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Full text of "Genealogy of the descendants of Thomas French who came to America from Nether Heyford"

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Genealogy 

of the Descendants of 

Thomas French 



Who Came to America from Nether Heyford, Northamptonshire, 

England, and Settled in Berlinton (Burlington) in the 

Province and Country of West New Jersey, of which 

he was one of the Original Proprietors, together 

with William Penn, Edward Byllynge, 

Thomas Ollive, Gauen Laurie 

and Others 

With Borne account of 

Colonial Manners and Doings 



Setting up of Friends' Meetings, Copies of Old Minutes and other 

Particular Writings of Public Interest, Curious and 

Rare Papers in Fac-simile, Noteworthy 

Happenings and Places, etc. 

Together with 

One Hinidred and Fifty Picture Prints 

Compiled and Published by 

Howard Barclay French 

Of the Seve?ith Generation 

Volume II 

PHILADELPHIA 
PRIVATELY PRINTED 

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Copyright 

Howard B. French 

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page 

Samuel H. French [732] Frontispiece 

The French Homestead, near Trenton, N. J 14 

Christ Protestant Episcopal Church, Philadelphia 16 

Baptismal Font 17 

Portrait, Richard French [269] 20 

Portrait, " Aunt Kitty " French 22 

" Aunt Kitty " French House, Moorestown, N. J., 1825 24 

Colonial China and an Old-Time Mantelpiece 31 

Susannah French Hollingshead [303] House, Moorestown, N. J., 1800 36 

Mount Holly Meeting House, 1775-1S50 42 

Portrait, Barzillai French [318] 46 

Chancel, St. Mary's Protestant Episcopal Church, Burlington, N. J 54 

Wedding Present to Elizabeth H. Beck, 1817 67 

Silhouette, Mary (Ivins) French 69 

Uriah French [353] House, near Mullica Hill, N.J 70 

Site of Samuel French [141] Saw Mill, near Mullica Hill, N. J 72 

Uriah French [353] House, Swedesboro, N. J., 1784 74 

Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church, Swedesboro, N. J., 17S5 76 

Embroidered Silk Pin Cushion of Mary (Ivins) French 79 

Pilesgrove Meeting House, Woodstown, N. J., 1785 81 

Woodbury Meeting House, 1715-1783, and School House, 1813 82 

An Old-Time Court Petition, 1801 84-86 

Silhouette, Martha (French) Hillman [730] 87 

Dishes Belonging to Mary (Ivins) French 88 

Jacob French [354] House, near Ewan, N. J 98 

Charles French [356] House, near Mullica Hill, N. T 106 

Portrait, Samuel French [357] 112 

Rebecca Clark French House, Woodbury, N. J 116 

Chair Belonging to Beulah (Gibbs) Clark 119 

Portrait, Joseph C. French [360] 124 

Family China 125 



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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page 

Belongings of Charles French, 3rd [143] 131 

Gilbert Page House, Moorestown, N. J., 1800 132 

Family China 136 

Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church, Moorestown, N. J., 1838 136 

Portrait, Judge Samuel Black [384] 146 

Portrait, Nathan Wright Black [3S5] 148 

Charles Creighton French [393] House 155 

Plan of Delaware River Wharves, Arch to Market St., about 1800 156 

Arch Street Meeting House, Philadelphia, 1804 158 

Portrait, John Taylor French, Jr. [477b] 164 

Edward French [559] House, West Moorestown, N. J 192 

Portrait, Mary ( Parry) French 208 

Portrait, Samuel French [635] 208 

Portrait, Thomas Y. French [638] 210 

Portrait, Barzillai French [645] 212 

Portrait, Thomas French [667] 220 

Portrait, Samuel B. French [668] 222 

Samuel B. French House, Beaver, Pa., 1845 224 

Silhouette, Agnes ( French ) Combs [729] 247 

Silhouette, Isaac Combs 247 

" White Mansion," Summer Residence of Samuel H. French [732] 260 

Fluid Lamp, 1850 261 

Portrait, Clayton French [735] 266 

" Woodfield," Summer Residence of Clayton French 268 

Portrait, Lieutenant J. Hansell French, U. S. A. [1427] 272 

Silhouette, Theodosia (French) Cake [737] 277 

Portrait, Elizabeth (Groff) French 278 

Portrait, Samuel E. French [738] 278 

Portrait, William Hazelton French [746] 284 

Portrait, Elizabeth (Atkinson) French 284 

Green Street Meeting House, 1813 287 

Portrait, Captain Samuel G. French [755] 294 

Swords Presented to Captain Samuel G. French 294 

Portrait, General Samuel G. French [755] 300 

General French's Reminiscences of Harmony School 303 

Harmony School, Mullica Hill, N. J., 1805-1888 304 

John C. French [758] Building, 1858 309 

Stony Brook Meeting House, 1759-60-61 315 

A Family Piece 325 

Portrait, Rear-Admiral John J. Read, U. S. N., Retired [1592] 336 

Portrait, William French Brick [1295] 452 

" Alderbrook," Summer Residence of Howard B. French [1406] 482 

Destroyed by fire April 1st, 1908. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page 

Lake at " Alderbrook," Summer Residence of Howard B. French 484 

" Alderbrook," Summer Residence of Howard B. French 486 

Portrait, C. Stanley French [1415] 488 

Portrait, Harry B. French [1430] 494 

Memorial Church of the Good Shepherd, Rosemont, Pa., 1894 496 

Interior, Memorial Church of the Good Shepherd, Rosemont, Pa 498 

Memorial Tablet, Church of the Good Shepherd 500 

Portrait, Charles S. French [1474] 522 

Rancocas Meeting House, 1772 574 

Foot Stool Belonging to Mary (Ivins) French 663 



Signatures of Page 

Allen, Enoch 85 

Matthew 84 

Benson, John 85 

Blackwood, Jn 86 

Brown, Thomas 84 

Carpenter, Thos 84 

Clement, J 86 

Combs, Isaac 248 

Agness Ann [729] 248 

Coombs, Samuel 85 

Cooper, Nathan 85 

Cozens, B. E 84 

E 86 

Edwards, John 85 

Eldridge, Job S5 

England, Daniel 85 

Ffirth, John 85 

Flaningan, Samuel 84 

French, C. Stanley [1415] 4S8 

Chas. S. [1474] 523 

Charles [356] 109 

Charles, Jr 85 

Clayton [735] 266 

Edward [559] 192 

Hannah I. [753] 119 

Harry B. [1430] 494 

J. T. [477b] 164 

Jacob [354] 85, 99 

Mary 80 

S. G. [755] 260, 303 

Samuel [357] 119 



Signatures of Page 

Samuel C [747] 289 

Samuel H. [732] . . . Frontispiece 

Uriah [353] 80, 85 

William S. [739] 279 

Wm. H. [746] 285 

Gill, John 84 

Groff, Garret 85 

Haines, John 85 

Joshua 85 

Harrison, William 85 

Harker, David 85 

Jonathan 86 

Hazelton, Wm 85 

Henszey, Isaac S4 

Heston, Thomas 86 

Hollinshead, Wm 84 

Hooton, 1 85 

Hopkins, Jas 86 

Horner, George, Jur 85 

Inskeep, Abraham 86 

Jackson, John 85 

Kirby, Samuel 85 

Lippincott, Joshua 85 

Lucas, Albert 258 

Matts, John 85 

Moore, Josiah 85 

Mulford, Wade 85 

Nicholson, Abel 85 

Pancoast, James 85 

Paul, Jonathan 86 

Read, John J. [1592] 341 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Signatures of Page 

Richards, Richard 85 

Roberts, Josiah 50 

Rogers, Joseph 85 

Sailor, Wilm 85 

Shoemaker, Clayton F. [1403]. 259 

Robt 259 

Smith, Joseph Zane 85 

Sparks, Robert, Junr 85 

Stratton, James S6 



Signatures of Page 

Taylor, George 85 

Waterall, William 258 

Wm 259 

West, Isaiah 84 

Jonathan 85 

Wetherill, W. H 259 

Wilkins, Tho 86 

Wolf, David 85 

Zane, Joseph, Jur 85 




ANCIENT ANNALS OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 




HE ancestors of Thomas ffrench, progenitor, who located 
in Burlington, N. J., in 1680, as one of the Proprietors, 
and the genealogy of whose descendants is related in this 
work, lived for many generations in one of the most inter- 
esting and picturesque sections of England. For a thou- 
sand years the hills and dales, the beautiful streams and 
notable memorials of Northamptonshire have been celebrated in song and 
story. The fascinating annals of folk lore deal with its quaint people and 
their curious ways. In Volume I some account has been given of the ancient 
parish of Nether Heyford and its notable church, S. S. Peter and Paul, a 
landmark of Norman civilization. Therein, as recorded, appears the register 
of Thomas ffrench and his sires, running back for many years. The entire 
region is full of historic interest. Many travellers journeyed through North- 
amptonshire, frequently leaving accounts of their observations. One of the 
most curious of these ancient records, telling of the wanderings of a primitive 
official — a county surveyor — in 1610, remained unpublished until more than 
one hundred years later, in 1722, and is now regarded as a rare literary and 
historic treasure. From this narrative entitled : " Delineation of Northamp- 
tonshire ; Being a brief Hiftoricall and Chorographicall Defcription of that 
County. The Names of Cyties, Townes, Parifhes, Hamlets, Howfes of 
Note, and other Remarkables. By the Travayle of John Norden, in the 
Year M. D. C. X;" we quote as follows: 



This Northamptonfhire is a moft pleafant Shire, adorned both with falu- 
tarie and profitable Seates, manie and notable Sheepe Paftures, rich feedings 
for Cattle, firtile Corne Groundes and lardge Feilds greatly inrichinge the 
induftrious Husbandman. No Shire within this Land hath fo little wafte 
Grounds, for theare is not in a manner anie part thereof, but is turned to 
fome profitable Ufe. It is very populous, and the Townes, Parifhes, yea 
every Hamlett for the moft parte, but moft efpeciallie the Houfes of the 
Nobillitie moft healthfully Scituate in a moft pure and pleafant Ayre. The 
Countrie moft comfortable for Travaylers not only in regard of the open 
perfpects which are delightfull to wayfaringe Men ; But alfo in regarde of 

vii 



ANCIENT ANNALS OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 

plentie of Townes, Parifhes and Villages, which are fo univerfallie difperfed, 
that in every two or three Myles, at the moft, is found a Place of eafe to 
the wearifome Travylour. It lyeth in a plain forme, not Craggie by reafon 
of extraordinarie high Hills, fells, or Mountaines, though fome afcendings 
and defcendings theare are, which are no waye to be compared to Mountains, 
which are common in fome other Partes of this Lande, as Somerfett, Dorfett, 
Devon, and Cornwall. In this Shire a Travyller maye, in the highwaies as 
he commonly Travelleth, number in fome Places twenty, at fome Stations 
thirty, or more Parifhe Churches. And fo much the rather, for that the 
moft parte of the Steeples in all that Countie are carried very high with 
a kinde of Spire like unto a Pyramys. The firtilitie, falutarie ayre, pleafant 
perfpects and conveniencie of this Shire in all things to a generous and noble 
mynde have fo allured Nobilitie to plante themfelves within the fame, that 
no Shire within this Realme can anfwere the like Number of Noblemen, as 
are Seated in thofe Partes. Betides thefe her Majeftie hath three ftately 
Seates within the fame Shire, as, The Honore of Grafton, Collewefton, and 
Ffotheringhay Caftle. 

Theare are alfo Seated within this Shire divers Knights. Befides thefe 
Barons and Knights, are very many Efquires, the moft of them alfo very 
pleafingly seated within this Shire. Many other Gentlemen theare are within 
this Shire, the recytall of whofe Names and dwellings, I will omytt. No 
Shire within this Lande is fo plentifullie ftored with Gentry in regarde 
whearof this Shire may feeme worthy to be termed the Herralds Garden, 
whearin they may gather fuch varieties of Coates as in fome degree or 
other match all their Coates in Englande. Manie other Things may be faid, 
and that not unneceffarylye touching the further comodious Scituation of 
this Shire not only in regarde of Profitt but alfo of pleafure. Ffor Hawkinge 
both on Land and River it will hardly be matched, fuch pleafant Fields and 
lardge perfpects at will, to view the foaringe Ffawkon, and golden ftreames 
fo interlaceinge the cheareful Hills and Dales replenifhed with Game of 
all fortes to delighte the noble Mynde. Deare, Red and Fallowe, both in 
Parks, Fforefts, and Chafes are fo plentifull as noe one Shire yeeldeth lyke. 
Theare are three Fforefts within this Shire, as Rockingham Fforeft, White- 
woode and Sawfy Fforefts whearof your Honor is Cuftos Ferarum. The 
Lord Compton hath alfo a Chafe called Yardly Chafe. Theare are Parks 
greate Store. Her Majeftie hath Grafton, Potterfpery, Hartwell, Stoke 
Bruerne, Moulton, Rockingham, Bridgeftoke two Parkes, great and litle, 
Cliffe Parke, Ffotheringhay Parke, Higham Parke not walled but hedged. 
Parkes of Noblemen IV. Parkes of Knights V. Parkes of Efquires V. 
Thus is Northamptonfhire furnifhed with Parkes, Forefts, and Chaces yeald- 
inge often recreation to the Mynde exercife to the Bodie, and relief to the 
Table. 

Now to call to Mynde fomethinge touchinge the Husbandmans delight, I 
cannot but wonder to call to Mynde the greate heards of Cattle longinge 



ANCIENT ANNALS OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 

to every Small Parishe, Village, and Hamlett, which when in my Small 
Travayle I did behold by fuch generall multitudes I perfwaded my felfe of 
an impoffibilitie, that fo Small Parifhes and Places of fo flender Accompt 
could yeeld fo great a Number of Kyne and other Cattle fuch mayne 
Fflocks of Sheepe and which made me moft to marvayle were the greate 
heards of Swyne, a Beaft altogether unprofitable, till he come to the 
Slaughter. Then his ruftie Ribbs in a Froftye Morninge will pleafe the 
Ploughman, and will fo fupple his Weatherbeaten Lipps, that his Whipp 
and his Whittle will hamer out fuch harmony as will make a Dogge daunce 
that delights it. But howfoever they be fed, the bafer forte of Men prove 
wealthie, and wade through the World with good countenance in their call- 
ing, leaft beholden generally to the monied Men of any other Shire whatfo- 
ever that I knowe. 

Now touchinge the generall eafe of the Countrie in regarde of Markett 
Townes and the apte Scituation of them I thincke it cannot be wifhed in 
better forte then it is, fo fittly marfhialed and difpofed as no Village, Parifhe, 
or Place in the whole Shire is fcarcely diftant 4 Myles from fome one 
Markett Towne, either in the fame Shire, or the next adjoyninge, for the 
Shire at the broadeft Place is not 16 Myles and the Markett Townes are fo 
fcattered heare and theare to the Number of 12, that fewe Places are above 
3 Myles diftant from fome Markett Towne. 

This Shire ftandeth environed with VIII other Shires, namely Rutland- 
fhire on the North, Lyncolnefhire on the North, Northeaft. Huntingdon- 
fhire Eaft, North-Eaft. Bedfordfhire Eaft, South-Eaft. Buckinghamfhire 
South. Oxfordfhire South, South-Weft, Warwickefhire Weft. Leicefterfhire 
North -Weft. It is devided into 20 Hundreds, namely. The Hundred of 
Naffaborowgh, The Hundred of Navesford, Polbroke Hundred, Huckflowe 
Hundred, Sutton Hundred, Norton Hundred, Towcefter Hundred, Warden 
Hundred, Hanfordhoo Hundred, Newbottle Hundred, Rothwell Hundred, 
Gylesborough Hundred, Ffalwefley Hundred, Corby Hundred, Willow- 
brooke Hundred, Orlingbury Hundred, Higham-Ferrers Hundred, Spellowe 
Hundred, Wymerfley Hundred, and Cleyley Hundred. Now it is neceffary 
fomething to confyder of this Worde Hundred, whence it is derived, and 
why it is fo called. It is called in Latin Centuria, of the number of an 
Hundred, which of the Saxons was called Hundred. King Alured, when 
he concluded a Peace with Guthrune a Dane, he feeminge to followe the 
Councell which Jethro gave to Moyfes, for the more eafye Government of 
the People of Ifrael, to devyde his Companie into manie Regiments. So 
did he devyde England into quafdam Satrapias into certaine Provinces, 

which we call a Shire, cominge of the Word ( ) which fignifieth to 

devyde. And thearefore the Shire beinge devyded into Centurias, or after 
the Saxons hundredr as alfo into Decurias Companies, often Men and the 
cheife of them was amongfte the Romanes Decurio. And the Saxons called 
fuch a Company of 10 Men tien man tale. And he that is nowe called in 



ANCIENT ANNALS OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 

Northamptonshire a Therdbarow, was of the Saxons called Teohungmon ( ?) 
called in the Weft Partes at this Daye a Tythingman. And the Place 
wheare he ruleth is called a Tythinge, in tyme paft confiftinge of 10 
Howfholders, but nowe more or leffe, and every 10 Tythings made an 
Hundred whereas nowe tyme hath Altered it. But I thincke the Worde 
Therdbarowe among the Northamptonfhire Men groweth of the Saxon 

( ) which fignifieth a cheefe Pledge or Surety, one that ftandeth to 

anfweare for all fuch as are within his Tythinge or Barowe. And in tyme 
paft theife petite and fubofficers ended divers and fundrie inferriour Offences 
comytted within his chardge, being lefte as a Pledge infteede of the Cen- 
turio, or Overfeer of the Hundred to redreffe the letter, and to enforme of 
the Greater Offences. And in theife Daies the Governours of Hundreds 
are called Conftables, of the Worde Conftabilire, to make fure and Stable 
whether in prefervation of the Peace, endinge and determininge of Quar- 
rells, or to ftoppe effectually whatfoever feemeth to tend to the prejudice 
of the Comonwealth of his hundred. 

This Shire is very well ftored with faire Rivers, Brookes, and Springs, 
a moft profitable and pleafant Ornament, and wifhed Neighbours to all 
Inhabitants, amonge which theare are IV principall and cheefe Rivers, the 
firft is diverflye Named, which paffeth through the whole Shire from 
Davonter in the Weft and South, to Peterborowgh in the North Eafte, and 
this River is of Mr. Cambden called Avon, but of Pollydore Virgyll, Nyne, 
and of the Countrymen Nen. It rifeth in 6 or 7 Heads neare unto Davonter, 
and at Flowre taketh in another braunche which rifeth nere Anderbury Hill ; 
and fo continually meetinge with other Rivers it becometh a greate River. 

Theare is another River which is called Weland, which taketh Name of 
the Parifhe of Weland in Leicefterfhire, nere which it rifeth, and this River 
devydeth Northamptonfhire from Leicefterfhire and Rutlandfhire, as alfo 
from Lyncolnefhire. 

The third River is Charwell, which devydeth Northamptonfhire, and 
Oxfordefhire, and it taketh Name of Charwelton, wheare it rifeth. 

The 4 mayne River is Oufe which runneth by Brackley, and fo environeth 
a Parte of Northamptonfhire at Stoni-Stratford and then runeth through 
Buckinghamfhire, Bedfordfhire, and fo into the Ifle of Elye. 

To fpeake now fomethinge of the Places of Woode with this Shire, which 
indeed by the Scarcetie thereof feemeth moft of all to blemifhe the Shire, 
yet many Places are well ftored, as aboute Rockingham, almoft as far as 
Oundell, and reafonably about Peterborowgh, and heare and theare through 
the whole Country, but efpecially about Grafton, Whittlewoode, and Saucye 
Forefts. 

Nowe for Meadowes and deepe feedings, they are every wheare fo difperft 
as they feeme to rejoyce the poore Countrieman, nay every Travaylor may 
rejoyce to fee the Feelds on the Hills above, and the Vallies below, with 
fuch comly Garments of Corne and Graffe every wheare as David fayth, to 
rejoyce and finge in regarde of the plentie it Yearly yeeldeth. 



ANCIENT ANNALS OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE x ; 

Syth then that Northamptonfhire yeeldeth fuch varietie from our God, 
who will not give praife unto our God, that he may give yet more encreafe 
an Hundred Folde? He is able and willinge, oh that we would endeavour, 
and he would bleffe our labours, our Stocke and Store, and would not fuffer 
any leadinge into Captivitye, nor any complayninge in Northamptonfhire. 

The cheife Towne in this Shire is Northampton, Northanton, by which 
Titles it hath bene heartofore knowne, but now only knowne by the Name 
of Northampton, whence it taketh its Name is fufficiently fet downe in the 
difcourfe of the Shire. Polidore Virgill fol 37. amrmeth, that Northamopton 
was a Cytie, and called Trinobantum Urbem, the Cytie of Trinobant, but 
Urbs fignifieth not only a Cittie, but alfo a walled Towne, and although it 
be noe Cittie it is a walled Towne. And as the faid Polidore fayeth, the 
Countrie People by corruption of Speache, inftead of Trinobante, called it 
Tranton. But I am perfwaded, that they that fo tooke that, weare greatly 
deceaved, for Trinobantes (as Ptolomey the Egyptian fayeth, with whome 
agree in that pointe all latter Writers are the Effex and Mydlefex Men. 
At this Towne of Northampton have bene many memorable Things don, 
which to declare with brevytie I hope fhall not feeme fuperfluous unto your 
Honor. 

Theare is a very auncient and memorable Monoument within i a Myle 
of the Towne made in forme of Charinge-Crofse, but not fo high, whearof 
fome have dreamed, that it fhould be theare erected to demonftrate the 
Center of England ; but I doe not perfwade my felf that it was the caufe 
of the errection thearof, for that indeed it is not the middle of the Land, 
it ftandeth too far towards the South and Eaft, yet might it carry fome 
kynde of culler if England paffed not beyond Humber Northward as did 
Loegrea. But it appeare by auntient Cronicles that the fame Monument 
with others in divers Places in the Highwaye thence to London were erected 
by Edward the I. in the 19 Yeare of his Raigne, and in the Yeare of Chrift 
1290. in memoryall of Elioner his Queene, who died at Hardly neare Lyn- 
colne, from whence fhe was brought to Northampton, and theare refted, in 
remembrance whearof he caufed this Monument to be erected in that Place 
from thence the Corpes of the Queene weare carried to Weftminfter and 
theare interred. 

This Towne is a fayre Towne with many fayre old Buildings lardge 
Streets and a very ample and fayre Markett Place. It is walled aboute with 
a Wall of Stone but meane of Strength, neare unto the Towne theare 
ftandeth an auncient Caftle Ruynous. Mathew Parys reportethe that Queene 
Elionor Mother to Kinge John, being ayded by Huberte Arch-Bifhope of 
Canterbury and the Nobles of the Realme, called a meetinge of all Eftates 
of the Land, and theare raifed them to take Oth of obedience unto Kinge 
John her Sonne after the Deathe of Kinge Richard the firft, in the Yeare 
of Chrifte 1199. but to form a clearer Idea, fee the reprefentation of this 
Towne, hereunto annexed. 



xii ANCIENT ANNALS OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 

Kinge Henry 3. (as reporteth Polidore Virgill) for certaine Riotuous 
Actions commytted by some of his Barons came to Northampton accom- 
panied with his Lords, Nobles, and Marfhiall Men and undermyned the 
Wall, made a Breach and entered the Towne and flew divers Men, that 
had affifted his Rebellious Barons, he tooke Prifoners 15 Barons and 60 
Knights (as reporteth Mathew of Weftminfter) befyds many others of 
Accompt Anno Chrifti 1264. but other Writers differ from him about the 
Number. 

Theare is neare this Towne in the South-Syde thearof called the new 
Feilde, betweene Hardingfton and a Place called Samdisford, a fhowe of 
a Forte or Trenche caft up with Diches by Henrie the 6. when he came to 
Northampton in the Yeare of Chrift 1466. againfte the Earle of Marche 
and other Rebells, betweene whome was fought a moft cruell Battle, wheare 
the Kinge was difcomfited and 10000. of his Men flaine and drowned in 
the River Nen, or as fome call it, Avon. 

In the tyme of Kinge Henrie the 2 was a Parliament holden at this Towne, 
to which came the Kinge of Scottes to conclude a Peace betweene him and 
the Kinge of England fo Fabian 321. 

Alio theare was a Battle fought neare Northampton betweene the Earle 
of Pembrooke and the Yorkfhire Men in the tyme of Edw. IV. wheere the 
Earle was difcomfited. Pol. Virgill. 

The Schollers of Cambridge in the tyme of Hen. Ill came to Northamp- 
ton, entendinge theare to buyld an Univerfitie by confent of the Kinge, but 
they foon retourned to Cambridge. 

Wellingborrow called of fome Wedlingborow, of others, Wenlingborowe 
ftandeth neare the River Nen or Avon, and is now called Wellingborowe- 
Forum of the Markett theare, as in the Countrie of Dorfett theare is 
Blandford-Forum. It may be thought that the Name of that fhould be 
Wellingborowe fo given in regarde of the Springs that rife in many Places 
in, and neare the Towne. It is faid that fome Part thearof fometimes 
belonged to the Duchy of Lancaster. But now the whole Towne, as I am 
enformed, belongeth unto your Honor. 

Thus my Right Honorable Good Lord havinge breefely runn over North- 
amptonshire, which for wante of Tyme and fitt Opportunitye is not fo 
thoroughly Performed, as I perhaps may hearafter doe, I befeeche you 
accepte hearof, untill better Oppertunetye be offered to Accomplifhe the Reft. 



GENEALOGY 



OF THE DESCENDANTS OF 

THOMAS FRENCH 



260— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

William, 111). 

b. 1st mo. 27th, 1783. 

d. November 21st, 1831, in Trenton, N. J. 

m. Anastasia Bye, daughter of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth Bye. 
She b. November 3rd, 1793. 

d. March 2 7th, 1858, in Philadelphia; buried in 
Odd Fellows' Cemetery, Philadelphia. 

477a— EDWARD RICKEY FRENCH 

m. Sarah Richmond. 

477b— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH, JR. 

b. July, 1822. 
m. January 7th, 1847, Sarah (Sutphin) Vleit. 

477c— ELIZABETH RICKEY FRENCH 

b. April 7th, 1829. 
m. George Byron Armbruster, M.D. 

TRIBUTE TO JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH 

The Trenton, N. J., "Emporium" of November 26th, 1831, contained the following: 
" Departed this life on the 21st inst., in the 48th year of his age, Mr. 
John French. On the day following his remains were interred in the Bury- 
ing Ground of the Baptist Church at Bloomsbury (N. J.), attended by a 



14 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



large and respectable number of friends. His approved integrity, amiable 
and upright deportment, kind and affectionate heart, manifested especially 
toward an aged and infirm mother, a sister and orphan children of a 
deceased brother, whose dependence was entirely upon him for support, with 
engaging and pleasing manners, in general won the esteem of all who 
knew him. He fulfilled, with correctness and fidelity, the responsible office 
of first clerk of the State Prison for upwards of four and twenty years 
with great acceptability and satisfaction to the State. He has left an affec- 
tionate consort and three small children." 

The accompanying picture of the French homestead at Lamberton, N. J., now a part 
of Trenton, is reproduced from a pen and ink drawing, from memory, by John Taylor 
French, Jr. [477b], who was born and lived there until the death of his father in 1831, 
when he came with his mother to Philadelphia. Rachel Rickey French [264] sister of 
John Taylor French [260] conducted a school in this house for many years. There is 
every reason to believe that it had also been the home of William [111] and Rachel 
(Rickey) French, father and mother of John Taylor French. 




THE FRENCH HOMESTEAD, NEAR TRENTON, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 15 

262— MAHLON KIRKBRIDE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard 5; 

William, 27; William, 111). 

b. 6th mo. 12th, 1788. 

d. September 6th, 1821. 

m. May 15th, 1807, Sarah Stackhouse; Rev. James 
Abercrombie performing ceremony; Christ 
Church record, Philadelphia. 

478— MARIA ELVIRA FRENCH 

b. July 4th, 1808. 
m. May 2nd, 1830, William Franklin Cooper. 

479— WILLIAM WASHINGTON FRENCH 

b. January 14th, 1811. 
m. August 24th, 1834, Ann Herbert Arey. 

480— HARVEY AUGUSTINE FRENCH 

b. August 19th, 1813. 
d. in Cuba. 

481— SARAH JANE FRENCH b. June 12th, 1816. 

m. June 4th, 1S37, George Geist Stambach. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held 10 mo. 8th 1805. 

Chesterfield preparative meeting reports that a Certificate of removal is 
requested for Mahlon French to the Monthly Meeting of Philadelphia, who 
is placed an apprentice to Solomon White Conrad, a Member of that Meet- 
ing, W m Chapman Jun. and Joseph M. Lawrie are appointed to make 
inquiry and if nothing appears to obstruct to prepare the certificate for the 
approbation of next meeting. 

At Chesterfield Monthly Meeting held 11 mo 5 1805 

Mahlon French had a certificate of removal granted to the Monthly 
Meeting of Philadelphia. 



16 GENEALOGY OF THE 

CHRIST CHURCH, PHILADELPHIA 

Hallowed by sacred and national associations covering two centuries, this 
historic place appeals to the hearts of passing generations of American 
citizens. Coexistent with the first Friends' societies in Pennsylvania, its 
beneficent influence extended throughout the colony. During critical periods 
in colonial and national life it has been a center of abiding interest. Hither 
have reverently come sober-minded leaders of public thought, bearing the 
burdens of responsibility and earnestly seeking divine guidance and help. Men 
of wonderful gifts and power, personal exemplars of the higher life, of 
supreme devotion to duty, exalted purpose and lofty patriotism, have led 
deeply moved multitudes in prayer and praise and meditation and fulfilled 
their great mission with unwearied and unselfish zeal. 

Here attended the Continental Congress, shortly after the battle of Lex- 
ington, in 1775. Again many members came at the close of the great strug- 
gle for national liberty, to give heartfelt thanks. Here the wisest and best 
of those delegated to frame a federal constitution sought wisdom and strength. 
The first president, after the removal of the federal government from New 
York, for seven years was a regular worshipper, and his successor likewise, 
until the capital was located in Washington. The first general convention 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church in America met here, few in numbers 
but strong in faith and spirit, laying broad the foundations and sending 
forth the revised book of prayer and service. For over sixty years Rev. 
William White faithfully served here, first as a youthful assistant minister, 
then the watchful father of his always loving flock and for half a century 
as the revered counsellor and bishop, active and zealous until almost the 
last hour of a life reaching within sight of four score and ten. 

Christ Church parish was organized and the first building erected in 1695. 
Passing years brought increased membership and imperative need of enlarge- 
ment. With prophetic vision the future was provided for, the result being 
the solid and handsome structure which has met every requirement since 
1 744. The tower was completed about ten years later, with its sweet chime 
of bells bought in England at a relative cost today of about $15,000, and 
which have sent forth their inspiring notes without interruption, save during 
the British occupancy of Philadelphia, 1777-78, when they were removed to 
prevent possible destruction. For many years the rich tones of the bells were 
heard every Tuesday and Friday evening preceding market days, and were 




I 



CHRIST PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH, PHILADELPHIA 
As completed in 1754. From an old pen-and-ink drawing 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



17 



beloved by the residents of Philadelphia and the adjacent districts. It 
became the habit of many of the farmers to come to the city early the even- 
ings before market days to hear the sweet music of the chimes. This custom, 
unfortunately, ceased with the passing away of old Philadelphia. For more 
than a century the bells were rung upon almost every special occasion of 
public rejoicing, and the great bell tolled when leading citizens were buried. 
Thus many notable events in American history were observed, from the 
Declaration of Independence to the memorable obsequies of Abraham 
Lincoln. The bricks used in the construction of the church were brought 
from England; the splendid columns were made from giant trees of the 
American forest. The beautiful brass candelabra was purchased in London 
in 1744. The pulpit dates from 1770. Sacred vessels have been constantly 
in use for fully two hundred years, those presented by Queen Anne, in 1708, 
during late years being used only on Easter Sunday. Many impressive and 
artistic memorials are in place, the window in the east end being a tribute 
of the generation just passed to Bishop White, whose remains rest beneath 
the chancel. The coat of arms of Great Britain, which was placed above the 
pew occupied by the colonial governors, is preserved in the rector's room. 
The unique ancient baptismal font contains a silver bowl presented in 1712. 

The parish records, written with great care, are safely 
kept in a fire-proof vault beneath the tower. Within the 
church, in the adjoining yard and the larger sacred reserva- 
tion a short distance away, lie representatives of nearly all 
the noted colonial families. This part of " God's acre " has 
thus far not been trespassed upon by the iconoclastic spirit 
of the time. As a shrine for reverent-minded pilgrims 
Christ Church possesses an abiding interest. Through its 
open doors daily pass many people, and numberless prayers 
have silently ascended from lone worshippers and little com- 
panies of religious visitors, regardless of sect, creed or 
race. All are welcome, questions are courteously answered 
and places of special interest, like the Washington and 
Franklin pews, pointed out. Over all pervades the spirit 
of peace, calmness and faith. The original of accompanying picture was 
made in 1789. 




BAPTISMAL FONT 



18 GENEALOGY OF THE 

263— AMOS TAYLOR FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

William, 111). 

b. 1st mo. 23rd, 1791. 

d. 7th mo. 29th, 1824, in Eaton, Ind. 

m. May 6th, 1812, Ruth Ewing. 

She b. 1st mo. 5th, 1790. 

d. 3rd mo. 15th, 1830. 

482— JOSEPH FRENCH b. 8th mo. 12th, 1814. 

d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1844. 
m. 8th mo. 25th, 1836, Elizabeth Cox. 

483— HORACE FRENCH b. 5th mo. 25th, 1817. 

m. June 23rd, 1S3S, Charlotte Brooks. 

4S4— AMOS TAYLOR FRENCH, JR. 

b. 9th mo. 24th, 1820. 
m. 9th mo. 29th, 1841, Lydia W. Brooks. 
She d. April, 1870. 

485— MAHLON FRENCH. b. 4th mo. 21st, 1823. 

d. 4th mo. 21st, 1823. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes : 
Chesterfield Mo. Mtg held 4 mo. 6th 1813 

Chesterfield preparative Meeting informs that Amos French has accom- 
plished his marriage with a woman not in membership with Friends, by 
the assistance of a Presbyterian Preacher, John C. Abbott and John Wright 
are appointed to write to Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting and request Friends 
of that Meeting to treat with him on the occasion and inform this Meeting 
of the result of their care therein. 

Chesterfield Mo. Mtg held 5 Mo 4th 1813 

The friends appointed to write to Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting respecting 
Amos French's case, report that they have complied with their appointment. 

Chesterfield Mo. Mtg. held 12 mo 7th 1813 

Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting informs that agreeable to the request of our 
monthly meeting in the 4th mo last respecting Amos French's case, they at- 
tended thereto but found he was settled within the compass of Greenwich 
Monthly Meeting which has prevented their treating with him ; therefore 
John Wright and John C. Abbott are appointed to write to Greenwich 




iticiiAKi) kkk.mii 



1872 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 19 

Meeting, and inform them of the charges against Amos French, and request 
friends to treat with him on the occasion, and inform this meeting of the 
result of their care therein. 

Chesterfield Mo. Mtg: held 1 mo 4th 1814 

The committee appointed to write to Greenwich Monthly Meeting respect- 
ing Amos French's case desired to pay further attention thereto and report 
to next meeting. 

Chesterfield Mo. Mtg: held 2 mo 8th 1814 

The Committee appointed to write to Greenwich Monthly Meeting respect- 
ing Amos French's case report that they have complied with their appoint- 
ment. 

Chesterfield Mo. Mtg: held 7 mo 3 d 1814 

The friends appointed in 12 mo. last in Amos French's case produced a 
minute from the Monthly Meeting of Greenwich, purporting their conclu- 
sion to accept his acknowledgment, the same Friends are desired to make 
application to that Meeting for the paper of acknowledgment, and produce- 
it to this Meeting when received. 

Chesterfield Mo. Mtg. held 8 mo 2 a 1814 

The consideration of Amos French's case being again brought forward,, 
the Meeting unites in dispensing with the application to Greenwich Monthly 
Meeting for the original paper of acknowledgment and agrees to the result 
of that Meeting in his case, William Chapman and John Wright are ap- 
pointed to prepare a certificate of removal for him to the said Monthly 
Meeting of Greenwich, for the approbation of next Meeting. 

Chesterfield Mo: Mtg: held 10 mo 4 th 1814 

A Certificate of removal was granted for Amos French to Greenwich 
Monthly Meeting. 

265— THOMAS PRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27 J 

Richard, 112). 
b. 1st mo. 17th. 1785. 
d. 11th mo. 14th, 1811. 
m. Ann Headly. 
She b. Sth mo. 11th, 1785. 
d. 1st mo. 7th, 1815. 

4S6— ALFRED FRENCH b. 10th mo. 29th, 1807. 

m. 9th mo. 25th, 1830, Eliza Silvers 

487— HIRAM FRENCH b. 11th mo. 27th, 1809. 

Ann (Headly) French, widow of Thomas French [265], married second, Charles 
Taggart, by whom she had one child, Rachel M. Taggart, born 6th mo. 1st, 1813. 



20 GENEALOGY OF THE 

266— CHARLOTTE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112). 

b. 10th mo. 17th. 1786. 
m. Jesse Van Horn. 

488— THOMAS FRENCH VAN HORN 

m. Sarah McConkey. 
489— MORTIMER VAN HORN 

490— DAVIS VAN HORN d. unmarried. 

491— LYDIA ANN VAN HORN 

b. 10th mo. 31st, 1821. 

m. First, 1837, Nimrod Genglen. 

m. Second, 1849, George Rose Smith. 

492— LEWIS HAMILTON VAN HORN 

b. 9th mo. 22nd, 1822. 
m. February 24th, 1841, Evaline Scott. 

493— MARY VAN HORN d. in infancy. 

269— RICHARD FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112). 

b. 11th mo. 26th, 1799. 

d. 7th mo. 5th, 1872, buried in Cedar Hill Ceme- 
tery, Frankford, Phila. 

m. 9th mo. 12th, 1822, Sarah Hutchinson, daugh- 
ter of Randall and Mary (Mason) Hutchinson. 
She b. 5th mo. 4th, 1801. 

d. 1st mo. 8th, 1890, buried in Cedar Hill Ceme- 
tery, Frankford, Phila. 

494— CAROLINE CLARK FRENCH 

b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1824. 
d. 11th mo. 20th, 1900. 

495— MARY ANN FRENCH b. Sth mo. 7th, 1826. 

d. 5th mo. 6th 1901. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 21 



496— RICHARD FRENCH, 3RD b. 9th mo. 20th, 1829. 

m. 1855, Hester Ann Heisler. 

497— HENRY FRENCH b. 1st mo. 5th, 1832. 

d. 9th mo. 28th, 1832. 

498— JOHN SAVAGE FRENCH b. 9th mo. 9th, 1833. 

m. June 22nd, 1854, Mary Ann Seibert. 

499— LEWIS HENRY FRENCH b. 12th mo. 14th, 1835. 

m. December 15th, 1870, Mary Jane Allen. 

500— FRANCIS EUGENE FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 18th, 1838. 
m. March 1st, 1868, Sarah H. Freas. 

501— SARAH VIRGINIA FRENCH 

b. 11th mo. 25th, 1840. 
d. 7th mo. 17th, 1901. 

502— EDITH LOWRY FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 19th, 1844. 

Richard French, Jr. [269], was for twelve years, from 1838 until 1850, superintendent 
of the Philadelphia, Germantown & Norristown Railroad. He then entered into busi- 
ness for himself as millwright, mechanical engineer and engine builder. This he con- 
tinued until 1857, when he became an employee of the Baldwin Locomotive Works, 
Philadelphia, where he remained until his death, in 1872. 

271— REBECCA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 j 

William, 119). 

b. June 24th, 1785. 
d. September 10th, 1853. 

m. Enoch Thorn, son of Daniel and Elizabeth 
(Sickles) Thorn. 
He b. May 18th, 1783. 
d. February 9th, 1862. 

503— WILLIAM FRENCH THORN 

b. March 4th, 1806. 
m. Sarah . 

504— MIRANDA THORN b. 1807. 

m. Nathan Atherton. 



22 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



505— MARIA THORN 

506— JOSEPH FRENCH THORN 

507— FURMAN THORN 
508— DAVID C. THORN 
509— LOUIS THORN 
510— ENOCH THORN, JR. 
511— MICHAEL THORN 
512— REBECCA ANN THORN 
513— ELIZABETH THORN 
514— EMELINE THORN 
515— HENRY THORN 
516— EDWIN THORN 



b. February 1st, 1808. 

m. 8th mo. 21st, 1829, William Russell. 



b. October 11th, 1809. 
d. January 22nd, 1810. 

b. May 14th, 1811. 
d. April 17th, 1834. 

b. November 21st, 1813. 
m. Margaret Godfrey. 

b. November 16th, 1815. 
m. Christiana Nippes. 

b. May 2nd, 1818. 
m. Elizabeth Cox. 

b. July 22nd, 1820. 
d. August 31st, 1837. 

b. May 31st, 1822. 
m. Albert Stuart. 

b. March 11th, 1824. 
m. James McCurdy. 

b. July 4th, 1826. 
m. William Brittin. 

b. September 15th, 1828. 
d. October 24th, 1847. 

b. November 28th, 1831. 
m. Emma Ogilby. 



273— JOSEPH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

William, 119). 

b. February 27th, 1790. 

d. January 17th, 1825. 

m. December 25th, 1815, Christiana Slim, daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Hannah (Pearson) Slim. 
She b. August 1st, 1794, "on the sixth day of the 
week, about 3 o'clock in the morning." 

d. November 12th, 1897. 




'AUNT KITTY" FRENCH 



1897 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 23 

517— SARAH S. FRENCH b. June 10th, 1817. 

m. December, 1839, William DeRochbrune. 

518— HORACE FRENCH b. February 18th, 1819. 

d. January 6th, 1825. 

519— SAMUEL FRENCH b. January 19th, 1821. 

d. August 29th, 1824. 

520— LEWIS D. FRENCH b. January 5th, 1823. 

m. September 26th, 1850, Mary Loretta Cooper. 

521— JOSEPH FRENCH b. May 8th, 1825. 

m. November 28th. 1S50, Catharine Beagary. 



CHRISTIANA — "AUNT KITTY" — FRENCH 

Christiana (Slim) French attained celebrity as the oldest person recorded 
in the history of Moorestown, New Jersey, having reached the age of 103 
years at the time of her death, in 1897. Her centennial birthday, August 1, 
1894 was an occasion of great public interest, all classes of the community 
uniting in the celebration. Church and fire bells were rung, the local brass 
band furnished music and a great number of persons, many from a distance, 
extended hearty congratulations; "Aunt Kitty," as she was long known, 
cordially greeting every one, displaying wonderful endurance and manifest- 
ing great enjoyment. The life-like picture herewith given was taken during 
the day, and that of her long-time home at about the same time. Through- 
out her long life she possessed remarkable health, and looked closely after 
her affairs. For more than forty years she never took medicine and during 
her last illness, which was a general decline of vital powers, it was needful 
to resort to strategem to secure the kindly administration of stimulants. In 
her will, which was made in her 92nd year, she divided her estate between 
the two children then living, after the payment of a legacy of $50 each to 
nine grandchildren. 

Joseph French [273] after his marriage to Christiana Slim, in 1815, 
engaged in the then infant industry of raising shade and fruit trees, estab- 
lishing what became known as Fairview Nurseries, in West Moorestown. He 
prospered greatly, and a short time before his death, in 1825, built the house 
in which his widow lived for over seventy years. He died intestate and 
his estate was administered bv his father-in-law. Samuel Slim. An in- 



24 GENEALOGY OF THE 

ventory of personal property taken, February 10, 1825, by Peter Slim and 
Win. Stiles, appraisers, showed a valuation of $2,206.54. His surviving 
associate, John Perkins, formed a partnership with Edward French [559] and 
they bought the nurseries and conducted the business for many years. John 
Perkins married Anna Evans [554], granddaughter of Edward French [121]. 

276— MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 J Richard, 

120). 
b. 11th mo. 25th, 1788. 
d. 11th mo. 13th, 1858. 
m. 1811, William Jones, of Baltimore, Md. 
He d. about 35 years of age. 

522— JOHN JONES b. 12th mo. 8th, 1812. 

m. October 30th, 1834, Annabellah Barrett. 

523— MARY JONES m. Charles Rowand. 

277— SARAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 J Richard, 

120). 
b. 10th mo. 4th, 1791. 
d. 5th mo. 13th, 1858. 

m. 1815, Anthony Warrick, Jr., son of Anthony 
and Elizabeth (Crawford) Warrick. 

524— HENRY CRAWFORD WARRICK 

b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1816. 

m. 3rd mo. 30th, 1843, Deborah A. Borton. 

525— ISAAC WARRICK b. 2nd mo. 11th, 1818. 

d. 10th mo. 1894, unmarried. 

526— KEZIAH WARRICK b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1820. 

m. 11th mo. 2nd, 1843, Lewis V. Atkinson. 

527— RICHARD FRENCH WARRICK 

b. 3rd mo. 28th, 1822. 

Went to California in 1860; supposed to 
be deceased. 

528— BEULAH WARRICK b. 1st mo. 6th, 1825. 

m. January 6th, 1847, Joshua Huston. 



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21 

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d 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



25 



279— SAMUEL P'RENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120). 

b. 10th mo. 15th, 1796. 
d. 11th mo. 22nd, 1837. 

m. 1820, Elizabeth Roberts, daughter of Jeremiah 
Roberts. 



529— RICHARD B. FRENCH 



b. 6th mo. 26th, 1821. 

m. November 6th, 1845, Elizabeth M. Hend- 
rickson. 



530— JACOB R. FRENCH 



b. 1st mo. 14th, 1824. 



531— SARAH FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 10th, 1826. 
m. William Limeburner. 



532— SOPHIA B. FRENCH 



b. 1st mo. 26th, 1831. 
d. December 27th, 1904. 



533— SAMUEL FRENCH, JR. b. 4th mo. 4th, 1833. 

m. February 24th, 1855, Rachel M. Bates. 



534— JONATHAN FRENCH 



b. 11th mo. 12th, 1835. 
d. unmarried. 



Jacob R. French [530] when quite a young man left his home in Gloucester county, 
New Jersey, and journeyed to the West, settling in California in 1848. From there he 
went to Oregon and took up a government claim of some 300 acres, establishing his 
home near Bethany, Oregon, about eight miles from Portland. He had two daughters 
who married and resided in the same vicinity. In 1894, some years after the decease of 
his wife, he came east for the purpose of visiting his relatives, few of whom he found 
living, and these few failed to recognize him. Grieved and disappointed he returned 
to Oregon, and soon thereafter failing health prompted him to take a sea voyage to the 
Sandwich Islands. He died, however, on the return trip and was buried in the Pacific 
Ocean. 



26 GENEALOGY OF THE 

281— KEZIAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard. 5; Jonathan, 31 j 

Richard, 120). 

b. 6th mo. 7th, 1803. 

d. 1st mo. 30th, 1879; buried in Baptist Cemetery, 

Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. 1822, Samuel Hillman, son of Ephraim and 

Elizabeth (Crawford) Hillman. 
He b. 9th mo. 4th, 1800, near White Horse, Gloucester 

Co., N. J. 
d. 1st mo. 26th, 1856; buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground, Haddonfield, N. J. 

S3S— SOPHIA BENDLER HILLMAN 

b. 12th mo. 8th, 1823. 
d. 2nd mo. 20th, 1825. 

536— ADALINE T. HILLMAN b. 10th mo. 19th, 1825. 

m. February 10th, 184S, Adam B. Sharp. 

<37— SOPHIA FRENCH HILLMAN 

b. 5th mo. 12th, 1828. 

m. March 17th, 1849, James Haney. 

538— ELIZABETH HILLMAN b. 2nd mo. 8th, 1831. 

m. March 6th, 1853, David Lummis, Jr. 

539— SAMUEL HILLMAN b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1833. 

m. March 11th, 1858, Rebecca M. Jones. 

540— ABEL NICHOLSON HILLMAN 

b. 8th mo. 26th, 1835. 

m. November 17th, 1859, Rebecca Webb. 

541— KEZIAH FRENCH HILLMAN 

b. 6th mo. 7th, 1838. 

d. 2nd mo. 27th, 1904, unmarried. 

542— ANN HILLMAN b. 9th mo. 14th, 1840. 

m. March 25th, 1869, Reuben Dobbs. 

543— SARAH CRAWFORD HILLMAN 

b. 9th mo. 2nd 1843. 
unmarried. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 27 



ANCESTRY OF SAMUEL HILLMAN. 

John Hillman came from England to America as one of the pioneers of West Jersey. 
In 1697 he bought of Francis Collins 170 acres of land in Gloucester (now Camden) 
county, near the future site of Haddonfield, and settled there, this property having been 
originally " the surveyed fourth of ye share or proportion of land appertaining to 4/7 
of the propriety of ye said Francis Collins purchased of Edward Bylling and dated 2nd 
of June 1677." The log house of John Hillman was for a time a wayside inn, on the 
road to Egg Harbor. He died in 1729 and by will dated July 5th, 1707, and proved 
May 5th, 1729, he made the following bequests: 

" To my trusty and well beloved wife, Margaret, all my estate, both real 
and personal, untill my children shall attain to ye age of one and twenty 
years and afterwards as I shall how appoint. 

To son Daniel 100 acres of land which I purchased of William Sharp, 
with all improvements thereon, to enter thereon when he shall attain ye age 
of one and twenty years, excepting one third thereof unto his mother during 
her life. 

To son John this plantation on which I now live which I purchased of 
Francis Collins, containing 170 acres of land, with all improvements thereon, 
he to enter thereon immediately after ye decease of his mother, it to remain 
hers during life. 

To daughter Ann a two year old heiffer, when she shall attain ye age of 
one and twenty years. 

To daughter Abigail one yearling heiffer when she shall attain ye age of 
one and twenty years. 

To my wife Margaret all ye remainder of my personal estate, household 
stuff, goods, chattels whatsoever unto her disposing forever." 
Executrix, wife Margaret. 
Witnesses 

Jno. Walker Francis Collins 

John Kay Joseph Collins 

Inventory of personal property taken by Thomas Stokes, £231, 03s, 10-l/2d 
In 1745 John Hillman, Jr., purchased from Thomas Atkinson, 500 acres of land near 
White Horse tavern, and extending from the south branch of Cooper's Creek to the 
north branch of Timber Creek. He built thereon a house in which he lived during the 
remainder of his life. There was a saw mill on this tract, and for many years John 
Hillman, Jr., and his sons worked at clearing up the forest. In 1751, he purchased 100 
acres adjoining. He died in 1764, and by will dated June 29th, 1764, proved July 18th, 
1764, he devised his holdings as follows: 

" To my beloved wife Elizabeth one third part of my personal estate and 
one third part of the saw mill and homestead place. 

To my son Joab all that tract of land lying on the south branch of Coopers 
Creek where Solomon Eldridge now lives and one third part of saw mill. 



28 GENEALOGY OF THE 

To my son Josiah all that plantation and tract of land the homestead, 
with the grist mill and one third part of saw mill. 

To my son Daniel 100 acres of land bought of John Mickle, Sheriff, of 
the property of Mahlon Southwick. 

To my two grandsons, James and Joseph Hillman, all that tract of land 
which I bought of Henry Woodrow, 194 acres, to be equally divided be- 
tween them. 

To my son Josiah one third part of my personal estate, the other one 
third not yet disposed of to be equally divided between my three sons, Joab, 
Joseph and Daniel." 

Executor, Josiah Hillman. 

Witnesses : — • 

Daniel Able 
Isaac Tomlinson 
William Clark 

Inventory of personal estate, £253, 14s, lOd 
In 1782 John Hillman, a descendant of the pioneer John Hillman, presumably through 
his son Daniel, was in possession of a tract of land near Almonesson, N. J., on Timber 
Creek, and in 1798 this property became the homestead of Francis French [116]. 

Joab Hillman, son of John, Jr., and Elizabeth Hillman, was born October 23rd, 1725. 
He married, first, " Litisha " Cheeseman, license dated March 7th, 1748. She was born 
August 29th, 1728. They had three children, Sarah, born April 15th, 1750; James, born 
March 22nd, 1755; Joseph, born June 8th, 1757. Joab Hillman married, second, Mary 
Matlack, daughter of John and Mary Matlack and granddaughter of the pioneer William 
Matlack, license dated April 18th, 1761. They had children, Elizabeth, born July 5th, 
1762; Sarah, born August 18th, 1764; Mary, born November 14th, 1766; John, born 
February 15th, 1768; William, born November 14th, 1771; Ephraim, born July 1st, 1773, 
died July 14th, 1845; Joab, Jr., born December 2nd, 1775. Joab Hillman died intestate 
in 1776, and his estate was administered by Josiah Hillman; Isaac and Ephraim Tomlin- 
son, appraisers; inventory £149, lis, 3d. The following advertisement appeared in a 
newspaper of July 29th, 1766: 

" Run away from Joab Hillman, the 4th inst. July, an Irish Servant Lad, 
named Bryan Maquod, about 20 Years of Age, about 5 Feet 2 Inches high, 
has a Defect in his Left Eye, and black curled Hair; had on when he went 
away, Ozenbrigs Shirt and Trowsers, Brass Buckles in his Shoes, an old Felt 
Hat, and an old green Jacket. Whoever takes up and secures said Lad in 
any Goal, so that the Owner may have him again, shall receive Forty Shill- 
ings Reward, and all reasonable Charges, paid by Joab Hilman, living in 
Newtown, Gloucester County, New Jersey, about 7 Miles from Cooper's 
Ferry." 
Ephraim Hillman, sixth child and third son of Joab and Mary (Matlack) Hillman, 
married in 1776 Elizabeth Crawford, born October 9th, 1777, died October 2nd, 1868. 
They were the parents of Samuel Hillman, who in 1822, married Keziah French [281]. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 29 

283— JEMIMA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Edward, 

121). 
b. 9th mo. 27th, 1771. 

m. April 21st. 1790, Jacob Borton. of Evesham 
township, Burlington Co., N. J. 

544— ELIZABETH BORTON b. 5th mo. 17th, 1791. 

545— STACY BORTON" b. 3rd mo. 7th, 1795. 

d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1801. 

546— EDWARD BORTON b. 7th mo. 25th, 1797. 

547— ABIGAIL BORTON b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1799. 

548— JEMIMA BORTON b. 10th mo. 26th, 1802. 

S49— JACOB BORTON b. 6th mo. 19th, 1806. 

550— AMASA BORTON b. 6th mo. 29th, 180S. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 2" Month 1791 Jacob 
Borton produced an Acknowledgment for outgoing in Marriage with one 
not in Membership with us, which being twice read and attended to, it ap- 
peared the prevailing sense that Jno. Collins & Robert French take a solid 
opportunity with him and report their sense of his disposition of Mind to 
next Meeting. 

284— HANNAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121). 
b. 4th mo. 7th, 1773. 

m. March 7th, 1792, Nathan Evans, of Evesham 
township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
551— STACY EVANS 

552— EDWARD EVANS 

553— NATHAN EVANS, JR. d. 11th mo. 1871, aged 73 years. 

554— ANNA EVANS b. 1800. 

m. 1823, John Perkins. 



30 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 9th of 5 mo. 1794 The 
Friends appointed on a visit to Nathan Evans reported a compliance 
therewith, & apprehend his disposition favourable towards the acceptance 
of his Acknowledgment; which being attended to with a good degree of 
solid weight, wherein it appeared the prevailing sense that his case be con- 
tinued for a further time of probation, under care of Robert French and 
Reuben Matlack. 



285— JOSEPH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Edward. 

121). 
b. 4th mo. 6th, 1774. 
d. 1822. 
m. (about) 1797, Elizabeth Zane. 

555— LOCKEY ANN FRENCH b. 6th mo. 16th, 1798. 

m. 12th mo. 17th, 1818, Stokes Haines [468]. 



556— SARAH FRENCH 

557— ANNA FRENCH 

558— MARY FRENCH 
559— EDWARD FRENCH 



b. -4th mo. 12th, 1800. 

m. 1st mo. 17th, 1819, Samuel E. Wilkins [686]. 

b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1802. 

m. Joseph Bird. 

b. 11th mo. 25th, 1803. 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1806. 

m. 1st mo. 13th, 1834, Judith M. Scattergood. 



560— SIMEON ZANE FRENCH b. 12th mo. 9th, 1807. 



561— ELIZABETH FRENCH 
562— JOSEPH FRENCH, JR. 

563— HANNAH FRENCH 



b. 11th mo. 29th, 1809. 

b. 9th mo. 17th, 1811. 

m. August 21st, 1834, Mary Ann Clunn. 

b. 12th mo. 10th, 1815. 



Joseph French [285] second son of Edward [121], upon reaching his majority was 
apparently placed in charge of a farm of 105 acres which he conducted for some years 
and which was afterward conveyed to him by his father, in 1821, as his share of the 
paternal estate. This land, located on the north side of the Camden and Moorestown 
road, west Moorestown, comprised part of the " deed of gift " of Thomas ffrench, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



31 



progenitor, to his son Thomas, in 1694. Joseph French, like his father and other 
members of the family, took an interest in public affairs of Chester township. He 
served as overseer of highways in 1811-13-18. Dying intestate, in 1822, his estate was 
administered by his widow, Elizabeth French, and Stokes Haines. The farm was 
sold by the administrators and some 60 acres, including the dwelling, became the 
property of his son Edward [559]. An inventory of personal property, taken 2d mo. 
5th, 1822, showed a valuation of $1,125.12. 

287— SARAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Edward, 

121). 
b. 4th mo. 19th, 1777. 
m. First, 12th mo. 19th, 1803, Gilbert Deacon. 

m. Second, Currie. 

564— MARY DEACON 
565— STACY DEACON 
566— HANNAH DEACON 
567— MARTHA DEACON 

292— SAMUEL FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Thomas, 33; Edward, 

121). 
b. 12th mo. 2nd, 1785. 
m. Sarah . 

568— SARAH ANN FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 11th, 1807. 
569— STACY FRENCH b. 11th mo. 2nd, 1808. 

570— SAML'EL STOKES FRENCH 




COLONIAL CHINA AND AN OLD-TIME MANTELPIECE 



32 GENEALOGY OF THE 

296— CHARLES HAINES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 

33; Edward, 121). 

b. 11th mo. 8th, 1797, near Moorestown, N. J. 

d. 10th mo. 22nd, 1848, in Berlin, N. J. 

m. First, 1st mo. 27th, 1820, in Upper Greenwich 

Meeting, Gloucester Co., N. J., Hannah E. 

Moore, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Heul- 

ings) Moore. 
She b. 3rd mo. 17th, 1800. 
d. 8th mo. 11th, 1823. 
m. Second, 1st mo. 7th, 1826, Mary Moore, 

daughter of Joseph and Mary (Heulings) 

Moore. 
She b. 8th mo. 20th, 1790. 
d. 3rd mo. 24th, 1883. 

571— WILLIAM BOWEN FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 26th, 1821. 

m. November 6th, 1S45, Elizabeth Stokes 
Braddock. 

572— MARY MOORE FRENCH b. 9th mo. 17th, 1822. 

m. 1st mo. 18th, 1844, Benjamin S. Kain. 

Children of Charles Haines and Mary (Moore) French. 

573— HANNAH FRENCH b. 11th mo. 20th, 1826. 

d. 9th mo. 29th, 1827. 

574— HEULINGS MOORE FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 15th, 1829. 
d. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1853. 

575— CHARLES EDWIN FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1832. 

m. First, 1st mo. 12th, 1852, Elizabeth H. 

Moore, 
m. Second, November 11th, 1885, Elizabeih 
Ashmead. 

Mary (Heulings) Moore was a daughter of Abram Heulings. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 33 

CHARLES HAINES FRENCH 

Charles Haines French, youngest son of Edward [121], was a man of 
ability and influence. With his brother-in-law, Jacob Borton, he was made 
an executor of his father's will, under which he inherited the homestead 
farm, near West Moorestown, of over 200 acres, subject to numerous lega- 
cies. He discharged this trust with intelligence and fidelity, being called 
upon to sacrifice practically all of his patrimony, in order to meet require- 
ments of the will and other unexpected obligations. Edward French was 
a liberal-minded man and often served others in a most generous way. 
Sometime after his death there was grievous default on the part of certain 
persons for whom he had become bondsman. These unpaid obligations 
were presented to Charles as executor and he manfully shouldered the burden, 
although it stripped him of all that had come to him from his father's 
estate. Meanwhile he had bought a farm, near Marlton, but soon disposed 
of it and entered upon other lines of business. He removed to Berlin, then 
Gloucester county, and became a practical surveyor. He took an active 
and efficient interest in public affairs. He was made justice of the peace 
and became lay Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in 1833, 1838 and 
1843, and also served as a member of the Legislature in 1842. When the 
county was divided he served as lay Judge of the Common Pleas Court of 
Camden county during part of 1848, the year of his death. 

Charles Haines French was noted for his hospitality and generosity. He 
was always ready to help others and the settlement of his affairs by his sons 
brought to light some curious facts. In the inventory of his small estate 
the item " book accounts," i. e., monies due, exceeded the value of all his 
other resources. He gave his services freely as surveyor and thus aided 
land owners who did not always remember their obligations to him. His 
work in this connection was regarded as particularly reliable and included 
many large estates. He took great interest and pride in the early history 
of the descendants of Thomas ffrench, progenitor, collecting and preserv- 
ing many valuable papers and threads of family history, including the 300 
acre " deed of gift " from Thomas [ 1 ] to Thomas French, Jr., in 1694. Had 
his resources in later life been equal to his zealous desires, he would doubt- 
less have contributed still further to the solution of genealogical problems 
which may now never be solved. Charles Haines French played well and 
honorably his part in the battle of life. 

3 



34 GEN EALOGY OF THE 

INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF CHARLES HAINES FRENCH, 1848 

A true and perfect inventory of the goods and chattels, rights and credits 
of Charles H. French, late of the County of Camden, deed., made by 
William B. French, administrator, and Joseph Heritage and Chalkley 
Haines, this sixth day of November 1848 : 

Purse and apparel $ 25.00 

Household goods 165.35 

One grey mare 30.00 

One cow 1 2.00 

Wagons, Hay, lumber, etc 95.20 

Book accounts 411.80 

Note, Isaac Brittle 600 

Book accounts supposed to be desperate $60.81 

$745J5 

299—TJRIAH FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33. 

Uriah, 122). 

b. 5th mo. 27th, 1788. 
d. 8th mo. 7th, 1878. 

m. Ann Bates, daughter of Joshua and Amy 
Bates. 
She b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1789. 
d. 5th mo. 5th, 1870. 

576— SARAH FRENCH b. 4th mo. 17th, 1812. 

d. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1894. 

m. John W. Keys, Probate Judge for sev- 
eral years at Lebanon, Ohio. 

577— RACHEL FRENCH b. 10th mo. 10th, 1814. 

d. 3rd mo. 27th, 1891. 
m. George Holland. 

578— JOSHUA FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 28th, 1817. 

m. 12th mo. 23rd, 1844, Lydia Trego. 

579— ANN FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1819. 

m. Warner Kinsey. 

580— BEULAH FRENCH b. 5th mo. 13th, 1821. 

d. 2nd mo. 11th, 1839. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 35 

581— AMANDA FRENCH b. 1st mo. 25th, 1824. 

d. 7th mo. 6th, 1842. 
m. Joseph Rogers. 

582— ABIGAIL FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1828. 

m. John Barnhurst. 

583— WILLIAM FRENCH b. 1st mo. 2nd, 1833. 

d. 6th mo. 21st, 1842. 

301— WILLIAM FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; George, 

123). 
b. 3rd mo. 30th, 1776. 
m. Abigail . 

584— HARRIET FRENCH m. Charles Brown. 

585— WILLIAM FRENCH, JR. m. Elizabeth Phillips. 

303— SUSANNAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123). 
b. 11th mo. 16th, 1781. 

m. 11th mo. 14th, 1811. "in a public meeting of 
the sd people [Friends] held at Chester" 
[Moorestown, N. J.], Andrew Hollingshead, 
son of Morgan and Rebecca Hollingshead. 
He b. 6th mo. 26th, 1784. 

586— AMANDA EVALINE HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 8th mo. 16th, 1812. 

587— GEORGE FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 2nd mo. 16th, 1814. 

588— MORGAN ELWOOD HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 8th mo. 30th, 1815. 

588a— RACHEL FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 1st mo. 3rd, 1818. 

588b— JOHN HOLLINGSHEAD b. 6th mo. 9th, 1821. 

d. 3rd mo. 30th, 1822, in Moorestown, N. J. 

588c— REBECCA JANE HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 10th mo. 8th, 1822. 

d. Sth mo. 4th, 1832, in Moorestown, N. J. 



36 GENEALOGY OF THE 

MEETING RECORDS 

Minutes of Haddonfield Meeting of Women Friends : 

" At a Monthly meeting of Women friends held in Haddonfield 8th mo. 10th 181S — A 
Certificate was prepared for Andrew Hollingshead and Susannah his wife, with there 
fore Children, namely Amanda Evalinia, George French, Morgan Elwood and Rachel 
French Hollingshead recommending them to Chester meeting which was read approved 
and signd." 

On 11th mo. 15th, 1818, Andrew Hollingshead with his wife and four children were 
received into Moorestown Meeting. On 7th mo. 4th, 1839, and 8th mo. 8th, 1839, certifi- 
cates of removal were granted by Moorestown Meeting to Andrew and Susannah Hollings- 
head and their daughters Amanda E. and Rachel F. Hollingshead to Springborough 
Meeting, Ohio. On 8th mo. 9th, 1838, George F. Hollingshead was granted a certificate 
of removal to Cherry St. Meeting. Philadelphia ; and on 6th mo. 7th, 1849, Morgan E. 
Hollingshead was granted a certificate of removal to Westfield Meeting, Ohio. 

304 — BATHSHEBA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123). 
b. 3rd mo. 15th, 1783. 
d. 2nd mo. 6th, 1865. 

m. 4th mo. 24th, 1806, Joseph Roberts, son of 
Jonathan and Mary (Spencer) Roberts (second 
wife), of Bristol township, Bucks Co., Pa. 
He b. 3rd mo. 18th, 1784. 
d. 10th mo. 30th, 1841. 

589— GEORGE S. ROBERTS b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1S07. 

m. 5th mo. 7th, 1829, Lydia Grubb. 

590— CAROLINE ROBERTS b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1809. 

m. 10th mo. 9th, 1828, Garret Williams. 

591— MATILDA ANN ROBERTS b. 10th mo. 5th, 1814. 

d. 3rd mo. 25th, 1873, unmarried. 

592— FRANKLIN ROBERTS b. 7th mo. 27th, 1820. 

m. 7th mo. 2nd, 1849, Georgeanna Wilcox. 

593— SUSAN H. ROBERTS b. 6th mo. 20th, 1824. 

d. 8th mo. 20th, 1880, unmarried. 

Jonathan Roberts of Bristol township, Penna., was born in 1744 and died in 1797. 
He married first, Martha Kirk, and had children, Jonathan and Jesse ; married second, 
Mary Spencer, and had children, Joseph, Levi, Rachel, George, and Joseph ; married 
third, Mary Jones, and had children, Enoch and Martha. 



> 

•2, 



w 

H 
/. 

O 



3 



a 
- 



o 







DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



37 



308— RACHEL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; George, 

123). 
b. 7th mo. 30th, 1792. 
d. 4th mo. 12th, 1855. 

m. 10th mo. 13th, 1814, Enoch Roberts, son of 
Jonathan and Mary (Jones) Roberts (third 
wife), of Bristol township, Bucks Co., Pa. 
He b. 10th mo. 5th, 1789. 
d. 4th mo. 19th, 1856. 



594— CHARLES H. ROBERTS 



b. 8th mo. 29th, 1815. 
m. Elizabeth T. Clark. 



595— MARY J. ROBERTS 

596— SUSAN F. ROBERTS 
597— ALMIRA ROBERTS 
598— EDWARD H. ROBERTS 
599— RACHEL R. ROBERTS 
600— WILLIAM P. ROBERTS 
601— HENRY C. ROBERTS 



b. 10th mo. 5th, 1816 
d. 6th mo. 23rd, 1896. 
m. 12th mo., 1852, Alfred Hoopes. 
He b. 1819. 

d. 2nd mo. 7th, 1876. 

b. 7th mo. 17th, 1818. 
m. 4th mo. 18th, 1844, Joseph G. Cox. 

b. 11th mo. 22nd, 1820. 
m. William C. Murphy. 

b. 10th mo. 9th, 1822. 

d. 8th mo. 7th, 1890, unmarried. 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1825. 

m. 2nd mo. 25th, 1847, Charles E. Thompson. 

b. 9th mo. 4th, 1826. 
m. 1850, Sarah Bender. 

b. 12th mo. 12th, 1828. 
m. Elizabeth Hickman. 



309— MATILDA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; George, 

123). 
b. 12th mo. 14th, 1795. 
d. 2nd mo. 25th, 1849. 
m. Thomas Quick. 



602— ISAAC FRENCH QUICK 



38 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



312— ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129). 
b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1770. 

m. 11th mo. 15th, 1796, Joseph Jones, son of 
Jonathan and Hannah (Coles) Jones. 
He b. 1st mo. 27th, 1771. 

d. 1835, near Germantown, Phila. 



603— JONATHAN JONES 



■604— JAMES JONES 



b. 8th mo. 27th, 1797. 
m. Mary Cowperthwaite. 

b. 12th mo. 14th, 1798. 
d. 12th mo. 12th, 1799. 



605— ROBERT JONES 



b. 1st mo. 22nd, 1800. 
d. in the West. 



■606— ELY JONES 



b. 7th mo. 14th, 1801. 
d. 12th mo. 12th, 1802. 



607— JESSE JONES 



608— MERCY JONES 



b. 1st mo. 25th, 1803. 
d. 9th mo. 1st, 1804. 

b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1805. 
d. young. 



609— HANNAH FRENCH JONES 

b. 1st mo. 24th, 1807. 
d. 7th mo. 31st, 1808. 

'610— HANNAH FRENCH JONES, 2ND 

b. 11th mo. 14th, 1808. 

m. 11th mo. 27th, 1839, Edward Bonsall, 3rd. 

Jonathan Jones, son of Joseph and Mary Jones, of Cheltenham, Penna., and Hannah 
"Coles, daughter of Solomon and Martha Coles, of Exeter Meeting, Berks Co., Penna., 
were married 4th mo. 27th, 1769. Hannah, born 6th mo. 2nd, 1745, died 7th mo. 24th, 1807. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthy Meeting held at Evesham the 7th of 10th mo. 1796. Joseph 
Jones son of Jonathan Jones and Elizabeth French daughter of Thomas 
French dec'd appeared and declared their intention of marriage with each 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 39 

other, surviving Parents being present consented the young Man residing 
within the limits of Abington Monthly Meeting was informed that a 
Certificate from thence would be expected at their next appearance. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 11th Mo. 1796. 
Joseph Jones and Eliz". French appeared and declared the continuation 
of their intention of Marriage with each other the young Man producing 
a Certificate from the Monthly Meeting of Abington to the satisfaction 
of this they are at liberty to consumate their said intentions and Abraham 
Brown and Samuel Roberts Junr. are appointed to be present see that good 
order be kept & report to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 9th of 12th mo. 1796. The 
friends appointed to attend the Marriage of Joseph Jones & Elizabeth 
French reported it was orderly accomplished and the company small. 

Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends: 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends held at Evesham the 7th of 
the 10th Mo. 1796 Joseph Jones and Elizabeth French appeared & de- 
clared their intentions of marriage with each other her Mother present con- 
sented, Esther Lanning and Elizabeth Roberts senior are appointed to en- 
quire respecting her clearness and report to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends held at Evesham the 11th of 
the 11th Mo. 1796 Joseph Jones and Elizabeth French appeare'd and De- 
clared the continuance of their intentions of marriage with each other and 
having the return of enquiry clear respecting her, he also producing a 
certificate from Abington Monthly meeting, & his mother's consent in writ- 
ing, they are left at liberty to consumate their marriage, & Reuben Cow- 
perthwaite & Elizabeth Roberts are appointed to be present see that good 
order be kept, and report to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women held at Evesham the 9th of the 12th 
Mo. 1796 The friends appointed to attend the Marriage of Joseph Jones 
and Elizabeth French report it orderly accomplished. 



313— JAMES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129). 
b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1773. 
d. 8th mo. 29th, 1844. 

m. 5th mo. 17th, 1801, Mary Rogers, daughter of 
William and Annie Rogers. 
She b. 1st mo. 29th, 1780. 
d. 4th mo. 21st, 1851. 



40 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



611— WILLIAM R. FRENCH 



612— THOMAS FRENCH 



613— ANN FRENCH 



614— ROBERT FRENCH 
615— JAMES FRENCH, JR. 
616— CHARLES FRENCH 
617— RICHARD FRENCH 



b. 6th mo. 13th, 1802. 
m. 4th mo. 30th, 1824, Judith Crew. 

b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1805. 
d. 5th mo. 26th, 1806. 

b. 12th mo. 12th, 1808. 
d. 10th mo. 20th, 1862. 

m. First, in Friends Meeting, Damascus, 
Ohio, Francis J. Townsend. 
He b. 9th mo. 1st, 1804. 
d. 1844. 

m. Second, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Wm. Ken- 
worthy. 

b. 4th mo. 9th, 1810. 
d. 7th mo. 11th, 1819. 

b. 5th mo. 24th, 1814. 
m. 1st mo. 8th, 1841, Annie E. Gifford. 

b. 9th mo. 3rd, 1816. 
d. 9th mo. 13th, 1821. 

b. 10th mo. 13th, 1818. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 5th of 9th Mo. 1794. 

Certificates of removal were requested for Jno. Howey to Piles Grove 
Monthly Meeting, James French to Red-Stone mo. meetg. & Jno. Lippincott, 
son of Isaac Lippincott, to Burlington Monthly Meeting; Jno. Maxell & 
Isiah Haines for the first, Morgan Hollinshead & Samuel Roberts Junr. 
for the second & Thomas Lippincott & Henry Warrington for the third, 
are appointed to make the necessary inquiry respectively, and if nothing 
appears to obstruct, prepare & produce them to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 10 of 10 mo. 1794 

The Committees appointed produced Certificates on behalf of Jno. Howey, 
James French, Jno. Lippincott, Hope Cattell & minor Children & Rachel 
Lippincott ; which being read were with some amendment, approved signed 
by the Clk. and the two latter sent to the Women for their signing. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 41 

Mount Holly Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

10 mo. 10th 1799 James French brought Certificate from Redstone to 
Mt. Holly. 

8 mo. 7th 1800 James French Removed by Certificate to Abington. 

Abington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At Abington Monthly Meeting held the 25 th of the 8 th Month, 1800 

James French produced a Certificate from Mount Holly Monthly Meet- 
ing, dated the 7'" Instant, which was read and received. 
At Abington Monthly Meeting held 31 st of 1 st Mo: 1803 

James French requests a Certificate to Evesham Monthly Meeting, 
Benjamin Rowland & William Bailey are appointed to prepare one for 
the approbation of next Meeting. 



MOUNT HOLLY MONTHLY MEETING. 

The colonial settlement on the Northampton, or Rancocas, river, which 
was first called Bridgetown and later Mount Holly, was founded in 1681, by 
John Cripps, who came to Burlington in the ship Kent, in 1677. Daniel 
Leeds surveyed for him 300 acres and later 200 acres additional, which com- 
prised the site of the future county seat of Burlington. The line of this 
survey is quaintly described as running "through a swamp, wherein growes 
store of Holley and within said Tract is a mountaine to which the Province 
East, South and West and North send a beautiful aspect named by the owner 
thereof Mount Holley." Cripps was greatly pleased with his purchase and 
the colonial prospect in general, as is shown by his letters to friends in " old 
England." He died in 1687, but his descendants worthily carried out his 
plans as a pioneer. His son Nathaniel, about 1700, gave ground for the first 
Friends' Meeting House, and his grandson, Samuel, in 1784, gave land for 
a Friends' burial ground. The location, in both instances, was on Wood 
lane near the mount. The first meeting house was a small frame structure, 
but it stood for three quarters of a century. In the beginning meetings were 
held at private houses. In 1775 a two-acre lot, at what is now the corner 
of High and Garden Streets, was bought of Rev. John Brainerd. A new 
graveyard was set apart and the first story of the present brick meeting house 
built. During the Revolutionary struggle this building became historic. It 
was alternately occupied by the contending armies and evidence of rough 
usage is shown by marks made by cleavers and guns on benches and floors, 
visible to this day. Friends, however, continued to hold stated meetings with- 
out interference. 



42 GENEALOGY OF THE 

During the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia, in 1793, the peaceful 
quiet of the village was again disturbed by the invasion of many terror stricken 
refugees, the most reckless being the French-American contingent. Stephen 
Girard at one time kept a little store on Mill Street. What is believed to have 
been the first free school in New Jersey was established in Mount Holly by 
Friends about 1759. The school house then erected is still standing. The 
Relief Fire Company, one of the oldest in the country, was organized in 1752. 
In 1850 the meeting house was remodelled and enlarged, the second story 
being added. The Monthly Meeting is the custodian of complete and val- 
uable records from 1676 to the present time. An interesting relic, still care- 
fully preserved, is the marriage certificate of William Boen and his wife 
" Dido," bearing date 1 763, and containing the names of many Friends as 
witnesses. Both were slaves, but were given freedom upon marriage and 
received as members of the Society of Friends. Their future conduct was so 
exemplary that upon the death of William, in 1829, in his 90th year, the 
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting adopted a memorial concerning him. Mount 
Holly Monthly Meeting has always had a large membership. For seven gen- 
erations this community has been noted as a center of activity and influence 
in the Society of Friends. Orthodox Friends' Meeting House, built in 1832, 
is on Buttonwood Street. 

-315— HANNAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129). 
b. 6th mo. 7th, 1775. 
d. 4th mo. 11th, 1858. 

m. 5th mo. 9th, 1797, Anthony Morris, Jr., son of 
Anthony and Sarah (Cranmer) Morris. 
He b. 4th mo. 18th, 1773. 
d. 5th mo. 19th, 1826. 

618— BARZILLAI MORRIS b. 5th mo. 4th, 1798. 

m. 1st mo. 2nd, 1823, Sarah Crew. 

619— ESTHER MORRIS b. 8th mo. 12th, 1799. 

d. 9th mo. 16th, 1888. 
m. 12th mo. 27th, 1827, Daniel Boulton. 

620— SARAH MORRIS b. 5th mo. 31st, 1801. 

m. 3rd mo. 1st, 1821, James B. Bruff. 



z 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



43 



621— THOMAS MORRIS 



622— HANNAH MORRIS 



623— JOSEPH MORRIS 



624— ELIZABETH MORRIS 



625— ANTHONY MORRIS 



626— MARY MORRIS 



b. 12th mo. 29th, 1802. 
d. 1st mo. 16th, 1809. 

b. 10th mo. 17th, 1804. 
d. 12th mo. 4th, 1870. 
m. 8th mo. 1828, Joseph Jones. 

b. 12th mo. 1st, 1806. 
m. Julia A. Palmer. 

b. 6th mo. 13th, 1809. 

m. 11th mo. 28th, 1839, William Carson. 

b. 6th mo. 13th, 1809. 
m. Elizabeth Stuckey. 

b. 8th mo. 12th, 1811. 
d. 2nd mo. Sth, 1884. 

m. 11th mo. 1st, 1832, in Friends Meeting, 
Damascus, Ohio, William Boulton. 
He b. 6th mo. 5th, 1812. 



627— JOHN MORRIS 



628— MARTHA MORRIS 



b. 9th mo. 2nd, 1813. 

d. 9th mo. 2nd, 1815. 

b. 6th mo. 8th, 1815. 

d. 7th mo. 12th, 1815. 



629— STEPHEN MORRIS 



b. 4th mo. 14th, 1818. 
d. unmarried. 



Anthony Morris, Jr., who married Hannah French in 1797, was a Burlington County, 
New Jersey, farmer, who in 1802, with his wife and three children, located in Fayette 
County, Pennsylvania, becoming a member of Redstone Monthly Meeting. Most of 
his descendants are now residents of Ohio. He was a great-grandson of Anthony 
Morris, founder of the family in America, who came to Burlington in 1682, becoming 
prominent in the business, religious and social affairs of the colonies. In 1685 he sold 
a lot of ground on the river front, to Thomas ffrench, progenitor, and the same year 
removed to Philadelphia, where for more than half a century he was a prosperous and 
influential citizen. His business interests became extensive. He took great interest 
in educational matters, in various movements for the promotion of the public good and 
repeatedly filled public offices of responsibility. He was married four times and left 
a large family, many of whose descendants have become prominent in the various 
walks of life. 



44 GENEALOGY OF THE 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

At a monthly meeting held at Evesham the 7th of the 4th month 1797. 
Anthony Morris son of Anthony Morris and Hannah French Daughter 
of Thomas French [129] deceased, appeared and declared their intentions 
of marriage with each other ; surviving parents being present consented and 
the young man was informed that a Certificate would be expected at their 
next appearance. 

At a Monthy Meeting held at Evesham the 5th of 5th mo. 1797. Anthony 
Morris and Hannah French appeared and declared the continuation of their 
intention of marriage with each other the young Man producing a Certi- 
ficate from Burlington Mo. Mtg. to the Satisfaction of this : they are at 
liberty to consumate their marriage and Morgan Hollingshead and Samuel 
Roberts Junr. are appointed to be present, see that good order be preserved 
and report to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 9th of the 6th mo. 1797 — 
The Friends appointed to attend the marriage of Anthony Morris & Hannah 
French, reported it orderly accomplished. 

Minutes of Evesham Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends held at Evesham the 7th of the 
4th Month 1797 — Anthony Morris and Hannah French appeared & declared 
their intentions of marriage with each other, Parents present consented, 
Ruth Collins & Priscilla Lippincott are appointed to enquire respecting her 
clearness & report to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends held at Evesham the 5th of 5th 
Mo. 1797 — Anthony Morris & Hannah French appeared and declared the 
continuance of their intentions of Marriage with each other, and having the 
return of inquiry clear respecting her, he also producing a Certificate from 
Burlington monthly meeting dated the 1st of this Month they are left at 
liberty to consumate their Marriage, Ruth Collins & Priscilla Lippincott are 
appointed to be present see that good order be kept & report to next 
Meeting. 

At a monthly meeting of Women friends held at Evesham the 9th of 
the 6th Mo. 1797 — The friends appointed to attend the Marriage of Anthony 
Morris and Hannah French report it orderly accomplished. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



45 



317— ROBERT FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129). 

b. 4th mo. 24th, 1779. 
d. 2nd mo. 13th, 1862, in Salem, Ohio. 
m. 2nd mo. 25th, 1807, by Friends' ceremony, in 

Salem, Ohio, Anna Street, daughter of Zadok 

and Eunice (Silvers) Street. 
She b. 8th mo. 17th, 1784, in Salem, N. J. 
d. 3rd mo. 26th, 1842, in Salem, Ohio. 



630— ZADOK S. FRENCH 
631— JOSEPH FRENCH 
632— ANN FRENCH 
633— LYDIA FRENCH 
634— JOHN FRENCH 
635— SAMUEL FRENCH 



b. 1st mo. 7th, 1808. 
m. 9th mo. 2nd, 1846, Miriam Holloway. 

b. 9th mo. 5th, 1810. 
d. 3rd mo. 25th, 1813. 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1816. 

m. 10th mo. 30th, 1844, John W. Johnson. 

b. 5th mo. 11th, 1819. 
d. 6th mo. 28th, 1840. 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1822. 

m. 3rd mo. 26th, 1845, Martha Howey Ogden. 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1822. 
m. 3rd mo. 31st, 1847, Mary Jones Parry. 



Zadok Street and Eunice Silvers, daughter of Aaron and Anna Silvers, were married 
in Friends' Meeting, Salem, N. J., 4th mo. 5th, 1775. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Abington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At Abington Monthly Meeting held the 30'" of the 7 th Mo 1804 The 
Certificate was produced read and accepted for Robert French from Red- 
stone Mo. Meeting dated the 29 th of the 6 th mo. 

At Abington Monthly Meeting held the 29 tb of the 7 th mo. 1805 German- 
town represents That Robert French requests a Certificate to Middletown 
Monthly Meeting in the State of Ohio, Jonathan Jones & Abraham Keyser 
are appointed to make the needful enquiry, and if no obstruction appears 
prepare an efsay. 



46 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



318— BARZILLAI FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129). 

b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1781. 
d. 1st mo. 6th, 1858, in Damascus, Ohio, 
m. 1 1 tli mo. 1st, 1810, Mary Yates, daughter of 
Benjamin and Phebe Yates. 
She b. 3rd mo. 17th, 1785, in Virginia. 

d. 8th mo. 23rd, 1850, in Damascus, Ohio. 



636— ELIZABETH FRENCH 



b. 10th mo. 30th, 1811. 
d. 1st mo. 3rd, 1831. 



637— ALBERT FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 9th, 1815. 
m. 8th mo. 1st, 1839, Elizabeth M. Corse. 



638— THOMAS YATES FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 21st, 1816. 

m. 3rd mo. 27th, 1862, Rachel H. Blackburn. 



639— ROBERT FRENCH 



b. 8th mo. 2nd, 1817. 
d. 10th mo. 19th, 1836. 



640—' 



Ltwin sons 

641— J 

642— EZRA FRENCH 



b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1819. 
d. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1819. 

b. 11th mo. 22nd, 1820. 

m. First, 5th mo. 1st, 1851, Ann W. Stanley, 
m. Second, Uth mo. 30th, 1863, Mary John- 
son. 



643— MARTHA FRENCH 



b. 6th mo. 9th, 1822. 
d. 8th mo. 4th, 1822. 



644— DAVID FRENCH 



b. 11th mo. 3rd, 1823. 
m. 4th mo. 29th, 1857, Eliza Miller. 



645— BARZILLAI FRENCH, JR. b. 2nd mo., 14th, 1826. 

m. First, 9th mo. 29th, 1852, Deborah Miller, 
m. Second, Martha Blackburn. 



646— LYDIA FRENCH 



b. 12th mo. 2nd, 1827. 

m. 3rd mo. 26th, 1856, Theophilus Morlan. 




1781 



BARZILLAI FRENCH 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 47 

MEETING RECORDS 

Westland [Ohio] Mo. Meeting Minutes : 

27 th of the 2 nd month, 1796, Benjamine Yates produced a certificate from 

Goose Creek [Va.] monthly meeting dated 30 of 11 mo. last, for himself, 

Phebe, his wife, and several children, viz., Sarah, James, Ruth, Mary, Jemima 

and Benjamine. 

. .• ■'*.,. 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

10th of 12 mo. 1S02 A Certificate being requested for Barzillai French 
to the Monthly Meeting at Abington, Xos e ph Hunt and Morgan Hollinshead 
are appointed to make the necessary inquiry, and if nothing appears to 
obstruct, prepare and produce one to next meeting. 

7th of 1st Mo. 1803 The friends appointed produced a Certificate on 
behalf of Bazillai French as directed, which being read was approved and 
signed by the Clerk. 

Abington Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At Abington Monthly Meeting held 31 st of 1 st Mo: 1803. Barzilla 
French produced certificate from Evesham Monthly Meeting in New Jersey 
dated this Month which being read is accepted. 

At Abington Monthly Meeting held the 30 th of the 3" month 1807. 
Germantown represents That Barzillai French requests a Certificate to 
Salem Monthly Meeting in the State of Ohio. Samuel Wilson jun r and 
Thomas Jones jun r . are appointed to make the necefsary enquiry and if 
nothing obstruct prepare one. 



319— ELIJAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129). 
b. 5th mo. 4th, 1784. 
d. 4th mo. 9th, 1815. 
m. 3rd mo. 4th, 1807, Susannah Curie. 
She b. 8th mo. 7th, 1787. 



647— THOMAS FRENCH 
648— REBECCA FRENCH 



b. 1st mo. 5th, 1808. 

b. 1st mo. 5th, 1808. 

m. In Friends Meeting, Goshen, Ohio, Jesse 
Reames. 



649— ELIZA ANN FRENCH b. 10th mo. 13th, 1809. 

m. Baliff. 

650— JOSEPH C. FRENCH b. 12th mo. 26th, 1810. 

m. Sarah Jones. 



48 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



651— MARIA FRENCH 



652— ELIJAH FRENCH, JR. 



b. 9th mo. 20th, 1S12. 
d. 8th mo. 5th, 1813. 

b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1814. 
m. Huldah Marmon. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 11th of 3 d mo. 1791 Certi- 
ficate of removal was requested on behalf of Elijah French (a minor) to 
Haddonfield Monthly meeting, Benjamin Rulon is appointed to make the 
necessary inquiry; and if nothing appears to obstruct, prepare and produce 
one to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 8th of 4th month 1791 The 
Friends appointed produced Certificates on behalf of Elijah French, Hope 
Cowperthwaite and Children, Edith Coate, and Hannah French which were 
read, and with some amendment approved, signed by the Clk. & the three 
latter sent to the women for their signing. 



320— MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Robert, 131). 

b. 1st mo. 6th, 1786. 
d. 9th mo. 27th, 1870. 

m. 3rd mo. 24th, 1808, Josiah Roberts, son of 
Joseph and Susannah (Coles) Roberts. 
He b. 1st mo. 3rd, 1783. 
d. 10th mo. 25th, 1841. 



653— HANNAH ROBERTS 



654— ROBERT F. ROBERTS 



655— GEORGE ROBERTS 



656— JOSIAH ROBERTS, JR. 



b. 10th mo. 22nd, 1811. 
m. 11th mo. 13th, 1834, Reuben Roberts. 

b. 4th mo. 9th, 1814. 
m. 2nd mo. 17th, 1842, Ruth Ann Hunt. 

b. 11th mo. 3rd, 1818. 

m. 10th mo. 31st, 1848, Elizabeth R. Middle- 
ton. 

b. 3rd mo. 26th, 1823. 
m. 4th mo. 12th, 1849, Lydia Roberts. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 49 

JOSIAH ROBERTS 

Josiah Roberts, who married Mary French, only child of Robert [131] and 
Hannah (Warrington) French, was the sixth child and fourth son of Joseph 
and Susannah (Coles) Roberts, who were married in 1771. Susannah Coles 
was the daughter of Kendal and Ann (Budd) Coles. She was born 10th mo. 
3rd, 1751, and died 9th mo. 29th, 1828. Joseph Roberts, born 7th mo. 8th, 
1742, died 2nd mo. 22nd, 1826, was the son of Joshua and Rebecca (Stokes) 
Roberts, who were married 10th mo. 3rd, 1741. Rebecca Stokes was the 
daughter of Joseph and Judith (Lippincott) Stokes, and was born 1st mo. 
28th, 1720. Joshua Roberts was the son of John and Mary (Elkinton) 
Roberts, who were married 1st mo. 27th, 1712. Mary Elkinton was the 
daughter of George and Mary Elkinton, and died 2nd mo. 11th, 1759. John 
Roberts, born 1st mo. 4th, 1694, died 9th mo. 9th, 1747, was the son of John 
and Sarah Roberts, the progenitors of that family in Burlington county. 
Thomas Ollive, representing the proprietors, deeded to John Roberts of Over- 
stone, Northamptonshire, England, February 26, 1676-7, one sixteenth of a 
share of West Jersey, and John and Sarah Roberts first located on the north 
side of Rancocas creek, their pioneer home tract adjoining that of Thomas 
ffrench [1]. Five years later, in 1682, John Roberts joined with Timothy 
Hancock and William Matlack in purchasing a large tract of land on the 
Pensaukin creek, the Roberts' survey calling for 267 acres. And in 1684, the 
purchasers entered into a covenant with the neighboring Indians, whereby 
through their chief, Tallaca, they released all claim to " those plantations 
at Pensaukin, promising forever to defend the said John Roberts, &c, from 
all other Indians laying any claim thereto." These plantations became the 
center of a thriving community, being about one and a half miles from the 
future village of Moorestown. In 1898 the descendants of John and Sarah 
Roberts erected near the site of their colonial home a stone memorial, fittingly 
inscribed, which stands on the south side of the Camden and Moorestown pike, 
at the crossing of the Pensaukin. 

Sarah Roberts was the first woman to assume responsibility as a tax- 
payer in Chester township, she signing the corporation agreement, in 1696. 
In 1700 she became a trustee for the purchase of ground for the first 
Friends' meeting house and burial ground in Moorestown. From such a vig- 



50 GENEALOGY OF THE 

orous ancestral line Josiah Roberts inherited superior mental and personal 
qualities. His educational opportunities were limited by the meager facili- 
ties of the time, but through self-culture and the development of his gifts 
of thought and composition, he came to occupy a useful and enviable place 
in the community. He was much interested in educational and literary 
matters, in which he was heartily seconded by his wife. A reliable friend, 
a thorough business man, an influential citizen of enlarged and benevol nt 
views, he was respected and beloved wherever known. The late Elisha 
Roberts, of Moorestown, his nephew, had a vivid recollection of his m 
attractive characteristics. Isaac T. Hopper, an esteemed friend, regarded 
him as one of the most gifted men he ever knew. 

Josiah Roberts lived in Evesham Township, Burlington Co.. at the time 
of his death in 1841. His will, dated 10th mo. 4th, and proved 11th mo. 
17th, 1841, gave to his wife Mary. $1,500, $400 yearly, and a home in the 
house he occupied during her life or widowhood. Sufficient lands were to 
be sold to pay outstanding debts, remainder of real estate to be divided 
equally among his children, viz.: Hannah, wife of Reuben Roberts, Robert 
F. Roberts, George Roberts and Josiah Roberts. Executors, wife, Mary 
Roberts, and son, Robert F. Roberts. An inventory, taken 11th mo. 15th, 
1841, by Elisha Hunt and Richard M. Hugg, appraisers, showed personal 
property to the amount of $4,498, Josiah and Mary | French) Roberts were 
. >■ members of Moorestown Monthly Meeting, and likewise took much 
interest in the establishment and maintenance of the school founded by the 
Hicksite branch of Friends after the separation, in 1828. They were ap- 
pointed on committees of visitation and superintendence. Both are buried in 
Friends' Burying Ground, Moorestown. X. J. 




SIGNATURE TO WILL, 184 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



51 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas, Josiah Roberts, of Chester in the County of Burlington in New Jersey, son 
of Joseph Roberts of the same place and Susanna his wife ; and Mary French, daughter 
of Robert French, of the same place, and Hannah his wife, (she being dec' 1 ) having 
declared their intentions of marriage with each other, before a monthly meeting of the 
religious society of Friends, held at Chester ; according to the good order used among 
them, and having consent of parents, their said proposal of marriage was allowed of by 
the said meeting. Now these are to certify whom it may concern, that for the full 
accomplishment of their said intentions, this twenty-fourth day of the third month, in 
the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eight, they, the said Josiah Roberts 
and Mary French, appeared in a public meeting of the said people, held at Chester afore- 
said ; and the said Josiah Roberts, taking the said Mary French by the hand, did, on 
this solemn occasion, openly declare, that he took her, the said Mary French, to be his 
wife, promising, with Divine assistance to be unto her a loving and faithful husband 
untill death should separate them. And then, in the same afsembly, the said Mary- 
French, did in like manner declare, that she took him, the s d Josiah Roberts to be her 
husband, promising, with Divine afsistance to be unto him a loving and faithful wife,, 
untill death should separate them. And moreover, they, the said Josiah Roberts and 
Mary French, (she according to the custom of marriage, afsuming the name of her hus- 
band) did as a further confirmation thereof, then and there to these presents set their 
hands. 

And we whose names are also hereunto subscribed, being present at the solemnization 
of the said marriage and subscription, have as witnefses thereto, set our hands the day 

and year above written 1808. 

Josiah Roberts 
Mary Roberts 



Mary Cowperthwaite 

Ann Edwards 

Atlantic Matlack 

Rachel Roberts 

Joshua Roberts 

Jacob Hollinfhead 

John Roberts 

John Hunt 

Efther Hunt 

Samuel Roberts 

Enoch Roberts jn r 

Rachel Stokes 

John Stiles 

William Roberts, jun r 

Job Cowperthwaite, junr 

Isaac Stiles 

Samuel Cowperthwaite 



Hannah Warrington 
Anne Middleton 
Arthur Collins 
William Roberts 
Elizabeth Roberts 
George Matlack 
Joel Evans 
John Collins 
Esther Collins 
Rebecca Matlack 
Jo s Matlack 
Asa Matlack 
Elizabeth Matlack 
Phebe Hunt 
Hannah Roberts, Sener 
Rachel Stiles 
Mary Dudley 



Tofeph Roberts 
Susanna Roberts 
Robert French 
Elizabeth French 
Mary Roberts 
Jofeph Roberts Jun r 
Rachel Roberts 
W" Roberts Jun r 
Geo. Roberts 
Ann Roberts Jun r 
David Roberts 
Enoch Roberts 
Hugh Roberts 
Hephzibah Roberts 
Elizabeth Warrington 
Ann Matlack 
Benjamin Warrington 



52 GENEALOGY OF THE 

321— CHARLES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132). 



m. 



d. in Canfield, Mahoning County, Ohio. 
657— SARAH FRENCH 
658— JAMES FRENCH 
659— JOHN FRENCH 
660— WASHINGTON FRENCH 
661— CHARLES FRENCH, JR. 
662— REBECCA FRENCH 

322— JOSEPH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132). 
b. 11th mo. 3rd, 1781, in Mount Holly, N. J. 
d. April 2nd, 1847, in Beaver, Pa. 
m. September 2nd, 1804, Martha Newton; Rev. 
Charles H. Wharton, D.D., Rector of St. Mary's 
P. E. Church, Burlington, N. J., performing 
ceremony. 
She b. 4th mo. 10th, 1786, in Moorestown, N. J. 
d. June 17th, 1858, in Beaver, Pa. 

663— NEWTON FRENCH b. July 17th, 1805. 

d. February 10th, 1827, in Beaver, Pa., un- 
married. 

664— JAMES FRENCH b. March 27th, 1807. 

m. . 

665— CHARLES NEWTON FRENCH 

b. January 4th, 1811. 

d. March 27th, 1877. in Beaver, Pa., un- 
married. 

666— JOSEPH FRENCH, JR. b. May 21st, 1813. 

m. Elizabeth Poorman. 

667— THOMAS FRENCH b. October 4th, 1815. 

m. December 2nd, 1849, Delia Elizabeth Griffey. 

668— SAMUEL B. FRENCH b. December 1st. 1818. 

m. September 11th, 1842, Emily Robinson. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 53 



669— MARIA CLARK FRENCH 



b. November 22nd, 1821. 

d. May 20th, 1891, in Beaver, Pa., unmarried. 



670— BILLINGS O. P. FRENCH 

b. August 8th, 1823. 

d. September 22nd, 1846, in Beaver, Pa., un- 
married. 

671— LEANDER SMITH FRENCH 

b. September 30th, 1825. 

672— CAROLINE FRENCH b. January 12th, 1828. 

m. Henry T. Patton. 

JOSEPH FRENCH 

Joseph French [322], son of James and Sarah (Ferguson) French, while 
a young man and living in Burlington County, N. J., learned the trade of 
shoemaking. Shortly after his marriage to Martha Newton, in 1804, he jour- 
neyed to western Pennsylvania and located in Beaver County, at what is now 
Beaver Falls. Here he established himself in the manufacture of shoes, 
giving employment to a number of persons. Eight years later he removed 
to Beaver and extended his operations in the same line, continuing this indus- 
try successfully throughout the remainder of his life. Soon after locating in 
Beaver, he purchased an attractive residence at the southeast corner of Elk 
and Second Streets, where he and his wife lived until their death. He was 
for many years one of the leading citizens of that section, being actively inter- 
ested in religious and charitable work. He also gave much profitable attention 
to agriculture, conducting several farms. He was regarded as an energetic 
and progressive man, and accumulated a considerable estate. A numerous 
family grew up around him, and he had a large circle of acquaintances and 
friends among all classes, by whom he was greatly beloved. His death, April 
2nd, 1847, caused extended sorrow; and eleven years later, June 17th, 1858, 
his wife, likewise highly esteemed, passed peacefully away. Family records 
state: "Grandfather and grandmother [Joseph and Martha French] were 
noted for their honesty, kindness and upright dealings with all mankind. 
Grandmother came of Quaker parents, and was much loved and respected by 
all. Grandfather was a very fine looking man, very tall and straight. They 
were great workers in the Methodist Church." 



54 GENEALOGY OF THE 

325— THOMAS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132). 
b. 1st mo. 3rd, 1795. 
d. 1846. in Salem, Ohio. 

m. First, Elizabeth Talbott, daughter of Joseph 
and Mary Talbott. 
She b. 12th mo. 8th, 1788. 

m. Second, 6th mo. 27th, 1827, Martha Bryan, 
daughter of Haron and Charity Bryan. 
She b. 1st mo. 8th, 1802. 
d. 5th mo. 24th, 1872. 

673— ALLEN T. FRENCH b. 4th mo. 2nd, 1818. 

m. Martha Gibson. 

674— JOSEPH T. FRENCH b. 8th mo. 21st, 1819. 

m. 1st mo. 4th, 1844, Isabella T. Swain. 

675— JAMES F. FRENCH b. 6th mo. 10th, 1821. 

m. 9th mo. 19th, 1857, Mary E. Frame. 

676— WILLIAM F. FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 30th, 1823. 

m. 4th mo. 9th, 1857, Deborah G. Bonsall. 

Children of Thomas and Martha (Bryan) French. 

677— HARON FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1828. 

678— ELIZABETH FRENCH b. 5th mo. 24th, 1830. 

m. 4th mo. Uth, 1870, Washington Brewster 
He (1. 8th mo. 22nd, 1889. 

679— NEWTON FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 14th, 1833. 

m. First, 2nd mo. 14th, 1855, Annie Templin. 
m. Second, 2nd mo. 11th, 1893, Elizabeth 
Wharton. 

680— SARAH FRENCH m. 10th mo. 1st, 1856, John S. Butler. 

681— MARTHA FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 28th, 1837. 

m. Evan . 

682— THOMAS EMMOR FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 25th, 1844. 
m. Hettie . 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 55 

329— SAMUEL CARR, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Ann, 

135). 
b. 3rd mo. 24th, 1788. 
m. Patience . 

683— ANN CARR m. Moses Gruwell. 

334— URIAH WILKINS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Ann, 138). 

b. 8th mo. 22nd, 1758. 
d. 10th mo. 23rd. 1804. 

m. October 18th, 1792, Elizabeth Eyre, daughter 
of Samuel and Elizabeth Eyre. 
She b. 5th mo. 12th, 1769. 
d. 6th mo. 15th, 1807. 

684— ELEANOR H. WILKINS b. 7th mo. 27th. 1793. 

m. 9th mo. 28th, 1815, Farmer Burn. 

685— JACOB F. WILKINS b. 10th mo. 22nd, 1794. 

d. 9th mo. 19th, 1864. 

686— SAMUEL E. WILKINS b. 10th mo. 9th, 1797. 

m. 1st mo. 17th, 1819, Sarah French [556]. 

687— BENJAMIN E. WILKINS b. 6th mo. 9th, 1800. 

m. Sarah Jaggard, widow. 

688— NATHAN E. WILKINS b. 1st mo. 13th, 1802. 

d. 4th mo. 25th, 1802. 

689— ELIZABETH E. WILKINS 

b. 11th mo. 13th, 1803. 

339— ISAAC WILKINS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Ann, 138). 

b. 12th mo. 7th, 1772. 
d. April 7th, 1853, in Camden, N. J. 
m. April 14th, 1796, Ann Hollingshead [377], 
daughter of Hugh and Eleanor (French) 
Hollingshead. 
She b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1779. 
d. January 3rd, 1862. 



56 GENEALOGY OF THE 

690— ELIZA WILKIN'S b. December 20th, 17%, in Moorestown, N. J. 

d. March 29th, 1882. 

m. August 6th, 1840, Nathan Davis; Epis- 
copal ceremony. 
He b. December 19th, 1793. 

d. October 8th, 1861 (no issue). 

691— RICHARD WILKIN- b. January 19th, 1799. 

m. 3rd mo. 26th, 1829, Eliza Ann Coate. 

692— ABIGAIL WILKIN- b. August 19th, 1801, in Moorestown, N. J. 

il. August 3rd, 1862, in Camden, N. J. (un- 
married). 

Records in the possession of the descendants of Isaac and Ann (Ilollingshead) Wilkins 
(daughter of Hugh and Eleanor (French) Ilollingshead), seem to indicate that the name 
in this branch of the family was spelled Hollinshead. Other descendants of Hugh and 
Eleanor (French) Hollingshead have retained the " g." The spelling of the name has 
been more or less variable since the settlement in this country of the pioneer John Hol- 
linshead — Holinshead, Hollinghead, Hollingshead. 

341— CHARLES WILKINS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles. 42; Ann, 

138). 
b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1779. 

m. First, Lydia Hazelton, daughter of William 
and Abigail (Wright) Hazelton. 
She b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1782. 
d. 4th mo. 10th, 1805. 

m. Second, 1808, Sarah Striker, daughter of Philip 
and Rebecca (Eayre) Striker. 

693— THOMAS WILKINS m. Rebecca Haines, daughter of Isaac and 

Elizabeth (Austin) Haines (no issue). 

Children of Charles and Sarah (Striker) Wilkins. 

694 — LOUIS WILKIN'S m. Rebecca Ann Moore, daughter of John and 

Keturah (Eayre) Moore. 

695— URIAH WILKINS m. Ann Eliza Foster, daughter of Josiah and 

Llizabeth Foster. 

696— REBECCA ANN WILKINS 

697— CAROLINE WILKINS m. John Watson. 

698— CHARLES WILKINS 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 57 

344 — WILLIAM BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 

139). 
m. March 1st, 1804, Mary Inskeep, daughter of 
Abraham, Jr., and Hannah (Stokes) Hopkins 
Inskeep. 
She b. January 23rd, 1784. 
d. March 26th, 1857. 
699— JOSEPH INSKEEP BRICK 

b. December 23rd, 1804. 
m. February 16th, 1832, Rebecca Clement. 

700— ABIGAIL FRENCH BRICK 

b. February 17th, 1809. 
m. about 1831, Job Bartlett. 

701— HANNAH BRICK b. August 25th, 1810. 

m. January 25th, 1834, Clayton Lippincott. 

702— WILLIAM STOKES BRICK 

m. Mary Harbaugh. 

703— SAMUEL FRENCH BRICK 

b. 1823. 
m. 4th mo. 6th, 1848, Caroline Kay Clark. 

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

STATE OF NEW JERSEY \ 
Gloucester County j ° * 

To All It May Concern 
Know ye that on this day of the date here of, William Brick of the Town of Gloucester 
in the County of aforesaid of the one Part and Mary Inskeep of the Township of Water- 
ford in the County aforesaid of the other Part were by me the Subscriber one of the 
Justices of the Peace in and for said County, Joined in the Holy Bonds of Matrimony 
and Pronounced Man and Wife. Witness my hand and seal the first day of March in 
the Year of our Lord 1804. J. Clement 

In the presence of 

Abraham Inskeep Rachel French 

Jno. Brick Sibbillah Inskeep 

Jacob Stokes Lydia Stokes 

William Roberts Samuel Eastlack 

Aquila Stokes Isaac Doughten 

Sarah Brick Samuel Henry 

Ann Roberts John Brick, Jun. 

Bathsheba Brick Joseph Inskeep 

Abbey Stokes 



58 GENEALOGY OF THE 

ANCESTRY OF MARY (INSKEEP) BRICK 

The Inskeep family were among the early settlers of west New Jersey, 
although not of the first adventurers. The progenitor, John Inskeep, son of 
John, with his wife Mary, sons John. James and Joseph, and daughter Mary, 
came from Staffordshire, England, in 170S, and settled near the present 
village of Marlton, Camden (formerly Gloucester) county, taking up an 
extensive tract of land. From the time of his emigration to this country 
until his death in 1729. the pioneer, John Inskeep, bought and sold large 
tracts of land in Burlington and Gloucester counties ; and he owned for a time 
the tract along the south branch of Pensaukin creek, a part of which, in 1747, 
became the plantation homestead of Charles French, Jr. [42], and his son 
Charles f 143]. That John Inskeep was a man of education, superior mental 
qualities and pronounced strength of character is evidenced by the influence 
that he soon exerted in the affairs of the colony and the public positions which 
he held. He was justice of the peace during 1713-1714-1715, and held 
minor offices for YVaterford township from 1716 to 1723 inclusive, excepting 
1719 — surveyor of roads, one of the freeholders, assessor, foreman of the 
grand jury, etc. ; Judge of the Quarter Sessions and Court of Common Pleas 
of Gloucester county from 1724 until the time of his death. By his will, 
dated November 11th, 1729, and proved January 12th. 1729, he devised to 
his son John 215 acres of land in Evesham township, Burlington county, 
where John then lived. To Joseph and Abraham (the latter then under age), 
was left the homestead property — Joseph to receive 300 acres, "one feather-bed 
and furniture at his mother's discretion, a pair of oxen, 2 cows, all the hus- 
bandry utensils, riding mare, and negro boy Ishmaiel " ; Abraham to receive 
the remaining portion of the homestead property after his brother Joseph'^ 
300 acres were carefully laid out. To James was given 5 shillings, and the 
mare called "Tib," he having been previously established in Burlington, by 
his father, in the business of weaving. To the daughter Mary, who married 
William Heulings, was given a negro girl "Jenny" and £50 to be paid by 
her brother, Joseph. To the wife, Mary, was left the balance of personal 
estate, and the negro woman called " Hannah " ; and if " son Joseph marry 
and bring a wife to this plantation he shall pay his mother £5 a year during 
her life." Wife Mary and son John were appointed executors, and they were 
authorized to sell several hundred acres of land. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 59 

Abraham, youngest child of John and Mary Inskeep, born 4th mo. 18th, 
1712, in New Jersey, married 1740, Sarah, daughter of George Ward. They 
had the following children: Hannah, born 10th mo. 23rd, 1741; Esther, 
born 7th mo. 17th, 1743, died 1748; Elizabeth, born 6th mo. 15th, 1745, 
died 9th mo. 9th, 1775, married 1765, Samuel Tonkins; Sarah, born 1st mo. 
4th, 1747, married 10th mo. 20th, 1764, Thomas Stokes; Sabilla, born 5th 
mo. 12th, 1750, married John Tonkins; Abraham, Jr., born 5th mo. 6th, 
1752; Priscilla, born 2nd mo. 2nd, 1755, married 1773, Benjamin Pine; 
John, born 1st mo. 29th, 1757; Joseph, born 10th mo. 4th, 1759, died 10th 
mo. 15th, 1793, married 10th mo. 14th, 1790, Susanna Bennett; George, born 
12th mo. 13th, 1761, died 9th mo. 15th, 1763; Hope, born 8th mo. 14th, 
1763. 

By will dated April 1st, 1732, proved April 26th, 1732, Joseph Inskeep, 
third son of John and Mary Inskeep, devised to his " brother Abraham 
Inskeep my plantation together with all buildings and improvements to him 
his heirs and assigns forever." This devise placed Abraham in possession 
and ownership of the homestead property, and he occupied the dwelling in 
which his father had died. Abraham conducted successfully for a number 
of years in Waterford township an extensive blacksmith and wheelwright 
business. He died 1st mo. 16th, 1780; and by will dated January 1st, 1780, 
and proved January 27th, 1780, made the following bequests: To his wife 
Sarah, 1 cow ; bed and furniture, etc. ; " and owing to unsettled and fluctuat- 
ing state of our currency cannot settle on any particular sum, and leave it to 
son Abraham and wife to settle it each year, &c. during her widowhood." 
To Abraham, Jr., was bequeathed the part of the plantation where he then 
lived; to Joseph, the homestead plantation, 2 working horses, a colt called 
" Sportsman," 2 cows, etc., and the blacksmithing tools. To these two 
sons jointly was bequeathed their father's cedar swamp and pine lands lying 
on a branch of Egg Harbor river called the " 4 mile branch." Among sons 
John, Abraham, Jr., and Joseph, the father's wearing apparel was to be 
divided equally. And among daughters, Hannah Inskeep, Sarah Stokes, 
Priscilla Pine, son John, and daughter Sabilla Tonkins' four children, was 
to be divided in equal parts the proceeds of sale of balance of personal estate. 
By codicil dated January 13th. 1780, son John was to have " apprentice boy 
George Sasman to serve him during the rest of his apprenticeship." Sons 
John and Abraham, Jr., were appointed executors. 

Abraham Inskeep, Jr., eldest son and sixth child of Abraham and Sarah 



60 GENEALOGY OF THE 



(Ward) Inskeep was born 5th mo. 6th, 1752, and married Hannah (Stokes) 
Hopkins, widow of Haddon Hopkins, and daughter of Joshua and Amy 
Stokes. They had three children: Sarah, born 9th mo. 5th, 1773, died 
1st mo. 22nd, 1855, married 1799, Joseph Powell Rogers; Mary, married 
William Brick; Joseph, born 3rd mo. 12th, 1788, died 1st mo. 28th, 1847, 
married 3rd mo. 12th, 1812, Rachel Kay. 

On April 23rd, 1785, Joseph Inskeep, the youngest living son of Abraham, 
Sr., and Sarah (Ward) Inskeep, conveyed to his brother, Abraham Inskeep, 
Jr., the share of the home plantation which he had inherited from his father, 
thus placing the second Abraham in possession of the property on which 
had dwelt his grandfather, John Inskeep, at the time of his death in 1729. 
This property has now passed entirely out of the family. 

Abraham Inskeep, Jr., was a man of strong character, and of marked 
influence in the community. He served as justice of the peace and later 
as lay Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 1796, 1806 and 1812. At the 
time of his death, which occurred July 17th, 1820, the "Herald and 
Farmer," a newspaper published in Woodbury, N. J., thus referred to him: 

" Died, on the 17th inst. at his residence in this county, after a lingering 
illness borne with exemplary patience and resignation, Abraham Inskeep, 
Esq., in the 69th year of his age. The death of this distinguished citizen 
will long be lamented, and his memory cherished with feelings of no com- 
mon interest, not only as an upright magistrate, but for his practical virtue 
and usefulness." 

He survived his wife several years. By will dated April 16th, 1820. and 
proved August 1st, 1820, he devised to his daughters, Sarah Rogers and 
Mary Brick, in equal shares, his tract of land and cedar swamp on a branch 
of the Egg Harbor river called " the 4 mile branch." His executors, who 
were sons-in-law Joseph P. Rogers and William Brick, were directed to sell 
the home plantation and residue of real and personal estate not otherwise 
disposed of ; and after the payment of all debts and legacies, the residue was 
to be divided into four equal parts, one fourth to Sarah Rogers, one fourth 
to Mary Brick, one fourth to son Joseph, one fourth to grandchildren Sarali 
Ann Rogers, Joseph Brick and John Ray Inskeep. To son-in-law Joseph 
Rogers was bequeathed $300, " to compensate him for sundry services 
rendered me." An inventory of personal property, taken July 31st, 1820, 
showed a valuation of $2,000. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 61 



As illustrating one of the usages of the early settlers, noted also in the case 
of Thomas ffrench, progenitor, the following paragraph in the will of Abra- 
ham Inskeep, Jr., is of special interest: 



" I hereby order and direct my Executors before the sale of this my 
plantation to put the fence Round the family burial ground in good Repair 
and enjoin it on the Purchaser of this my Plantation and his Afsigns in a 
legal way always to keep the said burial ground in decent Repair and to 
Sufer and permit a Pafsage to and from the Same at the funerals of per- 
sons there admitted to be intered." 



This small isolated graveyard, some fifty feet square, is located about one 
mile west of Marlton, N. J.; and though the graves are now overrun with 
briars, and a number of stones broken and out of place, it is still surrounded 
by a substantial fence, and a few stones remain to mark the resting place of 
the pioneer, John Inskeep, who died December 15th, 1729, and some of his 
descendants. Through all the mutations of ownership, this family burial 
ground has been carefully maintained and the places of interment preserved. 

John Inskeep, brother of Abraham Inskeep, Jr., and second son of 
Abraham and Sarah (Ward) Inskeep, was born 1st mo. 29th, 1757, married 
1st mo. 22nd, 1778, Sarah Hulings, died 12th mo. 18th, 1834, buried in 
Christ Church Graveyard, Philadelphia. He served over four years in the 
Continental battalions of New Jersey during the Revolution, as private, com- 
missary, quartermaster and lieutenant. About 1785 he removed to Phila- 
delphia and became a successful china and glassware merchant. He was 
chosen Mayor in 1800 and again in 1805, and served as associate Judge of 
the Common Pleas Court 1802-05. In 1806 he was elected president of 
the Insurance Company of North America, retaining that place until failing 
health compelled him to retire, in 1831. 

The Inskeep family were active in the membership and work of the 
Episcopal Church, and for many years they occupied a prominent place in 
the business community of Gloucester and Burlington counties. They were 
owners of extensive tracts of timber land, and the preparation of lumber 
for various requirements seemed to become an hereditary trait. 



62 GENEALOGY OF THE 

345— ANN BRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 139). 

m. 5th mo. 16th, 1799, William Roberts, son of 
Joseph and Susannah (Coles) Roberts. 

d. 9th mo. 13th, 1820. 
He b. 12th mo. 21st, 1775. 

d. 12th mo. 10th, 1836; buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Moorestown, N. J. 

704— ABIGAIL BRICK ROBERTS 

b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1803. 
m. 10th mo. 17th, 1822, Benajah Butcher, Jr. 

705— MARY ANN ROBERTS b. 8th mo. 2nd, 1805. 

m. First, 1826. William Bispham. 
m. Second, 2nd mo. 20th, 1840, Josiah Engle 
Coles. 

706— SUSAN ROBERTS b. 2nd mo. 8th, 1808. 

m. 3rd mo. 24th, 1836, Richard Carroll. 

Mill IN'G RECORDS 

Haddonfield Minutes of y" Mo: Meeting of Women Friends: 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women Friends held at Haddonfield the S ,h 

of the 4 ,h month 1799 

William Roberts & Ann Brick appeared and declared their intentions 

of Marriage with each other, Lydia Borough & Abigail Thorn are appointed 

to make the usual enquiry & report to next Meeting. 

13 lb of the S th month 1799 William Roberts and Ann Brick appeared 
and Declared they Continued their intentions of Marriage the Consent of 
Parents appearing and Clear account being given in respecting the young 
Woman, they are therefore at liberty to proceed agreeable to good order, 
Beulah Clement and Mary Borough are appointed to attend the Marriage 
to see good order kept and report to next Meeting. 

10" 1 of the b lb Month 1799 From the report given in by the Friends 
who were appointed to attend the Marriage of William Roberts and Ann 
Brick it appears it was orderly Conducted. 

At A Monthly Meeting of Women Friends held Haddonfield the 9" 1 
day of the 9 th Month 1799 

One of the overseers from Haddonfield informed that Ann Roberts 
requested a Certificate to recommend her to Friends of Evesham Monthly 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



63 



Meeting. Beulah Clement and Rebecca Hopkins are appointed to make 
the necefsary inquiry and prepare one for next Meeting. 

14 lh Day of the 10 tB Month 1799 A Certificate being prepared for Ann 
Roberts, Recommending her to Friends of Evesham, being read was Signed 
by the Clerk. 



346— ABIGAIL BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 

139). 
m. about 1799 Captain Jacob Stokes. 



707— CAROLINE STOKES 



b. 1800. 
m. Josiah Engle Coles. 



708— ANNA MARIA STOKES b. 1802. 

m. 1818, Joseph Clark Collings. 

709— HOWELL STOKES m. Sarah Shivers. 

710— MARMADUKE STOKES d. unmarried. 

710a— SARAH STOKES d. unmarried. 



349— AMY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140). 

b. 12th mo. 3rd, 1774. 
d. 2nd mo. 19th, 1861, in Yorkville, 111. 
m. 11th mo. 20th, 1799, John Pope, son of V 
Nathaniel and Sarah Pope. 



711— SAMUEL POPE 

712— ELIZABETH F. POPE 
713— MIRIAM POPE 

714— RICHARD POPE 

715— JOHN POPE 



b. 10th mo. 26th, 1800. 

m. 4th mo. 14th, 1830, Mary Cook. 

m. 2d mo. 14th, 1822, Clayton Roberts. 

b. 12th mo. 4th, 1805. 

m. Allen Jones. 

b. 11th mo. 15th, 1808. 

d. unmarried. 

b. 8th mo. 9th, 1811. 

d. unmarried. 



64 GENEALOGY OF THE 

716— JACOB F. POPE b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1816. 

m. First, 1st mo. 5th, 1840, Ann Cook. 

m. Second, 1st mo. 23rd, 1877, Elvira Benton. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Monthly Meeting Minutes of Women Friends Held at Haddonfield. Sec. Book: 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women Friends at Haddonfield 6th month 10th 1805 A 
Certificate was produced to this meeting from Upper Springfield dated 6th month 5th 
1805 recommending John Pope & Amy his wife, with their two minor children viz, Samuel 
and Elizabeth, to the notice of this, which was read & accepted. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women frds held at Haddonfield the T" mo 10'" 1815 Amy 
Pope likewise requests to be joined in a Certificate with her Husband & Children to 
Chester M" Meeting, Sarah Day & Martha Burrough are appointed to make inquiry & 
report to the Men fr'd" on the like appointment. 

8"' mo H xh 1815 Certificate being prepared & produced to this Meeting for John Pope, 
Amy his Wife with their five minor Children to wit Samuel, Elizabeth, Miriam, Richard 
I ■'. & John Pope to Chester Mo Meeting all which was Read approved and signed. 

John Pope and his wife and five children were received into Chester Meeting [Moores- 
town] from Haddonfield. 11th mo. 9th, 1815, and the family removed to Upper Evesham 
Meeting 5th mo. 9th, 1822. 



350— ABIGAIL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140). 
b. 12th mo. 27th, 1777. 
d. 1st mo. 28th, 1850. 

m. 1801, Joseph Jones, son of Joseph and Sarah 
Jones. 
He b. 9th mo. 18th, 1777. 

717— ELIZABETH F. JONES. b. 7th mo. 11th, 1802. 

d. 12th mo. 11th, 1826, unmarried. 

718— REBECCA HATCH JONES 

b. 1st mo. 21st, 1804. 
m. Joel Roberts. 

719— AQUILLA JONES b. 6th mo. 13th, 1809. 

m. Elizabeth T. Coles. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 65 

MEETING RECORDS 

Haddonfield Minutes of y e Mo: Meeting of Women Friends: 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women Friends held at Haddonfield the 10"" 
day of the I s ' Month 1802. 

This meeting was informed that Abigail Jones (late French) had been 
visited by the overseers for accomplishing her marriage contrary to the good 
order of friends, this meeting appearing easy a visit should be paid her ap- 
points Hannah Clement, Mary Elfreth and Beulah Clement to that service 
and to report their sense respecting her to next meeting. 

8 ,h day of the 2 nd Month 1802 One of the friends appointed to visit 
Abigail Jones reported that they have been prevented from performing the 
service, they are therefore continued on the appointment. 

8 th day of the 3 rd Month 1802 The friends appointed to visit Abigail 
Jones for outgoing in marriage now made report, that they had performed 
the service and the meeting appears easy at her request, that the case should 
lay another month. 

12 Ul day of the 4 th Mo. 1802 An acknowledgement was produced to 
this meeting by Abigail Jones, condemning her outgoing in marriage, this 
meeting after a solid consideration appoints Mary Swett and Ann Black- 
wood to take an opportunity with her on account thereof and report their 
sense of her situation of mind to next meeting. 

10"' day of the S" Month 1802 The friends appointed respecting Abigail 
Jones's acknowledgement made report that they had performed the service, 
and that she appeared in a tender disposition ; this meeting taking the matter 
into serious consideration, unites in its going forward to Men friends, 
who inform us that they are united in the reception thereof; Ann Gill and 
Mary Elfrith are appointed to inform her of the conclusion of the meeting. 

351— RICHARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140). 
b. 7th mo. 6th, 1781. 
d. 9th mo. 4th, 1845. 
m. Hannah Lippincott. 

720— SARAH LIPPINCOTT FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 11th, 1822. 
m. Joseph L. Walton. 

721— GEORGE FOX FRENCH b. 10th mo. 24th, 1825. 

m. Mary Cushing. 

s 



66 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

10th of 6th Mo. 1803 Richard French, by a friend, requests a Certifi- 
cate of removal to the monthly meeting of Pilesgrove. Morgan Hollinshead 
and Joshua Borton are appointed to make the necessary inquiry, and if noth- 
ing appears to obstruct prepare and produce one to next meeting. 

Nth of 7th month 1803 The friends appointed produced certificates on 
behalf of James Cattle Junr., Deborah his Wife, and five Children, Vizt. 
Ann, Hannah, Elizabeth, Sarah and Deborah ; also for Richard French and 
Jesse Owen as directed, which being severally read were approved, signed 
by the Clk. and the former sent to the Women for their signing. 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

11th of the 7th Mo. 1809. A Certificate was produced from the monthly 
meeting of Greenwich for David C. Wood dated 27th of 7th month last ; 
also a certificate for Richard French and one for Isaac Ilowey (a minor) 
from the monthly meeting of Pilesgrove dated 22nd of last month, they 
were severally read and accepted. 

11th 9 mo. 1820. A Certificate for Richard French to the Monthly Meet- 
ing of Upper Evesham, was requested ; James Saunders and Samuel 
Mickle, were appointed to take the necessary care. 

12th Mo. 7th 1820 A Certificate for Richard French was read, approv'd 
and signed by the Clerk. 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

Richard French came in by certificate from Woodbury the 7th of 12th 
Mo. 1820, removed to Philadelphia Northern District the 11th of 1st Mo. 
1823. 

Hannah French removed to Northern District the 11th of 1st Month 1823. 

Sarah L. French removed to Northern District the 11th of 1st Month 
1823. 

Record of Certificates granted by Burlington Monthly Meeting 1787 to 1879. 
To the Monthly Meeting of Friends of Chesterfield. 

Dear friends, Sarah L. French having requested our certificate to unite 
her to your meeting, enquiry has been made and no obstruction appearing, 
we recommend her as a member of our religious society to your christian 
care and regard and are your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of Burlington Monthly Meeting of Friends held 
the 5th day of 10th mo. 1846 

R. Jones Thos. Dugdale ) _ , 

<v Clerks 
correspondent Sarah W. Dugdale j 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



67 



To the monthly Meeting of Friends of Chesterfield. 

Dear Friends, Hannah French having removed to reside within your 
limits has applied for our certificate. Inquiry having been made and no 
obstruction appearing, we hereby certify that she is a member of our re- 
ligious Society and we recommend her to your christian care and regard 
and are your friends. 

Signed in and on behalf of Burlington Monthly Meeting of Friends held 
the 5th day of 10th month 1846 

R. Jones Thos. Dugdale 1 

correspondent S. \V. Dugdale j 

352— JOSHUA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140). 
b. 10th mo. 30th, 1787. 

d. 1825, in Evesham twp., Burlington Co., N. J. 
m. 10th mo. 3rd, 1817, Elizabeth H. Beck. 
She b. 5th mo. 22nd, 1795. 

d. 3rd mo. 19th, 1867; buried in Colestown (N.J.) 
Cemetery. 

722— SAMUEL BECK FRENCH b. 10th mo. 5th, 1818. 

m. First, 1st mo. 7th, 1847, Elizabeth E. 

Moore, 
m. Second, 11th mo. 10th, 1864, Mary Comly. 

723— ELIZABETH STOKES FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 8th, 1820. 
m. 5th mo., 1842, Allen M. Rogers. 

724— CHARLOTTE BECK FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 1st, 1823. 

d. 4th mo. 24th, 1895, buried in Colestown 

(N. J.) Cemetery, 
m. 3rd mo. 21st, 1844, William Butler. 

725— MARY LIPPINCOTT FRENCH 

b. 8th mo. 10th, 1825. 
m. 1st mo. 16th, 1845, Samuel Burrough. 




WEDDING PRESENT TO ELIZABETH H. BECK, 1817 



68 GENEALOGY OF THE 

353— URIAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141). 

b. 7th mo. 13th, 1770, in Waterford township, 
Gloucester Co., N. J., "on the 6 day of the 
week between 8 & 9 oClock in morning." 

d. 9th mo. 27th, 1825, " 50 minutes past three 
oclock in the afternoon," buried in Friends 
Burying Ground, Woodbury, N. J. 

m. 6th mo. 3rd, 1802, Mary Ivins, daughter of 
Isaac and Hannah (Tilton) Ivins, of Salem 
County, N. J. 
She b. 7th mo. 26th, 1783. 

d. 7th mo. 10th, 1842, "at half past seven in the 
evening," buried in Friends Burying Ground, 
Woodbury, N. J. 

726— HANNAH IVINS FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 19th, 1803. 
m. August 30th, 1832, David Blackwood 

Morgan. 

727— ISAAC IVINS FRENCH b. 1st mo. 26th, 1805. 

d. 8th mo. 31st, 1826, "at 8 oclock in the 
morning." 

728— SARAH IIEULINGS FRENCH 

b. 4th mo. 19th, 1807. 
m. November 10th, 1836, Jeremiah J. Richards. 

729— AGNES ANN FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 14th, 1809. 

m. 1st mo. 7th, 1830, Isaac Combs. 

730— MARTHA FRENCH b. 8th mo. 1st, 1811. 

d. April 20th, 1897; buried in Evergreen 

Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 
m. March 15th, 1832, Benjamin Hillman. 

731— MARY IVINS FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 17th, 1814. 

m. February 24th, 1843, Edwin Shoemaker. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



69 



732— SAMUEL HARRISON FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 25th, 1816. 
m. October 6th, 1842, Angelina Dunseth. 

733— CHARLES BARCLAY FRENCH 

b. 12th mo. 5th, 1818. 

m. May 11th, 1846, Sarah Louisa Langcake. 



734— URIAH FRENCH, JR. 



b. 6th mo. 25th, 1821. 
m. Caroline Wheedon. 



735— CLAYTON FRENCH 



b. 5th mo. 16th, 1824. 

m. First, April 30th, 1846, Catharine Ann 
Hansell. 

m. Second, April 12th, 1888, Margaret (Han- 
sell) Ritter. 




1783 MARY (iVINS) FRENCH 1842 



70 GENEALOGY OF THE 

URIAH FRENCH 

Uriah French [353], eldest son and child of Samuel [141] and Sarah 
(Heulings) French, for some years directed the operations of his father's 
saw mill property and the farm connected therewith, located a short distance 
west of the main road leading from Mullica Hill to Ewanville, now Harrison 
township, Gloucester county, N. J. Though inheriting this property, 115 
acres and saw mill, from his father, in 1814, he sold it within the same year 
to his uncle, Charles French [143]. Uriah owned other property in the neigh- 
borhood, which he did not dispose of until 1817, about which time he removed 
to Swedesboro, to engage in mercantile business. The saw mill estate was 
sold by the executors of Charles French, in 1835, to his son-in-law, Gilbert 
Page, of Moorestown. During the next forty years it changed hands many 
times, the present owner purchasing it in 1877. 

This pioneer mill, located in the midst of a great woodland, along Raccoon 
creek, was one of the first in South Jersey and did service for more than one 
hundred years, being dismantled about thirty years ago. Its lonely ruins are 
covered by a thick growth of trees, vines and underbrush. Part of the 
original forebay, through which the water passed to the big wheel that 
furnished the power to run the great saw, is still visible. The mill race is 
clearly outlined in part, the whole comprising a wierd and intensely interest- 
ing spot to those familiar with its history, suggestive of the creeping folklore 
of chimney-corner days. All the great trees that once stood guard over 
the beautiful valley and hillside are gone, yet the site is picturesque and 
impressive, as the accompanying picture shows. 

A Swedish map published in 1654 shows a settlement near the mouth of 
Raccoon creek, where Swedesboro afterwards was located. Trinity Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church, a rude log structure, was built in 1 704, close to 
the landing, being surrounded by a strong stone wall. The ground adjacent 
^vas assigned by the Swedish home government to the church, but such 
simple methods of settlement prevailed, with nominal ground rents, that this 
patrimony now only yields a revenue of about sixty dollars a year, although 
the real estate concerned embraces the business and residence heart of a 
thriving town and is of great value. In 1784 the present fine brick church 
was built (see illustration), it coming within control of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church about one hundred years ago. Old records are carefully 
preserved and there is a silver communion service bearing date 1731. 
Several beautiful trees of great age adorn the grounds. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 71 

Directly opposite the site of the old log church, beside the creek, a large 
brick house, with commodious wareroom basement, for commercial purposes, 
was built, about 1784, by David Harker, being owned by him until 1806, 
and by his son until 1827. This building, as the accompanying illustration 
shows, is in an excellent state of preservation. Hither came Uriah French, 
about 1817, establishing himself as a merchant and continuing the business 
until shortly before his death, in 1825. The main retail store occupied the 
west end of the first floor, which plainly shows the effects of long usage. 
A wharf, a few feet from the basement door, afforded needful facilities for 
the receipt and shipment of goods. This property has changed owners many 
times within the past one hundred years. It is subject to an irredeemable 
ground rent of five dollars a year, held by Trinity Church since 1 704. After 
her husband's death Mary (Ivins) French removed to the vicinity of Mullica 
Hill, where she resided the remainder of her life. 

ANCESTRY OF MARY (IVINS) FRENCH 

The Ivins family were among the early settlers of Long Island, whence \ 
they joined the movement to East Jersey, about 1690. A few years later 
they located in Burlington county, West Jersey, while subsequent generations 
were prosperous and influential residents of Salem and Gloucester counties, 
and also of Bucks county, Pennsylvania. In 1711 Isaac Ivins, of Mansfield 
township, Burlington county, married Sarah Johnson. A second wife was 
Lydia Brown, daughter of Preserve Brown, Sr., and upon her death he married 

Ann . His children were, Isaac, Jr., who married, first, 1737, 

Mary Hopkins; second, 1771, Ann Curtis, widow; Moses, married about 
1752, Keziah Shreve [103]; Joseph, married 1741, Hannah Everingham ; 
Ann, born 1732, married, first, 1748, Levi Nutt ; second, 1769, Hugh 
Hutchins ; Diademia, born 1734, married 1753, John Thorn, Jr.; Aaron, 
married 1 764, Ann Cheshire ; and probably Thomas, Sarah, William, Solomon 
and Lydia. 

Isaac Ivins was for half a century one of the noted residents of his 
section. He kept a general store and trading post at Georgetown, Burlington 
Co., which was the resort of the trapper Indians as well as white hunters. 
Quarrels were frequent and the storekeeper's peace officer was a fierce monkey, 
which speedily put the rioters to flight. Isaac Ivins lived to a great age and 
accumulated a considerable estate. He died in 1768, and by will dated July 
19th, 1767, and proved July 11th, 1768, he made the following bequests: 



72 GENEALOGY OF THE 

" I give and bequeath to Ann my well beloved Wife all the Household 
Goods of every kind that was hers when I married her, and likewise 
Fifteen pounds. 

Residue of estate unto my well beloved Children that shall be living 
at the time of my Decease. 

My well beloved Son Joseph Ivins, and my Son in Law John Thorn 
Executors of this my Last Will and Testament." 

Witnessed by W m . Walton, Aaron Taylor and John Robinson 

Inventory of the estate of Isaac Ivins, deceased, taken July 8, 1768, Caleb 
Shrevc and John Chapman, appraisers, was as follows : 

£ s. d. 

Pursce & Apperral 36 6 2 

Bonds & Bills 520 18 7 

Shop goods 702 11 11 

House goods 143 6 

Book Debts 3302 17 11 

4706 7 

Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes of 7th mo. 1st, 1737, state that 
" Isaac Ivins Jun r requested a certificate at this Meeting to the Monthly 
Meeting at Burlington relating to Marriage. Friends appoint Michael New- 
bold & Joseph Recklefs to enquire into his Converfation & Clearnefs on 
account of Marriage & get a certificate drawn accordingly." 

On the 23rd of 9th mo., 1737, the marriage of Isaac Ivins, Jr., of Mans- 
field, and Mary, daughter of Edward Hopkins, of Burlington, was " orderly 
accomplished." Among the witnesses were Richard French [5], William 
French [27] and Charles French [8]. Only a partial list of the children of 
Isaac Ivins, Jr., and his wife, Mary Hopkins, seems to be available, namely; 
Samuel, Mary, Aaron, a daughter who married John Robbing Barzillai, 
Isaac (3rd). 

Isaac Ivins, Jr., was overseer of roads and surveyor of highways for Ches- 
terfield township in 1 744-46, and constable 1 749 ; and the township records 
contain the following note : 

1744 It was ordered at this Towns meeting that Burgas Hall and Isaac 
Ivens, Jr., overseers of ye highways should each make A Book and keep 
account of all persons that do work on ye road and such necklects to cum 
and make A report of ye saim the next towns meeting to the next overseers 
and then they shall bring in the cost of that Book and shall be paid by the 
order of ye said town. The said books each cost six shillings and six pence. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 73 

In 1771 Isaac Ivins, Jr., married, second, Ann Curtis, widow, of Chester- 
field Monthly Meeting. The minutes of the meeting are as follows : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held in Chesterfield y e 4 th of 7 m °. 
1771 — Isaac Ivins and Ann Curtis appear'd the first time and publish'd 
their Intentions of Marriage with each other Joseph Dewes & Thomas 
Watson is desired to make the necefsary inquiry Concerning the man and 
likewise how her former Husbands Will is Comply'd with and report to 
our next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held in Chesterfield y" 1 st 8 mo 1771. 
Isaac Ivins and Ann Curtifs appear'd the second time and he declar'd 
they Continu'd their Intentions of Marriage Joseph Dewes and Thomas 
Watson report nothing appears to obstruct their proceedings and Likewise 
that her former Husbands Will is Complyd with as far as she and others 
Concern'd apprehend is to the advantage of the Legatees they are left to 
their liberty to accomplish their said intentions according to good order. 
Joseph Dewes and Benjamin Field is appointed to attend the Marriage 
and report to our next Monthly Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held in Chesterfield y e 5 th : 9"'°— 1771. 
The friends appointed to attend the Marriage of Isaac Ivins and Ann 
Curtifs report they was there and Saw nothing but what was orderly. 

