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Full text of "Genealogy of the Page family in Virginia. Also a condensed account of the Nelson, Walker, Pendleton and Randolph families, with references to the Byrd, Carter, Cary, Duke, Gilmer, Harrison, Rives, Thornton, Wellford, Washington, and other distinguished families in Virginia"

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1583001 



R^Yh^C- X>S HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC L|BRARY 



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GENEALOGY 



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PAGE j^AMILY IN VIR GINIA 

ALSO A CONDENSED ACCOUNT OF THE 

Nelson. Walker, Pendleton and Randolph Fami'ies, 

V/ITH REFERENCES TO THE 

BYRD, CARTER, GARY, DUKE, GIL:\IER, HARRISON; RIVES, 
THORNTON, WELLFORD, WASHINGTON, 

And other distinguished Families in Virginia. 



ONE OF THE FAMILY. 



NEW YORK : 

Jenkins & Thomas, Printers, 8 Sprcce Street. 

1883. 



Bl-fN^ 



V.i-.^>>: ^-v. 



1583001 



TO THE MEMORY OF 

COL. JOHN PAGE, ESQ., 

FIRST OF HIS FAMILY I.V VIRGINIA, 

WHOSE TEMPERATE AND INUUSTRIOL'S HABITS, INDOMITABLE ENERGY 

AND STRICT INTEGRITY, 

WON FOR HIM A HIGH PLACE IN THE CONFIDENCE OF THEIR MAJESTIES, 

WILLIAM AND MARY, 

AS A MEMBER CF THEIR COUNCIL IN THE 

DOMINION OF VIRGINIA, 

AND ARE WELL WORTHY OF IMITATION BY HIS DESCENDANTS, 

THIS LITTLE BOOK IS PIOUSLY DEDICATED 

BY 

THE AUTHOR. 




THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT. RICHMOND, VA 



PREFACE. 



The Original Tombstone of Col. John Pag:e, the first of his 
family in Virginia, was a marble slab imported from England about 
the year 1695. In some unknown way it was broken, and for many 
years the fragments were scattered about the Episcopal churchyard 
at Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia. 

For the purpose of restoring it, one of the descendants of Col. 
Page visited Williamsburg in the summer of 1877, and, on the 22d of 
June of that year, had the fragments, that could be found, collected 
and placed, by the consent of the Vestry, on a brick platform in the 
vestibule of the church. 

All the lower portion of the tombstone is lost, except a narrow 
strip containing parts of words. This fragment was enclosed in the 
brick platform above mentioned. The upper portion consists of two 
pieces, one of which evidently had not been found when Bishop 
Meade wrote his book entitled " Old Churches and Families of 
Virginia" ; for the partial inscription mentioned by him. Vol. I., 
p. 195, is evidently an inaccurate copy of so much of the inscription 
only as was found on one of these fragments. 

During the month of January, 1878, a new monument of Carrara 
marble was erected at the head of the grave which was found by 
the side of that of his wife, Alice. It contains an exact copy of the 
coat-of-arms and inscription that were found on the original tomb- 
stone. There are also other notices, one of which gives the date of 
the erection of the new monument. The inscriptions on the Page 
tombstones at Williamsburg and Rosewell were at that time copied, 
and this led to a more extended investigation of the subject of the 
Genealogy of the Page Family in Virginia, which has finally re- 
sulted in the following little book. 

In tracing out the different branches and members of the Page 
Family in Virginia, a somewhat condensed account of other families 
became necessary. This was particularly the case with regard to 



8 PREFACE. 

the Nelsons. These two in turn involved the Walkers, and others. 
It was thought best, therefore, to bind them all in one book. 

In speaking of localities, the names of the County, State, and 
even Country when necessary, are also given when they are known. 

The Roman numbers refer to the Generation, and the ordinary 
figures to the position of an individual, with respect to age, in any 
given family. The Generations are reckoned from the first, or what 
is supposed to be the first, of the family in Virginia. The Roman 
numbers are not usually applied to females, nor to males who have 
no married children, but in these two classes of cases a brief and 
concluding account is given at the time, or else reference is made 
to some other part of the book. 

Whenever a date is given without qualification, it has been 
copied from a tombstone, family Bible or other trustworthy record. 
But whenever a date is said to be about such and such a time, it 
has usually been calculated upon the supposition that a woman mar- 
ries at the age of 20, and a man at 25, and that their children 
were born every other year after the first year of married life. 

The book has been compiled from a correspondence with vari- 
ous members of families referred to in it, extending over a period of 
six years. 

The following persons have furnished valuable information, 
viz : 

1. Mrs. George Byrd, of New York City. 

2. Capt. R. R. Carter, of Shirley, on James River, Virginia. 

3. Mrs. Fanny Nelson Carter, on James River, Virginia. 

4. Wilson Miles Cary, Esq., of Baltimore, Maryland. 

5. Miss Nellie Deans, Rosewell, Gloucester Co., Virginia. 

6. R. T. W. Duke, Jr., Charlottesville, Albemarle Co., Virginia. 

7. Miss Mary Jane Griffith, of Shelly, Gloucester Co., Virginia. 

8. Hon. Hugh Blair Grigsby, of Charlotte Co., Virginia. 

9. Mrs. Mary R. P. Harrison, of The Rowe, on James River, 
Virginia. 

10. Mrs. Ellen Wayles R. Harrison, of Edge Hill, Albemarle 
Co., Virginia. 

11. Genl. Roger Jones, Inspector-Gen., U. S. Army, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

12. Mrs. Fannie B. P. Meade, of Washington City, D. C. 



PREFACE. 9 

13. Col. William Nelson, of Oakland, Hanover Co., Virginia. 

14. Dr. Robert W. Nelson, of Charlottesville, Albemarle Co., 
Virginia. 

15. Miss L. Page Nelson, of New York City. 

16. Miss Fannie B. Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia. 

17. \V. Steptoe Nelson, of Bedford Co., Virginia. 

18. Mann Page, Esq., Lower Brandon, on James River, Virginia. 

19. Legh R. Page, Esq., Richmond, Virginia. 

20. John \V. Page, Esq.. of Petersville, Frederick Co., Maryland. 

21. Peyton N. Page, Esq., of Gloucester Court House, Virginia. 

22. Dr. John R. Page, University of Virginia. 

23. William N. Page, Esq., of Cumberland County. Virginia. 

24. John Page, Esq., Oakland, Hanover County, Virginia. 

25. Miss Lucy M. F. Page, Washington City, D. C. 

26. Carter PL Page, Esq., Albemarle Co., Virginia. 

27. Judge John E. Page, Clarke Co., Virginia. 

28. Fred. ]\L Page, Sewanee, Franklin Co., Tennessee. 

29. John Page, Buenos Ayres, South America. 

30. Samuel H. Pendleton, New York City. 

31. Mrs. W. N. Pendleton, Lexington, Rockbridge Co., Virginia. 

32. Mrs. D. Coupland Randolph. Cumberland Co., Virginia. 

33. Francis R. Rives, Esq., New York City. 

34. William C. Rives, Esq., Newport, R. L 

35. Mrs. Lucy B. P. Saunders, Washington City, D. C. 

36. Stephen Tucker, Royal College of Heraldry, London. 
Information in some cases was obtained from the ''History of 

Bristol Parish, (Dinwiddle Co., Virginia,) by Rev. Philip Slaughter, 
of Virginia, and the " History of St. Mark's Parish,'' (Culpepper Qp., 
Virginia,) by the same author. 

Bishop Meade's book, entitled " Old Churches and Families of 
Virgijiia,'' has also been found useful, and reference to it is fre- 
quently made in the earlier portions of the genealogies of several 
families. 

For the purpose of ascertaining the parentage of Col. John 
Page, progenitor of the Page family in Virginia, an exact copy of 
the coat-of-arms and inscription on the original tombstone was 
taken by John Draddy, a sculptor, of New York City, when he was 
at Williamsburg, Virginia, in the month of January, 1878, superin- 



IQ PREFACE. 

tending the erection of the new monument over the grave of Col. 
Pat The copy was certified to by Mr. Draddy and acknowledged 
bv°him before a Notarv Public, whose authority m turn was certmed 
t b™he Clerk of theCity and County of New York. The papers 
were then certified to by the British Consul res.dmg m the City of 
Xew York, and forwarded to Stephen Tucker, Her Majesty- s Pur- 
^uWant-It^arms, Rougecroi., Royal College of Heraldry. V.ctor.a 
St London, E. C. (East Centre). 

It is evident that all alleged crests and coats-of-arms of the 
Pa»e family of Virginia, which do not correspond in outlme w,th 
fhose found on the original tombstone of Col. John Page, Esq at 
Wmiamsburg, James City Co.. Virginia, are utterly worthl .., 
wh h" they exist on spoons, candlesticks, furniture, or any other 
Tub'tance whatever. They originated, no doubt, through the want 
of proper investigation, and a consequent lack of mtelhgence on tne 

'"''^The following is an exact copy of Mr. Draddy's certificate, and 
others : 




■■Know all men bv these presents : That I, John Draddy. Sculpror, re- 
siding in the City of New York. County of New York State of New Wk, 
and United States of America, do hereby certify, declare and make known, 



PREFACE. II 

that the above drawing representing a coat-of-arms is a true and exact copy, 
made and executed by me, of a coat-of-arms on the old tombstone situated in 
the vestibule of the Episcopal Church, Parish of Bruton, City of Williamsburg, 
County of James City, State of Virginia, and United States of America; 
and that the following is a true and exact copy of the inscription upon the 
iforesaid tombstone, to wit: 

'Here lieth in hope of a Joyful! Resurection the Body of Colonel John- 
Page, of Bruton Parish, Esquire, One of their Majesties Council in the Do- 
minion of Virginia. Who Departed this life the 23 of January in the year of 
our Lord 69^. Aged 65.' 

I furthermore certify that, in my opinion, some numeral belonging to 
the date 69^4 has been obliterated by an injury sustained by the said tombstone. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this ist day 
of February, in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Eight Hundred and 
Seventy-nine. 

JNO. DRADDY. [seal.] 

Witness: 

A. P. Smith." 

"St.\te of New York, 
Cily and County of New York. 

Be it remembered, that on this ist day of February-, One Thousand Eight 
Hundred and Seventy-nine, before me, A. P. Smith, a Notary Public, duly ap- 
pointed for and residing in the City of New York, commissioned and author- 
ized to administer oaths, personally appeared John Draddy, to me known to 
be the person described in and who executed the foregoing certificate, who 
being by me duly sworn, did acknowledge, depose and say, that he executed 
the foregoing certificate, and that the same is true. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal 
of office the day and year above written. 

' A. P. SMITH, 
[seal.] Notary Public, 

Co. N. Y., No. 93." 

"State of New York, ) 
City and Coun'y 0/ NruiJ York. [ 

I, Hubert O. Thompson, Clerk of the City and County of New York, 
and also Clerk of the Supreme Court for the said City and County, being a 
Court of Record, do hereby certify, that A. P. Smith, before whom the an- 
nexed deposition was taken, was, at the time of taking the same, a Notary 



12 PREFACE. 

Public of New York, dwelling in said City and County, duly appointed and 
sworn and authorized to administer oaths to be used in any Court in said 
State, and for general purposes; and that his signature thereunto is genuine, 
as I verily believe. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal 
of the said Court and County the 3d day of May, 1879. 

Hubert O. Thompson, CLrk." 

The latter certificate was a printed form signed by Hubert O. 
Thompson, Clerk, and pasted to John Draddy's acknowledgment 
before A. P. Smith, the Notary Public. The two papers thus pasted 
together were taken to the British Consulate, where the following 
certificate was obtained: 

" Her Britannic Majesty's Consulate General, New York, (Arms of 
Great Britain follow.) 

I, Edward Mortimer Archibald, Esq., Companion of the most Honorable 
Order of the Bath, Her Britannic Majesty's Consul General for the States of 
New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Delaware, do hereby 
certify that I have reason to believe that the signature subscribed and seal 
affixed to the certificate hereunto annexed are the true signature and seal of 
A. P. Smith, who was, on the day of the date of said certificate, a Notary Pub- 
lic, in and for the State of New York, duly commissioned and sworn, to whose 
official acts faith and credit are due. 

In witness whereof, I do hereunto set my hand and seal of office at the 
City of New York, this third day of May, in the year of our Lord one thous- 
and eight hundred and seventy-nine. 

PIERREPONT EDWARDS, [seal.] 

Vice-Consul." 

The three foregoing papers were all sealed together officially, 
and placed in an envelope. They were then forwarded to Mr. Ste- 
phen Tucker, Rougecroix, Royal College of Heraldry, London, E. 
C, on Saturday, May loth, 1879, by a special messenger, to wit: 
John S. Perkins, Purser of the Steamer Canada, of the National Line. 
At the same time a photograph of the coat-of-arms of Alice, wife of 
Col, John Page, copied from her tombstone at Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia, was also sent, together with a copy of the inscription on her 
tombstone — accompanied by a draft for ^^30, payable to Mr Tucker's 
order- 



PREFACE. 



13 



The following diagram is an exact copy of the coat-of-arms 
last mentioned : 




There are no marks on the tombstone to indicate the tinctures 

in either of these coats-of-arms. After the lapse of nearly a year. 

Mr. Tucker wrote as follows : 

" Herald's College, E. C, 

17 Feb., 1880. 
Dear Sir: I hope we have been successful in affiliating your ancestor, 
John Page. We did not know where ' Uxenden Co., ]Mid.,' (referred to by 
Mr. Gatty in the copy pedigree sent to you to which the arms borne by your 
family were attached) till we traced the will of* Richard Page (dated 15 Aug., 
1638, and proved 6 Dec, 1642). In this we found a direction that he should 
be buried at Harrow. Acting on this clue, we wrote to Harrow and have 
received a certificate to the effect that ' John and Mar)', sonne and daughter of 
Thomas Page, of Sudbur>-, were baptized 26 Dec'r, 1628.' I hope this will be 
satisfactory to you. 

Yours faithfully, 

STEPHEN TUCKER, 
• Rougecroix." 

To Dr. R. C. M. Page, 

31 West 33d Street, New York. 



u 



PREFACE. 



The sketch pedigree, referred to in Mr. Tucker's letter, is, in 
substance, a.s follows, viz : 

I. Henry Page, of Wembley, 
in the Parish of Harrow, County 
Middlesex, England, was born 
about 1500, and married about 1535 
A. D. 

Arms — Or, a fesse dancette between 
three martlets ; azure, a bordure of the 
last. 

In the above diagram, AZURE 
(blue) is represented by horizontal 
parallel straight lines, and OR 
(gold) by dots. 

n. John Page, one of the sons 
of the above-named Henry Page, 
and of the same place, was born there about A. D. 152S. He mar- 
ried, about 1553, Awdrye, daughter of Thomas Redding, of Hedg- 
eston, County Middlesex, England. They had two sons, viz : 




1. John Page, eldest, one of the masters in Chancer}-. 

in 1634- 

2. Richard Page. 



He was living 



HI. Richard Page, second son of the above-named John 
Page, and Awdrye Redding, his wife, was born at Wembley, about 
1556, and removed to Uxenden, in the Parish of Harrow, County 
Middlesex, England. He was living in 1634. His will is dated 15 
Aug., 1638, and was proved 6 Dec, 1642. He was married twice, 
but had no issue by one of his wives, probably the second. Both 
his wives died ante 1638. By one of his wives, probably the first, 
whose name was Frances, he had ten children. The eldest of these 
was John Page, of the middle temple, London. One of his sons, 
probably the seventh, was named Thomas. 

IV. Thomas Page, about^the seventh son of the above-named 
Richard Page and Frances, his wife, was born at Uxenden about 
1597, and removed to Sudbury, in the Parish of Harrow, County 



PREFACE. ■ 15 

Middlesex. England. He married about 1622; name of wife at 
present unknown, and, according to the Record, "John and Mary. 
Sonne and daughter of Thomas Page, of Sudbury, were baptized at 
Harrow, 26 Dec. 1628." 

V. John Page, son (probably second son) of the above-named 
Thomas Page, of Sudbury, County Middlesex, England, seventh of 
Richard, second of John, first of Henry Page, of Wembley, County 
Middlesex, England, all of the Parish of Harrow, was born at the 
first-named place in A. D. 1627. He emigrated to America about 
1650, and became the progenitor of the Page family in Virginia. 

Mr. Tucker writes, i6th March, 1880: " You quite understand 
that viiicii inore could be ascertained as to the pedigree, if you cared 
to incur the expense." 

Should any one ever desire to pursue the matter further, the 
most important step, perhaps, would be to obtain an official and 
complete list of the wills in Somerset House from 1500 to 1650, with 
such extracts as may have any bearing on the case. This is best 
done through the College of Heraldry, London, and would cost 
about ^25. 

Other points could doubtless be cleared up, one after another, 
but it costs much money without any certainty of success in obtain- 
ing the desired information. It also takes much time. 

For an account of the family of Sir Gregory Page, Baronet of 
Greenwich, County Kent, who was the father of Sir Gregory Page, 
the last Baronet of Wricklemarsh, County Kent, whose fortune was 
inherited by his great-nephew, Sir Gregory Page Turner; also the 
family of Major-Gen. Sir John Page; also of Sir Thomas Hyde Page, 
whose arms are quartered with those of Page, of ^Middlesex, and 
others, see Burke s Extinct and Dunnant Baronetcies ; Burke s 
General Arvwitry, etc. 

The arms of all these Page families bear a resemblance to each 
other, and doubtless they were all descended from the same ancestor. 
The origin of the name of Page, as a family cognomen, may be 
found in Ryviers Boeder a (Acts of the Kings of England) in 41st 
Henry HI., A. D., 1257, when it appears that Hugo de Pageham, of 
Ebor (York), was a bearer of dispatches from Edward, King oi 
England, to the King of Spain, and 'thus being Letter Bearer, or 
Page, he became known as Hugo Page de Pageham. 



l6 PREFACE. 

It may be observed that Mann Page (Rosewell Branch) of 
Lower Brandon, on James River, Prince George County, Virginia, 
is the primogeniture representative of the family, and that Legh 
Richmond Page and Walker Yates Page are the respective 
representatives of the North End and Broadneck branches. 

The following remarks in regard to Heraldry are copied in sub- 
stance from Elvin's Synopsis of Heraldry, London, Robert Hard- 
wicke, 192 Piccadilly, 1866: 

A co.\T-OF-ARMS consists of the shield, crest, helmet, wreath, external 
omamenuation and motto. The latter is not hereditan,-, and m.ay be selected 
to suit one's fancy. By .\rms are meant the shield and all things on it. The 
latter are called bearings. Arms, therefore, include the shield and its bearings. 
The arms form the most important part of a coat-of-arms, and should always 
be mentioned first in a description — the outline shape of the shield being un- 
important and made according to one's fancy or convenience. 

Crest is a figure, real or fictitious, set upon a wreath, placed above the 
helmet. 

Wreath (Torce or Torse) upon which the crest is placed, is of silk, com- 
posed of two different tinctures (being the first metal and color mentioned m 
the blazon of the shield), twisted together so as to form six folds. J^Iore or 
less is bad heraldry. The wreath is placed between the helmet and crest which 
are fastened together by it. 

Helmet (Cask, Casque, or Helme), is a covering for the head. Helmets 
are used as the distinctive marks of nobility and are differently depicted. The 
helmet of a Baronet, or Knight, for instance, is of steel ornamented with gold, 
and is shovixi /ull-/aced, xvUh beaver and vizor open; the helmet of an Esquire or 
Gentleman, on the contrar}-, is a steel profile helmet, ornamented with gold ; 
the beaver and vizor both close. 

Lambrequin' (Mantle or Hood) interv-enes between helmet and crest. 
This and other external ornamentation are made according to the taste of the 
artist. 

Motto is a word or saying placed on a scroll either under the arms or 
above the crest, and sometimes both. It may be selected according to one's 
fancy. 

Knight (K, Sir, when applied to a Knight) Eques. 

Esquire (Esqr.) Armiger. 

Gentleman (Gent. ) Generosus. 



PREFACE. 17 

Fesse is a band drawn horizontally across the face of the shield and occu- 
pies its middle third. 

D.wcETTE is the largest indenting used in heraldr\-, and its points never 
exceed three, nor are less than two and a half. 

Indented is the smallest indenting, and its points are many. 

Per pale has reference to a surface equally divided by a line drawn in a 
vertical direction. Thxxs per pale, dancelte, or and azure signifies that a surface is 
equally divided by a dancette line, drawn in a vertical direction, the left half of 
which surface is tinctured or, and the right, azure. 

Forcene is a term applied to horses, and signifies rearing — the term ram- 
pant being applied to wild beasts. 

Tinctures include all the colors used in coat-armor, which are divided 
into three classes, viz: 

I. Metals. 2. Colors. 3. Furs. 

1. The ]\Ietals are: 

Or (gold), represented in engraving by dots. 
Argent (silver), in engraving left quite plain. 

2. The colors are seven, viz: Gules (red), Azure (blue). Sable (black). 
Vert (green), Purpure (purple), Tenne (orange), and Sangulve (dark red). 
Of these, Azure is represented in engraving by horizontal parallel straight lines, 
and Sable by horizontal and vertical straight lines crossing each other at right 
angles. 

3. Furs are generally considered to be four in number, viz : 

Ermine, white field with black spots. 
Ermines, black field with white spots. 
Erminois, gold field with black spots. 
Pean, black field with gold spots. 
Paly is when the field or any surface is divided into any number of equal 
pieces of alternate tinctures by perpendicular lines. 

Martlet is a bird shaped like a swallow, with a forked tail and two tufts 
instead of legs. 

Crescent signifies second son. 

Border, or Bordure, is used as a mark of diff"erence; it contains a fifth of 
the field in breadth, and runs all round the edge of the shield. 

A complete coat-of-arms is generally used oii a tombstone, a memorial 
window, or on labels to be pasted in books. On the doors of Broughams, and 
similar vehicles, the crest and motto are sufficient But on large carriages, 
the arms, crest and motto are generally used. On paper and envelopes, the 
crest and motto, or arms, crest and motto are commonly used, the helmet in 



lo PREFACE. 

these cases being omitted. The wreath (torse, or torce) always goes with the 
crest, though it may not be mentioned in the description. 

In regard to Family Portraits, the following nine are in the 
possession of Dr. R. Channing M. Page, of Xew York City : 

(i). The original portrait of COL. JoHN Page, ESQR., the first of 
the family in Virginia. He is represented as about thirty-three 
years old. Hair, dark brown, long, wavy, and parted in the middle. 
Eyes, blue. Comple.xion, light. He has on a dark gown with two 
white tassels depending from the neck, in front. Holds in his left 
hand a hat. Near his left elbow the canvas is marked as follows: 

o 

The canvas originally measured 25x30 inches, no doubt, but 
at present it measures about 24x28 inches, having been cut down to 
that size by various picture cleaners. It was purchased by Dr. R. 
Channing M. Page, of New York City, from Mrs. Cornelia Griffith, 
of Shelly, Gloucester County, Virginia, in January, 1878. It was 
cleaned and relined by Mr. J. Oliver, of New York City, and, in 
places where the paint had worn off, retouched by Eastman Johns- 
ton, Esqr., of the same city. It is said to have been painted by Sir ■ 
Peter Lely, and is an excellent work of art. There is no copy of it 
except one in water-color, by C. H. Sherman, of New York City, 
rSSi, and the likeness is exact. 

(2). Manx Page, the first of that name, and only surviving 
grandson of the above-mentioned Col. John Page, Esqr. He is 
represented as a child about five years old, with a red bird {Cardi- 
nalis Virginiamis, or Virginian nightingale) on his'left hand. Hair, 
brown, long, and parted in the middle. Eyes, brown. Complex- 
ion, ruddy. Dress, a blue frock, with long sleeves and red sash 



PREFACE. 19 

around the waist. A very inferior work of art. and probably painted 
by a colonist about 1696. Purchased from the same person as the 
first. 

A copy from this portrait was made in water-color, 1881, by C. 
H. Sherman, of New York City. In this copy the position has been 
somewhat changed, and the sleeves of the dress have been short- 
ened. The red sash around the waist has been omitted, and the 
hair is cut and parted on one side and made a shade or two lighter. 
The likeness of the face has, however, been retained. The bird is 
clasped to the breast with both hands, instead of standing on the 
left hand and being pointed at with the right, as in the original por- 
trait. The engraving in this book was taken from this water-color 
copy by Sherman. 

(3). Hon. Mann Page, Esqr., the first of that name, of Rose- 
well, Gloucester County, Virginia. Hair, a white powdered wig. 
Eyes, brown. Complexion, ruddy. Necktie, white. Coat, red velvet 
and buttoned up so that no vest appears. Left hand partly concealed 
in the coat in which it rests. Right hand dropped naturally ; 
right arm resting on the chair-arm. Ruffles, white. An excellent 
work of art, and said to have been painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller. 
There is some doubt regarding this statement, since Sir Godfrey 
Kneller died in 1722, at which time Hon. Mann Page, Esqr., was 
only thirty-one years old. The portrait represents a person older 
than that. The wig he has on may, in a measure, account for the 
discrepancy between his real age, and his age as it appears in the 
portrait. It was purchased in 1878 by Dr. R. Channing M. Page, of 
New York City, from Mrs. Saunders, of Washington, D. C. 

(4). Judith Carter, of Corotoman, Lancaster County, Vir- 
ginia, second wife of Hon. Mann Page, Esqr., of Rosewell. She alone 
of his two wives had surviving male issue. Painted about 1730 by 
an unknown artist, and inferior as a work of art. Hair, dark and 
scant. Eyes, dark. Complexion, dark. Dress, green satin, with 
open front and half short sleeves. Neck and sleeves of dress 
trimmed with white lace. Hands in graceful position. Red curtain 
in background, and she is sitting in a chair of the same color as the 
curtain. Purchased at the same time and from the same person 
as the preceding. Her face has a masculine appearance. This por- 
trait is probably genuine, and there is a strong Carter likeness in it. 



20 PREFACE. 

It is of the same size as the preceding and in the same kind of 
frame. 

(5). Hon. John Page, of North End, Gloucester (now Mat- 
thews) County, Virginia. Hair, dark. Eyes, dark. Complexion, 
dark. Necktie, white. Vest, dark green. Coat, snuff-colored. 
Ruffles, white. Hat in left hand, dark. An inferior work of art by 
Bridges, Virginia, about 1750. Copied in part in the engraving. 

(6). Jane Bvrd, of Westover, Charles City County, Virginia, 
wife of Hon. John -Page, of North End. Hair, dark. Eyes, dark 
brown. Complexion, fair. Dress, white satin. Sleeves, half short. 
Cord around waist, and tassels, golden. The dress is very long- 
waisted. The right hand is playing with the tassels, and the left 
"hand rests upon a table having a red cover upon it. An inferior 
work of art by Bridges, of Virginia, about 1750. Copied in water- 
color by C. H. Sherman, of New York City, 1882. A Japanese vase 
of flowers is added in the copy to fill up a vacant space that was 
occupied by some object unknown in the original. The original 
portrait was also copied in oil by Myers, of Richmond, Virginia, 
about 1871, for Mrs. William C. Rives, of Castle Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia. The original portraits of Hon. John Page, of 
North End, and Jane Byrd, his wife, were purchased by Dr. R. 
Channing M. Page, of New York City, in 1878, from Mrs. Mary R. 
P. Harrison, of The Rowe, on James River, Virginia, opposite Lower 
Brandon. She had inherited them through her grandfather. Major 
Carter Page, of The Fork, Cumberland County, Virginia. The 
engraving does not do her full justice 

(7). John Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia, at 
the age of fourteen, afterwards Governor of Virginia. He is repre- 
sented as a youthful sportsman, with his dark hat having a feather 
in it, powder flask and two dead partridges on the ground near him. 
A single-barreled gun with flint lock, and the stock extending up 
to the muzzle, rests against his right hand and arm. He is sitting 
in a very graceful posture, with the left hand on the left knee. Hair, 
auburn, and done up in a cue at the back of the neck. Eyes, blue. 
Complexion, light. Necktie, white. V^est, white in shadow. Coat 
and knee-breeches, snuff-colored — the latter fastened just below the 
knee with silver buckles. Ruffles, white. Shoes, dark, with silver 
buckles. Stockings, white. 



PREFACE. 21 

Said to have been painted in 175S by Benjamin West, wh(?, at 
that time, was about eighteen years old, and painting his first por- 
traits in Philadelphia and New York. 

This portrait was purchased in 1878 by Dr. R. Channing M. 
Page, of New York City, from Mrs. Lucy B. P. Saunders, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. Mrs. Saunders is the only surviving child of Gov. 
John Page. A copy in part of this portrait was made by G. P. A. 
Healy, in New York City, Oct., 1880, and placed in the Virginia 
State Library, in the Capitol, at Richmond, Virginia. 

There is also a water-color copy of the original portrait, by C. 
H. Sherman, of New York City. It is now in possession of Mrs. 
Saunders, in Washington, D. C. There is another portrait of Gov. 
John Page, in the Museum of the Independence Hall Building, in 
Philadelphia. It was painted by Charles Wilson Peale. 

(8). Col. Archibald Carv, of Ampthill, Chesterfield County, 
Virginia. Hair, white powdered wig. Eyes, brown. Complexron, 
fair. Necktie, white. Vest, white. Coat, snuft"- colored. Ruffles, 
white. Left hand partly concealed by the vest in which it rests. 
Right hand, slightly extended as if about to shake hands with some 
one. It was painted about 1750 by an unknown artist, and is an 
inferior Avork of art. It is said to have been painted by Charles 
Wilson Peale, of Philadelphia, but it is more probable that it was 
the work of Bridges. Copied in part in water-color, by C. H. Sher- 
man, of New York City, 1882. The original portrait was purchased 
by Dr. R. Channing M. Page, of New York City, from Mrs. Mary 
A. P. Daniel, of .Cumberland County, Virginia, who inherited it 
from her grandfather. Major Carter Page, of The Fork, Cumberland 
County, Virginia, whose first wife was the daughter of Col. Archi- 
bald Cary. 

(9). Mary Randolph, of Curl's Neck on James River, Henrico 
County, Virginia, wife of Col. Archibald Cary, of Ampthill. Pur- 
chased from the same person, and at the same time with the pre- 
ceding portrait. It was probably painted by the same artist, and 
is inferior as a work of art. Hair, dark. Eyes, dark. Complexion, 
brunette. Dress, green satin, with half short sleeves, trimmed with 
white lace. Holds a wreath of roses in her hands. Copies of both 
of these portraits, in oil, are in possession of Wilson Miles Cary, 
Esqr., of Baltimore, Maryland. 



22 PREFACE. 

Of the foregoing portraits, all except those of Hon. Mann Page, 
Esqr., Judith Carter, and Mary Randolph, are represented in the en- 
gravings in this book. The reasons for this are, that the two former 
may be considered doubtful, and the latter is a very difficult one 
to copy. 

Mrs. Mary B. Whiting, of Millwood P. O., Clarke County, Vir- 
ginia, has in her possession the portraits of Mann.Page (the father 
of Gov. John Page^^aiid AXXE Corbix Tayloe, his second wife. 
She received them from her mother, Mrs. Lucy Page Baylor Bur- 
well, who obtained them from Mr. Harrison, of Brandon, the hus- 
band of Elizabeth (called "Betsey") Page. 

IMrs. Abby B. P. Hopkins, of Winchester, Frederick County, 
Virginia, has a portrait in her possession that was thought, by the 
late Judge John E. Page, to be the portrait of Dr. ROBERT Powell 
Page, of the Broadneck family. 

There are six portraits in the possession of John Page, of 
Estancia San Carlos, Bragado, Buenos Ayres, South America, con- 
cerning which there is absolute certainty only in regard to one. 
That is the portrait of ALvRY AL\NN, the wife of Mathew Page, and 
the mother of JMann Page the first. This fine portrait is about 
three-quarter length, and she is represented with blue eyes. The 
rest of her description is unknown to me. The canvas now meas- 
ures 1.36x1.09 yards (probably South American measure). From a 
careful consideration of the information received from John Page, of 
Buenos Ayres, and others in Virginia, the unavoidable conclusion 
has been reached that the remaining five portraits of this collection 
are doubtful. It is stated upon good authority that there never 
was any portrait of Hon. Mathew Page. Two of the five are said 
by some to be Charles Carter and his wife. According to John 
Page, of Buenos Ayres, these two are of the same size, the canvas 
of each measuring 1.19X.90 yards, and their frames are alike. The 
man has a wig on, and has blue eyes. The woman has hazel eyes. 
The remaining three portraits consist of a man and two women. 
All have hazel eyes, are of the same size (the canvas measuring 
.82X.59 yards), and are unknown. 

It is much to be regretted that the owner of these portraits was 
unwilling to sell the portrait of Mary Mann, and that it seems to 
have been impossible for him to furnish a copy of it. The following 
are descriptions of the remaining engravings in this book: 



PREFACE. 23 

(7). Dr. R. Chaxning M. Page, of New York City. Hair, 
curly and dark, sprinkled with gray. Eyes, dark gray. Complex- 
ion, fair, inclined to ruddy. Collar, white. Coat, vest and scarf, 
dark. Scarf pin, a golden bear, from Berne, Switzerland. The 
engraving is copied from a photograph by Sarony, of New York 
City, 1883. The engraving does not do him justice. 

(8). Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Fitch Wixslow Page, of West- 
port. Fairfield County, Connecticut, wife of Dr. R. Channing M. 
Page, of New York City. Hair, dark. Eyes, blue. Complexion, 
fair. Dress, black velvet, with dark lace shawl. Short sleeves. 
White lace handkerchief in right hand. Diamond pin. Diamond 
bracelet on right wrist. Diamond ring on third finger of left hand. 
Engraved from a photograph taken from the original portrait by 
G. P. A. Healy. This handsome portrait, nearly whole length, is 
now in the Corcoran Art Gallery, Washington, D. C. 

(9). Hox. William Nelsox, of Yorktown, York County, Vir- 
ginia, President of the Dominion of Virginia. Engraved from a 
water-color copy taken at Yorktown, Virginia, May, 1B33, by C. H. 
Sherman, of New York City. This water-color was copied by Mr. 
Sherman from the original portrait by an unknown artist. The 
portrait is in the Nelson House, at Yorktown, Virginia. Hair, a 
gray-white powdered wig. Eyes, brown. Complexion, ruddy. 
Necktie, white. Vest, long, and white in shadow. Coat, snuff- 
colored. Ruffles, white. Hat under left arm, dark. 

(10). Gov. Thomas Nelsox, of Yorktown, York County, Vir- 
ginia, Major-General in the American Army, and Signer of the 
Declaration of American Independence. For a description of his 
portrait, see his family history under Nelsox, Part H. 

(11). Hox. Fraxcis Walker, of Castle Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia. Engraving taken from a water-color copy by 
C. H. Sherman, of New York City, 1881. Mr. Sherman's water- 
color is copied from the original miniature by an unknown artist. 
This miniature is in the possession of Mrs. Frances Meriwether, of 
Cismont, Albemarle County, Virginia. In the water-color, the 
shape of the head was slightly altered, and this involved the omis- 
sion of the cue of hair at the back of the neck. Hair, gray-white 
wig. Eyes, blue. Complexion, fair. Necktie and frilled shirt front, 
white. Coat, blue. Vest, yellow. 



24 PREFACE. 

(12). Jane Byrd Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Vir- 
ginia, wife of Hon. Francis Walker, of Castle Hill. Engraving- 
copied from a miniature painting by unknown artist, in possession 
of Dr. R. Channing M. Page, of New York City. The picture is 
reversed in the engraving. She is represented as a child about five 
years old. Hair, golden. Eyes, blue.- Complexion, blonde. Pearl 
necklace around her neck. Dress, white. Copied in water-color 
by C. H. Sherman, of New York City, 1881. 

R. A. Brock, Esqr., of Richmond, Virginia, Secretary of the 
Virginia Historical Society, sends the following descriptions of Judge 
Pendleton and John Randolph: 

(13). Judge Edmund Pendleton, of Edmundsburg, Caroline 
County, Virginia. Engraving copied from a photo, by Davis, of 
Richmond, Virginia, taken 1883, from an etching by H. B. Hall, 
of Morrisania, New York, 1872. This etching is in the Virginia 
State Library, Capitol Building, Richmond, Virginia, and was cop- 
ied by Mr. Hall from the original portrait by unknown artist. The 
original portrait is in the possession of the Virginia Historical So- 
ciety, at the Westmoreland Club, Richmond, Virginia. Hair, large 
wig, powdered gray-white. Eyes, blue (light gray .-•). Complexion, 
fair. Necktie, white. Coat and vest, dark. 

(14). John Randolph, of Roanoke, Charlotte County, Virginia. 
Engraved from a drawing made by the American Photo-engraving 
Co., New York City, 1883, from an old print. Hair, dark brown, 
streaked with gray, and parted in the middle. Eyes, brown appar- 
ently; but they are variously described as brown, blue, and black. 
Complexion, olive-tinted (sallow). Necktie, blue. Coat and vest, 
dark. Collar and shirt-bosom, white. 

All the engravings were done by the American Photo-Engrav- 
ing Co., 15 Vandewater St., New York City. The work is well 
done, and in nearly every instance the exact likeness has been 
retained — an effect very difficult to produce in the absence of color. 

Mr. L. A. Lanthier, No. 6 Astor Place, New York City, was the 
framer of Sherman's water-colors. The pictures were first secured 
by glue and nails to wooden mats trimmed with kid. On the front 
of the wooden mats were glued the gray paper mats, containing the 
inscriptions. French plate glass was placed in front of these, and 
the whole, in each case, was sealed together with parchment bind- 



PREFACE. 25 

ing, in order to keep out the dust. They were then carefully laid 
in well fitting frames of mahoganized cherry wood, secured at the 
corners bv nails, and also strips of brass let into the wood across the 
joints behind, and fastened with screws. The glass, mats and pic- 
tures having been wedged in tightly and secured by nails, the backs 
were fastened in with zinc sheeting, and this was covered with brown 

paper. . 

The Nelson Coat-of^arms is engraved from a drawing copied 
from the original tombstone of Scotch Tom Nelson, at ^^orktown. 
Virginia, by C. H. Sherman, of New York City, 1883. 

'The Belvoir House, Albemarle County, Virginia, is engraved 
from a drawing by B. H. Toquet, of New York City, 1881, made 
from designs furnished by Dr. Robert W. Nelson, of Charlottesville, 
Albemarle County, Virginia. 

All the other diagrams, as well as the printed inscriptions on 
the mats of the above-mentioned water-color portraits, were done 
by H. S. Dennison, Chirographer, of New York City. 

Grace Church, Virginia, was engraved from an old photograph, 
furnished by Mrs. Nathaniel R. Coleman, of Halifax County, Vir- 
ginia, and Memorial Church, Westport, Connecticut, was engraved 
from a lithographic print furnished by Mrs. R. C. :\I. Page. 

In regard to Genealogies it is probably safe to state that no 
genealogy of an extensive family has ever been printed absolutely 
Jorrect in every respect. The indulgent reader is therefore re- 
quested to be not too severe in criticising mistakes that may be 
found in this little book. 

People whose duty it is to work for the support of themselves 
and those dependent on them, can ill afford to bestow their time 
upon such pecuniarily unremunerative subjects as Heraldry and 
Genealogy. General George Washington, when asked for informa- 
tion regarding his ancestry, is said to have replied to the effect that 
he knew very little about it, as he had never found time enough to 
look it up. While it is well to be correctly informed in regard to 
some of the chief points, it is not wise to carry the matter too far, 
or to talk about it, when the time might better be occupied in some 
other way. Parents and others who find that they can trace their 
genealogy back a few or many generations, should not think their 
own blood or that of their dear children so good that IT WOULD BE 



26 PREFACE. 

A PITY FOR THEM TO WORK. The better the blood the more im- 
portant it is to keep it untainted by unpaid debts and dishonorable 
transactions; for good family, be it remembered, is not salvation of 
itself, nor is it any excuse for idleness or intemperance. Idleness 
leads to poverty, and poverty begets ignorance, which is the head 
and source of vice. And it only requires a generation or two of 
idleness and consequent bad management, for posterity of good 
blood to find their way into the common jail. 

It is dishonorable to beg and borrow and to live on credit with- 
out paying your debts, however good your blood may be. On the 
contrary, it is not only honorable but altogether proper for ALL to 
earn a living by honest, earnest labor of some kind — manual or 
other — whatever others may think or say, or however it might look, 
or even smell. 

OXLV THE SLMPLE AND VULGAR ARE A.SHAMED TO WORK, and 
prefer either to live in extreme poverty and discomfort, or else live 
beyond their means — pretending to be somebody until at last the 
bubble bursts. 

Let such people reflect beforehand that mankind was born to 
labor, for the edict of Almighty God has gone forth: 

" In the sweat of thy face 
Shalt thou eat bread, till 
Thou return unto the ground." 

Gen. iii., 19. 

However rich or poor one may be. therefore, it is worse than 
folly to attempt to dodge the issue. The earlier in life this is known, 
the better, for difficulties increase in proportion to idleness. The 
most difficult thing for a grown person to do is to make a business 
of doing nothing. Hence the great importance of the early selec- 
tion of some definite and worthy object in life, and its earnest and 
continuous pursuit. In order to succeed, let habitual industry, 
punctuality and temperance be early inculcated. 

Intemperance does not, as a rule, commence with any well 
defined outbreak. It may be noticed for the first time, but, in 
nearly every case, the real origin of the evil goes back to youth or 
even childhood. In the vast majority of cases the prime cause of 
intemperance is the force of example or association. Fond and 



PREFACE. 27 

simple parents imagine that it is no harm to give their children 
" what is left in the glass," until the rum habit is slowly but surely 
formed. It grows up with the child and becomes a part of him. 
All at once he is noticed to be drunk. Unwary youths persuaded. 
or even bullied by evil companions, are trained into the rum habit 
in the same way. Once this fell habit is formed, who can stop it } 
And even if it is stopped, who can tell when it will begin again ? 
Show me a man who never touched alcohol before he was twenty- 
five years old, and you will find him to be temperate, even if he does 
drink. Show me a man who has been tippling from his youth up, 
and here you will see one who, if not an habitual drunkard, is in 
constant danger of becoming one. It is well, therefore, for parents 
to put their foot on this matter in the beginning, and not allow 
their children to touch alcoholic fluids until they become of age, 
and so pass from under their charge. Not having the habit already 
fastened upon them, which many are physically unable to resist, 
they will then be old enough to have sense enough to judge for 
themselves. What is true of alcohol is true of other things that 
make people drunk, not even excepting tobacco. The one otten 
leads to the other, and not infrequently tobacco is the stepping 
stone to rum. 

" Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, 
Nor any unproportion'd thought his act. 
Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar : 
The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, 
Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel ; 
But do not dull thy palm with entertainment 
Of each new hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade. 

3ic * * * * * * 

Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice ; 
Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. 
******* 
Neither a borrower, nor a lender be ; 
For loan oft loses both itself and friend. 
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. 
This above all. — to thine ownself be true ; 
And it must follow, as the night the day, 
Thou canst not then be false to any man. 
Farewell : my blessing season this in thee !" 

Shakespe.^re —Hamlet, Act I, Scene HI. 



28 PREFACE. 

"The truest successes in life are not those into which people 
fall by accident, or those uhich they win by a single bold stroke, 
but those into which they grow by a slow and sure unfolding of 
capacity and power. For unless a man has been trained for his 
chance, the chance, when it does come, will only make him ridicu- 
lous. A great occasion is- worth to a man exactly what his antece- 
dents Jiavc enabled Jiim to make of it. The most unfortunate thing 
that can happen to a young man is often the very thing which his 
friends regard as a piece of exceedingly good luck. There is no 
better preparation for failure than that a man has been put into a 
place of influence, responsibility and power before he has been de- 
veloped and equipped for it. Men who make this mistake or have 
this misfortune, commence life at the apex of the pyramid, and de- 
scend, step by step, to the bottom. The true road to success leads 
in the opposite direction ; it begins in small things and by a pa- 
tience that never yields to discouragement, to disappointment, to 
hope deferred, moves on from one point of achievement to another, 
meeting each new opportunity with an increased power and each 
new duty with an enlarged outlook upon the work to be done. We 
cannot learn too soon nor too well that in ourselves is lodged what- 
ever force is needed to send us along the path of a successful life ; 
that close beside us is the work which our hands are to do ; and 
that right before our feet is the path in which we are to walk. 

"In every community there are men and women 'waiting for 
something to turn up.' They think they are willing to work, but 
they fail to find anything to do ; they are looking for opportunities, 
but somehow the opportunities elude them. What is the trouble .^ 
Most people want to begin at the top. Instead of taking hold of 
the first piece of work that comes to hand, and driving it through 
as if it were the grandest thing they ever expected to do, they 
either decline it because it does not meet their tastes, or they do it 
in a half-hearted way because they take no real interest in it. 
Their thoughts are so far in advance of what they are doing that 
the thing in hand is only half done. It is the use of the first oppor- 
tunity that makes a second opportunity, but thousands are always 
waiting for the second to come first ; they are e.xpecting miracles 
when they ought to be working along the normal lines of success. 
It is the boy who takes a place in the country store and puts brains. 



PREFACE. • 29 

strength and heart into the weighing of sugar and the measuring of 
potatoes, who finally sits down in his office in a great warehouse and 
telegraphs his orders to the ends of the earth ; the other boy, who 
wanted to be a great merchant, by omitting the sugar and potatoes 
continues in the obscurity of his native village. These small duties, 
these meagre opportunities, are the training-schools of success, and 
no one gets the prize who does not take his degree in them. 

" The world is full of people who do things ' fairly well' ; it is in 
daily and pressing need of those who do them supremely well. If 
you want success, do not expect to get it by chance, but seek it 
through the open doors of the things that lie next you, and seek it 
as if your soul depended upon your finding it. The method of 
growth is the method of nature, and no man can copy her methods 
too closely. Long ago Dr. Holmes put the whole matter of success 
in life in a few pathetic words descriptive of the race in which those 
who started with most promise were left behind, and the unexpected 
winner came to the front by virtue of qualities unsuspected at the 
beginning. The promise of success is not in brilliancy of gift, in 
quickness of action, nor in high ambitions, but in that patience 
which is in itself a noble achievement. The man who. is sure to win 
waits for success, while he industriously trains himself in the schools 
of work, endurance and study. ' Learn to labor and to wait.' That 
is to say, ' learn to work, but while you are working be also willing 
to wait for success ' (and not to wait for success while you are sitting 
down with folded hands). Such a man places his faith not in tricks, 
or devices, or luck, but in the development of himself by a law of 
nature which is as certain in its operations as that which moves the 
planets in their courses. He who chafes under his present burden, 
and scorns his place and work as small and mean compared with the 
thing he would do, is every day widening the breach between his 
ideal and his possible achievement. The masters of life — women of 
rich, ample nature, ripening in all strengths and graces with the 
years ; men full of simple, teachable spirit, gathering sweetness and 
power as they advance — have learned to reverence the present mo- 
ment and the present duty, and are convinced to the very bottom 
of their souls, that the only road to great achievement lies through 
the faithful doing of the thing that lies next to them. There is no 
tnagic or enchaiitinent in life, no bick or fortu)ie in its final possessions; 



30 PREFACE. 

it is simple sequence of cause and effect, simple and undeviating; 
working out of the law that zvhatsocvcr a viaii sozjcth that shall he 
also reap. He cannot plan a great career, and hew his opportuni- 
ties into its solid structure, except by striking with full force the 
blow that the present moment makes room for. Men and women 
who are full of this spirit expand their lives by sheer force of faithful 
living, and are able, by and by, to look back and see their little 
duties rounding into grand completeness, the little opportunities 
widening out into the highest possibilities. Every great work grows 
out of endless and toilsome details. The historian is years in the dim 
seclusion of libraries before he gives the world a new chapter in its 
life; the great orator works far into sleepless nights before he stands 
on the platform with his fingers on the keys of human passion and 
sentiment ; the writer denies himself even rational pleasures through 
laborious years, that he may enrich his thought by contact with the 
world's thought, and put the eloquence of simplicity into his style. 
Grappling with small difficulties is the only training which fits one 
for dealing with great problems; faithful performance of small duties 
the only preparation for grand services; patience, fidelity and stead- 
fastness to-day the only seed that will make to-morrow golden with 
harvests of fame or usefulness. The boy who is to-day doing his 
duties w^ell and cheerfully is in training for the cares of empire ; the 
mother who is to-day giving strength, time and wealth of affection 
to her children (while making them walk straight), in the dim seclu- 
sion of her home, is making the whole world richer by her obscure 
ministry, is very possibly shaping the characters (from ten to eight- 
een years of age) that are to shape the destiny of the age, and is 
surely building in the only material which defies decay, survives 
death, and declares its architecture in the fadeless light of eternity. 
After all has been said about the work of the artist, the poet and 
the thinker, it is the mother zuho stands nearest God in creative 
pozc'er."' 

Lord Nelson's mother not only taught him his duty, when a 
child, but saw to it that he performed it — peaceably if she could, 
forcibly if she must. And so, when the hero of the Nile and Copen- 
hagen appeared on the final scene at Trafalgar, it was doubtless the 
influence and early teachings of his mother that inspired him with 
the immortal signal: 



PREFACE. 
'* ENGLAND EXPECTS EVERY MAN TO DO HIS DUTY." 



31 



Prayer, with effort, is good. Prayer, without effort, Hke faith 
without works, is dead. That such praying is not answered, is not 
to be wondered at, since it is only done for the sake of convenience, 
and is, consequently, a fraud. It is easier for lazy people to pray 
than to work. Mothers, therefore, who not only pray, but attend to 
business also, are likely to see their sons and daughters grow up to 
be men and women, read\' and willing to perform their whole duty 
at all times, under all circumstances, and at all hazards. Mothers, 
on the contrary, who are satisfied to pray, and even teach, without 
enforcing obedience, may expect to see their children grow up to be 
humbugs — and often sanctified humbugs. Sorrow, or other emotion, 
is not religion. There is not a thief in the Penitentiary who is not 
sorry, and some sobbing members of the church run for the whisky 
jug as soon as they can hurry home from the communion table. 
Others do worse things, judging from public trials. So much for 
sham religion. 

From the foregoing observations, it appears that ancestry, like 
other things, is good only for what it is worth. It will NOT HELP 
THEM WHO DO NOT HELP THEMSELVES. 

The motive for placing this volume before its readers, therefore, 
has not been prompted by the idea of glorifying anyone. It is sim- 
ply an unvarnished statement of facts, so far as they could be ascer- 
tained. And if the names of some worthy people and their family 
history shall be preserved from oblivion, the object in printing this 
book will have been accomplished by 

THE AUTHOR- 



PART I 



PAGE FAMILY IN VIRGINIA, 



1583001 




COAT-OF-ARMS OF COL. JOHN PAGE, Esqr., 

FIRST OF HIS FAMILY IN VIRGINIA, 

AS EMBLAZONED BYJ. S. AND A. B. WYON, CHIEF ENGRAVERS OF HER MAJESTY'S SEALS, 

287 Regent Street, London. 



" Neither give heed to fables and endless genealogies, which minister ques- 
tions, rather than godly edifying/'— I. Timothy, I., 4. 



"But avoid foolish questions, and genealogies, and contentions, and 
strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain."— Titus, III., 9. 






(s 



;(r 
^r* ' 



U 






- 1 



W 5 



^ 



1^ 



4 



n 



x. 




km 



(From the original portrait by S'r Peter Leiy. London, i66o.; 

COL. JOHN PAGE, ESQR., 

WILLIAMSBURG, JAMES CITY CO., VIRGLMIA. 
Died 23d January, 1692, Aged 65. 



PAGE FAMILY." 



I. Jonx Page, the first of the family in Virginia, is mentioned 
on his tombstone at WILLIAMSBURG, James City County. Virginia, 
as " Colonel JOHX Page, of Bruton Parish, Esquire." 

According to the Record in the Royal College of Heraldry, 
London, it appears that he was the son of Thomas Page, of Sud- 
bury, in the Parish of Harrow. County Middlesex, England, and was 
baptized at Harrow, 26 Dec, 1628. 

He was probably a relative of Sir Gregory Page, Baronet, of 
Greenwich, County Kent, England, as their arms closely resemble 
each other and their crests are identical. 

As already stated in the Preface, Thomas Page, of Sudbury, 
was descended from Henry Page, of Wembley, County Middlesex, 
England, whose arms were as follows: 

Or, a fesse danceite between three martlets azure, a bordure of the last. 

The coat-of-arms found on the tombstone of Col. John Page, 
at Williamsburg, Virginia, is as follows, the arms being identical in 
outline with those of Page of Wembley, except the bordure: 

Arms. — .\ fesse dancette between three martlets, a middle chief crescent. 

Crest. — A demi-horse forcene (rearing). 

There are no marks on the tombstone to indicate tinctures, and 
no motto. (See diagram in the Preface). The crescent found on 
the tombstone merely signifies " second son." 

Col. John Page married about 1656, Alice Luckin, of the County 
of Essex, England. She was descended from the baronet of the 
same name, whose coat-of-arms is as follows: 

Arms. — Sable, a fesse indented between two leopards' faces or. 

Crest. — A demi-griffin or, issuing out of a tower paly of si.K of the last 
and sable. 

This exactly corresponds in outline with that found on the 
tombstone of Alice, the wife of Col. John Page, except that in the 
latter case the arms have a bordure. (See diagram in the Preface). 

* Xote. — A careful perusal of the Preface is recommeaded to the reader. 



PAGE FAMILY 



The omission of the bordure to the arms on the tombstone of 
Col. John Page, appears to have been the error of a sculptor who 
placed it b)" mistake on the arms of the wife Alice, where it does 
not belong. 

The arms of the Page Family in Virginia are, therefore, the 
first above named of Page, of Wembley, County Middlesex, Eng- 
land. Crest, a demi-horse forcene (rearing) per pale dancette or 
and azure. 

Motto. — Spe Labor Levis. 

The'following is an accurate diagram of the original tombstone 
of Col. John Page, now in the vestibule of the Episcopal Church at 
Williamsburg, James City Count}'. Virginia: 



■fl^ 



Here liethinhcfrpeofajoyfull Resurcction 
the Body of CoSlonel John Page of 
Bruton ParismEsquire. One of their 

Majesties Councul in the Doimnioa 



of Virginia . W: 
life the 2) of J 
of our Lor 



Departed this 
inuary in the year 
|6^i Aged 65 . 



^^»y?OT» cie Original 

J/. SUlen/son, p. 




WILLIAMSBURG. 43 

Col. John Page was born in England, 1627. and emigrated to 
Virginia about i650'. when he was about 23 years of age. Accord- 
ing to his tombstone, he died 23d January, 1692. aged 65. 

His wife, Alice Luckin, died at Williamsburg, James City 
County, Virginia, 22d June, 169- (last figure obliterated), aged J^. 
The following is an exact copy of the inscription on her tomb- 
stone, viz.: 

Here lyeth the Body of Alice P.^ge 

■■ wife of John Page of y« County of York 

in Virginia. Aged 73 years. Who 

departed this life the 2 2d day of June 

Anno Domini 169- 

The last figure in this date is obliterated, but looks like 8, thus: 
1698. 

In regard to the above inscription on the tombstone of "ALICE 
Page, wife of John Page, of y= County of York, in Virginia," it may 
be stated that the two counties of York and James City come to- 
gether at Williamsburg, Virginia, so that Col. John Page might have 
lived in York County, although he is buried in James City County; 
or, he may have lived in both counties at different times. 

The following is a certificate from Dr. Robert M. Garrett: 

" \VlLLL\MSBURG, VIRGINIA, I 6th DcC. , 1879. 

I do hereby certify that the records in the Clerk's Office of the City of 
Williamsburg and James City County, Virginia, contain no will of Col. John 
Page, and that the Clerk thereof states that all records of both offices— up to 
a short period before the late war — were destroyed during the war. 

Given under my hand and seal as Justice of the Peace for the City of 
Williamsburj. 

Ro. M. Garrett J. P." [l- s.] 



lis ^■ 












-lliuX 














J^rfZ-Y' 


fe 


\^i}''''S^'' 


-m0 


^fe^ 


'_--' 




"},' 


----' '• 


Sf '. 


/>'/.f;ero e^.'-. 


C"//.-/-. 



(From a dr.i-i<inj: hy Draddy Bros., Broadi^'ay. X. ¥.. 1S7S.) 

MONCMEXT TO COL. JOHN' PA(}E, ESQR.. 

WlLLIAMSBLRG, JaMES CiTY CoLNTY, ViRGIMA. 
Erected Jamuiry. iSjS. to r^pLice the origitial tombstone. 



WTLLIAMSBL'RG. 45 

The following is copied from the Richmond (Virginia) U'trkly 
Statt', of 15th P^eb., 1878: 

" A ver\- chaste but substantial obelisk was erected last month over the 
grave of Col. John Page, in the old Episcopal churchyard, at Williamsburg, 
Virginia, bv Dr. R. Channing M. Page, of New Vork. The fragments of about 
half the original tombstone were found and collected from various parts of the 
churchvard. By permission of the Vestry, these were placed in the vestibule 
of the church for preserNation. The coat-of-arms and inscription are still vis- ^ 
ible, the latter reading as follows: 

' Here lieth in hope of a JoyfuU Resurection the Body of Colonel John- 
Page, of Bruton^ Pari-sh, -Esquire. One of their Majesties Council in the Do- 
minion of Virginia. Who Departed this life the 23 of January, in the year of 
our Lord -69 >^. Aged 65.' 

