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Full text of "Genealogy of one line of the Hopkins family, descended from Thomas Hopkins, in Providence, from 1641 to 1692"

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GENEALOGY 



OF 



ONE LINE 



OF THE 



HOPKINS FAMILY. 



BY A DESCENDANT. 



41 



GENEALOGY 



OF 



ONE LINE 



OIT THE 



HOPKINS FAMILY, 

Descended from Thomas Hopkins, in Providence, 

FROM 1G41 TO 1G92. 

By a Descendant. 

"Rightly to interpret the present, we must know something of the past." 



■We rellcct the cliaractcrs of those wlio have preceded \is, atul the ties of eoiisan- 
giiinity bind us to traits dcn'elopeil in the lives of our ancestors. Hence, a kufiwl- 
edge of tlicin and of their characteristics tends to acquaint us with the probabilities 
of our own career, and enables us to guard against unworthy proclivities, and to 
foster those of an opposite nature. 



FOR PRIVATE DISTRIBUTION. 



PROVIDENCE: 
J. A. & E. A. llEiD, Printers. 

1881. 



Introduction. 



Several years since, the writer became interested in genea- 
logical investigations, particularly of the Hopkins families 
descended from Thomas, at Providence, from 1641 to 1692, 
from tlie fact that his maternal parent bore that name before 
her marriage, and was one of Thomas' descendants, and hav- 
ing coUepted considerable material pertaining to the subject, 
designed embodying it in a chart which might be of use in 
the preparation of a full genealogy, if at any subsequent time 
some one interested in the matter should attempt its produc- 
tion. Circulars were freely distributed among those bearing 
the name, calling for information needed, to which so few 
responses were given that it appeared evident that only by 
personal interviews could success be hoped for, and circum- 
stances preventing the adoption of that method, it has been 
held in abeyance until the present time. 

Information relative to one line of descent running from 
the eldest son of the common ancestor, Thomas, being more 



X 



4 ivTROnrrTTOV 

easily attaiiifiMe, partly on accoimt of its limited numbers 
an<l partly from the public prominence of some of them, it 
appeared possible to arrange a gt'iiealoirical account of this 
branch, which is found in the following i)age8. 

The multitudinous sources from which the various particu- 
lars have been gleaned precludes reference to authorities, 
but no claim to originality is based upon such omission, and 
thanks to all those who have given aid are herelty tendered. 

Although it i^ not claimed that this record is entirely free 
from errors, great pains have be^n taken to make it unobjec- 
tionable in that particular. 

It is well known to those conversant with genealogical 
investigations, that it is common for discrepancies to occur 
between different records of the same event, a prominent 
example of which occurs to the writer at the present time, 
where four different dates were given in as many different 
records, of the age of the widow of a prominent individual, 
deceased in Providence within the present century. Thus the 
genealogist is not always blamable for erroneous dates gath- 
ered from such conflicting accounts. 

The writer is aware that doubt or disappointment will rest 
upon many bearing the name of Hopkins, at not finding their 
own families represented as descendants of Stephen, one of 
the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Many, of 
more than ordinary intelligence, claim to be descended from 



INTKOUMCTION, 5 



) 



liiin, wliOM investigation proves tlu'ir claim groundless. This 
is not to be wondered at, when so large a portion of the peo- 
ple arc utterly indifferent to a knowledge of even their near 
ancestry, it being an exception rathrr than the rule for per- 
sons to lie able to give the name of either of their great- 
grandparents. 

Whenever Smithlield, Gloucester, or Scituate are named in 
these pages in connection with dates earlier than February, 
1731; Cranston, June, 17o4 ; Johnston, February, 1759; or 
Foster, 1781, it is to be understood as applying to the parts 
of the old town of Providence set off at the dates named to 
constitute the new towns thus designated. A. H. 



Explanations. A number enclosed in parenthesis and 
placed before a name denotes that the same person is repre- 
sented in a previous generation by the same number, in the 
running line of numbers. 

The small figure following a name denotes the generation 
of the person from the first Thomas^ calling him of the first. 

Hopkins names in the tables are given in capital letters, 
and those one remove from the name, through marriage, are 
in italics. 



.V 



One Line qe the Hopkins Family. 



1. THOMAS HOPKINS! , the common ancestor of many 
of tlie numerous families bearing the name of Hopkins now- 
resident in Rhode Island, and of others scattered through 
the various states of the Union, was the son of William and 
Joanna (Arnold) Hopkins. He was born in England, April 
7, 1G16, and died in Providence prior to Dec. 27, 1692. 

A deed given by Maj. William Hopkins, son of Thomas, 
bearing the last named date, is recorded in Providence Book 
of Deeds, No. 4, page 11, wherein certain lands are repre- 
sented as having formerly belonged to William's honored 
father, Thomas Hopkins, deceased, and as this is a gift deed 
from William, the elder, to his younger brother, Thomas, 
prompted probably by a sense of the injustice of the law of 
primogeniture which gave the property of the parent to the 
eldest son, it is presumable that the conveyance soon followed 
the decease of the parent, thus showing the approximate time 
of his decease as stated. 



8 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionan , gives the year of his 
decease as 1699. An error without doubt resulting from the 
fact of a Thomas Hopkins' will being probated Feb. 25 of that 
year. The details of the will referred to show conclusively 
that it was one of some other person bearing the same name. 

The mother of Thomas was a daughter of Thomas and 
Alice (Oully) Arnold. She (Alice) was baptized Nov. 30, 
1577. Her brother, William Arnold, born June 24, 1587, 
was the father of Benedict Arnold, who was the first governor 
of Rhode Island under the Royal Churter granted in 1643, 
and ancestor of most of those liearing the name who have had 
their homes in Warwick, in this State, and a half-brother,- 
Thomas, was the ancestor of those bearing the name among 
the early settlers of northern Rhode Island. A very numer- 
ous posterity of both l)ranrhos yet exists and honors the name 
wherever located. 

Thomas had a sister Frances, born May 28, 1614, who mar- 
ried William Man, an early settler in Providence, and had 
two children, Abraliara and Mary. Abraham Man was one of 
the few Providence men who "staid and went not away" 
during the scare of King Philip's war, and it appears that he 
was wounded in some encounter with the red men in that 
memorable struggle, as Colonial Records^ Vol. 3, page 165, 
notes the receipt by him of " three pounds in or as money for 
the cure of his wound [received] in the late Indian war." 



ONE LINE OP THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 9 

Mary Man niariied a Lapliain aiui liad two children, .iuhn 
and Mary. Tlioinas had also a sister Klizaheth, born Jnly 3, 
1619, of whom no furthci* acconnt has l)een obtained. 

He married, probably about the year 1648, jndging from 
the fact tliat his tw.o sons, said to 1)6 his only children, were 
admitted freemen of the colony in 1672, and assuming that 
such admission occurred soon after they arrived at a suitable 
age to entitle them to freemen's privileges. 

The name of his wife is at present a matter of conjecture. 
Savage says it was Elizabeth, daughter of William Arnold, 
and sister to (jov. Benedict Arnold. If so, he married his 
cousin. This belief has been heretofore assumed by the 
writer, but recent publications of genealogical mutter per- 
taining to the Arnold family, and other facts brought to his 
notice have created a doubt as to its correctness, and much 
time has been devoted to investigations, made with a view feo 
corroborate the earlier belief, or to substantiate a different 
opinion, based upon reliable data. Not much satisfaction has 
resulted from these investigations, but, trusting that further 
researches may clear up the doubt, it may be well to leave it 
an open question.* 

* This position is taken with some misgivings, from the fact that Go\'. Stephen 
Hopkins, a great-grandson of Thomas, notes in his family reconl that she was a 
daughter of William Arnold, and as ho was sixteen j'ears old when his grandfather, 
Maj. William Hopkins, a son of Thomas, died, it appears somewhat presumptuous, 
at this late day, to question its authenticity. A, H. 

2 



10 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

He appears to have contributed fioin liis talents to the 
public weal, having been a Deputy to the General Assembly 
from Providence for the years 1652, '59, '60, '65, '66 and '67, 
and a member of the Town Council in 1667 and 1672. His 
children were : 



I 



I. William*, b. — ; d. .luly 8, 1723. 

II. Thomas*, b. — : d. April 1, 1718. 



(2.; Maj. WILLIAM HOPKINSS the eldest son of 
Tliomas, was made a freeman of the colony April 30, 1672. 
He married about the year 1680, Abigail, widow of Stephen 
Dexter, son of Rev. Gregory Dexter. She was a daughter of 
John and Sarah Whipple, early settlers in Providence, having 
removed hither from Dorchester, Mass., about the year 1659. 
The major was a man of marked ability, serving the colony 
both in a civil and military capacity, until advanced age 
claimed a cessation from public employment. 

He was noted as a surveyor of lands throughout the colony, 
and numerous accounts of his labors in this profession abound 
in the records. 

His home at the time of his decease, and probably for a long 
time previous, was at Massapauge, a portion of Providence 
that was included in the part set off to make the town of 
Cranston in 1754. He died, as before noted, July 8, 1723, 
leaving a large property, the bulk of which, after ])rovi(l- 



ONr: LINK OF TIIR IFOPKINS lAMlLi'. 11 

y 

ing for the support of liis wife during her widowhood, he 
bequeathed to his grandson, William. (See "Will in appendix.) 
iris widow survived until 1725, and in her will, made Aug, 
19, of that year, she made, among other l)cquests, certain lega- 
cies to her son, John Dexter, and daughter, Abigail Field, chil- 
dren by her first husband. (See Will in appendix.) 

The issue of William's marriage Muth Abigail Dexter, was 
one son. 

4, William', b. —; d. — , 1738. 

(4.) WILLIAMS, the only child of Major William and 
Al)igail, died in Scituate between the dates of June 11 and Oct. 
9, 1738. The first date being that of his will, and the latter, 
when it was presented for probate. (See Will in appendix.) 
He married early in life, Ruth, daughter of Samuel and Plaine 
(Wickenden) Wilkinson. Samuel was a son of Lawrence 
Wilkinson, an early settler in Providence, and Plaine, a 
daughter of the Rev. William Wickenden, who succeeded Rev. 
Gregory Dexter in the pastorate of the First Baptist Church 
in Providence. 

Although Scituate has been frequently named as the early 
home of William and Ruth, circumstances indicate that it 
was in the vicinity of the home of William's parents, at or 
near Massapauge. 



12 ' ONE LINE OP THE H0PKIN3 FAMILY. 

CHILDREN. 

5. I. ^VILI.IAM^ b. (probabl}- in Cranston) about the year 

1705 ; d. in Providence, Feb. 17, 175.'). 

6. n. SxEruEX*, b. in Cranston, March 7. 1707 : d. in Prov- 

idence. July 13, 1785. 

7. III. KuFLS*, b. — ; d. — . 

S. IV. JoiiK*, b. — ; d. Feb. 1, 175.'). 

'.'. V. Hope*, b. March 3, 1717 ; d. July 20, 1803. 

10. VI . E.SEK*, b. April 2G, 1718 ; d. Feb. 26, 1802. 

11. VII. Sa.muel*, b. — ; d. September, 1744. 

12. Vlll. AniGAiL*, b. 1727 ; d. Jan. 30, 1772. 
iv IX. S.<vvv^<. h 17-2>!: d. Nov. 8, 1745. 

(_6.) Col. WILLIAM^, the eldest son of William and 
Ruth, being the eldest grandson of Major William, and bear- 
ing ills name, and perhaps also on account of early develop- 
ing a character calculated to ])rlng credit to the family, the 
grandsirc made him the recipient of a large portion of his 
estate. He early engaged in a maritime life, and was remark- 
able for his dash and enterprise, his career being marked by 
many characteristics of a resolute and reckless nature. 

Tradition, which, by the way, is never parsimonious of its . 
gifts, ascribes to liim a series of adventures of a quixotic 
character. It is said of him that, when about nineteen years 
of age, being in London when a riot was in ])rogress that 
tlircatened the safety of the Royal family, he promptly organ- 



ONE LINK OP THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 13 

ized a force of sailors and loyul fiti/ens, under the iii8i)iring 
cry of "Fall in und jjrotcct the King!" and rushing to the 
onset, quelled the disturbance, to the gfeat gratification of the 
imperilled dignitaries. For this, it is said, he received many 
marks of royal favor, among which was the j)resentation of a 
court suit, which was for many years in possession of his 
descendants, who became numerous, and each claiming a por- 
tion of it as an heir-loom, it was cut in pieces and distributed 
among them. A fragment of the coat came into the j)osses- 
sioii of the late Stephen Randall, wlio married one of the 
descendants, and was presented by him to the Rhode Island 
Historical Society, and is now one of the exhil;its of its antique 
department. 

He married Sarah, daughter of and Abigail Curtis, 

who was born Oct. 31, 1707. 

CHILD. 

14. CnniSTorHEu'', b. — , 1722 ; d. March 20, 17G7. 

(6.) Gov. STEPHEN HOPKINSS the second child of 
William and Ruth, was born in Cranston, March 7, 1707, as 
is shown by a record of his family made by himself Feb. 3, 
1754, which sets at rest the oft-repeated account of his birth 
having occurred in Scituate. 

Numerous and abler pens have portrayed the exalted char- 
acter of Stephen Hopkins, one of the immortal signers of the 



14 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

Declaratiou of ludependeiiee, and it is not meet for the luini- 
ble scribbler of these lines to attemi>t to add to the panegyrics 
so lavishly bestowed upon him. His praise is upon the lips 
of every student of history at all conversant with the public 
records of the period of his active life, and whether in the 
routine of humble avocations, fitting him by gradual ap- 
proaches to reach and adorn the highest stations, or at the 
apex of his exalted positions, his character shines forth with 
resplendent brilliancy. He was for many years governor of 
Rhode Island, also chief justice of the Superior Court, and 
from time to time a recipient of the most important offices in 
the gift of the colony. 

Always steadfast in opposition to the encroachments of the 
mother country upon the liberties of the colonies, he was ever 
ready to originate and carry forward measures tending to sep- 
aration and independence. Thongh far advanced in life, his 
signature to the Declaration bears evidence to his firmness of 
purpose in placing before the world his approval of that docu- 
ment, and the trembling, palsied hand, though it failed to 
show liis ability as a penman known to those familiar with 
his writing at an earlier period, failed not to perpetuate his 
name among the heroes that dared brave the despotism 
attempting to crush out the liberties of their beloved country. 