Isaac Ivins, Jr., died in Chesterfield township, Burlington Co., N. J., 
in 1786; and by will dated 8th mo. 11th, 1786, and proved August 28th, 
1 786, he made the following bequests : 

Wife Ann all she brought with her and £40 per year during her life. 

Grandson Samuel Ivens plantation where I now live when 21. 

Granddaughters, Mary Ivens, Sarah Ivens, daughters of son Samuel 
deceased £100 each to be paid by grandson Samuel. 

Grandson Job Davis £400 when 20. 

Grandson Jonathan Davis my plantation bought of Rich d . Kirby. 

Grandson W m . Davis, Granddaughter Abigail Davis, Grandson Ivens 
Davis, £150 each to be paid by their brother Jonathan when they are 21. 

Son Aaron Ivens land I purchased of W m . Kirby in Hanover Twp. 
Burlington Co. 

Granddaughters, Mary Davis, Meribah Davis, Hannah Davis, £200 each 
when of age to be paid by Son Aaron. 

Daughter Mary Davis £70 per annum for 10 years to be paid by son 
Aaron. 

Son in law John Robbins, land bought of Rob'. Hutchinson and lying 
in Monmouth Co. 

Granddaughter Hannah Ivens daughter of son Barzillai dec'd £200 to be 
paid by my son in law John Robbins, when she is of age. 



74 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Son Isaac Ivens lot of land purchased of Benj : Bunting lying near 
Bordentown and commonly called the Red House. Also land in Monmouth 
Co. joining Isaac Antrim and other land of son Isaac. 

Grandson Isaac Davis to be paid £50 out of my moveable estate. And 
all the rest to be equally divided amongst my children and grandchildren 
and my son Barzillai's widow Margaret Ivins. 

Executor — Son Aaron Ivens. 

Witnesses — Joseph Wildes, John Piatt, John Earl. 

Isaac Ivins, 3rd (but frequently referred to as Isaac, Jr.), son of Isaac, Jr., 
and Mary (Hopkins) Ivins, married in 1776 Hannah Tilton. Concerning 
this marriage, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting Minutes are as follows: 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Chesterfield y* 7 th : 3 mo : 1776. 

Isaac Ivins jun r . and Hannah Tillton the first time appeared & Declar'd 
their intentions of Marriage with each other their parents present Except 
his father whose consent will be expected next Meeting. Fretwell Wright 
and Isaac Cogil is appointed to make inquiry into his Clearnefs with others 
on that account and report to our next Meeting. 
At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Chesterfield y* 4" 1 of 4 m ° : 1776. 

Isaac Ivins Ju r . & Hannah Tillton appear'd the second time and he de- 
clar'd they continued their intentions of marriage with each other, nothing 
appearing to obstruct they are left to their Liberty to accomplish their 
said intentions according to good order used amongst friends. Fretwell 
Wright and Isaac Cogil is appointed to attend the marriage & report our 
next Meeting. 
At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Chesterfield y* 2" of 5" Mo. 1776. 

The Friends appointed to attend the Marriage of Isaac Ivins Jun r . and 
Hannah Tilton report they were there and think it was in a good degree 
orderly accomplished 

Isaac Ivins, 3rd (Jr.), like many other Friends of his time, who were con- 
scientiously opposed to war, was compelled to choose between rendering mili- 
tary service and paying a fine. In consequence he was a subject of discipline, 
as the following record from the minutes of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting 
show : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Chesterfield the 5th of 8 mo. 
1779 Isaac Ivins Jur produced an Acknowledgment to this meeting con- 
demning his having signed the Association and paying fines in lieu of per- 
sonal service in the war which was read and referred for the consideration 
of next meeting. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 75 

Chesterfield M. M. held at Chesterfield 9 mo. 6 1781 Upperfreehold Pre- 
parative Meeting informs Isaac Ivins hath acted as a juryman on a jury 
appointed for the confiscation of estates has paid an exempt or substitute 
tax for the support of war and neglects the attendance of our religious 
meetings. John Bullock and Joseph Bullock are appointed to treat with 
him, inform him of the charges and report at next meeting. 

At Monthly Meeting held at Chesterfield the 4th of 8 mo. 1782 Isaac 
Ivins produced a paper to this meeting condemning his serving as a juryman 
for the purpose of confiscating estates and being in the practice of paying 
all the monies Demanded of him for carrying on the present unhappy con- 
test without enquiring for what use intended from which he apprehends it 
reasonable to suppose he hath paid one or more substitute or exempt Taxes 
and neglecting the attending of our religious Meetings was read and received. 

In 1792 Isaac Ivins, 3rd, with his wife Hannah and their minor children 
removed from Burlington county to Salem county, as the following extract 
from the minutes shows : 

From our Monthly Meeting held at Chesterfield the 7'" of the 2 m ° 1792. 

To the Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Salem. 
Dear Friends. 

From our Monthly Meeting held at Chesterfield the 7 th of the 2 m ° 1792. 
and Hanah his wife Together with their Children, Namely, Barzillia, 
Thomas, Elizabeth, Mary, Margaret, Ann and Hanah, they being in their 
minority, who hath Removed to live within the Verge of your Meeting thefe 
may Certify they have a Right of Membership amongft us and on Inquiry 
we find their lives and Conversations Hath been in a good Degree Orderly 
and often attended Our Religious Meetings for Worship and Discipline 
and Isaac hath Settled his outward affairs to Sattisfaction as far as appears 
as Such we Recommend them to your Christian Care and Oversight and 
Remain your Friends Brethren and Sisters. 

Signed by Order & on behalf f Joshua Bunting Clk 
of Our afore S' 1 . Meeting By | Lucy Abbott Clk 

In the same year, 1792, in which Isaac Ivins, 3rd, removed to Salem 
county, N. J., Aaron Ivins with his wife Ann (nee Cheshire) and their chil- 
dren Isaac, Samuel, Ann, Mary and Barclay, moved from Upper Springfield 
(whither they had removed from Chesterfield in 1788) to Bucks county, 
Penna., taking a certificate to Falls Monthly Meeting. Their son, Aaron 
Jr., born in 1768, died 1813, married first, 1793, Miriam Middleton, of 
Mansfield township ; and in 1 795 he and his wife and young son removed 
from Upper Springfield and located near the elder Aaron and his family, in 



76 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Bucks county, Pa., uniting also with the Falls Monthly Meeting. Aaron 
Ivins, Jr., married second, in 1799, Ann (Ivins) Cook [208], daughter of 
Moses and Keziah (Shreve) Ivins [103]. 

At the time of his death, in the spring of 1814, Isaac Ivins, 3rd, and his 
family were living in Pittsgrove township, Salem county, N. J. He died 
intestate, and his estate was administered by his sons, Barzillai and Thomas. 
An inventory of personal property taken April 29, 1814, showed a value of 
$2,961.59. Appraisers, Eleazar Mayhew and Samuel Cawley. 

Mary and Hannah Ivins, daughters of Isaac and Hannah (Tilton) Ivins, 
married, in Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting, 6th mo. 3rd, 1802, and 3rd mo. 
28th, 1811, respectively, Uriah [353] and Samuel French, Jr. [357], the 
oldest and fourth sons of Samuel and Sarah (Heulings) French. 

Hannah (Tilton) Ivins, born 1754, was the daughter of Abraham and 
Elizabeth (Thorn) Tilton, who were married in 1748. The following 
minutes are taken from Chesterfield Monthly Meeting records : 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting house in Chester- 
field the 7'" of the 10 nl ° 1732. 

Abraham Tilton brought a Certificate to this Meeting from Friends at 
Shrewsbury Signifying his converfation and clearnefs from Women on 
account of Marriage which was read & well approved of. 
At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at our Meeting Houfe in Chester- 
field y° 3 d of y° 9'"°— 174$. 

Abraham Tilton and Elizabeth Thorn the first time appeared at this 
Meeting and declared their intentions of Marriage. The Meeting appoints 
Amos Middleton and Timothy Abbott to enquire concerning his converfation 
and clearness on account of marriage and make Report to next Monthly 
Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in Chester- 
field the first of the 10 mo 1748. 

Abraham Tilton and Elizabeth Thorn the Second time appeared at this 
Meeting and declared their Intentions of marriage continued. The Meeting 
leaves them at liberty to accomplish their said Intentions according to good 
order, and appoints Marmaduke Watfon and Thomas Middleton to attend 
the Marriage & make report to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Friends held at their Meeting Houfe in Chester- 
field the fifth day of the Eleventh Month 174S. 

Thomas Middleton Reported that he attended the Marriage of Abraham 
Tilton with Elizabeth Thorn and there was nothing appeared to him dis- 
orderly. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 77 

The children of Abraham and Elizabeth (Thorn) Tilton were Patience, 
Sarah, Hannah, Lucy and Abraham, Jr. At the time of his death, in 
December, 1761, Abraham and family resided in Nottingham township, Bur- 
lington county. He died while dictating his will, which is dated December 
21st, 1761, but the following bequests had been made: To his wife, one third 
of the movable estate and profits of estate until children were of age. To 
children, Patience, Sarah, Hannah, Lucy and Abraham, the remaining two- 
thirds of movable estate, to be divided in equal shares, daughters at 18, 
son at 21. To Patience and Sarah, to be equally divided, the tract of land in 
Nottingham township, purchased of Samuel Stevenson; unless son Abraham, 
when he became of age, desired the land, in which case it was directed he 
should pay to his sisters, Patience and Sarah, £200 each. To Hannah the 
land purchased of Nathan Allen, lying in Monmouth county. To Lucy land 
purchased of Mahlon Wright, lying in Nottingham township. To Abraham 
balance of his father's estate in Nottingham township. Letters testamentary, 
with will annexed, were granted to widow Elizabeth Tilton, January 5th, 
1762, affirmed to by Amos Middleton and brother-in-law Joseph Killey. 

Abraham Tilton was the son of Samuel and Patience (Allen) Tilton, of 
Monmouth county, N. J., who were married 4th mo. 5th, 1705. Samuel Tilton, 
born March 2nd, 1678, in Gravesend, L. I., died intestate in Middletown, 
Monmouth county, in 1745, and letters of administration were granted to his 
widow, Patience Tilton, May 6th, 1745. Inventory of personal estate, taken 
2nd mo. 8th, 1745, William Miller and Thomas Lowrie, appraisers, showed 
a valuation of £394 01 02y 2 . Samuel Tilton was the son of John, Jr., and 
Rebecca (Terry) Tilton, who were married May 12th, 1674, at Flushing, L. I. 
John Tilton, Jr., was the son of John and Mary Tilton. John Tilton settled 
at Gravesend, L. I., in 1645, and was granted a plantation lot. He was town 
clerk, 1650, 51, 52 and 53; Justice of Court of Common Pleas 1674. He 
died 1688. 

Patience (Allen) Tilton, widow of Samuel Tilton, died in Burlington 
county, in 1748, and letters of administration were granted to her son Abraham 
May 13th, 1748. Inventory of personal estate taken "April ye 20th, 1748, 
Thos Lawrie and Robert Lippincott, Appraisers," amounted to £83 08 0. 

Patience (Allen) Tilton, born 3rd mo. 8th, 1683, was the daughter of 
Jedidiah and Elizabeth (Howland) Allen, daughter of Henry Howland, of 
Duxbury, Mass. Jedidiah, born at Sandwich, Plymouth Colony, Mass., in 
1646, was the son of Ralph Allen and grandson of George Allen, of Plymouth, 



78 GENEALOGY OF THE 



both of whom figured prominently in early New England history. He and 
his wife and ten children. Experience, Ephriam, Elizabeth, Nathan, Judah, 
Esther, Ralph, Henry, Mary and " Pachence," located in Shrewsbury, Mon- 
mouth Co., N. J., about 1683. In 1686 a daughter, Meribah, was born, and 
in 1699 twin sons, David and Jonathan. His first wife was Experience, 
daughter of James Swift. 

Jedidiah Allen became a leading citizen of East Jersey both amongst 
Friends and in the business world. He made large purchases of land and 
aided in the industrial development of the colony. Records at Trenton show 
many important transfers of this character. As an elder and minister he 
was highly regarded by Friends. A notable summer Quarterly Meeting was 
held in his orchard at Shrewsbury. He was frequently a representative in 
Yearly Meeting at Burlington and Philadelphia. He signed the protest 
against George Keith, in 1692. He was one of the trustees of the Friends 
Meeting House at Shrewsbury. In 1688 he visited New England Friends 
on a preaching tour, and in 1703 made a similar visitation along the New 
Jersey coast. He was justice of the peace in 1700 and 1701, and sat in the 
General Assembly as a representative from Monmouth county in 1703. He 
died in Shrewsbury near the close of the year 1711. By will dated Septem- 
ber 15th, 1711, ami proved February 6th, 1711, he made the following 
bequests : 

To eldest son Ephriam Allen, all land and meadow in Pensilvania, con- 
taining 230 acres. 

To grandson Joseph Allen, 80 acres of land and meadow in Shrewsbury, 
lying on the west end of Thomas White's land, and another piece of land 
and bogg meadow at the head of White's brooke 

To son Ralph Allen, land and meadow adjoining land said Ralph now 
dwells on and half of my bog in the " great Bogg." 

To son Henry Allen, all the land and meadow joining easterly the land 
Henry now lives on and westerly by Joseph Allen, and half part of said 
bog. 

To son Jonathan Allen, all those tracts of land and meadow in Shrews- 
bury township, bounded by land of Ralph and Henry Allen, land I 
bought of Job Almey, lands of George Allen, Joseph West, William 
Hewlet and land at the Iron bog; and 14 acres on west side of the brook 
that joins the Iron bog; one half of my Salt Meadow on Goose Neck in 
Shrewsbury. 

To son David Allen, the Plantation of land and Meadow "whereon I now 
live being that I bought of Job Almey"; also the other half of meadow 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



79 



on Goose Neck aforesaid; paying therefore £150 in legacies, £20 each year 
yearly, that is to say, £15 "to Mary Allen Daughter of John Allen of Wood- 
bridge Deceased when the said Mary Allen shall come to the age of one 
and twenty years." Also £20 to my grandson Joseph Allen, the said 
Ephraim Allen's son, when aged 20; £20 to granddaughter Dinah Allen, 
sister to the said Joseph Allen ; the remaining £95 to be paid to the ex- 
ecutors as it becomes due. Provided always that the said David shall 
provide a cellar, a room &c for my wife Elizabeth. 

To two sons, Henry and Jonathan Allen, all right of Propriety in thi 
Eastern Division of the said province ; and also a piece of Meadow in 
Shrewsbury, at or near Raccone Island, to be divided between them. 

To each of the following sons, £40 : Ephraim, Elisha, Nathan, Judah, 
Ralph, Henry, Jonathan and David. David's £40 to be part of the £150 
previously mentioned. To said David, " my Great Bible." Residue of 
books to be divided " amongst All My owne Children." 

To each of my eight sons already named in this will, a silver spoon. 
To each of four daughters a silver spoon. 

To four daughters, Ester Adams, Mary Wells, Patience Tilton and 
Meribah Thorn, £25 each. 

Residue of estate, real & personal, to wife Elizabeth and she appointed 
executrix. 

Witnesses : Amos White, Wm. Brinley, Sam. Denny, Jacob Dennis. 

Codicil Dated September 25, 1711, Having left out of will, several pieces 
of meadow &c in the town of Freehold and some in Shrewsbury : To two 
sons, Ralph and Henry, 24J<2 acres of Meadow in Freehold To sons David 
and Jonathan, meadow in Shrewsbury. 

Witnesses: William Hunt, Samuel Denny, Thomas Chambers. 




EMBROIDERED SILK PIN CUSHION OF MARY (iVINS) FRENCH 



80 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting Record of Marriages : 

Whereas Uriah French of the Township of Greenwich in the County of 
Gloucester and State of New Jersey son of Samuel French and Sarah his 
wife, and Mary Ivins of the Township of Woolwich and County aforesaid 
Daughter of Isaac Ivins and Hannah his wife having declared their in- 
tentions of marriage with each other before several of the Monthly Meet- 
ings of the people called Quakers at Pilesgrove in the County of Salem and 
state aforesaid according to the good order used among them and having 
the consent of parents their said proposal of Marriage was allowed by the 
said Meeting. Now these are to certify whom it may concern that for the 
full accomplishing their said intentions this third day of the sixth month 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and two, they the said 
Uriah French and Mary Ivins appeared in a public meeting of the said 
people at Pilesgrove aforesaid and the said Uriah French taking Mary 
Ivins by the hand did on this solemn occasion openly declare that he took 
her the said Mary Ivins to be his wife promising with the Lord's assistance 
to be unto her a loving and faithful husband until death should separate 
them, and then in the same assembly the said Mary Ivins did in like manner 
declare that she took the said Uriah French to be her husband promising 
with the Lord's assistance to be unto him a loving and faithful wife until 
death should separate them. And moreover they the said Uriah French 
and Mary Ivins she according to the custom of marriage assuming the name 
of her husband as a further confirmation thereof did then and there to 
these presents set their hands and we whose names are also hereunto sub- 
scribed being present at the solemnization of the said marriage and sub- 
scription have as witnesses hereunto set our hands the day and year above 
written. 




Mary Colson 
Isaac Howey 



Aaron Pancoast 
Sarah Groff 



Sarah French 
Jacob French 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



81 



Abigail Howey 
Hope Lippincott 
Elizabeth Lippincott 
Martha Ogden 
Aaron Lippincott 
Sarah Lippincott 
Abraham Silver 
Elizabeth Silver 
Joseph Allen 
Hannah Allen 
Benjamin Moore 
Hannah Moore 
William Matlock 



Joseph Allen 
Elizabeth Ivins 
Jonathan Iredell 
Sarah French 
Hannah Ellis 
Rebecca Zane 
Samuel Ellis 
Jacob Davis 
Thomas Enoch 
Samuel Ogden 
Maryann Ogden 
Jane Sharp 
George Colson 



Samuel French 
Thomas Ivins 
Margaret Ivins 
Mary Thorn 
Isaac Ivins 
Hannah Ivins 
Deidamia Thorn 
Samuel French 
Mary Thorn 
Amasa Moore 
Agnes Moore 
Sarah Bunting 
John Thorn 



Early Friends in Salem County, New Jersey, about 1725, organized a society after- 
wards known as Pilesgrove Meeting, being subject to Salem Monthly Meeting. In 
1785 the large brick meeting house herewith reproduced was built in Woodstown. In 
1794 a Monthly Meeting was set up. In 1849 the meeting house was enlarged by an 
addition of 16 feet to its length. The society has always been in a flourishing condi- 
tion and descendants of pioneer Friends in that locality have been amongst the most 
influential members of the community for several generations. At the time of the 
separation, in 1827, the followers of Elias Hicks controlled Pilesgrove Meeting and also 
Woolwich Preparative Meeting at Mullica Hill, which has always been subject to the 
former. 




PILESGROVE MEETING HOUSE, WOODSTOWN, N. J., BUILT 1785 



82 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MEETING RECORDS 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

5th Mo. 29 1826 A Certificate from Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting dated 
the 25th of last month for Mary French, with her six minor children, Agness 
Ann, .Mary, Samuel H., Charles B., I'riah and Clayton French was read 
and accepted. 

3 mo. 31st. 1829 And the women's meeting informed that Mary French 
had been treated with for associating with others in holding meetings set 
up in opposition to Friends, and contrary to Discipline and that they had 
concluded to disown her: with which this meeting uniting, James Saunders, 
and Samuel Webster were directed to produce to our next meeting a Testi- 
mony of denial adapted to their cases. 

4 mo. 28 1829. The Committee appointed produced minutes of disunion 
against Mary French and David Cooper, which were read and approved 
as follows. 

" Whereas Mary French and David Cooper have had a right 
of membership in our Religious Society, but have separated 
themselves from Religious communion with us, by associating 
with others in holding what they call Quarterly and Monthly 
meetings Subordinate to a Yearly .Meeting set up in opposi- 
tion to Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, in violation of the regu- 
lar order established among Friends; and we having en- 
deavored to labor with them for this manifest inconsistency 
with our principles without the desired effect, this meeting 
believed that however painful, yet the well being of Society 
demanded that their conduct should be testified against. And 
they the said Mary French, and David Cooper are no more to 
be considered members of the Religious Society of Friends. 
Nevertheless, we sincerely desire that through the renewed 
visitations of Divine Grace, they may be brought to a just 
sense of the nature of their deviations and be enabled to make 
the necessary satisfaction to this meeting." 
A copy was furnished the women's meeting for their concurrence and 
care, in the case of Mary F'rench. 

This record refers to the disownment of Mary (Ivins) French by the Woodbury 
Monthly Meeting for uniting with Hicksite Friends at the time of the separation of 
Friends in the year 1827. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 83 

WOODBURY MEETING. 

As early as 1696 Friends residing in the vicinity of Woodbury creek met 
for worship at the house of John Wood. In 1715 one acre of ground on the 
east side of the " King's Highway," the first great road leading from Bur- 
lington to Salem, being part of the 200 acres originally taken up by Thomas 
Mathews, was deeded by John Swanson to John Ladd, Henry Wood, founder 
of Woodbury, and John Cooper, as trustees for Friends. The same year a 
substantial brick Meeting House was built by John Cooper. The timbers 
used were very heavy, the rough hewn joists being 10 x IS inches, 51 feet in 
length, fastened by heavy hand-made iron braces. This solid work of con- 
struction has commanded the admiration of builders for nearly two hundred 
years. An addition of equally enduring character was built in 1783, when 
the older part was repaired, after the trying days of the Revolutionary 
war, the meeting house having been used, at different times, as a commissary 
depot and hospital. In 1785, under the direction of Haddonfield Quarterly,. 
a Monthly Meeting was set up in connection with Upper Greenwich, now 
Mickleton Meeting. A minute of the time says: "It is recommended to the 
said meetings, when divided, to feel after each other and to sit together at 
their Monthly Meetings, as they may feel their minds drawn and engaged 
thereto from time to time." The first elders of Woodbury Meeting were 
David Cooper and James Whitall, Jr. Woodbury Friends took special in- 
terest in the colored people, in securing their freedom and promoting their 
education and material welfare. The school house adjoining the Meeting 
House, a model building of its kind, was erected in 1813 and remains in excel- 
lent condition. It has always been a popular center of learning for the chil- 
dren of Friends and others, being uniformly under the control of Friends. 
Both branches of the Society, Orthodox and Hicksite, use the Meeting House. 
Throughout the history of Gloucester County the influence of Friends has 
been a potent factor in business, political and social as well as religious circles. 
The burying ground of Woodbury Meeting is the resting place of representa- 
tives of many of the colonial families. Uriah French [353] and Mary (Ivins) 
French, grandparents of the compiler and publisher of this Genealogy, are 
buried here, with other members of the family. The grave of Dame Whitall, 
famous in the Revolutionary history of Red Bank, is upon the terrace, close 
to the " King's Highway." 



84 GENEALOGY OF THE 

AN OLD-TIME COURT PETITION, 1801 

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1811 MARTHA (FRENCH) HILI.MAN 1897 

MARRIAGE ANNOUNCEMENT 

"On Thursday evening the 15th inst [March 15th, 1832] by Mayor Richards Esq. [of 
Philadelphia], Benjamin Hillman of Salem, Ohio, to Martha, daughter of Uriah French, 
deceased, of New Jersey." From Philadelphia Daily Chronicle, March 16th, 1832. 

VERSES FROM AN AUTOGRAPH ALBUM BELONGING TO 
MARTHA (FRENCH) HILLMAN [730] 

An Adieu 



Farewell! and oh! if aught of Grief 
Shall mingle with thy last adieu, 

May it at least, afford relief, 

Those that thou leavest partake it too. 

Though weeks have pafs'd uncounted by, 
Thy presence has not taught us yet, 

To feel, with thee, Satiety ; 

Or part with thee without regret. 



S8 GENEALOGY OF THE 

But, in exact proportions to 
Our past enjoyment — present pain, 

Arises while we bid adieu ! 

The hope that we shall meet again. 

Is it not meet it thus should be, 

That light and shade should mingle thus 

When we must lose a Friend like thee, 
And thou, awhile must part from us? 

Yes surely — Nor could friendship ask 
A stronger test her power to tell 

Than that it should be felt a task, 
A painful one to say, Farewell! 

Yet not a painful one alone; 

For our regrets a pledge shall give, 
That days and hours too swiftly flown, 

In cherished memory long shall live. 

Then let our parting hour befit 

The happy ones that we have spent ; 

Though grave, let Grief not darken it, 
With aught like thanklefs discontent. 

Tis something to have shared so much 
Of joy that friends alone can know ; 

Tis more to feel we part as such, 
Aye ! rendered more than ever so. 

But oh ! it is more soothing, still 

To feel a fond hope when we sever, 
Absence can not affection chill, 

And we may meet more dear than ever. 
3'" mo 11" 1832 <hy Cousin E. B. French [746] 

Phil* 

Lines To M. F. on Her Wedding Day 

Phoebus approving of this day, 

All glooms and mists hath hidden, 

Willing a compliment to pay 
To lovely Martha's wedding. 

For late the atmosphere o'erspread, 

A threat'ning aspect wore, 
Now Sol resplendent shews his head, 

And glooms and mists appear no more. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 89 

We will then to the nuptials haste, 

Nor fear bespatter'd gowns — 
Nature to honor Hymen's feast, 

Hath for smiles exchanged her frowns 
Philadelphia 3 rd mo'" 15 lh 1832 Rebecca Shaw 

Matrimony 

Alone, the woodbine droops and pines ; 
But round the elm with fondnefs twines, 
With clasping tendrils seeks to rise, 
And soon the stormy blast defies ; 

Till buds and spicy flowers are seen 
Amidst the broad elm's branches green. 
How emblematic of the fair, 
Consign'd to man's protecting care ! 

He finds her heart his hope and stay, 
His refuge in the evil day : 
Condemn'd to bloom and blush alone, 
She pines unnoticed, or unknown ; 

But placed within his sheltering arms, 
She there unfolds her lovlier charms ; 
And thus, carefsing and carefs'd, 
The pair are in their union Blefsed. 
Philadelphia 3rd mo 25th 1832 T Hilliard 



Friendship 

Friendship the greatest blifs we mortals know, 

It hightens pleasure, softens every woe, 
Expands the heart, softens thought, severe disarms, 

And in the mind unfolds a thousand charms. 

May all the joys around thee wait 

Which fortune hath in store, 
Propitious heaven attend thy fate 

Till time shall be no more. 

Agnefs Ann Combs [729] 
mo. 22 d 1832, Philadel* 



90 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Think not that I shall ere forget thee, 
No thy grief shall all be mine 
I will weep when foes beset thee. 
Smile when fortune sun shall shine. 

Fare thee Well Dear Sister 



To Martha 

Accept the ardent wishes of a faithfull friend ; 

May peace and happinefs on all thy steps attend, 

Since thou to visit distant lands must go: 

To meet those friends who thy lov'd virtue know. 

Oh ! may the enlightening beams of heaven divine, 

Mark thy pure thoughts and o'er each action shine. 

With bright succefs may every effort prove: 

The joys, the comforts, of redeeming love. 

When angry clouds disturb the briny deep, 

Or gentle breezes in their caverns sleep, 

Calm and composed thou dost behold the hour, 

Fears not the event supported by God's power, 

Pursues the paths unconscious of each ill. 

Thy task allotted by thy Saviour's will. 

When thou at evening's solemn prayer's attend, 

Oh ! breathe one aspiration for thy absent friend. 

thy cousin Mary Clark [763] 
Mullica Hill 8 ,h Mo 9 ,h 1836 



Think ok Me 

O think of me ! for we must part 

And tears shall speak the sad adieu ; 
Yet oh, for ever shall my heart 

Enchanting sifter beat true to thee 
O think of me when far away 

From me dear sifter, fortune bids thee roam 
And softly with the dying day 

My spirit to thy bower shall come 
Yes! the dear privlege I'll claim 

In fancys dreams to fly to thee 
In silence lispe thy darling name 

Then Martha sometimes think of me. 

Thy Sifter Hannah I. Morgan [726] 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 91 

THE SEPARATION OF FRIENDS, IN 1827 

In the autumn of 1819, Elias Hicks, a venerable Friend, belonging to New York Yearly 
Meeting, and an acceptable minister in the Society for many years, visited Pine Street 
Meeting, Philadelphia. His severe testimony against slavery and the use of the products 
of slave labor, caused discussion and some irritation. Three years later a committee of 
Elders, claiming to represent different Monthly Meetings in Philadelphia, addressed an 
open letter to Elias Hicks, raising the question of his soundness in doctrine, alleging 
his denial of the Divinity of Christ. This charge he denied and also the right of these 
Elders to take disciplinary inquiry or action, he being solely amenable to his own Monthly 
and Yearly Meetings, within which he had not been assailed. In 1825, another effort 
was made by the Elders to secure hostile action, but it failed. It was claimed that the 
accusations against Elias Hicks of " holding sentiments inconsistent with the scriptures 
and the principles of Friends," was only the apprehension of some individuals, " who 
could not with propriety or justice enforce their views as a final standard." There 
seemed no disposition on the part of Friends, as a body, to take any steps in the matter. 
But the agitation continued. Family visits to the members of Green Street Monthly 
Meeting had been made by Elias Hicks, and he had received ' the Meeting's endorsement 
and approbation of their unity with his gospel labors among them.' For this ' offence the 
whole strength of those calling themselves orthodox was brought to bear on Green 
Street Monthly Meeting through the Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting,' and that body in 
5th mo., 1827, adopted a report that Green Street Monthly Meeting should be " laid 
down " and attached to Northern District Monthly Meeting. This proceeding on the 
part of the Quarterly Meeting was ' regarded by Green Street Monthly Meeting as an 
arbitrary measure, unwarranted by Discipline.' And as it had become manifest that their 
rights as a Monthly Meeting would not be respected by the Philadelphia Quarterly Meet- 
ing, Green Street Monthly Meeting had concluded in 4th mo. to dissolve their connection 
with that body, and accordingly in 5th mo., 1827, they applied to Abington Quarterly 
Meeting to be received as a branch of that meeting and the proposal was agreed to. In 
defense of this " peaceable and orderly retreat from an alarming infringement of our 
rights," Green Street Meeting, 10th mo. 4th, 1827, issued a detailed review of the whole 
case. On the 15th of 10th month, 1827, men Friends, to the number of nearly fifteen 
hundred, assembled " in the capacity of a Yearly Meeting," in a large temporary build- 
ing, erected for the purpose, at Fourth and Green streets, Philadelphia, women Friends 
assembling in the Green Street Meeting House. Representatives were called from Abing- 
ton, Bucks, Concord, Western and Southern Quarterly Meetings, and also from Mount 
Holly, Chesterfield (N. J.) and Radnor Monthly Meetings. The committee appointed to 
draught " an epistle to our absent brethren and sisters, within the compass of this 
Yearly Meeting produced an essay, which, being deliberately read, was adopted," 10,000 
copies being printed and distributed to Quarterly and Monthly Meetings. Following is 
the Epistle adopted : 

An Epistle from the Yearly Meeting of Friends, Held in Philadelphia by 
adjournments, from the 15th of the tenth month to the 19th of the same, 
inclusive, 1827, to the Quarterly, Monthly, and Particular meetings of 
Friends within the compass of the said Yearly Meeting. 



92 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Dear Friends, 

Having convened in this Yearly Meeting, under very peculiar and trying 
circumstances, in order to transact the business of the church, our minds 
have been comforted and strengthened, in the evidence afforded that we are 
Still mercifully regarded by our Holy Head, whose heavenly wing has gra- 
ciously overshadowed this meeting to the humbling of our spirits ; and tender 
sympathy has flowed towards our absent brethren and sisters, whom we 
affectionately salute in the love of the everlasting gospel. 

We fervently desire that all may be increasingly concerned to retire from 
the noises, the contentions, and the confusions that are in the world — that 
we may individually submit to the government of the Prince of Peace, who 
gathered our forefathers to be a people and committed to them important 
testimonies. 

These testimonies have been felt to be near and dear to us, and a living 
travail has been known that our Zion may arise and shine in her ancient 
brightness, as in the morning of the day, when her sons and daughters 
were despised and persecuted, yet inherited the blessing pronounced by our 
Divine Master: "Blessed are ye when men shall revile you, ami persecute 
you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake." 

Beloved friends, we feel the awful responsibility of our present sianding, 
and the necessity of abiding, individually, in the meekness and simplicity 
of the truth as it is in Jesus — avoiding all doubtful disputations which 
engender strife, and earnestly endeavouring to show forth by a Godly life 
and conversation, that we are his humble followers, who " when he was 
reviled, reviled not again," and whose religion enjoins that we resist not 
evil, but overcome evil with good. 

We believe there never was a period in our society, when it was more 
important for those who feel bound to the law and the testimony to stand 
faithful at their posts; having on "the whole armour of God." which only 
can protect from the dangers that surround us. But if we keep a single eye 
to the Captain of our salvation, humbly waiting for him to put forth and 
go before us, we have nothing to fear — hard things will be made easy, and 
bitter things sweet ; for " greater is he that is in you, than he that is in 
the world." 

In the present agitated state of society, its living members must be led 
into exercise and suffering : and we earnestly desire that all may be preserved 
in the spirit of patience, gentleness, and forbearance, under every provoca- 
tion and trial. And in the exercise of the salutary discipline of the church, 
Oh ! that we may seek for a right qualification to treat with offenders in 
the spirit of restoring love, — most carefully guarding against the influence 
of party feeling, which may, almost imperceptibly, entwine itself in move- 
ments professedly designed to support the discipline of society. Let us re- 
member that its original and primary object is, to seek and to save — not to 
destroy. If we in a spirit of violence seize the discipline as a sword, to be 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 93 

wielded in the will and wisdom of man, we thereby depart from our ancient 
and Christian principle, and wound the cause of truth and righteousness. 

Our profession is high and holy; and let us be increasingly concerned to 
walk consistently therewith. The patient sufferings of our faithful prede- 
cessors finally established for them an excellent name, even amongst their 
persecutors. They held up with practical clearness a peaceable testimony 
against " wars and fightings," and by a scrupulous adherence to the prin- 
ciples of justice, became proverbial for their integrity. 

In the present afflicting state of things, we feel deeply concerned that 
their example in these respects may be kept steadily in view — that our religious 
testimonies may never be wounded by contending for property and asserting 
our rights ; — that no course be pursued, although sanctioned by the laws 
of the excellent civil government under which we live, that may be at vari- 
ance with the spirit of that holy Lawgiver, who taught his disciples, " If 
any man will sue thee at the law and take away thy coat, let him have thy 
cloak also ; " and who set forth his own situation as it related to this world 
when he said, " The foxes have holes and the birds of the air have nests, 
but the son of man hath not where to lay his head." 

And we tenderly exhort, that in places where our members constitute the 
larger part of any meeting, their conduct may be regulated by the rule laid 
down by our blessed Lord : " Whatsoever ye would that men should do to 
you, do ye even so to them." 

The discipline under which we act, positively discourages members of our 
society from suing each other at law. To violate this discipline in a meet- 
ing capacity, is not only a departure from our established order, but is cal- 
culated to injure us in the eyes of sober inquirers after truth, and to disturb 
the peace of our own minds. 

Dearly beloved young friends ! how shall we address you in language 
sufficiently expressive of the tender solicitude which we feel for your welfare ! 
We are fully aware that many of you have witnessed scenes of contention, 
painfully affecting to the inexperienced mind, and calculated to produce the 
inquiry, "Who shall show us any good?" But remember, dear children, 
that truth is truth though all men forsake it. " The foundation of God 
standeth sure, having this seal, the Lord knoweth them that are his." 
Although there may have been seasons when, as amidst the raging of the 
billows, you have been ready to cry out, Lord save us or we perish, yet may 
you remember that the Almighty power which rebuked the winds and the 
waves, is the same that ever it was, and is still graciously disposed to say 
to the humble tossed mind, " Peace, be still." 

Retire then, we entreat you, from all airy speculations on religious sub- 
jects — from all light and chaffy conversation. Enter into your closets — shut 
the door — commune with your own hearts and be still. Thus you will learn 
in the school of Christ. Your religious experience will be gradually en- 
larged, and as you continue humble and obedient you will be raised up a 



94 GENEALOGY OF THE 

righteous generation, and will stand as faithful advocates for the law and 
testimony of our God. There will arise from amongst you judges as at the 
first, and counsellors as at the beginning: instead of the fathers there will 
be the sons, and instead of the mothers there will be the daughters. 

The language of the Meeting for Sufferings, in the introduction to the 
Book of Advices published under the direction of our Yearly Meeting in 
1808, appears peculiarly adapted to our present situation, and is as follows: 

" The following extracts have been compiled for the benefit of the members 
of our Yearly Meeting, that observing the travail of the church under various 
concerns, which in divine wisdom have been communicated for its weighty 
attention, they may be drawn to the principle of life and light manifested 
in the mind, which points out the path of duty and can alone preserve therein. 

"Our ancient Friends and their faithful successors to the present day, have 
earnestly laboured to turn the attention of all to this pure spirit; knowing 
from experience, that it is the means appointed by God for effecting our sal- 
vation, and the only foundation of all true religion and worship. As by 
this we have been led into divers testimonies which have distinguished us 
from most other professors of the Christian name, we fervently desire that 
all our members may walk by the same rule and mind the same things; thus 
everyone filling his place in the body, we shall grow up into Him in all 
things, who is the Head, even Christ." 

We recommend these advices to the weighty attention of all our members. 

Finally, beloved friends, may we all remember that the gospel of Christ 
stands not in speculative opinions, nor in the will and wisdom of man, but 
in the power of the one true and living God. Our blessed Lord gave ample- 
proof of its simplicity, in selecting illiterate fishermen to be amongst its 
promulgators. And as we are engaged humbly to abide in this power, no 
divination nor enchantment can prevail against us. 

" Now unto Him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you 
faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy, to the only 
wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both 
now and ever. Amen." 

Signed by direction and on behalf of the meeting, by 

Benjamin Ferris, 
Clerk of the men's meeting. 
Rebecca B. Comly 
Clerk of the women's meeting. 

Yarious Monthly Meetings, wherein the separation was widely discussed, took action 
concerning the matter, placing upon record minutes expressive of their views. Following 
is taken from the minutes of Haddonfield Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 

At Haddonfield Monty Mee g of Women friends hid 1" month 14 th 1828 
A friend from the mens mee 8 informed this, that they had appointed a 
committee to consider of the rise & progrefs of a late seperation which has 
taken place in our Monthly Meeting and that an explanatory minute should 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 95 

be prepared to place on record, propose that women fr ds should join them 
therein — the following named fr' ls are appointed to the service, Sarah Nich- 
olson, Sarah Crefson, Hannah Hopkins, Abigail Evans, Amy Jones, Rebecca 
Barton, Jr., Rebecca Pottes, Ann Swett. 

At Haddonfield Monthly Meeting of Women friends held 2"' 1 mo 11 th 
1828 The committee appointed last month to unite with men friends in 
order to prepare a minute of record explanatory of the situation of our 
Monthly Mee B — produce the following — which being read & solidly consid- 
ered was united with — and directed to be placed on our records. 

The extraordinary and trying situation into which the religious society 
of Friends has been introduced within a few years past, and the peculiar 
exercise to which many concerned minds have been subjected — has induced 
this Meeting to believe that it would be right to preserve some record of the 
causes, which have led to our difficulties, that those of the present day, as 
well as such who may come after us may be forewarned of danger, and 
through the continued extension of divine regard, and a close and humble 
dependence on the safe leadings of Christ Jesus our Holy Head, may hap- 
pily experience preservation from the delusive snares, which have entangled 
many minds in the present day. — Friends in many parts within the limits 
of our Yearly Meeting, have for several years past, been painfully affected 
with the promulgation of sentiments and doctrines, which tend to lay waste, 
the faith in the proper divinity of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, and 
the benefits derived to all mankind through that most satisfactory sacrafice 
which he made of Himself, without the gates of Jerusalem. — Ideas, and 
views, of this kind, gaining an entrance into the minds of many of the mem- 
bers of our religious Society, and the restraints of the Crofs of Christ being 
cast off, our salutary order and discipline disregarded, libertinism and self 
sufficiency were thus introduced. 

This disaffected spirit manifested itself more fully during the time of our 
last Yearly Meeting, inducing many members to meet, in a separate capacity ; 
who after spending sometime together, agreed to hold another meeting of 
that kind in the sixth month ensuing, from these afsemblies they issued 
addrefses, inviting those who were disposed to unite with them to withdraw 
from our communion. 

From that period to the present, continued efforts have been made to 
accomplish this determined object, and the disjunction has so far advanced 
that the seperatists now hold meetings bearing the names of Quarterly, & 
Monthly Meetings. — In the 10 th month last, they held a mee 8 in Philadel- 
phia to which they arrogated the title of our regularly established Yearly 
Meeting, and issued another addrefs, purporting to be from our ancient and 
duly organized body; thereby showing their disregard to candor & justice 
by using this cover, while at the same time, they were endeavouring to com- 
plete the schism they had made, by instituting a distinct association, which 
cannot be acknowledged by our religious Society. 



96 GENEALOGY OF THE 

A number of the members of this Mo 1 Mee*, being influenced by the subtle 
workings of this delusive spirit, have so far yielded to its plausible pres- 
entations, as to join with others, in holding sundry meetings, and using vari- 
ous means to draw into their measures of alienation, and confusion. And 
having come to this mee e at the usual time of holding it in last month, with 
design as it is believed to carry their schemes into effect, as a considerable 
number of persons attended from other places, and several of the same char- 
acter who had been disowned by the Monthly Meetings of which they had 
formerly been members, having convened with them were encouraged in 
this imposition by several of our members, they remained in the Meeting, 
although repeatedly requested to withdraw; — we were thereby under the 
necefsity of adjourning the meeting — after which a number of our members, 
and those other persons, in company with them remained in the house, and 
held mee' under the assumed name of Haddonfield Mo 7 Mee', in violation 
of the good order of our religious Society, and regardlefs of the wholesome 
provisions, & restrictions of its justly established rules; and it is with much 
exercise and concern that we make this record on the minutes of this meet- 
ing (which appears to have been established more than 140 years, and held 
with unity & reputation until this time) there is lefs than one fourth of our 
members who have thus made a schism, and seceded from us and hold them- 
selves no longer in connection with our ancient & regularly established 
Quarterly & Yearly Meeting. 

The following week friends afsembled pursuant to adjournment and trans- 
acted the businefs of the mo' mee" and through the extension of ancient 
Goodnefs, we were favoured with a solemn & quiet meeting, for which we 
trust many minds were reverently thankful. 

354— JACOB FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141). 
b. 4th mo. 30th, 1773, near Mullica Hill, Glou- 
cester Co., N. J., "at 12 oClock in the day." 
d. 12th mo. 25th, 1843, buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. First, Sarah Ellis. 
She d. 1833, buried in Friends' Burying Ground. Mul- 
lica Hill, N. J. 
m. Second, Hannah (Pancoast) Cooper, widow of 
Nathan Cooper. 

736— ABIGAIL S. FRENCH b. 9th mo. 28th, 1799. 

m. First, February 10th, 1820, Joseph Cooper, 
m. Second, March 16th, 1853, Stacy Ilazelton. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 97 

737— THEODOSIA FRENCH b. 12th mo. 1st, 1801. 

m. February 5th, 1827, Lawrence Cake. 

738— SAMUEL ELLIS FRENCH 

b. 1802. 

m. 11th mo. 27th, 1828, Elizabeth Groff. 

739— WILLIAM SMITH FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 4th, 1S06. 

m. 1st mo. 26th, 1832, Rachel Iredell. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a monthly meeting held at Woodbury the 15th Day of the 5th Mo. 
1798 The Preparative Meeting of Upper Greenwich reports, Jacob French 
hath been dealt with for accomplishing his Marriage contrary to the good 
order establish'd among Friends, being before a Justice of the Peace, 
Samuel Mickle Jun r . and Joseph Whitall are appointed to visit him, and 
report their sense of the situation of his Mind, to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Woodbury the 12th of the 6th Mo. 1798 
The Friends appointed, report they had an opportunity with Jacob French, 
and gave a favorable account of the situation of his mind. In tenderness 
to him his case is defer'd for further consideration, to next meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Woodbury the 10th Day of the 7th Mo. 
1798 The case respecting Jacob French (for having accomplish'd his 
Marriage in a way contrary to the good order established among Friends) 
being resumed, and no further account received from him ; it appears the 
sense of the meeting to Disown him ; and he the said Jacob French is no 
more to be considered in Religious Membership with Friends, until his 
future Conduct shall manifest more consistence with our Profession & he 
condemns his deviation to the satisfaction of Friends. Of which and of 
his privilege of appeal, Joseph Whitall, and Paul Cooper, are appointed to 
acquaint him, give him a copy of this Minute, and to report to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Woodbury the 14th of the 8th Mo. 1798 
The Friends appointed report, they together, performed the service to Jacob 
French, who signified " he had no inclination to appeal." 



98 GENEALOGY OF THE 

WILL OF JACOB FRENCH, 1841 

Know all men by these presents that I Jacob French of the township of 
Woolwich, in the County of Gloucester, and State of New Jersey, being of 
sound and disposing mind and memory, do make and publish this instru- 
ment of Writing for my last will and testament, this sixteenth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord One thousand, Light hundred and forty 
one; in manner following — viz — 

First — I order and direct my Executor hereinafter mentioned to pay all 
my just debts and funeral expenses out of my personal property not other- 
wise devised, as speedily as possible. 

Second — I give and bequeath to my dear Wife Hannah C. French all 
my household goods (Excepting those hereinafter otherwise devised) — 

I give and bequeath to my dear wife the house & lot where I now live, 
containing One acre more or less, so long as she remains my widow ; and 
at her marriage or death I order and direct the same to be sold, and the 
proceeds arising from the sale thereof, to be divided between my four 
children or their legal representatives share and share alike — I also give and 
bequeath to my dear wife the interest arising upon two thousand dollars to 
be paid to her annually so lung as she remains my widow — I also give 
and bequeath to my dear wife all the right, title and interest that I may 
die possessed in the bond & mortgage that she holds against the house and 
lot that Joseph C. Pancoast purchased of Edward Iredell and now in the 
occupancy of Abel Knight — All the above bequest I make to my dear wife, 
for the love I bear her, and in lieu of her dower in my real estate. 

Third — I give to my Grand-daughter Sarah F. Cooper my large Silver 
table spoons and silver sugar tongs — 

Fourth — I give to my Grand-daughter Enphama M. Cake Twenty 
dollars — 

Fifth — I give to my Grand-son Hewlings French my silver watch, and 
mx silver tea-spoons — 

Sixth — I give to my Grandson Jacob French my desk, and six silver tea 
spoons — 

Seventh — I order and direct my Executor hereinafter mentioned to make 
sale of all the real and personal Estate of which I may die pofsefsed 
Excepting such of the same as has been above devised to my dear wife; and 
to my two grand-daughters and Grand-sons: — and after placing at interest 
on good landed security, the two thousand dollars as above mentioned for 
my dear wife : and the payment of the twenty dollars as bequeathed to my 
Grand-daughter Euphama M. Cake : — and the ballance of money so arising 
from the sale of my real and personal Estate, not otherwise devised, I order 
to be divided between my four Children Abigail S. Cooper, Theodosia Cake, 
Samuel E. French & William S. French, or their legal representatives, 
equally — that is to say, share and share alike : — and lastly I make and ap- 
point Elijah Bower of the township of Woolwich Executor to this my testa- 
ment and last will — 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



99 



In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this sixteenth 
day of September in the year of our Lord One thousand Eight hundred 
and forty one — 1S41 

Signed, sealed, published 
and declared by the said 
Jacob French, to be his 
last Will and testament, 
in the presence of us — 

Samuel M. Haines 

Silas S. Brooks 

Thomas Sailer 



^atsrij ^re^u^J 



INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF JACOB FRENCH, 1844 

A true & perfect inventory of the Goods & Chattels rights & credits, monies 
& effects of Jacob French late of the township of Woolwich in the County 
of Gloucester & State of new Jersey 



Sorrel horse $ 75.00 

Bay horse 25.00 

Cow 20.00 

Sundry gearing in Stable... 8.00 
Double & single carriage 

harness 12.00 

Waggon (light 30.00 

75 bu : Corn @ 40c 30.00 

Sundries in Barn 6.00 

3 tons hay & corn tops 25.00 

Manure 10.00 

Cart and Casks 20.00 

Heavy waggon sides &c... 15.00 

Two hogs 35.00 

Stalks 2.00 

Potatoes 2.50 

Lot of Chains, old iron, &c. . 3.00 
Ploughs, harrows — wheel 

barrow 10.00 

Mattock Beetle &c 2.00 

Garden tools 1 .00 

Ashes 1.00 

$332.50 



Kirkbrides Note & 4 mo : 10 

days int 42.91 

Sundries in Smoke house. . . .$ 3.00 

Fire wood 5.00 

Sundries under house shed.. 1.50 

Sundries in Kitchen 15.00 

Sundries in Cellar 10.00 

Sundries in Sitting room.... 25.00 

Sundries in Parlor 75.00 

Sundries in room over parlor 50.00 

Sundries in garret 20.00 

Sundries in Bed Room, over 

Sitting room 20.00 

Sundries in Bed Room, over 

Kitchen 10.00 

D. Wolf's Bond & 11 mo: 

int: 316.50 



$593.91 

Desk & Y* doz tea spoons. . . 20.00 

Watch & Yt. doz tea spoons. . 20.00 
Yz doz : table spoons & sugar 

tongs 20.00 



50 cords wood on Maiden property 1.50 — 75.00 

We Certify the above to be a true list of the personal property of Jacob 
French dec' 1 , as presented to us 

Jan y . 4. 1844 Charles French ) 

Affirmed to Jany 5. 1844 Thomas Sailer j a PP ralsers 



100 GENEALOGY OF THE 

355— AGNES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141). 
b. 2nd mo. 24th. 1775, near Mullica Hill, N. J., 
" of the 6 day of the weak 20 minits after 
3 oclock in at." 
d. 5th mo. 24th, 1854, buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground, 16th and Race Sts., Philadelphia. 
m. 12th mo. 20th. 17^2, Amasa Moore, son of 
Bethuel and Martha (Allen) Moore. 
He b. 3rd mo. 15th. 17 70 
d. 12th mo. 3rd, 1810. 

740— SAMUEL FRENCH MOORE 

b. 10th mo. 7th, 1793. 
m. Rachel Haines. 

741— WILLIAM MOORE b. 9th mo. 27th, 1795. 

d. 3rd mo. 19th, 1796. 

742— MARY MOORE b. 8th mo. 31st, 1797. 

d. 9th mo. 10th, 1799. 

743— SARAH FRENCH MOORE 

b. 4th mo. 13th, 1799. 

m. May 10th, 1821, Thomas Inskeep. Jr. 

744— BETHIEL ALLEN MOORE 

b. 5th mo. 8th, 1801. 

m. April I lth, 182S, Hannah Naglee Inskeep. 

745— AMASA WILLIAM MOORE 

b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1807. 
d. 6th mo. 25th, 1849. 
m. Olivia Lindo. 

Bethuel Moore, son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Eennimore) Moore of Evesham town- 
ship, Burlington Co., N. J.; and Martha Allen, daughter of John and Mary (Butcher) 
Allen, of the county aforesaid, the former deceased, were married 4th mo. 12th, 1764, in 
Evesham Meeting. Bethuel Moore, born 1st mo. 14th. 1741, died 3rd mo. 4th, 1831. 
Martha (Allen) Moore born 1744, died 8th mo. 31st, 1807. Bethuel an. I Martha (Allen) 
Moore had the following children: Asa, born 15th of 3rd mo. 1765, died 16th of 7th mo. 
1766; Keturah, born 14th of 2nd mo. 1767; Amasa. born 15th of 3rd mo. 1770; Sarah, 
born 23rd of 9th mo. 1772; Mary, born 9th of 1st mo. 1774, died 21st of 9th mo. 1782; 
Bethuel, born 6th of 2nd mo. 1776; Martha, born 5th of 5th mo. 1778; Jane, born 9th of 
6th mo. 1780; Allen, born 21st of 5th mo. 1783. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 101 

MEETING RECORDS 

Evesham Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly meeting held at Evesham the 9th of 11 mo. 1792. Certi- 
ficates were requested on behalf of Amasa Moore in order for marriage 
with a member of Woodbury mo. meeting and Wm. French, in his minority, 
to recommend him to the care of friends of Philadelphia monthly meeting; 
Jno. Maxell & Stacy Haines for the former & Benj. Rulon & Morgan 
Hollinshead for the latter are appointed to make the necessary inquiry & if 
nothing appears to obstruct, prepare and produce them to next Meeting. 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At our Monthly Meeting held at Woodbury — 13th of 11th Mo. 1792. 
Amasa Moore, son of Bethuel Moore and Agnes French daughter of Samuel 
French, appeared and declared their intentions of Marriage with each other ; 
their Parents being present, consented ; and the young man belonging to 
another Monthly Meeting, was informed a certificate would be expected at 
our next meeting. 

At our Monthly Meeting held at Woodbury the 11th Day of the 12th» 
Month 1792. Amasa Moore and Agnes French appear'd, and express'd the 
continuation of their intentions of Marriage with each other : The young 
man produced a Certificate from the Monthly Meeting of Evesham, which 
was read : They are at liberty to accomplish their said intentions, — And 
Thomas Enoch, and Ephraim Gardner are appointed to be present, and 
see that good order is kept, report to next meeting, and return the Certificate 
to be Recorded. 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Woodbury the 15th of the 1st Month 1793. 
The friends appointed to attend the marriage of Amasa Moore & Agnes 
French, reported it was orderly accomplished, the company rather large, 
& the Certificate is returned to be recorded. 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Record of Marriage Certificates: 

Whereas Amasa Moore of the Township of Evesham in the County of 
Burlington and State of New Jersey son of Bethual Moore and Agnefs 
French of the Township of Greenwich in the County of Gloucester and 
State aforesaid Daughter of Samuel French, having declar'd their intentions 
of Marriage with each other before several Monthly Meetings of the 
Peopel called Quakers held at Woodbury in the County of Gloucester afore- 
said according to the good order used amongst them, and having consent 
of Relations concerned, there said Proposals of Marriage was allowed of 
by the said Meeting. 



102 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Now these are to Certify whome it may concern that for the full accom- 
plishing of there said intentions this twentyeth Day of the Twelfth Month 
in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety two, they 
the said Amasa Moore and Agnefs French appeared in a public Meeting 
of the said Peopel in the Township of Greenwich aforesaid, and the said 
Amasa Moore takeing the said Agnefs French by the hand did in a solemn 
manner openly declare that he took the said Agnefs French lo be 
his Wife promiseing through the Lord's assistance to be unto hur a 
loving and faithful Husband until Death should separate them. And then 
and their in the fame Assembly the said Agnefs French did in like manner 
declare that fhe took the said Amasa Moore to be hur Husband promiseing 
through the Lord's assistance to be unto him a loving and faithful Wife 
until Death should separate them (or words to that import) And more- 
over they the said Amasa Moore and Agnefs French, she according to the 
custom of Marriage afsuming the name of hur Husband, as a further con- 
firmation thereof did then and their to these presents set their Hands. 
And we whose names are hereunder subscribed being present at the solemni- 
zation of the said Marriage and subscription, have as Witnesses theirunto 
set our hands the Day and Year above written. 



Hosea Moore 
David Brown 
Thomas Iredell 
Ann Iredell 
Nathan Bassett 
Benj. Heritage Jr. 
Hannah Heritage 
Jane Lippincott 
Joshua Lord 
Wm. Wood 
Sarah Wood 
Jacob Wilkins 
Ann Wilkins 
Ann Brick 
Lettice Wills 
Rachel French 
Sarah Foster 
Mary Smith 
Rebekah Iredell 
Chalkey Moore 
Joseph Iredell 
Isaac Wilkins 
Josiah Moore 



Theodosia Lippincott 
Mary Lippincott 
Sarah Miclde 
Phebe Brown 
John Moore Junr. 
William Moore 
Hope Lippincott 
Micajah Clement 
Sarah Barnes 
Samuel Mickle 
William Ford 
Martha Lippincott 
Rachel Moffett 
Rebecha Mills 
Uriah French 
Wm. White 
Thomas Enoch 
Sam'l. Tonkin 
Mary Tonkin 
Elizabeth Paul 
Ephraim Gardiner 
Abigail Brick 



Amasa Moore 
Agnes Moore 

Samuel French 
Sarah French 
Bethuel Moore (Sener) 
Martha Moore (Sener) 
Joseph Heulings 
Keturah Heulings 
Joseph Rogers 
Sarah Rogers 
Bethuel Moore Jr. 
Martha Moore Jr. 
Agnes Roberts 
Jane Moore 
Allen Moore 
Elizabeth Moore 
John Haines Jr. 
Jacob French Jr. 
Edward Carpenter 
Lydia Moore 
Charles French 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 103 



CERTIFICATE OF REMOVAL. 

To Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting. 
Dear Friends : 

Application being made for our Certificate, on behalf of Agnes Moore, and her two 
minor children, (Viz) Sarah French Moore and Amasa William Moore, who reside 
within the verge of your Meeting, enquiry being made, no obstruction appears to the 
granting a certificate. 

We recommend them to your Christian care and notice. 

From our Monthly Meeting held at Evesham the 9th day of the 8th mo. 1811. 

And signed by order thereof by 

Joshua Sharp I 

,, „ ,. /■ Clerks 

Mary Gardiner } 



PERSONAL BEQUESTS OF AGNES (FRENCH) MOORE 

I give and bequeath to my Grand-Daughter Sarah F. Moore the 
Beaureau that stands on the South side of my room and one of the dressing 
glasses that is upon it — Also the Card Table, Also the Wash Stand & Basin 
and Ewer that is upon it — also Two Woolen Blankets and one Bed quilt also 
the silver Hook that is attached to my watch Ribbond — 

To my daughter Sarah Inskeep I give the other Beaureau and Dressing 
Glass — The Mahogany turn down Stand — All the chairs and cushions upon 
them — The Carpet and the two stools — Also my Silver Tea Spoons- — All my 
wearing apparel and all the Bed clothes except Such as are given to others 
and one half of the remainder of all that is not specially named for others. 

To Amanda daughter of my son Bethuel A. Moore I give the Bed Stead — 
Bed — Mattress — Bolster and Pillows— One Cotton Blanket — and white Bed 
Spread and the Mirror that hangs in my room. To my Grandson Samuel 
F. Moore son of Amasa Moore I give my Gold Watch — Ring and Watch 
Key — 

To my Grandson Carlton R. Moore I give the Clock and two lacquered 
Boxes on the Mantel — the five China Jars or vases — All my silver spoons 
except the Tea Spoons and my spectacles. The Eider down Comfortable 
—The Stand and Brackets for the clock — China Tooth Brush tray — Foot 
Tub and the Hanging Book Shelves and Books and my hand Mirror with 
lhe glass in each side — 

To Olivia Moore widow of my son Amasa I give the remaining half of 
every thing not specially mentioned — the first named half being given to 
my daughter Sarah Inskeep. 



104 GENEALOGY OF THE 

356— CHARLES PRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141). 

b. 4th mo. 22nd, 1777, near Mullica Hill, N. J., 

" at y a after 8 at Night & 3 day of the weak." 
d. 6th mo. 13th, 1845, buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. First, 12th mo. 27th, 1798, Martha Hazelton, 
daughter of William and Abigail (Wright) 
Hazelton, of Manahawkin, N. J. 
She b. 12th mo. 23rd, 1779. 

d. 4th mo. 22nd, 1807, buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. Second, 11th mo. 3rd, 1808, Esther (Davis) 
Lippincott, widow of Joshua Lippincott, Jr., 
and daughter of Jacob and Esther (Wilkins) 
Davis. 
She b. 5th mo. 8th, 1778. 
(1. 7th m... 4th. 1809. 

m. Third, 1 1 tin mo. 28th, 1810, Pri-.illa Moore, 
daughter of Joshua and Rachel ( Ballinger) 
Moore. 
She b. 1st mo. 1st, 1784. 

d. 5th mo. 4th, 1865, buried in Friends' Burying 
('.round, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

Children of Charles and Martha (Hazelton) French. 

746— WILLIAM HAZELTON FRENCH 

b. 10th mo. 28th, 1799. 

m. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1824, Elizabeth Borton Atkin- 
son. 

747— SAMUEL CLEMENT FRENCH 

b. 12th mo. 12th, 1801. 

m. First, 3rd mo. 3rd, 1830, Rachel Colson. 

m. Second, 5th mo. 7th, 1868, Keturah Moore. 

748— STACY FRENCH b. 4th mo. 23rd, 1804. 

m. 7th mo. 30th, 1829, Mary (Goslin) Cook. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 105 

749— SARAH FRENCH b. 7th mo. Sth, 1806. 

d. 6th mo. 18th, 1807. 

Children of Charles and Priscilla (Moore) French. 

750— MARTHA HAZELTON FRENCH 

b. Sth mo. 11th, 1811. 
m. 2nd mo. 6th, 1839, Edward Iredell. 

751— ANN H. FRENCH b. 12th mo. 10th, 1812. 

d. 2nd mo. 19th, 1826. 

752— CHARLES FRENCH b. 8th mo. 9th, 1814. 

d. 11th mo. 28th, 1881, unmarried; buried in 
Friends' Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, 
N.J. 

Two other children who died in childhood. 

Joshua Lippincott, Jr., son of Joshua, son of Jacob, son of Restore, a son of the 
pioneer Richard Lippincott, was born 1st mo. 23rd, 1774, died 12th mo. 16th, 1805, mar- 
ried 11th mo. 27th, 1800, Esther Davis. They had three children as follows: Lydia, born 
9th mo. 16th, 1801, married, 1823, David Scull, son of Gideon and Sarah Scull; Beulah, 
born 10th mo. 16th, 1803, died 10th mo. 5th, 1806; Amy, born 8th mo. 14th, 1805, died 
9th mo. 1st, 1806. 



CHARLES FRENCH, JR. 

Charles, third son and fourth child of Samuel [141] and Sarah (Heulings) 
French, was a long time farmer resident of what is now Harrison township, 
Gloucester county, N. J. He was a man of industry, influence and much 
public usefulness. He early took an interest in philanthropic and educational 
movements. He was a local trustee of the poor, 1803 to 1808 inclusive, and 
again in 1820-30-31-32-44. He was a member of the Legislature in 1813- 
14—24-26. He served some years as justice of the peace and in 1813 and 
1836 as lay Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Gloucester county. He 
was an active member of the Society of Friends and for over thirty years, 
1801-33, served as trustee of the Friends' school and meeting house property 
and graveyard at Mullica Hill. In early life he was assigned a fine farm 
of 142 acres by his father, and inheriting the same successfully cultivated it 
for half a century. 



106 GENEALOGY OF THE 

The Friends' graveyard at Mullica Hill was the only public burial place in 
that section for many years. Over 600 persons now rest there — more than the 
population of the immediate community — representing the early families who 
subdued the wilderness and their industrious and orderly successors, who 
labored faithfully to maintain the highest principles of society. The records 
show that over one hundred of those buried there passed the allotted three 
score and ten years. Upwards of fifty descendants of Samuel and Sarah 
(Heulings) French, appear in the list of burials. The centennial anniversary 
of the founding of Mullica Hill Meeting, held in 1897, was an occasion of 
great interest, many persons being present from a distance and taking part 
in the exercises. Historic papers were read and impressive addresses de- 
livered, all in accord with the spirit of Friends. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

At a Monthly Meeting held at Woodbury the 14th Day of 5th mo. 1799 
The preparative Meeting of Upper Greenwich reports Charles French hath 
been treated with for accomplishing his Marriage in a way contrary to the 
good order established among Friends. David Brown and Isaac Hensey 
are appointed to visit him, and report their sense of the situation of his 
mind, to next meeting. 

The 11th of the 6th Mo. 1799. The Friends appointed, report, they to- 
gether, had an opportunity with Charles French, and that he express'd 
a desire of a " months forbearance." Which is granted. 

9th of 7th mo. 1799. — The case respecting Charles French being resumed, 
and he now producing a written Acknowledgment, it was read and consid- 
ered. And it appears the sense of the Meeting to accept it, it being as 
follows, viz". — 

To Friends of the Monthly Meeting of Woodbury — 
Dear Friends — 

I the subscriber having had a right of Membership with 
Friends but having been so unguarded in my Conduct as to 
accomplish my Marriage in a way contrary to the good order 
of Friends by which breach of good order I have brought 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 107 

trouble on my Friends and sorrow on myself, hopeing that 
these lines and my future conduct may be such that I may 
be reconciled to my Friends again which is the sincere de- 
sire of 

Charles French 
9th of the 7th Mo. 1799 



Minutes of Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting of Women Friends : 
Tilesgrove Mo. Meeting of Women friends held the 29th of 8th Mo. 1828. 

Pilesgrove preparative Meeting produced a written report, which is as 
follows that Hannah Moore, Elizabeth Colson, Martha Lippincott, Rachel 
Colson, Mercy Ridgway, Keziah Ridgway, Rachel Moore, Kitturah Moore, 
Rebecca Moore, Atlantic Moore, Mary Gardner, Ann Gardner, Priscilla 
French, Hannah Iredell, Sybilla Iredell, Mary Butcher, Lydia Robins, 
Deborah D. Pancoast, Hannah C. Risley, Ann Gaunt, Rebecca Pancoast, 
Lydia Moore, Naomi Holmes, Sarah G. Pancoast, Margaret Hazelton, Lydia 
Haines, Rachel Iredell, Achsa Lippincott, Lydia Gibson, Elizabeth Cole, 
Martha Cole, and Ursilla Groff, have been treated with for afsociating with 
others in setting up & holding separate Meetings, which they call a Monthly 
and Quarterly Meetings of Friends : in violation of our discipline, and con- 
trary to the established order of the Society of Friends. 

Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting of Women Friends held the 3rd of 10th Mo. 

1828. 

The Committee nominated at our last Mo. Meeting to treat further with 
Martha Cole, Mercy Ridgway, Elizabeth Cole, Priscilla French, and 29 
others, report they had an opportunity with the above named individuals 
feverally, all of whom endeavored to justify the steps they had taken, and 
evinced no disposition to continue with Friends. 

Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting of Women Friends held 23rd of 10th Mo. 1828. 
Minutes of disownment prepared and handed by Men Friends against 
Martha Cole, Mercy Ridgway, Elizabeth Cole, Priscilla French and 29 
others having been read and approved Abigail Scull, Ruth Clement, Hannah 
Smart and Sarah Webster are appointed to serve each of them with a copy 
thereof, acquaint of their right to appeal, and report to our next Mo. 
Meeting. 



108 GENEALOGY OF THE 



WILL OF CHARLES FRENCH, JR., 1845 

Know all men by these presents that I, Charles French of the Town- 
ship of Spicer, in the County of Gloucester, and State of New Jersey, 
being sick and weak in body, but of sound mind, memory and understand- 
ing, and considering the certainty of death, and the uncertainty of the time 
thereof, do therefore make and declare this my last will & testament in 
manner following viz — First, I order and direct my executor hereinafter 
mentioned to defray all my just debts and funeral expenses out of my per- 
sonal property, not otherwise appropriated — Second — I give to my Wife 
so much of my household goods and provision and grain as she may think 
proper to appropriate to her own use — 

Third — I give to my son William H. French Ten dollars — 
Fourth — I give to my son Samuel C. French Ten Dollars — 
Fifth — I give to my son Stacy French Five dollars — 
Sixth — I give to my daughter Martha II. Iredell ten dollars. 
Seventh — I give to my son Charles French Ten dollars — 
Eighth— If my personal Effects not Otherwise appropriated, shall bring 
more than Enough at public sale to defray all my just debts, funeral ex- 
pences and the above legacies, then I order and direct my executor to 
apportion the balance between William II. French, Samuel C. French, 
Martha H. Iredell and Charles French share and share alike — 

Ninth — I order and direct my Executor, to secure by bond and Mortgage, 
to my son Charles French, upon the farm where I now reside, the money 
that shall be due him, from me, at the time of my decease — Tenth— I order 
my Executor to make sale, as soon as practicable, of my Wife's share of 
the real estate of Joshua Moore dec'd and the proceeds arising therefrom 
to be given wholly to her — 

Eleventh — I order and direct my Executor, in a reasonable time, to make 
sale of the farm where I now reside, subject to the mortgage of my son 
Charles French. 

Twelfth— If my personal property not otherwise appropriated shall be 
found insufficient to pay my just debts, funeral expenses and legacies, I 
order the ballance to be made up from the sale of my real estate — 

Thirteenth — I order and direct my executor, after the payment of all my 
just debts and legacies to place the ballance of monies left in his hands, 
at interest, upon real estate security— the interest to be paid annually to 
my dear Wife during her natural life— in lieu of her dower in my real 
estate — 

Fourteenth — After the demise of my Wife, Priscilla French, I order and 
direct my Executor to divide the residue of my estate between William H. 
French, Samuel C. French, Martha H. Iredell & Charles French or their 
legal representatives, share and share alike — 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



109 



Lastly — I make and appoint William H. French my Executor to this my 
testament and last will — 

In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this seventeenth 
day of March in the year of our Lord, one thousand Eight hundred and 
forty five 






Signed, sealed published 
and declared by the said 
Charles French, to be his 
last will and testament in 
the presence of us 
Jo" H. French 
Hannah Haines 
Thomas Sailer 



State of New Jersey 
Gloucester County, ss. 

I, Bowman Sailer Surrogate of the County of 
Gloucester, do certify the annexed to be a true copy 
of the last will and testament of Charles French late of 
the County of Gloucester deceased, and that William H. 
French the executor therein named, proved the same be- 
fore me, and is duly authorized to take upon himself the 
administration of the estate of the testator, agreeably 
to the said will 
Witnefs my hand, and seal of office, the Eleventh day of July, in the year 
of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and forty five 

Bowman Sailer Surrogate 



Seal of 

Surrogate of 

Gloucester Co. 

N J. 



Gloucester County fs — William H. French sole Executor in the within 
Testament named, alleging himself to be conscientiously scrupulous of tak- 
ing an oath and being duly affirmed according to law, on his solemn 
affirmation saith that the within instrument contains the true last will and 
Testament of Charles French the Testator therein named so far as he 
knows, and as he verily believes ; that he will well and truly perform the 
same, by paying first the debts of the said deceased and then the Legacies 
in the said Testament specified, so far as the goods, chattels and credits of 
the said deceased can thereunto Extend, and that he will make and ex- 
hibit into the Surrogates office at Woodbury in the County of Gloucester, 
a true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the goods, chattels and 
credits of the said deceased, that have or shall come to his knowledge 
or possession, or to the possession of any other person or persons, for his 
use, and render a Just and true account, when thereunto Lawfully required 

Affirmed and subscribed 
July 11"" 1845 before me W m . H. French 

Bowman Sailer Surrogate 



110 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



IW ENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF CHARLES FRENCH, JR., 1845 

A true and perfect inventory of all and Singular the goods Chatties 
rights and credits of Charles French late of the township of Harrison in 
the County of Gloscester deceased made by us whose names are hereunto 
Subscribed the tenth day of July in the year of our Lord One Thousand 
Eight hundred forty five 1845 





10.00 


tramels Griddle & bake Iron 


1.00 




12.00 
12.00 




.12 




Stove & rake 


3.00 


Ditto Yorke 


12.00 


Setting room Chair 

Dineing table 


3.00 


White face 


13.00 


2.50 


Red Heiffer Pink 


14.00 


Corner Cupboard 


3.00 


three voung Cattle 


16.00 


Dineing room crockery... 


.50 


1 1 Sheep 


17.00 




5.00 




6.00 


Dineing room Carpet 


3.00 




35.00 


6 Chairs in Kitchen Cham- 




Old Mare 


16.00 




1.50 


6.00 


Card tables Ditto 


.50 




60.00 
40.00 




.50 


Sorrel Horse 


1 bed & bed Stead 


10.00 




5.00 


Carpet in Kitchen Chamber 


6.00 


Light Wagon & Harnefs.... 


18.00 


Bed & Bedstead 


10.00 


10.00 


trunks & Cradle 


.50 




5.00 




.50 


Ploughs & Harrows 


12.00 


Box &c in Garret 


.50 




3.00 




.37 


Sundrys in Entry of Hay 




.50 


.50 




.75 


Waggon Sides & Marl Box. 


2.50 


2 Spinning Wheels 


1.50 


1 ton of old Hay 


4.00 


Candles Sticks 


.75 


Chain Harnefs bridl 




Case of Bottles 


.50 




6.00 
4.00 




2.00 


Plough Gears & fly nets.... 




6.00 




339.00 


2 double Coverlids 


6.00 




2 singles Coverlids 


2.00 


Driping & Frying pans.... 


1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
5.00 
.50 


Chest of bed Clothes 

Trunk & Hackel . 


12.00 
.25 


Iron Pots & Kettles 


bed in back room & Clothing 


10.00 
3.00 


Brafs Kettles 

tin ware 


2 Chairs 


2.00 






109.74 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



111 



Meal Chest &c 1.50 

Cutting & Mefs Box 1.50 

Rakes & Forks 2.00 

70 dozen of Wheat 16.00 

50 dozen rye 7.00 

Lot of Chains 3.00 

Grind Stone 2.50 

Swinging Sides &c .75 

8 Baskets 1.00 

Hows & Shovels 1.50 

Barn Shovel & half bushell. 1.25 

Syth & Sickels 2.25 

Fork Chain ropes .75 

Mall Wedges & Axes 1.00 

2 Saws square & Adzes 1.00 

2 riddles 1.00 

Augers Chissel &c .50 

2 pair of Stillyards 2.00 

Sundres .50 

Grain Chest 1.00 

Old com 14.00 

Wheel Barrow .50 

2 barrels Vinegar 3.00 

2 Emty Barrels 50 

tubs & Soap 4.00 

Wash tubs & Buckits 3.00 

Pork & tubs 4.00 

Emty tubs 3.00 

Meat Chest 50 

Tallow 3.50 

jugs & Bottles 37 

Dough tray 1-25 

Lard & tubs 4.00 

Barrell Churn 1.00 

Kegs & Keeler 75 

Milk pans & jars .50 

Cheese Prefs & vats 2.00 



1 looking Glass 1.50 

Bed & Bed stead in front 

Chamber 20.00 

Stand & Fixtures .75 

Shovel & tongs & hand Irons 1.50 
Bed & beds stead in lower 

room 8.00 

Bureau 3.00 

looking glafs .50 

Entry & Stairs Carpet 3.00 

Desk & book Case 4.00 

books 150 

Waters & Snuffer 1.25 

Rocking Chair 1.00 

14 yard of Carpeting 2.80 

Corner Cupboard in Parlour 3.00 

Walnut Dineing table 2.00 

8 day Clock 15.00 

Parlour Carpet 10.00 

Silver Plate 20.00 

Crockery ware in Parlour.. 2.00 

Knives & Forks 3.00 

Xote of Hand against W" 

II. French for 415.00 

Xote of Hand against S C 

French for 195.00 

Note of Hand against 

Sarah Clarke 300.00 

1013.80 

109.74 

93.87 

339.00 



$1556.41 



93.87 



Appraisers 



Samuel French 
Thomas Iredell 



W m . H. French Executor. 



112 GENEALOGY OF THE 



357— SAMUEL FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141). 

b. 4th mo. 10th, 1779, near Mullica Hill, N. J., 

" on 7 day of the weak in the afternoon." 
d. 3rd mo. 5th, 1852, buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground. Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. First. 3rd mo. 28th, 1811, Hannah Ivins, 
daughter of Isaac and Hannah (Tilton) Ivins. 
She d. 4th mo. 30th. 1813, buried in Friends' Burying 
Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. Second, 10th mo. 3rd, 1816, Rebecca Clark, 
daughter of Garrett and Beulah (Gibbs) Clark. 
She b. 1st mo. 1st, 1790. in Billingsport, Gloucester 
Co., N. J. 
d. 7th mo. 19th, 1879, buried in Eglington Ceme- 
tery, Clarksboro. N. J. 



753— HANNAH IVINS FRENCH 

b. 4th mo. 14th. 1813. 

cl. 4th mo. 16th, 1845, unmarried ; buried in 
Friends' Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, 

N. J. 



Children of Samuel and Rebecca (Clark) French 



754_GARRETT CLARK FRENCH 

b. 8th mo. 10th, 1817. 

d. 3rd mo. 8th, 1826. buried in Friends' 
Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 



75S_S.\\iri:i. GIBBS FRENCH 

b. 11th mo. 22nd, 1818. 

m. First, April 26th, 1853, Eliza Matilda 
Roberts. 

m. Second. January 12th, 1865, Mary Fon- 
taine Abercrombie. 




SAMUEL FRENCH 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 113 

756— CHARLES CLEMENT FRENCH 

b. 8th mo. 27th, 1821. 
m. January 15th, 1846, Henrietta E. Hansell. 

757— JOSEPH HEWLINGS FRENCH 

b. 6th mo. 12th, 1823. 
m. January 17th, 1846, Hannah Ann Wilkins. 



758— JOHN CLARK FRENCH 



b. 3rd mo. 24th, 1825. 
m. February 14th, 1854, Sarah Frances Roberts. 



759— GEORGE WASHINGTON FRENCH 

b. 7th mo. 30th, 1827. 



d. 4th mo. 10th, 1835, buried in Friends' 
Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 



760— SARAH CLARK FRENCH 



b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1835. 
m. April 15th, 1868, John Gill Whitall. 



SAMUEL FRENCH, JR. 

Although neither the oldest nor youngest son of Samuel and Sarah (Heul- 
ings) French, it was the good fortune of Samuel French, Jr., to inherit the 
farm of over 220 acres located in Greenwich, now Harrison township, Glou- 
cester Co., N. J., whereon his father wrought so faithfully for more than 
two score years. He was born, spent all his long life of 73 years, and died 
in the old homestead. At the time Samuel French [141] made his will, three 
of the older sons were settled in their own homes, and the youngest was only 
a lad. Samuel, Jr., remained at his right hand, and when he married in 1811 
brought his young wife thither, to brighten the home but two short years, 
when death entered herein. He walked worthily in his father's footsteps. He 
was an industrious and successful farmer, a careful business man, a citizen of 
high ideals ; and he preferred the ways of private life to holding public office. 
He was specially devoted to the educational welfare of his children and took 
pardonable pride in the honorable career of his son, Samuel G. French [755], 
who had rendered such brilliant public service in the war with Mexico. 



114 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Samuel Prench, Jr., was a man of great independence of character and 
would not swerve from any course he had deliberately entered upon with 
conscientious motives. This was strikingly illustrated upon the occasion of 
his marriage, in 1816, to Rebecca Clark. He declined to make acknowledg- 
ment to Meeting for "marrying out." although in all other respects in full 
accord with the principles of Friends. He frankly declared he could not 
express formal regret when he felt none. He was his own self-reliant 
counsellor and set a consistent example always as a loving father, faithful 
friend and good citizen. He died intestate and his estate was administered 
by his sons, Charles Clement [756] and Joseph Hevvlings French [757]. 
An inventory showed personal property to the amount of $3,200. He was 
buried in the Friends' Burying (Iround. at Mullica Hill. His wife Rebecca 
(Clark) French was buried in the historic Eglinton Cemetery, Clarksboro, 
Gloucester Co., X. J., the original ground for which was set apart from his 
estate by John Eglinton, in his will, 1776, in these words: "I set apart 10 
square rods of land for a Kurying ground, where the family has heretofore 
been and to be interred for the use of the family and their Heirs forever, the 
said Burying — to be put in repairs by my Executors out of my personal estate." 

The kindly relationship that existed between Samuel French, Jr., and his 
children, was shown in the remarkable expressions contained in the will of 
his daughter, Hannah I. French, who died in 1845, in which filial solicitude 
was thus manifested, it being specially desired that he should " be more 
careful of his health and that he will not work so hard or expose himself so as 
to endanger his health." This document is reproduced in full upon another 
page. 

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

WHEREAS Samuel Trench Junior of the Township of greenwich in the 
County of Gloucester and State of New-jersey son of Samuel French and 
Sarah his Wife of the same place (his Mother dece'd) and Hannah Ivins 
daughter of Isaac Ivins and Hannah his Wife, of the Township of Pitts- 
grove in the County of Salem and State afforesaid, having declared their 
intentions of marriage with each other, before a Monthly meeting of the 
religious society of Friends, held at Pilesgrove, according to the good order 
used among them, and having consent of parents their said proposal of mar- 
riage was allowed of by the said meeting. NOW these are to certify whom 
it may concern, that for the full accomplishment of their intentions, this 
twentyeight day of the third month in the year of our Lord one thousand 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



115 



Eight hundred and eleven, they, the said Samuel French and Hannah Ivins 
appeared in a public meeting of the said people, held at Pilesgrove afore- 
said ; and the said Samuel French taking the said Hannah Ivins by the 
hand, did, on this solemn occation, openly declare, that he took her, the 
said Hannah Ivins to be his Wife, promising, with Divine afsistance to be 
unto her a loving and faithful Husband untill death should separate them; 
and then, in the same afsembly, the said Hannah Ivins did in like manner 
declare, that she took him, the said Samuel French to be her Husband, 
promising, with Divine afsistance to be unto him a loving and faithful 
Wife, untill death should separate them. And moreover, they, the said 
Samuel French and Hannah Ivins (she according to the custom of mar- 
riage, afsuming the name of her Husband) did as a further confirmation 
thereof, then and there to these presents set their hands. 

And we whose names are also hereunto subscribed, being present at the 
solemnization of the said marriage and subscription, have, as witnesses 
thereto, set our hands the day and year above written. 

Samuel French Jur. 
Hannah French 



Mary Satterthwaite 
Mary Davis 
Achsah Taylor 
Patience Lippincott 
Abigail Lawrie 
Sarah Ogden 
Thomas Davis 
Wm. White 
A. Silver 
Gideon Scull sr. 
Chamley Allen jr 
Job Black 
Sam 1 Holmes 
John Ogden 
Bevan Flitcraft 
Asahel Flitcraft 
William Adams 
Stacy Hazelton 
James Lippincott 
S". White 
Samuel Cawley J" 



Achsah Gaunt 
Jonathan Smith 
Hanna Smith 
Hannah S. Hollinshead 
Rebecca W. Howey 
Lydia S. Cawley 
Sarah Holmes 
Eliza W. Smith 
Lydia Lawrie 
Mary F. Lippincott 
Hannah Lippincott 
Eliza Allen 
Eliza Morgan 
Elisa B. Mulford 
Hope Lippincott 
Jacob Davis 
Samuel Ogden 
Esther Davis 
Maryann Ogden 
Sarah Scull 
Mary Lippincott 



Isaac Ivins 
Hannah Ivins 
Ann Ivins 
Charles French jun r 
Priscilla French 
Agnes Moore 
Elizabeth Chattin 
Sarah Ivins 
Sarah Ivins 
Thomas Ivins 
Barzillai Ivins 
Elizabeth Ivins 
Martha C. Davis 
Elizabeth Black 
Jerusha Smith 
Naomi J. Ballinger 
Ann H. French 
Keturah Moore 
Rebecca Morgan 
Samuel Gaunt 



116 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF SAMUEL FRENCH, JR., 1852 



Appraisement of Goods &c. of Samuel 

French and Saml Rogers. Mch. 9/52 

1 Sorrel Mare 75.00 

4 Horses 300.00 

8 Cows 150.00 

3 HeilTers 30.00 

1 Mark.! Waggon 80.00 

1 Rockawa; 90.00 

1 Heavy Waggon 16.00 

1 Cart 10.00 

1 Sleigh 6.00 

Heavy Waggon Sides .... 4.00 

Hoe Harrow 4.00 

4 Ton Meddow Hay 32.00 

6 Ton Upland Hay 72.00 

Ton Straw 7.00 

Fan Mill 20.00 

1 1 iriHl's, Heavy Collar & 
Bridles 10.00 

5 Bushels Rye 3.75 

28 Bushels Wheat 27.00 

12 Hushels Buckwheat 6.00 

5 Bnshels Oats 2.00 

Buffalo Robe 4.00 

Market Waggon Harnefs.. 2.00 

100 bushels Corn 60.00 

4 Houghs 20.00 

2 Harrows 5.00 

Marl, Bolten, Dung & 

Wood Sides 2.00 

Lot Swingle trees, 

Yokes &c 3.00 

(art Harnefs 3.00 

3 Geese 3.00 

7]/i cords Dry Pine Wood 

1.25 9.37 

4 Do Green 1.00 4.00 

Straw Cutter 2.00 

Lot Hay & Dung forks 2.00 

Lot Shovels 1.00 

6 Rakes 75 

1065.87 



French Deed, by S. Clement 



Brot up $1065.87 

1 Grind Stone 1.50 

1 Wheel Barrow 2.00 

.5 Ladders 4.00 

2 pair Stilyards 1.00 

Lot Axes 1.75 

Log & other Chains 5.00 

Lot Shovels Hoes &c 2.50 

Box & Sundries 2.00 

Lot Stone Tools 3.00 

Lot Iron & Swingle Trees. 5.00 

Post Augur & Holing Axe 1.00 
Lot Stalk Knives Sickles 

&c 2.00 

Lot Augurs 1.00 

Lot Open Hogshead Bbls &c 3.75 

Corn Sheller 1.00 

2 Ropes 2.00 

25 baskets 10c 2.50 

I Big Iron Kettle 1.50 

Grain Cradle & Scythe.... 3.00 

Brindle dog 1.00 

7 acres, more or lefs Green 

Wheat 35.00 

II Do Do Rye 35.00 
4 Hives Bees 10.00 

—Cellar— 

50 Callous Vinegar 12c 6.00 

1 bbl. Cider 3.00 

6 hhd. & bb" 6.00 

1 Funnel 25 

Tallow 1.50 

2 Soap & 1 Lye Tub 2.00 

1 Churn 1.00 

Lot Tubs 75 

20 bushels Potatoes 10.00 

700 lb Pork 50.00 

Pork Tubs 5.00 

$1277aS7 



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pffl%:i#: 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



117 



1277.87 

2 half Bushel Measures... .75 

50 lb Lard 5.00 

Hams & Sholders 15.00 

6 Jowels 2.00 

Chees Prefs & 4 vats & 

[illegible] 2.00 

2 Saws & 2 Squares 1.00 

Kitchen Furniture ...*<^\. 1.50 

1 Book Case 1.00 

1 Table 1.50 

6 Windsor Chairs 1.50 

2 Arm Chairs 1.00 

25 yds Carpet 25c 6.25 

1 Eight day Clock 10.00 

1 Sofa 10.00 

6 Blinds 9.00 

25 yds Carpet 7.50 

37 yds Do 15.80 

1 Stove 6.00 

1 Card Table 1.00 

2 Bed Steads & Bureau 5.00 

1 Bed Stead 3.00 

10 yds Carpet 25c 2.50 

24 yds Do 15c 3.60 

Small Stove 3.00 

Looking Glafs .50 

4 Blinds 50 

1 Stand 12 

Close Horse .50 

Wash Stand &c 50 

Bureau 3.00 

Small Bed Stead 25 

3 Chairs .30 

Bed & Bed Stead 3.00 

Spinning Wheel & Reel.... .50 

Bureau 1.00 

Looking Glafs .50 

Bed & Bed Stead 2.00 

Lot Carpet 1.00 

Gun 1.00 

5^4 cords wood 1.25 6.87 

$1414.31 



Amt up 1414.31 

Bonds & Notes of Hand... 1793.27 
Fifty Bushels Seed Potatoes 20.00 

$3227.58 
Wood on Landing 42.42 

$3270.00, 
Sundry articles taken by 
the widow at appraise- 
ment 50.00 

$3320.00 



Cha". C. French ) 
Joseph H. French } Adm '- 

Samuel C. French | r , 

Samuel Rogers j 



118 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Gloucester County fs. Charles C. French and Joseph II. French Admin- 
istrators of the estate of Samuel French deceased, Severally alleging them- 
selves to be conscientiously Scrupulous of taking an Oath, and being duly 
Affirmed According to law, on their respective Affirmation say, that the 
within writing contains a true and perfect Inventory of all and Singular 
the Goods, Chattels and credits of the said Samuel French deceased, as far 
as have come to their knowledge or possession, or to the possession of any 
other person or persons, for their use. 

Severally aff. & Sub- 
scribed March 9, 1852 Chas. C, French 
Before me Joseph H. French 
Bowman Sailer Surrogate 

WILL OF HANNAH I. FRENCH [753], 1845 

I Hannah I French of the County of Gloucester State of New Jersey, 
knowing the uncertainty of life judge it right and prudent while in the 
full enjoyment of all my faculties of mind and memory to make this my 
last will and testament in manner following 

1. I revoke and annul all other wills which I may have made heretofore — 

2. I desire that all my just debts, for which I have received a valuable 
consideration paid, as also my funeral charges paid out of my personal 
property — 

3. I give and bequeath unto my Si-.t.-r Sarah One Hundred Dollars to be 
paid out of my personal property — in one year after my death — which 
said sum shall be placed at Interest in a fafe manner by her Father, or such 
persons as may be chosen for her during her minority, until she arrives at 
the age of Eighteen, when the amount of principal and Interest is to be 
paid over to her or her heirs if she is not living. 

4. I give and bequeath unto my Sister Sarah My Cold watch — Chain — 
Bracelet & Breast pin. 

5. I give and bequeath unto my two Aunts Mary Clark and Catherine 
R. Shaw Two Hundred Dollars each apiece, to be paid to them in one 
year after my death, if living at that time — if not, to revert to my heirs. 

6. I give and bequeath unto my Father Samuel French all my real 
Estate, known as the Pine Tavern Tracts, &c &c &c, situated in the Counties 
of Salem & Gloucester, State of New Jersey, and which by reference to 
the County Courts & Offices for recording deed will more fully appear : to 
have and to hold the same during his natural life. And at his death I 
desire that it shall be sold, and the proceeds be equally divided between 
My Four Brothers Samuel G.— Charles C— Joseph H. & John C. French, 
their heirs & afsigns forever — 

7. I further desire and it is my wish as my Father is growing old, and as 
I have left him all my real Estate during his life time that he will be more 
carefull of his health & that he will not work so hard or expose himself 
so as to endanger his health — 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



119 




8. I also give & bequeath unto my Father all other property whether 
personal or real Estate that may not be enumerated in the foregoing 
clauses — 

9. I do hereby nominate, constitute and appoint My Father, Samuel 
French to be my Executor or the Executor of this my last Will and testa- 
ment, and to cause the same to be well and faithfully executed, agreeably 
to the true intent and meaning thereof and as the same ought to be executed. 
In Witnefs and testimony whereof I the said Hannah I. French have 
affixed my hand and Seal dated and executed in the City of Philadelphia 
this First day of March in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Eight 
Hundred and Forty five, 1 March 1845 

Signed Sealed & de- 
livered in presence of us 
John R. Rowand 
W M Maull 
W m . H. French 

Gloucester County fs — Samuel French Sole Executor in The within Testa- 
ment named, Alleging himself to be conscientiously scrupulous of taking an 
oath, And being duly affirmed according to law, on his Solemn Affirma- 
tion, saith, That the within instrument contains The true last will and 
Testament of Hannah I French, The Testatrix therein named, so far as he 
knows, and as he verily believes ; That he will well and truly perform The 
same, by paying first The debts of the said deceased, and Then The legacies 
in The said Testament Specified, so far as The goods, chattels and credits 
of The said deceased can Thereunto extend, And render a Just and true 
account, when Thereunto lawfully required 

Affirmed and Subscribed 
April 26 tb 1845 before me 
Bowman Sailer 

Surrogate 



(Zfamct^O Ji<r-&rt<s& 




;hair belonging to BEULAH (GIBBS) CLARK 



120 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



359— SARAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141). 

b. 11th mo. 24th, 1783, near Mullica Hill, N. J., 
" on the 2 d Day of y 6 Week, about 9 oClock at 
\ Jit." 

d. 6th mo. 23rd, 1865, buried in Eglington Ceme- 
tery, Clarksboro, N. J. 
m. 2nd mo. 8th, 1810, John V. Clark, son of 
Thomas and Christian (Vanneman) Clark. 
He b. 4th mo. 3rd, 177''. m Deptford township, Glou- 
. ester Co., N. J. 

d. 10th mo. 22nd, 1827, buried in Eglington 
Cemetery, Clarksboro, N. J. 



761— SARAH CLARK 



b. llth mo. 17th, 1811. 
(I. 8th mo. 9th, 1812. 



762— JOHN SAMUEL CLARK b. 12th mo. 27th, 1812. 

d. 4th mo. 30th. 1825. 



763— MARY CLARK 



b. 1st mo. llth, 1815. 

in. 1st mo. 26th, 1837, Joseph Jessup. 



764— JACOB FRENCH (LARK b. 10th mo. 15th, 1817. 

m. First, 3rd mo. 21st, 1839, Mary Pancoast. 
m. Second, 3rd mo. 22nd, 1850, Mary Hazelton. 



765— ANN EVELINE CLARK b. 5th mo. 5th, 1822. 

d. 9th mo. 19th. 1835. 



John V. Clark married first, llth mo. 7th, 1799, Mary Zane. She born 10th mo. 6th, 
1778, died 12th mo. 21st, 1808, leaving three children, as follows: Charles French Clark, 
born 8th mo. llth, 1800, died 10th mo. 16th, 1875; Thomas Morgan Clark, born 10th 
mo. 24th, 1802, died 1823; Keturah Clark, born 10th mo. 7th, 1805, died 1821. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 121 



THOMAS CLARK. 

Thomas Clark, son of Jeffrey and Mary Clark, was born February 18th, 1737, and 
married April 8th, 1758, Christian, born September 26th, 1741, daughter of Garret and 
Christian Vanneman. Jeffrey Clark died in Southwark, Philadelphia, in 1782, leaving 
three sons, Timothy, Thomas, Jeffrey, and three daughters, Catharine, Elizabeth and Mary. 
Thomas and his brother Jeffrey became prominent in the colonial life of South Jersey. 
Thomas was particularly interested and influential, as a man of high character and ideals, 
in social and religious matters. He founded the Church of England, now known as St. 
Peter's Protestant Episcopal Church, Clarksboro. Jeffrey conceived the idea of settling 
a town at the junction of the Salem, Burlington and Mullica Hill roads. He became a 
large land holder at that point and the future village of Clarksboro was the outgrowth of 
this enterprise. The following interesting items are taken from the diary of Thomas Clark : 



EXTRACTS FROM "THOMAS CLARK'S JOURNAL 1758 BEGUN" 
A Slave Set at Liberty. 

In the year of our Lord 1760. Garret and Ruth Vanneman, his widow 
made me Executor to their estates. They had a negro girl slave appraised 
to fifty-five pounds. I kept her at the appraisement and some time after 
she grew up, had a male negro child that she named Saul Freman, she died 
soon after. I put him out to board at eight pounds a year until he was 
about five years old. Then I took him home and brought him up in my 
own family until he was about twenty-four years of age and on the fourth 
day of July 1800 I manumitted him and set him at Liberty. Agreeable to 
the Laws of New Jersey in such cases made and provided. The Certificate 
of his freedom is recorded in the Clerk's Office in the County of Gloucester, 
In the State of New Jersey. 

I feel myself exceedingly happy on account of my setting the above negro 
man free. I hope the spirit of all keepers of slaves is abating and that of 
the slave rising from the dust, their condition mollifying, the way I hope 
is preparing, under the auspices of heaven for a Total Emancipation and 
that this is disposed in the order of nature and of events, to be with the 
consent of the masters, rather than by compulsion ; and if the hope of free- 
dom for them or their posterity was held forth as the reward of good 
behavior the Slaves would be bound by personal interest to be civil, orderly 
and industrious. 

A Comet Appeared. 

I seldom see anything that raised a wonder in me which does not give my 
thoughts a turn that makes my heart the better for it. On the 5th of Sep- 
tember 1769, at two o'clock and forty minutes in the morning, I observed 



122 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



a Comet or Playing Star as nigh the Equinoxon line as I could observe 
which course from me to it was South — seventy-two degrees — East. Its 
tail extended thirty-nine degrees and thirty minutes south-westwardly from 
the said Comet by the surveying instrument which makes 2370 miles long 
at 60 miles to a degree. The Sun at this time is six degrees and four min- 
utes north of the time observed by me Thos. Clark at Clonmel in the County 
of Gloucester, New Jersey. North America, the place of my nativity. 

How spacious must the universe be that give such bodies as these their 
full play without suffering the least disorder or confusion by it. What a 
wonderful show it is to those beings that can look into this great theatre 
of nature and see such tremendous objects wandering through those im- 
measurable elements and running th.ir appointed courses. The eyes of 
future generations may hereafter be strong enough to comprehend this mag- 
nificent prospect and their understanding may be able to find out the several 
uses of these great parts of the Universe. In the meantime they are proper 
objects for our imaginations to contemplate on that we may form more 
exalted notions of Infinite wisdom and power and learn to think humbly of 
ourselves and all the little works of human invention. 



August 29th, 1801 

A Prayer upon Toleration 

i boa Eternal Incomprehensible Being who art the fountain of mercy 
and the source of love, thy sun light-, equally the Christian and the Atheist 
— thy showers equally nourish the fields of the Believer as the Infidel, the 
seed of virtue is ever found in the heart of the impious and the heretic. 
From thee I learn that diversity of opinions does not prevent thee from 
being a beneficent Father to all mankind. Shall I then to thy feeble crea- 
tures be less indulgent? Shall I not permit thy subjects to adore thee in 
whatever manner they please? Shall I persecute those who differ from me 
in point of thinking? Must religion be spread with the point of the sword? 
O, Thou whose dignity and mighty power love, embrace the whole universe, 
grant that such erroneous principles may never harbor in my breast. Where 
is the religion that does not instruct to love virtue and detest vice? Let all 
religions be tolerated, let all mankind pay their worship to thee — thou Eternal 
Being in the manner they think best. Does error in judgment deserve ex- 
pulsion from society and is force the proper way to win the heart or bring 
the mind to a true sense of religion? Let the shameful chains of religious 
tyranny be parted assunder and the sweet bonds of love unite all subjects 
forever. May thy Almighty Power never forsake them. O, Thou Incom- 
prehensible Being fortify my resolutions with thy love: surmount every 
difficulty and let that law of our Divine Master which inculcates charity and 
patience be always impressed on my part. Amen. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 123 

My conduct in life until I was 64 years of age all set forth by me Thos. 
Clark. As soon as I was settled I bought books and read them and im- 
proved my natural abilities, so that I became Surveyor of Lands and Con- 
veyancer in the early part of my life which qualified me for other business. 
It proved much to my advantage, notwithstanding I labored under natural 
disabilites I was appointed to public stations in life more so than the gen- 
erality of men of my age and at an earlier period than Common people, 
such as Executor to Estates and Guardian to Minors, Town Officers, Mana- 
gers of Public Works, Justice of Peace under the King's Government 
Council of Proprietors. I built a house of worship in Greenwich Township 
which was then wanted to be called Saint Thomas Church and which name 
I refused to be called in the year 1770, but now called Berkeley's Church 
in memory of John Lord Berkeley the Proprietor of West New Jersey. 

I was a member of the General Assembly of Xew Jersey for seven years, 
Judge of the Pleas and Judge of the Orphans Court, Justice of the Peace 
and Notary Public for the County of Gloucester. I recommend to my 
children the reading of books for the improving of their knowledge. I 
always followed learning since I first settled and went through the path of 
life perhaps in as peaceable manner as any person ever did — clear of broils, 
strifes and contentions. I never was sued for a just debt in my lifetime, nor 
scarcely ever sued any person and no person was ever detained in goal on 
my account nor their lands or goods sold. This gives peace to the mind and 
to God that passeth all understanding and keeps the mind and heart in the 
knowledge and love of God and the fellowship of his Son. So that I hope 
the latter part of my days may be happy in the land the Lord my God giveth 
me until it shall please God to call me. I am one of the Legislative Council 
of New Jersey for the Years of 1799, 1800, 1801, 1802, 1803. 

I am waiting for the Great Teacher, convinced that the order of nature 
is perfect — that Infinite Wisdom governs all things, and that Christianity 
comes from God, and resting with full assurance on this one truth, which 
is the Gospel of peace lifting above the world, warming the heart with the 
love of God. In hope of a future deliverance from everlasting death — where 
the way is open to social happiness and reason utter her voice with suc- 
cess — and looking forward beyond the grave where a government is erected 
under that Messiah, who has tasted death for every one. I seem to have 
hopes that I shall be a partaker of that happiness beyond the grave which 
is not to be expected in this world — I mean to fulfill the duties enjoined 
to my station with a cheerful activity enjoying the world and ready to leave 
it when God pleases to call me. 



124 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



360— JOSEPH CLEMENT FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141). 

b. 7th mo. 20th. 1786, near Mullica Hill, N. J., 
" on the fifth day about one <>■ 1<» k in the after- 
noon." 
d. 2nd mo. 2nd. 1857. 
m. First, Elizabeth P. Ellis. 
S i b. 1779. 

d. 8th mo. 23rd, 1845. 

m. Second, 9th mo. 7th. 1848, Nam v Yanneman. 
b. 3rd mo. 21st, L796 
d. 5th mo. 21st, I ■ 



766— EMM \ V l Ki Mil 

767— HANNAH Ik! M II 



b. Illh mo. 24th. 1814. 

m. <>(h mo. 15th, 1838, Isaac B. Mulford. 

the age of 12 years. 



362-1 I.I riCE wills Thomas, l ; Charles, 8 j Charles, 42. Elizabeth, 

142). 

b. 1 1th mo. 5th, 1771. 
.1. 4th mo. 13th, 1851. 

m. 8th mo. 25th, 1795, William Rowand; Edward 
Inn. h [121], Justii e of the Peace, Hurlington 
County, performing ceremony. 
W". R. b. 7th mo. 27th, 177 v 
d. 10th mo. 10th, LSI 7. 



768— SARAH Wills ROWAND b. 1 lth mo. 10th, 1706. 

(1. 2nd mo. 11th, 1882. 



7 9_j\\ii -. wii is ROWAND b. 7th mo. 31it, 1798. 

d. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1824. 



770— ANN COLES K< W \\l> b. ''th mo. 21st, 1800. 

■ I 7th mo. 29th, 1883. 




JOSEPH C. FRENCH 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



125 



771— JOSEPH FRENCH ROWAND 

b. 4th mo. 10th, 1803. 

m. 10th mo. 3rd, 1830, Nancy Curlis Butter- 
worth. 

772— ELIZABETH WOOD ROWAND 

b. 7th mo. 12th, 1805. 
d. 7th mo. 8th, 1883. 

773— SABILLA FRENCH ROWAND 

b. 8th mo. 9th, 1807. 
d. 2nd mo. 24th, 1888. 

774— ACHSAH IRICK ROWAND 

b. 11th mo. 8th, 1809. 
d. 12th mo. 28th, 1884. 

m. Joseph Jackson Budd, son of Isaac and 
Ann (King) Budd of Mount Holly, N. J. 
He b. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1805. 
d. 6th mo. 29th, 1866. 

775— REBECCA LETTICE ROWAND 

b. 4th mo. 15th, 1813. 
d. 6th mo. 8th, 1818. 

Child of Achsah Irick Rowand [774] and Joseph Jackson Budd. 

SARAH ROWAND BUDD b. 1st mo- 25th. 1847. 

d- 3d mo. 6th, 1856. 

Joseph Jackson Budd married first, Sarah B. Earl, born 11th mo. 14th, 1807, and 
died 11th mo. 3rd, 1840. Their children were: Josephine, b. 7th mo. 11th, 1835, d. 
6th mo. 22nd, 1879, m. 10th mo. 1st, 1866, Henry I. Budd; Rebecca E. Budd, b. 11th mo. 
10th, 1838, d. 9th mo. 16th, 1862. 




FAMILY CHINA 



126 GENEALOGY OF THE 

363— ANN WILLS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Elizabeth, 142). 

b. March, 17*5. 

d. February 4th, 1852, buried in Mount Holly, 

N.J. 
m. First, 4th mo. 8th, 1795, in Rancocas, N. J., 
Evan Clement, M.D., son of Samuel and 
Beulah (Evans) Clement. 
He d. 1797. 

m. Second, 1799, John Blackwood, M.D., son of 
Joseph and Rebecca (Moss) Blackwood. 
He b. July 28th, 1772. 
d. 3rd mo. 16th, 1840. 

Evan Clement, M.D., was born in Haddonfield, N. J. lie was the first native of that 
part of Gloucester (now Camden) County, to adopt the profession of medicine and prac- 
tice it in that section. He died without issue, and intestate, his estate being administered 
by his widow, Ann Clement, Samuel Clement and James Hopkins. Dr. John Blackwood 
succeeded to his practice for a short time, and also married his widow. 

Children of Ann (Wills) Clement [363] and John Blackwood, M.D. 

776— ELIZABETH BLACKWOOD 

b. 8th mo. 16th, 1R00. 

d. 12th mo. 14th, 1867. 

m. First, November 26th, 1818, George W. 
Burr, son of Henry and Phoebe (Wil- 
liams) Burr. 
He b. 9th mo. 5th, 1798. 

m. Second, February 26th, 1833, Asa Gaunt 
Shinn. 

777— EVAN CLEMENT BLACKWOOD 

b. 7th mo. 3rd, 1803. 
d. 1843. 
m. Mary Burr. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 127 

JUDGE JOHN BLACKWOOD, M.D. 

Dr. John Blackwood was born in Blackwood, N. J., in 1772, and was 
apparently a descendant of John Blackwood, a noted Scotch Presbyterian 
immigrant, who founded that place about 1750. After succeeding Dr. Evan 
Clement, at Haddonfield, for a time, he removed to Mt. Holly, where he 
became prominent and influential in his profession and in political and 
business circles. He served as postmaster from April 1st, 1816, until May 
20th, 1829. November 16th, 1825, he was commissioned by Governor Isaac 
H. Williamson, Lay Judge of the Common Pleas and Orphans' Court of 
Burlington county. He accumulated considerable of an estate, and resided 
for a number of years on Main Street, Mt. Holly, N. J., his residence, recently 
removed, adjoining the Friends' Meeting House. He was buried in the 
Friends' Burying Ground, within a few rods of his long time homestead. 
Following is a copy of the commission issued to him by Governor Williamson : 

State of New Jersey 

To John Blackwood, Esquire Greeting 

The Council and Assembly, reposing special trust and confidence in 
your integrity, prudence and ability, have at a Joint Meeting appointed 
you, the said John Blackwood, to be one of the Judges of the Inferior 
Court of Common Pleas, in and for the County of Burlington. You are 
therefore by these presents commissioned one of the Judges of the said 
Inferior Court of Common Pleas to be holden in and for the said County 
of Burlington. To have and to hold the same, with all powers and juris- 
dictions cognizable in the said Court and before a Judge of the Inferior 
Court of Common Pleas severally or jointly in said county with other the 
Judges of the said State ; together with the fees allowed for the exercise 
of the several duties thereof, agreeably to the constitution and laws of the 
said State. 

In Testimony whereof the Great Seal of the said State is hereunto 
affixed. 

Witness Isaac H Williamson, Esquire, Governor of the State of New 
Jersey, at Trenton, the Sixteenth day of November in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty five. 

(Signed) Isaac H Williamson 
By the Governor 

Dan' Coleman, Secretary 



128 GENEALOGY OF THE 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF JUDGE JOHN BLACKWOOD, M.D., 1835 

Date. Jan 20. 1835 

Mt Holly, Burlington Co. N. J. Proved March 27, 1840 

Residence and furniture and income from bank stock and monies in- 
vested, to wife, Ann W. Blackwood, during Widowhood, subject to educa- 
tion and support of grandchildren, Nelson Burr, Ann Burr and Mary Burr. 

Upon remarriage of widow, Ann W. Blackwood, or her death, house and 
furniture to daughter, Elizabeth (Burr) Shinn. Should said daughter, 
again become widowed and remarry, or after her death, house, furniture 
and income to above named grandchildren. 

To Son Evan C. Blackwood farm of 107 acres in Northampton township; 
after his decease, if without issue, to said grandchildren. 

Executrix, Wife Ann W. Blackwood — 

Elizabeth Blackwood [776], daughter of Judge John Blackwood, M.D., and Ann (Wills) 
Clement Blackwood, married, first, George W. Burr and had the following children : 
Nelson, born October 23rd, 1819, died September 16th, 1851, unmarried; Ann, born June 
6th, 1821, died April 30th, 1895, married, November 22nd, 1840, Asa Gaskill ; Mary, 
born November 21st, 1823, died about 1900, married Robert Snodgrass. Elizabeth 
(Blackwood) Burr married, second, Asa Gaunt Shinn, and had four children, namely, 
Asa Gaunt, Jr., John Blackwood, I'z Gaunt, Henry Clay. 

Ann Burr, daughter of George W. and Elizabeth (Blackwood) Burr, married, Novem- 
ber 22nd, 1840, Asa Gaskill, and had the following children: George Burr, born Septem- 
ber 18th, 1841; Charles O., born June 25th, 1S43; Oliver, born September 15th, 1845; 
Julia, born July 31st. 1847; Joseph II., born May 23rd, 1850; Ann Black, born September 
25th, 1853; Judson, born July 31st, 1860; Henry Shinn, born November 13th, 1863. 
Joseph H. Gaskill married December 25th, 1872, Ellamina S. Logan, and had children: 
Thomas Logan, born July 6th, 1874; Nelson Burr, born September 12th, 1875; Charles 
Sutter, born October 11th, 1877, married, January 1st, 1908, Eleanor Lapham. Joseph 
H. Gaskill was appointed judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Camden County, in 
1894, and served continuously until 1907. His son, Nelson Burr Gaskill, in 1907, was 
appointed Assistant Attorney General of New Jersey and reappointed in 1908 for five 
years. 

364— REBECCA WILLS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Elizabeth, 

142). 
b. 1780. 

d. 1st mo. 14th, 1847. 

m. 5th mo. 15th, 1799, Samuel Woolman, son of 
Jonah and Martha Woolman, of Northampton 
township, Burlington Co., N. J. 
He b. 2nd mo. 9th, 1769. 
d 9th mo. 27th, 1843. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 129 

778— ELIZABETH WOOLMAN b. 1st mo. 30th, 1800. 

m. 4th mo. 14th, 1830, Thomas E. Deacon, 
son of John and Hannah Deacon. 
He b. 1789. 

d. 7th mo. 11th, 1853 

779— URIAH WOOLMAN b. 1804. 

d. 10th mo. 1st, 1829. 

780— MARTHA WOOLMAN b. 2nd mo. 2nd 1807. 

m. 11th mo. 12th, 1845, John Borton, son of 
John and Jemima Borton. 
He b. 1805. 

d. 8th mo. 8th, 1866. 

781— CHARLES F. WOOLMAN b. 8th mo. 30th, 1809. 

d. 11th mo. 2nd, 1851. 

m. 1836, Patience Buzby [875], daughter of 
Nicholas and Hannah (Heaton) Buzby. 

365— ELIZABETH WILLS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Eliza- 
beth, 142). 
m. October 23rd, 1800, Thomas Wood; Thomas 
Adams, Justice of the Peace, Burlington Co., 
N. J., performing ceremony. 

782— RICHARD WOOD 

783— CHARLES WOOD 

784— ANN WOOD 

785— LOUISA WOOD 

367— MOSES WILLS, JR. (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; Elizabeth, 

142). 
b. 12th. mo. 17th, 1792. 
d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1873. 

m. 12th mo. 17th, 1818, Rebecca Wright Black 
[386], daughter of William and Hope 
(French) Black. 

For record of children of Moses Wills, Jr., and Rebecca Wright Black see 386. 
9 



130 GENEALOGY OF THE 

368— ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Charles, 143). 

b. August 14th, 1784, near Fellowship, N. J. 

d. March 14th, 1849, buried in Trinity P. E. 

Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 
m. June 20th, 181 1, Joshua M. Hollingshead, M.D. 
(St. Andrew's records, Mt. Holly, N. J.). 
He d. June 6th, 1819, in Moorestown, N. J., in his 
33rd year. 

786— CHARLES FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. November 25th, 1812. 

m. October 26th, 1843, Anna Hendry Dough- 
ten. 

787— HORACE HUGH HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. May 1st, 1815. 

m. January 11th, 1S37, Abigail Ann Stockton. 



369— JOSEPH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, S; Charles, 42; Charles, 

143). 
b. September 2nd, 1786, near Fellowship, N. J. 
d. August 8th, 1830, buried in Trinity P. E. 

Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 
m. December 9th, 1813, Mary Stokes, daughter of 
Joshua and Deborah (Hooten) Stokes. 
She b. 1793. 

d. 1841, buried in Trinity P. E. Churchyard, 
Moorestown, N. J. 

788— SABILLA S. FRENCH b. September 16th, 1817. 

d. August 25th, 1S77, unmarried; buried in 
Trinity P. E. Churchyard, Moorestown, 
N.J. 

789— MARY ANN FRENi II b. January 26th, 1820. 

d. April 10th, 1883, unmarried; buried in 
Trinity P. E. Churchyard, Moorestown, 
N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



131 



790— DEBORAH H. FRENCH b. August 29th, 1822. 

d. November 24th, 1865, unmarried; buried 
in Trinity P. E. Churchyard, Moorestown, 
N.J. 



791— ELIZABETH FRENCH 



b. April 4th, 1826. 

d. June 6th, 1896, buried in Trinity P. E 

Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 
m. 9th mo. 14th, 1858, Edward Wills [843], 

son of Moses, Jr., and Rebecca (Black) 

Wills. 



792— SARAH J. FRENCH 



m. William C. Porter, son of Joseph Porter, 
d. October 29th, 1851, buried in Trinity P. 
E. Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 



Mary Ann French [789] in her will, dated December 7th, 1880, proved May 1st, 1883, 
left to St. Andrews Protestant Episcopal Church, Mt. Holly, N. J., a legacy of $1,000, 
in trust; also $300 to the Union Association of the Children's Home, Mt. Holly. 




BELONGINGS OF CHARLES FRENCH, 3RD [143] 



132 GENEALOGY OF THE 



371— ATLANTIC FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Charles, 143). 

b. September 21st, 1791, near Fellowship, N. J. 

d. March 13th, 1869, in Philadelphia, buried in 
Trinity P. E. Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 

m. March 19th, 1812, Gilbert Page, son of Thomas 
and Alice Page (St. Andrew's records, Mt. 
Holly, N. J.). 
He b. August 7th, 1784. 

d. July 7th, 1862, buried in Trinity P. E. Church- 
yard, Moorestown, N. J. 



793— CHARLES FRENCH PAGE 

b. March 27th, 1813. 

d. April 27th, 1866, unmarried, in Philadel- 
phia; buried in Trinity P. E. Churchyard, 
Moorestown, N. J. 



794— THOMAS STOKES PAGE, M.D. 

b. May 11th, 1815. 
m. January 5th, 1841, Anna Maria Liljivalch. 



795— WILLIAM HOOTON PAGE 

b. January 6th, 1818. 

d. August 12th, 1824, buried in Trinity P. E. 
Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 



796— JOSEPH FRENCH PAGE b. October 14th, 1820. 

m. October 16th, 1845, Ellen Forde Hansell. 



797— SABILLA ANN PAGE b. February 13th, 1823. 

d. February 15th, 1825, buried in Trinity 
P. E. Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 133 

798— EDWARD PAGE b. February 23rd, 1826. 

d. February 12th, 1827, buried in Trinity 
P. E. Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 



799— SARAH FRENCH PAGE b. February 5th, 1828. 

d. October 23rd, 1847, unmarried ; buried in 
Trinity P. E. Churchyard, Moorestown, 
N. J. 



800— EDWARD AUGUSTUS PAGE, M.D. 

b. October 23rd, 1830. 

m. October 6th, 1859, Josephine Augusta Bisp- 
ham. 



801— RODNEY SPENCER PAGE 

b. February 28th, 1833. 

d. October 15th, 1834, buried in Trinity P. E„ 

Churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 



802— ELIZABETH FRENCH PAGE 

b. July 23rd, 1835. 

d. April 7th, 1900, at her residence, No. 5 
Cork Street, London, England. 

m. First, July 7th, 1869, in Holy Trinity 
Church, Philadelphia, Joseph Blake Bisp- 
ham, son of Joseph and Susan (Tucker) 
Bispham. 
He b. October 13th, 1831. 

d. August 15th, 1874. 

m Second, September 23rd, 1881, in San' 
Francisco, Cal., Sir William Lane Booker, 
C. M. G.; Knight, Companion of the Most 
Distinguished Order of St. Michael and 
St. George. (No issue.) 



At the time of the marriage of Elizabeth F. (Page) Bispham to Sir William Lane 

Booker, he was the representative of England in San Francisco ; later he was made 

Consul General to New York City, where they resided for some ten years, about 1884 
removing to London. 



134 GENEALOGY OF THE 

GILBERT PAGE 

The first half of the nineteenth century was a notable period in the 
political, social, industrial and religious life of West Jersey. It developed 
strong men in every community. One of the most active and influential 
citizens of Moorestown was Gilbert Page, son-in-law of Charles French 
[143]. He came of rugged ancestry and throughout a long life left his 
impress upon those around him. Soon after his marriage to Atlantic French 
he purchased the large brick house which now adjoins the Orthodox Friends 
Meeting House, Moorestown, made suitable alterations and set up a general 
store, which he successfully conducted for two score years. He took great 
interest in public affairs and was postmaster for 26 years, from March 19th, 
1813, until May 4th, 1839, serving under the administrations of Presidents 
Madison, Monroe, John Quincy Adams, Jackson and Van Buren. In the 
memorable log cabin and hard cider campaign of 1840, Mr. Page was very 
active in the Whig party, directing in behalf of General Harrison the largest 
political meeting that had ever been known in that part of the country, 
the festivities extending far into the night. 

Older residents of Moorestown who remember Gilbert Page recall many 
interesting incidents concerning him. One of his favorite diversions for a 
time was the raising of geese, his fine flocks feeding on the rich meadow 
grasses a short distance from his house. One night the entire flock, number- 
ing thirty, save one old gander, disappeared, and in a little bag, near his 
resting place, was found a penny for every goose stolen and this exasperating 
confession pinned on the parcel : 

" Dear Mr Page 
Dont be in a rage ; 
But if you do its no wonder, 
For I bought all your geese 
For a penny a piece, 
And left the money with the gander." 

There was a stormy time that day in the vicinity, but the stolen geese 
never were recovered, nor were the perpetrators of the crime discovered. 

Mr. Page accumulated considerable property, one notable purchase being 
the saw mill and farm, near Mullica Hill, formerly owned by Uriah French, 
and which he bought of the heirs of his father-in-law, Charles French [143] 
in 1835. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 135 

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH, MOORESTOVVN, N. J. 

Amongst the earliest settlers of Chester township, Burlington county, New 
Jersey, were members of the Church of England. Many of their descendants 
united in founding churches of their own faith. One of the first of these 
was at Colestown, which for over one hundred years, like St. Mary's, Burling- 
ton, served a large community. As Moorestown and vicinity grew in popula- 
tion and wealth, it was determined to locate a church there. Trinity parish 
was formed and a fine stone building erected, which was consecrated in 
March, 1838. This has been twice enlarged, a rectory and parish house 
added, memorial windows placed and the entire church property is one of the 
most attractive in the diocese. 

The adjoining graveyard contains many beautiful memorials. In the 
center enclosed plot rest thirteen members of the French family, including 
Charles and Sabilla, with as many others nearby. Directly opposite is the 
Page plot, with a center monument and a number of individual tablets. The 
church has had ten regular ministers in charge. Rev. Dr. James Hart 
Lamb serving the longest, from 1878 to 1898, being succeeded by the present 
rector, Rev. Dr. Robert McKay. Many members of the French family and 
its allied branches — Hollingshead, Page, Porter, Wills, Gill — have been asso- 
ciated with the religious and social life of Trinity church since its foundation, 
seventy-five years ago. Sabilla French [373], daughter of Charles and Sabilla, 
who died in 1880, left a legacy of $100, the interest of which is to be perpet- 
ually applied to the care of the family plot in the graveyard of Trinity church. 

376— AGNES HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Eleanor, 144). 

b. 8th mo. 6th, 1776. 
d. 11th mo. 21st, 1842. 

m. William Page, M.D., son of Thomas and Alice 
Page. 
He b. 7th mo. 9th, 1770. 
d. 9th mo. 4th, 1839. 

803— THOMAS PAGE, M.D. b. 6th mo. 8th, 1798. 

m. First, Elizabeth S. Butcher, 
m. Second, Eliza C. Tucker, daughter of Judge 
Ebenezer Tucker, of Tuckerton, N. J. 



136 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



804— WILLIAM PAGE, JR. 

805— ELEANOR PAGE 
806— AGNES PAGE 
807— CLAYTON H. PAGE 
808— SARAH PAGE 
809— ELIZABETH F. PAGE 
810— ABIGAIL II. I'AGE 



b. 1 1th mo. 8th, 1804. 

m. Rebecca Coate, daughter of Asahel and 
Mary (Strieker) Coate. 

b. 1st mo. lbth, 1S08. 
m. Isaac Haines. 

b. 1st mo. 22nd, 1813. 
m. October 1st, 1846, Thomas Moffett. 

b. 2nd mo. 6th, 1814. 
m. Margaret Tucker. 

b. 4th mo. 9th, 1818. 
d. unmarried. 

b. 7th mo. 1st, 1821. 
d. unmarried. 

I). 7th mo. 10th, 1824. 

d. October 15th, 1865, unmarried. 



377— ANN HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Eleanor, 144). 
b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1779. 
(1. January 3rd, 1862. 

m. April 14th, 1796, Isaac Wilkins [339], son of 
Jacob and Ann (French) Wilkins. 
He b. 12th mo. 7th, 1772. 

(1. April 7th, 1853, in Camden, N. J. 

For record of children of Ann Ilollingshead and Isaac Wilkins see 339. 




1 WILY CHINA 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 137 

380— HUGH FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Eleanor, 144). 

b. 6th mo. 18th, 1786. 

" Died yesterday afternoon [5th mo. 17th, 1844] 
Hugh F. Hollingshead, Esq., merchant of this 
city, in the 58th year of his age. His male 
friends and those of the family are respectfully 
invited to attend his funeral from his late resi- 
dence, No. 112 S. 3rd St. [Philadelphia], on 
Tuesday afternoon next, at 3 o'clock, without 
further notice, to proceed to Laurel Hill." ( U. S. 
Gazette, May 18, 1844.) 

m. 10th mo. 29th, 1812, Martha Mickle, daughter 
of Joseph and Hannah (Burrough) Mickle. 
She b. 12th mo. 9th, 1794. 

d. 6th mo. 4th, 1860, in Philadelphia. 

811— ANNA H. HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 1st mo. 16th, 1S17. 
m. First, February 2nd, 1835, Charles C. 

Barton, U.S.N. 
m. Second, March 27th, 1837, Charles C. 
Barton, U.S.N. 

812— ELLEN HOLLINGSHEAD b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1819. 

d. 8th mo. 1st, 1861. 

813— JOSEPH MICKLE HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 10th mo. 15th, 1821. 
m. March 6th. 1851. Caroline Atwood. 

814— CHARLES HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 6th mo. 2nd, 1824. 
d. 6th mo. 14th, 1826. 

815— HENRY HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 11th mo. 24th. 1826. 

d. 8th mo. 26th, 1908, near Frank ford, Phila- 
delphia. 

816— ELIZA W. HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 5th mo. 1st, 1829. 

m. March 20th, 1851, James M. Gillilan. 



138 GENEALOGY OF THE 



817— MARTHA HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. 8th mo. 25th, 1831. 
d. 1st mo. 13th, 1851. 

818— EMILY HOLLINGSHEAD b. 11th mo. 27th, 1833. 

d. 12th mo. 2nd, 1859. 

818a— MARY HOLLINGSHEAD b. 4th mo. 4th, 1836. 

d. 9th mo. 23rd, 1892. 



HUGH FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD. 

Hugh French Hollingshead, youngest child and only son of Hugh and 
Eleanor (French) Hollingshead, was the grandson of Hugh and Anne (Evees) 
Hollingshead, whose marriage was reported 10th mo. 4th, 1734, in the 
Monthly Meeting of Women Friends at Haddonfield, as having been orderly 
accomplished. Hugh Hollingshead was the son of John and Agnes (Hack- 
ney) Hollingshead. By deed of gift dated May 18th, 1745, John Hollings- 
head of the township of Chester, county of Burlington, conveyed to his " son 
Hugh Hollinshead, of same county, for divers good and valuable causes and 
considerations me thereunto moving, plantation and thoroughfare where he 
now liveth, with buildings and improvements, etc." 

In the ancient diary kept by John Hunt, a minister among Friends in New 
Jersey, during the latter part of the eighteenth and the beginning of the 
nineteenth centuries, is the following note concerning the burial of Hugh 
Hollingshead: 

"22 of y" 10 m ° 1770 (Snows) went to our Meeting to y' Burial of Hugh 
Hollinfhead, Ann Moore was there on a Yifit from Merry Land She 
preached and prayed in a moft wonderful & powerful Manner, her firft 
words, Let us be Careful not to be afhamed of y" Crosf of Christ" 

Anne (Evees) Hollingshead, widow of Hugh, died in 3rd mo., 1784, and 
John Hunt made the following note in his diary, relating to her burial : 

"28 of 3" 1 m 1784 Was first day. Went to our Meeting. Anna Hol- 
lingshead an antient woman w:is Buried there was a Large Concours of 
very Raw people and a very poor time it was." 

Concerning the marriage in 1775 of Hugh and Eleanor (French) Hollings- 
head, the diary contains the following entry : 

"23 of y' 11 mo. 1775 I was at our Meeting Hugh Hollinfhead & 
Elener Flinch was Married Mafsy Redman was there & Spoke very well." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 139 

And at the time of the burial of Hugh Hollingshead, husband of Eleanor, 
John Hunt made this reference to it : 

" 20 of 3 rd m 1786 We went to the burial of Hugh Hollingshead & held a 
meeting which was but a Low time." 

Hugh French Hollingshead [380] came to Philadelphia from New Jersey 
in early manhood and entered mercantile life. After purchasing the resi- 
dence of Charles Creighton French [393] on Mulberry (Arch) street near 
Seventh street, in 1815, he formed a partnership with William Piatt, under 
the firm name of Hollingshead & Piatt, wholesale grocers, at 47 North Water 
street. He continued this business prosperously until his death in 1844. For 
some years thereafter his son, Joseph M. Hollingshead, was the sole proprietor. 
The elder Hollingshead, about 1820, bought the residence 112 South Third 
street (below Walnut, at that time), where he died; and by will dated De- 
cember 27th, 1841, proved May 23rd, 1844, he bequeathed this property to 
his wife, Martha (Mickle) Hollingshead. He was one of the founders and 
first directors of the State Bank of Camden, established in 1812. He re- 
mained in the board for ten years, being associated with Joseph Matlack, 
Joseph M. Bispham and other leading citizens. For a number of years Hugh 
F. Hollingshead and his family were members of the Philadelphia Monthly 
Meeting. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Minutes of Haddonfield Meeting of Women Friends : 2nd Vol. 

At a monthly meeting of Women friends held at Haddonfield 9th mo th 14 th 1812. 
Hugh F. Hollingshead son of Hugh Hollingshead deceas'd and Martha Mickel Daughter 
of Joseph Mickel appeared and declar'd their intentions of Marriage with each other 
their Mothers being present consented, Elizabeth Cooper and Prudence Kaighn are 
appointed to make the necefsary inquiry respecting the young Woman and report to next 
Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends at Haddonfield 10 m ° 12 th 1812 The report 
of the enquirers being clear, there's no obstruction to the proceeding of Hugh F. Hollings- 
head and Martha Mickel in their marriage engagements, they are left at liberty to 
solemnize their marriage agreeable to our rules, Hannah Ward and Elizabeth Cooper are 
appointed to be present to see that it is orderly conducted and report to next Meeting. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Women friends held at Haddonfield the ll' h month 9 tb 1812 
We are informed by the friends appointed to attend the Marriage of Hugh F. Hollings- 
head and Martha Mickel that they attended and it was orderly accomplished. 



140 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 



WtRRXAS Hugh 1'. Hollingshead of the Township of Newton in the County of Glou- 
cester in the State of New Jersey Son of Hugh Hollingshead Deceased and of Eleanor 
his Wife And Martha Mickle of the Township County and State aforesaid Daughter 
of Joseph Mickle and of Hannah his Wife Deceased. Having declared their intentions 
of Marriage with each other before a Monthly Meeting of the people called Quakers held 
at Haddonfield in the County aforesaid according to the good order used amongst them 
and having Consent of Surviving Parents their said proposal of Marriage was allowed 
of by the said Meeting. 

Now These Are To Certify whom it may concern that for the full accomplishing of 
their said intention this Twenty-ninth day of the Tenth Month in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight Hundred and Twelve they the said Hugh F. Hollingshead and Martha 
Mickle appeared in a public Meeting of the said people at Newton aforesaid and the 
said Hugh F. Hollingshead taking the said Martha .Mickle by the Hand did on this 
Solemn occasion openly declare that he took the said Martha Mickle to be his wife prom- 
ising with the Lords Assistance to be unto her a loving and faithful Husband until Death 
should separate them and then in the same Assembly the said Martha Mickle did in like 
manner declare that she took the said Hugh F. Hollingshead to be her Husband prom- 
ising with the Lords assistance to be unto him a loving and faithful Wife until Death 
should separate them. And Moreover they the said Hugh F. Hollingshead and Martha 
Mickle (She according to the custom of Marriage assuming the name of her Husband) 
As a further confirmation thereof did then and there to these Presents set their Hands 
and we whose Names are also hereunto Subscribed being present at the Solemnization of 
the said Marriage and Subscription have as Witnesses thereunto set our Hands the Day 
and Year above written. 

Hugh F. Hollingshead 
Martha Hollingshead 



John Cooper 
Francis Campion 
Joseph Mickle jnr 
John M. Kaighn 
James Cooper 
Isaac M. Cooper 
Joel Hollinshead 
Samuel Webster 
Richard Jordan 
Josiah Atkinson 
Joshua Cooper 
Joseph Sloan 
Jacob Glover 
Joseph Boggs 
John Ward 
Benjamin ( 



Rachel K. Inskeep 
Sarah B. Glover 
Hannah W. Hopkins 
Ann West 
Hannah Barton 
Elizabeth H. West 
Leatitia Ward 
Rebecca Ward 
Sarah Branson jun. 
Mary Glover 
Elizabeth Cooper 
Hannah Ward 

Prudence Kaighin 

Miriam Kay 

Rebecca W. liurrough 

Mary Mickle junr. 



Joseph Mickle 
Rebekah Mickle 
Jos. Matlack 
Eleanor Matlack 
Abigail Stockton 
Ann Wilkins 
Ann Burrough 
Beulah Mickle 
Elizabeth Champion 
Sarah Kaighn 
Keziah Clement 
Prudence Cooper 
Sarah Cooper 
Mary Curtis 
Hannah Sloan 
Mary Harrison 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 141 

Saml. C. Champion Elizabeth French Priscilla Atkinson 

William Stockton Jun Maria M. Champion Hannah Cowperthwaite 

Isaac Wilkins Eliza Wilkins Mary M. Archer 

Jos Kaighn Kitty Ann Field Hannah Dugdale 

Abel Clement Jim Ell H. Field Elizabeth Glover 

Saml Haines Saml. Black Mary Glover 

Sam Thomas Joseph French Rachel Sloan 



SUMMARY OF WILL OF HUGH F. HOLLINGSHEAD, 1844 

Dated December 27th, 1841. Proved May 23rd, 1844. 

I give to my beloved wife Martha Hollingshead, the dwelling in which we live, 112 S. 
3rd St., Philadelphia, during the period of her life and all my household furniture and 
silverware, horses and carriage. I value said personal property at $8,000. 

I give to my executors so much property as shall produce an income to my wife of 
$4,000, to be paid quarterly during her life. 

I give to my executors 1/ 16th part of my estate in trust for the maintenance and 
education of my grandchildren, Martha and Ellen Barton, children of my dec'd daughter 
Anna, provided that it shall be in the discretion of my said executors to withhold all 
funds for the maintenance and education of said grandchildren if they should not be 
placed with such persons as they may approve having regard for the welfare of said 
children, and upon the further trust on the arrival of my said grandchildren of lawful 
age respectively or upon their marriage if the same be prudently entered into, to pay 
them a reasonable outfit, or to settle the same for their separate use and the residue of 
this share of my estate to keep invested for the sole and separate use of my said grand- 
daughters during life, share and share alike, their receipts to be a full discharge to the 
said trustees. And after their decease respectively, the principal held for each shall be 
paid to the child, children or next of kin of the decedent, if more than one, in equal shares, 
but in exclusion of any husband my said granddaughters may have, both as to the prin- 
cipal after their decease and the income to be paid to them during life. And by next of 
kin is to be understood on the decease of either of said granddaughters without leaving 
any child her surviving sister, or her child or children, and on the decease of the sur- 
vivor, without any child her relatives of my blood and not those there may be related on 
the side of their father, and with said exception the present intestate law to be the rule 
of distribution. 

The residue of my estate I direct may be divided into seven equal parts, or shares, one 
share thereof to my son Joseph M. Hollingshead, one to my son Henry and five shares 
to my executors, in trust, to pay the income of the same, share and share alike, unto my 
daughters Ellen, Eliza, Martha, Emily and Mary Hollingshead, for their separate use, 
without any liability to any debts or engagements of any husbands they may have, for 
life. And upon their decease their share or shares shall be paid over to their child or 
children or next of kin, on their arrival at lawful age in exclusion, both as respects 
principal and income, of all claims by any husbands my said daughters may have. 



142 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Should I make any advances towards an outfit in life or business of any of my children, 
the same shall be taken as part of his or their share of my estate and be charged 
accordingly. 

(Provides for any possible change in trusteeship, through death or otherwise.) 
Executors " my friends Wm. Piatt and his son Clayton T. Piatt and my son Joseph 
M. Hollingshead." 

381— CHARLES FRENCH MATLACK, M.D. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Eleanor, 144). 

b. 11th mo. 1st, 1798, near Moorestown, N. J. 

d. 8th mo. 1st, 1874, Shoemaker's Lane, German- 
town, Philadelphia ; buried in ( lermantown 
Monthly Meeting Burying Ground (Coulter 
Street). 

m. 6th mo. 16th, 1834, in North Meeting, Phila- 
delphia, Sarah Ann Maule, daughter of Israel 
and Ann (Garrigues) Maule. 
She b. 7th mo. 24th, 1811. 

d. 5th mo. 23rd, 1881. 

819— ANNA MATLACK b. 3rd mo. 15th. 1S35. 

m. bth mo. 30th. 1856, William Trost Richards. 

820— JOSEPH MATLACK b. 6th mo. 23rd, 1836. 

d. 11th mo. 17th. 1843. 

821— CHARLES MATLACK b. 7th mo. 30th, 1838. 

d. 3rd mo. 16th, 1843. 

822— ELEANOR MATLACK b. 12th mo. 25ih. 1840. 

d. 5th mo. 10th, 1896, in New York City, un- 
married. 

823— HANNAH MAI II. MATLACK 

b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1844. 

m. March 10th, 1870, John Taylor Roberts. 

823a— JOSEPH MATLACK b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1846. 

m. October 15th, 1870, Anna P. Dreher. 

823b— CHARLES MATLACK b. 4th mo. 7th, 1840. 

m. Sth mo. 21st, 1895, Mary Fletcher Stevens. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 143 

CHARLES FRENCH MATLACK, M.D. 

Charles French Matlack, M.D., son of Joseph and Eleanor (French) Hol- 
lingshead Matlack, being of a studious and scientific turn of mind, decided, 
upon attaining manhood, to leave the home farm in Chester township, Bur- 
lington county, N. J., and take up his residence in Philadelphia. Here he 
entered the drug store of Charles Marshall, with whom he studied pharmacy, 
and then took a course in the medical department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, under the personal guidance of Dr. Joseph Parish. He graduated 
in 1820, and secured appointment as resident physician at the Friends' Asylum 
for the Insane, Frankford. Later he located as a practicing physician on 
North Second street, near Arch street, and afterwards on Arch street near 
Fourth street. He was one of the volunteer staff of the historic Philadelphia 
Dispensary for six years. During the epidemic of 1832 he rendered heroic 
and efficient service at the Cholera Hospital. At this time his attention was 
earnestly given to the new German theory of Homoeopathy. He mastered 
the German language and studied the works of Hahnemann, the founder, in 
the original. He entered upon this practice in 1833 and soon became known 
as one of its ablest and most efficient disciples. He wrote much in its behalf, 
translating a number of German publications. For a time he was the only 
native American in Pennsylvania representing this school of medicine among 
practitioners. He declined a professorship in the Homoeopathic Medical 
College of Pennsylvania, founded in Philadelphia in the fall of 1848 — the 
predecessor of Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital. He was such an 
enthusiastic student and so devoted to his professional work that his health 
broke down in 1849 and for two years he was compelled to rest. He then 
removed to a healthful location on Shoemaker's Lane, Germantown, where he 
resumed practice and continued the same until his death, at the ripe age of 
three score, ten and five. Throughout his long and honorable career, Dr. 
Matlack was known and highly esteemed for his conscientious devotion to 
what he believed to be the truth, in science and religion. He was a respected 
member of the Society of Friends and took an active and zealous interest in 
its affairs. 