The date of the year has been obliterated in part, but it must have 
been, originally, i69>^. The grave was marked by a mound of broken bricks, 
etc., by the side of his wife, Alice, whose tombstone is still in a fair state of 
preser^-ation. The obelisk is about twelve feet high, and consists of a shaft, 
die and base of the best Carrara marble, with a plinth of granite, the whole 
having been very neatly executed by Messrs. Draddy Bros., of Broadway, New 
York. It is erected on a solid foundation of brick and cement, extending six 
feet deep, at a total cost of five hundred dollars. The inscriptions; etc., are as 
follows, viz.; Front face: coat-of-arms. Col. John Page died 23d January-, 
1692. Aged, 65. Name and date also on plinth beneath the ground. Re- 
verse: He being dead yet speaketh.— Heb. xi. 4. Right face: the original 
inscription copied from the old tombstone with a notice to that efiFect. Re- 
verse: erected Januar\', 1878, to replace the original tombstone." 

" Their Majesties," occurring in the inscription, refers, of course, 
to William and Mary, who reigned 1690-1702. They were suc- 
ceeded by Queen Anne, 1702-14. 

It is evident that the fragment of date, -691^, found on the 
tombstone of Col. Johh Page, was, originally, 169 ><. This means 
1691 or 1692, and was also written i6|^, 1691-2, or 1691-92, etc. 

The error of the Julian calendar consisted in making the year 
365 !.{ days, w^hich was about eleven minutes too long. This in time 
amounted to days. In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII. ordered the 5th 
October to be called the 15th, and that the years 1700, 1800 and 
1900 should not be accounted leap years. That is the Gregorian 
calendar. 



46 PAGE FAMILY. 

The change frorn JuHan to Gregorian reckoning was made in 
Great Britain by Act of ParHament, Sept., .1752. the 3d of that 
month being called the 14th, and the following year to commence 
January ist instead of March 25th. It appears that O. S. (old style) 
and N. S. (new style) refer only to the Julian and Gregorian calen- 
dars respectively, t\ ^.: George Washington born nth Feb., O. S.; 
22d Feb., N. S. 

From the 14th century up to 1752. in England, the legal and 
ecclesiastical year both began 25th March, which was the supposed 
date of the immaculate conception. After the change was adopted, 
in 1752, by which the legal year began ist January, events which 
had occurred in January, February, and up to the 25th March of the 
old legal year, would, according to the new arrangement, be reck- 
oned in the next subsequent year. 

Bishop Meade, in his <9A/ Churches, Ministers and Families in 
Virginia, Vol. I., p. 146, states as follows: 

"In 1678 it was proposed to erect, at Williamsburg, a good church 
to take the place of two indifferent ones in the parish. Rowland 
Jones was the first rector. John Page, first of the Family, headed 
"the 'list of subscriptions with i;20, and gave the ground for the 
church and graveyard Afterwards his eldest son, Fran- 
cis, enlarged the church." etc. For a picture of this church see 
Bishop Meade, op. cit., Vol. I., p. 146. 

Bishop Meade, Vol. I., opns citatum, p. 195, also states that it 
was called Bruton Parish, in honor of Thomas Ludwell, who came 
from a parish of the same name in Somiersetshire, England. 

The church and wall around the churchyard are built of brick, and 
are both in a good state of preservation. It is usually said that the 
bricks used in the building of this and of other churches in those 
days, were imported. This, however, is probably a mistake. Rev. 
Philip Slaughter {^Hist. of Bristol Parish, p. 90) says: "There was 
no occasion for it, as brickmakers were among the earliest importa- 
tions, and the bills for moulding and burning the brick for the cap- 
itol at Williamsburg, James City County. Virginia, are still extant. 
(Palmer's Calendar of StaTie Papers, 125; ist Henning, 208.)" 

The gates, both of wrought iron, are very ornamental. The 
ivy that now grows so luxuriantly at the east end of the church, 
originally came from Westminster Abbey, England. 



WILLIAMSBURG. 47 

The following is a copy of a letter from Col. John Page to 
his son Matthew: 
"To My Loving Son, Capt. Matthew Page. 

Son Matthew: I herewith present you a New Year's gift, wherein you 
may observ-e the excellency of Scripture learning, which I desire that you may 
read mark, and learn, that you may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed 
hope of everlasting life which God hath given you in the Gospel of our Saviour 
Jesus Christ. You will in this little book see what you are by nature-born 
in sin having in vou an original pravity, indisposition to do good, and prone- 
ness to evil. There is also taught you that Christ by His death vanquished 
death as Himself saith (John xi., 25), 'I am the resurrecnon and the life: he 
that believeth in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live.' Therefore 
endeavor that Christ's death may become effectual to your soul, that you may 
rise from the death of sin to righteousness of life. Keep yourself from sin, 
and p'-av for God's Spirit to establish faith and sanctification in your heart, that 
you may live an heavenlv conversation on earth; that, after death, eternal glory 
may be vour portion. Set not lightly by my gift, but esteem those fatherly 
instructions above earthlv riches. Consider the dignity of your soul, and let, 
no time slip wherebv you may, with God's assistance, work out your salvation 
with fear and trembling. I pray God bless you and give His blessing to .what 
I have written for vour everlasting happiness, which is the prayer of your^truly 

, • r .u ' John Page. 

loving father, •• 

January ist, 1688. 

The little book referred to in this letter, and presented by Col. 
John Page to his son Matthew, on the f^rst day of January, 1688, as 
a New Year's gift, was a MS. in Col. Page's handwriting. It con- 
tained practical instructions of a religious nature, together with quo- 
tations from the Bible. Though perhaps it was never intended ,or 
the press, yet it was so much esteemed by the late Bishop William 
Meade, of Virginia, that in the year 1856 he had it published, it 
was printed by Henry B. Ashmead, George St., above Eleventh, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. There are a limited number of copies. 
These are distributed chieay among Col. Page's descendants, by 
whom the book is known as The Deed of Gift. ^ , t u 

Bishop Meade, in his preface to this b'ook, states that Col. John 
Page died 23d January, 1691-2. aged 60. This is an evident mis- 
take, since, according to the inscriptions on his tombstone, he died 
at that time, aged 65. 



48 PAGE FAMILY. 

At the end of the book there is a notice — written by Bishop 
Meade presumably, though not signed — stating that the book was 
written by a titled personage. This mistake appears to be due to a 
statement made by Gov. John Page, in his brief Autobiography, in 
which he says that Col. Page was supposed to have been knighted 
(see Bishop Meade, op. cit.. Vol. I., p. 147, note). That he was not 
knighted, however, is a fact now well known and easily proved. I 
do not know what became of the original MS. of the Deed of Gift. 

According to the original tombstones at Williamsburg and 
Rosewell, Col. John Page and Alice, his wife, had two children, 
viz: 

1. Francis Page, eldest, bom at Williamsburg, Virginia, A. D., 1657. 

2. Matthew Page, born at Williamsburg, Virginia, A. D. 1659. 

II. Francis Page, of Williamsburg, James City County, Vir- 
ginia, eldest son of Col. John Page, of England and above-named 
place, and Alice Luckin, his wife, was born at the first-named place, 
in 1657, and died there lOth May, 1692, aged 35 years. 

The inscription on his tombstone, at Williamsburg, Virginia, 
is as follows: 

Here lieth in hope of a Joyfull Resurection 
the Body of Captain Francis Page of 
Bruton Parish in the Dominion of Virginia. 
Eldest Son of Colonel John Page of the 
same Parish, Esquire. Who Departed 
this life the tenth Day of IMay 
in the year of our Lord 
1692. Aged 35. 

Bishop Meade, Vol. I., op. cit., p. 196, says that "he died at this 
early age not without, however, being much distinguished as a law- 
yer. To him, according to Henning, were committed several trusts: 
among them the revision of the laws of the Colony, He was a ves- 
tryman of the Parish of Bruton, and contracted for the building of 
that part of the present 'church that was built before the time of 
Governor Spottswood." 

Capt. Francis Page married, about 1682, Mary Diggs, the in- 
scription on whose tombstone is as follows: 



WILLIAMSBURG. 49 

Here lieth in hope of a Joyful! Resurrection 

the body of Mary the wife of Captain 

Francis Page of Bruton Parish in 

the Dominion of Virginia. Daughter of 

Edward Diggs of Hampton Parish in 

the same Dominion, Esquire. Who Departed 

this Hfe the Eighteenth Day of March in 

the year of our Lord 1697. Aged 3- 

The last figure is partially obliterated, but it looks like 2. Thus: 
aged 32. 

Captain Francis Page and Mary Diggs, his wife, had an only 
child, Elizabeth Page, the inscription on whose tombstone is as 
follows: 

Here lyeth the Body of Elizabeth Page dec"'^ 
late wife to John Page of York County, Gent, 
and Daughter of Cap. Francis Page late of the 
same county deceased. Who Departed, this 
life the 12th November Anno Domini 1702 
and in the 30th year of her age. 

There are at present (1883) five graves of the Page Family at 
Williamsburg, Virginia, and the foregoing inscriptions are exact 
copies, in every respect, of those found on the tombstones. These 
copies were made i8th October, 1881, by Dr. R. Channing M. Page, 
of New York City, in the presence of Francis R. Rives, Esqr., of 
the same place, the two being, at that time, on a visit together to 
the Centennial Anniversary of the Yorktown Surrender. 

Elizabeth Page, only child of Capt. Francis Page and Mary 
Diggs, his wife, was born at Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1683. She 
married about r/oi, John Page, an eminent lawyer, by whom she 
had no issue, and died I2th Nov., 1702, aged 19. 

It is not known who her husband, John Page, was. There is 
no tombstone to his m.emory to be found, nor is there any appear- 
ance of a grave by the side of that of his wife. It is probable that 
he was her cousin who originally came from England, and returned 
thither after the death of his wife. 

Bishop Meade, Vol. I., op. cit., p. 197, says: 

"There is also in the Williamsburg churchyard the tomb of a Mrs. Page. 



so PAGE FAMILY. 

wife of John Page, and the daughter of Francis. This John Page was, doubt- 
less, Col. John Page, the lawyer, to whom the Vestr}' intrusted their rights. 
when Nicholson and others sought to invade them The Vestry- 
directed "Mr. John Page (who was grandson of the old vestrj-man of that name, 
who was now dead), an eminent lawyer and member of the Council, to pre- 
sent the case to the House of Burgesses, requesting them to take action on the 
subject, etc." 

This John Page was not grandson, but grandson-in-la\v of the 
" old vestryman of that name who was now dead," for he married 
the granddaughter, and both were named Page. 

It was this case of the Vestry of Bruton Parish versus Parson 
Whately and his supporter, Governor Nicholson, about 1702, that 
led Bishop Meade, Vol. I., op. cit., pp. 150, 151, to write as follows: 

"In the histor}- of the Vestries we may fairly trace the origin not only of 
that religious liberty which afterwards developed itself in Virginia, but also of 
the early and determined stand taken by the Episcopalians of Virginia in 
behalf of civil liberty. The Vestries, who were the intelligence and moral 
strength of the land, had been trained up in the defense of their rights against 
.governors and bishops, kings, queens, and cabinets. They had been slowly 
fighting the battles of the Revolution for one hundred and fifty years. Ta.xa- 
tion and representation were only other words for support and election of 
ministers. The principle was the same. It is not wonderful, therefore, that 
we find the same men, who took the lead in the councils and armies of the 
Revolution, most active in the recorded proceedings of the Vestries. Examine 
the vestrv- books and jou will find prominent there the names of Washington, 
Pe>ton Randolph, Genl Nelson, Gov. Page, Richard Henr\- Lee, George 
Mason, and hundreds of others who might be named as patriots of the Revo- 
lution." 

The Williamsburg branch of the Page Family in Virginia be- 
came extinct upon the death of Capt. Francis Page without surviv- 
ing issue. The second son, Matthew Page, had an only son, as we 
shall see, from whom all the others are descended. 



II. Matthew Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, Vir- 
ginia, second son of Col. John Page, of England and Williamsburg, 
James City County, Virginia, progenitor of the Page Family in Vir- 
ginia, and Alice Luckin, his wife, was born at the last-named 
place in 1659, and removed to the first-named place. He died 9th 
January, 1703, aged 44 years, and on his tombstone at Rosewell he 
is mentioned as " Honourable Collonell Matthew Page, Esqr." 

The following is a copy of the inscription. 

Here lieth Interred y« Body of y^ Honourable 
Collonell Matthew Page Esqr. Ofie of Her Majesties 
most Honourable Councell of the Parish of 
Abington in the County of Gloucester in the 
Collony of Virginia. 
• Son of the Honourable Collonell John & Alice 

Page of the Parish of Bruton in the County 

of Yorke in y^ aforesaid Collony. Who Departed 

this life in the 9th day of Januar}- Ann. 

Dom. 1703 in y« 45th year of his age. 

In the above inscription " Her Majesties most Honourable 
Councell" refers to Queen Anne, who reigned 1702-14. Hon. 
Matthew Page was one of the members of the original Board of 
Trustees for the College of William and Mary, and his name appears 
in the Charter of that Institution as "Matthew Page, Gent." This 
Charter is dated " at Westminster, the eighth day of February, in the 
fourth year of our reign" (1692). A MS. of this Charter maybe 
seen at the Royal College of Heraldry, London. 

For a picture of the College, see Bishop Meade, o/>. cit.. Vol. 

I., p. 157- 

Hon. Matthew Page was a member of the Colonial Council of 
Virginia in the early part of the reign of Queen Anne. 

He married, about 1689, Marv Mann, only child of John and 
Mary Mann, of Timberneck, Gloucester County, Virginia, where he 
probably lived several years before removing to Rosewell. The 
house in which he lived at the latter place does not now exist. 



52 PAGE FAMILY. 

Mary Mann was an heiress, and alone survived her parents; 
hence the reason for naming her only surviving child. Manx. 

She was born at Timberneck, in 1672, and died at Rosewell, 
27 March, 1707, aged 35. She was buried at Rosewell, and the 
following is a copy of the inscription on her tombstone there: 
Here lyeth Interred the Body 
of Mary Page wife of the 
Hon'^'^ Matthew Page Esquire 
one of Her Majestys Councel 
of the Collony of Virginia and 
Daughter of John and Mary 
Mann of this Collony. Who 
Departed this life y« 24th Day 
of March in y« year of our 
Lord 1707 in y= thirty Sixth 
year of her Age. 
In regard to John and Mary Mann, the parents of the wife of 
Hon. Matthew Page, the following are copies of the inscriptions on 
their tombstones at Timberneck: 

Here Lyeth y^ Body of John Mann of 

Gloucester County in Virginia. Gent 

Aged 63 years. Who Departed this life 

ye yth Day of Januar,- Anno Domini 1694. 
That of Mary, his wife, reads as follows: 

Here Lyeth Interred the Body of Mrs 
Mary ]\Iann of the County of Gloucester in 
the Collony of Virginia. Gentle Wo"". Who 
Departed this life the iSth day of ]vlarch 170^. 
Aged 56 years. 

Of the four children of Hon. Matthew Page and Mary Mann, his 
wife, three died infants. One of these, Elizabeth, the eldest, was 
buried at Timberneck, and the inscription on her tombstone there 
is as follows: 

Here Lyeth y= Body of Elizabeth Page 
Daughter of Matthew Page of y= Colony of 
Virginia. Gentleman, Aged three \ears. 
Who departed this life y= i 5th day of March 
Anno Domini 1693. 



ROSEWELL. 53 

The other two children were buried at Rosewell, and the in- 
scription on their joint tombstone reads as follows: 

Neare this Place lye Interred the Body of 
Matthew Pagk Son of y^ Honourable Colon*'' 
Matthew Page Esqr. and Mary his wife. 
Who departed this life the 31 day of December 
An". DOm. 1702 in y^ 5th month of his Age. 
Allso the Body of Mary Page Daughter 
to Colongii Matthew Page Esqr. &. Mary 
his wife. Who Departed this life y= 14th day of 
Jan: An". Do'". 170^ in the 7th yeare of her Age. 

The children of Hon. Matthew Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester 
County, Virginia, and Mary Mann, his wife, were therefore as 
follows: 

r. Elizabeth Page, eldest, born 1690. Died at Timberneck 15th March, 
1693. Aged 3 years. 

2. Mann Page, born 1691. Only survivor. 

3. Mary Page, born 1697. Died at Rosewell 14th January, 1703. Aged 

6 years. 

4. Matthew Page, born 1702. Died at Rosewell 31st December, 1702. 

Aged 4 months. 

The location known as Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia, 
was originally settled by Hon. Matthew Page about the year 1700, 
although the house that was built there by him does not now exist. 
Why he should have selected that particular site is not certainly 
known. It is no more conveniently situated than the location now 
called Shelly, and the latter is of a considerably higher elevation 
than the former, which is quite a consideration in that rather flat 
portion of the country. It is claimed by some that Powhatan had 
his headquarters at Rosewell, and it is supposed that Hon. Matthew 
Page settled there in commemoration of the event of the saving of 
the life of Capt. John Smith by Pocahontas. Many Indian relics 
have been found at Rosewell and in its immediate vicinity, and from 
various accounts it would appear that Rosewell was about the loca- 
tion of Powhatan's headquarters. On the other hand, Howison, in 
his History of Virginia, is quite positive that Shelly, which was 
formerly called Wcrotvocoviico/is, the correct location that marks the 



54 



PAGE FAMILY. 








iFrom a 7uai€r-coior copy by C. H. Sherman, N. V., i8Si, from the original portrait by 
unknown artist, z6gb.'\ 

MANN PAGE, I . 
Founder of the present Rosewell Mansion, ^725. 

Died 24th January, 17 JO. Ag^d jg. 



ROSEWELL. 55 

spot where that celebrated Indian chief, or " Emperor of Virginia," 
once resided. Bishop Meade {op. cit.. Vol. I., p. 335) inclines to 
Howison's statement of the case. The two localities are not very 
far distant from each other, and are separated by Carter's Creek, 
which flows into York River. They are both situated on the left 
bank of York River, Rosewell being on the right bank of Carter's 
Creek, while Shelly is on the left bank of that stream. 

III. Mann Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia, 
the first of that name, second and only surviving child of Hon. 
Matthew Page, of the same place, and Mary Mann, his wife, second 
child (and only one having surviving male issue) of Col. John Page, 
of England and Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia, pro- 
genitor of the Page Family in Virginia, and Alice Luckin, his wife, 
was born at the first-named place in 1691, and died there 24th 
January, 1730, aged 39 years. 

The following is an exact copy of the inscription on his tomb- 
stone at Rosewell: 

Here lie the remains of the Honourable Mann Page Esq. 
One of His Majesties Council of this CoUony 
of Virginia. 
■ Who Departed this life the 24th Day of January 1730 
In the 40th year of his Age. 
He was the Only Son of the Honourable M.\tthe\v Page Esq. 

Who was likewise a member of His Majesties Council. 

His first wife was Judith Daughter of Ralph Wormeley Esq. 

Secretaiy- of Virginia; 

By whom he had two Sons and a Daughter 

He afterwards married Judith Daughter of the Hon'^'^ Robert Carter Esq. 

President of Virginia 

With whom he lived in the most tender reciprocal affection 

For twelve years: 

Leaving by her five Sons and a Daughter. 

His publick Trust he faithfully Discharged 

with 

Candour and Discretion 

Truth and Justice, 

Nor was he less eminent in His private Behaviour 

For He was 



56 PAGE FAMILY. 

A tender Husband and Indulgent Father 

A gentle Master and a faithfull Friend 

Being to All 

Courteous and Benevolent Kind and Affable. 

This Monument was piously erected to his Memory 

By His mournfully Surviving Lady. 

According to Gov. Page's autobiography quoted in Bishop 
Meade, Vol. I., op. cit., p. 147, note, Hon. Mann Page was educated 
at Eton College, in England. 

He was a member of the Virginia Colonial Council when he 
died — being in the early part of the reign of George II. (1727-60). 
He was also a member of the Council during the latter part of the 
reign of George I. (1714-27). He inherited a vast landed estate, 
and was the founder of the present Rosewell Mansion. 

According to Bishop Meade, he made a financial mistake in building such 
a large and costly house. Others say that the account of Bishop ]Meade, Vol. 
I., op. at., pp. 331, 332, is based on inaccurate information, and is greatly ex- 
aggerated. However this may be, he was only 16 years old when his parents 
and grandparents on both sides were dead, and it is hardly surprising that a 
youth thus left alone in the world should be tempted into extravagance under 
the idea that he was rich because he had inherited vast forests. 

The present Rosewell House was commenced about 1725. It was barely 
completed in 1730, when Hon. !Mann Page died, and his body was laid out in 
the great hall, where it remained a short time before it was buried. The 
house is situated on the right bank of Carter's Creek, near the junction of the 
latter with York River, and just opposite Shelly. It is built of brick, with 
imported marble casements, and is three stories high, exclusive of the base- 
ment. It was then, and for many years afterwards, the largest house in Vir- 
ginia. The rooms are cubes in their proportions. The large hall was wain- 
scoted with polished mahogany, and the balustrade of the grand stairway was 
made of the same material. The latter is carved by hand to represent baskets 
of fruit, flowers, etc. From the roof can be seen the Nelson House, at York- 
town, about 15 miles away. It is the tradition of the place that Jefferson 
drafted the Declaration of Independence in this house before going to Phila- 
delphia. This tradition is not only not impossible, but is highly probable, as 
Jefferson was an intimate friend of Gov. John Page, and frequently visited 
Rosewell. For a picture of this house, see Bishop Meade, op. cit., Vol. I., p. 
332. It remained in the possession of the Page Family until about 1838, 



ROSEWELL. 57 

when it was sold, together with the land belonging to it, to Thomas B. Booth, 
of Gloucester County, Virginia, for the paltry sum of twelve thousand dollars. 

Mr. Booth changed the original flat roof to its present shape, covering it 
with galvanized iron instead of the lead, which he sold. After selling 535,000 
worth of lumber and wood from the estate, he sold the estate to John Tab 
Catlett, of Gloucester County, Virginia, for $22,500. The present owner, 
Mrs. Deans, says that her husband, lately deceased, bought it from Catlett, in 
1855, for the last-named sum. The above-mentioned Mr. Booth evidently 
had an eye to profit when he bought the place. The lead was stripped from 
the roof, as already stated, and sold — galvanized iron being used instead. The 
grand old cedars bordering the avenue, some of which are said to have been of 
enormous size, were cut down and the wood sold for tub timber. The mahogany 
wainscoting was detached from the walls of the hall and sold, but being unable 
to dispose of the carved wood of the stainvay, it was whitewashed. Even the 
bricks of which the wall of the graveyard was made were removed. The very 
foundations of the tombstones themselves appear to have been taken away, and 
the large marble slabs are scattered about on the surface of the ground. For 
a ver>' interesting account of Rosewell, the reader is referred to Scribner's 
Monthly Magazine for Oct., 1881, published in New York by The Century Co. 

Hon. Mann Page was quite prominent in politics, and accord- 
ing to Gov. Page (Bishop Meade, Vol. I., op. cit., p. 147, note), he 
was influential in " checking the British merchants from claiming 
even freight on their goods from England," etc. 

He married first, at the age of 21, in 1712, Judith Wormeley, 
aged 17, daughter of Hon. Ralph Wormeley, Secretary of the Colony 
of Virginia. The following is an exact copy of the inscription on 
her tombstone at Rosewell: 

Sacrae et Pise Memoriae 
Hoc Monumentum positum doloris 
ab Honorato Mann Page Armigero 

charissimae suae conjugis 

JUDITHJE 

In ipso aetatis flore decussae 

Omatissimi Ralphi Wormeley 

de Agro Middlesessiae 

Armigeri 

• Nee non Virginiani Secretaij quondam Meritlssimi 

Filliae dignissimae 

Lectissimae dilectissimaeque fceminae 



58 PAGE FAMILY. 

Quje vixit in Sanctissimo Matrimonio 

quatuor annos totidemque menses. 

Utriusque Sexus unum Superstitem 

reliquit 

Ralpham et Mariam 

vera Patris simul et Matris ectypa. 

Habuitque tertium ^Iann nominaium 

vix quinque dies videntem 

Sub hoc Siienti Marmore Matre sua inclusum 

Post cujus partum tertio die 

Mortalitatem pro Immortalitate 

commutavit. 

Proh dolor ! 

Inter uxores amantissima 

Inter matres fuit optima 

Candida Domina 

Cui summa Comitas 

Cum venustissima suavitate morum et sermonum 

conjuncta 

Obiit duodecimo die Decembris 

Anno Milessimo Septingessimo decimo Sexto 

yEtatis Suae vicessimo Secundo. 

The following is a translation of the inscription on the tomb- 
stone of Judith Wormeley: 

" To the Sacred and Pious ]Memor\' of his most beloved wife, Judith, cut 
down in the ven- flower of her age, this Monument of grief was erected by the 
Honourable Mann Page Esquire. She was a most worthy daughter of the ver}' 
illustrious Ralph Wormeley of Count)' Middlesex, Esquire, formerly also a 
most deserving Secretary- of Virginia. She was a most excellent and choice 
lady who lived in the state of most holy matrimony for four years and as many 
months. She left one sun-ivor of each sex, Ralph and Maria, true likenesses 
together of Father and Mother. She also had a third named Mann, who, scarcely 
five days surviving, under this silent marble was inclosed with his mother. On 
the third day after his birth she exchanged mortality for immortality. Alas, 
grief! She was a most afl^ectionate wife, the best of mothers, and an upright 
mistress of her family, in whom the utmost gentleness was united with the most 
graceful suavity of manners and conversation. She died on the twelfth day of 
December in the One' Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixteenth year and the 
twenty-second of her age. " 



ROSEWELL. 59 

The following is copied from the old Family Bible now in pos- 
session of Frederick M. Page, son of Capt. Thomas Jefferson Page, 
U. S. Navy: 

" ]\Iann Page son of Judith & M. Page born the 8th of December, about 
three of the clock in the morning, 1716. On the twelfth day of December (the 
most unfortunate that ever befel me) about seven of the clock in the morning, 
the better half of me, my dearest dear wife, was taken from me, after she had 
endured the bitterest pangs of death about thirty hours, with the greatest 
patience imaginable, and most absolute resignation to the blessed will of God." 

The said Family Bible was printed in London, 1696, and contains, 
besides the Bible, the Episcopal Prayer Book, Hymns, and the Apocrypha, 

The records contained in it are ver)^ meagre and written by different peo- 
ple at different times. The above-quoted memorandum was probably written 
by Hon. Mann Page himself, unless it is a copy. That and a memorandum 
regarding the births of Ralph and ^Nlaria Page (which see) are the only satis- 
factory entries, the rest being in different handwritings and without dates. 

Armiger literally means armor-bearer, but in heraldry it signi- 
fies Esquire (see Preface). 

In a letter from William C. Rives, Esqr., of Newport, R. I., to 
Dr. R. C. M. Page, of New York City, dated i8th Feb'y, 1879, he 
says: 

"One of our nearest neighbours at Newport is Miss Catherine P. Worme- 
ley, daughter of Admiral Ralph Wormeley, of the British Navy. He v.as a 
Virginian by birth, and beyond doubt, of the same blood with the lady whose 
beautiful epitaph you have transcribed." 

Hon. Mann Page married, secondly, in 1718, Judith Carter, 
third child and second daughter of Hon. Robert (King) Carter, 
President of the Colony of Virginia, and Judith Armistead, his first 
wife. In regard to Hon. Robert Carter, Capt. R. R. Carter, of Shir- 
ley, on James River, Charles City County, Virginia, writes as fol- 
lows, i8th May, 1879: 

"Robert Carter (King) was the son of John Carter by his third wife, 
Sarah Ludlowe. The said John Carter was bom in England, moved to Cor- 
otoman, Lancaster County, Virginia, in 1649, built the house and a church 
there, and died there in 1669, Robert 'The King' being then six years old. 

King Carter married, first, in 1688, Judith Armistead, and secondly, in 
1 701, Betty Landon. By each of these wives he had five children. Judith 



6o PAGE FAMILY. 

Carter, the second wife of Mann Page, of Rosewell, was his third child, and 
second daughter by the first wife, and was born about the year 1694- 

My great-grandfather, Charles Carter, of Shirley, married, secondly, in 
1770, Anne Butler Moore, of Chelsea, King William County, Virginia. Their 
daughter, Anne Hill Carter, was born in 1793, but when she married Gen. 
Lee (Light Horse Harry) I do not know. Miss Moore was granddaughter 
of Gov. Spottswood. 
To Dr. R. C. ^r. Page, ) 
New York City. j 

It may be stated here that Sir Alexander Spottswood, Governor 
of Virginia, was Aid-de-Camp to Marlborough at the Battle of 
Blenheim. He built the house now known as the Moore House, at 
Yorktown, Virginia, in which the terms of surrender were signed by 
Lord Cornwallis, in Oct., 1781. 

Judith Carter was about 23 years of age when she became the 
second wife of Hon. Mann Page, of Rosewell, in the year 1717-18. 
When she died, or at what age, is not known. Bishop Meade, Vol. 
\.,op. cit., p. 351, says: "There were tombstones over each of the 
wives of this the first Mann Page — one in Latin and the other in 
English. The latter was first broken, and then crumbled away." 
The children of Hon. Mann Page and Judith Wormeley, his first wife, 
were as follows: 

1. Ralph Wormeley Page, eldest, bom at Rosewell, 2d December, 1713. 

He lived to become a student at William and Mary College, but died 
single and probably young. 

2. Maria Page, born at Rosewell, 24th February, 1714- She was called 

Judith after the death of her mother, and married, about 1735, Wil- 
liam Randolph, of Tuckahoe, Goochland County, Virginia. She 
was the grandmother of Gov. Thomas Mann Randolph, of Edge 
Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia. (See Randolph.) 

3. Mann Page, born at Rosewell, 8th December, 1716; died infant 

The following is a copy of the record in the old Family Bible 
in regard to these three children of Hon. Mann Page and Judith 
Wormeley, his first wife: 

" Ralph Page, the son of Judith & Mann Page, was born at Rosewell 
the second of December about half an hour after twelve at night, 1713. 

Mary P., the daughter of Judith & M. Page, was born the 24 day of Feb- 
ruary, about 8 o'clock in the morning, 17 14. 



ROSEWELL. ■ 6r 

Mann Page, son of Judith ct M, Page, born the Sth of December about 
three of the clock in the morning, 1716." 

The children of Hon. Mann Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester 
County, Virginia, and Judith Carter, his second wife, were as 
follows: 

1. ]\Iann Page, eldest, bom at Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia^ 

about 1 71 8, resided there. He married first, 1743. Alice Gr}-mes. 
Their eldest child was Governor John Page. Mann Page married 
secondly, about 1748, Anne Corbin Tayloe. 

2. John Page, second son and child, born at Rosewell, Gloucester 

County, Virginia, about 1720; removed to North End, Gloucester 
(now Matthews) Countv', Virginia. He married, about 1741, Jane 
Byrd, of Westover, on James River, Charles City County, Virginia. 

3. Robert Page, third son and child, bom at Rosewell, Gloucester 

Count)-, Virginia, about 1722; removed to Broadneck, Hanover 
Count)', Virginia. He married 20th January, 1750, Sarah Walker. 

4. Carter Page, born at Rosewell about 1724. He was a student at Wil- 

liam and INIary College, but died single and young. 

5. Matthew Page, bom at Rosewell about 1726. He also became a stu- 

dent at William and Marv' College, but died young and without issue. 
6". Daughter Page, bom at Rosewell about 1728, and died infant. 

The three surviving brothers, Mann, Johx and ROBERT, be- 
came the heads respectively of the three branches of the Page Fam- 
ily in Virginia, viz: (i). RosEWELL, also called the White Pages. 
(2). North End, or Black Pages. (3). Broadxeck Pages. The 
latter removed to Clarke County, Virginia. 

After completing the history of the Rosewell Pages, we will 
consider the North End and Broadneck branches. 

IV. Manx Page, the second of that name, OF Ro.sewell, 
Gloucester County, Virginia, eldest son of Hon. ]\Iann Page, Esqr., 
of the same place, and Judith Carter, his second wife (by whom 
alone he had surviving male issue), only survivor of Hon. Matthew- 
Page, of the same place, and Mary Mann, his wife, second (and only 
son having male issue) of Col. John Page, of England, and Williams- 
burg, James City County, Virginia, progenitor of the Page family in 
Virginia, and Alice Luckin, his wife, was born at the first-named 
place about the year 1718. 



62 PAGE FAMILY. 

He was probably buried at Rosewell, but at what age he died 
is not known. Bishop Meade, Vol. I., oJ>. cit., p. 352, correctly 
states that "there is no tombstone over the second Mann Page." 

According to the Catalogue of William and Man.' Col lege, he was a mem- 
ber of the Board of Visitors of that Institution in 175S, and is designated as 
•' Mann Page, Gent.'" His son, Governor John Page, in his autobiography, 
as quoted in Bishop Meade, Vol. I., op. cit., p. 147, note, says: " He declined 
the office of Councillor in favor of his younger brother, John Page (of North 
End), who, my father said, having been brought up in the study of the law 
regularly, was a much more proper person for that office than he was." 

Mann Page, the second, was a member of the Continental Congress, from 
Virginia, in 1777, with Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Nelson (afterwards Gov- 
ernor), and George Wythe. (See Lanman's Dictionary of Congress.) 

He married first, in 1743, Alice Grymes, daughter of Hon. John 
Grymes, of Middlesex County, Virginia, who was a member of the 
Colonial Council during the reign of George I. The following is a 
copy of the inscription on her tombstone at Rosewell, viz: 

Here lies the Body of Mrs. Alice P.\ge 

Wife of Mann Page Esq. 

She departed this life the nth Day of January 1746 

In child-bed of her second Son 

In the 23rd year of her Age 

Leaving 

Two Sons and one Daughter. 

She was the third Daughter 

of the Honourable John Gri.mes Esquire 

of 

Middlesex County 

one of His Majesty's Council in this Colony 

of Virginia. 

Her personal Beauty 

and the uncommon Sweetness of her Temper 

Her affable Deportment and Exemplary Behaviour 

Made her respected by all who knew 

The spotless Innocency of her Life 

and her singular Piety 

Her Constancy & Resignation at the Hour of Death 

Sufficiently testified 



ROSEWELL. 63 

Her firm it certain Hopes of a joyfull Resurrection. 

To her sacred ^Memory 

This Monument is piously erected. 

The children of Mann Page, of Rosewell, and Alice Grymes, his 
first wife, were as follows, viz: 

1. John Page, eldest, born at Rosewell, 17th April, 1744, and afterwards 

Governor of Virginia. 

2. Judith Page, born at Rosewell about 1745, married Lewis Burwell, of 

Carter's Creek, Gloucester County, Virginia. 

3. Son Page — died infant. 

Mann Page married secondly, about 1748, Anne Corbin Tayloe, 
of Mt. Airy, Spottsylvania County, Virginia, and they had the fol- 
lowing children, viz: 

1. Mann Page, born at Rosewell about 1749; removed to Mansfield, 

Spottsylvania County, Virginia. 

2. Robert Page, born at Rosewell about 1751; removed to HanovertowH, 

Hanover County, Virginia. 

3. Tayloe Page, born at Rosewell, 1756; died there, 1760, aged 4 years. 

The following is a copy of the inscription on his tombstone at Rose- 
well, viz: 

Here lyeth interr'd the Body of 
, Tayloe Page 

Third Son of M.\nx and 

Ann Corbin Page. 

Who Departed this life 

the 29th Day of November 1760 

in the 5th year of his Age. 

4. Gvvynn Page, born at Rosewell about 1758; removed to Kentucky. 

5. Matthew Page, born at Rosewell about 1760. Died single. 

6. Elizabeth Page (called "Betsey"), born at Rosewell about 1762. 

Married, about 1782, Benjamin Harrison, of Brandon, on James 
River, Prince George County, Virginia. Their daughter, Lucy 
Harrison, married Richard Byrd, and their children were : 
(r) Addison Byrd; married Miss Custis. 

(2) Otway Byrd, and 

(3) Mary Anne Byrd, who married Beverly Kennon, and had 

two sons. 



64 PAGE FAMILY. 

7. Lucy Burwell Page, born at Rosewell about 1764; married first, about 
1784, Col. George W. Baylor, and had the following children, viz: 

(1) John Baylor; married Nancy Fitzhugh. 

(2) Lucy Baylor; married William Brent. 

(3) ]Molly Baylor; married Horner. 

(4) Nathaniel Baylor: died unmarried. 

(5) Eliza Baylor; married Horner. 

(6) Francis Baylor; died unmarried. 

Lucy Burwell Page, the widow Baylor, married secondly, about 1798, 
Col. Nathaniel Burwell, of Carter Hall, Qarke County, Virginia, 
and had: 
(i) Tayloe Burwell; died unmarried. 

(2) William Burwell; married Mar>- Brooke. 

(3) Eliza Burwell; married Dr. James Hay. 

(4) IMary Burwell; married Francis Whiting. She now resides at 
Clay Hill, Millwood P. O., Clarke County, Virginia, and has 
in her possession the portraits of Mann Page, of Rosewell, her 
grandfather, and Anne Corbin Tayloe, his second wife. (See 
Preface.) 

(5) George Burwell; married, first, Isabella Dixon; and secondly, 

Agnes Atkinson. 

(6) Thomas H. Burwell; died unmarried. 

Colonel Nathaniel Burwell first lived at The Grove, near Williams- 
burg, James City County, Virginia. The house is still standing. It is said to 
contain the finest marble mantelpiece ever brought to Virginia in olden times. 
After the death of his first wife, Susan Grymes, Col. Burwell was so afflicted 
that he went to Rosewell and requested Governor John Page to send for his 
young and beautiful widowed half-sister, Mrs. George W. Baylor, for him to 
marr}'. The widow came, but refused to listen to Col. Burwell's addresses. 
The latter put it all to rights by saying: " Lucy, you don't know what is good 
for you. Your brother John and I arranged it all before you came !'' Their 
marriage took place soon after. The ceremony having been performed, he 
said: " Now, Lucy, you can weep for your dear George, and I will weep for 
my beloved Suky !'' 

Col. Burwell built Cart.er Hall soon after the Revolution, and before 
1790. He left The Grove for his eldest son, Carter Burwell. 

The foregoing copies of inscriptions on the tombstones at Rosewell were 
furnished by Miss Nellie Deans, of that place, in 1S79, ^"^ ^^ey are accurate 
in every respect, just as they exist on the tombstones. The Timberneck in- 
scriptions were furnished about the same time, by Peyton N. Page, Esqr., of 
Gloucester Court House, Virginia. 









^€3^^^-^ 






*^;?m^A 












#1^^ 



*y 



^l^ 






■^ 



:tz 












f ^-^ 



^^■^-ka^ 



l€^) 



^^ 







(From the Original Forirait. by Bc^tjamin JVesl, ijjS.J 

GOV. JOHN PAGE, 

ROSEWELL, GlOITF.^TER CoiNTV, VIRGINIA. 
DieJ I Ilk October, jSoS, aged 64. 



M^^m 



6^ PAGE FAMILY. 

V. John Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia, 
Governor of Virginia, eldest son and child of Mann Page, of the 
same place, and Alice Grymes, his first wife, eldest son and child of 
Hon. Mann Page, Esqr., of the same place, and Judith Carter, his 
second wife (by whom alone he had surviving male issue), second 
and only surviving child of Hon. Matthew Page, of the same place, 
and Mary Mann, his wife, second (and only child having male issue) 
of Col. John Page, of England and Williamsburg, James City County, 
Virginia, progenitor of the Page Family in Virginia, and Alice 
Luckin, his wife, was born at the first-named place, 17th April, 
1744, and died at Richmond, Virginia, nth Oct., 1808, aged 64 
years. He was buried in St. John's Episcopal Churchyard, near 
the present east side entrance. 

A tombstone of Carrara marble was placed to his memory, 
November 26th, 1881. It was made by Messrs. Rogers & Miller, 
of Richmond, Virginia, and has upon it the following inscription: 

Gov. John P.\ge 
(coat-of-arms) 

Died 

Oct. nth 1808 

Aged 64 Years. 

Blessed are the dead 

Which die in the Lord. 

In the diagram on the following page furnished by William G. 
Strange, Esqr., of Richmond, Virginia, may be seen the relative 
positions of St. John's Church, Richmond, V^irginia, and Gov. Page's 
grave — the latter marked ^.• 

The portion marked A was built first, and at h, near the present door/i 
stood Patrick Henrj-when he uttered the memorable words, "Give me liberty 
OR orvE ME DEATH !" It was in this portion, also, that the Virginia Convention 
met for the ratification of the Federal Constitution in 178S. 

The shaded portion marked B is said to have been added in 1S36. 

c is the new main entrance to the church. 

</ is a door — it originally led to a galler}-. 

t on the south side was the old main entrance, but has been converted 

into a window. 
f was originally the position of the old pulpit, which was subsequently 
moved, and the present east side entrance was placed here. 



ROSEWELL. 



67 



p is the location of the new pulpit facing the new main entrance c. 

g is the grave of Gov. John Page. 

For a picture of this church, see Bishop Meade, op. tit., Vol. I., p. 141. 



:8F(CAD 




Gf^ACE 



He was educated at William and !Mar\- College, where he was the associate 
and intimate friend of Thomas Jefferson, and his follower in politics after^vards. 

The following letters written by him in his earlier years will be read 
with interest: 

"RosEWELL, Sept. 1 8th, 1772. 

Dear Sir: The bearer of this, Mr. Robert Andrews, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, was educated and took his degrees with credit at the College of Phila- 
delphia. He has lived as tutor in my father's family several years, has applied 
himself to the study of divinity, and now offers himself a candidate for holy 
orders. His morals, abilities and orthodoxy are such that it gave me pleasure, 
when I found he was determined to enter into that sacred office in our church. 
.\s his character is trulv amiable, I heartily recommend him to your notice; 
ever)- civility shown to him will be deemed as shown to myself; and if you will 



68 PAGE FAMILY. 

please introduce him to the most ingenuous gentlemen of your acquaintance, 
as he is ver\- ingenuous himself, you will lay an additional obligation on your 
much obliged and most obedient sen-ant, John Page, ]vy. 

John Xorton, Esq., London. " 

RosEWELL, July ye 2ISt, 1 773- 

Dear Sir: I must beg leave to introduce to you Mr. Thos. Davis, a can- 
didate for holy orders, and a late usher of our college. I need say but little 
of him, as I suppose you are acquainted with his father, and make no doubt 
he will carry many recommendations to you. I had obser\ed for several years 
past a great inequality of the quantity of rain which fell, and judged that in the 
gust of 1769 and some other hea\y showers, there fell as much as fell in the 
same time in any part of Europe; and 1 had fancied that our dews were greater 
than in most parts of the world. I had also supposed that not only our crops, 
but our health must be greatly affected by this inequality of moisture, and that 
both must depend upon a certain due proportion of heat and moisture. To 
be satisfied on this point, I contrived a simple instrument by which I could 
easily measure the rriirth part of an inch of rain. INIr. David Jameson, by Mr. 
Hunt's me'ans, procured such an instrument from London, ]Mr. Hunt causing 
it to be made after his direction. ]Mr. Jameson imported two, and gave me 
one. We have now for thirteen months kept an exact journal of the weather, 
and most accurately measured the rain and dews which fell. I measured at 
Rosewell, 40iVo'^, and Mr. Jameson, at York, 4iruVo (inches?), which fell 
from June 14th, 1772, to June i4ih, 1773. We several times found nearly 
four divisions of dew in our glasses, which were equal to j\-^\^ of an inch on 
the earth. I have troubled you with this long account of our observations, 
partly because I thought it might be acceptable to you and your curious 
friends, as being the first that ever were made of this kind in America, and 1 
may say, with such an instrument, in the world. With best wishes, etc., vour 
much obliged humble servant, John Page, Jcv. 

yohn Xorton, Esq., London.'' - 

He was with Washington in one of his western expeditions against the 
French and Indians. Afterwards he was a Representative in the House of 
Burgesses. In 1776, he was a visitor of the College of William and r^Iar)-; at 
which time he is mentioned in the Virginia Almanac as John Page, Junior, 
Esqr., to distinguish him from his uncle, Hon. John Page, of North End, 
Gloucester (now INIatthews) County, Virginia. 

It was about this period of his life that Gov. Page opposed Lord Dunmore 
in the attempt of the latter to place John Randolph (who went to England 
when the war commenced) among the visitors of the College, and succeeded in 



ROSEWELL. 69 

having Mr. Nathaniel Bunvell (afterwards of Frederick County, Virginia), 
chosen, Lord Dunmore"s vote alone being cast for Mr. Randolph. During 
the Revolution an,- struggle Gov. Page rendered important services as a mem- 
ber of the Committee of Public Safety, and as Lieutenant-Governor of the 
Commonwealth. He also contributed freely from his private fortune to the 
public cause, and was an officer for the County of Gloucester, Virginia, during 
the war. He was elected one of the earliest Representatives in Congress from 
Virginia, upon the adoption of the Federal Consiitution, and continued to act 
in that capacity from 1789 to 1797. 

In the Congressional Record of 17S9, we find, among others, that John 
Page and James Madison, Representatives from Virginia, resided at No. 19 
Maiden Lane, New York City — the seat of Government being at that time 
in New York, from which city Mr. Page was opposed to its removal. (See 
Repub. Court, p. 166, tiote.') In reference to changing it, "Dr. Benjamin 
Rush, of Philadelphia, wrote to a friend, saying, that he was glad that there 
was a prospect of moving it from '■such a sink hole of vice.' Mr. Page, of Vir- 
ginia, on the other hand, who was sagacious, moral, and without local interest, 
except in his own State, declared that New York was superior to any place he 
knew, for the orderly and decent behaviour of its inhabitants."' (Repub. 
Court, p. 522.) 

In 1796 and 1799 he published addresses to the people, and in 1800 he 
was chosen one of the electors for President. In Dec, 1S02, he was chosen 
Governor of Virginia, in the place of James Munroe. After ser\ing three 
terms he was succeeded by Mr. Cabell in 1805. (The State Constitution at 
that time required the Governor to be elected annually by the General As- 
sembly, and permitted the same person to serve only three years in succession. 
At least four years must then elapse before the same person could be elected 
again to that office.) 

The following is a copy of a paper in possession of Thomas W. Page, Esqr., 
of Turkey Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia, signed in Governor Page's hand- 
writing: 

' The Common-ivealih of Virginia, 
To Jacob C. Clarke, Greeting: 

Know You, that from the special trust and confidence reposed in 
your fidelity, courage, activity and good conduct, and upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Court of the County of Albemarle, our Governor, in pursuance of 
the act, intituled {sic), " An act to amend and reduce into one the several 
acts of the General Assembly for regulating the Militia of this Common- 
wealth," doth appoint you the said Jacob C. Clarke, Lieutenant in the 



70 PAGE FAMILY. 

Eighty Eighth Regiment, third Brigade, and second Division of the said Mili- 
tia, to rank as such agreeably to the number and date hereof. 

In testimony whereof, these our letters are sealed with the Seal of the 
Commonwealth and made patent. 
Witness John Page our 

said Governor, at Richmond, this 
13th day of July, 1S05. 

JOHN PAGE. 
Regiskrtd. 

S.\m: Coleman.'" 

At the time of his death, in iSoS, he was Commissioner of Loans, a Fed- 
eral office, which had been conferred upon him by President Thomas Jeffer- 
son. " Hon. John Page was, from his youth, a man of pure and unblemished 
life. He was a patriot, a statesman, a philosopher, and a Christian. From 
the commencement of the American Revolution to the last hour of his life, 
he exhibited a firm, inflexible, unremitting, and ardent attachment to his 
country, and rendered her ven.- important services. His conduct was marked 
by uprightness in all the vicissitudes of life — in the prosperous and calamitous 
times through which he passed — in seasons of gladness and of affliction. 

He was not only the patriot, soldier, and politician, the well-read theolo- 
gian and zealous churchman — so that some wished him to take orders, with a 
view to being the first Bishop of Virginia — but he was a most affectionate do- 
mestic character." 

He was born about the same year with Thomas Jefferson and Col. John 
Walker — the latter of Castle Hill and Belvoir, Albemarle County, Virginia. 

Governor John Page married twice. He married, first, about 
1765. Frances (called " Fannie "), daughter of Col. Robin Burwell, 
of Isle-of-\Vight County, Virginia, and Sallie Nelson, his wife. The 
latter was the only child of Thomas Nelson (Scotch Tom), of York- 
town, York County, Virginia, and the widow Fannie Tucker (whose 
maiden name was Houston), of Bermuda Islands, his second wife. 
Col. Robin Burwell was the brother of Betty Burwell, who was the 
wife of President Nelson. 

Frances Burwell, first wife of Governor John Page, died in 1784, 
aged 37, and was buried at Rosewell, although no tombstone ap- 
pears to have been erected to her memory. Three of their children 
died infants. Their namsus are unknown. The remaining nine were 
as follows, viz: 



ROSEWELL. 71 

1. Mann Page, eldest, born at Rosewell, 1766; removed to Shelly, 

Gloucester County, Virginia, and married, 5th June, 17SS, Eliza- 
beth, eldest daughter and sixth child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of 
Yorklown, York County, Virginia. 

2. John Page (No. i), born about 176S; died infant. 

3. Robert Page, born about 1770; died unmarried, at Yorktown, Vir- 

ginia, aged about 25 years. 

4. Sally Burwell Page, born about 1771; married, about 1790, William, 

eldest son and child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia. 

5. John Page (No. 2), born about 1773; drowned in Carter's Creek, in 

17S4, aged about 11 years. 

6. Alice Page, born at Rosewell about 1775; married, first, about 1793, 

Dr. John Augustine Smith, of Yorktown Virginia, by whom she had 

as follows: 

(i) Robert K. Smith, first of Louisville, Kentucky, and then of 
Lexington, Mo.; died 1877, aged about 82 years. He married, 
about 1825, ]\Iary Fn; of Albemarle County, Virginia. 

(2) John Page Smith; died about 1875 in Louisville, Ky. He 

married twice, and had several daughters and two sons, one of 
whom was killed in the late war. 

(3) Augustine Smith; removed to Alabama, and died in Mobile, 

leaving three sons and two daughters. 
{4) Lucy Calthrope Smith; married, 1835, Ralph Diggs, of Louisa 
County, Virginia. He removed to Alabama, and died in 1836. 
The widow now lives in Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, West 
Virginia, with her nephew, Dudley Diggs Pendleton. 

(5) William Smith; removed to Alabama. 

(6) Rev. Dudley D. Smith, of Wilmington, Del.; married twice. 

Alice Page (ihe widow Smith) married, secondly, in 1812, Col. Dud- 
ley Diggs, of Louisa County, Virginia, and had Elizabeth Diggs, 
who married, in 1840, Hugh N. Pendleton, and was his second 
wife. (See Pendleton.) 

7- Frances Page, born at Rosewell about 1777; married, first, in 1793, 
1 homas Nelson, Jr., second son of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of York- 
town, Virginia. Their daughter, Thomasia, married, 182 1, Bishop 
William Meade, of Virginia, and was his second wife. 
Frances Page (the widow Nelson) married, secondly, about 181 1, 
Dr. Carter Berkeley, ofEdgewood, Hanover County, Virginia. 

S. Francis Page, born at Rosewell about 1781, removed to Rug Swamp, 
Hanover County, Virginia, and married, in 1806, Susan, fourth 



72 PAGE FAMILY. 

daughter and tenth child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, 

Virginia. 
9. Judith Carter Page, born at Rosewell about 17S3; married, about 

1803, Robert, ninth child and youngest son of Gov. Thomas Nelson. 

of Yorktown, Virginia. Being Chancellor of William and Mary 

College, he was called Chancellor Nelson. 
Thus there were twelve children of Gov. John Page and Frances Bur- 
well, his first wife, three of whom died infants, names unknown. Of the re- 
maining nine, five married sons and daughters of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of 
Yorktown, Virginia. 

Gov. John Page married, secondly, 1789, in New York City. 
Margaret, daughter of William Lowther, of Scotland. She was vis- 
ited by Gen'l La Fayette, 20th October, 1824, at Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia, while he was on his way from Yorktown to Richmond, dur- 
ing his last visit to America. Although Gov. Page was now dead, 
his name appeared among those of other patriots of the Revolution, 
on the obelisk that was temporarily erected at the main entrance to 
the Capitol Square at Richmond, Virginia, during the celebration of 
Gen'l La Fayette's visit. 

There were eight children by the second marriage, as fol- 
lows, viz: 

1. Margaret Lowther Page, born at Rosewell about 1790; married, first, 

about 1 8 ID, John H. Blair, of Elmington, Hanover County, Virginia, 

and had : 

(i) Archie Blair; died in Kentucky, leaving a widow and daughter. 

(2) Margaret McLean Blair; unmarried. 

(3) Mary Anne Beverly Blair; married a son of Richard Anderson, 
of Richmond, Virginia, by his first wife. 

(4) Fanny Adams Blair; married another son of Richard Anderson, 

of Richmond, Virginia, by his first wife. 

Margaret Lowiher Page (the widow Blair) married, secondly, the 
above-mentioned Richard Anderson, of Richmond, Virginia, 
and was his second wife. He was the father of her two sons-in- 
law. By the second marriage, she had: 

(i) Richard Lowther Anderson; died infant. 

(2) Margaret Anderson; brought up by her aunt, Mrs. John Minor 
Botts. 

2. William Lowther Page; died infant. 



ROSEWELL. 73 

3. ]\rary Mann Page; ditto. 

4. Gregor}- Page; a ver}' talented youth; was drowned while a student at 

William and Man- College. 

5. John Page; died unmarried in 1S3S. He was a very cultivated and 

polished gentleman, who had traveled a great deal. 

6. John William Page; died infant. 

7. Barbara Page, born at Rosewell about 1795; died, unmarried, at Wil- 

liamsburg, Virginia, about 1S64, aged 69 years. 

8. Lucy Burwell Page, youngest of the twenty children of Gov. John Page, 

was born at Rosewell, in 1S07. She married, 182S, Hon. Robert 
Saunders, of Williamsburg, James City Count\', Virginia. He died 
about 1870. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Saunders removed 
to the Louise Home, established in Washington, D. C, by the liber- 
ality of Hon. W. W. Corcoran, of that city. The children of Hon. 
Robert Saunders and Lucy, his wife, were Barbara, Lelia, Robert 
(died infant), Robert, Lucy (died infant), John (ditto), and Page. 
We now return to the children of Mann Page, the second, of Rosewell, 
Gloucester County, Virginia, and Anne Corbin Tayloe, his second wife. 

V. Mann Page, of Mansfield, Spottsylvania County, Virginia, 
eldest son and child of Mann Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, 
Virginia, and Anne Corbin Tayloe, his second wife, was born at the 
last-named place about 1749, and removed to the first-named place. 

He married, i8th April, 1776, Mary Tayloe, fifth child and 
daughter of John Tayloe, of Spottsylvania County, Virginia, and 
Rebecca Plater, his wife. 

John Tayloe died i8th April, 1779. He married, nth July, 
1747, Rebecca, daughter of Hon. George Plater, of Maryland. The 
children of Mann Page and Mary Tayloe, his wife, were as follows, 
viz: 

1. Maria Page, bom about 1777; married Lewis Burwell. 

2. Lucy Gwynn Page, bom about 1779; married Josiah Tidball. 

3. 'Ma.nn Page, born about 1781; married, but name of wife is unknown. 

Their son, Mann Page, married Miss Willis, of Orange County, Vir- 
ginia. No issue known. 

V. Robert Page, second son and child of ]Mann Page, of Rose- 
well, Gloucester County, Virginia, and Anne Corbin Tayloe, his 
second wife, was born at Rosewell, about 1751, and removed to 
Hanovertown, Hanover County, Virginia. 



74 PAGE FAMILY. 

He married, about 1776. Elizabeth Carter, daughter of Charles 
Carter, of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Their children were: 

1. Elizabeth Page (called " Betsey ''). born about 1777; married about 

1797, Philip Bur,vel!, of Chapel Hill, Frederick County, Virginia, 
son of Col. Nathaniel Burwell, of Carter Hall, Clarke County, Vir- 
ginia, and Susan Gr\mes, his first wife. No issue known. 

2. Charles Page, born about 1778; married in Sept'r, 1799, Sally Cary, 

fourth daughter and sixth child of Col. William Nelson, of the Dorrill, 
Hanover County, Virginia, who was the eldest son and child of 
Secretar}- Thomas Nelson, of Vorktown. Virginia. (See Nelson. ) 

3. Mann Page, born about 17S0; married, about 1803, Mar}- Chiswell 

Nelson, sister of his brother Charles' wife. 

V. GWYXN Page, fourth son and child of Mann Page, of Rose- 
well, Gloucester County, Virginia, and Anne Corbin Tayloe, his 
.second wife, was born at Rosewell, about 1758, and removed to 
Kentucky. 

He married twice — the names of both wives being unknown — 
and had three children, as follows, viz: 

1. Dr. Matthew Page, born about 1789; removed to Clarke County, Vir- 

ginia, and married, about 1814, Mar>- Randolph (called "Polly"), 
daughter of Archie Car\- Randolph, of that county, who was the 
eldest son of Thomas Isham Randolph, of Dungeness, Gooch- 
land County, Virginia. (See Randolph.) Their children were (i) 
Archie Cary Page, (2) Gwynn Page, (3) William Meade Page, and (4) 
Matthewella Page (called 'Olattie"), who married, about 1841, Ben- 
jamin Harrison, Jr., of "Berkeley" (Harrison's Landing), on James 
River, Charles City County, Virginia. 

