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Full text of "Genealogy of the descendants of Thomas French who came to America from Nether Heyford"

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Genealogy 

of the Descendants of 

Thomas French 



Who Came to America from Nether Heyford, Northamptonshire, 

England, and Settled in Berlinton (Burlington) in the 

Province and Country of West New Jersey, of which 

he was one of the Original Proprietors, together 

with William Penn, Edward Byllynge, 

Thomas Ollive, Gauen Laurie 

and Others 



With some account of 



Colonial Manners and Doings 

Setting up of Friends' Meetings, Copies of Old Minutes and other 

Particular Writings of Public Interest, Curious and 

Rare Papers in Fac-simile, Noteworthy 

Happenings and Places, etc. 

Together with 

One Hundred and Fifty Picture Prints 

Compiled and Published by 

Howard Barclay French 

Of the Seventh Generation 

Volume I 



PHILADELPHIA 

PRIVATELY PRINTED 

1909 



C-^'^'oL'^' "^ 



Copyright 
Howard B. French 

1909 






..,.o=\ 



[library of OOMSnESsf 



.3,1 

!'«'' Cl_ AA'.. INC. 




IN LOVING REMEMBRANCE OF 
MY HONORED AND REVERED FATHER 

SAMUEL H. FRENCH 

THIS WORK IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED 



Those ivJio do not treasrti-e up the memory 
of their ancestors^ do not deserve to be re- 
mefnbered by posterity. — Edmund Burke. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



PAGE 

Howard Barclay French [1406] Frontispiece 

Fire-set Belonging to Charles French [143] ix 

Sycamore Tree, Burlington, N. J 26 

Gov. Samuel Jennings' House, " Green Hill " 28 

First Page " Burlington Meeting Records," 1678 30 

Burlington Meeting House, 1691 30 

Burlington Meeting House, 1785 32 

St. Mary's P. E. Church, Burlington, N. J., 1769 34 

Title Page, Gabriel Thomas' History of West New Jersey, 1698 36 

Church S. S. Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, Eng., 1200 40 

Church S. S. Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, Interior View 42 

Church St. Michael, Bugbrooke, Eng., 1200 44 

Persecution of Thomas French and Others, 1657 46 

Petition of " Quakers " to King Charles II, 1663 47 

Gov. Franklin's House, "Franklin Park," N. J., 1770 48 

Map of Lands Taken up by Pioneer Settlers 50 

Family Bible of Thomas FFrench, Progenitor 52 to 62 

First Page, " Concessions and Agreements," 1676 68 

First Signature Page, "Concessions and Agreements" 72 

Last Signature Page, "Concessions and Agreements" 76 

Thomas FFrench's Cattle Marks, 1680 75 

Prerogative Seal of New Jersey, 1682 77 

Leaf from " Council of Proprietors' Minute Book," 1688 80 

Colonial Oil Lamp 82 

Table in Burlington Meeting House 91 

Marriage Certificate, Richard French and Mary King, 1701 96 

Meeting Certificate for Richard French, 1733 100 

V 



vi LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

Chesterfield Meeting House, Crosswicks, N. J., 1776 112 

Chesterfield Meeting PIouse, Crosswicks, N. J., Rear View 114 

Deed of Gift, Thomas FFrench to Son Thomas, 1694 116 

Survey of Land for Thomas French, 1732 125 

Haddonfield Meeting House, 1760 138 

Abington Meeting House, 1700 and 1756 147 

Surveyor General's Office, Burlington, N. J., 1825 152 

Colonial Advertisement, 1722 157 

Fireplace Bellows, 1 730 1 73 

Village Green, Nether Heyford, Eng 174 

Ancient Chair in Burlington Meeting House, 1700 180 

Warming Pan, Seventeenth Century 184 

Sycamore and Walnut Trees, Gloucester, N. J 200 

Tombstone, Preserve Brown 206 

Philadelphia in 1720 220 

Bordentown Meeting House, 1741 220 

Upper Springfield Meeting House, 1 727 226 

Shreve Homestead, Mt. Pleasant, N. J., 1725 and 1742 230 

Francis French [116] House, near Almonesson, N. J 234 

Old Colestown (N. J.) P. E. Church, 1751 (St. Mary's) 238 

Old Colestown (N. J.) P. E. Church (St. Mary's), Interior View 240 

Colonial Money of New Jersey, 1 763 239 

St. Mary's Monument, Colestown, N. J., 1907 241 

Family Spinning Wheel 252 

Colonial Money of New Jersey, 1 776 265 

Evesham Meeting House, Mt. Laurel, N. J., 1760 and 1798 266 

American House, Haddonfield, N. J., 1750 284 

Colonial Clock, 1720 285 

Chest Brought From England by Henry Wood, 1682 292 

" Petticoat Bridge," Burlington Co., N. J., 1778 306 

Advertisement, Wm. French Jr. [Ill] Plaster Mii.i., 1803 333 

Falls Meeting House, Bucks Co., Pa., 1789 334 

Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church, Philada., 1700 336 

Edward French [121] House, near West Moorestown, N. J., 1770-1850 342 

Edward French [121] House, near West Moorestown, N. J 344 

Comb-back Chair, 1790 361 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS vii 

PAGE 

Robert French [131] House, near Moorestown, N. J 362 

MooRESTOWN (Chester) Meeting House, 1802 368 

Moorestown Meeting House (Orthodox), 1897 372 

Foot Warmer, 1 750 375 

Candlestick and Snuffers, 1770 383 

Marriage Certificate, Jacob French and Elizabeth Stokes, 1772 384 

A Relic of the Nursery, 1 749 385 

Silhouette, Samuel French [141], 1748-1814 387 

Silhouette, Sarah (Heulings) French, 1752-1806 387 

Samuel French [141] Homestead, near Mullica Hill, N. J 388 

Silver Pieces, Charles [42] and Samuel French [141] 392 

Chatelaine Hook, Ann H. French [361] 395 

Mullica Hill Meeting House, 1804 396 

Subscriptions to Friends' School, Mullica Hill, N. J., 1789 397 

Desk Belonging to Samuel French [141] 398 

Plan of French's Estate, near Mullica Hill, N. J 399 

Mickleton (Upper Greenwich) Meeting House, 1798 400 

Walnut Table Belonging to Sarah (Heulings) French 404 

Wrightstown Meeting House, 1787 405 

Parlor Chair, 1760 409 

Charles French [143] House, near Fellowship, N. J., 17 — and 1785 410 

Charles French [143] House, near Fellowship, N. J., End View, 1785 412 

Charles French [143] House, Moorestow'n, N. J., 1820 414 

Charles French [143] Rear Lawn, Moorestown, N. J 416 

Portrait, Elizabeth (French) Gill [372] 418 

Portrait, John Gill "^18 

John Gill House, King's Highway, Haddonfield, N. J., 1841 420 

Sofa Belonging to Charles French [143] 421 

New Jersey in the War of 1812 423 

Ancient Family China Piece 430 

Bill for Merchandise Bought of Charles French [147], 1792 434 

Walnut Dressing Table, 1700 449 



VIU 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Signature of 

PAGE 

Allen, Joseph 397 

Mathew 80, 86, 120, 123 

Atkinson, Samuei 132 

Black, George [389] 430 

Samuel [384] 430 

WiLLLVM 429 

BoRTON, Jacob 347 

Breintnall, John 202 

Brick, Abigail [139] 383 

John (3rd) 382 

Brown, Mary 182 

Preserve (Jr.) 182, 218 

BuRROUGH, Samuell 120, 123 

Buzby, Nicholas 177 

Richard 145 

Cattell, James 263 

Clark, William 120, 123 

Clemdkies, Edward 132 

Cowperthwaite, John 120 

Creighton, Hugh 283 

Elles, Hannah 397 

Fish, Justa 120 

French, Benjamin [30] 233 

Charles [8] 80, 89 

Charles (Jr.) [42] 277 

Charles (3rd) [143] 416 

Charles [147] 435 

Charles H. [296] 347 

Edward [36] 130 

Edward [121] 346 

Elizabeth [372] 419 

Elizabeth 437 

George [123] 355 

Hannah 263, 265 

Howard B. [1406] . .Frontispiece 



page 

James [132] 375 

John (Jr.) [44] 173 

M.^RY 136 

Mary 282 

Richard [5] 89, 108 

Richard [120] 339 

Robert [35] 134, 260, 262 

Robert (Jr.) [131] 372 

Samuel [141] 383, 394, 397 

Thomas [1] 77 

Thomas [6] ..120, 123, 132, 171 

Thomas (3rd) 133} 246 

Thomas [129] 361 

Uriah [122] 349 

William [27] 233 

Gardnier, Ephriam 397 

Gibson, Joseph (Jr.) 397 

Grubb, Henry 80 

Harris, Sam 108 

Heulings, Jacop, 125 

Jacob (Jr.) 401 

Hollingshead, Eleanor [144].. 425 

Hugh F. [380] 419 

Hootten, Benjamin 397 

HuGG, John 192 

Iredell, Abraham 397 

Jewell, John 80 

LippiNcoTT, Jacob 132 

Rebekah 397 

Thom.-vs 197 

Matlack, Joseph 419 

Mickle, John 200 

Middleton, Tho 188 

Nathan 267 

Moore, Benjami.n 397 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



IX 



PAGE 

MuRFiN, Sarah 182 

Pancoast, Aauon' 397 

PiTTMAN, Richard 120, 123 

Revell, Tho. 80 

Roberts, Agnes 397 

RuDDEROW, John 120, 123 

Scattergood, Jos. Surrogate.... 108 

Scholey, Joseph 182 

Sharp, Hugh 90 

Shreve, Benjamin 108, 228 

Benjamin [210] 300 

Caleb (Jr.) [213] 300 



PAGE 

Israel [107] 311, 320 

Stiles, Robert 120, 123 

Stockdell, Jarves 199 

Stokes, John 290 

Sunderland, Wh.liam 108 

Walker, John 120, 123 

Wallis, Thomas 120, 123 

Westland, Nath 80 

Wills, Elizabeth [142] 408 

James 171 

Moses 430 




FIRE-SET BELONGING TO CHARLES FRENCH, 3RD [143]. 



i 



1 



AS A TALE THAT IS TOLD 




FTER five and thirty years a work voluntarily assumed is 
happily and thankfully completed and placed in the hands 
of the members of the family who wished copies printed 
for their use. It is scarcely necessary to refer to the fact, 
always in evidence in genealogical work, that omissions 
constantly occur. Who among our readers can realize what 
the gathering of the material from countless and in many instances long 
hidden sources on both sides of the sea, its careful preparation, painstak- 
ing verification, laborious compilation and final passage through the press, 
has been? The difficulties and discouragements met with on every hand 
can scarcely be conceived. In some cases those who should have been 
the most ready and eager to help, have been strangely indifferent and 
seemingly hostile to honest truth seeking inquiry. Many letters have re- 
mained unanswered for unknown reasons; doubtless, in some cases, because 
reliable registers have not been kept, and in others are quite lost. Thus 
family records are left incomplete ; and in some instances mistakes may have 
been transcribed by those sending what was in their possession. Many others 
have gladly and willingly cooperated to the extent of their knowledge and 
opportunity. Thus little by little, patiently and earnestly, the fast disappear- 
ing threads of a family history, than which there can be none more interesting 
and inspiring, have been gathered up and woven together day by day, month 
by month, year by year. 

Far from complete is the story that is told. There are breaks in the narra- 
tive which cannot be covered ; records have been lost, memory has failed, and 
half revealed facts have at times barred the way. Yet the enlarged and 
fascinating transcript given is one which may be reviewed with supreme satis- 
faction by every living descendant of the rugged and heroic pioneer who, 
with the scars of suffering for conscience sake upon him, stepped upon the 
bank of the Delaware that late summer morning, two hundred and twenty- 
eight years ago, with his faithful wife and nine children, the youngest only 
four years of age. Thomas ffrench — his quaint original way of spelling the 

xi 



xii AS A TALE THAT IS TOLD 

family name — was one of the men who found empires and republics, and 
through the line of his descendants there runs the distinctive marks, strong 
and clearly defined, of a pure mind, high purpose, inflexible honesty, never 
flagging industry and all the essential qualities of upright and successful 
manhood and womanhood. The old motto of the family, Malo Mori Quam 
FcEDARi (I would rather die than be debased), fully exemplifies the general 
characteristics of his descendants. 

There has been a steadfast purpose also, widening and strengthening all 
the while, to make this book a living picture of the times of which it treats. 
It is with satisfaction that the record here submitted embraces so much of 
general historic interest, which in itself involved an immense amount of labor 
and great expense ; and the photographer and engraver at their best, have 
been impressed to make the picture presented graphic and delightful. The 
publication reproduces many Friends' Meeting Houses and places of special 
interest to that Society, whose faithful members did so much toward laying 
broad and deep the foundations of the American Republic. 

It is desired here to make acknowledgment of the invaluable services of 
many Friends some of whom have no personal interest in the book. The New 
Jersey State Librarian, New Jersey and Pennsylvania Historical Societies, 
Friends' Libraries, Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Library, Public Libraries 
of Woodbury, Camden, Haddonfield and Burlington, and Court Record 
Officials at Trenton, Mount Holly, Camden, Woodbury and Philadelphia 
have extended courtesies which are gratefully acknowledged. The enthu- 
siastic work of Charles S. French and his able assistance for many years as 
an earnest co-laborer cannot be overestimated. This can also be said of my 
cousins, Sarah French Whitall and Margaret B. French ; and of my secretary, 
Clara G. Sheppard, who has for many years devoted every spare moment to 
correspondence, records and data, compiling and revising with unceasing 
diligence and fidelity. Able assistance has been rendered by Anna M. North,* 
of Trenton, N. J., and also by Edwin K. Hart, the veteran journalist, whose 
skill and experience as writer and editor have been put to the best uses in 
the final revision and publication. To these and many others heartfelt appre- 
ciation is here cordially expressed. 

Those who may observe statements concerning matters of historical interest 
somewhat different from other publications should bear in mind the fact that 

* It is with feelings of deepest regret that I have to note the death of my friend and 
co-laborer, Anna M. North, who died 5th mo. 16th, 1908. 



AS A TALE THAT IS TOLD xiii 

the information here presented was obtained from original records and ac- 
cepted authorities, after most intelligent and careful research. This applies 
to the history of localities, meetings, and individuals, as well as to graphic 
reproduction of documents, wills, deeds, minutes, etc. Reliability has been 
the test constantly applied in all departments of inquiry, made all the more 
necessary by the multiplicity of current errors concerning persons and events 
of the past. 

Let us hope that coming generations of the French family and the large 
number of allied families interested wall make a record as worthy of remem- 
brance and emulation as those who silently follow each other through these 
pages. 

Howard B. French 

Philadelphia^ November, igo8 



SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM 




COKING backward seven generations the thoughtful Amer- 
ican citizen of to-day can take a calm, rational, just and 
philosophical review of the inspiration, rise, marvellous 
development, far reaching influence and beneficent effects 
of Quakerism. No other great movement of a reforma- 
tory and religious character ever was more timely, or more 
urgently needed. None ever seemed more directly the outcome of divine 
purpose and control over the destinies of mankind. None ever more impres- 
sively illustrated the truth contained in the burning words of Holy Writ : 
" Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit, saith the Lord of hosts." 
The British realm was convulsed with a stormy revolution in which the 
blood of a dethroned king mingled with that of his rebellious subjects. The 
fierce contention of partisans thrilled the nation and fixed the wondering 
attention of the civilized world. The sword had been appealed to and on 
many iields of carnage the issue had been met. Established government had 
been overthrown and some advance made in human liberty and the recogni- 
tion of popular rights. Yet the triiunph of the Commonwealth was but fleet- 
ling. In a little while royal power was again supreme and wielded with 
defiant forgetfulness of the lesson taught by the headsman of Whitehall. 

Meanwhile, every element of furious and relentless persecution exhausted 
the means of destruction aimed at the disciples and supporters of the man 
of peace who had found the secret of irrepressible devotion to what he be- 
lieved to be the truth. It was a strange spectacle, an exhibition of hiiman 
perversity, blindness, injustice and unwisdom which makes the darkest page 
in English history. Neither cajolery, argument, threats, shameless robbery 
under forms of law, imprisonment, physical torture nor edicts of banishment 
from home and kindred, could put out the fires that blazed within the hearts 
of these witnesses of the Inner Light. Within twenty years nearly ten thou- 
sand passed through prison gates, and upward of two hundred and fifty lives 
were directly sacrificed, yet higher and higher rose the swelling tide of testi- 
mony for righteousness. 

XV 



xvi SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM 

Through it all there was no intended disrespect for legitimate authority, 
rightfully and justly exercised. No people the world ever knew were more 
intensely loyal to self-respecting rulers than the Quakers. The iron-hearted 
but clear-headed Cromwell had openly recognized their immovable integrity. 
" Here is a people," he said, " whom I cannot buy with money, gifts nor 
offices." And when, upon a notable occasion, a number of self-sacrificing 
men and women came to him to plead that they might take the places of 
others, worn and weary and dying in jail, he cried out to his amazed courtiers : 
"Who among you would do such a thing for me?" Repeated expressions 
of profound respect for rulers were put forth. There was no resentment, 
no sullen treasuring up of multiplied wrongs, with evident purpose to square 
the account when opportunity offered. The spirit of peace, forgiveness and 
blessing was ever present, ever manifest, ever active and sincere, with the 
self-consciousness of a happy reward that made the heavens ring with the 
joy that could not be confined nor suppressed. 

The story of the persecution of the Quakers, at home and abroad, even in 
this land, whither their pursuers had fled to escape like injustice and suffer- 
ing, will be pondered with amazement by future historians. Millions of the 
best men and women of this Republic to-day are all unconscious of the inspir- 
ing fact that they have their ancestral roots in the little companies of heroic 
souls who passed through the fiery furnace, seven times heated, during the 
last half of the seventeenth century. 

And out of all this time of trial was to come a sequel little dreamed of by 
the drifting royal opportunist when, lazily floating in his pleasure barge on 
the Thames, one summer afternoon in 1677, he waved a kindly adieu and gave 
his kingly blessing as he saw the crowded decks of the good ship Kent, then 
lifting anchor and setting sail for the new world. "Are these Quakers?" 
indifferently asked Charles II. Aye, and more than that! They were the 
real advance couriers of the coming great Empire of the West. All that had 
gone before, all that had been done before, only comprised a fragmentary 
beginning. Now the serious and lasting, united and effective work of nation 
building was about to begin on the quiet banks of the Delaware. Only men 
and women of consecrated purpose, the purest lives, dauntless courage, sublime 
faith and never-ending endurance could have met the exacting demands, car- 
ried out faithfully and effectively the lofty aim that animated these heroic 
yet humble spirited pioneers. 

Upon what apparently trifling things great affairs often turn. For half 



SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM xvii 



a century the political and commercial leaders of the old world had been 
learning little by little of the undeveloped continent beyond the great sea. 
In our own aggressive time it seems incomprehensible that more energetic and 
successful inquiry should not have been made, under the auspices of powerful 
governments with the ready cooperation of eager self-seekers. No man of 
that age dreamed of the commercial possibilities of America. The men of 
Jamestown, Plymouth, New Amsterdam, New Netherlands, Maryland and 
the Carolinas were regarded as fanatical zealots ; suggestively and almost 
derisively termed in official documents and current chronicles " adventurers." 
And such they truly were, for every hour of their lives, on sea or land, was 
one of peril and uncertainty. The vast and gloomy wooded wilderness was 
forbidding enough ; but the wild and fierce creatures of the forest comprised 
the least ever-present danger. Terrorizing tales of multitudes of bold and 
warlike savages thrilled every heart. The course pursued by many of the 
early colonists towards the natives had been the very essence of unwisdom 
and injustice. Out of it all was to come the most remarkable transforma- 
tion known to mankind. 

Yet it was the personal recklessness and improvidence of a few royal and 
semi-royal spendthrifts that directly opened the way for the industrious set- 
tlement of the new and unknown lands, contemporary with the amazing 
stupidity, from a national standpoint, involved in driving from their firesides 
and their native hillsides and hamlets tens of thousands of the best men and 
women of the realm. Pondering the cruel problem before them, the suffer- 
ing Quakers learned that the prodigal head of the restored kingdom had 
flung away to his waiting brother, the Duke of York, who in a little while 
was to succeed him as James II, millions of acres, and that in order to have 
money to spend in continued luxury and extravagance, he in turn had sold 
this gift of fabulous richness rightly handled, for a song, to two men, neither 
of whom knew nor cared what it was worth, or made the least effort to find 
out. They likewise were ready for an easy and quick speculation, and the 
financial embarrassment of a third party ended in the most extraordinary land 
transaction in the world's history. 

Not only was the greater part of colonial New Jersey sold for a little more 
than the money value of one hundred thousand dollars to-day, or about three 
cents an acre, but the short sighted King, to free himself from the burden 
of an annoying obligation, squared the long-standing account with the son 
of his deceased creditor, and thus for $400,000 \\'illiam Penn became the 

2 



xviii SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM 

possessor of an embryo empire. The amount paid for Pennsylvania, two 
hundred and twenty-five years ago, would to-day scarcely buy half a dozen 
corner lots in the business center of any one of its thriving cities. 

It seemed as though all things were at hand for the ready carrying out 
of some grand scheme for the lasting benefit of humanity. Twenty-five years 
of trial, through which strong men and self-sacrificing women had suffered 
martyrdom with sublime patience and endurance, had prepared their souls 
and bodies for the ordeal ahead. They faced the dangers of the great deep 
and the unknown perils and hardships of the wilderness, with calm self- 
reliance and exalted faith in the guidance and care of Him whom they served 
with unvarying fidelity. They had sounded the depths of brotherly love and 
were prepared to treat with gentleness and the kindliest trustfulness the 
wondering natives, whose utmost confidence was thus speedily won and never 
lost. There is nothing more touching and beautiful in human annals than 
this close and happy intermingling with the untutored children of the forest. 
Even before these mild mannered, honest faced, open hearted strangers had 
stepped upon the shores of the Delaware, their wants were anticipated and 
a welcome extended that must have brought tears of joy to many trembling 
mothers holding their helpless little ones to their bosoms. 

" The Indians are very loving to us," wrote one of the Burlington pioneers, 
and therein was revealed the whole marvellous story, the full answer to the 
heartfelt prayers for protection and safety which had been daily offered up 
during the long and weary voyage. Already conscienceless adventurers had 
brought evil upon the Indian and he was only too eager to make a lasting 
treaty of peace and sobriety and mutual protection with those of different 
principles and habits and purposes. " We will make a broad path," said 
a wise old chief, at one of the earliest councils, near Burlington. "If in 
passing the white man sees an Indian asleep, he will not disturb him. And 
if the Indian sees the white man asleep, he will pass by and not harm him." 
Words of child-like simplicity and goodwill that must have made the angel 
watchers that hovered over the camp of this new Israel drop tears of joy. 

For seventy years peace reigned in Pennsylvania, until indeed, the white 
man's perfidy brought the destruction of war ; while no conflict with the red 
man ever stained the history of the state founded by the peaceful and just 
men of Shrewsbury, Salem, and Burlington. Food was voluntarily furnished 
in many a crisis, when the settlers were in sore straits. Lands w-ere released 
on terms that now seem incredible. Within a little more than thirty days 



SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM xix 



after the arrival of the pioneer settlers in 1677, deeds were signed covering 
an area nearly equal to one half the acreage of the State to-day. Shelter 
was offered the poorest wayfarer and in the quiet little meeting houses the 
dark skinned hunters and trappers with their wives and children were soon 
found drinking eagerly from the same mysterious fountain mental and spirit- 
ual strength. 

One of the earliest marriages at Burlington, number three on the recorded 
Friends' Meeting list, was that of a young Friend of Fenwick's colony at 
Salem, with an Indian maiden of winning ways and high character, as her 
subsequent life happily showed. This modest little daughter of a chief was 
treated with the same high consideration extended to her white sisters of the 
most influential families. Her marriage certificate was signed by the relig- 
ious and social leaders of the community. The scene was one worthy to be 
commemorated by the most gifted artist. Often children were left in the 
care of Indian neighbors while their parents journeyed from home, or attended 
Yearly Meeting, and without a single betrayal of trust. Many of these trusty 
allies sought the privilege of a last resting place beside their good friends. 
In God's acre they sleep peacefully with those whom they welcomed when 
fleeing from oppression and peril in their own land. Sometime, mayhap, 
the darkness that has encompassed the American Indian will be penetrated 
and it will be revealed that these strange people, possessed of such remarkable 
traits and character, came from progenitors of the human race who were 
closely allied with the brightest type of mankind ever known. 

The purpose of the Quaker colonists was, as they frankly said, to lay the 
foundations broad and deep, based upon the very highest principles of justice. 
Liberty of the individual and freedom of conscience were assured to all, not 
only to those of their own faith. By example and precept they sought to 
make Pennsylvania and New Jersey model Commonwealths, where all men 
should have every right guaranteed. They were constitution makers and 
nation builders of superior wisdom, wonderful foresight, broad minded patri- 
otism. It was the full flower of their work which inspired the admiring 
tribute of the greatest English statesman of the nineteenth century. " The 
Constitution of the United States," said Mr. Gladstone, " is the wisest docu- 
ment ever conceived by the mind of man." 

In the industrial arena these always zealous workers wrought mightily. 
The purse-proud drone and social parasite of our time was unknown amongst 
them. They reduced the forest, redeemed waste places, developed resources, 



XX SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM 



established and fostered trade, and all the while maintained the highest 
standard of commercial integrity. The records of the business meetings of 
their religious society bear constant testimony to their determination to permit 
no variation from the strictest principles of honesty, while every effort was 
made to settle all differences quietly and peaceably, without even recourse to 
law. They were the original and consistent friends and exponents of arbi- 
tration, and well it would have been for those who have come after them, 
in all the walks of life, if this wise and just example had been followed. 

Their abhorrence of every aspect of warfare forbade them bearing arms, 
but they were never lacking in loyalty to rightful government. During the 
Revolution they were often subjected to ill-founded suspicion and rash injus- 
tice. But when the conflict was over, no one bore more willing and deserved 
tribute to their purity of motive and upright conduct than Washington him- 
self. Upon one occasion while he was President, he asked an esteemed 
Friend on what principle he had opposed the war. " On the same prin- 
ciple," was the reply, " that I should be opposed to a change in this govern- 
ment. All that ever was gained by revolutions is not an adequate compensa- 
tion to the poor mangled soldier for loss of life or limb." Washington 
pondered deeply and then earnestly said: "I honor your sentiments; there 
is more in that than mankind have generally considered." 

In social life the Quakers lived upon the loftiest plane. Here, again, their 
meeting records show how zealous they were for the preservation of the honor 
and safety of the home. Then as now they could not look with the least 
shadow of toleration upon any infraction of the moral law. Without the 
elaborate and pretentious hygienic knowledge of our day of scientific advance- 
ment, their homes, plain and simple in every appointment, were the abode 
of cleanly healthfulness, self-restraint and self-control, that rendered lon- 
gevity, barring accident, the natural inheritance of almost every child of 
sound parentage. The blood of more than two hundred years of Quakerism, 
with its strain of English, Irish, Welsh and Scotch vigor and French Hugue- 
not refinement, has produced a people of unequalled physical purity and 
strength. Their contribution in this respect alone, to the welfare and hap- 
piness of the American people, has been of immeasurable value. That they 
may not only not diminish in numbers or influence, but grow in strength 
everywhere, must be the earnest wish of every one having the interests of the 
human race at heart. 

No subject was nearer the hearts of Friends than education. With earnest 



SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM xxi 

solicitude for the welfare of future generations — and their enlightened sym- 
pathy in this respect was not confined to their own Society circles — they 
founded schools of superior character in every community, in some instances 
before neighborhood meeting houses were built. At Burlington this matter 
was taken up soon after the establislinient of a meeting, it being specially 
provided by the Assembly, in 1682, that the revenues from an adjacent island 
should be exclusively devoted to the cause of education. Many of these 
schools were the predecessors of famous institutions in the educational world. 
The first school in Philadelphia was established by Friends in 1683 ; and six 
years later, at the earnest suggestion of the founder of the colony, what has 
been known for over two hundred years as the Penn Charter School was 
founded, its formal charter dating from 1698. It is a significant fact that 
great numbers of the most discerning people having no connection with the 
Society of Friends have placed their children, with entire confidence and to 
their great benefit, in the care of Friends' teachers. The pioneer schools 
were generally located near meetings and were cooperative neighbors. It 
was an impressive union of moral, religious and intellectual forces always 
working for the common good. 

In the higher arena of spiritual life Quakerism has fulfilled a mission as 
surely God- given as it has been abundantly blessed by every possible mani- 
festation of Divine favor. It was no new thing the shepherd boy of Leices- 
ter discovered and so fervently and successfully taught. He only revealed 
to those sitting in darkness and others led away by empty formality and still 
others lost in the wilderness of sinful indulgences and neglect, the real 
character, possibilities, privileges and joy of the soul. Opening wide his 
young heart and earnestly seeking the light of truth from its true and only 
source, he was vouchsafed in overwhelming measure knowledge, comfort, 
courage, experience and strength which made him a flaming herald of 
righteousness. 

In a single sentence George Fox summed up his conclusive faith. " I 
saw," said he, " that Christ died for all men and had enlightened all men 
and women with His divine and saving light and that no man could be a 
true believer but who believed in it." That he was not self-deceived, the 
victim of a too exalted imagination, was quickly shown by the multitude of 
rejoicing followers who were ready to testify to the presence within their 
own souls of a light and joy never before known. That there was, also, 
readiness for self-sacrifice was speedily demonstrated. Yawning jails and 



xxii SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM 

dungeons had no terrors for these devoted people. Men of refined character 
and delicately nurtured women bowed their necks to the yoke of oppression 
and endured hardships with a meekness and fortitude that must ever com- 
mand the admiration of mankind. 

George Bancroft, the ablest and fairest minded of American historians, 
beautifully sums up the lesson of that wonderful period, when he says : 

" Far from rejecting Christianity, the Quaker insisted that he alone held 
it in its primitive simplicity. The skeptic forever vibrated, the Quaker was 
fixed. To him Christianity was freedom. He loved to remember that the 
patriarchs were graziers, that the prophets were mechanics and shepherds. 
To him there was joy in the thought that the brightest image of divinity on 
earth had been born in a manger, had been reared under the roof of a car- 
penter. Every avenue of truth was to be kept open. The Inner Light to 
the Quaker is not only the revelation of truth, but the guide of life and the 
oracle of duty." 

The zeal of Friends for the propagation of the truth as it was revealed to 
them was boundless. Their feet hardly touched the ground in Burlington 
and elsewhere before they arranged meetings for worship, often sitting under 
the trees, or gathering in one another's houses or even barns, until other 
places could be built. There were thank offerings from full hearts and the 
missionary spirit was instantly manifested. Many gifted with speech and 
highly favored with clearness of view were eager to carry the gospel tidings 
to those deprived of special privileges. The story of these pioneer preach- 
ers and their journeyings to and fro through the wilderness is as fascinating 
as it is inspiring. Their quaint journals portray all unconsciously their own 
spiritual devotion and show the unity and love which pervaded the people. 
Wayside meetings would be held at short notice, with great comfort to all 
concerned. Friends never were too busy to assemble and reverently listen to 
the sweet story of old. 

It was not stout-hearted and strong-bodied men alone who thus traveled 
in all directions and in all seasons to minister to those in need. Scores of 
devoted women left their comfortable homes, threading the bridle paths 
through the forests, crossing on horseback swollen streams, meeting the lone 
Indian by the way without fear, often stopping at his wigwam, cabin or cave, 
hearing the shrill cry of the panther and the wolf. They journeyed to the 
bleak hillsides of New England, to the far South, to the border settlements 
along the Susquehanna and Wyoming. They crossed again the ocean and 
labored with the Friends left behind in the fatherland. 



SPIRIT AND MISSION OF QUAKERISM xxiii 

The literature of memorials and journals concerning these first ambassadors 
of righteousness in the American wilderness will be read by coming genera- 
tions with increasing interest and spiritual profit. The long roll of names 
tenderly recalled and talked of around the fireside by successive generations 
comprises a list of Christian workers worthy of everlasting remembrance. 
In every good word and work the Friends were and have always been zealous, 
self-sacrificing, unwearied. In the spirit of truth they have labored faith- 
fully. Their mission has been to bless and help mankind, to illustrate in their 
own calm, pure, contented lives the teachings of the Master whom they 
serve in quietness and peace. 



GENEALOGY 



OF THE DESCENDANTS OF 



THOMAS FRENCH 



THE COLONIAL DAWN 




HE exact date of the first settlement of New Jersey is not 
fixed by accepted historical records. The earliest colonists 
were Dutch from Holland, about 1620, who planted a col- 
ony near the present site of Bergen. In 1623 another com- 
pany, under Captain Cornelius Mey, settled on the east side 
of the Delaware, nearly opposite where Philadelphia was 
located more than half a century later. They built Fort Nassau, on what 
is now known as Timber creek, a stream which enters the Delaware a short 
distance below Camden. During the ensuing forty years, Swedes, Finns, 
Dutch and English struggled for supremacy, until, in 1664, Charles II, of 
England, disregarding all rival claims, granted all the territory between the 
Delaware and Connecticut rivers to his brother, the Duke of York, who later 
succeeded him as James II, and forcibly took possession. Pending complete 
subjection of the country, the Duke sold all his claims to Lord Berkley and 
Sir George Carteret, M'ho named the tract New Jersey, in honor of Sir 
George, who as governor of the island of Jersey, had loyally sustained Charles 
in his contest with parliament and Cromwell. There was much difficulty in 
establishing permanent and satisfactory local government. 

In 1673, Berkley sold his interest in the proprietorship to John Fenwick 
and Edward Byllynge, Quakers, who later conveyed a controlling interest to 
AVilliam Penn, who had become much interested in the project, and two other 
Quakers of financial responsibility, Gauen Laurie and Nicholas Lucas. In 
1675, Fenwick brought over a colony of upwards of two hundred persons 

25 



26 GENEALOGY OF THE 

and established a settlement on the Delaware at an attractive place which 
he called Salem, in view of its peaceful and inviting aspect. In 1677 another 
company of homeseekers came from London, made up almost entirely of 
English and Irish Quakers, locating some sixty miles farther up the river, 
founding Burlington. Thus the permanent settlement of West Jersey was 
begun by strong men and heroic women. 

For some years the province was divided into East and West Jersey. In 
February, 1682, the upper territory, as far north as the Hudson river, was 
purchased by William Penn a,nd eleven associates, all men of means, high 
character and influence, and later twelve others were added. One of these, 
Robert Barclay, an able Scotchman and influential Friends' minister, was 
made Governor. Through wise and just administration the country became 
an asylum for the oppressed and entered upon an era of industrial develop- 
ment and great prosperity. Under a subdivided proprietorship and gover- 
norship, however, many difficulties arose; and in 1702 the proprietors sur- 
rendered the civil government to the British crown, retaining all personal 
property rights in the land, under the original agreements of purchase. Lord 
Cornbury became the first governor, under Queen Anne. 

FIRST CONSTITUTION OF NEW JERSEY 

The great charters of civil and religious liberty granted the settlers of New 
England were duplicated by the first Constitution of New Jersey, afterward 
reappearing in all essential particulars, in Pennsylvania. Formulated by 
Berkley and Carteret, and signed February 10, 1664, it was entitled: "The 
Concessions and Agreement of the Lords Proprietors of the Province of New 
Caesarea, or New Jersey, to and with all and every of the Adventurers, and 
all such as shall settle or plant there." It was provided that government 
should be vested in a governor, six councillors, whom he should choose, and 
an Assembly, to be chosen by the people. Loyalty to the crown of England 
was required. The Assembly was to make all laws needful, create courts 
and provide for the common defense. Faithful and impartial execution of 
every civil trust was guaranteed. The next section was the most important 
of all ; it declared as follows : 

" That no person qualified as aforesaid, within the said province, at any 
time shall be any ways molested, punished, disquieted or called in question, 
for any difference in opinion or practice in matters of religious concernments, 




SYCAMORE TREE, BURLINGTON, N. J., OVER 300 YEARS OLD 
To which tradition says pioneer vessels were moored 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 27 

who do not actually disturb the civil peace of the said province; but that 
all and every such person and persons may, from time to time, and at all 
times, freely and fully have and enjoy his and their judgments and con- 
sciences, in matters of religion, throughout the said province, they behaving 
themselves peaceably and quietly, and not using this liberty to licentiousness, 
nor to the civil injury or outward disturbance of others; any law, statute 
or clause contained, or to be contained, usage or custom of this realm of 
England, to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding." 

Seven years' occupancy and use of land secured permanency of title. As 
an inducement to industrious settlers it was provided that every freeman 
becoming a member of the colony at the beginning should be given one hun- 
dred and fifty acres of land for himself and one hundred and fifty acres for 
every able-bodied man servant, seventy- five acres for each minor servant 
above fourteen years, and seventy-five acres was to be given to each " Chris- 
tian servant " at the expiration of his term of service. 

FOUNDING OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

Twelve years after the issuance of the Berkley-Carteret proclamation of 
settlement, the first organized movement towards acceptance of its liberal 
provisions was inaugurated in London. On the third of March, 1676, about 
one hundred and fifty earnest-minded men, including William Penn, Gauen 
Laurie, Thomas Lambert, Thomas Ollive, Thomas ffrench, Edward Byllynge 
and Henry Stacy, signed a paper entitled, " The Concessions and Agree- 
ments of the proprietors, freeholders and inhabitants of the province of West 
New Jersey in America." This now historic document, in the preparation 
of which William Penn played a large part, followed the main lines of the 
Berkley-Carteret paper, making still further provision for the successful 
planting of the new colony and its wise and efficient government. Conmiis- 
sioners were to be selected and appointed to represent the lords proprietors 
and the settlers and to have power to order and manage the affairs of the 
province. They were also to divide the land into stated provisions of ten 
parts each, or proprieties, these to be subdivided. Future Commissioners 
were to be elected by the citizens. An Assembly, or legislative body, was 
to succeed the Commissioners, the members being chosen by the people, by 
ballot. 

An outline of governmental provisions and legislation was given, the pur- 



28 . GENEALOGY OF THE 



pose being to found a model Commonwealth in which the largest measure of 
individual liberty was to be allowed, consistent with the protection of the 
rights of all and the maintenance of good order. Disturbers of the peace 
were to be regarded as public enemies and dealt with severely, but trial by 
jury was provided for and impartial administration of justice assured. Im- 
prisonment for debt was forbidden. Peace with the Indians was to be faith- 
fully maintained. There was to be free legislative discussion and open voting 
before the people. The section of this immortal document which will for- 
ever command the increasing admiration of mankind, was as follows : 

" That no men, nor number of men upon earth, hath power or authority 
to rule over men's consciences in religious matters ; therefore it is consented, 
agreed and ordained, that no person or persons whatsoever, within the said 
province, at any time or times hereafter shall be any ways, upon any pretence 
whatsoever, called in question, or in the least punished or hurt, either in 
person, estate or privilege, for the sake of his opinion, judgment, faith or 
worship towards God, in matters of religion; but that all and every such 
person and persons, may from time to time, and at all times, freely and fully 
have and enjoy his and their judgments, and the exercise of their consciences, 
in matters of religious worship throughout all the said province." 

Hampton L. Carson, former Attorney General of Pennsylvania, in a recent 
address before the Pennsylvania Historical Society, thus spoke of " William 
Penn as a Law Giver " : 

" He severed church from State ; secured the rights of conscience ; wedded 
religious liberty to civil security ; encouraged immigration ; armed the citizen 
with the ballot ; converted prisons into work-houses ; abolished the infamy of 
jailers' fees ; punished perjury and extortion ; destroyed multiplicity of suits ; 
overthrew the inequalities of primogeniture ; suppressed piracy ; assailed vice ; 
stripped the criminal law of ferocious punishments ; encouraged literature ; 
rewarded science, and thus strove to secure the peace, purity and happiness 
of his people." 

SETTLEMENT OF BURLINGTON 

The rise of the Society of Friends must ever be regarded as one of the 
memorable events in the history of mankind. Out of the fires of persecution 
arose companies of consecrated men and women who crossed the sea to set 
up an empire of civil and religious freedom. The settlement of Burlington 
was one of the links in the chain of circmnstances that illustrated the most 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 29 



beautiful and inspiring lessons of faith, courage and heroic endurance. Fol- 
lowing the first ship, the Kent, in 1677, within three years came upwards of 
fourteen hundred persons, all eager to share the trials of the pioneers. These 
settled along both sides of the Delaware, from Salem to the falls, near the 
site of the future state capital of New Jersey. Some were families of fair 
estate, for those times; others possessed very little with which to begin life 
in the wilderness. Others were modest tradesmen and useful artisans. 

The first little company felt their way cautiously, leaving their ship some 
forty miles below Chygoe Island, where they finally determined to locate a 
town. Not an hour was lost, however. Within forty days negotiations were 
completed with the Indians whereby large tracts of land were possessed. 
The plan adopted resulted in the laying out of Burlington — or Bridlington, 
as it was first called — essentially as it is to-day. Lots were assigned and 
houses built as rapidly as possible, while farm lands were located and cleared 
for cultivation. The old chronicles present quaint pictures of this hopeful 
colony of busy and happy workers. Every day brought some new revelation. 

"A MIGHTY FORTRESS IS OUR GOD" 

The dominant note was one of reverent gratitude for divine guidance and 
protection. An early letter to friends in England said : 

" A providential hand was very visible and remarkable in many instances, 
and the Indians were even rendered our benefactors and protectors. With- 
out carnal weapons, we entered the land and inhabited therein, as safe as if 
there had been thousands of garrisons, for the Most High preserved us from 
harm, both of man and beast." 

Many of the first built houses in Burlington were small wooden structures, 
some log huts, while a number of families for a time abode in caves along 
the river banks. Later substantial brick dwellings were erected and in this 
still old-fashioned town to-day, so quiet and restful, may be found a number 
of houses built in the early part of the eighteenth century and during the 
period prior to the Revolution. Some of these are large and imposing, show- 
ing all the distinguishing marks of the colonial era. Samuel Jennings, the 
first governor of West Jersey under the immigrant proprietors, had a large 
mansion on the river bank. He also built a fine country seat, known as 
" Green Hill," about two miles from Burlington, which stood with scarcely 
any change until a few years ago, when it was removed, but not until a pic- 



30 GENEALOGY OF THE 



ture of it was taken, which is here reproduced. Gov. Jennings was a noted 
Friends' minister, and at his country house meetings of ministers were often 
held. 

BURLINGTON MEETING 

That there was public worship very early is evident from the statement 
that open air meetings were held under sails borrowed from ships, and even 
marriages were thus celebrated. It was decided to organize the society in 
due form and the first minute, herewith given, quaintly sets forth this fact. 




lyice by i/ieacvt> ^^c€iMx)^Yieo cfcrSb rruxn^ j^evb^ 
LuitSwti^ ^umiCies /viH,vc i/vcfrispoT^ tf^trtSe/vcs -mix 
inio inh 'jh^vince ofV^CSt yVitu Jc/iscij (fie ^aib -jm^oibs in. 
ifiose uipipct ^nanrb f{ave fovunh Hneeb4jA.U a£<otbin^ io otm 
ui^uxctice trt^ive: ifyloue. wee. carru>^ ^zom io Seille, cMopihfy 
YdedinM fo^ in^ wtll o^exvna xfie Clwai/is c^in'^^tk 
H was cm^ceeb maJt acayvbinauj ttjkotAjSi ^e'^onearih 
CCcQo^irial^ Hwas^one. the ^/^^ WV ^^o J ob/S 

^TstTage of '^jBurlingtoiv Meetuia Hecords" 

Meetings were regularly held at the houses of different members for a 
number of years, chiefly those of John Woolston and Thomas Gardiner. The 
first Yearly Meeting, taking in also Friends' societies at Salem, Shrewsbury 
and Crosswicks, New Jersey; Shackamaxon and Falls, Pennsylvania, was 
held at Thomas Gardiner's, Burlington, 6 mo. 28"^ 1681. Some years later 
the Yearly Meeting alternated with Philadelphia, until it was permanently 
located in the latter city in 1760. 



I 



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3 2! 

£ a 

- I 

3 O 

3D 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 31 



Soon after locating in Burlington, Friends took it into consideration to 
build a meeting house, as the society was rapidly outgrowing the capacity 
of private houses. Accordingly we find the following niinute, under date 
12 mo. 5"^- 1682: 

" It is ordered that a meeting house be built according to a draught of 
six square building of forty foot square from out to out for which he is 
to have 160 pounds, which y^ meeting engageth to see y" Persons paid that 
shall disburst y" same to Francis Collings." 

This important project seems to have proceeded slowly ; in part, apparently, 
on account of the diligent attention the contractor paid to the attractive widow 
of Dr. Gosling, whom he finally secured as his second wife. In those days 
honorable courting, especially on the part of well-to-do widowers with young 
children, seems to have been regarded as a serious business. Finally the 
building was completed. The minute for 2 mo. 6 1691, says: 

" This day it is ordered that our First day Meetings at Burlington shall 
begin in the morning at the 9"^ hour, and at the 2°'^ hour in the afternoon ; 
and be held both morning and evening in the meeting house." 

The accompanying illustration of this historic structure is from a drawing 
furnished the artist, a native of Burlington. With the occupancy of the 
Meeting House marriages were solemnized there. Several years later a brick 
addition was erected, for winter use. For nearly one hundred years successive 
generations of Friends met in these quaint buildings for worship and coun- 
sel. The burial ground, immediately in the rear, was used meanwhile and 
has been since, until very little unoccupied space is left. 

In 1785 the present Meeting House was built and it stands as firmly as 
ever, like the two great trees overshadowing it, which have stood guard for 
fully two hundred and fifty years. Historic relics, still in use, are the little 
pine table, upon which marriage certificates are signed, and the chairs, also, 
shown in accompanying illustrations, all more than two hundred years old 
and good for centuries more, though the fact is to be noted with infinite 
regret that the active membership of this historic Meeting is sadly reduced. 
In early days it was so noted for the number of ministers in attendance that 
it was sometimes referred to as the " School of the Prophets." 

The following curious minutes are taken from early Burlington records: 



32 GENEALOGY OF THE 



At our Wens Monthly Meeting held at y*" House of Tho' Gardiner in 
Bur*°° y" 10*" of y' 7*" mo: 1683 

Friends saw meet to take it into their Consideration y' It might be 
necefsary to have a Carriage made to Carry Such y* are to be Laid in 
y' Ground who Live in remote parts from y" Burying place which is 
Referred to y* next meeting for further Consideration. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at y* House of Tho" Gardiner in 

gto- ye jst Qf ye gth jjjQ. j^g3 

Where the meeting ordered y' Jn° Butcher Should make a Carriage to 
bear Such to y*' Ground y* depart this Life who have Lived at a Distance 
from y* Burying Place & their Relations do now Live. 



NOTABLE LAND MARKS 

One of the notable land marks in the graveyard — now lying flat, as the 
Meeting some seventy-five years ago decreed all of like elaborate character 
should be placed — is the tombstone of a worthy member of one of the pioneer 
families of Burlington, whose descendants have ever since held positions of 
usefulness and influence in the Society and the religious and business world. 
The inscription on this memorial reads as follows : 

On the 30th day of July 1754 died 
Joseph Scattergood, Esq 
aged 40 years 
And the next day was interred here 
He was a Husband Loving & Beloved 
A Tender parent A Kind Relative 
A Sincere & faithful Friend a Good Master 
an Honest Man 
This Stone is placed over his Grave 
by his Mournful Widow as a Tribute 
Justly due to his Memory 

Another impressive reminder of the early days is the great sycamore tree 
on the bank of the Delaware river, to which immigrant vessels were moored 
before a wharf was built. Accompanying picture shows this forest giant 
as it appears to-day, nearly three hundred years old, a wonderful specimen 
of long-lived trees in America. Its circumference, in 1908, was twenty-one 
feet eight inches. 



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c 

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C 
3? 






o 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 33 



FOUNDING OF ST. MARY'S CHURCH 

For a quarter of a century from the beginning, Friends constituted the only 
religious society in or about Burlington. In 1703 the Church of England 
established St. Mary's, first known as St. Anne's. This parish, therefore, is 
one of the oldest in America. The original building, erected in 1703, but 
not finished within for several years thereafter, has been enlarged four times 
and is now used chiefly for charitable purposes. The illustration given shows 
the front after the extension was made in 1769. A former rector, Rev. Dr. 
Morgan Hills, has published an elaborate history of the church. During the 
first seventy-three years there were but four regular ministers, namely, Revs. 
John Talbot, Robert Weyman, Colin Campbell and Jonathan Odell. 

The first and third of these pioneer missionaries sometimes, under the spell 
of discouragement in consequence of many obstacles, complained to the parent 
society in London that the plain non-conformist people, amongst whom their 
lot had been cast, were too aggressive and too influential in the affairs of the 
province. But Dr. Odell seemed to more generously sum up the whole mat- 
ter when, in 1768. he frankly declared, in a letter to his clerical superiors; 
" Of all Dissenters in this country, the Quakers are the most friendly to our 
Communion." Ten years later this zealous missionary had fresh cause to 
acknowledge Quaker kindness, on account of the timely aid and protection 
of a noted Quaker widow, Margaret Morris, whose quick wit saved him 
from capture and ignominious punishment by the enemies of his king. 

FEATURES OF SOCIAL LIFE 

Social intercourse in and around Burlington soon brightened the lives of 
the pioneers. Chronicles of the time relate how the members of different 
communities exchanged visits and in each town or hamlet a neighborly spirit 
prevailed. A pleasant summer time custom was out-door teas, quite informal 
and therefore all the more enjoyable. The quaint little porches, generally 
having a short bench on either side of the doorway, were almost universal. 
Here elderly men and women would sit in the evening, chatting with passing 
friends, while the young folks would occupy rustic seats upon the side lawn, 
or stroll to the river bank. Quarterly Meeting days, vendues and local fairs 
were occasions of great social interest. 

Early marriage records show how busy cupid was uniting families in Penn- 
sylvania and New Jersey. The young men did not believe in lengthy bache- 

3 



34 GENEALOGY OF THE 

lorhood, and very few spinsters beyond the age of twenty-two were to be 
found. Early marriages and large, healthy families, domestic peace and 
happiness characterized those days of nation founding. It was a period of 
wonderful simplicity, trustfulness, honesty, purity and genuine material pros- 
perity and spiritual development. The civic and religious records show how 
each community was blessed, and industrial advancement and increasing 
population was supplemented by the setting up of meetings throughout West 
Jersey. Early meetings were Burlington, Mt. Holly, Springfield, Chester- 
field (Crosswicks), Rancocas (Northampton), Chester (Moorestown), Had- 
donfield, Newton, Evesham and Woodbury. 

PENSAUKIN TRADITIONS 

Definite traces of early meeting places in several instances have been quite 
lost ; concerning others shadowy tradition points to the site of pioneer homes, 
as it was the custom to hold meetings in private houses until more suitable 
places could be provided. Old resting places for the dead have likewise 
been virtually obliterated. On the west bank of Pensaukin creek, near where 
it is crossed by the road from Camden to Moorestown, beneath a grove of 
trees, is an old graveyard, long since abandoned for use. A meeting house 
stood near by two hundred years ago. To this place the dead were some- 
times brought in boats from Philadelphia. Several stones remained in posi- 
tion until half a century ago. Upon one was traced the faint inscription : 

E. C 

1713 

From the same place was taken a stone, which was set up in the wall of 
a neighboring spring house. The following inscription was copied there- 
from: 

WHO ART THOU THAT 

PASETH BY: LOOK ON THIS 

PLACE; SEE HOW WE LIE 

AND FOR THY SOLE 

BE SURE CARE TAKE 

FOR WHEN DETH COMS 

TWILL BE TOO LATE 



9) 



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So 1^ 

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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 35 



AN INCIDENT OF THE TIME 

In 1689, George Keith, an early and active Friends' minister, came from 
England, having been engaged as teacher of the first grammar school in 
Philadelphia, afterwards known as the Penn Charter School. He was re- 
garded by contemporaries as a very learned man, and in 1691 his preaching 
led to a doctrinal division amongst Friends. Refusing to be admonished, the 
disturber was disowned by the Yearly Meeting which met at Burlington in 
1692. The result was an attempt to set up separate meetings of so-called 
Christian Quakers, who were known as Keithians. In 1694, Keith returned 
to England and in a short time became identified with the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church, receiving ordination at the hands of the Bishop of London in 
1700. He again appeared in the colonies, this time as the first missionary 
of the Church of England to New Jersey and Pennsylvania and was known 
as the relentless foe of Quakerism the remainder of his days. 

Friends' meeting records show some curious effects of the Keith schism. 
A number of cases of severe discipline are to be noted. One taken from the 
book of certificates of the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting, relating to a Bur- 
lington incident, is herewith given : 

" John Jones his paper of Condemnation in order to clear the truth &c 

" Whereas I did amongst many others unadvisedly sign a pernitious 

paper said to be given forth from y® yearly meeting at Burlington the 

4th jth ^th ^ yth (j^j.gg of jjjg seaventh month 1692 which was indeed a 

seperate meeting set up out of the unity of ffriends and in Opposition to 
Y ^^ And the said paper Containing a severe Censure & Judgment upon 
ffriends Especially those ministering friends that gave forth the first Public 
Testimony against George Keith &c though the pretence was for peace and 
reconciliation and I not then percieving the mischievous design y' was Car- 
rying on was prevailed with to do as afores'' which as it was a great abuse 
to ffriends & Contributed to the Strengthening an evil spirit and wrong 
party : so it hath bin my sorrow and burthen Wherfore I do for satisfac- 
tion to my abused Brethren & Caution to others to beware of the Like 
Snare — and if it might be for the reclaiming of such as are fallen w'" me 
all ready into it & for the removing of all Jealousies y* might Justly raysed 
in y* minds of any that might hinder our unity and fellowship in the 
Truth Give forth this Testimony against that and all other acts done by 
me tending to the making or Countenancing y* hurtful! seperation made 
by George Keith &c Blessing the Lord in the sence of his mercy who hath 
opened a way for my return and given me a place amongst his people 
where I desire for ever to hold the unity of the spirit in the bond of 

P^^*^^ (Signed) John Jones" 



36 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MESSAGE OF GEORGE FOX 

During his visit to America, in 1672, George Fox passed through the sec- 
tion afterward known as West Jersey, and wrote to his friends at home com- 
mending it as a desirable place for settlement. " It is a most brave country, 
with good soil," he said. He always took a lively interest in the Quaker 
colonies, and in a letter written in March, 1676, about the time of the sign- 
ing of the " Concessions and Agreements," addressed to " Friends in New 
Jersey and those who intend going there," he said : 

" Let your lives and words and conversations be as becomes the Gospel, 
that you may adorn the truth and honor the Lord in all your undertak- 
ings. Let that be your desire, and then you will have the Lord's blessing, 
and increase both in basket and field and storehouse ; and at your lyings 
down you will feel him, and at your goings forth and coming in. And 
let temperance and patience and kindness and brotherly love be exercised 
among you, so that you may abound in virtue and the true humility; living 
in peace, showing forth the nature of Christianity; that you may all live 
as a family and the church of God." 

COUNCIL OF PROPRIETORS 

The land affairs of the province of West Jersey were at first conducted 
by special commissioners appointed by the proprietors, who came to America 
with the colony in 1677. This body was vested with authority to regulate 
the allotment of all lands, through surveys, make rules affecting rights of 
ownership, public highways, etc., in strict accord with the fundamental prin- 
ciples laid down in the " Concessions," signed in London, in 1676. They 
faithfully performed this work for ten years. The whole number of proprie- 
tors had now become so large and the members were so scattered that the 
transaction of business had become difficult. Therefore a general meeting 
of proprietors was held at Burlington, February 14, 1687, at which it was 
determined that there should be constituted a Council of Proprietors, to con- 
sist of eleven members, afterwards reduced to nine, to be annually chosen 
from among themselves. 

These Councillors were fully empowered to act in all such affairs as con- 
cerned the general body. They agreed upon a system of rules relating to 
surveys and sales of land. In this manner the land affairs of West Jersey 
continued to be directed for a long period, and indeed the authority so exer- 



An Hiftonoil Defcnption 

O F THE 

PROVINCE and CX")UNTilY 

O F 

IVefi-New-jferfey 

AMERICA. 

A fhortVie^* ot their Laws. CuftorTis inj J{elip-nm. A3 
alfo the Tempe-amerd of the Air and Chmaie; Tfic 
Jatnefs of tlievJoj/, with the vaft Product of l\:ce, &c. 
The Improvemenr of their Z,4/7ij (as dj E^incnd) to 
Vafiure. Meadoujs. 8<c. Their making great quanti- 
ties of Vitch and Tar, as alfo Turfentine^ wfiicn pro- 
ceeds from the Pine Trees^ with 7?ti:[^« as clear as 
G«v2 J/^^jc^, with pavdcuJar "Remarks upon tljfir 
T<7ii'-a^, Fairs and Marcus ; wich the great Pleniy of 
Or/ and f4^haJf-Bon» made frorn the great Tiurr\ber of 
iVhaler rhej yearir taU : As alfo many other Pi-oiihi- 
ble and New lmprovaT\ents. 



Wever raade Puhlick till iigw, 



% GABRIEL THOMAS. 



L JN' D 2^: 

Prinred in the Year 1698. 

TITLE-PAGE, GABRIEL THOMAS' HISTORY OF WEST NEW JERSEY 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 37 



cised is recognized to this day in connection with unlocated and unsurveyed 
lands. The Council meets once a year, in May, in Burlington. The early 
minute books are carefully preserved in the office of the Surveyor General, 
at Burlington, and generally are in good condition. A few leaves have been 
moth-eaten, as will be seen by the photographic reproduction of part of the 
minute of a meeting in 1687, at which Thomas ffrench was recorded as pres- 
ent. Another picture shows the present Surveyor General's office, erected 
about one hundred years ago, in which original documents, including the 
" Concessions and Agreements " of 1676 are preserved. 

In the Surveyor General's office is the original final deed of James, Duke 
of York, afterwards James II, to William Penn, Gauen Laurie and others, 
in trust for Edward Byllynge, bearing date August 6, 1680. It is a large 
parchment sheet, about 30 x 35 inches, showing but little the marks of decay. 
It was recently photographed, for the first time, for the compiler of this 
book, a copy being presented to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The 
famous " Concessions and Agreements," beautifully w-ritten on heavy vellum 
and bound in book form, defies the ravages of time. It is as clear as when 
engrossed and signed two hundred and thirty-one years ago. Three pages 
of this immortal document are reproduced, the title page and two others 
showing the signatures of Penn, Byllynge, Laurie, OUive, Thomas ffrench 
and other leaders of the colonization movement. 

PEN PICTURE OF COLONIAL LIFE 

In many respects the quaintest story of the early settlement of Pennsyl- 
vania and New Jersey was written by Gabriel Thomas, an observant English- 
man, who lived fifteen years in the colonies and wTote a truthful account of 
what he saw and heard. This little book was published in London, in 1698. 
Original copies are very rare and when found bring a fabulous price. About 
fifty years ago a liberal-minded antiquarian of New York, Henry Austin 
Brady, had the book faithfully reproduced by lithographic process. A pho- 
tograph of the title page of the second part, dealing with New Jersey, is 
given. The author's special purpose, uniquely set forth, was to present such 
4 a favorable account of the new country that industrious persons of good 
character would be induced to seek homes in a land where there was wide 
opportunity for every one. Interesting extracts are here presented: 

"The first Inhabitants of this Countrey were the Indians, being supposed 
to be part of the Ten dispersed Tribes of Israel; for indeed they are very 



38 GENEALOGY OF THE 

like the Jews in their Persons, and something in their Practices and Wor- 
ship, for they observe the New Moons with great Devotion and Reverence. 
And their first Fruits they offer, with their Corn and Hunting Game they 
get in the whole Year, to a False Deity or Sham-God, whom they must 
please, else, as they fancy, many Misfortunes will befall them and great 
Injuries will be done them. They are very loving to one another and are 
very kind and civil to any Christians. The Women are very ingenious in 
their several Imployments as well as the Men. Their young Maids are 
naturally very modest and their young Women when newly married are 
very nice and shy. As to the manner of their Language, it is high and 
lofty, with a short sentence. 

" Burlington is become a very famous Town, having a great many 
stately brick houses in it. There are many fine Wharfs and large Timber 
Yards, Malt Houses, Bake Houses and most sorts of Tradesmen. There 
are many Fair and Great Brick Houses on the outside of the Town which 
the Gentry have built for their Countrey Houses. There are kept in this 
Famous Town several Fairs every year. Bread, Beer, Beef, Pork, Cheese, 
Butter and most sorts of Fruit here is great Plenty and very Cheap. 

" There is Glocester Town, which is a very Fine and Pleasant Place, 
being well stored with Summer Fruits, whither Young People come from 
Philadelphia in the Wherries (boats) to eat Strawberries and Cream, within 
sight of which City it is sweetly situated. The Air is very Clear, Sweet 
and Wholesom ; in the depth of Winter it is something colder, and as 
much hotter in the heighth of Summer than in England. 

" They have Wheat, Rye, Peas, Gates, Barley, Rice &c in vast quantities ; 
also Roots, Herbs and Salads in abundance. Of Fish they have many 
sorts in prodigious Shoals and Wild Water Fowl are numerous beyond all 
expectation, and Land Fowl are in extraordinary abundance and very large, 
with Charming and curious Birds too tedious to specify. 

" I might have given a much larger Account of this Countrey, and yet 
without straining or deviating in the least from the Principles of my 
Profession, which are Truth itself. I have no Plot in my Pate, deep 
Design, not the least expectation of gaining anything by them that go 
thither, or losing by those who stay here. Reader, I wish thee all Health 
and Happiness in this and Everlasting Comfort in the World to come." 




THE FRENCH FAMILY IN ENGLAND 




N'DER variously spelled surnames the French family ap- 
peared in England soon after the Norman conquest. The 
tirst of the line recorded was with William the Conqueror 
at the battle of Hastings, October 14, 1066, when Harold, 
King of the Anglo-Saxons, was defeated after an all-day 
struggle. Of 60,000 valiant soldiers, William lost more 
than 15,000. Yorkshire records of 1100 frequently show the name French. 
Others located in the beginning chiefly in the southeastern counties, but later 
appeared in the west and north as far as Scotland. They were very early in 
Ireland, and one branch of the family trace their descent directly from RoUo, 
Duke of Normandy. In England, before the close of the thirteenth century, 
the French family had become extensive, prosperous and influential. 

Old records present curious facts. The will of Adam Frensch, of Glouces- 
ter, provided for his burial in church, beside his first wife, Maud. His cloth- 
ing was to be sold for the benefit of his soul. To his widow, Alice, he left 
lands, but in case of her remarriage they were to be sold, one half the pro- 
ceeds for her benefit, the other half for the good of the soul of Maud. In 
York the name was spelled Francais; in Berks, Ffrensh; in Middlesex, 
Frenssh ; in Somerset, Frensce ; in Surrey, Frensche ; in Northampton, Fran- 
ceis and Fraunceys ; in Wiltshire, French. Two centuries later it is gener- 
ally found, in Northampton, ffrench, after the manner adopted by the direct 
ancestors of that branch of the family whose descendants are recorded in 
this genealogy. 

Thomas ffrench, founder of the New Jersey branch of the French family, 
resided, in 1680, the year of his migration to America, in Nether Heyford, 
a parish in the hundred of Newbottle Grove, county of Northampton, seven 
miles south by west from the city of Northampton, England. This parish 
is very ancient, the church of S. S. Peter and Paul having been erected in 
the early part of the thirteenth century. The first patron was Roger de 
Heyford, in 1216. The register that has been preserved begins in 1558, 
showing the French family parishioners as far back as 1560. The church 

39 



40 GENEALOGY OF THE 

is a splendidly preserved specimen of Norman architecture. There is a chime 
of four bells; round the tenor is the inscription: 

"THOMAS MORGAN GAVE ME, TO THE CHURCH OF HEY- 
FORD FRANK AND FREE." 

The donor was a descendant of Francis Morgan, who, about the middle 
of the sixteenth century, for a time filled an honorable place upon the local 
bench. The Morgan family for more than two centuries were active and 
influential in the affairs of Nether Heyford parish. In the church a marble 
tablet perpetuates the memory of Judge Morgan. There are other notable 
memorials, one to a baronet who died in 1467; another beautifully illustrates 
Faith and Hope. In this parish was born Dr. John Preston, the patriarch 
of the Puritans, whom the Duke of Buckingham vainly sought to use in the 
service of the king, James I. Many members of the French family also 
attended services in the ancient church of St. Michael, at Bugbrook, about 
a mile and a half from Nether Heyford, and which was built early in the 
thirteenth century. Its register likewise begins in 1558. Accompanying 
illustrations, from photographs taken in 1895, show exterior view of the 
church at Nether Heyford, interior view, the Village Green and the church 
at Bugbrook. 

The church at Heyford has been under the care of one noted family of 
ministers for the past one hundred years, grandfather, father and son. The 
latter, Rev. H. H. Crawley, examined the parish register for the purposes of 
this book and in a recent letter says : 

"The Heyford Register, the earliest begins in 1558, is a very interesting 
one. I began to search from that date to 1774 and find that there are about 
70 entries of baptisms, marriages and burials of the name and they are 
evidently members of one family. There are at least 60 entries of the 
name between 1558 and 1680; the other entries of the name are evidently 
members of the family who did not leave the old country and I should 
say there are collateral branches of your family still living in or near 
Heyford. Your family in old days evidently held a responsible position 
in the parish, for members of the name appear as guardians in the seven- 
teenth century. The earliest record I can find is 1560. A part of Hey- 
ford formerly had a right of baptism, burial, etc., in Bugbrook. There is 
an aisle in Bugbrook church which is still called Heyford aisle, just as 
there is a Heyford aisle in the church at Stowe IX Churches." 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 41 



In the earliest days of the Society of Friends a little meeting house was 
set up at Bugbrook. There as at Hey ford and elsewhere the members con- 
tinued to outwardly conform, registering births and baptisms at the church, 
but it seems they often drew the line at burials and thus incurred at times 
severe criticism. From the Bugbrook parish register of 1668 the following 
curious note is taken : 

" About this time that untoward generation of Quakers began to bury 
theirs distinctly by themselves in their gardens and orchards in several 
places of the towne, all which burialls, there being no notice given of 
them to the minister or parish clerke, are here omitted, nor have their 
names inserted in this church register, tho there was a considerable mor- 
tality among them, as also those of several other sort of phanaticks, who 
having forsaken the church, would not be buried in the church yard, but 
in their orchards or backside of their houses." 

Thomas ffrench, father of Thomas ffrench, the progenitor of the New 
Jersey branch of the French family, like his ancestors of many generations, 
lived at Nether Heyford, where he was known as an influential and useful 

citizen. He married, first, Sara , by whoin he had the following 

children : 

Patience, b. 1637. Thomas, b. 1639. Sara, b. 1643. Elizabeth, b. 1645. 
Mary, b. 1648. John, b. 1651. 

By his second wife, Martha , he had: Robert, b. 1657. Martha, 

b. 1660. 

Thomas ffrench, senior, was buried May 5'^" 1673. Sara ffrench, his wife, 
was buried Feb. 9"'- 1653. 

The will of Thomas ffrench, as may be noted, is a quaint and characteristic 
document of the times. It shows the thoughtful regard of a loving parent 
in distributing his estate carefully and making special provision for those of 
tender years. 

WILL OF THOMAS FFRENCH, 1673 

In the Name of God Amen the Nine and twentyth day of Aprill in 
the five and twentyth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles 
the second of England Scotland Ffrance and Ireland King Defender of 
the faith Anno Dom 1673 I Thomas ffrench the Elder of Nether Heyford 
in the County of Northton being weak in body but of good and perfect 
Memory thanks be to Almightie God. And Knowing the uncertaintie of 
this life on earth do make this my last Will and testam in manner and 



42 GENEALOGY OF THE 

forme ffollowing And first being penitent and sorry for my sins past 
most humbly desireing forgivnesse for the same I give and Comitt my 
soule to Almightie God my Saviour and Redeemer in whom and by the 
meritts of Jesus Christ I trust and believe assuredly to be saved and to 
have full remission and forgivenesse of all my sins And my body to the 
earth from whence it was taken to be buryed in such decent and Christian 
manner as to m}' Executo""^ hereafter named shal be thought meet and con- 
venient revoking and annulling by these p'"sents all and every Will and 
Wills testam and testaments heretofore by me made and declared and this 
to be taken for my last Will and testament and none other I will that 
all those debts and duties w*^"* in right or conscience I owe to any manner 
of person or persons whatsoever shalbe well and truely contented and paid 
or ordained to be paid within convenient time after my decease by my 
Executors hereafter named Item I give and bequeath to Thomas ffrench 
my eldest sone the sume of twelve pence I give and bequeath to John 
ffrench my second sone two shillings and six pence I give and bequeath 
to Patience ffrench my eldest daughter two shillings and six pence I give 
and bequeath to Elisabeth ffrench my second daughter two shillings and 
six pence I give and bequeath to Mary ffrench my third daughter two 
shillings and six pence all w"'' said legacies I will shalbe payd by my 
Executors within six months after my decease All the rest of my goods 
cattell and chattels whatsoever I give and bequeath to Martha my loveing 
wife and to my sone Robert ffrench and my daughter Martha ffrench 
whom I make joint Executors of this my last Will and Testam I do nomi- 
nate and appoint my welbeloved ffreinds Thomas Kirton and William 
Steffe both of Hayford aforesaid overseers of this my last Will and Testam 
and do give them twelvepence apeece In wittnes whereof I the said 
Thomas ffrench have hereunto sett my hand and seale the day and yeare 
first above written 

Thomas ffrench [seal] 

Published signed and sealed 
in the presence of 
William Stif 

His 

Thomas X Kirton 
Mark 

Her 

Alice X Kirton 
Mark 

John Darby 
Proved 16'" August 1673 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 43 



THOMAS FRENCH, PROGENITOR 

As will be observed, Thomas ffrench, the progenitor, was the son of Thomas 
and Sara ffrench. His baptism, in childhood, in 1639, in the Protestant 
Episcopal Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Nether Heyford, England, is 
recorded, but when the religious Society of Friends arose he with other mem- 
bers of the family became actively identified therewith, suffering for his faith 
at different times. Upon one occasion he was sentenced to imprisonment for 
forty-two months for refusal to pay tithes to the amount of eleven shillings, 
he being at the time a resident of Upper Norton, Oxfordshire. Five other 
names of this family appear in Beese's remarkable book, namely, George, 
Robert, John, William and Moses. Penalty was inflicted upon the latter 
five times. He served altogether several years in prison. 

That Thomas ffrench was a man of great force of character, intense relig- 
ious conviction and earnest, consistent life, is abundantly evident. He shared 
Avith his associates trials and hardships and always resented everything bear- 
ing the slightest resemblance to injustice or oppression. A glance at the 
situation in England during the period of persecution will be timely. The 
most vigorous efforts were made to suppress the Society of Friends. Their 
meetings were outlawed, their property unjustly taken, through fines and the 
imposition of tithes, and great numbers were thrown into prison, where they 
were cruelly treated, hundreds suffering unto death. The sad and shameful 
story of this era of martyrdom would be quite incredible if the unquestioned 
record had not been preserved, in a book the like of which the world will 
never again see. 

Joseph Besse, the famous English Quaker controversialist, was born about 
1683 and died 1757. He was educated for the Episcopalian ministry, but 
becoming a convert to the teachings of Fox, refused a church living of four 
hundred pounds a year and became a vigorous defender of Quakerism. He 
wrote many religious tracts and books and edited various important works. 
He completed, in 1753, his great work, " The Sufferings of the People Called 
Quakers," from which quotations herewith given are taken. This comprises 
one of the most remarkable records ever compiled, being faithful transcripts, 
from original sources, found in the minutes of meetings, court records, peti- 
tions, personal letters, memoirs, etc. Its accuracy cannot be questioned and 
a testimonial to its fidelity to the truth is found in the fact that a century 
and a half ago the records were destroyed by the British government. 



44 GENEALOGY OF THE 



PRISONERS FOR CONSCIENCE SAKE 

Following is a literal copy of references to Thomas ffrench in " Sufferings 
of the People Called Quakers " : 

" Thomas French, of Upper Norton, was imprisoned, in 1657, at suit 
of William Thomas, a lawyer and renter of Tithes, and for a demand of 
but eleven shillings for Tithes suffered two and forty months imprison- 
ment." Vol. I, p. 564. 

" Thomas French was taken from meeting at Banbury, in 1662, and 
committed to prison." Vol. I, p. 568. 

"Thomas French, 1666, taken at meeting at house of Elizabeth White, 
at Coggs, near Whitney, committed to Jlouse of Correction for one month." 
Vol. I, p. 571. 

Two pages of this extraordinary book are reproduced, one reciting in- 
stances of persecution, including imprisonment of Thomas ffrench, and the 
other a most impressive petition to King Charles II, 1680. 

Some four score prisoners for conscience sake in Northampton jail, " who 
patiently suffer for worshipping the Living God in Spirit and Truth," in 
mid-summer, 1666, issued a warning and appeal, referring to the ravages of 
the plague and their view of the cause thereof. From this curious paper, 
headed " Truth the strongest habitation for all the People of God," we quote : 

" There is some of thy Rulers so desperately wicked in this County of 
Northampton, that commit sin even with greediness at this time, as tho 
there were no other way to stay God's Judgments, but by provoking him 
more and more with their sins in persecuting, sentencing and imprisoning 
of the Lord's People, having lately imprisoned fifty-eight persons called 
Quakers, both men and women, some of the latter with little infants and 
shutting them all up together in the common Goal in close roomes, in the 
very heat of the last month, and still they continue, the number of 82 
altogether. We who are sufferers in this Goal of Northampton, for the 
truth of the Lord, do spread these lines before the Nation, that so, if it 
be not too late, the Nation may see what is the cause of God's Judgments, 
lying so heavy upon this land and people, and may see who hath been the 
Troublers of England." 

From a lecture on " The Baptists and Quakers in Northamptonshire, 1650- 
1700," by the Rev. J. Jackson Goadby, delivered in College Street Chapel, 
Northampton, Oct. 24, 1882, we quote the following remarkable statement: 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 45 



SIXTY THOUSAND VICTIMS OF PERSECUTION 

"Quakers were put in the stocks for the crime of preaching; seized by 
soldiers as they were quietly going to their meetings ; committed for blas- 
phemy ; or when in the open fields where they had met for worship ; or 
as vagrants; as Sabbath breakers; as men who refused to take an oath; 
and as seditious men. They were pounced upon suddenly when assembled 
for worship, and carried off to prison ; crammed into crowded and reeking 
holes, the doors being fastened down for twelve hours every night, and 
refused all intercourse with their friends ; and in some cases they were 
brutally treated both by jailors, by the jailors' wives, and by the prisoners. 
Men and women were seized at their meetings, carried off in carts to 
some ale-house, locked up in a room all night, whilst their captors indulged 
in ribald songs and tippling, and then hurried off the next morning to 
prison. 

" Numbers of the imprisoned Friends, like their leaders in this county. 
Whitehead and Dewsbury, sent out epistles from the Northampton jail, 
detailing their own sufferings. Whitehead was the Quaker minister who 
always took his night cap with him when he went to meeting, because it 
was almost certain he would have to spend that night in prison. Some 
of the Quakers, it must be confessed, carried plain-speaking to the verge 
of rudeness. But this free speech is, after all, no justification of the 
brutal treatment received by the Friends at the hands of magistrates, and 
is, least of all, any palliation of the horrible fact that many hundreds of 
Quakers died of their harsh usage in the jails of England, and some 
scores in the common jail of Northampton. The Friends preserved their 
hold on the nation until the beginning of the eighteenth century, when 
they numbered 70,000. 

" If the record of other religious bodies is not so full of faithful mar- 
tyrs to the truth and conscience as that of the Quakers, it is not because 
they were any the less brutally treated, or any the less numerous. Jeremy 
White made a careful collection of the names of persons who suffered for 
their nonconformity during the reign of Charles II. Sixty thousand per- 
sons were included in this terrible list, and five thousand died of their 
sufferings. When James II. wished to gain possession of this dark calen- 
dar, that he might use it in his quarrel with the English State Church, 
and even offered 5,000 guineas for it, Jeremy White chose rather to burn 
the list than see it turned to such a purpose. Many of these sixty thou- 
sand brave men and women are unknown to fame, like the poor Holland- 
ers of the days of Henry VIII.; but their deeds and their heroism have 
not perished. We see it to-day in the larger and more settled liberty 
which every Englishman possesses. They also paid part of that great sum 
by which our forefathers bought our freedom." 



56+ 



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A Colleaion oj the Sufferings Vol. I. 

S.iyabrimmi, in the Grave-Yard it Banbury, exhorted the Pried to fear 
the Lord •' For which Chn/iian Exhortation, fome of her Hearers knockt her 
down and ftruck her violently. The Mayor and Magiftiates, who were pre- 
fent inftead of rcftraining them from offering fuch illegal Abufes, fen: the 
innocent Woman to Prifon, where ihe lay halt a Year. Alfo Jane IVaugb, for 
bearing her Teftimony to the Truth, and againft Deceit, in the Market-place 
:ii Banbury, was imprifoned five Weeks : As were Mary Coats d^nA Mary Lam- 
prey, for reproving t!ie Vices of the Mayor and Magiflrates there ; the former 
was relcafed the fame Night, but the other detained eighteen Days. 

Jcbn Shackerly, for fpeaking to a Prieft, at Oxford, fome difpleafing Words, 
was by his Means fent to the City Prifon, and there detained fevcn Weeks. 
And at another Time, for the like Offence againft the V ice-Chancellor, he 
was imprifoned twenty eight Weeks. 

ANNO 1656. Hejler Biddle, o^ London, was imprifoned zi Banbury for 
fome zealous Reprehenfion uttered againft the Mayor and Magiftrates there. 

ANNO 1657. In this Year Alexander Harris was impriloned for Tithes, 
on two A<nions -, one at the Suit of a Prieft, the other of an Impropriator : 
After three Years and an Half Imprifonment, he was taken fick, and his Cafe 
being repreftnted to his Profecutors, they had CompafTion on him, and having 
made fufficicnt Proof of the Man's Sincerity, were not willing he fhould die 
under Confinement at their Suit, and therefore freely and gcncroufly difcharged 
him. But their Deputy afterward took the Corn off his Ground for the Tithe, 
Annually, in what Qiiantities they pleafed. 

About the Middle of the Month called February this Year, IViHiam Cole, of 
Charlbury, profeciited in the Exchequer for Tithes, was fent to Prifon for reiufing 
to give in his Anfwer upon Oath. Being there, he was charged alio with an 
Adion for Tithes, by an Impropriator •, at whofe Suit he was detained in Pri- 
fon till he died, a faithful Witnefs againft the Antichriftian OpprefTion of 
Tithes. The fame Impropriator took from him alfo, while in Prifon, Goods 
worth 20/. for 5/. demanded. 

7homas French, of Vf>per-Norlcn, was alfo imprifoned at the Suk of IFilluvn 
Thomas, a Lawyer, and Renter of Tithes •, and (or a Demand of but i is. for 
Tithes, fufi'ered two and forty Months Imprifonment. 

ANNO 1658. In this Year, Richard Kite of Upper-Norton, Margaret 
Freebody of Jdn^s Hutton, Richard Betteris, and Hannah Alcock, were at feveral 
Times imprifoned for their Chriftian and religious Exhortations and Reproofs, 
given to the Priefts and People on various Occafions : For which Caule alfo, 
Bathia Hajle-wood, of Borlon, was ftoned, and othewife evilly treated by the 
Populace at Cropfody, the Prieft looking on, and laughing at the Wickedncfs 
of his Hearers. 

Tliere were, in thefe Times, fome Men advanced to the Office of Magi- 
ftrates, fo extremely fond of Perfonal Homage, as to profccute and imprilon 
Men lor the Omiffion of that, which no Law required : Hence it was that 
Simon Thompfon and Nathanael Knowles, meeting IVilliam Fines, otherwife called 
Lord Say, and not paying him the cuftomary Ceremony of the Hat, were by 
him fent to Oxford Goal, and detained two Months. At the next Seffions, he 
caufed them to be fent to the Houfc of Corredion, and detained there near 
eight Months, the fiid Nathanael Knowles being feveral Times cruelly whipt, 
and otherwife ill ufed. Likewifc Ellis Hookes, going to vifit his Mother, then 
rcfiding at the Houfe of Sir ff'Vliam IValler at Stanton-Harcourt, bccaufe he did 
not pay the Knight and his Lady the Hat-honour, and cuftomary Compli- 
ments, was by them, and their Servants, beaten and abufed : And by their 
Influence, his own Father was fo incenfed againft him, tlut he turned him 
out of Doors. 

It fo happened about this Time, that Richard Fartifworth, walking with one 
of his Friends up Bar.bury-Slrect, met the Mayor, and a Juftice of the Peace 
named IViUiam Allen: The Juftice looking very angrily upon Richard, ftruck 
off his Hat -, by which he difcovered his own Piide and Wrath, and how 



46 



PERSECUTION OF THOMAS FRENCH AND OTHERS, 1657 



■. 59^ 

S O M E R 

S L' T- 
SHIRE, 

1663. 



A leiif from 
ikfPiifoners 
to the King. 



yi Colledlion 0/ the Sufferings Vol. I. 

This Letter favours of the Humility, Patience, and Rcfignation of faithful 
SLifTcrers, and of that fervent Love which tlie Pcrfccuted, Tor die Tcftimoiiy 
of Chrift and a good Confcicncc, bear one towards another, praying for each 
otiiers Prefcrvation, and final Perfcverance to the End of their Hope, the 
Salvation of their Souls. 

The other Letter, or Addrels, was wriuen to the King when at B.xik, and 
is as follows i 



<( 



FORASMUCH, O King ! as our daily Sufferings arc augmented, 
and our Number in this Place fo greatly increafcd, as thai we cannor 
any longer well hold our Peace, but do in the Fear of God, and in true 
Humility in his Sight, in all Lowlinefs of Mind, after long Imprifonment, 
prefcnt thee, in this thy Progrcfs and Day of Profperity, with our gric\ous 
Sufferings for our Confcience in Things relating to God v our Souls being 
*' fubjeft to the Lord that made Heaven and Earth : And againfl thee, O 
♦* King ! have wc not done or imagined Evil, but do, according to the Truth 
♦* and Rightdoufncfs in our Hearts, dcfire thy Peace and Profperity, and that 
♦♦ Mercy may eltablilh thy Throne in Equity and Juflice. And whereas we 
♦» who are called Siudkeriy becaufe of the Fear of God, and to keep our 
♦' Confciences void of Offence, cannot take any Oadi, many of us are by a 
*' fcvcre Sentence deprived of all the Goods we have in this World, and our 
li Wives and innocent Children thereby expofed to utter Ruin, unlefs the 
♦' Execution thereof be prevented ; and others by Fines beyond their Abilities, 
•» adjudged to perpetual Imprifonment, and that tor Matter of pure Confcience 
*' only, and not for any Defign of Evil, or Wrong, intended towards thee, 
" O King ! or any of thy Subje<5b, as hath been largely teftified by many 
" Years Experience, through many Trials and Hard/hips in Bonds, wherein 
♦• the Lord hath been with us, and preferred us innocent and upright in our 
" Hearts toward thee, and for this we appeal to the Witnefs of God in all 
" Men, whether we have not fo approved our felves to this Day, in the 
*' Sight of God and Men. And as an Addition to our prefcnt Sufferings, 
" the Coaler's Cruelty fo abounds, that many of us are likely to be e.\poled 
*' to Familhment, and utter Deftruftion, being thrufl togedier in fuch a great 
«• Number, and denied fuch neceffary Accommodation, as is ordinarily given 
<' to the word of Men, befides what is daily farther thrcatned. We therclbre, 
*' as to our outward Man, being Objedls of thy Mercy and Clemency, ic 
*' being in thy Hands to difpofe of us at thy Pleafure, do in all due Subniillion 
** make our Appeal unto thee, as unto one who is able to relieve us : And 
*' the Lord open thy Heart to confider our Innocency and Dillrefs, and to 
*' acquit us from our grievous Sentences, and other our Imprifonment. And 
" it is the Defire of our Hearts, that in Truth and Righteoufnefs the 
»♦ God of Peace may profper thee to reign : And what Profit will the De.nth 
** of the Innocent be to the King ? 



Trom the Prijoners called Quakers, 
in Ilchefter, this ^tb Day of the 
Seventh Month i'663. 



Subfcribed by thirty of the Prifoners. 



This Letter, or Addrefs, difcovers an innocent Simplicity, attended with 
Chrijiian Courage, exprefTing a decent SubmifTion void of Flattery, and pro- 
feffing all due Allegiance and peaceful Subjedion to the King and his Govern- 
ment, with a noble and ftedfall Refolution of keeping their Conlcienccs 
undefiled and void of Offence toward God. This is the Stile of true Clnfiuiii 
Confelfors, whom the PerfeB Pear of Gcd hath exalted above an abjcft and 
fervile Departure from his Commandments, in Conformity to the L.uvs of any 
Power upon Earth. 

ANNO 1664. On the 7th of the Month called May, katbann: Lvaks 
and Sarah Chcvcrs. Women who travelled in the Work ot the Golpel, ca.nc 



vers., 

PETITION OF QUAKERS TO KING CHARLES II, 1663 



47 



48 GENEALOGY OF THE 



THE COMING OF THOMAS FRENCH 

Thomas flfrench was among the first to take a practical interest in the 
colonization of Friends in America. With William Penn, Gauen Laurie, 
Thomas Ollive, Daniel Wills, Edward Byllynge and about one hundred and 
fifty others, he signed the famous " Concessions and Agreements," at London, 
in 1676, which provided for the settlement of New Jersey. It is evident 
from records that he made a preliminary prospecting visit to this country, 
to locate his land and select a home site. He has left an account of the 
coming of himself and family, three years after the arrival of the pioneer 
colonists. He sailed from London, in the ship Kent, Gregory Marlowe, 
master — the same vessel which brought the first company of settlers in 1677 
to Burlington — about the P^' of August, 1680. with his wife and nine chil- 
dren, four sons and five daughters, the oldest child being sixteen, while the 
youngest was not yet four years of age. He settled upon a tract of 600 
acres of desirable land, located along the banks of the Rancocas, about four 
miles from Burlington. Throughout the remainder of his life he held an 
influential place in the colony and prospered in business. He was commis- 
sioner of highways 1684-5. At his death, in 1699, he was possessed of some 
1,200 acres of improved land and also his proprietary share of unsurveyed 
lands, approximately, 2,000 acres. During nearly twenty years residence 
as a leading citizen of Burlington County, Thomas ffrench trained all his 
children in ways of sobriety, industry, and religion, they in turn founding 
families in whom traits of strong character were noted. Each performed 
his and her share in the prosperous and happy development of colonial life. 

THE PIONEER HOMESTEAD 

The section of New Jersey in which Thomas ffrench located was a notable 
place in pioneer days. An old map, reproduced, shows the names of early 
settlers, two of the most conspicuous being Thomas Ollive, who served as 
proprietary Governor and member of the Council and who was eminent also 
as a Quaker preacher, and Dr. Daniel Wills, whose land joined that upon 
which the Friends' meeting house was built. Many fine old mansions marked 
the neighborhood, and some of these, over one hundred years old, remain. 
It is an interesting fact that part of the original plantation of Thomas 
ffrench is to-day owned and occupied by his descendants. Large tracts were 



o 
< 



X 






> 



> 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 49 



sold early in the eighteenth century by Charles ffrench, his son, to whom the 
homestead lands were willed by his father. In 1714, Charles fTrench con- 
veyed 250 acres to his brother-in-law, Nicholas Buzby, part of this descend- 
ing to the latter's son, John Buzby, who devised the same, in 1754, to his son 
John, who, in 1763, sold it to John Smith, of Burlington. The deed stated 
that the estate was thereafter to be known as " Strawberry Hill." It is sup- 
posed the great mansion, still standing, in an excellent state of preservation, 
was built by John Smith, about 1765 (see illustration). The place was 
leased soon after to Gov. William Franklin, as a summer home and purchased 
by him in 1770 for two thousand pounds. It then became known as " Frank- 
lin Park," containing a fine collection of deer and other high-class game. 
A great moat was constructed, the remains of which are still visible, to keep 
off poachers. 

AGAIN A FAMILY POSSESSION 

The Governor was removed from office, on account of his loyalty to the 
King, in 1776, and taken prisoner to Connecticut. Later he returned to 
New York, where his wife had died meanwhile, being buried under the 
chancel of St. Paul's historic church, Broadway. A beautiful tablet was 
erected by her husband, some years later. Gov. Franklin retained ownership 
of the Rancocas estate, without confiscation, until 1785, when he sold it to 
his son, William Temple Franklin, then living in Paris and who later became 
noted as the literary legatee of his grandfather, Benjamin Franklin. He 
sold the property, in 1790, to Robert Morris, the patriot financier of the 
Revolution, who held it until 1794, when William Bell, a rich Philadelphia 
merchant, became the purchaser, with a great amount of other land in West 
Jersey owned by Morris. Soon after Bell's death, in 1816, the property was 
sold to Joseph Churchman, who in 1822, conveyed "Franklin Park" to 
Mayberry McVaugh. A two-story brick dormitory was built adjoining the 
mansion, and a boarding school for boys set up, which became quite a 
famous institution of its kind. In March, 1843, Hudson Buzby [410] 
bought this historic property; and in 1862, his son Richard Buzby [894] 
became the owner through purchase. In 1889, Richard Buzby's son, Thomas 
T. Buzby [1689] bought the farm, about 100 acres of choice land, and the 
mansion, being the present occupant. Thus an important part of the orig- 
inal tract, cut out of the wilderness two hundred and twenty-eight years 
ago, and having a most interesting history, is again in possession of worthy 
descendants of the pioneer, Thomas ffrench. 




MAP showing location of lands along the Rancocas as taken up from the Indians hy Thomas 

ffrench and other pioneer settlers, between 1680 and 1690. 

50 Draughted by Charles Stokes [450] from ancient surveys. 



THOMAS FFRENCH'S FAMILY BIBLE 



The family Bible of Thomas ffrench, printed in 1630, and 
brought by him to this country in 1680, is still in existence 
and in a fair state of preservation, although showing the 
effects of tiine. It has always remained within the family. 
Accompanying illustrations are almost full size. The record 
presented and transcribed is in the handwriting of the pro- 
genitor, evidently having been set down at different times, 
under varying circumstances and influences, throughout a 
period covering over thirty years, the last entry being made 
a little while after the death of the long-time companion who 
had borne him thirteen children. Some of the lines have 
faded and a few words are quite illegible. The most strik- 
ing characteristic to be noted is the ever present spirit of 
humility, gratitude for manifold mercies and earnest desire 
for continued Divine guidance and protection. 

52 




i 




THOMAS P FRENCH'S FAMILY BIBLE, PUBLISHED 1630 



THOMAS FFRENCH'S FAMILY BIBLE 



The title page of this venerable edition of the Holy Book, 
" Imprinted at London by Robert Barker and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings moft Excellent Majeftie, 1630," was 
designed after the curious manner of the time, relating to ob- 
ject teaching of .Scriptural things. The names on the left 
refer to the twelve tribes of Israel ; those on the right recite 
the twelve apostles, with the writers of the four Gospels in 
the centre. The accompanying figures all have appropriate 
significance in the illustration of the Biblical story. The 
New Testament title page is of the same studious and impres- 
sive character. ' 

54 




^ 



=i ^' "-.^A liif ',"' ^ ^ ' c Qit.r ct c ijcec c u: r cf 






^ LEVI . <a SIMKOK. OkvbENT. 



^^^il^J^fP^^Jg't... -,ti!z: 




iiaL^':5"J 













«i 



TITLE-PAGE, THOiMAS KFRENCH'S EAM1I,V IJIHLE 



THOMAS FFRENCH'S FAMILY BIBLE 



Copy of writing on opposite page 

Thomas ffrench and Jane his wife, and Jane and Rachel his children. 

Jane was born about a fortnight before Saint James [in the Church 

Calendar July 25thJ in the year 1662. 

Rachel was born March the 24, 1663. 

Rachel was born March the 24, 1664. She alone was ris. 



In the year 1673 was a very stormy year for the waters did sore 
break out of their bounds and was a very wet season, such wet May 
day, after which floods that flooded the meadows when they were 
ready to mow and drove away in many stacks and bindings of hay, 
and we had a summer like unto winter for cold and wet for the 
general year. 



I and my wife and nine children through the great mercy of God 
came into this country and landed at Burlington, the 23 of the 7 
month 1680. Thomas ffrench. 



The Lord in heaven have mercy upon me. 

Thomas ff'rench his book. God give him grace in Then 

was I in great sorrow and tribulation. The Lord deliver me out 
of them all. 

56 



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A LEAF FKOM THOMAS FFRENCHS FAINIII.Y BIBLE 



THOMAS FFRENCH'S FAMILY BIBLE 



Copy of writing on opposite page 

Tho. french his book. God give him grace in Jesus Lord and when 
the bell for me doth toll, good Lord in heaven do rest my soul. 



The Lord deliver me out of all mj' troubles and pardon my sins. 
Lord bless all that [He] hath given in hand. 



The Lord deliver me in time of trouble and in time of adversitj', 
and Lord deliver me from all my enemies. 



I Thomas iTrench was married to my wife Jane, June 12, 1660. 

December the first about ten at night my son Richard was born, 

1665. The Lord give him grace that he may continually walk 
before Him. 



I Thomas ffrench was baptized November the 3, 1639. My son 

Thomas was born in 1667 between 8 and nine o'clock at 

night. 

1671 my son Charles was born, the 20 day of March between 11 

and 12 at night. 



In the year 1673 was a very strange 

58 






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A LEAF FR()>r THOArAS FFKEXCH S KAMII-Y I5IBLE 



\ 



THOMAS FFRENCH'S FAMILY BIBLE 



Copy of writing on opposite page 

The Lord be gracious and merciful unto me which way so ever 
I go whether it be out of the land or in the land or on the sea, the 
Lord be merciful unto me. This was wrote in the year 1664. 



My wife Jane deceased this life the fifth day of the 8 month 1692. 
My youngest child died the 12 of the same. 

60 



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A LEAF FROM THOMAS FFBENCH'S FAMILY li[BLE 



THOMAS FFRENCH'S FAMILY BIBLE 



Copy of writing on opposite page 

William French the son of Richard ffrench and Mary was born 
April the 7 in the year 1712. 



Sarah French the daughter of Richard French and Mary was born 
the 20th day of the 7th month 1715. 



All prophesies were given by inspiration and written for our learn- 
ing, upon whom the ends of the world are come. 



Rachel French the daughter of Richard Jun. and Rachel was born 
the 12th day of the 11th month 1722. 



Benjamin French 
1737 



William French his book May 10th 17- 
Thomas ffrench 

62 



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A LEAF FROM THOMAS FFRENCII'S FAMILY RrBLF 
Partial Family Register of Riolianl ftVi-noli (5) 



GENEALOGICAL RECORD 



64 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



1— THOMAS FFRENCH 

b. 



m. 

She d. 
m. 

2— SARA FFRENCH 
3— JANE FFRENCH 



October, 1639. 

Baptized November 3rd, 1639, at Church S. S. 

Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, England. 

1699, at Rancocas, N. J. 

First, June 12th, 1660, at "Parish Church of 

Whilton," England, Jane Atkins. 

8th mo. 5th, 1692, at Rancocas, N. J. 

Second, 7th mo. 25th, 1696, Elizabeth Stanton 

of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting. 

Baptized March 17th, 1661, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 
Buried April 10th, 1661. 

b. about July 11th, 1662. 

Baptized August 8th, 1662, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 
Buried April 30th, 1671. 



4— RACHEL FFRENCH 



5— RICHARD FFRENCH 



6— THOMAS FFRENCH, JR. 



7— HANNAH FFRENCH 



b. March 24th, 1664. 

Baptized April 3rd, 1664, at Church S. S. 

Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 
m. First, 1687, Mathew Allen, 
m. Second, 12th mo. 9th, 1702, Hugh Sharp. 

b. December 1st, 1665. 

Baptized December ISth, 1666, at Church 
S. S. Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 

m. First, 7th mo. 11th, 1693, Sarah Scatter- 
good. 

ra. Second, 11th mo. 13th, 1701, Mary King. 

b. 1667. 

Baptized October 31st, 1667, at Church 
S. S. Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 

m. First, 10th mo. 3rd, 1696, Mary Allen. 

m. Second, 8th mo. 9th, 1732, Mary (Pearce) 
Cattell. 

Baptized September 5th, 1669, at Church 
S. S. Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 
m. 8th mo. 30th, 1695, Richard Buzby. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



65 



8— CHARLES FFRENCH 



9— JOHN FP^RENCH 



b. March 20th, 1671. 

Baptized April 2nd, 1671, at Church S. S. 

Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 

m. First (sup.), 1708, Elinor . 

m. Second, . 

Baptized January 2nd, 1673, at Church 
S. S. Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 

m. First, 1701, Ann . 

m. Second, 6th mo. 10th, 1724, Sarah (Mason) 

Wickward. 



10— SARAH FFRENCH 



II— MARY FFRENCH 
12— JANE FFRENCH 

13— LYDIA FFRENCH 

14— AN INFANT 

15— REBECCA FFRENCH 



Baptized February 23rd, 1674, at Church 
S. S. Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 
m. 2nd mo. 1st, 1695, Isaac Wood. 

Baptized August 8th, 1675, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 
m. 8th mo. 30th, 1695, Nicholas Buzby. 

Baptized November 19th, 1676, at Church 
S. S. Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford. 
m. 1st mo. 1st, 1697, Daniel Hall. 

b. (sup.) 1682. 
m. (sup.) 1708, David Arnold. 

d. 8th mo. 12th, 1692. 

b. 6th mo. 8th, 1697. 
m. 2nd mo. 3rd, 1729, Robert Murfin. 

Thomas ffrench, in accordance with the custom of his family for generations, and 
that of nearly all Protestant Englishmen of his time, had his children baptized in the 
Church of England, notwithstanding his early sympathy and unity with the Society of 
Friends. The obligation thus assumed, as to religious care and training of his children, 
was faithfully kept, the family Bible being an impressive witness in this respect. 

The following is taken from the parish records of the Church S. S. Peter and Paul, 
Nether Heyford, England, concerning the marriage of Thomas ffrench and Jane Atkins. 
" Note. March 8 1663 The said Jane ffrench p'"senting unto me John 
Bedford parson of Heiford A Consigned Certificate of the said Thomas 
ffrench jun & Jane Atkins both of Heiford pish Testifying that they the 
said Thomas & Jane w' marryed in the pish Church of Whilton June 12 
1660 by M"" Richard Morris then Minister there : Returning her Certificate 
of marriage backe againe into her owne custody, I thus entred the Record 
of y* said marriage at her request, into this my Heiford pish Register." 

Thomas ffrench and Jane his wife were buried in a private burial lot, sixteen and 
one half feet square, on the homestead plantation, Rancocas, N. J., and this reservation 
was mentioned in deeds and observed for many years- Its e.xact location is now unknown. 
5 



66 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

That Thomas ffrench was a man of great force of character and independent action 
is evident from many things connected with his career in this country as well as in 
England. He early became an active and courageous member of the Society of 
Friends, enduring persecution with fortitude. He was not j'et twenty years of age 
when first prosecuted. In Burlington Meeting he held a conspicuous and influential 
place throughout his pioneer life, covering a period of nineteen years. The meeting 
records concerning him, as in so many cases, are fragmentary and incomplete. Matters 
of a personal character often were continued indefinitely and many times no final de- 
cision was recorded. In maintaining his rights as a citizen and property holder, Thomas 
ffrench felt himself called upon, almost at the beginning, to take action which seems 
to have excited comment, but he was firm in declaring the justice of his cause, although 
duly regretful that his course had given occasion for criticism. Details are not given, 
but aside from formal acknowledgment, in deference to feelings of Friends, the sturdy 
progenitor calmly went his way, recording his sympathy with the " weak," and later 
received a certificate relating to his proposed second marriage which showed his unim- 
paired standing. The most striking instance of his braving public opinion was a re- 
markable letter to ex-Governcr Ollive, in some respects the leading and most influential 
man in the Burlington colony. This eminent citizen was one of the original proprietors. 
He came with the pioneers in 1677, and at different times held the oftices of land 
commissioner, magistrate, member of Assembly, Speaker of the same. Deputy Governor 
and Governor, and was one of the Council of Proprietors. In his later years, when the 
letter of accusation was addressed to him by Thomas ffrench, he was regarded as a 
sort of arbitrator in general, in the settlement of private disputes, holding informal 
court in his fields, on his great plantation of over 600 acres on the Rancocas, which was 
near that of the man who severely criticised him and stood firmly by his declaration 
when called to account by Burlington Meeting, in which Thomas Ollive was for many 
years an acceptable minister. What was the cause of this trouble can now never be 
known. The ex-Governor's death occurred about this time and although Thomas ffrench 
lived for six years thereafter no further mention of the affair is to be found in the 
minutes of Burlington Meeting. The following is a complete transcript of references 
to Thomas ffrench. 

Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

Friends this Know y* I am Very Sorry & very much troubled y* I 
Should give Occation of Offence in y"' matter of my going to Law or Any 
Other matter wherein my Dear Brethern y'^ Lords People should be Offended 
Desiring you my Bretheren to forgive y^ Offence & I shall Seek all means 
that possibly Can be had to prevent y" Like Occation again. 
Your Friend & Brother 

Thomas French 
Read in y'' meeting 
y" 5th of y'' 12th mo. 1682. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 67 



At our mens monthly meeting held in Burlington in y® House of The" 
Gardiner y" 2'"' of y" Z"" mo. 1683. 

The Meeting saw meet to desire some friend to speak with Thos' French 
Henry Stacy & John Borten were willing to visit him & hear his answer 
& return their sense wether they find him senseable y' he sees it his place 
to Condemn his abrupt & Rude behavior in y" Monthly Meeting: Elias 
Farr & Tho' Gardiner & Tho' Mathews are willing to assist them & 
give an acct. to y" next Monthly Meeting : &c. 

At y" mens Monthly Meeting held at y'' house of Tho' Gardiner y" 17'" 
of y'' 3" mo. 1683. 

The Business of Tho' French yet Continued. 

At y* Mens Monthly Meeting in Burlington held at y" House of Tho' 
Gardiner y" 4'" of y*' 4*'' mo: 1683 

The meeting Still desired y* fr***' that were appoid. to Visit Tho' French 
(viz) Jn° Bourton Henry Stacy Thomas Gardiner Elias Farr & Tho" 
Mathews that they would take Care to go together & hear his Answer 
& give this meeting an Account. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held in Burlington in y" House of Thos" 
Gardiner y" 2°" of y' 5'" mo. 1683. 

Then friends desired that Tho' French would appear at y* next monthly 
meeting & in as much as Tho' Budd & Rob'' Powell & Will'" Brightwen 
are desirous to Visit him the Meeting Expects their Care to Lett him know 
y'' meetings desire & Return this meeting an account. 

At our mens monthly Meeting held in Burlington in y'' House of Tho" 
Gardiner y" 6'" of y" 6"' mo. 1683. 

Whereas after much tenderness of Spirit & Bowels of Compafsion exer- 
cised toward Tho" French who Doth still appear in a Spirit of Opposition 
against y" Truth to wit y** Same Spirit w*^" he did formerly Charge y® body 
of Friends w*'' Injustice Saying he Could have no Right done him <i 
confidently Justifyed himself in y*" Same : We therefore for y" Truths Sake 
do deny & Judge y* Spirit in which y" .Said Tho" French doth persist in 
to be out of and against y" Truth which Judgement will Stand Over his 
head Until he Repent. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held in Burlington y" 2"'' of y" 1"' mo. 
1684/5 

Where y** meeting gave Directions for y" entring y* Subscription Relating 
to y*" building y'' meeting Tho' French gave £2 



68 GENEALOGY OF THE 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at Burlington in y'' Iloufe of 
Thomas Gardiner y" 12'" of y" 7 mo. 1687 

Whereas a Testimony is Standing upon Record in this Book against 
The" French for Charging y® meeting with Injuftice he hath this Day de- 
clared in y® Meeting that what he had formerly Said to that Effect wafs in 
his haft & Pafsion for w*^*" he is now Sorry and In testimony whereof hath 
Subscribed 

Your Friend Tho' French 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting Held at the Houfe of Tho' Gardiner 
in Bton. y'= 10*" of y^ 7*" Mo. 1688 

Percivall Towle and Christopher Weatherill are Appointed to Speak to 
Tho" French Concerning his behaviour in Our publick Meeting at Bur- 
lington and if he refufe to give them Sattisfaction to defire his Appearance 
at our Next Monthly Meeting. 

At our mens Monthly Meeting Held at the House of Tho' Gardiner in 
Bton y" V of y* 8*" mo. 1688 

Thomas Gardiner Jofeph Pope & Isaac Marriot are appointed to Speak to 
Jno" Skeen and Tho' French and desire their appearance to the next 
Monthly Meeting. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at Burlington in y^ house of 
Thomas Gardiner y^ 12'" of y^ 7'" Month 1692 

Thomas Olive made complaint to this meeting against Thomas French, 
for Slandering and very Grosly abusing him in a letter directed to Thomas 
Olive which said letter Thomas French owneth and still standeth in 
vendication of y'' same. The Meeting seeing it necefsary to have all the 
Charges in the letter Examined do order Tho' ffrench to make proofe of 
his Charges by plain Evidence To The Gardiner John Shinn John Day 
& Francis Devenport who are appointed to meet togather The next fourth 
day to here & give Account to y^ next meeting. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at y*^ house of Thomas Gardener 
the 5'" of y' 4'" Month 1693 

Thomas Hackney being Minded to go for England desired a Certificate 
& the Meeting ordered Tho" Harden & Tho' ffrench to Enquire into his 
Clearness & if he be so found y* James Hill is by order of this Meeting 
to Wright & signe a Certificate for him & his daughter Agnes. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at y* house of Thomas Gardeners 
Adjorned to this Eleventh of y*" 7'" month 1693 [adjourned on account 
of Yearly Meeting] 



c / ^/^c" PropricloiJ 

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t^TLnicrica : 





FIRST PAGE, "CONCESSIONS AND AGREEMENTS," ir.76 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 69 

Thomas ffrench having laid before this Meeting his Intentions of 
going for England desired a Certificate & the Meeting do appoint John 
Paine & ffredom Lippincott to Enquire into his Clearnefs as to Marriage 
& also his Conversation & make report to the next Meeting. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at y* house of Thomas Gardners 
y^ 2"" of y" 8'" Month 1693 

Peter ffretwell & James Ilill appointed to enquire of y' four Friends 
appointed formerly to examine y* charge of Tho" ffrench against Tho : 
Olive how it appeared to them that account may be given to next 
Meeting. 

Att our Mens Monthly Meeting held at y* House of Tho Gardeners y" 
V of y" 11*" Mo. 1693 

The Meeting being informed y* sum who frequent this Meeting hath 
declared sum businefs y* hath past formerly in y* Meeting Concerning 
Tho ffrench being then refused a Certificate to y* abuce both to y° Meeting 
& also of said French y* Meeting desires all present to purge themselves 
by denial or else own it. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at y" hous of Thomas Gardeners 
the 6" of y* 6"" Month 1694 

Thomas French Intending to go for England Desired a Certificate & 
friends ordered y* ffredom Lippincott & Robert Hudson Should Enquire 
into his Clearness upon y* Account of Marriage & by their report as also 
Severall other Neighbours the meeting where Satisfied to give him one from 
this Meting which was accordingly done. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at the house of Eliz" Gardiner in 
Burlington y-^ 6'" of the 3"^ Mo. 1695 

It is ordered by this meeting that ffrancis Collings Richard Love & John 
Day are appointed to Speak to Tho' ffrench about his behaviour in Court 
Contrary to Truth & to make Report of his answer to the next Meeting. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at the House of Eliz' Gardiner in 
Burlington y' 3^^ of the 4'" Mo. I69S 

John Day and Richard Love giveth report to this meeting that Tho' 
French doth Condemn the thing & is sorry that he should offend the weak. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at the House of Eliz : Gardiner in 
Bton. y' 4" of y^ 9*" Mo. 1695 

Jno Paine & Tho' French are appointed to gather y* Meetings Subscrip- 
tions for the Meeting house. 



70 GENEALOGY OF THE 



At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at the House of Eliz" Gardiner in 
Bur"°° y'' 6"^ mo: 1696 

Tho' French Desired of this meeting a Certificate concerning his Clear- 
ness from Women in Relation to Marriage, fredom Lippincott & The 
Eves are appointed to make Enquiry & to make report of it to the 
next meeting. 

Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at the house of Robert Ewer, the twenty- 
eighth of the Sixth month 1696 

Milifsant Hoskins & Joan Southeby presented to this Meeting Thomas 
French and Elisabeth Stanton who declared their intentions of taking each 
other as husband & wife, this being the first time of their appearance, 
friends desire him to bring a Certificate from the Meeting where he 
belongs to, against the next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at the house of Robert Ewer, the twenty- 
fifth day of the Seventh Month 1696 

Melifsant Hoskins & Joan Southeby present, Thomas French and Elisa- 
beth Stanton to this Meeting, who declared their intentions of taking each 
other in marriage he producing a Certificate of his clearnefs from others, 
they were left to consummate their intended marriage in the fear of God. 

DEED, THOMAS FFRENCH FROM JOHN WOOLSTON, 1680 

This Indenture made & dated the Twentieth day of November in the 
yeare according to the Accompt now ufed in England, one Thousand 
six Hundred & Eighty Between John Woolston of Burlington in the 
Province of West New Jerfey yeoman of the one pte And Thomas ffrench 
of the same Towne aforesaid Cooper of the other pte witnefseth That the 
said John Woolston for & in Consideracon of the sume of Twenty ffive 
pounds Sterling to him in hand paid & secured to be paid by the said 
Thomas ffrench the Receipt whereof hee hath hereby acknowledge and 
thereof doth clearly acquitt & difcharge the said Thomas ffrench his Heires 
& Afsignes forever Hath granted bargained sold releafed & Confirmed And 
by thefe prefents doth grant bargaine sell Releafe & Confirme vnto the 
said Thomas ffrench his Heires & Afsignes forever, one Eighth pte of a 
ninetieth pte or propriety of Land Eyeing & being in the above said 
Province (except one Lott of Land in Burlington Conteyning one Acre & 
halfe a Rood with a dwelling houfe & fifty Acres belonging to the said 
Houfe according to the said purchase within the Towne Bounds, and Ex- 
cept one Lott of Land more in Burlington Conteyning by eftimacon Two 
Acres be the same more or lefse which the said John Woolston hath reserved 
now in his owne Tenure and occupacon which said Eighth pte of a 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 71 



Propriety hee the said Jolm Woolston hath & holdeth by vertue of a 
deed Indented beareing date the Six and Twentieth day of fTebruary 
in the yeare one Thoufand Six Hundred Seaventy & Six between Thomas 
Ollive of Welingbrough Ilaberdafher of the one pte & hee the said John 
Woolfton of the other pte To have & to hold the said Land & prmifses 
(Except what before excepted) vnto the said Thomas ffrench his Heires & 
Afsignes forever — Togeather with all & every of the mines mineralls 
woods ffishings Hawkings Huntings & ffowlings, & all other priviledges 
profitts & Comodities whatsoever belonging to the faid prmifses. 

And hee the faid John Woolston doth for himselfe his Heires Executors 
& Afsignes Covenant promife & grant to & with the faid Thomas (Trench 
his Heires Executors & Afsignes That hee the said John Woolston his 
Heires & Afsignes shall & will at any tyme within seaven yeares next 
after the date hereof at the requeft Cost & Charges of the said Thomas ffrench 
his Heires & Afsigns doe & Execute all & every such Lawful! conveyance & 
Conveyances as fhall be for the better secureing & settling all the Interest & 
Tytle of him y"^ said John Woolfton of in & to the above granted prmifses 
in & to the faid Thomas ffrench his Heires & Afsignes. In witnefs 
whereof the parties ffirft above named to thefe prfent Indentures have 
interchangeably fett their hands & Scales 1680 — 

Sealed & Deliured in y'^ The marke of 

prfence of Thomas Curtis John Woolfton I 

Abraham Hewlings 
Tho : Enos 

This Deed was Acknowledged y*" 26"" Sept. 1681 
before Robert Stacye " 

Thos : Budd U Comrs. 
Benja : Scott. 

SCHEDULE OR TARRY, THOMAS FFRENXH FROM JOHN 

WOOLSTON SENR. 

This Schedu'e or Tarry bearing date with a Deed of bargaine & Sale 
Between John Woolston Sen'' of the one pte And Thomas ffrench of y* 
other pte of one Eighth pte of a Propriety of Land in Weft Jerfey dated 
the Twentith day of November 1680 which y* afores" Deed doth make it 
more at large appeare Exprefsing y*^ Buttings & boundings of some certaine 
Lotts of Lott belonging to y" s"" Eighth pte of a ppriety as they were 
surveyed & Lotted out to mee y^ s'' John Woolfton which s'' Lotts of Land 
Excepting thefe Lotts of Land which are Excepted in ye Deed of bargain 
& Sale afores** I doe hereby acknowledge that I have sold & Confirmed unto 
y* s** Thomas ffrench his heires & afsignes forever, which are as followeth 
That is to say Two hundred Acres of Land be it more or lefse butting 
upon Rancokus Creek als Northampton River y" ppriety line & y' Land 



I 



72 GENEALOGY OF THE 

of William Biddle l3'eing South Eaft & John Roberts Land northwest Alfo 
Two hundred Acres of Land more w*" a meadow belonging to it more or 
lefse lyeing & being next to y'^ Propriety Line below Thomas OUives butting 
upon Rancokus Creek als Northampton River afores* ye Propriety line 
being on the north weft side of it. Alfo one Lott of Land more in Burlington 
in that wharfe Lott Lotted out for y* ppriety of Thomas ollives which 
ppriety is bounded with y* Highstreet Northeaft & a Little Alley lyeing on 
y° southwest side of John Hollinshead houfe & fronting northweft upon 
y® River Dellaware & south eaft upon y" back street which part or fhare 
of y^ s** Lott granted in y* bargaine & sale aforef Conteyneth Twenty 
five foot front upon the River aforef be it more or lefse & goeth through to 
y^ back street Tn witnefse whereof I have hereunto sett my hand & Seale 
Signed Sealed & Deliv'"ed The marke of 

in ye p'fence of John I Woolfton with a Seale Q 

John Shinn Novemb"^ ll'*" 1693 

Henry Grubb Jno. Shinn & Henry Grubb Attefted to 
Jn" Woolftons Executing hereof before 
William Biddle & Dan" Leeds Justices. 

DEED, THOMAS FFRENCH FROM ANTHONY MORRIS, 1685 

This Indenture made y* fourteenth day of y" moneth called Aprill 
in y® yeare according to y" Acco* now ufed in England One Thousand six 
hundred Eighty & five — Betweene Anthony Morris of Burlington in West 
Jerfey Baker of y* one pt And Thomas ffrench Inhabitant neare Burlington 
yeoman of y" other p* witnefseth that y* s'* Anthony Morris for & in Con- 
sid''acon of y* sume of fforty shillings of this Countrey Curr* pay. to 
him paid & secured by y" s" Thomas ff'rench at or before y^ ensealing & 
delivery of thefe p'"sents y® receipt whereof hee doth hereby acknowledge 
& thereof clearly actjuitt & discharge y^ s" Thomas ffrench his heires & 
afsigns forever. Hath granted bargained sold releafed & confirned 
And by thefe prsents doth grant bargaine sell releafe & confirm unto y® 
sd Thomas fi"rench his heires & alsignes forever one waterside Lott of 
Land in Burlington Conteyning Eight foot front upon y® great River abut- 
ting North upon y" s'' River & South upon y" Back street & East upon y* 
Land of y" s** Thomas ffrench & West upon Richard Bafnetts house it being 
part of y** purchafe which hee y" s** Anthony Morris hath & holdeth by 
vertue of a Deed Indented bearing date y* Tenth of y* ninth moneth 
one Thoufand Six hundred Eighty & three betweene Mahlon Stacy of y* 
one pt & hee ye s'' Anthony Morris of y* other pt To have & to hold y* 
s"* Lott of Land to y" s** Thomas ffrench his heires & afsignes to ye 
onely ufe & behoofe of him ye s** Thomas ffrench his heires & afsignes 
forever with Appurtennces wayes & Eafem'^ thereunto belonging And 
hee ye s'' Anthony Morris doth for him selfe his heires Exec'"s & afsignes 



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FIRST SIGNATURE PAGE, "COXCESSIONS AND AGKKKMKXTS." 1676 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 73 



Covenant prmil'e & grant to & with y° s*" Thomas ffrench his heires 
Exec""' & Afsignes that hee y® s'' Anthony Morris his heires & Afsignes 
shall & will at any time within seaven yeares next after ye date hereof at 
y*" request Cost & Charges of y'' s** Thomas ffrench doe and execute all & 
every such lawfull Conveyance & Conveyances as fhall be for y" better 
secureing & settling all y* interest & tytle of him y" s*" Anthony Morris 
ofin & to y" above granted p'mifses in & to y° s'' Thomas ffrench his 
heires & afsignes forever In witnefs whereof ye ptie first above named 
to thefe p''sent Indentures have interchangeably sett their hand & feale 
ye day & yeare first above written 1685. 

Sealed & delivered in ye p'"sence of Anthony Morris with a scale O 

John Paine 
William Hewlings 
Tho : Eves 
Novemb"" 4*" 1685 John Paine Attested that hee did fee y' sealing & 
Executing of this Deed according to y^ purport thereof 

before Tho: Revell Justice 

SURVEYS OF LAND FOR THOMAS FFRENCH 

Revell's Book shows following surveys for Thomas ffrench ; 600 acres of upland and 
meadow, under date of 2nd mo. 1684; and 600 acres of upland and 21 acres of meadow, 
under date of 1st mo. 1689. 

Surveyed then for Thomas ffrench, Vpland & Meadowe — Begining at 
a Corner Tree of John Roberts by Rancokus (als) Northampton River, 
& runs thence by y* said Land of John Roberts one hundred & Twenty 
chaines North North East halfe a point North to a brook called Mill 
Creek to another Conner tree of the said John Roberts, then up by the 
said Mill Creek fforty four chaines & an halfe to a white oak marked for 
a Corner, then South Southweft halfe a point South to a stake for a 
Corner at Northampton River afores''. Then downe by the said River to 
the first mentioned Corner. Togeather with Twenty Acres for meadow 
lyeing & being the next meadow belowe Tho : ollives meadow on y" same 
side y* said Northampton River as now marked out by the vpland y* 
northwest side of the same abutting upon the begining of that part of 
the River called long reach a litle Island in y" River lyeing upon the 
South East side thereof. Surveyed for Six hundred Acres as afores''. 
Surveyed then for Thomas ffrench at Pensoking Creek one Tract of 
Land : Begining at a black oak by y® said Creek next Thomas Wallis 
by whom it runs North East forty Chaines to a White oak & Turnes with 
said Thomas Wallis West North west Twenty seaven Chaines to a black 
oak. Corner to Jonathan ffox by whom it runs North East & forward to 
the end of one Hundred and Two Chaines. Then South East Eighty 
Chaines to a Red oake. Corner to Thomas Rodman, by whom it runs West 



74 GENEALOGY OF THE 

South West Eighty ffive Chaines to a black oak. Corner to Sam" Burrows, 
by whom it runs west & by North Twenty Six Chaines to a white oak. 
Then turnes with s*" Samuell South west Twenty nyne Chaines to a 
Hickory on the banck of the Creek aforesaid. Then by the said Creek 
to ye first station : Twenty one Acres for meadow Lyeth remote Eastwardly 
to the said Tract & is thus bounded : from a black oak in Thomas Hootens 
Lyne it runs South East & by Eaft Twenty three Chaines to a maple for a 
Corner Then South South West Eleaven Chaines to a black oak ; Then North 
west & by west Eighteene Chaines to a black oak Then North to the 
first station Surveyed togeather for Six hundred Twenty one Acres besides 
Highwayes. 

DEED OF GIFT, THOMAS FFRENCH TO SON THOMAS, 1694 

(See facsimile, page 116) 

This Indenture made the nineteenth day of the month called February 
in the year according to English account one thousand six hundred ninety 
and four between Thomas fl^rench of Wellingborough in the county of 
Burlington in the province of West Jersey yeoman of the one part and 
Thomas ffrench son of the aforesaid Thomas ffrench husbandman of the 
other part Witnesseth that the said Thomas ifrench Senior (for and in con- 
sideration of the natural affection good will and kindness which he 
hath and beareth unto his well beloved son) hath given granted and con- 
firmed and by these presents doth give grant and confirm unto the said 
Thomas ffrench Junior his heirs and assigns forever three hundred acres 
of land lying near Pensauken Creek, begins at a hickory on the bank of 
the said creek near the bridge by the land of Samuel Burrows by whom it 
runs northeast twenty-nine chains and east by south twenty-six chains to 
Thomas Rodman's land, then by the same east northeast fifty-eight chains 
to a black oak for a corner then northwest about seventy chains to a 
white oak for a corner, then southwest to the land of Thomas Wallis 
by whom it runs east southeast about twelve chains and southeast near 
four chains to a white oak for a corner, then southwest to a small run 
of water then bounded by the same into the said creek and goes up the same 
about four chains to the corner first named, and also all that piece of up- 
land and meadow containing twenty-one acres lying next to Thomas 
Hooton's land, together with the mines, minerals, woods, fishings, hawk- 
ings, huntings and fowlings and all and every of the appurtenances, 
profits and commodities whatsoever belonging to the said premises to have 
and to hold the said land premises and appurtenances thereof unto the 
said Thomas ffrench Junior his heirs and assigns unto the only use and 
behoof of him the said Thomas ffrench Junior his heirs and assigns forever 
and the said Thomas ffrench Senior for himself his heirs executors and 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 75 



administrators the said premises with the apiiurtenances unto the said 

Thomas ffrench Junior his heirs and assigns forever; against him the said 

Thomas ffrench Senior his heirs and assigns and all and every other 

person and persons whatsoever lawfully claiming by from or under him them 

or any of them shall and will warrant and forever defend by these presents. 

In witness whereof the parties first above named to these present indenture 

hath interchangably set his hand and seal the day and year first above 

written. 

Signed Sealed and Delivered 

in the presence of us, Thomas ffrench O 

William Michell 

Charles ffrench 

Thomas Eves 

Feby. 20th 1694 Then acknowledged ye Deed above written 

before us 

Peter Frettwell 

Tho. Revell Justices 

Feby. 25th 1694 Recorded ye abovewritten Deed in ye Pub- 
lick Records of )'e Province of West New Jersey ffol 433 
Libe zz, 

p me Tho. Revell Secy, & Regt 

THOMAS FFREXCirS CATTLE MARKS 

The following is taken from the Burlington Records for 1680, filed in the office of 
Secretary of State, Trenton, N. J. 

The Proceedings of Co''t at Burlington — 
Tho: Olive, Daniel Wills, Rob' Stacy & Mahlon Stacy- 
It is further ordered That all psons within y* Jurisdiscon of y*" Co''t bring 
in to y" next Co'"t y'' Marks & Eare Marks wherewith they have marked 
or intend to mark their Cattle Tlorfes Sheep & Swine to y" intent that — 
psons mark may be entered & inroUed & their Cattle Horfes Sheepe & Swine 
may be knowne each from other. 

In accordance with the above instructions of court, Thomas ffrench adopted and regis- 
tered in 1680, ear marks for his stock herewith given: 



Right Left 



76 GENEALOGY OF THE 



WILL OF THOMAS FFRENCH, 1698 

I Being intended if the Lord will to goe for Old England not knowing 
whether I shall ever returne againe to my ffamily doe make & ordaine 
this my last will & Testamt Revokeing all other Wills and promises 
whatsoever In manner & forme following. I give unto my wife Eliza- 
beth after my decease if shee be the longer liver the House & Plantation 
where now I live with four Hundred Acres of Land belonging to it with 
Twenty Acres of Meadow as it is surveyed and Recorded In the place next 
below the Land of John Test Together with the use of all my Stock & 
Household goods with the Corne growing upon the ground To have & to 
hold the same dureing her naturall life without Impeachment of Wast. I 
give unto my Sonne Charles ffrench Two hundred Acres of land lyeing 
next John Hudsons with the iTour or ffive Acres of Clear land at Creek 
with ye Little Meadow lyeing by it to him and his Heirs forever allowing 
my wife Elizabeth Egresse & Regresse to Transport any goods or Hay : I 
give unto my Sonne Charles ifrench after the Decease of me & my wife 
to him & his Heires forever Provided that hee pay that which I shall 
appoint him to pay all the Plantation where now I live together with the 
dwelling house Barnes & other Outhouses Gardens Orchards Arrable Land 
& Clear land Together with four Hundred Acres of Land belonging to 
the Plantation aforesaid also Twenty Acres of Meadow Together with two 
hundred Acres of land belonging to the Meadow Also Six Hundred Acres 
of Land more which shall or may fall to me In my Third takeing up my 
W^ill is that my sonne Charles ffrench shall pay out of the Lands and 
Plantation aforesaid unto the rest of his Brothers & Sisters as foUoweth, 
I give unto my Daughter Rachell Allen to her & her Heires Twenty pounds. 
I give unto my Daughter Hannah Busby to her & her Heires Twenty 
pounds. I give unto my Daughter Sarah Wood to her & herselfe alone 
as she shall have need of it her Husband shall not have noe part or share 
in it to her & her Heires Twenty Pounds. I give unto my Daughter 
Mary Busby to her & her Heirs twenty pounds. I give unto my Daughter 
Jane Hall to her & her Heires Twenty pounds. I give unto my Daughter 
Lydia French Twenty pounds. I give unto my sonne Thomas ffrench Six 
Shillings. I give unto my sonne John French Six Shillings. I give unto 
my Sonne Richard French Six Shillings. I give unto my sonne Richard 
French all the Reversion of my Eighth part of a Propriety and that Lott 
at Burlington upon which Richard Bassnett hath built Houses upon to him 
& his Heires forever. I give unto my Sonne Charles ffrench all my Yard 
Land in the ppish of neather Heyford to him & his Heires forever In old 
England. My Will is that my Sonne Charles ffrench shall pay all my 
Debts and Thirty pounds to my youngest Daughter Rebecca ffrench out of 



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LAST SIGNATURE PAGE, "CONCESSIONS AND AGREEMENTS," ir.76 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



77 



the Yard Land aforesaid if Rebecca shall live to the Age of Eighteen 
yeares and if Rebecca shall happen to die before shee come to the Age 
of Eighteen yeares then the Thirty pounds shall be paid unto & amongst 
my Five younger Daughters to Hannah Busby & Sarah Wood Mary 
Busby Jane Hall & Lydia ffrench my Will is that after the decease of 
me & my Wife that my Goods shall be divided amongst all my Daughters 
mentioned in my Will. And also my Will is that if I & my Wife 
Elizabeth shall happen to die before my youngest Daughter Rebecca is 
brought up that then my Sonne Charles ffrench shall bring her up or 
else to allow her Five pounds a year untill shee come to the Age of Ten 
yeares for & towards the bringing of her up. In Witness hereof I have 
hereunto sett my hand & Scale the Third day of the fourth month called 
June [1698] 





Seal 

Sealed & delivered in j-e p'^sence of John Paine Tho : Eves John Hollins- 
head jun"^ 



The above written is a true Coppy of the Originall 
will or Codecill of Thomas ffrench abovenamed, 
being with the same Originall Examined this 
Third Day of May Anno Dom 1699 As witnefse 
hereunto my hand & seale of Office 

Tho : Revell Secry & Reg' 




THE PREROGATIVE SEAL 

The Proprietors of the Province of East and West Jersey were distinctly religious, 
and expressed their reverence for the Almighty on every suitable occasion. The seal 
of the Prerogative Court under the Proprietors of East New Jersey, adopted in 1682, 
bears the legend, " Righteousness exalteth a Nation " and " 'Tis God giveth the 
increase." The seal of the Prerogative Court under the Proprietors of West New 
Jersey, adopted in 1682, bears the inscription, "The Earth is the Lords and the Full- 
ness Thereof," the sentence being taken from the first line of Psalm xxiv. The earliest 
impression of this Prerogative Seal extant is affixed to the certified copy of the will or 
codicil of Thomas ffrench, which bears a very fine clear impression of the seal in 
red wax. It is one inch and one-sixteenth in diameter. The design is not heraldic, 
but is evidently a conventional representation of the globe with its embracing great 
circles and bands. 