Eleanor (French) Hollingshead Matlack [144] by will dated 11th month 
10th, 1845, proved July 24th, 1850, bequeathed to her "son Charles F. Mat- 
lack Two acres and two roods of my lot of land whereon I now dwell [Chester 
township, Burlington Co., N. J.], with all the buildings and improvements 
appertaining thereto, to be run off on the easterly side of my said lot of land, 



144 GENEALOGV OF THE 

to him, his heirs and assigns forever. Nevertheless he is not to have posses- 
sion thereof until after the decease of my beloved Husband." Executors, 
Charles F. Matlack and David Roberts. Eleanor (French) Hollingshead and 
Joseph Matlack were married 12th mo. 13th, 1796, and lived near Moores- 
t(i\vn, N. J. Joseph Matlack died about 1857. lie was the son of Thomas 
Matlack, born 1744. who was the son of George, born 1717, the son of George, 
son of William Matlack, who was born in Nottinghamshire, England, in 1648, 
and came to Burlington, N. J., in the Kent, in 1677, becoming a large land 
holder. His son Timothy was the father of Colonel Timothy Matlack, a 
notable figure in the Revolution, member of the Pennsylvania Committee of 
Safety and one of the organizers of the Society of Free Quakers. 

Israel Maule, father of Sarah Ann (Maule) Matlack, was born in Radnor 
township, Pa., 12th mo. 28th. 1778, and died 11th mo. 25th, 1828, married 
5th mo. 5th, 1801, in North Meeting, Philadelphia, Ann Garrigues. He was 
the son of Daniel, son of Thomas, son of John, son of Thomas Maule, who 
left England for the Barbadoes about 1655, when he was twelve years of age. 
Some years later he went to Salem. Mass., becoming a merchant and an active 
member of the Society of Friends. He engaged in a zealous controversy with 
Cotton Mather, publishing several works, one of which, " Truth Maintained," 
wa^ burned by his Puritan enemies. In " New England Persecutors" he gave 
an account of the cruel treatment of Quakers. He was five times imprisoned, 
three times fined and three times whipped through the streets of Salem, at 
the cart's tail. His son John removed to Philadelphia in 1700. 

382— ANN BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 145). 

b. 8th mo. 12th, 1780. 
d. 8th mo. 24th, 1863. 

m. 6th mo. 12th, 1816, John Bishop, son of Robert 
and Jane Bishop. 
He b. 6th mo. 17th, 17 78, near Lumberton. N. J. 
d. 12th mo. 2nd, 1863. 

824— MARY BISHOP b. 8th mo. 15th, ISIS. 

m. Mahlon Kirkbride. 

825— JOHN BISHOP, JK. b. 3rd mo. 16th, 1820. 

m. First, 2nd mo. 5th, 1845, Rebecca F. Biddle. 
m. Second, 9th mo. 9th, 1896. Mary J. Bowen. 

826— REBECCA \V. BISHOP b. 5th mo. 10th, 1822. 

d. 4th mo. 18th, 1873, unmarried. 



) 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 145 

384— SAMUEL BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 145). 

b. 10th mo. 22nd, 1786, in Mansfield township, 
Burlington county, N. J. 

d. 9th mo. 14th, 1865, buried in Mansfield Meet- 
ing Burying Ground. 

m. 10th mo. 17th, 1816, Charlotte Biddle, daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Charlotte (Butler) Biddle. 
She b. 7th mo. 27th, 1798, at "Mount Hope," near 
Kinkora, Burlington Co., N. J. 

d. 5th mo. 5th, 1865, buried in Mansfield Meeting 
Burying Ground. 

827— MARY BLACK b. 8th mo. 31st, 1817. 

m. July 3rd, 1839, Joseph S. Read. 

828— THOMAS BIDDLE BLACK 

b. 2nd mo. 3rd, 1820. 
m. November 22nd, 1842, Anna Maria Buck. 

829— CHARLOTTE BIDDLE BLACK 

b. 3rd mo. 20th, 1822. 
m. 2nd mo. 9th, 1843, William Imlay Black. 

830— ABIGAIL ANN BLACK b. 7th mo. 15th, 1824. 

d. 1891, unmarried. 

831— EMELINE BLACK b. 8th mo. 14th, 1826. 

m. Edward M. Rulon. 

832— REBECCA WILLS BLACK 

b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1831. 
m. December 12th, 1849, William Imlay Black. 

833— ELIZABETH BIDDLE BLACK 

b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1833. 
m. First, March 4th, 1851, Dr. Edward A. 

Heintzelman. 
m. Second, February 2nd, 1854, Charles Ellis 

Folwell. 

10 



146 GENEALOGY OF THE 

JUDGE SAMUEL BLACK 

Samuel Black, born in the old homestead, Mansfield township, Burlington 
county, N. J., was fourth in line of descent from William and Alice (Taylor) 
k, pioneer immigrants who settled in Burlington in 1677; also fourth 
in line of descent from the pioneer Thomas ffrench and wife Jane Atkins. 
He was the third child and second son of William and Hope (French) Black, 
who were married 1st mo. 20th, 1780. Concerning this event, John Hunt 
made the following interesting note in his diary: 

"20 of y" 1" mo 1780 wee went to our Meeting W. Black & Hope 
Krinch was Married my wife & I being appointed were obliged to attend 
the Marriage a Light airy Company & a poor Difagreeable time it was to 
me & as Cold a Day I thot as I ever Seen & She in the thineft Drefs." 

Samuel Black became a noted citizen in his community, and throughout a 
long life held the highest respect of a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. 
In politics he was a strong Whig and Republican, holding many offices of 
trust and confidence, lie was Justice of the Peace, director of the Board 
of Chosen Freeholders, member of the New Jersey Assembly during the ses- 
sions of 1828, 1830 and 1831 ; and in 1840 was appointed lay Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas for Burlington county. His public duties were dis- 
charged with great intelligence, independence and zeal. He took a far- 
sighted view of projects of public improvement, believing these would greatly 
promote the prosperity of all classes of people. On the bench he was always 
courteous and impartial, and later in life often acted as arbiter between 
parties who sought his wise counsel. While a member of the New Jersey 
Assembly, Mr. Black strongly advocated the passing of the charter for the 
old Camden & Amboy R. R. notwithstanding the active opposition of his 
numerous friends and neighbors who were opposed to granting right of way 
through their farm lands. But realizing the great benefit which would 
ultimately result to the farmers and property holders through whose lands it 
was proposed to build the road, he cast his vote, the deciding one, for the 
charter. He died intestate, in 1865, and his estate was administered by his 
youngest brother, George Black. An inventory taken September 30th, 1865, 
Clayton Hancock and Augustus M. Wills appraisers, showed personal 
property to the value of $6,557. 

The wife of Judge Samuel Black. Charlotte (Biddle) Black, descended 
from old V vi Jersey and Pennsylvania families. She was a woman of supe- 









1786 



JUDOE SAMUEL BLACK 



1865 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 147 

rior qualities of mind and heart, and was greatly beloved. At the time of 
her death, one who had known her for many years, wrote of her as follows: 

"During her long illness she was a most patient sufferer; and although 
so excessively afflicted, she did not murmer. When one so benevolent, pure, 
kind and virtuous departs we feel it a duty to allude to her almost faultless 
character, that others may, if only in a slight degree, imitate her. She 
never had an enemy and never acted unfriendly; never spoke harshly 
to any one. When others were violent, in her mild voice she would soften 
their asperities. Although a member of no church, she lived and died a 
christian in faith, profession and practice. Her soul rests in peace. Her 
loss to those nearest to her is most sorely felt ; and in this their severest 
affliction we most heartily condole with them. That her merciful and for- 
giving disposition may be more generally practiced by others, is our fervent 
wish." 

385— NATHAN WRIGHT BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145). 

b. 10th mo. 21st, 1790, near Columbus, N. J. 

d. 3rd mo. 9th, 1880, in Columbus, N. J.; buried 

in Mansfield Meeting Burying Ground, 
m. 1st mo. 31st, 1828, Sarah Ellis, daughter of 

Amos and Mary (Haines) Ellis. 
She b. 6th mo. 4th, 1802. 
d. 9th mo. 10th, 1867. 

834— ANN BISHOP BLACK b. 10th mo. 4th, 1830. 

835— WILLIAM BLACK b. 9th mo. 27th, 1831. 

d. 11th mo. 30th, 1870, unmarried. 

836— JOSEPH FRENCH BLACK b. 4th mo. 11th, 1834. 

m. April ISth, 1865, Mary Elliott Simpson. 

837— MARY ELLIS BLACK b. 9th mo. 27th, 1836. 

m. 11th mo. 17th, 1858, William G. Wagoner. 

838— NATHAN BLACK b. 1st mo. 15th, 1839. 

Nathan Wright Black, fourth child and third son of William and Hope (French) 
Black, lived for eighty-six years in the farm homestead which was the scene of his birth. 
He was a successful farmer and man of high character and ability, widely known and 
greatly esteemed. He always declined to fill any public office, preferring a life of retire- 
ment. A few years before his death he removed to Columbus, N. J., where he had pur- 
chased a comfortable old-fashioned home for himself, daughter Ann and son Nathan. 
The accompanying picture was taken in his ninetieth year. 



148 GENEALOGY OF THE 



386— REBECCA WRIGHT BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145). 

b. 8th mo. 23rd, 1792. 
d. 1st mo. 16th, 1879. 

m. 12th mo. 17th, 1818, Moses Wills, Jr. [367], 
son of Moses and Elizabeth (French) Wills. 
He b. 12th mo. 17th, 1792. 
d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1873. 

839— WILLIAM BLACK WILLS 

b. 10th mo. 10th. 1819. 
d. 7th mo. 20th, 1820. 

840— CHARLES WILLS b. 10th mo. 6th, 1821. 

m. First, 5th mo. 5th, 1846, Mary Gray Blaclt. 
m. Second, 1873, Henrietta B. (McLaughlin) 
Wolcott. 

841— WILLIAM BLACK WILLS, 2ND 

b. 11th mo. 14th, 1823. 
d. 10th mo. 24th, 1831. 

842— AUGUSTUS MOSES WILLS 

b. 5th mo. 27th, 1826. 

d. 11th mo. 25th, 1887, unmarried. 

843— EDWARD WILLS b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1828. 

m. 9th mo. 14th, 1858, Elizabeth French 
[791] daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Stokes) French. 

844— CEORGE BLACK WILLS b. 2nd mo. 28th. 1831. 

m. First, 5th mo. 7th, 1861, Charlotte Biddle. 
m. Second, 10th mo. 16th, 1877, Sarah E. 
Biddle. 

845— ELIZABETH FRENCH WILLS 

b. 10th mo. 17th, 1833. 

m. 3rd mo. 6th, 1856, Richard Henry Page, 
M.D. 




1790 



NATHAN WKIintT BLACK 



1SVII 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



149 



387— WILLIAM BLACK, 4TH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145). 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1795. 
d. 5th mo. 4th, 1879. 

m. First, 4th mo. 12th, 1820, Ann Taylor New- 
bold, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Taylor) 
Newbold. 
She b. 11th mo. 17th, 1799. 
d. 11th mo. 22nd, 1858. 

m. Second, Mary (Newbold) Adams, widow, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary (Taylor) New- 
bold. 
She b. 1811. 
d. 1885. 

846— THOMAS NEWBOLD BLACK 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1821. 

m. 1st mo. 16th, 1845, Martha Field Biddle. 

847— MARY TAYLOR BLACK b. 4th mo. 4th, 1823. 

d. 10th mo. 27th, 1902. 

m. 4th mo. 6th, 1857, Judge John Clement, of 
Haddonfield, N. J., son of John and 
Hannah (Chew) Clement. (No issue.) 
He b. 11th mo. 8th, 1818. 
d. 8th mo. 15th, 1894. 

848— CHARLES FRENCH BLACK 

b. 6th mo. 21st, 1825. 
d. 2nd mo. 9th, 1826. 



S49— WILLIAM HENRY BLACK 



b. 1st mo. 4th, 1827. 

d. 2nd mo. 8th, 1878, in Mount Holly, N. J., 
unmarried. 



S50— FRANKLIN BLACK 



b. 4th mo. 4th, 1829. 
m. 9th mo. 5th, 1855, Mary Tallman Biddle. 



851— EDWIN BLACK 



b. 10th mo. 26th, 1831. 
m. March 8th, 1860, Euphemia Newbold. 



150 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



852— SARAH ANN BLACK 



853— CAROL I MO HI At K 



b. 11th mo. 19th, 1833. 

m. 5th mo. 23rd, 1867, John B. Atkinson. 

b. 2nd mo. 6th. 1836. 
d. 12th mo. 11th, 1S37. 



854— EMILY NEWBOLD BLACK 

b. 12th mo. 21st, 1842. 
d. 12th mo. 2nd. 1850. 

William Black served in the New Jersey State Legislature as Assemblyman from 
Burlington county from 1839 to 1S41. 

Judge John Clement, born in Haddonfield, N. J., was early trained to the business oi 
surveying, under the direction of his father, and followed that calling for upwards of 
forty years. In 1851 he became a member of the New Jersey Council of Proprietors and 
in 1885 was chosen president of that historic body. In 1854 he was appointed associate 
lay Judge for Camden county and served two terms. In 1864 he was appointed, by 
Governor Parker, one of the lay Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals, the court 
of last resort in New Jersey. He also served on several important state commissions, 
and from its organization, in 1864, was an active member of the Surveyors' Association 
of New Jersey. Judge Clement was a life-long student of local history and in his 
researches collected a great amount of information concerning the early settlers of Camden 
and adjoining counties, which he presented in his various writings upon the subject. 
His life was a busy and useful one in his day and generation. 

388— CHARLES BLACK (Thomas, 1: Charles, 8; Charles. 4.': Hope, 

145). 
b. 3rd mo. 8th, 1 799. 
d. 7th mo. 10th. 1879 
m. Mary Vail. 
855— JAMES HENRY BLACK d. young. 



389— GEORGE BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42: Hope. 145). 

b. 1st mo. 15th, 1802. 

d. 7th mo. 22nd, 1872. in Columbus, N. J. 
m. 9th mo. 22nd, 1838, Hannah M. Atkinson, 
daughter of Clayton G. and Hannah (Scott) 
Atkinson. 
She b. Huh mo. -'2nd. 1820. 
d. 4th mo. 29th, L88S 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 151 

856— CLAYTON ATKINSON BLACK 

b. 9th mo. 27th, 1839. 
m. November 16th, 1S50, Caroline Ellis. 

857— ANNA BLACK b. 7th mo. 19th, 1845. 

d. 5th mo. 9th, 1850. 



JUDGE GEORGE BLACK 

George Black, eighth child and sixth son of William and Hope (French) 
Black, was born on the homestead farm of his parents in Mansfield township, 
Burlington county. N. J. He remained with his father on the farm until he 
attained his twenty-third year, when in connection with his brother-in-law, 
Moses Wills, Jr. [367], he embarked in the mercantile business at Columbus, 
Burlington Co. The venture proved successful, and the partners purchased 
largely of real estate, from which they realized considerable advances. Mr. 
Black was a man of great mental and physical activity, and was one of the 
most prominent and public-spirited men of his time. He transacted a large 
amount of public business and was held in general respect and esteem. He 
was collector of Mansfield township for over twenty years, and chosen free- 
holder for nearly the same length of time. He was known widely throughout 
the county and state. He was elected to represent Burlington county in the 
State Legislature at the session of 1833. He was appointed to the office of 
state prison inspector, and subsequently was chosen by the Legislature one of 
the state directors of the Camden and Amboy Railroad Company. His name 
was also frequently spoken of for governor. On March 11th, 1868, he was 
appointed one of the judges of the Court of Common Pleas of Burlington 
county. He was also a member of the Board of Directors of the Mount Holly 
National Bank, president of the Columbus, Kinkora and Springfield Railroad 
Company, of which he was one of the projectors, and a director of the Mercer 
County Mutual Fire Insurance Co., of Pennington, N. J. At his death an 
inventory of his estate, taken July 29th, 1872, showed an appraisement of 
$20,571, Moses Wills and John Bishop appraisers. The estate was ad- 
ministered by his son, Clayton A. Black. 



152 GENEALOGY OF THE 

393— CHARLES CREIGHTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Uriah, 43; Charles, 147). 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1784, in Philadelphia. 

d. 1824, in Waynesville, Wayne township, War- 
ren Co., Ohio. 

m. 12th mo. 5th, 1809, in Northern District 
Monthly Meeting, Philadelphia, Mercy (Gil- 
pin) Chapman, widow of Benjamin Chapman, 
and daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Grey) 
Gilpin. 
She b. 11th mo. 11th, 1780. 

d. 11th mo. 13th, 1845, in Springboro, Warren 
Co., Ohio. 

858— REBECCA FRENCH b. 10th mo. 10th, 1810. 

d. 10th mo. 28th, 1815. 

859— JAMES S. FRENCH b. Sth mo. 14th, 1812. 

m. May 16th, 1839, Sarah King. 

860— CHARLES FRENCH b. Sth mo. 2nd, 1814. 

d. 11th mo. 1st, 1815. 

S61— WILLIAM B. FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 11th, 1818. 

m. 10th mo. 16th, 1845, Lydia Lovegrove 
Wilson. 

862— LYDIA ANN FRENCH b. 4th mo. 7th, 1821. 

m. 5th mo. 29th, 1840, Perry Lukens, Jr. 

CHARLES CREIGHTON FRENCH 

Inclined to mercantile life, Charles Creighton French, son of Charles and 
Rebecca (Taylor) French, after thorough training in the wholesale grocery 
and importing house of his father, about 1806, entered into business for him- 
self, in the same line of trade, locating in the same neighborhood, 48 North 
Front Street, Philadelphia. For a time he was in partnership with Nathan 
Dunn and later with Joshua Harker. Soon after his marriage, in 1809, he 
bought, March 3rd, 1810, of Jacob Roset, a fine three-story brick residence on 
Mulberry (Arch) street, a few doors east of Seventh street, paying therefor 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 153 

$6,500 (see accompanying illustration). He was at this time a member of 
Friends' Meeting for the Northern District, Key's Alley ; and in accordance 
with prevailing rules, upon changing his residence, he brought a certificate 
to Arch Street Meeting, as appears from the following extract from the min- 
utes of that meeting, 3rd mo. 27th, 1812: "A Minute from the Northern Dis- 
trict for Charles C. French, and Mercy his wife and their Children Rebecca 
and James French, also her daughter Sarah Chapman a minor, and one for 
William Black, Apprentice to Charles C. French." 

Apparently desiring to extend his business operations, the young merchant, 
August 17th, 1816, sold for $10,000 his Arch street residence, with a house 
and lot on Seventh street, which he had bought in 1811, to Hugh F. Hollings- 
head [380], merchant of Philadelphia. About this time there was consid- 
erable embarrassment amongst Philadelphia business men and the affairs of 
Charles Creighton French were the subject of a sympathetic inquiry upon 
the part of a committee of Friends of Arch Street Meeting. The report sub- 
mitted, 2nd month, 1817, showed that he had in no wise departed from 
accepted business methods or the discipline of the Society. Upon taking 
up his residence at 343 North 3rd street, within the limits of the Northern 
District Meeting, he again attended that meeting and received a certificate 
thereto, from the Arch Street Meeting, dated 6th mo. 27th, 1817, for himself, 
Mercy G., his wife, and their son James, and Joseph and Sarah Chapman, 
minor children of Mercy. He rendered valuable services in the settlement 
of several estates, and about 1820 retired from mercantile life in Philadel- 
phia and removed with his family to Waynesville, Warren Co., Ohio. He 
died in Warren county, Ohio, in 1824, intestate, his estate being admin- 
istered by his widow, Mercy G. French, under the direction of the Probate 
Court. An inventory of personal property showed a valuation of $889.26. 

In the accompanying illustration, showing the lines of stores and ware- 
houses a century ago, on Water street and what is now Delaware avenue, Phila- 
delphia, the site of the business place of Charles French [147], father of 
Charles Creighton French, is represented by the store of Samuel Crawford, 
his former partner and successor. 

Mercy (Gilpin) Chapman French was the daughter of Thomas and Sarah 
(Grey) Gilpin. Thomas Gilpin, born in 1749, died 1802, married August 
29th, 1777, Sarah Grey; Rev. Dr. William White, of Christ Church, Phila- 
delphia, officiating. Thomas was the son of Joseph, Jr., and Mary (Caldwell) 
Gilpin, who were married in 1729, and lived for a number of years in Bir- 



154 GENEALOGY OF THE 



mingham township, Chester county, Pennsylvania, later removing to the neigh- 
borhood of Wilmington, New Castle county, Delaware. Joseph Gilpin. Jr.. 
born 1 70.3-4, died 1 792, was the son of Joseph of Dorchester, Oxfordshire, 
England, and Hannah (Glover) Gilpin, who were married 1691-2. Joseph 
Gilpin, born 1663, son of Thomas and Joan (Bartholomew) Gilpin, like his 
father, was a minister of the Society of Friends, and in 1695 with his wife and 
two children tame to America and settled in Chester county. His home in 
Birmingham township was the center of interest among Friends in that sec- 
tion, meetings being frequently held there; and its hospitality was always 
cordially extended to newly arrived emigrants. Joseph Gilpin died in 1739 
and his widow, Hannah (Glover) Gilpin. 1757. In 174u Thomas Chalkley 
made tin- following note in his Journal: 

" Lodged at the widow Gilpin's, whose husband, Joseph Gilpin, was lately 
deceased; there was true Christian Love and Friendship between us for 
above fifty years. When first I saw Joseph in Pennsylvania, he lived in a 
Cave in the Karth, where we enjoyed each other's Company in the Love and 
I ar of God. This Friend had fifteen Children, who he lived to see brought 
up to the States of Men and Women, and all but two married well and to 
his Mind." 

Joseph Gilpin was a descendant of an ancient and honored English family, 
and founder of a family that for two centuries has been conspicuous and influ- 
ential in religious and public affairs in this country. His father. Thomas 
Gilpin, was a Puritan soldier, under Cromwell, but later joined the Society 
of Friends, and for his zeal therein suffered much persecution. His an- 
cestors were famous men as far back as the reign of King Tohn, in the 
thirteenth century. In 1206 the Baron of Kendal granted the estate of 
Kentmere in the county of Westmoreland to Richard de Gylpyn — the original 
way of spelling the name — in recognition, it is said, of Richard's prowess in 
killing a wild boar which had caused great destruction in that locality. This 
ancient seat was lost to the family at the time of the overthrow of Charles I. 
and never restored. For six generations the de Gylpyn family figured notably 
in early English history. 

Mercy Gilpin and Benjamin Chapman were married in 17'»7. He was 
born ''tli mo. 27th. 1775. and died 10th mo. 23rd, 1802. of yellow fever, con- 
tracted while nursing an apprentice. They had three children, Joseph B., 
born 1 798 J Sarah, born 1S00; Benjamin, Jr., born and died 1802. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 157 

FRIENDS' MEETINGS IN PHILADELPHIA 

The first Friends' meetings in Pennsylvania were held at Chester, in 1675, 
and at Falls, Bucks county, about 1681, with a meeting for worship in a 
private house at Shackamaxon, now Kensington, Philadelphia. The year 
following the arrival of William Penn and his company, in 1682, a meeting 
was set up on the river front, at the center of the new settlement. The first 
house of worship was known as the Bank Meeting. It was located on 
Front street, a short distance above Arch, or Mulberry, as it was then 
known. As population extended westward it was determined to build a 
meeting house at the center square, where the City Hall now stands. This 
was occupied in 1689. It was soon apparent that this location was too far 
westward from the general residence section, so there was a return to Front 
street, a second Bank Meeting being erected on the site of the first, larger 
and more convenient. This was about 1700. 

The growth of the society, meanwhile, had been rapid and in order to 
meet its requirements another and still larger place of worship was erected, 
at the southwest corner of Market and Second streets. This was known as 
the Great Meeting House. It was completed in the autumn of 1696 and 
it was under the care of this meeting that the second marriage of Thomas 
ffrench, the progenitor, took place, on 7th mo. 25th, 1696, when he was 
united to Elizabeth Stanton, a member of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting. 
Another enlargement, on the same site, took place 1756, this being known as 
the Greater Meeting House, which served until the erection, largely out of the 
same material, of the meeting house on Twelfth street below Market, 1812. 

In order to provide larger accommodation for yearly meetings and other 
needful purposes, it was decided early in the nineteenth century to build a 
meeting house at Arch and Fourth streets, which is one of the largest of the 
kind in the world, the combined capacity of the two wings being fully 2,200 
persons. The center and the east wing were completed in 1805 and the west 
wing in 1811. Until 1772 there was but one Monthly Meeting in Phila- 
delphia. The Yearly Meeting has met continuously in the Arch street Meet- 
ing House since 1760, before that period alternating with Burlington, New 
Jersey. The ground for this meeting house was given by William Penn, upon 
the occasion of his second visit to America, in 1701. It was originally used 
as a graveyard, many persons other than Friends being buried there, espe- 
cially during the yellow fever visitation of 1793, and it has been estimated 
that upwards of fifteen thousand rest therein. 



158 GENEALOGY OF THE 

In 1753 Pine street Meeting House was erected and this was used until 
the building of Orange street meeting, now Washington Square, in 1832. 
The second Bank Meeting was removed in 1790, and the Northern District 
Meeting erected in Key's Alley, near Second and Vine streets. This was 
succeeded, in 1838, by the Sixth and Noble streets Meeting. The Fourth 
street Meeting, below Chestnut street, was built in 1763, and removed in 
1859. Oreen street Meeting was built in 1813-14. Very early meetings 
were established at Byberry, Oxford, Frankford and Germantown. 

When Arch street Meeting was instituted that part of the city was the 
center of the Quaker colony and on meeting days the popular and beautiful 
thoroughfare presented an attractive sight, as multitudes of Friends wended 
their way to worship. The distinctive costumes of the society were almost 
universally adhered to and contemporary writers dwell with manifest pleasure 
upon the lively scenes of the time. The winsome beauty of the Quaker 
maidens, the manly character of the young men, the wonderfully sweet 
countenances of the elder women, the calm dignity of their companions, the 
abiding spirit of peace and content combined to make an impression upon the 
spectator that was inspiring and lasting. The effect was that of a semi- 
weekly benediction upon the whole community. In 1912 there are seven 
places of worship for Orthodox Friends in Philadelphia, and seven for the 
other branch of the Society. 

FRIENDS' ADVICE AND CAUTION 

From the monthly meeting of Friends, in Philadelphia, the 23d of the 

9th month, 1768, 
To our Friends and Brethren in religious profession with us. 

Dear Friends, A deep exercise and fervent concern, being impressed on 
our minds, for the preservation and welfare of the members of our re- 
ligious Society, and especially the youth under our care, we affectionately 
exhort and advise all who make profession of being led and guided by 
the dictates of the divine principle of Light and Truth, to commemorate 
with reverence and thankfulness, the manifold mercies and blessings which, 
by the bounty of the Lord our God, are continued to us ; and by integrity, 
sobriety, and circumspection of life and conversation, to manifest that we 
are sincerely desirous of walking answerable to so great favours. 

We are engaged the more immediately to excite these considerations at 
this time, from an apprehension that the minds of the unwatchful, will be 
in danger of being captivated by the ensnaring diversions of the horse races 
and stage plays, which are intended to be again exhibited in and near this 






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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 159 

city. We earnestly entreat and beseech you would seriously consider the 
danger and destructive tendency, of countenancing or encouraging these 
profane amusements, by attending, or being spectators of them ; as they 
evidently tend to introduce idleness, licentiousness, and intemperance, and 
are directly opposite to the precepts and example of our Lord Jesus Christ, 
and to the testimony and practice of his disciples and followers in every age. 

We therefore fervently desire that all Friends, to whom the important 
care of the youth is intrusted, would, by admonition and persuasion, en- 
deavour to convince them of the hurtful consequences of being deluded by 
these ensnaring temptations, and where this labour fails of success, that they 
would discharge their duty faithfully, by proper restraints. 

And, dearly beloved youth, considering how many are drawn aside into 
vanity and folly, from the holy visitation of Divine Love, which you have 
at times been sensibly affected with, we entreat and beseech you to avoid 
these temptations; suffer the sincere and ardent desires of your elder 
brethren for your present and eternal welfare, to have a place in your minds. 

Let a due consideration of the uncertainty of the time allotted you, excite 
you to devote it to the honour of God. Attend to the restraints of divine 
grace, and thus you will be preserved from the evils of the world, become 
serviceable in your several stations, and obtain true peace here, and a well- 
grounded hope of everlasting happiness hereafter. 

Signed in, and on behalf of our said meeting, by 

John Pemberton, Clerk at this time. 

At a Monthly Meeting of Worn. Frd" held at Haddonfield the 12'" of 12"' 

M°. 1791 

A Minute from the last yearly Meeting of Women fr'ds held in Philad". 
was now read, wherein it is recommended that Young People who are 
placed out in fr'ds Families should at the expiration of their Apprentice- 
ship, not only be suitably Cloath* 1 . but that they should be furnished with a 
Bible for their reading, having been properly instructed during their 
fervice to fit them therefor. 

407— JOSEPH BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11 j Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154). 
b. 1st mo. 14th, 1771. 

m. First, 4th mo. 16th, 1794, in Ancocas, N. J., 
Beulah Woolman, daughter of Asher and Rachel 
(Norcross) Woolman, of Northampton town- 
ship, Burlington Co., N. J. 
m. Second, Rebecca (White) Miller. 

863— ASHER BUZBY b. 1st mo. 20th, 1795. 

m. 4th mo. 14th, 1819, Ruth Wright. 



160 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



864— SAMUEL BUZ BY 



b. 9th mo. 2nd, 1796. 
m. 1827 Maria Tatum. 



86S— PATIENCE WOOLMAN BUZBY 

b. 7th mo. 20th, 1798. 



865a— ANN BUZBY 
866— RACHEL BUZBY 

867— AMOS BUZBY 

867a— JOSEPH BUZBY 



m. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1820, Mark Sheppard. 

died in infancy. 

b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1801. 

m. 1st mo. 7th, 1819, Empson Haines. 

b. 10th mo. 24th, 1802. 

m. 2nd mo. 19th, 1829, Sarah Ann Miller. 

m. Mary Heaton. 



867b— WILLIAM NORCROSS BUZBY 

m. 4th mo. 3rd, 1834, Caroline Gibbons. 



408— NICHOLAS BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; 

Amos Buzby, 154). 
b. 11th mo. 16th, 1773. 
d. 7th mo. 6th, 1865. 
m. 1798, Hannah Heaton. 
She d. 7th mo. 28th, 1860. 



868— RACHEL NY. BUZBY 



869— REBECCA BUZBY 



870— MARY BUZBY 



871— NICHOLAS BUZBY 



872— PAUL W. BUZBY 



b. 5th mo. 8th. 1799. 

d. 12th mo. 20th, 1870. 

m. 5th mo. 14th, 1834, Abel Buzby [427], 

son of William and Susannah (Deacon) 

Buzby. 

b. 9th mo. 27th, 1801. 

m. 2nd mo. 11th, 1829, John B. Wills, son of 
Joseph and Yirgin (Powell) Wills. 

b. 9th mo. 25th, 1803. 
m. Nathan Crane. 

b. 10th mo. 23rd, 1805. 
d. 7th mo. 12th, 1817. 

b. 2nd mo. 1st, 1808. 
d. 9th mo. 21st, 1830. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 161 

873— SARAH BUZBY b. 1st mo. 19th, 1810. 

m. First, Silas Warner, 
m. Second, John Borton. 

874— RUTH ANNA BUZBY b. 5th mo. 3rd, 1813. 

m. Philip Coate. 

875— PATIENCE BUZBY b. 3rd mo. 31st, 1816. 

d. 1st mo. 16th, 1868. 

m. 1836, Charles F. Woolman [781], son of 
Samuel and Rebecca (Wills) Woolman. 

876— AMOS BUZBY b. 9th mo. 30th, 1819. 

m. 11th mo. 20th, 1851, Rebecca E. Leeds. 

409— MARGARET BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; 

Amos Buzby, 154). 

b. 10th mo. 26th, 1774. 

m. 11th mo. 5th, 1800, in Ancocas, N. J., Samuel 
Hilliard, Jr., son of Samuel and Hannah (At- 
kinson) Hilliard, of Northampton township, 
Burlington Co., N. J. 
He b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1776. 
d. 3rd mo. 31st, 1822. 

877— RACHEL HILLIARD m. Charles Stevenson. 

878— MARTHA HILLIARD m. Josiah Bond. 

879— CHARLOTTE HILLIARD m. Thomas Bond. 

880— HANNAH HILLIARD d. unmarried. 

881— REUBEN HILLIARD m. Lydia Tyler. 

882— BENJAMIN HILLIARD d. young. 

883— SAMUEL HILLIARD m. Annie Sharp. 

884— MARGARET HILLIARD m. Edwin M. Mulford. 

885— JOB HILLIARD m. Catharine Elwell. 

886— KEZIAH HILLIARD d. unmarried. 

11 



162 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



410— HUDSON BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, SO; 

Amos Buzby, 154). 

b. 2nd mo. 1st, 1777. 

d. 3rd mo., 1864. 

m. 11th mo. 12th, 1800, Rachel Woolman, daugh- 
ter of Asher and Rachel (Norcross) Woolman, 
of Northampton township, Burlington Co., 
N.J. 
She b. 8th mo. 8th, 1782. 

(1. 11th mo. 30th, 1848. 



887— ANNE BUZBY 



b. 8th mo. 19th, 1801. 
d. 1st mo. 19th, 1804. 



888— EDITH BUZBY 



b. 7th mo. 8th, 1803. 
,1. 4th mo. 1871. 
m. 6th mo. 13th, 1866, Arthur Engle. 



889— ELIZABETH BUZBY 



b. 9th mo. 3rd, 1806. 
d. 9th mo. 10th, 1861. 
m. Joseph Deacon. 



890— MARY ANN BUZBY 



b. 1st mo. 3rd, 1808. 
<1. 4th mo. 5th, 1870. 

m. 5th mo. 11th, 1853, Allen R. Pharo, son 
of Robert and Anne Pharo. 



891— MARTHA BUZBY 



b. 4th mo. 27th, 1810. 
d. 1st mo. 25th, 1878. 

m. 11th mo. 8th, 1843, Thomas Taylor, Jr., 
son of Thomas and Martha Tavlor. 



892— EVAN BUZBY 



b. 10th mo. 15th, 1812. 
d. 1827. 



893— GRANVILLE W. BUZBY b. 1st mo. 1st, 1815. 

d. 2nd mo. 10th, 1865. 



894— RICHARD BUZBY 



b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1817. 
m. First, 1848, Miriam E. Middleton. 
m. Second, 11th mo. 17th, 1853, Mary Ann 

Taylor. 
m. Third, 12th mo. 19th, 1866, Deborah 

Borton. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



163 



895— NATHAN H. BUZBY 



b. 10th mo. 8th, 1819. 

d. March 13th, 1881 ; buried in Trinity P. E. 
churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 

m. February 5th, 1852, Adelle J. Doughton ; 
Rev. Samuel Randall of Trinity P. E. 
Church, Moorestown, performing ceremony. 
She b. December 29th, 1827. 

d. August 7th, 190h ; buried in Trinity Church- 
yard. 



896— REBECCA S. BUZBY 



b. 3rd mo. 9th, 1822. 

m. 3rd mo. 10th, 1841, Stokes Haines. 



897— HUDSON BUZBY, JR. 



b. 6th mo. 27th, 1824. 
d. 11th mo. 30th, 1864. 



898— SAMUEL W. BUZBY 



b. 8th mo. 12th, 1829. 
d. 3rd mo. 25th, 1906. 



Hudson Buzby [410] carried on the Ferry House and a farm at Long Beach for 
twelve years, and was esteemed for his geniality and hospitality. In March, 1843, he 
purchased the Governor Franklin property — part of the original homestead of Thomas 
ffrench, progenitor — where he resided until his death. His wife, Rachel Woolman, 
was a lineal descendant of John Woolman, the noted Friends' minister. In 1862, his 
son Richard [894] bought the Franklin Park farm. 



412— AMOS BUZBY 



JR. (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; 
Amos Buzby, 154). 

b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1781. 

d. 1868 ; will proved June 17th. 

m. 1806, Mary Watson Van Horn. 

She b. 1789. 

d. 1868. 



898a— BENJAMIN VAN HORN BUZBY 

b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1807. 
d. 10th mo. 2nd, 1889. 
m. Elizabeth Hillyard. 



898b— ELIAS S. BUZBY 



b. 9th mo. 20th, 1811. 
m. 4th mo. 1849, Susan Scattergood. 



164 GENEALOGY OF THE 



898c— REBECCA BUZBY b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1814. 

d. 1901. 
m. Charles Deacon. 

898d— MARY JANE BUZBY b. 1 1th mo. 1st, 1819. 

898e— PATIEN'CE BUZBY b. 10th mo. 18th, 1824. 

d. 3rd mo. 27th, 1889. 
m. Benjamin Mather. 

The family record of Amos Buzby, Jr. [412], as here given, was furnished by his 
daughter, Mary Jane Buzby [898d], 5th mo., 1911, in her 92nd year, and at that time 
in the enjoyment of excellent health. The death date of Amos Buzby, Jr. [412], as given 
on page 440, Vol. 1, of this work, is incorrect (although obtained from an apparently 
authentic source), as will be observed by the foregoing record. 

477b— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, S; William, 

27; William, 111 ; John T, 260). 

b. July, 1822, in Lamberton, N. J. 

d. March 3rd, 1852, in Philadelphia; buried in 

Odd Fellows' Cemetery, Philadelphia, 
m. January 7th, 1847, Sarah (Sutphin) Vleit, 

daughter of Christopher and Theodosia (Bye) 

Sutphin. 
She b. January 21st, 1821. 

d. May 27th, 1905, in Philadelphia; buried in 

Mount Peace Cemetery, Philadelphia. 

898f— ANASTASIA FRENCH b. February, 1848. 

d. April 24th, 1854. 

898g— ELLA ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. March 26th, 1850. 

m. September 20th, 1871, Captain Thomas H. 
Marston. 

898h— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH, 3RD 

b. February 16th, 1852. 
d. February 16th, 1853. 




1822 



JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH, JR. 



1852 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 165 

JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH, JR. 

As a young man of exceptional talent and worth, John Taylor French, Jr., 
son of John Taylor and Anastasia (Bye) French, early attracted the attention 
and won the high regard of a wide circle of friends. He learned the trade of 
stone engraver and this was his daily occupation. To the close confinement 
thereof was attributed the premature termination of a promising career. He 
manifested ability both as an artist and writer, many of his portraits and 
sketches receiving praise from competent critics. Before the days of photog- 
raphy he made clinical sketches for surgeons in Philadelphia hospitals. The 
accompanying portrait of himself is reproduced from his own sketch, made 
when he was nineteen years old. Likewise the picture of the old homestead 
at Lamberton, N. J., which appears on another page of this volume, was his 
quaint handiwork, being drawn in later years from boyhood memory. One 
of the literary papers to which he contributed was " Scott's Weekly," which, 
March 13th, 1852, referred to his untimely death as follows: 

" In recording the death of John T. French, one of our earliest, warmest, 
and best friends, we must be pardoned for expressing our remembrance 
of private worth, his warmth of heart, and his many noble social qualities. 
He was one of the few men in God's world whose friendship stood the test 
of years without change and whose memory will live sacred in our heart. 
In his profession, he was proficient, and many of the productions of his 
pencil are stamped with artistic excellence and merit of the first order. 
He was an enthusiast of art, and an ornament to the profession in which 
he spent his life — his very being. As a writer, he gained some distinction. 
His compositions were chaste, easy and graceful; fertile in feeling and rich 
in all that marks a poem with beauty. His devotion to his profession pre- 
cluded him from giving much of his time to the Muses, yet all of his pro- 
ductions were finished and exquisite." 

477c— ELIZABETH RICKEY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Wil- 
liam, 27; William, 111 ; John T., 260). 

b. April 7th, 1829, in Trenton, N. J. 

d. December 11th, 1909, in Philadelphia; buried 

in American Mechanics' Cemetery, 
m. George Byron Armbruster, M.D. 
He b. September 15th, 1824. 

d. June 14th, 1892, at his residence, 915 North 
Eleventh street, Philadelphia. 



166 GENEALOGY OF THE 

898i— GEORGE BYRON ARMBRUSTER, JR. 

b. 1850. 
cl. August 7th, 18S6. 

898j— ANASTASIA FRENCH ARMBRUSTER 

b. April 6th, 1851. 
m. May 23rd, 1877, Richard T. Phillips. 



478— MARIA ELVIRA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

William, 111 ; Mahlon K., 262). 

1>. July 4th, 1808. 
d. January 31st, 1847. 

m. May 2nd, 1830 (Sunday evening) in Philadel- 
phia, William Franklin Cooper. 
He b. November 27th, 1805. 
d. December 28th, 1890. 



898k— EMMALINE COOPER b. February 24th, 1831. 

m. Edmond B. Kershaw. 

8981— WILLIAM FRENCH COOPER 

b. May 2nd, 1834. 

d. January 4th, 1877, in Warsaw, Ind. 

m. 1875, Stella Moorehouse. 

898m— MARIA LOUISE COOPER 

b. August 27th, 1836 

m. May 5th, 1855, William G. Wynn. 

898n— JOSEPH BROWN COOPER 

b. October 22nd, 1838. 
d. April 5th, 1899. 
m. Mary Ellis, in Inwood, Indiana. 
She d. 1893. 



898o— ANN MARGARET COOPER 

b. August 24th, 1844. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 167 

479— WILLIAM WASHINGTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; 

William, 27; William, 111 ; Mahlon K., 262). 

b. January 14th, 1811. 
d. October 11th, 1897. 
m. August 24th, 1834, Ann Herbert Arey. 
She b. February 22nd, 1815. 
d. February 1st, 1864. 

898p— MARIA REEVES FRENCH 

b. May 16th, 1835. 

d. November 15th, 1872. 

898q— EMMA H. FRENCH b. December 1st, 1836. 

d. December 2nd, 1837. 

898r— ANNA S. FRENCH b. July 22nd, 1838. 

d. August 11th, 1876. 
m. George Reynolds. 

898s— RACHEL RICKEY FRENCH 

b. September 16th, 1840. 
d. September 5th, 1912, in Hammonton, N. J. 
m. September 12th, 1883, Rev. Benjamin T. 
Phillips. 

898t— AUGUSTINE HARVEY FRENCH 

b. May 5th, 1844. 
d. August 22nd, 1909. 
m. Virginia Maston. 

898u— SARAH JANE FRENCH b. January 14th, 1848. 

d. February 26th, 1902. 
m. 1873, Thomas Steel. 

898v— WILLIAM HERBERT FRENCH 

b. December 15th, 1849. 
m. Virginia Green. 

898w— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH 

b. March 3rd, 1851. 
m. December 7th, 1871, Virginia R. Alexander. 



168 GENEALOGY OF THE 

898x— GEORGE STAMBACH FRENCH 

b. December 5th, 1853. 
m. 1873, Emily Peterson. 

898y— ELIZABETH FRENCH b. October 17th, 1855. 

d. April 4th, 1875. 

898z— ELLA FRENCH b. November 29th, 1857. 

d. August 1st, 1882. 



481— SARAH JANE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

William, 111 ; Mahlon K., 262). 

b. June 12th, 1816. 

d. December 1st, 1884, at her residence, 1833 Wal- 
lace St., Philadelphia. 

m. June 4th, 1837, George Geist Stambach, son of 
Daniel and Ann Margaret (Geist) Stambach. 
He b. April 1st, 1812, in Northumberland Co., Pa. 

d. September 19th, 1876, at his residence, 702 N. 
19th St., Philadelphia. 

899— ANNA MARGARETTA STAMBACH, M.D. 

b. July 10th, 1838. 
m. June 29th, 1865, Rev. Edward Ilsley Galvin. 

900— JOHN AUGUSTINE HARVEY FRENCH STAMBACH 

b. July 22nd, 1840. 

m, June 19th, 1877, Marion English, daughter 
of Edward Bispham and Charlotte Biddle 
(Haines) English; Rt. Rev. William Ba- 
con Stevens, Bishop of Pennsylvania, offi- 
ciating. 
She b. August 4th, 1S47. 

901— GEORGE EDWIN STAMBACH 

b. November 16th, 1842. 
.1. March 14th, 1843. 

902— SARAH ELIZABETH STAMBACH 

b. March 4th, 1844. 
d. October 9th, 1844. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 169 

903— MAHLON DANIEL STAMBACH 

b. December 10th, 1845. 

ra. July 13th, 1881, Hanna Fox. 

904— WILLIAM HENRY STAMBACH 

b. April 3rd, 1848. 
d. June 9th, 1848. 

905— GEORGE GEIST STAMBACH, JR. 

b. May 11th, 1849. 

d. December 25th, 1874. 

906— IDA VALERIE STAMBACH, M.D. 

b. December 4th, 1S53. 

907— HENRY LAING STAMBACH, M.D. 

b. February 11th, 1S57. 

m. June 24th, 1891, Helen Winslow Knight. 

908— CARRIE ISABEL STAMBACH 

b. June 16th, 1S60. 
m. June 7th, 1887, Walter Hall Nixon, Esq. 

George Geist Stambach was one of Philadelphia's prominent merchants, and for nearly 
thirty years, from 1837 to 1863, conducted the hat and fur business at 710 North Second 
Street. He was an active Mason and Odd Fellow, being treasurer of Mt. Olivet Encamp- 
ment, I. O. O. F., for twenty-five years. During the Civil War Mr. Stambach was greatly 
interested in the Union cause ; and " not feeling able to shoulder a musquet," he took 
an active part in caring for sick and wounded soldiers. Immediately following the great 
battle of Gettysburg, in July, 1863, he organized a band of nurses and assistants, con- 
sisting of himself and his daughter, Dr. Anna M. Stambach [899], Mrs. Elizabeth Turner, 
Cyrus Whitson and several others, and conducted them at his own expense to the scene 
of hostilities, with ample supplies necessary for such a timely mission. This little party 
of volunteer aids rendered valuable services, remaining on the ground several weeks, until 
all the wounded had been properly cared for. 

John A. H. F. Stambach [900], after learning the business with his father, established 
in 1861 a fur store at 826 Arch Street, Philadelphia, which he successfully conducted until 
1899, when he retired from active business. 

Ida V. Stambach, M.D. [906], graduated from Hahnemann College, California, in 1SS8, 
and is a practicing physician in Santa Barbara, Cal., making a specialty of women's and 
children's diseases. 



170 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

This is to Certify, That on the Fourth day of June in the Year of our Lord One 
Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirty seven before me, John M. Cannon one of the 
Aldermen for the District of the Northern Liberties George G. Stambach of the Northern 
Liberties and Sarah Jane French were joined in Marriage, they declaring themselves 
clear of all engagements, or other lawful impediments, and taking each other for Hus- 
band and Wife, according to law. Is Witness Whereof, as well they the said George 
I r, Stambach and Sarah Jane Stambach (she assuming the name of her said husband) 
as I the said Alderman, and Witnesses present, have hereunto subscribed our names, the 
day and year above written. 

Alderman Geo. G. Stambach 

John M. Cannon [Seai ] Sarah J. Stambach 

Witnesses, Witnesses, 

F. S. Beitenman Anna M. How 

Jos. Thiele Rachel French 

Wm. F. Cooper Annastasia French 

Mrs. Mary Thiele 
Mary Thiele 



+83— HORACE FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; William, 27; William, 

111 ; Amos T, 263). 

b. 5th mo. 25th, 1817, in Greenwich, N. J. 

d. January 16th, 1904, in Greenwich, N. J. 

m. June 23rd, 1838, near Bridgeton, N. J., Char- 
lotte Brooks, daughter of Sheppard and Hannah 
(Keen) Brooks ; Rev. Henry Smalley, Baptist 
minister officiating. 
She b. November 5th, 1813, near Bridgeton, N. J. 

d. March 14th, 1901, in Greenwich, N. J. 

909— JOHN EWING FRENCH b. March 21st, 1839, in Greenwich, N. J. 

.!. March 21st, 1876, in Greenwich, N. J. 
m. May 5th, 1868, Mary Josephine Hopkins, 
daughter of Thomas and Esther (Eden- 
Beld) Hopkins. 
She b. April 21st. 1832, in Philadelphia. 

d. April 27th, 1<H0. in Philadelphia (no 
issue). 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 171 

910— SARAH HARRIS FRENCH 

b. April 5th, 1841. 
d. July 15th, 1844. 

911— RUTH EWING FRENCH b. March 21st, 1843. 

m. December 26th, 1874, Ebenezer P. English. 

912— CHARLES WILSON FRENCH 

b. August 2nd, 1845. 
d. April 26th, 1850. 

913— HANNAH BROOKS FRENCH 

b. November 22nd, 1847. 
m. September 24th, 1873, Thomas E. Bryant. 

914— CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. February 21st, 1849. 

m. December 26th, 1867, William B. Ware. 

915— WILLIAM HORACE FRENCH 

b. December 21st, 1850. 
m. March 19th, 1888, Ella C. Woodruff. 

916— EDWIN HARVEY FRENCH 

b. December 18th, 1858. 
m. April 14th, 1883, Eva Thomas. 

John Ewing French [909] enlisted in Co. F, 9th N. J. Vol. Infantry, at Trenton, N. J„ 
September 23rd, 1861. He served the entire war, being mustered out August 12th. 1865. 
His regiment participated in over thirty engagements in North Carolina and Virginia. 
He was present at Roanoke Island, February 8th, 1862; New Bern, March 14th, 1862; 
Fort Macon, April 14th to April 25th, 1862; Black Water River, September 4th, 1862, 
where he was wounded; Kingston, December 14th, 1S62; White Hall, December 16th, 
1862; Goldsboro, December 17th, 1862; Comfort Bridge, July 6th, 1863; Hill's Bridge, 
July 26th, 1863. 



486— ALFRED FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; Richard, 

112; Thomas, 265). 

b. 10th mo. 29th, 1807. 
d. 1st mo. 14th, 1857. 
m. 9th mo. 25th, 1830, Eliza Silvers. 
She b. 10th mo. 19th, 1809. 
d. 7th mo. 19th, 1896. 



172 GENEALOGY OF THE 

917— EMMA FRENCH b. 9th mo. 14th, 1831. 

d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1849. 

918— MARIA SMITH FRENCH b. 9th mo. 1st, 1833. 

m. First, 10th mo. 3th, 1848, Abram G. 

VanNeste. 
m. Second, 10th mo. 2nd, 1870, Garret V. 

Wilson, 
m. Third, 9th mo. 11th, 1883, Abram C. 

Wikoff. 

919— CORNELIUS VanN. FRENCH 

b. 6th mo. 8th, 1839. 

m. 3rd mo. 14th, 1860, Ellen Terhune 

920— CAROLINE BAUS FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1844. 

921— HANNAH ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 21st, 1846. 

922— JOHN CHESTER FRENCH 

b. 4th mo. 26th, 1848. 
d. 2nd mo. 24th, 1897. 



488— THOMAS FRENCH VAN HORN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Wil- 
liam, 27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266). 

m. Sarah McConkey. 
923— MORRIS VAN HORN 
924— CHARLOTTE VAN HORN 
925— ALBERT VAN HORN 
926— MARY VAN HORN 
927— RICHARD FRENCH VAN HORN 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 173 

491— LYDIA ANN VAN HORN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266). 

b. 10th mo. 31st, 1821. 
m. First, 1837, Nimrod Genglen. 
m. Second, 1849, George Rose Smith. 

928— MORTIMER CHARLES GENGLEN 

b. 1837, in Trenton, N. J. 
d. in infancy. 

929— DAVID NIMROD GENGLEN 

b. 4th mo. 23rd, 1839. 
m. Ada Barker. 

930— MARTHA CLAYPOLE GENGLEN 

b. 1843. 
m. Frederick A. Holly. 

931— CHARLOTTE ESTELLA GENGLEN 

m. First, Frank Willis Fisher, M.D., of 

Boston, Mass. (no issue), 
ra. Second, Otto G. Mayer (no issue). 

932— CHARLES MORTIMER GENGLEN 

d. at the age of seven. 

Children of Lydia Ann (Van Horn) Genglen and George Rose Smith. 

933— FRANCES MOTT ROSE SMITH 

unmarried. 

934— MARY JOSEPHINE ROSE SMITH 

d. young. 

935— GEORGE FREDERICK ROSE SMITH 

m. Maud Pendleton (no issue). 
d. 1885. 

936— JESSIE ESTELLA ROSE SMITH 

m. 12th mo. 24th, 1882, Frank Koewing. 

937— ANITA LYDIA ROSE SMITH 

m. 7th mo. 6th, 1S87, Thomas Smith Bassford. 



174 GENEALOGY OF THE 

492— LEWIS HAMILTON VAN HORN (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; Wil- 
liam, 27 ; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266). 

b. 9th mo. 22nd, 1822, in Trenton, N.J. 
d. May 14th. 1901, in Trenton, N. J. 
m. February 24th, 1841, in Hamilton Square, N. J., 
Evaline Scott, daughter of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth (Adams) Scott; Baptist minister perform- 
ing ceremony. 
She b. December 24th, 1825, in Mercerville, N. J. 
(1. April 18th, 1901, in Trenton, N. J. 

938— ELIZABETH SCOTT VAN HORN 

b. December 27th, 1842. 
m. June 9th, 1861, Hamilton B. Rulon. 

939— LEWIS HAMILTON VAN HORN, JR. 

b. March 14th, 1843, in Trenton, N. J. 
d. in infancy. 

940— MARY CHARLOTTE VAN HORN 

b. February 2nd, 1845. 
m. February 2nd, 1865, William E. Bowne. 

941— SAMUEL MARTIN VAN HORN 

b. February 17th, 1847. 
m. June 7th, 1869, Jean Colville. 

942— JOHN NUTT VAN HORN b. October 17th, 1848. 

m. Harriet Ouigley. 

943— WILLIAM DAVIS VAN HORN 

b. December 14th, 1850. 

m. June 1st, 1875, Elizabeth Firth. 

944— EVALINE SCOTT VAN HORN 

b. June 27th, 1S52, in Trenton, N. J. 
d. in infancy. 

945— CATHARINE DUNBAR VAN HORN 

b. June ISth, 1854. 
m. September, 1904, Frederick Osborn. 

946— ELLA EVALINE VAN HORN 

b. June 3rd, 1856. in Trenton, N. J. 
d. in infancy. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 175 



947— WARREN HAMILTON VAN HORN 

b. August 20th, 1864. 
m. June, 1904, Mary Stults. 

496— RICHARD FRENCH, 3RD (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112; Richard, 269). 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1829. 
d. 10th mo. 22nd, 1872. 
m. 1855, Hester Ann Heisler. 
She d. 1873. 

948— RICHARD HEISLER FRENCH 

b. 1857. 

d. 10th mo. 28th, 1873. 

949— FANNY H. FRENCH d. in infancy. 

498— JOHN SAVAGE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112; Richard, 269). 
b. 9th mo. 9th, 1833. 

m. June 22nd, 1854, Mary Ann Seibert, daughter 
of William and Elizabeth (Rutherford) 
Seibert. 
She b. June 23rd, 1838. 
d. March 8th, 1908. 

950— MARY LOUISA FRENCH b. April 12th, 1855. 

m. July 27th, 1887, J. B. C. McKee. 

951— WILLIAM SEIBERT FRENCH 

b. November 1st, 1857. 
d. October 5th, 1858. 

952— EMMA SNYDER FRENCH b. December 28th, 1876. 

m. June 19th, 1901, George H. Minnick. 

John Savage French enlisted December 23rd, 1861, in Company C, 90th Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, Col. Peter Lyle, commanding, an organization which rendered 
valliant service in the Army of the Potomac. It participated in a score of hard fought 
battles, including Second Bull Run, Rappahannock Station, Thoroughfare Gap, South 
Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Spottsylvania, Wil- 
derness, Petersburg and the great struggle along the Weldon railroad. It served under 



176 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Generals McDowell, Pope, McClellan, Burnside, Hooker, Reynolds, Meade and Grant. 
Private French was wounded at Antietam, Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. In the 
desperate fight with Mahone, near Petersburg, Va., August 19th, 1864, with 2,000 com- 
rades, including nearly one half of his own regiment, he was taken prisoner and confined 
in the famous Libby prison, at Richmond. Here he came under the kindly protection 
of an old boyhood friend, a civil attache of the prison, and escaped the sad fate of so 
many Union soldiers who were the victims of the open stockade at Salisbury, N. C. 
lie was exchanged in February, 1865, and on account of his reenlistment, which dated 
from February, 1863, was transferred to the 11th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. 
He was promoted to Sergeant and honorably discharged June 10th, 1865. He is Past 
Post Commander of Gen. E. D. Baker Post, No. 8, Grand Army of the Republic. 

499— LEWIS HENRY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112; Richard, 269). 

b. 12th mo. 14th, 1835. 

d. January 5th, 1900, in Philadelphia; buried in 

Cedar Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia. 
m. December 15th, 1870, Mary Jane Allen, daughter 
of Thomas and Eliza (Hutchinson) Allen; 
Rev. Charles Payne of Arch street M. E. Church, 
Philadelphia, performing ceremony. 
She b. September 26th, 1S35, in Emilie, Pa. 

953— HELEN MAY FRENCH b. November 17th, 1871. 

m. July 21st, 1902, William Bentley Daniels, 
son of Charles and Catharine (Irvine) 
Daniels. 

500— FRANCIS EUGENE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard. 5; William, 

27; Richard, 112; Richard, 269). 

b. 3rd mo. 18th, 1838. 

d. April 6th, 1895, in Philadelphia; buried in Ivy 

Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia. 
m. March 1st, 1868, Sarah H. Freas, daughter of 

Benjamin and Frances (Hannis) Freas; Rev. 

Andrew Manship, Methodist minister, officiating. 
She b. April 3rd, 1849, at Barren Hill, Pa. 

d. September 29th, 1910, in Philadelphia; buried 

in Ivy Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 177 

954— FRANCIS FREAS FRENCH 

b. December 20th, 1868. 
m. September 21st, 1892, Mary Hamilton. 



955— JOHN WESLEY FRENCH b. February 28th, 1872. 

d. September 28th, 1907. 
m. June 19th, 1907, Mary Supers. 



956— LILLIE MAY FRENCH b. August 26th, 1S74. 

d. January 9th, 1886. 



957— EDITH LOWRY FRENCH, JR. 

b. January 29th, 1885. 



958— FLORENCE MABEL FRENCH 

b. October 13th, 1888. 



517— SARAH SLIM FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 j 

William, 119; Joseph, 273). 

b. June 10th, 1817. 

d. March 23rd, 1892. 

m. December, 1839, William DeRochbrune. 

He b. April 11th, 1813. 

d. April 11th, 1845. 



959— MARY DeROCHBRUNE b. June 7th, 1841. 

m. September 24th, 1866, John A. Trask, son 
of John B. and Eliza (Wilson) Trask. 
He b. September 1st, 1826. 



960— ANNA DeROCHBRUNE b. April 30th, 1843. 

d. November 14th, 1870. 

m. November 4th, 1861, Walter N. Souder, 
son of Joseph and Ann (Reed) Souder. 
He b. April 10th, 1834 

d. December 29th, 1892. 
12 



178 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



520— LEWIS D. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; Wil- 
liam, 119; Joseph, 273). 

b. January 5th, 1823. 
d. May 6th, 1913, in Moorestown, N. J. 
in. September 26th, 1850, Mary Loretta Cooper, 
daughter of John and Mary (Smith) Cooper. 
She b. March 23rd, 1830. 

d. December 16th, 1909, in Moorestown, N. J. 



961— HORACE AUGUSTUS FRENCH 

b. August 24th, 1851. 
d. January 26th, 1852. 

962— ARTHUR FILLMORE FRENCH 

b. October 25th, 1852. 
m. December 22nd, 1875, Lavinia Sharp. 



963— ELLA FRENCH 



b. June 15th. 1S55. 



964— ANNA MARY FRENCH b. November 17th, 1857. 

m. October 19th, 1881, John Fuller. 

965— KATHERINE FRENCH b. July 21st, I860. 

m. November 18th, 1896, Egbert Griesimere. 



966— ALBERT LEWIS FRENCH 



b. June 16th, 1862. 

in. November 26th, 1895, Carrie Rogers. 



967— JOSEPH FRENCH 



b. October 20th. 1864. 
m. October 25th, 1901, Myrtle Rice. 



968— WALTER S. FRENCH 



1). November 10th, 1864. 
m. November 13th, 1889, Belzora Baker. 



969— OLIVE MAY FRENCH b, August 10th, 1868. 

m. January 11th, 1893, Benjamin Franklin 
Rogers. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 179 

521— JOSEPH FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; Jonathan, 31 ; William, 

119; Joseph, 273). 

b. May 8th, 1825. 

d. August 10th, 1867. 

m. November 28th, 1850, Catharine Beagary, 

daughter of John and Rebecca (Herbert) 

Beagary. 
She b. 1828. 

d. June 8th, 1888. 

969a— JOHN BEAGARY FRENCH 

d. November 18th, 1852, aged 2 months, 20 
days. 

Joseph French, while a young man, conducted a grocery business in Camden, N. J. 
He then became a clerk in the First National Bank, Camden, and later was placed in 
charge of the branch office, at Second and Market Streets, Philadelphia, where he served 
acceptably for several years, failing health, in 1866, causing his retirement. He was 
much esteemed by his business associates. 

522— JOHN JONES (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; Jonathan, 31 ; Richard, 120; 

Mary, 276). 

b. 12th mo. 8th, 1812. 

d. October 23rd, 1898, in Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. October 30th, 1834, Annabellah Barrett, 
daughter of Samuel and Amy (Simons) Barrett. 
She b. July 27th, 1817, in Greenland (now Magnolia), 
N.J. 
d. May 27th, 1904, in East Camden, N. J. 

970— WILLIAM JONES b. October 9th, 1836. 

m. May 10th, 1863, Mary Pearce Wilkins. 

971— SAMUEL JONES b. October 2nd, 1838. 

d. February 12th, 1839. 

972— HANNAH ANN JONES b. December 28th, 1839. 

m. February 28th, 1864, Silas C. Cline. 



180 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



973— SAMUEL JONES, 2ND 



974— AMY E. JONES 



975— MARY ANN JONES 



976— JOHN W. JONES 



977— CHARLES L. JONES 



978— SIMON JONES 



979— ANNA JONES 



980— JOSEPH B. JONES 



9S1— LAURA JONES 



b. May 6th, 1842. 

m. September 23rd, 1885, Susan Margaret 
Brandt. 

b. July 21st, 1844. 
d. June 26th, 1875. 



b. September 26th, 1847. 
d. December 29th, 1847. 

b. February 24th, 1849. 

m. February 22nd, 1883, Annie Mackwell. 
She d, February 19th, 1886 (no issue). 

b. November 1st, 1851. 
d. February 17th, 1870. 

b. August 19th, 1854. 
d. October 24th, 1877. 

b. April 16th, 1855. 
d. August 12th, 1858. 

b. December 20th, 1857. 
d. March 3rd, 1864. 

b. October 29th, 1863. 



A TRIBUTE BY A GRANDDAUGHTER (Mrs. Lavinia C. Hinchman [1S09]) 

"John Jones' education and habits from early youth led him to read and study the 
Bible, not as a text book but a revelation from God to man. He was a sincere and pious 
christian ; a man who feared God but not death. He maintained independence, but 
sought not riches; he thought none below him but the base and unjust; none above him 
but the wise and virtuous. He loved his parents, kindred, friends and country, and 
•devoted his life to them, resigning it calmly and giving all glory to his Creator." 



523— MARY JONES (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; Richard, 

120 j Mary, 276). 

m. Charles Rowand. 
982— ROBERT ROWAND 
983— MARY ROWAND 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 181 

,. 

524— HENRY CRAWFORD WARRICK (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jona- 
than, 31; Richard, 120; Sarah, 277). 

b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1816. 

d. 7th mo. 11th, 1864, in Hartford, Burlington 
Co., N. J.; buried in Colestown (N. J.) Ceme- 
tery. 

m. 3rdmo. 30th, 1843, Deborah A. Borton, daughter 
of David and Elizabeth Borton. 
She b. 5th mo. 27th, 1820, in Haddonfield, N. J. 

d. 10th mo. 23rd, 1863, in Hartford, N. J. ; buried 
in Colestown Cemetery. 

984— ELIZABETH BORTON WARRICK 

b. 3rd mo. 5th, 1844. 

m. 2nd mo. 25th, 1869, Levi L. Walton. 

985— WILLIAM HENRY WARRICK 

b. 9th mo. 25th, 1846. 

m. August 8th, 1867, Margaret A. Hollings- 
head. 

986— RICHARD ANTHONY WARRICK 

b. 7th mo. 1st, 1849. 
m. 2nd mo. 13th, 1878, Margaret W. Coles. 

987— JOHN BORTON WARRICK 

b. 7th mo. 6th, 1854. 
m. 12th mo. 12th, 1878, Mary A. Hancock. 



526— KEZIAH WARRICK (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Sarah, 277). 

b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1820, near Haddonfield, N. J. 

d. 3rd mo. 25th, 1865, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

m. 11th mo. 2nd, 1843, Lewis Venable Atkinson, 
son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Allen) At- 
kinson. 
He b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1820, in Mt. Ephraim, N. J. 

d. 7th mo. 5th, 1890, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 



182 GENEALOGY OF THE 



988— ANNA T. ATKINSON b. 11th mo. 15th. 1844. 

m. 3rd mo. 9th, 1865, Thomas J. Mounce. 

989— ELIZABETH V. ATKINSON 

b. 10th mo. 30th, 1S47. 

m. February 2nd, 1871, James Wilson Atkin- 
son, son of Thomas L. and Mary Ann 
(Wilson) Atkinson. 
He b. 12th mo. 12th. 1847. 

d. June 22nd, 187t>, in Camden. N. J. 

990— SARAH F. ATKINSON b. 11th mo. 27th, 1849. 

991— BEULAH H. ATKINSON b. 6th mo. 18th, 1852. 

d. 10th mo. 28th, 1856. 

992— LEWIS A. ATKINSON b. 1st mo. 7th, 1855. 

m. First, March 13th, 1877, Laura Allen 

Sherwin [2418]. 
m. Second, July 18th, 1896, Delia Kendle. 

993— JOSEPH W. ATKINSON b. 9th mo. 19th, 1857. 

m. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1881. Lillian A. Coles. 

994— RICHARD ATKINSON b. 10th mo. 9th, 1859. 

d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1863. 



528— BEULAH WARRICK (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Sarah, 277). 

b. 1st mo. 6th, 1825, in Camden Co., N. J. 
d. July 28th, 1875, in Philadelphia. 
m. January 6th, 1847, in Philadelphia, Joshua 
Huston; Rev. A. D. Gillett, Baptist minister, 
performing ceremony. 
J. H. b. June 19th, 1822. 

d. June 20th, 1851, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 

995— FRANKLIN HUSTON b. October 21st, 1847. 

d. December 2nd, 1906. in Newark, N. J. 
m. June 13th, 1878, in Newark, N. J., Kath- 
leen L. Barnett, daughter of William G. 
and Eliza (Rear) Barnett. 
She b. April 2nd, 1859, in Falmouth, Kngland. 
(No issue.) 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



183 



996— ABBIE HUSTON 



997— LEWIS A. HUSTON 



b. January 20th, 1850. 
m. June 3rd, 1880, Francis W. Harris. 

b. May 3rd, 1851. 

m. June 1st, 1904, Elizabeth Kinzler, daughter 
of Frederick and Dorothea (Frank) Kinz- 
ler. 
Sho b. December 14th, 1860. 



529— RICHARD B. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279). 

b. 6th mo. 26th, 1821, in Camden Co., N. J. 

d. December 9th, 1891, in Cedarville, N.J. ; buried 

in Centre Grove, N. J. 
m. November 6th, 1845, Elizabeth M. Hendrick- 

son, daughter of John and Mary (Morris) 

Hendrickson. 
She b. October 23rd, 1827, in Camden Co., N. J. 



998— ANNA H. FRENCH 



999— SAMUEL J. FRENCH 



1000— RICHARD FRENCH 



1001— JACOB R. FRENCH 



b. August 31st, 1846. 

m. First, March 28th, 1867, John W. Earl, 
m. Second, November 30th, 1906, Charles W. 
Tomlinson. 

b. February 20th, 1848. 
m. 1874, Charlotte Ehvell. 

b. November 19th, 1849. 
m. November 14th, 1874, Barbara Elwell. 

b. September 2nd, 1851. 
m. Annie M. Cox. 



1002— FRANKLIN P. FRENCH b. July 13th, 1853. 

m. 1878, Ida M. Beckett. 



1003— MARY E. FRENCH 



b. March 23rd, 1855. 
d. April 17th, 1855. 



1004— CHARLES H. FRENCH b. March 6th, 1856. 

m. 1879, Elmyra Newcomb. 

1005— ELIZABETH FRENCH b. March 28th, 1858. 

m. John S. Earl. 



184 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1006— JONATHAN FRENCH b. December 23rd, 1859. 

d. August 22nd, 1860. 

1007— SARAH E. FRENCH b. July nth, 1862. 

m. Dallas L. Whitecar. 

1008— CHARLOTTE FRENCH b. February 16th, 1864. 

d. May 23rd, 1881. 

1009— MARY M. FRENCH b. February 18th, 1866. 

m. David M. Duffield. 

1010— LAURA W. FRENCH b. February 22nd, 1868. 

m. September 19th, 1885, Melvin L. Jerrell. 

1011— JONATHAN G. FRENCH b. June 10th, 1870. 

m. November 25th, 1896, Elizabeth M. Kestler. 

533— SAMUEL FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279). 
b. 4th mo. 4th, 1833, near Haddonfield, N. J. 
d. May 29th, 1909, in Woodstown, N. J.; buried 
in East View Cemetery, Salem, N. J. 
• m. February 24th, 1855, in Salem, N. J., Rachel 
M. Bates, daughter of Edward and Lydia 
(Lacy) Bates. 
She b. March 6th, 1836, near Ewan, N. J. 
d. December 18th, 1886, in Salem, N. J. 

1012— EDWARD B. FRENCH b. November 23rd, 1855. 

d. November 23rd, 1857. 

1013— WILLIAM B. FRENCH b. December 28th, 1857. 

m. February 23rd, 1898, Pauline C. Ruff. 

1014— ELIZABETH R. FRENCH 

b. October 6th, 1860. 

m. March 20th, 1882, William Hazleton 
Reeves. 

1015— ALFRETTA K. FRENCH b. March 29th, 1863. 

m. March 16th, 1892, Anthony Woodward 
Durell. 

1016— SARAH L. FRENCH b. February 21st, 1865. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 185 



536— ADALINE T. HILLMAN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Keziah, 281). 

b. 10th mo. 19th, 1825, near Greenland, N. J. 
d. March 30th, 1907, in Berlin, N. J. 
m. February 10th, 1848, in St. Peter's rectory, 
Clarksboro, N. J., Adam B. Sharp, son of 
Sylvester and Ann (Bendler) Ferrell Sharp. 
He b. November 24th, 1825, near Greenland, N. J. 
d. March 15th, 1892, in Berlin, N. J. 

1017— HILLMAN FRENCH SHARP 

b. October 9th, 1850, in Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. June 17th, 1871, at the residence of Gen- 
eral Enoch Doughty, Doughty's Mills, near 
Absecon, N. J., Rosa A. Holmes, daughter 
of William and Alice (MacIIvane) Holmes ; 
Presbyterian minister officiating. 
She b. August 23rd, 1852, in Philadelphia (no» 
issue). 

1018— GEORGE WASHINGTON SHARP 

b. September 8th, 1855, near Haddonfield, 

N.J. 
d. August 15th, 1910, in Berlin, N. J. 

1019— HOWARD CRAWFORD SHARP 

b. May 22nd, 1858. 

m. August 6th, 1882, Anna M. Kammer. 

537— SOPHIA FRENCH HILLMAN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 

31; Richard, 120; Keziah, 281). 

b. 5th mo. 12th, 1828. 

d. March 10th, 1909. 

m. March 17th, 1849, James Haney. 

He deceased. 

1020— KEZIAH HANEY b. January 4th, 1850. 

d. November 20th, 1851. 

1021— CHARLES HANEY b. October 1st, 1851. 

d. October 10th, 1852. 



186 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1022— SARAH A. HANEY b. August 8th. 1852. 

d. May 2nd, 1875. 

m. October 11th. 1874. Edwin F. Peak (no 
issue). 

1023— JAMES HANEY b. September 13th, 1855. 

1024— WILLIAM H. HANEY b. February 25th, 1857. 

m. November 23rd. 1S79, Ella T. Coates. 

1025— SAMUEL II. HANEY b. July 14th, 1859. 

m. November 6th, 1889, Anna Heullings. 

1026— ALFRED W. HANEY b. October 15th. 1861. 

1027— ELIZABETH L. HANEY b. November 12th, 1866. 

1028— ADA LINE S. HANEY b. November 13th, 1868. 

m. September 25th, 1889, John Pidgeon (no 
issue). 



538— ELIZABETH HILLMAN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard. 120; Keziah, 281). 

b. 2nd mo. 8th, 1831, near Haddonfield, N. J. 
in. March 6th, 1853, in Camden, N. J., David 
Lummis, Jr., son of David and Susan (Brooks) 
Lummis ; Rev. Thomas R. Taylor, Baptist min- 
ister, officiating. 
D. I... Jr. b. August 15th, 1832, in Bridgeton, N. J. 
d. July 1st. 1910. In Camden, N. J. 

1029— FRANCIS ELMER LUMMIS 

b. December 2nd, 1853. 

d. January 18th, 1903. 

m. October 18th, 1880, Eliza C. Dickenson 

(no issue). 

1030— CHARLES HENRY LUMMIS 

I,. May 4th, 1859. 
m. May 0th. 1883, Ida Shaw. 

1031— LIZZIE HILLMAN LUMMIS 

b. November 6th, 1861. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 187 

539— SAMUEL HILLMAN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Keziah, 281). 
b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1833, in Camden Co., N. J. 
m. March 11th, 1858, Rebecca M. Jones, daughter 
of George and Maria (Buchanan) Jones; Rev. 
J. B. McCullough, of the Western M. E. 
Church, Philadelphia, performing ceremony. 
She b. September 25th, 1837, in Chester Co., Pa. 

1032— CHARLES LEVITTE HILLMAN 

b. February 1st, 1859. 
m. January 20th, 1881, Christina L. Dunn. 

Samuel Hillman, for half a century, has been a practical carpenter, building inspector 
and superintendent of inside finishing. For seventeen years he was in the service of the 
Franklin Fire Insurance Company of Philadelphia, as surveyor. Rebecca M. (Jones) 
Hillman is a great granddaughter of Col. Jonathan Jones, famous in the war for Inde- 
pendence, as commander of the Second Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was a cousin of 
John Paul Jones, the heroic naval chieftain. 

540— ABEL NICHOLSON HILLMAN (Thomas, 1: Richard. 5; Jona- 
than, 31 ; Richard, 120; Keziah, 281). 
b. 8th mo. 26th, 1835, near Magnolia, N. J. 
d. May 6th, 1899. 

m. November 17th, 1859. in Haddonfield, N. J., 
Rebecca Webb, daughter of William and Sarah 
(English) Webb. 
She b. February 7th, 1839, near Magnolia, N. J. 

1033— JOHN GILL HILLMAN b. August 29th, 1860. 

d. February 7th, 1897. 

1034— WILLIAM WEBB HILLMAN 

b. September 10th, 1862. 
m. September 15th, 1883, Elizabeth C. Wood. 

1035— OLLA REBECCA HILLMAN 

b. March 16th, 1873. 

In 1888 Abel N. Hillman purchased the Stuart property on Potter Street, Haddonfield, 
N. J. He became prominently identified with the public affairs of the borough. His 
high character and honesty of purpose appealed to the citizens of his community, and 
he was elected six times a member of the borough council, and served six years as treas- 
urer of the borough. He was also appointed by the mayor as supervisor of streets. 



188 GENEALOGY OF THE 



542— ANN HILLMAN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 j Richard, 

120; Keziah, 281). 

b. 9th mo. 14th, 1840, in Camden Co., N. J. 
m. March 25th, 1869, in Haddonfield.N. J., Reuben 
Dobbs, son of William and Ann (Dean) Dobbs]\ 
Rev. Robert F. Young, Baptist minister, per- 
forming ceremony. 
R. D. b. 3rd mo. 9th, 1844, near Haddonfield, N. J. 

d. January 12th, 1910, at his residence, "Wood- 
field Farm," near Haddonfield, N. J. 



1036— ALICE HILLMAN DOBBS 

b. January 14th, 1870. 

m. September 19th, 1889, John Franklin Peak. 

1037— HERBERT KAY DOBBS b. April 14th, 1873. 

m. 4th mo. 17th, 1895, Emily Miller Haines. 

1038— SARAH KEZIAH DOBBS b. July 30th, 1878. 

m. October 1st, 1903, Walter Warren Wayne. 

The Haddonfield Gazette of January 14th, 1910, contained the following: 

" Reuben Dobbs died on Wednesday at his home on the Berlin road, after 
a prolonged illness from Bright's disease. He was about 65 years old and 
was one of the leading and best known farmers of Delaware township, 
owning a large and fine farm about a mile and a half from Haddonfield. 
He was very exemplary in his habits and was greatly devoted to his family 
and a prominent and leading member of the Haddonfield Baptist Church. 
He was also a leading member of the local Odd Fellows' lodge. The de- 
ceased suffered for over a year from the effects of the disease. His demise, 
however, is supposed to have been hastened by the destructive fire at his 
place last summer when his large barns and all his crops were destroyed, 
the fire being started by the sparks from a steam threshing machine." 

William Dobbs was born in England in 1804, died near Haddonfield, N. J., December 
11th, 1872, buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Camden, N. J. Ann (Dean) Dobbs was born 
m England in 1806, died near Haddonfield, N. J., May 30th, 1861, buried in Evergreen 
Cemetery. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 189 

554— ANNA EVANS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Edward, 121 ; 

Hannah, 284). 

b. 1800. 

d. May 25th, 1871; buried in Baptist Graveyard, 

Moorestown, N. J. 
m. 1823, John Perkins. 
He b. 1801. 

d. March 13th, 1886; buried in Baptist Graveyard, 

Moorestown, N. J. 

1039— NATHAN E. PERKINS b. July 4th, 1824. 

m. February 1st, 1848, Sarah R. Williamson. 

1040— ELIZABETH H. PERKINS 

b. December 28th, 1825. 
d. July 1st, 18S7. 

m. April 25th, 1850, George E. Barber. 
He b. January 28th, 1827. 
d. November 12th, 1854. 

1041— MARY PERKINS b. January 22nd, 1827. 

d. April 10th, 1889. 
m. January 9th, 1851, Jesse Rickey. 
He d. April 7th, 1889. 

1042— JEMIMA PERKINS b. May 17th, 1829. 

m. January 17th, 1853, William Marter. 
He d. June, 1890. 

1043— HANNAH PERKINS b. May 10th, 1834. 

m. Jonathan Rogers, Jr. 

1044— JOHN PERKINS b. April 16th, 1836. 

m. March 2nd, 1858, Christiana Slim. 

1045— EDWARD WASHINGTON PERKINS 

b. October 10th, 1837. 

m. 1st mo. 10th, 1872, Annie H. Dudley. 

1046— EMELINE PERKINS b. December 29th, 1839. 

m. May 21st, 1867, Isaac Cooper, M.D. 

1047— CHARLES HENRY PERKINS 

b. July 24th, 1843. 

m. February 19th, 18S5, Mary Merritt. 



190 GENEALOGY OF THE 

555— LOCKEY ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121 ; Joseph, 285). 
b. 6th mo. 16th, 1798. 

m. 12th mo. 17th, 1818, Stokes Haines [468], son 
of Jacob and Hannah (Stokes) Haines. 

1048— JOSEPH F. HAINES d. unmarried. 

1049— ELIZABETH HAINES m. Albert Allen. 

1050— STOKES HAINES, JR. m. Hannah Kendall (widow). 

556— SARAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33 ; Edward, 

121; Joseph, 285). 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1800. 

m. 1st mo. 17th, 1819, Samuel E. Wilkins [686], 
son of Uriah and Elizabeth (Eyre) Wilkins. 

1051— ELIZABETH FRENCH WILKINS 

b. 9th mo. 11th, 1819. 

buried 4th mo. 16th, 1895, in Colestown 
(N. J.) Cemetery. 

1052— MARY FRENCH WILKINS 

b. 4th mo. 22nd, 1821. 
d. 3rd mo. 27th, 1822. 

1053— ELEANOR BURN WILKINS 

b. 3rd mo. 7th, 1823. 

m. 12th mo. 7th, 1842, Isaac Stiles. 

1054— CHARLES M. WILKINS b. 5th mo. 29th, 1825. 

557— ANNA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Edward, 

121 ; Joseph, 285). 

b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1802. 
m. Joseph Bird. 

1055— JOHN BIRD d. at about 17 years of age. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 191 

559— EDWARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Ed- 
ward, 121 ; Joseph, 285). 
b. 1st mo. 13th, 1806. 
d. 1871 ; buried in Trinity P. E. Churchyard, 

Moorestown, N. J. 
m. 1st mo. 13th, 1834, Judith M. Scattergood. 
She b. 1810. 

buried "Sunday, March 5th, 1865, Mrs. Judith, 
wife of Edward French, in churchyard, but 
without service, " Friends " " ( Trinity Church 
record). 

1056— SARAH ANNA FRENCH b. 12th mo. 11th, 1834. 

m. 3rd mo. 6th, 1S60, Thomas Lippincott 
Ogden. 

1057— BENJAMIN SCATTERGOOD FRENCH 

b. 6th mo. 24th, 1838. 

d. 12th mo. 30th, 1869; buried in Trinity 
Churchyard, Moorestown, X. J. 

1058— ELIZABETH WILKINS FRENCH 

b. 6th mo. 30th, 1841. 

d. 6th mo. 25th, 1863; buried in Trinity 

Churchyard, " without service, the parents 

Friends." 

EDWARD FRENCH 

Edward French, oldest son of Joseph [285] and Elizabeth (Zane) French, 
possessed in marked degree the business like qualifications of a successful an- 
cestry. All his manhood life he displayed enterprise and judgment in the buying 
and selling of real estate. Many such profitable transfers are recorded, the 
result being the acquirement of a considerable estate. He improved available 
property and took active part in the development of West Moorestown. Two 
notable transactions may be mentioned. In 1836 he bought, of Elizabeth 
R. Morgan, the revolutionary homestead of his grandfather, Edward French 
[121], with 95 acres, for $5,400 and one year later sold it to Mary Gosmer, 
for $7,100. This property is now known as " Forest Brook Farm." In 
order to settle the estate of Joseph French [285], commissioners of the 
Orphans' Court, February 8th, 1838, sold his homestead, on the north side of 



192 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Main street, West Moorestown, and his son Edward bought the dwelling and 
61 acres of farm land for $5,387. This property, in part, was embraced in 
the deed of gift of Thomas ffrench, progenitor, to his son Thomas, in 1694. 
It was profitably added to and the building of the Camden and Burlington 
county railroad through it so increased its value that it comprised a good 
fortune in itself when bequeathed to his only surviving daughter, Sarah 
(French) Ogden, in 1871. Edward French was engaged at different times 
in various business enterprises. Shortly after the death of Joseph French 
[273], husband of "Aunt Kitty" French, in 1825, the business he had 
•established in West Moorestown, later known as " Fairview Nurseries," was 
purchased, with the real estate, by Edward French and John Perkins, the 
first named retiring from the firm in 1S40. During the next thirty years 
he continued an active and leading citizen of Moorestown. 

SUMMARY OF WILL OF EDWARD FRENCH, 1871 

Date April 15—1871 Proved Aug 17—1871 at Mount Holly 

Daughter Sallie A. Ogden wife of Thomas L. Ogden the farm & premises 
where I now live situate in Chester Twp. Burl Co. N. J. laying on both 
sides of Rail Road containing 135 acres; also 100 shares of Camden Na- 
tional State Bank Stock, and also residue of my estate after following be- 
quests complied with. 

Grand-daughter — Mary Ogden — 100 shares of Stock of above said Bank 
Stock is to be left to my Exrs. in trust, interest to educate her, and when of 
age (21) to receive principal and interest. 

Brother — Joseph French use of $4000 and at his death to go to his 
children. 

Sister-in-law — Maria Folwell $1000, she to receive the interest and at her 
death her daughter Hannah to have it for her own use forever 

Niece Eleanor Stiles $500, and also a note I have against her husband 
Isaac Stiles to be cancelled 

Nephew Charles M. Wilkins, Note against him to be cancelled. 

Israel M. Scattergood $2000, invested till he is 21. 

George Scattergood $1000, invested till he is 21. 

to be invested & interest used for education in both cases 

Son-in-law Thomas L. Ogden, bond I have to be cancelled. 

Executors — Son-in-law Tho*. L. Ogden. Marmaduke B. Taylor 



Witnesses — 



L. B. Clevenger^g^^^^ (ffi?*0rUlA> 







- 



w 

■J. 



O 

W 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 193 

562— JOSEPH FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121; Joseph, 28S). 

b. 9th mo. 17th, 1811. 
d. November 3rd, 1872, in Philadelphia, 
m. August 21st, 1834, Mary Ann Clunn, daughter 
of Captain Clunn. 
She b. January 10th. 1819. 

d. November 3rd, 1862, in Philadelphia. 



1059— CHARLES ADRIAN FRENCH 

b. June 21st, 1835. 

d. December 18th, 1856. 



1060— FERRIS PRICE FRENCH 

b. December 2 1st, 1837. 
m. October 20th, 1873, Jennie Scott. 



1061— JOSEPH HENRY FRENCH 

b. November 27th, 1843. 
d. May 29th, 1850. 



1062— MARY ABBOT FRENCH b. August 15th. 1846. 

d. September 25th. 1870. 



1063— GEORGE WASHINGTON FRENCH 

b. January 3rd, 1849. 
d. February 22nd, 1869. 



1064— EDWARD W. FRENCH b. July 5th, 1852. 

d. March 17th, 1872. 



1065— ELIZABETH HESTON FRENCH 

b. October 5th, 1855. 
d. July 6th, 1880. 
13 



194 GENEALOGY OF THE 

571— WILLIAM BOWEN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 

33; Edward, 121 ; Charles H., 296). 

b. 3rd mo. 26th, 1821, near Moorestown, N. J. 

d. March 17th, 1882, buried in Harleigh Ceme- 
tery, Camden, N. J. 
m. November 6th, 1845, in Camden, N. J., Eliza- 
beth Stokes Braddock, daughter of Samuel and 
Judith Ann (Bates) Braddock; Rev. T. R. 
Taylor, Baptist minister, performing ceremony. 
She b. 3rd mo. 11th, 1826, in Philadelphia. 

d. September 20th, 1893, buried in Harleigh 
Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 

1066— SAMUEL BRADDOCK FRENCH 

b. September 13th, 1846. 
d. April 3rd, 1908, in Runnymede, N. J.; 
buried in Harleigh Cemetery, Camden, 

N. J. 

1067— ANNA HEWLINGS FRENCH 

b. December 22nd, 1848. 

d. August 12th, 1850, buried in Harleigh 
Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 

1068— CHARLES HAINES FRENCH 

b. November 19th, 1850. 

d. March 13th, 1900, unmarried, buried in 
Harleigh Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 

1069— HEWLINGS MOORE FRENCH 

b. June 13th, 1853. 
m. April 17th, 1881, Rebecca Louisa Souder. 

1070— HENRY STOKES FRENCH. 

1). September 5th, 1855. 
m. First, September 25lh, 1878, Ruth Anne 

Ayres. 
m. Second, August 27th, 1891, Joanna Denny. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 195 

1071— JOHN HAZZARD FRENCH 

b. July 8th, 1858. 

d. December 21st, 1863, buried in Harleigh 
Cemetery. 

1072— HANNAH MARY FRENCH 

b. October 19th, 1860. 

m. December 16th, 1886, George Nathan 
Strong. 

572— MARY MOORE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121; Charles H., 296). 

b. 9th mo. 17th, 1822. 
d. October 3rd, 1882. 

m. 1st mo. 18th, 1844, Benjamin S. Kain, of Marl- 
ton, N. J. 
He d. December 25th, 1899, aged 78. 

1073— HANNAH F. KAIN d. April 18th, 1S46. 

1074— JOSEPH E. KAIN m. Ella Snyder 

1075— JOHN H. KAIN m. Fannie B. Snyder. 

d. 1906. 

1076— MARY ANNA KAIN m. November 1st, 1870, Joseph Mickle Brick 

[1298]. 

1077— EMILY B. KAIN m. George F. Middleton. 

1078— ELLA E. KAIN m. C. S. Bareford. 

1079— DEBORAH H. KAIN m. I. Walter Sharp. 

1080— CHARLES FRENCH KAIN 

m. Margaret Lewis. 

1081— CAROLINE S. KAIN m. William H. Newell. 

John H. Kain [1075] became connected with the San Luis Division, Tampico Line, 
Mexican Central Railway, in 1889; and in 1892 was made chief engineer of the Mexican 
Central Railway, which position he held for two years. At the time of his death in 
1906, he was nearly blind. 



196 GENEALOGY OF THE 

575— CHARLES EDWIN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 

33; Edward, 121; Charles H., 296). 

b. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1832, in Burlington Co., N. J. 
d. April 8th, 1894, at Indian Mills, Burlington 
Co., N. J. 

m. First, 1st mo. 12th, 1852, Elizabeth H. Moore, 
daughter of Joseph H. and Elizabeth Moore. 
She b. 8th mo. 8th, 1827, in Greenwich township, Glou- 
cester Co., N. J. 

d. 12th mo. 2nd, 1880, in Camden, N. J. 

m. Second, November 11th, 1885, Elizabeth Ash- 
mead. 



1082— THOMAS ELLIS FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 5th, 1855, in Atsion, Burlington 

Co., N. J. 
m. First, May 6th, 1879, Cecelia Jane Carr, 
daughter of Daniel and Cecelia Carr. 
She d. August 3rd, 1S89, buried in Colestown, 
N.J. 
m. Second, June 28th, 1904, Mary E. Esser, 
M.D., of Philadelphia. 



1083— MARIE J. FRENCH b. 11th mo. 15th, 1859, in Camden, N. J. 



Thomas Ellis French [1082], after completing his education, studied law in the office 
of Benjamin F. Shreeve, Camden, New Jersey. He was admitted to the bar in 1876 and 
as counsellor in 1879. He at once entered upon practice, soon reaching a foremost 
place at the Camden county bar and has continued his life work, declining all oilers 
of public preferment. For a time he was in partnership with Charles G. Garrison, 
for some years past an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey. He 
has given special attention to real estate, insurance and corporation business and has 
been counsel in many important cases. Two of these related to the title to Long Beach, 
involving proprietary records and the right of the present board — or Council of Pro- 
prietors — to pass title to strangers. He is thoroughly conversant with laws and 
decisions relating to surveys and has many important papers of this character prepared 
by his grandfather, Charles Haines French [296]. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



197 



578— JOSHUA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Uriah, 

122; Uriah, 299). 

b. 2nd mo. 28th, 1817. 
m. 12th mo. 23rd, 1844, Lydia Trego. 
She b. 11th mo. 16th, 1813. 
d. 8th mo. 23rd, 1846. 



1084— MARY T. FRENCH 



b. 1st mo. 1st, 1846. 

m. 1st mo. 24th, 1868, George T. Bunnell. 



579— ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Uriah, 122; 

Uriah, 299). 

b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1819. 

m. Warner Kinsey, son of Edmund and Elizabeth; 
Kinsey. 



10S5— EMMA KINSEY 



b. 1st mo. 17th, 1840. 
d. 1st mo. 14th, 1850. 



1086— EDMUND KINSEY 



b. 9th mo. 24th, 1841. 

d. 5th mo. 15th, 1864, at the battle of Resaca,. 
Ga. 



1087— AMANDA KINSEY 



b. 11th mo. 28th, 1844. 
m. Leander Chilberg. 



1088— URIAH KINSEY 



b. 10th mo. 11th, 1851. 
d. 7th mo. 3rd, 1857. 



1089— CHARLES KINSEY 



b. 9th mo. 6th, 1853. 
m. Ellen Tracy. 



Edmund Kinsey with his wife and six children, Warner, Amos, Cyrus, Martha, 
William and Sarah, came into Moorestown Meeting from Byberry (Penna.) Meeting, 
6th mo. 7th, 1832, and removed by certificate from Moorestown Meeting to Clear Creek, 
Ills., 8th mo. 7th, 1845. 



198 GENEALOGY OF THE 



584— HARRIET FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; George, 

123; William, 301). 
m. Charles Brown. 

1090— ELINOR BROWN 

1091— WILLIAM FRENCH BROWN 

1092— MARK BROWN 

1093— CHARLES HOPKINS BROWN 

1094— HARRIET BROWN 

1095— RICHARD A. BROWN 

S8S— WILLIAM FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; William, 301). 
m. Elizabeth Phillips. 

1096— HANNAH FRENCH 

1097— ABIGAIL FRENCH 

1098— ANN ELIZA FRENCH m. John Horter. 

1099— ELINOR FRENCH 

589— GEORGE S. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; Bathsheba, 304). 
b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1807. 
d. 5th mo., 1870. 

m. 5th mo. 7th, 1829, Lydia Grubb, daughter of 
Samuel Grubb. 
She b. 3rd mo. 9th, 1807. 

1100— SAMUEL G. ROBERTS b. 4th mo. 10th, 1830. 

d. 3rd mo. 29th, 1840. 

1101— JOSEPH ROBERTS b. 3rd mo. 29th, 1832. 

d. 4th mo. 14th, 1877. 

1102— ELMA ROBERTS b. 6th mo. 20th, 1841. 

d. 11th mo. 30th, 1889. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 199 



590— CAROLINE ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; Bathsheba, 304). 
b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1809. 
m. 10th mo. 9th, 1828, Garret Williams. 
He b. 12th mo. 26th, 1806. 

1103— RACHEL WILLIAMS b. 5th mo. 12th, 1830. 

d. 1st mo., 1843. 

1104— MARY JANE WILLIAMS b. 9th mo. 9th, 1833. 

d. 1st mo., 1843. 

1105— JOSEPH R. WILLIAMS b. 8th mo. 23rd, 1836. 

d. 2nd mo. 18th, 1864. 

592— FRANKLIN ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; Bathsheba, 304). 
b. 7th mo. 27th, 1820. 
d. 3rd mo. 18th, 1887. 

m. 7th mo. 2nd, 1849, Georgeanna Wilcox. 
She b. 2nd mo. 10th, 1827. 

1106— JULIA ROBERTS b. 7th mo. 18th, 1850. 

d. 1st mo. 31st, 1851. 

1107— GEORGE FRANKLIN ROBERTS 

b. 8th mo., 1852. 

1108— ORLENA ROBERTS b. 1855. 

1109— HENRY C. ROBERTS. b. 1858. 

594— CHARLES H. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; Rachel, 308). 
b. 8th mo. 29th, 1815. 
m. Elizabeth T. Clark. 
She d. 8th mo. 5th, 1890. 

1110— SUSAN ROBERTS 

1111— JEFFERSON ROBERTS 



200 GENEALOGY OF THE 

596— SUSAN F. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; Rachel, 308). 

b. 7th mo. 17th, 1818. 

d. 12th mo. 31st, 1889. 

in. 4th mo. 18th, 1844, Joseph G. Cox. 

He b. 3rd mo. 21st, 1818. 

1112— WILLIAM HENRY COX b. 6th mo. 16th, 1S45. 

m. Catharine Childs. 

1113— JOSEPH G. COX, JR. b. 9th mo. 24th, 1847. 

d. 5th mo. 31st, 1889. 

1114— RACHEL F. COX b. 7th mo. 30th, 1849. 

1115— EDWARD CHARLES COX 

1116— ENOCH ROBERTS COX b. 10th mo., 1852. 

597— ALMIRA ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; George, 

123; Rachel, 308). 

b. 11th mo. 22nd, 1820. 

m. William C. Murphy, son of Mahlon Murphy. 
He b. 12th mo. 29th, 1818. 

1117— EDWARD R. MURPHY b. 12th mo. 20th, 1843. 

m. 10th mo. 2nd, 1884, Josephine G. Guffett. 

1118— SARAH C. MURPHY b. 5th mo. 30th, 1846. 

m. 2nd mo. 21st, 1884, Isaiah Shoemaker. 

1119— ALMIRA R. MURPHY b. 5th mo. 6th, 1849. 

1120— RACHEL F. MURPHY b. 2nd mo. 29th, 1852. 

1121— SUSAN C. MURPHY b. 6th mo. 28th, 1854. 

m. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1886, George F. Smith. 

1122— LETITIA MURPHY b. 1st mo. 13th, 1857. 

'123— MARY J. MURPHY b. 8th mo. 26th, 1859. 

m. 10th mo. 16th, 1894, Robert Simpson. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 201 

599— RACHEL R. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; Rachel, 308). 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1825. 

m. 2nd mo. 25th, 1847, Charles E. Thompson,, 
son of Peter Thompson. 
He b. 3rd mo. 7th, 1821. 

1124— JAMES THOMPSON b. Sth mo. 23rd, 1848. 

1123— MARY R. THOMPSON b. 4th mo. 13th, 1850. 

m. David Sadler. 

1126— CHARLES E. THOMPSON, JR. 

b. 5th mo. 23rd, 1852. 
m. Mary Emma Gilmore. 

1127— WALTER THOMPSON b. 10th mo., 1858. 

1128— HENRY R. THOMPSON b. 9th mo. 1st, 1862. 

1129— EDGAR ALFRED THOMPSON 

b. 10th mo. 3rd, 1864. 

600— WILLIAM P. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; Rachel, 308). 

b. 9th mo. 4th, 1826. 
m, 1850, Sarah Bender. 

1130— HENRY ROBERTS 
1131— ELLA ROBERTS 

601— HENRY C. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

George, 123; Rachel, 308). 

b. 12th mo. 12th, 1828. 

m. Elizabeth Hickman, daughter of Dr. Joseph 
Hickman, of Willistown, Pa. 
She b. 11th mo. 19th, 1824. 
d. 8th mo. 2nd, 1896. 



202 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1132— JOSEPH HENRY ROBERTS 

b. 8th mo. 10th, 1858. 
d. 11th mo. 15th, 1884. 

1133— CHARLES EDWARD ROBERTS 

b. 1st mo. 5th, 1861. 
d. 4th mo. 3rd, 1895. 

1134— GEORGE SPENCER ROBERTS 

b. 4th mo. 30th, 1864. 
d. 7th mo. 4th, 1886. 

1135— MARY H. ROBERTS b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1866. 

1136— ALFRED HOOPES ROBERTS 

b. 9th mo. 25th, 1867. 

1137— WILLIAM GRANT ROBERTS 

b. 6th mo. 9th, 1877. 

610— HANNAH FRENCH JONES, 2ND (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert, 35; Thomas, 129; Elizabeth, 312). 
b. 11th mo. 14th, 1808, near Germantown, Phila. 
d. 12th mo. 27th, 1893, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. 11th mo. 27th, 1839, Edward Bonsall, 3rd, son 
of Edward and Rachel (Warington) Bonsall. 
He b. 4th mo. 26th, 1814, in Salem, Ohio, 
d. 12th mo. 13th, 1901, in Salem, Ohio. 

1138— JOSEPH JONES BONSALL 

b. 9th mo. 16th, 1840. 
d. 10th mo. 26th, 1841. 

1139— SIDNEY ANN BONSALL 

b. 6th mo. 23rd, 1843. 
m. 3rd mo. 30th, 1864, Thomas F. Fawcett. 

1140— ROBERT BONSALL b. 5th mo. 25th, 1846. 

m. 4th mo. 25th, 1S74, Sarah E. Templin. 

1141— JOSEPH E. BONSALL b. 6th mo. 22nd, 1848. 

in. 2ml mo. 17th. 1S70. Inez M. Taylor. 

1142— ELIZABETH J. BONSALL 

b. 5th mo. 6th, 1851. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



203 



611— WILLIAM R. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313). 

b. 6th mo. 13th, 1802. 

d. 8th mo. 14th, 1869, buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground, Damascus, Ohio, 
m. 4th mo. 30th, 1824, in Springfield Meeting, 
Columbiana County, Ohio, Judith Crew, 
daughter of Obadiah and Mary Petros Crew. 
She b. 1st mo. 1st, 1804, near Culpeper C. H., Va. 
d. 9th mo. 20th, 1868. 



1143— UNITY FRENCH 



b. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1825. 

m. 5th mo. 1st, 1845, Samuel Woolman. 



11 



MARY CREW FRENCH b. 10th mo. 16th, 1826. 

m. First, 6th mo. 3rd, 1847, Andrew Jobes. 
m. Second, October 3rd, 1867, Phineas Cooper. 



1145— ESTHER FRENCH 



1146— CHARLES FRENCH 



1147— JOHN FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 2nd, 1828. 
m. First, 6th mo. 3rd, 1846, Joseph Crew. 
m. Second, 3rd mo. 10th, 1855, Daniel P. 
Strawn. 

b. 9th mo. 21st, 1830. 

m. 7th mo. 10th, 1852, Elizabeth McCartney. 

b. 7th mo. 4th, 1832. 

m. First, 2nd mo. 9th, 1855, Harriet H. 

Conner, 
m. Second, 5th mo., 1882, Emily Conner. 



1148— OBADIAH CREW FRENCH 

b. 10th mo. 5th, 1834. 



1149— ELIZABETH FRENCH 
1150— ANNA FRENCH 

1151— JUDITH FRENCH 



m. May 1st, 1856, Mary C. Fowler. 

b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1837. 

m. 8th mo. 31st, 1854, Josiah C. Ratcliff. 

b. 11th mo. 9th, 1839. 

m. First, 6th mo. 1st, 1859, Ezra Coppock. 

m. Second, June 22nd, 1875, Robert C.Taggart. 

b. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1842. 

m. March 19th, 1868, Joshua Woodward. 



204 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1152— WILLIAM JAMES FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 6th, 1847. 

in. First, February 27th, 1868, Mary Jayne 

Taylor, 
m. Second, March 7th, 1900, Elizabeth Ed- 
wards. 

615— JAMES FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; James, 313). 

b. 5th mo. 24th, 1814. 

d. 1st mo. 19th, 1885; buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground, Medford, N. J. 
m. 1st mo. 8th, 1841, in Tuckerton, N. J., Annie 

E. Gifford, daughter of William and Hannah 

(Braddock) Gifford. 
She b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1816. 

d. 5th mo. 20th, 1896; buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground, Medford, N. J. 

1153— WILLIAM GIFFORD FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 6th, 1841. 
d. llth mo. 2nd, 1850. 

1154— HANNAH ANN FRENCH 

b. 2nd mo. 18th, 1843. 
d. llth mo. 23rd. 1891. 

1155— CHARLES GIFFORD FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1845. 

m. June 28th, 1882, Mary E. Currie. 

1156— MARY BORTON FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 31st, 1847. 
d. llth mo. 23rd, 1906. 

m. First, Moore. 

m. Second, Jacob G. Evans. 
He d. April 29th, 1888. 

1157— IMOGENE LUCILLA FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 14th. 1850. 

m. November 28th, 1869, Jonathan H. Troth. 

1157a— JAMES G. FRENCH b. 7th mo. 9th, 1854. 

d. 5th mo. 17th, 1858. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



205 



1158— ROBERT ROGERS FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1857. 

d. 4th mo. 17th, 1886, unmarried. 

"Anna E. French, Emmogene L. French [1157], and Robert R. French [1158], came 
into Evesham Monthly Meeting, Mount Laurel, N. J., from Upper Springfield, Ohio, by 
certificate, 11th mo. 23rd, 1866." 

618— BARZILLAI MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315). 

b. 5th mo. 4th, 1798. 
d. 12th mo. 26th, 1861. 
m. 1st mo. 2nd, 1823, Sarah Crew. 
She b. 4th mo. 4th, 1802. 
d. 11th mo. 17th, 1863. 



1159— MERIBAH MORRIS 
1160— JANE MORRIS 
1161— JAMES B. MORRIS 
1162— JOHN W. MORRIS 



1163— THOMAS F. MORRIS 
1164— HANNAH MORRIS 
1165— ELIZA ANN MORRIS 
1166— SARAH C. MORRIS 
1167— MARY P. MORRIS 



b. 12th mo. 13th, 1823. 

m. 1842, George C. Baldwin. 

b. 4th mo. 25th, 1825. 

m. 3rd mo. 10th, 1862, John Steele. 

b. 6th mo. 1st, 1826. 

m. 9th mo. 3rd, 1846, Nancy Kirkbride. 

b. 6th mo. 1st, 1826. 

m. First, 6th mo. 3rd, 1847, Mary Kirkbride. 
m. Second, 10th mo. 13th, 1859, Rebecca 

Morrough. 
m. Third, 2nd mo. 1st, 1877, Mary N. Barber. 

b. 9th mo. 22nd, 1828. 
m. 6th mo. 26th, 1853, Martha Harris. 

b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1831. 

m. 8th mo. 15th, 1848, William Woodruff. 

b. 11th mo. 13th, 1832. 
m. Robert Kirkbride. 

b. 12th mo. 18th, 1835. 

m. 1st mo. 25th, 1860, Alexander C. Lutes. 

b. 1st mo. 29th, 1838. 
m. 8th mo. 23rd, 1857, Joseph Townsend. 



206 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



620— SARAH MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315). 

b. 5th mo. 31st, 1801. 
(1. 1st mo. 27th, 1890. 
m. 3rd mo. 1st, 1821. James B. Bruff. 



1168— I.VDIA B. BRUFF 



b. 1st mo. 26th, 1822. 

m. 3rd mo. 27th, 1851, William H. Oliphant. 



1169— HANNAH BRUFF 



b. 8th mo. 27th, 1823. 
d. 10th mo. 11th, 1882. 
m. 3rd mo. 1849, Edward Williams, M.D. 



1170— CHARLES BRIEF 



b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1825. 
d. 4th mo. 1st, 1835. 



1171— JOSEFH BRUFF 



b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1827. 
d. 11th mo. 14th, 1885. 
m. Anna M. Ogden. 



1172— MARY BRUFF 



b. 5th mo. 3rd, 1829. 

m. 7th mo. 27th, 1S48, Benjamin C. Andrews. 



1173— JAMES BRUFF 



b. 2nd mo. 27th, 1831. 
d. 8th mo. 30th, 1834. 



1174— SARAH BRUFF 



b. 8th mo. 4th, 1833. 

m. 8th mo. 30th, 1859, Tristram Coggeshall. 



1175— ESTHER BRUFF 



b. 10th mo. 9th, 1835. 

m. 3rd mo. 28th, 1877, Isaac N. Miles. 



1176— HENRIETTA T. BRUFF b. 3rd mo. 5th, 1837. 

d. 9th mo. 5th, 1837. 



1177— ELIZABETH Bkl FF 



b. 9th mo. 13ih. 1838. 

m. 10th mo. 27th, 1864, Lindley M. Kirk. 



1178— ANNA LOUISA BRUFF b. 4th mo. 11th, 1840. 

d. 2nd mo. 25th, 1872. 



1179— M SAN I'.KUFF 



b. 4th mo. 20th, 1842. 
d. 8th mo. 24th, 1842. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 207 

624— ELIZABETH MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315). 

b. 6th mo. 13th, 1809. 
d. 8th mo. 29th, 1843. 

m. 11th mo. 28th, 1839, in Friends' Meeting, 
Damascus, Ohio, William Carson. 
He b. 1st mo. 7th, 1811. 

1180— MORRIS E. CARSON b. 8th mo. 16th, 1843. 

630— ZADOK STREET FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317). 

b. 1st mo. 7th, 1808, in Salem, Ohio. 

d. 4th mo. 15th, 1871, in Salem, Ohio. 

m. 9th mo. 2nd, 1846, in Guernsey Meeting, Guern- 
sey, Ohio, Miriam Holloway, daughter of Rob- 
ert Holloway. 
She b. 11th mo. 10th, 1820, in Guernsey Co., Ohio. 

d. 1904. 

1181— ROBERT FRENCH b. 1st mo. 22nd, 1848. 

m. First, June 23rd, 1887, Elizabeth Mary 

Newton, 
m. Second, Mary Schoppelrey. 

1182— LYDIA FRENCH b. 5th mo. 28th, 1850. 

m. May, 1905, Dr. J. B. Kirk. 

1183— AMY FRENCH b. 8th mo. 6th, 1856. 

(i. 1st mo. 15th, 1881. 

632— ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 129; 

Robert, 317). 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1816, in Salem, Ohio, 
d. 6th mo. 28th, 1899, in Salem, Ohio. 
m. 10th mo. 30th, 1844. in Friends' Meeting, Salem, 
Ohio, John Warren Johnson, son of Philip and 
Hannah (Warren) Johnson. 
He d. 1898. 



208 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1184— ANNA JOHNSON b. 9th mo. 27th, 1845, in Salem, Ohio. 

m. August 8th, 1878, Lemuel Fawcett, son of 
Josiah and Sarah (Oliphant) Fawcett; 
Presbyterian minister performing cere- 
mony. 
He b. December 29th, 1838. in Salem, Ohio, 
d. September 14th, 1910, in Salem, Ohio. 

634— JOHN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Robert, 317). 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1822, in Salem, Ohio. 

d. 5th mo. 22nd, 1889, in Salem, Ohio. 

m. 3rd mo. 26th, 1845, in Friends' Meeting, 
Salem, Ohio, Martha Howey Ogden, daughter 
of John and Ann (Howey) Ogden. 
She b. 1st mo. 1st, 1826, in Woodstown, N. J. 

1185— ANNA STREET FRENCH 

b. 10th mo. 7th, 1846. 

m. 10th mo. 24th, 1867, Lindley Murray 
Brackin. 

1186— JOSEPH HOWEY FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 28th, 1850. 

m. July 1st, 1873, Emma Florence Hibler. 

1187— MARY ANN FRENCH b. 9th mo. 14th, 1853. 

m. 9th mo. 25th, 1873, Benjamin Wilson. 

1188— SARAH JOHN FRENCH b. 6th mo. 5th, 1856. 

1189— ELMIRA TOWNSEND FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 15th, 1858. 

m. 8th mo. 27th, 1884, Joseph Green Steer. 

1190— GEORGE JONES FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 23rd, 1861. 
d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1872. 

1191— EDWARD OGDEN FRENCH 

!). 12th mo. 27th, 1863. 
m. January 2Sth, 1896, Ada H. Townsend. 

1192— CHARLES OGDEN FRENCH 

b. 8th mo. 1st. 1869. 
d. 2nd mo. 19th, 1874. 




1817, MARY (PARRY) FRENCH 



1822, 9 \ Ml' II. FRENCH 1871 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 209 

635— SAMUEL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Robert, 317). 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1822, in Salem, Ohio. 

d. 11th mo. 1st, 1871, in Germantown, Philadel- 
phia ; buried in Salem, O. 

m. 3rd mo. 31st, 1847, in Friends' Meeting, 
Salem, Ohio, Mary Jones Parry, daughter of 
Daniel and Hannah (Jones) Parry. 
She b. 10th mo. 6th, 1817, in Philadelphia, Pa. 

d. 3rd mo. 11th, 1912. 

1193— SARAH FRENCH b. 7th mo. 1st, 1849. 

d. 1st mo. 15th, 1869. 

1194— HANNAH L. FRENCH b. 9th mo. 15th, 1851. 

m. 11th mo. 23rd, 1876, Abel Walker. 

1195— LOUIS B. FRENCH b. 7th mo. 7th, 1853. 

m. October 4th. 1877. Deborah D. Hall. 

1196— CHARLES FRENCH b. 7th mo. 10th, 1855. 

d. 10th mo. 22nd, 1856. 

637— ALBERT FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Barzillai, 318). 

b. 7th mo. 9th, 1815. 
m. 8th mo. 1st, 1839, Elizabeth M. Corse. 
She d. 5th mo. 5th, 1887. 

1197— WILLIAM HENRY FRENCH 

b. 10th mo. 25th, 1840. 

m. 3rd mo. 29th, 1864, Rachel Satterthwaite, 
daughter of David and Ruth Satterthwaite. 
She d. 9th mo. 6th, 1865. 

1198— ANNA FRENCH b. 5th mo. 10th, 1S42. 

1199— REBECCA C. FRENCH b. 9th mo. 17th, 1845. 

m. 6th mo. 2nd, 1874, Caleb Davies. 

1200— ALBERT EDWARD FRENCH 

b. 10th mo. 12th, 1850. 

m. 5th mo. 16th, 1878, Abbie Caroline Betts. 

14 



210 i, I N I \ l (k;\ OF l HE 

638— THOMAS YATES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Barzillai, 318). 

b. 7th mo. 21st, 1816, in Damascus, Ohio, 
d. 4th mo. 13th, 1895, in Salem, Ohio. 
m. 3rd mo. 27th, 1862, in W'estland Meeting, 
Penna., Rachel H. Blackburn, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Ann (Hewitt) Blackburn. 
She b. 9th mo. 23rd, 1831, in Brownsville, Penna. 
d. 12th mo. 2nd, 1904, in Salem, Ohio. 

1201— CLARKSON SHEPPARD FRENCH 

b. 8th mo. 26th, 1863, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. 3rd mo. 28th, 1888, in Friends' Meeting, 
Salem, Ohio, Annie B. Young, daughter of 
Thomas and Ann (Barber) Young. 
She b. 11th mo. 2nd, 1854, in Salem, Ohio. 

642— EZRA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Barzillai, 318). 

b. Ilth mo. 22nd, 1820, in Damascus, Ohio. 

d. 9th mo. 22nd, 1899, in Damascus, Ohio. 

m. First, 5th mo. 1st, 1851, in Friends' Meeting, 
Damascus, Ohio , Ann W. Stanley. 

m. Second, 11th mo.' 30th, 1863, inTriends' Meet- 
ing, New Garden, Ohio, Mary Johnson, daughter 
of Benjamin and Martha (Grizell) Johnson. 
She b. 11th mo. 11th, 1827, in New Garden, Ohio. 

d. 11th mo. 22nd, 1910, in Damascus, Ohio. 

1202— ELI FRENCH b. 12th mo. 17th, 1853. 

m. March 16th, 1879, Lorinda A. Greenamver. 

Children of Ezra and Mary (Johnson) French. 

1203— BENJAMIN J. FRENCH b. 7th mo. 11th, 1866. 

1204— MARY ISABELLA FRENCH, M.D. 

b. 11th mo. 18th, 1869. 
m. 1st mo. 17th, 1900, George F. De Vol, M.D. 




1816 



THOMAS Y. FBENCH 



1895 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



211 



644— DAVID FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Barzillai, 318). 

b. 11th mo. 3rd. 1823. 

m. 4th mo. 29th, 1857, in Friends' Meeting, Sandy 
Springs, Ohio, Eliza Miller. 
She b. 4th mo. 19th, 1833. 



1205— MARY FRENCH 



b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1858. 
m. 8th mo. 22nd, 1889, Charles Stratton. 



1206— ELMA FRENCH 



b. 4th mo. 21st, 1S60. 

m. 10th mo. 14th, 1891, William T. Oliver. 



1207— SOPHIA FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 4th, 1862. 
d. 3rd mo. 7th, 1872. 



1208— ELISHA L. FRENCH 



b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1866. 



645— BARZILLAI FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Barzillai, 318). 

b. 2nd mo. 14th, 1826. 
d. 8th mo. 31st, 1902. 

m. First, 9th mo. 29th, 1852, in Friends' Meeting, 
Sandy Springs, Ohio, Deborah Miller. 
She b. 9th mo. 16th, 1828. 
d. 11th mo. 9th, 1872. 

m. Second, in Friends' Meeting, Middletown, 
Ohio, Martha Blackburn, daughter of William 
and Ann (Hewitt) Blackburn. 
She b. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1833. 
d. 8th mo. 5th, 1888. 



1209— EDGAR FRENCH 



b. 8th mo. 13th, 1853. 

m. 4th mo. 6th, 1876, Ruth Emma Vansyoe. 



1210— MARY FRENCH 



b. 8th mo. 8th, 1854. 
d. 4th mo. 4th, 1858. 



212 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1211— HENRIETTA FRENCH b. 9th mo. 13th. 1859. 

1212— BARZILLAI MORRIS FRENCH 

b. 8th mo. 13th, 1865. 
m. 5th mo. 28th, 1896, Ardella M. Barber. 



646— LVDIA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Barzillai, 318). 

b. 12th mo. 2nd, 1827. 

m. 3rd mo. 26th, 1856, in Friends' Meeting, 
Damascus, Ohio, Theophilus Morlan. 
He b. 6th mo. 16th, 1826. 



1213— MARY FRENCH MORLAN 

b. 8th mo. 14th, 1857. 

m. 12th mo. 23rd, 1886, Nathan Kirk. 



650— JOSEPH C. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Elijah, 319). 

b. 12th mo. 26th, 1810. 
m. Sarah Jones. 

1214— ELIZABETH FRENCH m. Benjamin Satterthwaite. 



652— ELIJAH FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Elijah, 319). 
b. 10th mo. 2nd. 1814. 
m. Huldah Marmon. 

1215— JOSEPH FRENCH 




1820 



B u;/ll,i, w FRENCH 



1W2 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 213 

653— HANNAH ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Robert, 

131; Mary, 320). 

b. 10th mo. 22nd, 1811, near Fellowship, N. J. 
d. 10th mo. 28th, 1882, near Moorestown, N. J. 
m. 11th mo. 13th, 1834, Reuben Roberts, son of 
Enoch and Ann (Matlack) Roberts. ^ 
He b. 8th mo. 15th, 1811, near Moorestown, N. J. 
d. 11th mo. 17th, 1855, in Alexandria, Va. 

1216— JOSEPH LOVETT ROBERTS 

b. 2nd mo. 26th, 1836. 
d. 12th mo. 6th, 1859. 

1217— MARY ANN ROBERTS b. 1st mo. 5th, 1838. 

m. 12th mo. 10th, 1861, Warrington Gilling- 
ham. 

1218— EDWARD ROBERTS b. 5th mo. 21st, 1840. 

m. 10th mo. 3rd, 1867, Hannah A. Lippincott. 

1219— JOSIAH ROBERTS b. 11th mo. 13th, 1842. 

m. 5th mo. 26th, 1869, Anna B. Andrews. 

1220— ENOCH CORE ROBERTS 

b. 9th mo. 1st, 1844. 

m. 11th mo. 22nd, 1871, Priscilla L. Evans. 

1221— JOHN H. ROBERTS b. 7th mo. 4th. 1847. 

m. 2nd mo. 19th, 1874, Sarah B. Williams. 

1222— REUBEN MATLACK ROBERTS 

b. 9th mo. 26th, 1S50. 
m. 9th mo. 16th, 1886, Susan M. Merritt. 

1223— BENJAMIN HALLOWELL ROBERTS 

b. 10th mo. 15th, 1854. 

Enoch Roberts, of Chester, County of Burlington, N. J., son of Samuel and Hannah 
Roberts, and Ann Matlack, daughter of Reuben and Elizabeth Matlack, were married 
3rd mo. 2nd, 1809. 



214 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



654— ROBERT FRENCH ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Robert, 131 ; Mary, 320). 

b. 4th mo. 9th, 1814, in Fellowship, N. J. 

d. 9th mo. 13th, 1884, in Fairfax Co., Va. 

m. 2nd mo. 17th, 1842, in Friends' Meeting, 
Moorestown, N. J., Ruth Ann Hunt, daughter 
of Caleb and Rhoda (Matthews) Hunt. 
She b. 11th mo. 25th. 1819, in Brownsville, Pa. 

d. 1st mo. 1st, 1897, at "Cameron," Fairfax Co., 
Va. 



1224— CALEB HUNT ROBERTS b. 12th mo. 20th, 1842, in Burlington Co., 

N. J. 
d. 7th mo. 13th, 1863, in Fairfax Co., Va. 

1225— ALFRED HINT ROBERTS 

b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1845. 

m. October 17th, 1877. Jean Campbell Har- 
mon. 



1226— WALTER ROBERTS 



b. 10th mo. 14th, 1846. 

m. March 5th, 1S91, Rebecca Harmon. 



1227— MARY EMMA ROBERTS b. 11th mo. 18th, 1848, at "Cameron," Fair- 
fax Co., \'a. 
d. 2nd mo. 18th, 1910, in Philadelphia; buried 
in Fairfax Co.. \ a. 



1228— JAMES WALKER ROBERTS 

b. 1st mo. 17th, 1851. 

1229— ANNA MILLER ROBERTS 



b. 9th mo. 8th, 1854. I 

1230— ELIZA WALKER ROBERTS 

b. 4th mo. 27th, 1858. 



at " Cameron," Fair- 
fax Co., Va. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 215 

A VIRGINIA HOMESTEAD 

From a communication received from Anna M. Roberts [1229], 1st mo. 27th, 1910: 
" My father came to Virginia in 1848, having become interested in Alex- 
andria and vicinity when attending, in his youth, Benjamin Hallovvell's well 
known school. He bought, with his brother-in-law, Reuben Roberts, this 
place, " Cameron Mills," — where we still live. The house was old in 1848 
and is now one of the oldest in this part of the world, but we continue to 
find it a real home, full of comfort. My father left his children a good 
heritage in an honored name and they have done nothing to mar that inheri- 
tance. We continue to hold our membership in the Society of Friends— my 
brothers and sisters and myself. 

" Walter Roberts [1226] is a merchant in Alexandria, a bank director, 
president of the Alexandria Water Co., etc. James W. Roberts [1228] is a 
farmer, bank director, school trustee, president of one of the most important 
home insurance companies, etc. While not engaged in extended business 
interests, they are men of high standing, living busy and useful lives." 



A NOTABLE EDUCATOR 

Benjamin Hallowell, born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, 8th mo. 17th, 1799, 
died 9th mo. 7th, 1877, at his home near Sandy Spring, Montgomery county, Maryland, 
was a noted teacher, lecturer and philanthropist. It was under his direction and prin- 
cipalship that Friends' Central School, Philadelphia, was founded in 1845, at Fifth and 
Cherry streets. His skilful organization was the beginning, upon sound principles, of a 
noted institution. Previously he had conducted for a number of years a successful and 
prominent school in Alexandria, Virginia, but " the wear of the large school and lecturing 
twice a week on Chemistry, Astronomy, Geology, Philosophy, etc., through the term of 
eleven months, began to tell unfavorably on his physical constitution," and in the summer 
of 1842 he retired with his family to his farm at Rockland, Sandy Spring, Maryland, 
whence he went to Philadelphia, ninth month, 1845. After a year of earnest and effective 
work in that city, to which, in the characteristic sensitiveness of his nature, he refers 
as being " by no means to my own satisfaction, but I was conscious of having done the 
very best I could under the circumstances," he returned, much to the regret of his friends 
and associates in Philadelphia, to his Rockland farm, there to remain in retirement but 
a short time, when he again assumed charge of the school at Alexandria, broadening and 
extending its scope of usefulness. For more than half a century Benjamin Hallowell 
was a leading figure in the councils of Friends, his influence for good being felt in many 
directions. In 1910 seven pupils of his first school in Philadelphia were living, all retain- 
ing tender and appreciative memories of their early teacher. 



216 GENEALOGY OF THE 



655— GEORGE ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Robert, 

131 ; Mary, 320). 

b. 11th mo. 3rd, 1818. 

d. 10th mo. 13th, 1890; buried in Colestown (N. 

J.) Cemetery. 
m. loth mo. 31st, 1848, Elizabeth R. Middleton, 
daughter of Charles and Ann C. Middleton. 
She b. 1st mo. 28th, 1830. 

d. 4th mo. 27th, 1908; buried in Colestown Ceme- 
tery. 

1231— HANNAH FRENCH ROBERTS 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1849. 
m. 3rd mo. 28th, 1872, Mark Haines. 

1232— ELIZA KNIGHT ROBERTS 

1). 10th mo. 28th, 1851. 

d. 1st mo. 17th, 1899. 

m. 12th mo. 24th, 1891, Howard T. Lake. 

656— JOSIAH ROBERTS, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Robert, 131 ; Mary, 320). 

b. 3rd mo. 26th, 1823, in Fellowship, X. J. 

d. 7th mo. 4th, 1901, in Baltimore, Md. 
m. 4th mo. 12th, 1849, by Friends' Ceremony, 
Eydia Roberts, daughter of Asa and Anna 
(Lippincott) Roberts. 
She b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1824, near Fellowship, N. J. 
d. 4th mo. 20th, 1894, in Baltimore, Md. 

1233— ANNIE LIPPINCOTT ROBERTS 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1850. 

in. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1S76, George M. Lamb. 

12J4— MARY FRENCH ROBERTS 

b. 6th mo. 30th, 1852. in Fellowship. N. J. 
d. 11th mo. 7th, 1890, in Baltimore, Md. 

1235— ELI. FN THOMAS ROBERTS 

b. 9th mo. 14th. 1S54, in Fellowship, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 217 

1236— CAROLINE ROBERTS b. 4th mo. 24th, 1857, in Fellowship, N. J. 

1237— ROBERT FRENCH ROBERTS 

b. 8th mo. 19th, 1862, in Fellowship, N. J. 
m. October 20th, 1910, at " Bloomfield," Over- 
brook, Pa., Isabel Chambers, daughter of 
Cyrus and Mary (Pyle) Chambers. 

Asa Roberts, born 2nd mo. 2nd, 1795, son of Samuel and Hannah (Stiles) Roberts and 
Anna Lippincott, born 3rd mo. 22nd, 1796, daughter of Samuel and Priscilla (Brien) 
Lippincott, were married 10th mo. 25th, 1821. Asa Roberts died 1st mo. 24th, 1859; 
Anna (Lippincott) Roberts died 10th mo. 7th, 1836; buried in Moorestown (N. J.) 
Burying Ground. 



664— JAMES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 132; 

Joseph, 322). 

b. March 27th, 1807. 
d. April 3rd, 1836, in Beaver, Pa. 
m. . 

1238— MARTHA FRENCH m. Houston. 

d. in Detroit, Mich. 

666— JOSEPH FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

James, 132; Joseph, 322). 

b. May 21st, 1813. 

d. November 11th, 1871, in Pittsburgh, Pa. r 

buried in Beaver, Pa. 
m. Elizabeth Poorman. 
She d. 1890. 

1239— ELIZABETH FRENCH 

1240— BELLE FRENCH m. Patterson. 

1241— MARY FRENCH b. 1846, in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

m. Eli Lemon Sheldon. 
He d. 1892. 

1242— NEWTON FRENCH d. young. 



218 GENEALOGY OF THE 



MARY FRENCH-SHELDON, AUTHOR AND EXPLORER 

Mary Trench-Sheldon [1241], third daughter of Joseph French, an engineer and mathe- 
matician of ability, and his wife, Elizabeth (l'oorman) Trench, a practicing physician 
of New York City for some years, was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., during the residence of 
her parents in that city. She was carefully educated as a musician and linguist and also 
took a course in medicine, but never practiced. Developing a taste and talent for litera- 
ture and exploratory travel, she early entered the field as an author, translator and public 
lecturer. She made three journeys around the world, making historical and ethnological 
research, meanwhile translating a number of important French books. She became 
specially interested in African exploration, and greatly pleased French savants by such 
a faithful translation of M. Gustave Flaubert's " Salammbo " that the French government 
placed a copy of her work in his tomb, at Rouen. She conducted the publishing house 
of Saxon & Company for many years and was constantly engaged in editorial and lit- 
erary work. 

Her interest in African exploration and civilization led to a notable expedition, under 
her own direction, in 1891. The following year, under the title " Sultan to Sultan," she 
published a remarkable story of her adventures among the Masai and other tribes of 
East Africa, with maps and many suggestive illustrations reproduced from photographs 
made by this intrepid explorer, who was unaccompanied by any white person. Among 
her one hundred and forty native attendants there were only about half a dozen women. 
Her special object was to demonstrate the justice and wisdom of a peaceable and kindly 
policy in dealing with the long misunderstood and abused people of the Dark Continent. 
She passed through many perilous adventures and reached the East Coast, upon her 
return, in almost a dying condition. The story is told with fidelity to nature and at 
times with much feeling. The astonished natives always showed profound respect towards 
" Bebe Bwana," the " Woman Master " of this novel expedition. They vied with each 
other in rivaling the members of the caravan in paying daily court and performing acts 
of kindness and courtesy. 

The expedition started inland from Mombasa in March, 1801, journeying some two 
hundred miles southwestwardly, to the great mountain Kilimanjaro, the vicinity of 
which is occupied by the Masai and other wild tribes. The explorer performed a remark- 
able feat in descending by a rugged and dangerous route, to the famous lake that lies 
in a perilous volcanic basin. Through interpreters she made herself rpiite at home in a 
forbidding wilderness, where no white woman and few white men ever trod. She was 
permitted to look upon inner scenes of African life and to learn many things hidden from 
the ordinary traveller. She walked much of the way and when wearied was carried in 
a huge basket palanquin which afforded a nu' c ' Bnd restful retreat during the heat of 
mid-day. Upon one occasion her carriers slipped, in crossing a fearful gorge, and all 
were plunged into the roaring abyss. In rescuing her the poor affrighted fellows, in 
their wild efforts to carry her up the steep rug"ged bank, hopelessly slipped and dropped 
her a second time, resulting in serious injury to her spine where she struck the rocks, 
nearly costing the life of " Bebe Bwana." This journey of an intelligent and brave 
American woman was a close, face to face, study <>f racial conditions that was certain to 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 219 

attract the attention of learned men and thoughtful observers everywhere. It secured 
recognition from British geographers and scientists ; and the following year after Mrs. 
French-Sheldon's return to England she was commissioned to visit the missionary workers 
in the English Congo region. Her book was reviewed in the most flattering manner, 
many other travellers testifying to its interest and value. She was made a member of 
the Royal Geographical Society, London, and resides in Pembroke Square, Kensington, W. 
Some years before her journey to Africa this notable woman met and married Eli 
Lemon Sheldon, a man of considerable intellectual gifts and a successful author. He 
fully sympathized with her in her work, but was unable to accompany her on her memo- 
rable journey. His health failed and he died, in 1892, as her book was going to press. 
In the revised preface she paid the following tribute to his memory: 
" Dedicated to Eli Lemon Sheldon 
To whom I owe all I have accomplished. My inspiration, my critic, my 
advocate, my refuge, my anchor, my sympathizer, my friend, my comrade, 
my husband. 

Honorable, gifted, noble, unselfish, gentleman, beloved by all; whose 
sudden demise has laid upon me a tragic burden of sorrow during the 
completion of this volume. 

M. French-Sheldon. 
Boston, U. S. A., August 1st, 1892." 

667— THOMAS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132; Joseph, 322). 

b. October 4th, 1815, in Old Brighton (now 

Beaver Falls), Beaver County, Penna. 
d. November 2nd, 1886, in Burlington, Iowa, 
m. December 2nd, 1849, in Burlington, Iowa, 
Delia Elizabeth Griffey, daughter of William 
and Mary (Spitzer) Griffey, of Morgantown, 
W. Va. 
She b. October 4th, 1827, in Morgantown, W. Va. 

1243— CLARENCE NEWTON FRENCH 

b. February 10th, 1851, in Burlington, Iowa, 
d. August 20th, 1853, in Burlington, Iowa. 

1244— CLEON FRENCH b. April 27th, 1852. 

m. April 14th, 1880, Margaret M. Mason. 

1245— KATE FRENCH b. March 25th, 1855. 

m. June 23rd, 1873, O. T. Hillhouse. 

1246— IDA FRENCH b. October 14th, 1860. 

m. September 24th, 1888, H. L. Craesser. 



220 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1247— LEE NEWTON FRENCH b. June 26th, 1864, in Burlington, Iowa. 

1248— LAURA LEANNAH FRENCH 

b. July 14th, 1868, in Burlington, Iowa, 
deceased. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS FRENCH 

Thomas French, fifth son and child of Joseph and Martha (Newton) 
French, received his early education in Beaver, Penna., and then went to 
Pittsburgh and took a course of study to fit himself as mechanical engineer. 
In that capacity he served for several years on the western and south- 
western steamboat lines. In 1841, he removed to Burlington, Iowa, where 
he followed his calling and engaged successfully in various industrial enter- 
prises. He represented the notable firm of Gales & Seaton, owners and 
editors of the " National Intelligencer," Washington, D. C, for twelve years, 
operating the Burlington ferry, controlled by them, and as general agent 
looked after their extensive western interests. In 1854, Mr. French with 
a number of others purchased about 700 acres of land which included the 
ferry property on the Illinois side of the river. He then superintended the 
construction of four large steamboats, built at different points, Cincinnati, 
St. Louis and Brownsville, Pa., three for use of the ferry, and one for the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. In the fall of 1856, Mr. French 
sold his interest in the ferry, and was not again interested in business for 
some years. He had also dealt largely in real estate, buying and selling 
city and other valuable property, and had acquired considerable real estate 
personally. He took an active and influential interest in local affairs. He 
was seven years a member of the City Council, and was Mayor of Burlington 
during the entire civil war, in that position rendering conspicuous and 
efficient service to the national government. He assisted in raising troops 
and took a notable part in caring for the families of Union soldiers. He 
was an efficient city officer, and his term of office was marked by a wise, 
orderly and economical administration. In all the walks of life, Captain 
French was recognized as a man of high character and worthy motives. 
His humanitarian views led him to espouse the cause of the colored race, as 
a vigorous advocate of emancipation before the war. To this end he allied 
himself with the Republican party at its birth and always sustained its 
principles. He is remembered in Burlington, Iowa, where he lived for two 
score years, as one of its most noted citizens. 




THOMAS FRENCH 



18X6 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 221 

668— SAMUEL B. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132 ; Joseph, 322). 

b. December 1st, 1818, in Beaver, Beaver Co., Pa. 
d. January 28th, 1874, in Beaver, Beaver Co., Pa. 
m. September 11th, 1842, in Bridgewater, Beaver 
Co., Pa., Emily Robinson, daughter of Hugh 
and Nancy (Black) Robinson. 
She b. March 2nd, 1824, near New Brighton, Beaver 
Co., Pa. 
d. September 7th, 1894, in Beaver, Pa. 

1249— MARTHA NEWTON FRENCH 

m. September 17th, 1867, Jason Richardson. 

1250— NANCY ROBINSON FRENCH 

d. February 21st, 1902, in Beaver, Pa. 

1251— THOMAS R. FRENCH 

1252— SAMUEL FRENCH d. April 22nd, 1853, in Beaver, Pa. 

1253— FRANKLIN P. FRENCH d. January 4th, 1871, in Beaver, Pa. 

1254— ELIZA FRENCH m. October 8th, 1879, Rev. J. W. Dorrance. 

1255— MARY FRENCH m. August 14th, 1876, James W. McKenzie. 

1256— EMILY R. FRENCH 

1257— SARAH FRENCH m. December 9th, 1905, John Ferguson. 

1258— KATHERINE DAVENPORT FRENCH 

d. February 1st, 1909. 

1259— JEANETTE FRENCH d. July 21st, 1901, in Beaver, Pa. 

1260— ALICE FRENCH m. June 6th, 1894, J. Ware Sharpless Kerlin. 

1261— WILLIAM CALDWELL FRENCH 

Attorney-at-Law. 



222 GENEALOGY OF THE 

SAMUEL B. FRENCH 

Samuel B. French [668], sixth son and child of Joseph and Martha 
(Newton) Prench, when a young man entered the service of one of the 
steamboat companies plying on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, between Pitts- 
burgh and New Orleans. He possessed qualities specially adapted to this 
work, and was very successful. He became captain and part proprietor and 
later owner of several steamboats, among them the Joseph Pierce, Tropic 
and Shenango. Retiring from river life, he engaged extensively in the manu- 
facture of brick under the firm name of French & Quay. The plant was 
conveniently located on the south side of the Ohio River, directly opposite 
Heaver, Pa., and Mr. French was conducting this business at the time of 
his death. About 1845, Mr. French built a substantial and attractive brick 
residence in Beaver, at the northwest corner of Elk and Second streets (see 
accompanying illustration), in which he resided until his death in 1874. He 
was a public spirited man of considerable influence and prominence, and in 
politics an old line Democrat. His active river life had prevented his accept- 
ing political office. He was of benevolent and social disposition, active in 
the Masonic fraternity, being a charter member of St. Joseph Lodge No. 457, 
F. & A. M., of Beaver, and a member of Commandery No. 1 of the Knights 
Templars, of Pittsburgh. After Mr. French's death in 1874 his former part- 
ner, Matthew Stanley Quay, later noted in the politics of Pennsylvania, settled 
the estate, and secured possession of the residence at Elk and Second streets, 
which he occupied as his home for the balance of his life. 

Mr. French's wife, Emily (Robinson) French, was for many years an 
active member of the First Presbyterian Church, of Beaver, Pa. ; she survived 
her husband some twenty years, dying at the age of seventy. 

672— CAROLINE FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James 

132 ; Joseph, 322). 

b. January 12th, 1828. 
m. Henry T. Patton. 

1262— THOMAS PATTON 

1263— MARY PATTON d. young. 

1264— CHARLES NEWTON PATTON 

d. young. 




1818 



SAMUEL B. FRKXt'll 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 223 

1265— HENRY T. PATTON, JR. 
1266— FRED. PATTON. 

674— JOSEPH T. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132; Thomas, 325). 

b. 8th mo. 21st, 1819. 
m. 1st mo. 4th, 1844, Isabella T. Swain. 

1267— ELWOOD THOMAS FRENCH 

b. 2nd mo. 8th, 1845. 