2. G\\ynn Page, of Louisville, Ky., an eminent lawyer. He removed 

to San Francisco, Cal., and amassed a large fortune. He died un- 
married, and left his money to his sister Lucy. 

3. Lucy Page, of San Francisco, Cal., unmarried. 

VL Manx Page, of Shelly, Gloucester County, Virginia, eldest 
son and child of Gov. John Page, of Rosewell, same county, Vir- 
ginia, and Frances (called " Fannie") Burwell, his first wife; eldest 
son and child of Mann Page, of the same place, and Alice Grymes, 
his first wife; eldest son and child of the Hon. Mann Page, Esqr., of 
the same place, and Judith Carter, his second wife (by whom alone 



ROSEWELL. 75 

he had surviving male issue); second and only surviving child of 
Hon. Matthew Page, of same place, and Mary ]\Iann, his wife, second 
(and onl\- son having male issue) of Col. John Page, of England and 
Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia, progenitor of the Page 
Famil>- in \*irginia, and Alice Luckin, his wife, was born at Rose- 
well, the second above-named place, in 1766, and died 24th August, 
18 1 3, at Mt. Air. Hanover County, Virginia, aged 47 years. 

He was buried at Airwell. the seat of the Berkeleys, in Hanover 
County, Virginia. 

He founded Shelly, on York River, Gloucester County, Vir- 
ginia, in 1794. It is situated on the hill opposite Rosewell, across 
Carter's Creek. 

The original name for this place was Werowocomico, and is said to have 
been the location of Powhattan's Headquarters, where Pocahontas is said to 
have saved the life of Captain John Smith. The name being difficult of pro- 
nunciation, it was changed by Gov. Page to Shelly, on account of ihe great 
quantity of shells found there. (See Bishop Meade, op. cit.. Vol. I., p. 335.) 

He married, 5th June, 1788, Elizabeth Nelson, eldest daughter 
and sixth child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown. York County, 
Virginia, and Lucy Grymes, his wife, and their children were as 
follows, viz: 

1. John Page, eldest, born at Shelly, 7th March, 1789; died there 31st Jan- 

uar}', I Si 7, aged 28 years — from disease contracted during sen-ice in 
the war of 18 12, and from excessive blood-letting by his physicians. 
He married, in 18 12, Elizabeth (called "Betsey"') Perin, of Glouces- 
ter County, Virginia. Xo surviving issue. She married, secondly, 
the eminent lawyer, Thomas J. Michie, of Staunton, Augusta County, 
Virginia. No issue. 

2. Lucy Mann Page, born 9th February-, 1790; married, about 181 1, Dr. 
Nathaniel Nelson, of The Lodge, Hanover County, Virginia. He 
was the youngest son and fourth child of Col. Hugh Nelson, of 
Yorktown, Virginia, and Judith Page, his wife. (See Nelson.) 

3. Frances Burwell Page (called " Fannie "), born 15th July, 1791; mar- 
ried, about 18 13, Major William Perin, of Goshen, Gloucester 
County, \'irginia. She died 20th INIay, 18 19, aged 28 years. Their 
daughter, Anna Louise Perin, married, about 1838, Wyndham Kemp, 
of Gloucester County, Virginia, and died, leaving three children, viz: 



PAGE FAMILY. 

(i) Perin Kemp, lawyer; Gloucester Court House, Virginia. 

(2) Emily Kemp, married Peyton X. Page, of same place. 

(3) Wyndham Kemp, Jr., of Texas. 

Ellen Perin, sister of Anna Louise Perin, died single. 

4. Thomas Nelson Page, born 5th October, 1792; married ist Feby,. 

1827, Juliana, daughter of Isham Randolph, of Richmond. Virginia. 
She was the sister of Fanny P. Randolph, the wife of William N. 
Page, of the North End branch. (See Randolph.) 

5. Mann Page, born 9th June, 1794; married, first, 18 19, Judith Nelson. 
of Hanover Count}-, Virginia. He married, secondly, Anne Page 
Jones, of Gloucester County, Virginia. 

6. Eliza Nelson Page, born October 15th, 1795; married, 1830, Benjamin 

Pollard, of Norfolk City, Virginia. Their only child. Ellen Pollard, 
married, about 1853, Mr. Marsden, of the same place. 

7. William Nelson Page, born July 20th, 1797, died unmarried at 'Sh. 

Air, Hanover County, Virginia, in 1S29, aged 32 years. 

8. Mar>- Jane Page, bom October 3Cth, 1798; married, about 1832. 
Archie McGill, of Winchester, Frederick Count}-, Virginia, and after- 
wards of Barley Wood, same county, Virginia. No issue. 

9. Dr. Warner Lewis Page, born March loth, 1800; died unmarried, at 

Rugswamp, Hanover County, Virginia, 26th ^^larch, 1822, aged 22 
years. 

10. Sally Burwell Page, born 8th May, 1802; died single, at Shelly, in 

1869, aged 67 years. 

11. Ann (called "Nancy") Page, bom loth Febman-, 1803; married 24th 

April, 1823, Francis K. Nelson, of Cloverfields, Albemarle County, 
Virginia, and was his first wife. He was the eldest son and child of 
Hon. Hugh Nelson, of Belvoir, same county. (See Nelson.) 

12. Philip L. G. Page, bom 2Sth Sept'r, 1805; died single, at Shelly, ist 
April, 1 82 1, aged 16 years. 

13. Robert Nelson Page, born 13th Dec'r, 1806; died single, 15th Aug- 
ust, 1824, aged 18 years. 

14. Thomas Jefferson Page, bom Sth January, 1808; married, in 1838. 

Benjamina Price, of Loudon County, Virginia. 

15. Comelia ^L Page, fifteenth and last child of Mann Page, of Shelly, 

and Elizabeth Nelsun, his wife, was born 29th April, 1809, and mar- 
ried, at Alexandria, Virginia, 23d Dec'r, 1835, Lieutenant .-Vlberto- 
Griffith, U. S. Navy. During a storm on the Pacific Ocean he burst 
a blood-vessel on board ship, and died. Their only child. Mar}- Jane 
Griffidi, unmarried, resides with her mother at Shelly, Gloucester 
Couniv, Virginia. * 



ROSEWELL. ' yj 

VI. Fran'CIs Page, of Rugswamp. Hanover County, Vir- 
ginia, eighth child and fifth son of G.ov. John Page, of Rosewell, 
Gloucester County, Virginia, and Frances (called " Fannie") Bur- 
well, his first wife, was born at Rosewell, about 1781, and married, 
in 1806, Susan (called "Suky"), fourth daughter and tenth child of 
Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia, and Lucy Grymes, his 
wife. Their children were as follows, viz: 

1. Anzoleite Page, bom 1S07; married, in 1851, Rev. William X. Pendle- 

ton, of Lexington, Virginia. (See Pendleton.) 

2. Thomas Lucius Page, eldest son, resided at Rugswamp, Hanover 

County, Virginia, and died there, single, in 1861, aged 52 years. 

3. Francis Mann Page, born about 1S13; married, 1854, Victorine 

Valette, of Baltimore, Maryland, and had five children, viz: (1) John 
Randolph Grymes, (2) Victorine, (3) Rosalie Rosewell, (4) Marie, 
and (5) Edmund Shelly. 

4. Anne Rose Page, born 1815: unmarried, removed to Oakland, Han- 

over County, Virginia, the residence of Capt. Thomas Nelson. 

5. Frances Burwell Page (called ''Fannie "), born about 181S; married, 

1838, Philip N. Meade. Their children were: (i) William; married 
in Louisa County, Virginia. No issue. (2) Everard, minister in 
the Episcopal Church. (3) Philip N., Jr., (4) Harry Vernon, (5) 
Susan Page, (6) Mary Nelson, (7) Fannie. Four others died infants. 
Philip N. jNIeade resided at [Mountain View, Clarke County, Vir- 
ginia. He was the eldest son of Bishop William Meade, of Virginia, 
and Mar}- Nelson, his first wife, daughter of Philip Nelson, of Clarke 
County, Virginia. After the death of her husband, [Mrs. Fannie B. 
P. Meade removed to the Louise Home, Washington, D. C. 

6. John Page, born about 1S22: removed to Oakland, Hanover County 

Virginia, where he married, 1S47, Elizabeth Burwell (called " Bet- 
sey ■'), fourth daughter and eighth child of Capt. Thomas Nelson, of 
the same place. Three children, as follows: (i) Rev. Francis Page, 
of the Episcopal Church: (2) Thomas N. Page, lawyer, Richmond, 
Virginia; (3) Rosewell Page, lawyer, Danville, Virginia. 

7. Hughella Page, born about 1824, died, single, 1844, aged about 20 

years. 

VI. Charles Page, of Kanovertown, Hanover County, Vir- 
ginia, about the eldest son and second child of Robert Page, of the 
same place, and Elizabeth Carter, his wife, second son and child of 



jS PAGE FAMILY. 

Mann Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia, and Anne 
Corbin Tayloe, his second wife, was born at the first-named place 
about 1778. 

He married, in Sept'r, 1799. Sally Gary, fourth, daughter and 
sixth child of Gol. William Nelson, of The Dorrill, Hanover 
Gounty, Virginia, eldest son and child of Secretary Thomas Nelson, 
of Yorktown, Virginia, and was her first husband. (See Nelson.) 
Their children were as follows, viz: 

1. Elizabeth Burwell Page (called "Betsey"), bom about 1800; married, 

about 1820, Dr. B. R. Wellford, of Fredericksburg, Virginia, and 
was his first wife. She died leaving one child, who married Joseph 
Atkinson, of North Carolina. 

2. Caroline Page, born about 1802; married, about 1822, John C. Pol- 

lard, of Hanover County, Virginia. 

3. Norborne Page, born about 1S04; married, about 1829, Marv' Jones. 

No known issue. 

4. William A. Page, born about 1806: married, about 1 83 1 , Caroline 

Jones, and died leaving four children, names unkno\\Ti. 

5. Robert C. Page, born about 1808; married, about 1833, Martha 

Temple, and died without issue, in California. His widow resided 
in Kichmond, Virginia. 

VI. Mann Page, of Hanovertown, Hanover Gounty, Virginia, 
about the third child and second son of Robert Page, of the same 
place, and P^lizabeth Garter, his wife, second son and child of Mann 
Page, of Rosewell. Gloucester Gounty, Virginia, and Anne Corbin 
Tayloe, his second wife, was born at the first-named place about 
1780. 

He married, about 1803, Mary Ghiswell, eighth child and fifth 
daughter of Gol. William Nelson, of The Dorrill, Hanover Gounty , 
Virginia, eldest son of Secretary Thomas Nelson. Their children 
were as follows, viz: 

1. Robert Page, born about 1804; died unmarried. 

2. Charles Page, born about 1806; married, about 1831, Catherine, 

daughter of Wilson Car}' Nelson, of Hanovertown, who was the son 
of Capt. Thomas Nelson, the third son and child of Secretary Thomas 
Nelson. No issue known. 

3. John F. Page, bom about 1808; married, about 1833, Lucy, also a 



ROSEWELL. 79 

daughter of Wilson Can,- Nelson. They had one child, viz: Mary 
^Nlann Page, born about 1S34, and married, about 1854, William B., 
son of Hon. Willoughby Newton, of Westmoreland County, Virginia, 
and brother of Rev. John B. Newton, of Norfolk City, Virginia, who 
married Roberta P. Williamson, of Orange County, Virginia, Wil- 
liam B. Newton died leaving a widow and three children, viz: (i) 
Lucy P., (2) Willoughby and (3) Kate. They resided at Summer 
Hill, Old Church P. O., Hanover County, Virginia. 

VII. Thomas Nelson Page, of Shelly, Gloucester County, 
Virginia, second and eldest surviving son and fourth child of Mann 
Page, of same place, and Elizabeth Nelson, his wife, eldest of Gov. 
John Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia, and Frances 
(called "Fannie") Burwell, his first wife, eldest son and child of 
Mann Page, of the last-named place, and Alice Grymes, his first 
wife, eldest son and child of Hon. Mann Page, Esqr., of same place, 
and Judith Carter, his second wife (by whom alone he had surviving 
male issue), second and only surviving child of Hon. Matthew Page, 
of same place, and Mary Mann, his wife, second (and only son hav- 
ing male issue) of Col. John Page, of England and Williamsburg, 
James Cijiy County, Virginia, progenitor of the Page Family in Vir- 
ginia, and Alice Luckin, his wife, was born at Rosewell, 5th Oct'r, 
1792, and died at Shelly, in October, 1835, aged 43 years. At his 
own request he was buried at Rosewell. 

He married, ist February, 1827, Julianna, second child and 
daughter of Isham Randolph, of Richmond, Virginia, who married 
Miss Coupland. Isham Randolph was the second son and child of 
Thomas Isham Randolph, of Dungeness, Goochland County, Vir- 
ginia. (See Randolph.) Julianna Randolph was the sister of Fannie 
P. Randolph, the wife of William N. Page. (See North End.) 

Thomas N. Page and Julianna Randolph, his wife, had only one 
surviving child, viz: 

Manx Page, of Lower Brandon, on James River, Prince George County, 
Virginia, unmarried. He was bom at Shelly, 21st April, 1835, a 
few months before his fathers death. Being the eldest son of the 
eldest son, etc., he is the representative of the Page Family in Vir- 
ginia. Should he die without issue, the eldest son of Major Francis 
N, Page comes ne.xt in order, and after his family, that of Dr. John 
R. Page, of the University of Virginia. 



8o PAGE FAMILY. 

VII. Manx Page, of Greenland, Gloucester County. Vir- 
ginia, fifth child and third son of Mann Page, of Shelly, same county, 
Virginia, and Elizabeth Nelson, his wife, was born at the second- 
named place, 9th June, 1794, and died in January, 1841. aged 47 years. 

He was among those who were appointed marshals, with power to select 
as many assistants as they might deem necessary, whose duty it was to form the 
procession and preserve order, on the iSih and 19th October, 1824. at York- 
town, York County. Virginia, during the visit of Gen'l Lafayette. (His full 
name was ]Marie Jean Paul Roch Yves Gilbert Motier Marquis de Lafavette. ) 

Mann Page married first, in 1819, Judith, daughter of Francis 
Nelson, of Mt. Air, Hanover County, Virginia, fourth son and child 
of Gov. Thomas NeUon. of Yorktown, Virginia. The wife of Fran- 
cis Nelson was Lucy, youngest child of Hon. John Page, of North 
End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, 
his wife. (See North End.) 

Judith Nelson, first wife of Mann Page, was the sister of Philip Nelson, of 
Mt. Air, Hanover County, Virginia, second husband of Jane Crease, widow of 
Rev. George W. Nelson, of the Episcopal Church. She was also the sister 
of Jane Nelson, who married, 1819, John Page, of North End, Clarke County, 
Virginia, and was his first wife. 

The children of ^lann Page and Judith Nelson, his first wife, 
were as follows, viz: 

1. Frances Nelson Page, eldest, bom at Greenland, Gloucester Countv, 

Virginia, 28th October, 1820. Was educated at West Point Mihtary 
Academy, and became a Major in the U. S. Army. Married 25th 
February, 185 1, Susan Duval, of Florida. 

2. Powhattan Robertson Page (called " Posie "), bom at Greenland, about 

1822, and died 19th June, 1864, aged about 42 years. He served 
through the Mexican War as Captain of a company in the 14th Reg't 
Infantr}-, U. S. Army, and was a gallant officer and soldier. He 
married, 1853, Elizabeth (called "Lizzie"), daughter of Dr. Samuel 
Scollay, of Smithfield, Jetferson County, West Virginia. He died in 
18^4. leaving a widow and one child, Lizzie Scollay Page, who re- 
moved with her mother to Clarksburgh, Harrison County, West Vir- 
ginia. 

Mann Page, of Greenland, Gloucester County, Virginia, mar- 
ried, secondly, in 1829, Anne Page Jones, of same county, Virginia. 
Their children were as follows, viz: 



ROSEWELL. 8 1 

1. John Randolph Page, eldest, Physician, of the University of Virginia, 

Albemarle County, Virginia, was born at Greenland, Gloucester 
County, Virginia, in 1830. He married, 30th October, 1S56, at 
Eagle Point. Gloucester County, Virginia, Delia, eldest daughter of 
John Randolph Bryan, of Can-sbrook, Fluvana County, Virginia, and 
Elizabeth Coalter, his wife, who was the daughter of Judge Coalter, 
and the favorite niece of John Randolph, of Roanoke. Dr. John R. 
Page, and Delia, his wife, had seven children, as follows, viz: (i) 
Mann, (2) Charles C, (3) Anne, (4) Delia, (5) Ada S., (6) Joseph B. 
and (7) John Randolph. 

2. Martha T. Page, born at Greenland, Gloucester County, Virginia, 

about 1834; married, about 1854, H. W. Vandergrift, of Alexandria, 
Virginia. 

3. Elizabeth N. Page (called "Betty"), born about 1836; married, about 

1856, James Goggin, of Hempstead, Texas. 

4. Richard M. Page, born at same place, about 183S; resides in Glou- 

cester Count}-, Virginia. [Married, about 1863, Kate, daughter of the 
late Jacob Wragg, of Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Virginia. 
No issue. 

5. Peyton N. Page, born at same place, about 1840, lawyer and Common- 

wealth's Attorney for Gloucester County, Virginia; married, about 
1865, Emily, daughter of Wyndham Kemp, of same countv, and 
Anna Louise Perin, his wife. No surviving issue. 

VII. Captain Thomas Jefferson Page. U. S. Navy, eighth 
son and fourteenth child of Mann Page, of Shelly, Gloucester County. 
Virginia, and Elizabeth Nelson, his wife, was born at Shelly, 8th 
January, 1808. 

He married, at Washington, D. C, in 1838, Benjamina, daughter 
of Benjamin Price, of Loudon County, Virginia. She resided for 
many years at Florence, Italy. 

Thomas Jefferson Page entered the U. S. Navy in Oct., 1827, as midship- 
man. He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant, in June, 1833, and to that 
of captain, in 1855. In the early part of his service he was employed, for a 
time, on the U. S. Coast Survey. In 1853 ^e was appointed to the command 
of an expedition for the exploration of the tributaries of the River La Plata, 
and adjacent countries, from which he returned in 'Ms.y, 1856, after an absence 
ot three years and four months. His narrative of this expedition was published 
in 1859, 8vo, New York. 

In 1857 Congress made a further appropriation to complete the explora- 



82 PAGE FAMK.Y. 

tion of the Parana and tributaries of the Paraguay Rivers. Commander Page 
was assigned to this service, which was finished in December, i860. 

The children of Capt. T. J. Page and Benjamina Price, his wife, 
were as follows, viz: 

1. Thomas Jefferson Page, Jr., bom in New Jersey, 15th Feb., 1839; died 

unmarried, at Florence, Italy, i6th June, 1S64, aged 25 years. He 
was buried in the English cemetery there. 

2. John Page, born at Washington, D. C, 29th Nov., 1840; removed to 

Estancia San Carlos, Bragado, Buenos Ayres, South America. jNIar- 
ried, 1863, Julia Lowr}-, of Buenos Ayres, S. A. He has in his 
possession the original portrait of iMar\- ]Mann, and five others that 
are doubtful and unknown. (See Preface.) 

3. Lilly Page, born at Washington, D. C, 1842, married, Oct., 1866, the 

Marquis Spinola, of Florence, Italy. He died, leaving her a widow 
with several children. 

4. Philip N. Page, bom at Washington, D. C, 2d May, 1847; also re- 

moved to Buenos Ayres, South America. 

5. Mary Bell Page, bom at Washington, D. C, 1848; died at Florence, 

Italy, 1870. 

6. Frederick M. Page, born at Washington, D. C, i8th April, 1852; 

married, 28th Oct., 1880, Sadie Byrd, daughter of A, M. Chichester, 
of Loudon County, Virginia. 

7. George B. Page, bom at Washington, D. C, 28th Sept., 1857. 

VIII. Major Francis Nelson Page, U. S. Army, eldest son 
and child of Mann Page, of Greenland, Gloucester County, Vir- 
ginia, and Judith Nelson, his first wife, was born there 28th October, 
1820, and died at Fort Smith, Arkansas, 25th March, i860, aged 
40 years. 

He graduated at the West Point Militar}- Academy, in 184 1, and ser\-ed 
as Lieutenant of Infantry in the closing of the Florida War. He afterwards 
served through the Mexican War with great gallantry'. From an old U. S. 
Army Register we copy the following, viz: "Francis Nelson Page (Virginia), 
Cadet, Sept., 1836; Bvl Sec. Lieut. 7th Infantry-, July, 184 1; Adjutant 1845 to 
1847; Brevet First Lieutenant for gallant conduct in defense of Fort Brown, 
9th May, 1 84 6: First Lieut. Aug., 1846; Assistant Adjutant-General (rank of 
Captain) May, 1847; Brevet Major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the 
battles of Contreras and Cherubusco, 20 Aug., 1847; distinguished and wounded 
in the battle of Chapultepec; relinquished rank in line, Aug., 185 1." 



ROSEWELL. 83 

After the war with Mexico, the Legislature of the State of Virginia presented 
him with a sword in consideration of his brilliant services. This sword and 
others, together with the pistols of Gen'l (also Gov.) Thomas Nelson, of York- 
town, Virginia, were in the possession of ^Major Page's eldest son. 

Major Francis N. Page married, 25th February, 185 1, Susan, 
daughter of Col. William Duval, of Florida, who was afterwards 
Indian Agent for the Indian Territory, at Fort Smith, Arkansas, 
and nephew of Judge Gabriel Duval, of Washington, D. C. The 
widow of Major Francis N. Page removed to St. Louis, Missouri. 
Their children were: 

1. Francis Nelson Page, Jr., eldest, born at Fort Smith, Arkansas 21st 

Feb., 1852. 

2. Lucy Nelson Pa;e, born at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 29th Aug, 1853. 

Married, 8th January, 1877, Dr. William A. Hardaway, of St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

3. Powhatan Randolph Page, bom at last-named place, 8th Dec, 1854. 

4. Kate Rector Page, born at Fort Brooke, Florida, 7th Feb., 1S57. 

5. Elias Rector Page, bom at Fort Smith, Arkansas, 9th Nov., 1858. 

Died there 1859, infant. 




(From the Orii^iiiui Portrait, by Bridges, Virginia, 17 jo.) 

HON. JOHN PAGE, 
NcRTH End, Glolcester (now Matthews) County, Virgini.a- 

Miitiber of the Virginia Colonial Council, 1776. 



NORTH END. 85 



IV. John Page, of North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) 
County, Virginia, second son of Hon. IMann Page, Esqr., of Rose- 
well, same County, Virginia, and Judith Carter, his second wife (by 
whom alone he had surviving male issue), second and only surviving 
child of Hon. Matthew Page, of same place, and Mary Mann, his 
wife, second (and only son having male issue), of Col. John Page, of 
England, and Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia, progeni- 
tor of the Page famil}- in Virginia, and Alice Luckin, his wife, was 
born at the second above-named place about the year 1720. and died 
about 1780, aged about 60 years. 

He married, about i740-"4i, Jane Byrd, who was one of the 
younger children of Col. William E. Byrd, of Westover, on James 
River, Charles City County, Virginia, and Maria Taylor, of Ken- 
sington, England, his second wife. 

According to Governor Page's letter, extracts from which may be seen in 
Bishop Meade, 0/. cit.. Vol. I., p. 147, note, he was educated a lawyer, and was 
a member of the Colonial Council, in place of his elder brother, Mann Page, 
of Rosewell. In this capacity we find the name of Hon. John Page, of North 
End, in the Virginia Almanac for 1776. He was, therefore, among tlie last 
of the Colonial Councillors. 

He was also a visitor of the College of William and Mary — his name 
appearing as such in the catalogue of that Institution in 1764 — being the early 
part of the reign of His Majesty, George III. 

In regard to Col. William E. Byrd, father of the above-mentioned Jane 
Byrd, it may be slated that his first wife was Lucy Park, daughter of the Brit- 
ish officer who brought the news of the victory at Blenheim to Queen Anne. 
Col. Byrd had no sons by Lucy Park, his first wife, but there were two daugh- 
ters, one of whom was the celebrated beauty, Evelyn Byrd. During a visit to 
England, she was introduced to William Pitt (Lord Chatham), who remarked 
that " he no longer wondered why young gentlemen were so fond of going to 
Virginia to study ornithology, since such beautiful Byrds were there I" Col. 
Byrd married, secondly, Mrs. Maria Taylor, of Kensington, England. Her 
maiden name is not known. The following is copied from a book by Lizzie 
Nicholas, now in possession of Mrs. George Byrd, of New Vork City: " Col. 
Byrd made a second alliance with Mrs. Maria Taylor, elde'st daughter and one 
of the co-heiresses of Thomas Taylor, of Kensington, and in 1726 they came 
to reside in this Colonv " (Virginia). 








F-^-^ -^2-** 









'^^^-'^^^^^i 









{From tJif Ori^bial Portrait, hy Br'uigjs, Virginii, ij 5°-') 

JANE BYRD, OF WESTOVER, VIRGINIA, 
Wife of Hon. John Page, of North End. 
Married 17 41. ** 



NORTH END. 8/ 

Col. Byrd had by Maria Taylor, his second wife, a son (from whom the 
Byrdsare descended) and three daughters — one of whom was Jane Byrd. She 
was one of the younger children, and was born about 1723. Col. Byrd was 
born in 1674 and died in 1744, aged 70 years. He was buried at Westover. 

He was one of the surveyors for establishing the line between Virginia 
and North Carolina. The original MS., written by himself, is at Lower Bran- 
don, Virginia. (For the names of the surveyors of other portions of this line, 
see Walker.) 

Hon. John Page, and Jane Byrd, his wife, were, doubtless, buried at 
North End; but, strange to say, it is not positively known. There are no 
tombstones there, or anywhere else, erected to their memory. As tombstones 
were brought over from England in those days, it is probable that the war of 
the Revolution broke up the business; and, before anything was done in the 
matter, their graves became obliterated and forgotten. 

The North End house was destroyed by fire during the war of the Revo- 
lution; — probably durinfT Arnold's raid in Virginia. 

Hon. John Page, and Jane Byrd, his v.ife, had fifteen children 
in all, four of whom died infants, their names being unknown. The 
eleven that survived were as follows: 

1. jNIann Page, eldest, born at North End, Gloucester (now ^latthews) 

County, Virginia, about 1742; removed to Fairfield, Clarke County, 
Virginia. He married, about 1767, Mary IMason Selden, of Salving- 
ton, Stafford County, Virginia. 

2. John Page, born at North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, 

Virginia, about 1743; removed to Caroline County, Virginia. He 
■ married, in 1764, Elizabeth (called "Betty") Burwell. 

3. Jane Page, born about 1751; married, about 1770, Dr. Nathaniel 

Nelson, 'Second son and child of President William Nelson, of York- 
town, Virginia. 

4. Dr. William Page, born at North End, about 1753; removed to Rich- 

mond, Virginia. He married, about 1778, ^liss Jones. 

5. Judith Page, born about 1755; married, about 1775, ^o^- Hugh Nel- 

son, third son and child of President William Nelson, of Yorktown, 
Virginia. 

6. Carter Page, born at North End, 1758; removed to Willis' Fork, Cum- 

berland County, Virginia. He married, first, in 17S3, Mary Gary, 
and, secondly, in 1799, Lucy, eighth child and third daughter of 
Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia. 

7. Robert Page, born in 1764; removed to Janeville, Clarke County, 



88 PAGE FAMILY. 

Virginia. He married, in 1788, Sarah Page, of Broadueck, Hanover 
County, Virginia. As four other children had died infants — names 
unknown — when Robert was born, he was really the dct^cnth child, 
although the stventh survivor. 

8. INIaria (called " Molly") Page, born about 1765; married, first, John 

Byrd; secondly, Archie Boiling; and thirdly, Peter Randolph; by 
none of whom had she any issue. 

9. Matthew Page, born about 1767; died unmarried. 

10. Thomas Page, born about 1773; married, about 1798, Mildred, 

daughter of Edmund Pendleton, father of Edmund Pendleton, who 
married Jane B. Page, daughter of the above-named John Page (No. 
2).and Elizabeth Bunvell, his wife. Of the children of Thomas Page 
and Mildred Pendleton, his wife, Mildred Page married Palmer. 
There were also Thomas, Henry, and Robert, of whom nothing at 
present is known. 

11. Lucy Page, youngest, born about 1775; married, about 1792, Francis 

Nelson, of INIt. Air, Hanover County, Virginia, fourth son and child 
of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia. 

V. Manx Page, of Fairfield, Clarke County, Virginia, eldest 
son and child of Hon. John Page, of North End, Gloucester (now 
Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, his wife, was born at 
the last-named place about 1742. It is not known when he died or 
where he was buried. He married, about 1767, r^Iary Mason, daugh- 
ter of Samuel Selden, of Salvington, Stafford County, Virginia. 
There are two Salvingtons, viz: Upper Salvington, on Potomac 
Run, arid Lower Salvington, on Potomac Creek. It is not known 
which of the two is meant here. 

Their only known surviving children were as follows, viz: 

1. William Byrd Page, eldest, born about 1768; married, about 1793, 

Anne, daughter of Richard Henry Lee, and sister of General Henry 
Lee (Light Horse Harry.) 

2. Jane Byrd Page, born about 1770; married, about 1790, Major Thomas 

Swann, o'i Baltimore, Maryland, from whom the wealthy family in 
that city is descended. 

V. JOHX Page, of Caroline County, Virginia, second son and 
child of Hon. John Page, of North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) 
County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, his wife, w^as born at the last- 



NORTH END. 89- 

named place about 1743, and died in 1789, aged about 46 years. It 
is not known where he was buried. 

He was one of the original members of the Phi Beta Kappa So- 
ciety that was organized at Williamsburg, James City County, Vir- 
ginia, 15th December, 1776. 

He married, in 1764. Elizabeth (called "Betty"), daughter of 
Lewis Burwell, of King's ]\Iills (Kingsmel), York County, Virginia. 
She was burned to death in the Richmond Theatre, Virginia, 26th 
December, i8ii,andher name appears on the monument erected 
there (the present Monumental Church) to the memory of those 
who perished in the flames on that occasion. John Page and Eliza- 
beth Burwell his wife, had fifteen children. Of these, Robert, John, 
Byrd, and Carter died unmarried, and probably young. Six others 
died infants — their names being unknown. The five surviving chil- 
dren were as follows, viz: 

1. Octavius Augustine Page, eldest, Lieutenant United States Navy, 

born about 1765, and died, in Boston, Mass., June, 1813, of 
fever, during the war of 18 12, aged about 48. He was an officer of 
the ship Chesapeake, and was sick in Boston when the memorable 
fight with the Shannon took place. The news of the British victory, 
and the death of Capt. Lawrence, no doubt hastened his death. He 
was unmarried. 

2. Jane Bunvell Page, born about 1774; married, 23d August, 1794, Ed- 

mund Pendleton, Jr., of Caroline County, Virginia, and was his first 
wife. (See Pendleton.) 

3. Peyton Randolph Page, born about 1776; married, about 1801, the 
' widow Bryant. He died, age unknown, leaving four children, of 

whom nothing at present is known. He belonged to the L^nited 
States Navy; rank unknown. He was captured by the British during 
the war of 1812, and had a hard struggle with some prisoners about 
a rat, that all claimed as food. 

4. Lewis Burwell Page, born about 1778; was a Sailing-master in the 

United States Navy, and died in Portsmouth, Virginia, September 
i6th, 1826, aged about 48 years. He married, about 1803, the 
Widow Read, of Philadelphia, and left one child, who married Dr. 
J. R. Chandler, United States Navy. 

5. Hugh Nelson Page, Captain United States Navy; youngest, and fifth 

survivor, and fifteenth child, was born in 1788. He married, first, 
in 1838, Imogen Wheeler. No issue. He married, secondly, in 
1848, Elizabeth P. U'ilson, and had issue. 



90 PACK FAMILY. 

V. Dr. William Page, of Richmond, Virginia, about the 
fourth child and third son of Hon. John Page, of North End, Glou- 
cester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, his wife, 
was born at the last-named place about 1753. It is not known 
when he died, or at what age. He married, about 177S, a Miss 
Jones. It is not known whose daughter she was. Their children, 
so far as known, were as follows, viz: 

1. Jane Byrd Page, born about 1779; married, about 1799, Dr. Henry 

W: Lockett. No issue known. 

2. William Byrd Page, born about 17S1; married, about 1S06, Lucy 

Segar. Their children were: 

(i) John Carter Page, shoe dealer, Richmond, Virginia; married 

Martha Goff. 
(2) ^lary Jane Page; married George Bargamin. Nothing further 

known at present. 

3. John Carter Page, born about 17S3; married, about iSoS, a IVIiss 

Segar — probably sister of Lucy, who was the wife of his brother Wil- 
liam. No issue known at present. 

There is much more in connection with this branch of the family^ 
no doubt; but little is knowti at present. The following is copied 
from the Richmond (Virginia) daily State, 20th June, 1881: 

" Last night Mr. William H. Page, City Gas Inspector, died at the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Bargamin, after a long illness. While his demise was not un- 
locked for, it will cause profound regret to a large circle of friends and acquaint- 
ances. Mr. Page was made City Gas Inspector at the time of the reorganiza- 
tion of the city government, in 1865, and he filled the office faithfully to the 
time of his death. As a citizen, he was energetic and public-spirited. ^Ir. 
Page always manifested a deep interest in the welfare of the city. He was one 
of the first members of the Konservative Kampaign Klub, and was, as long as 
his health remained to him, one of the most active members of his party. He 
was also a contributing member of the Howitzers. Mr. Page was in the 35th 
year of his age. His funeral will take place to-morrow evening at five o'clock, 
from the Second Baptist Church." 

From the fact that Mrs. Bargamin's name is mentioned in the foregoing- 
notice, it is probable that the said William H. Page belonged to the last- 
mentioned portion of the Page family, though it is not positively certain. 



NORTH END. 9 1 

V. Carter Page, of Willis' Fork, Cumberland County, Vir- 
ginia, sixth surviving child, and about the fourth son of Hon. John 
Page, of North End. Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, 
and Jane Byrd, his wife, was born at North End in 1758, and died 
in April, 1825, aged 67. He was buried at The Fork, with Lucy 
Nelson, his second wife. His residence was so named from its 
proximity to the fork of Willis River. 

According to the Virginia Hision'cal Regisicr, his name appears in the list 
of students who left the College of William and Mar}- in 1 776. to join the Amer- 
ican army. He rose to the rank of Major, and ser\-ed as Aide-de-camp to 
General Lafayette during the campaign in Virginia against Cornwallis. 

"During the visit of Lafayette to the United States, in 1S24, Gov. Pleas- 
ants, of Virginia, loth August. 1824, addressed a letter to him at New York, 
inviting him to be present, at Yorktown, Virginia, on the 19th October follow- 
ing. Hon. James Lyons, of Richmond, Virginia, was deputed to bear the invi- 
tation to the General in New York. He replied on the i8th, accepting the 
invitation. 

At a meeting of the Mayor. Recorder, and Senior Alderman of the city of 
Richmond, 31st of August, 1S24, for the purpose of adopting such measures 
as might be most expedient and proper for the reception of General Lafayette 
in that city, it was ordered as follows: 

1. That the polite offer of the Governor to afford apartments in the Gov- 
ernor's House for the reception of Major-General Lafayette and his suite, be 
thankfull}- accepted, and that arrangements for furnishing the same be accord- 
ingly made. (This was afterwards changed, and General Lafayette was quar- 
tered in what was at that time the Eagle Hotel.) 

2. That as it would be a subject of high gratification to the citizens of 
Richmond that General Lafayette, during his residence in that city, should be 
attended by as many of the officers of the Revolutionar}- war as maybe practica- 
ble to assemble, a correspondence be opened with General Robert Potersfield, 
Major John Nelson, Major Carter Page, Commodore James Barron, Colonel 
Robert Randolph, Captain Thomas Price, and other Revolutionary soldiers of 
Virginia, now living, invidng their attendance in Richmond upon the arrival 
of their distinguished fellow-soldier. 

3. That John Marshall be solicited to prepare an appropriate address for 
the occasion. 



92 PAGE FAMILY, 

present 



4. That Mr. Jefterson, Mr. Madison, and :Mr. Monroe be invited to be 



(Signed,) John Adams, Miyor. 

W. H. FITZ^vHYLSO^•^•, Rccordir, 

Thos. Brockenb rough, Senior Alderman. 

When General Lafayette arrived in Richmond, Virginia, October 27th, 
1824, it is said that the introduction of the Revolutionar\' officers here, as well 
as at Yorktown, was, perhaps, the most interesting and affecting scene of all. 
These aged and venerable men, amounting to forty in number, were presented 
to their old companion-in-arms in the spacious drawing-room appropriated to 
his use, on Tuesday evening, October 27th, 1S24, very soon after his arrival. 
He received them in the most cordial and affectionate manner, evincing the 
deepest svmpathy with them in the recollection of their hardships and dangers 
through which they had mutually passed, and the proud result of their joint 
labors. 

At 5 o'clock P. M. the General sat down to dinner with his suite, the gen- 
tlemen who had attended him from Norfolk, the officers of the Revolutionar>- 
army, the offi.cers of the Federal, State, and City Governments, and the mem- 
bers of the Committee of Arrangements. 

Benjamin Watkins Leigh acted as President of one table, and Dr. John 
Brockenbrough of the other, assisted by ^lessrs. Fitzwhylsonn, Thomas Brock- 
enbrough, R. G. Scott, and W. H. Roane, as Vice-Presidents, General La- 
fayette, the Chief Justice, and :Mr. Calhoun at the right of :Mr. Leigh, the Gov- 
ernor and Judge Brooke at his left; and on both sides and in front were sta- 
tioned the Revolutionar}- officers. 

Toasts were given by General Lafayette, Governor Pleasants, Chief Justice 
Marshall, Mr. Calhoun, and many others, including Major Carter Page, who 
gave the following: 'The memory of Baron Viomenil, who gallantly stormed 
one of the British redoubts at Yorktown.' 

The name of Major Carter Page was inscribed with the names of other 
Revolutionar}- patriots on the west front of the obelisk temporarily erected for 
the occasion on the west of the principal entrance into the Capitol Square, at 
Richmond, Virginia." 

While I was in Richmond, Virginia, in July, 1 861, in the barber shop of 
Lomax Smith, Richmond's great negro barber, under the E.xchange Hotel, a 
street band struck up the Marseillaise Hymn. " Dey could play no more 'pio- 
priate chune den dat now," remarked Mr. Smith; " 'minds me of Gineral La- 
fayette. I used to shave him and fix his har when he was in Richmond." Like 
Gov. John Page, his first cousin, and Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Vir- 





07 



"A'^^ (^^zCt/^e^ V^Xj^->-^ :fT-^^-;7 



NORTH END. 93 

ginia, whose daughter Lucy was his second wife, ?iIajor Carter Page probably 
spent his money freely in the Revolutionary cause, and like them (^but unlike 
Washington), kept no account of it. Consequently, it was impossible for Con- 
gress to reimburse him. 

In regard to the Gary family, it may be said that COL. Miles 
Gary, the first of his family in Virginia, was the son of John Gary, 
of Bristol, England, whose younger brother, James Gary, emigrated 
to New England. 

The said Gol. Miles Gary was born in Bristol, England, A. D. 
1620, and emigrated to Warwick County, Virginia, in 1640. He 
died there in 1677. He was the Royal Naval Officer for James River, 
and was a member of the Colonial Council, under Berkeley. He 
was a lineal descendant of Henry Gary, Lord Hunsdon, and was, at 
the time of his death, the heir apparent of the barony. 

He married Ann, daughter of Captain Thomas Taylor, and by 
her had four sons. Of these only two are known to the writer at 
present, viz: 

1. Col. Miles Car\-, Jr., probably the eldest, married Mary, daughter of 

Col. William Wilson, of Hampton, Virginia. 

2. Hsnr)' Car}-, probably one of the younger sons — the father of Col. 

Archibald Gary of Ampthill, Chesterfield County, Virginia. 

Col. ]\riles Gary, Jr., and Mary Wilson, his wife, had an only sur\iving 
married son, viz: Col. Wilson Gary, who was the grandfather of Wilson Jef- 
ferson C.ARY, of Car)-sbrooke, Fluvanna County, -Virginia. The latter married, 
in 1805, Virginia Randolph, and was the ancestor of the Carys of Baltimore, 
Maryland. (See Thomas Mann Randolph, of Tuckahoe.) 

Mary Car\- (called " Polly "), the first wife of Major Carter Page, was'the 
youngest child of Col. Archibald Car}', of Ampthill, Chesterfield County, Vir- 
ginia, and Mar}- Randolph, his wife, who was the daughter of Richard Ran- 
dolph, of Curl's Neck, on James River, Henrico County, Virginia, and Jane 
Boiling, his wife. The latter was fourth in descent from Pocahontas, as fol- 
lows: John Rolfe married Pocahontas in 16 16; Thomas Rolfe, their son, mar- 
ried Miss Poythress; Jane Rolfe, their daughter, married Robert Boiling; John 
Boiling, their son, married Mar}- Kennon; and Jane Boiling, their daughter, 
married Richard Randolph. Pocahontas died at Gravesend, England, and is 
said to have been buried in the northwest corner of the churchyard there. 

Col. Archibald Gary was born 24th January, 1720, and died in September, 
17S6, aged 66 years. He was a sterling patriot of the Revolution, and was a 



94 PAGE FAMILY. 

member of the Virginia Convention of 1776. He was called "Old Iron. 



-C ----- ■' 









n 



POCAHONTAS. 



He married, 31st ^lay, 1744, ^lar}' Randolph, of Curl's Neck, as we have al- 
ready said. Their children were: 

1. Anne Cary, born Februar}-, 1745; married, i8th November, 1761, 

Thomas Mann Randolph, of Tuckahoe, Goochland County, Virginia, 
who was the father of Gov. Thomas Mann Randolph, of Edge Hill, 
Albemarle County, Virginia. (See Randolph, of Tuckahoe.) 

2. Mary Car>' (No. i), born July, 1747, died, August, 1748, infant. 

3. Jane Car}', bom 12th Februar}-, 1751; married, about 1768, Thomas 

Isham Randolph, of Dungeness, Goochland County, Virginia. 

4. Sarah Cary, bom 23d Februar}-, 1753 ; married, about 1773, Mr. 

Boiling. 

5. Elizabeth Car}-, bom April, 1755; married, about 1775, Richard 

Kincaid. 

6. Henr}- Cary, only son, born 2d March, 1756, died, an infant, 17th 

May, 175S, aged about two years. 

7. Mar}- Car}- (No. 2), called " Polly," first wife of Major Carter Page, of 

The Fork, Cumberland Countv, Vir^rinia. 



NORTH END. 



95 











>1^^\ 



{From the Origituji Portrait.) 

COL. ARCHIBALD CARY, 

AmPTHILL, CftESTERFIELD COL'NTY, VIRGINIA. 
Died, September, /7S6, Aged 66. 

Major Carter Page married, first, I2th April, 1783, at Tucka- 
hoe, Goochland County, Virginia. Mary Cary (called "Polly"), 
youngest daughter of Col. Archibald Cary, of Ampthill, Chester- 



96 • PAGE FAMILY. 

field County, Virginia, and Mary Randolph, his wife. Mary Gary 
was born 4th December, 1766, and died 26th January, 1797, aged 31 
years. She was buried at Presquisle, on James River, Virginia. 
Their children were as follows; 

1. John Car}- Page, eldest, born at The Fork, Cumberland County, Vir- 

ginia, 9th May, 17S4; removed to Union Hill, same county; mar- 
ried, 1 2th October, iSoS, Mar\' Anna Trent. 

2. Henr)- Page, born at The Fork 29th September, 17S5; removed to 

Kentucky; married, 23d December, 1S13, Jane B. Deane. 

3. Carter Page, Jr. (No. i), born 9th December, 1786, died 7th November," 

17S9, infant. 

4. Lavinia Randolph Page, born 15th June, 17S8, died 8th November, 

1789, infant. 

5. Carter Page, Jr. (No. 2), born August lodi, 1790, died 3Cth June, 

1 79 1, infant 

6. Dr. Mann Page, born at The Fork 26th October, 1791; removed to 

Turkey Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia; married, 12th December, 
181 5, Jane F. Walker. 

7. William Page, born August 21st. 1793; died 26th December, 1793. 

8. Mary Isham Page, born 30th December, 1794, was burned to death in 

the Richmond Theatre, Virginia, 26th- December, 1811, aged 17. 
Her name is inscribed on the monumant erected there (site of the 
present Monumental Church) to their memory. 

Major Carter Page married, secondly, in 1799, Lucy, eighth 
child and third daughter of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Vir- 
ginia. After the death of her husband, in 1825, she became enti- 
tled to, and received, a pension from the United States Govern- 
ment, in consideration of his services as a soldier and an ofificer dur- 
ing the Revolutionary war. She was born 2d January, 1777, and 
died 5th January, 1863, aged 86 years. She was buried by the side 
of her husband at The Fork. Their children were as follows: 

1. Thomas Nelson Page, bom about 1800; died young. 

2. Nelson Page, eldest survivor, bom at The Fork, 8th November, 1801; 

died there in November, 1850, aged 49. He resided at The Fork, 
which he inherited. He married, first, in march, 1828, Lucia, daugh- 
ter of Randolph Harrison, of Clifton, Cumberland County, Virginia, 
and had: 



NORTH END. 97 

(i) Man- Randolph Page (called "Polly"), born about 1835; mar- 
ried Benjamin Harrison, son of William B. Harrison, of Upper 
Brandon, on James River, Virginia, and Marj- Harrison, his 
wife, who was sister to Lucia, the wife of Nelson Page. Benja- 
min Harrison died in July, 1862. His widow resided at The 
Rowe, on James River, opposite Lower Brandon, Prince 
George County, Virginia. She sold The Fork, her father's 
residence, about 1870. Their children were: (a) William Byrd: 
(i) Lucia, married, 1878, Dr. E. R. Cocke, of Cumberland 
County, Virginia; (c) Nelson, died infant; and (d) Benjamin. 

(2) Lucius Car}- Page, bom about 1838; died young. Nelson Page 
married, secondly, Maria Hamilton. No issue. 

3. William Nelson Page, born at The Fork, 28th February, 1803; re- 

moved to Ca Ira, Cumberland County, Virginia; married, 1827, Fan- 
nie P. Randolph, and had igsue. 

4. Lucy Jane Page, born at The Fork 6th April, 1804; died 7th January, 

1872, aged 68. She married, in 1827, Jonathan P. Cushing, of 
Massachusetts, who was President of Hampden Sidney College, Vir- 
ginia. Their children were: 

(i) Lucy Cushing, bom about 1830; married, about 1853, Francis 
D. Imng, of Cartersville, Cumberland County, Virginia, and 
was his first wife. They had: (a) Robert, and (3) Lucius Cushing. 
(2) Bettie Cushing, bom about 1835; married, about 1855, Rev. W. 
C. Meredith, of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, and 
was his second wife. Their children were: (a) Jonathan P. 
Cushing, and (3) Lucy Page. 

5. Robert Burwell Page, bom at The Fork, 1806; died, 1837, aged 31 

years; married, November, 1829, Sarah H., daughter of Thomas 
May, of Buckingham Count}- Court House, Virginia. Their chil- 
dren were: 
(i) Carter Page; died young. 

(2) Mary May Page, bom about 1S35; married, i86o, Francis D. 

Irving, and was his second wife. They removed to Farmville, 
Prince Edward County, Virginia. Children: (a) Dr. Paulus 
Irving, of Danville, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; (i) Sarah 
May Irving; {c) Francis D. Irving, and {d) Robert Page Irving. 

(3) Lucy Nelson Page, bom about 1837; married Rev. James Gram- 
mar, of Ashland, Hanover County, Virginia. 

6. Thomas Page, bom at The Fork, 8th June, 1807; removed to Lo- 

cust Grove, Cumberland County, Virginia; he married, 5th Novem- 
ber, 1839, Sally Page, of Clarke County, Virginia. 



98 ' PAGE FAMILY. 

7. Mar)- Maria Page, born at The Fork in 1S13; married, in 1835, Rev. 
George W. Dame, of the Episcopal Church, Danville, Pittsylvania 
County, Virginia, They were both alive in 1S83. Children: 
(i) Jonathan Cushing Dame. 

(2) Lucy Carter Dame. 

(3) Rev. William Meade Dame, of the Episcopal Church. 

(4) Ellen Dame. 

(5) Nelson Dame. 

(6) Rev. George W. Dame, Jr., of the Episcopal Church. 

The following is extracted from a letter from Willian N. Page, 
Esqr., of Ca Ira, Cumberland County, Virginia, to Dr. R. C. M. Page, 
of New York City, dated ist February, 1879 : 

" I have, as requested through "my son, Dr. Isham Randolph Page, of 
Baltimore, Mar}-land, copied from the Family Bible of Col. Archibald Carv^, the 
foregoing information, which is all that is accessible to me in regard to the 
first and second marriages of your grandfather (and my father), Major Carter 
Page. This gives the births, deaths, and ages of all the children of your 
grandfather by each of his wives. All the first have passed away, and of the 
second, my sister, Mrs. Mar\- Maria Page Dame, and myself, are the only sur- 
vivors. I remain your only surviving (half) uncle — within a few days of 76 
years. The Family Bible of Col. Archibald Gary, which was kept at The Fork 
for some years after the death of Major Carter Page, afterwards passed into the 
family of John C. Page — the eldest son of the first wife, who resided at Union 
Hill, Cumberland Count}-, Virginia. 

"The said Car}- Family Bible is now in the possession of D. Coupland 
Randolph and Harriet Page, his wife, at Union Hill. This Bible does not at 
present contain the record of the marriage of INIajor Carter Page with Lucy 
Nelson, his second wife. After the death of Major Page, in April, 1825, his 
widow, under the law of Congress, became entitled to a pension, the legal claim 
to which could only be established by the evidence furnished in the record of 
her marriage with Major Carter Page, in the Gary Family Bible. The leaves 
containing the record of the fact were detached from the Bible and sent to the 
proper authorities at Washington, D. G. They availed in securing the pension, 
but were never sent back. This accounts for the non-appearance, at present, 
of Major Page's second marriage in its place in the Gary Family Bible." 

Ca Ira is a French e.xpression, signifying " that will go." It was a watch- 
word during the French Revolution. 

V. Robert Page, of Janeville, Clarke County, Virginia, elev- 



NORTH END. 99 

enth child and seventh survivor of Hon. John Page, of North End, 
Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, his 
A-ife, was born at the second-named place in 1764, and died at the 
first-named place, ist January, 1840, aged •j6 years. 

According to the Virginia Historical Register, he was one of the students 
who left William and Mar}' College, in 1776, to join the American army. He 
rose to the rank of Captain, and was one of the Revolutionar\' officers who 
were invited to be present at the reception of General Lafayette, in Leesburg, 
Loudon County, Virginia, 9th August, 1825, during the last visit of that dis- 
tinguished officer to the Cuited States. This occurred on the return of Gen- 
eral Lafayette from Oakhill, Loudon County, Virginia, the residence of Presi- 
dent James Monroe, near Leesburg. According to Lanman's Dictionary 0/ 
Congress, Captain Robert Page was a Representative in the United States Con- 
gress, from Virginia, 1 799-1 801. 

Hon. Robert Page married, in 1788, Sarah W. Page, who died 
4th April, 1843, aged 6j. She was the youngest surviving child of 
his uncle, Robert Page, of Broadneck, Hanover County, Virginia, 
and was, therefore, his first cousin. (See Broadneck.) Their chil- 
dren were as follows: 

1. Jane Byrd Page, bom at Janeviile, Clarke County Virginia, in 1789; 

married, in 1812, John W. Page, of the same county. 

2. John Page, eldest son, born at Janeviile, Clarke County, Virginia, 2d 

September, 1792; removed to North End, same county, Virginia. 
He married, first, in 18 19, Jane Nelson, ofMt. Air, Hanover County, 
Virginia; and, secondly, in 1836, Sarah Williamson, of Glenoker, 
Fauquier County, Virginia. He had issue by both his wives. 

3. Sarah Walker Page (called "Sally"), bom at Janeviile, 30th December, 

1793; died unmarried. 
4- Robert Page, born 23d June, 1795; died infant. 

5. Judith Carter Page, bom 25th April, 1800; died single. 

6. Catherine Page, born 23d October, 1803; died infant. 

7. Mar>' Mann Page, born 29th March, 1805; married, in 1832, Joseph 

A. Williamson, of Orange Court House, Virginia. She died in 1876, 
aged 70 years, and was buried at Tappahannock, Essex County, Vir- 
ginia. Their children were: 
(i) Robert Page Williamson, died single, 1854, aged 21 years. 

(2) Sally Page Williamson, ditto, 1872, aged -^j years. 

(3) Williams Williamson, ditto, 1858, aged 22 years. 



100 PAGE FAMILY. 

(4) Roberta Page Williamson, bom in 184 1; married, in 1862, Rev. 
John B. Newton, of the Episcopal Church, Norfolk City, Vir- 
ginia, and has seven surviving children. 

(5) Joseph A. Williamson, Jr. ; married, about 1868, Nellie, daugh- 

ter of Dr. Thomas McGill, of Mar}-land, and has four children. 
8. Robert Walker Page, born 17th April, 1807; died single. 

VI. William Byrd Page, of Fairfield, Clarke County, Vir- 
ginia, eldest son and child of Mann Page, of the same place, and 
Mary Mason Selden, his wife, eldest son of Hon. John Page, of 
North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane 
Byrd, his wife, was born at the first-named place about 1768, and 
married, about 1793. Anne, daughter of Richard Henry Lee, and 
sister of General Lee (Light Horse Harry) of Revolutionary fame. 
Their children were as follows, viz: 

1. William Byrd Page, eldest, born about 1794; single. 

2. Mary Anne Page, born about 1796; died in December, 1873, '^o^'^ 

about 77 years. She married, about 18 16, General Roger Jones, 
Adjutant-General United States Army, and had twelve children, as 
follows, viz: 

(i) William Page Jones, single, graduated at the West Point Military 
Academy, 1S40; was killed same year by the falling of his horse. 

(2) Catesby ap Roger Jones; married Gertrude Tart, of Selma, Ala- 

bama, and died there in June, 1877, leaving a widow and five 
children. 

(3) Letitia Corbin Jones; died, unmarried, in Georgetown, D. C, 

January-, 1869. 

(4) Mar)' Jones; unmarried. 

(5) Dr. Eusebius Lee Jones, of New York City and California. He 
married, first, Julia Stewart, of King George County, Virginia, 
and had one child. He married, secondly, about 1873, Martha 
Moran, of New York City. Dr. Jones died, in Oakland, Cal., in 
Januar)-, 1876. 

(6) Edmonia Page Jones; unmarried. 

(7) Roger Jones, Inspector-General United States Army, Washing- 

ton, D. C. He graduated at West Point Military Academy in 
1 85 1, and married Frederica B. Jones, of New York.. They have 
three children. 

(8) Walter Jones; died, 1876. He married Miss Brooks, of Mobile, 

Alabama, who died about 1873. They had three children. 



4 

NORTH END. lOI 

(9) Charles Lucian Jones; married Mary Anderson, of Wilmington, 
North Carolina, who died about 1871. No issue. 

(10) Thomas Skelton Jones; married in Nashville, Tennessee. 

(11) Virginia Byrd Jones; unmarried. 

(12) Winfield Scott Jones; unmarried; banker in San Francisco, 

California. 

3. Rev. Charles Henry Page, second son, and eldest to have issue, was 

born 1801, He married, 1S27, Gabriella Crawford, of Amherst 
County, Virginia. 

4. Mann Randolph Page, born about 1S03; married; name of wife 

unknown. His daughter, Jane Byrd Page, married, nth May, 1S54, 
Guerdon H. Pendleton, of Clarke County, Virginia. (See Pen- 
dleton. ) 

5. Jane Byrd Page, born about 1805; unmarried. 

6. Captain Richard L. Page, United States Navy, born about 1807; 

resided at Norfolk, Virginia; married, about 1S32, Alexina Taylor, 
of same city. Walter H. Page, born about 1850,13 the only child 
known at present. 

7. Car)- Selden Page, bom about 1809; unmarried. 

8. Dr. Thomas Page, born about 181 1; married; name of wife and resi- 

dence unknown. 

9. Edmonia Page, born about 18 13; married, about the year 1S33, Hall 

Neilson. 

VI. Hugh Nelson Page, of Norfolk City, Virginia, Captain 
United States Navy, fifteenth and youngest child of John Page, of 
Caroline County, Virginia, and Elizabeth (called " Betty ") Bur- 
well, his wife, second son and child of Hon. John Page, of North 
End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, 
his wife, was born at the second-named place in Septenriber, 1788, 
and died at the first-named place, 3d June, 187 1, aged 82 years. 

Hugh N. Page entered the United States Navy as midshipman, ist Sep- 
tember, 181 1. In June, 181 2, he was ordered to the gunboat squadron, sta- 
tioned at Norfolk City, Virginia, for the protection of that harbor. On August 
13th, same year, he was ordered to Commodore Chauncey's squadron, on Lake 
Ontario; but left this, and joined Commodore Perry, on Lake Erie — volun- 
teers for this service having been called for. He was assigned to duty on board 
the schooner 7/^rcJj, Lieutenant Conklin, September nth, 181 1. He took 
an active part in the Battle of Lake Erie, which began at 12 M. and closed 



I02 PAGE FAMILY. 

at 3 P. M., same day. In this action he behaved with great gallantn-, and was 
wounded in the hand. He was placed in charge of the prisoners, and had the 
honor of bearing to General Harrison, who was then stationed at the mouth of 
Sandusky River, the immortal dispatch from Commodore Perr}-, "We h.ave 

MET THE ENEMY .\ND THEV ARE OURS." 

