son, Thomas (2), father 
of Robert Bickerton, of Clairton, being the founder of this branch. 

(I) Thomas '(i) Bickerton was a sheep farmer of the Cheviot Hills in 
Northumberlandshire, England, until after the birth of his son, Thomas (2), 
in 1814, later lived in Lancastershire. He died in England but his widow 
came to the United States and died in Wheeling, West Virginia, a very old 
lady. Thomas Bickerton had children: i. James, came to the United States 
and was a coal miner in West Virginia, living in Wheeling; it was in his 
home that the widow Bickerton passed her last years. 2. John, came to the 



i3i8 WESTERN PENT^SYLVANIA 

United States and met his death in the Ohio river about 1870; he was a coal 
miner, and in connection with his brothers operated a coal bank of their 
own. 3. Alexander, resided at Boggs Run, below Wheeling, where with 
his brothers he operated a coal bank. 4. Thomas (2), of further mention. 
5. Robert, died in 1888, was an iron master of Wheeling, operating furnaces 
in association with partners. 6. Arthur, died in 1904 at Fayette City, Penn- 
sylvania ; was a coal miner. 7. Margaret, married John Douglass, a "forty 
niner" who never returned, spending his later years in Utah; she died about 
1847. 8. William, a Mormon preacher and missionary but not a believer in 
polygamy, died in St. John's, Kansas. 

(II) Thomas (2) Bickerton, son of Thomas (i) Bickerton, was born 
in the village of Bedlandton, Northumberlandshire, England, in April, 1814, 
died in West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, January 18, 1886. He spent the first 
eighteen years of his life in England, acquiring an education and learning 
the carpenter's trade. About 1832 he came to the United States, settling 
in Wheeling, West Virginia, where he worked at his trade around the coal 
mines, also building the flat bottomed barges used in transporting coal on 
the western rivers. In 1849 he caught the "gold fever" and, joining the 
army of treasure seekers, journeyed to California, where he was quite suc- 
cessful in finding gold. In two years, however, he returned east for his 
wife and family, but she refused to go and persuaded her husband to remain 
with her. Yielding to her wishes in the matter, he purchased a house in 
West Elizabeth, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and there for the remainder 
of his days engaged in coal mining. In his later years he bought a small 
farm near West Elizabeth and there resided until death, but continued a 
mine worker in connection with the cultivation of his small farm. He was 
a man of large stature, standing six feet in height and proportionately well 
built. Both he and his wife were active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He married Eliza Smith, born in Staffordshire, England, in 1823, 
died in West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, in June, 1896. daughter of Frederick 
and Mary Smith, and granddaughter of William Smith, all of Staflfordshire. 
The Smith family came to the United States about 1825, William settling 
in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he became a river boatman. Frederick 
and Mary Smith with their daughter, Eliza, went further west, settling in 
Steubenville, Ohio, Eliza at that time being four years of age. They later 
located in Wheeling, West Virginia, where Frederick Smith engaged in the 
retail coal business. Later he moved to McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where 
he became a successful general contractor. He was a devout Methodist, a 
local preacher and very prominent in the church. Frederick and Mary Smith 
had children: i. Eliza, married Thomas Bickerton, of previous mention. 

2. Alfred, superintendent of the Fawcett Coal Company, lived in Pittsburgh. 

3. William, died in 1887. was a pilot on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 
maintaining his residence in Louisville, Kentucky. 4. Thomas (3), an Ohio 
river pilot and steam boat captain until his retirement ; he now resides at 
Haysville, Pennsylvania, aged eighty-two years. 5. Jane, married Marshall 
Lazier, whom she survives, a resident of Charleston, West Virginia. 6. 




{^/^Ur^a^^z^:? <^ <^<^ve:c^e^^W_ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1319 

George, a steel mill worker, died in East McKesport, Pennsylvania. 7. 
James, a worker in Wood's rolling mills, now retired on a company pension, 
a resident of McKeesport. 9. Frederick, a cattleman, owning a ranch in 
Nebraska, where he died. Children of Thomas (2) and Eliza (Smith) Bick- 
erton : i. Robert, a prosperous dairy farmer of JefTerson township. 2. 
Watson, a coal miner, residing at Dravosburg, Pennsylvania. 3. Thomas 
Smith, of further mention. 4. Jennie, married Thomas Bennett, and resides 
in Clairton, Pennsylvania. 5. William, a farmer of Belle Vernon, Penn- 
sylvania. 6. Frederick, a general workman of Riverview, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) Thomas Smith Bickerton, third son of Thomas (2) and Eliza 
(Smith) Bickerton, was born on Fifth avenue, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, 
July 7, 1852, and there resided with his parents until their removal to West 
Elizabeth five years later. His education was obtained in the public schools, 
his attendance being limited to a few months each winter. At the age of 
fourteen years even this privilege was denied him and for one year he 
worked steadily in the coal mine with his father and brothers. One year 
convinced him that he was not adapted to a miner's life and he exchanged 
his position for one as teamster. He was successful and until 1874 con- 
tinued in that business, becoming the owner of teams and outfit. Mr. 
Bickerton developed an oil field in Lincoln township, Allegheny county, form- 
erly operated by Andrew Carnegie, known as the Carnegie Natural Gas 
Company; this at the time Mr. Bickerton took hold of it was an abandoned 
field. Mr. Bickerton re-leased it in 1893, and in 1894 developed it. He 
built a line to convey the gas to the United States Glass Company, of Glass- 
port, and operated it until 190T, when he sold out to the Rock Run Fuel 
Gas Company, through John A. Snee and C. F. Shafifer. Mr. Bickerton 
cleaned up about $100,000 in this deal. He went into Mifflin township 
and was also successful in that field and sold out to the same company in 
1903. In 1874 he married and the next year bought a house and grounds 
on the crest of the hill back of West Elizabeth and has since added ad- 
joining tracts until his estate now consists of four hundred acres of fine 
farm and grazing land. In 1902 he erected large modern barns and stocked 
his farm with a herd of fine cattle, now numbering forty head, and began 
farming as both shipper and retailer of milk. He conducts operations on 
a large scale and has perhaps the finest estate in the township, as well as 
the largest. In 1903 he erected his present fine brick residence and there 
lives in prosperous contentment, proud that from nothing but pluck and a 
stout heart to begin with, he has been enabled by frugality, industry and 
the aid of a good wife, to reach a position of comfortable plenty. He is a 
Republican in politics, but his farm and his family are his chief concerns 
and he takes no active part in public aff'airs. 

Mr. Bickerton married, July 4, 1874. Mary J. Wray, born in Man- 
chester, Pennsylvania (now part of Pittsburgh North Side), October 28, 
1854, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Ewing) Wray, both bom in 
county Derry, Ireland. Thev came to this country fn the same ship and a 
few months later were married in New York City. They had grown up on 



I320 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

adjoining farms in Ireland and had known each other from childhood. 
After five years tlie young couple moved to Manchester, where Joseph Wray 
for five years followed the occupation of teamster. They moved to Jeffer- 
son township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, bought a farm and there 
lived until death. Children of Thomas S. and Mary J. (Wray) Bickerton, 
all born at the Jeflferson township farm: i. Joseph, born October 28, 1875, 
now a resident of East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 2. Mary Jane, bom 
June 16, 1876, died September, 1876. 3. Thomas (4), born August 7, 
^^77' a gas well driller, of Mound City, Pennsylvania, married Agnes 
Miller, and has children: Ray, Mabel, Ruth, Fern. 4. Elizabeth, born 
August 27, 1879, married Miles T. Miller, tipple boss at Mine No. 7, Jeffer- 
son township, and has children: Floyd, Claire, Clifford, Harold, Ethel. 
5. John, born June 6. 1881, now his father's farm assistant; married Ida 
Stemme, and has children: John (2), Donald, Bernice, Orville, Thomas 
(5). 6. Fred, born July t, 1882, now assisting his father; married Mar- 
garet Bedell, and has children : Roy, Ross, Earl, Mary Jane. 7. James 
B., born October 6. 1885, also his father's farm assistant ; married Mary 
Bryson, and has children: Kenneth, Margaret. 8. Mark, born June 16, 
1890. is boss of a tipple gang at Mine No. 7 ; married Mayme Stidard. 9. 
Clifford, born April 6, 1892, died March 15, 1898. 



This is an English family of great antiquity, the name being 
BALCOM spelled in some of the earlier records "Balkcom ;" it signifies 

"hill" and "dell." Although the name does not appear among 
the original inhabitants of Charlestown, Massachusetts, it was neverthe- 
less identified with the early settlement of that place. There were two 
immigrants of this name who arrived in America prior to 1690; Henry, 
who established himself at Charlestown; and Alexander, who settled first 
at Providence, Rhode Island, removing later to that part of Rehoboth, 
Massachusetts, which is now Attleboro. 

Henry Balcom, probably of Balcome, in Sussex, England, came over 
to this country in about the year 1664, according to one record. According 
to the history of Charlestown, however, he was at that place as early as 
1655, being admitted freeman there September i, 1655. He was a black- 
smith by trade. In 1664 he purchased propertv in Charlestown, and re- 
sided there for the remainder of his life, dying February 29, or April 29, 
1683. There is evidence that he took an active part in public affairs, and 
his estate when inventoried, was valued at three hundred and fifty-four 
pounds. He was twice married. By his first wife, whose name does not 
appear in the records, he had one daughter, Sarah, who died December 8, 
1666. He married his second wife, Elizabeth Haynes, or Haines, on August 
12, i666. She was a daughter of Deacon John Haynes, of Sudbury, who 
came to this country from England in 1638. He settled in Sudbury, and 
with two others was granted three thousand, two hundred acres of land at 
Quinsigamond, now Worcester, Massachusetts. Mrs. Elizabeth Balcom, who 
survived her husband many years, was admitted to the church^t Charles- 



WRSTERN TEXXSYLXAXIA i.^_'i 

town. May 22,, 1699. In 1713 she was living in Siullnir), whither she re- 
moved in 1694, taking her family with her. By this second marriage, Henry 
Balcom had the following children: Hannah, born March 16, 1668, died 
April 21, 1668; John, born October 15, 1669; Elizabeth, born August 16, 
1672, married Gershom Rice; Joseph, whose descendants are numerous in 
the New England states. 

Luk-e Doty Balcom, who api)ears to have been one of the many descend- 
ants of Henry Balcom, the immigrant, was born in Bennington, Vermont, 
in the year 1804, and died in 1884. He was reared in North Adams, Massa- 
chusetts, where he attended school and received an excellent education. De- 
veloping great talent along mechanical lines, he devoted himself to wood- 
working at the conclusion of his studies, and became an expert carpenter, 
cabinet-maker, wagon-maker, and millwright. He devoted much time to travel 
in later years, spending much time abroad and having the distinction of hav- 
ing circled the globe. His later years were passed in Licking and Knox 
counties, Ohio. He belonged to the Disciples' church, and was a member 
of the Free and Accepted ]\Iasons. His wife was a Miss Cynthia Horr, 
born at Worthing, Ohio, November 21, 1819, and now deceased. She was 
a daughter of Major Horr, who was also a physician, and who fought in 
the War of 1812. Mr. and Mrs. Balcom had six children: Nancy Eliza- 
beth, Alonzo Milton, Julia, Cynthia Amelia. Silas Bland, and Otis, the 
latter being mentioned further. 

Dr. Otis Balcom, son of Luke Doty and Cynthia (Horr) Balcom, wari 
born at Fallsburg, Licking county, Ohio, October 27, 1859. He passed his 
boyhood in Gambler, Ohio, where he attended the public schools : and at 
the conclusion of his studies began his business career as a teacher during 
the winter season, clerking in a store for the remainder of the year. He 
continued thus for about six years, when he learned the trade of millwright 
under his father's instructions and continued in business with him for 
some time. He then took up the study of medicine, reading in the office 
of Dr. John W. Russell, at Mt. Vernon, for a period of two years, after 
which he entered the Pulte Medical College at Cincinnati, and was grad- 
uated there, receiving the degree of M. D. He became resident physician 
in the hospital after his graduation, and subsequently entered upon his 
career as a general practitioner. Deciding, however, to devote himself 
particularly to diseases of the eye, he entered upon another course of train- 
ing, and in 1907 came to Meadville, where he has since followed his pro- 
fession as specialist in this line of medical practice, with the result that 
he is now considered the leading physician here in such diseases. He is 
a prominent member of the Pennsylvania Optical Association, and of the 
American Association of Opticians. 

Dr. Balcom is an intensely public-spirited man, taking a most active 
and influential interest in all matters that concern the public welfare. He 
is a member of the Chamber of Commerce in which his influence is strongly 
felt ; and is prominent in the Progressive party as far as politics are con- 
cerned. He has also served in the militia, having enlisted as a private in 



1322 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Company C of the Seventeenth Regiment Ohio National Guards ; he re- 
mained eleven years in the service, and was promoted to the rank of ser- 
geant major. Perhaps Dr. Balcom's strongest hobby is the collection of 
coins to which he has devoted much time and attention. His collection 
now numbers over ten thousand, and is one of the finest in tliis section of 
the country, including some of the rarest and most valuable coins that have 
been issued. In numismatic circles he is considered one of the best-informed 
men in the state upon such matters. He is a charter member of the Ameri- 
can Numismatic Association. 

Dr. Balcom is also keenly interested in Masonic and fraternal affairs, 
and was made a Mason in Logan Lodge, No. 575, Free and Accepted Masons, 
at Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1893. He is a member of Mt. Vernon Lodge, 
No. 20, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of Knox Lodge, No. 121, 
Daughters of Rebekah, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, having been united with 
the former body in 1883. In 1894 he was made a sir knight in Olive 
Branch Lodge, Knights of Pythias. He belongs also to Meadville Lodge, 
No. 99, Independent Order of Moose, and to Meadville Aerie, No. 429, 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. He is a member of the Episcopal church in 
which he is in high standing. 

On April 26, 1891, Dr. Balcom was married at Aurora, Indiana, to 
Lula Bailey, daughter of Marshall M. and Elizabeth Bailey : she was born 
January 8, 1871, at Indianapolis, Indiana. By this union Dr. and Mrs. 
Bailey have one daughter, Dorothy Mary, born in Indianapolis, May 10, 
1892. Miss Balcom is a graduate of Aurora High School, and is at present 
a student at Teachers' Normal, Terre Haute, Indiana. 



The first of this branch of the Brown family of whom we 
BROWN have record is John Brown, who in all probability is the John 
Brown referred to in the assessment list for Hanover town- 
ship, Pennsylvania, 1785. Tradition has it that his five sons left the vicinity 
of Hanover township for the northwest. Of these sons, John separated 
from the others and was not again heard from. Richard and Andrew took 
up lands in West Salem township, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and Wil- 
liam and James took up lands near them in Vernon township, Trumbull 
county, Ohio. 

(II) Andrew Brown, son of John Brown, was bom in Hanover town- 
ship, near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He took up lands in West Salem 
township, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, about 1794, and followed the oc- 
cupation of farming. Fie married Mary McLaughlin, and had children: 
Josiah, see forward ; Nancy, Lovina, Sally, Maria. 

(HI) Josiah Brown, son of Andrew and Mary (McLaughlin) Brown, 
was born in West Salem township, 1816, and died at the same place, 1868. 
He was a farmer by occupation, and his entire life was spent on a farm 
which has now (1913) been in the possession of the Brown family for more 
than a century. It consists of one hundred and forty acres, and is kept 
in a fine state of cultivation. He was a staunch Republican, and for a 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1323 

number of years served as a justice of the peace. He was a member of 
the Baptist church. Mr. Brown married (first) Mary Morford. They had 
children : Dr. Thomas M. ; Melissa, married Dr. A. B. Cushman ; Susan, 
married William H. Brooks; Andrew. Mr. Brown married (second) Per- 
melia Orlina Williams, born in Vernon township, Trumbull county, Ohio, 

died September, 1899, a daughter of Osman and (Sheldon) Williams, 

of Connecticut. Children by second marriage: Emma J., married Samuel 
K. Parker, deceased; Emerson O. ; Ransom J.; Nancy A., married Abram 
M. See; Minerva C. ; Lulu M., married Albert F. See; Milo C. ; Manley 
Orr, see forward. 

(IV) Manley Orr Brown, youngest child of Josiah and Permelia 
Orlina (Williams) Brown, was born in West Salem township, Mercer 
county, Pennsylvania, February 18, 1868. He was but six months old when 
his father died. The public schools of the district furnished his elementary 
•education, after which he attended the Greenville High School, from which 
he was graduated with high honors in May, 1887. Li 1887-88 he taught 
in the public schools of his native township, and at the same time prepared 
himself for entrance to college. He was graduated from the Allegheny Col- 
lege, Meadville, Pennsylvania, in 1891, the degree of Bachelor of Arts being 
conferred upon him, and in 1894 he received the degree of Master of Arts. 
From 1891 until 1894 he held the position of instructor of the Greek and 
Latin languages in Hall Institute, at Sharon, Pennsylvania, and during his 
spare time devoted himself to the study of law. This study was pursued 
in the office of James P. Colter, Esq., and Mr. Brown was admitted to the 
bar of Crawford county, Pennsylvania, February 25, 1895. He was ad- 
mitted to the superior court in May, 1900, and to the supreme court of the 
state and United States court, in October, 1900. He has resided in Mead- 
ville since November, 1894, his present residence being at No. 364 Walnut 
street. He has held a number of more than usually responsible positions 
for so young a man, and has been highly honored. In 1903 he was elected 
president of the Crawford County Bar Association, and served in this office 
for a period of two years. He has been the solicitor of the Commonwealth 
Bank since the organization of that institution. He has always been an 
ardent supporter of Republican principles, and has been in office as city 
solicitor for a number of vears. His interest in religious matters is an active 
■one, and he is serving in the office of deacon in the First Baptist Church. 

Mr. Brown married, in Warren, Pennsylvania, September 5, 1895, An- 
toinette Dunham, born in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, August 7, 1868, a daugh- 
ter of the Rev. George W. and Catherine Maria (Dimham) Snyder, the 
former a minister of the Gospel, and who had other children : Laura K., 
Anna G. and Agnes L. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have had children : Douglas, 
"born June 14, 1896, and George Lorimer, born June 23, 1903. 



Frank A. Cooper, since 1898 engaged in the drug business at 

COOPER Oakmont, Pennsylvania, is a grandson of Samuel and Sarah 

(Van Voorhis) Cooper, who were early settlers of Washing- 



1324 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ton county, Pennsylvania. Samuel Cooper was a farmer of Nottingham 
township, Washington county, and there owned land, reared a family and 
died in old age. He was a Democrat in politics, and both he and his wife 
were exemplary members of the Baptist church. Children: John P., de- 
ceased ; Clarinda, deceased ; Frederick W., of further mention. 

(II) Frederick W. Cooper, son of Samuel and Sarah (Van Voorhis) 
Cooper, was born in Nottingham township, Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 25, 1837, and now resides at Charleroi, Pennsylvania, retired. 
He attended public schools and was his father's assistant until tlie latter's 
death, then inherited the home farm, which he cultivated until his retire- 
ment. He is a Democrat in politics, a member of the Baptist church and of 
the Masonic Order. Mr. Cooper married Mary Manown, of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania. Children : Frank A., of further mention ; Clarinda, 
Samuel and Ella, the latter deceased. 

(III) Frank A. Cooper, eldest son of Frederick W. and ]\Iary (Man- 
own) Cooper, was born at the Nottingham township homestead, Washing- 
ton county, Pennsylvania, August 12, 1871. He was educated in the Bryant 
public school, near his home, and the public school of Monongahela City, 
spending the earlier years of his life at the home farm. In 1890 he entered 
the College of Pharmacy, at Ada, Ohio, whence he was graduated in 1893. 
For the first two years after graduation he was prescription clerk with the 
old established drug firm of R. E. Byers, at Monongahela City, then spent 
two years in a similar capacity at the McConnell Pharmacy, Parnassus, 
Pennsylvania. He occupied various positions until February 15, 1898, when 
he opened a drug store in Oakmont. Allegheny county, at the corner of 
Washington and Allegheny avenues. There he conducted a prosperous busi- 
ness, purchased the property and continued until 1907, when he moved his 
business to its present location. No. 643 Allegheny avenue. He has other 
interests in the borough, including a fleet of canoes and boats for pleasure 
boating on the river. He is a Democrat in politics, and belongs to Oakmont 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Cooper married, in Jime, 
1898, Mary Jane Pinkerton, of Parnassus, Pennsylvania, and has one daugh- 
ter, Genevieve, born June 23, 1899. 



The Carson family is of ancient origin, being found before 
CARSON the year 1300 in Dumfriesshire, Scotland. The name is also 

spelled Corson. A branch of the family went to L'lster Prov- 
ince, Ireland, and was settled there as early as 1653. From this family most 
of the American Carsons are descended. Nearly all of the name at present 
in Ireland are living in the Scotch counties of Antrim, Down and Tyrone. 
The coat-of-arms of one branch of the family in Ireland — perhaps belonging 
to all — is described : Or a chevron gules between three crescents proper 
two and one. Crest : An elepliant proper. Motto : Fortittidine et Pru- 
denfia. 

(I) Carson, was a minister of the United Presbyterian church, 

and died in Ireland. 



WESTERX PEi\XSYL\-AXIA 1325 

(II) John Carson, son of the preceding, was born in Ireland, where 
he was educated and learned the carpenter's trade. He emigrated to 
America in the year 1852, and located at Tompkinsville, Lackawanna county, 
Pennsylvania, where he lived until 1872, when he migrated to Allegheny 
county, in the same state. He and his brother James were in business as 
general contractors, operating under the firm name of Carson Brothers. 

Mr. Carson married Eliza Jane, also born in Ireland, a daughter of 

and ( Ilildebrantj Hamilton, and they had children : Robert, Anna M., 

William. Charles Presley, of further mention ; Caroline. Mr. Carson and 
his family were members of the United Presbyterian church, of which Dr. 
Presley was pastor. 

(III) Charles Presley Carson, son of John and Eliza Jane (Hamilton) 
Carson, was born in the Third Ward, Allegheny, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 3, 1862. He was educated in the public schools near his 
home, and upon leaving these was apprenticd to learn the painters' trade, 
at the age of seventeen years. He then entered the employ of Hamilton 
Leonard Arnold & Company, with whom he remained for a period of thir- 
teen years. The connection was dissolved when Mr. Carson established 
himself in business independently as a general house painter, and he has 
worked up a large and successful business. He moved into the house he is 
at present occupying in 1873, and has lived in it continuously since that 
time. Mr. Carson married, April 16, 1907, Nancy Devellin, and they have 
one child, Bella Jane. 



Edmund Richard Young is by descent half English and half 

YOUNG Scotch, his father's family coming from the latter people, his 

mother's from the former. He is himself a native of England, 

though the greater part of his life has been spent in the LInited States, and 

his associations are now almost exclusively American. 

His paternal grandparents, Peter and Marjory Young, were born and 
passed their entire lives in Scotland, where he followed the trade of shoe- 
maker. His son, James Young, the father of Edmund R. Young, was also 
born in that country, and was there reared, learning the trade of machinist 
and turning his attention to work on steam vessels. It was at the time 
of the great development of steam transportation both on land and sea, 
and Mr. Young found plenty of work in this chosen line. It was about this 
period that the London & North Western Railway was extending its lines 
through the country and building locomotives in large numbers. The shops 
where the construction was going on were at Crewe, in Cheshire, and thither 
Mr. Young repaired, and soon found employment there, remaining in the 
place until the time of his death. Sprung of a hardy, capable race himself. 
he was united in marriage to the daughter of a no less strong people. The 
family of the mother of Edmund R. Young was a sea-faring stock, fisher- 
men and sailors of the type which won and maintained for England her 
supremacy on the seas. Mr. Harrison, the maternal grandfather of Mrs. 
Young, was a native of Liverpool, and himself a fisherman, living and dying 



1326 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

in his native region. His daughter, Alary Harrison, was married to James 
Young and lived with him in Crewe, giving birth to seven children, as 
follows: James, Christina, Edmund Richard, Mary, Alfred, and two chil- 
dren who died in infancy. 

Edmund Richard Young, the third child and second son of James 
and Alary (Harrison) Young, was born January 27, 1844, at Crewe, Eng- 
land, and there received his education. He spent, indeed, the whole of his 
childhood and much of his young manhood in his native country, and after 
completing his schooling applied himself to mastering the trade of boiler 
maker. This he did in the shops of the London & North Western Railway 
Company, where his father was employed. He became proficient in his 
trade, and found employment therein in a number of different parts of 
England. He thus went from place to place ever gaining greater experience 
and skill, until he had reached the age of twenty-four years, when hearing 
of the tremendous development in the Lfnited States of America, in the line 
he was following, he decided to try his fortune in the great Republic of 
the Western Hemisphere. Accordingly he ventured forth, and upon reach- 
ing this country went at once to the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one 
of the great centres of the industry in which he was interested. He re- 
mained in that place only about one year, however, when he was offered 
an excellent position in the factory of John C. Bryon, of Titusville, Penn- 
sylvania, which did a large business in the way of a general foundry. This 
concern has since become the Titusville Iron Works, and there Air. Young 
was employed for a period of two years. It speaks well for the intelligence 
and capability of the young man that after a .short period of three years 
he found himself in a position where he was no longer obliged to seek 
employment of others, but could start an independent concern of his own. 
Yet such was the case. In the year 1871 he severed his connection with 
the Titusville concern, and going to Triumph, Pennsylvania, a little place 
in the vicinity of Titusville, there established a machine shop of his own. 
From the start the venture was successful and Air. Young began to be ;> 
prominent figure in the region. His interests were not confinerl to manu- 
facturing either, but embraced one of the most important industries of the 
region, which was then just beginning its phenomenal development. Only 
sixteen miles from Titusville, Triumph, Pennsylvania, was situated just 
in the midst of the oil country, and Air. Young then became interested. • 1 
interest he has ever since retained, in the oil operations in that neighb - 
hood. After remaining in Triumph for about there years, he returnee', n 
1874, to Titusville, and there founded his present great plant. For a time 
he remained the sole owner of the extensive manufactory, but after a 'me 
he admitted a Air. R. D. Locke into partnership with himself, the co. .'rn 
being known thenceforward as the Young & Locke Company. After some 
time. Air. Locke retired from the business, leaving Mr. Young the sole 
proprietor once more, a condition which obtains up to the present time. 
The establishment is now known as the E. R. Young & Son Machir" Com- 
pany, and carries on operations which have grown in magnitude d im- 




^^^,...>^, ^ i>^ 



WESTERN PENXSYLX'ANIA 1327 

portance from the first until the present, and are even now growing rapidly. 

Mr. Young's prominence, in the community does not depend entirely 
upon his success in the business world. A wealthy and successful man, 
and an extensive operator in both the iron and oil industries, he has not, 
like so many of the successful men of the day, stultified his sympathies and 
atrophied every part of his being save those employed in the getting of 
wealth and power. On the contrary he is not more conspicuous as a busi- 
ness man than in an hundred other capacities, for he makes it a point to 
keep himself an active participant in the life of the community in all its 
various aspects. Mr. Young is a Republican in political belief, and served 
with credit as a member of the Titusville City council for two years. He 
is a conspicuous figure in the social world of Titusville, a prominent fra- 
ternity man, and an active church member. His religious affiliations are 
with the Presbyterian church, and he is a material supporter of the many 
benevolences connected with the parish work. He has for many years been 
a member of the Masonic Order, and is now one of the oldest of the past 
eminent commanders of the Titusville Rose Cross Commandery, No. 38, 
Knights Templar. Mr. Young became a Free Mason in Titusville, dur- 
ing the time of his residence in Triumph, and has since risen high in that 
order. 

Mr. Young married Selina Reed, also a native of England. Their mar- 
riage took place in England, and two cliildren were born to them there before 
they migrated to America. To Mr. and Mrs. Young nine children in all 
have been born, of which there are now six living. They are as follows : 
Thomas, who was born in England and died in infancy; James William, 
also born in England ; Mary, born in Triumph, Pennsylvania ; Edmund R., 
also a native of Triumph: Lillian, who died in infancy; Maude, who died 
in infancy: Robert Alfred; Frank Raymond and Harrison Hurst. 

Edmund Richard Young Jr., the fourth child of Edmund Richard and 
Selina (Reed) Young, was born in Triumph, Pennsylvania, May 20. 1874. 
While he was still very young his parents removed to Titusville, sixteen 
miles away, a much larger and more important place, and it was there that 
he received his education. In 1894, when he was about twenty years of age, 
he was admitted into his fatlier's business, and there continues to the present 
time, his aptitude and persevering industry having made for him an excellent 
place in the concern. He married, September 7, 1898, Harriett L. Harris 
of Titusville. To them has been born one child, a charming little daughter, 
Harriett Adelaide Young. 



The first member of this family of whom we have record 
CHALLIS is Samuel Challis, who was clerk of the church in Black- 
motley Parish, Essex county, England. 
(H) Daniel Challis, son of Samuel Challis, was a farmer all his life 

in England. He married Digby. 

(HI) George Challis, son of Daniel and (Digby) Challis, was 

born in England, and there became the manager of a large farm. He emi- 



1328 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

grated to America in 1872, bringing with him his wife and five of his chil- 
dren, three of his sons and a brother, Thomas, having come to the United 
States two years previously. Mr. Challis married Elizabeth Jarvis, also a 
native of England, and they had children ; Daniel W., who married Mary 
Frances Jones, of Ohio; Harry G., of further mention; Joseph, who came 
to America in 1870 with his two elder brothers ; James, David, Thomas, 
Emma, Minnie. 

(IV) Harry G. Challis, son of George and Elizabeth (Jarvis) Challis 
was born in Blackmotley Parish, Essex county, England, November 5, 1850. 
With his brothers, Daniel W. and Joseph, and his uncle, Thomas, the young- 
est brother of his father, he emigrated to the United States in 1870, William 
Pollard, a former hotel man of England, also accompanying them. For a 
time they labored on construction work in Canada, then in Virginia, and in 
the spring of 1872 came to Edgewater, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
where he has been engaged in railroad construction work and forestry since 
that time. He assisted in finishing the railroad from Pittsburgh to "Little" 
Washington. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, to which he gives 
substantial supjxjrt. Mr. Challis married, in 1875, Mary Jones, and has had 
children : George, Minnie, Harry, William, Mary, Caroline, Zoxa, Thomas. 



This is a record of four generations of Crawfords, 
CRAWFORD dating from the emigration of Major William Crawford. 

a native of county Donegal, Ireland, who settled near 
Midway, Washington county, Pennsylvania, on a farm and was a stock raiser. 
The manner in which he gained his military title is unknown, nor is it certain 
whether it was given for service in his native land or in the country of his 
adoption. He was a Covenanter in religious belief. He married, in Ireland, 
Nancy ]\Iorrow, and there were four children born in Ireland : George, 
William, Margaret, Matthew, and after their arrival in this country five 
children were born to them, as follows: John, died young; Oliver, M.D., 
Thomas, Major James, Robert, who died suddenly in 1855, aged forty. 

(II) Matthew Crawford, son of Major William and Nancy (Morrow) 
Crawford, was born in county Donegal, Ireland, in 1802, and was brought 
to this country by his parents when two years of age. After completing his 
studies, he became a farmer in ]\It. Pleasant township, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and followed this occupation throughout the active years of 
his life, his death occurring in 1894. in his ninety-third year. Mr. Crawford 
was thrice married. His first wife was Mary Slater, who died in 1836; she 
was a daughter of James and Martha (Thompson) Slater, the former named 
born in county Armagh. Ireland, in 1768, and the latter named also a native 
of Ireland; they came to New York City in 1792, and in 1800 settled on a 
farm in Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, which he culti- 
vated ; they were members of the Reformed Presbyterian church ; James 
Slater died in 1842, and his wife in 1836. Children of Matthew and Mary 
(Slater) Crawford: i. Martha, married a Mr. McQuitty. deceased; lived 
in Carnegie, Pennsylvania. 2. Nancy, married a Mr. Reed, and resides in 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1329 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa ; one of their sons is United States senator from Mis- 
souri. 3. Eliza, deceased, married a Mr. Erskine, and lived in Steubenville, 
Ohio. 4. James Slater, of whom further. 5. Dt. William, of Frankfort, 
Philadelphia; lives with a son, Rev. Harry H. Crawford, a minister of the 
Presbyterian church. 

(Ill) Dr. James Slater Crawford, son of Matthew and Mary (Slater) 
Crawford, was born near Hickory, Mt. Pleasant township, Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1832, died November 11, 1890. He grew to man- 
hood on the home farm, attended the district schools situated near his 
father's farm, and afterward taught school for several years. Feeling that 
he could with profit use additional general and classical education, he studied 
for a time in the University of Michigan, and later entered the medical 
department of the Western Reserve College, Cleveland, Ohio, whence he was 
graduated in 1862. He first practised in Haneytown, West Virginia, where 
he remained for a few years, and then moved to Taylorstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he established permanently and was engaged in professional 
work the remainder of his life. His power for good in the community was 
not limited by the professional service he was able to render, but in every- 
thing pertaining to the work of the United Presbyterian church in Taylors- 
town he was a prime factor, his activities including a prominent and leading 
part in its founding, membership in its session, the superintendency of its 
Sunday school, and other interests. No important committee was com- 
plete without him as a member, no decisive steps were taken by any of 
the sub-organizations of the church without first seeking his advice and 
opinion, which, tempered by wise and mature judgment, he willingly gave. 
His wife was likewise a member of the United Presbyterian church. 