78 GENEALOGY OF THE 



INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF THOMAS FFRENCH, 1699 

A true Inventory of the goods and chattels of Thomas ffrench Late of 
Wellingburrough in the County of Burlington Deceafed Aprifed by us 

whofe names are under written y* 21 day of the Second Month called 
April 1699. 

£ s. d. 

Imp" his Books 01 00 00 

one Bed and furniture 07 10 00 

one Bed and furniture 05 00 00 

one old Bed boulfter & blankit 02 00 00 

one Lookinglafs 00 06 00 

one Table Cloth 00 03 06 

one old pilion 00 02 06 

one old great kettle 02 10 00 

one brafs poridge i)ot 01 13 00 

one brafs Skimmer 00 03 00 

one Iron pot and hooks 00 14 00 

one Little Iron Kettle 00 07 00 

one Iron dripping pan 00 05 00 

one Jack and two Spitts 01 00 00 

fire Shovil and tongs 00 04 00 

one pare of pot hangers 00 02 00 

one grind Stone 00 05 00 

one old box Iron & two heaters 00 03 00 

one frying pan 00 03 00 

pewter 04 04 06 

Iron tooles & other old Iron 03 10 01 

Earthen ware 00 04 06 

one old gun 00 12 00 

one Cheft and two boxes 00 13 00 

two milk pails 00 04 00 

one table 00 10 00 

two old baggs 00 02 00 

3 old chears 00 03 00 

one old doetrogh old barrils and "1 

.u 1 T K (00 OS 06 

other woodn Lumber ' 

one grid Iron 00 02 00 

one Iron barr 00 07 00 

horfe gears 00 01 00 

one old cart 01 10 00 

plow and plow tackling 00 10 00 

4 Cows 12 00 00 

2 Small 3 year old Steeres 05 00 00 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



79 



2 Small 2 year olds and one yearling 

two poore mares & 1 horfe 

4 Sows and Some Little Shoats 



'■ ■} 

'inc; to it J 



£ 


s. 


d. 


04 


00 


00 


06 


00 


00 


04 


04 


00 


£ 68 


05 


07 


£200 


00 


00 



A house barne & plantation with 
4 hundred Acres of Land belonging 

John Paine 
Thomas Harding 
John Hudfon 
Thomas Eves. 



The within written Inventory was proved according to Law amounting 
to y* Su"* of Two Hundred Sixty Eight pounds five Shillings & Seaven 
pence this Third day of May Anno Dom 1699 

Before us 

Nath: Westland 
The: Revell Sec"'' & Reg"" John Jewell 



ADMINISTRATION BOND OF CHARLES FFRENCII, 1699 

Know all men by these p'"sents That we Charles ffrench of Wellingborrow 
in the County of Burlington within y* Province of West New Jersey 
yeoman Mathew Allen of y"' County of Burlington afores*" yeoman & 
Henry Grubb of y^ Towne & County of Burlington afores'' Innholder are 
holden & firmly bound unto y^ Hon*"* ye Gov''no'' of the s'" Province in 
y^ full & just Sume of ffive hundred Thirty & Six pounds Currt. Silver 
money within y* s'' Province to be paid to y*' said Govrno"" or to his 
Afsignes or Succefsors for y^ time being To y*^ which paymt well & truly 
to be made wee binde our Selves & every of us by himselfe joyntly & 
severally for & in j'e whole our & every of our Heires Exec''s & Admistors 
firmly by these prsents sealed with our Scales dated ye Third day of May 
Anno RRs Gulielmi tertis Angl &c vndecimo Annoq Dom 1699 
The Condition of ye above written Obligacon is such that if ye above 
bound Charles ffrench (now admitted Admistrator of y^ Goods Chattells 
& Estate late of Thomas ffrench deceased) doe & shall truly & faithfully 
prforme & fullfill y* mind & will of y* said Thomas ffrench according as 
is menconed in ye Codecill annexed to y" Letter of Admistracon to him 
y^ s** Charles Granted bearing date abovewritten & do & shall also Render 
& give to ye Registrs office at Burlington abovesaid just & true accompts 
of & Concerning the Estate late of ye said Thomas ffrench which now 
is in or shall come to y"" pofsefsion Custody or knowledge of him ye said 
Admistrator when thereunto reasonably required, and also doe & shall 



80 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



truly & faithfully discharge himselfe of his said Administratorshippe 
according to Law. Then y* Obligacon abovewritten to be voyd & of noe 
effect, or elfe to be & remaine in full force & vertue. 
Sealed & delivered 
in ye prsence of 




/ mdCo 



and 



J^^c^ 








May y*" Z^ 1699 Charles ffrench (son of Tho : ffrench deceased) Exhibited 
& proved an Instrum* or Codecill of his s"* Tho. ffrench mind & will 
& also Exhibited & proved an Inventory of his Estate according to Law, 
which originall Codecil is annexed to y* Letter of Administration then 
granted to s* Charles who then gave bond & security according to Law, 
y* True Coppy of which Codecil, y^ originall Inventory & bond being in y* 
office The s** Codecil & Inventory being proved & administration granted 
before Nath : Westland & Jno : Jewell Justices 
Tho : Revell Secry & Reg"" 

We have reason to believe that Thomas ffrench did not go to England as had been 
his intention when making the foregoing will. It will be noted that immediately after 
his death, Charles ffrench, his son, applied for certificate from Burlington Meeting on 
account of an intended visit to "Old England" (see No. 8). The estate was admin- 
istered upon by the executor, and after the decease of the widow all the special provisions 
of the will were faithfully carried out. The great plantation was divided into smaller 
tracts, and during the ensuing two centuries many deeds of transfer were made. 



> 

Q 

H 

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W 
O 

Q 

O 

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o 



o 

•I) 

w 
o 

l-H 

H 
O 

w 
d 

H 

a 

a 
o 
o 



00 
00 







^ 



DESCENDANTS OF THOxMAS FRENCH 81 



MEETING RECORDS, JAXE AND LYDIA FFRENXH 

At our mens monthly meeting held at the Meeting House in Burlington 
y' 5"" of y" 12'" mo. 16% 

Dan" Hall & Jane ffrench (12) declared their Intentions of Marriage 
it being the first time of their coming. 

At our mens monthly meeting held at our Meeting House in Bur'"° y* 
1"* of the 1^' Mo. 169 f Dan" Hall & Jane ffrench appeared y* Second time 
& Declared their Intentions of Marriage y* Meeting finding nothing to 
obstruct or hinder the Same they are Left to Consumate that weighty 
affair as they in a Convenient time & Place in y' fear of y* Lord Shall 
See meet. 

At y* womens meeting held in Burlington y* S'" of y* 11*" Mo. 1703 
Elizabeth Gardiner & Susannah fTurniss are appointed to admonish Lidia 
ffrench (13) Concerning her keeping Company with one y' is not a friend. 

At y* womens meeting held in Burlington y' T*"" of y* 12'" mo. 1703 
Elizabeth Gardiner & Susannah fTurniss being apointed last meeting to 
speak to Lidia ffrench had no opertunity as yet therefore they are desired 
to continue their care therein. 

6'" of y* P* mo. 1704 Elizabeth Gardiner & Susannah fTurniss report 
that they have endeavoured to speak with Lidia fi^rench but have had no 
opertunity therefore have made diligent enquiry & are informed that shee 
doth not now keep company with that man y* meeting was informed of. 



PETITION OF JANE HALL, 1709 

To be appointed administratrix to her husband's estate. 

To the Honorable Richard Ingoldesby Esqr. Lieutenant Gouernor of her 
Majesties Provinces of New Jersej-, New Yorke &c 
The Petifion of Jane Hall widdow of Daniel Hall Lately Deceafed 

Humbly Sheweth, 
That your Petifioners husband latelj^ died Intestate faveing that on his 
death-bed he verbaly declared that he left all to me and appointed me his 
Sole Executrix 

Your petifioner therefore humbly praj-es that 'S'our Honnor would 
be pleafed to Committ the administration of her husbands estate to your 
petifioner and your petifioner as in duty bound fhall ever pray 

the marke of 

Jane \ Hall. 
6 



82 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Burlington the 19'" April! 1709. 
I Jane Hall doe follemnly declare in the presence of Almighty God 
the witnefs of the truth of What I fay That Daniell Hall decealed died 
without any -will al farr as I know and belelve and that I will well and 
truely administer all and fingular the goods Chatties and Creditts of the 
faid deceafed and pay his Debts as farr as his goods Chatties and 
Creditts will thereunto extend and the Law require me and that I will 
make a true and perfect Inventory of all the faid goods Chatties and 
Creditts as alfo a Juft account when thereunto Required 

the marke of 

Jane ( Hall 

Burlington the 19*^" Aprill 1709 
Then appeared before me Richard Ingoldesby Esq"". Lieuetenant-Gouernor 
of her Majesty's provinces of New Jersey New Yorke &c Jane Hall widdow 
of Daniel Hall late of this County deceafed and praying for administra- 
tion of the Goods Chatties & Creditts of the faid deceafed I doe fitt to 
grant the fame accordingly She haveing been duely attested faithfully to 
administer the faid estate & returne an Inventory thereof Accordingly. 

Rich : Ingoldesby 




COLONIAL OIL LAMP 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



83 



4— RACHEL FFRENCH (Thomas, 1) 

b. March 24th, 1664. 

Baptized April 3rd, 1664, at Church S. S. Peter 
and Paul, Nether Heyford, England, 
m. First, 1687, Mathew Allen. 
He d. October, 1701. 

m. Second, 12th mo. 9th, 1702, Hugh Sharp, son 
of William and Hannah Sharp. 
He b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1668. 
d. 1742. 



16— MATHEW ALLEN, JR. 



17— MERCY ALLEN 



18— MARY ALLEN 

19— THOMAS ALLEN 
20— HANNAH SHARP 
21— REBECCA SHARP 



b. Sth mo. 23rd, 1688. 

m- 1711, Grace Jones. 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1692. 

m. First, 1710, Thomas Middleton. 

m. Second, 10th mo. 2nd, 1730, John Hugg. 

m. Third, 2nd mo. 19th, 1732, Thomas Lip- 
pincott. 

b. Sth mo. 23rd, 1695. 

m. First, Jarves Stockdell. 

m. Second, Sth mo. 15th, 1741, John Mickle. 

b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1699. 

m. 8th mo. 29th, 1724, John Brientnall. 

m. First, 2nd mo. 26th, 1727, William Coate. 

m. Second, 1754, Joseph Lippincott. 



Robert Allen, grandson of Mathew Allen, m. Mary 



Their daughter, Margery 



Allen, m. Job Rogers, and their daughter, Rhoda Rogers, m. Daniel Estell. Mary Estell, 
daughter of Daniel and Rhoda Estell, m. Morton McMichael, Mayor of Philadelphia, 
1866, 1867, 1868. 

MATHEW ALLEN 

A signer of the " Concessions and Agreements," Mathew Allen became 
one of the early English settlers of Burlington County, New Jersey. Ap- 
parently he was possessed of considerable means and had great faith in the 
future of the new country. In 1680, he bought of John Smith of " Christeene 
Creek" [Delaware] 3200 acres of land located along the Delaware near 



84 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Rancocas creek and extending eastward. Some 500 acres of the tract he 
conveyed to Isaac Conoroe in 1683, "out of good will and kindness which 
he hath and beareth unto the said Isaac Conoroe," also a further 500 acres 
to his brother Jacob Conoroe, under same conditions ; and the descendants 
of these men have ever since lived in the same vicinity. Isaac and Jacob 
Conoroe were evidently the step-sons of Mathew Allen, as from contemporary 
records he appears to have been married to their widowed mother previous 
to his marriage to Rachel ffrench in 1687. He is frequently referred to in 
old deeds as the "father-in-law" of Isaac and Jacob Conoroe; a term 
synonymous in colonial days with step-father. 

Mathew Allen became a farmer resident of Chester township ; he was also 
a carpenter, and took an active interest in the affairs of the community. He 
was elected constable of Chester township in 1699 and served as tax assessor 
during part of 1701, the year of his death. In the month of May of that 
year, he was one of the signers of the address of the inhabitants of West 
Jersey to King William, asking his " Sacred Majesty " to assume the civil 
government of the Colony, many things having been suffered under pro- 
prietary control. This curious paper, so expressive of the characteristic 
loyalty of British subjects, concluded as follows: 

" That the great and glorious God who of his wonderful! Goodness 
& mercy hath sett you over his Great People will preserve your sacred 
Maj*^ from the wicked contrivances, of all those who shall endeavour to 
oppose y'' Maj"' in the great worke w*^" Ij'es before You is and shall be the 
fervent & Constant Prayers of Us who crave leave to subscribe Our 
Selves your Maj'^^ most humble Suppliants." 

DEED, JOHN SMITH TO MATHEW ALLEN 

The following is an abstract of deed bearing date August 14th, 1680, of John .Smith 
" of Christeene Creek in America (yeoman) to Mathew Allen of Burlington in West 
Jersey, in America (carpenter)." 

Consideration Three score & Tenne pounds in good Country pay — grants 
bargains, sells &c — unto said Mathew Allen his heirs & Assigns forever (in 
his Actual pofsefsion now being by vertue of a bargaine & sale to him made 
for one whole yeare by Indenture bearing date the day before the date 
hereof & by vertue of y* statue for tranfferring vfes into poffeffion) 
All that his Lott or prcell of Land allready laid forth lyeing & being 
neare Rancokus Creek upon Dellaware River in America being comonly 
called the great Lott & was first laid forth conteyning by Estimacon 
Three Thousand Two hundred & odde Acres or thereabouts. And allfoe 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 85 

all ye his Lott or Lotts of Lands lyeing or being in the Islands of 

Burlington aforesaid Togeather alfoe with all such pte & pts share & shares 

as fhall belong or appertayne to the said Lott or Lotts in Burlington 

Towne bounds when the said Town bounds shall be devided & laid forth 

with all privileges &c to them apperteyning (except & reserved out of this 

prsent deed or grant, unto the s'* John Smith his heirs & afsigns one 

Acre & an halfe of Land in Burlington Island afres* lyeing to y^ High 

Street there & adjoyning to a Lott of Land belonging to the s* Mathew Allen 

and except alfoe one Lott or prcell of Land in Burlington afores** con- 

teyning by estimacon Eight Acres, or thereabouts be the same more leffe 

in the tenure or occupacon of William Brightwell or of his affignes) — all 

deed?, writings coppies &c to be made at the charge of s"* Mathew Allen 

his heirs & Assignes, (The Sume of one shillinge & Six pence comonly 

called three Guilders yearely to be paid by said Mathew Allen his heires 

& afsignes unto the said John Smith his heires & afsignes at the ffeast dayes 

of St. John the Baptist, if lawfully demanded as a Cheife Rent or Quitt 

Rent onlly excepted or foreprized) &c 

John Smith 

Sealed & deli'rded in p'"fence of John White 

Tho: Revell 

Alfoe Sealed & Deli'rded in the p'"fence of Willm Emley 

Thomas Lambert, Tho : ffairman & Tho : Revell. 

WILL OF MATHEW ALLEN, 1701 

In the Name of God Amen 

This being my last will and testament : by which I make void any other 
wills whatsoeuer : this feuententh of the feuenth month and in y* thirteenth 
year of his maiesties Reign : and in y^ year of our Lord one thousand feuen 
hundred and one : I Matthew Allin of y" Prouinc of New West jerfy and 
townfhip of Chester being wake of body yet of a perfect memory and 
mind : I doe Conftitute and ordeign my beloued wife Rachel Alin and 
my fon Mathew Alin to be fole Executorf : to performe my will as fol- 
oweth : I giue to my fon Mathew my plantation & all the land belonging 
to it except two hundred Ackers where Ifaac Conorow now liveth (it 
fhall begin at the Run and fo to John Adamfef path fo along the 
path half a mile fo to the Run again) I giue it to him when at age: to 
him and his heirf for euer also thirty pounds in Catle : I giue to my fon 
thomas Allin : the before mentioned two hundred Ackers and goshon ling 
one Northhampton Riuer : with thirty pounds in Catle : when at Age to 
him his heirs and assigns f oreuer : I doe order that my wife or her Assigns 
pay to my two dafters Marfy and Mary Allin thre hundred pounds : and 
my fon Mathew or his heirs or Assigns fhall pay one hundred pounds when 
they fhall arive at the Age of twenty years to them and their heirs or 
Assigns for euer and if either Child, dye, its portion fhall be deuided 



86 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



equally between the Rest : the interest of the four hundred fhall be for the 
bringing up of the Children — 

Also I giue my wife the lot of land in burlington to her or her Assigns 
for euer and the remamding part of the ftock I doe order my wif to 
pay Alinor Conorow y*^ daughter of Isaac Conorow hue pounds when at 
Age : Also that Negro dick be fold for y* vse of the plantation allso I giue 
Isaac Conorow three fhilings. Also to Jacob Conorow three fhilings Also 
to Anthony frier three fhillings 



md delivered -» / 



Sealed and delivered 
in the presents 
Abraham 
Ifaac Con 




Octob"" 17, 1701 
Abraham Heulings and Isaac Conarroe appearing before us, two of y* 
Juftices in the County of Burlington upon their Solemn atteftacon did 
declare that they were p'"fent and saw and heard y® above Teftator Matthew 
Allen signe Seal deliver Publish and declare y^ above Inftrument as his laft 
will & Teftam' & sett their hands thereto as Witnefses & further depofeth 
that to y'^ beft of their Underftanding, the Teftator was of sound and 
difpofeing mind & memory at y" Executeing thereof 

Tho : Gardiner 
Sam" ffurnis 



INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF MATHEW ALLEN, 1701 

October y* 9"^ 1701 

A True Inventory of the goods and Chattels of Mathew Allen Late of 
Chester in the County of Burlington in Weft Jerfey deceafsed, as foUoweth 
Preifed by us whofe names are under written 

lb f D 

Imp*"" his Ready money and Aparel 15 10 00 

6 pare of fheets 09 00 00 

5 pillow beeres 00 09 00 

3 table Cloths and two napkins 00 12 00 

other pieces of Linin 00 07 00 

bed and furniture 05 00 00 

bed and furniture 05 10 00 

bed and furniture 02 10 00 

New Linin 02 06 06 

A peice of new woolin Cloth 05 19 00 

A Remnant of new druget 00 11 00 

2 great brafs kettles and one fkillit 08 00 00 



\ 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 87 



1 warming pan 00 

2 brafs candlefticks 00 

3 Iron potts and one Iron kettle 02 

pewter 05 

milk veffils 02 

Lanthorne 00 

Cheft of drawers 04 

Chefts 01 

1 5 cows 60 

1 bull 03 

pare of oxen 11 

pare of young ftears 04 

[ — (torn)] two years old heyfors 12 

5 yearlings 09 

8 Calves 08 

2 horfes one mare & 1 yearling Colt 14 

21 Sheep 12 

30 head of fwine 20 

500 pound waite of Cheefe 12 

5 barrills of boyled fider 05 

2 barrills of fifh 02 

corn in the barn & in the houfe 40 

30 load of hay 18 

1 Cart 01 

plow and tackling 01 

Iron tooles 02 

fpade and howes 00 

other old Iron 00 

fire Irons 01 

box Irons and heaters 00 

bible and other books 00 

1 pare of ftilliards & fcales 00 

1 pare of money fcales 00 

wool 02 

faddle and pillion 01 

f pining wheelf 01 

1 gun 01 

frying pan 00 

peafe [ ?] 02 

grind ftone 00 

old fiths and fickles 00 

one cunnooe 02 

old baggs 00 



IS 


00 


05 


00 


00 


00 


06 


00 


00 


00 


05 


00 


00 


00 


05 


00 


00 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


15 


00 


00 


00 


10 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


10 


00 


00 


00 


08 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


10 


00 


04 


00 


04 


00 


12 


00 


03 


00 


02 


OS 


07 


06 


15 


00 


15 


00 


06 


00 


05 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


07 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



88 GENEALOGY OF THE 

lb f D 

chears ftooles and other Lumber 01 17 00 

3 negroes two men and one woman 115 00 00 



£ : 443 07 08 

lb 1 D 

Debts oweing to the faid Mathew Allen 300 00 00 

brought from y*" other fide 443 07 08 



Preifed by us £ : 743 07 08 

John paine 
Tho : Eves 
Abraham heulings. 

BOND, RACHEL ALLEN, RICHARD AND CHARLES FFRENCH, 1701. 

Know all men by thefe prfents That We Rachel Allen of the County of 
Burlington, in the Province of Weft New Jersey Widdow, Matthew Allen, 
Rich'' ffrench, and Charles ffrench sll of the same Count}' yeom are 
holden and ftand firmly bound unto the Hono*"'" Coll. Andrew Hamilton 
Governo'' of the s* Province in the Sume of ffifteen hundred pounds of 
curr' silver money of y'' s** Province To be paid to y'' s* Governo'' or to his 
lawfuU Succefsors for y" time being To the w'^'' Paymt well and truely to 
be made W^e bind ourselves and every of us our and every of our heires 
Executors and Adm""^ for the whole and in the whole joyntly and severally 
firmly by these Presents Sealed w'" our Seals dated in Burlington the 17'" 
day of Octob'' Anno Dm 1701 Annoqe R. R' Gulielmi tertij Anglis &c 
decimo tertio 

The Condicon of the above Obligacon is such That if the above bounden 
Rachel Allen, and Matthew Allen, (one y^ Wife the other the son and alfo) 
Executors of the laft will and Teftam* of Matthew Allen late of Chefter 
in ye s" County of Burlington yeom deed, do and shall truely and juftly 
fullfill and performe the laft Will and Teftam* of the said Teftator being 
the day of the date hereof proved and given into ye Regifters Office at 
Burlington afores'^ juft and true Accompts of and concerning the same 
Eftate late of and belonging to ye s*" Teftator w*^'' now is or hereafter shall 
come into their or either of their cuftody pofsefsion or knowledge when 
thereunto lawfully required, and thereof and of every part thereof discharge 
themselves according to Law That then the above Obligacon to be void 
& of none Effect or elfe to be and remaine in full force and virtue 

her 
Rachel Allen 

^^ 

mark 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 89 



Sealed and delivered 
In the presence of 

Tho : Gardiner 
Sam" ffurnis 
Tho : Eves 
Edward Hunloke 




CAo^^A^^ 



HUGH SHARP 

Hugh Sharp was a native of Northampton, England, whence he came to 
Pennsylvania, a lad of fourteen years of age, with his father the year of 
Penn's arrival. His family settled in Pennsbury, where he remained 
until he married Rachel, daughter of Thomas ffrench, widow of Mathew 
Allen, of Burlington county. New Jersey. Evidently having had educa- 
tional advantages he became a prominent, useful and influential citizen, of 
high standing in religious as well as business circles. He was a leading 
Friend, being a member of Burlington Monthly Meeting, and for some years 
an elder. He located in Chester township, becoming owner of several large 
plantations in that vicinity. In 1715 he received a grant of 3700 acres of 
unsurveyed lands from the Council of Proprietors, 230 acres of which were 
located in Hunterdon county and 400 acres in Morris county. 

Hugh Sharp's special gifts as a M-riter and man of affairs were utilized 
in various ways. His signature, as a witness, is found on wills and other 
documents and he prepared many inventories. He drew petitions to the 
legislature, notably for a bridge over the Rancocas, in 1709. The same 
year he served in that body as a member for the western division of Burling- 
ton county, the first Assembly of Governor Lord Lovelace. He signed a 
memorial to Governor Burnet, " in obedience to the order of Council, ap- 
pointing a time for the Proprietors for exhibiting their reasons why the bill 
for repealing an act for running and ascertaining the line of partition 
between the eastern and western divisions of New Jersey, should not pass." 
This was in 1721. 

February 18, 1708-9, Hugh Sharp was appointed guardian of Thomas 
Allen, " a minor of the age of eleven years or thereabouts, son of Mathew 
Allen, late of the county of Burlington, deceased, and Rachel the now wife 
of the said Hugh Sharp." He entered bond in the sum of 500 pounds, 
April 11, 1709. 



90 GENEALOGY OF THE 



WILL OF HUGH SHARP, 1741 

I Hugh Sharp of the Township of Wellingborrow and County of Burling- 
ton & province of West New Jersey Esquire thanks be to God being of 
perfect Sound disposing mind and memory do make & ordain this my last 
will and Testament in manner and form following that is to say Principally 
I give & Recomend my Spiritts into y*' hands of God y* gave It and my 
Body to the Earth to be decently Buried att y" difcretion of my Executors 
hereafter named And as Touching such worldly Eftate wherewith itt hath 
pleafed God to blefs me in this Life I give and Bequeath y*^ Same in 
maner and form as followeth — Item I give and Bequeath unto my dear 
and Loveing wife Rachel Sharp all that my Lott of Land in Burlington, 
fronting Pearl Street and Runing half way Back to Water Street to 
her and to her heirs and Afsigns forever I alfo Give unto my Said wife 
y® Sum of thirty pounds proclamation money to be paid to her annually 
out of my Eftate dureing her Natural Life by my Executors in Lew of her 
thirds of my Eftate which She is Therewith Contented. 

Item I Give unto my daughter-in-Law Mary Micle y* wife of John Micle 
all maner of Debts due or Owing unto me from her. 
Item I give unto y" Monthly Meeting of ffriends in Burlington y"' sum 
of five pounds to be paid into the hands of Caleb Raper Efq"" in twelve 
months after my Deceafe for the ufe of the afforesaid Meeting. And 
wheras I have Sold to my Son in Law William Coate my plantation, whereon 
I now dwell for Eight Hundred pounds Item I Give unto my Said Son 
Wm. Coate the Sum of four Hundred pounds thereof he paying y^ 
Intereft thereof for which he hath given me bonds and to my Son in 
Law John Brintnale the other four hundred pounds. And it is my 
will that after my Deceafe and my wife's that my Eftate Shall be Equally 
Divided Between my two Sons in Law as afores'', And I do nominate 
and appoint my Said two Sons in Law John Brientnall and William Coate 
Executors of this my Last will and Testament And I doe Hereby Revoake 
and Difsanul all former and other Wills and Teftaments by me Heretofore 
made making and ordaining this my Last will & Testament In wittnefs 
whereof I have hereunto Sett my hand and Seale This fifth day of y^ 
Eighth Month Comonly Called October and in the year of our Lord 1741 

Signed Sealed published pronounced and 
Declared by the Said Hugh Sharp as his 
Last will and Testament in y"' prefence of 

Peter ffearon 
Abr'" ffarrington 
Joshua Raper 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



91 



Abraham Farrington and Joshua Raper Two of the witnefses to the 
within written will being of the People called Quakers on their Solemn 
affirmation which they took according to law did declare & affirm that they 
Saw Hugh Sharp the Testator therein named Sign & Seal the same & 
heard him publish pronounce & declare the within written Instrumt to be 
his last will and Testament and that at the doing thereof y^ s'* Testator 
was of sound disposing mind memory and understanding so far as they 
know and as they Verily believe & that Peter ffearon the other witnefs was 
present and Signed his name as an evidence thereto together with these 
affirmants in presence of the s'' Testator 

Abr'" Farrington 
Joshua Raper 

Affirmed at Burl" y'^ Thirteenth Day of January A. D. 1742 before me 

Joseph Rose, Surrogate 

Be it Remember'd that the last will and Testament of Hugh Sharp dec'd 
having Been duly proved as aboves* probate & letters Testamentary were 
granted by his Excellency Lewis Morris Esq"" Governour &c. unto Wm 
Coates &Jo° Brientnall the Ex''^ therein named who being duly affirmed 
well & Truly to perform the S"* will to Exhibit a True and perfect Inventory 
and render a Just accompt when thereunto lawfully required Given under 
y^ prerogative Seal of S** province at Burlington the Second Day of March 
A. D. 1742 p Arch" Home Regr. &c 




HISTORIC TABLE, BURLINGTON MEETING HOUSE 
Upon this table marriage certificates have been signed for more than two hundred years, 

and it is still in use, 1908. 



92 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



5— RICHARD FFRENCH (Thomas, 1) 

b. December 1st, 1665. 

Baptized December 15th, 1666, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, England. 

d. 1745. 

m. First, 7th mo. 11th, 1693, Sarah Scattergood, 
daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Scatter- 
good of Stepney Parish, London, England. 
She d. about 1700. 

m. Second, 11th mo. 13th, 1701, Mary King, 
daughter of Harmanus and Mary King of 
Nottingham Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 



22— ELIZABETH FRENCH 
23— RICHARD FREA'CH, JR 

24— THOMAS FRENCH 
25— MARY FRENCH 
26— REBECCA FRENCH 
27— WILLIAM FRENCH 

28— SARAH FRENCH 

29— ABIGAIL FRENCH 

30— BENJAMIN FRENCH 
31_jONATHAN FRENCH 



b. 1694. 

m. William Scholey. 

b. 8th mo. 20th, 1696. 
m. Rachel . 



m. 8th mo. 15th, 1724, Preserve Brown, Jr. 

m. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1729, Benjamin Shreve. 

b. April 7th, 1712. 

m. Sept. 20th, 1748, Lydia Taylor. 

b. 7th mo. 20th, 1715. 

m. 2nd mo. 1741, William Marlin. 

b. 7th mo. 5th, 1717. 

m. First, 1st mo. 1737, James Lewis. 

m. Second, Jacob Taylor. 

b. 12th mo. nth, 1719. 

m. January ZQth, 1742, Martha Hall. 

b. 11th mo. 27th, 1722. 

m. 1st mo. 12th, 1744, Esther Matlack. 



Harmanus King died 5th day of 1st mo. (March) 1727/8 in his 76th year. 
Mary King died 24th day of 11th mo. 1740, in her 88th year. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 93 

RICHARD FRENCH 

A memorandum in the family Bible of Thomas ffrench, then residing at 
Nether Heyford, England, and in his own handwriting, says : " December the 
first about ten at night my son Richard was borne, 1665. The Lord give 
him grace that hee may continually walk before him." A long and useful life 
shows how fully this characteristic prayer of a devout and loving father was 
answered. Richard was a lad of fifteen when he came to America with 
the family, in 1680. So far as known, his youth and early manhood were 
spent on the Rancocas homestead plantation. That he was devoted to farm 
life is shown in the fact that upon his marriage, in 1693, he purchased an 
extensive tract of land, 460 acres, in Mansfield township, Burlington county, 
where he seems to have resided during the remainder of his life. A deed 
of release of all claim to the home farm, after his father's death, to his 
younger brother, Charles, shows the kindly relationship that existed and his 
contentment with his own lot. 

That Richard French was a faithful and zealous Friend is evident from 
meeting records of the period, wherein his name appears many times. His 
nearest meeting was the one early established at Crosswicks. In 1715 he is 
recorded as an overseer and in 1723 as an Elder and minister. He was a 
frequent representative at Quarterly and Yearly Meeting. He was now past 
middle age, but for a quarter of a century continued active in the work of 
preaching and visitation, journeying through the wilderness to New England 
and the South. The original certificate of 1733, a facsimile of which is 
given, is wonderfully well preserved, showing many notable names of that 
pioneer period. In the promotion of religious life in the colonies Richard 
French was conspicuous and influential. In business affairs he was active 
and prosperous, as his many deeds and other papers show, particularly his 
will and the accompanying inventory of personal property. In 1701 he 
served as tax collector for Mansfield township. He raised a large family, 
all of his ten children reaching marriageable age. The peculiar phraseology 
of his recorded papers shows a mind exceedingly careful of details, with a 
just and kindly spirit, a continuing answer to the fervent prayer of his father 
at his birth. His monthly meeting fittingly testified, after his death, that 
in the exercise of his gift in the ministry, " he labored faithfully in his 
declining age, and travelled much in North America." 



94 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

The following are extracts from various Meeting records showing reference to 
Richard French. 

Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at the House of Thos. Gardiners 
y* 7'" of y"^ e'" mo: 1693 

Richard ffrench and Sarah ^cattergood came before this Meeting and 
Declared their Intention of Marriage it being the first Time. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at y'' house of Thomas Gardeners 
Adjorned to this Eleventh of y" 7"" Month 1693. 

Richard ffrench & Sarah Scattergood came this second time and de- 
clared their Intentions of Marriage & the Meeting upon Enquire finding 
them Clear they are prmitted to Solemnize y^ same as in y® fear of God they 
see meete. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at our Meeting House in Bur*"" y* 
P* of the 1^' Mo. 169f 

Whereas Some Diiference appeared between Christopher Wetherill & 
Rich'' French Concearning a Peice of Meadow in dispence between 
them Jno. Brown ordered to Speak to Rich** to be here at the next Mo'" 
Meeting. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at our Meeting house in Burlington 
y* 5'" of y' T"" Mo: 1697 

Richard French in psuance to y" Order of y*" Last meeting appeared 
at this Meeting & the Men by them Chosen to finally End y" Difference 
between them are these Joshua Humphreis ffreedom Lippincott Jno. Wills 
& Tho Raper. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at Our Meeting House in Burlington 
y-^ 7"' of y" 4*'^ Mo. 1697 

The men before chosen by Christopher Wetherill & Richard French gives 
account to this Meeting y* y** difference between them is ended. 



Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

A — 10*" Mo. 1701 Richard French and Mary King signifyed their inten- 
tions of taking each other in marriage and according to y* good order 
yoused amongst us, Wm. Wood and Thos. Scholey are appoynted to enquire 
concerning his clearness on y' acco* & make report to our next Mo. Mtg. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 95 

1^' of 11 mo. 1701 Rich'd French and Mary King signified their intentions 
of marriage with each other y"' 2nd time, and enquiry having been made 
on both parts concerning their clearness from others on y* account and 
nothing appearing but that they are cleare they are left to proceed accord- 
ing to y* good order yoused amongst us. 

Our Women's Monthly Meeting was held at the Meeting house in Chester- 
field where -1 — 10 mo. 1701 — Richard French of this meeting and Mary 
King the daughter of Harmanus & Mary also of this meeting laid before 
this meeting their intentions of joining each together in marriage. Hannah 
Overton & Rebecca Davenport are to enquire of the young woman's clear- 
ness & give report to our next monthly meeting. 

1 — 11 mo. 1701 — Richard French and Mary King aforesaid have the 
Second time published their intentions of marriage before us : So Friends 
finding things clear leaves them to the men Friends. 

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Record, Book 1, Marriages, Births and Deaths. 
Whereas Richard French of the Township of Mansfield & County of 
Burlington in the province of West Jersey yeoman, & Mary King daughter 
of Harmanus King of the Township of Nottingham & County & province 
afores** having intentions of taking each other in Marriage did publish 
the same before Several Monthly Meetings of the people called Quakers & 
had the consent of the said Meetings & of parents & Relations concerned. 
And for the full determination of their said Intentions They the said 
Richard French & Mary King aforesaid appeared in a Solemn Afsembly of 
the aforesaid people met together for that end & purpose at the House of 
Harmenus King in the Township of Nottingham & County & province 
aforesaid upon the thirteenth day of the Eleventh month One Thousand 
Seven hundred & one Where he the said Richard French, taking the said 
Mary King by the hand did openly declare Friends in the fear of the Lord 
& in the presence of this Afsembly I take this my friend Mary King to be 
my Wife promifsing to be a loving & faithful husband till death Separate 
& the said Mary King in like manner did take the said Richard French 
to be her husband promifsing to be a faithful & loving Wife till death 
Separate us. And as a further confirmation thereof the said Rich** French 
& the said Mary Afsuming her husband's name upon her did then & 
there Set their hands to thefe presents & we whose names are hereunto 
Subscribed were Witnefses to the said Solemnization & Susbscription. 

Richard French 
her 

Mary <TI French 
mark 
Francis Davenport Hannah Woodward Harmanis King 

Josiah Gratton Rose Fowler Mary King 



96 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Antho. Woodward 

Saml. Overton 

Jno. Bunting 

Jno. Leeson 

Geo. Nicholson 

Tho. Folkes Senr. 

Tho. Folives Junr. 

Gervas Hall 

Francis Davenport Junr. 



Mary Quicksall 
Katherine Thorne 
Sarah Davenport 
Anne Davenport 
Susanna Decow 
Bridget Davenport 
Sarah Bunting Junr. 
Esther Overton 
Martha Shreeve 
Hanna Overton 
Eliza. Folkes 



John King 
Charles French 
Joseph King 
Jno. French 
Tho. Scattergood 
Tho. Brian 
Joseph Pancoaft 
Wm. Pancoaft 
rhomasin Pancoaft 
Wm. Quicksall 
Jos. Scattergood 
Hannah Pancoaft 
Lydia French. 



Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes, Continued 

4 mo — 5*" — 1701 — This meeting have under consideration Psons which 
Profefs truth and wass in Companey with those y* Broke y® Prison Dore 
oppne After A Riotous Manner at Burlington to Deale with them acording 
to the good order of truth. 

friends Appoynted to Speake with all Such as above that be Long to 
this meeting and to make Report to our next Monthly Meeting is Thomas 
Scholey, William Wood and John Warren. 

5 mo 3'' — 1701 — Thomas Scholey and William Wood acquaints this Meet- 
ing y* According to Appoyntm* they have been with those p''fons, and 
y^ Meeting Again appoynts them to speak with the p''sons above Sd to be 
at our next Monthly Meeting. 

6th mo. 7*" 1701— Richard French Thomas Curtis David Curtis & 
Abraham Browne (At y* Requeft of William Wood and Thomas Scholey 
appoynted by the meeting) was at this meeting. 

7th mo. 4'" — 1701 Whereas divers disorderly p''fons did upon y^ IS**" 
day of y" 1^' mo Last Apeare in a body at Burlington And we not 
understanding their wicked Intentions, but being unwareyly drawn into 
y' tumultious Companey Which in the End Broke forth in to A Riotus 
and unlawfull Breakeing opne y*" Prifon Doref Now for y" Cleareing of 
ourfelves and oure Profeffion from all Such unlawfull unwarrantable and 
deteftable actions as above Wee do here by Solemnly declare that Wee 
are Absolutely Cleare from being in Anej^ wife directly or in directly 
Intentionally Conserned in the InCorriageing Abeting or Aiding to y* 
Pfons above Sd and do forder declare y' wee are hartaly Sory that our 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 97 

unhappy Lott was to be at y^ unlawful Meeting. In teftamony whereof 
,we do here unto Subscribe our Names y*^ day and yeare Abovefd. 

Richard ffrench 
Tho : Curtis 
David Curtis 

7^'' mo 4"' 1701 — Richard French Appeared at this Meeting and Signed 
A Paper to the Sattisfaction of friends. The meeting appoints Richard 
French and John Bunting to goe to Thomas Curtis & David for y'" to 
sign y* Papper as above. 

8 mo 1^ 1701 John Bunting and Richard French gives this mtg account 
y' they have been with Thos. and David Curtis and y' they have both signed 
y*^ paper above mentioned. 

At a Monthly Meeting at Chesterfield Meeting-house ye 2"'' day of y* 11*'' 
Mo. 1706 

friends by this Meeting Appointed to Attend and Accompaney Publike 
friend traveling this Way so far as is Neflary is John Murfin 

Robert Willson 
Edward RockhiU 

John Abbott 
Rich'* french 
& Matthew Wattson 

4"" of 6**^ Mo. 1715 — Two or three of the Overseers belonging to this 
Meeting for some reasons requested that there might be added to their 
assistance one Friend more which the Meeting having taken into consid- 
eration do appoint Richard French to be Overseer joyned to those before 
named. 

At Meeting at Chesterfield Mtg-house 6"" of the 8"'" 1720. The Friends 
of Chester being the lower part of this County acquainted Friends of this 
Meeting sometime paft that by an accident of Fire their Meeting House 
was burnt therefore requefted some afsistance of this Meeting that such as 
were free to contribute to so good a Work whereupon Several Friends 
Subfcribed to pay as soon as they could to Richard French & William 
Murfin the Sums contained therein to be applyed to the ufe aforesaid. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting House in 
Chesterfield the 5'" of the 11'"° 1720. 

Richard French & William Murfin being formerly appointed to receive 
the Money Subfcribed to afsist our Friends at Chester in order to rebuild 
their Meeting House that was burned brought in a Receipt to this Meeting 
from under the hands of Thomas French (6) & James Adams for the 
money paid to them being ten pounds, three Shillings new Currency. 

7 



I 



98 (;enealogy of the 

1^' of 6 mo. 1723 This Meeting hath thought fit to appoint our Friends 
and Elders Richard French and Benjamin Clarke and request that they will 
meet with our severall Meetings of Ministring Friends held at Burlington at 
the times agreed to by the General Meeting of the Ministring Friends. 

6 — 6 mo. 1724 — This meeting having considered the advantage that 
Friends and Truth may receive by putting in practice the weighty work 
of Love and service in visiting Friends families do for that service appoint 
our dear friends Richard French, Jos. Watts, John Sykes & Isaac Horner 

At Chesterfield monthly meeting held the 6"' of Sixth month, 1724. 
This meeting having considered the matter referred to this time concerning 
a Meeting House to be built near Stony Brook approves thereof and a 
subscription was made in order thereto. Richard French and John Tan- 
tum are appointed to receive for the meetings use the sums subscribed, as 
Friends are in readiness to pay same. John Tantum and Thomas Lambert 
are appointed to lay the matter before the next Quarterly meeting at 
Burlington for its approval and assistance. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in 
Chesterfield the 7'" of the 2™° 1726— 

Friends of this Meeting having had for sometime paft under their 
consideration the advantage it would be for Expediting the businefs 
that may be propofed in this meeting a preparative Meeting where those 
that have any businefs to propofe to this Meeting may have the advice of 
such Friends as may be present at said Meeting & that they are to be 
holden at the Meeting Houfe every fifth day next before our Monthly 
Meeting, immediately after the Week day Meeting is over & to consist 
of twenty four Men and Women Friends to be named by the respective 
Meeting or so many of thofe named as can well be there & such other 
Solid Friends who are Members of our Monthly Meeting as can attend 
it which sd preparative Meeting shal report to y"* next mo'^ Meeting such 
things considered by them as come properly before said Meeting. Friends 
appointed to attend it are as follows ; Richard French, John Sykes, Joseph 
Worth, Abraham Farrington, Isaac Horner, John Tantum, John Abbott, 
Benjamin Clark, Samuel Large, Preserve Brown, John Wood & Thomas 
Lambert. Named by our Women as followeth Mary Bunting, Rebecca 
Waring, Hannah Overton, Hannah Woodward, Anne Abbott, Mary Brown, 
Joanna Sykes, Thomasin Pancoast, Elianor Horner, Alice Bunting, Eliza- 
beth Tantum, & Sarah Murfin. 

At A Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in 
Chesterfield the 6*" of the 8'"° 1726. 

Our Friends Richard French & John Sykes propofed that if this Meeting 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 99 



approved of it thej- thought it might be of good Service not only to their 
'and many other Friends famileys but give an opportunity to some who 
would be willing to come sometimes if near to Settle at some convenient 
place near them a Meeting to be every firft day during the winter Quarter 
which propofal this Meeting approves of and leaves the Settling of the 
Same to them and Friends that way. 

5 — 11 mo. 1726 In answer to our friends request and the Quarterly 
Meeting directions, this meeting thinks fit to appoint our Friends Richard 
French, Abraham Farrington, Benjamin Clark and Thos. Lambert to make 
themselves acquainted as much as they can of the labors and service of 
that worthy servant of the Lord Thomas Wilson when in these parts 
and draw it in writing and bring it to our next Monthly Meeting. 

2 — of 5'" mo. 1730 Friends subscribed to the raising of a half j'early 
collection for the use of our Yearly Mtg. and appointed our friends Rich*" 
French and Isaac Horner to receive the same. It is desired it may be paid 
in before next monthly meeting. 

3 — 6 mo. 1732 A subscription was forwarded at this Meeting in order 
for the Yearly Meeting Stock and appoint our Friends Richard French and 
John Tantum to receive the same. 

7'" of 12'" Month 1733 Our Friend Richard French requested a certifi- 
cate of this meeting signifying that for some time he had some drawing 
in his mind to visit Friends in ^'irginia and Maryland and accordingly he 
had one signed. 

[Facsimile of certificate above requested and granted appears upon accom- 
panying page.] 

4*" of 5'" mo. 1734 Our Friend Richard French being returned from 
his visit of Love to Friends in North Carolina and Virginia and brought 
certificates from Friends which are a good account & satisfactorie to 
this meeting. 

4*" of 9™° — 1736 — Friends appointed Isaac Horner, Richard French, 
William Morris, Joshua Wright and Marmaduke Watson to treat with 
Joseph Borden about Land to build a Meeting house on, and a grave-yard 
he having made an offer to some Friends concerning it. 

2'^ of 10""° 1736 — The friends appointed to treat with Joseph Borden 
have been with him, and he hath ordered two pieces of Land one for 
a Meeting House and the other for a Grave Yard to Friends Satiffaction ; 



100 GENEALOGY OF THE 



and desire Samuel Satterthwaite, Benjamin Shreve, Thomas Newbold, 
Benjamin Clark Jun'' — Ananiah Gaunt and Joseph Gardiner to receive 
the Deed and Sign an acknowledgment of Truft for it : This Meeting orders 
Jofeph Recklefs to make the Writings as soon as he can with conveniency. 
The Declaration of Trust for the Land at Bordentown to be made to Joseph 
Recklefs, Marmaduke Watson, Samuel Pancoast and Benjamin Field. 

6*'' of 11 mo. 1736 — Joseph Reckless reported that the writings were not 
done for the Land for a Meeting House and Grave Yard at Bordentown 
for want of the Survey. The Meeting orders him to get it done as soon 
as can be with conveniency. 

3'"'' of 12"'° 1736 — Joseph Recklefs to continue his care for getting the 
writing done for the Meeting House and graveyard at Bordentown. 

7*" of 5"'° — 1737 — Joseph Recklefs gives accot that the Deeds for the 
Meeting House and Grave Yard at Bordentown are done, this Meeting 
desires him to get the Declaration of Trust signed against Next Meeting. 

1 — 1 mo. 1739 — Richard French acquainted this Meeting that he had 
a concern on his mind to Yisit Friends in New England Defiring a 
Certificate on that account 

5 — 2 Mo. 1739 — Richard French had a Certificate Signed at this Meeting 
according to his request. 

5 — 5 Mo. 1739 — Richard French brought into this Meeting two Certifi- 
cates one from Dover Monthly Meeting in New England dated the 19th 
day of the 3** mo. 1739 The other from the Yearly Meeting at Newport 
on Road Island dated the 11th of the 4 mo. 1739 both giving a satisfactory 
account of his Service and of his orderly Conversation. 

6 — 7 mo. 1739 — Richard French brought a Certificate to this meeting 
from Long Island dated 25 — of 5 mo. 1739 giving a satisfactory account 
of his Service there. 

5 — 1 mo. 1741 — William Marlin and Sarah French (28) the first time 
appeared at this meeting and declared their intentions of marriage with 
each other. Friends appoint Isaac Horner & Marmaduke Watson to enquire 
concerning his conversation and clearness on account of marriage and 
make report to ne.xt monthly meeting. 




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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 101 

2 — 1^ mo. 1741 — Wm. Marlin and Sarah French the second time de- 
clared their intentions of marriage : Nothing appearing to obstruct. 
Friends leave them to their liberty to consumate the same to see that things 
are orderlj'. 

Minutes of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

5th of ye 1st mo. 1741 William Marlen a frequenter of our meetings 
for worship and Sarah French (28) hath published theire intention of 
marriage, two friends are appointed to make enquire concerning her and 
report to next meeting. 

2nd of 2nd mo. 1741 William Merlen and Sarah French ye second time 
signified they continued theire intentions of marriage and nothing appearing 
to hinder their proceeding they are left to the conclusion of men friends. 

William Marlin was Overseer of Roads for Chesterfield Township, 1746. 



"SERTIFICATE" OF HARMANAS KING 

The following is taken from a very old Book of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Records : 

fi'rom our Monthly Meeting at fflushing on Long Ifland the feventh day 
of y* ffirst mo 1699— 

Deare ffriendf wee dearly falut you in the truth and hearby fartefie 
that Harmanas King Lived amongft us and belonged to our Meeting and 
hee remouing into your parts to Live requefted of us a fertificate of his 
Conuerfation which was sober and orderly walking acording to his profef- 
sion in much fimplifetti and haue Left a good report behind him hauing 
made prouif of his Loue to truth acording to his capafity by an Inofent 
Conuerfation and as fuch wee defire hee may bee Receiued amongft you 
hoping that hee will Contineue in y*' fam nearneff to truth and itf 
ffoloworf. 

Signed by order and on behalf of our faid meeting 

pr Sam Bown. 

APPOINTMENT OF RICHARD FRENCH TAX COLLECTOR, 1701 

An Act of Assembly made May 1700 entitled "An Act for raifing a Tax 
towards an Honorable Support of Government as also to defray Several 
Provincial Debts &c. 

And it is Hereby Enacted by the Authority of the Same " 

Governor — advice of Council and Consent and agreement of the Representa- 
tives in this General free Assembly met and Assembled) that the Persons 



102 GENEALOGY OF THE 

herein after mentioned be appointed and are hereby appointed and author- 
ized in the several and respective Townships Precincts or Districts in the 
said Province, to be Assessors and Collectors for the Afsefsing and gather- 
ing the faid Tax as follows, viz ; " 

In Burlington Co., — for Mansfield Thomas Curtis and James Crafts 
Sen*" Afsefsors ; — Richard French ; Collector. 

At Sessions of Gen. Assembly convened at Burlington the 12*" Day of 
May, 1701 and ending 2P' Day of same. 

Andrew Hamilton — Governor, (with advice of this Council) and by 
Samuel Jennings Speaker of House of Representatives 

Recorded per me 

Edward Hunloke Clerk Council 

DEED, RICHARD FRENCH TO THOMAS BRYAN, 1714 

This Indenture made and dated the Seventh day of February in the year 
according to English account one thousand seven hundred and fourteen 
Between Richard French of the Township of Mansfield in the County 
of Burlington and the Western Division of the Province of New Jersey 
Yeoman of the one part and Thomas Bryan of the Township of North- 
ampton and County & Province aforesaid yeoman of the other part Witnef- 
seth that the said Richard French for and in consideration of the Sum of 
Twenty five pounds at nine Shillings and two pence pr ounce to him in hand 
paid by the said Thomas Bryan the Receipt whereof he the said Richard 
French doth hereby acknowledge and thereof and of every part and parcel 
thereof doth clearly acquit and discharge the said Thomas Bryan his Heirs 
Executors Administrators and every of them by these presents have 
Given Granted aliened Released and confirmed and by these Presents do 
Give Grant Alien Release and Confirm unto the said Thomas Bryan and 
to his Heirs and afsigns One Eighth part of a Ninetieth part of the said 
Province otherways understood an Eighth part of a propriety of Land 
lying and being in the said Province together with All the Right Title 
property claim and demand whatsoever except all the Town bound Land 
and Except Eighteen hundred Acres being taken up and Surveyed in the 
said Province being usually called the first Second and third Dividend 
which Eighth part of a propriety he the said Richard French hath and 
holdeth by virtue of a Deed Indented bearing date the twentieth day of 
No"""" Anno 1680 Between John Woolston of Burlington and province 
aforesaid Yeoman of the one part and Thomas French father of the said 
Richard French party to these presents of the other part which eighth part 
of a propriety was purchased by the aforesaid John Woolston of Thomas 
Olive of the Township of Wellingborough Haberdasher and was held by 
Virtue of a Deed Indented bearing date the twenty sixth day of February 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 103 

Anno 1676 Between the said John Woolston and Thomas Olive together 
with all the Right Title claim and demand whatsoever unto the said Thomas 
Bryan his Heirs and Afsigns forever To have and to hold the said Land 
Premifses except what before Excepted unto the said Thomas Bryan his 
Heirs and afsigns forever Together with all and every of the Reversion and 
Reversions Remainder and Remainders with the Mines Minerals woods 
Fishings Fowlings Hawkings Huntings and all other priviledges profits 
and Commodities whatsoever belonging to the said Premifses And he the 
said Richard French doth for himself his Heirs Executors Administrators 
doth Covenant promise Grant to and with the said Thomas Bryan his 
Heirs & afsigns by these presents that at the time of the Sealing and 
Delivery hereof he the said Richard French is the true and Lawful Owner 
& proprietor of the said Premifses and hath in himself good Right full 
power and absolute Authority to Sell and Confirm the said Granted and 
Bargained Premifses and every part and parcel thereof unto the said 
Thomas Bryan his Heirs and Afsigns forevermore And further that the 
said Richard French his Heirs Executors and Administrators shall and 
will from time to time and at all times forever hereafter at the Request 
cost and Charges of the said Thomas Bryan his Heirs or afsigns make do 
and Execute such further Acts matters thing or things whatsoever for the 
better and more fully conveying and confirming the said Premifses hereby 
Granted and Sold unto the said Thomas Bryan his Heirs and afsigns 
according to the true Intent and meaning of these presents In witnefs 
whereof he the said Richard French hath to this present Indenture set 
his hand and seal the day and year first above written 1714. 

Richard French [seal] 

Sealed Signed and Delivered in the presence of Michael Newbould Samuel 
Bustill George Willis — Endorsed 

Be it Remembered that on the Seventh day of February one thousand 

seven hundred and thirty one personally appeared before me Peter Bard 

Esq"" one of His majestys Council for the Province of New Jersey Richard 

French and acknowledged that he Signed Sealed and Delivered the 

within Instrument for the use therein mentioned r, , r> j 

Peter Bard 



DEED, RICHARD FRENCH TO HUGH HUDDY, 1714 

To : all Chriftian people to whome thefe prefents Shall Cum Know ye 
that I Richard ffrench of manffield In ye County of Burlington & weftern 
Devifion of New Jerfey j'eoman Eldeft Son & heir of Thomas ffrench of y" 
County of Burlington aforef and Legate, To his Laft Will & teftamt for 
& In consideration of y^ sum of Seuenteen pounds Tenn Shillings have 
Remifsed Releafed altogeather for me my heirs Executors & Adminiftrators 
Haue Quit claimed vnto Hugh Huddy of y* town & County of Burlington 



104 GENEALOGY OF THE 



aforef Esq"" for his full & peaceable pofsefsion & Seil'in being & to his 
heirs & afsignes all my Right Eftate Title Claim vfe Intreft & Demand 
which I y*' aforef*' Richard ffrench any time Had haue or In any wife 
foreuer may haue or my heirs at any time hearafter may haue of or In 
two Lotts of Land Laying In Burlington aforef* Bounded as ffoUoweth 
vizt. the firft being A Water Lott Containing Eight foot ffront vpon y" 
River Dellaware Abutting North vpon ye Said River & South vpon ye 
Back Street & Eaft upon }•" Land of y" said Thomas ffrench and Weft 
upon Richard Bafnett 

The other : A WharfF Lott Lotted out for y* propriety of thomas olives 
which propriety Lott is bounded with the High Street North Eaft & a 
Littell alle Leying on ye South Weft side of John HoUinfhead Houfe & 
ffrunting North Weft upon ye River Dellaware & South Eaft upon ye 
back ftreet Containing Twenty ffive ffoot frunt vpon ye River aforef'^ ; So : 
yt Neither I ye aforefd Richard ffrench my heirs or any other by vs or In 
our Names any Right, Estate title Claim vfe Intreft or Demand of and In 
the said Lotts of Land bounded as Aboue and premifses Nor In any parcell 
thereof may or ought to Require Claime or Challenge But from Every 
Action Right title claim vfe Intreft or Demand to the aforefaid premifses 
or to Any parcell thereof wee are altogeather Excluded & for euer Debarred 
by thefe prefents. 

In. W^itnefs. whereof I y'' said Richard ffrench haue Heirvnto Sett my 
hand & Seale this twenty Second day of May one Thoufand seven Hundred 
And ffourteen Sealed & Deliuered In ye prefence of vs 



Richard Allison : 
W S : Martinaux 
Joseph Recklefs 



Richard ffrench [seal] 



DEED, RICHARD FRENCH TO HIS SON THOMAS, 1729/30 

This Indenture made the Sixth day of y^ Eleventh Month Commonly 
called January in ye year of our Lord one thousand S^ven hundred and 
twenty nine Thirty & in the third year of ye Reign of King George y* 
Second over England &c. 

Eetweene Richard French of the township of Mancefeild & County of 
Burlington in y*" Weft divifion of new Jerfey yeoman of the one part and 
Thomas french Son of y^ afore named Richard French of y* same Town- 
fhip County & division afores* Sadler of ye other Part Witnefseth that ye 
said Richard French for & in confideration of y*" Sum of tenn pounds of 
Good Current money of Weft Jerfey to him in hand by his said fon but 
more Efpecially for and in Confideration of y^ Love good Will and affec- 
tion that he hath & bareth towards his sd fon hath Given Granted Bargained 
& sold Alined Enfeoffed Conveyed and Confirmed & by thefe prefents 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 105 

Doth fully freely Clearly & abfolutely Give grant Bargain & sell Alien 
EnfeofTe Convey & Confirme unto his said son Thomas French and to his 
heirs & Afsignes for ever one Certaine peice parcel or Tract of Land situ- 
ated Lying & being in y* Township of Mancefield & County of Burlington 
aforesaid Containing ninty six acres & by y" survey thereof it lyeth thus 
bounded. Begineth at a small Black oak for a Corner in y" line of 
Preserve Brown's Land & runs from thence a long by y^ line of y'^ Land 
of Jacob Decows & Joseph Pancoast Southwestwardly fifty two degrees 
fifty Eight Chains to a post by a Hickery tree marked for a corner & from 
thence it Runs south Lastly seventy Degrees thirty four Chains by ye 
Land of Caleb Shreve to a White oake Corner Thence Nort Eaftwardly 
thirty two Degrees fourteen Chains & a half to a Maple tree for Corner 
& from thence Nort Eaftwardly Seven degrees thirty five Chain & three 
rod to the Corner first named Containing ninety six acres as a fores'* it 
being part of the Land adjoyning to y* farm & plantation Whereon ye 
s"* Richard French now Inhabiteth & is a part of that four Hundred & 
sixty acres of Land that he the sd Richard French purchaled of William 
Biddle by Deed baring date y^ Eighteenth day of November Anno Domini 
1693 & is Recorded in ye publick Records of Weft Jersey in book B 
page 355 & 356) Relation being thereunto had it doth & will more fully 
and more at Large appear Togather with all & every y* Mines Minerals 
Woods Ways Waters fowlings fifhings Huntings Hawkings & all other 
Royalties franchifes powers profits Comodities Hereditaments & appur- 
tenances whatsoever unto ye said Ninty six Acres of Land belonging 
or in any wife appertaining alfo all y* Estate Right Title Intreft ufe 
pofsefsion property Claim and Demand whatfoever of him y* said Richard 
French Either in Law or Equity of in to or out of y" said Granted land & 
premifes or any part or parcell thereof and y*^ Reverfion Reverfions 
Remainder & Remainders thereof & of every part thereof To have & to 
hold the said peice parcell or tract of Land situated limited & bounded as 
in maner above Exprefsed and Containing Ninty Six Acres as aforesaid & 
all & singular other y* before mentioned and Intended to be Granted & 
bargained premifes & every part & parcel thereof with their and every 
of their appurtenances unto ye said Thomas French his heirs and Afsignes 
for Ever to ye onely Proper Ufe benefit & behoofe of him y" sd Thomas 
French his Heirs and Afsignes for Ever more and y'' said Richard French 
y* father Doth Covenant for himfelf his heirs Execut^ & Administ^ that 
at the time of y* sealling and Delivery of thefe prefents is Lawfully & 
Rightfully seazed in the above mentioned & defcribed tract of Land & 
Granted & Bargained premifses of a good sure perfect & Indefeazable 
Estate of Inheritance in fee simple And hath in himself good Rightfull 
power lawfull & abfolute Authority to Give Grant Bargain & Sell y® Same 
unto y'' said Thomas French his heirs & Afsignes for ever So that now 
y*' said Thomas French his Heirs & Afsignes shall & may from time to time 



106 GENEALOGY OF THE 



& at all times for Ever hereafter peaceablj- & Quiatly have hold Ufe 
ocqupie pofsefs and Injoy all y'^ above mentioned & defcribed ninty six 
Acres of Land & Granted premifes with all & every of their appurtenances 
without y'^ LawfuU let suit Trouble Deniall Eviction Ejection Molleftation 
or other Interruption of him y*^ s'* Richard French his Heirs Execut' Ad- 
minift' or any other person or persons whatfoever But against himfelfe 
y^ said Richard French his heirs Executors or Adminift^ & against all & 
every other person or perfons whatsoever having or Claiming or that shall 
or may at any time hereafter have or Claim any lawfuU Estate Right Title 
or Intreft of into or of the said Granted Land & premifses or any part or 
percel thereof shall & will warrant «S: for ever defend by thefe prefents In 
Witnefs whereof the sd Richard French hath sot to his Hand & seal y^ 
Day & year first above Written 1729/30. 

Richard French with a [seal] 

Signed Sealed and Delivered In the prefents of Edmond Jones, Joseph 
Stockton Job Stockton Tho Scattergood 

Be it Remembered that on the Twenty Sixth Day of March In the 
Year of our Lord one Thousand Seven Hundred & Thirty Three Perfonally 
Appeared before me Peter Bard Esq'' one of his Majestys Councell for 
the Province of New Jerfey Edmond Jones who being sworn on y*' holy 
Evangelist of Almighty God Did Declare he was Prefent & saw Richard 
French sign seale & Deliver the Within Inftrument for ye ufe Within 
mentioned 

Peter Bard 
Recorded June 21'" 1733 p P. B— S. 

WILL OF RICHARD FRENCH, 1745 

Whereas I Richard French of Mansfield Township in County of Burling- 
ton in the western Division of the province of New Jersey this Twenty 
fourth day of the Seventh Month in the year of our Lord One Thousand 
Seven Hundred and fforty ffive being very weak and Sick in Body but of 
perfect mind and Memory thanks be Given unto Almighty God therefore 
And for all Mercies Daily received and knowing it's Appointed for all 
men once to die do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in 
the following manner and form that is to Say Principally and first of all 
I give and Recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it and as 
for my Body I Recommend it to the Earth to be Buried in a Christian 
like And Decent Manner at the Discresion of my Executor hereafter 
Named, and as touching such Worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased 
God To Blefs me with all in this life I give Devise and Beftow of ye 
same in the following Manner — Imi^rimus it is my mind and will that all 
my Just Debts and funeral Expences and also the Annuity and all Legacies 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 107 

hereafter Exprefsed be by my Executor well and Truly paid and performed 
in Convenient Time After my Decease ITEM I give and Bequeath unto 
my well beloved and Espoused Wife Mary French Ten pounds of good 
Current Money of West Jersey to be paid to her Yearly and Every year 
so long as she Continues to be my widow but no Longer to be paid 
by my said Executor I also give unto my said Wife all the Beding and 
Furniture belonging to ye Back Room of my house wherein we now lodge 
and allso to have the priviledge of y'' Said Room to Dwell in so long as 
She Continues to be my Widow as aforesaid also I order that my Said 
Executor shall keep a Good Horfe and a Good Cow for my said Wife at 
all Seasons during her Widowhood as aforesaid And also to procure Fire- 
wood for her Sufficient for her own ufe during her Widowhood as afore- 
said ITEM I give unto my son Richard French the full and Just Sum 
of Five Shillings Current Money of West Jersey being in full of his 
Portion he being Advanced by me before this time ITEM I give and 
bequeath unto my son Thomas French the like Sum of five Shillings of 
Like money aforesaid he likewise having been by me heretofore advanced 
ITEM I give and bequeath unto my Son Benjamin French and also to 
my Son Jonathan French That is to Say to each of them the full and Just 
Sum of Twenty pounds Current Money of West Jersey aforesaid to be 
paid unto each of them within y" Term of two years after my Decease 
ITEM I give and Bequeath unto my Daughter Elizabeth Scholey the 
Now Wife of William Scholey the Sum of five Shillings Current Money 
as the aforesaid She being by me heretofore Advanced 

ITEM I give and Bequeath unto my Daughter Mary Brown the now 
Wife of Preserve Brown the Sum of Five Shillings of Like Money afore- 
said She having likewise been by me heretofore Advanced 

ITEM I give and Bequeath unto my Daughter Rebekah Shreve the 
Now Wife of Benjamin Shreve the like Sum of five Shillings of Like 
Money aforesaid She also having been by me heretofore advanced 

ITEM I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Sarah Marling the now 
Wife of William Marling the like Sum of five Shillings of Like Money 
aforesaid She also having been by me heretofore Advanced 

ITEM I give and Bequeath unto my Daughter Abigail Taylor the Now 
Wife of Jacob Taylor y"' like sum of five Shillings of Like Money afore- 
said She also having been by me heretofore Advanced 

ITEM All and singular other the Remainder of my Estate both real 
and Perfonall I give bequeath and Devise unto my Son William French 
and to his heirs and af signs forever to Enable him to pay my Just 
Debts and Legacies And I do also make and Ordain him my said Son 
William French to be my only whole and Sole Executor of this my Last 
Will and testament Revoking making Null and Utterly Void all other 
Wills or Will Testament and Executors by me at any time heretofore 



108 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



made and Bequeathed Ratifying and Confirming this and no other to be 
my Last Will and Testament In Witnefs whereof I have hereunto Set 
my hand and Seal the day and year being first above written. 
Sign'd Sealed published pronounced 
& declared by the said — Richard 
French as his Last Will & Testament 
in the presence of Us the Subscrib- 
ers, Vizt 








fl^' 



'^^'^ryi.^.ri 








William Sunderland Benjamin Shreeve & Samuel Harris the witnefses 
to the within Written Will being duly affirmed according to Law did 
Declare that they Saw Richard flfrench the Testator within Named Sign 
& Seal the Same and heard him publish Pronounce and Declare the 
within Instrument to be his Last Will and Testament and that att the 
Doing thereof the Said Testator was of Sound & Disposing Mind & 
Memory as far as these affirmants Know and as they verily Believe and 
that they Severally Subscribed their names as witnefs thereto in the 
presence of the Testator 

Affirmed at Burlington the Ninth Day 

of November Anno Dom ; 1745 Before me 





DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 109 



William French Sole Executor in the within Testament Named being duly 
affirmed according to Law did declare that the within Instrument con- 
tains the True Last Will & Testament of Richard French the Testator 
therein Named So far as he knows and as he verily beleives and that he 
will well and truly perform the Same by paying first the Debts of the 
Said Deceased & then the Legacies in the Said Testament Specified So far 
as the Goods Chattels and Credits can thereunto Extend and that he will 
make & Exhibit into the Prerogative Office in Burlington a True and 
Perfect Inventory of all and Singlar the Goods Chattels & Credits of the 
Said Deceased that Shall come to his Knowledge or Pofsefsion or to the 
Pofsefsion of any other Person or Persons for his use and render a Tust 
and True account when thereunto Lawfully required. 

Affirmed at Burlington 
November y" 9"'; 1745 before me 

Jo^ Scattergood Surrogate 

INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD FRENCH, 1745 

A True and perfect Inventory of all the Goods and Chattells Rights & 
Credits of Richard French Late of the Township of Mansfield in County 
of Burlington in the Western Division of New Jersey (Deceased) Taken 
the Twentj^ fifth Da}' of the Eighth IMonth in the year of Our Lord 1745. 

£ s. d. 

To his Purfe & Apparrel & Debts Standing Out. . . 47 OS 

To Two Indentures on Two Servants 19 00 

To Fourteen Horfes Mares & Colts 79 10 

To Thirty Three Neat Cattle 76 10 

To Twenty Two Sheep 7 10 

To Fifty fat Swine & Fifty Young Steres 73 00 

To Twelve Acres of Indian Corn 18 00 

To Seven Acres of Winter Grain in the Ground... 4 04 

To Wheat Rye Oats & Hay in the Barn 24 10 

To Hay sold & in ye Barrack & Stacks 23 00 

To Buck Wheat in Stack 2 10 

To An Apple-Mill, Cyder & Casks 12 00 

To Waggon, Cart, Sled, Gears & Ox Chains 16 16 

To Ploughs, Harrow, & Harrow Teeth &c \ 

& a Cheefe Prefs ( 

To Tar in a Barrel 5 

To Sundrys in the Cellar 4 15 

In the Hall, To Sundry Goods & Furniture 22 12 8 

In the Kitchen, To Sundry Goods & Furniture.... 11 15 6 

To Sythes, Axes Cycles & Hoes & Sundrys 5 00 

In the New Room To v^ Furniture thereof 20 15 



no GENEALOGY OF THE 

£ s. d. 

Jn the Hall Chamber To Goods & Furniture 19 10 — 

In the New Room Loft To Sundrys 2 18 — 

In the Milk House Loft to Furniture 12 00 — 

In the Buttery To Sundrys 4 06 6 

Carry'd Over 513 00 8 

To Brought Over £513 00 8 

To Flax, Baggs, a Grindle Stone & Sundrys 3 00 

In the Back Room, viz^ 

To One Large Pewter Dish & 1/2 Doz Plates "i ^ no n 

& Four Spoons & a Warming pan J 

To 1/2 Doz pewter porringers a Box Iron 2 i 

Heaters Mortar and pestel i 

To One Feather Bed & Furniture & 3 Sheets 12 00 

To One Walnut Case of Drawers 4 10 

To a Tea Table and Furniture 1 5 

To Five Chairs & a Small Box 18 

To Two Table Cloths cS: Five Napkins 1 10 

To One Looking Glafs 5 

To One Oak Chest 6 

To One Side Saddle 2 10 

Total 542 14 8 

Samuel Wright 
Michael Newbold 
Barzillai Newbold 

Samuel Wright Michael Newbould & Barzillai Newbould the appraisors 
of the annexed Inventory being Duly affirmed did Declare that the Goods 
Chattels & Credits in the Said Inventory Set down and Specifyed were by 
them appraised according to their Just and True respective rates and 
vallues after the best of their Judgment & understanding & that they 
appraised all things that were brought to their view for appraisement 
Affirmed at Burlington the ninth 

day of November A D, 1745 

Before me Jo^ Scattergood Surrogate 

William French .Sole Executor of the Last Will & Testani* of Richard 
ffrench Dec'' being duly affirmed according to Law did Declare that the 
annexed Writing contains a True and Perfect Inventory of all and 
Singular the Goods Chattels & Credits of the Said Deceased so far as 
hath come to his Pofsefsion or Knowledge or to the Pofsefsion of any 
other Person or Persons for his use 
Affirmed at Burlington the 9'" 
day of November A. D. 1745 

Before me Jo' Scattergood Surrogate 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 111 



THOMAS SCATTERGOOD 

Thomas Scattergood, progenitor of the family in this country, with his 
wife Elizabeth, came from Stepney Parish, London, England, with the 
Burlington pioneers, in 1677. He settled on a tract of 160 acres near the 
present site of Columbus, New Jersey, on Craft's creek, living for many years 
in a cave dwelling, where he raised a family of nine children. His only 
neighbors in the beginning were Indians, with whom he held kindly relation- 
ship, ever after maintained. He was an earnest minded Friend and so 
trained his children that they became useful members of the Society. He 
signed the testimony issued by Friends against George Keith in 1692. 

The will of Thomas Scattergood, dated November 3rd, 1697, proved 
November 27th, mentioned his sons Thomas, Joseph and Benjamin; son-in- 
law Thomas Brian, husband of Elizabeth Scattergood, then deceased; 
daughters Sarah French, Hannah Pancoast, Tomsin Pancoast; servant Mary 
Records; son Benjamin, Executor, with Richard French (son-in-law), Wil- 
liam Pancoast and Nathaniel Records as overseers. The inventory of per- 
sonal estate, dated November 11th, 1697, showed a valuation of £125 5s. 6p. 

Thomas Scattergood, Junior, was born in England, in 1668. On " y® 
17"^ day of y® 11"^ mo. called January, 1694" he was married to Phoebe, 
daughter of Christopher Wetherill, and she became an active member of 
Burlington Meeting. He was clerk of Burlington Meeting from 1714 to 
1738, and was very frequently appointed representative to Yearly Meeting. 
In 1730 he first appeared as a representative in the Yearly Meeting of 
Ministers. He Avas evidently regarded in the community as a man of superior 
clerical attainments and a wise counsellor concerning material things. He 
seems to have drawn many wills and other important papers, and his name 
as a witness appears in many places in the records of the time. His son 
Joseph, for a time mariner with Thomas Chalkley, in the West Indian trade, 
afterwards studied law and became Surrogate of Burlington county. His 
signature appears in connection with the probating of the will of Richard 
French. He was a citizen of estimable character, and his memory is per- 
petuated by a notable tombstone in the Friends' Burying Ground at Burling- 
ton, the inscription upon which is given elsewhere. His son Thomas (3rd) 
became an eminent Friends' minister, and from 1783 to 1814 his influence in 
that capacity was widely felt. He travelled considerably in England and 



112 GENEALOGY OF THE 

the colonies, and left a voluminous journal which holds a high place in 
Friends' literature. 

It will be noted that two of the daughters (Hannah and Tomsin) of 
Thomas Scattergood the elder, married Pancoasts. An old document in the 
possession of Henry Pancoast of Mesopotamia, Ohio, shows the origin of the 
Pancoasts in America. The following is an exact copy : 

" Joseph Pancoast, son of John and Elizabeth Pancoast of Ashen, fieve 
miles from Northampton Town, in Northampton Shire (Eng.) born 1672, the 
27th of eighth month, called October; and in the year, 1680. Oct. 4th came 
into America in the ship " Paradise," William Evelyn, Master; and I settled 
in West New Jersey, Burlington County, and on the 14th of the eighth month, 
October, 1696, I took to wife Thomasine Scattergood, daughter of Thomas 
and Elizabeth Scattergood, of Stepney Parish, London, who also transported 
themselves into Burlington County, in America," 

William Pancoast and Hannah Scattergood were married y^ fifth day of 
y^ 3'^ month 1695. 

CHESTERFIELD MEETING (Crosswicks) 

The first religious organization perfected within the limits of Chesterfield 
township, Burlington county, N. J., was Friends' Meeting at Crosswicks in 
1677, and held at the house of Thomas Lambert. In 1684 a monthly 
meeting was established, and held at Francis Davenport's This was called 
Chesterfield Monthly Meeting of Friends, by which name it is still known. 

First Month 5th, 1691, it was "proposed to build a Meeting house at ye 
burying ground at Chesterfield." This ground had been given to the 
Friends by Thomas Foulke, and a deed of trust made to Francis Davenport, 
Samuel Bunting, John Bunting, Thomas Gilberthorpe, Roger Parke and 
Robert Wilson. On the 7th of ye 11 mo. 1691 " Francis Davenport, Samuel 
Andrews, William Wood, Samuel Bunting and Thomas Gilberthorpe were 
appointed to treat with the carpenters." On 10 mo. 4th 1691, this com- 
mittee reported they had let the work to John Green, and the Meeting house 
was to be placed on a portion of the six acres of land which Samuel Bunting 
and John Bunting on 3 mo. 3d 1693, deeded to Robert Murfin, John Abbott, 
Edward Rockhill and John Willsford for ten shillings, as Trustees for 
Chesterfield Monthly Meeting. These six acres adjoined the burial ground. 
The first meeting was held in this building " ye 6th of ye 8 mo. 1693," and 



o 

33 

2 



a 



o 

O 

o 



Q 
X 



1^^ 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 113 

in 11th mo. 1693 the Committee reported, "that they had paid John Green 
£40, and for buy work £1, also had given him 2 shillings over and above." 
The building was of frame. 

On 1st mo. 7th 1706 Francis Davenport and William Wood were ap- 
pointed to see after the building of a new brick Meeting house, which was 
located near the top of the hill, on the ground since used as a burial place. 
It was finished about the autumn of 1707, and used for nearly half a century. 

4th mo. 5th 1753 " This Meeting thinking it needful that this house should 
be Repared and some Adition made thereto for the Servife of ye Women's 
Meetings, do appoint John Sykes, John Thorne, Joseph Thorne, Preserve 
Brown, William Morris, Thomas Middleton and George Middleton to con- 
fider what Repares will be wanted, and how the Adition propofed can beft 
be done and Repoart to the next Monthly Meeting." 

5th mo. 3d 1753 "The friends appointed Concerning the Repairs and 
Inlargement of the Meeting House Repoart that it is there opinion that a 
Linto added to the North Side of the house sixteen foot wide will be the Moft 
Convenient. The Meeting Concurs therewith and orders it to be Reported 
to the Quarterly Meeting for theire approbation Likewife." 

6th mo. 7th 1753 "The Inlargement of this Meeting house having ben 
Confidered And Gained the Approbation of the Quarterly Meeting There- 
fore the Meeting Concludes to proceed And Apoints John Sykes, Preserve 
Brown and George Middleton to Manage the Same according to the plan 
Concluded on with all possible Speed." No mention is made of the date 
of the completion of these repairs and enlargement. 

1st mo. 7th 1773 "The Treasurer of the Monthly Meeting produced the 
account of the cost of a stove for the Meeting house 8- 4s. lOd." This 
stove was cast from New Jersey iron ore at Atsion Furnace, Burlington Co., 
N. J. It was placed in this second Meeting-house; and when the present 
house was finished, it was removed to it, and is still there (1907). 

2d mo. 4th 1773 The subject of again enlarging the Meeting-house was 
introduced, but it was finally concluded to build a new one, which is the 
present structure, and is near the site of the first one. It was completed in 
1776. When the British troops marched from Philadelphia on their way 
to Monmouth, in 6th mo. 1778, a detachment attempted to cross the bridge 
at Crosswicks. The American stationed on the north side under General 
Dickinson in endeavoring to prevent them from crossing, shot three cannon 



114 GENEALOGY OF THE 



balls into the Meeting-house ; two through the roof and one into the brick 
wall. The imprint of this latter ball is still visible, as shown in the accom- 
panying picture. The ball measures three inches in diameter and weighs 
three and a half pounds. It is in possession of a resident of Crosswicks. 
The Meeting-house, soon after the battle of Trenton, was occupied by the 
American soldiers for a barracks. On First days the benches were arranged 
and meetings held there as usual. Many descendants of the pioneer Friends 
reside in and about Crosswicks and keep up the society as during the reign 
of their ancestors. 

ANCIENT MEETING RECORDS 

The following is a preface taken from the original book of minutes of Chesterfield 
Monthly Meeting, commencing 2nd of 8th Mo. 1684: 

It hath Pleased the Mighty God And Great Jehova in this Last Age 
After the Create night of Darkenefs and Appostacy Which hath Spred 
over Nations Kinereds tongues And People Since thofe Glorious Dayes in 
Which the Appoftles Lived by his outftretched Gathering Arme and by y® 
Word of his Etternal Power, To Gatherd People Who was Weary of All 
dead formes, And outfide Profefsions into A Waiting frame of fpirit Wheare 
Wee dorst Not thinke our owne thoughts nor fpeake our owne words in 
things Relating to his kingdom And Way of Worfhipe and being thus 
Brought down By y" Mighty Power of God Wee was y" more Cippable 
to Receve Councell and inftructions from him, Who through And by his 
Ion Christ Jefus the tru Light y* Lighteth Every one y' Cometh in 
to y" World Appeared in us And tought us his way and Worfhipe whitch 
is in Ipirit and truth this hee tought us While Wee Was in old England 
our native Land whitch Wee may fay through the Great mercy of y® Lord 
wass in this Latter Age the firft of Nattions Wheare the Lord Appeard in 
foe Mighty A Power And Bright fhining Glory to y* Gathering of thoufands 
into his fould Wheareby his People Became A Body Whereof Christ is y® 
head And then the Lord our God As hee Did unto Paul And y^ Elders 
of y* Churches in y*' Appostels Dayes begot A Godly Care in y*^ harts of 
fum of his People Whome hee had Gathered and brought in to a Living fense 
of his Worke in this day and Also of the Misteryous Working of the 
Enemy of All Good, who in All Ages as y*^ fcriptures, of truth fully 
teftifyes Laboured by his fubtilty and transforming to draw y^ Lords 
People in to Loosenefs and Disorder that fo the Pretious truth and the 
puer Way of the Lord might be dishonoured and his Worthy name 
Blafphemed. Wee fay the Lord hath fet fum as Watchmen Uppon y® 
Walls of Jerufalem and hath Laid A Godly Care and A Nefsefity upon 
fum of his People that All things in this Churches of Christ may be kept 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 115 

fweet and Clean and y* Mariages and All other things Relateing to y" 
Church affaires may be Performed in y'' Good order of the Gofpell of 
Peace therefore in the Wisedome And Councill of God it was feene mete that 
first dales And Weekely Meettings might be Appointed And Diligently kept 
unto for Eddification and y"^ Worshiping of god And y* Monthly Quar- 
terly And yearly meetings might be Appointed and dilligently kept unto 
by all futch, who are of An honest Converfation as becomes truth and 
have the Weights of the Lords Worke in this our day and the Care of 
the Churches upon them for the fettling and ordering affairs thereof, and 
to Admonish and Give Advice unto fuch As ftand in neede of it and y" 
Lord by his Providence And mighty Power hath brought fum of his 
People out of their Native Countery over the Great Deepe into this Wilder- 
nefs and Remote Part of the World As Weft Jersey And Places Ajacent 
Whear as hee hath Laid the fame Weight and Care upon fum of us as 
hee Did in ouer Native Land that All things may be Well Amongst us 
to y*^ honouer of his Great And Worthy name Which is the Ground And 
End of this following Booke John Wilsford 

ffrancis Davenport 
William Watfon 

The following minute is from the same book and more particularly relates to Women's 
Meetings. 

All Deare friends Both Men and Women When you Com to Meete 
About bufnis As Well As to other Meetings wait to feele ye power of god 
y* fo what you doe in things Relating to Church affairs May be Doone, in 
y" Power which is over All decept and Disorder And then if Aney fhould 
be fo ftuborn or Wilfull As to Appose What you Doe or to Reject your 
Councils or Advice the will Appose and Reject y*^ Power of God w"^*" is 
the higher Power to Which All fhould be fubject both in them f elves And 
in others in whome it Appeares which Power will ftand over All j'* is 
Unruly and Rebellious And As to y'^ W^omens Meetings I Certainly know 
they have A Cervis for God in his Church and y" Lords Power doth often 
Attend theire Affemblyes in A wonderful! manner And he hath made y" 
And Will Make fuch Who keepe in y*^ Power of God to Anfwer y" End 
for w*^*" they was Created (viz) to be helpe meete As y^ Wooman was 
in y^ begining while fhee ftood in Godf Councill but when fhee Left y' 
And tooke Council of ye Serpent fhee be Came hurtful to ye Man foe All 
fhold keepe in ye Power of God that foe they may Receive Councils from 
him foe Will they be Coeworkerf And fellow Labour''^ And helpe on in 
the Worke of the Lord the Elder inftruckting the younger as y® holy 
Woomen did in the Dayes of old 

Dear friends in the Love of God are thefe few Lines written And in 
ye fame I Defire they May be Receved. 

yM : of y" IZ'" m° : John Wilfford 

168J 



116 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



6— THOMAS FFRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1). 

b. 1667. 

Baptized October 31st, 1667, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, England. 
d. 1745, buried in Friends' Burying Ground, 
Chester Meeting, Moorestown, N. J. 

m. First, 10th mo. 3rd, 1696, " 5th day of week 
at Friends' Meeting House," Mary Allen, 
daughter of Judah and Mary Allen of Shrews- 
bury, N. J. 
She d. about 1730. 

m. Second, 8th mo. 9th, 1732, Mary (Pearce) 
Cattell, widow of Jonas Cattell, whom she had 
married 2nd mo. 8th 1714, at the house of 
James Shinn. 



32— JOSEPH FRENCH 

33— THOMAS FRENCH, 3RD 

34— JUDITH FRENCH 
35— ROBERT FRENCH 

36— EDWARD FRENCH 
37— MARY FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1698. 

b. 8th mo. 27th, 1702. 

m. May 8th, 1746, Jemima Elkinton. 

d. young. 

b. 6th mo. 1707. 
m. 10th mo. 1737, Hannah Cattell. 

d. 1740, unmarried. 

m. First, April ISth, 1736, Nathan Middleton. 
m. Second, 9th mo. 17th, 1761, George Matlack. 



THOMAS FRENCH, JR. 

Thomas French, Jr., second son of Thomas ffrench, progenitor, inherited 
the vigorous qualities of his father in a marked degree, and received, as a 
special token of parental favor, a deed of gift, conveying to him 300 acres 
of desirable land. A facsimile of this ancient document, dated 1694, is 
herewith given. The estate was located in Chester township, Burlington 
county, between the north branch of Pensaukin creek and what is now 
West Moorestown. It adjoined that of notable families of the pioneer 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 117 



period, and its energetic owner soon became prominent and influential in 
the business, political, social and religious life of the community. He was 
the first tax collector of the township, being appointed in 1693, and again, 
by the Governor, in 1701. He also held the same office in 1723. In 1699 
he was overseer of highways. In 1705 he was chosen constable, in 1707 
overseer of the poor, and served as freeholder 1713-14, 1720 and 1725 to 
1728. 

In many ways, official and unofficial, Thomas French, junior, as he was 
known long after his father's death, aided in the development of the re- 
sources of the section where he resided for half a century. He was always 
active in the aifairs of the Society of Friends, and was one of the trustees, 
with Mathew Allen, his brother-in-law ; John Hollinshead, Joseph Heritage, 
Sarah Roberts, Timothy Hancock and seven other prominent Friends, to 
whom James Adams and Esther his wife conveyed by deed dated 2nd mo. 
(April) 9, 1700, the ground upon which the first meeting house at Moores- 
town was built the same year. His first wife, Mary Allen, belonged to a 
family active in the aifairs of the early settlement at Shrewsbury, N. J., 
and with her he became a useful member of the Newton and later Haddon- 
field Monthly Meetings of Friends. His second wife, Mary Cattell, was 
likewise very active in the aifairs of Haddonfield Monthly Meeting of 
Women Friends, being an overseer for ten years. Their names appear in 
many places in the remarkable record kept by Elizabeth (Haddon) Estaugh 
for over fifty years. Thomas was frequently appointed as representative to 
quarterly meetings, then held alternately at Newton, Haddonfield and Salem, 
and also to Yearly Meeting, at Burlington and Philadelphia; and served on 
various important meeting committees. Part of the original estate of 
Thomas French, junior, comprised the homestead property on the north side 
of the Camden turnpike, near West Moorestown, which remained in the 
family for nearly two hundred years. 

RECORD OF MARRIAGE 
The following is taken from an ancient Shrewsbury record. 

1696, 3d of 10th mo., (in margin 9th of 4 mo., 1697), Thomas French, 
Jr., living in West Jersey, near Burlington, md. Mary Allen, of 
Shrews., Sth day of week at Friends' Meeting House : 
Wits : Thomas French, Jr., 

Thomas French Her 

Caleb Allen Mary X French 

George Allen mark 



118 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Remembrance Lippincott Mary Forman 
John WooUey Her 

John Hance Hannah X Allen 
ffranses Borden mark 

Elizabeth Lippincott Margrett Lippincott 

Hanna Allen Lidya Woolly 

Margrett Leeds Marcy Woolly 

Elizabeth Hance Elizabeth Allen 

Elizabeth Hooton Elizabeth Allen 

Ann Lippincott Mary Tillton 

Jane Borden John Lippincott 

Nathaniell Slocom Jedidiah Allen 

MEETING RECORDS 

Newton Monthly Meeting Minutes. Haddonfield Quarter : 

8*" of 11"" mo. 1710. Att y" Afores'* meeting John Hollingshead Com- 
playnes y* the ffriends undernamed have Joyned with y^ Inhabitants of 
Chester township in A legall process for the forcing of s** John to main- 
taine a caseway at Ancokus ferry the meeting appoynts George Smith and 
Thomas Shackle to Desyer John Copperthwaite, Joseph Herritge, Thomas 
French, Thomas Adams and John Roberts to Appeare at the next monthly 
meeting to answare the Afores'* Objections. 

At a monthly meeting held at the house of Thomas Shackle y^ 8'" of 
6"' mo. 1715. At s" meeting Thomas French is appointed to be one of the 
overseers for the upper meeting in the Room & Stead of John Hollingshead. 

10-12 mo. 1721. At said meeting y" Overseer being Enquired of Signify 
viz y" friends of y*^ upper meeting that y" are uneasy with y** Conduct of 
Thomas French as an Overseer therefore Joseph Heritage is Desiered to 
Acquaint him that he make his appearance at our next monthly meeting. 

12-1 mo. 1722. At s** meeting whereas at our last monthly meeting it 
was signified that there was an uneasiness with some friend Concerning 
Thomas French being an Overseer, upon which he was Desiered to appear 
at this meeting ; he accordingly hath appeared and Signified that what 
omissions hath happened by him in the Execution of his Ofiice was because 
he thought it not to belong to his present Service at that time, therefore 
this meeting hath thought fitt and doth Appoint Samuel Atkinson to Act 
in y" room of Thos. French as overseer of that mtg. 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

11-7-mo. 1732 At said meeting Thomas French and Mary Cattle y* 
first time signifyed their intentions of taking each other in marriage, there- 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 119 

fore Thos. Hackney & Thos. Lippincott are appointed to make inquiry as 
is usual & are desired to make their answer to our next monthly meeting. 

9-8-mo. 1732 At said meeting Thomas French and Mary Cattle y* sec- 
ond time signified their intentions of taking each other in marriage, there- 
fore after this meeting rec'd satisfaction concerning his clearness with 
others on y® account of marriage & of his conversation consents that they 
may take each other according to y^ good order used amongst us and appoint 
Abraham Chattin & Constantine Wood to be present at said marriage to 
see it orderly accomplished. 

13-9-mo. 1732. At said meeting y^ friends appointed report that they 
were present at y^ marriage of Thos. French & Mary Cattle & that it was 
orderly accomplished. 

Haddonfield Minutes of y^ Mo: Meeting of Women Friends: 

Att a m"ly m*g of wo"" fr"*" held at Haddonfield y"^ 11'" of 7" 1732 
At s** m*g Tho. French & Mary Cattle signified y"" intentions of m'g y* 
m*g ap" Hannah Hains & Mary Wood to make y" ufual inquiry & report 
to next m° m*g. 

Att a m"ly m*g of wo"" fr'^' held at Haddonfield y" 9*" of 8"" 1732 Tho 
French & Mary Cattle signified y" continuation of y'' intentions of m'"g 
return of inquirs being clear y'' m*g confents to y^ accomplifhm' of y' s" 
m'"g & ap*^ Eliz. Gibson & Grace Chattin to see good orders kept & report 
to next m" m'g. 

Att a m'ly m'g of wo"' fr"'' held at Haddonfield y"^ 13th of 9"" 1732 re- 
ported y* y^ afors** m'"g was o''dly accomplifhd. 

PROCEEDINGS OF "TOWN-MEETINGS" 

Following curious minutes are taken from an old " Town Book " of Chester Township, 
Burlington County, N. J. : 

May 26-1692 

Whereas several of the inhabitants have suffered several losses & damages 
through the 111 Con — of the Constable being not Ready at hand when 
Goods or cattle be stolen. Therefore to prevent & frustrate such ill minded 
persons in their evil designs we the Inhabitants of this Township of Chester 
Do mutually By all consents that if any person or persons do suffer anj' 
damage in his goods or Cattle by any such 111 Minded person shall forth- 
with if the Constable be not read}' at that Instant present time take two or 
three of his Neighbors with him to the dwelling house of such person that 
is suspected & demand the person to Search and if suspected do denie & 



120 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Refuse to do the same they may take him upon suspicion before a Magis- 
trate forthwith & there compalain against him. 
We have hereunto Set our Hands. 







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^nnyM^eurJ (fU^^I^ 







NOTE May 26-1692 
The Inhabitants of 
Chester Township Mu- 
tually agreed that if 
any householder & Res- 
identer in s** Township 
doth neglect his ser- 
vice at mending of 
Bridges & highways 
within our Township 
having a lawful sum- 
mons shall pay 3^/0 
pr day for default. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 121 

March 18- 1693 

Whereas the Inhabitants of the Townshipp of Chester have had town 
meetting held this 18'" day of March 1693. Sessors Chosen for the County 
Taxe also the same for the Provincial Taxe and also Colecttors for the 
collecting of the s** Taxe. 
Imprimiss 

John Ruderow 

James Sherwynn, Sessorss 

Thomas French, Collector 

October y'' 17'" day 1698. 

By virtue of A town [meeting] this day held att y*^ dwelling house of 
Thomas Wallis Acording to Order thereuppon Agreed the mageer part of 
y® free houlders of the Town Shipp of Chester Alias ponsoking in the 
county of Burlington to chosse Justa ifish for A Constable in the place 
of ffrederick King drafted to serve out the s"* ffr Kings twelve months, 
Imprimis secondid. To order five pounds Lawful money of the province 
to Any on[e] that will discover Hoggs stollen then make sufficient prooff 
to be payd by John Ruderow town Clarck as soon as it evidently appears. 

Tersius — If Counstable Be not to be had neer & Redey when Goods lost 
or Cattell lost he that loosseth have any sussbishtion of Any on[e] in the 
townshippe he may take two or three sufficient neighbors & demand of the 
suspected the previlledge to sarch & if the suspected deny & Refuseth for 
to do su him foorth with upon susspisstion. 

Those three Articles concluded upon By uss hear under written 

Mathew Allen Richard Pittman 

George Greave W" : Clarke 

Tho: Cleverly Robert Stilles 

Tho: Walles John Walker 

W": Matlacke Justa ffish 

John Cowperthwaite mount Coxe 

Tho : ffrench Charles Stoolman 

Samuall Buroughs John Rudderow, Clk. 

January 25, 1698 

By virtue of a Town Meeting held here the day and year mentioned 
and the major part of the freeholders of this Township of Chester (alias 
Penshawken) met together and unanimously agreed with one consent to 
choose Constable and overseer of the High Ways, viz Mount Cox, Constable 
& Thomas French over-seer of the Highways. 



122 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Allso farther concluded And Condescended to have two Highways layd 
out within the town viz. one and first from the Highway leading from 
Burlington to Salem Actually layd out & markt By twelve men & the over- 
seer to the Bridge now Remaining on the westerly Branch of ponsoakin 
now called Cropwell near Richard Bromley. And the other leding from 
the township of Evesham to A landing By William Matlack formerly called 
ponsoaking now Chester River. 

The names of the twelve men & the overseer y' layd out y® Road 
William Matlack William Clarke 

James Sherwyn John Hollinshead 

George Cleave William Hollinshead 

John Cowperthwaite Anthony ffryer 

Richard Pittman James Adams 

Robert Stiles Joseph Heritage 

Thomas ffrench Overseer of y^ Hwys. 

March 18-1698 

Whereas the constable of our Town have Reed two Warrants VIZ one 
for A provincial Taxe as followeth Every hundred acres of land surveyede 
not Improved 3 pence & Every Acre of land fencid and Improved half 
pence & every wagon Is 3d & Every neat cattell 3 pence & every hors 6 
pence & every sheep halfe peny & every hog sould or disbosed 3 pence. 

And in other for A county ta.\ which is the two thirds of the provincial 
Taxe that 3 four pence of Every part of the provincial Taxe. 

These two warrants was excepted by the Township the 18 day of March 
1698 and Sessors choosen VIZ James Sherwyn Jo Rudderow Also collec- 
tor chosen for the gathering & paying In VIZ Thomas ffrench. 

March 18-1698 

" Whereas Several of the Inhabitants of this Township have been Bur — 

and sufferers great loss & damage of several of the Inhabitants By 

ill qualified persons of Hogg Hunters going out contrary to Law with 
Dogs & Guns to kill their Neighbors Hoggs, therefore it is concluded upon 
By the Major part, and the most well minded Men of this Township of 
Chester — that if any person or persons do discover and make proof of the 
same — he is to have for the discovery & make sufficient proof of, the sum 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



123 



of 5£ to be paid him by John Rudderow or of the Inhabitants of the 



Township 



Signed 







^e<rf^<^ (/) ^^^^'^^^ 











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And further it is concluded 
that if any suspected Person 
be found alone in the woods 
hunting of hogs with Gun & 
Dog without any of his neigh- 
bors along with him, he may 
be taken forth with before 
a Magistrate & thereto be 

and Bound over to the 

next Court of Quarter Ses- 
sions. Concluded March 18- 
1698 



124 GENEALOGY OF THE 



A CURIOUS NEW JERSEY DOCUMENT OF 1707 

Illustrating the charitable spirit of colonial days and the manner in which worthy 
unfortunates were looked after, a quaint paper appears among the old records in the 
office of the Secretary of State, Trenton, N. J., of which the following is a copy. 

" Richard Ingoldesby, esquire. Lieutenant Governor of her Majesty's 
Province of New Jersey, New York, etc. 

" To all Christian people by whom these presents shall come or may 
concern. Greeting: Whereas, to certificate made under the oaths and 
attestations of Thomas French and John Hollingshead, overseers of the 
poor, for the township of Chester in the County of Burlington, and other 
sufficient inhabitants of the said County taken before Theo. Revell, J. 
Bass, Robert Wheeler, John Ruderroe, and Wm. Heulings, justices of the 
peace for the County of Burlington that Francis Lee a lame and infirme 
man hath lately mett with a very great loss by fire having his house burnt 
down and all his clothes, tooles, provisions and household goods burnt and 
destroyed to the value of £90 and upwards, and it likewise appearing that 
the said Francis Lee without the charitable contributions of pious and well 
disposed Christians must of necessity fall to intolerable poverty and ruin. 
These therefore out of a tender compassion of his sufferings and loss. 
We consent and doe by these presents grant unto the said Francis Lee, 
leave lycense and authority to aske, collect and receive for his own use all 
such sum or sums of money or other things as shall be by any charitable 
Christians given him toward the repairing of his loss, and I doe likewise 
ernestly recommend to them the commiseration of the said Francis Lee as 
an offering highly acceptable to Almighty God hereby requiring and com- 
manding all orthodox ministers or teachers in the several Churches or 
other religious societies in this province that they assist the said Francis 
Lee by exhorting and stirring up these and those to soe good and pious 
a work, and all church wardens are hereby required and commanded to 
make collections for him the said Francis Lee. 

Given unto my hand and scale at Burlington this fifth day of October 
in the fifth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne by the grace 
of God, of England, Holland, France and Ireland, defender of the faith. 
Anno Dom. 1707" 

It would seem that such a case as here noted must excite the general pity and sympathy 

of a well ordered community, but in this instance great feeling was created among 

certain classes, particularly on account of the extraordinary order of the Governor, 

requiring public collections in the churches, this being authoritatively addressed to " all 

orthodox ministers and teachers," and evidently was intended to include Friends as well ; 

I' 
as other non-conformist bodies, although the latter were as yet few in numbers and j 

scarcely organized. { 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



125 






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SURVEY OF LAND FOR THOMAS FRENCH, 1732 



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126 GENEALOGY OF THE 



DEED, THOMAS FRENCH FROM HASKER NEWBERRY, 1737 

This Indenture — made the twenty Seventh day of May in the year of 
our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and thirty Seven and in the tenth 
year of the Raign of King George the Second of Great Brittain &c Be- 
tween Hasker Newberry, Hufbandman and Mary his Wife and Naomi 
Heritage Daughters and Heirises to John Heritage late of Waterford in 
the County of Gloucefter and Weftern Divifsion of New Jerfey Deceafed 
of the one part — And Thomas ffrench of the Township of Chefter in the 
County of Burlington within the Divifsion aforesaid Yoeman of the other 
part Whereas Edward Bylling and trustees by their Indentures of leafe 
& Releafe bearing date the twenty Sixth and twenty Seventh days of March 
Ano. : 1682 for the Confideration therein mentioned did Grant Bargain and 
Sell unto Isaac Martin Six full Equal and undivided five and twenty parts 
of a Propriaty within the Weftern Divifion aforesaid And the said Isaac 
Martin by his laft will and teftament made in Writing dated the twenty 
fourth day of November Ano 1682 among other things by him given did 
Will and Devise the same to Katherine his then Wife and afterward John 
Sibley did Intermarry with the Said Katherine Widdow Relict of the Said 
Isaac Martin, whereby the Said John Sibley became pofsefsed of and 
Legally vefted in the above mentioned land devifed and bequeathed by 
her former Hufband Isaac Martin as aforesaid And Whereas the Said 
John Sibley and Katharine his wife by their Indentures of Leafe and 
Releafe under their hands and Seals Duly Executed bearing date the thirty 
firft day of May and firft day of June Ano. 1696 for the Confideration 
therein mentioned did Grant Bargain and Sell unto Richard Heritage the 
above mentioned land which laft recited Indenture is Recorded in the 
Publick Records of the Divifion aforesaid in book C folio 179 & 180 Rela- 
tion unto the feveral recited Indentures laft Will and testament and records 
being had may more at length appear. And the — Said Richard Heritage 
being So thereof Seized as aforesaid Died Inteftate whereby John Heritage 
Son and right heir at Law to his father Richard Heritage became pof- 
sefsed and Legally vefted in the revertion of the aforesaid lands And after- 
wards the Said John Heritage died Inteftate Seized as aforesaid and left 
two Daughters Viz Mary and Naomi to whom the Said revertion of the 
above mentioned lands Defended by right of Inheritance and afterwards 
the Said Mary Heritage Did Intermarry with the Said Hasker Newberry 
oiie of the parties to thefe prefents Now this Indenture witnesseth that 
the Said Hasker Newberry and Mary his Wife and the Said Naomi 
Heritage for and in Consideration of the Sum of Thirty Eight Shil- 
lings Current Money of the Divifsion aforesaid to them or one of them 
in hand paid by the said Thomas ffrench the receipt whereof they 
the Said Hasker Newberry and Mary his wife and the Said Naomi Heri- 
tage doth hereby own and acknowledge thereof and every part and parcel 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 127 

thereof do hereby acquit Exonerate and Difcharge the Said Thomas ffrench 
his heirs Execut's and Adminift's and every of them fforever by these 
prefents hath granted Bargained and Sold Aliened Enfeofed Conveyed and 
Confirmed and by thefe prefents doth grant Bargain and Sell Alien Enfeof 
Convey and Confirm unto the Said Thomas ffrench and to his heirs and 
afsigns fforever Thirty Eight Acres of unlocated land to be taken up 
laid forth and Surveyed in any part of the Divifion aforesaid where the 
Same hath not been Surveyed and legally purchased of the Indians and 
to observe the laws rules Cuftoms and Methods of the Council of Pro- 
priators in that cafe made and Provided Together with all the Mines Min- 
erals quarries ifishings ffowlings Hawkings Huntings woods Swamps Ways 
Waters Water Courses and allso all and Singular other the rights royalties 
proffits Comodities Hereditaments and Appurtenances unto the Same be- 
longing or in any wife appertaining of them the Said Hafker Newberry 
or Mary his Wife or Naomi Heritage both in Law and Equity and every 
part and parcel thereof To have and to hold the above granted and Bar- 
gained undivided Thirty Eight acres of land as the same is above Men- 
tioned or Intended to be here in granted Bargained and Sold unto the 
Said Thomas ffrench his heirs and Afsigns unto the only proper ufe and 
behoof of the Said Thomas ffrench his heirs and assigns fforever And 
the Said Hasker Newberry and Mary his Wife and the Said Naomi Heri- 
tage for themselves and for all and every of their heirs Executors and 
Adminiftrators doth hereby Covenant Grant and Agree to and with the 
Said Thomas ffrench his heirs and afsigns and by thefe prefents that they 
the said Hafker Newberry and Mary his Wife and the Said Naomi Heri- 
tage at the time of the Enfealing and Delivery of thefe prefents are and 
Standeth lawfully and Sufficiently seized in their tract or parcel of unlo- 
cated land and in every part and parcel thereof and hath good right full 
power lawful and abfolute authority in themfelves to grant Bargain and 
Sell the Same unto the Said Thomas ffrench his heirs and afsigns fforever 
And the Said Hafker Newberry and Mary his Wife and the Said Naomi 
Heritage for themselves and for their Heirs the Said Thirty Eight Acres 
of unlocated land within the Weftern Divifion of New Jersey aforesaid 
and all and singular others the herein granted and Bargained premifes 
and every part and parcel of the Same unto him the Said Thomas ffrench 
his heirs and afsigns against them the Said Hasker Newberry and Mary 
his Wife and againft the Said Naomi Heritage and every of their Heirs 
and againft all and every other perfon and Perfons any thing having or 
lawfully Claiming or that may or Shall at any time hereafter have or 
lawfully claim any Estate right title or Interest of in or unto the above 
mentioned premises or any part or parcel thereof Shall and Warrant and 
Defend the same unto the Said Thomas ffrench his heirs and afsigns 
fforever (The quitrents there out Ifsuing to the King his heirs and Suc- 
cessors and the arrears thereof if any be only Excepted) And ffurther 



128 GENEALOGY OF THE 

they the Said Hasker Newberry and Mary his Wife and the Said Naomi 
Heritage shall and will from time to time and at any time or times here- 
after at the reafonable requeft Cost and Charges in the law of the said 
Thomas ffrench his heirs or afsigns make do Execute and perform all and 
every other matters or things Conveyances and afsurances in the law what- 
soever for the ffurther better and more perfect afsuring Sure making 
Conveying and Confirming the Same to the uses above mentioned in Such 
manner and Sort as he the said Thomas ffrench his heirs or afsigns or 
his or their Council learned in the Law Shall lawfully devife advife or 
require and So as tho. — perfon or perfons unto whom Such requeft be made 
be not compelled nor hereby Compellable to travil or go from the place 
of their ufual abode further than the City of Burlington within the 
Divifion aforesaid for the doing or executing thereof and so as Such 
ffurther Afsurance contain no larger Covenants or Warranty then herein 
is above Comprifed In Witness Whereof the parties first above named 
in these presents hath hereunto Interchangably Sett their hands and Seals 
the day and year first above written 1737 

The above mentioned Indenture Hafker Newberry [seal] 

was by the said Hafker Newberry her 

and Mary his wife Sealed and De- Mary ( Newberry [seal] 

livered in the prefence of us. Viz'" mark 

her 
John Harvy Naomi Ti Heritage [seal] 

his mark 

James O Mafon 

mark 
John Newberry 



LEASE OF "CANOE SWAMP" BY THOMAS FRENCH ET AL TO EDWARD 

FRENCH, 1737 

The following document recites the lease of rights in a notable woodland property by 
Thomas French (6) and other owners, to Edward French (36). 

This Indenture made the Seventh day of Novem'r in the year of Our 
Lord one thousand Seven hundred and thirty [seven] and in the Eleventh 
year of the Reign of King George the Second of Great Brittain &c Between 
Thomas Evens Ann Wallis Alias Heulings Relict of Thomas Wallis late 
of Burlington County in the Weftern Divifion of New Jersey Deceafed 
and Thomas ffrench Thomas Ballinger John Roberts all of the county of 
Burlington aforesaid yeomen And Timothy Matlack and William Clark 
of the County of Gloucester within the Divifion aforesaid yeomen of the 
one part And Edward ffrench of the County of Burlington aforesaid, Hus- 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 129 

bandman of the other part Whereas Mount Cox, William Clark William 
Evens William Matlack Thomas Wallis Thomas ffrench Henry Ballinger 
Sarah Roberts John Sharp and George Smith by one Indenture of Bar- 
gain and Sale bearing date the tenth day of April Ano 1697 for the Con- 
sideration therein Mentioned did purchase of Stephen Day one hundred 
acres of Land and Swamp scittuate lying and being in the county of Bur- 
lington aforesaid Commonly Called or known by the name of the CONEW 
SWAMP and the Said Stephen Day did referve one Eleventh part thereof 
to his own ufe and that the Said Partners Did unanimoufly agree that 
if any of them did fell cut down sell or take away any tree or trees without 
the confent of the Major part of the Said Partners should be Subject to 
the penalties as in the Said Deed and Schedule thereunto anexed relation 
unto the Said Deed and Schedule being had may more at length Appear 
Now this Indenture Witnesseth that the Said Thomas Evens Ann Wallis 
Alias Heuling Thomas ffrench Thomas Ballinger John Roberts Timothy 
Matlack and William Clark being the Major part of the Said Partners 
are Inclin'd to make the beft of the timber on the aforesaid premifes for 
the ufe of every one of the Said Partners for and in confideration of the 
rents and Covenants hereafter Mentioned hath Demifed Granted to farm 
and letten and by thefe prefents for themfelves and for every one of the 
Said partners fully Clearly and abfolutely doth Demife Grant to farm and 
lett unto the Said Edward ffrench and unto his heirs and afsigns all that 
their one hundred acres of Swamp Scittuate as aforesaid to git Coopers 
Stuff or Staves to and for the ufe of the Said Edward ffrench his heirs 
and afsigns for and during and untill the full end and term of two years 
to Commence from the day of the date of thefe prefents fully to be com- 
pleat and ended Yielding and paying in each refpective year the Sum of 
Ten Shillings P thoufand for every thoufand he the Said Edward ffrench 
his heirs or Afsigns do git of Staves To Hold the Said Swamp and all 
the herein Demifed premifes unto the Said Edward ffrench his heirs and 
afsigns until the full Expiration of the above Mentioned term without 
the lawful lett suit denial hindrance moleftation Eviction Ejection or any 
other Interruption of them the said Thomas Evans Ann Wallis Alias 
Heulings Thomas ffrench Thomas Ballinger John Roberts Timothy Matlack 
or William Clark their heirs Execut's or Adminift's or any other perfon 
or perfons lawfully Claiming any part or parcel thereof Shall and will 
warrant and Defend the same During all the said term And Notwithftand- 
ing what is here above mentioned the parties above Said the parties here- 
unto do hereby Covenant and agree that the said Edward ffrench his heirs 
or afsigns Shall give for Barrell Staves eight shillings P thoufand and 
for hogfett Staves Tenn Shillings P thoufand and for Pipe Staves and 
Heading fifteen Shillings P thousand And the Said Edward ffrench his heirs 
and afsigns do hereby Covenant and agree to and with the Said parties 



■■ 



130 GENEALOGY OF THE 




that the Said Edward ffrench his heirs and afsigns shall make no waste 
or as little as possible In witness whereof the parties aforesaid hath here- 
unto Interchangably sett their hands and Seals the day and year first above 
written (1737) 

Sealed and delivered 
in the presence of lis 
Robert Davis 
John Cowperthwaite 

DEED, THOMAS FRENCH TO EDWARD FRENCH, 1738 

The following Deed of Gift shows transfer by Thomas ffrench (6) of his entire 
interest in the " Canoe Swamp " to his son Edward (36) . 

THIS INDENTURE made the twenty-fifth day of September (So 
Called) in the Year of our Lord one thoufand Seven hundred and Thirty 
eight and in the twelfth year of the Reign of King George the Second 
of Great Brittain &c. Between Thomas ffrench of the Townfhip of Chefter 
in the County of Burlington within the Western Division of New Jersey 
Yeoman of the one part And Edward ffrench his Son of the other part 
Witnefseth that the Said Thomas ffrench for and in confideration of the 
Natural love and affection he hath and beareth unto his said Son Edward 
ffrench and for his better Support Maintainance and livelyhood as allso 
for and in Confideration of the Sum of fiive Shillings Currt money of the 
Same place to him in hand paid by his Said Son Edw*" ffrench the receipt 
whereof he the Said Thomas ffrench doth hereby own and acknowledge 
thereof and every part and parcel thereof do hereby requit & difcharge 
the Said Edw"^ ffrench his heirs execut's & adminift's and every of them 
fforever by thefe p'fents hath given granted Bargained Sold aliened En- 
feofed Conveyed & Confirmed and by thefe p'fents fully clearly and abfo- 
lutely doth give grant Bargain Sell alien Enfeof Convey and Confirm 
unto the Said Edw** ffrench and unto his heirs & afsigns all that his one 
Eleventh part of all that hundred acres of Swamp scittuate in the County 
of Burlington aforesaid Purchs'^ in partnership with Mounce Cock William 
Clark William Evens William Matlack and others as may appear by one 
indenture of Bargain and Sale made Between Stephen Day of the one 
part and Mounce Cock, William Clark, William Evens, William Matlack, 
Thos Wallis, & the afores'' Thos ffrench, Henry Ballinger, Sarah Roberts, 
George Smith & John Sharp bearing date the tenth day of 2*^ month Ano. 
1697 relation unto the Said Indenture being had may and will more fully 
and at length appear Together with all and every the Timber trees woods 
under woods ffishings, ffowlings and Huntings and all other the proffits 
Comodities Heraditaments & Appurtenances whatsoever unto the Said one 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 131 

Eleventh part of the Said one hundred acres of land belonging or apper- 
taining and allso all the Eftate right title Interest pofsefsion property 
Claim and Demand whatsoever of him the Said Thomas ffrench as well in 
law as in Equity of in or unto the said given granted & Bargained premifes 
and every part & parcel thereof To have And to hold the above given 
granted and Bargained undivided Eleventh part of the Said one hundred acres 
mentioned or Intended to be herein given granted and Bargained premifes 
and every part & parcel thereof unto the Said Edw'* ffrench his heirs and 
afsigns unto the only proper ufe and behoof of the Said Edward ffrench his 
heirs and afsigns Forever And the Said Thomas ffrench for himself his 
heirs Execut's and Adminift's doth hereby covenant grant and agree to and 
with the said Edward ffrench his heirs and afsigns by thefe prefents that 
he the said Thomas ffrench is and Standeth Lawfully and Sufficiently Seized 
in his Demeafne as of ffee of and in the above mentioned premifes and in 
every part and parcel of the Same and in their and every of their Appur- 
tenances and at the time of the Enfealing and Delivery of thefe p'fents hath 
good right full power Lawful and abfolute authority in himself to give grant 
Bargain and Sell the above mentioned one Eleventh part of the Said one 
Hundred Acres of land and every part and parcel thereof with their and 
every of their appurtenances unto the Said Edward ffrench his heirs and 
afsigns fforever, as is above in thefe prefents Mentioned Declared and Ex- 
prefsed So that now and hence forth and forever hereafter it shall and may be 
lawful to and for the Said Edward ffrench his heirs and afsigns to have hold 
ufe occupy pofsess and enjoy all and Singular the above given granted and 
Bargained premifes and every part and parcel of the Same, without the 
Lawfull lett suit denial hindrance moleftation Eviction Ejection or any 
other Interuption of the said Thomas ffrench his heirs Executors or Admin- 
istrators or any other perfon or perfons whatsoever Lawfully Claiming or 
pretending to claim any part or parcel thereof by from or under him them 
or any of them or by his or their or any of their Confent afsent privity 
or procurement Shall and will from time to time and at all times hereafter 
Warrant and Defend the Same and every part and parcel thereof unto the 
Said Edward ffrench his heirs and afsigns fforever (The quit rents there- 
out Ifsuing unto the King his heirs and Succefsors and the arrears thereof 
if any be only excepted) And the Said Thomas ffrench and all claiming 
under him Shall and will from time to time or at any time or times here- 
after at the request Costs and Charges in the law of the Said Edward 
ffrench his heirs or afsigns make do acknowledge and execute or cause or 
procure to be made done suffered acknowledged and executed all and every 
such ffurther and other lawfull & Reasonable acts matters & things Con- 
veyances & Afsurances in the law whatsoever for the further better more 
perfect assuring sure making conveying and Confirming the Same to the 
ufes above Said So as such other assurance contain no larger covenants or 
warrants than herein is above comprised In witness whereof the party firft 



132 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



above named in these presents hath hereunto Sett his hand and seal the 

day and year first above written — 

And further the said Thomas ffrench for himself 
his heirs Exect's and Adminift's do hereby Covanant 
grant & agree to & with his Said Son Edward that 
he y^ said Edward ffrench his heirs & afsigns Shall 
have all and Singular y*^ over plufs revertion & 
Revertions remainder and remainders of him if Said 
Thos ffrench which he now hath or which may at 
any time appear to be due within the above said 
Swamp and this was entered before y® Executing 
hereof 




Sealed and delivered in the presence of us Viz*. 




^<2 




^^^'^'(^ 



(^O^^-^ 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 133 

WILL OF THOMAS FRENCH, 1745 

Let it be Recorded that I Thomas ffrench of Chefter in the County of 
Burlington in the Province of New Jersey Yeoman being perfect & Sound 
in mind and memory Thanks be given to Almighty God therefore, and 
having in my Mind the uncertainty of this life, & the certainty of death 
when it Shall pleafe God to Call and being will that Such temporals as 
the Lord in his Great Goodnefs hath lent me in this life [far beyond my 
defarts] Should Come unto Such perfon & Perfons as I Shall herein Nomi- 
nate & appoint hereby revoking «S: making void all former & other Wills 
& Teftaments heretofore by me made & this only to be taken for the Same 

IMPRIMIS I Give and Bequeath unto my Son Jofeph five pounds to 
be paid him by my Son Thomas out of the Profifits of the Plantation I 
do herein give & devife to him 

ITEM I Give and bequeath unto my Son Robert thirty pounds to be 
paid by my Said Son Thomas at the time 

ITEM I Give & Bequeath unto my Daughter Mary tenn Pounds 

ITEM I Give & Bequeath unto my Daughter Mary's four Sons each 
of them five pounds when they attain their full ages 

ITEM I Give & bequeath unto my Wife five Shillings all which above 
mentioned legacies I do hereby order my Said Son Thomas to pay them 
out of the proffits of the Said Plantation Current money of the Same place 
(ie) Jofephs Roberts Marys & my Wifes Legacies in twelve months after 
my Deceafe 

ITEM I Give Devife & bequeath unto my Son Thomas & unto his heirs & 
afsigns fforever all that one hundred and fifty three acres of land whereon 
I Now Dwell togather with all the appurtenances unto the Same belonging 
(be the number of acres more or less) Item I Give & devife all that 
my Ceder Swamp Containing twenty five acres unto my Son Robert & 
unto my Son Thomas their heirs and afsigns iforever to be Equally divided 
between them Share & Share alike 

ITEM I Give & bequeath unto my Said Son Robert my Riding horfe 
Bridle & Saddle & my Wearing Apparrell 

ITEM I do her^'by give and bequeath all that my perfonal Eftate 
after my Juft debts are paid & dif charged unto my Son Robert & unto my 
Son Thomas to be Equally divided between them Share & Share alike who I 
do hereby ordain and appoint my Execut'"s of this my laft Will & Teftament 

In Witnefs Whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal this twenty 
Sixth day of the Sixth Month Anoque Dom one thoufand Seven hundred 
and forty five 1745. his 

Signed Sealed pronounced and declared 
to be his laft will and Teftament in the Thomas ( .fi"rench 
presence of us viz 

Joshua Bispham 

Nathan Middleton mark 

Sam". Atkinson 



f 




134 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Joshua Bispham and Samuel Atkinson two of the Witnefses to the above 
Written Will being of the People called Quakers on their Solemn Affirma- 
tions which they took according to Law did Declare That they Saw Thomas 
French the Testator above Named Sign & Seal the Same and heard him 
publish pronounce & Declare the above Instrument to be his Last Will 
& Testament And that at the Doing thereof the Said Testator was of 
Sound & Disposing Mind & Memory as far as these Affirmants Know and 
as they verily beleive and that Nathan Middleton the Other Subscribing 
Evidence was Present & Signed his Name as a Witnefs to the Said Will 
Together with these Affirmants in the presence of the Said Testator. 

Affirmed at Burlington the first Day of November Anno Domini 1745 

Before me Jo^ Scattergood Surrogate 

Thomas French one of the Executors in the Within Testament Named 
(Robert French the Other Executor having disclaimed the Execution 
thereof) being duly affirmed according to Law Did Declare that the 
Within Instrument contains the True Last Will & Testament of Thomas 
French the Testator therein Named So far as he knows and as he verily 
beleives and that he will well & truly perform the Same by paying first 
the Debts and then the Legacies in the Said Testament Specified So far 
as the Goods Chattels and Credits of the Said Deceased can thereunto Ex- 
tend and that he will make and Exhibite into the Prerogative Office in 
Burlington a True and Perfect Inventory of all & Singular the Goods 
Chattels & Credits of the Said Deceased that Shall come to his knowledge 
or Pofsefsion or to the Pofsefsion of any other person or Persons for his 
Use And render a Just and True Account when thereunto Lawfully required 

Affirmed at Burlington this firft Day of November 1745 

Before me Jo' Scattergood Surrogate 

ROBERT FRENCH'S RENUNCIATION OF EXECUTORSHIP 

Whereas Thomas French Late of Chester in the County of Burlington 
Yeoman Deceased Lately Made & published his Last Will & Testament 
bearing date the Sixth day of the Sixth Month one thousand Seven hundred 
& forty five and thereof appointed Robert French & Thomas French Execu- 
tors. Now I the Said Robert French being unwilling to take upon me 
the Burthen of the Said Executorship have Renounced & Disclaimed and 
by these presence do Renounce & Disclaim the Said Executorship or any 
Medling or acting in the Same In Testimony whereof I have hereunto Set 
my Hand & Seal this first Day of November Anno Domini one thousand 
Seven hundred & forty five 

Sealed & Delivered in the presence of 
Sam'. Atkinfon ^^ /J -" "^^ ' / 

Joseph Heritage ^^^^jj^^ Jt^kA 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 135 



INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF THOMAS FRENCH, 1745 

A true and perfect Inventory of all & Singular the Goods & Chattels 
rights and Credits of Thomas ffrench late of Chefter in the County of Bur- 
lington &c dec*, taken the 17"' of October Ano 1745 being all the Came 
to our view appraifed by us under Written. 

£ S d 

Imprimis to in y** parlor to purse & Apparrell 11 14 6 

in Ditto to bed furniture & Sundry other things 08 06 

in y'' Leanto to Sundry Sorts of Beding & other things 08 18 

in another Leanto to a bed & divers other things 02 09 

in y* great Room to tables Chairs & divers other Lumber. ... 07 11 6 

in y*" Chamber to two bed & divers other things 06 17 

in y'' Kitc"h to Kettles pots and divers other things 07 10 6 

in y" Cellar to Cyder with apples & Lumber 09 10 

in y'' Yard to plows Cart and Hufbandry Utenl'ills 07 10 6 

in the field to Winter Corn growing 07 10 

in Ditto to Indian Corn & potatoes 15 12 

in the Barn and Stack Yard to Wheat r3-e & oats 21 10 

in Ditto to hay 05 15 

to Sheep 07 00 

to Cattell 38 10 

to a horfe bridle & Saddle 11 15 

to Swine 20 00 

to Book Debts 02 00 

to Worfted at the Weavers 05 08 

215 7 
Joseph Heritage 



( Joseph Heritag 
Appraised by us -^ „ , , , . r 
^ . -^ I Sam . Atkinfon 



Affirmed at Burlington the ffirst day of November Anno Domini 1745 
Before me Jo^. Scattergood Surrogate 



RECEIPT, MARY FRENCH TO THOMAS FRENCH (33), 1745 

I Mary French of Chester in the County of (Burlington) «S:c. Widow 
have received of Thomas French of the Same place Executor to the last 
will and testament of my late deceased Husband Thomas French one obli- 
gation bearing even date with these presents Conditioned for the payment 
of twenty two pounds currt. money payable in twelve months And I do 



136 GENEALOGY OF THE 

hereby acquit and Discharge the said Thomas French his heirs, executors 
and Administes of and from all and all mannor of actions, cause and causes 
of actions suits debts bills Bonds Writings obligatorys sum and sums of 
money quarrels and controversies of what kind soever (touching) his said 
late deceased Fathers Estate or any thing concerning him the above said 
executor had made moved or depending from the beginning of our first 
acquaintance to the date of these presents — In witness whereof I have 
hereunto set my hand seal — 

Dated the twenty-first day of October in the year of our Lord One thou- 
sand Seven Hundred and forty five (1745) 

Seal'd and deli ver'd( first .:^^S.r 

Burlington in the top line, 



JiLa^ ip-9^xc 




and touching in the Mar- 
gent was entered before 
the executing hereof) in 
the presence of 
his 
William X Prickit 

mark 
Joseph Heritage 

JOSEPH FRENCH [32] 

Minutes of Newton Mo. Mtg., Haddonfield Quarter : 

8th-8 mo. 1722 At said meeting, application was made for a Certificate 
for Joseph French, therefore the mtg. appoints Samuel Atkinson and Joseph 
Stokes to make Enquiery concerning his Clearness and are desiered to 
make their answer to our next monthly meeting. 