It is not strange that the shafts of political cn\y should 
have been hurled at him at a time when personal vituperation 



ONK LINE OF TMH HOPKINS FAMILY, 15 

was a common w(3apon of political warfare, but it is singular 
that, after the lapse of nearly one hundred and thirty years, 
one could be found who thought it necessary to revive the 
personalities of that period, in order to exalt the rc|mtation 
of an ancestor by whom Hopkins was antagonized, and one 
whose eminence and public worth needed no invidious com- 
parisons to bolster up his memory among those who were fully 
cognizant of his many virtues. And as the original attacks 
did not redound to tlie credit of those instigating them, and 
political defeat followed, so this later demonstration among a 
people fully alive to the merits of both parties, and having in 
addition a local pride in sustaining the exalted character of 
Hopkins, was listened to by them with a courteous deference, 
though they personally disapproved of it, and considered it 
the emanation of a mind nettled by the thought that the 
memory of Ho})kins was more highly appreciated than that 
of his opponent.* 

An impetus was given to the settlement of the western part 
of early Providence by a division of the land among the heirs 
and assigns of the original proprietors, and many found new 
homes in that region. Among these were many of the 
Hopkinses. 

The second Thomas, who died in 1718, left a family of eight 
sons and four daughters. Their original home was in Smitli- 

 Paper read before the R. I. His. Society by Col. John Ward, Dec. 2, 1880. 



16 ONE LINE OP THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

field, a little west of the Pawtucket or IJlackstone River. But 
as early as 1740 tlioj- had all migrated to Scituate, and there 
settled, and very many of their descendants yet cling to their 
Scituate and Foster homes, and are now numbered with the 
inhabitants of these ])laees. Stephen's parents and his own 
immediate family were among those who made this change of 
residence, and on the organization of the new town in 1731, 
they were there and ready to participate in <bc j)roceedings 
incident to its formation. 

Stephen, then at the age of twenty-four years, was the first 
town clerk, a position which he held for several years. 

He represented the town in the General Assembly for the 
years 1732, '33, '35, '86, '37, '38, and '41, after which wc find 
him a representative from his new home in Providence. 

It is not the purpose of the writer to follow the particulars 
of the career of this distinguished individual, for they are 
interwoven in the memories of all Rhode Islanders who are 
interested in the contemplation of noble character as shown 
in a long life of eminent service in their behalf.* 

John Adams, who was associated with him in Congress, 
speaks of him thus : " The pleasantest part of the labors for 
the four years I spent in Congress, from 1774 to 1778, was in 
the Committee on Naval AiBfairs. Mr. Leo and Mr. Gadsden 



• For » ilffnllnd nr^cniint of the public Hfc of Oovcmor Hnpkin)<, the reader is 
iiiti'l HMorical Tract, AV». 0, published by Sidney S. Rider. 



ONE LINE OP THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 17 

were sensible moii aiul very cliccrful, Iml, (iov. Hopkins, of 
Rhode Island, al)ov(! seventy years of age, kept us all alivt;. 
Upon business, liis experience and judgment were very use- 
ful, l^ut wlien the business of the evening was over, he kept 
us in convcrsation''till eleven and sometimes twelve o'clock. 
His custom was to drink notliing all day until eight in th<' 
evening, then his beverage was Jamaica spirits and water. \t 
gave him wit, humor, anecdotes, science and learning. He 
had read Greek, Roman and British history, and was familiar 
with English poetry, particularly Pope, Thompson, and Mil- 
ton, and the flow of his soul made all of liis reading our own, 
and seemed to bring in recollection in all of us all we had ever 
read. . . . Hopkins never drank to excess, but all he 
drank w^as immediately not only converted into wit, sense, 
knowledge and good humor, but inspired us all with similar 
qualities." 

The Governor married for his first wife, Oct. 9, 1726, 
Sarah, daughter of Sylvanus and Joanna (Jcnckes)' Scott. 
She was born June 25, 1707, and died Sept. 9, 1753. Her 
grandfather was John Scott, son of Richard, who is said to 
have been the first Quaker that settled in Providence. For a 
second wife he married, Jan. 2, 1755, Anne, widow of Benja- 
min Smith, and daughter of a Benjamin Smith, father and 
husband bearing the same name. By her first husband, Anne 
^ had four children, one of wdiom, Benjamin, born Oct. 14,1744, 



18 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

was the father of thirteen chiMrcii. Thi' home of this last 
Benjamin was at Quinsnaket, in the Arnold neighborhood, in 
what is now the town of Lincoln. Stephen Hopkins Smith, 
long and favorably known as a man of ])rominencc in vaiious 
manufacturing and other industries, was of this family. lie 
was a man of pleasing address, gentlemanly beai'ing, and 
much interested in promoting imi»rovements in methods of 
agriculture and horticulture. Rural excursionists seeking rec- 
reation at Goldfish I'ond (formerly known as Swan Pond), 
near his old home, were indebted to him for the improve- 
ment of its wild scenery by embellishments attractive and 
instructive. 

The children of Stephen Hopkins and his wife Sarah, were : 

15. I. RuFCs", b. in Cranston, Feb. 10, 1727 ; d. in Scitualc, 

Nov. 13, 1812. 

IC. II. JoHN^ b. Nov. C, 1728 ; d. July 20, 1753. 

17. III. RL•Tn^ b. Oct. 3, 1781 ; d. April 2, 1735. 

18. IV. LYDIA^ b. Jan. 0, 1733 ; d. June 29, 1793. 

19. V. SiLVANU-"'. b. Oct. 19, 1734 ; d. April 23, 1753.- 

20. VT. SimonS b. Aug. 2G, 1736 ; d. April 2, 1744. 

21. VII. Georgk\ b. Jan. 11, 1739 ; d. — 1775. 

(7.) RL'Jb'US'. ijittle is known of this son of William 
and Ruth. He was living at the time Maj. William, his 
grandfather, died, in 172:% and was legatee of a small bequest 



ONK LINIO OF TFIK HOPKINS FAMILY. 19 

from his estate. This is known to have been in possession of 
his brother William at a later date, and lio jtrobably died 
young. 

It may be well to state hero that no records found give the 
dates of birth of Rufus, John, Samuel, Abigail, or Susanna, 
children of William and Ruth, l)ut approximate dates in 
the case of a part are made out from grave-stone ins(3rip- 
tioiis, where date of death is given with years of age. In 
others, not thus ascertained, their position in tlie table may 
not be correctly given. 

(8.) Capt. JOHN HOPKINS*, son of William and Ruth, 
and brother of the Governor, married Catherine, daughter of 
the second William Turpin, who died wliile holding the office 
of town treasurer of Providence, March 15, 1744. He (John) 
died at sea, Feb. 1, 1745, and left his widow with three 
young daughters as follows : 

22. I. RuTH^ b. — ; d. — . 

23. II. SARAH^ b. — ; d. Oct. 14, 1818. 

24. HI. Anna% b. — ; d. Dec. 26, 1823. 

Catherine administered upon liis estate, and the inventory 
of his personal property showed a value of 1,938 pounds;, 5 
shillings, 6 pence. She subsequently married Dr. Job Haw- 
kins, and died Dec. 30, 1749, aged 30 years, 2 months, and 5 
days. 



20 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

(9.) Capt. SAMUEL IIOPKIXS*, son of William and 
Ruth, died at Hispaniola, in the month of September, 1744, 
probably unmarried. His brother Stephen administered ui»on 
Ills estate, and the inventory of liis personal property repre- 
sented a value of 548 pounds, 9 shillings. Nothing further 
is known of him by the writer. 

(10.) HOPE HOrivIXSS daughter of AYilliam and Ruth, 
married first, July 8, 1736, Henry Harris, son of Henry, son 
of Thomas, son of Thomas, the first of the name in Providence, 
and had by him : 

CHILDREN. 

L!/dia\ b. 1788 ; d. Nov. 6, 1822. 

liuth', b. April 2, 1740; d. Sept. 16, 1820. 

Sarah', b. Dec. 7, 1742 ; d. Dec. 8, 1824. 

Snsannah\ h. Oct. 28, 1744; d. April 29, 1824. 

IIo])e; b. May 29, 1746 ; d. Nov. or Dec., 1799. 
Henry Harris died Aug. G, 174G, and Hope mar- 
ried for her second husband, Sept. 5, 1752, Dr. 
Job Hawkhis, whose first wife was the widow of 
her brother John. 

CHILDREN, 

30. VI. Catherine', b. May 17, 17o3. 

31. VH. Henry Harris', b. Feb. 20, 1755. 

32. VHI. Mefietable', b. Feb. 22, 1757 ; d. Feb. 14, 1795. 



25. 


I. 


26. 


II. 


27. 


HI. 


28. 


IV. 


29. 


V. 



ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 21 

Little lias been gleaned from the records relative to Henry 
Harris, the first husband of Hope, but that he was a man much 
appreciated is evident from the fact that 'numerous collateral 
branches of the family had sons that bore his name to perpet- 
uate his memory. 

Of Hope's daughters (-5), Lydia-"^ married Cai)t. Joseph 
Tillinghast, sou of Capt. Jonathan, of Newport, and had one son, 
Henry Harris, who died Feb. 21, 1782, in his twentieth year. 

(26.) Ruth>'> married, in February, 17G5, Job Smith, son of 
Daniel and Dorcas (Harris) Smith, a lineal descendant of 
John Smith, the miller. He was born Sept. 24, 173G, and 
died Aug. 15, 1818. They had nine children, among whom 
was Col. Henry Smith, who married, Oct. 19, 1799,Abbie 
Crawford Allen, daughter of Zachariah. Plenry Smith built 
the Duncan house on Smith's Hill, now (1881) owned by Al- 
bert W. Smith. He died June 28, 1818, aged 52 years, and 
his widow, Sept. 25, 1855, aged 79 years. 

Benjamin Smith was another son of Job and Ruth. His 
home was in the brick end house on Davis Street, Smith's 
Hill, where he died Dec. 29, 1824, aged 56 years. He mar- 
ried Frances Fosdick, daughter of his aunt Mehetable, who 
died Dec. 23, 1834, aged 53 years. They had Albert T. F., 
Benjamin F., Frederick H., and Adeline. They have all 
passed away, Adeline, who married Abner Cay, Jr., being the 
last to survive. 



22 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

(27.) Sarali^, the third child of Hope, married, Oct 2, 
1768, her cousin, John B. fTopkiiis, the eldest son of Commo- 
dore Esek, and died without issue. 

(28.) Susamiir', tiu; fourth child of Hope, married, Dec. 
26, 1772, Capt. Joseph Cooke, sou of Gov. Nicholas Cooke. 
She probably died without issue. 

(29.) Hope'', the fifth child of Henry, and Hope Harris, 
married, Nov. 9, 1771, Cul. William Wall. He was one of the 
nine Providence men who embarked in the enterprise of 
founding the city of Hudson, on the North River, in 1783. 
He probably did not long continue a resident of Hudson, as 
he died at Genesee in July, 1803, his wife having previously 
(leceasod at Savannah, Ga., in 1799. 

(32.) Mehetable-^, the eighth and youngest child of Hope 
and her husband Job, married, in January, 1781, Maj. Thomas 
Fosdick. They settled in Portland, Me., where Mehetable 
died in 1794, and Thomas in 1801. They had Thomas, who 
fliod in 1803, aged 21 years; Frances, before mentioned as 
marrying hercousin Benjamin Smith, and James W., who .set- 
tled iu Providence and married first. May 1, 1814, Abigail, 
daughter of Dr. Ephraim Coinstock, and second, Jan. 27, 
1818, Maria, dauglitcr of Edward Thurber. James W. is 
remembered by the writer as comman«ler of the first military 
parade he ever witnessed, in front of the first district school- 



ONE LINE OF TIIR HOPKINS FAMILY. 23 

house at the nortli end, in rrovideucc, aljout the year 1810. 
He was a man of small stature, "with a florid ('omplexion, fiuo 
form, f>:raccful movement, and of a true soldierly boarinj^. He 
died with a rdative of his first wife, in Smithfiold, July 21, 
1864, aged 73 years. 

Hope"* died, as before noted, July 20, 1803, and was buried 
in Johnston, Avhich had probably been her home throughout 
her married life. The following epitaph, copied from her 
grave-stone, is here inserted to show the laudatory character 
of the eulogies of that period, prompted by the demise of a 
good woman. 

" Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Hope Hawkins, wife of the 
late Doct. Job Hawkins, and sister of the renowned statesman 
and patriot, Stephen Hopkins. She departed this life the 20th 
of July, 1803, aged 8G years, 4 months, and G days. 

" This remarkable lady was laudably attentive to practical 
virtue, and by being ever tenderly moved by the calls of social 
nature, she administered, within her sphere, succor and com- 
fort when they were most needed. She posses-sexl capacious 
powers oi" mind, enriched by study, experience and acute 
observation, and with cheerfulness of temi)er her magnanim- 
ity of soul displayed itself amid the various trying scenes of 
her protracted life. 

" Faith, Hope, Patience and Charity having been her chosen 
company, the Peace of God which passeth all understanding 



24 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

appeared divinely bright to attend her fleeting spirit out of 
time into eternity. 

" .*^afe are you lodged above these rolling spheres, the bale- 
ful influence of whose giddy dance shr<ls snd vicissitude on 
all around." 

(11.) Com. ESEK HOPKINS*, son of William and Ruth, 
early entered upon a sea-going life, and attained to an honor- 
able distinction in his chosen profession. 

He married, Nov. 28, 1741, Desire, daughter of Ezekiel 
Burroughs, of Newport, and making his home there, sailed in 
command of various vessels until 1755, when he abandoned 
the sea, and removed to Providence to engage in mercantile 
pursuits. He subsequently resumed his old profession, and 
at the outbreak of the Revolution engaged heart and soul with 
bis patriotic compeers in promoting the cause of liberty. The 
following synopsis of his career in the navy, and iji other 
stations, is mostly copied from Arnold's Tlulory of Rhode 
Island : 

"August, 1775, he was appointed commander of the garri- 
son at Fox Point, in Providence, on a threatened attack by 
British shijis. In October of the same year he Avas appointed 
to the command of a force of GOO men for special service to 
rcjtel a force from the British fleet on a foraging cxpcdilion 
to the islands of Rhode Island in (juest of live stock. 



h 






ONE LINE OP THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 25 

'' Later ill tlic same month lie was appointcl witli Joadph 
Brown, to go through tlic colony and decide what places 
should be fortified, and in what manner. 

"Oct. 4,1775, he was commissioned brigadier Ijy Gov. Nich- 
olas Cooke. Dec. 22, 1775, he was confirmed by Congress 
commander of the first naval fleet organized and equipped by 
the colonies. He sailed from Delaware Bay Feb. 17, 1776, 
made a descent on New Providence March 3, and captured 
the forts with a large amount of military stores and upwards 
of 100 cannon, with which he sailed for New England. 

" April 4, ho captured the British schooner ' Hawke,' of six 
guns, Captain Wallace, and on the 5th, the boml3-l)rig ' Bol- 
ton,' of eight guns. On the 6th, he engaged the frigate 
' Glasgow,' of twenty guns, and after an action of three hours 
she escaped into Newport under protection of the British 
squadron. 