For his brilliant services on this occasion, young Page was voted a sword 
by the United States Congress, and one by the State of Virginia also. 

He was ne.\:t ordered to the Xhrgdrij, which, with others of the squadron, 
conveyed General Harrison's army to Maiden, to attack General Procter, but 
the latter fled at the approach of the fleet. 

In the spring of 1814, he went, under Commodore Sinclair, to Detroit, 
to convey Major Crogan's force to retake ^Mackinaw. Crogan was defeated. 
and his force was taken on board again. After destroying an English fort on 
Saginaw River, and burning a large schooner loaded with provisions, he pro- 
ceeded to Erie, to winter there. After a leave of absence of three years, he was 
promoted to the rank of Lieutenant in 1S18. He was ordered to the flagship 
/o^n Adams, Commodore Perr}-, with whom he sailed to South America. On 
this voyage, Commodore Perr}- died at Trinidad. In 1834 he took out the 
Boxer, with the United States Charge d' Affaires, to Valparaiso, Chili. 

In 1838 he was promoted to Commander, and, in 1843, he was ordered to 
the Levant. Taking on board, at Norfolk City, Virginia, Henry A. Wise, United 
States Charge d' Affair ts to Brazil, he landed him at Rio. He afterwards cruised 
on the Pacific coast. 

When the war with Mexico broke out, he was ordered to Monterey, which 
was- seized, and the United States flag hoisted. October, 1847, he was ordered 
to take command of the receiving ship Pennsylvania, at Norfolk, Virginia. 

In 1849 he was promoted to the rank of Captain, United States Na\y, and 
ordered to the Pacific, to take command of the flagship Savannah. He was 
retired in 1855, on leave pay. 

Captain Hugh N. Page married, in November, 1838, Imogen, 
daughter of Guy Wheeler, Esqr., of Nansemond County, Virginia. 
She died in 1847, without issue. He married, secondly, 13th July, 
1848, Elizabeth P., daughter of Holt Wilson, Esqr., of Portsmouth, 
Virginia. Their children were as follows, viz : 

1, Mary Elizabeth Page, born in Portsmouth, Virginia, I9ih June, 1850; 

died, unmarried, at the same place, 25th Februarv', 1879, aged 28 
years. 

2. Hugh Nelson Page, Jr., bom at Portsmouth, Virginia, 17th July, 



NORTH END. IO3 

1852; removed to Norfolk City, Virginia, and married, 23d October, 
1878, Sallie, only sur\-iving child of Dr. Thomas Newton, of the last- 
named place, and Miss Darragh, his wife. (The latter was descended 
from Lydia Darragh.) No known issue at present. 

3. Holt Wilson Page, born at Portsmouth, Virginia, October 28th, 1853; 

married, 22d Januar}-, 187S, Hattie W., eldest daughter of Marshall 
Parks, of Norfolk City, Virginia. There were two children, viz: 
(i) Marshall Park Page, born 29th October, 1878. 
(2) Bettie Burwell Page, born 30th Jan uar)-, 1880. 

4. Carter Bruce Page, born at Portsmouth, Virginia, 24th May, 1855. 

5. Edmund John Rutter Page, bom at Portsmouth, Virginia, 22d Novem- 

ber, 1857. 

VI. JO^N Gary Page, of Union Hill, Cumberland County, Vir- 
ginia, eldest son and child of Major Carter Page, of Willis Fork, 
same county, Virginia, and Mary Cary, his first wife, was born at 
the last-named place, 9th May, 1784, and died at Union Hill, 14th 
May, 1853, aged 69 years. 

He was a very handsome man, of powerful frame and fine proportions, 
standing six feet four inches in height In his face and e.Kpression he ver>- 
much resembled his grandfather, Col. Archibald Carv'. Even in his later years 
there was a strong family resemblance in his face to Col. Cary's portrait. He 
was a man of great energy and fine judgment, and was wonderfully acute in 
discerning the characters and motives of others. Though he commenced life 
at 14 years of age, as a poor office boy in a st;ore in Richmond, Virginia, he 
accumulated a large fortune before his death. 

He was verv- successful in his last years as a farmer, having retired to his 
farm at Union Hill, some time before his death. He attributed his success 
to the correct business habits he had formed while a bookkeeper in Richmond, 
Virginia. 

All his children were bom at Locust Grove, Cumberland County, 
Virginia. It is about one mile from The Fork. To his two daughters, Mrs. 
Fisher and Mrs. Hobson, he gave the Locust Grove property, and it was 
bought from them about 1840, by Thomas Page, their half-uncle. 

John C. Page married. 12th Oct., 1808, Mary Anna, daughter 
of Dr. Alexander Trent, of Barley Hill, Cumberland County, Vir- 
ginia. She died loth January, 1877, aged 86. Their children were 
as follows, viz: 

I. Lavinia Anderson Page, born at Locust Grove, Cumberland County, 



I04 PAGE FAMILY. . 

Virginia, 2Cth June, 1809. Married, in 1832, Dr. Edward Fisher, 
Sup't of the Insane Asylum at Staunton, Virginia. Children: 
(i) George Fisher married, 1864, !Miss Wcodfin, of Powhatan 
County, Virginia. 

(2) John Page Fisher, called "Pat," of Haxall's Flouring Mill, 

Richmond, Virginia, died single, in 1863. 

(3) Nannie Ambler Fisher, married, 1S58, William H. Kennon, of 

Richmond, Virginia. She died, i856, leaving several children. 

(4) Eliza Page Fisher, died single, 1S67, aged 29. 

(5) Charles Fisher. 

(6) Edward Fisher. 

2. Mary Anna Page, born 26th May, 181 1; married, 1845, John Daniel, 

Esqr., of Broomfield, Cumberland County, Virginia. He died, 1850. 

They had two children: 

(i) Lucy Daniel, married, 1S69, Francis Kinckel, of Lynchburg, 

Virginia, and has several children. 
(2) Anna Daniel, married, 1870, ]\L Lewis Randolph, of Edge 

Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia. 

3. Virginia Randolph Page, born 17th August, 1813; married, 1833, 

Thomas Hobson, of Powhatan County, Virginia, who died in 1850. 
Children: 

(i) Mary Anna Hobson, married, 1854, Mann Page, of Albemarle 
Count}'', Virginia, who died leaving one sun,'iving child, Charlotte. 

(2) Caroline Hobson, called "Caddy;" unmarried. 

(3) Joseph Hobson; unmarried. 

(4) Virginia Page Hobson, married, 1863, Richard Archer, of Pow- 

hatan County, Virginia, and had three children. 

(5) Thomas Hobson, Jr., died single, 1864. 

(6) Ellen Hobson, married Nash, 

(7) Clara Hobson. 

(8) Alexander Hobson. * 

(9) Cary Hobson. 

4. Eliza Trent Page, born 19th Oct'r, 181 5; died single, i6th Sept'r, 1838, 

aged 20 years. 

5. Ellen Cary Page, bom 19th June, 181 7; died single,- 19th May, 1837, 

aged 20 years. 

6. Alexander Trent Page, eldest son, of Cumberiand County, Virginia, 

born 2ist Nov., 1S19; died April 4th, 1845, aged 26. Married, in 
1840, Martha Henderson, of Northfield, same county, and had one 
child, viz: Martha Henderson Page, married, 1867, Mr. Stewart, of 
Alexandria, Virginia. She died in 1870, leaving two sons. 



NORTH END. IO5 

7. Maria Willis Page, born iSth January, 1S22; died 1S62, aged 40. 

She married, 1843, R^^'- WiHi^rn H. Kinckel, of the Episcopal 
Church, Lynchburg, Virginia, and had: 

(i) Francis Kinckel, called "Frank," married, 1S69, Lucy Daniel. 
iif and has several children. 

(2) Anna Kinckel married, about iSjo, J. P. Williams, of Lynch- 

burg, Virginia. 

(3) William Kinckel. 

(4) Maria Kinckel. 

(5) John P. Kinckel. 

(6) J. Carrington Kinckel. 

(7) Alexander Gilmer Kinckel. 

(8) Frederick Kinckel. 

8. Archibald Cary Page, second son, and eldest to have male issue, born 

22d April, 1S24; died in 1871, at Spring Hill, Goochland County, 
'Virginia, aged 47- He married, in 1846, Lucy, daughter of Dr. John 
Trent, of Trenton, Cumberland County, Virginia, and had two sons, 
viz: 

(i) William H. Page, eldest, born about 1845, '^"^ 
(2) John C. Page. 
He married, secondly, about 1853, Lizzie Trent, sister of Lucy, the first 
wife, and had one child, viz: 

(i) Archibald Car>- Page, Jr. 
He married, thirdly, in 1859, Eliza Harrison, of Richmond, Virginia. 
No issue. 

9. Carter Page, born 25th March, 1826; died 31st May, 1826, infant. 

10. Harriet Randolph Page, born 15th April, 1827; married, 1857,0. 

Coupland Randolph, of Richmond, Virginiv^, son of Isham Randolph, 
of that city. They removed to Union Hill about 1865. Children: 
(i) Mar>- A. Randolph. 

(2) D. C. Randolph, Jr. * 

(3) B. Heath Randolph. 

11. John Cary Page, Jr., born at Locust Grove, Cumberland County, 

Virginia, 2 2d Feb., 1830; removed to Auburn, same county. He 
married, first, 1858, Nellie, daughter of Dr. Willie J. Eppes, of 
Millbrook, Buckingham County, Virginia. Children: 

(1) Willie J, Page, eldest, born 1859. 

(2) Mary A. Page. 

(3) Martha Burke Page. 

Mrs. Nellie Eppes Page died about 1878, and John C. Page, Jr., removed 



106 PAGE FAMILY. 

to Clav Bank, Cumberland County, Virginia. He married, secondly, about 
1882, Julia Trent, widow of John Taylor Gray, Esqr., of the firm of Adie & 
Gray, Druggists, Richmond, Virginia. 

12. EdN\-ard Trent Page, youngest, born 20th :^Iay, 1S33; removed to Half- 
way Branch, Cumberland County, Virginia. He married, in 1854, 
Beitie, daughter of J. S. Nicholas, of Seven Islands, same county. 
* Children: 

(i) Nannie Nicholas Page, married in Lynchburg. 

(2) Marv- Byrd Page. 

(3) John Nicholas Page. 

(4) Edward Trent Page, Jr. 

(5) Bessie Coupland Page. 

VI. Henry Page, of Todd County, Kentucky, second son and 
child of Major Carter Page, of The Fork, Cumberland County, Vir- 
ginia, and Mary Gary,- his first wife, was born at the last-named 
place, 29th Sept'r, 1785, and died in Kentucky, in 1845, aged 60 
years. 

He was educated at William and Mart- College, Williamsburg, James 
City County, Virginia, in the catalogue of which Institution his name appears 
in the alumni list for 1804. He lived, first, near Ca Ira, Cumberland County, 
Virginia, where all his children were bom. He removed to Kentucky about 
the year 1 84 1 . ' • 

He married, 23d Dec, 181 3, Jane B. Deane, and their children 
were as follows, viz: 

1. Mary Car\- Page, called " Polly," born at Ca Ira, Cumberland County, 

Virginia, 27th Oct., 1S14, and married, 23d Dec'r, 1840, Rev. George 
McPhail, of the Presbyterian Church. He died about 1870, while 
President of Davidson College, North Carolina. Their children 
were: ♦ 

(i) Jane McPhail, died single. 

(2) Mar}- McPhail, married Rev. Mr. Davis, of the Presbyterian 
Church, and died. 

(3) Henry McPhail, married, and resides in Norfolk City, Virginia. 

(4) Lillian McPhail, married Rev. Mr. Irving, of the Presbyterian 
Church, and died. 

2. Thomas Deane Page, eldest son, born at Ca Ira, Cumberiand County, 

Virginia, 27Lh July, 1816; removed to Henry County, Missouri, 
where he died, 31st Januar}', 1864, aged 48. He married, 1846, 



NORTH END. I07 

Isabella Caileit, of Todd Couniy, Kentucky, and their children 



were: 



(i) Fannie Catlett Page, married 28ih Oct., 1874, William McCown, 
who died 1S75. 

(2) Henry Page, born 27ih Dec, 1849; married 9th January, 1878, 

Maude G. Crews. 

(3) Jane Deane Page, born about 1S51; died 8th July, 1855. 

(4) Thomas Deane Page, Jr., born 20th Oct'r, 1853. 

(5) Calmere Catlett Page, born 24th April, 1856. 

(6) Carter Page, died 30ih Aug., 1S76, aged 16 years. 

(7) Isabella Page, born 2 2d April, 1859. 

(8) John Cary Page, born I2ih Feb., 1861. 

Carter Page, of Chillicothe, Missouri, born at Ca Ira, Cumberland 
County, Virginia, 4th May, 1S18; married Crst, 14th Dec'r, 1843, 
Betty Byers, who died soon after, leaving one child, Henry Cary 
Page, who also died infant. He married secondly, 6th Januar>-, 
1853, Sarah Bell Miller, of Cynthiana, Kentucky, and had: 
(i) Elizabeth Deane Page, born loth Sept'r, 1854. 

(2) Henry Page, born ist Oct'r, 1856; dentist in Chillicothe, Mis-: 
souri. 

(3) Isaac Newton Page, born Feb., 1S58. 

(4) Eglantine Page, born i860. 

(5) James Page, born 1862. 

(6) Virginia Lee Page, born 1S65, and died infant. 

(7) Catherine Page, born 1867, and died infant. 

Eliza "S\'allace Page, born at Ca Ira, Cumberland County, Virginia, 
2d July, 1820; married, 1851, Jonathan Clark Temple, uf Logan 
County, Kentucky. He lived only a few weeks, but she never mar- 
ried again, and died 30th June, 1872, in Chillicothe, Missouri, aged 
52, leaving no issue. 
Rev. James^Jellis Page, born at Ca Ira", Cumberland County, Virginia, 
7th July, 1822; was educated at the Theological Seminary, Fairfax 
Countv, Virginia, and entered the Episcopal ministry. He married, 
i6th Dec'r, 1851. Virginia, daughter of E. W. Newton, of Charleston, 
• West Virginia. Mr. Newton was a native of Vermont, and a gradu- 
ate of Dartmouth College. The wife of Mr. Newton belonged to 
the Nicholas family, who are descended from a Colonial Minister of 
the Church of England. Children: 
(i) Wood Newton Page, born 13th Nov., 1852. 
(2) Henry Deane Page, born 2d Nov., 1854. He was educated for 



I08 PAGE FAMILY. 

the Episcx>pal Church at the Theological Seminary, Fairfax 
County, Virginia. • 

(3) Sarah Bell Page, born 2Sth July, 1S56. ♦ 

(4) Thomas Carter Page, born Sth Dec'r, 1858. 

(5) Mary Wallace Page, born 17th Nov., i860. 

(6) Lilla Leigh Page, born 7th May, 1868. 

6. Anne Catharine Page, born at Ca Ira, Cumberland County, Virginia, 

13th January, 1825; married, 1850, Dr. Charles A. Williams, of 
Chillicothe, Missouri. She died 1878, aged 53, and left four chil- 
dren, viz.: 

(i) Jane Clark Williams, born 14th Aug., 1852; married ist Janu- 
ary, 1S74, Henry M. Hatton, of Chillicothe, Missouri, and had 
two children, of whom Hubert 3IcPhail, born i8th Sept'r, 1877, 
was the second, and alone survived. 

(2) Lucy Washington Williams, born 22d Dec'r, 1855. 

(3) Henry Page Williams, died young. 

(4) Charles Williams, born 3d Feb., 1S66. 

7. Martha Bell Page, youngest of Renvy Page, and Jane B. Deane, his 

wife, was born at Ca Ira, Cumberland County, Virginia, 17th Feb., 
1827. Unmarried. 

Dr. Mann Page, of Turkey Hill (also called Keswick), Albe- 
marle County, Virginia, sixth child and third surviving son of Major 
Carter Page, of The Fork, Cumberland County, Virginia, and Mary 
Gary, his first wife, was born at the last-named place, 26th Oct., 
1791, and died at the first-named place, 15th May, 1S50, aged 58 
years and 7 months. 

He was educated at Hampden Sidney College, Virginia, and afterwards 
graduated in Medicine at Philadelphia, in 1813. 

The following is an exact copy of his Medical Diploma, now in the pos- 
session of his youngest son. Dr. R. Channing 3.L Page, of New "^'ork City: 

"Omnibls ad quos pflesentes Liter.e pervenerint SALUTEM: Cum 
Gradus Universitatis instiiuii fuerint, ut Viri de Literarum Republica bene 
meriti, seu nostrae Almae Matris Gremio educati, seu bonarum artium Dici- 
plinis aliunde erudiii, a Literatorum Vuigo secernerentur. Sci.\Tis qlod 
NOS PR^FECTUS, VICE PR.EFECTUS, ET PROFESSORES UNI- 
VERSITATIS PENXSVLVANIENSIS Gradu Doctoris in Arte Medica 
libenter concesso TESTAMUR quanti fecimus Virum Probum Ma.vn Page 
in Artis Medic3e Scieniia plenius instructum, cujus Mores benevoli cum cm- 



NORTH END. IO9 

nibus iis Artibus quae optimum quemque ornant, nos illi devinxerint, Eun- 
dem idcirco virum honorabilem et oriiatum Manx Page omnium Suffragiis 
DOCTOREM IN ARTE MEDICA creavimus et constituimus, eique hujus 
Diplomatis virtute, singula Jura Honores et Privilegia ad ilium Gradum inter 
nos. IN CUJUS REI TESTIMONIUM, Sigillum Universitatis majus hisce 
Praesentibus apponi fecimus, Nominaque subscripsimus. 

DATUM PHILADELPHL^ Die Mensis Aprilis primo Annoque Salutis 
humance Millesimo Ociingentessimo, et decimo tertio. 

Benj'n Rush, M. D., Inst: et prax: med: et cliri: Profr. 

Casparus Wistar, M. D., Anatomise Professor. 

Benjamin Smith Barton, M.D., Mat. Med. Hist. Nat. Sc. Prof. 

Philippus Syng Phvsick, M.D., Chirurgise Profr. 

Johannes Syng Dorsey, M.D., CbirurgiL^ Profr adjunctus. 

Johannes Redman Coxe, M.D., Chem. Profr. 

Tho. C. James, M.D., Art. Obstet. Profr. 

Johannes Andrews, D.D., Prsfectus. 

Robertcs Patterson, A.M., Vice Prxfectus. 
• The Seal consists of seven books piled upon each other, and bearing the 
following inscriptions from top to bottom respectively: "Theolog., Astronom., 
Philos. Nat., Mathemat., Logica, Rhetorica, Grammaiica." On the cir- 
cumference of the Seal is the inscription: "Sigillum Academle Philadel. in 
Pensylvania,'' Inside of this is the motto "Sine Moribus Van.e." 

Dr. Mann Page commenced the practice of medicine in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, but after his marriage he retired to his wife's estate, called Turkey Hill, 
near Cobham, Albemarle County, Virginia. The estate, consisting of 3,700 
acres of land, was a part of the Casde Hill estate, owned by Hon. Francis 
Walker, but which originally belonged to Meriwether. (See Walker.) 

"On Friday, Nov. 5th, 1824, a dinner was given to Gen'l Lafayette in. 
the Rotunda of the University of Virginia, by e.K-President Thomas Jefferson. 
The General's "son, George W. Lafayette, was also present. Ex-President 
James Madison, who was present, responded to the regular toast, 'James 
Madison, the ablest expositor of the Constitution,' and ended by proposing the 
following toast: 'Liberty, which has virtue for its guest and gratitude for its 
feast.' Volunteer toasts were proposed by Thomas J. Randolph, W. C. Rives, 
Th. Walker Gilmer, Dr. Mann Page, Wm. F. Gordon, V. W. Southall, N. P. 
Trist, Colonel S. Carr, Richard Duke, and others. Mr. Southall presided with 
great dignity, and none who were present will ever forget the enthusiasm of 
this recepdon." 

Dr. Mann Page was, as we have already stated, the grandson of Col. Archi- 
bald Car>-, who was descended from the Carys of Cockington and Torr Abbey, 



no PAGE FAMILY. 

England. In regard to a certain decree, said to have been made in the Court 
of Chancery, England, respecting the property of the Carys of Cockington, Dr. 
:\rann Page wrote to Francis R. Rives, Esqr., Secretan,- of the American Le- 
gation, in London, under date of 22d Feb., 1843. Edward Everett was at that 
time the American minister to England. In reply, Mr. Rives wrote from Lon- 
don, 27th March. 1843: ". . . . Immediately after the receipt of your letter, 
I addressed a note to H. J. Perr}-, Esqr., the principal Secretary to the Lord 
High Chancellor, asking for the desired information, which, he wrote me, it 
was not in his power to give, unless some clue is furnished whereby the name 
of the suit in court can be ascertained. A copy of his reply I herewith trans- 
mit you. I then addressed myself to George Stanley Cary. Esqr., the present 
representative of the Car}-s of Follaton House, who is ignorant of the Chancery 
decree in question. That gentleman fonvarded a copy of my letter to the 
widow of his late cousin, the proprietor of Torr Abbey; and she turned the 
letter over to her cousin, Mr. Browne, who says they are not aware of any 
decree having been made in the Court of Chancery respecring the property of 
the Car>'s of Cockington (who are the ancestors of the Carys of Torr Abbey 
and of the Car\-s of Follaton House), nor have the family any recollection of 
any such matter. Entire copies of the letters of Messrs. Car>' and Browme I 
likewise inclose you. These circumstances, it seems to me, furnish ample 
proof of the erroneous character of the information you have received respect- 
ing this affair."' 

The following is a copy of the reply of George Stanley Cary, Esqr., of 
Follaton House, to Mr. Francis R. Rives: 

"Follaton House, 22 March, 1843. 

Sir: I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter this morning. I 
beg to state that I am totally unacquainted with any circumstance relative to 
the decree in Chancerv' that your correspondent in the United States alludes 
to. I have forwarded by this day's post a copy of your letter to the widow of 
my late cousin — the proprietor of Torr Abbey, where the family has resided 
the last 1 70 years. 

I have. Sir, the honor to be your most ob't servant, 

George Stanley Cary. 
To Francis R. Rives, Esqr. 

P. S. — Should any further information be sought for, relative to the Car)' 
family, it will be most cheerfully given by Mrs. J. Car}-, who resides at No. 16 
Park Road, Regent's Park." 

Mr. John Car>-, of Cockington and Torr Abbey, residing in Vienna, Aus- 
tria, heard, through Mr. Everett, of this letter from Dr. Mann Page to Francis 
R. Rives, Esqr., in regard to the Cary property, and wrote as follows: 



NORTH END. I If 

'•Vienna, March 14th, 1846. 
Dr. !M.\nn Page, Albemarle County, Virginia, U. S. America. 

My Dear Sir: On the iSth of June last, 1845, I availed myself of the 
pleasure of addressing you. Obtaining unfortunately no answer up to this 
day, I much fear that the said inclosure has, on account of special reasons. 
been misled. .Allow me consequently to trouble you again with these lines, 
at the same time inclosing herewith a repetition of the letter in question, 
under date of 18th June last, 1S45. 

"Vienna, June i8th, 1845. 

My Dear Sir: Informed at last, unfortunately but of late, of your address, 
through the medium of Mr. Everett, the American Minister at London, I 
venture to avail myself of the pleasure of inclosing you these lines on a most 
important subject regarding my family. I am apprised, my dear Sir, that you 
are the gentleman who addressed Mr. Everett, during the spring of 1843, an 
inclosure imparting to him information that you had received from England, 
to the effect that, according to a recent decree of English Chancer}-, a consid- 
erable amount of properly had accrued to the heirs of. Sir Henrv' Car}-, of 
Cockington, in Devonshire. ]My much lamented father, Mr. John Car}-, of 
Cockington and Torr Abbey, in Devonshire, was direcdy descended from Sir 
Henr}- Car}', who was the son of Sir George Car}', of Cockington, Sherift" of 
Devonshire in the iSlh of Charles I. After that monarch's fallen fortunes, Sir 
Henr}-Cary emigrated, with his family, to Virginia; which event is well kn<:.wn 
to nre from records in English Histor}-, as more so from \-ariou3 important docu- 
ments regarding my family; copies of which have been in ray possession since 
my infancy. As a member of the family, being my father's youngest son, and 
as a father, as well as in behalf of my innumerable brothers and sisters, I shall 
feel myself, my dear Sir, much and much indebted to your extrem.e kindness 
in favoring me in short, if possible, with a few lines, informing me from what 
source in England you gained this intelligence. 

I have resided on the Continent for many years, and here in Germany 
for si.xteen years. I was formerly in the Austrian service, and at present retain 
the character of an Austrian officer. My brothers are dispersed in all parts of 
the world; which fate, my dear Sir, I do not doubt you are aware, befalls the 
younger sons in England. By chance, unfortunately but of late, I heard indi- 
rectly of the above stated important communication. The amount of prop- 
erty in question, and said to be in the Court of English Chancer}-, is possibly 
leasehold propert}- now falling in; and if this be the case, the same, instead of 
reverting to the present representative of my family, namely, to my nephew^ 
Robert Car}', eldest son of my sister-in-law, Mrs. Car}-, of Torr Abbe\-, in 
Devonshire, on his obtaining his majority of twenty-or.e years, the same must 



112 PAGE FAMILY. 

evidently, after having been sold, be equally divided among us brothers and 
sisters. 

I repeat again and again, my dear Sir, how much and much I shall feel 
myself indebted to your extreme kindness if you will impart to me the source 
in England from which you gained your information regarding the matter, and 
also whether the property in question is personal or leasehold now falling in. 

I gained information of this important event in the spring of 1833. iMy 
sister, who is at present married in Hungary, was on a visit to us here in 
Vienna, at that time. One day, during the month of April, 1833, she received 
from my mother-in-law, Mrs. John Car}-, a letter which by chance fell into my 
hands. 

In this letter she stated that my sister-in-law, Mrs. Gary-, of Torr Abbey, 
had received, some days since, a most strange letter from the American Min- 
ister in London, stating that a member of the Car}- family in the United States, 
had heard that by a late decree of English Chancer}', a large amount of prop- 
erty had accrued to the heirs of Sir Henr}- Car}- (son of Sir George Car}-, of 
Cockington), and that the said property was leasehold property then falling in. 
Subsequently I addressed a letter on the subject to Mr. Edward Everett, 
American Minister in London, and he confirmed the statement communicated 
to my sister by my mother-in-law. Moreover, Mr. Everett addressed a letter 
on the subject to my sister-in-law, Mrs. Cary, of Torr Abbey, and he intimated 
to me her answer, stating that she was not aware of the existence of any such 
property, nor could she obtain any information respecting it, unless the date 
and the name of the decree in question were known. 

I repeat again and again, my dear Sir, that I shall feel myself truly much 
indebted to your extreme kindness in forwarding to me as soon as possible 
information regarding this important subject. At the same time I should feel 
myself much obliged to you if you could forward to me the addresses of certain 
members of my family, residing in the State of Virginia, who are descendants 
of Sir Henr}- Car}-, of Cockington and Torr Abbey, in Devonshire. 

Trusting on a speedy answer, I remain, my dear Sir, your most sincere 
and thankful friend, 

John Cary, of Cockington and Torr Abbey." 

I do not remember the origin of the statement that there had been a de- 
cree in the English Court of Chancery regarding the Car}- property. No such 
decree has been heard of by those who were cenainly in a position to have 
known it, had it really ever been made. There is strong reason to suspect 
that it was merely a quack advertisement in some newspaper, by a so-called 
law firm which made a business of swindling credulous people about such 



NORTH END. 113 

matters. Not long since I read an article in the London Times regarding th6 
arrest and imprisonment of two men engaged in this business, in which a fee 
in advance is always required. The article concluded with a warning to peo- 
ple to put no confidence in such statements, as they invariably were mere baits 
for swindling the credulous. 

Jane Franxes Walker, the wife of Dr. Mann Page, was born in the Nel- 
son House, at Yorktown, Virginia, 17th Feb'y, 1799, and died at Turkey 
Hill, 7th Feby, 1873, aged 74 years. The house in which she was married 
was situated on Main St., Richmond, Virginia, and was subsequently destroyed 
by fire. She was descended on her mother's side from the Nelsons of York- 
town, Virginia, as follows : Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia, first of 
his family in Virginia, and called "Scotch Tom," married, 1710, Margaret 
Reid; their son, William Nelson, of the same place, and known as President 
Nelson, married, 173S, Elizabeth (called "Betty") Burwell; their son, Col. 
Hugh Nelson, of the same place, married, 1775, Judith Page; their daughter, 
Jane Byrd Nelson, married, in 1798, Hon. Francis Walker, of Castle Hill, 
Albemarle County, Virginia, and was the mother of Jane Frances Walker, the 
wife of Dr. Mann Page. On hep fathers side she was descended from the 
Washington family as follows :'Col. John Washington and his brother Lawrence 
emigrated from England to Westmoreland County, Virginia, and became the 
progenitors of the Washington family in that Slate. Col. John Washington 
married, about 1650, Anne Pope, who was his second wife; their son, Law- 
rence, married, about 1675, Mildred Warner; they were the grandparents, 
through their son Augustine, of Gen'l George Washington and his brother. 
Col. Samuel Washington (who married five times), and their daughter, Mjldred, 
sister of Augustine Washington, and aunt of Gen'l George Washington, mar- 
ried, about 1701, Roger Gregor\-; their three daughters married three brothers 
Thornton, Mildred Gregor}- marrying, about 1720, «Col. John Thornton; their 
daughter, Mildred Thornton, married, first, Nicholas Meriwether, and sec- 
ondly. Dr. Thomas Walker, of Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia; their 
son, Hon. Francis Walker, married, 1798, Jane Byrd Nelson, of Yorktown, 
Virginia, and their eldest child was Jane Frances Walker, the wife of Dr. Mann 
Page. (See Nelson, also Walker.) Jane Frances Walker and Judith Page 
Walker, her younger sister, who married Hon. William C. Rives, U. S. Senator 
from Virginia, studied the French language in Richmond, Virginia, under M. 
Fremont, the father of the late Genl John C. Fremont. 

Dr. Mann Page married. 12th Dec, 181 5, at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, Jane Frances, eldest child of Hon. Francis Walker, of Castle 
Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd Nelson, of York- 
town, Virginia, his wife. Children: 



IH PAGE FAMILY. ^ 

1. Maria Page, bom in Richmond, Virginia, Dec, 1816, died unmarried, 

at Turkey Hill, 15th June, 1837, aged 21 years. 

2. Ella Page, born at Castle Hill, Albemarle Count}-, Virginia, 18th Sept. 

181S; died unmarried, at Turkey Hill, 14th Nov., 18S2, aged 64 years. 

3. Francis Walker Page, eldest son, born at Turkey Hill, 17th Nov., 1S20. 

Removed to Cobham Grove, Albemarle County, Virginia, and died 
there 12th July. 1846, aged 26 years. He was buried at Turkey 
Hill. He married, 4th Sept'r, 1S44, Anna E., daughter of Benjamin 
F. Cheesman, and Maria S, AVhittemore. his wife, both of New York 
City. Mrs. Cheesman is the daughter of Thomas Whittemore and 
Lucy Snow, his wife. Mr. Whittemore was bom in Leicester, Mass., 
and removed to New York City, where he became a prominent and 
wealthy merchant. He died in 1829. He was sixth in descent from 
Thomas Whi'temore, of Maiden, Mass., who emigrated to America 
with Gov. Winthrop, of that State, in the year T635. Anna E. 
Cheesman was the niece of the late distinguished physician and sur- 
geon, Dr. John S. Cheesman, of New York City, who was a contem- 
porary of the late Prof. Valentine Mott, of that city. She died at 
Cobham Grove, 1880, leaving one son, Francis Walker Page, Jr. 

4. Carter Henry Page, second son, born at Turkey Hill, Albemarle 

County, Virginia, 21st Nov., 1822; removed to Eldon, near Cobham, 
same county. He married, in 1857, Leila, daughter of Capt. Wil- 
liam Graham, of Baltimore, Marv'land. Children: 
(i) Leila Graham Page, born 1S58. Resides at Eldon. 

(2) William Graham Page, eldest son, bom July, i860, lawyer; re- 
moved to Baltimore, Marvland. 

(3) Carter H. Page, Jr., born 1S64. Traveled in Europe during the 
summer of 1882, with his uncle, Dr. R. C. M. Page, of New 
York. While in Paris he visited the grave of Lafayete, in TAe 
Cimdiere Historique, No. jj Rue Picpus, pres de la barnere du 
Trone, and placed a wreath oi immorklhs on the tombstone, as 
his great-grandfather. Major Carter Page, of the Fork, Cumber- 
land County, Virginia, had served as Aid-de-Camp to Gen'l Lafay- 
ette during the campaign in Virginia against Cornwallis, in 1781. 

(4) Mar}- Bowdoi'n Page, bora 1866. 

5. John Car}- Page, born 1824; died infant, 1S26. 

6. Frederick WinslowPage, bom at Turkey Hill, 2Cth Nov., 1826; re- 

moved to IMillwood. Albemarle County, Virginia. He married, 24th 
Dec, 1850, Anne Kinlcch, daughter of Dr. Thomas W. Meriwether 



NORTH END. II5 

of Kinloch, Albemarle County, Virginia, and Anne Carter Nelson, 
his wife, who was a granddaughter of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of York- 
town, Virginia. Mrs. Anne Kinloch Meriwether Page died in the 
spring of 1867. Children: 

(i) Jane Walker Page, bom at Lynchburg, Virginia, 2 2d Sept'r, 
1851; married, 1875, Thomas Walker Lewis, of Castalia, Albe- 
marle County, Vir'ginia. They removed to Airslie, near by, in 
the same county, and have several children. 

(2) Eliza M. Page, born ist Aug., 1833; died single, 1871. 

(3) Annie Nelson Page, bom 15th Sept'r, 1855; married, 1875, 

Nathaniel Coleman, of News Ferr}', Halifax County, Virginia, 
and has issue. Annie bore a strong resemblance to the portrait 
of her ancestress, Jane Byrd. of Westover, on James River, 
Charles City County, Virginia, who was the wife of Hon. John 
Page, of North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia. 

(4) Frederick K. Page, of Millwood, Albemarle Count)-, Virginia, 
born 24th July, 1857. He married, in 1878, Flora Temple, 
daughter of William Lewis, of same county. They have several 
children. 

(5) William Douglas Page, bom nth June, 1859; died April 1878, 

aged 20 years, unmarried. He was buried in the Nelson Ceme- 
tery at Belvoir. 
' (6) Evelyn Byrd Page, born 21st Sept'r, 1862; married, 19th July, 
1882, John AL Coleman, of Halifax County, Virginia. 
(7) Mildred Nelson Page, bom 27th June, 1865. Resided several 
years with her uncle. Dr. R. C. I\L Page, of New York City. 

7. Jane Walker Page, bom i8th Oct, 1828; died unmarried, 29th Jan- 

uary, 1845, ^o^<i ^7- 

8. Mann Page, Jr., born at Turkey Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia, ist 

May, 183 1 ; removed to Mansfield, same county. He died in Octr, 
1864, aged about 33 years, and was buried at Turkey Hill. He mar- 
ried in May, 1854, Mary Anna Hobson, of Powhatan County, Vir- 
ginia, and left one surviving child, viz: Charlotte Nelson Page, bom 
about 1862. 

9. Chariotte Nelson Page, born at Turkey Hill, Albemarle County, Vir- 

ginia, 25th March, 1833; died at Kinloch, same county, 1849, un- 
married. She was buried at Turkey Hill. 

[O. William Wilmer Page, bom 1835; died of typhoid fever, 6th Nov., 
1857, aged 22 years. 

II. Thomas Walker Page, bom at Turkey Hill, Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, in April, 1837; resided at same place. He married, in the 



ii6 



PAGE FAMILY 



spring of 1861, Nannie Watson, daughter of James Morris, of Syl- 
vania, Green Springs, Louisa County, Virginia, and Caroline Pleas- 
ants, his wife. Children: 
(i) Ella Rives Page, born 1S62. 

(2) James Morris Page, born 1S64. 

(3) Thomas Walker Page, Jr., boru iS«^6. 

(4) Constance Morris Page, bom 1S68. 

(5) ]Mann Page, bom 1872. 

(6) Rose Morris Page, born 1S76. 







(From a pholo;^raph hy Scrony, N. Y., iSSj.J 

RICHAED CHAXNING MOORE PAGE, M.D^ 
Xew York City. 



NORTH END. ' 11/ 

12. Dr. Richard Channing Moore Page, born 2d January, 1S41, at Turkey 
Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia; removed to Xew York City in 
1867- He married, 30th April, 1S74, in the Memorial Episcopal 
Church, at Westport, Connecticut, Mary Elizabeth Fitch, widow of 
the Hon. Richard Henry Winslow, of that place. 

Mary Eliz.\beth Fitch was the second daughter and youngest child of 
Stephen Fitch, Esqr., of Norwich, Xew London County, Connecticut, and 
Mar}- Ingraham Rogers, his wife. She first married Hon. Richard Henry 
"VVinslow, of Westport, Fairfield County, Connecticut, who was the founder of 
the banking firm of Winslow, Lanier vt Co., of Xew York City. He was a 
Connecticut State Senator, and was the Democratic candidate for Governor of 
that State in 1S61. A short time before his death, which occurred 14th Feb., 
1 86 1, he commenced to build a beautiful granite church at Westport. This 
church is of the Protestant Episcopal denomination, and was subsequently 
completed by his widow. The ;nterior is very handsome, and is finished off 
with carded oak and chestnut. Some of the frescoes on the walls so perfectly 
resemble statuary that they remind one of Dewitts celebrated frescoes in the 
Royal Palace, at Amsterdam, Holland. The windows are of stained glass — 
the memorial window in the rear of the chancel being one of the most beauti- 
ful in America. The organ, made by Hall & La Baugh, of Xew York City, 
cost five thousand dollars, and was presented by ]\Irs. Mar}- E. Fitch Winslow. 
The bell was cast by Xaylor, of Troy, Xew York. Within the base of the 
tow-er is a well of excellent water, out of which Gen'l George \^'ashington 
d.rank in Sept'r, 1780, when stopping at the old tavern that formerly stood 
here. In the vestibule of the church is a mural tablet bearing the following 
inscription: 

MEMORIAL CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRIXITY, 
WESTPORT. 

THE CHURCH 

OF THE HOLY TRIXITY 

was incorporated April 14, i860; 

REV. JOHX PURVES. Rector. 

The comer-stone of this edifice was laid, • 

September 19, i860, 

By Rt. Rev. JOHX WILLIAMS, D.D., Assistant Bishop.^ 

In gratelul commemoration of 

RICHx^RD HENRY WINSLOW, 

who bought the site and began the erection of this structure; 



Il8 PAGE FAMILY. 

and of his widow, 

MARY FITCH WTNSLOW, 

who completed it; 

The Society, Februan- 17, 1S62, 

adopted the corporate name it now bears. 

The Church, first opened for divine service 

Februar\- 23, 1S62, 

was solemnly consecrated to the worship of God 

June 30, 1S63, 

according to the order of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 

in the United States of America. 

In perpetual memory of these ei'oits 

This tabid has been inscribed and is notv set up bv order 0/ 

WILLIAM HENRY BEXJA:\nX, Rector. 

JOHN CLEAVELAXD and WILLIAM H. MARVIN, Wardens. 

\\ iLLiAM Wood, ] 

John F. Bulkley, 
Elijah S. Downes, 
John H. Gray, |- Vestrymen. 

Charles J. Ketchum, i 
George Jelliffe, | 

Henry Taylor, J 

The following is copied from a letter received from the present Rector of 
Memorial Church: 

Westport, Fairfield County, Connecticut, 19th June, 1S83. 
Dr. R. C. M. Page, New York City. 

My Dear Sir: I send you the names of the first class confirmed in Me- 
morial Church. They were confirmed by Assistant Bishop John Williams 
(Bishop Brownell being too old and infirm), of Connecticut, May Sth, i860, 
and were as follows: Elizabeth I. Townsend, Jane Howel Townsend, M. A. 
Perring, James Frederick Perring, Laura Sophia Perring. It is impossible to 
find out who was confirmed first. The first person baptized (and consequently 
the first person made a member of the church) was William Payne, baptized 
June 24th, i860, by the Rev. John Purves. The first marriage in the parish 
was that of Henr>- Augustus Ogden to Abbie Jane Coley, May i6th, 1S60, also 
by Rev. John Pur\-es. The first marriage in the church was that of William 
Kirk to Miss Smith, March loth, 1863, by the Rev. Rufus Emery, of South- 
port, Connecticut- The first burial in the parish was tliat of the founder, Hon. 
Richard Henry Winslow, Feb. i8th, 1861. 

Yours truly, 

Alonzo Norton Lewis, D.D., Rector. 







MEMRIAL CHURCH ofTHi:HQLV TRINITY. WESTPORT (^°^' ^ '^^^ .^,^^^^^ 

BESUN IN CM er HON RICHARD HEUPl^ r/l»SLOm *NO COmPLtTEO /« ISS2 SfMAPf FITCH ^IflSLaM.. 



120 PAGE FAMILY. 

"In May, iS6o, the second Episcopal Society, in the town of Westport, 
purchased the property corner of East Church Street and ?^Iyrlle Avenue. 
known as the 'Wakeman Lot,' for the sum of two thousand dollars. R. H. 
Winslow, Francis Burritt, and Daniel J. Townsend were appointed a commit- 
tee, with power, to build a stone church edifice and chapel upon the 'Wake- 
man Lot,' and to complete and furnish the same upon such plan, and in such 
mode and manner in all respects, as they may deem proper or expedient. The 
committee were instructed to make all contracts necessar}-, in order to carr\- 
into effect, and fully to exercise, the power delegated to them. In Februar}-, 
1861, the society met with a great loss in the decease of ]Mr. Richard H. 
Winslow, and. in the following April, the decease of 'Sir. Francis Burritt. The 
church edifice which had been comm.enced by Mr. Winslow, was, after his 
death, finished by his widow, Mary Fitch Winslow, who tendered its use to 
the society of the ' Holy Trinity." The name of the society was shortly after- 
wards changed to that of 'The Memorial Church of the Holy Trinity.' 

"The site on which ^lemorial Church is built was the 'Wakeman Place,' 
formerly an old inn. Gen'l George Washington passed a night at this tavern, 
in Sepi'r, 1780, while returning from Hartford, where he had been to meet 
Count Rochambeau. During the demolition of the ancient edifice there was 
found among the dedn's a French crown -piece of an early date in the eighteenth 
century, in excellent preservation. " {//I'sf. of Fairfidd County, Connecticut, p. 
526, 'j. W, Lewis k Co., Philadelphia, 1881.) 

Mar>- Elizabeth Fitch, the widow of Hon. Richard H. Winslow, and wife 
•of Dr. R. Channing ]NL Page, of New York City, was descended on her mother's 
side as follows: from Sarah Wilson, of Boston, ]Mass., who married Edward 
Cowell, of England, the legal heir to all the property now included in the 
City of Leeds: Joseph Wilson, of Boston, Mass., died in 1680, leaving the 
daughter, Sarah Wilson, who married Edward Cowell, of England, who re- 
moved to Boston, Mass. Their daughter, • Sarah Wilson Cowell, married 
Timothy Ingraham, of Rhode Island. Solomon Ingraham, their son, married 
Lydia Vail, and had two children, viz: (i) Capt. Solomon Ingraham, died un- 
married; and (2) Mary Ingraham, who married Ebenezer Rogers. Their 
daughter, Mar}- Ingraham Rogers, married Stephen Fitch, of Norwich, New- 
London County, Connecticut. Their second daughter and youngest child 
was, as we have seen, Mar\- Elizabeth Fitch. 

A stock company of gentlemen, composed of the descendants of Edward 
Cowell and Sarah Wilson, his wife, have, for some years past, been search- 
ing in the United States and England for the will of Edward Cowell, but so 
far have not succeeded in finding it. Capt Solomon Ingraham had a copy of 
ihe original will This copy was put away in a tin box in Boston, Mass, 



/"-■' 











mm 






- W 

■mmM 
■mi%w^ 






(From a portrait by Healy, Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D. C.J 

MRS. MARY ELIZABETH FITCH WINSLOW, 
Wife of Dr. R. C. M. Page. 

Married April joth, l8j4. 



122 PAGE FAMILY. 

whence there is strong evidence that it was stolen by a lawyer. It is supposed 
that he sold it to interested parties in England, with a view to destroying an 
evidence of claim to the property, as well as preventing the discovery of the 
original will. 

VI. William Nelson Page, of Ca Ira. Cumberland County, 
Virginia, third son and second surviving child (and eldest having 
surviving male issue) of Major Carter Page, of The Fork, same 
county, Virginia, and Lucy Nelson, his second wife, was born at 
The Fork, 28th Feb'y, 1S03. He married, in 1827, Fannie P., 
daughter of Isham Randolph, of Richmond, Virginia, and had the 
following children: 

1. Dr. Isham Randolph Page, eldest, born about 1834; removed to Balti- 

more, Maryland. He married, first, in 1863, Virginia Barton, of 

Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia. She died, leaving one 

child, viz: Virginia Barton Page, bom 1864. He married, secondly, 

Oct. 30th, 1866, Charlotte Stevens, of Baltimore, Maryland, and had 

two children, viz: 

(i) Frances ^McHenrv' Page, born about 1867. 

(2) Robert Stevens Page, born about 1S69. 

2. Anne Randolph Page, called '' Nannie," died, 8 years old. 

3. Philip Nelson Page, born about 1838, died young. 

4. William Nelson Page, Jr., died 21st July, 1S61, aged 20. 

5. Rev. Coupland Randolph Page, of the Episcopal Church, born about 

1842; married, 1876, Ellen Baker, of Winchester, Frederick County, 
Virginia, and had several children. 

6. Lucia Harrison Page, born about 1844; died young. 

7. Fannie Randolph Page, born about 1846; married, 1873, Rev. W. C. 

Meredith, of the Episcopal Church. He resided at Winchester, 
Frederick County, Virginia, and died about 1875, leaving her a 
widow with one child, viz: Fannie Randolph Meredith. Fannie R. 
Page was the third and last wife of Rev. W. C. Meredith, his second 
wife having been Bettie Cushing, of The Fork. 
VL Thomas Page, of Locust Grove, Cumberland County, Vir- 
ginia, sixth child and fifth son and survivor of Major Carter Page, 
of The Fork, same county, Virginia, and Lucy Nelson, his second 
wife, was born at the last-named place, 8th June, 1807, and died at 
the first-named place, 4th July, 1874, aged 67. 

He married, 5th Nov., 1839. Sally, daughter of John W. Page 



NORTH END. 1 23 

(see Broadneck). of "White Hall," Clarke County, Virginia, and 
Jane Byrd Page, daughter of Hon. Robert Page, of Janeville, same 
county, Virginia; his wife, Mrs. Sally Page, was born Aug., 1S18, 
and died 27th Nov., 1872, aged 54 years. Their children were as 
follows: 

1. Dr. Robert Page, eldest, born 12th Januar>', 1842, and removed to 

Ballsville.. Powhatan County, Virginia. He married, iSth Dec'r, 
1878, Anna, daughter of Willis W. Hobson. of same county, and 
Arabella Boiling, of Petersburg, Virginia, his wife. There are sev- 
eral children. 

2. Carter Page, born about 1844; teacher. 

3. Lucy Nelson Page, born 17th Januar>-, 1852; married, September 5th, 

1877, W. T. Johnson, of Powhatan County, Virginia, and had one 
child — Sally P. Johnson. 

4. James Chisholm Page, born 1855. 

5. Thomas Nelson Page, born 6th June, i860. 

6. Willianna Page, born 27th October, 1864. 
Four other children died infants — names unknown. 

VI. John Page, of North End, Clarke County, Virginia, second 
child and eldest son of Hon. Robert Page, of Janeville, same county. 
Virginia, and Sarah Walker Page, his wife (and first cousin), was 
born at the last-named place, 2d September, 1792. 

He married, first, in 1819, Jane, daughter of Francis Nelson, of 
Mt. Air, Hanover County, Virginia, and Lucy Page, his wife, who 
was the youngest child of Hon. John Page, of North End, Glouces- 
ter (now Matthews) County, Virginia. Jane Nelson was the sister 
of Judith, who married, in 1819, Mann Page, of Greenland, Glouces- 
ter County, Virginia, and was his first wife. (See Rosewell.) They 
were granddaughters of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Vir- 
ginia. The children of John Page, by the first marriage, were: 

I. Robert Francis Page, born about 1820; removed to Campbell County, 

Virginia. He married, 1847, Lavinia Sulli\an, daughter of James 

Christian, of King and Queen County, Virginia. Children: 

(1) Edwin Randolph Page, bom 19th September, 1849. at ^Vest 

Point, King William County, Virginia. He married, about 1S74, 

Olivia McDaniel, of Jones Count}-, North Carohna. 



124 PAGE FAMILY. 

(2) Francis Nelson Page, born at Campbell Court House, Campbell 
Countv, Virginia, 29th Januar}-, 1S55; removed to California. 

(3) Roberta Frances Page, born at Campbell Court House, Virginia, 

14th Mav, 1857: removed to Richmond, Virginia. 

2. Edwin Randolph Page, born about 1S22; also removed to Campbell 

County, Virginia. He married, 1S50, the widow, Olivia Cam, 
daughter of John Alexander, of the same county, Virginia. Children: 
(i) ]Mary Mann Page. 

(2) William Nelson Page. 

(3) Edmonia Randolph Page; married. 1878, Thomas A. Bledsoe, 

of Augusta County, Virginia. 

3. Judith Carter Page, born about 1824: died unmarried. 

4. Lucy Nelson Page, born about 1828; married, 1S60, James Madison 

Sublett, of Powhatan County, Virginia, and had: 
(i) Octavia Page Sublett. 

(2) Mar}- Carter Sublett. 

(3) Florence Sublett. 

(4) Lucy Nelson Sublett. 

(5) Olivia Byrd Sublett. 

5. Thomas ]\Iann Page, born about 1S30; removed to Bedford County, 

Virginia, and married, 1854, Rosalie, daughter of James Brown, of 
Buckingham County, Virginia. Their only child is William Nelson 
Page, bom about 1855. 

John Page, of North End, Clarke County, Virginia, married, 
secondly, in 1836, Sarah Williamson, of Glenoker, Fauquier County, 
Virginia. She was sister to Joseph A. Williamson, of Orange Court 
House, who married Mary Mann Page, daughter of Hon. Robert 
Page, of Janevilie, Clarke County, Virginia. The children by the 
second marriage were: 

1. Helen Page, born 1839, and died single, 1859, aged 20. 

2. Rev. William Williamson Page, of the Presbyterian Church, born 1841; 

removed to New Vork City; he married, 1877, Lizzie M., daughter 
of Rev. Nathaniel Pierson, of Baltimore, ]Mar}'land. She died about 
1880, leaving one child — Surr\- Kent Page. 

V.n. Rev. Charles Henry Page, of the Episcopal Church, 
third child and second son (being also the eldest to have issue) of 
William Byrd Page, of Fairfield, Clarke County, Virginia, and Anne 



NORTH END. 1 25 

Lee, his wife (who was sister to General Light Horse Harry Lee, of 
Revolutionary fame), eldest surviving son and child of Mann Page, 
of the same place, and Mary Mason Selden, his wife, eldest son and 
child of Hon. John Page, of North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) 
County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, his wife, was born at the first- 
named place in 1801, and died at Georgetown, D. C, in 1876, aged 
75 years. He married, in 1827, Gabriella, daughter of Judge Craw- 
ford, of Amherst County, Virginia, who was a brother of William 
H. Crawford, of Georgia, one of the candidates for President of the 
United States, in 1825. Their children were: 

1. Jane Byrd Page, born about 182S; married, about 184S, Thomas Bar- 

bour Bryan, of Alexandria, Virginia, Children: 
(i) Charles Page Br^an. 
(2) Jeannie Byrd Brjan. 

2. Elizabeth Spooner Page, born about 1833; married, about 1853, Dr, 

Glover Perin, Surgeon U. S. Army, and had: 
(i) Gabriel Perin; married Col. Henry Prout. 

(2) Mar>' Byrd Perin. 

(3) Lucy Legh Perin. 

(4) Charles Page Perin. 

(5) Betty Page Perin. • 

(6) Sophia Perin. 

(7) Virginia Langdon Perin. 

(8) Glover Fitzhugh Perin. 

3. Legh Richmond Page, eldest son, bom about 1835; married, 1863,. 

Page Waller, of Richmond, Virginia. 

4. William Wilmer Page, born about 1S37; married, about 1865, Vic- 

toria Amiraux, of Canada. Children: 

(1) Gabriella Page. 

(2) William Wilmer Page, Jr. 

(3) Thayer Page. 

5. Roger Jones Page, born about 1839; removed to Louisville, Kentucky, 

and married, 1867, Mar\', daughter of Hon. John Mitchell, the Irish 
patriot, and late member of the British Parliament, from Tipperar)-, 
Ireland. They had a son, named John Mitchell Page. 

6. Sophia Perin Page, bom about 1841; married, 1862, Nathaniel Shaler. 

Two children, viz: 
(i) Gabriella Page. 
(2) Anne Page. 



126 PAGE FAMILY. 

7. Charles Henn- Page, Jr.. born about 1845; married, 1S76, Annie 

Brown, of Oregon. 

8. Lucy FiLzhugh Meade Page; unmarried. 

VIII. Legh Richmond Page, of Richmond, Virginia, law- 
yer, third child and eldest son of Rev. Charles Henry Page, and 
Gabriella Crawford, his wife; third child and second son (being the 
eldest to have issue) of William Byrd Page, of Fairfield, Clarke 
County, Virginia, and Anne Lee, his wife (who was sister of Gen- 
eral Light Korse Harry Lee, of Revolutionary fame), eldest surviv- 
ing son and child of Mann Page, of the same place, and IMary Mason 
Selden, his wife, eldest son and child of Hon. John Page, of North 
End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, progenitor of the 
North End branch of the Page family in Virginia, and Jane Byrd, 
his wife, was born about 1835. Being the eldest son of the eldest 
son, etc., in descent from Hon. John Page, of North End, he is the 
representative of that branch of the Page family. 

He married, in 1863, Page, daughter of Logan Waller, of Rich- 
mond, Virginia. Their children are: 

1. Mar>- Lee Page, bom in Richmond, Virginia, about 1864. 

2. Charles Henr\- Page, eldest son, born at same place, about 1866. 

3. Legh Richmond Page, Jr., bom at same place about 1S68. 

4. Waller Page, ditto, about 1870. 

5. Brooks Page, ditto, about 1872. 

6. Gabriella Page, ditto, about 1874. 



BROADNECK. 12/ 



IV. Robert Page, of BroadneCK, Hanover County, Vir- 
ginia, third and last surviving son and child of Hon. Mann Page, 
Esqr., of Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia, and Judith Carter, 
his second wife (by whom alone he had surviving male issue), sec- 
ond and only surviving child of Hon. Matthew Page, of the same 
place, and Mary Mann his wife, second (and only son having male 
issue) of Col. John Page, of England, and Williamsburg, James City 
County, Virginia, progenitor of the Page family in Virginia, and 
Alice Luckin, his wife, was born at the second-named place about 
1722, and died suddenly at the first-named place, upon returning 
from a ride on horseback, about the year 176S, aged 46. He founded 
the Broadneck House, Hanover County, Virginia, about 1750. It 
was destroyed by fire during the war of the Revolution, his two sons, 
Robert and John, being youths at that time. 

His son Robert probably rebuilt the house after the war, while 
others of the family rernoved to Clarke County, Virginia. 

He married, 20th j'anuary, 1750- at the age of about 28 years, 
Sarah Walker, sister of Clara Walker, who married Allen. The 
portrait of Clara Walker is said to be at Clairmont, the Allen resi- 
dence, on James River, Virginia. The two sisters Walker were 
co-heiresses, and daughters of an English gentleman. 

The children of Robert Page and Sarah Walker were: 

1. Mann Page (No. i), born at Broadneck, Hanover County, Virginia, 

2 6tli October, 1750; died infant. 

2. Robert Page, Jr., eldest sunivor, born at the same place 15th June, 

1752; married, in 1799, Mar>- Braxton, ofChericoke, King William 
County, Virginia. 

3. Mann Page (No. 2), born 1754; died infant. 

4. Judith Page, born 15th October, 1756; married, about 1776, John (.=) 

Waller. Children: 

(i) Sarah Waller: married, about 1806, Richard B>Td. 

(2) Benjamin Waller; married, about 18 14, Mi^s Travis. 

(3) Martha H.Waller; married, first, about 1810, William Monta- 
gue; and, secondly, Joseph H. Travis. 

(4) John Waller; married, about 1818, Miss Greenhow. 



128 PAGE FAMILY. 

(5) Dorothy Waller; died single. 

5. Catherine Page, bom 7th November, 1758; married, about 1778, Ben- 

jamin (?) Waller, of Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia. She 
died many years ago, leaving: 

(i) Martha Waller; married, first, about iSoo, George W. Holmes, 
and, secondly, Lawrence Morse. 

(2) Benjamin C. Waller; married Hattie Cottell. 