Dr. Crawford married a cousin, Nannie Morrow Crawford, born near 
Hickory, Washington county, Pennsylvania, July 22, 1844, daughter of 
Robert (mentioned in the first paragraph, her ancestry being the same as 
her husband) and Sarah A. (Elder) Crawford, her father having been the 
owner of a farm near Hickory, Pennsylvania, where he conducted stock 
raising operations, dying in 1855, his wife surviving him for a time. Chil- 
dren of Robert and Sarah A. (Elder) Crawford: i. Nannie Morrow, of 
previous mention, married James Slater Crawford. 2. William, deceased; 
an attorney ; lived in Pittsburgh. 3. Elder David, deceased ; was a farmer 
near Midway, Washington county. Pennsylvania. 4. Cassie J., married 
W. W. McNall, a farmer, and resides at Imperial, Pennsylvania. 5. Robert 
O., deceased ; was an attorney ; resided in Pittsburgh. 6. John J., a physician 
of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. Children of James Slater and Nannie M. 
(Crawford) Crawford: i. Herbert Pollock, born November 11, 1868; a 
physician of Crafton, Pennsylvania; married Florence Zena Barr, daughter 
of Dr. W. W. Barr, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 2. James Slater, of 
wihom further. 3. Robert M., twin of James Slater, died in infancy. 4. 
John Edgar, unmarried, a physician of Ray, Arizona, chief surgeon for the 
Ray Consolidated Copper Company Mines at that place. 5. Paul Hume, 
unmarried, a physician of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 



1330 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The following is a tribute to Mrs. Nannie Morrow Crawford from 

her sons : 

Bereft of her beloved husband, whose staunch and tender support she had 
clung to through many blissful years in a devotion seldom equaled, she turned 
her sorrowing heart to her four sons. At this time the oldest was twenty-one 
years of age and the youngest was eight. In the years which followed there 
was never a sacrifice too great, a service too irksome or a duty shirked. Today, 
looking backward through the tangled web of childhood dreams and boyhood 
ambitions, she, mother, stands enthroned in the hearts of her children as an 
indelible image of love, all absorbing devotion and Christian character. 

(IV) Dr. James Slater (2) Crawford, son of Dr. James Slater (i) 
Crawford and Nannie Morrow (Crawford) Crawford, was born in Taylors- 
town, Washington county, Pennsylvania, May 9, 1876. He was educated in 
the public and private schools of that place. His early studies completed, he 
studied for a time in Washington and Jefferson College, later obtaining his 
professional education in the Medical School of the University of Western 
Pennsylvania, receiving his diploma from that institution in 1899. In the 
year that he graduated from the university, he began practice with an uncle, 
Dr. J. J. Crawford, and was for one year and a half engaged in professional 
work in Imperial, Pennsylvania. Desirous of further and more advanced 
instruction in certain branches of his calling, he enrolled in the Polyclinic 
Medical School of New York City, then located, in January, 1901, in Ingram, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he has since been in active practice. 
At the present time he cares for the needs of a large general practice and 
serves on the statT of the Pittsburgh South Side Hospital, holding a worthy 
position in the medical fraternity of the region, among whom he is recognized 
as a physician of learning, merit and ability. While a student he was a 
member of the Phi R.ho Sigma, a medical fraternity, and now holds mem- 
bership in the Allegheny Coimty Medical Society, the Pennsylvania State 
Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. His fraternal 
order is the Masonic, in which he holds the Knights Templar degree, his 
commander}' being Chartiers No. 78, of Carnegie, Pennsylvania. His polit- 
ical faith is Republican. He and his wife are members of the United Pres- 
byterian church. Dr. Crawford is a worthy successor of the gentleman 
whose name he bears, his honored father, and in the profession that he has 
chosen he continues the work begun in a previous generation to the credit of 
the family name. 

Dr. Crawford married. June 6. 1905, Ella Belle Weinman, born at Wil- 
kinsburg, Pennsylvania, daughter of Jacob and Anna Barbara Weinman, 
both living at the present time, her father a retired banker and coal mer- 
chant. Children of Dr. and Mrs. Crawford: i. Dorothea, born August 8, 
1909. 2. James Slater (4), born May 11, 1912. Since 1905 the family resi- 
dence has been at the corner of Center and Hodgson avenues, where Dr. 
Crawford caused to be erected a handsome residence. 



The Danner family has been in this country but a few gen- 
DANNER erations, but they have given ample proof of their desir- 
ability as citizens. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA i.l.^i 

(I) George Banner, who lived and died in Germany, was a stone mason 
in his earHer years, and later a contractor. He married Nickles. 

(II) Frederick Danner, son of George and (Nickles) Danner, 

was born in Germany, and died there at the age of sixty-seven years. His 
business occupation was that of a building contractor. He married Cath- 
erine Nuernberger, and they had children : Henry, who died in 1870, while 
a participant in the Franco-Prussian War; Frederick, of further mention; 
John, a resident of Blairsville, Pennsylvania; Christina, lives in Germany; 
Marie Louise, lives in Illinois : Catherine and Susanna, live in Germany. 

(III) Frederick (2) Danner, son of Frederick (i) and Catherine 
(Nuernberger) Danner, was born in the Kingdom of Bavaria, Germany, in 
1853. He was educated in his native country, and his first employment was 
in the stone cutting industry. He then learned the trade of brick laying, 
and was a foreman bricklayer for a period of thirty-eight years. He emi- 
grated to America in 1882, settled at Creighton, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was with the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company for twenty- 
one years. He then built the Idenkamp's factory, plate glass works. After 
this he was in the employ of several plate glass companies. He was and 
is a man of considerable inventive ability, and has taken out three patents. 
Two of these are on melting furnaces, and the third is on a car. He formerly 
lived on West Seventh avenue, but in 1904 built the brick house at No. 711 
Center street, in which he is residing at the present time. He has served 
three years as the Republican representative in the common council, and his 
religious affiliation is with the Lutheran church. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity since 1891 ; was one of the organizers of the local lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias ; is a member of the Germania Society, and of 
the Protective Home Circle. 

Mr. Danner married, in 1875, Louise Schole, and they have had chil- 
dren: Frederick Lewis, John Henry, Frederick Wilhelm, Marie Louise, 
Louise Hedrick. Mrs. Danner is a daughter of Gerhardt Sohole, born in 
Germany in 1824, died in 1891. He was a millwright by trade, and came 
to America in 1881, locating at first in Homestead and later in Pittsburgh. 
He followed his trade of building mills in this country, and combined this 
with general carpentering. He married, in Germany, Elizabeth Breikmeier, 
a native of that country, and they had children : Henry William, Wilhelm, 
Louise, who married Mr. Danner, as mentioned above. 



The Downey family has been w^ell known .in Ireland for 
DOWNEY many generations, and Sir John Downey, head of the branch 
under review here, was a distinguished soldier. He was born 
in county Donegal, Ireland, and served many years in the British army. He 
was present at the famous battle of Waterloo, and throughout the Spanish 
campaign. He was the father of nine sons and six daughters, and of these 
children only one came to America. 

(II) Andrew Downey, son of Sir John Downey, was born in county 
Donegal. Ireland, about 1817, and as he was the ninth son, inherited neither 



1332 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



title nor estate, which went to the eldest son. He served in the British 
army for some years, then obtained a position in a bank in Londonderry, 
then removed to Scotland with his family about 1870, where he was con- 
!iected with a blast furnace for a time and then retired to private life. In 
1883 he came to America to join his son, Charles. He was a member of 
the Catholic cihurch. He had a great-uncle, James Moore, who had come 
to America prior to the war of the Revolution, and some of whose descend- 
ants lived in Philadelphia, and fought bravely in the Civil War. He mar- 
ried, in Ireland, Alice O'Callaghan, born in county Donegal, Ireland, about 
1819, a daughter of James and Annabelle (Mcllwaine) O'Callaghan, the 
former a stone mason, contractor and land owner. Both were natives of 
county Donegal, Ireland, and had seven daughters and one son, five of these 
children coming (o America: Margaret, unmarried, died in New York 
City; Isabel, married Murray, died in New York City; Hannah, mar- 
ried, and died in New York City; Edward, died in New York City; Alice, 
who married Mr. Downey. Mr. and Mrs. Downey had children : James, 
a retired stone cutter, lives in Glasgow, Scotland ; Andrew, has a municipal 
position in New York City; Mary, married Michael Barr, and lives in New 
York City ; Charles, of further mention ; William, living retired in Duquesne ; 
John, lives in Germantown, Pennsylvania; Edward, died in Duquesne; 
Michael, died in infancy; Sarah, married James O'Hagan, and lives in New 
Jersey ; Catherine, married John Powers, and lives in Stony Point, New 
York; Hannah, married James Fox, and lives in New York City; Nora, died 
in childhood. 

(Ill) Charles Downey, son of Andrew and Alice (O'Callaghan) 
Downey, was born in county Donegal, Ireland, in August, 1857. His edu- 
cation was commenced in the Irish National School, and completed in Scot- 
land. He joined the Fenian Society, and was obliged to flee to Scotland, and 
in 1881 emigrated to America, where he settled at Coal Valley, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania. He was engaged in coal mining eleven years in Scot- 
land, and four years after his arrival in this country, then came to Duquesne, 
where he became the proprietor of a hotel on Grant avenue, which he con- 
ducted until about 1902. He then engaged in the wholesale liquor business, 
becoming a successor to O'Doherty & Company, the old pioneer firm in that 
line at No 422 Penn avenue, Pittsburgh, and has been identified with this 
since that time. He was one of the organizers of the First National Bank 
of Duquesne, and is a director of the institution. He is also largely in- 
terested in real estate affairs, and built a beautiful house in 1909 on Fourth 
street, on land which had been in his possession for twenty-two years. In 
political matters he is a Democrat, and he and his wife were members of 
the Holy Name Roman Catholic Church. He was married, in 1884, at Mc- 
Keesport, by the Rev. Father Nolan, to Catherine O'Reilly, born at Sand 
Patch Tunnel, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, died in Duquesne, and was 
buried on Good Friday, 1914. at Calvary Cemetery. They had children: 
Alice, who was graduated from the California State Normal School, is now 
a school teacher, and makes her home with her father ; Mary, was grad- 




Joie^ ^a// 



WESTERN PENNSYL\A.\IA 1333 

uated from the Duquesne High School, and is at home ; Charles, lives in 
Duquesne ; Catherine, a student in the commercial department of the Pitts- 
burgh Academy; Andrew, Mary and Catherine, deceased. 



The Ball family is said to have had its origin in France, and 
BALL from that country migrated to Germany, where they lived many 

years. 
John Ball was born in Bavaria, Germany, where his entire life was 
spent. He was a farmer all his life, and a devout member of the Roman 

Catholic church. He married Margaret , whose birthplace was also 

Bavaria, and she died in that country. They had children : George, who 
emigrated to the United States, where he followed his trade as a shoemaker, 
and died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania ; John, emigrated to the United 
States, lived on a farm at North Oakland, Butler county, Pennsylvania, and 
died there at the age of sixty-six years ; Joseph, of further mention ; Eliza- 
beth, married Schett, and lived and died in Bavaria, Germany. 

Joseph Ball, son of John and Margaret Ball, was born in the town of 
Nimling. Bavaria, Germany, March 19, 1834, and died April 19, 1900. He 
acquired his education in the public schools of his native town, and at the 
age of fourteen years emigrated to America, joining his brother George, 
who had preceded him, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They both learned the 
shoemaker's trade, and later Joseph Ball became a drover, and bought and 
sold stock all round Pittsburgh. During the oil excitement in the state, he 
went to Butler county, and there bought a farm in Oakland township and 
leased the oil interests on this. He removed to this farm in 1872, and 
there continued in business as a drover. He also bought and sold several 
farms, and was an all around, progressive business man. In 1878 he removed 
with his family to Butler, Pennsylvania, where he lived retired from busi- 
ness until his death. In 1889 he had purchased the old home of Dr. Graham, 
at No. 137 East Jefiferson street, and his widow still lives there. He was a 
staunch supporter of Democratic principles. He was a member of the St. 
Paul's Roman Catholic Church, and his family are still communicants there. 
Mr. Ball married, August 23, 1862, Margaret Spiker, born in Summit 
township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, November 14, 1839. She is a daugh- 
ter of John and Susan (Pistorrious) Spiker, both born in Bavaria, Ger- 
many, where they grew to maturity and married. He was a farmer, and in 
1831 emigrated to this country with his family, having just enough money 
to enable them to reach Butler county, Pennsylvania. They were thrifty 
and industrious people, and in the course of time amassed a sufficient capital 
to enable them to purchase a farm in Oakland township, on which they re- 
sided until death, at which time they were in very comfortable circum- 
stances. They had been obliged to endure the numerous hardships of the 
early pioneers, lived in a log cabin which they erected themselves, but were 
a contented and happy people. They had children: Peter; Margaret, men- 
tioned above ; John, lives on a farm in Oakland township ; Andrew, de- 
ceased ; Susan, widow of Peter Zimmel, Hves in St. Joseph, Pennsylvania. 



1334 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. and Mrs. Ball have had children: John, Mary, Adam, Joseph and 
Elizabeth, who were between the ages of nine and fourteen years, died 
within seven weeks of each other of diphtheria; John, a merchant and oil 
operator of Butler, married Blanche Thompson, and had children: Delia 
Margaret and Jordan William ; Mary, married William McCartan, a build- 
ing construction contractor, and has children : Mary Margaret, Samuel 
Joseph, George Casper and Ruth Gertrude ; Casper Joseph, unmarried, lives 
in Butler, and is manager of the High Grade Oil Refining Company, and is 
owner of the Ball Oil Company, oil producing. 



W. L. Daugherty Jr., one of the representative citizens 
DAUGHERTY of Pitcairn, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, has been 
closely connected with the development of that town, 
from its inception to the present time. He is a member of a family which 
has been for many years resident in the western part of Pennsylvania, where 
members of it came, at a time when the country was little more than wilder- 
ness, with sparsely settled tracts dotting it here and there. The members of 
the Daugherty family were indeed pioneers, and have grown up with the 
growth of the region, until they are intimately identified with the life and 
traditions of that part of the state. 

(I) John Daugherty, paternal grandfather of W. L. Daugherty Jr., 
accompanied by his wife, came to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 
the early days, and there took up their abode for a number of years. Mrs. 
John Daugherty had been a Miss Leasure. They both lived to good old 
ages in their adopted home in the west, Mrs. Daugherty dying in West- 
moreland county at the age of seventy-six years. After his wife's death, 
Mr. Daugherty removed to Allegheny county, and there died at the age of 
eighty-six years. 

(H) W. L. Daugherty, son of John Daugherty, was born in New 
Stanton, Westmoreland ocunty. Pennsylvania, December 28, 1831. He 
grew up in the life his father had led in that primitive region, and became a 
farmer, developing and cultivating the property which he inherited. It was 
during his early life that the growth of the neighborhood, which afterwards 
became so great, was first noticeable in any large degree, and with the in- 
creasing population, Mr. Daugherty's business changed somewhat. He re- 
mained a farmer, to be sure, but in addition to this he engaged in a livery 
business, which in course of time became very prosperous, so much so, in- 
deed, that for the past few years he has been able to retire from active busi- 
ness entirely. He still owns a fine farm upon which he resides, but he is 
now engaged in politics, in which he has always been greatly interested. 
He is a member of the Republican party, and takes a keen interest in the 
questions of the day, and all the great issues which are at present agitating 
the country. He is a staunch member of the United Presbyterian church. 
W. L. Daugherty Sr. was married to Mary McWilliams, a native of West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of John and Margaret (Duff) 
McWilliams, of Penn township in that county, Mrs. McWilliams a native 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1335 

of Larabee Station, Pennsylvania. The McWilliams were pioneers in West- 
moreland county, just as were the Daugherty family, and there both of Mrs. 
Daugherty's parents died, he at the age of eighty-four years, and she at 
seventy-three. To Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Daugherty Sr. were born eight 
children, as follows : Lovinger L., deceased ; Elizabeth, deceased ; W. L. 
Jr., of whom further; Ida M. ; John M. C, deceased; Linnie A.; Harry N.; 
Mary B. 

(Ill) W. L. Daugherty Jr., the third child of W. L. and Mary (Mc- 
Williams) Daugherty, was born April i, 1866, in Penn township, Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania. He was fortunate enough to enjoy that rapidly 
disapp>earing heritage of the American youth, the early training on a farm, 
than which there are few things better calculated to fit him for the battle 
of life. Mr. Daugherty spent his childhood and youth upon his father's 
farm, attending in the meantime the local public schools, where he gained 
an excellent general education. Upon completing his studies, he learned 
the trade of carriage builder and followed this line for some time in the oil 
country, and then took up carpentry, in which trade he remained until the 
year 1904. Three years before this, however, he had come to Pitcairn, Penn- 
sylvania, when the town was beginning its development, and as a carpenter 
he aided in the construction of the first houses there erected. He has made 
the place his home ever since that time, and his name is associated with 
much of its development as closely as with those first houses. On April i, 
1904, Mr. Daugherty abandoned his trade of carpentry, and went into the 
undertaking business on his own account, in which he has been eminently 
successful. For a time he added the livery business to the other enter- 
prise, but later sold out this part of his trade, and devoted himself ex- 
clusively to the undertaking establishment. He now owns his own place 
of business which is located at No. 316 Broadway, Pitcairn, Pennsylvania, 
and is a man of substance and importance in the community of which he 
is a member. He has always been highly interested in politics, giving in- 
telligent attention to the various questions both of national and local import 
which hold the political stage today. He is an active member of the Re- 
publican party, and stands high in its local councils. He has also served 
on the town council for one term, to the great satisfaction of his constitu- 
ents. Mr. Daugherty is a staunch member of the United Presbyterian church, 
as was his father before him, and his children are being reared in that 
persuasion. He attends the church of that denomination in Pitcairn with 
his family, and is an active worker in the interest of the congregation, and 
a material support to the many benevolences and philanthropies in connec- 
tion therewith. 

Mr. Daugherty has been thrice married, the first time, in 189 1, to Jennie 
Tillbrook, a native of Pitcairn. There was one child by this marriage. Gail, 
born in 1893. The first Mrs. Daugherty died in 1896. In 1901 Mr. Daugh- 
erty was again married, this time to Mary O'Neal, a native of Pitcairn. 
There was one child of this union, William, born October. 1901. The second 
Mrs. Daugherty died in 1903. In February, 1905, Mr. Daugherty was mar- 



1336 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ried for the third time, this time to Mary Glew, a native of Patton town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 



Gottfried Erb was born at Weidenau, Kreis Pulda, Germany, and 
ERB died in 1906. He was a farmer all his life, and a member of the 

Catholic church. He married Catherine Lauer, and had children : 
Martin, who emigrated to America ; Lorenz ; Martin, who came to America ; 
Paul, Rosie, Attis, Rahban, Leo, Anna, Josephine and Mary. 

Martin Erb, son of Gottfried and Catherine (Lauer) Erb, was also 
born at Weidenau, Kreis Pulda, Germany, March 7, 1859. He emigrated to 
America, landing here. May 2, 1883, and found employment on a farm near 
Philadelphia, for a time. He then went to the state of Minnesota, where 
he also worked on a farm. His political views were those of the Republican 
party, and he was a member of the Catholic church. Upon his arrival in 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, he also turned his attention to farming. 
He has served as township commissioner. He married, November 25, 1884, 
Rosie Lauer, whose father was a farmer in Germany, and had children: 
Katherine, Lawrence, Mary, Joseph, Frank, Rosie, mentioned above; Mag- 
dalene, Edward, died in 1893. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Erb: i. 
Katherine, married George Pfeifer, lives in Reserve township, and has chil- 
dren : Rosa, Millet, George and William. 2. Lawrence, married Lena 
Sivert, lives in Ross township, and has one child living, Joseph. 3. Mary, 
married Otto Kablash, lives in Reserve township, and has one child : Klar- 
ence. 



James Elliott, of county Antrim, Ireland, a farmer, was the 
ELLIOTT father of a son, Robert Elliott, who in manhood came to 
this country, settling in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, where 
he resided until his death. He married Mary Ann Johnston, also born in 
county Antrim, Ireland. Children: John, a soldier in the English army; 
Margaret, Mary, Nancy, William, of further mention ; Robert, James, Frank, 
Lizzie. The family were members of the Presbyterian church. 

William Elliott, son of Robert and Mary Ann (Johnston) Elliott, was 
born in Allegheny city, Pennsylvania, October 9, 1861. He attended the 
public schools until twelve years of age, then became a glass blower's ap- 
prentice in the factory of McCulley & Company, his term of service expiring 
July 21, 1877, after serving four years. He became an expert bottle blower, 
and until the present year, 1914, has been continuously employed in the 
different glass factories of the Pittsburgh district. He owns a farm of 
twelve acres in Penn township, where he has resided since July 3, 1901. He 
is a member of the Bottle Blowers' Union, is Independent in politics, and 
belongs to the Presbyterian church. 

He married, June 28, 1892, Emma Jane Speer, daughter of James and 
Martha Jane (Wallace) Speer. The Speers, of Scotch-Irish descent, were 
early settlers at Speer's Landing and Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania. Rev. 
Speer, father of James Speer, was a minister of the Baptist church. James 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA i337 

Speer was a first class engineer and for twenty years was engineer on Ohio 
river steamboats, and at one time, with his brother, owned and ran his own 
boat. Later he became a brick manufacturer and while working at the yards 
fell from a ladder and was fatally injured. He married Martha Jane Wal- 
lace, daughter of Arthur and Anna (Garrett) Wallace, the former born in 
Ireland, the latter a member of the Garrett family of Philadelphia and 
Delaware county, Pennsylvania, members of the Society of Friends. After 
coming to the United States, Arthur Wallace, who was accompanied to 
this country by his mother, located in Pittsburgh. He freighted over the 
mountains, operated a business, owned much land along the Monongahela, 
but later lost his wealth and died at the early age of fifty years. Children 
of James and Martha Jane (Wallace) Speer: Janette, married Wilson M. 
Davidson ; Cyrus, William, Arthur, John, George, Anna, Hester, Emma 
Jane. Qiildren of William and Emma Jane (Speer) Elliott: Mary Martha, 
deceased ; Emma Jane ; William ; Albert, deceased ; Howard, deceased ; Ralph 
Edward ; Robert ; Sherman ; Kenneth ; George, deceased. 



The name of Forsyth, or Forsaith, as it is sometimes spelled, 
FORSYTH originated in Scotland and is of great antiquity. During 
the great religious upheaval which so violently agitated the 
Scotch Protestants, in the seventeenth century, it was allied with the Cove- 
nanters, and those of its representatives who were determined to live up to 
the teachings of the Presbyterian doctrine sought a refuge in the North of 
Ireland, where the pros{)ects of religious liberty were much brighter. The 
exodus from Scotland to Ireland was followed at a later period by another 
to America, which has continued to the present time. 

(I) Adam Forsyth, the progenitor of this branch of the Forsyth family 
in this country, was born in Scotland, and emigrated to America with his 
family in 1852. He settled at McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
where he was a farmer and a coal miner. The large farm he owned is now 
the site of East McKeesport. He married, in Scotland, Ellen Latty, and 
they 'had children: John, a merchant, who died at Calamity, Pennsylvania; 
Robert, a retired farmer, lives in Arcadia, Wisconsin ; Colan, a soldier, died 
in McKeesport ; James, died in Libby Prison during the Civil War ; George, 
a farmer, died in Wisconsin ; Andrew, died in boyhood in Scotland ; Adam 

L., of further mention; Belle, married (first) Wolfe, (second) Thomas 

Barr, and lives at Greensburg Pike; Grace, married (first) Thomas Fer- 
guson, (second) Edward Faidley, and died in Duquesne, Pennsylvania. 

(II) Adam L. Forsyth, son of Adam and Ellen (Latty) Forsyth, was 
born in Holytown, Scotland, in October, 1849, ^^'i died in McKeesport, 
Pennsj'lvania, in August, 1910. He was three years of age when he came 
to America with his parents, and after attaining maturity removed to Bell- 
bridge, Allegheny county, where he lived until 1886. He then removed to 
McKeesport, and later to Homestead, where he was engaged in business as 
a merchant. In earlier life he had devoted his time to political matters, 
working in the interests of the Republican party. He filled a number of 



1338 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

public offices among them being those of justice of the peace, school director 
and road supervisor. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Free and Accepted Masons, Knights of Pythias, Knights of 
Malta, Royal Arcanum, and Knights of the Maccabees, and he and his wife 
were consistent members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Forsyth married, 
in Bellbridge, Pennsylvania, Hannah Huey, born in Pittsburgh, died in Home- 
stead, in December, 1913, and they had children: William, a river man, 
lives in Homestead ; John, died in boyhood ; Robert, a resident of Home- 
stead; Charles, died young; Edward, a mill worker, lives in Homestead; 
Ellen, died in childhood ; Albert M., of further mention. 

William Huey, father of Mrs. Hannah (Huey) Forsyth, was born 
in Pittsburgh, and died in Bellbridge about 1896. He resided in Pittsburgh 
until the "gold fever" of 1849, when he went to California, and six years 
later returned a wealthy man. He settled in Bellbridge, where he organized 
the Gumbert, Huey & Farrow Coal Company, with which he was actively 
identified until two years prior to his death. Political matters always had a 
large share of his attention, and he gave his support to the Democratic party. 
He was married, on the present site of the court house in Pittsburgh, to 
Sarah Van Fossen, also a native of Pittsburgh, and both were members of 
the Methodist Protestant church. They had children : Hannah, who mar- 
ried Mr. Forsyth, as above mentioned ; Susan, married John W. Bradley, 
and lives in McKeesport ; Sarah, married Charles Phillips, and lives in Glass- 
port; Kate, unmarried, lives in McKeesport; Mary, twin of Kate, died in 
childhood ; Eliza, died young ; William, unmarried, lives in McKeesport ; 
John, killed at the age of sixteen years. 

(Ill) Albert M. Forsyth, son of Adam L. and Hannah (Huey) For- 
syth, was born at Bellbridge, Pennsylvania, March 22, 1884. He acquired 
his education in the public schools of homestead, and upon its completion 
he found employment in the store of his father and learned the business 
of catering from the smallest detail to the most perfect service. As the years 
advanced, he took a deeper interest in this line of business, improving it in 
many ways, and assuming control of the management. Upon the death of 
his father he purchased the interests of the other heirs, and has been sole 
proprietor and manager since that time. He has added an ice business to it, 
and now supplies about fifteen hundred people daily with this very neces- 
sary commodity. He also has a number of other business interests, many 
of them connected with enterprises of an important nature. He is a stock- 
holder of the Homestead National Bank; also of the Homestead Building 
and Loan Association. His fraternal affiliation is as follows: Homestead 
Lodge, No. 582, Free and Accepted Masons ; Wilkinsburg Chapter, No. 285, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Ascalon Commandery, No. 59, Knights Templar ; 
Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; Knights 
of Malta; Knights of the Mystic Chain. He is a staunch Republican, and a 
member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Forsyth is not married. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1339 

Jacob Reiber, a farmer near the village of Goeninger, in the 
REIBER Kingdom of VVuertemberg, Germany, was a leader in the 
Lutheran church there. The family had been landed proprie- 
tors for a number of generations, and he employed a large force of men to 
cultivate his farm. 

(II) Martin J. Reiber, son of Jacob Reiber, was born in Goeninger, 
in 1778, and died in 1865. He emigrated to the shores of this country in 
1832, the voyage taking three months, followed the florist's trade in the 
city of New York, and was also engaged in market gardening. In 1837 he 
came to Butler county, Pennsylvania, and there became proprietor of the 
Reiber Hotel in Summit township. About 1856 he removed to the borough 
of Butler, and there his death occurred. He served as a member of the 
city council of Butler, was a charter member of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 
assisted in building it and was one of its elders. Politically he was a Demo- 
crat. Mr. Reiber married Catherine Fetzer, born in 1787, and died in i860, 
and they had children : Catherine, married Martin Loefler, and lived at 
Bradys Bend ; Martin, lived in Butler, Pennsylvania, where he was the pro- 
prietor of a general store; George, of further mention; Barbara, married 
H. Julius Klinger, a flour miller, and lived in Butler; Jacob, a hotel pro- 
prietor, lived in Zelienople, Pennsylvania, later removed to Cleveland, Ohio ; 
Margaret, died in 1832, two weeks after her arrival in this country ; two 
others who died in infancy. 

(HI) George Reiber, son of Martin J. and Catherine (Fetzer) Reiber, 
was born in Goeninger, Wuertemberg, Germany, November 23, 1815, and 
died January 11, 1904. In 1834 he followed his father to the United States, 
and also engaged in market gardening. In 1839 he removed to Summit 
township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, erected a saw mill on his father's 
farm, and operated it two years. In 1845 he purchased a farm near Hannas- 
town, Pennsylvania, and two years later removed to Millerstown, in the 
same state, where he and his brother Martin conducted a general store. In 
1856 he purchased a grist mill and one hundred and thirty-seven acres of the 
Oymer tract on the edge of the borough of Butler. He remodeled the mill 
several times and finally equipped it with a full roller system, carrying on 
this industry until his retirement in 1884. He had a number of other in- 
terests. From 1865 to 1873 he owned and conducted a distillery. He was a 
Republican in political matters, and he and his wife were members of the 
German Lutheran church. Mr. Reiber married Mary Reiger. born near 
Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany, May 29, 1826, died in March, 1884. They had 
children: Martin G, a miller in Butler, died in 1895; Caroline, married 
William F. Miller, lived in Butler, both now deceased ; Henry, lives in Butler, 
is president of the Independent National Gas Company, is an oil producer, 
and unmarried ; Wilhelmina, married Rev. Frederick Meiser, now deceased, 
and she lives in Detroit, Michigan; Mary L., unmarried, lives in Butler; 
Anna M., unmarried, lives in Butler; Elizabeth, unmarried, lives in Butler; 
George L., treasurer of the Independent National Gas Company, and an oil 
producer, is unmarried, and lives in Butler ; Edward, of further mention ; 



I340 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Ida F., unmarried, lives in Butler; Agatha, died at the age of seven years. 

Valentine Reiger, grandfather of Mrs. Mary (Reiger) Reiber, was a 
member of a wealthy and honored German family, who ranked with the 
nobility. There were many professional men in this family, and a number 
of them held high positions under the government. They owned a large 
estate, and were communicants of the Lutheran church. Mr. Reiger mar- 
ried Margaret Reibolt. 

Jacob Reiger, son of Valentine and Margaret Reiger, was born in 
Hessen, Germany, and died on his farm in Pennsylvania at the age of 
seventy-three years. In 1839 he emigrated to the United States with his 
family and bought a farm in Clearfield township. Not long after his arrival' 
in this country he took a trip through the south, intending to purchase a 
plantation there, but he contracted yellow fever, and while lying ill of this, 
some unscrupulous person stole the eight thousand dollars in gold which 
he brought with him from Europe. In Europe he and his family were people 
of great wealth, and his reason for coming to this country was because he 
did not want his five sons to enter the army. They were all over six feet 
in height, and very powerful. He and two of his sons went to California 
during the excitement of 1849. Mr. Reiger married in Germany, Eve Rei- 
bold, born in that country, died in Pennsylvania at the age of sixty-nine years. 
They had children : Barbara, married George Yeager, a farmer, in Hannas- 
town, Pennsylvania; Mary, who married George Reiber, as above men- 
tioned ; George, a farmer, now deceased, lived at Marwood, Pennsylvania ; 
Martha, married John Cooper, lived on a farm in Jefferson township; Val- 
entine, now eighty-one years of age, is still a farmer in Clearfield township; 
Henry, now deceased, was a farmer in Qearfield township ; Elizabeth, mar- 
ried August Crumpy, now deceased, a farmer, near Saxonburg; Eve, mar- 
ried August Seatkin, a merchant, both living in Saxonburg; Louisa, mar- 
ried John Settof, a pilot on river boats, lives in Pittsburgh ; Jacob, a retired 
farmer, lives in Butler, Pennsylvania ; John, deceased, was a brick manu- 
facturer in Butler. 