" He was censured by Congress for not following literally his 
instructions on his southern cruise, and although his whole 
career as commandant reflected honor to himself and glory 
to the navy, his enemies finally succeeded in procuring his 
discharge from the service, which was finally accomplished 
Jan. 2, 1778." 

From long experience as commander in the merchant ma- 
rine, where the exercise of autocratic power was deemed 
indispensable, he was not well fitted to brook the restraint 



26 ONE LINE or TRP HOPKINS FAMILY. 

imposed upon liim l)y his new position; and his own judg- 
ment niled his action when in the service of tlie government, 
regardless of its effect upon the opinions of others. Ilence 
the liostility to him witli tho result named. 

The records show that after his retirement from the navy 
he was constantly engaged in duties of a ]»ultlic nature, and 
no lukewarmness to the cause of his country during her peril 
resulted from the action of the government in displacing him. 
The heart of a Benedict Arnold did not palpitate in his breast, 
but strong devotion to the welfare of his country was ever 
manifested in his public and private life. 

ITis success in his early calling had resulted in a compe- 
tency, and on his removal to Providence he invested exten- 
sively in real estate, and with a provident management of his 
resources, he was enabled to i»rovidc for his large family 
without encroaching upon his acquired capital. Jlis Provi- 
dence home yet stands on the outskirts of the city, and is 
owned bv his descendants. 

Tiio children of Esck and Desire were : 

John BiRUOUGHS', b. Aug. 25, 1742 ; d. Dee. 5, 179G. 
Hkakt', b. Sept. 1, 1714; d. July 11, 1825. 
AniGAii/, b. Oct. 25, 174G ; d. April 25, 1821. 
Samuel*, b. Feb. 10, 1748; d. Sept. 22, 1750. 
AM^.Y^ b. Jan. 2G, 1751 ; d. Dec. — , 1825. 
Stei'IIRnS b. March 6, 1753 : d. July 3, 17fil. 



33. 


I. 


34. 


II. 


35. 


III. 


3C. 


IV. 


37. 


\ . 


3S. 


VI. 



ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS TAMILY, 27 

39. VII. Susannas b. May 10, 170G ; d. — . 

40. VIH. Eskk', b. June 0, 17.'>8 ; d. — 1777. 

41. IX. SamuklS 1). — ; cl. Dec. — , 1782. 

42. X. Uesiki/', b. May 17, 1704 ; d. May 20, 1843. 

(12.) ABIGAILS daughter uf William and Ruth, mar- 
ried Nathan Angell, son of Joseph, son of James, son of 
Thomas, one of the first settlers of Providence. 

CHILOKEN. 

43. I. NathanieL^. 

44. II. Stisanna^. 

45. III. Rosabella^, mar. Samuel Chase, Jr. 

46. IV. Samuel^: 

47. V. Sarah^, mar. Col. Ephraim Bowen. 

48. VI. Abigail^. 

49. VII, iV«i7ia??.^ married, Oct. 14, 1787, Amy Kinnicutt, and 

was father of Joseph K. Angell", distinguished 
for his logal attainments, and author of several 
valuable works pertaining to his profession, on 
which high encomiums were bestowed by some of 
the most eminent jurists of the country. 

(13.) SUSANNAS the yonngest child of William and 
Ruth, died unmarried at 17 years of age. Her grave, with 
inscribed headstone, is in the buiying-ground with that of her 
aunt Hope, in Johnston, and she was probably a member of 
her family at the time of her decease. 



28 ONi: usL uF THE iiorwiNs family. 

(14.; CvPT. CnillSTOPriERS son of Col. William* and 
Sarah, followed the example set. bv his father and most of his 
uneles, by adopting a sea-faring life. He married, May 8, 
1750, Sarah, daughter of Jndtr,. Daniel and Joanna (Scott) 
Jenckes. 

CHILDREN. 

50. I. Danikl", b. — ; d. ^Nlay 12. 181.'). in bis sixty-sixth 

yeav. 
."•1. If. .ToakxaG, b. — : (1. Xnv. 21. 182;i in lior sixlv- 
fourth year. 
_. HI. Sallys, b. —; d. 1792. 
''" IV. Chkistoi'her", b. — ; d. — . 

.. V. WiLLLVM^, b. — ; d. — . 
.-(;. VT, r»> 1.1 .-", 1, • ,1. . 

Liui.siopiiLT s "s\ idow married for a second husband, in No- 
vember, 1772, Ambrose Page. She died July 23, 1812, aged 
79 years. 

(15.) RuFUS'^, the eldest son of Gov. Stephen, early en- 
tered upon the activities of a busy life, and was prominent 
in promoting industries instituted to develop the resources of 
his native state. Uis early manhood was spent in maritime 
pursuits, in wliich he attained a high rank as a nautical C'»m- 
raauder. The public life of his father afforded opportunities 



ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 29 

for his advancement in political knowledge, and many years 
of his life were devoted (o the service of his town and state. 

He filled various positions of trust in the management of 
affairs eonneeted with the Revolutionary period, was for sev- 
eral years a judge of the Court of Common Pleas for Provi- 
dence County, and for a season justice of the Superior Court 
of the State ; repeatedly elected to represent Scituate in the 
General Assembly ; and a trustee of Brown University from 
1782 until his decease. About the year 17G6 he was associ- 
ated with his fatlier and Messrs. Nicholas, Joseph, John, and 
Moses Brown and Jabez Bowen, in a project to utilize a bed 
of iron ore found in Cranston, and the building of Hope Fur- 
nace soon followed, in which was cast, among other articles, 
cannon for use in the army during our struggle for independ- 
ence. 

Tlie bell now in use in the steeple of the First Baptist 
Church, in Providence, was broken in 1787, and recast at the 
Hope Furnace. The furnace was located in Scituate, several 
miles from the bed of ore, and ox teams w^ere used to con- 
vey the ore to the furnace. Rufus Hopkins was the manag- 
ing man of the concern. 

He married first, Oct. 13, 1747, Abigail, daughter of John 
Angell, who died July 21, 1758, aged 27 years, 11 days ; and 
second, Xov. 11, 17^9, Sarah, daughter of Capt. Joseph Olney, 
and sister of Col. Jeremiah Olney. She was born March 31, 
1732, and died Oct. 2, 1785. 



67. 


I. 


/iS. 


11. 


.':'. 


TIT 


GO. 


IV. 


r.i. 


V. 


G2. 


VI 


63. 


VI] 



30 ONK LINE OF THK HOPKINS FAMILY. 

cnir.DUKN. 
Bij ftrat icife. 
John", b. Oct. 11, 1750; d. Sept. -ia?.)!. 
A daugiitek", b. and d. April o, 1753. 
SiLVAKus^, b. Sept. 17, 17o<; ; d. Aug. 21, 17j7. 

JBy second wife. 

Stephen", b. Jan. 1, 17G2; d. June 1. 18;J(). 
SiLVANUS% b. June 25, HG-l ; d. Aug. 18, 1821. 
RuFus«, b. Nov. 15, 1771 ; d. Aug. 29, 1773. 
VII. Joseph OlnetC, b. March 20, 1774, d. Jan. 5, 1792. 

(16.) Capt. JOHN HOPKINS-^the second son of Gov. 
Stephen, true to the instincts of the family, adopted a sea-far- 
ing life, which seemed at that time to afford the best opportu- 
nities for advancement in worldly interests, and included in 
its profession the noblest and most talented specimens of the 
race. lie was master of a sloop called the" Two Brothers," 
and sailed for Cadiz, Spain, Aug. 3, 1751, and while engaged 
in coasting from port to port was taken sick with small-pox, 
at St. Andcro, where he died July 20, 1753, aged 24 years, 8 
months, and 3 days. 

lie married ]^rnry, daughter of Robert and Amey Gibbs. 

• 1Iannah\ b. July -'1, i 750 ; d. Feb. H, 181G. 



ONE t.TNr OF TiiK iiorKiN? rA:\iir.Y. 81 

(18.) LYDi A''', tlio fourtli cliild of Gov. Steplicn, was bom 
in Scitiiatc. Slic married, June 5, 1703, as his second wife, 
Col. Daniel Tillinglia.st, son of Cai)t. Joscj)li Tiilinghast, a 
native of Newport, R. I. He was born June 2, 1732, and 
died in Uxbridge, Mass., 8ep1. 18, 180G. Jle was a prominent 
citizen of Providence, liis adopted home ; engaged extensively 
in the distillery business, and was for a long time colonel of the 
Providence Artillery Company. 

CHILURKN. 

G5. I. aeorrje\ b. Nov. 10, 176-1 ; d. — . 

GG. II. John\ b. Jan. 2, 17GG ; d. — . 

G7. III. Steplien\ b. Sept. 17, 17C8 ; d. Feb. 10, 1841. At 

one time city treasurer of Providence. 
G8. IV. Sarah Scoft\ b. April 2, 1771 ; d. Jan. 24, 1783. 
C9. V. Silvanu!i\ b. July 19, 1772; d. — . 

James Tillinghast, a prominent lawyer of Providence, is a 
great-grandson of Daniel and Lydia, through (67) Stephen 
and Charles F. Tillinghast. 

(19.) SILVANUS5, the fifth child of the Governor, was 
born in Scituatc, and almost as a matter of course early 
entered the line of the family profession, and at the age of 
eighteen years, had advanced to the position of second-in- 
command of a vessel that was wrecked on the shore of Cape 
Breton. The crew attempted to reach Louisburg in a small 



32 ^'^-T- T7Vr '^r THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

schooner, and while jiassing the island of iSt. Peter's were sur- 
prised by a great number of Indians, in canoes, captured, 
taken on shore, and barbarously murdered. 

Tlic year 1753 was a trying crisis in the life of Governor 
Hopkins. Within a period of si.\ months he was called upon 
to part with two sons in the early prime of their manhood, 
when their prospects for a cicditable career of usefulness 
were of the most flattering character, and the companion of 
his early joys and sorrows. The circumstancos of the death 
of the sons were such as to intensify his grief for their loss. 
John, dying in a Catholic country and being a Protestant, his 
remains were refused a Christian burial, and no greater mis- 
fortune could befall a parent than to have a knowledge of 
the horrible torture and death of Silvanus. His wife, stricken 
by protracted disease, aggravated by mental prostration in- 
duced by her sad family bereavements, died by her own hand, 
thus filling to overflowing his cup of sorrow. But in the lan- 
guage of another, " the storm at length passed by, and bowed 
but not broken by its flinsfoniivs. he again rrsnmpd his duties 
as a j'n''!''' nfVt<-i-'y." 

(21.^ APT. GIilORGE U0PKINS5, the youngest ciiild of 
the CJovenior, it seems almost suj)erfluous to state, was a sea- 
faring man. and was early engaged in <lutic's of n rt'sponsi- 
ble nature. R. I. Cohnial Records, vol. vi., page 7, gives the 



ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS PAMFLY. 33 



*. 



following: " Tlu; Assembly do vote mid resolve, mid it is voted 
and resolved that 200 |»oimds he allowed and paid out of 
the general treasury unto Mr. George Hopkins, for his time, 
trouble, and expense in going to and fetching from New 
York the silver and gold granted by His Majesty to this 
colony." 

This service must have been performed by George befoi'c 
he was eighteen years old, as the resolve passed at the Janu- 
ary session iu 1757 and his eighteenth birth-day occurred 
January 22 of the same year. 

He was master of a vessel that sailed from Providence for 
Surinam Nov. 20, 1774, and on the return voyage stopi)ed at 
Charleston, S. C, and sailing thence for Providence Aug. 25, 
1775, was never afterwards heard from. 

He married, March 14, 1773, lluth Smith, a daugliter of 
his father's second w^ife by her first husband, Benjamiu 
Smith. She survived, until March 25, 1812, and died at the 
age of 6G years and 6 months. They had no issue. (See 
appendix.) 

(23.) SARAH^, daughter of (8) John and Catherine, mar- 
ried, Aug. 2, 1761, Abraham Whipple, who was born hi Provi- 
dence Sept. 26, 1733. He commanded the expedition that 
went from Providence on the evening of June 9, 1772, to 
burn the British schooner '' Gaspee,'' then aground on Namquit 
Point. 



34 ONE LINE OP THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

After a distiDguislied career in tlie service of his country 

as commodore in tlie American navy, he removed to Marietta, 

Ohio, in 179^), wliere he died I^Iay 29, 1819, having survived 

his wife, who deceased Oct. 14 of the previous year, aged 

78 years. 

cun.nRF.N. ' 

70. I. Juifi/, married, in April, 1781, Lieut-Colonel Sproat, 

of the Massachusetts line. 

71. IT. /"'j///. married, in July, 1789, Dr. Ezekiel Comstock', 

of Smithficld. 

(24.) ANNA HOPKINS^, sister of the preceding, mar- 
ried first, Dec. 13, 1761, William Metcalf, and second, Esck 
Esten. 

CHILDREN. 

By first hnshand, 

72. T. A danrjhtei^, -who married Alfred Mann, and had, 

among other children, "William Metcalf Mann", who 
was one of the editors of tbe Providence Ameri- 
can^ and died ]March 2,1817. in his twenty-third 
year. 

By second hnshand. 
1?, John'', b. April 24, 177;"i ; d. July 7, 1782. 

74. III. Rphecca\ b. Nov. 12, 1776 ; d. Nov. 30, 1850. 

75. IV. EseK*, b. Dec. 27, 1778 ; d. Jan. 11, 1779. 

7G. V. Esel<^,h. Dec. M, 1779; d. May 21, 1842; married, 
Sept. 14, IHOO, Sarah, daiightor of Benjamin 



77. 


VI. 


78. 


VII. 


79. 


VIII 


80. 


IX. 



ONE LrNIO OF THI-J HOl'KINS FAMILY. 35 

Jciiks. She was born (Jet. o, 17M2, auil died 
April 21), I810. 

CiiiLDUKN : Stephen, Jnlia Ann, Henry, Thomas, 
George W., .laines F., AVilliani W, ('ornelius, 
Sarah J., Eliza, Stepiien B., and a .second Jnlia 
Ann. 
.1 Oavrjhler\ b. Nov. 0, 1781 ; d. Dec. 1, 1781. 
Hem'}/, b. Oct. 22, 1782 ; d. Nov. 12, 1801. 
Catherine^, b. July 8, 1784 ; d. Jan. — , 1S4G. 

Jo/m«, b. May 21, 1786 ; d. June 11, ; married 

Emeline , and had Nancy, Frances, John, 

Stephen, and Alonzo. 