(3) Dr. Robert Page Waller; married, first, about 181 5, Eliza C. 
Griffin, and secondly, Julia W. Mercer. 

6. John Page, born at Broadneck, Hanover County, Virginia, 29th Jan- 

uar}% 1760; removed to Pagebrook, Clarke County, Virginia. He 
married, in 1784, Maria H. Byrd. 

7. Matthew Page, born at Broadneck, 4th ^Nlarch, 1762; removed to 

Annefield, Clarke County, Virginia. He married, about 1787, Anne, 
daughter of Richard K. Meade, and sister of Bishop William Meade, 
of Virginia. Children: 
(i) Sally Page, married, about 1808, Rev. Charles W. Andrews, of 

Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, West Virginia. 
(2) iNIary Frances Page; married, about iSio, John Byrd. She died 

leaving one child, who married Rev. J. R. Jones, of Clarke 

County, Virginia. 

8. Walker Page; born 1764; died unmarried. 

9. Sarah Walker Page, youngest, born at Broadneck, 16th Feb., 1766; 

married, in 1788, Hon. Robert Page, of Janeville, Clarke County, 

Virginia. (See North End.) 
V. Robert Page, Junr., of Broadneck, Hanover County, 
Virginia, second and eldest surviving son and child of Robert Page, 
of same place, and Sarah Walker, his wife, was born there 1 5th 
June, 1752. 

As already stated, he probably rebuilt the Broadneck House, which had 
been destroyed by fire during the Revolutionary war, he being a youth at that 
time. His son. Walker Y. Page, is recorded as an alumnus in the catalogue 
of the College of William and Mary-, at Williamsburg, James City County, 
Virginia, for the year 18 10. He is there mentioned as the "son of Robert 
Page, of Broadneck, Hanover County, Virginia. ' 

He married, in 1799, Mary, daughter of Carter Braxton, of 
Chericoke, King William County, Virginia, and their children were 
as follows: 



BROADNECK. I29 

1. Robert Page, eldest, born about 17S0; died single. 

2. Carter Braxton Page, born about 1782; married, about 1S07, Eliza 

Nicholson. No issue. 

3. Sally \V. Page, born about 17S4; married, about 1S04, Humphrey 

Brooke, of Spottsylvania County, Virginia. Children: 
(i) Mar}' Brooke; married, about 1S25, Mr. Helm, and died, leav- 
ing many children. 

(2) Elizabeth (called "Betsey'") Brooke; married Thomas Black- 

bum, of Clarke Count}% Virginia, and died, leaving children. 

(3) Anne Brooke; married, about 1830, Oliver A. Shaw, of Louis- 

iana, and died, leaving Johanna, Eliza, Oliver, Herbert, Sally, 
Stephen, and Judith; all of whom removed to California. 

(4) Robert Brooke; married, about 1S38, Eliza Smith, and had one 

child, viz: Robert Carter Brooke. 

(5) Sarah W. Brooke; married Samuel Williamson. 

(6) Hon. Walker Brooke, U. S. Senator from Mississippi, 1852-53: 
died at Vicksburg, Miss., 1870. He married Miss Eskridge, 

4. John W, Page, third son and eldest having issue, was born at Broad- 

neck, Hanover County, Virginia, 1786, and removed to Clarke 

County, Virginia. He married, first, i8i2,Jane Byrd Page, of Jane- 

ville, same county, and had issue. He married, secondly, in 1833, 

, Emily Smith, of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia. No issue. 

5. Judith Robinson Page, born about 1788; died unmarried. 

6. Walker Y. Page, born about 1790, and mentioned in the catalogue of 

William and Mary College for 1810, as "son of Robert Page, of 
Broadneck, Hanover County, Virginia; " died unmarried. 

7. Mattie Page, born about 1792; died unmarried. 

8. Catherine Page, born about 1794; died unmarried. 



V. John Page, of Pagebrook, Clarke County, Virginia, second 
son and child of Robert Page, of Broadneck, Hanover County, Vir- 
ginia, and Sarah Walker, his wife, was born at the last-named place 
29th June, 1760. He died 17th September, 1838, aged 7^. 

He married, in 1784, Maria Horsemander, daughter of Col. Wil- 
liam E. Byrd, of Westover, on James River, Charles City Count}-. 
Virginia. She was probably the niece of Jane Byrd, of that place. 
who married, 1741, Hon. John Page, of North End, Gloucester (now 
Matthews) County, Virginia. The children of John Page and Maria 
H. Byrd were as follows: 



I30 PAGE FAMILY. 

1. William Byrd Page, eldest, born about 17SS; married, first, about 

1813, Evelyn Byrd Nelson; and secondly, Eliza M. Atkinson. 

2. Nancy Page, born about 1790; died infant 

3. Sarah \V. Page, bom about 1792; married, in 1813, ]Major Thomas 

M. Nelson, of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, who was a grandson 
of Secretary- Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia. She died 
1835, aged about 43. (See Nelson.) 

4. Dr. Robert Powell Page, bom nth Januarv*, 1799; married, first, about 

1819, Mar}- Francis; and secondly, about 1839, Susan G. Randolph. 

5. Judge John E. Page, born nth March, 1795; married, 1823, Emily 

McGuire. 

6. Abby B. Page, bom August, 1798; married, about 1816, John Hop- 

kins, of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, whom she survived. 
Their children were: 
-. (i) William E. Hopkins, Commodore U. S. Navy. 

(2) John Hopkins, Jr.; died unmarried. 

(3) Dr. St. George Hopkins; married, first, about 1859, Miss Brown, 
of Philadelphia, and had one child — a daughter. He married, 
secondly, about 1868, Miss Cunningham, of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and has three children. He removed, with his family, to 
California. 

7. Mary W. Page, born 1800; married, 1816, Benjamin Harrison, of 

Berkeley (Harrison's Landing), Charles City County, Virginia, and 
died in Richmond, 1865, aged 65. She was buried at Pagebrook, 
Clarke County, Virginia. Children: 
(i) Lucy Harrison; unmarried; resided in Clarke County, Virginia. 

(2) Henry Harrison; married, about 1845, Fannie Tab Burwell, 
daughter of George H. Burvvell, of Carter Hall, Clarke County, 
Virginia. 

(3) Benjamin Harrison, Jr.; married, about 1850, Mattie, daughter 
of Dr. Matthew Page, of Clarke County, Virginia, and Polly Ran- 
dolph, his wife. Dr. Matthew Page was the eldest son of Gwynn 
Page, of Kentucky, who was the fourth child of Mann Page, of 
Rosewell, and Anne Corbin Tayloe, his second wife. (See 
Rosewell.) 

(4) Maria Harrison; died single. 

(5) Evelyn Harrison, ditto. 

8. Dr. Matthew Page, youngest; bom at Pagebrook, Clarke County, Vir- 

ginia, i8or; removed to Edenton, Chowan County, North Carolina. 
He married, first, 1829, Mary Matilda, daughter of Josiah Collin?, of 



BROADXECK. 131 

the last-named place. She died, leaving no surviving issue. He 

married, secondly, in 184S, Henrietta Elizabeth Collins, sister of his 

first wife, and had one surviving child, viz: 

(i) Herbert Henry Page; born 15th November, 1S51; married, 
1876, Mary Louise, daughter of Dr. John Herbert Cleborne, of 
Petersburg, Virginia. They had several children, viz: {a) Her- 
bert Cleborne, born 17th September, 1877; {5) Byrd Alston, 
born 30th July, 1879; i^) ^Veldon Bathursr, born nth Novem- 
ber, 1880; and perhaps others. 

VI. John White Page, of White Hall, Clarke County, Vir- 
ginia, fourth child and third son (being the eldest to have issue) of 
Robert Page, Jr., of Broadneck, Hanover County, Virginia, and 
Mary Braxton, his wife, second and eldest surviving child and son 
of Robert Page, of the same place, and Sarah Walker, his wife, was 
born at Broadneck in 1786, and died in Winchester, Frederick 
County, Virginia, 19th October, 1861, aged 75. His name appears 
in the catalogue of William and Mary College, as an alumnus 
for 1807. 

He married, first, in 1812, Jane Byrd, eldest child of Hon. Rob- 
ert Page, of Janeville, Clarke County, Virginia, and Sarah W. Page, 
his wife. (See North End.) The latter was, as we have seen, the 
youngest child of Robert Page, of Broadneck, Hanover County, 
Virginia, and Sarah Walker, his wife. Mrs. Jane Byrd Page Page 
died in Winchester, Virginia, 27th March, 1830, aged 38. Their 
children were: 

1. Robert Matthew Page, eldest, born 14th ^lay, 18 14; died unmarried in 

Texas, in 1839. 

2. Walker Yates Page, second son, and eldest having issue, was born at 

White Hall, Clarke County, Virginia, i6th December, 1816; removed 
to Frederick City, Mar>-land, and married, 1st June, 1858, Nannie 
C. Tyler. 

3. Sally Page, born 7th August, 181 8; died November 27th, 1872; 

married, 5th November, 1839, Thomas Page, of Locust Grove, Cum- 
berland County, Virginia. (See North End.) 

4. Nathaniel B. Page, born 1820; married, 15th November, 1848, Mary 

Anna Richardson. No issue. He died in Washington, D. C. , 27th 
July, 1853, aged S3- 

5. Mary B. Page, born i6th August, 1821; unmarried; removed to Bal- 

timore, Maryland. 



1^2 PAGE FAMILY. 

6. Jane Bvrd Page, born 23d May, 1823; died 27th February, 1855, aged 

32. She married, loth August, 1847, Rev. James Chisholm, who 
died in Portsmouth, Virginia, in 1854, during the yellow fever epi- 
demic. He left two »ons, viz: 

(1) William B. Chisholm, born 20th September, 1848. 

(2) John W. Chisholm, died infant. 

7. John White Page, Jr., born 9th November, 1824, at White Hall, 

Clarke County, Virginia; removed to Petersville, Frederick County, 
Maryland, and married, 14th November, 1855, Ellen, daughter of 
Dr. George W. West, of the same county, Maryland. Children: 
(i) Judith Robinson Page, born 8th June, 1857. 

(2) George West Page, born 31st January, i860. 

(3) William C. Page, born 28tli April, 1862. 

(4) Ellen West Page, born 3d March, 1866. 

(5) Eliza Byrd Page, born i8th May, 1869. 

(6) John Byrd Page, born 17th March, 1874. 

8. Judith Robinson Page, born 7th March, 1826; died unmarried, 4th 

September, 1856, aged 30 years. 

9. Carter Braxton Page, youngest, born at White Hall, Clarke County, 

Virginia, 18th June, 1829; removed to Bladensburg, Prince George 
County, Maryland, where he died 28th April, 1881, aged 52 years. 
He married, first, in 1853, Emily, daughter of Dr. William Armis- 
tead, of Fluvana County, Virginia, by whom he had five children, 
only one of whom survived, viz: Robert Matthew Page, born 18 58. 
He married, secondly, ist November, 1867, Evelina, daughter of 
William Gray, of Caroline County, Virginia. No issue. 

John W. Page, of White Hall, Clarke County, Virginia, mar- 
ried, secondly, in February, 1833. Emily, daughter of Gen. Edward 
Smith, of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, by whom he had 
no issue. 

VI. William Byrd Page, of Pagebrook, Clarke County. Vir- 
ginia, eldest son and child of John Page, of the same place, and 
Maria H. Byrd, his wife, was born there about 1788, and died ist 
September, 1828, aged about 40 years. After his death, his younger 
brother, Judge John E. Page, resided at Pagebrook. 

He married, first, about 18 13, at Westover, on James River, 
Charles City County, Virginia, Evelyn Byrd, daughter of Judge 
William Nelson (a younger brother of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of 



BROADNECK. 133 

Yorktown, Virginia), and Abby Bird, his wife. Their children were 

as follows: 

1. Anne Willing Page, born about iSu; married, 'in 1835, Thomas Car- 

ter, of Annefield, Clarke County, Virginia, who formerly lived in 
King William County, Virginia. She was his second wife. Children: 

(1) Dr. Charles Shirley Carter, of Bahimore, Maryland; married Miss 

Swann, of that city. 

(2) Captain William Page Carter, of Clarke County, Virginia; mar- 
ried Lucy, daughter of Dr. Robert Powell Page, of the same 
county, and Susan G. Randolph, his second wife. 

They are half brothers of Col. Thomas H. Carter, of Pampa- 
tike, Manquin P. O., King William County, Virginia. 

2. Dr. William Byrd Page, eldest son, born about 18 17; removed to 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He married, about 1840, Celestine, 
daughter of Samuel Davis, of Louisiana. No issue known at present. 

3. John°Page, born about 1820; resided in Clarke County, Virginia. He 

married, about 1845, Lucy Mann Bur,vell, of Carter Hall, same 
county, the sister of Mrs. Henry Harrison. No issue known at 
present. 

William Byrd Page, of Pagebrook, Clarke County, Virginia, 
married, secondly, about 1822, Eliza Mayo, daughter of Robert 
Atkinson, of Mannsfield, near Petersburg, Dinwiddle County, Vir- 
ginia, and had children as follows, viz: 

1. Evelyn Page, born about 1823; married, about 1841, Richard Henry 

Lee, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

2. Mary Page, born about 1825; married, about 1842, William, son of 

Major Thomas M. Nelson, of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, who 
was a grandson of Secretary Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia. 
(See Secretary Nelson.) 

VL Dr. Robert Powell Page, of Saratoga, Clarke County, 
Virginia, fourth child and second son of John Page, of Pagebrook, 
• Clarke County, Virginia, and Maria H. Byrd, his wife, was born at 
the last-named place, nth January, 1794. and died at the first- 
named place in March, 1849, aged 55 years. He was buried at Page- 
brook. AUU D ^ 
It is probable that the portrait in the house of Mrs. Abby Byrd 
Page Hopkins, at Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, is his 



134 PAGE FAMILY. 

likeness — according to a letter written by his brother, the late 
Judge John E. Page, of Pagebrook, Clarke County, Virginia. He 
married, first, about 1819, Mary, daughter of Thomas Willing 
Francis, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Their children were as fol- 
lows, viz: 

1. ]\Iaria B. Page, born about 1820; married, about 1840, Mayhew Wain- 

wright, of New York City, and had four children, viz: 

(i) Elizabeth (called "Lizzie") Wainwright: married, about i860, 

John Page Burwell, of Clarke County, Virginia. 
.(2) Mayhew Wainwright, Jr., Lieutenant U. S. Navy, killed by 

pirates on the Pacific coast. 

(3) Robert Wainwright, U. S. Army. 

(4) Maria Wainwright, born about 1S47; married, about 1867, 

Henry Slaughter, of New York City, and was an actress — her 
nom-ik-lhidtre being Fannie Louise Buckingham. 

2. Dora W. Page, born about 1822; married, about 1S42, Nathaniel Bur- 

well, of Clarke County, Virginia. 
5. Nancy F. Page, born about 1824; married, about 1S44, Joseph Pleas- 
ants, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Robert Powell Page, of Saratoga, Clarke County, Virginia, 
married, secondly, about 1839, Susan Grymes, daughter of Archie 
Randolph, of the same county, and Susan Burwell, of Carter Hall, 
same county, his wife. Archie Randolph was the eldest son of 
Thomas Isham Randolph, of Dungeness, Goochland County, Vir- 
ginia. (See Randolph.) The children by the second marriage 



were : 



Elizabeth B. Page, born about 1840; died, unmarried, at Cobham 

Park, Albemarle County, Virginia, during the summer of 1863, aged 

about 23 years. 
Mary Francis Page, born about 1842; married, about 1867, John 

Esten Cooke, author, of Clarke County, Virginia. She died in 1868; 

no surviving issue known. 
Lucy B. Page, born about 1844; married, in 1868, Captain William 

P. Carter, of Clarke County, Virginia. There are several children. 
Robert Powell Page, Jr., born at Saratoga, Clarke County, Virginia, 

about 1846; remained there. He married, about 1870, Agnes, 

daughter of George H. Burwell, of Carter Hall, same county, and 

Agnes Atkinson, his wife. 



BROADNECK. I35 

VI. Judge John E. Page, of Pagebrook, Clarke County, Vir- 
ginia, fifth child and third son of John Page, of same place, and 
Maria H. Byrd, his wife, was born there nth March, 1795, and 
died there in March, iSSi, age 85 years. He resided at Pagebrook 
after the death of his brother, William Byrd Page, in 1828. 

He w'as Circuit Court Judge for the counties of Clarke and Warren, Vir- 
ginia, up to the time of his death. In 1S63 he brought his family to Albe- 
marle Countv, Virginia, and resided, for about a year, at Cobham Park, the 
residence of William C. Rives, Esqr. , of Newport, Rhode Island. The four 
children of Dr. Robert Powell Page, by the second wife, were with him. It 
was during this time that three of them died. 

Judge John E. Page married, in 1823, Emily, daughter of Col. 
W^illiam H. McGuire. of Harper's Ferry, Loudon County, Virginia, 
who was an officer of much distinction in the United States Army. 
Their children, as far as known, were as follows, viz: 

1. John Y. Page, eldest, born in Clarke County, Virginia, about 1824; 

removed to St. Louis, Missouri, where he practiced law; married, 
about 1859, Lizzie Wash. 

2. Mary M. Page, born about 1826; unmarried. 

3. Emina Page, born at Pagebrook about 1830; married, in 1S53, Philip 

Nelson, of Nelson, Nelson County, Virginia, and was his first wife. 
She died in October, i860, leaving two children — William and 
Emily. (See Nelson.) 

4. Dr. Robert P. Page, born at Pagebrook, Clarke County, Virginia, about 

1838; removed to Berr}-ville, same county, and married, about 1S64, 
Mattie, daughter of William Harris, of Petersburg, Dinwiddle 
Count}', Virginia. Children: William Harris, Evelyn Byrd, John 
Evelyn, Bettie, and William Douglas. 

5. Anne W. Page (called "Nannie"), bom at Pagebrook, Clarke County, 

Virginia, about 1842; married, in 1864, Dr. William Douglas Meri- 
wether, of Kinloch, Albemarle County, Virginia. (See Nelson.) She 
died at Culpepper, Virginia, in 1875, leaving one child, viz: Evelyn 
Page Meriwether. 

6. Jane McGuire Page, born about 1844; unmarried. 

7. Evelyn Byrd Page, bom about 1846; died single, August, 1863. at 

Cobham Park, Albemarie County, Virginia, aged about 17 years. She 
was buried in the old Nelson Cemeter}-, at Belvoir, same county, Vir- 
ginia. 



136 PAGE FAMILY. 

8. William Byrd Page, bom about 184S; died about August, 1863, at 
Kinloch (the residence of Dr. Meriwether), Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, and was buried in the Nelson Cemeter}', at Bel voir, with his 
sister. 

VII. Walker Yates Page, of Frederick City, Frederick 
County, Maryland, eldest surviving son and second child of John 
Page, of White Hall, Clarke County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd Page, 
his first wife; fourth child and third son (being the eldest to have 
issue) of Robert Page, Jr., of Broadneck, Hanover County, Virginia, 
and Mary Braxton, his wife, eldest son and child of Robert Page, of 
the same place, progenitor of the Broadneck branch of the Page 
family in Virginia, and Sarah Walker, his wife, was born at the 
second-named place i6th December, 18 16. He removed to Fred- 
erick City, Frederick County, Maryland. Being the eldest son of 
the eldest son, etc., in descent from Robert Page, of Broadneck, he 
is the representative of that branch of the family. 

He married, ist June, 1858, Nannie C, daughter of Dr. William 
Tyler, of Frederick City, Maryland. Their children (two having 
died infants) are as follows, viz: 

1. Mary Addison Page, bom in May, 1859; single. 

2. Nannie Walker Page, bom July, 1864. 

3. William Tyler Page, only surviving son, born October 8, 1868. 



PART II. 



NELSON FAMILY. 



^^#^Cvytt*-,^^ 







(From a water color copy by C. H. Sherman, N. Y.. l383, from the or.g.na! portrait by untn.wr, artist.) 

HON. WILLIAM NELSON, OF YORKTOWN, VIRGINIA, 

PRESIDENT OF THE DOMINION OF VIRGINIA 

Died 19th Nov., 1772, Aged 61. 




NELSON COAT-OF-ARMS. 



I. Thomas Nelson, of York- 
town, York County, Virginia, pro- 
genitor of the Nelson Family in that 
State, was the son of Hugh Nelson, 
of Penrith, County of Cumberland, 
England, and Sarah, his wife, and 
was born at the last-named place 
20th February, 1677. He emigrated 
to the Colony of Virginia about the 
year 1700, and became the pro- 
genitor of the Nelson Family in 
Virginia. 

" He died at Yorktown, Virginia, 
7th October, 1745, aged 6S years, 
and was buried in the Episcopal Churchyard there. He was popu- 
larly known as " Scotch Tom," from the fact that his parents were 
from the North of England, near Scotland. x\bove is given an 
exact copy of the coat-of-arms found on his tombstone at York- 
town, Virginia. The engraving is made from a drawing copied from 
the original tombstone at Yorktown, Virginia, May, 1883, by C. H. 
Sherman, of New York City. 

I do not know the correct tinctures of this coat-of-arms, as none 
are represented on the tombstone. In outline the arms are identical 
with those of Nelson, of Yorkshire, England, and this fact is sug- 
gestive of the origin of the names of Yorktown and York County, 
Virginia. The following is probably a correct description of Scotch 
Tom Nelson's coat-of-arms: 

Arms. — Per pale argent and sable, a cheveron between three fleurs-de-lis 
counterchanged. 

Crest. — A fleur-de-lis per pale argent and sable. 

For information regarding the wreath, helmet, and external 
ornamentation, according to the rules of good Heraldry, see the 
Preface. 

No motto is mentioned on the tombstone, but, in the United 
States of America, one of Lord Nelson's might, without impropriety, 
be adopted, viz: "' palniajn qui meruit, feraty 



142 NELSON FAMILY. 

The following is an exact copy of the inscription found on the 
tombstone of Scotch Tom Nelson, at Yorktown, York County, 
Virginia: 

Hie jacet 
Spe certa resurgendi in Christo \ 

Thomas Xelson, Generosus 

Filius Hugonis et Sariaj Xelson 

de Penrith in Comitatu Cumbriae 

Natus 20"^° die Februarii Anno Domini 1677 

Vitae bene gestae finem implevit 

7"=° die Octobris 1745. .Etatis suae 68. 

The translation of the above inscription is as follows: " Here Iieth in the 
certain hope of being raised up in Christ, Thomas Xelson, Gentleman. Son 
of Hugh and Sarah Xelson, of Penrith, in the County of Cumberland. Born 
on the 20th day of Februar\-, in the year of our Lord, 1677. He completed 
a well-spent life, on the 7th day of October, 1745. Aged 68." 

His only portrait, a very fine one, was destroyed by fire, in Richmond, 
Virginia, in 1S64. 

According to Bishop Meade, Vol. I., op. at., p. 205, he founded York- 
town in 1705. "A few venerable relics of the past," says Bishop Meade, "are 
all that may now be seen. The old York House is the most memorable. 
The comer-stone of it was laid by old President Xelson, when an infant, as it 
was designed for him. He was held by his nurse, and the brick laid in his 
apron and passed through his little hands." That statement is evidently erro- 
neous, since the present Xelson House, at Yorktown, Virginia, was founded at 
a later date, by President X''elson, who was bom in 171 1. 

The following is probably the correct account of the Xelson houses at 
Yorktown, Virginia: 

First. Thomas Xelson, known as Scotch Tom, founded Yorktown, 
Virginia, about 1705, and, as any other emigrant would do, he built a wooden 
house first. Second. He built, about 171 5, the first brick house. All traces 
of this house have disappeared. It was situated not far from the present Xel- 
son House, in a north-westerly direction from the latter, and on the opposite 
side of the road that runs in front of it. This house was afterwards occupied 
by Col. Hugh Xelson, grandson of Scotch Tom. A portion of the wall was 
standing about 1840, with multiflora roses growing over it. Third. Scotch 
Tom, about 1725, built another brick house for Secretary Thomas Xelson, his 
youngest son and third child. This stood several hundred yards in rear of the 
present Xelson House, in a south-easterly direction from the latter. Being 



YORKTOWN. . 143 

much nearer the lines during the siege of York, Oct., 1781, it was so bom- 
barded that it was never repaired. Not a vestige of it now remains. Secretary 
Thomas Nelson was in this house when the siege commenced. During the 
bombardment, his butler was killed while serving dinner, waiter in hand. 
Then Secretar}' Nelson left the house under a flag of truce, and was escorted 
into the American lines by his three sons, who were officers under Washington. 
Fourth. The present Nelson House, which was occupied by Lord Comwallis 
as headquarters of the British Army, during the siege, Oct, 1781, was built as 
late as 1740-41, by President William Nelson, for his eldest son, Thomas, 
afterwards signer of the Declaration of Independence, Governor of Virginia, 
and Major-General in the American Army. Gov. Nelson was an infant in 
1740-41, having been born 26th Dec'r, 1738, and it was through his little 
hands that the first brick was made to pass when the present Nelson House 
was founded. For a picture of this house see Bishop Meade, op. cii.. Vol. I., 
p. 204; Scribner's Monthly Illustrated Magazine (The Century), Oct., 1881, p. 
803; and the Magazine of American History, A. S. Barnes & Co., July, 1881, 
p. 47- 

The old Custom House at Yorktown, Virginia, was doubtless built about 
17 1 5, the same year as the first Nelson brick house — or even before it. In 
either case it would be the oldest brick house in that section of the country-, as 
it is the oldest and first Custom House in the United States of America. It 
escaped serious injury during the bombardment, in Oct., 1781. 

The following is copied from a letter to Dr. R. C. M. Page, of New York 
C\ty, from Col. William Nelson, of Oakland, Hanover County, Virginia, under 
date of April 3d, 1883: 

'* I learned in my young days from my father and mother that the present 
Nelson House at Yorktown, Virginia (the same, by the way, in which I was 
born), was built about the year 1740-4I, by President William Nelson for his 
eldest son, Gov'r Thomas Nelson — then an infant in his nurse's arms — and 
the first brick was made to pass through his little hands. This occurred a feu- 
years before the death of his grandfather, Scotch Tom, who died 7th Oct., 
1745. Bishop Meade was certainly inaccurate in his statement of the building 
of that house. As regards your account of the other Nelson houses at York- 
town, Virginia, I think that it is as nearly accurate as you can get it at this 
late day. 

""Gov'r Thomas Nelson died 4th January, 1789, at one of his farms in 
Hanover County, Virginia, and his body was carried down to York and buried 
in the old churchyard, immediately at the foot of his father's tomb; so that 
graadiather, father, and son (Scotch Tom, President Nelson, and Gov'r Nel- 
son), were buried in a continuous line, the head of the second near the foot of 
the first, and the head of the third near the foot of the second. 



144 NELSON FAMILY. 

"I make this statement that you may put it on record, so that it may be 
known by those who desire it." 

In regard to the parents of Col. WilHam Nelson, referred to in the fore- 
going letter, it may be stated that his mother was Judith, eleventh and youngest 
child and fifth daughter of GovV Thomas Nelson, and that Col. William Nel- 
son's father was Thomas, eldest son and third child of Col. Hugh Nelson, of 
Yorktown, Virginia. 

Thomas Nelson, the first of his family in Virginia, and known 
as Scotch Tom, married, first, about i/io, ^Margaret Reid, and their 
children were as follows : 

1. William Nelson, eldest, bom at Yorktown, York County, Virginia, 

about 1711; died there 19th Nov., 1772, aged 61. He was known 
as President Nelson. Married, about 1738, Elizabeth (called 
"Betty") Burwell. 

2. Mar)' Nelson, born at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1713; married, about 

1733, Col. Edmund Berkeley, of Barnelms, Middlesex County, Vir- 
ginia. Children: 

(i) Edmund Berkeley, Jr., of same place, married, first, 'Mzry Ran- 
dolph, of Tuckahoe, and secondly, Mar\' Bunvell. 

(2) Nelson Berkeley, of Airwell, Hanover County, Virginia, married 

Betty Carter. 

(3) Mar\' (called "Molly'") Berkeley, married Dr. Corbin Griffin, 

and had one child, viz: Major Griffin. 

(4) Sally Berkeley. 

(5) Lucy Berkeley. 

3. Thomas Nelson, youngest, bom at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1716; 

died there, in 1782, aged 66. He was known as Secretary Nelson; 
married, about 1745, Lucy Armistead. 

Thomas Nelson, known as Scotch Tom, married, secondly, 
about 172 1, Fanny Houston, the widow Tucker, of Bermuda Islands, 
by whom he had one child, viz: 

(i) Sally Nelson, born at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1722; married, about 
1742, Col. Robin Burwell, of Isle-of-Wight Count}', Virginia. He 
was a brother of Elizabeth (called " Betty ") Burwell, wife of President 
William Nelson. The children of Col. Burwell and Sally Nelson, 
his wife, were: 
^'-fiT'yathaniel Burwell, of Lancaster County, Virginia, married Miss 
Worrneley, of Middlesex County, Virginia. 



YORKTOWN. 145 

(2) Frances Burwell (called "Fannie"), first wife of Gov. John Page. 
There were probably other children, but their names are not known. 

As the Nelsons of Virginia are known as descendants of Presi- 
dent Nelson and Secretary Nelson, we will consider each of these 
two branches separately. 



146 



NELSON FAMILY 



II. William Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Virginia, 
President of the Dominion of Virginia, and known as PRESIDENT 
Nelson, eldest son and child of Thomas Nelson, known as Scotch 
Tom, of England and the same place, progenitor of the Nelson 
Family in Virginia, and Margaret Reid, his first wife, was born 
there in 1711, and died there 19th November, 1772, aged 61 years. 
He was buried in the Episcopal churchyard, at Yorktown, Virginia. 

The following is the inscription copied from his tombstone: 

"Here lies the body of the Honourable William 

Nelson Esquire 

late President of His Majesty's Council in this 

Dominion. In whom the love of man and the love 

of God so restrained and enforced each other 

and so invigorated the mental powers in general 

as not only to defend him from the vices and follies 

of his countr)- but also to render it a matter 

of difficult decision in what part of laudable 

conduct he most excelled. Whether in the tender and 

endearing accomplishments of domestic life 

or in the more active duties of a wider circuit 

As a neighbour, a gendeman or a magistrate 

whether in the graces of hospitality, or in the possession 

of piety. Reader if you feel the spirit of that 

excellent ardour which aspires to the felicity 

of conscious virtue animated by those consolations 

and divine admonitions, perform the 

task and expect the distinction of the 

righteous man. 

He died the 19th of November, Anno Domini 1772. 

Aged 61." 

From the above epitaph it appears that he was President of the Council a 
short time before, or at the time of, his death. He had also been President of 
the Dominion. According to Bishop Meade, Vol. I., op. at., p. 205, he was 



PRESIDENT NELSON. I47 

" called President Nelson, because SO often President of the Council, and at 
one time President of the Colony." " His Majesty's Council," in the inscrip- 
tion, refers, of course, to the Colonial Council of His Majesty, George H. or 
George HI. 

The correspondent of the Xew York Herald, writing from Yorktown, 19th 
September, 18S1, says, in regard to the inscription on President Nelson's tomb- 
stone: "The epitaph of William Nelson, the father of the Revolutionary pa- 
triot (Gov. Nelson), is lengthy, and, in its terms, superlative enough to fit a 
George Washington." 

His portrait, three-quarter length, is in the Nelson House, at Yorktown, 
Virginia. 

President William Nelson married, about March, 1838, Eliza- 
beth (called " Betty ") only daughter of Nathaniel Burwell, of Glou- 
cester County, Virginia, and Elizabeth Carter, his wife. The latter 
was the second daughter of Robert (King) Carter and Judith Armis- 
tead, his first wife. The children of President William Nelson and 
Elizabeth (called " Betty") Burwell, his wife, were as follows, viz: 

1. Thomas Nelson, eldest. Signer uf the Declaration of American Inde- 

pendence, Governor of Virginia, and Major-General in the American 
Army, born at Yorktown, Virginia, 26th December, 1738; died 4th 
January, 1789, aged 51; married, about 1761, Lucy Gr}-mes. 

2. Dr. Nathaniel Nelson, born at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1745; died 

of pulmonary consumption in Bermuda Islands; married, about 1770, 
Jane, eldest daughter and about third child of Hon, John Page, of 
North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane 
Byrd, his wife. (See Page Family, North End.) Their children were: 
(i) Elizabeth (called "Betsy"); married Burwell, of Saratoga, Clarke 
County, Virginia. Mrs. John Page, of Oakland, Hanover 
Count}', Virginia, " was named after her. (See Page Family, 
Rosewell. ) 
(2) William Nelson; died single, 1802, aged 22 years. 

3. Col. Hugh Nelson, bom at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1750; died 13th 

October, 1800, aged 50; married, about 1775, Judith, second daugh- 
ter and about the fifth child of Hon. John Page, of North End. She 
was the sister of Jane Page, wife of Dr. Nathaniel Nelson. 

4. Robert Nelson, bom at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1752; removed to 

Malvern Hill, near James River, Charles City County, Virginia 



1148 NELSON FAMILY. 

He married, first, about 1777, Mar)', second daughter of Hon. Philip 
Gr)-mes, of Middlesex County, Virginia, and iNIary Randolph, his 
wife. Mary Gr)-mes was the sister of Lucy, who married Governor 
Thomas Nelson, the eldest son. By the first wife, Robert Nelson, of 
Malvern Hill, had one child, viz: 
(i) Elizabeth (called "Betsy"') Nelson; died single. 

He married, secondly, about 1 756, Susan, daughter of Speaker John 
Robinson, of the Virginia House of Burgesses. The latter was the 
father of Beverly Robinson, of New York, the loyalist, who married 
Susanna Phillipse. The children of Robert Nelson, by the second 
wife, were: 
(i) William Nelson. 

(2) Mar}' Nelson; married Prosser. 

(3) Robert Nelson. 

(4) Susan Nelson. 

(5) Dr. Peyton Randolph Nelson. 

(6) Nathaniel Nelson. 

(7) Chiswell Nelson. 

(8) Lucy Nelson. 

(9) Ethelia Nelson. 

(10) Nancy Nelson; married Moore. 

(11) Robinette Nelson. 

5. Judge William Nelson, of the District Court, was born at Yorktown, 
Virginia, about 1754, and died in 18 13, aged about 59, and was 
buried at Yorktown. He was the godfather of his granddaughter, 
Anne Willing Page, the second wife of Thomas Carter, of Annefield, 
Clarke County, Virginia. (See Page Family, Broadneck.) He was 
known as "Uncle Judge Billy," and Col. William Nelson, of Oak- 
land, Hanover County, Virginia, was named after him. Judge Wil- 
liam Nelson married, first, about 1779, Miss Taliaferro, of James 
City County, Virginia, and had one child, viz: Elizabeth (called 
"Betsey") Nelson, who married Edwards. 

He married, secondly, Abby, daughter of Col. William E. Byrd, 
of Westover, on James River, Charles City County, Virginia, and 
Mary Willing, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, his wife. Children: 
(i) Mar>' Nelson; married Pickens, of South Carolina. 

(2) Abby Byrd Nelson. 

(3) Evelyn Byrd Nelson; married, 18 13, William Byrd Page, of 

Pagebrook, Clarke County, Virginia, and was his first wife. (See 
Page Family, Broadneck.) . ' 



PRESIDENT NELSON. I49 

(4) Lucy Nelson; married Harrison, of Berkeley (Harrison's Land- 

ing), on James River, Charles City County, Virginia. 

(5) Rosalie Nelson, 

According to Bishop Meade, Vol. L, op. cit., pp. 205, 206, "President 
Nelson had many daughters, but none lived beyond the twelfth year. One of _ 
the sons (name not known) became an idiot from a fall from an upper stor}'- 
window, and another was burned to death. These afflictions contributed tO' 
make Mrs. Nelson a woman of sorrowful spirit." President Nelson left landed 
estates to each of his five sun.-iving sons. Of these, William and Robert were 
captured by British troopers under Tarleton, at Castle Hill, the residence of 
Dr. Thomas Walker, Albemarle County, Virginia, during the war of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. 

III. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Virginia, 
Signer of the Declaration of American Lndependence, 
Governor of the State of Virginia, and Major-General 
IN THE American Army, was born at Yorktown, Virginia, 26th 
December, 1738. He was the eldest son and child of President Wil- 
liam Nelson, of the same place, and Elizabeth (called "Betty") 
Burwell, his wife; and President William Nelson was the eldest son 
and child of Thomas Nelson, known as Scotch Tom, of England 
and the same place, progenitor of the Nelson family in Virginia, 
and Margaret Reid, his first wife. 

Gov. Nelson died during an attack of asthma, caused by expos-, 
ure during the war of the Revolution, at Mt. Air, Hanover County, 
Virginia, on the 4th January, 1789, aged 51 years. He was buried 
at the foot of President Nelson's grave, at Yorktown, Virginia, but 
there has never been, as yet, any tombstone placed there to his 
memory. 

According 10 Bishop Meade, Vol. L, op. cit., pp. 206, 207, he "was 
placed under the care of Rev. Mr. Yates, of Gloucester County, Virginia, after- 
wards President of William and Mar}' College, in order to prepare him for an 
English University. At the age of fourteen — sooner than was intended — he. 
was sent thither. The circumstance which hastened his going was the follow- 
wing: On one Sunday afternoon, as his father was walking on the outskirts- 
of the village of Yorktown, he found him at play with some of the little negroes, 
of the place. Feeling the evil of such associations, and the difficulty of pre- 
venting them, he determined to send him at once to England; and a vessel 
being ready to sail, he was despatched the ne.xt day to the care of his friends — 
Mr. Hunt, of London, and Beilby Porteus, then Fellow of Cambridge Univer- 



150 NELSON FAMILY. 

sity, and afterwards Bishop of London. He went for some time to the pre- 
paratory school of Dr. Newcome, at Hackney, and then to the especial care 
and tutorship of Dr. Porteus. The letters of Mr. Nelson to Mr. Hunt and 
Dr. Porteus — copies of which I have, and the answers to which are acknowl- 
edged — evince deep anxiety for the improvement of his son in all things, but 
especially in morals and religion. He is evidently uneasy about the spirited 
character of his son, fearing lest it might lead him astray, and begs his friends 
to inform him if his son shows a disposition to idleness and pleasure. In order 
to avoid the temptations incident to young men during the vacation — espe- 
cially such as are far away from friends — he requests Dr. Porteus to place him, 
during those seasons, with some eminent scientific agriculturist, and thus pre- 
pare him for dealing with the soils of America. After seven years he returns 
home — being delayed several months beyond the time he intended, by a cir- 
cumstance which showed the religious character of his father. In a letter to 
his friend, Mr. Hunt, he alludes to the fact that two young Virginians, whose 
habits he feared were not good, were coming over in the ship in which he 
expected his son, and he must request that he be not sent with them; that he 
would rather his coming be postponed six months than have them as his com- 
panions, though they were sons of some of the first families of Virginia, and of 
those who were on terms of intimacy with his. His return was accordmgly 
delayed for some months. On his arrival, Mr. Nelson writes to his friends in 
England, that he is much pleased with the general improvement of his son, 
but regrets to find that he has fallen into that bad practice which most of the 
young Virginians going to England adopt, of smoking tobacco — adding 
emphatically, 'Ji///iy /oSacco;' zlsothzt ' of ezting a.nd drinking, though not to 
inebriety, more than was conducive to health and long life.' Still, he was 
rejoiced to see him, such as he was, with good principles." 

While young Nelson was on his voyage home frcm England, he was 
elected a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses, although he was at that 
time barely 2 1 years of age. 

He was one of the members of the First Convention, which met at Wil- 
liamsburg, James City County, Virginia, in 1774,10 consider the matter of 
taxation of the colonies in America, by the Plome Government in England. 
He was again a member of the Provincial Convention, and in July, 1774, he 
was appointed Colonel of the 2d Virginia Regiment of Infantry. 

He was a member of the Convention which met at Williamsburg, James 
City County, Virginia, in May, 1776, to frame a constitution for Virginia; and 
was elected to offer the resolution instructing the Virginia delegates in Con- 
gress, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to propose a Declaration of Independence. 
He signed Thk Declaration of Independence, of 4th Jlly, 1776. In May, 
1777, he was obliged, by an indisposition affecting his head, to resign his seat 



PRESIDENT NELSON. I51 

in Congress; but in the following August, during the alarm occasioned bv 
the entry of the British fleet, under Admiral Howe, within the capes of Vir- 
ginia, he was appointed Commander-in-chief of the Virginia State forces; and 
soon after, in response to an appeal from Congress, he raised a troop of cavalry 
•with which he repaired to Philadelphia. In June, 1781, he was chosen Gov- 
ernor OF THE State of Virginia, a position to which he was recommended 
by Thomas Jefferson, then retiring from office. He participated in the siege 
of Yorkiown, Virginia, Oct., 1781, as Commander of the Virginia ]\Iilitia, 
with the rank of Major-General in the American Ar-my. His force, about 
3,000 strong, was raised and equipped at his own expense, and constituted the 
second, or reser\-e line, and performed fatigue duty during the siege. As it 
•was thought that Lord Comwallis, Commander of the British Army, occupied 
his house (the present Nelson House) as headquarters, he ordered it to be 
bombarded, saying to Gen'l Lafayette: "Spare no particle of my property so 
long as it affords comfort or shelter to the enemies of my country-." His ser- 
vices, and, as a matter of policy, those also of the Militia whom he had col- 
lected, were highly commended in the General Orders of Gen. George Washing- 
ton, the American Commander-in-chief, 20th Oct., 1781, being the day after 
the surrender of Lord Comwallis with the British Army. His statue was one 
of the six selected to be placed around the Washington Monument, at Rich- 
mond, Virginia, The other five were Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, 
Andrew Lewis, John Marshall and George Mason, For a picture of the 
Washington Monument at Richmond Virginia, see Frontispiece. 

Gov. Nelson built the Offley House, in Hanover County, Virginia, during 
the Revolution, in order to send his family there to a place of safety. For a 
description of this wretched little place see mention of Chatellux's account of 
it in Bishop Meade, Vol. L, op. cii., p. 211. Here it was that the Governor's 
son Robert (afterwards of Malvern Hill) used to sing the hymn: 
" Send comfort down from thy right hand 
To cheer us in this barren land," etc. 

The old Offley House is probably gone, but the pond — the Offley pond — 
that well-known source of chills and fever for the whole neighborhood, yet 
stands. 

Gov, Nelson had left to him by his father, President Nelson, landed prop- 
erty, including the present Nelson House, at Yorktown, Virginia, and ;^40,ooo 
in hard cash. As one Virginia shilling was equal to i65^ cents of United 
States coin, and twenty shillings made a pound, the value of the latter was 
about three dollars and thirty-three and a third cents. Forty thousand pounds 
■would therefore be equal to a little more than one hundred and thirty-three 
thousand dollars of present United States coin — which was a great deal of 
money for those days. 



152 NELSON FAMILY. 

Nevertheless, he died poor — having given all he had to the cause of 
liberty. Such nobility of soul and purity of motive form a combination 
in character rarely seen in the bistort' of the world, and no doubt he was con- 
scientious in the matter; but yet how different from Washington 1 The latter, 
although he had no large family to support, "magnanimously refused any pay 
for his services, but merely asked Congress to reimburse him for his expenses, 
an accurate account of which he had kept" It is needless to say that Con- 
gress promptly paid him, having the detailed accounts with dates specified, to 
be guided by. Had Gov. Nelson kept an accurate account of his expenses, 
no doubt Congress would have gladly paid him back also. But it appears 
that he had no account to present to Congress. Consequently his family had 
to be that much poorer. One may, therefore, here see the difference between 
a patriotic man, and a patriotic man who was also wise. 

The only original portrait of Gov. Thomas Nelson was painted when he 
was a youth of i6 years of age, by Chamberlin, in London, 1754. This por- 
trait, the canvas of which measures about 30x40 inches, formerly hung in the 
parlor, at Oakland, Hanover County, Virginia, but was removed to Shelly, 
Gloucester County, same State. It is a good painting, but much abused, 
having a hoM in the canvas at the chin. The following is a copy of a letter 
written by the artist that was sent by Anderson, of Richmond, Virginia (since 
removed to New York City), to Shelly, Gloucester County, Virginia, to pho- 
tograph the portrait of Gov. Nelson there: 

"Richmond, Virginia, March 19th, 1878. 

Friend Brady : Your communication received this morning. The 
description of the portrait of Gen. Thomas Nelson, at Shelly, Gloucester 
County, Virginia, is as follows: 

Age — about 16. 

Hair — light, color of Naples yellow in the light. 

Eyes — blue, medium shade. 

Complexion — rur^dy, with plenty of warm color. 

Coat — gray. 

Collar of coat — gray velvet 

Necktie — white. 

Vest — white in shadow. 

Buttons — brass. 

Ruffle on sleeve — white. 

Hat under arm — black. ; . 

Hoping this may be satisfactory-, 

Yours respectfully, 

Wm. E. Trahem." 



- Mp/ 



^ -/■ 





xx^^'V 




(From the original portrait by Chamberlin, London, 17 ^4.) 

GOV. THOMAS NELSON. 
YoRKTOWN, York County, Virginia. 



SigTter of the Declaration of Independence, July 4th, 1776. 



154 NELSON FAMILY. 

It is only a half-length portrait, hat under left arm, but the left hand does 
not appear. The white ruffle on the right sleeve and part of" the right hand is 
seen, the fingers being concealed from view by the waistcoat, in which the 
right hand partly rests. 

This portrait has been copied for the capitol at Richmond, Virginia, 
where it may be seen among the Governors in the State library. There is 
also a copy at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the room 
where the famous Declaration was signed. 

The Family Bible of Governor Thomas Nelson is at present in 
the possession of the Goggin family, in Campbell County, Virginia. 
For the purpose of obtaining a copy of the record contained in that 
Bible, I applied to \V. Steptoe Nelson, Esqr., of Forest Depot, Bed- 
ford County, Virginia. Mr. Nelson wrote to Mr. Goggin on the sub- 
ject, and received the following reply: 

'• Leesville, Campbell Coi'.my, Virginia, ] 
28th March, 1S83. j 

W. Steptoe Nelson, Esqr.. Forest Depot. 

Dear Friend and Cousin: Your letter in regard to the Nelson Family 
Bible was received this evening. Enclosed you will find all the information in 
it regarding the Nelson family. The record refers only to Governor Nelson's 
family, and is written on the title leaf between the Old and New Testaments, as 
there is no blank space for family record. Nothing is said of the Pages. 

Aff"ectionately yrs., S. C. Goggin." 

The following is an exact copy of the record in the Family 
Bible of Governor Thomas Nelson, referred to: 

"Thomas Nelson and Lucy Grymes were married the 29th July, 1762. 
William Nelson, born August 9th, ijts- 
Thomas Nelson, born December 27th, 1764- 
Philip Nelson, born March 14th, 1766. 
Francis Nelson, born June 25th, 1767. 
Hugh Nelson, bom Septem'r 30th, 1768. 
Elizabeth Ne'son, bom December 26th, 1770. 
Mary Nelson, bom December i9ih, 1774. 
Lucy Nelson, born Jan'y 2d, 1777. 
Robert Nelson, born October 14th, 1778. 
Susanna Nelson, bom October 3d, 1780, 
Judith Nelson, born ^Lly 8th, 1782." ■ • ' ^ 



PRESIDENT NELSON. 1 55 

Gov. Thomas Nelson married, 29th July, 1762, Lucy, daughter 
of Philip Grymes. of Middlesex County, Virginia, and Mary Ran- 
dolph, his wife, who was the daughter of Sir John Randolph, of Wil- 
liamsburg, James City County, Virginia, and Susanna Beverly, 
his wife. 

Gov. Nelson's wife, Lucy Grymes, lived to be 80 years old, 
*' leaving," says Bishop Meade, " twenty dollars to her minister, 
and freedom to her servant, the only one she had." She was not 
buried with her husband at Yorktown, but at the east end of Fork 
Church graveyard, Hanover County. Virginia. Their children were 
as follows: 

1. William Nelson, eldest, born at Yorktown, Yirginia, Aug. 9th, 1763; 

married, about 1790, Sally Bur^vell, eldest daughter of Governor 
John Page. 

2. Thomas Nelson, Jr., born at Yorktown Yirginia, December 27th, 1764, 

second son, and eldest to have surviving male issue; married, in 
1795, Frances, third daughter and seventh child of Gov. John Page. 

3. Philip Nelson, born at Yorktown, Yirginia, March 4th, 1766: removed 

to Clarke County, Virginia, and married, 1789, Sarah N. Burwell. 

4. Francis Nelson, bom at Yorktown, Yirginia, June 25th, 1767; removed 

to Mt. Air, Hanover County, Yirginia, and married, about 1792, 
Lucy, youngest daughter of Hon. John Page, of North End, Glou- 
cester (now Matthews) County, Yirginia. 

5. Hon. Hugh Nelson, bom at Yorktown, Yirginia, September 30th, 

1768; removed to Belvoir, Albemarle County, Yirginia, and married, 
in 1799, Eliza, daughter of Francis Kinloch, of South Carolina. 

6. Elizabeth Nelson, eldest daughter, bom at Yorktown, Yirginia, 

December 26th, 1770; married, 5th June, 1788, Mann Page, of 
Shelly, Gloucester County, Yirginia, eldest son of Gov. John Page. 
(See Page Family, Rosewell.) 

7. Mary Nelson, bom at Yorktown, Yirginia, December 19th, 1774; mar- 

ried, about 1792, Robert Carter, of Shirley, on James River, Yir- 
ginia, by whom she had Hill Carter, and others. 

8. Lucy Nelson, born at Yorktown, Virginia, Januarj- 2d, J 777; married, 

in 1799, Major Carter Page, of Willis Fork, Cumberiand County, 
Virginia, and was his second wife. (See Page Family, North End. ) 

9. Robert Nelson, bom at Yorktown, Virginia, October 14th, 1778; mar- 

ried, about 1 803, Judith Carter, youngest daughter and ninth surviving 



156 NELSON FAMILY. 

child of Gov. John Page by his first wife. (See Page Family, Rosewell.) 
He was called " Chancellor " Nelson, from having been Chancellor of 
William and Mar}- College. He died, 1819, at Williamsburg, James 
City County, Virginia, aged about 40. He was professor of law in 
William and Man,- College, and was also Equity Judge. He was a 
Presidential Elector in 18 13. They had one surviving child, viz: 
(i) Lucy Nelson, who married, about 1830, Hugh N. Pendleton, of 
Caroline County, Virginia, and was his first wife. She died, leav- 
ing one child, viz: Julia Pendleton, who married, about 1853, 
James Allen, of Bedford, who died August, 1862, leaving one 
child, viz: Hugh Allen, who is the sole surviving descendant of 
Chancellor Robert Nelson. Julia Pendleton, the wife of James 
Allen, of Bedford County, Virginia, died 1865. 

10. Susanna (called "Susan") Nelson, born at Yorktown, Virginia, Octo- 

ber 3d, 1780; married, in 1806, Francis Page, of Rugswamp, Han- 
over County, Virginia, eighth child and fifth son of Gov. John Page- 
(See Page Family, Rosewell.) 

11. Judith Nelson, born at Vorkiown, Virginia, May 8th, 1782; married, 

1804, Captain Thomas Nelson, of Oakland, Hanover County, Vir- 
ginia. 
It will be seen that five of the children above mentioned married five of 
Gov. John Page's children; and two of them married two of the children of 
Hon. John Page, of North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia. 
Thus, of the eleven children of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia, 
and Lucy Grymes, his wife, seven of them married Pages. 
• 
in. Col. Hugh Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Virginia, 
about the third son and child of President William Nelson, of the 
same place, and Elizabeth (called " Betty") Burwell, his wife, was 
born there in 1750, and died there 3d October, 1800, aged 50 years. 
He married, about 1775. Judith, about the second daughter and 
fifth surviving child of Hon. John Page, of North End, Gloucester 
(now Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, his wife. The 
portrait of Judith Page is at Oakland, Hanover County, Virginia. 
Judith Page Walker, her granddaughter, of Castle Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia, who married Hon. William C. Rives, was named 
after her. The children of Col. Hugh Nelson and Judith Page, his 
wife, were as follows, viz: 

1. Jane Byrd Nelson, born at Y6tlPl©\\n, Virginia, about 1776; married. 



PRESIDENT NELSON, 1 57 

1798, Hon. Francis Walker, of Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia. (See Walker.) 

2. Lucy Nelson, born at Yorktown, about 1778; married, i6th Mav, 

1798. Edmund Pendleton, Jr., of Caroline County, Virginia, and was 
his second wife. (See Pendleton.) 

3. Captain Thomas Nelson, eldest son, born at Yorktown, Virginia, 1780; 

removed to Oakland, Hanover County, Virginia, and married, 1804, 
Judith, youngest child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Vir- 
ginia. 

4. Dr. Nathaniel Nelson, born at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1786; 

removed to The Lodge, Hanover County, Virginia, and married, 

about 181 1, Lucy Mann, eldest daughter of Mann Page, of Shelly] 

Gloucester County, Virginia. (See Rosewell.) Dr Nelson first' 

lived at a place called 'Z*:? la Salva, Gloucester County, Virginia, but 

the name was changed to Snugly by some people who bought it. 

Children: 

(i) Elizabeth (called "Betsey") Mann Nelson; married, about 1830, 

Rev. John R. Lee, of the Episcopal Church, and had (a) Mary, 

died aged 18, and ib) Charies D. 

(2) Judith Carter Nelson; single; Richmond, Virginia. 

(3) Thomasia Nelson; single. 

(4) Judge Hugh Nelson, of Franklin County, Virginia; married Miss 

Taliaferro, and had several children. 

(5) Nancy Nelson; married, about 1838, Dr. Binford, of Henry 
County, Virginia. 

5. Carter Nelson, born about 1788; died single. * 

6. Frances Edmonia Nelson, born about 1790; died single. She had a 

talent for drawing, and was an artist. 

7. Maria Nelson, youngest, bom 1794; was burned to death in the Rich- 

mond Theatre, Virginia, December 26th, i8ii, aged 17. Her body 
was identified by the watch of Hon. Francis Walker, her brother-in- 
law, of Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia. This watch was 
found on her body in a partially fused condition, but was easily iden- 
ti^ed. Dr. Robert W. Nelson, of Chariottesville, Albemarle County, 
Virginia, had the watch, and a little diamond belonging to it was in 
possession of Dr.kR. C. ^L P^ge, of New York. 

IV. William Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Virginia,' 
eldest son and child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of the same place, and 
Lucy Grymes, his wife, eldest son and child of President William 



158 NELSON FAMILY. 

Nelson, of the same place, and Elizabeth (called " Betty") Burwell, 
his wife, eldest son and child of Thomas Nelson, known as Scotch 
Tom, of England and the same place, progenitor of the Nelson 
Family in Virginia, and Margaret Reid, his wife, was born at York- 
town, Virginia, August 9th, 1763. 

He married, about 1790, Sally Burwell, eldest daughter and 
fourth child of Gov. John Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, 
Virginia, and Frances (called "Fannie") Burwell, his first wife. 
(See Page Family, Rosewell.) Their children were: 

1. Thomas Nelson, eldest, born at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1791; 

married, about 1815, Mar}' Lewis, the widow Peyton. No issue. 
He died probably young. The widow Nelson married, thirdly, Pey- 
ton, by whom she had one child, Rebecca, who married Edward 
Marshall, of Fauquier County, Virginia. 

2. Elizabeth Nelson, born at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1793; married, 

about 1 8 13, West, of Accomac County, Virginia, and had one child, 
Sarah, who married, about 1835, William Parker, of the same county, 
and had issue. 

3. William Nelson, Jr., second son, and eldest to have issue, was born at 

Yorktown, York County, Virginia, about 1795. He married, first, 
in 1824, Mrs. Catherine Fox and had: 

(1) Lucy Thomas Nelson, married, about 1851, Howard, of York 
County, Virginia, and had issue. 

(2) Sally Bursvell Nelson, married, about 1854, Felix B. Welton, of 
Morefield, Hardy County, West Virginia. 

(3) Catherine Nelson, single. 

(4) ^lary Nelson. 

(5) Elizabeth (called "Lizzie") Page Nelson, of New York City. 

William Nelson, Jr., of Yorktown, Virginia, married, secondly, 

about 1844, Mrs. Whiting, who was a Miss Shield, of York County, 

Virginia, and had: 

(i) William Nelson, Jr., died loth Sept'r, 1877, at St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, aged 32. He left a widow, but no issue, and this branch 
became extinct 

(2) Fannie Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginii: 

IV. Thomas Nelson, Jr., second son and child (being also 
the eldest to have surviving male issue) of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of 
Yorktown, York County, Virginia, and Lucy Grymes, his wife, was 



PRESIDENT NELSON. '150 

born there Dec'r 2;th, 1764, and married. 1795, Frances, third 
daughter and seventh surviving child of Gov. John Page, and Frances 
(called '' Fannie ") Burwell, his first wife. The name of his brother 
William's family, having become extinct upon the death of William 
Nelson, Jr., loth Sept'r, 1S77, at St. Louis. Missouri, without issue, 
the family of Thomas Nelson became representative of the family. 
^ The children of Thomas Nelson and Frances Page, his wife. 



were: 



I. Thomasia Nelson, bom about 1796; married, 1821, Bishop William 
Meade, of the Episcopal Church, Virginia, and was his second wife. 
She was buried in The Fork Church graveyard, Hanover County, 
Virginia. 

z. Fannie Nelson, born about 179S; died unmarried. 