(IV) Edward Reiber, son of George and Mlary (Reiger) Reiber, was 
born at Butler, Pennsylvania, January 24, 1862. His education was ac- 
quired in the public schools of his native county, and upon the completion 
of his studies he commenced to assist his father and gained a practical knowl- 
edge of the varied business interests. In 1884 his father turned the flour 
mill over to his sons, the firm name becoming George Reiber & Sons. In 
1886 they started a flour and feed store, and in 1887 a grocery store at 
Nos. 117 and 119 Jefiferson street, which they continued successfully until 
1897. Edward Reiber attended to the business end of these propositions, 
and managed the store. In 1888 the three brothers — Henry, George L. and 
Edward — organized and incorporated the Independent National Gas Com- 
pany of Butler, Pennsylvania. They drilled for gas locally and confined their 
operations to Butler county. The business has increased each year and has 
been an enormous success financially. They are also partners in extensive 
oil interests in Butler county, and have seventy producing wells at the 



WESTERN' PENNSYLVANIA 1341 

present time. Edward Reiber is vice-president and director of the Mer- 
chants' National Bank of P.utler. He is a Progressive in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Butler Golf Club. In 1907 the three brothers, all unmarried at 
that time, purchased the finest stone residence in Butler, at No. 465 North 
Main street, and two of the brothers and three of the sisters are living in 
it now. This house was decorated by Vantine, of New York City, and is a 
work of art from the cellar to the roof. Many thousands of dollars have 
been spent in beautiful and costly wood carving, and the furniture and 
draperies were manufactured especially to harmonize with each other. The 
members of the family all belong to the Lutheran church. 

Edward Reiber married, June 17, 1914, Nora Emma, born in Butler, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of James and Wilhelmina Duffield, both still living 
in Butler, where he is an oil operator. Mr. and Mrs. Reiber live at No. 
537 North Main street, a beautiful and commodious residence. 



The record of this old Pennsylvania family, originally of Ire- 
GEALEY land and founded in this colony by James Gealey, the immi- 
grant, is replete with deeds of military valor and bravery. Be- 
ginning with the War for Independence, in which James Gealey and his 
sons participated, the greatest conflicts of the country found those of the 
name ready for service in the cause of justice and right, the War of 1812 
and the War between the States finding them at the front, inspired by the 
highest patriotism, strengthened by the greatness of their cause. But it must 
not be concluded that deeds of violence were necessary to develop the ex- 
cellent family traits, for in times of peace those of the family have taken 
foremost position in the professions, in business, and in the less ornamental 
arts and callings. 

(II) John Gealey, son of James Gealey, lived during early life in the 
eastern part of Pennsylvania, and there married, in 1797, coming with two 
of his children, a daughter, aged sixteen years and William, aged six years, 
to the locality that became Lawrence county, Pennsylvania. John Gealey 
cleared a small tract of land and erected thereon a log cabin, work that he 
completed in the fall. It was necessary for him to return east and to bring 
the remainder of his family to the new home, and although he realized the 
folly of leaving his children alone, there was no alternative, and he expected 
to be able to make the journey rapidly. Upon arrival at his home in the 
east, Mr. Gealey was stricken ill. and after his recovery other members of 
his family contracted serious maladies, so that his departure to join his two 
children in Lawrence county was delayed until the following spring. In the 
meantime the son and daughter underwent severe discomfort and suffering. 
Although in no actual physical danger during their father's absence, the 
meagreness of their food supply and the lack of communication with neigh- 
bors, the nearest white settlers being three miles distant, made their plight 
miserable. The daughter cared for her younger brother with steadfast de- 
votion, and received substantial assistance from an old Indian man. whose 
home was about one-half of a mile distant. His resources were, however. 



1342 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

no more extensive than theirs, and during the last six weeks of their lonely 
stay the two subsisted upon potatoes alone. The reunion was a joyful one, 
and from that time prosperity attended the family, John Gealey clearing and 
cultivating four hundred acres of land, upon which he lived until his death. 
He and his brothers were soldiers in the American army during the Revo- 
lutionary War, and although four of his brothers met death in that struggle, 
John Gealey survived. 

(III) William Gealey, son of John Gealey, was born about 1791, and, 
as previously narrated, was brought to Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, in 
boyhood. As a youth he aided his father in the clearing of his land in that 
locality, and afterward inherited a section thereof. In 1849 he effected a 
trade with a son-in-law, James Nelson, by which, in exchange for his share 
of the homestead property, he became owner of a farm about three-quarters 
of a mile away, upon which he resided until his death, about 1875. He was a 
Republican in political belief, and with his wife belonged to the United Pres- 
byterian cihurch (formerly Covenanters). William Gealey saw active service 
in the War of 1812, going to the front early in the conflict. He married 
Joanna Stuart, who died aged about eighty-two years, having suffered from 
blindness for many years. They were the parents of numerous children, 
among them : Joanna, married James Nelson, and died on the old Gealey 
homestead ; William R., of whom further ; Elizabeth, married Wesley Black, 
and died in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania; James, died about 1862; John, 
a soldier of the Union army in the War between the States, was killed during 
the fighting in the Wilderness campaign. 

(IV) William R. Gealey, son of William and Joanna (Stuart) Gealey, 
was born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, in April, 1837. He was edu- 
cated in the local schools, and after his marriage made his home on the farm 
that his father had obtained by the trade with his son-in-law previously de- 
scribed. Here he has since lived, the farm becoming his property in 1867. 
He enlisted at the beginning of the Civil War in Company E, One Hundredth 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, "Roundhead Regiment," and 
served until disabled in the Second Battle of Bull Run. He lay for three 
days on the battlefield before he was reached by the hospital corps of the 
Confederate army, who immediately placed him in the care of his comrades. 
Mr. Gealey was for a time in the Centerville Hospital, later being transferred, 
his injuries requiring one year to heal. He now lives retired at his life-long 
home, having lived a busy and useful life, eventful in at least its military 
chapter. He is a Republican in political conviction, having been the in- 
cumbent of numerous local offices, and with his wife is a member of the 
United Presbyterian church, which he has ser\'ed as elder and trustee. He 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Gealey married, in February, 1867, Mary, born in Mercer county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1845, daughter of Thomas McDowell, her parents natives 
of Mercer county, Pennsylvania. Thomas McDowell was a farmer and land 
owner, and was a soldier in a Pennsylvania regiment during the War between 
the States. He died about 1906, his wife, a Miss Montgomery, dying in 1904. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1343 

Qiildren of Thomas McDowell: i. Mary, of previous mention, married 
William R. Gealey. 2. Martha, married Alexander Hanna, and died in 
Dodge City, Kansas. 3. Sarah E., married Thomas Barnes, deceased, and 
lives in Grove City, Pennsylvania. 4. E. Alonzo, lives on the homestead 
farm near Grove City, Pennsylvania. Children of William R. and Mary 
(McDowell) Gealey: i. John W., a member of the United Presbyterian 
ministry and a professor in one of its colleges; lives in Stockton, California. 
2. Thomas M., of whom further. 3. Edith, died aged twelve years. 4. W. 
Renwick, a shoe merchant of Stockton, California. 5. Margaret, married 
Rev. E. A. Campbell, and resides in Pittsburgh. 6. James A., a coal operator, 
lives in Newcastle, Pennsylvania. 7. Sarah Elizabeth, married Dr. James 
Lowrey, of South Bend, Indiana county, Pennsylvania. 

(V) Thomas M. Gealey, son of William R. and Mary (McDowell) 
Gealey, was born in Plain Grove township, Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, 
June 13, 1869. His education, that of a general nature, was completed by 
a course in the University of Western Pennsylvania, after which he taught 
school for five years. He then began the study of law, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1900, since which time he has been engaged in general practice. 
For the past eleven years his home has been in Clairton, Pennsylvania, al- 
though he maintains offices in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he has taken 
a leading stand in the legal profession. He has been solicitor of the borough 
of Clairton since that place received its municipal charter, and has also served 
on the school board of the borough. He is a Republican in politics, and 
holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Mr. 
Gealey has been closely associated with all of the movements for civic im- 
provement in Oairton, and is known as a citizen zealous and unselfish in 
service. His professional reputation is of the highest, and along legal lines 
he has achieved much, adhering ever to principles straightforward and honor- 
able. 

He married, June 28, 1906, Agnes Prindeville. born in Allegheny City 
(Pittsburgh North Side), Pennsylvania, and has children: William R., Sarah, 
Thomas M., Jr. 



The founder of the Guffey family in this country was William 
GUFFEY Gufifey, a native of Ireland, who upon his arrival in America 

located in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, settling on 
the old Guffey homestead, in Sewickley township, the application for which 
was made to King George in 1769, by James Baird, the consideration being 
twenty-one hundred pounds. On this land Mr. Guffey built a log cabin 
and made the first clearing said to have been made west of the Allegheny 
mountans. He was one of the members of General Forbes' expedition. 
He died in Sewickley township, in January, 1783. 

(II) The line of descent traces through his son, James Guffey, born 
in 1736, who was two years or age when his father immigrated. He was 
twice married, his first wife being Margaret, daughter of William and 



1344 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Margaret Campbell, who bore him three children: John, of whom further; 
Polly, Belle, and another child who died in May, 1791. His second wife 
was a Miss Findley, who bore him two children : Sarah and William. 

(III) John Guffey, son of James and Margaret (Campbell) Gufifey, 
was born in Sewickley township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
August 6, 1764. He was for many years the justice of the peace and spent 
his entire time in the vicinity in which he was born. He married (first) 
Agnes Lowry, born April 18, 1773, and they had eleven children: James, 
William, Anna, John, of whom further; Robert, Joseph, Alexander, Mar- 
garet, Isabella, Mary and Nancy. By his second wife, Rebecca (Stewart) 
Gufifey, he had Benjamin and Stewart. 

(IV) John (2) Gufifey, son of John (i) and Agnes (Lowry) Gufifey, 
was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, grew up at the home farm, 
but after his marriage purchased a farm in Sewickley township of that 
county, on which he lived until his death. He was a quiet, retiring man, 
industrious and thrifty. He had seven children: i. Robert, died at Belle 
\^ernon, Pennsylvania. 2. John, of whom further. 3. George, died in 
Illinois. 4. Andrew, a merchant, died in West Newton. 5. James, now 
living in West Newton, retired. 6. William, now a retired farmer of 
Herrington, Kansas. 7. Hannah, married a Mr. Budd, and died many 
years ago. 

(V) John (3) Guffey, son of John (2) GufTey, was born on the 
Sewickley township farm in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1825, died 
in Forward township, Allegheny county, in 1898. He remained his father's 
assistant until his marriage, then purchased a farm in Forward township, 
on which he lived until death. On this farm of one hundred and forty 
acres, he erected a substantial dwelling and a barn, which are still in good 
repair. There he lived a quiet, upright life, was a Democrat in politics, 
served as school director, and with his wife is buried in Round Hill 
Cemetery, both having been members of the Round Hill Presbyterian 
Church. 

Mr. Gufifey married Catherine Stoner, born in the old Stoner home- 
stead (now occupied by C. E. Stoner) in Forward township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1832, died in the same township in 1899. She 
was the daughter of Henry and Salome (Schraeder) Stoner, who came 
from Germany many years ago, landing in Baltimore, Maryland. The 
name as brought from the Fatherland was Steiner, but in America soon 
became Stoner and has so remained in this branch. Henry and Salome 
Stoner did not long remain in Baltimore, but made their way westward, 
choosing a location in now Forward township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania. There he purchased a farm of one hundred and fifty acres, 
covered with forest and this he cleared and improved, fertile fields fol- 
lowing the forest and a good farm house taking the place of the earlier log 
cabin. This house still stands, although it has been remodeled and enlarged. 
The grain and other products of his farm that he wished to sell he loaded 
into fiat boats and floated them to the markets on the Ohio river. He died 



WESTERN' PENNSYLVANIA 1345 

on the homestead, aged seventy-five years; his wife survived him many 
years, dying in 1899. Both were members of the Presbyterian church, 
and both are buried in Round Hill Cemetery. Children of Henry and 
Salome Stoner: i. Catherine, married John (3) Gufifey, of previous 
mention. 2. Maria, married a Mr. Billick, and died in 1906 at Elizabeth, 
Pennsylvania. 3. William, married Martha J. Nicholls, who died in 1874; 
he is now living retired at his farm in Forward township. 4. John, died on 
the old homestead, a farmer. 5. A daughter, died in youthful womanhood; 
unmarried. Children of John and Catherine (Stoner) Gufifey: i. Frank, 
now a practicing lawyer of Fremont, Ohio. 2. Edward, deceased. 3. John 
Dickey, of whom further. 

(VI) John Dickey Gufifey. youngest of the three sons of John (3) and 
Catherine ( Stoner ) Gufifey, was born in Forward township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, on the farm he now owns, March 20, 1873. He was 
educated in the public schools of the district, and from youth was his father's 
assistant. Later he managed the farm alone, and after his father's death 
bought out the other heirs and became sole owner. For many years he 
devoted the farm to dairy purposes, maintaining a herd of forty cows and 
tnarketing an immense amount of dairy products. Recently he sold his 
stock, retired from dairying and now runs the place as a stock farm, 
breeding nothing for market but pure bred Holstein cattle. His cattle are 
carefully selected for pedigree and performance, Mr. Gufifey being an ex- 
pert judge and thoroughly informed. He is a Democrat in politics, and a 
member of Round Hill Presbyterian Church. Mr. Gufifey married, in 1900, 
Clara Greenwalt, born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, daughter 
of Abraham and Rebecca (Gufifey) Greenwalt. Children: Rebecca, John, 
Jacob. 



John T. Hempel. born in Germany, December 26, 1833, was 
HEMPEL the founder of his line in the United States, coming to 

East Pittsburgh when a youth of nineteen years. He was 
educated in the schools of his native land, there learning the trade of silk 
weaver, and after immigrating to the LTnited States became a coal miner. 
This latter occupation he forsook to engage in farming in Braddock town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, owning eighty-five acres on which 
now stands the town of Ardmore. This he cultivated until about 1899. 
when he retired, in 1906 making his home in Hannastown, Pennsylvania. 
In addition to the activities mentioned above he had built up a considerable 
real estate and mortgage business, the management of which his son, 
Samuel, undertook upon his father's retirement. 

John T. Hempel married Wilhelmina Breidenbecker, born in Colum- 
biana county, Ohio, died about 1896, and has children: i. Wilhelmina, 
resides in East McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 2. John G., lives in Ardmore, 
Pennsylvania. 3. George, a resident of Ardmore, Pennsylvania. 4. Henry, 
deceased. 5. Mary, lives at home. 6. William, deceased. 7. Samuel, of 
whom further. 



1346 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Samuel Hempel was a farmer until 1904, in which year he assumed 
the responsibility of his father's real estate dealings. In the year that he 
attained his majority he was elected tax collector of Braddock, an office 
that he filled for three years, after which he was for three years township 
treasurer. He is now a member of the school board, and upon the expira- 
tion of his present term will have been in office for eight years. There has 
been no time since he arrived at man's estate that Mr. Hempel has been 
free from public duties, having been elected to all of his offices as a Re- 
publican. He was one of the prime movers in the project that resulted in 
the securing of paved streets for Hannastown, where he resides. He is a 
member of Lodge No. 510, Free and Accepted Masons, and belongs to the 
National Geographical Society. He belongs to the Church of the United 
Brethren, his father a communicant of the Lutheran church. 



The city of Kassel, Germany, is one of those typical, 
HARTUNG German places where the past and present seem to rub 

shoulders and jostle one another. The old city, with its 
records and monuments of a great history, with its ancient public buildings 
and quaint dwellings, the upper stories of which reach out across the 
streets as though bowing to one another, is penetrated and surrounded 
with the bustle and stir of new industrial Germany, for Kassel is the com- 
mecial center of its region, and its recent development has been rapid. This 
development might have been greater still, however, had not Kassel, like 
so many of its sister cities in the "Fatherland," sent a large proportion of 
its most vigorous sons across the seas to find in newer realms a freedom 
from political wrongs and oppression denied them at home. The United 
States of America has been the chief gainer by this process which has 
deprived Germany of so much of its best blood, and it was to this country 
that the family of which Mr. Hartung is a member migrated during the 
early part of the last century. 

The paternal grandparents of Isaac Hartung, Henry Hartung, was a 
resident of Kassel, and there spent his entire life, but in 1829, his son, 
Michael Hartung, though still a youth, determined to try his fortunes in 
the "New World." Accordingly he set sail for the United States, and upon 
arrival in that country made his way to the state of Pennsylvania, and 
settled near Zelienople in that state, in a region where there was little 
besides wilderness in those early days. He paid five dollars an acre for 
land which he then turned to and cleared, hewing trees and struggling 
with all the other difficulties of the pioneer's life. He was, however, suc- 
cessful in his venture, and established a place of comfort in the midst of the 
forests, and a homestead upon which his descendants are still living. He 
was a member of the Republican party, and his sons have inherited his belief 
along with his personal qualities. Michael Hartung married Katherine 

, also a native of Kassel, whose parents came to the United States 

and settled near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the early dayys. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hartung were the parents of a large family of children, of which Isaac 
was one. 



WESTERN PEXXSYLVAXIA i347 

Isaac Hartung, a son of Michael and Katherine Hartung, was born in 
1845, near Zelienople, Butler county, Pennsylvania. The first fourteen 
years of his life were passed on his father's farm, where he aided in the 
farm work, but at that age he left the parental roof, and learned the trade 
of butcher. He later engaged in this business on his own account and 
remained therein for a period of over twenty-five years. Mr. Hartung 
first came to Etna, Pennsylvania, about the year 1870, and from then until 
the present time, a period of some forty-five years, he has resided alter- 
nately in that town and at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. His present home 
is in Etna. He has been a most active member of the community, and has 
practically built up the quarter of Etna in which his home is situated. He 
is a Republican in politics, as was his father, and keenly alive to all 
questions of public policy, whether their bearing be of local or general 
interest. 

Mr. Hartung married, August 26, 1869. Emma Braun, born in Schal- 
ter township, Pennsylvania, daughter of Adam and Susan (Sieber) Braun, 
both natives of Germany, who had come in their youth to the United 
States and here married. Mr. and Mrs. Hartung are both members of ti.e 
Lutheran church, and in that belief have reared their family of children. 
They are the parents of five children, as follows : Isaac Jr., the proprietor 
of the New National Hotel at Mount Clemmons, Pennsylvania; Charles H., 
who has continued his father's butcher business and now operates a shop 
in Etna ; William ; Sarah C. ; Emma Schelly. 



The Negley family is descended from John Nageli, of Canton 
NEGLEY Berne, Switzerland, co-temporary and fellow worker with 

Zwingli, with whom he went from Switzerland into Germany 
in the sixteenth century, preaching the Reformation. The original Swiss 
spelling of the name, "Nageli," still maintains with the Swiss branch of the 
family, was first modified to Naegly, and a century since to its present 
form, Negley. The Swiss name has a floral signification, it meaning "a 
little pink," and the crest used by one branch of the Swiss family in 
modern times presents the carnation as its distinguishing feature. The 
name is beloved by the Swiss, as also by the Germans, through their devo- 
tion to Hans George Nageli, the illustrious composer, lecturer and author 
of valuable works on music, member of congress, and at the same time 
president of the Swiss Association of Music. He was born in the Canton 
of Zurich, May 26, 1768, and died at Zurich in December, 1836. He is 
affectionately known as "Pater Nageli," "Father of the Folk Songs of 
Switzerland," and founder of choral societies. Another illustrations mem- 
ber of the Swiss family was Carl Wilhelm Nageli, naturalist, born in 1817 
near Zurich, professor of botany at Zurich and later at Munich. He opened 
new fields in all branches in botany and was the author of a large number 
of master works on this science. A German branch of the family has long 
been identified with Heidelberg, Professor Nageli having occupied with 
distinction the chair of medicine in Heidelberg University. 



1348 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(1) Jacob Negley, descendant of John Nageli, of Switzerland, was 
born at Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germany, sailed for America in 1739, ac- 
companied by his family, and his two brothers — Casper and Benjamin or 
John — and their families. He died while on this voyage and was buried 
at sea. His widow and three children came to this country and settled in 
Bucks county, Pennsylvania, about that time. One brother settled in 
Maryland, the other on the banks of the Delaware, where Negley's Hill 
is commemorative of this event. 

(H) Alexander Negley, son of Jacob Negley, was born in Frankfort, 
Germany, in 1734, and died November 3, 1809. He was about five years of 
age when he was brought to this country. In 1778 he settled within five 
miles of Fort Pitt, on the present site of Highland Park, where later his 
death occurred. He was the first white settler in the East Liberty Valley, 
served his country in the Revolutionary War, and was largely instrumental 
in erecting the first church in Pittsburgh. His farm comprised about three 
hundred acres, including Negley's Run and Heath's Run, incorrectly called 
Hite's Run. He utilized Negley's Run by erecting a grist mill and a fulling 
mill upon it, and purchased a farm for each of his children. At that time 
Pittsburgh was represented by a few log houses at Fort Duquesne. His 
home with the ground surrounding it was known as Highland Park. Mr. 
Negley married, in 1762, Mary Ann Bergstresser, and sometimes spelled 
Berkstresser, born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1741, died June 
20, 1829. They had children: i. Felix, born September 22, 1764, died 
April 19, 1836; served in the Revolutionary War; married, May 28, 1800, 
Ruth Horton. 2. Jacob, born August 28, 1766, died March 18, 1826; mar- 
ried, June 9, 1795, Anna S. Winebiddle, who died May 10, 1867. 3. Peter, 
died in infancy, in 1768. 4. Elizabeth, born February 15, 1772, died No- 
vember 15, 1855; married, in 1801, John Powell and had eight children. 5. 
Peter, born February 6, 1774, died in 1791. 6. Margaret, born June 10, 
1776, died March 11, 1857; married, December i, 1800, Philip Burtner, and 
had ten children. 7. John, of further mention. 8. Alexander, born August 
I, 1781, died August 2, 1807. 9. Casper, born March 17, 1784, died May 
23, 1877; married Elizabeth Fluke, November 6, 1823. 10. Mary Ann, born 
August 20, 1786, died December 4, 1833; married Samuel Byington, and had 
four children. 11. Henry, born October 20, 1790, died in 1791. 

(Ill) John Negley, son of Alexander and- Mary Ann (Bergstresser) 
Negley, was born in Fort Ligonier, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1778, and died 
in Butler, Pennsylvania, August 11, 1870. He married, June i, 1816, Anna 
Elizabeth Patterson, born August 3. 1798, died August 19, 1835. They had 
children: i. Mary Bergstresser, born in Butler, May 29, 1817, died there in 
August, 1905 ; she married John G. Muntz, and they had five children. 2. 
Elizabeth Hull, born January 10, 1819, died August 17, 1835. 3. Susannah, 
born February 13, 1821, died- November i, 1908; she married, November 
17, 1845, Joseph P. Patterson. 4. John Henry, of further mention. 5. 
Felix Casper, born February 28, 1825, died in Pittsburgh, October 5, 1901 ; 
married, October 12, 1848, Margaret Ann Dickson. 6. Minerva, born Febru- 




^/^ .^^^ Q(ff^^/ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1349 

ary 6, 1827. died in 1859: married, November 27, 1845, Samuel Haseltine, 
and hatl four children. 7. James Alexander, born April 3, 1829, died in 
I'hiladelpliia in i89(>; married, September 10, 1861, Elizabeth Mytinger, 
and they had six children. 8. Anna McClain, born January 26, 1831, died 
February 28, 1831. c;. William Clark, born February 21, 1833, died Sep- 
tember 17, 1850. 10. Albert Gallatin, born February 22, 1835, married 
Elenora Reynolds, and has had five children ; he lives in Florence, Alabama, 
where he has been postmaster fifteen years, city engineer twenty-eight 
3'ears, and he was a major in the Civil War. 

(I\') John Henry Negley, son of John and Anna Elizabeth (Patter- 
son) Negley, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, February 7, 1823, and died 
June 17, 1908. He received his preparatory education in the public schools 
and at Butler Academy, and in 1841 matriculated at Washington College, 
Washington, Pennsylvania. He then studied law under the preceptorship 
of John Bredin, and was admitted to the bar in 1845. He was appointed 
district attorney in 1848 and 1849, and was elected to this office in 1850, 
being the first man elected to it in Butler county. He was active in local 
political affairs. In 1855 he and Joseph P. Patterson bought the Democrat 
Herald, and in the fall of that year they commenced to publish the paper. 
In 1858 he sold it and started the American Citizen, afterward called the 
Butler Citizen. He stumped the county for Lincoln in i860, and in 1861 
was in the enrollment office. He enlisted in Company G, Fourteenth Penn- 
sylvania Militia, and served a short term. He was a member of the state 
legislature, 1863-64-65. In 1888 he sold his newspaper to his son, William 
Clark Negley, and retired to private life. Mr. Negley married, July 8, 
1847, Mary Harper, born in Butler, May 18, 1828, died December 2, 1912, 
Children: i. Elizabeth Ann Hull, born April 17, 1848, died in 1906; mar- 
ried. May 21, 1872, Rev. Levi H. Geschwind. 2. William Clark, born 
December 18, 1850, died April 9, 1909; married, January 8, 1878, Emma 
Armor Stauffer. 3. John Henry, born December 24, 1853, died April i, 
1897; married (first) December 24, 1877, Mary Lack, who died January 
20, 1880; married (second) Elizabeth Shearstone, of Philadelphia. 4. 
James Fletcher, born March i, 1857, died March 4, 1857. 5. Joseph Pres- 
cott, born November 14, 1858; married, February 7, 1883, Kate Baum 
Coleman; lives in Pittsburgh. 6. Mary Stella, born April 26, 1861. 7. 
Martin Luther, born January 11, 1864, died August 21, 1884. 8. Felix 
Casper, born July i, 1866; is living unmarried in Butler. 9. Arthur, born 
March 13, 1869, died in 1872. 10. Edgar Hayes, of further mention. 

(V) Edgar Hayes Negley, son of John Henry and Mary (Harper) 
Negley, was born in Butler, Butler county, Pennsylvania, January 31. 1875. 
After passing with credit through the elementary and high schools of 
Butler, he read law under the preceptorship of Judge Ebenezer Junkin. 
and was admitted to the bar, March 13, 1899. He has been in active prac- 
tice since that time, but prior to the Spanish-American W^ar he was a 
reporter. For fifteen years he was a member of the Butler Volunteer Fire 
Department, and for ten years ran on the champion racing team of the 



135° 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



First Ward Hose Company. He is the secretary and manager of the Butler 
Publishing Company, which publishes the Clean Commonwealth, which was 
started in 1909. In political matters he is a Prohibitionist, and has served 
as auditor of the borough, and was a member of the school board from 
1906 to 1909. During the Spanish-American War Mr. Negley was a 
member of Company E, Fifteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, serving from April 27, 1898, to September 19 of that year. He 
is a member of Butler Camp, No. 33, United Spanish War Veterans, and 
thrice was elected judge advocate of the Department of Pennsylvania, and 
is filling that office at the present time. He is also a member of the Captain 
Edwin Lyon Camp, Sons of Veterans. His religious affiliation is with the 
Grace Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Negley married, July 8, 1907, Mary Alice, a daughter of William 
Harrison and Sarah Bell (Fleeger) Wick, and they have had children as 
follows: Mary Alice, born August 23, 1908; John Henry, born July 20, 
1910, died August 28, 1913; Alexander, born January 29, 1912; Nancy 
Jane, born May 31, 1914. 



The family of Harrison has been represented in Western 
HARRISON Pennsylvania for many years, its original seat being in 
McKeesport and Port Perry. The members of the family 
have ever been noted for upright character, leading lives of usefulness and 
activity, contributing their share to the growth and upbuilding of the com- 
munities in which they located. 

(I) William Henry Harrison, grandfather of Richey C. Harrison, of 
Turtle Creek, was a native of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He was one 
of the pioneers of Port Perry, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he 
owned a saw mill on Crooked Run, run by water power, a motive that has 
almost altogether been supplanted by steam. He married, and among his 
children was George, of whom further. 

(II) George Harrison, son of William Henry Harrison, was born in 
Versailles township. Port Perry, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, died Oc- 
tober 29, 1906, aged seventy-seven years. He attended the common schools 
of that period, and in early life picked potatoes where Edgar Thompson's 
Steel Works are now located, this being his first occupation, he beginning to 
make his own living when a mere boy. He learned the trade of ship car- 
penter and built boats for Colonel Miller, and followed this line of work 
up to the early sixties, when he engaged in farming pursuits on the site of 
the present town of Swissvale, and later had charge of five hundred acres 
for Mr. John Chalfante in Wilkins and Penn townships, being thus occu- 
pied at the time of his death. During his boyhood he also worked in the 
mines, driving the first mule out of the mines at Port Perry, and from this 
humble beginning he worked his way upward, the success he achieved being 
the direct result of energy and determination. He married Rachel Bond, a 
native of Port Perry, Pennsylvania, daughter of Benjamin and Huldah 
(Key) Bond, the former named coming to Allegheny county from the city 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1351 

of Philadelphia, a descendant of an English ancestry, and the latter named 
a member of a Quaker family of Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. Harrison 
were the parents of eight children : William B., George W. and Benjamin 
B., twins ; John W., Huldah E., Richey C, Kate J., Oliver Duff. 

(Ill) Richey C. Harrison, son of George Harrison, was born in Wil- 
kins township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, August 24, 1864. His boy- 
hood was spent in work on the home farm and in attendance at the town- 
ship schools, and from the age of seventeen to twenty-four he was engaged in 
the buying and selling of live stock. He then entered into farming opera- 
tions with his father, continuing until the age of twenty-seven years, and 
then began the operation of sixty-three acres of the farm owned by his 
wife's people, conducting a dairy until 1907, and since then to the present 
time (1914) has been engaged in teaming and general farming, at which he 
has been highly successful. He is progressive in his ideas, thorough in his 
methods, giving attention to every detail, and the success he has attained 
is a natural sequence. He has always manifested a keen interest in politics, 
being an adherent of the Republican party, and in 1894 was appointed tax 
collector, was re-elected for another term of three years, served one term 
as school director, then appointed township auditor, then became a member 
of the township board of commissioners, served as president of the same for 
a number of years, and holds membership in the board at the present time. 
The number of offices he has filled is ample proof of the respect in which he 
is held by his fellow townsmen. He has held membership in the Free and 
Accepted Masons for the past twenty-three years, being now a member of 
Valley Lodge, No. 613. He and his family are members of Beulah Presby- 
terian Church. 

Mr. Harrison married Anna Johnston, daughter of Joseph and Sarah 
(Lindhart) Johnston. The land on which Mr. Harrison now resides was 
patented by members of the Lindhart family and it has been handed down 
from generation to generation to the present time. Five children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Harrison: Adella M., George Richey, James Gilmore, 
Mildred Mcintosh, Robert Franklin. 



The name of Hoffmann is of German origin, and is 
HOFFMANN probably derived from "Hoff'' or "Hof," meaning 

"court," and "Mann," meaning man." This would indi- 
cate that the earlier bearers of it were courtiers or people of importance at 
a court. 

( I ) Michael Hoffmann, of German descent, was an early resident of 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He was a coal miner on South Side, and 
was killed on a tipple of Jones & Laughlin about 1867. His wife died some 
years after he did. They were tlie parents of children : John, of further 
mention; Frederick, lives in Pittsburgh; George, went to California during 
the gold fever and never returned ; Louise, married George Edel, and lives 
in Canton, Ohio; Amelia, married F. A. Dentenberg, and lives at Soutli 
Side, Pittsburgh. 



1352 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(II) John Hoffmann, son of Michael Hoffmann, was born in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, June 28, 1847. He spent his entire life in Pittsburgh, 
where he was clerk, accountant, and manager at various times for sand and 
brick companies. He was Republican in politics and served as a member of 
the school board. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and 
his wife belonged to the German Evangelical church. He married Anna S. 
Weber, born in Germany, December 15, 1849, a daughter of John Michael 
and Dorothy (Dorsch) Weber, both born in Germany and married there. 
They emigrated to America about 1850, and settled in Pittsburgh, where he 
followed his calling as a blacksmith and wagon builder on South Eighteenth 
street. Later they removed to Allegheny, where she died. Mr. Weber 
returned to South Side, Pittsburgh, and died there about 1899. They had 
children : John, a blacksmith and wagon builder, died in Pittsburgh ; Wil- 
liam, a physician, lives on South Side; Charles, a melter in the steel works, 
died at Tarentum ; Henry, a blacksmith; Anna S., who married Mr. Hoff- 
mann, as above stated; Lena, married J. P. Conrad, and moved to the West; 
Yetta, died unmarried. Mr. and Mrs. Hoffmann have had children : Amelia 
Matilda, married George Saupe, and lives at South Side, Pittsburgh ; Albert, 
proprietor of a restaurant, died in 1909; John M., of further mention; 
Edward G., unmarried, lives at South Side ; Harry W. and Ida H., unmar- 
ried, live with mother; Robert B., died in infancy. 