12th-9 mo. 1722 At said meeting the Persons appointed to make En- 
quiery concerning Joseph French's Clearness from Women on the Account 
of Marriage and of his Conversation report they find that he is clear from 
all women amongst us to the Best of their knowledge, as to his conversa- 
tion they do not find it so well as could be Desiered, therefore the meet- 
ing orders that he have a Certificate accordingly. 

Joseph French, like his father, sought a wife in East Jersey, and it appears early 
located in or near Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, where, so far as can be learned, he 
continued to reside until his death in 1752. He died intestate and the estate was admin- 
istered by James Farrell, who had married Joseph's daughter Mary in 1751. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 137 



NEWTON MEETING 

Early Friends who came from England with the first West Jersey colon- 
ists set up a meeting at Newton, in 1682. They met at each other's houses 
for five years and in 1687 built a log meeting house, the first in Gloucester 
county. This primitive building was used for its original and other pur- 
poses for more than a century. Within this period it was a notable land- 
mark, town meetings and elections being held there as well as stated religious 
services. Being located on the bank of Newton creek, people came in boats 
in great numbers, this being one of the customs of the time, when roads 
through the forest were scarcely more than bridle paths. Sometimes burials 
were made at night, the light of flaring pine torches making weird and pic- 
turesque scenes. Many of the old families lie in the ancient and long 
neglected graveyard. The old meeting house fell into decay and was aban- 
doned some years before its accidental destruction by fire, December 22, 
1817. The territory nearer the Delaware river becoming more thickly popu- 
lated, the present substantial brick meeting house was erected in 1801, being 
located on the Mt. Ephriam road, about two miles from the original site, now 
in the suburbs of Camden, and known thereafter as Camden Meeting. 

Thomas Sharp, an energetic young Irish Friend, afterward a noted sur- 
veyor of West Jersey, who came with the pioneers in 1681, left an account 
of the settlement of Newton from which we quote as follows : 

" Immediately amongst us a meeting was set up and it grew and increased. 
Zeal and fervency of spirit was in some good degree at that time abounding 
among Friends ; in commemoration of our prosperous success and eminent 
preservation, both in our crossing the great deep, as also, whereas we were 
but few at that time and the Indians many, whereby it put a dread upon our 
spirits, considering they were a savage people. But the Lord, who hath the 
hearts of all in his hands, turned them so as to be serviceable unto us and 
very loving and kind. Which cannot be otherwise accounted but to be the 
Lord's doings in our favor, which we had cause to praise him for. And 
that the rising generation may consider that the settlement of this country 
was directed by an impulse upon the spirits of God's people, not so much 
for their ease and tranquility, but rather for the posterity that should be 
after, and that the wilderness being planted with a good seed might grow 
and increase to the satisfaction of the good husbandman." 



138 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



HADDONFIELD MEETING 

Friends amongst the settlers in the vicinity of what is now Haddonfield 
first worshipped at Newton and in private houses. A Monthly Meeting was 
established as early as 1695. In 1721 the first meeting house, a log struc- 
ture, was erected on land given by John Haddon, of England, at the in- 
stance of his daughter Elizabeth, who had married John Estaugh. She was 
clerk of the Women's Meeting for over half a century and performed her 
duties with painstaking care. These minutes are still in the custody of 
descendants of the Haddon family. In 1760 a substantial brick meeting 
house was built adjoining the old one, a picture of which, taken from an 
old publication, is given. In 1851 this was removed and each branch of 
the Society erected the houses since in use. From the separation, in 1828, 
until 1851, both used the old building. In 1787 a brick school house was 
built and this is still in use, being in an excellent state of preservation. The 
ancient " Indian field," cleared land, cultivated by the natives, was close 
to the site of the first meeting house and was an historic spot until revolu- 
tionary times. The main highway, running east and west, was called the 
" King's Highway " and that running north and south, facing the meeting 
houses, " Ferry Road." The present peaceful and beautiful surroundings 
are in keeping with the history of this notable place. 




Friends Meeting-house, Haddonfield. 

BUILT 1760. REMOVED 1851. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 139 

7— HANNAH FFRENCH (Thomas, 1). 

Baptized September 5th, 1669, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, England, 
m. 8th mo. 30th, 1695, Richard Buzby "of y« 
Province of Pensilvania," son of John and 
Mary Buzby, formerly of Milton, England. 
He b. 1670. 

d. 7th mo. 1747. 

38— JOHN BUZBY b. 10th mo. 5th, 169[6]. 

39— THOMAS BUZBY m. 8th mo. 1723, Mary Mason. 

40— JANE BUZBY m. 7th mo. 1731, Jonathan Fincher. 

41— REBECCA BUZBY m. 10th mo. 1724, Daniel Roberts. 

RICHARD BUZBY 

The Buzby family -were among the earliest settlers of Pennsylvania, con- 
sisting of John Buzby, who came from Milton, England, to Philadelphia, 
in 1682, with his wife Mary, his sons John, William, Edward, Richard and 
Nicholas, and daughters Mary, Elizabeth and Sarah. He was a weaver 
and his sons, all sturdy young men, were for a time engaged in the same line 
of work. The following is a copy of certificate brought by John Buzby 
from England, taken from the records of the Philadelphia Monthly 
Meeting : 

"The 4" day of y^ 2""^ Mo. 1682. Whereas, John Buzbey, weaver, of 
Milton, in the parish of Shipton and belonging to the meeting at Milton 
is disposed to transport himself beyond sea into pensilvania this is our 
testimony to whom it may Concerne he ownes the living and everlasting 
truth of god and hath walked amongst us blameless in his life and Con- 
versation and wee doe beleeve he is nott Indebted unto none as wee Can 
understand therefore we doe sett our testimony thereof." 

In 1696, William and Richard Buzby purchased large adjoining tracts 
of land, soon after increased to over 600 acres, located in Oxford township, 
Philadelphia, and now between Frankford and Olney. The greater part 
of this fine estate, constantly increasing in value, remained in the possession 



140 GENEALOGY OF THE 

of the family for nearly two hundred years, being handed down to different 
direct heirs by eight wills and a number of deeds. In 1742, Richard Buzby 
conveyed to his son Thomas, in consideration of eighty pounds — a nominal 
sum, as the real value even then was much greater — " and natural love and 
affection," his homestead and 157 acres of land. His wife, Hannah, joined 
in this affectionate transaction, being dutifully cared for when she became 
a widow, five years later, and still further provided for through the will 
of her son Thomas, whom she survived, made in 1757, a few months before 
his death. The will of Richard Buzby, as will be observed, was confined 
to the distribution of personal property to his children, he having disposed 
of practically all his real estate. Some sixty-five years after his death part 
of the family estate was devoted to notable uses. 

In 1813, Isaac Buzby, a descendant of William and Richard, and members 
of his family, for $6,754, conveyed fifty-two acres of land to the Board of 
Trustees of Friends' Asylum for the Insane, Frankford. Some years later 
a part of the original Richard Buzby farm was added to this property. 
Friends' Asylum was the first distinctive separate institution for the humane 
treatment and restoration of the insane in this country, although the Penn- 
sylvania Hospital has always had a department for the " care and cure of 
Lunaticks," as declared in its charter, 1751. Now in its ninety-first year. 
Friends' Asylum has a record unexcelled. It has cared for nearly 4,000 
patients, more than one third of whom were restored. 

For thirty years Richard Buzby was a very active member of Abington 
Monthly Meeting, Oxford Preparative Meeting being his local home Meet- 
ing. He was a frequent representative at Quarterly and Yearly Meetings, 
and was zealous in the performance of special duties. He was for a long 
time an acknowledged minister among Friends. We quote a few interest- 
ing minutes from the Meeting Records. A manuscript found among old 
papers of the Yearly Meeting of the year 1750, entitled, " An account of the 
time of the decease of such ministers and elders belonging to the Monthly 
Meeting of Abington as departed this life since the year 1720, with some 
short memorials concerning them," contains the following : 

" In the 7th mo. of the year 1747 died Richard Buzby belonging to 
Oxford particular meeting. He was a Friend in the ministry whose tes- 
timony was well received and travelled with the approbation of his friends 
to some distant parts of this continent in Truth's service. He was inof- 
fensive and examplary in life and conversation. Aged 77 years, was buried 
at Friends burying ground at Oxford aforesaid." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 141 

In 1857 the following appreciative sketch of the life and work of Richard 
Buzby appeared in " The Friend " : 

Richard Busby was born in England, in the year 1670. At what time 
he came to America, we have not been able to learn ; but we find him in the 
year 1700, a useful member of Dublin [afterwards Abington] Monthly 
Meeting, and probably alread}' in the ministry. After the year 1704, we 
find many marks of his dedication, and of the estimation in which he was 
held by his friends. In tracing him through the records of the various 
meetings of ministers some striking and interesting minutes were found. 
In the Twelfth month, 1707, after recording that " Richard Busby and 
John Cadwallader " reported that things were well among them at Dublin, 
these remarks follow : " In consideration of which, that the Lord is pleased 
still to continue his goodness and care over us, and to lengthen out our 
day and time of peace, love and brotherly kindness, — pressing more and 
more after perfect and fervent charity, the meeting was thankful to the 
Lord." 

In the early part of the year 1721, Richard Busby and William Walton 
performed a religious visit to the meetings of Maryland, Virginia and 
North Carolina, which, from " divers certificates " produced by them on 
their return, appears to have been to the comfort and edification of those 
among whom they had laboured. In the Quarterly Meeting of Ministers 
and Elders, held Twelfth mo. 3d, 1721, "The ancient love and power of 
God was felt, to the comforting the meeting. Tender exhortation was 
given to the due exercise of the heavenly gift. Whereas of late several 
serviceable labourers in the vineyard of Christ have been removed, we 
should pray to the Lord that he would raise up and send forth more faith- 
ful servants ; that his work of righteousness and Truth may increase and 
prosper, to the church's edification and his glory." 

In 1722, Richard, with some other ministering Friends from Pennsyl- 
vania, attended Shrewsbury Yearly Meeting. We find but little record of 
his services, yet it is evident that he was considered a diligent and faithful 
labourer in the church. Richard Busby and the other representatives from 
the Quarterly Meeting of Ministers and Elders, held in the Twelfth mo., 
1723, to the General Meeting of Ministers, in the following month, were 
directed to report, that " Friends in the ministry are careful in their con- 
versation, diligent in attending meetings, both on First and week days ; that 
their labour and services are well received ; that they are in love and unity, 
and that the assistance of worthy elders is found very serviceable in these 
meetings." 

Meeting records show that other children of John and Mary Buzby mar- 
ried as follows: John, Mary Taylor, of Tinicum Island, 2nd mo. 1st, 1690; 
William, Sarah Seary, 6th mo. 11th, 1685; Edward, Susannah Adams, 3rd 
mo. 7th, 1696; Sarah, Richard Tomlinson. 



142 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

At our mens monthly meeting held at the house of EHz : Gardiner in 
Burlington y^ 2""* of y* 7'" mo. 1695— Richard Busby & Hannah French 
declared their intentions of marriage it being y^ First time of their coming 
they Desired y* Unity of Friends. 

At our Monthly Meeting held at the house of Eliz. Gardiner in Bur- 
lington y' 7'" of y" 8'" Mo: 1695— Richard Busby & Hannah ffrench de- 
clared their intentions of Marriage it being the Second time & upon en- 
quiry made the meeting find all Clear and nothing to impede or hinder 
the Same they are Left to Consumate y^ weighty affair as they in a Con- 
venient time & Place in the fear of the Lord Shall See meet. 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas an Intention of Marriage hath been duely Published according 
to y® Laws of this Province of West New Jersey in America and alsoe att 
severall of the meetings of y"* people of God Called Quakers And noe obstruc- 
tion appearing to obstruct or hinder them — Now These are to Certifie 
whom it may Concerne that the said Richard Busbey of y'^ Province of 
Pensilvania and Hannah ffrench of y^ County of Burlington did on the 
30th day of y* Eighth mo. in y* year 1695 in A solem Assembly of y'^ 
people Aforesd ; Take & declare themselves to be Husband and wife and 
in Testimony they subscribe theire names & we alsoe as wittnesses — 

Richard Busbey 
Hannah Busbey 

John Adams (Justice) John Busbey | 

George Deacon Thomas ffrench j 

Daniell Hall Richard ffrench 

John filetcher Tho. ffrench, Junr. 

Richard Tomlinson Isaac Wood 

Benj. Wheate Ed. Busbey 

Will. Pancoast John Busbey 

John Woolman Nicholas Busbey 

Tho. Scatergood John ffrench 

Joseph Pancoast Charles ffrench 

Sarah Busbey Mary Wheate 

Mary Busbey Sarah Roberts 
Eliz. Adams 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 143 

Abington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 
At our Mo-Meeting y" 31 : 11 m°, 1714 

Whereas there hath been a complaint made by Rich'' Tomlinfon againft 
his three Brother's by Law, viz, William, Richard & Edward Buzby, 
ffriends being willing to put an end to y* Said defference, have advifed 
them to choofe 4 friends to hear & determine y^ Matter with all Expedi- 
tion : which accordingly they did make choice of four friends, who heard 
y* matter debated, & put an end to y* difference. 

At our Mo: Meeting y'' 28: 11 m° 1716 

As to the proceding minits in relation to y^ vifiting of families, it is 
concluded that every perticular Meeting make choice of Such weighty 
friends as may be of moft Service in Such a weighty Concern, & prefent 
them to y^ next Mo-Meeting. 

At our Mo-iSleeting y'' 25: 12 m" 1716 

As to y'^ former Minits Relating to y" visiting of families, friends of 
Abington haue Chofen John Cadwallader, Morris Morris & Thomas Canby. 
Oxford Meeting have chofen Edmond orphood & Richard Buzby ; German- 
town Meeting have Chofon Rich — Lewis & Dennis Cunnard. 

Bybury Meeting have Chofon none as j'et for that Service, it is left to 
their further Confideration, against next Meeting. 

At our Mo-Meeting y" 24: 12 m" 1717 

In pursuance of y^ Minit last month ; concerning y^ Vifiting of families : 
Oxford meeting have chofen Edmond Orphood Richard Buzby & John 
Shallcrofs. 

At our Mo-Meeting held y' 23'^ of y' 12" mo 1718 

Friends from Each particular preparative Meeting have Nominated per- 
fons to Vifit families, viz. Ox'ford fr''" Chofe Rich" Bufby Jn" Shallcrofs 
& Edm" : Orpwood. 

At our Mo-Meeting held y^ 27*" of y" 12'" mo 1720 

A Certificate was Granted to Will"' Walton & Richard Busby in Order 
to Vifsit in ^laryland on y" Service of Truth. 

At our Mo: Meeting held y" 31'': of y' 5'" mo 1721 

Whereas our friends William Walton & Richard Bufby haveing Per- 
form'd their Vifsit in y" Service of Truth in Virginia & Maryland & Caro- 
lina & Withall have Produced Several Certificates Signifying their Great 
Satisfaction & Unity in their Vifsit of Love. 



144 GENEALOGY OF THE 

« 
At our Mo: Meeting held y' 26'" of y' 6'" mo 1723 

Whereas friends are to Appear at Philad* : by y* Appointm* : of y^ Quar- 
terly Meeting Relating to Dan' : Potts Friends Do appoint Morris Morris 
John Cadwallader Rob* : Fletcher Dan' : Thomas Edward Bolton Griffith 
Jones John Duncan and Tho^ : Wood & Rich'* Bufby to attend y*' Service. 

At our Mo-Meeting held y' 22'' of y* 12" mo 1730/1 

Whereas Bybery fr''^ of Late have been Very much at Difference among 
themfelves which has proved an Exercife to this Meeting therefore fr"*' : 
of this Meeting Do appoint John Cadwalader Morris Morris Nicholus 
Auftin Rich". Bufby & Griffith Jones to Endeavour in y* Spirit of Love 
to bring them to a Reconciliation. 

At a M° Mg held the 26'": 4'": m°. 1732 

Rich** : Buzby & Tho* Roberts are app'' : to Speak with James Dilworth 
Ju'' : & endeavour to bring him to a Senfe of his outgoings in taking a wife 
contrary to the Difcipline. 

WILL OF RICHARD BUZBY, 1743 

I Richard Buzbey of Oxford Township In the County of Philadelphia 
& Province of Penfilvania Yeoman Being Sickly & weak of Body but of 
Sound Memory & Judgment Thanks be unto God, Calling to mind the 
Uncertainty of the Time of my Continuance in this Life haue thought fitt 
& do hereby make this my Last will & Testament in manner & Form Fol- 
lowing, That is to say First I Recommend my Soul & Spirit to the Mer- 
ciful Protection of God that Gaue it, & my Body to the Earth to be De- 
cently Inter'd by my Son Thomas Buzbey, when it Shall pleas the Lord 
so to Dispose of it, & as Touching my outward Estate I will that the Same 
be Disposed of as herein after Declared, Imprimis I will that all my Just 
Debts & Funeral Charges be paid as Soon as Pofsible by my Son Thomas 
Buzbey, ITem I Give Devise & Bequeath vnto my Son Thomas Buzbey 
(after mine & my wife's Decease) A Long Black Wallnut Table, & a Little 
Desk or Cabinet with Draws, & all my weavours Loomes & Tackling Be- 
longing to them, ITem I Give to my Two Daughters, Jane Fincher & 
Rebecca Roberts & to their Children for Ever (after mine & my wifes 
Decease) all my Household Goods & Moveables wheresoever Lying or 
being (Except as before mentioned Given to my Son Thomas Buzby) & 
I allso Give unto my Said Two Daughters all my Cows Chattels or Living 
Creatures, to them & their Children for Ever (after mine & my wife's 
Decease) all which as before mentioned I Give Devise & Bequeath to my 
aforesaid Two Daughters & their Children for Ever, (after mine & my 
wife's Deceafe as aforefaid) And Lastly I hereby Constitute & nominate 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



145 



& appoint my Son In Law Daniel Roberts Executor of this my Last will 
& Testament, Hereby Revokeing all Former & other wills heretofore by 
me made & Declareing this & no other to be my Last will & Testament 
In wittnefs whereof I have hereunto Set my hand & Seal This First day 
of the Sixth month August. In the Sixteenth year of the Reign of King 
George the Second of Great Brittain &c anno que Dins one Thousand 
Seven Hundred Fortv & Three 



d^A^J 




Signed Sealed Published 
& Declared by the Said 
Richard Buzbey to be his 
Last will & Testament In 
the Presence of us 

William Sutton 

Mary Sutton 

Joseph Jones 



It is my will & I do hereby allso appoint & order that my Son Thomas 
Busbey shall pay my wife's Funeral Charges as well as my own & all my 
Just Debts as aforefaid In wittnefs whereof I haue here vnto put my hand 
& Seal the day & year mentioned on the other Side, 

Signed Sealed Published 
& Declared before us 
William Sutton 
Mary Sutton 
Joseph Jones 

Philad'' Dec 11"": 1747. Then psonally appeared W"". Sutton one of 
the witnefses to the foreging Will and to the Supplemt. thereto annexed and 
On his Solemn affirmacon according to Law did declare & affirm he Saw 
& heard Richard Busbey the Teftator therein named Sign Seal publish & 
declare the Same Will for & as his Laft will & Teftam*. and the s*. Sup- 
plem'. for & as a part of the Same and that at the doing thereof he was 
of Sound mind Memory & Understanding to the best of his knowledge and 
that Jofeph Jones since Deced and Mary Sutton now absent did also Sub- 
scribe their Names as witnefs". thereto in the presence of & at the request 

of the Testator 

Coram 

W'" Plumsted Reg. Genl. 




10 



146 GENEALOGY OF THE 

ABINGTON MEETING 

During the period immediately preceding William Penn's arrival in Penn- 
sylvania, in 1682, settlers began to locate in the desirable territory to the 
north of the site of the " Green Countrey Towne " laid out by the proprietor. 
Amongst these Friends were numerous and influential. The setting up of 
meetings M'as a matter of very early consideration. Worship was held, after 
the custom of the time, in private houses. Among the earliest records we 
lind the following historical note : 

"At a monthly meeting y*^ 8th 9 m" 1682 

" At this time Governour William Penn and a multitude of ffriends 
arrived here, and Errected a City Called Philadelphia about half a mile 
from Shackamaxon where meetings were Eftablished." 

In 1684 a log meeting house was built in Oxford township and Oxford 
Meeting established. Meetings were also set up about this time at Byberry 
and Cheltenham and primitive meeting houses erected. In 1697, John 
Barnes gave Friends 120 acres of land in Cheltenham for educational pur- 
poses and a burial ground. It was at once decided to build a stone meet- 
ing house, with help of Friends in Philadelphia, as the early minutes note; 
the building being completed in 1700. For some years theretofore the 
society at Cheltenham had been known as Dublin Meeting, the name of the 
nearby township wherein many of the members lived. It was now changed 
to Abington. About this time Oxford Meeting lapsed, owing to the Keith 
schism, a majority of its members falling away, many uniting with Trinity 
Protestant Episcopal Church, which secured possession of the property, erect- 
ing the first part of the present venerable building about 1711. 

Some years thereafter — the first Abington minute referring thereto ap- 
pearing in the record for 1723 — Oxford Friends reorganized their meeting, 
being subject to Abington Monthly Meeting. A century later this Oxford 
Meeting became known as Frankford Meeting, thus continuing until the 
present time, though since 1827 it has been subject to Green Street Monthly 
Meeting, Philadelphia. There have been some changes in the meeting house 
and grounds at Abington, but the present solidly built edifice, a portion of 
which is more than two hundred years old, in no way shows the effects of 
passing years. The grove of great trees, many of them past the century 
mark, forms a beautiful view from the highway. Directly opposite has been 
erected one of the finest school buildings in the State, this institution having 
always been under the care and supervision of Friends. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



147 



Abington Meeting has always been prosperous and influential. Quarterly 
Meetings held there are still occasions of great interest. Some extracts from 
early minutes are here given : 

On the 24'" of 11 mo. 1695, this meeting having taken into consideration 
y° good advice of Friends from the last yearly meeting, to put in practice 
their council to admonish those that profess God's truth and do not walk 
answerable thereto. This meeting have chosen Richard Whitefield and 
Edward Orphood to inspect into Oxford meeting, also two for Germantown, 
two for Cheltenham and the same for Bj'berry meeting. 

At the meeting of 31*' of 11 mo. 1697, William Jenkins gave Friends a 
relation of Friends' proceedings at Philadelphia, concerning their assist- 
ance towards building a new meeting house at Abington. William Jenkins 
and Joseph Phipps are appointed to attend the next monthly meeting to 
acquaint y' Friends do approve of their method of subscription and accept 
their love. This meeting on the 28"" following do desire for y^ future y' 
Edward Orphord and Timothy Hanson take due inspection into the youths 
behavior belonging to Oxford meeting. 

1 mo. 25, 1700. Friends appoint Joseph Phipps, Thomas Canby & Wm. 
Jenkins to inspect into y" accts. of Everard Bolton and Samuel Cart con- 
cerning y^ building of y** Meeting house at Abington. 

4th mo. 24, 1700. Friends appointed to inspect accts. of Everard Bolton 
& Sam'l Cart reported due Everard Bolton 18 s 6d, which Friends do 
order to be paid. 




ABINGTON MEETING HOUSE, 1700 AND 1756 



148 GENEALOGY OF THE 



8_CHARLES FFRENCH (Thomas, 1). 

b. March 20th, 1671. 

Baptized April 2nd, 1671, at Church S. S. 

Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, England. 

m. First (sup.), 1708, Elinor . 

m. Second, . 

42— CHARLES FRENCH, JR. b. 8th mo. 12th, 1714. 

m. 10th mo. 6th, 1739, Ann Clement. 

43— URIAH FRENCH m. Mary McCullock. 

CHARLES FRENCH 

The third son of Thomas ffrench, progenitor, appears to have held a 
responsible relationship towards his father and other members of the family. 
It became his duty to administer the estate, and in this connection he visited 
England in 1699 and several times thereafter. A number of deeds of con- 
veyance show his disposition of the property. In one of these special reser- 
vation is made of the family burial lot, on the homestead farm, in which 
Thomas ffrench and his wife were buried, this provision being continued for 
nearly half a century, when it seems to have been lost sight of by later 
owners after the tract was subdivided. The plantation was bequeathed to 
Charles, subject to certain legacies, his father conveying to him 200 acres 
of land by deed of gift dated June 3rd, 1698, and afterwards bestowing 
the whole 600 acres upon him by will, proved 1699. In this connection a 
notable incident occurred. In 1713, Richard French, in order that the will 
of his father might be performed, " as far as in him lyeth," and fearing that 
" some right might appertain to him " in said plantation, as heir apparent 
of Thomas ffrench, being the eldest son, that should cause hindrance of the 
sale and permanent transfer of the property, or lead to future complications 
in connection therewith, as the original will of the testator had been left 
in England, by deed of release (herewith given) conveyed to his brother 
Charles any possible right he might have in the plantation. 

Charles French evidently was a man of great activity and influence during 
his life. He resided chiefly in the upper part of Burlington county, but 
had interests elsewhere and lived for a time in Gloucester county, where he 
is supposed to have been a neighbor of the Kay, Ellis, Coles, Fortiner, Lip- 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 149 

pincott, Inskeep and other pioneer families in Waterford township. Many 
real estate and administration papers, wills, deeds, etc., of that early period 
have been lost and the records at the first county seat, Gloucester, were 
destroyed through the burning of the old court house, in 1786. Only two 
curious court minute books of the time, chiefly reciting quarter sessions busi- 
ness, were saved and many of the leaves of one of these are charred and torn 
and almost illegible. The records copied at Trenton are far from complete. 
Those preserved in the Surveyor General's office, at Burlington, relate to 
surveys and to a limited degree deal with transfers of property. 

Unhappily, meeting records concerning Charles French are almost equally 
vague and fragmentary. He seems to have been twice married, his first wife 
apparently being a member of Shrewsbury Meeting, and his second wife not 
being a member of the Society of Friends, although there is no record of 
final discipline. It is believed he had three daughters by the second mar- 
riage, and that these were they whose marriages are recorded in the book 
of licenses at Trenton; viz., Jemima, who married Francis Kay in 1743; 
Hope, who married Isaac Kay in 1748 (both grandsons of the pioneer John 
Kay) ; and Bathsheba, who married Daniel Fortiner in 1748. Francis and 
Jemima Kay had three children, John, Samuel and Mary. The former, in 
1807, left a large family, ten children, by two wives, Keziah Thorn, daughter 
of Capt. Joseph and Isabella (Cheeseman) Thorn, and Elizabeth Brown; 
and an estate in Waterford township of over 600 acres. Isaac and Hope 
Kay were living in 1772, but no family record has been discovered. John 
Kay, the progenitor, was one of the most noted citizens of his locality, he 
being a large land owner in Waterford township and active and influential 
in public life. His homestead was near the present hamlet of Ellisburg, 
now Delaware township, Camden county. In 1685 he was elected to the 
Assembly and he also served as one of the judges of the original Gloucester 
county. He was a noted arbitrator in the community and served as chair- 
man of the committee on the settlement of the boundary between New Jersey 
and New York. He was much interested in the Indians and their proper 
treatment. He was a prominent Friend and at his house early meetings 
were held and marriages celebrated. He died in 1741. 

Daniel Fortiner, who married Bathsheba French, was an English artisan 
pioneer, a worker in wood, skilful and much esteemed for good qualities. 
His descendants have been industrious and useful citizens, one of the most 
widely known being the late Elwood K. Fortiner, merchant, of Camden. 



150 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at our Meeting house in Burlington 
y* 8*" of y'' 3" mo. 1699 Charles ffrench desired of this Meeting a Cer- 
tificate in order for his going for England. Tho. Eves and Henry Grubb 
are appointed to Inquire into his Clearness & Conversation & to give ace* 
to y^ next Meeting. 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held alt our Meeting house in Burlington 
y* 5"" of y*" 4*"" mo*'' 1699 The men appointed to Enquire into y^ Clear- 
ness of Charles ffrench give report y* they finde him Cleare Except in his 
publication according to law therefore have ordered after y*" publication 
y* y" Cleark draw a Certificate & it be perused by Tho Gardener Christo- 
pher Wetherill Jno. Hollenshead Tho. Raper Ben Wheat Isaac Meriott and 
Peter ffretwell & if liked to Signe it. 

Att our Mens Monthly Meeting held att our Meeting house in Burling- 
ton y*^ 6"' of y" 7"' mo. 1703 Charls French came before this meeting 
& acquanted the meeting y* he Intended God Willing to go for ould 
England & desired a Certificate therefore this meeting appoint John Wills 
& Tho : Eves to enquire into his clearnefs & to draw up a Certificate 
accordingly as they find things & bring it to y'' next meeting. 

From our Monthly Meeting held at Burlington y'' V^ of y" 11 mo. 
1704, and continued by adjournment til y* 25 of y" same. 

To all captains and other military officers concerned — wereas : Peter 
Fretwell, Tho. Gardiner, Thos. Scattergood, Tho. Wetherill and some 34 
others for Burlington ; John Fenimore, Tho. Lippincott, Charles French 
and some 1 1 others for Wellingborrou ; and some 70 others for Northamp- 
ton, Mancefield, Chester and Eversham — 

Did att our last Monthly Meeting appear declaring that they were of 
y* Society of y^ people called Quakers & that for conscience sake they 
could not bear nor use arms to y*" destruction of y" lives of men, and being 
willing to receive y^ benefit of y** favor expressed to y*" said People in an 
Act of Assembly lately made & published att Burlington entituled an Act 
for selling the Militia of this Province ; pursuant to the requirings of y* 
said Act, they do request of us that we would certifie that they were of the 
People called Quakers : and though most of them were well known to us, 
yet that we might act with more care and caution therein, we did appoint 
certain persons to make particular enquiry into their Behaviour &• uppon 
such Enquiry made, we do not find any Reason to Deny them their request 
as aforesaid. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 151 

These are therefore to certifye that the persons above named are of y* 
Society of People called Quakers, & were so at y" time of y'^ making of y* 
said act. 

Signed in, & by order of, y'' said meeting. (Signed by six representa- 
tives of each of the Meetings mentioned) 

This action had reference to current excitement over the French and 
Indian border vicars. 

Att our monthly meeting att Burlington y^ 1^ of y* 12'" mo*" 1707 Charles 
French Requested of this meeting a Certificate to Srowfbury [Shrewsbury] 
month meeting on the account of taking a wife thereto belonging upon 
which this meeting appoints Tho. Eves & John Wills to Enquire in Rela- 
tion thereto. 

Att our monthly meeting att Burlington y^ T' of y^ 1^' mo'" 1707/8 
The friends appointed to Enquire into y* Clearness of Charles French 
bring report y' they find nothing but that he is clear on y* account of 
marriage & as to his conversation nothing appears Scandolous or Roproch- 
ful therefore this meeting ordereth y" Cleark to draw a Certificate ready 
in order to be signed at y"* next meeting. 

Att our monthly Meeting att Burlington the y^ of y* 6'" mo'" 1719 
There was an account given that Charles ffrench hath gon Contrary to 
y* good order of friends in his marriage and he hath been spoken to for 
itt and he seems to be sory for his so doing and is willing so far as he 
can to make satisfaction for his disorders & y* meeting appoints Hugh 
Sharp to Speak to him to be att y'^ next meeting in order to make satis- 
faction under his hand. 

Att our monthly meeting att Burlington y^ 7'" of 7'" Mo. 1719 Hugh 
Sharp that was appointed to Speak to Charles french and to acquaint him 
that the meeting Expects that he should appear at the next meeting to give 
y' meeting satisfaction and according he hath spoken to him and gave him 
sum Expection that he would be at y*' Meeting but doth not onely sen in 
a paper but the meeting Expects that he should be at y* next meeting and 
Hugh Sharp is ordered againe to acquaint him with y" order of the 
Meeting. 



152 GENEALOGY OF THE 



DEED, CHARLES FRENCH AND MATHEW ALLEN TO JOHN 

HUDSON, 1699 

This Indenture made the ffifth day of the month Called June in the 
year of our Lord according to English Accompt One Thousand six Hun- 
dred Ninety and nine Between Charles ffrench of Wellingbourrough in 
the County of Burlington in the province of West Jersey son of Thomas 
ffrench and Executo"" to the Last Will and Testament of his father and 
Mathew Allen of the Towne of Chester in the County aforesaid Yeoman 
of the one part And John Hudson of the said Towne of Wellingburrough 
in the County aforesaid Carpinder of the other part Witnefseth that 
whereas Thomas ffrench father of the laid of the said Charles ffrench was 
Lawfully pofsefsed of Six Hundred Acres of Land fronting on Northamp- 
ton River and lying next to the Land of John Hudson which faid six 
Hundred Acres of Land fronting on Northampton River and lying next 
to the land of John Hudson which said Six Hundred Acres belongeth 
to a Sixteenth part of a Propriety which he the said Thomas ffrench pur- 
chafed of John Woolstone as by one Indenture bearing date the twentieth 
day of November 1680 doth and may appear And the said Thomas ffrench 
did give unto the said Charles ffrench two hundred Acres of the said 
Land by a Deed of Gift bearing date the third day of June 1698 And 
Afterward did confirm the whole six Hundred Acres unto the said Charles 
ffrench by his last will and Testament And the said Charles ffrench fince 
the Decease of his said father hath figned and fealed one Indenture of 
Mortgage to the aforesaid Mathew Allen bearing date before the date of 
these presents to be voyd on Payment of sundry Debts as by the said In- 
denture it doth now at Large apear Now these presence Witnefs that the 
said Charles ffrench and Mathew Allen for and in Consideration of the 
Sum of of five and Twenty pounds Currant fillver Money in this province 
to him the said Charles ffrench in hand paid and fecured by the faid John 
Hudson at or before the fealing and Delivery of these presents the Receipt 
whereof they the said Charles ffrench and Mathew doe hereby Acknowledge 
and thereof Clearly Acquitt and Discharge the said John Hudson his heirs 
Executo'"^ and Administrato"'^ And Every of them forever by these pres- 
ents Have Granted Bargined fold Enfeoffed and Confirmed and by these 
presents doth Grant bargain fell Enfeoffe and confirm unto the said John 
Hudson his heirs and afsigns forever One Hundred Acres of Land Begin- 
ning at a ftone by the faid Northampton River Then by the said John 
Hudsons Land to the Milcrick to a popler being Corner to the said Land 
Then downe the same to a fmall White Oake feven Chaine and a halfe 
then south westerly twenty Eight degrees One Hundred and fourty Chaine 
to a white Oake by the said River then up the fame to the ftone first 
mintioned Together allsoe with the mines mineralls woods fishings hawk- 
ings huntings and fowlings and all and Every the Appurtences profits 




kMlliiMMMHMatlMniuMJbHIIMMMldiil 




SURVEYOR-GENERAL'S OFFICE, BURLINGTON, N. J., 1S25 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 153 

and Commodities whatsoever belonging to the faid Premifses And the 
Reversion and Reversions Remainders and Remainders thereof And all the 
Estate Right title Interest Use pofsefsion property Claim and Demand 
whatsoever of them the said Charles ffrench and Mathew Allen in or to 
the fame — To have and to hold the said one Hundred acres of Land unto 
the said John Hudson his heirs and Afsigns to the only proper use and 
behoofe of him the said John Hudson his heirs and Afsigns forever And 
the faid Charles ifrench and Mathew Allen for themselves feverally and 
Respectively and for their Several and Respective heirs Executors Admin- 
istrato"*. and Afsigns doe Covenant promise and Grant to and with the 
faid John Hudson his heirs and Afsigns by these presence that they have 
not wittingly or Willingly Committed or done any Act matter or thing 
whereby or by reason whereof the said premifses hereby Granted is Shall 
or may be Charged Burthened or Incumbered in any title Charge Estate 
or otherwise Howsoever & then the rents thereout Ifsueing to the King and 
his fuccefsors and the Arrears thereof if any be And Allsoe that the faid 
Charles ffrench and Mathew Allen Their heirs and Afsigns fhall and will 
at all times hereafter during the fpace of feven Years Next Ensueing the 
date hereof at the request Cost and Charges of the said John Hudson his 
heirs or Afsigns make doe and Execute or Cause to be made done and 
Executed all and every fuch LawfuU Conveyance or Conveyances for the 
further better and more parfect Afsureing and fure making the above- 
faid premifes unto the faid John Hudson his heirs and Afsigns forever as 
by the faid John Hudson his heirs or Afsigns fhall be Lawfully required, 
foe as the partie or parties to whome fuch request be not Compelled nor 
hereby Compellable to travill from the place of his or their aboade further 
then to the towne of Burlington for the doing and Executing thereof 
And soe as fuch Conveyance Containe Noe further warranty then as afore- 
said In Witnefs whereof the parties first above named to these Present 
Indenture have Interchangably set their Hands and feals the day and year 
first above written 1699 

Charles French with a [feale] 
Mathew Allen with a [feale] 

Signed fealed & Delivered in y*" presence of John Test, Sam": ffurnis 
Thomas Eves The 9"": day of the month called August 1728 Then the 
within Named Thomas Eves one of the Evidences to the within Deed Came 
before me Underwritten being one of the Kings Council for the province 
of New Jersey and upon his folemn Afiirmation did declare that he was 
present and faw the within Named Charles French and Mathew Allen fign 
feal and Execute the within Deed unto the within Named John Hudson 
and that he faw John Test and Samuel ffurnis fign as Witnefses to the fame. 
Witnefs my hand the day and year abovefaid. 

John Wills. 



154 GENEALOGY OF THE 

DEED, CHARLES AND RICHARD FRENCH TO HENRY 

PEEPS, 1704 

This Indenture made the ffirst Day of November in the year of our 
Lord according to English ace*. One thousand Seven hundred and ffour 
Between Charles French of the Township of Wellingbourrough in the 
County of Burlington Within the province of New Jersey yeoman And 
Richard French of the Township of Mansfield in the said County of Bur- 
lington Province aforesaid yeoman of the One part And Henry Peeps of 
the Township of Chesterfield and County of Burlington aforesaid Hus- 
bandman of the other part Witnefseth that the said Charles French & 
Richard French for and in Consideration of the Sum of thirty pounds of 
Current Silver money within the Westerly Division of the province afore- 
said to the said Charles French and of ffive Shillings like current Silver 
money aforesaid to the said Richard French by the said Henry Peeps to 
them respectively in hand paid at and before the Ensealing and Delivery 
hereof the receipt of which said Sum of thirty pounds the said Charles 
French doth hereby acknowledge & the receipt of the said ffive Shillings 
the said Richard French hereby acknowledgeth and thereof and of every 
part Pcell thereof doe and Each and Either of them — Respectively Doth 
acquit Exonerate and Discharge the said Henry Peeps his heirs Executors 
and Administrators and every of them forever by these presents Have 
Granted bargained and sold aliened Enfeoffed & Confirmed and by these 
Psents Doe ffully Clearly and absolutely Grant bargain & Sell aleyne 
Enfeoffe and Confirm unto the said Henry Peeps his heirs and Afsigns 
forever The ffuU Quantity of Six hundred Acres of Land to be Taken up 
Laid fForth and Surveyed to and for the said Henry Peeps his heirs and 
Afsigns in any place within the said Westerly Division of said Province 
where purchased from the Native Indians and not before taken up and 
Surveyed which said Six hundred Acres of Land is to be taken up in 
right of the Share or Shares of Land for the third Dividend belonging to 
an Eighth part of a propriety of Land within the said Westerly Division 
of the said Province & by the Last Will and Testament of Thomas French 
Deccd : ffather of said Charles and Richard French given and Bequeathed 
to said Charles French as by the same will relation being thereunto had 
more at Large Appears. Together with all and every the Mines Minerals 
Woods ffishings foulings Hawkings Huntings and ffowlings and all Other 
profits Comodities Hereditaments and Improvements Whatsoever to said 
Six hundred acres of Land belonging or in any wise Appertaining and 
Also all the Estate right Title Interest pofsefsion Property Claim and 
Demand whatsoever of them the said Charles French and Richard French 
or Either of them as well in Law as in Equity of in Or unto the said 
granted and bargained Six hundred acres of Land or any part or parcell 
thereof with the appurtenances and the Reversion and Reversions Remain- 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 155 

der and Remainders of the Same and of Eevery part thereof To Have and 
To Hold the said Six hundred acres of Land and granted and Bargained 
Premifses and every part and parcell thereof writh the Appurtenances unto 
the said Henry Peeps his heirs and Afsigns forever. 

And the said Charles French Richard French for themselves Jointly 
and Severally and for them and Either of their heirs Executors and 
Administrators Doe Covenant promise and Grant to and with the said 
Henry Peeps his heirs and Afsigns by these presents that at the time of 
the Sealing and Delivery hereof they the said Charles French & Richard 
French or y'' one of them have Or hath good right full power and LawfuU 
and absolute authority to Grant bargain Sell and Confirme the said Six 
hundred acres of Land Granted or Mentioned to be granted pmifses with 
the Appurtenances unto the said Henry Peeps his heirs and Afsigns forever 
in Manner and fform as in these presents is mentioned and Exprefsed And 
that they the said Charles French and Richard French or either of them 
have not nor hath not wittingly or willingly Committed Sufferred or Done 
any act matter or thing whatsoever whereby or by reason whereof the said 
granted and Bargained premifses or any part or peel thereof is are shall 
or may be Charged Burthend or Incumbred in any Tytle Charge Estate 
or Otherwise howsoever Other than the Quittrents thereout Ifsuing unto 
Our Sovereign Lady the Queen her heirs and Succefsors and the Arrears 
thereof if any be and Lastly the said Charles French for himself his heirs 
Executors and administrators Doth hereby Covenant promise and Grant 
to and with the said Henry Peeps his heirs and Afsigns That he the said 
Charles French and his heirs Shall and will at all and every time and 
Times hereafter During the Time and Space of Seven Years Next Ensuing 
the Date hereof at the request Costs and Charges of the said Henry Peeps 
his heirs and Afsigns make do Execute or Cause to be made done or 
Executed Such ffurther and Other lawful Act and Acts thing and things 
Conveyance & Afsurance Whatsoever for the ffurther better more ffull and 
perfect Conveying Confirming and Afsuring the said Six hundred Acres 
of Land and granted and bargained premifses and every or any part or 
parcell thereof with the appurtenances unto the said Henry Peeps his heirs 
and Afsigns for ever According to the purport true Intent and meaning 
of these presents as by him the said Henry Peeps his heirs and Afsigns 
Shall be reasonably required Soe as the person or persons to whom Such 
request Shall be made be not Compelled or Compellable to Travell or goe 
ffurther then to the Town of Burlington aforesaid for the making Doing 
or Executing hereof and So as Such ffurther Afsurance Contain noe ffurther 
Covenants or Warranty then According to the Tenor of these presents 
In Witnefs whereof the said Parties first above named to these present In- 
denture have Set their hands and Seals the Day and Year first above 
written 1704 

Richard French & [Seal] 
Charles French & [Seal] 



156 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Sealed and Delivered in the presence of Daniel Leeds T Wright William 
Bull Tho Revell November Z" : 1704. 

Then received y" Sum of money respectively mentioned for the considera- 
tion of the within granted Lands by us Charles French Richard French 
Witnefses by us Tho : Revell Daniel Leeds. 

Endorsed County of Burlington July ZS**" : 1762 — Then personally Came 
and appeared before me Charles Read Esq'' : one of his Majesties Council 
for the province of New Jersey Revell Elton Esq'' : a person to me well 
known and worthy of good Credit being duly Sworn did Depose that he 
was acquainted with the handwriting of Daniel Leeds and Thomas Revell 
Esq"" (decea'' long since) had Seen them respectively write their names and 
verily believes that the names Daniel Leeds and Thomas Revell Signed as 
Witnefses to the within Deed are of the proper hand writing of the said 
Daniel Leeds and Thomas Revell 

Jurat Coram Cha Reed 
Recorded this Septem'' 1762. 

DEED, RICHARD FRENCH TO CHARLES FRENCH, 1713 

The following is the deed of release made by Richard French [5] to his brother Charles 
[8], of all claims in the home plantation. 

To all Perfons to whom these prefents Shall come or may Concern — Greet- 
ing Know yee, that Richard French Son & Heir apparant of Thomas 
French Late of Wellinborrow in the County of Burlington & Province of 
Weft Jerfey Deceafed, for divers good & "Valuable Considerations me there- 
unto moving & more particularly that I may as much as in me Lyeth 
Endeavour that the Laft Will and Teftament of my said father should 
be performed, and whereas my said father by his Laft Will & Tefta- 
ment bareing Date the third day of June, Anno Domini, One thoufand six 
hundred ninety Eight, Did Nominate & Appoint my Brother Charles 
French to be his Sole Executor of his said Will and did by the same Give 
& bequeath unto my said brother all that farm plantation or tract of Land, 
Scituate Lying & being in the Townfhip of Wellenborrow aforesaid Con- 
taining by the survey thereof Six hundred acres of Land In Upland & 
Meadow, with all & every the premifses & appurtenances belonging or in 
any Wife appertaining & Whereas my sd Brother being Lately In Old 
England there Leaving the sd Originall Will which may Caufe the hindrance 
to my brother of y" Sale of y'' sd Plantation as If some right might apper- 
tain to me for want of the said Will If it should any Wife Mifcarry or 
be Loft I being the Eldeft Son & heir of my sd Father, Therefore to pre- 
vent & Avoid all Controverfy for touching or Concerning the same 1 the said 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 157 

Richard French have Remifed releaf and forever Quit Claimed and I do 
by thefe prefents, for me my Heirs Executors and adminiftrators & Afsigns 
Remife Releafe & for ever Quitt Claim, unto the sd Charles French his 
Heirs & Afsigns, Remife Releafe & forever Quitt Claim unto the sd — all 
and all manner of Right Title Intereft property Claim & Demand whatfo- 
ever — which I the sd Richard French now have my heirs Executors shall 
or may have Challenge or demand of in or to the sd Mentioned Tract of 
Land lying & being in the Townfhip of Wellenborrow as aforesaid Contain- 
ing Six hundred acres of Upland & Meadow So that I the s* Richard 
French my Heirs Executors Adminiftrators or Afsigns shall not, nor will 
not at any time hereafter make any claim Challenge or Demand of in or 
to the said Tract of Land as aforesaid or to any part or parcel of the 
Same — but that both myself my Heirs Executors Adminiftrators or Afsigns 
or any or every of them shall from henceforth be thereof & of every part 
& parcel thereof & therein be utterly «S: forever Excluded & Debarred by 
these prefents. 

In Witnefs whereof I the said Richard ffrench have hereunto Set my 
hand & Seal this twenty Ninth day of January, In the Twelfth year of 
the Reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne Queen over Great Brittain, &c. 
Anno Domini, One thoufand seven hundred and Thirteen. 

Richard French w"' a Seal [seal]. 

Seal'd & Delivered In the prefence of, 

Daniel Smith, Tho : Middleton, Tho : Scattergood. 

A COLONIAL ADVERTISEMENT, 1722 

In December, 1719, Andrew Bradford, the pioneer printer of Pennsylvania, son of 
William Bradford, began the publication in Philadelphia of the first newspaper issued 
in the state. " The American Weekly Mercury," as the paper was called, was " Printed 
and Sold by Andrew Bradford, at the BIBLE in the Second Street; and alfo by 
William Bradford in New-York, where Advertifements are taken in." It was a small 
two-column four-page sheet of the most primitive style and often contained curious 
advertisements, the result of the efforts of immigrants to find each other in the new 
country. In several numbers of the " Mercury," beginning April 19, 1722, appeared the 
following notice, revealing the approximate date of one of the visits of Charles French 
to " Old England " : 

N. B. They have a ?afs ^ihDgvf'ilh them from Co).... 
of Mar)'I.ind all ii: one Paper. 
! «"1 yi^frcas about Twctity Years ^oce, there came into 
:^ ' I W thc(e Parts of ArHerkn, with ooe Mr. Cbarle* 
French, who lives at Anccats-Creck ia BwrlhgtonComty, \tk 
Well-Jerfey^ one Smud lacy bom in Northsmptmfbnc^ 
Thefe are to give Nocice, Thiit if the f ji<J '\amuel Ucy 
b.' living, and willcorae to Henry Flower, Portmafter o£ 
Fhiladelphij, he may be informcdof fomcthing very coa- 
fidcrablefor his Advantage-, And further. If any Perfoa 
can give any true and fatisfjftory Account or Proof of thd 
faid Sa.mue! Lacy's bdng nowlivin.-^, (h^H have a Reward 
of Five Pounds current Money of this Province paid them 
by the faid Henry Flower. 



lifto- 
uchy, 

Bar 

s, for 
>, for 



158 GENEALOGY OF THE 

9— JOHN FFRENCH (Thomas, 1). 

Baptized January 2nd, 1673, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, England. 
d. 1729. 

m. First, 1701, Ann . 

m. Second, 6th mo. 10th, 1724, Sarah (Mason) 
Wickward, widow of William Wickward, and 
daughter of John Mason of Evesham Town- 
ship, Burlington Co., N. J. 

44— JOHN FRENCH, JR. b. 1702. 

d. 1729. 

45— THOMAS FRENCH b. 1703. 

46— CHARLES FRENCH b. 1704. 

47— RACHEL FRENCH b. 1705. 

m. First, Enoch Fenton. 

m. Second, Dec. 1, 1735, Nathaniel Wilkinson. 

48— ANN FRENCH b. 1707. 

m. Joshua Woolston. 

William Wickward and Sarah Mason were married in 1717, and had children, Samuel, 
Hannah and Rachel. 

JOHN FRENCH 

The youngest son of Thomas ffrench, progenitor, appears to have inherited 
in good degree the qualities of success which characterized his father and 
brothers. He no doubt was advanced patrimony sufficient to enable him to 
make a good start in life, although his share of the paternal estate under 
the will was nominal. Records show that he early acquired considerable 
land in Northampton township, where he resided for a mmiber of years 
and prospered as a farmer, adding to his plantation, from time to time, and 
finally possessed upwards of 500 acres. The curious and painstaking ac- 
count of his executors shows extended business relationship, and the per- 
formance of this trust in accordance with the letter and spirit of the will 
of the testator. In life he set a consistent example and his last formal 
expressions comprised impressive admonition. His son Charles seems to 
have remained in Northampton township and official records established the 



DESCENDANTS OF THOxMAS FRENCH 159 

fact that the latter's daughter Margaret married William Hooper, a resident 
of Northampton township, the license bearing date Dec. 24, 1744, and 
accompanying which is the following quaint endorsement : 

Dec. 24, 1744, Joshua Bishop affirmed before Joseph Scattergood, one 
of his Majesty's Justices for the city of Burlington, that he heard Charles 
French, father of Margaret French, give his consent that William Hooper 
should marry his said Daughter. 

, his 

Joshua X Bishop 
mark 
Affirmed before 

Jof Scattergood 

From sundry records it would appear that William Hooper and Margaret, 
his wife, had two sons; Isaac who, in 1775, married Martha Tice, and 
Jacob who, in 1772, married Hannah Piatt. 

William Hooper died intestate in 1759 and his wife Margaret, renouncing 
her right to administer the estate, at her suggestion Thomas Budd was ap- 
pointed to act in that capacity. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

Att our Monthly Meeting held at Burlington y^ V of 4'" Mo. 1724. 
John ffrench made application to this Meeting on y* account of marriage 
with one within the Vearg of Newtown mo"" meeting for which y" meet- 
ing appoints Joshu Smith & James Lippincott to make Enquiry Concern- 
ing his clearness & conversation and make report to y*^ next meeting. 

Att our Monthly Meeting att Burlington y^ 6"* day of y* 5"' month 
1724 - - The two friends Joshua Smith and James Lippincott that was 
appointed to make enquire in to y*^ Clearness of John ffrench both on y* 
account of Marriage and also his life and conversation report to this meet- 
ing y' they do not find anything to object but he is clear on y"' account 
of marriage and his conversation pretty orderly of late for which y^ 
meeting orders y* Cleark to draw a Certificat accordingly. 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

13 — 5 mo. 1724 At said meeting John French and Sarah Wickwart sig- 
nify their intentions of taking each other in marriage, the said John 
Living within the Verge of Burlington Monthly Meeting therefore he is 
given to understand a certificate will be expected at his next presentation 
from them. 



160 GENEALOGY OF THE 



10 — 6 mo. 1724 At said monthly meeting John French and Sarah Wick- 
wart the second time presented their Intentions of taking each other in 
marriage. This meeting after receiving a Certificate from Burlington Mo. 
Meeting consents that they may take each other in Truth's way, and 
appoints John Haines and W'"' Borton to be present at sd marriage, to 
see it be orderly accomplished. 

14*" 7 mo. 1724 At said meeting John Haines reports to this meeting 
that he was present at y*" marriage of John French and Sarah Wickwart 
& that it was orderly accomplished. 

Haddonfield Minutes of y*' Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

Att a m"ly m'g of w°m fr"' held at Haddonfield y" 13'" of 5'" m° 1724 
At s** m'g Jn° French & Sarah Wickware signified y"" intentions of m'"g, 
y'' m'g app*' Eliz. Evins & Mary Evees to make y^ ufual inquirie & 
report accordingly to next m° m*g. 

Att a m-'ly m*g of w°m fr"' held at Haddonfield y^ 10"' of 6'" 1724 
At s'* m'g Jn° French & Sarah Wickward signified y" continuation of y"" 
intentions of m''g y*" return of inquirers is they find nothing so mattierall 
as to obstruct y"" proceedings so y*' m'g confents to y® accomplifhm' of 
y* s* m'"g according to y^ good ord"" among fr''^ &c & appoints Hannah 
Hains & Hannah Borton to see good o'^d'" kept. 

DEED, SARAH MORREY TO JOHN FRENCH, 1717 

To All to whome thefe prefents Shall Come Sarah Morrej' of y*" Cit}' 
of Philadelphia in y*" prouince of penfilvania widow Distiller Sends 
greeting — 

Whereas by a Certain Draught of Certificate bearing Date in October 
1693 under y* hand of Daniell Leeds there was Surveyed unto Lady 
Martha Roads Sam' Barker and Tho : Wright two tracts of Land on y" 
Branches of Ancocus Creek in y'' County of Burlington in west new 
Jerfey y*^ one s'' to Contain three thoufand one hundred and twenty acres 
and y*^ other twelve hundred acres as by s'' Certifycate &c and y'^ Record 
thereof in y"^ Secretaries office may appear And Whereas by uirtue of 
Seuerall mefne Conveyances and Afsurences in law She y'' said Sarah 
Morrey now is and Stands Lawfully Seized of a good right and Estate 
in all that part & parts of y*" before mentioned Lands with y® appurtences 
Whereof he s** Tho : Wright was Seized & pofsesed in common w"' s'* 
Roads & Barker by uirtue of y*' above survey &c or otherwise howsoeuer 
and for as much as many Disputes in law and other wise have arifen in 
Relation to y*" Right and title of y*' s** Rhoads Barker and Wright to 
y** s'' land by and between them and their Afsigns and y'' present Settlers 
thereon who alfo by uirtue of Surueys Indian purchases and Seating 
Claime a right to Seuerall parts & parcells thereof in order thereof to 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 161 

accomedate in a Christian and peaceable name all disputes Law Suits Con- 
treuerfis Claims of Right or title by from or under y*^ s'' Tho : Wright 
to y* part of y* Lands in pofsesion of John french of y^ County of Bur- 
lington afors"* & townfhip of Northampton yeoman which is Bounded as 
followeth Viz' in two tracts of y'' first Begins at a white oak near y^ 
mouth of Run or Creek Stop y" Jades Run thence S'. Easterly S"* : twenty 
one Chains to another white oak thence N" : Easterly 73 degrees Sixty 
three Chains to a gum by s** Creek then down y" Same by y* Seuerall 
Cources thereof and bounding therew*" to y'' Corner \v* oak first men- 
tioned Surveyed for one hundred acres and y^ other tract Begins at a 
hickery tree Corner to Jacob Lambs Land thence \>y his Land East by 
South twenty two Chains to a black oak Corner then South East twenty 
fiue Chaine to a white oak Corner then weft South west four Chains to 
a black oak then near South to a brook Called Stop y^ Jades Run then 
Bounding down by y^ Same and y*^ above last mentioned tract of Land 
to a white oak Corner at y*" mouth thereof then north Seuenteen Chains 
then East north East twenty two Chains then East by north three Chains 
to y" first mentioned Corner Surveyed for one Hundred and twenty acres 
now thefe prefents wittnefseth y' She y'^ s"^ Sarah Morey not only for y^ 
Confiderations and Caufes afors'^ But alfo for y" further Confideration 
of y^ Sum of Seuen pounds Curr' money of America to her in hand 
paid by John french afor*"^ y*^ recept whereof She doth hereby acknowl- 
edge hath Remised Released and c;uitt Claimed and by thefe prefents 
She y'' s** Sarah Morrey for her Selfe her heirs & afsigns do freely Clearly 
and abfolutely Remise Releafe and for Ever Quit Claime unto him y" 
s** John french and to his heirs and afsigns all that her Right title Intreft 
property Clayme and Dem*" of in to or out of y*^ s"* two tracts of land 
Joyned in one being in y"* whole two hundred and twenty acres and all 
y® ways waters water Cources woods Houfes Buldings fields fences im- 
prouem*^ marfhes Swamps meadows mines mineralls fifhings fowlings 
Hawkings huntings Rights Liberties preuilidges Hereditam*^ And appur- 
tences to Each p' and parcell thereof belonging or in any wife appertaining 
togeather with y" Reuerfon and reuerfons Remainder and remainders 
rents ifsues and profits thereof and p' and parcell thereof to have and 
to hold all y'' s"^ two hundred twenty acres of Land and premises with 
Euery y^ appurtences unto him y® s'^ John french to y" only use and behoofe 
of him y^ s^ John french his heirs and afsigns for euer So y* neither 
he y® s'' Tho : Wright nor his heirs nor afsigns nor y* heirs nor Afsigns 
nor Legates of George Hutchinson Dec'* nor She y* s"" Sarah Morrey nor 
her heirs nor afsigns nor any other perfon or perfons by from or under 
them Either or any of them Shall Com will or may at any time here- 
after have Clayme challenge or Demand any Estate Right title property 
pofesion or other thing of in or to any part share or portion of j'^ s** 
Lands & premises by thefe prefents Released or Intended to be hereby 

11 



162 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Releafed But from all actions and Suits caufe and Caufes of actions & 
Suits Rights titles or Claj'ms Either in Law or Equity Shall and will from 
thence forth for Euer be utterly Bared and Excluded by thefe prefents 
in wittnefs whereof She y* s" Sarah Morey hath hereunto Sett her hand 
& Seale this fourth day of Novemb"" in y^ fourth year of y^ Reign of King 
george ouer great Brittain <S;c Anno Domini 1717 

Sarah Morrey [Seal] 

Signed Sealed & Deliuered in presents of us 
Philo : Leeds Isaac Decou Jn° Budd 

County of Burlington in y'* prouince of New Jersey y^ 20'" of March 
1720 then came before me under written one of his maieftys Councill 
for y" prouince of New Jerfey Isaac Decou and uppon his Solemn Afirma- 
tion declares y' he saw Sarah Morrey Sign Seall and deliuer y* above 
inftrum* as hier uolentary act and Deed for y*^ uie aboue mentioned taken 
before me y'' day and }'ear aboue written. 

Peter Bard. 

WILL OF JOHN FRENCH, 1729 

I John French of Northampton In y" County of Burlington & Western 
Division of 3'*" Province of New Jersey, yeoman. Being very sick & weak 
In Body But of sound & Perfect mind & memory Thanks be given to 
Almighty God therefore Calling to mind y*^ mortallity of my Body & 
Knowing That it is appointed for all men once to Dye Do make & Ordain 
This my Last will & Testament & Do hereby utterly Revoke Disanul & 
make void all other former wills or Testaments by me heretofore made. 

And princepally & first of all I Give & Recommend my Soul Into y® 
hands of God that Gave It and my Body I Recommend to y^ Earth to 
be buried In a Christianlike Decent manner at y" Descretion of my Execu- 
tors hereafter Named. And as Touching Such worldly Estate where- 
with it hath pleased God to Bless me with In This Life I Give Devise 
& Dispose of y" Same In manner & form following — 

Imprimus — And first of all I order my funeral Charges & Just Debts 
to be Raised out of my moveable Estate & paid by my Executors here- 
after named And as for y" Remaining part of my Estate both Real & per- 
sonal after my Just Debts & funerall charges is paid I Give & Dispose 
of y*^ same as followeth — 

ITEM I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my oldest son Thomas French 
& to his heirs & Assigns forever y* sum of five Pounds Current Lawfull 
money of America to be paid by my Executors & all my waring Cloaths 
to be Delivered by my Executors 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 163 

ITEM I Give Devise & Bequeath unto ni}' Second Son Charles French 
& to his heirs & assigns forever all That Part & parcel of my Land Lying 
adjoyning on y* East side of a line or Lines of marked Trees to be Run 
Beginning at a Hickory Corner next to Jacob Lambs Land & Runing 
from thence a Cross my said Land upon a straight line southerly to a 
Chestnut tree marked for a Corner standing by a pond In y*" Division 
Between y* long field and y" Rye piece & from thence extending still across 
my said Land southerly upon a streight line unto another Chestnut tree 
for a Corner standing in y'' south line of my said Land being by Estima- 
tion one hundred & three acres he my said second son Charles French 
Paying unto my Daughter Ann French y** sum of fifteen pounds current 
Law full money of america. 

ITEM I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my oldest Daughter Rachel 
Fenton & to her heirs & assignes for Ever all That my mantion house 
plantation & Land Lying adjoyning y® West side of y® above Described 
Lines Limited & Bounded & to be Run as above mentioned scituate & 
being In y'' abovesaid Township of Northampton In y*^ County & Division 
of y^ province aforesaid Shee my said oldest Daughter Rachel Fenton 
yeilding & Paying unto my youngest Daughter Ann French y"' sum of 
fifty Pounds Current Lawfull money of America. 

ITEM I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my Daughter In Law Sarah 
French my side saddle to be Delivered by my Executors. 

ITEM I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my Son In Law Samuel Wick- 
ward when he shall arrive or Live to y® age of Twenty one years old 
y® sum of six pounds Current Lawfull money of america to be paid by 
my Executors. 

ITEM I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my Daughter In Law Hannah 
Wickward when she shall arrive or Live to y*" age of Twenty one years 
old y* sum of six pounds current Lawfull money of america to be paid 
by my Executors. 

ITEM I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my Daughter In Law Rechael 
Wickward when she shall arrive or Live to y^ age of Twenty one years 
old y^ sum of six pounds Current Lawfull money of america to be paid 
by my Executors. 

ITEM Also That If any one or more of my said Son In Law or 
Daughters In Law y* above named Wickwards should happen to Dye 
before they comes to age as abovesaid That then y" Legacie belonging 
or Given to y"' said Deceased person or persons shall be Given or paid 
by my Executors to my son Charles French & my Daughters Rechael 
Fenton & Ann French to be equally Divided to each of them their Equal 
Division. 

ITEM I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my well Beloved & Trusty 
friends my Brother Thomas French & my neighbour James Wills whom 
I Likewise Nominate Constitute & ordain my whole & sole Executors to 



164 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



this my Last will & Testament to Each of them y* sum of five shillings. 
Giving & Granting unto my said Executers or either of them LawfuU 
& absolute power & authority to Take Receive sell & Dispose of all my 
personal Estate where & whatsoever which is not before Given Devised 
or Bequeathed to y*^ Intent That my said Executers shall be Enabled to 
Pay my funeral charges & Just Debts & ye Legacies herein before Be- 
queathed. 

Item And also whatsoever part of my Estate In Goods Chatties or 
Credits that shall Remain In my said Executers hands or y" Survivours 
of them I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my son Charles French & my 
Daughters Rechael Frenton & Ann French to be equally Divided to 
Each of them their Equal Dividen and I do hereby Ratifie & Confirm 
This & no other to be my Last will & Testament In witness whereof I 
have hereunto set my hand and seal this Thirteenth Day of Aprill Anno 
qe Dominey one Thousand Seven Hundred & twenty nine 1729 



Signed, sealed and Delivered Pub- 
lished pronounced & Declared by y" 
said John French to be his Last will 
& Testament In y*" presence of us 

William Allcott 

Jacob Lamb 

Joseph Meneer 

John Budd 



his 



John 




French 



mark 




■j-Tm-i^ 



Co — Burlington SS Be it Rememberd that on this Ninth day of May 
An° Don 1729 personally came and appeared before me Samuel Bustill 
D. Surrogate & Register of y® western Division of y" Province of New 
Jersey duly commissioned &c William Allcott one of the wittnesses to y^ 
above & within will subscribed who being sworn on y'^ holy Evangelists 
of Almighty God do depose that he was present & saw John French Sign 
& Seal & heard him publish pronounce & declare y" Instrum*. on this 
sheet of paper contained to be his last will & Testament and that at the 
doing thereof s" Testator was of sound mind memory & understanding 
to y" best of his knowledge & belief & that at y^ sametime Joseph Meneer 
& John Budd the other subscribed evidences were present & signed their 
names as Evidences to y* same in y^ presence of y** Testator 



William Allcott 



Jurat Coram Me 
Sam' Bustill 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 165 

INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN FRENCH, 1729 

May the 9 Day 1729. 

A Trew a praisement of y*^ Estate of John French Sener Late Deceased 
Begining as followeth 

£ S d 

Purs and a parrell 12 5 9 

Bed & furneture 4 

to side Sadel 3 

to tow Chest and Linning 1 4 

to a table & box and other things 1 12 9 

to a dow trouf 10 

to a Bibles & other things 1 12 6 

to potts & a pann 18 

to husbandtree tooles & old iorn 3 12 

to puter & other things 3 S 

to 2 horsses & a mair & 2 saddels 31 10 

to a feather Bedd and furniture & other things 6 5 

to 2 Beds and Rey & other Lomber 5 

to Bacon 10 10 

to milk vessel & other things 1 10 

to Rey Indian Corn & oates 7 

to Cart & ploues & other Lumber 4 10 

to Hogs 4 

to all the Cattell 34 

to Sheep 6 

to y* womens a parrell and other things 12 16 

to a peace of Cassey 13 

to a Chest & other things 5 8 

to Book Debts Deu 4 6 7 

to Bonds Deue 12 10 

By a trew a praisement by Thomas Bifhop 
Test — Michal Woolfton 

William Alcott Totall £167 1 7 

Affirmed to May 9 — 1729 — by Thomas Bishop 

Michal Woolfton 
Thomas french 



166 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



ACCOUNT OF EXECUTORS OF 

The Accompt of Thomas French and James Wills Executors of the laft Will and 
deceased As well of and for such and so much of the Goods, Chattels and Credits of 
and disbursements out of the Same &c. 



Thefe Accomptants charge themselves — 



Debtors 



Thefe Accomptants charge themselves with all and sin- 
gular the Goods and Chattels Rights and Credits of the 
said Deceased mentioned and specified in an Inventory and 
Appraisement thereof made and Exhibited into the Registry £ 
of the Prerogative Court in the Secretary's Office at Burling- (167 
ton Amounting as by the said Inventory and appraisement 
appears to the Sum of One hundred and sixty seven pounds 
One Shilling and seven pence 

To moneys advanced upon sale of Testators Effects above ) 
the Inventory the sum of i 

Thefe Accomptants pray allowance of their payments and 
Disbursements out of the Estate of the said Deceased as 
appears on the Contra Credit side of this acco* : 



S 
1 



d 

7 



14 18 6^ 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 167 

WILL OF JOHN FRENCH, 1732 

Teftament of John French late of Northampton in the County of Burlington yeoman 
the said Dece''. as came to their hands to be administered as of and for their payments 



Pr. Contra Thefe Accomptants pray allowance 



mp^. By moneys paid at the Registers office for the Lett" Teftamentary 
em. By moneys paid to William CoIIum as appears pr. recet No (2) 
t. By Womans Apparel to Jn" Briggs as appears pr. receipt N" (3) 
By moneys paid to Ann Lamb as appears pr. receipt N" (4) . 
By moneys paid to Daniel Wills as appears pr. receipt N" (5) . 
By moneys paid to W'" : Murrell as appears pr. receipt N° (6) . 
By moneys paid to Rich*: Smith as appears pr. Recet N° (7) . . 
By moneys paid to Dorothy Large as appears pr. Rece* N° (8) 
By monej's paid to W"' Allcott as appears pr. Rece* N° (9) . . . 
By moneys paid to W™ Cramer as appears pr. Rece* N" (10) . . 
By moneys paid to Joseph Hilliard as appears pr. Rece* N° (11) 
By moneys paid to Thomas Bishop as appears pr. Rece* N" (12) 
By moneys paid to Edward Shippin as appears pr. Rece* N° (13) 
By moneys paid to Richard Jones as appears pr. Rece* N" (14) 
By moneys paid to Jonathan Wright as appears pr. Rece* N" (IS) 
By moneys paid to John Briggs as appears pr. Rece* N° (16) . . . 
By moneys paid to Tho' : Griffiths as appears pr. Rece' N° (17) . . 
By moneys paid to William Bifhop as appears pr. Rece* N" (18) 
By moneys paid to John Anderson as appears pr .Rece* N" (19) 

Summa 
Carryed to page (4) 



£ 


s 


d 


2 


5 


7 





13 


6 


12 


16 


— 


7 


6 


4 


4 


12 


11 


4 


18 


— 


2 


15 


3 


24 


6 


OYz 


2 








1 


5 





1 


2 





1 


6 


6 


1 


13 


2 





17 


6 





13 


3 





12 


3 





12 








7 








6 


9 



£48 9 OVz 



168 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Thefe Accomptants continue themselves Debtors 

£ S d 

To the Amount of the Inventory brought from page (1) 167 1 7 

To moneys advanced upon the sale of the Teftators Effects 

above the Inventory 14 18 byz 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 169 



s 


d 


9 


OJ^ 


10 


b 


6 





10 





9 


4 


5 





3 





3 





4 


4 


2 


9 


2 





2 


2 



Pr. Contra Thefe Accomtants pray allowance 

£ 

By Sundrys brought from page (2) amounting to the sum of . . . . 48 

It. By moneys paid Samuel Woolfton as appears pr. rece' N" 20/ 

Itt. By moneys paid John Budd as appears pr. rece' N° (21) 

Itt. By moneys paid to Titan Leeds as appears pr. rece' N" (22) 

Itt. By moneys paid to John Brown as appears pr. rece' N° (23) 

Itt. By moneys paid to Michael Woolfton as appears pr. rece' N° (24) . . 

Itt. By moneys paid to Joseph Stephens as appears pr. race' N" (25) ... 

Itt. By moneys paid to Jacob Lamb as appears pr. rece' N" (26) 

Itt. By moneys paid to Isaac DeCow as appears pr. rece' N" (27) 

Itt. By moneys paid to Mary Wood as appears pr. rece' N° (28) 

Itt. By moneys paid to Thomas Bryan as appears pr. rece' N° (29) .... 
Itt. By moneys paid to Charles ffrench Jun"" a Debt Due from y''. Dece''. 4 
Itt. By moneys paid to James Wills Due from the Dece'' and for Dis- 
bursements for and towards the funeral of the Dece'' 2 9 

Itt. By moneys paid to Thomas ffrench one of the sons of the dec'' in 

full of a Legacy, as appears pr. his Rece' N" (30) 5 

Itt. By the Wearing apparell of the Dece'' delivered to the said Tho'. 
ffrench pursuant to the Deceased's bequeft thereof to him, which 

s''. apparell was appraised in the Inv""^ : of the dece""^. Eftate at. . 10 2 9 
Itt. By a Side Saddle delivered to Sarah ffrench, pursuant to the De- 
ceased's bequest thereof to her, appraised in the Inventory of 

the Deceased's Estate at the sum of 3 — — 

Itt. By Sundrys out of the Estate of the Deceased to Samuel Wickward, 

amounting to the sum of I 6 6 

Summa £76 17 1J4 
Carryed to page (6) 



170 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Thefe Accomptants continue themselves Debtors 

£ S. d. 
To the Amount of the Inventory brought from page (3) .... 167 1 7 
To Moneys advanced upon the sale of the Teftator's Effects 

above the Inventory the Sum of 14 18 6J/^ 

Summa £182 — IJ/2, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 171 

Pr. Contra Thefe Accomptants pray allowance — 

£ S d 

Item. By Sundrys brought from page (4) amounting to 76 17 IJ/2 

By moneys allowed to these accomptants by the Residuary Lega- 
atees for their time trouble and Expences in the Carrying on 
and managing the administracon of the Testator's Estate selling 
receiving and paying Z' : the Sum of 4 — — 

Itt. By moneys paid to Charles ffrench in full of his Legacy out of 
the Teftators Estate as appears pr. his Discharge for the same 
and is Voucher N° : (32) the Sum of 30 — — 

Itt. By moneys paid to Enoch ffenton in full of his Wive's Legacy out 
of the Testator's Estate, as appears pr. his Discharge for the 
same and is Voucher N° : (33) the sum of 30 — — 

Itt. By moneys paid to Joshua Woolfton in full of his Wive's Legacy 
out of the Teftator's Estate as appears pr. his discharge for the 
same and is Voucher N" : (34) the sum of 27 18 — 

Itt. By moneys paid to the Register on the Drawing and Stating of 
this account crediting and pafsing the Same and Quietus Est. Z' : 

the sum of 1 5 — 

Summa £170 — 5^ 

Ballance in thefe accomptant's hands for Samuel Wickward and 
Rachel Wickward two of the Legattees of the said Dece" : Six 
pounds Each to be paid them at the age of twenty one years 
without Int 12 00 00 



£182 — iy2 

A true Acco'. Pr. us 



172 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Be it Remembered that on the twenty ninth day of August in the year 
of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and thirty two Thomas ffrench 
and James Wills Executors of the laft Will & Teftament of John ffrench 
late of Northampton in the County of Burlington yeoman Dece" : Exhibited 
before me Samuel Buftill Deputy Register of and for the Western Divifion 
of the province of New Jersey the within account of their Administration 
of the goods and Chattels Rights and Credits of the said Deceased, 
together with the proper Vouchers, which acco*^ on Due confideration I 
have allowed of and approved and Caused to be filed in the office. In 
Teftimony — whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seal the twenty 
ninth Day of August af' : Anno Domini One thoufand seven hundred and 
thirty two 

Sam'. Bustill D Reg"' : 



WILL OF JOHN FRENCH, JR., 1729 

I John French Jun"" of Northampton In y'' County of Burlington & 
Western Division of y" Province of New Jerfey being very sick & weak 
In body but of sound & Perfect mind & memory Thanks be given to 
almighty God Therefore calling to mind y*" mortallity of my Body & 
Knowing that it is appointed for all men once to Dy Do make & ordain 
this my Last Will & Testiment utterly Revoking & annulling all other 
wills & Testaments by me heretofore made. 

And principally & first of all I Give & Recommend my soul Into the 
hands of God that Give & for my Body I Recommend to y"* Earth to 
be Buried In a Christian like Decent manner at y^ Discretion of my Execu- 
tor hereafter Named & as Touching such worldly Estate wherewith It hath 
pleased God to Blefs me with In This Life I Give Devise & Difpofe of y* 
same In y" following manner — 

Imprimis and first of all I order my funerall Charges & Just Debts to 
be paid by my Executer and as for y* Remaining Part of my Estate after 
my funeral Charges & Just Debts is paid I Give Devise & Dispose of them 
as followeth viz — 

Item I Give Devife & bequeath unto my oldest Brother Thomas French 
y*" sum of five Shillings current Lawfull money of y^ abovesaid province 
to be Paid by my Executer hereafter named 

Item I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my oldest Sister Rechall Fenton 
y" sum of five Shillings Current Lawfull money of y* above said province 
to be paid by my Executer hereafter named. 

Item I Give Devife & Bequeath unto my youngest Sister Ann French 
y" sum of five Pounds current Lawfull money of y" above said province 
to be paid by my Executer hereafter named 

Item I Give Devise & Bequeath unto my wellbeloved & Trusty friend 
and Brother Charles French whom I Likewise Nominate Constitute & 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



173 




9:^ 




73i 



•^Z^C^ 



ordain my whole & Sole Executer to this my Last will & Testament all 
my Estate In Goods Chatties & Credits what & wheresoever he my said 
Executer yeilding & Paying my funerall Charges & Just Debts & y" 
Legecies above bequeathed and I do hereby Rattifie & confirm this & no 
other to be my Last will & Testament as witnefs my hand & seal this 
Twentj' fourth Day of March anno qe Dominey one Thousand seven hun- 
dred & Twenty eight nine & In y" second j-ear of his majestic King George 
his Reign over Great Britton &c 1728/9 

Signed sealed Deliv- 
ered & Published pro- 
nounced & Declared 
by y* said John french 
as his Last will & 
Testament In the pres- — 

ence of us 

Abraham Marriott 

Jacob Lamb 

Thomas Dawson 

John Budd 
Con. Burlington fs Be it Remembered that on y"^ Tenth day of May 
Ano 1729 personally came & appeared before me Samuel Bustill D. Sur- 
rogate & Register of y"^ Western Division of }'* Province of New Jersey 
duly Commissioned &c Jacob Lamb one of the Witnesses In y"^ within 
Will subscribed who on his solemn affirmacon according to Law doth 
declare & affirm that He was present & Saw John fFrench y" Testator 
within named Sign & Seal & heard him Publish Pronounce & Declare 
y" within Instrument to be his Last Will cS: Testament & that at y^ doing 
thereof the Testator was of Sound mind memory & understanding to y" 
best of his Knowledge & belief & that at y" Same time also Abraham 
Marriott, Thomas Dawson, & John Budd y*" other Subscribing Evidences 
were present & Signed their Name as Wittnefses to y" same in y^ presence 
of y" Testator 

Jurat Coram me Jacob Lamb 

Sam' Bustill, D. Rg. 




^^m^ 




FIREPLACE BELLOWS, 1/30 



174 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



II 



10— SARAH FFRENCH (Thomas, 1). 

Baptized February 23rd, 1674, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, England, 
m. 2nd mo. 1st, 1695, Isaac Wood, son of Jonathan 
Wood, of Woodbury Creek, N. J. 



49— Mary Wood 



m. 9th mo. 8th, 1738, Hugh Clifton of Salem, 
N. J., at the house of Wm. Coate, Phila- 
delphia. 



- MEETING RECORDS 

Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At our Mens Monthly Meeting held at y* house of Elizabeth Gardeners 
the fourth of y" 12"" Mo*'' 1694 

Isaac Wood & Sarah ffrench declared their Intentions of marrige it 
being the first time of their Comeing to this meeting. 

At our mens monthly meeting held at the House of Eliz. Gardiner in 
Burlington y" P' of the Second mo. 1695 

Isaac Wood & Sarah ffrench came before this meeting to Declare their 
Intentions of marriage it being the Second time & the meeting find nothing 
to obstruct Enquiry being made they being found clear the Meeting thought 
fitt that they should Consumate the Same according to the Good order of 
Truth. 



11— MARY FFRENCH (Thomas, 1). 

Baptized August 8th, 1675, at Church S. S. 
Peter and Paul, Nether Heyford, England, 
d. 1728. 

m. 8th mo. 30th, 1695, Nicholas Buzby of Bur- 
lington County, N. J., son of John and Mary 
Buzby of Pennsylvania, formerly of Milton, 
England. 
He d. 6th mo. 28th, 1727, buried on the 29th. 



50— THOMAS BUZBY 
51_jOHN BUZBY 

52— ISAAC BUZBY 



m. 1727, Margaret Haines. 

m. 1731, Hannah Adams, 

d. 1754. 

m. Martha . 




5? 



O 

o 



O 




f 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



175 



53— WILLIAM BUZBY 

54— BENJAMIN BUZBY 
55— LYDIA BUZBY 
56— MARY BUZBY 
57— JANE BUZBY 
58— ELIZABETH BUZBY 
59— SARAH BUZBY 



b. 5th mo. 10th, 1714. 

m. 8th mo. 25th, 1739, Mary Wills. 



m. 1718, James Marson. Jf\.\ < 

m. Sth mo. 13th, 1729, John Swain. 

m. 1727, Jacob Burtsal. 

m. 1741, Samuel Wickward. 



As in so many other instances of early days, no record of the births of the children 
of Nicholas and Mary (French) Buzby appear in Meeting minutes. The marriage 
record is also incomplete. The order here followed is that given in the wills of both 
parents. 



NICHOLAS BUZBY 

Of the sons of John Buzby, English immigrant, who located in Philadel- 
phia about the time of Penn's arrival, none \Yas more industrious, energetic 
and successful than Nicholas, who, some time before his marriage to Mary 
French, in 1695, settled in Burlington county, as a farmer. He raised a 
family of ten children, becoming the progenitor of a great number of worthy 
and useful citizens. Many of his descendants reside in New Jersey today, 
while others are to be found throughout a wide territory. In 1714 he 
became possessed, through purchase from Charles French, his brother-in- 
law, of 250 acres of the original Thomas ffrench estate, near Rancocas. 
Half a century later this tract was included in the 300 acres sold to Gov. 
William Franklin, a part of which, as elsewhere noted, is now owned by 
Thomas T. Buzby [1689], a direct descendant of Nicholas. The Burling- 
ton county pioneer Buzby was a consistent Friend, a long-time member of 
Burlington Monthly Meeting, with his wife Mary, who survived him only a 
little more than one year. Many of his descendants likewise have been 
active and zealous Friends, one of these, Richard [894] of Willingborough, 
having been noted for his upright life and worthy example. 



176 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At our mens monthly meeting held at the house of Eliz. Gardiner in 
Burlington y" Z"" of y*^ 7'" mo. 1695— Nicholas Busby & Mary French 
declared their intentions of Marriage it being y* first time of their Coming 
they desire y" Consent of ffriends in it. 

At our Monthly Meeting held at the house of Eliz. Gardiner in Bur- 
lington y" 7'" of y*" 8'" Mo: 1695— Nicholas Busby and Mary ffrench 
declared their Intentions of marriage the Second time & upon Enquiry 
made find all Clear & Nothing to hinder or Impede the same they are 
Left to Consummate that weighty affair in a Convenient time & Place as 
they in the fear of the Lord Shall think fit. 

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas An Intention of marriage hath Been dewly published according 
to y** Lawes of This Province of West New Jersey in America And alsoe 
att severall of The meetings of y" people of God called quakers And nothing 
appearing to obstruct or hinder them. Now these are to Certifie whome 
it may concerne that the sd. Nicholas Busbey and Mary flfrench of y^ 
County Burlington did on y* SO*"* of y^ Eighth Month in y" Yeare 1695 
in a Solem Assembly of y* aforesd. People Take and declare themselves 
to be husband and Wife and in Testimony they subscribe there names 
and we allsoe as wittnesses being present. 

Nicholas Busbey 
Mary Busbey 



John Adams (Justice) 
Benj. Wheate 
John Siddon 
Thomas Stokes 
John ffletcher 
Daniel Hall 
Thomas Scattergood 
George Deacon 
William Pancoast 
John Paine 

Tho. P 

Tho. Scatergood 
Joseph Pancoast 
Richard Tomlinson 
Richard Mason 
John Woolman 



Thomas flfrench 
John Busbey 
John Busbey, Junr 
Edward Busbey 
Richard ffrench, 
Thomas ffrench 
Richard Busbey 
Charles French 
Isaac Woods 
John ffrench 
Sarah Busbey 
Mary Busbey 
Hanah Busbey 
Eliz. Adams 
Sarah Roberts 
Mary Wheats 



fathers 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



177 



WILL OF NICHOLAS BUZBY, 1727 

I Nicolas Buzby of Wellingborough in the County of Burlington and 
Province of New Jersey being fick and weak of body but of found and 
difpofing mind and memory do make this my laft Will and Teftament and 
do hereby difpofe of that outward eftate which it hath pleafed God to 
Intruft me withall in manner and form following Viz : Imprimis My 
Will is that all my juft debts and funerall Charges be duly paid and dis- 
charged as foon as may be after my deceafe. 

2*"^ I give and bequeath unto my Son Thomas Buzby forty fhillings 
lawfull money of America. 

31'y I give unto my Son John Buzby forty fhillings like money 
aforefaid. 

4"'"' I give unto my Son Ifaac Buzby forty fhillings like money 
aforefaid. 

5">iy I gjyg jjjjfQ jjjy gQj^ William Buzby forty fhillings like money 
aforefaid. 

^thiy J gj^,g yj^(.Q j^y gpjj Benjamin Buzby forty fhillings like money 

aforefaid. 

ytbiy J gj^,g unto my daughter Lydiah the wife of James Marfon forty 
fhillings like money aforefaid. 

8""y I give unto my daughter Mary Buzby forty fhillings like money 
aforefaid. 

9""^ I give unto my daughter Jane Buzby forty fhillings like money 
aforefaid. 

jO"ny I give unto my daughter Elizabeth Buzby forty fhillings like 
money aforefaid. 

ll*'"y I give unto my daughter Sarah Buzby forty fhillings like money 
aforefaid. 

Lastly all the refidue and remainder of my eftate both reall and per- 
fonall I give devife and bequeath unto my well beloved wife Mary Buzby 
and to her heirs and Afsignes for ever Alfo I do hereby appoint Conftitute 
and Ordain My faid Wife to be the fole Executrix of this my laft will 
and Teftament ordering her to pay all my debts and Legacies aforefaid 
and Impowering her to recieve all fuch debts that are juftly due and 
owing unto me In Witnefs whereof I have hereunto fet my hand and 
feal this twenty fecond day of the fixth Month 1727. 

Witnesses 



Jacob Burdsall 

his 
John X Marfon 

mark 
John Wills 

12 



TvS^^^^ 




178 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Probat William Burnet Esq"" Capt. General & Governour in Chief of 
y'' Provinces of New York New Jersey & y^ Territories Thereon depend- 
ing in America & Vice Admiral of y'' Same &c. To all To whom These 
Presents shall Come or may Concern Greeting Know yee That at Bur- 
lington in y" province of New Jersey y* first Day of October Anno Dom : 
one Thousand Seven hundred & Twenty Seven y^ last Will & Testa- 
ment of Nicholas Buzby Late of y" Township of Wellinborough yeoman 
Dece'' was proved before Samuel Bustill who is Thereto by me Author- 
ized & appointed for That Purpose & now Approved & Allowed of by me 
having while he Lived & at y^ Time of his Death Goods Chattels & Credits 
in divers places Within this Province by means whereof y^ full Disposition 
of all & Singular of The Goods Chattels & Credits of y" Said Dece'* & 
y* Granting Administration of Them also y* hearing of Account Calcu- 
lation or Reckoning & y* final Discharge & Dismifsion from y^ Same unto 
me Solely & not unto any other Inferiour Judge are Manifestly known To 
belong & y*" Administracon of all & Singular y"* Goods Chattels & Credits 
of y* said Dece'* & his Last Will & Testament in any manner of ways 
Concerning was Granted unto Mary Busby y'^ Executrix in y^ Said Last 
Will & Testament named chiefly of well & Truly Administring y^ Same 
& of making a True & perfect Inventory of all & Singular y* Goods 
Chattels & Credits of y* Said Dece** & Exhibiting y® Same into y' Registry 
of y*^ Prerogative Court in y® Secretarys Office at or before y^ Thirtyeth 
Day of March next ensuing & of Rendring a just & True Account when 
thereunto Required. 

In Testimony whereof I have Caused y^ Prerogative Seal of y^ Said 
Province of New Jersey To be hereunto Affixed at Burlington in y^ province 
of New Jersey Aforesaid The first Day of October in y^ first Year of his 
Majestys Reign Anno Dom: 1727. 

la. .Smith Secry — 

W^ILL OF MARY BUZBY, 1728 

I Mary Bufby of the Townlhip of Wellingborow in the County of Bur- 
lington in the prouince of Weft New Jerfy being sick of body but of sound 
and difpofing mind and memory doe make this my Laft will and Tefta- 
ment and doe hereby Difpofe of that outward Eftate which it hath pleafed 
God to Intruft me withall in maner and form foiling : viz' Imprimis my 
will is that all my Juft Debts and funarall Charges be duly pay"* and 
difcharged as soon as may be after my defceas 2'^'^. 1 give unto my son 
John Bufby six pounds LawfuU money of America. 

3'"''. I give unto my son Isack Bufby Six pounds lick money as aforefaid. 
4<"y I give unto my son William Busby six pounds alfo like money as 
aforefaid 5*"^ I give unto my son Bengman Bufby six pounds money 
as aforefaid. 6'^"'. I give unto my Dafter Lydia Marfon wife of James 
Marfon six pounds Like money as aforefaid. 



DESCENDx\NTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



179 



7'"^. I give unto my Dafter Mary Bufby six pounds money as afore- 
faid. 8'"''. I give unto my Dafter Jane Burfhall now wife of Jacob Bur- 
fhall six pounds lick money as aforefaid. 

9*^'-^'. I give unto my Dafter Elezabeth Bufby six pounds lick money 
as abouefaid. 

10*'-^'. I give unto my Dafter Sary Bufby six pounds Lick money as 
aforefaid, and if any of my fones fhould dye before they arive at y^ age 
of twenty years then their money fhall be Equaly devided among y® Reft 
and alfo if any of my Dafters fhould dye before they arive at y^ adge of 
Eighteen years then their money fhall be Equaly Devided amongst y^ Reft. 
and Laftly all y® Refidue of Remainder of my Eftate both Reaill and 
Parfonall I give Deuife and Bequeath unto my Son Thomas Bufby to hime 
and to his heirs and afsigns for euer. 

Alfo I doe hereby appoint Conftitute and ordain my said son Thomas 
Bufby to be my fole Executor of this my Laft Will and Teftament ordring 
him to pay all my Juft Debts, and Legafefs aforefaid giuen by me and 
impowering him to Receiue all fuch Debts that are Juftly due to me. In 
Witnefs whereof . I have hereunto fett my hand and feal this fift day of the 
tenth month called December 1728. 

Sealed figned and Declared in y'' 
sight and prefents of 
Thomas Reues 

mark Mary 

Nathan n Crofby 

his 
Hugh Sharp 



lark 



ni 



hir 



^,^iil^. 



Buzby 




Pro : New Jersey fs 

Be it Remembered that on the twenty first day of January Anno : Dom : 
One thousand Seven hundred and twenty Eight Pfonally came and appeared 
before me Samuel Bustill D. Surrogate and Register of the Weftern Divi- 
sion of the province of New Jersey duly Commifsioned and appointed Hugh 
Sharp Esq"". One of the Witnefses Subscribed to the within Will who being 
one of the people called Quakers on his Solemn affirmation according to 
law did declare and affirm that he was present and saw Mary Busby the 
Teftatrix in the within Will named sign and seal the same, and that he 
heard her publish pronounce and declare the within writing to be her laft 
Will and Teftament, and that at the doing thereof she the said Teftatrix 
was of sound mind, memory and understanding to the beft of his knowl- 
edge and belief, and that at the same time alfo Thomas Reves and Nathan 
Crosby the other two Subscribed Evidences were prefent and that they 
together with this affirmant did sign as Witnefses to the within Will in the 
prefence of the Testatrix — 

Affirmed before me Sam'. Bustill D: Reg"" : 



180 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Pro : New Jersey fs : 

Be it Remembered that on the day of the date above written personally 
came and appeared before me Samuel Bustill D. Register of the Weftern 
Division of the province of New Jersey duly Commifsioned and appointed 
Thomas Busby the Executor within named who being one of the people 
called Quakers On his Solemn Affirmation according to Law doth declare 
and Affirm, that the within writing contains the laft Will & Teftament of 
Mary Busby the Teftatrix within named as far as he knows and believes 
and that he will well and truly pform the same by paying first the Debts 
of the deceased and then the Legacys contained in the within Will so far 
forth as the goods Chattels and Credits of the said deceased will thereunto 
Extend or the Law will charge, and that he will make a true and perfect 
Inventory and alfo render a Juft account when thereunto required — 

Affirmed before me 

Sam' : Bustill D. Reg'. 

A true and perfict Inventory of the Goods and Chattels of Mary Bufby 
Late Widow of Nickles Bufby Defec'd of the Townfhip of Wellingborow 
in the County of Burlington in Weft New Jerfy as foUoweth 
Appraifed by us whofe names are under written. 

Total £97 7 6 
Hugh Sharp 
John Milborn 




ANCIENT CHAIR IN BURLINGTON MEETING HOUSE, I70O 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 181 

15— REBECCA FFRENCH (Thomas, 1), daughter of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Stanton) ffrench. 

b. 6th mo. 8th, 1697. 

m. 2nd mo. 3rd, 1729, Robert Murfin, son of 
William and Sarah (Bunting) Murfin. 
He b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1705. 
d. 1753. 

60— THOMAS MURFIN 

61— WILLIAM MURFIN 

62— JOHN MURFIN 

William Murfin was the son of Robert and Ann Murfin of the town of Eaton, Not- 
tinghamshire, England, who came to America in the ship " Shield," which arrived at 
Burlington, N. J., 10th mo., 1678, O. S. William was born 1st mo. 16th, 1681 ; died 
3rd mo. 3rd, 1742; married June 8-1704, in Chesterfield Meeting House, Sarah Bunting, 
daughter of John and Sarah Bunting. Sarah Bunting was born 8th mo. 3rd, 1686, and 
died 7th mo. 26th, 1762. 

SUMMARY OF INV. OF EST. OF ROBT. MURFIN, 1753 

Inventory of Goods & Chattels of Robart Murfin Decefed Appreafed by 
y' vnder fubfcribers this 13*" Day of y* 9'" Mo 1753 

Total £18 17 4 
Pre. Brown 
William Bunting. 

William Murfin the Admr — charges himself with £18 17 4 

To what Came to hand afterwards 1 7 2 



£20 4 6 



WILL OF SARAH MURFIN, 1754 

I Sarah Murfin of Notingham in the County of Burlington and Western 
Devision of New Jersey widow being in helth of body and of Sound mind 
and memory do make This my Last Will and Testament in form following 

First My Will is That all my Just Depts and funeral charges be paid 
and Discharged by my Executors hereafter named. 

Itam I give first in perticuler To my granson John Murfin Williams son 
my great Red Chist that was my son Josephs — 

I give to my grandaughter Ann Murfin my Black Trunk in perticuler. 

I give to my grandaughter Sarah Large my Best Bed and furniture be- 
longing to it and a pear of sheets and pillow cases besids and my warming 
pan and my wool wheel With all those things that are in the high chist 



182 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



of Drawers Which her father Left in perticuler for their use which Things 
their is a perticuler account Taken of to be kept. Also a Redish Trunk 
with child Lining in it to be devided betwixt her and her Sister Mary- 
Large : also my plush Side Saddle to be for the use of her and her Sister 
Mary Also my black walnut ouel Table I give to Sarah and big black 
chear. 

I give to my grandaughter Mary Large my Second Best Bed bolster an 
pillows and 2 pear of Sheets and pillow caises 2 Blankits and a coverlid 
and my Black wallnut low chist of Drawers and a Red Chist that was her 
Mothers with all the things that are in that chist There being an account 
taken of the perticulers To be kept Also 6 black chears and my Lining 
wheel and if in case one of them die before she arrive to the age of eighteen 
years that then the Surviver to have what was hers and if in case boath 
of them should die before they be eighteen years old then what they were 
to have had (if they have no child or children) then to be eqqualy devided 
amongst the rest of my gran children 

Also I give my wearing cloaths to my 3 grandaughters to be equely 
deuided amongst them 

The Rest of my Small Estate the one half I give to my son William and 
his son John and his daughter Ann Murfins and the other half to my other 
gran children Thomas William and John Murfins the children of my son 
Robert Murfin decesed 

Lastly I do constitute and appoint my Loving son William Murfin To be 
my Executor of This my Last will and Testament in Witness whereof I 
have hereunto Set my hand and Seal the first day of October one thousand 
Seven hundred and fifty fouer 1754 

Signed Sealed and acknowl- /^ ^ ^"ri«OT9K?i^ 

edged to be her Last will in 
the presence of us y_^ t,s^ 



^a^^oriA^^ 1*1 





^ 



c^u?y 



/^/^7>t/>2_ 



(J^fA Jo^^M^ 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 183 

A Teftimony from Chefterfield Monthly-Meeting in New-Jerfey, concern- 
ing Sarah Murfin. 

" This worthy woman was one whom it pleafed the Lord, to call out of 
the broad way and vanities of the world, and make acquainted with his 
bleffed truth ; and as She abode under the crofs, it pleafed the almighty 
to manifeft unto her, that She was a chofen veffel or inftrument for his 
Service, to preach the gofpel. She was fervent in prayer. Serviceable in 
vifiting families, and her godly example in life and converfation, great 
humility and Self-denial, much adorned her miniftry ; careful to bring up 
her family in the fear of the Lord, and in plainnefs of Speech and apparel ; 
being indeed a mother in Ifrael. 

" We fervently defire that the great Lord of the harveft, may be pleafed 
to continue to his church and people, a living miniftry ; and that many may 
be made willing to run his errands and be Serviceable in his hand, as was 
this our worthy friend, who departed this life, the 26th of the Seventh 
month 1762, aged about Seventy- Six years." 

AN EARLY ACCOUNT OF COLONIAL LIFE 

The following notice of the early settlement of Burlington by the English, commu- 
nicated to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania by John F. Watson, was copied from 
the original autograph of Mrs. Mary Smith, a Friend, who arrived with the primitive 
colonists, when she was only four years of age : 

Robert Murfin and Ann his wife, living in Nottingshamshire, England, 
had one daughter born there in the year 1674, the 24th of the 2d month, 
named Mary, (the writer of this account, who married the first Daniel 
Smith of Burlington). After that they had a son called Robert. [Born 
3rd mo. 24th, 1676.] 

Some time after it came in their minds to move themselves and family into 
West Jersey in America ; and in order thereto, they went to Hull and pro- 
vided provisions suitable for their necessary occasion, — such as fine flour, 
butter, cheese, with other suitable commodities in good store ; then took their 
passage in the good ship, the Shield of Stockton, with Mahlon Stacy, 
Thomas Lambert, and many more families of good repute and worth ; and 
in the voyage there were two died and two born ; so that they landed as 
many as they took on board. And after about sixteen weeks sailing or 
on board, they arrived at Burlington in the year 1678; this being the first 
ship that ever was known to come so high up the Delaware River. Then 
they landed and made some such dwellings as they could for the present 
time ; — some in caves, and others in palisade-houses secured. With that, 
the Indians, very numerous, but very civil, for the most part, brought corn 
and venison, and sold the English for such things as they needed; so that 
the said English had some new supply to help their old stock, which may 
well be attributed to the good hand of Providence, so to preserve and pro- 
vide in such a wildnerness. 



184 GENEALOGY OF THE 

I may not omit some English that came the year before, which landed 
lower down the river, and were gotten to Burlington, who came in some 
small vessels To Burlington before us, — and was consented to by the Indians. 

The first comers, with the others that came near that time, made an 
agreement with the Indians for their land, — being after this manner : — From 
the river to such and such creeks ; and was to be paid in goods, after this 
manner, say — so many match coats, guns, hatchets, hoes, kettles ; two full 
boxes, with other materials, all in number as agreed upon of both Indians 
and English. When these goods were gotten from England and the 
Indians paid, then the above-mentioned people surrendered some part of 
the land to settle themselves near the river — for they did not dare to go 
far from it at first. 

I must not forget, that these valiant subjects, both to God and their 
king, did buy their land in old England before they entered (upon this 
engagement,) and after all this, did submit themselves to mean living, 
taking it with thankfulness, mean and coarse; as pounding Indian corn 
one day for the next day ; for there was no mill, except some few steed- 
mills, and (we) thought so well of this kind of hard living, that I never 
heard them say, ' I would I had never come ! ' which is worth observing, 
considering how plentifully they lived in England. It seems no other than 
the hand of God, so to send them to prepare a place for the future genera- 
tions. I wish they that come after may consider these things, and not 
be like the children of Israel after they were settled in the land of Canaan, 
forgetting the God of their fathers and following their own vanities ; and 
so bring displeasure, instead of the blessings of God, upon themselves ; 
which fall and loss will be very great on all such. 

Now to return to Robert Murfin and his wife ; after they came into this 
land, they had one son called John [born 1679] ; and in the year 1681, 
they had another son called William ; and in the year 1684, they had a 
daughter called Johannah. Robert and John died young [1686]. 

It may be observed how God's providence made room for us in a won- 
derful manner in taking away the Indians. There came a distemper among 
them so mortal that they could not bury all the dead. Others went away, 
leaving their town. It was said that an old Indian king spoke prophet- 
ically before his death and said, " the English should increase and the 
Indians decrease." 
Mary Murfin and Daniel Smith were married 5th mo. 2nd, 1695, at the house of 
Francis Davenport. 




WARMING PAN, SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 185 

16— MATHEW ALLEN, JR. (Thomas, 1 ; Rachel, 4). 

b. 8th mo. 23rd, 1688. 

m. 1711, Grace Jones, daughter of John and 
Rebecca Jones of Pennsylvania. 
Sheb. 7th mo. 12th, 1693. 

63— MATHEW ALLEN, 3RD m. 1737, Martha Stokes, daughter of Joseph 

and Judith Stokes (Haddonfield Meeting 

record) . 
d. about 1760. 

64— JOHN ALLEN m. March 26th, 1744, Mary Butcher (Christ 

Church record), 
d. about 1753. 

64a— WILLIAM ALLEN m. 1st mo. 1745/6, Judith Stokes, daughter 

of Joseph Stokes (Haddonfield Meeting 
record). 

MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

14th of 3 Mo. 1711 Matthew Allin signified his intention of taking a 
young woman to wife which is a liver in Pensilvania and desired a certificate. 

13th of 6 Mo. 1711 Certificate granted to Matthew Allin in order for 
marriage. 
Abington Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

Mo-Meeting y" 27 : 6 m° 1711 

Whereas Mathew Allen of West Jerlie & Grace Jones having declared 
their Intentions of Marriage with each other before two Mo-Meetings 
Enquiry being made by perfons appointed found Clear from all others 
on y" account of Marriage Did accamplish their Marriage in y® Unity of 
Friends as is Signified by their Marriage Certificate. 

"TO BE SOLD" 



" A plantation, lying on Rancokus Creek, in Burlington Co, West Jersey, 
betwixt the New Ferry and the Mouth of the said creek, containing 400 
acres, SO Acres whereof being banked Meadow, Part improved, and Part 
to clear. 

The said Plantation hath on it a good Dwelling-house, Kitchen and 
Draw well. Orchard, and cleared Upland for a Settlement, about 50 acres, 
Any Person inclining to purchas the same, may see the land, and Con- 
veniences, and know the Terms and Title, by applying to Matthew Allen, 
living on the Premises." 
From "Pennsylvania Gazette," Feb. 1st, 1759. 



186 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Mathew Allen, 3rd [63] had daughter, Grace, born 10th mo. 6th, 1741; married, first, 
3rd mo. 17th, 1763, Ner. Eayre, son of Richard Eayre ; married, second, 1767, William 
Rogers, Jr., son of William Rogers. Also son, Enoch, who married 12th mo. 1st, 1774, 
Hannah Collins of Waterford Township, Gloucester Co., N. J., daughter of Samuel 
Collins (Haddonfield Meeting records). There is reason to believe that he also had sons 
Mathew, Anthony and Joseph, concerning whom detailed records are not available. 

17— MERCY ALLEN (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4). 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1692. 
d. 2nd mo. 17th, 1754. 

m. First, 1710, Thomas Middleton, Jr., son of 
Thomas Middleton of Springfield Township, 
Burlington Co., N. J. 
He d. 1724. 

m. Second, 10th mo. 2nd, 1730, John Hugg, Jr., 
son of John Hugg of Gloucester Co., N. J. 
He d. 1730. 

m. Third, 2nd mo. 19th, 1732, Thomas Lippin- 
cott, son of Freedom Lippincott of Willing- 
borough Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
He b. 10th mo. 28th, 1686. 
d. 9th mo. 5th, 1757. 

65— THOMAS MIDDLETOX, 3RD 

66— MATHEW MIDDLETON 

67— HUGH MIDDLETON 

68— HANNAH MIDDLETOX m. 1727, at Chesterfield Meeting, James Clark 

son of Benjamin Clark of Stony Brook, 
N. J. 

69— REBECCA MIDDLETON 

70— RACHEL MIDDLETON 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 187 

THOMAS MIDDLETON, JR. 

Thomas Middleton, Jr., who married Mercy Allen, was the eldest son of 
Thomas Middleton, who came from England about 1700 and settled upon 
a farm in Springfield Township, Burlington County, N. J., where he died 
in 1704, leaving five children, Thomas, John, Nathan, Naomi and Eliza- 
beth. The first named bought a house and lot in Burlington, on High 
Street, where he conducted business for himself during the next ten 3^ears 
after his marriage and until his health failed. During this time he bought 
additional property. Under his will his estate was left to the care of his 
widow and brother John, with special regard for the proper education and 
training of his six children. His brother John, through industry and econ- 
omy, became possessed of considerable property. The descendants of both 
have been numbered among the most respectable and useful citizens of Bur- 
lington County. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Month!}- Meeting Minutes : 

Att A m°ly m*g of women friends held at Newton y"' 13'" of 1^' mo. 
1709/10 

At s** m'g Tho. Midleton & Marcy AUin declard y^ intentions of mg y^ 
first time Esther Adams & Mary Hooten are o'"d'"d to make y* ufual inquiry 
to return y"" ace' to next m'g. 

Att A m°ly m'g of women friends held at Newton y" 8"" of 3 mo 1710 
Tho Midleton & Mercy Allin signified y* continuation of y'' intentions of 
m'"g, consent of parents apearing & return of inquiers clear y* m*g confents 
to y* accomplifhm' of y"" s** m'"g according to y* good o''d'' amongst friends 
Est^'d so. 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF THOMAS MIDDLETON, JR., 1724 

Thomas Middleton, Burlington Town & Co., N. J., Taj'lor, " weak ". 
Date, 2 mo (Aperill) 23rd, 1724 Proved, August 10- 1724 
Wife Mercy Rest of my estate to bring up children 

Children, eldest son, Thomas £25 ) , ,, . , „ 

, ,, , „.^ ' to be put to traides at suit- 
second son, Mathew £20 - , , 

TT , ^'.^ ^ ^ble age. 

youngest son, Hugh £20 j 

eldest daughter, Hannah £15 ) these legacies to be paid to 

second daughter, Rebeckah £15 - my sons when 21, to my 

youngest daughter, Rachall £15 i daughters when 18. 

Executors — Wife Mercy 

Brother John Middleton 



188 GENEALOGY OF THE 

" I give my Executors full authority to sell my lott and dwelling-house 
in y" Town of Burlington and my 20 acres of Town Bound Land purchased 
of Sam" Meriott" &c. 

Witnesses 

John Smith 
W"' Collum 





Tho: Scattergood w'/'c^* 

A True and Parfect Inventory of all and Singular the Goods and 
Chattils of Rights and Creaditts of Thomas Middleton of the Town of 
Burlington in the Prouence of Weft New Jarfey Taylor, Late Deceafed 
Taken at his houfe In Burlington aboue Said by Jonathan Louitt and Isaac 
Pearfon of the Same place, as far forth as Came to our Ands and Knowl- 
edge, Which is as ffolloweth ; 

Total £82—14 5 
The above Inventory taken by us the 22 Day of July 1724 
Ifaac Pearfon 
Jonathan Lovett 



JOHN HUGG, JR. 

In the early settlement of New Jersey the Hugg family had large landed 
possessions in Gloucester County, owning plantations along Timber Creek, 
where the Irish immigrant, John Hugg, who had suffered imprisonment as 
a Friend, located in 1683. He died in 1706, leaving two sons, John and 
Elias, both of whom became prominent and influential citizens of the same 
neighborhood. John, Jr., in 1688, married Priscilla, daughter of Francis 
Collins, by whom he had nine children, four daughters and five sons. His 
wife having died, he married Elizabeth Newbie, daughter of Mark Newbie, 
the Irish pioneer, in 1714. He was active in public life. For six years, from 
1695, he was one of the judges of Gloucester County. For twelve years, 
from 1718 to 1730, he was a member of the Executive Council, serving 
acceptably under Governors Hunter, Burnet and Montgomerie. From 1726 
to 1730 he was sheriff of Gloucester County. He served as one of the com- 
missioners to remove and locate the Indians, and performed this delicate 
duty with tact and success. He sold the Swedish settlement near the mouth 
of Raccoon Creek the ground for a church, the successor of which is the 
present Trinity Episcopal Church, at Swedesboro, erected in 1785. Late 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 189 

in the winter of 1730-1, shortly after his marriage to Mercy Middleton, he 
met with an almost tragic deatli. Riding from home in the morning, he was 
apparently taken ill about a mile from his house. Alighting from his horse, 
he spread his cloak on the ground to lie down on, and having put his gloves 
under the saddle girth and his whip through one of the rings, he turned the 
animal loose, which going home, put the family upon search, when he was 
found, speechless. They carried him to his house and he died that evening. 
Attempts to do violence to rulers always were severely condemned by the 
Quaker settlers in America. Upon one occasion, in 1697, the Quaker mem- 
bers of the Assembly of West Jersey and other leading citizens set forth 
their renewed loyalty to King William. Among the signers whose names 
were attached to this quaint paper were Francis Davenport, Thos. Gardiner, 
John Hugg, John Hugg, Jr., John Woolston, Mahlon Stacy and nearly two 
score others. This extraordinary " agreement to uphold the interests of the 
King" reads as follows: 

Wee the Subscribers to this present Instrument (being vnder y* Denomi- 
nation of Quakers) haveing vnderstood, that a Horrid Plott, and Con- 
spiracy, hath been contrived against ye person and Government of King 
William y® third, over England <S:c : which it hath pleased God, graciously 
to prevent ; by a timely Discovery thereof : as appears at large, by an Act 
of Parliament presented to vs at this time by our Governor, Andrew 
Hamilton : Recommending it as propper, for us after y" example of England 
&c : to Subscribe, to ye form an association in that Act Contained. Or at 
least ; that such of us whose Religiouse Principles will not suffer us to 
Subscribe in manner and form therein Expressed ; Should Answer y® Intent 
of it, by Subscribeing to a Declaration, of our fidelity, and Loyalty, to y* 
King and Government as now Established, which we willingly, and Chear- 
fully doe in manner following viz : 

Wee doe Sollemnly Promise and Declare, in y* presence of God, }'e 
witness of y" truth of what we say That we will alwayes be ifaithfuU to 
King William and vse all such Endeavors, as we can for y" preservation 
and Safety of his person and Government, and doe Utterly Abhorr, and 
Detest, all Traiterouse and Dissloyall practices, against our King and 
Government, and are thankfull to God, for his preservations Continued over 
his person ; and y" Realmes he Rules which we pray God long to Continue 
in peace and Safety. 



190 GENEALOGY OF THE 

MEETING RECORDS 

Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

Att our Monthly Meeting at Burlington the 5*" of 8'" month 1730 
John Hugg & Marcy Middleton appeared at this meeting and declared 

their intentions of marriage it being the first time. 

Att our Monthly Meeting at Burlington y* first of y* 9 Mo*" 1730. 

John Hugg and Marcy Middleton appeared att this meeting and 
declared they were of the same mind as att the last meeting on y*' account 
of marriage for which they were left to their liberty to solemnize their 
intentions when they shall see meete so it be orderly performed Sam"^" 
Woolman and Jonathan Wright are appointed to attend, and y* said John 
Hugg having first produced a certificate of his conversation and clearness 
to marriage first had which Jonathan Wright and Samuel Woolman are 
desired to make enquiry wether the said Marcy have performed her former 
Husbands will in relation to his children. 

Att our Monthly Meeting att Burlington y^ 7"' of y*" 10*" Month 1730. 

An account was given in to this meeting that the marriage of John Hugg 
& Marcy Middleton was orderly performed. The friends appointed to 
enquire wether the said Marcy had taken care to perform her former Hus- 
bands will report that the necessary care was taken. 

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas John Hugg of y"' Township and County of Glosester in the 
west division of New Jersey and Marcy Middleton of y® Town & County 
of Burlington and division aforesaid, widdow, Having declared their Inten- 
tions of marriage with each other before several Monthly Meetings of the 
People called Quakers at Burlington, in said West division of New Jersey, 
aforesaid, according to y* good order used amongst them, and haveing 
concent of Parents and Relations concearned their proposal of Marriage 
was allowed of by the said Meetings. 

Now these are to Certifie whome it may concearne that for the full accom- 
plishing of their said intentions this second day of the tenth month in 
y* year of our lord according to English Account one thousand seven hun- 
dred and thirty. They y^ said John Hugg and Marcy Middleton appeared 
at a publick Meeting of y" aforesaid People and others Met togather at 
their publick Meeting House in the Township of Northamton and County 
of Burlington Aforesaid near Rancokas, alias Northamton River, And the 
said John Hugg taking the said Marcy Middleton by the hand did in a 
solemn manner openly declare that he took her the said Marcy Middleton 
to be his wife promising by divine assistance to be unto her a loving & 
faithful Husband until death shall seperate them and then & there in the 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



191 



said assembly the said Marcy Middleton did in like manner declare that 
she took y" said John Hugg to be her Husband promising by divine assist- 
ance to be unto him a faithful and loving wife until death shall seperate 
them. And moreover they the said John Hugg and Marcy Middleton 
she according to y" custom of marriage assuming the name of her Husband 
as a farther confirmation did then and there to these presents set their 
hands. 

And wee whose names are hereunto subscribed being present amongst 
others att the solemnization of said Marriage and subscription have as wit- 
nesses thereunto set their hands the day & year above written 1730. 

John Hugg 
Mercy Hugg. 



John Wills 
John Stoaks 
Isaac Connaro 
Tho'. Scattergood 



Elizabeth Wills 
Susanna ffearon 
Elizabeth Wills, Jun 
Rebeckah Wills 
Jane Greene 
Ellen Connarro 



Rachel Sharp 
Mary Stockton 
William Ellis 
Lawrence Houghton 
Josiah Kay 
Hannah Albertson 
John Hugg, Jun"" 
Ann Harrison 
Kathrian Ellis 
Thomas Allen 
Thomas Busby 
Rebecca Middleton 
INIargret Busby 



Minutes of Burlington Monthly Meeting of W^omen Friends: 

Att our womens Monthly Meeting held att our Meeting House in Bur- 
lington the 4'" day of the 11*'' Mo. 1730 

Mercy Hugg made application for a certificate on account of her removal 
to Haddonfield Monthly Meeting. 

Att our Women's Monthly Meeting held att our Meeting House in Bur- 
lington the first day of y^ 12 Mo. 1730. 

A certificate for Mercy Hugg was signed in this Meeting. 



Att our Women's Monthly Meeting held at our Meeting House in Bur- 
lington the 3'' day of y*= 3 Mo. 1731. 

The certificate which was given to Mercy Hugg was returned and made 
no use of by reason of the demise of her husband and her sudden return- 
ing back. 



192 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



SUMMARY OF WILL OF JOHN HUGO, JR., 1722 

John Hugg, Gloucester Township and County, West New Jerse}-, " sick 
and weak ". 
Date, 2nd mo. 7th 1722 Proved, March 23* 1730 

My mulatto girl Dina (born of Negro Sue y' will belong 
to Daughter Mary when shee is 21, by virtue of my 
Wife Elizabeth "i ffather's Last will) her life and to be disposed of to my 
Daughter Hannah or Sarah Hugg as she shall think 
propper. 



I 



Children 



Joseph 



Gabriel 



' The tract of land where I now live. Joseph y" lower 
part whereon improvements are made, 140 acres with y^ 
Island I bought of John Ladd to be bounded north by 
my brother Elias, &.C., and y* 60 acres Lying in Town 
bounds of Gloucester I bought of Edward Smout. 200 
acres to son Gabriel. 



C Equal share of tract of land I bought of Joseph Pigeon 
J also the neck of land where Joseph Edwards now 
(_ liveth, &c. 



Jacob 



My tract adjoyning John Richards below Great Mantoe 
Creek together with y'" Reversions off my Proprietary 
Rites Excepting any overplus in any of y^ tracts all 
ready taken up provided there is no want in regard to 
- what is assigned to y" Paying off my just Debts 



My wife Elizabeth to spare what she can to my two Daughters Prifsilla 
Ayres and Hannah Hugg. 

My Executrix has power to sell that tract of Land on which Patrick 
Flamingham fformerly lived, which I purchased of W'" White, she to make 
conveyances in order to pay my just debts. 

Executrix, my wife Elizabeth 

Witnesses, W" Eddinfield W his mark 

his /7 /) /Tt ^ OiJ^<. 

W" X Grow 

mark 
Tho' Sharp '■*' C*''^ '^J^jt?^'^ 

Inventory taken March 24, 1731 £339—18—0 

Jn° Hinchman 
Isaac Jennings 




Appraisors 



I 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 193 

RENUNCIATION OF MARCY HUGO, 1730/1 
of right to administer the estate of her late husband, John Hugg, Jr. 

Know all men by thefe p'"sents That I Marcy Hugg widow & Relict of 
John Hugg Late of the County of Gloucester in the province of New Jerfey 
Esq'' deced for divers good Causes and Consideracons me thereunto moveing 
Have Renounced and disclaimed and by these presents Do Renounce and 
Disclaim all the Right Title & Interest w*^" I have or may have or Claim 
of in & to the Administracon of the Eftate of the s* Deced' John Hugg 
my Late husband, Saveing unto me my Right of Dower, or thirds out of 
the s"^ Deced'^ Estate, willing that the Adm° of the s" Deced'^ Estate be 
Granted to such pson or psons as the Judge or proper officer thereunto 
appointed & authorized in the s** province shall think fitt. In Witnefs 
whereof I have hereunto Sett my hand and Seal y^ nineteenth day of 
March A" Dno 1730/1 

Signed and Sealed her 

In presence of us Marcy m Hugg 

Sam' Sharp mark 

Sam' Bustill. 

ADMINISTRATION BOND OF GABRIEL HUGG, 1731 

Know all men by thefe presents That we Gabriel Hugg, and William 
Harrison both of the County of Gloucester, in the province of New Jersey 
Gen' are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency John Montgomerie 
Esquire Governour of the provinces of New York and New Jersey &c. 
in the Just and full sum of Six hundred pounds of good and LawfuU 
money of America to be paid unto the said Governour or to his Succefsours 
or afsigns To the which payment well and truly to be made and performed 
we bind our Selves our heirs Executors and Administrators, Joyntly and 
Severaly firmly by thefe presents. Sealed with our Seals and dated this 
Seveenth day of April Anno Dom One thousand Seven hundred and thirty 
one. 

The Condition of this above Obligation is Such That Whereas John 
Hugg late of the County of Gloucefter af* Esq'' Dece** left behind him 
his laft Will and Teftament in writing bearing date the Seventh day of 
the Second Month in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred 
and twenty two and thereby appointed Elizabeth Hugg Sole Executrix of 
the said laft Will and Teftament, who Died before the said Teftator and 
the above bounden Gabriel Hugg being one of the Sons of the said Teftator 
in order to take care of the said Testator's Estate hath prayed that Letters 
of Administration of the said Teftators Estate with the said Will annexed 
may be granted to him for the ufes in the said Will mentioned And 
13 



194 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Whereas the said Will hath been lately proved in due form of Law by 
the Witnefses to the said Will, And the said Gabriel Hugg in Order to 
take care of the said Testators Estate having obtained Letters of Adminis- 
tration of the s" Testator's Estate. Now if the above bounden Gabriel 
Hugg Administrator af" do make or Caufe to be made a true and perfect 
Inventory of all and Singular the goods Chattels and Credits of the said 
Dece'' which have or Shall come to the hands pofsefsion or knowledge of 
him the said Gabriel Hugg or into the hands of any other person or per- 
sons for his ufe, and the same so made. Shall Exhibit or cause to be 
Exhibited into the Registery of the prerogative Court in the Secretary's 
office at Burlington at or before the seventeenth day of June now next 
Ensuing And the Same Goods Chattels and Credits of the said Deceased 
at the time of his Death or which at any time after shall come to the 
hands or Pofsefsion of the Said Gabriel Hugg, or unto the hands or Pofsef- 
sion of any other person or persons for his ufe do well and truly administer 
according to Law and to the uses and intents in the said Will mentioned 
and declared and shall alfo make or caufe to be made a Just and true 
acco* of the Said Administration at or before the Seventeenth day of June 
which will be in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and 
thirty two. Then this obligation to be void and of none Effect or Elfe to 
be and remain in full force and virtue. 

Sealed and Delivered Gabriel Hugg [Seal] 

In the presence of us W"' Harrilon [Seal] 

Jn" Hinchman 

Sam' BustiU 



THOMAS LIPPINCOTT 

Thomas Lippincott, the son of Freedom and Mary Lippincott, of Ran- 
cocas, N. J., married, 9 mo. 1711, Mary, daughter of John and Esther 
Haines, of Evesham Township, and settled upon a tract of about 1,000 
acres in Chester Township, purchased of the executors of Gov. Samuel Jen- 
nings, in 1711, for one hundred and seventy-six pounds. This estate ex- 
tended from Pensaukin Creek to Swedes run and covered the site of the 
present village of Westfield. Thomas Lippincott was an industrious and 
useful citizen, frequently holding a place in the township government. In 
1715 he was overseer of highways; 1717 and 1722, overseer of the poor; 
1720, constable; 1725-26, county collector; 1738, surveyor of highways. 
Town meetings were held at his house from 1743 until 1754. His second 
wife, Mercy (Allen) Middleton Hugg, was very active in Haddonfield 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 195 



Meeting for a number of years. After her death, in 1754, he married Rachel 
Smith, widow, of Mt. Holly, a noted minister in the Society of Friends. 
Concerning her the Mt. Holly Monthly Meeting gave the following 
testimony : 

She was an exemplary, sjmpathizing friend. Her testimonj' in public 
meetings was short, yet savory and seasonable. In her last painful illness 
she expressed herself in this wise : " Oh ! if it be Thy will, dear Father, grant 
me patience to bear all that Thou in Thy wisdom may see meet to afflict me 
with." To a friend present she said : " Oh ! that love may increase and 
abound in this day of outward trials, and faithfulness be kept to, is my 
sincere desire. My trials through life have been many; but blessed be the 
Lord's holy name ; when He has appeared all darkness has vanished." She 
departed this life Q'" M. 29'\ 177Q, aged 80 years. 

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas Thomas Lipfincott of y* Township of Chester in y^ County 
of Burlington in the West Division of New Jersey in America and Marcy 
Hugg late of y" County of Glofsester but now of y^ County of Burlington 
& Division aforesaid Widdow Having declared their Intentions of Mar- 
riage with each other before several Monthly Meetings of y*^ People called 
Quakers at Burling*"" in said West Division of New Jersey Aforesaid 
according to the good order Ufed amongst them and having Consent of 
Parents and friends and Relations Concearned their proposal of Marriage 
was Allowed by the said Meetings 

Now THESE ARE TO Certifie whome it may Concearne y' for y^ full 
accomplishing of their said Intentions this nineteenth day of y* Stcond 
Month in y" year of our Lord according to English account one thousand 
Seven hundred and thirty two they the said Thomas Lippincott and Marcy 
Hugg appeared at a publick Meeting of y^ aforesaid people and others 
Met togather at their publick Meeting houfe in y* township of Northamton 
& County of Burlington afore said near rancoker alias Northamton River 
And the said Tho^ Lippincott taking y" said Marcy Hugg by y® hand did 
in a Solemn Manner Openly Declare that he took her the said Marcy 
Hugg to be his Wife promifsing by Divine Afsistance to be unto her a 
loving and faithfuU Hufband until death shall separate them And then 
and there in the said Afsembly the said Marcy Hugg did in like manner 
declare that she took y'^ said Thomas Lippincott to be her Husband prom- 
ifsing by Divine Afsistance to be unto him a faithfull and Loving Wife 
until death shall separate them And MoREO^■ER they the said Thomas Lip- 
pincott and Marcy Hugg shee according to the Custom of Marriage afsum- 
ing the name of her present Husband as a farther Confirmation thereof 



196 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



did then and there to these presents set their hands And Wee vvhofe 
names are here under alfo subscribed being present at the solemnization of 
said Marriage and subfcription have as Witnefses thereunto set our hands 
the day and year above Written 1732: 

Thomas Lippincott 
Marcy m Lippincott 
her mark 



Nathaniel Lippincott 
Thomas Middleton 

Jarriott 

Peter Fearon 
Samuel Woolman 
Jo° Hollinfhead 
Tho Scattergood 
John Watson 
John Stoaks 
John Green 
Edward Mellon 



Mary Hooton 
Joseph Stoaks 
Thomas ffrench 
Thomas Buzby 
John Wills 
Joseph HoUinshead 
Eliz: Wills 
Elizabeth Woolman 
Jane Green 
Rebeckah Middleton 
Sarah Hollinfhead 



Hugh Sharp 
Rachel Sharp 
Sam Lippincott 
Freedom Lippincott 
William Coate 
Caleb Haines 
John Wills 
Richard ffrench 
Elizabeth Lippincott 
Sarah Haines 
Thomas Hooton 



SUMMARY OF WILL OF THOMAS LIPPINCOTT, 1755 

Thomas Lippincott, Chester, Burlington Co., Colony of West N. Jersey, 
yeoman. 

Date, 5 mo. 23" 1755 Proved at Burlington, Oct. 7 1757 

To Son Isaac All my land Scittuate on Swead run. Beginning on S. side 
thereof in Joseph Stokes' Line ; thence from the said run 
by said Stokes' Line to his first corner, thence to the nearest 
Corner of Clifton's Land ; thence by the head Line thereof 
to the head line of Samuel Davis' Land ; thence by same 
to the head Line of the Other Lotts till it Comes to the 
Lower Corner of my Land thence of a Line of marked trees 
to the aforesaid Sweeds run thence up the same to the place 
of beginning unto my s** Son Isaac During his natural Life 
and after his Decease unto my said son Isaac's son being 
Grandson Thomas Lippincott and to his male heirs & in 
default of such issue to the use & behoof of the second, 
third, fourth, fifth, si.xth, seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth 
son and sons of said Thos. Lippincott Junr Succefsively one 
after the other. Also to son Isaac 150 acres Scittuate on 
pensaukin Creek, Beginning by s* Creek in Henry Warrin- 
ton's Line, thence by same 80 chains ; thence at Right Angle 
10 chains ; thence the Course down the said Creeke to make 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



197 



the full quantity of 150 acres — to son Isaac his life then 
to his son my grandson Isaac Lippincott and to his male 
heirs in manner from age to age as described in first men- 
tioned tract. Also £10 in twelve months after my decease. 