(33.) Capt. JOHN B. IIOFKINSs the eldest son of 
Com. Esek, commanded one of the boats engaged to convey 
the parties who captured and destroyed the " Gaspee" off Paw- 
tuxet on the evening of June 9, 1772, before alhided to. He 
followed up this exploit by services of a naval character dur- 
ing the revolutionary period, as is attested by the records 
from which we quote : 

" He commanded the ' Cabot ' of 14 guns, in the fleet with 
his father, the Commodore, and was severely wounded in the 
action with the ' Glasgow,' previously referred to. June 8, 
1776, he was appointed to the command of the frigate ' War- 
ren,' and sailed from Providence on a cruise Feb. 16, 1778, 
and on the 16th day of April, just two months later, arrived in 



30 ONE LINE OF TfTE nOPKIX^ FAMILY. 

Boston with the ' Queen of France,' Capt. Joseph Olncy, and 
the 'Ranger,' Capt. Simpson. These ships had sailed under 
Capt. Hopkins as senior oflicer, and liad captured a fleet of 
seven British vessels, one a twentj-frun ship, and .six transports 
with valuable stores, and twenty-four British officers, bound 
for Georgia. The value of the captured stores was estimated 
at four hundred thousand dollars. Tliis successful cruise 
gave great joy to the people." 

He morried, Oct. 2, 176S, his cousin, Sarah Harris, from 
which union there was no issue.-^ 

(^34.) HEARTS the second child of Esek and Desire, 
never married, but lived in her father's family until his 
decease, then with her sister Desire until July 11. 1825, when 
she died, in her eighty-fir-t ronr. 

(35.) ABIGAIL-^, third child of the Commodore, married 
Joseph Hawkins, of North Providence. 

CllILUUK.N. 

81. I. i^am//', married first, Charles Leonard, second 

^Vilbur. 

82. J I. 6'a.'jan?ia'', married Nehemiah .SUcldon, and died in 

May, 1807, inlier thirty-third year. 
H'.i. III. -Vary*, married, in August, IT'Jo, Elhanan Martin, of 
Troy, N. V., a native ofllchoboth, Mass. He 
died in Trov, July, 180«j, aud was buried in the 



UNK LINI'} OF TIIK HOPKINS FAMILY. 37 



b^ 



liimily burying-jTi'oiiud in RclioViotlj. Ili.s widow 
returned witli lior family to Rhode Island, and 
died in I'lovidence, Aug. 31, 1855, in lier 
eightieth year. 

CjnM>RKN : Ksek II., Leiiaion, Abby Ann, 
Maiy, and Elhanan. 

84. IV. Desire\ d. Aug. 25, ,1809, in lier tliirtytliird year, 

85. V. Jlenr^f, married, Oct. 1, 1804, Mary ArnoUl. 

8G. VI. Ameif, married, July 12, 1806, Peyton K. Leonard. 

87. VII. Esck lIopkins\ 

88. VIII. Joseph B.\ married, July 2, 1814, Harriet Angell, 

daughter of Benjamin. 
80. IX. Harriett 

(37.) AMEY5,the litth child of Esek and Desire, mar- 
ried first, in 1777, Dr. John Clarke. 

CHILDREN. 

90. I. Stephen HojiMns^ b. 1777 ; d. Nov. 2, 1795. 

01. II. John Hojykins^, b. April 1, 1780 ; d. Nov. 28, 1870. 
Married second, in October, 1797, Judge John 
Dorrance, who died June 29, 1813, in his sixt}'- 
sixth year. He was a graduate of Brown Uni- 
versity in the class of 1774, and afterwards a 
tutor in that institution. 

Dr. Clarke was a resident of New Jersey, and came to 
Rhode Island in 1777, in connection with Dr. John Barnett, 



38 ONE LINK OF TUK IIOF'KINS FAMILY. 

to superintend the arrangement of a sraall-pox liospital in 
Nortli Providence. During liis stay licre ho became acquainted 
with and marriod Amey. He sub-sefjuently returned to Eliza- 
bethtown, N. J., wlierc lie died April 27, 1794, leaving his 
widow and two sons, with whom she returned to her father's 
home in North Providence. Her son Stephen died at eighteen 
jfoars of age, but John H. lived to be eighty-one years old, and 
was prominent in the business and political affairs of Rhode 
Island. He represented the city of Providence in the State 
Ijcgislature for several years, and the State in the United 
States Senate for the term commencing March 4, 1847. In 
personal appearance it is said he bore a striking resemblance 
to his grandfather, the Commodore, which he seemed to 
realize, and amplify by certain peculiarities in dress. 

(39.) SUSANNA^, seventh child of the Commodore, mar- 
ried, in August, 1791, the Rev. Dr. Jonathan Maxey. 

ciiiLnnEN. 
92. 1. Cornelia MANNr>f<j®, 1). June 11, 1702; married, 
Jan. 18, 1814, James Gregg, of Columl)ia, S. C. 
0.3. II. Amky Hopkins', b. May 1, 1794. 
91. HI. Desire liiimouons', b. Feb. 19, 1796. 

95. IV. Ki^K Hopkins", b. May IG, 1799. 

96. V. Stephen IIopkin.s% b. Feb. 16, 1801. 

97. VI. Jonathan*, who was an attorney at law, and died at 

Autauga County, Alabama, Nov. 19, 1823. 



ONK LINE OP THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 39 

d8. VII. ViuGii>, who was killed by the explosion of the great 
gun on board the U. S. steamship "Princeton," 
when on an excursion trial trip on the Potomao 
River, Feb. 28, 1844. The Hon. Abel P. Up- 
shur, Secretary of the Navy, met his death by the 
same catastrophe. President Tyler was one of 
the company on board, but escaped injury, 

Pr. Maxey was born in Attleboro, Mass., Sept. 2, 1768, and 
entered as a student in Brown University, graduating in 
the class of 1787. He became a tutor in the University, 
which position he held until 1791, when he was elected pastor^ 
of the First Baptist Church in Providence. 

In 1792 he was elected to the presidency of the college, and 
continued to hold the appointment until 1802, when he re- 
signed, to accept the presidency of Union College, at Schen- 
ectady, N. Y., and remained there until 1804, when he was 
invited to take the presidency of South Carolina College, 
which he accepted, one prompting motive to his decision 
being that the warmer climate would be conducive to his 
health, his physical condition seeming to require tlic cliange. 

He retained the presidency of this last institution until his 
decease, which occurred at Columbia, June 4, 1820, at the age 
of 51 years, 9 months, and 2 days. 

Dr. Maxey was almost universally popular in every condi- 
tion of society in whicli he was placed. 



40 ONE LINE OF Tur nnPRINS FAMILY. 

The exceptions were from narrow-uiindeJ and bigoted peo- 
ple who were unable to appreciate a noble and generous 
nature. The most marked of these cases was shown in an 
opiMisition to his appointment to the presidency of Union 
College on account of the alleged " unsoundness of his theo- 
logical views/' and a quotation from his sermon preached on 
the death of President Manning was given in support of the 
accusation. It was as follows : 

" The only thing essential to christian union is love or 
benevolent aflfQction. Hence it is with me a fixed principle 
to censure no man except for immorality. A diversity of 
religious opinions, in a state so imperfect, obscure, and sinful 
as the present, is to be expected. An entire coincidence of 
sentiment, even in important doctrines, is by no means essen- 
tial to christian society, or the attainment of eternal felicity. 
How many are they, who appear to havo been subjects of 
regeneration, who have scarcely an entire comprehensive view 
of one doctrine of the Bible? Will the gates of paradise be 
barred against these because they did not have the penetrating 
sagacity of an Edwards or a Hoi)kins ? Or shall these great 
theologian champions engross Heaven and shout hallelujahs 
from its walls, while a Priestly, a Price, and a Winchester, 
merely for a difference of ojMnion, though pre-eminent in vir- 
tue, must sink into the regions of darkness and pain?" All 
lionor to the man who, with strong religious convictions of his 



ONE LTNR OP TIIH IIOPKINH FAMILY, 41 

own, woi'lil promulgate such liljcral seiitiinonts, regardless of 
the assaults induced by bij^otry and intolerance. Shade of 
Roffer Williams sustain sucli. 



'C3^ 



(40.) ESEK HOPKINS, Ju.% the eighth child of the Com- 
modore, graduated at Brown University in the class of 1775, 
at the age of seventeen years. Very little information con- 
cerning him has been gathered, and that little is somewhat 
confused in the matter of dates. Arnold, in his Ilislonj of 
Rhode Island^ vol. ii., p. 441, says of him : " In July, 1779, he 
was in command of the privateer * Lively,' which vessel was 
previously a British Privateer of ten guns, taken by Col. Tal- 
bot in a small sloop called the ' Argo.' " Colonial Records, 
vol. viii., p. 335, notes that he was a prisoner of war at Hal- 
ifax, having been captured by a British force while acting as 
lieutenant on board the Providence sloop, and at the Decem- 
ber term of the General Assembly in 1777, a resolve was 
passed that " Major-General Spencer be requested to suffer 
and permit Lieutenant Otway, who was captured by tlie 
State's forces with the British frigate 'Lark,' to be given up 
in order to redeem said Hopkins from captivity." 

Again, the triennial catalogue of Brown University has him 
starred as deceased in 1777. No record of his father's fam- 
ily seen by the writer (and several have been published) gives 
the date of his decease, and the most probable conjecture 



42 ONE LINE OF THE nOPKTNR FAMILY. 

that can be made in rep:ar(l to it is, that Arnold was in error 
in attribnting to liim tlie command of tlic " Lively" in 1779, 
and that he probably died at Halifax while a prisoner of war 
in 1777, before an exchange conld be made based upon the 
resolve passed by the General Assembly in December of that 
year. This assumption is strengthened l»y the fact that no 
grave-stone for him is seen in the family burying-ground, 
wliile the resting-place of the remains of all the other of the 
Commodore's sons, except Samuel, who died at sea, are thus 
identified. 

If his decease occurred in 1777, he died at the age of nine- 
teen years, and probably unmarried. 

(41.) SAMUEL^ the ninth child of Esek and Desire, is 
the only one the date of whose birth is not found in any 
record known to exist. His next elder l)rother, Esek, was 
born in 1758, and his sister, Desire, in 1764, his birth occur- 
ring between those dates. He married, in August, 1781, Zer- 
viah Charlotte Lindsey, daughter of Capt. Thomas* and 
Sarali (Field) Lindsey, and soon after embarked on a voyage 
in a brig commanded by Capt. Joseph Cooke, son of Governor 
Cooke, who married his cousin, Susanna Harris. On the 

•This Paptain Lindwy was i>robnbly the ono who wna ninstor of the slod]) 

" Hannah." an»l whf)«c maiifRiivcrinjf t« escape capture by the " Ga«pcc" resulted 

of his pursuer on Xnm'iuit Point, tlius phieinK her in position to 

1 Httcd out for her dcatniction, ln'fore alhuled to. Staplon' ilnmii? 

(flvr« the name as f'apt. lU'nJamin Lincls/»y, but Col. Htc. has it Capt. Thomas. 



ONE LINK Oi.' IMi: llol'KINS FAMILY. 43 



>^ 



return voyage the In-ig arrived in TJosfoii Jan. 5, 1783, but 
young ^lopkins was not one of licr crew. lie was lost over- 
board about a month previous, and all efforts to save him 
proved unavailing, lie left his young wife and infant daugh- 
ter to mourn his loss. 

CHILD. 

99. Sai{ah«, b.— ; d. Oct. 30, 18G0, aged iH 3 ears. 

His widow married for a second husband, Jan. 3, 1789, 
Calvin Wheaton, son of Comfort and Anne Wheaton, and 
third, Nov. 4, 1804, Capt. Samuel Staples. She died Oct. 26, 
1848, aged 88 years. 

(42.) DESIRE5, the tenth and youngest child of the 
Commodore, married first, in April, 1782, Joseph Augell, sou 
of James. By him she had one daughter. 

100. I. Eliza^, b. March 16, 1783 ; d. Oct. 12, 1860. 

The union was not a happ}' one, and after the 
birth of Eliza, Desire returned with her child to 
her father's house. A divorce followed this sep- 
aration, and July 23, 1791, she married Dr. Sam- 
uel Leonard, of Taunton, Mass., a graduate of 
Yale College in the class of 3 773, and a recip- 
ient of an honorary degree from Brown Univer- 
sity in 1791. By him she had two sons. 



44 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

101. II. Esek Samuel Ilopkins^^, b. Oct. 9, 1794 ; d. Dec. 19, 

1834. 

102. III. John Burroughs IlopJcins'^, b. Sept. 16, 1797; d. 

March 18, 1853. 

Mr. Leonard died in Taunton, Aug. 20, 1807, in his fifty- 
seventh year, and Desire agsiin returned t<^ the old homestead 
in North Providence with her family, and assumed control of 
the estate, her pn routs nnd V.rnHiors hnving previously passed 
away. 

Her sons botli graduated at Brown University in the class 
of 1814, and Esek S. XL, went into the apothecary Vjusiness, 
and located in the basement of the old Manufacturers' Hotel, 
fronting Market Square, in Providence, the site of Avhich is 
now covered by the What Cheer Building. He was always in 
delicate health, and went to Indian Key, East Florida, in hope 
of recu|)erating it in that more genial clime, where he died, 
and from whence his remains wer0» removed and interred in 
the North Burying-Ground. iji Pfbvidcnce. He was unmar- 
ried. 

John B. H. Leonard never married, but lived with his 
mother, and managed the homestead estate. 

He was a quiet, unobtrusivci^aan, and much respected in the 
community. A marble bust of liim, sculptured by a Provi- 
dence artist, George 0. Annal)lc, has recently been presented 



ONE LINIO OP Tilli: HOPKINS FAMILY. 45 

to the Rhode Island Historical S<M'i(>ty, which is an excellent 
likeness of the original. 

At the decease of his mother, the many acres of the 
homestead farm had greatly increased in valu(,', owing to its 
close proximity to large manufacturing establishments and 
the general spread of population, the fee of which rested in 
him and his half-sister Eliza, by inheritance. John also 
owned real estate in Taunton, inherited from his father. 
Both being childless, they made wills, each Ijequeathingtothe 
survivor their entire property. John died first, and Eliza, 
though possessed of a large fortune, like many others who 
never realized an actual want, conceived herself poor, and 
probably suffered as much from the impression as though it 
was an actual fact. She grew morose and fretful, and seemed 
to have no sympathy for any of her kindred. In her will, 
made subsequent to the death of John, she bequeathed to two 
Baptist churches her entire property, giving that part of it 
situated in Taunton to a church society there located, and the 
balance, situated mostly in North Providence, to the First, or 
Charitable Baptist Society, in Providence. She left many 
relatives who were deserving of consideration, but she ignored 
them all in the final disposal of her large wealth. Her extreme 
aversion to recognize them, prompted a united effort to render 
the will null and void, wdiieh, after three trials, was success- 
ful, the verdict of the jury resting upon the ground of the 



46 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

insanity of the testator. On the first two trials the jury were 
unable to agree. 