(Ill) John M. Hoffmann, son of John and Anna S. (Weber) Hoff- 
mann, was born at South Side, Pittsburgh, September 13, 1876. He obtained 
his education in the Humboldt public school and the commercial department 
of the Pittsburgh High School, from which he was graduated. He then 
took a course in stenography in Martin's Business School, and was thus well 
equipped for a business career. In 1897 he entered the employ of the 
Tempest Brick Company as a stenographer, remaining with them until 1913, 
when he was elected to the office of secretary upon the death of Thomas M. 
Evans. The headquarters of this concern are at McKeesfKjrt, the plant 
being located at Gallatin, where it employs fifty men. The product, a special 
fire brick, is in demand by steel works everywhere. Mr. Hoffmann has 
lived in McKeesport since 1904. He is a Republican in politics, and he and 
his wife are members of the St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church. He 
is a member of Germania Lodge, No. 509, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Royal Arcanum; Protected Home Circle, of which he has been accountant; 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics; Improved Order of Hepta- 
sophs; Daughters of America. Mr. Hoffmann married, in 1899, Clara M., 
born in Pittsburgh, a daughter of John and Magdalene Burgert, and they 
have had children : Gilbert J., Margaret, Dorothy, John James. 



Henderson is a name derived from Henry — Henry's 
HENDERSON son — or Hendrick — Hendrick's son — and in time be- 
came Henrison, Hendrickson, Henderson. The name is 
an old one in both England and Scotland. The Jiendersons have been well 
represented in all the wars of the country. 

(I) Joseph Henderson was born in Newcastle, England, and spent his 
entire life there. He married Mary Armstrong. 



WESTERN- PENNSYLVANIA 1353 

(II) Robert Henderson, son of Joseph and Mary ( Armstrong j Hen- 
derson, was born in Newcastle, England, in October, 1840, and came to 
America about 1878. He settled at McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he 
was employed by the National Rolling Mill Company as general superin- 
tendent, a position he held until 1903. He then removed to Hagerstown, 
Maryland, where he is living retired from active work at the present time 
He married (first) Elizabeth, born in 1854, died in 1898, a daughter of John 
Walton, also born in Newcastle, England, where he was a wholesale dealer 
in jams and jellies until his death. Children: Hannah, died when about 
twelve years of age; Emily, died at the age of ten; Mary Ellen, married 
Robert Muir, and resides in Pittsburgh: Thomas Scott, in the employ of 
the West Penn Light and Power Company, lives in Carrick. Pennsylvania ; 
Ralph W., a member of the police department of McKeesport; Laura, mar- 
ried Perty Painter, and lives in McKeesport; Margaret Elizabeth, married 
William Childs, and lives in McKeesport ; Maude, married Zachariah Webb, 
and lives in Pittsburgh ; Ada. married Hanson Bowie, and died in Cali- 
fornia about 1909 ; Robert, of further mention ; J. Stanley, died in Hagers- 
town, Maryland, about 1908. Mr. Henderson married (second) Mrs. 

• — • Simcox. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the 

Methodist Episcopal church. He was formerly a member of McKeesport 
Lodge, No. 581, Free and Accepted Masons. 

(HI) Robert (2) Henderson, son of Robert (i) and Elizabeth (Wal- 
ton) Henderson, was born in McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
June 15, 1884. After thorough preparation at the public schools, he entered 
Cascadilla College, from which he was graduated in the class of 1903, and 
then spent one year at Cornell University, making a special study of chem- 
istry. Upon leaving Cornell University, he became a chemist for the Jones 
& Laughlin Steel Company, in whose employ he has remained uninterrupt- 
edly since that time. He commenced his active chemical labors in 1910. He 
is Republican in his political views, and a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and the Youghiogheny Country Club. Mr. Hen- 
derson is not married. 



Patrick Greer, the American ancestor of the Greers of this 
GREER review, was born in the county of Londonderry, Ireland, in 

1764, and died in 1857. After his marriage, but prior to 1800, 
he emigrated to America, and settled at what is now Larimer Station, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He was a wheelwright by trade, and 
he and his wife were members of the Bethel Associate Reform Church. He 
married, in Ireland, Elizabeth Wilson, born in 1769, and had children : 
William, of further mention ; James, who settled in Dayton, Ohio, where his 
death occurred, was the father of the late Rear Admiral James A. Greer, 
of the United States navy ; John ; Joseph ; Samuel ; George ; Rebecca, mar- 
ried a Mr. Murphy ; Eliza Jane, married a Mr. Boyd ; Caroline, married 
General T. J. Wood. 

(II) Squire William Greer, son of Patrick and Elizabeth (Wilson) 



1354 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Greer, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1802, 
and died July 15, 1872. He was a prosperous farmer, and a man of prom- 
inence in his day. He served for many years as justice of the peace in 
Penn township, was a colonel in the militia, and for a long time an elder 
in the United Presbyterian church. Squire Greer married, May 11, 1826, 
Abigail, who was born August 11, 1803, and died July 13, 1886, a daughter 
of Colonel Joseph and Abigail (By ram) Collins, and had children: Rev. 
Joseph Collins, who married Jennie S. Shryock, a sister of Hon. D. W. 
Shryock, of Greensburg ; Agnes, married Rev. John M. McElroy, D.D. ; 
James M., of further mention; Elizabeth J.; William S. ; Caroline K., mar- 
ried Matthew Wilson ; Sarah B., married J. B. Bratton ; Eunice E., married 
Rev. James McElroy; Abigail, married James Patterson; Jennie M., never 
married. 

Abigail (Collins) Greer was a daughter of Colonel Joseph and Abigail 
(Byram) Collins. The latter was a daughter of Edward Byram, and was 
captured with him by a band of Indians of the Seneca tribe, April 7, 1779. 
They were in captivity about two years, were fairly well treated, but suf- 
fered greatly from cold, fatigue and hunger, while in camp and while on 
marches from place to place. They were taken to Canada one winter, and 
while there were in the power of Toseph Brant, the leader of the hostile 
Indians. Finally they were released and made their way back to New 
Jersey, the old home of the Byrams. and subsequently to Edward Byram's 
old farm and home near Murrysville, where he found his wife and younger 
children, who were overjoyed to see one whom they had mourned as dead. 
Abigail Byram married Joseph Collins, and they lived on the farm on which 
she had been taken captive. They were both members of the Long Run 
Presbyterian Church, in which he was also an elder. After the death of 
her husband, and when her children had left home, Mrs. Collins lived with 
her son William, and after his death with her son-in-law. Squire Greer, at 
whose home she died, November 2?. 1851. 

(III) James M. Greer, son of Squire William and Abigail (Collins) 
Greer, was born in Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, March 12, 1831., 
He married, April 5, 1854, Anna Jane Stevenson, born July 2, 1829. They 
had children: i. Joseph S., of further mention. 2. Agnes Caroline, born 
September 12, 1856. married, November 12, 1854, David K. McQuilkin, 
born July 15, 1857; children: James, born December 25, 1886; Robert W., 
born October 14, 1888; Homer S., born May 9, 1891 ; they live at La Porte 
City, Iowa. 3. William Connor, born April 17, 1859; married, January 18, 
1888, Elizabeth Hershey, born June 24, 1859; children: Clara Agnes, born 
December 27, 1888; Anna Elizabeth, born June 10, 1893; W'illiam H., born 
August 12, 1894. 4. George McCune, born August 4, 1863; married Lida 
McMath, and lives near Murrysville: children: James M., William G., 
Collins Alexander, Nelson Patterson, Paul Edward, Mary Z., Sarah Johnson. 
5. Clara Belle, born May 24, 1868; married, October 3, 1895, Nelson 
Euwer, born October 4, 1865 ; they live at Parnassus, Penn.sylvania, and 
have one child, James Greer, born August 20, 1901. 

(IV) Joseph S. Greer, son of James M. and Anna Jane (Stevenson) 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1355 

Greer, was born in Patton township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, March 
19, 1855. He was educated in the public schools in the vicinity of his home, 
and at a suitable age engaged actively in farming, with which he has been 
identified all his life. He takes a decided interest in the public affairs of 
his community, giving his political support to the Republican party. His 
religious support is given to the United Presbyterian church, of which he is 
a consistent member. He married, November 12, 1884, Belle J. Sharp, a 
daughter of George Sharp, born July 3, 1813, died September 25, 1900. He 
married Sarah, a daughter of Alexander McDowell. The paternal grand- 
father of Mrs. Greer was James Sharp, bom in Ireland, who married Isa- 
bella Harkness. They had children: i. James Alexander, living at Taren- 
tum; married (first) Ada Stotler, (second) Sarah Watt. 2. Nancy Martha, 
deceased. 3. Charles Long, of Illinois. 4. Margaret M., living at Aspin- 
wall ; married J. M. Morrison. 5. George R., married Laura Fryer. Chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Greer: i. George Sharp, born October 4, 1885; mar- 
ried Ethel Thompson; lives on a farm in Plum township; children, Leon 
Otice, Sarah L. and Joseph T. 2. Stevenson McMillin, born December 10, 
1888; married Edna Hogg; lives at Coalinga, California; one child, James S. 
3. James Ralph, born April 8, 1891 ; married Molly Young; lives in Pit- 
cairn, Pennsylvania; child, Janice. 4. Walter Ray, born April 27, 1893. 5. 
Joseph Emerson, bom February 6, 1896. 6. Margaret Bell, born August 10, 
1898. 7. Charles Stunkard, born November 29, 1901. 8. Sarah Anna-Ada 
Abigail, born October 6, 1903. 9. Robert Alexander, born March 14, 1905, 
died July 31, 1905. 



Born in the Kingdom of Westphalia, Prussia, William Krone, 
KRONE now of Wilson, Pennsylvania, traces to a long line of German 
forebears. The Krones were an agricultural family, Luther- 
ans in religious faith, and as a race, hardy and well built. Christian Krone, 
father of William Krone, possessed greater strength than any other man 
in his district. 

Christian Krone was born in Westphalia, February 27, 1826, died 
March 27, 1875, his death caused by being thrown from a wagon by his 
runaway horse. He farmed for many years, later operated a distillery for 
a time, but soon returned to his original occupation. He married Wil- 
helmina Kilfeilt, born in the same town as her husband. May 2, 1833, died 
May 3, 1883. Children: i. Heinrich, a scliool teacher, died in Germany, 
aged twenty-five years. 2. William, of further mention. 3. August, now a 
chief of police in Germany, a man of tremendous strength and size, weigh- 
ing three hundred and fifty pounds. 4. Otto, a real estate dealer of Penn- 
sylvania, now deceased. 5. Charles, a baker of Newark, New Jersey. 6. 
Hugo, born and now living in Westphalia, also a man of great strength 
and size, held for two years the wrestling championship of Germany. 7. 
Lena, married Fred Wiesman, a butcher, and resides at Westphalia. Five 
cither daughters of Christian Krone died young. 

William Krone, of Wilson, Pennsylvania, was born in Westphalia, 



1356 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Prussia, now a part of the German Empire, December 25, 1858. He was 
well educated in school and "■•■mnasium and was preparing for the profes- 
sion of civil engineer, when the death of his father in 1875 necessitated his 
leaving school and beginning a wage earner's life. He learned the trade of 
baker and confectioner, .serving an apprenticeship of three years. He 
worked at his trade and served two years in the German army, until 1886, 
when he came to the United States. He worked at his trade for one year in 
Brooklyn, New York, then joined his brother Otto in Pittsburgh, taking up 
his residence on the South Side. For one year he was foreman of the cake 
baking department of Ward's bakery, then opened a bakery in Homestead, 
Pennsylvania, which he operated for one year. He was employed at his 
trade until 1891, when he cast his fortunes with the new town first known 
as Mendelsohn, now Wilson. He was the first business man to locate in the 
town, his bakery, confectionery and grocery store the first business house 
in what is now a prosperous and thriving community. As the town grew in 
importance, he enlarged and kept pace with the increased demand for his 
goods, doing a prosperous business until 1907, when he sold out and retireti 
with a competence. He still resides in Wilson in the comfortable house he 
purchased the year of his retirement. 

Mr. Krone married, November 24, 1887, Elizabeth (Garister j Snyder, a 
widow, born in Glasbouden, in a Rhenish province of Germany, November 
20, 1852. She is a daughter of John and Catherine (Usher) Garister, both 
born in Germany, where they married, coming to the United States in 1855, 
locating in Pillsbury, where John Garister became a puddler in the steel mills. 
He resided in Etna and continued a puddler until the age of sixty-five, then 
retired and lived in ease until his death in 1904 at the age of eighty-five 
years. His wife died in 1906 at the age of ninety years. 

Their daughter, Elizabeth, was two years of age when her parents 
came to Pittsburgh, where she was educated in a German Catholic school, 
her parents being members of the Roman Catholic church. In November, 
1873, she rnarried Frank Snyder, a blacksmith, who died May 2-j, 1885, 
leaving five children: i. George, died in 1910, a hotel keeper of Wilson. 
2. John, a resident of Clairton, Pennsylvania. 3. Frank, married Stella 
Sequat, and resides at Coal Valley, Pennsylvania. 4. Clara, married Clarence 
Fogle, and resides in Wilson. 5. Rudolph, married Anna Bluhmling, and 
resides at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. By second marriage with William 
Krone there are no children. 



Robert Snodgrass was born in Ireland, and in early 
SNODGRASS manhood emigrated to the United States, locating near 
Jamestown, Pennsylvania. At that time the section be- 
tween Jamestown and Meadville was entirely unsettled, and the pioneers in 
this region were called upon to endure innumerable hardships and dangers. 
Mr. Snodgrass purchased a farm, and this he cleared and cultivated until 
his death. He married Margaret McMaster, also a native of Ireland, and 
they became the parents of children, all born in South Shenango township. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA i357 

Crawford county, Pennsylvania: Robert, William, James M., of further 
mention ; Jane. 

(II) James M. Snodgrass, son of Robert and Margaret (McMaster) 
Snodgrass, was born in South Shenango township, Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1815, and died there in 1888. He was educated in the common 
schools and like his father was a farmer all the active years of his life. 
He gave his political support to the Republican party from the time of its 
organization until his death, and was a strong Abolitionist, taking an active 
part in the conduct of the "underground railway," which was of such ma- 
terial assistance to the negroes in attaining freedom. He married Mary 
Ann Gamble, bom in county Down, Ireland, in 1818, a daughter of the Rev. 
John and Elizabeth (Parr) Gamble, the latter of Philadelphia. Rev. John 
Gamble was born in county Down, Ireland, received his education there 
and was a prominent teacher. He was still young when he emigrated 
to America, taught in Philadelphia and elsewhere, and then entered the 
ministry. He finally settled at Jamestown where his death occurred. He 
had children: Dr. William J., of Mosiertown ; Dr. David, of Jamestown; 
John, of Shenango township; Martha; Caroline; Mary Ann, mentioned 
above. Mr. and Mrs. Snodgrass had children: i. Robert A., was a phy- 
sician of Hartstown and Conneaut Lake, Pennsylvania, and died in 1890. 
2. Rev. William J., D.D., was a pastor in West Middlesex, Pennsylvania, 
for a period of forty years; died there at Christmas, 1912. 3. Henry, lived 
and died on the homestead farm. 4. Emeline, married Robert Royer, of 
Jamestown, Pennsylvania. 5. Elizabeth^ married John G. McFeeters, of 
Jamestown, Pennsylvania. 6. David G., of further mention. 

(III) Dr. David G. Snodgrass, son of James M. and Mary Ann 
(Gamble) Snodgrass, was born in Jamestown, Pennsylvania, in 1857. After 
a preparatory course at Jamestown Seminary, he became a student at West- 
minster College, and after his graduation from this institution entered the 
Ohio Medical College, from which he was graduated in the class of 1882 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He took a post-graduate course at 
the Jefferson Medical College the following year, served as interne at St. 
Francis Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, and has taken an additional short sum- 
mer course ever since that time. He commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession at West Middlesex, then practiced in Conneaut Lake for a time, and 
finally settled permanently at Meadville, Pennsylvania, where he now has 
a large and lucrative practice, and has won a reputation for skill in his pro- 
fession. He has been engaged in polyclinic work at the Chicago University, 
the Polyclinic Medical School of New York, Johns Hopkins, of Baltimore, 
Maryland, and other institutions of equal note. He is the medical examiner 
for a number of the life insurance companies. His affiliation witli pro- 
fessional and other organizations is as follows : County, State and American 
Medical associations ; Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; Knights of the 
Maccabees ; Knights of Pythias. Dr. Snodgrass married E. Pauline Van 
Home, in 1908, and has one child, John D. 



1358 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



This branch of the Koegler family descends from the 
KOEGLER ancient Koegler family of Prussia, Europe, John M. Koeg- 
ler, of Wilson, Pennsylvania, being the third generation in 
the United States. 

(I) Grandfather Koegler, a blacksmith, came to the United States in 
1842, settling in Pittsburgh on the South Side. He brought with him a 
family, including several sons, who found employment in the glass manu- 
facturing establishments of the district, in fact the Chambers Glass Com- 
pany were instrumental in bringing the family to the United States. The 
sons all entered the employ of the Chambers Company, but several years 
later established in other lines. There were four sons and four daughters 
in the original Koegler family founded in the United States by Grandfather 
Koegler, the blacksmith: i. Adam, originally a glass blower, later estab- 
lished a carpet store at 1316 Carson street, Pittsburgh, that is yet conducted 
by the sons. 2. George, died at age of forty, was an expert glass blower. 
3. William F., of further mention. 4. Gottleib, enlisted in the Union army 
and died during the Civil War. 5. Margaret, married William Hale, a glass 
blower of Pittsburgh, South Side. 6. Augusta, married Charles Brack, also 
a glass blower of the South Side. 7. Elizabeth, married Elias Gunter, and 
resided near her sisters. 8. A daughter, died in infancy. 

(H) William F. Koegler, son of the immigrant, was born in Prussia 
in 1830, died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1884. He attended school until 
1842, then came with the family to the United States, beginning work in 
the Chambers Glass Works when quite young. He became a master teaser 
and remained with the Chambers Company for many years, then was en- 
gaged by a co-operative glass company and other firms in the glass business 
until his death. He was a quiet, industrious man, possessing the character- 
istic traits of his race. He married Magdalena Steel, born in Wittenberg, 
Germany, March 2, 1832, died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 2, 1912, 
daughter of Christopher and Christina Steel, both of German birth. Chris- 
topher Steel was a locksmith, and about the year 1845 came to the United 
States with his wife and familv. locating in Pittsburgh on the South Side, 
where he died in 1870, his wife in 1874, leaving an only child, Magdalena. 
Christopher Steel had a locksmith shop on the South Side and did a good 
business, one of the buildings that he fitted with locks being the old Pitts- 
burgh jail. Children of William F. and Magdalena (Steel) Koegler: i. 
Edward, deceased ; followed the trade of glass blower and lived in Pitts- 
burgh. 2. William, now living retired in Carrick, Pennsylvania, after spend- 
ing many years in the glass business as blower and factory manager. 3. 
John M., of further mention. 4. George, died in 1912; was a Pittsburgh 
hotel proprietor. 5. Frederick, now living in Carrick, Pennsylvania. 6. 
Louis, now residing in Muncie, Indiana, a glass blower. 7. Philip, now a 
glass packer with the Gilman Drug Company. 8. Philomena, married 
Snyder Smith, whom she survives, a resident of Clairton, Pennsylvania. 
9. Magdalena, deceased; married (first) William Bretzer, and (second) 
John Ehler. 10. Elizabeth, married Henry Werner, a glass blower, now 
residing in Clarksburg, West Virginia. 11. Christian, died in infancy. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1359 

(III) John M. Koegler, now living retired in Wilson, Pennsylvania, 
was born on Seventh street, Pittsburgh, South Side, April 28, i860, third 
son of William F. and Magdalena ( Steel ) Koegler. He attended public 
school and the old Humboldt German Lutheran school until fourteen years of 
age, although from the age of nine years he worked all except the winter 
months as a "carrying in" boy at the glass factory. At fourteen years he 
became a constant worker, summer and winter, learning the trade of bottle 
blowing and becoming an expert blower at the Wilson Glass Factory. He 
continued working at his trade, an exceptionally good one at that time, 
until he was thirty-two years age, acquiring capital and experience; in 1892 
he abandoned this. He then invested his savings in a hotel at Blair, Penn- 
sylvania, which he purchased and named "Koegler Hotel." There he con- 
ducted a prosperous business for thirteen years, retaining ownership until 
1905, when he sold the property to the Carnegie Steel Company and pur- 
chased his brick residence in Wilson, Pennsylvania. He is a member of the 
Junior Order of American Mechanics, and in political faith a Republican. 

Mr. Koegler married (first) September i, 1893, Emma Stelley, born in 
Jefifer.son township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of John and 
Laura Stelley, he a farmer now deceased. Mrs. Koegler died in January, 
1904, and in November, 1909, Mr. Koegler married (second) Annetta 
Weimer, born in Perryopolis, Pennsylvania. Children by first marriage : 
T. Stella, died aged thirteen years. 2. Alberta, born September 7, 1898. 
Qiildren by second marriage: 3. Emma, born March 6, 191 1. 4. Laura, 
born May 26, 1912. 5. Jcihn M. (2), born March i, 1914. 



One of the ancestors, on the maternal side, of Clifton V. 
KEEPER Keefer. a prominent citizen of Pitcairn, Pennsylvania, was 

George Wallace, born in Western Pennsylvania, was ap- 
pointed first judge of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was one of the 
wealthy and influential men of his day, having been the owner of all the 
land now included in the town of Braddockfield. and there conducted agri- 
cultural pursuits. The Christian name of his wife was Jane. 

(I ) Daniel Keefer, grandfather of Clifton V. Keefer, was a resident of 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he resided for many years, 
honored and respected by his neighbors and friends. He married Catherine 
Van Dyke, and among their children was B. O., of whom further. 

(II) B. O. Keefer, son of Daniel Keefer, was born in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania. He obtained a practical education in the schools of 
his neighborhood, and he began his active career by accepting a position as 
school teacher, in which line of work he continued for some time, and later 
turned his attention to the real estate and insurance business, in which he 
was highly successful. He was a staunch Republican in politics, served in 
the state legislature, as deputy internal revenue collector and as deputy 
treasurer of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, all of which duties he 
performed in a manner to win the approbation and commendation of his 
superiors in office. He married Anna M. Her, born in Barrell township, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and they were the parents of seven 
sons and one daughter. 



1360 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(III) Clifton V. Keefer, son of B. O. Keefer, was born in Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, November 13, 1876. His elementary education, 
received in the public schools of Westmoreland county, was supplemented 
by attendance at Greensburg Academy and in a business college in Greens- 
burg. In 1897 he began his active career by engaging in the real estate and 
insurance business at Pitcairn, and his patronage has steadily increased with 
each passing year, and at the present time (1914), after being in business 
in the same place for seventeen years, he is numbered among the successful 
business men, having made for himself a reputation second to none, and 
gained success through his own unaided efforts. In 1905 he was elected to 
the office of justice of the peace of Pitcairn, and so ably did he perform the 
duties of the sarnie that he was re-elected in 191 1, and is serving at the 
present time (1914). He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, 
and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Keefer married, 
May 19, .1897, Leah Jones, daughter of John H. and Mary (Richard), 
Jones, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. Children : Iva C, Floyd 
C, Margaret Bernice. 



The forebears of Andrew Kelley, who until his death in 1908 

KELLEY was one of the highly respected and prosperous farmers of 

Gibsonia, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, were early settlers 

of Beaver, farmers, and on both maternal and paternal lines families of 

prominence in the early life of that county. 

Andrew Kelley conducted dairy and general farming operations at 
the farm until his death, living in contented prosperity, surrounded by the 
love of family and the substantial results of his years of fruitful endeavor. 
Mr. Kelley married (first) in 1857, Lena, daughter of David and Catherine 
Fogle, of Pine township, her parents both born in Germany. She died 
January 15, 1876, the mother of six children: i. Margaret, married 
Thomas Keown. 2. Charity Ann, married Jesse Roberton. 3. Mary Olive, 
married William McKinney. 4. Sarah Jane, married Samuel Arbuthunot. 
5. John Nevin, deceased. 6. Elizabeth, married Charles Gibson. Mr. 
Kelley married (second) March 13, 1885, May, daughter of David and 
Eliza (Wilson) Crooskey, of Highland township. Children of Andrew 
Kelley and his second wife, May (Crooskey) Kelley: i. Ethel, residing 
at home. 2. Edna, married Albert Foy. 3. Emma (or Irma), residing at 
home. 4. William, residing at home. Mrs. May (Crooskey) Kelley sur- 
vives her husband and resides at the home farm at Gibsonia. 



The first member of the Keil family, now so prominent in the 
KEIL region of Sharpsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, to set 
AND foot in America was George Keil, a native of Hessen- 

SEAVEY Darmstadt, Germany, and one of the much maligned company 
of Hessian soldiers which George III., King of Eng- 
land, hurled into the Colonies to cope with the American patriots in 
the Revolutionary War. The Hessians were heartily hated by the patriots 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1361 

as interlopers, and accused of every atrocity, but it must not be forgotten in 
considering them that they were but helpless instruments in the hands of 
their commanders, virtual masters, and that there was probably much sym- 
pathy in the heart of more than one soldier for these strangers in a far 
western land against whom they had been, through no choice of their own, 
pitted in a war in which they had no personal interest. For the rank and 
file of the Hessian troops were recruited from the great mass of the people 
of that German principality, a sturdy race who at that very period, were 
engaged in a struggle for their own rights and freedom with an oppressive 
ducal house, saddled upon them by the aristocratic customs and traditions 
of a past age. This belief is certainly given color by the action of George 
Kiel himself, who when the war was over preferred to remain in the new 
land of liberty, against which he had been forced to bear arms, than to 
return to the land of his birth where human rights were still disregarded, 
and the battle of liberty yet to be fought. Mr. Keil was a man of talent, 
who besides following the trade of weaver, was also a surveyor, neither of 
which ability were likely to go begging in the rapidly developing country. 
The first home chosen by the Keil family in their adopted land was Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, and here the four sons of George Keil spent their 
childhood and youth. His sons were Jacob, John, Peter and George, the 
three latter choosing a mercantile life, John becoming a grocer in Pittsburgh, 
Peter, a grain dealer and banker, and George in the same city. 

In the case of Jacob Keil, through whom the direct line of descent to 
the present representatives of the family was continued, the business which 
he chose was the highly lucrative one of building contractor, in which he 
prospered greatly, erecting a number of important structures, and among 
them the Allegheny County Work House, of which one of his sons, Peter, 
Jr., afterwards became the first superintendent. Jacob Keil was later asso- 
ciated with the firm of Lewis, Dalzell & Company, who did a large iron and 
steel business in Pittsburgh. Tt was during the life of Jacob Keil that the 
family removed from the city of Pittsburgh to Etna, Pennsylvania, about 
the year 1840, and at a later date they again changed their home to the 
present location in Sharpsburg. The children of Jacob Keil, four in num- 
ber, all sons, were as follows: Peter, Jr., of further mention; Edward; 
John; George L., the father of the present Sharpsburg family of the name. 
Of these George L. and Peter are no longer living. 

Peter Keil served during the Civil War in the LInion army, enlisting 
as a drummer boy, and returning with the musket of a full fledged soldier. 
He married Margaret Bram, of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, and by her had 
three children. His children were unusually talented, one of them, Hen- 
rietta Keil, having an unusual voice, which was given careful cultivation in 
New York and Paris. Later the young lady went on a tour of Europe and 
the United States with Damrosch, and there won much renown as an artist. 
A son, A. L. Keil, is now the eastern representative of William G. John- 
ston, the great publisher's firm of Pittsburgh, having his offices in Phila- 
delphia. George Laurence Keil, the youngest son of Jacob Keil, was for 
many years a successful grain merchant in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, and 



J 362 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

died in 1899. He married, Alay 19, 1881, Maria E. Seavey, a daughter of 
William L. Seavey, of Sharpsburg, where she was born. 

The Seavey family are of French Huguenot descent, a strain which has 
contributed so much to the vigor and strength of the splendid New England 
stock of the country, and furnished not a few of the most distinguished 
names in American Colonial history. The earliest mention of the name in 
this country is in connection with Nathaniel Seavey. who appears in Maine, 
whither he had been attracted by the opportunities there afforded to ship 
builders, by the great pine forests near at hand, the presumption being that 
he had followed the same occupation in Europe before his migration to these 
shores. Josiah fought in the Continental army during the Revolution for 
the cause of freedom. Their home in Maine was in Kennebunkport. 

Josiah Seavey, whose father served in the Continental army, as late 
as 1830 moved from the old Maine home and came to Western Pennsyl- 
vania, where he had a grant of land situated between Allegheny and Etna, 
in Allegheny county. Here he settled in the vicinity of Pittsburgh, and 
here erected the first of Apang's iron mills, which afterwards grew to such 
great proportions. He was the father of six children, as follows : William 
L., the father of Mrs. George Keil, mentioned above; George A.; Josiah, 
Jr. ; Jason ; Emily, now Mrs. James Saint, the only survivor of this genera- 
tion in the town of Sharpsburg: and Katherine and Anna. All of these 
children are dead with the exception of Mrs. Saint, just mentioned, and 
Mrs. Anna Turney, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. George A. Seavey and 
his brother, Josiah, went west to Colorado, where they engaged in mining. 
For a full account of the Seavey family, the reader is referred to the ex- 
cellent genealogy^ of the family contained in the Boston Genealogical 
Library. 

William L. Seavey, the eldest son of Josiah Seavey, became a building 
contractor in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, and did a prosperous business 
there. He also owned a valuable farm in the locality. At the time of the 
outbreak of the Civil War, William L. Seavey was anxious to enlist in the 
LTnion army, but an unfortunate accident while a boy had deprived him of 
the sight of one eye, and this was deemed sufficient to debar him from the 
desired service. Air. Seavey married Eliza Jane Hughes, and by her had 
four children, as follows : Maria E., who as above mentioned became the 
wife of George L. Keil; Luella I., now a resident of Columbiana, Ohio; 
George A., now profitably engaged in the grain business in Sharpsburg, 
Pennsylvania ; and Orion W., now a resident of Cleveland, Ohio, general 
manager of Electric Freight Service in Ohio. 

By the marriage of George L. Keil to Miss Seavey, two old families, 
both of which have been conspicuously associated with the Sharpsburg 
region, have been united, and in the character of the children of this union 
there is every reason to believe that the high traditions of the past will be 
continued. Mr. and Mrs. George L. Keil are the parents of three children: 
Laurence H., of further mention; Clifford V.. who studied at the Institute 
of Technology, now engaged in the hardware business in Sharpsburg; and 
Alma L., now a student at the Pennsylvania College for Women. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1363 

Laurence H. Keil, the eldest child of George L. and Maria E. (Seavey) 
Keil, was bom June i, 1882, at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. The elementary 
portion of his education was obtained in the local public schools, and at 
Pittsburgh Central High School, which he attended until 1900. He then 
matriculated at the Western University of Pennsylvania, now the University 
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and in due course of time graduated there- 
from with the class of 1906. Later he was admitted to the bar of Alle- 
gheny county, and of Pennsylvania in Pittsburgh. Since that time he has 
been active in the practice of his profession in Pittsburgh and Sharpsburg, 
Pennsylvania. He has also been engaged in real estate development work 
in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 



Charles A. Hartmann is one of a family representative 
HARTMANN of the best type of German American character, which 
has brought to the cosmop>olitan citizenship of the 
United States a leaven of its own peculiar virtues, of unswerving pursuit of 
an object, of quiet industry and honest thrift. His grandparents on both 
sides of the house lived and died in the "Fatherland," and his father also 
passed his youth and early manhood there, receiving his education at the 
local volkeschule, and later learning the tinning trade. He was married in 
Germany to Barbara Isengart, but emigrated to the United States when their 
son Charles A. was but little more than a year old. His destination in this 
country was Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but he did not settle in that city, but 
pressed on to Sharpsburg in the same state, and there made his first home 
in the "New World." He later removed to Temperanceville, and finally to 
Etna, Pennsylvania, where he remained until the time of his death. During 
these years Mr. Hartmann, Sr., followed the trade he had learned in his 
native land, and did considerable tinning work, and at length, after making 
his home in Etna, he also established a tinning business there, to which he 
devoted himself for the remainder of his life. To Mr. Hartmann and his 
wife were born ten children, as follows: Henry, Edward, Charles A., Frank, 
John, Kate, Barbara, Lizzie, Rosa and Anna. 

Charles A. Hartmann, the third child of John and Barbara (Isengart) 
Hartmann, was born October 14, 1859, in Germany. The following year 
his parents brought him to the United States with them at the time of their 
immigration thither. He was educated in the public schools of Etna, Penn- 
sylvania, and upon completing his studies, learned from his father the 
latter's trade of tinning. He started an independent business on Freeport 
street, Etna, in 1890, and his office is still at that location, although, on 
account of his greatly increased business, he was obliged to move his shop 
to the two-story building which he now occupies on Union street. In the 
year 191 1 the firm became C. A. Hartmann & Sons, Mr. Hartmann taking 
into partnership his sons. Lender the new arrangement the business con- 
tinues to be large and flourishing. Besides his business. Mr. Hartmann 
finds time for other interests and is greatly interested in politics, whether 
local, state or national. He is a member of the Republican party. 