To Son Nathaniel Rest of my land where I now dwell during his life, then 
to his son my Grandson John Lippincott and to his male 
heirs, as above described. Also to son Nathaniel £10 in 
twelve months after my decease. 

To three daughters Abigail £30 "\ 

Esther £30 > in twelve months after my decease 
Mary £75 j 

Grandchildren Mary Wills £25 ^ 

Hope Wills £25 v in twelve months after my decease 

Meribah Ruddero £10 ^ 
Daniel Wills £20 when of age 

Phebe Lippincott, daughter of deceased son Thomas £100 
when sixteen 

■J daughters of my deceased daughter Pa- 
Hannah Andrews I . . , , „,_ , . , ^ 

. , V tience Andrews, each £25 when eighteen 

Pheby Andrews i . , 

J or married. 

Daughter-in-law Rebecca Middleton £15 for services done for me. 



Executors — Sons Nathaniel Lippincott 
Isaac Lippincott 



y^^/^^^^'^^^^^'i^^ (XTii- 




Witnesses — Arthur Borradail 
John Matlack 
Samuel Atkinson 



Inventory taken September 24, 1757 
Josa. Humphris 



John Cox 



£568—0—6 



Appraisers 



198 GENEALOGY OF THE 

IS— MARY ALLEN (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4). 

b. 8th mo. 23rd, 1695. 
m. First, J arves Stockdell. 
He d. October, 1726. 

m. Second, 5th mo. 15th, 1741, John Mickle of 
" Glosester Co." ; at house of Hugh Sharp in 
Willingborough Township, Burlington Co., 
N.J. 
He d. 1744. 

71— RUTH STOCKDELL m. December 31st, 1735, John Small. 

72— HANNAH STOCKDELL b. 1718. 

m. 1743, John Stokes, Jr. 
73— DARKES STOCKDELL 

74— RACHEL STOCKDELL m. 1739, William Wood. 

75- PRUDENCE STOCKDELL 

. JARVES STOCKDELL 

Among the younger men active in Friends' Society of his time, Jarves 
Stockdell held a leading place. He is supposed to have been the son of 
William Stockdale, a noted citizen of Pennsylvania, who Avas for a time a 
member of the Assembly, and also a minister in the Society of Friends. 
Jarves Stockdell resided in Evesham Township and frequently represented 
at superior meetings the meeting early established in that township. In 
Haddonfield Quarterly minutes he is referred to as "a lively minister and 
exemplary in his deportment." His marriage with the step-daughter of 
Hugh Sharp brought him into relationship with an influential family. By 
his will proved October 27th, 1726, he bequeathed "unto my Dear and 
Loueing Wife Mary Stocdell all my Land and Plantation I now live upon 
with all my Improuments and alfo to my Trusty & Well beloued fifather-in- 
Law Hugh Sharp alfo all that my Land and plantation with the Improv- 
ments to them and their heirs for Ever and to Sell all or part of the same 
for the ufefs hereafter meneced." His movable estate was given to his 
wife, she to pay his just debts, and the rest for bringing up the children and 
paying legacies, each daughter to receive twenty pounds. The personal 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 199 

inventory included " a prentes boy and two bound servant boys." He de- 
parted this life at a comparatively early age, highly regarded throughout 
a large circle. In Thomas Chalkley's "Journal" we find the following: 

" First day morning (7 mo. 1726) I went to Evesham, New Jersey, to 
the burial of our serviceable friend Jervice Stockdale ; he being in good 
esteem there was much people. The meeting was in a good tender frame 
and continued several hours in which divers testimonies were delivered, in 
order to stir up people to truth and righteousness and godly living that 
they might die well." 



JoATH^k^JC 



SIGNATURE TO WILL, 1 726 

This name is variously spelled in different records; herein the clearly defined autograph 
of Jarves Stockdell is followed. 

INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF JARVES STOCKDELL, 1726 

October 14'" 1726 

A true Inventory of the Goods and Chattells of Garues Stockdel late of 
Euefham in y"* County of Burlington in Weft Jerfy deed as followeth 

£ S d 

to Purf s & Apparel 1 5 — 6 — 5 

to Cow kine one pare of oxen one Bull in all 16 34 — — 

to Horfs 3 & one mare 16 — — 

to IS Sheep 04 — 0— 

to 35 hogs and Shoots 11 — 15 — 

to Corn in y^ Stack wheat & Ryy 03—00—00 

to Corn in y* ground 02—10—00 

to 2 Loomes and Taklen with warping Bars and 2 Weels 11 — 03 — 06 

to Ingen Corn 05—00—00 

to y^ Beft Bed and furniture 10—00—00 

to two Beds more and furniture 06 — 00 — 00 

to two lorn pots one brace Cettel some puter fire shouel .... 01 — 18 — 00 
to one Cheft one Box Six chairs a Remnant of new Cloth... 02 — 00 — 00 
to one mans Sadel one wooman fadel woofted & wooU & bridels 04 — 10 — 00 

to milk vefells and Chees 04 — 00-00 

to A Cart & plow & other working Tools 06—00—00 

to one Tabel one Dow trouff & other Lumber 01 — 10 — 00 

to one Bibel one Littel wheel and other things 01 — 10 — 00 

to one prentes Boy and two bound Saruants Boys 15 — 00 — 00 

to ftacks of hay in y^ Meddow 10-00 — 00 

165—02—11 



200 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Pro : New Jersey fs 

This Twenty first day of October Anno : Dom : one thousand Seven 
hundred and Twenty Six pfonally came and appeared before me Samuel 
Bustill D. Surrogate and Register of the Weftern Division of the province 
of New Jersey, Mary Stockdell and Hugh Sharp the Executrix & Executor 
of the laft Will and Testament of Jarves Stockdell dece'' they being of the 
people called Quakers, On their Solemn affirmation according to Law do 
declare Testifie and affirm that the above written containf a True and 
perfect Inventory of all and Singular the Goods Chattels and Credits of 
the said Deceased, So far forth as hath come to their knowledge pofsefsion 
or view or to the view, pofsefsion or knowledge of any other pfon for their 
ufe and that they brough every thing to the view of the appraisers. 

Affirmed her 

Coram me Mary m Stockdell 

Sam' Bustill mark 

Hugh Sharp 



JOHN MICKLE 

John Mickle, who married Mary (Allen) Stockdell, in 1741, was a grand- 
son of the progenitor of his family in America, Archibald Mickle, an Irish 
Quaker, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1682, and later located in Newton 
Township, Gloucester County, West Jersey, and who had ten children. 
John Mickle became a prosperous pioneer farmer and large land owner and 
his will, proved December 13, 1744, shows an estate of considerable size for 
those days, including several houses, over 600 acres of land, half a dozen 
negroes, who were to be freed at forty years of age ; and other personal 
property. His wife Mary was given " One hundred pounds and all that 
was hers before marriage, in lieu of dower." His landed estate was divided 
among his children by a former marriage, sons William, John and Samuel, 
daughter Hannah Ladd and grandson John, with ten pounds each to two 
other grand children. His inventory showed personal property to the 
amount of six hundred and twenty-three pounds. 



SIGNATURE TO WILL, 1 744 




SYCAMORE AND WALNUT TREES, GLOUCESTER, N. J., OVER 250 YEARS OLD 

Under these trees members of tlie Council of Proprietors for Gloucester County have met 
annually since organization in 1687. Owing to decay, the sycamore tree was removed in 1906. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 201 



20— HANNAH SHARP (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4). 

b. about 1707. 
d. 1770. 

m. 8th mo. 29th, 1724, John Breintnall, son of 
David and Jane (Blanchard) Breintnall of 
Philadelphia. 
He d. 1747. 

76— RACHEL BREINTNALL m. 9th mo. 26th, 1747, Jonathan Lewis. 

77— REBECCA BREINTNALL m. July 5th, 1751, Edward Weyman. 

78— ELIZABETH BREINTNALL m. Ackley. 

79— MARTHA BREINTNALL m. May 11th, 1752, James Lowther. 

80— LETITIA BREINTNALL m. Tillyer. 

81— HANNAH BREINTNALL m. Mihier. 

Jane Blanchard, born in England in 1656, came to Philadelphia in 1682, and m. 10th 
mo. 6th, 1683, David Breintnall. She became a member of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting 
of Friends, being particularly active in the affairs of discipline. She was spoken of in 
the records of the time as an "improving woman." About 1700 she began a ministry 
which was continued until a short time before her death, 6th mo. 25th, 1725. David 
Breintnall d. about 1730. Their son, John Breintnall, m. first, 1717, Susannah Shoe- 
maker, daughter of Jacob and Margaret Shoemaker. Susannah d. 1719 and left two 
children, David and Mary. Mary Breintnall m. 1742, Thomas Kite; they had children: 
Susannah, m. John Burden; Deborah, m. Stephen Phipps ; Joseph, m. 1784, Susannah 
Letchworth ; John ; Benjamin, m. Rebecca Walton ; Elizabeth, m. John Letchworth. John 
Breintnall m., second, Hannah Sharp [20]. 

WILL OF JOHN BREINTNALL, 1747 

I John Breintnall of the City of Philadelphia being weak of Body but 
through the Goodness of God of sound mind and memory do make Pub- 
lish and declare this my Last Will and Testament in manner following That 
is to say First I give devise and bequeath to my six youngest Daughters 
viz Rachel, Rebekah, Elizabeth, Martha, Letitia and Hannah Forty Foot 
apiece ffronting the alley lying — Between me and Joseph Howell and to 
Extend from the said alley the utmost extent of my Ground Westward To 
hold to them my said Daughters severally and respectively their Heirs and 
afsigns forever and my mind is that the youngest of my Daughters allot- 
ment shall be the remotest from Chestnut Street and the next youngest 
allotment next the youngest and So in that Order according to Each 
Daughters age the minor Daughters being remotest from the street As 



202 GENEALOGYOFTHE 



concerning my Eldest Son David Brintnall towards whom I have here- 
tofore acted the Part of a Tender ffather I do hereby give unto him the 
sum of one Shilling and no more in full of his part of my Estate And 
as for and concerning all the rest and residue of my Mefsuage Lot Tene- 
ments & Hereditamts with Appurtenances Goods Chattels Effects and Estate 
Real and Personal whatsoever or wheresoever I do give devise and bequeath 
the same unto my Dear and Loving Wife Hannah Breintnall in ffee simple 
she paying my just Debts and ifuneral Expenses — I do think my mefsuage 
with the Ground & appurtenances in the pofsefsion of Joseph Styles my 
under tenant the most saleable and fittest for my Wife to part with. There- 
fore I recommend it as most proper to be sold (if need be) before any 
other part of my Estate and I do Nominate her my said Dear wife Hannah 
Breintnall to be the sole Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament 
and I do request my Loving ifriend Joseph Scattergood of Burlington in 
West New Jersey to afsift my said Executrix with his Council as she shall 
have occasion — And I do declare this my Last Will and Testament hereby 
revoking all others in Witnefs whereof I the said John Breintnall have 
set my Hand and seal hereunto the fifth Day of June in the yeare One 
Thousand seven hundred and fortv seven. 




&c^^v/ncc/^ 




Signed sealed Published «S; Declared by the above named John Breintnall 
for his Last Will and Testament in the presence of us who have hereunto 
subscribed our names in his presence and at his request — Plunkit Fleefon 
Anthony Benezet & William Saver}' 

Approved July 1, 1747 

SUMMARY OF INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN BREINTNALL. 

Wearing Apparrell & Watch 22 " " 

Shop Goods LSI " 8 '• 

Cash 14 " » 

Household Goods 198 " 15 " 

In the Store 13 " " 

In the Yard 23 " " 

the lease of the Pasture Ground 30 " " 

the 2 Houses & Lotts 800 " " 

£1282^' 3 " 



Plunket Freefon 

Joseph Howell > Appraisers, Aug. 6"' 1747 



P>enj'' Peters ) 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



203 



The will of Hannah Breintnall, dated June 24th, 1769, and proved August 27th, 1770, 
provided for the sale of her " messuage lands &c. in Pennsylvania " and the distribution 
of the money arising therefrom in six equal parts to her daughters, Rachel Lewis, 
Rebecca Weymer, Elizabeth Ackley, Martha Lowther, " Laetitia Tillier," and " Anne 
Milnor." In the case of Elizabeth Ackley it was specially directed that her share of 
the estate should be held in trust for her during her husband's life, and at her death to 
go to her children, sons when 21, daughters when 18. " Friend Thomas Say of Phila- 
delphia," Executor. 

21— REBECCA SHARP (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4). 

111. First, 2nd mo. 26th, 1727, William Coate, sou 
of Marmaduke and Ann (Pole) Coate. 
He d. 1749. 

m. Second, 1754, Joseph Lippmcott. 
He d. 1779. 
She d. 1781. 



82— ANNA COATE 



m. Samuel Atkinson. 



83— MARMADUKE COATE 



m. 1747, Sarah Matthis 



84— WILLIAM COATE, JR. 



85— ISRAEL COATE 



86— BARZILLAI COATE 



m. 4th mo. 13th, 1768, Elizabeth Stokes. 



87— HANNAH COATE 



m. 10th mo. 24th, 1751, William West of 
Mount Holly, N. J. 



88— RACHEL COATE 



b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1737. 
d. 6th mo. nth, 1797 

m. 1770, Joseph Burr of Hanover Township, 
Burlington Co., N. J. 



89— MARY COATE 



b. 3rd mo. 16th, 1739 
m. 1761, Joseph Ridgway. 



90— BEULAH COATE 



m. 3rd mo. 30th, 1763, John Ridgway. 



91— EDITH COATE 



204 GENEALOGY OF THE 

22— ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5). 

b. 1694. 

m. William Scholey, son of Robert and Sarah 
Scholey. 
92— ROBERT SCHOLEY b. 6th mo. 9th, 1718. 

93— SARAH SCHOLEY b. 10th mo. 4th, 1720. 

94— RICHARD SCHOLEY b. 1st mo. 22nd, 1723/4. 

95— THOMAS SCHOLEY b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1725. 

The Scholey family, from Yorkshire, England, were among the earliest settlers of 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. They were noted as prosperous and influential citizens, 
large land owners, active in business and religious affairs. Thomas and Robert were 
among the company of home seekers who settled in the vicinity of Burlington, 1677 and 
1678; Thomas coming in the flie-boat "Martha," and Robert in the "Shield." About 
1679, a large tract of land was taken up on the west side of the Delaware, near the falls 
(later the township of Falls, Bucks Co., Pa.), and the settlement named Crewcorne, 
after a town in Somersetshire, Eng. Thomas and Robert Scholey held several hundred 
acres. Pioneer troubles came quickly, and on April 12, 1680, an earnest petition was 
addressed to Governor Andros, Thomas and Robert being among the signers, asking that 
the inhabitants of the little colony be protected from the peril and suffering resulting 
from the sale of liquor to the Indians. Apparently more favorably impressed with the 
opportunities of West Jersey, Thomas and Robert Scholey located between 1680 and 
1685 in Burlington County, where they bought several large tracts in Mansfield, Spring- 
field and Chesterfield townships. A minute of Chesterfield Mo. Meeting, 7th mo. 2nd, 
1686, shows the kindly sentiment of the community: "Whereas this Meeting is made 
Aquainted that Robert Scholey hath Sustained A Great Loss By the fire Burning of his 
Corne and Hay, hath thought fitt to make Enquierry how it is With him, and hath 
ordered Thomas Lambert and Mahlon Stacey to Goe And Speake With him and Give 
their Reports to the Next monthly Meeting." 

That Robert, Thomas and John Scholey — the latter coming from England about 
1680 — were valued citizens is shown by the court records of the time, wherein they 
appear as co-executors, appraisers of estates, witnesses of property transfers, etc. Robert 
served as constable of Yorkshire tenth, 1682. Thomas Scholey, as a contemporary of 
Richard French [5] in Chesterfield Meeting, was a frequent representative to quarterly 
meeting and served on important committees. Robert Scholey was buried " at the ffalls 
the 25th day of the 1 mo. 1689." His widow, Sarah Wheatly, having married Caleb 
Wheatly in 1696, died 14th day of 1st month, 1714/15, "and was buried at ffriends 
burying ground at the ffalls." 

23— RICHARD FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5). 

b. 8th mo. 20th, 1696. 

m. Rachel . 

96— RACHEL FRENCH b. 11th mo. 12th, 1722. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



205 



25— MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5). 

m. 8th mo. 15th, 1724, Preserve Brown, Jr., son 
of Preserve and Mary Brown of Mansfield, 
Burlington Co., N. J. 
buried 6th mo. 18th, 1746, in Friends' Burying 
Ground, Fourth and Arch Sts., Philadelphia. 
He m. Second, 8th mo. 21st, 1747, Mary Sykes, 
daughter of John and Joanna Sykes of Ches- 
terfield Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
She b. 9th mo. 3rd, 1707. 

d. 1783. 
He d. 5th mo. 23rd, 1760. 

Children of Preserve and Mary (French) Brown. 

97— PRESERVE BROWN, 3RD b. 6th mo. 26th, 1729. 

d. 9th mo. 1st, 1758. 

m. October 2nd, 1748, Elizabeth Till (Christ 
Church record, Philada.). 



98— RICHARD BROWN 



b. 11th mo. 10th, 1732. 

m. 5th mo. 15th, 1755, Sarah Taylor of Ches- 
terfield Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 



99— MARY BROWN 



b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1735. 
m. 8th mo. 12th, 1756, John Jones, Jr., son 

of John and Mary (Doughty) Jones of 

Philadelphia. 



100— SARAH BROWN 



b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1737. 
m. 11th mo. 11th, 1756, Joseph Scholey. 



101— WILLIAM BROWN 



b. 1st mo. 3rd, 1740/1. 

m. 1762, Rebecca Jones, daughter of John 
and Mary (Doughty) Jones of Philadel- 
phia. 



102— ABIAH BROWN 



b. 9th mo. 2Sth, 1743. 
m. March 12th, 1765, Margaret Sharp. 



John Jones, son of Edward Jones, " of Merion, Philadelphia County, province of 
Pennsylvania, Chyrurgion," and Mary Doughty, daughter of Jacob Doughty, of Cross- 
wicks, Burlington Co., N. J., were married 12th day of 9th mo., 1717. 



206 GENEALOGY OF THE 



PRESERVE BROWN, JR. 

In the year 1710, Preserve Brown, Sr., removed from Chesterfield Monthly 
Meeting to Burlington Monthly Meeting, residing at Mansfield, a few miles 
from Bordentown, N, J. About this time there lived in that vicinity four 
persons bearing the quaint names. Preserve Brown, Safety Borden, Safety 
Magee and Hananiah Gaunt. Preserve Brown and his wife were highly 
esteemed and regarded as " valuable Friends." At his death he was buried 
in Friends' Burying Ground, located on what is now Prince Street, near 
Church Street, Bordentown. As a mark of special honor and respect the 
Friends erected to his memory a tombstone bearing the inscription : 

" In Memory of 

Preserve Brown 

who died the 26 day of 

the 4 month 1744 

Aged 65 }-ears " 

This solitary tombstone, in the northwest corner of the grounds, is at the 
present time (1907) in a good state of preservation. It is of blue marble, 
about two feet high, with top scrolled in the usual style of that day, and is 
one of the oldest tombstones to be found in any Friends' burying ground in 
New Jersey. Tombstones were rarely erected by Friends at so early a date. 

When John Montgomerie was appointed Governor of New Jersey, 1728, 
the Grand Jury addressed the King a congratulatory message of a somewhat 
fervid character, rejoicing in the " daily accessions to Your Glory," promis- 
ing faithful adherence, etc. Preserve Brown was one of the signers, with 
a nimiber of other Quakers, who added a line, saying : " We agree to the 
matter and Substance of this Address but make some exceptions to the Stile." 
From this unique paper we quote : 

" We cant without a rapture of thankfulness, recount our obligation to 
Your Majestic, for Your Parental care of Your People in this Distant 
CoUonie. 

"... We Shall not Tresspass farther upon Your Royal Patience, but 
shall offer up our fervent prayers to the King of Kings, that he will please 
to direct Your Majesty by his unerring wisdom, & always encline Your 
heart to his Glory & Encompass Your Sacred Person with his Favour as 
with a Shield, & make }-our Government an universal blessing to all Your 
Dominions." 



H 
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5? 






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3 X 






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6 

2 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 207 

Preserve Brown and his wife Mary gave careful attention to the rearing 
of their son, Preserve Brown, Jr. We are told: "He was trained in the 
nurture and admonition of the Lord and the good effect thereof seems to 
have been very apparent. He was diligent in attendance upon all religious 
duties, was exemplary in plainness, both of speech and apparel, and of a 
kind and hospitable disposition." He took an active part in the building 
of the Friends' meeting house at Bordentown, in 1738-1741, serving on 
several committees in connection therewith. With Colin Campbell, Thomas 
Scattergood, Abraham Hewlings, Daniel Smith, Sr., Joshua Raper, Thomas 
Wetherill, Sr., Joseph Hollinshead, William Buckley, Thomas Mariott, 
William Black, William Hewlings, Samuel Black, and a number of other 
prominent and public-spirited citizens, he became a charter member of an 
organization which had for its object the purchasing and " Collection of 
useful Books, in order to erect a Library, for the advancement of knowledge 
and Literature in the City of Burlington." This library, thus founded in 
1758, has continued to this day one of the notable institutions of its kind 
in New Jersey. 

In 1741, Preserve Brown, Jr., was appointed overseer of the poor in 
Chesterfield Township, a position his charitable disposition well fitted him 
to fill. In 1743 he was elected surveyor of highways. He was a large 
landholder, owning many hundred acres in the vicinity of Sand Hills. He 
built and operated Laurie's grist mill, on Doctor's Creek, and was a very 
active and successful business man. In the fall of 1745 he removed with 
his family to Philadelphia, where he engaged in the brewing business, near 
Second and Vine Streets. In the summer of 1 746 his wife, Mary French, 
died and was buried in Friends' Burying Ground, Fourth and Arch Streets. 
In the latter part of 1749 (11 mo. 9th) a great fire destroyed his brew 
house. This was a misfortune he could ill bear at that time. A subscrip- 
tion in his behalf was started by Israel Pemberton and his son Israel, they 
subscribing fifty-five pounds. John Smith, who married Hannah Logan, 
carried the paper around and secured altogether about two hundred pounds. 
In his diary he says: " I met with some very free to give and others very 
skillful in distinctions to excuse themselves." 

In 1751, Preserve Brown, Jr., again took up his residence in Burlington 
County, New Jersey, continuing until his death, in 1760, an active and relia- 
ble member of Chesterfield Meeting. He was elder and clerk of the meet- 
ing for many years and a frequent representative at Quarterly Meeting. An 



208 GENEALOGY OF THE 



entry in the Chesterfield mmutes, 6 mo. 1st, 1758, refers to his desiring to 
be " Excused from being Clark of this Meeting on account of his Hardnefs 
of hearing." On the inside of front cover of 2nd book of Chesterfield 
Monthly Meeting Minutes is written : " Preferve Brown recorded 1 1 1 pages." 
That this worthy Friend was successful in business is shown by his will and 
inventory of his personal estate, reciting property upwards of $15,000 in 
value and about the same amount due on book and bond accounts. In the 
issue of June 26th, 1760, of the " Pennsylvania Gazette," appeared the fol- 
lowing advertisement : 

All Persons indebted to the Estate of Preserve Brown, late of Nottingham, 
in West-New-Jersey, deceased, are desired to pay, and those who have any 
Demands, against said Estate, are desired to bring in their Accounts, that 
they may be adjusted and paid by Richard Brown, at the late Dwelling- 
House of said Preserve Brown, and John Jones, of Phila, Executors. 

To be sold, a convenient Malt and Brew-house, situate in the Northern 
Liberties, between Second and Third-Streets, just above Vine-Street; for 
Title and Terms of Sale enquire of said Executors. 

Three of Preserve Brown's sons became men of note in their time. Rich- 
ard Brown, like his father, was a miller, and at one time owned Wain's mills, 
Crosswicks, N. J. During the Revolution he embarked extensively in the 
production of salt, but the venture proved a losing one. William Brown 
became a leading shipping merchant of Philadelphia, but lost all during the 
Revolution by the capture of his ships. Later he established a large biscuit 
bakery and his product became very popular with ship captains. Upon his 
death his brand sold for five hundred dollars. For refusing to take off his 
hat to the crown he was the victim of a sword blow upon the head by a 
reckless British soldier, from which he never recovered. He was known as 
the " honest Quaker " and was highly esteemed throughout the community. 
He gave freely to charitable objects and was a zealous member of Friends' 
Meeting. 

Abia Brown became possessed, through inheritance from his father, of an 
extensive mill property in Nottingham Township, Burlington County, which 
he sold, in 1768, to Robert Lewis, of Philadelphia, for about 1,000 pounds. 
In this deed of transfer he is referred to as " Ironmaster." After removing 
to Sussex County, he became quite prominent in public affairs and sat in 
the Provincial Congress of New Jersey during the session at Trenton, 1775, 
and at New Brunswick, 1776. The "Pennsylvania Gazette," March 19, 
1767, contained the following advertisement: 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 209 



"TO BE SOLD BY THE SUBSCRIBER" 

A Valuable grist mill, with two pair of stones and three boulting cloths, 
and turning lathe, hoisting all by water, with a good two story dwelling 
house, four rooms on a floor, a cellar under the whole, with two Kitchens, 
and a well of good water at the door ; a good barn, stables, store-house, 
and smoak-house, with a good landing, and store house at the same, 
sufficient to contain 300 barrels of flour, where a shallop may load at the 
door, that can carry 200 barrels of flour ; also a small dwelling-house for 
the miller, and spring-house, and cooper's shop, with about 100 acres of 
land, one half of the same meadow, and the remainder fit for the plough, 
and in fence. It is pleasantly situated on the great road that leads from 
Trenton to Crosswicks and Allentown, and on the road that leads from 
Princetown to the above landing, on a constant stream of water, the whole 
in good repair, and in a public place for the business of Keeping Store, 
where there may be plenty of wheat had, it being two miles from Cross- 
wicks, 6 from Trenton, 12 from Princetown, 6 from Allentown, and 3 from 
Bordentown. Any person inclining to purchase the same, may apply to 
Joseph Scholey, living near the said premises, or to the subscriber, living 
at Sharp's iron works, in Sussex County, N. J. Abia Brown 

MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in Ches- 
terfield the 3" of the 7 mo. 1724 

Preserve Brown Jun'' & Mary French daughter of Richard French both 
belonging to this Meeting declared their intentions of taking each other 
in Marriage whereupon this meeting appoints our Friends John Warren 
& John Sykes to make enquiry of his clearnefs from all others on account 
of Marriage & of his conversation & make report to our next Monthly 
Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in 
Chesterfield the 1'* of the 8 mo. 1724 

Preserve Brown Jun"" & Mary French Jun*" the second time declared their 
intentions of taking each other in Marriage & nothing appearing upon 
enquiry but that they are clear on that account & consent of parents being 
had This Meeting leaves them to their liberty to accomplish their said 
Marriage according to the good order ufed among Friends and appoint 
John Warren & John Sykes to make report to our next Meeting. 

At A Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in Ches- 
terfield the 5*" of the 9 mo. 1724 

Our Friends appointed at our laft Monthly Meeting to have the oversight 
at the two Marriages paft at our laft Monthly Meeting Give account that 
they saw nothing but all things were decently mannaged. 
14 



210 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas Preserve Brown Jun'' of Mansfield in the County of Burlington 
& Western division of New Jersey & Mary French daughter of Richard 
French of the same place having declared their Intentions of Marriage with 
eath other before Several Monthly Meetings of the people called Quakers 
at Chesterfield in the County of Burlington aforesaid According to the good 
order used among them whofe proceedings therein after a deliberate Con- 
sideration thereof & having consent of parents & relations concerned nothing 
appearing to obstruct were approved of by the said Meetings. 

Now thefe are to Certifie all whom it may concern that for the full 
accomplishing of their said Intentions this fifteenth day of the Eighth 
month in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven hundred & twenty 
four. They the said Preserve Brown Jun'' & Mary French appeared in a 
public Meeting of the said people & others at their public Meeting houfe 
in Chesterfield aforesaid. And the said Preserve Brown Jun*" taking the 
said Mary French by the hand did in a solemn manner openly declare that 
he took her to be his Wife promifsing through the Lords Afsistance to be 
unto her a loving & Faithful Husband until the Lord Should by death 
Separate them. And then & there in the said Afsembly the said Mary 
French did in like manner declare that She took the said Preserve Brown 
to be her husband, promifsing to be to him a faithful & loving Wife till it 
Should pleafe the Lord by death to Separate them. And Moreover the said 
Preferve Jun"" & Mary French (She according to the Custom of Marriage 
Afsuming the name of her husband) as a further Confirmation thereof did 
then & there to thefe prefents set their Hands. And we whose names are 
here-under Subscribed being among others present at the Solemnization of 
the said Marriage & Subscription in manner aforesaid as Witnefses there- 
unto have also to thefe prefents set our names the day & year above written 
1724 

Preserve Brown Jun"" 
Marv Brown 



W'" Scholey 
Joshua Shreeve 
The: French Jun'' 
Benj° Shreeve 
Jn° Abbott 
]n° Sykes 
Jn" Black 
Ro: Stork 
W'" Murfin 
Jos : Recklefs 



Abra : Brown Jun"^ 
Rich"* Lawrence 
Tho : Newbould 
Tho : Johnson 
Eliz" Scholey 
Mercy King 
Sarah Murfin 
Mary Ellis 
Phebe Bunting 
Eliz" Tantum Jun'' 



Richard French 
Preserve Brown 
Harmenius King 
Tho : French 
Rich'' French Jun' 
Jn° King 
Jos: King 
Tho : King 
Fra : King 
Abra Brown 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 211 

At a Meeting of P'riends held at their Meeting Houfe at Chesterfield 
Seventh of the 10"" 1738 

Isaac Horner on behalf of Friends at Bordentown requefted Liberty to 
build a Meeting Houfe there which this Meeting agrees to & it is referred 
to the next Quarterly Meeting 

At a Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe at Chesterfield the 
3'^ of 2'"" 1740 

Thomas Potts Jun"" & Preserve Brown Jun"" to get a Deed for Joseph 
Borden for a piece of ground on the other side of the Street for a Meeting 
Houfe & to deliver up the old Deed for the other piece of ground. 

At a Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Ploufe at Chesterfield 

(jth ^^ gn.o J74Q 

Preserve Brown Jun'' & Thomas Potts Jun"" have discharged their trust 
on account of the Land for a Meeting Houfe and Grave Yard at Borden- 
town. 

At a Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe at Chesterfield 

Friends allow the inhabitants at and near Bordentown to have a Meeting 
every First day for this winter quarter according to their request. 

Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held in our Meeting House in Philadelphia the 
29'" of the Ninth Month, 1745 

Preserve Brown produced to this Meeting a Certificate for himself and 
Wife and son Preserve from Chesterfield Monthly Meeting in New Jersey, 
dated the 5'" Seventh Month last which was read and well received and 
sent to the Women Friends. 

From Monthly Meeting held at Chesterfield 7'" mo. 5'", 1745 
To our Friends at their Monthly Meeting to be held at Philadelphia 
sendeth Greeting 

Dear friends these may acquaint you that our friend Preserve Brown 
being removed within the Compass of your Meeting hath requested a few 
lines by way of Certificate for himself his wife and son Preserve, enquiry 
having been made according to good order it appears they have been sober 
and orderl)' in their Conversation and Just in their dealings so recom- 
mending them to Divine protection and your Christian care desireing their 
growth and perseverance in y"* blessed Truth 

' Isaac Hornor 



Signed in and by order 
of the said Meeting by 



W. Morris 
Providence Hewes 
Thos Wright 
and others 



212 GENEALOGY OF THE 

At A Monthly Meeting of ffriends held in our Meeting House in Phila- 
delphia the 28*" day of Sixth Month 1747— 

Preserve Brown applied for a Certificate on Account of marriage to 
Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, which Israel Pemberton and John Smith are 
appointed after inquiry to prepare. 

At a Monthly Meeting held in our Meeting House in Philadelphia, the 
25'" of 7 Month 1747 

Certificate prepared for Preserve Brown to Chesterfield Monthly Meeting. 

From our monthly meeting held at Philadelphia the 25"' of the 7mo : 
1747 

To the monthly meeting of friends at Chesterfield in the County of Bur- 
lington 

Dear Friends 

The bearer hereof our Esteemed Friend Preserve Brown acquainted our 
last monthly meeting with his Intentions of Marriage with a friend belong- 
ing to your meeting and Requested a few lines from us on his behalf — 

This is therefore to Certify you that he is a person in unity with us, 
being of an Orderly Life and Conversation, and as far as we can find 
Clear from any person in relation to marriage Excepting with the person 
with whom he intends to appear at your meeting — We Recommended him 
to your Christian Care in the accomplishment of his said marriage and 
with the Salutation of Dear Love Remain Your Friends and Brethren 

Signed in and on behalf ) ^ , t^ , ^ik 

f" . , . ^ > Israel Pemberton C'"- 

of our said meeting By 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Marriages, Book I. 

Whereas Preserve Brown of the City of Philad* in the province of 
Pensilvania, And Mary Sykes daughter of John Sykes of y" Township of 
Chesterfield in the County of Burlington & Western divifion of New Jersey, 
& Joanna Sykes his Wife Having declared their Intentions of Marriage 
with each other before Several Monthly Meetings of y" people called 
Quakers at their Meeting houfe in Chesterfield afores*" according to y* good 
order used among them whofe proceedings therein after a deliberate con- 
sideration thereof. And having confent of Parents & Relations concerned 
nothing appearing to obftruct, were approved of by y* said Meetings. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



213 



Now Thefe are to Certifie all whom it may concern that for the full 
accomplifhing of their s** Intentions this twenty firft day y^ eighth Month, 
in y'' year of our Lord One Thoufand Seven hundred & forty Seven They 
y^ said Preserve Brown & Mary Sykes appeared at a public Meeting of 
the said people & others at thier Meeting Houfe at Upper Springfield in 
y* County of Burlington & Western division of New Jersey afores'* And 
y* said Preserve Brown taking the said Mary Sykes by the hand did in a 
Solemn manner openly declare that he took her to be his Wife promifsing 
through the Lords afsiftance to be to her a loving & faithful Hufband 
until it Should pleafe the Lord by death to Separate them. And then & 
there in the s" afsembly the said Mary Sykes did in like manner declare 
that She took y*' s" Preserve Brown to be her hufband promifsing through 
the Lords afsistance to be to him a faithful & loving Wife until it Should 
pleafe y'^ Lord bj' death to Separate Them. And Moreover the s'' Preserve 
Brown & Mary Sykes (She according to y*" Custom of Marriage afsuming 
the name of her husband) as a further confirmation thereof did then & 
there to thefe p'^fents set their hands And we whofe names are hereunto 
Subfcribed being among others prefent at y^ Solemnization of y^ s** Mar- 
riage & Subfription in manner afores'' as Witnefses thereunto have also 
to thefe prefents set our hands y" day & year above written 

Preserve Brown 
Mary Brown 



Edith Newbold 
Francis Scholey 
Mary Wright 
Hannah Newbold 
Efther White 
Hannah Zane 
Sarah Newbold 
Anne Newbold 
Mary Black 
Rachel Scholey 
Rebecca Smith 



Michael Newbold 
Barzillai Newbold 
Benj* Shreve 
Tho : Boud 
W"': French 
Tho: Black 
Jn° Newbold 
Js : Decow Medius 
Jn° Scholey 
Sam' Black 
Sam' Pleafant 
Edw" Black 
Antho : Sykes 
Jn" Kirkbride J"" 
Anne Carlile 
Anne Brooks 
Sarah Dilwin 



John Sykes 
Joanna Sykes 
Jacob Andrews 
Sam' Sykes 
Jn" Kirkbride 
Jn° Brown 
Anne Andrews 
Rich'' Brown 
Joanna Sykes 
Kezia Shreve 
Rebecca Wright 
Rebecca Wright 
Sarah Brown 
Rachel Bowne 
Isabel Scholey 
Edw" Brooks 
Benj' Sykes 
Tho : Brown 



214 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



From Monthly Meeting at Chesterfield in the County of Burlington and 
Western Division of New Jersey 11"" mo. T*** 1747 

To the Monthly Meeting of Friends at Philadelphia in the Province Pen- 
silvania with the Kind salutation of Love 

Dear friends Application hath been made to us for a Certificate on 
behalf of Our frd Mary (Sykes) Brown who is removed to live within 
the verge of your meeting These are to Certifie that from the report of 
the Enquirers appointed according to good order, her Conversation appears 
to be sober & orderly Diligent in attending our Meetings for Worship & 
is owned to be a member in unity with us so leaving her to the manifesta- 
tion of Truth & to her and your Godly & Christian care desireing her 
further Growth and perseverance in the blessed truth, We take leave and 
Subscribe ourselves vour friends Brethren & Sisters 



Signed in and on behalf 
of our said Meeting by 



Isaac Deacon Clk 
Alice Bunting 
Eleanor Hornor 
Joanna Sykes 
Elizabeth Walton 

and many others 



ANCESTRY OF MARY (SYKES) BROWN 



John Sykes and Joanna Murfin, daughter of Robert and Ann Murfin, were married 
"in a Meeting at their publick Meeting place in Chesterfield 8th Mo. (October) 19th, 
1704." She was born Sth mo., 1684. John and Joanna Sykes were both acknowledged 
ministers among Friends. Their married life continued for a period of upwards of 
sixty-seven years. They had twelve children, ten of whom grew to maturity. John 
Sykes was the son of Samuel Sj'kes who with his wife and children and aged father, 
John Sykes, emigrated from Ashford-in-the-water, Derbyshire, England, and arrived at 
Burlington in 1683. Samuel Sykes and his brother Anthony were both early and promi- 
nent adherents of Quakerism in England, the latter becoming a minister. Anthony met 
an untimely death about 1678. John Sykes was born in 1682 and died 1771. He was 
survived by his wife Joanna, four daughters and three sons. His will, proved November 
18th, 1771, showed him to be possessed of considerable property in Burlington and 
Hunterdon counties, N. J., which was divided among his wife and children. One of the 
bequests mentioned in the will was, " £5 towards inclosing the Lott of ground whereon 
Friends Meeting House stands in Bordentown." Joanna Sykes died at about ninety 
years of age. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 215 



MEETING RECORDS— CONTINUED 

Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At A Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held in our Meeting 
house in Philadelphia the 26'" day of Second Month 1751 

Preserve Brown being about to return to reside within the Compafs of 
Chesterfield Monthly Meeting by a Friend requesting a Certificate for 
himself and Wife. 

At A Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held in our Meeting 
house in Philadelphia the 3P' day of Third Month 1751 

Certificate prepared and read for Preserve Brown and Wife to Chester- 
field Monthly Meeting. 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends at theire Meeting houfe in Chester- 
field held at y' 4th of 5 mo 1751 

Preferve Brown Brought Into this Meeting a Certificate from Phila- 
delphia Monthlj' Meeting for himself and Wife Which was Read and 
Received 

At a Monthly Meeting of friends at theire Meeting houfe In Chefterfield 
y* 3* of 7'" 1755. Isaac Decow Declining to act as Clark any Longer 
Preferve brown is apointed to that Service. 

Att a monthly Meeting of Friends at theire Meeting houfe in Chefter- 
field the 1 of 6 mo. 1758 

Preferve Brown defires to be Excufed from being Clark of this Meeting 
on account of his Hardnefs of hearing which the Meeting Concents to, 
And appoints Able Midleton Clark of the Meeting in his Sted. 

At Chesterfield Monthly Meeting 11 mo 2" 1758 

Preserve Brown brought one Hundred & Fifty Books to this Meeting to 
be Distributed in y* particular Meetings belonging to this Meeting Intitled 
a Mite into the Treasury by David Hall. 

At Chesterfield Monthly Meeting 8 mo. 4'" 1763 

The Friends appointed to prepare Memorials of such Ministers and 
Elders within the verge of this Meeting that had not been heretofore done, 
laid before this Meeting three, viz : one concerning our friend Isaac Horner, 
one for Sarah Murfin, one for Preserve Brown which was read and 
approved of. 

Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At A Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held in our Meeting 
house in Philadelphia the 31^* day of 1^* month 1749 

Preserve Brown Jun"^ [97] produced paper acknowledging his breach of 
Discipline in Marriage desir'd to be continued under the Care of Friends 
which was read and remain for further Consideration. 



216 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends at theire Meeting houfe in Chester- 
field held y° 6th of 6 mo 1754 

Richard Brown [98] brought in a certificate from Philadelphia Monthly 
Meeting, which was Read and Accepted. 

11 Mo 5th 17bl William [101] and Bia Brown [102] by Amos Mid- 
dleton Request Certificate of Removal to Philadelphia Monthly Meeting 
Timothy Abbot and the Clerk to inquire. 

3rd of 12 Mo. 1761 Certificate granted to William and Abia Brown to 
Philadelphia Monthly Meeting. 



WILL OF PRESERVE BROWN, JR., 1759 

It is to be Remembered that I Preserve Brown of Notingham in the 
County of Burlington & Province of New Jersey Shopkeeper Being in a 
declining state of helth. But of sound and Disposing Mind and Memory, 
and knowing the uncertainty of this Life, am Minded to Dispose of such 
Estate Reil & Personall whereof I may dye Possesed & sized ; do make 
this my last will & Testament in maner & forme following : That is to say 
first I Give & bequeth unto My Beloved Wife Mary and unto her heirs & 
asignes forever all that I had with her from her father or otherwise, or 
the valew thereof if any of the things should worne out, and the best horse 
I shall die Possesed of & the Riding Chear ; Also I Give & Bequeth to my 
said Wife the use of one half of the house. Mills, Stores Land & medow 
hereafter devised to my Son Abia to be Possesed & Injoyed by her so long 
as she continues my widow, which is intended and I hope she accepts 
Instead of her dower or thirds out of my Estate. 

Also I Give & Bequeth unto my Son Richard Brown one third Part of 
all the Personall Estate I shall Die Possessed of after my Debts are paid 
& household goods are divided as above & hereafter Expressed to be pos- 
sesed by him his Heirs & asigns forever. 

Also I Give & Devise unto my Son William Brown that Part of the Land 
I Purchased of William Morris In the Township of Nottingham aforesaid 
that Lyes on the Southeast Side of the Mill pond & Doctors Creek (Except 
one half Acre at the End of the tumbling dam which is Reserved for the 
use of the Mills). 

Also I Give & Devise unto my said son William a lott of Land in Not- 
ingham aforesaid Bounded Southerly by a Road & South westerly by the 
Road that Leads from Crosswicks to Trenton & North westerly and North- 
easterly by William Murfins Land, also my three houses and loots In Vine 
Street In Philadelphia that Stand next to Second Street he paying the 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 217 

Ground rent that arises thereon, To have & to hold the said Lands and 
Loots of Land with the buildings thereon Errected & the apurtenancies 
theirto belonging unto my said Son William Brown & to his Heirs & 
assigns forever, Also I give & Bequeth unto my said Son William Brown 
and to his Heirs One third part of the Personall Estate I shall Die pos- 
sessed of after my Debts are paid & household goods are divided. 

Also I give & devise to my Son Abiah Brown and to his heirs Heirs and 
Assignes forever all the Land I Purchased of William Morris in Notingham 
aforesaid that lies between the Road that Leads to Trentton aforesaid and 
Crosswicks Creek on the North side of Doctors Creek & also one half 
acre of Land at the South east end of the Tumbling Dam above reserved 
with the Mill pond, Mills & Mill houses, Dwelling house Barnes Shops 
Stables Stores and Wharves thereon and all the appurtenences thereto 
belonging he Letting my abovesaid wife have one half of the use thereof as 
long as she Continues my widow, Also I give and Bequeth unto my said 
Son Abia & his heirs one third part of the Personall Estate I shall die 
possessed of aftor my Debts are paid & household goods are divided. 

Also I Give and Devise unto my Daughter Mary Jones and to the Heirs 
of her body & to theire Heirs & assignes forever My house In Vine Street 
in Philadelphia adjoyning to the East End of the abovesaid three Houses, 
divised to my Son William with the Lott thereto belonging, 

Also I Give and Bequeth unto my said Daughtor Mary one half of the 
household goods I shall die Possessed of after my wife hath got the goods 
that came by her as aforesaid. 

Also I Give and Divise unto my Daughter Sarah Scholy and to the Heirs 
of her body «& to theire Heirs & assignes forever the Land I Purchased 
of William Morris In Notingham Lying on the North Side of the Mill 
pond & bounded by the said pond, and on the West by the Road that Leads 
from Crosswicks to Trentton, and Northerly by a road that Leads out of 
that to John Taylors Land & Estorly by the said Taylors Land, Also 
twenty five Acres of Land I Purchased of ye said Wm. Morris bounded 
by Samuell Stevensons Land & Abraham Tiltons & Gisbort Hendersons 
& Francis Bordons Land with all the Buildings & apurtanances thereunto 
belonging. And like wise all my Houses & Lotts in Chestorfield in the 
County of Burlington with the Groundrents & all the apurtenancies there- 
unto belonging. 

Also I Give & bequeth unto my Said Daughtor Sarah one half of the 
household goods that I shall Die Possesed of after my wife hath got the 
goods above Bequeathed to her. 

Provided Also and my will farther is that if any of my Children should 
Die under twenty one Years of age & without issue that the part or Por- 
tion of such Child or Children shall be Equally divided among the sur- 
vivors of them and Likewise If either of my daughtors should Die without 



218 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Issue that the Lands & houses Divised to her shall be Sold and the money 
they fech be divided Equally among the rest of my Children that shall sur- 
vive or theire Heirs, And for the bettor Inabling my Executors to dischare 
my debts & Legasyes herein before Given. 

My Will farther is that all the Residue of the Reile Estate that I shall 
Die Possessed of that is not hearein specifacally Divised shall be sold in 
fee Simple by my Executors, or the Survivor or Survivors of them, or 
the Executors or Administrators of such Survivor, for the best price or 
prices that can be had for the Same and the Moneys arrising from such 
Sails to be added to my Personall Estate for the Purposes aforesaid. 

Lastly I nominate My Sons Richard & William Brown and Soninlaw 
John Jones Executors of this my Last Will and Testament, hereby revoking 
all former Wills by me heretofore made & Declaring this only this to be 
my Last will & Testament. 

In Witness whereof I have hearunto afixed my hand & Scale this thirtenth 
day of the Sixth Month Called June In the yere of our Lord one thousand 
seven hundred & fifty nine. 

Signed Sealled Pubblished and Declared to be the Last Will and Testa- 
ment of the abovesaid Preserve Brown in our Presence who at his request 
and in his Presence have subscribed our Naims as witnesses thereunto. 

The word Bequeth in the sixtenth Line & the word Divise in the forty 
Ninth Line & the word her between ye 74th & 75th Line being first made 
what they are. 

And Lotts, being likewise Interlined between the 28th & 29th Line, & 
his Heirs, being Interlined between the 46th & 47th Line. 






Samuel Redford 
James White 
John Brown 
Peter Suslmann. 

James White & Peter Sousman two of the Witnesses to the Within 
Will the said James White being duly affirmed according to law and the 
said Peter Sousman did Depose that they were present & saw Preserve 
Brown the Testator within Named Sign and Seal the Same and heard him 
publish pronounce & declare the within Instrument of Writing to be his 
last Will & Testament, and that at the Doing thereof the said Testator was 
of Sound & Disposing mind Memory and Understanding as far as they 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 219 

know and as they verily believe and that John Brown and Samuel Redford 
the other subscribing Evidences were present at the same time & signed 
their Names as Witnesses to the same Together with this Affirmant Depo- 
nent in the presence of the said Testator. 

James White 
Peter Suslmann 
Sworn & Affirmed at Burlington 
December 11th 1760, before S. Blackwood, Surrogate. 

Richard Brown one of the Executors within named being of the people 
called Quakers and duly affirmed according to law did declare and Affirm 
that the within Instrument of writing contained the true Last Will & Testa- 
ment of Preserve Brown the Testator therein Named deceased as far as 
he knows and as he verily believes and that he will well & truly perform 
the same by paying first the Debts of the said deceased and then the lega- 
cies in the said Testament Specified so farr for the as the Goods Chattels 
& Credits of the said deed can thereunto extend & that he will make and 
Exhibit a true and perfect Inventory of all the Goods & Chattels of the said 
deceased which have or shall come to his knowledge & possession or to 
the possession of any other person for his use & render a just and true 
account of his Administrations when thereunto lawfully required. 

Richard Brown 
Affirmd the day & j'ear 
above, before S. Blackwood, Surrogate. 



SUMMARY OF INV. OF EST. OF PRESERVE BROWN, JR. 

Inventory of Preserve Brown late of Nottingham in the County Burling- 
ton, in West New Jersey, Merchant Deceased, Dated 6 mo 2" 1760 

£ S d 

Goods in and about House, in the Mill, down at the Landing. . 2364 18 9 

5 Calves missing at time of appraising sence found at 30 S. . . . 7 10 

Shop Goods 667 8 11 

Book debts 2795 12 5 

. . , William Murfin 

Appraisers ^ 

Samuel Stevenson 



^ ( Richard Brown 

E.xecutors ' 

i William Brown 

Affirmed at Burlington this 15'" 
day of April Anno Dom 1762 

before Sam' AUinson Surrogate 



220 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



LIST OF DEBTORS BY BONDS OR BILLS 



Sam' Depevvs 14 Bonds 
Andrew Davises Bill 
Thomas Schooley Bond 

King " 

W" Parker Bill 
Daniel Cafsels — Bond 
Steven Carter's — Bill 
David Kaighls — Bond 
John Davis — Bond 
Andrew Davison — Bill 
Henry Browns — Bond & Bill 
Abraham Browns — Bond 
Sam' Bonvills 
W" Lawrences 
Daniel Greens — Note 
James Senes's — Bill 
Jo' Gay's— Bond 

Benj Englishes — Note 



Geo: Hopkins — Bond 

Benj : Page's— Bill 

Geo. Palmer — Bond 

James Prices's — Note 

John Pitmans — Bill 

James M'"Clealans — Bond 

Tho* Stevenson — Bond 

Rich" and John Reeds— Bond (2) 

Mathew Wilson — Bill 

James Shaw " 

Matthew Wright— 2 Bills 

Nathaniel Warner's — Bill 

Archibald Silvers " 

Tho''. Lawries — Bond 

Jo* and Abraham Skirm — B. 

Charles Vankides Bond 

Robert Quigleys " 










PHILADELPHIA IN 17 20 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 221 

BORDENTOWN MEETING 

Friends among the early settlers in the vicinity of Bordentown, N. J., 
sought and obtained privilege from Chesterfield Monthly Meeting to hold 
meetings for worship in their immediate neighborhood for three months in 
each year. No mention is made of the place of holding these meetings, and 
it is very probable that they were held, as in many other instances, at the 
house of some Friend living in or near Bordentown. About 1736, Joseph 
Borden made an offer to some Friends of land upon which to build a meet- 
ing house, and for a graveyard; and in the ninth month of that year a 
committee from Chesterfield Monthly Meeting was appointed to treat with 
him concerning it. In fifth month, 1737, the deeds for the meeting house 
and graveyard were reported finished and the Meeting directed that the 
" Declaration of Trust be signed against Next Meeting." For some reason 
the matter seems to have rested for about a year and a half. No further 
record of it appears upon the Meeting minutes until tenth month, 1738, when 
Isaac Horner, on behalf of Bordentown friends, made a request that they 
might have liberty to build a meeting house there, and Chesterfield 
Monthly Meeting agreeing, the matter was referred to the next Quarterly 
Meeting. On the 3rd of second month, 1740, "Thomas Potts Junr. and 
Preserve Brown Junr. were appointed to procure a Deed from Joseph Borden 
for a piece of ground on the other side of the Street for a Meeting house 
and to deliver up the old Deed for the other piece of ground." This trust 
was duly performed, and another committee, of which Preserve Brown, Jr., 
was an active member, was appointed to superintend the erection of the 
building, which was completed in 1741. This meeting house is still stand- 
ing in excellent condition, as accompanying picture shows. It is located 
on what is now Farnsworth Avenue, opposite Crosswicks Street. In 1905 
this Meeting was " laid down " as a place of worship on First and Fifth 
days, no Friends living there, but Chesterfield Monthly Meeting was held 
there in the Third, Sixth, Ninth and Twelfth Months alternately with Cross- 
wicks and Trenton until the spring of 1907, when for various reasons it was 
decided to discontinue holding any meetings there. 



222 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



26— REBECCA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5). 

m. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1729, Benjamin Shreve, son of 
Caleb and Sarah (Areson) Shreve of Mans- 
field Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
He b. 6th mo. 9th, 1706. 
d. 1751. 



103— KEZIAH SHREVE 



b. March 8th, 1730. 
m. about 1752, Moses Ivins. 



104— RICHARD SHREVE 



b. 6th mo. 10th, 1732. 
d. unmarried. 



105— CALEB SHREVE 



b. 8th mo. 25th, 1734. 
m. 11th mo. 19th, 1755, Grace Pancoast, 



106— WILLIAM SHREVE 



b. 8th mo. 4th, 1737. 
m. First, May 8th, 1756, Anna Ivins. 
m. Second, 12th mo. 15th, 1768, Rhoda Ivins. 
m. Third, February 21st, 1779, Anne (Wood- 
ward) Reckless. 



107— ISRAEL SHREVE 



b. 12th mo. 24th, 1739. 
m. First, 2nd mo., 1760, Grace Curtis, 
m. Second, 5th mo. 10th, 1773, Mary Cokley. 



108— SARAH SHREVE 



b. 10th mo. ISth, 1744. 

m. First, May 4th, 1768, David Scattergood. 

m. Second, April 24th, 1779, Joseph Beck, 

m. Third, John Nixon. 



109— BENJAMIN SHREVE, JR. b. 10th mo. 7th, 1747. 

m. First, 7th mo. 10th, 1770, Hannah Marll. 
m. Second, 1786, Susan Wood. 



110— SAMUEL SHREVE 



b. 1st mo. 25th, 1750. 

m. First, 

m. Second, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 223 

BENJAMIN SHREVE 

The Shreve family were among the earliest settlers of New England, 
Caleb, the progenitor, being recorded as a resident of Plymouth, Mass., in 
1641. Two of his sons, Caleb and John, located in Rhode Island, the for- 
mer, in 1680, marrying Sarah, daughter of Dirick Areson, of Flushing, L. I. 
Soon after he removed to Shrewsbury, East Jersey, in the vicinity of which 
he remained from 1685 until 1699, when he purchased a large tract of over 
300 acres from Richard French [5], Mt. Pleasant, Mansfield Township, 
Burlington County, West Jersey. This notable homestead has remained in 
the possession of successive generations of the family until this day. 

Caleb Shreve had seven sons and three daughters. At his death, in 1740, 
sixty years after his marriage, his wife was still living. His will bequeathed 
to her one third of his personal property and a life interest in his real estate. 
In a note " inferted before signing of ye same," he requested that his wife, 
at her death, leave her personal property to Benjamin, the youngest son, to 
whom was left the entire estate, after his mother's death, except certain small 
legacies to his brothers, Thomas, Joshua, Joseph, Caleb, Jonathan and David, 
five shillings each; the same to his daughters, Mary (Shreve) Gibbs and 
Sarah (Shreve) Ogburn; five shillings to his son-in-law, Benj. Scattergood, 
and some personal property to Sarah Shreve, daughter of his son Joshua. 
It is supposed that the older sons were provided for in his life time. The 
daughter who was the wife of Benj. Scattergood evidently was deceased. 

Benjamin Shreve added to his valuable patrimony by various land pur- 
chases some 450 acres. Tradition says that he died prematurely in conse- 
quence of a fall from his horse. He was not yet fifty years of age. His 
will shows his solicitude for his minor children and their careful bringing 
up. Several of his sons and one grandson distinguished themselves in the 
war for national independence. Although the Shreve family were honored 
and esteemed Friends, meeting and government records show that the various 
branches of the family were possessed of a martial spirit to an eminent 
degree. A portion of the old house, shown in accompanying picture, was 
built by Caleb Shreve in 1725, and another part by Benjamin in 1742, these 
figures being conspicuous on the eastern end. It stands upon high ground, 
commanding a fine view, and within has many colonial features, in old 
Dutch tiling, fireplaces, cupboards, etc. From Caleb [105] the property 
passed to his son, Benjamin, who died in 1844. In 1902 it descended to the 
present owner, B. F. Haywood Shreve, of Philadelphia. 



224 GENEALOGY OF THE 

DEED, RICHARD FRENCH TO CALEB SHREVE, 1699 

This Indenture made y^ Twynty Second day of Aprill in y^ yeare of o"" 
Lord according to English Ace* one Thousand Six hundred ninety & nine 
Betweene Richard ffrench of y* Township of Mansfield in y^ County of 
Burlington in y*' Province of West New Jersey yeoman of y* one p* And 
Caleb Shreeve of ffreehold in y* Province of East Jersey yeoman of y^ 
other p* Witnelseth that y^ sd Richard ffrench for & in Considracon of 
one hundred Seaventy Seaven pounds & ten shillings currant silver money 
within y*' s'' Province to him by y*^ sd Caleb Shreeve at & before y" sealing 
& deliv''y hereof in hand paid y^ receit whereof he y" s** Richard ffrench 
doth hereby' acknowledg- & thereof & every part & pcell thereof doth acquit 
exon'"ate release & discharge y^ s* Caleb Shreeve his heires Exe's adm'"s 
& every of them forever by these p'"sents Hath granted bargained sold 
alyened enfeoffed & confirmed & by these p'"sents doth fully clearly & abso- 
lutely grant bargain sell alyen enfeoffe & confirm unto y" s'' Caleb Shreeve 
his heires & Afsignes forever Three hundred twenty & five acres of land 
Situate lieing & being at Mount Pleasant in 3'** Township of Mansfield & 
County of Burlington afores'' Begins at a Stake in John Butchers line in 
y^ great meadow E. by N 29 chaines to a stake in same meadow thence E. 
3° ; S 49 chaines, to black oak by Michael Newbolds land thence along by 
same 14 chaines to a white oak, thence W.NAV 20 chaines to a stake in 
a meadow, thence N.N.E. 26 chaines to a maple ; thence E. by S 4 chaines 
to a white oak thence N.E. 2 chaines to a stake thence WNW 51 chaines 
to a stake by Joseph Pancoafts land, thence along by ye same SAV. 5 
chaines to a black oak thence E. 9 chaines to a black oak thence along by 
y^ s** Joseph Pancoafts land SSW 71 chaines to place of beginning, — Said 
Three hundred twenty & five acres of land is part of that four hundred 
& Sixty acres of land which formerlj' did belong unto William Ellis & 
which The s** Richard ffrench by one Indenture bearing date y* Eighteenth 
day of November Anno Dom 1693 did purchase of William Biddle of 
Mount Hope Executo'' of y^ last will & testamt of y" s" William Ellis 
recorded in Liber B, folio 355 & 3.56 and all dwellings &c. appertaining 
thereto — with liberty for s** Caleb Shreeve to pass throu y'^ land of s'' 
Richard ffrench to a certaine well or spring in y" same below Abraham 
Brown's Meadow & ifsuing out of y" South Side of a certaine Hill there 
& there out to take water for his and their use & that their cattle shall 
have free access to same. 

Signed Richard ffrench with a scale 

Apr" 22'' 1699 acknowledged by Richard ffrench: 

before Tho : Revell Juftice. 

May 11th — 1699 Sarah wife of Richard ffrench declared 
her free & full consent to ye sale of y* p'"mifses in this 
Deed whereto shee sett her marke — A — Sarah ffrench In 
presence of Tho: Revell Justice 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 225 



MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

6 — 1 mo. 1729. Benjamin Shreeve son of Caleb and Sarah Shreeve and 
Rebbecca French daughter of Rich'd and Mary French declared their inten- 
tions of taking each other in marriage, their parents being present gave 
their consent. The friends appointed to enquire concerning his conversa- 
tion and clearness on account of marriage are Joseph Pancoast and John 
Black and make report to our next monthly meeting. 

3 — 2 mo. 1729. Benj. Shreeve and Rebecca French the second time 
appeared at this meeting and he signified they continued in the same mind 
expressed to the last meeting and the friends appointed by our last meeting 
report that they find nothing to obstruct their proceedings Therefore this 
meeting gives them liberty to accomplish their said marriage according to 
the good order used among friends. Friends appointed to oversee at said 
marriage are Preserve Brown and Joseph Pancoast and make report to our 
next mo. meeting. 

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas Benjamin Shreeve son of Caleb Shreeve and Rebecca ffrench 
daughter of Richard ffrench both of y" Township of Mancefeild and County 
of Burlington in the West division of New Jersey in America having 
declared their Intentions of Marriage with Each other before severall 
Monthly Meetings of y'' people Called Quakers in y'' Township of Chester- 
field and County of Burlington aforesaid according to the good order used 
and Established amongst them and having Consent of parents and relations 
Concerned their proposal of Marriage was allowed of by the said Meetings. 

Now these are to Certifie whom it may concearn that for the full accom- 
plishing of their said Intention this twenty third day of y'^ second month 
in the year of our lord one thousand and seven hundred & twenty nine 
they y^ said Benjamin Shreeve and Rebecca French appeared at a publick 
meeting of the aforesaid People and others met to gather at their publick 
Meeting house at y*^ upper End of Springfield and County of Burlington 
aforesaid. And y* said Benjamin Shreeve Taking the said Rebecca ffrench 
by y'' hand did in a Solemn manner openly declare that he took her the 
said Rebecca ffrench to be his Wife promising by divine Assistance to be 
unto her a loving & faithfuU husband until death should seperate them. 
And then and there in y^ said Assembly the said Rebecca ffrench did in 
like manner declare that she took y" s** Benjamin Shreve to be her Husband 
promising by divine Assistance to be unto him a faithfuU & loving wife 
until death should seperate them And Moreover they y** said Benj. Shreve 
and Rebecca ffrench she according to y" Custom of Marriage assuming y*^ 
15 



226 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



name of her Husband as a farther confirmation thereof did then & there 
to these presents set their hand and wee whose names are here under also 
subscribed being present att y* Solemnization of y" said Marriage and Sub- 
scription have as Witnesses thereunto set our hand The day & year above 
Written 1729 

Benjamin Shreeve 
Rebecca Shreeve 



Thomas Shreeve 
Elizabeth Shreeve 
Isaac Gibbs 
Mary Gibbs 
Tho. Ifrench 
John King 
Mary Brown 
Joseph Shreeve 
Joshua Shreeve 



Jane Shreeve 
Sarah Ogborn 
William fFrench 
Caleb Shreeve 
Richard ffrench 
Sarah Shreeve 
Mary ffrench 
Mary King 
James Shreeve 



Hope Shreeve 
Jonathan Shreeve 
Hannah Shreeve 
Constance King 
Isaac Gibbs 
ffrancis King 
Joseph King 
Tho. King 



The above names are from the relatives' column, forty-two names besides 
these appear on the certificate. 

The pioneer Friends who settled in the upper part of Burlington County, New 
Jersey, for some years worshipped in each others' houses, but as population grew they 
were permitted by the Burlington Quarter to set up a permanent meeting. Joshua Shreve 
gave a piece of ground and in 1727 Upper Springfield Meeting House was built. Con- 
trary to the usual custom at that time, this was a substantial brick structure, which has 
withstood the ravages of passing years. The date still clearly appears on one end, 
showing this to be one of the oldest meeting houses in the country. The descendants of 
many old families reside in the vicinity. 




UPPER SPRINGIIEI.O MEETING IIOISE, 1727 



\k 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 227 

WILL OF BENJAMIN SHREVE, 1750/1 

In the Name of God Amen The Fourteenth Day of March in the Year 
of our Lord 1750.51 One Thousand Seven Hundred & Fifty, Fifty One, 
I Benjamin Shreve of Mansfield in the County of Burlington in the Prov- 
ince of West new jersey Yeoman being w^eak and Sick in bodey but in 
perfect Mind and Memory thanks be given to God for the Same, therefore 
calling to mind the Mortality of my Body and knowing that it is Appointed 
for all Men once to die, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testa- 
ment. And as touching Such Worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased 
God to bless me in this Life, I give devise and dispose of the Same in the 
following manner and Form. Imprimis it is my Will and I do order, That 
in the first place, all my just Debts and Funeral Charges be paid and 
Satisfied by my Executors hereafter mentioned. 

Item I give to my well beloved Wife Rebecca Shreve One Third part 
of all mj' personal Estate, to her Heirs and Assigns forever. And also the 
Benefit of my Real Estate if She continue my Widow till my Children come 
of Age each in their Order it being to enable her to bring them up, but 
if She happen to Marry again She Shall have no power any longer in my 
Real Estate or the bringing up of my Children, Saving at the Discression 
of my Exrs. as they Shall Appoint or order. Item I give to my Two 
Daughters (Viz) Kezia Shreve and Sarah Shreve Share and Share alike 
of the remainder of my Personal Estate to be paid them as they attain to 
the Age of Eighteen Years. Now it is my Will that Kezia she Shall have 
her Portion within a Year after my Decease Seeing She is of Age and 
Sarah as abovesaid now if either of my Daughters Die within a Year after 
mj' decease She that Surviveth Shall have the Portion of the Deceased. 
Item I give to my Son Caleb Shreve all and Singular the Estate of Lands 
and Tenements I now live on to him his Heirs and Assigns forever. Item 
I give to my Son William Shreve all and Singular the Lands Farm or 
Plantation I lately purchased of of Preserve Brown lying and being in 
Mansfield and part in Chesterfield in ye Said County of Burlington to be 
enjoyed by him when he Attaineth to the Age of Twenty One Years, his 
Heirs and Assigns forever. Item I give to mj' Son Israel Shreve all that 
Farm or Plantation I lately Purchased of Jacob Ong of Hanover and also 
the One Hundred Acres of Land I had by Virtue of my Fathers last Will 
& Testament which Land my Father Purchased of Daniel Smith, to him 
his Heirs and Assigns forever. And also a right for One Hundred Acres 
of Land which I Purchased of Preserve Brown all which to be enjoyed by 
him when he attaineth to the Age of Twenty One Years his Heirs and 
Assigns for ever. Item I give to my Three Sons (Viz) Caleb, William 
and Israel all & Singular my Cedar Swamp to be equally Divided amongst 
them by North and South Lines, Caleb to have the West Side, William 
the middle part and Israel the residue to be enjoyed by them their Heirs 



228 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



and Assigns forever. Further it is my Will that if my Son Caleb Should 
Die before he come of Age that William Shall have the Portion that was 
given to Caleb, and Israels Portion shall be that is given to William and 
if either of j'e younger Ones die before they come of Age the Survivor to 
enjoy both their Portions his Heirs and Assigns forever. Item I give to 
my Two Youngest Sons Benjamin and Samuel each of them Five Hundred 
Pounds to be paid them as they attain to the Age of Twenty One Years, 
and if either of them die before they come of Age the Survivor to have 
the whole and to be paid as foUoweth Caleb to pay to Benjamin Four 
Hundred Pounds and William to pay to Benjamin One Hundred Pounds 
lawful Money of the Same Place. And William to pay unto Samuel Four 
Hundred Pounds & Caleb One Hundred Pounds to compleat their Portions 
to be paid them out of their Estates given them as abovesaid. Also it is 
my Will that my Nigro Man Jack be immediately Set free he paying to 
them that enjoyeth the Homestead forty Shillings per Year for Five Years 
after my Decease and the Money to be kept in order to keep him in his 
Old Age, and the rest they that enjoyeth the Homestead Shall make up in 
Maintaining him. I likewise order that no Timber be cut to waste or 
destro)'ed Saving for the necessary use of ye places, nor no more upland 
to be cleared neither any of ye Meadows & Swamp land to be plowed. 
Lastly I Constitute and appoint Daniel Doughty and Michael Newbold my 
trusty and well belowed Friends, my only & Executors of this my last 
Will and Testament. And I do hereby utterly disallow, revoke & disanul 
all and every other former Testaments, Wills, Legacies, & Executors, by 
me in any ways before this Time Named, Willed and Bequeathed, Ratifying 
& Confirming this and no other to be my last Will and Testament In 
Witness whereof I have hereunto Set my Hand and Seal the Day and 
Year above written. 



Signed, Sealed, Published and Declared 
by the Said Benjamin Shreve as his 
last Will & Testament in ye Presence 
of us ye Subscribers 

Barzillai Newbold 

Levi Nutt 

Robt. Bland 




Le'<:6e^ 




Daniel Doughty & Michael Newbold Executors in the within Testament 
named being duly affirmed according to Law did declare that the within 
Instrument contains the true last Will and Testament of Benjamin Shreve 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 229 

the Testator therein named so far as they know and as they verily believe 
and that they will well and truly perform the same by paying first the 
debts of the said deceased and then the Legacies in the said Testament 
specifyed so far as the Goods Chattels and Credits of the said Deceased 
can thereunto Extend and that they will make and Exhibit into the preroga- 
tive Office in Burlington a true and perfect Inventory of all and Singular 
the Goods Chattels and Credits of the said deced that have or shall come 
their knowledge or possession or to the possession of any other person or 
persons for their use & render a just accot. when lawfully Required. 

Affirmed at Burlington this | Danl. Doughty 

29th of March 1751. J Michael Newbold 

Cha Read Sr. 

INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF BENJAMIN SHREVE, 1751 

An Inventery of the Goods Chattels and Credits of Benjamin Shreve 
Late of the Township of Mansfield and County of Burlington, Dec'd. 
Taken & Appraised the Eighteenth Day of the Second Month 1751 ' 



Purs & Apparrel 38 1 11^2 



£ S D 
[I. 

Cattel 92 13 

Horses 112 00 

Sheep 21 6 

Swine 13 00 

Green Corn 28 10 

Grain 30 13 6 

Port Gemons & bacon 58 8 6 

Chair & two wagons 38 00 

Husbandry Utentials Plows Harrows &c 34 00 6 

Goods in the Common Rume Clock & Chairs &c 21 09 6 

in the Rume below Stairs Bed Case of Draws &c 31 16 

in the first Chaimber Bed Cais of Draws Glass c 32 16 

in the Second Chaimber Bed & Sondries 09 2 6 

Goods in the third Chaimber Beds & Sonderies Good.. 31 11 10 

in the Shop Rume Bed &c 09 3 

in the Kitchin Iron putor brass &c 15 6 4 

in the Old Chaimber Beds flax fithers &c 17 17 6 

Goods in the Cellor Syder Sperits Molases &c 21 4 6 

Shoe Lether 16 6 

An Old Negrow Man OS 00 

Debts Dew on Bonds Bills & Book 1300 17 3i^ 



1979 4 1 

a womans Side saddle 1 



1980 4 1 



230 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



W" Cooke 

Thos Black ^ Appraisers 

Anthony Sykes ) 



I 



Thomas Black and Anthony Sykes two of the appraisers of the within 
Inventory being duly affirmed according to Law did declare that the 
Goods Chattels and Credits in the said Inventory set down and specifyed 
were by them appraised according to their Just and true respective rates 
and Values according to the best of their Judgment and understanding and 
that they appraised all things that were brought to their View for appraise- 
ment. 



Affirmed at Burlington this 
Eighth day of May 1751 
Cha Read Sr. 



Thos. Black 
Anthony Sykes 



Daniel Doughty and Michael Newbould Executors of the last Will and 
Testament of the within named Benjamin Shreve deceased being duly 
affirmed according to Law did declare that the within Writing contains a 
true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the Goods Chattels and 
Credits of the said deceased so far as have come to their possession or 
knowledge or to the possession of any other person or persons for their Use. 



Affirmed at Burlington this 
Eighth day of May ADom : 1751 
Cha Read Sr. 



I 



Danl Doughty 
Michael Newbold. 




BUILT 1725 AND 1742 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 231 

27— WILLIAM FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5). 

b. April 7th, 1712. 
d. 1781. 

m. September 20th, 1748, Lydia Taylor of Bor- 
dentown, N. J. 

Ill— WILLIAM FRENCH, JR. b. May 10th, 1751. 

m. 9th mo. 17th, 1777, Rachel Rickey. 

112— RICHARD FRENCH b. October 15th, 1759. 

m. Mary Davis. 

113— LYDIA FRENCH b. March 19th, 1763 

m. July 16th, 1782, Gabriel Allen of Borden- 
town, N. J. 

ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATE OF WILLIAM FRENCH, 1781 

Letters of adm : was granted by his Excellency William Livingston Esq 
unto William French Adm'' to the Estate of William French late of the 
County of Burlington Deceased being first duly affirmed to administer the 
lame Exhibit a true Inventory & render a Just & true account of his 
Administration 

Given under the Prerogative feal the 8*" Day of December 1781 
Wm. Wood, Bondsman. Bowes Reed Reg"". 

An Inventory of the Goods & Chattels of William French Late of the 

County of Burlington in the Township of Hanover — Dec'd Taken the 

26'" day of October 1781— 

£34 16 

k T-- k ^ Affirmed at Burlington ") 

, [■ Apprs — Dec 8 — 1781 before me ^ John Wood 

John Wood ) ,^ i 

' John Phillips burrog ) 



29— ABIGAIL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5). 

b. 7th mo. 5th, 1717. 

m. First, 1st mo. 1737, James Lewis of Philada. 
He d. March, 1741. 

m. Second, Jacob Taylor. 

114— JAMES LEWIS, JR. 



232 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting House in Chef- 
terfield the 3" of y*' IZ"'" 1736 

James Lewis and Abigail French appeared at this Meeting & declared 
their Intentions of Marriage Friends appoint Isaac Horner & preserve 
Brown Jun'' to enquire into his Converfation & Clearnefs on Account of 
Marriage & make report to next Monthly Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in Ches- 
terfield y* 3" of y* 1'"" 1736/7 

James Lewis & Abigail French appeared the Second time at this Meeting 
& declared their continuance in the same mind relating to Marriage. He 
producing a Certificate from Phila. nothing appearing to hinder they are 
to accomplish the Same according to good Order. Friends appoint Joseph 
Pancoast & John Sykes to attend the Marriage. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in Ches- 
terfield the 7"^ of the 2"'" 1737 

Joseph Pancoast Sent account that things were orderly at the Marriage 
of James Lewis. 

Minutes of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

3rd of 12th month 1736, James Lewis and Abigal French published their 
intention of marriage, her parents consenting and he producing a certificate. 
Two friends appointed to make enquiry concerning her and make report to 
next meeting. 

3rd of 1 mo. 1737. James Lewis and Abigal French published their 
intention of marriage the second time, and nothing appearing to hinder 
they are left to the conclusion of men friends. Two friends appointed to 
attend the marriage. 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF JAMES LEWIS, 1740/1 

James Lewis, Bordentown, Burlington Co., N. J., by will dated February 

8 — 1740/1, proved March 28 — 1741, bequeathed unto 

Wife Abigail " My Personal estate, — Joseph Jay to give her a title to the 
land I bought of him nere Bordentown & paid him for. 
Charles Taylor to make her a title for lot I bought of him 
in Bordentown & paid him for ; also I give her Yz of my 
tract at or near Nefhaminy pa, to bring up my child " 

Son James " The other ^ of land above mentioned — when 21. He to 
be put to a trade when 14" 

Executor "My wife Abigail Lewis" 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



233- 



30— BENJAMIN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5). 

b. 12th mo. nth, 1719. 
d. 1747. 
m. January 29th, 1742, Martha Hall, daughter of 

Burgiss Hall, " Marriner," of Bordentown, 

N. J., and Abigail Hall. 

115— RICHARD FRENCH 

MARRIAGE LICENSE 

Licence of Marriage on the Twenty nineth Day of January AD. 1742 
was granted by his Excy Lewis Morris Esq"" Gov'' unto Benjamin French 
of Bordenstowne in the County of Burlington Carpenter of the one party 
& Martha Hall Spinster, Daughter of Capt° Burgifs Hall, of the same 
place of the other party. 

Arch"* Home, Secry. 



SUMMARY OF WILL OF BENJAMIN FRENCH, 1747 

Benjamin French Borden's Town, Burlington Co. N. J. " Joyner " 
Date— Sept 10, 1747. Proved Oct 16, 1747. 

Wife — Martha French " to have proceeds of sale of Estate to bring up 

my son Rich"" 
Child — Richard — To be put to a beneficial traid when Ex"" thinks suitable. 
Executor — My brother W'" French 



Witnesses — Joseph Tillton 

Sam' Farnsworth 
Tho' Folkes. 




^^^^/tuJt^^:^^ 



SIGNATURE OF EXECUTOR 

Inventory taken Sept 19 — 1747 

By Us Freeholders in Bordentown 
Tho" Folkes 
Jn" Imlay 
Sam" Shourds jun'' 



£278—00—00 



234 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



31— JONATHAN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5). 

b. 11th mo. 27th, 1722. 

m. 1st mo. 12th, 1744, Esther Matlack, daughter 
of John and Mary (Lee) Matlack. 
She m. Second, July 21st, 1744, Vespasian Kemble. 
He d. 1778. 
She d. 1795. 



116— FRANCIS FRENCH 



m. Elizabeth 



117— MARY FRENCH 



118— EUNICE FRENCH 



m. Tonas Thomas. 



118a— JONATHAN FRENCH 



119— WILLIAM FRENCH 



m. May 25th, 1783, Ruth Higby. 



120— RICHARD FRENCH 



b. 8th mo. 6th, 1760. 

m. 10th mo. 11th, 1784, Sophia Bendler. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

2 — 12 mo. 1743 A certificate for Jonathan French was desired to the 
Monthly Meeting at Haddonfield concerning his conversation on account 
of marriage. Friends appoint Michael Newbold and Barzilla to enquire 
as usual and draw a certificate accordingly. 

1 — 1 mo. 1744 A certificate was signed at this meeting for Jonathan 
French to the monthly meeting at Haddonfield. 



Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

13 — 12 mo. 1743 Jona. French and Esther Matlack daughter of John Mat- 
lack declared their intention of taking each other in marriage therefore 
John Hollingshead and Jos : Stokes are desired to make the usual enquiry 
and to make report thereof at our next monthly meeting, the Young People's 
Fathers being present consent to sd proposals. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 235 

12 — 1 mo. 1744 Jona. French & Esther Matlack appeared and signified 
the continuation of their intentions of taking each other in marriage The 
Friends appointed to make enquiry into sd Jonathan's conversation & clear- 
ness on account of marriage not find anything to obstruct and he produced 
a certificate from Chesterfield to Friends satisfaction they are left to their 
liberty to consumate their intentions according to good order and appoints 
Thos. Redman & Benj. Holmes to be present to see that good orders be kept. 

9 — 2°'' mo. 1744 The committee report that they were present at the 
marriage of Jonathan French and Esther Matlack & that it was orderly 
accomplished. 



Haddonfield Minutes of y^ Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

Att a m"ly m'g of wo"" fr''' held at Had^fl" y"' 13"" of 12"' 1743/4 at s" 
m*g Jonathan French & Hester Matlack signified y"" intentions of m'"g fr**' 
ap'^ Rachel Smith & Phebee Burrough to make y^ ufual inquiry & report 
to next m*g. 

Att a m"ly m*g of wo"' fr"*' held at Had''f"' y" 12'" of Ist™" 1743/4 Jona- 
than French & Hefter Matlack signified y'' continuation of their intentions 
of marriage, Confent of parents apearing & return of inquirs clear, friends 
confents to y" accomplifhm* of y"" said marr^'g according to y'' good order 
among us, & ap" Rachel Smith & Eliz* Hillman to attend y*' s** m'"g & 
report to next m*g. 

Att a m"ly meeting of wo'" fr"' held at Had^fl" y' 9'" of 2"' 1744 It was 
reported by y" perfons ap*** to attend y" mar°^ y' they was orderly accomplifh"*. 



Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

12 — 1 mo. 1750 The Overseers of Haddonfield reported that they had 
Dealt with Jonathan French for a Neglect of attending our religious Meet- 
ing for Worship and disorderly conversations and that he still persists in 
the same ; therefore Robt. French and Robt. Stephens are appointed to 
acquaint him that unless he makes satisfaction Friends must proceed against 
him and make report thereof to our next monthlj' Meeting. 

9 — 2 mo. 1750 The P'riends appointed to speak to Jonathan French re- 
ported that they had not had any opportunity therefore they are desired to 
continue their care. 

14 — 3 mo. 1750 The affair of Jonathan French was referred to next 
Monthly Meeting. 



236 GENEALOGY OF THE 



4 mo. 1750 Isaac Andrews is desired to acquaint Jonathan French that 
Friends desire his appearance at our next monthly meeting to answer the 
charge for which he hath been dealt with, otherwise they must proceed. 

9'" of 5'" mo. 1750 Isaac Andrews reported that he had spoken to Jon" 
French and he gave Expectation of appearing but did not therefore that 
affair is referred to the Consideration of our next monthly meeting. 

13 — 6 mo. 1750 Jonathan French not appearing to give satisfaction for 
his misconduct or sending any reason why he did not, therefore Wm. Forster 
and Edmond Hollingshead are appointed to draw a testification against him 
and produce it at our next monthly meeting. 

10 — 7 mo. 1750 Wm. Foster and Edmond Hollingshead produced a tes- 
tification against Jonathan French but Wm. Forster reporting that he had 
spoke with him and that he gave some expectation of making satisfaction 
therefore it was referred to the consideration of our next monthly meeting. 

8 — 8 mo. 1750 Jonathan French appeared and Friends were of opinion 
that it might be better to refer the matter to the consideration of our next 
mo. meeting. 

7 — 10 mo. 1750 The affair relating to Jonathan French being now recon- 
sidered and he not appearing the testification brought against him in y'' 
7^" mo. last was read and approved and signed by the clerk, and Sam'l 
Clement & Wm. Griscom are appointed to serve him with a copy thereof 
and acquaint him with his privilege of appeal. 

1-1 — 11 mo. 1750 Samuel Clement and Wm. Griscome reported that they 
had served Jonathan French with a copy of the testification against him 
and that he did not incline to appeal, therefore Ebenezer Hopkins is ap- 
pointed to read it in a publick First day meeting at Haddonfield and make 
report thereof at our next Mo. Mtg. 



Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y'^ 7'" of y"" 2""* mo. 1782. 
Friends from y" Preparative Meeting at Chester reported that Jonathan 
French [118a] had been treated with for the neglect of attending Meet- 
ings outgoing in marriage and being active in Military Services therefore 
John Roberts and Wm. Matlack are appointed to treat further with him 
& report to next meeting. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 23\ 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y*" 7*" of V^ mo. 1782. 
The friends appointed reported that they have performed a visit to Jona- 
than French who doth not appear desirous to retain his right of member- 
ship ; therefore William Matlack & John Roberts are appointed to inform 
him that the meeting has come to a judgment to disown him & prepare a 
minute accordingly & produce it to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y"' 4*" of y" 4'" mo. 1782. 
One of the friends appointed reported that he had informed Jonathan 
French of the judgment of this meeting according to appointment & pro- 
duced a minute of disownment against him which was read approved and 
signed by the Cl'k & John Collins & Abraham Warrington are appointed 
to give him a copy thereof inform him of his privilege of an appeal & 
report to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 9"" of y* 5"" Mo. 1782. 
The friends appointed reported that they have given Jonathan French a 
copy of the Disownment against him according to appointment & he said 
he should not appeal. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 8'" of 2°'' Mo. 1788. 
The Committee appointed to peruse the Records of this Meeting &c. pro- 
duced the following report which being several times read was with some 
alteration approved being as follows vizt : 

To the Monthly Meeting held at Evesham 

We the Committee appointed in the 12'" M° last to peruse the Records 
of said Meeting &c having several times met and carefully examined the 
same, have to Report; that all the children of Jonathan [31] and Esther 
French not heretofore disunited, must be considered as having a right of 
Membership, agreeable to the Minute of the Yearly Meeting in the Year 
1762 & further explained in the Year 1782. 

Submitted to the Meeting 2°" Mo. 8'" Day 1788, and signed on behalf of 
the Committee by William Matlack. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 10*" of 10'" Mo. 1788. 
Friends from the Preparative Meeting at Chester reported that from a late 
examination of the Records of this Meeting it appears that Francis [116], 
William [119], and Richard French [120] have a right of Membership of 
which they were ignorant until of late ; previous wherto they have been 
guilty of divers matters inconsistent with our Discipline (vizt.) outgoing 
in their Marriages, and neglect of attending Meetings ; and the two former 
with other reproachful conduct : which severally claiming the attention of 
Friends, wherein they unite in appointing John Collins, Abrm Warrington, 
Humphrey Owen, Joshua Lippincott, Sam'l. AUinson and Enoch Evans, 
to take a solid opportunity with them, and report their sense of their dispo- 
sitions of Mind to next Meeting. 



I 



238 GENEALOGY OF THE 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 7'" of 11 "" Mo. 1788. 
The Committee appointed on a visit to Francis, William and Richard French 
reported attention thereto, in the performance whereof they evidenced such 
satisfaction as influenced them to request time for further labour with them if 
consistent with the judgment of the Meeting; which was granted, and they 
to report thereon as occasion may require. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 5'" of 6'" Mo. 1789. 
The Friends under whose care the case of Francis French was referred in 
the 10"' mo. last, now reported that he declines making necefsary satisfac- 
tion for his deviation ; therefore Saml. Roberts Jr. and Joseph Warrington 
are appointed to inform him that Friends have come to a judgment to 
disown him, prepare a Minute accordingl}' for the approbation of ne.xt 
Meeting. 

At a Monthly meeting held at Evesham the 10 of 7'" M° 1789. One 
of the Friends appointed to inform Francis French of the judgment of last 
Meeting, and produce a Disunion agst. him, having performed the same 
agreeable thereto, which being read, but not being fully satisfactory, was 
returned for amendment, & produce it to ne.xt Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 7*" of 8*" Mo. 1789. 
The Disunion against Francis French, returned at last Meeting for amend- 
ment, being again produced and read, was, with some alteration approved 
and signed by the Clk. Thomas Lippincott & Henry Warrington are ap- 
pointed to give him a Copy thereof inform him of his privilege of Appeal- 
ing, and report to next Meeting. 

The Friends to whose care the case of William French was committed 
in the 10*'' m° last now reported that he doth not appear desirous of con- 
tinuing his right of Membership ; which after being attended to, united the 
Meeting in the appointment of Joseph Roberts and Joshua Hunt to prepare 
a Minute of Disownment for the approbation of next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11*" Day of the 9'" Mo. 1789. 
The Friends appointed to give Francis French a Copy of the Disunion 
against him &c. reported their compliance therewith and he signified no 
intention of appealing. 

The Committee appointed produced a Disunion against William French 
which being read and approved was signed by the Clk. Joseph Roberts 
«& Henry Warrington are appointed to give him a Copy thereof, inform 
him of his privilege of appealing, and report to next meeting. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



239 



At a Monthly meeting held at Evesham the 9*" of 10'" M" 1789. 
One of the Friends appointed to give William French a copy of the Dis- 
union against him &c. reported his compliance therewith and he signified 
no intention of Appealing. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 10'" of 6'" mo. 1791. 
The case of Richard French being continued under the care of Joshua Lip- 
pincott and Sam'l Allinson in the 11*'' mo. 1788, the latter of whom is now 
dec"*. Saml. Burrough is appointed to unite with the former in giving the 
necessary attention thereto, and report thereon as occasion may require. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 9'" of 12'" Mo. 1791. 
Richard French produced an acknowledgment for consummating his mar- 
riage contrary to the order established amongst us, which being several 
times read and attended to, it appeared the united sense of the Meeting that 
the same be now accepted ; and is in the following words (vizt.) 

To the Monthly Meeting of Evesham — 

I the subscriber having a Birthright amongst Frds : but not 
having any knowledge thereof till since I consummated my 
marriage contrary to the good order established amongst them ; 
on being treated with, feel love & nearness towards my Friends, 
and have a sincere desire to retain my right in Society, hoping 
this with my future orderl}' walking may reconcile me to my 
friends again, is the desire of 

Richard French 

12" mo. 9" 1791 







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COLONIAL MONEY OF NEW JERSEY, 1763 



240 GENEALOGY OF THE 

FRANCIS FRENCH 

A resident of Chester Township, Burlington County, N. J., during early 
manhood, Francis French [116] wrought faithfully at his trade of house 
carpenter until he accumulated a fund suflficient to buy a comfortable farm 
homestead, where he spent the remainder of a long life. INIay 26, 1798, he 
purchased of William Holmes, for 500 pounds, a " messuage, plantation and 
tract " of seventy-seven acres, located along Timber Creek, near the present 
village of Almonesson, Deptford Township, Gloucester County. This land 
was purchased from the original proprietaries by Thomas Matthews, in 1681, 
and for more than half a century subsequently was part of the great Hill- 
man estate. The ancient house, shown in accompanying picture, evidently 
erected at two different times, during the eighteenth century, has all the dis- 
tinguishing marks of pioneer days, rough stone, primitive clap-boarding, 
heavy timbers and doors, wooden latches, very low roof and immense fire- 
places, long since closed in. Local tradition says it was a colonial tavern 
and Indian trading post. A former resident, then past four score, said the 
house was old in his boyhood days, about the time of Francis French's death, 
1831. 

After the separation of the latter from Friends' Society, he became 
specially interested in Old Colestown Protestant Episcopal Church, making 
a subscription of several pounds a year towards the maintenance of the grave- 
yard, neglected through lack of an efficient church organization. No meet- 
ing or church record concerning his marriage or the births of his children 
has been found, but certain court records, at Woodbury, show his relation- 
ship to the family of Jonathan French and recite the names of his children 
and grandchildren and the disposition of his estate. By deed, dated March 
28, 1814, "Francis French, Richard French, ' Unice ' Thomas, widow of 
Jonas Thomas, and Mary French, single woman, of Gloucester County, 
heirs at law of Jonathan French, who died intestate, sold to Isaac Arm- 
strong, of Gloucester County, for $307, nine acres of land." " Unice " 
made her mark and signed in the presence of George French, justice of the 
peace of Moorestown. 

Before the Orphans' Court, Gloucester County, Dec. term, 1831, Joseph 
Orens, administrator of the estate of Francis French, asked for Commis- 
sioners' sale of land, mentioning as " heirs at law " the following children : 

Hannah (French) Sloan, Samuel French, Jonathan French, Mary 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



241 



(French) Husk. Also the children of Sarah (French) Roberts, deceased, 
and children of Esther (French) White, deceased. 

It is recited that "three discreet and indifferent (impartial) persons, 
between the parties," were appointed Commissioners, viz., John Clement, 
David B. Morgan and Joseph Saunders. On February 1, 1833, the farm 
homestead, seventy-seven acres, was sold to James Rowand, for $1,400. Two 
other small lots, seventeen and a half acres in all, were sold for $430. 
About thirty years later the Cunard family bought the farm and retained 
it until recently. The location of this property invests it with peculiar 
interest, as although only six miles from Woodbury, for more than one hun- 
dred years it was on the outskirts of civilization in Gloucester County, 



ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, COLESTOW^N, N. J. 



Next to St. Mary's, Burlington, this is, or was, the oldest Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church in West Jersey. Services w^ere held in the 
vicinity, about four miles from Moorestown, as early as 1703, the 
year the church at Burlington was founded, but the little wooden 
church was not built until about 1751. It was 34 X 30 feet, with 
high pulpit, small chancel, high-backed benches, boxed-in seats for 
the choir, and a three-part cast-iron stove, for wood, brought from 
England, in 1760. Accompanying illustrations show this ancient 
and historic structure within and without. The little church had 
many vicissitudes and several times the society was almost abandoned. 
In 1796 there was serious trouble over the old graveyard, in which 
members of many pioneer families lie buried. Francis French [116] 
was one of the subscribers to a special maintenance fund. The 
pulpit Bible, first used, is carefully preserved; likewise a silver 
communion service, now cared for by Trinity Church, Moorestown. 
To the infinite regret of a wide circle of friends, a mysterious fire 
destroyed St. Mary's, November 7, 1899. In 1907 a granite monu- 
ment was erected on the site to perpetuate the memory of a notable 
landmark in the religious and social history of ^Vest Jersey. 




ST. MARY S MONUMENT 



16 



242 GENEALOGY OF THE 

33— THOMAS FRENCH, 3RD (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6). 

b. 8th mo. 27th, 1702. 

d. 4th mo. 28th, 1757, buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Chester Meeting, Moorestown, 
N.J. 
m. May 8th, 1746, Jemima Elkinton of Evesham 
Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
She b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1725. 

buried 4th mo. 11th, 1782. 

121— EDWARD FRENCH b. 1st mo. 7th, 1747. 

m. Mary Wilkins. 

122— URIAH FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1748 

m. First, June 29th, 1771, Rachel Ingersoll. 
m. Second, August 6th, 1800, Isabella Peacock. 

123— GEORGE FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 9th, 1753. 

m. 5th mo. 1775, Rachel Rakestraw. 

124— MARY FRENCH b. 6th mo. 23rd, 1755. 

m. April 4th, 1771, John Reily. 

125— SARAH FRENCH b. 9th mo. 26th, 1757. 

m. 1776, Charles Brown. 

THOMAS FRENCH, 3RD 

The second son of Thomas French, Jr., seems to have inherited the farm- 
ing habits of his ancestors and to have remained in the same location in 
which his father resided, in Chester Township. He was active in local 
affairs and served as constable, overseer of highways and overseer of the 
poor for Chester Township. His homestead, at the west end of Moores- 
town, was part of the estate conveyed to his father by Thomas ffrench, 
progenitor, through the deed of gift of 1694. A special survey, made in 
1752, showed that it joined other lands of his father and of his brother, 
Robert French. He bequeathed this plantation to his son Edward and it 
continued in family ownership until sold by one of his descendants, Sarah 
(French) Ogden, about twenty-five years ago. Apparently he deferred 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 243 

making his will until his strength was fast failing, but his declared intention 
was accepted and faithfully carried out. During his life time he added by 
purchase considerably to his landed patrimony. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

1^1 — 8 mo. 1751. The Overseers of Chester meeting reported that they 
had dealt with Thos. French for going out in marriage & that he had given 
an e.\i)ectation of making satisfaction which he hath not yet done. Thos. 
Lippincott & Jos. Stokes are appointed to acquaint him that unless he 
comply with Friends request & produce satisfaction, they will be obliged 
to proceed against him. 

9 — 10 mo. 1751. Jos. Stokes and Thos. Lippincott reported that they had 
spoken to Thos. French who gave expectation of making satisfaction, but 
not being here he was referred to the consideration of next meeting and 
the clerk appointed to bring the minute or a copy of it that was made on 
j^e returning ye above mentioned acknowledgment. 

13 — 1 mo. 1752. Thomas French produced an acknowledgment for his 
outgoing in marriage which was read and received, and is as followeth : 

To Friends at their Monthly Meeting at Haddonfield. I the 
subscriber having broke the good rules established amongst 
Friends by going contrary thereto in marriage am sorry for it 
and desire Friends to accept this as acknowledgment therefore, 
from your friend, 

Thomas French. 

Haddonfield Minutes of y" Mo: Meeting of Women Friends: 

Women friends of y" m"ly meeting being met at Had°f"' y' 10" of 2'" 
1752 report by y'^ overseers of Chefter y* Jemima French defire^ to come 
under y" notice of fr"^^ which fr''* take under consideration. 



Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends: 

10 — 10 mo. 1776. The overseers being enquired of reported from Chester 
that Sarah Brown formerly Sarah French [125] had been treated with for 
outgoing in her marriage and she not appearing in a disposition of mind 
to be reconciled to Friends and having ye concurrence of ye mens meeting 
we therefore disown her according to our discipline and Hannah French 
is appointed to acquaint her thereof. 



244 GENEALOGY OF THE 



DEED, JOSHUA BISPHAM TO THOMAS FRENCH, 3RD, 1746 

This Indenture Made the Thirteenth day of March in the year of our 
Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Forty Six And in the twentieth 
year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Second Between Joshua 
Bifpham of the Township of Chester and County of Burlington and prov- 
ince of New Jersey Merchant of the one part, and Thomas French of the 
Town County and province aforesaid Yeoman of the other part Witnefseth 
that the said Joshua Bifpham for and in consideration of one Pound fifteen 
Shillings Current Lawful Money of the Said Province to him in hand paid 
by the Said Thomas French at and before the Sealing and delivery of thefe 
presents the Receipt whereof the Said Joshua Bifpham doth hereby Acknowl- 
edge and thereof and ever}' part and parcel thereof doth Clearly and Abfo- 
lutely acquit Exonerate and discharge the Said Thomas French His Execu"'' 
and Admin"'' and every of them by these presents Hath granted Bargained 
and Sold aliend EnfeofT'd and Confirm'd and by these presents for him 
and his heirs doth Clearly and abfolutely grant Bargain and Sell alien 
EnfeofI'd and confirm unto the aforesaid Thomas French his heirs and 
afigns all that Lot of Land Containing one Rood and Twenty perches Sit- 
uated lying and being in the Township of Chester Butted and Bounded 
as followeth (Viz) Beginning at a Spanish Oak Corner to Thomas French 
and Runs from thence by y'' Said French South Twenty Six Degd East 
two Chains to a post Corner to Joseph Heritages Land thence by y* S* 
Heritages North Eighty four degd twenty Minutes West four Chains forty 
three Links to a Spanish Oak Corner to the aforesaid French thence by S* 
French North Sixty Nine Degd East three Chains Seventy Six Links to 
the Corner first mentioned; Containing by Survey thereof one Rood and 
Twenty perches of Land which was taken up and Surveyd to Solomon 
Lippincott the Nineteenth day of August 1742 And Convey'd to Joshua 
Bifpham by a Instrument bearing date April the Tenth 1743 Together with 
all and every y^ Heridetements and appurtenances to the same one Rood 
and twenty perchs of Land and premifes belonging or in any wise apper- 
taining or there with usealy Occupied or Injoy'd and the Reversion or 
Reversions Remainder and Remainders Rents Ifsues and profits of the 
premifes and every part and parcel thereof and all the Estate Right title 
Interest use property Claim and demand whatsoever both in Law and 
Equity of him the Said Joshua Bifpham of in to and out of S'' one Rood 
and twenty Perchs of Land and premifes and every part and parcel thereof 
and all writeings touching the Same premifes only to have and to hold the 
Said one Rood and twenty perchs of Land and all and Singular the prem- 
ifes hereby granted and Convey'd or meant mentioned and intended So to 



I 
1 1 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 245 

be Sold with them and every of their appurtenances unto the Said Thomas 
French his heirs and afsigns for ever to the only jjroper ufe and Behoof 
of the Said Thomas French his heirs and afsigns forever and the Said 
Joshua Bifpham for himself his heirs Execu'rs and Adm'rs and for every 
of them doth Covenant and grant to and with the Said Thomas French 
his heirs and afsigns by these presents in Manner Following That is to Say 
that he the Said Joshua Bifpham and his heirs the aforesaid one Rood and 
twenty perchs of Land & premifes and every part thereof with all the 
appurtenances unto the Said Thomas French his heirs and afigns, against 
him the Said Joshua Bifpham and his heirs and against all and every other 
person or persons Claiming or to Claim by from or under him or them ; 
or by from or under any other perfon or perfons whatsoever Shall warrant 
and forever defend by thefe prefents And that he the Said Joshua Bifpham 
and his heirs Shall and will from time to time and at all times Hereafter 
upon the Reasonable request and at the proper Cost and Charges in Law 
of him the Said Thomas French his heirs and afsigns, do acknowledge Exe- 
cute and perform, or caufe to be done, all and every such further, and 
other Lawfull and Reafonable Acts matters and things Whatfoever Requifite 
and Necefsary for the further and more Sure makeing and Conveying the 
premifes and every part thereof with the Appurtenances unto the Said 
Thomas French his heirs or afigns devifed or advised or Required In Wit- 
nefs whereof the party first above named hath to this prefent Indenture 
Set his hand and Seal the day and year above written. 

Joshua Bispham 
Signed Sealed and delivered 
in the presence of us 
Nathan Pratt 

his 

John I Small 

mark 



This Sixth day of April Ano 1752 there Came before me one of the 
Judges of the County Court for holding of Pleas for the County of Bur- 
lington Joshua Bifpham Efq"" and did Acknowledge the within Deed as 
his act and Deed (taken and Acknowledged before me) for the ufe within 
Mentioned. 

Jos* Bispham 
Revell Elton 



246 GENEALOGY OF THE 



TEN YEARS' APPRENTICESHIP INDENTURE, 1750 

THIS INDENTORE Witnefseth that I Richard Jackson Son of John 
Jackson of The Township of Chister and Count}' of Burlinton and Prouince 
of weft new Jarfey hath put him Self And by Thefe Prefents by The 
Confent of his Father Doth voillenta''^ and of his own free will and Accord 
put him Self Apprentice To Thomas French to Serve his Heirs or afsigns 
of the Township of Chifter and County of Burlington and province afore- 
said — Farmor to Learn His Ocupatnt and after the Maner of an Appren- 
tice To Serve from the Day of the Date here of for and During and unto 
The full End and Term of ten Years and nine Months Next Enfuing 
During all Which Term the Said Apprentice his Said Mafter faith fully 
Shall Serve his Secrets keep his Lawful Comands Every whare Readily 
obay he Shall Do no Damage to his Said Mafter nor See it to be Don by 
others with ovt Letting or Giveing Notice thare of to his Said Mafter he 
Shall Not wafte his Said Mafters Goods nor Lend them unlawfully to 
Any he Shall Not Contract Matrimony with in The Said term Att Cards 
Dice or any other UnlawfuU Game he Shall Not play whare by his Said 
Mafter may have Damage with his own Good nor the goods of others 
with out Licence from his Said Mafter he Shall neither buy nor Sell he 
Shall not Abfent him Self Day nor night from His Said Mafters Service 
with out his Leave nor haunt ale Houfses Taverns or play hovfses but In 
all Things be have him Self as a faithfuU Apprentice ought to Do Dureing 
the Said term and the Said Mafter Shall Ufe the utmost of his endavovr 
to teach or Cavfe to be tavght Wright and Sifer as fir as the Rule of 
three and the Said Mafter is to teach or Cavse to be taught the Said 
Apprintes The Ocap^tion which he now followeth And procure and prouide 
for him Sufficient Meat Drink Lodging and wafhing fiting for an apprentice 
During the Said term of ten Years and nine Months and at the Expiration 
of the Said term the said Mafter is heirs or Afsigns is to Give the Said 
Apprentice twenty poun'*^ of Good Currant Money the Said Master Is to 
Give the Said apprentis two Suits of appirl that Is to Say one Sute for 
hollowdays and one Sute for working Days . . . 

And for the trve Performance of all and Singular the Covenants and 
Agreements a fore Said the Said parties bind Them Selves Each Unto 
the other firmly by Thefe prefen*"^ In Witnefs whare of the Said parties 
have Interchangeably Set their hands and Seals here unto Dated the forth 
Day of April in the twenty fifth Year of Raign of our Sovenring Lord 
George King of Grate britain &c Annoque Domini : one Thoufand Seven 
Hundred and fifty — 
in the prefence of -^j^ ^ - <f^ 

Robert ffrench ^^A^^TtUX^ t^^H^ 

John Risdom ^*^ "^ 



\^^ 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 247 



WILL OF THOMAS FRENCH, 3RD, 1757 

Let it be recorded that I Thomas French of Chester in the County of 
Burlington Yeoman Do make this my last Will and Testament as fol- 
loweth Viz. 

Imp'^"''' — I give and Bequeath unto my eldest son Edward French my plan- 
tation whereon I now Dwell, which was given to me by my Father 
to him his Heirs and assigns forever 

Item — I give and bequeath unto my second Son Uriah French all that my 
plantation which I bought of Richard Heritage to him his Heirs 
and assigns forever 

Item — I give and bequeath unto my youngest son George French my Two 
Houses and Tenements in Moors Town and also Fifty Acres of 
Land part of my affore Said plantation which my father gave me 
adjoyning the Said Houses and So to the end of the Said Land 
adjoyning Nathan Middletons Land 

Item — I Give and bequeath unto my Daughter Mary French the Sum of 
Fifty pounds to be paid out of my personal Estate 

Item — I Give and Devise unto my well beloved wife Jemimah all the 

Remainder of my personal Estate and also the use and profitts of 

all my Lands till my Affore-Said three Sons Attain the Age of 

Twenty One Years She my Said Wife paying and Discharging all 

my Just Debts. 

The Above was declared by Thomas French to be his last Will the 28th 

of April 1757 but before the Same was Completed he became Senseless Died 

having Mentioned the above in our hearing — 

John Cox 

Hugh Hollinshead 

Robert French 

Be it remembered that on ye 29 day of April 1757 John Cox Robert French 
& Hugh Hollinshead appeared before me Charles Read Esqr. One of the 
masters of the High Court of Chancery of the province of New Jersey & 
being all of the people called Quakers on their respective Solemn Affirma- 
tions which Each of them took, did declare that they were present & heard 
Thomas French declare the contents of the within writing to be part of 
his Will in the ilness of which he died & about two hours before his death, 
but before he could finish it he was taken senseless & dyed. At the desire 
of the Widow of said French lett it be recorded that the son & Heir may 
thereby know his fathers Intentions 

Chas. Read Mag Cur Con 
Recorded this 20'" Aug: 1761 
Chas : Read, Reg"". 



248 GENEALOGY OF THE 



INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF THOMAS FRENCH, 3RD, 1757 

A True & perfect Inventory of all and Singular the Goods and Chattels 
rights and Credits of Thomas French Late of Chester in the County of 
Burlington &c. Deed. Taken the 5th Day of May Anno 1757 being all 
that Came to our View Appraisd By us under written — 

£ S d 
Imprs. — To Cash and wearing Apparrel in the Lodging Room. 17 15 

To a Rideing Horse Bridle & Saddle 13 15 

To Book Debts £16: 13 : To and Old Watch 20S To 

a bedd & furniture £12 29 13 

To a Case of Drawrs £4: 10 To a Table and Trunk 

27/6 5 17 6 

To 7 Chairs 25S To Chania Delf and Glass 15S To 

a Chest 11/6 2 11 6 

To a Small Looking Glass 3/ To warming pan lOS. . 13 

Item — To a feather Bedd and Bedding in Leanto Room £7:0:0 

To Chaf Do 40S 9 

To a Chest and Sundries therein 1 

Item. — To a bedd and Bedding in the Lower Room £10: To 

pewter 30S 11 10 

To a Settle & 2 old Tables 20S To a Small Table & 

Dough Trough, 15S 1 15 

To Chairs & Sundries 18/ To wooden 7/6 To a brass 

Kettle 20S 2 5 6 

To Iron potts and Tea Kettle 28/ To pott Rax tier 

Shovels Tongs 25/ 2 13 

Item — To a Chaf Bedd in Chamber £3 : To wheat & Rye 

flower £3 : — 6 

To Spinning Wheels old Casks 2 Scythes 6 Baggs & 

Sundries 3 9 

Item — To Hogsheads and Barrels in Celler and Hogs Lard and 

earthen ware 4 3 

To Cyder royal 30S Tub of Soap 30S To Small 

Keggs &c. 4/ 3 4 

Item — To Bacon in Smoak House 4 10 

I tem — To Linnin Yarn 1 15 

Item — To Sundry Edge Tools and old Iron 88/ To a New 

plough & Irons 24/6 5 12 6 

To 2 ploughs one Harrow 4 pair Horse Geers and an 

o.x Chain 4 

To a pair of Steers and Yoak £8 : To 6 Cows £20. ... 28 

To Young Cattle £9 To 20 Sheep £7 : 15 16 15 

To 21 Hoggs 18 



ic_ 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 249 

To an Iron Bound Waggon £8: To an Iron Bound 

ox Cart £4 12 

To a Horse Cart £3 : To a Slay 30S To a Cyder press 

& Mill 40S 6 10 

To 15 Bushels Indian Corn 33/9 To a Stack of Rye 

£8:10 10 3 9 

To Clean Wheat and Wheat in Sheaf £7 To Creen 

Wheat and Rye in the Ground £10:3 17 3 

To 3 Horses £20: To Cutting Box & Mill to Clean 

Corn 27/6 21 7 6 

To 20 Bushel of Oates 1 11 8 

£262 12 11 
Joshua Humphris 
John Cox. 

Jemima French and Robert French administrators of all and Singular 
the Goods Chattels & Credits of Thomas French within mentioned deed, 
being of the People Called Quakers on their Solemn affirmations which they 
Respectively took according to Law Did Declare that the within Inventory 
Contains a True and Perfect Inventory of all and Singular the Goods 
Chattels & Credits of the said Deceased which have Come to their knowl- 
edge and Possion or to the Possion of any other pson or psons for their use. 

Affirmed at Burlington Robert French 

May 6th 1757 before Jemima French 

Saml. Peart, Surrogate. 



ACCT. OF ADMINISTRATRIX OF EST. OF THOMAS FRENCH, 1761 

The Account of Jemima P'rench Administratrix of all and Singular the 
Goods Chattels & Credits which were of Thomas French deceased, as well 
of and for such and so much of the Goods as of and for her payments 
& Disbursements out of the same. 

This Accomptant Chargeth herself Dr. 

This Accomptant Chargeth herself with all & Singular the 
Goods Chattels & Credits which were of the said deceased 
mentioned and Specified in an Inventory & Appraisement 
thereof made and Exhibited into the Registry of the Prerog- 
ative Court in the Secretaries Office in Burlington, Amount : g £ s d 
(as by the same Inventory appears) to the Sum of 262 12 11 



250 GENEALOGY OF THE 

P Contra. This Accomptant prays Allowance Cr. 

£ s d 

No. 1. By Mony's paid Mary Stanley as p rec' 9 — — 

2. By Do. paid Lucy Hurley as p Rec* 3 8 — 

3. By Monies paid James Cornish as p Rec' 2 19 — 

4. By Do paid Ezekiel Lippincott a Note 3 2 — 

5. By Do paid Samuel Shute as p Rect 1 11 — 

6. By Do paid Grace Lippincott as p Do 2 3 6 

7. By Do paid Samuel Collins- as p Do — 8 6 

8. By Do paid John Wallis as p Do 5 14 5 

9. By Do paid Samuel Fisher as p Do — 10 — 

10. By Do paid Daniel Toy 1 6 4 

11. By Do paid Mary Wallace as p Rect 3 12 2 

12. By Do paid Thomas Spicer as p Do 11 12 9 

13. By Do paid Thomas Morton as p Do — 16 11 

14. By Do paid George Matlock as p Do 2 7 — 

15. By Do paid Wm. Matlock as p Do — 17 — 

16. By Do paid Josiah White as p Do — 6 6 

17. By Do paid Robert Hunt as p Do — 11 5 

18. By Do paid George Weed as p Do 2 2 3 

19. By Do paid Joshua Bispham as p Do — 17 8 

20. By Do paid for Letters of Admn as p Do 1 10 — 

21. By Do paid John Collins as p Do 5 5 1 

22. By Do paid Samuel Stokes as p Do 63 11 6 

23. By Do paid Ezekiel Lippincott as p Do 1 13 8 

24. By Cash paid Michael Linch as p Rec* 32 5 — 

25. By Do Paid Thomas Redman as p Rec* 2 3 8 

26. By Do paid Ephraim Roberts as p Do — 7 6 

27. By Do paid Charles Ferguson as p Do 3 3 8 

28. By Do paid Jane Middleton at Bond & Intr 36 17 — 

29. By Do paid Joshua Wright, the Order of Jonath". 

Tho" 1 8 5 

30. Do Do paid Mary Wallace a Bond & Intst 29 10 — 

231 11 
By Commissions on the Am' of the Inventory 

@ 7 £ p. Cent 18 5 8 

By Cash paid for Quietus Est. & Settlem' of this 

Acct 1 12 — 



250 18 7 
Ballance Remaining in the Hands of this Ac- 
comptant 11 14 4 

262 12 11 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



25) 



WILL OF JEMIMA FRENCH, 1789 

Let it be Recorded that I Jemimah French of Moores Town in the 
County of Burlington Widow, being weak of Body but of Sound and Dis- 
posing mind and Memory, thanks be Given unto God therefor, and being 
Defireous that Small Estate which it hath pleafed God to blefs me with 
in this Life Shall Come unto Such perfons as I shall herein Nominate 
and appoint do make this my Laft Will and Testament in Manner fol- 
lowing — 

Imprimis. I Will that all my funeral Charges & Just Debts be fully 
paid by my Executor hereafter Named . . . 

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Daughter Sarah Brown my two Bedds 
& furniture thereunto belonging and a Cafe of High Cherry tree Drawrs, 
and a Mahogany Tea Table and Looking Glafs, and a Couch and beding 
thereunto belonging — and a Note or Bill I have against my Son George 
French, and a Large Chest Standing in my Lodging Room, half a Dozen 
of my best Chairs & an arm Chair and a Chids high Chair, and a Large 
Pewter Dish that was her Father's & Six of my best Pewter plates. I also 
Give all my Waring Cloaths to my said Daughter Sarah and a Big wheel . . . 

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Grand Daughter Unea Keen, my 
little wheel . . . 

Item I Give and becjueath to my said Daughter Sarah my best Dieper 
Table Cloaths . . . 

Item I order & it is my Will that all the Reiidue of my Estate be Sold 
as soon After my Deceafe as may be Convenient, Item and out of the 
money Arifing from the Sales thereof I Give and Bequeath unto my three 
Sons namely Edward Uriah & George French Each the Sum of Ten Shil- 
lings, they being heretofore provided for. Item I Give & bequeath unto 
my said Grand Daughter Unea Keen the Sum of fifteen pounds in hard 
Money or the Value thereof in other Currency. 

Item I order and it is my Will that the Refidue of my Estate After 
my Just Debts funeral Charges and Legacies are paid Shall be Equally 
Devided between my four Childred and my said Grandaughter Unea Share 
and Share Alike Item & Lastly I do hereby Nominate Conftitute and 
appoint my said Son Edward French whole and Sole Executor of this my 
Laft Will and Teftament In Witnefs whereof I have hereunto Set my 
Hand and Seal the firft day of April in the year of our Lord one thoufand 
Seven Hundred and Eighty nine 1789 

hir 
Signed Sealed pronounced & 
Declared by the within Named 
Jemimah French as and for 
her Last Will & Testament 
in the prefence of us — 
Joseph Newton 
Tohn Cox 



Jemim 



..ffx 



French 



mark 




252 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Joseph Newton one of the witnefses of the within will being duly 
affirmed according to Law did affirm and say that he saw Jeminiah French 
the Testatrix therein named make her Mark and Seal the same Sc heard 
her publish pronounce and declare the within writing to be her last will 
and Testament, that at the doing thereof the said Testatrix was of sound 
& disposing mind and memory as far as this affirmant knows and as he 
verily believes and that John Cox the other Subscribing Evidence was 
present at the same time & Signed his name as a witnefs to the said Will 
together with his affirmant in the presence of the S"* Testatrix — 
Affirmed at Burlington the 13'" ") 

day of May 1789 before me > Joseph Newton 

Herbert M'Elroy Surr ) 

Edward French sole Executor in the within named being duly affirmed 
according to Law did affirm and say that the within Instrument of writing 
Contains the true Last Will and Testament of Jemimah French the Tes- 
tatrix therein named so far as he knows and as he verily believes, that 
he will well and truly perform the same by paying first the Debts of the 
said Testatrix and then the Legacies in the said Testament Specified so 
far forth as the Goods Chattels and Credits of the said dec'd can thereunto 
Extend & that he will make and Exhibit into the Prerogative Office of New 
Jersey a true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the goods Chattels 
& Credits of the said Dec"" that have or shall come to his knowledge or 
pofsefsion or to the pofsefsion of any other person or persons for his use 

and render a Just and true Account when thereunto Lawfully required. 

Affirmed at Burlington the 13'" ^ 

May 1789 — ^before me v Edward French 

Herbert M'Elroy ) 

Inventory dated April 15'" 1789 £74—0—10 

John Cox 
Joseph Newton 
Appraisers 




A FAMILY SPINNING WHEEL 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



253 



35— ROBERT FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6). 

b. 6th mo. 1707. 

buried 9th mo. 7th, 1760, in Friends' Burying 
Ground, Chester Meeting, Moorestown, N. J. 
m. 10th mo. 1737, Hannah Cattel, daughter of 
Jonas and Mary (Pearce) Cattel. 
She b. 6th mo. 7th, 1716. 
d. 6th mo. 27th, 1801. 



126— JONAS FRENCH 



b. 9th mo. 17th, 1738. 



127— MARY FRENCH 



b. 10th mo. 4th, 1740. 

m. First, 12th mo. 24th, 1761, William Hold- 
craft, 
m. Second, 3rd mo. 16th, 1797, Isaac Gibbs. 



128— HANNAH FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 15th, 1743. 

d. Uth mo. 29th, 1784, unmarried. 



129— THOMAS FRENCH 



b. 12th mo. 26th, 1745. 
m. April 22nd, 1769, Mercy Co.\. 



130— ELIZABETH FRENCH 



b. 2nd mo. 28th, 1747. 
d. 3rd mo. 10th, 1767. 

m. June 18th, 1766, John Ferguson (Christ 
Church record, Philadelphia). 



131— ROBERT FRENCH, JR. 



b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1749. 

m. First, 2nd mo. 15th, 1785, Hannah War- 
rington. 
m. Second, Sth mo., 1803, Elizabeth Stokes. 



132— JAMES FRENCH 



b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1751. 
m. First, July 24th, 1773, Mary Clark, 
m. Second, October 12th, 1779, Sarah Fer- 
guson. 



133— JOSEPH FRENCH 



b. 10th mo. 14th, 1753. 
d. aged two weeks. 



254 GENEALOGY OF THE 



134— KEZIAH FRENCH b. 5th mo. 11th, 1756. 

m. John Thompson. 

135— ANN FRENCH b. 10th mo. 26th, 1758. 

m. 12th mo., 1781, Samuel Carr. 

ROBERT FRENCH 

Robert French, third son of Thomas French, Jr., was a man of strong 
character, who early developed characteristic family traits. He purchased 
from Thomas Cowperthwaite, in 1741, thirty acres of good farm land, 
located on the northwest side of Moorestown, N. J. ; and, three years later, 
his father conveyed to him by deed of gift, dated March 23, 1744, one 
hundred and sixty-seven acres adjoining the same. Here he resided until 
his death, in 1760. His will directed the sale of the property as soon after 
his death as his executors might think proper, and it was in part disposed 
of, although not immediately. In 1744 his son James [132] purchased 
fifty acres. The same year his son Robert [131] bought fifty-five acres; 
and in 1801, through the will of his mother, Robert became possessed of 
the remainder of the estate, subject to the care of an invalid brother. 

Robert French, the elder, became a recognized minister in the Society of 
Friends and was much esteemed. Both he and his wife Hannah were very 
active in the affairs of Chester (Moorestown), Evesham and Haddonfield 
Meetings, being many times appointed representatives to Quarterly and 
Yearly Meetings. Hannah French was made overseer of Chester Meeting 
in 1747 and elder in 1765, serving in the latter capacity thirty-six years. 
In his journal, Daniel Stanton, a minister of Philadelphia Monthly Meet- 
ing, makes the following note: " I was at a large Meeting at Chester at the 
burial of Robert French a Friend in the ministry who was much beloved 
and valued as a good Example among Friends where he had lived." 

"The Friend," 10 m. 1, 1859, gave the following appreciative sketch: 

Robert French was born in the township of Chester, County of Bur- 
lington, West Jersey, 1708. His parents were religious members of the 
Society of Friends, whose pious labors on his behalf, through the Lord's 
assisting grace, were blessed. He was religiously inclined from his youth 
and grew in favor with his heavenly Father and in the esteem of his 
friends. His natural abilities were not great, yet his innocent, exemplary 
life and faithfulness in discharging the duties laid upon him, made his way 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 255 

open with all lovers of the Truth. Having received a gift of the ministry 
of the gospel, he was often led to exercise it, generally briefly, but in a 
lively manner, to the comfort of the well-minded. He was often engaged 
to exhort to love, and was himself a good example of that Christian virtue, 
watchful over his own spirit, and living in good measure agreeable to his 
profession therein. " His removal was a loss to the meeting he belonged 
to, yet we are fully satisfied it was his gain." He was a minister twenty- 
two years. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

14 — 9 — mo. 1737 Robert French and Hannah Cattle the first time sig- 
nified their intentions of marriage with each other, therefore Joseph Stokes 
and Thos. Hackney are appointed to make enquiry as usual and make 
report thereof to our next Monthly Meeting, parents present give consent 
to said. 

12—10 mo. 1737 Robt French and Hannah Cattle signified y* Z""" 
time they continued their intention of marriage, therefore not finding any- 
thing to obstruct this mtg. allows that they may take each other in marriage 
and appoints Jos. Stokes and Thos. Hackney to be present to see said 
intended marriage accomplished orderly. 

9 — 11 mo. 1737 The committee report that they were present at the mar- 
riage of Robt. French and Hannah Cattle and y' it was accomplished 
orderly. 

Haddonfield Minutes of y" Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

Att a m°ly m*g of w"m fr"^ held at Haddonfield y" 14*'' of 9*" m" 1737 
Robert French & Hannah Kettle signified y' intentions of m'g Mary 
Roberts & Ann Cooper are ap" to make y'' ufual inquirie & report to 
next m*g. 

Att A m-ly m*g of w°m fr"' held at Haddonfield y« 12*" of lO"" 1737 
Robert French & Hannah Kettle signified y" continuation of y"" intentions 
of m''g, confent of parties concernd ap''g & return of inquiers clear, y" m'g 
confents to y"' accomplifhm' of y'' s*" m'"g according to y" good o''d'' amongst 
fr'^, & ap'" Eliz" Evins & Sarah Hains to see good o''d''s kept &. report 
to next m*g. 

Att a m^ly m*g of w"m fr''^ held at Haddonfield y* 9'" of 11'" 1737/8 
last m*g minuit' being read reportd y' perfons ap'd y* y" afors'' m''g was 
orderly accomplifh"^. 



256 GENEALOGY OF THE 

[Men's Meeting] 

8 — 10 mo. 1740 Robert French, Josiah & Wm. Foster, John Hollings- 
head, etc. to meet at ye house of Jos. Cooper on ye first second day in next 
month in order to peruse the minutes of this meeting in order that they may 
be fairly entered in a book that is bound and that they may have power 
to correct said minutes 

11 — 3 mo. 1747 Edmund llollingshead from the Preparative Mtg of 
Chester requests that Robt. French might have Liberty to sit in the Meeting 
of Ministers and Elders which this meeting consents to and that it being 
signified in there report to the Quarterly Meeting of Ministers & Elders. 

11 — 3 mo. 1747. The Overseers of each meeting are desired to meet 
at Haddonfield at seven in the morning before the monthly meeting with 
the company of Joshua Lord, Thos. Redman and Isaac Andrews, Wm. 
Forster, Robt. French etc. to consider what is best to be done in the case 
of such as walketh disorderly and has been neglected to be dealt with & 
discharged ourselves of them, & to make report thereof at our next monthly 
meeting. 

12 — 8 mo. 1759 Chas. and Robert French are among the friends ap- 
pointed to meet at Haddonfield ye 28th instant at ye 10th hour in ye fore- 
noon to waitily consider that friends would again revive ye consideration 
of seperate monthly meeting for Evesham and Chester. 

9 — 6 mo. 1760 Robt. French one of committee to inspect whether friends 
have wills by them and likewise to collect such births and burials as ye 
persons concerned neglects to do and bring them through the Preparative 
Mtg. to the monthly meeting to be recorded. 



Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly meeting held at Evesham y* 10'" of y" 9'" Mo. 1761. 
Isaac Evens produced an Essay of The Testimonys of this meeting, Con- 
cerning our Dec'd friends Robert French and Obadiah Borton which were 
read and with Some amendment approved and ye Clerk is Directed to 
Transcribe them, & sign them, & send them with ye reports to our next 
Quarterly meeting. 



Haddonfield Minutes of y" Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

Women friends of y'' m°ly m'g being met at Had°f"* y" 11'" of 3'" 1747 
no other bufinefs from Chefter, but y* recjuest of an other over-seer, to be 
chofen, where upon, fr''* ap'^ Han" French. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 257 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 
[Women's Meeting] 

7" of 7" mo. 1763. The necessity of revising of the minutes of this meet- 
ing coming under consideration ; therefore Hannah French, Hannah Foster, 
Sarah Wilkins, and Ruth Bispham are appointed to inspect all the said 
minutes and correct such of them as they may find needful, and set a price 
for transcribing the said minutes into a bound book to be purchased for that 
service and make report when the work is perfected. 

8"— of 9"— mo. 1763 We the Committee appointed by the Mo. Mtg. at 
Evesham to inspect the minutes of said meeting have all met on y* occa- 
sion agreeable to direction and have performed y" service and are of the 
mind that it is worth one pound, five shillings to transcribe them into a 
bound book. Sign'd this 16*" of y^ 8'" Mo. 1763— By Hannah Foster, 
Sarah Wilkins, Hannah French and Ruth Bispham. 

Hannah French and Ruth Bispham are appointed to comprize the answers 
into one and draw the report for the Quarterly Meeting, and one of them 
sign it on behalf of this meeting. 

[Men's Meeting] 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham y'' 5"' of y^ first mo. 1764. 
Our friend Mark Reeve signified that he had Drawings in his mind to 
visit y* Families of Friends within y" compass of Chester Meeting, & he 
produced y* concurrence of Salem Monthly Meeting which was approved 
of Therefore Edm'* HoUinshead, John & Joshua Roberts, Hannah French, 
Esther & Rebukah Roberts are app'' to joyn him in that service. 

[Women's Meeting] 

5" of 1" mo. 1764 The meeting appoints Hannah French, Esther and 
Rebekah Roberts to join Mark Reeve & Joshua Thompson in visiting Fami- 
lies of Friends belonging to Chester. 

8 — of 3" mo. 1764. Hannah French requests a few lines by way of cer- 
tificate to recommend her to friends of Haddonfield Monthly Meeting. 

[Men's Meeting] 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham y'' 8*'' of y" 3'^ mo. 1764. 
The women friends requested that Certificates might be prepared to recom- 
mend Hannah French to y*^ monthly meeting at Haddonfield & Mary Enoch 
& Hannah Shinn to ye monthly meeting at Burlington therefore Enoch 
Roberts is appointed to prepare that for Hannah French & Mary Enoch, 
& Josiah Prickitt that for Hannah Shinn agreeable to y' acct. they receive 
from y* women & produce them to next meeting. 
17 



258 GENEALOGY OF THE 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y* 5"" of y^ 4*'' Mo. 1764. 
The Friends appointed produced certificates on behalf of Hannah French, 
Mary Enoch, & Hannah Shinn, according to appointment which were read 
approved & signed by y'^ clerk, & sent to y" women for their signing. 