The writer cannot pass from the consideration of this fam- 
ily without bestowing a brief tribute to the memory of Desire 
Loonard. Being distantly allied in kinshiii, and cireum- 
stances requiring frequent visits to her home on errands of a 
character calculated to draw out the workings of a sympa- 
thetic heart, she was always found ready to respond \n a 
manner that proved the true inwardness of her being to be 
based upon love to all, and a desire lo ameliorate the condi- 
tion of the unfortunate and afflicted. The epitaph on the 
grave-stone of lier aunt Hope, prcviou.sly noted, in all its 
essential points would aptly apply to her character. 

As the decease of all of the Commodore's sons preceded 
his own, and all died without male issue, with his own demise 
the Hopkins name ceased to exist in this line, except for a 
brief period in the single instance of Sarah, the daughter of 
his .son Samuel, thus cutting off the perpetuity of this branch 
of the Hopkins family, though numerous descendants through 
marriage of his daughters are yet living in Rhode Island and 
ehsewhcre. 

(50.) DANIEL''', son of (14) Christopher and Sarah, was 
a farmer, and lived in North Providence, lie married, Sept. 
4, 1774, Susanna, daughter of John and Ruth Wilkinson. 
She died March 5, 1830, in her seventy-third year. 



ONE LINE OK THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 47 

( inM>lM.N. 

103. I. Dl.;aouAIl^ b. Dec. 28, 1775 ; d. Oct. 29, 18.'i4. 

104. II. CnRisTOi>iiEK',b. — , 1776 ; d. M:iv 10, 1H24, unmarried. 

105. III. WiLLiAM% b. .Iiine 30, 177'J; d. April 23. 1815. 

(51.) JOANNA«, second child of (14) Christopher and 
Sarah, married, in January, 1778, Nicholas Cooke, Jr., son of 
Governor Cooke. 

C11U.UIIKX. 

lOG. I. Sarah H.\ b. Oct. 7, 1778. 

107. II. mcholas\ b. Oct. 19, 1780; d. Nov. 15, 1851. 

108. III. Maria', b. Aug. 18, 1782; d. Oct. 9, 1783. 

109. IV. Jeremiah 0.% b. Jan. 30, 1784. 

110. V. Mary L.\ b. July 31, 1786 ; d. Jan. 23, 1787. 

111. VI. Daniel S.\ b. May 18, 1789. 

112. VII. John', b. Oct. 14, 1792; d. May 16, 1858. 

113. VIII. Abigail S.\ b. Oct. 9, 1795 ; d. Jan. 10, 1851. 

114. IX. William H.\ b. Feb. 14, 1798; d. Aug. 6, 1862, 

married, Aug. 31, 1825, Caroline, daughter of 
John Jenckes, of Smithfield. 

(52.) SAI.LYc^ third child of (14) Christopher and Sarah, 
married, Oct. 3, 1776, Daniel Smith, son of William and Abi- 
gail Smith. He was born April 9, 1757, and died April 29, 
1780. 



48 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

CHILDREN. 

115. I. AbiffaiP, b. Sept. 8, 1777, d. Ma}- 8, 1792. 

lie. II. William II.\ b. Sept. 16, 1778, d. May 22, 1834. 

(60.) STEPIIENc, fourth cliild of ^lo) Rnfus, resided in 
Providence. He married, Jan. 30, 1785, Mary, daugliter of 
Capt. William and Lydia Rodman. She died Feb. 22, 1849, 
aged 86 years. 

CHILDREN. 

117. 1. George', b. Nov. 21, 1785 ; d. March 5, 1796. - 

118. II. Ri-Fus", b. July 13, 1787 ; d. Nov. 5, 1787. - 

119. III. RuFus^ b. Aug. 15, 1788 ; d. Nov. 9, 1817. 

120. IV. William R.", b. Feb. 21, 1790 ; d. June 21, 1790. " 
121.' V. Lydia% b. July 2, 1791 ; d. Aug. 16, 1791. 

122. VI. Joseph R.", b. July 9, 1792 ; d. March 9, 1793. 

123. VII. Lydia", b. July 9, 1792 ; d. Nov. 28, 1793. 

124. VIII. John G.^ b. Feb. 21, 1794 ; d. March 21, 1875. 

125. IX. Sophia", b. Aug. 14, 1796 ; d. March 11, 1801. 

126. X. Mary E.', b. Nov. 11, 1798 ; d. Feb. 14, 1872. 

127. XI. Gkouge W.", b. Feb. 21, 1800 ; d. Sept. 24, 1800. 

128. XII. Harriet A.', b. Oct. 26, 1801 ; d. Feb. 22, 1879. - 

129. XIII. Stephen', b. April 25, 1803 ; d. Sept. 12, 1803. 

Of thi.-^ numerous family of thirteen cliildren, only four 
lived to mature age, and of the four, only John G. and Har- 
riet A. married and liad families. 



ONE LINE or THK MOPKfN^^ l'AMH,T. 49 

(61.) Col. 8iL\ANL.S ll(>rklNS% the littli cliiM of 
(15) Riifus, maiTU'd Mary, (hiiglitcr of Ctipt. Petor and Kliz- 
abelh (Gardner) Wantoiu lie was for many years a resi- 
dent of Scituate, and engaged in the mannfactnre of cotton 
goods. A respected citizen of Providence, whose residence 
during his youth and early manhood was in Scituate, speaks 
in the highest pi-aise of tlie character of tiie Colonel and his 
family. They were regarded as su.stalning an enviable posi- 
tion in society, which they were entitled to liy their courtonns 
deportment and unswerving integrity. 

About the year 1819, the family removed to Washington 
Village, Coventry, R. I., and Silvanus became cashier of the 
" Bank of Kent " there located. They subsequently removed 
to Norwich, Conn., where he died Aug. 18, 1824, and his 
widow the 28th of the same month, in her sixty-first yeai'. 

CHILDREN. 

130. I. Sarah Olney', b — ; d. June 1, 1821. in her twen- 

ty-ninth year. 

131. II. Joseph Olney"', b. Jan. 22, 1794 ; d. Dec. 1, 1841. 

132. III. William Waxton''. b. — : d. Nov. 24, 1821. n-zod 2r, 

3'ears. 

133. IV. Samuel Snow^ 1).— ; d. Oct. IG, 182G, aged 26 

years. 

134. V. Edward A.^ b. July 4, 1802 ; d. Sept. IG, 1836. 

135. VI. Georor Sn v^vr sM>. Dec. 3, 1804 ; d. Dec. 12, 18G3. 

7 



* 
50 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY, 

(lU.) H ANN A FI IIOPKINS'5 , daugliter of (16) John and 
Mary, married, Marcli 29, 1767, James Burrougli, of Provi- 
dence. 

CniLDUEN. 

ISn. I. John n.\ b. — ; buried April 3, 1770. 

137. II. John II.\ b. — ; buried Jan. 21, 1771. 

138. III. Aniey W.''., born about 1772, married Henry C. Jones, 

and died at Charleston, S. C, Nov. 3, M'Ah, in 
her twenty-fourth year. 
130. IV. George H.\ b. — : d. Nov. 13, 1807, aged 33 years. 

140. ^^ Hannah^ b. — ; d. unmarried. 

141. VI. WiUiain'. b. — ; d. — ; IMarried Magdelina Van 

Rensselaer, daughter of the Patroon of Hudson. 

142. VII. Gustavus James\ b. — ; d. — ; married in New 

Orleans. 

143. VIII. Caroline', b. — ; d. March 28, 18.50. 

144. IX. Sidney H.' (Capt.), b. — ; d. in Richmond, Va., 

Oct. 24, 1821, aged about 40 years; married at 
Philadelphia in 1801), to Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Dunlap, of Philadelphia. 

145. X. EdwarcT (Capt.), b. — ; d. in Providence, Oct. 27, 

1821, aged 40 j'ears. 
\iC^. Xr. C'ornWjV, b. — ; d. — . 
147. XII. Sarah', b. — : d. July 21, 18.30. 



o\r. t INK or THK IKU'KINS KAMILif. ."»1 

The foregoing list may not indicate the exact order of the 
births. 

(99.) SARAHS daughter of (41) Samuel and Zerviah C. 
Hopkins, married, March 22, 1801, Gen. Joseph Hawcs. Jlr 
was born in Dcdhani, Mass., but spent most oJ his life in 
North Providence, living in the prominent mansion situated 
near the Corliss Steam Engine Company's ^vorks, and in the 
immediate vicinity of the old homestead of Sarah's grand- 
father, Commodore Hopkins. He was engaged in mercantile 
pursuits, having a store on AVest Water Street (now Dyer 
Street) , in Providence, also in manufacturing, operating a cot- 
ton-factory in Rehoboth or Seekonk, Iklass. 

CHILDREN. 

Jos€2)h\ b. — ; d. Aug. 24, 1864, aged 60 years. 
GnstavKs', b. — ; d. — . 

Sophia Charlotte', b. — ; d. — ; married. Jan. 11 
1831, George West. 

151. IV. /Sarah HopJcins', b. — ; married, June 18, 1833, 

Geo. J. Harris. 

152. V. Harriet NeweU\ b. — . 

153. VI. Elizabeth Boioe.n\ b. — . 

154. VII. Samuel ILq^kins", b. — ; d. April 1, 1824, aged 3 

3'ears. 

155. VIII. Amey\ b. — . 

156. IX. Susannah 3faxey', b. — . 



148. 


I. 


149. 


II. 


150. 


Ill 



52 ON'E LINE np THK HOPKINS FAMILY. 

(lOS.) DEHORAHs daughter of (50) Daniel and Susan- 
nah Hopkins, married Smith Arnold, of Smithfield. 

till i.i'iii.^. 

157. 1. Jfuinna II.'* , b. March VJ, 17U2; d. Sept. 29, 1820; 

married Foster Peck, and Imd Susan", who 
- nianied John Barnes, and Foster S.", who mar- 
ried Marcy "\V. Randall, daughter of Daniel Ran- 
dall. 

158. II. Daniel'^^ went Soutli, married and settled there, and 

died, leaving descendants now resident in At- 
lanta, Ga. 

159. III. Susa7i Ho2)kins», b June 18, 1797 ; married, Oct. 12, 

1831, Stephen Randall, and died without issue, 
Feb. 10. 1870. 

160. TV. Ann MJ, b. April 20, 1800 ; d. March 3, 1875 ; mar- 

ried LeBaron Martin, son of Elhanan and Mary 
11. Martin, who was born in Troy, N. Y., Feb. 
9, 1800, and died in Pro-vidence, June 25, 1872. 

cnir,DRE\. 

1 . Joanna Arnold Cooke'. 
L'. Infiint son*. 
3. Ann'. 

Smith Arnold*. 

.Mary Temple'. 
»;. Ann Brown', married Cintis W. Dexter. 
7. Crawford Smith", married Alice S. Luther. 



ONE LINK OF THK Hi)PKIN.'=« FAMILY. 63 

^^ 

8. Deborah Hopkins', married George W. Cornell. 
0. Elhanan', married Mary Emma Foster. 

10. riaine Wickendcn". 

11. I Susannah Arnold", married Allen Hurt. 

(105.) WILLIAM', sou of (50) Diiniol« and Susannah, 
married Lucina, daughter of Benjamin Jeucks. She was born 
Jan. 20, 1781, and died Oct. 12, 1846. 

CHILDREN. 

161. I. Ruth ANGELL^ b. April 12, 1802 ; d. Aug. 17, 1871. 

162. II. John W.», b. Sept. 15, 1805 ; d. April 2, 1807. 

163. in. William H.«, b. May 10, 1807 ; d. March 6, 1848. 

164. IV. Stephen J.\ b. Jan. 29, 1809 ; d. Feb. 4, 1833. 

None of William and Lucina's children married, and on 
the decease of Ruth, in 1871, the Hopkins name in the line 
descended from Col. William, brother of the Governor and 
the Commodore, disappeared, leaving only the descendants of 
the Governor's son Rufus, who are of limited numbers, to 
engage our attention in concluding this work. 

(124.) JOHN G.s son of (60) Stephen and Mary, was 
born and died in Providence. He married, Oct. 15, 1820, 
Rosamond S. Dawless, who died May 13, 1872, aged 73 years, 
7 months, and 19 days. 



105. 


I. 


1fi6. 


II. 


ir,7. 


Ill 


16«. 


IV 


169. 


V. 



54 ONE LINK OF THK nOF'TTINS FAMrTV. 

CIULDKKN. 

George William**, b. July 13, 1821. 

Henry Rogeus% b. Nov. 23, 1823. 

Ann ?:lizabetii«, b. Aug. 14. 1828; d. Sept. 14, 

1861. 
Mauv Roi)Man«, b. Feb. 19, 1831 ; d. Feb., 1839. 
Stei'uen^, b. Sept. 24, 1837. 

(128.) HARRIET A. HOPKINS", daughter of (60) Ste- 
phen and M.iiy, niirri-d Elisha C. Wells, son of Pahn-r 
Wells. He was born Feb. 14, 1798, and died Oct. 20, 1864. 

children. 

EMZARr/m% b. Aug. 28, 1823; d. Sept 10, 1823. 
EL[ZABET^^ b. June 22, 1825; d. March 1, 1826. 
William R.», b. Sept. 9, 1826 ; d. Jan. 26, 1846. 
Charlotte C.^, b. March 7, 1829 ; married, Oct. 16, 
18.31, Thomas A. Sweetland, who was born Feb. 
14, 1829. 
174. \ . Elisiia C.8, b. Jan. 10, 1832 ; d. March 3, 1832. 
17.3. VI. Harriet A.\ b. March 12, 1833 ; d. Feb. 15, 1834. 

176. VII. Elisha C.^ b. Dec. 24, 1834 ; d. Sept. 21, 1853. 

177. Vrn. MAin- E.s, b. Feb. 2, 1838 ; d. at Springfield, Mass., 

March 20, 1869; mamed, Nov. 19, 1861, George 
W. Tapley ; had one son, William WelU^. h. 
Aug. 8, 1«n7. 



170. 


I. 


171. 


11. 


172. 


III. 


173. 


IV. 



ONE LINE OK THE Hnl'KlNS KAMIF.Y. 55 

(13J.; JOSKIM] OLNEY HUPKINS, .son of Col. Syl- 
vanuH and Mary, married, Jan. 1, 1818, Lydia P. JIazcn. She 
was born Nov. 10, 1792, and died .Jan. 17, 18C6. 

CIIILDUKN. 

[All born in Xorwich except Charles W., who was born in Bozrah, Coun.] 

JosKPii W.^ b. Dec. 3, 181'J ; d. Sept. 2/), 1820.  

Henry IIunt», b. Oct. 18, 1821. 

Sarah Olnei-*, b. March 17, 1824. — 

Jane Elizabeth", b. June 7, 1827. 