3. Thomas Nelson, born about iSoo; died sin"-le. 

4. Rev. George Washington Nelson, born about 1805; married, about 

1835, Jane Crease, of Alexandria, Virginia, and was her first husband. 
Thomas Nelson died, date unknown, leaving his widow who married, 
secondly, Dr. Carter Berkeley, of Edgewood, Hanover County, Virginia! 
Their children were: 

1. Carter Berkeley, married a sister of Bishop Mcllvaine, of Ohio, and 

died leaving one child, who married Capt. McCauley, U. S. Navy. 

2. Catherine (called " Kitty "), who married Lucius Minor, of Edgewood, 

Hanover Count)-, Virginia, and was the mother of Charies L C. 
Minor, C. N. Berkeley Minor, and others. 

IV. Philip Nelson, of Clarke County, Virginia, third son and 
child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Virginia, 
and Lucy Grymes, his wife, was born at the last-named place, March 
14th, 1766, and married, 1789, Sarah N., daughter of Nathaniel 
Burwell, of Isle-of- Wight County, Virginia. Sarah was a niece of 
Gov. John Page's first wife. Their children were as follows: 

1. Thomas Nelson, eldest, born in Clarke County, Virginia, about 1790; 

married, 1820, Mildred Nelson, of Belvoir, Albemarie County, 
Virginia. 

2. Mary Js'elson, bom about 1792; married, about 1812, the Episcopal 
Bishop, William Meade, of Virginia, and was his first wife. She was 
the first cousin of Thomasia Nelson, his second wife. 

3. Dr. William Nelson, born in Clarke County, Virginia, about 1795, 



l60 NELSON FAMILY. 

resided there. He married, 1S34, Nancy Mitchell, of Charleston, 
South Carolina, and had: 

(1) Philip Nelson, eldest, bom in Clarke County, Virginia, about 

1835; removed to Oak Ridge (Mr. Richard Gamble's old place), 
Albemarle Countv, Virginia. He married, about 1873, Emily, 
daughter of Rev. John P. McGuire, of Esse.x County, Virginia. 
She is the sister of Rev. Kinloch Nelson's wife. 

(2) Chadotte Nelson, single. ♦ 

(3) Annie Nelson, died single. 

(4) Selma Nelson, single. The two sisters, Charlotte and Selma, 

resided with their brother at Oak Ridge. 

IV. Francis Nelson, of Mt. Air, Hanover County, Virginia, 
fourth son and child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, York 
County, Virginia, and Lucy Grymes. his wife, was born at the last- 
named place. June 25th, 1767, and married, about 1792, Lucy, 
youngest surviving and fifteenth child of Hon. John Page, of North 
End, Gloucester (now Matthews) County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, 
his wife. 

Their children were as follows: 

1. Thomas Nelson, eldest, born about 1793; died single. 

2. Mann Nelson, bom about 1795; married, first, about 1820, Amelia 

Washington, and second, Lydia Kounslar. 

3. Susan Nelson, bom about 1796; died single. 

4. Jane Nelson, born about 1798; married, in 1819, John Page, of North 

End, Clarke County, Virginia, and was his first wife. (See Page 
Family, North End.) 

5. Lucy Nelson, bom about 1799; died single. 

6. Judith Nelson, born about 1801; married, 1819, Mann Page, of 

Greenland, Gloucester County, Virginia, and was his first wife. 
(See Page Family, Rosewell.) 

7. Maria Nelson, bom about 1803; married, about 1823, John Redman, 

of Jefferson County, West Virginia. 

8. Sally Nelson, born about 1805; married, about 1825, Dr. Samuel 

Scollay, of Smithfield, Jefferson County, West Virginia, and had: 
(i) Elizabeth (called "Lizzie") Scollay, married Capt. P. R. Page, 

U. S. Army. (See Page Family, Rosewell.) 
(2). Mary (called •'Mollie") Scollay, married, 1865, Rev. G. W. 

Nelson, of the Episcopal Church. There were, doubtless, 

other children whose names are unknown. 



PRESIDENT NELSON. l6l 

9. William Nelson, born about 1807; married, abou^ 1832, Mary, ^ 

daughter of Col. William Macon, of Mt. Prospect, New Kent County, 
Virginia. No issue. William Nelson at one time worked on the 
farm of Dr. Mann Page, at Turkey Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia. 

10. Francis Nelson, known as "one arm Frank," born about 1809; mar- 
ried, about 1840, Letitia Prosser, of Bremo, Charles City County, 
Virginia. He died, leaving a widow and six children. 

Francis Nelson at one time worked on the Belvoir farm, Albemarle 
County, Virginia. He after^vards worked at Shirley, on James River, 
Virginia. At the latter place he lost his arm in some machinery. 

11. Philip Nelson, born at Mt. Air, Hanover County, Virginia, about 

181 1 ; resided there. He married, in 1845, Jane Crease, widow of 
Rev. George W. Nelson, of the Episcopal Church, and was her sec- 
ond husband. Children: 
(i) Francis Nelson. 

(2) Caroline, died in 1876, aged 18. 

(3) William Nelson. 

12. Hugh Nelson, born at Mt. Air, Hanover County, Virginia, about 

18 13; removed to Clarke County, Virginia. He married, 1836, Ade- 
laide Holker, of Boston, Mass. He died at the former residence of 
K. S. Nelson, Albemarle County, Virginia, about 1863, and was 
buried at Belvoir, same county. Two children, viz: 
(i) Hugh Nelson. 
(2) Nannie Nelson; died single. 

13. Fannie Nelson, born about 1815; single. 

14. Elizabeth (called "Betsey'') Nelson, bom about 1817; married, 1835, 

Dr. James McCoughtrv-, and had issue. 

IV. Hon. Hugh Nelson, of Belvoir, Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, fifth son and child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, York 
County, Virginia, and Lucy Grymes, his wife, was born at York- 
town, Virginia, September 3Cth, 1768, and died at Belvoir, i3th 
March, 1836, aged 68. 

He was at one time Speaker of the House of Delegates, of Vir- 
ginia. He was afterwards Judge of the Federal Court, and was 
sometimes called Judge Nelson; Presidential Elector in 1809; Rep- 
resentative in the United States Congress, from Virginia, i8ii-'23; 
and immediately thereafter he was appointed Minister to Spain by 
President James Monroe, during the latter part of his adminis- 
tration. 



'i62 NELSON FAMILY. 

He mawried, 1799, Eliza, only child of Francis Kinloch, of 
Charleston, South Carolina, and Mildred Walker, his first wife. 
(See Walker.) Their children were: 

1. Francis Kinloch Nelson, eldest, born at Belvoir, Albemarle County, 

Virginia, in 1800; removed, first, to Peachylorum, and then to Clo- 
verfields (his second wife's residence), both in the County of Albe- 
marle. It was at the latter place that he died, 1862, aged 62 years. 
Peachylorum was a part of the Walker estate, and was probably 
named after Peachy Walker, who was the twelfth and youngest child 
of Dr. Thomas Walker, of Castle Hill, same county. 
• Francis K. Nelson, married, first, at Shelly, Gloucester County, Vir- 
ginia, 24th April, 1823, Anne (called "Nancy") Page, of that place. 
(See Page Family, Rosewell.) Children: 
■ (1) Isabella Nelson; married, 1856, Dr. John F. Gardener, and 
died, leaving Nancy (called "Nina "), and Francis. 
(2) Hester Nelson; died unmarried. 

Francis K. Nelson married, secondly, 1843, Margaret Douglas 
Meriwether, widow of Francis ^Meriwether, of Bedford County, Vir- 
ginia, by whom she had two children— (a) Mary Walker Meriwether, 
married Thomas J. Randolph, Jr., of Edge Hill, Albemarie County, 
Virginia; and {b) Charies Meriwether. She had no issue by her 
second husband, Francis K. Nelson. She was known as "Aunt 
Peggy," and was the daughter of Captain W. D. Meriwether, of 
Cloverfields, Albemarle Count)', Virginia. 

2. Mildred Nelson, bom about i8c2; married, in 1820, Thomas Nelson, 

of Clarke County, Virginia, who was her first cousin, 

3. Anne Carter Nelson, born about 1804; married, 1824, Dr. Thomas 

Warner Meriwether, of Kinloch, Albemarle County, Virginia. She 

died there in 1858, aged about 54. Dr. T. W. Meriwether died in 

1862. Their children were: 

(i) Dr. William Douglas ?»Ieriwether; died in Tennessee, 1880. He 
married, first, 1847, Phcebe Gardener, of Richmond, Virginia, 
and had: {a) Mary Gardener, who married Wallace, of Kentucky; 
{b) William Hunter; {c) Thomas Warner; and {d) Isabella. 

Dr. W. D. Meriwether married, secondly, 1864, Anne W. 
(called "Nannie") Page. (See Page Family, Broadneck). She 
died at Culpepper, Virginia, in 1873, leaving one child, viz: 
Evelyn. 

(2) Mildred Nelson Meriwether; married, 1856, George Macon, of 



PRESIDENT NELSON, l5^ 

Cloverfields, Albemarle County, Virginia, and had; (a) Thomas; 
{6} Charlotte, married Frank M. Randolph; (c) Littleton; {d) 
George; and (e) Douglas. 

(3) Anne Kinloch Meriwether, married, 24th December, 1S50, Fred- 

erick W. Page, of Millwood, Albemarle County, Virginia.' (See 
Page Family, North End.) 

(4) Eliza Meriwether; married, 1S53, N. H. Massie, of Charlottes- 
ville, Virginia, and was his first wife. She died without issue. 

(5) Charlotte Nelson Meriwether; married, 1865, Thomas Jefferson 

Randolph, Jr., and was his second wife. She died, 1876, leav- 
ing one child, viz: Mar>- Walker. 

(6) Thomas W. :\reriwether, Jr.; died single, 1862. 

(7) Jane Meriwether; died infant 

4. Dr. Thomas Hugh Nelson, born at Belvoir, Albemarie County, Vir- 
ginia, 30th May, 1807; removed to Elk Hill, Bedford County', Vir- 
ginia, where he died nth November, 1861, in the 55th vear of his 
age. He married, first, in June, 1833, Sarah A., daughter of John 
Alexander, Esqr., of Campbell County, Virginia. Children; 
(i) Chariotte Simmons Nelson, born 14th ^larch, 1834; died single 

(2) John Alexander Nelson, born 9th January, 1836; died, single, 

October nth, 1863, aged 27. 

(3) Hugh Nelson, twin brother of John; died, single, loth Novem- 

ber, 1866, aged 30 years. 

(4) William Steptoe Nelson, born 2d November, 1837. 

(5) Eliza Kinloch Nelson, born 15th August, 1839; married, Sep- 
tember, i860. Dr. James H. Bowzer. She died 17th Novem- 
ber, 1880, aged 41 years. She left three children: (a) Thomas 
Hugh, born 2d August, 1863; (d) Eddie Page, born 24th Sep- 
tember, 1865; (c) Lulie Preston, bom ist May, 1867. 

(6) Thomas Walker Nelson, born 9th March, 1841; married, 3d 
November, 1869, Lilia McDaniel, who died 6th April, i'870. 
No issue. 

(7) Cleland Kinloch Nelson, born 2d September, 1842; married, 6 th 

November, 1873, Ella Scott, of Lynchburg, Virginia. Children: 
(a) Charies, (d) Sallie, (c) Helen. ' 

(8) Helen Lewis Nelson, bom 15th July, 1844; married, April, i_ 
J. N. Early, of Bedford Count}-, Virginia. Children; (a) Li.. 
Page, (d) Susan Alexander, (c) Henr>' W., (d) Helen Kinloch. 

Dr. Thomas Hugh Nelson married, secondly, 4th October, 
1853, Mrs. Mary Ann Meem, of Lynchburg, Virginia. Her 



'75 
^ilia 



l64 NELSON FAMILY. 

maiden name was Matthews. The children by the second mar- 
riage were: 
(i) Emily G. Nelson, born 4th July, 1854; married, 31st October, 
1877, W. H. Dabney, of Lynchburg, Virginia. Three children: 
{a) William B.,born 15th September, 187S; {d) Thomas Hugh, 
bom i8ih August, 1881; {c) Mar}- C, bom 2d :March, 1883. 

(2) Edwin M. Nelson, bom 12th October, 1855. 

(3) Frank W, Nelson, born i6th Februar\', 1857. 

(4) C. Page Nelson, bom i6ih December, 1859; married, i6th 

December, 1S80, Charles T. Dabney, of Alexandria, Virginia, 
and has one child: Mar\- Norvell. 

(5) Charles Keating Nelson, bom 20th October, i860. 

All the members of this family live in Bedford County, Vir- 
ginia, except Nos. (i) and (4), of the children by the second 
marriage. 

5. Charlotte Nelson, born about 1S08; died single. 

6. Rev. Cleland K. Nelson, of the Episcopal Church, was bom at Bel- 

voir, Albemarle County, Virginia, about 18 14 (as two other children 

died infant), and removed to Annapolis, Maryland. He married, 

first, 1840, Mar>- A., daughter of John Marbur>-, of Georgetown, D. C. 

Children: 

(i) Mary Cleland Nelson, married, 1868, Holmes E. Offley, banker, 

Washington, D. .C, and has several children. 
(2) John Nelson, married, resides in Baltimore, ^Maryland. 

Rev. C. K. Nelson, married, secondly, Marv- Hagner, of 

Washington, D. C, and has Fanny and Hugh. 

7. Caroline Nelson, bom 1816; died single, 1853, aged 36. 

8. Rearing Simmons Nelson, born 18 19, at Belvoir, Albemarle County, 

Virginia, married, 1841, Julia, daughter of Thornton Rogers, of 

Keswick, Albemarle Count)-, Virginia. Children: 

(i) Hugh Nelson, married, 1864, Rose Bentley, and has three sons. 

(2) Francis K. Nelson, died 1864. 

(3) Margaret Nelson, died young. 

(4) Bettie H. Nelson, married, 1876, Beverly Mason, of Fairfax 

County, Virginia, and has several children. 

(5) Celia R. Nelson, married, about 1870, Goolrick, of Fredericks- 

burg, Virginia, and has several children. 

(6) Rev. Cleland K. Nelson, married. 

(7) Keating S. Nelson, Jr. 

(8) William M. Nelson. 



PRESIDENT NELSON. 165 

9. Dr. Robert William Nelson, born 1822, at Belvoir, Albemarle County, 
Virginia; removed to Charlottesville, same county. He married, in 
1844, his first cousin, Virginia L., daughter of Capt. Thomas Nel- 
son, of Oakland, Hanover County, Virginia. Children: 
(i) Dr. Hugh Thomas Nelson, married, 1871, Mary (called "Polly") 
Gilliam, and has several children. 

(2) Nancy Nelson, died infant. 

(3) Susan P. Nelson. 

(4) Robert \V. Nelson, Jr. 

(5) William Nelson. 

(6) Eliza Nelson. Two others died infant. 

IV. Captain Thomas Nelson, of Oakland, Hanover County, 
Virginia, eldest son and third child of Col. Hugh Nelson, of York- 
town, York County, Virginia, and Judith Page, his wife, was born 
at Yorktown, Virginia, 17S0, and died at Oakland, in 1859, aged 79 
years. He was buried at Fork Church, Hanover County, Virginia. 
He lived in Richmond, Virginia, at one time, where he was the pro- 
prietor of the Virginia Hotel near the Capitol Square. He was 
Commissioner of Loans, a federal office, held by him under the 
United States Government. He afterwards retired to his farm at 
Oakland, Hanover County, Virginia. He married, 1804, Judith, 
youngest child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, 
Virginia, and Lucy Grymes, his wife. She was, therefore, his first 
cousin. She died, 1869, aged %-j , and was buried at Fork Church. 
The two were known as Uncle Tom and Aunt Judy. Their chil- 
dren were as follows, viz: 

1. Hugh Thomas Nelson, eldest, born 1805, at Oakland, Hanover 

County, Virginia; died unmarried. 

2. Mar)' Carter Nelson, bom about 1805; died unmarried in 1861, aged 

56 years. 

3. Col. William Nelson, known as "William Particular," bom about 

1807; resided, unmarried, at Oakland. He was named after Judge 
William Nelson, fifth son of President Nelson. 

4. Maria Nelson, bom about 1809; died single. 

5. Judith Nelson, born 181 5; died 1832, unmarried, 

6. Lucy Nelson, born 1817; died single 1872, aged 55. 

7. Rev. Robert Nelson, of the Episcopal Church, bom at Oakland, 

Hanover County, Virginia, in 18 19, was Missionary to China. He 



l66 NELSON FAMILY. 

married, 1848, Rose, daughter of James Points, Esqr., of Staunton, 
Augusta Count}-, Virginia. Children: 

(i) James P. Nelson, eldest, married, 4th Feb., 1873, Marv- W., 
daughter of Edward W. Morris, of Hanover County, Virginia. 

(2) Thomas Nelson, married, 2d Sept'r, 1880, Mar>- Alice, daughter 

of Joseph House, Esqr., of Virginia City, Placer Count)-, Cali- 
fornia. 

(3) Mary C. Nelson. 

(4) John Nelson. 

(5) Rosebud Nelson. 
■ (6) Emily Nelson. 

(7) Ruth Nelson. 

8. Elizabeth (called " Betsey") Burwell Nelson, born about 1824; mar- 

ried, 1847, John Page. (See Page Family, Rosewell.) 

9, Virginia L. Nelson, born about 1826; married, 1844, Dr. Robert W. 

Nelson, of Charlottesville, Albemarle County, as ve have already 



V. Rev. George Washington Nelson, of the Episcopal 
Church, fourth child and second son of Thomas Nelson, Jr., and 
Frances Page, his wife, second child and son (being also the eldest 
to have surviving male issue) of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, 
York County, Virginia, and Lucy Grymes, his wife, qldest of Presi- 
dent William Nelson, of the same place, and Elizabeth (called 
"Betty") Burwell, his wife, eldest of Thomas Nelson, known as 
Scotch Tom, of England and the same place, progenitor of the 
Nelson Family in Virginia, and Margaret Reid, his first wife, was 
born about 1805, and married, about 1835, Jane Crease, of Alex- 
andria, Virginia, and was her first husband. He died about 1840. 
His widow married, secondly, in 1845, Philip Nelson, of Mt. Air, 
Hanover County, Virginia, and had issue, as we have already seen. 
She died at Wytheville, Wythe County, Virginia, in 1878, aged 62 
years, and was buried there. 

The children of Rev. G. W. Nelson and Jane Crease, his wife, 
were as follows, viz: 

1. Thomas Crease Nelson, eldest, born about 1836; died single, at Mt. 

Air, Hanover County, Virginia, Nov., 1857, aged about 21. 

2. Jane Nelson, bom about 1838; single. 



PRESIDENT NELSON. 167 

3. Rev. George Washington Nelson, Jr., bom in 1840; married, 1S65, 
Mary, daughter of Dr. Samuel Scollay, of Smithfield, Jefferson 
County, West Virginia, and has several sons and daughters. Being 
the eldest son of the eldest son, etc., he is the representative of the 
Nelson Family in Virginia. 

V. Thomas Nelson, of Clarke County, Virginia, school teacher, 
eldest of Phih'p Nelson, of same county, and Sarah N. Burwell, his 
wife, third of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia, and Lucy 
Grymes, his wife, was born in Clarke County, Virginia, about 1790, 
and married, 1820, his first cousin, Mildred, daughter of Hon. Hugh 
Nelson, of Belvoir, Albemarle County, Virginia. Their children 
were : 

1. Dr. Robert Bur\vell Nelson, eldest, of Charlottesville, Virginia, born 

about 1823; died 1868, aged 45. He married, 1847, i\Iar\- S., 
daughter of John Price, of Fincastle, Botetourt Count)', Virginia, 
where Dr. Nelson first practiced his profession. Children: 
(i) Thomas F. Nelson, married, about 1874, Sophia Wormeley, who 
died leaving one son. 

(2) Dr. J. William Nelson, removed to Philadelphia. 

(3) Robert Nelson, died young. 

2. Rev. William IMeade Nelson, of the Episcopal Church, born 1825; 

died 1876, aged 51. He married, about 1850, Sarah W, Semmes, 
of Alexandria, Virginia, and left two daughters, Annie and Eliza. 

3. Philip Nelson, of Nelson, Nelson County, Virginia, bom about 1828; 

married, first, in 1853, Emily, daughter of Judge John E. Page, of 
Clarke County, Virginia. (See Page Family, Broadneck.) She died, 
leaving two children, William and Emily. 

He married, secondly, Fannie Essenger, of Nelson County, Vir- 
ginia, and had several daughters. 

4. Eliza Kinloch Nelson, bom in Clarke County, Virginia, about 1821; 

married, in 1856, Nathaniel H. Massie, of Charlottesville, Albemarle 
County, Virginia, and was his second wife. They had several 
children. 

5. Archie Nelson, born about 1832; was killed by a tree falling on him 

while at work, in 1868. 

6. Sallie Bur^vell Nelson, born in Clarke Count}', about 1836; married, 

1868, Thomas Williamson, of Leesburg, Loudon County, Virginia. 
He was the son of Professor Williamson, of the Virginia Military 
Institute, at Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia, Children: 



l68 NELSON FAMILY. 

(i) Thomas Williamson. 

(2) Robert Williamson. 

(3) Garnet Williamson. 
. (4) Nancy Williamson. 

7. Mar)- Nelson, born in Clarke County, Virginia, about 1837; married 

Rev. !Mr. Quinby, missionary to Japan. 

8. Rev. Kinloch Nelson, of the Episcopal Church, youngest, bom in 

Clarke County, Virginia, 1839; removed to the Episcopal Theologi- 
cal Seminary, Fairfa.^ County, Virginia, and became Prof, of Bible 
History in that institution. He married, in 1S68, Fenton, daughter 
of Rev. John R McGuire, of Esse.x Count}-, Virginia. They\ave 
several children. 



II. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Virginia, 
Secretary of the Colonial Council of Virginia, and hence known as 
Secretary Nelson, second son and third child of Thomas Nelson, 
known as Scotch Tom, of England and the same place, progenitor 
of the Nelson Family in Virginia, and Margaret Reid, his first wife, 
was born at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1716, and died there in 1782, 
aged 66. He was buried there. There is no tombstone over his 
grave, and no portrait of him exists. 

He married, about 1745, Lucy Armistead, who was probably a 
younger relative of Judith Armistead, the first wife of Robert (King) 
Carter. The name of Armistead is said to have originated in Vir- 
ginia, with William Armistead, or D'Armstadt, who emigrated from 
Hesse Darmstadt to Virginia in 1636, and settled in Elizabeth City 
County, in that State. 

Secretary Nelson and Lucy Armistead, his wife, had no daugh- 
ters, and only three surviving sons, all of whom were heroes in the 
Revolution, and became officers in the American Army, under 
Washington. They were all present at the siege of Yorktown, in 
October, 178 1, and brought their father into the American lines 
under flag of truce. They were as follows, viz: 

1. Col. William Nelson, of the American Army, eldest, was born at 

Yorktown, Virginia, 17th June, 1746, and removed to The Dorrill, 
Hanover County, Virginia; married, 24th November, 1770, Lucy 
Chiswell. 

2. Major John Nelson, of the American Army, was born at Yorktown, 

Virginia, about 1748, and removed to Oakhill, Mecklenburg County, 
Virginia. He married, about 1772, Nancy Carter, of Williamsburg, 
Virginia. 

3. Captain Thomas Nelson, of the American Army, was bom about 1750, 

at Yorktown, York Count\', Virginia, and removed to " Bears Spring," 
Hanover County, same State. He married, about 1775, Sally, daugh- 
ter of Col. Wilson Cary, of Williamsburg, James Cit>- County, Vir- 
ginia. There was only one child so far as known, viz: 
(i) Wilson Cary Nelson, bom about 1776, at Bears Spring, Han- 
over County, Virginia; married, but the name of his wife is at 
present unknown. He had two daughters, viz: (a) Catherine, 



I/O NELSON FAMILY. 

who married, about 1831, Charles Page, of Hanovertown, Han- 
over County, Virginia; and (3) Lucy, who married, about 1833, 
John F. Page, of same place. (See Page Family, Rosewell.) 

III. Col. William Nelson, of The Dorrill, Hanover 
County, Virginia, eldest son and child of Secretary Thomas Nelson, 
of Yorktown, York County, Virginia, and Lucy Armistead, his wife, 
second son and third child of Thomas Nelson, known as Scotch 
Tom, of England and Yorktown, Hanover County, Virginia, pro- 
genitor of the Nelson Family in Virginia, and Margaret Reid, his 
first wife, was born at Yorktown, Virginia, 17th June, 1746, and died 
25th Nov., 1807, aged 61 years. 

He was educated in England, with his first cousin, Gov. Thomas 
Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia. He was present at the battles of 
Monmouth and Brandywine, and all the Northern battles in which 
Washington's army was engaged. He was also present at the siege 
of Yorktown, Virginia, in October, 1781, with the rank of Colonel of 
Infantry in the American Army. He married, 24th November, 1770, 
Lucy, daughter of Col. Chiswell and Elizabeth Randolph, his wife, 
who was probably a daughter of Councillor William Randolph, of 
" Chatsworth," and afterwards of " Willow Branch," both in Henrico 
County, Virginia. Lucy Chiswell was born 3d August, 1752, and 
died 14th April, 18 10, aged 58 years. They had the following 
children: 

1. Lucy Nelson, born at The Dorrill, Hanover County, Virginia, 13th 

September, 1771; married, 13th November, 1809, William Meau.x, 
of New Kent Count}-, Virginia, and died without issue, 15th Septem- 
ber, 1824. 

2. Elizabeth Nelson, born i8th May, 1773; died single. 

3. Caroline Nelson (No. 1), born 18th May, 1775; died 6th July, same 

year. 

4. NoRBORNE Thomas Nelson, eldest son, born at The Dorrill, Hanover 

County, Virginia, 29th August, 1776; married, about 1801, his first 
cousin, Lucy, daughter of Major John Nelson, of Oakhill, Mecklen- 
burg County, Virginia. 

5. Warner Lewis Nelson, born 28th December, 1777; died, 29th April, 

1785. 

6. Sally Cary Nelson, born 6th April, 1780; married, first, 1799, Charles 

Page, of Hanovertown, Virginia. (See Page Family, Rosewell.) She 



SECRETARY NELSON. I7I. 

married; secondly, Thomas Atkinson, of " Mansfield," near Peters- 
burg, Dinw-iddie County, Virginia, by whom she had no issue. She 
died, Januar}-, 1S61, agetl 81 years. 

7. William Nelson, bom 30th Oct., 1781; died infant, 2d April, 1782. 

8. Mary Chiswell Nelson, born 20th March, 1783; married, about 1S03, 

Mann Page, of Hanovertown, Virginia, brother of Charles. (See Page 
Family, Rosewell.) 

9. Dr. William Randolph Nelson, bom 9th October, 1784. ; died at 

"Gould Hill," Hanover County, Virginia, 1862, aged 78 years. He 
married, about 1809, the widow, Lucy Oliver, whose maiden name 
was Tomlin. No surviving issue. 

10. Caroline Nelson (No. 2), bom 27th May, 1786; died 12th November, 

1790, infant. 

11. Fanny P. Nelson, born 23d December, 1787; married, 1807, John 

Spottswood Wellford, of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Children: 
(i) Jane Wellford; married, about 182S, James Park Corbin, of Moss 
Neck, Caroline County, Virginia, and had: (a) S. Wellford Cor- 
bin, of Fariey Vale, King George County, Virginia; (5) Mrs. 
John Dickinson, of Fredericksburg, Virginia; (c) Kate Corbin; 
married, first, 1863, Alexander S. Pendleton, of Lexington, 
Rockbridge County, Virginia, who died, 1864, with no surviv- 
ing issue. She married, secondly, John Brooke, of Lexington, 
Virginia, and had several children; {d) James Park Corbin, Jr., 
married Miss Ficklin. 

(2) Dr. William Nelson Wellford, of Fariey, Culpepper County, Vir- 
ginia; married, about 1835, Mrs. Fariey Fauntleroy, whose 
maiden name was Corbin. He died in July, 1S72, leaving: {a) 
Dr. William N. Wellford, Jr. , of Campbell County, Virginia,, 
who married and had several children; and (d) R. Corbin Well- 
ford, of New York City, and others. 

(3) Mary C. Wellford; married, about 1837, Dr. George F. Car- 
michaei, of Fredericksburg, Virginia. She died, leaving three 
sons: (a) James; {d) Spottswood, and (r) Charles Carter. 

12. George R. Nelson, bom i6th October, 1789; died 20th November, 

1802, probably single. At his request, his portion of his fathers 
estate was given tu his eldest brother, Norbome Thomas Nelson. 

13. Susan R. Nelson, bom i8th May, 1791; married, first, 2d March, 

1809, William Wellford, brother of J. Spottswood Wellford, of Fred- 
ericksburg, Virginia. William Wellford died, leaving one child, 
Lucy Wellford, who married, about 1830, Dr. Robert C. Randolph, 



172 NELSON FAMILY. 

of Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia. (See Randolph.) Susan R. 
Nelson, the widow Wellford, married, secondly, Philip Burwell, of 
Chapel Hill, Clarke County, Virginia. He died nth Feb., 1849, 
and she died 27th Dec, 1S69, aged 78 years. 

16. Hugh Nelson (14 and 15, died infants, names unknown), bom at The 

Dorrill, Hanover County, Virginia; married, about iSiS, Elizabeth 
H. Mirige. He died, ist April, 1862, aged 69. His wife was of 
Wyanoke, on James River, Charles City County, Virginia. She was 
a great-niece of William Henr\- Harrison, President of the United 
States of America, and granddaughter of Benjamin Harrison, of 
Berkeley (Harrison's Landing), on James River, Virginia, who was 
one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Children: 
(i) Sally Nelson; single. 

(2) Lucy Nelson; single. 

(3) Fanny P. Nelson; married, about 1S60, Charles Carter, who 
resides near Shirley, on James River, Virginia, and has several 
children. 

(4) Hugh Nelson; married, about 1865, INIaria, daughter of John 
Selden, near Westover, on James River, Charles City County, 
Virginia, and had one child, viz: William Nelson. 

(5) Mar)' Nelson. 

(6) William R. Nelson; removed to Selma, Alabama, and married, 
about 1867, Octavia Stevens, of Tennessee. 

17. Armistead Nelson, youngest, born at " The Dorrill," Hanover County, 

Virginia, nth February, 1795; became an officer in the U.S. Navy, 
under Commodore Decatur. He aftenvards resigned, and became a 
merchant. He married, about 1820, Mary Henderson, of Freder- 
icksburg, Virginia, and had one son, viz: 

(i) Dr. "William A. Nelson, U. S. Navy; married, about 1846, Mar\- 
Moncure, of Stafford County, Virginia. 

in.^ Major John Nelson, of Oak Hill, Mecklenburg County, 
Virginia, second son and third child of Secretary Thomas Nelson, 
of Yorktovvn, York County, Virginia, and Lucy Armistead, his wife, 
was born at Yorktown, Virginia, about 1748. When the war of the 
American Revolution commenced, he entered the American army, 
and rose to the rank of Major of Infantry. He married, about 
1773, Nancy, daughter of John Carter, a merchant, of Williams- 
burg, James City County, Virginia. They are said to have had a 
large family; but the following names only are known, viz: 



SECRETARY NELSON. I 73 

1. John Nelson, eldest, born about 1774, at Oak Hill, Mecklenburg 

County, Virginia. 

2. Robert Nelson, born at the same place about 1776. 

3. Major Thomas M. Nelson, born 17S2 ; married, 1S15, Sarah W., 

daughter of John Page, of Pagebrook, Clarke County, Virginia. 
(See Page Family, Broadneck.) 

4. Lucy Nelson, born about 1784; married, about 1801, as we have 

seen, her first cousin, Norborne Thomas Nelson, eldest son and 
fourth child of Col. William Nelson, of "The Dorrill," Hanover 
County, Virginia. 

5. William Nelson, born about 1786. 

6. Hugh Nelson, born about 1788, 

IV. Major Thomas M. Nelson, U. S. Army, about the third 
surviving son and child of Major John Nelson, of Oak Hill, Mecklen- 
burg County, Virginia, and Nancy Carter, his wife, second son and 
child of Secretary Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Vir- 
ginia, and Lucy Arm.istead, his wife, was born at the first-named 
place in 1782, and removed to Co'umbus, Muscogee County, Georgia, 
where he died loth November, 1853, aged 71 years. Reserved with 
distinction in the war of 1812, as Captain of Infantry. After the 
war he was promoted to the rank of Major. He soon after resigned, 
and was a representative in the United States Congress, from Vir- 
ginia, i8i6-'i9. He declined a re-election, and retired to private 
life. He was a Presidential Elector in 1829 and 1833. 

He married, 18 15, Sarah Walker Page, of Pagebrook, Clarke 
County, Virginia, who was the daughter of John Page, of that place, 
and the sister of Judge John E. Page, also of the same place. (See 
Page Family, Broadneck.) Mrs. Sarah \V. P. Nelson, died, 1835, 
aged about 43. Their children were: 

1. Evelyn Nelson, born about 1816; married, about 1835, Robert Car- 

ter, of Columbus, Georgia. 

2. Hon. John P. Nelson, eldest son. Representative in the U. S. Con- 

gress, from Georgia. 

3. Col. William Nelson, of Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia; born 

about 1820; married, about 1845, ^lary, daughter of William Byrd 
Page, of Pagebrook, Clarke County, Virginia, and Eliza Atkinson, 
his second wife. 



^74 NELSON FAMILY. 

4. Maria H. Nelson, born about 1822; married, about 1842, Mr. Wool- 

fork, near Columbus, Georgia. 

5. Rosalie Nelson, born about 1S24; married, about 1S44, Mr. Ticknor 

of Geors:ia. ' 



PART III. 



WALKER FAMILY, 









^ 



;\ M 



/ 












■•- \ 1 - ■ •■ 




. \ - 



(From a water color drawpg by C. H. Sherman, N. Y., r83i ) 

HON. FRANCIS WALKER, 

CASTLE HILL, ALBEMARLE CO., VIRGINIA, 

Died 1806. Aged 42. 



WALKER FAMILY. 



The Walkers, of Virginia, came from Staffordshire, Eng- 
land, about 1650, at an early period in the history of the Colony 
of Virginia. The Walker Family Bible is in the possessson of Dr. 
Bernard H. Walker, of Stevensville, King and Queen County, Vir- 
ginia, and was printed in 1589. 

I. Thomas Walker, of Gloucester County, Virginia, pro- 
genitor of the Walker Family in Virginia, was a member of the Colo- 
nial Assembly in 1662, being at that time a Representative from 
the County of Gloucester. His wife and children are at present 
unknown to the writer, though his eldest son was probably named 

Thomas. 

*********** 

III. Thomas Walker, of King and Queen County, Vir- 
ginia, was probably a grandson of the above-mentioned Thomas 
Walker, of Gloucester County, same State. The following is copied 
from a letter from Dr. Bernard H. Walker, of Stevensville, King 
and Queen County, Virginia, to Dr. R. C. M. Page, of New York 
City, dated 30th October, 1880: 

"The old Walker Family Bible, in my possession, was printed in 1589, 
and the New Testament was attached in 1602. In this old Bible there is this 
memorandum: 'September y« 24th, 1709. I went to Sant Clemones Church, 
(signed) Thomas Walker.' 

" The ne.xt memorandum is this: ' My dafter, Mary Peachy Walker, was 
born y' first cure of y* thirtieth day of Janevary, 1710, babtised the day fol- 
lowK y» 31st.' There are also in said Bible the following memoranda:, 

" 'John Walker borne y* 29 of April, at five, 171 1.' 

" ' Tho' Walker borne Jan^ y« 25, 171 5.' 

" ' Mary Peachy Walker married May y« 13 in the year of our Lord, 1732.' 

"John Walker, married 9th Nov., 1735, Miss Baylor, of Essex County, 
Virginia, and had three children, viz: 

" I. Baylor Walker, a son. 

" 2. Susannah Walker. 

"3. Elizabeth Walker." 



l8o WALKER FAMILY. 

Thomas Walker, of King and Queen County, Virginia, married, 
39th September, 17C9, at St. Clemens Church, in said county, 
Susanna, whose surname was probably Peachy. Their children 
were as follows: 

I. Mary Peachy Walker, born 1710; married, ijih May, 1732, Dr. 
George Gilmer, of Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia, and 
had Dr. George Gilmer, of " Pen Park,"' Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, who was the grandfather of Gov. Thomas Walker Gilmer. 

2 John Walker, eldest son, born 29ih April, 171 1 ; married, but the 
names of his wife and children are at present unknown to the writer. 
His descendants live in King and Queen County, Virginia, of whom 
Dr. Bernard H. Walker, above-mentioned, is probably the repre- 
sentative. Dr. Walker A. Hawes, of New Vork City, formerly of 
Virginia, is also a descendant. The Baptist minister, Robert B. 
Semple, father of Baylor Semple, who was the Whig editor of the 
old Fredericksburg (Virginia) iVcWs, was his descendant by his 
daughter. 

3. Dr. Thomas Walker, second son, born in King and Queen County, 
Virginia, 25th January, 1715; removed to Castle Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia. He married, first, in 1741, Mildred Thornton, 
the widow Meriwether, by whom he had issue. He married, sec- 
ondly, about 1781, Elizabeth Thornton, first cousin of his first wife 
and sister of Mildred Thornton, who was the second of the five 
wives of Col. Samuel Washington, brother of Gen. George Wash- 
ington. Dr. Thomas Walker had no issue by his second wife. 

IV. Dr. Thomas Walker, of Castle Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia, third child and second son of Thomas W^alker, of 
King and Queen County, Virginia, and Susanna [Peachy], his wife, 
grandson (?) of Thomas Walker, of Gloucester County, Virginia, 
progenitor of the Walker Family in Virginia, name of his wife . 
unknown, was born at the second-named place, 25th January, 1715, 
and removed to the first-named place, where he died 9th Novem- 
ber, 1794, aged 79 years and nearly 10 months. 

He was probably the first white man that ever entered Kentucky, having 
gone there about 1750, or thirteen years before Daniel Boone. Dr. Walker's 
hatchet, with which he marked trees that formed the boundary lines of the 
lands purchased by him from the Indians, was found several years ago in 
Kentucky, where he had lost it. It was marked "T. W.," and is said to be 
now in a museum in Louisville, Kentucky. 



CASTLE HILL. l8l 

Walker's Mountains, in Southwest Virginia, are probably named after 
Dr. Thomas Walker. On his way to Kentucky, about 1750, he gave the 
name to Cumberland Gap and Cumberland River, in honor of the Duke of 
Cumberland, who routed the rebels at the battle of Culloden about 1747. 

On the loth October, 1774, the Indians, under their chief, Cornstalk, 
were defeated by the Colonial troops under the commantl of Andrew Lewis^ 
at the B.\TTLE of Point Ple.\s.\nt. This place is situated on the right bank 
of the Great Kanawha River, at its junction with the Ohio River, in what is 
now called West Virginia. 

The cause of this battle appears to have been due to disaffection on the 
part of the Indians with the Treaty of Lancaster, as well as others that were 
subsequently made in confirmation of it. The Treaty of Lancaster was made 
on the 2d July, 1744, between Represeniaiives of the Six Nations of Indians 
and Commissioners of His ^Majesty, George II. By this treaty the Indians 
agreed forever to abandon all claim to any territory within the Colony of Vir- 
ginia. The Treaty of Lancaster, and several other documents, which are writ- 
ten on parchment, and were in the possession of Dr. Thomas Walker, are now 
in the possession of Thomas Walker Page, Esqr, of Turkey Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia, they having come to him through his mother, Jane Frances 
Walker Page, the granddaughter of Dr. Thomas Walker. The following is 
a copy of the Treaty of Lancaster: 

\ 
"To all people to whom these presents shall come. 

Canasaieego, Tachanoontia, Joneehat, Caxhayion, Torachdadon, Neeco- 
kanyhak, and Rociniwuchto, Sachems or chiefs of the nation of the Ononda- 
gas, Saquesonyunt, Gachiaddodon, Hucdsaly-akon, Rowanhohiso, Osochquah, 
and Seayenties, Sachems or chiefs of the nation of Cahugas, Swadany alias 
Stuckelimy Onecliuaagua, Onoch-Kally dawy, alias Watsathua, Tohash- 
waniarorow, Amyhoctkhaw, and Tear-Haasuy, Sachems or chiefs of the nations 
of the Tuscaroras, Tanasanegoes, k Tanichuintees, Sachems or chiefs of the 
nation of tlie Senikers send Greeting. 

Whereas the six United nations of Indians laying claim to some Lands 
in the Colony of Virginia, signified their Willingness to enter into a Treaty 
concerning the same, Whereupon Thomas Lee Esqr, a member in Ordinary 
of his Majesty's honourable Council of State and one of the Judges of the 
Supreme Court of Judicature in that Colony, and William Beverly Esqr, Col- 
onel and County. Lieutenant of the County of Orange, and one of the repre- 
sentatives of the people in the house of Burgesses of that Colony, were deputed 
by the Governor of the said Colony as Commissioners to Treat with the said 
Six nations or their Dei.uties, Sichems or chiefs as well of, and concerning 



l82 WALKER FAMILY. 

the said claim as to renew their covenant chain between the said Colony and 
the said Six nations, and the said Commissioners, having met at Lancaster, 
in Lancaster County, and Province of Pensylvania, and as a foundation for a 
Stricter amity (S: Peace at their Juncture, agreed with the said Sachems or Chiefs 
of the said Six Nations, for a Disclaimer and Renunciation of all their Claim 
or Pretence of right whatsoever of the said Six Nations and an Acknowledge- 
ment of the Right of our Sovereign, the King of Great Britain, to all the Land 
in the Colony of Virginia. Now know ye that for and in consideration of the 
Sum of four hundred pounds current Money of Pensylvania paid and deliv- 
ered to the above-named Sachems or Chiefs partly in Goods and panly in Gold 
Money by the said Commissioners, they the said Sachems or Chiefs on behalf 
of the said Six Nations do hereby renounce and disclaim not only all the Right 
of the said Six Nations, but also recognize and acknowledge the right and 
Title of our Sovereign, the King of Great Britain, to all the Lands within the 
said Colony as it is now or hereafter may be peopled and owned by his said 
Majesty, our Sovereign Lord, the King, his heirs and possessors. In Witness 
whereof the said Sachems or Chiefs for themselves and on behalf of the people 
of the Six Nations aforesaid, have hereunto put their hands and Seals the Sec- 
ond day of July, in the Eighteenth Year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord 
George the Second of Great Britain etc., and in the year of our Lord One 
thousand seven hundred and forty-four. 



" Signed Sealed and Delivered 
In the Presence of 

EwD. Jennings, Conrad Weisor, Interpreter 

P. Thomas — Edwd Smout 

P. King William Marshe. 



Tho" Colvil 
James Hamilton 
Rich" Peters 
W- Logan 
JNo. Tayloe Jun" 
Phil. Lud. Lee 
pRESBY Thornton 
Nat. Rigby 



Tanickeinties 

Onucknaxgua 

Shickelimy 

Watsatuha 

Tohasaangarrorons 

Anuchockin 



(^ 


(L. S.) 


a> 


(L. S.) 





(L. S.) 


CO 


(l. S.) 


(JJU 


(l. S.) 


o 


(l. S.) 





CASTLE HILL. 






183 


Nat. Rigbie Jun* 


Tiorhasuy 




^ 


(L.S.) 


Benedict Calvert 


Sidoceax 




G 


(L. S.) 


James Patton 


Attiuska 




• 


(L. S.) 


James Logan Jun" 


Teewachadachgua 




9 




Tho' Cookson 


Thorniua Waggon 




V 




Tho' Craddock 


- 
Canassatego 




J 


(L. S.) 


Rob"' Byooke Jun" 


Tochanoontia 




X 


(L.S.) 


Jas. Madison 


Johnuas 




-A.^ 


(L. S.) 


William Black 


Saxagan 




-A 


(L.S.) 




Torachaadon 




i 

his mark 


(L. S.) 


Heecohanyhak 






• £§=. 


(L. S.) 


Potirawuchta 






V 


(L. S.) 


Taraghsackgua 






k 


(L. S.) 


Saguchsonyunt 


\ 


^ 


\>~< 


(L. S.) 


Gachradodon 






s' * 


(L.S.) 


Hataslyaken 






^ 


(L.S.) 


ROWANHOHEISO 






(L. S.) 


Soghguah 








(L. S.) 


Seayentus 








(L.S.) 


Tanananego 
Virginia ss* 


. 




-/f 


(L. S.) 


At a General Cc 


urt held at the Capitol the 25 


th day 


of October, 


1744. 



1 84 WALKER FAMILY. 

This Deed Poll was proved by the oaths of Edmund Jennings Esqr. 
Philip Lud. Lee, and William Black three of the Witnesses thereto and ordered 
to be Recorded. 

Teste Ben. Waller C. G C. 
A Copy 

Teste 

Peter Pelham Jun. & 
Ben. Waller C. G C." 

The Capitol of Virginia iji those days was at Williamsburg, 
James City County. 

It appears from the foregoing Treaty of Lancaster that the claim 
to all lands in the Colony of Virginia was purchased from the In- 
dians for the sum of four hundred pounds of Pennsylvania currency 
(between twelve and fifteen hundred dollars), to be paid "partly in 
Goods and partly in Gold Money," but especially " partly in Goods " 
no doubt, such as cheap whiskey, gunpowder tobacco, and the like. 
This was, however, comparatively, a very large sum to pay for a 
sound title to all the land within the Colony of Virginia, when we 
consider the fact that Manhattan Island, upon which the city of 
New York now stands, was purchased from the Indians by the 
Dutch for the sum of twenty-four dollars ! Sharp bargains these, all 
done up as they were in due form according to law, and not far be- 
hind similar jobs of the present day. 

Some of the Sachems probably became dissatisfied with the 
Treaty of Lancaster (made 2d July, 1744), and it appears that, sub- 
sequently, other treaties were made from time to time, confirming 
the Treaty of Lancaster. For instance, a " powwow " was held, for 
this object, at Loggstown (Ohio) in 1752. The following is a copy 
of the parchment: 

" Whereas at the Treaty of Lancaster, in the Count)' of Lancaster, and 
Province of Pensylvania, held between the Government of Virginia, and the 
Six United Nations of Indians in the Year of our Lord 1744, The hon."® 
Thomas Lee and William Beverly Esqr, being Commissioners, a Deed Recog- 
nizing and acknowledging the right and Title of his Majesty our Sovereing 
Lord, the King of Great Britain, to all the Lands within the Colony of Yirginia, . 
as it was then or might be hereafter peopled and bounded by his said Majesty 
our Sovereign Lord the King, his heirs and successors, was signed sealed and 
delivered by the Sachems and Chiefs of the Six United Nations then present 
as may more fully appear by the said Deed, reference thereto being had: We 



CASTLE HILL. I35 

Conogareira, Chescaga, Cononsagret, Eaghnisance, Togrondoara, and Thorn- 
arissa, Sachems and Chiefs of the said Six Nations now in Council at Loggs- 
town, do hereby Signify our Consent to & Confirmation of the said Deed in 
as full and ample a manner as if the same was here recited, and whereas his 
Majesty, the King of Great Britain, has at present a Design of making a Set- 
tlement or Settlements of British-Subjects on the Southern or Eastern parts of 
the River thus called otherwise Allegany, we in Council Joshua Fr)-, Lunsford 
Lomax, and James Patton Esq'« being Commissioners on behalf of his Majesty, 
Do give our consent thereto and do further promise that the said Settlement 
or Settlements shall be unmolested by us, & that we will, as far as in our power, 
assist and Protect the British Subjects there inhabiting. 

In Witness whereof we have hereunto put our hands and Seals this thir- 
teenth day of June in the Year of our Lord 1752. 

Signed Sealed and Delivered [ 
in the Presence of j 



William Trent 
Geo. Croghax 
Tho' McKee 



W" Blyth 
Hugh Crawford 
W- West 

Mich'- Teass, Jr 

Christ" Gist 
W" Preston 
Aaron Price 
Peter Poster 
Virginia, ss' 



Conogareira 



Chescaga 



Cononsagret 



Montour Eaghnisara 



^ 



-> — ^ 




■X. 

Togrondoara /^—^ ~A/ 



Thomarissa 




(L.S.) 

(l. s.) 
(l. s.) 

(L. S.) 
(L. S.) 

(L. S.) 



At a General Court held at the Court house in Williamsburg the 2d 
day of November 1752. 



1 86 WALKER FAMILY. 

This Deed Poll was acknowledged by Montour Eaghnisara one of the 
Sachems within named and was proved to be the Act and Deed of the said 
Sachems also within named by the oath of William Trent, and William Pres- 
ton, Witnesses thereto and Ordered to be Recorded." 

Teste Ben. Waller W, C W. 
A Copy 

Teste 

Peter Pelham, Jin" & 
Ben. Waller C D G. Cur." 

The follouing are copies of parchments which explain them- 
selves. They have reference to the purchase of six millions of acres 
of land on the Ohio River by certain persons, among whom we find 
Dr. Thomas Walker and his two sons, John Walker and Thomas 
Walker, Jr. 

"This Indenture made this thirtieth day of July in the year of Our Lord 
One Thousand Seven hundred and Seventy Seven Between George Croghan 
Esq"-, of Fort Pitt in the State of Virginia of the one part, and Thomas Walker, 
John Walker, Thomas Walker Jun', Nicholas Lewis, George Gilmer, Mathew 
Maury, Reuben Lindsay, of the County of Albemarle, Henr>' Yxy, of the 
County of Culpepper, and Joseph Hornsby, of the City of Williamsburg, in the 
State aforesaid, of the other part Witnesseth. Whereas the aforementioned 
George Croghan Esq, did on the tenth day of July, Anno Domini One Thou- 
sand Seven hundred and Seventy five, purchase of the Chiefs or Sachems of the 
Six United Nations of Indians a Certain Tract or Parcel of land in fee marked 
by Certain Boundaries and Containmg by Estimation Six Million of Acres, all 
which will fully appear by a true and Accurate Copy of the Deed of the afore- 
said purchase hereto annexed, recourse being thereunto had. Now this Inden- 
ture WITNESSETH that the said George Croghan Esq-- hath for and in Consid- 
eration of the Sum of five thousand Spanish Dollars, to him in hand paid, the 
Receipt whereof he doth hereby acknowledge. Bargained, Sold, Aliened, 
Enfeoffed and delivered, and by these Presents doth Bargain, Sell, Alien, 
Enfeoff and deliver unto the aforesaid Thomas Walker, John Walker, Thomas 
Walker Jun', Nicholas Lewis, George Gilmer, Mathew Maury, Reuben Lind- 
say, Henry Fry, and Joseph Hornsby, one Clear Eight and Fortieth part of the 
Tract or Parcel of Land of the Six United Nations of Indians purchased as 
heretofore-mentioned, and as by the annexed Deed described, to them, their 
Heirs and Assigns forever: not as Joint Tenants but Tenants in Common, in 
the Proportions hereafter to be mentioned, that is to say to the afores* John 



CASTLE HILL. I87 

WaJker one full Sixth part of the land hereby Conveyed, to the aforesaid Thomas 
Walker Jun-- one full Seventh part of the Premises hereby Conveyed, to the 
aforesaid Thomas Walker one full Eighth part of the Land hereby Convered, 
and all the Rest and Residue of the Land hereby Conveyed after the deduct- 
ing of the aforesaid three Shares to be divided among Thomas Walker, Nich- 
olas Lewis, George Gilmer, Mathew Maur^-, Reuben Lindsay, Henry Fry, and 
Joseph Hornsby, two Shares to the said Thomas Walker, and to the others one 
full share each, the land so to be laid off as to allow the afore-mentioned Gran-- 
tees their Just proportion on the River, To have and to hold the aforesaid 
Land together with all and Singular, the Profits, Priviledges, Immunities and 
Hereditaments thereunto belonging or in any wise appertaining in the Pro- 
portions heretofore Specified, them the aforesaid Thomas Walker, John Walker, 
Thomas Walker Jun^ Nicholas Lewis, George Gilmer, Mathew Maur>', Reu- 
ben Lindsay, Henrv- Fr}', and Joseph Hornsby, their Heirs and Assigns forever, 
not as Joint Tenants but as Tenants in Common according to the true intent 
and meaning of this Indenture. I\ Testimony whereof the aforesaid George 
Croghan hath hereunto set his hand and affixed his Seal the date first-above 
written. 

Sealed and Delivered 

In the Presence of 

George Rootes r 

B.RKARD Gratz J W.LUAM Cooper . qeo. Croohan- [s.alI 

Strother Tones f t t^ 

rp -r. T J- Peyton Jun' 

1 HOMAS Edmondson Jun" J ■' 

Received of John Walker Esq^ one of the Grantees within mentioned, 
the within mentioned Consideration Muney full this 30th day of July 1777. 

_ Geo. Croghan. 

Teste 

Geo. Rootes, 

Barnard Gratz. 

Memorandum. 

Livery and Seisin made at the dating and ensealing the within Presents 

„ Geo. Croghan. 

Teste 

Geo. Rootes 

Strother Jones. Thomas Edmondson Jun' 
William Cooper 

J. Peyton Jun' 
Croghan 1 
to 5- Deed.' 

Walker & al. 



} 



1 88 WALKER FAMILY. 

"To ALL Peoplf. to whom these Presents shall come Greeting: 

Know ye that we Kapthsuda, Tiendenago, Guitogunt, Oquncequago, 
Tegurahogo and Saquonea, Chiefs and Sachems of the Six United Nations of 
Indians, and being and effectually Representing all the Tribes of the said Six 
United Nations send Greeting. Now know ve therefore that we the said 
Chiefs orSachemsoftheSi.K United Nations in full Council at Fort Pitt assembled: 
for and in Consideration of the Sum of Twelve Thousand Spanish Dollars, or 
value thereof in merchandize to us in hand paid by George Croghan, the 
Receipt whereof we do hereby acknowledge: and for and in Consideration of 
the great Justice and Integrity of the said George Croghan, Used and E-xercised 
by him towards the Si.x Nations and their Allies in all his Publick and Private 
Conduct and Transactions wherein they have been Concerned, Have Granted, 
Bargained, Sold, Aliened, Released, Enfeoffed, Ratified and fully Confirmed a 
Certain Tract or Parcel of Land Beginning at the Shore on the South side of 
the River Ohio, Opposite the mouth of French Creek or Beef River, thence 
down the said River Ohio on the South side thereof Opposite the mouth of 
Big Beaver Creek, thence on a straight or direct line, across the said River 
Ohio, to the mouth of the said Beaver Creek, thence along the said Beaver 
Creek on the northerly side of the same, to an Old Indian Town, known by 
the name of Kaskaskias, thence up a Branch of the said Bever Creek, known 
by the name of Shinango, and on the northerly side of the same to the Head 
or Termination of the said Branch, thence on a Straight or direct line to the 
head of French Creek, or Beef River, thence down the said Creek or River, on 
the Southerly side of the same, to the mouth thereof, and from thence in a 
Straight or direct Line across the River Ohio to the place of Beginning, Con- 
taining, by Estimation, Six Millions of Acres, be the same more or less. And 
by these Presents do Grant, Bargain, Sell, Alien, Release, Enfeoff, Ratify and 
fully Confirm unto the Said George Croghan, his Heirs and Assigns all the 
above described Tract or Parcel of Land, Granted or intended to be Granted, 
and also the Mines, Minerals, Ores, Trees, Islands, Woods, Underwoods, 
Waters, Watercourses, Profits, Commodities, Advantages, Rights, Liberties, 
Priviledges, Hereditaments and Appurtenances whatsoever to the said Tract or 
Parcel of Land belonging or in anywise Appertaining, and also the Reversion 
and Reversions, Remainder and Remainders, Rents, Issues and Profits thereof, 
and all the Estate Right of Title, Interest, Use, Property, Possession, Claim 
and demand of us the said Kayathsuda, Tiendenago, Guitogunt, Oqunce- 
quago, Tegurahogo, and Saquonea, Chiefs or Sachems aforesaid, and of all 
and every Other Person and Persons whatsoever of or belonging to the said 
Nations of, in, to, and out of the Premises and everj* part and Parcel thereof 
To HAVE AND TO HOLD the Said Tract or Parcel of Land, and all and Singular 



CASTLE HILL. 189 

the said Granted or Bargained Premises with the Appurtenances unto the said 
George Croghan, his Heirs and Assigns forever, and the said Kayathsuda, Tien- 
denago, Guitogunt, Oquncequago, Tegurahogo, and Saquonea, for themselves 
and for the Six United Nations and all and every Nation and Nations, and their 
and ever}' one of their Posterities, the said Tract of Land and Premises and 
ever)' part thereof against them the said Kayathsuda, Tiendenago, Guitogunt, 
Oquncequago, Tegurahogo, and Saquonea and against the Six United Nations 
and their Tributaries and Dependents and all and everv' one of their Posteri- 
ties unto the said George Croghan, his Heirs and Assigns shall and will War- 
rant and forever defend by these Presents, Provided always nevertheless, ajid it 
is the true intent and meaning of these Presents that the said George Croghan, 
his Heirs, Executors, Administrators and Assigns shall not make any Settle- 
ments on the above described or mentioned Tract or Parcel of Landfor the 
term of Fifteen Years, unless the Indians settled in that part of the Countrv' 
shall remove farther down the River Ohio to a better Hunting Countr}-, any 
thing herein Contained to the Contrarv' thereof in anpvise notwithstanding. 