[Women's Meeting] 

5" of 4" mo. 1764 A certificate being read approved and signed recom- 
mending our Friend Hannah French to ye care of Friends of Haddonfield 
Monthly Meeting. 



Haddonfield Minutes of y^ Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women Friends held at Haddonfield the 9"" 
4 Mo. 1764. 

A Certificate was produced from Evesham Monthly Meeting recommending 
Hannah French to the Notice of this Meeting as a Friend in good Unity, 
which was Read and Received. 



Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 
[Men's Meeting] 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 8'" of y"" 11'" mo. 1764. 
Hannah French requested certificates to recommend her two sons, Thomas 
and Robert to the monthly meeting at Haddonfield, Therefore Thomas War- 
rington & John Lippincott are appointed To make y* Needful Enquiery & 
prepare Them according & produce Them To Ne.xt Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y'' 6*" of y^ 12"> Mo. 1764. 
The Friends appointed, produced Certificates on behalf of Thomas & Robert 
French, according to appointment which were read approved and signed 
by y*' Clerk. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 6*'' of y* 6*'' mo. 1765. 
A Certificate was produced on behalf of Thomas French from y"' Monthly 
Meeting at Haddonfield Dated y^ IS"" of y* 5*'' mo. 1765 recommending 
him to have been orderly whilst amongst them, which was read & rec'd. 

[Women's Meeting] 

9'" of 6*'' mo. 1765 Our friend Hannah French being returned from 
Haddonfield with a certificate which friends gladly receive. 

8**" of 8'" mo. 1765 Hannah French, Hannah Haines, Hannah Foster, 
and Rebecca Roberts appointed to inspect and correct the minutes of this 
meeting. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 259 

5"' of 9'" mo. 1765 We the committee appointed by y'' monthly meeting 
of women friends of Evesham, to inspect and correct y^ minutes of y® said 
meeting have met agreeable to appointment and have inspected and cor- 
rected such of them as we tho't needful and agreed with Hannah Haines 
to transcribe them into the bound book for the sum of one pound two shil- 
lings. .Signed by us, Hannah Foster, Hannah French, Rebecca Roberts, 
and Hannah Haines. 

5"" of 9"" mo. 1765 There appears a necessity of another elder for Chester 
Preparative Meeting therefore they have nominated our Friend Hannah 
French to that service which was sent to y* men friends for their appro- 
bation. 

[Men's Meeting] 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 5"* of ye 9"' mo. 1765. 
The women Friends alfo signified that they proposed Hannah French to 
be an appointed Elder for Chester preparative meeting which was approved 
of, & y* Clerk is Directed to Notifie y^ Quarterly Meeting of Ministers & 
Elders thereof for their concurrence. 

[Women's Meeting] 

10*'' of 2'' mo. 1774 Hannah French one of a committee to visit such as 
are in y* neglect of attending meetings. 

10 — 4 mo. 1783 Hannah French one of the women friends appointed to 
sit with the Friends of upper Evesham at some of their first Preparative 
Meetings. 

8"' 10 mo. 1784 Hannah French appointed on committee to read and 
revive some ancient advices of discipline. 

5 — P* mo. 1787 Hannah French appointed on committee to attend the 
meeting for parents and heads of families. 

[Men's Meeting] 

Extract from Record book of Sufferings of Friends of Evesham Monthly 
Meeting for non Compliance of Military duty. Being An Account of 
Friends Sufferings within the Compass of Evesham Monthly Meeting for 
refusing to pay a Tax for procuring Powder & other Military Stores & for 
refusing to be Active in Military Services. The Sums Demanded : Goods 
taken: the Value thereof; by whom taken, & by what Authority is as 
followeth. 

6'" mo. 1783. Taken from Hannah French (Widdow) by Abraham 
Winner & John Mott a Coverlid & Blankett rated £1: 10: Substitute Tax 
demanded about 10 s. 



260 GENEALOGY OF THE 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 5'" of the 3""" Mo. 1802. 
One Elder deceased, To wit, Our esteemed friend Hannah French, an 
Elder of Chester preparative, and Evesham Monthly Meetings, departed 
this life on the 27" day of the 6*" Mo. 1801 in the 85th year of her age. 

In her passage through Time, she e.xperienced many scenes of difficulty 
and probation ; which she was enabled to bear with Christian fortitude ; 
through the efficacy of that Faith which worketh by love, and is the support 
of the Righteous through all ages. In the latter years of her life it 
appeared that her love towards her fellow Mortals evidently increased ; she 
often expressing in her last illness, earnest Solicitude that her connections 
with others, would press after the same apprehending it a good preparative 
for the awful Scene to which with a becoming resignation, she appeared 
to be hastening. 



RECEIPT, ROBERT FRENCH [35] TO THOMAS FRENCH [33}, 1745 

I Robert French of Chester in the County of Burlington Sec, have 
Reseved of Thomas French of the Same place Excutor to the Last Will 
and Testament of my late deceased Father Thomas French one obligation 
bearing even date with these presents Conditioned for the payment of Thirty 
pounds currant money and my Fathers horse bridel and Saddel and all his 
wearing aperrel and I do hereby acquit and discharge The Said Thomas 
French his heairs Executors and Administrators from all except Thee half 
of the Seder Swamp that was left between us and from all other actions 
Cause and Causes of action Suits Debts bils Bonds writings obligations 
Sum and Sums of money Quarrels and conterouersies of what kind Soever 
touching his late Deceased Fathers Estate or anj'thing concearning him The 
above Said Excutor had made moved or depending from the begining of 
our first acquantance To the date of these presents. In Witness whareof 
I have hereunto set my hand Seal Dated The Twenty forth day of October 
in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven hundred and forty and five 
(1745) 





^KC 




Sealed and delivered 
in The presence of 
Samuel Atkinson 
Joseph Heritage 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 261 



WILL OF ROBERT FRENCH, 1760 

Let it be recorded that I Robert French of Chester in the County of 
Burlington and within the Province of West New. Jerfey Yeoman Being 
Sick «S; weak of Body, But of Sound and Dispofing mind and memory thanks 
be given to Almighty God therefore ; and Calling to mind the uncertainty 
of this life, and the Certainty of Death when it may please Almighty God 
to call ; and being Desirous that what Temporal Estate it hath pleased 
God to lend me in this life Shall Come unto Such perfon and perfons, as 
I shall herein Nominate and appoynt. Herebj' revoaking and making Void 
all other wills & Testaments heretofore by me made Either by word or 
writing ; and this only to be taken for the same as followeth Viz'. 

Imp"^^ I Do hereby order and Direct, that all my Estate may be Sold 
Both Real and perfonal as Soon after my Death, as my Execu""^ Hereafter 
Named may think proper, and I Do hereby Impower my Execu"^ or the 
Survivers of them to make as Good a Deed or Deeds of Conveyance to the 
purchafer or purchafers of my lands, as I my Self Could do were I perfon- 
ally present, and out of the firs payments arifing from my Estate I order 
my Execu"^^ to pay and discharge all my Just Debts whatsoever, and the 
Remainder of my Estate I Despofe of in the following manner 

Item — I Give and Bequeth unto my Dear and well beloved Wife Hannah 
the Sum of One Hundred pounds Procklamation Money to her my Said 
Wife her heirs and afsigns forever. 

Item — I Give and Becjueth unto my Son Jonas French & to his Heirs and 
Afsigns forever ; the Sum of One Hundred Pounds money aforefaid, and 
Also a gray Mare Bridle and Saddle which was Called his . . . 

Item — I Give and Bequeth unto my Daughter Mary French and to her 
heirs and afsigns for Ever a Bay Coult a Saddle and Bridle, and the Sum 
of fifty pounds Money Afforefaid, to be paid to her by my Execu"^^ as 
Soon after my Debts are paid as may be Convenient — 

Item I Give and Bequeth unto my Daughter Hannah French the Sum 
of Fifty pounds money afforefaid to be paid to her by my Execu'''* in Man- 
ner Afforefaid to her my Said Daughter her heirs and Afsigns forever — 

Item I Give and Bequeth unto my other Six Children Namely Thomas 
French Elizabeth French, Robert French James French Kiziah French and 
Anne French, the Sum of Fifty pounds Each, to them and Each of them 
my said Children their heirs and afsigns forever, to be paid to them as 
they may Severly attain their full ages or married, which may first happen, 
by my Execu"^^ — 

Item it is my Will and I do hereby order that all the Remainder of 
my Estate (after my Just debts and legacies aforefaid are paid), shall be 
Equily Divided Mongst my Wife and Children Share and Share alike 



262 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Item it is my Will that my Dear and well beloved wife Should have 
the Interest of Each of my Children's Shares whilst they are under age the 
Better to Enable her to bring up and Edicate my Said Children . . . 

Item My will is if any of my Said Children Should happen to Dye before 
they attain their full age leaving no lawfull Ishue then and in Such Case 
I order his her or their Share So Dying to be Equily Devided amongst 
my Surviving Children Share and Share alike — 

Item I Give and Bequeth unto my Said Wife a Gray mare Saddle and 
bridle — • 

Item I do hereby Nominate and appoynt my Said Dear Wife Hannah 
Execu — and my Brother-in-law James Cattle and my Son Jonas French 
Executors to this my last Will and Testament in Testamoney whereof I 
have here unto Sett my hand and Seal the thirty first Day of the Eighth 
Month in the Year of our of Our Lord One thousand Seven Hundred and 
Sixty 1760. 

Signed Sealed pronounced and declared by the within named Robert 
French to be his last Will and Testament in the presence of us whofe 
Names are hereunto Subscribed as witnefses thereto. 



(jlotr^f-/:. '^r^ptck I 



Tho' Morton 
John Matlack 
Samuel Gafkill 
John Cox 

Samuel Gaskill and John Coxe two of the Witnefses to the above Will 
being of the People called Quakers and duly affirmed according to Law did 
declare and Affirm that they were Present and saw Robert French the Tes- 
tator above Named Sign & Seal the fame and heard him publish pronounce 
and declare the above Instrument to be his last Will & Testament and that 
at the doing thereof the said Testator was of Sound & dispofing Mind 
Memory and Understanding as far as they know and as they Verily believe 
and that Thomas Morton and John Matlacke the other Subscribing Evi- 
dences were present and Signed their Names as Witnefses to the fame 
together with thefe Affirmants in the prefence of the said Testator. 

Affirmed at Burlington October ) Samuel Gafkill 

r' Anno Dom 1760 before j John Cox 

.S. Blackwood Surrogate. 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 263 

Hannah French and James Cattell the Exrs. within Named being of 
the people called Quakers on their Solemn Affirmation which they took 
according to Law did declare & Affirm that the within Instrument of 
writing contains the true last Will & Instrument of Robert French the Tes- 
tator therein Named deceased as far as they know and as they Verily believe 
and that they will well & truly perform the same by paying first the Debts 
of the said deceased & then the Legacies in the said Testament Specified 
so farr forth as the Goods Chatties & Credits of the said deceased can 
thereunto extend and that they will make and Exhibit into the Registry of 
the Prerogative Office at Burlington a true and perfect Inventory of all 
& Singular the Goods Chatties & Credits of the said deceased which have 
or shall come to their knowledge or pofsefsion or to the pofsefsion of any 
other perfon or perfons for their LTfe and Render a Just & true Acct when 
thereunto Lawfully Recjuired — 



Affirmed October V 17()0 
before 

S. Blackwood Surrogate. 






INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT FRENCH, 1760 

An Inventory of the Goods Chattels and Credits of Robert French Late 
of Chester in the County of Burlington Dec. Taken and Appraised by 
us under : written the 24"' day of September 1760 

£ S P 

To wareing Apparrel in the Lodging Room 9 

To a ffether Bedd and ff urniture 10 

To 2 old Chests and Sundries therein 1 10 

To a Case of Old Drawers 20/. To a warming pan & Bedd 15/ 1 15 

To a Small Looking glass 5/ Glass Bottles &c 2/6 7 6 

To Sundries old pewter in the frunt Room 17 6 

To pair of Stilyards Lantron old pine tables 15 

To Sundry old chairs worsted and woollen Yarn 2 6 6 

To 2 old wheels old Sive &c 17/6 To Sundry old books &c 1 9 6 

To a Bed and Bedding in the first Room upstairs 8 10 

To an old Chest and Some Bed Cloaths therein 1 4 

To a ffether Bed and beding in the Second Room 4 10 

To 2 old Chaff Beds and Beding 3 

To wooU Tubs and Sundries 25/ To an old Saddle 19/. . . 2 4 

To an old Gun 12/ in the Kitchen 12 

To a Dough Trough 5/ To Sundry Iron potts pott Rase 

&c 22/6 1 7 6 

To End Irons and Shovel Tongs &c 18 



264 GENEALOGY OF THE 

To Tubs pails lic 7/6 To Sundry old Iron Edge tools 

&c 22/6 1 10 

To old Casks &c in the Cellar 1 3 

To Edge tools Chains and Sundries in the Smoak house. . . 2 2 

To Rye in the Stack Suposed to be 65 Bushel a 2/6p 8 2 6 

To wheat in the Stack Suposed to be 15 Bushel a 4/ 3 

To a Stack of Gates 5 

To Flax & Sundries in the Barn 1 11 

To Sundry Stacks of hay 15 

To 23 Sheep * 6 10 

To 3 old ploughs and a harrow 2 8 6 

To an Iron Bound Waggon £9— To 2 old Carts £4: 10:... 13 10 

To 6 Cows at 70/p To 3 heffers a 40/p Yearling D" 30/. . . 28 10 

To a Yoak of Oxen 12 

To a field of Indien Corn and Some punkins 8 10 

To one thousand Shingles at home 3 

To Eight Thousand Shingles at the Ceader Swamp 16 

To Scythes Grind-stone Geers old harrows &c 1 7 6 

To a piece of Buck : wheat 1 

To a Gray Mare £10— To D° £10— To a bay coult £8 28 

To a gray Horse £7 To an old Gray Mare 10/ 7 10 

To 16 Small Hoggs & 14 Piggs 14 

To 16 Yards of Tomey at 4/6p 3 12 

John Cox 
Enoch Roberts 

John Coxe and Enoch Roberts the Appraisers of the above Inventory 
being of the People called Quakers and duly Affirmed According to Law. 
did declare and Affirm that the Goods Chatties and Credits in the above 
Inventory Set down & Specified were by them Appraised according to 
their Just and true Respective Rates and Values after the best of their 
Judgment & Understanding an that they Appraised things were brought 
to their View for Appraisement 
Affirmed Octo 1"* 1760 before John Cox 

S. Blackwood Surrogate. Enoch Roberts 

Hannah French and James Cattell Executors of the last Will and Testa- 
ment of Robert French deceased being duly Affirmed according to Law 
did declare & Affirm that the Above Writing contains a true & perfect 
Inventory of all & Singular the Goods Chatties & Credits of the said 
deceased as farr as have come to their knowledge or possion or to the 
possession of any other person or persons for their Use 
Affirmed October P' 1760. Hannah ffrench 

before me James Cattell 

S. Blackwood .Surrogate. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



265 



SUMMARY OF WILL OF HANNAH FRENCH, 1785 
Hannah French — Chester, Burlington Co., N. J. Widow. 
Date— 12 mo. 12th— 1785 Proved, August 18-1801 

Children — Robert French — After directing that her debts and funeral 
charges be paid — " I give all the rest, residue & remainder of 
my personal estate (excepting my wearing apparel) Together 
with all that Mefsuage, Tenement Plantation & tract of Land 
whereon I now dwell Situate in Chester afores* with the Appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, to my Son Robert French sub- 
ject to the following Incumbrance, that he maintain my Son 
Jonas French during his natural life." 
Jonas — to be maintained during his natural life by Robert and 
his Heirs, Admr'' or afsigns. 



Executor, Son Robert French 



C Joshua Hunt 

Witnesses : } Esther Hunt Jun"" 
(_ William Roberts. 




'am<^/ 



'i<(frml 




m 



>z>oc> 



eTHTS B\LL of FTFTEEN SHILLINGS Proclamation, 
■* is emitted by a LA IV of the Colony of NEW- JERSEY, 
)a(rcd in the Fourteenth Year of the Reign of his Majcfty 
t^:„„ ^ =• -o D o n- .i._ Third. Dated MARCH aj, 1776. 

FIFTEEN. SHILLINGS. 





^^?^f^ 




m 
m 

1 



•-.^..^i^^^i.; 



COLONIAL MONEY OF NEW JERSEY, 1776 

On the reverse side is an engraving of a skeleton leaf, with the words : " Fifteen 
Shillings. To counterfeit is death. Burlington, New Jersey. Printed by Isaac Collins." 



266 GENEALOGY OF THE 

EVESHAM MEETING 

The first account of this meeting states that Friends assembled for wor- 
ship at the house of William Evans, in 1694. He was the progenitor of 
the Evans family in New Jersey and came with the pioneers to Burlington 
in 1677. The first meeting house was built about 1698, when regular meet- 
ings Avere established. Referring to this meeting appears the following 
minute in the Haddonfield records, authorizing the establisliment of Pre- 
parative and Monthly meetings : 

" Request for this meeting was laid before Haddonfield Monthly Meet- 
ing 23 of ye 3'* Mo. 1759 and was kept under consideration of ye Quarterly 
Meeting until ye 21 of 3"* Mo. 1760, ye sd request was granted." 

The following minute also appears : 

" It having been observed by some Friends of Evesham and Chester 
Meetings the great increase of a hopeful and rising generation among us, 
and the comfortable increase of our meetings for worship, from hence a 
concern arose for their further advancement in the blessed Truth ; and 
having by experience seen the need and use of church discipline, and the 
necessity of waiting for Divine aid in the management thereof; and observ- 
ing the increase and multiplicity of business at Haddonfield Monthly 
Meeting, of which we are members, by reason whereof our aff'airs could not 
be carried on with that improving calmness and deliberation which the 
nature of the service required ; and being concerned that generations to 
come may ask and seek for the good old way, and may walk therein by 
a clear illumination of mind and simplicity of manners ; — under these con- 
siderations a concern arose to request that Evesham and Chester might be 
constituted to hold a separate Monthly Meeting; which, after several years' 
deliberation, and a firm persuasion that it might be for general service, was 
accordingly done, as the minutes do set forth." 

In 1760 the second meeting house was built. In 1798 it was enlarged 
and a partition put in. After 1828 both branches of the Society used the 
same building, a quaint specimen of old-time meeting houses. The wood- 
work was not painted, except around the doors and windows. On the north 
side of the building Avas a well which was filled up in 1846. The original 
lock on the front door was eight by eleven inches, two inches thick, fastened 
by heavy bolts. The key weighed nearly one half a pound. In the old 
house was a librarv filled with books as old as itself. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 267 

37— MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6). 

m. First, April 15th, 1736, Nathan Middleton. 
He d. 1760. 

m. Second, 9th mo. 17th, 1761, George Matlack. 

136— BEULAH MIDDLETON 

137— NATHAN MIDDLETON, JR. 

Thomas French [6], father of Mary (French) Middleton, in his will dated 1745, 
bequeathed to his " daughter Mary's four sons each of them five pounds when they attain 
their full age." At least three of these sons appear to have been deceased at the time 
of the death of Nathan Middleton, in 1760, as only one son is mentioned in his will. 
Nathan Middleton was constable of Chester Township, Burlington Co., N. J., in 1732, 
and overseer of highways, 1748-49. 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF NATHAN MIDDLETON, 1760 

Nathan Middleton Chester, Burlington Co. N. J. Yeoman ; " sick & weak 

in body " 

Date June 6th — 1760. Proved — June 30 — 1760 at Burlington. 

Wife Mary remainder of my personal estate, & use of my plantation 
where I dwell, until son Nathan is 21, to enable her to bring 
up my children 

Children — daughter, Bulia a lot of land to be taken off from my planta- 
tion as follows ; beginning at corner of Joshua Bispham's field 
next adjoining the land whereon the Meeting houfe stands & to 
extend from s'^ Bisphams corner a perrilal Courfe with his line 
to my Meadow fence thence as the fence now Stands to the Road 
Between my plantation and the plantation late Nehemiah Haines's 
thence a South Courfe up the sd road to the Meeting-house 
Lands, thence part by the Same and part by the Said Bispham's 
Land to place of beginning ; also give her a case of Drawers 
other articles of furniture, largest brass kettles and warming 
pan, my young Sorrel'd Mare &c &c. when 18 or married ; £30 
to be paid by son Nathan 3 years after he comes of age 

Son Nathan rest of my lands & plantation 1 horse 2 cows when 21 



Executors — Wife Mary 

friend Sam' Stoke 



. i/Pa^hn?n^'b/!k^rPr-. 



Witnesses Robt French W'" Thomas John Cox 

Inventory Taken June 24 — 1760 — £321 

To Martin Hefter's a Dutch Lad's Time 4 yrs — £14. 
To Phillip Acreman's a Dutch boy's time 6 yr — £18. 



268 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



42— CHARLES FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8). 

b. 8th mo. 12th, 1714. 
d. 1st mo. 15th, 1785. 

m. 10th mo. 6th, 1739, Ann Clement, daughter of 
Jacob and Ann (Harrison) Clement. 
She b. 9th mo. 24th, 1720. 
d. 8th mo. 9th, 1778. 



138— ANN FRENCH 



b. September 24th, 1740. 
m. 12th mo. 12th, 1757, Jacob Wilkins. 



139— ABIGAIL FRENCH 



b. January 18th, 1742. 
m. 9th mo. 1760, John Brick, 3rd. 



140— JACOB FRENCH 



b. April 28th, 1745. 

m. 12th mo. 3rd, 1772, Elizabeth Stokes. 



141— SAMUEL FRENCH 



b. September 17th, 1748. 
m. 4th mo. 7th, 1769, Sarah Heulings. 



142— ELIZABETH FRENCH 



b. February 18th, 1750. 

m. First, 10th mo., 1768, James Wills. 

m. Second, 4th mo. 11th, 1787, Moses Wills. 



143— CHARLES FRENCH, 3RD. b. October 25th, 1753. 

m. May 29th, 1783, Sabilla Stokes. 



144— ELEANOR FRENCH 



b. March 19th, 1756. 

m. First, 11th mo. 23rd, 1775, Hugh Hollings- 
^ head, 
m. Second, Joseph Matlack. 



145— HOPE FRENCH 



b. November 5th, 1763. 
m. 1st mo. 1780, William Black, 3rd. 



146— SARAH FRENCH 



b. January 3rc], 1765. 
d. 8th mo. 3rd, 1778. 



(Birth dates of children are taken from Charles and Ann French family 
Bible; dates of marriages are from Meeting and Church records.) 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 269 

CHARLES FRENCH, JR. 

Charles French, Jr. [42], learned the trade of mason, supposedly while a 
resident of Philadelphia, whence he removed to Moorestown, New Jersey, 
about 1740. He pursued his calling successfully and became a land owner 
in that vicinity. Yet like his forbears he was devoted to rural life and 
the cultivation of the soil. April 20, 1747, he purchased of James Childs 
a fine piece of land, 259 acres in extent, located on both sides of the south 
branch of Pensaukin Creek, partly in Evesham Township, Burlington 
County, and partly in Waterford Township, then Gloucester, now Camden 
County, near the present hamlet of Fellowship. This property had first 
been taken up by the Inskeep family, three brothers, jointly interested, 
James, Joseph and John, selling it to their father, November 8, 1727. He 
sold it, December 31, 1728, to James Childs, who, nearly twenty years later, 
conveyed it to Charles French, who made it his homestead throughout the 
remainder of his life, increasing his holding until a final survey, in 1782, 
showed that he owned 460 acres in that immediate neighborhood. In all 
lines of industrial effort he prospered greatly, exercising large influence 
throughout the community. In 1760 he assisted in building the second 
Friends' meeting house, Moorestown, one of his associate workmen being 
Mathew Allen, whose ancestor was a son-in-law of Thomas ffrench, the pro- 
genitor. At this time he became an overseer in Chester Meeting, Moores- 
town, and with his wife was active in the affairs of the Society, frequently 
sitting as representative in Quarterly Meetings at Haddonfield and Salem. 
In later life he took special interest in Evesham Meeting. 

In 1771, Charles French availed himself of a special opportunity, at 
Sheriff's sale, at Woodbury, purchasing 1,000 acres of "land and swamp." 
with saw mill, farm houses, etc., located along and near Raccoon Creek, 
Greenwich (now Harrison) Township, about three miles from Mullica Hill. 
This extensive property, belonging to James Budd, was in four tracts, partly 
cultivated, other sections containing valuable timber. The purchase price 
was 505 pounds, little more than one half the amount of the judgment. 
Soon thereafter this property was taken charge of by the owner's son, Samuel 
French [141], whose inheritance it became, about ten years later. The will 
and inventory of Charles French [42] shows that at the time of his death, 
in 1784, he was a man of large possessions. 

Charles French gave much intelligent attention to local affairs and to the 
promotion of public improvements. He became known as " straight roads " 



270 GENEALOGY OF THE 

French, on account of his vigorous advocacy of direct highways. Many 
amusing anecdotes were told of him in this connection. One neighbor sold 
out to get clear of him. Locating at some distance, he was amazed and 
vexed one day to find his pursuer, with a party of surveyors, prospecting 
across his land for a new road. After a parley he good naturedly accepted 
the situation. Upon another occasion the energetic roadmaker became so 
absorbed in his work in the woods, following the survey, he forgot his horse 
and buggy, going home with a neighbor at nightfall. After supper his black 
servant had to walk several miles to rescue the forgotten horse. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

8 — 8 — mo. 1739 Charles French & Ann Clement the first time Signi- 
fied their intention of taking each other in marriage, the sd. Charles is 
acquainted that a few lines from Frds. of Phila. will be expected at their 
next appearance and also appoints Joseph Stokes & John Hollingshead to 
make proper enquiry while sd. Charles hath had his living amongst us & 
make their ans. to our next Monthly Mtg. 

12 — 9 — mo. 1739. Charles French & Ann Clement y* second time Sig- 
nified their intention of marriage ; this meeting after receiving Satisfaction 
concerning Charles clearness on y^ account of marriage according to y* 
good order used amongst us & appoints Timothy Matlack and Jos. Tomlin- 
son to be present at sd. intended marriage to see it accomplished orderly. 

11 — 10 mo. 1739. Joseph Tomlinson reported that he was present at the 
marriage of Charles French and Ann Clement and that it was accomplished 
orderly. 

Haddonfield Minutes of y* Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

Att a m'-ly m*g of wo"" fr"' held at Haddonfield y" 8'" of S"" 1739 at 
s"* m*g Charles French & Ann Clements signified y"" intentions of m''g, m'g 
ap*' Marth" Matlack & Rebecca White, to make y* ufual inquirie & report 
to next m*g. 

Att a m°ly m*g of wo'" fr"' held at Haddonfield y* 12"" of 9"' 1739 
Charles French & Ann Clement signified y* continuation of y"" intentions 
of m'"g, confent of parties concernd ap''g, & retu''n of inquirers clear, y* 
m*g confents to y* accomplifhm* y"" of, & apoints Martha Matlack, & 
Rebecca White, to see good o'^d'"s kept, & report to next m*^ 

Att a m''ly m'g of wo'" fr"' held at Haddonf" y" 10'" of 10*" m" 1739 
but y* fr**' ap'*" to tend C. French &c was not acquainted w*" y" time. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 271 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas Charles French of the County of Burlington in the province 
of New Jersey Brick-layer and Ann Clement Daughter of Jacob Clement 
Late of the County of Gloucester Deceased having Declared their Inten- 
tions of marriage vi^ith Each Other before Several Monthly Meetings of the 
People Called Quakers at Haddonfield within the County of Glouce*"" 
Afores* According to the Good Order Used amongst them & Having the 
Consent of Relations Concerned their Said preposal of Marriage was allowed 
by the Said Meeting. Now These are to Certify whom it may concern 
that for the full accomplishing their s**. Intentions this Sixth Day of the 
tenth Month in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and thirty 
nine they the Said Charles French takeing the said Ann Clement by the 
hand Did in a Sollemn Manner Openly Declare that he took her the Said 
Ann Clement to be his wife promising through the Lords Afsistance to be 
unto her a loving & faithful Husband untill Death should seperate them ; 
& then and their in the Same Assembly the said Ann Clement did in like 
manner declare that she took Charles French to be her husband promising 
through the Lords Assistance to be unto him a faithfull & Loving wife 
untill Death Should Sepperate them & Moreover they the said Charles 
French & Ann Clement She According to the Custom of Marriage Assuming 
the name of her husband, as a further Confirmation thereof did then and 
there to these Presents Sett their hands & we whose names are here under 
Also Subscribed being present at the Sollemnization of the sd. Marriage 
& Subscription have as witnesses there unto Set our hands the Day and 
Year above Written. 

Charles French 
Ann French 

Elizabeth Tj-ler Samuel Clement 

James Hinchman Jacob Clement 

Thomas French, Jr. Mary Middleton 

Uriah French Hannah Hinchman 

Benj. Heritage Thomas Bate 

Wm. Hinchman Nathan Middleton 

Simeon Ellis Thomas French 

Mary Ellis Harry Bate 

Sarah Ellis Kesia Williott 
Sarah Ellis, Jr. 
John Hinchman 

and 20 other names not in the relatives' column. 



272 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes Continued : 

10 — 1 — mo. 1746 Joseph Heritage reported from the Preparative Meet- 
ing of Chester that said meeting has appointed Charles French to be one 
of the overseers of the Grave Yard at said Chester which was approved 
of by this meeting 

14 — A — mo. 1760 Chas. French one of the friends added to ye com- 
mittee on ye affair of those whose general conduct has denied ye way of 
Truth. 

9 — 6 mo. 1760 Edmond Hollingshead from ye preparative meeting at 
Chester reported that Robt. Hunt requested to be released from being an 
overseer and that he proposed Charles French in his stead which this meet- 
ing concurs with. 



Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

Agreeable to ye Direction of ye Quarterly Meeting held in ye 3'' & 9'" 
months Last Friends of Evesham and Chester held their monthly meeting 

at Evesham on ye 9th of ye 10th m° 1760 Edm* HolHnshead & Charles 

French are appointed overseers of Chester meetings. 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham y^ 9'" of y'' 4'" mo. 1761 
Wm. Foster, Thos. Evens, Edmond HolHnshead, Thos. Wilkins, John Roberts 
& Charles French are appointed agreeable to y" Direction of our Last Quar- 
terly Meeting, to confer with friends of Haddonfield monthly meeting in 
what manner to hold our youths meeting for y'' Future & to assist in pre- 
paring a report to be Sent to y" next Quarter, but y" time for sd friends to 
meet is referd to f*^ of Haddonfield to appoint. 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham y'' 8'" of y" 4"" Mo. 1762 
Isaac Evens produced a copy of a minute importing that the monthly meet- 
ing at Haddonfield had appointed a committee to settle the Quotas for the 
Yearly Meeting Stock, Therefore Charles French, John Roberts, Wm. Foster, 
& Isaac Evens are appointed to joyn them in that Service, to meet at Had- 
donfield the 12th Instant at nine o'clock and report their proceeding to our 
next meeting. 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham y^ 7"' of y^ 7^'' mo. 1763 
Friends from Chester meeting reported that Charles French requested to 
be released from y^ service of an overseer, & that they proposed Joshua 
Roberts to that service in his stead which was approved of. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 273 

Quarterly Meeting Minutes of Gloucester and Salem (Haddonfield) : 

1768 — Joseph Gibson, William Foster, Josiah Albertson, Charles French, 
Solomon Lippincott, Mark Reeve, & David Cooper were " desired to pre- 
pare an Epistle of Advice and Admonition to the Several Monthly Meetings 
on the subject of Horse racing, fox hunting etc." 

The Committee appointed at last Meeting reported in Writing as follows: 
We of the Committee appointed to consider the Queries from Haddon- 
field proposed to last Quarterly Meeting, having several times met on the 
Occasion & solidly deliberated thereon, in Answer to both the Queries, do 

give it as our Sense & Judgement, That, being a Party to a Horse 

Race and Wager is not in the Sense of our Discipline a Crime that requires 

to be condemned, or Testified against in a public Manner 

That Horse-Racing is to be considered as Vain Sports, and Wagers as 
Lotteries : — Nevertheless, as it is of a very corrupting Nature, and many 
times leads into Things that are publicly Scandalous ; when this is the Case, 
it may be necessary for Monthly Meetings to testify publicly against such 
Conduct, unless the Offenders will take it on themselves by a public 
Acknowledgment, in which Cases, the Age, & other Circumstances of the 
Offenders ought to be considered 

Haddonfield ),,,,., ,i , • i_ -^^ j . nr ^• 

^ , ^ .-.^ !■ All which nevertheless is submitted to ye Meeting 

24th 3 mo. 1768 \ 

Joseph Gibson William Foster 

Josiah Albertson Charles French 

Solomon Lippincott Mark Reeve 

& David Cooper 

Which being twice read, after a Time of solid Consideration it was 
approv'd, & the Clerk is directed to deliver a Copy thereof to Haddonfield 
Monthly Meeting. — They also produced an Essay of a Testimony to be pub- 
licly read against Horse Racing, Fox Hunting &c. which being read was 
approv'd and the Clerk is directed to send Copy thereof to the several 
Monthly Meetings, who are to order the same to be publicly read on a 
First Day at each of their particular Meetings and may have the same 
repeated as often as they find necessary. 

DEED, CHARLES FRENCH TO BARZILLIA COATES, 1769 

This Indenture made the seventeenth day of January in the year of our 
Lord One thousand seven hundred and sixty nine Between Charles French 
of Waterford in the County of Gloucester and province of New Jersey 
Yeoman of the one part, and Barzillia Coates of Willenborough in the 
County of Burlington and province afs** yeoman of the other part. 
18 



274 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Witnefseth that the said Charles French for and in Consideration of the 
Sum of Six pounds proclamation Money to him paid by the said Barzilla 
Coates, the Receipt whereof he doth hereby Acknowledge and him the said 
Barzilla Coates of and from the same doth acquit and discharge hath 
granted Bargained and Sold, and by these Presents doth grant bargain & 
Sell unto the said Barzilla Coates his Heirs and Afsigns all that Tract of 
Land Surveyed to his Grand Father Thomas French in 1684 situate in the 
Township of Willenborough afs** Bounded as foUoweth to wit, Beginning 
at a Corner Tree formerly John Roberts's by Rancocas alias Northampton 
River, and runs thence by the said Land of John Roberts One hundred 
and twenty Chains North North East half a point North to a Brook called 
Mill Creek to another Corner Tree of the said John Roberts. Then up by 
the said Mill Creek forty four chains and an half to a white Oak marked 
for a Corner, Then South South West half a point South to a Stake for a 
Corner at Northampton River afs'' Then down by the said River to the first 
mentioned Corner. Together with twenty Acres for Meadow lying and 
being the next Meadow below Thomas Olives Meadow on the same side the 
said Northampton River, as now mark'd out by the upland, the North 
West side of the same, abutting upon the beginning of that part of the 
River called long Reach, a little Island in the River lying upon the South 
East side thereof surveyed for Six hundred Acres as by the Survey thereof 
recorded in Revell's Book of Surveys fol : 83 in the Secretary's Office in 
Burlington appears Excepting thereout such parts as have been already 
legally granted sold and Conveyed to any Person or Persons whomsoever 
Together with all and singular the Rights, Liberties Priviledges, Heredita- 
ments and appurtenances Rents Ifsues & profitts thereof or any part thereof, 
and all the Estate Right & Title of him the said Charles French of in and 
to the same To have and to hold the said Tract or parcel of Land and 
Meadow with all and singular the Rights Liberties Priviledges Heredita- 
ments & appurtenances to the same belonging (except as above excepted) 
unto the said Barzilla Coates his Heirs and Afsigns To the only Ufe and 
Behoof of the said Barzilla Coates his Heirs and Afsigns for ever And 
the said Charles French for himself his Heirs Executors and Administrators 
doth Covenant to and with the said Barzilla Coates his Heirs & Afsigns 
by these presents That he the said Charles French and his Heirs, and all 
and every other Person and Persons anything having or claiming in the 
said Tract or parcell of Land Tenements and Premises or any part thereof 
by from or under him shall and will from time to time and at all times at 
the Reasonable request, and at the Costs and Charges in the Law of the 
said Barzilla Coates his Heirs or Afsigns make and Execute, or cause to 
be made and Executed all and every such further or other lawfull & Rea- 
sonable Act or Acts thing or things Device or Devices whatsoever for the 
further, better and more perfect Granting Conveying and Afsuring the said 
Tract or parcell of Land Tenements & Premises afs" (except as before 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 275 

excepted) unto the said Barzilla Coates his Heirs or assigns. To the only 
use & Behoof of the s'* Barzilla Coates his Heirs & Afsigns for ever as by 
the s" Barzilla Coates his Heirs or Afsigns or his or their Council learned 
in the Law shall be reasonably devised, advised and required — provided 
such further Afsurance Contain no other Covenant than is Comprised in 
this Deed. In Witnefs whereof the parties to these presents have inter- 
changeably set their hand and Seals dated the day & year just above 
written 

Charles ffrench [Seal] 
Sealed & Delivered in the presence of John Lanning, John Norton. 

WILL OF CHARLES FRENCH, JR., 1784 

Let it be Recorded that I Charles French of the Township of Waterford 
in the County of Gloucester in the State of New Jersey Yeoman, being at 
this time of sound and disposing mind and memory, thanks be given unto 
Almighty God therefor. And Calling to mind the uncertainty of this 
Life and the Certainty of Death when it may please God to Call, and 
being desirous that the Temporal Estate which it pleased divine Provi- 
dence to bless me with in this life, shall come unto such persons as I 
shall herein after nominate and appoint hereby revoking and making void 
all former Wills and Testaments by me made, either by word or Writing 
and this only to be taken for the same as followeth Viz. Imprimis I Will 
and order that m}' Executors hereafter named, do pay all my funeral 
Charges, and Just Debts, out of my personal Estate, as soon after my 
Decease as can Conveniently be done. Item I Give and Devise unto my son 
Jacob French a Certain piece of Land at the Eastwardly end of my Plan- 
tation whereon he now Dwells, as the same was lately ran of by David 
Fisher. Beginning at a stone in the old Line of my Plantation standing 
on the ditch Bank thence South thirty Degrees, West five Chains to a 
stone thence North Thirty three Degrees, West five Chains and Twenty 
seven links to a stone, thence South Seventy five Degrees, thirty minutes. 
West fourteen Chains and forty four Links to a White oak, then South 
Twenty Eight Degrees, West Twenty six Chains and Seventy five links to 
a stone, thence South Eighty Six Degrees and thirty minutes, East Eight 
Chains and Eighty links to a White oak, thence South Thirty nine Degrees, 
West nine Chains and Sixty links to a stone by the Road, thence North 
Eighty Eight Degrees, East thirteen Chains and Sixty links to a Black 
Oak in John Lippincott's line thence Along said line. North fifty nine 
Degrees, East Nineteen Chains and fifty links to a Black oak Corner to 
Thomas Hollinshead's Land, thence by the same North Twenty Six Degrees 
and fifteen minutes. West Ten Chains and Seventy links to a Stone, thence 
North Sixty six Degrees and thirty minutes. East Twelve Chains and 
Twenty five links, to a stone, thence North Twenty five Degrees, and thirty 



276 GENEALOGY OF THE 

minutes West Eight Chains and Ninety links to the Beginning Corner. 
Containing Seventy five Acres, and one half Acre be the same more or less, 
all which Seventy five Acres and half of Land, with the Buildings & Im- 
provements thereon or thereunto belonging, I Give and Devise to my said 
son Jacob French during his natural Life (Excepting only the Grist Mill 
Stream of Water hereafter Devised to my son Charles French) Item in case 
my said son Jacob should die before his present Wife, then and in that 
case I Give and Bequeath the use and profits of the said Plantation unto 
her during the time she may remain my said son Jacob French's Widow 
and no longer. Item after the Decease of my said son Jacob, and the 
Decease or Second Marriage of his said present Wife, I do hereby order 
and it is my Will that my Executors or the Survivor of them, or any 
other person or persons that he or they may Authorize or appoint, shall 
sell the said Plantation to the best bidder And all the money Arising from 
the sales, of the said Plantation I Give and Bequeath unto my said Son 
Jacob's Children to be Equally divided amongst them share and share 
alike. Item In case any or either of my said son Jacob's Children should 
Die before the said money can be divided, it is my Will that if him her 
or them so Deceased should leave Lawful Issue that such Issue shall have 
the Parents share or devidend. Item I Give and Devise unto my son 
Charles French And to his Heirs and Assigns forever, all the Remainder 
of my Land and Plantation whereon I now Dwell with the Grist Mill and 
other Improvements thereunto belonging, together with all my Household 
Furniture and farming utensils, he my said son Charles paying out of the 
same the sum of Five Hundred pounds, unto my Daughters in manner 
hereafter mentioned. Item Whereas there is a Ditch that Runs through 
part of the Land Devised to my son Jacob that Conveys a Stream of Water 
to my Grist Mill to prevent any Dispute hereafter, I Give and Devise the 
said Stream of Water unto my said son Charles his Heirs and Assigns 
forever, that is to say Ten feet of Land on each side the Middle of the 
Water Course, so far as the same Runs through the Land Devised to my 
son Jacob as aforesaid. Item I Give and Devise unto my said son Charles, 
and to his Heirs and Assigns forever. All my Cedar Swamp Reserving 
so much timber out of the same as my said son Jacob may want for Rails 
or Building on his own Plantation and no more. Item I Give and Devise 
unto my son Samuel French and to Heirs and Assigns forever, all that my 
several tracts of Land, Plantation and Saw Mill and utensils thereunto 
belonging whereon he now Dwells in the County aforesaid he paying out 
of the same the sum of Ten pounds Current money to each of my three 
Grand Daughters namely Ann, Abigail and Sarah Brick, as they severally 
arive to the Age of Eighteen years. Item if either of my said Grand 
Daughters should die under Age, without Issue, I will that her Legacy so 
Dying shall be paid to her Surviving sisters, or Sister, and if any Child 
or Children should be left by either of them then the Legacy to be paid 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 277 

to her or their Child or Children so Deed. Item I Give and Bequeath unto 
my Daughter Hope Black the sum of one Hundred pounds Current money 
of New Jersey to be paid to her by my son Charles French in one year 
after my Decease, she being as I think the most Necessiatie for the first 
payment. Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Daughter Abigail Brick the 
sum of one Hundred pounds money aforesaid, to be paid to her by my said 
son Charles French in two years after my Decease. Item I Give and 
Bequeath unto my Daughter Elizabeth Wills, the sum of one Hundred 
pounds money Aforesaid, to be paid to her by my said son Charles in three 
years after my Decease. Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Daughter Ann 
Wilkin the sum of one Hundred pounds money aforesaid, to be paid to her 
by my said son Charles in four Years after my Decease. Item I Give and 
Bequeath unto my Daughter Elenor Hollinshead, the sum of one Hundred 
pounds money aforesaid to be paid to her by my said son Charles in five 
years after my Decease. Item I Give to Chester Meeting the sum of Twenty 
pounds towards repairing the Meeting House, and Grave Yard, to be 
paid by my Executors out of the Interest Arising from the money that may 
be then due to me. Item I Give & Devise all the Residue and Remainder 
of my Personal Estate (after my Just Debts and funeral Charges are paid) 
unto my aforesaid five Daughters to be equally divided amongst them, share 
and share alike. Item it is my will and I do hereby order that in case any 
or either of my said Daughters should Depart this Life before their Legacy 
or Devidend is paid, then and in that case her or their share so dying shall 
be Divided amongst her or their Children. Item and Lastly I do hereby 
nominate Constitute and appoint, my said sons Samuel French and Charles 
French Executors of this my last Will and Testament. 

In Witnefs whereof I have hereunto Set my Hand and Seal the thirteenth 
day of the Eleventh Month (November) in the year of our Lord One 
thoufand Seven Hundred and Eighty-four — 1784 



^^ 




Signed Sealed published prounounced and Declared by the Said Charles 
French as and for his Last Will and Testament in the prefence of us the 
fubfcribing Witnefses who in his prefence & at his Requeft have fubfcribed 
our Names as Witnefses thereunto — 

David Davis 

Samuel Coles Davis 

John Cox 



278 GENEALOGY OF THE 

David Davis and Samuel Coles Davis, two of the Witnesses to the within 
Will being duly affirmed According to Law, did Severally Affirm and say, 
that they saw Charles French the testator therein named Sign and Seal the 
same and heard him publish pronounce and Declare the within writing to be 
his last Will and Testament, and that at the doing thereof the said Testa- 
tor was of sound and disposing mind and memory, as far as these affirmants 
know and as they verily believe, and that John Cox the other Subscribing 
Evidence was present at the same time and signed his name as a Witness 
to the said Will Together with these affirmants in the presence of the said 
Testator David Davis, Samuel Coles Davis. 

Affirmed at Burlington March the 29th 1785 before me 

Herbert McElroy Surrogate 

The Foregoing Will being proved Probate was Granted by His Excellency 
William Livingston Esqr. unto Samuel French and Charles French, Execu- 
tors in the said will named they being first duly Affirmed well and truly to 
perform the same Exhibit a true and perfect Inventory & Render a Just 
and true Account when thereunto Lawfully required Given under the Pre- 
rogative Seal the day and Year aforesd. 

Bowes Reed Regr. 

INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF CHARLES FRENCH, JR., 1785 

An Inventory of the Good and Chattels Rights Credits and Effects of 

Charles French of Waterford In the County of Gloucefter And State of 

Niew Jerfey Dec" Taken and Appraifed this 28"" Day of March 1785 by 
Us the Subfcribers Which is as follows Viz : 

To his Wearing apparrel and some other Small Things. £ 21 

To his Silver Watch 5 

To A Mare Saddle & Bridle 31 

To A Bond againft William Black 52 

To A Bond againft Samuel French 56 

To A Bond againft Ephraim Hains 39 

To A Bond againft William Ilinchnuin 346 

To A Note againft John Cox 2 

To Cafh In Hard Money 24 

To Sundry Book Debts 19 

To a Cafe & Bottles 

Total 599 8 5 

Thomas Stokes 



/ 


4 








10 





9 


6 


8 


4 


3 


2 


16 


2 


3 


6 


7 


1 


13 


4 


10 






. . ^ Appraiiers 

David Davis ' 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 279 

David Davis one of the appraisers of the within Inventory being dulj' 
affirmed according to Law did afiirm & say, that the Goods Chattels & 
Credits in the within Inventory Let down & Specified were ^y him Ap- 
praised according to their just & true respective rates & values after the 
best of his Judgment & Understanding & that Thomas Stokes — the other 
appraiser whose name is thereto subscribed was present at the same time & 
consented in all things to the doing thereof & that they appraised all things 
that were brought to their view for appraisement. David Davis 

Affirmed at Burlington March 29*" 1785 

Samuel French & Charles French Executors of Charles French dec'' 
being duly Affirmed according to Law did affirm & Say that the within In- 
strument of Writing Contains a true & perfect Inventory of all & Singular 
the Goods Chattels & Credits of the s** deceased that have come to their 
Knowledge or Pofsefsion or to the Pofsefsion of any other Person or Persons 
for their use — 

Affirm'd ut Ante Coram me ) Samuel French 

Herbert M'"Elroy Surrogate ) Cha^ French 

ANCESTRY OF ANN (CLEMENT) FRENCH 

Samuel Harrison, mariner, located in Gloucester County, N. J., sometime prior to 1688. 
Various genealogical investigations have discovered traditional ground for belief that 
this early adventurer in West Jersey was a son or grandson of General Thomas Harrison, 
a noted leader in the English Revolution of 1648, one of the signers of the death warrant 
of Charles I, and who was finally executed after the restoration of the monarchy under 
Charles II, in 1660. 

Samuel Harrison m. Sarah, daughter of William Hunt, and had children : William, 
Samuel and Ann. In 1689 he bought land near Woodbury Creek from Thomas Gardiner, 
administrator for the estate of Thomas Matthews, original purchaser; and in 1691, an 
additional tract from Thomas Sharp of Newton. He was highly esteemed and respected 
in the community, and it is interesting to note that in 1697 he was made "heir and 
executor of real and personal estate," including 450 acres of land in Gloucester Co., of 
Thos. Penston. By will dated Aug. 5, 1700, proved March 18, 1704/5, Isaac Goodwin 
" left son John to the care of Samuel Harrison," who was appointed executor of " out- 
ward " estate. As the latter died in 1703, the execution of this trust became the duty of 
his widow, Sarah Harrison. Inventory of personal estate of Samuel Harrison, taken 
Feby. 9, 1703/4, amounted to £500 17s. 6d., including books £20, plate £28, four negroes 
£120. Letters of administration were granted to the widow, March 1, 1703/4. 

Ann Harrison, daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Hunt) Harrison, m. Jacob Clement, 
born 1678. In 1709 and 1710 Jacob Clement served as sheriff of Gloucester County. He 
died prior to 1739. In 1720 a son and daughter, twins, were born to Jacob and Ann 
(Harrison) Clement, and named Jacob and Ann. Ann Clement, the daughter, married 
in 1739, Charles French [42]. Jacob Clement was a son of James and Jane Clement, 
who settled on Long Island. James was son of Gregory Clement, a citizen of London, 
England, member of the Cromwell Parliament, and one of the judges who tried and 
condemned Charles I, in 1648. 



280 GENEALOGY OF THE 

GREGORY CLEMENT 

Gregory Clement, a member of the jury which tried and condemned 
Charles I., King of England, in 1648, was a London merchant. He had 
taken great interest in the Revolution and entered the Cromwellian parlia- 
ment in 1646. He was diligent and efficient in the performance of his legis- 
lative duties, and when he was chosen to sit in judgment upon his dethroned 
sovereign he reluctantly obeyed the perilous summons, and at the conclusion 
of the trial set his hand and seal to the historic death warrant. Later he 
Avas deprived of his seat in parliament, having incurred the displeasure of 
some of his associates, but was restored after Cromwell's death. With most 
of the regicides, Gregory Clement disregarded the peril of punishment after 
the restoration and remained in England. He was arrested and brought to 
trial. At first he pleaded " not guilty," but later, upon the importunity of 
his relatives, who thus hoped for mercy, he acknowledged the offense charged. 
Instead, however, he was excepted from all clemency, both of estate and 
life, and barbarously executed, with several others, October 16, 1660. The 
terrible scenes of the hour sickened executioner and spectators, the sentence 
of the law calling for hanging — partial strangulation only — disemboweling 
and quartering of the mutilated body, after the head was cut off. Before 
execution he expressed extreme regret because he had pleaded guilty, which 
had rendered him " unworthy to die in so glorious a cause." His estates 
having been confiscated, one of his sons, James, came to America, in 1670, 
taking up a small tract of land on Long Island. From him descended the 
Clement family of New Jersey, one of whom was the ancestor of Ann 
Clement, who married Charles French, Jr., in 1739. The American de- 
scendants of the men who tried and condemned Charles I, have always en- 
countered many difficulties in securing essential genealogical facts, on account 
of the fierce persecution of the regicides after the restoration and the conse- 
quent destruction of family records, to prevent discovery and possible 
punishment of those in any way related to them. But in some instances 
diligent research has been in part at least rewarded. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



281 



WARRANT TO EXECUTE KING CHARLES I, A. D. 1648 

At the high Co'^t of Juftice for the tryinge and judginge of Charles 
Steuart Kinge of England January XXIX*" Anno Dm 1648. 

Whereas Charles Steuart Kinge of England is and ftandeth convicted 
attaynted and condemned of high Treafon and other high crymes And 
fentence uppon Saturday laft was pronounced againft him by this Co'^t to 
be putt to death by the feveringe of his head from his body OF w'''' fentence 
execution yet remayneth to be done. Thefe are therefore to will and require 
you to fee the faid fentence executed In the open Streete before Whitehall 
uppon the morrow being the Thirtieth day of this inftante month of January 
betweene the hours of Tenn in the morninge and ffive in the afternoone of 
the fame day w*" full effect And for foe doing this fhall be yo"^ fufficient 
warrant And thefe are to require All Officers and Souldiers and other the 
good people of this Nation of England to be affiftinge unto you in this 
Service Given under our hands and Seales. 
To Collonell ffrancis Hather Colonell Huncks 

and Lieutenant Colonell Phayre and to every of them. 



Jo. Bradshawe 
Tho : Grey 
O Cromwell 
Edw. Whalley 
M. Livesey 
John Okey 
J Dauers 
Jo. Bourchier 
H Ireton 
Tho Mauleuerer 
Har: Waller 
John Blakiston 
J Hutchinson 
Willi Goff 
Tho Pride 
Pe Temple 
T Harrison 
J Hewson 
Hen Smyth 
Per. Pelham 



Ri Deane 
Robert Tichborne 
H Edwards 
Daniel Blagraue 
Owen Rowe 
William Purefoy 
Ad : Scrope 
James Temple 
A Garland 
Edm : Ludlowe 
Henry Marten 
Vine' Potter 
Wm : Constable 
Rich Ingoldesby 
Will: Cawley 
Jo Barkstead 
Ifaa Ewer 
John Dixwell 
Valentine Wauton 



Symon Mayne 
Tho : Horton 
J Jones 
John Moore 
Gilbt Millington 
G fHeetwood 
J Alured 
Robt Lilburne 
Will fay 
Anth : ftapley 
Gre Norton 
Tho. Challoner 
Tho. Wogan 
John Venn 
Gregory Clement 
Jo : Downes 
Tho Wayte 
Tho. Scot 
Jo : Carew 
Miles Corbet 



From original document in House of Lords. 



282 GENEALOGY OF THE 

43— URIAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8). 

m. Mary McCullock. 
She m. Second, August 10th, 1759, Hugh Creighton 
of Gloucester County, N. J. 

147— CHARLES FRENCH m. 4th mo. 7th, 1773, Rebecca Taylor. 

148— SAMUEL FRENCH m. First, November 11th, 1775, Mary Wayne. 

m. Second, Elizabeth . 

URIAH FRENCH 

Uriah French, as was the prevailing custom among Friends in the early 
days, mastered a trade, becoming a bricklayer and locating in Newton Town- 
ship, Gloucester County (now Camden County), N. J. In 1749 he bought 
of James Hinchman, a descendant of the pioneer of that name, about 100 
acres of land, near Haddonfield. March 25, 1758, he sold this property 
to Joseph Bullock, this being a short time before his death. His estate was 
administered by his widow, Mary French, with her brother-in-law, Charles 
French [42], as bondsman, as the following memoranda, taken from Glouces- 
ter County original will files, 1754-60, will show: 

Uriah French, Bricklayer Newton Township Gloucester Co. N J. Intestate. 
Adm^ Mary French (widow) of above place. 

Bondsman Charles French, of above place 
Date of letters Aug 7 — 1758 
Invty taken Aug 4— 1758 total £202 4 5 



From estate of John McCollock and other cash £47 1 11 

Jacob Clement 



T ^, n-u I Apprs 

John Gill J 

Affirmed to Tune 12—1759. 




SIGNATURE OF ADMINISTRATRIX 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



283 



Account of Hugh Creighton & Mary his wife late Mary French Relict 
of Uriah French late of Gloucester Co. died who charge themselves with 

£208 10 S 

Amount of Inventory £202 4 5 

Rec'd of W" Woods Ex" 2 6 

" of Archibald Mickles' Est 1 17 6 

Cash unappraised being paid to Nath' 

Brundage before appraisement 2 2 6 

£208 10 5 
Persons to whom payments were made 

John Ladd Surrogate Thos Champion John Ilatkinlon 

Mary Hawhins Beulah Clement James Mulock adm"' of 

Amos Archer Cha^ Ferguson Benj. Collins 

Sam' Hugg John Jones Simeon Ellis for 

Elizabeth Maxwell Jacob Clement Sarah Norris 

Isaac Kay W" Hinchman Tatum Williams 

Tho^ Edgerton Geo. Weed Abraham Inskeep 

Elizabeth Craig John Blackwood John Hillman 

Sam' Murrell Rob* Friend Price Jacob Albertson 

Anne Sharp John Gill Saml Harrison for 

W™ Griscom Tho' Redman James Talman 

Tho^ Thackra Jacob Burroughs and Kezia Hinchman 

Rich'' Weeks Henry Crawford Nath' Brundage 

Hugh Creighton Jo^ Thomas for Exrs John Matlack Jr 

James Inskeep of Josiah Hewey Rich* " 

John Bailey Job Siddons Elizabeth Estaugh 

Isaac Andrews Jacob Stokes adm"' 

of Joseph Ellis dec'd 
Judith Jennings — 

The above account is just and True as to the Charge &. Discharge thereof 
April 2"— 1764 

Hugh Creighton 
Mary Creighton 

ORIGINAL SIGNATURE. 

Examined this Account with the \'ouchers & approved of by me this 2'' 
April Anno Dom. 1764 

Samuel Allinson, Surrogate. 



284 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



HUGH CREIGHTON— HADDONFIELD REMINISCENCES 

Hugh Creighton, who married Mary ( McCullock) French, was a well 
known citizen of Haddonfield before and during the Revolutionary War. 
He owned and conducted from 1777 until about 1790 the historic "Tavern 
House," in which the New Jersey Council of Safety and Legislature met 
at different times. Their daughter Mary, born 1762, married, in 1787, Dr. 
James Stratton, son of Benjamin and Sarah (Austin) Stratton, of Cumber- 
land County, N. J., and resided near Swedesboro, N. J.; their son, Charles 
C. Stratton, born 1796, died T 859, was member of the New Jersey Assembly 
from Gloucester County, N. J., in 1821-23 and 1828, Representative in Con- 
gress, 1837-39 and 1841-43, and Governor of New Jersey, 1845-48. 

In 1900 the State of New Jersey bought the "American House," the 
name by which the old hotel was known to later generations, placing it in 
the care of a patriotic association. On the front wall was placed a tablet 
bearing the following inscription : 

Within this building, 
then a tavern-house, 
the Council of Safety 
for New Jersey was 
organized March 18th, 1777. 
Herein also, in September 
of the same year, the legisla- 
ture unanimously resolved 
that thereafter the word 
" State " should be substituted 
for " Colony " in all public 
writs and commissions. 
1750 1900 

While the Creighton's conducted this historic inn at Haddonfield, it was 
the centre of political, official and social life. Here the famous Committee 
of Safety held many important sessions. Here were brought, by summary 
process, many leading citizens to answer more or less serious charges of 
indifference or hostility to the patriot cause. Here the gravest questions 
were considered and momentous decisions reached concerning the prosecu- 
tion of the war and the rights of citizenship. Soldiers of distinc- 
tion of both armies made the " tavern house " their headquarters. The 
genial proprietor and his wife, noted for her loving and unselfish disposition, 



[The historical accuracy of 
this statement has recently been 
questioned, by a New Jersey 
State official. At the time of 
the publication of this book the 
matter is a subject of further 
inquiry by those specially con- 
cerned.] 



SI 

M 

Q 



O 

o 



o 

K 



C 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



285 



pi 



5^-4;^ 



possessed many acquaintances, friends and relatives. Con- 
spicuous among the young folks who participated in a round 
of innocent pleasure in this ancient hostelry on the King's 
Highway of Haddonfield, was a merry little Quakeress — 
Dolly Payne, the bright and beautiful daughter of John 
Payne, Jr., and Mary (Coles) Payne, then living in Phila- 
delphia. They were strict and conscientious Friends, and 
before leaving the home plantation in Scotchtown, Va., 
they evidenced their devotion to high principles by freeing 
their slaves. To their bright and fun loving young 
daughter, the quiet and plainness of the home life became 
at times dull and monotonous, and the visits made to her 
Uncle and Aunt Creighton's at Haddonfield, where she 
entered so heartily into the festive occasions at the inn, were 
memorable days in the life of Dolly Payne. She greatly 
enjoyed the drives taken on delightful summer days with 
kind Aunt Creighton, cousins and friends, to Moorestown, 
Burlington and Trenton, and the visits which they made 
on these occasions to the shops. Prominent families of 
the neighborhood entertained her, and many admirers paid 
court to her beauty. Withal she remained a member of 
Meeting, and at Pine Street Meeting House, Philadelphia, 
1st mo. 7th, 1790, she married John Todd, a promising 
young member of the bar and a Friend. A large company 
was present including Uncle and Aunt Creighton. In the 
latter part of 1793, Dolly (Payne) Todd was left a widow 
with a son. She then made her home with her mother, who, owing to loss 
of husband and means, was endeavoring to make her living by taking 
boarders. One of her patrons was James Madison, member of Congress 
from Virginia, and future President of the United States. He was nearly 
twenty years the senior of young Mrs. Todd to whom he addressed his 
attentions, and whose beauty had ripened with passing years. There were 
marked differences in their mental and physical characteristics and tempera- 
ment, but in 1794 they were married and lived happily together for two 
score years. As the brilliant and popular mistress of the White House, 
" Dolly " Madison remembered her happy days at Haddonfield and always 
cordially welcomed visitors from that locality. 



1720 



286 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



47— RACHEL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; John, 9). 

b. 1705. 

m. First, Enoch Fenton, son of Eleazer and Eliza- 
beth (Stacy) Fenton. 
He b. 1693. 
d. 1732. 

m. Second, December 1st, 1735, Nathaniel Wil- 
kinson. 



149— ELEAZER FENTON 



b. 1723. 
m. Nov. 7th, 1753, Elizabeth Atkinson. 



150— VESTA FENTON 



m. Jany. 21st, 1754, Obadiah Ireton. 



151— RACHEL FENTON 



152— ENOCH FENTON, JR. 



Eleazer Fenton and Elizabeth Stacy were married February 2nd, 1690. She born 8th 
mo. 17th, 1673; he died 1704. 



50— THOMAS BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11). 

m. 1727, Margaret Haines, daughter of Thomas 

Haines. 
d. 1773. 

152 a— DANIEL BUZBY 



153— THOMAS BUZBY, JR. 



b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1739. 
m. 1765, Tabitha Hugg. 



1S4_AM0S BUZBY 



b. 7th mo. 20th, 1742. 
m. First, Patience Springer, 
m. Second, Rebecca Matlack 



154 a— ISAAC BUZBY 



155- JOSEPH BUZBY 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



287 



53— WILLIAM BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary 11). 

b. 5th mo. 10th, 1714. 

d. 9th mo. 5th, 1759. 

m. 8th mo. 25th, 1739, Mary Wills, daughter of 
Daniel and Elizabeth (Woolston) Wills of 
Northampton Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
She b. 5th mo. 6th, 1718. 

d. 3rd mo. 12th, 1786. 

156— WILLIAM BUZBY, JR. b. 10th mo. 23rd, 17SL 

m. 6th mo. 9th, 1773, Susannah Deacon. 

157— ELIZABETH BUZBY m. 5th mo. 13th, 1767, Samuel Haines, Jr. 

Daniel Wills, son of John Wills of Northampton Township, and Elizabeth Woolston, 
daughter of John Woolston of Mansfield Township, Burlington Co., N. J., were married 
at Springfield Meeting House 8th mo. 13th, 1714. 

71— RUTH STOCKDELL (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Mary Allen, 18). 

m. December 31st, 1735, John Small. 
He d. 1769. 



158— ISRAEL SMALL 
159— JONAS SMALL 
160— W^ I L LI AM SMALL 
161— JOHf^ SMALL 
162— ROBERT SMALL 
163— RUTH SMALL 



m. October 13th, 1763, Ann Hinchman. 



m. December 21st, 1778, Elizabeth Morris. 



164— MARY SMALL 



m. Thomas Archer. 



In his will, dated August 1st, 1768, approved February 27th, 1769, John Small, 
yeoman, of Evesham, Burlington Co., N. J., divided his estate, real and personal, amongst 
his family. Unto his wife he gave the use and benefit of his houses and lands, so long 
as she remained his widow, in order to bring up his children. To his sons William and 



288 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



John six acres of land and ten pounds each. To his son Robert six acres upon arriving 
at his majority and also five pounds. It was specially provided that these lands should 
" not to be Lett to any others but some of my sons." To his daughter Ruth Small 
furniture and five pounds, at 21 ; likewise to his daughter Mary, wife of Thomas Archer, 
twenty shillings. The rest of his lands to his sons Israel and Jonas Small, equally, with 
a dwelling house for each, they to pay to their brothers the money legacies above men- 
tioned. Wife Ruth, son Israel and friend Edward Darnal were named Executors. Israel 
declined to serve. The inventory of his personal property, appraised by Samuel Garwood 
and Abraham Borton, showed a valuation of 93 pounds and 15 shillings. 



72— HANNAH STOCKDELL (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Mary Allen, 18). 

b. 1718. 

d. 6th mo. 16th, 1790. 

m. 1743, John Stokes, Jr., son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Green) Stokes, of Willingborough Town- 
ship, Burlington Co., N. J. 
He b. 5th mo. 15th, 1713. 

d. 8th mo. 24th, 1798. 



165— MARY STOKES 



b. 8th mo. 15th, 1745. 
m. Isaac Newton. 



166— JOHN STOKES, 3RD 



b. 6th mo. 22nd, 1747. 
m. Susannah Newton. 



167— DAVID STOKES 



b. 11th mo. 12th, 1751. 

m. 4th mo. 15th, 1784, Ann Lancaster. 



168— JARVES STOKES 



b. 11th mo. 10th, 1753. 
m. Nov. 27th, 1773, Elizabeth Rogers. 



169— HANNAH STOKES 



b. 10th mo. 12th, 1756. 
m. First, 4th mo. 9th, 1794, Jacob Haines, 
m. Second, George Browning. 



170— ELIZABETH STOKES 



b. 5th mo. 31st, 1759. 
m. 5th mo., 1803, Robert French [131]. 



171— RACHEL STOKES 



b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1765. 

m. 10th mo. 12th, 1785, Joseph Hackney, Jr. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 289 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF JOHN STOKES, JR., 1786 
John Stokes, Wellingborough Burlington Co., N. J., yeoman 
Date— 3 Mo— 7th— 1786. Proved August 30th— 1798 

Wife — Hannah £100 out of my personal estate 

£100 to be paid by son John one year after my decease 
£ SO " " " David in consideration of land I 

shall hereinafter give to him. 

Also she is to have L^se of West End of my Dwelling House, 
both above Stairs and Below — her widowhood Household 
Furniture ; use of Kitchen, Oven, Pump use of Garden Place 
where I live, and as much Cyder as shall be necefsary for 
her own Family Consumtion. 600 weight of good Pork, 
400 Weight of good Beef, Ten Bushels of clean Wheat and 
Ten Bushels of Rye ; Firewood ready Cut and brought to 
her Door fit for her Room and Use. Also to be kept for 
her on the Place free of E.xpence a Riding Horse, two 
Milch Cow and Si.x Sheep. These to be attended to by 
David 

Daughters Hannah ) If these daughters remain unmarried at my wife's 
Elizabeth] death, they are to enjoy all privileges given to their 
Mother during their unmarried lives. If only one survives 
the Mother and is unmarried she is to enjoy all above privi- 
leges until married. 

Sons — John Stokes My lands and Improvements Lying in Haycock Town- 
ship, in Bucks Co., Penna., where he now lives, he paying 
in One year after my Decease to his Mother £100. 

David Stokes — My Land and Plantation Lying to the Southward of 
a Line Beginning at a Black Oak Corner standing at the 
North West Corner of that Land which Aaron Wills bought 
of the Executors of Thomas Green and from thence to run 
Westward quite acrofs my Lands to a Stone standing as a 
Corner to my Land, and there being two Corners near 
together as setled by Arbitration between me and Jonathan 
Borden, the Westernmost Corner I fix as the Bounds of this 
Division ; also all the Land I hold between the said Line 
and Ancocus Creek with the Buildings ; also all my Cedar 
Swamp I bought of E.xecutors of John Stockton ; also one 
half of my Cedar Swamp which I bought of Vincent Leeds 
lying at Mount Skitt ; also a large Brafs Kettle ; he my son 
David to pay my wife Hannah £50. in one yr. after my 
death. 



19 



290 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Gervas Stokes — that part of my plantation where he now lives lying 
Northerly of the above Discribed Line of Division being 
all my Land between the said Line and Mill Creek with the 
Buildings and Appurtenances ; Also all that my Cedar 
Swamp I bought of Revel Elton ; also one Equal Undivided 
half part of the Cedar Swamp purchased by me of Vincent 
Leeds. 
4 Daughters — Mary Newton 

the Residue of my Perfonal Estate after 

Legacies & Debts are deducted, so that 

Hannah and Elizabeths shares be equal. 

Also Mary and Rachels shares be also Equal. But Mary 

and Rachels share to be Each of them £100. less than 

Hannah and Elizabeth. 



Hannah Stokes 
Elizabeth Stokes 
Rachel Hackney 



E.xecutors — 

My Wife Hannah 

r John Stokes 
Sons — -{ David Stokes 
Gervas Stokes 




Witnesses, 



Thomas Buzby 
Samuel Kille 
Dan' Smith 



Codicil — dated Aug. 17 — 1791. Whereas in within Will I ordered my 
Son John to pay to his Mother £100. in case She was left a Widow, and son 
David to pay her £50 ; but as she is deceased, in lieu thereof Son John is 
to pay my two Daughters Hannah and Elizabeth Stokes each £25, or £50. 
to the Survivor in case of the decease of Either in one year after my 
Death ; and I order Son David Stokes to pay to said two Daughters each 
£25 ; or £50 to Survivor, in case Either dies in one year after my decease. 
David is to furnish them or the Survivor of them 300 Weight of pork, 300 
Weight of Beef Ten Bushels of clean Wheat and Ten Bushels of Rye as 
long as they are unmarried ; one horse — two Milch Cows and Six Sheep, 
all of their own choosing and kept on the place free from Expence. 

John Stokef [Seal] 
C Jonah Woolman 
Witnesses - Edith Peddle 
(_ Mary Stokes. 



Inventory taken September 13th — 1798 



£2074 " 3 " 1 



William Deacon ) , 

C 1 XT • ■ -^1^1^ 

Samuel Haines ^ 
Affirmed to Sept. 15—1798 



raisers. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 291 

74— RACHEL STOCKDELL (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Mary Allen, 18). 

m. 1 739, William Wood, son of Constantino Wood, 
of Woodbury Creek, Gloucester Co., N. J. 
He d. 1762. 

172— WILLIAM WOOD, JR. m. 1777, Hannah Ladd. 

173— RACHEL WOOD 

174— SARAH WOOD m. 1773, Samuel Thompson. 

175— LETITIA WOOD m. 1772, James Mickel. 

176— ANNA WOOD 

William Wood was a great grandson of Henry Wood, founder of Woodbury, N. J., 
who came from Bury, England, with his son John, in 1682, and settled on the stream 
which became known as Woodbury Creek. William was the eldest son of Constantine 
Wood, who was the third son of John; the latter dying in 1705/6. Constantine, born 
in 1683, died 1734, was the first child born of English parents in that vicinity. Henry 
Wood and his son John brought with them the following certificate, recorded in Had- 
donfield Monthly Meeting Book of Certificates, 1681-1741: 

The 20'" day of y"^ Second Month 1682 from y** Monthly Meeting att 
Clithrice [Clitheroe] in y^ County of Lankeshire [Lancashire] 

To ffriends in America of y" monthly meeting wheare it may fall to the 
Lott of Henry Wood & John Wood his son to inhabit. These may Satisfie 
you y* y^ above named Henry Wood & John Wood with their ffamilyes 
goeing to those ptes is with consent of ff'riends, and we farther sertifie you 
y' y** both have been faithful to the Truth and great sufferers for their 
Testimony and are of good report amongst ffriends in several ptes of this 
County and in several ptes of this nation, so with our Deare Loves to you, 
remembered Desireing your Loving assistance to both these our Deare 
ffriends wee rest your ffriends in the truth. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Minutes of y" Mo: Meeting of Women Friends: 

Att a m"ly m'g of wo'" fr'^' held at Haddonf"* y'' 10'" of 10'" m" 1739. 
Wm Wood & Rachel Stockdale signified y"" intentions of m'"g, E. Ballinger 
& M. Wilkins ap"* to make y" ufual inquirie, & report to next m'g. 

Att a m^ly m'g of wo"" fr"' held at Haddonfield y^ 14'" of 11"" 1739/40. 
Wm Wood & Rachel Stockdale signified y" continuation of y'' intentions of 
m'g, confent of parents being had, & return of inquirers clear, y" m'g 
allows y"", to accomplifh y"" s^ m'"g, according to y^ good ord"" abovs**, & 
ap'^ Eliz Lord & Mary Gibfon, to see good o''ders kept, & report to next m'g. 



292 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



SUMMARY OF WILL OF WILLIAM WOOD, 1762 

The will of William Wood, dated 4 mo. 30, 1762, proved May 26, 1762, 
shows him to have been a man of large possessions, both real and personal. 
His wife Rachel and Ebenezer Miller were made exectuors. It was pro- 
vided that the widow should have the choice of a personal homestead, ten 
acres and small house, or the use of a portion of the old homestead ; this 
and the plantation being devised to the eldest child and only son, William. 
The remainder of the real estate was to be sold and proceeds equally divided 
between the four daughters, with 75 pounds each in money additional. Small 
legacies were devised to his brother Francis ; Constantine Jeffries, son of his 
sister Leatitia ; his niece, Elizabeth Smith, and cousin, Mary Small. Two 
hired lads were to have a suit of clothes each if they learned a trade, and 
one five pounds upon attaining his freedom. In case of the son's death, 
the widow — remaining such — was to have the care of the education of the 
children and she was to have the residue of income, after other provisions 
of the will were carried out. The following inventory of personal property 
makes an interesting and suggestive showing of the affairs of a prosperous 
farmer and business man of those days. 

£ s d 

To his horse bridle Saddle Wearing Apparel & Cash 107 — — 6 

To 9 Feather beds & furniture Desk bookCase & Clock & other 

household goods 200 — 1 — 6 

To Carts Waggon & Other plantation Utensils with Rye Wheat 

Indian Corn and Oats on the Ground 76 — 16 — 6 

To Horses Cattle Sheep and Swine 281 — 6 — 

To Bonds Bills and Book Debts out Standing 686 — 7 — 3 

James Whitall John Wilkins Appraisers £1351 — 12 — 9 




CHEST BROUGHT FROM ENGLAND BY HEiNRY WOOD, 1682 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 293 

86— BARZILLAI COATE (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Rebecca Sharp, 21). 

m. 4th mo. 13th, 1768, Elizabeth Stokes, daughter 
of Samuel and Hannah (Hinchman) Stokes. 
d. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1784. 

177— EDITH COATE m. Mahlon Budd. 

178— HANNAH COATE m. Daniel Smith. 

179_WILLIAM COATE m. Sarah Hollingshead. 

89— MARY COATE (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Rebecca Sharp, 21). 

b. 3rd mo.- 16th, 1739. 

m. 1761, Joseph Ridgway of Springfield Town- 
ship, Burlington Co., N. J. 

180— ISRAEL RIDGWAY b. 11th mo. 16th, 1762. 

d. 1809. 

181— SARAH RIDGWAY b. 6th mo. 17th, 1764. 

m. 12th mo. 21st, 1785, Isaac Morgan. 

182— BEULAH RIDGWAY b. 3rd mo. Sth, 1766. 

d. 1835. 

183— RACHEL RIDGWAY b. 12th mo. 31st, 1767. 

m. June 26th, 1796, John Butterworth. 

184— MARY RIDGWAY b. 12th mo. 11th, 1769. 

d. 1848. 

185- COATES RIDGWAY b. 7th mo. 30th, 1771. 

d. 4th mo. 13th, 1816. 

186— CATHARINE RIDGWAY b. 10th mo. 12th, 1773. 

m. First, Samuel Potts, 
m. Second, Samuel Paxson. 

187— ANNA RIDGWAY b. 12th mo. 24th, 1775. 

m. Samuel Butterworth. 



294 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



188— ABIGAIL RIDGWAY 



189— JOSEPH RIDGWAY 



b. 6th mo. 5th, 1778. 
m. David Bullock. 

b. 6th mo. 8th, 1781. 
d. 6th mo. 9th, 1781. 



90— BEULAH COATE (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Rebecca Sharp, 21). 

m. 3rd mo. 30th, 1763, John Ridgway. 
d. 3rd mo. 30th, 1807. 

190— WILLIAM C. RIDGWAY 
191— EDITH RIDGWAY 

192— REBECCA RIDGWAY m. 7th mo. 19th, 1792, Jeremiah Boone, "Jew- 

eler of Philadelphia." 

193— MIRIAM RIDGWAY 
194— MARY RIDGWAY 



100— SARAH BROWN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Mary, 25). 

b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1737. 

buried 6th mo. 2nd, 1811. 
m. 11th mo. 11th, 1756, in Chesterfield Meeting, 
Joseph Scholey of Nottingham Township, Bur- 
lington Co., N. J. 
He d. 2nd mo. 10th, 1778. 



195— JAMES SCHOLEY 



b. 9th mo. 19th, 1757. 

d. 2nd mo. 2Sth, 1826. 

m. 9th mo. 7th, 1786, Mary Rogers, daughter 
of Isaac and Ann Rogers, of Windsor 
Township, Middlesex Co., N. J. 



196— SAMUEL SCHOLEY 



b. 11th mo. 18th, 1759. 



197— MARTHA SCHOLEY 



b. 5th mo. 18th, 1761. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



295 



198— MARY SCHOLEY 



199— AXX SCHOLEY 
200— JOHN SCHOLEY 
201— RACHEL SCHOLEY 



b. 7th mo. 24th, 1762. 
m. 10th mo. 12th, 1780, Isaac Thorn, son of 

John Thorn, of Chesterfield Township, 

Burlington Co., N. J. 

b. 5th mo. 1st, 1766. 
b. 4th mo. 21st, 1769. 
b. 9th mo. 14th, 1770. 



103— KEZIAH SHREVE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Rebecca, 26). 

b. March 8th, 1730, in Burlington Co., N. J. 
m. about 1752, Moses Ivins, son of Isaac Ivins, Sr. 
He d. 1803, in Monmouth Co., N. J- 



202— CALEB lYIXS 



b. 12th mo. 14th, 1753. 

d. 8th mo. 26th, 1845, in Hornerstown, N. J. 
m. Sarah Wright. 
She d. 1821. 



203— MOSES lYIXS 
204— SARAH lYIXS 
205— ISRAEL lYIXS 



m. John Dixon. 

b. 2nd mo. 19th, 1760. 

d. 6th mo. 11th, 1822, near Wrightstown, N. J. 

m. 1780, Margaret Woodward, daughter of 
Anthony and Constance (Williams) Wood- 
ward. 
She b. 11th mo. 12th, 1759. 

d. 2nd mo. 17th, 1832. 

m. March 20th, 1783, Jonathan Cleaver, 
m. Adam Gibbs. 

b. 1st mo. 12th, 1768. 

d. 11th mo., 1851. 

m. First, Ezra Cook. 

m. Second, 1799, Aaron Ivins. • 

William Cleaver, son of Jonathan and Rebecca (Ivins) Cleaver [206], m. Oct. 9, 
1823, Jane W. Thomas, their daughter Mary m. Sept. 13, 1842, Hugh DeHaven, their 
son Holstein DeHaven, president, Real Estate Title Ins. & Trust Co., Phila., m. Nov. 
12, 1891, Annah B. (Colket) Gallup, widow of Edwin C. Gallup, and daughter of Coffin 
and Mary Pennypacker (Walker) Colket. 



206— REBECCA IVIXS 
207— L YD I A lYINS 
208— AXX lYIXS 



296 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



105— CALEB SHREVE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Rebecca, 26). 

b. 8th mo. 25th, 1734, in Burlington Co., N. J. 
d. 4th mo. 21st, 1792. 

m. 11th mo. 19th, 1755, Grace Pancoast, daughter 
of Thomas and Anne Pancoast. 
She b. 4th mo. 7th, 1 734. 
d. 5th mo. 23rd, 1806. 



209— PHEBE SHREVE 



b. 5th mo. 12th, 1757. 
d. 3rd mo. 26th, 1796. 
m. 1778, Joshua Forsyth. 



210— BENJAMIN SHREVE 



b. July 7th, 1759. 

d. April 16th, 1844. 

m. April 13th, 1785, Rebecca Lippincott. 

She d. 8th mo. 27th, 1821. 



211— ANN SHREVE 



He 



b. 10th mo. 10th, 1763. 

d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1783. 

m. 3rd mo. 20th, 1782, Michael Rogers, Jr., 
son of Michael and Ann Rogers, of Not- 
tingham Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 

b. 2nd mo. 9th, 1756. 



212— REBECCA SHREVE 



b. 9th mo. 30th, 1764. 
d. 11th mo. 15th, 1821. 
m. Isaac Perkins. 



213— CALEB SHREVE, JR. 



b. 10th mo. 30th, 1766. 
d. 5th mo. 24th, 1836. 
m. 6th mo. 2nd, 1802, Frances Hunt, daughter 

of Ralph and Mary Hunt of Lavvrence- 

ville, N. J. 
She b. 2nd mo. 27th, 1772. 
d. 2nd mo. 15th, 1862. 



214— REUBEN SHREVE 



She 



b. 8th mo. 16th, 1768. 
d. 6th mo. 19th, 1841. 

m. 11th mo. 18th, 1795, Mary Scattergood, of 
Mansfield Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
b. 3rd mo. 31st, 1773. 
d. 2nd mo. 12th, 1821. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



297 



215— THOMAS SHREVE 



She 



b. 9th mo. 1st, 1770. 

d. 2n(i mo. 17th, 1846, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

m. 11th mo. 5th, 1801, at Indian Springs 
Meeting House, Maryland, Ann Hopkins, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Thomas) 
Hopkins, of Baltimore, Md. 

b. 2nd mo. 26th, 1775. 

d. 12th mo. 12th, 1815. 



216— GRACE SHREVE 



b. 10th mo. 15th, 1772. 

d. 6th mo. 22nd, 1843, unmarried. 



217— MARY SHREVE 



b. 4th mo. 10th, 1775. 
d. 11th mo. 30th, 1777. 



CALEB SHREVE 

Caleb Shreve took a conspicuous and influential part in public affairs dur- 
ing the critical years when the colonies were struggling for independence. 
As one of the representatives of Burlington County, he sat in the New Jersey 
Provincial Congress during its memorable session of 1776, taking an active 
part in the proceedings and earnestly supporting notable measures proposed 
by the friends of liberty, though he opposed the adoption of a test vote of 
allegiance for persons entitled to vote for members of the Assembly at the 
ensuing fall election. This was the first Assembly of New Jersey to be 
chosen after the adoption of the new state constitution. He favored a con- 
ciliatory policy as far as possible, evidently in accordance with his religioua 
principles, and was fully sustained by his own electorate, through four suc- 
cessive elections to the Assembly. While a member of the Provincial Con- 
gress, he voted in favor of permitting paroled persons to secure the return 
of personal property. July 2, 1776, he voted for the adoption of the new 
constitution which obliterated colonial goverrmient; and on July 17 joined 
in the unanimous and enthusiastic endorsement of the action of the Conti- 
nental Congress in declaring the colonies forever free and independent, the 
resolution passed pledging the members to support " the freedom and inde- 
pendence of the State of New Jersey with our lives and fortunes and the 
whole force of the State." 



1^ 



298 GENEALOGY OF THE 

As noted, Caleb Shreve was elected a member of the New Jersey Assembly 
in 1776, 1777, 1778 and 1779. He was also elected 1783 and 1784. His 
course as a legislator was the same as in the Provincial Congress, independent 
and conservative. Some of his votes showed remarkable courage, in view of 
the events of the times and the excited state of the public mind. A notable 
instance was his recorded opposition to the confirmation of the Council of 
Safety. Evidently he maintained a high place in public confidence all the 
Avhile. He prospered greatly in business, the inventory of his personal estate 
showing a valuation of nearly $12,000. He died in 1792 intestate and his 
estate was administered by his sons, Benjamin and Caleb. 

Although a Friend, himself a non-combatant and a very conservative citi- 
zen throughout the Revolution, Caleb Shreve did not escape the consequences 
of war. Among the claims filed at Trenton for damages by British troops 
in New Jersey in December, 1776, and June, 1778, is an inventory of losses 
by Caleb Shreve of money, clothing, saddle, bridle, twelve large silver coat 
buttons, calves, sheep, geese, ducks, turkeys, fowls, shoes, pewter plates and 
basins, £43 3s. Od. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

4 mo. 5 — 1759 This Meeting being inform'd that Caleb [105] and Israel 
Shrieve [107] has been guilty of Training and William Shrieve [106] mar- 
ried contrary to y* good order and Discipline Established amongst Friends 
Jonathan Cheshire and Anthony Sykes is desired to let them know if they 
dont make this Meeting Satisfaction as discipline directs they will be 
Testify'd against. 

8 mo. 5"' 1759 Caleb Shrieve laid before this Meeting an Acknowl- 
edgment Condemning his being guilty of Training which was read and 
receiv'd. 

3 mo. 6 — 1777 The Pre Mee of Upper Springfield reports that Caleb 
Shreve, John Wood, John Black, Joshua Shreve, William Newbold, Jos. 
Newbold, John Middleton & Wm. Wood, Junr. had been visited on account 
of being concern'd in Military services, and that they seemed to justify 
their conduct therefore Joshua Gibbs, Alex. Howard, Wm. Copperthwait 
& Garvas Pharo are appointed to endeavour by further Christian Labour 
if possible to bring them to a just sense of their Transgrelsion and report 
to next Meeting. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 299 



7 mo. 3'' 1777 One of the Friends appointed to that service reports 
that Joseph Nevvbold has been served with a copy of the Testification of 
this Meeting against him and he did not intend to appeal, Anthony Sykes 
and Fretwell Wright are desired to Afsist them in performing the necelsary 
labour and care of the cases of Caleb Shrieve, John Wood & John Middle- 
ton and report to next Meeting. 

11 mo. 6*"^ 1777 The Friends appointed to that service produced a Testi- 
fication against Caleb Shreve Jun"" for acting in or promoting military 
measures which was read and approv'd and sign'd, and the same Friends 
are appointed to Read it to him give him a copy if requir'd let him know 
his right of appeal and report to next meeting. 

12 mo 4"' 1777 Joseph Forsyth reports he has read friends Testification 
against Caleb Shreve to let him know his right of appeal. 

7 mo. T^ 1778 Caleb Shreve's Acknowledgment condemning his repaying 
the money to those who had bought his goods taken for military fines was 
read and received. 



BENJAMIN SHREVE [210] 

The patriotic spirit of the Shreve family was manifested throughout the 
Revolutionary War, as shown by the records in the Adjutant General's office, 
at Trenton, N. J. In 1779, Benjamin [210], eldest son of Caleb Shreve, 
with his cousin, presumably Richard [220], son of William Shreve [106], 
enlisted at Philadelphia and served six months on board a Letter of Marque 
called the " Trooper," sixteen guns, commanded by Captain Samuel Howell; 
and afterwards served for a time under Captain Edward Thomas. In the 
early autumn of 1782, he joined the Company of Light Horse and Infantry, 
First Regiment, Burlington Co., N. J., Militia, of which William Shreve 
[106] was Colonel, and Richard Shreve [220] Captain; and was commis- 
sioned by Governor Livingston as First Lieutenant. This troop served in an 
emergency capacity, during times of special danger, until the end of the war, 
engaging in many skirmishes. On December 26th, 1782, it had a lively 
encounted with Tory refugees at Cedar Creek, Monmouth County, N. J., 
where several men were wounded and one killed. On January 6th, 1783, 
during a skirmish in the same locality, Lieutenant Benjamin Shreve was 
wounded in the knee, by reason of which he was compelled to retire from the 
service. He became a Revolutionary pensioner. 



300 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Although a mere lad, only sixteen years of age, Caleb Shreve [213], second 
son of Caleb, served as a private for short periods in his cousin Richard's 
command. He was reported with the troop on October 13th, 1782; Novem- 
ber 5th, 1782, and December 20th, 1782; and took part in the engagement 
at Cedar Creek, December 26th, 1782. He also served a short time during 
the early part of 1783. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

2 mo. 6"" 1783 The Friends appointed report they visited Benjamin 
Shreve [210] in respest to his bearing Arms in a Military way, he informed 
them he Expected to continue therein, therefore this Meeting disowns him, 
the said Benjamin Shreve, from being a Member of our religious Society 
untill he becomes sensible of his Deviation and condemns the same as disci- 
pline directs. William Satterthwaite and Barzillai Furman are appointed 
to give him a Copy of this Minute, inform him of his right of appeal, and 
report to next Meeting. 

4 mo. S** 1783 The Friends appointed report Benj Shreve hath been 
served with a Copy of the Minute of the Meeting against him and inform'd 
of his right of Appeal. 



^> 





SIGNATURES OF ADMINISTRATORS, ESTATE OF CALEB SHREVE [lOS] 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



301 



106— WILLIAM SHREVE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Rebecca, 26). 

b. 8th mo. 4th, 1737, in Burlington Co., N. J. 

d. 1812. 

m. First, May 8th, 1756, Anna Ivins of Spring- 
field Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 

m. Second, 12th mo. 15th, 1768, Rhoda Ivins. 

m. Third, February 21st, 1779, Anne Reckless, 
widow of Joseph Reckless, Jr., and daughter of 
Joseph and Hannah Woodward. 

218— JEREMIAH WARDER SHREVE 

b. 1757. 

m. 1775, Sarah Beck, 
d. about 1783, at sea. 



219— AMY SHREVE 



220— RICHARD SHREVE 



221— ISAAC SHREVE 



222— KEZIAH SHREVE 



223— SAMUEL SHREVE 



m. 



Ridgway. 



d. before 1810. 

b. 9th mo. 25th, 1760. 

d. 9th mo. 12th, 1822, in Bloomfield Town- 
ship, Crawford Co., Penna. 

m. 1783, Margaret Newbold, daughter of 
Thomas Newbold. 
She b. 5th mo. 26th, 1766. 

d. 9th mo. 10th, 1852. 



224— ANNA SHREVE 



b. 9th mo. 1st, 1773. 
d. 12th mo. 20th, 1846, in Belfast, O. 
m. Nathan Shumard. 



Joseph Reckless, Jr., son of Joseph and Margaret (Satterthwaite) Reckless, was born 
3rd mo. 27th, 1722, died 11th mo., 1771. He was a Friend of high standing in the 
Meeting and in the community in which he resided. Chesterfield Meeting records show 
that he was frequently appointed on important committees for the consideration of 
"weighty affairs." From 1750 to 1768 he was clerk of Chesterfield township, N. J. He 
carried on the milling business at the mill formerly owned by his father, near the 



L 



302 GENEALOGY OF THE 

present site of Recklesstown, N. J. By his will, dated October 30th, 1771, and proved 
November 26th, 1771, he devised to his wife Anne rents and profits of his grist mill, 
houses and land in and about Recklesstown, to bring up and educate their children until 
the youngest son, Robert, was 21, when the property was to be sold and divided among 
their five sons, Joseph, Isaac, John, Anthony and Robert. And it was devised that these 
sons were to have equal share of profits arising from the sale of their father's " half 
of mill called Chapman's, lot containing one acre near Prince Town, 20 acres at Chees 
Quakes in the south ward of city of Amboy, 108 acres in Hanover township, Burlington 
Co., quarter part of a saw mill and Pine land." Wife Anne, Robert Field, Esq., William 
Wood, j-eoman, apjiointed executors. Inventory of personal estate taken 11th mo. 21st, 
1771, amounted to £533, Os, 6d. Children of Joseph and Anne (Woodward) Reckless 
were Joseph, born lOth mo. 29th, 1753, died 8th mo. lOth, 1773; Isaac, born 4th mo. 
19th, 1755; John, born 12th mo. 30th, 1756; Robert, born 12th mo. 8th, 1758; Anthony, 
born 8th mo. 13th, 1760; Robert, born 3rd mo. 1st, 1763; Mary, born 1st mo. 10th, 1765. 



COLONEL WILLIAM SHREVE 

Sharing the military spirit of other members of the family, William Shreve 
rendered himself amenable to the discipline of the Friends' Society as early 
as 1759, and was dealt with in that year by the Chesterfield Meeting for 
" Training," evidently in connection with the French and Indian wars. 
When the Revolution came on he resumed training. August 26, 1775, he 
was commissioned Second Major, First Regiment, Burlington County, N. J., 
Militia. September 28, 1776, he was promoted to First Major; March 15, 
1777, Lieutenant Colonel, and April 18, 1778, was made Colonel, continuing 
to serve when occasion required for several years. In August, 1782, his son 
Richard [220] was elected Captain of the troop of Light Horse belonging 
to the same regiment. 

Being active in support of the Revolutionary cause. Col. Shreve suffered 
with many others during the march of the British army through New Jersey 
in the summer of 1778. His claim for dainages, submitted to the State gov- 
ernment, showed a total loss, June 23, 1778, of nearly £1,400, including 
" one dwelling house 24 X 32-1/2 feet, 2 stories, high Seiled & Painted, built 
in the year 1765." 

About the close of the Revolutionary War, Col. Shreve entered mercantile 
life in Burlington County, but was not successful. On November 2, 1782, 
he and his wife Anne made an assignment of all their " messuages, lots of 
ground, lands, tenements, hereditaments and real estate whatsoever and 
Avheresoever situated, moneys, debts, credits, etc. (except Family's wearing 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 303 



apparel)," to three prominent Philadelphia merchants, Jeremiah Warder, 
Jr., Mordecai Lewis, and Samuel Coates, in trust for his creditors, " anything 
remaining to be for use of William Shreve and family." On December 
12th, 1789, these assignees for "divers sums of money and further sum of 
£2537 — 10 shillings conveyed to Moses Ivins 304 acres of land, being the 
same land and premises which William Shreve and wife Ann conveyed to 
Jeremiah Warder, Mordecai Lewis and Samuel Coates, Nov. 2, 1782"; 
showing considerable of an estate for those times. It is not known how 
much accrued to Col. Shreve after the payment of all obligations, but in 
1788 he journeyed to western Pennsylvania with his brother Israel and 
others. Evidently the prospect was not alluring in that locality, as he re- 
turned to Burlington County, N. J., and resimied business there with success. 
His will, dated May 1, 1810, proved January 1, 1813, disposed of personal 
estate amounting to $2,043.00. His wife Anne was given the estate that 
belonged to her at the time of her marriage, and also one half of the real 
and personal estate of the decedent, after debts and other small legacies were 
paid. His daughter, Keziah Shreve, received the other half of the property, 
and her mother's wearing apparel. His other children's share was one hun- 
dred dollars each. 

VICTIMS OF BRITISH VANDALISM 

The ten days' march of the British army from Philadelphia to the upper 
New Jersey coast was an occasion of great trial and suffering to a large 
number of helpless people. At Haddonfield, June 18, 1778, Sir Henry 
Clinton, the Commander-in-Chief, issued a stringent order against disrepu- 
table practices, declaring his intention " to execute upon the spot every man 
maurauding, or who shall quit his post upon the march without permission " ; 
yet at Crosswicks, five days later, June 23, in the orders for the day the 
following significant statement appeared : 

The Houses of Mrs. Shreve and Mr. Tallman having been burned this 
morning, the Commander in Chief will (if the destruction of the Houses 
was intentional) give a reward of 25 Guineas to any one who will discover 
the person or persons who set fire to the above Houses, so that they may be 
brought to punishment for an act so disgraceful to the Army. The Com- 
mander in Chief gives notice that any person that may hereafter be found 
committing such disorders will be delivered to the Provost for immediate 
execution. 



304 GENEALOGY OF THE 

While near Freehold, Monmouth County, Sir Henry made his headquarters 
for the night at a farm house which was completely stripped of furniture 
and valuables, including clothing, and the inmates subjected to humiliation 
and suffering. The aged mistress of the plantation, 74 years old, was com- 
pelled to spend the night with her servants in the milk house. The stock 
was stolen and the damage sustained was very great. At Navesink two 
men were tried for burning a house and barn and acquitted. One woman 
camp follower was given 100 lashes on the bare back and drummed out of 
camp for plundering — the only conviction recorded. At Sandy Hook Sir 
Henry's order of the day (July 5) contained the following humiliating 
confession : 

The Commander-in-Chief is, though reluctantly, obliged to say that the 
irregularity of the Army during the march reflected much discredit on that 
discipline which ought to be the first object of an officer's attention. 

Tradition says that during this memorable march the commander-in-chief, 
upon one occasion at least, set a deplorable example of weakness and fright. 
This was when he spent the night at Crosswicks, June 23, 1778. He and 
his staff occupied the Bunting house. Having " dined " beyond his capacity, 
Sir Henry Clinton was put to bed in a very much demoralized condition. 
A little later he was the victim of a fearful " nightmare," and rushing down- 
stairs and out the open door, the night being very hot, he was soon flounder- 
ing in the mud at the border of a little stream near the house. His cries 
and the excitement which followed, with his rescue, made up a most ridicu- 
lous affair. The hostess was compelled to furnish material with which to 
cleanse the noble Sir Henry and place him in bed again to get calmed down. 
This story has been preserved in an unpublished manuscript belonging to 
descendants of the Bunting family. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

10 mo. 4'" 1759 William Shrieve laid before this Meeting and Acknowl- 
edgment Condemning his Training and marrying contrary to good order 
and Discipline Established among Friends which was read and left for 
further proof of his conduct. Anthony Sykes is desired to read it at the 
close of some First Day Meeting before our next Meeting. 

11 mo. 1"' 1759 Anthony Sykes reports he has read William Shrieves 
Acknowledgment pursuant to the order of last Meeting. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 305 



5 mo. 1^ 1776 Anthony Sykes informs the Meeting that William Shreeve 
and Barzillai Newbold had been concerned in Military services that they 
have been Treated with and are not disposed to condemn the same Samuel 
Black and Samuel Satterthwaite are appointed to let them know that unlefs 
they condemn their said Transgrefsion to the satisfaction of the Meeting 
they will be disowned agreeable to Discipline. 

6 mo. 6"' 1776 The friends appointed to acquaint William Shreeve and 
Barzillai Newbold of the complaint against them for acting in Military 
Services report they have had an opportunity with them and they did not 
appear in a disposition of condemning their conduct therein. Therefore 
this Meeting disowns the said William Shreeve and Barzillai Newbold from 
being members of our Religious Society until they come to a sense of their 
misconduct and forsake it and condemn the same as our Discipline directs 
Richard Way Furman and Joseph Forsyth are appointed to serve them 
with a copy of this Minute let them know their right of appeal and report 
to next Meeting. 

7 mo. 4'" 1776 One of the friends appointed to serve William Shreeve 
and Barzillai Newbold with a Copy of the Minute of the Meeting against 
them report it has been done and they did not either of them intend to 
appeal. 

REVOLUTIONARY DOCUMENTS 

To His Excellency the Governor William Livingston Esq"" Commander 
in Chief of the Militia of this State in New Jersey — 

Agreeable to a State Law of this State for raising a Company of Light 
Horse to belong to the first Regiment of Burlington County Militia Com- 
manded by Col. William Shreve to be Raised in the Several Townfhips of 
Chesterfield, Mansfield & Springfield & Hanover the different Inhabitants 
was notified to meet at the House of Solomon Rockhill in Mansfield Town- 
ship the Majority then meet by plurality of voices did Ellect for Capt. 
Richard Shreeve [220] for Lieu' Benj" Shreve [210] for Coronet John 
Brown Jr. which we beg your Honour will grant Commifsions for the fame. 

Signed by order of the Company Aug 7, 1782 James Fenimore Clk. 

State of New Jersey To Doct"" Aaron Swain Dr. 
Dec 28 1782. 

To attendance on Rob* Reckless a wounded Soldier Belonging to Capt. 
Rich'' Shreves Company of Horse from the first Rigement of Burlington 
County Melitia at a Scurmish at Ceder Creeke in the County of Monmouth 
from Dec 28—1782 to Jany 10'" 1783 Amount £18—10—6 

I do certify that the Above named Person Robert Recklefs Was in Pub- 
lick Service When Wounded Under my Command y^ 27"' of December 1782. 

Richard Shreve Capt. 
20 



306 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



"PETTICOAT BRIDGE" 

The section of Burlington County through which the British army passed 
on its march from Philadelphia to New York in the summer of 1778, was 
the scene of many stirring incidents. The struggling patriots destroyed 
bridges, obstructed roads and harassed the enemy in many ways. The Eng- 
lish commander, Sir Henry Clinton, complained bitterly of this in his com- 
munications to his friends in New York, and officially magnified the strength 
of his opponents. At the crossing of Assissicunk creek, near Jacksonville, 
a bridge was burned. Great public inconvenience resulted and while most 
of the able-bodied men of the vicinity were absent, tories in hiding or fol- 
lowing the enemy, and members of the militia on duty elsewhere, a band 
of sturdy women, wives and daughters of the continental soldiers, turned 
out and put up a temporary structure, which on account of this manifestation 
of patriotic energy, suggestively became known as " Petticoat Bridge." In 
the accompanying picture part of the old timbers may be seen under the new 
iron bridge. For more than a century local fire-side tales relating to this 
instance of the courage and energy of the women of revolutionary days, have 
been a feature of many family and social gatherings. Homesteads of the 
Shreve, Newbold, Reckless, French, Black and many other noted families 
were in this neighborhood and the damage done by the maurauding English 
troops was very great. 







&."--""v.. ^:^s 



PETTICOAT BRIDGE 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



307 



107— ISRAEL SHREVE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Rebecca, 26). 

b. 12th mo. 24th, 1739, in Mansfield Township, 

Burlington Co., N. J. 
d. 12th mo. 14th, 1799, in Fayette County, Penna. 
m. First, 2nd mo. 1760, Grace Curtis of Burling- 
ton Co., N. J. 
She d. 12th mo. 12th, 1771. 

m. Second, 5th mo. 10th, 1773, Mary Cokley; Rev. 
Jacob Duche performing ceremony; Christ 
Church record, Philadelphia. 
She b. 8th mo. 17th, 1749, in Amity Township, Berks 
Co., Pa. 



225— JOHN SHREVE 



b. 4th mo. 8th, 1762. 
d. 9th mo. 8th, 1854, in Alliance, Ohio, 
m. September 9th, 1786, Abigail Ridgway, 
daughter of Solomon and Mary Ridgway, 
of Burlington Co., N. J. 
She b. 1st mo. 4th, 1765. 
d. 6th mo. 4th, 1808. 



226— ELIZABETH SHREVE b. 5th mo. 11th, 1765. 

d. 1769. 



227— SARAH SHREVE 



b. 1769. 
d. 1769. 



228- KEZIAH SHREVE 



b. 6th mo. 4th, 1771. 
d. 4th mo. 14th, 1834. 
m. 1791, Thomas Stevens. 



Children of Israel and Mary (Cokley) Shreve 



229— ESTHER SHREVE 



b. 8th mo. 11th, 1774. 

d. 8th mo. 8th, 1837, in Belmont Co., Ohio, 
m. 12th mo. 29th, 1790, William Briggs, son 

of Job and Hannah Briggs, of Fayette 

Co., Penna. 



230— ISRAEL SHREVE, JR. 



b. 9th mo. 11th, 1778. 
d. unmarried. 



308 GENEALOGY OF THE 

231— GEORGE GREENE SHREVE 

b. 10th mo. 14th, 1780. 

Went to China and never heard from. 

232— REBECCA SHREVE b. 5th mo. 14th, 1783. 

d. 1st mo. 23rd, 1868, in Louisville, Ky. 
m. First, 7th mo. 24th, 1804, Fergus Moore- 
head, of Fayette Co., Penna. 
m. Second, James C. Blair, of Louisville, Ky. 

233— HENRY MILLER SHREVE 

b. 10th mo. 21st, 1785. 

d. 3rd mo. 7th, 1851, in St. Louis, Mo. 
m. First, 2nd mo. 28th, 1811, Mary Blair, of 

Brownsville, Penna. 
m. Second, Lydia Ann Rogers. 

234— BENJAMIN SHREVE b. 5th mo. 27th, 1787. 

d. 11th mo. 11th, 1824, at sea. 
m. Elizabeth . 



235— MARY SHREVE b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1792. 

m. William McMillin. 

236— CALEB SHREVE 



COLONEL ISRAEL SHREVE 

In the vigor of his young manhood Israel Shreve took an active part in 
the military affairs of the colony. Before the outbreak of hostilities in the 
war for independence he served for a time as Colonel of the First Battalion, 
Gloucester County Militia. When the New Jersey Continental line was iirst 
organized he was commissioned, November 8, 1775, Lieutenant Colonel of 
the Second Battalion Infantry. The officer in command was Colonel Wil- 
liam Maxwell, who throughout the Revolutionary struggle commanded the 
famous New Jersey brigade that bore his name. These troops were enlisted 
for one year and rendered conspicuous service in the campaign of 1776, in 
northern New York and Canada, taking part in the siege of Quebec and the 
battle of Three Rivers. At the expiration of their term of service they were 
discharged and the second New Jersey Continental line recruited. In a let- 
ter, dated Point Independence, October 18, 1776, Gen. Maxwell, addressing 
Gov. Livingston and the New Jersey Legislature, said : 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 309 

" I have the pleasure to inform you that I have as good a set of officers 
as any battalion in the Continental service and they will make good soldiers. 
I beg leave in a particular manner to recommend to your notice Col. Shreve. 
He has been very attentive to getting a thorough knowledge of his duty. 
Although I must regret his absence from any regiment I should have the 
honor to command, yet I cannot refrain from doing him the justice to recom- 
mend him to you as fit for first preferment in these battalions, or to com- 
mand the fourth to be raised." 

In accordance with this flattering testimonial from his superior officer, 
Colonel Shreve, November 28, 1776, was commissioned Colonel of the Sec- 
ond Battalion, enlisted for the war. In this capacity he participated in the 
campaign of the following year, taking part in engagements at Ash Swamp, 
near Woodbridge, New Jersey, May 31, 1777; Short Hills, N. J., June 26, 
1777, and the battle of Brandy wine, Pennsylvania, September 11, 1777, 
where he was severely wounded. Upon his recovery Col. Shreve, with his 
son John, a brave lad who accompanied him in several campaigns, joined 
the army at Valley Forge, sharing the terrible privations endured by the 
patriot soldiers during that memorable encampment. In the spring of 1778 
his command was ordered to join the forces in West Jersey, where British 
troops were constantly raiding the inhabitants. 

April 21, Col. Shreve was at Haddonfield. At midnight a detachment of 
the enemy, 1,400 strong, crossed from Philadelphia to Gloucester and 
stealthily marched to Haddonfield. Vigilant watch was kept, however, and 
the little band of American soldiers, at 3 o'clock on Sunday morning, the 
22nd, escaped to Mt. Holly. Three dilatory men were overtaken and bayo- 
neted. The enemy " gasconaded through the village," terrorizing the help- 
less residents, thus expressing their wrathful disappointment, and then re- 
turned at daylight to Philadelphia. This incident illustrated Col. Shreve's 
watchfulness and readiness in emergencies. His command was with the 
detachment of the American forces, under Gen. Maxwell, which harrassed 
the army of Gen. Clinton on its last march through New Jersey and was at 
the lively skirmish near Crosswicks, Burlington County, June 21, 1778. 
Pushing on, the battalion was at the battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1778. 
During the march of the British through the neighborhood of Col. Shreve's 
home they burned his house and destroyed the crops. 

In the campaign of 1779, against the hostile Indians in Pennsylvania and 
New York, Col. Shreve and his battalion were active and efficient, this ser- 



310 GENEALOGY OF THE 

vice extending from May until November. In the spring of 1780 they 
helped to drive the enemy from northern and eastern Jersey, taking part in 
engagements at Connecticut Farms, June 7, and Springfield, June 23. In 
his report of the operations around Springfield, Gen. Nathaniel Greene, 
under date of June 23, 1780, said: 

" Col. Shreve was stationed at the second bridge, to cover the retreat of 
the first line. Here the enemy were warmly received, but as they advanced 
in great force, with a large train of artillery, he had orders to join the 
brigade. The troops that were engaged behaved with great coolness and 
intrepidity, and the whole of them discovered an impatience to be brought 
into action. The order and discipline which they exhibit do them highest 
honor." 

September 26, 1780, Col. Shreve was appointed to the command of the 
Second Regiment of the Continental Line, and for a time commanded the 
New Jersey brigade at West Point, during the critical period of Arnold's 
treachery. He was placed in personal charge of the detachment which sur- 
rounded the guard at Major Andre's execution. Upon the reorganization 
of the army, about the 1st of January, 1781, he retired from active service, 
but not until he had undergone a painful experience and given a renewed 
manifestation of his loyalty and zeal. He had always set a conspicuous 
example of unselfish devotion to the cause of freedom. Upon one occasion, 
when a large number of the line and company officers of the New Jersey 
brigade had signed and forwarded to the Legislature an earnest protest and 
demand, concerning their long neglected pay, he declined to I'oin them. 
Washington was exceedingly stirred up and made a strong appeal to the 
patriotism of the petitioners, promising that their wrongs should be righted, 
but begging them not to leave the service at that critical hour, as they had 
declared their intention of doing. The matter was adjusted. In January, 
1781, several hundred private soldiers of the New Jersey line mutinied. 
Their grievances were many. Col. Shreve went about amongst them and 
did all he could to quell the revolt. He largely succeeded, but three ring- 
leaders persisted in making trouble and two of these were tried by court 
martial and shot. 

Col. Shreve made large sacrifices during the war and his personal affairs 
were in an unhappy condition, after six years continuous and faithful service. 
Upon his retirement from the army, however, he was called upon to take up 
the responsibilities of civil government, as a member of the legislature from 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 311 

Burlington County, 1781-83. Some years later, in 1788, he removed with 
his family to southwestern Pennsylvania, locating on a tract of land in 
Fayette County surveyed by Washington some twenty-five years before and 
then owned by him, from whom it was first rented on advantageous terms 
and afterwards purchased. His will, made a few days before his death, and 
herewith published, directed final payment on this land to Gen. Washington. 
Further interesting papers relate incidents in the eventful life of this notable 
member of one of the pioneer families of New Jersey, many of whom partook 
of his patriotic and intrepid spirit. It was a singular coincidence that he 
died the same day that Washington passed away, December 14, 1799. 

Col. Shreve's fourth son, Henry M., was distinguished for his improve- 
ments in steamboats in use on the western rivers and the invention of prac- 
tical devices for clearing those great streams of the accumulated obstructions 
of centuries. Fifty years after his death, Congress granted his heirs the 
sum of $50,000 for this great service. Shreveport, La., was named for him. 

LETTERS OF COL. ISRAEL SHREVE TO HIS SON JOHN SHREVE 

Dear Son Sorel, 12th June 1776. 

You and Samuel Shute are to Go off home with Lieut Anderson, you 
are to take j-our Guns and Acutrements, your Blankets, and all your Cloath- 
ing. Git Read}' as soon as possable, it is Better for you to Go than staj' — 
John is to Go home to Philadelphia — Stay there or Go up to his unkle 
Caleb — Go to School keep With Mr. Anderson untill you Git home Keep 
Samuel Shute at 3-our mothers untill he can Git an oppertunity to Go 
home in some Market Waggon, be kind to your Mother and Sisters keep 
out of all bad Company. Go up to your Unkles when your Mother Orders 
you I have sent a Letter to John Stille}-, one to your Unkle Caleb and 
one to your Mother, they are all three foalded up together and Directed 
to Mr. John Stilley when you Git home Deliver them to the Owners, take 
a Pillow Case to put your Cloathes In. Lieve my Chest in the Care of 
Doctor holms and Thomas Smith. Lieve the Key. — Both of you be Cheer- 
ful and set off as it is my and Capt. Shutes Commands. Anderson has 
money for Johns Expenses be Good Lads and I hope you will farewell 
Dont think hard hut Go off amediatelv I am vour father 




P. S. Keep this Letter it will Do for a pass when you Git home show it 
to your mother. If you are a Good Lad If I live you shall Go With Me 
Next Campain. 



312 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Mount Independance 25th August 1776. 

Dear Son 

I have the pleasure to Inform you that j'our Comarade Samuel Shute 
was yesterday appointed Ensign In Capt. Dillons Company (Write him a 
Letter, according to the form I here send you) My son Spend not one 
moment in Vain Your Mother Informs me you are at a Good School. 
Do all you Can to Learn, you are not to join the Regt untill we Come 
home which Will be some time in November. Consider now you are an 
oflicer in the Army of the United States of America. I Wrote that you 
Was appointed Ensign in Capt Brearley's Company a month ago to Day. — 
Strive to be as Good a Scholar and Soldier as Mr. Ensign Saml Shute, 
he is to go to School untill we Come home, — Spend not your time playing 
on the Streets With Mischevious Boys But Study to be the Scholar and 
the Soldier. Be Dutiful to your Mother, and kind to your Sisters. I have 
Wrote to your Unkle William to Let your Couzen Richard Shreve, Come 
out With me next Campaign. My Love to you hoping to here of your 
Welfare, — I am With Great tenderness and Respect your 

Father Israel Shreve 

P. S. Lt. John Higgins Died at Crown point we here nothing of Lt. 
Friese Read 

I. S. 



AN EMPHATIC ORDER FOR FORAGE 
Sir, 

Quarter Mafter Banks Informs me you Refule to Let him have forage 
on my order. 

Col. furman told me he had placed you there to purchase forage and 
Defired Me to Call on you when I wanted. An order from him is not 
Material. As I Command him And you, when in the Limits of My Com- 
mand. I know you have grain at Several places And if you Re [parts of 
several lines here torn from manuscript] order I shall send for you and 
[ ] you for Difobedience of Order and take the grain. Your Com- 
pliance will prevent You and me trouble 

I am your Moft Hum' 

Serv' I Shreve Col. Comd"" 

Newark March 25'" 1779 
to Mr. Safern. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 313 



COL. SHREVE'S JOURNEY TO WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The following is the journal of travel of Col. Israel Shreve and relatives and friends 
from New Jersey to Western Pennsylvania, 1788: 

Journal of travel from Township of Mansfield, county of Burlington in 
the State of New Jersey, to the Township of Rostrover in the County of 
Westmoreland, State of Pennsylvania, of party consisting of Israel Shreve 
and Mary, his wife, with their children, Kezia, Hesther, Israel, George 
Greene, Rebecca and Henry ; John Fox and James Starkey ; three two horse 
waggons and three Cows. William Shreve and wife, with their children, 
Anna and Richard. Joseph Beck and Sarah, his wife, with their children, 
Benjamin, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Henry, Joseph and Ann ; with one three 
horse waggon. Daniel Hervey and Sarah, his wife, and their child. Job, 
with a Mulatto Boy named Thomas ; and Joseph and Ann Wheatly ; John 
Shelvill ; one three and one two horse Waggon and one cow. In all 29 
Souls. 

Monday the 7th of July, 1788 — Set out and crossed the Delaware at 
Donkses Ferry where we parted with a Number of our Relations and 
friends who had accompanied us and continued on to the Sign of General 
Washington, 17-/4 miles to-day, here staid all night. Rainy in the Night. 

Tuesday the 8th of July — Set out early, halted in the City of Philadel- 
phia several hours getting necessaries ; Left the City and passed the Schuyl- 
kill over a Bridge at the Middle Ferry, halted on the Hill on the other Side. 

Set out again and Halted at the Sign of the Buck 21 miles to day. 
Stayed all Night. 

Wednesday the 9th July — Set out at Sunrise, Daniel Harvey and wife 
being unwell halted and breakfasted at the Sign of the Spread Eagle, 
here for the first time in our Journey boiled the Tea Kettle, Set out again 
hindered by having two horse shoes put on, hard showers of Rain to-day, 
halted at Downington, 22 Miles to-day, Stayed all Night. 

Thursday the 10th July — Set out again hindered some time getting forage 
at a Mill, went on over exceedingly muddy bad roads, halted and dined 
at Caleb Ways, here perceived the Black mare badly foundered, drenched 
her with salt and water and sent her to the light waggon, went on and 
halted at the Sign of the Marriner's Compass, kept by a Mr. Taylor, in 
Pequa Valley, 13-^ Miles to-day only, occasioned by Bad Roads and 
crossing the South Mountain and one of mj' vi^aggons drove by James 
Starkey oversetting bottom upwards, to day the women were much fatigued 
by walking, Sarah Hervey walked eight and a half miles over the Hill at 
one heat. 



314 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Friday the 11th July — Set out and passed over Roads full of bad Mud- 
holes, halted and breakfasted at the Sign of the Hat kept by Andrew 
Coldwell, hindered this morning by getting clasps put round the felloe 
of a wheel, went on over muddy roads to George Prisly at the head of the 
Great Spring, Sign of the Bird in Hand and dined. Set out again and 
crossed the Canestoga Creek within two miles of Lancaster — 17 miles to 
day, all cherry and in high spirits, stayed all night, it being the height 
of harvest, took particular notice of the wheat which is bad in general so 
far, being killed by the severity of the weather, and much mildewed. 

Saturday the 12th July — Set out Early and halted some time in Lan- 
caster, had one new horse shoe put on. Drove out of town and break- 
fasted late — went on, halted at Scotts Mill and dined in the woods, went 
on again and were obliged to halt at a Private House, paraded our beds 
in a barn, this did not set well. Daniel went on to Elizabethtown in the 
Night, 16 miles to day. 

Sunday 13th Jul}' — Set out and halted at Alexander Boggs ; at the Sign 
of the Bear in Elizabethtown, 4 miles to day ; Here John Gaston and Wife 
overtook us on their waj' home to the Monongahala River. 

Monday the 14th July — Set out at Sunrise, halted and breakfasted at 
Middletown ; we are now in sight of the Susquahanna River; went on to 
the Chambers Ferry crossed over to Captain Simpsons, — Set out again and 
forded a rapid Creek called Yellow Breeches, — very mirey roads — halted 
at Pattersons Tavern, 8 miles to day, stayed all night — here is good level 
land ; the wheat along the road from Lancaster to the Susquahanna, appears 
to have jilenty of straw but is much mildewed and rusty. 

Tuesday the 15th July — Set out again passed over exceedingly good level 
land and halted at Carlisle and dined — here lost my Dog — Set out again 
and passed over level roads full of bad mudholes, halted at Robert Sim- 
ples Tavern, 22 miles to day — Rainy night. 

Wednesday 16th July — Set out and halted at Mr. Cracken's Tavern at 
the head of the Great Spring and breakfasted. Road something better than 
yesterday, went on to Shippensburg, there halted and dined at Capt Scotts 
Tavern, — (when we dined at Taverns we always made use of our own pro- 
visions.) Set out again in a hard rain, by advice took the right hand road 
that leads over the three hills, lately opened and made by a Mr. Skinner 
from Jersey, halted at Joseph Fenleys Tavern at the Sign of the Ball, 19 
miles to-day, a rainy night, Roads level but muddy in places to day. 

Thursday 17th July — Set out and halted at Coopers Tavern at the foot 
of the first hill called the Blue mountain and breakfasted, all in good health 
and high spirits. Crops from the Susquahanna to this place exceedingly 
good and plenty, free from mildew and rust, then ends the good land until 
over all the hills except in spots, and here began sorrow. Set out and 
ascended the first Mountain so steep tliat we were obliged to double the 
teams to get up and verj- stony going down the other side, in this valley 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 315 

crossed a Creek called Cannogoguinop, halted at said Mr. Skinners who 
made the road, A hard rain coming on and our horses much worried we 
stopped the afternoon, 8 miles to daj-, stayed all night. Here Joseph Becks 
daughter Ann was taken sick. 

Friday 18tli July — Set out again and rose the second hill called the North 
Mountain, this as steep and stony as the first at the west fort forded a 
Creek in Path Valley, went on and halted at a Tavern, the Landlord drunk, 
a man who calls himself Noble with the ^Landlady on the Bed nursing the 
Landlord who was fast asleep ; — this place affords neither forage nor 
water and whiskey nearly out. Coming down the last Hill Daniel Hervey 
left his stallion to follow the waggon, the horse took an old path and 
caused several hours search before he was found stripped of all his gears 
but the collar, consisting of a new blind bridle, a pair of leather lines, har- 
nes, back and belly bands, and one iron trace the other having been taken 
to lock the waggon — about 2 o'clock in the afternoon set out and ascended 
the third hill called the Tuscarora Mountain which is much steeper than 
the other. At or near the top there are several Cabins, in one lives or 
stays an old woman who appears to be very sick and in distress. At the 
West fort of this third Hill is a good farm — Went on a mile farther to 
Mr. Gimmersons who keeps a Tavern and Store of Goods which he sells 
as cheap for hard cash as such Goods are sold in Jersey for paper money. 
Here had the misfortune to break one of my Waggon wheels, sent it on 
five miles this evening to be repaired, 8 miles only to-day: This is the place 
called the Burnt Cabins, where the old road that passes through Chambers 
Town comes into the old Road said to be twenty miles farther than the 
new one but much better and shuns two of the three Hills just mentioned. 
Our women complain heavily on account of being obliged to walk on foot 
over the Mountain. 

Saturdaj"- 19th July — About eleven o'clock set out all but the disabled 
Waggon and passed over barren sideling roads, halted at Capt Birds at 
fort Littleton, 5 miles to day, one or two pretty good farms in this valley, 
here stayed for the Waggon wheel which was not finished until evening. 

Sunday 20th July — Sent the repaired wheel to the Waggon, About eleven 
o'clock had a further hindrance by having three horse shoes put on. Set out 
and passed over barren roads good but much gullied, halted in the woods 
at a Run of Good Water at the foot of Sideling Hill, 13 miles to daj', 
stayed all night, heavy complaints among the Women. 

Monday 21st July — Set out and ascended Sideling Hill up a good new 
Road made by said Skinner, halted on the top and breakfasted at Henry 
Livingstons Tavern, went on over exceedingly stony Roads to Rays Hill, 
here cut saplings and chained to our Waggons, this hill steep, gullied, and 
very stony. Skinners men at work making a new Road down, we continued 
on to the crossings of the Juneatto, forded the River, halted on the Hill 
at a Colonel Martins Tavern, Land Lord nor Lady at home, no feed but 



316 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2 Rye sheaves cut up for which I paid 9d, the girls of the House very 
uncouth and surly ; went on and halted at Cabin Tavern kept by a Jersey 
Dutchman ; 12 miles to-day. Road from Martins barren and bad sideling 
hill ; one felloe of one of my Waggons gave way, Mr. Shreve put in a 
new one. 

Tuesday 22nd July — Set out after breakfast, went on and passed through 
Bedford, halted for a horse shoe, went on four miles further and halted at 
John Bonnets Tavern at the forks of the Old Pennsylvania and Glade 
Roads, 15 miles today. Here is an excellent farm with more than one hun- 
dred acres of the best Meadow land. Joseph Becks child very ill, stayed 
here all night. 

Wednesday 23rd July — Set out late in the morning, went over a poor 
country and in the evening halted at a poor Dutch Hut where the Land- 
lady was very angry with D. H. for pulling a radish. No feed at this 
Tavern nor anything else but whiskey, 13 miles to day. The gnats very 
bad here. 

Thursday 24th July — Set out and passed on five miles to the foot of the 
Allagana Mountain, having now passed twelve miles along Dry Ridge and 
seen but two or three houses which are very poor, — went on and ascended 
the mountain which is nothing of a Hill to what we have passed, halted 
and dined a little off the road on the Hill, very rainy, we then proceeded 
on from the Allagana one mile into the Glades and halted at Christian 
Spikers where we staj'ed the remainder of the Day on account of the 
illness of the child, 13 miles to day; — About eleven o'clock this evening, 
Ann Beck doughter of Joseph Beck departed this life to the great grief of 
her parents, more so on account of being far distant from their former 
home. 

Friday 25th July — Sent to Berlin for a Coffin which arrived towards 
Evening when the child was decently interred in Mr. Spikers family Bury- 
ing ground. Stayed here all night again. Still raining by spells. 

Saturday 26th July — Hired George Pancakee and two horses to put 
before my heaviest Waggon for 8 — 4 per day and find him and horses. Set 
out, halted at a Blacksmith, had two clasps put on my Waggon wheel and 
one horse shoe put on — Set out and halted at Mr. Blacks, here is a family 
waiting for Judsims, [Judge John C. Symmes] went on taking a right hand 
road at an empty Cabin on account of the other Road being cut so much 
by heavily loaded Waggons, halted and dined at one Jacob Louts, went on 
and halted at a Dunker called Perkeys, 15 miles to day. The land in the 
Glades on the Roads we have passed poor. 

Sunday 27th July — Set out and after going a few hundred yards missed 
the most material part of Daniel Hervej'S property, it having gone before 
and taken a wrong road, a hue and cry was raised when to his great joy 
it was found unhurt. We passed on and began to rise Laurel Hill, halted 
and breakfasted at a run of Water. Set out again and ascended to the top 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 317 

of the Mountain over miry and ston}- Roads, then soon began to descend, 
first down a short steep hill, then a long gradual descent through Chestnut 
Brush, the timber appearing to have been killed by fire sometime before, 
huckle berries here as well as in many places before very plainly on the 
low green bushes, — this Road down is over logs and stones enough to dash 
all to pieces : At length we arrived at a house in Legenear Valley it being 
Sunday and rain coming on we stayed the afternoon and all night. Our 
women exceedingly fatigued by walking over the Mountain. 

Monday 28th — Set out and after passing three miles halted and break- 
fasted. Set out again and found the steepest hill we had met with, in 
going up Chestnut Hill were obliged to put six horses to some of the 
heaviest waggons. Raining hard — Descend the Ridge and came into the 
other road which is so miry as to sink the Waggons to the hubs in many 
places, stopped at a Blacksmiths and had one shoe put on one of my horses. 
Set out again and met Joseph Wood on his way to Jersey from Little 
Kenhaway, he informed me that a house was ready for me in the forks 
of Youghaina, went on and was overtaken by John Fo.x with the intelli- 
gence that one of Daniel Herveys Waggons had broken down. I halted 
at John Bennetts junior it being the first house over all the mountain. In 
the evening all the waggons arrived less Daniel Herveys two. 12 miles 
today — D. Harvej' last evening in coming from his Waggon to Mr. Bennetts, 
got out of the Road ; it being very dark he could not find it again and was 
forced to take up his lodging in the Woods until day. Sarah Harvey and 
Sarah Beck walked six miles over very bad Roads this afternoon and 
arrived much wearied. 

