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Full text of "Geneological [!] ... The Dinkins and Springs families in connection with the Kendrick, Fox, Ball, Alexander, Riddick, Smith, Hart and others"

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GENEOLOGICAL 



"We are all made of the shreds and patches 
of many ancestors.'' 






^EHQUo^ 




QUQDAB OMNIBUS 



The Dlnkins and Springs Families 



— In Connection with the- 



Kendrick, Fox, Ball, Alexander, Riddick, 
Smith, Hart and Others* 



By CAPTAIN JAMES DINKINS. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

1908. 



PICAYUNE 










( tY»o jSffSSfc o^neT^) 










JOB PRINT 






Gift 
Au'.h^r 
(Pt • • 

J A; 



...EXPLANATION.. 



h 



During a visit to Washington a few months back, I spent 
some time at the Congressional Library, searching records in 
connection with a subject in which it was necessary to trace 
the geneology of a very prominent family. I could find 
nothing whatsoever relating to them, and expressed surprise 
to one of the librarians that such was the case. "Why," he 
replied, "the Southern people have been, and are still, very 
negligent in making record of such matters. They seem to 
be satisfied themselves with their pedigrees, and are indif- 
ferent about what they term the ignorance of others." 

Upon a closer investigation I was unable to find any 
record of many of our most distinguished families, and I 
determined then, as far as I was able, to compile in durable 
form, the geneology of my own family, and that of my wife. 
I felt impelled by a sense of duty to my children and to the 
younger members of both families, to do so. 

There is much information relating to dates, etc., which I 
have not been able to obtain, but the within will serve to 
establish a basis for further records. 

JAMES DINKINS. 

New Orleans, La., Feb. 20, 1908. 



THE DINKINS FAM 



COMPILED BY CAPTAIN JAMES DINKINS, 
OF NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



Many years ago I had the pleasure of knowing a gentle- 
man (Mr. De Courcey) who had spent much time and energy 
in investigating the origin of family names, and other sub- 
jects, in the old world. 

He was ;. man of learning and wide information. Mr. 
De Courcey stated that the name "Dinkins" originated in 
Wales about A.D. 1500, and signified "The Devil in the 
Bush." 

The people thus characterized were evidently "Bush- 
whackers," who resisted the government for some supposed 



w rong. 



So it seems the original Dinkins came from Wales, and 
have it from tradition, they moved into the lowlands of 

Scotland in the Kith Century, from whence they were driven 

into Londonderry in the north of Ireland. 

Three brothers, James, John and Samuel, and two 
cousins, Thomas and Joshua, landed at Charleston, S. C, in 
October, 1717. 

We can find no trace of them afterwards in South Caro- 
lina for fifty or more years, except that Captain Sam Dinkins 
idently a son or grandson of one of the brothers) is men- 
tioned as Captian in .Marion's famous Cavalry. He dis- 
tinguished himself for bravery on many fields. 

It seems they removed to North Carolina and settled in 
Mecklenburg County, for about 1740 we find the names of 
James, John and Joshua Dinkins in the records there. 

James, John, Richard and Thomas Dinkins were soldiers 
in the Revolutionary War from Mecklenburg County, N. C, 
and .lames Dinkins. son of John Dinkins and Fannie Hen- 
derson, ami husband of Lucy Kendrick, was a member of 
Captain James Wilson's company first regimenl Mecklenburg 
troops m the War of L812. -"Alexander's History of Mecklen- 
burg." 

John Dinkins married Fannie Henderson in 1751. 

« 







MISS LYNN DINKINS ROBINSON 

The Youngest Member of the Dinkins Family 



Their daughter, Martha, born 1766, married John Ken- 
drick, born 1764, in 1785. 

Their son, Joshua, born 1770, married Obedience Ken- 
drick, born 1773, in 1803. 

Their son, James, born 1772, married Lucy Kendrick, 
born 1775, in 1793. 

Their son, Frederick, born 1778, married Cynthia 
Springs, born 1783, in 1802. 