Samuel Snow", b. Jan. 9, 1830. 

William W.^ b. Jan. 9, 1830 ; d. Nov. 27, 1833. 

Charles Wesley\ b. May 20, 1833. 

(132.) WILLIAM WANTON HOPKINS', son of Col. 
Silvanus and Mary, married, Dec. 25, 1822, Jane Webb. No 
issue. His widow subsequently married John Hebard, and i.s 
now (1881) a widow, residing in Norwich. 

(133.) Capt. SAMUEL SNOW HOPKINS^, son of Col. 
Silvanus and Mary, married at New London, in October, 1824, 
Elizabeth P. Brooks, of New London. His residence at time 
of marriage was at Providence, R. I. • 

He was master of ship " Louisa," and died at Havana, Island 
of Cuba, Oct. 16. 1826. 



178. 


I. 


179. 


IT. 


180. 


in. 


181. 


IV. 


182. 


V. 


183. 


VI. 


184. 


VII 



5(J UM. LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

(134.; Capt. EDWARD AUGUSTUS HOPKINS", son 
of Col. Silvanus and Mary, was born in Scituate, R. I., and 
died in New Hartford, Conn. He married in Norwich, Jan. 
16, 1823, Elizabeth Carter. She was born in Exeter, N. H., 
Jan. 16, 1806, and died in Fall River, Mass., Sept. 24, 1877. 

CHILDnEN. 

185. I. Mary Wanton\ b. Jan. 0, 1827 ; d. July 21, 1881. 

186. II. Elizabeth Gil.max', b. Nov. 4, 1830. 

187. III. Edward AuGUS'-rrs", b. in Norwich, Sept. 24, 1833, 

served in the war of the great Rebellion , and died 
uumarriofl. wbilo in thfi U. S. nav.il service. Jan. 
3, 1860. 

188. W. ■Mri.i.cs.v MFxrALF". h. An<r. 1- 1«3.i. 

(135.) GEORGE SILVANUS HOPKINS", son of Col. 
Silvanus and Mary, was born in Scituate, R. I., and died in 
Colchester, Conn. 

Married fir.st, Sept. 15, 1832, Esther (Rose) Cooley, who 
died Jan. 23, 1838, aged 29 years. Married second, Sept. 1. 
1843, Dianthia Robinson, who died Doc. 7, 1850, aged 48 
years. 

rillLDREN. 

By first wife. 

189. I. William W.e, b. Oct. 1, 1833 ; d. Aug. 7, 1850. 

190. II. Frederick Ferdinand*, b. Feb. 17, 1836. 



ONE LINE OP TIIR HOPKINS FAMILY. .57 

191. ill. Mauy EsTHEir, b. .^q)t. 21, iS.'iT. 

Bij second ivife. 

192. IV. George Waiuien«, b. April 1, 1«44. 

(165.) GEORGE WILLIAM HOPKINS^, son of (124) 
John G. and Rosamond S., born and resides in Providence ; 
married, Nov. 20, 1844, Maria, dauglitcr of Samuel and Ase- 
nath (Lewis) Angell. She was born in Warren, R. I., Sept. 
25, 1821, and died in Providence, Feb. 24, 1879. 

CHILDREN. 

193. I. Ellen Maria', b. Jan. 31, 1846, a teacher in one of 

the public schools in Providence. 

194. II. Charlotte Elizabeth', b. Sept. 2, 1847. 

195. in. George W., b. and d. Feb. 1, 1851. 

(166.) HENRY R. HOPKINSs, son of John G. and 
Rosamond S., married, Nov. 28, 1850, Seraphina V. Williams- 
and has resided for several years at Pawtneket, R. L 

CHILDREN. 

196. I. Charlotte Emma^, b. Feb. 9, 1853 ; d. July 16, Iv'iTl. 

197. II. Harriet Rosamond, b. Sept. 5, 1856. 

(167.) ANN ELIZABETH HOPKINS », daughter of John 
G. and Rosamond S., married, March 13, 1851, Edward 
Cory. 



58 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY, 

CHILDREN. 

198. I. EdicanPy bom Oct. 20, 1851 ; married Kate Battcj. 

199. II. William Iletirf, b. Dec. 15, 1853 ; d. Oct. 14, 1859. 

200. III. Mary Bodman\ b. Feb. 14, 1856 ; manied, Oct. 25, 

1876, Earl P. Mason, of Fall River, Mass. 

201. IV. Herbert Manton\h. Dec. 19, 1858. 

(169.) STEPHEN HOPKINS^, son of John G. and Ros- 
amond S., resides in Providence. Married, in Springfield, 
Mass., Nov. 28, 1876, Margarette E. Lee. 

(179.) HENRY HUNT HOPKINSS son of (131) Joseph 
0. and Lydia P., married, Nov. 20,1842, Lucy L., daughter of 
Nathaniel H. and Phcbe L. Shermnn. She was born March 
8, 1824. 

s 

CniLDKEN. 
[All born in Preston, Conn., except Joseph H., who was born in Norwich.] 

202. I. Joseph H.», b. Aug. 12, 1843. 

203. II. IIenkietta T.', b. Sept. 7, 1852. 

204. III. William II. », b. April 2^ 1856 ; d. Oct. 28, 1870. 

205. IV. Jexme S.», b. Jan. 21, 1857. 

(180.) SARAH 0. HOPKINSS daughter of Joseph 0. 
and Lydia P., married, Oct. 9, 1844, George H. Martin. 



ONK LINK OF THr; IIOI'KINS TAMILY. 50 

V 

V 

CHILDREN. 

[All born in Norwicli.] 

200. T. Eslelle JIazen\ b. Aug. 27, 184G, married, Oct. 14, 

1875, Lucius Tuttlc. Have Effio Estelle, born in 

Ilartford, Conn., Jan. 13, 1879. 

207. II. George Edward\ b. Jan. 27, 1851, graduated at Yale 

College, and entered the ministry-. Is now (1881) 
settled at Brattleboro', Vt. 

208. III. Lillian Sarali\ b. May 29, 1858 ; d. July 2, 1868. 

(181.) JANE ELIZABETH HOPKINS^, daughter of 
Joseph 0. and Lydia P., married, June 23, 1844, William 
Lamphere. 

CHILDREN. 

209. I. Jane Elizabeth*, b. July 3, 1845 ; married, at Norwich, 

Dec. 21, 1871, Jacob Morrill Currier. 

210. II. Lydia 3felissct\ b. Jan. 15, 1850; married, Dec. 1, 

18G9, Rufus Franklin Hill, at Norwich. 
Have, 1. Mary Elizabeth^", b. June 24, 1870. 

2. William Frankliui", b. Sept. 21, 1871. 

3. James McKenzie^", b. Sept. 1, 1872. 

4. Harry Hopkins^", b. Sept. 6, 1875. 
*211. IIL Gertrude Hopkins^h. Oct. 19,1858. 

(182.) SAMUEL SNOW HOPKINS^, son of Joseph 0. 
and Lydia P., married, Nov. 30, 1852, Amanda Lucy Dow. 
She was born in Manchester, Conn., March 30, 1834. 



60 ONE LINE OF THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 

CniLDUEN, 
[All bom in Norwich.] 

212. I. Alice Louise', b. March 2, 1857; married, Mayo, 

1880, Henry Richardson Wood, of Mehose High- 
lands. 

213. n. Jessie Dow», b. Jan. 21, 1.S67. 

214. HI. LoLis Ai.hkrt'. b. Dec. 24, ISTfi. 

(184.) CHARLES WESLEY HOP JvlNS^, son of Joseph 
0. and Lydia P., is a member of the " Hopkins & Allen Mann- 
facturing Company," engaged in the manufacture of fire-arms 
of various kinds at Norwich, Conn. 

He married, June 11, 1856, Ann Amelia Beach, daughter 
of William S. and Lucy S. Beach. She was born in Glaston- 
bury, Conn., Sept. 3, 1834. 

CHILD. 

215. Charles Leslie', b. at Norwich, Jan. 15, 1861. 

(185.) MARY WANTON H0PK1NS«, daughter of Capt. 
Edward A. and Elizabeth, married, Jan. 11, 1843, David 
Macaffrce. 

cniLDKKN. 

21G. I. Willknn Edicurd\ b. June 20, 1845. 

217. IT. ^farl/ Elizabeth^ b. July 2G, 1848; d. June 8, 1853. 

218. III. Lunette Hopkins^ b. March 31, 1850. 



ONE LINR OP THE HOPKINS FAMILY. 61 

219. IV. Evelina ]Ia»«oH% b. July 4, 1852; d. Feb. 4, IH7D ; 

married, Dec. 18,1876, Charles T. Bliss, of New- 
port. 

220. V. Emma Elsie\ h. Nov. 13, LS.O.O ; m.-irned, .Jan. 2, 

1879, Alfred White. 

221. VI. George W.\ b. Feb. 22, 1858. 

222. VII. Carrie Cornelia^ b. Dec. 31, 1800; d. Sept. 8, 1879. 

223. VIII. Zizzie Gertrude', b. Dec. 18, 18G2. 

224. IX. David L.\ b. Aug. 27, 1865. 

(186.) ELIZABETH OILMAN HOPKINSs, dfinrrhter of 
Capt. Edward A. and Elizabeth, was born in Norwicli, and 
after the decease of her fatlicr at New Hartford, removed 
with her mother's family to Fall River, Mass., where she now 
resides. She married, Jan. 18, 1854, Earl P. Bowen, son of 
Earl P. and Julia A. Bowen, who was born in Bristol, R. 1., 
Nov. 24, 1832. 

CHILDKEN. 

225. I. Mary\ b. Aug. 27, 1856 ; d. Sept. 22, 1857. 

226. II. Edward Augustus'^ b. Sept. 29, 1859. 

227. III. Frank W.\ b. June 11, 1865; d. March 30, 1867. 

Mr. Bowen is an inspector in the Custom House at Fall 
River, and the son, Edward A., is in the insurance business. 



62 ONE LINK OF TUF, imrKTVS FAMILY. 

(188.) MELIS.^A MKTUALF 110PK1NS% daughter of 
Capt. Edward A. and Elizabeth, was horn in New Hartford. 
She married, ^fay 7, 1862, Charles W. Hawkins, son of Wil- 
liam H. and Elarrict (Thurber) Hawkins. He was born in 
Fall River, Nov. 29, 1835, and now resides there. 

C11IM>KEX. 

228. I. JTnny Angell \ b. June 1, 1864 ; d. Jan. 29, 1860. 
220. II. Edward Ij?e\ b. Feb. 18, 1866. 
2.30. HI. Ada Poolei^, b. Nov. 13. 1868. 

(190.) FREDERICK FERDINAND HOPKINS^, son of 
(135) George S. and Esther, was born in Norwich, now re- 
sides in Worcester, and is engaged in the insurance business. 
He married, Jan. 1, 1857, Sarah M. Lewis, who was born in 
Norwich. 

CniLUREX. 

231. I. Herbert P.», 1). June 25, 1858. Is a conductor on 

the Boston, Barre and Gardner Railroad. 

232. ir. Edward Earle', b. Aug. 26, 1860. A student at 

Harvard Medical College. 

233. HI. Marion A.', b. June 16. 1862 ; d. Aug. 5, 1864. 

234. IV. Frederick S. 9, b. Dec. 11. 1864. A stiulont .it Wor- 

cofiff-r High School. 



ONE LINE OF TfIR HOPKINS FAMILY. 63, 

(192.) GEORGE WAllREN IIOPKINSs, sou of George 
S. and Dianthia, married and moved West, and have 

23.'5. One daughter. 

(194.) CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH HOPKINS^, daugh- 
ter of George W. and Maria, married, Oct. 25, 1870, Charles 
A. Watcrhouse, son of Chailcs H. and Elizal)ctli S. (i. Water- 
liouse. He was born in Providence, May 2,'5, 1845. 

CHILD. 

23G. George Hop1cins'\ b. Aug. 2, 1872. 

CONCLU-SION. 

In concluding this brief genealogy it may be well to note 
.the fact of the dropping off, one after another, of the different 
families without leaving male issue to perpetuate the name of 
Hopkins in this line ; until, at the present time, there can be 
counted only fourteen who possibly, and six who probably, can 
be relied on to prevent its extinction altogether. It is hoped 
that these may appreciate the duty devolved upon tliem of 
preventing such a finale of so illustrious an ancestry. 

A. H. 



Appendix. 



WILL OF MAJ. WILLIAM HOPKINS. 

I William Hopkins, of tlic town of Providence, Colony of 
Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, in New England, 
Yeoman : being now sick and weak of body, but througli 
mercy, of somid disposing mind and memory, praise be given 
to God for the same ; do make this my last Will and Testa- 
ment, in manner and form following. 

First and principally I commit my spirit into the merciful 
hands of Almighty God, my Creator ; and my body, commit 
to the earth to be decently buried ; at the discretion of my 
Executor hereinafter named; and as to the outward and 
worldly estate that the Lord has been pleased to bless me 
with, I give and bequeath as followeth. 

Imprimis — I give and bequeath unto my grandson, Wil- 
liam Hopkins, of Providence, all that my homestead, mead- 
ows and tenements where I now dwell, situated in Providence 
aforesaid, near to a place called Massapaugc, with my mead- 



66 APPENDIX. 

ows at Massapauge, and upland thereto adjoining, and a piece 
of upland laid adjoining to Pawtuxct line and on the east 
side of my said Massapauge meadow. All Avhicli lands and 
meadows are, in estimation, two hundred acres ; upon the 
conditions following. 

That he shall allow his grandmother, my wife, Abigail 
Hopkins, one convenient room in my dwelling house, and to 
find and provide for her a sufficient maintenance and attend- 
ance, both in sickness and health, during the term of her nat- 
ural life, provided she remains a widow ; and if she be not 
contented to dwell with him, then my will is that he shall 
maintain her at some other place, which she may choose. 

And my will further is, that my said grandson shall not 
Bell nor dispose of said lands nor meadows nor no part of 
said teiiements until after my wife, his said grandmother is 
deceased. 

And also my will is and I do hereby order that he shall 
allow as I do hereby give and bequeath unto his brother, my 
grandson, Rufus Hopkins, one load of salt grass, in my mead- 
ows, which I give him my said grandson, William, yearly, 
every year during the term of his natural life; after he my 
said grandson Rufus shall attain to the age of twenty-one years ; 
that is to be understood that my said grandson Rufus, shall 
have liberty to cut so much grass in my said meadows as 
shall yield him two loads of hay yearly ; ujion which condi- 



APPENDIX. 67y 

tions I give and bequeath to my said grandson, William IIop- 
kiiis, my dwelling house with all my above mentioned lands 
and meadows, to have and to hold unto him, his heirs, Execu 
tors, Administrators and assigns, with the privileges and ap- 
purtenances forever. 