1268— ELY A E. A. FRENCH b. 12th mo. 8th, 1851. 

m. 5th mo. 27th, 1875, Lacey B. Sanford. 

675— JAMES F. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132; Thomas, 325). 

b. 6th mo. 10th, 1821. 

m. 9th mo. 19th, 1857, Mary E. Frame. 

1269— LEWIS FRENCH 
1270— EMMER FRENCH 
1271— LIDA FRENCH 

676— WILLIAM F. PRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

James, 132; Thomas, 325). 

b. 3rd mo. 30th, 1823. 

m. 4th mo. 9th, 1857, Deborah G. Bonsall, daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Martha (Sharp) Bonsall. 

1272— LORIN T. FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 20th, 1858. 

m. 12th mo. 25th, 1881, Mary E. McDowell. 

1273— MATTIE R. FRENCH b. 12th mo. 23rd, 1860. 

1274— EMMA A. FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 15th, 1868. 



224 GENEALOGY OF THE 

679— NEWTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132 ; Thomas, 325). 

b. 2nd mo. 14th, 1833. 

m. First, 2nd mo. 14th, 1855, Annie Templin. 
m. Second, 2nd mo. 11th, 1893, Elizabeth 
Wharton. 

1275— JAMES FRENCH 

1276— WILLARD FRENCH 

680— SARAH FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35 ; James, 132; 

Thomas, 325). 

m. 10th mo. 1st, 1856, John S. Butler. 

1277— THOMAS F. BUTLER b. 10th mo. 24th, 1858. 

m. 2nd mo. 19th, 1878, Alfaretta Middleton. 

1278— LAWRENCE W. BUTLER 

b. 6th mo. 24th, 1860. 

1279— MERIBAH BUTLER b. 2nd mo. 26th, 1867. 

.681— MARTHA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132 ; Thomas, 325). 

b. 2nd mo. 28th, 1837. 
m. Evan . 

1280— ELLA m. Long. 

1281— ALICE 



1282— JOSEPH 
1283— EDITH - 



71 

> 



= 

o 



- 

o 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 225 

682— THOMAS EMMOR FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35 ; 

James, 132; Thomas, 325). 
b. 3rd mo. 25th, 1844. 
d. 10th mo. 17th, 1895. 
m. Hettie . 

1284— ENOCH FRENCH 

1285— ALBERT FRENCH 

1286— CARRIE FRENCH 



683— ANN CARR (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Ann, 135; Samuel 

Carr, 329). 
m. Moses Gruwell. 

1287— CHARLES C. GRUWELL b. 9th mo. 8th, 1853. 

m. First, 3rd mo. 25th, 1875, Anna S. Oli- 

phant [2075]. 
m. Second, 11th mo., 18S7, Mary (Tomlinson) 

Stephens. 



684— ELEANOR H. WILKINS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Ann, 138; Uriah Wilkins, 334). 
b. 7th mo. 27th, 1793. 
d. 9th mo. 16th, 1867. 

m. 9th mo. 28th, 1815, Farmer Burn, son of 
Joseph and Hannah Burn. 
He b. 12th mo. 23rd, 1791. 
d. 1st mo. 13th, 1864. 

1288— EDWARD FARMER BURN 

b. 3rd mo. 11th, 1S17. 
d. 5th mo. 14th, 1817. 

ELLEN MATILDA MARTIN, adopted daughter 

b. 5th mo. 21st, 1818. 

15 



226 GENEALOGY OF THE 

686— SAMUEL E. WILKINS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Ann, 

138; Uriah Wilkins, 334). 
b. 10th mo. 9th, 1797. 
d. 9th mo. 20th, 1826. 

m. 1st mo. 17th, 1819, Sarah French [556], 
daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Zane) 
French. 

For record of children of Samuel E. Wilkins and Sarah French, see 556. 



687— BENJAMIN E. WILKINS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Ann, 138; Uriah Wilkins, 334). 
b. 6th mo. 9th, 1800. 
d. 7th mo. 23rd, 1878. 
m. Sarah Jaggard, widow. 

1289— HANNAH ANN WILKINS 

b. 4th mo. 26th, 1826. 

m. January 17th, 1846, Joseph Hewlings 
French [757]. 

1290— URIAH FRENCH WILKINS 

b. 7th mo. 2nd, 1828. 
d. 2nd mo. 17th, 1829. 



691— RICHARD WILKINS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Ann, 

138; Isaac Wilkins, 339). 
b. January 19th, 1799, in Moorestown, N. J. 
d. April 4th, 1861, in Camden, N. J. 
m. 3rd mo. 26th, 1829, by Friends' Ceremony, Eliza 
Ann Coate, daughter of William and Sarah 
(Hollinshead) Coate. 
She b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1803, near Pemberton, N. J. 
d. 4th mo. 14th, 1861, in Camden, N. J. 

1290a— ISAAC HOLLINSHEAD WILKINS 

b. 9th mo., 1830. 

d. 9th mo. 27th, 1839. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 227 

1291— SALLIE ANN WILKINS b. 9th mo. 6th, 1840. 

m. First, September 20th, 1864, Dr. Henry 

Ackley, U.S.N. 
m. Second, January 22nd, 1877, Nathan F. 

Cowan. 

1292— RICHARD COATE WILKINS 

b. 8th mo. 27th, 1845. 

m. June 1st, 1874, Laura Stokes. 



699— JOSEPH INSKEEP BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344). 

b. December 23rd, 1804. 
d. August 31st, 1868. 

m. February 16th, 1832, Rebecca Clement, daughter 
of Abel and Keziah (Mickle) Clement. 
She b. 3rd mo. 8th, 1809. 
d. 8th mo. 11th, 1885. 

1293— ABEL CLEMENT BRICK 

b. 12th mo. 6th, 1832. 
d. 8th mo. 12th, 1834. 

1294— JOHN INSKEEP BRICK b. 12th mo. 6th, 1832. 

m. December 24th, 1874, Elizabeth Roberts 
Thorne. 

1295— WILLIAM FRENCH BRICK 

b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1834. 

m. 5th mo. 16th, 1860, Anna Brick Coles 
[1331]. 

1296— HENRY BRICK b. 11th mo. 9th, 1835. 

m. January 4th, 1866, Agnes B. Haines. 

1297— EDGAR BRICK b. 4th mo. 30th, 1837. 

m. November 9th, 1865, Susan Roberts Coles 
[1332]. 

1298— JOSEPH MICKLE BRICK b. 6th mo. 25th, 1838. 

m. November 1st, 1870, Mary Anna Kain 
[1076]. 



228 GENEAL OGY OF THE 

1299— ABIGAIL FRENCH BRICK 

l>. 12th mo. 21st, 1839. 
m. George Cowperthwaite. 

1300— REBECCA CLEMENT BRICK 

b. 12th mo. 2nd, 1854. 
d. 8th mo. 5th. 1855. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Minutes of Haddonfield Meeting of Women Friends: 

At Haddonfield Monthly Meeting of women friends held 8th mo. 13th, 1832. Had- 
donfield preparative Meeting informs that Rebecca Brick (late Clement) has accomplished 
her marriage contrary to the order of discipline, for which she has been visited by the 
overseers. Elizabeth Haines and Elizabeth Kaighn are appointed to visit her and report 
to next meeting. 

9th mo. 10th, 1832. One of the friends appointed to visit Rebecca Brick report they 
attended thereto, and that she left her case with friends, after serious consideration, this 
mee" unites in testifying against her if approved by men fr a * — who now inform that they 
confirm our judgment in respect to her — Sarah Hillman and Beulah Hopkins are ap- 
pointed to inform her thereof. 

700— ABIGAIL FRENCH BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail. 139] William Brick, 344). 

b. February 1 7th, 1809, in Marlton, N. J. 
d. December 15th, 1857, in Pennypack, Pa. 
m. about 1831, Job Bartlett, son of Nathan, 2nd, 
and Deliverance (Hazelton) Bartlett. 
He b. February 19th, 1807. 

d. March 9th, 1883, in Philadelphia. 

1301— MARY BRICK BARTLETT 

b. 1836. 

d. December 7th, 1910, in Tuckerton. N. J. 

m. William Davis. 

1302— ADELAIDE BARTLETT m. Miller II. Gilchrist, of Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

(deceased). 

1303— HENRY BARTLETT d. March 4th, 1862. 

1304— JOHN BARTLETT d. May, 1862. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 229 

1305— CHARLES FRENCH BARTLETT 

b. July 27th, 1848. 

m. April 20th, 1871, Emily Elizabeth Craw- 
ford. 

1306— JOSEPH BRICK BARTLETT 

m. Mary Ellis. 
Deceased. 

1307— JOB COLLIN BARTLETT 

m. Mary Ida Spain. 



701— HANNAH BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 

139; William Brick, 344). 

b. August 25th, 1810. 
d. August 5th, 1854, in Cropwell, N. J. 
m. January 25th, 1834, Clayton Lippincott, son of 
Samuel and Anna (Haines) Lippincott. 
He b. June 14th, 1807, in Cropwell, N. J. 

d. December 30th, 1882, in Cropwell, N. J. 

1308— AGNES BRICK LIPPINCOTT 

b. August 3rd, 1835. 
m. Jacob L. Evans. 
(Both deceased.) 

1309— WILLIAM BRICK LIPPINCOTT 

b. March 18th, 1837. 

m. 3rd mo. 10th, 1868, Rachel E. Collins. 

1309a— MARY BRICK LIPPINCOTT 

b. January 14th, 1842. 



702— WILLIAM STOKES BRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344). 

m. Mary Harbaugh, of Pittsburg, Pa. 

1310— EMMA TRISCILLA BRICK 

m. 1865, Dr. C. W. Buvinger, of Dayton, O. 



230 GENEALOGY OF THE 

703— SAMUEL PRENCH BRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344). 

b. 1823. 

d. 1 1th mo. 28th, 1869 ; buried in Colestown Ceme- 
tery. 

m. 4th mo. 6th, 1848, Caroline Kay Clark, 
daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Kay) 
Clark. 
She b. 10th mo. 15th, 1820. 



1311— BENJAMIN CLARK BRICK 

b. 1st mo. 25th, 1849. 

1312— MARY KAY BRICK b. 7th mo. 27th, 1850. 

d. 8th mo. 6th, 1858. 

1313— ELIZABETH CLARK BRICK 

b. 1st mo. 11th. 1852. 

1314— WILLIAM S. BRICK b. 5th mo. 26th, 1854. 

1315— CAROLINE C. BRICK b. 2nd mo. 16th, 1856. 

m. Bowman S. Lippincott. 

1316— SAMUEL FRENCH BRICK, JR. 

b. 7th mo. 11th, 1S58. 

1317— HENRIETTA C. BRICK b. 1st mo. 8th, 1860. 

d. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1860. 

1318— MARY ELLA BRICK b. 6th mo. 21st, 1861. 

m. Samuel C. Roberts. 

1319— ANNA BRICK b. 10th mo. 9th. 1863. 

buried 12th mo. 23rd, 1882, in Colestovrn 
Cemetery. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 231 

704— ABIGAIL BRICK ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345). 

b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1803, in Fellowship, N. J. 
d. 2nd mo. 5th, 1874, in Norristown, Pa. 
m. 10th mo. 17th, 1822, Benajah Butcher, Jr., son 
of Benajah and Rachel (Shinn) Butcher. 
He b. 5th mo. 20th, 1796. 
d. 4th mo. 30th, 1860. 

1320— ANN R. BUTCHER b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1823. 

m. Samuel Roberts. 

1321— WILLIAM BUTCHER b. 8th mo. 1st, 1825. 

m. 1848, Franklinia E. Woodward. 

1322— MARY B. BUTCHER b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1827. 

m. Alan R. Lukens. 

1323— CAROLINE W. BUTCHER 

b. 10th mo. 3rd, 1828. 

m. Isaac Lloyd. 

1324— SARAH R. BUTCHER b. 7th mo. 21st, 1830. 

d. 9th mo. 24th, 1891. 

m. Chalkley Styer, son of Charles and Hannah 
(Roberts) Styer. 

1325— SUSAN E. BUTCHER b. 10th mo. 27th, 1832. 

m. Andrew Fife. 

1326— BENAJAH BUTCHER, 3RD 

b. 5th mo. 2nd, 1836. 
m. February 5th, 1859, Sarah Jones. 

1327— JACOB BUTCHER b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1838. 

d. 5th mo. 31st, 1864. 

1328— ABIGAIL B. BUTCHER b. 4th mo. 24th, 1840. 

d. 8th mo. 25th, 1896. 
m. First, Thomas Potts. 

m. Second, 10th mo. 12th, 1892, Chalkley 
Styer, son of Charles and Hannah (Rob- 
erts) Styer. 
He b. 1st mo. 13th, 1826, in Montgomery Co., Pa. 



232 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1329— HARRIET W. BUTCHER 

b. 2nd mo. 25th. 1843. 

m. First, February 25th, 1875, Joshua S. 

Haines, 
m. Second, 11th mo. 21st, 1889, James Q. 
Atkinson. 

1330— RACHEL S. BUTCHER b. "th mo. 7th, 1846. 

d. 10th mo. 10th, 1871. 

705— MARY ANN ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345). 

b. 8th mo. 2nd, 1805, in Fellowship, N. J. 

d. 4th mo. 28th, 1851, at Coles Landing, N. J.; 

buried in Colestown Cemetery, 
m. First, 1826, William Bispham, son of John and 
Margaret (Budd) Bispham. 
He b. June 22nd, 1802. 

d. November 15th, 182 7. 

m. Second, 2nd mo. 20th, 1840, Josiah Engle 
Coles, son of Kendal and Sarah (Engle) Coles. 
He b. 8th mo. 19th, 1797, near Evesham, N. J. 

d. 1st mo. 18th, 1870, in Wilmington, Del.; buried 
in Colestown Cemetery. 

1331— ANNA BRICK COLES b. 1st mo. 10th, 1841. 

m. 5th mo. 16th, 1860, William F. Brick [1295]. 

1332— SUSAN ROBERTS COLES 

b. 7th mo. 7th, 1843. 
m. November 9th, 1865, Edgar Brick [1297]. 

706— SUSAN ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 

139; Ann Brick, 345). 
b. 2nd mo. 8th, 1808. 
d. 11th mo. 18th, 1885. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 23£ 

m. 3rd mo. 24th, 1836, Richard Carroll, son of 
Daniel and Martha (Wetherby) Carroll. \ 
He b. 12th mo. 6th, 1796. 
d. 4th mo. 13th, 1845. 

1333— ANNA BRICK CARROLL b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1839. 

1334— WILLIAM ROBERTS CARROLL 

b. 1st mo. 11th, 1841. 

m. January 20th, 1870, Ella Stokes. 

1335— CHARLES DORAN CARROLL 

b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1844. 

m. March 9th, 1876, Laura J. Collins. 

Susan (Roberts) Carroll was for a long time "a valued elder" of the Monthly Meeting 
of Philadelphia. 



707— CAROLINE STOKES (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail,. 

139; Abigail Brick, 346). 

b. 1800. 

d. July 16th, 1838. 
m. Josiah Engle Coles, son of Kendal and Sarah 

(Engle) Coles. 
He m. Second, 2nd mo. 20th, 1840, Mary Ann; 

(Roberts) Bispham [705]. 

1336— JACOB STOKES COLES b. 10th mo. 16th, 1820. 

m. March 12th, 1858, Hannah C. Foster. 

1337— ABIGAIL STOKES COLES 

b. 1824. 
m. 10th mo. 15th, 1846, John Buzby. 

1338— JOB KENDAL COLES deceased. 

1339— JOSEPH CUTHBERT COLES 

deceased. 

Five other children who died in infancy. 



234 GENEALOGY OF THE 

708— ANNA MARIA STOKES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139 ; Abigail Brick, 346). 
b. 1802. 

d. November 18th, 1804. 

m. 1818, Joseph Clark Collings, of Collingswood, 
N.J. 

1339a— ABIGAIL S. COLLINGS b. September 18th, 1819. 

d. in childhood. 

1339b— JOSEPH Z. COLLINGS b. September, 1821. 

d. in childhood. 

1339c— SARAH STOKES COLLINGS 

b. March 10th, 1824. 
d. 1845. 

1339d— JAMES H. COLLINGS b. May 15th, 1826. 

d. 1891. 

m. First, Susannah Ward, 
m. Second, Azelline McDowell. 

1339e— CAROLINE C. COLLINGS 

b. August 9th, 1828. 
m. Lemuel Fowler. 

1339f— JACOB S. COLLINGS b. December, 1830. 

d. in childhood. 

1339g— CHARLES C. COLLINGS 

b. August 21st, 1832. 
d. 1908. 
m. Sarah J. Cooper. 

1339h— RICHARD M. J. COLLINGS 

b. October 3rd, 1835. 
d. in childhood. 

1339! — MARTHA ANN COLLINGS 

b. February 3rd, 1838. 

d. December 12th, 1910. 

m. Charles \V. Turnley. 

1339J— JOSIAII ('. CoLLI.NGS b. May 9th, 1S40. 

d. in childhood. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 235 

1339k— MARY E. COLLINGS b. October 3rd, 1842. 

m. February 2nd, 1881, Jacob P. Fowler. 
He d. March 12th, 1890. 

13391— JOSEPH STOKES COLLINGS 

b. October 3rd, 1844. 

d. March 6th, 1909. 

m. July 26th, 1868, Anna M. Burns. 

1339m— ANNA MARIA COLLINGS 

b. August 3rd, 1847. 
d. in childhood. 

1339n— ANNA STOKES COLLINGS 

b. August 3rd, 1849. 
m. First, 1875, Horace L. Haines, 
m. Second, October 1st, 1887, Daniel C. Kean. 
m. Third, July 28th, 1901, John W. Watson. 

\ 

711— SAMUEL POPE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; 

Amy, 349). 

b. 10th mo. 26th, 1800. 
d. 8th mo. 23rd, 1860. 

m. 4th mo. 14th, 1830, Mary Cook, of Monmouth 
County, N. J. 

1340— RICHARD F. POPE b. 3rd mo. 16th, 1832, 

m. 12th mo. 31st, 1861, Susan W. Bristol. 

1341— EMILY POPE b. 5th mo. 9th, 1836. 

1342— NATHANIEL POPE b. 8th mo. 12th, 1838. 

1343— ELLVVOOD POPE b. 4th mo. 5th, 1840. 

1344— SOLOMON POPE b. 6th mo. 3rd, 1842. 

1345— SARAH POPE b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1848. 

1346— ELIZABETH POPE b. 10th mo. 29th, 1850. 

1347— PHERE POPE b. 4th mo. 29th, 1852. 



236 GENEALOGY OF THE 

712— ELIZABETH F. POPE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140; Amy, 349). 

m. 2nd mo. 14th, 1822, in Friends' Meeting, 
Moorestown, N. J., Clayton Roberts, son of 
Joshua and Rachel (Coles) Roberts, 
d. 1873, in Yorkville, 111. 
He b. 4th mo. 2nd, 1797. 

d. 1st mo. 3rd, 1880, in Yorkville, 111. 

1348— SARAH FOPE ROBERTS b. 1st mo. 18th, 1823. 

in. January 18th, 1854, Joshua Nelson Austin. 

1349— JOSHUA ROBERTS b. 5th mo. 23rd, 1825. 

d. 9th mo. 26th. 1843. 

1350— MIRIAM JONES ROBERTS 

b. 6th mo. 12th, 1827. 

m. First, December 21st, 1854, Dexter P. 

Pierce, 
m. Second, April, 1865, Eleazar H. Austin. 

1351— JOHN P. ROBERTS b. 11th mo. 11th, 1829. 

m. 1st mo. 1st, 1854, Elizabeth Brown. 



713— MIRIAM POPE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; 

Amy, 349). 

1>. 12th mo. 4th. 1805. 

d. 9th mo. 11th, 1888, near Moorestown, N. J.; 
buried in Colestown (N. J.) Cemetery. 

m. Allen Jones, son of William and Sarah (Web- 
ster) Jones. 
He b. 4th mo. 11th, 1803. 

d. 8th mo. 11th, 1889, in Woodstown, N. J.; 
buried in Colestown Cemetery. 

1352— ALBERT JONES b. 10th mo. 19th, 1825. 

m. April 9th, 1857, Sarah H. Rogers. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 237 

1353— ELIZABETH ROBERTS JONES 

b. 6th mo. 16th, 1827. 

m. 4th mo. 7th, 1853, George M. Evans. 

1354— SARAH WEBSTER JONES 

b. 3rd mo. 25th, 1829. 
m. 3rd mo. 27th, 1851, Samuel L. Roberts. 

1355— BARCLAY JONES b. 12th mo. 18th, 1830. 

m. 1st mo. 1st, 1857, Mary Haines. 

1356— RICHARD POPE JONES b. 10th mo. 16th, 1833. 

m. First, January 30th, 1862, Minetta Higley. 
m. Second, Levica Powers. 

1357— AMY POPE JONES b. 9th mo. 8th, 1835. 

m. 2nd mo. 12th, 1856, Charles E. Davis. 

1358— ALLEN HENRY JONES b. 10th mo. 23rd, 1846. 

m. August 24th, 1870, Eleanor K. Kimball. 



716— JACOB FRENCH POPE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Amy, 349). 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1816, in Monmouth Co., N. J. 
m. First, 1st mo. 5th, 1840, in Yorkville, 111., Ann 
Cook, daughter of John and Mary (Morris) 
Cook. 
She d. 10th mo. 30th, 1874. 

m. Second, 1st mo. 23rd, 1877, Elvira Benton (no 
issue ) . 

1359— AMY FRENCH POPE b. 5th mo. 10th, 1841. 

m. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1860, L. W. Thurber. 

1360— JOHN C. POPE b. 12th mo. 28th. 1843. 

m. 1st mo. 31st, 1866, Lucinda S. Drury. 

1361— CHARLES C. POPE b. 8th mo. 21st, 1846. 

m. February 3rd, 1887, Ada B. Kennedy. 



238 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



1362— ELLEN" H. POPE 

1363— MIRIAM J. POPE 
1364— JESSE E. POPE 
1365— LIDA ANN POPE 



b. 1st mo. 23rd, 1849. 

m. First. 10th mo. 21st, 1868, Ephraim Frank 

Moulton. 
m. Second, July 21st, 1904, Charles Redfield. 

b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1852. 

m. 11th mo. 18th, 1877, Lemuel Watldns. 

b. 11th mo. 18th, 1858. 

m. 8th mo. 27th, 1889, Cora If. Bloom. 

b. 11th mo. 19th, 1865. 



718— REBECCA HATCH JONES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Abigail, 350). 

b. 1st mo. 21st, 1804. 
d. 11th mo. 9th, 1826. 
m. Joel Roberts. 

1366— ABIGAIL JONES ROBERTS 

b. 1st mo. 12th, 1825. 

m. 10th mo. 4th, 1849, Thomas Evens, Jr. 



719— AQLTLLA JONES (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; 

Abigail, 350). 

b. 6th mo. 13th, 1809. 
d. 8th mo. 9th, 1850. 
m. Elizabeth T. Coles. 
She d. 6th mo. 22nd, 1886. 



1367— ABIGAIL F. JONES 



b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1833. 
d. 3rd mo. 5th, 1833. 



1368— JOHN COLES JONES b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1835. 

m. 1st mo. 28th, 1869, Amanda Deacon. 



1369— JOSEPH AQLILLA JONES 



b. 8th mo. 25th, 1837. 

m. 1863, Sarah E. Cowperthwaite. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 239 

720— SARAH LIPPINCOTT FRENCH (Thomas, 1: Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Jacob, 140; Richard, 351). 
b. 1st mo. 11th, 1822. 
d. 10th mo. 28th, 1883. 

m. Joseph L. AValton, son of Thomas and Anna 
(Lippincott) Walton. 
He b. 9th mo. 23rd. 1824. 
d. 8th mo. 23rd, 1871. 

1370— ANNA FRENCH WALTON" 

b. 9th mo. 13th, 1851. 

m. Herbert Linwood Stiles. 



721— GEORGE FOX FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Richard, 351). 
b. 10th mo. 24th, 1S:5. 
m. Mary Cushing, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

1371— NELLIE FRENXH 

1372— MINNIE FRENCH 

722— SAMUEL BECK FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8: Charles. 42; 

Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352). 
b. 10th mo. 5th, 1818, near Marlton. N. J. 
d 3rd mo. 17th, 1880. 

m. First, 1st mo. 7th. 1847. Elizabeth E. Moore, 
daughter of Hewlings and Anna (Hollinshead) 
Moore. 
She b. IS 16, near Medford. N. J. 

d 3rd mo. 30th, 1860, in Evesboro. N. J. 
m. Second, 11th mo. 10th, 1864, Mary Comlv, of 
Frankford, Philadelphia. 

1373— ANNA MOORE FRENCH 

b. 2nd mo. 3rd. 
m. November 14th, 1S72, William Slim. 



240 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1374— JOSHUA FRENCH b. 12th mo. 1st, 1849. 

m. 4th mo. 27th, 1887, Louisa Bright. 

137S— HENRY CLAY FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1852. 

m. First, Mary Anna Cox. 
She b. 12th mo. 29th, 1857. 
d. 5th mo. 12th, 1883. 

m. Second, 3rd mo. 7th, 1889, Sallie C. 
Stratton. 
She b. 5th mo. 9th, 1866. 

723— ELIZABETH STOKES FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352). 
b. 9th mo. 8th, 1820, near Medford, N. J. 
d. 9th mo. 4th, 1865, near Merchantville, N. J. 
m. 5th mo., 1842, Allen Moore Rogers, son of Wil- 
liam and Ann Venicomb Rogers. 
He b. 2nd mo. 15th, 1823, in Evesham township, Bur- 
lington Co., N. J. 
d. 9th mo. 27th, 1903, in Hartford, N. J. 

1376— SAMUEL FRENCH ROGERS 

b. 9th mo. 11th, 1843. 
m. 6th mo. 11th, 1877, Miriam Evens. 

1377— SARAH MOORE ROGERS 

b. 11th mo. 2nd, 1845. 
m. September 6th, 1873, James Abbott Gordon. 

1378— FRANK EUGENE ROGERS 

b. 4th mo. 17th, 1848. 
m. December 17th, 1874, Elizabeth Howell. 

1379— EMLA TOOLE ROGERS b. 12th mo. 25th, 1850. 

d. 8th mo. 19th, 1868, unmarried. 

1380— ELIZABETH FRENCH ROGERS 

b. 8th mo. 5th, 1853. 

1381— ALINE ROUSELLE ROGERS 

b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1856. 

m. 5th mo. 19th, 1880, Joseph B. Rudderow. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 241 

1382— ANN VENICOMB ROGERS 

b. 7th mo. 5th, 1859. 
m. July 8th, 1885, Richard J. Roberts [2292]. 

1383— IRWIN CLIFTON ROGERS 

b. 12th mo. 28th, 1861. 
m. June 3rd, 1891, Amelia Conzelman. 

725— MARY LIPPINCOTT FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352). 

b. 8th mo. 10th, 1825, near Medford, N. J. 

d. 3rd mo. 6th, 1910, in Camden, N. J. 

m. 1st mo. 16th, 1845, at homestead of Charles 
French [421, near Fellowship, N. J., Samuel 
Burrough, son of Samuel and Priscilla (Moore) 
Burrough. 
He b. 2nd mo. 14th, 1814, near Camden, N. J. 

d. 2nd mo. 24th, 1901, in Marlton, N. }. 

1384— ELIZABETH FRENCH BURROUGH 

b. 11th mo. 16th, 1845. 

m. First, March 1st, 1865, William A. Shivers, 
m. Second, August 4th, 1889, Joseph H. Ivins. 

1385— PRISCILLA MOORE BURROUGH 

b. 1st mo. 31st, 1849. 
m. September 30th, 1905, Joel R. Evens [2326], 

son of Thomas and Abigail (Roberts) 

Evens. 

1386— JOHN STOKES BURROUGH 

b. 1st mo. 28th, 1851. 

m. First, April 24th, 1872, Margaret Stoy. 
m. Second, December 22nd, 1894, Mary Sparks. 

1387— LYDIA SAUNDERS BURROUGH 

b. 1st mo. 29th, 1854. 
m. January 24th, 18S3, Ashton Fisler. 

1388— COURTLAND HAINES BURROUGH 

b. 6th mo. 7th, 1857, unmarried. 
16 



242 GENEALOGY OF THE 

726— HANNAH IVINS FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Uriah, 353). 

b. 3rd mo. 19th, 1803, near Mullica Hill, Glouces- 
ter Co., N. J. 

d. January 27th, 1890, at her residence, Corinthian 
Ave., Philadelphia, buried in Mount Vernon 
Cemetery, Philadelphia. 
m. August 30th, 1832, David Blackwood Morgan, 
son of David and Sarah (Blackwood) Morgan, 
Charles F. Clark, justice of the peace, Glou- 
cester Co., N. J., performing ceremony. 
D. B. M. b. February 11th, 1785. 

d. March 10th, 1868, at his residence, " Burrwood 
Farm," H addon township, Camden Co., N. J. 



1389— EDWIN ATLEE MORGAN 

b. August 9th, 1833. 
d. November 6th, 1888. in Philadelphia, 
m. April 19th, 1856, Elizabeth M. Caldwell. 



1390— DAVID URIAH MORGAN 

b. February 25th, 1836. 
m. September 8th, 1873, Annie C. Pidgon. 



1391— MARY SARAH BLACKWOOD MORGAN 

b. December 27th, 1838. 
d. April 4th, 1839. 



1392— ELIZABETH TOMLINSON MORGAN 

b. May 13th, 1841. 

d. March 15th, 1900, unmarried. 



1393— ROBERT BARCLAY MORGAN 

b. December 30th, 1844, unmarried. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 243 



JUDGE DAVID BLACKWOOD MORGAN 

David Blackwood Morgan was a descendant of the pioneer Morgan and 
Blackwood families, long associated with the early settlers of Gloucester 
county. His father, David Morgan, was born December 1 5th, 1740, died 
June 4th, 1789. He married in 1768, Mary Blackwood and had children, 
Margaret, born April 25th, 1769; John, born March 15th, 1771 ; Mary, born 
January 15th, 1774. Mary (Blackwood) Morgan died January 30th, 1774, 
and David Morgan married, second, Sarah Blackwood, and had three sons, 
Joseph, born March 9th, 1780 ; Randall, born January 15th, 1782 ; and David 
Blackwood Morgan, born February 11th, 1785. Sarah (Blackwood) Morgan 
died March 3rd, 1785. By will dated April 13th, 1789, proved June 17th, 
1 789, David Morgan directed that his " three younger sons, Joseph, Randle, 
and David, be put to trade as they severally shall choose after they arrive to 
the age of 14, and I also desire that said three sons shall live with the persons 
they are now with until they are 14; son Joseph with his uncle Joseph Black- 
wood, Esq.; my son Randle with his cousin Randle Morgan; and my son 
David with Ephraim Cheesman, and the cost of educating and bringing up 
son David until he is 14 is to be paid out of his portion." 

David Morgan was the son of George Morgan, of Deptford, Gloucester Co., 
N. J., whither he had come from Bucks Co., Pa., about 1734. By will dated 
April 17th, 1759, proved May 16th, 1759, George Morgan mentions his sons- 
George, Randall, Jonathan, David and Abraham, daughters Anne Styles and 
Martha. 

David Blackwood Morgan married first, March 10th, 1814, Elizabeth (Tom- 
linson) Clark, of Gloucester township and county. She was born March 
28th, 1783, and died February 1st, 1829. They had the following children: 
Ellwood, born March 13th, 1815 ; Joshua T., born February 24th, 1817, died 
August 25th, 1833; Mordecai, born April 22nd, 1819; Ann, born December 
23rd, 1820; Barclay, born January 13th, 1824, died November 6th. 1825. In 
1820 David B. Morgan purchased of Abel Nicholson a farm of 119 acres, 
with large dwelling, still standing, near Chew's Landing, on Timber Creek. 
Later he added to this homestead, and during the next twenty-five years pur- 
chased several tracts in the same vicinity. He took an active interest in public 
affairs and in 1829 and 1838 was made justice of the peace and also served 
the same year as lay Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Gloucester 



244 GENEALOGY OF THE 

county. In 1833 he was a subscriber to the maintenance fund of the historic 
St. John's Protestant Episcopal Church, at Chew's Landing. He acted as 
administrator in the settlement of many estates, being one of the Orphans' 
Court Commissioners who sold the farm of Francis French [116], on Timber 
Creek, near Almonesson, in 1833. In 1837 he sold his farm at Chew's Land- 
ing, devoting himself thereafter to other business. Upon his death, at an 
advanced age, in 1868, he was buried with his ancestors in the old graveyard 
of the First Presbyterian Church, Blackwood, N. J. 



MEETING RECORDS 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

4th Mo. 24th 1826 Certificates for Hannah I. French [726] and Sarah 
H. French [728] from Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting, dated the 28th ultimo, 
being received were read and accepted. 

2nd mo. 24th 1829 The womens meeting reported that Hannah Cooper, 
Mary B. Lippincott, Elizabeth Cooper and Hannah I. French, had been 
visited for joining with others in attending meetings set up in opposition 
to Friends, and contrary to the discipline, and established order of our 
society ; and shew no disposition to make Friends the necessary satisfaction. 

3 mo. 31st 1829 Testimonies of denial against Hannah Cooper, Mary 
B. Lippincott, Elizabeth Cooper, Hannah 1. French and Edna Knight, 
were produced, and with a small alteration approved as follows : they were 
sent to the women's meeting for its further care To wit: "whereas Hannah 
Cooper, Mary B. Lippincott, Elizabeth Cooper and Hannah I. French have 
had a right of membership in our Religious Society, but have separated 
themselves from Religious Communion with us, by associating with others 
in holding what they call Quarterly and Monthly meetings subordinate to 
a yearly meeting set up in opposition to Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, in 
violation of the regular order established among Friends ; and we having 
endeavored to labor with them, for this manifest inconsistency with our 
principles, without the desired effect, this meeting believed, that however 
painful, yet the well being of Society demanded, that their conduct should 
be testified against. And they the said Hannah Cooper, Mary B. Lippin- 
cott, Elizabeth Cooper and Hannah I. French are no more to be considered 
members of the Religious Society of Friends. Nevertheless we sincerely 
desire that through the renewed visitations of Divine Grace, they may be 
brought to a just sense of the nature of their deviations, and be enabled to 
make the necessary satisfaction to this meeting." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 245 

728— SARAH HEULINGS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353). 

b. 4th mo. 19th, 1807, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 12th mo. 31st, 1882, at her residence, North 

Third St., Camden, N. J.; buried in Evergreen 

Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 
m. November 10th, 1836, Jeremiah J. Richards, 

son of John and Priscilla (Jones) Richards. 
He b. 11th mo. 17th, 1809, near Swedesboro, N. J. 
d. 10th mo. 20th, 1860, at his home, " Eaglepoint 

Farm," near Red Bank, Gloucester Co., N. J.; 

buried in Friends' Burying Ground, Woodbury, 

N.J. 



1394— ISAAC FRENCH RICHARDS 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1837. 
d. 9th mo. 20th, 1837. 



1395— MARY FRENCH RICHARDS 

b. 10th mo. 31st, 1839. 
m. October 22nd, 1868, John S. W. Johnson. 



1396— GEORGE WASHINGTON RICHARDS 

b. 11th mo. 13th, 1841. 
deceased. 



1397— ALBERT RICHARDS b. 11th mo. 20th, 1843. 

d. 3rd mo. 28th, 1844. 



1398— JOHN RICHARDS b. 10th mo. 23rd, 1845. 

d. 4th mo. 5th, 1846. 



1399— URIAH FRENCH RICHARDS 

b. 3rd mo. 27th, 1847, unmarried. 



246 GENEALOGY OF THE 

MEETING RECORDS 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes: 

7th mo. 27 1830 The women's meeting informed that they had treated 
with and concluded to disown Achsah Knight, Sarah French, and Martha 
Edmundson for separating themselves from Religious Communion with 
Friends, by associating with those who hold Quarterly, Monthly, and Pre- 
parative Meetings, set up in opposition to Philadelphia Yearly meeting of 
Friends; with which this meeting unites and Samuel Webster and Josiah 
Tatum were appointed to prepare minutes of disownment accordingly. 

8th mo 31st 1830 Minutes of disownment against Aschsah Knight, 
Sarah French, Martha Edmundson and Mary Jessup being produced, 
they were read, approved as follows, and sent to the women's meeting: To 
wit : " Whereas Achsah Knight and Sarah French, have had a right of mem- 
bership in the Religious Society of Friends, but have separated themselves 
from Religious Communion with us, by associating and uniting with those 
who hold Quarterly, Monthly and Preparative Meetings Subordinate to a 
meeting set up in opposition to Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends 
contrary to the regular established order of our society ; for which Friends 
have endeavored to deal with them, but without the desired effect. This 
meeting believed that however painful, yet the well being of our Society 
demanded that their conduct should be testified against ; And they the said 
Achsah Knight and Sarah French are no more to be considered in Religious 
Membership with Friends. Nevertheless, we desire that they may be favored 
with a just sense of the nature of their deviations, and be enabled to make 
Friends the necessary Satisfaction." 



729— AGNES ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Uriah, 353). 

1). 2nd mo. 14th, 1809, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 11th mo. 14th, 1834, "at 1 OClock in the 

afternoon." 
m. 1st mo. 7th, 1830, Isaac Combs, son of John 

and Mary Combs. 
He b. 10th mo. 10th, 1805. 
d. 3rd mo. 24th, 1833. 

1400— MARTHA FRENCH COM PS 

b. 10th mo. 31st, 1830. 
d. 11th mo. 26th, 1832. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



247 




24S 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

WHEREAS Isaac Combs of Woolwich Township in the County of 
Gloucester and State of New Jersey, Son of John Combs of the same place, 
and Mary his wife, and Agnefs Ann French, Daughter of Uriah French 
of the Township of Greenwich, County aforesaid, and Mary his wife (the 
former Deceased), having declared their intentions of Marriage with each 
other before a Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, held 
at Woodbury, in the County aforesaid, according to the good order used 
among them, and having the consent of Parents, their said proposal of 
Marriage was allowed of by the said Meeting. 

NOW these are to Certify Whom it may Concern, that for the full 
accomplishment of their said intentions, this seventh day of the first month 
in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty, they, the 
said Isaac Combs and Agnefs Ann French, appeared in a public Afsembly 
of the said people held at Upper Greenwich, and the said Isaac Combs 
taking the said Agnefs Ann French by the hand, did on this solemn occa- 
sion openly declare, that he took her the said Agnefs Ann French to be his 
Wife, promising with Divine Afsistance to be unto her a loving and faithful 
Husband until Death should separate them. And then in the same 
Afsembly, the said Agnefs Ann French did in like manner declare, that she 
took him, the said Isaac Combs to be her Husband, promising with Divine 
Afsistance to be unto him a loving and faithful Wife, until Death should 
separate them. 

And Moreover, they, the said Isaac Combs and Agnefs Ann French (she 
according to the custom of Marriage asfuming the name of her husband) 
did as a further confirmation thereof, then, and there, to these presents set 
their hands. 

And We, whose names are hereunto subscribed, being present at the 
solemnization of the said Marriage and Subscription, have as Witnefses 
thereto set our hands the day yeare above written. 







''WZs 



t £?iris£4 



Samuel Edmondson 
Moses Batten Jr. 
I-vlia Thorn 
Hannah P. Haines 
Harriet H. Brown 



Ann Haines 
William Haines 
Mary B. Craft 
Lydia Craft 
Hannah Rulon 



Mary French 
John Combs 
Mary Combs 
Hannah I. French 
Sarah II. French 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



249 



Abigail W. Hinchman 
Sarah Mickle 
Benjamin W. Heritage 
Elizabeth Kille 
William Mickle 
Rebecca C. Pine 
Phebe Rulon 
Mary Albertson 
Lydia S. Bacon 
John Combs 
Huldah Combs 
Lydia Combs 
William S. Combs 



Kazia Clark 
Mary Rulon 
Martha Rulon 
Ann W. Haines 
Mary Ann Paul 
Samuel Mickle 
William Pine 
George Craft 
Isaac Haines 
David W. Brown 
John C. Gill 
William Thorne 
Edmund Weatherby 



Martha French 
Mary I. French 
Thomas Combs 
Isaac Combs 
Moses Rulon 
Susanna Rulon 
Rebecka Craft 
Hepparchia Haines 
Heppe Haines 
Alexander Black 
Joshua Haines 



MEETING RECORDS 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

1st mo. 26th 1830 — The women's meeting informed that they had dealt 
with and concluded to disown Agnes Ann French, and Priscilla H. War- 
rington — they having separated themselves from Religious Communion with 
us, by joining with others who have set up meetings in opposition to Friends 
■ — and this meeting uniting with them in the conclusion Samuel Webster 
and James Saunders were directed to include them in the minute to be drawn 
for Nathan Warrington and Joel Paul. 

2 mo. 23 1830. The friends appointed produced the following minute, 
which being read, was approved and a copy, so far as the women were 
interested, was sent into them, for their further care. And John Packer, 
and George Mickle were named, to furnish Nathan Warrington and Joel 
Paul each with a Copy, and acquaint them with their right of Appeal : 
To Wit: "Whereas Nathan Warrington, Joel Paul, Priscilla H. Warring- 
ton, and Agnes Ann Coombs (late French) have had a right of membership 
in our Religious Society; but have separated themselves from Religious 
Communion with Friends by associating with others in holding what they 
call Quarterly and Monthly Meetings Subordinate to a meeting set up in 
opposition to Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, in violation of the regular order 
established among Friends : And we having endeavored to labor with them 
for this manifest inconsistency, without the desired effect this meeting be- 
lieved, that however painful, yet the well being of Society demanded that 
their conduct should be testified against. And they, the said Nathan War- 
rington, Joel Paul, Priscilla H. Warrington, and Agnes Ann Coombes, are 
no more to be considered members of the Religious Society of Friends. 
Nevertheless, we sincerely desire they may be brought to a just sense of the 
nature of their deviations and be enabled to make the necessary satisfaction 
to this meeting." 



250 GENEALOGY OF THE 

731— MARY IVINS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Uriah. 353). 

b. 2nd mo. 17th. 1814, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. May 28th. 1884, 6:30 A. M., at " Pine Grove 

Farm," near Haddonfield, Camden Co., N. J.; 

buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia. 
m. February 24th, 1843, Edwin Shoemaker, son of 

George and Keziah (Key) Shoemaker. 
He b. January 10th, 1818, near Swedesboro, N. J. 

d. February 11th, 1898, in Mantua, N. J.; buried 

in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia. 

1401— BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SHOEMAKER 

b. 12th mo. 22nd, 1843. 
d. 12th mo. 22nd, 1843. 

1402— GEORGE URIAH FRENCH SHOEMAKER 

b. 7th mo. 13th, 1846. 

d. 8th mo. 15th. 1848, "half past 11 oclock 
in the fore noon." 

1403— CLAYTON FRENCH SHOEMAKER 

b. 7th mo. 12th, 1S49. 
m. June 11th, 1879, Jennie E. Gushing. 

George Shoemaker, born June 13th, 1782, died February 2nd, 1868, married February 
9th, 1809, Keziah Key, born May 23rd, 1791, died September 28th, 1849. 

MEETING RECORDS 

Woodbury Monthly Meeting Minutes : 

3 mo. 26 1833 The following minute being produced, it was read, ap- 
proved, and sent to the women's meeting for its further care, to wit : 
" Whereas Mary French hath had a right of membership in the Religious 
Society of Friends, but hath separated herself from religious communion 
with us, by uniting with those who have also separated and who hold meet- 
ings in opposition to Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends contrary to the 
regular order of our Discipline for which she has been tenderly treated with, 
agreeably to the order established among Friends, with out any apparent 
good effect: This meeting believed it right, however painful the duty, to 
testify its disunity with her, in this, her procedure; and she the said Mary 
French is not to be considered in Religious membership with Friends, until 
she shall manifest a due regard to the Rules of our Discipline and acknowl- 
edge her deviation to the satisfaction of this Meeting." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 251 

732— SAMUEL HARRISON FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353). 

b. 9th mo. 25th, 1816, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. 2nd mo. 1st, 1895, 5 P. M., at his residence, 
228 West Logan Square, Philadelphia; buried 
in Evergreen Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 

m. October 6th, 1842, in Salem, Ohio, Angelina 
Dunseth, daughter of Alexander and Henrietta 
(Needles) Dunseth. 
She b. 7th mo. 6th, 1820. 

d. 2nd mo. 26th, 1884, 11 P. M., at their summer 
residence, " White Mansion," on the White 
Horse turnpike, three miles from Camden, N. J., 
where, owing to her protracted illness, the 
family had spent the winter. Buried in Ever- 
green Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 

1404— EMMOR DAVIS FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 1st, 1844. 
m. September 6th, 1866, Edith Lippincott. 

1405— WILLIAM ALEXANDER FRENCH 

b. 4th mo. 30th, 1846, in Salem, Ohio. 

d. 4th mo. 11th, 1886, at his father's resi- 
dence, White Horse turnpike, Camden Co., 
N. J.; buried in Evergreen Cemetery, 
Camden, N. J. 

1406— HOWARD BARCLAY FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 3rd, 1848. 
m. November 9th, 1882, Ida Colket. 

1407— MARY HARRIET FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 12th, 1850, in Salem, Ohio, un- 
married. 

1408— ELIZA FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1853, in Philadelphia, Pa. 

d. 8th mo. 11th, 1SS6, in Philadelphia; buried 
in Evergreen Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 

1409— CLARA ANGELINA FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. ISth, 1857. 
m. May 24th, 1894, Adam Jakob. 



252 GENEALOGY OF THE 

SAMUEL HARRISON FRENCH 

As already noted, Uriah French [353] soon after selling his farm and 
saw mill property near Mullica Hill, N. J., removed with his family to 
Swedesboro, where he engaged in mercantile business, remaining there until 
his death, in 1825. Although but nine years of age at the time of his 
father's death, with three younger brothers, Samuel H. French was then 
called upon to face the serious problems of that earnest useful life which 
afterwards characterized him ; and in the quaint language of the times, he 
became the " man of the house." The family returned to live in the vicinity 
of Mullica Hill, and for some years thereafter Samuel H. French attended 
the historic Harmony School at that place, his cousin, Samuel G. French 
[755], afterwards a famous soldier, being his schoolmate. He was a faithful 
helper in the home and on the farm, building up a sturdy young manhood. 
When sixteen years of age, home ties were broken, and he went forth con- 
fidently to make his own way in the world, carrying with him as a token 
of his mother's loving tender care and solicitude, a Bible containing the 
inscription in her handwriting, " Samuel H. French from his mother," which 
she had given him with the earnest request that he " search the Scriptures 
and follow their precepts." He was placed as an apprentice with his older 
cousin, William Hazelton French [746], of Philadelphia, doubtless little 
dreaming of the measure of success which he was to achieve in the com- 
mercial world. Attentive, efficient and faithful, he was soon entrusted with 
larger responsibilities. He was sent to Salem, Ohio, about 1837, on a busi- 
ness trip, which proved more than usually successful, and he decided to locate 
there. He soon became very profitably interested in several enterprises. 
His affairs prospered socially as well as otherwise. It was here he met and 
married the lady who thereafter journeyed through life with him as his 
faithful helpmate. Four of their children were born in Salem. 

Returning to Philadelphia in 1852, Mr. French entered vigorously upon 
the business career which soon marked him as one of the leaders in the 
manufacturing and mercantile development of the city. Having acquired 
special knowledge of a particular branch of trade, he determined to con- 
tinue therein, and associated himself with his younger brother, Clayton 
French [735] in establishing the manufacturing branch of French & 
Richards, wholesale dealers in drugs, paints and oils, northwest corner of 
Tenth and Market streets, Philadelphia. The manufacturing department of 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 253 

the business was conducted under the style of C. French & Co.. and they 
at once commenced the production of paints, plaster, cement and building 
materials at York avenue, Crown and Callowhill streets, purchasing the plant 
of Paschall Coggins, located there, fitting it up with improved machinery, 
etc. The business prospered greatly but was soon overtaken by misfortune. 
On the night of October 1st, 1854, the factory was destroyed by fire, causing 
a severe loss thus early in the career of the new firm. From the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger of October 2nd, 1854, we quote the following: 

" At one oclock yesterday [Sunday] morning the extensive steam plaster 
mills, corner of York Avenue and Callowhill St, belonging to Messrs C. 
French & Co, took fire and burned to the ground. The basement, first and 
second stories were occupied by the firm and contained a valuable engine and 
other costly machinery, besides a large quantity of prepared plaster and 
cement. Messrs French & Richards occupied the upper stories as a manu- 
factory of paints and oil. At the time of the fire there were fifteen tons 
of zinc ground in the mill, several tons prepared for grinding, about five 
tons of green paint, together with other colored paints and oils. The loss 
is estimated at $45,000; insurance $13,000. The origin of the fire is not 
accounted for; some think it was accidental, while others suppose it was 
the work of an incendiary." 

The situation was met with courage, energy and faith, the high credit in 
the business world for integrity and enterprise already established being a 
potent factor in this trying hour. By February, 1855, there was erected upon 
the site of the old factory a large and substantial four-story building, con- 
taining all the (then) modern appliances for the manufacture of paints 
and plaster ; and the machinery was started and the factory put in full opera- 
tion on the fifth day of that month. In that year the name of the firm was 
changed to French, Richards & Co. In 1857 they erected at the junction of 
York avenue, Fourth and Callowhill streets a five-story brick and iron build- 
ing, and in 1864 a storehouse on Noble street, between Fourth street and 
York avenue, and the following year a large and commodious stable, with 
accommodations for 28 horses, on York avenue, below Buttonwood street, 
extending eastward and connecting with the warehouse on Noble street. 

The fire which destroyed the plaster works fortunately left standing the 
adjoining building, situated at the southwest corner of York avenue and 
Callowhill street. This house had been built by John Penn, on part of his 
" Spitsylvania " estate — Manor of Springetsbury — and being located as it was, 



254 GENEALOGY OF THE 

on Old York road, over which much traffic passed between Philadelphia and 
New York, its pretentious size made it an object of more than usual interest. 
It was, we believe, the first house erected in that section, north of Vine street, 
the then northern limit of the city. When making alterations in the building, 
which has been remodeled for office use by the firm of Samuel H. French & 
Co., a brace of duelling pistols, pigs of lead, bullet moulds, knives and many 
other interesting relics have been found. The bricks in this building were 
brought from England and the wood used, oak and hickory, is now almost 
as hard as stone. Sentimental and patriotic considerations have prevailed 
thus far when propositions to tear down and rebuild, in accordance with 
modern methods and conveniences, have repeatedly been suggested. Another 
noteworthy land mark, nearby, at the junction of York road and Fourth 
street, is the Indian pole, surmounted by a giant chief, which stands on the 
site of the last great " pow wow " of the receding sons of the forest, a century 
and a half ago. 

In the equitable division of burdens and responsibilities arising under a 
business of remarkable growth and magnitude, Samuel H. French gave the 
manufacturing department of French, Richards & Co., daily and unceasing 
personal supervision, while Clayton French devoted his energies to the 
general management of the sales department of the business. The dominant 
qualities of each supplemented the other harmoniously and effectively. But 
another great trial was just ahead. At 10:30 P. M., October 3rd, 1865, the 
great seven-story warehouse at Tenth and Market streets was discovered 
to be on fire. Owing to the inflammable nature of the contents, the building 
was soon a roaring furnace. The scene was wierdly impressive and at- 
tracted a multitude of spectators, while the firemen — the heroic volunteers of 
those days — performed their perilous duties with unselfish zeal. The loss 
by the fire was about $300,000, with less than $200,000 insurance. As an 
interesting account of this notable incident in local history, we take the 
following from the Philadelphia Public Ledger of October 4th, 1865: 

" Last evening about eleven oclock, a fire broke out in the extensive 
drug and paint Establishment of French, Richards & Co., Tenth & Market 
Streets. The fire was discovered by a citizen who was passing, who gave 
the alarm, but before any fire engines could be got into service the entire 
first and second floors were in flames, from the large amount of drugs and 
paints stored there. Smoke poured from every window of the huge five 
story warehouse. The fire rapidly extended all over the building. The roof 
soon fell in and t'le fire reached the cupola, presenting a magnificent sight. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 255 

The cupola burned for a half hour and then fell, tilling the heavens with 
myriads of sparks, the city being brilliantly illuminated for a great dis- 
tance around. Sparks were thrown upon the houses in all directions and 
the firemen were kept busy watching them, so as to prevent the spread 
of the conflagration. The two buildings adjoining on the west, also oc- 
cupied by French, Richards & Co, as storehouses for glassware, were some- 
what damaged both by fire and water. The fire raged for several hours 
and at half past twelve this morning the entire inside of the building was 
consumed and only the bare walls were standing. There was no damage 
to surrounding property. The loss was very heavy." 

There were no facilities in those days for the quick transmission of in- 
telligence to the suburbs, no local telegraph, no telephone, no early trains for 
newspapers. Samuel H. French first learned of the disastrous work of the 
night when crossing the Delaware, in the morning, on the ferry boat, his 
family yet lingering in their country home, on the White Horse pike. 
" That's too bad," was his characteristically brief, unruffled comment. After 
a few minutes consultation with his brother, as they stood beside the smoking 
ruins, orders were issued for the resumption of business, at a temporary loca- 
tion, 630 Market street, where the entire stock and fixtures of Thomas P. 
James were purchased. Needing much larger quarters, pending the rebuild- 
ing at Tenth and Market streets, the Franklin market house (now the 
Mercantile Library building) on Tenth street, below Market, was occupied 
by French, Richards & Co. for about two years. It was then owned by the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, which proposed to utilize it as a great 
central station, adjoining that at Market and Eleventh streets, but the 
exigencies of business and the erection of the new City Hall, on Broad street, 
necessitated the removal of tracks on Market street. The building had been 
used by the United States Sanitary Commission during the Civil War, as a 
depot of supplies. 

The new building which French, Richards & Co. erected at the northwest 
corner of Tenth and Market streets, and occupied , in the fall of 1867, was 
one of the finest commercial structures in the city. The hydraulic elevator, 
with a shaft extending ninety-six feet below the surface of the street, cost 
$25,000. All departments of the business rapidly increased during the 
ensuing years. On January 1st, 1883, Clayton French and Samuel H. French 
dissolved their partnership of more than thirty years. The former con- 
tinued the wholesale drug business at Tenth and Market streets, while the 
latter remained at Fourth and Callowhill streets, in the manufacturing line, 



256 GENEALOGY OF THE 

organizing the firm of Samuel H. French & Co., with his sons, William A. 
French and Howard K. French, and John L. Longstreth, as partners, the 
latter having been connected with the business from the year 1852. Shortly 
after this change the firm established an additional factory in Camden, N. J. 
On April 11th, 1886, William A. French died; and since the death of the 
senior partner, in 1895, and the retirement of Mr. Longstreth, in 1901, 
Howard B. French has continued the business, with ever-increasing success, 
adhering to the sound principles and wise policy which always characterized 
its honored founders. 

During an active career of nearly three score years, Samuel H. French 
took a lively and influential interest in all the great questions of the time. 
He was eminently conservative and safe in all business methods, yet in full 
accord with every progressive idea of practical utility, his firm becoming a 
pioneer among manufacturers and merchants in the adaptation of improved 
ways and means of extending trade. Its quick recuperation, after two de- 
structive fires, was an illustration of business energy and enthusiasm. Its 
individual members were at all times ready to do their personal part along 
civic lines and in sustaining public enterprises and worthy charitable effort. 
As their trade relations were very extensive, so with many others their losses 
were heavy in consequence of the breaking out of Civil War, in 1861 ; but a 
spirit of firm devotion to the cause of national union was earnestly mani- 
fested at all times. Passing incidents were significant. 

Upon one occasion, when indignant citizens demanded the enforced retire- 
ment, from Philadelphia, of a too pronounced sympathizer with rebellion, 
who was a business neighbor and tenant of Samuel H. French, he vigorously 
declared: " That's right and I'll lend his associates all the money needful to 
buy out his interest." Owning a farm in Maryland, he caused to be erected 
a national flag, which floated during the ensuing exciting years, an object of 
intense and patriotic interest to a great multitude of soldiers of the Union 
army, as they passed by, on the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore 
railroad. 

A notable incident occurred the middle of May, 1862, during the opera- 
tions of General McClellan's army, near Vorktown. Virginia. There had 
been much fighting for several days and as hospital accommodations in the 
field were inadequate, many wounded soldiers were sent north. Pennsyl- 
vania made special provision for the care of its own men, sending Surgeon 
< ieneral Smith, with a corps of assistants and nurses to the front. Upwards 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 257 



of two hundred wounded men were placed on a Baltimore steamer and 
hurried to Philadelphia, via the Delaware and Chesapeake Canal, where 
they arrived on Tuesday night, May 13th. News of their coming had been 
forwarded, so that a great crowd assembled at Vine street wharf. Merchants 
and manufacturers volunteered the services of their wagons, as improvised 
ambulances. French, Richards & Co. sent fifteen wagons, to help in this 
merciful work of transferring the wounded soldiers to the hospitals, these 
being the first teams to arrive at the wharf. 

Although always a consistent member of the Society of Friends, .Samuel 
H. French insisted upon bearing his share of the burden cheerfully borne by 
all loyal citizens and doing even more than this. He furnished substitutes 
for himself — though he was beyond the age limit — two sons and two busi- 
ness associates, and specially cared for the families of those in his employ 
who enlisted, duplicating the bounty paid by the State, county and city. He 
had very early in life espoused the cause of the colored people, yet with char- 
acteristic freedom from ostentation, very little record was left of the great 
work which he did for wronged and needy humanity. As a young man. in 
Ohio, he conducted a branch of the famous " Underground Railway," assist- 
ing many fleeing bond men and women to escape from their pursuers. When 
the Home for Aged Colored Persons was started in Philadelphia, after the 
war, he was one of the earliest subscribers, becoming a life member of the 
corporation. 

Repeatedly worthy-looking young colored men were seen in Mr. French's 
private office. To all curious inquiries he would return evasive answers. 
Not even the officers of the educational institutions where these grateful 
beneficiaries were received, were permitted to know to whom they were 
indebted. Enough has been learned, however, to make clear the fact that a 
considerable number of young men were thus fitted for work amongst their 
own people, the single imperative condition being that they must go South 
and either teach or preach. Doubtless in many ways the good seed was 
sown without the knowledge of men, the harvest of which will continue to 
be gathered in the years to come. 

A beautiful tribute was paid, a touching mystery to the wondering eyes 
that witnessed it. Into the crowded house of sorrow-, during the solemn 
services over the remains of Samuel H. French, quietly pressed two aged 
colored women. After gazing tearfully, for the last time, upon the face of 
the man who had so often remembered, in their hour of need, the people now 

17 



258 GENEALOGY OF THE 

fitly represented by these humble mourners, they knelt by the casket, remain- 
ing there during the reading of scripture and prayer, a scene worthy the 
sympathetic tears of angel watchers above. 

The loss sustained by the paint trade of Philadelphia in the death of 
Samuel H. French was the principal topic at the February (1895) meeting 
of the Paint Club of that city. During his long and successful business 
career he had made many friends and his wide popularity was shown in the 
utterances of members of the trade. One of those who spoke, Mr. S. K. 
Felton, said that Mr. French " represented the very highest type of honorable 
business men. He was a man of the strictest integrity and among the most 
exemplary of that exemplary Christian body, the Society of Friends. I have 
known him in business for forty-five years, and have never heard a word 
uttered against his character as a Christian or as a business man." 

The following resolutions were adopted as expressing the unanimous senti- 
ment of the club : 

Whereas, it has pleased Almighty God to call to his abiding home, 
through death, our honored townsman, Samuel II. French, the merchants 
and paint trade of Philadelphia are profoundly impressed with the great 
loss they have sustained ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the Paint Club, recognizing the loving hand of the 
All-Wise Father that governs life and death, reverently bows to this decree. 
We are also thankful for the example of the honest and pure life of Mr. 
French, who, in a marked degree, seemed to have sanctified his business 
life, extending through a period of over fifty years, with the calm peace 
of the God of his revered Quaker fathers, thus illustrating the weight and 
value of moral character in business. 

Resolved, That this club will long cherish the memory of Mr. French, 
the Christian gentleman, and that the secretary be requested to send a copy 
of these resolutions to the bereaved family. 




et 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



259 



Simultaneously there were many other expressions of like character, from 
long-time friends. From a number of these communications, addressed to 
Howard B. French, quotations are thus made : 

" I desire to express my great sympathy for you in your bereavement, for 
your father was surely one of nature's noblemen. Far better than fame or 
riches is the verdict that the world will pronounce in his case, that he was 
a good man and one who will be sorely missed. 




<Z*S< 



" The expression of calm, sweet peace, combined with manly dignity, was 
so rare and so spiritual that I am sure it must have been a source of great 
comfort to you and your family. The life was beautiful and the body was 
beautiful in death. I trust our Father in Heaven is giving you His 
Consolation and blessing. v 

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" He was spared to reach a good old age, to see his children grown up 
and highly respected, and now he is called away, leaving a record behind 
him worthy of imitation — an example dear to his children and hosts of 
friends. 



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" Not only was Mr French a recognized Captain of industry, but his 
noble bearing marked him as such to every observer, while the commanding 
outward appearance was an evidence of the inward man. Confidence in his 
character and word was assured. Entirely free from ostentation, he 
pursued the tenor of his manly way with dignity and good will towards 
his fellow men, as he passed through life. As I gazed upon his face, its 
calm repose inspired the thought : Here is a man prepared to meet his God. 



<22& 



260 GENEALOGY OF THE 

"It is with feelings of profound sorrow I learn that the spirit of your 
good father has taken its flight — to whence we know not? I picture him 
in his coffin ; you have looked on his face for the last time ; and the lid 
closes forever from your sight all that is mortal of a good man and a kind 
father, and it is returned 'to the ground; for out of it, was it taken.' 

" For three score years I have known him well, and I can recall naught 
but unbroken friendship — not only to me but to members of my family. 
He contemned all that was low and mean, and a generous impulse governed 
his acts. I can offer no consolation to you or the members of his family; 
that must come from a higher source. I can only sympathize in your 
affliction and share it with you. His death makes me feel more lonely 
in this world; one by one the companions of my youthful days have passed 
away to the otherside of the river until I am left almost alone. 
Affectionately Your Cousin 



, ^y, 77^1^4^— 



From "Drugs, Oils and Paints," February 18th, 1895, Philadelphia, a 
leading trade paper, we quote as follows: 

" Samuel H. French was a man of pronounced views, charitable, benevo- 
lent and of unswerving integrity, in every respect a type of the upright 
christian gentleman and business man. Of dignified demeanor, tranquil life 
and unselfish nature, he often expressed it as his ambition to leave to his 
family, not great wealth but an honorable name ; and in this his success was 
marked, for there has been none more honored in the city of Philadelphia." 

The most tender and suggestive message of abiding respect and sympathy 
came from the office employees, a number of whom had been in the service of 
the man whom all had learned to look upon as their best friend, for many 
years. We quote this beautiful letter entire : 

" Mr Howard B French 
Dear Mr French 

It is with hearts keenly alive to the suffering occasioned by just such sea- 
sons through which you are now passing, that we earnestly wish to extend 
you our deepest sympathies. You have lost a father, we a friend, but to 
those who sorrow with you at this time comes the thought — that to some 
extent breaks in upon the sombreness of the gloom — that it has been a 
most sacred privilege to have come in touch with this one of God's children, 
in whom was embodied so many of the attributes which brings a life into 
the measure of the stature of the ' Perfect One.' 

" We sincerely hope that to you may come some little comfort in the 
thought, thai as life would not be complete without death, so the going 
out of this life, so rirh in the crowning years of time, seems but a quiet 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



261 



benediction to the closing of a well spent day ; and that as the broken circle 
closes, and the duties of life are once more assumed, we shall find our- 
selves knitted closer in loyal and loving allegiance to the son of him who 
leaves a memory of such living useful worth 
" With deepest sympathy, we are," etc. 

The inspiration of these impressive words is readily perceived. They re- 
veal the manner of man Samuel H. French was in his daily walk and 
conversation ; they show the influence exercised upon those having the closest 
opportunity to observe the guiding principles of an always busy life; the 
effect of a consistent example of just dealing, kindly consideration, practical 
sympathy, genial fellowship. Out of full hearts affectionate tribute is paid 
and the promise of renewed loyalty freely given, an exhibition of the con- 
tinuity of devotion that calls for the highest admiration. Well would it be 
throughout the business world if such instances were not so rare. In the 
home, the social circle, the religious and philanthropic arena, this winning 
personality created an atmosphere of up-lifting confidence that made his 
presence a constant benediction. His children were his happy companions ; 
he was the sharer of their hopes, ambitions and pleasures. His business, 
associates leaned on him at all times, relied upon his counsel, respected his 
admonition and his chief partner, his younger brother, fondly regarded him 
as without an equal in the affairs of men. 

Thoroughly devoted to his self-appointed duties, this strong-minded leader 
in the business world, when the day was done, found his delight in the 
quiet restfulness and beauty of rural life, an outward reflection of an inward 
love of the ways of peace and righteousness. The exalted faith of the fathers. 
was to him an ever-present and joyous reality. His calm countenance at all 
times showed forth his supreme trustfulness. From early life, guided by a 
faithful mother's loving eye, he wrought for himself a place of usefulness and 
honor, leaving the priceless heritage of a good name, his steadfast chief desire 
and purpose. As a fitting and lasting tribute to the one hundredth anniver- 
sary of the birth of the nation, Mr. French planted, in the spring of 1876, one 
thousand shade trees along the roads surrounding his summer home, in Camden 
county, New Jersey. Most of these trees have grown to large size, and now 
(1913) add much to the beauty of the neighborhood and the comfort of the 
inhabitants of that very populous locality. It is deemed a special privilege 
and duty thus to gather up the scattered threads of a life of singular purity, 
fidelity, industry and lofty devotion to the best ideals, for the inspiration and 
encourgament of those who come after. 




FLUID LAMf 



262 GENEALOGY OF THE 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER FRENCH. 

William Alexander French [1405], second son and child of Samuel H. 
and Angelina (Dunseth) French, was educated at Friends' Central School, 
Fifteenth and Race streets, Philadelphia. While attending school he mani- 
fested an eager desire to win a useful place in the commercial world, takiim 
special interest in chemistry and those studies which, rightly applied, would 
enable him to succeed therein. After completing his schooling, he took a 
position in the office of the manufacturing branch of his father's firm, French, 
Richards & Co., where he quickly adapted himself to circumstances and rap- 
idly acquired a knowledge of the details of business. It was his special delight 
to perform those duties which brought him into close relationship with his 
father, and to relieve him of needless work of supervision. He was early 
entrusted with larger responsibilities and never failed to meet every require- 
ment. In 1872, with his elder brother, Emmor Davis French [1404], he 
formed the firm of E. D. & W. A. French, manufacturers and dealers in paints 
and building materials, with location in Camden, N. J. The brothers re- 
mained together in business until 1878, when, owing to ill health, Emmor D. 
French retired from the firm, and William A. French continued the business 
until January, 1883, at which time it was absorbed by his uniting with his 
father, Samuel H. French, his brother, Howard B. French, and John L. Long- 
streth, forming the firm of Samuel H. French & Co., a division having taken 
place at that time in the old firm of French, Richards & Co., the latter con- 
tinuing under that name in the drug business, and Samuel H. French & Co. 
continuing the manufacturing and builders' supply department of the business. 

William A. French was actively interested in all that pertained to the 
advancement and betterment of Philadelphia. He was connected with a 
number of charitable institutions and devoted much time and attention to 
benefiting the colored race, rendering material assistance in establishing a 
home for colored orphans. His death, from pneumonia, at an early age, the 
result of unremittent devotion to business, was a sad blow to a large circle 
of friends, both business and social, and an irreparable loss to his family. 
He was loved and respected as a man of noble character and the highest 
ideals of life. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 263 

733— CHARLES BARCLAY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353). 

b. 12th mo. 5th, 1818, in Swedesboro, Gloucester 
Co., N. J. 

d. December 15th, 1870, at his residence, "Osier 
Farm," near Rowandtown (now Westmont), 
Camden Co., N. J. ; buried in Evergreen Cem- 
etery, Camden, N. J. 

m. May 11th, 1846, Sarah Louisa Langcake, 
daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (Bavington) 
Langcake. 
She b. July 4th, 1825, in Frankford, Penna. 

d. January 6th, 1910, at the residence of her son, 
C. Stanley French, 1817 N. 18th St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; buried in Evergreen Cemetery, 
Camden, N. J. 



1410— ANNA ERLEVIA FRENCH 

b. February 24th, 1847, in Camden Co., N. J. 
d. August 31st, 1888, in Camden, N. J. 
m. June 25th, 1878, Henry Brown Fowler, 
C.E., son of Jacob P. and Eliza T. 
(Brown) Fowler. 
He b. June 21st, 1846, in Philadelphia. 

d. September 26th, 1909, Philadelphia. 



141 1— CLAYTON FRENCH b. March 17th, 1849, in Philadelphia. 

d. August 6th, 1849, in Philadelphia. 

1412— BARCLAY CHARLES FRENCH 

b. August 19th, 1851, in Philadelphia, 
d. July 6th, 1853, North East, Md. 

1413— THOMAS LANGCAKE FRENCH 

b. July 23rd, 1853, North East, Md. 
d. December 1st, 1853, North East, Md. 



264 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1414— WALTER FRENCH b. November 22nd, 1854. 

m. July 8th, 1875, Rose Albertson. 

1415— CHARLES STANLEY FRENCH 

b. June 21st, 1857. 
m. September 26th, 1882, Ella Dunning. 

1410— MARGARET BAVINGTON FRENCH 

b. May 9th, i860, near Camden, N. J., un- 
married. 



1417— ANGELINA FRENCH b. December 13th, 1862, near Camden, N. J., 

unmarried. 



1418— WILLIAM ALEXANDER FRENCH. JR. 

b. April 10th, 1866, near Camden, N. J. 
d. July 8th, 1866, near Camden, N. J. 

As a young man. Charles Barclay French, third son and eighth child of Uriah [353] 
and Mary (Ivins) French, was apprenticed to his cousin, William Hazelton French [746]. 
For some little time after the expiration of his apprenticeship he remained in the 
employ of his cousin, but having a pronounced liking for out-door life, he engaged in 
farming, continuing therein until his death in 1870. He took an active interest in local 
conditions, advocating practicable improvements; and while residing in Newton town- 
ship, Camden county, N. J., he was largely instrumental in having Newton creek 
dredged, from its mouth to the White Horse turnpike, making available and highly 
productive a large section of meadow and greatly improving in every way the surround- 
ing country. In February, i860, the house in which he lived, located at the intersection 
of White Horse pike and Collings' road, was entirely destroyed by fire, the family barely 
having time to escape from the burning building. The night was extremely cold, every- 
thing frozen, and the exposure and shock of losing the home resulted in illness from 
which he never recovered. 



Thomas Langcake, born in Frankford, Penna., March 12th, 170,0, died June 8th, 1851, 
married September 12th, 1822, Rebecca Bavington, who was born in Frankford, Penna., 
February 2nd, 1800, died January 29th, 1883, in Camden, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 26S 

734— URIAH FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353). 

b. 6th mo. 25th, 1821, in Swedesboro, N. J. 
d. 9th mo. 3rd, 1857, in Missouri. 
m. Caroline Wheedon, daughter of Luther and 
Sally (Wolley) Wheedon. 
She d. 12th mo. 2nd, 1887. 

1419— CLAYTON FRENCH d. in army. 

1420— LUCIUS FRENCH d. in army. 

1421— SARAH FRENCH d. 2nd mo. 16th, 1856, in Philadelphia. 

1422— GEORGE FRENCH d. about 17 years of age, in Atwater, Ohio. 

1423— SAMUEL H. FRENCH d. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1856, in Philadelphia. 

1424— EMMER MULFORD FRENCH 

b. Sth mo. 12th, 1853. 



Uriah French, Jr., fourth son and ninth child of Uriah [353] and Mary (Ivins) 
French, devoted most of his life to manufacturing and commercial pursuits. For some 
years he conducted a general hardware store in Millville, N. J., and later for a short 
time resided in Camden, N. J., whence he moved with his family to Philadelphia and 
formed the firm of Shords & French, soap manufacturers. Their business prospered 
materially and the future seemed very promising for the firm. In 1856, during an 
epidemic of smallpox in Philadelphia, two of his children were stricken and died, so 
disheartening and impairing the health of his wife that he was induced to move his 
family to the vicinity of Atwater, Ohio, near the home of his wife's parents. Shortly 
after this he went to Missouri, to look after some business matters and while there died 
suddenly. Although no evidence was obtained as to the cause of death, it was supposed 
at the time that the money which he had on his person, which was of considerable 
amount, had tempted some avaricious person to take his life. 



266 GENEALOGY OF THE 



735— CLAYTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Uriah, 353). 

b. 5th mo. 16th, 1824, in Swedesboro, N. J. 

d. July 26th, 1890, 1.15 P. M.,at his summer resi- 
dence, " Woodfield," near Logan Station, York 
Road, Philada. ; buried in Laurel Hill Ceme- 
tery, Philada. 

m. First, April 30th, 1846, in First Moravian 
Church, Philada., Catharine Ann Hansell, 
daughter of James and Ann Catharine (Ehren- 
zeller) Hansell; Rev. Edward Bondthaler per- 
forming ceremony. 
She b. October 22nd, 1827. 

d. February 1st, 1881, at their city residence, N.E. 
cor. 19th and Spruce streets, Philada.; buried 
in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philada. 

m. Second, April 12th, 1888, Margaret (Hansell) 
Ritter, widow of Bradford Ritter, and daughter 
of James and Ann Catharine (Ehrenzeller) 
Hansell. 
She b. July 20th, 1834. 

d. July 31st, 1905, at Delaware Water Gap, Penna. 

1425— MARY IVINS FRENCH b. February 9th, 1847. 

m. January 15th, 1868, George VV. Banks. 

1426— EMMA B. FRENCH d. 1840, about eight months of age. 

1427— JAMES HANSELL FRENCH 

b. March 14th, 1851. 

d. January 17th, 1880, near Ojo Caliente, San 

Mateo Mountains, N. M. ; buried from his 
father's city residence, Philada., February 
28th, 1880 ; interment in Laurel Hill Ceme- 
tery. I'hila. 

1428— ELLA II. FRENCH d. about two years of age. 

1429— MARGARET HANSELL FREN( II 

b. October 20th, 1855. 
m. April 25th, 1878, John Rulon-Miller. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 267 

1430— HARRY BANKS FRENCH 

b. July 25th, 1857. 
m. First, October 30th, 1883, Augusta Anna 

Graham, 
m. Second, November 8th, 1900, Elizabeth 

Engle (Lombaert) Pentz. 

1431— CATHARINE HANSELL FRENCH 

b. April 20th, 1859. 
m. December 12th, 1881, George H. Earle, Jr. 

1432— SAMUEL HARRISON FRENCH, JR. 

b. June 6th, 1861. 

m. February 18th, 1884, Sara Elizabeth 

(Barker) Saunders. 

1433— CAROLINE ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. January 25th, 1866. 

m. October 19th, 1893, Frederic William 
Wilson Graham. 



CLAYTON FRENCH 

Clayton French, fifth son and youngest child of Uriah [353] and Mary 
(Ivins) French, was less than two years old at the time of his father's death. 
When about eight years of age he went to live with George T. Atkinson and 
his wife Elizabeth, useful and influential Friends living near Mullica Hill, 
N. J., his mother having returned to that vicinity after the death of her hus- 
band in Swedesboro, where the family had lived for some years. He was 
early trained to industrious and careful habits. Diligent in study, quick in 
acquiring practical knowledge, ambitious and maturing rapidly, like his elder 
brother, Samuel, he journeyed to the great city on the Delaware when a lad 
of sixteen to seek a place of usefulness where he might profitably develop the 
gifts already indicated. He found what proved to be a very promising oppor- 
tunity with Dr. Edward S. Wilcox, who conducted a retail drug store at the 
northwest corner of Eleventh and Callowhill streets, or the outskirts, in those 
days, of Philadelphia. During the last years of his engagement, Dr. Wilcox 
was seriously ill and the conduct of the business was left entirely to Mr. 
French, although but nineteen years of age. His management, however, 
proved so successful as to attract the attention of Mr. William Campbell, who. 



268 GENEALOGY OF THE 

after Dr. Wilcox's death, became a partner with Mr. French, under the style 
of Campbell & French. This connection lasted only about a year, and was 
succeeded by the firm of French & Richards, composed of Clayton French, 
William II. Richards, afterwards his brother-in-law, and John E. Morey, 
with location at the northwest corner of Tenth and Market streets. In 1852, 
his elder brother, Samuel H. French, became associated with the firm. In 
1857, William H. Richards died, and in 1859 the death of John E. Morey 
occurred. In 1861, Clayton and Samuel H. French admitted Edwin Morey, 
brother of John E. Morey, deceased, to an interest in the firm, from which 
he withdrew July 1st, 1865. In January, 1866, C. W. Funk and William 
Hazelton, Jr., were admitted to the firm, the latter dying in 1884, w-hile the 
former retired in January, 1888. In January, 1883, Clayton and his brother, 
Samuel H. French, dissolved their business connection, the latter continuing 
the manufacturing department at York Avenue, Fourth and Callowhill streets, 
and the former the drug business at Tenth and Market streets, under the old 
style, French, Richards & Co. In January, 1885, Clayton French connected 
with him his son, Harry B., and on the first of January, 1888, his son, Samuel 
H. French, Jr., and his nephew, C. Stanley French. 

As will be observed, Clayton French was the founder of the firm of French 
& Richards, afterwards French, Richards & Co. For over forty years he was 
an active partner, giving close and effective attention to the daily conduct of 
its affairs and to his vigilance and zeal its prosperity was in large measure 
due. Other interesting details of its successful history appear on preceding 
pages, in chronological order, in the sketch of Samuel H. French, his elder 
brother, and partner for over thirty years, and therefore need not be re- 
peated here. 

At the time of his decease, July 26th, 1890, Mr. French was senior member 
of the firm of French, Richards &: Co., a special partner with Bailey, Banks 
& Biddle, a director in the Guarantee Trust & Safe Deposit Company, the 
Pennsylvania Warehousing Company, the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing 
Company, the Charleston (S. C.) Mining and Manufacturing Company, the 
United States Chemical Company, and from January, 1873. until the time of 
his death member of the Executive Council of the Philadelphia Board of 
Trade. 

In January, 1861, the firm of French, Richards & Co. signed the call for 
a meeting of manufacturers and wholesale druggists to form an association, 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 269 

the objects of which were defined as follows : " To facilitate the purchase 
and sale of drugs, the common interests of its members by encouraging inti- 
mate personal intercourse with each other, and the protection of the individual 
and united interests of the drug trade." This association became known as 
the " Philadelphia Drug Exchange," which has continued an influential and 
useful adjunct of the trade for half a century. Mr. French was elected a 
member of the first board of directors and served in that capacity for many 
years. 

Throughout an active and uniformly successful business career of nearly 
half a century, Clayton French built up and maintained a reputation for 
energy, sagacity, integrity and foresight that gave him an enviable place as 
a leader in the world of trade. Exacting in his requirements of others, he 
applied the same rules of industry and fidelity to himself. He permitted no 
deviation from correct business principles. Contracts must be executed as 
agreed upon, even though sometimes at a loss to his own firm, but it was 
seldom that his judgment was at fault. He was far-seeing and courageous, 
reaping reward where less self-confident conduct would have failed to bring 
satisfactory returns. His knowledge of business extended to minute details 
and he could not tolerate negligence or careless methods. His relations with 
employees were friendly and helpful. He was hospitable to friends and 
always solicitous for the welfare and happiness of his own family, contrib- 
uting most liberally to the desires of those near to him, and taking a pardon- 
able pride in the surroundings and appointments of his home. 

Always interested in civic affairs and believing in the maintenance of sound 
principles of government and upright political methods, Mr. French gave 
freely of his time and substance to forwarding the great reform movement 
that led to the adoption of a new charter for Philadelphia. As a member of 
the Committee of One Hundred he rendered valuable service. Throughout 
the Civil War period he joined his business associates in upholding the cause 
of the Union. Like his elder brother and long-time partner, Clayton French, 
without fortune or influential friends at the beginning, solved for himself the 
problem of life, achieving a measure of material success only vouchsafed to 
men of strong mind, high purpose and indomitable will. 

At the time of his death his city residence was 1827 Walnut street, Phila- 
delphia, and he had a beautiful country home located on York Road, near 
Fisher's Lane. 



270 GENEALOGY OF THE 



At the meeting of the Executive Council of the Philadelphia Board of 
Trade, following Mr. French's death, these minutes were adopted : 

"The Philadelphia Board of Trade has recently suffered by decease the 
loss of some most useful, and while in health, most active members. Among 
those so lost by death, none were more useful and none more active than 
Clayton French. 

" In the many years of his connection with and services to this Board, his 
counsel and advice were always earnest, always to the point and of marked 
ability and wisdom. 

" By this Board he has been repeatedly chosen as a delegate to the Na- 
tional Board of Trade ; in which Board his ability to handle and debate the 
great commercial questions coming before the body indicated the thought- 
ful practical intelligence of this eminent merchant. 

" For the past year his friends and associates marked with sorrow the 
physical infirmity and declining health of Mr. French, and, while his mind 
remained bright and clear, all knew that he could not long be with us. 

" We can but mourn the loss of such men, and bow to the will of Provi- 
dence." 



The following is an extract from the Minutes of a meeting of the Board 
of Directors of the Guarantee Trust and Safe Deposit Company, August 4th, 
1890: 



"The President announced to the Board in a fitting manner and with appropriate 
remarks, that a loss had been sustained in their membership by the demise of Mr. 
Clayton French on July 26th, 1890, whereupon, on motion of Mr. Stadiger, the following 
was adopted, viz : 

"The Officers and Board of Directors of the Guarantee Trust and Safe 
Deposit Company are called upon to record the death of another of its early 
Directors, Mr. Clayton French. Impressed as they are with his strict 
integrity, the correctness of his judgment, the faithfulness which he dis- 
played in performing the duties intrusted to him, as well as the kindness and 
courtesy of manner which tempered his business exactness— the Board feel 
his loss most keenly both as a social as well as business friend and associate 
and order that this minute be inscribed in the Minute book of the Company. 

"They further direct that this Resolution be transcribed and forwarded 
to Mr. French's afflicted family with the expression of their sincere sym- 
pathy with them in the loss of one so deservedly held dear by them." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 271 

LIEUTENANT JAMES HANSELL FRENCH 

James Hansell French [1427], eldest son of Clayton and Catharine Ann 
(Hansell) French, was born and received his preliminary education in the city 
of Philadelphia. In 1869 he was appointed a cadet in the United States 
Military Academy, West Point, in accordance with his ardent desire and the 
seeming trend of his life, he being fond of outdoor pleasures and stirring 
adventure. He graduated with honor in 1874, and entered the cavalry service 
as second lieutenant in the Ninth Regiment, stationed in Texas. On account 
of raids of border cattle thieves the young officer soon saw very active and 
more or less dangerous service. He frequently pursued marauders beyond 
the Rio Grande, and upon one occasion broke into a secret storehouse where 
their arms were kept and confiscated them, defying the local Mexican author- 
ities. For this act he was indicted but being sustained by his superior officers 
the matter went no further. Soon thereafter he was ordered to Fort Garland 
and marched his detachment over the desert plains for several weeks, endur- 
ing great hardships. Later he retired from the army, but in 1877 his com- 
mission was renewed and he soon engaged on the frontier, taking part in 
hazardous expeditions against warring Indians in the southwest. 

It was in Arizona, in January, 1880, that Lieutenant French, serving under 
Major Morrow, was assigned to pursue a band of hostile Apache Indians, of 
which Victoria was chief, in the San Mateo mountains. This service required 
great courage and endurance, and resulted in the untimely ending of the young 
officer's life. An interesting account of the fatal engagement was addressed 
to his father, Clayton French, by a comrade, Lieutenant M. W. Day, Ninth 
Cavalry, from which we quote as follows : 

" It becomes my painful duty to inform you of the death of your son 
J. Hansell French who was killed at the head of his company in action with 
Victoria's band of hostile indians in the San Mateo Mts., N. M., about 25 
miles from Ojo Caliente on the 17th inst. His company was on the extreme 
left of the command during the engagement. He and Major Morrow rode 
their mules up the mountain and dismounted under a ledge of rocks at 
3 P.M. Receiving no shots from the hostiles Maj. Morrow returned to 
direct the movements of the troops. Hansell and Purington with their 
companies climbed upon the top of the Mt. Hansell scouted along the top 
of a canon and finally opened fire on some hostiles who had obtained a posi- 
tion inside the crescent formed by the troops, and engaged them 'til near 



272 GENEALOGY OF THE 

dark. The fighting was mostly on the right flank, but about sundown a few 
shells were exploded amongst the hostiles who fled & ran around the Mts. to 
the left flank. It being now dark orders were issued for all the troops to be 
withdrawn to camp. As there had been no firing in his vicinity for half an 
hour, Ilansell supposed that the hostiles had retired, and moved ahead of 
his command about two hundred yards to look into the canon, when a volley 
was poured into him at a distance of only a few yards. His death was instan- 
taneous and painless. When his men brought in his body under the direc- 
tion of Lieut. Maney 15th Infty. who volunteered to go in after him, his 
face had the same handsome smile and commanding expression that it bore 
when he led his company up the mountain. He distinguished himself by 
his bravery and skill at planning a defence in an engagement with Victoria 
on the Sierra Blanco Canon, on the 12th inst. ; and was working hard to 
distinguish himself during this campaign, for the sake of his parents and 
brothers and sisters. He spoke of them very frequently. Just before he 
went into this unfortunate engagement he was speaking to us about them 
and you were continually in his mind. He was noted for his generosity 
and high standard of honor. The favorite officer in his Regiment, his loss 
is a heavy blow to us, as to those who were with him as cadets at West 
Point." 

Lieutenant French's remains were interred with full military honors on 
top of the mountain, with seven soldiers who were killed in the campaign. 
Soon thereafter the body was forwarded to Philadelphia and buried in Laurel 
Hill Cemetery. Fellow officers united in a feeling testimonial as to their 
late comrade's bravery and efficiency. His untimely death was the occasion of 
sympathetic sorrow throughout an extended social circle wherein his personal 
worth was cordially recognized. 

It may be of interest to here note that the Indian chief Victoria, one of 
whose band killed Lieutenant French, was one of the most troublesome leaders 
of the Apaches with whom the frontier army ever had to deal. Four times 
within five years he broke away from the reservation assigned to his people 
in New Mexico, leading marauding bands through the country and along the 
Mexican border. In September, 1879, objecting to removal to the care of 
the San Carlos agency, he took the field with several hundred warriors. He 
was pursued during the next few months by Colonels Grierson and Hatch 
over 1.000 miles, the troops being almost constantly engaged in fighting. It 
was during this campaign that Lieutenant French was killed. Finally Vic- 
toria was < based over the Mexican border and his band broken up, and he was 
reported killed in the latter part of 18S0. 




LIEUTENANT J. HANSELL FRENCH, 1\ S \ 1880 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 273 



ANCESTRY OF CATHARINE ANN HANSELL 

Peter David and Ann Dorethea (Hencht) Hansell came to Philadelphia about 1754 
and settled in Kingsessing township. He constructed and operated for many years a 
tannery, and built a homestead 1759-60 on the present site of the Presbyterian Orphan- 
age, 58th and Kingsessing avenue. His family were among the earliest pewholders in 
the neighboring colonial Swedish Lutheran Church, now St. James P. E. Church, King- 
sessing, 69th and Woodland avenue. The cornerstone of the original part of this his- 
toric edifice was laid, August 5th, 1762, by Rev. Charles Mangus Wrangell, rector .of 
Old Swedes' Church, assisted by Rev. Henry M. Muhlenberg, who was known as the 
patriarch of the colonial Evangelical Lutheran churches in America. He was the father 
of Reverend, afterwards Major General Peter Muhlenberg, famous during the Revolu- 
tion. The pioneer Hansell family and many of their descendants throughout four gen- 
erations rest in the burial ground of St. James, their tombstones being remarkably well 
preserved. Peter David was born in 1724 and died November 19th, 1786. His will, 
dated September 21st, 1784, proved December 2nd, 1786, bequeathed quite an estate to 
his wife and children. Ann Dorethea (Hencht) Hansell was born 1732 and died Decem- 
ber 22nd, 1812. Their children were David, William, George, Barnett, Jacob, John. 
Mary, Elizabeth, Charles, Peter, Andrew. The sons were all industrious and useful 
citizens, successful farmers and artisans and their children, likewise, were active in in- 
dustrial and mercantile pursuits. 

William Hansell, second son of Peter David, was born in 1757, died July 16th, 1800, 
married November 16th, 1783, Sarah Morris; pastor of St. Michael and Zion Lutheran 
Church, Philadelphia, performing ceremony. Sarah Morris was born 1762, died Decem- 
ber 12th, 1833; funeral services were held at the residence of her son, James Hansell, 
76 North nth St., near Race, Philadelphia. William Hansell and wife Sarah are buried 
in the same grave in St. James Churchyard. William and Sarah (Morris) Hansell had 
children: Anne, born 1785, died unmarried March 15th, 1847; Hannah, born 1788, died 
May 29th, 1873, married June 24th, 1827, Samuel Forman ; James, born 1791; Morris, 
born 1794. died April nth, 1839; William, born 1796, died October 9th, 1846, married 
March 4th, 1819, Elizabeth Ann Berrett; Thomas; Sarah, married April 25th, 1822, 
John Matthews, Jr. 

James Hansell, eldest son of William and Sarah (Morris) Hansell, born 1791, married 
July 31st, 181 7, Ann Catharine Ehrenzeller. Baptismal records of the First Moravian 
Church, Philadelphia, give this name as Anna Catharina Ehrenzeller. In the American 
[Philada.] Daily Advertiser, August 2nd, 1817, appeared the following marriage notice: 
"On Thursday evening last [July 31st] by the Rev. Mr. [Jacob] Broadhead, Mr. James 
Hansell to Miss Ann C. Ehrenzeller, both of this city." Rev. Jacob Broadhead was a 
distinguished minister of the Dutch Reformed Church in America. He came to Phila- 
delphia from New York in 1813, being pastor of the First Dutch Reformed Church, 
N. W. cor, of Crown (now Lawrence) and Race streets, until 1826. He was a regi- 
mental chaplain during the war of 1812. He was born in 1784 and died in 1855. 

James Hansell was a pioneer watch and clock-maker, and silversmith, being long 
recognized as a leading manufacturer in that industry. He carried on the business very 
IS 



274 GENEALOGY OF THE 

successfully for marly half a century, and for upwards of forty years his store was in 
the building on Market Street, now 706, within close proximity to the site where Thomas 
Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence. He died March 31st, 1865. His will, 
dated October 5th, 1850, and proved April 6th, 1865, amply provided for his wife, his 
children being residuary legatees. His wife, Ann C. Hansell, was made executrix, and 
his sons-in-law Charles C. and Clayton French and William H. Richards, executors. 
Ann C. Hansell died June 27th, 1886. Both buried in Woodlands Cemetery, West 
Philadelphia. James and Ann Catharine (Ehrenzeller) Hansell had the following chil- 
dren: Emma Ehrenzeller, born July 4th, 1818, died February 27th, 1891, married No- 
vember 14th, 1839, Jacob W. Boiler; Ellen Justice, born October 7th, 1821, died June 
27th, 1865, married January 15th, 1846, William H. Richards; Henrietta Ehrenzeller, 
born November nth, 1824, died March 3rd, 1S78, married January 15th, 1846, Charles 
C. French [756] ; Catharine Ann, born October 22nd, 1827, died February 1st, 1881, 
married April 30th, 1846, Clayton French [735] ; Sarah, born March 24th, 1830, died 
March 15th, 1886, married February 24th, 1857, Charles W. Funk; Warner, born October 
19th, 1832, died August oth, 1833; Margaret Humphreys, born July 20th, 1834, died 
July 31st, 1905, married first, June 15th, 1858, Bradford Ritter, he died August nth, 
1873; married second, April 12th, 1888, Clayton French [735]. 

Jacob Ehrenzeller, born April 5th, 1725, son of Jacob and Anna Magdalena (Kiinter) 
Ehrenzeller, left Basle, Switzerland, in 1749 and sailed for America from Rotterdam. 
After a passage "of seven or eight weeks, in an old leaky vessel, arrived at Philadelphia. 
Whole cost 70 or 80 gulders, yet brought a ducat ashore." He bought a plantation in 
Maryland but did not remove there, entering into business projects in Philadelphia, 
where he remained the rest of his life, nearly half a century. On June ;th, 1754, he 
was married to Anna Gertrude Hankee, by Rev. John Dietrich Heinzelman, pastor of St. 
Michael Lutheran Church, Fifth and Cherry Streets, Philadelphia. There were three 
children by this marriage; the mother dying January 28th. 1765, Jacob married second, 
October 21st, 1765, Elizabeth Hankee, who bore him two children. She died October 4th, 
17111; and June 6th, 1770, Jacob married "for the third and last time." Anna Catharine 
Baker, born in Frankfort, Germany. August 12th, 1742, by whom he had eight children: 
Hilary, born July 20th, 1771. baptized August 2nd, 1771, by Rev. Dr. Duche, assistant 
rector of Christ Church, afterwards Chaplain of the Continental Congress: Catharine, 
born February 23rd, 1773, died July 4th, 1773; John Christopher, born May 21st, 1774, 
died May 13th, 1776; George, born May 12th. 1770, .lied November 6th. 182c). married 
October 21st, 1805, Henrietta Loveland ; Maria, born November 15th, 177S, married June 
9th, 1796, Lewis Fouquet; William, born March 2;th, 17S1, died June oth, 178IJ Anna 
Catharine, born September 29th, 17S2; Christopher, born February loth, 1786, died Sep- 
tember ililh, 1798, of yellow fever. Jacob Ehrenzeller died October 27th, 1798, and is 
buried in the same grave with his first wife and her infant daughter in Christ Church 
graveyard, Fifth and Arch Streets, Philadelphia. Beside them rests the third wife, Anna 
Catharine Baker, who died April 16th, 1823. In the same enclosure are buried Jacob's 
second wife and eight of his children. Ten of Jacob's thirteen children were baptized 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 275 



by ministers of Christ Church, three of them by Rev. William White, D.D., afterwards 
first Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania. 

Hilary Ehrenzeller, eldest child of Jacob and Anna Catharine (Baker) Ehrenzeller, 
married May 19th, 1793, Ann Catharina DehufT; the pastor of the First Moravian 
Church, Lititz, Lancaster Co., Pa., performing ceremony. In the records of the First 
Moravian Church, Philadelphia, are recorded the births and baptisms of two children of 
Hilary and Ann Catharina (Dehuff) Ehrenzeller: Jacob Dehuff Ehrenzeller, born March 
27'b, 1795, baptized April 12th, 179;, married August 22nd, 1816, Mary Ann Matlack ; 
Anna Catharina Ehrenzeller, born October 3rd, 1797, baptized November 19th, 1797, 
married July 31st, 1817, James Hansell. Hilary Ehrenzeller died September 7th, 1798, 
of yellow fever, and is buried in St. Peter's graveyard, Third and Pine Streets, Phila- 
delphia. 

The Dehuff family were among the earliest German colonists to settle in America. 
John Dehuff and Catharina Brecht, daughter of John and Catharina Brecht, were mem- 
bers of a little company who came from the Palatinate in 1725 and located in Maryland. 
They were married in 1727 and some years later removed to Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, where John Dehuff died in 1751. They had eleven children: Henry, born 1738, 
died 1800, married March 14th, 1768, Philipina Eberman, daughter of John and Anna 
Eberman. Their daughter, Ann Catharina Dehuff, born December 31st, 1773, died July 
21st, 1814, married May 19th, 1793, Hilary Ehrenzeller. 



736— ABIGAILS. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141; Jacob, 354). 

b. 9th mo. 28th, 1799. 
d. March 11th, 1869. 
m. First, February 10th, 1820, Joseph Cooper, son 

of Nathan and Hannah Cooper; Josiah Moore, 

Esq., performing ceremony. 
J. C. b. March 19th, 1797. 
d. June 12th, 1849. 
m. Second, March 16th, 1853, Stacy Hazelton, son 

of William and Abigail Hazelton ; Rev. Charles 

Kain, Jr., performing ceremony. 

1434— SARAH FRENCH COOPER 

b. August 8th, 182 1. 
m. 2nd mo. 16th, 1843, Benjamin Cloud. 

1435— HANNAH ANN COOPER b. April 30th, 1825. 

d. October 3rd, 1840. 






276 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1436— ABIGAIL FRENCH COOPER 

b. July 23rd, 1829. 
d. May iSth, 1888. 
m. 12th mo., 1859, Amos Gaunt. 
He d. 1886 (no issue). 

1437— AN XA P. COOPER b. June 2nd. 1833. 

m. February 26th, 1852, Quincy A. Sherwin. 



WEDDING INVITATION 

" Miss Abigail S. French and Mr. Joseph Cooper's compliments to Mr>. 
" Hannah Cooper and solicits the favour of her Company at Jacob French's 
"at 5 o'clock P. M. February icth 1820." 



737— THEODOSIA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles. 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Jacob, 354). 

b. 12th mo. 1st, 1801, in Gloucester Co., N. J. 

d. May 9th, 1858, in Franklinville, N. J. 

in. February 5th, 182 7, Lawrence Cake, son of 

George and Phebe (Moore) Cake. 
He b. February 3rd, 1799, in Deerfield, Cumberland 

Co., N. J. 
d. February 23rd, 1869, in Philadelphia. 

1438— EUPHEMIA MOORE CAKE 

b. December 13th, 1827. 
m. August 7th, 1850, Samuel F. Fisler, M.D. 

1439— SARAH JOSEPHINE CAKE 

b. July 25th, 1832. 

m. January 13th, 1858, William llmvey. Jr. 

1440— EMMA LOUISA CAKE b. May 10th, 1837. 

m. January 28th, 1863, Robert McCalla Eng- 
lish. 

1441 — LAWRENCE ELMER CARF 

b. April 30th, 1840. 

m. December 1st, 1859, Mary L. Lumis. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



277 




l80I THEODOSIA (FRENCH) CAKE 1858 



278 GENEALOGY OF THE 

738— SAMUEL ELLIS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Jacob, 354). 

1). 1802, in Mullica Hill. N. J. 

d. 9th mo. 5th, 1874, in Yorktown, Salem Co., 

N.J. 
m. 11th mo. 27th, 1828. Elizabeth GrofT, daughter 

of Joseph and Elizabeth (Test) GrofT. 
She b. 8th mo. 26th, 1800, in Harrisonville, N. J. 
d. 2nd mo. 11th, 1869, near Yorktown, N. J. 

1442— HEW LINGS FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1830. 

m. First, 3rd mo. 18th, 1858, Mary Amanda 

Summerill. 
m. Second, January 1st, 1880, Emma Jones. 

1443— WILLIAM FRENCH b. 1832. 

d. in infancy. 

1444— JOSEPH GROFF FRENCH 

b. Qth mo. 6th, 183;. 

m. May 10th, 1850, Emma Treen. 

1445— MARY ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. qth mo. 16th, 1837. 

m. November 17th, 1857, Franklin Iszard. 



739_\VII,I.I.\M SMITH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141 ; Jacob. 354). 

b. 5th mo. 4th, 1806, near Mullica Hill. N. J. 

d. 10th mo. 13th, 1882; buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

m. 1st mo. 26th. 1832. Rachel Iredell, daughter of 
Thomas and La Bella (Moore) Iredell. 
She b. 5th mo. L4th, 1804. 

d. 11th mo. 18th. 1896 j buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill. N T . J. 

1446— JACOIi FRENCH b. 10th mo. 27th, 1832. 

m. 3rd mo. 15th. i8(S6. Caroline Summerill. 



a 
- 
o 



w 

H 
O 




- 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



279 



1447— THOMAS IREDELL FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 10th, 1834. 



1448— SARAH E. FRENCH 



1449— ELLIS FRENCH 



m. First, February 5th, 1870, Rebecca M. 
Nichols. 

m. Second, March 17th, 1875, Sarah G. (Arm- 
strong) Pennegar. 

m. Third, March 21st, 1878, Elizabeth 
(Cassaday) Bates. 

b. 8th mo. 4th, 1835. 
m. 3rd mo. 20th, 1861, Thomas Edwards, Jr. 

b. 12th mo. 25th, 1836. 

m. First, November 25th, 1882, Anna R. 

Stratton. 
m. Second, December iqth, 1888, Caroline K. 

Steward. 



Signature to Will. Dated July 3 ist. 1878. Proved October 27TH. i88i 
Thomas I. French, Ellis French and Thomas Edwards.Jr.. Executors 



740— SAMUEL FRENCH MOORE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Agnes, 355). 

b. 10th mo. 7th, 1793. 
d. 3rd mo. 7th, 1827. 

m. Rachel Haines, daughter of Nehemiah and 
Abigail Haines. 
She b. 3rd mo. 20th, 1 796. 
d. 4th mo. 13th, 1877. 

1450— CARLTON RIDGWAY MOORE 

b. 4th mo. 22nd, 1818. 

m. December 24th, 1838, Mary Hardie Mc- 
Clure. 

1451— BLOOMFIELD HAINES MOORE 

b. 12th mo. 16th, 1819. 
m. October 27th, 1842, Clara Jessup. 



280 GEN I'A LOGY OF THE 

743 — SARAH FRENCH MOORE (Thomas, 1: Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, Ml ; Agnes, 355). 

b. 4th mo. 13th, 17''''. 
d. April 27th. 1867. 

id. May 10th, 1821, Thomas Inskeep, Jr., son of 
Thomas and Mary (Stockton) Inskeep. 
He b. September 26th, 1801. 
d. December 26th. 1836. 



1452— ANNA STOCKTON INSKEEP 

b. February 13th, 1S22. 

m. December 12th, 1841, Edward K. Eyre. 



1453— EMILY ROTCH INSKEEP 

b. < Ictober 8th, 1823. 

m. November 4th, 1S44, lienjamin I. Ritter. 



, 454 _jOSEPH M. INSKEEP b. August 5th, 1825. 

m. Elizabeth J. Taylor. 



1455— TIloMAS INSKEEP, 3RD b. August 2Mb. 18*7. 

d. July 20th, 1844. 



1456— AGNES FRENCH INSKEEP 

1). December 13th, 1829. 

d, unmarried. 

Thomas Inskeep, son of John and Elizabeth (Bockman) Inskeep. grandson of John 
and Sarah (Ward) Inskeep, and great grandson of the pioneer John Inskeep who settled 
in Gloucester Co., N. J., in 1708; was born January 15th, 1771, died October 7th, 1813, 
married January 31st, 1 7<)b, in First Baptist Church, Philadelphia. Mary Stockton, 
daughter of William and Mary (Naglee) Stockton. William Stockton, born I7;n, died 
1838, married 1775, Mary Naglee, was the son of William, born 1712, died 17S1. married 
17^1 Mary lirian ; grandson of Job who married Ann Petty, and great grandson of 

Richard Stockton, born near London, England, settled in New England prior to 1040, 
later located at Flushing, L. I., being one of the patentees of that town, and about l6qo 
removed to Springfield township, Burlington Co., where he died in 1*07; founder of the 
• ton family in New Jersey, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 281 

744— BETHUEL ALLEN MOORE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Agnes, 355). 

b. 5th mo. 8th, 1801. 

d. 2nd mo. 14th, 1851 ; buried in Friends' Burying 
Ground, 16th and Race Sts., Philadelphia. 

m. April 11th, 1825, Hannah Naglee Inskeep, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary (Stockton) 
Inskeep; William Stockton, Esq., Justice of 
the Peace (uncle of the bride), performing 
ceremony. 
She b. 9th mo. 14th, 1803. 

d. 4th mo. 28th, 1857; buried in Mercer Ceme- 
tery, Clinton St., Trenton, N. J. 

1457— AGNES FRENCH MOORE 

b. 2nd mo. ioth, 1826. 
m. August 31st, 1848, James Wilson. 

1458— AMANDA INSKEEP MOORE 

b. 7th mo. 7th, 1S27. 

m. November qth, 1853, Henry Cardwell Pot- 
ter. 

1459— ADRIANNA MOORE b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1S29. 

m. December 19th, 1848, Samuel Mitchell 
Anderson. 

1460— BETHUEL ALLEN MOORE, JR. 

b. 7th mo. 4th, 1830. 
d. 5th mo. 9th, 1866. 

1461— HANNAH STOCKTON MOORE 

b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1832. 
d. 6th mo. 25th, 1844. 

1462— MARY ANNA MOORE b. 12th mo. 25th, 1834. 

d. 5th mo. 21st, 1842. 

1463— JACOB RIDGWAY MOORE 

b. ioth mo. 18th, 1836. 
d. 12th mo. 8th, 1837. 



282 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1464— JACOB RIDGWAV MOORE, 2ND 

b. 12th mo. nth, 1837. 
il. 6th mo. 8th, 1902. 

1465— THOMAS IXSKEEP MOORE 

b. 4th mo. 19th, 1839. 

1466— JOHN STOCKTON MOOKE 

b. 7th mo. 26th, 1840. 
(I. 8th mo. 9th, 1840. 

1467— CLEMENTINA MOORE b. 7th mo. 27th, 1841. 

m. October 7th, 1869, Charles H. Oberge. 

1468— MARY ANNA MOORE, 2ND 

b. 1st mo. 10th, 1843. 

m. July 16th, 1868, Edwin H. Trego, M.D. 

1469— HANNAH ROSALBA MOORE 

b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1844. 

m. October 18th, 1870, John F. MacKie. 

1470— WILLIAM STOCKTON MOORE 

b. 5th mo. l6th, 1846. 
d. 6th mo. 16th, 1846. 



746— WILLIAM HAZELTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141; Charles, 356). 

b. 10th mo. 28th, 1799, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. 9th mo. 15th, 1883, at his residence, 1938 Mt. 
Vernon St., Philadelphia ; buried in Fairhill 
Burying Ground, Philadelphia, 
m. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1824, in Mullica Hill Meeting 
House, Elizabeth Borton Atkinson, daughter 
of John and Elizabeth (Borton) Atkinson. 
She b. 8th 1110. 16th. 1800, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. 10th mo, 2nd, 1864, in Philadelphia; buried in 
Fairhill Burying Ground, Philadelphia. 

147'— CAROLINE FRENCH b. 4th mo. nth, 1S25. 

m. 5th mo. 20th, 1847, David T. Burr. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 283 

1472— GEORGE ATKINSON FRENCH 

b. 10th mo. 16th, 1826. 
d. 6th mo. 22nd, 1827. 

I473 _J0HN ELI FRENCH b. 4th mo. 28th, 1828, in Philadelphia. 

d. 8th mo. iqth, 1904, in Stroudsburg, Pa.; 
buried in Fairhill Burying Ground, Phila- 
delphia, 
m. 1 2th mo. 2nd, 1852, Cynthia Elizabeth 
Jones, daughter of William and Rachel 
H. Jones, of Gulf Mills, Pa. 
She d. nth mo. 25th, 1901, in Germantown, 
Philada. ; buried in Fairhill Burying 
Ground, Philada. (no issue). 

1474— CHARLES STRICKLAND FRENCH 

b. qth mo. 21st, 1829. 

m. First, 5th mo. 22nd, 1856, Clementine 
Albertson. 

m. Second, 6th mo. 13th, i860, Anna Bow- 
man. 

1475— WILLIAM FRENCH b. 1st. mo. 14th, 1832. 

m. November 6th, 1856, Annie E. Crowell. 

1476— GEORGE FRENCH b. 8th mo. 18th. 1833. 

d. 3rd mo. 14th, 1834. 

1477— RICHARD FRENCH b. 2nd. mo. 4th, 1836. 

m. First, 12th mo. 1st, 1859, Julia A. C. 

Abbott, 
m. Second, 2nd mo. 4th, 1873, Mary W. 

Baynes. 

1478— ELIZABETH ATKINSON FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 25th, 1838. 
d. nth mo. 25th. 1838. 

1479— MARTHA HAZELTON FRENCH 

b. 12th mo. 8th, 1839. 
m. September 24th, 1863, John B. Solms. 



284 GENEALOCV (IF THE 

WILLIAM HAZELTON FRENCH 

William Hazelton French, eldest son of Charles [356] and Martha (Hazel- 
ton) French, came to Philadelphia in his youth and learned a trade. About 
1824 he established himself in business in that city, becoming a prosperous 
contractor and builder ; his work extending throughout the eastern, central, 
southern and some of the western States. For many years previous to his 
death his place of business was located at 1735 Chestnut street. He took a 
leading part in developing a section of the city, the vicinity of Rittenhouse 
Square, which has for more than half a century been noted for its wealthy 
and cultured residents. In 1834 he bought a piece of ground at the south- 
west corner of Schuylkill Sixth and Locust streets, a thinly populated por- 
tion of the city, now Seventeenth and Locust streets, and in the autumn of 
that year he commenced building thereon the first brick house in that location. 
Winter coming on, and having no means of warming the building, it was 
boarded up until the spring of 1835, when he finished it and there established his 
home. Following this he built a number of large and comfortable brick houses 
on Locust, Seventeenth and Rittenhouse streets. His business career covered 
a period of three score years, and when past eighty he continued to give daily 
personal direction to many of its details, supervising correspondence, advising 
and suggesting in many helpful ways. Using the best materials and skilled 
workmanship, his products were of the highest class. At the Centennial 
Exhibition in Philadelphia, in 1876, he exhibited a model of the great 
Egyptian pyramid Cheops, which attracted wide attention. Many duplicates 
of this work were ordered by art collectors, and Egyptian visitors were among 
the appreciative purchasers. 

William Hazelton French always took an active interest in the welfare and 
advancement of Philadelphia; served as councilman, and was one of the 
originators, in 1852, and the first president of the Philadelphia City Insti- 
tute and Free Library, located at the northeast corner of Eighteenth and 
Chestnut streets. To this beneficent institution, he gave most earnest and 
enthusiastic support, continuing as president for fourteen years, and was a 
manager until his decease. This is one of the oldest free libraries in the 
city, and continues to have a large attendance. Mr. French was also con- 
nected with the Howard Hospital and other charitable institutions, and gave 
sympathetic thought to the care of the poor and wayward. All his life he 




1799, WILLIAM HAZELTON FRENCH, 18&3 IN ll, KLIZAP.KTII (ATKINSON) FRENCH, 18C4 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 285 

was a consistent and active Friend. He adhered to the principles of the 
Society at all times, and in consequence was often compelled to face a strong 
current of public opinion and even to ignore the formal demands of the con- 
stituted authorities. He conscientiously refused to pay military tax. The 
amount exacted was small and the collecting officer upon several occasions 
regretfully but courteously seized a special piece of household furniture that 
was highly prized. This was in due form put up at public sale, an agent of 
the owner always being the purchaser. Thus the lawful obligation was met 
without violation of personal scruples. Friend French ardently sympathized 
with the Union cause, but he could not voluntarily sustain war measures, even 
during that memorable contest. He was keenly alive to the condition of the 
sick and wounded during those dark days, and the families of many unfor- 
tunates were the recipients of his kindly thought and care. It was in his 
home and under his friendly guidance that some of his young cousins (re- 
ferred to in other portions of this volume), who later took such prominent 
parts in life, received their first insight into the active business world. In 
1824 he and his wife united with Green Street Monthly Meeting by certificate 
from Pilesgrove Meeting, Woodstown, N. J.; and in 1835, upon his removal 
to Locust street, he united with Spruce Street Meeting, where he remained 
an active member until his death. 





i^*-tsri 



o< 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE 

Whereas, William II. French of the County of Philadelphia in the State of Pennsyl- 
vania Son of Charles French of Gloucester County in the State of New Jersey and 
Martha his late Wife deceased, and Elizabeth B. Atkinson Daughter of John Atkinson 
of Gloucester County aforesaid and Elizabeth his Wife having declared their intentions 
of Marriage with each other before A Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of 
Friends held at Pilesgrove in Salem County New Jersey according to the good order 
Used among them: And having the Consent of their Surviving Parents thereto their 
said Proposal of Marriage was allowed of by the said Meeting now these are to cer- 
tify Whom it may concern that for the full accomplishment of their said intentions this 
third day of the third Month in the Year of Our Lord One thousand eight hundred 
and twenty four, they the said William H. French and Elizabeth B. Atkinson appeared 



286 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



in A Public Assembly of the said People held at Woolwich in the County of Gloucester 
and State of New Jersey aforesaid : And the said William H. French taking the said 
Elizabeth B. Atkinson by the hand did on this solemn occasion openly declare that he 
took her the said Elizabeth IS. Atkinson to be his Wife promising with Divine Assist- 
ance to be unto her A loving and faithful Husband until Death should separate them. 
And then in the same Assembly the said Elizabeth Ii. Atkinson did in like manner 
declare that she took him the said William H. French to be her Husband promising 
with Divine Assistance to be unto him A loving and faithful Wife until Death should 
separate them. 

And Moreover, they the said William II. French and Elizabeth B. Atkinson (she 
according to the Custom of Marriage assuming the name of her Husband) did as A 
further Confirmation thereof then and there to these presents Set their hands: — 

And We Whose names are hereunto also subscribed being present at the Solemnization 
of the said Marriage and Subscription have as Witnesses thereunto Also Set our hands 
the day & year above written — 



Sarah Snowden 
Lydia Tatum 
George Tatum 
Elizabeth Tatum 
Sibyl Tatum 
Jonathan Heritage 
Israel Pancoast 
Stacy Hazelton 
Sarali Hazelton 
Lydia Thorn 
Isabella Paul 
Richard Davis 
Hannah Moore 
Hannah Heritage 
Naomi Holmes 
Chalkley Moore 
Abel Robins 
Lydia Robins 
Abigail Davis 
Gabriel Davis 
John Pancoast 
Sarah Pancoast 
James Beatty 



James Lawrie 
James Horner 
Samuel Gaunt 
David C. Pancoast 
Sand. Moore 
Nathan D. Pancoast 
Benjamin Colson 
Isaac Combs 
Moses Rulon, Jr. 
Ellwood Lippincott 
Reuben Roberts 
Benj. Heritage 
Isaac B. Snowden 
Mary Snowden 
Jacob Ridgway 
Mary A. Zane 
Margarett B. Robins 
Ann E. Pine 
Martha Pancoast 
Mary R. Bower 
Sarah B. Zane 
Sarah H. Pine 
I). M. Davis 



William II. French 
Elizabeth B. French 

John Atkinson 
Elizabeth Atkinson 
Charles French, Jr. 
Priscilla French 
Esther Atkinson 
George Atkinson 
John Atkinson, Jr. 
Mary Hazelton 
John Knight 
Rebecca Jones 
Elizabeth Groff 
Theodosia French 
Rebecca Snowden 
Susanna Bedford 
Lydia W. Atkinson 
Stacy French 
Samuel C. French 
Thomas Wilkins 
Win. Hazelton 
B. A. Moon 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



287 



GREEN STREET MONTHLY MEETING, PHILADELPHIA 

In the early part of the nineteenth century the Society of Friends had 
become a prominent and influential element in the life of Philadelphia. 
Within fifteen years three large Meeting Houses were erected: Arch street, 
1802-4, Twelfth street, 1812, and Green street, 1813-14. The North Meet- 
ing, in Key's Alley, near Second and Vine streets, was in flourishing condition 
and the need of greater accommodations was felt. Some Friends were appre- 
hensive as to the success of a meeting so far " out of town " as Fourth and 
Green streets ; in a little while, however, this meeting had a large and active 
membership. The Preparative Meeting was set up in 1814, and the Monthly 
Meeting in 1816, the additional meetings later becoming subject thereto 
being Frankford, Fairhill, Germantown and Girard Avenue. At the time 
of the separation, in 1827, the followers of Elias Hicks controlled Green 
Street Meeting, which at once became the center of influence of that branch 
of the Society in Philadelphia. The Yearly Meeting of men Friends was 
held there from 1829 until it was moved to Fifteenth and Race streets in 
1857, and during that period the women Friends held their Yearly Meeting 
in the Meeting House which had been erected immediately after the separa- 
tion, on Cherry street below Fifth. Many noted ministers of the Society 
appeared at Green Street Meeting from time to time. That part of the city 
became a favorite residential section and Friends comprised a numerous por- 
tion of a highly intelligent and wealthy population, which also led to the 
erection by Orthodox Friends of the large Meeting House at Sixth and Noble 
streets, in 1838. 




GREEN STREET MEETING HOUSE, 1813 



288 GENEALOGY OF THE 

747— SAMUEL CLEMENT FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141 ; Charles. 356). 

b. 12th mo. 12th, 1801, near Mullica Hill. N. J. 

d. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1877; buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

m. First, 3rd mo. 3rd, 1830, Rachel Colson, 
daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Moore) 
Colson. 
She b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1803. 

d. 2nd mo. 10th, 1865; buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

m. Second, 5th mo. 7th, 1868, Keturah Moore, 
daugher of Samuel and Hannah ( Borton) 
Moore. 
She b. 12th mo. 26th, 1814, near Woodstown, N. J. 

d. 5th mo. 26th. 1902; buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill, N. ]. 



1480— ELIZABETH COLSON FRENCH 

b. nth mo. 13th, 1831. 
m. 4th mo. 5th, i860 John Gaunt, Jr. 



1481— EZRA COLSON FRENCH b. 10th mo. 14th, 1833. 

d. 7th mo. 3rd, 1S63; buried in Friends 
Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

1482— ALFRED FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1837. 

m. March 2nd, 1865, Abigail Anna Sailer. 

1483— GEORGE \V. FRENCH b. 7th mo. 20th, 1841. 

d. 10th mo. imli, 1S04; buried in Friends' 
Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 



14S4— SAMUEL M. FRENCH b. oth mo. 7th, 1848. 

d. 7th mo. 16th, 1904, unmarried. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 289 



Ezra Colson French [1481], Sergeant, Company H., 2nd U. S. Infantry; killed at 
Gettysburg, Penna. 

George W. French [1483], Corporal, Company F., 12th Regiment, New Jersey Volun- 
teers ; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va. 

Jonathan Colson, born 4th mo. 30th, 1780, died 5th mo. 5th, 1850. 
Elizabeth (Moore) Colson, born nth mo. 5th, 1780, died nth mo. 8th, 1856. 

Signature to Will, Dated 15TH of 6th Month, 1874. Proved April 20. 1877 
Alfred French and John Gaunt." Executors 



FRIENDS' UNITY WITH PATRIOTIC PRINCIPLES. 

When the long agitation over the question of slavery in the Southern States was 
followed by attempted secession and civil war, the attitude of Friends became a matter 
of great public interest. Their uniform earnest sympathy with the anti-slavery cause 
rendered it quite impossible for them to nullify their sentiments by opposing the efforts 
of the Federal government in dealing effectively with its armed enemies. They deplored 
at all times the necessity of a resort to arms but their loyalty as citizens was unquestion- 
able. Individual members of the Society, mostly women and some of the older men, 
spoke and wrote strongly against the demoralizing tendencies and destructive effects of 
war; but very few meetings recorded special testimony upon the subject. When enthu- 
siastic young Friends felt called upon to aid the cause of freedom and the Union, even 
to the extent of uniting with the Union forces in the field, they were in some cases gently 
admonished, but seldom disciplined. 

A memorable and suggestive incident occurred in one meeting. An earnest discussion 
was suddenly ended by the emphatic protest and declaration of a noted Friend, of life- 
long physical weakness, that if he had been able he would have gone to the field himself. 
Philanthropic movements on behalf of Union soldiers, especially the sick and wounded, 
were most earnestly and effectively supported by Friends in every part of the country. 
There were abundant contributions of food, clothing, medicine and other needful things. 
In some cases Meeting House lawns were surrendered for hospital purposes. Beyond 
all this, a vast sum of money was subscribed by Friends directly for hospital uses and 
expenses. Through Jay Cooke, the great war financier, many millions of dollars were 
thus offered up in the cause of humanity. " I knew," says Mr. Cooke in his " Memoirs," 
" that vast wealth was in the hands of members of the Society of Friends. I sent for 
some of their representative men and after acknowledging my admiration for the 
principles upheld by them, I submitted a plan by which, without a violation of those 
principles, they could effectually aid the government. It was well known to them that 
large sums were required for the support of hospitals, for medicines and attendance 
19 



290 GENEALOGY OF THE 

upon the sick and wounded, etc., and I proposed to personally see to it that all their 
subscriptions should be applied directly to the relief of the sick and wounded and in the 
purchase of such things as were required for their comfort. This proposition was 
entirely satisfactory." Mr. Cook presented this matter in person, at Washington, to 
I'resident Lincoln and the Secretary of the Treasury, both of whom heartily concurred 
in the proposition submitted and promise was given that the funds furnished by the 
members of the Society of Friends would be used in sustaining the government during 
the perilous period, but not for the prosecution of the war. Subscriptions in large 
amounts were then made by Friends to the loans, and this manifestation of confidence 
in the government on their part greatly increased the available funds and made more 
popular the sale of United States bonds among other citizens; thus materially aiding 
the government in solving one of the great problems of the time. The consistent courage, 
fidelity and patriotism of Friends was made manifest in every possible way. 

The 12th Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, was one of the most noted organizations 
from that State during the Civil War. It served from September 4th, 1862, until June 
4th, 1865, in the Army of the Potomac, participating in upwards of thirty engagements. 
These included Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold 
Harbor, Capture of Petersburg, Farmville and Appomattox, being present at Lee's sur- 
render, April gth, 1865. The regiment lost over 250 men killed in battle and dying from 
wounds and disease, while nearly as many more were incapacitated by wounds and sick- 
ness. Its muster roll aggregated 2,000 names. Many were transferred to other organ- 
izations. The regiment was largely composed of young men representing the leading 
families of Gloucester, Salem and Cumberland counties, many of whom were members 
of the Society of Friends. 

748— STACY FRENCH (Thomas, 1: Charles. 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Charles, 356). 
b. 4th mo. 23rd, 1804, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 10th mo. 11th, 1858, on farm near Mullica 

Hill, N. J. 
m. 7th mo. 30th, 1829, Mary (Goslin) Cook, 
daughter of William and Esther (Middleton) 
Goslin; widow of Marmaduke Cook. 
She (1. 4th mo. 23rd, 1858. near Mullica Hill, N.J. 

1485— JOHN HAZELTON FRENCH 

b. 8th mo. "th, 1831. 

d. nth mo. qth, 1857, unmarried, in Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 

i486— THOMAS MIDDLETON FRENCH 

b. nth mo. 8th, 1834. 

m. February 23rd, 1S67, Sarah English. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 291 

1487— PRISCILLA FRENCH b. 6th mo. 7th, 1836. 

d. nth mo. 25th, 1910; buried in Friends' 

Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. June igth, 1873, Hon. John W. Hazelton, 
son of Stacy and Abigail (Cook) Hazel- 
ton. 
He b. December 10th, 1S19, at Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. December 20th, 1878. 

1488— ABIGAIL HAZELTON FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1840. 

m. First, 4th mo. 7th, 1864, Reuben W. White, 
m. Second, 10th mo. 26th, 1893, Reuben 
Noxon. 

1489— RHODA SNOWDEN FRENCH 

b. 1842. 
d. 1843. 

1490— CHARLES FRENCH b. 7th mo. 6th, 1845. 

d. 12th mo. 22nd, 1863; buried in Friends' 
Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

Charles French [1490], private, Company II., 12th Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers. 

Honorable John W. Hazelton was a prominent and influential citizen of South 
Jersey for many years. He was educated in the public schools and became a prosperous 
farmer. He was interested in political affairs all his manhood life, actively beginning 
with the Harrison campaign of 1840. He served as a delegate to the Republican Na- 
tional Convention at Chicago, in 1868, and was a member of the National House of 
Representatives, from the First District of New Jersey, from 1871 to 1875, serving 
on the Committee on Agriculture. The West Jersey Press, December 25th, 1878, thus 
spoke of him : " He was among the first to espouse the Republican cause in South 
Jersey and continued to the day of his death to take the liveliest interest in its success 
As a member of Congress he was faithful and attentive and while he made but few 
speeches, he did his full share of Committee work and looked closely after the welfare 
of his constituents." The Woodbury Constitution, December 25th, 1878, said: "Mr. 
Hazelton was a most worthy citizen, a kind friend and hospitable neighbor. His death 
will be regretted by a large circle of friends, whose intimate knowledge of the man led 
to the greatest respect and esteem." 

750— MARTHA HAZELTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141; Charles, 356). 

b. 8th mo. 11th, 1811, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 10th mo. 11th, 1889; buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 



292 GENEALOGY OF THE 

m. 2nd mo. 6th, 1839, Edward Iredell, son of 
Jonathan and Hannah (Ellis) Iredell. 
He b. 7th mo. 16th, 1808, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 12th mo. 22nd, 1867; buried in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

149 1— WILLIAM FRENCH IREDELL 

b. nth mo. 1st, 1840. 
m. 2nd mo. 18th, 1864, Margaretta Kirby. 

1492— CHARLES FRENCH IREDELL 

b. 4th mo. 2nd, 1849. 
d. 9th mo. 20th, 1849. 

755— SAMUEL GIBBS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles. 8: Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Samuel, 357). 

b. 11th mo. 22nd, 1818. near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. April 20th, 1910, in Florala, Ala.; buried in 

Pensacola, Florida, 
m. First, April 26th, 1853, Eliza Matilda Roberts, 
daughter of Joseph Lowrey and Mary (Sy- 
mington) Roberts, of Natchez, Miss.; Rev. 
James Purviance, Presbyterian minister, per- 
forming ceremony. 
She b. July 31st. 1825, in Philadelphia. 

d. June 13th, 1857, in San Antonio, Texas ; buried 

in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, 
m. Second, January 12th, 1865, Mary Fontaine 
Abercrombie, daughter of General Anderson 
and Sidney (Crimes) Abercrombie, of Russell 
County, Alabama, near Columbus, Ga. Cere- 
mony performed by Rev. Mr. Harrison, Metho- 
dist minister, who by request used the Episcopal 
service. 
She b. December 8th. 1838, in Russell County. Ala- 
bama, 
d. May 16th, 1900. in Atlanta, Ga. ; buried in 
Pensacola, Florida. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 293 

1493— MATILDA ROBERTS FRENCH 

b. August 16th, 1855, at Fort Smith, Ark. 
m. January 7th, 1897, in Christ Church, 
Woodbury, N. J., Rev. Howard Ernest 
Thompson, son of Samuel and Mary 
(Heyl) Thompson; Rev. B. F. Thompson 
of St. Michael's Church, Birdsboro, Pa.,, 
performing ceremony. 
He b. October 19th, 1850. 

Children of Samuel Gibbs and Mary Fontaine (Abercrombie) French. 

1494— SAMUEL GIBBS FRENCH, JR. 

b. January 22nd, 1866, in Washington Co.,. 

Miss. 
m. January 12th, 1898, in Formosa, Fla.,. 
Edyth Duer, daughter of Dr. James H. 
and Mary Elwyn (Moore) Duer, of For- 
mosa, Florida. 
She b. August 4th, 1876, in New Orleans, La. 

1495— ADA MARY FRENCH b. August 12th, 1867. 

m. January 3rd, 1889, Leonard Hilton-Green. 

1496— ROBERT ABERCROMBIE FRENCH 

b. August 12th, 1872. 
m. June 30th, 1904, Alys (Duer) Bidwell. 



GENERAL SAMUEL GIBBS FRENCH 

To have outlived every comrade who, like himself, achieved distinction and' 
won repeated public and official acknowledgment of brave and brilliant ser- 
vices in a war three score years ago ; to have evidenced patriotic and cour- 
ageous public spirit and unselfish devotion to his country and to the cause of 
humanity, through the offer of his services to the government again, when 
midway in his eightieth year — one of very few instances on record ; to have 
reached his ninety-second year with a bright eye, firm step and warm heart, 
manifesting a sympathetic interest in all that relates to the welfare of the 
nation — is the inspiring record of a descendant of Thomas ffrench, who 
seemed to have inherited in special measure the rich gift and abiding virtues 
of an honored ancestry. 



294 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Born near Mullica Hill, Gloucester County, New Jersey, November 22nd, 
1818, Samuel Gibbs French, the second son of Samuel [357] and Rebecca 
(Clark) French, passed his boyhood years on the farm, receiving his primary 
education at the notable Harmony school, a reproduction of which is given 
on another page, with accompanying sketch, also facsimile of a quaint remi- 
niscent letter from General French, when in his eighty-eighth year, recalling 
interesting incidents in connection with his attending this school. It was 
during that period that the future military leader largely laid the foundation 
of the wonderful physical strength which was to sustain him in ordeals few 
could endure, and carry him far along in life. When only eight years of 
age his military destiny was unconsciously indicated, through the sudden birth 
of admiration of a soldier's life. For nearly ten years he kept this forbidden 
ambition hidden within his own breast, then was rejoiced to receive parental 
permission to enter the United States Military Academy at West Point, and 
received his appointment as cadet March 22nd, 1839, after a preparatory 
term at the famous Burlington Academy, Burlington, N. J. At West Point 
he was associated with young men of superior talent, every one of whom, 
reaching middle life, attained conspicuous places. 

In the graduating class of 1843, thirty-nine in number, W. B. Franklin 
stood number one, George Deshon two. W. F. Raynolds five, Isaac F. Quimby 
six, Roswell S. Ripley seven, John J. Reynolds ten. Samuel (1. French four- 
teen, C. C. Auger, sixteen, U. S. Grant twenty-one, Rufus Ingalls thirty-two. 
Every one of the class living in 1861 entered the military service except 
George Deshon, who was long a faithful priest and missionary of the Cath- 
olic Church in New York City ; and all except one gained the rank of general. 
No other class in the history of the Academy has had such a remarkable 
record. General French outlived all his fellow-members of the Class of '43. 
In his "Autobiography," published in 1901, the General gives many touching 
reminiscences of his classmates, with whom he maintained cordial fellowship. 
In his first letter to General French after the Civil War. General Rufus 
Ingalls, Grant's always efficient quartermaster-general, writing of an excit- 
ing midnight scene during the bombardment of the Union army along the 
James River at Harrison's Landing, in the summer of 1862, said: "You 
don't know, dear Sam, how near you came killing me that night, which, had 
it happened, would have been a great sorrow to you." And in a letter from 
Portland, Oregon, dated September 6th, 1889, and sent to Oeneral Quimby, 










> 




CAPTAIN SAMI'KL <i. FRENCH, AGED 32 
From a Daguerreotype tnken in 1850 



SWORDS PRESENTED 1" 
CAPTAIN SAMUEL G. FRENCH 

The one upon right, with eagle head and 
jeweled hilt, by the citizens of New Jersey, 
at Trenton, July 4, 1847; that upon left, with 
gold scabbard, by the Legislature of New 
Jersey , February 8, 1 849. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 295 



who was ill, it being affectionately passed along to General French, General 
Ingalls in the fullness of his heart thus wrote: 

" Your letter surprised me most joyously. I was thinking of you con- 
stantly and lovingly. Do not give up. Let us live to the last possible hour. 
I hope to meet you this fall. * * * I am robust, never better. Habits per- 
fect; fact. Why not at 70? Write me dear ' Nykin.' Nail your flag high 
up, and don't regard dark clouds. 

Very affectionately 

Rufus " 

Referring to this cheering message General French thus tenderly writes 
in his book : 

"My dear, good Rufus! How I recall the many happy days we have 
passed together ! My love for you was like unto Jonathan's for David, and 
you have gone and left me, gone to your long home. Yet I can see you now. 
. . . There always was mirth when Ingalls was present. He was the prince 
of good fellows ; ever cheerful, never selfish, full of quaint humor." 

What a delightful revelation ! Grizzled old soldiers recalling youthful 
days with loving hearts and lasting friendship. They will answer the roll 
call together on the other side with renewed joy and fidelity. 

July 1st, 1843, Cadet French received his first commission, entering the 
United States Army as brevet second lieutenant, Third Artillery, and Octo- 
ber 1st joined his company at Fort Macon, N. C. In November of the same 
year he was ordered to Washington, thence to West Point, to prepare draw- 
ings for light and heavy artillery in consequence of his superior skill as 
draughtsman and artist. Two of his water color paintings, made while a 
cadet, were retained for wall pictures ; and have remained at the Academy 
ever since. Upon one occasion, while at the White House, General French 
asked President Grant if he would not have one of the little pictures returned 
to him. With quiet irony, referring to his own deficiencies as an artist, Grant 
replied: "Certainly, and you may have any of mine that are there." The 
picture was not disturbed. Lieutenant French continued on the duty assigned 
for a year, and on November 12th, 1844, joined his company which had 
been transferred to Fort McHenry, Baltimore. Here he remained until 
active preparations for the coming war with Mexico led to important military 
movements. In August, 1845, he sailed with Major Ringgold's battery of 
horse artillery to Aransas Pass, Texas, to join the army of occupation under 
General Zachary Taylor. 



296 GENEALOGY OF THE 

In the short but sanguinary conflict of 1846-47 a considerable number of 
bright and capable young men won distinction, but no one made a finer record 
than Lieutenant French, who early attracted the personal notice of his appre- 
ciative superiors. He rendered conspicuous service at the first meeting with 
the enemy, at Palo Alto May 7th, 1846, and was complimented by General 
Taylor at the battle of Resaca de la Palma, May 9th, where he had charge 
of a battery that held an important post. June 18th, 1846, he was promoted 
to the full rank of second lieutenant. During the struggle for the possession 
of the city of Monterey he was in charge of a piece of artillery which for two 
hours was exposed to such a destructive fire from barricades and housetops 
that his horse and four out of five gunners were shot down. General Taylor 
was close by part of the time, quite oblivious of danger. Promotion to brevet 
first lieutenant, " for gallant and meritorious conduct in the several conflicts 
at Monterey," came September 23rd, 1846. 

At the battle of Buena Vista, February 23rd, 1847, Lieutenant French dis- 
played efficiency, courage and fortitude that commanded the admiration of 
officers and men. While directing rapid artillery firing upon the advancing 
enemy, he was struck in the right thigh by a heavy musket ball. Refusing to 
leave the field, he remained on his horse, part of the time directing his men 
and later earnestly endeavored to rally disordered troops. Twice during the 
day his wound was probed without success. In his own account he says: 
" Weary, tired and weakened by loss of blood, with my leg stiff and useless, 
I was taken from my horse and carried into a large room, where the floor 
was covered with wounded beside me. When General Taylor came after the 
battle ended, with his help I was placed in a wagon and taken to camp." 

For many weeks the young officer suffered from his wound. He was on 
a cot forty days, growing very weak and still the ball could not be found until 
he located it himself and heroically demanded its extraction, regardless of 
consequences, and this, too, before the day of anesthetics. Finally he was 
sent north to recuperate, where he was joyously received by his friends and 
especially his parents, as the newspapers had reported him amongst the slain. 
His bravery had been officially recognized by promotion to first lieutenant 
and he was also brevetted captain " for gallant and meritorious conduct in 
the battle of Buena Vista." Still other honors of a peculiarly gratifying 
r awaited him. The people of his own State had determined to 
testify their high regard and grateful appreciation. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 297 

At Trenton, New Jeresey, July 4th, 1847, Captain French was presented 
with a sword by the citizens of the State, " for distinguished service in the 
battles of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma and Buena Vista." The occasion 
was one of great interest to a large and representative assemblage in a public 
hall. Also, February 8th, 1849, there was presented to him, in accordance 
with a resolution of the Legislature of New Jersey, passed February 10th, 

1847, a sword with the inscription, " For brave and gallant conduct displayed 
in the battles of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, and Monterey. Subsequently 
distinguished at Buena Vista, and promoted to the rank of Captain." At 
the same time similar testimonials were presented to three other worthy young 
officers from New Jersey, viz., Captain \V. R. Montgomery, and Lieutenants 
N. B. Rossell and Fowler Hamilton. Captain French was unavoidably 
absent, being on military duty in Texas. Referring to him, Governor Haines 
paid a high tribute to his courage, fidelity and efficiency. In response,. 
Richard P. Thompson spoke, in part, as follows : 

" When on bloody fields he periled his life for his country, one hope 
animated his young and gallant spirit, and this day finds that glorious hope 
fulfilled. Here, within sight of the battle ground of Trenton, the descend- 
ants of heroes are proving to the world how Jerseymen appreciate and re- 
ward the heroism of her sons. I can well imagine how Captain French's 
manly heart will overflow with gratitude. The perils and privations he en- 
dured, the pain and anguish of his wound, will be forgotten in the joy 
of this event — in the knowledge that the Legislature of his beloved State 
has placed in his hands this mute but eloquent certificate of brave deeds 
in his country's service." 

The young officer who had thus early won a proud place in the army and 
at home, continued to move forward, solely on his own merit. January 12th, 

1848, he was commissioned captain and assistant quartermaster in the general 
staff of the army, outranking some officers who had been from twelve to 
eighteen years in the service. He and Rufus Ingalls were the only two 
officers who received staff appointments or commissions as captains under five 
years' service, and both were appointed over officers recommended by General 
Jesup, Quartermaster-General. The high office of Quartermaster- General of 
the Army of the Potomac was most capably filled by General Ingalls during 
the entire period of the Civil War. 