James Dinkins' and Lucy Kendrick 's children were 

Lewis, born 1798, married, first, Harriet Erwin in 1821; 
she died 1827. Second, married Elizabeth Patterson, 1829. 
She died 1858. He died 1868. 

Sarah, born 1800, married Wm. Branch. 

Louisa, born 1802, married first, Richard Dinkins (her 
cousin) in 1820; he died. Second, married Alfred Gallo- 
way; he died 1857. She died 1873. 

Rufus Kendrick, born 1804, killed in duel at Canton, 
Miss., 1837. 

Lucinda, born 1812, married Lewis G. Slaughter. 

Alexander Hamilton, born 1815, married Cynthia Din- 
kins Springs, born 1822, in 1842. He died Oct. 1, 1872. 
She died March 4, 1870. 

Alexander Hamilton Dinkins, son of James Dinkins, and 
Lucy Kendrick, his wife, and Cynthia Dinkins Springs, 
daughter of Wm. P. and Margaret P. Springs, his wife, 
were married in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, in 
1842. 

They reared six children : 

James, born 1845, married Sue E. Hart, born 1844, in 
1866. 

Margaret Springs, born 1846, married John L. Hender- 
son in 1866. She died 1879. 

Wm. Leonidas, born 1849, married Kate Mc Willie, born 
1855, in 1874. 

Sarah Tallulah, born 1852, married John B. Kemp in 
1872. No children. 

Blandina Baxter, born 1854, married E. A. Lindslev in 
1878. She died 1880. No children. 

Hamilton Charles, born 1857, married Willie Tunstall 
in 1886. 

James Dinkins and Sue E. Hart were married Novem- 
ber 15th, 1866. 

Their son, Lynn Hamilton, was born in Madison County, 
Mississippi, August 15th, 1867. 

Their daughter, Myriam Cynthia, was born in Madison 

s 



County, Mississippi. December 6th, 1870. Married C. G. 
Robinson, of Charlottesville, Va., in 1003. 

Their son, Karl Jeffrey, born February 3rd, 1887, in 
Madison County, Mississippi, died February 3rd, 1891. 



Margarel Springs Dinkins and John L. Henderson's chil- 
dren : 

Pauline, bom 1868, died 1869. 

Lee Dinkins, born 1870, died 1879. 

JOHN Hamilton, born 1872. 

I, ri. a ElEMP, born 1871. married^ Meeks. 

Charles Coolidge, born 1876, died 1876. 



W. L. Dinkins' and Kate McWillie's children 
Ke.mi- McWillie, born 1876, died 1904. 
Louisi; Springs, born 1877. 
Kittie Lee, born 1879. 
Lucy Calhoun, born 1885. 
Suenette, born 1892. 



II. C. Dinkins' and Willie Tunstall's children 
William Tunstall, born 1889. 
John Hamilton, born 1893. 



Alexander Hamilton Dinkins and Cynthia Spring 
Dinkins. his wife Lived in Madison County, Mississippi, from 
ih.' (kite <it' their marriage (1842) until their deaths in 1870 
and L872, during which time they won the love and confidence 
of all who knew them. 

They took an active interest in everything which con- 
tributed to the happiness and welfare of their neighbors, 
isted many worthy persons in starting life, and 
educated Numerous boys and girls whose parents were unable 
to do so. 

As an evidence of the high regard in which they were 
held, nearly all their neighbors named a child for Ihem. 
Several families having a Hamilton and Cynthia also. Dur- 
ing the war they employed their numerous slaves in making 
crops of breadstuffs and raising meats, which were freely 
distributed among the needy. 




JAMES DINKINS 

Taken at the time he joined the Confederate Army, April, 1861, 



The writer has often been told by men who were too 
old for military service, and by ladies also : 

"We do not know how we could have lived through 
the war without the bounties we received from Mr. and 
Mrs. A. H. Dinkins." 