Item. — I give and bequeath unto my grandson, Rufus Hop- 
kins, my house lot of land which was laid out upon my own 
right, upon the hill called Stampers Hill, in said Providence, 
and was laid out in the last division of house lots in said 
town ; and also all my whole right in the commons, called 
the Stated Commons, in Providence aforesaid. 

To have and to hold the said lots of land and commons, 
with the privileges and ai)purtenances thereunto belonging, 
unto him my said grandson Rufus Hopkins, his heirs, Execu- 
tors, Administrators and assigns forever. 

Itein — I give and bequeath unto my sou William Hopkins, 
all that farm of land and meadow adjoining, whereon he now 
dwells, with the privileges and appurtenances thereunto be- 
longing, for him to give and dispose of to and among his 
children as he shall sec cause ; and all the rest of my lands 
and commons which I have not hereinbefore disposed of, 
either within this town of Providence or elsewhere, I give and 
bequeath to my aforesaid son William Hopkins, his Heirs, 
Executors, Administrators and assigns forever. 

Item — I give and bequeath unto my grandson, William 



68 APPENDIX. 

Ilopkiiis, one feather bed and furniture thereunto belonging; 
and also one Cow, I having before given him a Heifer. 

And as to the rest of my goods and moveable estate, be it 
of what sort and kind soever, I give and bequeatli ; after 
debts, funeral expenses and other expenses are duly paid, 
unto my wife Abigail Uopkins, for her to dispose of as she 
shall see cause, amongst my children and grandchildren ; 
except what she brought witli lier, and that she may do with 
as she will. 

And I now ordaine and appoint and make my said loving 
wife Abigail Hopkins, sole Executrix to this my last Will 
and Testament. 

In witness whereof I do hereunto set ray hand and seal this 
first day of July, in the ninth year of his Majesty's Reign, 
George, King of Great Britain &c. Anno Domini One thou- 
sand, seven hundred and twenty-three. 

WILLIAM HOPKINS. 
Witnesses, 

Richard Brown, 

John Hoyle, 

Rirn.4.RD Waterman, Jr. J 



APPENDIX. 60 

WILL OF ABIGAIL UOPKINS, WIDOW OF 
MAJ. WILLLVM IIOPKLNS. 

I Abigail Hopkins, of Providence, in the Colony of Rhodo 
Island and Providence Plantations ; widow ; being now very 
sick and weak of body, but of sound and disposing mind and 
memory ; praise be given to God for the same ; calling to 
mind the mortality of my body and not knowing how soon it 
may please God to remove me out of this present world ; do 
make this my last Will and Testament, in manner ftnd form 
following. 

First and principally I commit my spirit into the merciful 
hands of Almighty God, my Creator, and my body I commit 
to the Earth, to be decently buried at the discretion of my 
Executor hereinafter named ; and as to the outward and 
worldly estate the Lord has been pleased to bless me with in 
this present life I give and bequeath as followeth. 

Imprimis — I give and bequeath unto my three children ; 
John Dexter, William Hopkins and Abigail Field, forty shil- 
lings apiece, to be taken out of that money tliat is due to me 
from the proprietors of Providence, for services done by my 
husband ; and as to the remaining part of said money due to 
me by said proprietors, which I suppose to be about tliree 
pounds, I give to my grandson William Hopkins. 

Item I give to my daughter Abigail Field, my biggest 



70 APPENDIX. 

Brass Kettle ; aud my least Iron Kettle 1 give to mv grand- 
daughter, Abigail Dexter. 

Item I give to ray grandson William Hopkins, all the 
rest of my brass and iron household stuff, and my two cows 
and the one third part of my Pewter that is marked TV ^ A : 
and the other two thirds of said Pewter that is so marked, I 
give to my two granddaughters, Hope Hopkins and Abigail 
Hopkins, to be equally divided betwixt them. 

Item I give to my granddaughter Abigail Dexter three 
plates of my Pewter, not marked ; and all the remaining part 
of my Pewter not marked, I give to my daughter Abigail 
Field, and I also give unto my said daughter, Abigail Field, 
my Napkins and Table Cloth, being six Napkins and one 
Table Cloth. 

Ilem I give to my daughter Abigail Field, my Bed Cur- 
tains, and pillow and bolster case, and my Trunk and Box, 
and great chair standing in the outward room, and two small 
chairs. — Aud I give my great Chest unto my grandson 
Stephen Dexter. 

Item I give my Bed unto my granddaughter, Abigail 
Hopkins. 

Rem I give to my daughter Abigail Field, two pairs of 
Linen Sheets and two pairs of pillow cases, and one pair of 
flannel sheets, and all my wearing apparel. 

Ilem I give to my two granddaugliters, Hope Hopkins 



APPENDIX. 71 

and Abigail Hopkins, each of ihcm, a pair of linen sliccts, and 
each a pair of Pillow Cases. 

Item I give to my granddaughter Abigail Dexter, one 
pair of linen sheets and one pair of Pillow Cases. 

Item I give and beciueath unto my son William Hopkins, 
my case of Bottles with the case they are in. 

And as to the rest and remaining part of my estate that I 
have not hereinbefore disposed of, after all my debts, funeral 
charges and other expenses are duly paid, what then after 
remains, I give to my grandson William Hopkins, with my 
husband's, his grandfather's silver buttons for a shirt. 

And I do name and ordaine, appoint and make my said 
grandson William Hopkins, sole Executor to this my last 
Will and Testament ; to receive and pay all my debts and 
execute my Will according to the contents thereof. 

In witness whereof I do hereunto set my hand and seal the 
16th day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand, 
seven hundred and twenty-five. 

• ABIGAIL HOPKINS her A marke 

Signed, sealed, pronounced and declared 
in presence of 

James Olney )- 

Job Harris 

Richard Waterman Jr. 



72 APPENDIX. 

WILL OF WILLL-IM HOPKINS, SON OF MAJ. WILLIAM 
AND ABIGAIL HOPKINS. 

In tlie uamc of God, Amen. This Eleventh of June, in 
the twelfth year of his Majesty's reign, George the Second 
King of Great Britain, A. D. 1738. I, William Hopkins, of 
Scitiiate, in the County of Providence, in the Colony of 
Rhode Island, yeoman, being very sick and weak of body, but 
of perfect mind and memory (thanks be to God for it) and 
calling to mind the mortality of my body, and knowing It is 
appoiiited for man once to die, do make and ordain this my 
last Will and Testament in manner and form following: that 
is to say, principally, and first of all my soul I recommend 
into the hands of God that gave it & my body to the earth to 
be buried in decent christian burial at the discretion of my 
executors hereinafter named. And as touching such worldly 
estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me in this present 
life, I give, demise and dispose of the same in the following 
manner and form : 

Imprimis f I give to my three sons, namely, William Hop- 
kins, Stephen Hopkins and John Hopkins, five shillings each, 
and the reason that I give them no more is I have given them 
sufiicient already 

7/em,I give to my two youngest sons, namely, Esek Hop- 
kins aud Samuel Hopkins, one Gun, one log chain, and one 
Horse, aud likewise all my working tools besides, to be equally 
divided l>ctween them two. 



APPENDIX. 73, 

//6'W, I give to my two sons, namely, Eack Hopkins and 
Samuel ]iopkins, all my wearing apparel after my decease. 

Hem, I give to my two younger danglitcis, namely, Abi- 
gail Hopkins and Susannah Hopkins, my two trunks and all 
that is in them, except my papers, to be equally divided be- 
tween them. 

Item, I give to my daughter, Susannah Hopkins, my Bed 
and Bedding whereon I used to lie, namely two pairs of sheets, 
one pair of flannel and one pair of linen, three blankets, and 
two rugs, one bolster and one pillow. 

Item, I give to my three daughters namely, Hope Harris 
& Abigail Hopkins and Susannah Hopkins, Forty Pounds in 
money to be paid to each of them in one year after my decease. 

Item, and all the rest of my money and goods, I give and 
bequeath to my two younger sons, namely, Esek Hopkins and 
Samuel Hopkins, to be equally divided between them two. 
And I do nominate and appoint ray son in law, Henry Harris 
to be my sole Executor to this my last Will and Testament, 
and in confirmation I have hereunto set mv hand and seal, the 
day and year above Avritten. 

WILLIAM HOPKINS [L. S.] 

In the presence of us ") 

EzEKiEL Hopkins, I 
John Evans, | 

Jabez Bowen. j 

10 



74 APPENDIX. 

WILL OF GOV. STEPllEX HOPKINS. 

The Inst Will and Testament of Stephen Hopkins, of Provi- 
dence, at the County of Providence, in the State of Rhode 
Island and Providence Plantations, Esquii-e, made and pub- 
lished in Providence this Twentieth day of May, in the year 
of our Lord, One Thousand, Seven Hundred and Eighty One, 
Witnesseth. That I give unto my daughter Lydia Tilling- 
hast, One Third part of my upper Garden, to be taken off on 
the North Side, and of Equal Breadth at Each End, to be and 
Kemain unto her and lier Heirs forever. 

I give to my granddaughter, Hannah Burrough, ray Two 
Lots of Land at Tockquotton to be and Remain to her and 
her heirs forever. 

I give to my son Rufus Hopkins, my Dwelling House where 
I now live, with the Out Houses and Garden, and Twelve 
Acres of Land in Providence Neck. ... I also give unto 
him ray Part of the Furnace Hope, and of all Such Lands as 
have been purchased for and belong to the Furnace Estate, 
with ray Part of the Iron Ore in Cranston', and of the Land 
in which it Lies, together with niy part of the Buildings, 
Materials and Utensils to the said Furnace belonging, and all 
my part of the Air Furnace, and of all the Apparatus for mak- 
ing, Forming and boring Cannon, and my part of all the Can- 
non and other iron on Hand at about the Furnace. . . . 



APIM-'NOIX. 7 



r 



J alno give unto ray son Rufus Hopkins, Tlirco ITundre<l Acres 
of Land in lilouccstcr, all which I give unto him and to his 
Heirs forever, together with all Moneys and Securities for 
Money belonging to the Furnace Estate, and my Gold Watch, 
he paying all my Just Debts and Such Legacies as I shall 
hereinafter give and make, so that my moveable and personal 
Estate in Providence be not charged. 

I give unto my Beloved Wife, Anne Hojikins, the L^se and 
Improvement of one Half of my Dwelling House and Gar- 
dens, and Twelve Acres of Land In the Neck, during her Life, 
together with the Use and Improvement of the Half of my 
Household Goods and personal Property in Providence during 
her Life, and after her Decease to go and remain to her 
Dauditer Amev Russell. 

I give to my Daughter in Law, Ruth Hopkins, widow of my 
son George Hopkins, One Thousand Dollars in Silver, being 
Money which belonged to him and which he Ordered that she 
should have. 

And I also give unto her the use of the Other Half of my 
Dwelling House, Gardens, and Twelve Acres of Land in the 
Neck during her Widowhood, and I give her the other half 
of my Household Goods and personal Property in Providence. 

I give to my Daughter in Law, Amey Russell*, as much 
money as will purchase a good Feather Bed and its Furniture. 



*Amy Russell was the second wife of Joseph Russell, and a daughter of the gov- 
ernor's second wife by her first husband, Benjamin Smith. 



76 



APPENDIX. 



I give to all my Negroes their Freedom, to take place im- 
mediately with Respect to those who shall be of Age, and of 
the others, the Males at Twenty One and the Females at 
Eighteen years of Age. 

I make and ordain my Son Rufns Hopkins Executor of this 
my Will, whom I Request and Desire to take the Care and 
Oversight of my Family, and supply them from Time to Time 
with Money and Such other Things as tliey may want for their 
Support in a Decent manner. 

In Witness whereof 1 have hereunto set my hand and seal 
the day and year aforewritten. 

STEPHEN HOPKINS 



Signed, Sealed, published and declared "^ 
by the said Stephen Hopkins to 
be his last Will and Testament 
in the Presence of us who at his 
Request and in the presence of 
Each othrr have signed as Wit- 
nesses. 

John Brown 
John Rogers 
Silas Downer 



^ 



ATPENUIX. 77 

Copy of a letter wiiltcn by Governor Hopkins wlien in 
attendance at the first session of the Continental Congress, at 
IMiiladelphia, to his son's wife, kindly fnrni.shod by Charles 
W. Hopkins, of Norwich. 

Philadelphia, June 21, 1775. 
Beloved Ruth. 

I wrote you on the 25th of May and gave you an account 
of our journey hither. Since then I have had an ill turn and 
two or three fits of fever and ague, but am now well. Your 
mother has not been well for several days and is now quite 
poorly. I hope she will soon be better. George, I expected 
to have seen here but believe he has gone to South Carolina. 
Col. Washington will set out from here in a day or two for 
New England to take the command of the Continejital Army 
of which he is appointed Commander in Chief. He .will be 
accompanied by Gen. Lee, who also has a command in the 
army which is taken into the pay of all Ameri(;a. 

I can give no guess yet when we shall leave this jdace, cer- 
tainly not very soon, unless we adjourn to the Northward, 
which is talked of but not agreed to yet. 

Give my love to all parts of the family, and respects to all 

who may ask after me. Should be glad to hear from you, and 

remain your 

Affectionate Father 

Stephen Hopkins 



Index 



HOPKINS ('HRTSTIAN NAMES. 



L t in; 11^ li 1 <.-.'• •ifij* fh' i in- I'ii/ii »  



First Generation. 



hii7!ii» lii, 

Frances, 

Tliomas, 






8 

7 


i><- 


t:^iivt Orifri f ' 


' ' II , 


Tliomas, 

William. 




7, 10. l.T 

7, 10 



Tuird (Jciuiialioi- 



William, 



11, 13 



Allien. 


/• .. 


.,,■11, i:,,,. 




I'J. 27 


K>: V . 








12,24 


!!<.; . 








12. 20 


Join.. 








\ 12,10 


Ud;,,-, 








. 12, 18 


.^:iinuel. 








12. 20 


StP)>'ic»« 




V2. V. 


. K. 17 


18, 20, 23 


8ii«Aiina, 








12,27 


\V;ili;,T,. 








12 

1 




/■ 


fth r„n< 


Vdlhin. 




Altitrail. 








26, 3(i 


Ai.  -. 








2r), 37 


A- 








19.34 


Clir;--'ipiier, 






13,28 


Desire, 








27,43 


F-wik. 








27,41 


Georee, 








18, 32 


Uoarl, 








2f!, a; 



John, 




18, 30 


John B., 




21). 35 


Lj'dia, 




18.31 


llufns, 




18, 28 


Pauls <•• of StcpV 


len, 


18 


Ruth, d. of John 




in 


Samuel, 




26, 27, 42 


Sarali, 




10, 33 


Silvauus, 




18, 31 


vSiinrin, 




18 


Stephen, 




2« 


Susanna, 




27,38 


^'u.th 


Generation. 