Mr. Hartmann has been thrice married. His first wife was Elizabeth 



1364 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Roth, a native of Pittsburgh. To them were born five children, as follows : 
Harrison; Frederick, deceased; Karl J., of whom further; Cyril and Freda, 
deceased. Mr. Hartmann's second wife was Louisa Greinner, a native of 
Ross township. The children of this union were : Elry ; Rosa, deceased ; 
Edward, also deceased. Mr. Hartmann was a third time married, this 
time to Emma Meister, a native of Allegheny, Pennsylvania. To them 
have been born three children: Esther, Alice, Florence, deceased. Mr. 
Hartmann is a member of the Lutheran church and in that belief has reared 
his children. 

Karl J. Hartmann, the third child of Charles A. and Elizabeth (Roth) 
Hartmann, was born in Etna, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1890. He was 
educated in the local public schools, continuing his studies until reaching 
the age of sixteen years, when he entered the tinning shop of his father 
and there learned the trade. In the year 191 1 he was taken into partnership 
by his father, and now aids in conducting the flourishing business. Young 
Mr. Hartmann is one of the rising men of the town and a very active 
member of the community. Like his father, he belongs to the Republican 
party. He is a member of the local lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is prominent in the life of 
these organizations and in the social life of the town generally. 



The \\'iiller family is an ancient and honorable one of Ger- 
WULLER many, where it has been distinguished for a number of 
generations for the ability displayed by its various members 
in the field of music. This ability has been transmitted to their descend- 
ants here. 

Professor John Wiiller, a native of Westphalia, Germany, spent his 
entire life in that land, where he died at the age of sixty-five years. He 
was an organist and builder by occupation, and earned more than a merely 
local renown. His wife, who died at the age of eighty-six years, bore 
him two sons and two daughters. 

Professor John Henry Wiiller, son of Professor John Wiiller, was 
born at Marl, Westphalia, Germany, March 2, 1821, and died in Butler, 
Butler county, Pennsylvania, January 30, 1889. He was the recipient of an 
excellent education in his native land, especial attention being paid to the 
subject of music, as he showed undoubted talent and marked ability from 
his earliest years. For some years he taught school in his native land, and 
at the age of thirty years came to the United States, where he supported 
himself by giving musical instruction. Five years were spent in this occu- 
pation in New York City, and he then removed to Selina, New York, having 
married in the meantime, and lived in that town for a period of one year. 
He next removed to Pitt.sburgh, Pennsylvania, where he taught music two 
years, and finally settled at No. 123 Franklin street, Butler, Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, where the remainder of his life was spent. The homestead 
on which he resided is still in the same condition as in his lifetime. He 
followed the musical profession in Butler also, and in addition to this was 




J^/^ K^U4Uf/ (ilp/i^<e4^ 



WESTERN" PENNSYLVANIA 1365 

largely interested in real estate matters. He lived retired from business 
responsibilities during the last sixteen years of his life. While giving his 
consistent support to the principles of the Democratic party, Mr. Wiiller 
took no active part in the political affairs of the township. He was con- 
sidered the leading musician of Butler, during his years of activity, being 
able to play on a variety of instruments, and also was equally proficient in 
vocal music. His religious affiliation was with the Roman Catholic Church, 
of which he was a devout member. 

Professor Wiiller married, about 1853, Johanna Keiffer, also born in 
(jermany, who was ten years of age when brought to this country by her 
parents, Daniel and Margaret (Kerk) Keifer, and received her education 
in this country. She had no especial musical ability, but the children were 
all talented, and received excellent high school and college educations. 
Children of Professor and Mrs. Wiiller: Daniel H., now deceased, was a 
druggist on Main street, Butler, Pennsylvania ; Mary, unmarried, at home ; 
Joseph L., a retired druggist of Butler; Jennie and Emma, at home; 
Charles B., a druggist of East Butler. 



The name of Johnston has been familiar in this country 
JOHNSTON from its first settlement by Europeans, but in various 
forms, that of the family under discussion here being 
the ancient English and Scotch form, differing from such as Jonson, John- 
son, Jansen, Johansen, etc. 

(I) James Johnston, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, emigrated to America 
with his wife, Catherine (Sept) Johnston, and for a time lived on the 
"Pike." Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was a shoemaker by trade and plied 
this successfully at Pittsburgh, later removing to Beaver county, where he 
died at the age of sixty-five years. 

(II) Archibald Johnston, son of James and Catherine (Sept) Johnston, 
was born in the North of Ireland, and came to this country with his parents 
when he was nine years of age. He was educated here in the district 
schools, and when he reached man's estate became an engineer on vessels 
which plied on the Ohio river. Later he retired to the old homestead at 
Scottsville, where he kept the farm in a fine state of cultivation. He mar- 
ried Mary Mackrell, also born in the North of Ireland, a daughter of Henry 
and Nancy (Real) Mackrell. The latter died before her children emigrated 
to America. Mrs. Johnston emigrated to this country at the age of seven- 
teen years, and later she and the other children of this family sent for 
their father and his second wife to come over here. They had purchased 
a farm in Scottsville. Beaver county. Pennsylvania, as a home for the old 
people, but the father died two days after his arrival there. 

(III) Marshall Johnston, son of Archibald and Mary (Mackrell) 
Johnston, was born in Scottsville, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, October 
19, 1842, died June 4, 1910. 

During his boyhood he was obliged to assist with the farm work 
during the summer months, and could only attend school during the winter. 



1366 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

He acquired his education at the district schools and the Dayton Academy, 
and was attending this last named institution at the outbreak of the Civil 
War. He at once abandoned his studies and offered his services in defence 
of the Union. He tried to enlist in the Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
but was not accepted because of his youth. Having obtained the permission 
of his parents, he made another attempt to join the army, and this time was 
accepted, and served three years under Captain Duff, a professor of the 
Dayton Academy. He then returned to Pittsburgh, and there read law in 
the office of Judge Fetterman and S. A. Johnston, the latter his brother. 
Having been duly admitted to the bar, he commenced the active practice 
of his profession, with which he was identified until his death. He was in 
partnership with his brother, S. A. Johnston, and later his son, Oliver 
Reed, was admitted to the firm. Mr. Johnston was an excellent man of 
business as well as a fine lawyer, and had he chosen to devote his energies 
to a business career would undoubtedly have been as successful in that as 
he was in his professional work. He was one of the organizers of the 
Peoples Building and Loan Association of Pittsburgh, and of the Home 
Building and Loan Association of Bellevue ; was the first vice-president of 
the Citizens' National Bank of Bellevue. At the time of his death he was 
a member of the board of trustees of the Third United Presbyterian Church 
of Pittsburgh. He was also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic ; 
the Veteran Legion ; Avalon Lodge, No. 657, Free and Accepted Masons. 

Mr. Johnston married, in 1868. Mary W. Reed, of Pittsburgh; Mrs. 
Johnston lived in the same place fifty years, the house having formerly 
belonged to her paternal grandmother, who was a member of an old Alle- 
gheny family. William Reed, grandfather of Mrs. Johnston, was born in 
Ireland, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, emigrated to America at an early date 
and settled at Pittsburgh. He was a carpet weaver by trade. He married 
Mary Wilson, and their son. William F. Reed, married a daughter of William 
and Maria (Harris) Whitehead, of England, who came to this country 
about 1845 and settled on ground which has now been appropriated to 
cemetery uses. He was a marble cutter by trade in England, and he and his 
brothers brought the laurels which are still in the cemetery. William F. 
Reed, father of Mrs. Johnston, was a plumber and brass fitter. He was born 
in Strasburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston have had children : 
Oliver Reed, a promising young attorney, died in young manhood: Annie 
Matilda ; Harry Kerr, a right of way man of the Central District Telephone 
Company ; Mary Eva, who married John C. Dicks. 



This is among the oldest of German families, all obtainable 
HILLEN information showing the residence of the name in that coun- 
try. Peter Hillen, father of Peter Hillen, Jr., was born in 
that country about 1828, the son of German parents who had passed their 
lives there, and died about 1880. He was the owner of a farm in his 
native land and cultivated his acres until his death. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Catholic church. He was twice married, his 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1367 

first wife having six children, and he married (second) Katherina, daughter 
of Phihp and Anna Frerres, who lived and died in Rhine province, Ger- 
many, her father a farmer on a small scale. Of the children of Philip and 
Anna Frerres, two came to the United States, Katherina and a brother, who 
now resides in the West. After the death of Peter Hillen, his wife, in 1884, 
came to the United States and settled in Heidelberg, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. Her resources were slender and her needs many, so that 
soon after her arrival she apprenticed her oldest son to a farmer of the 
locality, in 1888 marrying a second time, her husband being Frank Libert, 
she dying in 1912, he surviving her to the present time. By her second 
marriage she was the mother of one daughter, Lena, who married Peter 
McDermott, a merchant, and resides in Burdine, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania. Children of Peter and Katherina (Frerres) Hillen: i. William, 
a carpenter of Heidelberg, Pennsylvania. 2. Peter, of whom further. 3. 
Philip, a justice of the peace of Heidelberg, Pennsylvania. 4. Catherine, 
married Peter Teiss, and resides in McDonald, Pennsylvania. 

Peter Hillen, son of Peter and Katherina (Frerres) Hillen, was born 
in Rhine province, Prussia, Germany, April 19, 1872. He received his 
scholastic training in the schools of Germany, France and the United 
States, in France receiving instruction from an uncle with whom he lived 
and learned the language of that country. He learned the carpenter's trade 
after completing his studies and followed that occupation for fifteen years, 
in 1904 establishing in contracting, a line in which he has since remained, the 
present scope of his business including operations in Carnegie, Bridgeville, 
Mount Lebanon and Heidelberg. The greater part of his work has been 
done in the erection of residences, many of the most attractive houses of 
that locality having been built under his direction, his force numbering 
about eight men. In 1908 he constructed a house on Ellsworth avenue, 
Loupurex, Pennsylvania, and there resides at the present time, his residence 
commodious, tastefully designed and comfortable. For three terms Mr. 
Hillen has served as a member of the borough council of Loupurex, his 
political beliefs being those of the Socialist party. He belongs to the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, the Knights of Malta, the Loyal Order of 
Moose, and the German Beneficial Society, of which last named body he 
was an organizer and has for two years been its president, an ofiice he now 
(1914) holds. Mr. Hillen married, in 1906, Agnes, born in Prussia, Ger- 
many, daughter of Jacob and Anna Colley. Mr. and Mrs. Hillen are the 
parents of two children, Agnes and Arthur. 



The name of Jenkins is of English origin, and is recorded 
JENKINS with honor in America and Europe. They have furnished 
many men of distinction in professional life, as well as in 
commercial pursuits, and the other activities of life. 

(I) Jenkins was a farmer and old resident of Black Lick, Indiana 

county, Pennsylvania, where he was also an extensive land owner. He mar- 
ried and had children : Mary, married David Berry, and died in Indiana 



1368 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

county, Pennsylvania; William Henry, of further mention; David, lives in 
Black Lick, Indiana county, Pennsylvania. 

(II) William Henry Jenkins, son of Jenkins, was born in Indiana 

county, Pennsylvania, and died in Saltsburg, in the same county, in 1892, 
aged fifty-four years. After his marriage he settled at Livermore, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, where he taught school for a time, then 
engaged in the feed business. Subsequently he turned his attention to real 
estate matters, with which he was identified for some years. He was always 
active in the interests of the Republican party, and served for a long time as 
justice of the peace. He was twice a candidate for the state assembly, and 
during three terms held a political appointment in the house of representa- 
tives at Harrisburg. He was a justice of the peace at the time of his death. 
During the Civil War he served in Company A, Fifty-fourth Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He and his wife were members of the 
Presbyterian church, and fraternally he was connected with the Royal 
Arcanum. He married Mary Catherine Rombach, who died in Glenfield, 
Pennsylvania, in 1900, aged sixty-one years. She was a daughter of 
Matthias and Mary (Jennings) Rombach, the latter born near Latrobe, 
Pennsylvania, died at Saltsburg. Mr. Rombach was born in Germany, and 
was in his early youth when he came to this country. He commenced his 
business career as a traveling peddler, going about the country on foot, as 
was the custom of those days. When he had accumulated a small capital by 
dint of thrift and undoubted industry, he opened a store, and carried on his 
business in this manner on a small scale. His correct business methods, 
however, did not fail of their proper effect, and his business increased 
steadily, until at the time of his death he was considered one of the most 
successful jewelers in that section. Mr. and Mrs. Rombach had children : 
Elizabeth, married John Martin ; Matthias, Jr., retired from business, lives 
at Saltsburg; William D., died in Saltsburg, was a hardware merchant: 
Mary Catherine, mentioned above. Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins have had children : 
Harry, died in infancy; Ehzabeth, died in infancy; Mary Florence: William 
Martin, of further mention; J. Arthur, a jeweler, living at La Grande. 
Oregon ; Anna Catherine, widow of Charles E. Sprague. 

(III) \Villiam Martin Jenkins, son of William Henry and Mary 
Catherine (Rombach) Jenkins, was born at Livermore, Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, November 14, 1871. At first he attended the pubHc schools 
of Saltsburg, then was pre])ared for college at the Kiskiminetas Preparatory 
School, finally matriculating at the University of Pittsburgh, where he 
took a special course in civil engineering to round out some practical work 
he had done in that line. He was in the employ of several firms and of 
the United States government for some years, then established himself in 
the real estate and insurance business at Saltsburg, Pennsylvania, in asso- 
ciation with John E. Elrick. He continued there until iqoo, when he 
entered the employ of the Pittsburgh Coal Company as a draftsman and 
computer. At the end of six weeks he became division engineer for the 
Monongahela River Consolidated Coal & Coke Company, and when this 



WESTERN i'EXXSVL\AXJA 1369 

was absorbed by the Pittsburgh Cual Company in lyu, Air. Jenkins re- 
mained with the latter corporation. In lyoy he was made chief draftsman; 
in 191 1, assistant chief engineer; and he then became assistant engineer of 
the Pittsburgh Coal Company; in October, 1913, he was appointed assistant 
real estate agent of the Pittsburgh Coal Company, a position of which he is 
the incumbent at the present time. Since November, 1901, he has lived at 
Dravosburg, where he has built himself a tine house on Ridge avenue. 
Politically a Republican, he has always given his strong support to that 
party. He is a member and past master of Aliquippa Lodge, No. 375, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of McKeesport; member of AIcKeesport Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; McKeesport Commandery, Knights Templar. Mr. 
Jenkins married, October 14, 1897, Anna Grace, a daughter of Edward H. 
and Lydia Thompson, and they have one child, Grace Florence. 



Kuhn and Kuhns are names of prominence in Westmoreland 
KUHN county, Pennsylvania, the form of the name being varied with 

that of Kuntz in the same family. The family may be of 
Dutch, but is more probably of German extraction. 

(I) Kuhn married, and had children: George, of further men- 
tion; Arthur J., died July 8, 1913, was president of the Homestead Realty 
Company, and married Mary McCowie; Jennie K., unmarried, lives in 
Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 

(H) George Kuhn, son of Kuhn, was born at Broad Ford, Fayette 

county, Pennsylvania, in 1852, and died in 1884. He was a very young 
child when he removed with his parents to Latrobe, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and there became a student at St. Vincent's Academy. As 
he attained manhood he made a study of pharmacy, and was engaged in 
the drug business, having a store of his own until his death. He and his 
family were members of the Roman Catholic church. He married Catherine 
Lipp, born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1854, died in 1895, ^ sister of: 

Mary, married Hoffman, a physician in Wallbrook, Pennsylvania; 

, married Dr. Charles Meyer, and lives at No. 1619 Caroline street, 

Baltimore ; , married Hodinotte. Mr. and Mrs. Kuhn became 

the parents of children as follows : Gertrude, married John W. Fadyen, an 
attorney in Latrobe, Pennsylvania; James C, of further mention; Bertha, 
unmarried, lives in Latrobe ; Charlotte, died at the age of four years ; 
Catherine, married David M. Gibson, superintendent of a coal mine, and 
lives in Latrobe ; George, died at the age of two years. 

(HI) James C. Kuhn, son of George and Catherine (Lipp) Kuhn, 
was born on Hartford Road, in Baltimore, Maryland, April 15, 1878. After 
the death of the father in 1884, the widow removed with her family into 
the city of Baltimore, where James C. attended school until the age of 
fourteen years. He then became a salesman for Haywood Brothers & 
Wakefield Company, who were wholesale dealers in chairs and baby car- 
riages, and remained with that firm five years, the territory he covered 
lying in Baltimore, and in \\'ashinCTton, District of Columbia. In 1898 he 



I370 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



came to Homestead, Pennsylvania, and at first worked for his uncle, A. J. 
Kuhn, in the real estate business, but after a time established himself inde- 
pendently in this line. In 1901 the Homestead Realty Company was organ- 
ized, and in 1903 Mr. Kuhn became a salesman for this concern, his uncle, 
Arthur J. Kuhn, being the president. In 1910 James C. Kuhn was chosen 
vice-president of the company, and upon the death of his uncle in 1913 
succeeded him in the presidency. This company does an extensive business 
and has a large number of salesmen. Mr. Kuhn is a Progressive in his 
political affiliation, and has served as a member of the borough council of 
Homestead. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He resides at No. 218 East Eleventh street. 

Mr. Kuhn married, June 26, 1907, Hilda, born in San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, a daughter of Henry and Ida (Fletcher) Norton, the former a 
native of New York City, the latter born in Memphis, Tennessee, and both 
now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Kuhn have had children : Thomas Carey, 
born January 19, 1909; Rachel, born February 2-j, 1912; David Norton, 
born January 5, 1914. 



Joseph H. Kim comes of one of the most capable and liberty 
KIM loving of the peoples of Europe, the cradle of those hardy virtues, 

which though represented by a comparatively small element in the 
United States, has yet engrafted upon the citizenship of this country their 
traits of fearlessness and independence of action. 

(I) His grandfather, Sebastian Kim, was born in Switzerland among 
the Alps, and possessed in full measure the strong and enterprising char- 
acter of his race. Full of the desire to see the world and try its experiences 
for himself, he set forth as a young man in the year 1818 to make the 
journey to America, the reports of whose great opportunities had pene- 
trated every corner of the European countries. From the first adventures 
befell him and he was forced to remain nine weeks in Holland by the 
shipwreck of his vessel. Not discouraged, however, he continued on his 
way the following year, and in due time reached these shores. The first 
place in which he made his home was the city of Riiladelphia, where he had 
his headquarters for a number of years, although he could scarcely be said 
to live there, as he made a number of extended excursions to other parts. 
He was strongly attracted by the opportunities to be found in the rapidly 
developing western region of the state of Pennsylvania, and actually made 
three trips to Pittsburgh from Philadelphia and back on foot, crossing the 
mountains and braving all the perils and hardships of the way, in those days 
of pioneering sinister enough. Finally after assuring himself in this man- 
ner of the advantages to be found in that region, he removed there and 
made his home in Pittsburgh for a few years. The great possibilities in 
farming in that part of the country soon attracted his attention and he 
acquired a fine piece of farming land in Penn township, Allegheny county, 
to which he moved, and was soon conducting very profitable farming opera- 
tions. He raised garden truck for the surrounding community, which, with 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1371 

its rapidly increasing population, offered the best and surest imaginable 
market. Besides the garden truck, Mr. Kim made a specialty of maple 
sugar, with which the surrounding wilderness provided him great quantities, 
and molasses. He married Mary Wonderley, who bore him six children, 
as follows: iVIary, Maria, Theresa, who later became Mrs. Joseph Keating, 
of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania; Sebastian, Jr.; Henry, Ambrose, Thad- 
deus, Joseph, of whom further. Sebastian Kim was a faithful member of 
the Catholic church, and this faith he handed on to his children. 

(II) Joseph Kim, son of Sebastian Kim, was born in Philadelphia, 
before his parents had left that place for their more western home in 
Allegheny county. He was still a young child when that move was taken, 
hovi'ever, so he gained his education in the schools of Birmingham, Penn 
township. He later followed in the footsteps of his father, took up truck 
farming and continued his father's profitable business. He also engaged in 
lumbering, and butchering business, which was a highly lucrative business 
in that time and place. As an illustration of the size of his operations, it 
may be stated that his truck farm, in 1876, the year of the war panic, com- 
prised sixty-five acres. He married Louisa Limegrover, he and his wife 
being the parents of ten children, as follows: Cecelia; Joseph H., of whom 
further; William C. ; Sebastian, deceased; Mary A., now Mrs. James Man- 
ning, of Penn township; Barbara, who now resides with her mother; 
Theresa, now Mrs. Joseph Schafer, of Penn township; Louise M. B., who 
married George B. Verner, a glass worker, and a resident of Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania ; Rose C, who married Phillip Witham, a telegrapher. There 
were besides these, two boys who died in infancy, Edward and John. Mr. 
Kim was a member of the Catholic church, a Democrat in politics, and a 
prominent figure in the neighborhood. His death occurred November 7, 
1880. 

(III) Joseph H. Kim, the second child and eldest son of Joseph and 
Louisa (Limegrover) Kim, was born in Penn township, January i, 1864. 
He first saw light on the old homestead which had served his father and 
grandfather as a farm, and which was to serve him in a similar capacity. 
He obtained his education in the public schools of Penn township, and upon 
completing his studies took the management of the old Kim farm into his 
able hands. Like his father and grandfather, he raises and markets truck, 
his crop being represented by such staples as tomatoes, cabbages, potatoes, 
and a large quantity of fruit, fifteen acres being devoted to this alone. He 
is an expert gardener and farmer, and well known throughout the region 
as an authority on agricultural subjects. Like his father, he is a member 
of the Democratic party, and a keen and intelligent observer of the political 
issues agitating the country. To him has descended the faith of his ancestors, 
that of the Roman Catholic church, and he. in turn, is rearing his children 
therein. 

Joseph H. Kim married, January T7. toot, Mary J. E. Joyce, a 
native of Alpsville, Pennsylvania, where she was born December 14, 1877, 
and a daughter of Thomas J. and Honora Joyce. Mr. Joyce is a native of 



-^■^72 



^^'ESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



Ireland, where he was born December 14, 1853. ^i*^ came to the United 
States when about seventeen years of age and settled first in Jefferson 
county, Pennsylvania, and removed later to Pittsburgh, where he has 
resided about forty years. He and Mrs. Joyce are the parents of seven 
children: Mary J. E., now Mrs. Kim; Margaret, John, Anna, Thomas, 
Martin and Helen, all of whom are living. To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. 
Kim have been born eight children, as follows : Martha Josephine, born 
October 30, 1901 ; Mary Louise, born November 17, 1902; Joseph H., Jr., 
born June 6, 1904; Regina Frances, born November 24, 1905; Helen Marie, 
born November 3, 1907; Anna Theresa, born October 15, 1909; Paul 
Sebastian, born January 24, 191 1; William Adrian, born March 5, 1914. 
The four older children, Martha Josephine, Mary Louise, Joseph H., Jr., 
and Regina Frances, are all students at the school of St. Joseph, at Verona, 
Pennsylvania. 



Little is known of the earlier history of this family, except 
CRATTY the fact, and a very important one, that the various members 
always performed the duties of the stations of life to which 
they were called with exemplary fidelity and ability. 

William Cratty, who was for a number of years a resident of Arm- 
strong county, Pennsylvania, later removed with, his family to Butler county, 
in the same state. He married Elizabeth Henshaw, and of his four sons and 
three daughters the elder ones were born in Armstrong county, the others 
in Butler county. 

Captain Eli Graham Cratty, son of William and Elizabeth (Henshaw) 
Cratty, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, April 20, 1841, 
and died in January, 1876. His education was commenced in the public 
schools of Butler county, Pennsylvania, and completed at the Weatherspoon 
Institute, in the same county. He was then engaged in teaching school in 
Forward and Butler townships. Butler county, Pennsylvania, until April, 
1861, when he enlisted for three months. Upon the expiration of this term 
of service he returned to Butler county, and at once re-enlisted, becoming a 
member of Company E, One Hundred and Third Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry. He was advanced through the various grades until 
October 28, 1862, when he was appointed captain of the company. He 
remained in active service, and on April 20, 1864, the anniversary of his 
birth was captured at Plymouth, North Carolina, but escaped, March 7, 1865. 
Altogether he was captured four times, escaping on three of these occasions, 
but served imprisonment eleven months, three of these being spent in Libby 
Prison. He was removed from this prison as a concession to his rank, and 
was finally mustered out, June 25, 1865, when he returned to Butler county. 
After his marriage he resided in Petersville, Butler county, where he was 
the owner of a general store, and was also engaged in teaching until his 
appointment as clerk to the county commissioner of Butler county, an office 
he had filled about two and a half years when death put an end to his 
labors. He was a member of the local Post, Grand Army of the Republic, 




wa/i/:. Gii c/')'ci/ia^?i ^*w//W 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1373 

and an elder in the United Presbyterian church. His poHtical support was 
given to the Rcpuhhcan party. 

Captain Cratty married, in October, 1865, Agnes Carsons, born in 
Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, removed to Butler county with her parents 
when she was five years of age. She was the only child of John and 
Catherine (Brodfoot) (Donnon) Carsons, both natives of Scotland. The 
former died in Butler county, Pennsylvania, at the age of fifty-nine years, 
the latter died in the same county, at the age of eighty-two years, and both, 
members of the Covenanters' church, are buried in North Cemetery, Butler 
county, Pennsylvania. John Carsons came to America at the age of twenty- 
five years, and for a time was a farmer in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, 
where he married Catherine (Brodfoot) Donnon, widow of John Donnon, 
by whom she had no children. He continued farming after his removal to 
Butler county. Of the children of Captain and Mrs. Cratty the two 
eldest were born in Petersville, the others in Butler. Their names 
are as follows: John Carson, deceased; Catherine; Elizabeth, deceased; 
Lelila Ada, married David Caldwell, one child, Agnes Cratty; Nora Agnes, 
married C. B. McMillian, one son, John Carson. Mrs. Cratty is a member 
of the Women's Relief Corps, associated with the Grand Army of the 
Republic, a member of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and an 
active worker in the interests of the United Presbyterian church. She is a 
stockholder of the Savings and Trust Company of Butler, and resides at 
No. 129 South McKean street, Butler, Pennsylvania. 



The family of Kearney, well and favorably known fn Mc- 
KEARNEY Keesport and vicinity, represented in the present genera- 
tion by Edward C. Kearney, an enterprising and pro- 
gressive business man of McKeesport, is an old and honored one, the mem- 
bers in the various generations performing well their part in all the duties 
devolving upon them. 

(I) Kearney, grandfather of Edward C. Kearney, was the father 

of five children, namely : James, David, Edward C, of whom further ; 

Emma, wife of James Malloy, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and . 

(H) Dr. Edward C. Kearney, father of Edward C. Kearney, was born 
in Monongahela City, Washington county, Pennsylvania, 1844, died in 
August, 1903. After completing his studies in the schools of his native 
city, he studied medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. Stuckslager, of 
McKeesport, then pursued a course in the Cleveland Medical College, from 
which institution he graduated, after which he matriculated in the Johns 
Hopkins College, graduating from the medical department. He began the 
active practice of his profession in Dravosburg. Pennsylvania, removing 
from there to McKeesport, where he spent the remainder of his life, about 
twenty years. He was a skillful practitioner, and won and held the esteem 
of his many patrons, also the confidence and good will of his medical 
brethren. He took an active part in public affairs, his influence for good 
being felt in many directions, was a prominent member of the First 



1374 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Methodist Episcopal Church, and a staunch Democrat in poHtical beUef, 
serving his party on many occasions. He married Mary Jane Stone, born 
on South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, living at the present time (1914) 
at No. 1412 Mauner avenue, McKeesport, Pennsylvania. She is a daughter 
of William Alsburg and Mary Jane Stone, he a native of England; they 
came to Pittsburgh, and Mr. Stone engaged in the coal business, being the 
first man to float coal to New Orleans, being the owner of live steamers for 
that purpose, and by this means he amassed a considerable fortune. Pie 
died on the ocean while making a trip to England, and his wife died in 
Dravosburg, Pennsylvania. They were the parents of six other children 
besides Mrs. Kearney, namely: Joseph A., deceased; George W., deceased; 
William S., deceased ; John W. ; Thomas B., engaged in the hardwood 
lumber business in Cincinnati, Ohio ; Elizabeth. Mr. Stone named his boats 
for his children, also named one the "Coal Alley." Dr. and Mrs. Kearney 
had three children: Edward C, of whom further; William S. ; Charles E. 
(Ill) Edward C. Kearney was born in Dravosburg, Pennsylvania, 
October i, 1874. He attended the public schools of his native place and 
the Indiana (Pennsylvania) State Normal School. His first employment 
was in the office of the National Tube Company at McKeesport, and later 
in the masonry department of the same company at Pittsburgh, being em- 
ployed by the company for about ten years in all. He was a director and 
treasurer of The Realty Company of McKeesport for eleven years, and in 
August, 1913, he engaged in the real estate, insurance, bonds and mortgage 
business, representing the Equitable Life Insurance Company, and for the 
past eight years has been a notary public. He has been successful in this 
line of work, the direct result of perseverance, energy and determination. 
He gives his allegiance to the Democratic party, in the work of which he has 
taken an active part, and he is a member of the Knights of Malta and the 
Royal Arcanum. Mr. Kearney and his family are members of the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church of McKeesport. Mr. Kearney married, in 
1903, Alice Hunter, of McKeesport. daughter of the late Thomas Hunter. 
Two children: Edward C, born December 12. 1906, and Alice Louise, 
born August 19, 191 1. 



From county Sligo, Ireland, came Patrick Rafter to tlie 
RAFTER United States, settling in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, 

where he and his wife passed their entire lives, he dying in 
1872, she seven years afterward. His wife, Mary, daughter of Matthew 
and Ann (Morrison) Byron, was likewise a native of Ireland, and they 
were the parents of: Bridget, born in Ireland, died in infancy; Mary, of 
whom further; Thomas, born in Summit Hill, Pennsvlvania, as were his 
younger brothers and sisters. Thomas. Ann, John. James, William, Edward, 
Catherine, Ellen, Hannah, Elizabeth. 

Mary, daughter of Patrick and Mary (Byron) Rafter, was born in 
county Sligo, Ireland, March 22. 1836. and in her early life made her home 
with her maternal grandparents, joining her parents in Summit Hill, Luzerne 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1375 

county, Pennsylvania, about 1856. She married, January 21, 1869, John 
KilculHn, born in Ireland, son of John KilcuUin. John Kilcullin came from 
Ireland when a young man, his occupation being that of mill-worker, and 
after his marriage lived for a time in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. On De- 
cember 15, 1891, Mrs. Kilcullin moved to Aspinwall, Pennsylvania, there 
building a house and establishing in the grocery business, as she has since 
been engaged. She was the proprietress of the first store opened in Aspin- 
wall, and during Cleveland's second presidential administration was post- 
mistress of the Aspinwall office. Mrs. Kilcullin has met with excellent 
success in her business dealings, and has prospered well, owning other 
property in that locality. Her store is known throughout the country-side, 
and all of its many patrons know its owner as "Mother Kilcullin," by which 
title she is universally addressed. During the more than twenty years that 
she has been in active business she has neither needed nor asked favors of 
her competitors of the opposite sex, but, learning the arts of successful 
dealing, she has invested them with the simplicity and gentleness of her 
nature, with what success her generous patronage shows. Her greeting is 
ever cheery and her smile bright, and the unfaltering faith with which she 
meets the morning is the secret of her calmness of spirit and the brightness 
of her life. She has grown old at her place of business, and the reward of 
her labors in Aspinwall is, besides material benefit, the friendship of all and 
the love of many. She is a member and regular attendant of the Roman 
Catholic church. Children of John and Mary (Rafter) Kilcullin: John, 
deceased; Murdock, deceased; Mary Josephine, married Harvey C. Light- 
ner, of Pittsburgh. 



The name of Playward is one which is not unfamiliar in 
HAYWARD the annals of our country, but the particular branch of 

which this sketch treats only came to the United States in 
more recent years, while it is more than probable that they have had a 
common origin with those of the name who came here before them. The 
grandparents of Dr. George Earnest Hayward, of Meadville, Crawford 
county, Pennsylvania, came to this country from England, and settled in 
Washington county, Pennsylvania. 

(II) James Baird Hayward, their son, was born in England, and came 
to the United States with his parents. Later in life he engaged in the 
wholesale flour and feed business, and has been successfully identified 
with this for the past thirty years. For a period of eighteen years he was 
connected in an official capacity with the Monongahela Milling Company. 
In political opinion he is a staunch Democrat, and his religious affiliations 
are with the Methodist church. Fraternally he is associated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He married Anna, daughter of Stephen 
L. and Anna Earnest, of Pennsylvania. They have had children : Stephen 
L. ; Julia, deceased; Elizabeth; James B. ; Rachel, deceased; Laura T. : 
George Earnest, see forward ; Ellen P. 