298 GENEALOGY OF THE 



The War Department in many ways manifested its special confidence in 
Captain French. His personal knowledge of the southwestern frontier — 
then a barren and forbidding waste and wilderness — and his experiences in 
the Mexican War, were utilized for valuable purposes. In the winter of 
1849 he was ordered to San Antonio, Texas, to fit out a train of wagons with 
provisions and supplies and conduct it to El Paso, Texas, where the Third 
Regiment had been ordered. Over 2,000 mules and 1,200 oxen for draft 
animals and corresponding wagons were required. There was not even a 
trail to the west; all was a wilderness of plain and mountains, creeks and 
rivers, over which no white man had journeyed except two United States 
engineers. A road of nearly seven hundred miles had to be constructed, 
which was done under Captain French's direction. There was but one house 
at El Paso on the Texas side of the Rio Grande River. It required four 
months to construct the road and carry the expedition through, the troops and 
caravan arriving there in September. 

In the winter of 1851 Captain French was selected to head another expe- 
dition over the route to El Paso. To his suggestion that some one else might 
be assigned this time, Quartermaster-General Jesup emphatically declared he 
would entrust the responsible task to no one else. Besides, he wanted an 
intelligent and detailed report of the country, its resources, possibilities for 
immigration, the Indians, etc., and he suggestively added: "Let the service 
be performed in your usual manner, and with your accustomed energy, and 
I am sure all will go right." The trust was faithfully discharged and the 
elaborate report submitted reflected the highest credit upon the zeal, discern- 
ment and statesmanlike character of Captain French. This report, with that 
of the previous expedition, gave the government and the people of the United 
States their first comprehensive knowledge of the great section which has 
since become such an important part of our country. The expedition made 
one march of ninety-six miles in fifty-two consecutive hours, without finding 
water. Everything was dead, and even the once tall grass turned to ashes. 
Now a transcontinental railway crosses this former supposed desert waste 
and every element of progress is uniting in its development. 

During the next two years Captain French was on duty at department 
headquarters, Washington, where he was the recipient of marked social atten- 
tions with his young wife, nee Eliza Matilda Roberts, daughter of Joseph 
I.owrcv Roberts, of Natchez, Miss., who had been president of the branch 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 299 



bank of the United States Bank of Pennsylvania, and at his death, March 
28th, 1853, was agent of that institution. In the spring of 1854, about a 
year after his marriage, Captain French, at his request, was assigned to duty 
at Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he remained, leading an ideal life of marital 
happiness, for two years. In April, 1856, he again tendered his resignation 
from the army, and moved to his plantation in Mississippi, on Deer Creek, 
near Greenville. His resignation was finally regretfully accepted, having 
been several times previously refused, when it was learned that the offer of a 
prolonged furlough could not conveniently be availed of ; and took effect 
May 31st, 1856. 

The coming of a little girl, Matilda Roberts French, August 16th, 1855, 
was an occasion of great joy. Less than two years thereafter the clouds sud- 
denly gathered. This sad story is beautifully told by General French in his 
" Autobiography " from which we quote : 

" In the spring of 1857 Mrs. French and her little girl went on a visit 
to her sister, Mrs. John C. French, San Antonio, Texas, and in May follow- 
ing I joined her there. And here a great sorrow crossed my path. On the 
morning of June 13, Mrs. French greeted me with joy and hope, but ere 
the day passed her life ended in that sleep " that knows no breaking." She 
went to the grave for her baby boy, and took him with her. Oh, the irony 
of fate! She, the peer of the noblest, crowned by every grace, the idol of 
the house, the gentle mother, the handmaiden of charity, the priestess of 
religion, a believer in its promises, bowed to His will, and left all that 
makes life attractive before age or disease or disappointment or grief or 
sorrow had chilled her heart ; and left a smile on her face for weeping 
friends, when her pure spirit rose to meet her God. Her remains rest with 
her babe on her breast, beside her parents, in a vault at Laurel Hill 
Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa., where the waters of the beautiful Schuylkill 
gentle flow by the portals of her tomb." 

Long-time association in the army, at Washington, and elsewhere, with 
influential southern people, and the establishment of a home in that section, 
where his friendship was highly regarded and his cooperation earnestly 
sought — these and the behest of the State, led Captain French to accept an 
appointment from the Governor of Mississippi, after that State seceded. 
February 12th, 1861, he was made lieutenant colonel and chief of ordnance 
in the army of the State. He performed the duties of this post until October, 
when he unexpectedly received an offer of appointment as brigadier general 



300 GENEALOGY OF THE 



in the Confederate service. Consulting his family, his mother and sister, 
who were then living with him near Greenville, advised him to accept, and 
after some delay he did so, October 23rd, being assigned to the defense of 
the Potomac River, at Evansport, Va. From July 21st, 1862, until June, 
1863, he was in command of the department of North Carolina and Southern 
Virginia. He built Fort Fisher. Wilmington, N. C, making it one of the 
strongest defenses on the coast. He also traced out and constructed the forti- 
fications around Petersburg, Va., regarded by General Grant as a model of 
defensive warfare and which held the Army of the Potomac in check for 
nine months. Having been appointed major general in the service of the 
Confederate States October 22nd, 1862, he was transferred to the west in 
June, 1863, where he served until the close of the war, his last appearance in 
action being at the battle of Nashville, December 15-16, 1864. 

In Mexico and during the Civil War General French participated in thirty- 
five engagements. Throughout the terrific campaigns in Georgia and Ten- 
nessee he seemed to bear a charmed life. At one time there was almost con- 
tinuous fighting for one hundred days and all the while French's command 
was on or near the front line. At Kennesaw Mountain, Allatoona — which 
inspired the famous gospel hymn, "Hold the Fort" — Atlanta, Franklin, 
Nashville and other terrible conflicts, his troops suffered appalling losses. 
As an engineer, strategist, counsellor and fighter he had few equals on either 
side of the line, and often was vastly the superior of men of higher temporary 
rank under whom he obediently and faithfully served. An impartial history 
of the struggle must give General Samuel G. French a high place among 
great commanders. 

January 12th, 1865, General French married Mary Fontaine Abercrombie, 
daughter of General Anderson Abercrombie, an officer of the United States 
Army during the War of 1812. One brother-in-law. Major Wylie Aber- 
crombie, had served on General French's staff; another, Captain Robert S., of 
the Confederate Army, was mortally wounded July 14th, 1864. In April, 
1865, the veteran soldier of two wars was paroled, at Columbus, Georgia, and 
a few weeks later he returned to his desolate plantation in Mississippi. 
Nothing remained but the mansion and land, the former rich fields overgrown 
with weeds. Without resources, the owner was compelled to rely upon gen- 
i rous minded friends in the north for a fresh start. His cousins, Clayton 
and Samuel H. French, when he came to Philadelphia, received him with 




GENERAL SAMUEL <i. FBENC) 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 301 



great kindness. Referring to the latter in his book as " one of the best men 
that ever lived," he further says, " There will be no charges against him when 
the judgment book is opened." He also gratefully acknowledges the conduct 
of Mr. Louis Cooper, a relative of his mother, who voluntarily deeded to him 
the homestead in Woodbury, N. J., which Mr. Cooper had purchased at gov- 
ernment sale during the Civil War, it having been confiscated. So life " on 
the old plantation" was energetically and successfully renewed. For several 
years he served as Mississippi State levee commissioner and rendered valuable 
service in reclaiming the submerged lands Later he moved to Woodbury, 
N. J., where he resided for about a year, during which time he acted as presi- 
dent of a railroad in course of construction in Virginia. He then purchased 
a residence in Columbus, Ga., residing there for several years, but becoming 
interested in an orange grove in Winter Park, Florida, he finally located there 
in 1881. Advancing years, however, prompted him to dispose of the orange 
grove in 1895 and move to Pensacola, Florida, where his daughter, Mrs. 
Leonard Hilton-Green lived. 

Pondering upon the strange and persistent historical inaccuracies put forth 
by certain prominent writers, both north and south, General French, while 
living in Pensacola, determined to utilize his leisure hours in writing his 
autobiography, a volume entitled " Two Wars," largely a transcript of his 
voluminous diary, primarily for the instruction and enjoyment of his chil- 
dren. The work grew under his lively pen until it became one of the most 
interesting and valuable chronicles of the kind ever published. It is written 
throughout in a modest spirit of self-effacement. The writer seemingly is 
never conscious of the fact that he has played the hero's part. His allusions 
to his old classmates at West Point and later comrades in peril are exceed- 
ingly tender, compelling the reader's sympathy and admiration as the mist 
gathers in his own eyes. November 22nd was a sacred day with this gallant 
old leader of men. Referring to it in one place he pauses reverently, as 
though standing with uncovered head before the Great Assize, to say : 

"To-day (November 22, 1894) is my birthday, and I am now six years 
past the time allotted to man by the psalmist. For this I am truly grateful 
to Him from whom all blessings flow, and I will henceforth endeavor to walk 
humbly before Him." And be it remembered to his everlasting honor, that 
even four years later he again offered his services to his government when 
war with Spain was imminent. Words fail to fitly describe the honor due 
such a spirit. Here is what he says in his own simple yet heroic way : 



302 GENEALOGY OF THE 

"Although my lot was cast with the South, and whatever may be my 
opinion of the action of the North before, during, and after the war as 
expressed in these pages, I am as loyal to the Constitution and as ready to 
uphold and maintain the rights and dignity of the United States as any man 
within its boundary ; and this was evidenced when I tendered my services, as 
a soldier, to the President before war was declared against Spain." In 1887, 
General French, as a veteran of the Mexican War. was placed on the rolls as 
a United States pensioner. 

Standing alone, like the giant oak when all its fellows had fallen, Samuel 
Gibbs French, the youthful hero of Monterey and Buena Vista, the dauntless 
soldier of Allatoona, the inspiring patriot of '98, became a national figure of 
peculiar and impressive significance. The last two years of his life he spent 
with his son, Robert A. French, at Florala, Ala. ; and there after a brief 
illness due to a fall he died, April 20th, 1910. This event called forth 
expressions of deep regret and profound respect from many places, North 
and South. Very few of the gallant old soldier's friends in early life re- 
mained, but his circle of personal acquaintance continued wide and inter- 
esting. His funeral on April 21st, at Pensacola. Florida, was an occasion 
of great impressiveness. From "The Pensacola Journal." April 22nd. we 
quote as follows : 

" Signal but deserved honor was paid yesterday when ' taps ' were sounded 
as the body of the late General Samuel G. French was lowered into the 
grave made at St. John's cemetery. A bugler from Fort Barrancas was 
present and sounded the refrain. Among the army officers in full dress 
uniform, were Col. Allen, ('apt. Douglass anil Lieut. Richardson. 

11 The body of Gen. French, accompanied by sorrowing relatives, was met 
by a delegation of Confederate veterans, under command of Capt. Dixon 
R. Reed. With bared heads the veterans received the body of their departed 
comrade, and the casket was placed in a waiting hearse. It was then taken 
over to Christ Church, where for nearly two hours it lay and was viewed 
by numbers of people, friends and admirers of the great man who had 
answered the last roll call. Flowers in profusion testified the esteem in 
which the aged veteran had been held ; and at the hour for the funeral 
ceremony, the church was crowded with friends who came and heard the 
words spoken consigning to the grave the remains of the distinguished 
soldier. Upon his body was the military cloak he had habitually worn. 
Following the religious ceremony, the body was conveyed to St. John's 
Cemetery and there interred." 

Thus a life of brilliant achievement was ended. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 303 






l~~~. a *u, ,cJ,^u. ■ *• ~~ r ^-y t Z~* to '**** ■**(& <~^~ 

GENERAL FRENCH'S REMINISCENCES OF HARMONY SCHOOL. 

Joseph Bennett, number two in list of teachers given under accompanying picture, is 
described by General French as one who " wore black silk breeches and a gown of the 
same material coming down to his ankles, and was regarded as an highly educated man 
of the olden school." 



304 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Samuel Gibbs French, Jr. [1494], was educated at Roanoke College, Salem, Va., and 
took up the work of civil engineer on railroad construction in 1S87. Chief engineer of 
Yellow River railroad from 1900 to 1907, since which time he has been employed as 
civilian engineer in U. S. Engineering Department, located at Fort Barrancas, Florida. 

Rev. Howard Ernest Thompson [refer 1493], born at his father's home near Borden- 
town, N. J., received his early education at private schools of his native place, and at 
Trenton Academy, Trenton, N. J. For a time organist, Sunday School teacher and 
lay-reader in Christ Church, Bordentown. Prepared for seminary under private pre- 
ceptor, Rev. Nathaniel Pettit, rector of Christ Church ; graduated from the General 
Theological Seminary, New York City, June, 1878. Ordained deacon in Trinity Church, 
Princeton, by Bishop Scarborough, of N'ew Jersey, June 9th, 1878, and ordained priest, 
by same bishop, in St. Michael's Church, Trenton, June 8th, 1879. Curate St. Timothy's 
Church, Roxborough, Philadelphia, 1878 to 1880; rector Trinity Church, Woodbridge, 
N. J., 1880 to 1884; rector Christ Church, Woodbury. N. J., 1884 to 1896; rector 
Emmanuel Church, Allegheny, Pa., 1896 to 1900, and while in that city chaplain of the 
Pittsburgh Local Assembly of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew. Rector of St. Peter's 
Church, Freehold, N. J., from 1900 to 1910, chaplain of the Freehold Military School 
and New Jersey Military Academy. Secretary of the Diocese of New Jersey and rector 
of St. Luke's Church, Newbold, N. J., 1911. An earnest and successful worker among 
young men. 



756— CHARLES CLEMENT FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141 ; Samuel, 357). 

b. 8th mo. 27th, 1821, near Mullica Hill. X. J. 

d. September 9th, 1857, in Philadelphia; buried 
in Woodlands Cemetery, West Philadelphia. 

m. January 15th, 1846 (Thursday evening) , Hen- 
rietta Ehrenzeller Hansell, daughter of James 
and Ann Catharine (Ehrenzeller) Hansell, of 
Philadelphia. 
She b. November 11th. 1S24. 

d. March 3rd. 1S7S, in Philadelphia; buried in 
Woodlands Cemetery. 

1497— ANNA HANSELL FRENCH 

b. November nth, 1846. 
d. December 19th, 1849. 

1498— REBECCA FRENCH b. October 24th, 184S. 

d. June 2nd. 1852. 




HARMONY SCHOOL, MULLICA HILL, N. J., BUILT 1805, REMOVED 1888 
From a drawing from memory by Dr. James W. Walmsley, a pupil of half a century ago, who also furnishes 

the following sketch : 

The "eight-square" school-house was a type of building which was quite popular in the first half of the last 
century. The windows, well up from the floor, prevented the attention of those who followed the flowery 
paths of knowledge from being attracted by outside events. The shape gave equal light, heat and ventilation, 
and placed the schoolmaster practically close by every pupil— an important consideration in those good old 
days when, the survivors tell the present generation, "Lickin' and larnin' " were intimately associated, 
"Lick ins" were a part of the daily curriculum, and for the largest boys the master used a heavy, two-handed 
gad; for the younger boys and girls, the flat side of his ruler was used by striking the palm of the hand when 
extended to receive the punishment. These methods were used by the master in his efforts to impart infor- 
mation, and as a part of the earning of his salary. 

The following is a list of those who taught in the "Old Brick School" 



Ira Gibson 
Joseph Bennett 
Felix Smith 
Jared Schofield 
Chauncey Miller 
John Clements 
Rachel Chattin 
Zephaniafa Butts 
Samuel Bolton 



Benj. F. Chatham 
Isaac Snowden 
Wm. Snowden, 1844 
Harriet Miller 
Ruth Neel 
Ruthanna Neel 
Abbie Snowden 
Mary J. Snowden 
Roswell Reynolds 



John Zerus 
David Trump 
Jesse Barry 
Mary Shourds 
Emily Fogg 
Wm. Gordon 
Kate Keely 
Abraham Romans 
Ray Hinchman 



Ruth Darlington 
John C. Applegate 
Samuel Warrick 
Martha Haines 
Loring Batten 
John Tonkins 
Wellington Kugler 
Thomas Buchanan 
Walter Fox 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 305 



1499— ELLEN RICHARDS FRENCH 

b. June 15th, 1850. 
d. June 12th, 1852. 

1500— RHEA BARTON FRENCH 

b. November 1st, 1852. 

m. November 5th, 1874, Sarah Virginia 
Sweeney. 

1501— LOUISA FARRAND FRENCH 

b. August 1st, 1854. 

CERTIFICATE OF MARRIAGE 

This certifies. That Charles C. French of Philadelphia and Henrietta 
E. Hansell of the same city were by me united in Marriage on the fifteenth 
day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
forty six conformably to the laws of Pennsylvania and the ordinance of 
God. 

M. LaRue P. Thompson 

Minister of the Gospel 
(Tenth & Arch Sts., Presbyterian Church, Philada.) 

757— JOSEPH HEWLINGS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Samuel, 357). 

b. 6th mo. 12th, 1823, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. June 7th, 1862, in San Antonio, Texas, and 

there buried, 
m. January 17th, 1846, Hannah Ann Wilkins 

[1289], daughter of Benjamin E. and Sarah 

(Jaggard) Wilkins. 
She b. 4th mo. 26th, 1826. 

d. June 7th, 1892, in San Antonio, Texas; buried 

in Austin, Texas. 

1502— LYDIA EYRE FRENCH b. September 20th, 1846. 

m. May 31st, 1870, Samuel Archinard, of 
Geneva, La. 

1503— HORACE GIBBS FRENCH 

b. March 4th, 1848. 

m. November 16th, 1881, Ida B. Wilson. 
20 



306 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1504— BENJAMIN WILKINS FRENCH 

b. November 24th, 1849. 
<1. October 27th, 1856. 

1505— SAMUEL FRENCH b. August 13th, 1851. 

d. In San Antonio, Texas, 
m. June 13th, 1876, Alice Diskill, of Austin, 
Texas (no issue). 

1506— LINDA FRENCH b. November 27th, 1853. 

d. September 29th, 1856. 

1507— CHARLES CLEMENT FRENCH, 2ND 

b. October 23rd, 1855. 
m. February 15th, 1S87, Mary Bronaugh. 

1508— HOWARD SIDNEY FRENCH 

b. April 27tb, is; 7. 

d. September 19th, 1857. 

1500— REBECCA CLARK FRENCH 

b. July 15th, 1858. 

1510— HENRY SPENCE FRENCH 

b. September 20th, i860, 
d. March 20th, 1861. 



758— JOHN CLARK FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Samuel, 357). 

h. 3rd mo. 24th. 1825, mar Mullica Hill, N. J. 

.1. May 15th, 1889. in Cuero. DeWitt Co., Texas; 
buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia. 

m. February 14th. 1854, at "The Mary's Planta- 
tion," near Natchez, Miss., Sarah Frances 
Roberts, daughter of Joseph Lowrey and Mary 
(Symington) Roberts; Rev. James Purviance, 
Presbyterian minister, performing ceremony. 
She b. March 19th, 1827, in Philadelphia. 

1511— MARY FREN( II b. October 10th. 1855. 

m. May 26th. 1SS0. John Williams Patten, Jr. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 307 

JOHN CLARK FRENCH 

John Clark French, fifth son of Samuel [357] and Rebecca (Clark) 
French, was born in the old homestead, near Mullica Hill, N. J., the home 
of his father throughout a long life and where his grandfather settled in 
1770. He attended Harmony School and later Bishop Onderdonk's School 
at Jamaica, Long Island. On March 4th, 1844, he entered the employ of 
Richard Williams, wholesale dry goods merchant, located at No. 91 Market 
street (O. S.), Philadelphia, but after a brief service, he was compelled to 
relinquish his position owing to impaired eyesight, and went South. In the 
spring and summer of 1851, as paymaster's clerk, he accompanied his brother, 
Captain Samuel G. French, U. S. A. [755], at the time of his noted expedi- 
tion from San Antonio, Texas, to El Paso. When the party returned, Mr. 
French was offered and accepted a position with the firm of Lewis & Groes- 
beck, San Antonio, who were engaged in mercantile business and the trans- 
portation of government supplies from the coast to the various army posts on 
the frontier. Mr. French soon purchased the Lewis interest ; and as Groes- 
beck & French the firm extended their operations to include the banking busi- 
ness, selling exchange on New York and Philadelphia. After the death of 
Mr. Groesbeck, Mr. French conducted the business alone, with continued 
marked success. In 1858 he built, at what is now the corner of Dolorosa 
street and Dwyer avenue. Main Plaza, the French Building (see line cut), 
where, after disposing of his general business, he devoted himself exclu- 
sively to the banking business. His banking house became the center of 
many important financial operations ; and here was established the first bank 
in San Antonio. A portion of the French Building was used by the govern- 
ment for a time as military headquarters, also as a federal building. Mr. 
French took an active interest in public affairs, and contributed in many ways 
to the prosperity of San Antonio. He was a pioneer in the introduction of 
gas in that city, erecting the first plant and acting as executive of the com- 
pany for a number of years. It is interesting to note that gas at that time 
was produced by this company from cotton seed. Mr. French was likewise 
particularly interested in railway development, and established the Gulf, 
West Texas & Pacific road, which later became a part of the Southern Pacific 
svstem. 



308 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Before and after the Civil War Mr. French was an influential factor in 
the section wherein he had located and was the recipient of many evidences 
of popular esteem. During the war, however, being a stout adherent of the 
Union cause, he passed through many exciting and perilous adventures, the 
result being the sacrifice of a large part of his private fortune. He was 
repeatedly warned that his life was in danger, but refused to leave the city, 
and loyal friends, particularly a large and courageous German colony, many 
members of which he had materially aided in getting a start in life, valiantly 
stood by him in the dark hours. Much of his property was confiscated, and 
his home was the scene of many exciting encounters. With the return of 
peace, Mr. French renewed his efforts for the advancement of Texas, and 
through his energy considerable northern capital was secured for the promo- 
tion of Texas enterprises. Before his death in 1889 he was widely recognized 
as a far-sighted public benefactor. Some time after the war, while continuing 
his business relationship in the far South, he returned to the vicinity of his 
■early home, residing for several years at Woodbury, N. J. He made many 
trips abroad, finally returning to Texas where he ended a long and busy life. 
A local (Texas) journal thus recorded its view of his industrious career: 



" Mr. French can best be classed as a pioneer in the railway enterprises 
of this state, and while others may have accomplished more in this regard, 
no one man prior to the war had better succeeded and thereafter more ear- 
nestly and at a greater sacrifice devoted his energies in this direction ; anil 
to no one is this portion of Texas more indebted for its railroad facilities 
by the investment of his means and the direction of the capital of others, 
than to the subject of this memoir. Many other public enterprises of the 
city of San Antonio were the recipients of his energies and aid, and the 
older citizens will attest his influence and activity for the public weal, in 
his business and enterprise. His life was ever active, and though for very 
many years deprived of sight and in feeble health, his interest in public 
enterprises did not abate, and his mind and power could always be com- 
manded in aid of the same. He was a thorough business man, prompt, 
intelligent and positive, of most genial disposition and attractive manners, 
just and considerate of the feelings and rights of others, firm in his friend 
ship and steadfast in his professions. In the full fruition of a well spent 
life, he passed quietly away, leaving a record must worthy the commenda- 
tion and imitation of all." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



309 



Mr. French, with the aid of two other interested parties, founded the city 
of Cuero, DeWitt County, Texas, in 1871, and had large landed interests in 
that vicinity. It was there he died, while on his way from Galveston to San 
Antonio. Some years after his death, his widow, Sarah (Roberts) French, 
built at Cuero, the John C. French High School, as a memorial to her husband. 
This substantial two-story building is fitted up with all modern appliances 
for educational purposes and the gift was highly appreciated by the residents 
of that city. Mrs. French has also aided materially in establishing many of 
the manufacturing and business enterprises of Cuero, notably the Cotton 
Compress, the Cotton Oil Mill, the Guadalupe Valley Cotton Manufacturing 
Co., and the First State Bank and Trust Co. ; and has made numerous contri- 
butions to public charities. Since the death of her husband Mrs. French has 
spent a portion of each year in San Antonio and has always taken the keenest 
interest in everything pertaining to the advancement and bettering of that 
city. She gave the ground upon which to erect the Madison Square Presby- 
terian Church and for the Young Men's Christian Association Building, and 
contributed a large portion of the money required for the erection of these 
edifices. 




^£Z> (.^-/ir., 



JOHN C. FRENCH BUILDING, 1858 



310 GENEALOGY OF THE 



760— SARAH CLARK FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Samuel, 351). 

b. 2nd mo. 22nd. 1835. near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. April 15th, 1868, John dill Whitall, son of 
Charles and Louisa Mickle (Reeves) Whitall; 
Episcopalian minister officiating. 
He b. 12th mo. 9th, 1830, at Red Bank, N. J. 



1512— CHARLES FRENCH WHITALL 

b. August 21st, 1870. 
d. November 4th, 1SS5. 



1513— MATILDA FREN'CH WHITALL 

b. September 29th, 1873. 



ANCESTRY OF JOHN' GILL WHITALL 

Benjamin Clarke, a native of Scotland, but later a London stationer and bookseller, 
and an agent of the proprietors of East Jersey, came to America in 1683, with his only 
son, Benjamin, who was " born at Reading in Berkshire. Old England, the 13th of the 
3d month 1670" (Chesterfield Meeting records). He located at Perth Amboy, East 
Jersey, and in March, 16S4, his wife, Ann (Phipps) Clarke, daughter of Thomas Phipps. 
joined him. Having brought with him "a Library of Books to sell," he set up a store 
in the "Town but yet in infancie," and one of these early settlers in writing to a distant 
friend alludes to the " good stationer's shop of books at New Perth." The grant from 
the proprietors stipulated that his house "should be thirty feet by sixteen feet, eighteen 
feet high to the raising, with a window in each room to the front, three feet high and 
three feet nine inches broad and three lights, each light fifteen inches from rabit to 
rabit, uniform to the rest of the houses to be built." There is every reason to believe 
that it was the first house built in Perth Amboy, named for James, Earl of Perth, witli 
Indian name " Amboy" added. He died in 1689, leaving his estate to his son Benjamin. 
who, 1 2th mo. 25th, 1689, married Ann Giles, born in Braintree, Mass., 15th of April, 
1669, daughter of James and Elizabeth Giles, of Piscataway, East Jersey. 

Benjamin Clarke, second, took an active part in public affairs, filling several local 
offices, and was a Deputy to the General Assembly in 1692. In 1696 he bought twelve 
hundred acres of land along Stony Brook, near where Princeton was later located. He 
built a homestead on this tract and continued to live there until his death in 1747. The 
battle of Princeton, January 3rd, 1777. was chiefly fought on this land, and when Gen- 
eral Hugh Mercer was mortally wounded he was carried to the home of Thomas Clarke, 
a descendant of Benjamin, where he was attended constantly by members of the family 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 311 

until his death a few days later. This house remains in a good state of preservation, and 
containing many colonial and Revolutionary relics, is the patriotic Mecca of visitors to 
Princeton ; and is the scene of interesting periodical reunions of the descendants of Ben- 
jamin and Ann (Giles) Clarke. This is not the original Clarke homestead, nor does it 
occupy the site of the original home. 

Benjamin Clarke, second, was an intelligent and good business man, also a surveyor; 
and that he was highly esteemed in the community is evidenced by the fact that his 
name frequently appears in important documents of the period. He was deeply inter- 
ested in Meeting affairs and far ahead of the times in his disapproval of holding slaves. 
In 1709 he conveyed some nine acres of land to Richard Stockton and others in trust 
for a Meeting house lot and burying ground and it was on this property that Stony 
Brook Meeting House was built and used for many years. The Chesterfield Meeting 
records show that Benjamin and Ann (Giles) Clarke had ten children; the following 
being a copy of the record : 

"Ann, born at Rariton river the 18th, 2d month, 1691. 
Elizabeth, born at Same place the 5th, 9th month, 1692. 
James, born at Same place, the 13th, 6th Month, 1694, 

departed this life 10th of 8th month, 1 771. 
Sarah, born at Stoney Brook the 2nd, 9th month, 1696. 
Benjamin [3rd], born at Same place, the 17th, 7th month, 1698, 

departed this life in 12th month 1742/3. 
John, born at Same place the 29th, 10th month, 1700, 

departed this life 8th of 5th month, 1768. 
Mary, born at Same place the 22d, 9th month, 1702. 
Joseph, born at Same place the 20th, 4th month, 1705. 
Hester, born at Same place the 18th, 12th month, 1707/8. 
Mattheu, born at Same place the 12th, 5th month, 1709." 

Benjamin Clarke, second, died 5th month, 1747, and was buried in Stony Brook 
Burying Ground. By will dated March 15th, 1742/3, proved June 5th, 1747, he bequeathed 
to his eldest son, James, the homestead plantation. 

His wife, Ann Giles, had a most eventful childhood, witnessing many thrilling scenes 
of pioneer life and sharing with her parents hardships and daily perils in the New 
England wilderness, owing to Indian hostilities. James Giles and Elizabeth, his second 
wife, came to America from Kent County, England, and after a voyage of nine weeks 
arrived at Boston in the early part of November, 1668. In a few weeks, having refreshed 
themselves after their long voyage at sea, they went to Braintree, Mass., where in the 
spring of 1669 their daughter Ann was born. She was but a month old when her parents 
sailed with her from Boston eastward and established a home on the Kennebeck River, 
and six years and four months old when they were driven from their home by the Indians 
and compelled to seek shelter in a garrison formed in a neighboring house, which, how- 
ever, within a few months, they were forced to forsake and go to " Rowsick house," the 
main garrison. And on " the ninth of August, 1676," the record states, " early in the 
morning, when no Englishman thought of any war, they [the Indians] came down to 



•512 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Rowsick, and took it, and killed and took away about fifty people, and burnt down the 
house, and all other buildings about, killing and destroying all that came in their way; 
so as we were forced to fly for our lives in a Canoe and leave all ever we had, and glad 
that we could save our lives. We and the rest of Kennebec neighbors, whom God had 
preserved from the cruelty of the Indians got to Damoras Cove, a fishing island about 
(wo leagues from the main land." A few months later the family journeyed to Long 
Island, where they remained for a few years, then went to Staten Island; and when 
Ann was thirteen years of age, her parents finally established their home upon the 
Karitan River, Piscataway, X. J. 

Ann Clarke, eldest daughter of Benjamin and Ann (Giles) Clarke, married 1st mo. 
18th, 1712/3, John Cooper, born qth mo. 22nd, 1083, son of William and Mary (Brad- 
way) Cooper and grandson of William and Margaret Cooper, progenitors, who came 
to Burlington, X. J., in 167S, from Coleshill. Warwickshire. England, and a little later 
" settled at ye mouth of ye creek named after him Cooper's Creek," also known as Pyne 
Point, afterwards Camden. John and Ann (Clarke) Cooper settled in Deptford town- 
ship near Woodbury. They had four sons and four daughters. He died 9th mo. 22nd, 
1730. and his widow survived him thirty-six years, dying 12th mo. 17th, 1766. Their 
second daughter, Ann Cooper, born 4th mo. 23rd. 1716, died qth mo. 22nd. 1707. mar- 
ried gth mo. 23rd, 1739, James Whitall. born 7th mo. 4 th. 1717, died 1808. He was 
the son of Job, who was the son of James Whitall, who came to America from near 
Litchfield, Staffordshire, England, about 1688, and settled on a hundred acre tract on 
Timber Creek. Gloucester Co., X. J., called Upton. In 1700 he sold this property and 
bought 411 acres of land on the Xew Jersey side of the Delaware River, about six miles 
below Philadelphia, known as "Red Bank," and upon his death in 1714 the Red Bank 
estate, containing at that time over 460 acres, descended to his son Job and from him 
to his son James, who with his wife, Ann (Cooper) Whitall, established a home there 
in 174S, and this house is still standing in excellent condition. Fort Mercer on the Dela- 
ware was located at Red Bank on the edge of the Whitall property. Cooperating with 
a part of the British fleet, Count Carl Emil Kurt von Donop, with twelve hundred 
Hessians, on October 22nd. 1777. attacked the fort. A furious battle ensued. The 
American force, under Colonel Christopher Greene, was much inferior in numbers and 
equipment to the enemy, being composed of less than live hundred inexperienced troops, 
but they bravely repulsed their assailants, who suffered great loss, including their com- 
mander. I lame Whitall (Ann Cooper) refused to leave her home during this perilous 
time. Tradition says she took her spinning wheel to the cellar and calmly went on with 
her work. After the battle, when her rooms were tilled with wounded and dying soldiers, 
she tenderly ministered to their wants, at the same time consistently testifying to her 
horror of war. Some years ago, the federal government having purchased the Whitall farm, 
transferred twenty acres of this historic ground, including the house and the remnants 
of Port Mercer, to the County of Gloucester, X. J., and the care of this is now perma- 
nently in the hands of the Board of Chosen Freeholders. A granite monument overlooks 
the grounds, and the Gloucester County Historical Society have a room in the house in 
which are gathered many interesting memorials of colonial and revolutionary days. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 313. 

James and Ann (Cooper) Whitall had nine children. Their son Job, born 7th mo. 
27th, 1743, died 9th mo. nth, 1797, married 10th mo. 17th, 1769, Sarah Gill, born 5th 
mo. 28th, 1751, died I2th mo. 29th, 1824, daughter of John and Amy (Davis) Gill, of 
Haddonfield, N. J.; their son, Charles Whitall, born 2nd mo. 15th, 1793, died 8th mo. 
24th, 1873, married 12th mo. 10th, 1819, Louisa Mickle Reeves, born 12th mo. 1st, 1798, 
died 10th mo. 31st, 1876, daughter of Clement and Sarah (Wood) Reeves; their son, 
John Gill Whitall, born 12th mo. 9th, 1830, at Red Bank, N. J., married Sarah Clark 
French [760], fifth in line of descent from Thomas and Jane (Atkins) ffrench. 



STONY BROOK. MEETING 

The records of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting show that, 10th mo. 7th, 
1710, Friends at Stony Brook were granted liberty to hold a meeting for 
divine worship on First-days, either at the house of Benjamin Clarke or 
Joseph Worth. Permission for weekday meetings was granted in 1713. In 
1709 Benjamin Clarke (second) had conveyed to Friends, through Richard 
Stockton and others, as trustees, some nine acres of land for a meeting house 
and burial ground at Stony Brook. In 1722, fourth month, 7th. it was 
decided " it may be serviceable to build a Meeting House upon a piece of 
land appointed for that purpose near Joseph Worth's." The meeting ap- 
proved of the proposal and referred it for further consideration. 

At the monthly meeting held at Chesterfield the 2nd of fifth month. 17 24. 
the following report was made: "Whereas it was considered that it is con- 
venient that a meeting house for the use of Friends be erected near Stony 
Brook, this meeting advised that our friends Joseph Worth, Benjamin Clarke, 
Abraham Farrington, John Tantum and Thomas Lambert meet and consider 
the bigness and manner of a house to be built, and what the cost might be 
as near as their judgment or estimate may come. Said Friends having met 
and considered the same, report to this meeting that a house may be built of 
stone, 34 feet long and 30 feet wide from out to out and to finish it so far as 
will render it useful as they think, for about £150, new money. This meeting 
refers the further consideration thereof to our next monthly meeting." 

At the meeting held 6th mo. 6th, 1724, the plan was approved, and Richard 
French [5] and John Tantum were appointed "to receive for the meetings 
use the sums subscribed, as Friends are in readiness to pay same." Later in 
same year, Burlington Quarterly Meeting gave its approval, and recommended 
"the matter to Burlington Monthly Meeting for their contribution in assist- 



314 GENEALOGY OF THE 



ing Friends at Stony Brook in raising 200 pounds for that purpose." The 
1st of 2nd month, 1725, Joseph Worth. Benjamin Clarke and Joseph Tantum 
were instructed by Chesterfield Meeting to proceed with the building of the 
Meeting House, which it is supposed was completed in 1726, although there 
is no record of any report when the house was finished. This building stood 
until 1759, when Friends thought it needful to rebuild it, and accordingly 
application was made to Burlington Quarterly Meeting for advice and assist- 
ance. " At Burlington Quarterly Meeting, held the 26th of Second mo., 
1759, Chesterfield monthly meeting informs that the Friends at Stony Brook 
applied to that meeting for some Friends to join them to inspect what would 
be necessary to be done at their meeting house ; and their report was that they 
thought it needful to rebuild it and desire the advice of the Quarterly meet- 
ing therein. William Morris, Hugh Hartshorne, Edward Cathrall, Joseph 
Noble, Daniel Doughty, William Lawrie and Abel Middleton were appointed 
to view the said meeting house and report their judgment whether it may 
not be sufficiently repaired without being taken quite down, and if they think 
necessary to take it down, to inform Stony Brook friends that it may be done 
forthwith." 

"At Chesterfield monthly meeting held 7th of Sixth month, 1759. The 
Quarterly meeting recommends this meeting to appoint managers to get Stony 
Brook meeting house rebuilt. This meeting appoints John Clarke and Thomas 
Watson to that service, and when done to make a report to this meeting." 

"At a Quarterly meeting held at Burlington the 23rd of Second month, 
1761. An account from Friends of Stony Brook of the cost of rebuilding 
their meeting house was laid before this meeting, amounting to £238 5s. lid., 
of which £63 15s. was raised among themselves by contribution and the 
remainder is yet to raise, which this meeting agrees shall be done by contri- 
bution, and for that purpose doth recommend it to the several monthly meet- 
ings to raise the said forthwith, according as the quotas shall be settled by 
John Hoskins, Benjamin Field, John Ridgway and Samuel Lundy who are 
to report to next meeting." 

They reported to the next quarterly meeting that it had been done and the 
money paid to the managers of Stony Brook meeting house. 

"At Chesterfield monthly meeting held the 4th of Sixth month, 1761, the 
Treasurer reported he had paid to the managers of the Stony Brook meeting 
house the quota ft" our monthly meeting, being E63. 15s." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



315 



This stone Meeting House, rebuilt upon the original foundation, still 
remains in a good state of preservation, showing all the quaint features of 
early days. Friends worshipped at Stony Brook for over one hundred and 
fifty years, but during the past forty years meetings have not been held there, 
on account of the numerical weakness of the Society in that vicinity. The 
battle of Princeton was fought within sight of the Meeting House. 










a. ** 



: m ' 



STONY BROOK MEETING HOUSE, 1759-60-61. 



316 GENEALOGY OF THK 



763— MARY CLARK (Thomas. 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42 j Samuel. 141 ; 

Sarah, 359). 

h. 1st mo. 11th, 1815, in Gloucester Co., N. J. 

d. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1890; buried in Eglington Ceme- 
tery, Clarksboro, N. J. 

m. 1st mo. 26th, 1837, by Friends' Ceremony, 
Joseph Jessup, son of James and Sarah (West) 
Jessup. 
He d. 2nd mo. 5th, 1885, in Mullica Hill. N. J., aged 
82 years; buried in Eglington Cemetery. 



1514— ANNIE EVALYN JESSUP 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1838. 
m. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1865, George Craft, 3rd. 



i 5 i 5 _jAMES B. JESSUP b. 71I1 mo. 24th, 1840. 



1516— JOHN SAMUEL JESSUP b. 8th mo. 28th, 184a. 

m. November 2nd, 1 S 7 1 , Mary M. Howell. 



1517— JOSEPH C. JESSUP I). 1st mo. 15th, 1845. 

d. 2nd mo. iSth, 1864. 



1518— CHARLES CLARK JESSUP 

b. 3rd mo. 141I1. 1S47. 

m. August 5th, 1SS0, Abbie T. Reeves. 



1519— EDWARD ('. JESS! P b 10th mo. aist, 1849. 

d. 10th mo. 8th, 1859. 



1520— SAT. I. IK JESSUP b. 9th mo. 14th. 185a. 

d. 6th mo. sth, 1876. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 317 



764— JACOB FRENCH CLARK (Thomas. 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Sarah, 359). 

b. 10th mo. 1 5th, 1817, near Paulsboro, Gloucester 

Co., N. J. 
d. 6th mo. 6th, 1891, in Woodstown, N. J. ; buried 

in Eglington Cemetery, Clarksboro, N. J. 
m. First, 3rd mo. 21st, 1839, Mary Pancoast, 
daughter of David J. and Phoebe (Snowden) 
Pancoast. 
She b. 3rd mo. 11th, 1820, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 10th mo. 15th, 1847; buried in Eglington 

Cemetery, 
m. Second, 3rd mo. 22nd, 1850, Mary Hazelton, 
daughter of William and Margaret (Robbins) 
Hazelton. 
She b. 6th mo. 17th, 1827, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 2nd mo. 14th, 1905, in Woodstown, N. J.; 
buried in Eglington Cemetery. 

1521— PHOEBE PANCOAST CLARK 

b. 4th mo. 8th, 1840. 
d. 4th mo. 24th, 1844. 

1522— WILLIAM SPENCER CLARK 

b. 4th mo. 5th, 1845. 

m. July, 1S70, Harriet H. Norton. 

Children of Jacob French and Mary (Hazelton) Clark. 

1523— ELLA CLARK b. 8th mo. 14th, 1853. 

111. 4th mo. 29th, 1880, Howard T. Woolman. 

1524— SARAH CLARK b. 5th mo. 28th, 1859. 

d. 3rd mo. 19th, 1862. 

1525— MARY HAZELTON CLARK 

b. 1st mo. 29th, 1866. 

1526— JOHN VANNEMAN CLARK 

b. 12th mo. 15th, 1870. 
d. ?th mo. 25th 1873. 



318 GENEALOGY OF THE 

766— EMMA N. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Joseph C, 360). 

b. 11th mo. 24th, 1814. 
d. 5th mo. 24th, 1885. 

m. 9th mo. 15th, 1838, Isaac 11. Mulford, son of 
Lewis and Rachel (Buzby) Mulford. 
He b. December 16th, 1813. 
d. June 21st, 1895. 

1527— ISAAC B. MULFORD, JR., M.D. 

b. 1st mo. 8th. 1S43. 

d. nth mo. 21st, 1882, in Camden, N. J. 

m. 12th mo. 4th, 1866, Mary M. Ware, 
daughter of Elijah and Beulah (Powell) 
Ware, of Salem, N. J. (No issue.) 

1528— ELIZABETH EMMA MULFORD 

b. 1 2th mo. 27th, 1845. 
m. May 13th, 1875, Francis L. Godfrey. 

1529— JOSEPH F. MULFORD b. 7th mo. 2nd, 1852. 

d. nth mo. 21st, 1863. 

771— JOSEPH FRENCH ROWAND (Thomas. 1; Charles, 8; Charles. 

42; Elizabeth, 142; Letticc Wills. 362). 

b. 4th mo. 10th, 1803. 
d. 9th mo. 23rd, 1872. 
m. 10th mo. 3rd. 1830, Nancy Curlis Butterworth, 

daughter of John and Rachel Butterworth, of 
Yiinentown, N. J. 

1530— JOSEPH FRENCH ROWAND, JR. 

h. 12th mo. 30th, 1833. 
d. 2nd mo. 21st, 1862. 

1531— REBECCA LETTICE ROWAND 

b. 12th mo. 31st, 1848. 

m. 6th mo. 8th, 1887, Noah Haines Peacock, 
son of John and Sarah Peacock, of Chair- 
ville. Burlington Co., N. J. 
He 1>. 5th mo. 26th, 1827. 
d. nth mo. 5th, 1900. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 319 



1532— JAMES WILLS ROWAND died in infancy. 

1533— JOHN BUTTERWORTH ROWAND 

died in infancy. 

1534— HENRY CLAY ROWAND died in infancy. 

Joseph French Rowand, Jr. [1530], Captain, Company C, 3rd Regiment, New Jersey 
Volunteers. 



786— CHARLES FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42 ; Charles, 143 ; Ann, 368). 

b. November 25th, 1812. 

d. October 22nd, 1857; buried in Trinity P. E. 

churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 
in. October 26th, 1843, Anna Hendry Doughten, 

daughter of Isaac and Ann Doughten. 
She b. October 26th, 1817. 

d. August 18th, 1894; buried in Trinity P. E. 

churchyard, Moorestown, N. J. 

1535— ANNA D. HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. August 25th, 1844. 
d. March 19th, 1847. 

1536— CHARLES FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD, JR. 

b. February loth, 1846. 
m. May 10th, 1870, Emma Henderson. 

1537— WILLIAM DOUGHTEN HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. March 9th, 1848. 

1538— ISAAC DOUGHTEN HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. October 25th, 1850. 
d. March, 1895. 

1539— ANN FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. November 26th, 1852. 

1540— ELIZABETH FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. February 9th, 1854. 



320 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



787— HORACE HUGH HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Charles, 143; Ann, 368). 

h. May 1st, 1815. 

d. December 22nd, 1890; buried in Trinity P. E. 

churchyard, Moorestown. X. J. 
m. January 11th, 1837, Abigail Ann Stockton. 
She b. November 4th, 1817. 

d. August 20th, 1873; buried in Trinity P. E. 
churchyard, Moorestown, X. J. 

1541— SALLIE F. HOLLINGSHEAD 

h. November 8th, 1837. 

1542— ELLEN S. HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. January 22nd, 1842. 

1543 — A daughter, who requests that her name or that of her husband and chil- 
dren be not entered in this record. 



794— THOMAS STOKES PAGE, M.D. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371). 

b. May 11th, 1815. 

d. January 10th, 1872, in San Francisco, Cal. 

m. January 5th, 1841, in Valparaiso, Chili, S. A., 
Anna Maria Liljivalch, daughter of Olof Lilji- 
valch, of Stockholm, Sweden: Rev. Alexander 
H. Small, P.O.. Fellow of Emanuel College, 
Cambridge, and Chaplain R. M., performing 
ceremony. 



1544— OLOF PAGE 

154S— HEN KV PAGE 
1546— CHARLES PAGE 
i?47— WILFRED PACE 
1548— ANITA PAGE 



b. November 24th, 1842. 

b. April 4th, 1845. 

b. March 12th, 1847. 

b. February 13th, 1849. 

b. January 24th, 1851. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 321 



1549— CAROLINA PAGE b. January 1st, 1853. 

d. March 27th, 1854. 

1550— ARTHUR PAGE ~j b. February 2nd, 1855. 

155 1— GEORGE PAGE j b. February 2nd, 1855. 

d. July 26th, 1857. 

1552— GEORGE THOMAS PAGE b. May 14th, 1857. 

1553— MARIA THERESA PAGE b. October 23rd, 1858. 

d. August 16th, 1859. 

1554— ELIZABETH PAGE ") b. October 1st, 1861. 

1555— MANUELITA PAGE J b. October 1st, 1861. 

1556— WILLIAM PAGE 

796— JOSEPH FRENCH PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles. 42; 

Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371). 

b. October 14th, 1820, at Moorestown, N. J. 

d. November 6th, 1896, at his home, 1820 Chest- 
nut St., Philadelphia. 

m. October 16th, 1845, Ellen Forde Hansell, 
daughter of William Sutton and Elinor (Forde) 
Hansell ; Rev. George B. Ide, pastor of First 
Baptist Church, Philadelphia, performing cere- 
mony. 
She b. January 7th, 1824. 

d. July 18th. 1912, in Cape May, N. J. 

1557— ELLEN ATLANTIC PAGE 

b. August 3rd, 1846. 
m. Henry Clay Butcher. 

1558— JOSEPH FRENCH PAGE, JR. 

b. November 28th, 1848. 
m. June 13th, 1878, Josephine R. Collins. 

21 



322 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



1559— CHARLES PAGE 



b. September qth, 1852. 
d. September 13th, 1853. 



1560— EDWARD DELANO PAGE 

b. September 5th, 1855. 

m. December 2lst, 1886, Annie Christine 
Oregg, daughter of Joshua Z. and Emma 
Tungerich Gregg. 
She b. February 27th, 1866. 

1561— CHARLES HENRY PAGE 

b. January 8th, 1858. 
in. May 17th, 1882, Rebecca G. Grosholtz. 

1562— WILLIAM HANSELL PAGE 

b. December 18th, 1859. 
m. September 24th, 1896, in St. Luke's P. E. 

Church, Germantown, Philadelphia, Sarah 

Sherrerd. 

1563— LOUIS RODMAN PAGE b. November 25th, 1861. 

m. April 12th, 1887, Mary L. Crozer. 



1564— ROBERT HANSELL PAGE 



1565— FRANCES PACE 



b. August 7th, 1863. 

111. April 24th, 1889, Sara L. Crozer. 

b. 1 October 14th, 1865. 

in. February 8th, 1887, Winthrop liurr. 



Joseph F'rench Page [790]. fourth son of Gilbert and Atlantic (French) Page [371!. 
spent some time in his father's store at Moorestown, N. J., then enlarged his knowledge 
of business through service in a mercantile house in Philadelphia. Soon after attaining 
his majority he entered into partnership with his brother, Charles French Page [793], 
as a stock broker. Two years later he became an extensive wholesale dealer in coal, 
having offices on Broad street near Cherry, and at Locust street wharf, on the Schuylkill 
River, Philadelphia. Southern credits and losses at the outbreak of the Civil War caused 
Mr. Page to abandon this line of business, and in 1803 he established a wholesale dry- 
goods house at 237 Market street. He dealt largely in government blankets and other 
military supplies and became very prosperous. About 1867 he retired from active busi- 
ness, residing during the remainder of his life at 1K20 Chestnut street. Between 1880 and 
1S90, in connection with his sons, Edward and Joseph F. Page, Jr., he directed the devel- 
opment of :i valuable tract of real estate which he owned in the northern part of the city. 
Throughout a long and active life, Mr. Page was noted for industry, integrity and 
geniality. He had many friends among the leading business men of his day, with whom 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 323 



in later life he took keen enjoyment in reviewing the mercantile and manufacturing 
development in Philadelphia in the days before the Civil War. He was fond of outdoor 
life and loved dogs and horses. Upon the occasion of a destructive fire in his Market 
street store a valuable hunting dog was burned to death, causing Mr. Page more grief 
than his financial loss. 

Ellen Forde (Hansell) Page was the eighth child of William Sutton and Elinor (Forde) 
Ilansell, daughter of Standish, Jr., and Sarah (Britton) Forde. William Sutton Hansell, 
born November 6th, 1787, died December 22nd, 1872, married October 15th, 1812, Elinor 
Forde, was the second son of Barnett and Sarah (Sutton) Hansell. Barnett Hansell, 
fourth son of the pioneer, Peter David Hansell, was born January o,th, 1760, died October 
nth, 1809, married June 24th, 1784, Sarah Sutton, who was born in Delaware, July 17th, 
1760, and died in Philadelphia, August 25th, 1793. William Sutton Hansell was one of 
the pioneer manufacturers of harness and saddlery ware in Philadelphia. In 1810 he 
established himself in business on Market street, near the Delaware River. He was a 
" constant and tireless worker ; the cutting of six dozen riding bridles was an after 
supper task." The business prospered, being extended to different parts of the country, 
and has been continued by his sons and grandsons under the firm name of Wm. S. 
Hansell & Sons, the house recently celebrating its one hundredth anniversary. From 
the time of the Mexican War until the present the founder and his successors have fur- 
nished the United States government with many kinds of horse equipments, and during 
the Civil War shoes, tents and clothing. Mr. Hansell was much interested in religious 
and philanthropic work, and was a deacon in the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia 
for fifty years. 



800— EDWARD AUGUSTUS PAGE, M.D. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371). 

b. October 23rd, 1830, in Moorestovvn, N. J. 

d. February 18th, 1881, at 1415 Walnut St., 
Philadelphia. 

m. October 6th, 1859, at 1503 Spruce St., Phila- 
delphia, Josephine Augusta Bispham, daughter 
of Joseph and Susan (Tucker) Bispham; Rev. 
William Suddards, D.D., Rector of Grace 
Church, Philadelphia, performing ceremony. 
She b. December 21st, 1832, in Philadelphia. 

d. May 27th. 1890, at 2013 Pine St., Philadelphia. 

i S 66— JOSEPHINE BISPHAM PAGE 

b. June 20th, 1863. 



324 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1567— ALICE TUCKER PAGE b. September 21st, 1865. 

(I. January 15th, 1903. 

1568— EDWARD SYDENHAM PAG1 

b. June nth. 1868. 
m. December 8th. 1898, Helen D. Bickley. 

1569— GEORGE BISPHAM PAG] 

b. September 24th, 1870. 
m. February 27th, K10S, Maud Newlin. 

[570— ELIZABETH BISPHAM PAGE 

b. March 27th, 1875. 
m. March 5th, 1904, Robert \V. Atkinson. 

1570a— CHARLES BOWKER PAGE 

died in infancy. 

Edward Augustus Page, M.D. [800], eighth child and sixth son of Gilbert and Atlantic 
(French) Page [371]. received his academic education at the famous I.awrenceville, 
N. J., school for boys. He entered the medical department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania and graduated therefrom in 1852 as surgeon and general practitioner. During 
the following thirty years he attained high rank in his profession. He rendered valuable 
service as an army surgeon during the Civil War, being attached for a time to the 
Satterlee Army Hospital in West Philadelphia. He accompanied the relief hospital 
vessel sent to the Army of the Potomac, at Harrison's Landing. \ a., after the seven days' 
lighting in that vicinity. May, 1862. In later years he was medical director of the Penn 
Mutual Insurance Co., of Philadelphia. He was also a member of the staff at St. 
Joseph's Hospital. For many years his residence and office was at 14 1 5 Walnut street. 



806— AGNES PAGE (Thomas, l ; (harks. 8; Charles, 42; Eleanor, 144; 

Agnes 1 [ollingshead, 376). 

b. January 22nd, 1813. 
d. August 29th, 1899. 
m. October 1st, 1846, Thomas Moffett ; Rev. George 

Y. Morehouse, of St. Andrew's I'. E. Church, 
Mi. Holly. N. J., per form in!,' ceremony. 

1571— WILLIAM C. MOFFETT b. July 24th. 1847. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



325 




A FAMILY PIECE 



326 GENEALOGY OF THE 



811— ANNA H. HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Eleanor. 144: Hugh F. Hollingshead, 
380). 
b. 1st mo. 16th. 1817 (Philada. Mo. Meeting 

record), 
m. "On the 2nd inst. [Feby. 1835]. by Augustus 
D. Tarr, Esq., Passed Midshipman Charles 
Crillon Rarton, of the U. S. Navy, to Anna, 
eldest daughter of Hugh F. Hollingshead, Esq., 
of this city" [Phila.]. ( U. S. Gazette, Feby. 
11th, 1835.) 

" Laws of Pennsylvania, Session of 1834-35 (p. 74)." 
AN ACT 
"To annul the marriage contract of Charles Crillon Barton and Anna his wile. 
Section I. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
■wealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority 
of the same : That the marriage contract entered into by and between Charles Crillon 
Barton and Anna, his wife, late Anna Hollingshead, both of the City of Philadelphia, 
be and the same is hereby annulled and made void, and the parties released and dis- 
charged from the said contract, and from all duties and obligations arising therefrom, 
is fully and effectually and absolutely as if they never had been joined in marriage. 

James THOMPSON 
Speaker of the House of Representatives 
James Kekn 
Speaker of the Senate 
Approved the eighteenth day of March, Anno 1 lomini, eighteen hundred and thirty-five. 

GEO. WOLF, Governor" 

m. "On Monday 27th inst. [March, 1837], Charles 
Crillon Barton, U. S. Navy, to Anna, eldest 
daughter of Hugh F. Hollingshead, Esq., of 
this city." ( Public Ledger, March 29th. 1837.) 

d. "At Woodbury. N. J., mi Saturday afternoon 
last [November 6th, 1841], after a short ill- 
ness, Anna, wife of Lieut. Charles Crillon 
Barton, of the U. S. Navy, in the 25th year of 
her age." I . S. Gazette, Nov. 8th. 1841.) 
CHARLES CRILLON BARTON 

b. August 28th, 1812, in Pennsylvania. 

d. August 28th, 1851. in Philadelphia. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCEI 327 

1572— MARTHA CRILLON BARTON 

b. February 7th, 1838. 

m. December 19th, 1861, William C. Car- 
penter. 



1573— ELLEN HOLL1NGSHEAD BARTON 

b. September 18th, 1839. 
m. October 4th, 1866, Edward Bleecker, M.D. 

1574— ANNA BARTON b. 1841. 

d. 1S41. 

Charles Crillon Barton was a son of Dr. William P. C. Barton, of Philadelphia, a 
noted physician and author from 1820 until his death in 1856, and surgeon in the United 
States Navy for nearly forty years. Dr. Barton was a grandson of the Rev. Thomas 
Barton, a noted colonial minister and missionary, who married Esther Rittenhouse, sister 
of the famous astronomer, Dr. David Rittenhouse. Charles Crillon Barton was appointed 
midshipman in the Navy December 1st, 1824, when only twelve years of age; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman June 14th, 1834, and reached the grade of Lieutenant, February 
25th, 1841. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico, in 1846, he was cruising in foreign 
waters off the coast of Africa. He returned in the Casket to the service of the Home 
Squadron the same year, and in 1847 was assigned to survey duty at the Philadelphia 
Navy Yard. His health failed in 185 1, and in August of that year he died in Phila- 
delphia. Under the direction of his father, Dr. Barton, the funeral was held at St. 
Stephen's Episcopal Church (Philadelphia), and he was buried with naval honors, the 
remains being accompanied to Laurel Hill Cemetery by an escort, in accordance with 
the following order : 

"NAVAL NOTICE. Officers of the U. S. Navy and Marine Corps, 
attached to this station are hereby invited to attend the funeral of the late 
Lieut. Charles C. Barton, U. S. Navy, in uniform, with the usual badge 
of mourning, at 3 o'clock P. M. to-morrow, 30th inst., from No. 8 Sansom St. 

George C. Read, Commandant. 
Commandant's office U. S. Navy Yard, Philada., 29th August, 1851 " (U.S. 
Gazette, August 30th, 1851). 

Lieutenant Barton maintained an enviable record in the Navy. On January Sth, 1845, 
he married Christiana Campbell, daughter of Amos Campbell, of Woodbury, N. J. She 
was born in July, 1819, and died January Jth, 1903. For many years she was a United 
States pensioner on account of Lieutenant Barton's services in the Mexican War. 



328 GENKALOGY OF THE 

813— JOSEPH MICKLE HOLLINGSHEAD (1'homas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Eleanor, 144; Hugh F. Hol- 
lingshead, 380). 

b. loth mo. 15th, 1821. 

(1. March 28th, 1888. 

m. March 6th, 1851. Caroline Atwood, daughter 
of John M. and Henrietta Maria (Coffin) At- 
wood; Rev. Albert Barnes, pastor of First 
Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, performing 
ceremony. 
She b. June 3rd, 1828. 

d. August 17th, 1899. 



1574a— HEN RY HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. December 24th, 1851. 



1574b— A LICE HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. August 3rd, 1S54. 
d. February 2nd, 1904. 



15740— ELLEN HOLLINGSHE VD 

b. April 23rd. 185S. 

m. 1871), J. Rundle Smith. 



i574d— CAROLINE HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. January 7th, 1861. 
m. April ioth, 1890, J. Russell Griftitls. 



1574c— HUGH E. HOLLINGSHEAD, 2ND 

b. March 17th, 1862. 
d. July 12th, 1862. 



15741— HUGH E. HOLLINGSHEAD, 3RD 

b. 1864. 
d. 1868. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 329 

816— ELIZA W. HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Eleanor, 144; Hugh F. Hollingshead, 380). 

b. 5th mo. 1st, 1829. 

d. March 11th, 1852. 

m. March 20th, 1851, Sunday morning, in Christ 
Church, Philadelphia, James Montgomery Gil- 
lilan, of Ireland; Rev. Benjamin Dorr, D.D., 
rector, performing ceremony. 
J. M. G. d. March 8th, 1898, aged 76. 

1575— WILLIAM HOLLINGSHEAD GILLILAN 

d. in New York, unmarried, about 1904. 

819— ANNA MATLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Eleanor, 

144; Charles F. Matlack, 381). 

b. 3rd mo. 15th, 1835, in Philadelphia. 

d. 11th mo. 30th, 1900, in Newport, R. I. ; buried 

in South Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, 
m. 6th mo. 30th, 1856, by Friends' ceremony, in 

Philadelphia, William Trost Richards, son of 

Benjamin M. and Annie (Trost) Richards. 
He b. 11th mo. 14th, 1833, near Philadelphia. 

d. 11th mo. 8th, 1905, in Newport, R. I.; buried 

in South Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia. 

1575a— ARCHER RICHARDS b. 4th mo. 30th, 1857. 

m. August 24th, 1882, Caroline Nelson. 

1575b— CHARLES MATLACK RICHARDS 

b. 6th mo. 7th, 1859. 
d. 4th mo. 6th, 1865. 

1575c— ELEANOR FRENCH RICHARDS 

b. 5th mo. 10th, 1862. 
m. 4th mo. 27th, 1882, William F. Price. 

'575d— JOSEPHINE ANNA RICHARDS 

b. gth mo. 20th, 1864. 
d. 8th mo. 30th, 1865. 



330 GENEALOGY OF THE 



iS7Se— THEODORE WILLIAM RICHARDS 

b. 1st mo. 31st, 1868. 
m. May 28th, 189.6, Miriam S. Thayer. 

I575f— ANNA MARY RICHARDS 

I). 4U1 mo. 3rd. 1870. 
m. July 18th. 11105, William T. Brewster. 

15758— HERBERT MAULE RICHARDS 

b. 10th mo. 6th, 1871. (Professor of Botany 
in Columbia University, X. V.) 

1575k— MILDRED RICHARDS b. 1st mo. 30th, 1879. 

d. 3rd mo. loth, 1880; buried at the Necrop- 
olis in Woking, England. 

William Trost Richards, after receiving a grammar and high school education, turned 
his attention to the study of art, becoming a painter by profession before he had attained 
his majority. In 1855 he went to Europe, spending a year in study and observation in 
Florence, Rome and Paris. In 1856 he opened a studio in Philadelphia and rapidly won 
his way to a high place among artists, as a painter of landscapes and marine pictures. 
His work is represented in permanent collections of notable institutions in this country 
and abroad, among these being the Metropolitan Museum, New York, Academy of Fine 
Arts, Philadelphia, Corcoran Art Gallery, Washington, and Shaube Gallery, Hamburg. 
He was awarded a medal at the Centennial Exhibition, Philadelphia, 1S76, and at the 
Paris Exhibition, 1880,. Upon his return from Europe, a short time before his death, 
he was given a public reception in Philadelphia, at which eulogistic addresses were made 
by prominent citizens. 

From a critical review of Mr. Richards's work in "The National Cyclopedia of Amer- 
ican Biography" (1904), we quote as follows: 

" 111-, most important landscapes represent at best his pre-Kaphaelistic 
methods, showing a masterly treatment of detail. In later years he gave 
more attention to marine painting and created some remarkable and elabo- 
rate reproductions of surf, breaker, wave and sand. In 1866 he went to 
Europe with the object of perfecting himself in the execution of coast 
scenes, and spent some time in Paris, studying canvasses at the exhibition 
of 1867. The following year he returned home, and during the period 
from 1870 to 1878 devoted every summer to sketching by the sea. He then 
for two years had a studio in London and exhibited at the Royal Academy. 
For many years he has been a regular contributor to the National Academy 
exhibition in New York, and also to the American Water ("lor Society, 
of which he is an honorary member." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 331 

823— HANNAH MAULE MATLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Eleanor, 144; Charles F. Matlack, 381). 

b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1844. 

m. March 10th, 1870, John Taylor Roberts, son of 
Spencer and Elizabeth (Taylor) Roberts.^ 
He d. 1895. 

I575i— SARAH MATLACK ROBERTS 

b. May 6th, 1871. 

m. June igth, 1900, Cornelius Weygandt 
(Professor of English Literature, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania), son of Cornelius N. 
and Lucy (Thomas) Weygandt. 

I575J— SPENCER ROBERTS b. May 2nd, 1873. 

m. September 28th, 1910, Anna Dorothea 
Wienberg. 

1575k— EDITH ROBERTS b. December 31st, 1874. 

m. April 17th, 1895, Walter Gibson Sibley, 
son of Edward Abbott and Ellen (Gibson) 
Sibley. 

15751 — ELIZABETH ANN ROBERTS 

b. September 18th, 1876. 
d. March 10th, 1893. 

1575m— JOHN TAYLOR ROBERTS, JR. 

b. September 2nd, 1878. 

m. April 20th, 1904, Blanche Dawson Gilroy. 
She b. July 4th, 1871. 

823a— JOSEPH MATLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42 ; Eleanor, 

144; Charles F. Matlack, 381). 

b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1846. 
d. September 8th, 1904. 

m. October 15th, 1870, Anna P. Dreher, daughter 
of Judge Samuel S. and Sarah (Phillips) 
Dreher. 
She b. October 15th, 1849. 

I575n— CHARLES H. MATLACK 



332 GENEALOGY OF THE 

i575o— SAMUEL DREHEK MATLACK 

b. June 14th, 1873. 
m. October 28th, 1896, Katharine D. Moore. 

'575P- PAUL MATLACK b. May 17th. 1877. 

«575<1— SARA MATLACK b. Angus! 25th, 1881. 

m. October 21st, 1905, Warren H. Prentzel. 

823b— CHARLES MAI LACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles. 42; 

Eleanor, 144; Charles F. Matlaek, 381). 

1). 4th mo. 7th, 1849, in Philadelphia (Arch street 

below Seventh), 
m. 8th mo. 21st, 1895, in Nrownfield, Maine, Mary 
Fletcher Stevens, daughter of Augustus Krvin 
and Jane Steele (Tyler) Stevens. 
She b. 1st mo. 28th, 1861, in Portland, Maine. 



I575r — BARBARA MATLACK b. loth mo. 5th, 1896. ' 
IS75S— JUDITH MATLACK 1). cjth mo. gth, 1898 



All born at " Hidden 

- Hearth," Matunuck, 

Washington Co., R. I. 



15751— CONSTANCE REVERE MATLACK 

b. 5th mo. 30th, 1902. _ 

824— MARY BISHOP (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 145; 

Ann Black, 382). 

b. 8th mo. 15th, 1818. 
m. Mahlon Kirkbride. 

1576— MAHLON KIRKBRIDE, JR. 

drowned in Johnstown flood with his wife 
and two children. 

"577— WILLIAM is. KIRKBRID1 

1578— ANNA KIRK1SR1DE died unmarried. 

1579— ELLA KIRKBRIDE m. Allen Walker. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 333 



825— JOHN BISHOP, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 

145; Ann Black, 382). 
b. 3rd mo. 16th, 1820. near Columbus, N. J. 
d. 8th mo. 1st, 1900, in Trenton, N. J. 
m. First, 2nd mo. 5th, 1845, Rebecca F. Biddle, 
daughter of Israel and Sarah (Field) Biddle. 
She b. 1st mo. 16th, 1826, in Kinkora, N. J. 
d. 4th mo. 4th, 1893, in Columbus, N. J. 
m. Second, 9th mo. 9th, 1896, Mary J. Bowen. 

Children of John and Rebecca (Biddle) Bishop. 

1580— THOMAS SPARKS BISIIOr 

b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1846. 
m. November 12th, 1873, Rebecca Hance. 

1581— SARAH BIDDLE BISHOP 

b. qth mo. 5th, 1847. 

d. 10th mo. 28th, 1866, unmarried. 

1582— JOHN ISRAEL BISHOP b. 7th mo. 4th, 1849. 

m. nth mo. 9th, 1871, Anna Ridgway. 

1583— JANE BISHOP b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1S51. 

m. 2nd mo. 12th, 1874, Ellis Branson. 

1584— ANNA BISHOP b. 12th mo. 9th. 1852. 

d. nth mo. 9th, 1893. 
m. Samuel Wooley (no issue). 

1585— BIDDLE BISHOP b. nth mo. 8th, 1854. 

d. 10th mo. 25th, 1879, unmarried. 

1586— WILLIAM BISHOP b. 12th mo. 23rd, 1856. 

m. 5th mo. 25th, 1883, Martha II. Holloway. 

1587— REBECCA FIELD BISHOP 

b. nth mo. 26th, 1858. 

m. December 23rd, 1880, Rev. Robert E. 
Campbell, Jr. 

1588— CHARLOTTE WILLS BISHOP 

b. 4th mo. 10th, 1862. 

m. April 10th, 1884, Nathan B. Wagoner 
[1606]. 

1589— MARY C. L. BISHOP b. 5th mo. 26th, 1865. 



334 GENEALOGY OF THE 

827— MARY BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 145; 

Samuel Black, 384). 
b. 8th mo. 31st, 1817, near Columbus, N. J. 
d. December 8th, 1890, in Mount Holly, N. J. 
in. July 3rd, 1839, Joseph Samuel Read, son of 
Samuel Joseph and Sarah (Budd) Read; Rev. 
George Y. Morehouse-, of St. Andrew's P. E. 
Church. Mt. Holly, N. J., performing ceremony. 
J. S. R. b. June 23rd, 1802. in Mount Holly. N. J. 
d. August 10th, 1877, in Mount Holly, N. J. 

1590— CHARLOTTE BLACK READ 

b. April 27th, 1840. 

m. May 25th, 1861, David V. Conover. 
1591— SAMUEL JOSEPH READ b. April 24th, 1841. in Mount Holly. N. J. 

died in infancy. 

1592— JOHN JOSEPH READ b. June 17th, 1842. in Mount Holly, N. J. 

d. October 24th, 1910, in Mount Holly, N. J. 
Rear Admiral, U. S. N. 

1593— VIRGINIA READ b. June nth, 1844, in Mount Holly, X. J. 

died at age of 9 years. 

1594— AUGUSTA MILNOR READ 

b. December 12th, 184;. 

m. October 17th, 1867, Walter S. Oliphant. 

1595— LAURA MOREHOUSE READ 

b. July 27th, 1848. 
m. June loth, 1875. Dr. William A. Conover. 

1596— HENRY BLACK READ b. January 12th, 1850, in Mount Holly, N. J. 

d. June 25th, ion, in Omaha. Neb.; buried 
in St. Andrew's churchyard Mount Holly. 

m. November 26th, 1884, in St. Mary's P. E 
Church. Philadelphia, Clara Gay Keen, 
daughter of Jason Fenimore and Cornelia 
Frances (Cay) Keen. 

I 597 _\V1 1.1.1AM BLACK READ b. June 21st. 1852. in Mount Holly, N. J. 

died in infancy. 

1598— MARY BLACK READ b. December nth. 1855. in Mount Holly, 

d. August nth, 1856. 

l 5 99_JOSEPH S. READ. JR, b. January 2nd, 1858, in Mount Holly, N. J. 

died in infancy. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 335 

REAR ADMIRAL JOHN JOSEPH READ, U. S. N. 

John Joseph Read [1592], third child and second son of Joseph S. and 
Mary (Black) Read, and sixth in line of descent from Thomas ffrench, 
received his early education at private schools and the West Jersey Collegiate 
Institute. In September, 1858, he was appointed to the United States Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, Md., from the Second Congressional District of New 
Jersey. At the outbreak of the Civil War, in 1861, the Federal government 
being greatly in need of officers for the Navy, the third class at the Academy, 
of which young Read was a member, was ordered into service on May 10th. 
He reported to the commandant of the New York Navy Yard and was at 
once assigned to duty as Acting Midshipman on the U. S. Frigate Potomac. 
This vessel soon joined the blockade squadron, in the Gulf of Mexico. The 
utmost vigilance was required and there were many exciting incidents. One 
of these was the capture in Mobile Bay of a schooner falsely flying British 
colors. Acting Midshipman Read was in charge of a small boat which 
engaged the enemy on shore in a sharp conflict. His superior officer was 
Winfield Scott Schley, Master (many years later Rear Admiral), who in his 
official report of the affair, highly praised " the firmness and coolness " of the 
officers and men under his command. 

In January, 1862, the Potomac was ordered to Vera Cruz to protect Amer- 
ican interests in Mexico, and Midshipman Read witnessed the landing of the 
allied French, Spanish and English armies, under the Spanish General Prim, 
which foreign occupation preceded the coming of the ill-starred Emperor 
Maximilian. After the capture of New Orleans, in April, 1862, he was one 
of the junior officers in command of the armed seamen who served as a guard 
for the fleet representatives who entered the city and raised the United States 
flag on the public buildings. The populace was very indignant and riotous 
scenes occurred. 

Receiving his promotion as Ensign, November 22nd, 1862, young Read 
was assigned to duty on the U. S. Flagship Hartford with Admiral Farragut. 
In this capacity he served during the conflict with the Confederate batteries 
at Port Hudson, on the Mississippi River, in March, 1863 ; also in the engage- 
ments at Grand Gulf and Warrington, below Vicksburg. His personal expe- 
riences at this time were thrilling and perilous. Later he served on recon- 
noitering expeditions in bayous of Louisiana and between Mobile and Pensa- 
cola, in the Gulf of Mexico. Ensign Read's next service was with the South 



336 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Atlantic Squadron during the siege of Charleston, 1863-64. Though one of 
the youngest officers his high standing was shown by an incident in the his- 
tory of the great ironclad U. S. Frigate Ironsides, to which he had but 
recently been ordered. One dark night, October 5th, 1863, a daring and 
almost successful attempt was made to destroy the vessel by means of a pow- 
erful torpedo. The explosion startled the entire fleet. Read was sent in a 
small boat on a voyage of discovery, but the mysterious craft had gotten away 
in the misty night. During this period he was for a time attached to the 
monitor Nahant. He was promoted lieutenant February 22nd, 1864, and 
made executive officer of the U. S. steamer R. R. Cuyler, which served with 
the North Atlantic and West Gulf squadrons. He was present at both 
attacks on and the capture of Fort Fisher, N. C, December, 1864, and Jan- 
uary, 1865. This was one of the most desperate conflicts of the war and all 
engaged in it earned the gratitude of the nation. It virtually ended blockade 
running and left the Confederacy without further material aid from beyond 
the seas. In March, 1865, the Cuyler was ordered to join the West Gulf 
squadron, where it participated in the siege of Mobile, in the early part of 
April. After the capture of that last Confederate stronghold, April 6th, the 
Cuyler, at that time the flagship of Rear Admiral Thatcher, proceeded to 
Galveston, Texas, in the vicinity of which the final remnants of the Confed- 
erate forces surrendered during the first week in June. All through this 
period Lieutenant Read, as executive officer of the Cuyler. rendered most 
efficient service. 

Lieutenant Commander Read, having received promotion to that rank in 
July, 1866, and been assigned to the U. S. Steamer De Soto, was present the 
same year at the attack on and destruction of the forts at Cape Haytien. 
Hayti, by the British squadron under Commodore McClintock. He next 
served on board the U. S. Frigate Guerriere, European Squadron, 1871. 
During 1876-77 he commanded the U. S. Flagship Richmond, cruising in 
the South Atlantic and South Pacific. He was promoted Commander, De- 
cember 11th, 1877, and assigned to shore duty in Washington, Bureau of 
Yards and Docks, and later as Lighthouse Inspector of Mississippi River, 
with headquarters at St. Louis. After commanding the historic U. S. Steamer 
Michigan on the northern lakes in 1883. he was made Lighthouse Inspector at 
Philadelphia, Fourth District, in 1889. 

* »n March 31st, 1891, Commander Read, having again journeyed to the 
South Pacific, assumed command of the U. S. Corvette Iroquois, then at 




lx-12 BEAK-ADMIBAX JOHN J. BEAD, V. 9. N„ RETIRED 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 337 

Honolulu. For more than a year he sailed this noted old ship around the 
Hawaiian Islands and Samoa, returning to Mare Island Navy Yard, San 
Francisco, in April, 1892, when the worn out vessel was put out of commis- 
sion. April 27th, 1893, after thirty years' active service, this veteran officer 
received his commission as Captain. During 1894 he was in charge of the 
receiving ship Independence at Mare Island Navy Yard. 

The new and model protected cruiser Olympia was now ready for service. 
Great things were expected of her. The ship was put in commission at Mare 
Island February 5th, 1895. Captain Read was placed in command, with 
a new crew of over four hundred men and ordered to the Asiatic station. He 
at once began training seamen and gunners. For several weeks the naval 
militia of California were exercised on this thoroughly equipped vessel during 
short trips along the Pacific coast. On August 25th, 1895, the Olympia took 
her departure for Yokohama, Japan, via Honolulu. The ship made a splendid 
record and upon arrival in Asiatic waters, in November following, excited 
the admiration of the Japanese and the officers of other foreign nations. 

The long voyage in the Olympia abundantly demonstrated Captain Read's 
superior ability as a naval officer. His skill as a scientific navigator was 
shown upon many occasions. During a great storm in mid-Pacific, lasting 
many perilous days, his watchfulness was ceaseless, while his calm courage 
inspired officers and men to faithfully perform every duty. A fire in the coal 
bunkers at the same time necessitated heroic and energetic measures. Visit- 
ing many Asiatic ports, good behavior on the part of seamen and mariners 
was required to maintain the high reputation of the United States Navy. 
Captain Read, while a strict disciplinarian, was always in sympathetic and 
kindly relationship with his men. Minor offences were regarded generously, 
but serious or repeated infractions of the naval regulations were sternly dealt 
with. Captain Read was justly proud of his handsome man-of-war, and 
especially of her crew in marksmanship. A large part of the first crew of 
the Olympia had been " green " men who were transformed under Captain 
Read's training into the efficient sailors and gunners whose skill was of the 
highest service in the Spanish-American War, making a brilliant record with 
Captain Gridley and Admiral Dewey at the battle of Manila Bay. 

The Olympia was one of the war vessels invited to witness the great cele- 
bration at Vladivostok, Siberia, in honor of the Czar, May, 1896. The 
harbor was so crowded with craft of all nations at the time that Russian 
pilots hesitated to lead in the big American ship. With chart before him, 

22 



338 C 1 \ I \].ui;\ OF THE 

Captain Read, with his usual courageous and accurate seamanship, person- 
ally directed the entrance of his vessel into the harbor, safely reaching an 
advantageous place for anchorage, winning the admiration of other naval 
i ommanders, who freely offered their congratulations. 

Captain Read very naturally entertained the hope that he could retain his 
assignment for the full three years, but the Navy Department, in pursuit of 
routine methods, transferred a number of officers of high rank, and so it 
happened that on July 28th, 1897, at Yokohama, a modest looking stranger 
came on board, and Captain Read assembling his officers and crew in impres- 
sive array, transferred the command of the Olympic to Captain Joseph V. 
(Iridley. A little later the vessel became the flagship of Commodore, now 
Admiral, Dewey, and forever famous in consequence of its leading part in 
the battle in Manila Hay. Philippine Islands, May 1st, 1898, which resulted 
in the destruction of the Spanish fleet there assembled. When Captain Read 
transferred the command of the Olympic to Captain Gridley, he carried with 
him the highest respect and affectionate regard of his shipmates of every 
grade. A comrade of forty years' service, Rear Admiral Longnecker, has 
said of him: " His modesty was only equalled by his true worth as a man 
and an officer." 

This final voyage to the East comprised Captain Read's last service on 
the sea. He returned to the United States and was assigned to duty at 
League Island Navy Yard, Philadelphia, where he remained two years. No- 
vember 29th, 1900, he was commissioned Rear Admiral. During 1901—02-03 
he was Commandant of the Navy Yard and Station at Portsmouth, N. H. 
He closed his active career, after forty-three years' eventful service, while 
i liairman of the Lighthouse Board, Washington, D. C, June 17th, 1904, 
when he was retired on account of age. 

The years of his retirement Rear Admiral Read spent en joy ably at his 
home in Mount Holly, N. J., with occasional sojourn abroad and at various 
pleasure and health resorts in this country. The legacy of a vigorous and 
long lived ancestry served him until almost three score and ten. The an- 
nouncement of his death, after a brief illness, came as a painful surprise to a 
wide circle of friends in civic as in naval life. Funeral services, conducted 
by Rev. James Stoddard, rector of St. Andrew's P. E. Church, Mount Holly, 
were largely attended by notable citizens, among them Rear Admirals James 
W. Thomson, Edwin Longnecker and John V. Ilanscom, and Acting Chief 
Engineer John D. Williamson, long-time friends and comrades of the deceased 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 339 

veteran officer. Representatives of the Union League of Philadelphia, the 
Loyal Legion, the Society of the Cincinnati, and the Descendants of the War 
of 1812 were present and acted as honorary pall-bearers. By special request 
of the deceased officer there was no military or naval display. Interment was 
made in St. Andrew's churchyard, Mount Holly, where rest his father, grand- 
father, great grandfather and other members of the Read family. 

Rear Admiral Read was elected a member of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion of the United States, December 2nd, 1868. He was chosen a 
member of the Council of the Commandery of Pennsylvania May 7th, 1890, 
and Senior Vice-Commander May 1st, 1901. A memorial issued by the 
Commandery June 20th, 1911. after reciting his honorable long-time ser- 
vices, says : 

" Admiral Read was one of the few surviving officers who served all 
through the War of the Rebellion and through the War with Spain. His 
record, as cited, shows the various duties he was called on and which were 
efficiently and gallantly performed. Companion Read never married but 
was a devoted brother in every way to his family ; was a genial Companion, 
pleasant and obliging. His demise is and will continue to be deeply lamented 
by his relatives and friends. All in all his equal will be difficult to find." 

The following warm tribute to Rear Admiral Read is from his long-time 

friend and associate, Rear Admiral Francis H. Delano of the United States 

Navy: 

CARVEL HALL 

Annapolis, Maryland 

March 24th, 1911. 
My dear Mr. French : 

Yours of March 20th came a day or two ago. My acquaintance with the 
late Rear Admiral Read dates back to my midshipman days, when we were 
serving on the U. S. S. Susquehanna, flagship of Rear Admiral Palmer, 
commanding the U. S. North Atlantic fleet. 

Read was the executive officer and although a Lieut. Commander, was 
young for the billet but he took an enthusiastic interest in his profession 
and was a most thorough and efficient officer. This interest and this efficiency 
he displayed throughout his naval career. He was of fine presence, made 
up his mind quickly, was always well groomed and as a sailor man would 
say, was ready for quarters or inspection at any minute. 

The Susquehanna had a good many things happen that cruise. She 
arrived in Mexican waters just after Maximillian was shot, chased after 
Santa Anna, around the Spanish Main, got in a hurricane on the way to 
St. Thomas where the Admiral was to take possession in case the United 



340 GENEALOGY OF THE 

States Senate ratified the treaty. Experienced the earthquake and the earth- 
quake wave which landed the I'. S. S. Monongahela high and dry on the 
island of Santa Cruz and ended with a serious outbreak of yellow fever, 
which proved fatal to the Admiral and many others. 

Read commanded the Olympia, flagship on the Asiatic Station, during her 
first commission and I was with him a year or so as Executive or Second 
in Command and our association, officially and socially, was more than 
friendly. We had a bright lot of midshipmen on board and Read took a 
lively interest in them and their future careers — too lively the youngsters 
thought, for the Olympia was a very smart ship and they were kept busy. 
When they were sent home for final examination. Read was as anxious and 
solicitant for their welfare as if they had been his own boys and was delighted 
to hear of the fine records they made. Two were killed in service, those 
remaining are to-day most valuable officers. 

When Read was Commandant of the Portsmouth Navy Yard I was on 
duty then as Ordnance Officer and in a position to see how successful was 
his administration. 

lit* was a good sailor man and always handled his ships well. As .1 
matter of course, was conscientious in the performance of duty and expected 
the same of others, a good disciplinarian, somewhat punctilious, loyal to his 
friends, considerate to subordinates but stern and unrelenting if occasion 
required. 

Throughout the service his ability as an officer was appreciated, and for 
his many good qualities as a man he was highly esteemed. You have 
Admiral Read's record as furnished by the Navy Department, an epitome 
of his naval career and I fear this letter will strike you as using many 
words to say few things but it gives you what the record does not — the 
estimate of the man by the service at large. 

With kindest remembrances from Mrs. Delano, I am glad to say she is 
well, and from me to you and yours. 

Always sincerely. 

(Signed) FRANCIS II. DELANO. 

It may be of interest to the reader to note some excerpts from a letter 
received by the author from the mother of one of the young bluejackets on 
the Olympia. under command of Captain Read: 

"As you may have guessed, it was because my son was wild and wayward that he ran 
away and entered the Navy. I wrote a letter to ("apt. Read explaining and saying that 
while I thought the boy needed all the discipline he could get, in case of sickness I 
united him to have all that money could procure for him. •\c, &c. The Captain wrote 
me a nice long personal letter, and after that as long as he remained with the ship we 
exchanged letters about twice a year. My son did not know this until after he returned 
home. He had a devotion to Captain Read that never abated. From a letter from my 
son I have gleaned the enclosed : 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH .ill 

" We were seventeen days from Honolulu to Yokohama and it stormed 
most all of the way. It may not have been the same typhoon, but we must 
have run from one into another. I know in looking back we always spoke 
of it as a ten day typhoon. We were on duty and fighting the fire, and the 
ship heaving. Although the storm was terrible the Olympia was new and 
staunch, and Capt. Read not a man to turn until forced to. We were ready 
for Silver Island but did not have to go. He was very strict, and admired 
both by officers and men for his seamanship. I dare say there was not a 
cleaner record in the Navy than Capt. Read's. I think I have always given 
you that impression, and you know what nice letters he wrote you about me." 




Joseph Read, great grandfather of Rear Admiral John Joseph Read, was the son of 
Samuel and Dorothy (King) Read, who were married June igth, 1738, by the rector 
of Christ Church, Philadelphia. Joseph, their eldest son, was born in Philadelphia, April 
16th, 1739. He located for a time in Burlington, N. J., where he studied law with 
Charles Read, and was admitted to the bar in 1768. He established his home in Mount 
Holly, and took an active interest in everything pertaining to the progress and develop- 
ment of his home town. He was a vestryman of St. Andrew's Church from 1772 until 
his death, November 19th, 1814, and was elected lay delegate, 1785-86, to attend the 
State Convention of the Episcopal Clergy and Laity then held at Burlington ; member 
of the Provincial Congress, 1775. He married, February 7th, 1771, Martha Rossell, 
daughter of Zachariah and Margaret (Clark) Rossell. She died February 19th, 1830, in 
the 77th year of her age. 

Samuel Joseph Read, son of Joseph and Martha (Rossell) Read, was born in Mount 
Holly December 14th, 1771, died October 2nd, 1836. He also became a leading member 
of the bar, having been admitted in 1792, and was its oldest practitioner in Mount 
Holly at the time of his death. He was an officer in the War of 1812, commanding a 
battalion of New Jersey infantry under General Elmer, with title of Major. He was 
commissioned September 19th, 1814, and served until December 22nd of the same year, 
being stationed at Billingsport, on the Delaware River, below Philadelphia ; subsequently 
he became Colonel of the 1st Regiment, Salem Brigade, in the New Jersey militia. He 
was vestryman of St. Andrew's Church from 1809 to 1836, and lay delegate to the Con- 
vention of 1814-15. He married December 9th, 1799, Sarah Budd, daughter of Dr. 
Stacye and Sarah (Monrow) Budd. She was born March 8th, 1781, and died October 
2nd, 185 1. 

Joseph Samuel Read, second son and child of Samuel Joseph and Sarah (Budd) Read, 
born June 23rd, 1802, died August 10th, 1877, engaged in mercantile business in Mount 
Holly for a number of years and later held a government position in Washington, D. C. 



342 GENEALOGY OF THE 

He married July 3rd. 183c,. Mary Black, eldest child of Judge Samuel and Charlotte 
(Biddle) Black, ami great, great, great granddaughter of Thomas and Jane (Atkins) 
(Trench. 



ST. ANDREWS P. E. CHURCH. MOUNT HOLLY, N. J. 

In 1738 Rev. Colin Campbell, a missionary of the English Church Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, took charge of St. Mary's 
Church, Burlington. N. J., and having the care of the surrounding country, 
soon became interested in establishing a mission at the growing settlement on 
the Rancocas, called Mount Holly, known also for a long time as Bridge- 
town. By lease and release dated March 31st and April 1st. 1742. two 
acres of ground were, by Isaac Pearson (of Burlington), Mahlon Stacy and 
John Burr (of Bridgetown), given in trust and confidence, "To the intent 
that a Church may be built thereon for the celebration of Divine Service 
after the manner of the Church of England, as by Law established, and for 
a Burial Place for the Dead of the Congregation of Protestants to assemble 
there forever and to no other Use, Intent or Purpose whatsoever." The an- 
cient survey covering these two acres of land recites that they were "surveyed 
of and from the land of Mahlon Stacy, Isaac Pearson and John Burr at their 
Iron Works," which were located on the 340 acre tract that they owned on 
the south side of Rancocas Creek. The ground conveyed, with some addi- 
tions, has been from that time continuously used for burial purposes, and is 
called the churchyard. Here the first church was erected, becoming known 
as St. Andrew's, and although a small wooden structure it was pretentious 
for the times, as will be noted by Mr. Campbell's report to the Society in 
1742: "At a place called Mount Holly, about eight miles from Burlington, 
the people have built a handsome Church, and given it, by a deed of gift, to 
the Society and three other trustees, of whom the missionary at Burlington 
is to be always one." For considerably over twenty years, Mr. Campbell dili- 
gently, cheerfully and patiently journeyed from week to week from Burlington 
to Mount Holly in New Jersey and Bristol in Pennsylvania, "performing 
the duties of his several churches, not only by reading the public service and 
preaching, but also by publicly catechising the youth, and grounding them 
in the principles of the holy faith"; and in a large measure he reveals the 
secret of his successful labors when he reports to the Society his firm determi- 
nation, "to study to be quiet, and mind his own business, and leave events 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 343 

to God." On June 25th, 1763, Mr. Campbell reported to the Venerable 
Society : " I can with truth and pleasure acquaint the Society that my several 
congregations live peaceably with one another as well as with those who dissent 
from us ; and are in an encreasing state in so much that that of Burlington 
are about enlarging the Church . . . and that of Mount holly have finished 
a new Gallery for the reception of people who were so crowded in the body 
of the Church that before rendered it very inconvenient." He further stated 
in that year that his congregation at Mount Holly, which at his first coming 
consisted of but four families of the Church of England, had so increased by 
the " divine blessing on his endeavour " that they were thinking of applying 
to be made a separate mission. In 1764 they bound themselves to the Society 
to pay a missionary £30 sterling. In 1765 the parish was incorporated by 
Royal Charter, and Mr. Campbell's term of service continued until his death, 
August 9th, 1766. It is interesting to note that the present authorities of 
St. Andrew's Church have in their possession an ancient Prayer Book with 
Psalter bearing the inscription " Sent by the Society to the Rev d Mr. Colin 
Campbell, for the use of Mount holly Church, April 25th, 1749." 

Rev. Jonathan Odell, on July 25th, 1767, arrived in Burlington, as mis- 
sionary, succeeding Mr. Campbell, and when reporting to the Society, in 
October of that year: "There are in Burlington about 200 Families of In- 
habitants, of which we may rate about one in four to belong to the Church 
of England," he referred to his charge at Mount Holly as follows : " I should 
have mentioned before that the Parishioners at Mount Holly are at least as 
numerous as those at Burlington and likewise give a decent devout attention 
to the publick Worship." He continued to officiate at St. Andrew's, in con- 
nection with the church at Burlington, until the trying times of the Revolu- 
tion, when he was compelled to take refuge in New York ; and it is doubtful 
whether there were any further services held in the church for a number of 
years. A record in 1779 states: "there has been a total cessation of public 
worship in the provinces of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and almost every 
Missionary driven out." There was a reorganization in 1784; the first min- 
utes extant of a meeting after the war being those of October 22nd, 1784, 
and shortly thereafter Rev. Samuel Spraggs was made minister of St. An- 
drew's and continued until September, 1789. During his rectorship a new 
church building of brick was erected within the town, on what is called 
Church street. It was comfortable, though primitive in style, having benches 



344 GENEALOGY OF THE 

instead of pews, and the walls were unplastered. At a meeting of the minis- 
ter, wardens and vestry of St. Andrew's, held May 18th, 1812, it was resolved, 
the minutes show, "that each member be invested with authority to solicit 
contributions for pewing, plaistering and finishing the Church." And at the 
meeting of June 10th, 1813, a motion was made "that the Vestry proceed 
to finishing the Church in the manner specified in the subscription paper, viz, 
pewing, plaistering and painting, there appearing to be a sufficient sum sub- 
scribed for that purpose." This building, altered in part, is still standing, 
being a portion of a foundry and manufacturing establishment. At an 
annual meeting of the wardens and vestrymen of St. Andrew's, on May 18th, 
1807, "a motion was made and agreed to, to alter the resolution entered into 
last annual meeting, for the sale of the Old Church House at the Crave 
Yard and insted of Sale thereof to take it down and build a conveneant shed 
out of it on the corner of the Lott Back of the new Church next to Joseph 
Butterworth's Lott, the Building to be extended back into the Clover Lott 
and Messrs. Joseph Bennett, John Dobbins and Samuel Clark were appointed 
to superintend the same," and shortly thereafter the original church building 
was taken down. There still remains in the churchyard a beautiful oak tree 
near which the church had stood; and within a short distance of the tree is a 
gravestone hearing the inscription, "Alexander Shiras, 1790-1821, Second 
adult of that full name in Mount Holly. He lies at his own request where 
the first church stood." From 1793 to 1809 the Reverends Henry Van Dyke, 
Andrew Eowler, Joseph Turner and Richard Charming Moore officiated at 
St. Andrew's at different short intervals; and supplemented by the faithful 
and acceptable lay service of Dr. Peter Van Pelt a portion of the time, the 
church was kept open and the congregation together during that period. 
Rev. Daniel Higbee was in charge from 1809 to 1814. officiating also for a 
time at St. Mary's, Colestown, also as the general missionary in the State by 
appointment of the Convention. In 1815 Rev. George Youngs Morehouse 
was called to the rectorship, and with fourteen communicants began his forty- 
four years' faithful and successful incumbency. Under his ministry the 
present i hurch building on High street was erected in 1844. and later a bell 
was placed in the tower. Each Sunday morning at 8 o'clock one may hear 
repeated the am ient i ustom of ringing the church bell to give notice to the 
inhabitants of Mount Holly thai services will be held in the church that day. 
In 1853 the parish was reincorporated under the laws of New Jersey. In 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 345 



1879 a parish building was added and in 1883 the present rectory was built. 
Rev. G. P. Schetky succeeded Mr. Morehouse as rector 1859-63; Rev. D. 
H. McCurdy 1864-68; Rev. C. M. Perkins, 1869-82; Rev. John D. Hills 
1882-89; Rev. Charles A. Hayden 1889-91; Rev. Richard A. Rodrick 
served 1891-97; Rev. James Stoddard, of Connecticut, the present minister, 
came to the rectorship in 1898, and in 1900 the congregation of Trinity P. E. 
Church, established in 1859, united with St. Andrew's. In 1899 Mr. Stod- 
dard also assumed charge of the mission at Columbus, N. J., which was estab- 
lished by Rev. C. M. Perkins about 1880 and known as St. Luke's mission. 
St. Andrew's Church records contain the names of many representative colo- 
nial families of note, and in the churchyard rest a large number of former 
leading citizens. 

\ 

828— THOMAS BIDDLE BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; Samuel Black, 384). 

b. 2nd mo. 3rd, 1820. 

d. April 9th, 1864, in Columbus, N. J. 

m. November 22nd, 1842, in Bridgeton, N. J., 
Anna Maria Buck, daughter of Dr. Ephraim 
and Elizabeth (Hendry) Buck. Ceremony by 
Rev. S. Jones, D.D., Presbyterian minister. 
She b. June, 1820, in Philadelphia. 

d. March. 1876, in Rockford, 111. 

1599a— ELIZABETH BLACK b. November, 1S44. 

m. January 25th, 1869, in Leavenworth, Kans., 
William Parmelee, son of William and 
Katherine (Wright) Parmelee; Presby- 
terian minister performing ceremony. 
W. P. b. July 16th, 1836. 

1599b— SAMUEL BLACK b. December, 1845. 

d. May 8th, 1911. 

m. First, November, iS6g, Flora J. Pratt, 

m. Second, 1892, Mary L. Ilanna. 

1599c— EPHRAIM BUCK BLACK 

died in childhood. 



346 GENEALOGY OF THE 

829— CHARLOTTE BIDDLE BLACK (Thomas. 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145; Samuel Black, 384). 
1). 3rd mo. 20th, 1822, near Columbus, Burlington 

Co., N. J. 
d. November 25th, 1847. near Jobstown. Burling- 
ton Co., N. J. 
m. February 9th, 1843, William Imlay Black, son 
of Thomas and Mary (Wood) Black. Cere- 
mony by Rev. George V. Morehouse, of St. 
Andrew's P. E. Church, Mount Holly. X. J. 
W. I. B. b. 10th mo. 9th, 1816, near Jobstown, N. J. 

d. November 13th, 1893, in San Francisco, Cal. 
m. Second, December 12th, 1849, Rebecca Wills 
Black [832], sister of Charlotte Biddle Black. 

I599d— HENRY BLACK b. January 12th, 1844. 

d. June 14th. iQoq, in Moorestown, X. J. 
m. October 15th, 187c), Susan Clarkson (no 

issue). 

1590*— CHARLOTTE BIDDLE BLACK, JR. 

b. February 3rd, 1846. 
m. February 14th, 1866, Joseph \V. Biddle. 

831 — EMELINE BLACK. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles. 42; Hope, 

145; Samuel Black, 384). 
b. 8th mo. 14th, 1826. 
d. 5th mo. 6th. 1904. 
m. Edward M. Rulon. 

15991— ELIZABETH RULON m. Thomas Donoher. 

832— REBECCA WILLS BLACK (Thomas, 1: Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; Samuel Black, 384 
b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1831. 

d. November 24th, 1895, in San Francisco, Cal. 
m. December 12th, 1S49. William Imlay Black, 
son of Thomas and Mary (Wood) Black 
[refer 829]. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 347 

I599g— MARY WOOD BLACK b. October 3rd, 1850. 

m. E. Smith Hunt. 

I599h— HOWARD BLACK b. November 30th, 1851. 

m. November 20th, 1878, Sarah L. Ede. 
She d. March 24th, 1880. 

I599i— GEORGE WOOD BLACK b. March 10th, 1854. 

d. July nth, 1902, in San Francisco, Cal. 
m. March 29th, 1883, Florence L. Butler. 

1599J— ELLA FOLWELL BLACK 

b. September 5th, 1862. 
m. James Ingram. 

1599k— THOMAS BLACK b. July 20th, 1864. 

833— ELIZABETH BIDDLE BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145; Samuel Black, 384). 

b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1833, in Columbus, N. J. 

m. First, March 4th, 1851, in Mount Holly, N. J., 
Dr. Edward A. Heintzelman, son of John and 
Harriet (Pinkerton) Heintzelman. Ceremony 
by Rev. Samuel Miller, Presbyterian minister. 

m. Second, February 2nd. 1S54, in New York. 
Charles Ellis Folwell, son of Joshua and Abi- 
gail (Ellis) Folwell. Ceremony by Rev. James 
Millett, Episcopal minister. 
C. E. F. b. August 24th, 1829. 

d. December 22nd, 1908, in Columbus, N. J. 

1S99I— HARRIET HEINTZELMAN 

b. December 19th, 1851. 
d. July 13th. 1894. 

Children of Elizabeth (Black) Heintzelman and Charles E. Folwell. 

1599m— ABBY ELLIS FOLWELL 

b. September 29th, 1855. 

I599n— NATHAN FOLWELL b. January 2nd, 1857. 

d. July 1 2th, 1880. 



348 GENEALOGY OF THE 

836— JOSEPH FRENCH BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; Nathan W. Black, 385). 

b. 4th mo. 11th, 1834. 

d. May. 1887. 

m. April 18th, 1865, Mary Elliott Simpson. 

She m. Second, James Davis. 

1600— MARY SAUNDERS BLACK 

b. January 1st. 1866. 

1601— KATE O. BLACK b. July I2th. 1867. 

1602— JOSEPH FRENCH BLACK, JR. 

b. February 2;th, 1869. 

1603— SARAH ELLIS BLACK b. August 3rd, 1871. 

1604— FRANK SIMPSON BLACK 

b. May 17th, 1873. 

837— MARY ELLIS BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 

145; Nathan W. Black, 385). 

h. 9th mo, 27th. 1836, at "Level-green Farm," 

Columbus, Burlington Co., N. J. 
111. 11th mo. 17th, 1858, by Friends ceremony, 
William C. Wagoner, \"son of William and 
Elizabeth (Gatzmer) Wagoner. 
He b. 12th mo. 12th, 1831, in Stanton. Hunterdon 
Co., X. J. 

1605— HENRY BLACK WAGONER 

b. 8th mo. 28th, 1859. 

in. May. iSK<i, Mary Madeline I'ranke. 

1606— NATHAN BLACK WAGONER 

I p. 10th mo. 101I1, 1861. 
111. April 10th, 18S4, Charlotte W. Bishop 

I15SS]. 

-CHARLl S I'l ACK WAGONER 

b. 1st mo. 31st, 1865. 
m. April 5th, 1893, Annie Vail Chase. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 349 



840— CHARLES WILLS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles. 42 ; Hope, 145 ; 

Rebecca W. Black, 386). 

1). 10th mo. 6th, 1821. 

d. 10th mo. 11th, 1889. 

m. First, 5th mo. 5th, 1846, Mary Gray Black, 

daughter of Thomas and Mary Gray (Wood) 

Black. 
She b. 4th mo. 18th, 1825. 
d. 2nd mo. 26th, 1871. 
m. Second, 1873, Henrietta B. (McLaughlin) 

Wolcott. 

1608— ANNA WOOD WILLS b. 3rd mo. 7th, 1847. 

d. 5th mo. 4th, 1863. 

1609— WILLIAM BLACK WILLS 

b. Jth mo. ~th, 1849. 

1610— EMILIA ADELAIDE WILLS 

b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1851. 

844— GEORGE BLACK WILLS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; Rebecca W. Black, 386). 

b. 2nd mo. 28th, 1831. 

m. First, 5th mo. 7th, 1861, Charlotte Biddle, 
daughter of Israel Biddle. 
She d. 3rd mo. 11th, 1876. 

m. Second, 10th mo. 16th, 1877, Sarah E. Biddle, 
daughter of Charles Biddle. 

Children of George Black and Sarah (Biddle) Wills. 

161 1— GEORGE AUGUSTUS WILLS 

b. 7th mo. 30th, 1878. 

,6i2— WILLIAM LEE WILLS b. 6th mo. 4th, 1882. 

d. nth mo. 16th, 1882. 



350 GENEALOGY OF THE 

845— ELIZABETH FRENCH WILLS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145; Rebecca W. Black, 386). 

1). 10th mo. 17th, 1833. 

m. 3rd mo. 6th, 1856, Richard Henry Page, M.D., 
son of Dr. Thomas and Elizabeth (Butcher) 
Page. 
Ik- b. 9th mo. 22nd, 1828, in Burlington Co., N. J. 

1613— RICHARD HENRY PAGE, .IK. 

b. 1st mo. 9th, 1S57. 

1614— REBECCA BLACK PAGE b. 3rd mo. 28th, i860. 

d. 6th mo. 6th, 1884. 

1615— ANNA WILLS PACK b. 8th mo. 2nd, 1S62. 

1616— ELIZABETH BUTCHER PACE 

b. 5th mo. 31st, 1869. 

846— THOMAS NEWBOLD BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145; William Black, 387). 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1821, in Philadelphia. 

d. 12th mo. 12th, 1888; buried in Mansfield Meet- 
ing Burying (Iround (N. J.). 

m. 1st mo. 16th, 1845, Martha Field Biddle, 
daughter of Israel and Sarah (Field) Biddle, 
of Mansfield. X. J. 
She b. 6th mo. 29th, 1821, near Kinkora, N. J. 

(1. 3rd mo. 20th, 1902. in Iladdonfield, N. J.; 
buried in Mansfield Meeting Burying Ground. 

1617— WILLIAM AUGUSTUS BLACK 

b. 8th mo. 10th, 1846. 

d. 6th mo. 8th, 1878, unmarried. 

1618— ISRAEL BIDDLE BLACK b. 7th mo, 28th. 1S48. 

111. 2nd 1110. 24th, 1879, Sarah H. Coles. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 351 

1619— CAROLINE VIRGINIA BLACK 

b. 10th mo. 5th, 1850. 
m. February 19th, 1873, Edward W. Hunt. 

1620— WALTER BLACK b. 5th mo. 13th, 1853. 

d. 10th mo. 22nd, 1862. 

1621— THOMAS NEWBOLD BLACK, JR. 

b. 4th mo. 6th, 1857. 
m. September 24th, 1895, Mary Neale. 

1622— MARTHA BIDDLE BLACK 

b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1859. 
m. November 26th, 1884, Edwin J. Dewey. 

1623— JOSEPH SHREVE BLACK 

b. 5th mo. 14th, 1862. 



850— FRANKLIN BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 

145; William Black, 387). 

b. 4th mo. 4th, 1829, in Philadelphia, 
d. 7th mo. 8th, 1889, near Bordentown, N. J. 
m. 9th mo. 5th, 1855, Mary Tallman Biddle, 
daughter of Israel and Sarah Tallman (Field) 
Biddle. 
She b. 3rd mo. 17th, 1833, at "Mount Hope," Bur- 
lington Co., N. J. 
d. 5th mo. 15th, 1911, near Bordentown, N. J.; 
buried in Mansfield Burying Ground. 

1624— EMILY NEWBOLD BLACK 

b. 8th mo. 1st, 1856. 

1625— MARY ANNA BLACK b. 6th mo. 10th, 1858. 

m. November 25th, 1885, Samuel H. Newbold. 

1626— GEORGE W. BLACK b. 7th mo. 25th, i860. 

d. 4th mo. 7th, 1886. 

m. 6th mo. 3rd, 18S5, Lucy W. Gatewood. 
She d. in autumn, 1887. 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



1627— JOHN CLEMENT BLACK 

b. 1 ith mo. qth, 1862. 

i6a8— FRANKLIN BLACK, JR. b. 12th mo. 27th. 1864. 

d. 1st mo. 23rd. 1865. 

1639— SARAH TALLMAN BLACK 

b. 1 ith mo. 25th. 1865. 

m. 2nd mo. 21st, 1903, William Walton. 

1630— CHARLOTTE WILLS BLACK 

b. qth mo. 16th, 1868. 

(631— WALTER BLACK b. nth mo. 5th, 1870. near Bordentown, N. J. 

m. October 17th, 1895. Rebecca Burr Bullock, 
daughter of Anthony and Anna Wilson 
(Bryan) Bullock. 
She b. March 16th, 1872, in Vincentown. X. J. 
d. August 30th, 1896. 

1632— WILLIAM BLACK b. 9th mo. 3rd, 1876. 

851— EDWIN BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles. S; Charles, 42; Hope, 145; 

William Black, 3s 7 |. 

b. 10th mo. 26th, 1831. in Chesterfield twp., Bur- 
lington Co., N.J. 
(1. July 9th, 1890, in Chesterfield twp., X. J. 
m. March Nth, 1860, Euphemia Newbold, daughter 
of David Sands and Sarah (Stockton) New- 
bold; Episcopal ceremony. 
She b. February 20th, 1N32. in Chesterfield twp.. N.J. 

1633— ELIZABETH FRENCH BLACK 

1>. March 25th. 1S02. 
m. September 3rd. 1884, George Black [1640]. 

1634— ANNA NEWBOLD BLACK 

b. August 15th, 1865. 

m. September 16th, 1903, John B. Atkinson. 

1635— I ILK M.w PERCY BLACK 

b. July 2 1st, 1S67. 

1636— MARY TAYLOR BLACK b. April 17th. 1870. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 353 



852— SARAH ANN BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 

145; William Black, 387). 

b. 1 1th mo. 19th, 1833, in Burlington Co., N. J. 

d. 11th mo. 12th, 1900, in Earlington, Ky. 

m. 5th mo. 23rd, 1867, by Friends' ceremony, John 
Bond Atkinson, son of George T. and Eliza- 
beth Townsend (Bond) Atkinson. 
He b. 11th mo. 11th, 1840, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. September 21st, 1911, in Georgetown, N. J.; 
buried in West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Phila- 
delphia. 

m. Second, September 16th, 1903, Anna Newbold 
Black [1634], daughter of Edwin and Eu- 
phemia (Newbold) Black; Episcopal minister 
officiating. 

1637— JOHN BOND ATKINSON, JR. 

b. 4th mo. 29th, 1868. 
d. 10th mo. 31st, 1880. 

1638— MARY NEWBOLD ATKINSON 

b. 5th mo. 9th, 1869. 

m. November 15th, 1893, Paul M. Moore. 

John B. Atkinson, a native of Gloucester County, New Jersey, was in early life a 
teacher in the Aaron School, Mount Holly, N. J., and after graduating from the Poly- 
technic Institute of Philadelphia was employed as civil engineer with the Erie R. R., 
and later during the construction of the Hoosac tunnel, an important piece of engineer- 
ing work. In 1871 he settled in Hopkins County, Kentucky, as superintendent of the 
St. Bernard Coal Co., now the St. Bernard Mining Co., Earlington, Ky. At that time 
the company was a small concern, operating only one mine, but under the efficient man- 
agement of Mr. Atkinson both as superintendent and president, — the latter position he 
had held for a number of years prior to his death — with the aid and support of officers 
and men trained by him, the company became the largest of its kind in the State, owning 
a number of mines and producing double the amount of coal of any other company in 
Kentucky. He was a member and officer of the American Society of Civil Engineers, 
Engineering Association of the South, American Geographical Society, Engineers' Club 
of New York City, Pendennis Club of Louisville, Ky., Sons of the Revolution ; member 
of the Board of Trustees of the State University of Kentucky and President of Kentucky 
Jamestown Commission. Mr. Atkinson was a pioneer in forestry and devoted consid- 
erable time to this work. Prior to the subject becoming an important public issue, he 
23 



354 GENEALOGY OF THE 



caused to be planted hundreds of acres of the St. Bernard lands in trees of various 
kinds. He attended the first conference of Governors held in the White House at 
Washington, May, 1908, as one of the advisors of the Governor of Kentucky, and 
presented at that time an important paper on " Forestry as Related to Mining Interests." 
He was greatly interested in educational work, and the substantial and well equipped 
school buildings of Earlington and other towns where the St. Bernard mines are located, 
were the result of his efforts; he was also a liberal patron of the Atkinson College for 
colored people at Madisonville. Ky. His consideration, sympathy and kindness, his 
universal fairness and charity in dealing with all questions, won for him the utmost 
confidence and affectionate loyalty of all his employes ; likewise the esteem and love of 
a large circle of friends and acquaintances in Kentucky and elsewhere. In noting the 
death of Mr. Atkinson, the Louisville Courier-Journal referred to him as follows: 

"lie has been connected with the coal mining interests of Kentucky for 
nearly forty years. In that time, from a comparative small beginning, he 
had built up a corporation which for many years has been the leading coal 
and coke producing company in the State, operating nine mines, employing 
several thousand men and mining more than half the entire output of the 
chief coal-producing county in the State. 

" Such a record of accomplishment betokens uncommon executive ability. 
In all the years of Mr. Atkinson's management of his company there was 
remarkable freedom from labor troubles. He operated his mines with non- 
union men, but there has been but one strike of any importance in the com- 
pany's history, and several efforts by union labor leaders to organize the 
mines were unsuccessful. It has been said of Mr. Atkinson that he was 
never too busy to listen to any personal grievance or to the smallest affairs 
of his humble employe and to give freely of his time to counsel and to 
remedy. His influence was paramount with his associates and employes, 
and they were faithful to his interests — or to what he conceived to be the 
interests of his company. 

" Mr. Atkinson's activities were largely responsible for extensive mineral 
development in Hopkins County, adding greatly to the wealth and pros- 
perity of the region wherein he operated, incidentally, to the industrial 
and commercial progress of the State. A Kentuckian by adoption, he 
became strongly interested in the State's resources and was identified with 
many movements for their advertisement and exploitation. His intimate 
connection with the organizations for the display of Kentucky products at 
several of the great national and international expositions that have been 
held in the past twenty years should be remembered gratefully by the citi- 
zens of tin- State. He was a believer in conservation, and he was one of 
the few practical conservationists in this section of the United States. He 
wai an authority on forestry and his experiments in that direction have 
attracted much attention. He planted millions of trees in Hopkins County 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 355 

in anticipation of the time when they would be needed to take the place of 
a vanishing timber supply, and in twenty years of active forestry operation 
he transformed and beautified vast tracts of land that had been denuded 
of trees and had become literally 'the waste places of the earth.' The death 
of a man so able, so resourceful and so public-spirited is a distinct loss to 
the State wherein so much of his talent and energy has been exercised to 
such splendid purpose." 

856— CLAYTON ATKINSON BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42 ; Hope, 145 ; George Black, 389). 
b. 9th mo. 2 7th, 1839, near Columbus, N. J. 
d. October 22nd, 1887, at "Locust Hill Farm," 

near Columbus, N. J. 
m. November 16th, 1859, Caroline Ellis, daughter 
of Amos and Anna M. (Davis) Ellis. 
She b. April 26th, 1839, in Philadelphia. 

d. August 20th, 1910, in Somerville, N. J. 

1639— ANNA MAUD BLACK b. October 7th, i860. 

d. May 22nd, 1882. 

1640— GEORGE BLACK b. June 21st, 1863. 

m. September 3rd, 1884, Elizabeth F. Black 
[1633]- 

1641— CHARLES ELLIS BLACK 

b. September 21st, 1865. 

m. May qth, 1889, Amy Hutchinson Newbold, 
daughter of Edwin and Charlotte(Shreeve) 
Newbold. 

Clayton Atkinson Black, only son of Judge George [389] and Hannah (Atkinson) 
Black, succeeded to the management of the homestead farm, just outside the village of 
Columbus, in 1861, which he successfully conducted for many years, making it his 
permanent home. Upon the death of his father he became vice president of the Colum- 
bus, Kinkora and Springfield Railroad. In 1872 he was chosen director of the Mercer 
County Mutual Fire Insurance Company and of the Mount Holly National Bank. In 
1873 he was made a director of the Bordentown Turnpike Company, and although sev- 
eral times pressed to accept political honors, declined, until Governor McCIellan ten- 
dered him the appointment of judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Burlington 
County, which he accepted, and went upon the bench in April, 187S. Judge Black was 
always deeply interested in agricultural pursuits, and did much to bring about a mutual 
understanding between the farmers and other tax-payers, and for the protection of game, 
laws for which were drawn by him and may be found upon the statute-books. 



356 GENEALOGY OF THE 



859— JAMES STRATTON FRENCH (Thomas. 1; Charles, 8; Uriah, 

43; Charles, 147; Charles C, 393). 

b. 8th mo. 14th, 1812, in Philadelphia. 

d. November 16th, 1873, in Philadelphia. 

m. May 16th, 1839, in Wilmington, Delaware, 
Sarah King; Rev. Father Reilly, of St. Mary's 
College, performing ceremony. 
She b. December 15th, 1820. 

d. April 12th. 1902, in Philadelphia. 



1641a— HORACE STOKES FRENCH 

b. February 6th, 1840. 
deceased. 



1641b— MERCY" FRENCH b. December 22nd, 1842. 

deceased. 



1641c— MARY ANN FRENCH l>. June 8th. 1844. 

m. June 15th, 186,5, John B. C. Andersen. 



i64id— CHARLES CR1 IGHTON FRENCH, 2ND 

b. January 25th, 1S47. 

m. September 26th, 1872, Mary Klotz. 



i6 4 ie— JAM I IS STRATTON FRENCH, JR. 

b. June 18th, 1 S4.1. 



1 64 1 f — HORACE STOKES I Rl N( II. 2ND 

b. June iQth, 1850. 



1641K— SARAH ELLA FRENCH b. November 30th. 1853. 

m. First, August 20th, 1873. William II. Gun- 
lock. 

m. Second, August 25th. 1884. George O. 
Howe. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 357 

CAPTAIN JAMES STRATTON FRENCH. 

James Stratton French, eldest son and second child of Charles Creighton 
[393] and Mercy (Gilpin) Chapman French, when a lad went with his 
father to Ohio, where he remained for some years, returning to Philadelphia 
and entering upon a sea-faring life in the commercial marine. He served 
chiefly on coasting vessels, being recorded as captain of various craft, until 
the breaking out of the Civil War, when he offered his services to the Federal 
government as an experienced sailing master. He was appointed Acting 
Master August 29th, 1861, and assigned to the U. S. brig Perry, then sta- 
tioned off Alexandria, Va., and engaged in patrol and guard duty on the 
Potomac. It required great vigilance and energy to break up secret night 
traffic between the Confederate forces in Virginia and sympathizers in Mary- 
land. Acting Master French frequently boarded contraband vessels, thus 
learning of the hostile preparations and movements of the enemy, and ren- 
dering efficient service under trying and often dangerous circumstances. He 
remained with the Perry for a year or more and on December 3 1st, 1862, was 
ordered to the U. S. ironclad frigate Roanoke. This vessel was an old time 
man-of-war that had narrowly escaped destruction by the Confederate rann 
Merrimac, which was successfully encountered by the Monitor in March,. 
1862. The Roanoke was attached to the North Atlantic blockading squad- 
ron during 1863, doing duty along the Carolina and Virginia coast. 

On July 12th, 1864, Acting Master French was ordered to the Wilderness,. 
and on July 1 5th, on the recommendation of his commanding officer, he was- 
commissioned Acting Volunteer Lieutenant and placed in command of this 
vessel, a transport steamer, engaged in transport and despatch duty on the 
James River, during the active operations of that period. He witnessed a 
number of minor engagements and reported movements of the enemy. Upon 
the Wilderness being assigned to the Fort Fisher, N. C, expedition, as a 
gunboat, Lieutenant French, November 23rd, 1864, was detached and ordered 
to join the Mississippi squadron in the Southwest. He was assigned to the 
U. S. steamer St. Clair, with which he remained until the close of the war. 
On July 25th, 1865, he was granted four months leave, and December 22nd, 
1865, was honorably discharged after serving faithfully four years and five 
months. Returning to Philadelphia, he was thereafter appointed to a respon- 
sible place in the Navy Yard, where he remained until his death, in 1874. 



358 GENEALOGY OF THE 



For his service in the navy his widow was granted a pension. Captain French 
served many of the old time merchants of Philadelphia and was highly spoken 
of by those who knew him during his active and useful life. He is buried 
in Fernwood Cemetery, Delaware Co., Pa. His son, Charles Creighton 
French [1641d], served in the navy during and after the war a period of 
three years, enlisting the first time when he was only fifteen years old. 

In a letter dated July, 1910, Ella (French) Howe [1641g] thus refers to 
Captain French : 

" I can only tell you in regard to my father that a nobler, better man 
never lived. He died poor in this world's goods, for he was always help- 
ing others. But any one that saw his coflin borne the length of the street 
on the shoulders of some of his Grand Army comrades and heard the cries 
of the poor of the neighborhood, ' that they had lost their best friend,' 
would have realized that he had treasures laid up above. His motto was 
' Do unto others as you wish to be done by.' " 

Rear Admiral James M. Forsyth, retired, entered the United States Navy 
in the spring of 1861, as Master's Mate. He rose rapidly through junior 
and senior grades, rendering efficient and notable service. He has interesting 
recollections of Captain French, as appear from the following letter, written 
from Nassau, Bahamas, under date of March 4th, 1911 : 

" I knew Capt. James S. French best in the merchant service when he 
was Captain of the brig Calvert of Philada. and I was a common sailor 
under his command. This was in i860. We made two voyages to Sierra 
Leone, coast of Africa. He was a good friend to me, teaching me naviga- 
tion and seamanship and encouraging in me an ambition to rise in the 
merchant service. He was a good man, never rough in his language or 
deportment, showing signs of a good education ; was fond of Shakespeare ami 
Scott, often quoting to me in the long night watches. I was a youngster 
of 18 or 19 and thought him one of the best of men. We drifted apart 
in seafaring life and I volunteered in the Navy for the Civil War and 
found he had done the same. We were never thrown together in the Naval 
service, except once in 1863, when both our ships were under repair at New 
York. At that time I think he was in the Roanoke and I was in the Water 
Witch. After the war he left the sea and was employed at Philadelphia 
Navy Yard, under Commandant 1'endergrast. That is the last I remember 
of him. ... I consider that I owe a good deal 10 the fine training I got 
from Capt. French." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 359 

861— WILLIAM B.FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Uriah, 43; Charles, 

147; Charles C, 393). 

b. 3rd mo. 11th, 1818. 

m. 10th mo. 16th, 1845, in Friends' Meeting, 
Green Plains, Clark County, Ohio, Lydia Love- 
grove Wilson, daughter of Stephen and Hannah 
P. Wilson. 
She b. 5th mo. 4th, 1828. 

1642— LAURA H. FRENCH b. qth mo. 22nd, 1846. 

d. 5th mo. 18th, 1847. 

,643— CHARLES ELLISON FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 16th, 1848. 
m. December 28th, 1885, Abbie R. Waite. 

1644— ALICE FRENCH b. 6th mo. 30th, 1849. 

m. October 16th, 1878, James H. Dutro. 

1645— EMMA B. FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1853. 

m. in Niles, Michigan, George W. Coss ; 
Methodist minister officiating. 

1646— EDWARD WILSON FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 21st, 1856. 

m. 2nd mo. 15th, 1891, Ada Dickey. 

1647— HANNAH MERCY FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 5th, 1858. 

m. November 30th, 1S76, John F. Reid. 

1648— WALLACE L. FRENCH b. 6th mo. 1st, 1864. 

d. 8th mo. 1st, 1867. 

1640— WILLIAM ARTHUR FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 4th, 1869. 

m. August 15th, 1893, in Lockland, Ohio, 
Bertha Glover; Baptist minister officiating. 

1650— HERBERT FRENCH b. 10th mo. 28th, 1872. 

d. 8th mo. 20th, 1881. 



360 GENEALOGY OF THE 

862— LYDIA ANN FRENCH ["homas, 1 ; Charles,8; Uriah. 43; Charles, 

147; Charles C, 393). 

b. 4th mo. "th, 1821, in Waynesville, Warren Co., 

Ohio, 
d. 6th mi). 26th, 1885, in Springboro, Warren Co., 

Ohio. 
m. 5th mo. 29th. 1840, in Friends' Meeting, 

Springboro, Ohio, Parry Lukens, Jr.. son of 

Parry and Mary (Moore) Lukens. 
He b. 10th mo. 18th, 1816, in Philadelphia, 
d. 6th mo. 22nd, 1891. in Springboro, Ohio. 

(The name of Parry Lukens, Jr., was by usage changed to Perry.) 

1651— WILLIAM FRENCH LUKENS 

b. 6th mo. 26th, 1841. 
(1. 7th mo. 23rd, 1841. 

1652— MARY MOORE LUKENS b. 7th mo. 31st, 1843. 

d. 6th mo. nth, 1856. 

1653— ALFRED THOMAS LIKENS 

b. 7th mo. 6th, 1845. 
m. June ;th, 1873, Mary Melita Brandriff. 

1654— EMMA JANE LUKENS 1>. oih mo. 12th. 1847. 

m. December 2;th, 1S07, John A. Langdon. 

1655— PRISCILLA LIKENS b. nth mo. 14th, 1849. 

d. 1st mo. 30th, 1855. 

,656— PERRY LUKENS, 3RD b. 12th mo. 17th, 1S53. 

1657— CHARLES FRENCH LUKENS 

b. 5th mo. 26th, 1858. 

m. August 15th, 1SX3, Anna (I. O'Blennis. 

1658— WILLIAM FRENCH LIKENS 

b. 1st mo. 15th, i860. 

1659— EDWAKD WRIGHT LIKENS 

b. oth mo. 7th, 1862. 

d. August 20th, 1904, in Batson, Texas. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 361 

ANCESTRY OF PARRY LUKENS, JR. 

Jan Lucken — the family name later being changed to Lukens — was one of the thirteen 
pioneer colonists of Germans who settled Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa., in 1683 ; 
whither they had mostly come from Crefeld, a city of the lower Rhine, near the border 

of Holland, lie married in 1683 Mary , probably Kunders, daughter of Thones 

Kunders, who had accompanied him to America. It has also been stated that he married 
Mary, sister of Reynear Tyson, who was likewise one of the company arriving on the 
Concord. Jan Lucken possessed the confidence and esteem of Francis Pastorius, Chris- 
topher Sower and other leading spirits of the time, and took an active part in the govern- 
ment and affairs of the Germantown settlement. He was chosen constable in l6gi, 
burgess in 1693, and sheriff 1694-5. He was also active in Friends' Meeting, being for 
a time overseer; and the members of his family and his descendants for six generations 
were actively identified with Meeting affairs, although prior to settling in Penn's New 
Province of Pennsylvania, like many other of the early Germantown families, Jan 
Lucken's family were Mennonites. About 1705 he bought an estate of 500 acres in 
what became known as Horsham township, Montgomery County, Pa., and in 1720 he 
gave 150 acres of this land to his son Peter. He died in 1744, and his wife in 1742. 
His children were: Elizabeth, Elase (Alice), William, Sarah, John, Mary, Peter, Hannah, 
Mathias, Abraham and Joseph. 

William Lucken, eldest son of Jan and Mary Lucken, was born February 22nd, 1687-8, 
married, 1710, Elizabeth, daughter of Reynear Tyson. They resided in Upper Dublin 
township, and William was for a time overseer of Horsham Meeting. He died in 1739- 
and his widow in 1765, aged 74 years. Their eldest son, William, married, first, 1741, 
Martha Pennington, daughter of Thomas Pennington, by whom he had four children. 
She died in 1750 and in 1751 he married her cousin, Elizabeth Pennington, probably the 
daughter of Daniel Pennington. For this he was severely disciplined by Abington 
Monthly Meeting, but in 1757 he made due acknowledgment and was restored to mem- 
bership. By the second marriage there were five sons. He died in 1803, having resided 
most if not all of his life in Horsham township, on the 100 acre plantation inherited 
from his father. 

Thomas Luckens, fourth son and child of William and Elizabeth (Pennington) 
Luckens, was born February 20th, 1758, and married 12th mo. 6th, 1782, in Horsham 
Meeting, Jane Parry. Their son, Parry Lukens, born 7th mo. cjth, 1785, married, in 

1806, Mary Moore, of Gwynedd Monthly Meeting. On 7th mo. 1st, 1807, Horsham 
Meeting took note of " Parry Lukens marrying out of unity " ; and on 9th mo. 30th, 

1807, he offered his acknowledgment, which the Meeting accepted. Parry and Mary 
(Moore) Lukens had the following children: Jane, born 8th mo. 23rd, 1807; Henry, 
born 3rd mo. 24th, 1809; Thomas, born 10th mo. 6th, 1810; Richard and Harriet, born 
8th mo. 29th, 1812; Priscilla Ann, born nth mo. 27th, 1814; and Parry, Jr., born loth 
mo. 18th, 1816, married 5th mo. 29th, 1840, Lydia Ann French [S62]. 



362 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



Mary Moore, born 1st mo. 7th, 1786, in Lancaster Co., Pa., died in Media, Pa., 1st 
mo. 20th, 1868, was the daughter of Henry Moore, born 1753, and wife, Priscilla Hill 
Jackson. He died 1S29; she died 1821. Henry Moore was the son of Mordecai Moore, 
of London Town, M.I., who married in 1739 Elizabeth Coleman, daughter of Dr. Joseph 
Coleman. Mordecai Moore died in Montgomery Co., Pa., July 31st, 1800; he was the 
second son of Richard Moore, who married in 1709 Margaret Preston, born 1689. 
Richard Moore died in Philadelphia 1734; he was the son of Dr. Mordecai Moore, who 
came to Maryland as the family physician of Lord Baltimore, and whose second wife. 
whom he married in 1704, was Deborah, born in 1682, ninth child of Thomas Lloyd. 
Margaret Preston was the daughter of Samuel Preston, who was born in Pautuxent, 
Md„ 1665, died in Philadelphia, September 10th, 1743. He was a noted member of the 
Provincial Council, treasurer of the Provinces, and Mayor of Philadelphia, October, 171 1. 
to October, 1712. He married in Philadelphia, July 6th, 1688, Rachel Lloyd, born in 
London, Kng., January 20th, 1667, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Jones) Lloyd. 
Thomas Lloyd, eminent in the colonial history of Pennsylvania, was descended from an 
ancient family in Wales, who traced their noble lineage back a thousand years. Their 
great estate, known as " Dolobran," was located in Montgomeryshire. Thomas, born 
February 17th, 1640, in Wales, died in Philadelphia, Pa., September loth, 1694, was the 
third son of Charles, the thirtieth in the line. He became an early convert to Quakerism 
and an intimate friend of William Penn, suffering for his faith, like many others. He 
determined to transplant himself and family to the New World and joined the Pennsyl- 
vania colony, arriving in Philadelphia in the ship America in 1683, a fellow voyager 
with Francis Pastorius, the chief founder of Germantown, with whom he formed a 
pleasant intimacy, they conversing in Latin. Being a man of high character and supe- 
rior attainments, Thomas Lloyd was selected by Penn in 1684 as the first president of 
the Provincial Council, the colonial legislative body, in which he served a number of 
years. He was also named by Penn in 1687, with four others, as Deputy Governor. 
In addition, he held for some time the offices of Commissioner of Property, to sign land 
warrants; Keeper of the Great Seal of the Colony, which was used to certify public- 
documents and commissions; and Master of the Rolls, or registrar of laws and public 
proceedings. His responsibilities and duties were at times burdensome, but he faithfully- 
sought to serve the Proprietor and the people for nine years. He took a paternal interest 
in the welfare of the people, looking after their spiritual as well as material affairs. He 
was very influential with the Quakers and many tributes were paid to his memory. He 
had ten children by his first wife, Mary Jones, whom he married in Shropshire Meeting, 
London, September oil., 101.5. Three of the daughters, namely, Rachel, Hannah, an, I 
Mary, were exceptionally bright, becoming noted in the family history of the colony. 
To these Francis Pastorius dedicated a little volume of poems, commemorative of their 
voyage together a< n>" the great sea. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 363 
\ 

863— ASHER BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407). 

b. 1st mo. 20th, 1795. 
d. 12th mo, 1868. 

m. 4th mo. 14th, 1819, Ruth Wright, daughter of 
Benjamin and Mary (Ridgeway) Wright. 
She b. 3rd mo. 29th, 1800. 
d. 9th mo. 7th, 1886. 

1660— MILTON' BUZBY died young 

1661— NATHAN WRIGHT BUZBY 

b. 8th mo. 20th, 182 1. 
m. 2nd mo. 28th, 1850, Lucy Wright Gaskill. 

1662— BEULAH ANN BUZBY b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1824. 

m. 5th mo. 30th, 1848. Charles Comly Gaskill. 

,663— MARY WRIGHT BUZBY b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1826. 

d. 3rd mo. 31st, 1882. 

864— SAMUEL BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11 ; Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby. 407). 

b. 9th mo. 2nd, 1796. 
d. 3rd mo. 25th, 1861. 

m. 1827, Maria Tatum, daughter of David C. and 
Hepzibah (Rose) Tatum. 
She b. 4th mo. 2nd, 1807. 
d. 2nd mo. 6th. 1884. 

1664— DAYID TATUM BUZBY b. nth mo. 25th, 1827. 

m. 6th mo. 12th, 1849, Mary M. Scott. 

1665— HENRY BUZBY d. 1878. 

1666— ELLA CECELIA BUZBY b. 1st mo. 22nd, 1837, in Wilmington, Del. 

m. 1 2th mo. 7th, 1858, Stephen Kingston 
McCay, son of Alexander and Mary 
(Kingston) McCay. 
He b. 3rd mo. 27th, 1830. in Philadelphia. 

1667— J. FRANK BUZBY b. 1842. 

d. 5th mo. 8th, 1901. 



364 ( ; I : N K A L ( ) G Y OF THE 



865— PATIENCK WOOI.MAN BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary. 11; Thomas 

Buzby, SO; Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 
407). 

b. 7th mo. 20th, 1798, in Salem Co., N. J. 

d. 8th mo. 6th, 1861, in Bridgeton. N. J. 

m. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1820, in Pilesgrove Mo. Meeting, 
Woodstown, N. J., Mark Sheppard, son of 
Thomas and Mary (Thompson) Sheppard. 
He b. 10th mo. 21st, 1798, near Greenwich, Cumber- 
land Co., N.J. 

d. 11th mo. 24th, 1861, in Philadelphia. 

1668— JOSEPH BUZBY SHEPPARD 

b. 8th mo. l6th, 1821. 
m. November o,th, 1847, Frances Maxwell. 

1669— MARY SHEPPARD b. 12th mo. 1st, 1823. 

m. January 13th, 1853, Daniel I'ithian. 

1670— LYDIA SHEPPARD b. nth mo. 1st, 1825. 

111. February 20th, 1850, William Oilman. 

1671— JOHN WOOLMAN SHEPPARD 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1830. 

m. 1854, Georgie L. Sheppard. 

1672— THOMAS SHEPPARD b. 3rd mo. 21st, 1838, in Wilmington, Del. 

d. 10th mo. 4th, 1840. 



866— RACHEL BUZBY (Thomas, 1 ; Mary. 11 ; Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407). 

b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1801. 
d. 1st mo. 29th, 1883. 

m. 1st mo. 7th, 1819, Empson Haines, son of Ben- 
jamin and Elizabeth (Kirliyi Haines. 
He b. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1796. 
d. 9th mo. 27th, 1878. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 365 

1673— EMALINE HAINES b. 1819. 

d. 1893. 
m. Allen Garwood. 



1674— BENJAMIN I!. HAINES b. 4th mo. 5th, 1821. 

d. 10th mo. 7th, 1842. 



1675— BEULAII HAINES 



b. 7th mo. 16th, 1824- 
d. nth mo. 5th, 1827. 



1676— ELIZABETH A. HAINES b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1826. 

d. 10th mo. 29th, 1827. 

1677— ANNABELLA HAINES b. -th mo. 31st. 1827. 

d. 4th mo. 17th, 1828. 

1678— EMPSON K. HAINES b. 5th mo. 10th, 1820. 

d. 6th mo. IQth, 1845. 
m. 5th mo. 12th, 1864. Elizabeth Ivins. 



1679— CHARLOTTE C. HAINES 



b. 6th mo. 17th, 183 1. 
d. 6th mo. 19th, 1845. 



1680— NATHAN HAINES 



b. 12th mo. 31st, 1833. 
m. Sarah Garwood. 



1681— MARY HAINES 



b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1837. 
m. 1st mo. 1st, 1857. Barclay Jones [1355]. 



1682— AMOS W. HAINES 



b. 1st mo. 29th, 1831). 
m. 10th mo. 18th, 1871, Martha Williams. 



1683— JOSEPH II. HAINES 



b. nth mo. 26th, 1842. 
d. 4th mo. 2qth, 1895. 



1683a— CLAYTON HAINES 



b. 1st mo. 29th, 1847. 

m. 1st mo. 7th, 1875, Anna Potts. 



366 GENEALOGY OF THE 






867— AMOS BUZBY (Thomas. 1; Mary, 11; Thomas 'Buzby, 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407). 

b. 10th mo. 24th, 1802. 

d. 10th mo. 20th, 1878, in South Woodstown, N.J. 
m. 2nd mo. 19th, 1829, Sarah Ann Miller, daughter 
of William and Rebecca (White) Miller. 
She b. 9th mo. 4th, 1809. 

d. 2nd mo. 1st. 1888, near Daretown, N. J. 

1683b— EMILV BUZBY b. 1st mo. 14th, 1831. 

m. First, 6th mo. 3rd, 1852. William White, 
m. Second, 9th mo. 15th, 1857, Robert H. 
Dare. 

1083c— EDWARD BUZBY b. nth mo. 1st, 1832. 

m. 3rd mo. 12th, 1S57, Hannah H. Scatter- 
good. 

1683d— ELIZABETH .MILLER BUZBY 

b. 7th mo. 26th, 1834. 

16838— CM AM LESS MIDDLETON BUZBY 

b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1836. 
m. 3rd mo. 12th, i860, Rebecca H. Groff. 

16831— JOSEPH W. BUZBY b. nth mo. 24th, 1837. 

m. 1S72, Jennie DuBois. 

l683g— REBECCA ANN BUZBY b. nth mo. 1st, 1839. 

m. 1872, William Keeper. 

1683I1— CORNELIA A. BUZBY b. 10th mo. 8th. 1S41. 

111. 1867, David D. Sheppard. 

1683!— AMOS Bl ZBY, JR. b. 7th mo. 26th, 1843. 

d. in infancy. 

1683J— WILLIAM II. Bl ZBY b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1845. 

m. 4th mo. 5th, 1880, Elizabeth liurkart. 

1683k— FRANKLIN BUZBY b. 12th mo. 26th, 1846. 

m. qth mo. 15th, 187(1, Ella Woolman. 

1683I— SAM1 I I Bl ZBY b. nth mo. 8th, 1848. 

m. 1878, Linda DuBois. 

William Miller was born 3rd mo. 15th, 1785. 
Rebecca (White) Miller was born 4th mo. 28th, 1786. 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 367 

867b— WILLIAM NORCROSS BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas 

Buzby, 50 ; Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 
407). 

m. 4th mo. 3rd, 1834, Caroline Gibbons, daughter 

of George Washington and Rachel (Naglee) 

Gibbons. 
d. 12th mo. 8th, 1869, near Westville, N. J.; 

buried in Friends' Burying Ground, Woodbury, 

N.J. 
She b. 10th mo. 24th, 1809, in Philadelphia. 

d. 7th mo. 12th, 1891, in Salem, N. J.; buried in 

East View Cemetery, Salem, N. J. 

1683m— ALBERT G. BUZBY b. 1st mo. 25th, 1835. 

m. November 8th, 1865, Mary Broadbent. 

168311— EMMA BUZBY b. nth mo. 14th, 1S36. 

m. December gth, 1874, Quinton Keasbey. 



576— AMOS BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154; Nicholas Buzby, 408). 

b. 9th mo. 30th, 1819. 
d. 4th mo. 11th, 1906, in Rancocas, N. J. 
m. 11th mo. 20th, 1851, Rebecca E. Leeds, 
daughter of Isaac and Rebecca (Moore) Leeds. 
She b. 1819. 

d. 2nd mo. 16th, 1902, in Rancocas, N. J. 