Tuesday 29th July — Sent for D. Harveys broken waggon and got a new 
axle-tree put in. We are now clear of the Mountains over which we have 
with much difficulty got so far safely except the misfortune of losing the 
child. The Allagania mountain, the Back Bone of America or the United 
States, is easy to ascend, being a long gradual ascent up Dry Ridge. Upon 
it, especially on the East side are very large white pines in great plenty ; 
the Glade is a high country or piece of land 18 miles wide : — Between this 
and the Laurel mountain the road for many miles is through chestnut 
Timber, such I never before saw for size and height — In many places as 
many rails could be cut on an acre as could be got out of the best Cedar 
Swamp in Jersey. The land is of little value but for timber. 

Wednesday 30th July — Set out halted and breakfasted at Mr. Robesons, 
went on through a settlement on good level land for this country, stopped 
and dined within four miles of Budds Ferry, here found a Mr. Brunt with 
a large family from Hunterdon in Jersey bound for Kentuckj", went two 
miles further and found Moses Juttle waiting for Judge Symmes, went on 
again and forded Youghagaina River, the water being so high as to come 
into some of the waggons that happened to drive a little amiss — Halted 
and stayed all night at Budd's Ferry — 14 miles to day — We are now in the 



JT' 1 



318 GENEALOGY OF THE 

forks — Here I received Colonel Bayard's letter of instructions where to find 
the house prepared for me. 

Thursday, 31st July — Set out, and halted at Capt. Petersons, where Cawet 
[Carrs] formerly lived ; went on, and took the Elizabethtown Road for sev- 
eral miles, when all the waggons left me and turned off to the right hand 
near the meeting house to Asher Williams. I went on with my family, and 
turned to the left of Mr. Walter Walls. A hard rain coming on, and the 
road difficult to find, I stayed the afternoon and all night. Mr. Wall is 
a Jerseyman, and very kind. 

Friday, Ist August — Set out. Mr. Wall sent his son James as a guide 
with me ; after going a mile or two, met Mr. Joseph Lemmon, the owner 
of the house I was going to, with Mr. Taylor. Walter Carr also accom- 
panied us, with several others, to our new habitation, where we arrived 
about one o'clock in the afternoon — All well, after a very fatigueing journey 
of 25 days since leaving Jersey. The house provided for me is a new one, 
30 feet by 26, two stories high, built of hewed white oak Logs, with a very 
good stone chimney. The house is not finished, no family having lived in 
it until we came. We set to, stopped it with lime and clay, laid the upper 
floor with Chirety [cherry] boards, and it is now pretty comfortable for 
Summer. — There is a Spring of good water within about five rods of the 
door. 

I have the privilege of pasture and fourteen acres of good land to sow 
this fall with wheat, and plenty of apples for house use, &c. &c. 

I have ridden over some of the neighborhood, and must say that the land 
in general is exceedingly good, producing excellent crops of grain — Many 
parts are too rich for wheat, though the crops in general are good. Indian 
corn in some places is excellent, in other fields it has been hurt by the wet 
season — All that truth can say against the place is that the land in general 
is hilly, though even the sides of the hills are very rich, producing Walnut, 
Sugar Trees, Ash, with a variety of other woods, (S:c. — As to the inhabi- 
tants, they are mostly from Jersey, very kind to new comers, as well as 
to one another ; they live in a plain way, not spending much in Dress and 
fo]jpery, but are well provided with the real necessaries of life. 

Israel Shreve 

Rostrover Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, 
August 10th, 1788. 

By Jacob Keelor, who faithfully discharged his duty in carefully driving 
a waggon. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 319 

LETTER OF COL. LSRAEL SHREVE TO HIS BROTHER CALEB SHREVE 

Forks of Yough, Deer. 26th, 1789. 
Dear Brother : 

Having an opportunity to Philada., I embrace it, and mention my situa- 
tion or intended one. Since I have been here have wished to get Wash- 
ington's Bottoms, and have at last obtained the whole tract on rent for 
five years. I wrote to the General by his Agent in this County, Colonel 
Canon, who a few weeks ago returned from New York ; the General was 
pleased to order Colonel Canon to let me have the whole of the Bottoms so 
called at my own offer. — The old farm contains about 80 acres of improved 
upland and about 40 of the best kind of meadow, a bearing orchard of 120 
apple & 100 peach trees ; the buildings as good as most in this Countrj* — 
pretty well situated, and five other improved farms that at this time rent 
for £43 — 10 — I am accountable for the whole rent, which altogether is 
£60 — so that I shall have the old place for £16 — 10, to be paid either in 
money or wheat at 3/ per Bushel. 

I considered this land at the Miami Settlement was rising fast, and that 
I had better pay this low rent for a well improved farm than barter away 
my land at a low rate for land here — Land does not rise much in this place, 
owing to the great emigration down the River. It seems as if people were 
crazy to get afloat on the Ohio. Many leave very good livings here, and 
set out for they know not where, but too often find their mistake. I believe 
this as good as any of the settlements down the River for the present. The 
Mississippi trade is open at this time, and all the Wheat, Whiskey, Bacon, 
&c., buying up by those concerned in it ; the highest price for Wheat is 4/ 
in trade, or 3/. 9. cash, whiskey, 3/. cash, and Bacon, 9d. p. lb. cash, &c. 

On the farm where I am going is as good a stream for a Grist Mill as 
any in the whole forks, and a Mill that can be set going for, I believe, £50, 
and a number of years given for the repairs. I am in hopes of being able 
to set it going as it will produce more grain than all six farms on the tract. 

I am to have possession the first of April next — and flatter myself I 
have as good a chance as any person in my circumstances could expect — I 
shall have nothing to attend to but my own private concerns — and think 
this way of life far preferable to any other. — Richard Shreve is to have one 
of the small farms ; they contain of improved land as follows : one, 40 
acres upland and 5 good meadow ; one, 35 acres upland and 7 good meadow ; 
one, about 35 acres upland and 6 good meadow ; the other two about 25 
acres upland and 5 or 6 of good meadow each; the whole in fences, they 
being the year before last rented for repairs only, &c. Peggy Shreve has 
a daughter ; she and her husband have been very sickly this last fall, but 
have recovered. I am grandfather to another son ; — John and his wife 
pretty well, as is our family at present, but expect the measles, as it is in 



320 GENEALOGY OF THE 

the school where our boj's go. I hope you are all well also — I am, with 
great respect and love, Your Brother, 

Israel Shreve 
To Caleb Shreve, Esquire, 

Mansfield, Burlington County, New Jersey. 

favd. by To be left at Charles French's, merchant, 

Mr. Richard Jones next door to Old Ferrj-, Philada. 

WILL OF COL. ISRAEL SHREVE, 1799 

In the Name of God Amen I Israel Shreve of the Township of Franklin 
County of Fayette and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Being very weak in 
body but in perfict sound mind & memory do make this my last Will and 
Testament in manner following first I order all my funeral charges and 
just debts fully paid by my Executor hereinafter named, Item I, Give & 
bequeath to my beloved wife Mary One thousand Dollars in full for her 
Dowry & share of said estate Item I give & bequeath to my sons George 
Henry & Benjamin One hundred fifty Acres of Land each George to have 
where Laphin lives, Henry where Spencer lives Benjamin where I live 
I give and bequeath unto my daughter Rebeckah and Mary each Two hun- 
dred dollars I give and bequeath unto my son John & Israel one hundred 
dollars each I give and bequeath unto my Daughters Kiziah and Esther 
one hundred dollars each I do hereby nominate and appoint my trusty 
friends Edward Cook John Shreve and Richard Noble to be my Executors 
to this my last will and testament I do hereby order and fully Otherwise 
my said Executors to sell and dispose of all the Residue of my Estate both 
Real and Personal and money arising therefrom together with my out 
standing debts to be apropriated to the payment of my Funeral Charges 
& out standing debts and legasies and the over plus if any there be to be 
divided equally amongst my wife and children I do hereby order and 
request my said Executors to call upon George Washington and pay his 
Demand or due with the first money that comes into their hands belonging 
to said Estate and obtain a title for said land according to his Article and 
when such Deed is obtained to execute Deeds to all such as I have hereto- 
fore sold to according to their Articles takeing care to obtain payments 
from them as soon as it may be had I do give and bequeath unto my 
beloved wife Mary my son Benjamins Part of land to her use unto he is 
of age I do hereby submit this my last Will and Testament unto the judg- 
ment and management of my said Executors relying on their fidelity and 
good conduct as WITNESS my hand seal this ninth day of December in 
the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety and nine 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 321 

LIEUTENANT JOHN SHREVE [225] 

Many youthful soldiers took part in the war for independence, none mak- 
ing a more commendable record than John Shreve [225]. He was a lad of 
thirteen, in the fall of 1775, when made an Ensign, Second Battalion, 
Gloucester Co., N. J., troops, of which his father, Israel Shreve, was Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. He took part in the campaign in New York and Canada 
the following spring and summer. In November, 1776, he was made First 
Ensign and in July, 1777, Lieutenant, in which capacity he served at differ- 
ent times until 1781. At the battle of Springfield, N. J., he received a 
buckshot in one of his legs, which he carried until his death, seventy-five 
years later. Accompanying papers give interesting personal reminiscences 
of his career in the army and afterward. 

During the winter encampment at Valley Forge the soldierly bearing of 
Lieut. Shreve, then in his sixteenth year, as shown in the different scouting 
expeditions sent out under his command, won the admiration of a number 
of ladies then visiting the army. With the approbation of General Wash- 
ington, they presented the young officer with a beautiful and valuable buckle, 
set with costly stones, for his sword belt. This precious relic was given by 
Lieut. Shreve to a granddaughter, when the clouds of civil war were gather- 
ing, with the patriotic warning: "Don't let it fall into disloyal hands." 
He enjoyed the friendship of General Washington, and while dining with 
the President and Lady Washington, in November, 1796, the latter called 
his attention to the dinner service of blue and gold of a thousand pieces. 
made in China, which had been presented to her husband by the Society of 
the Cincinnati, of which the guest was a member. At Valley Forge, Gen- 
eral Lafayette became much interested in Lieut. Shreve. When the French 
patriot visited America, in 1825, and was met at Brownsville, Pa., Lafayette 
recognizing a tall figure in the crowd on the wharf, gave him an old familiar 
salute, and in a moment they were in each other's arms. 

Soon after his marriage, in 1786, John Shreve moved to southwestern 
Pennsylvania, where he purchased a farm and lived many years. He was 
also engaged in the Mississippi trade, purchasing large quantities of flour, 
which he shipped to New Orleans, thence to the West Indies, where he 
exchanged it for sugar, which was brought to New York. For several terms 
he was a member of the Pennsylvania legislature and filled various local 
offices with credit to himself and advantage to the public. About the year 

21 



322 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1825, his children having removed to Ohio, he went to that state and made 
his home with them until his death, which occurred September 8, 1854, in 
the ninety-third year of his age. In closing a sketch of John Shreve, the 
"Democratic Transcript," of Ohio, October 11, 1854, said: 

" He was a man of vigorous intellect and strong memory; he was benevo- 
lent to a fault, and often contributed to relieve the wants of others beyond 
what his own necessities would strictly justify. He was an ardent friend 
of freedom, strongly devoted to the principles of liberty, for which he had 
fought and bled under Washington. We have noticed concisely a few of 
the leading incidents in the life of one who served his country, both in peace 
and war, with a faithfulness that won the approbation of such men as Wash- 
ington and Lafayette and the community in which he resided. To his pos- 
terity he has left the inheritance of an unsullied reputation, of greater worth 
than the gold of California." 

LIEUT>. JOHN SHREVE'S REVOLUTIONARY SERVICES 

The following is an abstract from the personal narrative of the services of Lieut. 
John Shreve, of the New Jersey Line of the Continental Army : 

I, John Shreve was born April 8 — 1762 in Mansfield, Burlington Co. New 
Jersey : son of Israel Shreve, who commanded the 2^ New Jersey Regiment 
" Continental Line," and I was in active service during the war of the Revo- 
lution I was made Ensign in 1776, and Lieut in July 1777, in which capac- 
ity I served until I left the army in 1781. I was but 13 when I entered 
the army. Soon after the Battle of Bunker Hill, Congress composed of 
the 13 Colonies, ordered four regiments to be raised in New Jersey. 

W^Maxwell was appointed Col. of the 2* Regiment; and my father, 
Israel Shreve, appointed Lieut-Col. of same. Maxwell's men were ready 
first & marched for Canada. My father followed the last of Feby, and 
took me with him. We passed through Trenton, past Sussex Court House 
in New Jersey, and Kingston (alias Esopus) to Albany in New York; 
here we stayed several weeks, waiting for ice to disappear in the lakes. 
As soon as possible we went up the Hudson to Old Fort Edward, then to 
F' George. When the ice had gone out of Lake Champlain, we, with 25 
or 30 men, cut through the ice, passed Ticonderoga, and so on down the 
beautiful Sorel, to the St. Laurence ; then through Lake St. Peter, and 
next day passed & landed at W^olfe's Cove, in sight of Quebec ; then up 
Wolfe's road to Abraham Heights & joined our other troops, I believe, on 
2" or 3" of May 1776. 

British reinforcements arriving, our army raised the siege & retired up 
the river on May 6 — 1776. We were repulsed at Three Rivers and retired 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 323 

to Sorel. My father was left at Sorel to collect provisions. Capt. Ephraim 
Anderson was sent express to Congress, and my father sent me and Samuel 
Shute, son of Capt. Shute, with Capt. Anderson to go home, attend school 
& fit ourselves better for next campaign. 

Gen. Sullivan conducted our army up the Sorel, & over Lake Champlain, 
making a stand at Mt. Independence, where I was appointed Ensign in 
2'* Regiment, a few days after the Declaration of Independence. 

Capt. Anderson left me with Saml Shute at Skenesborough, contrary to 
promise, and took most of my money. Samuel and I went on foot by our- 
selves to Albany, then in a vessel to New York, and from thence on foot 
to Bristol (Penna). I crossed over the Delaware to Burlington, & stayed 
a few days with my grandmother ; then on to Phil* and to school until the 
Jersey troops were discharged. 

New regiments were organized «S: mustered the first of Feby 1777. I was 
appointed V^ Ensign in 2'^ Regiment Dec 26 — 1776. My father Israel 
Shreve was Colonel of this regiment. We had an engagement with the 
enemy at Short Hills & Capt. Ephraim Anderson was killed. 

At the battle of Brandywine my father was wounded in the thigh. I 
took him to near Darby where we stayed until morning, then through 
Philadelphia to one of my Uncle's in New Jersey. When we stopped to 
dress the wound & unbuttoned his breeches at the knee, the bullet, which 
had been flattened on one side by striking the bone, rolled down on his 
boot. I believe one of my Sisters has it now. 

After the British obtained possession of Philadelphia I went with my 
father to Reading. I joined the regiment at White Marsh, a short time 
after the battle at Germantown. We went into winter quarters at Valley 
Forge, where the whole army suffered for want of provisions and clothes. 
M)' father had now recovered sufficient to join his regiment and later was 
ordered to Haddonfield, New Jersey, with his command, to prevent the 
enemy getting supplies in that part of the country. Our patrols stopped 
great quantities of provisions going to the British. 

I was at West Point when Gen. Arnold deserted to the enemy and saw 
him making his escape to the British ship. At the execution of Major 
Andre, though not on duty, I was with the guard and my father had com- 
mand of the detachment of troops that formed a square to keep off the 
crowd. 

I continued with the army until 1781, when my father could no longer 
remain, having become too fleshy to ride a horse. He desired me also to 
leave on account of condition of our family affairs. He had no available 
property left, and could obtain no pay from the Government. The surren- 
der of Lord Cornwallis occurred the same autumn and was the only 
engagement the New Jersey troops were in after I left the army. I was in 
my minority the whole of the time, being but 21 at close of the war. 



324 GENEALOGY OF THE 



LETTER OF LIEUT. JOHN SHREVE TO HIS NIECE, 1853. 

Near Salem, Ohio, April, 1853. 

S. B. D. : Dear Niece — A short account of my life. I am this day ninety- 
one years old. I write this without spectacles. I was born on the 8th 
day of April, 1762, in Burlington County, New Jersey. My mother died 
when I was about nine years old. My father married again, in about three 
years after. In the year 1775 the war of the Revolution commenced. .Soon 
after the battle of Bunker Hill the Provincial Congress ordered four regi- 
ments to be raised in New Jersey, to serve one year. My father thought 
it was his duty to assist in liberating his country from British tyranny, 
and he was appointed Lieut. Colonel of the second regiment, which was 
raised and equipped, and marched in February, 1776, for Canada. My 
father thought it was not proper to leave me with a step-mother, and took 
me with him in the army. I was appointed an ensign in the regiment, the 
ISth July, and returned to Philadelphia, and went to school to fit me 
better for the next campaign. 

When the regiment was discharged in December, a new regiment was 
ordered to be raised. My father was appointed Colonel, and I, first ensign. 
We lost a Captain, killed in the battle at Short Hills, in New Jersey, in 
June. I was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant the first of July. My 
father was wounded in the battle of Brandywine, the 11th of September, 
1777. I went with him through Philadelphia to New Jersey — then took 
him to the town of Reading in Pennsylvania, when the British entered 
Philadelphia — and I joined the Regiment at White Marsh. Shortly after, 
we went into winter quarters by building huts at Valley Forge, where we 
suffered for want of provisions and clothes. After a partial supply of the 
latter, my father was ordered with his regiment to cross the Delaware and 
take a stand at the town of Haddonfield, seven miles from Philadelphia, 
to watch the motions of the enemy. In March, 1778, General Washington 
thought they were preparing to make their escape through New Jersey to 
New York. When the British were moving their army over the river, 
General Maxwell was ordered with the other two regiments (the first and 
third) to join the second, and joined us at Mount Holly. When the enemy 
evacuated the city and crossed over the river, Washington moved the army 
and crossed the Delaware at Coryell's and Howell's ferries above Trenton. 

I was ordered with a guard to take the baggage of the brigade to the 
northeast of Trenton, and stay there till the enemy passed, and our army 
approached the enemy, whom they met at Monmouth Court House. I fol- 
lowed our army, and was at Englishtown, three miles from the battle-field. 
The day after the battle, when the enemy had moved off in the night, and 
left their dead and most of their wounded, I joined the brigade with the 
baggage; this was in June, 1778. The enemy made their escape to Sandy 
Hook and New York. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 325 

Our brigade was ordered on the lines at Elizabeth Town and Newark, 
where we remained through the following winter. We had many skirmishes 
and engagements with the British and Tories that winter and spring. 
They came out with eight or nine thousand men and thirty waggons, in June 
1779, intending to take our stores of provisions at Morris Town. We 
stopped them at the town of Springfield. The people said when they 
returned the thirty wagons were full of their dead and wounded. In Sep- 
tember of that year, our brigade was ordered to join Gen. Sullivan, to 
chastise the Indians and Tories towards the Susquehanna, and their towns 
in the Genessee county, west of New York. On our return, we win- 
tered near Morris Town, in New Jersey. In 1780 we were on the lines 
of our former station, near Newark, when the British ship brought Major 
John Andre (the English spy) and laid at the head of Tappan Bay, about 
seven miles below West Point Fort. General Greene was ordered with sev- 
eral brigades to lay at the little town of Orange ; our brigade was one. I 
was ordered to take a stand with twenty-six men, near to where the ship 
lay, to watch her motions. While there I saw General Arnold, the traitor, 
go on board the ship when he made his escape; and saw Major Andre, 
the spy, hung. 

In the }-ear 1781, mj' father being very fleshy, weighing three hundred 
and twenty pounds, he could not get a horse that could carry his weight 
faster than a walk, and he retired from the army on half pay. We then 
had but little property, except our public securities, which could not be 
turned into money. He thought it best for me to leave the army also, and 
help to support his family. That year ended the war. 

I stayed and assisted the family until the year 1786, when I was married, 
and remained in New Jersey until the fall of the year 1787, then removed 
with my wife and child to the west side of the Alleghany mountains, and 
purchased one hundred acres of land, with but two or three acres cleared, 
and a small cabin without a nail or any sawed board, on Little Red Stone 
Creek, a branch of the Monongahela river, about thirty-three miles south 
of Pittsburg, where I remained thirty-eight or forty years, and raised a 
family of nine children. I cleared about sixty acres of land, mostly with 
my own hands. I served the township a great part of the time in all the 
public offices. A county commissioner three years — five different times a 
commissioner for laying graded roads — and three times in the State Legis- 
lature. I went one trip down the river to Cincinnati — one trip to the 
Falls of Ohio, and returned by the wilderness, through part of Tennessee 
and part of Virginia. I went three times with flour down the rivers Monon- 
gahela, Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans, and took flour from New 
Orleans to the West Indies, one time to Havana, in the Island of Cuba; 
one time to Kingston, in the Island of Jamaica. Took sugar from Cuba 
and rum from Jamaica to New York, and paid six thousand seven hundred 
dollars duty to the United States on the sugar and rum. 



326 GENEALOGY OF THE 

I was concerned with a company in a manufactory after the close of the 
last war with England, and lost the most of my savings from my fifty 
years' toil. I surveyed land occasionally for more than thirty years. I 
had the rheumatism in my limbs, which prevented me from following the 
compass, and I moved to the State of Ohio, where I have remained with 
my children about twenty-seven years. Congress acknowledged to be in- 
debted to me for services rendered to the United States, and I am now receiv- 
ing an annuity which enables me to provide a comfortable living in my old 
and declining age. John Shreve. 

108— SARAH SHREVE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Rebecca, 26). 

b. 10th mo. 18th, 1744, m Burlmgton Co., N. J. 

d. 1821. 

m. First, May 4th, 1768, David Scattergood. 

m. Second, April 24th, 1779, Joseph Beck, 

m. Third, John Nixon. 

237— BENJAMIN SCATTERGOOD 

238— ELIZABETH SCATTERGOOD m. Joseph Shumar. 

239— REBECCA SCATTERGOOD m. Aaron Horner. 

Children of Sarah (Shreve) Scattergood and Joseph Beck 

240— JOSEPH BECK, JR. m. 1810, Rebecca Gibbs, of Columbus, N. J. 

241— HENRY BECK d. in Columbiana Co., Ohio. 

242— ANN BECK d. 7th mo. 24th, 1788, while family were 

travelling in wagons from Burlington Co., 
N. J., to western Pennsylvania. 

109— BENJAMIN SHREVE, JR. (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Rebecca, 26). 

b. 10th mo. 7th, 1747. 

d. nth mo. 18th, 1801, in Alexandria, Va. 
m. First, 7th mo. 10th, 1770, Hannah Marll, 
daughter of John Marll, of Philadelphia. 
She d. 12th mo. 25th, 1784. 

m. Second, 1786, Susan Wood of Alexandria. Va. 

243— WILLIAM SHREVE b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1772, in Alexandria, Va. 

d. lOth mo. 3rd, 1773. 



\.J 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



327 



244— A SON 



b. 8th mo. 20th, 1773. 
d. 8th mo. 20th, 1773. 



245— JOHN SHREVE 



b. 7th mo. 12th, 1774, in Alexandria, Va. 
d. 7th mo. 17th, 1774. 



246— REBECCA SHREVE 



b. 8th mo. 7th, 1775, in Alexandria, Va. 
d. 7th mo. 3rd, 1793. 



247— SARAH SHREVE 



b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1777, in Winchester, Va. 
d. 9th mo. 24th, 1777. 



248— ISAAC SHREVE 



b. 3rd mo. 25th, 1779, in Winchester, Va. 
d. 9th mo. 24th, 1829. 
m. First, 5th mo. 2nd, 1802, Hannah Very, 

daughter of Capt. Samuel and Hannah 

Very, of Salem, Mass. 
She b. 9th mo. 10th, 1781. 
d. 1st mo. 13th, 1820. 
m. Second, 11th mo. 7th, 1820, Mary Moulton, 

daughter of Bartholomew and Elizabeth 

Moulton, of Danvers, Mass. 
She b. 1st mo. 13th, 1795. 
d. 12th mo. 20th, 1854. 



249— BENJAMIN SHREVE, 3RD 

b. 12th mo. 6th, 1780, in Winchester, Va. 
d. 5th mo. 8th, 1839, in Salem, Mass. 
m. Mary Goodhue (no issue). 

250— SAMUEL BUTCHER SHREVE 

b. 12th mo. 20th, 1782, in Alexandria,, Va. 
d. about 1865, in Burlington, N. J. 
m. Rachel Huffendoffer, of Alexandria, Va. 



251— A SON 



b. 8th mo. 18th, 1784. 
d. 8th mo. 18th, 1784. 



Child of Benjamin and Susan (Wood) Shreve 



252— JOHN SHREVE 



b. 5th mo. 1st, 1787, in Alexandria, Va. 
d. 2nd mo., 1821. 



328 GENEALOGY OF THE 



BENJAMIN SHREVE, JR. 

Benjamin Shreve, Jr., fifth son of Benjamin and Rebecca (French) Shreve, 
in early life located in Alexandria, Va., at that time a place of considerable 
commercial importance. He entered into partnership with James Laurason, 
and their business, that of shipping and commission merchants, became quite 
extensive. They sent large quantities of flour to New England and received 
shipments of leather from the same section; the town of Salem, Mass., being 
noted at that time for the tanning of leather with hemlock bark. Pleasant 
business relationship was established between Benjamin Shreve and Captain 
Samuel Very of Salem, Mass.; and in 1794 the former sent his son Isaac, 
then a lad of fifteen, to Salem, in the care of Captain Very, to learn the 
trade of tanner. Five of Benjamin Shreve's children had died in infancy, 
a daughter at the age of seventeen, and in his son Isaac was centered the 
hopes of a fond father. There were also two younger sons, Benjamin 
Shreve, 3rd, and Samuel Butcher Shreve. The mother of these boys having 
died while they were six, four and two years old respectively, their father 
married a second time and had one son, John Shreve, Isaac was attentive 
and diligent, and soon after the expiration of his apprenticeship married. 
May 2nd, 1802, Captain Very's daughter Hannah and returned with her to 
Alexandria, Va. His father having died a short time before, the patrimony 
left him was used to set up the tanning business. About ten years later 
Isaac vShreve and his wife left Alexandria and returned to Salem, Mass., 
where he conducted a profitable tanning business for the remainder of his 
life. He had eight children by his first wife, viz., Rebecca, Samuel, Hannah, 
Isaac, Jr., Benjamin, Mary, Louisa and Frances Eliza; and by his second 
wife (Mary Moulton) five children, viz., Elizabeth, Susan Wood, John, Mary 
and George. His brother, Benjamin Shreve, 3rd, married Mary Goodhue 
of Salem, Mass., and engaged in the East India trade quite profitably. He 
had no children; he died in Salem, May 8th, 1839, aged fifty-eight years. 

When Isaac Shreve left home to learn his trade in Salem, Mass., his father 
addressed to him a remarkable letter, facsimile of which would have been 
herewith given, but the original was, unfortunately, lost some years ago. 
The following, however, is an attested copy of this thoughtful communica- 
tion, so full of wisdom and tender regard : 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 329 

Alexandria, 29th the Sth Month, 1794 

Dear Son Isaac : Thee is now going from under the care of thy loving 
father, whose eyes have been ever watchful for thy good into the wide 
world. Thee will be now under the care of Captain Very, who will advise 
thee for thy good, and I would wish thee to be advised by him. I have 
thought it most for thy good for thee to go to Salem to learn the trade 
of a tanner. If Captain Very can get thee a place to suit, I would advise 
thee to stay ; if not, come home by the first opportunity that offers. As 
thee will be among strangers, take good care how thee forms acquaintance. 
Let them be friends, if possible, and steady, sober lads, older than thyself, 
and the fewer the better. A young man's happiness, both in this world and 
that which is to come, in a great measure depends on the connections he 
forms when young. Keep steady to meeting and to plainness both in 
speech and apparel, and that God that made us will protect thee from all 
harm. Above all things, be true to thy trust and defraud no man, though 
the thing may be small. But do unto men as thee would that they should 
do unto thee. And by so doing thee will gain the esteem of all good men 
and thy master, and come up in the world a useful member of society. 
Thee will have peace in thy own mind, which cannot be taken away but 
by actions which I hope thee wilt not be guilty of. If I should be spared 
to live until thee comes of age, I am in hope to be able to set thee up 
in thy intended business, so that by care and industry thee may soon get 
above the frowns of this world. But if I should be taken away from works 
to rewards, thee may expect an equal share of what I leave behind me ; 
provided thee conducts thyself in a sober, orderly manner. If thee agrees 
to stay, I shall send thee a certificate, which thee must take to the monthly 
meeting. As there will be many opportunities, I would have thee to write 
often, and let me know if thee stand in need of anything, and I will en- 
deavor to furnish thee from time to time. I want thee to serve five years 
and a half. Then thee will have sometime in the winter which will give 
time for thee to prepare for settling thyself in the spring following. I now 
recommend thee to that God that has protected me from my j'outh until this 
time (my father having died when I was about four years old). And I 
am sure he is the same heavenly Father that ever He was, and will remain 
to protect and preserve all those that love and fear Him. 

From thy loving father 

Benj. Shreve 

N. B. Take care of the little money thee has, for thee will find that to 
be a friend where all others have forsaken thee. I shall furnish thee with 
small matters of money according as I hear of thy behaviour. Often read 
this advice and endeavor to follow it. 



330 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



110— SAMUEL SHREVE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Rebecca, 26). 

b. 1st mo. 25th, 1750, in Burlington Co., N. J. 

d. about 1814. 

m. First, . 

m. Second. . 



253— BENJAMIN SHREVE 



254— TOHN SHREVE 



255— WILLIAM SHREVE 



256— SAMUEL SHREVE, JR. 



257— MARY SHREVE 



b. near Alexandria, Va. 

m. First, Muse. 

m. Second, Barbara Swink. 

m. Anna Ball. 

d. young, in \'irginia. 

b. 1785. 

d. 1862, in Falls Church, Va. 

m. First, Priscilla Payne, 

m. Second, Mary Ann Culver. 

d. young. 



Samuel Shreve [110] was commissioned in June, 1775, Adjutant of the First Battalion. 
Gloucester County, N. J., Militia, and later was promoted to Captain. In February, 
1777, he was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the same Battalion. Resigned from army 
in October. 1778. 



Ill— WILLL\M FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27). 

b. May 10th, 1751. 

d. 10th mo. 27th, 1808. 

m. 9th mo. 17th, 1777, at Falls Meeting (Bucks 
Co., Pa.), Rachel Rickey, daughter of Thomas 
and Hannah Rickey, of Lower Makefield 
Township, Bucks Co., Pa. 
She d. 8th mo. 27th, 1827, in Lamberton, N. J. 



258- LYDIA FRENCH 



259— HANNAH FRENCH 



b. 8th mo. 25th, 1778. 
d. 8th mo. 18th, 1781. 

b. 12th mo. 5th, 1779. 
d. 5th mo. 22nd, 1782. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 331 

260— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH b. 1st mo. 27th, 1783. 

d. 11th mo. 21st, 1831. 

261— WILLIAM RICKEY FRENCH 

b. nth mo. 23rd, 1785. 

262— MAHLON KIRKBRIDE FRENCH 

b. 6th mo. 12th, 1788. 
m. May 15th, 1807, Sarah Stackhouse. 

263— AMOS TAYLOR FRENCH b. 1st mo. 23rd, 1791. 

m. 5th mo. 6th, 1812, Ruth Evving. 

264— RACHEL RICKEY FRENCH 

b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1794. 

" Died at Lamberton, N. J., on Monday morning the 27th August, Rachel 
French, widow of William French, deceased, aged 80 years. The deceased 
was a respectable member of the Society of Friends, and has left this world 
with a comfortable hope of a blessed immortality beyond the grave." 

From the Philadelphia " Daily Advertiser," Sept. 3, 1827. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Minutes of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Woman friends held at Chesterfield y* 3'^ of 
4'" Mo. 1783— 

We are informed by Men friends that Rachel French had a Certificate 
granted from the Falls Monthly Meeting directed to this included with her 
Husband William French, wich hath Neglected to Produce to this Meeting 
therefore Hannah Linton and Sarah Robins are to visit her in Company 
With men friends and Report to Next Meeting. 

6*'' of y* 5 mo. 1783 A Certificate was brought in this meeting for 
Rachel French, included with her husband Wm. French from the Monthly 
Meeting held at the fals in buks County Pensilvany bearing date ye 3'' 
of y* 3** mo. 1779 which was read and received. Likewise an acknowledg- 
ment for the Neglect of its laying so long not brought in and also the 
Neglecting of attending Religious meetings which was read and received. 

11"' of 7"' mo. 1797. A Certificate was laid before this meeting for 
Rachel French wife of Wm. French; included in her husbands and their 
five minor children to wit, John, William, Malon, Amos and Rachel from 
the monthly meeting of Haddonfield bearing date the 8"* of 5'" Mo. 1797 
which was read and recei\ed. 



332 GENEALOGY OF THE 



DEED OF PATENT RIGHTS, OLIVER EVANS TO WILLIAM FRENCH 

Know all men by these presents, that I Oliver Evans of the City of 
Phil" State of Pennsylvania, do for my self my heirs and afsigns by these 
presents, for and in consideration of the sum of two hundred & fifty dollars 
to me in hand paid the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, afsign, 
Transfer & convey, and forever release to William French Millwright, of 
the State of New Jersey his heirs and afsigns, all my right unto title and 
Interest in, my new invention, called the Screw Mill, for breaking different 
hard substances ; in all those States of the United States situated North or 
east of the river Delaware, Viz The States of New Jersey, New York, Con- 
necticut, Vermont, New Hamshire, Mafsachusetts including the Districts 
of Main and Rhode Island. For this invention I have received the exclu- 
sive rights of making selling and using in the United States of America 
by letters patent under and by the authority of the said States, & bearing 
date the fourteenth of February eighteen hundred and four, as by said 
Letters pattent will fully appear ; hereby transfering & conveying to the 
said William French his heirs & afsigns all my rights, power and authority 
in me vested by the Laws of the United States, to demand, sue for and 
recover any sums of money, due or that, may here after become due, for 
the making, selling or using of my said invention as well as all the penalties 
or forfeitures for the evation or infringements of my Pattent rights which 
may by the laws of the United States be recoverable, and all the profits 
and emoluments arising from my said invention in the aforesaid seven 
States of the United States for and during the term of time of my Pattent, 
j'et unexpired. In Witnefs whereof I have here unto set my hand & seal 
the twenty sixth of July Eighteen hundred and six 

Oliver Evans [Seal] 
Signed sealed and delivered 
in the presence of 

Daniel French 

Samuel Satherthwaite 

City of Philadelphia fs — Be it known that on the twenty ninth day of 
September one thousand eight hundred and six, before me Benjamin Nones, 
Esquire Notary Public for the Common wealth of Pennsylvania duly com- 
mifsioned and authorized dwelling in the City of Philadelphia personally 
came the above named Oliver Evans and acknowledged the foregoing to be 
his act and deed 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my Ilcmd and affixed my 
notarial seal the day & year last aforesaid 
Benj Nones Noty. Public 1806. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



333 



JScw/y Invented Pla/ter Workf^ 



DRY 




M1LL> 



J^acie hy William French, of NeV}-Jcrfe$. 

THE above iiivcilion and improTement confifts ^fio* 
cipally, in Jlavinjr the Piafler grouriti thro'ugb artiJ 
byifcrew, mftead ot c)o1"e, heavy itiO! ftnncs ty v.atef. 
The fubfcriber wifhes to cill the atCtnticn.of all thofe 
»/ho arc in the habit of lifing cr foy;ing plalter.and ihinV* 
it proptr here Vi obfervc — Thst-6t his PlailorVVorks he 
grinds the Plafter in fuch 3 mahner as to tneafure ?,touc 
i4 buhels to thf ton, which is foUfnJ, by obfervaiion anil 
fxpericnce. to be th^ proper 'proportion which ihe rne3- 
lure fFould bear to' the weight; whereas, at the mill -h 
where FLartfr is crcund by water, it may be regdili- re- 
duced down fo flat as to make froni 30 to 11 b'jfheis the 
ton, and even as fine as duft — The refult is. thofe v.hO 
boy «f my grindirf^. gel aboRt a ton weight in p?ying fot* 
a+buflicls a!id in buyiiip the fame ■weigh', giound lo ver-y 
fipe, pay ior from 301032 bufhcls The diffcrenceirn 
fubftai.'ce to purchafers is obvious and needs no erplana- 
lion. To roll indiari corn in, or other grairv, J h'-fr may 
begroundvery fine ; but upon na other principle fhculd it 
be reduced to a powder. Any perf')ii who v/i!l resd 
]ad)^t Peters' Treatue upon ihc ufe of PlaOer and Pric- 
licaLfarmiug, (a ln.ali panij-hlet highly Wonhy <sf lo* 
i ifleption offcvtry fiTnTe^rymr/'lher^y learn fncjrada of 
i iTiilt aijd efTecJ of Plafter, m d\\ its varioOs modes t-f ufe^ 
I as*ell a> upon diflerent (o !>,. ft tHiiiidoubtccyy ihy intre- 
i eft. topionjote the iiic ^nd fn!e of Fialter, an i hrivef^or* 
! larjrcly into the mi:iu(a<yuriiigol it — It is a if o evid'^rn ly n y 
ir.ic.-eft, th:u thcfdrmtr* whobuy of me fhculd fied it t)^;* 
I fvyfr thc'.r leafonable expcdlatiaiis arid wilhcSv cthcrwilc 
,! it can be no objed to ihcm. The true mode tf fclhog 
I; Piaficr which is {;roiind, is by ■A'cight tor in t);at mo<l«i 
1 we, will) dcalin it, buy it. I hope yet to eftahlilh 'h:<t 
I mode, tho 1 have mctwiihfonie oppofuion to it, Tl ? 
1: caufc isevirient — for when 1 fell 24 bulhels, which rruklf 
1: 'a tun ■v.'ciglit, tl'iofc v.ho grind it dead flat, fell Irom 3* 
li to 31 bcfiel-., wfucJi niLikc but the fame vcijjlt, an' it 
1! ba^ lecu faid by tome that they ccuid ;iu<l wvuid fell thr^r 
' flafttr under my price, bs^ tn.it price whatitir.jy ; btt 
I thcrtafonoi th is ludy appear^ from tbe foreg<riiig ls<i<»--» 



oy ^rnumg it Jiii^r they iccrciilc the balk, but act l6»- 
fubftafice-- It IS l/iuj; ^y^nltafure, ibey underfcl, but Hi tw 
other way ; yet very Ic'w Jaimers have confidcrcd the 
difference m purchafing this article, tvhtthef it be j^^^tiiuflA 
to a proper degree of hncncls.cr to a powder ; there arc, 
however, fotr>e,wh& a/e convc«f»iit lit the uf<; of Pl/l(l9*-i' 
and who well know th.e diflereijce, as well as the rcccf- 
(rty ol its being properly manuf.idlur c>j, anri all who c<;n- 
tiniic in the ulc of it, will, no coubt, obt^iiin adtfanr.-gcC'm 
knowledge, for experience '♦vili naturally lead 10 the !•€- 
ceir^ry inlormation. 

Auicc the fubfcfi..cr publifhed his fuggf/lloivs atid id^a* 
llifl year, with lefgeot to Plafter beiug grournl dav*i» 
flat, y.rid to duft, he is bappy to fii.d, tJi-ii inauy pejfcEj 
finve paid cloic aiteiition to ic, and fruni real r xperiiHcc. 
they find '.he ftatnnent correcS):, ai^d they aI(o find, by 
like expcricncr, that ihe Pia{\cr grt/und (as it appears) t» 
a dull or powder, hah not i\ body 01 weight left in it. fufe- 
(ic:cot to huio' it fiaiionary, and of CcU.lc thf body and 
fubftancc IS blown to dilpcifios;' It it true, tbai feme 
tumes. and gcncrnl 7, this powcercd Phller biiojfS Jor- 
ward ar. iriiiiicfliitc und rapid giov,-tn, or vegtt'ation ; birt 
oblervc, ii luon pafles off for want of havir.g in or fibout 
U a body fufhccut 10 it tain, a.^d often difcyveis ihis w>T>t 
bclore iIk- finl (e.-.k.n alter fowing is pad, It isUkc" ilc 
very difficult to gccthe i; me placed on thegroiind regu- 
lar ai>d cvcnjaiid this. I would onferve,ib a mattrial point- 
If yuu iov^ d/ y. It dutls and blows ont of p'a*c — if vtt; it 
elogs and will fall in lumps, and untven. 

It will be fouod, that v/hen Piafler is ground to a re- 
gular and pr<ipcr li^c, there will always be a .^flicienC 
proportion of u in flour to ptomote and cairy on an imtnc- 
diate vegeiation — 'J he coarfer parts produce their effect 
Gjliowing : 

A coaftant fupply v»ill be for fale here, warra.ited of 
the fii ft qual ty, aud if it does not prove luch, he engages 
'.o refund the money, and the purchiler not to rrtuni the 
Plafter. It will be fold on asieafonabic ttrms as the (ub- 
ftriber can poffibly afford, and he hopes to retain, and Axil 
auginriu that gooa fi^iare of cuftom which he has hcjc'.v- 
forc ezperic/ictd. 

Now on band and for Salcy 
300. Tons in the grofs — Alio, any quan- 
tity ground to a proper fizc, by the bufh- 
el, or in barrels of lour bufhels each. 

iV. COMBES. 

Lamberton, (on Delaware) Jan. l,-i8o.^ aoi-iiw 



ADVERTISEMENT FROM " TRENTOX FEDER.XI.IST," >tARCH 21, 1803 



334 GENEALOGY OF THE 



FALLS MEETING 

The early settlers of Pennsylvania in the vicinity of the Delaware river 
falls were mostly Friends. They met in each others' houses for worship, 
under the care of Burlington, N. J., Monthly Meeting, until 1683, when they 
set up a Monthly Meeting, the first in what was afterwards known as Bucks 
County, and in 1690 built a small brick meeting house, 20 X 25 feet. This 
was enlarged in 1700, and in 1728 a new building was erected to accommo- 
date the increasing membership. Additions were made in 1758 and 1765, 
and the large and substantial stone meeting house, herewith reproduced, was 
built in 1789, the year the American Congress caused a survey to be made 
along the Delaware in Falls township, with a view to locating there the Dis- 
trict of Columbia and the capital of the United States. Falls Meeting has 
always held a foremost place in the history of the Society of Friends. Dur- 
ing the first century of its existence over five hundred marriages were 
recorded. 

Relations between the early meetings at Burlington and Falls were very 
close and mutually helpful. Upon one occasion two young Friends wishing 
to marry disregarded the rule concerning certificates. The Burlington Meet- 
ing addressed to Friends at Falls a very earnest and characteristic letter, in 
vindication of their action in withholding approval, from which we quote 
as follows : 

To our dear friends and brethren in the monthly meeting for the County 
of Bucks, in Pennsylvania : 

Dear friends, with love unfeigned in the holy covenant of life, do we 
greet and tenderly salute you, blessing God for the holy communion and 
fellowship which he hath graciously brought his people into, and doth 
defend and preserve them in, where being kept, our greatest care will be 
for the honor of God, and the good of his people. Dear friends, we are 
comforted concerning many of you, being fully assured of your integrity 
and service in the Lord, and are glad our lot has fallen so near each other, 
and do desire that in this service and work of God, which he is carrying 
on here as well as elsewhere, and will make glorious in his time, we may 
be all packed together, and knit in that holy bond, which the strongest 
powers of darkness are not able to break. 

Dear friends, as to the business of and his friend, we are 

informed that he has a certificate come, and, therefore, our exercise as to 
that is at an end ; yet, still, we are desirous, according to our former inten- 
tions, to give you a naked serious account. Wherefore, we have laid such 
an injunction on all, of having certificates when their marriages were pre- 
sented, that came single and marriageable into this country. We had many 






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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 335 



marriages that came before us where little could be certified concerning the 
persons, yet earnestly pressing the accomplishment of the matter, which 
became a great strait and exercise to honest friends on whom God had laid 
the care of his honor. Yet, for a time, in condescension did permit such 
marriages, constantly expressing ourselves not satisfied therewith, still desir- 
ing that care might be taken for the future, that things too doubtful and 
dangerous might not be put upon us ; requesting the care and help of 
Friends in England to inform such as come over, that they might bring 
certificates with them; giving notice through our respective meetings that 
it was expected ; also, informing all how they might be helped by the 
monthly meeting here in their sending. Yet, notwithstanding it was allowed, 
and the old practice continued and grew amongst us, and the burthen of 
the upright grew with it, some alleging that such and such were passed 
and why not we. So, finding it of that dangerous consequence, and that 
it strengthened the wrong, and hurt the good, we can say, in the sight of 
God and his people, necessity was laid upon us to do what we did, singly 
eyeing the glory of God, and the advancement of His truth in it. So, not 
doubting that we shall be felt, and credited, and strengthened by you 
herein, we subscribe ourselves by order, and on the behalf of our men's 
monthly meeting, the 2d of the fifth month, 1683, your friends and brethren 
in the love and travails of the truth. Samuel Jennings, Thomas Budd 

112— RICHARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27). 

b. October 15th, 1759. 
d. 2nd mo. 26th, 1823. 
m. Mary Davis. 
She b. 12th mo. 29th, 1761. 
d. 12th mo. 12th, 1829. 

265— THOMAS FRENCH b. 1st mo. 17th, 1785. 

m. Ann Headly 

266— CHARLOTTE FRENCH b. 10th mo. 17th, 1786. 

m. Jesse Van Horn. 

267— LYDIA FRENCH b. 9th mo. 19th, 1788. 

d. 9th mo. 19th, 1788. 

268— LYDIA FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 3rd, 1793. 

d. 11th mo. nth, 1801. 
269— RICHARD FRENCH, JR. b. 11th mo. 26th, 1799. 

m. 9th mo. 12th, 1822, Sarah Hutchinson. 

Richard French [112] served in the Continental army, and was for a time under the 
command of General Cadwallader of Pennsylvania. He took part in the operations 
against the Hessians and British in the vicinity of Trenton and Bordentown, N. J., 
December, 1776. 



336 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



119— WILLIAM FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31). 

m. May 25th, 1783, Ruth Higby; Gloria Dei (Old 
Swedes') Church record, Philadelphia. 
She d. 1801. 



270— JOHN FRENCH 
271— REBECCA FRENCH 

272— RICHARD FRENCH 
273— JOSEPH FRENCH 



d. young. 

b. June 24th, 1785. 
m. Enoch Thorn. 

d. young. 

b. February 27th, 1790. 
m. December 25th, 1815, Christiana Slim. 



The Swedish colonists who settled along and near the Delaware during the seventeenth 
century built four churches and maintained them for more than one hundred years. 
That located near the Indian settlement of Wiccaco was for a long time the center of 
religious activity and influence in the southern part of Philadelphia. Services were first 
held by Rev. Jacob Fabritius, in 1677, in the block house fort, built in 1669. This was 
torn down in 1698 and in 1700 the present brick church, apparently good for centuries 
yet, was built by Rev. Andrew Rudman. The church came under the care of the 
Protestant Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania in 1841. The present rector. Rev. Snyder 
B. Simes, has been in charge for forty years. 




GLORIA DEI (OI.D SWEDES') CHURCH, PHILADELPHIA. 1700 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



337 



120— RICHARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31). 

b. 8th mo. 6th, 1760. 
d. 12th mo. 19th, 1839. 
m. 10th mo. 11th, 1784, Sophia Bendler. 
She b. 8th mo. 16th, 1762, 
d. 8th mo. 6th, 1845. 



274— JACOB FRENCH 
275— JONATHAN FRENCH 
276— MARY FRENCH 
277— SARAH FRENCH 
278— RICHARD FRENCH, JR. 
279— SAMUEL FRENCH 
280— ELIZABETH FRENCH 
281— KEZIAH FRENCH 



b. 4th mo. 22nd, 1785. 

d. 9th mo. 29th, 1791. 

b. 12th mo. 25th, 1786. 

m. Rebecca Wilson. 

b. nth mo. 25th, 1788. 

m. 1811, William Jones. 

b. 10th mo. 4th, 1791. 

m. 1815, Anthony Warrick, Jr. 

b. 8th mo. 30th, 1793. 

d. 4th mo. 16th, 1853, unmarried. 

b. 10th mo. 15th, 1796. 

m. 1820, Elizabeth Roberts. 

b. 10th mo. 14th, 1798. 

d. 2nd mo. 14th, 1800. 

b. 6th mo. 7th, 1803. 

m. 1822, Samuel Hillman. 



RICHARD FRENCH 

Richard French [120] was a prosperous farmer and brickmaker, his 
homestead of over 100 acres being located on the White Horse pike, near 
the present village of Kirkwood, Camden County, N. J. He was a methodical 
business man of enviable reputation and wide influence. His home was a 
model of neatness and his personal habits exact. He kept all engagements 
with scrupulous care. An old account book, preserved by one of his grand- 
daughters shows profitable relations with many business men and builders 
of that period. During the months of September, October and November, 
1801, he sold over 30,000 bricks, at an average price of £1 17s. 6d. per 
thousand. He died in his 80th year, leaving to his children and grand- 

22 



33S GENEALOGY OF THE 

children the memory of a well spent life. Until some time after his marriage 
to Sophia Bendler, in 1784, Richard French supposed he had lost his birth- 
right in the Society of Friends, on account of the action taken in the case 
of his father, Jonathan French [31]. Evidently he was in full accord with 
Friends and when he learned that the way was open for him to renew his 
membership in meeting, he at once took advantage of the long desired oppor- 
tunity, submitting an acknowledgment for marrying out and an appeal for 
recognition characteristic of the gentle spirit he alw^ays manifested. This 
communication, addressed to Eveshan Monthly Meeting, appears with the 
entire record of proceedings taken, under Jonathan French [31], and is here- 
with reproduced : 

To the Monthly Meeting of Evesham 

I the Subscriber having a Birthright amongst Frds ; but not having any 
Knowledge thereof till since I consummated my marriage contrary to the 
good order established amongst them ; on being treated with, feel love & 
nearness towards mj' Friends, and have a sincere desire to retain my right 
in Society, hoping this with my future orderly walking may reconcile me 
to my friends again, is the desire of Richard French 

12" mo. 9" 1791 

In 1792 Richard French was granted a certificate of removal from Evesham 
Monthly Meeting to Haddonfield Monthly Meeting, in which meeting he 
continued to take an active interest imtil his death in 1839. 

WILL OF RICHARD FRENCH, 1839 

I Richard French of the Township and County of Gloucester and State 
of New Jersey being of Sound mind and Memory, do Make and Publish 
this For my last Will and Testament . . . First I Give and Bequeath to my 
dear Wife Sophah French the Income and profits of my Farm where I now 
leive Situate in the Township of Gloucester one Cow at her Choise one Bed 
Bedstid and Beding and I allso Give to her as much of my Furniture as 
she may think necefsary to keep house. Second; It is my Will and I do 
order my Executor to sell the Balance or remainder of my Personall prop- 
erty after my Wife shall take what she may Think Necefsary to keep house 
and pay all my Just debts and Funerall Charges and the Remainder I Give 
and Bequeath to be Eaqually Divided Between my three daughters namely 
Mary Jones Sarah Warreck and Kiziah Hillman third It is my Will and 
I do order my Executor at the deceas of my wife to Sell att Public or 
Private Sale all my Real Estate be the Same More or Lefs and where so 
ever Found and the Money Ariseing thereon to be Eejually divided the one 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 339 

half part of the neate profits to be Equeally Between My Son Samuel 
Frenches Four Sones namely Richard B. French Jacob French Samuel 
French and Jonathan French I Give and Bequeath to the above named 
Richard B. French Jacob French Samuel French and Jonathan the above 
mentioned one half part of the neate profits ariseing on the sale of my 
real Estate to be Eaquelly divide Between them Fourth I Give and Be- 
queath to my son Jonathan French and to my son Richard French and to 
my daughter Kiziah Hillman the other half part of the neate profits arise- 
ing on the Sale of my real Estate to be Eaqueally divided Between them 
Fifth and lastly I do appoint my son in law Samuel Hillman Executor of 
this My Testament and Last Will I appoint Samuel Hillman Guardean 
to have the Care of my son Richard and his Estate and Person In Witnefs 
Whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal this Twentininth day of 
August in the year of Our Lord one thousand Eight hundred and Thirty- 
nine 1839. 






'A. 




Signed sealed published and 
declared by the said Richard 
French to be his Testament and 
last Will in the presence of us 

David Sloan 

lazer Sickler 

Christopher Sickler 

Gloucester County fs, Samuel Hillman Executor in the within testa- 
ment named, alledging himself to be confcientiously fcrupulous of taking 
on oath and being duly affirmed according to law upon his affirmation faith 
that the within inftrument contains the true last will and testament of 
Richard French the testator therein named so far as he knows and as he 
verily believes, that he will well and truly perform the fame by paying first 
the debts and then the legacies in the faid testament Specified so far as 
the goods chattels and Credits of the faid deceased can thereunto extend, 
and that he will make and exhibit into the Surrogates Office of the County 
of Gloucester a true and perfect Inventory of all and fingular the goods 
chattels and credits of the faid deceased that have or fhall come to his 
knowledge or pofsefsion or to the pofsefsion of any other person or persons 
for his use, and render a just and true account when thereunto lawfully 
required 

Subfcribed and affirmed at 
Woodbury this first day of 

January, A. D. 1840. Samuel Hillman 

before me — J. C. Smallwood, 



340 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



121— EDWARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33) 

b. 1st mo. 7th, 1747. 

d. 8th mo. 21st, 1822. 

m. Mary Wilkins. 

She b. 5th mo. 28th, 1750. 

d. 5th mo. 29th, 1827. 



282— THOMAS FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 1st, 1770. 
d. 7th mo. 21st, 1770. 



283— JEMIMA FRENCH 



b. 9th mo. 27th, 1771. 
m. April 21st, 1790, Jacob Borton. 



284— HANNAH FRENCH 



b. 4th mo. 7th, 1773. 
m. March 7th, 1792, Nathan Evans. 



285- JOSEPH FRENCH 



b. 4th mo. 6th, 1774. 
m. (about) 1797, Elizabeth Zane. 



286— JOHN FRENCH 



b. 2nd mo. 16th, 1775. 
d. 2nd mo. 20th, 1775. 



287— SARAH FRENCH 



b. 4th mo. 19th, 1777. 

m. First, 12th mo. 19th, 1803, Gilbert Deacon. 

m. Second, Carrie. 



288— ANNE FRENCH 



b. 2nd mo. 16th, 1779. 



289— EDWARD FRENCH 
290— STACY FRENCH 



b. 9th mo. 7th, 1780. 
b. 8th mo. 5th, 1782. 



291— ISAAC FRENCH 



b. 10th mo. 10th, 1784. 
d. 10th mo. 15th, 1784. 



292— SAMUEL FRENCH 



b. 12th mo. 2nd, 1785. 
m. Sarah . 



293— URIAH FRENCH 



b. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1787, 
d. 3rd mo. 6th, 1788. 



294— MARY FRENCH 



b. 12th mo. 15th, 1789. 
m. Dominic Connelly. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 341 



295— SYLENIA FRENCH b. 7th mo. 10th, 1792. 

m. Dennis. 

296— CHARLES HAINES FRENCH 

b. 11th mo. 8th, 1797. 

m. First, 1st mo. 27th, 1820, Hannah E. Moore. 

m. Second, 1st mo. 7th, 1826, Mary Moore. 



EDWARD FRENCH 

Edward French was for many years a noted and influential resident of 
Chester Township, N. J. He resided before, during and for many years 
after the Revolution, on a plantation at the west end of Moorestown, now 
known as " Forrest Brook Farm," some two hundred acres in extent. He 
was much interested in township aifairs, serving as overseer of highways in 
1773, and chosen freeholder in 1784 and from 1788 to 1793 inclusive. He 
was a member of the township committee, in many of the old records called 
"Representatives," in 1786 and from 1788 to 1794. He was also a long- 
time justice of the peace; and between 1795, when the marriage license law 
was passed, and 1801, he married sixty-four couples. In 1770 he sold a 
piece of ground on what is now the north side of West Moorestown to Samuel 
Fanning, upon which the latter erected a comfortable house; and in 1821, 
Edward French purchased this property, removing there with his wife, to 
whom he bequeathed at the time of his death, in 1822, a life tenancy therein. 
He was a man of strong character and great vigor of mind and body. Prior 
to 1779 he was an active member of Friends' Meeting. During the Revo- 
lutionary War an " old tippler " went to the Friends' Meeting House in 
Moorestown on First Day morning, while Friends were at worship, and 
opening the door, called out in a loud voice: " Here you are all sittin' in 
meetin' and the British are down at Neddie French's." It is scarcely neces- 
sary to say that the usual form of breaking meeting was not observed. 

The plantation of Edward French, which he devised to his son, Charles 
Haines French, was formerly the property of his grandfather, Thomas 
French [6]. He also owned for many years an adjoining property, one 
hundred and fifty-three acres, on the north side of the present Camden and 
Moorestown turnpike, which comprised a portion of the estate conveyed by 
deed of gift 1694, by Thomas ffrench, progenitor, to his son Thomas, grand- 



342 GENEALOGY OF THE 

father of Edward French. Part of this property, one hundred and five acres, 
Edward French conveyed to his son Joseph in 1821. The latter dying intes- 
tate, and the farm being sold, under direction of the Orphans' Court, by 
Commissioners, in 1838, Edward French [559], son of Joseph, bought sixty- 
one acres, which, with an additional tract, he bequeathed in 1871 to his 
daughter, Sarah A. Ogden, by whom it was sold in 1872 to Ellwood Hol- 
linshead, after one hundred and seventy-eight years consecutive ownership 
by members of the French family. 

Two views of the Edward French homestead, now known as " Forrest 
Brook Farm," are herewith given, one showing its appearance as it faced the 
old " King's Highway," in Revolutionary times ; the other, the present front, 
facing the Camden and Moorestown turnpike. On one of the small window 
panes, in the eastern end of the first floor sitting room, there appears the 
name and date, " Charles H. French 1819," scratched with a diamond. 
This was evidently done by Edward's youngest son, who at that time was 
23 years of age, and who inherited the farm. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 9"* of y* 8*" mo. 1770. 
Edward French produced an acknowledgment of his out going in marriage, 
which was read and referred for consideration. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y" 6'" of y^ 9'" mo. 1770. 
Edward Frenches acknowledgment was now accepted and is in the follow- 
ing words — 

To Friends of Evesham Monthly Meeting, as I y^ under writer having 
gone out in marriage which is Contrary to Friends rules, in which Conduct 
I allow myself in fault, & am willing to Condemn y* Same hopeing that 
my future Conduct may render me worthy of friends further notice, 
y* 9'" of y' 8'" mo. 1770 Edward French 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y* 9'" of y" 9*" mo. 1779. 
Friends from y^ preparative Meeting at Chester reported that Edward 
French & Enoch Allen had been treated with for paying their fines in Lieu 
of Military Service. Therefore Samuel Shute & John Roberts are appointed 
to visit them and report to ne.xt meeting. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 343 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 7'" of 10'" Mo. 1779. 
The friends appointed reported that they have visited Edw'd French & 
Enoch Allen but that they did not appear in a Suitable Disposition to 
Condemn their Misconduct therefore this meeting proceeds to Disown them 
y® said Edw'd French and Enoch Allen from having any Right of member- 
ship amongst us until they come to a Sight of their Misconduct & condemn 
y* same to friends Satisfaction, which that they may is our Sincere Desire 
& Jacob Hollinshead & Wm. Matlack are appointed to give them a copy of 
this Minute & report to Next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y* 4"' of y" U"' mo. 1779. 
The friends appointed reported that they have given Edw'd French a Copy 
of y* Minute against him ; but they have not had an opportunity with 
Enoch Allen. 



REVOLUTIONARY DAMAGES 

Inventory of Damage done to Edward French by the American Troops 
under the Command of General Varnum and others February IS"" 1777 

1200 Cedar Rails @ 25/ 200 Oak d° @ 6/ £15 12 

Hay and Grain taken by Waggoners; 2 5 

£17 17 

Thomas Morris being Sworn, Deposeth that he saw the Troops of the 
Continental take and Destroy the articles Contained in the within Inventory. 

Thomas Morris 

Inventory of the Goods of Edward French Plundered and Destroyed 
by the Troops of the British Armey in June 1778, \'izt. 

1 Old Horse, 1 two year old heifer, 2 yearling D" £12 

5 Calves, 25 Sheep, 4 large Hogs, 5 Shoats 24 2 6 

80 Fowls, 9 Geese, 4 Tons Hay, 1000 Ceedar Rails 25 12 6 

300 Oak Rails, Harnefs for 2 Horses 3 3 — 

Sundry Timber and Fruit Trees, 1 Acre Flax 4 10 — 

1 Gun, Sundry Cloathing 3 10 — 

£72 18 

Thomas Morris being Sworn, Deposeth that he lived in the Famely of the 
above Applicant in the time of the British Troops being at his House and 
Saw Said Troops Plunder and Destroy the Several Articles Contained in 
the Above Inventory. 

Thomas Morris. 



344 GENEALOGY OF THE 



WILL OF EDWARD FRENCH, 1821 

I Edward French of the Township of Chester in the County of Burlington 
and State of New Jersey being of Sound and disposeing Mind and Memory, 
Do make and publish this my last will and testament, Makeing all former 
and other will by me maid Void and this only to be taken for the Same 
in Manner & form following that is to Say 

1*' I give and bequeth to my wife Mary French the Rent and profit 
of the houfe and lot of Land where I now dwell which I purchased of 
Samuel Lanings Estate together with the Land adjoining on the North Side 
of the Stage Road adjoining to Joseph Frenchs land and bounding by the 
Same to the line of George French & the same to the Main Street or Stage 
Road and down the Same to the place of begining during her natural life. 
I also give to my Said wife two good beds and beding together with other 
houfehold goods such as she shall chofe to the amount of Eighty dollars 
to be taken at the appraised price and dispofe of her houfehold goods to 
whome she may see fit. I also order my Son Charles H. French to take 
charge of her and to see that she shall not want for any nefsarys during 
her life. 

2°* I Order my Executors here after Named, to sell and dispofe of all 
my moveable Estate not otherwife dispofed of, as soon after my discease 
as can be Conveniantly Done, and pay all my Just debts and Nefsesary 
Expences, and to avoid disputes as much as pofsable and it is my will that 
all the grain and grafs standing or growing on the premises and Vigatbles 
of every kind I mean what I claim as mine to be dispofed of and all my 
Sider works and Still and Utentials thereunto belonging & boyler in the 
boyler houfe, to be considered as movables and disposed of as such for the 
payment of debts and in cafe my movable estate Should not be Sufficient to 
pay my debts I order my Executors to sell and dispofe of that houfe and 
lot where James Ginnet now dwells and likewife to sell of in Small lots 
Land to the Eastward of Coles Medow Road sufficient to discharge the 
Remainder of m)^ Just debts and to make Deed or Deeds for the same good 
and sufficient as I could do in life 

3^"^ I give and devife to my Son Joseph French ten dollars, out of my 
movable Estate, he having Received his full Share of my estate by Deed 
bareing date the fifth day of June one thoufand Eight hundred and twenty 
one 

4"' I give & devise to my Son Charles H. French the Plantation where 
he now dwells with his complying with the Legecies to be paid out of the 
Same, begining at a Stone in George P"renchs line below the School houfe 
and Corner to Joseph Frenchs land and Runing on his line to James 
Hinchmans land and corner to Joseph French, and from thence by Hinch 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 345 

mans Coles & Josiah Roberts land to Cowperthwaits, Chambers Hunts and 
so on to a Small Run of water & down the same to a small lot quit- 
claimed to Hugh Cowperthwaits to the North branch of pensaukin creek and 
up the Same the Severil Courfes to a Maple Stump thence by land of 
Hannah & Joseph Cowperthwaits the Severil courfes to the arch bridge in 
the Haddonfield Road thence up the South side of a Large ditch And main 
water courfe to a Stone in Range with Benjamin Hunts line where I and 
Samuel Cowperthwait agreed it should be placed from thence along Hunts 
and George French land the severil courses to the place of begining. 
Likewise a lot of Seder Swamp on atco atco adjoining to a Lot given to 
Joseph French containing eight or nine acres be the same more or less to 
him his Heirs and afsigns for ever providing*** he pays the Legacies allotted 
to be paid out of the Same. 

5"' I give and bequeth to Daughter Jemima Borton Eight hundred dollars 
to be paid to her by my Son Charles H. French out of the Plantation given 
to him in twelve months after my decefe and in Case Jemima should decese, 
before She Receives this Legecy the Money hereby given to her to be 
divided among her Surviving Children and her husband equally share alike 

6'" I give and bequeth to my daughter Mary Conelly two hundred 
dollars to be paid to her by my Son Charles H. French out of the planta- 
tion given to him, and Likewife all the houfehold goods I lent her some 
years back — but in cafe my Daughter Mary should deceafe before She 
Receives this Legecy her husband is to have no part thereof, but to Remain 
in the hands of my Executors to be devided equally between her Children 
when they arrive to the age of twenty one or the Survivors of them. I 
mean the Children of my Daughter Mary is to Receive this Legecy Not 
her husband. 

7"" I give and bequeth to my Daughter Sarah Currie a certain Note 
signed to me by my son Joseph French for one hundred dollars together 
with a bed and beding Cafe of Draws looking glafs other things I brought 
from Alloways Creek yet on hand together with one hundred dollars to be paid 
her by my Son Charles H. French out of the Plantation given to him but 
in case she should decs*^ before she gits this Legecy her husband is to have 
No part thereof, but to Remain in the hands of my Executors to be equally 
devided between her Children she had by Gilbert Deacon when they arrive 
to full age Share alike. 

8"" I give and bequeth to my Daughter Syllenia Dennis Eight Hundred 
dollars to be paid to her by my Son Charles H. French out of the planta- 
tion given to him in one year after my decefe, but in cafe She should die 
befor She Receives this Legacy her Children she shall then have and her 
husband is to share this equally between them share alike and to be paid her 
in one year from my decefe. 

Q**" I give and bequeth to my Grand Son Samuel French the Son of my 
Son Samuel French Decas'' And after the deth of his Grand Mother the 



346 GENEALOGY OF THE 

houfe and lot where I now dwell with the land adjoining as it is discribed 
to his Grand Mother on the North Side of the Stage Road and bounding 
on the Land of Joseph French and Rode to Coles Medow when he arrives 
to the age of twenty one years and that if my Grand Son Samuel should 
decf' before his Grand Mother then the land given to him after the decefe 
of his Grand Mother must be sold and the money arrifseing the sale thereof 
must be devided between my then surviveing Children and Sarah Ann 
French my Grand daughter share alike sons and Daughters I likewife give 
to my Grand Son Samuel French the Remainder of my wood land to the 
Eastward of Coles Medow Road after a fufficency be sold for the payment 
of my debts, but my Executors is to have the care of the property and see 
that no wast be committed and if he should die without Lawful Isue I 
order it to be sold and dispofed of as above but if he should survive his 
grand Mother and have lawful Isue I give it to him his heirs and afsigns 
forever. 

10*" I give and devise to my grand daughter Sarah Ann French two 
hundred dollars to be paid to her by my Son Charles H. French out of the 
plantation given to him and in cafe she should deceafe before she is twent}' 
years of age then this Legacy to decend to all my then surviving Children 
share alike. 

Lastly I Nominate my Son Charles H. French and Jacob Borton my 
Son-in Law to be Executors to this my last will and testament and to see 
that the same be strickly complyed with. In Witnefs whereof I have here- 
unto Set my hand and affixed my Seal this Ninth day of June one thoufand 
Eight hundred and twenty one 1821 — In the prefence of the Subscribing 
witnefses who at my Request have afsigned their thereto — 



^^^^^^"-^ JrTf-MA^ % 




Signed Sealed pronounced and by '\ Hugh Hollinshead 
the testator to be his Last Will & ^ Thomas Gill 
testament in the prefence of us. j William Hooton 



Hugh Hollinshead & William Hooten two of the witnefses to the within 
will being duly sworn & affirmed, to wit the said Hugh Hollinshead being 
duly sworn, & the said William Hooten alleging himself to be conscien- 
tiously scrupulous of taking an oath & being duly affirmed according to law, 
upon their respective oath & affirmation declare & say, that they saw 
Edward French the testator therein named deceased sign & seal the fame 
& heard him publish, pronounce & declare the within writing to be his last 
will and testament ; that at the time of the doing thereof the said testator 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 347 

was of sound and disposing mind & memory so far as this deponent & 
affirmant know & as they verily believe ; and that Thomas Gill the other 
Subscribing evidence was present at the fame time & signed his name as 
a witnefs to the said will together with this deponent & affirmant in the 
prefence of the said testator 

Sworn & affirmed the 7th Sept'' A. D. Hugh HoUinshead 

1822 before me William Hooten 

Abrm. Brown Surrog 

Charles H. French & Jacob Borton executors within named alleging 
themselves to be conscientiously scrupulous of taking an oath & being duly 
affirmed according to law declare & say that the within instrument contains 
the true last will & testament of Edward French the testator therein named 
deceased so far as they know & as they verily believe ; that they will well 
& truly perform the fame by paying first the debts of the said deceased and 
then the legacies in the said testament specified so far as the goods, chattels 
& credits of the said deceased can thereunto extend ; & that they will make 
& exhibit into the Prerogative Office at Trenton a true & perfect inventory 
of all & singular the goods & chattels & credits of the said deceased which 
have or shall come to their knowledge or pofsefsion or to the pofsefsion 
of any other person or persons for their use «S: render a just & true account 
when thereunto lawfully required. 






Affirmed the 7'" day of Sept"' A. D. 
1822 before me Abrm. Brown — Surrog 



INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD FRENCH, 1822 

A True & perfect inventory of all and singular the Goods and Chattels 
rights & credits of Edward French Deceased Late of the township of Chester 
& County of Burlington Made by us whose names are hereunto subscribed 
The fifth day of September One thousand eight hundred & twenty two 
Thus 1822 

D. cts 

Purse and wearing Apparel 68.02 

Horse Chais & harnefs 89.00 



348 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Horned Cattle 26.00 

Swine 9.00 

Plate and Other household Goods 439.75 

Corn Growing at the time of his Death 55.00 

Hay and Grain in the barn 80.00 

Potatoes & vegitables in the Ground 5.00 

Cider Mill & prefses & Emty Casks 35.50 

Fruit fallen 2.00 

Stills & appurtenances belonging thereto 123.00 

Boiler 2.00 

Buckwheat standing 3.00 

Implements of husbandry 27.25 

Debts 945.89 

"$1909^ 



Appraised by us the day ] 
and year above written j 



William Roberts 
W" Doughten 



1822 Sep' 7*'' 1 Sheep & 1 Cupboard since appraised. 



5.50 



Affirmed the 7"" day of Sept"' AD. 
1822 before me — Abm. Brown Surog 



W"' Doughten 
Charles H. French 
Jacob Borton 



122— URIAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33). 

h. 3rd mo. 14th, 1748. 
d. 1823. 

m. First, Jmie 29th, 1771, Rachel Ingersoll, 
daughter of Ebenezer Ingersoll, of Great Egg 
Harbour, N. J. 
m. Second, August 6th, 1800, Isabella Peacock, 
widow. 



297— MARY FRENCH 



Haines. 



298— REBECCA FRENCH 



299— URIAH FRENCH, JR. 



b. 5th mo. 27th, 1788. 
ni. Ann Bates. 



300— GEORGE FRENCH 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



349 



WILL OF URIAH FRENCH, 1822 



I Uriah French of the Township of Chester, County of Burlington and 
State of New Jersey, Senior — being of sound mind and memory, do make 
and publish this for my last Will and Testament. 

First My Will is, that the House and Lot, or corner lot, that lies on the 
Burlington and Moorestown Roads, containing about one Acre of Land 
more or less, may be sold, and the Money arising therefrom to pay my 
just Debts and Funeral charges, and the residue, I give and bequeath to 
dear Wife Iszabella French and to Margaret Peacock, Daughter to said 
Iszabella — to be equally divided between them. 

Second, — The House and Farm whereon I now live containing about 
nineteen Acres and three roods of Land, more or lefs, with all the appur- 
tenances. And also all my Moveable effects wherever they may be found, 
I give and bequeath to my dear Wife Iszabella French and her said Daughter 
Margaret Peacock, (During the natural life of my said Wife Iszabella 
French) to be equally divided between them. And at my Wife's Decease, 
my Will is, that the same may fall to her said Daughter Margaret Peacock 
to her and her heirs, forever. 

Third, I give and bequeath to Mary Haines, Rebecca French, Uriah French 
& George French, my sons and Daughters, five Dollars a piece to be paid 
to them, or their heirs in five years after my Decease. I appoint James 
Vansciver Executor, and my Wife Iszabella French Executrix, of this my 
Testament and last Will. In Witnefs whereof I have hereto set my hand 
an Seal, this twenty fouth day of September in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and twenty-two. 




;/: 



T^e^ 



/ 



^(/sft^ 




Signed, Sealed, published & declared ~) John Wi 

s \ David W 



,^ard 
by the said Uriah French Sen"" to be his \- David Ward 
Testament & last Will, in presence of us ) Abraham Heulings 



John Ward one of the witnefses to the within will alleging himself to 
be conscientiously scrupulous of taking an oath and being duly affirmed 
according to law doth declare and say that he faw Uriah French Sen"" the 
testator therein named deceased sign and seal the fame and heard him 
publish, pronounce and declare the within writing to be his last will and 
testament . 



Affirmed the 30'" day of May 
A. D. 1823 before me 

Abrm Brown Surrog — ) 



\ 



John Ward 



350 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Isabella French and James Vansciver executors within named being duly 
sworn depose and saj' that the within instrument contains ihe true last will 
and testament of Uriah French Sen'' the testator therein named deceased 
so far as they know & as they verily believe ; that they will well and truly 
perform the fame by paying first the debts of the said deceased and then 
the legacies in the said testament specified so far as the goods chattels and 
credits of the said deceased can thereunto extend ; and that they will make 
and exhibit into the Prerogative Office at Trenton a true and perfect inven- 
tory of all and singular the goods chattels and credits of the said deceased 
which have or shall come to their knowledge or pofsefsion or to the pof- 
sefsion of any other person or persons for their use, and render a just & 
true account when thereunto lawfully required. 

Sworn the 30*" day of May Isabella French 

A. D. 1823 before me James Vanfciver. 

Abrm Brown Surrog 



123— GEORGE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33). 

b. 2nd mo. 9th, 1753. 
d. 1827. 

m. 5th mo. 1775, Rachel Rakestraw, daughter of 
Thomas Rakestraw. 
She b. 9th mo. 8th, 1755. 



301— WILLIAM FRENCH 



b. 3rd mo. 30th, 1776. 
m. Abigail . 



302— ABRAHAM FRENCH 



b. 5th mo. 23rd, 1778. 



303— SUSANNAH FRENCH b. 11th mo. 16th, 1781. 

m. 11th mo. 14th, 1811, Andrew Hollings- 
head. 

304— BATHSHEBA FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 15th, 1783. 

m. 4th mo. 24th, 1806, Joseph Roberts. 



305— ISAAC FRENCH 



b. 9th mo. 8th, 1785. 
d. 10th mo. 14th, 1791. 



306— JACOB FRENCH 



b. 5th mo. 8th. 1788. 
d. 10th mo. 15th, 1791. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 351 

307— FIRMAN FRENCH b. 7th mo. 29th, 1791. 

d. 10th mo. 21st, 1791. 

308— RACHEL FRENCH b. 7th mo. 30th, 1792. 

m. 10th mo. 13th, 1814, Enoch Roberts. 

309— MATILDA FRENCH b. 12th mo. 14th, 1795. 

m. Thomas Quick. 

GEORGE FRENCH 

George French, the youngest son of Thomas [33] throughout a long and 
busy life was one of the most prominent and useful citizens of Moorestown. 
In 1774, when he was twenty-one years of age, his brother Edward conveyed 
to him, " for ten pounds and natural love and good will which he beareth 
toward his brother and for his better support," three lots, fifteen acres and 
a house, in the west end of Moorestown. He at once entered into business 
and prospered greatly, accumulating considerable property for those days, as 
will be observed by his will, in which provision was made for his children 
and grand children. He took an active interest in local affairs, holding 
various offices during a period of forty years. In 1784 he was chosen tax 
collector for Chester township, assessor in 1787 and again in 1805, member 
of the township committee, or " representative," in 1796-99 and 1800-1. In 
1799 he served as chosen freeholder. He was justice of the peace for many 
years later in life. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham ye 6th of ye 4th mo. 1775. 
George French son of Thos. French dec'd. & Rachel Rakestraw Daughter 
of Thos. Rakestraw Dec'd appeared and Declared their Intentions of mar- 
riage with Each other. Therefore Wm. Matlock and John Lippincott are 
appointed to make j'e needful Enquiery & report to next meeting his 
mother being present consented. 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham ye 4th of 5'e 5th mo. 1775. 
George French & Rachel Rakestraw appeared & signified the Continuation 
of their Intentions of marriage with Each other ye Friends appointed to 
make Enquiery reporting nothing to obstruct their proceedings. There- 
fore they are at Liberty to Consumate their said Intentions according to 
good order & Thos. Wilkins & Joseph Wilcox are appointed to be present 
& see that good order be kept & report to next meeting. 



352 GENEALOGY OFTHE 

Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends: 

6th of 4th Mo. 1775. George French and Rachel Rakestraw appeared 
and declared their intentions of marriage with each other. Two friends 
appointed to enquire into her life & conversation & make report. 

4 — 5 mo. 1775. George French and Rachel Rakestraw appeared and 
signified the continuation of their intentions of marriage. 

8 — 6 mo. 1775. The friends appointed to attend the marriage of George 
French and Rachel Rakestraw report it was orderly accomplished. 

[Men's Meeting] 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 4th of ye 11th mo. 1779. 
Friends from the Preparative Meeting at Chester reported that Jos''' 
Morgan Jun"' & George French had been treated with for paying a fine 
in Lieu of their personal service in ye Militia therefore Jacob HoUinshead 
& John Rifdon are appointed to visit them and report to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 9th of ye 12th Mo. 1779. 
One of j-e Friends appointed reported that they had Visited Jos'' Morgan 
Junr. & George French who did not appear disposed to make Friends 
satisfaction, therefore this meeting Disowns them from having any right 
of membership with us until they are favour'd to see their Error & make 
ye necessary Satisfaction & Joseph Worinton & John Collins are appointed 
to give them a Copy of this minute and report to ne.xt meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 6th of y^ 1'* Mo. 1780. 
The friends appointed reported that they have given Joseph Morgan Jun'' 
and George French Copies of this Meeting's Minute against them. 

REVOLUTIONARY DAMAGES 

Inventory of Goods and Chattels of George French Plundered by the 
British Troops in June 1778 — 
1 Cow, 3 Sheep, half a Ton Clover hay £8 15 — 

Henry Bradshaw being affirmed Declared that he Saw the British Troops 
Runing After the Cow above mentioned, and Soon After their Departure 
Saw Such Remains of her as Convinced him that the Said Cow was killed 
by the Said Troops, and as he lived in the Same House with the above 
Applicant has good Reason to Believe that the other articles Contained 
in the Above Inventory, was Plundered by the aforesaid British Troops. 

Henry Bradshaw. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 353 



CHESTER TOWNSHIP'S AID TO PHILADELPHIA, 1793 

Richard S. Smith being appointed at a Town Meeting held the 12th Day 
of October last to receive such monies as Should be Collected from the 
Inhabitants and to forward the same to the Committee appointed in Phila- 
delphia for the Relief of the poor of that city labouring under the dreadful 
Malady called the Yellow Fever Reported That he had Received from the 
different collectors as follows : 

Oct'' 12 1793 of William Roberts the sum of £13 

20 of do 22 

Jany 9 1794 of do 3 

Oct 19 1793 of Nathaniel Middleton 7 

Nov 22 of do 4 

Jany 9 1794 of do 1 

Oct 22 1793 of George French 22 

Jany 9 1794 of do 2 

Oct 22 1793 of Samuel Shute 5 

" 29 of do 

Nov 30 of do 4 

Jany 9 1 794 of do 

Mch 1 1 of Joseph Morgan subscribed in Pine Wood 2 
Total Sum Received £89 



WILL OF GEORGE FRENCH, 1825 

Let is be recorded that I George French of the Township of Chester 
in the County of Burlington and State of New Jersey, being at this time 
week of body yet favour'd with Sound disposing mind and memory : I do 
make and ordain this to be my last will and Testament in words follow- 
ing — (First) I will and order that all my Just debts and funeral charges 
be paid by my Executor herein after named and appointed out of my per- 
sonal effects, as early after my decease as convenience will admit. 

(Second.) I will and bequeath to my grandson William French the Sum 
of Two hundred Dollars in cash to be paid to him by my Executor within 
one year after my decease ; and also four Shares of the Stock I hold in 
the Camden bank. — (Third.) I will and bequeath to my grand-daughter 
Harriot Brown the Sum of Two hundred Dollars in cash, to be paid to her 
by my Executor within one year after my decease ; and also four Shares 
of the Stock I hold in the Camden Bank. 

(Fourth.) I will and bequeath to my grandsons George HoUinshead 
and Charles Roberts each of them one new Silver watch of the value of 
eighteen Dollars each. 

23 



1 


4—1/2 


17 


3 


17 


6 





7—1/2 


6 


2 


2 


6 


10 





19 


4—1/2 








7 


11 








4 





9 


6 


16 


2—1/2 



354 GENEALOGYOFTHE ' 

(Fifth.) I will and bequeath to my grandson Isaac One hundred Dollars 
in cash, to be paid by my Executor out of my personal estate. 

(Sixth.) I will and bequeath to Lydia Peacock widow of Isaac Peacock 
Deceased Eighteen Dollars in cash, to be paid to her by my Executor out 
of my Personal estate. 

(Seventh.) I will and bequeath to my Daughter Susanna Hollinshead 
the new house and lot of Land at the corner of Bodine road So called, 
where She now dwells ; with all the Improvements that are thereon, to have 
and to hold to her; her Heirs and afsigns forever. — (Eighth.) I will and 
bequeath to my Daughter Bathsheba Roberts the house lot of Land and 
other Improvements that are thereon which I purchased of John Anderson 
together with a lot of land adjoining the Same marked on the draught 
thereof N° 3. containing three acres and three roods of Land be the Same 
more or lefs ; to have and to hold to her, her heirs and afsigns forever ; and 
also one hundred Dollars in cash, to be paid to her by my Executor within 
one year after my Decease 

(Ninth.) I will and bequeath to my Daughter Rachel Roberts the house, 
lot of Land and the Improvements that are thereon, where She now dwells ; 
which I purcased of the Afsigneese of Joshua Humpries, together with all 
that lot of Land I purchased of Doctor Daniel Benneville to have and to 
hold to her, her heirs and afsigns forever ; and also Three hundred Dollars 
in cash to be paid to her by my Executor within one year after my decease. — 

(Tenth.) I will and bequeath to my Daughter Matilda French the house, 
lot of Land and the improvements that are thereon which I purchased of 
Uriah French together with that lot of Land adjoining the Same marked 
on the draught N" 2 containing Six acres two Roods and fifteen perches 
of Land be the Same more or lefs ; to have and to hold to her ; her heirs 
and afsigns forever ; and also the Sum of four hundred Dollars in cash 
to be paid to her by my Executor within one year after my decease : And 
I also give unto her four Shares of the Stock I hold in the Camden bank ; 
And one good bed, bedding, and bedstead; the bureau that has been com- 
monly called hers and the breakfast table Standing in the parlor: — It is my 
will that if there Should be any claim ever hereafter made on any part 
of the Land I have heretofore bequeathed whereby the right and interest 
of either of my said children should be Injured; that I do hereby subject 
and make liable each and every Share I have aforesaid bequeathed, in 
equal proportions, to make good Such injury, to the child injured if any 
should occour by paying to them their due proportions thereof. 

(Eleventh.) All the rest, residue and remainder of my estate both real 
and personal whatsoever and wheresoever I will and direct my executor to 
Sell, hereby impowering him to make titles to the Said Lands as good and 
Sufficient as I myself might or could do were I personally present — and 
the procedes of the Sales after paying out my Just debts, funeral charges, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



355 



the Legacys aforesaid and the expenses of the Settlement of my estate, I 
will to be divided into five equal proportions ; and one fifth part thereof 
I will and bequeath to my Daughter Susanna HoUinshead ; and one other 
fifth part thereof I will and bequeath to my Daughter Bathsheba Roberts 
and one other fifth part thereof I will and bequeath to my Daughter Rachel 
Roberts, and one other fifth part thereof I will and bequeath to my Daughter 
Matilda French ; and the remaining other fifth part thereof I will to be 
equally divided between my grandson William French and my grand- 
daughter Harriot Brown Share and Share alike. 

And lastly I do constitute and appoint my esteemed friend Benjamin H. 
Lippincott Executor of this my last will and testament ; herby renouncing 
and revokeing all other and former wills and testaments by me at any 
time heretofore made and this only to be taken for my last will. 

In Witnefs whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal this four- 
teenth day of the eleventh month (called November) in the year of our 
Lord one Thousand eight hundred and twenty five. (1825.) 




<5^(t^^«<^^ 




Signed Sealed pronounced and declared by the above 
named George French to be his last will and testa- 
ment in the presence of us who have Subscribed our 
names as witnefses thereto in the presence of the testator. 

James Todd 
Clayton Roberts 
Hugh Shotwell. 



Clayton Roberts one of the witnefses to the within will alleging himself 
to be conscientiously scrupulous of taking an oath & being duly affirmed 
according to law doth declare & say that he saw George French the testator 
therein named deceased sign & seal the same & heard him publish, pro- 
nounce & declare the within writing to be his last will & testament that at 
the time of the doing thereof the said testator was of sound & disposing 
mind & memory so far as this affirmant knows & as he verily believes ; & 
that James Todd & Hugh Shotwell the other subscribing evidences were 
present at the same time and signed their names as witnefses to the said 
will together with this affirmant in the presence of the said testator. 



Affirmed the 25"" day of September '\ 

A. D. 1827 before me V 

Abm. Brown Surrog j 



Clayton Roberts. 



356 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Benjamin H. Lippincott sole executor within named alleging himself to 
be conscientiously scrupulous of taking an oath & being duly affirmed 
according to law doth declare & say that the within instrument contains 
the true last will and testament of George French the testator therein named 
deceased so far as he knows & as he verily believes ; that he will well and 
truly perform the same by paying first the debts of the said deceased and then 
the legacies in the said testament specified so far as the goods, chattels & 
credits of the said deceased can thereunto extend ; and that he will make 
and exhibit into the Prerogative Office at Trenton a true and perfect inven- 
tory of all (S: singular the goods, chattels & credits of the said deceased 
which have or shall come to his knowledge or pofsefsion or to the pofsefsion 
of any other person or persons for his use, and render a just and true 
account when thereunto lawfully required 

Affirmed the 25"' day of September ") 

A. D. 1827 before me y Benjamin H. Lippincott. 

Abrm Brown Surrog \ 



INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF GEORGE FRENCH, 1827 

A True and perfect Inventory of all and Singular the goods, chattels, 
rights and credits of George French late of the Township of Chester in the 
County of Burlington deceased, made by us whose names are hereunto 
Subscribed the twenty first day of the ninth month in the year of our Lord 
1827. 

Dol cts. 

His apparel and Silver watch 18 00 

Purse 403 96 

Sixteen Shares of Camden Bank Stock 640 00 

Plate and other Household goods &c 233 50 

Debts due on Bonds, Notes &c 2979 19 

Interest on Said obligations 182 47 

Rent in arrear 259 18 

Due on Book accounts 310 69 

Total. $5026 99 

Appraised by us the day and year above written 

William Roberts 
Affirmed the 25"' day of September Amos Stiles 

A. D. 1827 before me 

Abrm : Brown Surrog — 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 357 

127— MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35). 

b. 10th mo. 4th, 1740. 

m. First, 12th mo. 24th, 1761, William Hold- 
craft of Chester Township, Burlington Co., 
N.J. 

m. Second, 3rd mo. 16th, 1797, Isaac Gibbs. 

310— ROBERT HOLDCRAFT 
311— WILLIAM HOLDCRAFT 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham ye 5th of ye 11th mo. 1761 
William Holdcraft, & Mary French Daughter of Robert French Dec^ 
appeared and Declared their Intentions of marriage with each other, there- 
fore Edmd Hollinshead & John Lippincott are appointed to make Enquiery 
Concerning the young mans clearness & Conversation & make report thereof 
to our next meeting, her mother being present consented. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 10th of ye 12th mo. 1761 
William Holdcraft & Mary French appeared and signified the continuation 
of their Intention of marriage with Each other, the friends appointed to 
make Enquiry reporting nothing to obstruct their proceeding, therefore 
they are at Liberty to proceed therein according to good order and Thos. 
Warrington & John Lippincott are appointed to be present and see that 
good order be kept and make report thereof to our next meeting. 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham ye 7th of ye 1st Mo. 1762. 
The friends appointed to attend the marriage of William Holdcraft and 
Mary French, reported that it was orderly accomplished. 

Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

5" of 11 mo. 1761. Wm. Holdcraft and Mary French appeared and 
declared their intentions of taking each other in marriage. 

10" of 12" mo. 1761. Wm. Holdcraft and Mary French appeared and 
signified the continuation of their intention of marriage. Nothing obstruct- 
ing they are allowed to proceed. 

7" of 1" mo. 1762. The overseers appointed to attend the marriage of 
Wm. Holdcraft & Mary French report that it was orderly accomplished. 



358 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



129— THOMAS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35). 

b. 12th mo. 26th, 1745. 
d. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1785. 

m. April 22nd, 1769, Mercy Cox, daughter of 
Newberry and Elizabeth Cox. 
She b. 8th mo. 26th, 1746. 
d. 2nd mo. 1st, 1807. 



312— ELIZABETH FRENCH 
313— JAMES FRENCH 
314— THOMAS FRENCH. JR 



b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1770. 

m. 11th mo. 15 th, 1796, Joseph Jones. 

b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1773. 

m. 5th mo. 17th, 1801, Mary Rogers. 



315- HANNAH FRENCH 



f-b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1773. 
d. 1st mo. 23rd, 1852. 

m. sup., 1798, Esther Cattel, at Red Stone 
Meeting, Fayette County, Penna. 
She b. 3rd mo. 28th, 1780. 

d. 7th mo. 27th, 1856 (no issue). 

b. 6th mo. 7th, 1775. 
m. 5th mo., 1797, Anthony Morris, Jr. 



316— JOSEPH FRENCH 



b. 1st mo. 23rd, 1778. 
d. 1st mo. 23rd, 1778. 



317— ROBERT FRENCH 



318— BARZILLAI FRENCH 



b. 4th mo. 24th, 1779. 
m. 2nd mo. 25th, 1807, Ann Street. 

b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1781. 

m. 11th mo. 1st, 1810, Mary Yates. 



319— ELIJAH FRENCH 



b. 5th mo. 4th, 1784. 

m. 3rd mo. 4th, 1807, Susannah Curie. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 8'" of y* 3'"'' mo. 1770. 
Thos. French produced an acknowledgement for outgoing in marriage which 
was read and referred for Consideration. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 359 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 5'" of y' 4'" Mo. 1770. 
Thomas Frenches acknowledgement is now accepted of & is in the follow- 
ing words — 

The 8"' of y*" 3* mo. 1770. To y^ monthly meeting at Evesham, — Dear 
Friends, Whereas I y" Subscriber hereof have been Educated in y^ prin- 
ciples of Truth, But for want of adhearing to y* true teacher, have so farr 
Diviated from y" good rules Established by Friends as to Consummate my 
marriage Contrary to y'' good order, & by so Doing have Brought Sorrow 
on myself & friends For which misconduct I am heartily Sorry, hopeing 
this with my orderly walking for the Future may again Bring me under 
y*^ Care & notice of Friends is the hearty Desire of j^our friend. 

Thomas French 

[Women's Meeting] 

9" of 7" mo. 1772 Mary French requests to be taken under the care of 
Friends. Ann Stokes and Esther and Rebecca Roberts are to visit her and 
enquire into the motive of her request. 

6 — 8 mo. 1772. Friends having considered the request of Mary the wife 
of Thos. French and having nothing to object but that her request may be 
granted with desires for her further groath in the Truth. 

5 — 3 mo. 1784. Friends from the Preparative Meeting at Chester report, 
that Thomas French and wife makes request for their daughter Elizabeth 
French to be joined in membership with Friends. Two Friends are ap- 
pointed to visit her. 

gth ^th j^Jq 1784. The Friends appointed to visit Elizabeth French report 
that they have had an opportunity with her to some good degree of satis- 
faction ; and having the concurrence of the Men's Meeting, this meeting 
concludes to grant the request. 

[Men's Meeting] 

9"" 4'" Mo. 1784. The Women inform that Tho's. French requests that 
his Daughter Eliz : (a minor) may be received under friends Care & they 
having visited her and expressing their satisfaction. She is accordingly- 
received and they are desired to acquaint her therewith. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y** 9'" of 7"' Mo. 1784. 
A Certificate was desired for Thos. French Marcy his Wife & their Seven 
Children vizt. Eliz., James, Thomas, Hannah, Robert, Barzillai & Elijah 
to Mount Holly; therefore Jos. Hunt & Abrm. Warrington are appointed 
to make the necesfary enquiry and if nothing appears to obstruct prepare 
one and produce it to next meeting. 



360 GENEALOGY OF THE 

[Women's Meeting] 

9" 7 Mo. 1784. Marcy French requests to be included with her husband 
and children (to wit) Eliz. James, Thos. Hannah, Robert, Barzillai and 
Elijah in a certificate to Friends of Mount Holly Monthly Meeting. Abigail 
Stokes and Elizabeth Cattle are appointed to make the necessary inquiry 
concerning her, and give their account to Friends appointed to draw it. 

[Men's Meeting] 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y"' 6"* of 8"" Mo. 1784.— 
The Friends appointed reported some obstruction in preparing a Cert, for 
Thomas French and Family; which being considered they are desired to 
continue their care therein. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the lO"' of the 9'" M°. 1784 
The Friends appointed to prepare a Certificate for Thos. French and 
Family are continued to the service. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 8'" of 10*" M°. 1784. 
The Friends appointed to prepare a Certificate for Thos. French and Family 
are continued to the service. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y*" 5'" of 11'" W. 1784. 
The Friends appointed to prepare a certificate for Thos. French & Family 
are continued to the service. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 10*" of 12*" Mo. 1784. 
The Friends appointed to prepare a certificate for Thos. French and Family 
are continued to the service. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 7*" of 1'* Mo. 1785. 
The Friends appointed to prepare Certificate for Thomas French and Family 
are continued to the service. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11'" of 2'^ Mo. 1785. 
The Friends appointed to prepare a Certificate for Thomas French and 
Family inform'd the Meeting that the obstruction heretofore reported, was 
removed, but that himself is deceased since last Meeting; and that his 
Widow and Children have a prospect of returning to reside within the 
limits of this Meeting; which being considered, it is apprehended that 
I further care respecting a Certificate for them at present, may be suspended. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



361 



[Women's Meeting] 

11th of 2nd Mo. 1785. The men inform, that the request made in the 
7 mo. last for a certificate on behalf of Thomas French and family having 
met with obstruction, which has since been removed : That himself is since 
deceased, and his family expecting still to continue members of this meet- 
ing : The request is therefore discontinued. 

Record book of Sufferings of Friends of Evesham Monthly Meeting for 
non Compliance of Military duty. 

12th Mo. 24th 1777. Taken from Thomas French, by Savory Toy Con- 
stable, by Virtue of a Law of New Jersey & warrent under ye hands & 
Seals of Peter Stretch and William Hough, one Calf & 25 Bushels of 
Indian Corn rated £6:0:0 Fines Demanded £26 : 5 : — 

SIGNATURE TO MARRIAGE BOND, 1 769 




COMB-BACK CHAIR, l/PO 



362 GENEALOGY OF THE 

131— ROBERT FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35). 

b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1749. 
d. 1811. 

m. First, 2nd mo. 15th, 1785, Hannah Warring- 
ton, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Roberts) 
Warrington. 
She b. 1760. 

d. 4th mo. 4th, 1786. 

m. Second, 5th mo. 1803, Elizabeth Stokes [170], 
daughter of John and Hannah (Stockdell) 
Stokes. 
She b. 5th mo. 31st, 1759. 
d. 1st mo. 26th, 1847. 

320— MARY FREN'CH b. 1st mo. 6th, 1786. 

m. 3rd mo. 24th, 1808, Josiah Roberts. 

ROBERT FRENCH, JR. 

Robert French, Jr., the third son of Robert French [35] was a life-long 
resident of the vicinity of Moorestown, N. J., and a worthy and useful citizea 
Having learned the trade of mason, he pursued that calling in connection with 
farming at the old homestead, inherited from his father. In 1782 he became 
a trustee of the property granted to Friends of Chester Preparative Meeting, 
Moorestown, including care of the old meeting house ground and graveyard, 
and also of that on which the present meeting house and school building 
stand, on the south side of Main Street, and continued a trustee for nearly 
thirty years. He was master mason in the construction of the meeting house 
built in 1802. All his life he was active in the affairs of Chester Prepara- 
tive Meeting and Evesham Monthly Meeting. His wise counsel and faith- 
ful cooperation were sought concerning many matters of weight, such as 
discipline, marriage, education, orderly living, attendance upon worship, 
temperance, philanthropy, setting up of meetings, etc. The meeting records 
relating to him are remarkable. He set a consistent example and exercised 
wide influence. He was overseer of highways of Chester Township in 1798. 
His wife, Elizabeth (Stokes) French, survived him many years. In her will, 
dated 3rd mo. 21st, 1839, proved Feby. 16, 1847, she made the kindly request 
that her wearing apparel be placed with her executors, in trust, " to be dis- 



Q 



O 



X 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 363 

posed of as they may think best amongst the poorer class of women in the 
vicinity of Moorestown or elsewhere." 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 6th of 12th mo. 1781 — 
Robert French appointed as one of a Committee to consider & report their 
judgment respecting the time of admitting and passing of Marriages. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 8th of ye 8th Mo. 1782 — 
Wm. Rogers on behalf of the committee appointed to collect an account of 
the sufferings of friends within the compass of this Meeting requested an 
additional number thereto there being two members Dec'd. since appoint- 
ment & William Matlack one of the surviving members requested a release 
which was granted & Enoch Evans, Job Collins, John Roberts, Joshua 
Hunt & Robert French are added in the room of such as are dec'd or 
released from the service. 

At a Monthly meeting held at Evesham the 7th of 1st Mo. 1785. 
Robert French Son of Robert French dec'd. and Hannah Warrington 
Daughter of Thomas Warrington appeared and declared their intentions 
of Marriage with each other his Mother being present consented, and the 
Meeting being inform'd that her Father was also consenting : Wm. Matlack 
and John Collins are appointed to inquire into his clearness and conversa- 
tion and report to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 2" Mo. 1785. 
Robert French and Hannah Warrington appeared and declared the con- 
tinuation of their Intentions of Marriage with each other, the Friends 
appointed reporting nothing to obstruct their proceedings they are at liberty 
to consumate their marriage and John Collins and Joshua Hunt are ap- 
pointed to be present, see that good order be kept, and report to next 
Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 3rd Mo. 1785. 
The Friends appointed to attend the Marriage of Robert French and 
Hannah Warrington reported that is was orderly accomplished. 

[Women's Meeting] 

7th. 1st Mo. 1785. Robert French and Hannah Warrington appeared 
and declared their intentions of marriage with each other, his mother being 
present consented. 

11th of 2nd Mo. 1785. Robert French and Hannah Warrington appeared 
and signified the continuation of their intentions of marriage with each 
other, and nothing appearing to obstruct they are at liberty to consumate 
the same. 



364 GENEALOGY OF THE 



11 — 3 mo. 1785. The Friends appointed to attend the marriage of Robert 
French and Hannah Warrington, reported that it was orderly accomplished. 

[Men's Meeting] 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 9th of the 5th I\Io. 1788 — 
Robert French being sometime since appointed by this Meeting to inspect 
the Account of Friends Sufferings now requested to be released thereform, 
which was granted. 

At a Monthly meeting held at Evesham the 10th of 2^ mo. 1792 — 
It being divers times heretofore proposed, and now again revived the expe- 
diency of selecting several Minutes of Advices from our Book of Discipline 
which might be profitably communicated to Parents and heads of Families, 
in a meeting of conferrence for that purpose appointed ; which after being 
solidly deliberated upon it appeared the united sense that John Collins, W" 
Roberts, John Roberts, Rob't. French, Samuel Roberts senr., Wm. Rogers, 
Bethuel Moore, Enoch Evans, Joshua Lippincott, Job Haines, Job Collins, 
Jos" Owen and Joshua Stokes be appointed to take the subject under their 
weighty consideration, & report their service to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham 10th of 5th mo. 1793 — 
A proposition relative to the division of this meeting being divers times 
heretofore suggested for consideration, and the subject at last meeting being 
revived and weightily deliberated upon, it appeared the prevailing sense 
that could the proposed division be effected with that uniting harmony the 
nature of the case required, it might be productive of real advantage to the 
members of this Meeting, and the benefit of Society ; in consequence whereof 
divers friends were then verbally appointed to attend the several prepara- 
tive meetings constituting this, in order to obtain their unanimous sense 
and Judgment thereon : who now reported, that agreeable to the tenour 
of their appointment they have attended the several preparative meetings, 
who appear generally united that the proposed division might be beneficial 
should it be concluded with that unamity the subject requires ; which report 
being weightily deliberated upon, it appeared the united sense that the 
following named friends be appointed to take the subject matter relative 
to the mode and manner of sd. proposed division into solid deliberation, 
proceed theirin as they may be enabled in the wisdom of Truth, and 
report thereon to this meeting when necessary, vizt. Jno. Collins, Abraham 
Warrington, Jno. Roberts, Robert French, Joseph Roberts, Joshua Matlack, 
Wm. Roberts, Reuben Matlack, Wm. Rogers, Theo. Hollinshead, Enoch 
Evans, Isiah Haines, Joshua Lippincott. Isaac Borton, Stacy Haines, Wm. 
Haines, Thos. Lippincott, Jno. Haines Junr., Wm. Allison, Jos. Owen, Jno. 
Haines, Job Collins, Sam'l. Shinn, I5arzillai Braddock, Joshua Stokes, 
Lawrence Webster & Job Prickett : who agree to meet at this place next 
second day week at the eleventh Hour. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 365 



At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 10th mo. 1793. 
Friends from the preparative meeting at Chester reported that Robert 
French requesting to be released from ye station of an Overseer, they were 
united in proposing for consideration the appointment of Abraham War- 
rington to succeed him therein ; which on deliberation appears to be fully 
concurred with. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 8th of Uth Mo. 1793 — 
Friends from the preparative meeting at upper Evesham reported that 
divers members residing at a place called new hopewell within their 
limits, request liberty for holding meetings of worship every other first 
day, and the third 5th day in each month for five months next ensuing, 
at a house of Jonathan Jones beginning at the eleventh hour ; which being 
attended to with a good degree of solid weight & sympathy wherein it 
appeares the prevailing sense that sd. meetings be held agreeable to request 
for three months, the first of which to be held next first day, & that Job 
Collins, Isaac Borton, Jos. Owen, Ephraim Stratton and Robert French be 
appointed to have the overst. thereof, & report their sense thereon in the 
second mo. next. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 10*" of 1" mo. 1794 
The consideration of the Extracts being resumed by reading them again 
at this time, & after a time of mature deliberation, it appeared the pre- 
vailing sense, that Robert French, Jno. Hunt, Jno. Collins, Jno. Borton, 
Jno. Ma.xwell, Wm. Rogers, Stacy Haines and Henry Warrington be 
appointed to unite with the Overseers in giving further attention to the 
subject of the right Education of our Youth and Others in endeavouring 
to promote a consistency with our profession in their Dress & general 
deportment ; and report their service herein to this Meeting in the ninth 
mo. next. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 4th Mo. 1794 
Joseph Engle on behalf of the Committee in negro-cases proposed for con- 
sideration, the appointment of a meeting for the benefit of that people, 
which is concurred with, to be held at this place next first day Week, begin- 
ning at the third Hour P. M : and Jno. Collins, Jacob Hollinshead, Robert 
French, Job Haines, Joseph Engle, and Wm. Rogers are appointed to have 
the oversight thereof, and report to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 6th of 6th Mo. 1794. 
Report was now made that the select Meetings of Ministers & Elders held 
at this place are much smaller than heretofore, in consequence of the 
establishment of upper Evesham monthly meeting ; and apprehending it 



366 GENEALOGY OF THE 

consistent with Discipline, that the appointment of select members should 
be an act of the monthly meeting, Abraham Warrington, Jno. Collins, 
Robert French, Jno. Roberts, Wm. Snowdon, Wm. Rogers, Job Haines 
and Gabriel Davis are desired to take the subject under weighty delibera- 
tion, & as way may open propose to the Monthly meeting for approbation, 
such friends as they may apprehend qualified for that Station — who agree 
to meet at Chester meeting House, next third Day. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the Uth of 7th Mo. 1794 
The Committee appointed to deliberate on the subject of nominating select 
members to this Meeting having attended thereto were united in proposing 
Rob't. French and Job Haines to that Station, which being severally con- 
sidered, were, after weighty deliberation, concurred with ; and the Clk. 
directed to notifj' the next Quarterly meeting of Ministers and Elders 
thereof, by transmitting a copy of this Minutes consents thereto. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 5th of 12th mo. 1794. 
The preparative meeting at Chester inform that divers of their Members, 
living somewhat remote from said meeting, have requested the liberty of 
holding three meetings in friends lower School House in Chester afore- 
said to be held the first, first days following our monthly meetings in the 
first, second, & third months, beginning at the Eleventh hour A. M. : which 
being deliberated upon with a good degree of solid weight, there appeared 
a union in granting said request, & appointmt. of Robert French, Abraham 
Warrington and Saml. Lippincott to have the oversight thereof, & report 
theron to this meeting in the 4th mo. next. 

11th of 9th Mo. 1795 The Book of Discipline was delivered to Rob't 
French for the present Month. 

At a Monthly ]\Ieeting held at Evesham the 9th day of 10th month 1795 
The Friends appointed to have the oversight of Meetings held in Chester 
lower School house, reported they had been held to general satisfaction 
And a request being now made for liberty to hold three meetings in the 
former manner with the addition of three to be held on the fifth day week 
succeeding each first day Meeting which being solidly weighed said request 
is granted and Robert French, Abraham Warrington and Henry Warring- 
ton are appointed to have the oversight thereof and report to this Meeting 
in the first month next. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 6th of 11th Mo. 1795 
The Committee appointed to take into consideration the altering this House 
to accommodate the Quarterly Meeting reported some attention thereto yet 
further deliberation thereon appearing necessary they are continued with 
the addition of Robert French, Bethuel Moore, Joseph Roberts, Lucas Gibbs, 
Wm. Roberts and Joshua Roberts and report to this Meeting as occasion 
may require. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 367 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 8th of 1st month 1796 
Agreeable to the conclusion of last Meeting the consideration of the weighty 
subjects recommended in the Extracts being resumed and divers weighty 
Observations being made thereon tending to excite more vigilance in guard- 
ing against giving way to the inordinate pursuit of the grandeur of the 
World too manifest amongst us in the extravagance of our dress and House- 
hold Furniture and the neglect of attending our Religious Meetings and 
giving way to a sleepy disposition when assembled, also the Subject of Spir- 
ituous Liquors being revived the following named friends are desired to 
take the latter subject under care and persue such further steps as may 
appear necessary to discourage the unnecessary Use of this Article and 
enable us to transmit a cleare account of our progress therein to the Quar- 
terly Meeting in the 9"' month next Vizt. Sam'l. Lippincott, Joseph Matlack, 
Henry Warrington, Robert French, Ab'"m. Engle, Gabriel Davis, Job 
Haines, Wm. Rogers & Stacy Haines. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 5th of 2nd Mo. 1796 
The deviations pointed out in the Extracts respecting the neglect of attend- 
ing meetings giving way to Sleeping when afsembled and the extravagance 
observable in Drefs, Addrefs, Household furniture &c coming weightily 
before this Meeting the following named friends are desired to unite with 
the Overseers in endeavouring as ability may be afforded to promote a refor- 
mation in these respects (vizt.) John Collins, Job Haines, Robert French, 
Wm. Haines, Joseph Matlack, Cox Haines, John Roberts, Henry Warring- 
ton, and William Rogers to report to this meeting as occasion may require. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 7th of 10th mo. 1796. 
The Committee appointed to the oversight of the Meetings last held in 
Chester lower School House reported the}* had been held to a good degree 
of satisfaction and a request being now made for liberty to continue three 
Months longer in they were held last Winter with which the Meeting concurs 
and appoint Joseph Warrington, Joseph Matlack, Saml. Lippincott and 
Robert French to have the oversight thereof and report to this Meeting in 
the first Month next. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 9th of 12th Mo. 1796 
The Clk. produced the Extracts from the Minutes of our last Yearly Meet- 
ing which were read and the several weighty subjects therein reccommended 
being considered it appeared the united sense of the Meeting that the fol- 
lowing named friends be appointed to take the subject of Spirituous Liquors 
under their care and labour to promote a reformation therein as they may 
be enabled and make report to this Meeting so as to enable us to send up 
a clear account of the progress made therein to our next Yearly Meeting 
(vizt.) Abrm. Brown, Joseph Matlack, Reuben Matlack, Robert French, 
William Snowdon, Bethuel Moore. Stacv Haines and Gabriel Davis. 



368 GENEALOGY OF THE 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 5th of Sth Mo. 1797 
The subject matter of making Suitable provision at this place to accomo- 
date the Quarterly Meeting as noted in the foregoing Minute being resumed 
and deliberated upon with a good degree of condescension, the meeting 
uniting in the appointment of the following Friends to take under consid- 
eration the digesting a plan and computing the expence of making the 
necessary alterations in this House for the purpose above mentioned (viz.) 
John Roberts, Wm. Rogers, Lucas Gibbs, Job Haines, Joshua Sharp, Levi 
Ballinger, Robert French, Zebedee Wills, Isiah Haines, Wm. Wilkins, John 
Borton, Gabriel Davis, Joseph Engle, Isaac Snowdon, Sam'l. Lippincott, 
Sam'l Matlack, Jacob HoUingshead, Jeremiah Matlack, John Warrington, 
& Samuel Roberts Senr. who are directed to proceed therein, and report 
to this Meetg. as occasion may require. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the Sth of 1st Mo. 1798 
The Preparative Meeting of Chester propose for consideration the discon- 
tinuing of the practice of having what is called Groom's Men &c. at the 
time of accomplishing marriages ; which being considered and spoken to 
the Meeting united in the appointment of Robert French, John Collins, 
Abraham Brown, John Roberts, William Roberts, Joshua Roberts, Edward 
Hilliar, Gabriel Davis, William Rogers, Levi Ballinger, William Haines, 
Job Haines, John Borton and Zebedee Wills to unite with the Committee 
of the Women's Meeting on the subject, proceed therein as way may open, 
and report thereon to next or future Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 10th mo. 1799. 
Two meetings for the benefit of black people were appointed. Robert 
French, John Roberts, Joseph Matlack, Job Haines, Gabriel Davis and 
William Snowden are appointed to the oversight thereof and report to next 
meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 6th of the 6th month 1800. 
The Extracts from the Minutes of our last Yearly Meeting being produced ; 
on being read, the Subject of Distillation, dealing in and unnecessary use 
of Spiritous Liquors coming under Solid deliberation, and most of the 
Quarter's Committee thereon being present, and earnest care and solicitude 
evidently prevailing in the minds of many friends for the advancement of 
this weighty Concern ; for which purpose the following friends are appointed 
to have the subject under their care, proceed therein as way may open and 
report to this meeting on or before the 3'^ month next. Yiz. Thomas Lip- 
pincott, Robert French, John Matlack, John Roberts, Isaac Snowden, Job 
Haines, Jacob Borton & Zebedee Wills. 

5th — of 12th mo. 1800. — The j^reparative meeting of Chester propose for 
consideration the appointment of a solid committee to Join the Overseers 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 369 

in taking into consideration the state of Society with respect to the support 
of our Discipline and attention to other advice of the Body conveyed in 
the Extracts, particularly the last : On deliberation the meeting united in 
the appointment of John Collins, William Rogers, Hinchman Haines, Job 
Haines, Joseph Matlack, Samuel Lippincott, Robert French, John Hunt, 
James Hemingway, Levi Ballinger, and William Roberts to that service ; 
to proceed therein as Truth may open the way and report to next or future 
Meeting. 

5th of 6th Mo. 1801. The Extracts from the minutes of our last Yearly 
Meeting being read, and the subject of distilling, dealing in, and unneces- 
sary use of Spiritous liquors coming under consideration, the following 
friends are appointed to have the subject under their care, proceed therein 
as way may open, and report their service to this meeting so as to enable 
us to send up a clear account to our next Yearly Meeting, — Viz. Abraham 
Warrington, John Matlack, Caleb Atkinson, Robert French, John Maxell, 
Joseph Haines, and Samuel Matlack. 

10th of 7th Mo. 1801. Pursuant to the conclusion of last meeting, some 
parts of the Extracts being again revived, and the subject of the boarding- 
school coming under consideration the following friends are appointed to 
attend the sitting of our several ensuing Preparative meetings ; and as way 
may open endeavor to promote liberality in affording some further assistance 
in that important concern ; also, attend to the direction of our last Yearly 
meeting in the revival of former advices therefrom ; and report to next or 
future Meeting. Joseph Matlack, Abraham Warrington, John Collins, 
Robert French, Job Haines, Gabriel Davis and William Rogers. 

At a monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 6th mo. 1802 
The Extracts being read, and the subject of distilling, dealing in, and 
common use of spiritous Liquors, coming under weighty consideration ; the 
Meeting united in the appointment of the following friends to have the sub- 
ject under their care, proceed therein as way may open, and report thereon 
to this meeting in the 3'' mo. next, Vizt. John Mazell, Levi Ballinger, William 
Rogers, John Hunt Junr., Samuel Roberts, Robert French, Morgan Hollins- 
head, Joshua Roberts, Joseph Warrington Jr., William Evans, Henry War- 
rington and Samuel Lippincott. 

8th of 7th month 1803. The minute of our last Quarterly meeting rela- 
tive to the practice of distilling and vending spiritous Liquors, together 
with some paragraphs of our last and former Extracts on that subject, being 
read ; and being favoured with the company of most of our Quarterly 
meetings committee under that appointment ; a concern for the advance- 
ment of friends Testimony herein, was felt to prevail : and the following 

24 



370 GENEALOGY OF THE 

friends were appointed to join in a labor to promote a reformation in these 
respects ; and as way may open, endeavour to discourage the unnecessary 
use of those Liquors. Viz. — Jacob Borton, William Wilkins, Jos. Haines, 
Zebedee Wills, Robert French, Wm. Roberts, Morgan HoUinshead, John 
Hunt, Abraham Warrington, Henry Warrington Junr., Joshua Lippincott 
and W^m. Borough, who are directed to report thereon at, or previous to, 
our meeting in the 4th month ne.xt. 

7th of 1st Mo. 1803. Abraham Warrington Junr. produced an Acknowl- 
edgment for laying a wager on a horse race, thereby expressing sorrow 
therefor, which being read and considered with a good degree of weight, 
& John Collins and Robert French expressing a willingness to take an 
opportunity with him on the occasion, they are therefore appointed thereto ; 
and report their sense of his disposition of mind to next meeting. 

8th of the 4th month 1803. Robert French and Elizabeth Stokes appeared 
and declared their intention of marriage with each other. 

6th of 5th Month 1803. Robert French and Elizabeth Stokes appeared 
and signified the continuation of their intention of marriage with each 
other ; and the friends appointed reporting nothing to obstruct their pro- 
ceeding, they are, therefore, at liberty to consumate their marriage agreeably 
to good order ; for the preservation of which, John Matlack and Morgan 
HoUinshead are appointed to be present and report to next meeting. 

10th of 6th Mo. 1803. The friends appointed to attend the marriage of 
Robert French and Elizabeth Stokes report it orderly accomplished. 

[Women's Meeting] 

At the Monthly Meeting of Women Friends held at Evesham the 8th 
of 4th Month 1803, Robert French and Elizabeth Stokes appeared and ex- 
pressed their intentions of marriage with each other, the meeting appoints 
Mary Gibbs and Rebecca HoUinshead to enquire respecting her clearness 
of other like engagements and report to next meeting. 

6 — 5 mo. 1803. Robert French and Elizabeth Stokes appeared and ex- 
pressed the continuance of their intentions of marriage with each other and 
no obstruction appearing they are at liberty to accomplish their marriage 
agreeably to good order, Mary Gibbs and Rebecca Cowperthwaite are 
appointed to be present and report to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 10th of the 6th Month 1803. 
The friends appointed to attend the marriage of Robert French and Eliza- 
beth Stokes report it orderly accomplished. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 371 

Record book of Sufferings of Friends of Evesham Monthly Meeting for 
non Compliance of Military duty. Being An Account of Friends Suffer- 
ings within the Compass of Evesham Monthly Meeting for refusing to pay 
a Tax for procuring Powder & other Military Stores & for refusing to be 
Active in Military Services. The Sums Demanded : Goods taken : the Value 
thereof ; by whom taken, & by what Authority is as followeth. 

Taken from Robert French by sd. Toy, one Mare rated £20 : : 0. Fines 
Demanded £23:5:0— 12th mo. 23" 1777 

Taken from Robert French 11th mo. 24th 1780 by Peter Bankson a 
Saddle, rated at £1 : 10 : Fine Demanded £30— 

Taken from Robert French 10th mo. 27th 1780 by William Venhorn one 
Hog rated £1:10:0— Ta.x Demanded £51:4:6— 

Was Taken from Robert French 5th Mo. 29th 1781— by Samuel Ivens 
Constable : one sheep, rated £0:7:6 

10/31 — 1782 Taken from Robert French by Joseph Brackney a Heifer 
rated at £4:0: — Taxes Demanded not Assertained 

11th mo. 29 — 1782 — Taken from Robert French by Samuel Ivens for 
Sundry Taxes a Cow & one Hog rated £6:5:0 Demands not assertained. 

11th Mo. 25" 1783 — Taken from Robert French by Jacob Cooper Con- 
stable (by virtue of a Warrant signed Darling Conrow) two hogs valued 
5£, a Heifer 3£, two Sheep 7£, and 10 Bushels of Indian Corn 1£ 10 S. 
Demand £6: 13"-: 6" 

7th M°. 22* 1784 Taken from Robert French by said Wiley, by virtue 
of a Warrant signed as above, a Cart rated at 4£, two Sheep at 15/ and a 
Grindstone at 10/ Whole Amount S£ : 5 S : 0— Demand 3£:9S:2d 

2nd Mo. 4th 1790. Taken from Robert French by the Authority aforesaid 
(John Griffith Deputy Constable) 5 sheep rated 3£:15S:0 — Sum demanded 
not ascertained. 

2nd Mo. 1802 Taken from Robert French by Josiah Gibbs Deputy Con- 
stable 3 bu. of Corn valued at 4/6 Amt. £1 8s. Od. for a Demand of £1 
3s. 6d. — by an Execution signed Thomas Adams. 

2nd Mo. 5th 1802 Taken from Robert French by Israel Hammell Dep. 
Constable 7 — 3/4 Bush'' of Corn valued at 4/6 Amt. £4 6s. 5d. for a Demand 
of £3 3s. 6d. by an Execution signed Edward French. 



37: 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



WILL OF ROBERT FRENCH, JR., 1808 

I, Robert French of the township of Chester, Countj' of Burlington and 
State of New Jersey, being of sound mind and memory, do make and pub- 
lish this for my last will and testament. First, I give and bequeath to my 
dear wife Elizabeth French the sum of four hundred dollars, and all the 
household goods she brought to me and one milch cow to be paid to her 
in sixty days after my decease. Second, I bequeath to my said dear wife 
half of the profits of my plantation during her natural life, to be paid to 
her yearly which annuity I give in lieu of dower out of my estate, and if 
not accepted as such in thirty days after my decease then my will is that 
the said annuity be void. 

Third, all the residue of my estate after payment of debts both real and 
personal I give and devise to my daughter Mary Roberts in fee simple, to 
her, her heirs and assigns forever — I appoint my dear wife Elizabeth French 
and my son-in-law Josiah Roberts, executors of this my testament and last 
will. In witness whereof I have hereto set my hand and seal this second 
day of ninth month in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
eight. 




Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said Robert French to be 
his testament and last will in the presence of us : Andrew Hollinshead, Job 
Hollinshead, Morgan Hollinshead. 



I, Robert French make this codicil to my testament and last will, besides 
what I have bequeathed to my beloved wife in my last will to which this 
is a codicil ; if she should choose to reside on my plantation, I leave her 
the privilege of half the house to live in and fire wood brought to the door 
sufficient for her use, but if she should choose to live in her own house it 
is my will that my executors deliver to her seven cords of wood every year 
at her door as long as she remains my widow, besides which I give her one 
good bed, bedstead and bedding to be her own. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this ninth day 
of second month in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
eleven 1811 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 373 



MOORESTOWN MEETINGS 

About the year 1 700 the meeting at Chester was established and was called 
the Adams' Meeting, from its being located upon their land. By a deed of 
James and Esther Adams, dated 9th of 4th mo. 1700, we learn that a meet- 
ing house already stood there, viz. : " To the Trustees of the Religious Society 
of Friends, for one acre of land lying and being on the west side of the 
King's highway, with all that house or building now erected, and being upon 
said acre of land, called the Quaker Meeting House." It was of logs and 
was destroyed by fire. In 1721 a house built of stone succeeded it, and was 
located in what is now the burial ground, on the north side of the street. 
In the ensuing years repairs and additions became necessary, costing upwards 
of $1,500. Amongst those who generously contributed, both money and 
labor, were Charles French [42], Jonathan French [31] and Mathew Allen, 
Jr. This place of worship was used by the Friends of the vicinity for 
over eighty years, when owing to increase in population, it became necessary 
to provide a new meeting house. In 1781 a lot of something over two acres, 
on the south side of the main street, was purchased " for the sum of ninety- 
six pounds, five shillings and seven pence, gold and silver." Twenty years 
later a large brick meeting house was built, and this has been used since 
1802. The old building was torn down and much of the material used in 
the construction of a school house within the new enclosure. In 1829, Ortho- 
dox Friends built a frame meeting house on the same lot, which they used 
until a few years ago, when they erected a large modern brick building. 
After the removal of the meeting the ground on the north side of the street 
was used for burial purposes only. About 1740 a member of the meeting 
planted a strong young sycamore tree near the old meeting house. For more 
than a century it has been the pride of the community, and today, though 
fully one hundred and seventy years old, it is as vigorous as ever. Moores- 
town originally was called Chestertown at one end and Rodmantown at the 
other, and was also known as Adams, after pioneer families. Finally it took 
its permanent name from one Thomas Moore, an enterprising settler, who 
was one of the early inn keepers, though his first house only contained four 
rooms. During its entire history of over two centuries, Moorestown has been 
one of the most distinctive Quaker communities in the United States. 



374 GENEALOGY OF THE 

132— JAMES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35). 

b. 3rd. mo. 1st, 1751. 

m. First, July 24th, 1773, Mary Clark; Rev. 
Jacob Duche performing ceremony; Christ 
Church record, Philadelphia. 

m. Second, October 12th, 1779, Sarah Ferguson. 

321— CHARLES FRENCH m. • . 



322— JOSEPH FRENCH b. 11th mo. 3rd, 1781. 

m. September 2nd, 1804, Martha Newton. 

323— JAMES FRENCH 

324— ROBERT FRENCH 

325— THOMAS FRENCH b. 1st mo. 3rd, 1795. 

m. First, Elizabeth Talbott. 

m. Second, 6th mo. 27th, 1827, Martha Bryan. 

MARRIAGE BOND 

Know all Men by these Prefents, 

That we James French and William Co.\ of the County of Burlington — 
are held and firmly bound unto His Excellency William Livingston Esq. 
Governor and Commander in Chief of New Jersey, &c. in the Sum of Five 
Hundred Pounds current lawful Money of New Jersey, to be paid to the 
laid William Livingston Esq'' Governor, &c. his Succefsors and Afsigns ; 
for which Payment well and truly to be made, we bind our felves, our 
Heirs, Executors and Adminiftrators, and every of them, jointly and fever- 
ally, firmly by thefe Prefents : Sealed with our Seals, dated the twelfth 
Day of October — Anno Domini One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy 
Nine. 

The Condition of this Obligation is fuch. That whereas there is a Mutual 
Contract of Marriage between James French — of the one party, and Sarah 
Ferguson — of the other party, and the Parties have complied with the 
Terms prefcribed in an Act of the General Afsembly of New-Jersey, made 
in the Year of our Lord One Thoufand Seven Hundred and Nineteen, 
intitled, An Act to prevent clandeftine Marriages. 

Now if it fhall hereafter appear that the Certificates produced, or either 
of them, have been fraudulent, or that either the aforefaid James French 
or the aforefaid Sarah Ferguson — had not the Confent of their Parents, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



375 



Guardians, or Persons under whofe Care they were, figning the faid Cer- 
tificates ; or that the faid James French — or the faid Sarah Ferguson — or 
either of them, had fome lawful Let or Impediment of Pre-contract, Affinity 
or Consanguinity, to hinder their being joined in the Holy Bands of Matri- 
mony, and afterwards of living together as Man and Wife; then this 
Obligation to ftand and remain in full force and Virtue, otherwife to be 
void and of none Effect. — 



^a^^ <5W«c/^ 



ySUMi^ 




Sealed and Delivered 
in the Prefence of 
BowesReed 



Will'" Cox [Seal] 



The New Jersey marriage license law of 1719 was a measure specially enacted to 
prevent clandestine marriages of minors, but it was not in practice thus regarded exclu- 
sively. The provisions of the act were exact and elaborate and evidently were held in 
great public respect for many years. But as time passed and colonial power weakened, 
" marriage by license " became less popular and marriage bonds, like that filed by 
James French, when he contracted a second marriage, rapidly fell into disuse about the 
time of the Revolution. There are about ten thousand of these bonds on file in Trenton. 
The act remained nominally in force or at least on the colonial statute books, until 1795. 
Its chief beneficiaries, financially, were the rural justices of the peace. The clergy were 
much opposed to it, and in Pennsylvania a similar law was strongly attacked by Bishop 
White. 




FOOT WARMER, 1750 



376 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



135— ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35). 

b. 10th mo. 26th, 1758. 

d. 4th mo. 9th, 1842. 

m. 12th mo. 1781, Samuel Carr, son of Caleb Carr. 