(III) Dr. George Earnest Hayward, son of James Baird and Anna 



1376 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(Earnest) Hayward, was born in Monongahela, Pennsylvania, June 3, 1885. 
He acquired his elementary education in the public schools of Monongahela, 
and was graduated from the Kiskiminitas Springs schools in 1906. Matricu- 
lating at the Hahnemann Medical College, of Philadelphia, he was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in the class of 1910. One year was 
spent as an interne at the Pittsburgh Homeopathic Hospital, in Pittsburgh, 
and he then established himself in practice in Meadville, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, becoming the successor to Dr. E. C. Parson, with offices at 
No. 224 Chestnut street. Dr. Hayward is Independent in his political 
opinions, and is an attendant at the Methodist church. He is a member of 
the Pennsylvania State Homeopathic Medical Association; of Lodge No. 
408, Free and Accepted Masons ; and of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 
Dr. Hayward is progressive in his ideas, yet this progressiveness is tem- 
pered with a certain amount of conservatism, which will always keep him 
on the safe side in the practice of his profession. His practice is a rea- 
•sonably extensive one, and it is increasing with great rapidity. He is 
rapidly gaining the confidence of the community, and great things are 
expected of him in the future. 



Joseph Lehner comes of a family representative of the best 
LEHNER type of the stalwart Swiss people, who for centuries were 

engaged in a fierce struggle for liberty, and who, of all the 
nations of the motlern world, first demonstrated the possibility of practical, 
permanent republican government. Although coming in smaller numbers 
than many of their neighbors as immigrants to this country, the great 
impulse to escape from oppressive social conditions being absent in their 
case, yet have they introduced a leaven of their virtues into the composite 
citizenship of the United States, which cannot but prove of inestimable 
value in the final makeup of the new American race. 

His father, Charles Lehner, was a native of Switzerland and a resi- 
dent of that country until the year 1871. During the Franco-Prussian War 
there was at one time as many as two hundred French soldiers quartered in 
the Lehner home, and for whom the family cared. In the year mentioned 
above, Charles Lehner emigrated to the LTnited States, and at once went to 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he made a home for himself and family 
upon the North Side. He had been trained in the calling of miller in his 
native land, and had while yet living there followed it for a period of 
eighteen years. Some time after his settlement in Pittsburgh, in 1871, to 
be precise, he resumed his past trade, and operated a flour mill until the 
year 1877, when he purchased a large farm of one hundred and ten acres 
at Milltown, Pennsylvania, near Verona. Charles Lehner was married in 

his native land to Magdalina . and by her had six children, four sons 

and two daughters, two of the sons and one daughter being still alive. 

Joseph Lehner, son of Charles and Magdalina Lehner, was born in 
1871, in Switzerland. His father emigrated to the New World in the same 
year as that in which his birth occurred, and two years later Mrs. Lehner 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1377 

followed her husband with their children. It thus happened that, coming 
as he did when but two years of age, his childish associations are all with the 
land of his adoption. He received but scanty education through the ordinary 
channels, but his quick mind and the earnest desire to gain knowledge stood 
him in good stead, and by close application and hard work he has made 
good the deficiency of his early training. While a mere boy he was obliged 
to assist his father in the hard path which the elder man had to walk in 
his elforts to support a wife and children in a strange land. Between the 
two, therefore, there grew up a strong cdmradship. Father and son shared 
their toil and hardships, stood by one another through thick and thin, and 
in the end won the fight against difficulties. Together they engaged in a 
number of business ventures, at one time conducting a delivery business, 
confectionery shop and a pool room together. In the year 1880 Joseph 
Lehner engaged in the feed business, in which he has continued ever since 
with a high degree of success. His first establishment was located on East 
Railroad avenue, Verona, Pennsylvania, and there he remained until he 
built his present store building in 1895 on the corner of Penn and South 
streets, which has remained his headquarters ever since. In 1906 he built a 
fine brick and stone front residence, next to his place of business, and here 
he is dwelling at present. When Mr. Lehner removed his business from 
East Railroad avenue, he did not dispose of the property, but continues to 
retain possession of it, a policy which has amply justified itself, the place 
being now rented as a moving picture house and netting him a lucrative 
income. 

Mr. Lehner married, in 1900. Anna Ebel. a daughter of Ebel, 

of East Liberty, Pennsylvania, where she was born. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Lehner have been born three children, Marie. Lorretta and Marcella. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lehner are members of the Roman Catholic church, and in that 
faith are rearing their children. 



The McKelvys of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, descend from 
McKELVY James McKelvy, born in Ireland, who with his wife and 

infant son, James (2), came to Pennsylvania and located 
on Penn avenue, Wilkinsburg. Later he purchased a farm and later still 
bought land in what is now Wilkinsburg, paying ten dollars per acre for 
land, upon a part of which his grandson, James S. McKelvy, lives. James 
(2) McKelvy was born in county Down, Ireland, and was brought when 
a babe to this country by his parents. He was married in 1824 and in 1828 
began farming land now owned by his son. In 1839 he erected the house 
that is yet in use and in good condition, residing therein until his death. He 
was a successful stock raiser and farmer and prospered abundantly. He 
married Rosanna Swissheler, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Wonders) 
Swissheler, the latter living to the great age of ninety-three years. Rosanna 
Swissheler was born in then Wilkinsburg township, now Swissvale borough, 
where the family settled in 1814. Her father served in the Revolution 
and endured many perils from Indians in the early days. Children : James 



137S WESTERN PENNSYL\ANIA 

S., Margaret Ann, John, James M., Elizabeth, John S., of whom further; 
Martha, Wilham and Wilbur. The family were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, the father a strong Whig. 

John S. McKelvy, son of James (2) and Rosanna (Swissheler) Mc- 
Kelvy, was born in the old farm house now occupied by him as a country 
home, in Wilkinsburg township, April 22, 1841. He was educated in public 
schools and Allegheny College, reaching his junior year when his brother 
enlisted in the Union army in 1861, causing John S. to be called home to 
take his brother's place on the farm. This brother, James S., was badly 
wounded at Nashville and died from the effects of his injuries. John S. 
remained on the farm which he now owns and has made it his home until 
the present time, although since 1904 he has spent the winter months in 
Wilkinsburg. He followed the lead of his father, and continued the line 
of breeding shorthorn cattle and fine sheep. The farm contains something 
less than one hundred acres and is a valuable property. He is a member of 
the First Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsbiu'g, and for forty years has been 
a member of the Masonic Order. Mr. McElvy married, in 1865, Eleanor M. 
Horner, of Wilkinsburg, her old home now being the site of the First 
National Bank. Children: Rose, James, Mary, Elizabeth, Eleanor, John 
S. (2). 



The thickening mill has left us several words of familiar 
WALKER import, among which is \Yalker. Claiming as it does an 
almost unrivalled position in the rolls of our nomenclature, 
it reminds us of the early fashion of treading out the cloth before the 
adaptations of machinery were brought to bear on this phase of the craft. 
Walker has disappeared as a term of trade, and it is in the directories alone 
that the name declaring the forgotten mysteries of early English cloth manu- 
facture can be found. But the stern virtues which made the early bearers 
of the name useful and valued citizens are still evidenced in the life of their 
posterity, showing the virility and mental force which characterized them. 

(I) Harvey Walker, a resident of Pittsburgh, removed to Greenville, 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania, at an early date, and there was a real estate 
dealer. He married and had a family. 

(H) James Nicholas Walker, son of Harvey Walker, was born in 
Greenville, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and died when about twenty-five 
years of age. He was a farmer by occupation. He married Mal-y Louise 
McGranahan, who married (second) Jacob Miller, and lived on a farm in 
Sadsbury township. She married (third) Rev. John McLean, whom she 
also survived, and died in 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Walker had children: 
Harvey, deceased, was a veteran of the Civil War, during which struggle 
he lost an arm ; John, a farmer living in Sadsburg township ; James Nicho- 
las, of further mention ; Priscilla. died young. 

(HI) Dr. James Nicholas (2) Walker, son of James Nicholas (i) 
and Mary Louise (McGranahan) W^alker, was born in East Fallowfield 
township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1849, and his early 




//rM^^^^tj^ ///v^, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1379 

years were spent on the farm there, and in Greenville, Pennsylvania. He 
attended the public schools and was then prepared for college, becoming a 
student at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, from which he was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He commenced the 
practice of his profession in Greenville, Pennsylvania, where he remained 
two years, and after a short interval in Mexico and New Mexico, located in 
Linesville, Pennsylvania, in 1882, and has since been successfully engaged 
in medical practice in that town. In 1910 he associated his son, Herman 
Hervey, with him, and intends to retire gradually from active practice. 
Dr. Walker married Mary B. Hervey, a sketch of whose family is appended, 
and they have had children : Herman Hervey, of further mention ; Helen, 
born June 6, 1888, is employed in a bank ; Mildred, born January 4, 1894, 
at home. 

(IV) Dr. Herman Hervey Walker, son of Dr. James Nicholas (2) 
and Mary B. (Hervey) Walker, was born in Linesville, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, April 23, 1886. The public schools of Linesville furnished 
his early education and he was then prepared for entrance to college at 
the Washington and Jefiferson Academy at Washington, Pennsylvania. In 
1905 he matriculated at JefTerson Medical College, Philadelphia, and was 
graduated from this institution in 1909 with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. His interneship was spent at the Altoona (Pennsylvania) Hospital, 
and in 1910 he located in Linesville, becoming an associate of his father, 
whose practice he is gradually taking over. While a student at college he 
was a member of the Hare Medical Society and the Ptolemy fraternity. 
He is a member of Crawford County Medical Society, Pennsylvania State 
Medical Society, American Medical Association, Pine Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of which he is past master ; also a member of the Royal 
Arcanum. His religious afiftliation is with the United Presbyterian church. 
Dr. Walker married, September 10, 1914, Bertha Louise McKean, born in 
Conneaut township, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, February 13, 1893, a 
daughter of L. H. and Mary (Spaulding) McKean. the former a farmer of 
the township. 

(Maternal Line of Dr. H. H. Walker.) 

(I) George Ludwig Mytinger was married, in Brettach, a village of 
Baden, Germany, November 11, 1749, to Margaret Engelhardt. He sailed 
with his family from Rotterdam, Holland, arriving in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, September 30, 1754, and then settled at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

(II) John Jacob M;ytinger, son of George Ludwig and Margaret 
(Engelhardt) Mytinger, was born in Germany, September 19, 1750. He 
was a soldier in the War of the Revolution, serving as second lieutenant 
in the command of Batholomew Von Heer's Light Dragoons, a battalion 
authorized for special service by Washington, and a part of the time his 
body guard. Lieutenant Mytinger served imtil the close of the war. 

(III) Hannah Mytinger, daughter of Lieutenant John Jacob Mytinger, 
was thirteen years of age when she became an orphan, and she was reared 
by an uncle, Lewis Mytinger, of Alexandria, Pennsylvania. She married 



1380 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

John Conrad Bucher, of Alexandria, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and 
tliey had children: Maria, married John Porter; Anna Dorothea, of further 

mention ; Elizabeth, died unmarried ; Susannah, married Dr. Houtz ; 

Hannali, married George Swoat; Caroline, married Charles Hatfield; John 
Jacob, a farmer, lived in Cumberland Valley; George Conrad, a capitalist, 
lived in Alexandria, and married a Miss Scott. 

(IV) Anna Dorothea Bucher, daughter of John Conrad and Hannah 
(Mytinger) Bucher, was born August 15, 1780. She married, December 
10, 1799, Charles Porter, at one time a merchant in Alexandria, Pennsyl- 
vania, later a flour merchant and the owner of a flour mill at the same place. 

(V) Jane Porter, daughter of Charles and Anna Dorothea (Bucher) 
Porter, married the Rev. Hugh Henry Hervey, D.D., a son of Robert and 
Mary Hervey, the former a miller by trade, who came to this country from 
Ireland in 1846. Robert and Mary Hervey had children : Robert, an oil 

'producer; John, a farmer and merchant; William, went to Australia; James, 
a miller ; Ford, an oil producer ; David, an oil producer ; Mary, died in early 
womanhood ; Hugh Henry, of further mention. 

(VI) Rev. Hugh Henry Hervey, D.D., was born near Bambridge and 
Neury, county Down, Ireland, October 10, 1826, and died December 31, 1903. 
He received a good education at the Royal Institution, Belfast, Ireland, and in 
1846 emigrated to this country with his parents. He located at Tarentum, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was graduated from the Western 
Theological College, at Pittsburgh, in 1848. He then passed to the Asso- 
ciate Reformed Theological Seminary, and was graduated from this in 

1852. He was ordained a minister of the United Presbyterian church in 

1853, and the following year was assigned to a pastorate at Hartstown, 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania. Prior to receiving this appointment he 
had also preached to the congregations at Jamestown and North Shenango. 
He served as minister at Hartstown for the period of forty-six years, was 
many years a member of the board of trustees of the Theological Seminary 
at Pittsburgh, and also of Westminster College. He married, October 11, 
1853, Jane Porter, born in Alexandria, Pennsylvania, January 27, 1832, died 
September 20, 1899. They had children: Mary B., who married Dr. James 
Nicholas Walker (see Walker III) ; Jennie, married J. R. Andrews, and 
lives in Mcadville. Pennsylvania. 



Among the early Scotch-Irish pioneers of Western Penn- 
McJUNKIN sylvania was the well known and highly respected Mc- 

Junkin family, whose various members in the course of 
years have done their full share toward increasing the prosperity of the 
state of Pennsylvania. 

(I) Robert Mcjnnkin. a native of Scotland, migrated to Ireland about 
1745. He married and had a family. 

(II) William Mcjnnkin. son of Robert Mcjunkin, received a good 
common school education. He was in all probability a farmer. He emi- 
grated to America, and settled in Plum township, Alleghenv county, Peim- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1381 

sylvania, in 1788, about three years after his marriage. He erected the first 
blociv house in that section of the country, and he and his neighbors took 
refuge in it when the Indians made their frequent depredations. He was 
an active member of the Plum Creek Presbyterian Church, Allegheny 
county, and he assisted in building the original house of worship on a part 
of his farm. The remains of his block house may still be seen. Mr. Mc- 
Junkin married, in Ireland, about 1785, and had children: William, of 
further mention ; David, who removed to Butler county, Pennsylvania, 
shortly after 1800, and his descendants are to be found there at the present 
day; James, who removed to Ohio, and from there to the Shenandoah 
Valley, where his descendants are numerous. 

(III) William (2) Mcjunkin, son of William (i ) Mcjunkin, was born 
in Ireland, and was a very young child when brought to this country by his 
parents. He was successfully engaged in agriculture, owning a farm of two 
hundred and thirty acres. He was Republican in political opinion, and a 
Presbyterian in religious denomination, and served for many years as an 
elder of the old Plum Creek Presbyterian Church. He married Susan 
Mary Meanor, and they had ten children : William Alexander, died in 
infancy; Josiah, William, David, James, of whom further; Susan, Mary, 
Martha, Elizabeth, Sarah. 

(IV) James Mcjunkin, son of William (2) and Susan Mary (Meanor) 
Mcjunkin, was born in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
January 5, 1824, and died July 21, 1900. A sound, practical education was 
obtained in the common schools of the district, and he followed agriculture, 
as his forebears had done. He gave his political support to the Republican 
party, and served as school director and road supervisor for many years. 
His religious affiliation was with the Presbyterian church, in which he was 
a member of the board of elders for a long time. He married (first) 
Rebecca Logan, and by this union there was no issue. He married (second) 
March 11, 1869, Mary Elizabeth Carpenter, and had children: William 
Marshall, who married Jennie W. Wakefield, of Pittsburgh, a granddaughter 
of Rev. Samuel Wakefield, a prominent Methodist Episcopal minister, and 
the author of a large number of hymn books, many of which are still in use; 
Eleanor C. ; Walter L., married Millie Cunlifife, and had two children, Mary 
E. and Melinda T. ; James, of further mention ; Mary E. ; Rebecca L., mar- 
ried William W. Wallace, and had two children, Sarah E. and Robert M. 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth (Carpenter) Mcjunkin was born June 21, 1844. a 
daughter of Jeremiah Murry and Eleanor (McFadden) Carpenter. Her 
paternal ancestor in this country was Heinrich Zimmerman (the trans- 
lation of which is Carpenter), who came from the Canton of Berne, Swit- 
zerland, about 1698, with his family, and settled in Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, about 1703. He had a son Daniel, a grandson Daniel, a great- 
grandson John, and a great-great-grandson Jeremiah Murry Carpenter, the 
father of Mrs. Mcjunkin. Jeremiah Murry Carpenter was a teacher in his 
earlier years, then became a farmer and surveyor, and was also a scrivener 
or drawer of contracts. In political matters he was a Democrat, served 



1382 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

many years as justice of the peace, and was a member of the miHtia. He 
was a staunch adherent of the Presbyterian faith, and was one of the ruhng 
elders of the old Plum Creek Presbyterian Church. He married Eleanor, 
born in West Middletown, Washington county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of 
James and Margaret (Stewart) McFadden. They had four children besides 
Mrs. Mcjunkin, and were people of prominence in the community. The 
names of these children are : Mary E. ; John James, common pleas judge 
of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania; Jeremiah M. ; Samuel L. and Bertha E. 
(V) James (2) Mcjunkin, son of James (i) and Mary E. (Carpenter) 
Mcjunkin, was born in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
December 7, 1876. The public schools furnished his educational advantages, 
and he has supplemented these by well chosen reading on all the questions of 
importance of the day. He is independent in his political views, preferring 
to form his own opinions, based on the merits of a political candidate, 
rather than to have them formed for him. His religious affiliation is with 
the Presbyterian church, of which he is a consistent member and a ruling 
elder. When his father died he divided his property among his children, 
and seventy acres of fine farming land fell to the lot of James Mcjunkin, 
when he attained his majority. He married, in September. 1913, Mabel 
Elizabeth Boord, a daughter of William and Anna P. (Ryan) Boord, her 
father being a farmer in that section. Mr. and Mrs. Mcjunkin are the 
parents of one child, James W., born July 27, 1914. 



The name of McElheny is one which is well known in the 
McELHENY industrial world in Pennsylvania, and in many other 
states. 

(I) William McElheny was born in Scotland, emigrated to the United 
States, where he lived for a time in Adams county. From there he migrated 
to Snowden township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he was a 

farmer during the remainder of his life. He married King, and had 

children: Robert, William, Victor, Samuel, John, of whom further; Hugh, 
Mjrs. Torrence, Mrs. Hara, Mrs. Wilson, Mrs. King. Of these Samuel, 
Robert and John were scythe makers in Schaler township. 

(H) John McElheny, son of William and (King) McElheny, 

learned his trade with his brother Robert, and then worked for S. W. 
Shaw for some years. Later he had a good factory of his own at Little Pine 
Creek, where he owned a farm of one hundred acres. His widow is now 
residing on this farm, which was virgin forest when he purchased it about 
1 82 1, and he cleared it, converted the timber into lumber in the saw mill 
which he erected there, and it is now a finely cultivated place. He was a 
man of much influence in the community, and served two years as justice 
of the peace. He married Mary, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hil- 
ands) Morrows, both the Morrows and Hilands being pioneer families in 
Perrysville, Allegheny county. They had children : Victor K., Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Hurst, John A., of whom further. 

(HI) John A. McElheny, son of John and Mary (Morrows) Mc- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1383 

Elheny, was born on the farm in Schaler township, August 8, 1834, and 
spent the active years of his Hfe in general farming. He was a Repubhcan 
and a member of the Presbyterian church. He married Sarah J., a daughter 
of Henry and Katherine (Spang) Griesmere. The Sprangs came to this 
country originally from H^oUand, became prominently identified with the 
iron industry here, and during the Revolutionary times were noted for their 
connection with the Hession troops, General Kuyphausen being an intimate 
friend of George Spang, one of the ancestors. Children of Mr. and Mrs. 
McElheny: John H., deceased; Robert H., a Bachelor of Science, lives at 

Mars, Butler county, Pennsylvania ; Mary C, married Thompson, lives 

at Millvale; Caroline L., at home; Thomas L. W., a water well driller, of 
Schaler; Oscar William C, a farmer on the homestead; Roy, of further 
mention. 

(IV) Roy McElheny, son of John A. and Sarah J. (Griesmere) Mc- 
Elheny, was born on the McElheny homestead, in Schaler township, in 
1884. He was educated in the Locust Grove School, in his native township, 
and then took up the occupation of well drilling, in association with a 
brother. This partnership was later dissolved, and Mr. McElheny has now 
been engaged in this line of industry independently since 1910. He resides 
on the homestead. Mr. McElheny married, in 1907, Elizabeth Stewart, a 

daughter of and Elizabeth Thompson, and both are members of the 

Presbyterian church at Glenshaw. They have had children : Mildred Lillian 
and Chester Addison. 



Thomas and Ann Martin, old settlers of Somersetshire, Eng- 
MARTIN land, there lived and died, he a gardener. They were the 

parents of thirteen children, eight of whom survived child- 
hood, and of these, Gilbert, the eldest, became the founder of his family in 
the United States, and is now one of the leading business men of Carnegie, 
Pennsylvania. Children of Thomas and Ann Martin : Gilbert, of whom 
further ; Sanborn, known as Charles in his English home ; Adaline, resides 
in Bath, England, unmarried ; Albert, a plasterer of Carnegie, Pennsylvania ; 
George, died aged eighteen years ; Mary, married William Gwynn, and 
resides in California; Harry, a printer, residing in England; a daughter, 
died aged eighteen years. 

(II) Gilbert Martin, eldest son of Thomas and Ann Martin, was born 
in Somersetshire, England, and spent the first nineteen years of his life in 
his native land, there obtaining his education. He then came to the United 
States, locating in Mansfield Valley, now Carnegie, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he apprenticed himself to a contractor of mason work, be- 
coming in time a skilled workman. He then became a contracting plasterer 
and carried on a very large and prosperous business for several years. He 
then founded the Carnegie Mill and Lumber Company, being himself the 
sole owner of the company, and until 1901 conducted a successful and 
profitable retail lumber business in Carnegie. He then retired with a com- 
petence and has since passed his winters in California, devoting his summers 



1384 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

to the care of his large real estate interests in Carnegie. His California 
holdings consist of a small orange grove which he manages more as a 
recreation than a business. He is a director of the Crafton Savings Bank 
and Trust Company, of Crafton, Pennsylvania, and of the First National 
Bank of Carnegie, and while he has surrendered the cares of private mer- 
cantile business, he takes an active interest in the welfare of his community. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, Knights of Malta, the 
Royal Arcanum, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in politics is 
a Republican. He married Emma Page Hall, who bore him four children : 
I. Homer Osmond. 2. Frank Gilbert, of Carnegie, manager of the Ingram 
Lumber and Supply Company. 3. Edwin Hall, of Carnegie, clerk for the 
John Dunlap Company. 4. Alice Edna, married Russell Marple, and re- 
sides in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, her husband a draughtsman, with the 
Fort Pitt Bridge Company. 

Emma Page (Hall) Martin is a daughter of James B. and Sarah C. 
(Beaumont) Hall, and granddaughter of John and Sarah Hall, of England. 
John Hall came to Western Pennsylvania early in the nineteenth century, 
locating in Pittsburgh, on what is now Fifth avenue, but later moved 
out in the country further, locating near what is now Bridgeville. He 
finally moved to Washington, where he owned eighty-six acres near Canons- 
burg, on which he and his wife both died. They were both members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Their children were all born in Pennsyl- 
vania : John, Sarah, Henry, Robert, Maria, Elizabeth and James B. 

James B. Hall, the youngest child, was born near Bridgeville, Pennsyl- 
vania. He married Sarah C. Beaumont, of French ancestry, daughter of 
William and Ann Beaumont, whose parents died in Illinois, leaving her an 
orphan when quite young. She was a cousin of the Halls and was brought 
to Pennsylvania and there lived with her relatives until her marriage to 
James B. Hall. The young married couple began life on the old Hall farm 
of eighty-five acres near Bridgeville, which in fact James B. had managed 
from the time he was sixteen years of age, later purchasing the property 
from the other heirs, paying for the farm with money earned by threshing 
grain for other farmers of the locality. They lived for many years on their 
farm, James B. dying at the age of sixty-eight years, his widow at the age 
of eighty-two years. Children: William John, died in 1912, in Carnegie, a 
carpenter; Sarah Ann, married Joseph Smith, whom she survives, a resident 
of Carnegie; Elizabeth, died in infancy; James B. (2), died in infancy; 
Mary, married James Johnson, and resides in Venice, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania; Emma Page, married Gilbert Martin, of previous mention; 
Edward S., died in Illinois ; Frank, resides in Carnegie ; Fanny, died in 
infancy; Charles, died in infancy. 

(Ill) Homer Osmond Martin, eldest son of Gilbert and Emma Page 
(Hall) Martin, was born in Carnegie, Pennsylvania, January 14, 1881, 
and was there educated in the public schools. He began business life as an 
employee of his father in the lumber business, continuing five years, when 
his father sold the business. Homer O. next entered the employ of the 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1385 

Pent! Sash, Door and Blind Company, then was with the Pittsburgh Coal 
Company, later entering the employ of the Keystone Lumber Company, the 
largest retail and wholesale lumber company in Western Pennsylvania. He 
later became shipper and for several years was in charge of the company's 
outside work, a responsible position, as in the past ten years the company 
has doubled its business. On January 13, 1914, Mr. Martin was elected 
a director of the company and is one of the useful, valued men of a strong 
organization. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mi-. Martin married, in 1905, Olive Sarah Freed, born 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Judson Freed, of an 
old county family; children: Mildred, Thelma, Homer O. (2). 



The ancestors of Matthias W. McDonald, a prominent 

McDonald citizen of Turtle Creek, were natives of Scotland, from 

whence they came to this country, first settling in Clinton 

county, Pennsylvania, then in Center and then in Jefiferson counties, where 

they were actively and prominently identified with local affairs. 

(I) David McDonald, grandfather of Matthias W. McDonald, was 
born in either Jefferson or Indiana counties, Pennsylvania, but was among 
the early settlers of Jefferson county. He married Alargaret Lantz, a 
native of Jefiferson county, Pennsylvania, and among their children was 
Samuel Marshall, of whom further. 

(H) Samuel Marshall McDonald, son of David McDonald, was born 
in Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, died aged seventy-two years. After 
completing a common school education, he turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, and later became a lumberman, accimiulating considerable 
capital from the latter named occupation. He served in the Civil War. 
enlisting in the Seventy-sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
his service being noted for bravery and complete obedience to orders. He 
was active in the ranks of the Democratic party, and served in the capacity 
of county auditor, county commissioner, school director for thirty years, 
and justice of the peace for twenty years. He married Mary C. Timbhn, 
born in Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, daughter of George and Margaret 
(McHenry) Timblin, the former named a native of Jefferson county, 
Pennsylvania, a farmer by occupation, and the latter named a native of 
North Point, Indiana county, Pennsylvania. They were the parents of 
twelve children, eight of whom are living at the present time (1914), 
among whom is Matthias W., of whom further. 

(Ill) Matthias W. McDonald, son of Samuel Marshall McDonald, 
was born in Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, December 24, 1862. He 
received an excellent education by attendance at the common schools in 
the neighborhood of his home, at Glade Run Academy, Edenboro Normal 
School and Clarion Normal School. Being thus thoroughly equipped for 
the profession of teaching, he accepted a position as teacher, serving in 
that capacity for a number of years, meeting with well deserved success. 
In the year 1892 he engaged in the real estate and insurance business in 



1386 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Reynoldsville, Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, and remained there until 
1896, when he removed to Turtle Creek, his present residence, his brother, 
George M., operating the business he had established in Reynoldsville. He 
at once established a similar business in Turtle Creek, which he is conducting 
at the present time, and from which he derives a lucrative livelihood. 
Being a man of strict business principles, upright and honorable in his 
methods, he was chosen as a director in the East Pittsburgh Building and 
Loan Association, and he is also actively interested in local banks and other 
enterprises, his advice and counsel being of great value. Mr. McDonald 
holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. 

Mr. McDonald married, in 1896, Minnie M. Reynolds, of Reynolds- 
ville, Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Thomas and Christina 
(Ernest) Reynolds. Children: Fay, Gorman, Dorothy. The family are 
members of the Lutheran church, in which they take an active interest. 



The McCutcheons, of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, 

McCUTCHEON descend from the Scotch-Irish McCutcheon family of 

Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, founded by 

William and Andrew McCutcheon, who together patented one hundred and 

thirty-five acres there, February 25, 1828. Later they acquired a great 

amount of land, much of which is yet owned by descendants. 

(II) Andrew McCutcheon, son of one of the pioneer ancestors, was 
born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, there married Nancy Irwin, 
lived and died. He farmed the homestead and there reared his family of 
three sons and four daughters. 

(III) William McCutcheon, son of Andrew and Nancy (Irwin) Mc- 
Cutcheon, was born at the Westmoreland county homestead and there 
spent his youth. Later he went to Pittsburgh, where he followed the trade 
previously acquired, carpenter. For several years he was a contractor and 
builder in Pittsburgh, then about 1885 moved to the Park farm, upon 
which he resided until his death. He married Martha, daughter of William 
(2) and Nancy (Johnston) Park and granddaughter of William (i) and 
Mary (McGahey) Park, who came from Ireland, and settled in Penn 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. William Park met his wife, 
Mary McGahey, on the passage to America, were soon afterward married 
and together began life in the log cabin he built in Penn township. Nancy 
(Johnston) Park, wife of William (2) Park, was a daughter of John and 
Martha (Miskimming) Johnston, who came in 1745, John aged seventeen 
years. He served in the Revolutionary War and was attached closely to 
General Washington in a confidential capacity. Later he became owner of 
six hundred and twenty acres in what was then Pitt township, now Penn 
and Wilkins township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He built a log 
house on his tract, where now stands the frame house in which the Mc- 
Cutcheons reside. John Johnston was a justice of the peace until his 
death in t8io. By his first wife, Martha, he had a son, George. By his sec- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1387 

ond wife he had James, Nancy and Jane. From John Johnston the farm 
has been handed down in direct succession to the present owners. Children 
of WilHam and Martha (Park) McCutcheon : Jesse, died young; Mary 
Nancy; Lily; William Park, of further mention; and John Gilmore, all 
living at the old Johnston Park homestead, except William P., who occu- 
pies part of the old farm, but has separate residence. 

(IV) William Park McCutcheon, son of William and Martha (Park) 
McCutcheon, was born at the Park homestead in Penn township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, November 10, 1874. He was educated in public 
schools of the township and at Wilkinsburg High School, and from youth 
was his father's assistant on the farm and at his carpentering. He also 
learned the carpenters' trade but beyond assisting his father in his building 
operations has never followed it. preferring the life of a farmer. He 
cultivates fifty acres of the old Park farm, which has descended from John 
Johnston, and there erected a fine brick house in 1904. He has prospered in 
business, farm and garden yielding plentifully to his intelligent cultivation. 
He is a member of the United Presbyterian church. Mr. McCutcheon 
married, December 25. 1906, Daisy Saylor, of Penn township. Children : 
den, Owen, Nevin. 



Jacques Chalet, born in the village of La Roen, France, was 
CHALOT a farmer in his native land. In 1853, fearing that he and 

his sons would be drafted for military service, he emigrated 
with his family to America, and settled at Frenchtown, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania. He was small of stature, and had suffered an injury to 
his back, but this did not interfere with his successful farming operations. 

He married Julia , also a native of La Roen, and they had seven sons and 

one daughter: Francis, of further mention; Joseph, a farmer in Crawford 
county, near Frenchtown ; Xavier, was killed in an accident in a saw mill ; 
Philip, lived at Guys Mills, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he died 
of pneumonia; John, now deceased, lived in Transfer, Mercer county, 
Pennsylvania ; three died at an early age, one of them being the daughter, 
Mary, who was ill when the family boarded the ship on their voyage to 
this country. The attending physician thought that the voyage might benefit 
the child, but she died on the fourth day out. 

(II) Francis Chalot, son of Jacques and Julia Chalot, was born in La 
Roen, France, March 27, 1835, and died on his farm in Frenchtown, Craw- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, May 22, 1902. His life was spent in his native 
]and until the age of eighteen years, when he came to this country with his 
parents and brothers, to escape drafting into the army, in which he would 
have been obliged to serve three years at an average pay of three cents per 
day. Upon his arrival in America the family settled at Frenchtown, and 
young Francis obtained employment with the nearby farmers. After his 
marriage he rented farms for a time, and cultivated them independently 
imtil he had amassed sufficient capital to enable him to purchase a small 
farm for himself, on which he passed the remainder of his days. He also. 



1388 WESTERN PEXXSYLN AXIA 

for a time, worked in a saw mill. He was a staunch supporter and attend- 
ant of the Roman Catholic church. Mr. Chalot married, July 15, 1858, 
Rosanna Lopeno, born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, November 8, 
1839, now living with her son, Francis Xavier Chalot. They had children : 
Francis Xavier, of further mention ; Anna, married Frank Mallaird, and 
lives at Stittsville, Pennsylvania; John, a jeweler, lives at Atlantic, Penn- 
sylvania; Emma, died at the age of seventeen years; George, died at the 
age of eleven years. 