"Natura lo fece e poi ruppe la Stampa." 




THE KENDRICK FAMILY 



IN CONNECTION WITH THE BALL AND DINKINS 
FAMILIES. 



(Arranged by Hon. Greene Kendriek, 146 Elm Street, West 
Haven Station, West Haven, Conn.) 



As far back as 1480 it was known that the Ball family 
came originally from Boechan, called Barkham, where 
William the Conqueror stayed his ruthless hand on the 
devastating march from the battle of Hastings. 

In the College of Arms, London, we find that "William 
Ball, Lord of the Manor, of Barkham, died in the year 
1480." 

From this William Ball, George Washington was eighth 
in descent. Mary Ball, his mother (whose mother first mar- 
ried a Johnson and had one daughter) was seventh, and 
Joseph Ball, Washington's great-grandfather was fifth. 

And I will now state how the Kendriek family comes 
into the Ball line, and, as a matter of course, in connection 
with George Washington, the Father of his Country: 

The last Col. William Ball alluded to was born in 
England in 1601, married Hannah Atherold, daughter of 
Thomas Atherold of Burgh in Suffolk. He was a lawyer 
at Grey's Inn, London. His wife was Mary Vesey, daughter 
of Thomas Vesey of Oldham (gentleman). 

Col. William Ball and Hannah Atherold married in 
London in 1634. They had three children — Richard, Joseph 
and Hannah, named for her mother. 

Col. William Ball came to Virginia with his wife and 
two children in 1638. He was named in the Northumber- 
land records in 1660 as William Ball (merchant). A part 
of his estate was called " Millenbeck. " 



Their son, JOSEPH BALL, 
born In England in 1636. 



Ills daughter, MARY BALL, 
married Augustine Washing- 
ton. 



Their first child 
GEORGE WASHINGTON. 



was 



COLONEL WILLIAM BALL, 
born in England in 1601. Mar- 
ried Hannah Atherold in Lon- 
don in 1634. Came to Lan- 
caster County, Virginia, in 
1638. 



Their daughter, HANNAH 
BALL (only daughter) born 
in Lancaster Co., Va. Mar- 
ried Captain David Fox, Jr. 



Their son, HENRY FOX, 
born in Lancaster Co., Va., 
married ANNA WEST, daugh- 
ter of Col. John West, Colonial 
Governor of Virginia , and 
granddaughter of Sir Thomas 
West, third Lord Delaware, or 
De la Ware. 



Their son, RICHARD FOX, 
born in King William County, 
Virginia, in 1701. Married 
Hannah Williamson, of Sur- 
rey County, Virginia; settled 
in Brunswick, later in Lunen- 
burg County. 



Their daughter, AMY FOX, 
married John Kendrick. 



William Kendrick, father of John Kendrick, was born in 
King William County, Virginia, 1704. He married Sarah 
Jones, of Suffolk in 1726. She was first cousin to Martha 
Jones Dandridge, mother of Martha Washington. 

William Kendrick 's father was John Kendrick of County 
Gloucester, Virginia, born 1670, died 1715. 

John Kendrick, son of William Kendrick, of King Will- 
iam County, Va., and Sarah Jones, of Suffolk, born 1735, 
and Amy Pox, daughter of Col. Richard Fox, of King Will- 
iam County, Va., and Hannah Williamson, of Surry County, 
Va . born 1740, were married in 1760. Their children: 

JOHN, born 1764, married Martha Dinkins 1785; he 
died 1825. 

(Jki.i m:. their son, bom 1798, died 1873. 

JOHN, their smi, born 1825 in Charlotte, N. C, was Gov- 
ernor of Connecticut in L853. lie died 1877 in Waterburv, 
( lonn. 

Greene Kendrick, son of John Kendrick, born 1851; 
i in New Eaven ( lonn. 

10 




JAMES DINKINS 

Nineteen Years of Age 
Captain, General Chalmers Escort Company, First Division Forrest Cavalry 



Obedience, bora 1773, first married John Osborne; he 
died 1801. Second married, Joshua Dinkins. 