In Witness whereof we the said Chiefs and Sachems in behalf of ourselves 
Respectively, and in behalf of the whole Six United ^sations aforesaid, have 
hereunto set our hands and Seals in the Presence of the Persons subscribing as 
Witnesses hereunto, at a Congress held at Fort Pitt this tenth day of July in 
the year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven hundred and Seventy five. 

mark 



Sealed and Delivered 
In the Presence of us. 

John Campbell 

Thomas Hosier 



Kayathsuda . . . Senecas 



Tiendenago. . .Onondagas 




John 



his 
mark 



the Mount° 



mark 



Mainok, interpreter 
to the Crown" 



Guitogunt. .Cayhugas 



A correct copy taken from Oquncequago. . .Oneidas //- \ '.• } (l. s;) 
the original 



Teste 



Geo. Rootes. Tegurahago. . .Mohawks 




(L. S.) 



(l. S.) 



(l. s.) 



(L.8.) 



190 WALKER FAMILY. 



uiarK 



Saquonea. . .Tuscaroras fV (l. s.) 

the Cross " 

In one of the above-mentioned documents Fort Pitt is referred 
to as being in the State of Virginia. It appears that Virginia and 
Pennsylvania both claimed it, the former under a charter from 
James I. and the latter under a charter from Charles II. On Aug. 
31, 1779, commissioners appointed by the two provinces met in 
Baltimore, and agreed upon the boundary, which was duly ratified 
by their respective legislatures. Since that time Pittsburg has 
remained in Pennsylvania. 

The following are copied from parchments having reference to 
comparatively small tracts of land in the counties of Albemarle and 
Louisa: 

"George the Third by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and 
Ireland King Defender of the Faith &c. To all to whom these Presents 
shall come Greeting. Know ye that for divers good Causes and Consider- 
ations, but more Especially for and in Consideration of the Sum of Twenty 
Five shillings o\ good and Lawful Money, for our Use paid to our Receiver 
General of our Revenues in this our Colony and Dominion of Virginia, We 
HAVE Given, Granted, and Confirmed, and by these Presents for us our Heirs 
and Successors, Do Give, Grant, and Confirm, unto Thomas Walker, one cer- 
tain Tract or Parcel of Land Containing two hundred and twenty si.x acres, 
lying and being in the Count}- of Albemarle, in the Coves and on the Ridges 
of one of the Ragged Mountains, and bounded as followeth to wit; Begin- 
ning at Pointers in Thomas Fitzpatrick's line running thence along the same 
North thirty two Degrees and a half East one hundred and twenty Poles to a 
Chestnut Oak, North eighty nine Degrees East one hundred and twenty four 
Poles to Pointers in Samuel Gay's Line, and with his Lines North twenty nine 
Degrees East one hundred and seventj^ eight Poles to Pointers, South eighty 
nine Degrees West one hundred and fort}- Poles to Pointers thence new lines, 
South fifty three Degrees West eighty nine Poles to Pointers, South thirty six 
Degrees West one hundred and eighty five Poles to Pointers in Jacob Moon's 
line, South thirty nine Degrees East eighty Poles to the Beginning. With 
ALL Woods, Under Woods, Swamps, Marshes, Low-grounds, Meadows, Feed- 
ings, and his due Share of all Veins, Mines, and Quarries, as well discovered 



CASTLE HILL. I9I 

as not discovered, within the Bounds aforesaid and being Part of the said 
Quaniiiy of Two hundred and twenty six Acres of Land, and the Rivers, 
Waters, and Water Courses therein contained, together with the Privileges of 
Hunting, Hawking, Fishing. Fowling, and all other Profits, Commodiiies, 
and Hereditaments whatsoever, to the same or any Part thereof belonging, 
or in any wise appertaining, To have, hold, Possess, and Enjoy, the said 
Tract or Parcel of Land, and all other the before granted Premises, and ever)- 
Part thereof, with their and ever}- of their Appurtenancas, unto the said 
Thomas Walker and to his Heirs and Assigns forever, To the only Use and 
Behoof of him, the said Thomas Walker, his Heirs, and Assigns forever, To 
BE HELD of us OUT Heirs and Successors, as of our ]Manor of East Greenwich, 
in the Count)- of Kent, in free and Common Soccage, and not in Capite or by 
Knights Service, Yielding .\nd Paying unto us, our Heirs, and Successors, for 
every fifty Acres of Land, and so proportionably for a lesser or greater Quan- 
tity than fifty Acres, the Fee Rent of one Shilling Yearly, to be paid upon the 
Feast of Saint Michael the Archangel, and also Cultivating and Improving 
three Acres part of ever)- fifty of the Tract above mentioned within three 
Years after the Date of these Presents. Provided always that if three Years 
of the said Fee Rent shall at any time be in Arrear and Unpaid, or if the said 
Thomas Walker his Heirs or Assigns do not within the Space of three Years, 
next coming after the Date of these Presents, Cultivate and Improve three 
Acres part of ever}- fifty of the Tract above-mentioned, Then the Estate, hereby 
Granted shall Cease and be Utterly Determined, and thereafter it shall and 
may be Lawful to and for us our Heirs and Successors, to grant the same 
Lands and Premises with the Appurtenances unto such other Person or Per- 
sons as we our Heirs and Successors shall think fit. In Witness whereof we 
have caused these our Letters Patent to be made. Witness our trusted and 
well beloved John Earl of Dunmore our Lieutenant and Governor General of 
our said Colony and Dominion at Williamsburg Under the Seal of our said 
Colony, the first Day of August, One thousand Seven hundred and Seventy 
two, In the twelfth Year of our Reign. Dunmore " 



There is a similar parchment dated 20th June, 1772, and signed by Dun- 
more. It is a grant from George III to Thomas Walker of 350 acres of land 
"lying and being in the County of Louisa on the Branches of Great Creek and 
bounded as foUoweth to wit: Beginning at Robert Sharp's Corner several pines, 
running thence, on his lines. North Sixty nine Degrees West one hundred 
poles to a pine, thence North nine Degrees East one hundred and Sixty eight 
Poles to Sharps Corner pine in Biggar's line, thence on Biggar's line North 



192 WALKER FAMILY. 

twenty seven Degrees West twenty four Poles lo Mathew launders's Corner 
pine in Biggars Line, thence on Launders line South thirty nine Degrees East 
one hundred and eighty poles to William Hughson's Corner Pine on the Side 
of a hill in his line, thence on Hughson"s line South forty Degrees East twenty 
two Poles to a pine, thence South twelve Degrees "West tw^o hundred and 
eighty poles to a Corner pine in Graves's line, thence on Gravess line North 
Seventy Degrees East one hundred and eighty seven poles to his Corner ^^■hite 
Oak by the side of a Branch, thence South twenty poles to Fords Corner three 
pines in his line, thence on Fords line East forty poles to a pine in his line, 
thence North t^velve Degrees East one hundred and Seventy four Poles to the 
Beginning."' 

The price of this last mentioned tract of land was thirty-five shillmgs, which 
sum was paid by Dr. Walker to the Receiver General of the Revenues of the 
Colony, upon the same conditions with the preceding grant of 226 acres in 
Albemarle County. 



The -following parchment, found among Dr. Walker's papers, 'has refer- 
ence to a grant from George II to one James Flanegen, of a "Certain Tract 
or parcel of Land containing two hundred and fifty acres lying and being in 
the Count}- of Louisa and bounded as followeth to wit; Beginning at the said 
Flanegens Corner Pine in Silvanus [Morris's line, thence on his line South 
sixty two Degrees West one hundred and ninety six Poles crossing three small 
branches of Bunches Creek to his Comer two Spanish Oaks on the side of a 
Hill, thence new lines North sixty Degrees West one hundred and ninety six 
Poles to a Comer small Pine, thence North forty Degrees East one hundred 
and sevent}' two Poles to the beginning " &c. 

The price of this piece of land was twenty-five shillings upon the same 
conditions as the two preceding. It ends as follows; "Witness our Trusty 
and well beloved Sir William Gooch, Baronet, our Lieut. Governor and Com- 
mander in Chief of our said Colony and Dominion, at Williamsburg under the 
Seal of our said Colony, the twentieth day of August, One thousand seven 
hundred and forty seven. In the twenty first Year of our Reign. 

William Gooch. " 



Dr. Walker probably received an Academic education ^t the College of 
William and Marv', Virginia, but it is not known that he ever graduated in 
medicine. He probably served a certain length of time under some physician 
and was then licensed to practise by the County or other authorities, according 



CASTLE HILL. I93 

to law. An original bill rendered by him for medical services in the case of 
Peter Jefferson, father of President Thomas Jefferson, U. S., was for many 
years to be seen at Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia. 

Fredericksburgh, situated on the Rappahannock River, Spottsylvania 
County, Virginia, was, at that time, like Yorktown, a point to which Goods 
were directly imported from England. At Turkey Hill, Albemarle County, 
Virginia, Thomas \V. Page, Esqr., has in his possession an old fashioned tall 
clock that has inscribed on its face " Thomas Walker, Fredericksburgh, 

y\ " 

Dr. Walker is said to have been Commissary General of the Virginia troops 
under Washington in Braddock's Army, and he was present at the defeat of the 
latter in 1755, near the present Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. When he returned to 
Castle Hill from this expedition, he brought with him a stallion that lived to 
be 48 years old. 

William C. Rives, Esqr., of Newport, R. I., has in his possession the frag- 
ment of a letter from i\Ir. Jackson, of Fredericksburg, Virginia, to Dr. Thomas, 
Walker, written a short time after Braddock's defeat. In this letter I\Ir. 
Jackson inquires after Dr. Walker's health and also that of Col. (afterwards 
General) George Washington. He concludes by saying that "if he had not 
known of Braddock's defeat and had read that the Royal forces had been so 
badly beaten by half naked savages', he would have disbelieved it and would have 
burned ye book." 

Dr. Thomas Walker and Andrew Lewis were appointed Commissioners nn 
the part of the Government of Virginia to treat with the Six Nations of Indians 
at Fort Stanwix, New York, in 1768. There were also Commissioners from 
New York, and this treaty occurred during the administration of Gov. John- 
son, of New York. 

Dr. Thomas Walker and his son, John Walker, were Commissioners on 
the part of Virginia to treat with the Indians at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, about 
1777, the object being to conciliate them during the war of the Revolution. 
Commissioners were also appointed by the American Government. Dr. 
Thomas Walker was the president of the meeting. 

Dr. Walker was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses in 1775, 
for organizing a plan of defense, and was also placed on the second General 
Committee of Safety (see Journal of Convention, i6th Dec. 1775). He was 
also, in 1778, Commissioner with David Smith, on the part of Virginia, to com- 
plete the boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina, from Steep Rock 
Creek to the Tennessee line. 

In 1728, Col. William Byrd, William Dandridge and Richard Fitz Wil- 
liams, with Thomas and Mayo, as surveyors, ran the boundary line between 



194 WALKER FAMILY. 

Virginia and North CanViina, from the sea-coast t(j Peter's Creek, now in. Pat- 
rick County, Virginia, a distance of about 240 miles. In 1749, Col. Joshua 
Fry and Peter Jefferson (father of Thomas Jefferson who was President U. S. ) 
were commissioned on the part of Virginia to continue the line from Peter's 
Creek to Steep Rock Creek — about 40 miles. Lastly, it was completed to 
the Tennessee line, in 1778, as above-mentioned. The total length is about 
320 miles. The last portion of the line sur\'e}ed is still known as Walker's 
line. 

Col. Byrd's MS. of his part of the work is at Lower Brandon, on James 
River, Prince George County, Virginia. It is neatly bound in book form and 
a number of copies have been printed. 

It may be stated here that Peter's Creek in Patrick County, Petersburg in 
Dinwiddie County, and Peter's Mountain in Albemarle County, Virginia, are 
said to have been named after Peter Jefterson, the faiher of President Thomas 
Jefferson, U. S. 

Dr. Walker was intimately connected both by public and private relations 
with Genl. Geo. Washington and Thomas Jefferson, to the latter of whom he 
was guardian. Dr. Walker was married twice, and both of his wives were 
second cousins (or first cousins once removed) of Genl. George Washington 
in the following way: 

Col. John Washington and I^urence Washington, son's of Leonard Wash- 
ington, of Warton, County Lancaster, England, and Anne, his wife, emigrated 
to America together in 1659. They settled in Westmoreland County, \'ir- 
ginia, and became the progenitors of the Washington Families in that State. 
Genl. George Washington was descended from Col. John Washington by his 
second wife, Anne Pope, of Bridges Creek, Westmoreland County, Virginia, 
as follows: Col. John Washington and Anne Pope, his second wife, had, 
among other children, Laurence Washington, who married, about 1680, Mil- 
dred W^arner, of Gloucester County, Virginia, and had by her three children, 
viz: 

(i.) John Washington, married, about 1712, Catherine Whiting, of Glou- 
cester County, Virginia. Had a large family, of whom Catherine mar- 
ried Fielding Lewis. 
(2.) Augustine Washington, married, first, 20ih April, 1715, Jane But- 
ler, and secondly, 6tli March, 1737, Mary Ball, by whom he had, 
among others, Genl. George Washington, born 22d Feb'y, 1732, and 
Col. Samuel Washington. 
(3.) Mildred Washington, who married, first, about 1705, Roger Gregory, 
of King and Queen County, Virginia, "and had by him 3 daugliters, 
Frances, Mildred, and Elizabeth, who married 3 brothers, Co'- Fran- 



CASTLE HILL. 195 

cis Thornton, Col. John ThornU>n, and Reuben Thornton, all of 
Spottsvlvania Countv, Virginia. She had for her second husband 
Col. Henr}- Willis, of Fredericksburgh, Virginia, and by him the 
present Col. Lewis Willis, of Fredericksburgh " (seeGenl. Geo. Wash- 
ington's letter, dated 2d May, 1792). 

Francis Thornton, progenitor of the Thornton Family in Virginia, settled 
in Caroline County. He was the father of the above-named 3 brothers, viz: 

(i.) Col. Francis Thornton, who married Frances Gregory, and had: (a) 
Mildred Thornton, who was the second of the five wives of Col. 
Samuel Washington, the brother of Genl. George Washington; (b) 
Elizabeth Thornton, who was the second wife of Dr. Thomas 
Walker. 

(2.) Col. John Th'ornton married Mildred Gregory, and had ^Mildred 
Thornton, who married, first, in 1738, Nicholas Meriwether, by 
whom she had one child, viz: Mildred Meriwether, born 19th May, 
1739; married Col. Syme, of Hanover Co., Virginia. Nicholas 
Meriwether died, and his widow, Mildred Thornton Meriwether, 
married, secondly, in 1741, Dr. Thomas Walker, of Casde Hill, Albe- 
marle County, Virginia, and was his first wife. 

(3.) Reuben Thornton married Elizabeth Gregory. No issue known. 

It will thus be seen that the mothers of Dr. Walker's two wives were sisters, 
who were first cousins of Genl. George Washington, and that Dr. Walker's 
two wives were themselves first cousins, who were second cousins (or first 
cousins once removed) of Genl. George Washington, 

According to some statements. Col. Samuel Washington's second wife was 
Mildred, daughter of Col. John Thornton. If this be true, then Dr. Walker's 
first wife, also named Mildred, was the daughter of Col. Francis Thornton. 
It is quite easy to make a mistake about this matter, as Col. John Thornton 
and Col. Francis Thornton had married sisters, and each had a daughter named 
Mildred. It is better, therefore, in the absence of proof, to follow the order as 
given in the above-mentioned letter of Genl. George Washington. 

Dr. Thomas Walker, by marrying the widow Meriwether, became pos- 
sessed of the Castle Hill estate, comprising about 1 1,000 acres of land in Albe- 
marle County, Virginia, which originally was part of a grant of land from 
George II. to a certain Meriwether. Subsequently the estates of Turkey Hill, 
Peachylorum, Belvoir, Kinloch, etc., were cut off from the original Castle Hill 
estate for Dr. Walker's children and grandchildren. 



ig6 WALKER FAMILY. 

The exact date of the founding of the Castle Hill House is not certainly- 
known. The old part of the present house was not quite finished in 1764, 
when Hon. Francis Walker was born. Dr. Walker must, therefore, have lived 
in some other house previous to that time, which has been removed. He prob- 
ably lived at Fredericksburg, Virginia, up to tlie time of his removal to Castle 
Hill. The house built by Dr. Walker, and which was nearly finished in 1764, 
fronted northwest, towards the mountain; but in 1824 an addition was built 
by Hon. William C. Rives, so that the house then fronted southeast. The two 
wings, or greenhouses, were added by Mr. Rives in 1840. 

What is known as the Albemarle Pippin, probably the most deliciously 
flavored apple in the world, is nothing more than the Newtown Pippin of New 
York State, which is said to have been introduced into Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, by Dr. Thomas Walker. The climate of Albemarle and nature of the 
soil are peculiarly adapted to the perfection of this*justly celebrated fruit. 
These apples are so delicate that they decay very easily, and each apple 
should be separately wrapped in tissue paper that has been previously dipped 
into a solution of salicylic acid, and then dried. The paper thus prepared 
should also be packed freely in the interstices between the apples, to prevent 
shaking and bruising. 

It was on the 4th of June, 1781, according to Lossing (see Field Book 0/ 
the Revolution), when Tarleton, with his British Troopers, on their way to Char- 
lottesville, Virginia, appeared at Casde Hill and demanded breakfast. Among 
the rebels surprised there were William and Robert, brothers of Gov. Thomas 
Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia, and Francis Kinloch. In their attempt to 
escape, the latter was pursued into the vineyard field by a British soldier, who 
shouted, "Stop, cousin Frank; you know I could always beat you running." 
Whereupon the cousin Frank surrendered to an old acquaintance and relative. 
Living at Castle Hill at that time was a colored lad, about eleven years old, 
named Thom.as Wilkes. Dr. Walker brought him to Castle Hill from King 
and Queen County, Virginia, and subsequently employed him as his body ser- 
vant He was also at one time fifer of the Eighty-eighth Virginia Regiment. 
He lived to an old age, and became known far and near as " Uncle Tom." 
He died about i860, aged about 90 years. 

According to Uncle Tom, Tarleton's men were mostly armed with hal- 
berds and spontoons. They are a sort of spear, and samples of these weapons 
are seen in the Tower of London, in the room called The Horse Armor)'. 
Tarleton was on his way to Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, hav- 
ing received orders from Comwallis to capture Gov. Thomas Jefferson (after- 
wards President United States), and members of the Virginia Legislature, there 
assembled. 



CASTLE HILL. I97 

Tarleton was detained at Castle Hill about the breakfast, for more reasons 
than one. The cook stated that the soldiers forcibly carried off the food as fast as 
she could prepare it. This put Tarleton out of humor, and when he was told 
that some of his men were breaking open the stables and stealing the horses, 
he lost all patience and became furious. The culprits were seized, and, accord- 
ing to Uncle Tom, punished in a terrible manner. Having been stripped to 
the waist, they were bound across tobacco hogsheads. In this position they 
were flogged with a perforated sole-leather paddle. The screams of the unfor- 
tunate creatures attested the severity of the punishment; but none except those 
who have heard Uncle Tom imitate their cries can fully appreciate it. 

Meantime, a Mr. Jewitt, or Jouitte, of Louisa County, had ridden on 
ahead, and informed Gov. Jefferson, who barely had time to escape into the 
woods. According to Lossing, op. a'i., Tarleton had pushed on to Castle Hill, 
" where he understood many influential Virginians were assembled. Several 
of these were captured, among whom were William and Robert, brothers of 
Gov. Thomas Nelson. * * * The delay for breakfast at Dr. Walker's was 
sufficient to allow most of the members of the Legislature at Charlottesville to 
escape. Mr. Jefferson had not been gone ten minutes when the British 
troopers rode up and found the Monticello mansion deserted." 

According to Uncle Tom, Dr. Walker was accustomed to meet with Indian 
Chiefs under an o.xheart cherry tree that stood in the then rear of the house, 
but which subsequently died, and was removed about 1854. He said that he 
never heard the Indians talk much, as they eyed him very suspiciously. He 
however remembered to have heard one of the Sachems say with much excite- 
ment, " DoMI-NICKAH-HEE-HAi-SKEESH-SKEESH " ! 

Uncle Tom used to say that Dr. Walker had a remarkable dog named 
Bowser. The doctor went out once upon a time and remained absent among 
the Indians for the space of seven years. Upon his return to Castle Hill one 
evening, his dog, who had not seen him in all that time, recognized his voice, 
and broke through a shutter in getting out of a room to meet him. The iden- 
tical shutter was at Castle Hill in 1852, and Uncle Tom always took great 
pride in showing it. 

He also used to say that Dr. Walker was very careful with everything that 
might be of use. On a certain occasion he was going to split a nice piece of 
timber for kindling wood, but the doctor saw him and bade him put it into 
the barn. " If it is not wanted for some useful purpose in seven years," said 
he, "go there then and turn it over." 

It may be said of Uncle Tom, that whenever he was much pleased with 
any one, he had a peculiar way of expressing his hope of seeing them again 
soon upon his taking leave, thus: " Good mornin" sir. I shall see you agriin. 
as the bull said to the havstack ' ! 



198 WALKER FAMILY. 

For a histor)' of Walker's Parish, in the County of Albemarle, see Bishop 
Meade, op. at.. Vol. II., p. 41, ei seq. "Thomas Jefferson (afterwards Presi- 
dent United States) and Nicholas Meriwether," says Bishop Meade, " laid off 
two acres for Walker's Church, by order of the Vestry of Fredericksville Parish. 
The land was given by Dr. Thomas Walker. An old mountain chapel stood 
here first, the age of which is not known," etc. The old mountain chapel 
was succeeded by Walker's Church, which, in 1855, was replaced by the beau- 
tiful Gothic edifice known as Grace Church. This building, an ornament of 
which any community may be proud, is made of freestone, quarried in the 
neighborhood, and the interior is finished off with carved oak and Virginia 
pine. The windows are of stained glass. The three marble tablets that stand 
in the rear of the chancel were the gift of the late Mrs. Henry Sigoumey 
(Amelie Louise Rives), of Boston, Mass., who was lost on the ill-fated steamer, 
Ville dti Havre, 2 2d November. 1873. ^ hese tablets are framed in cars'ed oak, 
and have inscribed upon them the Ten Commandments. The bell in the 
tower was presented by David Sears, Esqr., of Boston, Mass. It weighs 1,575 
pounds, and was cast by Mr. Hooper, of that city. 

On the ist January, 1845, according to the record on the Vestrv'-book of 
Walker's Parish, Albemarle County, Virginia, Dr. Mann Page, of Turkey Hill, 
Francis K. Nelson, Esqr., of Cloverfields, Hon. William C. Rives, of Castle 
Hill, and James Terrell, Esqr., of Music Hall, residents of the said Parish, 
were appointed a committee to take such necessar}' measures as they might 
deem expedient, for commencing and proceeding with the building of a new 
church. Owing to the estimated cost of the building, however, the corner 
stone was not laid until about 1848. Soon after this occurred. Hon. William 
C. Rives was appointed American Minister to France, and was absent four 
yeans. Meantime, Dr. Mann Page and James Terrell, Esqr., both died, so that 
for some time the work was postponed. Hon. William C. Rives returned to 
Castle Hill in the autumn of 1853, and it was chiefly due to the energv' and 
devotion of Mrs. Rives that the building was completed earl\- in 1S55. It was 
named Grace Church, and was consecrated on the 9th ^lay, 1855, by Bishop 
"William Meade, of Virginia. Edward C. Mead, of Keswick, Thomas W. 
Page, of Turkey Hill, and Charlotte N. Meriwether, of Kinloch (afterwards the 
second wife of Thomas J. Randolph, Jr.), all of Albemarle County, Virginia, 
were the first persons ever confirmed in the new building. They were con- 
firmed by Bishop William Meade, of Virginia, who laid liis hands first on 
Edward C. Mead. 

Dr. Thomas Walker married, first, in 1741, Mildred Thornton, 
widow of Nicholas Meriwether. She was born 19th March, 172 1, 



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GRACE «^ H U R V. H . 

Walker's Parish, Albfmari.e Colntv, Virginia. 

Consecrated gth Mnv, '^53- 



200 WALKER FAMILY. 

and died i6th Nov., 1778, aged 57 jears. and was'buried at Castle 
Hill. 

He married, secondly, about 1781. Elizabeth Thornton, first 
cousin of his first wife. There was no issue by this marriage. His 
second wife becoming a widow, married Alcock, a British officer, and 
removed from Castle Hill to Eldon, near Cobham, Albemarle 
County, Virginia. In 1859 it became the residence of Carter H. 
Page, Esqr. Alcock had been a Revolutionary prisoner of war at 
Charlottesville, same county, Virginia. 

While Dr. Walker was going to Fredericksburg, Virginia, to 
his second marriage, it is said that he was stopped by the British 
soldiers whom he met on the way, but when they ascertained the 
object of his journey, they let him through their lines. The children 
by his first marriage were as follows: 

1. Mary Walker c'Capc. Moll, of local fame.'* — Duke), born at Castle 

Hill, 24th July, 1742; married, about 1760, Nicholas Lewis, grand- 
father of the late Capt. Robert Lewis, of Castalia, Albemarle County. 
Virginia, who married, about 1835, Sally Craven, of Pen Park, same 
county. Of their children, Thomas Lewis married, 1874, Jane Walker 
Page, of Millwood. (See Page Family, North End.) 

2. Hon. John Walker, eldest son, born at Castle Hill, 13th Feby., 174^^; 

removed to Belvoir, Albemarle County, Virginia, and married, about 
1764, Elizabeth Moore. 

3. Susan Walker (called " Suky ") born at Castle Hill, 14th Deer., 1746; 

married, in June, 1764, Henry Fry, whose descendants now live in 
Albemarle County, Virginia. 

4. Thomas Walker, Junr., second and only son to have male issue, was 

born at Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia, 17th March. 174I, 
and removed to Indian Fields, samecountv. He married, about 1773, 
Margaret Hoops, of Pennsylvania. 
5.' Lucy Walker, born at Castle Hill, 5th May, 1751; married, about 
1771, Dr. George Gilmer, of Pen Park, Albemarle Countv, V^irginia. 
Children: 
(r) James Gilmer, born about 1772; died without issue. 

(2) Mildred Gilmer (called '-Milly"), born about 1774; married, 
about 1794, Hon. William Wirt, Attorney-Gener.d. Author of 
the British Spy, etc. 

(3) George Gilmer, born about 1776; married, about- 1801, Mis.s 



CASTLE HILL. 20I 

Hudson, and had {a) Thomas Walker Gilmer, Governor of Vir- 
ginia, who .was the father of Christopher (called " Kit"); John 
Hanner; Anne married Peter McGhee; Mrs. Adams, who was 
the mother of Miss Mattie Adams; Lucy married E. S. Pegram, 
and Rev. Thomas Walker Gilmer, who died single. Gov. Gil- 
mer was accidentally killed on board the Prince/on, U. S. man- 
of-war, 28th Feby., 1844, by the bursting of a cannon. He was 
then Secretary- U. S. Navy, his appointment having been made 
by President John Tyler, February 14th, 1844. Mr. Upshur, 
Secretary' of State, was also killed at the same time. Mr. Gilmer 
was succeeded by John Y. JMason as Secretary U S. Navy, and 
Mr. Upshur by John C. Calhoun, as Secretary of State. Hon. 
William Wilkins, of Pennsylvania, was at that time Secretary of 
W'ar. President Tyler and Hon. and Mrs. William C. Rives, 
were on board when the sad accident occurred. 

(4) Peachy Gilmer, born about 1778, wife unknown.. They had: 

{a) William Wirt Gilmer (called " Billy Gilmer "); died single. 
{d) Peachy Harmer Gilmer, married Isabella Walker; (c) George 
H. Gilmer, Judge of Pittsylvania County; {(/) Francis W. Gil- 
mer; {e) Mrs. Wilmer; {/) Mrs. Emina Gilmer Breckinridge, 
of Botetourt County, Virginia. 

(5) Dr. John Gilmer, born about 1778; married, about 1805, Miss 

Minor, and had two daughters, one of whom died single; the 
other' married Franklin Minor, whose descendants live in Albe- 
marle County, Virginia. 

(6) Lucy Gilmer, born about 1782; married, about 1802, Peter 

Minor, of Albemarle County, Virginia. 

(7) Susan Gilmer, bom about 1784. 

(8) Harmer Gilmer, bom about 1786. 

(9) Francis Walker Gilmer, born about 1788; unmarried; Professor 
of Law at the University of Virginia, Author and Scholar. He was 
sent by Thomas Jefferson (ex-President United States) to Eng- 
land, for the purpose of procuring professors for the University 
of Virginia, near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia. 

Elizabeth Walker (called " Betsey ") bom at Castle Hill, ist August, 
1753; married, about 1773, ^^v. Matthew Maury, second rector of 
old Walkers (now Grace) Church, in Walker's Parish, Albemarle 
County, Virginia, and had Reuben, Polly, Milly, Elizabeth, Kitty, 
John, F'ontaine, Thomas, and Walker. Their descendants live in 
Albemarle Couniv, Viririnia. 



202 WALKER FAMILY. 

7. Mildred Walker (called " Milly "), born at Ci>tle Hill. 5ih June. 1755; 

married, about 1775, Joseph Hornsby, of Williamsburg, James City 
County, Virginia. No issue. 

8. Sarah Walker, born at Castle Hill 2Sth Mirch, 1758; married, about 

1778, Col. Reuben Lindsay, of Albemarle County, Virginia, and was 

his first wife. Children: 

(i) Mildred Lindsay; probably died single. 

(2) Sally Lindsay; married, about 1810, her first cousin, Capt. James 
Lindsay, of The Meadows, Louisa County, Virginia. He was 
the son of David Lindsay, who was the brother of Col. Reuben 
Lindsay. They had two children, one of whom died; the other, 
Mildred Lindsay, married, 1837. Alexander Taylor, and died 
leaving two children, viz: Sally Lindsay Taylor, who married, . 
1858, Col. John M. Patton, and died 1S72, aged 34, leaving 
children; and Fannie Taylor, who was smothered to death by 
wheat in Warwick & Barksdale's flouring mill, in Richmond, 
Virginia, 1850, aged 13 years. 

9. Martha Walker, born at Castle Hill, 2d May, 1760; married, about 

1780, George Divers, of Farmington, Albemarle County, Virginia, 
No issue. 

10. Reuben Walker, born 8Lh October, 1762, died 23d August, 1765, 

aged 3 years. 

11. Hon. Francis Walker, born at Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Vir- 

ginia, 2 2d June, 1764.: resided there. He married, 1798, Jane By rd 
Nelson, of Yorktown, Virginia. 

12. Peachy Walker, youngest, born at Castle Hill, 6th February, 1767; 

married, about 1787, Joshua Fry, of Kentucky. Their eldest daugh- 
ter, Susan Fry, married, about 1808, Mr. Goolsby, and Anne Fry, 
the second daughter, married, about 18 10, Mr. Bullit, all of Ken- 
tucky. 

V. Hon'. John- Walker, of Belvoir, Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, eldest son and second child of Dr. Thomas Walker, of Castle 
Hill, same county, Virginia, and Mildred Thornton, the widow of 
Nicholas Meriwether, his first wife, was born at Castle Hill, 13th 
February, 1744, and died 2d December, 1809, aged 65 years. He 
was buried at Belvoir, although his death occurred in a house near 
Madison's Mill, Orange County, Virginia, some distance from Orange 
Court House, while he was on his way to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
to undergo a surgical operation. A ruptured artery was the imme- 



BELVOIR. 2^3 

diate cause of his death. No operation had been performed. The 
hemorrhage occurred while Hon. Col. John Walker was in his car- 
riage. He was speedily removed to the house aforesaid, but he 
expired in a few moments afterwards. His wife, Elizabeth Moore, 
daughter of Bernard Moore, of Chelsea, King William County, Vir- 
ginia, died about the same time — in December, 1809. She was ill at 
Belvoir when he left home for Philadelphia. Her sister, Anne But- 
ler Moore, married, in 1770, Charles Carter, of Fredericksburg, Vir- 
ginia, and was his second wife. Their daughter, Anne Hill Carter, 
was born in 1773, and married General Lee (Light Horse Harry), 
of Revolutionary fame. 

The following is a copy of the correspondence between Dr. Thomas 
Walker and Bernard Moore, in regard to the marriage of Hon. Col. John 
Walker to Elizabeih Moore: 

" May 27th, 1764. • 
Dear Sir: My son, Mr. John Walker, having informed me of his intention 
to pay his addresses to your daughter, Elizabeth, if he should be agreeable to 
yourself, lady and daughter, it may not be amiss to inform you what I feel 
myself able to afford for their support, in case of an union. My atTairs are in 
an uncertain stale; but I will promise one thousand pounds, to be paid in 
1766, and the further sum of two thousand pounds I promised to give him; 
but the uncertainty of my present affairs prevents my fixing on a time of pay- 
ment — ihe above sums are all to be in money or lands and other effects, at the 
option of my said son, John Walker. 

I am, sir, your humble servant, 

Thomas Walker, 
Col. Bernard Moork, Esqr., 

in King William." 



"May 28th, 1764. 
Dear S[r: Your son, Mr. John Walker, applied to me for leave to make 
his addresses to my daughter, Elizabeth. I gave him leave, and told him at 
the same time that my affairs were in such a state that it was not in my power 
to pay him all the money this year that I intended to give my daughter, pro- 
vided he succeeded; but would give him five hundred pounds more as soon 
after as I could raise or get the money; which sums you may depend I will 
most punctually pay to him. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

Bek.nard .Muore. 
To Thomas Walker. 

Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Va." 



204 WALKER FAMILY. 

Hon John Walker was United States Senator from Virginia in 1790. He 
.was also Confidential Aid to General George Washington during the Revolu- 
tionary war, and was also known as Colonel John Walker. 

The following is a copy of a letter from General George Washington to 
Patrick Henry, in regard to the above-mentioned John Walker: 

" To Patrick Henry, Governor of Virginia. 

MoRRiSTOwN, 24th Feby, 1777. 
Dear Sir: Mr. Walker, I doubt not, informed you of the situation in 
which I have placed him, in order that he may obtain the best information, 
and, at the same time, have his real design hid from the world; thereby avoids 
ing the evils which might otherwise result from such appointments, if adopted 
by other States. It will naturally occur to you, sir, that there are some secrets 
which cannot, or at least ought not, to be entrusted to paper, nay, which none 
but the Commander-in-Chief at the time should be acquainted with. If Mr. 
Walker's commission, therefore, from the Commonwealth of Virginia, should 
be known, it would, I am persuaded, be followed by others of the like nature 
from other States, which would be no better than so many marplots. To 
avoid the precedent, therefore, and from your character of Mr. Walker, and 
the high opinion I myself entertain of his abilities, honor and prudence, I have 
taken him into my family as an extra Aid-de-Camp, and shall be happy if, in 
this character, he can answer your e.xpectations. I sincerely thank you, sir, 
for your kind congratulations on the latter success of the Continental arms 
(would God it may continue), and your polite mention of me. Let me 
earnestly entreat that the troops, raised in Virginia for this army, be forwarded 
on, by companies or otherwise, without delay, and as well equipped as possi- 
ble for the field, or we shall be in no condition to open the campaign. With 
every sentiment of respect and sympathy, 

I am, dear sir, &c., &c., 

George Washington." 

(See Writings 0/ George Washington, by Jared Sparks, Vol. IV., p. 329, 
Boston; Russell, Odione & Metcalf; and Hilliard, Gray & Co., 1834.) 

The location known as Belvoir is about three miles south-west from Cas- 
tle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia, and was first settled by Lewis. The 
remains of the old Lewis family burying-ground were for a long time to be 
seen, but nearer to the mountain than the house built by Col. John Walker. 
The original Belvoir settlement was undoubtedly made by Lewis, who mar- 
ried Meriwether. It was to the latter family that all the land in this part of 
the county was originally granted by George II. The Lewis house was some- 
where near the old Lewis burial-ground, but has long since passed away. 









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WALKER FAMILY 



Hon. Col. John Walker married Elizabeth Moore in 1764, and it was 
about that time that he built his first house. This house was taken down 
when the second house was to be built, and moved to Milton, on the Rivanna 
River, Albemarle County, Virginia. It was afterwards moved down to its 
present location, near Cobham, same county, and is the same that was occu- 
pied by Howell Lewis. The second house was built about 1790. This was 
destroyed by fire in the autumn of 1836. It was thought that the fire was 
occasioned by a defective flue (loose mortar in the chimney) in the garret, as 
it was first discovered at that point adjoining the south-west chimney. The 
following is the ground plan of this second Belvoir House, built by Hon. CoL 
John Walker in 1790: 







There were four rooms on the first floor and three rooms up stairs on the 
second floor. Above this was a very large garret. About fifty yards north-east 
from the house was the kitchen, and at the same distance south-west from the 
house, was an outhouse or office. Still further south-west were stables, near 
the mountain road. 

Just in rear of ihe house was an ornamental garden, and behind this was 
the kitchen garden. At the north corner was a lot planted in fine trees and 
shrubs, and at the north corner of this lot was the cemetery. The road, with 
magnificent oaks and poplars on each side, wound gracefully along from the 
house to the public road that runs between Gordonsville and Charlottesville, 
and entered it at a point a little east of a point opposite old Walker's (now 
Grace) Church. 

The Belvoir estate was inherited by Eliza Kinloch, only grandchild of 
Hon. Col. John Walker, and she married Hon. Hugh Nelson (see President 
Nelson). After the death of the latter, it was divided, and the home part fell 



BELVOIR. 207 

to the youngest son, Dr. Robert W. Nelson, of Charlottesville, Albemarle 
County, Virginia. He sold it in 1846 to D. C. Car\er. 

Hon. Col. John Walker married, in 1764, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Bernard Moore, of Chelsea, King William County, Virginia. She 
was a granddaughter of Col. Sir Alexander Spottswood, Knight, 
and Aid-de-Camp t© the Duke of Marlborough at the battle of Blen- 
heim. He was Governor of the Colony of Virginia, and founder 
of the so-called MoORE House, at Yorktown, York County, Vir- 
ginia. 

' They had only one child, viz: 

I. Mildred Walker, born at Chelsea, King William County, Virginia, ist 
August, 1765, and married, at Belvoir, 2 2d February, 1781, Francis 
Kinloch, of Charleston, South Carolina. They in turn had only one 
child: 

(i) Eliza Kinloch, born 31st December, 1781; married, 28th April, 
1799, Hon. Hugh Nelson, fifth child and son of Gov. Thomas 
Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Virginia. ^Mildred Walker 
died 17th October, 1784, and Francis Kinloch married, sec- 
ondly, Anne Middleton, of South Carolina. There is no sur- 
viving male issue of Francis Kinloch. 
The following is copied from a letter in regard to the Kinloch family in 
South Carolina: 

"Charleston, S. C, January 30th, 1883. 
Dr. R. Channing M. P.\ge, New York City. 

Dear Sir: I am just in receipt of your favor of the 28th 'inst., and hasten 
to reply. Our name is usually pronounced Kinlaw. The Francis Kinloch 
to whom you refer as having married, 2 2d February, 1781, Mildred Walker, of 
Belvoir, Albemarle Count)-, Virginia, has now no representative of the name. 
I know one of his granddaughters very well — Mrs. Singleton, of Columbia, 
S. C. This lady and her sons and one daughter are special friends of my own. 
The family of Kinloch, to which I belong, in this State, is large. We do not 
know of any positive relationship with the family of the above named Francis 
Kinloch, but members of each family have talked it over, and we believe that 
such relationship does exist My father came to this country from England 
when quite young; but originally his ancestors were from Scotland. It will 
afford me pleasure to meet you, should you come this way. 

Very truly yrs., 

R. A. Kinloch, M.D." 



208 WALKER FAMILY. 

V, Thomas Walker, Junr., of Indl\n Fields. Albemar'.e 
County, Virginia, fourth child and second son (being the eldest to 
have male issue) of Dr. Thomas Walker, of Castle Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia, and Mildred Thornton, the widow of Nicholas 
Meriwether, his first wife, third child and second son of Thomas 
Walker, of King and Queen County, Virginia, and Susanna (Peachy), 
his wife, grandson (?) of Thomas Walker, of Gloucester County, 
Virginia, who was a member of the Virginia Assembly in 1662, pro- 
genitor of the Walker Family in Virginia, was born at Castle Hill, 
Albemarle County, Virginia, 17th March, 1749. The mill on the 
public road near Indian Fields, now known as Cowherd's Mill, 
was built by Thomas Walker, and a stone in the front wall of the 
building has inscribed on it the initials- " T. W.," also the date of its 
erection. 

He married, about 1774, Margaret Hoops, of Carlisle, Pennsyl- 
vania, whose father is said to have educated Benjamin West, the 
artist. Some of their children are known to have died infants, and 
others are probably not recorded. He alone of the sons of Dr. 
Thomas Walker had male issue. Their children were as follows: 

1. Jane Walker, born about 1775; married, about 1795, Mr. Rice, of 

Charlotte County, Virginia. 

2. Elizabeth Walker, born about 1777; married, about 1797, Mr. Michie, 

of Albemarle County, Virginia. She became blind, and was known 
as "Cousin Betsey Michie;" but retained her maiden name of 
Walker on the Maury monument at Grace Church. This monument 
was erected in memory of Rev. James r^Iaury (father of Matthew), 
who was the first Rector of old Walker's Church. His wife was a 
Miss Walker — probably a cousin of Dr. Thomas Walker — and it was 
no doubt in this way that he became Rector of Walker's Church. 
The following is the inscription: "Sacred to the Memory of Rev. 
James ^Nlaury, first Pastor of Walker's Parish. Born April 8th, 1717. 
Died June 9th, 1769. This Monument was erected by Elizabeth 
Walker, as a tribuie to his Piety, learning and worth." 

The monument marks the spot where the pulpit of old Walker's 
Church stood — for he was buried under the pulpit. 

3. Thomas Walker, Junr., born at Indian Fields about 17S0; died infant. 

4. Martha Walker, born about 1788; married, about 1S08, Mr. Goolsby, 

of Kentucky. 



CASTLE HILL. 2O9 

5. John Walker, born about 1790; died infant. 

6. Captain Meriwether Lewis Walker, born at Indian Fields, Albemarle 

County, Mrginia, about 1792; removed to Logan, same county, 
Virginia. He married, about 18 17, Maria Lindsay, and had male 
issue. 

7. Maria Barclay Walker, born about 1798; married, in 1S20, Richard 

Duke, of Albemarle County, Virginia, by whom many of the ancient 
barns and machines in that county were constructed. Children: 
(i) Mildred Wirt Duke, born about 182 1; married, about 1839, 
George Gilmer. 

(2) William Johnson Duke; married, about 1848, Miss Anderson, 

of Kentucky, and died, leaving Richard, Florence and I^ura. 

(3) Lucy A. Duke; married, first. Wood, of Tennessee, and secondly, 

Bills, of the same State. 

(4) ^Nlary J. C. Duke; married Smith, deceased, of Te.xas. 

(5) Margaret Hoops Duke; died single. 

(6) Elizabeth Duke; married Rhodes, deceased. 

(7) Hon. Richard Thomas Walker Duke, of Charlottesville, Albe- 
marle County, Virginia; Member of Congress, Commonwealth's 
Attorney, etc. ; married Miss Eskridge, and has two sons and 
one daughter. 

(8) Sallie F. Duke; married Deskins; she died, leaving one daughter. 

(9) Charles Carroll Duke, of Mississippi; married Hattie Walker, and 

has two daughters. 
(10) Mattie L. Duke; single. Resided with Mrs. Smith, at Morea, 
University of Virginia. 

V. Hon. Francis Walker, of Castle Hill, Albemarle County, 
Virginia, eleventh child and fourth and youngest son of Dr. Thonnas 
Walker, of same place, and Mildred Thornton, the widow of Nich- 
olas Meriwether, his first wife, was born there 22d June, 1764, and 
died there in 1806, aged 42 years. 

He was a Representative in the U. S. Congress from the counties 
of Orange and Albemarle, 1793-1795. 

His watch that was worn by his sister-in-law, Maria Nelson, at the Vir- 
ginia Richmond Theatre when it was destroyed by fire 26th December, 18 11, 
came into the possession of Dr. Robert W. Nelson, of Charlottesville, Albe- 
marle County, Virginia. A little diamond from this watch came into the pos- 
session of Dr. R. C. ^L Page, of New York City, who had it set in the back of 
his own watch, with the following inscription: 



2IO 



WALKER FAMILY 



"This diamond belonged to Hon. Francis Walker's watch, by which was 
identified the body of his sister-in-law, Maria Nelson, who was burned in the 
Richmond Theatre, 26th Deer., 181 1, oet. 17. 

London, May 26, 18S0. " 




(/•rorn a .Mini a tit re Paintiu^.^ 

JANE BYRD NELSON, 

Wife of Hon. Francis Walker, of Castle Hill. 

Married Ijg8. 

Hon. Francis Walker married, 1798, Jane Byrd, eldest child 
of Col. Hugh Nelson, of Yorktown, York County, Virginia, and 
Judith Page, his wife. Their children were: 

I. Jane Frances Walker, born in the Nelson House, Yorktown, York 
County, Virginia, 17th Februar)-, 1799, and married, in Richmond, 
Virginia, 12th December, 181 5, Dr. Mann Page, of Turkey Hill, 



CASTLE HILL. 211 

Albemarle County, Virginia. She died at Turkey Hill, 7th February, 
1873, ^ft^d 74 years. (See Page Family, North End.) 
Thomas Hugh Walker, only son, born 1800; died, infant, in 1805, 

aged 5 years. 
Judith Page Walker, bom at Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia, 
24th March, 1802; married, 24th March, 1819, Hon. William C. 
Rives, U. S. Senator from V^irginia. She died at Castle Hill, where 
she resided, 23d Januar.-, 1882, aged 80 years. Children: 
(i) Francis Robert Kives, eldest, of New York City, born at Castle 
Hill, 1822. Fie was Secretary of the U. S. Legation, in London, 
1 842-1 845, when Hon. Edward F>erett was Minister there, 
during President Tyler's Administration. Married, 1848, 
Matilda Antonia, only child of George Barclay, of New York 
City. They had: (a) George Lockhart Rives; married, 1873, 
Caroline Kean, of Elizabeth City, New Jersey, and has issue ; 
{i) Ella Louisa Rives; married, 1875, David King, Jr., of New- 
port, R. L, and has children; (r) Francis R. Rives, Jr.; mar- 
ried, 1879, Georgia Fellows, of New York City, who died with- 
out issue; (d) Constance Rives; (e) Maud Rives, twin sister to 
Constance; married, May, 1882, Walker Breese Smith, of New 
York City; (/) Reginald William Rives. 

(2) William Cabell Rives, of Newport, R. L, born at Castle Hill, in 

1825, married, 1849, Grace Winthrop Sears, of Boston, Mass. 
Children : {a) Dr. William C. Rives, married, 1876, Mary F. 
Rhinelander. of New York City; (d) Alice Rives: {c) Arthur 
Landon Rives. 

(3) Alfred Landon Rives, born in 1830, removed to Mobile, Ala- 

bama. Vice-President of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. He 
graduated with distinctiori at the eco/e des ponts et chausses, Paris. 
He ser\-ed with General Meigs in the construction of the new 
wing of the Capitol at Washington, D.C., in 1859-60. He 
married, 1859, Sadie, daughter of James B. McMurdo, of Rich- 
mond, Virginia. Children: {a) .\melie Louise Rives; (b) Ger- 
trude Rives, and {c) Sadie Rives. 

(4) Amelie Louise Rives, bom in Paris, 8th July, 1832. She was 
named after the wife of Louis Philippe, who was a great friend of 
the family. She married, 1854, Henrj- Sigourney, of Boston, 
Mass. They, with three children and nurse, were lost on board 
the ill-fated steamship, Vilie du Havre, zzd November, 1873, 
leaving one sun;v«.r, Henry .Sigourney, Jr. 



212 WALKER FAMH.V. 

(5) Ella Rives, single, resides at Castle Hill. 

Hon. William C. Rives was born in Nelson County, Virginia, 4th May, 1793, 
and died at Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia, 25th April, 1868, aged 
75 years. He was educated at Hampden Sidney College, and also at William 
and Mary College. He removed his residence to Casile Hill in 182 i. 

1809-11, he stuelied law under Thomas Jefferson. 

1814-15, Aide-de-camp to Gen'l John H. Cocke, of Virginia. 

1817-19, Member of the Virginia House of Delegates from Nelson County. 

182 1, Presidential elector. 

3822-23, Member of the Virginia House of Delegates from .\lbemarle. 

1S23-29, Representative in the U. S. Congress. 

1829-32, U. S. Minister to France, first time. 

1832-34, 1836-39, 1 84 1 -4 5, U. S. Senator from Virginia. 

1849-53, U. S. Minister to France, second time. 

1853-68. Private life. Devoted his time to the internal improvements of 
Virginia, the Virginia Historical Society of which he was President, and his 
History 0/ the Life and Times of James Madison. In 1861 he was a delegate to 
ihe Peace Conference in Februar)'. 

I'he following is an inscription on a tablet in Grace Church, Albemarle 
Count}', Virginia: 

In Memory 

OF 
ONE OF THE FOUNDERS 

OF THIS Church. 

WHXIAM CABELL RIVES, LLD. 

Statesman, Diplom.\tist, Historian. 

Born 4th May, 1793, 

Died 25TH April, 1868. 

Uniting a clear and capacious intellect, 

A courageous and generous temper, 

with sound learning 

And commanding eloquence, 

He won a distinguished place 

AMONG THE FOREMOST ilEN 

Whom Virginia ha3 consecrated 

To the service of the country; 

While he addkd lustre to his talents, 



LOGAN. 2 ! 3 

By the purity and dignity 
of his public career, 
And adorned his private life j. 

WITH ALL the VIRTUES ' 

WHICH CAN GRACE THE CHARACTER 

OF Husband, Father, Friend 

AND 

CHRISTIAN. 

*' Blessed are the dead which 
die in ihe Lord." 

VI. Captain Meriwether Lewis Walker, of Logan (called 
after the Indian chief of that name), Albemarle County, Virginia, 
sixth child and eldest surviving son of Thomas Walker, Junior, 
of Indian Fields, same county, Virginia, and Margaret Hoops, his 
wife, fourth child and second son (being the eldest to have male issue) 
of Dr. Thomas Walker, of Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia, 
and Mildred Thornton, the widow of Nicholas Meriwether, his first 
wife, third child and second son of Thomas Walker, of King and 
Queen County, Virginia, and Susanna (Peachy), his wife, grandson (.') 
of Thomas Walker, of Gloucester County, Virginia, Member of the 
Virginia Assembly in 1662, and progenitor of the Walker Family in 
Virginia, was born at Indian Fields, about 1792, and died about 1861. 
aged about 69 years. He was generally known as Lewis Walker, or 
Captain Walker. 

He married^ about 1817, Maria, daughter of Col. Reuben Lindsay 
and Maria Tid well, his second wife, who was the sister of Elizabeth Tid- 
well, the wife of General William Fitzhugh Gordon, of Edgeworth, 
Albemarle County, Virginia. Mrs. Maria L. Walker died about 
187 1, aged about 74 years, but her sister, Mrs. Gordon, was alive in 
1883, and residing with her youngest son, Mason Gordon, at Char- 
lottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, in her 92d year. 

The children of Captain M. Lewis Walker and Maria Lindsay, his 
wife, were: 

I. Dr. Thomas Walker, eldest, born at Logan, Albemarle County, 
Virginia, about 18 18, removed to Lynchburg, Virginia. Being the 
eldest son of the eldest son, etc., he is the representative descendant 



214 WALKER FAMILY. 

of Dr. Thomas Walker, of Castle Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia. 
He married, about 1855, Miss Dabney, and has issue. 

2. Isabella Walker, called " Belle," bom about 18 19, married, about 

1836, Dr. Peachy Harmer Gilmer, and had: 

(1) Margaret W. Gilmer, burned to death in 1854, when the Indian 
Fields house was destroyed by fire. 

(2) Walker Gilmer. 

3. Reuben Lindsay Walker, bom at Logan, Albemarle County, about 

1828, removed to Richmond, Virginia. He married, first, about 
1848, Miss Eskridge, of Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, by 
whom he had several children. Of these Francis Walker married, 
1879, Miss Prvor, daughter of Roger A. Prj'or, of Brooklyn, New 
York, but formerly of Virginia. R. Lindsay Walker married sec- 
ondly, about 185S, Sally Elam, and has issue. 

4. Margaret Walker, born about 1832, married about 1856, William H. 

Pryor. 



PART IV. 



PENDLETON FAMILY, 



Jf?r^ 



'A 



(:■". 






\ 



\ 



^'V 



ki 







- \ 




JUDGE EDMUND PENDLETON, 

EDMUNDSBURG. CAROLINE CO., VIRGINIA, 

Died 23d Oct., 1803, Aged 8-2 Years. 



PENDLETON FAMILY. 



The following is a brief account of the Pendleton family in Vir- 
ginia: 

Henry Pendleton, of Norwich, England, had two sons: (i) 
Nathaniel Pendleton, minister in the PLstablished Church of Eng- 
land, who died without any known issue, and (2) Philip Pendleton. 

I. PuiLit* Pendleton, of Norwich, England, and New- 
Kent County, Virginia, about the second son of Henry Pendleton, 
of the first-named place, was born there in 1650. He emigrated to 
the Colony of Virginia in 1674. and settling in that portion of New 
Kent County. Virginia, which now forms Caroline County, became 
the progenitor of the Pendleton Family in Virginia. He died in the 
last-named county in 172 1, aged 71 years. 

He returned to England on a visit in 1680, and upon his return- 
ing to Virginia, he married, in 1682, Isabella Hert (pronounced Hart). 
They had three sons and four daughters, whose descendants are 
scattered in every direction. 

II. Henry Pendleton, eldest son and child of Philip Pen- 
dleton, of Norwich, PLngland, and Caroline County, Virginia, pro- 
genitor of the Pendleton Family in Virginia, and Isabella Hert (pro- 
nounced Hart), his wife, was born in Caroline County. Virginia, in 
1683, and died there in May, 1721, aged 38 years. 

He married, in 170^, Mary, daughter of James Taylor. She was 
born in 1688, survived him, and married, secondly, Ed. Watkins. 
She died in 1770, aged 82. Henry Pendleton and Mary Taylor, 
his wife, had five sons and two daughters. The two daughters 
married Gaines, and one of them, Isabella, was the grandmother of 
General F-. P. Gaines, of the United States Army. 

Of the five sons, we shall only notice JUDGE Edmund PENDLE- 
TON and John Pendleton. The other three sons married Bar- 
hours, Turners, etc. 



220 PENDLETON FAMILY. 

Judge Edmund Pendleton, of Edmundsburg, Caroli.ie 
County, Virginia, fifth child and son of Henry Pendleton, of the 
same county, and Mary Taylor, his wife, was born 9th Sept., 1721, 
and died at Richmond, Virginia, 23d Oct., 1803, aged 82 years. He 
married, first, in January, 1741, Elizabeth Roy, who died in Novem- 
ber following, leaving one child, a son, who died infant. 

He married, secondly, in June. 1743, Sarah Pollard, by whom 
he had no issue. 

There are on record in the Virginia Land Registry Office, grants in his 
name numbering nearly io,ooo acres. The following autobiography is copied 
from the Richmond (Virginia) ^w/w/rcT, of the issue of April nth, 1S28: 

" I was born September gth, 1721; my faiher died some time before. In 
Februar\', 1734-35, I was bound apprentice to Col. Benjamin Robinson, 
Clerk of Caroline Court. In 1737 I was made Clerk of the Vestry of St. 
Mary's Parish, in Caroline; with the profits I purchased a few books, and read 
them very diligently. In 1740 I was made Clerk of Caroline Court-Martial. 
In April, 1741, with my master's consent, I was licensed to practise law as an 
attorney, being strictly examined by Mr. Birradell. January 21st, 174 i. I ^^'•is 
married to Betty, daughter of Mr. John Roy, against my friends' consent, as 
also my master's, who, nevertheless, still continued his affection to me. My 
wife died November 17th, 1742. I was married a second time the 20th of 
January-, 1745, to Sarah, the daughter of Mr. Joseph Pollard, who was born 
on the 4th day of May, 1725. I practised mv profession with great approba- 
tion and success, more from my own good fortune and the kind direction of 
Providence than my own merit; and in October, 1745, my reputation at the 
County Courts prompted me to make an effort at the General Court, in which 
I continued until 1774, when the dispute with Great Britain commenced. 

In November, 175 i, I was sworn Justice of the Peace for Caroline, and 
continued to November, 1777. In January, 1752, I was elected as a Bur- 
gess from Caroline. I was continued one of the representatives oj that County 
without interruption until 1774, at which time I presided in Caroline Court 
and was County Lieutenant. In June of that year news arrived of the inimi- 
cal designs of Parliament against the town of Boston, on which account the 
Assembly voted a fast, and were dissolved by the Government. .\ number of 
members stayed in Williambburg, to keep the fast, when news arrived of the 
Boston Port Bill; when they collected, and recomm-inded to the people to 
choose members for convention, to meet in August. I was chosen a member 
to that convention, which voted the utility of a General Congress of the States, 
to meet in Philadelphia the ist of Septembe-. • I was chosen, ami attended that 



CAROLIXK CO., VIRGINIA. 221 

Cungress, and a second in May, 1775. In August, 1775, I was appointetl 
President of the C^mimittee of Safety, and in December following, President of 
the Convention, on ilie death of Mr. Randolph, and re-chosen President of the 
new one in May, 1776. In October, 1776, I was elected to the chair of the 
House of Delegates, which sat under the new Constitution. In March, 1777, 
by a fall from a horse, I had my hip dislocated, and have been unable to walk 
ever since, except on crutches; however, the good people of Caroline the next 
month chose me as delegate, in hope of my recovery', but I could not attend 
tiie May session, and another Speaker was appointed, in which, however, I 
was highly honored by all the candidates having promised to resign the Chair 
when I should come. I attended on crutches in the October session, but 
meant then to take leave of all public business, and retire; but the General 
Court and Court of Chancery being established, I was prevailed on by some 
worthy members to consent to be nominated as a Chancer}' Judge, in which I 
was elected to the Presidency of the whole three by a unanimous vote. 