16830— ISAAC L. BUZBY b. 5th mo. 3rd, 1853. 

d. 3rd mo. 5th, 1884. 



1683P— AUGUSTUS C. BUZBY b. 6th mo. 16th, 1854. 

m. September 23rd, 1880, Florence Free. 



l683q— IDA R. BUZBY b. 7th mo. 19th, i860. 



368 GENEALOGY OF THE 



894— RICHARD BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, SO; 

Amos Buzby, 154; Hudson Buzby. 410). 
b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1817. 
d. 12th mo. 15th, 1886. 

m. First, 1848, Miriam E. Middleton, daughter of 
Benjamin and Eliza Middleton. 
She d. 3rd mo. 29th, 1850. 

m. Second, 11th mo. 17th, 1853, Mary Ann Taylor, 
daughter of Thomas and Martha Taylor, of 
Springfield, N. J. 
She d. 12th mo. 2nd, 1864. 

m. Third. 12th mo. 19th. 1866. Deborah Borton. 
daughter of Joseph and Sarah Borton, of Kan- 
cocas, N. J. 

Child of Richard and Miriam (Middleton) Buzby. 

1684— BEN T JAMIN M. Bl'ZBV b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1850. 

d. in infancy. 

Children of Richard and Mary Ann (Taylor) Buzby. 

1685— MIRIAM E. BLZBV b. 4th mo. nth, 1855. 

d. 1st mo. 2nd, 1906. 

m. ;th mo. 28th, 1S74. William M. Winner, 
son of William and Elizabeth Winner. 

1686— MARTHA TAYLOR BUZBY 

b. qth mo. 10th, 1856. 

m. 4th mo. 16th, 1870, Ezra C. Engle. son of 
Ezra and Sara Engle. 

1687— WALTER S. BUZBY b. 1st mo. uth, 1858. 

d. 2nd mo. 5th, 1858. 

1688— ADELAIDE BUZBY b. 6th mo. 27th. 1850. 

m. 5th mo. 15th, 1882, Walter S. Reeve, son 
of Xewbold and Anna Reeve. 

1689— THOMAS TAYLOR BUZBY 

b. 5th mo. 7th, 1861. 

m. 3rd mo. 16th, 1SS7, Elizabeth Lippincott 
Leeds. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 369 

896— REBECCA S. BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; 

Amos Buzby, 154; Hudson Buzby, 410). 

b. 3rd mo. 9th, 1822. 

d. 3rd mo., 1899. 

m. 3rd mo. 10th, 1841, in Rancocas, N. J., Stokes 

Haines, son of Joseph and Hannah Haines, of 

Evesham, N. J. 

1689a— BARCLAY HAINES d. 6th mo. ;th, 1857. 

1690— HANNAH M. HAINES b. 12th mo. 23rd, 1843. 

1691— FRANKLIN HAINES d. nth mo. 8th, 1858. 

1692— RACHEL W. HAINES b. 3rd mo. 21st, 1859. 

898b— ELIAS S. BUZBY (Thomas, 1 ; Mary, 11 ; Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos, 

Buzby, 154; Amos Buzby, Jr., 412). 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1811. 
d. 2nd mo. 17th, 1895. 
m. 4th mo., 1849, Susan Scattergood. 
She b. 1820. 

d. 4th mo., 1865. 

1693— ELIZA SCATTERGOOD BUZBY 

b. 9th mo. 10th. 1850. 

1694— MARY WATSON BUZBY b. 10th mo. 12th, 1852. 

1695— JOSEPHINE BUZBY b. 9th mo., 1854. 

d. 1857. 

1696— HOWARD BUZBY b. 6th mo. 26th, 1855. 

1697— JOSEPH S. BUZBY b. 6th mo. 17th. 1857. 

m. 3rd mo. 16th, 1887, Anna Rebecca Smith. 

1698— MILTON WRIGHT BUZBY 

b. 5th mo. 29th, 1864. 

m. 10th mo. nth, 1893, Idella Haines, daugh- 
ter of Job S. and Ellen B. (Holmes) 
Haines. 



370 GENEALOGY OF THE 

898g— ELLA ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 

27; William, 11! ; John T., 260; John T, 
447b). 

b. March 26th, 1850, in Philadelphia, 
m. September 20th, 1871, Captain Thomas Hand 
Marston, son of William and Catharine (Reh- 
fuss) Marston. 
He b. January 19th, 1844. 

1699— KATE S. MARSTON b. June 22nd, 1872. 

d. February 15th, 1910. 

1700— ELLA I'. MARSTON b. March 2Qth, 1874. 

d. September 28th, 1876. 

1701— J. WILLIAM MARSTON b. April 14th. 1878. 

d. January 29th, 1893. 

1702— SARA II R. MARSTON b. September l6th, 1881. 

Captain Thomas Hand Marston was numbered among that great army of patriotic and 
heroic boys who served the Union cause during the Civil War. At the age of seventeen, 
August 17th, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company F, 82nd Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, being mustered out as captain, four years later. His various promotions 
were all marks of recognition of bravery. Twice, at Chancellorsville and Cold Harbor, 
Va., he seized the flag and rallied his comrades in critical situations. At Cold Harbor, 
though only a sergeant, young Marston was in command of his company at the close of 
that terrible fight. His regiment participated gallantly in a score of leading battles, 
notably Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Malvern, Second Hull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville, Mine Run, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Winchester and 
Cedar Creek. Captain Marston was wounded at Chancellorsville and for many years 
has suffered from illness contracted in the Appomattox campaign. 



898j— ANASTAS1A FRENCH ARMBRUSTER (Thomas, l: Richard, 

5; William, 27; William, 111; John T., 
260; Elizabeth R.. 447c). 

b. April 6th, 1851, in Philadelphia, 
m. May 23rd, 1877, Richard Taylor Phillips, son 
of William H. and Willimina (Taylor) Phillips. 
He b. December 12th, 1849. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 371 



1703-GEORGE BYRON ARMBRUSTER PHILLIPS 

b. March 29th, 1878. 
m. June 30th, 1905, Henrietta Jost. 

1704— PERCY TAYLOR ARMBRUSTER PHILLIPS 

b. March 18th, 1882. 

m. June, 1907, Ethelyn May Shoemaker. 
She b. May 10th, 1884. 

I7 o 5 _RICHARD EUGENE ARMBRUSTER PHILLIPS 

b. November 26th, 1884. 

m. October 17th, 1910, Wilhelmina Mampe. 



89Sm— MARIA LOUISE COOPER (Thomas, 1 ; Richard. 5 ; William, 27; 

William, 111; Mahlon K., 262 ; Maria E., 
478). 
b. August 27th, 1836. 
d. December 24th, 1892. 
m. May 5th, 1855, William G. Wynn. 

1706— EMMA COOPER WYNN b. August 21st, 1856. 

m. February 1st, 1877, Wilford M. Gove- 
He d. September 22nd, 1907. 

1707— WILLIAM FRANCIS WYNN 

b. June 13th, 1858. 

1708— MARGARET COOPER WYNN 

b. August 4th, i860. 

1709— CORA VIRGINIA WYNN b. June 24th, 1874. 



898w— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; William, 27; 

William, 111 ; Mahlon K., 262; William W., 
479). 
b. March 3rd, 1851, in Delaware Co.. Pa. 
m. December 7th, 1871, Virginia R. Alexander, 
daughter of William and Amanda (Margerum) 
Alexander. 



372 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1710— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH, JR. 

b. September 15th, 1874. 

1711— IDA FRENCH b. June 28th, 1876. 

m. April 16th, 1900, Wilson S. Turner. 

1712— HOWARD FRENCH b. July 23rd, 1878. 

m. March 7th, igoo, Mabel Maxwell. 

1713— WALTER FRENCH b. December 16th, 1880. 

m. November 12th, 1904, Elizabeth Keates, 
daughter of William H. and Mary Amelia 
(Townsend) Keates. 
She b. October 6th, 1881, in Linwood, N. J. 

1714— WILBERT A. FRENCH b. October 21st, 1882. 

m. September 6th, 1905, Martha Murray. 

John Taylor French [898W] in 1877 located in Hammonton, N. J., where he carried 
on business, and was postmaster for four years under President Cleveland. In 1900 he 
established a store for the sale of paints, oils, varnishes and painters' supplies in Atlantic 
City, N. J. Director of the Hammonton Trust Co. and president of the Atlantic City 
Realty Co. 



.899— ANNA MARGARETTA STAMBACH, M.D. (Thomas, 1; Richard. 

5; William, 27; William, 111; Mahlon K., 
262; Sarah J., 481). 
b. July 10th, 1838. 
d. April 26th, 1872, in Aiken, S. C. ; buried in 

Odd Fellows' Cemetery, Philadelphia, 
m. June 29th, 1865, in Philadelphia, Rev. Edward 
Ilsley Galvin, son of Thomas P. and Martha 
(Jones) Galvin; Rev. William H. Furness, 
Unitarian minister, performing ceremony. 
He b. April 3rd, 1838, in Calais, Me. 

d. August 21st, 1908, in Belmont, Cal. 

1715— CARROLL DUNHAM GALVIN 

b. April 7th, 1866. 

m. July 24th, 1901, Edna L. Harriett. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 373 



Rev. Edward Ilsley Galvin was a graduate of Harvard Divinity School. His first 
parish was the Unitarian Church at Brookfield, Mass. Later he served the churches at 
Peabody and Brighton, Mass. In 1876 he accepted a call to Walla Walla, Washington 
Territory. His next field of labor was Chicago, as pastor of the Second Unitarian 
Church, and for seventeen years superintendent of the Chicago Athenaeum, which he 
reorganized and efficiently conducted as an educational institution for the poor. Mr. 
Galvin always took an active interest in public affairs. During the Civil War he organ- 
ized a company of volunteers in Brookfield, Mass. He served as second lieutenant of 
Co. F, 42nd Regiment, Mass., one hundred days' men, in the summer of 1864. He also 
acted as chaplain of the regiment, with the rank of captain. After the war he became 
a member of the " Loyal Legion " and took an active interest in the Society. His wife, 
Dr. Anna Margaretta (Stambach) Galvin, graduated in medicine in 1857, and was a 
practicing physician in Philadelphia and Brookfield, Mass., for a number of years. 

903— MAHLON DANIEL STAMBACH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Wil- 
liam, 27; William, 111; Mahlon K., 262; 
Sarah J., 481). 

b. December 10th, 1845. 

m. July 13th, 1881, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Hanna 
Fox, daughter of George and Eliza J. (Price) 
Fox; Revs. A. S. Dudley and L. J. Jones, Pres- 
byterian ministers, officiating. 
She b. March 9th, 1851, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

d. April 1st, 1907, in Pasadena, Cal. 

1716— ELISE STAMBACH b. December 7th, 1888, in Cincinnati, O. 

1717— GEORGE MAHLON STAMBACH 

b. March 25th, 1893, > n Anchorage, Ky. 



907— HENRY LAING STAMBACH, M.D. (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; 

William, 27; William, 111; Mahlon K., 
262; Sarah J., 481). 

b. February 11th, 1857. 

m. June 24th, 1891, in Santa Barbara, Cal., Helen 
Winslow Knight, daughter of Francis H. and 
Elizabeth Holmes (Collamore) Knight; Rev. 
Philip S. Thacher performing ceremony. 
She b. October 23rd, 1867, in Reading, Mass. 



374 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1718— HEXRV LAING STAMBACH, JR. 

b. June 14th, 1842, in Santa Fiarbara, Cal. 

Henry Laing Stambach, M.I)., graduated from Hahnemann Medical College, Phila- 
delphia, March 10th, 1879, and is engaged in general practice in Santa Barbara, Cal. 



908— CARRIE ISABEL STAMBACH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; William, 

27; William, 111; Mahlon K... 262; Sarah 
J.. 481). 
b. June 16th, 1860, in Philadelphia, 
d. February 8th, 1902, in Santa Barbara, Cal. 
m. June 7th, 1887, in Santa Barbara, Cal., Walter 
Hall Nixon, Esq., son of Theodore Adams and 
Susan Van Court (Hall) Nixon; Rev. A. W. 
Jackson performing ceremony. 
W. If. N. b. October 31st, 1S58, in Philadelphia. 

d. March 21st, 1893, in Santa Barbara, Cal. 

1719— WALTER HALL NIXON, JR. 

b. July 20th, 188S, in Santa Barabara, Cal. 

1720— HEXRV STAMBACH NIXON 

b. June 3rd, 1890, in Santa Barbara, Cal. 

1721— ALICE RITTEXHOl'sr: NIXON 

b. March 27th. 1S02, in Santa Barbara, Cal. 

William Hall Xixon was descended from the famous Rittenhouse family of Pennsyl- 
vania colonial days. He inherited brilliant qualities of mind and character, and had his 
career not been terminated in early life, through physical weakness, he would have made 
an honored place for himself in the professional world. As a bright and ambitious lad 
he attracted the attention of Sharp & Alleman, long established attorneys of Philadelphia. 
He entered their office about 1875 and studied law, attending lectures in the Law Depart- 
ment of the Pennsylvania I Diversity. He graduated in June, 1880, and was admitted 
to the bar the same month. He remained with his appreciative preceptors for several 
years, until failing health impelled him to locate at Santa Barbara, Cal. Here he prac- 
ticed law and also entered the newspaper arena, as editor of one of the journals of that 
city. He was popular and influential and his death was widely regretted. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 375 



911— RUTH EWING FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

William, 111; Amos T., 263; Horace, 483). 

b. March 21st, 1843, in Greenwich, N. J. 
m. December 26th, 1874, in Cleveland, Ohio, Ebe- 
nezer P. English, son of William and Phebe 
(Dare) English. 
He b. February 25th, 1828, in Greenwich, N. J. 
d. August 19th, 1907, in Greenwich, N. J. 

1722— HOWARD EWING ENGLISH 

b. March 30th, 1885, in Fairton, N. J. 

913— HANNAH BROOKS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 

27; William, 111; Amos T., 263; Horace, 
483). 
b. November 22nd, 1847, in Greenwich, N. J. 
m. September 24th, 1873, Thomas Edward Bryant, 
son of William and Frances (Wallen) Bryant; 
Rev. Henry E. Thomas, pastor of Greenwich 
Presbyterian Church, performing ceremony. 
T. E. B. b. September 17th, 1843, in Philadelphia, 
d. June 21st, 1910, in Philadelphia. 

1723— FRANK BRYANT b. October 28th, 1874. 

d. September 5th, 1884. 

1724— CHARLOTTE FRENCH BRYANT 

b. February 22nd, 1880. 

m. April 23rd, 1909, Albert W. Wright. 



1725— ALBERT R. BRYANT b. May 12th, 1882. 

m. November 20th, 1906, Georgina Anderson. 



1726— THOMAS EDWARD BRYANT, JR. 

b. June 20th, 1890. 



376 GENEALOGY OF THE 

914— CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; 

William, 27; William, 111; Amos T, 263; 
Horace, 483). 

b. February 21st, 1849, in Greenwich township, 

Cumberland Co., N. J. 
m. December 26th, 1867, in Greenwich. N. J., 
William Brantley Ware, ^son of Isaac S. and 
Sarah (Bacon) Ware; Rev. John S. Stewart, 
Presbyterian minister, performing ceremony. 
W. B. W. b. July 30th, 1846, in Stow Creek township, Cum- 
berland Co., N. J. 

1727— WILBERT RAYMOND WARE 

b. January 8th, 1870. 
.1. July 5th, 1884. 

1728— LIZZIE BACON WARE b. March 2nd, 1872. 

in. February nth, 1903, Oakford F. Pitman. 

1729— SARAH FRANCES WARE 

b. February 17th, 1876. 



915— WILLIAM HORACE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard. 5; William, 

27 j William, 111; Amos 'I'., 263; Horace, 
483). 

b. December 21st, 1850, in Greenwich, N. J. 
m. March 19th, 1888, Ella Carl Woodruff, daughter 
of Enos and Mary F. (Stathem) Woodruff. 
She b. May 14th, 1854, in Greenwich, N. J. 

1730— CHARLES L. FRENCH 1>. January 30th. 1890. 

d. July 16th, 1890. 

1731— MA RY W. FRENCH b. November 23rd, 1893. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 377 

916— EDWIN HARVEY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 

27; William, 111; Amos T., 263; Horace, 
483). 
b. December 18th, 1858, in Greenwich, N. J. 
m. April 14th, 1883, Eva Thomas, daughter of 
John and Angarena (Steelman) Thomas. 
She b. February, 1868, in Greenwich, N. J. 

1732— HORACE FRENCH b. March 23rd, 1884. 

d. September 8th, 1890. 

1/33— GEORGE W. FRENCH b. February 22nd, 1885. 

d. July 19th, 1885. 

1734— JOHN E. FRENCH b. June 12th, 1886. 

m. August, 1905, Rosella Keller. 

1735— MARY E. FRENCH b. April, 1888. 

d. April 14th, 1890. 

918— MARIA SMITH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112; Thomas, 265; Alfred, 486). 
b. 9th mo. 1st, 1833. 

m. First, 10th mo. 5th, 1848, Abram G. Van Neste. 
He d. 12th mo. 7th, 1862, in Alexandria, Va. 

m. Second, 10th mo. 2nd, 1870, Garret V. Wilson. 
m. Third, 9th mo. 11th, 1883, Abram C. Wikoff, 
of Millstone, N. J. 
He d. 2nd mo. 21st, 1895. 

i"36— JOHN ALFRED VAN NESTE 

b. 12th mo. 25th, 1849. 
m. September 1st, 1875, Rachel Croxon Wikoff. 

1737— MARY TABITHA VAN NESTE 

b. 4th mo. 24th, 1852. 

m. November 29th, 1S71. John Howard 
Wilson. 

1738— EMMA ELIZABETH VAN NESTE 

b. 4th mo. 20th, i860, 
m. September 3rd, 1885, Peter Henry Sturr. 

Abram G. Van Neste mustered in as private in Co. E, 30th N. J. Volunteers, Septem- 
ber 17th, 1862, for nine months' service. Died in U. S. Army Hospital, Alexander, Va. 



378 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



919— CORNELIUS VAN N. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; William, 

27; Richard, 112; Thomas. 265; Alfred. 
486). 

b. 6th mo. 8th, 1839. 

m. 3rd mo. 14th, 1860, Ellen Terhune, daughter 
of Garrett and Margaritte Terhune. 

1739— EMMA JANE FRENCH b. I3th mo. iqth, i860. 

d. 6th mo. 12th, 1869. 

1740— CORNELIIS AUGUSTUS FRENCH 

b. nth mo. 26th, 1862. 
d. 8th mo. 4th, 1865. 



1741— ALFRED FRENCH 
1742— MARY E. FRENCH 



b. 7th mo. 15th, 1865. 

m. nth mo. 29th. 1891, Mary P. Sweeny. 

b. 7th mn. 28th, 1868. 

m. 2nd mo. 23rd. 1891, Griffen B. Conklin. 



929— DAVID NIMROD GENGLEN (Thomas, 1; Richard. 5; William. 

27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; Lydia A. 
Van Horn, 491). 

b. 4th mo. 23rd, 1839, in Trenton. N. J. 
m. Ada Barker, of New York. 

1743— DAVID NIMROD GENGLEN, JR. 

died in infancy. 

1744— HENRY GENT; I. EN died in infancy. 



930— MARTHA CLAYPOLE GENGLEN (Thomas, 1 ; Richard. 5; Wil- 
liam, 27; Richard. 112; Charlotte, 266; 
Lydia A. Van Horn, 491). 

b. 1S43, in Trenton. N. J. 
m. Frederick A. Holly, of New York. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 379 



1745— CHARLOTTE E. HOLLY b. 1866. 

m. 6th mo., 1892, Frank Stanbrough, of New 
York. 

1746— GEORGIANA LYDIA HOLLY 

b. 1867. 

m. First, 1887, Frederick Connolly, 
m. Second, John Bannon. 

1747— FREDERICK A. HOLLY, JR. 

b. 1869. 

1748— JESSIE HOLLY died in infancy. 

Children of Charlotte E. Holly [1745] and Frank Stanbrough : 
Dorothy Stanbrough. 
Georgiana Lydia Stanbrough. 
Frank Holly Stanbrough. 

Child of Georgiana Lydia (Holly) Connolly [1746] and John Bannon: 
Helen Georgiana Bannon. 



936— JESSIE ESTELLA ROSE SMITH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Wil- 
liam, 27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; 
Lydia A. Van Horn, 491). 

m. 12th mo. 24th, 1882, Frank Koewing, of New 
York. 

1749— ESTELLA LYDIA KOEWING 

b. 12th mo. 15th, 1885, in Chicago, 111. 

1750— ANITA ROSE KOEWING b. 1st mo. 21st, 1890, in New York. 

1751— JESSIE ETHEL KOEWING 

b. 1st mo. 12th, 1892, in Evanston, III. 

1752— FRANCES MOTT KOEWING 

b. 3rd mo. 20th, 1895. in Orange, N. J. 

1753— MARTHA KOEWING died in infancy. 



380 GENEALOGY OF THE 



937— ANITA LYDIA ROSE SMITH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 

27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; Lydia A. 
Van Horn, 491). 

in. 7th mo. 6th, 1887, Thomas Smith Bassford, of 
New York, son of John Odlin and Rebecca 
Almira Bassford. 

1754— THOMAS SMITH BASSFORD, JR. 

b. Sth mo. 20th, 1888, in New York. 



1755— FREDERICK ROSE BASSFORD 

b. 2nd mo. loth, 1891, in New York. 

1756— ERNEST HALL BASSFORD 

b. nth mo. 6th, 1892, in Brooklyn. 



938— ELIZABETH SCOTT VAN HORN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Wil- 
liam, 27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; 
Lewis H. Van Horn, 492). 

b. December 27th, 1842, in Mercerville, N. J. 
m. June 9th, 1861, Hamilton B. Rulon. 

1757— L1I.LIE EVALINE RULON 

b. March 14th, 1862. 
d. young. 

1758— NORMAN ELLWOOD RULON 

b. October, 1864. 

1759— WALTER HAMILTON RULON 

b. November 1st, 1868. 



-; -FREDERICK AUOUSTUS RULON 

b. March 27th, 1885. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 381 

940— MARY CHARLOTTE VAN HORN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; 

William, 27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; 
Lewis H. Van Horn, 492). 

b. February 2nd, 1845, in New York, 
m. February 2nd, 1865, William Edward Bowne. 

1 761— ANNIE EVALIN BOWNE 

b. August 26th, 1866. 

1762— LEWIS HAMILTON BOWNE 

b. August 27th, 1868. 

1763— NELLIE POULSON BOWNE 

b. March 20th, 1877. 

1764— CHARLOTTE BOWNE b. June 15th, 1882. 

941— SAMUEL MARTIN VAN HORN (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; William, 

27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; Lewis H. 
Van Horn, 492). 
b. February 17th, 1847, in Trenton, N. J. 
m. June 7th, 1869, Jean Colville. 

1765— JESSE VAN HORN d. young. 

1766— EVALINE VAN HORN d. young. 
1767— FRANK VAN HORN b. 1883. 

942—JOHN NUTT VAN HORN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; Lewis H. Van 
Horn, 492). 
b. October 17th, 1848, in Trenton. N. J. 
m. Harriet Quigley. 

1768— LEWIS HAMILTON VAN HORN 

b. September, 1868. 

1769— CHARLES MORTIMER VAN HORN 

b. October, 1871. 



382 GENEALOGY OF THE 

943— WILLIAM DAVIS VAN HORN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 

27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; Lewis H. 
Van Horn, 492). 

b. December 14th, 1850, in Trenton, N. J. 
d. March 27th, 1887. 
m. June 1st, 1875, Elizabeth Firth. 



1770— EVAL1NE SCOTT VAN HORN 

b. 1876. 



1771— WILLIAM DAVIS VAN HORN. JR. 

b. 1879. 



947— WARREN HAMILTON VAN HORN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; 

William, 27; Richard, 112; Charlotte, 266; 
Lewis H. Van Horn, 492). 

b. August 20th, 1864, in Trenton, N. J. 
d. July 14th, 1908. 
m. June, 1904, Mary Stults. 

1772— JEAN KITE VAN HORN b. May 16th, 1905. 



952— EMMA SNYDER FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

Richard, 112; Richard. 269; John S., 49S). 

b. December 28th, 1876. 

m. June 19th, 1901, George Heston Minnick, son 
of George Washington and Annie Elizabeth 
( Mi Cauley) Minnick. 
He b. April 20th, 1871, in Nicetown. Philadelphia. 

•773— ANNA ELIZABETH MINNICK 

b. February 12th, 1903. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 383 



954_FRANCIS FREAS FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; William, 27 ; 

Richard, 112; Richard, 269; Francis E., 
500). 
b. December 20th, 1868. 

m. September 21st, 1892, Mary Hamilton, daughter 
of Robert and Anna Hamilton; Rev. Thomas 
C. Arnold, D.D., of St. Mary's P. E. Church, 
Philadelphia, performing ceremony. 
She b. December 29th, 1866, in Port Deposit, Mary- 
land. 

1774— FRANCIS RAYMOND FRENCH 

b. November "th, 1893. 

1775— ALBERT FRENCH b. August 23rd, 1901. 

962— ARTHUR FILLMORE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jona- 
than, 31; William, 119; Joseph, 273; Lewis 
D., 520). 
b. October 25th, 1852. 
m. December 22nd, 1875, Lavinia Sharp. 

1776— LEWIS N. FRENCH b. February 5th, 1877. 

1777— HORACE L. FRENCH b. May 18th, 18S0. 

1778— ETHEL FRENCH b. March 10th, 1884. 

, 77Q _EMMA FRENCH b. April 18th, 1891. 

964— ANNA MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

William, 119; Joseph, 273; Lewis D., 520). 
b. November 17th, 1857. 
m. October 19th, 1881, John Fuller. 

1780— HARRY FULLER b. June 13th, 1883. 

d. in infancy. 

1781— EDNA FULLER "| b. September 6th, 1885. 

I b. September 6th, 1885. 

1782— HELEN FULLER J d. December 2ist, 1907. 



384 GENEALOGY OF THE 

965— KATHERINE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

William, 119; Joseph, 273; Lewis I)., 520). 

b. July 21st, 1860. 

m. November 18th, 1896, Egbert Griesimere. 

1783— RUTH GORHAM GRIESIMERE 

b. June 26th, 1898. 

1784— EGBERT CAROLYN GRIESIMERE 

b. August 24th, 1900. 



966— ALBERT LEWIS FRENCH (Thomas. 1 ; Richard. 5 ; Jonathan. 31 ; 

William, 119; Joseph. 273; Lewis D., 520). 

b. June 16th, 1862. 

m. November 26th, 1895, Carrie Rogers, daughter 
of Benjamin and Jerusha ( Hollingshead) 
Rogers. 

1785— SARA FRENCH b. September 13th, 1897. 

1786— GERALD COOPER FRENCH 

b. December 12th, 1S99. 

1787— BENJAMIN ROGERS FRENCH 

b. October 4th, 1903. 

1788— ALBERT LEWIS FRENCH. JR. 

b. June 8th. 1906. 
d. in infancy. 



•967— JOSEPH FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 ; William, 

119; Joseph, 273; Lewis D„ 520). 

b. October 20th, 1864. 

m. October 25th, 1901, Myrtle Rice. 

1789— KENNETH FRENCH b. February 15th, 1005. 

1790— VIRGINIA I..WVSON FRENCH 

b. July 4th, 1909. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 385 



968— WALTER S. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

William, 119; Joseph, 273; Lewis D., 520). 

b. November 10th, 1864. 

m. November 13th, 1889, Belzora Baker, daughter 
of Abram C. and Jane (Fairfowl) Baker. 
She b. May 1st, 1866. 

I7QI — JOSEPH RUSSELL FRENCH 

b. May 8th, i8qi. 

1792— GEORGE BAKER FRENCH 

b. March 19th, 1894. 
d. January 21st, 1897. 

i- 93 _WILLIAM DeROCHBRUNE FRENCH 

b. July 15th, 1896. 

1794— WALTER EDWARD FRENCH 

b. July 13th, 1899. 

1795— ESTHER FRENCH b. December 28th, 1901. 

, 79 6— JOHN PRICE COOPER FRENCH 

b. August 15th, 1906. 



969— OLIVE MAY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

William, 119; Joseph, 273; Lewis D., 520). 

b. August 10th, 1868, in Moorestown, N. J. 
m. January 1 lth, 1893, Benjamin Franklin Rogers, 
son of Benjamin and Jerusha (Hollingshead) 
Rogers. 
He b. December 2nd, 1872. 

1797— RALPH ROGERS b. August 6th, 1894. 

1798— MIRIAM ROGERS b. November 8th, 189;. 

1799— ALBERT ROGERS b. May 20th, 1899. 

25 



386 GENEALOGY OF THE 



970— WILLIAM JONES (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 ; Richard, 

120; Mary, 276; John Jones, 522). 

b. October 9th, 1836. 

m. May 10th, 1863, Mary Pearce Wilkins, daughter 
of William and Mary Ann Wilkins. 

1800— CLARA P. JONES b. May 9th, 1864. 

d. September 1 8th, 1804. 

1801— WILLIAM II. JONES b. May 21st, 1865. 

d. July 15th, 1865. 

1802— GEORGE W. JONES b. November 9th, 1868. 

1803— CURTIS JOHN JONES b. November nth, 1873. 

d. January 15th, 1874. 

1804— SAMUEL B. JONES b. August 14th, 1877. 

1805— WALTER A. JONES b. July 28th, 1883. 

d. September 5th, 1883. 



972— HANNAH ANN JONES (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Mary, 276; John Jones, 522). 

b. December 28th, 1839. 

m. February 28th. 1864, Silas C. Cline, son of 
Oeorge and Naomi (Lippincott) Cline; Rev. 
A. Atwood, Methodist minister, performing 
ceremony. 
S. C. C. b. December 26th, 1838, near Marlton, N. J. 

1806— ALHERT J. (LINE b. May 7th, 1865. 

in. November I2th, 1890. Mary V. Doyle. 

1807— FRANK L. CLINE b. July 1st, 1867. 

111. April 8th, 1891, Mary A. Ilurd. 

1808— HOWARD V. CLINE b. December 21st, 1868. 

m. November 25th, 1891, Ida E. Frame. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 387 

1809— LAVINIA CLINE b. December 30th, 1870. 

m. December 2nd, 1892, William C. Hinch- 
man, Jr. 

1810— EMMA CLINE b. February 17th, 1874. 

d. April 5th, 1874. 



973_SAMUEL JONES, 2ND (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 J 

Richard, 120; Mary, 276; John Jones, 522). 

b. May 6th, 1842. 

d. April 7th, 1904, in Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. September 23rd, 1885, Susan Margaret Brandt, 
daughter of Jacob Zimmerly and Elizabeth 
(Fleisher) Brandt. 
She b. October 7th, 1852, in Boyertown, Pa. 

181 1— FLORENCE JONES b. January 10th, 1887. 

1812— WILLIAM H. JONES b. January 1st, 1889. 



984— ELIZABETH BORTON WARRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jona- 
than, 31; Richard, 120; Sarah, 277; Henry 
C. Warrick, 524). 

b. 3rd mo. 5th, 1844. 
d. 1st mo. 13th, 1890. 

m. 2nd mo. 25th, 1869, by Friends' ceremony, Levi 
Lippincott Walton, son of Silas and Mary 
(Lippincott) Walton. 
He b. 2nd mo. 18th, 1845, in Moorestown, N. J. 
d. 3rd mo. 26th, 1880. 

1813— SILAS WALTON b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1870. 

m. 3rd mo. 20th, 1895, Mary Jones, daughter 
of Joseph and Elizabeth Jones. 

1814— DEBORAH B. WALTON b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1871. 

m. 10th mo. 18th, 1894, Henry B. Coles, son 
of Charles B. and Mary (Coleston) Coles. 



388 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1815— HENRY RAYMOND WALTON 

b. 12th mo. igth, 1873. 

1816— AUBREY SPENCER WALTON 

b. 1 2th mo. 4th, 1877. 

m. 2nd mo. 20th, 1901, Mabel Dudley, daugh- 
ter of Charles II. and Sarah B. Dudley. 

1817— LEYI LIPPINCOTT WALTON, JR. 

b. 1st mo. 15th, 1880. 

m. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1904, Anna Kirkbride, 
daughter of Charles P. and Henrietta 
Kirkbride. 

985— WILLIAM HENRY WARRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 

31 j Richard, 120; Sarah, 277; Henry C. 
Warrick, 524). 

b. 9th mo. 25th, 1846. 

d. July 8th, 1898, in Moorestown, N. J. 

m. August 8th, 1867, Margaret A. Hollingshead. 

daughter of Enoch and Rachel (Atkinson) 

Hollingshead. 
She b. March 23rd, 1848, in Moorestown, N. J. 

1818— WILLIAM ROLAND WARRICK 

b. September 27th, 1873. 
m. June 15th, 1903, Marian Deacon. 

1819— HOWARD THOMAS WARRICK 

b. November 22nd, 1877. 

986— RICHARD ANTHONY WARRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Richard. 5; Jona- 
than, 31; Richard, 120; Sarah, 277; Henry 
C. Warrick, 524). 

b. 7th mo. 1st, 1849. 

m. 2nd mo. 13th, 1878, by Friends' ceremony, Mar- 
garet W. Coles, daughter of Mahlon H. and 
Frances (Curtis) Coles. 
She b. 2nd mo. 1st. 1855, in Fellowship, N. J. 

1820— MAHLON HENRY WARRICK 

b. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1879. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 389 

1821— EDWARD MORRIS WARRICK 

b. 9th mo. 26th, 1882. 

1822— RAYMOND COLES WARRICK 

b. 7th mo. 10th, 1884. 
m. January 10th, 1906, Ivey Schmelley. 

987— JOHN BORTON WARRICK (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 

31; Richard, 120; Sarah, 277; Henry C. 
Warrick, 524). 
b. 7th mo. 6th, 1854. 

m. 12th mo. 12th, 1878, by Friends' ceremony, 
Mary A. Hancock, daughter of Joseph and Jane 
F. (Potts) Hancock. 
She b. 9th mo. 25th, 1857, in Springfield township, 
Burlington Co., N. J. 

1823— GEORGE H. WARRICK b. 6th mo. 19th, 1880. 

d. 1st mo. 25th, 1910, in Hartford, N. J. ;■ 

buried in Colestown (N. J.) Cemetery, 
m. 1st mo. 12th, 1904, Caroline Horner Leeds, 
daughter of Harry Howell and Elizabeth 
(Horner) Leeds, of Rancocas, N. J. 

1824— HELEN WARRICK b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1895. 

988— ANNA T. ATKINSON (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 j 

Richard, 120; Sarah, 277; Keziah Warrick,. 
526). 
b. 11th mo. 15th, 1844, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. 3rd mo. 9th, 1865, by Friends' ceremony, 
Thomas James M ounce, son of Peter and Ann 
(Iredell) M ounce. 
He b. 4th mo. 12th, 1833, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. 3rd mo. 12th, 1911 ; buried in Friends' Burying 
Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

1825— LEWIS A. MOUNCE b. 4th mo. 5th, 1866. 

1826— ADA K. MOUNCE b. 10th mo. 20th, 1868. 



390 GE N E A LOGY OF THE 



992— LEWIS ALLEN ATKINSON (Thomas. 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 

31; Richard, 120; Sarah, 277; Keziah War- 
rick, 526). 

b. 1st mo. 7th. L8SS, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. First, March 13th, 1877, Laura Allen Sherwin 
[2418J, daughter of Quincy A. and Anna 
(Cooper) Sherwin. 
She b. September 27th, 1854. 
d. December 13th, 1894. 

m. Second, July 18th, 1896, Delia Kendle, daughter 
of Abram and Harriet (Cardiner) Kendle. 
She h. June 25th. 1869, in Hurffville, N. J. 

1827— EKMA A. ATKINSON. b. .May !.?th, 1878. 

1828— ANNA S. ATKINSON b. August 28th. 1879. 

1839— ALBERT WARRICK ATKINSON 

b. November 2nd. 1SK2. 

1830— HELEN B. ATKINSON b. December 27th, 1884. 

1831— FRANKLIN S. ATKINSON 

b. June 22nd. 1887. 

1832— LEVI \V. ATKINSON b. May 22nd, [89a. 



993— JOSEPH WARRICK ATKINSON (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jona- 
than, 31 ; Richard, 120; Sarah. 277; Keziah 
Warrick. 526). 

1). 9th mo. 19th. 1857, in Mullica Hill. N. J. 
in. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1881. by Friends' ceremony, 
Lillian A. Coles, daughter of Joseph and Eliza- 
beth A. i Moore) Coirs. 
She b. loth mo. 25th, 1856. in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

1833— EDGAR C. ATKINSON b. 2nd mo. 16th, 1885. 

is ;i — ELSIE V. ATKINSON b. loth mo. 171I1. 1887. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 391 



996— ABBIE HUSTON (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonatnan, 31; Richard, 

120; Sarah, 277; Beulah Warrick, 528). 

b. January 20th, 1850. 

d. May 8th, 1896. 

m. June 3rd, 1880, Francis W. Harris; Rev. H. L. 
Duhring, of All Saints' P. E. Church, Phila- 
delphia, performing ceremony. 

1835— LEWIS II. HARRIS b. June 3rd, 1882. 

1836— ELIZABETH WARRICK HARRIS 

b. December 5th, 1883. 
d. November 20th, 1886. 

1837— FRANKLIN H. HARRIS b. December 31st, 1887. 



998— ANNA H. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; Jonathan, 31 ; Richard, 

120; Samuel, 279; Richard B., 529). 

b. August 31st, 1846, in Gibhsboro, N. J. 
m. First, March 28th, 1867, John W. Earl, son of 
Eli and Matilda (Burke) Earl. 
He b. October 1st, 1844, in Centre Grove, N. J. 
d. January 27th, 1905, in Centre Grove, N. J. 
m. Second, November 30th, 1906, Charles W. Tom- 
linson, son of Isaac and Sarah W. (Burton) 
Tomlinson. 
He b. April 14th, 1846, near Clementon, N. J. 

1838— CHARLES F. EARL b. January qth. 1868. 

m. July 25th, 1892, Rachel Taylor. 

1839— LILLIE M. EARL. b. December 12th, 1869. 

d. November 28th, 1874. 

1840— HARRY F. EARL b. April nth, 1876. 

d. September 14th, 1877. 

1841— ELIZABETH E. EARL b. June 5th, 1877. 

m. October 19th, 1895, George B. DeMaris. 



392 GENEALOGY OF THE 

999— SAMUEL J. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Richard B., 
529). 
b. February 20th, 1848, in Gibbsboro, N. J. 
d. April 20th, 1879, in Cedarville, N. J. 
m. 1874, Charlotte Ehvell, daughter of Henry and 
Sarah (Johnson) Ehvell. 

1842— THOMAS T. FRENCH b. October 15th, 1875. 

Enlisted in Navy in 1892 and has not 
since been heard of. 

1843— SAMUEL FRENCH b. February 20th, 1878. 

m. Clara Horner. 



1000— RICHARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Richard B., 
529). 
b. November 19th, 1849. in Gibbsboro, N. J. 
m. November 14th, 1874, Barbara Ehvell, daughter 
(if Henry and Sarah (Johnson) Elvvell. 
She d. July 20th, 1907 ; buried in Fairton, N. J. 

1844— HENRY E. FRENCH b. March 12th, 1877. 

1845— WALTER M. FRENCH b. September 24th, 1879. 

1846— SARAH E. FRENCH b. October 6th, 1880. 

m. Morton R. Fisher. 

1001— JACOB R. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Richard B., 
529). 
b. September 2nd, 1851. in Gibbsboro, N. J. 
d. March 4th. 1904. 

111. Annie M. Cox, daughter of Isaac and Mary 
Ann (Ware) Cox. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 393 

1847— RICHARD B. FRENCH b. August nth, 1876. 

1848— MARY A. FRENCH b. October 14th, 187S. 

1849— WALLACE H. FRENCH b. August 10th, 1881. 

m. 1904, Mae Sheppard. 



1850— J. LINWOOD FRENCH b. January 28th, 1885. 

d. December 31st, 1885. 



1851— PERCY FRENCH b. February 24th, 1887. 

d. May 4th, 1887. 

1852— ISAAC C. FRENCH b. September 26th, 1889. 

1853— J- THORNTON FRENCH b. January 1st, 1901. 



1002— FRANKLIN P. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 j 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Richard B., 
529). 
b. July 13th, 1853, in Gibbsboro, N. J. 
d. November 17th, 1888, in Cedarville, N. J. 
m. 1878, Ida M. Beckett, daughter of Jacob and 
Rachel Beckett. 

1854— FLORA M. FRENCH b. March 4th. 1879. 

m. William Murray. 



1855— CHARLES H. FRENCH b. December 9th, 1S82. 

d. 1899, in Bridgeton, N. J. 

1856— ELIZABETH M. FRENCH 

b. August 21st, 1884. 

m. Robert Brown. 



394 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1004— CHARLES H. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard. 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Richard 13., 
529). 
b. March 6th, 1856. in Gibbsboro, N. J. 
d. March 17th, 1883, in Cedarvilk-, X. J.; buried 

in Centre Grove, N. J. 
m. 1879, Elmyra Newcomb, daughter of Arieck 
Newcomb, of Newport, N. J. 

1857— C. ROSCOE FRENCH b. July 3rd. 1880. 

d. 1892, in Newport, N. J. 

1858— HARRY II. FRENCH b. September 24th, 1881. 

1859— ELLA FRENCH b. April 10th, 1883. 

<1. July 7th. 1883. 



1005— ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Samuel. 279; Richard B., 
529). 
Ii. March 28th, 1858, in Gibbsboro. N. J. 
m. John S. Earl, son of Eli, Jr.. and Matilda 
I Shrppard) Earl. 

i860— MARTHA A. EARL m, A. Roggenburger. 

1861— MORRIS .1. EARL m. Jennie Loose. 



1007— SARAH I-:. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard. 120; Samuel, 279; Richard 1!., 
529). 
b. July 9th. 1S62. in Gibbsboro, N. J. 
(1. January 24th, 1888. in Cedarville, N. J, ; buried 

in Fairton, X. J. 
m. Dallas L. Whitecar, son of Allen and Mary 
Jane (Smith 1 Whitecar. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 395 

1862— LOTTIE L. WHITECAR b. August 10th, 1882. 

d. May 27th, 1883. 

1863— LIZZIE M. WHITECAR b. August 22nd, 1884. 

d. July 1st, 188;. 

1864— ALBERT WHITECAR b. May 6th, 1886. 

d. August 27th, 1886. 

1S65— JONATHAN G. WHITECAR 

b. October 23rd, 1887. 
d. December 27th, 1887. 

1009— MARY M. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 ; Rich- 
ard, 120; Samuel, 279; Richard B., 529). 

b. February 18th, 1866, in Centre Grove, Cum- 
berland Co., N. J. 

d. August 15th, 1886, in Cedarville, N. J.; buried 
in Centre Grove, N. J. 

m. David M. Dufheld, son of Nathan Duffield. 

1866— MELVIN L. DUFFIELD b. June 3rd, 1885. 

d. July 24th, 1885. 

1010— LAURA W. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard. 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard. 120; Samuel, 279; Richard B.. 
529). 
b. February 22nd. 1868, in Fairton, N. J. 
m. September 19th, 1885, Melvin L. Jerrell, son 
of John P. and Sarah E. (Elmer) Jerrell. 
He b. March 25th, 1865, in Fairton. N. J. 

1867— RICHARD B. JERRELL b. November 29th, 1886. 

d. November 8th, 1887. 

1868— JACOB T. JERRELL b. May 2nd. 1888. 

d. May 9th, 1888. 

1869— MARY M. JERRELL b. June 29th, 1889. 

d. June 29th, 1889. 

1870— M. LINWOOD JERRELL b. September 19th, 1891. 



396 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



1871— EMMA F. JERRELL b. May 2nd, 1893. 

1872— D. MORRIS JERRELL b. September 25th, 1895. 



1011— JONATHAN G. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 ; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Richard B., 

529). 
b. June 10th, 1870, in Cedarville, N. J. 
m. November 25th, 1896, Elizabeth M. Kestler, 
daughter of John and Frances (Hoffman) 
Kestler. 
She b. August 27th, 1870, in Washington, D. C. 



1873— JOHN J. FRENCH 



b. December 17th, 



in Cedarville, N. J. 



1874— WILLIAM G. FRENCH b. September 6th, 1899, in Cedarville, N. J. 
1875— MARY E. FRENCH b. September 22nd, 1901 



187b— LIZZIE II. FRENCH 



b. December 7th, 1902, 
d. December 20th, 1902, 



1877— FRANKLIN PIERCE FRENCH 

b. December nth, 1903, 
d. January 23rd, 1904, 



1878— ALICE FRENCH 
1879— LAURA G. FRENCH 



b. October 23rd, 1905, 
b. August 27th, 1907, 



in Philadelphia. 



1013— WILLIAM B. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 j 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Samuel, 533). 

b. December 28th, 1857. 

m. February 23rd, 1898, Pauline C. Ruff, daughter 
of Thomas Ruff. 



1880— SAMUEL HOOKER FRENCH 

b. April 10th, 1902. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 397 



1014— ELIZABETH R. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; Jonathan, 31 ; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Samuel, 533). 

b. October 6th, 1860. 

m. March 20th, 1882, William Hazelton Reeves, 
son of Joshua and Martha (Hazelton) Reeves. 

1881— SAMUEL FRENCH REEVES 

b. December 28th, 1882. 

1882— CLAUDE REEVES b. December 2nd, 1883. 

d. July 29th, 1884. 

1883— GEORGE HAZELTON REEVES 

b. December 7th, 1885. 



1015— ALFRETTA K. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 ; 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Samuel, 533). 

b. March 29th, 1863. 

m. March 16th, 1892, Anthony Woodward Durell, 
son of Edward H. Durell. 

1884— ANTHONY WOODWARD DURELL, JR. 

b. November 21st, 1895. 

1019— HOWARD CRAWFORD SHARP (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jona- 
than, 31; Richard, 120; Keziah, 281; Ada- 
line T. Hillman, 536). 

b. May 22nd, 1858, near Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. August 6th, 1882. in Berlin, N. J., Anna M. 
Kammer, daughter of C. Frederick and Anna 
Mary (Wambsgans) Kammer. 
She b. February 4th, 1865, in Berlin, N. J. 

1885— HELEN ADALINE SHARP 

b. 1883. 



398 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1886— EDNA MARV SHARP b. June 8th, 1884. 

m. October 4th, 1904, Harry Herrmann, son 
of George and Minnie (Schmidt) Herr- 
mann. 
He b. September qth, 1883. 

1887— VIRGINIA RAMMER SHARP 

b. October 16th, 1886. 

1888— MYRTLE II I U.MAX SHARP 

b. March 13th, 1891. 

1880— MARION ALICE SHARP b. September 3rd, 1898. 

1024— WILLIAM H. HANKY (Thomas, 1; Richard. 5; Jonathan, 31; 

Richard, 120; Keziah, 281; Sophia F. Hill- 
man, 537). 

b. February 25th, 1857. 
m. November 23rd. 1879, Ella T. Coates. 
She d. 1904. 

1890— EMMA A. HANEY b. November qth, 1880. 

d. December 18th, 1883. 

1801— VIOLET HANEY b. July 28th. 1887. 

d. October 1st, 1890. 



1025— S.WII II. 11. HANEY (Thomas, 1: Richard. 5; Jonathan. 31; 

Richard. 120; Keziah, 281; Sophia F. Hill- 
man. 537). 

b. July 14th. 1S59. 

m. November 6th, 1889. Anna Heullings. 

1892— ROP.ERT HANEY b. November 20th, 1890. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 399 

1030— CHARLES HENRY LUMMIS (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jona- 
than, 31 ; Richard, 120; Keziah, 281 ; Eliza- 
beth Hillman, 538). 

b. May 4th, 1859, in Camden, N. J. 

d. February 14th, 1895, in Camden, N. J. 

m. May 6th, 1883, in Philadelphia, Ida Shaw, 
daughter of Henry and Amanda (Bateman) 
Shaw. Ceremony by Rev. C. F. Turner, Metho- 
dist minister. 



1893— ETHEL LUMMIS b. April 17th, 1885. 

d. February 29th, 1888. 



1894— EARL ABBETT LUMMIS b. January 13th, 



1895— VERNON LUMMIS b. October 28th, 1894. 

d. January 13th, 1895. 



1032— CHARLES LEVITTE HILLMAN (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5; Jona- 
than, 31 j Richard, 120; Keziah, 281; 
Samuel Hillman, 539). 

b. February 1st, 1859, in Camden. N. J. 
m. January 20th, 1881, in West Philadelphia, 
Christina L. Dunn, daughter of Frederick and 
Annie (Burns) Dunn. Ceremony by Rev. J. 
Richards Boyle, minister of Christ M. E. 
Church, West Philadelphia. 
She b. January 28th, 1863, in New Brunswick, N. J. 



1896— CHARLES SAMUEL HILLMAN 

b. October 14th, 1 88 1. 



400 GENEALOGV OF THE 

1034— WILLIAM WEBB HILLMAN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 

31 j Richard, 120; Keziah, 281; Abel N. 

llillman, 540). 

b. September 10th, 1862, near Haddonfield, N. J. 
d. April 25th, 1900. 

m. September 15th, 1883. in Philadelphia, Eliza- 
beth C. Wood, daughter of Isaac and Cecilia 
(Horter) Wood. 
She b. December 20th, 1865, in Haddonfield, N. J. 



1897— EDITH ANNA HILLMAN 

b. April 26th, 1885. 
d. July 9th, 1885. 



1898— ABEL HORTER HILLMAN 

b. November 3rd, 1891 



1036— ALICE HILLMAN DOBBS (Thomas, 1; Richard. 5; Jonathan, 

31; Richard. 120; Keziah, 281; Ann Hill- 
man, 542). 

b. January 14th, 1870. near Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. September 19th, 1S89, at " Woodfield Farm," 
near Haddonfield, N. J., John Franklin Peak, 
son of John and Amanda (Palmer) Peak. 
Ceremony by Rev. H. A. Greismer, Baptist 
minister. 
J. !•'. P. b. May 14th. 1868, in Camden, N. J. 



1899— HELEN ALICE PEAK b. September 27th, 1890. 

d. November 30th, 1898. 

1900— J. FRANCIS I KIM II PEAK 

b. April 30th, 1902. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 401 



1037— HERBERT KAY DOBBS (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 ; 

Richard, 120; Keziah, 281; Ann Hillman, 

542). 

b. April 14th, 1873, near Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. 4th mo. 17th, 1895, by Friends' ceremony, 
Emily Miller Haines, daughter of Joseph M. 
and Martha (Caum) Haines. 
She b. 5th mo. 4th, 1875, near Mt. Ephraim, N. J. 

1901— HERBERT REUBEN DOBBS 

b. 6th mo. nth, 1S96. 
d. gth mo. 14th, 1807. 

1902— JOSEPH LAWRENCE DOBBS 

b. 7th mo. 12th, 1897. 

1903— REUBEN HILLMAN DOBBS 

b. gth mo. 20th, 1898. 

1904— GEORGE D. STUART DOBBS 

b. 9th mo. 7th, 1900. 

1905— EDITH ANNE DOBBS b. 6th mo. 9th, 1903. 

1906— HERBERT KAY DOBBS, JR. 

b. nth mo. 4th, 1907. 

The farm home of Herbert K. [1037] and Emily (Haines) Dobbs, on Timber Creek, 
near Mount Ephraim, Camden, formerly Gloucester County, N. J., comprises part of a 
noted tract of over 500 acres which was owned in early colonial days by the pioneer. 
John Hugg. In a deed of gift bearing date May 1st, 1689, a portion of this estate was 
conveyed by "John Hugge se r , Carpenter, to John Hugge junir Carpenter and Second 
son to ye sd John Hugge ye older for and in Considderation of ye naturall Loue and 
affection which he hath and bareth to his son ye sd John Hugge ye younger and for 
his Advancement better help support and towards a portion for him, and for divers other 
good Causes and Considerations him ye said John Hugge ye older hereunto espeacially 
moueing Hath Given Granted Bargained sold, etc., unto ye said John Hugge ye younger 
his heirs and Afsigns foreuer ye Just number and quantity of Two Hundred and fiifty 
acres of Land scituate and being within ye County aforesaid, etc. And allsoe that ye 
said John Hugge ye older hath not at any tyme before ye date of these presents com- 
mitted suffered or don any Act matter or thing whatsoeuer whereby or by Reason 



402 GENEALOGY OF THE 

» lit- reof ye said granted Land and premises or any part or parcell thereof is, are, shall 
or may be Charged Burthened or Incumbred by with or in any Title Charge Estate or 
other Incumbrance whatsoeuer or howeuer further or other than ye quitt Rents thereonto 
Ifsuing to James late King of England and his heirs and ye Arrearages thereof if any 
be," etc. In 1718 John Hugg, Jr., conveyed 200 acres of this tract to Jonathan Sell, who 
in 17m conveyed it to William Hampton, who willed it to his son, William Hampton, 
Jr. and he in turn willed it to his wife, Alice, and sons, Thomas and John, in 1775. 
These owners mortgaged it in 1776 to Thomas Redman for the sum of 736 pounds 4 
shillings; and on December 15th, 1783, 168 acres, or the portion of the tract situate in 
(iloucester County, was sold by Thomas Denny, sheriff, for 740 pounds, to Jacob Haines, 
great grandfather of Emily (Haines) Dobbs. Jacob Haines devised this property to 
his son, Abel Haines; and by will dated December 12th, 1832, proved January nth, 
1833, the property was bequeathed by Abel to his son, Jacob, and daughter, Rachel 
Haines. On June 1st, 1853, Joseph, youngest son of Abel Haines, purchased the prop- 
erty from his brother and sister. He died July 15th, 1901; and on February 15th, 1902, 
Herbert K. and Emily (Haines) Dobbs purchased from the executors of Joseph M. 
Haines a considerable portion of the property, and are at present possessed of some 157 
acres of the original grant of John Hugge ye older to John Hugge ye younger, in 16S9. 
This property is attractively located near the ancient settlement of Chew's Landing, and 
is considered one of the most productive farms in the vicinity. The present homestead 
is of brick construction, a portion of which having been built by Abel Haines in 1807. 



1038— SARAH KEZIAH DOHUS (Thomas. 1 ; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 ; 

Richard, 120; Keziah, 281; Ann Hillman. 
542). 
b. July 30th, 1878, near Haddonfield. N. J. 
d. February 1st, 1910; buried in Baptist Ceme- 
tery. Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. October 1st, 1903, at "Woodfield Farm," near 
Haddonfield. N. J., Walter Warren Wayne, son 
of Walter and Emelia ( Schnackenberg) Wayne. 
Ceremony by Rev. Frank A. Smith, pastor of 
the Haddonfield Baptist Church, assisted by 
Kc v. W. W. Cassellierry, pastor of the Haddon- 
field Presbyterian Church. 
W. W. W. 1). March 26th, 1874. in Haddonfield. X. J. 

1907— ANNA EMELIA WAYNE b. June 9th, 1905. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 403 

The Haddonfield Gazette of February 4th, 1910, contained the following: 

" Sarah, the wife of Walter Warren Wayne, of Ellis street, aged 32 
years, died on Tuesday at the home of her mother, on Berlin avenue. The 
deceased suffered but a short time from pneumonia. She was the daughter 
of the late Reuben Dobbs, who died on the 12th of last month. She had 
been staying with her mother since the time of his death and was taken 
sick and died there. She was a very estimable character and was respected 
and esteemed by all who knew her. She is survived by her husband and 
one daughter. Much sympathy is expressed for Mr. Wayne and for the 
Dobbs family, who have been sorely afflicted recently." 



1039— NATHAN E. PERKINS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121; Hannah, 284; Anna Evans, 
554). 
b. July 4th, 1824, in Moorestown, N. J. 
d. July 3rd, 1908, in Maple Shade, N. J. 
m. February 1st, 1848, Sarah R. Williamson, 
daughter of Charles and Sidney Williamson. 
She b. May 4th, 1825, in Wallingford, Pa. 
d. July 11th, 1904, in Maple Shade, N. J. 

1908— CHARLES W. PERKINS, M.D. 

b. November 27th, 1849. 

m. February 24th, 1875, Sarah E. Eckfeldt, 
daughter of Adam C. and Martha A. 
(Campbell) Eckfeldt. 
She b. March 9th, 1853. 

1909— WINFIELD PERKINS b. July 27th, 1851. 

d. May 18th, 1852. 

1910— JOHN H. PERKINS b. December 22nd, 1854. 

m. February 6th, 1879, Almina Keziah Jones, 
daughter of Wilkins and Keziah (Shinn) 
Jones. 

John H. Perkins [1910], member of firm of Barber & Perkins, prominent wholesale 
grocers, located on North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia; established about 1876. 



404 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1043— HANNAH PERKINS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121; Hannah, 284; Anna Evans, 
554). 
b. May loth. 1S34, in Moorestown, N. J. 
d. December 13th, 1908, in Germantown, Phila- 
delphia, 
m. Jonathan Rogers, Jr., son of Jonathan and 
Mary (Peacock) Rogers. Ceremony by Rev. 
Edward D. Fengell, Baptist minister of Moores- 
town, N. J. 
J. R., Jr. b. November 25th, 1823, in Mt. Holly, N. J. 
d. August 28th, 1872, in Mt. Holly, X. J. 

1911— EVA ROGERS I,. July 29th, 1859. 

m. November 26th, 1896. in Camden, N. J.. 
William Edgar Binns, son of William and 
Rachel (Hare) Binns. 

1912-WILBUR ROGERS 1,. March 6th, 1866. 

1044— JOHN PERKINS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Edward. 

121 ; Hannah, 284; Anna Evans, 554). 
b. April 16th, 1S36. 

m. March 2nd, 1858, Christiana Slim, daughter of 
Peter and Mary (Smith) Slim. Ceremony by 
Rev. Edward I). Fengell, Baptist minister of 
Moorestown, N. J. 
She b. June 4th, 1838. 

1913— HENRY CLAY PERKINS 

b. January 24th, 1859. 

m. February loth, 1884, Matilda Paul. 

1914— ELIZABETH BARBER PERKINS 

b. June 1 8th, i860, 
m. June 28th, 1888, Frederick B. I.anning. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 405 

1915— FLORENCE E. PERKINS 

b. June 1st, 1864. 
m. January 31st, 1889, Edward F. Pettit. 

iqi6— ALAMEDA A. PERKINS b. November 3rd, 1867. 

m. July, 1903, Orlando Mitchell. 

1917— EDWARD S. PERKINS b. February roth, 1870. 

m. February ioth, 1896, Clara W. Haines. 



1045— EDWARD WASHINGTON PERKINS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Thomas, 33; Edward, 121; Hannah, 284; 
Anna Evans, 554). 

b. October 10th, 1837, in Moorestown, N. J. 

d. 11th mo. 30th, 1893; buried in Colestown (N. 
J.) Cemetery. 

m. 1st mo. 10th, 1872, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Camden, N. J., Annie H. Dudley, daughter of 
John H. and Hannah Ann (Glover) Dudley. 
She b. 4th mo. 12th, 1844, near Moorestown, N. J. 

1918— MARION DUDLEY PERKINS 

b. ioth mo. 12th, 1873. 
m. April 18th, 1900, Cooper Jessup. 

1919— THOMAS HAINES DUDLEY PERKINS 

b. 6th mo. 20th, 1885. 

m. October 16th, 1909, Alice Roberts Sul- 
livan 

1920— EDWARD RUSSELL PERKINS 

b. 6th mo. 4th, 1890. 

1046— EMELINE PERKINS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121; Hannah, 284; Anna Evans, 
554). 

b. December 29th, 1839, in Moorestown, N. J. 
d. March 24th, 1876, in Trenton, N. J.; buried 
in Baptist Cemetery, Moorestown, N. J. 



406 GENEALOGY OF THE 

m. May 2 1st, 1867, in Wilmington, Del., Isaac 
Cooper, M.D., son of Clark and Miriam (Lip- 
pincott) Cooper. 
He b. about 1845, in Fellowship, N. J. 
d. 1905, in Trenton, N. J. 

1921— CLARK COOPER b. October 28th, 1869, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

m. March 6th, 1806, in Trenton, N. J., Anna 
Wyckoff Scudder. 



1047— CHARLES HENRY PERKINS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 

33; Edward, 121; Hannah, 284; Anna 
Evans, 554). 

b. July 24th, 1843, in Moorestown, N. J. 

d. September 7th, 1890, in Moorestown, N. J.; 
buried in Colestown Cemetery. 

m. February 19th, 1885, in Auburn, N. Y., Mary 
Merritt, daughter of George and Adeline Mer- 
ritt ; Presbyterian minister officiating. 
She b. October 23rd. 1857, in Sherwood, N. V. 

1922— ALTA BARBARA PERKINS 

b. June 17th, 1886. 

1053— ELEANOR BURN WILKINS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 

33; Edward, 121; Joseph, 285; Sarah, 556). 
b. 3rd mo. 7th, 1823. 
d. 3rd mo. 28th, 1875; buried in Colestown (N. 

J.) Cemetery, 
m. 12th mo. 7th, 1842, Isaac Stiles, son of Ben- 
jamin and Martha (Matlack) Stiles. 
He b. 11th mo. 14th, 1818. 

d. 4th mo. 18th. 1871 ; buried in Colestown Ceme- 
tery. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 407 

1923— SAMUEL WILKINS STILES 

b. 10th mo. 29th, 1844. 

1924— SARAH ELIZABETH STILES 

b. gth mo. 8th, 1847. 
d. 1st mo. 17th, 1878. 

1925— MARTHA M. STILES b. 12th mo. 19th, 1849. 

1926— MARY ELEANOR STILES 

b. 10th mo. 24th, 185 1. 

1927— ISAAC STILES, JR. b. 8th mo. nth, 1855. 

1928— JACOB WILKINS STILES 

b. 2nd mo. 17th, 1858. 

1929— GERTRUDE K. STILES b. 6th mo. 7th, 1861. 

1930— HENRY L. STILES b. 12th mo. 17th, 1864. 



1056— SARAH ANNA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas. 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward. 121; Joseph, 285; Edward, 559). 

b. 12th mo. 11th. 1834. in Moorestown. N. J. 

d. 1st mo. 4th, 1909, in Denver, Colo. 

m. 3rd mo. 6th, 1860, by Friends' ceremony, 
Thomas Lippincott Ogden, son of Samuel and 
Martha Davis (Lippincott) Ogden. 
He b. 12th mo. 10th, 1834. near Swedesboro. N. J. 

d. 7th mo. 30th. 1880. near Woodbury, N. J. 

1931— MARY OGDEN b. 12th mo. 3rd, i860. 

m. February 6th, 1883, in Woodbury, N". J., 
Thomas M. Mayer, son of Andrew and 
Mary (MacDonald) Mayer. 
He b. May 20th, 1858, in Philadelphia. 

1932— LIZZIE FRENCH OGDEN 

b. 7th mo. 28th, 1864. 
d. 8th mo. 14th, 1865. 



408 GENEALOGY OF THE 

The Woodbury Constitution of August 4th, 1880, contained the following: 

" Mr. Thomas L. Ogden, President of the Delaware River Railroad, died 
at his residence, Ogden Heights, near Woodbury, July 30th, in the 46th 
year of his age. The cause of his death was internal hemorrhage. His 
funeral on Monday last was largely attended. Interment at Eglington 
Cemetery. Mr. Ogden was widely known as President of the Delaware 
River Railroad Company and the owner of large wood and stone interests. 
Through the ownership of a large amount of bonds of a defaulting con- 
tractor of the road he became its involuntary owner, being its largest credi- 
tor and buying it at the Receiver's sale. He reorganized the company and 
was getting it into good shape when his sudden death ended his activities." 

1060— FERRIS PRICK FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121 ; Joseph, 285; Joseph, 562). 
b. December 21st, 1837, in Philadelphia, 
d. November 6th, 1911, in Philadelphia, 
m. October 20th, 1873, Jennie Scott, daughter of 
Hugh and Jannet (Humphreys) Scott. Cere- 
mony by Rev. W. M. Rice, pastor of Fourth 
Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. 
She b. March ISth, 1848, in Philadelphia. 

1933— NEAL FRANCIS FRENCH 

b. December 2nd, 1874. 
m. November 20th, 1896, Julie Gette. 
She b. November 27th, 1876. 

1069— HEWLINGS MOORE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas. 6 ; Thomas, 

33; Edward, 121 ; Charles H., 296; William 
B., 571). 
b. June 13th, 1853, in Camden, N. J. 
m. April 17th, 1881, in Camden. N. J., Rebecca 
Louisa Souder, of Berlin, N. J.; Methodist 
« eremony. 

1934— WILLIAM n. FRENCH b. February 24th. 1886. 

m. Theodosia liehl. 

I93S— ELIZABETH S. FRENCH b. January 14th. 1890. 

in. June nth, K)o6, Wilbur !■". Matlack. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 409 

1070— HENRY STOKES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 

33; Edward, 121; Charles H., 296; William 
B., 571). 
b. September 5th, 1855, in Camden, N. J. 
m. First, September 25th, 1878, in Camden, N. J., 
Ruth Anne Ayres, daughter of Charles S. and 
Harriet (Braker) Ayres; Baptist ceremony. 
She d. July 4th, 1879. 

m. Second, August 27th, 1891, in Paulsboro, N. J., 
Joanna Denny, daughter of Gideon and Sarah 
J. (Barber) Denny; Methodist ceremony. 

1936— FRANCIS DENNY FRENCH 

b. March 23rd, 1894. 

1072— HANNAH MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 

33; Edward, 121; Charles H.,296; William 
B., 571). 
b. October 19th, 1860, in Camden, N. J. 
m. December 16th, 1886, George Nathan Strong, 
son of Nathan and Cynthia (Fries) Strong; 
Baptist ceremony. 
He b. April 21st, 1864. 

d. November 13th, 1889, in Denver, Colo. 

1937— GEORGE NATHAN STRONG, JR. 

b. April 28th, 1889. 

d. November 5th, 1889, in Camden, N. J. 

1076— MARY ANNA KAIN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Edward, 121; Charles, H., 296; Mary M., 
572). 
m. November 1st, 1870, Joseph Mickle Brick 
[1298], son of Joseph Inskeep and Rebecca 
(Clement) Brick. 
He b. 6th mo. 25th, 1838. 

d. 8th mo. 26th, 1899; buried in Colestown (N. 
J.) Cemetery. 



410 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1938— BENJAMIN KAIN BRICK, M.D. 

m. June, 1902, Edna Unruh. 

1939— EMILY L. BRICK 

1940— FLORENCE T. BRICK m. October 12th, 1899, \V. P. Haines. M.D. 

1941— HELEN REBECCA BRICK 

1084— MARY T. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Uriah, 

122; Uriah, 299; Joshua, 578). 

b. 1st mo. 1st, 1846. 

m. 1st mo. 24th, 1868, George T. Bunnell, son of 
Oscar and Sarah Bunnell. 

1942— LYDIA LUENNA BUNNELL 

b. 1st mo. 26th, 1869. 

m. 10th mo. 16th, 1888, John C. Irvin. 



1087— AMANDA KINSEY (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; Uriah, 

122; Uriah, 299; Ann, 579). 

b. 11th mo. 28th, 1844. 
m. Leander Chilberg. 

1943— HARRY \V. CHILBERG b. 7th mo., 1870. 

cl. 12th mo. 17th, 1890. 

1944— ANNA M. CHILBERG b. 9th mo., 1872. 

d. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1893. 

1945— CHARLES K. CHILBERG 

m. 8th mo. 29th, 1894, Gertrude M. Smith. 

1946— FLORA A. CHILBERG ] 

[■ twins. 
1947— FANNY B. CHILBERG J 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 411 

1139— SIDNEY ANN BONSALL (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Elizabeth, 312; Hannah F. 
Jones, 610). 

b. 6th mo. 23rd, 1843. 

m. 3rd mo. 30th, 1864, Thomas F. Fawcett, son 
of William and Elizabeth (Test) Fawcett. 

I94 8_WILLIAM ELMER FAWCETT 

b. 5th mo. 22nd, 1865. 
m. Caroline S. Lannen. 

1949— EMMA LURETTA FAWCETT 

b. 2nd mo. 3rd, 1867. 

1950— EDWARD CLOUDSLEY FAWCETT 

b. 10th mo. 23rd, 1871. 
m. Sara Hayes. 

1951— HOWARD S. FAWCETT b. 4th mo. 12th, 1877. 

1952— RALPH FERNLEY FAWCETT 

b. 2nd mo. gth, 1880. 

m. Mamie Goddard, daughter of James H. 
and Mary Goddard. 

1953— ESTHER SIDNEY FAWCETT 

b. 9th mo. 23rd, 1882. 

1954— LUTHER T. FAWCETT b. 1st mo. 6th, 1885. 



1140— ROBERT BONSALL (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Elizabeth, 312; Hannah F.Jones, 610). 

b. 5th mo. 25th, 1846. 

m. 4th mo. 25th, 1874, Sarah E. Templin, daughter 
of John and Jane (Stokes) Templin. 

1955— ABBIE H. BONSALL b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1875. 

m. Alva L. Hively. 



412 GENEALOGY OF THE 

, 95 6— JOHN WALTER BONSALL 

b. 12th mo. 20th, 1878. 

'957— EDWARD E. BONSALL b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1880. 

1958— CARRIE BERTHA BONSALL 

b. 2nd mo. 5th, 1887. 



1141— JOSEPH E. BONSALL (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Elizabeth, 312; Hannah F. 
Jones, 610). 

b. 6th mo. 22nd. 1848. 

m. 2nd mo. 17th, 1870, Inez M. Taylor, daughter 
of Washington D. and Lucinda (Adams) 
Taylor, 

1950— LEROY T. BONSALL b. 1st mo. 5th, 1871. 

m. 4th mo. 26th, 1893, Elizabeth A. Goddard. 

i960— ARTHUR A. BONSALL b. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1877. 

.1. 5th mo. 18th, 1886. 

1961— ELLA C. BONSALL b 1st mo. 7th, 1879. 

m. Lee R. Chamberlain. 



1143— UNITY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6: Robert. 35; Thomas, 

129; James, 313; William R., 611). 

b. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1825, in Damascus, Columbiana 
Co., ( )bio. 

d. 11th mo. 19th. 1905, in Grayford. Jennings 
Co., Indiana. 

m. 5th mo. 1st. 1845. in Friends' Meeting, Da- 
mascus. Ohio, Samuel Woolman, son of Samuel 
and Rebecca (White) Woolman. \ 
He b. 8th mo. 1 7th. 1814, in Damascus, Ohio. 

d. 6th mo. 5th. 1868, near Butlerville. Indiana. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 413 



1962— THOMAS T. WOOLMAN b. 5th mo. 31st, 1846. 

m. 10th mo. 31st, 1878, Susan Shepard. 

1963— JUDITH ANN WOOLMAN 

b. 4th mo. 8th, 1848. 

m. May 14th, 1868, Nathan Phillips. 

1964— MARIETTA WOOLMAN b. 3rd mo. 16th, 1850. 

m. June 29th, 1869, Simeon A. Tanner. 

1965— B. FRANKLIN WOOLMAN 

b. 2nd mo. 15th, 1853. 
d. 7th mo. 15 th, 1879. 

1966— OBADIAH F. WOOLMAN 

b. 9th mo. 1st, 1855. 
m. 12th mo. 24th, 1878, Jennie Christy. 

1967— WILLIAM JOEL WOOLMAN 

b. nth mo. 20th, 1857. 
m. January 3rd, 1886, Sarah A. Johnson. 

1968— REBECCA JANE WOOLMAN 

b. 6th mo. 12th, i860, 
m. 12th mo. 25th, 1879, Elmer Everet Bland. 

1969— JOHN CHARLES WOOLMAN 

b. 4th mo. 17th, 1863. 
m. February 7th, 1886, Theresa G. Miller. 

1144— MARY CREW FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R.,611). 

b. 10th mo. 16th, 1826, in Columbiana Co., Ohio. 
d. January 3rd, 1908, in Wichita, Kansas. 
m. First, 6th mo. 3rd, 1847, in Shenango, Pa., 
\ Andrew Jobes, son of Louis and Ann (Dunlap) 
Jobes. 
He b. 8th mo. 25th, 1825, in Washington Co., Pa. 
d. 6th mo. 21st, 1857, in Damascus, Ohio, 
m. Second, October 3rd, 1867, in Damascus, Ohio, 
Phineas Cooper; Rev. John Storer officiating. 
He b. August 12th, 1824, in Chester Co., Pa. 



414 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1970— WILLIAM FRENCH JOBES 

b. 4th mo. 14th, 1849. 
m. April 29th, 1875, Sarah T. Stanley. 

1971— LEANNA JOBES b. 4th mo. 14th, 1851. 

• : 3rd mo. 1 jili, 1854. 

1972— CHARLES Sl'MNER JOBES 

b. 4th mo. 23rd, 1853. 
m. December 30th, 1875, Alma G. Taylor. 

1973— ALICE ANN JOBES b. 12th mo. 2nd, 1854. 

m. December 30th, 1874, Isaiah N. Sample. 

1974— ANDREW COOK JOBES b. 4th mo. 21st, 1857. 

m. June 22nd. 1881, Florence Coleman. 

Children of Mary C. (French) Jobes and Phineas Cooper: 

1975— JOSEPH R. COOPER b. August 19th, 1868. 

1976— MARY EVELYN COOPER 

b. February 20th, 1870. 
m. July 15th, 1892, John L. Williams. 
He b. August 20th, 1868. 

1145— ESTHER FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; James, 313; William R., 611). 

b. 7th mo. 2nd, 1828, in Damascus, Ohio. 

d. 1 lth mo. 3rd, 1892, in Defiance, Ohio. 

m. First, 6th mo. 3rd, 1846, Joseph Crew, son of 
Jacob and Rachel Crew. 
He b. 10th mo. 19th. 1819. 

d. 5th mo. 17th, 1847. 

m. Second, 3rd mo. 10th, 1855, Daniel P. Strawn, 
son of Abel and Hannah (Spencer) Strawn. 
He b. 2nd mo. 6th, 1827, in Salem, Ohio. 

d. 11th mo. 14th, 1891, in Salem, Ohio. 

1977— JOSEPH LEANDER CREW 

b. nth mo. 3rd, 1847. 
d. 12th mo. 24th, 1848. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 415 

Children of Esther (French) Crew and Daniel P. Strawn : 

1978— ALFRED ISAIAH STRAWN 

b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1856. 
m. 5th mo. 27th, 1882, Eliza Jane Phillips. 

1979— LYCURGUS WILLIAM STRAWN 

b. 1st mo. nth, 1859. 

m. First, October 10th, 1883, Emma F. Eng- 
land, 
m. Second, July 27th, 1904, Maud M. Sprouse. 

1980— BYRON ABEL STRAWN b. 1st mo. nth, 1859. 

m. November 24th, 1886, Lydia A. Cooper. 

1981— WINFIELD SCOTT STRAWN 

b. 7th mo. 19th, 1861. 
m. July 2nd, 1885, Florence M. Entrikin. 

1982— OMER CREW STRAWN b. 9th mo. 23rd, 1866. 

m. October 22nd, 1890, Ella Crane. 

1146— CHARLES FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; James, 313; William R., 611). 

b. 9th mo. 21st, 1830. 

m. 7th mo. 10th, 1852, Elizabeth McCartney. 
She b. 4th mo. 26th, 1831. 

1983— MARY FRENCH b. 5th mo. 15th, 1853. 

d. 8th mo. 10th, 185S. 

1984— FRANK FRENCH b. 1st mo. iSth, 1855. 

d. 8th mo. 25th, 1858. 

1985— ADELLIA FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 15th, 1857. 

m. George Clark. 

1986— JULIA FRENCH b. tst mo. iSth, i860. 

m. James Messick. 

1987— JOSEPH QUINN FRENCH 

b. oth mo. 14th, 1S64. 
d. 10th mo. 19th, 1873. 

1988— WILLIAM R. FRENCH b. 4th mo. 26th, 1871. 



416 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1147— JOHN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; James, 313; William R„ 611). 

b. 7th mo. 4th, 1832. 
d. 12th mo. 6th, 1893, of apoplexy. 
m. First, 2nd mo. 9th, 1855. Harriet H. Conner. 
She b. 8th mo. 7th, 1827. 
d. 2nd mo. 17th, 1881. 
m. Second, 5th mo., 1882. Emily Conner. 

1989— LENA FRENCH 1>. 12th mo. ioth, 1855. 

m. 7th mo. 27th, 1S7O, Rev. A. W. Wood. 

1990— WILLIAM I. FRENCH I.. ,;rcl mo. 7th, 1858. 

111. 6th mo. 19th. 1881, Flora A. Thayer. 

1991— CARRA BELL FRENCH t>. 6th mo. 5th, i860. 

1992— JESSIE FREMONT FRENCH 

b. -th mo. lSth, 1863. 

1993— LUELLA FRENCH b. nth mo. 14th, 186;. 

m. ioth mo. ;th, 1886, II. E. Hawkins. 



1148— OBADIAH CREW FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert,35; 

Thomas. 129: James. 313: William R., 611). 

b. 10th mo. 5th, 1834. in Damascus. Ohio. 

d. May 25th, 1910, in Temple, Comanche Co., 

( >klahoma. 
m. May 1st. 1856, in Ravenna. Portage Co., Ohio, 

Mary Cany Fowler, daughter of Daniel and 

Hannah (Carey) Fouler. 
She b. March 29th, 1837. in Atwater, I'ortage Co., 

Ohio, 
d. November 18th, 1899. in Hayden. Routt Co., 

Col. 

1994— ISADORE FRENCH b. February 6th, 1S57. 

m. May 15th, 1S7S. Samuel A. Jones. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 417 

1995— FRANK D. FRENCH b. July 6th, 1858. 

1996— ANNA M. FRENCH b. January 29th, i860. 

d. February 15th, 1865. 

I997 _ALVAN G. FRENCH b. November 10th, 1869. 

m. June 10th, 1892, Lillian Mathewson. 

Upon the death of Obadiah Crew French the Temple, Oklahoma, Tribune issued the 
following tribute : 

" The late Colonel Obadiah C. French, of this city, one of the founders 
of the town, has led an eventful life in several states, having been an active 
leader in whatever community he had located as a citizen. He was born 
in Columbiana County, Ohio, of Quaker parentage, and educated himself 
at schools under charge of that society. He engaged in farming until 
August, 1862, when he enlisted in the 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and 
served with that regiment for fifteen months, when he was transferred to 
Battery E, 1st Tennessee Light Artillery, and served two years, a portion 
of which time he was private secretary to Andrew Johnson, while military 
governor of Tennessee. He went to Natchez, Miss., in 1868, in the civil 
service of the government, and later engaged in contracting. For some 
time he was connected with the Mississippi Central Railroad — afterward 
made a part of the Illinois Central system. He was elected to the legisla- 
ture in 1870 and again in 1872 and 1874. He was a member of the Na- 
tional Republican Executive Committee from 1872 to 1876, and a delegate 
to the convention in 1872 when General Grant received his second nomi- 
nation for the presidency. He served as secretary of the State Republican 
Committee for two years and chairman for two years. He was appointed 
United States Centennial Commissioner from Mississippi, and served as 
chairman of the committee on tariff and transportation from the organiza- 
tion to the close of the same. He moved to Colorado in 1879 and engaged 
in farming and stock raising, when soon after he was made chief enrolling 
clerk of the Colorado senate. [World's Fair Commissioner from Colorado, 
1893.] In 1900 Mr. French came to Oklahoma and was appointed U. S. 
Court Commissioner at Cherokee, which position he held for one year. He 
served as secretary of the Oklahoma Live Stock Commission under the 
administration of Governor Jenkins and a portion of the term of Governor 
Ferguson. In 1902 the Colonel located in this county and was one of three 
that opened the site upon which to-day stands one of the best little cities 
in the State. In the fall of the same year his friends insisted that he make 
the race for the State senate against T. P. Gore, the present United States 
senator from this State, and although defeated in this race, he made a 
strong fight. He has been a prominent figure in Comanche County politics 
since the organization of the county, and in his death our city loses one of 
its most enterprising and best citizens." 
27 



418 GENEALOGY OF THE 

I he I04ih Ohio Regiment was mustered in August 30th, 1862, for three years. During 
the ensuing fifteen months it served in Kentucky and east Tennessee enduring many, 
hardships in the mountainous country and cooperating with the Unionists of that section. 
The 1st Tennessee Light Artillery was one of the organizations largely officered by 
experienced men in the northern army. Sergeant French was thus transferred and com- 
missioned lieutenant in Battery E in October, 1863. In the summer of 1864 he was 
assigned to the staff of General Alvan C. Gillem and served most acceptably. He was 
specially mentioned in official reports for gallant and efficient conduct in the engagements 
at Bull's Gap and Henderson, Tenn., in September, 1864. 



1149— ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611). 

b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1837, in Damascus, Ohio. 

m. 8th mo. 31st, 1854, in Upper Springfield Meet- 
ing, Damascus, Ohio, Josiah Christian RatclifT, 
son of Josiah and Mary (Hall) Ratcliff. 
He b. 7th mo. 7th, 1833, in Harrisburg, Ohio. 

d. 2nd mo. 17th, 1898, in Stratton, Nebraska. 

1998— HIRFORD RATCLIFF b. 7th mo. 2qth, 1855. 

m. March 7th, 1889, Mary Rook. 

1999— EMMOR CREW RATCLIFF 

b. 5th mo. 14th, 1857. 
m. September 26th, 1882, Alice Smith. 

2000— WILLIAM ROGERS RATCLIFF 

b. 5th mo. 4th, 1859. 
m. First, November 27th, 1886, Dora M. 

Huntington, 
m. Second, December 27th, i8q4, Cora E. 

Bailey. 

2001— MARY JUDITH RATCLIFF 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1861. 
m. October 15th, 1884, Scott A. Wilson. 

2002— ALICE ANN RATCLIFF b. nth mo. 7th, 1862. 

m. October i?th, 1884, Harry Cundall. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 419 

2003— ROBERT CHRISTIAN RATCLIFF 

b. 5th mo. 14th, 1864. 
d. 6th mo. 10th, 1872. 

2004— ELIZABETH RATCLIFF b. nth mo. 2ist, 1865. 

m. May 25th, 1899, John M. Kellogg. 

2005— MARGARET RATCLIFF b. 1st mo. 15th, 1868. 

d. 4th mo. 20th, 1889. 
m. 12th mo. 25th, 1886, Lincoln Ream. 

2006— EDGAR BYRON RATCLIFF 

b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1871. 
m. July 1st, 1898, Rose Bloom. 

2007— FLORENCE RATCLIFF b. 5th mo. 24th, 1872. 

d. loth mo. 22nd, 1872. 

2008— WALTER SCOTT RATCLIFF 

b. 7th mo. 17th, 1873. 
m. June 27th, 1900, Emma L. Ragen. 

2009— E. PEARL RATCLIFF b. 9th mo. 28th, 1876. 

m. September 24th, 1897, Allen F. Strayer. 



1150— ANNA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; James, 313; William R., 611). 

b. 11th mo. 9th, 1839, in Damascus, Ohio, 
m. First, 6th mo. 1st, 1859, in Damascus, Ohio, by 
Friends' ceremony, Ezra Coppock, son of Jere- 
miah and Hannah Lavinia (Brown) Coppock. 
He b. 6th mo. 24th, 1834, in Winona, Ohio, 
d. 8th mo. 14th, 1866, in Damascus, Ohio, 
m. Second, June 22nd, 1875, in New Lisbon, Ohio, 
Robert C. Taggart, son of James C. and Alice 
(Brown) Taggart. 
He b. 3rd mo. 17th, 1834, in East Palestine, Ohio. 

Superintendent of Government Mill at Dalton, 
Massachusetts. 



420 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2010— HAWAII LAVINIA COPPOCK 

b. 2nd mo. 14th, 1S02, in Salem, O. 
m. June 28th, 1893, in Chicago, 111., John 
Bachop Gilfillan, son of Robert and Janet 
(Bachop) Giliillan; Rev. Pleasant Hunter, 
D.D., pastor of the Westminster Presby- 
terian Church, Minneapolis, Minn., per- 
forming ceremony. 
J. B. G. b. February nth, 1835, in Barnet, Vt. 

2010a— MARY IRENE COPPOCK 

b. -th mo. 7th, 1865. 
d. 5th mo. 1st, 1866. 

Ezra Coppock attended school at Damascus Academy, Ohio, and later at Hiram College 
under James A. Garfield. He studied law and graduated at the law school in Cleveland, 
Ohio. Went into the army as captain of Company G, 104th Regiment of Ohio Volun- 
teers ; his health was broken by exposure. Upon his return from the army he was elected 
clerk of the Court of Columbiana County, Ohio; and although too ill to attend to the 
duties of the office, was elected to a second term, dying almost at its commencement. 
He was a man of unusual gifts. 

John Bachop Giliillan, born in Barnet, Caledonia County, Vermont, is of Scotch 
ancestry. He received his education in public schools, the Caledonia County Academy, 
and various law offices, being admitted to the bar in i860, since which time he has been 
a practicing attorney. From 1862 to 1866 he was city attorney of St. Anthony, Minne- 
sota; and attorney for the county of Hennepin, Minnesota, 1863 to 1867, and 1869 to 
1873. Member of the Board of Education from i860 to 1868, member of the Minnesota 
State Senate from 1875 to 1885, member of the Board of Regents of the University of 
.Minnesota from 1S81 to 1889, member of United States Congress from 1885 to 1887. In 
1894 he became director of the First National Bank of Minneapolis, and for two years, 
1903-1905, president of the same; since that time, and at present, chairman of the board 
of directors. 

1151— JUDITH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35j Thomas, 

129; James, 313; William R., 611). 
b. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1842, in Damascus, Ohio. 
d. December 18th, 1907. in Wichita, Kansas. 
m. March 19th, 1868, Joshua Woodward. 
He b. August 27th, 1836, in West Chester. Pa. 
d. December 18th. 1890, in Carbondale, Col. 

2011— ELIZAB1 111 M1I.I.ER WOODWARD 

b. January 16th, 1869. 
m. May 20th. [Sun, Herbert K. Hammond. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 421 



2012— WILLIAM R. FRENCH WOODWARD 

b. January 16th, 1871, in Damascus, O. 
d. April 6th, 1874, in Fort Collins, Col. 

2013— BABY WOODWARD b. December 15th, 1873. 

d. March 14th, 1874, in Fort Collins, Col. 

2014— EZRA CLAUDE WOODWARD 

b. November 3rd, 1875, in Fort Collins, Col. 

2015— GRACE PETRAS WOODWARD 

b. January 14th, 1879. 
m. September 15th, 10.06, Don Leon Adams. 

2016— JAY J. WOODWARD b. July 23rd, 1881, in Gunnison, Col. 

m. August 29th, 1908, in Los Angeles, Cal., 
Ruby Reese Martin, daughter of Robert 
William and Sarah Augusta (Laughlin) 
Martin. 
■She b. August nth, 1883, in Paris, Texas. 

1152— WILLIAM JAMES FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R.,611). 

b. 1st mo. 6th, 1847, in Columbiana County, Ohio. 
m. First, February 27th, 1868, in Damascus, Ohio, 
Mary Jayne Taylor, daughter of Milton and 
Lavinia (Lambert) Taylor. 
She b. August 8th, 1849, in Damascus, Ohio. 

m. Second, March 7th, 1900, in Alva, Woods Co., 
< )klahoma, Elizabeth Edwards, daughter of 
Nicholas N. and Annie (Hodge) Edwards. 
She b. April 21st, 1879, in Milan, Missouri. 

2017— ANNA MAY FRENCH b. January 14th, 1S69. 

d. March 8th, 1869. 

2018— WILLIAM OBADIAH FRENCH 

b. December 17th, 1869. 

Child of William J. and Elizabeth (Edwards) French: 

2019— CHARLES EDWARDS FRENCH 

b. August -th, 1903, in Alva, Okla. 



422 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1155— CHARLES GIFFORD FRENCH (Thomas. 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; James, 615). 

b. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1845, in Rancocas, N. J. 
d. August 4th, 1899, in Howard. Montana, 
m. June 28th, 1882, in Stillwater Minnesota, Mary 
E. Currie, daughter of James and Mary Ann 
(Buckley) Currie; Catholic ceremony. 
She b. February 4th, 1853, in St. Louis, New Bruns- 
wick, Canada. 

2020— MAYME FRENCH b. October ioth, 1883. 

2021— GERTRUDE FRENCH b. September 25th, 1887. 

2022— ANNA FRENCH b. June 21st, 1889. 

1157— IMOGENE LUCILLA FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; James, 615). 

b. 5th mo. 14th, 1850. 

d. February 11th, 1881; buried in Baptist Ceme- 
tery, Medford, N. J. 

m. November 28th, 1869, Jonathan H. Troth, son 
of William and Frances E. (Haines) Troth. 
He b. May 21st, 1841. 

d. November 8th, 1877; buried in Baptist Ceme- 
tery, Medford, N. J. 

2023— MARY ANNA TROTH d. in infancy. 

2024— CHARLES TROTH 

2025— LILLIAN IMOGENE TROTH 

b. April 12th, 1876. 

Jonathan H. Troth, September 4, 1862, enlisted in Co. C, 12th Regiment N. J. Vols., 
U. S. A., for three years. His regiment was engaged in thirty battles, from Chancellors- 
ville to Appomattox. He was terribly wounded in the left arm at Spottsylvania, Va., in 
May, 1864, suffering three amputations of the shattered limb. After prolonged illness 
he was honorably discharged while in the I'nited States Army hospital at Beverly, N. J., 
March 22, 1865. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 423 

1159— MERIBAH MORRIS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35 ; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618). 

b. 12th mo. 13th, 1823. 

m. 1842, George C. Baldwin. 

2026— MERRICK L. BALDWIN b. 5th mo. 21st, 1843. 

d. 5th mo. 31st, 1862. 

2027— ESTHER B. BALDWIN" b. 7th mo. 14th, 1844. 

m. 10th mo. 17th, 1861, Frederick Berck- 
heimer. 

2028— HANNAH M. BALDWIN b. 5th mo. 20th, 1846. 

m. 4th mo. 30th, 1868, Survantus B. Kerr. 

2029— SARAH BALDWIN b. 12th mo. 4th, 1848. 

m. 1st mo. 28th, 1876, John E. Phillips. 

2030— ANN BALDWIN b. 12th mo. 4th, 1848. 

d. 8th mo. 13th, 1861. 

2031— JAMES B. BALDWIN b. qth mo. 20th, 1850. 

d. 5th mo. 13th, 1857. 

2032— MARY ELIZA BALDWIN b. 6th mo. 5th, 1853. 

m. qth mo. 5th, 1872, Walter T. McCanney. 

1161— JAMES B. MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618). 

b. 6th mo. 1st, 1826. 

d. 9th mo. 19th, 1863, battle of Chickamauga, 

Tennessee, 
m. 9th mo. 3rd, 1846, Nancy Kirkbride. 

2033— SARAH ELLEN MORRIS b. Qth mo. nth, 1847. 

m. 10th mo. nth, 1867, Isaac Beight. 

2034— THOMAS FRANKLIN MORRIS 

b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1849. 
m. 8th mo., 1872, Florence Clark. 

2035— JOHN LEWIS MORRIS b. nth mo. 15th, 1850. 

m. nth mo. 15th, 1873, Hannah Shinn. 



424 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2036— CALVIN BYRON MORRIS 

b. 4th mo. 21st, 1855. 
d. 3rd mo. 10th, 1856. 

2037— MARION ADALINK MORRIS 

b. 3rd mo. 1 5th, 1857. 
m. 6th mo. 20th, 1874, James Milhouse. 

1162— JOHN \V. MORRIS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert. 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618). 

1). 6th mo. 1st, 1826. 

m. First, 6th mo. 3rd, 1847. Mary Kirkbride. 
She d. 7th mo. 24th, 1858. 

m. Second, 10th mo. 13th, 1859, Rebecca Mor- 
rough. 
She d. 1st mo. 8th, 1876. 

m. Third, 2nd mo. 1st, 1877, Mary N. Barber. 

2038— FERDINAND K. MORRIS 

b. 8th mo. 9th, 1848. 
m. 1866, Nancy Spencer. 

2039— JAMES E. MORRIS b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1854. 

d. 7th mo. nth, 1854. 

(Three sons born anil died young; unnamed.) 

Children of John W. and Rebecca (Morrough) Morris: 

2040— ELI N. MORRIS b. 9th mo. 19th, i860. 

m. nth mo. 10th, 1880, Syrenna Johnson. 

2041— MARY ELIZA MORRIS b. nth mo. tqth, 1863. 

m. 2nd mo., l8qo, Amos C. Silver. 

2042— SMITH V. MORRIS b. 12th mo. 23rd, 1869. 

m. iith ran. null, 1891, Matilda GiddingS. 

2043— Ll/CY J. MORRIS b. 12th mo. 4th, 1875. 

Child of John W. and Mary N. (Barber) Morris: 

2044— LYDIA ANN MORRIS b. 9th mo. iSth, 1880. 

d. 3rd mo. 20th, 1881. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



425 



1163— THOMAS F. MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618). 

b. 9th mo. 22nd, 1828. 

d. 11th mo. 25th, 1864. 

m. 6th mo. 26th, 1853, Martha Harris. 



2045— ALVARADA MORRIS 
2046— LOZON MORRIS 
2047— LEONIDAS MORRIS 



b. 4th mo. nth, 1854. 
m. nth mo. 26th, 1874, Angelina Cole. 

b. 1st mo. 23rd, 1856. 
m. 7th mo. 3rd, 1878, Catharine Myers. 

b. nth mo. 6th, 1857. 
m. 10th mo. 3rd, 1878, Mary Myers. 



2048— VARRILLUS MORRIS b. 4th mo. 4th, 1861. 

111. 4th mo. 7th, 1881, Jane Harman. 

2049— COMMODORE MORRIS b. 1863. 

m. 1st mo. 1st, 1889, Minnie Litzenberger. 



2050— THOMAS MORRIS 



b. 1st mo. 2nd, 1865. 



1164— HANNAH MORRIS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35 ; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618). 

b. 2nd mo. 2nd. 1831. 
d. 1st mo. 13th, 1862. 
m. 8th mo. 15th, 1848, William Woodruff. 

2051— MARY P. WOODRUFF b. 6th mo. 16th, 1849. 

m. 8th mo. 16th, 1876, Pettit F. Brockway. 

2052— LENORA WOODRUFF b. 12th mo. Sth, 1S50. 

m. Sth mo. 19th, 1873, Joseph C. Luckey. 

2053— WARREN W. WOODRUFF 

b. gth mo. 1st, 1852. 

m. 12th mo. 31st, 1883, Olive Leah Carter. 



426 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2054— SARAH ELIZA WOODRUFF 

b. gth mo. 27th, 1854. 
m. 6th mo. 10th, 1872, John Walker. 

2055— JOHN WOODRUFF b. 3rd mo. 6th, 18*8. 

2056— COMLV T. WOODRUFF b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1859. 

m. 8th mo. 16th, 1878, Wilhetmina Young. 



1165 — ELIZA ANN MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618). 

b. 11th mo. 13th, 1832. 

d. 10th mo. 10th, 1852. 

m. Robert Kirkbride. 

2057— JOHX M. KIRKBRIDE b. 12th mo. gth, 1849. 

m. 5th mo., 1872, Vina Craig. 

2058— ROBERT KIRKBRIDE b. 9th mo. 2nd, 1851. 

m. 5th mo. 21st, 1874, Ursula E. Diver. 



1166— SARAH C. MORRIS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618). 

b. 12th mo. 18th, 1835. 
m. 1st mo. 25th, 1860, Alexander C. Lutes. 
He b. 9th mo. 26th. 1835. 
d. 9th mo. 26th, 1877. 

2059— GERTRUDE ALICE LUTES 

b. 12th mo. 8th. 1 86 1 . 
m. 1st mo. 10th, 18S7, Samuel N. Alexander. 

2060— ETHLEEN LUTES b. Qth mo. 28th, 1863. 

2061— BELLE LUTES b. 2nd mo. 26th, 1866. 

2062— ORLANDO W. LUTES b. 3rd mo. 17th, 1868. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 427 

2063— ADRIAN EUGENE LUTES 

b. 10th mo. 10th, 1870. 

2064— MAUD CANDACE LUTES 

b. 6th mo. 21st, 1873. 

2065— LILLIAN GRACE LUTES 

b. 5th mo. 29th, 1877. 



1167— MARY P. MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618). 

b. 1st mo. 29th, 1838. 

m. 8th mo. 23rd. 1857, Joseph Townsend. 

2066— VIRGINIA F. TOWNSEND 

b. 7th mo. 3rd, 1858. 
m. 2nd mo. 5th, 1881, Acton Warthman. 

2067— REBECCA TOWNSEND b. nth mo. 7th, 1859. 

m. 3rd mo. 14th, 1888, Adna S. Day. 

2068— JONATHAN S. TOWNSEND 

b. 4th mo. 25th, 1862. 

m. 4th mo. 23rd, 1885, Ora Middleton. 

2069— SARAH M. TOWNSEND b. 4th mo. 8th, 1864. 

2070— JOSEPHINE TOWNSEND 

b. 3rd mo. 1 2th, 1866. 
d. 1st mo. 3rd, 1888. 

2071— HOMER C. TOWNSEND b. 3rd mo. 27th, 1869. 

m. 9th mo. 17th, 1891, Emma Owen. 

2072— ADA H. TOWNSEND b. 12th mo. gth, 1872. 

2073— IRENE TOWNSEND b. 10th mo. 25th, 1874 

2074— MARY TOWNSEND b. 2nd mo. 27th, 1876. 



428 



GENEALOOY OF THE 



1168— LYDIA B. RRUFF (Thomas. 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Sarah Morris, 620). 
b. 1st mo. 26th, 1822. 

m. 3rd mo. 27th, 1851, in Damascus, Ohio, by 
Friends' ceremony, William H. Oliphant, son 
of Samuel and Rachel (Heald) Oliphant. 
He b. 5th mo. 14th. 1816. 

2075— ANNA S. OLIPHANT b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1855. 

m. 3rd mo. 25th. 187;, Charles C. Gruwell 
[12S7]. 

2076— SARAH OLIPHANT 1>. 2nd mo. 21st, 1856. 

d. 5th mo. 3rd, 1856. 

2077— WILLIAM B. OLIPHANT b. 3rd mo. gth, 1861. 

d. 2nd mo. 19th, 1865. 






1172— MARY BRUFF (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas. 129; 

Hannah, 315; Sarah Morris, 620). 

b. 5th mo. 3rd. 1829. 

d. 1st mo. 20th, 1883. 

m, 7th mo. 27th, 1848, Benjamin C. Andrews. 

He b. 2nd mo. 8th. 1822. 

d. 3rd mo. 20th, 1868. 



2078— EDWIN ANDREWS 
2079— JAMES I!. ANDREWS 
2080— CHAR] I S ANDREWS 

2081— LOUISA ANDREWS 



b. 5th 1110. 3rd. 1S4C). 
m. 9th mo. 5th, 1878, Helen M. Seward. 

b. 10th mo. 30th, 1850. 
d. 3rd mo. 20th, 1868. 

1). 4th mo. 14th, 1852. 

m. 2nd mo. 25th. 1874. Axia (Kenworthy) 
Heald, wid. 

b. 1 2th mo. 2S1I1. 1853. 
m. 9th mo. 16th, 1881, John S. McCracken. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 429 



2082— WILLIS ANDREWS b. 2nd mo. 18th, 1856. 

unmarried. 

2083— JOSEPH JOHN ANDREWS 

b. 2nd mo. 18th, 1858. 

m. 2nd mo. 24th, 1883, Rhoda Hodson. 

2084— ALMIRA ANDREWS b. 1st mo. 8th, i860. 

d. 1st mo. 27th, 1865. 

2085— ALBERT HENRY ANDREWS, M.D. 

b. 12th mo. 2ist, 1861. 
m. 9th mo. 1st, 1886, Hattie Frazer. 

2086— BENJAMIN FRANKLIN ANDREWS, M.D. 

b. 2nd mo. 26th, 1864. 
m. nth mo. 26th, 1896, Bertha Hadley. 

2087— ALSINA MARY ANDREWS 

b. 1st mo. nth, 1866. 

2088— LUTHER J. ANDREWS b. 4th mo. 29th, 1868. 

m. nth mo. 14th, 1894, Emma Gifford. 

2089— SARAH BRUFF ANDREWS 

b. 1 2th mo. 30th, 1870. 



H74_SARAH BRUFF (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas,6; Robert,35; Thomas, 129; 

Hannah, 315; Sarah Morris, 620). 

b. 8th mo. 4th. 1833. 

m. 8th mo. 30th, 1859, in Friends' Meeting, Da- 
mascus, Ohio, Tristram Coggeshall. 
He b. 5th mo. 30th. 1830. 

2090— WILLIAM COGGESHALL 

b. 2nd mo. 16th, i86r. 
d. 8th mo. 15th, 1862. 

2091— ANNA MARY COGGESHALL 

b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1866. 
d. 3rd mo. 17th, 1867. 



430 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2092— JAMES EDWARD COGGESHALL 

b. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1869. 

m. 5th mo. 27th, 1896, Margaret Stacy. 

2093— ALICE E. COGGESHALL b. 10th mo. 12th, 1872. 

2094— OLIVER T. COGGESHALL 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1876. 
d. 3rd mo. 7th, 1876. 



1177— ELIZABETH BRUFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert,35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Sarah Morris, 620). 

b. 9th mo. 13th, 1838. 
m. 10th mo. 27th, 1864, Lindley M. Kirk. 
He b. 9th mo. 20th, 1839. 

2095— ALICE TROTH KIRK b. 9th mo. 4th, 1866. 

2096— LORENA J. KIRK b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1869. 

2097— WILLI ARD B. KIRK b. 8th mo. 18th, 1870. 
2098— ANNA LAURA KIRK b. 4th mo. 26th, 1877. 



1181— ROBERT FRENCH (Thomas. 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35 ; Thomas, 

129; Robert. 317; Zadok S., 630). 

b. 1st mo. 22nd, 1848, in Salem, Ohio. 

m. First. June 23rd, 1887, in New Castle. Pa., 

Elizabeth Mary Newton, daughter of John and 

Elizabeth Newton. 
She d. August 9th, 1889. 

m. Second, in Beaver, Pa., Mary Schoppelrey, 

daughter of William and Amelia Schoppelrey. 

2099— CARL R. FRENCH b. September 17th, 1888. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 431 

1185— ANNA STREET FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; John, 634). 

b. 10th mo. 7th, 1846, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. 10th mo. 24th, 1867, in Friends' Meeting, 
Salem, Ohio, Lindley Murray Brackin, son of 
Elisha and Esther (Favvcett) Brackin, of Cole- 
rain, Ohio. 
He b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1841, in Mt. Pleasant, Ohio. 



2100— EDWARD F. BRACKIN b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1870. 

m. gth mo. nth, 1902, in Philadelphia Monthly 
Meeting, Fourth and Arch Sts., Philadel- 
phia, Virginia Lois Sellew, daughter of 
Edwin P. and C. Virginia (Jones) Sellew. 
She b. 12th mo. 14th, 1877, in Windsor, Bloome 
Co., N. Y. 

2101— OGDEN J. BRACKIN b. 7th mo. qth, 1871. 

m. 12th mo. 25th, 1903, in Friends' Meeting, 
Winona, Ohio, Rachel S. Binns, daughter 
of David and Lizzie Binns. 
She b. 2nd mo. 17th, 18S2, in Pleasant Grove, 
Ohio. 



2102— MARTHA H. BRACKIN b. 7th mo. 4th, 1874. 

m. 10th mo. 23rd, 1895, Frederick C. Hoyle. 



2103— MARY ANNA BRACKIN b. 2nd mo. 5th, 1876. 

m. 5th mo. 20th, 1896, Oscar J. Bailey. 



2104— SARAH J. BRACKIN b. 5th mo. 30th, 1878. 

2105— ALICE M. BRACKIN b. 7th mo. 15th, 1880. 

2106— ESTHER BRACKIN b. 4th mo. nth, 1891. 



432 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1186— JOSEPH HOWEY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas. 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert. 317; John, 634). 

b. 5th mo. 28th, 1850, near Salem, Ohio, 
m. July 1st, 1873, Emma Florence Hibler, daughter 
of Benjamin Harvey and Catharine (Taylor) 
Hibler, of Salem, Ohio ; justice of the peace 
performing ceremony. 
She b. February 24th, 1852. in Cincinnati. Ohio. 

2107— FLORENCE MAY FRENCH 

b. February 20th, 1875. 

2108— ANNA S. FRENCH b. December 22nd, 1876. 

m. April 6th, i8qg, Eyle B. Harris. 

2109— ALFARATA FRENCH b. August 4th, 1880. 

m. September 4th, iqoi, Charles H. Cobourn. 

2110— MARTHA H. FRENCH b. September 25th, 1882. 

1187— MARY ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; John, 634). 
b. 9th mo. 14th, 1853. in Salem. Ohio, 
m. 9th mo. 25th. 1873, in Friends' Meeting, Salem, 
Ohio, Benjamin \\'ilson A son of Joseph and 
Eliza (Branson) Wilson, of Flushing, Ohio. 
He b. 10th mo. 11th, 1849. in Smyrna. Ohio, 
d. 6th mo. 23rd. 1910. 

21 1 1— JOSEPH G. WILSON. M.I). 

b. 6th mo. 23rd, 1874. 
m. July 26th, iqoo, Carmen Yriarte. 

2112— MABEL B. WILSON b. 2nd mo. 27th, 1876. 

m. 4th mo. 36th, 1895, Albertus I.. Hoyle. 

2113— GEORGE JO.NF.S WILSON 

b. nth mo. nth, 1878. 

m. 5th mo. 17th. iqoo, Sara Edna Hoffman. 

a 1 14— JOHN FRENCH WILSON b. 41b mo. 15th, 1886. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 433 

1189— ELMIRA TOWNSEND FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert, 35; Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; 
John, 634). 
b. 5th mo. 15th, 1858, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. 8th mo. 27th, 1884, in Friends' Meeting, Salem, 
Ohio, Joseph Green Steer, son of James and 
Mary (Green) Steer, of Barnesville, Ohio. 
He b. 4th mo. 14th, 1858, in Colerain, Belmont Co., 
Ohio. 

2115— BERTHA M. STEER b. Sth mo. 12th, 1885. 

21 16— EDITH STEER b. 7th mo. 16th, 1887. 

d. 1st mo. 29th, 1888. 

21 17— JOHN OGDEN STEER b. 12th mo. 15th, 1888. 

21 18— ANNA STEER b. 9th mo. 27th, i8qo. 

2119— JAMES HAROLD STEER b. 4th mo. 18th, 1896. 



1191— EDWARD OGDEN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; John, 634). 

b. 12th mo. 27th, 1863, near Salem, Ohio. 

d. February 16th, 1906, at his residence, 44 East 
Seventh St., Salem, Ohio. 

m. January 28th, 1896, in Salem, Ohio, Ada H. 
Townsend, daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Morris) Townsend; Rev. Mr. Youmans, 
Methodist minister, performing ceremony. 
She b. December 9th, 1872, near Salem. Ohio. 



EDNA OGDEN FRENCH (adopted) 

b. January gth, 1906. 

28 



434 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



1194— HANNAH L. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; Samuel, 635). 
b. 9th mo. 15th, 1851, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. 11th mo. 23rd, 1876, in Friends' Meeting, 
Salem, Ohio, Abel Walker, son of Joseph and 
Maria (Warfield) Holloway Walker. 
He b. 6th mo. 7th, 1849, in Flushing, Ohio. 

2120— BERTHA M. WALKER b. ioth mo. I2ih, 1878. 

m. 12th mo. 22nd, 1005, James W. Edgerton. 

2121— LLELLA L. WALKER b. 5th mo. 3rd, 1880. 

m. 6th mo. 26th, 10.07, Lloyd B. Jones. 



2122— JOSEPH S. WALKER 
2123— JULIA M. WALKER 

2124— JAMES F. WALKER 



b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1887. 
d. 9th mo. 30th, 1887. 

b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1887. 
d. 8th mo. 2nd, 1887. 

b. nth mo. 1st, 1889. 



1195— LOUIS BENJAMIN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; Robert, 31 7; Samuel, 635). 
b. 7th mo. 7th, 1853, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. October 4th, 1877, in Salem, Ohio, Deborah 
Deweese Hall, daughter of Robert and Mary 
(Deweese) Hall; Rev. W. A. Davidson, D.D., 
Methodist minister, performing ceremony. 
She !). September 24th, 1852, in Bamesville, Ohio. 

2125— ROLLAM) HALL FRENCH 

b. August 31st, 1878. 
m. June 2nd, 1004, Esther Morris Akin. 



2126— HELEN M. FREW II 



b. March 22nd, t88o. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 435 

1199— REBECCA C. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Barzillai, 318; Albert, 637). 

b. 9th mo. 17th, 1845. 
m. 6th mo. 2nd, 1874, Caleb Davies^ formerly of 

Pembrokeshire, South Wales, son of David and 

Anna Davies. 

2127— ANNA LUCRETIA DAVIES 

b. 4th mo. 7th, 1875. 

2128— HORATIUS BONAR DAVIES 

b. 2nd mo. 20th, 1877. 

2129— JOHN PITTENGAL DAVIES 

b. 7th mo. 27th, 187S. 

2130— REBECCA FLORENCE DAVIES 

b. 6th mo. 15th, 1881 

2131— CALEB DAVIES, JR. b. nth mo. 24th, 1885. 



1200— ALBERT EDWARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; Barzillai, 318; Albert, 
637). 
b. 10th mo. 12th, 1850. 

m. 5th mo. 16th, 1878, Abbie Caroline Betts, 
daughter of Alfred H. and Anna Almena Betts, 
of Cleveland, Ohio. 

2132— MARY GRACE FRENCH b. 9th mo. 20th, 1879. 

2133— WILLIAM HENRY FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 5th, 1881. 

2134— ALBERT EDWARD FRENCH, JR. 

b. 4th mo. 6th, 1888. 



436 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1202— ELI FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 129; 

Barzillai, 318; Ezra. 642). 

b. 12th mo. 17th, 1853. 

m. March 16th, 1879, in Leetonia, Ohio, Lorinda 
A. Greenamyer; Methodist ceremony. 

2135— GERTRUDE T. FRENCH b. July 31st, 1881. 
2136— PAUL C. FRENCH b. September 16th, 1890. 



1204— MARY ISABELLA FRENCH, M.D. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert, 35; Thomas. 129; Barzillai, 318; 
Ezra, 642). 

b. 11th mo. 18th, 1869. 

m. 1st mo. 17th, 1900, in Nanking. China, George 
F. De Vol, M.D., son of William and Rosetta 
(Eddy) De Vol. 
He b. March 8th, 1871, in Charles County. Maryland. 

2136a— MARY ELIZABETH DE VOL 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1902, in Nanking, China, 
d. 8th mo. 13th, 1902, in Ruling, China. 

2136b— CHARLES EDWARD DE VOL 

b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1903. 



in Luho. China. 



2136c— CATHARINE ISABELLA DE VOL 

b. 1st mo. 30th, 1906. 

2i36d— WILLIAM EZRA FRENCH DE VOL 

b. 9th mo. ;th, 1909. 

Dr. George De Vol and his wife Dr. Mary Isabella (French) De Vol, are in charge of 
the Friends' hospital at Luh Hoh, China, which is one of the missionary stations under 
the care of the Ohio Yearly Meeting. The following interesting excerpt is from a letter 
received by the author from Dr. Mary I. F. De Vol. dated June 7th. n>i2, Luho via 
Nanking, China : 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 437 

" Dr. Lucy A. Gaynor opened our medical work at Luho about fourteen 
years ago by making itinerating trips, once or more a month. In the fall 
and winter of 1898-99 I spent some months here studying the language and 
having a dispensary two or three times a week. In 1901 Dr. De Vol and 
myself were appointed to Luho. For some years we had a dispensary in a 
Chinese building and commenced our hospital work in a very crudely equipped 
Chinese house. In 1907 we opened a foreign hospital and at present have forty 
beds. Two wards for men and one for women and a small isolation ward. But 
our accommodations have been altogether too small of late. Luho is a walled 
city of some 30,000 inhabitants 3nd patients come from a large district as 
there is no other foreign hospital on this side of the Yangtse river within 
forty miles. In the early days there were many rumors given out about 
us, such as that we took out hearts and eyes and stole children, but the 
people are friendly now and it is no longer a matter of inducing people to 
come but how to care for all who do come. During the month of May 
there were over 1 100 dispensary patients and over 100 hospital patients. 
We regard the hospital work as the more satisfactory, both from a medical 
and evangelistic standpoint. We have a small chapel, seating about ninety, 
in the hospital building, and in this the patients congregate before the dis- 
pensary hours and an evangelist and Bible woman have a good opportunity 
to give them Christian instruction. A good deal of Christian literature is 
distributed from the dispensary. We have Christian helpers who assist in 
following up the work in the homes. It is a very great joy to see the 
change that comes to some of these who have been in such great spiritual 
darkness. We have been doing Red Cross work during the past months 
[in connection with the Revolution of 1911-12] and in December nearly 40 
wounded soldiers were brought in at one time. There are still some 500 or 
600 soldiers in the city. We also have many Famine Refugees." 



1205— MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Barzillai, 318; David, 644). 

b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1858. 

m. 8th mo. 22nd, 1889, in Friends' Meeting, Salem, 
Ohio, Charles Stratton. 
He b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1854. 



2137— BENJAMIN LAWRENCE STRATTON 

b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1891. 



438 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1206— ELMA FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Barzillai. 318; David, 644). 

1). 4th mo. 21st, 1860. 

01. 10th mo. 14th, 1891, by Friends' ceremony, near 
Salem, Ohio, William T. Oliver. 

2138— WINDEI.L F. OLIVER b. 4th mo. 14th, 1893. 



1209— EDGAR FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Barzillai, 318; Barzillai, 645). 
b. 8th mo. 13th, 1853. 

m. 4th mo. 6th, 1876, Ruth Emma Vansyoe. 
She b. 9th mo. 5th. 1858. 

2139— HOLLAND M. FRENCH b. 7th mo. 13th, 1879. 

d. 6th mo. loth, 1897. 

2140— HUBERT FRENCH b. 10th mo. 24th, 1882. 

2141— ALLEN EDGAR FRENCH 

b. 8th mo. 21st, 1892. 

2142— DOROTHY D. FRENCH b. 1st mo. 9th, 1896. 

d. 3rd mo. 8th, 1899. 

2143— ROLLAND B. FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 25th, 1900. 



1212— BARZILLAI MORRIS FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; Barzillai, 318; Bar- 
zillai, 645). 
b. 8th mo. 13th, 1865. 
m. 5th mo. 28th, 1896, Ardella M. Barber. 

2144— DEBORA C. FRENCH b. 3rd mo. 15th, 1897. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 439 

1213— MARY FRENCH MORLAN (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Barzillai, 318; Lydia, 646). 

b. 8th mo. 14th, 1857. 

m. 12th mo. 23rd, 1886, in Middletown Meeting, 
Columbiana Co., Ohio, Nathan Kirk. 
He b. 2nd mo. 16th, 1844. 

2145— ELISHA T. KIRK b. nth mo. 24th, 1887. 

2146— LOUIS J. KIRK b. Qth mo. 9th, 1889. 

2147— EDITH KIRK b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1892. 



1217— MARY ANN ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Hannah Roberts, 
653). 
b. 1st mo. 5th, 1838, near Moorestown, N. J. 
m. 12th mo. 10th, 1861, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Fellowship, N. J., Warrington Gillingham, son 
of Chalkley and Kezia (Warrington) Gilling- 
ham. 
He b. 8th mo. 9th, 1834, near Moorestown, N. J. 
d. 1 1th mo. 26th, 1909, in Medway, Accotink, Va. 

2148— HENRY WARRINGTON GILLINGHAM 

b. 9th mo. 24th, 1862. 
m. 3rd mo. 31st, 1897, Sarah Carpenter. 

2149— JOSEPH REUBEN GILLINGHAM 

b. 5th mo. 3rd, 1864. 
d. nth mo. 30th, 1865. 

2150— MARY McKINSTREY GILLINGHAM 

b. 9th mo. 16th, 1865. 
m. 1 2th mo. 28th, 1892, Abner G. Fell. 

2151— REUBEN ROBERTS GILLINGHAM 

b. 12th mo. 12th, 1867. 



440 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2152— BENJAMIN RITTER GILLINGHAM 

b. nth mo. 14th, 1869. 
d. 8th mo. 30th, 1876. 

2153— ANNA LEWIS GILLINGHAM 

b. 5th mo. 18th, 1871. 
m. 2nd mo. 12th, 1896, Edward Rogers. 

2154— EMMA KEZIA GILLINGHAM 

b. 12th mo. 4th, 1873, in Medwav, Accotink, 

Va. 
m. October 4th, 1902, in New York, Robert 
H. Lewis, son of George D. and Hannah 
A. (Bunting) Lewis. 

2155— ELIZA WILLIAMS GILLINGHAM 

b. 4th mo. 5th, 1876. 

2156— ELLA GILLINGHAM b. nth mo. 9th, 1879- 



1218— EDWARD ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35; Robert, 

131; Mary, 320; Hannah Roberts, 653). 

b. 5th mo. 21st, 1840, in Camden Co., N. J. 

m. 10th mo. 3rd, 1867, by Friends' ceremony, in 
the office of Morton McMichael, Esq., Mayor 
of Philadelphia, Hannah Ann Lippincott, 
daughter of Asa Roberts and Hannah (Thome) 
Lippincott. 

2157— ASA LIPPINCOTT ROBERTS 

b. 6th mo. 6th, 1870. 

m. nth mo. 19th, 1890, Florence E. Lippin- 
cott. 

2158— EDWARD ROBERTS, JR. b. 2nd mo. 21st, 1873. 

m. 8th mo. 15th, 1900, Edith Woodman. 

2159— HANNAH BERTHA ROBERTS 

b. nth mo. 3rd, 1878. 
m. 9th mo. 12th, 1900, Japhet Clifton Darnell. 

2160— ALBERT ROBERTS b. 3rd mo. 8th, 1884. 

d. 3rd mo. 14th, 1884. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 441 

1219— JOSIAH ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Robert, 

131 ; Mary, 320; Hannah Roberts, 653). 

b. 11th mo. 13th, 1842. 

d. 8th mo. 5th, 1902, in Camden, N. J.; buried in 

Colestown (N. J.) Cemetery, 
m. 5th mo. 26th, 1869, by Friends' ceremony, in 

Moorestown, N.J. , Anna B. Andrews, daughter 

of Benajah D. and Ann (Clark) Andrews. 
She b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1848, at Red Bank, Gloucester 

Co., N. J. 

2161— CLARENCE JOSIAH ROBERTS 

b. ist mo. 31st, 1886. 

1220— ENOCH CORE ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Hannah Roberts, 
653). 
b. 9th mo. 1st, 1844, in Burlington Co., N. J. 
d. 5th mo. 13th, 1880, in Burlington Co., N. J. 
m. 11th mo. 22nd, 1871, by Friends' ceremony, 
Priscilla L. Evans, daughter of Joseph T. and 
Rachel (Lippincott) Evans. 
She b. 9th mo. 30th, 1850. 

2162— GERTRUDE E. ROBERTS 

b. 4th mo. gth, 1873. 

m. 3rd mo. ist, 1899, Walter Rogers. 

1221— JOHN H. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert. 35; Robert, 

131 ; Mary, 320; Hannah Roberts, 653). 

b. 7th mo. 4th, 1847, in Fellowship, N. J. 
m. 2nd mo. 19th, 1874, by Friends' ceremony, near 
Moorestown, N. J., Sarah B. Williams, daughter 
of Isaac and Mary H. (Borton) Williams. 
She b. 7th mo. 10th, 1852, near Chestnut Hill, White 
Marsh, Pa. 



442 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2163— MARY WILLIAMS ROBERTS 

b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1875. 
m. 10th mo. 5th, 1898, Hyman G. Miller. 

2164— ELIZABETH WILLIAMS ROBERTS 

b. 7th mo. 19th, 1876. 
m. 1st mo. 12th, 1904. Walter R. Willets. 

2165— MARTHA POTTS ROBERTS 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1878. 

m. 3rd mo. 25th, 1903. W. Lockwood Kimball. 

2166— REUBEN ROBERTS b. 1st mo. 10th, 1880. 

d. 6th mo. 26th, 1880. 

2167— ANNA BORTON ROBERTS 

b. nth mo. 13th, 1883. 

1222— REUBEN MATLACK ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 

35; Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Hannah Rob- 
erts, 653). 

b. 9th mo. 26th, 1850, at Cameron Mills, Alex- 
andria, Va. 
m. 9th mo. 16th, 1886, under the care of Green 
Plain Monthly Meeting (Ohio), Susan M. Mer- 
ritt, daughter of Edward and Maria (Mullen) 
Merritt. 
She b. 4th mo. 4th, 1852, near Springfield, Ohio. 

2168— MERRITT EDWARD ROBERTS 

b. 7th mo. 8th, 1888. 

1225— ALFRED HUNT ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Robert F. Roberts, 
654). 
b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1S45, in Medford, N. J. 
d. 2nd mo. 24th, 1905, in Fairfax Co., Va. 
m. October 17th, 1877, Jean Campbell Harmon, 
daughter of Allen and Margaret (Potter) Har- 
mon, of Alexandria, Va. 
She b. 5th mo. 15th. 1855, in Alexandria, Va. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 443 

2169— ROBERT FRENCH ROBERTS 

b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1884, in Alexandria, Va. 
d. 1 2th mo. 8th. 1900. 



2170— ALFRED HARMON ROBERTS 

b. 8th mo. I2th, 1886, 

2171— EDMUND HUNT ROBERTS 

b. 12th mo. 18th, 1888, 



2172— MARGARET HARMON ROBERTS 

b. nth mo. nth, 1893. 



- in Fairfax Co., Va. 



1226— WALTER ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Robert, 

131 ; Mary, 320; Robert F. Roberts, 654). 

b. 10th mo. 14th. 1846, in Medford, N. J. 
m. March 5th, 1891, Rebecca Harmon, daughter 
of Allen and Margaret (Potter) Harmon. 
She b. 11th mo. 13th, 1860, in Alexandria, Va. 



2173— JAMES WALKER ROBERTS 

b. 12th mo. 2nd, 



2174— RUTH ROBERTS 
2175— JEAN ROBERTS 



b. 7th mo. 25th, 1893, 
b. 12th mo. 14th, 1894, 



■in Alexandria, Va. 



2176— WALTER CAMERON ROBERTS 

b. 4th mo. 16th, 1897, 

2177— ALLEN HUNT ROBERTS 

b. 5th mo. 2nd, 1899, 

2178— MARY HUNT ROBERTS b. nth mo. 14th, 1901, 



2179— JOHN EDMUND ROBERTS 

b. 12th mo. 14th, 1903, . 



.in Fairfax Co., Va. 



444 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1231— HANNAH FRENCH ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Robert, 131; Mary, 320; George Rob- 
erts, 655). 

b. 9th mo. 20th, 1849. 

d. 2nd mo., 1901. 

m. 3rd mo. 28th, 1872, Mark Haines. 

2180— ELIZABETH ROBERTS HAINES 

b. ioth mo. I2th, 1873. 

2181— JOSIAH HARVEY HAINES 

b. nth mo. 27th, 1880. 



1233— ANNIE LIPPINCOTT ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert, 35; Robert, 131 ; Mary, 320; Josiah 
Roberts, 656). 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1850, in Fellowship, N. J. 
m. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1876, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Philadelphia, George Michael Lamb, son of 
John Emerson and Esther (Matthews) Lamb. 
He b. 7th mo. 25th, 1847. in Baltimore Co., Md. 
d. 1st mo. 2nd. 1908, in Baltimore, Md. 

2182— EDITH LAMB b. ioth mo. 30th, 1877. 

m. 4th mo. 16th, 1903, Howard C. Johnson. 

2183— GEORGE MICHAEL LAMB, JR. 

b. oth mo. 4th, 187Q, in Baltimore, Md. 

2184— ROBERT EMERSON LAMB 

b. qth mo. 18th, 1881. 
m. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1908, Elizabeth M. Booth. 

2185— PHILIP EDWARD LAMB b. 12th mo. 1st, 1884, in Baltimore, Md. 

2186— JAMES fllBSON LAMB b. 2nd mo. 20th, 1889, in Baltimore, Md. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 445 

1244— CLEON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132; Joseph, 322; Thomas, 667). 

b. April 27th, 1852. 

m. April 14th, 1880, Margaret M. Mason, of 
Chicago, 111. 

2187— THOMAS R. FRENCH b. 1882, in Chaffee Co., Colorado. 

2188— EVA FRENCH 

Resided for some years in Aspen, Colorado. 



1245— KATE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 132; 

Joseph, 322; Thomas, 667). 

b. March 25th, 1855, in Burlington, Iowa. 

d. May 28th, 1895, in Creighton, Neb.; buried in 

Burlington, Iowa, 
m. June 23rd, 1873, O. T. Hillhouse. 

2189— OSCAR FRENCH HILLHOUSE 

b. March 31st, 1874. 

d. April 21st, 1883; buried in Burlington, 
Iowa. 



1246— IDA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 132; 

Joseph, 322; Thomas, 667). 

b. October 14th, 1860, in Burlington, Iowa, 
m. September 24th, 1888, in Burlington, Iowa, H. 
L. Graesser. 

2190— ROY FRENCH GRAESSER 

b. October 31st, 1892. 

Resided for some years in Creighton, Nebraska. 



446 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1249— MARTHA NEWTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; James, 132; Joseph, 322; Samuel B., 
668). 
m. September 17th, 1867, in Beaver, Pa., Jason 

Richardson, 
d. November 18th, 1900, in Negley, Ohio. 

2191— FRANK HIRAM RICHARDSON 

b. July 5th, 1868. 

d. November 29th, 1876. 

2192— CHARLES ALFRED RICHARDSON 

b. December 23rd, 1869. 

2193— STANFORD ENOCH RICHARDSON 

b. February 15th, 1871. 

2194— ALICE JEANNETTA RICHARDSON 

b. September 8th, 1872. 
d. April 17th, 1873. 

2195— JOHN BURT RICHARDSON 

b. July nth, 1874. 

2196— MARY EMILY RICHARDSON 

b. May 2ist, 1879. 

2197— KATE FRENCH RICHARDSON 

b. June 29th, 1SS1. 

1254— ELIZA FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 132; 

Joseph, 322; Samuel B., 668). 

m. October 8th, 1879, Rev. John W. Dorrance. 
d. March 17th, 1887, in Kingman, Kansas. 

2198— JAMES FRENCH DORRANCE 

b. October 21st, 1880. 

2199— HELEN DORRANCE b. January 8th, 1882. 

2200— CRETE DORRANCE 

2201— JEAN DORRANCE d. November 25th, 1887. 

2202— Rl 111 DORRANCE .1. March 8th, 1887. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 447 

1255— MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35 ; James, 132 ; 

Joseph, 322; Samuel B., 668). 

m. August 14th, 1876, James W. McKenzie. 
d. August 6th, 1904, in Beaver, Pa. 

2203— ROBERT C. McKENZIE b. August, 1880. 

2204— ELSIE McKENZIE b. July, 1883, in Beaver. Pa. 

d. 1885. 

2205— RALPH W. McKENZIE b. May 25th, 1889, in Beaver, Pa. 

1260— ALICE FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 132; 

Joseph, 322; Samuel B., 668). 

m. June 6th, 1894, J. Ware Sharpless Kerlin. 
2206— MILDRED P. KERLIN 
Four children deceased. 

1268— ELVA E. A. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132; Thomas, 325; Joseph T, 674). 

b. 12th mo. 8th, 1851. 

m. 5th mo. 27th, 1875, Lacey B. Sanford. 

2207— LULU E. SANFORD b. 3rd mo. 17th, 1876. 

2208— JENNIE I. SANFORD b. 2nd mo. 28th, 1877. 

2209— WILLIS F. SANFORD b. 6th mo. 30th, 1878. 

1272— LORIN T. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; James, 

132; Thomas, 325; William F., 676). 

b. 2nd mo. 20th, 1858. 

m. 12th mo. 25th, 1881, Mary E. McDowell, 

daughter of James and Amanda (McKnight) 

McDowell. 



448 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2210— HERBERT VV. FRENCH b. 12th mo. 14th, 1882. 
2211— MILDRED A. FRENCH b. oth mo. 22nd, 1884. 

1277— THOMAS F. BUTLER (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert. 35 ; James, 

132; Thomas, 325; Sarah, 680). 
b. 10th mo. 24th, 1S58. 
m. 2nd mo. 19th, 1878, Alfaretta Middleton. 

2212— HERSCHEL BUTLER 

2213— UDORA BUTLER 

2214— LOTTA BUTLER 



1287— CHARLES C. GRUWELL (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Ann, 135; Samuel Carr, 329; Ann Carr, 
683). 
b. 9th mo. 8th, 1853. in Marlborough, Stark Co., 

< >hio. 
m. First, 3rd mo. 25th, 1875, in West Branch, 
Cedar Co., Iowa, by Friends' ceremony, Anna 
S. Oliphant [2075], daughter of William II. 
and Lydia (Bruff) Oliphant. 
She b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1855. 
d. 3rd mo. 9th, 1886. 

m. Second, 11th mo., 1887, Mary (Tomlinson) 
Stephens, widow of Byron Stephens, and 
daughter of Mahlon and Margaret Ann Tom- 
linson, of Salem, Henry Co., Iowa. 

2215— WILLIAM H. GRUWELL b. 3rd mo. 20th, 1876. 

2216— EDWARD M. GRUWELL b. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1878. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 449 

2217— JAMES BRUFF GRUWELL 

b. 1st mo. 16th, 1880. 

2218— ADA E. GRUWELL b. 7th mo. 27th, 1882. 

2219— ANNA CLARA GRUWELL 

b. 8th mo. 18th, 1885. 

Children of Charles C. and Mary (Stephens) Gruwell : 

2220— HERBERT MAHLON GRUWELL 

b. 8th mo. 16th, 1889. 

2221— HILDAH MARY GRUWELL 

b. 7th mo. 30th, 1893. 

1289— HANNAH ANN WILKINS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Ann, 138; Uriah Wilkins, 334; Benjamin E. 

Wilkins, 687). 

b. 4th mo. 26th, 1826. 

d. June 7th. 1892, in San Antonio, Texas; buried 

in Austin, Texas. 
m. January 17th, 1846, Joseph Hewlings French 

[757], son of Samuel, Jr., and Rebecca (Clark) 

French. 
He b. 6th mo. 12th, 1823, near Mullica Hill. N. J. 
d. June 7th. 1862, in San Antonio, Texas. 

For record of children of Hannah Ann Wilkins and Joseph Hewlings French 
see 757. 

1291— SALLIE ANN WILKINS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Ann, 138; Isaac Wilkins, 339; Richard Wil- 
kins, 691). 
b. 9th mo. 6th, 1840, near Pemberton, N. J. 
d. April 1st, 1912. 

29 



450 GENEALOGY OF THE 

m. First, September 20th, 1864, Dr. Henry Ackley, 
U. S. N., son of Thomas and Mary (Barclay) 
Ackley ;■- Rev. Joseph Garrison, D.D., Episco- 
pal minister, performing ceremony. 
Dr. H. A. b. 1836, in Camden, N. J. 

d. December 1st, 1865, in Camden, N. J. 
m. Second, January 22nd, 1877, Nathan Frame 
Cowan, son of William and Cidney (Frame) 
Cowan; Rev. Joseph Garrison, D.D., perform- 
ing ceremony. 
N. F. C. b. November 27th, 1840, in Sadsburyville, Pa. 

2222— HENRY WILKIN'S ACKLEY 

b. January 17th, 1866 
d. January 17th, 1866. 

Children of Sallie A. (Wilkins) Ackley and Nathan F. Cowan: 

2223— WILLIAM GENET COWAN 

b. March 31st, 1878. 

2224— EDGAR NATHAN COWAN 

b. April 27th, 1880. 

2225— HERBERT RICHARD COWAN 

b. April 27th, 1880. 



1292— RICHARD COATE WILKINS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Ann, 138; Isaac Wilkins, 339; Richard 
Wilkins, 691). 

b. 8th mo. 27th, 1845, near Pemberton, N. J. 

d. March 9th, 1883, in Camden, N. J. 

m. June 1st, 1874, Laura Stokes, daughter of Uriah 

Woolman and Ann (Lawrence) Stokes; Rev. 

Joseph Garrison, I ).!)., performing ceremony. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 451 

2226— SALLIE ANN WILKINS, 2ND 

b. October 7th, 1875. 
d. June 4th, 1876. 



2227— EUGENE TAYLOR WILKINS 

b. April 22nd, 1878. 

m. April 29th, 1903, Mary Helen Wolf, 
daughter of Anthony and Laura (Dilkes) 
Wolf, of Camden, N. J.; Rev. Dr. Fish- 
burn, Presbyterian minister, performing 
ceremony. 



1294— JOHN INSKEEP BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344; Joseph I. 
Brick, 699). 

b. 12th mo. 6th, 1832, in Marlton, N. J. 

d. February 6th, 1900, near Bridgeboro, N. J. 

m. December 24th, 1874, Elizabeth Roberts Thome, 
daughter of Joshua and Hannah Inskeep 
(Rogers) Thorne; Rev. J. Wheaton Smith, of 
Beth Eden Baptist Church, Philadelphia, per- 
forming ceremony. 
She b. February 20th, 1838, in Fellowship, N. J. 

d. April 8th, 1906, in Hamilton township, Mercer 
Co., N. J. 



2228— REBECCA CLEMENT BRICK 

b. March 17th, 1876, in Mt. Ephraim, N. J. 



2229— JOHN INSKEEP BRICK, JR. 

b. June 19th, 1877, in Clarksboro, N. J. 



2230— ABEL CLEMENT BRICK b. September 19th, 1879, in Blue Anchor, N. J. 



452 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1295— WILLIAM FRENCH BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42 ; Abigail, 139 ; William Brick, 344 ; Joseph 
I. Brick, 699). 

1). 4th mo. 3rd, 1834, in Marlton, N. J. 

d. 7th mo. 6th, 1906, in Atlantic City, N. J.; 
buried in Woodlands Cemetery, West Philadel- 
phia. 

m. 5th mo. 16th, 1860, by Friends' ceremony, in 
presence of Alexander Henry, Fsq., Mayor of 
Philadelphia, Anna Brick Coles [ 1331 ], daugh- 
ter of Josiah Engle and Mary Ann (Roberts) 
Bispham Coles [705]. 
She b. 1st mo. 10th, 1841, at Coles Landing, N. J. 

2231— JOSEPH COLES BRICK, M.D. 

m. October 1st, iqc>4, Laura W. Clingan. 

2232— MARY ROBERTS BRICK in. February 26th, 1805, in Christ Church, 

Philadelphia, John Chalmers DaCosta, 
M.D., son of George T. and Margareita 
(Beesley) DaCosta; Rev. C. Ellis Stevens, 
I >.!>., performing ceremony. Dr. DaCos'.a 
is Professor of Surgery in Jefferson Med- 
ical College, Philadelphia. 

WILLIAM FRENCH BRICK. 

William French Brick, third son and child of Joseph Inskcep [699] and 
Rebecca (Clement) Brick, was born at the old family homestead, near Marl- 
ton, Burlington County, N. J. He was educated at Friends' private schools 
at Cropwell, N. J., and London Grove, Chester County, Pa. Acquiring con- 
siderable knowledge of the grocery and general store business with their father 
at home, William and his brother Fdgar [1297] set up for themselves in the 
same line at New Egypt, in the upper part of Burlington County, iti 1858, 
and the following year more extensively at Crosswicks, N. J. In 1865 
William removed to Wilmington, Delaware, where he established, at 113 
Market St., a large wholesale grocery and fruit trade, prospering greatly and 




WII.I.I \M FKENCH I'.UH'K 



1906 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 453 

becoming one of the leading merchants of a thriving community. Salt im- 
portation from Liverpool was a notable specialty, this branch of the business 
requiring the building of several large warehouses along the Christiana River. 
During the next twenty years Mr. Brick made an enviable reputation among 
the successful business men of Wilmington, who were always ready to testify 
to his energy, judgment and probity. The building which Mr. Brick pur- 
chased for the purpose of establishing his business in Wilmington had been 
a historic landmark in that locality for many years and was known as the 
"Indian King" hotel, Shipley street below Second and extending to Market 
street. This was a famous hostelry and " relay house " in the stage coach 
and mail post days before railroads and was a regular stopping place for the 
" Congressional Express," which conveyed the mail on horseback between 
New York and Washington. Mr. Brick's retirement from commercial life 
in 1883 was much regretted. In that year he became a resident of West 
Philadelphia, and thereafter devoted enthusiastic interest to agricultural 
affairs in New Jersey. Later he made his residence at 2045 Walnut street, 
Philadelphia; and in 1906, after a brief illness, an active manhood life of 
half a century closed. 

Mr. Brick inherited the splendid qualities of an honorable ancestry, and 
was always faithful to the highest ideals and principles in personal, social, 
business and political life. He was a Republican of staunch views, which he 
vigorously maintained while a resident of a border State. He sought to 
impress the wisdom of strict adherence to the moral law and frequently admon- 
ished associates, and especially business juniors, that it was their bounden 
duty to be honest and just in all their dealings. His own motto was : " Except 
ye pay the uttermost farthing ye cannot enter the Kingdom of Heaven." 
William French Brick and his wife, Anna Brick Coles, are both sixth in 
descent from Thomas ffrench and wife, Jane Atkins. 