He b. 10th mo. 22nd, 1754. 

d. 6th mo. 29th, 1832. 



326— HANNAH CARR 



b. 9th mo. 12th, 1782. 
m. 3rd mo. 12th, 1807, Thomas Middleton, 

son of John and Martha Middleton, of 

Evesham, N. J. 



327— CALEB CARR 



b. 7th mo. 28th, 1784. 
d. 4th mo. 18th, 1842. 

m. 11th mo. 13th, 1834, Mary Stockton, 
daughter of Samuel and Abigail Stockton. 
She d. 10th mo. 29th, 1852. 



328— JEREMIAH CARR 



b. 9th mo. 27th, 1786. 
d. 11th mo. ISth, 1786. 



329— SAMUEL CARR, JR. 



b. 3rd mo. 24th, 1788. 
m. Patience . 



330— MARY F. CARR 



b. 9th mo. 27th, 1791. 
m. 10th mo. 17th, 1816, Aaron Lippincott, son 

of Samuel and Theodocia Lippincott, of 

Evesham, N. J. 



331— ISAAC CARR 



b. 11th mo. 4th, 1793. 

m. 1st mo. 11th, 1816, Ann Craft, daughter 
of George and Elizabeth Craft of Mans- 
field, N. J. 



332— ROBERT CARR 



b. 12th mo. 9th, 1795. 



333— THOMAS CARR 



b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1798. 
d. 2nd mo. 28th, 1798. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 377 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 8"" of y'' 11'" mo. 1781. 
Sam'l Carr son of Caleb Carr & Ann French Daughter of Robert French 
dec'd, appeared & declared their Intentions of Marriage with each other, 
the young man residing within y^ Compass of Mount Holly Monthly Meet- 
ing was Informed that a Certificate from there would be expected at their 
next appearance. The Young Woman's mother being present consented and 
the young man produced his father's in writing. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y*" 6*" of 12'" mo. 1781— 
Sam'l Carr & Ann French appeared & signified the Continuation of their 
intentions of Marriage with each other, he produced a certificate from the 
Monthly Meeting at Mount Holly to the satisfaction of this. Therefore 
they are at Liberty to consumate their s'd Intentions & Enoch Evans & 
Joshua Lippincott are appointed to be present & see that good order be 
kept & report to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 10*" of y^ 1"' Mo. 1782. 
The friends appointed to attend the marriage of Samuel Carr & Ann French 
reported that it was orderly accomplished. 

Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

gth j^th jyj^^ 1781. Samuel Carr and Ann French appeared and declared 
their intentions of marriage with each other, therefore two friends are 
appointed to make the needful enquiry into her clearnefs of marriage and 
report to next Meeting ; the young woman's mother being present consented, 
and he produced his Father's consent in writing. 

10'" P' Mo. 1782. The friends appointed to attend the marriage of 
Samuel Carr and Ann French reported that it was orderly accomplished. 



138— ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42). 

b. September 24th, 1740. 

d. 2nd mo. 4th, 1840, buried in Evesham Burying 

Ground, 
m. 12th mo. 12th, 1757, Jacob Wilkins, son of 

Thomas Wilkins. 

334— URIAH WILKINS. b. Sth mo. 22nd, 1758. 

m. October 18th, 1792, Elizabeth Eyre. 



378 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



335— HANNAH WILKINS 



b. 2nd mo. 20th, 1761. 

m. October 28th, 1783, Benjamin Burrough, 
son of Samuel and Mary Burrough. 



336— SAMUEL WILKINS 



b. 11th mo. 10th, 1763. 
d. 1st mo. 14th, 1766. 



337— ANNA WILKINS 



b. 7th mo. 2Sth, 1767. 

m. January 17th, 1797, Asa Eyre; Edward 
French [121], Justice of Peace, perform- 
ing ceremony. 



338— JACOB WILKINS 



b. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1770. 

m. 1794, Theodosia Lippincott. 



339— ISAAC WILKINS 



b. 12th mo. 7th, 1772. 
m. April 4th, 1796, Ann HoUingshead [377]. 



340— THOMAS WILKINS 



b. 10th mo. 12th, 1775. 
d. 4th mo. 26th, 1848. 



341— CHARLES WILKINS 



b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1779. 
m. First, Lydia Hazelton. 
m. Second, 1808, Sarah Striker. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

14 — 11 mo. 1757 Jacob Wilkins son of Thos. Wilkins and Anne French 
daughter of Chas. French appeared and declared their intentions of mar- 
riage with each other. Parents being present consented, and James Cattle 
& Wm. Evens are appointed to make y'' needful enquiry into y® young 
mans clearness and conversation. 



12 — 12 mo. 1757. Jacob Wilkins & Ann French appeared and signified 
y" continuation of their intention of marriage with each other, }'" friends 
appointed to make enquiry reported nothing to obstruct & they are at liberty 
to consumate their said intentions. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 379 

Haddonfield Minutes of y* Mo: Meeting of Women Friends: 

Women friends of y" monthly meeting being met at Haddonfield y* 14"' 
of ll"" 1757 

Jacob Wilkins & Ann French signified their intentions of taking each 
other in marriage friends appointed to make y* usual inquirie are Jane 
Midleton & Rachel Coperthwait & report to next meeting. 



Women fr"' of y'' m"Iy meeting being met at Had-f"* y" 12th of 12'" 1757 
Jacob Wilkins & Ann French Signified y'' Continuation of their intentions 
of marriage confent of Parents appearing & return of inquirers clear fr"^ 
consent to y^ accomplishm' theirof according to y^ good order among fr*** 
& app*' Han* French & Kizia Heritage to attend it, to see good order kept, 
& report to next m'g. 



Women friends of y'' m^ly Meeting being met at Had-f* y^ 9'" of 1" 
m° 1758 reported y"" afores** marriage was orderly accomplish'' 



Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y" 10'" of y' 12'" Mo. 1778. 
Jos" Stokes, Jos" Roberts, Jacob Wilkins & Sam'l. French are appointed 
to take in subscriptions for y* journal of our friend John Churchman, «S: 
report to next meeting. 



At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y*" 7'" of 10'" IVIo. 1779. 
This meeting was Inform'd that y* Journals of our Dec'd friend John 
Churchman being almost compleated, therefore Jacob Wilkins, Samuel 
French, Joseph Roberts & Joseph Stokes are directed to call upon y" Sub- 
scribers, & Receive y'' Money & pay y' same to John Lippincott as soon as 
thev convenientlv can. 



Ann (French) Wilkins departed this life 2nd mo. 4th 1840 in the one 
hundreth year of her age; having attended Evesham Monthly Meeting 
until she was passed 96 years old, and retained all her faculties in a 
remarkable manner. 

Appearing sensible that she was nearing her close she was heard to say, 
* Come sweet Jesus, come quicklj-, not my will but Thine be done.' She 
was the mother of eight children, only three of whom survived her ; she 
had forty-four grandchildren and seventy great grand children at the time 
of her death 



380 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



139— ABIGAIL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42). 

b. January 18th, 1742. 

d. 2nd mo. 20th, 1797, in Gloucester Co., N. J. 

m. 9th mo., 1760, John Brick, 3rd, son of Judge 
John and Ann (Nicholson) Brick. 

He b. nth mo. 10th, 1733, in Salem County, N. J. 

d. 1780, in Gloucester Co., N. J. 



342— JOHN BRICK, 4TH 



343— SAMUEL BRICK 



m. February 19th, 1783, Mercy Hartley; Rev. 
Robert Blackwell performing ceremony ; 
Christ Church record, Philadelphia. 



344— WILLIAM BRICK 



345— ANN BRICK 



346— ABIGAIL BRICK 



347— SARAH BRICK 



m. Mary Inskeep. 

m. 5th mo. 16th, 1799, William Roberts. 

m. Captain Jacob Stokes. 

m. James Hale. 



ANCESTRY OF JOHN BRICK, 3RD 

John Brick, progenitor of the Brick family in West Jersey, came from 
England to Salem soon after the founding of the colony, in 1675. About 
1690 he bought 1000 acres of land located along a stream which afterward 
became known as Stow creek and the dividing line between Salem and Cum- 
berland counties. Ten years later he built a grist and saw mill and the vil- 
lage which grew up was called Jerico. For nearly half a century the pioneer 
John Brick was an active and influential man in the community. He died in 
1753. His son, Joseph, succeeded to the ownership of the mills, and his son, 
John, was given 240 acres of land in Salem county. Many years later the 
mills became the property of the Wood family. John Brick, Jr., who in 
1728 married Ann Nicholson, granddaughter of Samuel Nicholson, progeni- 
tor, an original Salem settler, became a prominent citizen. He represented 
Salem county in the Assembly, 1745-46, and was appointed a Common Pleas 
Judge for the new county of Cumberland, 1748, serving also as one of the 
managers in the building of the new court house. He died in 1758, leaving 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 381 

two sons and six daughters, amongst whom he divided a considerable estate. 
His son, John (3rd), born in 1733, who, in 1760, married Abigail French, 
was a prosperous farmer and business man. He left an estate located chiefly 
in Gloucester county, where he had bought of Charles Read, in 1766, three 
tracts of land, aggregating about 250 acres, for £1600. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

11 — 8 mo. 1760. John Brick son of John deceased and Abigail French 
daughter of Chas. French appeared and declared their intentions of mar- 
riage with each other. Y" young man belonging to Salem Monthly Meeting 
was acquainted that a certificate from thence would be expected at their 
ne.xt appearance ; he produced his mother's consent in writing, her parents 
being present gave theirs. 

8 — 9 mo. John Brick and Abigail French appeared and signified the 
continuance of their intentions of marriage with each other and he pro- 
duced a certificate from Salem Monthly Meeting to the satisfaction of this. 
They are left at liberty to consumate their said intentions. 

10 — 11 mo. 1760. The Friends appointed to attend the marriage of John 
Brick and Abigail French report that it was orderly accomplished. 

Haddonfield Minutes of y^ Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

Women friends of y*^ monthly meeting being met at Had''f''' y^ 11*" of 
8'" m° 1760 

Jn° Brick & Abigail French, signify" their intentions of taking each other 
in marraig, fr"' appointed to make y* ufual inquiry are Jane Midleton 
& Rebecca Roberts, & to make their report to next m°ly meeting. & y® 
young man belongin to Salem, a certificate expecte" next m'g. 

Women friends of y"* monthly meeting being met at Had°f''' y* 8"' of 
9"' 1760 

Jn° Brick & Abigail French, signified y" continuation of their intentions of 
taking each other in marraig, Confent of Parents appearing, & return of 
inquierr^ clear, fr''^ consent to y'' accomplishment thereof, according to y* 
good order among fr**^, & appoints Rebecca Roberts & Caziah Heritage to 
attend s* accomplishm*, to see good orders kept, & make their report to 
next m°ly meeting. 

Women friends of y' m'ly m*g being met at Had°f'" y' 10'" of 11'" 1760 
Report** y^ marriag of Jn° Brick & Abigail French, was orderly accomplish", 
being hindred by Sicknefs in its Proper Season. 



382 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



SUMMARY OF WILL OF JOHN BRICK, 3RD, 1780 

John Brick Gloucester Town & Co. New Jersey " being sick & weak " 
Date— 2 Mo— (Feby) 29—1780 Proved April 21—1780 at Timber Creek. 
Wife — Abigail sole use & profits of my plantation until son John is 25. 
Children — John Brick, that part of my plantation I purchased of Charles 

Read Lyeing the Easterly side of the 
great Road Leading from Gloucester to 
Salem, Bounding by Little Timber Creek 
the Lands of Isaac Burroughs Late of 
John Mickle deceased Samuel Harrison 
and said Road to the Bridge, Leading 
over said Creek. If he die before he is 
25 years of age, & without lawful issue 
this land to descend unto my son Samuel 
& lands devised to Samuel shall then 
descend to son W™ 
Samuel when 21 rest of my plantation & Va of my cedar swamp, 

& rest of cedar swamp to son John 
£150 to be paid to him, by son John Brick out of the 
land above bequeathed to him. Money 
equal to a Spanish peace of Eight at seven 
Shillings and six pence, Son Samuel also 
to pay son William £150 of like money. 
Both payments to be made when William 
is 21. 

all the remainder of my Personal Estate 
to be equally divided share and share 
alike and each one's share to be paid her 
when 18. If either of my daughters marry 
before she arrives at 18 years of age, her 
share to be paid her then. 

( Wife, Abigail Brick 

J Bro-in-law, Samuel French 



William 



Three Daughters Ann 

Abigail 

Sarah 




Witnesses Hannah Bispham 
Martha Harrifon 



John Bispham Junr. 
Sam' Clement 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



383 




Signatures of Executors 



Inventory of John Brick late of Town of Gloucester- 
Date April 11—1780 



Total £568—1—8 



Sam' Harrison ] 



Apprs. 



Jofeph Clement 
Affirmed to at Timber Creek 
April 21—1780 

Before Jo^ Hugg Surrog*. 



Upon her death, in 1797, the estate of Abigail Brick, who died intestate, was admin- 
istered by her brother, Charles French [143], the inventory showing personal property 
valued at, approximately, £700. 




FAMILY PIECES, I770 



4\ 



384 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



140— JACOB FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42). 

b. April 28th, 1745. 
d. 10th mo. 28th, 1827. 

m. 12th mo. 3rd, 1772, Elizabeth Stokes, daughter 
of Joshua and Amy (Hinchman) Stokes. 
She d. 2d mo. 5th, 1837; buried in Friends' Burying 
Ground, Moorestown, N. J. 



348— RACHEL FRENCH 



b. 8th mo. 13th, 1773. 

d. in Burlington, N. J., unmarried. 



349— AMY FRENCH 



b. 12th mo. 3rd, 1774. 

m. 11th mo. 20th, 1799, John Pope. 



350— ABIGAIL FRENCH 



b. 12th mo. 27th, 1777. 
m. 1801, Joseph Jones. 



351— RICHARD FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 6th, 1781. 
m. Hannah Lippincott. 



352— JOSHUA FRENCH 



b. 10th mo. 30th, 1787. 
m. 10th mo. 3rd, 1817, Elizabeth H. Beck. 



Elizabeth (Stokes) French was great-great-aunt of Edward C. Stokes, Governor of 
New Jersey, 1905-1908. 

Joshua Stokes, son of Thomas and Rachel (Wright) Stokes, married Amy Hinchman, 
of Haddonfield Monthly Meeting, 1741; he died 1779. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y*' 8'" of y* 10'" mo. 1772. 
Jacob French by John Hunt requested a certificate to y*" monthly meeting 
at Haddonfield in order for marriage with a member thereof. Therefore 
Enoch and Joseph Roberts are appointed to make y"' needful Enquiery and 
prepare one & produce it to next meeting. 



At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 5'" of y" 11'" mo. 1772. 
The Friends appointed produced a certificate on behalf of Jacob French 
which was read approved and signed by y'^ Clerk. 




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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 385 



Haddonfield Minutes of y^ Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends held at Haddonfield the IZ*"" of 
the 10'" M° 1772 

Jacob P'rench & Elizabeth Stokes (Daughter of Joshua Stokes) signified 
their Intentions of Marriage with each other. Mary Lippincott & Elizabeth 
Bates are appointed to make y* usual Enquery & report to next Meetg. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends held at Haddonfield the 9'" of 
11'" M" 1772 

Jacob French & Elizabeth Stokes Signified y"^ continuation of their inten- 
tions of Marr^", consent of Parties concerned app^ & return of Enquir^ 
clear concern^ y"^ young Woman, and y"^ young man producing a Certificate 
from Evesham signifying his clearnefs there, Fr'*^ consent to y* accom- 
plishm* thereof according to good order established amongst Friends. Mary 
Lippincott & Elizabeth Bates to attend, see good order kept & report to 
next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends at Haddonfield the 14"' of 12"* 
M° 1772 
Report y'' afores'" marr^ orderly accomplished. 




A RELIC OF THE NURSERV, 1/49 



25 



386 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



141— SAMUEL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42). 

b. September 17th, 1748, in Waterford township, 
Gloucester Co., N, J, 

d. 7th mo. 8th, 1814. 

m. 4th mo. 7th, 1769, Sarah Heulings, daughter 
of Jacob, Jr., and Agnes (Buckman) Heulings 
of Evesham township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
She b. 8th mo. 12th, 1753. 

d. 6th mo. 7th, 1806. 



353— URIAH FRENCH 



354— JACOB FRENCH 



355— AGNES FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 13th, 1770. 
m. 6th mo. 3rd, 1802, Mary Ivins. 

b. 4th mo. 30th, 1773. 
m. First, Sarah Ellis. 
m. Second, Hannah (Pancoast) Cooper. 

b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1775. 
m. 12th mo. 20th, 1792, Amasa Moore. 



356— CHARLES FRENCH, JR. b. 4th mo. 22nd, 1777. 

m. First, 12th mo. 27th, 1798, Martha Hazel- 
ton. 

m. Second, 11th mo. 3rd, 1808, Esther (Davis) 
Lippincott. 

m. Third, 11th mo. 28th, 1810, Priscilla Moore. 



357— SAMUEL FRENCH, JR. 



358— ANN FRENCH 



359— SARAH FRENCH 



b. 4th mo. 10th, 1779. 

m. First, 3rd mo. 28th, 1811, Hannah Ivins. 

m. Second, 10th mo. 3rd, 1816, Rebecca Clark. 

b. 5th mo. 12th, 1781. 

d. 2nd mo. 28th, 1782. 

b. 11th mo. 24th, 1783. 

m. 2nd mo. 8th, 1810, John V. Clark. 



360— JOSEPH CLEMENT FRENCH 

b. 7th mo. 20th, 1786. 
m. First, Elizabeth P. Ellis, 
m. Second, 9th mo. 7th, 1848, Nancy Vanne- 
man. 



361— ANN HEULINGS FRENCH 



b. 9th mo. 29th, 1788. 
d. 12th mo. 18th, 1812. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



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388 GENEALOGY OF THE 

SAMUEL FRENCH 

Samuel French [141] spent the early years of his married life as a farmer 
in the upper part of Waterford township, then Gloucester, now Camden 
county, N. J. It is evident that about 1771 he took charge of an extensive 
tract of land, upwards of 1000 acres, located in Greenwich, now Harrison 
township, Gloucester county. This estate, the property of James Budd, was 
sold by Sheriff Joseph Hugg, in 1771, to Charles French [42] and by his 
will, 1785, descended to his son Samuel French. In 1784 the latter pur- 
chased 125 acres in the same neighborhood and in 1794 and 1810 added to 
his holdings, until he became possessed of over 1300 acres, being one of the 
largest land owners in that section. Upon his death, 1814, farms were as- 
signed to his five sons, as detailed in his will, a lengthy document, revealing 
a careful administrative mind. The saw mill property, with 1 1 5 acres, given 
to Uriah, had been in his charge for some years. Charles was continued in 
possession of a desirable place; Jacob, also, in another nearby location, and 
with a goodly portion of land given to Joseph, the remainder of the great 
plantation was entrusted to Samuel, Jr., including the homestead. 

An accompanying outline map, taken from an ancient time-worn parch- 
ment, shows the general location of four of these farms. The homesteads 
reproduced are in excellent condition. The chimneys were built with old- 
fashioned fire-places, the heavy timbers and rafters are of oak, now hard as 
stone, the weather-boarding of cedar. Only one house, that of Jacob French 
and built by him, is of brick. These venerable dwellings, with probably 
one exception, are considerably over one hundred years old and with care 
will last many years. In the pioneer homestead General Samuel G. French 
was born. Here he spent his boyhood days, attending school at Mullica 
Hill, three miles distant, until be entered the United States Military Academy 
at West Point in 1839. This property passed out of possession of the family 
upon the death of his father Samuel French, Jr., [357] in 1852. 

Samuel French [141] was a prosperous and influential man in his com- 
munity. He sat as a representative of Gloucester county in the Assembly at 
Trenton during the sessions of 1795-96-97-1800-01-02. He took an active 
part in the proceedings, upon several occasions giving striking manifestation 
of his devotion to the principles of Friends. He served on several important 
committees. A bill concerning the College of New Jersey, at Princeton, in 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 389 



the session of 1796, contained provisions he could not approve and he voted 
against it. The same day he voted against a bill concerning cavalry and 
artillery. Two days later, February 19, 1796, he voted against a bill for 
organizing and training the militia of the state. He was watchful of the 
interests of his constituents and supported a measure providing for rebuilding 
and keeping in repair the main highway bridge over Great Timber Creek. 
He voted against a motion to dismiss a pending bill to prevent the importa- 
tion of slaves into New Jersey, looking to their release and protection from 
abuse. He served on a special committee to consider a petition of Indians 
for their removal to New York. November 10, 1800, Samuel French pre-- 
sented a bill, " An Act for relief of Josiah Hunt " who had lost a note issued 
to him by the state of New Jersey for the depreciation of his pay as a soldier 
of the United States. Josiah Hunt had presented a petition and Samuel 
French, as a member of the committee to whom his case was referred, wrote 
the report which he submitted. 

Throughout a manhood life of nearly fifty years Samuel French mani- 
fested the qualities of a conscientious, vigorous, industrious and honorable 
ancestry. He took intelligent interest in all public affairs, and set a con- 
sistent example as a member of the religious society with which he was 
actively connected for half a century, leaving the memory of a well spent 
and successful life. 

Sarah Heulings, wife of Samuel French, was the great-granddaughter of 
William Buckman who, in 1682, came to Pennsylvania from Billinghurst, 
Sussex county, England, with William Penn, in the ship " Welcome." 
Thomas Buckman, youngest son of William Buckman and his second wife, 
Elizabeth Wilson, was born 4th mo. 8th, 1707, died 1734, married 3rd mo. 
26th, 1726, Agnes Penquite, born 1705, daughter of John and Agnes (Sharp) 
Penquite. Agnes Buckman, daughter of Thomas and Agnes (Penquite) 
Buckman, was born 2nd mo. 6th, 1732, married 9th mo. 27th, 1750, Jacob 
Heulings, Jr., and their daughter, Sarah Heulings, married 4th mo. 7th, 1769, 
Samuel French [141]. Jacob Heulings, Jr., was the son of Jacob and 
Dorothy (Eves) Heulings, and grandson of William and Dorothy (Eves) 
Heulings who were married in 1680. William Heulings served as justice of 
peace for Burlington County, 1703; died 1713. Jacob and Dorothy (Eves) 
Heulings both died in 1758. 



Ill 



390 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthlj' Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 9'" of y* S'" Mo. 1769 
Samuel French son of Charles French & Sarah Hulings Daughter of Jacob 
Hulings Jr. Dec'd. appeared & Declared their Intentions of marriage with 
Each other. Therefore John Roberts & John Cowperthwaite are appointed 
to make y^ usual Enquiry Concerning him, & report to next meeting, parents 
being present Consented. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y" 6'" of y'' 4'" Mo. 1769. 
Samuel French & Sarah Hulings appeared & signified y* Continuation of 
their Intentions of marriage with Each other the Friends appointed to make 
Enquiery reporting nothing to obstruct their proceeding Therefore they are 
at Liberty to Consumate their said Intentions according to good order & 
Joshua Lippincott & Isaac Evans are appointed to be present & see that 
good order be kept, & report to next meeting. 

[Women's Meeting] 

9" of 3'* mo. 1769. Samuel French and Sarah Heulings appeared and 
declared their intentions of marriage with each other, parents present 
consented. 

6'" of y* 4'" Mo. 1769. Samuel P'rench and Sarah Heulings appeared 
and signified y" continuation of their said intention of marriage with each 
other and return of enquirers clear they are at liberty to consumate their 
said intention according to good order. 

4" 5 mo. 1769. Friends appointed to attend the marriage of Samuel 
French reported that it was orderly accomplished. 

[Men's Meeting] 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 4'" of y^ 2°'' Mo. 1779. 
Solomon Haines, Samuel French, Jno. Haines, Enoch Evans & Bethual 
Moore produced acknowledgements for paying fines in Lieu of their per- 
sonal service in y" Militia contrary to y" Rules Established in y'' Society 
which were read and Received. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y* 9*" of y" 3* mo. 1780.— 
Samuel French by Edward Darnel requested a Certificate to reccommend 
himself, Wife & children to the Monthly Meeting at Haddonfield, there- 
fore Enoch Evans & John Maxell Junr. are appointed to make y* usual 
Enquiry & prepare one & produce it to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 6'" of y" 4*" Mo. 1780. 
The friends appointed produced a Certificate on behalf of Sam'l. French, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 391 

wife and children, which was read approv'd & Sign'd by the Clk. & sent to 
the Women for their signing. 

[Women's Meeting] 

9" — 3 mo. 1780 Sarah French requested our certificate to be inclosed 
with her husband and children to joyn Friends of Haddonfield Monthly 
Meeting, therefore two friends are appointed to enquire into her life and 
conversation and give their account to y^ friends appointed to draw it. 

Haddonfield Minutes of y" Mo : Meeting of Women Friends : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends held at Haddonfield the 8*'' of 
the 5'" Month, 1780. 

A certificate was produced from Evesham Monthly Meeting Recommending 
Samuel French & wife Sarah «S: their Daughter Agnefs to the care of this 
which was read and Received. 

Samuel French spent his early life subject to Ev-esham Monthly Meeting, as will be 
noted. In 1780, some years after he removed to the lower part of Gloucester County, he 
became a member of Haddonfield Monthly Meeting. From various records, it is 
evident that the family attended worship at Mickleton, or Upper Greenwich, as it was 
then called, that being the nearest meeting to their residence. After Woodbury became 
a Monthly Meeting, 1785, Samuel French and family appear to have been united there- 
with, although the record of transfer it not attainable. Later the meeting at MuUica 
Hill was the home place of worship. 

WILL OF SAMUEL FRENCH, 1803 

In the name of God, Amen. I Samuel French of the township of Green- 
wich, County of Gloucester and State of New Jersey being at this time in a 
poor state of health but of sound mind and memory, not knowing but what 
my dissolution may be near, do make and publish this for my last will and 
Testament. 

First, I give and bequeath to my dear wife Sarah French one hundred 
pounds, to be paid to her by my executors, hereafter named as soon as 
it can be collected after my decease. Or she may take the whole or any 
part of the above said one hundred pounds at the praisement as she may 
think proper, and also six silver table spoons and nine silver tea spoons 
and the priviledge of two rooms in the house where I now dwell of her 
choice, and priviledge of the Oven, Pump, Cellar and fruit of all kinds 
for her own use, all kinds of sauce of vegitable production sufficient for 
her own use, with her firewood delivered at the door, Hay and grain suffi- 
cient to keep a horse and Hay and pasture for a cow. 

Second I bequeath to my son Uriah French my tract of land whereon 
the Saw Mill stands, bounded as follows Beginning at a stone for a corner 



392 GENEALOGY OF THE 

near said Mill and runs thence North thirty-seven and one half degrees 
West twelve chains and sixty-five links to a White oak thence North eighty- 
nine degrees West three chains and twelve links to an Elm thence North 
seventy-nine West five chains and forty-five links to a Black Oak thence 
North forty-two degrees West four chains and thirty links to a Black Oak 
thence North four degrees and thirty minutes East twenty-one chains and 
fifty links to a Hickory thence South fifty-six degrees West fifteen chains 
thence North twenty-two degrees West six chains and thirty links thence 
South fifty-three degrees West ten chains and forty links thence South 
twenty degrees East thirty-four chains and fifty links thence South eighty- 
eight degrees three chains thence South six degrees and thirty minutes East 
twelve chains and sixty links thence North seventy-two degrees and thirty 
minutes East twelve chains and thirty links thence North thirty-one degrees 
East four chains and sixty links thence South eighty-five degrees East 
thirty-four chains and fifty links thence North seventy-seven degrees and 
thirty minutes East six chains and seventy-five links thence North eighteen 
degrees West three chains and forty links thence North eighty-six degrees 
West five chains and twenty-eight links thence South thirty-five degrees 
West one chain and seventy-two links thence North eighty-four degrees 
and thirty minutes West five chains thence North twelve degrees and thirty 
minutes East nine chains and sixty links thence South seventy degrees and 
thirty minutes East twelve chains to the place of beginning. Containing 
one hundred and fifteen acres, more or less, together with all the appur- 
tenances to the Mill belonging. And also I bequeath unto my son Uriah 
my silver watch, and it is my will that my son Uriah do pay unto my wife 
Sarah French, yearly and every year the sum of forty dollars during her 
natural life 

Thirdly — I bequeath to my son Jacob French the plantation whereon he 
now lives with all the appurtenances except the part of said land which 
lays over the Cohawkin Road between Iredell's and Allen's land — and it 
is my will that my son Jacob do pay unto my wife Sarah French the sum 
of forty dollars yearly and every year during her natural life. 

Fourthly I give and bequeath to my son Charles French all that my 
tract of land I purchased of Hewit, bounding as follows beginning at a 
stake near a large Gum near Clems run and runs from thence North 
twenty-six degrees and thirty minutes West fifty-five chains thence South 
seventy-three degrees West seventeen chains and thirty links thence South 
seventy degrees West twenty-six chains thence South twelve degrees and 
thirty minutes West nine chains and sixty links thence South eighty-four 
degrees and thirty minutes East five chains thence North thirty-five degrees 
East one chain and seventy-two links thence South eighty-six degrees East 
five chains and twenty-eight links thence South eighteen degrees East three 
chains and forty links thence South twenty-six degrees and thirty minutes 
East one chain and seventy-five links thence South eighty degrees East nine 





1. Silver Knee Buckle belongiiis to Charles French (42), marked " C. F." 

2. Silver Shoe Buckles belonging to Samuel French (141) 

3. Silver Fastener for RufHed Shirt Front, belonging to Samuel French (141) 

4. Silver Knitting Shield belonging to Sarah (Heulings) French (141), marked "S. F. 2Sth, 11 mo. 1801." 

5. Silver Knee Buckle belonging to Samuel French (141) 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 393 

chains and thirty links thence South thirty-five degrees East nine chains 
and fifty links thence South seventy-five degrees and thirty minutes East 
thirty-three chains thence North forty-one degrees East two chains thence 
South sixty-five degrees East ten chains to the place of beginning Con- 
taining one hundred and forty-two and one half acres, with all the appur- 
tenances thereto belonging, and it is my will that my son Charles do pay 
unto my wife Sarah the sum of forty dollars yearly and every year during 
her natural life 

Fifthly, I give and bequeath unto my son Samuel French the plantation 
whereon I now dwell bounding as follows beginning at a Maple bush 
corner to Iredell's land and runs from thence North sixty-nine and one 
half degrees East thirty chains and fifty links thence East ten chains 
thence North forty-one degrees East twenty-five chains thence North sev- 
enty five degrees and a half East thirty-three chains thence North thirty- 
five degrees West nine chains and fifty links thence North eighty degrees 
West nine chains and thirty links thence North twenty-six degrees and 
thirty minutes West one chain and seventy-five links thence South seventy- 
seven degrees and thirty minutes West six chains and seventy-five links 
thence North eighty-five degrees West thirty-four chains and fifty links 
thence South thirty-one degrees West two chains and thirty-nine links thence 
South seventy-four degrees East seven chains and forty links thence South 
twenty-two degrees and thirty minutes East four chains and ten links 
thence South forty-eight degrees and thirty minutes East four chains and 
ninety links thence South eighty-one degrees East four chains thence South 
thirty degrees and thirty minutes East six chains and thirty-five links 
thence South thirty-three degrees West nine chains and seventy-two links 
thence South fifty-one and one half degrees East eight chains and seventy- 
five links thence North seventy degrees East three chains and ninety links 
to Raccoon Creek thence up the several courses thereof to the place of 
Beginning, containing two hundred and twenty-two acres and twenty-five 
perches of land be the same more or less together with all the appurtenances 
thereunto belonging, and also I bequeath unto my son Samuel my sorrel 
mare together with my saddle and bridle. 

Sixthly — I bequeath unto my daughter Agnes Moore the sum of fifty 
pounds to be paid by my Executors hereafter named in two j'ears after 
my decease 

Seventhly I bequeath to my son Joseph French the residue of my planta- 
tion whereon I now live bounded as follows beginning at a stone corner to 
Iredell's land and runs from thence North six and one half degrees West 
thirty-six chains and forty links thence North seventy-two degrees and 
thirty minutes East twelve chains and thirty links thence North thirty-one 
degrees East two chains and twenty-one links thence South seventy-four 
degrees East seven chains and forty links South twenty-two degrees and 
thirty minutes East four chains and ten links South forty-eight degrees 



394 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



and thirtj- minutes East four chains and ninety links thence eighty-one 
degrees East four chains thence South thirty degrees and thirty minutes 
East six chains and thirty-five links thence South thirty-three degrees West 
nine chains and seventy-two links thence South fifty-one degrees and thirty 
minutes East eight chains and seventy-five links thence South seventy 
degrees East twenty-eight chains and ninety links to the place of beginning 
containing ninety-two acres three roods and fifteen Perches of land be the 
same more or less, and also I bequeath unto my son Joseph all the land over 
the Cohawken road that I purchased of Joseph Gardiner lying between 
Allen's and Iredell's land, and also I bequeath unto my son Joseph twenty- 
five acres of land off the Egypt Tract adjoining the Cohawken Road and 
Joseph Allen's land and also I bequeath unto my son Joseph a certain Road 
that lies along Joseph Allen's line. 

Eighthly I bequeath to my daughter Sarah French two hundred pounds 
to be paid by my Executors hereafter named in one year after my decease. 

Ninthly I bequeath unto my daughter Ann French two hundred pounds 
to be paid by my executors as abovesaid when my daughter Ann shall 
arrive at the age of eighteen. 

Tenthly all the unappropriated Rights that I am possessed of at my 
decease I equally bequeath unto my five sons namely Uriah, Jacob, Charles, 
Samuel and Joseph. 

Eleventhly I order and empower my executors hereafter named to sell 
all the residue of my lands that has not been heretofore bequeathed and 
that after paying all my just debts and legacies as aforesaid the remainder 
of monies if any more be, to be equally divided between my beloved wife 
and three daughters namely Agnes Moore, Sarah and Ann French, and 
lastly I order my executors to sell all my moveable estate except what is 
taken by widow at the Praisement and the monies to be divided between 
my beloved wife and daughters as abovesaid after paying as abovesaid 
and lastly I appoint my two eldest sons namely Uriah and Jacob French 
Executors of this my last Will. In Witness whereof I have hereto set my 
hand and seal this twenty-third day of the seventh month in the year of 
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and three 



-^a-^^KU^Ce^ 




Sealed, signed published and declared by 
the said Samuel French to be his testa- 
ment and last will in the presence of us 

Rebecca Zane 

Isaac Eacrit 

Joshua Haines 
Will proved August 11, 1S14. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



395 



SUMMARY OF INV. OF ESTATE OF SAMUEL FRENCH, 1814 

An Inventory of the Goods and Effects of Samuel French late of the 
township of Greenwich County of Gloucester and State of New Jersey, 
deceased, as shown to us the subscribers and appraised this 4th. day of 
August 1814 

Wearing apparel and Desk 20 

Table & chairs, crockreware & sund 11.75 

Books, Looking glass, Cubboard and f urn 13.25 

two Beds and beding 35.50 

Seven Chairs and beding 28.50 

Hogshead, tubs & pail & sund 2.50 

Meal Chest, Tea Cettle & sund 2.25 

Book accounts 1 52.64 

$266.39 
Josiah Moore Joseph Allen 



IN MEMORIAM 

When sorrowing o'er some stone I bend, 

Which covers all that was a friend. 

And from her hand, her voice, her smile. 

Divides me — for a little while. 

Then Saviour seest the tears I shed — 

For Thou didst weep o'er Lazarus dead. 
Died on Thursday the 17th inst, Miss Ann French, youngest daughter of 
Samuel French, Esq., of Gloucester County, New Jersey. The sudden and 
premature death of this amiable young Lady has caused an universal gloom 
to pervade the minds of her relations and friends. With a mind highly 
cultivated, a taste refined, a judgment sound, a heart filled with benevo- 
lence and charity, and manners the most bland and insinuating, she could 
not fail to attract the attention and gain the esteem of those with whom 
she associated. To love and revere Miss French, it was only necessary to 
be acquainted with her. As a child she was affectionate and obedient, as 
a friend, frank and sincere. Although in the midst of youth and lovli- 
ness, with prospects flattering, she did not shrink at the approach of the 
King of terrors, but with a firm and unshaken confidence in the promise 
of her Saviour, she looked for immortality and bliss beyond the grave. 
The chasm occasioned in society by her death will not soon be filled — 
Lamented Maid thou art gone I — Our longing eyes will n'er behold thy 
lovely form again ! — Thy spotless soul has urged its way to Heaven — Bright 
cherubims welcome thy arrival on the shores of deliverance and felicity. 
Thy friends will long cherish the remembrance of thy many virtues and 
strive to make them their own. 




CHATELAINE HOOK 

BELONGING TO 
ANN H. FRENCH 



A tribute to the memory of Ann Heulings French [361] ; from a newspaper of 1812. 



396 GENEALOGY OF THE 

MULLICA HILL MEETING AND SCHOOL 

In the latter part of the seventeenth century one Eric Molica, an adven- 
turous Swede, belonging to one of the early colonies on the Delaware, 
ascended the winding stream which has become historic as Raccoon creek. 
He took up a large tract of land and founded a prosperous settlement, after- 
ward known as Mullica Hill. He had eight children and lived to round out 
almost a century. Indians were numerous and their name for the creek was 
Naraticon, or Raccoon, on account of great numbers of that lively animal 
in the dense forests which lined its banks. The soil was wonderfully fertile, 
as it is today after two hundred years' cultivation. Many curious Swedish 
traditions have long prevailed. Greenwich was the first township organized 
by the Gloucester County Court, in 1694. Friends early came to the 
vicinity and prospered greatly. They were separated from regular meet- 
ing places and asked permission to assemble otherwise. The first society 
in Mullica Hill appears to have been organized in 1797, meetings being held 
in the school house. This was continued until 1804 when the present large 
and substantial brick meeting house was built, at a most desirable location, 
on a high piece of ground, on the south side of the creek. 

As education was always in the minds of Friends, this community was 
no exception. The history of Mullica Hill School may be traced back 
through a period of one hundred and eighty-seven years, embracing five dif- 
ferent buildings. The first of these was built of cedar logs, with oiled paper 
for window lights. It served from about 1720 until 1756, when a frame 
house was built. In 1790 a larger and more comfortable building was 
erected, the result of awakened public interest. Samuel French [141] 
was one of the principal subscribers to the building fund, his younger chil- 
dren and some of his grandchildren attending the school for many years. 
This building was heated by an immense stove, the first luxury of the 
kind known in that part of the country. In 1824 building number four was 
erected, largely out of the materials of the old school house. In 1855 a two- 
story school house was built, and this, with all needful conveniences, has been 
used ever since. Charles French, son of Samuel French, was one of the 
trustees in charge of this property, including the meeting house and graveyard, 
from 1801 until 1833. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 397 




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SUBSCRIPTIONS TO FRIENDS* SCHOOL, MULLICA HILL, 1789 



398 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



MICKLETON (UPPER GREENWICH) MEETING 

Friends living between Mullica Hill and Woodbury, about 1740, built a 
small frame meeting house on a lot of ground granted for that purpose by 
Solomon Lippincott. The meeting was a branch of Haddonfield Monthly 
Meeting until 1785, when it was united with Woodbury meeting. In 1798 
a large and commodious brick meeting house was built, which has been in 
use ever since. This is located one and a half miles east of the former one, 
the old lot being held for a burying ground. In 1808 a large brick school 
house was erected, the school being under the special care of the meeting 
and becoming a noted educational institution. The meeting at Mickleton was 
first known as Lippincott's and later as Upper Greenwich. This meeting 
Avas the place of worship of Samuel French and family for many years, 
prior to the setting up of a meeting in Mullica Hill, in 1797. 




DESK BELONGING TO SAMUEL FRENCH [141] 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



399 



PLAN OF 
FRENCH'S ESTATE 
GRFNWICH TQWNSHl? 
GlOUCESTtR COUWTY 




FRENCH FARMS IN GLOUCESTER COUNTY, N. J. 

From an old map prepared by Samuel French [141] about 1790. The farm allotted 
to Jacob French was located near that of his brother Joseph. 



400 GENEALOGY OF THE 



WILL OF JACOB HEULINGS, JR., 1758 

In the Name of God Amen, I Jacob Heulings of Evesham in the County 
of Burlington and Provience of West New Jersey Being Sick and Weak of 
Body but of Sound and perfect Disposing mind and memory blefsed be 
almighty God for the Same and Calling to mind the Mortality of my Body 
and that it is appointed for all men Once to Dye DO make and Ordain 
this my Last will and Testament in manner and iform ifollowing VIZ My 
mind and will is that all my Just Debts and ffuneral Charges be Duly paid 
and Discharged by my Executors hereafter named as Soon as Conveniently 
Can be after my Decease; IMPRIMIS I Give my Son Jacob Heulings all 
that my Land and Plantation Whereon I now Dwell to Hold to him my 
said Son Jacob Heulings and to his heirs and Aisigns iforever He paying 
thereout to his three Sisters Theodosia, Sarah, and Agnes Heulings the 
Sum of Six Hundred Pounds in manner ffollowing That is to Say to my 
Daughter Theodosia Heulings the sum of Two hundred pounds in One 
year after my said Son arrives at the Age of Twenty One Years To my 
Daughter Sarah Heulings the Like sum of Two hundred pounds in two 
years after my Said Son arrives at the age aforesaid AND to My Daughter 
Agnes Heulings the Like Sum of Two Hundred pounds in three years after 
my said Son arrives at the Age af*^ AND my mind and Will is that if 
Either of my Said Daughters Should Dye before she arrives at the age 
and Time ffixed for their Receiving their respective Legacies to be paid 
in manner aforesaid that then her Legacy So Dying Shall be Equally 
Divided between the other two Surviving Daughters, I ALSO Give to my 
said Son Jacob Heulings my part and Share of a Certain Cedar Swamp 
Lying on ae Brook called Kettle Runn To Hold to him his Heirs and 
Assigns fforever Item I Give and Devise to my Loving wife Agnes 
Heulings all the use of my Land and Plantation So Given and Bequeathed 
as aforesaid until my Said Son Jacob Heulings arrives at the Age of 
Twenty Years PROVIDED that She Continue my widdow So Long and 
Commit no Wast thereon To Enable her to bring up my Children and to 
Give them Good Education BUT if it Should So happen that my said wife 
Should Marry Again before my Said Son arrives at The Age aforesaid 
THEN my will is that my Other Executors Shall Have the Care of 
Leasing my Place Educating and Bringing up my Children and Other 
Affairs of my Estate AND that they Let my wife have the Liberty of 
Living on the said Plantation after her Marriage on Such Terms as my 
Other Executors Shall See most Convenient for the benefit of My Children 
ITEM I do Give to my aforesaid wife all the remainder of my Estate 
be it what it will or where it will AND Do Nominate Constitute and 
Appoint my said Wife Agnes Heulings and my Brother-in-Law Micajah 
Wills and my Own Brother William Heulings Executors of this my Last 
will-Testament and Do ffrustrate and Make void all fformer Wills by me 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 401 

made and Declare this and no Other to be my Last Will and Testament 
IN TESTIMONY whereof I the said Jacob Heulings have hereunto Set 
my Hand and Affixed my Seal this thirty ffirst day of March ANNO 
DOM; One thousand Seven hundred and Fifty Eight 1758 




a^dT'^ 




Signed Sealed published pronounced and Declared by the within named 
Jacob Heulings as and for his Last will and Testament in the Presence of 
us with the words / then / ae Brook Called / ffirst interlined 

Hannah Z. Thorn 

Her X mark 
Abraham Heulings 
Elizabeth Buckman 

By the Honble. John Reading Esq., President of His Majesty's Council 
and Commander in Chief in and over his Majefty's Province of New Jerfey 
and Territories thereon depending in America, &c. 

To all to whom thefe Presents fhall come or may concern. Greeting. 

Know ye, That at Burlington on the Day of the Date hereof, before 
Samuel Peart Surrogate, being thereunto delegated and appointed, the lal't 
Will and Teftament of Jacob Heulings late of the County of Burlington, 
Deceafed (a Copy whereof is hereunto annexed) was proved; and is 
approved and allowed of by me. The laid Deceafed having while he lived, 
and at the Time of his Death, Goods, Chattels and Credits within this 
Province, by Means whereof the Proving the faid Will, and the granting 
Adminiftration, of all and fingular the faid Goods, Chattels and Credits, 
and alfo the auditing, allowing, and finally difcharging the Account thereof, 
doth belong unto me. And the Adminiftration of all and fingular the 
Goods, Chattels and Credits of the faid Deceafed, and any Way concern- 
ing his Will, was granted unto Agnefs Heulings, Micajah Wills and 
William Heulings Executors in the faid Will named, being firft duly 
affirmed well and faithfully to Adminifter the fame, and to make and 
exhibit a true and perfect Inventory of all and fingular the faid Goods, 
Chattels and Credits, and alfo to render a juft and true Account of their 
Adminiftration, when thereunto lawfully required. 

IN TESTIMONY whereof, I have caufed the Prerogative Seal of the 
Province of New-Jerfey to be hereunto affixed, this Thirtieth Day of May 
in the Year of Our Lord One Thoufand Seven Hundred and fifty eight. 

Charles Read Reg. 



26 



402 GENEALOGY OF THE 



INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF JACOB HEULINGS, JR., 1758 

A true and perfect Inventory of the Goods and Chatties, rights and 
Credits of Jacob Tleulings Late of Evesham in the County of Burlington 
and provence of New Jerfey yeoman Deceafed as was appraifed this 24th. 
of april Annoi Dom, 1758 

£ s. d. £ s. d. 

to his Purfe and apparrel 18 2 9 

to .Silver Watch 8 26 2 9 



to horfe Bridle and Saddle 16 

to two pare of three year old Steers 11 10 

to a 2 year old Colt 11 

to 7 Milch Cows 21 

to 4 young cattle 6 10 

to 3 Calves 1 15 

to a Bay mare 15 

to 2 Draugted Crosbars, 2 Plows and 2 Pair Gears 15 18 98 13 



to an Ax 5 

to Bay Mare Bigg with fold 6 

to Green Corn Rye in Lower field ] 

to " " " in upper " j 

to 6 acres of wheat 2 

to 11 Sheep and 8 Lambs 6 

to 21 Hoggs in the wood Pafter 10 31 5 



to Rye and flax in the Barn and Mill 3 

Goods in the Room 

to set of high Draws and Glafs 4 

to Bed and furniture 7 

to walnut table 1 

to a tea Table 1 

to a pine Chef t 

to Striped Druget 4 yds 

to 15 yrds. of worped 3 

to table Linnen 1 




10 










5 



















5 









12 



















5 





18 


17 






174 


17 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 403 

thee Room continued £ s. d. £ s. d. 

to and Irons 5 

to warming pan IS 

to Saddle Baggs 3 

to Corner Cupboard and Sundrys therein 2 10 

to 2 Spinning wheels and Reel 15 

to Great Wheel 10 

to Yz Doz. Chares and Arm Chare 10 

to Yi Doz. tea Spoons and tongs 1 12 

to Sundrys on the mantle-Shelf 7 6 

to Conductor Generalis 5 

to old Books 5 

to Sundrys as Lancets knives and other things... 5 6 12 6 

to Goods in the houfse 

to Pewter and knives and forks 3 

to Bed and furniture 9 

to Sundrys pots kettle and sundry Small artecles. 3 5 15 5 

In the Chamber 

to a Box Iron and 2 heaters 5 

to 6 Dear Skinns 2 15 

to flock Bed 2 

to Negro man Named Tip and Bed 40 

to tubs and flower 5 ' 

to 8 lb. yern 12 

to an old Sadie 5 46 2 



In the Aft Chamber 

to a feather Bed, 2 pillows Sheet and Blanket.... 1 15 

to a Bagg of feathers 2 

to Wool Baskets Cards and feathers and Sundrys 10 

to 4 Bush, wheat 10 4 15 



In the Cellar 

to 3 hogsheds and 2 

to Yx barrel of 

to one Barrel of Cyder 

to Sundrys of tubs and Pails &c 1 

to a tub of Lard 60 lbs 1 3 10 

75 4~b 



15 





10 





5 


















404 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



out of Doors £ s. 

to Horse Gears 5 

to Sundrys of tubbs 10 

to powdering tubb 5 

to Bacon in the Smoak houfe 8 

to a waggon 6 

to 3 Shoats 15 

to Indian Corn in the Cribb 2 

to 4 yokes and Chains and Sundry Utensils of 

husbandry 3 10 

to a hive of Bees 5 

to Two Deer and Bells 1 



d. £ s. d. 








21 5 








1 5 



14 10 

75 4 

193 17 

£283 1 1 



to a Boar 10 



Jofhua Ballinger 
James Cattell 

E & O Excepted 



Appraisers 




WALNUT TABLE WITH FALLING LEAVES, SARAH (HEULINGS) FRENCH 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



405 



AGNES SHARP PENQUITE 

John Penquite, who came from Parish Kayne, Cornwall, England, in 1683, 
was the third white settler in what is now Wrightstown township, Bucks Co., 
Pa. He was an enterprising and prosperous farmer and active and zealous 
Friend. Meetings were held at his house for over twenty years, until the 
building of the first meeting house, in 1721. The present meeting house, a 
picture of which is herewith given, was built in 1787. In 1690 John Pen- 
quite married, at Shrewsbury, N. J., Agnes Sharp, who came from England 
in 1686, and who became a highly respected minister among Friends, devoting 
over 70 years to useful work in the religious field. She died in 1758. John 
Penquite died 1719. 

" A Teftomony from Wrights Town Monthly-Meeting in Bucks county 
Pennfylvania, concerning our ancient friend and Sifter Agnes Penquite, who 
departed this life, the 20th day of the eleventh month 1758, being upwards 
of one hundred years old. 

" She brought a certificate with her from Europe, dated the 6th day of the Second month 
1686. She was of an innocent pious life and converfation, a good example in attending 
meetings both on firft and week-days, until a few years before her death. She was a 
minifter above Seventy years ; her teftimony, tho' generally Short, was moltly to Satsifac- 
tion and edification ; and in her declining age, when nature Seemed almoft Spent, She 
appeared more divinely favoured than common, to the admiration of Some. When She 
could no longer attend meetings, She would often, at meal times, appear in prayer, with 
praifes to the Lord, to the comfort and Satisfaction of thofe prefent ; and frequently 
Signified, ' She had the evidence of divine peace.' Not long before her departure She 
Said, ' That her Sweet Lord had not forfaken her, but was Still with her to comfort and 
refrefh her in her old age.' Thus She was removed from time to eternity, like a Shock 
of corn fully ripe." 




WRIGHTSTOWN MEETING HOUSE, 1787 



406 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



142— ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42). 

b. February 18th, 1750, in Waterford Township, 

Gloucester Co., N. J. 
d. 5th mo. 25th, 1812. 
m. First, 10th mo., 1768, James Wills, son of 

Micajah and Rebecca (Heulings) Wills, 
m. Second, 4th mo. 11th, 1787, Moses Wills, son 
of Daniel and Elizabeth (Woolston) Wills. 
He b. 11th mo. 15th, 1737. 
d. 1st mo. 30th, 1807. 



362— LETTICE WILLS 



b. Uth mo. 5th, 1771. 
m. 8th mo. 25th, 1795, William Rowand. 



363— ANN WILLS 



b. March, 1775. 

m. First, 4th mo. 8th, 1795, Evan Clement, 

M.D. 
m. Second, 1799, John Blackwood, M.D. 



364— REBECCA WILLS 



b. 1780. 
m. 5th mo. ISth, 1799, Samuel Woolman. 



365— ELIZABETH WILLS 
366— CHARLES WILLS 



m. October 23rd, 1800, Thomas Wood. 

b. 1787. 

d. 9th mo. 9th, 1806. 



367— MOSES WILLS, JR. 



b. 12th mo. 17th, 1792. 
m. 12th mo. 17th, 1818, Rebecca Wright Black. 



Moses Wills married, first, March 31st, 1764, Margaret Wills; she died 3rd mo. 7th, 
1782. They had the following children: 



Elizabeth Wills 



b. 12th mo. 29th, 1764. 
d. 8th mo. 28th, 1790. 

m. 5th mo. 4th, 1785, Joseph Burr, son of 
Robert Burr, of Ruland, Pa. 



Mary Wills 



b. 3rd mo. 17th, 1766. 
m. 3rd mo. 11th, 1789, John Haines, son of 

Ephraim Haines, of Chester Township, 

Burlington Co., N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



407 



Hope Wills 
Hannah Wills 



b. 7th mo. 15th, 1768. 

b. 6th mo. 20th, 1770. 
m. 12th mo. 14th, 1809, John Lancaster. 



Abel Wills 



b. 8th mo. 15th, 1772. 
d. 11th mo. 13th, 1774. 



Ruth Wills 



b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1775. 
d. 3rd mo. 1st, 1781. 



Rachel Wills 



b. 6th mo. 24th, 1777. 

m. 4th mo. 7th, 1803, David Mickle, son of 
William Mickle, of Greenwich, N. J. 



Aaron Wills 



b. 11th mo. 29th, 1779. 
d. 2nd mo. 20th, 1781. 



By will dated December 13, 1779, proved December 21, 1780, Elizabeth Wills made the 
following bequests to her great-grandchildren, daughters of her granddaughter Margaret 
Wills, wife of Moses Wills : Elizabeth £5 and six silver tea-spoons ; Mary £5, two pewter 
dishes, six plates and two porringers ; Hope, £5 and chest of drawers ; Hannah £5 and 
pair of sheets ; Ruth £5, six napkins and a table-cloth ; Rachel £5, a pair of silver buttons 
and warming pan. The money was to be paid to their father, Moses Wills, and kept at 
interest until children became of age. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 8th of ye 9th mo. 1768. 
James Wills son of Micajah Wills & Elizabeth French daughter of Charles 
French appeared & Declared their Intentions of marriage with each other. 
Therefore Joshua Lippincott and Jacob Evans are appointed to make ye 
needful Enquiery Concerning & report to next meeting, parents being pres- 
ent consented. 



At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 6th of ye 10th Mo. 1768. 
James Wills & Elizabeth French appeared & signified ye continuation of 
their Intentions of marriage with Each other ye friends appointed to make 
Enquiery reporting nothing to obstruct their proceeding, therefore they are 
at Liberty to Consumate their said Intentions according to good order, & 
Joshua, & Enoch Roberts are appointed to be present & see that good order 
be kept & report to next meeting. 



408 GENEALOGY OF THE 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham ye 10th of ye 11th Mo. 1768. 
The Friends appointed to attend ye marriage of James Wills & Elizabeth 
French reported that it was orderly accomplished. 

Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

8 — 9 mo. 1768. Jas. Wills and Elizabeth French appeared and declared 
their intentions of marriage with each other. Esther and Rebecca Roberts 
to make needful enquiry concerning her. 

6" of 10" mo. 1768. Jas. Wills and Elizabeth French appeared and sig- 
nified the continuation of their intention of marriage with each other, and 
inquiry having been made they are left at liberty to proceed in marriage. 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF ELIZABETH (FRENCH) WILLS, 1812 

Elizabeth Wills of Northamton Burlington Co., N. J., widow 

Proved June, 27—1812. 
Children Lettice Rowand, wife of W"' Rowand interest of $120 her life 
and at her death to her female children in equal shares 
Ann, wife of Doc"" John Blackwood use of $120. her life and at 

her death divided equally among all her children 
Rebecca, wife of Samuel Woolman use of $120. her life, then 

divided equally among all her children 
Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Wood, interest of $120. her life, then 
to be equally divided among her 3 children, viz Richard, Charles 
and Ann Wood 
Marcy Burr daughter of Joseph Burr $20. 
Moses Mickle son of David Mickle $30. when 21 
Sarah " sister of Moses, to have above'^'' $30 when 18, if 
her brother dies before day of payment. 
Granddaughters Martha Woolman ^ a Bed, Bolster and pillows 

Ann Wood f with one coverlid to each 

Son Moses Wills the remainder of my money wether in Cash Bonds Bills 
or otherwise, also all sheets, pillow cases, best Bed Bed-stead 
6 of my best blankets, 2 Coverleds, best bed-quilt Table Cloths 
Napkins &.c marked with the letters M & W, my Walnut Dining 
Table, Mahogany Breakfast Table, Cherry tree ftand, my brase 
and Irons all my Books, &c. 
Rest of household goods between my 4 Daughters ; Lettice to have 
my six silver Table Spoons in her share for life, then to her 
Daughter Elizabeth Rowand 

Executor — Son Moses Wills /7 a ' vi#2ir.r 

Witnesses — Sam' Black ' - -— . . .-. 



Nathan W. Black 

W" Black ^^^ ^ ' ' "^^^ 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



409 



A true and perfect Inventory of all and Singular the Goods chattels 
monies and effects Elizabeth Wills of the Township of Mansfield in the 
County of Burlington New Jersey, dec'' taken at her late dwelling the S'" 
day of June 1812. 

Cash and Wearing Apparrel 67.172 

Obligations to the amount of 1717.92 

Household Goods Kitchen furniture &c 339.423 

$2124.52 



Appraised the day and year above written by 



Affirmed to 7"' day of July, 1812 
before Abrm. Brown Surrg 



Joseph Wills 
George Haines 



Joseph Wills one of the apprs. 
Moses Wills Executor. 




nr 



PARLOR CHAIR, I 760 



410 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



143— CHARLES FRENCH 3RD (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42). 

b. October 25th, 1753, in Waterford Township, 

Gloucester Co., N. J. 
d. April 6th, 1834 (Sunday morning), buried 

in Trinity P. E. Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 
m. May 29th, 1783, Sabilla Stokes, daughter of 

Joseph and Atlantic (Bispham) Stokes; 

Rev. Robert Blackwell performing ceremony; 

Christ Church record, Philadelphia. 
She b. December 6th, 1757. 

d. November 4th, 1845, buried in Trinity P. E. 

Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J- 



368— ANN FRENCH 



b. August 14th, 1784. 

m. 6th mo. 20th, 1811, Joshua M. Hollings- 
head, M.D. 



369— JOSEPH FRENCH 



370— HOPE FRENCH 



371— ATLANTIC FRENCH 



372— ELIZABETH FRENCH 



b. 
m. 

b. 
d. 

b. 
m. 

b. 
d. 
m. 





He b. 
d, 


373— SABILLA FRENCH 


b. 
d 


374— SARAH FRENCH 


b. 
d 


375— CHARLES FRENCH 


b. 
d, 



September 2nd, 1786. 

December 9th, 1813, Mary Stokes. 

February 22nd, 1789. 
August 29th, 1805. 

September 21st, 1791. 

March 19th, 1812, Gilbert Page. , 

April 15th, 1794. 
April 20th, 1854. 

October 21st, 1841, John Gill, son of John 
and Annie (Smith) Gill; Rev. A. B. Pat- 
terson of Trinity P. E. Church, Moores- 
town, N. J., performing ceremony. 
7th mo. 9th, 1795. 
4th mo. 12th, 1884. 

June 21st, 1796. 
September 10th, 1880. 

December 4th, 1799. 
October 2nd, 1854. 

October 26th, 1801. 
August 29th, 1802. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 411 



Atlantic Bispham, born March 22nd, 1737, was the daughter of Joshua and Mary 
(Lawrence) Bispham, who were married in Bickerstaff, England, 1729, and sailed from 
London for America, December 13th, 1736, in the ship "Mary and Hannah," Henry 
Lavage, Captain. Owing to the fact of her being born on this voyage, she was named 
Atlantic by the captain of the vessel, who, tradition states, gave her a silk dress, in 
further honor of the event. The ship arrived at Philadelphia April 26th, 1737, after a 
trip of five months. Atlantic Bispham married, in 1757, Joseph Stokes, for many years 
an honored and useful citizen of Moorestown, N. J. 



CHARLES FRENCH, 3RD 

Upon coming into possession of the homestead, near Fellowship, in 1784, 
Charles French, 3rd, son of Charles French, Jr. [42], continued in opera- 
tion the old colonial grist mill on the home plantation, the site of which 
can still be traced, on the bank of the Pensaukin Creek, and in 1816 pur- 
chased another property of the same kind, with a saw mill and 37 
acres of land, in the same neighborhood, for $10,000. In 1800 he pur- 
chased three acres, a valuable site, near the center of Moorestown, and 
in 1818 bought 33 acres additional. Hither he removed, about 1820, having 
built one of the finest brick mansions of the time, in which he resided 
until his death. His widow, under a life tenancy, occupied the place until 
her death, and, in 1845, it was sold, later becoming the property of the 
Society of Friends, under whose direction it is used as a delightful retreat 
and boarding-home for aged Friends. 

While living in Moorestown, Charles French became a partner with 
William Roberts in a large woolen mill industry, at Mt. Holly. He 
acted as executor and adviser in the settlement of many estates and also 
performed several responsible trusts as assignee. His business activities 
continued until the close of a long and honored life. Old-time residents 
of Moorestown and vicinity remember him as one of the most useful citizens 
of that community. The work of his executors revealed the fact that he 
had quadrupled, in value, the estate with which he began, half a century 
before, being possessed of over 1,000 acres of land in Burlington and Glou- 
cester Counties, with farm houses, two grist mills and the mansion house 
in Moorestown and a large amount of personal property. The mansion 
was sold for $10,000; the farm homestead for $13,700 and other prop- 
erties at advanced prices. 



412 GENEALOGY OF THE 

The old French farm home, near Fellowship, has a most interesting 
history. As elsewhere stated, it was bought by Charles, Jr., in 1747, who 
soon after went there to live. In 1785 Charles, 3rd, shortly after his 
marriage, built a large brick addition to the old house, the initials of his 
own name and those of his wife appearing on the end, as shown in one 
of the accompanying illustrations. This house is a splendid old-time ex- 
hibit, solid and enduring, with brick-paved and enclosed apartments in the 
great cellar for ample storage purposes. The masonry is a marvel of expert 
work. The long slanting roof of the older part, running to within a few 
feet of the ground, is moss-covered, while the great oaken doors and im- 
mense fire-place, wuth brick-enclosed boiler annex for pig-killing time uses, 
tell the story of farm life one hundred and fifty years ago. The original 
dwelling was probably built about 1730. Here some of the children of 
Charles French, Jr., were born and reared and all the children of Charles, 
3rd. Here were the joyous scenes of marriage festivities and family re- 
unions and other events covering a period of nearly seventy-five years. 

Five sisters of Charles, 3rd, went forth, with glad anticipation, to their 
new homes. Two of his brothers brought brides, to receive the parental 
benediction, and he, likewise, came from Christ Church, Philadelphia, with 
Sabilla (Stokes) to spend nearly forty years together in the old home- 
stead. In the old chimney corners sat Charles and Ann, at eventide, as 
the years came on apace. Here their life stories ended, happily not far 
apart, joining the one child who left them at the dawn of womanhood. 
A little later, the years passing swiftly, three of the second generation that 
grew up under the family roof-tree, went forth, with chosen partners, each 
followed by the prayers and blessings of Charles and Sabilla. Three 
daughters tarried to comfort and care for them when the shadows lengthened. 
Hither, at various times of special interest, came troops of cousins and 
other relatives, young and old, from neighboring and, for those days, dis- 
tant communities. In the great " living room " there were feasts and 
merry-makings, while fascinating stories of colonial and revolutionary times 
were told after candle light. The last survivor of those happy occasions 
is Mary (French) Burrough [725], great granddaughter of Charles and 
Ann, who recently observed her 82nd birthday. The touching memories 
of this old homestead would fill many pages in themselves. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 413 



MEETING RECORDS 

Charles [143] and Sabilla (Stokes) French 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y** 4'" of y'= P' Mo. 1781. 
Friends from y^ Preparative Meeting of Chester reported that Charles 
French Jun"". hath been treated with for paying Military Fines in lieu of 
Personal Service. — and the Neglect of attending Meetings, therefore John 
Hunt and William Matlack are appointed to treat further with him and 
report to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y"* 8'" of y'' 3'* mo. 1781. 
The Friends appointed reported that they have had an opportunity with 
Charles French Jun''. who did not appear convinced of the Inconsistency 
of his Conduct in paying his Military Fine and the Neglect of attending 
Meetings : Therefore this Meeting disowns him according to our Discipline 
and John Hunt & John Roberts are appointed to give him a copy of the 
Minute & acquaint him of his Priviledge of an Appeal & report to next 
Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y" 5'" of y" 4'" mo. 1781. 
The Friends appointed to give Charles French Jr. a Copy of this Meeting's 
Minute against him, having not Comply'd therewith they are continued to 
the service. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 10'" of 5'" Mo. 1781— 
The Friends Appointed reported that they have given Charles French Jun"". 
a copy of the Disownment against him according to appointment. 

[Women's Meeting] 

6" — 2 Mo. 1783. Friends from the Preparative Meeting at Chester report 
that Sabillah French (formerly Stokes) has been visited for going out in 
her marriage ; after a time of deliberation thereon, this meeting appoints 
Hannah French, Elizabeth Grinsdale and Martha Dudlej' to visit her, and 
report their sense respecting her to next meeting. 

5" — 3d mo. 1784. The Friends appointed to visit Sabillah French report 
that they have had an opportunity with her, and that she appeared in some 
degree of tendernefs, but did not desire Friends forebearance ; after a time 
of deliberate consideration the meeting to refer her case to the care of the 
Mens-meeting. 



414 GENEALOGY OF THE 

[Men's Meeting] 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 5'" of 3'''^ Mo. 1784. 
The Women friends inform that they have treated with Sabilla French 
(formerly Stokes) for outgoing in marriage and consummating the same 
before an hireling Minister that she appeared tender but did not incline to 
make the necessary satisfaction therefor ; which being considered Jonas 
Cattell and Jno. Roberts are appointed to inform her that the Meeting has 
come to a Judgement to disown her, prepare a Minute accordingly & pro- 
duce it to next Meeting. 

9«h 4th jj^p 1784 The Friends appointed reported that they have deliv- 
ered the INIeetings Message to Sabilla French (late Stokes) and now pro- 
duced an Essay of a Minute disowning her which being read is approved 
and the Cl'k signed the same ; John Hunt and Sam'l Allinson are appointed 
to visit, give her a Copy and acquaint her with her right of appeal. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham y^ 7'" of y" 5"" Mo. 1784. 
One of the Friends appointed to give Sabilla French a copy of the disown- 
ment against her reported that they have not comply'd therewith for the 
above reason, (occasioned by reason of the other friends being indisposed). 
They are also continued to the service. 

At a Monthly-meeting held at Evesham the 11'" of the 6'" M". 1784 
The friends appointed reported that they have given Sabilla French a Copy 
of the Disownment against her according to appointment and she said she 
should not appeal. 

WILL OF CHARLES FRENCH [143], 1833 

Let this be recorded, that I Charles French of Moorestown in the Town- 
ship of Chester, County of Burlington & State of New Jersey ; being of 
sound mind & disposing memory ; Blefsed be the Most High for all his 
mercies extended to me ; but knowing the uncertainty of time here : Do 
make & ordain this my last Will & Testament, in manner & form follow- 
ing, viz. 

Imprimis. I direct my herein after named executors, to pay all my just 
debts & funeral expences out of my personal estate as early after my decease 
as convenient. 

Item. I give & devise unto my dear & well beloved wife Sabilla French, 
all that part of the plantation & tract of land whereon I dwell situate 
in Moorestown aforesaid now in my occupancy, together with all & sin- 
gular, the buildings & improvements of what kind or nature soever, thereon 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 415 

erected & made, for & during her natural life. I do further give & bequeath 
to m}' beloved wife aforesaid all my household goods & kitchen furniture, 
together with so much of the farming utensils, & stock as she may choose, 
including the Carriage, two of the best horses & harnefs : — Also the sum 
of four hundred dollars, payable quarterly out of the interests & rents of 
my estate. — Provided she accept the above in lieu of her full right of 
Dower. 

Item. It is my will that my four daughters, namely Ann Hollinshead, 
Elizabeth French, Sabilla French & Sarah French should have homes & 
live with their mother as they heretofore have done in my life time ; also 
after her death, during the space of one year, to enjoy all the privileges 
of said premises, household goods stock &c, thereon, including the Car- 
riage, horses & harnefs, by allowing a reasonable compensation therefor. 
And provided they or any of them agree to take the premises, as a part of 
their share of my estate ; they & my executors shall nominate men to value 
it accordingly — in which case I give & devise the same, with all & singular 
of its appurtenances, to such of them my said daughters so agreeing, & 
their heirs & afsigns, forever. 

Item. It is my Will & I hereby authorize and impower my executors 
to make sales, at such times & in such manner as may appear to them best, 
of all my real estate whatsoever & wheresoever situated in the State of 
New- Jersey, with all & singular of their appurtenances, for the best prices 
they can obtain for the same, & that they make & execute good & sufficient 
titles therefor ; — excepting neverthelefs, a limit of the time on the premises 
whereon I now dwell ; — the sales of which if not taken at valuation by my 
daughters as aforesaid, to be suspended till the expiration of the privileges 
herein before reserved. 

Item. I give & devise to my daughter Atlantic Page, my house & lot, 
in second street between Tammany & Green St. Philadelphia (3** door 
below Green) to her my said daughter & to her heirs; — which premises 
& their appurtenances, I value at six thousand dollars & to be considered 
as so much of her dividend of my estate. 

Item. I give & devise to my two Grand-children Sabilla & Mary Ann 
French, my house & lot in Seventh Street, between Green & Coats St. Phila- 
delphia, equally, share & share alike, to them & their heirs — which prem- 
ises & their appurtenances, I value at two thousand five hundred dollars, 
to be considered as part of their share of my estate 

Item. I give & bequeath to each of my daughters, Elizabeth French, 
Sabilla French, & Sarah French as much of my personal eifects, as each of 
their sisters Ann Hollinshead & Atlantic Page received at her outfit. 

Item. I give & bequeath to my daughter Ann Hollinshead; — to the chil- 
dren & the legal representatives of the deceased (if any) of my son Joseph 
French, (viz.) Sabilla, Mary Ann, Deborah, Elizabeth & Sarah French; — to 
my daughters Atlantic Page, Elizabeth French, Sabilla French & Sarah 



416 GENEALOGY OF THE 

French, all the residue & remainder of the proceeds & valuations of my 
estate, in equal division, share & share alike (my herein named Grand 
children to take one share) which bequest I do give to my said children 
«S:c. their heirs & assigns for their benefit & advantage forever. — Excepting 
out of the share to my aforementioned grand-children the sum of two 
thousand five hundred dollars, and on the account of Sabilla & Mary Ann 
French, — and out of the share to my daughter Atlantic Page the sum of 
six thousand dollars as aforesaid, & all the above recited shares subject to 
the annuity of my wife. 

Item. I appoint my daughter Elizabeth French & my nephew Joseph 
Stokes, to have the charge of that share of my estate which may fall to 
my son Joseph French's children ; to be kept at interest in Bank Stock or 
otherwise ; — the income of which so far as necefsary, to be expended in their 
education, & as they respectively attain the age of twenty one years, the 
full share to be paid over to them ; but in case of intermarriage, previous 
thereto, one half to be paid & no more & the remaining half at the age 
aforesaid ; allowing the valuation of my house & lot in Seventh St. taken 
out of the share of my estate set off, for the children of my son Joseph 
dec** from & out of the shares of Sabilla and Mary Ann French, to whom 
it is given. 

Lastly. — I nominate, constitute & appoint my daughter Elizabeth French 
executrix, my Brother-in-law Joseph Matlack & my nephew Hugh F. Hol- 
linshead. Executors of this my Testament & last Will. — 

In witnefs whereof, I have hereunto set my hand & seal this ninth — day 
of the fourth month (April) in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred & 
thirty three, 1833. 



"7^^^^^ c>4^.z^ ll 



fign'd, seal'd, publish'd & declar'd by the said Charles French to be his 
testament & last will, in the presence of us — 

Henry Warrington 
Joseph Hooton 
William Hooton 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 417 

State of New Jersey 

Burlington County fs ; William Hooton one of the Witnefses to the fore- 
going Will alledging himself to be conscientiously scrupulous of taking 
an oath and being duly Affirmed according to Law on his solemn Affirma- 
tion did declare and say that he saw Charles French the Testator therein 
named sign and seal the same, and heard him publish pronounce and declare 
the foregoing Writing to be his last Will and Testament and that at the 
doing thereof the said Testator was of sound and disposing mind and 
memory, as far as this Affirmant knows and as he verily believes ; — and 
that Henry Warrington and Joseph Hooton the other subscribing Evidences 
were present at the same time, and signed their names as Witnefses to the 
said Will, together with this Affirmant, in the presence of the said Testator. — 



Affirmed at Mount Holly the 23" 
day of May A D — 1834 — before me- 
Charles Kinsey 
Surrogate. 



William Hooton 



State of New Jersey 

Burlington County f s ; Elizabeth P'rench Executrix and Joseph Matlack 
and Hugh F. Hollinshead Executors in the within Testament named sever- 
ally alledging themselves to be conscientiously scrupulous of taking an oath 
and being duly Affirmed according to Law on their solemn Affirmations sev- 
erally did declare and say that the Within Instrument contains the true 
last Will and Testament of Charles French the Testator therein named so 
far as they know and as they verily believe, that they will well and truly 
perform the same by paying first the debts of the said deceased and then 
the Legacies in the said Testament Specified, so far as the goods chattels 
and credits of the said deceased can thereunto extend ; and that they will 
make and exhibit into the prerogative office at Trenton a true and perfect 
Inventory of all and Singular the goods, chattels and credits of the said 
deceased, that have or shall come to their knowledge or pofsefsion, or to 
the pofsefsion of any other person or persons for their use, and render 
a just and true account, when thereunto lawfully required. — 



Affirmed at Mount Holly the 23'' 
day of May A D — 1834 before me 
Charles Kinsey 
Surrogate 



Elizabeth French 
Tose])h Matlack 
Hugh F. HoUingshead. 



27 



418 GENEALOGY OF THE 



INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF CHARLES FRENCH, 1834 

A true and perfect Inventory of all and Singular the goods and chatties 
rights and credits moneys and effects of Charles French late of the Town- 
ship of Chester County of Burlington Deceased made by us whose names 
are hereunto Subscribed this twenty second day of the fifth Month Anno 
Domini 1834 — 

Silver watch & wearing ajiparel 60.00 

Cash on hand silver 186.56 ^ 

gold 50 ll843.56 

Bank notes 1607 

J 

household goods & kitchen furniture 1010.50 

Ceder bords plank Joice &c 94.00 

waggons plows and other farming utinseals 297.50 

horses horned cattle hogs &c 342.25 

light waggons gig and Sundry harnefs 135.00 

rye oats and corn 185.50 

old iron & chains &c 6.50 

Sundrys on the farm at Charles Becks 41.50 

bonds and notes drawing interest together with bank .Stock &c. . . . 12623.67 

Stock on the farm on the ferry road 27.00 

$16666.98 
Appraised by us whose names are hereunto 
Subscribed the day and year above written 

Jo^ Hugg 

William Hooton. 

.State of New Jersey, 

Burlington County SS. William Hooton one of the Appraisers of the 
above Inventory alledging himself to be conscientiously scrupulous of 
taking an oath and being duly affirmed, according to Law, did declare and 
say, that the goods, chattels and credits in the above Inventory set down 
and specified, were by him appraised according to their just and true 
respective rates and values after the best of his judgment and understanding 
and that Jo^ Hugg, the other appraiser, whose name is thereto subscribed 
was present at the same time, and consented in all things to the doing 
thereof, and that they appraised all things that were brought to their view 
for appraisement 

Affirmed the 23'' day of May ) ,tt.,,. 

. ^ ,„,, , , ' ^ \ Wilham Hooton 

A D. 1834, before me j 

Charles Kinsey 

Surrogate. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



419 



State of New Jersey 

Burlington County, SS. Elizabeth French Executrix and Joseph Matlack 
and Hugh F. Hollinshead Executors of the last Will and Testament of 
Charles French in the within Inventory named, deceased, severally alledging 
themselves to be conscientiously scrupulous of taking an oath, and being 
severally duly affirmed according to law, did severally declare and say, that the 
within writing contains a true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the 
goods, chattels and credits of the said deceased, as far as have come to their 
knowledge or pofsefsion, or to the pofsefsion of any other person or persons 
for their use. — 



Affirmed, the 23^ day 
of May A D. 1834 be- 
fore me 

Charles Kinsey 
Surrogate 




JOHN GILL 

John Gill, the fourth of the name in this country, was the great grand- 
son of the pioneer who came to Haddonfield, N. J., or the wilderness site 
thereof, in 1 706, as the business agent of Elizabeth Haddon, afterwards 
Elizabeth Estaugh. He was born on the homestead plantation, still re- 
maining in the family and now known as " Gillford." He followed farm- 
ing, being also a devotee of healthful rural sports, until the death of his 
father, in 1839, when he removed to Haddonfield. Shortly after, having 
married Elizabeth French, of Moorestown, he built the present mansion, 
the third on the same site, on the old King's Highway, or Main Street. 
The shrubbery of this notable place is more than one hundred years old 
and the twenty acres of beautiful lawn adjoining have not been ploughed 
for fully one hundred and twenty-five years. This ground was part of 
the historic Indian field, or cleared space occupied by the natives when 
the white man first came to that section. 



420 GENEALOGY OF THE 



During his lifetime John Gill took an active interest in public affairs, 
serving as an efficient legislator. In 1842 he was elected president of the 
State Bank, Camden, reelected when it became a national bank, in 1865, 
and held this responsible post for over forty years, or until his death, in 
1884. Under his wise, yet liberal, management this bank became one of 
the leading financial institutions of the state. He was always the sympa- 
thetic friend of the small borrower, especially the farmer of limited means, 
who needed assistance until his crops could be made available. Mr. Gill 
also took an active interest in public affairs. During the session of 1832 
he represented Gloucester County in the lower house of the legislature, 
and in 1848 was chosen Senator from Camden County. He had lively 
personal recollections of the last Indians in New Jersey, in his boyhood 
days, and while a legislator cheerfully voted for the generous appropriation 
in behalf of the remnant of former tribes, whose ancient fishing and hunt- 
ing rights in that state were thus redeemed, at their earnest request. 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF ELIZABETH (FRENCH) GILL, 1853 

Dated Haddonfield Dec 8, 1853 Proved Camden May 27, 1854 

One fifth of Estate to Sister, Sabilla French 
" " " " " " Sarah French 

" " " " " be divided between four nieces, daughters of 
brother Joseph, namely, Sabilla S. Mary Anne, Deborah H and Elizabeth 
French. 

Income of one fifth part of Estate to Sister Atlantic Page, wife of Gilbert 
Page, during his and her life. Should she survive her husband, she then 
to receive said full share of estate. 

One fifth part of estate to be divided between nephews Charles F. 
Hollingshead and H. H. Hollingshead. 

Wearing apparel to sisters, silverware to nieces and grand nieces, stating, 
as feme covert (i. e., not having absolute right of disposal) " nothing 
doubting that my said husband (John Gill) will gladly and faithfully carry 
into effect my wishes thereunto." 

" My beloved husband John Gill to have and take all my furniture as 
it now stands ; also fifteen silver desert spoons and six large spoons and 
the income of my stock in the Commercial Bank and the residue of my 
maiden property not herein before devised. But in case of my said hus- 
band's marriage, I give the above named silver to my three nieces, Sabilla 
S., Mary Ann and Deborah H. French; also my Commercial Bank Stock. 
And in case of (his) marriage or death, my husbands two daughters. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



421 



Rebecca M. Willits and Anna S. Gill, to have and take my dinner and 
tea sets, Anna to have her choice. And after the decease of my husband, I 
give all the residue of my furniture, and all other of my maiden property 
which I wish my said husband to have during his natural life, at his decease, 
to my abov^ named legatees, with bank stock, bonds & notes." 
John Gill, Executor. 

INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF ELIZABETH F. GILL, 1854 

A true and perfect inventory of and singular the goods and chattels 
rights and credits of Elizabeth F. Gill, late of Haddonfield in the county 
of Camden and State of New Jersey, deceased, made by John Gill, Executor, 
and Samuel Nicholson and John K. Roberts, two disinterested freeholders, 
this twenty fourth day of May, A. D. 1854. 

Purse and Apparel $ 493.00 

Household Goods 1,295.87 

34 shares stock in Western Bank 2,312.00 

24 shares stock in Farmers & Mechanics Bank 1,680.00 

18 shares stock in Commercial Bank 1,080.00 

Bonds and Notes esteemed good 7,199.85 

$14,060.72 

Samuel Nicholson ] 

X , T^ x^ 1 I appraisers 

John K. Roberts j ' ^ 

John Gill, Executor. 

Affirmed May 27, 1854 Mark Ware, Surrogate. 




SOFA BELONGING TO CHARLES FRENCH, 3rD, [143] 



422 GENEALOGY OF THE 

NEW JERSEY IN THE WAR OF 1812 

For many years prior to the second conflict with England the people of the United 
States suffered vastly more from injustice, insolent disregard of their rights and down- 
right persecution, than ever the colonies endured. American commerce had almost 
been destroyed. Nearly a thousand vessels had been unlawfully seized and a multitude 
of seamen impressed into the British service. The situation was exasperating; still, 
recognizing its apparent helplessness, especially on the sea, the nation was averse to 
war. It was earnestly hoped that the wrongs committed would cease. Sectional and 
commercial agitation resulted in serious division of public sentiment. When, June 18th, 
1812, the lower house of Congress declared war, this was most impressively shown. 

Out of 128 members present and voting, 79 supported the resolution and 49 opposed 
it. A change of 16 votes would have defeated the war measures, since almost universally 
regarded by statesmen and historians as a grave and lamentable mistake, full of 
peril. The votes of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania 
and Delaware, showed 27 for war and 34 against ; 4 out of 6 from New Jersey being 
recorded for peace. The Philadelphia " Gazette," the leading Federalist paper of the 
country, printed a fourteen column article signed by many influential citizens, bitterly 
denouncing the war, while its news columns were filled with reports of public indigna- 
tion meetings held in almost every state. In New England town bells were tolled, 
shops closed and business suspended. Three governors refused to heed the call of the 
Federal government for militia. Volunteer enlistments were slow, only about one tenth 
the number asked for promptly responding. Two widely different elements comprised 
a large and influential peace party, one actuated by humanitarian principles, in which 
Friends were conspicuous ; the other manufacturers, merchants and shipping men, 
apprehensive of disastrous losses. 

On the 4th of July, 1812, a convention of the friends of peace in New Jersey, com- 
posed of leading and influential citizens from every part of the state, assembled at 
Trenton. Charles French, 3rd [143], headed the delegation from Gloucester county and 
Edward French [121] was a representative from Burlington county, and, later, he was 
a member of the district Congressional Convention at Salem. The Trenton convention 
issued a patriotic, wise and most impressive address, declaring for the maintenance of 
honorable peace and urging negotiation to that end. It was suggested that delegates 
should be elected to a convention to meet at the same place August 11th, to nominate 
Presidential Electors and candidates for Congress ; it was also urged that peace party 
candidates for the legislature and county offices should be selected in the counties. 
The nominating convention met at Trenton, August 11th, and adjourned until Septem- 
ber 15th. Thirteen counties were represented by twenty-five delegates, nominations were 
made for Electors and Congressmen, and another stirring address issued and widely 
circulated. 

On the opposite page is given in facsimile, copy of a hand bill of those exciting days 
advertising the movement in Gloucester county, in which Franklin Davenport, Charles 
French, 3rd, Samuel Clement, Isaac Kay, John Gill and many other prominent citizens 
were actively interested. The influence of Friends in this worthy effort to promote 
peace and the public welfare was everywhere recognized. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 423 

WOODBURY, 

NEW JERSEY. 

PURSUANT 10 Public Notice given, a numerous meeting of tlie PEOPLE of the 
County of Gloucester, .Friends of Peace and the blessings lo be derived from a 
Governnienl administeitd on the principles and according to the example of the illus. 
trious WASHINGTON, met at the Court-House, the 1st of August, 1812, for the 
purpose of selecting suitable persons, who. at this tiuly alarming situation of our com- 
moD xoiiotrv, will make us« of all constitlitional means to obtain a repeal of the act 
of Congress declaring W'rtr, promote a se'alement of ::H differences uit[i Oreat*Rritain» 
u|)on honorable ternts, and by these means shield us from all the horrors of national, 
distresses, and the more dreaded miseries of civil dissension and saciifices^/'rGnjt7(«. 
Davenpori, acted as Chairman, and IVm. Watson, Secielaiy. 

After some impressive observations, made on the occasion by J. B. Caldwell, James 
Sloan, R. L Armstrong. Dr, Hopkins, and others, the Meeting proceeded to the .ip- 
poiiitment of a Committee from the several Townships of the County, to report a 
TICKET for the above important service, and for Sheriff and Coroners, lobe voted 
for at the ensuing Election — when the f<jllowing persons were agreed upon: 

U'airrford, Charles French^jgvi Ellis, Joseph C. Swett. 

Newlan, James Hurly, J«i«i^^oberls, William E. Hopkins. 

Gloiiceater Township, Samuel Clement, Job Eldridgc, Samuel B. Lippincott. 

Gloucester Toun, Isaac Kay, Isaac l)(3»den, Isaac Browning. 

Depijord, Edmund Brewer, J. L. Howell, J. B. Caldwell. 

Greemiich, Jacob Lippincott, Samue' P. /'aul. Edmund Welherl^y, 

Woohvich, John Gill, Joseph Chatham, John Benson. 

Weymouth, ^ 

C Eggharbaur, > Peter Steelman. Benjamin Scull, Daniel Carrell, Wm, Watsoa 

Galloway, ) 

The Committee, after a short space of time, reported the following Ticket tor the 
consideration of the meeting : 

Coimn/— JAMES HOPKINS. 

Assembly— li A. \C PINE, JOS. C. SWETT. DANIEL CARRELL. 
SAfriJ— JOSEPH V. CLARK. 
vCorowr.— JOS. M. BISPHAM, JOS. JAMES, JOHN ESTELL 

Whereupon it was unanimously resolved. That this meeting do fully approve of 
the above Ticket, that they will support the same by every constitutional mean in 
ihrir power, and they do recommend to those people of the county of-Gloucesler dis- 
■posed to think and act with them at this trying crisis of our public calamities, to ap- 
point committees in their several townships, lo aid in the great and good work. 

The Committee also report, that should any thing occur, by which the above per- 
eons, or either of them, cannot be voted for at the ensuing election, the following per- 
sons be put on nomination to supply any deficiency: Oolincil, M. C. Fiiher — Assem- 
bly, Charles French, J. B. Caldwell, Wm. Watson — Sheriff, John Baxter— CoroDer»r 
Daniel Baker, Wm. Cooper, James Bi>,";:n. 

The meeting proceeded to the appointment of " two delegates, to meet other dele*. 
gates, on Tuesday the 1 1th of August, inst. at 2 o'clock, P. M. at Trenton, for the ptl»' 
pose of agreeing on fit persons to be nominated as Electors of President and \' ice-yreii. 
dent of the United Slates, and as Members of Congress for this slate — whereupon 
Franklin Davenport and James B. Caldwell were chosen — and In case of their atuence, 
Joshua L. Howell, Joseph V. Clark or Matthew Gill.jun. be requested to supply their 
or either of their places. 

Ordered that 300 copies of the foregoing proceedings bt printed in handbills, for 
the use of the county, and that the same be published in the newspapers of this and 
our neigbouring stales, favourable to the peace, happiness and protection of the Amer- 
ican people. 

I'UANKLIN UAFEA-fOJi f, Chairman. 

Wm Watson, Secrelaiy 



424 GENEALOGY OF THE 

144— ELEANOR FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42). 

b. March 19th, 1756, in \\'aterford Township, 

Gloucester Co., N. J. 
d. 7th mo., 1850. 

m. First, 11th mo. 23rd, 1775, Hugh Hollings- 
head, son of Hugh Hollingshead. 
He d. 1786. 

m. Second, Joseph Matlack. 

376— AGNES HOLLINGSHEAD b. 8th mo. 6th, 1776. 

m. William Page, M.D. 

377— ANN HOLLINGSHEAD b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1779. 

m. April 4th, 17%, Isaac Wilkins [339]. 

378— ABIGAIL HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 6th mo. 28th, 1781. 

m. November 31st, 1802, William Stockton, 
son of William and Mary Stockton. 

379— HOPE HOLLINGSHEAD b. 11th mo. 29th, 1783. 

m. 4th mo. 23rd, 1807, D. Bassett. 

380— HUGH FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 6th mo. 18th, 1786. 
m. Martha Mickle. 

381— CHARLES FRENCH MATLACK, M.D. 

m. Sarah Ann Maule. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham y" 5'" of y"" 10'" mo. 1775. 
Hugh Hollingshead son of Hugh Hollingshead Dec'd & Ellioner French 
daughter of Charles French appeared & Declared their intentions of mar- 
riage with Each other Therefore Joshua Roberts and John Lippincott are 
appointed to make y* usual Enquiery & report to next meeting, parents 
being present consented. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 425 



At a monthl}- meeting held at Evesham y'' Q"' of y"^ 11'" mo. 1775. 
Hugh Hollinshead & EUioner French appeared & signified the continuation 
of their intentions of marriage with Each other the Friends appointed to 
made Enquiery reporting nothing to obstruct their proceeding Therefore they 
are at Liberty to Consumate their said Intentions according to good order 
& Joshua & Enoch Roberts are appointed to be present & see that good 
order be kept & report to next meeting. 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham ye 7th of ye 12th mo. 1775. 
The Friends appointed to attend ye marriage of Hugh HoUingshead & 
Elioner French reported that it was orderly accomplished. 

Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

5 — 10 mo. 1775. Hugh HoUingshead and Elioner French appeared and 
declared their intentions of marriage with each other. Therefore Rebeckah 
Roberts and Esther Hunt are appointed to make y"^ necessary enquiry 
concerning her. 

9 — 11 mo. 1775. Hugh HoUingshead and EUioner French appeared and 
signified ye continuation of their intentions of marriage with each other, 
and having ye return of enquirers clear therefore they are at liberty to 
consumate their said intentions according to good order. 

7 — 12 mo. 1775. The friends appointed to attend ye marriage of Hugh 
HoUingshead and Elioner French reported that it was orderly accomplished. 

Hugh HoUingshead died intestate in 1786, and his estate was administered by his 
wife and Jacob HoUingshead. Inventory of personal estate taken April 6, 1786, showed 
a valuation of £623 4s. 7d. The following interesting list of articles is quoted from 
the inventor}' : 

A Silver Watch & Buckles 

A " Ferry " Flat 

A Dusk, a case of Drawers 

A Cloc in the Parler 

Sundry articles in Parler Bowfat (buffet) 

1 dozen Silver Spoons 

Chaney in Bowfat 

time of bound boy Jeremiah Durell 

time of ditto John Wills 



Tho Hollinshead ^ 

Mofes Wills \ •^Pl^'"*- 



SIGNATURE OF ADMINISTRATRI.X 



426 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



145— HOPE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42). 

b. November 5th, 1763, in Waterford Township, 

Gloucester Co., N. J. 
d. 8th mo. 19th, 1834. 
m. 1st mo., 1780, William Black, 3rd, son of 

William and Mary (Gibbs) Black. 
He b. 2nd mo. 20th, 1759. 
d. 10th mo. 7th, 1839. 



382— ANN BLACK 



b. 8th mo. 12th, 1780. 
m. 6th mo. 12th, 1816, John Bishop. 



383— CHARLES FRENCH BLACK 

b. 1st mo. 20th, 1783. 
d. 4th mo. 9th, 1787. 



384— SAMUEL BLACK 



b. 10th mo. 22nd, 1786. 

m. 10th mo. 17th, 1816, Charlotte Biddle. 



385— NATHAN WRIGHT BLACK 

b. 10th mo. 21st, 1790. 
m. 1st mo. 31st, 1828, Sarah Ellis. 

386— REBECCA WRIGHT BLACK 

b. 8th mo. 23rd, 1792. 

m. 12th mo. 17th. 1818, Moses Wills, Jr. 



387— WILLIAM BLACK, 4TH 



b. 4th mo. 12th, 1795. 
m. First, 4th mo. 12th, 1820, Ann Taylor 

Newbold. 
m. Second, Mary (Newbold) Adams. 



388— CHARLES BLACK 



b. 3rd mo. 8th, 1799. 
m. Mary Vail. 



389— GEORGE BLACK 



b. 1st mo. 15th, 1802. 
m. 9th mo. 22nd, 1838, Hannah M. Atkinson. 



390— MARY BLACK 



b. 8th mo. 18th, 1805. 
d. 7th mo. 26th, 1812. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 427 

ANCESTRY OF WILLIAM BLACK, 3RD 

Prominent among the early settlers of West Jersey were William Black 
and wife Alice (Taylor), who came from England in the Flie-boat " Martha." 
which sailed from Hull late in the smnmer of 1677. He had signed the 
"Concessions and Agreements" in 1676, and upon settling at Burlington, 
took up a large quantity of land in Mansfield, Springfield and Chesterfield 
townships, much of which still remains in possession of members of the 
family. He was a zealous Friend, highly esteemed and respected, and held 
several offices of trust under colonial govermiient. He died in 1702, leaving 
wife, Alice, four sons, Thomas, W^illiam, John, Samuel, and daughter, Mary. 
Alice (Taylor) Black died 1709. 

John Black, son of William and Alice (Taylor) Black, m. 10th mo. 4th, 
1706, Sarah Rockhill : Chesterfield Mo. Meeting records. He died in Spring- 
field township in 1 744, intestate, leaving a considerable amount of property, 
and his estate was administered by Thomas Black of same place. 

William Black, son of John and Sarah (Rockhill) Black, m. 1740, Christine 
Page, and had children, Ezra, b. 1740 ; Achsah, b. 1742 ; Ann, b. 1743 ; John, 
b. 1745; Edward, b. 1746; Joseph, b. 1748. In August, 1754, William m. 
second, Mary Gibbs, daughter of Isaac and Mary (Shreve) Gibbs. Their 
children were Ann, b. 1755; Mary, b. 1757; William, b. 1759. William 
Black died Jany., 1760; and by will dated Dec. 31, 1759, proved Jany. 30, 
1760, bequeathed to his son Edward 100 acres of land in Chesterfield, Bur- 
lington Co. ; to Ezra, the home plantation in Chesterfield, with instructions 
to care for his grandmother; to John and William, lands and plantation in 
Mansfield, Burlington Co., to be equally divided between them when they 
arrived at the age of 21 ; to daughter Achsah, £200, one-half when 18, other 
half when 21 ; to daughter Ann, £100, to be paid by son Ezra, one-half when 
she was 18, other half when 21 ; to wife Mary, £200, etc., to bring up younger 
children. Mary (Gibbs) Black married, second, Samuel Burroughs, and 
died in 1807, at the age of 81. 

The descendants of William Black the pioneer have been men of strong 
character, who have made deep impressions upon the annals of their time. 
In the "Pennsylvania Chronicle" Jan., 1768, an interesting article appeared 
from a correspondent in Mansfield, Burlington Co., from which we quote: 

An early settler in this neighbourhood, acquired a large estate — he had 
five farms or plantations, and as many sons; and for each son, he intended 
one of the places, and his mind in that respect was well known in his 



428 GENEALOGY OF THE 

family; he however neglected to get his will reduced into writing, and 
died without one, so that as the English laws, in regard to descents, take 
place in this province, the whole landed estate, became the property of 
the eldest son. This he knew, but tho' he had then a family of children of 
his own, he, without hesitation or delay, ordered deeds to be drawn, and 
cheerfully executed them ; to convey to each brother the plantation designed 
for him by their common father. The name of this just man was William 
Black, and as he has been deceased several years, its hoped that the men- 
tioning of it, can give no offence to any body, nay, rather may it not be 
called a tribute due to such virtue, and the more necessary as his private 
way of living prevented him from being much known, and his religious 
profession from directing an}' marble monument to be erected to his memory. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham ye 9'" of ye 12'" Mo. 1779— 
William Black son of William Black Dec'd. & Hope French Daughter of 
Charles French appeared & Declared their Intentions of Marriage with 
Each other y^ Young Man residing within y*' Compass of Haddonfield 
Monthly Meeting was acquainted that a Certificate from thence would be 
expected at their next appearance. Parents being present consented. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 6"" of y'' 1" M"- 1780 
William Black & Hope French appeared and signified the continuation of 
their Intentions of Marriage with each other & he produced a Certificate 
from the Monthly Meeting at Haddonfield to the satisfaction of this, 
therefore they are at liberty to consumate their said Intentions according to 
good order & John Hunt & John Roberts are appointed to be present & 
see that good order be kept & report to next Meeting 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 10'" of the 2"^ Mo. 1780. 
The friends appointed to attend the Marriage of William Black & Hope 
French reported that it was orderly' accomplished as usual. 

Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends: 

9" — 12 mo. 1779. William Black and Hope French appeared and 
declared their intentions of marriage with each other. Parents present 
consenting. 

6" — 1 mo. 1780. Wm. Black and Hope French appeared y® second time 
and signified their intentions of marriage, and he produced a certificate 
from Haddonfield monthly meeting to y" satisfaction of this and having 
return of imiuirers clear they are left at liberty to consumate their said 
intentions. 

10" — 2 mo. 1780. The Friends appointed to attend y* marriage of Wm. 
Black and Hope French report it was orderly accomplished. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 429 



SUMMARY OF WILL OF \VILLL\M BLACK, 3RD, 1S34 

William Black — Mansfield Township, Burlington Co. N. J. 

" being favoured with sound mind and memory- " 
Date 11 Mo. (Xov) IS"" 1S34. Proved Oct 7—1839. 

Children Sam' Black 3 Lots of Meadow Land — as follows. 

N° 1 purchased of Sam' Vaughn & wife by deed dated 7 Mo. 
2* 1803 recorded in Book N. 501 &c at M* Holly. 
N" 2 purchased of John L. Hancock & wife July 18—1818 
recorded in Book H^ 338 &c in Clerks office Mt. Holly. 
3** bought of Ex''^ of Jacob Keelor dec'd recorded in Clerk's 
Office in Mt. Holly. All described in deeds. — 
Nathan Wright Black $5000. in addition to what I have advanced 

him heretofore 
William Black Jr. $3000, above what he has had heretofore. 
Charles Black — 3 lots purchased of Marj^ Stevens deed dated Sept 
27—1834 recorded Book B' 423 at Mt. Holly, also 4 other lots 
which I purchased — 

Lot 1. of Joshua S. Earl Esq*" at Sheriff's Sale he being then 
Sheriff of Burlington Co. by deed dated March 30—1825 
Lot 2. purchased of Jonathan Scattergood & wife — July 5, 
1833— Book H' 216 at Mt. Holly. 

Lot 3 — purchased of Benj Shreve & wife April 11 — 1791 
Lot 4 (wood lot) purchased of Sam' Fenimore 
George Black — House & lot I purchased of Dr. John Brognard, 

in the village of Columbus, & buildings thereon, also $1500. 
Ann Bishop wife of John Bishop $2000. 
Rebecca Wills $3000. & my eight day clock. 
Housekeeper — Mary Craft $40. 
Grand-daughters Mary Black 

Charlotte Black 
Abigail Ann Black 
Emeline " 

Rebecca " 

Elizabeth " 

arj is p ^ jaughters of John Bishop $100 each 
Rebecca ) 

Mary T. Black dau. of son W" Black Jr $100 
Grandson W" Black, son of Nathan W. Black $100. 



Children of son Samuel Black 
$100 each when 18 



430 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Executors 



vfCC^^^^^C^ 



Sons ' 




Son-in-law 



»^^,^/fe^ 



Witnesses Israel Nixon 

Aaron B. Rainier 
Chas. Mickle 



INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF WILLIAM BLACK, 1839 

A true and perfect Inventory of all and Singular the goods, chattels, 
rights and credits of William Black, late of the township of Mansfield in 
the county of Burlington and State of New Jersey, deceased made the 16'" 
day of October, 1839. 

Purse Dolls. 4.80 

Wills & Black's Note of hand & Interest 484. 

Thomas Starkey's do " do 68.85 

John Emley's do " do 57.90 

Dearbon waggon & harnfs 30. 

House hold good's & kitchen furniture 181. 



Amount Dolls. 826.55 

Thomas Starkey 
William E. Boulton 
Affirmed to Oct ''17—1839 



Appraised by us 




ANCIENT FAMILY PIECE 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 431 

147_CHARLES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Uriah, 43). 

m. 4th mo. 7th, 1773, Rebecca Taylor, daughter of 
Jacob and Abigail Taylor, of Chesterfield 
Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
d. 4th mo. 8th, 1809, in Philadelphia. 

391— ELIZABETH FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 15th, 1780. 

d. 9th mo. 15th, 1793. 

392— ANN FRENCH b. 1st mo. 15th, 1782. 

d. 10th mo. 15th, 1793. 

393— CHARLES CREIGHTON FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1784. 

m. 12th mo. 5th, 1809, Mercy (Gilpin) Chap- 
man. 

394_JAMES FRENCH b. 5th mo., 1787. 

d. 10th mo. 15th, 1793. 



CHARLES FRENCH 

Charles French [147] and Samuel Crawford were old-style Philadelphia 
grocery merchants, their place of business being at 43 North Water Street, 
on the south side of " Old Ferry Alley," which was the first alleyway below 
Arch Street, and adjoining the store of Elliston & Perot. They also oc- 
cupied the wharf, which was the second from Arch Street, next to the ferry 
slip. Their business was quite extensive, including large imports from the 
East Indies. For a time they had a branch store on Race Street, near 
Front. Charles French was thus engaged for over twenty-five years and 
having acquired a competency he retired, living near Third and Arch Streets. 
During the yellow fever epidemic of 1793 he lost three of his four children, 
two dying the same day. When the only surviving child and son, Charles 
Creighton French, attained his majority, in 1805, he engaged in the same 
line of business in which his father had been successful, locating his store at 
48 North Front Street. 

Charles French took into his employ, and into his home, a bright boy 
named Joseph Harrison, who later married the daughter of Mr. Craw- 



432 GENEALOGY OF THE 

ford. Their son, Joseph Harrison, Jr., made a large fortune by building 
railroads in Russia. His widow, who died in 1906, left a choice collec- 
tion of valuable paintings to the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held in our Meeting 
house in Fourth Street the 26"" day of the Second Month 1773. 

The Meeting was informed that Charles French who ferved his apprentice- 
ship with John Parish in this city, and has been an attender of our Meetings 
for worship, and is of a sober conduct, but not having brought a Certificate 
on his coming among us, has been in doubt respecting his right of member- 
ship on that account, and being about to enter into an Engagement of 
marriage with a young woman who is a member of Chesterfield Monthly 
Meeting, is desirous his case may be taken under consideration, and if the 
Meeting thinks proper, that he may have a Certificate to enable him to 
accomplish his intentions agreeably to the good order of our Discipline : 
John Pemberton and William Wilson are desired to take an opportunity 
of further conversing with him and to make such further Enquiry con- 
cerning him, as may appear necefsary and if no objection appears to pre- 
pare a Certificate suitable to the occasion, for the consideration of the 
Meeting next Month. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held in our Meeting 
house on Fourth Street the 26'" of Third Month 1773. 

Certificate prepared for Charles French to Chesterfield Monthly Meeting. 



Minutes of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

4*'' of S"* mo. 1773. Charles French and Rebecca Taylor laid their pro- 
posal of marriage the first time before this meeting, two friends are 
appointed to make enquiry of the young womans clearness of others & 
report. 

1" of 4" mo. 1773 Charles French and Rebecca Taylor appeared the 
second time, he declared they containued their intentions of marriage, and 
he producing a certificate from Philadelphia Monthly Meeting two friends 
are appointed to attend the marriage & make report. 

6" of 6" mo. 1773 The Friends appointed to attend the marriage of 
Chas. French and Rebecca Taylor report they saw nothing but what was 
orderly. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



433 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas Charles French of y* City of Philadelphia Son of Uriah French 
Late of Haddonfield in the County of Glofter Dec'd, And Rebeckah Taylor 
Daughter of Jacob Taylor of Chesterfield in y" County of Burlington 
Weftern devision of y* Province of New Jersey Haveing declared their 
Intentions of Marriage with Each other before Severial Monthly Meetings 
of y^ People call'd Quakers at Chesterfield aforesaid According to y® Good 
order used Amongst them Whose Proceedings there in — After a deliberate 
Consideration thereof and haveing Consent of parents and Relations con- 
cern* nothing appearing to obstruct were approved of By said Meeting. 

Now these are to Certify all whome it May Concern that for y* full accom- 
plishing their said Intentions, this Seventh day of y* fourth Month One 
Thoufand Seven hundred and Seventy Three The said Charles French and 
Rebeckah Taylor appeared in a Publick Meeting of the s* People and 
others, at there publick Meeting house in Bordentown, in the County of 
Burlington, afores"* And the said Charles French takeing the s* Rebeckah 
Taylor by the Hand, did in a Solemn Manner Openly Declare that he 
took her to be his Wife promising by Divine Afsistance to be unto her a 
faithfuU and Loveing Husband, untill death Seperates them. And then 
and there in the said Afsembly the Said Rebeckah Taylor did in Like 
Manner declare that She took the Said Charles French to be her Husband 
promising by Divine Afsistance to be unto him a faithful! and Loveing 
Wife Untill Death Should Seperate them. And moreover the Said Charles 
French & Rebeckah Taylor she according to y^ Custom of Marriage Afsume- 
ing the name of her Husband, as a further Confirmation Thereof, did then 
and there to these Presents set there hands And we whose names are heare 
Under Subscribed being prefent at the Solemnisation of y* s** Marriage & 
Subscription in Manner befores** as Witnefses thereunto have also to these 
prefents Set our hands the day and year above written 

Charles French 
Rebeckah French 



Joanna Brooks 
Bershaba Smith 
Isaac Wright 
Hope Kay 
Joseph Borden Jun"" 
W" Ivins 
Tho' Watson 
Jo' Duer 
Mary Wright 
Fretwell Wright 
Lydia Taylor 
Henry Budd 
James Laurie 



Achsah Quicksall 
Ann Curtis 
Mary Brown 
Elisabeth Watson 
Ann Brooks 
Elisabeth Taylor 
Jonathan Wright 
Ann Allison 
Mary Crighton 
Amos Taylor 
Ruth Allifon 
Ann Ivins 
Margret Corman 



Jacob Taylor 
Abigail Taylor 
Mary Crighton 
Samuel French 
Lewis Taylor 
Mary Thay 
Mary French 
Charles Taylor 
Mary Watson 
Rebeckah Potts 
Amy Watson 



2a 



434 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held in our Meeting 
house on Fourth Street the 26"' day of Seventh Month 1776. 

It is agreed to acquaint our next Monthly Meeting that Charles French 
has been treated with feveral Months since for afsociating to learn warlike 
exercises, and tho' he declined the practice for a Considerable time, and 
gave expectation that he would not again engage therein, j'et it appears 
he has not kept his resolution, — William Savery and David Bacon are 
appointed to administer such further admonition & advice as his deviation 
requires. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held the 27"" day of 
the 9'" Month— 1776. 

Charles French of this city. Bricklayer, who was educated and made pro- 
fession with us, hath in this time of outward Commotion so far deviated 
from our Christ" peaceable principles as to engage with others in learning 
the art of Wars, for w*^'' he had been treated with in brotherly love, but as 
he doth not appear convinced of our religious principles herein, we testify 
he hath disunited himself from fellowship w"* us, until he becomes con- 
vinced of his deviation & makes such acknowledgment as the nature of his 
case require, w''*' we desire he may be enabled to do through the afsistance 
of Divine Grace. 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF CHARLES FRENCH, 1804 

Charles French city of Phil" (Merchant) sick & weak in Body. 

Date— 11 Mo 3" 1804 Proved— April 12—1809. 

Wife — Rebekah in lieu of her Dower one full equal ^2 part of my monies. 
Goods, chattels, outstanding Debts Rights Credits & effects what- 
soever & wheresoever generally 1 full equall J/4 part of all & sin- 
gular my Estate Real & personal & mixed whatsoever & where- 
soever as her absolute property & for the proper use of her & her 
heirs & Assigns forever — 

Son — Charles C. French One full equal half part of my monies Goods 
Chattels outstanding debts, Rights Credits and Eft'ects whatsover 
and wheresoever generally. One like full equal half part of all 
my Estate Real, personal «S; mixed whatsoever & wheresoever to 
him his heirs & Assigns forever. If he die under age without 
issue my wife Rebekah French to enjoy that portion intended for 
Son Charles during her natural life. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 435 

Nieces — Marj- French ] 

Hope French j (daughters of my Bro : Samuel French) at death of 

my wife to receive % of what was to have been my Son Charles 

C. French's, to be equally divided, but if either die under age 

without issue, her share to go to survivor. 
Legatees John Taylor ) 

Charles French Taylor j Children of my wife's Bro : Enoch 

Taylor dec'd — Va of what was intended for my Son Charles C. 

French to be equally divided, & if either of them die under age 

& without issue, his share to go to survivor. 




Exrs — Wife — Rebekah French 

Son — Charles C. French 
Witnesses — 

Sam : Smith 

William Ashby 

P. Thomson 

INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF CHARLES FRENCH, 1809 

Inventory of an Appraisement of the Effects of the Estate of Charles 
French late of the City of PhiF Deceased — 

Cash in Bank of Penna 3928.04 

Cash lent Dunn & French 1600. 

Cash lent Jacob Clements 600. 

Interest due from Jacob Clements 98.39 

" due from Hannah Clements 50. 

Cash lent John Porter 20. 

Schuylkill Bridge Shares 37. 

Rachel Miller's Note of Hand ■ 90. 

Mathias Baili's " Do 37.56 

Bond & Judgment against Nathaniel Donald 451.18 

4000 p"" nankeens 3760. 

1 Case India Sewing Silk 610. 

Dunn & French's Note of hand 1000. 

Plate 200. 

Furniture 611. 

$13093.17 



I 



436 GENEALOGY OF THE 

148— SAMUEL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Uriah, 43). 

m. First, November 11th, 1775, Mary Wayne. 

m. Second, Elizabeth . 

He d. 1812. 

She d. 1813. 

395— MARY FRENCH 

396— HOPE FRENCH m. Webster. 

Samuel French, son of Uriah French [43], and later stepson of Hugh Creighton, was 
deeply imbued with the patriotic spirit of Revolutionary days. As a young man he 
enlisted in the Gloucester County militia, and it is evident that he saw active service. 
New Jersey State records show that on May 1st, 1784, he was awarded certificate No. 517 
for the depreciation of his pay as a Continental soldier during the war, amounting to 
£3. 3s. 9d. In " Votes and Proceedings of the General Assembly of the State of New 
Jersey, 1776-1780," is the note, "July 16, 1776, Cash paid Samuel French for a coffin 
for a Prifoner £1 10 0." Samuel French was a long time resident of Newton town- 
ship, Gloucester county, N. J. Dying intestate, in 1812, his estate was administered 
by his second wife, Elizabeth, the inventory of the personal estate showing a total of 
$285.00. Elizabeth French died about a year later, leaving an estate which amounted 
to $296.00. 



INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF SAMUEL FRENCH, 1812 

Inventory of goods and chattels rights and credits of Samuel French 
late of township of Newton. Made February 28, 1812 

Wearing Apparel 20 

Bed & Bedding in East Room up stairs 18 

Case of Drawers 10 

Bed Clothing 30 

Up Stairs and Trunk 2 

Bed & Bedding in Front Room up stairs 25 

One pine Chest do 2 

One Bed in West Room up stairs 10 

An unfinished desk 6 

Two small pieces of Worsted & Wool 6 

Carpenter Tools 5 

Lot of lumber 5 

One Mahogany Table in Parlor 12 

Walnut Breakfast Table 3 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 437 

Y2 Dozen Chairs 6 

Looking glass 6 

Andirons, shovel & tongs 5 

Tea tackling, queensware & pewter 12 

One ten plate stove in kitchen 16 

Kitchen furniture 16 

Spinning wheel 2 

Tubs & sundry articles in cellar 8 

Axes, hoes, forks and sundries 6 

Two Cows 36 

Four sheep 12 

Wood saw 1 

Cash 5.90 

$285.90 
Jacob Glover 



} 



( Apprs. 
James Hurley 

Elizabeth French Administratrix of Samuel French dec"*, being duly 
affirmed saith that the within writing contains a true and perfect Inventory 
of all and singular the goods Chatties and Credits of the said deceased 
as far as have come to her knowledge or pofsefsion or to the pofsefsion 
of any other person or persons for her use 



Aff"*. 9th day of March 

1812 Before me 

Jas. Matlach Surr. 



Uuyaii^^l^^r^fic/i, 



149— ELEAZER FENTON (Thomas, 1; John, 9; Rachel, 47). 

b. 1723. 

d. November 10th, 1789. 

m. November 7th, 1753, Elizabeth Atkinson, 
daughter of John and Hannah (Shinn) Atkin- 
son ; ceremony performed by Rev. Colin Camp- 
bell, Rector of St. Mary's P. E. Church, Bur- 
lington, N. J. 
She b. 2nd mo. 1st, 1731. 

397— SAMUEL FENTON b. 1755. 

d. February 27th, 1814. 



438 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



398— HANNAH FENTON 



b. March 30th, 1761. 
d. March 6th, 1805. 
m. November 6th, 1777, Jacob Shinn, Jr. 



399— ELEAZER FENTON, JR. b. June 8th, 1762. 

d. March 28th, 1816. 



m. November 11th, 1788, Elizabeth Clark, 
daughter of Thomas and Deborah ( Denny) 
Clark. 
She b. August 13th, 1769. 
d. February 23rd, 1824. 



153— THOMAS BUZBY, JR. (Thomas, 1 ; Mary, 11 ; Thomas Huzby, 50), 

b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1739. 
m. 1765, Tabitha Hugg. 
She b. 1st mo. 18th, 1745. 
d. 1st mo. 16th, 1784. 



400— JOHN BUZBY 



b. 8th mo. 24th, 1766. 



401— THOMAS BUZBY, 3RD b. 12th mo. 25th, 1768. 

d. 9th mo., 1816. 

m. 11th mo. 16th, 1788, Hannah Haines, 
widow of Ephraim Haines. 
She d. 1815. 



402— WILLIAM BUZBY 



b. 11th mo. 25th, 1773. 
d. 3rd mo. 8lh, 1798. 



403— ISAAC BUZBY 



b. 4th mo. 24th, 1775. 



404— BENJAMIN BUZBY 



b. 8th mo. 17th, 1778. 



405— HANNAH BUZBY 



b. 4th mo. 10th, 1781. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 439 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS BUZBY, 3RD 

Thomas and Hannah (Haines) Buzby [401] had sons, Thomas, Benjamin and Isaac, 
and daughter Hannah. Hannah Buzby, daughter of Thomas and Hannah (Haines) 
Buzby, married June 6th, 1799, Miles Foster; Edward French [121] Justice of the Peace, 
performing ceremony. Concerning this marriage, Burlington Monthly Meeting Minutes, 
4th mo. 7th, 1800, state " Hannah Foster, late Buzby, had her birthright amongst us, 
the People called Quakers, for want of attending to the dictates of Truth in her own 
mind, has deviated from the good order amongst us by accomplishing her marriage 
contrary thereto with one not in membership . . . for which conduct she has been 
treated with, but not being disposed to condemn the same, we disown the said Hannah 
Foster from being a member of our Religious Society until she manifests a desire by a 
suitable acknowledgment to be reconciled to Friends." 

Hannah Foster, daughter of Miles and Hannah (Buzby) Foster, married Joseph 
Banes. He died in Santa Lucia, Cuba, 1842. Josephine Banes, daughter of Joseph and 
Hannah (Foster) Banes, was born in Matanzas, Cuba; died July 31st, 1862, in Phila- 
delphia; married September 23rd, 1851, James Harwood Closson ; Rev. Charles Brown, 
Logan Square Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, performing ceremony. James Har- 
wood Closson, born September 23rd, 1826, son of John Closson [b. Oct. 14th, 1797] and 
wife Mary Libhart Loucks [b. Sept. 15th, 1799; d. Mar. 16th, 1879, in Phila.], was Cap- 
tain in the 91st Regiment of Penna. Vol. during the Civil War, and was killed in action 
at Hatchers Run, Va., November 22nd, 1864. James Harwood Closson, Jr., M.D., son 
of Capt. James Harwood and Josephine (Banes) Closson, born November 27th, 1861, 
married October 22, 1891, in Second Presbyterian Church, Germantown, Mary Eldredge 
Bell, daughter of Samuel Wilson Bell, president of the Farmers' & Mechanics' Bank 
of Philadelphia, and wife Mary E. Bancroft; Rev. C. H. P. Nason performing cere- 
mony. The children of James Harwood Closson, Jr., M.D., and wife Mary Eldredge 
Bell, are: Josephine Banes Closson, born September 12th, 1893; James Harwood Closson, 
3rd, born June 18th, 1896; Mary Bancroft Closson, born December 29th, 1898. 

James Harwood Closson, Jr., M.D., was educated in private and public schools of 
Philadelphia, Lafayette College, Easton, Pa., and Hahnemann Medical College, Phila- 
delphia, from which he graduated in 1886. He served for a year as resident physician 
at the Childrens Homeopathic Hospital, Philadelphia, and in 1887 entered into partner- 
ship with Dr. John Malin, a leading homeopathic physician of Germantown, Philadel- 
phia, who died two years later and to whose extensive practice Dr. Closson succeeded, 
at 53 West Chelton Ave., and where he has continued, becoming prominent in his pro- 
fession. He is a member and former president of the Philadelphia Homeopathic 
Society, Secretary of the Pennsylvania Homeopathic Society, member of the American 
Institute of Homeopathy, the Pennsylvania Historical Society, the Netherlands Society, 
Pennsylvania Genealogical Society, Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, Sons of the 
Revolution, New Jersey Society of Pennsylvania, the Union League and other organiza- 
tions. He is visiting physician at St. Luke's ' Hospital and much interested in the 
religious work of the Brotherhood of Andrew and Philip. On the paternal side Dr. 
Closson is a descendant of the first burgess and one of the original settlers of German- 
town, the author of the earliest protest against slavery, Abraham Op den Graeff. 



440 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



154— AMOS BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50). 

b. 7th mo. 20th, 1742. 

d. 6th mo. 10th, 1815. 

m. First, Patience Springer, 

i She d. 2nd mo. 18th, 1790. 

m. Second, Rebecca Matlack. 



406— MARY BUZBY 



407— JOSEPH BUZBY 



408— NICHOLAS BUZBY 



409— MARGARET BUZBY 



410— HUDSON BUZBY 



411— HANNAH BUZBY 



412— AMOS BUZBY, JR. 



413— DANIEL BUZBY 



b. 7th mo. 24th, 1769. 

m. 5th mo. 19th, 1792, at Ancocas, N. J., 
Robert Middleton, son of Amos and Eliza- 
beth Middleton, of Upper Freehold Town- 
ship, Monmouth Co., N. J. 

b. 1st mo. 14th, 1771. 
m. 4th mo. 16th, 1794, Beulah Woolman. 

b. 11th mo. 16th, 1773. 
m. 1798, Hannah Heaton. 

b. 10th mo. 26th, 1774. 
m. 11th mo. Sth, 1800, Samuel Hilliard, Jr. 

b. 2nd mo. 1st, 1777. 
m. 11th mo. 12th, 1800, Rachel Woolman. 

b. 1st mo. Sth, 1779. 

m. Uth mo. 13th, 1799, at Ancocas, N. J., 
Richard Heaton, son of John and Rachel 
Heaton of Willingborough Township, 
Burlington Co., N. J. 

b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1781. 
d. 9th mo. 6th, 1851. 

b. 2nd mo. 10th, 1783. 
d. 10th mo. 26th, 1785. 



Children of Amos and Rebecca (Matlack) Buzby. 
414_jOHN BUZBY 



41S_\VILL1AM BUZBY 



b. 11th mo. Sth, 1794. 

d. Sth mo. 12th, 1826. 

b. 9th mo. 22nd, 1796. 

d. 7th mo. Sth, 1822. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



441 



416— GEORGE BUZBY 

417— JOSEPH BUZBY 
418— ROBERT C. BUZBY 



b. 12th mo. 3rd. 1798. 
m. Esther . 



b. 12th mo. 14th, 1800. 
m. Elizabeth . 



156— WILLIAM BUZBY, JR. (Thomas, 1 ; Mary, 11 ; William Buzby, 53). 

b. 10th mo. 23rcl, 1751. 
d. 12th mo. 28th, 1814. 
m. 6th mo. 9th, 1773, Susannah Deacon. 
She b. 4th mo. 17th, 1749. 
d. 5th mo. 22nd, 1835. 



419— BEULAH BUZBY 
420— PHINEAS BUZBY 

421— WILLIAM BUZBY, 3RD 

422— JONATHAN BUZBY 
423— MARY W. BUZBY 



424— JOSEPH BUZBY 



425— ELIZABETH BUZBY 



426— MARTHA BUZBY 



427— ABEL BUZBY 



b. 1st mo. 16th, 1774. 

b. 10th mo. 3rd, 1775. 
d. 11th mo. 5th, 1776. 

b. 10th mo. 8th, 1777. 

m. 1st mo., 1804, Ann Lippincott. 

b. 11th mo. 16th, 1779. 

b. 10th mo. 28th, 1783. 

m. 5th mo. 13th, 1824, Jeremiah Bunting, son 
of William and Margaret Bunting, of 
Middletown Township, Bucks County, Pa. 

b. 8th mo. 8th, 1787. 
m. 1813, Mary Haines. 

b. 10th mo. 30th, 1789. 
m. 11th mo. 17th, 1808, John Gummere. 

b. 11th mo. 25th, 1792. 
m. Dubre Knight. 

b. 7th mo. 19th, 1795. 
m. 5th mo. 14th, 1834, Rachel W. Buzby 

[868], daughter of Nicholas and Hannah 

(Heaton) Buzby. 



442 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



157— ELIZABETH BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; William Buzby, 53). 

m. 5th mo. 13th, 1767, Samuel Haines, Jr., son of 
Samuel and Lydia (Stokes) Haines, of North- 
ampton Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 



428— WILLIAM HAINES 



429— MARY HAINES 



430— AARON HAINES 



431— ABEL HAINES 



432— JOSEPH HAINES 
433— ELIZABETH HAINES 
434— SAMUEL HAINES, 3RD 



b. 4th mo. 1 7th, 1768. 
m. Mary Eayre. 

b. 11th mo. 15th, 1770. 
m. 7th mo. 15th, 1789, Jacob Hollingshead. 

b. 3rd mo. 25th, 1773. 

m. October 29th, 1795, Martha Stokes [452], 
daughter of Jarves and Elizabeth (Rogers) 
Stokes. 

b. 9th mo. 30th, 1775. 

m. October 30th, 1800, Elizabeth Stokes [457], 
daughter of Jarves and Elizabeth (Rogers) 
Stokes. 

b. 4th mo. 1st, 1778. 
d. 1793. 

b. 7th mo. 15th, 17S0. 
d. unmarried. 

b. 12th mo. 13th, 1783. 
m. Susannah Chapman. 



Samuel Haines, Jr., married second, 10th mo. 15th, 1788, Mary Stevenson, daughter 
of Cornell Stevenson. Their children were : 



Lydia Haixes 
Robert Haixes 

Sarah Haines 

Ezra Haines 

Hannah Haines 



b. 7th mo. 31st, 1789. 

b. 1st mo. 2nd, 1791. 
m. Edith Rogers. 

b. 11th mo. 31st, 1792. 
d. 7th mo. 17th, 1795. 

b. 9th mo. 26th, 1795. 
m. First, Lucy Bishop, 
m. Second, Phoebe Pierce. 

b. 1798. 

m. Joseph R. Bishop. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



443 



165— MARY STOKES (Ihomas. 1 ; Rachel. 4; Mary Allen. 18; Hannah 

Stockdell, 72). 

b. 8th mo. 15th, 1745. 
d. 10th mo. 13th. 1829. 
m. Isaac Newton. 



435— JOHN NEWTON 



m. Rachel Sharp. 



436— SAMUEL NEWTON 



d. unmarried. 



437— MARY NEWTON 



438— HANNAH NEWTON 



m. Samuel Garwood, son of Israel Garwood. 
d. unmarried. 



166— JOHN STOKES, 3RD (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Mary Allen, 18; 

Hannah Stockdell, 72), 

b. 6th mo. 22 nd, 1747. 
m. Susannah Newton. 



439— WILLIAM STOKES 



m. Eleanor Long. 



440— MARY STOKES 



m. Thomas Lester. 



441— HANNAH STOKES 



m. Joshua Paul. 



442— ELIZABETH .STOKES m. David Roberts. 



443— RACHEL STOKES 



m. Timothy Smith. 



444_jOHN STOKES 



d. unmarried. 



445— SUSAN STOKES 



m. James Bryan. 



446— SAMUEL STOKES, M.D. m. Susan Meyers. 



447_STOCKDELL STOKES m. Eliza Eastburn. 



444 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



167— DAVID STOKES (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Mary Allen, 18; Hannah 

Stockdell, 72). 

b. 11th mo. 12th, 1751. 
d. 9th mo. 27th, 1830. 

m. 4th mo. 15th, 1784, Ann Lancaster, daughter 
of John and Elizabeth (Barlow) Lancaster, of 
Richland, Pa. 
She b. 1759. 

d. 9th mo. 25th, 1835. 



448— ISRAEL STOKES 



449— JOHN L. STOKES 



450— CHARLES STOKES 



451— DAVID STOKES 



b. 11th mo. 7th, 1785. 

m. Sarah Borton, daughter of Joshua and 
Elizabeth N. (Woolman) Borton. 

b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1788. 
d. 9th mo., 1822. 

m. Rachel Burr, daughter of Caleb and 
Martha Burr. 

b. 8th mo. 12th, 1791. 
d. 2nd mo. 27th, 1882. 

m. Tacy Jarrett, daughter of William and 
Ann (Lukens) Jarrett. 

b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1794. 

d. 1st mo. 22nd, 1817, unmarried. 