Christopher, 




28 


Daniel. 




28, 46 


Hannah, 




30,60 


Joanna, 




28,47 


John, 




30 


Joseph, 




30 


Rufus, 8. of Christopher, 


28 


liufus, s. of Rufus, 


30 


Sally, 




28.47 


Sarah, 




43. 51 


Silvauus, 




30,49 


Stephen, 




30,48 


William, 




28 


Seventh 


Oeneration. 




Christopher, 




47 


Dehorah, 




47,52 


Edw.anl A., 




40, aa 


George, 




48 



INDRX. 



79 



Ciftoigo S., 
Harriet A., 
Joliii (}., 
.7o.s(*i)li O., 

Jo.Sf'I'll 11., 

Lydiit, 
Mary E., 
lltifuH, 
Samuel S., 
Sarah O., 
Sopliia, 
Stephen, 
William, 
Williiun R., 
AVilliam W., 

Eif/hih Generation. 

Ann E., 
Charles W., 
Erlwuud A., 
Elizabeth G., 
Frederick F., 
George William, 
George Warren, 
Henry H., 
}£enry li., 



48 
4« 

48, Ki 
48, 0.". 

4!), r>r, 

48 
4H 
48 
48 

40, rw 
4!) 
48 
4H 

47, 'hi 
48 

40, 55 



54, 57 

55, (;o 

5() 

m, (ii 

50, (i2 

54, 57 

57, (;:j 

55, 58 
54, 57 



Jane K., 'uj, rdJ 

Joseph W., 55 

Mary E., f>7 

Mary II., .'»} 

MaryW.. r^i.tiO 

Melis.saM., 5«i, «•_> 

Samuel S., 55, Vi 

Sarah ()., .V). :.s 

Stephen, 54, r,H 

Williuni W., 8. of .Tosepli O., 55 

William W , h. of George 8., 5<; 

Nintk GeneratMTi. 



Alice L., 


00 


Charlotlc Eli/abeth, 


 57, ()4 


Charlotte Emma, 


57 


Charles L., 


(A) 


Ellen M., 


57 


George W., 


57 


Harriet R., 


57 


Henrietta T., 


58 


Jennie S., 


58 


Jessie D., 


m 


Joseph H., 


58 


Louis A., 


(iO 


William H,, 


58 



PERSONS OF OTHER NAMES, NOT BORN HOPKINS. 



Adams 

Alien, 

Allen, 

Angel 1 

Angel 1 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 

Angell 



1, John, 
Ahbie C, 
Zachariah, 
, Abigail, 
Asenath, 
Benjamin, 
, Elizii, 
, Harriet, 
, James, 
, John, 
, Joseph, 
, .Joseph K., 
, Nathan, 
, Nathaniel, 
, Rosabella, 
, Samuel, 
, Sarah, 



IG I 
21 I 
21 i 
27, 20 
57 

4:i 
37 

27, 43 
29 

27, 43 
27 
27 
27 
27 

27,57 
27 



Angell, Su.sanna, 
Angell, Thomas, 
Arnold, Ann M., 
Arnold, Benedict, 
Arnold, Daniel. 
Arnold, Elizabeth, 
Arnohl, Joanna, 
Arnold, ^fary, 
Arnold, Smith, 
Arnold, Susan H., 
Barnes, John, 
Barnett, John, 
Beach, Ann A., 
Beach, Lucy S., 
Beach, William S., 
Boweu, Earl P., 
Bowen, Edward A., 



8,0 



^1 
52 

, :>(> 

52 
9 
52 
37 
52 
52 
52 
37 
00 
(K) 

f;o 
61 
Gl 



80 



INDEX. 



Bowen, Frank "W., 
Bowen, Jabez, 
Bowen, Julia A., 
Brooks. Elizabeth P., 
Brown, Jolm, 
ISrown, Joseph, 
Browu, Moses, 
Brown, NicluMas, 
BurrpM'^h, Aniey W., 
Burr.usrh, Caroline, 
Burrou.L'ii, roriielia, 
Burroush. Edward, 
Bnrroufrh, fieorire It., 
Biirroni^h, (insi.ivus J. 
Burrough, Hanii;ih, 
Burrongl), .fames. 
Burr«'UKli, .lohu If.. 
!- - ■-■• --^ H 

; t;, 

iel , 

Carter, Eli/nbeth, 
Clarke. John, 
Clarke, John II., 

n., 

_ .ii. 

C,.n..->i«>ci;, l.::..:Miin, 
(^oinst ock , E/bkw\, 
Cooke, Ahijrail, 
Cooke, D.iniel S., 
Cooke, Jeremiah O., 
Cooke, John, 
Co<jke, .Joseph, 
C'"' ■f'. '^T•lri3, 



Cooke. S.^rah 11., 
r,.<.'Af. ^VilViam II., 

■■i«r, 
I . r?e "W., 

Cor -'i. 

Cor.,. .. ^rt M., 
Cory, M.ary \l., 
Cory, William H., 
Cartis, Abigail, 



Mild, 



Dexter, Cnr:: 
DeiUsr, Grejj;"i.v, 



61 
29 
61 
55 
29 
29 
29 
29 
50 
50 
,7) 
50 
50 
50 
60 
50 
50 
50 
50 
24 
24 
53 
56 
37 
37 
37 
22 
22 
34 
47 
47 
47 
47 
22,42 
47 
47 
22, 25, 47 
47 
47 
56 
53 
57,58 
58 
58 
58 
13 
13 
63 
10 
62 
10 



I Dexter, Stephen, 
' Dorrance. .John, 
' Dow, Amanda L., 
! Dunlap, Elizabeth, 
Dunlap, John, 
Esten, Alon/.o, 
; Esten, Catherine, 
i E.stou, Cornelius, 
I E.sten, Eliza, 
I E,sten, Emeline, 
j Esten, Esek, 
1 Ei^ten, Frances, 

Esten, George W,, 
I Est'^n, Henry, 
Esten, James F., 
E.sten, John, 
Esten, Julia A,, 
Esten, Nancy, 
Esten, Kebecc.^, 
Esten, Sarah J., 
Esten, Stephen, 
Esten, Stephen B., 
Esten, Thomas, 
Fosdick, F'ranoes, 
Fosdick, .lames W., 
Fosdick, Thoniiis, 
Field, Abigail, 
Foster, Mary E., 

Gadsden, , 

Gay, Abner, Jr., 
Gibbs, Amey, 
Gibbs, Mary, 
Gibbs, Robert, 
Gregg, James, 
Harris, George J., 
Harris, Henry, 
Harris, Hope, 
Harris, I.ydia, 
Harris, lluth, 
Harris, Sarah, 
Harris, Snsanna, 
Hawes, Amey, 
Hawes, Elizabeth B., 
Hawes, Gustavus, 
Hawes, Harriet N., 
Hawes, .Joseph , 
Hawes, Samuel H., 
Hawc-s, Sophia C, 
Hawes, Sarah H., 
Hawes, Susanna M., 
Hawkins, Ada P., 



10 

.37 
.59 
50 
50 
35 
35 

a5 

35 
35 
34 
35 
35 
35 
.35 

34,35 
;}5 
35 
34 
35 
;i5 
35 
35 

21,22 
22 
22 
11 
5,^ 
16 
21 
30 
.30 
30 
38 
51 
21 
21 
20 
21 
36 
43 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
62 



20, 
20, 

20, 

20, 
20, 



^ 



INDKX'. 



81 



Hawkins, Amoy, 
ILawkins, (Jatliorino. 
llinvkiiis, Cliarks W., 
Jlawkiua, Desire, 
Hawkins, Ksok H., 
J[awkihs, Kilward J^.. 
Hawkins, Harriet, 
Hawkins, Harriot T.. 
Hawkins, Harry A., 
Hawkins, Henry, 
Hawkins, Henry H., 
Hawkins, Job, 
Hawkins, Joseph, 
Hawkins, Joseph C, 
Hawkins, Mary, 
Hawkins, Mehetable, 
Hawkins, Sarah, 
Hawkins, Susanna, 
Hawkins, William H., 
Hazen, Lydia P., 
Hihanl, John. 
Hill, Harry H., 
Hill, James McK., 
Hill.Marv E., 
Hill. RufiisF.. 
Hill, William F., 
Jenckes. Caroline, 
Jenckes, Daniel, 
Jenckes, Joanna, 
Jenckes, John, 
Jeuckes, Sarah, 
Jencks, Benjamin, 
Jenoks, Lucina, 
Kinnicutt, Amey, 
Lapham, .Fohn, 
Laphani, Mary. 
Lampliere, .Jane E., 
Lamphere, LydiaM., 
Lampliere, William, 
Lee, Mr., 

Lee, Margarette E., 
Ijeonard, Charles, 
Leonard, Esek S. H., 
Leonard, John B. H., 
Leonard, Peyton R., 
Leonard, Samuel, 
Lewis, Sarah M., 
Lindsey, Sarah, 
Lindsey, Thomas, 
Lindsey, Zerviah C, 
Man, Abraham, ' 



37 
20 
(i'2 
;{7 
.37 
U'i 
37 
IW 
(>2 
37 
20 

ly 
m 

37 
3G 
20 

m 
m 

62 
55 
55 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
47 
28 
28 
47 
28 
:M, 53 
53 
27 
9 
9 
59 
59 
59 
1« 
58 
36 
44 
44 
37 
43 
62 
42 
42 
42 
8 



Man, Mary, 
Alan, NN'illiain. 
Mann, Alfr»!d, 
Mann, William M. 
Manninij, .laine^. 



Ma<anrr 

MacalTrcc, 

^lacalTroe, 

MacalTroe, 

M af.il rt'ri'e, 

ManalYree, 

MaculTrec-, 

Macaflrcc, 

Maoaffree, 



Carrie <!., 
llMvid, 

D.ivid r,,. 

lOjiiiiia E, 
Evelina W. 
( ipdi ■:,>' \V., 

I,i/./i>' ' r , 
Lunclte JI., 

Mtirv K., 



Macaffree, William E., 
Martin, Abhy Ann, 
Martin, Ann, 
Martin, Ann B., 
Martin, Crawford S.. 
Martin, Deborah H., - 
Martin, Elhanaii,- 
Martin, Esek H , 
Martin, Estellc, 
Martin, George K., 
Martin, George H., 
Martin, Joanna A. C, 
Martin, LeBaron, 
Martin, Lillian S., 
Martin. Mary, 
Martin, Mary H., 
Martin, Mary T., 
Martin, Plaine W., 
Martin, Smith A., 
ivrartin, Susanna, 
Maxcy, Amey H., 
Maxcy, Cornelia M., 
Maxcy, Desire B., 
Maxcy, Esek H., 
Maxcy, Jonathan. 
Maxcy, Stephen H. , 
Maxcy, Virgil, 
Metcalf, William. 
Olnej', Jeremiah, 
OIney, Joseph, 
Otway, Lieut., 
Page, Ambrose, 
Peek, Foster, 
Peck, Fosters., 
Peck, Susan, 
Randall, Daniel, 
Randall, Marcy W.. 



8 
H 
•H 
.34 
40 
61 

<;o 

61 
61 
01 
61 
61 

m 
m 

37 
52 
52 
52 
.">3 

36, 53 
37 
5i> 
59 
58 
52 
37 
59 
37 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 
38 
38 
38 
38 

;j8, 39 
38 
3!( 
;!4 
2^.< 

29, :i4i 
41 
28 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 



U 



82 




INDEX. 




Randn 


11. Stephen, 


13,62 


TillinKlmst, Stephen, 


31 


T-./lnn 


-■>!i, DiaiUhia, 


»> 


Tarpiu, Catherine, 


10 




:, Lvdia, 


48 
4H 


Tarpin, William, 
Tuttle, Eftie E.,- 


19 




, Mary, 


59 




. William, 


48 


Tuttlo. Lucius, 


5'.) 




la, 


1" 


Tyler, John, 


39 






17 


Ip.slmr. Abel, 


3!) 


,,,,..;. 


iw. ,i.»rd, 


17 


Wall. William, 


22 


Scott, 


Sariih. 


17 


W'allace, Capt., 


25 


- 


^vtvaiius. 


17 


Wanton, Elizabeth, 


■49 




. Capt., 


M 


Wautoti, Mary, 


49 


:Mliini 


Abigail, 


21 


Wanton. Peter, 


,49 


Smith 


Adeline, 


21 


Waterhouso. Charles A., 


• 63 


S.nitl, 


Ail..rt T. F., 


21 


Wjiterlioiise, Charles H., 


«:? 


s;i,.''. 


V i;ne. 


17 


Walerhouse, Elizabeth S. G., 


(i;< 


SinUh 


T  


17, 21 


M'aterhouse, George H., 


G3 


Sniitli 


= 1 


21 


Webb, Jane, 


55 


Sinitli 


l).i'.:.tl. 


21, 47 


Wells, Charlotte C, 


54 


Suiitli 


Dorcas, 


21 


W>lls, ElishaC, 


54 


Smith 


Henry. 


21 


Wells, Elizabeth, 


.54 


Smith 


.Toh. 


21 


Wells, Harriet A., 


54 


Sniitli 


J. .1.11, 


21 


AVells, Marv E., 


54 


Smitli 


Kiith. 


'Si 


Wells, Palmer, 


54 


Smith 


Stephen H.. 


IS 


West, George, 


51 


Smifli 


William. 


- 47 


Wheaton, Anne, 


43 




'Villiam II., 


48 


Wheaton. Calvin, 


43 




Mnj. (Ten., 


41 


Wheaton, Comfort, 


43 




:. Col , 


■■'•[ 


Whipple, Abraham, 


33 




nnel. 


4;'. 


Whipple, .Tohn, 


10 




r. A.. 


54 


Whipple, Katy, 


34 




T-O W., 


54 


. Whipple. Polly, 


34 




■1, 


22 


Whipple, Sarah, 


10 






22 


Wickenden, William, 


 11 




lies F., 


■M 


Wilkinson, John, 


4(} 




'■•■'.. 


31 


■Wilkinson, Lawrence, 


11 






31 


Wilkinson, Plaino, 


11 




;y Jl., 


21 


Wilkin.son. Ruth. 


4fi 




•lamej^. 


31 


Wilkinson, Snninel, 


11 




.Tolin, 


31 


Wilkinson, Susanna, 


4(5 




. .Tonatlian, 


21 


Williams, Roger, 


41 




f. ,w.. 1. 


21,31 


Williams. Seraphina V., 


57 






31 


Wood, Henry K., 


(50 


1 Mi liil. 


ii.i ^i . .T u i 'lii 11 ■" , 


■M 







>*<- 

^ 



i '-^ 



MAR 2 1930 



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-»A.. 



'V.W 






-ssas 



99'snn!^K' 



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