Lucy born 1775, married James Dinkins 1793; he died 
1825 ; she died 1849. 



It will be noticed that John Kendrick and his two 
sisters, Obedience and Lucy, married Martha, Johsua and 
James Dinkins. Three Kendricks married three Dinkins. 

In this connection it is proper to make mention 
of Amy Fox, who was acknowledged to be the most beautiful 
and accomplished Avoman in Virginia in her time 

She was remarkable for her happy disposition and bril- 
liant mind. Stories or her wit and other accomplishments 
are traditional in Virginia and North Carolina even now. 

After her death many beautiful tributes were written 
by eminent persons upon her life and character. 

James Dinkins' and Lucy Kendrick 's children: 

Lewis, bora 1798, married first Harriet Erwin in 1821; 
she died 1827; second married Elizabeth Patterson 1829; 
she died 1858; he died 1868. 

Sarah, born 1800, married Wm. Branch. 

Louisa, born 1802, married first Richard Dinkins (her 
cousin) in 1820; he died. Second married Alfred Galloway; 
he died 1857. She died 1873. 

Rupus, Kendrick, born 1804, killed in duel at Canton, 
Miss., 1837. 

Lucinda, born 1812, married Lewis G. Slaughter. 

Alexander Hamilton, born 1815, married Cynthia 
Dinkins Springs, born 1822, in 1842. 



Alexander Hamilton Dinkins, son of James Dinkins, 
and Lucy Kendrick, his wife, and Cynthia Dinkins Springs. 
daughter of Wm. Polk Springs and Margaret P. Springs, his 
wife, were married in Mecklenburg County, N. C, in 1842. 
They reared six children: 

James, born 1845, married Sue E. Hart., born 1844, in 
1866. 

Margaret Springs, born 1846, married John L. Hender- 
son in 1866; she died 1879. 

Wm. Leonidas, born 1849, married Kate McWillie, born 
1855, in 1874. 

Sarah Tallulah, bom 1852, married John B. Kemp in 
1872. No children. 

Blandina Baxter, born 1854, married E. A. Lindsley in 
1878; she died 1880. No children. 

Hamilton Charles, bora 1857, married Willie Tunstall 
in 1886. 

ii 



11 



THE SPRINGS FAMILY 



(Compiled by Captain James Dinkins from notes and 
records of old family bibles, and with valuable assistance 
from Mrs. Harriet M. Irwin, a worthy and highly prized 
member of the family, and from Alexander's History of 
Mecklenburg County.) 



We have it from tradition that the original name was 
Springstine, and that this family, also the Bleeckers, Bre- 
vards and Baxters came from Holland in the Sixteenth 
Century, and settled on Long Island, New York. We are 
told that the name Springstine was anglicized into Springs, 
soon after reaching America. At any rate, among the 
oldest streets in New York are Springs Street and Bleecker 
Street. That the Springs and Bleeckers, Brevards and Bax- 
ters intermarried is set forth in the records. The first re- 
liable information of the date of birth of any of the family, 
is that of John Springs, born on Long Island, New York, in 
1717. 

John Springs, at the age of 18, moved to Jones Neck, 
near New Dover, Delaware, and from thence to Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania; and in 1768 removed to Mecklenburg County, 
N. C, where he died at the age of 72. He married Sophia 
Cassaway, of Maryland. They had two sons, John and Rich- 
ard, and three daughters, Harriet, who married Dempsey, 
Eleanor married Henderson, and was mother of Chief Jus- 
tice Henderson ; Sophia married Black ; John married Sarah, 
daughter of Adam Alexander and Sarah Shelby, 1780. 

Richard Springs, the second son, was born in Jones 
Neck, Delaware, on October 22nd, 1754, and was 14 
years old when his parents removed to Mecklenburg County, 
N. C. He married Jane Baxter, of Lancaster, Penn., June 7, 
1781, and in 1784 settled in life at Big Sugar Creek, on the 
Catawba lands in Lancaster District, S. C. 