1296— HENRY BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 

139; William Brick, 344; Joseph I. Brick 
699). 

b. 11th mo. 9th, 1835, in Marlton, N. J. 
d. July 1st, 1898, in Marlton, N. J. 



454 GENEALOGY OF THE 

m. January 4th, 1866, Agnes B. Haines, daughter 
of Clayton W. and Eliza (Curtis) Haines; 
Morton McMichael, Esq., Mayor of Philadel- 
phia, performing ceremony. 
She b. March 29th, 1844, in Philadelphia. 

d. November 23rd, 1907, in Marlton. N. J. 

2233— CLAYTON HAINES BRICK 

b. March 1st, 1869, in Marlton, N. J. 
m. April 9th, 1890, Mary Woolston, daughter 
of Dr. Elijah B. and Rachel Inskeep 
(Haines) Woolston. 
She b. November 1st, 1869, in Marlton, N. J. 

1297— EDGAR BRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 139; 

William Brick, 344; Joseph I. Brick, 699). 

b. 4th mo. 30th, 1837, in Marlton, N. J. 
m. November 9th, 1865, Susan Roberts Coles 
[1332], daughter of Josiah Engle and Mary- 
Ann (Roberts) Bispham Coles [705J. 
She b. 7th mo. 7th, 1843, at Cole's Landing, N. J. 

2234— JOSIAH EDGAR BRICK b. August 18th, 1866. 

m. June 24th, 1896, Emma Ridgway. 

2235— CHARLES W. BRICK b. April 22nd, 1876. 

m. June 2Sth, 1902, Alice E. Braislin. 

2236— ARTHUR ROBERTS BRICK 

b. December 12th, 1885. 

1298— JOSEPH MICKLE BRICK. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344; Joseph I. 
Brick, 699). 
b. 6th mo. 25th, 1838. 
d. 8th mo. 26th, 1899; buried in Colestown (N. J.) 

Cemetery, 
m. November 1st, 1870, Mary Anna Kain [1076], 
daughter of Benjamin S. and Mary (French) 
Kain [572]. 

For record of children of Joseph Mickle and Mary Anna (Kain) Brick see 1076. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 455 

1299— ABIGAIL FRENCH BRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42 ; 

Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344; Joseph I. 

Brick, 699). 
b. 12th mo. 21st, 1839. 
d. 1910. 
m. George Cowperthvvaite. 

2237— GEORGE JOSEPH COWPERTHWAITE 

b. 7th mo. 20th, 1880. 
d. 7th mo. 25th, 1881. 



1305— CHARLES FRENCH BARTLETT (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Abigail, 139; William Brick, 
344; Abigail F. Brick, 700). 

b. July 27th, 1848, in Philadelphia. 

m. April 20th, 1871, Emily Elizabeth Crawford, 

daughter of John M. and Elizabeth (Jones) 

Crawford, of New Castle, Pa. ; Rev. B. L. 

Agnew and Rev. J. L. Withrow, Presbyterian 

ministers, officiating. 
She b. October 31st, 1849. 

d. March 24th. 1908, in Philadelphia. 

2238— JOHN CRAWFORD BARTLETT 

b. February 9th, 1S72. 
m. January 23rd, 1901, Anna M. Crawford. 

2239— MARY ADELAIDE BARTLETT 

b. June 7th, 1879. 

d. December 31st, 1881. 

2240— CHARLES EDWIN BARTLETT 

b. February 17th, 1883. 

m. October 3rd, 1910, in South Weymouth, 
Mass., Helen Ainsworth Reed. 

2241— EDITH ELIZABETH BARTLETT 

b. June 16th, 1888. 



456 



GENEAI. <h;Y OF THE 



1309— WILLIAM BRICK LIPPINCOTT (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 

42; Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344; 
Hannah Brick, 701). 

h. March 18th, 1837. 

m. 3rd mo. 10th, 1868, by Friends' ceremony, 
Rachel E. Collins, daughter of Clayton Collins. 
She 1). 3rd mo. 1st, 1843, in Mt. Laurel, N. J. 



2242— CLAYTON' C. LIPPINCOTT 

b. 2nd mo. 23rd. 1869. 



2243— WILLIAM J. LIPPINCOTT 



2244— LAURA E. LIPPINCOTT 



b. 8th mo. nth. 1872. 



b. nth mo. 10th, 1S80. 



in Crop well, N.J. 



1320— ANN R. BUTCHER (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 

139; Ann Brick, 345; Abigail B. Roberts, 
704). 
b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1823, in Marlton, N. J. 
d. November 6th, 1886, in Philadelphia. 
m. Samuel Roberts. 
He b. May 2nd, 1S23, in Philadelphia. 

d. September 6th, 1901, in Philadelphia. 



2245— JULIET ROBERTS 



2246— HF.BARI) ROBERTS 
2247— BLANCHE ROBERTS 



b. February 25th, 1847. 
m. First. November 20th, 1867, William 

Spooner. 
m. Second, August 2nd. 1SS6, Rudolph Kerst- 

ing. 

b. February 14th, 1850. 
m. 1S82, Elizabeth Roberts. 

b. August 14th, 1853. 

m. First, December 31st, 1877, Horace Franck. 
m. Second, February 28th, 1886. James H. 

Fleming, 
m. Third, June qth, 1909, Charles E. Lukens. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 457 

2248— EFFIE ROBERTS b. April 13th, 1855. 

m. December 25th, 1880, Stanley Walker. 

2249— RANDOLPH ROBERTS b. 1862. 

d. September, 1904. 
m. 1898, Helen . 



1321— WILLIAM BUTCHER (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; Abigail B. 
Roberts, 704). 

b. 8th mo. 1st, 1825. 

d. in Milford, N. J. 

m. 1848, Franklinia E. Woodward, daughter of 
Lewis and Phoebe (Stiles) Woodward; justice- 
of the peace performing ceremony. 
She b. April 9th, 1832, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. July 17th, 1907, in Carlisle, Pa. 

2250— LEWIS WOODWARD BUTCHER 

b. January 16th, 1852. 

2251— SARAH R. BUTCHER b. August 3rd, 1854. 

d. March 5th, 191 1, 
m. February 22nd, 1881, William Sheppard. 

2252— CAROLINE L. BUTCHER 

b. August 30th, 1858. 

1322— MARY B. BUTCHER (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 

139; Ann Brick, 345; Abigail B. Roberts, 
704). 
b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1827. 
m. Alan R. Lukens. 

2253— ESTHER L. LUKENS m. Walter H. Jenkins. 

2254— H. REEVES LUKENS 

2255— MARY L. LUKENS 



458 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1323— CAROLINE W. BUTCHER (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; Abigail B. 

Roberts, 704). 

b. 10th mo. 3rd, 1828. 
d. 12th mo. 7th, 1858. 
m. Isaac Lloyd. 

. 2256— MORRIS LLOYD 

1326— BENAJAH BUTCHER, 3RD (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42 ; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; Abigail B. 
Roberts, 704). 

b. 5th mo. 2nd, 1836, in Marlton, N. J. 

d. May 31st, 1862, in Fee Fee, St. Louis Co., Mo. 

m. February 5th, 1859, Sarah Jones, daughter of 
John and Phoebe (Buckman) Jones; Richard 
Vaux, Esq., Mayor of Philadelphia, perform- 
ing ceremony. 
She b. July 9th, 1836, in Gwynedd, Pa. 

d. September 12th, 1871, in Neodesha, Kan. 

2257— THOMAS J. BUTCHER 1). July 4th, i860. 

m. First, November 15th, 1883, May L. Blakey. 
m. Second, September 13th, 1803, Anna E. 
Moore. 

2258— CAROLINE LUKENS BUTCHER 

m. February 28th, 181)4, William I.. Rey- 
nolds, 
d. May 23rd, 1896. 

1329— HARRIET \V. BUTCHER (Thomas. 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; Abigail B. 
Roberts, 704). 

b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1843, in Evesham township, 

Burlington Co., N. J. 
m. First, February 25th, 1875, in Norristown, Pa., 

Joshua S. Haines, son of Joshua and Mary 

(Pine) Haines. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 459 



He b. 4th mo. I lth, 1812, in Cropwell, N. J. 
d. 7th mo. 22nd, 1881, in Norristown, Pa. 
m. Second, 11th mo. 21st, 1889, by Friends' cere- 
mony, in Norristown, Pa., James Q. Atkinson, 
son of Thomas and Hannah (Quinby) At- 
kinson. 
He b. 1838, in Bucks Co., Pa. 

2259— ABBIE B. HAINES b. October 7th, 1876. 

d. December 13th, 1877. 

2260— GERTRUDE J. HAINES b. October 15th, 1880. 

d. August 8th, 1881. 

1331— ANNA BRICK COLES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; Mary A. 
Roberts, 705). 

b. 1st mo. 10th, 1841, at Cole's Landing, N. J. 

m. 5th mo. 16th, 1860, by Friends' ceremony, in 
presence of Alexander Henry, Esq., Mayor of 
Philadelphia, William French Brick [1295], 
son of Joseph Inskeep [699] and Rebecca 
(Clement) Brick. 
He b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1834, in Marlton, N. J. 

d. 7th mo. 6th, 1906, in Atlantic City, N. J. 

For record of children of Anna Brick Coles and William French Brick see 1295. 

1332— SUSAN ROBERTS COLES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; Mary A 
Roberts, 705). 

b. 7th mo. 7th, 1843, at Cole's Landing, N. J. 
m. November 9th, 1865, Edgar Brick [1297], son 
of Joseph Inskeep [699] and Rebecca (Clem- 
ent) Brick. 
He b. 4th mo. 30th, 1837, in Marlton, N. J. 

For record of children of Susan Roberts Coles and Edgar Brick see 1297. 



460 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1334— WILLIAM ROBERTS CARROLL (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; 
Susan Roberts, 706). 

b. 1st mo. 11th, 1841, in Philadelphia. 

d. April 30th, 1882, in Philadelphia. 

m. January 20th, 1870, Ella Stokes, daughter of 
Richard and Margaret (Wilson) Stokes; Epis- 
copal ceremony. 
She b. April 23rd, 1848, in Philadelphia. 

2261— NINA CARROLL b. October 9th, 1870. 

m. October 9th, 1895, George H. Buzby. 

2262— RICHARD STOKES CARROLL 

b. May 25th, 1872. 

d. February 24th, 1878. 

2263— GERTRUDE CARROLL b. September 26th, 1873. 



1335— CHARLES DORAN CARROLL (Thomas, 1; Charles, S ; Charles, 

42; Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; Susan 
Roberts, 706). 

I). 2nd mo. 7th, 1844, in Philadelphia, 
m. March 9th, 1876, Laura J. Collins, daughter 
of John H. and Katherine (Stayman) Collins. 
She b. 1S48, in Philadelphia. 

2264— SUSAN CARROLL b. January 5th. 1S77. 

m. June 29th, 1S9S, Harry Earle Magargal, 
sou of Allan Magargal. 
He b. 1876. 

2265— WALTER ROBERTS CARROLL 

b. August 21st, 187S. 

m. February 21st, 1907, Marie Kurtz, daugh- 
ter of William Kurtz. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 461 

1336— JACOB STOKES COLES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Abigail Brick, 346; Caroline 
Stokes, 707). 

b. 10th mo. 16th, 1820, in Newton township, Glou- 
cester Co. (Haddon township, Camden Co.), 
N.J. 

d. May 4th, 1890; buried in Colestown (N. J.) 
Cemetery. 

m. March 12th, 1858, in Grace P. E. Church, 
Haddonfield, Hannah C. Foster, daughter of 
Dr. Jeremiah J. and Hannah (Clement) Foster. 
She b. October 12th, 1825, in Woodbury, N. J. 

d. December 3rd, 1897 ; buried in Colestown 
Cemetery. 

2266— J. FOSTER COLES b. March 20th, 1859, in Haddon twp., Cam- 

den Co., N. J. 
d. May 9th, 1913, in Santa Cruz, Cal. 
m. January 4th, 1900, in Santa Barbara, Cal., 
Mary Hoover, daughter of Daniel and 
Sarah Jane (Hinkle) Hoover. 
She b. October 26th, 1871, in Taylor Co., Iowa. 

2267— CAROLINE S. COLES b. September 20th, 1861. 

d. April 20th, 1893. 

1337_ABIGAIL STOKES COLES (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail. 139; Abigail Brick, 346; Caroline 
Stokes, 707). 

b. 1824, near Haddonfield, N. J. 

d. 4th mo. 9th, 1887, in Moorestown, N. J.; 

buried in Colestown (N. J.) Cemetery, 
m. 10th mo. 15th, 1846, John Buzby, son of John 

and Ann (Roberts) Buzby. x 
He b. 1st mo. 28th, 1819. 

d. 12th mo. 29th, 1909, in Moorestown. N. J.; 

buried in Colestown Cemetery. 



462 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2268— WILLIAM ROBERTS BUZBY 

b. 6th mo. nth, 1848. 

m. November 12th, 1884, Keturah (Kay) 
Snowden, daughter of Charles and Mary 
(Lippincott) Kay, and widow of Leonard 
Snowden. 
She b. November 12th, 1846. 

d. March 13th, 1910, in Atlantic City, N. J. 



2269— CAROLINE STOKES BUZBY 

b. 7th mo. 4th, 1852. 



John Buzby, of Evesham, County of Burlington, and Ann Roberts, daughter of Joseph 
and Susannah (Coles) Roberts, were married " in a public meeting of Friends held at 
Chester" [Moorestown, N. J.J, 29th day of 3rd month, 1810. 

William Roberts Buzby [2268], president of Haddonfield National Bank, elected 1896. 



1340— RICHARD F. POPE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140; Amy, 349; Samuel Pope, 711). 

b. 3rd mo. 16th, 1832. 
m. 12th mo. 31st, 1861, Susan W. Bristol. 
She b. 7th mo. 1st, 1837. 



2270— EDITH B. POPE b. 10th mo. 28th, 1862. 

m. 5th mo. 27th, 1886, George E. Cooley. 



2271— EDGAR J. POPE b. nth mo. 27th, 1863. 

m. (ith mo. 12th, 1888, Mattie Hilton. 



2272— CORA M. POPE b. 5th mo. 8th, 1867. 

m. 11th mo. 25th, 188;, William A. Davis. 

2273— HARRY E. POPE b. 10th mo. 20th, 1872. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 463 

1348— SARAH POPE ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Amy, 349; Elizabeth F. Pope, 
712). 
b. 1st mo. 18th, 1823, in Moorestown, N. J. 
d. April 7th, 1907, in La Grange, 111. 
m. January 18th, 1854, Joshua Nelson Austin, son 
of Silas and Elizabeth (Tompkins) Austin. 
He b. May 23rd, 1807, at Mahopac Falls, N. Y. 
d. March 19th, 1892, in Yorkville, 111. 

2274— ELIZABETH ROBERTS AUSTIN 

b. April 26th, 1859. 

m. September 7th, 1887, William Ennis Kin- 
nett, M.D. 

2275— MARY AUSTIN b. June 25th, 1861. 

m. June 25th, 1885, Rev. Henry William 
Powell. 

2276— JOHN CLAYTON AUSTIN 

b. March 12th, 1863. 
m. July 6th, 1886, Hattie Brydon. 



1350— MIRIAM JONES ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Amy, 349; Elizabeth F. Pope, 
712). 
b. 6th mo. 12th, 1827, in Moorestown, N. J. 
d. February 26th, 1907, in Yorkville, 111. 
in. First, December 21st, 1854, Dexter P. Pierce, 
son of John and Elizabeth (Barrett) Pierce. 
He b. 1822, near Hinsdale, Mass. 

d. October, 1861, in Hinsdale, Mass. 
m. Second, April, 1865, Eleazar Hazen Austin, son 
of Silas and Elizabeth (Tompkins) Austin. 
He d. August 16th, 1887, in Yorkville, 111. 

2277— ELLA PIERCE b. January 23rd, 1856. 

m. February iqth, 1880, in Yorkville, III., 
Charles Frederick Shepard. 



464 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1351— JOHN P. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140; Amy, 349; Elizabeth F. Pope, 712). 

b. 11th mo. 11th, 1829. 
m. 1st mo. 1st, 1854, Elizabeth Brown. 

2278— CHARLES B. ROBERTS b. nth mo. 9th, 1854. 

d. gth mo. 9th, 1857. 

2279— MILLIE A. ROBERTS b. 6th mo. 27th, 1858. 

m. 2nd mo. 14th, 1884, John B. Harris. 

2280— FRANK B. ROBERTS b. 8th mo. 15th, i860. 

2281— EM. MA F. ROBERTS b. 6th mo. 20th, 1863. 

deceased. 

2282— GEORGE C. ROBERTS b. 2nd mo. gth, 1866. 



1352— ALBERT JONES (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42 ; Jacob, 140; 

Amy, 349; Miriam Pope, 713). 

b. 10th mo. 19th, 1825, near Medford, N. J. 

m. April 9th, 1857, Sarah Hance Rogers, daughter 

of John and Hannah (Hance) Rogers; Joseph 

Wall, justice of the peace, Crosswicks, N. J., 

performing ceremony. 
She b. October 11th, 1832, near Crosswicks, N. J. 

d. July 19th, 1909, in Galesburg. 111.; buried in 

Elmwood Cemetery, Yorkville, 111. 

2283— SAMUEL V. JONES b. January 29th. 1859. 

d. June 27th, 1881 ; buried in Yorkville, III. 

2284— HANNAH ROGERS JONES 

b. November 10th, i860. 

m. 1 2th mo. 2nd, 1879, Isaac P. Norton. 

2285— HENRY E. JONES b. October ioth, 1864. 

d. January 13th. 1866 ; buried in Colestowu, 
N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 465 

1353— ELIZABETH ROBERTS JONES (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Jacob, 140; Amy, 349; Miriam Pope, 
713). 
b. 6th mo. 16th, 1827, near Moorestown, N. J. 
d. 12th mo. 14th, 1908, in Moorestown, N. J. 
m. 4th mo. 7th, 1853, George M. Evans, son of 
Thomas B. and Mary (Matlack) Evans. 
He b. 7th mo. 12th, 1826, near Hartford, N. J. 
d. 6th mo. 20th, 1887, near Hartford, N. J. 



2286— SARAH JONES EVANS b. 4th mo. 5th, 1854. 

d. 9th mo. 26th, 1876. 



2287— ALLEN JONES EVANS b. nth mo. 6th, 1859. 

d. 3rd mo. 4th, 1863. 

2288— THOMAS BALLINGER EVANS 

b. 4th mo. 2nd, 1863. 

m. 1 2th mo. 8th, 1887, Mary T. Rulon. 

2289— MIRIAM JONES EVANS b. 5th mo. 24th, 1870. 



1354— SARAH WEBSTER JONES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Amy, 349; Miriam Pope, 713). 

b. 3rd mo. 25th, 1829, near Moorestown, N. J. 

d. 4th mo. 2nd, 1905, in Hartford, N. J.; buried 
in Colestown Cemetery. 

m. 3rd mo. 27th, 1851, by Friends' ceremony, in 
presence of Charles Gilpin, Esq., Mayor of 
Philadelphia, Samuel Lippincott Roberts, son 
of Asa and Anna (Lippincott) Roberts. 
He b. 9th mo. 17th, 1822, near Fellowship, N. J. 

d. 3rd mo. 19th, 1881, in Hartford, N. J.; buried 
in Colestown Cemetery. 



466 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2290— AMY ROBERTS b. 2nd mo. 5th, 1852. 

m. 3rd mo. 19th, 1874, George N. Conrow. 

2291— ASA ROBERTS b. 3rd mo. 29th, 1855. 

m. 1st mo. 22nd, 1879, Rebecca C. Roberts. 

2292— RICHARD J. ROBERTS b. 8th mo. 20th, 1856. 

m. July 8th, 1885, Ann V. Rogers [1382]. 

2293— ANNA L. ROBERTS b. nth mo. 8th, 1858. 

d. 12th mo. 29th, 1861. 

2294— ELIZABETH ROBERTS b. 4th mo. 25th, 1863. 

m. 9th mo. 27th, 1893, Albert Haines. 

2295— ALBERT J. ROBERTS b. 12th mo. 17th, 1864. 

m. 3rd mo. 21st, 1894, Esther Lippincott. 

2296— SAMUEL L. ROBERTS, JR. 

b. 12th mo. 14th, 1873. 
m. 10th mo. 18th, 1899, Laura V. Coate. 

1355— BARCLAY JONES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140; Amy, 349; Miriam Pope, 713). 

b. 12th mo. 18th, 1830, near Fellowship, N. J. 

d. 6th mo. 11th, 1909, in Moorestown, N. J.; 
buried in Colestown Cemetery. 

m. 1st mo. 1st, 1857, Mary Haines [ 1681 ], daugh- 
ter of Empson and Rachel (Buzby) Haines. 
She b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1837. 

2297— MIRIAM JONES b. 12th mo. 14th, 1857. 

d. 2nd mo. 4th, 1858. 

2298— NATHAN HAINES JONES 

b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1859. 
m. 4th mo. nth, 1883, Arabella Rodebaugh. 

2299— ALLEN JONES b. 10th mo. 26th, i860. 

m. 1st mo. 7th, 1885, Sarah Slim. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 467 

2300— RACHEL HAINES JONES 

b. 4th mo. 22nd, 1862. 
m. 2nd mo. 21st, 1883, Edward B. Deacon. 

2301— CHARLES DAVIS JONES 

b. nth mo. 20th, 1863. 
m. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1892, Hannah L. Evans. 

2302— MARY ELLA JONES b. 6th mo. 18th, 1867. 

m. nth mo. 20th, 1909, Joseph Waterman 
Jarrett. 

2303— HOWARD EMPSON JONES 

b. 3rd mo. 27th, 1869. 
m. 9th mo. 28th, 1900, Florence Shreve. 

2304— EMPSON HAINES JONES 

b. 12th mo. 31st, 1871. 
d. 7th mo. 7th, 1872. 

2305— BARCLAY HENRY JONES 

b. 10th mo. 8th, 1873. 

m. First, 9th mo. 26th, 1898, Elizabeth S. 

Ballinger. 
m. Second, 6th mo. 23rd, 1909, Anna L- 
Woolman. 



1356— RICHARD POPE JONES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42,- 

Jacob, 140; Amy, 349; Miriam Pope, 713). 

b. 10th mo. 16th, 1833, near Moorestown, N. J. 
d November 26th, 1877, at Moorestown, N. J. 
m. First, January 30th, 1862, Minetta Higley,. 
daughter of Nelson Oliver and Emily (White) 
Higley. 
She b. January 30th, 1842. 

d. March 14th, 1865, in West Virginia. 
m. Second, Levica Powers. 

2306— LUELLA JONES b. October 28th, 1862. 

m. December 4th, 1884, Philip Jacoby. 



468 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1357— AMY POPE JONES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140; Amy, 349; Miriam Pope, 713). 

b. 9th mo. 8th, 1835, near Moorestown, N. J. 
m. 2nd mo. 12th, 1856, by Friends' ceremony. 

Charles Engle Davis, son of David and Mary 

A. (Engle) Davis. 
He b. 10th mo. 14th, 1832, near Woodstown, N. J. 
d. 4th mo. 29th, 1906, in Woodstown, N. J. 

2307— ANNA M. DAVIS b. 1st mo. 21st, 1858. 

m. 1 2th mo. 2nd, 1879, Thomas Weatherby. 

2308— ALLEN J. DAVIS b. 8th mo. 15th, 1859. 

m. 3rd mo. 10th, 1886, by Friends' Ceremony. 
Hannah Cooper, daughter of Elmer and 
Ann (Duell) Cooper. 
She b. 8th mo. 10th, 1863, in Gloucester Co., N. J. 

2309— CHARLES H. DAVIS I). 10th mo. 28th, 1866. 

m. 1st mo. 15th, 1889, Bertha Haines. 



1358— ALLEN HENRY JONES (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Amy, 349; Miriam Pope, 713). 

b. 10th mo. 23rd, 1846, near Fellowship, N. J. 
m. August 24th, 1870, in Cleveland, O., Eleanor 
Keen Kimball. 
She b. October 29th, 1852, in Union, Broome Co., V \. 

2310— GERTRUDE TIRZAH JONES 

b. January 17th, 1872. 
d. October 4th, 1891. 

2311— EDITH ELIZABETH JONES 

b. October 25th, 1874. 

2312— BESSIE NELLIE JONES b. September 2Sth, 1877. 

m. August bth, 1902, George William McKay. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 469 

1359— AMY FRENCH POPE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140; Amy, 349; Jacob F. Pope, 716). 

b. 5th mo. 10th, 1841. 
d. 9th mo. 16th, 1874. 
m. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1860, L. W. Thurber. 

2313— RUFUS ALLEN THURBER 

b. 6th mo. 30th, 1863. 
m. 10th mo. 24th, 1888, Bella Case. 

2314— ESTELLA MARY THURBER 

b. 5th mo. i8th, 1869. 
m. 12th mo. 5th, 1887, Richard Swain. 

2315— WILLIAM A. J. THURBER 

b. 7th mo. nth, 1872. 

2316— MILTON C. THURBER b. 12th mo. 15th, 1873. 

1360— JOHN C. POPE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; 

Amy, 349; Jacob F. Pope, 716). 

b. 12th mo. 28th, 1843. 
m. 1st mo. 31st, 1866, Lucinda S. Drury. 

2317— WILLIAM J. POPE b. 5th mo. 18th, 1875. 

23:8— CALLIE A. POPE b. nth mo. 28th, 1880. 

2319— IDA M. POPE b. 12th mo. 7th, 1882. 

1361— CHARLES COOK POPE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Amy, 349; Jacob F. Pope, 716). 

b. 8th mo. 21st, 1846, in Yorkville, 111. 
m. February 3rd, 1887, in Yorkville, 111., Ada B. 
Kennedy, daughter of Hugh and Jane Ann 
(Shibley) Kennedy; Methodist minister offi- 
ciating. 
She b. April 8th, 1861, in Bristol, 111. 

2320— HUGH KENNEDY POPE "1 b. December 12th, 1891. 
2321— LAWRENCE E. POPE J b. December 12th, 1891. 



470 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1362— ELLEN H. POPE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42 ; Jacob, 140 ; 

Amy, 349; Jacob F. Pope, 716). 

b. 1st mo. 23rd, 1849. 

m. First, 10th mo. 21st, 1868, Ephraim Frank 
Moulton. 
He d. May 30th, 1898. 

m. Second, July 21st, 1904, Charles Redfield. 

2322— JESSE R. MOULTON b. 3rd mo. 30th, 1871. 

1363— MIRIAM J. POPE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob 

140; Amy, 349; Jacob F. Pope, 716). 
b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1852. 
m. 11th mo. 18th, 1877, Lemuel Watkins. 

2323— HORNER WATKINS b. 12th mo. 13th, 1880. 

2324— ANNA WATKINS b. 10th mo. 23rd, 1885. 



1364— JESSE E. POPE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; 

Amy, 349; Jacob F. Pope, 716). 

b. 11th mo. 18th, 1858. 
m. 8th mo. 27th, 1889, Cora M. Bloom. 

2325— BEULAH POPE b. 5th mo. 13th, 1890. 

1366— ABIGAIL JONES ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Abigail, 350; Rebecca H. Jones, 
718). 
b. 1st mo. 12th, 1825. 

d. 5th mo. 25th, 1886; buried in Colestown (N. J.) 
Cemetery. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 



471 



m. 10th mo. 4th, 1849, Thomas Evens, Jr., son of 
Thomas and Sarah (Burrough) Evens. 
He b. 7th mo. 12th, 1819. 

d. 4th mo. 6th, 1898 ; buried in Colestown Ceme- 
tery. 



2326— JOEL R. EVENS 



2327— JOSEPH J. EVENS 



2328— HENRY EVENS 



b. 7th mo. 9th, 1850. 

m. First, 10th mo. ioth, 1872, Abbie B. C. 
Kay. 

m. Second, 1st mo. 12th, 1886, Lucy S. Ed- 
wards. 

m. Third, September 30th, 1905, Priscilla M. 
Burrough [1385]. 

b. 6th mo. 6th, 1851, in Marlton, N. J. 
m. 3rd mo. 27th, 1883, by Friends' ceremony, 
Sarah A. Moore, daughter of Isaiah W. 
and Hannah F. (Albright) Moore. 
She b. 12th mo. 6th, 1859, at May's Landing, N. J. 
(no issue). 

b. 5th mo. 8th, 1853. 
m. June 15th, 1881, Anna C. Britton. 



2329— THOMAS JACOB EVENS b. 6th mo. 9th, 1855, in Marlton, N. J. 

d. 5th mo. 23rd, 1882, in Marlton, N. J. 
m. December 22nd, 1880, Sarah J. Proud, 
daughter of Levi Proud; Baptist cere- 
mony. 
She d. February 7th, 1882 (no issue). 



2330— JOSHUA R. EVENS 



b. 1st mo. 29th, 1857. 
unmarried. 



2331— SARAH REBECCA EVENS 



b. nth mo. 21st, 1858. 
unmarried. 



2332— RACHEL S. EVENS 
2333— ISAAC S. EVENS 



b. 7th mo. nth, i860. 

m. 2nd mo. 7th, 1883, Levi T. Ballinger. 

b. 7th mo. nth, i860. 

m. nth mo. 27th, 1889, Helen A. Wills. 



472 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2334— ELIZABETH DORAN EVENS 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1863. 

»335— ABIGAIL JONES EVENS b. 10th mo. 31st, 1864. 

d. 1 1 th mo. 29th, 1866. 



1368— JOHN COLES JONES (Thomas, 1 : Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 

140; Abigail, 350; Aquilla Jones, 719). 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1835. 

m. 1st mo. 28th, 1869. Amanda Deacon. 

2336— DANIEL LEWIS JONES b. 4th mo. 15th, 1870. 

2337— WILLIAM AQUILLA JONES 

b. 12th mo. 26th, 1877. 



1369— JOSEPH AQUILLA JONES (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Abigail, 350; Aquilla Jones, 
719). 

b. 8th mo. 25th, 1837. 

m. 1863, Sarah E. Cowperthwaite. 

2338— MARTHA C. JONES m. John Brasilia, M.D. 

2339— AQUILLA JONES 



1370— ANNA FRENCH WALTON (Thomas. 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Richard, 351; Sarah L, 720). 

b. 9th mo. 13th. 1851. 

111. Herbert Linwood Stiles. 



2340— LIN WOOD WALTON STILES 

b. 3rd mo. l8lh, 1871. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 473 



1373— ANNA MOORE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Samuel B., 722). 

b. 2nd mo. 3rd, 1848, near Moorestown, N. J. 
m. November 14th, 1872, William Slim, son of 
Peter H. and Sarah (Rudderow) Slim; Rev. 
Charles Hill, Methodist minister, performing 
ceremony. 
W. S. b. June 28th, 1845, near Moorestown, N. J. 

d. October 30th, 1902, in Merchantville, N. J. 

2341— EDITH ELIZABETH SLIM 

b. July 1st, 1874. 

m. May loth, 1893, Walter Ball. 

2342— HOWARD FRENCH SLIM 

b. October 18th, 1876. 

m. April i6th, 1902, Bertha M. Ball. 



1376— SAMUEL FRENCH ROGERS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Elizabeth S., 
723). 
b. 9th mo. 11th, 1843. 
m. 6th mo. 11th, 1877, Miriam Evens. 

2343— LEON EVENS ROGERS b. 5th mo. 24th, 1878. 

1377_SARAH MOORE ROGERS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Elizabeth S., 723). 

b. llth mo. 2nd, 1845, in Marlton, N. J. 
m. September 6th, 1873, in Philadelphia, James 
Abbot Gordon, son of Richard and Mary 
(Abbott) Gordon; Presbyterian minister per- 
forming ceremony. 
He b. February 20th, 1832, near Sharptown, N. J. 
d. August 9th, 1909, near Beverly, N. J. 



474 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



2344— KATHLENA WOODHULL GORDON 

b. December 27th, 1874. 



2345— CARL GORDON 



b. October 10th, 1876. 

m. October 20th, igo4, in Smithtown, L. I., 
Cora Gould. 



1378— FRANK EUGENE ROGERS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Elizabeth S., 723). 

b. 4th mo. 17th, 1848. 
d. April 7th, 1905, in New York, 
m. December 17th, 1874, in Philadelphia, Eliza- 
beth Howell, daughter of Samuel and Chatty 
(Hendrickson) Howell; Presbyterian ceremony. 
She b. January 2nd, 1848, in Gloucester Co., N. J. 

2346— CHATTY ALMA ROGERS b. November 2nd, 1887. 

d. June 3rd, 1888. 

1381— ALINE ROUSELLE ROGERS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Elizabeth S., 
723). 
b. 3rd mo. 1st, 1856. 
m. 5th mo. 19th, 1880, Joseph B. Rudderow. 

2347— JOSEPH B. RUDDEROW, JR. 

b. 6th mo. 12th, 1882. 



1382— ANN VENICOMB ROGERS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Elizabeth S., 723). 

b. 7th mo. 5th, 1859, near Marlton, N. J. 
m. July 8th, 1885, in Chicago, 111., Richard J. 
Roberts [2292], son of Samuel L. and Sarah 
W. (Jones) Roberts; Presbyterian minister per- 
forming ceremony. 
He b. 8th mo. 20th, 1856, near Hartford, N. J. 

2348— FRANK EUGENE ROBERTS 

b. April 27th, 1886. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 475 

2349— HAROLD ROBERTS b. November 4th, 1887. 

2350— HERBERT STANLEY ROBERTS 

b. December 6th, 1892. 



1383— IRWIN CLIFTON ROGERS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Elizabeth S., 723). 

b. 12th mo. 28th, 1861. 
d. August 5th, 1901, in Lawton, Oklahoma, 
m. June 3rd, 1891, in Camden, N. J., Amelia 
Conzelman, daughter of William and Caroline 
(Shellhorn) Conzelman; Episcopal ceremony. 
She b. January 11th, 1871, in Philadelphia. 

2351— FRANCES MARIE ROGERS 

b. September 2nd, 1892. 

2352— LEONARD FRENCH ROGERS 

b. July iSth, 1895. 

2353— ALICE EMMA ROGERS b. July 27th, 1896. 

2354— HELEN RAY ROGERS b. June 6th, 1898. 

1384— ELIZABETH FRENCH BURROUGH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Mary 
L., 725). 
b. 11th mo. 16th, 1845, in Medford, N. J. 
m. First, March 1st, 1865, William A." Shivers, 
son of Charles and Martha (Harker) Shivers; 
Episcopal ceremony, 
m. Second, August 4th, 1889, Joseph H. Ivins, son 
of George K. and Jane Ivins ; Baptist ceremony. 
He b. March 22nd, 1858, in Camden Co., N. J. 

2355— WALTER HARKER SHIVERS 

b. October 7th, 1866. 

m. August 8th, 1888, Hannah R. Schloer. 



476 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1386— JOHN STOKES BURROUGH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Mary L., 725). 

b. 1st mo. 28th, 1851. 

m. First, April 24th, 1872, Margaret Stoy. 

m. Second, December 22nd, 1894, Mary Sparks. 

3356— HARRY S. BURROUCH b. June 2nd, 1873. 

m. September iqth, 1901, Emma James Col- 
lins, daughter of Henry Ely and Charlotte 
(Cunningham) Collins. 

1387— LYDIA SAUNDERS BURROUGH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; Joshua, 352; Mary 
L., 725). 

b. 1st mo. 29th, 1854, near Merchantville, N. J. 
m. January 24th, 1883, Ashton Fisler, son of Dr. 
Benjamin and Rebecca (Venicomb) Fisler; 
ceremony by Rev. A. K. Street, Methodist min- 
ister. 
A. F. b. June 24th, 1857. in Marlton. N. J. 

2357— WILLIAM VENICOMB FISLER 

b. July 10th, 1885. 

2358— SAMUEL BURROUCH FISLER 

b. October 14th, 1804. 
d. October 21st, 1804. 

1390— DAVID URIAH MORGAN (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Uriah, 353; Hannah I., 726). 
b. February 25th, 1836, near Chew's Landing, 
N.J. 

d. January 3rd, 1889, at Wissahickon. Philada. 
m. September 8th, 1873, in Camden, N. J., Annie 
Collings Pidgon, daughter of John and Keziah 
A. (Gilmore) Pidgon; Rev. Jacob T. Price, 
Methodist minister, performing ceremony. 
She b. July 5th, 1S46. in Collingswood, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 477 

2359— WILLIAM HENRY MORGAN 

b. October 19th, 1875. 
m. March 10th, 1904, Ada C. Morgan. 

2360— DAVID URIAH MORGAN, JR. 

b. November 2nd, 1877. 
d. September 1st, 1896. 

2361— HANNAH IVINS MORGAN 

b. January 26th, 1880. 
d. February 12th, 1882. 

2362— HOWARD FRANKLIN MORGAN 

b. May loth, 1882. 

m. July 15th, 1910, Mabel Louise Achen- 
bach, daughter of Henry and Mary (Kel- 
logg) Achenbach ; Methodist ceremony. 
She b. November 28th, 1882, in Spencer, Iowa. 

2363— ANNIE COLLINGS MORGAN 

b. October 21st, 1884. 

2364— ELIZABETH TOMLINSON MORGAN 

b. November 3rd, 1887. 
d. December 29th, 1888. 

David Uriah Morgan was a pioneer in the manufacture, in America, of sensitized 
paper for photographic purposes, and at the time of his death was possibly the largest 
manufacturer of this paper in the United States. 

139S— MARY FRENCH RICHARDS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353; Sarah H., 
728). 
b. 10th mo. 31st, 1839, near Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. October 22nd, 1868, John S. W. Johnson, son 
of John S. and Hannah (Roadnight) Johnson. 
He b. April 1st, 1844, in Coventry, Warwickshire, 
England, 
d. January 20th, 1897, at his residence, North 
Third street, Camden, N. J.; buried in Ever- 
green Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 



478 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2365— SARAH FRENCH RICHARDS JOHNSON 

b. August 24th, 1869, in Camden, N. J. 
d. October 12th, 1870, in Camden, N. J. 

2366— JOHN ALBERT JOHNSON 

b. October 1st, 1871, in Camden, N. J. 
d. September 7th, 1878, in Camden, N. J. 

2367— GEORGE HERBERT JOHNSON 

b. September 1st, 1874, in Camden, N. J. 

2368— MARION PENN JOHNSON 

b. September 28th, 1876, in Camden, N. J. 
m. February 22nd, 1908, John J. Nagle, son 
of Thomas and Annie (Morphy) Nagle. 
He b. May 3rd, 1874, in Cork, Ireland. 

John S. Johnson died June 2nd, 1856, in Coventry, Eng. ; Hannah (Roadnight) John- 
son, born in Kenihvorth, Eng., died in Coventry, Eng. 



1403— CLAYTON FRENCH SHOEMAKER (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141 ; Uriah, 353; Mary 
I., 731). 

b. 7th mo. 12th, 1849, near Swedesboro, N. J. 
m. June 11th, 1879, in Selma, Alabama, Jennie E. 
Cushing, daughter of Milton F. and Fannie 
(Green) Cushing; ceremony by Rev. Peter 
Gowan, Presbyterian minister. 
She b. May 17th, 1851. 

2369— JANE CUSHING SHOEMAKER 

b. September 2nd, 1882. 

d. August 23rd, 1910, at Beach Haven, N. J. 

2370— CLAYTON FRENCH SHOEMAKICK, JR. 

b. January 9th, 1887. 

2371— HELEN ROTHROCK SHOEMAKER 

b. August 31st, 1888. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 479 

CLAYTON FRENCH SHOEMAKER. 

Clayton French Shoemaker, third son of Edwin and Mary I. (French) 
Shoemaker [731], is a native of Gloucester County, N. J., being born in the 
same place and same house in which his father had been born, about one and 
a half miles from Swedesboro, N. J. He spent his early years on a farm, 
attending school in winter, and doing his share of the usual farm work in 
summer. At thirteen years of age he was sent to Philadelphia, where for 
three years his education was advanced. He then entered the employ of 
French, Richards & Co., serving that firm acceptably for twenty years and 
acquiring a thorough knowledge of the wholesale drug business. At the close 
of the year 1884 he left their employ; and on January 1st, 1885, associating 
himself with James C. Roller, formed the firm of Roller & Shoemaker, whole- 
sale druggists, succeeding to the business of Barrick, Roller & Co., 20 N. 
Fifth street, Philadelphia. On January 1st, 1888, Mr. Miers Busch was 
admitted as a general partner, without any change in the firm name, and the 
business was moved to a much more commodious and prominent location, No. 
602 Arch street, the firm by this time having become a prominent factor in 
drug circles. Mr. James C. Roller retired from the firm on April 13th, 1892, 
and the two remaining partners continued the business under the name of 
Shoemaker & Busch, removing to their present location, 511-15 Arch street, 
January 1st, 1900. 

During an active and successful career, Mr. Shoemaker has been officially 
connected with a number of trade and mercantile organizations. He is a 
member of the Board of Directors of the Philadelphia Chamber of Com- 
merce (formerly Trades League), Philadelphia Drug Exchange and Phila- 
delphia Credit Men's Association, having been president of the last two 
organizations, and of the National Wholesale Druggists' Association. For 
a number of years he has been an influential member of the Presbyterian 
Church and a generous contributor to many charitable institutions. Just and 
generous and of genial personality, Mr. Shoemaker is a model employer, 
taking a kindly and appreciative interest in those who have faithfully con- 
tributed to his prosperity. 



480 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Mr. Shoemaker and his family in the summer of 1910 sustained a severe 
loss in the sudden and almost tragic death of their elder daughter, Jane Cush- 
ing Shoemaker. While bathing in a heavy surf at Beach Haven, N. J., where 
she had been spending a vacation with friends, Miss Shoemaker was attacked 
by heart failure, and every medical effort in her behalf proved futile. She 
was a young woman of superior talent and accomplishments; a graduate of 
the Philadelphia High School, from which she received a scholarship for 
tuition at Bryn Mawr College, where she took the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 1905; and for the next two years she devoted serious attention to the 
furtherance of her studies in music and languages. In 1907 she began prepa- 
ration for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, by taking non-resident work 
at Bryn Mawr, on the standing of which she was given a resident fellowship 
in Economics, and received the degree of Master of Arts in 1910; appointed 
Fellow for the year 1910-11. It was her intention to spend some time in 
Vienna in further pursuance of her studies in connection with preparation for 
the Doctor's degree, but death untimely closed her career. In appreciation 
of her worth, and as an expression of their sorrow at her death, and of the 
esteem in which she was held by the president and faculty of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, a memorial service was held at the college in her honor. Faculty and 
fellow-students, through the columns of the college periodicals, fully expressed 
in terms most eulogistic their deep regard for her as student and classmate. 
From these we quote : 

" Everything human claimed her interest, and all knowledge was her 
province. She had musical ability beyond the average, a line critical appre- 
ciation of the best in art and literature, a passionate interest in social con- 
ditions and in the welfare of her city, a ready sympathy for her friends, 
and what is perhaps the most difficult art of life — a leisure to cultivate 
them all." 

" She was always the jolliest, most care-free of companions, with a quick 
adaptability to all sorts of people, and a ready understanding of another's 
point of view." 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 481 

1404— EMMOR DAVIS FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353; Samuel H., 732). 

b. 9th mo. 1st, 1844, in Salem, O. 
d. February 3rd, 1904, 1.15 A.M., at his residence. 
31 7 Vine Street, Camden, N. J. ; buried in Ever- 
green Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 
m. September 6th, 1866, Edith Lippincott, daughter 
of Josiah H. and Anna (Ogden) Lippincott; 
Rev. T. M. Cunningham, pastor of Alexander 
(now West Green St.) Presbyterian Church, 
Philadelphia, performing ceremony at home of 
George C. Townsend (uncle of bride), 1806 
Wallace St., Philadelphia. 
She b. 12th mo. 29th, 1846, near Woodstown, N. J. 

2372— ELLA FRENCH b. August 25th, 1868. 

d. December 25th, 1870. 

2373— MINNIE LIPPINCOTT FRENCH 

b. January 13th, 1871. 
m. December 12th, 1895, E. Bartine Johnson. 

2374— EDITH EVELYN FRENCH 

b. May 21st, 1874. 

d. January 5th, 1906. 

m. August 2nd, 1905, George F. Reifsneider. 

2375— ALICE FRENCH b. July 15th. 1877. 

2376— MARY HELEN FRENCH b. May 29th, 1882. 

m. January 28th, 1911, Conrad VV. Schauffele. 

Josiah II. Lippincott, son of Benjamin H. and Elizabeth (Holmes) Lippincott, was 
born 4th mo. 24th, 1822, died 10th mo. 31st, 1904, married 3rd mo. 7th, 1844, by Friends' 
ceremony, Anna Ogden, born 9th mo. 12th, 1823, died 2nd mo. 8th, 1S83; daughter of 
David C. and Beulah (Hancock) Ogden. 



482 GENEALOGY OF THE 

EMMOR DAVIS FRENCH. 

Emmor Davis French, eldest son and child of Samuel Harrison [732] and 
Angelina (Dunseth) French, was educated in private schools of Philadelphia 
and then entered the employ of his father's firm, French, Richards & Co., 
Philadelphia, where he remained until about 1870, at which time he embarked 
in a business enterprise on his own account, and later, with his brother, William 
A. French [1405], established the business of paint manufacturing and 
builders' supplies at Third, Vine and Main Streets, Camden, N. J., under the 
firm name of E. D. & W. A. French. He retired from this firm about 1878 
to establish a transportation line from the Camden and Philadelphia ferries 
to East Camden and to develop land in that section. He was interested in all 
plans for the development of Camden and was active in its business and public 
affairs, including the Delaware River tunnel project. During 1875 and 1876 
he was a member of the Camden City Council, and later was urged to accept 
a nomination for mayor, but declined. Owing to ill health, he removed to 
Port Republic, N. J., where he lived for a number of years, and later in 
Atlantic City, returning finally to Camden where he remained until his 
decease. Mr. French was fond of outdoor life and was noted for his good 
horsemanship. In 1866 he became an active member of the First Troop 
Philadelphia City Cavalry, and entered upon its non-active list in 1874. 
This Troop was organized in 1774, and has taken part in every war, and 
prominently participated in almost all public occasions in Philadelphia during 
the past one hundred and thirty-eight years. December 31st, 1872, Mr. 
French was commissioned captain, Battery B, Artillery, New Jersey National 
Guard, and retired June 22nd, 1876. He was a man of generous impulses 
and high ideals, and considered no sacrifice too great to be made in assisting 
those appealing to him for aid. Many of the old residents of Camden have 
most kindly recollections of him. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 483 



1406— HOWARD BARCLAY FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353; Samuel H., 
732). 
b. 9th mo. 3rd, 1848, in Salem, O. 
m. November 9th, 1882, Ida Colket, daughter of 
Coffin and Mary Pennypacker (Walker) Colket. 
Ceremony at the residence of her parents, 1336 
Spring Garden St., Philadelphia, by the Rev. 
C. George Currie, rector of St. Luke's P. E. 
Church (now St. Luke and the Epiphany), 
Philadelphia. 
She b. September 23rd, 1851, in Philadelphia. 

2377— COFFIN COLKET FRENCH 

b. November 20th, 1883. 
d. January 19th, 1884. 

2378— ANNAH COLKET FRENCH 



HOWARD BARCLAY FRENCH. 

Howard Barclay French, third son and child of Samuel Harrison [732] 
and Angelina (Dunseth) French, in 1852, when four years of age, accom- 
panied his parents to Philadelphia from Salem, O., where his father was tem- 
porarily engaged in business. After receiving an academic education at 
Friends' schools, he served three years and six months apprenticeship in the 
retail drug store of William B. Webb, during which time he attended the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, graduating from same in 1871. A month 
later he entered the employ of his father's firm, French, Richards & Co., 
wholesale druggists and paint manufacturers, established in 1844, and in July, 
1872, was transferred to their manufacturing department. While thus en- 
gaged he determined upon a professional career, and in 1879 entered Jefferson 
Medical College, where he pursued the regular course of study, in addition 
to the duties in the office of the above mentioned firm ; but the severe strain 
on his health and increased business responsibilities compelled him to abandon 
medical ambitions. It was then decided to separate the manufacturing de- 
partment of the business from the drug department; and in January, 1883, 



484 GENEALOGY OF THE 



Howard B., with his brother William A., joined with their father, Samuel H. 
French, and John L. Longstreth, in forming the firm of Samuel H. French & 
Co., which succeeded the manufacturing branch of the old firm. French, 
Richards & Co. In 1886 the death of William A. French occurred, and in 
1895 the death of Samuel H. French; and upon the retirement of John I.. 
Longstreth in 19(11. Mr. French became the sole proprietor of the business, 
retaining the firm name of Samuel H. French & Co. 

For twenty-five years he has been chairman of the Executive Committee of 
the Philadelphia Paint Manufacturers' Club, and was president of the Na- 
tional Paint, Oil and Varnish Association. He is treasurer of the Central 
Committee of the Paint and Varnish Manufacturers' Associations of the 
United States, and treasurer and director of the Paint Trade Mutual Fire 
Insurance Co. At its organization in 1890 he became a director of The 
Equitable Trust Company of Philadelphia, and in 1902 was elected to the 
presidency. For many years lie has served as one of the managers and trus- 
tees of the Philadelphia Southern Home for Destitute Children, the oldest 
institution of the kind in Pennsylvania ; also as a manager of the Home Mis- 
sionary Society. By appointment of the governor, he is a member of the 
Pennsylvania State Board of Charities and treasurer of same, devoting much 
time and attention to the discharge of the duties of that important trust. For 
forty years he has been trustee and for the past twelve years president of the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, the oldest and largest institution of the 
kind in the world. 

Mr. French has been conspicuous and active in many leading organizations 
of a commercial, patriotic and social character. Since its organization in 
1890, he has been a director of the Trades League of Philadelphia (now 
Chamber of Commerce) and is first vice-president, and has served as chair- 
man of many of its most important committees. Largely, if not entirely, 
through his instrumentality as chairman of one of the committees of that 
organization, the city of Philadelphia established a high pressure water system 
for fire service, and the recreation piers along Delaware Avenue. He was 
appointed by Governor Hastings a delegate to the Convention held in Tampa, 
Florida, in 1896, to devise methods for the proper defence of the Gulf and 
South Atlantic harbors of the United States, and also appointed by the gov- 
ernor a member of the Executive Committee of the Tennessee Centennial 
Commission of Philadelphia. He was secretary of the Union Committee on 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 485 

Transportation, Manufacturing and Commercial Interests of Philadelphia, 
which did valuable work for the improvement of the transportation facilities 
of that city. Served as a member of the Advisory Board of the Commercial 
Museums, now a member of its Board of Trustees; former director of the 
Manufacturers' Club and of the Franklin Institute. He was chairman of a 
joint committee of the commercial organizations of Philadelphia, and also of 
the sub-committee, on the selection of a new site for the United States Mint, 
1893-94, and it was undoubtedly largely through the energetic action of 
this committee that the Mint was retained in Philadelphia. For thirty-nine 
years Mr. French has been a member of the Union League, being one of 
the board of directors for several years, and now second vice-president. He 
has always been active in upholding the highest political standard. Chairman 
of the Citizens' Committee of Ninety-five for Good City Government, also a 
member of the Business Men's Republican League of 1895. During the 
administration of Mayor Warwick, 1895-1899, Mr. French served as a mem- 
ber of the Civil Service Commission of the city, examining upwards of two 
thousand applicants, a large percentage of whom were found deficient in the 
requirements of the places in the public service which they sought. In the- 
national contest of 1896 he was vice-chairman of the McKinley and Hobart 
Business Men's National Campaign Committee, and after the successful termi- 
nation of the campaign the President-elect and chairman Mark Hanna made- 
grateful acknowledgment, both in person and by letter, of the effective ser- 
vices rendered. In 1898 he was president of the National Republican League 
of Business Men; and in 1900, at the time of the holding of the Republican 
National Convention in Philadelphia, he was chairman and member of several 
committees of prominent citizens who superintended arrangements for the con- 
vention and extended special courtesies to the delegates and leading men' 
present from different parts of the country. During the Founders' Week 
celebration, October 4th-10th, 1908, commemorating the 225th anniversary 
of the founding of the city of Philadelphia, Mr. French as member of dif- 
ferent committees was active in a representative capacity in connection with 
the various industrial, patriotic and social features of that occasion. Member 
of a special committee on Transportation and Railroad Terminals ( 1910-1 1 ) , 
co-operating with the Mayor in an effort to provide ample facilities for the 
enlargement of trade and the adjustment of various interests, and the com- 
pletion of the comprehensive plans for the improvement of the city. Member 



486 GENEALOGY OF THE 

of the Committee of the Organizing Commission for the Twelfth Congress of 
the Permanent International Association of Navigation Congresses; member 
of the Atlantic Deeper Waterways Association. He was one of the origina- 
tors and president of the New Jersey Society of Pennsylvania, organized in 
1907, and now a director; member of the Ohio Society of Philadelphia, and 
was vice-president of same ; director of the Bath Portland Cement Company ; 
member of the American Pharmaceutical Association, Merion Cricket Club, 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Colonial Society, the Philadelphia 
Skating Club and Humane Society, and the Pen and Pencil Club of 
Philadelphia. 

Mr. French sat in the Republican National Convention, in June, 1912, as 
a delegate from the Second Congressional District, Philadelphia, taking a 
conspicuous part in the deliberations. Later he was largely instrumental in 
assisting to organize the Taft & Sherman Business Men's National Campaign 
Committee, being chosen its chairman, with Honorable John Wanamaker, 
Alba B. Johnson, president of Baldwin Locomotive Works, and Isaac H. 
Clothier, of Strawbridge & Clothier, as vice-chairmen. By appointment of 
Governor Tener, he was a delegate, representing Pennsylvania, at the Fifth 
Annual Convention of the Atlantic Deeper Waterways Convention, held in 
New London, Conn., September 4th-6th, 1912; he also represented the Com- 
mercial Museum and Chamber of Commerce of Philadelphia at this meeting. 
As chairman of the Finance Committee, Mr. French rendered efficient service 
in connection with the brilliant Historical Pageant, illustrating notable events 
in the history of Philadelphia, held in Fairmount Park, in the autumn of 1912. 

Mr. French has always taken deep interest in the landed affairs and early 
history of New Jersey, and is a member of the Council of Proprietors which 
holds the right of proprietorship in unlocated lands. This right of proprie- 
torship has succeeded from one generation to another for over two hundred 
and thirty years. 

On April 1st, 1908, " Alderbrook," the summer home of Mr. French, located 
in Upper Merion township, Montgomery County, Penna., and overlooking the 
picturesque and historic Chester Valley, was totally destroyed by fire. Ac- 
companying illustration shows " Alderbrook " rebuilt — colonial in design, 
occupying the site of the burned homestead. During the winter season, Mr. 
French occupies his residence at 2021 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

E. K. H. 
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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 487 



COFFIN COLKET. 

The ancestral roots of two noted New England colonial families extended through cen- 
turies before the Reformation. One was Colcord, pronounced and finally spelled Colket, 
the other Coffyn, now known as Coffin. Their descendants are numerous in England, the 
United States and other parts of the world. The direct ancestors of Coffin Colket, were 
Tristram Coffin, born in England, 1609, died in America, 1681 ; and Edward Colcord, 
born in England, 1616, died in America, 1685. The former came to New England about 
1640 and settled in Nantucket, Mass.; the latter came to what is now New Hampshire, 
about 1630. Both were men of means, enterprise and influence, and became heads of 
large and prosperous families. 

Coffin Colket was the son of Peter and Phoebe (Hamilton) Colket (Colcord). He was 
born at Epping, New Hampshire, October 15th, 1809, and died in Philadelphia, April 5th, 
1883. At an early age he left his New England home and came to Pennsylvania. This 
was the period when the pioneer American railroad projects were first undertaken. One 
of these was the Baltimore & Ohio, on the first section of which he constructed a number 
of bridges. This was in 1829. His next work was on the New Castle (Del.) and French- 
town Railroad in 1831-32, and following this he had large contracts on the Philadelphia 
and Columbia Railroad, the initial branch of the great Pennsylvania system. He built 
the Philadelphia, Germantown & Norristown Railroad, in 1833-34, a corporation with 
which he was associated during the remainder of his life, at the time of his death being 
its president, at which time he was also the president of the Chestnut and Walnut streets 
passenger railway and several other companies. For over forty years he was actively 
engaged in contracts and corporation management. He was interested in construction 
work on the Philadelphia & Trenton Railroad, the Renssalaer & Saratoga Railroad, the 
Troy & Champlain Canal, freight lines on Washington Avenue and Willow Street, Phila- 
delphia, the New Jersey Central, Blossburg & Corning (N. Y.), and Philadelphia, Wil- 
mington & Baltimore Railroads. He was at different times interested in the manage- 
ment of over thirty-eight corporations, mostly transportation companies. Until past 
three score and ten years he gave personal attention to his many enterprises, the active 
outdoor life he had led enabling him to carry on great undertakings with ease and 
pleasure. The completion and opening of a new line of transportation which he had 
built always gave him the greatest satisfaction, and he was justly proud of his remarkable 
record. Among local enterprises in which he took great interest and with which he was 
long connected, was the Merchants' Exchange, Third and Dock Streets, Philadelphia. 

Mr. Colket married March 21st, 1839, Mary Pennypacker Walker, born in Chester 
County, Pa., September 3rd, 1819, died November 15th, 1889, in Philadelphia. She was 
a descendant of Lewis Walker, a colonial pioneer of Chester Valley, and was the daughter 
of William and Sarah (Pennypacker) Walker, who celebrated their golden wedding in 
1867, surrounded by many happy descendants. 



488 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1409— CLARA ANGELINA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353; Samuel H., 
732). 

b. 1st mo. 18th, 1857, in Philadelphia. 

d. February 20th, 1901, in Philadelphia; buried 

in Evergreen Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 
m. May 24th, 1894, Adam Jakob; ceremony at the 

residence of her father, Samuel H. French, 228 

W. Logan Square, Philadelphia, by the Rev. 

Jacob Todd, pastor of Trinity M. E. Church, 

Philadelphia. 
A. J. d. October 20th, 1906, in Philadelphia. 

2379— GNADE BEATES JAKOB b. October 10th, 1S99. 

2380— CLARA JAKOB b. February 20th, 1901. 

d. February 22nd, 1901. 

1414— WALTER FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Uriah, 353; Charles B., 733). 

b. November 22nd, 1854, in North East, Md. 
d. August 26th, 1884, in Camden, N. J. 
m. July 8th, 1875, Rose Albertson. 

2381— MARY FREN'CH 

1415— CHARLES STANLEY FRENCH (Thomas, 1 j Charles,8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353; Charles B., 
733). 

b. June 21st, 1857, in Germantown, Philadelphia. 

m. September 26th, 1882, in St. Andrew's P. E. 
Church, Eighth and Spruce Streets, Philadel- 
phia, Ella Dunning, daughter of Charles Henry 
and Josephine Louisa (Bryan) Dunning; cere- 
mony by Rev. Wilbur F. Paddock, rector of 
church. 
She b. December 19th, 1857, in Chesapeake City, Md. 

d. October 28th, 1894, in Philadelphia; buried in 
Mt. Moriah Cemetery, Philadelphia. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 489 

2382— CHARLES DUNNING FRENCH 

b. March 4th, 1884. 

2383— HENRY BARCLAY FRENCH 

b. November 19th, 1889. 
d. February 5th, 1907. 

Charles Henry Dunning and Josephine Louisa Bryan were married March 24th, 1857. 
Charles Henry Dunning died May 24th, 1893. 



CHARLES STANLEY FRENCH. 

Charles Stanley French, sixth child and fifth son of Charles Barclay [733] 
and Sarah Louisa (Langcake) French, spent his boyhood days with his par- 
ents on the "White Mansion" farm, located on the White Horse turnpike 
and Gloucester Road, now part of Collingswood, and on the " Osier " farm, 
near Rowandtown (now Westmont), both in Camden County, New Jersey; 
and after receiving a private and public school education, he entered the 
employ, in 1874, of the drug department of his uncle's firm, French, Richards 
& Co., at Tenth and Market Streets, Philadelphia. Here he received a 
thorough training in the many details of the drug business ; and having proved 
himself well qualified for added responsibility, was admitted to a partnership 
in the firm in 1888. In 1891, following the dissolution of French, Richards 
& Co., he became connected — and is at this time (1912) so connected — 
with Samuel H. French & Co., Fourth and Callowhill Streets, Philadelphia, 
the members of which firm had in 1883 separated from French, Richards & 
Co., and became their successors in the manufacturing of paints and building 
materials ; and he is in active management of their large and prosperous busi- 
ness. In 1890 he was made director of the Mercantile Building and Loan 
Association of Philadelphia, and since 1900 has been president of same; 
member of the board of directors of the Philadelphia Credit Men's Associa- 
tion, also member of the board of trustees of the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy; treasurer of the New Jersey Society of Pennsylvania; member of 
the Union League and Historical Society of Pennsylvania; vestryman and 
treasurer of the Protestant Episcopal Memorial Church of the Advocate. Mr. 
French is also a life member of the Mercantile Beneficial Association of Phila- 
delphia, a benevolent organization instituted in 1842, incorporated in 1844, 
for the "purpose of alleviating the condition of such of its indigent members 



490 GENEALOGY OF THE 

as may be suffering from sickness or want of employment, or other causes, and 
for the promotion of the common welfare of the members." In the seventy 
years of its existence this association has thus distributed large sums of money. 
Its present membership numbers something over eleven hundred, including 
many of the most prominent business men in Philadelphia. He is a member 
of the executive committee of the Philadelphia Skating Club and Humane 
Society, organized 1850 and incorporated 1861. This unique society has had 
a most interesting history. It was organized for the purpose of " instruction 
and improvement in the art of skating, the cultivation of a friendly feeling 
in all who participate in the amusement, and the efficient use of proper appa- 
ratus for the rescue of persons breaking through the ice." In those days skating 
was chiefly confined to the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, accidents were 
numerous and often fatal, and the members of the club were required to carry 
the simple and effective device of a reel, about five inches long, made of hard 
wood, wound with a cord about fifty or sixty feet in length, and ending in 
a noose which the rescuer would fasten to his wrist, then throw the reel to 
the person in the water, " who having gotten hold of the cord, was then gently 
pulled out upon the firm ice." Many lives were saved in this way, and the 
club became recognized as a most worthy and useful organization. It was 
also required that each member, at all times when skating, wear on the left 
lapel of his coat a small silver skate, about an inch and a quarter long. And 
the carrying of the cord and reel, and the wearing of the little silver skate 
badge, are among the requirements of the membership at the present day. 
Every season conspicuous service has been rendered, and it is estimated that 
some nine hundred lives have been saved from drowning, the sick attended and 
the wounded treated. A singular fact recorded in this connection is that no 
instance is recalled of any of those saved from drowning ever making a con- 
tribution to the club or even returning to express appreciation of the service 
so humanely rendered. 

1425— MARY IVINS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel. 141 ; Uriah, 353; Clayton, 735). 

b. February 9th. 1847, in Philadelphia. 

m. January 15th, 1868, George YV. Banks, son of 
Jesse and Sally (Stowe) Banks; ceremony at 
the residence of her father, Clavton French, 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 491 



1505 Arch St., Philadelphia, by the Rev. Wil- 
liam Suddards, D.D., rector of Grace P. E. 
Church, Philadelphia. 
G. W. B. b. June 8th, 1837, in Redding, Fairfield County, 
Conn. 

2384— KATHARINE FRENCH BANKS 

b. November 30th, 1868. 

m. December 8th, 1897, Henry Bertrand Price, 

U. S. N. 

2385— JESSIE STOWE BANKS b. September 20th, 1871, in Philadelphia. 

d. August 31st, 1906, in Montreal, Canada, 
m. April 30th, 1903, Martin Hoyt Griffing, son 
of Martin Harvey and Mariette (Hoyt) 
Griffing. Ceremony at the residence of her 
uncle, George H. Earle, Jr., 1714 Walnut 
St., Philadelphia, by the Rev. Samuel E. 
Appleton, D.D., rector of P. E. Church of 
the Mediator, Philadelphia. 
M. H. G. b. November 5th, 1855, in Danbury, Conn. 

2386— CLAYTON FRENCH BANKS 

b. May 6th, 1877. 

m. February 19th, 1908, Annabelle Connelly. 

Jesse Banks, born March 15th, 1801, in Redding, Conn., married January 3rd, 1822, 
Sally Stowe, born March 4th, 1805, in Redding, Conn. Their son, George W. Banks, 
after receiving an academic education, learned the jewelry business in Bridgeport, Conn., 
and in the fall of 1859 removed to Philadelphia, associating himself with J. E. Caldwell 
& Company, one of the largest and most influential jewelry houses in that city. In 1865 
he was admitted to a partnership in the firm, which association was continued until the 
close of the year 1877. In March, 1878, Mr. Banks with Joseph T. Bailey, of Bailey 
& Company, and Samuel Biddle, of Robbins, Clark & Biddle, united in forming the firm 
of Bailey, Banks & Biddle, with Eli W. Bailey and Clayton French [735] as special 
partners ; and this firm soon became the largest and most prosperous jewelry house in 
Philadelphia. This partnership was continued until March, 1894, at which time, owing 
to the impaired health of Mr. Banks, the firm was incorporated ; and although retired 
from active business, he has retained his interest in the company as preferred stockholder 
and director. Mr. Banks has always been zealously interested in the advancement and 
prosperity of Philadelphia, and has taken active interest in many movements, both polit- 
ical and otherwise, to advance the interest of the city of his adoption. In 1892, he was 
very active in the work of the Russian Relief Committee, of which he was a member by 
appointment of Mayor Stuart ; and it was largely through his efforts that such a material 
success was attained. He has been a member of the Union League since April 22nd, 
1872, and is connected with numerous other organizations, both social and commercial. 



492 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1429— MARGARET HANSELL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

(harks, 42; Samuel, 141 ; Uriah, 353; Clay- 
ton, 735). 
h. October 20th, 1855, in Philadelphia, 
m. April 25th, 1878, in Holy Trinity Church, 
Philadelphia, John Rulon-Miller, son of Wil- 
liam Henry and Elizabeth Archer (Rulon) 
Miller; ceremony by the Rev. William Sud- 
dards, D.D., assisted by the Rev. William Neil- 
son McVickar. 
J. R.-M. b. November 6th, 1850, in Philadelphia. 

2387— JOHN RULON'-MILLER, JR. 

b. March 11th, 1883. 
m. April 29th, 1909, Anna R. Taylor. 

2388— SUMNER RULON-MILLER 

b. March 16th, 1885. 
m. October 27th, 1910, Eleanor Felton. 

2389— EMILY SPRING RULON-MILLER 

b. May 18th, 1887. 

m. October 1st, 1912, at " Wyola Farms," 
Newton Square, Pa., Rawdon Wright 
Myers, son of Walter Frederick and Mary 
Frances (Hovey) Myers, of Hartford, 
Conn. Ceremony by Rev. William C. Rich- 
ardson, S.T.D., rector of St. James P. E. 
Church, 22nd and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia. 
R. W. M. b. June 11th, 1884. 

2390— MARGARET FRENCH RULON-MILLER 

b. July 24th, 1889. 

d. February 19th, 1912. 

2391— CAROLINE FRENCH RULON-MILLER 

b. March 25th, 1891. 

2392— MAKY IV1NS RULON-MILLER 

b. October 31st, 1892. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 493 



1430— HARRY BANKS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Uriah, 353; Clayton, 735). 

b. July 25th, 1857, in Philadelphia. 

m. First, October 30th, 1883, in Holy Trinity 
Church, Philadelphia, Augusta Anna Graham, 
daughter of Dr. Archibald Hunter and Eliza 
Jane (Sampson) Graham; ceremony by Rev. 
William Neilson McVickar, rector. 
She b. September 4th, 1857, in Philadelphia. 

d. March 27th, 1892, in Rosemont, Pa.; buried in 
Woodlands Cemetery, West Philadelphia. 

m. Second, November 8th, 1900, Elizabeth Engle 
(Lombaert) Pentz, daughter of Herman Joseph 
and Sarah (Cochran) Lombaert, widow of 
James Allyn Pentz ; ceremony by Rev. Marcus 
A. Brownson, minister of Tenth Presbyterian 
Church, Philadelphia. 
She b. September 9th, 1858, in Chester, Pa. 
2393— CLAYTON FRENCH, JR. b. September 9th, 1884. 

2394— AUGUSTA GRAHAM FRENCH, JR. 

b. June 22nd, 1886. 

m. February 23rd. 1911, Tom Wallace. 
2395— HARRY B. FRENCH, JR. b. November 26th, 1887. 

d. May 25 th, 1892. 
2396— BESSIE GRAHAM FRENCH 

b. April 12th, 1889. 

m. January 30th, 1913, in Church of the 
Good Shepherd, Rosemont, Pa., Pearson 
Church Cummin, son of Robert Irvin and 
Ellen Pearson (Church) Cummin, of Day- 
ton, Ohio. Rev. Charles Townsend, rector 
of church, officiating. 
P. C. C. b. March 12th, 1889, in Dayton, O. 
2397— JAMES GRAHAM FRENCH 

b. January 29th, 1891. 

Herman Joseph Lombaert was general superintendent and later second vice-president 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad ; also first president of the American Steamship Co., which 
line sailed between Philadelphia and Liverpool. 



494 GENEALOGY OF THE 

HARRY BANKS FRENCH. 

Harry Banks French [1430] sixth child and second son of Clayton and 
Catharine Ann (Hansell) French is a native of Philadelphia, where he re- 
ceived his preliminary education and at a military academy in New Haven, 
Conn. He entered the class of 1877 at the University of Pennsylvania, but 
at the close of his sophomore year, in 1879, left to enter Harvard. Two 
years later, receiving a certificate, he retired from college to enter the business 
arena, taking an important place with the house of French, Richards & Co., 
where he remained until the dissolution of the firm, in 1891, having been a 
partner for several years. The relations between the members of this firm 
and their employees were always of the most pleasant character, and when it 
was learned that the business was about to be closed, the heads of departments, 
salesmen and clerks united in a signed testimonial, which they presented to 
Harry B. French, expressive of their cordial appreciation of the courtesy 
always extended them and their hearty good wishes for his future business 
career. This testimonial read as follows : 

Philadelphia, December 15, 1890. 
Mr. H. B. French, 

Dear Sir: Only a few short months since we had occasion to sympathize 
with you in the loss of your dear father, and when attending the funeral 
ceremonies we mourned the loss of an old and esteemed employer. 

After his death, with all due respect, we recognized you as the leader and 
head of the house of French, Richards & Co., but, while it is fortunately 
not through death, we are now further pained to learn that our relations 
with you have been so soon and unexpectedly severed. 

We are not unmindful, but greatly appreciate the efforts you made to 
continue the business, not only in your own interest, but also for the benefit 
of the employees. 

We thank you and shall ever honor and respect you, and, with our best 
wishes for the future welfare and prosperity of you and yours, we are 

Sincerely yours, 
Brooke B. Forster Isaac E. Coggins 

Nicholas Newlin James M. Whitecar 

Robert W. Chew D. M. Hunter 

Edith Fantini D. M. Harris 

Roland G. Dye John C. Detwiler 

August E. Krebs Samuel L. Griffin, Jr. 

Robert A. Wallis J. Levin Crew, Jr. 

Thomas E. Neel C. Philip Donnell 

Committee 



1857 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 495 

Mr. French responded to these expressions of kindly feeling and good will 
on the part of the employees in appreciative and appropriate terms. 

In 1891, Mr. French became a member of the newly organized firm of 
Smith, Kline & French Co., being elected vice-president. Mr. Smith died 
in 1903, Mr. Kline in 1909, and January 1st, 1910, Mr. French was elected 
president of the company. As wholesale druggists and drug manufacturers 
this company has greatly prospered, the increase in its business from year to 
year being more than gratifying. 

For many years Mr. French has been deeply interested in public affairs, 
zealously uniting with those unselfishly seeking to promote needful reforms 
in local government. In 1899 he was elected to the Board of Managers of 
the Philadelphia Municipal League, and in 1901 served as its president. The 
object of this organization was to secure the influence and efforts of all good 
citizens on behalf of lasting municipal reform, clean politics and honest gov- 
ernment. Its activities extended over a wide field and much good was accom- 
plished in the direction desired. Mr. French was chairman of a citizen's com- 
mittee, 1899-1901, which sought to secure the abolition of the Philadelphia 
Public Buildings Commission, which had existed for more than thirty years. 

At the February election in 1901 Mr. French was the Municipal League 
candidate for Receiver of Taxes; he was also twice a Reform candidate for 
Select Council, but in each case his special purpose was to maintain the cause 
of good government, with no desire to hold public office. He has been iden- 
tified with many movements designed to promote the public welfare and has 
shown practical sympathy with many charitable and religious objects. He is 
a member of the National Municipal League, for a time serving on its Execu- 
tive Committee. He is much interested in the benevolent objects of the Na- 
tional Civic Federation, especially of the Welfare Department; also a member 
of the Board of Directors of the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. He 
holds membership in the Art, Racquet, Church, Radnor Hunt and Merion 
Cricket Clubs. For twenty-five years he has been a conspicuous and influ- 
ential figure in the business, political and social world in Philadelphia, faithful 
in the performance of every duty assigned him, steadfastly adherent to the 
high standards of an honored ancestry. As employee and employer, his rule 
has been to deal justly with every one, while his personal relationship with 
many prominent men has been notable. 



496 GENEALOGY OF THE 

In 1893-4, with the grateful co-operation of the vestry of the parish, Mr. 
French erected the beautiful Protestant Episcopal Memorial Church of the 
Good Shepherd, at Rosemont, Pa., in loving memory of his deceased wife, 
Augusta (Graham) French. The church is a large and handsome stone struc- 
ture of Norman architecture, and has near the chancel a memorial tablet bear- 
ing the inscription : " This Church was erected to the Glory of God and in 
Sacred Memory of Augusta Graham French. Born Sept. 4, 1857. Died 
Mar. 27, 1892. By her husband, Harry B. French, Anno Domini Mdcccxciii. 
Amor Vincit." The pews of the church are forever free, a condition required 
by the broad-minded donor. It was dedicated on the first Sunday after Trinity, 
May 27th, 1894, by the late Bishop Ozi W. YVhittaker, assisted by the rector, 
Rev. Arthur B. Conger. 



1431— CATHARINE HANSELL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141 ; Uriah. 353; Clay- 
ton, 735). 
b. April 20th, 1859, in Philadelphia, 
m. December 12th, 1881, in Holy Trinity Church, 
Philadelphia, George H. Earle, Jr., son of 
George Hussey and Ellen Frances (Van Leer) 
Earle; ceremony by Rev. William Neilson Mc- 
Vickar, assisted by Rev. E. W. Appleton, D.D. 
G. H. E., Jr. b. July 6th, 1856, in Philadelphia. 

2398— CATHARINE ANN EARLE 

b. March 15th, 1883. 
m. March 6th. 1905, Victor C. Mather. 

2399— CAROLINE FRENCH EARLE 

b. December 5th, 1884. 
d. January 19th, 1890. 

2400— MARY EARLE b. December 5th, 1884. 

d. February 4th, 1885. 

2401— FRANCES VON LOUR EARLE 

b. January 13th, 1889. 
m. December 12th, 1908, Lawrence D. Beggs. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 497 

2402— GEORGE H. EARLE. 3RD 

b. December 5th, 1890. 

2403— RALPH EARLE b. November 4th. 1892. 

2404— CLAYTON FRENCH EARLE 

b. March 11th, 1894. 
d. October 15th, 1897. 

2405— HANSELL FRENCH EARLE 

b. November 10th, 1895. 

2406— EDITH EARLE b. April 1st, 1897. 

2407— GLADYS HOWLAND EARLE 

b. October 21st, 1899. 



GEORGE H. EARLE, JR. 

George H. Earle, Jr., is ninth in line of descent from Ralph Earlc. who 
settled in Rhode Island, New England, in 1638; and possesses a notable 
American ancestry on both the paternal and maternal side. His grandfather, 
Thomas Earle. who settled in Philadelphia in 1817, was a lawyer, philan- 
thropist and abolitionist. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Constitu- 
tional Convention of 1837, and was always an earnest advocate of popular 
rights and a firm believer in the principles of human brotherhood. He said: 
"My Democracy is that which was advocated by Thomas Jefferson; my 
religion that of the New Testament." He was candidate for Vice-President 
of the Liberty party, with James G. Birney, in 1840. Thomas Earle was born 
in Leicester, Mass., 4th mo. 21st. 1796, died in Philadelphia 7th mo. 14th, 
1849, married in 1820 Mary, daughter of Uriah and Phebe (Folger) Hussey, 
Nantucket, Mass. Their first son, George Hussey Earle, born 12th mo. 8th, 
1823, in Philadelphia, died June 18th, 1907, in Philadelphia, married April 
5th, 1849, Ellen Frances Van Leer, daughter of Isaac \V. and Phebe A. 
(Speekman) Van Leer, of Downingtown, Pa. In 1849 George H. Earle 
began the practice of law in his father's office, and succeeded him the same 
year. In 1862 he took into partnership his brother-in-law, Richard P. White, 
forming the firm of Earle & White. 

32 



498 GENEALOGY OF THE 

George H. Earle, Jr., fourth child and only son of George Hussey and 
Ellen Frances (Van Leer) Earle, after receiving an academic education, was 
specially tutored for Harvard College, which he entered in 1875. Pursuing 
his studies with diligence and devotion he lost his health and was compelled 
to retire from the institution within two years. After the restoration of his 
health he commenced a course of legal studies, being admitted to the bar in 
1878, and at once entered upon practice with his father's firm, Earle & White. 
On April 16th, 1886, he was appointed solicitor of the Pennsylvania Ware- 
housing & Safe Deposit Company, his service proving of such value that on 
May 14th, 1889, he was made vice-president, and May 1st, 1890, was elected 
president. In 1890 he became a director of the Guarantee Trust & Safe 
Deposit Company, and on April 21st of the same year was elected vice- 
president, from which position he resigned at the close of 1892, taking charge 
of the Finance Company of Pennsylvania, as president, December 14th. 
Through his instrumentality the company effected a very profitable arrange- 
ment with the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company as its commer- 
cial coal sales agent, which existed for twelve years. He maintained active 
connection with the law firm of Earle & White until about this period, when 
increasing financial responsibilities required all his time. January 10th, 1896, 
he became director and president of the Tradesmen's National Bank, and in 
like capacity took charge of the Market Street National Bank, January 20th, 
1899, renewed prosperity in both cases marking his service. In January, 1910, 
he resigned from the presidency of these institutions, becoming first vice- 
president in each case. 

In December, 1897, the Chestnut Street National Bank and its allied con- 
cern, the Chestnut Street Trust & Saving Fund Company, collapsed, the joint 
failure involving the control of the Philadelphia Record, a prominent news- 
paper. At the special solicitation of leading interests affected, Mr. Earle was 
appointed receiver of the bank, and as one of the assignees of the Trust Com- 
pany. The work of settlement involved great labor covering a period of sev- 
eral years and special direction of the management of the Philadelphia Record, 
the most valuable asset. The trust was discharged with such ability and 
fidelity that all depositors of the Chestnut Street National Bank were paid in 
full with interest, and the depositors of the Chestnut Street Trust & Saving 
Fund Company received payments up to July, 1911, of 90J4 per cent, of their 
claims, with the probability of a further distribution. 



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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 499 



Other activities of Mr. Earle have been in connection with the reorgani- 
zation, as chairman of the committee, of the Choctaw Coal and Railway Com- 
pany, now the Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf Railway Company, part of the 
Rock Island system; director and president, 1900, of the South Chester Tube 
Company; member of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company Voting Trust, 
1905 ; member of the Reform " Committee of One Hundred " ; member of the 
Philadelphia Stock Exchange ; Pennsylvania Commissioner to the World's 
Fair, St. Louis, 1904; member of the Mayflower Society and Sons of the 
Revolution ; director of the United Railways Investment Company of San 
Francisco. He was for some months a city director in the Philadelphia Rapid 
Transit Company, and served for a time on the board of The Equitable Trust 
Company of Philadelphia. Upon the failure of the Real Estate Trust Com- 
pany of Philadelphia, August 28th, 1906, Mr. Earle, upon petition of large 
stockholders and of the directors, was made receiver. All was confusion and 
uncertainty. Only prompt and vigorous measures upon the part of the great 
financial interests of the city prevented serious general consequences. Stock- 
holders and creditors, large and small, expressed readiness to co-operate to 
the extent of their ability and as the days went by and cheerful bulletins were 
given out as to the progress of reorganization plans, the community was fully 
prepared for the gratifying result. The official statement submitted received 
practically unanimous approval, and at the end of about sixty days from the 
date of suspension the Real Estate Trust Company reopened its doors, with 
Mr. Earle as president.. 

An incident in Mr. Earle's career of peculiar and suggestive interest was. 
the action of his Harvard classmates of '79 in selecting him for the degree of 
A.M. which was bestowed, at their request, in 1904. It is the custom for each 
class thus to honor a member upon the occasion of its twenty-fifth anniversary. 

At the primary election in Philadelphia, September 30th, 1911, Mr. Earle 
was nominated as the Republican candidate for mayor ; and at the election, 
November 7th, he was defeated by the Independent candidate, Rudolph 
Blankenburg, who received a majority of something less than five thousand 
votes. 



500 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1432— SAMUEL HARRISON FRENCH, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42 ; Samuel, 141 ; Uriah, 353 ; Clay- 
ton, 735). 
b. June 6th, 1861, in Camden County. N. J. 
d. April 30th, 1898, 6.15 P. M.. at his home, 
" Woodfield Farm," Bryn Mawr, Pa. ; buried in 
Church of the Redeemer graveyard, Bryn Mawr. 
m. February 18th, 1884, in Holy Trinity Church, 
Philadelphia, Sara Elizabeth (Barker) Saunders, 
daughter of Peter Kline and Lydia (Holt) 
Barker ; ceremony by Rev. William Neilson 
McVickar, D.D., rector. 
She b. January 10th, 1861, in Philadelphia. 

2408— JAMES HANSELL FRENCH, 2ND 

b. July 30th, 1885. 

2409— SAMUEL H. FRENCH. 3RD 

b. September 15th, 1887. 

m. November 9th, 1912, in St. James P. E. 
Church, 22nd and Walnut Sts., Philadel- 
phia, Ethel Mae Webb, daughter of Jesse 
Warne and Sara Day (Andrade) Webb. 
Ceremony by Rev. Charles S. Hutchinson, 
rector of St. Clement's P. E. Church, as- 
sisted by Rev. William C. Richardson. 
S.T.D., rector of St. James' Church. 
She b. February 2nd, 1886. 

2410— CATHARINE ANN FRENCH 

b. October 20th. 1889. 

2411— MARY BANKS FRENCH b. October 9th, 1892. 

S:ira Elizabeth Barker married first Samuel J. Saunders, youngest son and child of 
Macpherson and Sarah (Sleeper) Saunders, who were married 10th mo. 24th, 1S3S, and 
were for a time members of the Cherry Street Meeting, Philadelphia, afterwards remov- 
ing to Green Street Monthly Meeting. Macpherson Saunders was of the firm of J. & M. 
Saunders, 34 N. Fourth Street, Philadelphia, "wholesale boot, shoe and bonnet dealers;" 
and was well and favorably known in business circles. While driving with his son in 
Germantown, on Christmas Day, 1865, the horse took fright and run away, throwing 
Mr. Saunders out, fracturing his skull and causing instant death. Samuel J. Saunders 
was born 2nd mo. 16th, 1860, and died July 31st, 1881. Samuel J. and Sara Elizabeth 
(Barker) Saunders had one child, Effie Jeans Saunders. 




MEMORIAL I Uil.KT. t'lU'liCIl OF THE llimli SHEPHERD 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 501 

1433— CAROLINE ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141 ; Uriah, 353; Clay- 
ton, 735). 
b. January 25th, 1866, in Philadelphia. 
m. October 19th, 1893, in Church of the Ascension, 
Atlantic City, N. J., Frederic William Wilson 
Graham, son of Dr. Archibald Hunter and 
Eliza Jane (Sampson) Graham; ceremony by 
Rev. William Neilson McVickar, D.D., assisted 
by Rev. Mr. Townsend. 
F. W. W. G. b. June 25th, 1867, in Philadelphia. 

2412— FREDERIC WILLIAM WILSON GRAHAM, JR. 

b. September 8th, 1894, in Swarthmore, Pa. 

2413— THOMAS FFRENCH GRAHAM 

b. October 16th, 1895, 
(1. June 13th, 1896, 



-in Asheville, N. C. 



2414— HARRY FRENCH GRAHAM 

b. April 21st, 1899, 

2415— CAROLINE FRENCH GRAHAM 

b. November 20th, 1904, J 



1434— SARAH FRENCH COOPER (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Jacob, 354; Abigail S., 736). 

b. August 8th, 1821. 

d. February 20th, 1889. 

m. 2nd mo. 16th, 1843, Benjamin Cloud. 

He b. 9th mo. 4th, 1814. 

d. 4th mo. 7th, 1888. 

2416— JOSEPH COOPER CLOUD 

b. 12th mo. 4th, 1844. 
m. 2nd mo. 11th, 1868, Mary Scull. 

2417— ANNA COOPER CLOUD b. 1st mo. 8th, 1850. 

m. 12th mo. 29th, 1886, Henry G. Huff. 



502 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1437— ANNA P. COOPER (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Jacob, 354; Abigail S., 736). 

b. June 2nd, 1833. 
d. December 9th, 1895. 

m. February 26th, 1852, Quincy A. Sherwin, son 
of Joseph and Margaret (Allen) Sherwin. 
He d. March 26th, 1872. 

2418— LAURA ALLEN SHERWIN 

b. September 27th, 1854. 

m. March 13th, 1877. Lewis A. Atkinson[992]. 

2419— JOSEPH COOPER SHERWIN 

b. April 1st, 1857. 

2420— ROLAND ALVVN SHERWIN 

b. February 1st, 1859. 
d. August 20th, 1863. 

2421— EDWARD SHERWIN b. January 1st, 1861. 

2422— ABIGAIL C. SHERWIN b. December 4th, 1863. 

m. December 24th, 1891, Walter M. Avis, son 
of Paul and Sarah (Benezet) Avis. (No 
issue.) Walter M. Avis, postmaster (1908), 
Pomona, Cal. 

2423— FLORENCE SHERWIN b. November 23rd, 1866. 

d. January 24th, 1S67. 

2424— FRANK A. SHERWIN b. July 4th, 1872. 

m. August 13th, 1903, Gertrude Warner, 
daughter of Edward and Amanda Warner. 

1438— EUPHEMIA MOORE CAKE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Jacob, 354; Theodosia, 737). 

b. December 13th, 1827, in Franklinville, N. J. 

d. June 27th, 1896, in Clayton, N. J. 

m. August 7th, 1850, Samuel F. Fisler, M.D., son 
of Benjamin H. and Abigail (Turner) Fisler; 
ceremony by Rev. Charles E. Ford, Presbyterian 
minister of Williamstown, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 503 

S. F. F. b. October 16th, 1814, in Union, N. J. 
d. July 20th, 1893, in Clayton, N. J. 

2425— HELEN THEODOSIA FISLER 

b. June 17th, 1851. 
m. December 24th, 1872, Clayton G. Moore. 

2426— IDA ABIGAIL FISLER b. January 31st, 1853. 

m. November 15th, 1877, William A. William- 
son. 

2427— RUFUS FISLER b. September 13th, 1854. 

2428— LAWRENCE CAKE FISLER 

b. June 4th, 1856. 
m. November 25th, 1885, Mary Harding. 

2429— RHODA ASHCRAFT FISLER 

b. April 29th, 1858. 
m. February 14th, 1896, David W. Moore, Jr. 

2430— OSCAR FISLER b. January 24th, 1860. 

d. January 24th, 1860. 

2431— BENJAMIN CLOUD FISLER 

b. April 27th, 1861. 
d. August 22nd, 1863. 

2432— SAMUEL FRENCH FISLER 

b. November 15th, 1862. 
d. August 23rd, 1863. 

2433— JOSEPHINE HOWEY FISLER 

b. June 11th, 1864. 

2434— ELIZABETH FISLER b. May 28th, 1867. 

d. May 28th, 1867. 

2435— BENJAMIN HOGATE FISLER 

b. July 25th, 1869. 



504 GENEALOGY OF THE 



1439— SARAH JOSEPHINE CAKE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Jacob, 354; Theodosia, 737). 

b. July 25th, 1832, in Franklinville, N. J. 

(1. April 18th, 190S, in Mullica Hill. N. J. 

m. January 13th, 1858, William Howey, Jr., son of 
William and Hannah (Peterson) Howey; cere- 
mony by Rev. Charles E. Ford, Presbyterian 
minister. 
W. H., Jr., b. December 22nd, 1829, near W'oodstown, N. J. 

d. August 24th, 1894, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

2436— EMMA JOSEPHINE HOWEY 

h. January 3rd, 1870. in Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. February 24th. 1896, Walter Chattin Ridg- 
way, son of Frank B. and Julia P. (Chat- 
tin) Ridgway. Ceremony by Rev. John J. 
Davies, Baptist minister. 
W. C. R. b. March 30th, 1871, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 

1440— EMMA LOUISA 'CAKE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles. 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Jacob, 354; Theodosia, 737). 

b. May 10th, 1837. in Franklinville, N. J. 

m. January 28th, 1863. Robert McCalla English, 

son of Isaac and Rachel Gibbon (McCalla) 

English; ceremony by Rev. Charles E. Ford, 

Presbyterian minister. 
R. M. E. b. April 15th, 1832. in Salem, N. J. 

(1. March 2nd, 1908, in Cambridge, Mass.; buried 

in Evergreen Cemetery, Camden, N. J. 

2437— WALTER CAKE ENGLISH 

b. January 20th, 1864. 

m. June 5th, 1900. Anna E. Durfor. 

2438— CARRIE HOLLINGSHEAD ENGLISH 

b. May 4th. 1868. 
d. July 23rd, 1868. 

2439— ROBERT McCALLA ENGLISH, JR. 

b. June I4th. 1869. 
m. January 22nd, 1903, Lillian H. Smalley. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 505 



2440— CHAUNCEY FRENCH ENGLISH 

b. August 17th, 1875, in Camden, N. J. 
m. March 30th, 1910, in Cambridge, Mass., 
Harriet Griggs Bodfish, daughter of 
Clarence Julius and Mary S. (Smith) 
Bodfish. Ceremony by Rev. Alexander Mc- 
Kenzie, D.D., of Shepard Memorial Church, 
Cambridge, Mass. 
She b. January 14th, 1887, at Beacon Falls, Conn. 

2441— SARAH HOLLINGSHEAD ENGLISH 

b. March 20th, 1877. 
d. January 24th, 1879. 



1441— LAWRENCE ELMER CAKE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles,42; 

Samuel, 141; Jacob, 354; Theodosia, 737). 

b. April 30th, 1840, in Franklinville, N. J. 
d. December 13th, 1862. 

m. December 1st, 1859, Mary L. Lumis, daughter 
of Ephraim and Charlotte (Parvin) Lumis. 
She b. September 14th, 1830, in Cedarville, N. J. 
d. September 5th, 1907, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

2442— ELMER FRANKLIN CAKE 

b. March 31st, 1862. 
m. April 27th, 1886, Clara Virginia Vennell. 

Lawrence Elmer Cake, mustered in Co. I, 24th Regiment, N. J. Volunteers, William C. 
Shinn, captain, September 16th, 1862, and was killed at Fredericksburg, Va. 

1442— HEWLINGS FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Jacob, 354; Samuel E., 738). 

b. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1830, in Harrisonville, N. J. 

d. 10th mo. 8th, 1906, in Pennsville, N. J. 

m. First, 3rd mo. 18th, 1858, in Philadelphia, by- 
Friends' ceremony, Mary Amanda Summerill, 
daughter of William and Elizabeth (Crispin) 
Summerill. 



506 GENEALOGY OF THE 

She b. 11th mo., 1829, in Manington, N. J. 
d. 4th mo. 4th, 1879, in Sharptown, N. J. 
m. Second, January 1st, 1880, in Philadelphia, 
Emma Jones, daughter of George Monroe and 
Sarah Jane (Jones) Jones; Presbyterian minis- 
ter performing ceremony. 
She b. March 16th, 1838, in Philadelphia. 

2443— JOSEPH SUMMERILL FRENCH 

b. 1st mo. 1st, 1859. 
m. July 31st, 1879, Mary Elizabeth Dimmitt. 

2444— SAMUEL ELLSWORTH FRENCH 

b. 6th mo. 1st, 1861. 
m. June 4th, 1883, Ella J. Wildman. 

2445— WILLIAM S. FRENCH b. 4th mo. 17th, 1863, in Yorktown, N. J. 

2446— FRANK L. FRENCH b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1865. 

m. August 22nd, 1893, Content Bullman. 

Child of Hewlings and Emma (Jones) French. 

2447— EMMA SHAFTO FRENCH 

b. October 16th, 1880, in Trenton, N. J. 
m. November 11th, 1903, in Trenton, N. J., 
Edward A. Herron; Methodist minister 
performing ceremony. 

1444 — JOSEPH GROFF FRENCH (Thomas, I ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Jacob, 354; Samuel E., 738). 

b. 9th mo. 6th, 1835, in Harrisonville, N. J. 
m. May 10th, 1859, Emma Treen, daughter of John 
Merrick and Mary (Shaw) Treen. 
She b. January 13th, 1839, at May's Landing, N. J. 

2448— WILLIAM FRENCH b. April 25th. 1860. 

d. July 23rd, 1861. 

2449— MARY ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. August 25th, 1861. 

m. May 27th, 1885, Arthur H. Chandler. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 507 

1445— MARY ELIZABETH FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141 ; Jacob, 354; Samuel E., 

738). 
b. 9th mo. 16th, 1837, in Woodstown, N. J. 
d. May 9th, 1904, in Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia; 

buried in Cedar Green Cemetery, Clayton, N.J. 
m. November 17th, 1857, Franklin Iszard, son of 

Gabriel and Sarah (Swope) Iszard; Richard 

Vaux, Esq., mayor of Philadelphia, performing 

ceremony. 
F. I. b. December 3rd, 1834, in Clayton, N. J. 
d. October 31st, 1892, in Clayton, N. J. 

2450— EMILY ISZARD b. January 3rd, 1859. 

m. October 31st, 1878, Philip A. Heebner. 

2451— ANNE MOORE ISZARD b. May 3rd, 1861. 

m. September 30th, 1881, John Gordon Gray. 

2452— SAMUEL FRENCH ISZARD 

b. July 27th, 1868. 
m. April 7th, 1891, Delia York. 

2453— CHARLES FRANKLIN ISZARD 

b. September 10th, 1873. 
m. June 1st, 1899, Marion H. Raymond. 



1446— JACOB FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Jacob, 354; William S., 739). 

b. 10th mo. 27th, 1832. 

d. 7th mo. 18th, 1878; buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. 3rd mo. 15th, 1866, Caroline Summerill, 

daughter of William and Elizabeth (Crispin) 

Summerill. 

2454— SARAH ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 29th, 1872. 

m. 8th mo. 17th, 1893, Joel Coleman Snelbaker. 



508 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1447— THOMAS IREDELL FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Jacob, 354; William S., 
739). 
b. 1st mo. 10th, 1834, near Ewan, N. J. 
d. February 23rd, 1911, in Ewan, N. J. ; buried in 
Friends' Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. First, February 5th, 1870, Rebecca M. Nichols, 
daughter of John and Caroline (Ewan) Nichols. 
She b. 6th mo., 1841. 

d. September 21st, 1871. 

m. Second, March 17th. 1875, Sarah G. (Arm- 
strong) Pennegar, daughter of Isaac and Sarah 
Ann (Turner) Armstrong, and widow of Samuel 
Pennegar. 
She b. November 9th, 1837. 
d. July 28th, 1876. 

m. Third, March 21st, 1878, Elizabeth (Cassaday) 
Bates, daughter of Charles and Mary (Ayers) 
Cassaday, and widow of Thomas Bates. 
She b. May 14th, 1840. 

d. December 14th, 1895. 

Child of Thomas Iredell and Sarah G. (Pennegar) French. 

2455— WILLIAM FRENCH b. April 23rd, 1876. 

Children of Thomas Iredell and Elizabeth (Bates) French. 



2456— RACHEL IREDELL FRENCH 

b. July 21st, 1883. 

m. August 17th, 1904, Elmer Gant. 



2457— SARAH E. FRENCH b. April 3rd, 1885. 

d. July 5th, 1887. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 509 

Thomas I. French, corporal, Co. H, 12th N. J. Regiment; mustered in September 4th, 
1862, discharged on account of disability, December 19th, 1863. " He was a member of 
the M. E. Church of Evvan for many years; a faithful class leader and attendant at all 
the church services, until his physical ailments compelled him to remain in his room. 
During his long illness, he always received his friends and neighbors with a cheerful 
smile of greeting and when sympathy was offered would compare his affliction as nothing 
to what our blessed Saviour suffered for him. Everyone who knew of his conscientious, 
devoted Christian life, felt that he had entered into his reward." 



1448— SARAH E. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42 ; Samuel, 

141 ; Jacob, 354; William S., 739). 

b. 8th mo. 4th, 1835, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 

m. 3rd mo. 20th, 1861, by Friends' ceremony, 
Thomas Edwards, Jr., son of Thomas and 
Sarah (Lippincott) Edwards. 
He b. 3rd mo. 31st, 1828, near Woodstown, N. J. 

d. 5th mo. 23rd, 1899, in Woodstown, N. J. 

2458— WILLIAM F. EDWARDS b. 12th mo. 28th, 1861. 

m. 3rd mo. 18th, 1896, Sarah Edwards, 
daughter of Barclay and Keturah (Moore) 
Edwards. 

2459— FRANKLIN EDWARDS b. 5th mo. 4th, 1863. 

m. 2nd mo. 17th, 1887, Ida C. Longacre, 
daughter of Samuel and Deborah (Holton) 
Longacre. 

1449— ELLIS FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 141 ; 

Jacob, 354; William S., 739). 

b. 12th mo. 25th, 1836, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 10th mo. 24th, 1897, in Ewan, N. J.; buried in 
Friends' Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. First, November 25th, 1882, Anna R. Stratton, 
daughter of Joseph and Mary Elizabeth (Ash- 
brook) Stratton. 
She b. 4th mo. 20th, 1852, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. 4th mo. 12th, 1887; buried in Friends' Burying 
Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 



510 GENEALOGY OF THE 



m. Second, December 19th, 1888, Caroline K. 
Steward, daughter of Charles and Ellen (Lin- 
ton) Steward. 



2460— SABILLA IREDELL FRENCH 

b. September 24th, 1883. 



1450— CARLTON RIDGWAY MOORE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Agnes, 355; Samuel F. 
Moore, 740). 
b. 4th mo. 22nd, 1818. 
d. September 22nd, 1905. 

m. December 24th, 1838, Mary Hardie McClure, 
daughter of David and Ann (Russell) McClure. 
She b. August 21st, 1821. 
d. March 11th, 1863. 

2461— MARY BLOOMFIELD MOORE 

b. June 6th, 1840. 
m. George Wolfe. 

2462— JACOB RIDGWAY MOORE 

b. February 25th, 1842. 

d. September 26th, 1901, unmarried. 

2463— CARLTON RIDGWAY MOORE, JR. 

b. July 14th, 1844. 

m. September 28th, 1869, Jerusha Elizabeth 
Van Ness. 

2464— ANNE ELIZABETH MOORE 

b. September 18th, 1846. 

m. March 17th, 1868, Charles H. Shinn. 

2465— HELEN CLARA MOORE b. September 30th, 1848. 

m. September 13th, 1871, John B. Irick. 

2466— HENRY CLAY MOORE b. December 20th, 1850. 

d. April 25th, 1852. 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 511 

1451— BLOOMFIELD HAINES MOORE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42 ; Samuel, 141 ; Agnes, 355 ; Sam- 
uel F. Moore, 740). 

b. 12th mo. 16th, 1819. 

d. July 5th, 1878, at his residence, 510 S. Broad 

St., Philadelphia. 
m. October 27th, 1842, Clara Jessup, daughter of 

Augustus Edward Jessup. 
She b. February 16th ,1824, in Philadelphia, 
d. January 5th, 1899, in London, Eng. 

2467— ELLA CARLTON MOORE 

m. Count Carl Gustav von Rosen, of Stock- 
holm, Sweden. 

2468— CLARENCE B. MOORE 

2469— LILLIAN A. S. MOORE m. Baron Carl de Bildt, of Sweden. 

d. December 18th, 1911, in Sweden. 

Bloomfield Haines Moore, second son and child of Samuel French [740] and Rachel 
(Haines) Moore, in early life was engaged in a confidential capacity with Jacob Ridgway, 
who was a leading and wealthy merchant of Philadelphia, and for a time " a resident 
merchant and Consul of the United States for the city of Antwerp and the Netherlands," 
later returning to Philadelphia and residing on Chestnut Street opposite Independence 
Hall until his death in 1843. Mr. Ridgway bequeathed to his energetic young friend 
the sum of $10,000, which became the foundation of Mr. Moore's fortune, and when 
Augustus E. Jessup established the paper manufacturing business in 1843, near Wilming- 
ton, Del., he had associated with him his son-in-law, Bloomfield H. Moore, the title of 
the firm being Jessup & Moore. Later Mr. Jessup's son, Alfred Dupont Jessup, became 
a member of the firm. The elder Jessup died in 1859, and upon the retirement of Alfred 
D. Jessup, about 1870, Mr. Moore conducted the business alone until his death, under 
the old firm name. Meanwhile, he had become very prominent and influential in the 
business, social and scientific world. He was identified with leading financial institu- 
tions, a long time member of the Union League and vice-president of the Franklin 
Institute. He gave much attention to scientific and economic questions, was a liberal 
contributor towards philanthropic purposes, and took an active part in sustaining the 
work of the United States Sanitary Commission during the Civil War. His will, made 
December 12th, 1871, proved July 8th, 1878, was a characteristic document. It bequeathed 
his entire estate to his wife, Clara Jessup Moore, for life, directing its later division 



512 GENEALOGY OF THE 

among his children and their heirs. He expressed absolue trust in his wife's judgment 
and fidelity, but cautioned her against favoritism, and forbade her " to make or endorse 
notes or become security for any child who might contract indebtedness." He besought 
his children to treat each other with kindly consideration and in conclusion said : " Be 
truthful, just and honest and never do an act of which any honorable person could be 
ashamed." His estate was appraised by his executors, his wife and son Clarence, to 
approximate in value $5,500,000. He was the owner of the Rockland, the Augustine and 
the Chester Paper Mills, and at the time of his death was conducting two large business 
establishments, one in New York and one in Philadelphia, under the firm name of 
Jessup & Moore, for the sale of paper. 

Clara (Jessup) Moore, wife of Bloomfield II. Moore, was a descendant on both her 
maternal and paternal side of distinguished English families. She was known throughout 
wide social and literary circles at home and abroad, being recognized as a social leader. 
She was possessed of considerable literary ability and produced a number of essays and 
stories, chiefly dealing with social ethics and questions of the day, which most affect 
women and their position in public as well as private life. She also wrote a number of 
poems that were highly spoken of. Throughout her life she took an active interest in 
charitable and educational work, was a liberal patron of the University of Pennsylvania 
and the Franklin Institute; and during the Civil War, the Women's Branch of the Sani- 
tary Commission, in Philadelphia, was organized at her suggestion. She supplemented 
her husband's intelligent and generous interest in art work, presenting in 1882 to the 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia, a valuable collection 
of specimens of industrial art workmanship, including ceramics of various countries, oil 
paintings, ivory carvings, Roman and Florentine jewelry, Oriental porcelains, etc. The 
gift was designed as a memorial to her husband, and is known as the Bloomfield II. Moore 
collection. Some few years ago an investigation by art experts revealed the interesting 
fact that among the rare objects contained in this collection is a bottle-shaped vase, 
sixteen inches in height, of the wonderful "Peach Blow" hue. It dates back to about 
1600, or the end of the Ming dynasty, and is of considerable value, attracting the admir- 
ing attention of art connoisseurs of both worlds, this variety of " Peach Blow '' glaze 
being virtually a " lost art " at this time. A notable incident in Mrs. Moore's career was 
her liberal patronage of the late John W. Keely, of Philadelphia, known as the myste- 
rious " motor " man. She spent a large sum of money on this curious experiment and 
her generosity was the occasion of other unprofitable experiences. Her later years were 
spent entirely in London, where she had established a home which became the center of 
interest to a large circle of notable and influential people. 

Mrs. Moore's father, Augustus Edward Jessup, born about 1797 in New England, 
died December 17th, 1859, near Wilmington, Delaware, in addition to being a successful 
pioneer paper manufacturer, always manifested a keen and sympathetic interest in sci- 
entific matters. He was a member of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences for 
over forty years, ami left a fund for the express purpose .•! assisting young, earnest and 
struggling scientists. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 513 

1452— ANNA STOCKTON INSKEEP (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Agnes. 355; Sarah F. 
Moore, 743). 

b. February 13th, 1822. 

d. April 11th, 1905. 

m. December 12th, 1841, Edward E. Eyre; Rev. 

Richard Newton, D.D., of St. Paul's P. E. 

Church, Philadelphia, performing ceremony. 
E. E. E. b. December 12th, 1812. 
d. August 11th, 1895. 

2470— CHARLES E. EYRE b. September 17th, 1850. 

m. Kate Smith. 

2471— FRANK EYRE b. June 9th, 1854. 

m. September 15th, 1880, Harriet Gause. 

Edward E. Eyre was for nearly forty years associated with Washington I. Landell, 
under the firm name of Eyre & Landell, located at the southwest corner of Fourth and 
Arch Streets, Philadelphia, as importers, jobbers and retailers of dry goods, having a 
large patronage among Friends. 



1453— EMILY ROTCH INSKEEP (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Agnes, 355; Sarah F. Moore, 
743). 
b. October 8th, 1823. 
d. February 21st, 1891. 

m. November 4th, 1844, in St. Philip's P. E. 
Church, Franklin and Vine Streets. Philadel- 
phia, Benjamin I. Ritter. 

2472— EMILY INSKEEP RITTER 

b. August 31st, 1845. 

2473— ELIZABETH RITTER b. 1848. 

33 



514 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1457— AGNES FRENCH MOORE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Agnes, 355; Bethuel A. Moore, 
744). 
b. 2nd mo. 10th, 1826. 
d. September 17th, 1874; buried in Riverview 

Cemetery, Trenton, N. J. 
m. August 31st, 1848, James Wilson, son of Judge 
John and Mercy (Dunn) Wilson; ceremony at 
the residence of her father, Bethuel A. Moore, 
17 Carlton Square, Philadelphia, by the Rev. 
John Hall, D.D., pastor of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Trenton, N. J. 
J. W. b. August 30th, 1808, in Plainfield, N. J. 

d. February 11th, 1884, in Trenton, N. J.; buried 
in Riverview Cemetery. 

2474— LAURA WILSON b. June 20th, 1849. 

2475— HOWARD WILSON b. March 11th, 1851. 

d. June 27th, 1859. 

2476— KATHARINE SEYMOUR WILSON 

b. March 13th, 1853. 

2477— FREDERICK WILSON b. July 22nd, 1855. 

d. March 2nd, 1858. 

2478— HELEN AGNES WILSON 

b. February 22nd, 1859. 
d. July 23rd, 1892. 

James Wilson removed with his parents from Essex County to Trenton, N. J., in 1824, 
and soon thereafter began the study of law in the offices of Samuel R. Hamilton and 
James Ewing, being admitted to the bar in 1830, and commenced practice in Trenton. 
He was for a time a law partner of Samuel L. Southard, and was the first prosecutor of 
the pleas of Mercer County. Private secretary to Governor William Pennington ; member 
of the Assembly, 1840-41 ; clerk of the Supreme Court from 1842 to 1852, which office 
he filled with marked ability. During the Civil War he was appointed United States 
Commissioner of Enrollment to register citizens subject to military duty under the act 
of Congress. In 1875 he was made Commissioner of the Sinking Fund, which position 
he held at the time of his death in 1884. He was an able and conscientious lawyer, a 
wise counselor, a man of high repute and greatly esteemed in professional and private life. 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 515 

1458— AMANDA INSKEEP MOORE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Agnes, 355; Bethuel A. 
Moore, 744). 

b. 7th mo. 7th, 1827, in Philadelphia. 

d. June 1st, 1903, in Philadelphia; buried in 
Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia. 

m. November 9th, 1853, Henry Cardwell Potter, 
son of John and Harriet (Cardwell) Potter; 
ceremony by Rev. William Bacon Stevens, D.D., 
rector of St. Andrew's P. E. Church, Philadel- 
phia (afterwards Bishop). 
H. C. P. b. February 28th, 1822, in Philadelphia. 

d. March 6th, 1902, at his residence, 260 S. 9th 
Street, Philadelphia ; buried in Laurel Hill 
Cemetery. 

2479— HENRIETTA AUGUSTA POTTER 

b. August 17th, 1854. 

m. First, March 5th, 1873, F. Benicio Guer- 
rero, D.D.S. 
m. Second, May 15th, 1894, Walter Mont- 
gomery James, M.D. 

2480— ALFRED POTTER b. November 24th, 1856. 

m. November 7th, 1888, Ella M. Porter. 

JOHN POTTER— HENRY CARDWELL POTTER. 

John Potter was the son of John and Sarah (Todd) Potter, of Coventry, 
England, who were married in St. Martin's-in-the-Field, London, April 21st, 
1781. He was born in 1784 and died December 10th, 1833, in Philadelphia. 
He was a wealthy and prominent merchant of that city, owning vessels and 
trading extensively with foreign countries. On March 16th, 1817, he was 
married in Christ Church, Philadelphia, to Harriet Cardwell, fifth daughter 
and eighth child of Henry and Jane (Shorrock) Cardwell, of "Old Hall," 
Mottram-in-Longdendale, Cheshire, England. Henry Cardwell, son of Robert 
Cardwell, of Hyde, Cheshire, married March 12th, 1774, Jane Shorrock, of 
Salford, Manchester. Their daughter Harriet was born in Mottram-in- 
Longdendale, September 13th, 1786, and died in Philadelphia, September 
26th, 1863. 



516 C.ENEALOGY OF THE 

Desiring to possess a fitting home for his aristocratic English bride. Mr. 
Potter purchased of Chandler Price the colonial residence at 260 South Ninth 
Street, known as the Philadelphia home of Joseph Bonaparte, the exiled 
brother of Napoleon Bonaparte. This house, a substantial three-story brick 
structure of quaint French design, was built in the early part of the nineteenth 
century by Captain John Meany, a retired East Indian trader of ample mean-, 
cultivated taste and charitable ways. He imported all the material for his 
new residence from England. Beautiful mahogany doors, brick, and finer 
materials of building came hither in ships in such great quantities that after 
the house was finished there was a large surplus which the Captain generously 
gave to the poor. He lived sumptuously in this home for some time, but 
unfortunately his later years were clouded by adversity, and the property- 
passed into the possession of Chandler Price, during which time the house was 
occupied by " Comtede Survilliers," as Joseph Bonaparte was formally known 
when he came for refuge to this country, about 1815, following the downfall 
of the first Emperor of France. Renovations were made, and elaborate deco- 
rations of unique French design were added to the artistic beauty of the 
place, and these have remained to this day, greatly admired by succeeding 
generations. In the large dining room, some thirty by twenty-five feet, an 
admirably executed set of colossal mural pictures in black and white from the 
works of David the celebrated artist of the Napoleonic dynasty, tell the 
romantic story of Cupid and Psyche. The main rooms of the house are 
spacious apartments and contain many Bonaparte relics, likewise many rare 
and costly heirlooms of the Potter and Cardwell families. The severe gray 
walls of the exterior are relieved by heavy green shutters and a little side 
portico, the position of which indicates that Captain Meany when building 
his home intended the entrance to be from gardens extending to Spruce Street. 
In-teacl, however, other houses were erected close to it. to complete the square, 
and this left the main windows and entrance of the house on the side, thus 
largely hiding from view much of its architectural quaintness. John Potter 
was also possessed of a country seat on " Green Hill." as the section of Phila- 
delphia, now the \ i< initv of Girard College, was then known, 

John and Harriet (Cardwell I Potter had four children, namely: John 
Potter, Jr., born December 11th, 1817, died January 11th, 1862, unmarried; 
Jane Harriet Potter, born November 3rd. 1819. died May 9th. 1886, unmar- 
ried; Henry Cardwell Potter, born February 28th, 1822. died March 6th. 
1902, married, November 9th, 1853, Amanda Inskeep Moore; Ann Eliza 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 517 

Potter, born May 28th, 1825, died December 18th, 1853, unmarried. It was 
at the " Green Hill " home that Henry Cardwell Potter, third child and second 
son of John and Harriet (Cardwell) Potter, was born. He inherited the 
historic city residence of his father, living in it practically his entire life. He 
was exceedingly fond of the old home and always averse to making any 
changes in its appearance, within or without. For many years he was largely 
interested in the importation of coffee from Nicaragua, and was for twenty- 
five years Nicaraguan Consul at Philadelphia, which position he held at the 
time of his death ; also the Vice-Consulship of Costa Rica. Through his in- 
fluence a considerable number of Nicaraguan boys came to Philadelphia to 
study at the University of Pennsylvania and he befriended these boys in many 
ways. It is interesting to note that his grandson, Lorenzo Henry Cardwell 
Guerrero [3201]. is at the present time (1912) Consul General in Philadel- 
phia for the Republic of Nicaragua. Upon the death of Henry Cardwell 
Potter, in 1902, the historic home, 260 S. Ninth Street, Philadelphia, descended 
to his daughter, Mrs. Henrietta (Potter) Guerrero James [2479], the present 
owner and occupant, and she has most faithfully preserved the traditions and 
relics of the old house. 



1459— ADRIANNA MOORE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; Samuel,. 

141 ; Agnes, 355; Bethuel A. Moore, 744). 

b. 2nd mo. 7th. 1829, in Philadelphia. 

m. December 19th, 1848, Samuel Mitchell Ander- 
son, son of Joshua and Mary (Clark) Anderson, 
of Trenton, N. J. ; ceremony at the residence of 
her father, Bethuel A. Moore, Philadelphia, by 
the Rev. John Hall, of Trenton, N. J. 
S. M. A. b. December 23rd, 1821. in Trenton. N. J. 

d. July 31st, 1892. in Philadelphia ; buried in West 
Laurel Hill Cemetery. 

2481— WALTER M. ANDERSON 

b. September 23rd, 1849. 
d. February 16th, 1911. 



518 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2482— LOUIS RODMAN ANDERSON 

b. November 21st, 1854. 

m. December 22nd, 1897, in St. Andrew's 
Church, Philadelphia, Minnie Elizabeth 
Sherwin, of Batavia, N. Y. ; Rev. Edward 
K. Tullidge performing ceremony. 
She d. September 3rd, 1898, in Philadelphia. 

2483— ADRIAN ANDERSON b. December 16th, 1858. 

m. September 23rd, 1885, Pauline Merritt. 



1467— CLEMENTINA MOORE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Agnes, 355 ; Bethuel A. Moore, 
744). 
b. 7th mo. 27th, 1841, in Philadelphia, 
m. October 7th, 1869, Charles H. Oberge, son of 
Carl Hjallmar Wilhelm and Ullericka Hen- 
drietta (Shogrin) Oberge; ceremony by Rev. 
Wilbur F. Paddock of St. Andrew's P. E. 
Church, Philadelphia. 
C. H. O. b. February 11th, 1846, in Tidaholm, Sweden. 

2484— ULLERICKA HENDRIETTA OBERGE 

b. July 25th, 1874. 

2485— GEORGE F. OBERGE b. April 10th, 1878. 

m. November 30th, 1907, Ethel B. Atterbury. 



1468— MARY ANNA MOORE, 2ND (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42 ; 

Samuel, 141 ; Agnes, 355 ; Bethuel A. Moore, 
744). 
b. 1st mo. 10th, 1843, in Philadelphia. 
d. November 6th, 1872. 

m. July 16th, 1868, Edwin H. Trego, M.D. ; cere- 
mony by Rev. R. Bethel Claxton, rector pro tern, 
of St. Andrew's P. E. Church, Philadelphia. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 519 

E. H. T. b. 1842. 

d. June 4th, 1877, at his residence, 1302 Spruce 
St., Philadelphia. 

2486— ANNIE FLORENCE TREGO 

b. May 28th, 1869. 
d. March 24th, 1870. 



1469— HANNAH ROSALBA MOORE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Agnes, 355; Bethuel A. 
Moore, 744). 

b. 10th mo. 2nd, 1844, in Philadelphia. 

m. October 18th, 1870, John Freeman MacKie; 
ceremony by Rev. Wilbur F. Paddock, rector of 
St. Andrew's P. E. Church, Philadelphia. 
J. F. M. b. October 1st, 1835, in New York. 

d. June 18th, 1910, at his residence, 251 S. Eighth 
St., Philadelphia; buried in Arlington Ceme- 
tery, Philadelphia. 

2487— CLARENCE STOCKTON MACKIE 

b. September Sth, 1871. 
d. March 23rd, 1902. 

John Freeman MacKie was of Scotch descent. He enlisted in the United States Marine 
Corps in 1861, and served efficiently throughout the war. He was made first sergeant 
and repeatedly distinguished himself. For his courageous conduct at Drury's Bluff, on 
the James River, Va., May 15, 1862, he received a Congressional medal of honor. This 
was a notable engagement between several Federal gunboats and the Confederate shore 
batteries, which defended Richmond. The ironclad Galena, on which MacKie served, 
lost thirteen men killed and eleven wounded. The vessel was set on fire and greatly 
damaged by heavy shot and shell. After the war Sergeant MacKie became much inter- 
ested in veteran associations. He was chosen Commander of Naval Post No. 400, Grand 
Army of the Republic, and frequently made public addresses on Memorial Day. His 
funeral was largely attended by surviving comrades of the army and navy. He was a 
past commander of Farragut Association No. 1, Naval Veterans. 



520 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1471— CAROLINE FRENCH (Thomas. 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Sam- 
uel, 141 ; Charles, 356; William H., 746). 

b. 4th mo. 11th. 1825, in Philadelphia. 

d. 3rd mo. 25th, 1865, in West Philadelphia. 

m. 5th mo. 20th, 1847, by Friends' ceremony, at 
the residence of her father, William H. French, 
1700 Locust St., David Thomas Burr, son of 
Henry and Mary Burr. 
He b. 11th mo. 23rd, 1823. 

d. 3rd mo. 17th, 1901, in Swarthmore, Pa. 

2488— WILLIAM FRENCH BURR 

b. 1st mo. 21st, 1849. 

m. September 14th, 1875, Mary W. Reese. 

2489— iMARY FENIMORE BURR 

b. 1st mo. 19th, 1851. 
d. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1875. 



2490— HENRY DIMSDALE BURR 

b. 10th mo. 22nd, 1854. 

d. 3rd mo. 21st, 1856. 

2491— CAROLINE ELIZABETH BURR 

b. 11th mo. 16th, 1858. 

m. 7th mo. 14th, 1887, William J. Hall. 

2492— WALTER LINCOLN BURR 

b. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1861. 

David Thomas Burr married, second. 6th mo. 10th, 1880, Annie Louisa Hill (widow). 
She died 9th mo., 1896, aged 53 years. (No issue.) About 1840, as a lad. David T. 
Burr entered the employ of the Philadelphia cloth firm of Lippincott & Parry. Twenty- 
five years later he became a member of the succeeding firm of Lippincott, Johnson & Co., 
with whom he remained until his retirement from business, in 1896; and some time later 
he removed to Swarthmore. Pa. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 521 

1474— CHARLES STRICKLAND FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141; Charles, 356; 
William H., 746). 

b. 9th mo. 21st, 1829, in Philadelphia (98 Dilwyn 
St.). 

d. 4th mo. 10th, 1909, at his residence, 3204 Ham- 
ilton St., Philadelphia ; buried in Fairhill Bury- 
ing Ground, Philadelphia. 

m. First, 5th mo. 22nd, 1856, by Friends' ceremony, 
near Mullica Hill, N. J., Clementine Albertson, 
daughter of John and Sarah Albertson, of Balti- 
more, Md. 
She b. 5th mo. 18th, 1837. 

d. 9th mo. 9th, 1857, in Baltimore, Md. ; buried in 
Friends' Burying Ground, Baltimore, Md. 

m. Second, 6th mo. 13th, 1860, by Friends' cere- 
mony, in Byberry township, Philadelphia, Anna 
Bowman, daughter of John and Ann (Comly) 
Bowman. 
She b. 1st mo. 1st, 1838, in Byberry, Philadelphia Co., 
Pa. 

d. 3rd mo. 14th, 1890, at her residence, 3204 Ham- 
ilton St., Philadelphia ; buried in Fairhill Bury- 
ing Ground. 

2493— ELLA MAY FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 9th, 1857. 

m. January 13th, 1885, at Mount Washington, 
Md., George Sidney Lovett, Jr., son of 
George Sidney and Caroline (de Beelen) 
Lovett ; Episcopal ceremony. 
He b. July 25th, 1857, in Grand Rapids, Mich. 
(No issue.) 

Children of Charles Strickland and Anna (Bowman) French. 

2494— WILLIAM HAZELTON FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 5th, 1861. 
m. September 29th, 1887, Bessie C. Pott. 



522 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2495— CHARLES COMLY FRENCH 

b. 4th mo. 17th, 1865. 

2496— CAROLINE FRENCH b. 2nd mo. 3rd, 1867. 

d. 1st mo. 11th, 1868. 

2497— ANNA DORA FRENCH b. 5th mo. 21st, 1869. 

m. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1896, Edwin L. Palmer. 



CHARLES STRICKLAND FRENCH. 

Charles Strickland French was the fourth child and third son of William 
Hazelton [746] and Elizabeth Borton (Atkinson) French. His early educa- 
tion was obtained at private and public schools of Philadelphia, graduating 
from the high school in 1847. When about eighteen years of age he entered 
mercantile life with Hacker, Lea & Co., dry goods commission merchants, 32 
and 34 Chestnut Street (now 128 and 130), where he spent several years; and 
later was with Joseph S. Lovering & Co., sugar refiners, 27 Church Alley 
(now 225) ; obtaining in these two positions a practical knowledge of business 
methods. In 1864, with his brother Richard [1477], he engaged in the grocery 
business; and some three years later, the brothers dissolving partnership, 
Charles purchased the long established grocery business of C. Thomas at No. 
4 Market Street, where for twenty-five years he did a large wholesale and 
retail business ; supplying steamships and vessels with groceries and receiving 
the patronage of the increasing number of Philadelphia business men who 
made their homes in New Jersey. This well-known store became one of the 
landmarks of that wonderful period of river-front prosperity following the 
Civil War. In 1892, Mr. French moved his business to No. 4 North Water 
Street, where he continued until the adjoining properties were absorbed by 
the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company in the construction of its subway 
line, in 1906, when he retired from business. 

Charles S. French belonged to the class of old school merchants to whom 
Philadelphia is indebted for the maintenance of the highest standard of com- 
mercial rules of conduct. Throughout a long and busy life he consistently 
practiced the principles of the Society of Friends, of which he was always a 
useful member. He was a birthright member of Green Street Monthly Meet- 
ing; but in 1835 when his father moved to Seventeenth and Locust Streets, the 




CHARLES S. FRENCH 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 523 

family became members of Spruce Street Monthly Meeting by transfer of cer- 
tificate. In 1861, when he took up his residence on Nineteenth Street above 
Spring Garden, his certificate of membership was transferred to Race Street 
Monthly Meeting; and in 1867, when establishing his home at 3204 Hamilton 
Street, he became connected with the West Philadelphia Meeting, Thirty-fifth 
Street and Lancaster Avenue, a branch of Race Street Monthly Meeting. For 
over forty years he was a regular attendant of First-day morning meetings, 
rarely being absent unless away by appointment to attend other Meetings, or 
visiting relatives out of the city. He served the Monthly Meeting in various 
capacities, as elder for about twenty-five years, overseer for a number of years, 
member of various important committees, and an active worker in the First- 
day school. He took a keen sympathetic interest in many educational and 
charitable movements, and served for a number of years as director of the 
Philadelphia City Institute at Eighteenth and Chestnut Streets, established 
in 1854, largely through the instrumentality of his father, William H. French, 
who was for many years president. He became deeply interested in local and 
family history, and rendered valuable and untiring aid in the long and labori- 
ous work needful in the compiling of the genealogical records here presented ; 
and it is a source of deep regret to the author that his cousin, friend and co- 
laborer could not have been permitted to live to see the completion of the 
work. He enjoyed the esteem and love of a wide circle of relatives and 
friends to whom his genial personality always appealed. He was ever a 
devoted and loving husband, father and grandfather, exercising an affectionate 
interest in the homes and lives of the different members of his family. The 
tranquil closing of this gentle, earnest, well-spent life, 4th mo. 10th, 1909, so 
in accord with his oft-expressed wish, seemed as a benediction sought and 
freely given. 




euS 




524 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1475— WILL 1AM FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Charles, 356; William H., 746). 

1>. 1st mo. 14th, 1832, in Philadelphia. 

d. December 18th, 1.S91 ; buried in Fairhill Bury- 
ing Ground, Philadelphia. 
m. November 6th, 1856, Annie Emily Crowell, 
daughter of Thomas and Emily Crowell : cere- 
mony by Rev. John Chambers, minister of the 
First Independent (Presbyterian) Church, 
Philadelphia. 
She b. 1837. 

d. November 19th, 1907; buried in Fairhill Bury- 
ing Ground. 

2498— ELIZABETH A. FRENCH !.. September 25th, 1858. 

(1. June 14th, 1860. 

2499— JOHN ELI FRENCH, 2ND 

b. July 7th, 1861, in Philadelphia, 
m. December 12th, 1893, Ida L. Bowman, 
daughter of Edmund J. and Serena (Bow- 
man) Bowman; Episcopal cenemony. 
She b. March 9th, 1858. in Neffsville, Pa. 

d. June 7th, 1911, in Philadelphia; buried in 
Lancaster, Pa. (No issue.) 

2500— HENRY BUTLER FRENCH 

b. February 2°-th, 1864. 
m. November 22nd, 1887, Anna M. Maher. 

2501— SUSAN CROWELL FRENCH 

I.. November 2Sth. 1866. 
m. January 2bth, 1887, Samuel B. Hutchinson. 

1477— RICHARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, S ; Charles. 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Charles, 356; William II.. 746). 

b. 2nd mo. 4th. 1836, in Philadelphia. 

d. 9th mo. 23rd, 1905, at his residence. 193S Mt. 
Vernon St.. Philadelphia; buried in Fairhill 
Burying Ground. Philadelphia. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 525 

m. First, 12th mo. 1st, 1859, by Friends' ceremony, 
Julia Anna Cornelia Abbott, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth (Shaw) Abbott. 
She b. 9th mo. 7th, 1837, in Upper Merion township, 
Montgomery County, Pa. 
d. 4th mo. 2nd, 1871; buried in Fairhill Burying 

Ground, 
m. Second, 2nd mo. 4th, 1873, by Friends' cere- 
mony, Mary W. Baynes, daughter of Thomas 
and Sarah (Wetherald) Baynes. 
She b. 7th mo. 1st, 1839, in Wilmington, Del. 

2502— ELIZABETH BORTON FRENCH 

b. 11th mo. 20th, 1860. 
m. December 8th, 1891. Joseph M. Fredd. 

2503— MARY SHAW FRENCH b. 8th mo. 25th, 1864. 

m. 4th mo. 11th, 1904, by Friends' ceremony, 
Thomas Birckhead Hanway, son of George 
William and Olevia (Birckhead) Hanway. 
He b. 6th mo. 6th, 1868, in Aberdeen, Md. 

2504— RICHARD ABBOTT FRENCH 

b. 5th mo. 21st, 1867. 
m. 12th mo. 6th, 1894, Emily Walton. 

2505— WILLIAM HOWARD FRENCH 

b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1870. 

m. April 13th, 1893, E. Florence Broomell. 

Children of Richard and Mary W. (Baynes) French. 

2506— SARAH BAYNES FRENCH 

b. 11th mo. 16th, 1873. 

m. 10th mo. 11th, 1904, Charles S. Hopper. 

2507— CAROLINE BURR FRENCH 

b. 3rd mo. 7th, 1877. 

2508— ALBERT FRENCH b. 10th mo. 11th, 1880. 

d. 9th mo. 26th, 1882. 



526 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1479— MARTHA HAZELTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42 ; Samuel, 141 ; Charles, 356 ; Wil- 
liam H., 746). 

b. 12th mo. 8th, 1839, in Philadelphia. 

m. September 24th, 1863, John B. Solms, son of 
Joseph and Maria (Bartholomew) Solms; cere- 
mony by Rev. Robert C. Matlack, rector of the 
Church of the Nativity, Philadelphia. 
J. B. S. b. June 6th, 1821. 

d. August 31st, 1903. 

2509— JOHN B. SOLMS, JR. b. July 27th, 1864. 

d. August 12th, 1864. 

2510— MARTHA HAZELTON SOLMS 

b. March 26th, 1866. 

2511— SIDNEY J. SOLMS b. October 13th, 1868. 

d. November 30th, 1868. 

2512— WILLIAM HOUSTON SOLMS 

b. January 8th, 1871. 
d. July 8th, 1871. 

2513— MARIE EUGENIE SOLMS 

b. September 22nd, 1877. 



1480— ELIZABETH COLSON FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Charles, 356; Samuel C, 
747). 
b. 11th mo. 13th, 1831, in Philadelphia, 
d. 1st mo. 17th, 1890, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. 4th mo. 5th, 1860, by Friends' ceremony, John 
Gaunt, Jr., son of John and Elizabeth (Kirby) 
Gaunt. 
He b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1828, near Daretown, N. J. 
d. 8th mo. 31st, 1911, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 527 



2514— GEORGE WASHINGTON FRENCH GAUNT 

b. 9th mo. 2nd, 1865. 
m. 12th mo. 5th, 1888, Anna G. West. 

2515— EDGAR COOPER GAUNT b. 8th mo. 5th, 1868. 

m. June 12th, 1898, Mary C. Brown. 



1482— ALFRED FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Charles, 356; Samuel C, 747). 
b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1837, in Harrisonville, Gloucester 

County, N. J. 
m. March 2nd, 1865, Abigail Anna Sailer, daughter 
of Thomas and Hannah (Moore) Sailer; cere- 
mony by Alexander Henry, Esq., mayor of 
Philadelphia. 
She b. 3rd mo. 22nd, 1842, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

2516— HARRY S. FRENCH b. July 8th, 1866. 

m. First, June 8th, 1892, Harriet C. Reeves, 
m. Second, October 18th, 1900, Gertrude C. 
MacMillan. 

2517— RACHEL E. FRENCH b. October 26th, 1871. 

m. 12th mo. 5th, 1912, by Friends' ceremony, 
George M. Andrews, son of James and 
Elizabeth T. (Hilliard) Andrews. 

2518— CAROLINE M. FRENCH b. June 16th, 1881. 



1486— THOMAS MIDDLETON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141; Charles, 356; 
Stacy, 748). 

b. 11th mo. 8th, 1834, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

m. February 23rd, 1867, in Logan Square Pres- 
byterian Church, Philadelphia, Sarah English, 
daughter of Samuel and Ann (Vanmeter) 
English. 
She b. March 18th, 1836, in Salem County, N. J. 

d. October 3rd, 1890, in Trenton, N. J. 



528 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2519— FRANK C. FRENCH b. October 26th, 1868. 

m. April 28th, 1898, Lottie L. Wilson. 



2520— CLAYTON R. FRENCH b. July 24th. 1870. 



2521— MARY H. FRENCH b. May 2nd, 1873. 



2522— JOHN H. FRENCH b. July 7th, 1876. 



Thomas M. French enlisted in Co. A, Third Regiment, New Jersey Yolunteers; mus- 
tered in May 22nd, 1861, and mustered out October 23rd, 1864. 



1488— ABIGAIL HAZELTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles,8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141 ; Charles, 356; Stacy, 748). 

b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1840, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. First, 4th mo. 7th, 1864, by Friends' ceremony, 
Reuben W. White, son of Joseph and Lydia 
(Moore) White. 
He d. 7th mo. 26th, 1876, in Washington Court House, 
Fayette County, Ohio. 
m. Second, 10th mo. 26th, 1893, by Friends' cere- 
mony, Reuben Noxon, of Bloomfield, Ontario, 
Canada, son of Jonathan and Jemima (Way) 
Noxon. 
He b. 12th mo. 12th, 1830, in Prince Edward County, 
Ont. 



2523— FLORENCE WHITE b. 7th mo. 25th, 1866. 

d. 3rd mo. 2nd, 1875 ; buried in Friends' 
Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 529 

1491— WILLIAM FRENCH IREDELL (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Charles, 356; Martha H. 
French, 750). 

b. 11th mo. 1st, 1840, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. 8th mo. 28th, 1910; buried in Friends' Burying 

Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 
m. 2nd mo. 18th, 1864, Margaretta Kirby, daughter 
of Amos and Rachel (Parker) Kirby. 
She b. 1st mo. 12th, 1843, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 

2524— EDWARD IREDELL b. 6th mo. 30th, 1867. 

2525— MARY ANNA IREDELL b. 10th mo. 25th, 1872. 

d. 4th mo. 29th, 1902; buried in Friends' 
Burying Ground, Mullica Hill, N. J. 

William French Iredell, first son and child of Edward and Martha Hazelton (French) 
Iredell [750], was a well-known Friend, and member of Mullica Hill Monthly Meeting, 
of which he was treasurer for thirty years. He was appointed postmaster at Mullica Hill 
by President Harrison, serving four years. He was again appointed by President Mc- 
Kinley in August, 1897, and continued in office by reappointment until his death. He 
was collector of Harrison township for seven years, treasurer of French Lodge, No. 89, 
I. O. O. F., for twenty-four years and also treasurer of the Improved Order of Hepta- 
sophs. He was highly esteemed throughout the community. 



1495— ADA MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Samuel, 357; Samuel G., 755). 

b. August 12th, 1867, in Russell County, Alabama. 

m. January 3rd, 1889, at Winter Park, Florida, 

Leonard Hilton-Green, son of Rev. Henry and 

Margaret (Lindsell) Hilton-Green, of England. 

2526— ADA FRENCH HILTON-GREEN 

b. October 22nd, 1889. 

2527— HENRY LEONARD HILTON-GREEN 

b. September 16th, 1893. 

Leonard Hilton-Green, president of Citizens' National Bank, Pensacola, Florida, since 
1893. 



530 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1496— ROBERT ABERCROMBIE FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141 J Samuel, 357; 
Samuel G., 755). 

b. August 12th, 1872, at Alleghany Springs, Va. 
m. June 30th, 1904, in Jacksonville, Florida, Alys 
(Duer) Bidwell, widow, daughter of Dr. James 
H. and Mary Elwyn (Moore) Duer; ceremony 
by Rev. W. E. Warren, rector of St. Andrew's 
P. E. Church. 
She b. May 5th, 1876, in Tangipahoa, Tangipahoa 
Parish, La. 

2528— ADA MARY FRENCH b. July 19th, 1906. 

Robert A. French, second son and youngest child of General Samuel G. [755] and Mary 
(Abercrombie) French, was educated at Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida, and at 
the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md., but was compelled to resign from the 
Academy owing to an injury to his eye. He served three years in the Florida State 
troops, and later was appointed by Governor Bloxham junior ensign of the Fourth Di- 
vision of the naval battalion of the state of Florida. For four years he served as naval 
secretary to Governor Bloxham, with rank of captain in navy, and was reappointed 
assistant naval secretary, with same rank, for the term of four years, under Governor 
Jennings. For some years he occupied the position of teller in the Citizens' Bank of 
Pensacola, Florida; mayor of Florala, Ala., for two years, councilman for two years; and 
at present engaged in the real estate business in that city. 



1500— RHEA BARTON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141 ; Samuel, 357; Charles C, 756). 

b. November 1st, 1852. 
m. November 5th, 1874, Sarah Virginia Sweeney. 

2529— CHARLES CLEMENT FRENCH 

b. June 15th, 1876. 
d. 1886. 

2530— MAUD RHEA FRENCH b. August 24th, 1878. 

m. August 15th, 1900, Albert Donnelly Heyl. 

2531— HENRIETTA E. FRENCH b. April 4th, 1881. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 531 

2532— ANNA LOUISA FRENCH b. January 4th, 1883. 

m. September 24th, 1903, Clifford W. Ebur. 

2533— ELLEN ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. October 4th, 1887. 

2534— RHEA BARTON FRENCH, JR. 

b. September 11th, 1889. 

2535— ETHEL LEE FRENCH b. July 6th, 1895. 

1503— HORACE GIBBS FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Samuel, 357; Joseph H., 757). 

b. March 4th, 1848. 

m. November 16th, 1881, in Austin, Texas, Ida B. 
Wilson, daughter of James Boone and Mary 
Jane (Thompson) Wilson. 
She b. October 8th, 1855, in Marshall, Texas. 

2536— LAURA EDITH FRENCH b. September 20th, 1882. 

m. April 29th, 1903, Walter H. Whisenant. 

1507— CHARLES CLEMENT FRENCH, 2ND (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Samuel, 141; Samuel, 357; 
Joseph H., 757). 

b. October 23rd, 1855, in Pineville, N. J. 
m. February 15th, 1887, Mary Bronaugh, daughter 
of Judge Christopher C. and Annie E. (Payton). 
Bronaugh of Fort Worth, Texas. 
She b. April 6th, 1855, in Henry County, Mo. 