CHARLES STOKES [450] 

For more than half a century Charles Stokes, of Rancocas, was one of 
the best known and most useful citizens of Burlington county. A great-great- 
grandson of Thomas Stokes, the progenitor of the family in West Jersey, he 
inherited in marked degree the qualities of a vigorous ancestry. Farm life 
and school teaching occupied his early years, after which he pursued survey- 
ing, conveyancing and management of real estate as his calling, with the 
performance of responsible public duties. He was a member of the General 
Assembly in 1831 and of the Legislative Council in 1836-37. In 1836 he 
was appointed by Governor Vroom Master in Chancery, " as a token of long 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



445 



and appreciative friendship, which shall be as long as life." In 1844 he 
served efficiently as a member of the convention to revise the state con- 
stitution. He surveyed the Camden & Amboy railroad from the Rancocas 
River to Burlington. He also laid out Beverly, Delanco, Edgewater and 
other towns. He was long time surveyor of Willingborough township, mak- 
ing, from books of original surveys, the map of that section, showing pioneer 
locations, herewith reproduced. He was long noted for his zealous and 
consistent advocacy of the temperance cause. He was also firm in his devo- 
tion to peace principles and signed vigorous protests against the wars of 
1812, 1848 and 1860. As an earnest minded Friend he was known through- 
out the country, having sat in Philadelphia Yearly Meeting as a representa- 
tive from Burlington Quarterly, for sixty-five years, a record unequaled in 
the Society. He enjoyed remarkable health until within a short time of his 
death, in 1882, at the advanced age of 90 years. As the genealogical record 
shows, David Stokes [167], father of Charles Stokes [450], was a son of 
Hannah Stockdell, great granddaughter of Thomas ffrench, progenitor. 



168— JARVES STOKES (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Mary Allen, 18; Hannah 

Stockdell, 72). 

b. nth mo. 10th, 1753. 
d. 12th mo. 14th, 1804. 
m. November 27th, 1773, Elizabeth Rogers, 

daughter of William and Martha (Esturgans) 

Rogers. 



452— -MARTHA STOKES 



b. 6th mo. 26th, 1774. 

m. October 29th, 1795, Aaron Haines [430], 

son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Buzby) 

Haines. 



453— HANNAH STOKES 



b. 8th mo. nth, 1775. 

m. 2nd mo. 11th, 1795, at Ancocas, N. J., 
Granville Woolman, son of Asher and 
Rachel (Norcross) Woolman, of North- 
ampton Township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
He b. 1st mo. 1st, 1774. 



446 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



454— JOHN STOKES 



455— WILLIAM STOKES 



456— JARVES STOKES, JR. 



457— ELIZABETH STOKES 



b. 4th mo. 11th, 1777. 

m. 1798, Elizabeth Woolman, daughter of 
Asher and Rachel (Engle) Woolman. 

b. 1st mo. 14th, 1779. 
d. 8th mo. 17th, 1838. 

m. 4th mo. 8th, 1798, Hannah Hatcher, of 
Burlington County, N. J. 
She b. 8th mo. 11th, 1775. 
d. 4th mo. 18th, 1858. 

b. 11th mo. 5th, 1780. 

m. Abigail Woolman, daughter of Asher and 
Rachel (Engle) Woolman. 

b. 5th mo. 29th, 1782. 

m. October 30th, 1800, Abel Haines [431], 
son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Buzby) 
Haines. 



458— EDITH STOKES 



459— JOSEPH STOKES 



460— MARY STOKES 



461— ESTHER STOKES. 



462— STOCKDELL STOKES 



463— SAMUEL STOKES 



464— MORDECAI STOKES 



b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1784. 
d. in infancy. 

b. 2nd mo. 26th, 1787. 
d. 8th mo. 23rd, 1851. 

m. 1812, Harriet Stockton, daughter of 
Richard and Sarah Stockton. 
She d. 2nd mo. 17th, 1874. 

b. nth mo. 18th, 1788. 
d. 1875, unmarried. 

b. 1st mo. 22nd, 1791. 

m. Joseph Butterworth, son of John M. and 
Rachel (Eayre) Butterworth. 

b. 10th mo. 12th, 1792. 
m. Wilhelmina Metzgar. 

b. 8th mo. 13th, 1794. 

d. 10th mo. 11th, 1860. 

m. Amy Middleton. 

She d. 10th mo. 13th. 1874. 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1796. 
d. in infancy. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 447 



465— SARAH STOKES b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1798. 

d. 6th mo. 23rd, 1851. 



m. 8th mo. 4th, 1825, Uriah Haines, son of 
George and Edith (Woolman) Haines. 
He b. 2nd mo. 10th, 1800. 
d. 3rd mo. 13th, 1874. 



466— MORDECAI STOKES, 2ND b. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1800. 

d. 8th mo. 29th, 1835. 
m. Sarah Thompson. 



169— HANNAH STOKES (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Mary Allen, 18; 

Hannah Stockdell, 72). 

b. 10th mo. 12th, 1756. 

d. 6th mo. 16th, 1790. 

m. First, 4th mo. 9th, 1794. at Ancocas. N. J., 
Jacob Haines, son of Samuel and Lydia 
(Stokes) Haines, of Chester Township, Bur- 
lington Co., N. J. 

m. Second, George Browning. 

467— HANNAH HAINES m. Benjamin R. Morgan [472], son of Isaac 

and Sarah (Ridgway) Morgan. 

468— STOKES HAINES m. 12th mo. 17th, 1818, Lockey Ann French 

[555], daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Zane) French. 

171— RACHEL STOKES (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Mary Allen, 18-; 

Hannah Stockdell, 72). 

b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1765. 

m. 10th mo. 12th, 1785, Joseph Hackney, Jr., son 
of Joseph Hackney, of Chester Township, Bur- 
lington Co., N. J. 

469— JOSEPH HACKNEY, 3RD. 
470— JOHN HACKNEY 



« 



448 GENEALOGY OF THE 

181— SARAH RIDGWAY (Thomas, 1; Rachel, 4; Rebecca Sharp, 21; 

Mary Coate, 89). 

b. 6th mo. 17th, 1764. 

m. 12th mo. 21st, 1785, Isaac Morgan, son of 
Joseph and Mary (Stokes) Morgan. 

471— MARY MORGAN m. Joel Middleton. 

472— BENJAMIN R. MORGAN m. Hannah Haines [467], daughter of Jacob 

and Hannah (Stokes) Haines. 

473— HANNAH MORGAN m. Eli Stokes. 

474— ISAAC MORGAN 

475— GRIFFITH MORGAN m. Elizabeth Roberts. 

476— JOSEPH MORGAN m. Mary Burrough. 

477— JUDITH MORGAN m. First, Arthur Roberts. 

m. Second, Thomas Stiles. 

RICHARD RIDGWAY AND DESCENDANTS 

None of the early settlers of Pennsylvania and New Jersey was more successful and 
Influential than Richard Ridgway. Descended from notable English ancestry, he arrived 
at Burlington in September, 1679. With a number of his fellow homeseekers he crossed 
the Delaware, purchased land and founded a settlement known for many years thereafter 
as Crewcorne, and which was the site of the present town of Morrisville, Bucks Co., 
Pa. As elsewhere noted, these pioneers in the wilderness were early beset with a special 
annoyance and peril, in consequence of the sale of liquor to the Indians. A petition 
addressed to Governor Andros, of New York, April ye 12th, 1680, by the inhabitants of 
■Crewcorne, quaintly describes existing conditions : 

" To ye Worthy Governor of New Yorke. 

" Whereas, wee ye Inhabitants of ye new Seated Towne near ye falls of 
Dellaware (called Crewcorne) findeing ourselves aggrieved by ye Indians 
when drunk, informeth, that wee be and have been in great danger of our 
Lives, of our houses burning, of our goods stealing and of our Wives and 
Children affrighting, Insomuch that wee are afeard to go about our Lawful 
affairs, least when we come home we finde ym and our concerns damnified. 
These things considered, wee doe humbly & jointly desire that ye selling 
of brandy and strong liquors to ye Indians may be wholly suppressed, when 
if done wee hope wee shall live peaceably. Willi. Biles, Rich. Ridgway, 
Samuel fTeild, John Akarman, Robt. Lucas, Robt. Scholey, Tho. Scholey, 
Darius brinson, William Cooper, George Browne." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



449 



Richard Ridgway prospered at Crewcorne, but he was a man of large views and 
purposes. He bought additional tracts of desirable land in Pennsylvania, and in the 
fall of 1690 bought, of Gov. Daniel Co.\e, of West Jersey, 600 acres in the upper part 
of Burlington County, near Stony Brook, along the East Jersey line, locating there 
with his family for a time. Later he sold this property, and in the spring of 1697 pur- 
chased of John Hollinshead 600 acres at Mattacopeny, Burlington Co. A few months 
later he bought of Jane Ogburn 90 acres in the same section, transferring this property, 
with 100 acres additional, to his son Thomas, two years thereafter. Still other land pur- 
chases and sales by Richard Ridgway are recorded about 1700. He also became a land 
owner in East Jersey and for a time resided at the ancient settlement of Piscataway, now 
in the upper part of Middlesex County, one of his grantee's being the original Richard 
Stockton, father of his second wife, Abigail Stockton, and founder of the Stockton 
family in New Jersey. He returned to Burlington County and settled finally in Spring- 
field township, where he became active in public affairs, serving as one of the county 
judges at different periods between 1700 and 1720. He died in 1722, leaving an estate 
of considerable size. His will, dated September 21, 1722, proved April 5, 1723, appointed 
wife Abigail executrix, with sons Thomas and Job and son-in-law Henry Clothier as 
assistants. Inventory showed personal property to the value of £207 Us. His widow 
survived him about three years. Her will was proved December 19, 1726; inventory of 
personal estate amounted to £141 15s. 

Richard Ridgway was twice married, first to Elizabeth Chamberlayne, of Wiltshire, 
England, with whom he came to America. She died at Crewcorne, March 31, 1692. He 
married second, February 1, 1693/4, Abigail Stockton. By his first marriage he had 
seven children, viz., Thomas, Richard, Elizabeth, William, Sarah, Josiah and Joseph. 
There were seven children also by the second marriage, namely. Job, Mary, Jane, Abigail, 
John, Joseph and Sarah. Four children died in infancy — William, both Sarahs, and 
the first Joseph. The eldest son, Thomas, born in England in 1677, died 1724/5, in 
early life located in the Egg Harbor section and became the progenitor of a large branch 
of the family. Richard Ridgway, Jr., born at Crewcorne 1680, died 1718/9, located in 
Springfield township, Burlington County, and his descendants, likewise those of his 
brothers and sisters, have been numerous and prosperous. 

Sarah (Ridgway) Morgan [181], daughter of Joseph Ridgway of Springfield town- 
ship, was a great, great granddaughter of Thomas ffrench and Richard Ridgway, 
progenitors. 




WALNUT DRESSING TABLE, I70O 



29 



INDEX 



I. NAMES OF PERSONS 

II. NAMES OF PLACES 

III. NAMES OF CHURCHES 

IV. FRIENDS' MEETINGS 

V. MARRIAGE CERTIFICATES 

VI. HISTORICAL EVENTS 



INDEX OF NAMES OF PERSONS. 



PAGE 

Abbott, Anne 98 

John 97, 98, 112, 210 

Timothy 216 

AcKLEV, Elizabeth ( Breintnall) [ 78] , 201, 203 

AcREMAN, Phillip 267 

Adams, Elizabeth 142, 176 

Esther 117, 187, 373 

Hannah 174 

James 97, 117, 122, 373 

John 85, 125, 142, 176 

Mary (Newbold) 426 

Susannah 141 

Thomas 118 

Thomas 371 

Akarman, John 448 

Albertson, Hannah 191 

Jacob 283 

Josiah 273 

Alcock, Hannah 46 

Alcott, William 165 

Alin, Mathew 85 

Rachel [4] 85 

Allcott, William 164, 167 

Aixen, Anthony 186 

Caleb 117 

Elizabeth 118 

Elizabeth 118 

Enoch 186 

Enoch 342, 343 

Gabriel 231 

George 117 

Grace (Jones) 83, 185 



PAGE 

Allex^ Grace 186 

Hanna 118 

Hannah 118 

Hannah (Collins) 185 

Jedidiah 118 

John [64] 185 

Joseph 186 

Joseph 394, 395, 397 

Judah 116, 125 

Judith (Stokes) 185 

Lydia (French) [113] 231 

Margery 83 

Martha (Stokes) 185 

Mary 64, 116, 117 

Mary [18] 83, 198 

Mary 116 

Mary (Butcher) 185 

Mathew, 64, 79, 80, 83, 84, 85, 86, 88, 

89, 117, 120, 121, 123, 152, 153. 

Mathew, Jr. [16] 83, 85, 185, 373 

Mathew, 3rd [63] 185, 186, 269 

Mathew 186 

Mercy [17] 83, 186. 187, 194 

Rachel (French) [4] 76, 83, 88, 89 

Robert 83 

Thomas [19] 83, 89, 191 

William 46 

William [64a] 185 

Allin, Marsy [17] 85, 187 

Mary [18] 85 

Matthew 85, 185 

Thomas [19] 85 



452 



INDEX 



453 



PAGE 

Allinson, Samuel.. 219, 237, 239, 283, 414 

Allison, Ann 433 

Richard 104 

Ruth 433 

William 364 

Alured, J 281 

Anderson, Ephraim (Lieut.) .311, 323, 325 

John Ib7, 354 

Andre, John (Major) 310, 323, 325 

Andrews, Anne 213 

Hannah 197 

Isaac 236, 256, 283 

Jacob 213 

Patience (Lippincott) 197 

Pheby 197 

Samuel 112 

Andros, Governor 204, 448 

Anne, Queen of England. 26, 124. 155, 157 

Archer, Amos 283 

Mary (Small) [164] 287, 288 

Thomas 287, 288 

Areson, Dirick 223 

Sarah 223 

Armstrong, Isaac 240 

R. L 423 

Arnold, Benedict (Gen.) 310, 323, 325 

David 65 

Lydia (French) [13] 65 

AsHBY, William 435 

Atkins, Jane 64, 65 

Atkinson, Anna (Coate) [82] 203 

Caleb 369 

Elizabeth 286, 437 

Hannah M 426 

Hannah (Shinn) 437 

John 437 

Samuel, 118, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 
197, 203, 260. 

Austin, Nicholus 144 

Ayres, Priscilla (Hugg) 192 

Bacon, David 433 

Bailey, John 283 



PAGE 

Baili, Mathias 435 

Baker, Daniel 423 

Ball, Anna 330 

Ballinger, E 291 

Henry 129, 130 

Joshua 404 

Levi 368, 369 

Thomas 128, 129 

Bancroft, George 22 

Mary E 439 

Banes, Hannah (Foster) 439 

Joseph 439 

Josephine 439 

Banks, Quartermaster 312 

Bankson, Peter 371 

Barclay, Robert (Gov.) 26 

Bard, Peter 103, 106, 162 

Barker, Robert 54 

Samuel 160 

B.A.RKSTEAD, Jo 281 

B.A.RNES, John 146 

Basnett, Richard 72, 76, 104 

Bass, J 124 

Bassett, D 424 

Hope (Hollingshead) [379] 424 

Bate, Harry 271 

Thomas 271 

Bates, Ann 348 

Elizabeth 385 

Batten, James 423 

Baxter, John 423 

Bay.^rd, Colonel 318 

Beck, Ann [242] 313, 315, 316, 326 

Charles 418 

Elizabeth H 384 

Henry [241] 313, 326 

Joseph 222, 313, 315, 316, 326 

Joseph, Jr. [240] 313, 326 

Rebecca (Gibbs) 326 

Sarah (Shreve) Scattergood [108], 

222, 313, 317, 326 

Sarah 301 

Bedford, John (Rev.) 65 



454 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Bell, Mary E 439 

Mary E. ( Bancroft) 439 

Samuel W 439 

William 49 

Bendler, Sophia 234, 337, 338 

Benezet, Anthony 202 

Bennett, John, Jr 317 

Benneville, Daniel (M.D.) 334 

Benson, John 423 

Berkley, Lord 25, 26, 27 

Besse, Joseph 43, 44. 46, 47 

Betteris, Richard 46 

BiDDLE, Charlotte 426 

Hester 46 

William 72, 105, 224 

Biles, William 448 

Bill, John 54 

Bird, Captain 315 

Bishop, Ann (Black) [382] 426, 429 

Hannah (Haines) 442 

John 426, 429 

Joseph R 442 

Joshua 159 

Lucy 442 

Mary [824] 429 

Rebecca W. [826] 429 

Thomas 165, 167 

William 167 

BisPHAM, Atlantic 411 

Hannah 382 

John, Jr 382 

Joseph M 423 

Joshua, 133, 134, 244, 245, 250, 267, 
411. 

Mary ( Lawrence) 411 

Ruth 257 

Black, Abigail A. [830] 429 

Achsah 427 

Alice (Taylor) 427 

Ann [382] 426 

Ann T. (Newbold) 426 

Ann 427 

Charles F. [383] 426 



page 

Black, Charles [388] 426, 429 

Charlotte (Biddle) 426 

Charlotte [829] 429 

Christine ( Page) 427 

Edward 213 

Edward 427 

Elizabeth [833] 429 

Emeline |S31] 429 

Ezra 427 

George [389] 426, 429, 430 

Hannah M. (Atkinson) 426 

Hope (French) [145], 268. 277, 426, 428 

John 210, 225, 427 

John 298. 427 

Joseph 427 

Mary (Gibbs) 213, 426, 427 

Mary [390] 426 

Mary (Newbold) Adams 426 

Mary (Vail) 426 

Mary 427 

Mary [827] 429 

Mary T. [847] 429 

Mr 316 

Nathan W. [385] 408, 426, 429 

Rebecca W. [386] 406, 426 

Rebecca W. [832] 429 

Samuel 207, 213, 305, 427 

Samuel [384] 408, 426, 429. 430 

Sarah (Ellis) 426 

Sarah (Rockhill) 427 

Thomas 213, 230, 427 

William 207, 426. 427, 428 

William, 3rd, 268, 278, 408. 426, 427, 
428, 429, 430. 

William 427 

William [387] 426, 429 

William [835] 429 

Blackwell, Robert (Rev.) 380, 410 

Blackwood, Ann (Wills) Clement [363], 

406, 408 

John (M.D.) 283, 406 

S 219, 262, 263, 264 

Ri.agraue, Daniel 281 



INDEX 



455 



PAGE 

Blair, James C 308 

Mary 308 

Rebecca (Shreve)Moorehead [232], 308 

Blakiston, John 281 

Blanchard, Jane 201 

Bland, Robert 228 

Boggs, Alexander 314 

Bolton, Edward 144 

Everard 147 

Bonnet, John 316 

BoNViLLE, Samuel 220 

Boone, Jeremiah 294 

Rebecca (Ridgway) [192] 294 

Borden, Franses 118 

Francis 217 

Jane 118 

Jonathan 289 

Joseph 99, 211, 221 

Joseph, Jr 433 

Safety 206 

Borough, Wm 370 

Borradail, Arthur 197 

BoRTEN, John 67 

BoRTON, Abraham 288 

Elizabeth N. (Woolman) 444 

Hannah 160 

Isaac 364, 365 

Jacob 340, 346, 347, 348, 368, 370 

Jemima (French) [283] 340, 345 

John 50 

John 365, 368 

Joshua 444 

Obadiah 256 

Sarah 444 

William 160 

BoUD, Thomas 213 

BouLTON, William E 430 

BOURCHIER, Jo 281 

BouRTON, John 67 

BowNE, Rachel 213 

Brackney, Joseph 371 

Braddock, Barzillai 364 

Bradford, Andrew 157 

William 157 



PAGE 

Bradshaw, Henry 352 

Bradshawe, Jo 281 

Brady, Henry Austin 37 

Brearley, Captain 312 

Breintnall, David 201 

David 201, 202 

Elizabeth [78] 201 

Hannah (Sharp) [20], 83, 201, 202, 203 

Hannah [81] 201 

Jane (Blanchard) 201 

John 83, 201, 202 

Letitia [SO] 201 

Martha [79] 201 

Mary 201 

Rachel [76] 201 

Rebecca [77] 201 

Susannah (Shoemaker) 201 

Brewer, Edmund 423 

Brl\n, Thomas 96, 111 

Brick, Abigail (French) [139], 268, 277, 

380 to 383. 

Abigail [346] 276, 380, 382 

Ann [345] 276, 380, 382 

Ann (Nicholson) 380 

John 380 

John (Judge) 380, 381 

John, 3rd 268, 380 to 383 

John, 4th [342] 380, 382 

Joseph 380 

Mary (Inskeep) 380 

Mercy ( Hartley) 380 

Samuel [343] 380, 382 

Sarah [347] 276, 380, 382 

William [344] 380, 382 

Briextnall, John 90, 91 

Briggs, Esther (Shreve) [229]... 307, 320 

Hannah 307 

Job 307 

John 167 

William 307 

Brightwell, William 85 

Brightwen, William 67 

Brinson, Darius 448 

Brintnai.e, John 90 



456 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Brognard, John ( M-D.) 429 

Bromley, Richard 122 

Brooks, Ann 433 

Anne 213 

Edward 213 

Joanna 433 

Brown, Abiah [102], 205, 208, 209, 216, 217 

Abraham 96, 210, 220, 224 

Abraham, Jr 210 

Abraham, 347, 348, 349, 350, 355, 356, 
367, 368, 409. 

Charles 242 

Charles (Rev.) 439 

Elizabeth 149 

Elizabeth (Till) 205 

Harriet (French) [584] 353,355 

Henry 220 

John 94, 169, 213, 218, 219 

John, Jr 305 

Margaret (Sharp) 205 

Mary (French) [25], 92, 98, 107, 205 

207, 210, 226 

Mary [99] 205 

Mary 205, 207 

Mary (Sykes) . . 182, 205, 213, 214, 216 

Mary 433 

Preserve 205, 206, 207, 210 

Preserve, Jr., 92, 98, 105, 107, 113, 
181, 182, 205 to 221, 225, 227, 232. 

Preserve, 3rd [97] 205, 211, 215 

Rebecca (Jones) 205 

Richard [98], 205, 208, 213, 216, 218, 
219. 

Sam 101 

Sarah [100] 205, 213, 294 

Sarah (Taylor) 205 

Sarah (French) [125]... 242, 243, 251 

Thomas 213 

William [101], 205, 208, 216, 217, 218 
219. 

Browne, George 448 

Rachel 213 

Browning, George 288, 447 



PAGE 

Browning, Hannah (Stokes) Haines 

[169] 288, 447 

Isaac 423 

Brund.\ge, Nathaniel 283 

Brunt, Mr 317 

Bryan, James 443 

Martha 374 

Susan (Stokes) [445] 443 

Thomas 102, 103, 169 

Buckingham, Duke of 40 

Buckley, William 207 

BucKMAN, Agnes 389 

Agnes ( Penquite) 389 

Elizabeth 401 

Elizabeth (Wilson) 389 

Thomas 389 

William 389 

BuDD, Edith (Coate) [177] 293 

Henry 433 

James 269, 388 

John 162, 164, 169, 173 

Mahlon 293 

Thomas 67, 71, 159, 335 

Bull, William 156 

Bullock, Abigail (Ridgway) [188].. 294 

David 294 

Joseph 282 

Bunting, Alice 98, 214 

John 96, 97, 112, 181 

Jeremiah 441 

Margaret 441 

Mary 98 

Mary W. (Buzby) 441 

Phebe 210 

Samuel 112 

Sarah 181 

.Sarah, Jr 96, 181 

William 181 

William 441 

Burden, John 201 

BuRDSALL, Jacob 177 

Burnet, William (Gov.) 89, 178, 188 

BuROUGHS, Samuall 12? 



INDEX 



457 



PAGE 

Burr, Caleb 444 

Elizabeth (Wills) 406 

Joseph 203 

Joseph 406, 408 

Martha 444 

Marcy 408 

Rachel (Coate) [88] 203 

Rachel 444 

Robert 406 

BuKROUGii, Benjamin 378 

Hannah (Wilkins) [335] 378 

Isaac 382 

Jacob 283 

Mary 378 

Mary (French) [725] 412 

Mary 448 

Phebee 235 

Samuel 120, 123 

Samuel 239, 378, 427 

Burrows, Samuel 74 

BuRSHALL, Jacob 179 

Jane 179 

BuRTSAL, Jacob 175 

Jane (Buzby) [57] 175 

BuSBEY, Edward 142, 176 

Hannah (French) [7] 142, 176 

John 142, 176 

John, Jr 142, 176 

Mary 142, 176 

Mary (French) [11] 176 

Mary [56] 179 

Nicholas 142, 176 

Richard 142. 145, 176 

Sarah 142, 176 

Thomas 14S 

Busby, Bengman [54] 178 

Elizabeth [58] 179 

Hannah (French) [7] 76, 77 

Isaac [52] 178 

John [51] 178 

Margret 191 

Mary (French) [11], 76, 77, 178, 179, 

180. 



PAGE 

Busby, Nicholas 176 

Nickles 180 

Richard 141, 142, 143, 144 

Sary [59] 179 

Thomas [50] 179, 180. 191 

William [53] 178 

Bustill, Samuel, 103, 164, 172, 173, 178, 
179, 180, 193, 194, 200. 

Butcher, John 32, 224 

Mary 185 

BuTTERWORTH. Anna (Ridgway) [187]. 293 

Esther (Stokes) [461] 446 

John 293 

John M 446 

Joseph 446 

Rachel ( Eayre) 446 

Rachel (Ridgway) [183] 293 

Samuel 293 

BuzBEY, John 139 

Richard 144, 145 

Thomas [39] 144 

Buzby. Abel [427] 441 

Amos [154] 286. 440 

Amos, Jr. [412] 440 

Ann (Lippincott) 441 

Benjamin [54] 175, 177 

Benjamin [404] 438 

Benjamin 439 

Beulah [419] 441 

Beulah (Woolman) 440 

Daniel [152a] 286 

Daniel [413] 440 

Edward 139, 141. 143 

Elizabeth 139 

Elizabeth [58] 175, 177 

Elizabeth [157] 287,442 

Elizabeth [425] 441 

Elizabeth 441 

Esther 441 

George [416] 441 

Hannah (French) [7], 64, 139, 140, 

142, 144. 
Hannah (Adams) 174 



458 



INDEX 



PAGE 

BuzBY, Hannah [405] 438 

Hannah (Haines) 438, 439 

Hannah 439 

Hannah [411] 440 

Hannah (Heaton) 440, 441 

Hudson [410] 49, 440 

Isaac 140 

Isaac [52] 174, 177 

Isaac [154a] 286 

Isaac [403] 438 

Isaac 439 

Jane [40] 139 

Jane [57] 175, 177 

John 139, 141, 174, 175 

John [38] 139 

John, Jr 139, 141 

John [51] 49, 174, 177 

John 49 

John [400] 438 

John [414] 440 

Jonathan [422] 441 

Joseph [155] 286 

Joseph [407] 440 

Joseph [417] 441 

Joseph [424] 441 

Lydia [55] 175, 177 

Margaret (Haines) 174, 286 

Margaret [409] 440 

Martha 174 

Martha [426] 441 

Mary 139. 141, 174 

Mary 139 

Mary (Taylor) 141 

Mary (Mason) 139 

Mary (French) [11], 65, 174, 175, 

176 to 180. 

Mary (Wills) 175, 287 

Mary [56] 175, 177 

Mary [406] 440 

Mary W. [423] 441 

Mary (Haines) 441 

Nicholas.. 49, 65, 139, 174 to 178, 180 
Nicholas [408] 440, 441 



P.\GE 

BuzBY, Patience (Springer) 286, 440 

Phineas [420] 441 

Rachel (Woolman) 440 

Rachel W. [868] 441 

Rebecca [41] 139 

Rebecca (Matlack) 286, 440 

Richard [894] 49, 175 

Richard 64, 139 to 145 

Robert C. [418] 441 

Sarah 139, 141 

Sarah (Seary) 141 

Sarah [59] 175, 177 

Susannah (Adams) 141 

Susannah (Deacon) 287, 441 

Tabitha ( Hugg) 286, 438 

Thomas [39] 139, 140 

Thomas [SO] 174, 177, 196, 286 

Thomas, Jr. [153] 286, 290, 438 

Thomas, 3rd [401] 438, 439 

Thomas 439 

Thomas T. [1689] 49, 175 

William 139, 140, 141, 143 

William [53] 175, 177, 287 

William, Jr. [156] 287, 441 

William [402] 438 

William [415] 440 

William, 3rd [421] 441 

Byllixg, Edward 126 

Byu.yxge, Edward 25, 27, 37, 48 

Cadwali.ader, General 335 

John 141, 143, 144 

Caldwell, James B 423 

Campbell, Colin (Rev.) 33, 207, 437 

Canby, Thomas 143, 147 

Canox, Colonel 319 

Carew, Jo 281 

Carlile, Anne 213 

Carr, Ann (French) [135]. . .254, 376, 377 

Ann (Craft) 376 

Caleb [327] 376 

Caleb 376, 377 

Hannah [326] 376 



INDEX 



459 



PAGE 

Carr, Isaac [331] 376 

Jeremiah [328] 376 

Mary F. [330] 376 

Mary (Stockton) 376 

Patience 376 

Robert [332] 376 

Samuel 254, 376, 377 

Samuel, Jr. [329] 376 

Thomas [SSS"] 376 

Walter 318 

Carrell, Daniel 423 

Carson, Hampton L 28 

Cart, Samuel 147 

Carter, Steven 220 

Carteret, George, Sir 25, 26, 27 

Cassell, Daniel 220 

Cattell, Esther 358 

Hannah 116, 253, 255 

James 262, 263, 264, 404 

Jonas 116, 253 

Jonas 414 

Mary (Pearce), 64, 116, 117, 118, 119. 
253. 

Cattle, Elizabeth 360 

James 378 

Cawley, Will 281 

Chalkley, Thomas Ill, 199 

Challoner, Tho 281 

Chamberlayne, Elizabeth 449 

Champion, Thomas 283 

Chapman, Mercy (Gilpin) 431 

Susannah 442 

Charles I 279, 280, 281 

Charles II 16, 25, 41, 44, 45, 47, 279 

Chatham, Joseph 423 

Chattin, Abraham 119 

Grace 119 

Cheeseman, Isabella 149 

Cheshire, Jonathan 298 

Chevers, Sarah 47 

Childs, James 269 

Churchman, John 379 

Joseph 49 



PAGE 

Clark, Benjamin 98, 99 

Benjamin, Jr 100 

Benjamin 186 

Deborah (Denny) 438 

Elizabeth 438 

Hannah (Middleton) [68] 186 

James 186 

John V 386 

Joseph ^' 423 

Mary 253, 374 

Rebecca 386 

Sarah (French) [359] 386 

Thomas 438 

Walter 50 

William 120, 123. 128, 129, 130 

Clarke, William 121, 122 

Cleaver, Jane W. (Thomas) 295 

Jonathan 295 

Mary 295 

Rebecca (Ivins) [206] 295 

William 295 

Clemdries, Edward 132 

Clement, Ann, 148, 268, 270, 271, 279, 280 

Ann (Harrison) 268, 279 

Ann (Wills) [363] 406 

Beulah 283 

Evan (M.D.) 406 

Gregory 279, 280, 281 

Hannah 435 

Jacob 268, 271,279 

Jacob 279, 282, 283, 435 

James 279, 280 

Jane 279 

John 241 

Joseph 383 

Samuel 236, 271, 382 

Samuel 422,423 

Cleverly, Thomas 120, 121, 123 

Clifton, Hugh 1 74 

Mary (Wood) [49] 174 

Clinton, Henry (Sir), 303, 304, 306, 309 

Closson, James H. (Capt.) 439 

James H., Jr. (M.D.) 439 



460 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Closson, James H., 3rd 439 

John 439 

Josephine ( Banes) 439 

Josephine B 439 

Mary B 439 

Mary E. (Bell) 439 

Mary L. ( Loucks) 439 

Clothier, Henry 449 

CoATE, Ann (Pole) 203 

Anna [82] 203 

BarziUai [86], 203, 273, 274, 275, 293 

Beulah [90] 203, 294 

Edith [91] 203 

Edith [177] 293 

Elizabeth (Stakes) 203, 293 

Hannah [87] 203 

Hannah [178] 293 

Israel [85] 203 

Marmaduke 203 

Marmaduke [83] 203 

Mary [89] 203,293 

Rachel [88] 203 

Rebecca (Sharp) [21] 83, 203 

Sarah (Matthis) 203 

Sarah (Hollingshead) 293 

William 83, 90, 174. 196, 203 

William, Jr. [84] 203 

William [179] 293 

CoATES, Samuel 303 

William 91 

Coats, Mary 46 

Cock, Mounce 130 

COKLEY, Mary 222, 307 

CoLDWEix, Andrew 314 

Cole, William 46 

CoLKET, Annah B 295 

Coffin 295 

Mary P. (Walker) 295 

CoLLiNGS, Francis 31, 69 

Collins, Benjamin 283 

Francis 188 

Hannah 186 

Isaac 265 



PAGE 

Collins, Job 363, 364, 365 

John 237, 250, 352, 363 to 370 

Priscilla 188 

Samuel 186, 250 

CoLLUM, William 167, 188 

Combes, N 33:i 

CoNARROE, Isaac 86 

CoNNARo, Isaac 191 

CoNNARRO, Ellen 191 

Connelly, Dominic 340 

Mary (French) [294] 340. 345 

CoNOROE, Isaac 84 

Jacob 84 

CoNOROW, Alinor 86 

Isaac 85, 86 

Jacob 86 

CONROVV, Darling 371 

Constable, Wm 281 

Cook, Ann (Ivins) [208] 295 

Arthur 50 

Edward 320 

Ezra 295 

Cooke, William 230 

Cooper, Ann 255 

David 273 

Hannah (Pancoast) 386 

Jacob 371 

Joseph 256 

William 423 

William 448 

CoppERTHWAiTE, John 118, 298 

Corbet, Miles 281 

Corman, Margaret 433 

Cornbury, Lord (Gov.) 26 

Cornish, James 250 

Cornwallis, Lord (Genl.) 323 

Cowperthwaite, Hannah 345 

Hugh 345 

John 120, 121, 122, 123, 130 

John 390 

J oseph 345 

Rachel 379 

Rebecca 370 



INDEX 



461 



PAGE 

CowpERTHWAiTE, Samucl 345 

Thomas 254 

William 298 

Cox, Elizabeth 358 

John, 197, 247, 249, 251, 252, 262, 264, 
267, 277, 278. 

Mercy 253, 358 

Mount 120, 121, 129, 130 

Newberry 358 

William 374, 375 

CoxE, Daniel (Gov.) 449 

Mount 121, 123 

Cr.'^cken, Mr 314 

Craft, Ann 376 

Elizabeth 376 

George 376 

Mary 429 

Crafts, James 102 

Craig, Elizabeth 283 

Cramer, William 167 

Crawford, Henry 283 

Samuel 43 1 

Crawley, H. H. (Rev.) 40 

Creighton, Hugh, 282, 283, 284, 285, 436 
Mary (McCullock) French. 282, 283, 

284, 285, 433. 

Mary 284, 433 

Cromwell, Oliver 16, 25, 281 

Crosby, Nathan 1 79 

Culver, Mary A 330 

Cunnard, Dennis 143 

Curle, Susannah 358 

CURRIE, Sarah (French) Deacon [287], 

340, 345 

Curtis, Ann 433 

David 96, 97 

Grace 222, 307 

Thomas 71, 96, 97, 102 

Darby, John 42 

Darnal, Edward 288, 390 

Dauers, J 281 

Davenport, Anne 96 



page 

Davenport, Bridget % 

Francis 95, 112, 113, 115, 184, 189 

Francis, Jr 96 

Franklin 422, 423 

Rebecca 95 

Sarah 96 

Davis, Andrew 220 

David 277, 278, 279 

Gabriel 366 to 369 

John 220 

Mary 231, 335 

Robert 130 

Samuel 196 

Samuel C 277, 278 

Davison, Andrew 220 

Dawson, Thomas 173 

Day, John 68,69 

Stephen 129, 130 

Deacon, George 142, 176 

Gilbert 340, 345 

Isaac 214 

Sarah (French) [287] 340 

Susannah 287, 441 

William 290 

Deane, Ri 281 

Decou, Isaac 162 

Decow, Isaac 169, 215 

Jacob 105 

Susanna 96 

DeHaven, Annah B. (Colket) Gallup. 295 

Holstein 295 

Hugh 295 

Mary (Cleaver) 295 

Dennis, Sylenia (French) [295] . .341, 345 

Depew, Samuel 220 

Devenport, Francis 68 

Devonish, Barnard 50 

Dewsbury 45 

Dickinson, General 113 

Dillon, Captain 312 

DiLWiN, Sarah 213 

DiLWORTH, James, Jr 144 

DixON, John 295 



462 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Dixon, Sarah (Ivins) [204] 295 

DixwELL, John 281 

Donald, Nathaniel 435 

DouGHTEN, Wm 348 

Doughty, Daniel 228, 229, 230 

Jacob 205 

Mary 205 

DowDEN, Isaac 423 

DowNES, Jo 281 

DucHE, Jacob (Rev.) 307, 374 

Dudley, Martha 413 

DuER, Joseph 433 

Duncan, John 144 

Dunn & French 435 

Durell, Jeremiah 425 

Eacrit, Isaac 394 

Earl, Joshua S 429 

Eastburn, Eliza 443 

Eayre, Grace (Allen) 186 

Mary 442 

Ner 186 

Richard 186 

Eddinfield, William 192 

Edgerton, Thomas 283 

Edwards, H 281 

Joseph 192 

Eldridge, Job 423 

Elkinton, Jemima 116, 242 

Ellis, Elizabeth P 386 

Hannah 397 

Joseph 283 

Kathrian 191 

Levi : 423 

Mary 210, 271 

Sarah 271 

Sarah, Jr 271 

Sarah 386 

Sarah 426 

Simeon 271, 283 

William 191, 224 

Elliston & Perot 431 

Elton, Anthony 50 



pace 

Elton, Re veil 156, 245, 290 

Emley, John 430 

William 85 

Engle, Abraham 367 

Joseph 365, 368 

English, Benjamin 220 

Enoch, Mary 257, 258 

Enos, Thomas 71 

EsTAUGH, Elizabeth (Haddon), 117, 138, 

283, 419. 

John 138 

Estell, Daniel 83 

John 423 

Mary 83 

Evans, Enoch 237, 363, 364, 377, 390 

Hannah (French) [284] 340 

Isaac 390 

Jacob 407 

Katharine 47 

Nathan 340 

Oliver 332 

Thomas 129 

William 50, 266, 369, 378 

EVEES, Mary 160 

Evelyn, William (Master) 112 

Evens, Isaac 256, 272 

Thomas 128, 129, 272 

William 129, 130 

Eves, Thomas, 50, 70, 73, 75, 77, 79, 88, 89, 
150, 151, 153. 

EviNS, Elizabeth 160, 255 

Ewer, Isaa 281 

Robert 70 

EwiNG, Ruth 331 

Eyre, Anna (Wilkins) [337] 378 

Asa 378 

Elizabeth 377 

Fabritius, Jacob (Rev.) 336 

Fairman, Thomas 85 

Farnsworth, Richard 46 

Samuel, Jr 233 

Fark, Eiias 67 



INDEX 



463 



PAGE 

Farrell, James 136 

Mary (French) 136 

Farringtox, Abraham 90, 91. 98, 99 

Fearon, Peter 90, 91, 196 

Susanna 191 

Feild, Samuel 448 

Feximore, James 305 

John 150 

Samuel 429 

Fenley, Joseph 314 

Fenton, Eleazer 286 

Eleazer [149] 286, 437 

Eleazer, Jr. [399] 438 

Elizabeth (Atkinson) 286, 437 

Elizabeth (Stacy) 286 

Elizabeth (Clark) 438 

Enoch 158, 171, 286 

Enoch, Jr. [152] 286 

Hannah [398] 438 

Rachel (French) [47], 158, 163, 164, 

172, 286. 

Rachel [151] 286 

Samuel [397] 437 

Vesta [150] 286 

Fexwick, John 19, 25, 26 

Fergusox, Charles 250, 283 

Elizabeth (French) [130] 253 

John 253 

Sarah 253, 374, 375 

Field, Benjamin 100 

Robert 302 

FiNCHER, Jane (Buzby) [40] 139, 144 

Jonathan 139 

Fines, William 46 

Fish, Justa 120, 121, 123 

Fisher, David 275 

M. C 423 

Samuel 250 

Flamixgham, Patrick 192 

Fleeson, Plunket 202 

Fleetwood, G 281 

Fletcher, John 142, 176 

Robert 144 



PAGE 

Flower, Henry 157 

FoLKES, Eliza 96 

Thomas 96, 233 

Thomas, J r 96 

Forman, Mary 118 

Forster, William 236, 256 

Forsyth, Joseph 299, 305 

Joshua 296 

Phebe (Shreve) [209] 296 

Fortixer, Bathsheba (French) 149 

Daniel 149 

Ehvood K 149 

Foster, Hannah 257, 258, 259 

Hannah 439 

Hannah (Buzby) 439 

Josiah 256 

Miles 439 

William 236, 256, 272, 273 

Foulke, Thomas 112 

Fowler, Rose 95 

Fox, George 21. 36, 43 

John 313, 317 

Jonathan 73 

Fraxklix, Benjamin 49 

William (Gov.) 49. 50, 175 

William T 49 

Freebody, Margaret 46 

French, Abigail [29] 92, 231, 232 

Abigail [139] 268. 380. 381 

Abigail 350 

Abigail [350] 384 

Abraham [302] 350 

Agnes [355] 386,391 

Amos T. [263] 331 

Amy [349] 384 

Ann 158 

Ann [48] 158. 163, 164, 172 

Ann [135] 254, 261,376,377 

Ann (Clement) . . 148, 268, 271, 279, 412 

Ann [138] 268, 377, 378, 379 

Ann (Headly) 335 

Ann (Bates) 348 

Ann (Street) 358 



464 



INDEX 



PAGE 

French, Ann [358] 386 

Ann Heulings [361] 386, 394, 395 

Ann [368] 410 

Ann [392] 431 

Anne [288] 340 

Atlantic [371] 410 

Barzillai [318] 358,359,360 

Bathsheba 149 

Bathsheba [304] 350 

Benjamin [30] 62, 92, 107, 233 

Charles [8], 49, 58, 65, 75, 76, 77, 79, 

80, 88, 89, 93, 96, 142, 148 to 157, 

175, 176. 
Charles, Jr. [42], 148, 169, 256, 268 to 

280, 282, 373, 378, 381, 388, 390, 

407, 411, 412, 424, 428. 
Charles [46], 158, 159, 163, 164, 171, 

172. 
Charles, 3rd [143], 268, 276, 277, 278, 
279, 383, 410 to 421, 422, 423. 

Charles [147] 282, 320, 431 to 435 

Charles H. [296] . .341, 342, 344 to 348 

Charles [321] 374 

Charles, Jr. [356], 386, 388, 392, 393, 
394, 396, 399. 

Charles [375] 410 

Charles C. [393] 431, 434, 435 

Charles S. [1474] 12 

Charlotte [266] 335 

Christiana (Slim) 336 

Daniel 332 

Deborah H. [790] 415, 420 

Edward [36], 116, 128, 129, 130, 131, 

132. 
Edward [121], 242, 247, 251, 252, 340 
to 348, 351, 371, 378, 422, 439. 

Edward [289] 340 

Edward [559] 342 

Eleanor [144] 268, 424, 425 

Elijah [319] 358, 359, 360 

Elinor 65, 148 

Elizabeth 41, 42 

Elizabeth (Stanton), 64, 70, 76, 77, 181 



PAGE 

French, Elizabeth [22] 92, 203 

Elizabeth 234 

Elizabeth [130] 253, 261 

Elizabeth [142] 268, 406, 407, 408 

Elizabeth (Stokes) [170], 253, 288, 362, 

370, 372. 

Elizabeth (Roberts) 337 

Elizabeth [280] 337 

Elizabeth [312] 358, 359, 360 

Elizabeth (Talbot) 374 

Elizabeth (Stokes) 268, 362, 384 

Elizabeth II. (Beck) 384 

Elizabeth [372] . .410, 415, 416, 417, 419 

Elizabeth [391] 431 

Elizabeth 282, 436, 437 

Elizabeth (Zane) 340, 447 

Elizabeth P. (Ellis) 386 

Elizabeth [791] 415, 420 

Esther (Matlack) 92, 234, 237 

Esther (Cattel) 358 

Esther (Davis) Lippincott ..... 386 

Eunice [118] 234 

Firman [307] 350 

Francis [116] . . .234, 237, 238, 240, 241 

George 43 

George [123], 240, 242, 247, 251, 344, 
345, 350 to 356. 

George [300] 348, 349 

Hannah [7] 64, 139, 142 

Hannah (Cattell), 116, 243, 253, 254, 
256 to 265, 379, 413. 

Hannah [128] 253, 261 

Hannah [259] 330 

Hannah [284] 340 

Hannah E. (Moore) 341 

Hannah [315] 358, 359, 360 

Hannah (Warrington) 253, 362 

Hannah (Lippincott) 384 

Hannah (Pancoast) Cooper 386 

Hannah (Ivins) 386 

Hope 149 

Hope [145] 268, 426, 428 

Hope [370] 410 



INDEX 



465 



PAGE 

French, Hope [396] 435, 436 

Howard B. [140b] 1, 13, 37 

Isaac [291] 340 

Isaac [305] 350 

Isabella (Peacock) . . .242, 348, 349, 350 
Jacob [140] . . . .268, 275, 276, 384, 385 

Jacob [274] 337, 339 

Jacob [306] 350 

Jacob [354] 386, 388, 392, 394, 399 

Jacob [530] 339 

James [132] . . . .253, 254, 261, 374, 375 

James [313] 358, 359, 360 

James [323] 374 - 

James [394] 431 

Jane (Atkins) 56, 58, 60, 64, 65 

Jane [3] 56, 64 

Jane [12] 65, 81 

Jemima 149 

Jemima (Elkinton), 116, 242, 243, 247, 
249, 251, 252. 

Jemima [283] 340 

John 41, 42 

John 43 

John [9], 65, 76, 96, 142, 158 to 173. 176 

John, Jr. [44] 158, 172, 173 

John T. [260] 331 

John [270] 336 

John [286] 340 

Jonas [126] 253, 261, 262, 265 

Jonathan [31], 92, 107, 234, 235, 236, 
237, 240, 338, 373. 

Jonathan [118a] 234, 236, 237 

Jonathan 240 

Jonathan [275] 337, 339 

Jonathan [534] 339 

Joseph [32] 116, 133, 136 

Joseph [133] 253 

Joseph [273] 336 

Joseph [285], 340, 342, 344, 345, 346, 
447. 

Joseph [316] 358 

Joseph [322] 374 

Joseph C. [360] . .386, 388, 393, 394, 399 

30 



P.AGE 

Frenxh, Joseph [369].. 410, 415, 416, 420 

Joshua [352] 384 

Judith [34] 116 

Keziah [134] 254, 261 

Keziah [281] 337 

Lockey A. [555] 447 

Lydia [13] 65, 76, 77, 81, 96 

Lydia (Taylor) 92, 231 

Lydia [113] 231 

Lydia [258] 330 

Lydia [267] 335 

Lydia [268] 335 

Mahlon K. [262] 331 

Margaret 159 

Margaret B. [1416] 12 

Martha 41, 42 

Martha, Jr 41, 42 

Martha (Hall) 92, 233 

Martha (Newton) 374 

Martha (Bryan) 374 

Martha (Hazelton) 386 

Mary 41, 42 

Mary (Allen) 64, 116, 117 

Mary (Cattell), 64, 116, 117, 133, 135, 
136. 

Mary 136 

Mary (King), 62, 64, 92, 95, 107, 225, 
226. 

Mary [11] 65, 174, 175, 176 

Mary [25] 92, 205, 207, 209, 210 

Mary [37] 116, 133, 267 

Mary (McCuIlock) 148, 282, 284 

Mary [117] 234, 240 

Mary [124] 242, 247 

Mary [127] 253,261,357 

Mary (Davis) 231, 335 

Mary [276] 337 

Mary (Wilkins) 242, 340, 344 

Mary [294] 340 

Mary ( Moore) 341 

Mary [297] 348 

Mary ( Rogers) 358 

Mary (Yates) 358 



466 



INDEX 



PAGE 

French, Mary [320] 362 

Mary (Clark) 253, 374 

Mary (Stokes) 410 

Mary (Wayne) 282, 436 

Mary [395] 435, 436 

Mary (Ivins) 386 

Mary A. [789] 415, 416, 420 

Mary 433 

Matilda [309] 351, 354, 355 

Mercy (Cox) 233, 358, 359, 360 

Mercy (Gilpin) Chapman 431 

Moses 43 

Nancy (Vanneman) 386 

Patience 41, 42 

Priscilla (Moore) 386 

Rachel [4] 56, 64, 83, 84, 89 

Rachel [47] 158, 286 

Rachel 62, 92, 204 

Rachel [96] 62, 204 

Rachel (Rickey) 231, 330, 331 

Rachel R. [264] 331 

Rachel (Ingersoll) 242, 348 

Rachel (Rakestraw) 242, 350, 351 

Rachel [308] 351 

Rachel [348] 384 

Rebecca [15] 65, 76, 77, 181 

Rebecca [26] 92, 222, 225 

Rebecca [271] 336 

Rebecca (Wilson) 337 

Rebecca [298] 348, 349 

Rebecca (Taylor) 282, 431 to 435 

Rebecca (Clark) 386 

Richard [5], 58, 62, 64, 76, 88, 89, 92 

to 111, 142, 148, 154, 155, 156, 

157, 176, 196, 204, 209, 210, 223, 

224, 225, 226. 

Richard, Jr. [23], 62, 92, 107, 204, 210 

Richard [112] 231, 335 

Richard [115] 233 

Richard [120], 234, 237, 238, 239, 240, 
337, 338, 339. 

Richard, Jr. [269] 335 

Richard [272] 336 



PAGE 

French, Richard, Jr. [278] 337, 339 

Richard [351] 384 

Richard B. [529] 339 

Robert 41, 42 

Robert 43 

Robert [35], 116, 133, 134, 235, 242, 

246, 247, 249, 253 to 265, 267, 

357, 362, 363, 377. 
Robert, Jr. [131], 253, 254, 258, 261, 
265, 288, 362 to 372. 

Robert [317] 358, 359, 360 

Robert [324] 374 

Ruth (Higby) 234, 336 

Ruth (Ewing) 331 

Sabilla (Stokes) . .268, 410, 412 to 415 

Sabilla [373] 410, 415, 420 

Sabilla S. [788] 415, 416, 420 

Samuel [141], 268, 269, 276, 277, 278, 

279, 379, 382, 383, 386 to 399. 

Samuel 240 

Samuel [148] . . .282, 433, 435, 436, 437 

Samuel [279] 337, 338, 339 

Samuel [292] 340, 345 

Samuel [570] 345, 346 

Samuel, Jr. [357] . . . .386, 388, 393, 394 

Samuel, Jr. [533] 339 

Samuel H. [732] 3 

Samuel G. [755] 388 

Sara 41, 43 

Sara, Jr 41 

Sara [2] 64 

Sarah [10] 65, 174, 176 

Sarah [28] 62, 92, 100, 101 

Sarah (Mason) Wickward 65, 158 

Sarah 163, 169 

Sarah (Scattergood) . . .64, 92, 111, 224 

Sarah [125] 242, 243 

Sarah [146] 268 

Sarah (Stackhouse) 331 

Sarah (Hutchinson) 335 

Sarah [277] 337 

Sarah [287] 340 

Sarah Ann [568] 346 



INDEX 



467 



PAGE 

French, Sarah (Ferguson) . .253, 374, 375 

Sarah (Heulings), 268, 386, 387, 389, 

390, 391, 392, 393, 394. 

Sarah (Ellis) 386 

Sarah [359] 386, 394 

Sarah [374] 410, 415, 420 

Sarah [792] 415 

Sophia (Bendler) 234, 337, 338 

Stacy [290] 340 

Susannah [303] 350 

Susannah (Curie) 358 

Sylenia [295] 341 

Thomas 41, 42, 43 

Thomas [ 1 ], 1 1, 27, 37, 39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 
46, 48, 49, 50, 51 to 62, 64 to 80, 
89, 93, 102, 103, 104, 116, 117, 
142, 148, 152, 154, 156, 158, 175, 
176, 181, 242, 269, 274,341, 445, 
449. 
Thomas, Jr. [6], 58, 64, 74, 75, 76, 97, 
116 to 136, 142, 163, 165, 166, 
171, 172, 176, 196, 210, 226, 242, 
254, 267, 271, 341. 

Thomas [24] 92, 104, 105, 107, 210 

Thomas, 3rd [33], 116, 133, 134, 135, 
136, 242 to 250, 260, 271, 351. 

Thomas [45] 158, 162, 169, 172 

Thomas [129], 253, 258, 261, 358 to 361 

Thomas [265] 335 

Thomas [282] 340 

Thomas [314] 358, 359, 360 

Thomas [325] 374 

Uriah [43] 148, 271, 282, 283, 436 

Uriah [122], 242, 247, 251, 348, 349, 
350, 354, 433. 

Uriah [293] 340 

Uriah, Jr. [299] 348, 349 

Uriah [353], 386, 388, 391, 392, 394, 
399. 

William 43 

William [27], 62, 92, 107, 109, 110, 213, 
226, 231, 233. 



PAGE 

French, William, Jr. [Ill], 231, 330, 331 

332, 333. 
William [119] . . .234, 237, 238, 239, 336 

William R. [261] 331 

William [301] 350 

William [585] 353, 355 

Frensch, Adam 39 

Alice 39 

Maud 39 

Francais 39 

Franceis 39 

Fraunceys 39 

FFrench 39 

FFrensh 39 

French 39 

Frensce 39 

Frensche 39 

Frenssh 39 

Fretwell, Peter 69, 75, 150 

Frier, Anthony 86 

Fryer, Anthony 122 

FuRMAN, Barzillai 300 

Colonel 312 

Richard W 305 

FuRNis, Samuel 86, 89, 153 

FuRNiss, Susannah 81 

Gallup, Annah B. (Colket) 295 

Edwin C 295 

Gardener, Elizabeth 174 

Thomas 68, 69, 94, 150 

Gardiner, Elizabeth, 69, 70, 81, 142, 174, 
176. 

Joseph 100, 394 

Thomas, 30, 32, 67, 68, 86, 89, 94, 150, 
189, 279. 

Gardner, Thomas 50, 69 

Gardnier, Ephram 397 

Garland, A 281 

Garwood, Israel 44.'? 

Mary ( Newton) 443 

Samuel 288, 443 

Gaskill, Samuel 262 



468 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Gaston, John 314 

Gaunt, Hananiah 100, 206 

Gay, Joseph 220 

George II, 126, 128, 130, 145, 162, 173, 244, 
246. 

George III 265 

Gibbs, Adams 295 

Isaac 226, 427 

Isaac 226, 253, 357 

Joshua 298 

Josiah 371 

Lucas 366, 368 

Lydia ( Ivins) [207] 295 

Mary (Shreve) 223, 226, 427 

Mary (French) Holdcraft [127], 

253, 357 

Mary 370 

Mary 427 

Rebecca 326 

Gibson, Elizabeth 119 

Joseph 273 

Joseph, Jr 397 

Mary 291 

Gilberthorpe, Thomas 112 

Gill, Anna S 421 

Annie (Smith) 410 

Elizabeth (French) [372], 410, 419, 

420, 421. 

John 282, 283 

John 410, 422, 423 

John 410, 419, 420, 421 

Matthew, Jr 423 

Thomas 346, 347 

Gilpin, Mercy 431 

Gimmerson, Mr 31S 

Ginnet, James 344 

Gladstone, Mr 19 

Glave, George 120 

Gleave, George 122, 123 

Glover, Jacob 437 

GoADBY, J. Jackson (Rev.) 44 

GoFF, Willi 281 

Goodhue, Mary 327, 328 



page 

Goodwin, Isaac 279 

John 279 

Gosling, Dr 31 

Gratton, Josiah 95 

Greave, George 121 

Green, Daniel 220 

Jane 196 

John 112, 113, 196 

Thomas 289 

Greene, Jane 191 

Nathaniel (Genl.) 310, 325 

Grey, Tho 281 

Griffith, John 371 

Griffiths, Thomas 167 

Grinsdale, Elizabeth 413 

Griscom, William 236, 283 

Grow, William 192 

Grubb, Henry 72, 79, 80, 150 

Gummere, Elizabeth (Buzby) [425].. 441 
John 441 

Hackney, Agnes 68 

John [470] 447 

Joseph 447 

Joseph, Jr 288, 447 

Joseph, 3rd [469] 447 

Rachel (Stokes) [171] .. .288, 290, 447 
Thomas 68, 119, 255 

Haddon, Elizabeth 138, 419 

John 138 

Haines, Aaron [430] 442, 445 

Abel [431] 442, 446 

Caleb 196 

Co.x 367 

Edith (Rogers) 442 

Edith (Woolman) 447 

Elizabeth (Buzby), 287, 442, 445, 446 

Elizabeth [433] 442 

Elizabeth (Stokes) [457] 442 

Ephriam 406, 438 

Esther 194 

Ezra 442 

George 409 



INDEX 



469 



PAGE 

Haines, George 447 

Hannah 258, 259 

Hannah (Stokes) [lb9], 288, 447, 448 

Hannah 442 

Hannah [467] 447, 448 

Hannah 438 

Hinchman 369 

Isiah 3b4, 368 

Jacob 288,447, 448 

Job 364 to 369 

John 160, 194 

John 364, 390, 406 

John, Jr 364 

Joseph 369, 370 

Joseph [432] 442 

Joshua 394 

Lockey A. (French) [555] 447 

Lucy (Bishop) 442 

Lydia 442 

Lydia (Stokes) 442, 447 

Margaret 1 74, 286 

Martha (Stokes) [452] 442,445 

Mary 194 

Mary (French) [297] 348, 349 

Mary (Wills) 406 

Mary 441 

Mary ( Eayre) 442 

Mary [429] 442 

Mary (Stevenson) 442 

Nehemiah 267 

Phoebe (Pierce) 442 

Robert 442 

Samuel 442, 447 

Samuel, Jr 287, 290, 442, 445, 446 

Samuel, 3rd [434] 442 

Sarah 196 

Sarah 442 

Sarah (Stokes) [465] 447 

Solomon 390 

Stacy 364, 365, 367 

Stokes [468] 447 

Susannah (Chapman) 442 

Thomas 286 



PAGE 

Haines, Uriah 447 

William 364, 367, 368 

William [428] 442 

Hains, Ephriam 278 

Hannah 119, 160 

Sarah 255 

Hale, James 380 

Sarah (Brick) [347] 380 

Hall, Abigail 233 

Burgiss 233 

Daniel 65, 81, 82, 142, 176 

David 215 

Gervas 96 

Jane (French) [12], 65, 76, 77, 81, 82 

Martha 92, 233 

Hamilton, Andrew (Gov.) ... .88, 102, 189 

Hammell, Israel 371 

Hance, Elizabeth 118 

John 118 

Hancock, John L 429 

Timothy 117 

Hanson, Timothy 147 

Harden, Thomas 68 

Harding, Thomas 50, 79 

Harold, King of Anglo-Saxons 39 

Harris, Alexander 46 

Samuel 108 

Harrison, Ann 191, 279 

Ann 279 

Joseph 431 

Joseph, Jr 432 

Martha 382 

Samuel 279 

Samuel 279, 283, 382, 383 

Sarah 279 

Sarah 279 

Thomas (Genl.) 279, 281 

William 193, 194,279 

Hart, Edwin K 12 

Hartley, Mercy 380 

Harvy, John 128 

Haslewood, Bathia 46 

Hatcher, Hannah 446 



470 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Hather, Francis (Col.) 281 

Hatkinson, John 283 

Hawkins, Mary 283 

Hazelton, Lydia 378 

Martha 386 

Headly, Ann 335 

Heaton, Hannah (Buzby) [411] 440 

Hannah 440 

John 440 

Rachel 440 

Richard 440 

Hemingway, James 369 

Henderson, Gisbort 217 

Henry VIII 45 

Heritage, Benjamin 271 

John 126 

Joseph, 117, 118, 122, 125, 134, 135, 136, 
137, 244, 260, 272. 

Keziah 379, 381 

Mary 126 

Naomi 126, 127, 128 

Richard 126, 247 

Herritge, Joseph 118 

Hervey, Daniel 313, 315, 316, 317 

Job 313 

Sarah 313, 317 

Hester, Martin 267 

Heulings, Abraham 86, 88 

Abraham 349, 401 

Agnes (Buckman) 386, 400, 401 

Agnes 400 

Ann 128, 129 

Dorothy ( Eves) 389 

Dorothy ( Eves) 389 

Jacob 125, 389 

Jacob, Jr 386, 389, 390, 400 to 404 

Jacob, 3rd 400 

Sarah 268, 386, 389, 390, 400 

Theodosia 400 

William 124, 389 

William 400, 401 

Hewes, Providence 211 

Hewey, Josiah 283 



page 

IIewlings, Abraham 71, 207 

William 73, 207 

Hewson, J 281 

Heyford, Roger de 39 

Higby, Ruth 234 

Higgins, John ( Lieut.) 312 

Hill, James 68, 69 

HiLLiAR, Edward 368 

Hilliard, Joseph 167 

Margaret (Buzby) [409] 440 

Samuel, Jr 440 

IIillman, Elizabeth 235 

John 283 

Keziah (French) [281] .. .337, 338, 339 

Samuel 337, 339 

Hills, Morgan (Rev. Dr.) 33 

Hinchman, Ann 287 

Amy 384 

Hannah 271 

James 271, 282, 344 

John 192, 194, 271 

Kezia 283 

William 271, 278, 283 

Holdcraft, Mary (French) [127], 253, 357 

Robert [310] 357 

William 253, 357 

William [311] 357 

Hollenshead, John 150 ^ 

Hollingshead, Abigail [378] 424 

Agnes [376] 424 

Andrew 350 

Ann (French) [368] 410, 415 

Ann [377] 378, 424 

Charles F. [786] 420 

Edmond 236,272 

Edmund 256 

Eleanor (French) [ 144], 268, 277, 424 

425. 

George [587] 353 

H. H. [7871 420 

Hope [379] 424 

Hugh 268, 424, 425 

Hugh 424 



INDEX 



471 



PAGE 

HoLLiNGSHEAD, Hugh F.416, 417, 419, 424 

Jacob 3b8, 425, 442 

John 118, 124, 196, 234, 256, 270 

Joshua M. (M.D.) 410 

Martha (Mickle) 424 

Mary (Haines) [429] 442 

Sarah 293 

Susannah (French) [303], 350, 354, 355 

HoLLiNSHEAD, Andrew 372 

Edmund 1SC^57, 272, 357 

Elwood ■ 342 

Hugh 247,346,347 

Jacob 343, 352, 365 

Job 372 

John 72, 77, 104, 1 1 7, 122, 449 

Joseph 196, 207 

Morgan 369, 370, 372 

Rebecca 370 

Sarah 196 

Theodore 364 

Thomas 275, 425 

William 122 

Holmes, Benjamin 235 

William 240 

Holms, Dr 311 

Home, Archibald 91, 233 

Hookes, Ellis 46 

Hooper, Hannah (Piatt) 159 

Isaac 159 

Jacob 159 

Margaret (French) 159 

Martha (Tice) 159 

William 159 

Hooten, Mary 187 

Thomas 74 

HoOTON, Elizabeth 118 

Joseph 416, 417 

Mary 196 

Thomas 74, 196 

William 346, 347. 416, 417, 418 

HoOTTEN, Benjamin 397 

Hopkins, Ann 297 

Dr 423 



PAGE 

Hopkins, Ebenezer 236 

Elizabeth (Thomas) 297 

George 220 

James 423 

John 297 

William E 423 

Horner, Aaron 326 

Eleanor 214 

Elianor 98 

Isaac 98, 99, 100, 211, 215, 221, 232 

Rebecca (Scattergood) [239] 326 

HoRTON, Tho 281 

HosKiNS, Millisant 70 

Hough, William 361 

Houghton, Lawrence 191 

Howard, Alexander 298 

IIowELL, Joseph 201, 202 

Joshua L 423 

Samuel (Capt.) 299 

HuDDY, Hugh 103 

Hudson, John 76, 79, 152, 153 

Robert 50, 69 

Huffendorfer, Rachel 327 

Hugg, Elias 188, 192 

Elias 192 

Elizabeth (Newbie) 188, 192, 193 

Gabriel 192, 193, 194 

Hannah 192 

Jacob 192 

John 186, 188, 189 

John, Jr 83, 186, 188 to 193 

John, 3rd 191, 192 

Joseph 192 

Joseph 383, 418 

Mary 192 

Mercy (Allen) Middleton [17], 83, 186, 
190, 191, 193, 194, 195. 

Priscilla (Collins) 188 

PrisciUa 192 

Samuel 283 

Sarah 192 

Tabitha 286, 438 

Humphries, Joshua 94, 197, 249, 354 



472 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Humphries, Walter 50 

HuNCKS, Colonel 281 

HuNLOPE, Edward 89, 102 

Hunt, Benjamin 345 

Esther, Jr 2b5, 425 

Frances 296 

John. . .365, 369, 370, 384, 413, 414, 428 

Jos 359 

Josiah 389 

Joshua 238, 265, 363 

Mary 296 

Ralph 296 

Robert 250, 272 

Sarah 279 

William 279 

Hunter, Robert (Gov.) 188 

Hurley, James 423, 437 

Lucy 250 

Husk, Mary (French) 241 

Hutchinson, George 161 

J 281 

Sarah 335 

Imlay, John 233 

Ingersoll, Ebenezer 348 

Rachel 242, 348 

INGOLDESBY, Richard (L. Gov.), 81, 82, 124 

Rich 281 

Inskeep, Abraham 283 

James 269, 283 

John 269 

Joseph 269 

Mary 380 

Iredell, Abraham 397 

Ireton, H 281 

Obadiah 286 

Vesta (Fenton) [1501 286 

Ivens, Samuel 371 

IviNS, Aaron 295 

Ann [208] 295 

Ann 433 

Anna 222, 301 

Caleb [202] 295 



page 

IviNS, Hannah 386 

Isaac, Sr 295 

Israel [205] 295 

Keziah (Shreve) [103] 222, 295 

Lydia [207] 295 

Margaret (Woodward) 295 

Mary 386 

Moses 222,295,303 

Moses [203] 295 

Rebecca [206] 295 

Rhoda 222, 301 

Sarah (Wright) 295 

Sarah [204] 295 

William 433 

Jackson, John 246 

Richard 246 

James I 40 

James II 17, 25. 37, 45 

James, Joseph 423 

Jarrett, Ann ( Lukens) 444 

Tacy 444 

William 444 

Jay, Joseph 232 

Jeffries, Constantine 292 

Letitia 292 

Jenkins, William 147 

Jennings, Isaac 192 

Judith 283 

Samuel (Gov.) ... .29, 30, 102, 194, 335 

Jewell, John 79, 80 

Johnson, Thomas 210 

Johnston, Jno 239, 265 

Jones, Abigail (French) [350] 384 

Edmond 106 

Edward 205 

Elizabeth (French) [312] 358 

Grace 83, 185 

Griffith 144 

John 35, 283 

John 185 

John 205 

John, Jr 205, 208, 218 



INDEX 



473 



PAGE 

JoxES, J 281 

Jonathan 3b5 

Joseph 145 

Joseph 358 

Joseph 384 

Mary (Doughty) 205 

Mary (Brown) [99J 205, 217 

Mary (French) [276] 337, 338 

Rebecca, 185 

Rebecca 205 

Richard Ib7 

Richard 320 

William 337 

JUTTLE, Moses 317 

Kaighl, David 220 

Kay, Elizabeth (Brown) 149 

Francis 149 

Hope (French) 149,433 

Isaac 149, 283 

Isaac 422, 423 

Jemima (French) 149 

John 149 

John 149, 226 

Josiah 191 

Keziah (Thorn) 149 

Mary 149 

Samuel 149 

Keelor, Jacob 318, 429 

Keen, Unea 251 

Keith, George 35, 111, 146 

Kemble, Esther (Matlack) French ... 234 

Vespasian 234 

Kettle, Hannah 255 

KiLLE, Samuel 290 

Kixg, Constance 226 

Fra 210, 226 

Frederick 121 

Harmanus 92, 95, 101, 210 

John 96, 210, 226 

Joseph 96, 210, 226 

Mary 92, 95, 226 

Mary 64, 92, 94, 95 



PAGE 

King, Mercy 210 

Thomas 210, 226 

KiNSEY, Charles 417, 418, 419 

KiRBY, Joseph 231 

KiRKBRIDE, John 213 

John, Jr 213 

KiRTON, Alice 42 

Thomas 42 

Kite, Benjamin 201 

Deborah 201 

Elizabeth 201 

John 201 

Joseph 201 

Mary (Breintnall) 201 

Rebecca (Walton) 201 

Richard 46 

Susannah 201 

Susannah (Letchworth) 201 

Thomas 201 

Knight, Dubre 441 

Martha (Buzby) [426] 441 

Kno\vles, Nathanael 46 

Lacy, Samuel 157 

Ladd, Hannah ( Mickle) 200 

Hannah 291 

John 192, 283 

John 200 

Lafayette, General 321, 322 

Lamb, Ann 167 

Jacob 161, 163, 164, 169, 173 

Lambert, Thos., 27, 85, 98, 99, 112, 183, 204 

Lamprey, Mary 46 

Lancaster, Ann 288, 444 

Elizabeth (Barlow) 444 

Hannah (Wills) 407 

John 407 

John 444 

Lanning, John 275 

Samuel 341, 344 

Large, Dorothy 167 

Mary 182 

Samuel 98 



474 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Large, Sarah 181, 182 

Laurason, James 328 

Laurie, Gauen 25, 27, 37, 48 

James 433 

Lavage, Henry (Capt.) 411 

Lawrence, Richard 210 

William 220 

Lawrie, Thomas 220 

Lee, Francis 124 

Mary 234 

Leeds, Daniel 72, 156, 160 

Margaret 118 

Philo 162 

Titian 169 

Vincent 289, 290 

Leeson, John 96 

Lemmon, Joseph 318 

Lester, Mary (Stokes) [440] 443 

Thomas 443 

Letchworth, Elizabeth (Kite) 201 

John 201 

Susannah 201 

Lewis, Abigail (French) [29], 92, 231, 232 

James 92, 231, 232 

James, Jr. [114] 231, 232 

Jonathan 201 

Mordecai 303 

Rachel (Breintnall) [76] 201, 203 

Richard 143 

Robert 208 

LiLBURNE, Robert 281 

LiNCH, Michael 250 

Linton, Hannah 331 

LiPPiNCOTT, Aaron 376 

Abigail 197 

Ann 118 

Ann 441 

Benjamin II 355, 356 

Elizabeth 118, 196 

Esther 197 

Esther (Davis) 386 

Ezekiel 250 

Freedom 69, 70, 94, 186, 194, 196 



page 

LippiNCOTT, Grace 250 

Hannah 384 

Isaac 196, 197 

Isaac 197 

Jacob 132 

Jacob 423 

James 159 

John 118 

John 197 

John 258, 275, 351, 357, 379, 424 

Joseph 83, 203 

Joshua, 237, 239, 364, 370, 377, 390, 407 

Margrett 118 

Mary 194 

Mary (Haines) 194 

Mary 197 

Mary F. (Carr) [330] 376 

Mary 385 

Mercy (Allen) Middleton-Hugg [17], 
83, 186, 194, 196. 

Nathaniel 197 

Phebe 197 

Rachel (Smith) 195 

Rebecca (Sharp) Coate [21] . . .83, 203 

Rebecca 296 

Rebecca 397 

Remembrance 118 

Samuel 196 

Samuel 366, 367, 368, 369, 376 

Samuel B 423 

Solomon 244, 273, 398 

Theodocia 376 

Theodosia 378 

Thomas. . . .83, 119, 150, 186, 194 to 197 

Thomas 196, 238, 243, 364, 368 

Thomas 197 

Livesey, M 281 

Livingston, Henry 315 

William (Gov.), 231, 278, 299, 305, 308, 
374. 

Logan, Hannah 207 

Long, Eleanor 443 

Lord, Eliz 291 



INDEX 



475 



PAGE 

Lord, Joshua 256 

LouCKS, Mary L 439 

LouiTT, Jonathan 188 

Louts, Jacob 316 

Love, Richard 69 

Lovelace, Lord (Gov.) 89 

Lovett, Jonathan 188 

LowTHER, James 201 

Martha (Breintnall) [79] 201,203 

Lucas, Nicholas 25 

Robert 448 

Ludlowe, Edm 281 

McClealan, James 220 

McCoLLOCK, John 282 

McCuLLOCK, Mary 148, 282 

McElroy, Herbert 252, 278, 279 

McMichael, Morton 83 

McMiLLiN, Mary (Shreve) [235] 308 

William 308 

McVaugh, Mayberry 49 

Madison, Dolly (Payne) Todd 285 

James 285 

Magee, Safety 206 

Malin, John ( M.D.) 439 

Mariott, Thomas 207 

Marlen, William 101 

Marlin, Sarah (French) [28] 92 

William 92, 100, 101 

Marling, Sarah [28] 107 

William 107 

Marll, Hannah 222, 326 

John 326 

Marlowe, Gregory (Capt.) 48 

Marriot, Isaac 68 

Marriott, Abraham 173 

Marson, James 175, 177, 178 

John 177 

Lydia (Buzby) [55] 175, 177, 178 

Marten, Henry 281 

Martin, Colonel 315 

Isaac 126 

Katherine 126 



page 

Martinaux, W. S 104 

Mason, James 128 

John 158 

Mary 139 

Richard 176 

Sarah 65, 158 

Mathews, Thomas 67 

Mathis, Sarah 203 

Matlack, Charles F. (M.D.) [381] ... 424 
Eleanor (French) Hollingshead [144], 

268, 424 

Esther 92, 234, 235 

George 116, 125, 267 

James 437 

John 197, 234, 262 

John 283, 368, 369, 370 

Joseph, 268, 367, 368, 369, 416, 417, 
419, 424. 

Joshua 364 

Jeremiah 368 

Martha 270 

Mary (French) Middleton [37], 116, 

267 

Mary (Lee) 234 

Rebecca 286, 440 

Reuben 364, 367 

Richard 283 

Samuel 368, 369 

Sarah A. (Maule) 424 

Timothy 128, 129, 270 

William.... 120, 121, 122, 123, 129, 130 
William. . . .236, 237, 342, 351, 363, 413 

Matlock, George 250 

William 250 

Matthews, Thomas 240, 279 

Maule, Sarah A 424 

Mauleuerer, Tho 281 

Maxwell, Elizabeth 283 

John 365, 369, 390 

William (Genl.) . . . .308, 309, 322, 324 

M.WNE, Symon 281 

Medius, Js. Decow 213 

Mellon, Edward 196 



476 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Meneer, Joseph 164 

Meriott, Isaac 1 50 

Samuel 188 

Merlen, William 101 

Metzgar, Wilhelmina 446 

Mey, Cornelius (Capt.) 25 

Meyers, Susan 443 

MiCHELL, William 75 

Mickel, James 291 

Letitia (Wood) [175] 291 

MiCKLE, Archibald 200, 283 

Charles 430 

David 407, 408 

John 83, 198, 200, 382 

John 200 

Martha 424 

Mary (Allen) Stockdell [18], 83, 198, 

200. 

Moses 408 

Rachel (Wills) 407 

Samuel 200 

Sarah 408 

William 200 

William 407 

MiCLE, John 90 

Mary [18] 90 

MiDDLETON, Amos 216 

Amos 440 

Amy 446 

Beulah [136] 267 

Elizabeth 187 

Elizabeth 440 

George 113 

Hannah [68] 186, 187 

Hannah (Carr) [326] 376 

Hugh [67] 186, 187 

Jane 250 

Joel 448 

John 187 

John 298, 299, 376 

Martha 376 

Mary (French) [37], 116, 133, 267, 271 
Mary (Buzby) [406] 440 



PAGE 

MiDDi.ETON, Mary (Morgan) [471].. 448 

Mathew [66] 186, 187 

Mercy (Allen) [17], 83, 186, 187, 189, 
190, 191, 194. 

Naomi 187 

Nathan lib, 133, 134, 247, 267, 271 

Nathan 187 

Nathan, Jr. [137] 267 

Nathaniel 353 

Rachel [70] 186, 187 

Rebecca [69] . . . 186, 187, 191, 196, 197 

Robert 440 

Thomas, Jr.. .83, 113, 157, 186, 187, 188 

Thomas 186, 187 

Thomas, 3rd [65] 186, 187, 196 

Thomas 376 

MiDLETON, Able 215 

Jane 379, 381 

Tho 187 

MiLBORN, John 180 

Miller, Ebenezer 291, 292 

Rachel 435 

Millingtox, Gilbt 281 

Milner, Hannah (Breintnall) [81], 201, 203 

MOLICA, Eric 396 

Montgomerie, John (Gov.) . . . 188, 193, 206 
Moore, Agnes (French) [355], 386, 393, 394 

Amasa 386 

Benjamin 397 

Bethuel 364, 366, 367, 390 

Hannah E 341 

John 281 

Josiah 395 

Mary 341 

Thomas 373 

Priscilla 386 

Moorehead, Fergus 308 

Rebecca (Shreve) [232] 308 

Morgan, Benjamin R. [472] 447, 448 

David B 241 

Elizabeth (Roberts) 448 

Francis 40 

Griffith [475] 448 



INDEX 



477 



Morgan, Hannah (Haines) [467]. 447, 

Hannah [473] 

Isaac 293, 447, 448, 

Isaac [474] 

Joseph 

Joseph, Jr 

Joseph 

Joseph [476] 

Judith [477] 

Mary (Stokes) 

Mary [471] 

Mary (Burrough) 

Sarah (Ridgway) [181], 293. 447, 

Thomas 

MORREY, Sarah 160, Ibl, 

Morris. Anthony 72, 

Anthony, Jr 

Robert 

Elizabeth 

Hannah (French) [315] 

Lewis (Gov\) 91, 

]\Iargaret 

Morris 143, 

Morris, Richard (Rev.) 

Robert 

Thomas 

William 99, 113, 211, 216, 

Morton, Thomas 250. 

MoTT, John 

Moulton, Bartholomew 

Elizabeth 

Mary 327, 

MuLOCK, James 

MuRFiN, Ann 181, 183, 184, 

Ann 181, 

Joanna ( Johannah) 184, 

John 

John 

John 181, 

John [62] 181, 

Joseph 

Mary 183, 

Rebecca (French) [IS] 65, 



.\GE PAGE 

448 MuRFiN, Robert 112, 181, 183, 184, 214 

448 Robert 183, 184 

449 Robert 65, 181, 182 

448 Sarah 98, 181, 182, 183, 210, 215 

353 Thomas [60] 181, 182 

352 William 97, 181, 184, 210 

448 William [61] 181, 182,216,219 

448 William 181, 182 

448 MuRRELL, Samuel 283 

448 William 167 

448 

448 Nason, C. H. p. (Rev.) 439 

449 Newberry, Hasker 126, 127, 128 

40 John 128 

162 Mary 126, 127, 128 

73 Newbie, Elizabeth 188 

358 Mark 188 

49 Newbold, Anne 213 

287 Ann T 387 

358 Barzillai 1 10, 213, 228, 234, 305 

233 Edith 213 

33 Hannah 213 

144 John 213 

65 Joseph 298, 299 

49 Margaret 301 

343 Michael, 110, 213, 224, 228, 229, 230, 

217 234. 

262 Sarah 213 

259 Thomas 100 

327 Thomas 301 

327 William 298 

328 Newbould, Barzillai HO 

283 Michael 103, 110 

214 Thomas 210 

182 Newton, Hannah [438] 443 

214 Isaac 288,443 

97 John [435] 443 

184 Joseph 251, 252 

182 Martha 374 

182 Mary (Stokes) [165] ... .288, 290, 443 

181 Mary [437] 443 

184 Rachel (Sharp) 443 

181 Samuel [436] 443 



478 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Newton, Susannah 288, 443 

Nicholson, Ann 380 

George 96 

Samuel 380 

Samuel 421 

Nixon, Israel 430 

John 222, 326 

Sarah (Shreve) [108] 222, 326 

Noble, Richard 320 

Nones, Benjamin 332 

NORRIS, Sarah 283 

North, Anna M 12 

Norton, Gre 281 

John 275 

NuTT, Levi 228 

Odell, Jonathan (Rev.) 33 

Ogburn, Jane 449 

Sarah (Shreve) 223,226 

Ogden, Sarah A. (French) [1056], 242, 342 

Okey, John 281 

Olive, Thomas. .50, 68, 69, 75, 102, 103, 274 
Ollive, Thomas (Gov.), 27, 37, 48, 66, 71, 

72, 73. 

Ong, Jacob 227 

Op den Graeff, Abraham 439 

Orens, Joseph 240 

Orphood, Edmond 143 

Edward 147 

Orphord, Edward 147 

Orpwood, Edmond 143 

Overton, Esther 96 

Hannah 95, 96, 98 

Samuel 96 

Owen, Humphrey 237 

Jos 364,365 

Joshua 364, 365 

Page, Agnes (Hollin<^shead) [376]... 424 
Atlantic (French) [371], 410, 415, 416, 

420. 

Benjamin 220 

Christine 427 



page 

Page, Gilbert 410, 420^ 

William M. (M.D.) 42-1 

Paine, John 69, 73, 77, 79, 88, 176 

Palmer, George 220 

Pancake, George 316 

Pancoast, Aaron 397 

Anne 296 

Elizabeth 112 

Grace 222, 296 

Hannah 96, 111, 112 

1 1 annah 386 

Henry 112 

John 112 

Joseph, 96, 105, 112, 142, 176, 224, 225, 
232. 

Samuel 100 

Thomas 296 

Thomasin 9b, 98, 111, 112 

William 9b, 111, 112, 142, 176 

Parish, John 432 

Parke, Roger 112 

Parker, William 220 

Patterson, A. B. (Rev.) 410 

Paul, Hannah (Stokes) [441] 443 

Joshua 443 

Samuel P 423 

Paxson, Catharine (Ridgway) Potts [186], 

293 

Samuel 293 

Payne, Dolly 285 

John 50 

John, Jr 285 

Mary (Coles) 285 

Priscilla 330 

Peacock, Isaac 354 

Isabella 242, 348 

Lydia 354 

Margaret 349 

Pearson, Isaac 188 

Peart, Samuel 249, 401 

Peddle, Edith 290 

Peeps, Henry 154, 155 

Pelham, Per 281 



INDEX 



479 



PAGE 

Pemberton, Israel 207, 212 

Israel, Jr 207 

John 432 

Penn, William, 17, 25, 26, 27, 28, 37, 48, 
146, 175, 389. 

Penquite, Agnes 389 

Agnes (Sharp) 389, 405 

John 389, 405 

Penston, Thomas 279 

Peters, Benjamin 202 

Peterson, Captain 317 

Pharo, Garvas 298 

Phayre, Lieut. Col 281 

Phillips, John 231 

Phipps, Deborah (Kite) 201 

Joseph 147 

Stephen 201 

Pierce, Phoebe 442 

Pigeon, Joseph 192 

Pine, Isaac 423 

PiTTMAN, John 220 

Richard 120, 121, 122, 123 

Platt, Hannah 159 

Pleasant, Samuel 213 

Plumsted, William 145 

Pope, Amy (French) [349] 384 

John 384 

Joseph 68 

Porter, John 435 

Potter, Vinct 281 

Potts, Daniel 144 

Catherine (Ridgway) [186] 293 

Rebecca 433 

Samuel 293 

Thomas, Jr 211, 221 

Powell, Robert 67 

Pratt, Nathan 245 

Preston, John (Dr.) 40 

Price, James 220 

Robert F 283 

Prickit, William 136 

Prickitt, Job 364 

Josiah 257 



page 

Pride, Tho 281 

Prisly, George 314 

PuRESOY, William 281 

Quick, Matilda (French) [309] 351 

Thomas 351 

Quicksall, Achsah 433- 

Mary 96 

William 96 

QuiGLEY, Robert 220 

Rainier, Aaron B 430 

Rakestraw, Rachel 242, 350, 351, 352 

Thomas 350, 351 

Raper, Caleb 90 

Joshua 90, 91,207 

Thomas 94, 150 

Read, Charles, 156, 229, 230, 247, 381, 401 

Friese ( Lieut.) 312 

Reading, John 401 

Reckless, Anne (Woodward), 222, 301, 302 

Anthony 302 

Isaac 302 

John 302 

Joseph 100. 104. 210, 301 

Joseph, Jr 301, 302 

Joseph 302 

Mary 302 

Margaret (Satterthwaite) 301 

Robert 302, 30? 

Records, Mary Ill 

Nathaniel HI 

Redford, Samuel 218, 219 

Redman, Thomas 235, 250, 256, 283 

Reed, Bowes 231, 278, 375 

John 220 

Richard 220 

Reeve, Mark 257. 273 

Reily, John 242 

Mary (French) [124] 242 

Revell, Theo 124 

Thomas, 73, 75, 77. 79. 80, 85, 156, 224 
Reves, Thomas 1 79 



480 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Richards, John 192 

Rickey, Hannah 330 

Rachel 231, 330 

Thomas 330 

RiDGVVAY, Abigail [188] 294 

Abigail 307 

Abigail (Stockton) 449 

Abigail 449 

Amy (Shreve) [219] 301 

Anna [187] 293 

Beulah (Coate) [90] 203, 294 

Beulah [182] 293 

Catherine [186] T. . 293 

Coates [185] 293 

Edith [191] 294 

Elizabeth (Chamberlayne) 449 

Elizabeth 449 

Israel [180] 293 

Jane 449 

Job 449 

John 203, 294 

John 449 

Joseph 203, 293, 449 

Joseph [189] 294 

Joseph 449 

Joseph 449 

Josiah 449 

Mary (Coate) [89] 203, 293 

Mary [184] 293 

Mary [194] 294 

Mary 307 

Mary 449 

Miriam [193] 294 

Rachel [183] 293 

Rebecca [192] 294 

Richard 448, 449 

Richard, Jr 449 

Sarah [181] 293, 448 

Sarah 449 

Sarah 449 

Solomon 307 

Thomas 449 

William C. [190] 294 



PAGE 

RiDGWAY, William 449 

RiSDON, John 246, 352 

Roads, Martha 160 

Roberts, Agnes 397 

Ann (Brick) [345] 380 

Arthur 448 

Bathsheba (French) [304], 350, 354, 

355. 

Charles [594] 353 

Clayton 355 

Daniel 139, 145 

David 443 

Elizabeth 337 

Elizabeth 448 

Elizabeth (Stokes) [442] 443 

Enoch 257, 264, 384, 407, 425 

Enoch 351 

Ephriam 250 

Esther 257, 359, 408 

John 50, 72, 73, 118, 128, 129, 274 

John, 236, 237, 257, 272, 342, 363 to 
368, 390, 413, 414, 423, 428. 

John K 421 

Joseph 238, 364, 366, 379, 384 

Joseph 350 

Joshua, 257, 272, 366, 368, 369, 407, 424, 
425. 

Josiah 345, 362, 372 

Judith (Morgan) [477] 448 

Mary 255 

Mary (French) [320] 362, 372 

Rachel (French) [308].. 351, 354, 355 

Rebecca (Buzby) [41] 139, 144 

Rebecca, 257, 258, 259, 359, 381, 408, 425 

Samuel 364, 368, 369 

Samuel, J r 238 

Sarah 117, 129, 130, 142, 176 

Sarah (French) 241 

Thomas 144 

William, 265, 348, 353, 356, 364, 366, 
368, 369, 370. 380, 411. 

Robeson, Mr 317 

Robins, Sarah 331 



INDEX 



481 



PAGE 

ROCKHILL, Edward 97, 112 

Sarah 427 

Solomon 305 

Rodman, Clark 125 

Thomas 73, 74 

Rogers, Ann 294 

Ann 296 

Ann (Shreve) [211] 296 

Edith 442 

Elizabeth 288, 445 

Grace (Allen) Eayre [64] 185 

Isaac 294 

Job 83 

Lydia Ann 308 

Martha (Esturgans) 445 

Mary 294 

Mary 358 

Michael 296 

Michael, Jr 296, 

Rhoda 83 

William 186 

William, Jr 186 

William 363 to 369, 445 

RoLi.0, Duke of Normandy 39 

Rose, Joseph 91 

RowAND, Elizabeth [772] 408 

James 241 

Lattice (Wills) [362] 406, 408 

William 406, 408 

RowE, Owen 281 

RuDDERO, Meribah 197 

RuDDEROW, John 120, 121, 122, 123 

RuDERROE, John 124 

RuDMAN, Andrew (Rev.) 336 

Safern, Mr 312 

Satterthwaite, Samuel 100 

Samuel 305, 332 

William 300 

Saunders, Joseph 241 

Savery, William 202, 434 

Say, Thomas 203 

Will 281 



PAGE 

Scattergood, Benjamin 1 1 1, 223 

Benjamin [237] 313, 326 

David 222,326 

Elizabeth 92, 111, 112 

Elizabeth [238] 313, 326 

Hannah Ill, 112 

Jonathan 429 

Joseph, 32, 96, 108, 109, 110, 111, 134, 
135, 159, 202. 

Joseph Ill 

Mary 296 

Rebecca [239] 313, 326 

Sarah 64, 92,94 

Sarah (Shreve) [108] 222, 326 

Thomas 92, 96, HI, 112, 142, 176 

Thomas, Jr., 106, 111, 150, 157, 176, 
188, 191, 196, 207. 

Thomas, 3rd HI 

Thomasine 112 

Tomsin Ill, 112 

SCHOI.EY, Ann [199] 295 

Elizabeth (French) [22], 92, 107, 204, 

210. 

Francis 213 

Isabel 213 

James [195] 294 

John 204 

John 213 

John [200] 295 

Joseph 182, 205, 209, 294 

Martha [ 197] 294 

Mary [198] 295 

Mary (Rogers) 294 

Rachel 213 

Rachel [201] 295 

Richard [94] 204 

Robert 204, 448 

Robert [92] 204 

Samuel [196] 294 

Sarah 204 

Sarah [93] 204 

Sarah (Brown) [100] . . . .205, 217, 294 
Thomas 94, 96, 204, 448 



31 



482 



INDEX 



PAGE 

ScHOi.EY, Thomas [95] 204 

William 92, 107, 204, 210 

SCHOOLEY, Thomas 220 

Scot, Tho 281 

Scott, Benjamin 50, 71 

Capt 314 

ScROPE, Ad 281 

Scull, Benjamin 423 

Seary, Sarah 141 

Senes, James 220 

Shackerly, John 46 

Shackle, Thomas 118 

Shallcross, John 143 

Sharp, Agnes 405 

Anne 283 

Hannah 83 

Hannah [20] 83, 201 

Hugh, 64, 83, 89, 90, 91, 151, 179, 180, 
196, 198, 200. 

John 129, 130 

Joshua 368 

Margaret 205 

Rachel (French) Allen [4J, 83, 89, 90, 

191, 196. 

Rachel 443 

Rebecca [21] 83. 203 

Samuel 193 

Thomas 137, 192. 279 

William 83 

Shaw, James 220 

Shelvill, John 313 

Sheppard, Clara G 12 

Sherwyn, James 121, 122 

Shinn, Hannah 257 to 258 

Hannah (Fenton) [398] 438 

Jacob, Jr 438 

James 116 

John 68, 72 

Samuel 364 

Shippen, Edward 167 

Shoemaker, Jacob 201 

Margaret 201 

Susannah 201 

Shotwell, Hugh 355 



PAGE 

Shourds, Samuel, Jr 233 

Shreeve, Benjamin 108, 210, 225, 226 

Caleb 224, 225, 226 

Elizabeth 226 

Hannah 226 

Hope 226 

James 226 

Jane 226 

Jonathan 226 

Joseph 226 

Joshua 210, 226 

Martha 96 

Rebecca [26] 226 

Richard [220] 305 

Sarah 225, 226 

Thomas 226 

William 305 

Shreve, Abigail (Ridgway) 307 

Amy [219] 301 

Ann [211] 296 

Ann (Hopkins) 297 

Anna (Ivins) 222. 301 

Anna [224] 301,313 

Anna (Ball) 330 

Anne (Reckless) . . . .222, 301, 302, 303 

Barbara (Swink) 330 

Benjamin, 92, 100, 107, 108, 213, 222, 

223, 225, 227, 228, 229, 230, 328. 

Benjamin, Jr. [109], 222, 228, 326, 327, 

328, 329. 
Benjamin [210], 223, 296, 298, 299, 300. 
305, 429. 

Benjamin [234] 308, 320 

Benjamin, 3rd [249] 327, 328 

Benjamin 328 

Benjamin [253] 330 

Benjamin F. H 223 

Caleb 105, 222, 223, 224 

Caleb 223 

Caleb 223 

Caleb [105], 222, 223, 227, 228, 296 to 

300, 311, 319, 320. 
Caleb, Jr. [213] 296, 298, 300 



INDEX 



483 



PAGE 

Shreve, Caleb [236] 308 

David 223 

Elizabeth [226] 307 

Elizabeth 308 

Elizabeth 328 

Esther [229] 307, 313, 320 

Frances E 328 

Frances (Hunt) 296 

George G. [231] 308, 313, 320 

George 328 

Grace (Pancoast) 222, 296 

Grace [216] 297 

Grace (Curtis) 222, 307 

Hannah (Marll) 222, 326 

Hannah (Very) 327 

Hannah 328 

Henry M. [233] 308, 311, 313, 320 

Isaac [221] 301 

Isaac [248] 327, 328, 329 

Isaac, Jr 328 

Israel [107], 222, 227, 228, 298, 303, 
307 to 325. 

Israel, Jr. [230] 307, 313, 320 

Jeremiah Warder [218] 301 

John 223 

John [225], 307, 309, 311, 319, 320 to 
326. 

John [245] 327 

John [252] 327, 328 

John 328 

John [254] 330 

Jonathan 223 

Joseph 223 

Joshua 223, 226 

Joshua 298 

Keziah [103] 213, 222, 227, 295 

Keziah [222] 301, 303 

Keziah [228] 307, 313, 320 

Louisa 328 

Lydia Ann (Rogers) 308 

Margaret (Newbold) 301 

Mary [217] 297 

Mary (Scattergood) 296 



PAGE 

Shreve, Mary (Cokley) .222, 307, 313, 320 

Mary (Blair) 308 

Mary [235] 308, 320 

Mary (Moulton) 327, 328 

Mary (Goodhue) 327 

Mary 328 

Mary 328 

Mary Ann (Culver) 330 

Mary [257] 330 

Peggy 319 

Phebe [209] 296 

Priscilla (Payne) 330 

Rachel (Huffendoffer) 327 

Rebecca (French) [26], 92, 107, 222, 

227, 328. 

Rebecca [212] 296 

Rebecca (Lippincott) 296 

Rebecca [232] 308, 313, 320 

Rebecca [246] 327 

Rebecca 328 

Reuben [214] 296 

Rhoda (Ivins) 222, 301 

Richard [104] 222 

Richard [220], 299, 300, 301, 302, 305, 

312, 313, 319. 

Samuel [110] 222, 228, 330 

Samuel [223] 301 

Samuel B. [250] 327, 328 

Samuel 328 

Samuel, Jr. [256] 330 

Sarah (Areson) 222, 223 

Sarah [108] 222, 227, 326 

Sarah 223 

Sarah (Beck) 301 

Sarah [227] 307 

Sarah [247] 327 

Susan (Wood) 222, 326, 327 

Susan W 328 

Thomas 223 

Thomas [215] 297 

William [106], 222, 227, 228, 298, 299, 

301 to 305, 312, 313. 
William [243] 326 



484 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Shreve, William [255] 330 

Shrieve, Caleb 298, 299 

William 298, 304 

Shumar, Elizabeth (Scattergood) [238J, 

326 

Joseph 326 

Shumard, Anna (Shreve) [224] 301 

Nathan 301 

Shute, Captain 311, 323 

Samuel 250, 311, 312, 323, 342, 353 

Sibley, John 126 

Katherine 126 

SiCKLER, Christopher 339 

lazer 339 

SiDDON, Job 283 

John 176 

Silver, Archibald 220 

SiMES, Snyder B. (Rev.) 336 

Simple, Robert 314 

Simpson, Captain 314 

Skeen, John 68 

Skinner, Mr 314, 315 

Skirm, Abraham 220 

Joseph 220 

Slim, Christiana 336 

Sloan, David 339 

Hannah ( French) 240 

James 423 

Slocum, Nathaniel 118 

Small, Ann ( Hinchman) 287 

Elizabeth ( Morris) 287 

Israel [158] 287, 288 

John 198, 245, 287, 288 

John [161] 287, 288 

Jonas [159| 287, 288 

Mary [164] 287, 292 

Robert [162] 287, 288 

Ruth (Stockdell) [71]...19S. 287, 288 

Ruth [163] 287, 288 

William [160] 287 

Smallwood, J. C 339 

Smith, Bathsheba 433 

Daniel 157, 183, 184. 207, 227 



page 

Smith, Daniel 290, 293 

Elizabeth 292 

George 118, 129, 130 

Hannah (Coate) [178] 293 

la 178 

John 49 

John 83, 84, 85, 188, 207, 212 

Joseph 239, 265 

Joshua 159 

Mary ( Murfin) 183, 184 

Rachel 195, 235 

Rachel (Stokes) [443] 443 

Rebecca 213 

Richard 167, 239 

Richard S 353 

Robert 265 

Samuel 435 

Thomas 311 

Timothy 443 

Smout, Edward 192 

Smyth, Hen 281 

Snowden, Isaac 368 

William 366, 367, 368 

SousMAN, Peter 218 

SouTHEBY, Joan 70 

Spicer, Thomas 250 

Spiker, Christian 316 

Springer, Patience 286, 440 

Stackhouse, Sarah 331 

Stacy, Elizabeth 286 

Henry 27, 67 

Mahlon 72, 75, 183, 189, 204 

Robert 71, 75 

Stanley, Mary 250 

Stanton, Elizabeth 64, 70 

Daniel 254 

Stapley, Anth 281 

Starkey, James 313 

Thomas 430 

Steelman, Charles 120, 123 

Peter 423 

Steffe, William 42 

Stephens, Jose|)h 169 



INDEX 



485 



PAGE 

Stephens, Robert 235 

Stevens, Keziah (Shreve) [228], 307, 320 

Mary 429 

Thomas 307 

Stevenson, Cornell 442 

Mary 442 

Samuel 217, 219 

Thomas 220 

Stif, William 42 

Stiles, Amos 356 

Judith (Morgan) Roberts [477], 448, 

Robert 120, 122, 123 

Thomas 448 

Stilles, Robert 121 

Stilley, John 311 

Stoaks, John 191, 196 

Joseph 196 

Stocdell, Mary 198 

Stockdai.e, Jervice 199 

Rachel 291 

William 198 

Stockdell, Darkes [73] 198 

Hannah [72] 198, 288, 445 

Jarves 83, 198, 199, 200, 445 

Mary (Allen) [18] 83, 198, 200 

Prudence [75] 198 

Rachel [74] 198, 291 

Ruth [71] 198, 287 

Stockton, Abigail 376 

Abigail (Hollingshead) [378] 424 

Abigail 449 

Harriet 446 

Job 106 

John 289 

Joseph 106 

Mary 191 

Mary 376 

Mary 424 

Richard 446 

Richard 449 

Samuel 376 

Sarah 446 

William 424 



PACE 

Stockton', William 424 

Stokes, Abigail 360 

Abigail (Brick) [346] 380 

Abigail ( Woolman) 446 

Amy (Hinchman) 384 

Amy ( Middleton) 446 

Ann (Lancaster) 288, 444 

Ann 359 

Atlantic (Bispham) 410, 411 

Charles [450] 50, 444, 445 

David [167] .. . .288, 289, 290, 444, 445 

David [451] 444 

Edith [458] 446 

Edward C 384 

Eleanor ( Long) 443 

Eli 448 

Eliza ( Eastburn) 443 

Elizabeth 203, 293 

Elizabeth 268, 384, 385 

Elizabeth (Green) 288 

Elizabeth [170], 253, 288, 289, 290, 362, 
370. 

Elizabeth [442] 443 

Elizabeth (Rogers) 288, 442, 445 

Elizabeth [457] 442, 446 

Elizabeth (Woolman) 446 

Esther [461] 446 

Hannah (Stockdell) [72], 198, 288, 

289, 290, 362 

Hannah [169] 288, 289, 290, 447 

Hannah ( Hinchman) 293 

Hannah 362 

Hannah [441] 443 

Hannah [453] 445 

Hannah ( Hatcher) 446 

Hannah (Morgan) [473] 448 

Harriet (Stockton) 446 

Israel [448] 444 

Jacob 283 

Jacob (Captain) 380 

Jarves [168] 288, 290, 442, 445 

Jarves, Jr. [456] 446 

John 50 



486 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Stokes, John, Jr.. 198, 288, 289, 290, 362 

John 288 

John, 3rd [166] ... .288, 289, 290, 443 

John [444] 443 

John L. [449] 444 

John [454] 446 

Joseph, 136, 185, 196, 234, 243, 255, 270, 
379, 410, 411. 

Joseph 416 

Joseph [459] 446 

Joshua 364, 384, 385 

Judith 185 

Judith 185 

Martha 185 

Martha [452] 442, 445 

Mary [165] 288, 443 

Mary 290 

Mary 410 

Mary [440] 443 

Mary [460] 446 

Mordecai [464] 446 

Mordecai, 2nd [466] 447 

Rachel [171] 288, 447 

Rachel (Wright) 384 

Rachel [443] 443 

Rachel ( Burr) 444 

Sabilla 268, 410. 412 

Samuel 250, 267, 293 

Samuel (M.D.) [446] 443 

Samuel [463] 446 

Sarah (Borton) 444 

Sarah (Thompson) 446 

Sarah [465] 447 

Stockdell [447] 443 

Stockdell [462] 446 

Susan [445] 443 

Susan ( Meyers) 443 

Susannah (Newton) 288, 443 

Tacy ( Jarrett) 444 

Thomas 1 76, 444 

Thomas 278, 279, 384 

William [439] 443 

William [455] 446 

Wilhelmina (Metzgar) 446 



PAGE 

Stoolman, Charles 121 

Stork, Ro 210 

Stratton, Benjamin 284 

Charles C. (Gov.) 284 

Ephriam 365 

James (M.D.) 284 

Mary (Creighton) 284 

Sarah (Austin) 284 

Street, Ann 358 

Stretch, Peter 361 

Striker, Sarah 378 

Styles, Joseph 202 

Sullivan, General 323, 325 

Sunderland, William 108 

Surveyor General 37, 146 

Suslmann, Peter 218, 219 

Sutton, Mary 145 

William 145 

Swain, Aaron (M.D.) 305 

John 175 

Mary (Buzby) [56] 175 

SwETT, Joseph C 423 

Swink, Barbara 330 

Sykes, Anthony, 213, 230, 298,299, 304, 305 

Anthony 214 

Benjamin 213 

Joanna 98, 205, 212, 213, 214 

Joanna 213 

John 98. 113, 205, 209 to 214, 232 

John 214 

Mary 212, 213 

Samuel 213, 214 

Symmes, John C. (Judge) 316 

Talbot, Elizabeth 374 

John (Rev.) 33 

Talman, James 283 

Tallman, Mr 303 

Tantum, Elizabeth 98 

Elizabeth, Jr 210 

John 98, 99 

Taylor, Abigail (French) Lewis [29], 92, 

107, 231. 
Abigail 431, 433 



INDEX 



487 



PAGE 

Taylor, Alice 427 

Amos 433 

Charles 232 

Charles 433 

Charles F 435 

Elizabeth 433 

Enoch 435 

Jacob 92, 107, 231 

Jacob 431, 433 

John 217 

John 435 

Lewis 433 

Lydia 92, 231 

Lydia 433 

Mary 141 

Mr 313, 318 

Rebecca 282 

Rebecca 431, 432, 433 

Sarah 205 

Temple, James 281 

Pe 281 

Test, John 75, 153 

Thackra, Thomas 283 

Thay, Mary 433 

Thomas, Edward (Capt.) 299 

Eunice (French) [118] 234,240 

Daniel 144 

Gabriel 37, 38 

Jane W 295 

Jonas 234, 240 

Joseph 283 

William 44, 46 

William 267 

Thompson, John 254 

Joshua 257 

Keziah (French) [134] 254 

Samuel 291 

Sarah (Wood) [174] 291 

Sarah 447 

Simon 46 

Thorn, Enoch 336 

Hannah Z 401 

Isabella (Cheesenian) 149 



pace 

Thorn, Isaac 295 

John 298 

Joseph (Capt.) 149 

Keziah 149 

Mary (Scholey) [198] 295 

Rebecca (French) [271] 336 

Thorne, John 113 

Joseph 113 

Katherine 96 

TiCE, Martha 159 

Tichborne, Robert 281 

Till, Elizabeth 205 

TiLLTON, Joseph 233 

Mary 118 

Tillyer, Letitia (Breintnall) [80], 201, 203 

TiLTON, Abraham 217 

Todd, Dolly (Payne) 285 

James 355 

John 285 

ToMLiNSON, Joseph 270 

Richard 141, 142, 143, 176 

Sarah (Buzby) 141 

TowLE, Percivall 68 

Toy, Daniel 250 

Savory 361, 371 

Tyler, Elizabeth 271 

Vail, Mary 426 

Van Horn, Charlotte (French) [266], 335 

Jesse 335 

Vankide, Charles 220 

Vanneman, Nancy 386 

Vansciver, James 349, 350 

Varnum, General 343 

Vaughn, Samuel 429 

Venhorn, William 371 

Venn, John 281 

Very, Hannah 327, 328 

Hannah 327 

Samuel (Capt.) 327, 328, 329 

Vroom, Governor 444 

Walker, John 120, 121, 123 



488 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Walker, Mary P 295 

Wall, James 31S 

Walter 318 

Wallace, Mary 250 

Waller, Har 281 

William, Sir 46 

Walles, Tho 121 

Wallis, Ann 128, 129 

John 250 

Thomas, 73, 74, 120, 121, 123, 128, 129, 
130. 

Walton, Elizabeth 214 

Rebecca 201 

William 141, 143 

Ward, David 349 

John 349 

Warder, Jeremiah, Jr 303 

Ware, Mark 421 

Waring, Rebecca 98 

Warner, Nathaniel 220 

Warren, John 96, 209 

Warrick, Anthony, Jr 337 

Sarah (French) [277] 337, 338 

Warrington, Abraham, 237, 359, 364, 365, 

366, 369, 370. 

Abraham, Jr 370 

Hannah 253, 362, 363, 364 

Henry, 196, 238, 365, 366, 367, 369, 
416, 417. 

Henry, Jr 370 

John 368 

Joseph 238, 367, 369 

Mary (Roberts) 362 

Thomas 258, 357, 362, 363 

Washington, George (Genl.), 20, 310, 311, 
313, 319, 320, 321, 322, 324. 

Martha 321 

Watson, Amy 433 

Elizabeth 433 

John F 183 

John 196 

Marmaduke 99, 100 

Mary 433 



page 

Watson, Thomas 433 

William 115 

William 423 

Watts, Joseph 98 

Wattson, Mathew 97 

Waugh, Jane 46 

Wauton, Valentine 281 

Way, Caleb 313 

Wayne, Mary 282, 436 

W.-VYTE, Tho 281 

Weatherill, Christopher 68 

Webster, Hope ( French) 436 

Lawrence 364 

Weed, George 250, 283 

Weeks, Richard 283 

West, Hannah (Coate) [87] 203 

William 203 

Westi.and, Nathaniel 79, 80 

Wetherby, Edmund 423 

Wetherill, Christopher 94, 111, 150 

Phoebe Ill 

Thomas 150, 207 

Weyman, Edward 201 

Rebecca (Breintnall) [77] 201, 203 

Robert (Rev.) 33 

Wh alley, Edw 281 

Wheate, Benjamin 142, 150, 176 

Mary 142, 176 

Wheatly, Ann 313 

Caleb 204 

Joseph 313 

Sarah (Scholey) 204 

Wheeler, Robert 124 

Whitall, James 292 

Sarah (French) [760] 12 

White, Bishop 375 

Elizabeth 44 

Esther 213 

Esther (French) 241 

James 218, 219 

Jeremy 45 

John 85 

Josiah 250 



INDEX 



489 



PAGE 

White, Rebecca 270 

William 192 

Whitekield, Richard 147 

Whitehead 45 

WiCKWARD, Hannah 158, 163 

Rachel 158, 163, 171 

Samuel 158, 163, 169, 171, 175 

Sarah (Mason) 65, 158 

Sarah (Buzby) [59] 175 

William 158 

WicKWARE, Sarah 160 

WiCKWART, Sarah 159, 160 

Wilcox, Joseph 351 

WiLKixs, Ann (French) [138], 268, 277, 

377, 379. 
Ann (Hollingshead) [377] ..378,424 

Anna [337] 378 

Charles [341] 378 

Elizabeth ( Eyre) 377 

Hannah [335] 378 

Isaac [339] 378,424 

Jacob 268, 377, 378, 379 

Jacob [338] 378 

John 292 

Lydia (Hazelton) 378 

Mary 242, 340 

M. 291 

Samuel [336] 378 

Sarah 257 

Sarah (Striker) 378 

Theodosia (Lippincott) 378 

Thomas 272, 351, 377, 378 

Thomas [340] 378 

Uriah [334] 377 

William 368, 370 

Wilkinson, Nathaniel 158, 286 

Rachel (French) Fenton [47], 158,286 

William, Conqueror, The 39 

William III 84, 189 

Williams, Asher 318 

Tatum 283 

Willis, George 103 

WiLLiTS, Rebecca M 421 



PAGE 

WiLLOTT, Kesia 271 

Wills, Aaron 289, 407 

Abel 407 

Ann [363] 406 

Charles [366] 406 

Daniel (Dr.) 48, 50, 75 

Daniel I(i7, 197, 287, 406 

Elizabeth 191, 196, 407 

Elizabeth, Jr 191 

Elizabeth (Woolston) 287, 406 

Elizabeth (French) [ 142], 268, 277, 406 

to 409. 

Elizabeth [365] 406 

Elizabeth 406, 407 

George 50 

Hannah 407 

Hope 197 

Hope 407 

James 163, 166, 169, 171, 172 

James 268, 406, 407, 408 

John, 94, 150, 151. 153, 177, 191, 196, 
287. 

John 196 

John 425 

Joseph 409 

Lettice [362] 406 

Margaret 406, 407 

Mary 175, 287 

Mary 197 

Mary 406, 407 

Micajah 400, 401, 406, 407 

Moses 268, 406, 407, 425 

Moses, Jr. [367], 406, 408, 409, 426, 430 

Rachel 407 

Rebecca 191 

Rebecca ( Heulings) 406 

Rebecca [364] 406 

Rebecca W. (Ulack) [386], 406, 426, 

429. 

Ruth 407 

Zebedee 368, 370 

Wii.LSiOKD, John 112, 115 

WiLLSON, Robert 97 



490 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Wilson, Elizabeth 389 

Mathew 220 

Rebecca 337 

Robert 112 

Thomas 99 

William 432 

Winner, Abraham 259 

WoGAN, Tho 281 

Wood, Ann [784] 408 

Anna [176J 291 

Charles [783] 408 

Constantine 119, 291 

Elizabeth (Wills) [365] 405,408 

Francis 292 

Hannah (Ladd) 291 

Henry 291, 292 

Isaac 65, 142, 174, 176 

John 98, 231, 298, 299 

John 291 

Jonathan 1 74 

Joseph 317 

Letitia [175] 291 

Mary 119, 169 

Mary [49] 174 

Rachel (Stockdell) [74], 198, 291, l^^l 

Rachel [173] 291 

Richard [782] 408 

Sarah (French) [10], 65, 76, 77, 174 

Sarah [174] 291 

Susan 222, 326 

Thomas 144 

Thomas 406, 408 

William 94, 96, 112, 113 

William 198, 283, 291, 292 

William, Jr. [172], 231, 291, 292, 298, 
302. 

Woodward, Anne 301 

Anthony 96, 295 

Constance (Williams) 295 

Hannah 95, 98, 301 

Joseph 301 

Margaret 295 

WoOLi.EY, John 118 



pa(;e 

Woolly, Lidya 118 

Marcy 118 

WooLMAN, Abigail 446 

Asher 445, 446 

Beulah 440 

Elizabeth 196 

Elizabeth 446 

Granville 445 

Hannah (Stokes) 445 

John 50, 142, 176 

Jonah 290 

Martha [780] 408 

Rachel 440 

Rachel (Engle) 446 

Rachel (Xorcross) 445 

Rebecca (Wills) [364] 406, 408 

Samuel 190, 196 

Samuel 406, 408 

WooLSTON, Ann (French) [48] 158 

Elizabeth 287 

John. . .30, 70, 71, 72, 102, 103, 189, 287 

Joshua 158, 171 

Michael 165, 169 

Samuel 169 

WooLSTONE, John 152 

WoRiNTON, Jose])h 352 

Wright. Fretwell 299, 433 

Isaac 433 

Jonathan 167, 190, 433 

Joshua 99, 250 

Mary 213, 433 

Mathew 220 

Rebecca 213 

Rebecca 213 

Samuel 110 

Sarah 295 

Thomas 156. IhO, Idl. 211 

Yates, Mary 358 

York, Duke of (James II) 17, 25, 37 

Zane, Elizabeth 340 

Hannah 213 

Rebecca 394 



INDEX OF NAMES OF PLACES. 



I'AUE 

Abington, Pa 14b, 147 

Abraham Heights 322 

Adams, N. J 373 

Albany 322, 323 

Alexandria, Va. ..326, 327, 328, 329, 330 
Allegheny Mountain, Pa.. 316, 317, 325 

Allentown, N. J 209 

Alliance, O 307 

Almonesson, N. J 240 

Amboy 302 

America, 17, 32, 33, 36, 39, 48, 84, 93, 112, 
141, 142, 157, 161, 176, 178, 181, 
183, 189, 193, 195, 200, 225, 280, 
291, 312, 317, 321, 332, 401, 411, 
449. 

Amity Twp., Pa 307 

Ancocas (Rancocas), N. J., 440, 445, 447 
Ancocas (Rancocas) Creek, 118, 157, 

160, 289. 

Asheford-ix-the-Watek, Eng 214 

Ashen, Eng 112 

AsHSWAMP, N. J 309 

AssissicuNCK Creek, N. J 306 

Atsion, N. J 113 

Baltimore, Md 297 

Banbury, Eng 44, 46 

Bath, Eng 47 

Bedford, Pa 316 

Belfast, O 301 

Belmont Co., O 307 

Bergen, N. J 25 



PAGE 

Berks Co., Pa 307 

Berkshire, Eng 39 

Beverly, N. J 445 

Bickerstaff, Eng 411 

Billinghurst, Eng 389 

Bi.ooMFiELD Twp., Pa 301 

Blue Mountain 314 

Bordentown, N. J., 100, 206, 207, 209, 
211, 214, 221, 231, 232, 233, 
335, 433. 

BoRTON, Eng 46 

Brandywine (Battle of), 309, 323, 324 
Bridlington (Burlington), N. J. .. 29 

Bristol, Pa 323 

Brownsville, Pa 308, 321 

Bucks Co., Pa., 204, 289, 330, 334, 405, 
441, 448. 

Budds Ferry 317 

BuGBRooK, Eng 40, 41 

Bunker Hill 322, 324 

Burlington, N. J., 18, 19, 21, 22, 26, 28 
to 38, 48, 49, 56, 67, 68, 69, 70, 
72, 75, 76, 81, 82, 84, 85, 88, 
90, 91, 94, 96, 98, 102 to 111, 
117, 122, 124, 128, 134, 135, 142, 
149, 150, 151, 153, 159, 166, 174, 
176, 178, 181, 183, 187, 188, 190, 
191, 194, 195, 196, 202, 204, 207, 
214, 219, 229, 230, 231, 241, 249. 
252, 257, 262, 263, 265, 266, 274, 
278, 279, 285, 323, 327, 334, 349, 
401, 427, 437, 445, 448. 



491 



492 



INDEX 



PAGE 

BuRi.iXGTON Co., N. ]., 48, 74, 79, 83, 86 
to 95, 102 to 113, 116. 119, 121, 
124 to 130, 133, 134, 135, 136, 
142, 148, 152, 154, 156, 157, 158, 
160, 161, 162, 164, 167, 172, 174 
to 178, 180, 181, 185, 186, 187, 
190, 195, 196, 198, 199, 203, 204, 
205, 207, 208, 210, 212, 213, 214, 
216, 217, 219, 222 to 233, 240, 
242, 244 to 248, 251, 254, 260, 
261, 263, 265, 267, 269, 271, 273, 
287, 288, 289, 293 to 297, 299, 
301, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 309, 
311, 313, 320, 322, 324, 326, 330, 
344, 347, 349, 353, 356, 357, 372, 
374, 386, 400, 401, 402, 406, 408, 
409, 411, 414, 417, 418, 419, 422, 
427, 429, 430, 431, 433, 440, 442, 
444 to 447, 449. 

Burnt Cabins, Pa 315 

Bury, Eng 291 

Byberry, Pa 146 

Calikorxia 322 

Camden, N. J., 12, 25, 34, 117, 137, 149, 

341, 342, 353, 354, 420, 445. 
Camden Co., N. J., 149, 269, 282, 337, 388, 
420, 421. 

Canada 308, 321, 322, 324 

Carlisle, Pa 314 

Carolina 143 

Carolinas 17 

Cedar Creek, N. J 299, 300, 305 

Chambers Town (Ciiambersburg), 

Pa 315 

Chari.bury, Eng 46 

" Chees Quakes " 302 

Cheltenham, Pa 146 

Chester (N. J.), 97, 236, 237, 254, 256, 

259, 272, 342, 352, 365, 367, 368, 

373. 

Chester River 122 

Chester Twp., N. J., 84, 85. 86. 88. 89, 



page 
116, 118 to 126, 130, 133, 134, 
135, 150, 152, 194, 195, 196, 240, 
242, 244, 246, 247, 248, 254, 260, 
261, 263, 265, 267, 341, 344, 347, 
349, 351, 353, 356, 357, 362, 372, 
406, 414, 418, 447. 
Chesterfield (N. J.), 95, 98, 112, 209, 
210, 211, 212, 214, 215, 216, 217, 
232, 235, 331, 433. 
Chesterfield Twp., N. J., 101, 112, 154, 
204, 205, 207, 212, 214, 225, 227, 
295, 301, 305, 427, 431, 433. 
Chestertown (Moorestown), N. J., 373 

China 308. 321 

"Christeene" (Christiana) Creek. 

Del 83, 84 

Chygoe (Matinnicunck) Island, 

N. J 29 

Cincinnati, O 297, 325 

" Clithrice " (Cmtheroe). Eng. ... 291 

CoGGS, Eng 44 

CoLESTOWN, N. J 240, 241 

Columbiana Co., O 326 

Columbus, N. J Ill, 326, 429 

CoNESTOGA Creek. Pa 314 

Connecticut 49, 332, 422 

Connecticut Farms 310 

Connecticut River 25 

Cornwall, Eng 405 

CoRYELLS Ferry 324 

Craft's Creek, N. J Ill 

Crawford Co., Pa 301 

" Crewcorne " (Morrisville) Pa., 

204, 448, 449. 

Cropsody, Eng 46 

Cropwell, N. J 122 

Crosswicks, N. J., 30, 34, 93. 112, 113, 
114, 205, 208, 209, 216, 217, 221, 
303, 304. 309. 

Crosswicks Creek 217 

Crown Point 312 

Cuba 325 

Cumberland Co., N. J 284, 380 



INDEX 



493 



PAGE 

Danvers, Mass 327 

Darby, Pa 323 

Delanco, N. J 445 

Delaware Twp., N. T 149 

Delaware 422 

Delaware River, II, 16, 18, 25, 26, 29, 
32, 72, 83, 84, 104, 137, 183, 
204, 313, 323, 324, 332, 334, 
336, 396, 448. 

Deptford Twp., N. J 240, 423 

Derbyshire, Eng 214 

District of Columbia 334 

Doctor's Creek, N. J 207, 216, 217 

DoNKSEs Ferry 313 

Downingtown, Pa 313 

Dublin Twp., Pa 146 

East Indies 431 

East Jersey 26, 77, 136, 223, 224, 449 

Easton, Pa 439 

Eaton, Eng 181 

Edgwater, N. J 445 

Egg Harbor, N. J 449 

Elizabeth Town (Elizabeth), N. J., 324 

Elizabethtown, Pa 314 

Ellisburg, N. J 149 

England, 25, 26, 27, 29, 35, 39, 41, 43, 
64, 66, 68, 69, 70, 76, 80, 83, 
89. 92, 93, 111, 112, 124, 137, 
138, 139, 141, 148, 150, 156, 157, 
158, 174, 181, 183, 184, 187, 189, 
201, 204, 214, 241, 280, 281, 291, 
292, 326, 335, 380, 405, 411, 422, 
427, 449. 

Esopus, N. Y 322 

Europe 405 

Evesham, N. J., 34, 199, 236, 237, 238, 
239, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 272, 
342, 351, 357, 358, 359, 363, 364, 
365, 367, 368, 369, 370, 376, 377, 
379, 384, 390, 407, 408, 413, 414, 
424, 425, 428. 



page 
Evesham Twp., N. J. 122, 150, 158, 194, 
198, 242, 269, 287, 376, 386, 400, 
402. 

Falls, Pa 29, 30, 204, 334 

Falls Twp., Pa 204, 334 

Falls Church, Va 330 

Falls of Ohio 325 

Fayette Co., Pa. ..307, 308, 311, 320, 358 

Fellowship, N. J 269. 411, 412 

" Ferry Road," N. J 138 

" Forks of Yough " 319 

Fort Edward 322 

Fort George 322 

Fort Littletown, Pa 315 

Fort Nassau, N. J 25 

Flushing, L. 1 101, 223 

France 41, 124 

Frankfokd, Phila 139, 140 

" Franklin Park," N. J 49 

Franklin Twp., Pa 320 

Freehold, N. J 304 

Galloway Twp., N. J 423 

Genessee Co., N. Y 325 

Germantown, Phila 323, 439 

" Gillford," N. J 419 

" Glocester Town," N. J 38, 423 

Gloucester, Eng 39 

Gloucester, N. J., 149, 192, 273, 309, 382 

Gloucester Twp., N. J., 190, 192, 338, 423 

Gloucester Co., N. J., 126, 128, 137. 148. 

149, 186, 188, 190, 192. 193. 195, 

198, 200, 240, 241, 269, 271, 273, 

275, 276, 278, 279, 282, 283, 284, 

291. 308, 321, 330, 338, 339, 380, 

381, 382, 386. 388. 391. 395. 396, 

399, 406, 410. 411, 420, 422. 423, 

424, 426, 433. 436. 

Great Britain, 126, 128, 130, 145, 157, 

173. 423. 

Great Egg Harbor, N. J 348 

Great Egg Harbor Twp., N. J 423 



494 



INDEX 



pa(;e 

" Green Hill," N. J 29 

Greenwich Twp., N. J., 269, 388, 391, 
395, 396, 399, 407, 423. 

Haddonkield, N. J., 34, 117, 119, 138, 234, 
235, 236, 243, 256, 257, 258, 269, 
270, 271, 273, 282, 284, 285, 291, 
303, 309, 323, 324, 379, 381, 385, 
390, 391, 419, 420, 421, 433. 

Hanover 227 

Hanover Twp., N. J., 203, 231, 302, 305 

Harrison Twp., N. J 269, 388 

Hastings, Eng 39 

Hatcher's Run, Va 439 

Havana 325 

Haycock Twp., Pa 289 

Holland 25, 124 

Hornerstown, N. J 295 

Howell's Ferry 324 

Hudson River 26, 322 

Hull, Eng 183, 427 

Hunterdon Co., N. J 89, 214, 317 

Ilchester, Eng 47 

Indian Springs, Md 297 

Ireland 39, 41, 124 

Jacksonville, N. J 306 

Jamaica 325 

Jamestown 17 

Jerico, N. J 380 

Jersey (Island) 25 

Juniata 315 

Kayne Parish, Eng 405 

Kentucky 308, 317 

" King's Highway," N. J., 138, 285, 342, 

419. 

King's Hutton, Eng 46 

Kingston, N. Y 322 

Kingston, Ja 325 

Kirkwood, N. J 337 

Lake Champlain 322, 323 



PAGE 

Lake St. Peter 322 

Lamberton, N. J 330, 331, 333 

Lancashire, Eng 291 

Lancaster, Pa 314 

Lawrenceville, N. J 296 

Leicester, Eng 21 

Libraries 

Burlington 12, 207 

Camden 12 

Friends', Philada., 15th St 12 

Friends', Philada., 16th St 12 

Haddonfield 12 

Philadelphia 12 

Woodbury 12 

Ligonier Valley, Pa 317 

Little Kanawha 317 

Little Red Stone Creek, Pa 325 

Little Timber Creek, N. J 382 

London, Eng., 26, 27, 37, 46, 48, 54, 92, 
111, 112, 279, 280. 411. 

Long Island 100, 101, 279, 280 

Louisville, Ky 308 

Lower Makefield Twp., Pa 330 

Maine 332 

Mansfield Twp., N. J., 93, 95, 102, 103, 
104, 105, 106, 109, 150, 154, 204, 
205, 206, 210, 222 to 229, 287, 
296, 305, 307, 313. 320, 322, 376, 
409, 427, 429, 430. 

Mantua Creek, N. J 192 

Maryland 17, 99. 141, 143,297 

Massachusetts 327, 328. 332, 422 

Matanzas, Cuba 439 

Mattacopeny, N. J 449 

Mesopotamia, Ohio 112 

Miami Settlement 319 

MiCKLETON, N. J 391, 398 

Middlesex, Eng 39 

Middlesex Co., N. J 294, 449 

Middletown, Pa 314 

Middletown Twp., Pa 441 

Mill Creek 73, 290 



INDEX 



495 



PAGE 

MiLTOx, E.VG 139, 174 

Mississippi 321, 325 

Monmouth, N. J 113, 304, 309 

Monmouth Co., N. J., 136, 295, 299, 304, 

305, 440. 

Monmouth Court House 324 

MoNONGAHELA Rrer 314, 325 

MooRESTOWN, N. J., 34, 116, 117, 240, 241, 
242, 247, 251, 253, 254, 269, 285, 
341, 342, 349, 351, 362, 373, 384, 
410, 411, 414, 419. 

Morris Co., N. J 89 

MoRRisTowN, N. J 324, 325 

Morrisville, Pa 448 

Mount Ephriam, N. J 137 

Mount Holly, X. J., 12, 34, 195. 203, 309, 
324,