(Ill) Francis Xavier Chalot, son of Francis and Rosanna (Lopeno) 
Chalot, was born in Frenchtown, East Mead township, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, November 7, 1857. His opportunities for obtaining an edu- 
cation were but limited, and were confined to attendance at the Frenchtown 
public schools at irregular intervals until he was thirteen years of age. He 
then commenced working for the farmers in the neighborhood, earning 
twelve dollars and fifty cents per month, and turning this money over to 
his father. Later he commenced the business of building oil rigs, and for 
several years follow'ed this line of industry in the surrounding country. He 
then purchased a hay-baler and for a period of nineteen years operated this 
throughout Crawford, Warren, Elk and Jefiferson counties. In 1904 he 
removed to West Mead township, where he started a retail dairy business, 
which he is conducting very successfully, but for the past three years has 
been disposing of his dairy products at wholesale. He sells the dairy 
products in Meadville. He owns the old homestead farm in East Mead town- 
ship, but is at present living on rented property known as the Gilmore farm. 
Politically he entertains independent opinions, and he affiliates with the 
Roman Catholic church. Flis fraternal connection is with the Improved 
Order of Heptasophs. Mr. Chalot married, April 26, 1888, Rebecca, born 
near Frenchtown, a daughter of Louis and Frances Nageotte, both born in 
France, he later a farmer in Crawford county, Pennsylvania. Children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Chalot: Blanche, married Joseph Mercer,' and lives on a 
farm near Frenchtown ; George, employed on the railroad, lives in Mead- 
ville, Pennsylvania; Frances; Ralph; Albert, a student in the high school; 
Marion, also attending the high school; Lena, attending the ward school. 

Francis Lopeno, father of Mrs. Rosanna (Lopeno) Qialot (see Chalot 
II), was born in France, near the border line of Switzerland, February 4, 
1795. and died June 30, 1879. In 1821 he was drafted into the French army 
and served seven years in Spain, after which he was honorably discharged. 
He emigrated to America as soon as possible after his discharge, and set- 
tled in the city of New York, where he remained the greater part of three 
years, and there learned the art of button making from bone. He next 
removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade two 
years, and then removed to Frenchtown, Crawford county, where he lived 
during the remainder of his days. Lie followed the trade of bone button 
making until his eyesight failed, and was also the owner of a small farm. 
He and his family were devout Roman Catholics. Mr. Lopeno married 
Margaret Vezier, born near the village of Le Coit, France, in October, 




/A<:/-^' 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1389 

1808, died September J2, 18O7, a daughter of Francis and Frances Vezier, 
and she was brought tu this country in 1824. Francis Vezier died in 
France, and his widow married (second) Nicholas Galmish, and emigrated 
with him and her family to America in 1824, settling in the forest lands 
near Frenchtown in 1826, and he died there in 1849, of palsy. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lopeno had children: Margaret Jane, lives at Meadville, married John 
Wagner, deceased; Francis, a retired farmer and cooper, lives in Pettis, 
Crawford county, married Julia Heney, now deceased; Rosanna, married 
Mr. Chalot (see Chalot llj. 



The McClure family came to this cuuntry from Ireland 
McCLURE many generations ago, and have been equally honored and 
prominent in both lands. 

(I) Judge McClure spent the greater part of his life in Mifflin town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he was one of the pioneers of 
the section. He assisted in clearing a great part of the land of timber, and 
was actively engaged in farming. His political afifHiations were with the 
Republican party, and he was a member of the Methodist church. He 
married Catherine Cox and had children: Alexander, Francis, Andrew, of 
whom further ; Susannah, Margaret, Sarah. 

(II) Andrew McClure, son of Judge and Catherine (Cox) McClure, 
was born in Mifflin township in 1824, and died in 1908. He was educated in 
the public schools, and in early manhood established himself as a farmer, 
and was identified with agricultural pursuits almost all his life, only a 
short period, about fifty years ago, being spent in mercantile business. He 
lived near McKeesport, on the White Oak Levels. He was active in the 
interests of the Republican party, and served as tax collector. His religious 
affiliations were with the Methodist church, in which he was also active. 
He married Mary, a daughter of Samuel and Catherine (Webb) Kelly, 
and they had children: Catherine, married Rufus McKee: Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Henry Mikle : Samuel A., of further mention; Daniel, married 
Priscilla Taylor ; Sarah, married A. D. Foster ; Martha, married George B. 
Watkins; John, married Belle McHafifey ; Bert B., married Sarah. Mc- 
Cormick. 

(III) Samuel A. McClure, son of Andrew and Mary (Kelly) McClure, 
was born in McKeesport, ^Vllegheny county. Pennsylvania, December 28, 
1858. He was educated in the public schools of Versailles township, and 
upon the completion of his studies assisted his father in the cultivation of 
the farm. He purchased the farm on which he is at present located, about 
1893, this consisting of one hundred and twenty-six acres. He raises gen- 
eral market produce, and has set out a young orchard which is in fine con- 
dition, and promises much for the future. He gives his political support 
to the Republican party, and is a devout member of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. McClure married, in 1884, Laura, a daughter of Walter and 
Susannah (Stewart) Foster, and they have one child, Hazel Foster, born in 
1886, who married Tames Gibson, and has one child, Samuel Foster Gibson. 



I390 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



Henry Mehrlich is one of a family representative of that 
MEHRLICH fine type of German character, which has added to the 
cosmopolitan citizenship of the United States the leaven 
of its own sturdy endurance, industry and thrift. His father, John Mehrlich, 
was a native of the "Fatherland"' and came to the United States at the age 
of twenty-three years, one unit of that great tide of migration which set 
from Germany to these shores during the middle part of the last century, 
seeking refuge from the hard and oppressive conditions at home, in the 
freer atmosphere and amid the more liberal political institutions of the 
great republic of the Western Hemisphere. 

Mr. Mehrlich, Sr., had been a shoemaker by trade in his native land, 
and upon reaching this country continued to follow the same occupation 
in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, where he settled and made his home. It was 
not long, however, before he removed to Sewickley township and there 
engaged in farming, in which occupation he was highly successful. Some- 
time afterwards he purchased a farm of forty acres in Marshall township, 
Allegheny county, whither he removed, and he continued his farming opera- 
tions until the time of his death. The location of this property was near 
what is now Bradford Station on the Pittsburgh & New Castle trolley road. 
Mr. Mehrlich, Sr., was twice married, the first time to Elizabeth Long, 
also a native of Germany, and by her had three sons born to him, all of 
whom are living, of whom Henry of this review is one. After the death 
of the first Mrs. Mehrlich, he was again married and by the second union 
became the father of three daughters, all of whom are living. 

Henry Mehrlich, a son of John and Elizabeth ( Long) Mehrlich, was 
born September i, 1866, in Sewickley township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania. Not long after his birth his parents removed to their new farm 
of forty acres in Marshall township in the same county, and it was here 
that young Mr. Mehrlich passed his childhood, attending the local schools 
where he received his education. At the age of eighteen years he left the 
parental roof, and going to the city of Pittsburgh he learned the trade of 
blacksmith. After mastering the difficulties of this trade, he went to Mc- 
Kees Rocks, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he followed it for a 
period of years. In the year 1893 he removed to Millvale, Pennsylvania, 
and bought out the blacksmith establishment of George Dillig, next door to 
his present location. Here he plied his trade until the year 1901, when he 
built for himself the large establishment which he still occupies, engaged 
in a horse shoeing and general smithing trade. In this enterprise Mr. 
Mehrlich has been signally successful, and at the present time does a large 
and flourishing business in which he employs several men. 

Mr. Mehrlich married, August 31, 1893, May Carver, a native of Mill- 
vale, Pennsylvania. To them have been born six children, as follows : 
George, who after receiving the elementary portion of his education in 
the local public schools, is now taking a course in Iron City College ; Hilda, 
living at home with her parents ; Margaret, deceased ; Henry ; Matilda and 
Fred. 



WESTERX l'Ex\NSVL\ AXIA 1391 

Mr. Mehi'lich is a prominent figure in his community, taking an active 
part in the Hfe of the town. He is a member of the Repubhcan party and 
is keenly interested in the conduct of local politics. He is a member of a 
number of organizations of a social and fraternal character, these being 
the Junior Order of American Mechanics, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Daughters of Liberty, the Order of Moose and the German Benefit and 
Aid Society. Mr. Mehrlich and his wife are members of the German 
Lutheran church. 



The name of Weber is one which has become well known in 

WEBER many directions, and undoubtedly the various bearers of it 

have a common origin. Originally it was probably given to 

designate the trade of the person, as its meaning is "weaver." In the course 

of time it was adopted as a surname. 

(Ij Weber was born in (jermany, in the Province of Saxony, 

and also died there. He was a carpenter by trade, and was an active 
participant in the Napoleonic wars. He and his wife, who was also a native 
of Saxony, were members of the Roman Catholic church. 

(H) John Weber, son of the preceding, was born in Saxonberg, 
Saxony, Germany, in 1817, and died in March, 1899. In 1842 he emigrated 
to America with his wife and children, making the voyage in a sailing 
vessel, and landing here after a long and tedious passage. He settled in 
Allegheny, Pennsylvania, where he worked for a time in a grist mill, then 
became a teaser in a glass factory, retiring in 1882, and making his home 
with his son Frederick. He was a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, 
and his wife was a German Presbyterian. He married, in Germany, Rosalia 
Smith, born in Albersleben, Saxony, Germany, in 1824, died in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1885, a daughter of Smith, who was a cabinet maker. They 

had children : John, who died at the age of twenty-one years ; Frederick, 
of further mention; Frank, a paint contractor, died unmarried; Joseph, a 
painter, died unmarried at the age of fifty-two years ; Conrad, a railroad 
detective, lives at Beck's Run; Mary, died at the age of two years; Louise, 
died at the age of four years. 

(Ill) Frederick Weber, son of John and Rosalia (Smith) Weber, was 
born in Allegheny City, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 23, 
1852. He attended the public schools at Latrobe, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, for seven years, then for a short time those at South Side, 
I'ittsburgh. At the age of twelve years he commenced working in the glass 
factory and continued this for two years, after which he again became a 
pupil in the public schools, continuing for a period of three years. Upon 
the completion of his education, he found employment in the steel mill of 
Jones & Laughlin, in the Cold Roll Department, became a skilled and careful 
workman, and remained in their employ for a period of twenty years. In 
1884 he established himself in the grocery business at South Side, Pitts- 
burgh, at 171 Pius street, and conducted this successfully until 1901. In 
1895 he had built a sfcre at No. 604 Brownsville Road, Mount Oliver, and 



1392 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

was identified with both places of business until 1901, when he sold the 
South Side establishment, and gives his entire attention to the one at 
Mount Oliver. 

Mr. Weber married, April 14, 1872, Mary Vogfel, born at the South 
Side, Pittsburgh, May 4, 1853, died April 13, 1906; she was a daughter of 
Frederick and Magdalena Vogel, the former a teamster, both born in 
Germany, and married in the United States. Mr. and Mrs. Weber have 
had children : Frederick, died of diphtheria at the age of four years ; Ed- 
ward, died of diphtheria, at the age of one and a half years ; Rose ; Nellie, 
died at the age of seven months ; Frank, is the assistant of his father in the 
business ; Antoinnette. 



Nicholas J. Fruechtel, born in Germany in 1835, was 
FRUECHTEL the founder of his line in the United States, coming 
hither about 1868. His calling in the homeland was 
that of shoemaker, but in his new home he abandoned this trade, purchas- 
ing a part of the old Logan farm in Plum township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a Republican in political belief, and was prominent 
in the work of the German Lutheran church, of which he was a member. 
He married and had children : Elizabeth, thrice married, now lives in Penn- 
sylvania ; Henry, married Jennie Calgore ; J- Fred, of whom further ; Cath- 
erine, died aged twelve years ; Annie. 

J. Fred Fruechtel, son of Nicholas J- Fruechtel, was born in Plum 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, December 20, 1868, and was 
there educated in the public schools. In young manhood he began agricul- 
tural operations, which he continues to the present time. His political 
action is independent, and he is a member of the German Lutheran church. 
Mr. Fruechtel married Ida, born May 27. 1870, daughter of John 
and Elizabeth (George") Warn, her father a farmer and carpenter. 
Children of John and Elizabeth (George) Warn: Jennie; Henry; Ida; 
Elizabeth, died July 22, 1907; James, a carpenter, lives in Verona, Penn- 
sylvania ; Charles, married Elizabeth Argyle, and resides in Plum township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania; Jemima; Parry, died in 1884; Minnie, 
married Mert Hodle ; Grover, lives in Wyoming ; Ethel, married Frank 
Ritchie, and resides in Verona, Pennsylvania ; Nora, lives at home. Chil- 
dren of J. Fred and Ida (Warn) Fruechtel: Ruth, born February 15. 1891 ; 
\\'i!liam, December 17, 1894; Annie, December 22, 1896; Victor, j\Iarcli 
3, 1900; Clara, November 18, 1902; Florence, July 4, 1907; John, February 
20, 191 1 ; Brita, October 30. 1912. All of the above children live at home. 



John Cornett was born in Germany in 1832. and died in 
CORNETT Noble county, Ohio, in igo6. He emigrated to America 

in his youth, settling in Noble county in 1852. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and a member of the Catholic church. He married 
Barbara, born in Noble county, died December 10. 1884, a daughter of 
George and Barbara (Scheep) Miller, both born in Germany and early 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1393 

settlers in Noble county, where he died at the age of eighty-two years, 
and she at the age of seventy-six years. Mr. and Mrs. Cornett had chil- 
dren: John, of further mention; George, Lizzie, Rosie, Maggie, Joseph, 
Mary, Tillie, Lewis, Alexander, Inglets. 

(II) John Cornett, son of John and Barbara (Miller) Cornett, was 
born in Noble county, Ohio, June 29, 1859. He obtained a good education 
in the parochial and public schools of Noble county, and in that county was 
apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, which he followed there until 
1877. In that year he came to Braddock, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
and continued his work as a carpenter. He owns a fine home at No. 610 
Fourth avenue, in which he has now lived for the past seventeen years. 
He is a strong supporter of the Democratic party, and a devout member 
of the Catholic church. Mr. Cornett married, in 1881, Catherine, born in 
Monroe county, Ohio, a daughter of Adam and Catherine (Gasser) Burk- 
hart, who came to Noble county at an early date, and where he died in 
1902, aged seventy-two years, and she died in 1912 at the age of eighty-one 
years. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Cornett: i. Clara. 2. Cromelen, married 
Bertha Costello, and has one child, Clara. 3. Anna, born in 1886, died in 
1913; married Leo Crock, and had two children: Catherine; John, deceased. 
4. William, married Celia Weisart, and had one child, John Alexander, who 
died in 1913 at the age of two years. 5. Minnie, deceased. 



James Armstrong, a native of New Jersey, was the 
ARMSTRONG founder of his family line in Pennsylvania, being a 

pioneer of Armstrong coynty, where he was a holder 
of extensive lands. He died in that county, aged eighty-two years. He 
was accompanied to Armstrong county by a brother. Rev. Richard Arm- 
strong, likewise a native of New Jersey and a pioneer of that county, a 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. He held charges in Penn- 
sylvania for many years, and was an intim"ate friend of Bishop Simpson, 
of that denomination, and is buried by the side of his brother. James, and 
his nephew, Thomas, father of Captain Joseph T. Armstrong, of McKees- 
port, Pennsylvania, in the Freeport Cemetery, the ground for which was 
donated to the Methodist Episcopal church by the Armstrong family. James 
Armstrong married and had one son and one daughter, Thomas, of whom 
further, and Maria. 

(II) Thomas Armstrong, son of James Armstrong, was born in Greens- 
burg, Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, September 12, 1810, died in 
Freeport, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, in 1854. After completing his 
general education he took up civil engineering, received his degree in that 
profession, and became employed in the engineering corps of the Penn- 
sylvania railroad, his residence being in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. In 
later life he moved to Freeport, and there passed his remaining years, his 
death occurring when he was in the prime of life, aged forty-four years. 
He married Mary Taylor, born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 
1816, and had children: Frances, deceased; Lois, deceased; Mary, lives in 



1394 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Monongahela City, Pennsylvania; Edward, deceased; Captain Joseph T., 
of whom further; Anna, hves in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) Captain Joseph T. Armstrong, son of Thomas and Mary (Tay- 
lor) Armstrong, was born in Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 12, 1849. His father died when Joseph T. was a lad of five 
years, and the boy then made his home with an uncle, Joseph B. Taylor, 
in Monongahela City, Pennsylvania, where his boyhood days were passed 
and where he gained his education. Toward the close of the war between 
the states, when he was fifteen years of age, he enlisted in the Union army, 
becoming a member of Company H, One Hundred and Ninety-third Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served for six months, when 
peace was restored. As a young man he mastered the painter's and grainer's 
trade, and was employed thereat after his return from the front, being for 
a time connected with the state militia. He was for five years in the regular 
army of the United States, stationed at different posts throughout the west- 
ern part of the country, and then became a manufacturer of Monongahela 
City, Pennsylvania. His line was the making of fire brick, his product 
made in a factory he had erected and the process that he used covered by 
his own patents. This was the first fire brick factory in the valley, and he 
operated it until 1888, in which year he moved to McKeesport and estab- 
lished the firm of Wild & Armstrong, dealers in furniture, a concern that 
was active in its line until its dissolution seven years later. At this time 
Mr. Armstrong returned to Monongahela City, and was there engaged as a 
furniture dealer and undertaker until 1897, '" which year he disposed of 
his business and journeyed to Alaska, in that country spending two years. 
Since returning to Pennsylvania Captain Armstrong has resided in Mc- 
Keesport, Pennsylvania, and since 1900 has been again identified with 
furniture dealing as a member of the R. E. Stone Company. His home is 
at No. 223 West Fifth avenue, where he built a handsome residence in 1906. 
and he is likewise owner of two residences in Monongahela City. He has 
been a life-long Republican, and in Monongahela City was at one time city 
treasurer and school director. His church is the Methodist Episcopal. 
Captain Armstrong is a citizen of substantial qualities, and has taken de- 
sirable position among the business men of McKeesport. His career has 
been an eventful one, beginning with his youthful army service, and has 
given him a broad viewpoint and balance of judgment acquired in no other 
way. He is a successful merchant, universally popular. 

Captain Armstrong married, September 24, 1888, Jessie B. Anton, born 
near Monongahela City, Pennsylvania, daughter of John and Barbara 
(Haechelstein) Anton, her parents natives of Germany. Mr. and Mrs. 
Anton were married in that country, and after coming to Pennsylvania 
settled in Washington county, where he died in 1886, aged sixty-three years, 
his wife having died the year previous, aged seventy-three years. Children 
of John and Barbara (Haechelstein) Anton: John, Mary, George. Fred, 
Christopher, Joseph, Peter, Elizabeth. Jessie B., of previous mention, mar- 
ried Captain Joseph T. Armstrong. Children of Captain Joseph T. and 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1395 

Jessie B. Armstrong: Nellie, married John E. lierbertson, of McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania; George R., of McKeesport. 



John McFadden was born in Ireland in 1840, and is now 
McFADDEN living there at the age of seventy-four years. He mar- 
ried Catherine Cunningham, who died in 1869, and they 
had children : John, David, Augustus. 

Augustus McFadden, son of John and Catherine (Cunningham) Mc- 
Fadden, was born in Ireland, May 8, 1867. He was brought up by his 
maternal grandmother, Elizabeth Brown, who emigrated to America after 
the death of her husband, and settled in Philadelphia. There his early 
years were spent and there he acquired his education in the public schools. 
In 1885 he came to Pittsburgh, where he took a comprehensive course in 
Duff's Business College, and in 1887 removed to Braddock, Allegheny 
county, with the interests of which he has since been identified. He entered 
the employ of the Edgar Thompson Steel Company, rose to the position 
of foreman, and is now superintendent of the blacksmith department. His 
own energy and determination led him to acquire the fine education of which 
he is possessed, and his leisure time has always been spent in wide and 
diversified reading. He amassed a considerable fortune, which good man- 
agement has constantly increased, and he is the owner of his residence at 
No. 731 Fourth avenue, and also of No. 737 in the same street. He is 
Republican in political matters, and a member of the Catholic church. 

Mr. McFadden married, in Braddock, January 27, 1887, Elizabeth Car- 
roll, born in Ireland in 1869, a daughter of Richard and Ellen (Warnock) 
Carroll, the former of whom died in Ireland, after which his widow came 
to the United States in 1883, where she died in T911 at the age of seventy- 
three years. They had children : Thomas ; Margaret ; William, deceased ; 
Elizabeth, mentioned above ; Ellen. Richard Warnock, maternal grand- 
father of Mrs. McFadden, came to the United States in 1849. He was a 
resident of New York City, and in early life was employed in the construc- 
tion work of the railroads, and assisted in building the Pennsylvania railroad 
across the mountains. Mr. and Mrs. McFadden have had children: i. 
]\Iary E., born November 4, 1887 : married James Donavan, and has one 
child, Mary Madeleine. 2. Augustin William Brendan, born in 1892 ; was 
educated in the public schools, and was graduated from the high school in 
191 1 : he then matriculated at the University of Pittsburgh, was graduated 
from the classical department, and is now a student in the law department 
of that institution. 3. Elizabeth Catherine, was educated in the North 
Braddock schools, and was graduated from the high school in the class of 
1914. 4. Ann, born in 1901, is a student in the public schools. 



The meaning of this name is simple, unassuming, yet ever 
SCHLICHT ready, and it was probably the possession of these qualities 

which governed the bestowing of the surname upon the 
earlier members of this family, for they are still in evidence at the present 
time. 



1396 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Joseph Schlicht was born in Bavaria, Germany, and came to this 
country in early manhood about 1870. Some time after his marriage he 
removed to Pine Grove, Pennsylvania, and followed his trade as a car- 
penter. He lived for a time in Clarion county, and in 1896 removed to 
Butler, Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he lived until 1914, when he 
made a trip to his native land ; he completed the visit and was on his way 
home when he was stricken and died on board the ship "Canopie," one 
hour before she was booked to start; he is buried in Rotterdam, Holland. 
He was a Democrat politically, and a member of the Catholic Mutual 
Benefit Association. He was a devout member of the Catholic church. 
Mr. Schlicht married, about 1876, in Buffalo, New York, Elizabeth Bellis, 
who was born in Stuttgart, Germany, and came to this country about 1872. 
They had children: i. Michael, who died at the age of thirty years. 2. 
Margaret, married George Smith, and lives in Butler, Pennsylvania. 3. 
Joseph A., of further mention. 4. Martin, engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness in Butler. 5. John, twin of Martin, agent of the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad Company, lives at Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. 6. Peter, engaged in 
the hardware business in Butler. 7. Mary, died at the age of twelve years. 
8. Charles, lives with his parents at Butler. 9. Philomina, died at the age 
of one year. 

Joseph A. .Schlicht, son of Joseph and Elizabetli (Bellis) Schlicht, 
was born in Buffalo, New York, October 5, 1878. He acquired his educa- 
tion in parochial schools in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and in 1896 
came to Butler with the other members of his family. Here he readily 
found a position with a fish dealer, for whom he worked almost three 
years, receiving three dollars per week. His ambitious and energetic nature 
would not permit him to remain in a subordinate position, and about 1899 
he established himself in the same line of business independently on Main 
street. At the end of eight months he removed to better quarters on Jeffer- 
son street, and carried on his business in that location very successfully 
for a period of nine years. By this time he had amassed a considerable 
capital, and associating himself with his brother Peter, he organized the 
Standard Ice and Cold Storage Company. Owing to his excellent manage- 
ment of affairs it was found necessary, at the end of a couple of years, 
to enlarge their working space and capacity, and accordingly in June, 191 1, 
they erected a suitable plant at the corner of College and Monroe streets. 
This covered a piece of ground eighty by one hundred and forty feet, and 
they were the sole owners of the plant and everything connected with it. 
Three months later Mr. Schlicht purchased the interest of his brother Peter, 
and has remained the sole proprietor of this concern up to the present 
time. He employs eighteen people, and the plant manufactures one hun- 
dred tons of ice every twenty-four hours. The business is wholesale ex- 
clusively, and a very important branch of it is the cold storage department, 
which has space for vast quantities of fruits, meats, etc. It is the largest 
plant of its kind in this section of the state, and ships away enormous 
quantities of goods. Mr. Schlicht is a Republican in National politics, but 




Ji^/J^io^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLNANIA 1397 

is independent in local matters. He and his wife are members of St. Peter's 
Roman Catholic Church. Mr. Schlicht married, July 25, 1901, Josephine 
Spingler, born in Butler, Pennsylvania, and they have one child, Chester 
Jacob, born May 8, 1902. 



An old colonial family of Pennsylvania, long seated in Phil- 
NAYLOR delphia, the family of Naylor in this branch have spread to 

Western Pennsylvania and to Ohio. Orran P. Naylor, of 
Allison Park, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, is a descendant of Nelson 
W. Naylor, a life-long resident of Philadelphia. One of his sons was 
George F., of whom further. 

(II) George F. Naylor, son of Nelson W. Naylor, was born in Philadel- 
phia, died in Allison Park, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 191 1. As 
a boy he attended the public schools of Philadelphia, and in that city learned 
tlie trade of machinist, in 1869 locating in Zanesville, Ohio. Twelve years 
later he became assistant master mechanic in the shops of the Pittsburgh 
& Lake Erie railroad at Newark, Ohio, later being transferred to McKees- 
port, Pennsylvania, where he occupied the same position. In 1891 he ac- 
cepted the position of master car builder in the works at Warren, Penn- 
sylvania, and was then for a short time superintendent of the Pittsburgh 
Tool Refining Company, at W'arren. Mr. Naylor in 1892 abandoned his 
mechanical work, in that year, in partnership with, his son, Orran P., open- 
ing a general store in Allison Park, Pennsylvania, remaining its proprietor 
until his death in 191 1. During the time that he was a merchant of Allison 
Park Air. Naylor was likewise postmaster of that place, being a government 
servant from 1892 to 191 1. his son succeeding him in the postmastership. 
George F. Naylor answered the Union call for volunteers to preserve the 
integrity of the United States, and became a soldier in Company K, Twenty- 
sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, remaining with that com- 
pany until his honorable discharge from the service. He married Hannah 
M. Peterson, and had three children. 

(III) Orran P. Naylor, son of George F. and Hannah M. (Peterson) 
Naylor, was born in Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio, June 29, 1870. 
His father's business called the family to Newark, Ohio, and Orran P. 
Naylor there attended the public schools, his first position in the business 
world being as a clerk in the offices of the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie railroad 
at McKeesport, Pennsylvania. Leaving this service, he became chief clerk 
in the office of the Pittsburgh Tool Refining Company, at Warren. Penn- 
sylvania, resigning this position to enter business with his father. Father 
and son together strove for a strong and firmly founded mercantile trade, 
and the present wide patronage and flourishing business of the store are 
eloquent testimonials of the success that attended their labors. Upon the 
death of the father, the junior Naylor assumed his father's responsibilities as 
postmaster of Allison Park, and has also since conducted the business in- 
dependently, maintaining in every way the high standard raised while his 
father's partner. Mr. Naylor fraternizes with the Allegheny Lodge, Fra- 



1398 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ternal Order of Eagles, Hampton Lodge, No. 224, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and McKinley Lodge, No. 314, Free and Accepted Masons. 
He is a communicant of the Presbyterian church. He married, in 1900, 
Edith Quigley. 



Three-quarters of a century contains the American life 
HAVERLINE of this German family, known in Allegheny county, 

Pennsylvania, since the settlement in that region of 
George Haverline, who came from his native country about 1841. He at- 
tended the schools of the country of his birth, and after immigrating to the 
United States he became employed in a mill in Allegheny City (Pittsburgh 
North Side). The confinement of his work and the city residence were 
distasteful to him, and he undertook farming, buying land at Wexford 
and later purchasing property near Talley Cavey, living in the latter place 
until his death. He married Margaret Beck, and had children : Ann, 
Michael, George, of whom further; Margaret, John, Elizabeth. 

George (2) Haverline, son of George (i) and Margaret (Beck) 
Haverline, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, April 17, 1858. 
His early schooling was meager, as he attended the schools of Hampton 
and Richland townships for about one year. In young manhood he learned 
the blacksmith's trade at Talley Cavey, and for four years he was employed 
in that line at Talley Cavey, and for the four following years was the 
proprietor of a shop at Gibsonia, at the expiration of this time purchasing 
ninety-six acres of land at Allison Park, where he now resides. Mr. Haver- 
line has made many additions to the improvements upon the property in 
the course of his residence there, and now possesses a desirable farm. 
Instead of utilizing his entire acreage for general operations, Mr. Haverline 
has set out an orchard, whicbi, in full and vigorous growth, has proved a 
most profitable asset. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
church. He married, in 1886, Jeannette Woods, of McCandless township, 
Allegheny county. Pennsylvania, and has children: Georgetta, Florence, 
Grace, Alice, Carrie, Mary, Margaret, Jeannette, George. Michael. 



Frederick G. Duerr is a member of a family which represents 
DUERR in its members the best type of the German people, a type 

which has contributed to the composite population of the United 
States an element of great value, and woven into the growing fabric thereof 
its own sturdy virtues of tireless energy and industry and an unswerving 
pursuit of the objective. 

His parents were Christian Frederick and Hannah (Smith) Duerr, 
both natives of Germany, he having been born in the Kingdom of Wuerttem- 
berg. Christian Frederick Duerr came to the United States as a young 
man of twenty-one years, in 1842, and, upon his arrival here went directly 
to Pennsylvania and settled in the city of Pittsburgh in that state. Five 
years prior to this a wealthy fellow countryman of his, by the name of 
Christian Smith, had also come from Germany and settled in the neighbor- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1399 

liood of the great Pennsylvanian city. With him he had brought his family 
and among them his httle daughter Hannah, a child of ten years. Christian 
Smith had been a man of much importance and weaUh in his own country, 
and now, in the "New World," was a successful farmer and the proprietor 
of a flourishing hotel. Christian Frederick Duerr met Mr. Smith's daughter 
Hannah, when she had grown to womanhood and they were married. Mr. 
Duerr was a cooper when he first arrived in the United States, and later 
became a farmer. He served in the Civil War, and really gave up his life 
for his adopted country, for though not killed on the field of battle, he 
later died as a result of sickness brought on by swimming a river and sub- 
sequent exposure. His death occurred December 20, 1870, his wife sur- 
viving him for many years, finally dying in 1904. To them were born nine 
children, as follows: William C, born in 1850; Emilia Elizabeth, born in 
1852; John George, born in 1855; Fredericka Elizabeth, who died as an 
infant of three months; Mary Elizabeth, born in 1858; Sophia Carolina, 
born in i860, died in 1861 : Christina Fredericka, born in 1862; Frederick 
G., of whom further; Mary Emely, born in 1868, died December 19, 1904. 

Frederick G. Duerr, the eighth child of Christian Frederick and Hannah 
(Smith) Duerr, was born October 22, 1864, at Cabot, Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania. Cabot was at that time known as Saxon Station, and it was there 
that he spent the earliest years of his childhood and received the first por- 
tion of his education in the local schools. After the death of Mr. Duerr, 
Sr., in 1870, his widow sold the farm and moved to Great Belt, Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, and later to Winfield township, Butler county, and 
in each of these places Frederick G. Duerr attended school. As soon as 
he reached an age to make labor of any sort possible to him, he was set 
to work on his mother's farm, and his early training in this hard but 
healthy life gave him a foundation of health and endurance which has never 
failed him. At the age of fifteen years, however, he was taken from the 
farm and apprenticed to a shoemaker at Sarver's Station, Pennsylvania, his 
brother John George, who was established in that business there, and under 
whom the youth learned the trade. His natural aptitude soon made him a 
master of his tools, and he then worked as a journeyman until the year 
1886. In April of that year he was offered a position in a glass manufac- 
turing establishment, and from that time filled many positions until of recent 
3'ears he engaged in the successful milk business which he now conducts. 
His first work in a glass house continued from 1886 to 1892, when he en- 
gaged in the grocery business upon his own account. After a year of 
this enterprise, however, he received an offer of a better position in the 
great glass works at Creighton, Penns^'lvania, where he remained two years. 
In 1895 he entered the employ of the Pittsburgh Street Car Company. Two 
vears later he once more returned to the glass business, this time with the 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company at Tarentum, Pennsylvania, remaining until 
September, 1901, when he accepted a position at the Allegheny Plate Glass 
Works at Hites, now Glassmere. where he remained five years, then re- 
turned to the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, No. 2. Tarentum, Penn- 



i^oo WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

sylvania, and in 1906 he became the foreman of the casting department in 
that great concern. After holding this responsible post for a matter of 
three years or more, he resigned it to accept an ofifer in the steel mill at 
Brackenridge, Pennsylvania. He did not find the latter work congenial, 
however, and after a term of four and one-half years abandoned it. By 
this time Mr. Duerr was in a position, as a result of long years of hard 
work and economy, to engage in business for himself. In 1908, five years 
prior to his surrender of his position in the steel mill, he started a milk 
business which he turned all his energies into when free from his other 
connections. His store is on tlie corner of Roup and Orman streets, Taren- 
tum, Pennsylvania, and in tliis location the business has flourished greatly, 
and in 1914 he added a grocery store to his other enterprise. Mr. Duerr 
has lived for a number of years in Tarentum. In 1889 he built for himself 
a frame house on the corner of Roup and Orman streets, in which he lived 
until 1907, when he built his present brick store and dwelling, directly to the 
north of the old structure, and there carries on his business and makes his 
home. He owns both properties and rents the one which he no longer 
uses for himself. 