In 1779, when the Court of Appeals was organized, and made to consist 
of the Judges of the General Court, Chancer)' and Admiralty, the Chancellors 
were to have the first rank, and of course I presided in that Court. In 1788, 
when a new arrangement was made of the Superior Courts, and that of Appeals, 
to consist of separate Judges, I maintained my rank in that Court, and so may 
be considered as having been now fifteen years at the head of the Judiciary- 
Department. 

In 1788, when a State Convention was to meet to consider of a new pro- 
posed plan of f'ederal government, and all the officers of the State made eligi- 
ble, my good old friends in Caroline again called me to their representation in 
convention, and that respectable body to preside over them, indulging me in 
sitting in all my official duties, usually performed standing. Thus, without 
any classical education, without patrimony, without what is called the influ- 
ence of what is called family connection, and without solicitation, I have 
attained the highest offices of my countrj'. 

I have often contemplated it as a rare and extraordinary instance, and 
pathetically exclaimed: " Not unto me, O Lord, but unto Thy Name, be the 
praise." In His providence. He was pleased to bestow on me a docile and 
unassuming mind, a retentive memory, a fondness for reading, a clear head 
and upright heart, with a calm temper, benevolent to all, though particular in 
friendship with but few; and if I had uncommon merit in public business, it 
was that of superior diligence and attention. 

Under the Regal Government I was a Whig in principle, considering it as 
designed for the good of society, and not for the aggrandizement of its officers, 
and influenced in my legislative and judicial character by that principle, when 



222 I'ENDLKTON FAMILY. 

the dispute with Britain began, a redress of grievances, and not a revolution ct 
government was my wish; in this I was firm but temperate, and whilst I was 
endeavoring to raise the timid to a general united opposition by stating to the 
uninformed the real merits of the dispute, I opposed and endeavored to mod- 
erate the violent and fiery, who were plunging us into rash measures, and had 
the happiness to find a majority of all the public bodies confirming my senti- 
ments, which, I believe, was the corner-stone of our success. Although I sn 
long, and to so high a degree, experienced the favor of my countr} , I had always 
some enemies; few indeed, and I had the consolation to believe that their 
enmity was unprovoked, as I was ever unable to guess the cause, unless it was 
my refusing to go lengths with them as their partisan. 

July 20th, 1793. Edmund Pendlfton." 

"R. D. W.," in the Richmond (Virginia) Daily Slaie, 26th May, 1881, 
says: "Judge Edmund Pendleton was the first President of the Supreme Court 
of Appeals of Virginia, and his autobiography will, I think, commend itself to 
you as worthy of publication, and as presenting the record of a life which 
affords an example that ought to be cherished. Our young men would do well 
to read his life and be strengthened to follow on in his slow, steady, useful and 
brilliant career. Judge Pendleton died at the age of eighty-two years, in the 
full enjoyment of his mental faculties, and almost literally in the discharge of 
his official duties. '" 

III. John Pendleton, of Caroline County, Virginia, elder 
brother of Judge Edmund Pendleton, was about the fourth child and 
son of Henry Pendleton, of same county, and Mary Taylor, his wife, 
and was born in said county, about 1723, and died in April, 1799. 
aged about 76 years. He married twice, it is said, but the names of 
both his wives are unknown. By one of these marriages, probably 
the first, he had: 

1. Edmund Pendleton, eldest, born in Caroline County, Virginia, about 

1748, removed to White Plains, same county, and married about 
1773, Mildred Pollard. 

2. Son Pendleton, married and had two daughters but no male issue. 
There were several other sons, all of whom went West except Henry Pen- 
dleton, who settled in Louisa County, Virginia, and raised a large family.' 

IV. Edmund Pendleton, of White Plains, Caroline County, 
Virginia, eldest son of John Pendleton, of same county, was born in 
that county about 1748. He married, about ^i773,jMildrcd Pollard, 



CAROLINE CO., VIRGINIA. 223 

called " Milly," youngest sister of Sarah Pollard, who was the second 
wife of Judge P2dmund Pendleton. They had the following children: 

1. Edmund Pendleton, Junior, eldest, born at White Plains, Caroline 

County, \'irginia, iSth April, 1774, removed to Edmundton, same 
county. He married, first, 23d .\ugust, 1794, Jane B. Page. He 
married, secondly, i6th May, 1798, Lucy Nelson. 

2. Mildred Pendleton, bom about 1776 at White Plains, Caroline County, 

Virginia, married, about 179S, Thomas Page, about the seventh sur- 
viving son of Hon. John Page, of North End, Gloucester (now Mat- 
thews) County, Virginia, and Jane Byrd, his wife. (See Page Fami- 
ly, North End.) 
There were probably other children of Edmund Pendleton and Mildred Pol- 
lard, his wife, but they are not known. 

V. Edmund Pendleton. Junior, of Edmundton, Caroline 
County, Virginia, eldest son and child of Ednnund Pendleton, of 
White Plains, same county, and Mildred (called "Milly") Pollard, 
his wife, eldest son and child of John Pendleton, of same county (the 
names of his two wives being unknown), about the fourth child and 
son of Henry Pendleton, of same county, and Mary Taylor, his wife, 
eldest son and child of Philip Pendleton, of Norwich, England, and 
Caroline County (formed out of New Kent County), Virginia, pro- 
genitor of the Pendleton Family in Virginia, and Isabella Hert (pro- 
nounced Hart), his wife, was born at the second above-named place, 
i8th April^ I774- The date of his death is unknown. 

The estate, called " Edmundton," was given to him by his great- 
uncle. Judge Edmund Pendleton. He married, first, 23d August. 
1794, Jane Burwell, eldest daughter and about the second child of 
John Page, of Caroline County, Virginia, and Elizabeth (called 
"Betty") Burwell, his wife. The latter was the mother of Capt. 
Hugh N. Page, U. S. Navy, and others, and was burned to death in 
the Richmond (Virginia) Theatre, 26th December, 181 1. (See 
Page P'amily, North End.) Edmund Pendleton had one child by 
the first marriage, viz.: 

I. Elizabeth Page Pendleton, born at Edmundton, Caroline County, Vir- 
ginia, about 1795, married, iSth April, 18 17, John C. Sutton, of 
Norfolk City, Virginia. She died, leaving eleven children. 

Edmund Pendleton, Junior (his first wife dying), married, second- 



224 PENDLETON FAMILY. 

ly. i6th May. 1798, Lucy, second child and daughter of Col. Hugh 
Nelson, of Yorktown, York County. Virginia, and Judith Page, his 
wife. (See President Nelson.) The children by the second mar- 
riage were as follows : 

1. Hugh Nelson Pendleton, eldest, burn at Edmundton, Caroline Countv, 

Virginia, 13th April, iSoo, removed first to Clarke and then to Wythe 
County, Virginia. He married, first, 20th Februar}-, 1S29, Lucy 
Nelson, and secondly, about 1840, Elizabeth Digges. 

2. Mildred Pendleton, born at the same place, 21st March, 1802, raarried» 

17th November, 1S25, Edinund A. Pendleton, of Augusta, Georgia. 

Children: 

(i) Edmund Lewis Pendleton, born 28th January, 1827, married, 
October, 1S50, Catista E. Norton, of Vermont, and had one 
daughter, Edmonia Pendleton, married F. .S. Mosher, of Au- 
gusta, Georgia. 

(2) William Pendleton, born 21st June, 1828, married, 24th Septem- 
ber, 1862, Zemula C. Walker, of Augusta, Georgia. Has four 
sons. 

(3) John Pendleton, born 15th March, 1834; single. 

(4) Hugh Pendleton, twin brother of John, born 15th March, 1834, 
married, December, 1867, Rebecca Jones, of Nottoway County, 
Virginia. Has two sons and two daughters. 

(5) Judith Page Pendleton, bom about 1836, married, in 1858, Rich- 
ard B. Williams, of Richmond, Virginia. She died April, 1863, 
without issue. * 

(6) Armistead Franklin Pendleton, born September 25th, 1838, mar- 

ried in March, 1 868, Isabella Garvin, of Augusta, Georgia, and 
has two daughters and one son. 

(7) Anne Elizabeth Pendleton, born 9th October, 1844; single. 

3. Judith Page Pendleton, bom at Edmundton, Caroline County, Vir- 

ginia, 8th December, 1803, married, June, 1826, Robert H. Harri- 
son, of the same county, and died leaving two children, viz.: 

(1) William L. Harrison, married, about 1832, Lama A Lumpkin, 

of Dover, King William County, Virginia, and had Robert, Rosa, 
Annie, Mary and Lama. 

(2) Mary F. Harrison, married Dr. James E. Williams, of Richmond, 

Virginia. No issue. 

4. Dr. Francis Walker Pendleton, born at Edmundton, Caroline County^ 

Virginia, 7th December, 1808, removed to Warsaw, Richmond Coun- 



CAROLINK CO., VIRGINIA. 225 

ty, Virginia. He married, Januar\-, 1S34, Sarah F,, daughter of Daniel 
Turner, of Caroline County, Virginia, and had: 
(i) Robert Carter Pendleton, died a youth. 

(2) Nannie F. Pendleton, bom 1840. 

(3) Mildred E. Pendleton, bom 1841, married, about 1861, Tasker 
Crabbe, of Richmond County, Virginia. She died, leaving one 
child, Fannie Crabbe. 

5. Rev. William Nelson Pendleton, bom in Richmond, Virginia, 26th 

Dec'r, 1809; removed to Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia, 
where he died, 15th Januar}% 1SS3, aged 74 years. 

He married, in 1831, Anzolette Page, of Rugswamp, Hanover 
County, Virginia. (See Page Family, Kosewell.) Their children 
were; 

(i) Susan Pendleton, married, about 1852, Ed. Lee, who died with- 
out issue. 

(2) 'Slary Pendleton. 

(3) Rose Pendleton. 

(4) Alexanders. Pendleton, only son, called "Sandy,"' born about 

1839; died Sept., 1864. He married. 1863. Kate Corbin, of 
Moss Neck, Caroline County, Virginia. 'See Secretar}- Nelson.) 
They had one child that died infant. Mrs. Kate Corbin Pen- 
dleton married, secondly, Brooke, of Lexington, Rockbridge 
County, Virginia, and has issue. 

(5) Nancy Pendleton. 

(6) Leila Pendleton. 

6. Robert Carter Pendleton, born at Edmundton, Caroline County, Vir- 

ginia, 14th Sept., 1812; died single, at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 
1836, aged 24 years. 

7. James L. Pendleton, born at Edmundton, Caroline Countv, Virginia. 

about 18 15; removed to Richmond, Virginia. He married, in 1S40, 
Annalethia, daughter of Samuel S. Carter, of Richmonti, Virginia. 
She died there in 1881. He died many years before. Their chil- 
dren were: 
(i) Samuel H. Pendleton, born about 1841, removed to New York 

City; married, 1864, Sallie A., daughter of Philip H. Pendleton. 

of Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia. They had one child, 

Arthur Pendleton. 

(2) Hugh Thomas Pendleton, died single, 3d July, 1S63. 

(3) Emma Walker Pendleton, married, 1882, Robert C. Little, of 
Columbus, (Georgia. 



226 ■ PENDLETON' FAMILY. 

(4) Martha Carter Pendleton, married. 1871, Joseph M. Furqurean, 
of Richmond, Virginia, and has several children. 

(5) William J. Pendleton, married, about 1875, Mary J., daughter 

of John M. Royall, of Richmond, Virginia. 
8. Guerdon" H. Pendleton, born at Edmundton, Caroline County, \'ir- 
ginia, 4th April, 181 7; removed to Clarke County. Virginia. He 
died about 1S77, aged about 60 years. He married, nth May, 1854, 
Jane Byrd, (.laughter of Mann Randolph Page. (See Page Family, 
North End. ) 

VI. Hugh Nelson Pendleton, of Clarke County, Vir- 
jj'inia, eldest son and child of Edmund Pendleton, Jr., of Edmundton, 
Caroline County, Virginia, and Lucy Nelson, his second wife (there 
was no male issue by the first wife), eldest son and child of Edmund 
Pendleton, of White Plains, same county, and Mildred (called 
" Milly ") Pollard, his wife, eldest son and child of John Pendleton, 
of same county (names of his two wives unknown); about the fourth 
child and son of Henry Pendleton, of the same county, and Mary 
Taylor, his wife, eldest son and child of Philip Pendleton, of Nor- 
wich, England, and Caroline County (formed out of New Kent 
County), Virginia, progenitor of the Pendleton Family in Virginia, 
and Isabella Hert (pronounced Hart), his wife, was born at the sec- 
ond above-named place, 13th April, 1800. He died recently, exact 
age unknown. 

He married, first, 20th Feb'y, 1829, Lucy, only child of Chan- 
cellor Robert Nelson (ninth child and youngest son of Gov. Thomas 
Nelson, Yorktown, York County, Virginia), and Judith Carter Page, 
his wife, who was the ninth surviving child and youngest daughter 
of Gov. John Page, of Rosewell, Gloucester County, Virginia, 
and Frances (called " Fannie") Burwell, his first wife. Hugh Nel- 
son Pendleton and Lucy Nelson, his first wife, had only one child, 
viz: 

I. Julia Pendleton, born about 1830; died in 1865, aged about 35. She 
married, about 1853, James Allen, of Bedford County, Virginia, who 
died in Aug., 1862. They left one child, viz: Hugh Allen, who is 
the sole surviving descendant of Chancellor Robert Nelson. 

Hugh Nelson Pendleton married, secondly, about 1840, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Dudley Digges, of Louisa County, Virginia, and 



CLARKE CO.. VIRC.INIA. 22/ 

Alice Page, widow of Dr. John A. Smith, of Yorktown, York County, 
X'^irginia, his wife. Alice Page, the widow Smith, was the second 
survixing daughter and about the sixth child of Gov. John Page, and 
Frances (called " Fannie "1 Burwell, his first wife. 

Hugh Nelson Pendleton and Elizabeth Digges, his wife, had 
the following children, viz: 

I. Dudley Digges Penui.etox, eldest, born about 1S41; reniuveti to 
-Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, West Virginia. Being the eldest 
son of the eldest son, etc., he is the Representative Descendant of the 
Pendleton Family in Virginia, from John Pendleton, who belonged 
to the third generation of that family in Virginia. Dudley D. Pen- 
dleton married, about 1868, Helen Boteler. of Shepherdstown. 
They have several children. 

2 Robert Nelson Pendleton, born about 1843 : married, about 1868, 
Fannie Gibson, and removed to Wyth County, Virginia. 

3. Kennith Pendleton, born about 1845; ^i^*-^ young. 

For further information about the Pendletons, the reader is referred to the 
Hislorv 0/ St. Mark's Parish, Culpepper County, Virginia, by Rev. Phili|) 
.Slaughter, D.D. Published by Innes& Co., Baltimore, Maryland, 1877. 



PART V. 



RANDOLPH FAMILY, 



^" ""^^ 




(From an old print. 

JOHN RANDOLPH, 
ROANOKE, CHARLOTTE CGU^ITY, VIRGINIA. 
Died 24th May. 1833, Aged 60 Years. 



RANDOLPH FAMILY. 



The following is a somewhat incomplete account of the Ran- 
dolph Family in Virginia: 

I. William Randolph, of Turkey Island, on James River, 
Henrico County, Virginia, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 165 1. 
He emigrated to Virginia about 1674, and became the progenitor 
of the Randolph Family in Virginia. He died at the first-named 
place, loth April, 1711, aged 60 years. He was a member of the 
Virginia House of Burgesses, and of the Virginia Colonial Council. 
He married, about 16S0, Mary, daughter of Henry Isham, of Ber- 
muda Hundred, on James River, Virginia, and Catherine, his wife, 
whose maiden name is unknown. Their children were as follows: 

1. William Randolph. Jun'r, known as Councilor Randolph, eldest, 

born at Turkey Island, Henrico County, Virginia, about 1681; re- 
sided there. He married, about 1 705, Elizabeth Beverly. 

2. Thomas Randolph, born at Turkey Island, Henrico Count)', Virginia, 

about 1683; removed to Tuckahoe, on James River, Goochland 
Count)-, Virginia. He married, about 17 10, Judith Churchill 
(Fleming.'). 

3. Isham Randolph, born at Turkey Island, Henrico County, Virginia, 
^ jjj* about 1690; removed to Dun>;eness. Goochland County, Virginia. 

A,*^-' He married, in 171 7. Jane Rogers, of London, England. 

4. Sir John Randolph, Knight, born at Turkey Island, Henrico County, 

Virginia, about 1693; removed to Williamsburg, James City County, 
Virginia. He married, about 171 8, Susanna Beverly, sister of his 
brother William's wife. 

5. Richard Randolph, born at Turkey Island, Henrico County, Virginia, 

about 1695; removed to Curl's Neck, on James River, same county. 
He married, about 1720, Jane Boiling. 

6. Elizabeth Randolph, born at Turkey Island, Henrico County, Virginia, 

about 1697; married, about 1717, Richard Bland, of Jordan's Point, 
James River, Virginia, and was his second wife. Among their chil- 
dren were: 



234 RANDOLPH FAMILY. 

(i) Mar)' Bland, married, about 1738, Henry Lee, of Lee's Hall, on 
Potomac River, and was the gr;iiuhrn:>ther of Gen'l Lee (Light 
Horse Harrj-). 

(2) Richard Bland, eldest son, of Jordan's Point, on James River, 
Virginia. He was a member of the Virginia House of Bur- 
gesses; of the First American Congress at Philadelphia, and of 
the Virginia Convention of 1775. He married Anne Poythress. 

7. Mar}' Randolph, born at Turkey Island, about 1699; married, about 

1720, William Stith. Among their children was Rev. William Stith, 
• President of William and ?^Iar}' College, and Historian of Virginia. 
He married, Feb'y, 1744, Judith Randolph, of Tuckahoe. 

8. Edward Randolph married Miss Groves, of Bristol, England, and had 

issue. Of these, Edward married Lucy Harrison, and Elizabeth and 
Mary married Yates, of Gloucester County, Virginia. 

9. Henry Randolph, died unmarried, in England. 

n. WiLLL\M Randolph, known as Councilor Randolpfl 
of Turkey Island, Henrico County, Virginia, eldest son and child of 
William Randolph, of Yorkshire, England, and Turkey Island, 
Henrico County, Virginia, progenitor of the Randolph Family in 
Virginia, and Mary Isham, his wife, was born at the first-named 
place, about 1681, and resided there. 

He married, about 1705, Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Beverly, 
of Gloucester County, Virginia, and Eliza Peyton, his wife, who was 
a daijghter of Robert Peyton, descended from a family of that name 
in Norfolk, England. William Randolph, and Elizabeth Beverly, 
his wife, had the following children: 

1. Beverly Randolph, eldest, born about 1706; removed to Turkey Islaml, 

Henrico County, Virginia, and married, about 1731, Miss Lightfoot. 
He died without issue. 

2. Peter Randolph, bom at Turkey Island, Henrico County, Virginia, 

about 1708; removed to Chatsworth, same county. He married. 
about 1733, Lucy, daughter of Robert Boiling, and had William. 
Beverly, Robert and Anne. 

3. William Randolph, bom about 1710; removed to Wilton. Henrico 

County (.'), Virginia. He married, about 1735, Anne, daughter of 
Benjamin Harrison, of Berkeley (Harris'm's Landing), on James 
!!iver, Virginia, and Anne Carter, his wife. Their children were: 



TURKEY ISLAND. 235 

(i) William Randolph, born about 1736; died young. 

(2) Peyton Randolph, born about 1738; married, about 1763, Lucy 

Harrison, his cousin, and had Betty, Kidder, and Peyton. 

(3) Anne Randolph, bom about 1740; married, about 1760, Benja- 
min Harrison, of Brandon, on James River, Prince Geor^^e 
County, Virginia, and died without issue. 

(4) Elizabeth Randolph, born about 1742; married, about 1762. 
Philip Grj-mes, of Middlesex County, Virginia; probably the 
brother of Lucy Gn,-mes, who married Gov. Thomas Nelson, of 
Yorktown, Virginia. 

(5) Lucy Randolph, born about 1744; married, about 1764, Lewis 

Burwell, v)f Kings Mill (Kingsmel), York County (.'), Virginia. 
He was probably the brother of Elizabeth (called "Betty'') 
Burwell, wife of John Page, of Caroline County, Virginia. (See 
Nonh End.) 

4. Daughter Randolph, bom about 17 18; married Price. 

5. Elizabeth Randolph, bom about 1725; married, about 1745, Col. 

Chiswell. Their daughter, Lucy Chiswell, married, 24th Nov., 1770, 
Col. William Nelson, of The Dorrill, Hanover County, Virginia. 
(See Secretary Nelson.) 

n. Thomas Randolph, of Tuckahoe, on James River, Gooch- 
land County, Virginia, second son and child of William Randolph. 
of Yorkshire, England, and Turkey Island, Henrico County, Vir- 
ginia, progenitor of the Randolph Family in Virginia, and Mary 
Isham, his wife, was born at Turkey Island, Henrico County, \''ir- 
ginia, about 1683. He married, about 17 10, Judith Churchill, of 
Middlesex County, Virginia. There appears to be some uncertaint>- 
as to who was the wife of Thomas Randolph, of Tuckahoe. Ac- 
cording to Rev. P. Slaughter, in his His tor v of Bristol Parish, \^. 
214, she was a Miss Fleming. This corresponds with the statement 
made in Browning's Americans of Royal Descent, p. 298. On the 
other hand, Mrs. Ellen Wayles Randolph Harrison, of Edge Hill. 
Albemarle County, Virginia, states that her name was Judith Church- 
ill, and that no marriage between Randolph and Fleming took place 
until a later period. Mrs. Harrison suggested, however, that I 
should apply for correct information on this point to Wilson M. 
Gary, of Baltimore, Maryland. In reply to a letter from me on the 
subject, Mr. Gary wrote, under date of 8th March, 1S83, as follows: 



236 RANDOLPH FAMILY. 

" In the conflict of authorities as to the wife of Thomas Randolph, of 
Tuckahoe. I have always accepted Richard Randolph's account 
rather than that of John Randolph, of Roanoke, because the former 
was a professed antiquary and more likely to be correct than the 
eccentric and erratic statesman who probably took no pains to ver- 
ify his opinion by general research. There being no extracts from 
parish records, there is nothing left but to choose between their 
statements, aided by such corroborating testimony as one can ob- 
tain at this late day."' In view of this statement, I shall assume 
that the wife of Thomas Randolph, of Tuckahoe, was named Ju- 
dith Churchill. 

Their children were as follows: 

1. William Randolph, born at Tuckahoe, Goochland County. Virginia, 

in 171 2, married, about 1735, ^laria Judith, second child and only 
daughter of Hon. Mann Page, Esq., of Rosewell, Gloucester 
County, Virginia, and Judith Wormeley, his first wife. 

2. Judith Randolph, born about 1724, married, February, 1844, Rev. 

William Stith, President of William and Mar\- College, also Historian 
of Virginia. 

3. Mary Randolph, bom about 1726, married, about 1746, William 

Keith. Chief Justice John Marshall, of the United States, was de- 
scended from them. 

III. William Randolph, of Tuckahoe, on James River, Gooch- 
land County, Virginia, eldest son and child of Thomas Randolph, of 
the same place, and Judith Churchill, his wife, was born there in 
1712, and died 1745. 

He married, about 1735, Maria Judith, second child and only 
daughter of Hon. Mann Page, Esq., of Rosewell, Gloucester County, 
Virginia, and Judith Wormeley, his first wife. Their children were 
as follows, viz: 

I. Judith Randolph, b^rn about 1736, married, about 1756, Edmund 
Berkeley, of Barnelms, Middlesex County, Virginia, and was his first 
wife. He was the eldest son of Col. Edmund Berkeley, of the same 
place, and Mary Nelson, his wife, who was the only daughter and 
about the second child of Thomas Nelson, known as Scotch Tom, of 
Yorktown, Virginia, and Margaret Reid, his fir?t wife. They had only 
one child, who married Joseph Clayton. Edmund Berkeley, Junior, 
married, secondly. Mar)- Burwell, sister of Col. Burwell, of Carter 



TUCKAHOE. 237 

Hall, Clarke County, Virgitiia, and had Norborne, Car;er, William, 
Elizabeth (called Betsey), married Churchill, and was the grand- 
mother of J. Churchill Cooke and others; Lucy, married Hepanon; 
Alice, married Fontaine; Sally and Lewis. 

?. Mary Randolph, born about 173S, married, about 1758, Tarlton Flem- 
ing, of Goochland County, Virginia. 

3. Thomas Mann Randolph, born at Tuckahoe, Goochland County, Vir- 
ginia, in 1741. He was the only son, and married, i8th November, 
1761, Anne Car\'. 

IV. Thomas Mann Randolph, of Tuckahoe, on James River, 
Goochland County, Virginia, only son of William Randolph, of the 
same place, and Maria Judith Page, his wife, was born there in 1741. 
He married, i8th November, 1761, Anne, eldest daughter and child of 
Col. Archibald Gary, of Ampthill, Chesterfield County, Virginia, and 
Mary Randolph, of Curl's Neck, on James River, Henrico County, 
Virginia, his wife. Their children were as follows, viz: 

1. Mary Randolph, born 9th August, 1762, married, about 1782, David 

Meade Randolph, of Presqu' Isle, on James River, Virginia. She 
was known as " The Queen." Of their children, Beverly was a clerk 
in the United States Treasury Department, at Washington, D.C., 
and three of his sons, James, INIaur}-, and Richard, were in the em- 
ployment of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company, 

2. Henry Car}' Randolph, born about 1763; died iniant. 

3. Elizabeth Randolph, born about 1765, married, about 1785, Robert 

Pleasants, of Filmer. 

4. Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., eldest surviving son, and Governor of 

Virginia, was bom at Tuckahoe, Goochland Count}-, Virginia, about 
1767, and removed to Edge Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia. He 
married, in 1790, Martha, daughter of President Thomas Jefferson, 
U.S. 

5. William Randolph, born at Tuckahoe, about 1769, married, about 

1794, Lucy Boiling Randolph, and died, leaving two sons; viz: 
(i) William Fitzhugh Randolph, married Jane, daughter of Ran- 
dolph Harrison, of Clifton, Cumberland County, Virginia. She 
became entirely blind. Her two sons, Beverly and Eston, re- 
sided near her at Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia. Her 
only daughter married George Tabb, of Gloucester County, Vir- 
ginia. 



; ■ RANDOLPH FAMILY. 

(2) Beverly Randolph, married Miss Mayor, of Pennsylvania, and 
died, leaving one son, William Mayor Randolph, who removed 
to St. Louis, Mo. 

6. Archibald Car\- Randolph, born about 1771; died infant. 

7. Judith Randolph, born about 1773, married about 1793, her cousin, 

Richard Randolph, of Bizarre, who was the brother of John Randolph, 
of Roanoke. They had one son, who died a deaf mute, and left quite 
a large property 10 be divided among his heirs according to law. Of 
these, Col. Thomas Jefferson Randolph, of Edge Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia, received 2bo\xi forty dolLirsf 

8. Anne Cary Randolph, born at Tuckahoe, about 1775, married, about 

1795, Gouverneur ^.lorris, of Morrisania, New York, U. S. Minister 
to France. 

9. Jane Cary Randolph, bom about 1777, married, about 1797, Thomas 

Eston Randolph, of Bristol, England, and had : 

(1) Mann Randolph, Captain U. S. Navy. 

(2) Dr. James Randolph, of Tallahassee, Florida, married Miss 

Heywood. 

(3) Lucy Randolph, married Parkhill, of Jacksonville, Florida. 

(4) Harriet Randolph, married Dr. Willis; no issue. 

(5) Elizabeth Randolph, married Francis W^ayles, Eppes. 

(6) Dr. Arthur Randolph, of Tallahassee, Florida, married Miss 

Duval, and has issue. 

10. Dr. John Randolph, born at Tuckahoe, Goochland County, Virginia, 

about 1779; removed to Middle Quarter, same county. He mar- 
ried, about 1804, Judith Lewis, of Amelia County, Virginia. They 
had several children, the eldest of whom, W^illiam Lewis Randolph, 
married Margaret, daughter of Col. Thomas Jefferson Randolph, of 
Edge Hill, Albemarie County, Virginia, and had: (a) William L. 
Randolph, Jr., married, 1866, Agnes Dillon, of Savannah, Georgia. 
They reside near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, and 
have five children; {b) Margaret Randolph, married Ed. C. Ander- 
son, and had four children. 

11. George Washington Randolph, bom about 1781; died infant, 

12. Harriet Randolph, born about 1783; married, about 1803, Richard S. 

Hackley, of New York, Consul to Cadiz. He died, leaving two 
daughters, one of whom married Capt. Talcott, and had several sons 
and daughters. One of the sons, Randolph Talcott, removed to 
Richmond, Virginia. 

13. Virginia Randolph, born at Tuckahoe, Goochland County, Virginia, 



TUCKAHOE. 239 

31st Januan. 17S6. She married, at Monticello, Albemarle County, 
Virginia, 28th Aug., 1805, Wilson Jefferson Cary, of Carysbrooke, 
Fluvanna County, Virginia. He was the great nephew of United 
States President Thomas Jetferson. Their children were: 
(i) Col. Wilson Miles Cary, born at Car}'sbrooke, Fluvanna 
County, Virginia, 1806; removed to Baltimore County, Mary- 
land, and represented that count}- for six years in the Marviand 
State Senate. He married, in 1S32, Jane Margaret, daughter 
of Peter Carr and Hetty Smith, his wife. The latter was niece 
of Gen'l Samuel Smith, of Baltimore, Maryland. Their children 
wereasfollow-s: (a) Sarah Nicholas, married J. Howard McHenr)-, 
of Baltimore; (d) Virginia, died infant; (c) Hetty, married, first, 
Maj.-Gen. John Pegram, and secondly, Prof. Henry Newell, of 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore; (d) Virginia Randolph, 
died young; (<?) Wilson Miles, Attorney of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, representative of the Cary Family of Virginia, bom 1838; 
(_/") John Brune, married Fannie E., daughter of William S. 
Daniel, of Jefferson County, West Virginia; (^) Jenny; {A) Sid- 
ney Carr, of the firm of Carj &' Co., Merchants, Baltimore, 
Marvland. 

(2) Archibald Cary-, born at Carysbrooke, Fluvanna County, Virginia; 

removed to Cumberland County, Maryland. He married Mon- 
imia, daughter of Thomas, ninth Lord Fairfax, and died, leav- 
ing three children: (a) Falkland, a brilliant youth, died young; 
(6) Constance, married Burton N. Harrison, of Mississippi, re- 
moved to New York City; (c) Clarence, married, 1S7S, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Howard Potter, of the banking firm of Brown 
Bros., New York City. 

(3) Jane Blair Cary, married Rev. E. D. Smith, of New York City. 

(4) Mary Randolph Car)', married Dr. Orlando Fairfax. 

(5) Martha Jefferson Cary, married her first cousin, Gouverneur 

Morris, of Morrisania, New York . 

V. Thomas Mann Randolph, Junr., of Edge Hill, Albe- 
marle County, Virginia, GOVERNOR OF Virginia, was the fourth 
child and eldest surviving son of Thomas Mann Randolph, of Tuck- 
ahoe, Goochland County, Virginia, and Anne Cary, his wife, and 
was born at Tuckahoe about 1767. 

He was Governor of Virginia 1819-1821, and was a Presiden- 
tial Klector in 1825. 



240 RANDOLPH FAMILY. 

He married, in 1790, Martha, daughter of U. S. President 
Thomas Jefferson, and Martha Wayles, his wife. Their children 
were: 

1. Anne Cary Randolph, born 1791; mariied, about iSio, Charles Bank- 

head, and had: 

(i) Daughter; married John Carter. 

(2) Thomas M. R. Bankhead; died in Arkansas, without issue. 

(3) John Bankhead; lives in Missouri, and has a family. 

(4) WilHam Bankhead; removed to Alabama. 

2. Thomas Jcfterson Randolph, eldest son, born at Edge Hill, Albemarle 

County, Virginia, 1792; he resided there, and married, 18 15, Jane 
Nicholas. 

3. Ellen Randolph, born about 1794; died infant. 

4. Ellen Wayles Randolph, born about 1796: married, about 1824, 

Joseph Coolidge, of Boston, Mass., and had: 
(i) Joseph R. Coolidge; married Julia Gardiner. 

(2) Bessie; died infant. 

(3) Ellen R. Coolidge; married Edmund Dwight. 

(4) Sidney Coolidge; killed in the United States Army, at Chatta- 

nooga, 1864. 

(5) Algenon Coolidge, twin brother of Sidney; married Marv' 

Lowell. 

(6) Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; married Mehitable (Hettie) Ap- 

pleton. 

5. James Madison Randolph, bom about 1798; died single. 

6. Cornelia Jefferson Randolph; died single. 

7. Mary Jefferson Randolph; died single. 

8. Virginia Randolph, bom about iSoi; married, about 1821, X. P. 

St, who made the Treaty of Hidalgo Guadaloupe, after the Mexi- 
can war (1848), and had: 

(i) Thomas Jefferson Trist, deaf mute; married Ellen Lyman, also 
a deaf mute, of Boston, Mass. No issue. 

(2) Martha Jefferson Trist; married John Burke, of Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia, and had seven children. 

(3) Dr. H. B. Trist; married Anna Warring, of Savannah, Georgia, 

and has seven children also. 

9. Benjamin Franklin Randolph, bom about 1805; married, about 1828, 

Sarah Carter, and liad: 

( i) Meriwether Le'Ais Randolph: married L-jui-ia Hubard, and has 
five children. 



TUCKAHOE. 241 

(2) Septimia Anne Randolph; married Dr. David Meikleham, and 
had William. Morland Meikleham, who married in New York 
and lives in Fordham, with three children — Alice Scott, Ran- 
dolph, and Ellen Wayles. 

10. Meriwether Lewis Randolph, born about 180S; married, about 1830, 

Eliza Wharton. No issue. 

1 1. (George Wythe Randolph, born about 1815; married, about 1852, Mar)- 

E. Adams (the widow Pope). No issue. 

VI. Col. Thomas Jefferson Randolph, of Edge Hill, Albe- 
marle CouPxty, Virginia, eldest son and second child of Governor 
Tiionuis Mann Randolph, Jr.. of the same place, and Martha Jeffer- 
son (daughter of U. S. President Thomas Jefferson), his wife, third 
child and eldest son of Thomas Mann Randolph. Sr., of Tuckahoe. 
Goochland County, Virginia, and Anne Gary, his wife, eldest son 
and child of William Randolph, of the last-named place, and Maria 
Judith Page, his wife (who was the daughter of the first Mann Page 
and Judith Wormeley. his first wife), eldest son and child of Thomas 
Randolph, of the same place, and Judith Churchill, his wife, second 
son and child of William Randolph, of Yorkshire, England, and 
Turkey Island, Henrico County. Virginia, progenitor of the Randolph 
Family in Virginia, and Mary Isham, his wife, was born at the first 
above-named place in 1792, and died there in 1875, aged 83 years- 
He was buried at Monticello, in the Jefferson graveyard. 

He was a Presidential Elector in 1845, and was President of the 
National Democratic Convention, whith met in Baltimore, Mar)-- 
land. in 1 S73. He was also chosen President of the Philadelphia Cen- 
ter.ni.il Exhibition of 1876; but, as already stated, died a short time 
bctoro. He married, in 18 15, Jane, daughter of Gov. Wilson Gary 
N-ch.-'.as. of Warren, Albemarle County, Virginia. Their children 



were: 



Margaret Smith Randolph, born about 1816; married, about 1S36, 
William Lewis Randolph. 

^at^ey Jefferson Randolph, bom ^z^jui 1817; married, about 1838, 
J. C. Randolph Taylor, of Albemarle County, Virginia, and had: 
(i) Bennet Taylor; married, ab-i:: 1^65, Lucy Colston, and had six 
children. 

(2) Jane Randolph Taylor. 

(3) Susan Beverly Taylor; married John Blackburn. 



242 RANDOLPH FAMILY. 

(4) Jefferson Randolph Taylor, lawyer. Resides at Charlottesville, 
Albemarle Couniy, Virginia. 

(5) Margaret Randolph Taylor. 

(6) Charlotte Taylor; died infant. 

(7) Cornelia Jefferson Taylor. 

(8) Stevens Mason Taylor. 

(9) Edmund Randolph Taylor. 

(10) Sidney W. Taylor; died infant. 

(11) I.e. Randolph Taylor: died infant. 

(12) Moncure Robinson Taylor. 

3. Cary Anne Nicholas Randolph, born about 1820; married, about 1840, 

Frank G. Ruffin, of Albemarle Couniy, Virginia, and had: 
(i) Jefferson Randolph Ruffin. 

(2) William Roane RutTm; married, about 1868, Miss Mcllvaine, 
of Petersburg, Dinwiddle County, Virginia, and has several 
children. 

(3) Wilson Carv- Nicholas Ruffin t'married, about 1870, Mary Harvey. 

(4) George Randolph Ruffin; removed to Texas. 

(5) Frank Gildart Ruffin, Jr. 

(6) Eliza McDonald Ruffin. 

(7) Cary Randolph Ruffin. 

4. Mary Buchanan Randolph, born about 1821; died infant. 

5. Mary Buchanan Randolph (No. 2), born about 1823; resides, unmar- 

ried, at Edge Hill, and is principal of the school there. She very 
much resembles the portrait of Thomas Jefferson (President U. S.) 

6. Ellen Wayles Randolph, born about 1825; married, about i860, Wil- 
■ Ham B. Harrison, of Upper Brandon, on James River, Charles City 

County, Virginia, and was his second wife. She resided at Edge 

Hill after the death of her husband. Two children, viz: 

(i) Jane Nicholas Harrison. 

(2) Jefferson Randolph Harrison. 

7. Maria Jefferson Carr Randolph, born about 1827; married, about 

1848, Charles Mason, and had : 

(i) Jefferson Randolph Mason; removed to San Antonio, Texas. 
(2) Lucy Roy Mason. 

(3. John Enoch Mason, Commonwealth's Attorney, King George 
County, Virginia. 

8. Caroline Ramsay Randolph, born about 1828; resided, unmarried, at 

Edge Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia. 

9. Thomas Jefferson Randolph, Jr., eldest son, born at Edge Hill, Albe- 



DUNGEXESS. 243 

marie County, Virginia, about 1830; removed to Shadwell, same 
county; he married, first, about 1854, Mary Walker Meriwether, 
who died July, 1863. leaving: 
(i) Frank Meriwether Randolph; married Charlotte Macon. 

(2) Thomas Jefterson Randolph, jr. 

(3) Margaret Douglas Randolph; died young. 

(4) Francis Nelson Randolph; died young. 

(5) George Geiger Randolph. 

He married, secondly, in 1865, Charlotte N. Meriwether, and 
had one child, viz: Mary Walker Randolph. He was accident- 
ally killed by a blast on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, 
about 1870, aged about forty years. His second wife died 
about 1876. 

10. Dr. Wilson Gary Nicholas Randolph, born at Edge Hill, Albemarle 
County, Virginia, about 1832 ; removed to Charlottesville, same 
county. He married, about 1855, Mary Holliday, of that place, 
and had: * 

(i) Virginia Rawlings Randolph. 

(2) Wilson C. N. Randolph, Jr. 

(3) Mary Walker Randolph. 

(4) Julia Minor Randolph, 

II. Jane Nicholas Randolph, born about 1834; married, about 1855, R. 
Garlick H. Kean, and had: 
(i) Launcelot Kean. 

(2) Patsey Carv- Kean. 

(3) Jefferson Randolph Kean. 

(4) Robert Garlick Hill Kean, Jr. 

. 12. Meriwether Lewis Randolph, born at Edge Hill, Albemarle County, 
Virginia, about 1836; died there in 1870, aged about 34 years. He 
married, 1869, Anna Daniel, and died, leaving one child, that died 
infant. 
13. Sarah Nicholas Randolph, born at Edge Hill, Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, about 1838; unmarried. She removed to Mar}'land, and 
became the principal of the Patapsco Institute there. 

11. ISHAM Randolph, of Dungeness, on James River, Gooch- 
land County, Virginia, third son of William Randolph, of Yorkshire, 
England, and Turkey Island, Henrico County, Virginia, progenitor 
of the Randolph Family in Virginia, and Mary Isham, his wife, was 
born at Turkey Island about 1690. 



244 RANDOLPH FAMILY. 

He married, in 1717, Jane Rogers (or Rodgers), of Shadwell 
Street, London, England, and their children were: 

1. Jane Randolph, born in London, England, 1720; married, 1738, Peter 

Jefferson, of Shadwell, near the Rivanna River, Albemarle County, 
Virginia. This place was evidently named Shadwell after Shadwell 
Street, London, England, and not because shad-fish formerly came 
up the Rivanna River to that point. Of their children, were: 
(i) Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States of America, 
eldest, born 1743; died 4th July, 1S26, aged 83 years. Remar- 
ried, 1772, Martha, daughter of John Wayles, of The Forest, 
Charles City County, Virginia, and had two surviving children, 
viz: (a) Martha Jefferson; married, 1790, Governor Thomas 
Mann Randolph, of Edge Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia 
(father of Col. Thomas Jefferson Randolph, of the same place). 
• (d) Maria Jefferson; married, 1796, John Wayles Eppes, of 
Bermuda Hundred, Chesterfield County, Virgina, and had one 
child, viz: Francis Eppes, of Poplar Forest, Bedford County, 
Virginia, who married, first, 1822, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas Eston Randolph, of Ashton, Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, and had Jane, John, Jefferson, Rev. William and Eliza- 
beth. He married, secondly, Mrs. Crouch, by whom he had 
four or five children. 

(2) Randolph Jefferson. 

(3) Martha jefterson; married John Boiling. 

(4) Daughter Jefferson; married Dabney Carr. 

(5) Daughter Jefferson; married Lewis. 

(6) Daughter Jefferson: married Marks. 

2. Thomas Isham Randolph, eldest son; born at Dungeness, Gooch- 

land County, Virginia, about 1745; resided there. He married, 
about 1768, Jane, third child and daughter of Col. Archibald Cary. 

3. William Randolph, born about 1747; removed to Bristol. He mar- 

ried ^Lss Little. 

4. Mary Randolph; married, about 1770, Charles Lewis. 

5. Elizabeth Randolph; married, about 1771, John Railey. 

6. Dorothy Randolph; married, about 1773, John Woodson, of Gooch- 

land County, Virginia. 

7. Anne Randolph, born about 1755; tn-iiried, first, about 1775, Daniel 

Scott, by whom she had no issue. She married, secondly, Jona- 
than Pleasants, and had Samuel and Jane. She married, thirdly, 
James Pleasants, of Goochland County, Virginia, and had: 



DUNGENESS. 



245 



(i) James Pleasants, Governor of Virginia. 
(2) Susan Pleasants; married Carter Harrison, 



of Clifton, and had 
about 1777, Carter 



8.' Susanna Randolph, born about 1757; married, 
Harrison, of Clifton, and had: 
<- / (0 Robert Harrison, ancestor of Carter H. Harrison, the Mayor of 

Chicago. "i- 'i'*--' . -v . i ' .'•'!^* ^-A, 

s" (k) DatKrriicrHarrison; married Bradley. 

;- ([) Dai^m^ Harrison; married Drew. 

■) (5) Thomas Harrison; killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe, Indiana, 

^ ' November 5ih, iSii. 

~' ' III. Thomas Isham Randolph, of Dungeness. on James River, 
Goochland County, Virginia, eldest son of Isham Randoph, of the 
same place, and Jane Rogers, his wife, was born there about 1745. 

-He married, about 176S, Jane, third child and daughter of Col. 
Archibald Cary,. of Ampthill, Chesterfield County, Virginia, and 
Mary Randolph, of Curl's, his wife. Their children were as fol- 
lows, viz: 

I. Archibald (called " Archie ") Cary Randolph, eldest, born about 1769, 
at Dungeness, Goochland County, Virginia. He married, about 
1784, Susan Burwel!, of Carter Hall, Clarke County, Virginia, 
and had: 

(i) Dr. Robert C. Randolph, of Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia; 
married, about 1830, Lucy, only child of William Wellford and 
Susan R. Nelson, his wife. (See Secretary Nelson.) They had: 
{a) Archie Randolph; {li) William Wellford Randolph; married, 
1863, Add Stewart, of King George County, Virginia; he died 
6th May, 1864: {c) Bettie Randolph, married Smith, of Clarke 
County, Virginia; {d) Philip Randolph; died at the University 
of Virginia, 1857; {e) Susie N. Randolph; married in Halifax 
County, Virginia; {/) Robert Cary Randolph, died in 1864; 
(^) Thomas Hugh Randolph, married Miss Page, of Clarke 
County, Virginia; {/i) Isham Randolph, engineer; (/) Polly 
Cary Randolph. 

(2) Susan Grymes Randolph; married, about 1S39, Dr. Robert 

Powell Page, of Saratoga, Clarke County, Virginia, and was his 
second wife. (See Page P'amily, Broadneck.) 

(3) Mary (called "Polly") Randolph. 



246 RANDOLPH FAMILY. 

2. Isham Randolph, born at Dungeness, Goochland Count}', V^irginia, 

about 1770; removed to Richmond, Virginia. He married, about 

1791, Miss Coupland, of the same place, and had: 

(i) Julia Randolph, born about 1803; married, ist February, 1827, 

Thomas Nelson Page, of Shelly, Gloucester Couniy, Virginia. 

(See Page Family, Rosewell.) 

(2) Jane Randolph. 

(3) Fannie P. Randolph, born about 1S07: married, 1827, William 
N. Page, of Ca Ira, Cumberland County, Virginia. (See Page 
Family, North End.) 

(4) D. Coupland Randolph, born about 1809; married, 1857, Har- 
riet R. Page, of Union Hill, Cumberland County, Virginia. 
(See Page Family, North End.) 

3. Mary Randolph, born about 1771; married, about 17S9, Randolph 

Harrison, of Clifton, Cumberland County, Virginia, and had four- 
teen children, which see below. 

4. Thomas Randolph. 

Mary Randolph, eldest daughter of Thomas. Isham Randolph, of Dun- 
geness, Goochland County. Virginia, and Jane Cary, his wife, was 
born about 1771, and married, about 17S9, Randolph Harrison, of 
Clifton, Cumberland County, Virginia. Their children were four- 
teen, as follows, viz: 

(i) Thomas Harrison, born about 1790; married, about, 18 15, 
Eliza Cunningham, and had: (a) Burleigh; (i) Archie; (c) Dr. 
Tom, of New Kent; {(/} Randolph, of California, grandfather of 
Miss Harrison, who married Drewry, of Drewry's Bluff; removed 
to Wesiover, Charles City County, Virginia. Also grandfather 
of Mrs. Carter Melford, of Sabine Hall, Lancaster Couniy, Vir- 
ginia. 
• (2) Carter Harrison, born about 1792; married, about 1817, Janetla 
Fisher, of Richmond, Virginia, and had many children. 

(3) Archie Harrison, born about 1794; married, first, about 1819, 
Miss Heth; and, secondly, date unknown, Fanny Taylor, who, 
becoming a widow, married Ellis, of Chicago. Archie Harri- 
son had three children, viz: (a) Mrs. Kidder Taylor; (d) ^hs. 
Robert Morrison; (c) Henry Harrison. 

(4) Randolph Harrison, of Elk Hill, Goochland County, Virginia, 

born about 1796; married, about 1821, Henningham Wills, 
and had: (a) Mrs. A. Gordon, of Baltimore, Maryland; (5) Mrs. 
A. Hagner, of Annapolis, Maryland; (c) Julian Harrison, of 
.Millview; (c/) Randolph Harrison, of Elk Hill. 



DUNGENESS. 247 

(5) Rev. Peyton Harrison, of Baltimore, Maryland, bom about 1798; 

married, first, Miss Carr, daughter of Judge Dabney Carr, who 
was a nephew of President Thomas Jefferson. He married, 
secondly, Ellen Smith, of Philadelphia. Had three sons and 
two daughters, all of whom died. 

(6) Jane Harrison, born about 1800; married, about 1820, William 

Fitzhugh Randolph, of Fauquier County, Virginia. 

(7) Mar)' Harrison, born about 1802; married, 1827, William B. 

Harrison, of Upper Brandon, on James River, Prince George 
County, Virginia, and was his first wife. Children: {ii) Ran- 
dolph Harrison, of Ampthill, Cumberland County, Virginia; 
married Harriet Hielman ; (i) Benjamin Harrison, of The 
Rowe, Charles City County, Virginia; married, 1854, Polly R. 
Page (see Page Family, North End); (c) Shirley Harrison; (d) 
Dr. George Harrison, of Washington, D. C; married, 1876, 
Jennie, daughter of Dr. Robert Stone, of that city, and Marga- 
ret Ritchie, his wife. Dr. Stone was the first physician to see 
President Lincoln after the assassination. Dr. George Harri- 
son and Jennie Stone, his wife, have several children. 

(8) Lucy Harrison, born about 1806; married March, 1S2S, Nelson 
Page, of the Fork, Cumberland County, Virginia, and had Mary 
(called " Polly "), and Lucius, (See Page Family, North End). 

(9) Catherine Lilbourne Harrison, born about 1808; married, about 

1830, John S. McKim, of Baltimore, i\Iar}Iand, and had: (a) 
Mary McKim; (d) ^Margie McKim; and {c) Rev. Randolph 
Harrison McKim, of Harlem, New York; married, 1S62, Miss 
Phillips, of Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia. They have sev- 
eral children. 

(10) Willianna Harrison (called "Willie ''), born about iSio; mar- 
ried, about 1834, Henry Irving, who removed to Califoi^ia. 
They had one son, who died. 

(u) Susanna Harrison, born about 1812; married, about 1832, Rev. 
Samuel Blaine; she removed, with her son, Randolph Blaine, 
to Louisville, Kentucky. 

(12) Nannie Harrison, born about 1814; married, about 1840, Boil- 
ing Garrett, of Cloverplains, Albemarle County, Virginia, and 
had three charming daughters. 

(13) Virginia Harrison; died at the age of fifteen years. 

(14) William Mortimer Harrison; was drowned in the Rivanna River, 

Albemarle Count\-, Virginia, and was buried at Monticello. His 



248 RANDOLPH FAMILY. 

father, who, with his son William and other members of the 
family, were visiting Edge Hill, same county, informed the fam- 
ily that he had seen his son William, in a dreum, struggling 
in the water. Before bedtime a messenger came with the 
fatal news. 

II. Sir Joh\ Randolph, of Williamsburg, James City County, 
Virginia, fourth son and child of William Randolph, of Yorkshire, 
England, and Turkey Island, Henrico County. Virginia, progenitor 
of the Randolph Family in Virginia, and Mary Isham, his wife, was 
born at the last-named place in 1693, and died 15th March, 1737, 
aged 44 years. Upon a mural tablet that was placed to his memory 
in William and Mary College, destroyed by fire in 1859 (the college 
has been partially burned a number of times — usually from careless 
management), he was called "Johannes Randolph, Eques." It is 
proper, therefore, in speaking of him to say Sir John Randolph, as 
he was Eques or Knight, and not Armiger or Esquire, nor Gener- 
osus, which signifies Gentleman or Gent. 

He married, about 1718, Susanna, daughter of Peter Beverly, 
of Gloucester County, Virginia, and sister of Elizabeth, the wife of 
William Randolph, the eldest son, who was known as Councilor 
Randolph. According to the above-mentioned mural tablet. Sir 
John Randolph and Susanna Beverly, his wife, had the following 
children: 

1. John Randolph, born at Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia, 

about 1 7 19; married, about 1744, iNIiss Jennings. 

2. Peyton Randolph, born at Williamsburg, Jam'-s City County, Virginia; 

died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 22d Oct'r, 1775, aged 53 years. 
He was Attorney-General for Virginia, Speaker of the Virginia House 
of Burgesses, and President of the First American Congress. Mar- 
ried Elizabeth Harrison. No issue. 

3. Beverly Randolph, married Miss Wormelcy. 

4. Mar}' Randolph, bom at Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia, 

married, about 1743, Philip Grymes, of Middlesex County, Virginia. 

Children: 

(i) Philip Grv-mcs, Jr., married, about 1762, Elizabeth, daughter of 

William Randolph, of Wilton, and .\nne Harrison, his wife. 
(2) Lucy Gr}mes, married, about 1761, Gov. Thomas Nelson, of 

Yorktown, York Countv, Virginia. 



WILLIAMSBURG — CURL'S NECK. 249 

(3) Susan Givmes, married Nathaniel Biinvell, of The Grove. 

(4) Mary- Gnmes, married, about 1777, Robert Nelson, of Malvern 
Hill, Charles City County, Virginia, younger brother of Gov. 
Thomas Nelson, and was his first wile. There were perhaps 
others. 

III. John Randolph, of Williamsburg. James City County, 
Virginia, eldest son and child of Sir John Randolph, of the same 
place, and Susanna Beverly, his wife, fourth son and child of Wil- 
liam Randolph, of Yorkshire, England, and Turkey Island, Henrico 
County, Virginia, progenitor of the Randolph Family in Virginia, 
and Mary Isham, his wife, was born at the first-named place about 
1719. 

He married, about 1744, Ariana, daughter of Edmund Jennings, 
of Annapolis, Maryland, and their children were as follows: 

1. Edmund Randolph, born at Williamsburg, James City County, Vir- 

ginia, about 1745; did not follow his father to England when the war 
of the American Revolution broke out, but remained, and was 
adopted by his uncle, Peyton Randolph, who was President of the 
First American Congress. 

Edmund Randolph was the First Attgrney-Gener.^l of the 
United States of America, and was also Governor of the State of 
Virginia. He married, in 1796, Elizabeth, daughter of R. C. Nich- 
olas, and had: 
(i) Peyton Randolph, married Maria Ward. 

(2) Daughter Randolph, married P. V. Daniel. 

(3) Daughter Randolph, married Preston. 

(4) Daughter Randolph, married Bennet Taylor, of Albemarle 

County, Virginia. 

2. Arianna Randolph, born at Williamsburg, James City County, 

Virginia, about 1750; went with her father to England when the war 
broke <iut. She married Ralph Wormeley. Their son was an Ad- 
miral in the British Navy. He had three daughters, viz: {a) Mrs. 
Latimer, of Baltimore, Maryland: (<5) Catherine Preble Wormeley, 
resides at Newport, R. 1; (r) Arianna, married Daniel S. Curtis, of 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

II. Richard Randolph, of Curl's Neck, on James River, 
Henrico County, Virginia, fifth son and child of William Randolph, 
of Yorkshire, England, and Turkey Island, Henrico County, Vir- 



250 RAN'DOLril FAMILY, 

ginia, progenitor of the Randolph Family in Virginia, and Mary 
Isham, his wife, was born at Turkey Ishmd. Virginia, about 1695. 

He married, about 1720. Jane, daughter of John BolHng, of 
Bolhngbrook. Chesterfield Count\-. Virginia, and Mary Kennon.'his 
wife. Jane Hollmg was of the fourth generation in' descent from 
Pocahontas. Richard Randolph and Jane Boiling, his wife, had: 

1. Richard Randolph, Jr., born at Curl's Neck, about 1721; married, 

about 174^, Anno, daui^hter of David Meade, of Xansemond Countv, 
\'irginia. 

2. Mary Randolph, born at Curl's Neck, about i;.';; married, 31st ^l\y, 

1744, Cul. Arciiibald Car>-. of Ampthill, Chesterfield Countv, Vir- 
ginia. Of their children, 'Slavy Cary (called "Polly"), married 
Major Carter Pa-e, ot dhe Fork, Cumberland County, Virginia, and 
was his tir.-t uife. 

3. Jane Randolph, born about i72g; married, about 1750, Anthony 

Walke, of Princess Anne County, Virginia. Their son was Rev. 
Antliuiiy Walke. 
7. John Raiidolj.li (ih.cre were three others b-f.re him), born at Curls 
Neck, Henrico County, Virginia, about 1737; removed to Cawson's, 
probably ihc same county. He married, about 1769, Frances, 
daughter of d'hcxlnck Pland, and liad: 
(i) Richard RaiKh,I[)h, of lii/arre. burn about 1770; married, 1790, 

his couMH Judith, daughter of Thomas Mann Randolph, of 

Tuckahoe. 

(2) Theodnek Randolph, born 1771; died 1792, single. 

(3) John- R.vndolph, of Roanoke, Charlotte County, Virginia, born 3d 

June, 1773. Died unmarried, in Philadelphia, 24th May, 1833. 
He was buried at Roanoke, his residence, in Charlotte County. 
Virginia, but his remains have since been removed to Holywood 
Cemeter}-, Richmond, Virginia. 

For further information in regard to the Randolphs, the reader is referred 
to the //is/ory of Bristol Parish, Dinwiddle County, Virginia, by Rev. Philip 
Slaughter, D. D. Published by Randolph k English, Richmond, Virginia, 
1879. 



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