2537— MARY BRONAUGH FRENCH 

b. September 21st, 1890. 

m. January 24th, 1910, Thomas J. Lawler, Jr.,. 
son of Thomas J. and Elizabeth (Schmauch) 
Lawler, of St. Louis, Mo. 

2538— REBECCA CLARK FRENCH 

b. December 2nd, 1892. 
d. December 9th, 1892. 



532 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2539— CHARLES CLEMENT FRENCH, JR. 

b. January 7th, 1895. 

1511— MARY FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 

141 ; Samuel, 357; John C, 758). 

b. October 19th, 1855, in San Antonio, Texas. 

d. January 20th, 1884, at her residence, 2043 
Spruce St., Philadelphia; buried in Laurel Hill 
Cemetery, Philadelphia. 

m. May 26th, 1880, in Washington, D. C, John 
Williams Patten, Jr., son of John Williams and 
Catherine Lane (Kellum) Patten, of Philadel- 
phia. 
J. W. P., JR. m. Second, April 28th, 1892, Ellen Regina Sim- 
mons, daughter of James and Belinda A. Sim- 
mons ; ceremony by the Rt. Rev. Patrick J. Ryan, 
Archbishop of Philadelphia. 

2540— MARY FRENCH PATTEN b. January 17th, 1884, in Philadelphia. 

m. June 14th, 1911, in Devon, Pa., Rev 
Frank Seymour Scudder, son of Rev 
Ezekiel Carman and Ruth (Tracy) Scud 
der ; ceremony by Rev. A. A. Patton, D.D. 
Presbyterian minister, assisted by Rev 
Howard E. Thompson, Episcopal clergy 
man. 
F. S. S. b. April, 1862, in Yellore, India. Assistant 
Secretary (1912) of the Evangelical Board 
of Missions at Honolulu. Hawaiian Islands. 

151 4_ANNIE EVALYN JESSUP (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Sarah, 359; Mary Clark, 763). 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1838, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 7th mo. 16th, 1906, in Woodbury, N. J.; buried 

in Eglington Cemetery, Clarksboro, N. J. 
m. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1865, by Friends' ceremony, 

George Craft, 3rd, son of George, Jr., and 

Mary (Bassett) Craft. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 533 

He b. 3rd mo. 9th, 1840, in Mickleton, N. J. 

d. 5th mo. 30th, 1910, in Woodbury, N. J.; buried 
in Eglington Cemetery. 

2541— MARY JESSUP CRAFT b. 12th mo. 7th, 1865. 

m. August 19th, 1891, J. Maurice Wilkins. 

2542— NELLIE B. CRAFT b. 11th mo. 16th, 1870. 

George Craft, 3rd, member of the New Jersey Assembly, 1880 and 1881, representing 
Gloucester County. 



1516— JOHN SAMUEL JESSUP (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42 

Samuel, 141 ; Sarah, 359; Mary Clark, 763) 

b. 8th mo. 28th, 1842, in Gloucester County, N. J 
d. September 27th, 1911, in Woodbury, N. J. 

buried in Eglington Cemetery, Clarksboro, N.J 
m. November 2nd, 1871, Mary Moore Howell, 

daughter of Dr. Benjamin P. and Rachel 

(Lewis) Howell; Presbyterian ceremony. 
She b. May 16th, 1846, in Gloucester County, N. J. 
d. July 12th, 1909, in Woodbury, N. J. ; buried in 

Eglington Cemetery. 

2543— JOSEPH JESSUP b. January 20th, 1873. 

m. October 11th, 1902, Louise Gertrude Bains. 

2544— BENJAMIN HOWELL JESSUP 

b. February 12th, 1874. 
d. June 6th, 1875. 

2545— JOHN SAMUEL JESSUP, JR. 

b. January 24th, 1877. 

2546— MARY HOWELL JESSUP b. February 8th, 1878. 

2547— RACHEL LEWIS JESSUP b. April 14th, 1883. 

m. September 8th, 1910, Burton Douglas Saint. 

2548— ANNA GRAHAM JESSUP b. January 30th, 1886. 

2549— SARAH JESSUP b. March 8th, 1887. 



534 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Honorable John Samuel Jessup, second son and third child of Joseph and Mary (Clark) 
Jessup [763], was born in Harrison township, Gloucester County, N. J. He was educated 
at the West Jersey Academy, Bridgeton, and Princeton University, graduating from the 
latter institution in June, 1865. He studied law at the Harvard College Law School and 
with Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, in Newark, N. J., afterwards United States senator, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1868, and soon thereafter located in Woodbury, N. J. He 
practiced his profession in the courts of New Jersey for many years. In 1897 he was 
appointed by Governor John W. Griggs judge of the courts of Gloucester County, for 
five years, and reappointed by Governor Franklin Murphy in 1902, serving two terms. 
This office he filled with great acceptability, showing such keen, discriminating judgment 
that he became known as a jurist whose decisions were never reversed by a higher court. 
He retired to private practice in 1902, representing a number of estates, and was solicitor 
for several townships in the county. He always took an active part in Republican poli- 
tics, and served nine years as a member of Woodbury City Council, being president of 
that body for some years; also solicitor of the Board of Freeholders. Judge Jessup was 
deeply interested in religious affairs, and was for many years an elder and trustee of 
the Woodbury Presbyterian Church. He was a commissioner from West Jersey Pres- 
bytery to the General Assembly at Minneapolis in 18S6, and also at Atlantic City in 1910. 



1518— CHARLES CLARK JESSUP (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Samuel, 141; Sarah, 359; Mary Clark, 763). 

b. 3rd mo. 14th, 1S47, in Harrison township, N. J. 
m. August 5th, 1880, Abbie Thomas Reeves, 
daughter of Dr. Thomas and Isabella (Mc- 
Phail) Reeves. 
She b. 5th mo. 22nd, 1853, in Swedesboro, N. J. 

2550— ISABEL KINSELL JESSUP 

b. November 25th, 1882. 

m. June 1st, 1905, Leonidus Vail Garron, son 
of Lycurgus Vail and Margaret (Wilson) 
Garron. 

2551— EDWARD CLARK JESSUP 

b. October 24th, 1887. 

Charles C. Jessup, president of the First National Bank of Woodbury, X. J., for a 
number of years and postmaster of the Woodbury office. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 535 

1522— WILLIAM SPENCER CLARK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141; Sarah, 359; Jacob F. 
Clark, 764). 

b. 4th mo. 5th, 1845, near Paulsboro, N. J. 

d. 5th mo. 20th, 1900. 

m. July, 1870, Harriet H. Norton, daughter of 
John D. and Sarah S. (Davidson) Norton. 
She b. December 12th, 1847, in Nortonville, Glouces- 
ter County, N. J. 

d. December 8th, 1884, near Woodstown, N. J. 

2552— JACOB FRENCH CLARK, 2ND 

b. January 6th, 1879. 

1523— ELLA CLARK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Samuel, 141; 

Sarah, 359; Jacob F. Clark, 764). 

b. 8th mo. 14th, 1853, near Mullica Hill, N. J. 
d. 4th mo. 6th, 1911; buried in Eglington Ceme- 
tery, Clarksboro, N. J. 
m. 4th mo. 29th, 1880, by Friends' ceremony, 
Howard T. Woolman, son of James and Mary 
Ann (Pedrick) Woolman. 
He b. 8th mo. 5th, 1850, in Woodstown, N. J. 

2553— ROY CLARK WOOLMAN b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1881. 

m. 7th mo. 20th, 1904, Elizabeth B. Ring. 

1528— ELIZABETH EMMA MULFORD (Thomas, 1; Charles,8; Charles, 

42; Samuel, 141 ; Joseph C, 360; Emma N., 
766). 
b. 12th mo. 27th, 1845. 

m. May 13th, 1875, Francis L. Godfrey, son of 
Hezekiah and Sophia (Wicks) Godfrey. 
He b. January 24th, 1838. 
d. June 12th, 1889. 

2554— MULFORD GODFREY b. April 5th, 1877. 

d. May 24th, 1877. 



536 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2555— EMMA MULFORD GODFREY 

b. July 7th, 1880. 

m. November 21st, 1907, George A. Peacock. 

1536— CHARLES FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD, JR. (Thomas, 1; 

Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Charles, 143; Ann, 
368; Charles F. Hollingshead, 786). 

b. February 10th, 1846. 
d. May 13th, 1893. 

m. May 10th, 1870, Emma Henderson (St. An- 
drew's P. E. Church record, Philadelphia). 
She d. September 6th, 1900. 

2556— SABILLA FRENCH HOLLINGSHEAD 

b. March 27th, 1871. 

m. March 27th, 1895, Henry Hurff Sickler. 

2557— EDNA HOLLINGSHEAD b. March 22nd, 1876. 

m. May 29th, 1900, Edward Latimer, Jr. 

1557— ELLEN ATLANTIC PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371 ; Joseph F. Page, 
796). 
m. Henry Clay Butcher, son of Washington and 
Mary Elizabeth (Watson) Butcher. 

2558— LAURA PAGE BUTCHER 

m. Alfred Thornton Baker, son of Louis C. 
and Rachel Stevens (Conover) Baker. 

2559— HENRY CLAY BUTCHER, JR. 

m. Constance Devereux, daughter of Alfred 
and Constance S. (Antelo) Devereux. 

2560— ALICE TYSON BUTCHER 

m. George Brinton Roberts, son of George B. 
Roberts, former president of Pennsylvania 
R. R. Co., and Sarah Lapsley (Brinton) 
Roberts. 

2561— ELEANOR PAGE BUTCHER 

m. H. Radclyff Roberts, son of Howard and 
Pauline (Lewis) Roberts. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 537 

1558— JOSEPH FRENCH PAGE, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371; Joseph F. 
Page, 796). 
b. November 28th, 1848, in Philadelphia. 
m. June 13th, 1878, in St. Paul's Church, Chestnut 
Hill, Philadelphia, Josephine Richards Collins, 
daughter of Alfred M. and Hannah (Evans) 
Collins ; Rev. Wm. Neilson McVickar perform- 
ing ceremony. 
She b. February 12th, 1858, in Philadelphia. 

2562— CHARLES COLLINS PAGE 

b. March 17th, 1879. 

2563— EDITH PAGE b. April 11th, 1880. 

m. November 19th, 1912, in Church of Good 
Samaritan, Paoli, Pa., Harry Clay Potter, 
Jr., son of Harry Clay and Emily G. 
(Spooner) Potter; Rev. Horace Walton 
performing ceremony. 

2564— ELIZABETH RICHARDS PAGE 

b. November 17th, 1881. 

m. November 16th, 1904, in Church of Good' 
Samaritan, Paoli, Pa., James Kent Willing, 
son of Richard Lloyd and Elizabeth Kent 
(Ashhurst) Willing; Rev. Horace Walton 
performing ceremony. 

2565— JOSEPH FRENCH PAGE, 3RD 

b. July 26th, 1885. 

m. April 15th, 1908, Janet North. 

2566— RICHARD LLOYD PAGE b. July 27th, 1899. 

1561— CHARLES HENRY PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371 ; Joseph F. Page, 
796). 
b. January 8th, 1858, in Philadelphia, 
d. July 27th, 1892, in Philadelphia, 
m. May 17th, 1882, Rebecca Gibson Grosholtz, 
daughter of William and Mary (Gibson) Gros- 
holtz. 



538 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2567— MARY GIBSON PAGE d. in infancy. 

Charles Henry Page was a stock broker, in partnership with his brothers, Edward D., 
Joseph F., Jr., and Louis R. Page, under the firm name of E. D. Page & Bro., at 132 
S. Fourth St., Philadelphia. He was shot in his office by Ronald Kennedy, a former 
customer of the house, who was crazed by financial losses, and %vho then killed himself. 
As an energetic young business man, Mr. Page was widely and favorably known and his 
tragic death was sincerely mourned by many friends. 



1563— LOUIS RODMAN PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371 ; Joseph F. Page, 
796). 
b. November 25th, 1861, in Philadelphia. 
m. April 12th, 1887, in Upland Baptist Church, 
Upland, Pa., Mary Lewis Crozer, daughter of 
Samuel A. and Abby (Cheney) Crozer; cere- 
mony by Rev. Benjamin Griffith, D.D. 
She b. September 24th, 1866, in Upland, Pa. 

256S— ANNETTE PAGE b. June 23rd, 1888. 

m. February 3rd, 1910, in Holy Trinity Church, 
Philadelphia, Caspar Wistar Hacker, son 
of William and Hannah (Wistar) Hacker; 
ceremony by Rev. Floyd W. Tomkins, 
S.T.D., rector. 

2569— LOUIS RODMAN PAGE, JR. 

b. March 17th, 1890. 

2570— EDWARD CROZER PAGEb. August 9th, 1891. 

2571— MARY CROZER PAGE b. December 14th, 1893. 



1564— ROBERT HANSELL PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371 ; Joseph F. Page, 
796). 
b. August 7th, 1863, in Cape May, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 539 

m. April 24th, 1889, in Upland Baptist Church, 
Upland, Pa., Sara Levis Crozer, daughter of 
George K. and Emma P. (Snodgrass) Crozer; 
ceremony by Rev. Benjamin Griffith, D.D. 
She b. April 2nd, 1868, in Upland, Pa. 

2572— ROBERT HANSELL PAGE, JR. 

b. April 5th, 1893. 

2573— GEORGE CROZER PAGE b. December 5th, 1895. 

1565— FRANCES PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Charles, 

143; Atlantic, 371; Joseph F. Page, 796). 
b. October 14th, 1865, in Philadelphia. 
m. February 8th, 1887, in Holy Trinity Church, 
Philadelphia, Winthrop Burr, son of Isaac T. 
and Ann Frances (Hardon) Burr; ceremony 
by Rev. John A. Harris, rector of St. Paul's P. 
E. Church, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 
W. B. b. July 24th, 1861, in Boston, Mass. 

2574— ROSAMOND BURR b. June 8th, 1889, in Boston, Mass. 

2575— FRANCES BURR b. November 24th, 1890, in Boston, Mass. 

2576— WINTHROP BURR, JR. b. September 15th, 1S95, in Lawrence, L. I. 

2577— ROBERT PAGE BURR b. January 9th, 1898, in Lawrence, L. I. 

1568— EDWARD SYDENHAM PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371; Edward A. 
Page, 800). 
b. June 11th, 1868, in Philadelphia, 
m. December 8th, 1898, in St. James' P. E. Church, 
22nd and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia, Helen 
Douglas Bickley, daughter of Howell Wharton 
and Miriam Douglas (Scott) Bickley; cere- 
mony by Rev. Joseph Blanchard. 
She b. May 10th, 1874, in New York City. 



540 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2578— EDWARD SYDENHAM PAGE, JR. 

b. June 14th, 1900. 

2579— GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM PAGE 

b. February 26th, 1907. 

2580— ANNA DYKE SCOTT PAGE 

b. February 26th, 1909. 

2581— HELEN BICKLEY PAGE b. July 26th, 1910. 



1569— GEORGE BISPHAM PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371; Edward A. 
Page, 800). 
b. September 24th, 1870, in Philadelphia. 
m. February 27th, 1908, Maud Newlin, daughter 
of J. Shipley and Louisa (Verplanck) Newlin; 
ceremony at Shipley Farm, Secane, Delaware 
County, Pa., by Rev. David M. Steele, rector 
of the Church of St. Luke and the Epiphany, 
Philadelphia. 
She b. February 20th, 1878, in Philadelphia. 

2582— PRISCILLA VERPLANCK PAGE 

b. December 29th, 1908. 



1570— ELIZABETH BISPHAM PAGE (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Charles, 143; Atlantic, 371 ; Edward A. 
Page, 800). 
b. March 27th, 1875, in Philadelphia, 
m. March 5th, 1904, in Christ Church Chapel, 
Philadelphia, Robert Whitman Atkinson, son 
of Edward Atkinson ; ceremony by Rev. James 
R. Nesbitt, rector. 
R. W. A. b. December 14th, 1868. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 541 

2583— ALICA TUCKER ATKINSON 

b. December 10th, 1905. 

2584— ELIOT HEATH ATKINSON 

b. August 3rd, 1907. 



1572— MARTHA CRILLON BARTON (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Eleanor, 144; Hugh F. Hollingshead, 
380; Anna H. Hollingshead, 811). 

b. February 7th, 1838, in Philadelphia. 

m. December 19th, 1861, William Cheverl Carpen- 
ter, son of William S. and Sarah (Benedict) 
Carpenter; Episcopal ceremony. 
He b. October 26th, 1836, in Philadelphia. 

d. April 3rd, 1865, in Philadelphia. 

2585— ANNA HOLLINGSHEAD CARPENTER 

b. February 22nd, 1863. 

m. June 20th, 1889, Henry Pennypacker, son 
of Charles and Elizabeth A. (Pyle) Pen- 
nypacker. 

2586— WILLIAM S. CARPENTER, 2ND 

b. July 10th, 1864. 

d. December 26th, 1865. 

1573— ELLEN HOLLINGSHEAD BARTON (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Eleanor, 144; Hugh F. Hol- 
lingshead, 380; Anna H. Hollingshead, 
811). 
b. September 18th, 1839, in Haddonfield, N. J. 
m. October 4th, 1866, Edward Bleecker, M.D.,son 
of William E. and Elizabeth (Russell) Bleecker, 
of Albany, N. Y. ; Episcopal ceremony. 
Dr. E. B. b. January 9th, 1843, in Albany, N. Y. 

d. November 5th, 1899, in Whitestone, Long Is- 
land, N. Y. 



542 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2587— ANNA HOLLINGSHEAD BLEECKER 

b. July 15th, 1867. 

2588— WILLIAM BLEECKER b. January 31st, 1869. 

2589— RUTGER BLEECKER b. November 5th, 1870. 

2590— EDWARD BLEECKER b. July 8th, 1873. 

m. May 19th, 1908, Elizabeth Duryea. 

2591— BESSIE BLEECKER b. April 10th, 1876. 

d. July 22nd, 1877. 

1574c— ELLEN HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42 ; 

Eleanor, 144; Hugh F. Hollingshead, 380; 
Joseph M. Hollingshead, 813). 

b. April 23rd, 1858. 
d. January 22nd, 1880. 
m. 1879, J. Rundle Smith, son of Dr. Henry Hol- 

lingsworth and Mary Edmonds (Horner) 

Smith. 
He b. June 14th, 1857. 

d. December 30th, 1908. 

2592— ELLEN HOLLINGSHEAD SMITH 

b. January 17th, 1880. 

m. December 14th, 1904, in Church of St. 
Martin-inthe-Fields, Chestnut Hill, Phila- 
delphia, Cushman Newhall, son of Robert 
Stuart and Annette M. (Wright) Newhall; 
ceremony by Rev. Jacob LeRoy, rector. 
C. N. b. November 16th, 1879. 

1374d— CAROLINE HOLLINGSHEAD (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Eleanor, 144; Hugh F. Hollingshead, 
380; Joseph M. Hollingshead, 813). 

b. January "th, 1861. 
m. April 10th, 1890, J. Russell Griffitts. 

2593— SAMUEL POWEL GRIFFITTS 

b. September 2nd, 1892. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 543 

1575a— ARCHER RICHARDS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Eleanor, 144; Charles F. Matlack, 381; 
Anna Matlack, 819). 

b. 4th mo. 30th, 1857, in Philadelphia, 
m. August 24th, 1882, in Milwaukee, Wis., Caro- 
line Nelson. 

2594— ARCHER WILLIAM RICHARDS 

b. October 17th, 1885. 
m. July 29th, 1907, Dorothy Sheppy. 

2595— CHARLES NELSON RICHARDS 

b. October 6th, 1887. 

m. November 2nd, 1909, Margaret Silver- 
thorne. 

1575c— ELEANOR FRENCH RICHARDS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Eleanor, 144; Charles F. Mat- 
lack, 381 ; Anna Matlack, 819). 

b. 5th mo. 10th, 1862, in Germantown, Philadel- 
phia, 
m. 4th mo. 27th, 1882, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Germantown, Philadelphia, William Farmer 
Price, son of William Ballinger and Ellen 
(Farmer) Price. 
He b. 8th mo. 12th, 1860, in Milwaukee, Wis. 

2596— WILLIAM THEODORE RICHARDS PRICE 

b. 5th mo. 1st, 1885. 

2597— CHARLES MATLACK PRICE 

b. 3rd mo. 31st, 1887. 

m. 11th mo. 22nd, 1909, Ruth Alexander 
Madden. 

2598— DOROTHY PRICE b. 10th mo. 15th, 1890. 

d. 7th mo. 22nd, 1891. 

2599— GEOFFREY PRICE b. 11th mo. 16th, 1895. 

d. 1st mo. 7th, 1896. 

2600— EDITH BALLINGER PRICE 

b. 4th mo. 26th, 1897. 



544 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1575e— THEODORE WILLIAM RICHARDS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42 ; Eleanor, 144 ; Charles F. Mat- 
lack, 381 ; Anna Matlack, 819). 

b. 1st mo. 31st, 1868, at the home of Dr. Charles 
F. Matlack, Shoemaker Lane (now Penn St.), 
Germantown, Philadelphia. 
m. May 28th, 1896, Miriam Stuart Thayer, daughter 
of Professor Joseph Henry and Martha Cald- 
well (Davis) Thayer. 

2601— GRACE THAYER RICHARDS 

b. February 1st, 1898. 

2602— WILLIAM THEODORE RICHARDS 

b. March 24th, 1900. 

2603— GREENOUGH THAYER RICHARDS 

b. October 17th, 1905. 



Theodore William Richards, fifth child and third son of William Trost and Anna 
(Matlack) Richards [819], was carefully educated along the lines of his inclination, the 
•study of chemistry. He graduated from Haverford College, Pa., in 1885, and from 
Harvard University in 1888, being distinguished throughout for proficiency in chemistry, 
and receiving from the latter institution the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. He continued 
his studies in Germany, Switzerland, France and England, visiting many of the most 
•eminent chemists and important laboratories in Europe. In 1891 he became instructor 
at Harvard, the following year he was promoted to membership in the faculty of arts 
and sciences, and in 1894 he was appointed assistant professor, which position he held 
for seven years, during which time he made a number of trips abroad in the interest of 
his work, and was made a member of the International Committee on Atomic Weights. 
In 1901 he was called to a research professorship in the University of Gottingen, but 
the prompt offer of a similar position at Harvard caused him to decide to remain in 
America. And declining many positions that have been tendered him at home and abroad, 
Professor Richards has remained with Harvard, steadily advancing in the posts of respon- 
sibility assigned him, and devoting untiring efforts to the furtherance of scientific research. 
In 1903 he became chairman of the Division of Chemistry at Harvard, and in 1907 was 
selected as Visiting Professor to the University of Berlin. In 1905 he received the hon- 
orary degree of Doctor of Science from Yale University, in 1908 the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws from Haverford College, and in 1909 that of Chemical Doctor from 
Clark University. He is a member of many foreign and American scientific societies. 



DESCENDANTS OF T HOMAS FRENCH 545 

1575f— ANNA MARY RICHARDS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Eleanor, 144; Charles F. Matlack, 381; 
Anna Matlack, 819). 

b. 4th mo. 3rd, 1870, in Ciermantown, Philadel- 
phia, 
m. July 18th, 1905, in St. Luke's Church, Chelsea, 
London, England, William Tenney Brewster, 
son of John Leander and Adeline Augusta 
(Tenney) Brewster. 
He b. August 15th, 1869, in Lawrence, Mass. 

2604— HERBERT RICHARDS BREWSTER 

b. May 11th, 1906. 

d. February 13th, 1910. 

William Tenney Brewster, provost and professor of English in Barnard College, Co- 
lumbia University, N. Y. 



1575o— SAMUEL DREHER MATLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles,8; Charles, 

42; Eleanor, 144; Charles F. Matlack, 381 ; 
Joseph Matlack, 823a). 

b. June 14th, 1873. 
m. October 28th, 1896, Katharine D. Moore, 
daughter of Gilbert S. and Sarah C. (Davis) 
Moore. 
She b. August 11th, 1870. 

2605— MARGARET MATLACK b. October 13th, 1897. 

2606— GILBERT S. M. MATLACK 

b. March 21st, 1900. 
d. February 28th, 1902. 

2607— ELEANOR MATLACK b. May 4th, 1904. 

2608— KATHARINE A. MATLACK 

b. July Uth, 1905. 
35 



546 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1575q— SARA MATLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Eleanor, 

144; Charles F. Matlack, 381; Joseph Mat- 
lack, 823a). 
b. August 25th, 1881. 

m. October 21st, 1905, in First Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, Germantown, Philadelphia, War- 
ren H. Prentzel, son of Samuel F. and Mary S. 
(Derrickson) Prentzel. 
He b. August 10th, 1880, in Philadelphia. 

2609— SARA ANN PRENTZEL b. March 13th, 1908. 

2610— MARY PRENTZEL b. December 13th, 1910. 



1580— THOMAS SPARKS BISHOP (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145 ; Ann Black, 382 ; John Bishop, 
825). 
b. 3rd mo. 12th, 1846, in Columbus, N. J. 
d. November 13th, 1898, in Columbus, N. J. 
m. November 12th, 1873, in Bordentown, N. J., 
Rebecca Hance, daughter of William and Mar- 
garet (Borden) Hance; Episcopal ceremony. 
She b. December 2nd, 1852, in Bordentown, N. J. 

2611— THOMAS SPARKS BISHOP, JR. 

b. July 18th, 1877. 

m. June 15th. 1907, Isabella Adriance Mc- 
Kechnie, daughter of George Wilson and 
Molly (Spencer) McKechnie. 

2612— MARGARET BISHOP b. April 20th, 1892. 



1582— JOHN ISRAEL BISHOP (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; Ann Black, 382; John Bishop, 
825). 
b. 7th mo. 4th, 1849, near Columbus, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 547 

m. 11th mo. 9th, 1871, by Friends' ceremony, in 
presence of Daniel M. Fox, Esq., mayor of 
Philadelphia, Anna Ridgway, daughter of Jacob 
E. and Sarah (Shreve) Ridgway. 
She b. August 24th, 1850, in Philadelphia. 

2613— JOHN BISHOP, 4TH b. 12th mo. 20th, 1875. 

d. 3rd mo. 28th, 1884. 

2614— EMILY BISHOP b. 10th mo. 24th, 1878. 

m. 10th mo. Sth, 1901, by Friends' ceremony, 
John S. C. Harvey, son of Thomas B. and 
Mary (Sykes) Harvey. 
He b. Sth mo. 15th, 1872. 

2615— JOHN V. BISHOP b. 7th mo. 2nd, 1886. 

m. January 6th, 1909, Helen Bailey, daughter 
of Joseph and Alice (Shewell) Bailey. 

1583— JANE BISHOP (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 145; 

Ann Black, 382; John Bishop, 825). 

b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1851, near Columbus, N. J. 
m. 2nd mo. 12th, 1874, in Friends' Meeting, Mans- 
field, N. J., Ellis Branson, son of Thomas and 
Ann S. (Hendrickson) Branson. 
He b. 3rd mo. 18th, 1829, in Philadelphia. 

d. July 4th, 1882, in Philadelphia; buried in 
Friends' Southwest Cemetery. 

2616— CRAIG R. BRANSON b. 6th mo. 11th, 1879. 



1586— WILLIAM BISHOP (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 

145; Ann Black, 382; John Bishop, 825). 

b. 12th mo. 23rd, 1856, near Columbus, N. J. 
m. 5th mo. 25th, 1883, by Friends' ceremony, 
Martha H. Holloway, daughter of Jacob and 
Sarah (Fawcett) Holloway. 
She b. 10th mo. 10th, 1858, in Flushing, Ohio. 



548 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2617— EDWARD BISHOP b. 4th mo. 18th, 1884. 

m. August, 1908, Marjorie Long, daughter of 
Nathaniel and Jennie (Brandt) Long. 



2618— WILLIAM BISHOP, JR. b. Sth mo. 10th, 1891. 
2619— SARAH BISHOP b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1901. 



1587— REBECCA FIELD BISHOP (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; Ann Black, 382; John Bishop, 
825). 
b. 1 1th mo. 26th. 1858, near Columbus, N. J. 
m. December 23rd, 1880, Rev. Robert Erskine 
Campbell, Jr., son of Dr. Robert Erskine and 
Tabitha Atkinson (Meek) Campbell; Presby- 
terian ceremony. 
He b. September 9th, 1855, at Cross Hill, Laurens 
County, S. C. 



2619a— RALPH ERSKINE CAMPBELL 

b. September 30th, 1881. 
d. August 9th, 1882. 



2619b— JENNIE BRANSON CAMPBELL 

b. April 1st, 1883. 
d. July 15th, 1883. 



2620— ROBERT ERSKINE CAMPBELL, 31<l> 

b. August 13th, 1884. 

2621— BERNARD CAMPBELL b. August 29th, 1887. 

2622— EDITH CAMPBELL b. July 8th, 1891. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 549 



1588— CHARLOTTE WILLS BISHOP (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145; Ann Black, 382; John 
Bishop, 825). 
b. 4th mo. 10th, 1862. 

m. April 10th, 1884, Nathan Black Wagoner 
[1606], son of William G. and Mary E. ( Black) 
Wagoner. 
He b. 10th mo. 10th, 1861. 

2623— ELLIS SHANNON WAGONER 

b. September Sth, 1885. 

1590— CHARLOTTE BLACK READ (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145; Samuel Black, 384; Mary 
Black, 827). 
b. April 27th, 1840, in Mount Holly, N. J. 
d. January 3rd, 1893, in Freehold, N. J.; buried 

in St. Andrew's churchyard, Mt. Holly, N. J. 
m. May 25th, 1861, David Vanderveer Conover, 
son of Dr. Arthur V. and Eliza Ann (Vander- 
veer) Conover; ceremony by Rev. George P. 
Schetky, rector of St. Andrew's P. E. Church,. 
Mt. Holly, N. J. 
D. V. C. b. Freehold, N. J. 
d. 1894. 

2624— FLORENCE VANDERVEER CONOVER 

b. October 5th, 1866. 

m. 1897, General Burd W. Spencer. 

2625— ARTHUR VANDERVEER CONOVER 

b. September 7th, 1873. 

1594— AUGUSTA MILNOR READ (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; Samuel Black, 384; Mary Black, 
827). 
b. December 12th, 1845, in Mount Holly, N. J. 



550 GENEALOGY OF THE 

m. October 17th, 1867, Walter Scott Oliphant, son 
of Jonathan and Louisa (Burr) Oliphant; cere- 
mony by Rev. D. H. McCurdy, rector of St. 
Andrew's P. E. Church, Mt. Holly, N. J. 
W. S. O. b. 1838. 

d. February 1st, 1879. 

2626— ALICE READ OLIPHANT 

b. November 14th, 1871. 

m. June 7th, 1893, Edwin Van Dusen Paul, 
son of Jacob Wheeler and Susan (Fries) 
Paul ; ceremony by Rev. R. A. Rodrick, 
rector of St. Andrew's P. E. Church, Mt. 
Holly, N. J. 

2627— MARY AUGUSTA OLIPHANT 

b. September 10th, 1873. 

m. October 30th, 1900, Thomas Wilkins Hulme ; 
ceremony by Rev. James Stoddard, rector 
of St. Andrew's P. E. Church, Mt. Holly. 

1595— LAURA MOREHOUSE READ (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145; Samuel Black, 384; Mary 
Black 827). 
b. July 27th, 1848, in Mount Holly, N. J. 
m. June 10th, 1875, William Arthur Conover, 
M.D., son of Dr. Arthur V. and Eliza Ann 
(Vanderveer) Conover; ceremony by Rev. C. 
M. Perkins, rector of St. Andrew's P. E. 
Church, Mt. Holly, N. J. 
Dr. W. A. C. b. October 4th, 1839, in Freehold, N. J. 

2628— MADELEINE MOREHOUSE CONOVER 

b. July 27th, 1876. 
m. Robert Kuebler. 

2629— CARLTON R. CONOVER. b. May 14th, 1878. 

m. August 9th, 1900, Maggie Johnston. 

2630— WILLIAM A. CONOVKR. JR. 

b. October 17th, 18S0. 
d. August 14th, 1900. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 551 

2631— PHILIP RYALL CONOVER 

b. November 22nd, 1888. 

2632— LAWRENCE B. CONOVER 

b. June 22nd, 1890. 

1599e— CHARLOTTE BIDDLE BLACK, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Hope, 145; Samuel Black, 384; 
Charlotte B. Black, 829). 

b. February 3rd, 1846, near Jobstown, Burlington 

County, N. J. 
m. February 14th, 1866, Joseph Warner Biddle, 
son of Israel and Sarah ( Field) Biddle. 
He b. January 9th, 1841, near Mansfield, Burlington 
County, N. J. 
d. February 18th, 1895, in Columbus, N. J. 

2633— ELIZA BLACK BIDDLE b. January ISth, 1S67. 

m. February 25th, 1S92, J. Herbert Deacon, 
son of John L. and Mary (Wills) Deacon. 

2634— ANNA WILLS BIDDLE b. December 1st, 1869. 

m. May 6th, 1893, William I. Nevvbold, son 
of Edwin and Charlotte Anne (Shreve) 
Newbold. 

2635— MARION ENGLISH BIDDLE 

b. March 19th, 1873. 

m. November 15th, 1894, Samuel Ellis, son 
of Henry and Edith (Earle) Ellis. 

2636— REBECCA RODGERS BIDDLE 

b. January 17th, 1879. 

m. November 1st, 1905, Arthur W. Luce, son 
of Rev. Warren A. and Ella (Arnold) 
Luce. 

2637— SUSAN BLACK BIDDLE b. May 23rd, 1884. 

m. October 9th, 1906, Oswald Arthur Gross- 
kreuz, son of Otto A. and Marie (Korn) 
Grosskreuz. 



552 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1606— NATHAN BLACK WAGONER (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Hope, 145; Nathan W. Black, 385; 
Mary E. Black, 837). 

b. 10th mo. 10th, 1861. 

m. April 10th, 1884, Charlotte Wills Bishop[1588], 
daughter of John, Jr., and Rebecca F. (Biddle) 
Bishop. 
She b. 4th mo. 10th, 1862. 

For child of Nathan B. and Charlotte (Bishop) Wagoner see 1588. 



1618— ISRAEL BIDDLE BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; William Black, 387; Thomas N. 
Black, 846). 

b. 7th mo. 28th, 1848, in Chesterfield, Burlington 

County, N. J. 
m. 2nd mo. 24th, 1879, by Friends' ceremony, in 
presence of William S. Stokely, Esq., mayor of 
Philadelphia, Sarah Heulings Coles, daughter 
of Joseph Heulings and Hannah A. (Wool- 
ston) Coles. 
She b. 3rd mo. 25th, 1848, in Colestown, Camden 
County, N. J. 



2638— HANNAH WOOLSTON BLACK 

b. 7th mo. 26th, 1881. 



2639— WILLIAM A. NEWBOLD BLACK 

b. 11th mo. 19th, 1883. 



2640— LAURA COLES BLACK b. 4th mo. 28th, 1887. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 553 

1619— CAROLINE VIRGINIA BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42 ; Hope, 145 ; William Black, 387 ; Thomas 
N. Black, 846). 

b. 10th mo. 5th, 1850, in Chesterfield, N. J. 
m. February 19th, 1873, Edward Warner Hunt, 
son of Esaias Evans and Elizabeth L. (Warner) 
Hunt ; ceremony by Rev. Lansing Burrows, 
Baptist minister, of Bordentown, N. J. 
E. W. H. b. September 24th, 1846, in Kirkwood, Camden 
County, N. J. 

2641— EDWARD BLACK HUNT b. November 28th, 1874. 

d. May 11th, 1876. 

2642— HOWARD ESAIAS HUNT 

b. October 24th, 1879. 

m. March 10th, 1904, Mabel Shores Pray, 
daughter of William Peirce and Elizabeth 
(Shreve) Pray. 
She b. November 7th, 1879. 

2643— BIDDLE NEWBOLD HUNT 

b. May 27th, 1885. 



1621— THOMAS NEWBOLD BLACK, JR. (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; 

Charles, 42; Hope, 145; William Black, 387; 
Thomas N. Black, 846). 

b. 4th mo. 6th, 1857, near Bordentown, N. J. 
m. September 24th, 1895, in Evansville, Ind., Mary 
Neale, daughter of James Perry and Annie 
Eliza (Butler) Neale; ceremony by Rev. C. E. 
Bacon, minister of Trinity M. E. Church. 
She b. August 18th, 1871, in Henderson County, Ky. 

2644— MARTHA BLACK b. July 16th, 1896. 



554 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2645— THOMAS NEWBOLD BLACK, 3RD 

b. July 19th, 1898. 

2646— PERRY NEALE BLACK b. December 18th, 1900. 

2647— WILLIAM HARBISON BLACK 

b. September 18th, 1907. 

2648— MARY BLACK b. July 31st, 1910. 



1622— MARTHA BIDDLE BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; William Black, 387; Thomas N. 
Black, 846). 

b. 2nd mo. 13th, 1859, in Chesterfield township, 

Burlington County, N. J. 
m. November 26th, 1884, Edwin John Dewey, son 
of Andrew Spencer and Aletta ( Fengel) Dewey ; 
ceremony by Rev. H. A. Greismer, Baptist min- 
ister, of Haddonfield, N. J. 
E. J. D. b. November 28th, 1860, in Prairie City, 111. 

2649— MARY BLACK DEWEY b. December 1st, 18S5. 

d. September 8th, 1886. 

2650— ANNA ALETTA DEWEY b. August 31st, 1887. 

2651— EDWIN SWINKER DEWEY 

b. December 25th, 1889. 

2652— JOHN PEYTON DEWEY b. January 1st, 1892. 

2653— MARTHA DEWEY b. January 6th, 1895. 

2654— HELEN BIDDLE DEWEY 

b. May 20th, 1900. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 555 

Edwin John Dewey is of the tenth generation of descendants of Thomas Dewey, pioneer 
ancestor, who came to Dorchester, Mass., from Kent County, England, about 1630. His 
father, Andrew Spencer Dewey, was a private in the 55th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and was one of five brothers who served in the Union Army. Andrew was 
killed at the battle of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 6th, 1862; his four brothers 
served to the end of the war. His line of descent from Thomas Dewey is as follows : 
Andrew S. Dewey, son of Alonzo B. Dewey, who was the son of Israel, son of William, 
who was the son of Simeon, son of William, the son of Josiah, who was the son of 
Josiah, second son of Thomas Dewey. The mother of Edwin J. Dewey married, second, 
Major John W. Swinker, and in 1868 the family located in Haddonfield, N. J., where 
young Dewey received his education in private and public schools. In 1876, Edwin J. 
Dewey entered the employ of one of the leading printing houses of Philadelphia and 
subsequently he was connected with other prominent houses in the same line of business 
in that city. In 1885, with Elmer E. Eakins, he founded the printing house of Dewey & 
Eakins, 1004 Arch Street, Philadelphia. A distinguished member of the Dewey family 
is Admiral George Dewey of the U. S. Navy, whose ships destroyed the Spanish fleet in 
Manila Bay, May, 1898. Admiral Dewey's line of descent from the pioneer Thomas 
Dewey is as follows : He is the son of Dr. Julius Y. Dewey, who was the son of Simeon, 
the son of William, who was the son of Simeon, the son of William, who was the son of 
Josiah, son of Josiah, the second son of Thomas. 



1625— MARY ANNA BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Hope, 

145; William Black, 387; Franklin Black, 
850). 

b. 6th mo. 10th, 1858, at "The Willows," near 
Bordentown, N. J. 

d. June 20th, 1892, in Louisville, Ky. 

m. November 25th, 1885, Samuel Howell New- 
bold, son of Joshua and Elizabeth Johns 
(Mifflin) Newbold; Presbyterian ceremony. 
S. H. N. b. January 15th, 1854, in Byberry, Philadelphia 
County, Pa. 

2655— GEORGE BLACK NEWBOLD 

b. January 4th, 1888, in Louisville, Ky. 
m. August 19th, 1909, in Altoona, Pa., Mary 
Jeannette Witherow. 

2656— CLEMENTINE MIFFLIN NEWBOLD 

b. January 19th, 1890. 



556 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1629— SARAH TALLMAN BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; William Black, 387; Franklin 
Black, 850). 

b. 11th mo. 25th, 1865, near Bordentown, N. J. 

m. 2nd mo. 21st, 1903, by Friends' ceremony, Wil- 
liam Walton, son of Charles and Clarissa 
(Laing) Walton. 
He b. 4th mo. 25th, 1844, near Princeton, N. J. 

d. 1st mo. 27th, 1910. 

2657— MARY B1DDLE WALTON 

b. 8th mo. 1st, 1905. 



1633— ELIZABETH FRENCH BLACK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42 ; Hope, 145 ; William Black, 387 ; Edwin 
Black, 851). 

b. March 25th, 1862, in Springfield township, Bur- 
lington County, N. J. 
m. September 3rd, 1884, George Black [1640], son 
of Clayton Atkinson and Caroline (Ellis) Black. 
He b. June 21st, 1863, at "Locust Hill Farm," near 
Columbus, N. J. 

2658— PAUL CECIL BLACK b. June 24th, 1885. 

d. April 27th, 1899. 



1634— ANNA NEWBOLD BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Hope, 145; William Black, 387; Edwin 
Black, 851). 

b. August 15th, 1865, in Springfield township, Bur- 
lington County, N. J. 

m. September 16th, 1903, John Bond Atkinson, son 
of George T. and Elizabeth Townsend (Bond) 
Atkinson ; Episcopal minister officiating. 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 557 

He b. 1 1th mo. 1 1th, 1840, in Mullica Hill, N. J. 

d. September 21st, 1911, in Georgetown, N. J.; 
buried in West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Phila- 
delphia. 

2659— ANNA NEWBOLD ATKINSON 

b. April 1st, 1907. 



1638— MARY NEWBOLD ATKINSON (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42 ; Hope, 145 ; William Black, 387 ; Sarah 
A. Black, 852). 

b. 5th mo. 9th, 1869, in Mount Holly, N. J. 

d. June 22nd, 1907, in Earlington, Ky. 

m. November 15th, 1893, in Earlington, Ky., Paul 
McNary Moore, son of Dr. Thomas Henry and 
Jane Elizabeth (McNary) Moore. 
He b. December 28th, 1865, in Muhlenberg County, 
Ky. 

2660— JOHN ATKINSON MOORE 

b. August 23rd, 1894. 

2661— PAUL McNARY MOORE, JR. 

b. September 17th, 1898. 



1640— GEORGE BLACK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Charles, 42 ; Hope, 145 ; 

George Black, 389; Clayton A. Black, 856). 

b. June 21st, 1863, at "Locust Farm," near Co- 
lumbus, N. J. 
m. September 3rd, 1884, Elizabeth French Black 
[1633], daughter of Edwin and Euphemia 
(Newbold) Black. 
She b. March 25th, 1862, in Burlington County, N. J. 

For child of George and Elizabeth French Black see 1633. 



558 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1641c— MARY ANN FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Uriah, 43; 

Charles, 147 ; Charles C, 393 ; James S., 
859). 
b. June 8th, 1844, in Philadelphia, 
d. February 19th, 1897. 

m. June 15th, 1863, Captain John Bruce Crozier 
Andersen, son of Captain James B. and Ann 
(Bruce) Andersen; ceremony by Rev. J. H. 
Peters, Baptist minister. 
J. B. C. A. d. May 19th, 1896, in Philadelphia, in his 54th 
year. 

2662— ANNA B. ANDERSEN d. October 10th, 1864. 

2663— JOHN BRUCE ANDERSEN 

b. July 13th, 1866. 

m. April 10th, 1901, Margaret Lydia Joret. 

2664— WILLIAM HENRY ANDERSEN 

b. February 24th, 1869. 
d. May 9th, 1908. 
m. Elizabeth Portley. 

2665— SARAH ELLA ANDERSEN 

b. May 27th, 1872. 

m. May 4th, 1890, John Elias Burbage. 

2666— ROBERT WHITTAKER ANDERSEN 

b. August 23rd, 1875. 
m. Frances Biddle. 

2667— JAMES MORRISON ANDERSEN 

b. September 3rd, 1877. 

2668— KATE RUMNEY ANDERSEN 

b. December 30th, 1882. 
d. April 4th, 1889. 

2669— MARY ANDERSEN ") 

b. October 18th, 1883. 

2670-ANNA ANDERSEN [ dl 0i;,ob<;r 1Sth ' 1883 - 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 559 

Upon the death of Captain John Bruce Crozier Andersen, in 1896, the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger contained the following appreciative notice : " Capt. Andersen was born 
in Philadelphia in 1842. He began going to sea when he was a lad and later took a 
course in the Philadelphia Nautical School. Upon the organization of the American 
Steamship Line, in 1872, he entered the company's service, where his ability soon won 
the esteem of Capt. Morrison, of the Ohio, by whom he was made chief officer. Later 
he was offered a captaincy on the International Company's Line, where he remained a 
number of years until he returned to the American Line. 

" When the famous transatlantic yacht race was projected, in 1888, Capt. Andersen 
was chosen to command the American yacht Coronet, having as his competitor Capt. 
Samuel, in charge of the British yacht Dauntless. The race was exciting and dangerous, 
on account of rough weather ; the little American vessel covered the course in fourteen 
days, beating the Dauntless by about ten hours. 

" Captain Andersen was a man of marked individuality, whose courage and self confi- 
dence carried him through many dangers. He crossed the ocean in steamer service 164 
times. He received many marks of appreciation, upon one occasion being presented with 
a piece of plate by the British Humane Society ' in recognition of his humanity and 
heroism ' in the rescue of a crew of shipwrecked sailors. He was highly esteemed for 
his scientific acquirements as well as his skill as a navigator." 



1641d— CHARLES CREIGHTON FRENCH, 2ND (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 

8; Uriah, 43; Charles, 147; Charles C.,393; 
James S., 859). 

b. January 25th, 1847, in Philadelphia. 
m. September 26th, 1872, Mary Klotz, daughter of 
Michael and Theresa Klotz; ceremony by Rev. 
J. H. Peters, Baptist minister. 
She b. June 22nd, 1853. 

2671— MARY ELIZABETH FRENCH 

b. July 5th, 1S73. 

m. July 24th, 1898, William Henry Kenny. 

2672— SARAH FRENCH b. June 27th, 1875. 

d. July 2nd, 1877. 

2673— ELLEN FRENCH b. July 22nd, 1877. 

d. May 11th, 1881. 

2674— ANNIE FRENCH b. October 11th, 1879. 

d. May 10th, 1881. 



560 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2675— JAMES MICHAEL FRENCH 

b. October 21st, 1881. 

2676— CHARLES FRANCIS FRENCH 

b. June 11th, 1884. 

2677— KATHERINE CECELIA FRENCH 

b. April 27th, 1887. 

d. November 30th, 1903. 

2678— THERESA LAURETTA FRENCH 

b. April 12th, 1890. 

m. April 17th, 1907, Charles G. Dumont. 



1 641 g— SARAH ELLA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Uriah, 43; 

Charles, 147; Charles C, 393; James S., 
859). 
b. November 30th, 1853, in Philadelphia, 
m. First, August 20th, 1873, William H. Gunlock; 
ceremony by Rev. A. W. Heighim, Presbyterian 
minister, 
m. Second, August 25th, 1884, George O. Howe. 

2679— JAMES S. GUNLOCK d. March 14th, 1876, aged 18 months. 



1643— CHARLES ELLISON FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Uriah, 

43; Charles, 147; Charles C, 393; William 
B., 861). 
b. 1st mo. 16th, 1848. 

m. December 28th, 1885, in Rumney, N. H., Abbie 
R. Waite ; Baptist minister performing cere- 
mony. 

2680— JESSIE LILLA FRENCH b. November 24th, 1886. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 561 



1644— ALICE FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Uriah, 43; Charles, 147; 

Charles C, 393; William B., 861). 

b. 6th mo. 30th, 1849. 

m. October 16th, 1878, James Henry Dutro; Bap- 
tist minister performing ceremony. 

2681— GUY DUTRO b. March 4th, 1880. 

2682— PEARL DUTRO b. May 21st, 1883. 

2683— HOWARD DUTRO b. August 29th, 1888. 

1647— HANNAH MERCY FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Uriah, 43; 

Charles, 147; Charles C, 393; William B., 
861). 

b. 9th mo. 5th, 1858. 

m. November 30th, 1876, John Franklin Reid; 
Baptist minister performing ceremony. 

2684— HARRY MARTIN REID b. April 13th, 1878. 

2685— JOHN FRANKLIN REID b. April 22nd, 1885. 

2686— EDWARD WILSON REID b. June 23rd, 1891. 

2687— LILLIAN REID b. October 26th, 1893. 

1653— ALFRED THOMAS LUKENS (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8 ; Uriah, 43; 

Charles, 147; Charles C, 393; Lydia A., 

862). 

b. 7th mo. 6th, 1845, in Springboro, Warren 

County, Ohio, 
m. June 5th, 1873, in First Presbyterian Church, 
Fort Wayne, Ind., Mary Melita Brandriff, 
daughter of Alfred Dixon and Mary A. (Rob- 
erts) Brandriff; Rev. David Moffat, D.D., per- 
forming ceremony. 
She b. May 3rd, 1852, in Montgomery County, Ohio. 

36 



562 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2688— CLARA MARIA LUKENS b. April 13th, 1874. 

2689— ALFRED BRANDRIFF LUKENS 

b. July 14th, 1876. 

2690— GRACE EMMA LUKENS b. February 23rd, 1879. 

2691— EDWARD FRENCH LUKENS 

b. June 3rd, 1884. 

2692— LYDIA MOORE LUKENS b. June 20th, 1886. 

2693— MARTHA LUKENS b. January 25th, 1891. 

In 1861, at the beginning of the Civil War, Alfred Thomas Lukens, second son and 
third child of Perry and Lydia Ann (French) Lukens [862], then a lad of sixteen, was 
made drummer for a military company organized in southwestern Ohio to protect the 
homes, being only about fifty miles from the Kentucky border. After this company dis- 
banded he was drummer in the Third Ohio Militia and was out with his regiment at the 
time John Morgan, the notorious Confederate guerrilla, made his raid through Indiana 
and Ohio; after this he enlisted as a private in Company D, 184th Regiment, Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served until the close of the war, being mustered out of the service 
on the 27th day of September, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn., and was honorably discharged 
a few days later at Camp Chase, Columbus, O. 

1654— EMMA JANE LUKENS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Uriah, 43; 

Charles, 147; Charles C, 393; Lydia A., 
862). 
b. 9th mo. 12th, 1847. 

m. December 25th, 1867, in Franklin, Ohio, John 
A. Langdon. 
He b. February 11th, 1844, in Delphi, Ind. 

2694— MARY MOORE LANGDON 

b. March 14th, 1869. 
d. September, 1870. 

2695— PRISCILLA LANGDON b. April 11th, 1871. 

m. March 12th, 1887, Frank Wilson. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 563 

2696— ELLA HARTER LANGDON 

b. April 10th, 1879. 

m. December 22nd, 1898, Edgar H. Hatfield. 

2697— GERTRUDE LANGDON b. September 16th, 1883, in Springboro, O. 

d. July 2nd, 1889, in Decatur, Ala. 



In July, 1861, John A. Langdon, then a lad of seventeen, left his home at Springboro, 
Ohio, and walked to Lockland, Ohio, a distance of about forty miles, where he stayed 
with the family of William B. French [861] (son of Charles C. and Mercy G. French) 
for a few days, helping on the farm. Mr. French then took young Langdon to Camp 
Ludlow, near Cincinnati, where on July 25th he enlisted in Company D, 39th Regiment, 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was mustered into service August 3rd at Camp 
Dennison, for three years. In December, 1863, Langdon was appointed corporal; in 
July, 1864, sergeant; and in April, 1865, first sergeant, he having re-enlisted with others 
in 1864. The regiment was mustered out at Louisville, Ky., in July, 1865, having partici- 
pated in many engagements, including Corinth, Miss., Atlanta, Resaca, Kennesaw Moun- 
tain and Peach Tree Creek, Ga., and Sherman's great march from Atlanta to the sea. 



1657— CHARLES FRENCH LUKENS (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Uriah, 

43; Charles, 147; Charles C, 393; Lydia 
A., 862). 
b. 5th mo. 26th, 1858. 

m. August 15th, 1883, in Eaton, Ohio, Anna G. 
O'Blennis. 
She b. January 23rd, 1862, in Lebanon, Ohio. 

2698— WILLIAM LUKENS b. May 24th, 1884. 

2699— LYDIA A. LUKENS b. August 9th, 1886. 

m. February 6th, 1908, Elmer Bruns. 

2700— FLORENCE LUKENS b. August 24th, 1890. 

d. July 10th, 1897. 

2701— PERRY LUKENS b. March 23rd, 1893. 

2702— GRACE LUKENS b. July 23rd, 1899. 



564 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1661— NATHAN WRIGHT BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas 

Buzby, 50; Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 
407; Asher Buzby, 863). 
b. 8th mo. 20th, 1821. 
d. 11th mo. 13th, 1852. 

m. 2nd mo. 28th, 1850, Lucy Wright Gaskill, 
daughter of Josiah and Elizabeth (Wright) 
Gaskill. 
She b. 7th mo. 22nd, 1825. 
d. 4th mo. 8th, 1896. 

2703— NATHAN WRIGHT BUZBY, JR. 

b. 2nd mo. 26th, 1853. 
m. First, 11th mo. 27th, 1877, Ida Pierce, 
m. Second, 10th mo. 12th, 1893, Florence W. 
Harris. 

1662— BEULAH ANN BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 

50; Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407; 
Asher Buzby, 863). 
b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1824. 
d. 8th mo. 26th, 1905. 

m. 5th mo. 30th, 1848, Charles Comly Gaskill, son 
of Josiah and Elizabeth (Wright) Gaskill. 
He b. 12th mo. 8th, 1819. 
d. 8th mo. 2nd, 1872. 

2704— MARY BUZBY GASKILL b. 2nd mo. 20th, 1849. 

m. 2nd mo. 28th, 1872, George Grier Wad- 
dington. 
He b. 4th mo. 25th, 1849. 
d. 7th mo. 23rd, 1906. 

2705— NATHAN BUZBY GASKILL 

b. 9th mo. 30th, 1851. 

m. 2nd mo. 9th, 1876, Emma S. Wilson. 

2706— RUTH ANNA GASKILL b. 4th mo. 12th, 1854. 

2707— ISABELLA P. GASKILL b. 11th mo. 28th, 1855. 

m. 6th mo. 18th, 1884, Arthur Lane. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 565 

1664— DAVID TATUM BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 

50; Amos Busby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407; 
Samuel Buzby, 864). 

b. 11th mo. 25th, 1827. 

d. 5th mo. 27th, 1899. 

m. 6th mo. 12th, 1849, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Baltimore, Md., Mary M. Scott, daughter of 
Tovvnsend and Edith B. (Stockton) Scott. 
She b. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1829. 

d. 10th mo. 24th, 1899. 

2708— SAMUEL STOCKTON BUZBY 

b. 2nd mo. 16th, 1854. 

m. December 14th, 1881, Julia Van Ness 
Hutton. 

2709— ANNA STOCKTON BUZBY 

b. 6th mo. 13th, 1861. 
m. January 7th, 1885, Fisher Sloan. 

2710— ELLA CECELIA BUZBY b. 12th mo. 1st, 1870. 

m. January 20th, 1897, Walter E. Robb. 



1668— JOSEPH BUZBY SHEPPARD (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas 

Buzby, 50; Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 
407 ; Patience W. Buzby, 865). 

b. 8th mo. 16th, 1821, in Sharptown, N. J. 
d. November 3rd, 1885, in Philadelphia, 
m. November 9th, 1847, Frances Maxwell, daughter 

of Andrew and Frances (Davis) Maxwell; 

ceremony by Rev. John Chambers, pastor of 

First Independent (Presbyterian) Church, 

Philadelphia. 
She b. October 28th, 1821, in Philadelphia, 
d. July 31st, 1894, in Philadelphia. 

2711— JOSEPHINE SHEPPARD b. September 3rd, 1848. 

d. June 1st, 1885. 



566 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2712— ANDREW MAXWELL SHEPPARD 

b. November 3rd, 1850. 
m. February 4th, 1892, Florence Harding. 

2713— EDGAR LEVY SHEPPARD 

b. November 23rd, 1852. 
d. November 16th, 1903. 
m. November 18th, 1880, Elizabeth Lippincott. 

2714— WILLIAM BIDDLE SHEPPARD 

b. October 13th, 1854. 

2715— JOSEPH BUZBY SHEPPARD, JR. 

b. May 25th, 1857. 
d. July 14th, 1902. 

2716— FRANK SHEPPARD b. June 2nd, 1859. 

d. February 4th, 1865. 

2717— MAY SHEPPARD b. February 12th, 1861. 

m. November 22nd, 1883, Eben D. Jordan. 

2718— FRANCES SHEPPARD b. October 19th, 1863. 

Joseph Buzby Sheppard [1668], oldest son and child of Mark and Patience (Buzby) 
Sheppard [865], came to Philadelphia when a boy and secured employment with his uncle, 
William Norcross Buzby, a merchant, whose place of business was 329 High (after- 
wards Market) Street. Later he entered the employ of Cowell & Evans, dry goods mer- 
chants, Seventh and Chestnut Streets. In February, 1850, he established himself in the 
housekeeping drygoods business at 100S Chestnut Street, continuing therein successfully 
for thirty-five years, and being succeeded by his sons, in 1885. The firm, in the begin- 
ning, was Sheppard & Van Harlingen, later Sheppard & Arrison and, in 18S5, became 
J. B. Sheppard & Sons. Mr. Sheppard was active in the Union cause during the war, 
becoming a member of the L'nion League, in 1863. He was interested in religious work 
and was for some years an elder in the First Independent (Presbyterian) Church, of 
which Rev. John Chambers was pastor for half a century. 



1669— MARY SHEPPARD (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; 

Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407; Pa- 
tience W. Buzby, 865). 

b. 12th mo. 1st, 1823, in Bedford County. Pa. 
d. February 5th, 1911, in Bridgeton, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 567 

m. January 13th, 1853, in Bridgeton, N. J., Daniel 
Fithian, son of Jonathan and Mary (Harris) 
Fithian ; ceremony by Rev. S. B. Jones, Pres- 
byterian minister. 
D. F. b. August 23rd, 1798, in Deerfield, N. J. 
d. April 18th, 1878, in Bridgeton, N. J. 

2719— CLARA PIERSON FITHIAN 

b. August 13th, 1857, in Bridgeton, N. J. 



1670— LYDIA SHEPPARD (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; 

Amos Buzby, 1 54 ; Joseph Buzby, 407 ; Pa- 
tience W. Buzby, 865). 

b. 11th mo. 1st, 1825, in Pennsylvania. 

d. September 12th, 1861, in Roadstown, Cumber- 
land County, N. J. 

m. February 26th, 1850, in Philadelphia, William 
Gilman, son of Daniel and Ruth (Cook) Gil- 
man ; Baptist ceremony. 
W. G. b. September 7th, 1810, near Roadstown, N. J. 

d. July 1st, 1876, in Roadstown, N. J. 

2720— EDWARD GILMAN b. March 2nd, 1851. 

Deceased. 

2721— BEULAH BUZBY GILMAN 

b. February 22nd, 1852. 
m. December 7th, 1871, James P. Baker. 

2722— RHANDENA GILMAN b. November 22nd, 1854. 

Deceased. 

2723— MARY GILMAN b. November, 1858. 

Deceased. 

2724— WILLIAM GILMAN b. March 12th, 1860. 

2725— JOHN SHEPPARD GILMAN 

b. June 9th, 1861. 



568 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1671— JOHN WOOLMAN SHEPPARD (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas 

Buzby, 50; Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 
407; Patience W. Buzby, 865). 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1830, in Philadelphia, 
d. 2nd mo. 5th, 1890, in Bridgeton, N. J. 
m. 1854, in Philadelphia, Georgie L. Sheppard, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Sheppard. 
She b. January 3rd, 1840, in Baltimore, Md. 
d. August 16th, 1912, in New York City. 

2725a— LINDA SHEPPARD b. September 22nd, 1854, in Philadelphia. 

d. 1885. 

in. 1883, in Brooklyn, N. Y., John F. Mac- 
Martin, of Scotland, son of Finlay and 
Amanda MacMartin. 

2725b— FERDINAND SHEPPARD 

b. August 22nd, 1858, in Philadelphia, 
in. June, 1886, in New York City. Marie G. 
Wolff, of Germany, daughter of Henry 
and Regina Wolff. 

1681— MARY HAINES (Thomas, 1 ; Mary, 11 ; Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407; Rachel 
Buzby, 866). 

b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1837. 

m. 1st mo. 1st, 1857, Barclay Jones [1355], son of 
Allen and Miriam (Pope) Jones. 
He b. 12th mo. 18th, 1830, near Fellowship, N. J. 
d. 6th mo. 1 1th, 1909, in Moorestown, N. J. 

For record of children of Mary Haines and Barclay Jones see 1355. 

1683b— EMILY BUZBY (Thomas, 1 ; Mary, 1 1 ; Thomas Buzby. 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407; Amos 
Buzby, 867). 

b. 1st mo. 14th, 1831. 
d. 2nd mo. 19th, 1910. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 569 

m. First, 6th mo. 3rd, 1852, William White, son of 
Samuel and Jerusha (Smith) White. 
He d. 9th mo., 1852. 

m. Second, 9th mo. 15th, 1857, Robert H. Dare, 
son of David Dare. 
He b. 4th mo. 4th, 1827. 

2726— REBECCA FITHIAN DARE 

b. April 13th, 1859. 

m. October 6th, 1879, Edward Bacon. 

2727— ADA BUZBY DARE b. July 18th, 1860. 

m. February 23rd, 1881, Robert More. 

2728— THEODORE BOON DARE 

b. September Sth, 1861. 

2729— WILLIAM WHITE DARE b. March 6th, 1863. 

2730— ROBERT ROSE DARE b. January 12th, 1868. 

2731— EMILY MILLER DARE b. February 4th, 1869. 

m. December 4th, 1889, Linwood Wentzel. 



1683c— EDWARD BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; 

Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407; 
Amos Buzby, 867). 

b. 11th mo. 1st, 1832. 
d. 1st mo. 7th, 1894. 

m. 3rd mo. 12th, 1857, Hannah H. Scattergood, 
daughter of Jonathan B. and Eliza A. Scatter- 
good, of Salem, N. J. 
She d. 2nd mo. 12th, 1910. 

2732— AMOS S. BUZBY b. 2nd mo. 28th, 1860. 

m. 7th mo. 11th, 1885, Hannah L. Morgan. 

2733— JONATHAN S. BUZBY b. Sth mo. 15th, 1862. 

m. 2nd mo. 10th, 1892, Ella Miller, daughter 
of Warner and Sara Miller. 



570 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



2734— EDWARD F. BUZBY 



b. 4th mo. 20th, 1866. 
d. 12th mo. 20th, 1907. 
m. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1893, Jehiel E. Robinson. 



2735— LUELLA S. BUZBY 



b. 11th mo. 15th, 1S68. 
d. 12th mo. 9th, 1868. 



2736— HELENA C. BUZBY 



b. 11th mo. 20th, 1872. 
m. 2nd mo. 6th, 1900, Asher B. Waddington, 

son of George G. and Mary (Gaskill) 

Waddington. 



2737— SARA E. BUZBY 



b. 2nd mo. 15th, 1876. 

m. 1st mo. 17th, 1900, John Janvier Coombs, 
son of George and Mary Coombs. 



2738— JOSEPHINE S. BUZBY b. 5th mo. 7th, 1877. 

d. 11th mo. 7th, 1905. 

m. 4th mo. 24th, 1901, Charles M. Miller, son 
of Charles and Elizabeth Miller. 



1683e— CHAMLESS MIDDLETON BUZBY (Thomas, 1: Mary, 11; 

Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos Buzby. 154; 
Joseph Buzby, 407; Amos Buzby, 867). 

b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1836. 

in. 3rd mo. 12th, 1860, Rebecca H. Groff, daughter 
of Amasa and Urcilla (Coombs) Groff, of 
Mullica Hill, N. J. 
She b. 3rd mo. 8th, 1835. 



2739— GEORGE H. BUZBY 



b. 4th mo. 11th, 1861. 

m. 9th mo. 20th, 1889, Emily Lippincott. 
daughter of Mark and Emily (Nash) Lip- 
pincott. 
She b. 10th mo. 10th, 1859. 



2740— LOUIS M. [!UZI1Y 



b 12th mo. 23rd, 1864. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 571 

16S3m— ALBERT G. BUZBY (Thomas, 1 ; Mary, 11 ; Thomas Buzby, 50; 

Amos Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407; Wil- 
liam N. Buzby, 867b). 
b. 1st mo. 25th, 1835, in Philadelphia, 
d. January 4th, 1897, in Philadelphia, 
m. November 8th, 1865, in Grace P. E. Church, 
Philadelphia, Mary Broadbent, daughter of 
Samuel and Catherine (Cook) Broadbent. 
She b. May 17th, 1845, in Wethersfield, Conn. 
d. May 16th, 1869, in Philadelphia. 

2741— MARY BROADBENT BUZBY 

b. May 11th, 1869. 

m. April 26th, 1899, in Christ Church, Phila- 
delphia, George Cuthbert Gillespie, son of 
Thomas L. and Mary (Cuthbert) Gillespie; 
ceremony by Rev. C. Ellis Stevens, rector. 
G. C. G. b. September 14th, 1858. 

1683n— EMMA BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 50; Amos 

Buzby, 154; Joseph Buzby, 407; William N. 
Buzby, 867b). 
b. 11th mo. 14th, 1836, in Philadelphia, 
m. December 9th, 1874, Quinton Keasbey, son of 
Matthew and Ann ( Fisher) Keasbey. 
He b. June 5th, 1828, on homestead farm, Salem, N. 
J. (property purchased by Keasbey family. 
1709). 
d. June 15th, 1S8S, in Salem, N. J. 

2742— CHARLES QUINTON KEASBEY 

b. June 11th, 1876. 
d. June 11th, 1876. 

2743— HOWARD BUZBY KEASBEY 

b. March 28th, 1879. 

m. 6th mo. 20th, 1908, by Friends' ceremony, 

Anne T. Bassett. daughter of Evi Smith 

and Annie Elkinton (Thompson) Bassett. 

She b. 8th mo. 3rd, 1880, in Manington township, 

Salem Co., N. J. 



572 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



1683p— AUGUSTUS C. BUZBV (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas Buzby, 

50; Amos Buzby, 154; Nicholas Buzby, 408; 
Amos Buzby, 876). 

b. 6th mo. 16th, 1854, in Rancocas, N. J. 
m. September 23rd, 1880, in Philadelphia, Florence 

Free, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth (Ten- 

nant) Free. 



2744— AUGUSTUS E. BUZBY 



2745— HAROLD AMOS BUZBY 



2746— WARREN FREE BUZBY 



2747— EDWYNA T. BUZBY 



2748— NORMAN T. BUZBY 



b. March 2nd, 1882. 
.1. July 12th, 1882. 

b. March 29th, 1884. 

m. August 8th, 1906, in Church of the Saviour, 
West Philadelphia, Bertha Azpall Johnson, 
daughter of James C. and Elizabeth John- 
son ; ceremony by Rev. Cassius M. Roberts. 

b. December 17th, 1885. 

m. July 22nd, 1909, in Church of the Saviour, 
West Philadelphia, Mary Edith Miller, 
daughter of John E. and Josephine Miller ; 
ceremony by Rev. Julius G. Bierck. 

b. September 1st, 1887. 
d. January 17th, 1895. 

b. April 14th, 1896. 



2749— KENNETH K. BUZBY b. October 13th, 1898. 



1689— THOMAS TAYLOR BUZBY (Thomas, 1; Mary, 11; Thomas 

Huzby, 50 ; Amos Buzby, 1 54 ; Hudson Buzby, 
410; Richard Buzby, 894). 

b. 5th mo. 7th, 1861. near Jacksonville, N. J. 
m. 3rd mo. 16th, 1887, by Friends' ceremony, Eliza- 
beth Lippincott Leeds, daughter of Jacob and 
Margaret (Woolman) Leeds, of Rancocas, N. J. 
She b. 5th mo. 21st, 1863, in Rancocas, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 573 



2750— ELGAR LEEDS BUZBY b. 3rd mo. 24th, 1890. 

2751— HELEN WILSON BUZBY 

b. 12th mo. 29th, 1894. 

2752— THOMAS HARVEY BUZBY 

b. 7th mo. 14th, 1897. 

Thomas Taylor Buzby, youngest son and child of Richard [894] and Mary Ann 
(Taylor) Buzby, in 1889 purchased from his father a farm of about 100 acres, which 
comprises part of the original Thomas ffrench homestead near Rancocas, N. J. This is 
a well equipped, highly cultivated and prosperous farm. The large, old-fashioned house 
(see p. 48, vol. 1, of this Genealogy) was the home of Governor William Franklin at 
the time of the Declaration of Independence, and from which he was taken prisoner to 
Connecticut. Thomas T. Buzby and his family, like their ancestors for several genera- 
tions, are members of Rancocas Monthly Meeting; and the two sons and daughter have 
attended the Friends' school at Rancocas. 



RANCOCAS MEETING. 

Under authority of Burlington Monthly Meeting, a Meeting for worship at 
Rancocas was set up in 1681, Friends assembling at the house of Thomas 
Harding, a near neighbor of Thomas ffrench, progenitor. The first Meeting 
House was built about 1700, near the bank of the Rancocas creek, where the 
ancient graveyard remains. This meeting is referred to in early records as 
the "Meeting at Northampton." In 1772 the present brick Meeting House 
was built, the figures showing conspicuously on the east end. In 1820 an 
enlargement added twenty-five feet to the west end ; the gallery was extended, 
and a sliding partition provided, dividing the whole into two apartments. 
This house has since been in continuous use and is in excellent condition at 
this time. Minutes of the Preparative Meeting present a curious bit of his- 
tory of a notable period. Under date of 10th mo., 1828, we quote the fol- 
lowing : 

" A number of Friends formerly members of this Preparative meeting 
having separated therefrom and hold meetings which they call Ancocas 
Preparative meeting. It is thought out of these and other circumstances 
difficulties may occur with respect to future accommodations in the meeting 
house. Benjamin E. Ridgway, Israel Stokes, William Hilyard, Charles 



574 GENEALOGY OF THE 

Stokes, and Amos Buzby are therefore appointed a Committee to have the 
care of the house generally with Rachel Stokes, the present caretaker, and 
to be at all times ready to make any arrangement with those who have sepa- 
rated as above according to just and correct principles." 

The matter here referred to evidently received long and careful considera- 
tion. It was not until a meeting held 5th mo. 29th, 1834, that the following 
report was received, read and approved, the committee being continued, with 
instruction to give further attention to the object of their appointment, as 
might seem to be necessary. We quote : 

"The Committee appointed in the 10th month, 1828, to the care of the 
meeting house and to be at all times ready to make arrangements with the 
party called orthodox relative to accommodations in the meeting house re- 
port ; ' That said party for several years past have met separately for worship 
near the middle of the week — meeting on the fourth instead of the fifth 
day — at which time the house has by our direction been opened for them. 
But on the first day of the week they have continued to meet with us up to 
the present time. Understanding however that it was their desire to separate 
and meet on the first day of the week also by themselves and at the tenth 
instead of the eleventh hour, several individuals of our number communi- 
cated with several of theirs upon the subject and informed them that if they 
so wished and would name some of their number, to meet with some of ours, 
it was probable an arrangement could be made that would be satisfactory. 
Accordingly two of their number, Samuel Atkinson and George Haines, were 
deputed by their preparative meeting, who met with Benjamin E. Ridgway 
and Charles Stokes, at the meeting house at Ancocas on the 7th of the present 
month, when an arrangement was agreed upon as follows : " That hereafter 
the slides or partition dividing the two ends of the meeting house should be 
closed on first days. That they occupy the east end and we the west end 
of the house. And on all other days and times both they and we to occupy 
a part or the whole of the house as heretofore as may be necessary. That 
no change take place as regards the benches, etc., in the separate ends of the 
house and that the house be opened as heretofore under the care of Rachel 
Stokes, if she should wish it. And if their future convenience should make 
it necessary for them to have a lock on the east door that it be of such a 
construction that one key will unlock both doors, or that the key of said 
new lock be placed so that our care-taker may conveniently get it, and the 
same facilities be furnished them on our part relative to the west door. And 
as they propose to meet at the tenth hour it was agreed by them that care 
should be exercised that they did not occupy an undue proportion of the 
horse-sheds, and it was also mutually agreed that in all things having a 
tendency to disturb the quiet of their or our meeting by the members of 



o 

o 
o 
> 




DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 575 



either side that a care should be exercised. And that if anything of the 
kind should occur by our meeting being the means of giving unnecessary 
disturbance to theirs that some of our members shall in a friendly way be 
spoken to on the subject by some of theirs. And also if our meetings should 
in like manner be unnecessarily disturbed by them that they be spoken to, 
and that both they and we should endeavor to have the cause of uneasiness 
removed." 

Benjamin E. Ridgway 
William Hilyard 
Amos Buzby 
Israel Stokes 
Charles Stokes 
" 5th mo. 12th, 1834. Committee." 

The friendly arrangement thus agreed upon has been faithfully carried out 
for more than three quarters of a century, the two branches of the society 
occupying the ancient Meeting House in true Christian spirit. At an early 
date in the history of the Meeting at Rancocas a school house was built and 
one of the most noted teachers was the late John Gummere, afterwards famous 
as a mathematician and school book author. By will, dated May 2nd, 1796, 
proved August 6th, 1811, Joseph Buzby [155] directed that 100 pounds be 
paid to the Treasurer of Friends' School at Ancocas, upon the death of his 
wife, Hannah (Warrington) Buzby; and by will dated September 3rd, 1818, 
proved May 24th, 1819, Hannah (Warrington) Buzby bequeathed 25 pounds 
to the School. Joseph Buzby and Hannah Warrington were married in 1754 
under care of Haddonfield Monthly Meeting. 

Thomas Buzby [50], father of Joseph Buzby, was a long-time member of 
the Rancocas Meeting, and from the " Friend " we quote the following re- 
marks concerning his "exemplary and useful life": 

" Thomas, the son of Nicholas and Mary Buzby, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania about the year 1698. When quite young his parents removed to New Jer- 
sey, within the limits of Rancocas Meeting. When he attained to riper years, 
and came to have the care of a family, his steady conduct and circumspect 
walking, occasioned him to be esteemed by most who knew him. He was 
made overseer and elder in meeting and was useful in both stations. He 
appears to have been diligent in filling up his measure of duty, in religious 
and civil society, so that he passed along through life, useful amongst all 
with whom he was brought into connection, loving and beloved by those with 
whom he was intimately known. He died 10 mo. 23, 1773, about 75 years 
of age." 



576 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1 7 1 1— IDA FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; William, 27 ; William, 111; 

Mahlon K., 262 ; William W., 479; John T., 
898\v). 

b. June 28th, 1876. 

m. April 16th, 1900, Wilson S. Turner, son of 
George S. and Louise (Campbell) Turner. 
He b. January 9th, 1875, in Chesterton, Ind. 

2753— SPENCER FRENCH TURNER 

b. August 1st, 1905, in Hammonton, N. J. 



1712— HOWARD FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; Wil- 
liam, 111; Mahlon K., 262; William W., 
479; John T, 898w). 

b. July 23rd, 1878. 

m. March 7th, 1900, Mabel Maxwell, daughter of 
William and Frances (Evans) Maxwell. 
She b. October 29th, 1880, in Philadelphia. 

2754— VIRGINIA FRANCES FRENCH 

b. March 7th, 1901, in Hammonton, N. J. 

2755— ROBERTA MAXWELL FRENCH 

b. August 11th, 1905, in Hammonton, N. J. 



1714— WILBERT A. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

William, 111; Mahlon K., 262 ; William W., 
479; JohnT, 898w). 

b. October 21st, 1882. 

m. September 6th, 1905, Martha Murray, daughter 
of William John and Josephine (Manley) 
Murray. 
She b. April 26th, 1885, in Atlantic City. N. J. 

2756— JOHN TAYLOR FRENCH 

b. March 23rd, 1908, in Atlantic City, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 577 

1715— CARROLL DUNHAM GALVIN (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Wil- 
liam, 27; William, 111; Mahlon K., 262; 
Sarah J., 481 ; Anna M. Stambach, 899). 

b. April 7th, 1866. 

m. July 24th, 1901, in Oakland, Cal., Edna Lucy 
Bartlett, daughter of Pliny and Emma (Van 
Syckle) Bartlett. 
She b. January 12th, 1876, in Oakland, Cal. 

2757— RUTH GALVIN b. February 23rd, 1905, in Brookline, Mass. 



1728— LIZZIE BACON WARE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; William, 27; 

William, 111; Amos T, 263; Horace, 483; 
Charlotte E., 914). 

b. March 2nd, 1872. 

m. February 11th, 1903, Oakford Franklin Pitman, 
son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Morrison) Pit- 
man. 
He b. June 17th, 1873. 

2758— WILLIAM FRANKLIN PITMAN 

b. August 30th, 1907. 



1734—jOHN E. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; William, 27; William, 

111; Amos T., 263 ; Horace, 483 ; Edwin H., 

916). 
b. June 12th. 1886. 
m. August. 1905, Rosella Keller. 

2759— HENRY FRENCH b. February 2nd. 1907. 

37 



578 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1736— JOHN ALFRED VAN NESTE (Thomas, lj Richard, 5; William, 

27; Richard, 112; Thomas, 265; Alfred, 
486; Maria S., 918). 

b. 12th mo. 25th, 1849. 

m. September 1st, 1875, Rachel Croxon Wikoff, of 
Griggstown, Somerset County, N. J. 

2760— ALFRED WIKOFF VAN NESTE 

b. June 20th, 1876. 



1737— MARY TABITHA VAN NESTE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Wil- 
liam, 27 ; Richard, 112; Thomas, 265 ; Alfred, 
486; Maria S., 918). 

b. 4th mo. 24th, 1852. 

m. November 29th, 1871, John Howard Wilson, 

son of Garret V. Wilson (second husband of 

Maria S. French, 918). 

2761— HERBERT VOORHEES WILSON 

b. January 8th, 1873. 

2762— EVELYN MARIA WILSON 

b. November 28th, 1874. 

2763— WILLIAM HOWARD WILSON 

b. September 8th, 1877. 

2764— LUCIE WOOD WILSON b. October 23rd, I8S0. 

2765— MARY ETHEL WILSON b. August 12th, 1883. 

2766— MILFORD CARLETON WILSON 

b. November 6th, 1885. 

2767— BESSIE MATILDA WILSON 

b. August 8th, 1888. 

2768— JOHN H. WILSON b. January 6th, 1893. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 579 

1738— EMMA ELIZABETH VAN NESTE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; 

William, 27; Richard, 112; Thomas, 265; 
Alfred, 486; Maria S., 918). 

b. 4th mo. 20th, 1860. 

m. September 3rd, 1885, Peter Henry Sturr, of 
Ridgewood, N. J. 

2769— HARRY VAN NESTE STURR 

b. October 19th, 1889. 

2770— SADIE MARIA STURR b. February 16th, 1891. 



1806— ALBERT J. CLINE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31; Rich- 
ard, 120; Mary, 276; John Jones, 522; 
Hannah A. Jones, 972). 

b. May 7th, 1865. 

m. November 12th, 1890, Mary V. Doyle, daughter 
of John and Anna (Dempsey) Doyle. 

2771— HOWARD D. CLINE b. September 1st, 1891. 

2772— HELEN K. CLINE b. April 6th, 1894. 



1807— FRANK L. CLINE (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; Jonathan, 31 ; Richard, 

120; Mary, 276; John Jones, 522; Hannah 
A. Jones, 972). 

b. July 1st, 1867. 

m. April 8th, 1891, Mary A. Hurd, daughter of 
Sumner F. and Henrietta Clay (Elliott) Hurd. 

2773— LAWRENCE H. CLINE b. April 16th, 1892. 

2774— HENRIETTA N. CLINE b. November 5th, 1899. 



580 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1808— HOWARD F. CLINE (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 J 

Richard, 120; Mary, 276; John Jones, 522; 
Hannah A. Jones, 972). 

b. December 21st, 1868. 

m. November 25th, 1891, Ida E. Frame, daughter 

of George Washington and Eliza Eleanora 

(Simmons) Frame. 

2775— RUSSELL H. CLINE b. January 3rd, 1895. 

2776— MILDRED F. CLINE b. July 1st, 1900. 



1809— LAVINIA CLINE (Thomas, 1 ; Richard, 5 ; Jonathan, 31 ; Richard, 

120; Mary, 276; John Jones, 522; Hannah 
A. Jones, 972). 

b. December 30th, 1870. 

m. December 2nd, 1892, William Collins Hinch- 

man, Jr., son of William Collins and Mary T. 

(Bewley) Hinchman. 

2777— JOSEPH W. HINCHMAN b. October 25th, 1893. 



William Collins Hinchman, Jr., owns and successfully operates about seventy acres of 
cranberry meadows in the neighborhood of Taunton, Burlington County, N. J. These 
different meadows or bogs are named respectively " Spirit Vale," " Lake Toronto," and 
" Mary Collins." The latter meadow has been bearing fruit for fifty years without 
being reset ; and it contains one of the finest sulphur springs in New Jersey. A well- 
built house, having some sixty-odd rooms, and spacious storing capacity, affords accommo- 
dations for the large number of pickers required to handle and store the hundreds of 
bushels of fruit which are the usual annual yield from these different cranberry bogs. 
Within easy access of Philadelphia, surrounded by picturesque woods and having a pond 
which affords pleasant swimming and bathing, Taunton has become an attractive and 
interesting picnic resort. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 581 

1838— CHARLES F. EARL (Thomas, 1; Richard, 5; Jonathan, 31 j 

Richard, 120; Samuel, 279; Richard B., 529; 
Anna H., 998). 

b. January 9th, 1868. 

m. July 25th, 1892, Rachel Taylor. 

2778— WALTER A. EARL b. August 30th, 1895. 

1942— LYDIA LUENNA BUNNELL (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 

33; Uriah, 122; Uriah, 299; Joshua, 578; 
Mary T., 1084). 

b. 1st mo. 26th, 1869. 

m. 10th mo. 16th, 1888, John C. Irvin. 

2779— GEORGE ELLIS IRVIN b. 8th mo. 16th, 1892. 

2780— MARION MARGUERITE IRVIN 

b. 8th mo. 4th, 1896. 



1945— CHARLES K. CHILBERG (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Thomas, 33; 

Uriah, 122; Uriah, 299; Ann, 579; Amanda 
Kinsey, 1087). 

m. 8th mo. 29th, 1894, Gertrude M. Smith. 

2781— MARJORIE M. CHILBERG 

b. 6th mo. 21st, 1895. 



1948—WILLIAM ELMER FAVVCETT (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; Elizabeth, 312; Hannah 
F. Jones, 610; Sidney A. Bonsall, 1139). 

b. 5th mo. 22nd, 1865. 

m. Caroline S. Lannen, daughter of Joseph and 
Hannah (Stratton) Lannen. 

2782— GRACE FAWCETT 



582 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2783— RUSSELL FAWCETT 

• Twins. 
2784— RAYMOND FAWCETT J 



1 



1950— EDWARD CLOUDSLEV FAWCETT (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert, 35; Thomas, 129; Elizabeth, 312; 
Hannah F. Jones, 610; Sidney A. Bonsall, 
1139). 
b. 10th mo. 23rd, 1871. 

m. Sara Hayes, daughter of Charles and Deborah 
(Fawcett) Hayes. 

2785— THOMAS HAYES FAWCETT 



1955— ABBIE H. BONSALL (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Elizabeth, 312; Hannah F. 
Jones, 610; Robert Bonsall, 1140). 

b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1875. 
d. 4th mo. 6th, 1904. 
m. Alva L. Hively. 

2786— LEONARD BONSALL HIVELY 

1959— LEROY T. BONSALL (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35 ; Thomas, 

129; Elizabeth, 312; Hannah F. Jones, 610; 
Joseph E. Bonsall, 1141). 

b. 1st mo. 5th, 1871. 

m. 4th mo. 26th, 1893, Elizabeth A. Goddard, 
daughter of James and Mary Goddard. 

2787— MARION LEROY BONSALL 
2788— JOSEPH HENRY BONSALL 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 583 

1961— ELLA C. BONSALL (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35 ; Thomas, 

129; Elizabeth, 312; Hannah F. Jones, 610; 
Joseph E. Bonsall, 1141). 

b. 1st mo. 7th, 1879. 

m. Lee R. Chamberlain, son of J. Earl and Eloise 
Chamberlain. 

2789— INIZ ELOISE CHAMBERLAIN 

1962— THOMAS T. WOOLMAN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Unity, 1143). 
b. 5th mo. 31st, 1846. 
d. 3rd mo. 30th, 1910. 
m. 10th mo. 31st, 1878, Susan Shepard. 
She b. 9th mo. 24th, 1855. 

2790— DORA WOOLMAN b. 10th mo. 16th, 1879. 



1963— JUDITH ANN WOOLMAN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Unity, 1143). 
b. 4th mo. 8th, 1848, in Damascus, Columbiana 

County, Ohio, 
m. May 14th, 1868, Nathan Phillips, son of James 
and Sarah Ann (Bowers) Phillips. 
He b. January 15th, 1845, in Damascus, Ohio, 
d. July 16th, 1897, near Butlerville, Ind. 

2791— CORA BELL PHILLIPS b. August 1st, 1869. 

m. October 8th, 1905, James Lew Wilson. 

2792— FLORENCE A. PHILLIPS 

b. September 23rd, 1870. 

2793— JOHN M. PHILLIPS b. October 31st, 1872. 

m. October 8th. 1900, Lenora Hunt. 



584 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2794— CHARLES PHILLIPS b. January 14th, 1878. 

d. February 11th, 1878. 

2795— ORLANDO PHILLIPS b. January 1st, 1880. 

2796— LILLIAN PHILLIPS b. June 26th, 1885. 

d. September 23th, 1885. 

1964— MARIETTA WOOLMAN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Unity, 1143). 
b. 3rd mo. 16th, 1850, in Damascus, Ohio, 
m. June 29th, 1869, in Butlerville, Jennings County, 
Ind., Simeon A. Tanner, son of Andrew J. and 
Susanna D. Tanner. 
He b. December 15th, 1847, in Florence, Boon County, 
Ky. 

2797— FRANK TANNER b. November 20th, 1870. 

d. September 25th, 1872. 

2798— SUSIE MAY TANNER b. October 5th, 1875. 

m. November 23rd, 1898, John Franklin Ross. 
He d. December 18th, 1906. 

2799— WALLACE ANDREWS TANNER 

b. June 26th, 1880. 
m. April 14th, 1908, Barbara Susanna Langel. 

1966— OBADIAH F. WOOLMAN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Unity, 1143). 
b. 9th mo. 1st, 1855. 
m. 12th mo. 24th, 1878, Jennie Christy. 
She b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1857. 

2800— JARRUS C. WOOLMAN b. 9th mo. 15th, 1880. 

2801— OMAR H. WOOLMAN b. 6th mo. 26th, 1883. 

2802— JENNIE WOOLMAN 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 585 

1967— WILLIAM JOEL WOOLMAN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 
611; Unity, 1143). 

b. 11th mo. 20th, 1857, in Indiana, 
m. January 3rd, 1886, in Brewersville, Jennings 
County, Ind., Sarah A. Johnson, daughter of 
Richard and Mary (Sackett) Johnson. 
She b. August 24th, 1863, in Indiana. 

2803— LENA ANN WOOLMAN b. October 21st, 1886. 

m. September 4th, 1906, Leonard F. Spaulding^ 

2804— SAMUEL R. WOOLMAN b. February 9th, 1888. 

2805— EARL F. WOOLMAN b. April 7th, 1890. 

2806— JENNIE ETHEL WOOLMAN 

b. September 21st, 1893. 

2807— PEARL MAE WOOLMAN b. December 1st, 1896. 

2808— FRANKIE LEROY WOOLMAN 

b. November 28th, 1901. 



1968— REBECCA JANE WOOLMAN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 
611; Unity, 1143). 

b. 6th mo. 12th, 1860. 

d. 5th mo. 30th, 1900. 

m. 12th mo. 25th, 1879, Elmer Everet Bland. 

He b. 11th mo. 12th, 1859. 

2809— ELMER H. BLAND b. 10th mo. 7th, 1880. 

2810— SAMUEL W. BLAND b. 2nd mo. 14th, 1882. 

d. 1883. 

2811— ESSIE MAY BLAND b. 1st mo. 9th, 1886. 

2812— MAUD E. BLAND b. 6th mo. 16th, 1890. 



586 



GENEALOGY OF THE 



1969— JOHN CHARLES WOOLMAN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 
611 ; Unity, 1143). 

b. 4th mo. 17th, 1863, in Butlerville, Ind. 
m. February 7th, 1886, in Sardinia, Ind., Theresa 
G. Miller, daughter of Daniel and Harriet 
(Tullis) Miller. 
She b. February 8th, 1866, in Cheviot, Ohio. 

2815— HAZEL ELVA WOOLMAN 

b. April 16th, 1891. 

2814— RUBY THELMA WOOLMAN 

b. April 17th, 1899. 



1970— WILLIAM FRENCH JOBES (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611; 
Mary C, 1144). 

b. 4th mo. 14th, 1849, in Damascus, Ohio, 
m. April 29th, 1875, in Damascus, Ohio, Sarah T. 
Stanley, daughter of Joseph and Lydia (Wil- 
liams) Stanley: ceremony by Rev. A. J. Lane, 
Methodist minister. 
She b. September 7th, 1856, in Pickrelltown, Logan 
County, Ohio. 



2815— ALMA L. JOBES 



b. February 9th, 1876. 
m. June 11th, 1902, Edgar P. Grafton. 



2816— FLORA A. TOBES 



b. May 13th, 1880. 
m. June 10th, 1901, Sidney J. Hoskins. 



2817— WILLARD S. JOBES 



b. August 27th, 1S82. 
m. March 25th, 1907, Janie Rather. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 587 

1972— CHARLES SUMNER JOBES (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611: 
Mary C, 1144). 

b. 4th mo. 23rd, 1853, in Jennings County, Ind. 
m. December 30th, 1875, in Kosciusko, Miss., Alma 
G. Taylor, daughter of James Nixon and Mary 
E. (Campbell) Taylor; Rev. A. P. Sage, Meth- 
odist minister, performing ceremony. 
She b. July 16th, 1854. 

2818— HARRY C. JOBES b. October 31st, 1877. 

m. November 1st, 1910, Susan K. Smith. 

2819— MARY E. JOBES b. September 25th, 1879. 

2820— ANNIE MABEL JOBES b. March 27th, 1881. 

2821— JAMES NIXON JOBES b. February 16th, 1885. 

d. March 7th, 1885. 

2822— CHARLES TAYLOR JOBES 

b. September 8th, 1886. 

2823— ALICE C. JOBES b. September 12th, 1888. 

2824— HANNAH A. JOBES b. March 9th, 1891. 

2825— WILLIAM R. JOBES b. October 8th, 1895. 

1973— ALICE ANN JOBES (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129 ; James, 313 ; William R., 61 1 ; Mary C, 
1144). 
b. 12th mo. 2nd, 1854, in Indiana, 
m. December 30th, 1874, in Damascus, Ohio, Isaiah 
N. Sample, son of Robert and Mary (Dunn) 
Sample; ceremony by Rev. A. J. Lane, Metho- 
dist minister. 
I. N. S. b. July 26th, 1849, in Harmony, Pa. 

d. August 3rd, 1883, in Ackerman, Miss. 



588 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2826— CLARENCE D. SAMPLE b. April 4th, 1876. 

m. September 15th, 1903, in Denver, Colo., 
LaFay Hill. 

2827— FLORENCE CLARKE SAMPLE 

b. April 30th, 1880. 

m. October 11th, 1905, in Wichita, Kan., 
Charles Delos Stofer. 

1974 — ANDREW COOK JOBES (Thomas, lj Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Mary C, 1144). 

b. 4th mo. 21st, 1857, in Damascus, Ohio, 
m. June 22nd, 1881, in Kosciusko, Miss., Florence 
Coleman ; ceremony by Rev. J. H. Alexander, 
Presbyterian minister. 
She b. June 19th, 1857, in Charleston, S. C. 

2828— FLORENCE JOBES b. September 5th, 1886. 

d. January 25th, 1887. 

2829— ILEY COLEMAN JOBES b. March 5th, 1888. 

2830— ALICE CAMILLA JOBES b. April 11th, 1891. 

2831— FRANCES MILDRED JOBES 

b. May 16th, 1895. 



1978— ALFRED ISAIAH STRAWN (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 

Esther, 1145). 

b. 7th mo. 23rd, 1856, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. 5th mo. 27th, 1882, Eliza Jane Phillips, daughter 
of Milton and Sarah (Stevens) Phillips. 
She b. 4th mo. 12th. 1857, in Warren, Ohio. 

2832— MARY ESTHER STRAWN 

b. 12th mo. 24th, 1884, in Salem, O. 
m. 8th mo. 21st, 1905, John C. Snyder. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 589 

2833— GERTRUDE ADEL STRAWN 

b. 10th mo. 10th, 1886, in Alliance, O. 
m. 7th mo. 16th, 1904, J. J. Watson. 

2834— GEORGE MILTON STRAWN 

b. 5th mo. 29th, 1889, in Alliance, O. 

2835— HELEN STRAWN b. 1st mo. 5th, 1893, in Alliance, O. 

1979— LYCURGUS WILLIAM STRAWN (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Rob- 
ert, 35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; William 
R., 611; Esther, 1145). 
b. 1st mo. 11th, 1859, in Columbiana County, O. 
m. First, October 10th, 1883, Emma F. England, 
daughter of James R. and Elizabeth A. England. 
She b. August 12th, 1860. 
d. September 1st, 1903. 

m. Second, July 27th, 1904, Maud M. Sprouse, 
daughter of James A. and Mary Sprouse. 
She b. December 25th, 1874, in Lawyers, Campbell 
County, Va. 

2836— J. BYRON STRAWN b. August 6th, 1884. 

2837— EDNA ELIZABETH STRAWN 

b. September 6th, 1888. 
m. January 20th, 1906, Thomas Preas. 

2838— CLINTON H. STRAWN b. June 21st, 1892. 

2839— PERRY O. STRAWN b. April 1st, 1896. 

1980— BYRON ABEL STRAWN (Thomas, 1; Thomas. 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Esther, 1145). 
b. 1st mo. 1 1th, 1859, in Columbiana County, Ohio, 
m. November 24th, 1886, in Fort Wayne, Ind., 
Lydia A. Cooper, daughter of Cornelius and 
Mary (Witson) Cooper; Baptist ceremony. 
She b. April 3rd, 1862, in Fort Wayne, Ind. 

2840— BYRON SCOTT STRAWN b. January 24th, 1898, in Fort Wayne, Ind. 



590 GENEALOGY OF THE 

19S1— WINFIELD SCOTT STRAWN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 
611 ; Esther, 1145). 

b. 7th mo. 19th, 1861, in Columbiana County, 

Ohio, 
m. July 2nd, 1885, in Salem, Ohio, Florence M. 
Entrikin, daughter of William H. and Ara- 
mintha (Davison) Entrikin. 
She b. April 17th, 1864, in Columbiana County, Ohio. 

2841— STERLING SCOTT STRAWN 

b. January 12th, 1890, in Salem, 0. 



1982— OMER CREW STRAWN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611; 
Esther, 1145). 

b. 9th mo. 23rd, 1866, in Salem, Ohio. 
m. October 22nd, 1890, in Carthage, Ohio, Ella 
Crane. 
She b. December 25th, 1866, in Milford, Ohio. 

2842— FLOYD LEANDER STRAWN 

b. August 5th, 1892, 



-in Defiance, O. 



2843— HARRY OMER STRAWN 

b. March 31st, 1894, 

2844— KENNETH PEARCE STRAWN 

b. January 1st, 1896, 

2845— ELLA ESTHER STRAWN 

b. May 21st, 1898, 



2846— FA BLR \V 1 1 ITT EN STRAWN 

b. November 5th, 1899, in New York City. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 591 

1989— LENA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; James, 313; William R., 611; John, 

1147). 

b. 12th mo. 10th, 1855. 
m. 7th mo. 27th, 1876, Rev. A. W. Wood. 
He b. 10th mo. 10th, 1851. 

2847— ALLIE MAUD WOOD b. 5th mo. 31st, 1877, in Morocco, Ind. 

2848— Z. B. WOOD b. 8th mo. 12th, 1885, in Colfax, Ind. 

1990— WILLIAM I. FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
John, 1147). 

b. 3rd mo. 7th, 1858. 
m. 6th mo. 19th, 1881, Flora A. Thayer. 
She b. 7th mo. 12th, 1863. 

2849— GRACE HARRIET FRENCH 

b. 2nd mo. 12th, 1883. 

2850— FREDERICK LEROY FRENCH 

b. 9th mo. 4th, 1885. 

2851— WALTER A. FRENCH b. 7th mo. 22nd, 1888. 
2S52— HELEN MAY FRENCH b. 4th mo. 17th, 1891. 

1993— LUELLA FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; James, 313; William R., 611; John, 
1147). 

b. 11th mo. 14th, 1865. 
d. 11th mo. 8th, 1893. 
m. 10th mo. 5th, 18S6, H. E. Hawkins. 

2853— OPAL HAWKINS b. 3rd mo. 30th, 1888. 

2854— LOTTIE LEE HAWKINS b. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1889. 



592 GENEALOGY OF THE 

1998— HURFORD RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 7th mo. 29th, 1855, in Chariton, Iowa, 
m. March 7th, 1889, in Aurora, Nebraska, Mary 
Rook, daughter of William and Lydia (Sump- 
ter) Rook; Baptist ceremony. 
She b. October 1st, 1866, in Libertyville, Iowa. 

2855— ILIFF R. RATCLIFF b. March 17th, 1890. 

d. June 20th, 1890. 

2856— WILLIAM B. RATCLIFF b. January 9th, 1894. 
2857— LYDIA M. RATCLIFF b. August 21st, 1898. 



1999— EMMOR CREW RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas. 6; Robert, 35 ; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 5th mo. 14th. 1857, in Damascus, Ohio, 
m. September 26th, 1882, in Aurora, Nebraska. 
Alice Smith, daughter of Abraham and Eliza 
(Snell) Smith; Presbyterian ceremony. 
She b. September 24th, 1856. 

2858— ZOE V. RATCLIFF b. August 28th, 1883. 

2859— OLA GRACE RATCLIFF b. October 22nd, 1884. 

2860— GENEVA PEARL RATCLIFF 

b. November 15th, 1886. 



2861— JOSIAH FRENCH RATCLIFF 

b. March 4th, 1S90. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 593 

2000— WILLIAM ROGERS RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 
611 ; Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 5th mo. 4th, 1859, in Damascus, Ohio. 

m. First, November 27th, 1886, in Aurora, Ne- 
braska, Dora M. Huntington, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Jane (Truckenmiller) Huntington; 
Methodist ceremony. 
She b. October 10th, 1868, in Williamsport, Pa. 

d. April 6th, 1893, in Stratton, Nebraska. 

m. Second, December 27th, 1894, in Yorke, Ne- 
braska, Cora E. Bailey, daughter of Jacob and 
Mary (Gage) Bailey. 

2862— ECHO FAY RATCLIFF b. April 1st, 1892. 



2001— MARY JUDITH RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611; 
Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1861, in Chariton, Iowa, 
m. October 15th, 1884, in Aurora, Nebraska, Scott 
Alfred Wilson, son of William Augustus and 
Lydia Ann (Tatwan) Wilson; Methodist cere- 
mony. 
He b. November 23rd, 1856, in Georgetown, Ohio. 

2863— WARREN E. WILSON b. May 22nd, 1890. 
2864— LEO W WILSON b. June 23rd, 1897. 



2865— EDITH GENEVA WILSON 

b. January 3rd, 1902. 

38 



594 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2002— ALICE ANN RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 11th mo. 7th, 1862, in Chariton, Iowa, 
m. October 15th, 1884, in Aurora, Nebraska, Harry 
Cundall, son of Richard and Mary (Sailer) 
Cundall ; Methodist ceremony. 
He b. November 27th, 1859, in Kent, England. 

2866— CLINTON RAY CUNDALL 

b. December 15th, 1887. 

m. December 25th, 1907, Minnetta Victoria 
Lawyer. 

2867— MAGGIE ETHELL CUNDALL 

b. April 26th, 1891. 
m. June 1st, 1910, Carl Marsh. 

2868— PAUL CUNDALL b. April 27th, 1896. 

2869— WALTER RICHARD CUNDALL 

b. September 21st, 1898. 

2870— MARY ELIZABETH CUNDALL 

b. February 7th, 1901. 



2004— ELIZABETH RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 11th mo. 21st, 1865, in Chariton, Iowa, 
m. May 25th, 1899, in Trenton, Nebraska, John 
Mansfield Kellogg, son of Chester Beldon and 
Pluma (Barber) Kellogg; county judge per- 
forming ceremony. 
J. M. K. b. September 11th, 1853, in Mansfield, Ohio. 

2871— JOHN MANSFIELD KELLOGG, JR. 

b. February 10th, 1902. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 595 

2006— EDGAR BYRON RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35 ; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 2nd mo. 2nd, 1871, in Chariton, Iowa, 
m. July 1st, 1898, in New Windsor, Colorado, Rose 
Bloom, daughter of John and Susan (Wade) 
Bloom ; Baptist ceremony. 
She b. December 13th, 1881, in Conrad, Iowa. 

2872— PAUL FRENCH RATCLIFF 

b. January 10th, 1900. 

2S73— GEORGE WILLIAM RATCLIFF 

b. November 21st, 1902. 

2874— ELMAS MAYBELL RATCLIFF 

b. July 28th, 1905. 



2008— WALTER SCOTT RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R.„ 
611; Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 7th mo. 17th, 1873, in Aurora, Nebraska. 
m. June 27th, 1900, in Utica, Nebraska, Emma 
Lavilda Ragen, daughter of Oscar and Ellethea 
(Jackman) Ragen; Methodist ceremony. 
She b. October 4th, 1874, in Utica, Nebraska. 



2875— WELLINGTON RAGEN RATCLIFF 

b. May 4th, 1901. 

2876— CONNELL FRENCH RATCLIFF 

b. August 10th, 1903. 

2877— WILLIAM LYSLE RATCLIFF 

b. November 12th, 1905. 



596 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2009— E. PEARL RATCLIFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 611 ; 
Elizabeth, 1149). 

b. 9th mo. 28th, 1876, in Aurora, Nebraska. 
m. September 24th, 1897, in Stratton, Nebraska, 
Allen F. Strayer, son of Daniel and Mary 
Strayer ; Episcopal ceremony. 
He b. May 24th, 1872, in Lima, Ohio. 

2878— HAZEL MARIE STRAYER 

b. July 23rd, 1898. 

2011— ELIZABETH MILLER WOODWARD (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert, 35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; Wil- 
liam R., 611; Judith, 1151). 

b. January 16th, 1869, in Yorktown, 111. 
m. May 20th, 1890, in Carbondale, Col., Herbert 
Radford Hammond, son of Henry R. and Jane 
(Stuart) Hammond; Presbyterian ceremony. 
He b. November 13th, 1865, in St. Louis, Mo. 

2879— HERBERT RADFORD HAMMOND, JR. 

b. May 23rd, 1891. 

2880— HELEN GRACE HAMMOND 

b. January 23rd, 1893. 

2881— RUTH HAMMOND b. April 21st, 1895. 



2015— GRACE PETRAS WOODWARD (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; James, 313; William R., 
611 ; Judith, 1151). 

b. January 14th, 1879, in Cheyenne, Wyoming, 
m. September 15th, 1906, in Los Angeles, Cal., Don 
Leon Adams, son of John Quincy and Sarah 
Jane (Wilson) Adams. 
He b. December 19th, 1878, in Mound City, Kansas. 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 597 

2882— DOROTHY PETRAS ADAMS 

b. June 21st, 1907. 

2883— DON LEON ADAMS, JR. b. January 9th, 1909. 

2027— ESTHER B. BALDWIN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Meribah Morris, 1159). 
b. 7th mo. 14th, 1844. 
m. 10th mo. 17th, 1861, Frederick Berckheimer. 

2884— VIOLA L. BERCKHEIMER 

b. 9th mo. 8th, 1862. 

m. 6th mo. 10th, 1879, John G. Preston. 

2885— IDA F. BERCKHEIMER b. 6th mo. 12th, 1865. 

m. 3rd mo. 25th, 1885, Charles E. Hoover. 

2886— CURTIS C. BERCKHEIMER 

b. 2nd mo. 6th, 1867. 

m. 11th mo. 25th, 1888, Dora May Lee. 

2887— THOMAS F. BERCKHEIMER 

b. 4th mo. 5th, 1872. 

2029— SARAH BALDWIN (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618; 
Meribah Morris, 1159). 
b. 12th mo. 4th, 1848. 
m. 1st mo. 28th, 1876, John E. Phillips. 

2888— MERIBAH ROSA PHILLIPS 

b. 12th mo. 3rd, 1876. 

2889— NANCY LAURA PHILLIPS 

b. 4th mo. 7th, 1881. 

2032— MARY ELIZA BALDWIN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Meribah Morris, 1159). 
b. 6th mo. 5th, 1853. 
m. 9th mo. 5th, 1872, Walter T. McCanney. 



598 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2890— EDITH EVELYN McCANNEY 

b. 8th mo. 7th, 1875. 
d. 10th mo. 7th, 1876. 

2891— JOHN BALDWIN McCANNEY 

b. 6th mo. 11th, 1878. 

2892— EDNA GERTRUDE McCANNEY 

b. Sth mo. 11th, 1880. 

2893— ELMER LEON McCANNEY 

b. 10th mo. 19th, 1884. 

2894— CLIFFORD CURTIS McCANNEY 

b. 10th mo. 21st, 1889. 
d. 3rd mo. 10th, 1893. 



2033— SARAH ELLEN MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; James B. Morris, 1161). 

b. 9th mo. 11th, 1847. 

m. 10th mo. 11th, 1867, Isaac Beight. 

2895— J. WILBER BEIGHT b. 10th mo. 23rd, 1869. 

m. 10th mo. 23rd, 1890, Nora J. Lee. 

2034— THOMAS FRANKLIN MORRIS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai 
Morris, 618; James B. Morris, 1161). 

b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1849. 

m. Sth mo., 1872, Florence Clark. 

2896— PAUL MORRIS b. 1874. 

2897— LEWIS WARREN MORRIS 

b. 1881. 

d. 3rd mo. 17th, 1894. 

2898— FRANK MORRIS b. 1883. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 599 

2035— JOHN LEWIS MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; James B. Morris, 1161). 

b. 11th mo. 15th, 1850. 

m. 11th mo. 15th, 1873, Hannah Shinn. 

2899— MAUD ADALINE MORRIS 

b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1875. 



2037— MARION ADALINE MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai 
Morris, 618; James B. Morris, 1161). 

b. 3rd mo. 15th, 1857. 

m. 6th mo. 20th, 1874, James Milhouse. 

2900— NANCY I. MILHOUSE b. 9th mo. 6th, 1876. 

d. 3rd mo. 7th, 1877. 

2901— MARTHA ELLEN MILHOUSE 

b. 2nd mo. 20th, 1878. 

2902— VIVIAN A. MILHOUSE b. 8th mo., 1881. 

2903— MORRIS V. MILHOUSE b. 6th mo. 10th, 1886. 

d. 12th mo. 19th, 1891. 



2038— FERDINAND K. MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; John W. Morris, 1162). 

b. 8th mo. 9th, 1848. 
d. Sth mo. 11th, 1873. 
m. 1866, Nancy Spencer. 

2904— LIDA MORRIS b. 1867. 

m. 1886, James Spencer. 



600 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2045— ALVARADA MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Thomas F. Morris, 1163). 

b. 4th mo. 11th, 1854. 

m. 11th mo. 26th, 1874, Angelina Cole. 

2905— CORA MORRIS b. 12th mo. 16th, 1875. 

d. 5th mo. 6th, 1881. 

2906— FLORA MORRIS b. 8th mo. 16th, 1878. 

d. 7th mo. 10th, 1880. 

2907— MARY MORRIS b. 9th mo. 20th, 1880. 

2908— CHARLES MORRIS b. 11th mo. 28th, 1882. 

2909— CLARA MORRIS b. 2nd mo. 16th, 1884. 

2910— EVA MORRIS b. 7th mo. 27th, 1889. 

2046— LOZON MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618; 
Thomas F. Morris, 1163). 

b. 1st mo. 23rd, 1856. 
m. 7th mo. 3rd, 1878, Catharine Myers. 
She d. 4th mo. 15th, 1891. 

2911— ANDREW MORRIS b. 1st mo. 30th, 1880. 

2912— JESSE MORRIS b. 11th mo. 12th, 1883. 

2047— LEONIDAS MORRIS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas,6; Robert,35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Morris, 618; 
Thomas F. Morris, 1163). 

b. 11th mo. 6th. 1857. 

in. 10th mo. 3rd. 1S78, Mary Myers. 

2913— ELLUC MORRIS b. 9th mo. 29th, 1879. 

2914— GAIL MORRIS b. 6th mo. 8th, 1883. 

d. 1st mo. 4th, 1S87. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 601 

2048— VARRILLUS MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Thomas F. Morris, 1163). 

b. 4th mo. 4th, 1861. 

m. 4th mo. 7th, 1881, Jane Harman. 

2915— FREDERICK MORRIS b. 4th mo. 4th, 1882. 

2916— ADA MORRIS b. 2nd mo. 23rd, 1884. 

2917— HARRY MORRIS b. 3rd mo. 5th, 1890. 

2918— WILLIAM MORRIS b. 4th mo. 11th, 1893. 

2049— COMMODORE MORRIS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 31.5; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Thomas F. Morris, 1163). 

b. 1863. 

m. 1st mo. 1st, 1889, Minnie Litzenberger. 
She d. 4th mo. 13th, 1891. 

2919— FARA MORRIS b. 5th mo. 24th, 1890. 

2051— MARY P. WOODRUFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Hannah Morris, 1164). 

b. 6th mo. 16th, 1849. 
m. 8th mo. 16th, 1876, Pettit F. Brockway. 

2920— ARTHUR O. BROCKWAY b. 6th mo. 27th, 1877. 

d. 12th mo. 28th, 1878. 

2921— BERNICE PETTIT BROCKWAY 

b. 4th mo. 10th, 1879. 

2922— BERYL GRACE BROCKWAY 

b. 11th mo. 27th, 1883. 



602 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2923— ALMA MORRIS BROCKWAY 

b. 9th mo. 5th, 1888. 

2924— WALDO EMERSON BROCKWAY 

b. 7th mo. 16th, 1890. 



2052— LENORA WOODRUFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Hannah Morris, 1164). 

b. 12th mo. 8th, 1850. 

m. 8th mo. 19th, 1873, Joseph C. Luckey. 

2925— MARION A. LUCKEY b. 12th mo. 13th, 1874. 

2926— JEANNETTE LUCKEY b. 6th mo. 16th, 1876. 

2927— IDA LUCKEY b. 4th mo. 28th, 1878. 

2928— MAUD LUCKEY b. 9th mo. 2nd, 1880. 

2929— CLINTON LUCKEY b. 12th mo. 22nd, 1881. 

2930— REUBEN F. LUCKEY b. 4th mo. 7th, 1883. 

2931— CORA J. LUCKEY b. 9th mo. 10th. 1SS4. 

2932— MARGARET H. LUCKEY b. 1st mo. 30th, 1SS6. 

2933— CARL A. LUCKEY b. 5th mo. 10th, 1887. 

2934— JOSEPH LUCKEY b. 7th mo. 3rd, 1889. 

2935— ALFRED LUCKEY b. 1st mo. 9th, 1891. 

2936— WILLIAM R. LUCKEY b. 1st mo. 10th, 1892. 

2053— WARREN W. WOODRUFF (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Hannah Morris. 1164). 

b. 9th mo. 1st, 1852. 

m. 12th mo. 31st, 1883, Olive Leah Carter. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 603 

2937— IDA BELL WOODRUFF b. 5th mo. 6th, 1885. 

2938— WARREN EARL WOODRUFF 

b. 5th mo. 22nd, 1888. 



2054— SARAH ELIZA WOODRUFF (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Hannah Morris, 1164). 

b. 9th mo. 27th, 1854. 
m. 6th mo. 10th, 1872, John Walker. 

2939— SHERMAN WALKER b. 11th mo. 6th, 1S73. 

2940— HANNAH ELIZABETH WALKER 

b. 1st mo. 10th, 1875. 

2941— SAMUEL WALKER b. 11th mo. 1st, 1876. 

2942— HATTIE JANE WALKER b. 9th mo. 6th, 1878. 

2943— ANNIE WALKER b. 9th mo. 28th, 1880. 

2944— ELMER WALKER ~| b. 11th mo. 25th, 1881. 

2945— ELMA WALKER J b. 11th mo. 25th, 1881. 

2057— JOHN M. K1RKBRIDE (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Eliza A. Morris, 1165). 

b. 12th mo. 9th, 1849. 

m. 5th mo., 1872, Vina Craig. 

2946— T. CLYDE KIRKBRIDE b. 8th mo. 3rd, 1876. 

2947— KATIE B. KIRKBRIDE b. 3rd mo., 1880. 

2948— JOSIE KIRKBRIDE b. 10th mo., 1882. 

2949— JOY KIRKBRIDE b. 12th mo. 24th, 1886. 



604 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2058— ROBERT KIRKBRIDE (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Eliza A. Morris, 1165). 

b. 9th mo. 2nd, 1851. 
m. 5th mo. 21st, 1874, Ursula E. Diver. 
She b. 5th mo. 7th, 1852. 

2950— WILLIS F. KIRKBRIDE b. 4th mo. 29th, 1875. 

2951— CHARLES M. KIRKBRIDE 

b. 4th mo. 22nd, 1878. 

2952— ALFRED W. KIRKBRIDE b. 5th mo. 18th, 1880. 

2953— LUCY M. KIRKBRIDE b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1884. 

2059— GERTRUDE ALICE LUTES (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Sarah C. Morris, 1166). 

b. 12th mo. 8th, 1861. 

m. 1st mo. 10th, 1887, Samuel N. Alexander. 

2954— EDITH BELL ALEXANDER 

b. 10th mo. 12th, 1887. 

2955— LAURA MILDRED ALEXANDER 

b. 2nd mo. 4th, 1893. 

2956— SARAH ELLEN ALEXANDER 

b. 8th mo. 25th, 1894. 

2066— VIRGINIA F. TOWNSEND (Thomas. 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Mary P. Morris, 1167). 

b. 7th mo. 3rd, 1858. 

m. 2nd mo. 5th, 1881, Acton Warthman. 

2957— RALPH T. WARTHMAN b. 2nd mo. 1st, 1882. 

2958— DELBERT WARTHMAN 






DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 605 

2068— JONATHAN S. TOWNSEND (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai 
Morris, 618; Mary P. Morris, 1167). 

b. 4th mo. 25th, 1862. 

m. 4th mo. 23rd, 1885, Ora Middleton. 

2959— OLIN TOWNSEND b. 4th mo. 10th, 1890. 

2960— JOSEPHINE TOWNSEND 

b. 1st mo. 13th, 1892. 

2071— HOMER C. TOWNSEND (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Barzillai Mor- 
ris, 618; Mary P. Morris, 1167). 

b. 3rd mo. 27th, 1869. 

m. 9th mo. 17th, 1891, Emma Owen. 

2961— HARRY TOWNSEND b. 4th mo. 16th, 1893. 

2075— ANNA S. OLIPHANT (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Sarah Morris, 
620; Lydia B. Bruff, 1168). 

b. 2nd mo. 22nd, 1855. 
d. 3rd mo. 9th, 1886. 

m. 3rd mo. 25th, 1875, Charles C. Gruwell [1287], 
son of Moses and Ann (Carr) Gruwell. 
He b. 9th mo. 8th, 1853, in Marlborough, Stark 
County, Ohio. 

For record of children of Anna S. Oliphant and Charles C. Gruwell see 1287. 

2078— EDWIN ANDREWS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Sarah Morris, 620; Mary 
Bruff, 1172). 
b. 5th mo. 3rd, 1849. 
m. 9th mo. 5th, 1878, Helen M. Seward. 



606 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2962— HERBERT E. ANDREWS "1 b. 12th mo. 28th, 1879. 
2963— MABEL L. ANDREWS j b. 12th mo. 28th, 1879. 
2964— WALTER B. ANDREWS b. 12th mo. 2nd, 1881. 
2965— MARY ANDREWS b. 3rd mo. 4th, 1883. 

2081— LOUISA ANDREWS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Hannah, 315; Sarah Morris, 620; Mary 
Bruff, 1172). 

b. 12th mo. 28th, 1853. 
m. 9th mo. 16th, 1881, John S. McCracken. 

2966— MARY B. McCRACKEN b. 10th mo. 28th, 1884. 

2967— DAVID NELSON McCRACKEN 

b. 9th mo. 18th, 1887. 

2968— BERTHA McCRACKEN b. 11th mo. 15th, 1889. 

2969— ANNA DINAH McCRACKEN 

b. 10th mo. 25th, 1891. 

2083— JOSEPH JOHN ANDREWS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35 ; 

Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; Sarah Morris, 
620; Mary Bruff, 1172). 

b. 2nd mo. 18th, 1858. 

m. 2nd mo. 24th, 1883, Rhoda Hodson. 

2970— ANNIE ELIZABETH ANDREWS 

b. 8th mo. 12th, 1884. 

2971— IDA ALSINA ANDREWS b. 2nd mo. 10th, 1887. 

d. 11th mo. 3rd, 1888. 

2972— REBECCA MAY ANDREWS 

b. 3rd mo. 9th, 1890. 

2973— MARY ETHEL ANDREWS 

b. 10th mo. 16th, 1893. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 607 

2085— ALBERT HENRY ANDREWS, M.D. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert, 35 ; Thomas, 129; Hannah, 315; 
Sarah Morris, 620; Mary Bruff, 1172). 

b. 12th mo. 21st, 1861. 
m. 9th mo. 1st, 1886, Hattie Frazer. 

2974— RALPH ANDREWS b. 4th mo. 23rd, 1889. 

d. 5th mo. 7th, 1889. 

2975— JAY WAYNE ANDREWS b. 5th mo. 29th, 1890. 

2976— LOIRE ANDREWS b. 4th mo. 30th, 1894. 

2102— MARTHA H. BRACKIN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; John, 634; Anna 
S., 1185). 
b. 7th mo. 4th, 1874, in Colerain, Ohio, 
m. 10th mo. 23rd, 1895, in Friends' Meeting, Cole- 
rain, Ohio, Frederick C. Hoyle, son of William 
and Hannah (Plummer) Hoyle. 
He b. 12th mo. 26th, 1870, in Barnesville, Ohio. 

2977— MILDRED HOYLE b. 1st mo. 26th, 1897. 

2978— HELEN HOYLE b. 3rd mo. 21st, 1899. 

2979— ROBERT BRACKIN HOYLE 

b. 2nd mo. 11th, 1903. 

2103— MARY ANNA BRACKIN (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; John, 634; Anna 
S., 1185). 
b. 2nd mo. 5th, 1876, in Colerain, Ohio, 
m. 5th mo. 20th, 1896, in Friends' Meeting, Cole- 
rain, Ohio, Oscar J. Bailey, son of Lindley P. 
and Elizabeth (Stanton) Bailey. 
He b. 12th mo. 5th, 1874, in Barnesville, Ohio. 

2980— ALFRED L. BAILEY b. 3rd mo. 16th, 1897, in Barnesville, O. 



mis GENEALOGY OF THE 



2981— OLIVER BRACKIN BAILEY 

b. 6th mo, 14th, 1901, 

2982— JOSEPH OSCAR BAILEY b. 7th mo. 5th, 1903, 

2983— EDWARD F. BAILEY b. 1st mo. 30th, 1907, 



-in Wheeling, W. Va. 



2108— ANNA S. FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Thomas, 

129; Robert, 317; John, 634; Joseph H., 
1186). 
b. December 22nd, 1876, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. April 6th, 1899, in Pittsburg, Pa., Lyle B. 
Harris, son of Jesse and Lydia (Atkinson) 
Harris; minister of the Christian Church per- 
forming ceremony. 
He b. November 11th, 1877, in Salem, Ohio. 

2984— MARTHA A. HARRIS b. August 20th, 1900. 

2109— ALFARATA FRENCH (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; John, 634; 
Joseph H., 1186). 

b. August 4th, 1880. 

d. March 30th, 1904. 

m. September 4th, 1901, in Lisbon, Ohio, Charles 
H. Cobourn; Rev. Mr. Fowler of the Christian 
Church performing ceremony. 

2985— CARROLL F. COBOURN b. October 22nd, 1903. 

2111— JOSEPH G. WILSON, M.D. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; John, 634 ; Mary 
A., 1187). 
b. 6th mo. 23rd, 1874, in Smyrna, Ohio, 
m. July 26th, 1900, in Santurce, Porto Rico, Car- 
men Yriarte, daughter of Rafael and Hortensia 
(Koppisch) Yriarte; Catholic ceremony. 
She b. July 16th, 1880, in Porto Rico. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 609 

2986— MARTHA WILSON b. April 15th, 1901. 

2987— JOSEPHINE CARMEN WILSON 

b. January 14th, 1904. 

2988— BENJAMIN RAFAEL WILSON 

b. October 24th, 1908. 
d. November 21st, 1908. 

2989— MARY DOLRES WILSON b. June 22nd, 1910. 



2112— MABEL B. WILSON (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35 ; Thomas, 

129; Robert, 317; John, 634; Mary A., 
1187). 
b. 2nd mo. 27th, 1876, in Flushing, Ohio. 
m. 4th mo. 26th, 1895, in Friends' Meeting, Salem, 
Ohio, Albertus L. Hoyle, son of William and 
Hannah (Plummer) Hoyle. 
He b. 6th mo. 27th, 1872, in Barnesville, Ohio. 

2990— WILLIAM WILSON HOYLE 

b. 1st mo. 28th, 1896. 

2991— BENJAMIN HOYLE b. 6th mo. 24th, 1897. 

2992— ELEANOR MARY HOYLE 

b. 7th mo. 3rd, 1900. 

2993— DOROTHY HOYLE b. 1st mo. 19th, 1910. 

2113— GEORGE JONES WILSON (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129 ; Robert, 317 ; John. 634 ; Mary 
A., 1187). 
b. 12th mo. 11th, 1878. 

m. 5th mo. 17th, 1900, by Friends' ceremony, in 
West Chester, Pa., Sara Edna Hoffman, daughter 
of George A. and Hanna (Baldwin) Hoffman. 
She b. 6th mo. 20th, 1880, in West Chester, Pa. 

39 



610 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2994— GEORGE HOWARD WILSON 

b. 5th mo. 27th, 1902. 

2995— BENJAMIN WILSON b. 1st mo. 30th, 1910. 

2120— BERTHA M. WALKER (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; Samuel, 635; 
Hannah L., 1194). 

b. 10th mo. 12th, 1878. 

m. 12th mo. 22nd, 1905, in Flushing, Ohio, James 

W. Edgerton, son of James and Mary Ann 

Edgerton. 

2996— SARA GERTRUDE EDGERTON 

b. 4th mo. 12th, 1909. 

2121— LUELLA L. WALKER (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; Samuel, 635; 
Hannah L., 1194). 

b. 5th mo. 3rd, 1880. 

m. 6th mo. 26th, 1907, in Flushing, Ohio, Lloyd B. 

Jones, son of S. Morris and Jane C. (Balder- 

ston) Jones. 

2997— CHARLES WALKER JONES 

b. 6th mo. 29th, 1909. 

2125— ROLLAND HALL FRENCH (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6 ; Robert, 35; 

Thomas, 129; Robert, 317; Samuel, 635; 
Louis B., 1195). 

b. August 31st, 1878, in Salem, Ohio, 
m. June 2nd, 1904, in New York City, Esther Mor- 
ris Akin, daughter of Isaac Williamson and 
Julia Morris (Behm) Akin; Rev. Howard Ag- 
new Johnston, Presbyterian minister, perform- 
ing ceremony. 
She b. August 29th, 1881, in Des Moines, Iowa. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 611 

2998— HOWARD BARCLAY FRENCH, 2ND 

b. January 31st, 1906, in Fort Thomas, Ky. 

2999— ROLLAND HALL FRENCH, JR. 

b. October 8th, 1909. 
d. October 20th, 1909. 



2148— HENRY WARRINGTON GILLINGHAM (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 

6; Robert, 35; Robert, 131 ; Mary, 320; 
Hannah Roberts, 653; Mary A. Roberts, 
1217). 

b. 9th mo. 24th, 1862, in Carroll County, Md. 

m. 3rd mo. 31st, 1897, by Friends' ceremony, in 
New York City, Sarah Carpenter, daughter of 
Robert H. and Amy Thorn (Griffen) Carpenter. 

3000— SARAH NORBURY GILLINGHAM 

b. 8th mo. 18th, 1899. 

3001— EDITH LESLIE GILLINGHAM 

b. 1st mo. 29th, 1902. 



2150— MARY McKINSTREY GILLINGHAM (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert,35; Robert, 131; Mary,320; Hannah 
Roberts, 653; Mary A. Roberts, 1217). 

b. 9th mo. 16th, 1865, in Bellevue, Fairfax Co.,Va. 

m. 12th mo. 28th, 1892, by Friends' ceremony, in 

Medway, Accotink, Va., Abner Garrett Fell, son 

of Richard H. and Eliza T. (Garrett) Fell, of 

London Grove township, Chester County, Pa. 

He b. 5th mo. 20th. 1868, in West Grove, Pa. 

3002— MARIANNA FELL b. 2nd mo. 25th, 1894. 

3003— ALICE ELIZA FELL b. 12th mo. 5th, 1895. 

3004— ELIZABETH ROBERTS FELL 

b. 9th mo. 30th, 1897. 



612 GENEALOGY OF THE 



3005— EDITH MARGARETTA FELL 

b. 8th mo. 25th, 1899. 

3006— ROBERT ABNER FELL b. 12th mo. 24th, 1901. 

3007— EDWIN REUBEN FELL b. 12th mo. 13th, 1903. 

3008— LILLIAN FELL b. 4th mo. 20th, 1906. 

d. 8th mo. 27th, 1906. 

3009— EMMA LEWIS FELL b. 10th mo. 9th, 1908. 

2153— ANNA LEWIS GILLINGHAM (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Robert, 131 ; Mary, 320; Hannah Rob- 
erts, 653; Mary A. Roberts, 1217). 
b. 5th mo. 18th, 1871, in Cedar Grove, Accotink, 

Va. 
m. 2nd mo. 12th, 1896, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Medway, Accotink, Va., Edward Rogers, son of 
Josiah and Martha A. ( Hollingshead) Rogers. 
He b. 11 th mo. 9th, 1867, near Medford, Burlington 
County, N. J. 

3010— ALBERT EDWARD ROGERS 

b. 8th mo. 17th, 1897. 

3011— WILLIAM DAVIS ROGERS 

b. 11th mo. 15th, 1900. 

3012— MARIAN GILLINGHAM ROGERS 

b. 3rd mo. 11th, 1904. 

2157— ASA LIPPINCOTT ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Robert, 131 ; Mary, 320; Hannah Rob- 
erts, 653; Edward Roberts, 1218). 
b. 6th mo. 6th, 1870, in Camden, N. J. 
m. 11th mo. 19th, 1890, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Camden, N. J., Florence Elma Lippincott, 
daughter of Ahab Haines and Maria Louisa 
(Jones) Lippincott. 
She b. 4th mo. 27th, 1869, near Medford, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 613 

3013— EDWARD ASA ROBERTS b. 10th mo. 3rd, 1891. 

d. 8th mo. 1st, 1892. 

3014— JOSEPH EARLE ROBERTS 

b. 9th mo. 13th, 1893. 



2158— EDWARD ROBERTS, JR. (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Hannah Roberts, 
653; Edward Roberts, 1218). 

b. 2nd mo. 21st, 1873, in Camden, N. J. 

m. 8th mo. 15th, 1900, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Morrisville, Pa., Edith Woodman, daughter of 
Henry and Margaret (Neal) Woodman. 

3015— RUTH LIPPINCOTT ROBERTS 

b. 12th mo. 13th, 1901. 
d. 1st mo. 18th, 1905. 

3016— EDITH MARGARET ROBERTS 

b. 10th mo. 9th, 1905. 

3017— EDWARD WOODMAN ROBERTS 

b. 10th mo. Sth. 1910. 

2159— HANNAH BERTHA ROBERTS (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Hannah Rob- 
erts, 653; Edward Roberts, 1218). 

b. 11th mo. 3rd, 1878, in Camden, N. J. 
m. 9th mo. 12th, 1900, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Camden, N. J., Japhet Clifton Darnell, son of 
Aaron and Susan Elizabeth (Sharp) Darnell. 

3018— ELEANOR HANNAH DARNELL 

1). 7th mo. 7th, 1901. 

3019— MAY ELIZABETH DARNELL 

b. 7th mo. 5th, 1904. 



614 GENEALOGY OF THE 



2162— GERTRUDE E. ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Hannah Roberts, 
653; Enoch C Roberts, 1220). 
b. 4th mo. 9th, 1873. 

m. 3rd mo. 1st, 1899, by Friends' ceremony, Walter 
Rogers, son of Josiah and Martha (Hollings- 
head) Rogers. 
He b. 3rd mo. 17th, 1870, in Lumberton, N. J. 

3020— JOSEPH E. ROGERS b. 12th mo. 8th, 1899. 

3021— ALICE M. ROGERS b. 6th mo. 26th, 1904. 

3022— ROBERT J. ROGERS b. 8th mo. 8th, 1906. 

2163— MARY WILLIAMS ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Hannah Rob- 
erts, 653; John H. Roberts, 1221). 
b. 3rd mo. 3rd, 1875, in Camden, N. J. 
m. 10th mo. 5th, 1898, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Hyman G. Miller. 

3023— ELIZABETH R. MILLER b. 10th mo. 12th, 1900. 
3024— MILDRED T. MILLER b. 6th mo. 8th, 1902. 

2164— ELIZABETH WILLIAMS ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; 

Robert,35; Robert, 131; Mary,320; Hannah 
Roberts, 653; John H. Roberts, 1221). 
b. 7th mo. 19th, 1876, in Camden, N. J. 
m. 1st mo. 12th, 1904, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Walter R. Willets, son of 
Stephen T. and Mary S. (Moore) Willets. 

3025— ROLAND JOHN WILLETS 

b. 1st mo. 2nd, 1905, in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

3026— MARY E. WILLETS b. 5th mo. 28th, 1908, in Ridgewood, N. J. 

3027-ROBERT S. WILLETS b. 9th mo. 30th, 1909, in Ridgewood, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 615 



2165— MARTHA POTTS ROBERTS (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 

35; Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Hannah Rob- 
erts, 653; John H. Roberts, 1221). 

b. 3rd mo. 6th, 1878, in Camden, N. J. 

m. 3rd mo. 25th, 1903, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., W. Lockwood Kimball, son 
of William C. and Blanche (Reed) Kimball. 

3028— SYLVIA K. KIMBALL b. 3rd mo. 13th, 1905. 

2182— EDITH LAMB (Thomas, 1; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; Robert, 131; 

Mary, 320; Josiah Roberts, 656; Annie L. 
Roberts, 1233). 

b. 10th mo. 30th, 1877, in Baltimore, Md. 
m. 4th mo. 16th, 1903, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Govanstown, Baltimore County, Md., Howard 
Cooper Johnson, son of George K. and Sallie 
K. (Cooper) Johnson. 
He b. 1st mo. 18th, 1876. 

3029— ROBERT EMERSON LAMB JOHNSON 

b. 8th mo. 25th, 1905. 

3030— HOWARD COOPER JOHNSON, JR. 

b. 2nd mo. 7th, 1909. 

2184— ROBERT EMERSON LAMB (Thomas, 1 ; Thomas, 6; Robert, 35; 

Robert, 131; Mary, 320; Josiah Roberts, 
656; Annie L. Roberts, 1233). 

b. 9th mo. 18th, 1881, in Baltimore, Md. 
m. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1908, by Friends' ceremony, in 
Chester, Pa., Elizabeth Martin Booth, daughter 
of George Martin and Ellen (Miller) Booth, 
of Chester, Pa. 
She b. 3rd mo. 23rd, 1882. 

3031— ELLEN BOOTH LAMB b. 2nd mo. 24th, 1910. 



616 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2231— JOSEPH COLES BRICK, M.D. (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 

42; Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344; 
Joseph I. Brick, 699; William F. Brick, 
1295). 
b. in Crosswicks, N. J. 

m. October 1st, 1904, in Birdsboro, Pa., Laura 
Wood Clingan, daughter of Charles Brooke and 
Rosalind (Wood) Clingan. 
She b. at Hopewell Furnace, Pa. 

3032— MARY DaCOSTA BRICK b. September 19th, 1905. 

3033— CLEMENTINE BROOKE BRICK 

b. July 12th, 1909. 
(Named for her great-great-grandfather, Clement Brooke.) 

Joseph Coles Brick, M.D., is a member of the staff of the Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, and is head of one of the special departments. 

2234— JOSIAH EDGAR BRICK (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344; Joseph I. 
Brick, 699; Edgar Brick, 1297). 
b. August 18th, 1866, in Crosswicks, N. J. 
m. June 24th, 1896, Emma Ridgway, daughter of 
Daniel and Laura (Newbold) Ridgway. 
She b. December 29th, 1872, in Sykesville, N. J. 

3034— GERTRUDE NEWBOLD BRICK 

b. September 16th, 1905. 

2235— CHARLES W. BRICK (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles. 42; Abi- 
gail, 139; William Brick. 344; Joseph I. 
Brick, 699; Edgar Brick, 1297). 

b. April 22nd, 1876, in Crosswicks, N. J. 
m. June 28th, 1902, Alice E. Braislin, daughter of 
John and Elizabeth (Weber) Braislin. 
She b. March 2nd, 1872, in Crosswicks, N. J. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 617 

3035— SUSAN COLES BRICK b. December 30th, 1903. 
3036— EDGAR BRICK, JR. b. July 4th, 1908. 

2238— JOHN CRAWFORD BARTLETT (Thomas, 1 ; Charles,8; Charles, 

42; Abigail, 139; William Brick, 344; Abi- 
gail F. Brick, 700; Charles F. Bartlett, 
1305). 
b. February 9th, 1872. 

m. January 23rd, 1901, Anna Martindale Craw- 
ford, of Terre Haute, Ind. 

3037— ANDREW CRAWFORD BARTLETT 

b. October 30th, 1901. 

3038— MARY ELIZABETH BARTLETT 

b. November 18th, 1904. 
d. April 24th, 1906. 

3039— ELIZABETH FRANCES BARTLETT 

b. April 13th, 1907. 

2257— THOMAS J. BUTCHER (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; 

Abigail, 139; Ann Brick, 345; Abigail B. 
Roberts, 704; Benajah Butcher, 1326). 

b. July 4th, 1860. 

m. First, November 15th, 1883, May L. Blakey, 

daughter of Paxson and Letitia (Smith) Blakey. 
She d. May 8th, 1892. 

m. Second, September 13th, 1893, Anna E. Moore, 

daughter of William M. and Jane Wakefield 

(Kerr) Moore. 

3040— CHALKLEY S. BUTCHER 

b. June 12th, 1885. 
m. September 8th, 1909, Mertie Croasdale. 

3041— ANNA S. BUTCHER b. April 19th, 1889. 

3042— T. HERMAN BUTCHER b. April 13th, 1892. 



618 GENEALOGY OF THE 

2261— NINA CARROLL (Thomas, 1; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Abigail, 

139; Ann Brick, 345; Susan Roberts, 706; 
William R. Carroll, 1334). 

b. October 9th, 1870, in Philadelphia, 
m. October 9th, 1895, George Henry Buzby, son of 
George W. and Margaret (Lancaster) Buzby; 
Episcopal ceremony. 
He b. October 8th, 1862, in Philadelphia. 

3043— GEORGE CARROLL BUZBY 

b. April 19th, 1897. 

2270— EDITH B. POPE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; 

Amy, 349 ; Samuel Pope, 711; Richard F. 
Pope, 1340). 

b. 10th mo. 28th, 1862. 

d. 7th mo. 24th, 1888. 

m. 5th mo. 27th, 1886, George E. Cooley. 

3044— HUGH R. COOLEY b. 3rd mo. 10th, 1887. 

d. 6th mo. 9th, 1887. 

3045— DONALD COOLEY b. 7th mo. 1st, 1888. 

2271— EDGAR J. POPE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; 

Amy, 349; Samuel Pope, 711; Richard F. 
Pope, 1340). 

b. 11th mo. 27th, 1863. 

m. 9th mo. 12th, 1888, Mattie Hilton. 

3046— LeROY H. POPE b. 8th mo. 11th, 1893. 

2272— CORA M. POPE (Thomas, 1 ; Charles, 8; Charles, 42; Jacob, 140; 

Amy, 349 ; Samuel Pope, 711; Richard F. 
Pope, 1340). 

b. 5th mo. 8th, 1867. 

m. 11th mo. 25th, 1885, William A. Davis. 



DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS FRENCH 619 

3047— EARLE S. DAVIS b. 3rd mo. 7th, 1888. 

3048— WILFORD DAVIS b. 8th mo. 14th, 1890. 

3049— KENNETH B. DAVIS b. 11th mo. 11th, 1892. 

2284— HANNAH ROGERS JONES (Thoma