Mr. Duerr married, November 26, 1889, Mary Sophia Wilt, a daughter 
of Peter and Sophia (Hetzell) Wilt, of Tarentum, Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Duerr was born May 25, 1870, at Hoboken, Pennsylvania. Mr. Wilt was 
the son of John Wilt, a native of Germany, where he passed the entire 
period of his life. Peter Wilt, however, came to the United States as a 
young man of twenty-one years, in the year 1846, his birth having been 
on April 25, 1825. He settled in Saxonburg, Butler county, Pennsylvania, 
where he became a crockery worker. He later removed to Hoboken, Alle- 
gheny county, and there met his future wife. Mrs. Wilt was Sophia Het- 
zell and was born in Alsace, Germany, July 29, 1849. She was the youngest 
of thirteen children, the eldest of whom, a brother, had come to America 
before her birth. Twenty-five years later he had returned on a visit to his 
native land to find the little sister he had never seen grown to a charming 
girl of eighteen years. When he finally went back to America he took 
her with him. Mr. Wilt had been already married and was the father 
of three children, Henry, Mary and Barbara, when he met Miss Hetzell, 
and they were married, June 25, 1869, and became the parents of eight 
children, as follows : Mary Sophia, now Mrs. Duerr ; Carolina Christina ; 
Charles William ; George Harrison, deceased ; John Peter, deceased ; Frank 
Jesse ; Leona Frances ; Leroy Jacob. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Duerr have been born seven children, as follows: i. 
Bertha Mary, born September 2, 1890, now Mrs. Frank H. Petz, and the 
mother of one daughter, Arvilla Mary. 2. Freda Sophia, born in 1894. 
'3. William Franklin, born in 1900, died in 1901. 4. Mary Caroline Rosa, 
born in 1902. 5. Helen Elizabeth, born in 1908, died when only ten days 
old. 6. Frederick G., Jr., born in 1909. 7. Paul L., born September 8, 
191 1, died April 2, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. Duerr are members of the Ger- 
man Evangelical Lutheran church, and in that faith have reared and are 



WESTERN' PEN'XSYLX AXIA 1401 

rearing their children. They attend the livangehcal (German Lutheran 
church at Tarentum, and are prominently connected with the work of the 
church and its various benevolences. The rector, the Rev. George Amschle, 
performed the wedding ceremony for Mr. and Mrs. Duerr and the daughter 
also, Mrs. Petz, and baptized the little granddaughter. 



John Samuel Hines, for the past decade a resident of Avalon, 
HINES in the interests of which he takes an active and leading part, 

was born on Chestnut street, Lawrenceville, now Forty-second 
street, Pittsburgh, May 3, 1853, son of William and Hannah (Speer) Hines. 
William Hines, whose father was a native of Germany and died in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was born in Philadelphia, reared and educated 
there, and at the age of eighteen years came to Pittsburgh and engaged in the 
teaming business, having contracts to haul oil, which proved an exceedingly 
profitable enterprise, and during the last ten years of his active career con- 
ducted an express business, running from Lawrenceville to Pittsburgh. He 
married Hannah Speer, born in Deer Creek, now Harnerville, Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of William Speer, and sister of Speer, proprietor of 

the Speer Plow Works. William Speer was born in Germany, came to 
this country in early life, before his marriage, locating on Chestnut Hill, 
Philadelphia, where he followed the occupation of farming, served as con- 
stable and was active in community aiTairs. He died at Deer Creek, now 
Harnerville. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Hines : John Samuel, Anna Man,', 
deceased ; William Abraham ; Nicholas, deceased. 

John Samuel Hines attended Hill school, Pittsburgh, where he acquired 
an education which prepared him for the activities of life. His first posi- 
tion was as clerk for the firm of Pearson & Ollerberger, grocers, and after 
dissolving his connection with them he learned the trade of brick laying, 
and later became a labor foreman at the Lucy Furnace, and Mr. Scott, the 
steel man, was once on his pay roll. He ser\'ed in the capacity of labor fore- 
man for a period of eight years, during which time he gained the good will of 
those under his control by reason of his fair treatment and impartiality. 
He then returned to the laying of brick, accepting a position as foreman, 
and has so continued to the present time, following the same policy as here- 
tofore. He has been a resident of Avalon since June, 1904, and he i.^ a 
member and regular attendant of the services of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Mr. Hines married (first), 1875, Alice Shaffer: no children. He mar- 
ried (second), 1894, Carrie E. Woodruff; no children. 



Burke speaks of the "ancient and illustrious family of 
STEADMAN Stedmans fSteadmans) known in England since 1191." 

A Scotch family of Stedmans is descended from Patricius 
Stedman, 1369. A once strong Welsh family of this name is said now to 
have no male representatives. Of the Scotch family are several distinguished 
writers and soldiers. The first Stedman in New England was Isaac, who 



1402 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

came in the "Elizabeth," in 1636, and settled in Scituate. From him is de- 
scended Edmund C. Stedman, the poet. John and Robert Stedman came 
over in 1638. Robert Stedman's descendants married into the Quincy and 
Ellery families, and William Stedman was a member of congress. The 
names of Robert and Thomas Stedman are found on Windsor (Connecti- 
cut) records, in 1647, arid that of Thomas in New London, in 1649. From 
Thomas and Isaac are descended most of the Stedmans of New England, 
and from that section they have migrated to other portions of the United 
States. The destruction of early records, owing to various agencies, makes 
it often a matter of difficulty to establish uninterrupted descent. 

(I) James Steadman was probably bom in the state of Connecticut, 
and after his early marriage came to New York state. He was a farmer. 
Finally he located at Conneaut Lake, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and' 

died at the home of his son in Fallowfield township. He married , 

also bom in Connecticut, and of his fourteen children, thirteen attained 
maturity; six children were by a first marriage, and eight by a second: i. 
William, a farmer and oil operator, lived near Union City, Pennsylvania.' 
2. John Garner, of further mention. 3. Earl, a wagon maker, lived at 
Reaver Dam, Pennsylvania. 4. Daniel, a farmer, lived in Corey, Pennsyl- 
vania. 5. Polly, married Jesse Carrier, lived in Randolph township, and 
later went west. 6. Miranda, married Charles Windsor, who operated a saw 
mill, and lived in Clarion. Children by second marriage: 7. Samuel, was 
a farmer in Corey, Pennsylvania. 8. Perry, a farmer in Tennessee, where 
his death occurred. 9. Nathan, a retired blacksmith, of Corey. 10. Jerry, 
a farmer, who lived in Crawford county, Pennsylvania. 11. Thomas, left 
home in boyhood. 12. Nancy. 13. Rena. 14. Isabella. 

(II) John Garner Steadman, son of James Steadman, was born in 
Tioga county. New York, in November, 1807, and died in October, 1883. 
He grew up in the state of New York, assisting his father in the pioneer 
work connected with the farm, and at the age of eighteen years came to Craw- 
ford county; Pennsylvania, w'here he worked as a farm hand. Not long 
afterwards he married, and then rented a farm, which he cultivated for a 
time. In 1835 he was living in Tioga county. New York, but returned to 
Crawford county, where he located in East Fallowfield township. In 1843 
he purchased a fifty acre farm there, this being heavily wooded land. In 
order to make the first payment for this land, he drove two steers through 
the town of Greenville, Pennsylvania, and sold them for fifteen dollars. 
He could only get five dollars in cash, the remainder being taken in the form 
of groceries and other commodities. He walked home, then to Meadville, 
Pennsylvania, where he secured the deed for his property, paying the five 
dollars as security on it, and then walked back to his home. With the 
assistance of his sons he erected a log house, and commenced to clear the 
ground with a view to cultivation. This was done by cutting the timber, 
and burning it as was the fashion of that time. He lived on this place until 
within four years of his death, when he moved to a farm near Geneva, 
Pennsylvania, in Greenwood township, and there spent the remainder of his 



WESTERN' rENNSVL\ANIA 1403 

life. He and his wife were active and devout members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in which he was class leader for many years. Mr. Stead- 
man married Catherine Gross, born near Beaver Dam, Crawford county. 
Pennsylvania, March 2, 1812, died March 10, 1895. Children: i. Kinsley, 
deceased, was a Civil War veteran. 2. Earl, deceased, was a Civil War 
veteran. 3. Dow, of further mention. 4. Wesley, born July 31, 1838; is 
now living retired in Geneva, Pennsylvania. 5. Nelson, living on a farm 
in Arkansas, a Civil War veteran, who spent several months in Libby 
Prison. 6. Eliza, married Hiram Bedow, lives in Geneva. Pennsylvania. 
7. Lester, deceased, was a Civil War veteran. 8. Perry, born November 12, 
1845, died in 1907: he owned and lived on various farms in Greenwood 
township; he married Rachael Grinnell, who afterwards married his brother 
Dow ; children : Inez, married Silas Williams, now deceased, and lives in 
Greenwood township : El^ie, married Park Bailey, lives on a farm in Brook- 
field, Ohio: Pearl, married Harry Shadley, a machinist, and lives in Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 9. John, deceased. 

(HI) Dow Steadman, son of John Garner and Catherine (Gross) 
Steadman, was born in Tioga county. New York, October 9, 1835. He grew 
up in Greenwood township. Crawford county. Pennsylvania, and what little 
education he was able to obtain was acquired at the Finley District School, 
which was more than two miles from his home. His opportunities, how- 
ever, were limited, as he was obliged to devote the greater part of his time 
at the homestead farm until his eighteenth year. He then left his home, 
and spent three years in learning the wagon making trade, under Thomas 
McDowell, one mile east of Atlantic, Pennsylvania. After his first mar- 
riage he purchased a farm in the woods of Randolph township, and when 
he had this cleared, he sold it with a satisfactory profit. He at once re- 
peated this operation, netting a considerable sum by the sale of the second 
farm also. February i, 1864, he enlisted in Company B, Eighteenth Penn- 
sylvania Cavalry, and served one year and three months. During the greater 
part of this time he was located at Harper's Ferry, and he participated in 
many of the engagements with the Confederate forces under General Early. 
At the close of the war he was in the hospital, and when he was discharged 
he returned to Randolph township, and bought a farm on the Oil Creek 
road, where he lived several years. He then moved to Adams county, 
Nebraska, and bought a farm there which he is still holding: he took up 
a claim in Chase county, Kansas, proved it, and returned to Nebraska, where 
he made his home until 1909. When he first went there he purchased eighty 
acres for four hundred dollars, and when he left he sold this land for five 
thousand dollars. He carried on general farming in Adams county. In 
1909 he sold out and retired, and bought a house in Geneva, Crawford 
county, Pennsylvania, where he now lives. In political matters he is Re- 
publican. At the age of fifteen 3'ears he joined the ]Methodist Episcopal 
church, and has served as steward, class leader and trustee. Since coming 
to Geneva he joined the United Brethren church. 

Mr. Steadman married (first) Rachel Ralya. born in the old Block 



I404 WESTERN PENNSYLXANIA 

House in Meadville, I'eniisylvania, in 1826, died August 18. 1908, a daughter 
of John Ralya, a farmer, of German descent. He married (second) April 
29, 1909, Mrs. Rachael (Grinnell) Steadman, born October 3, 1853, widow 
of his brother Perry. Children: i. Clara, married Ezra Reese, both de- 
ceased. 2. Nancy, married I. C. Warren, botli deceased. 3. Ida, married 
Jason Dumas, a boiler maker, lives at Hastings, Nebraska. 4. Elmer M., 
a state evangelist, lives in Denver, Colorado ; married Mary Garris. 

The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Rachael (Grinnell) (Steadman) 
Steadman, were born in the state of New York, at what is known as Grin- 
nell's Corners. One of their sons, John Grinnell, served in the War of 
1812. Another son was Benjamin, of further mention. 

Benjamin Grinnell, father of Mrs. Steadman, was born in Tioga county, 
New York, August 11, 1811, and died March 13, 1890. He came to Craw- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, and purchased a farm in Greenwood town- 
ship. He was very successful in its cultivation, but sold it after his children 
had grown up, and purchased a farm in the eastern part of Greenwood town- 
ship in association with Perry Steadman, and lived there until his death. 
He married, February 18, 1830, Lucinda Staley, born in Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1817, died January 8, 1864, whose parents were also natives 
of New Y^ork state and settled in Crawford county, Pennsylvania. Children 
of Benjamin and Lucinda (Staley) Grinnell: i. Samuel, born April 11, 
1831 ; married Polly Gelven, both deceased. 2. Sciuire, born in October, 
1834; married Anna Mattox, both deceased. 3. Laura, born in March, 1836, 
died at the age of six years. 4. Dennis, born April i, 1838; married Melissa 
Powell, both deceased. 5. Morris, born November 19, 1839; married Mar- 
garet Ames, both deceased. 6. John, born in 1840; married Loretta Billings, 
both deceased. 7. Mark, born August 29, 1841 ; married Nancy Taylor ; 
he is a farmer in Geneva, Pennsylvania. 8. Dinah, born in 1843 ; married 
Porter Brooks. 9. Loretta, born December 3. 1843 ; lives in McKean county : 
married Abraham Davidson, deceased. 10. Jesse, born in April, 1845, died 
in infancy. 11. Gideon, born February 2, 1847; was a farmer, now de- 
ceased; married Emma Daniels. 12. Abigail, born August 15, 1850: mar- 
ried Extel Mattox, both deceased. 13. Samantha, born in September, 1851 ; 
married Christy Anderson ; lives in Greenwood township. 14. Rachael, men- 
tioned above, as the wife of Mr. Steadman. 15. Lodema, born September 7, 
1855 ; married William Hood, a farmer, and lives in Ohio. 16. Lewis, born 
June 20, 1857 ; a farmer at Monroe, Wisconsin ; married Esther Grinnell. 
All of these children were born in Greenwood township, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania. 



Second to no other trade of importance to the human family 

BAKER is that of baker; and from the trade which, from the dawn of 

civilization, has given employment to a multitude of laborers, 

continuously, comes the surname which has been the appellation of some 

of the most prominent and useful men among the English speaking people. 

(I) Robert Baker was born in Ireland, and emigrated to this country 



WKSTliRX PENNSYLVAMA 1405 

when lie was ^dung. lie settled in Big Beaver township, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania, on a farm of about one hundred acres, and died there about 
the year 1862. He and his wife, who outlived him some years, are buried 
at Clinton Cemetery. Both were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and he gave his political support to the Democratic party. He mar- 
ried Rachel Williams, also a native of Ireland, and they had children: i. 
Richard, of further mention. 2. Samuel, a farmer, removed to Ohio, where 
he died. 3. Enoch, also a farmer, in Ohio, where he died. 4. John, died on 
the Ohio river. 5. George, lived and died on the old homestead. 6. Sidney, 
married George Kirkpatrick, and died in Pittsburgh. 7. Meribah, married 
Samuel Jackson, and died in Pittsburgh. 8. Sophronia, went to California, 
where she died. 9. Millie, married a Mr. Zipperneck, and died in Ohio. 
10. William, died on the homestead. 

(II) Richard Baker, son of Robert and Rachel (Williams) Baker, was 
bom in Big Beaver township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, May 7, 1800, and 
died in November, 1882. He was the first white child born in Big Beaver 
township. He learned the trade of coopering, and followed this until he 
had amassed a sufficient capital to purchase one hundred and fifty acres of 
land, when he turned his attention to farming. He found much valuable 
coal under his land, but sold these rights to others to develop. The hamlet 
of Bakerstown was named in his honor, and he was its postmaster many 
years. He married Catherine Thompson, born in Beaver county in 1807, 
raised in Butler county, died October 9, 1884, and is buried in Clinton Ceme- 
tery. She was a daughter of James and Catherine Thompson, both born in 
Ireland, who emigrated to America, at first settled in Beaver county, Penn- 
sylvania, then removed to Butler county, where they purchased six hundred 
acres of timber land. A part of this he cleared, erecting a log cabin on it, 
and there spent the remainder of their days, the property at their death 
being divided among their children. They had children : i. Catherine, who 
married Mr. Baker. 2. Jane, married Shipman Newkirk, and died in Iowa. 

3. , married Howell. 4. Elizabeth, married John Irwin, and died 

on the old homestead in Cherry township, Butler county, Pennsylvania. 5. 
Sarah, married Samuel Sherlock, and died in Lawrence county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 6. Mary Ann, married John Davidson, and died in Iowa. 7. John, 
a farmer, died in Iowa. 8. Moses, a farmer, died in Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania. 9. James, killed in the Civil War. Mr. and Mrs. Baker had chil- 
dren : I. James, died in Andersonville Prison, during the Civil War. 2. 
William, a farmer, died in Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 3. Sophronia, 
when last heard from was living, unmarried, in Detroit, Michigan. 4. Sid- 
ney, deceased, was the widow of William Beatty, and lived in Beaver 
county. Pennsylvania. 5. Lorenzo, died from the effects of a wound le- 
ceived during the siege of \'icksburg. 6. John, a farmer in Iowa. 7. Rob- 
ert, starved to death in Belle Isle Prison, during the Civil War. 8. George 
Kirkpatrick, of further mention. 9. Thompson, a retired farmer, lives in 
Nebraska. 10. Richard Wesley, served during the Civil War in Company 
K, Tenth Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves; is a retired farmer in \'e- 



i4o6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

braska. ii. Sarah, married Benjamin James, and died in Lawrence county, 
Pennsylvania. 12. Mary A., married Frederick Strahley, and lives in 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 13. Nancy J., married Talbert Swogger, lives 
in Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 14. Matilda Thompson, lives in Pitts- 
burgh, and is the widow of Walter G. Craig, a soldier of the Civil War, 
a member of Company K, One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Regiment Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, who was in Belle Isle Prison and in Salisbury 
Prison six and a half months. 15. Rachel, widow of George Minner, lives 
in Wampum, Pennsylvania. 16. Catherine Ellen, married Robert Mills, 
lives in Nebraska. Four other children died in infancy. 

(Ill) George Kirkpatrick Baker, son of Richard and Catherine 
(Thompson) Baker, was bom in Big Beaver township, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania, December 7, 1837. His education was acquired in the public 
schools of his native county, and from his early years he has been identified 
with agricultural pursuits. At the age of twenty-two years he rented a 
farm in Center township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, and lived on this 
for six years. He then purchased eighty acres in Clay township, where 
he lived until 1898, engaged in general farming and stock raising. In the 
above mentioned year he retired, selling his farm, and has lived in Butler 
county since that time. March 28, 1865. he enlisted in Company I, Sixty- 
seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until July 
20, 1865, during this time being engaged in guard duty, and not being called 
upon to take part in any battle. He and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and he is a member of A. G. Reed Post, No. 
105, Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Baker married, September 20, i860, Martha Foster Russell, born 
in Venango county, Pennsylvania, July 9, 1835, and they have celebrated 
their golden wedding anniversary. John and Mary (McQuiston) Russell, 
grandparents of Mrs. Baker, were old residents of Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania, coming there from Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and were 
farmers and large land owners. William Russell, son of John and Mary 
(McQuiston) Russell, and father of Mrs. Baker, was born in Butler county, 
married there, and died on his homestead in Center township in 1893. He 
married Elizabeth McCandless, born in Butler county, died in Center town- 
ship, September 6, i860, a daughter of Robert and Jane (McCandless) 
McCandless, both born in Ireland, and farmers and large land owners in 
Center township. William and Elizabeth (McCandless) Russell had chil- 
dren: I. Mary Jane, died at the age of twenty years. 2. Margaret, married 
James Eakin, and died in Missouri. 3. Martha Foster, who married Mr. 
Baker, as above stated. 4. Elizabeth Abigail, married Anthony Thompson, 
and lives in Center township. 5. Robert McCandless, a farmer, died in 
Center township. Children of George K. Baker and wife: i. Thompson M., 
whose sketch is in this work. 2. Elizabeth R., married (first) Lowrey 
Stoops, (second) L. S. Byers, and has six children: Harry C. and Frances 
J. by first marriage, and Louis S., George C. Edward, and Gwndolyn by 
iher second marriage. 3. Mary C, married Oliver Pisor ; four children: 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 1407 

Oliver D., Le Verne, George, Martha V. 4. William R., married Mary 
Ralston; four children: Edith, Jesse, Harold and Robert C. 



Hiram Morris Richmond, second son of the Hon. Almond 
RICHMOND Benson and Mary (Morris) Richmond, was the descen- 
dant of one of the oldest and most prominent families in 
the country. A full history of his line of descent, as traced back to the 
immigrant, John Richmond, of Taunton, appears elsewhere in this work ; 
as does also an extended sketch of his father, the Hon. Almond Benson 
Richmond. The family is one whose English ancestry is illustrious, tlie 
original bearer of the name accompanying William the Conqueror into 
England, and founding a family whose representatives in England, and later 
in America, have upheld the honor of its traditions. 

Hiram M. Richmond was born in Meadville, Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, February 28, 1852, and was the second of his father's three sons. 
His elder brother, Lewis Lawton Richmond, is referred to at length else- 
where in this work; his younger brother. Major Charles E. Richmond, is 
now deceased. Mr. Richmond entered Allegheny College after receiving 
a thorough preparatory education, and upon completing his studies there, 
decided upon a legal career for which he fitted himself by reading law with 
his father, who was recognized as one of the leading criminal laywers of 
that time. Upon thoroughly preparing himself for his chosen profession, 
Mr. Richmond was admitted to practice in May, 1880. He became asso- 
ciated in business partnership with his father under the firm name of A. B. 
Richmond & Son, and was considered a most brilliant and promising young 
attorney. He had a large and increasing clientele in Crawford county, but 
after devoting only four years of his life to active practice, his health failed 
and he was compelled to retire from business. He died March 17, 1884. 
Mr. Richmond had retained his membership in his college fraternity. Delta 
Tau Delta, and was a communicant of tlie Episcopal church, as are also 
his wife and daughter. 

On December 9, 1879, he married Margaret Fowler, daughter of Daniel 
and Lydia Emeline (Pardee) Fowler; a sketch of the Fowler family also 
appears in this history. Mrs. Richmond was born at Newcastle, Lawrence 
county, Pennsylvania, January 17, 1858, and attended school in Burlington. 
New Jersey, finally graduating from Pennsylvania Female College, Pitts- 
burgh, in the class of 1877. Her cultural and educational attainments are 
unusual, and she is a woman of strong influence in the community in which 
she moves. For the past fourteen years she has served as treasurer of the 
City Hospital at Meadville. and she is an active member of Qirist Episcopal 
Church, in which she has been choir mother for twelve years. Mrs. Rich- 
mond devotes a part of her time to travel. Mr. and Mrs. Richmond had 
but one child, a daughter. Marguerite Richmond, born November 22, 1882, 
in Meadville. She has received an excellent education, having at the con- 
clusion of her high school course in this city attended the Misses Elv's 
school on Riverside Drive, New York City. On June 18, 1906, Miss Rich- 



i4o8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

mond was married to Charles Cogswell McCord, born January 15, 1878, 
son of Samuel and Jessie (Collins) McCord. Mr. McCord is a graduate 
of Yale, of the class of 1900, and is a member of the St. Elmo fraternity. 
He is now in the employ of the Erie railroad as division dispatcher and 
freight agent at Rochester, New York. Like his wife, Mr. McCord is a 
communicant of the Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. McCord have two 
children: Margaret Richmond, born January 13, 1909; Samuel, born Janu- 
ary 21, 1911. 



This is a Scotch name of high distinction, the Camp- 
CAMPBELL bells being a Highland clan noted in their home, and 
whose descendants have achieved eminence in other parts 
of the world. According to their tradition, the clan Campbell is of Irish 
origin, being descended from the great King Heremon, who reigned in 
Ireland from 1699 to 1683 B. C. Heremon's descendants form by far the 
most illustrious line in Ireland, and his ancestry is traced by the Irish 
chroniclers to Adam without a single break. As Pennsylvania has received 
since early days a large Scotch infusion, it is not strange, but rather what 
is to be expected, that Campbell is a common name in the state. The 
Campbells of this review came to Pennsylvania from the North of Ireland, 
and have given many valued citizens to the country. 

(I) Alexander Campbell was born in Butler county. Pennsylvania, 
April 13, 1813, and died November 12, 1877. In 1837 he purchased a farm 
in Concord township, on which he lived until 1873, when he purchased a 
farm at Mount Qiestnut, and there spent the remainder of his days. For 
many years he was a Whig in politics, then joined the ranks of the Repub- 
lican party. He married, in 1839, Eliza Jamison, who died December 3, 
1883, whose father was a farmer of Butler county, Pennsylvania. They 
had children: i. Joseph C. who enlisted, in August, 1861, in Company E, 
Thirty-first Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was an active 
participant in twenty-two battles ; he fell on the bloody field of Chickamauga. 
2. William T. 3. Andrew G., of further mention. Alexander Campbell and 
his wife were consistent members of the United Presbyterian church. 

(II) Andrew G. Campbell, son of Alexander and Eliza (Jamison) 
Campbell, was born on the Campbell homestead. Concord township, Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, July i, 1842, and died there, December 27, 1907. He 
learned the milling trade in the mill which stood on the homestead, and he 
and his father were associated in this industry as well as farming both before 
and after the Civil War. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, One 
Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and 
was mustered into service at Harrisburg. The regiment was ordered to 
Arlington Heights and soon afterward he took part in the battle of Antietam. 
After this he was detailed to serve with the supply train, and continued in 
this duty until he was honorably discharged, June 16, 1865. He then re- 
turned to Butler county, and resumed his farming operations. In 1868 he 
started a general store at Mount Chestnut, continued this for a few years, 




/^^^ c:^^yr^^i-/i^^^^^^ 



WESTERN PENXSYLX ANIA 1409 

then removed to Hrownsclale, I'ennsylvania, and later to Boydstown in the 
same state. In 1893 he was elected sheriff of Butler county, an office in 
which he served with great efficiency. He was a man of sterling worth 
and many fine traits of character. Politically he affiliated with the Repub- 
lican party. Mr. Campbell married Rachel J., a daughter of George H. 
Hutchinson, a farmer of Oakland township, and they had children: i. 
Alexander M., of further mention. 2. Eliza A., married John H. Robb, a 
grocer in Butler. 3. Thomas A., an oil operator at Beelers Station, West 
Virginia; twice married, name of first wife, Celia B. Stoner. 4. William j., 
lives at Core, West Virginia. 5. Charles F., lives at Renfrew, Pennsylvania; 
was twice married. 6. Millard H., an oil operator, of Salem, West Virginia. 
(Ill) Alexander M. Campbell, son of Andrew G. and Rachel J. (Hutch- 
inson ) Campbell, was born at Greece City, Concord township, Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, October 28, 1864. For some years he attended the Nixon 
District School in Penn township, leaving this at the age of thirteen years, 
and commenced the active work of life as a driver of a delivery wagon for 
his father. This took him through the surrounding country, and although a 
boy in years he accomplished much of a man's work. In 1894 he was ap- 
pointed by his father as deputy sheriff, and held this office until 1906, when 
he was elected sheriff' of Butler county, and held the office until 1909. He 
then rented the Atlas Hotel in Butler and later became the proprietor of 
this, and in 1910 purchased the hotel at the corner of McKean and Center 
avenues, and at the present time is still conducting this in a very prosperous 
manner. While he is very popular throughout the county, he has never 
taken an active part in political matters, but he gives. his political support 
to the Republican party. He is prominent as an oil operator, holding many 
local leases in this field. He is a member of Butler Lodge, No. 170, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, was exalted ruler in 1901, and repre- 
sented the lodge in 1902 at the Grand Lodge Convention at Salt Lake City. 
Utah. 

Mr. Campbell married. November i, 1904, Sarah A., born near Chicora, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of John and Ann ( Collins ) Sweeney, both now 
deceased. Mr. Sweeney was a farmer in Butler county, and in 1874 re- 
moved to Kansas, where he lived a few years. Returning to Pennsylvania, 
he made his home at Petrolia. Butler county, then removed to Butler, where 
the deaths of himself and wife occurred. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell have no 
children. 



Josiah Culbertson. of Scotch-Irish descent, came to 
CULBERTSON this country with a number of relatives, and settled 

at a place which they named Edinboro. Pennsylvania. 
He obtained a grant of a large tract of land, a part of which he cleared and 
farmed, and he was also engaged in business as a merchant. He also fol- 
lowed the tailor's trade with considerable success. He was a prominent and 
influential man in the community, was active in the organization of the 
Presbyterian church, and was one of the first trustees of the Edinboro 



I410 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

State Normal School. He had a brother, William, who constructed the 
Cambridge, Erie & Edinboro Trolley Line, and was a United States con- 
gressman. Mr. Culbertson married Cordelia Stewart, and they had children : 
James L., of further mention ; Cordelia ; Levine ; one died in infancy. 

(II) James L. Culbertson, son of Josiah and Cordelia (Stewart) Cul- 
bertson, was born in Edinboro, Erie county, Pennsylvania, attended the 
public schools, and was graduated from the Edinboro State Normal School 
at the age of eighteen years. For a time he was in the employ of others in 
the dry goods business in Meadville, and when he had accjuired a thorough 
and practical knowledge of this line of business, he established himself in 
the same town. His business has since been incorporated, and is conducted 
under the name of The J. L. Culbertson Dry Goods Company, of which he is 
the president and leading spirit. Until 1912 he conducted the business alone, 
but in that year he incorporated it. He is a member of the Congregational 
church, and has for many years been a member of Meadville Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons. He married Elizabeth Richmond Edmeston. born in 
Norwalk. Ohio, and they have had children : Charles Chester, deceased ; 
Margaret B., deceased ; Leland James, of further mention ; Robert A. ; 
Stewart A. ; Ivan C. David A. Edmeston, father of Mrs. Elizabeth Rich- 
mond (Edmeston) Culbertson, was born in Paisley, Scotland, and after his 
marriage emigrated to America. He settled at Norwalk, Ohio, where he 
conducted a large grocery and meat business. His brother Alexander was 
surgeon of the Ninety-third Regiment, New York, and Mr. Edmeston went 
to that state, enlisted under his brother, and served in the war two years, 
when a severe wound obliged him to return to his home. These were the 
last two years of the war, and upon its conclusion he made his home only 
for a short time in Norwalk. Ohio, when the after effects of the wound 
caused his death. He married Margaret A. Peek, a native of Amsterdam, 
New York, and they had children : David. Margaret. Alexander, Elizabeth 
Richmond, mentioned above as the wife of ]\rr. Culbertson ; Robert A. 

(III) Leland James Culbertson, son of James L. and Elizabeth Rich- 
mond (Edmeston) Culbertson. was born in Meadville, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, July 26. 1887. His education has been a liberal and most 
comprehensive one, commencing with attendance at the public schools near 
his home, one year in the Allegheny Preparatory School, then a course in 
civil engineering at the Rensselaer Polytechnic School, in Troy, New York. 
January 17, 1912, he registered with Albert L. Thomas, district attorney, and 
commenced reading law. and was admitted to the bar of Crawford county 
in May, 1915. On November 5, 1913. he was appointed a collector in the 
Department of Internal Revenue. For the past two years he has held the 
office of probation officer at the juvenile court. He resides in Vernon town- 
ship, just outside of Meadville. and is now serving his second term as school 
director. Mr. Culbertson is a devout member of the Church of Christ, 
Scientist. 



WESTERN PENNSYL\ANIA 141 1 

The surname Crosby is of very ancient English origin. It is 
CROSBY derived from two English words, cross and by (bury, burgh 

or borough J, meaning the town of the cross, and has been in 
use from the time when surnames were first adopted in England. In the 
time of Richard III., one of the name occupied Crosby House in London, 
and that city still has a street by the name. It is also found in no less than 
eight places in England, namely : Crosby-upon-Eden, near Carlisle, in Cum- 
berlandshire; with the villages of High and Low Crosby; another village in 
the western division of Cumberland ; Crosby-Garrett and Crosby-Ravens- 
worth, in Westmoreland; a village in the North Riding of Yorkshire; a 
village in Lincolnshire ; and Great Crosby and Little Crosby, suburbs of 
Liverpool. In 1204 Ode de Crosseby was constable of Tikehall in York- 
shire, and as early as 1220 we find Simon de Crosseby in Lancashire, where 
he was a landholder. The name Simon has continued in frequent use 
among his descendants to the pr