Richard Springs was a Revolutionary soldier, and was 
famous as Captain of a company which assisted in driving 
Cornwallis from Mecklenburg County. His company was a 
part of the column which the British dubbed ' ' The Hornets. ' ' 

Richard Springs and Jane Baxter reared a family of 
nine children. Ho di^d in 1833, after an honorable and 
successful life, in his 80th year. 

13 



John Springs, son of Kichard Springs and Jane Baxter, 
was born in Mecklenburg County, X. C., Dec. 24, 1782, and 
was two years of age when his parents removed to Lancaster 
Dim.. S. C. 

In 1808 he married his cousin, Mary Springs, daughter 
of Ins uncle John, and removed to York District, locating 
upon a farm known as "Springfield Plantation,." near Fort 
Mills, and remained there during his life. 

Be became very wealthy and was a man of great influ- 
ence. At the time of his death he was reputed to be the 
wealthiest man in his State. He took an active part in indus- 
trial improvements, and built many manufacturing enter- 
prises, lie was also an active politician, having served 
s< vera] terms in the Legislature. He was the agent of the 
Catawba [ndian tribe and was regarded by them as a true 
friend and adviser. He organized the first bank in South 
Carolina and was a director in several others. 

He was three times married but had no issue, except 
with his lirst wife. Mary Springs. They had three sons 
and two daughters. He died in 1853, at 72 years of age. 
The other children of Richard Springs and Jane Baxter were 

Cynthia, born May 30, 1784, married Frederick Dinkins. 

Andrew, born .Jan. 3, 1786, married Mary Moore. 

Richard, horn Jan. 10, 1788. 

Jam:, born Feb. 11, 1790, married Thos. Grier. 

El i. born March 14, 1792, married Tigert Craig. 

SOPHIA, bom April 27, 1794, married James Moore. 

Margaret IV. born April 12, 1796, married her cousin, 
Wm. Polk Springs, son of John Springs and Mary Alexan- 
der. 

Baxter, horn Feb. 11. 1798. 

II \i;kii:t B., horn Dee. 27, 1802, married Dr. Wm. Moore. 



The children of John Springs and Mary Springs were: 

RICHARD, A., married -lane Hobo. 

Mar's I,., married Brevard Davidson. 

Leroy, married Amanda Moore. 

Baxter, married Blandina Baxter. 

Sophia, married Wm. Meyers. 



Wm. Polk Springs, son of John Springs and Sarah 
Alexander, was horn March 7, 1790. He married his cousin 
Margarel Polk Springs, born April 12, 17!)(i, in 1811, and die,! 
m L829. Margarel I'., his wife, died Sept. 28, 1871. 

Their children : 

Leonora, born Nov. 6, 1813, married Chas. J. Harris. 
WILLIAM L, horn Aug. 15, 1816, married Mary David. 
Cynthia, horn De,-. i;. L822, married A. II. Dinkins, 1842 
John L., horn Sept. 1l\ L824, died Nov. 17, 1867. 

14 



Sarah L., born Aug. 22, 1826, died Sept. 28, 1900, 
married first Jas. Davidson, second Zena Grier; no children. 

Margaret B., born Nov. 12, 1828, died March 27, 1903, 
married Rev. Dr. Samuel C. Pharr. 

Alexander Hamilton Dinkins, son of James Dinkins and 
Lucy Kendrick, his wife, and Cynthia Dinkins Springs, 
daughter of Wm. P. Springs and Margaret P. Springs, his 
wife, were married in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, 
in 1842. 

Their children: 

James, born April 18, 1845. married Sue E. Hart, in 
1866. 

Margaret Springs, born 1846, married John L. Hender- 
son in 1866. She died 1879. 

Wm. Leonidas, born 1849, married Kate McWillie, born 
1855, in 1874. 

Sarah Tallula, born 1852, married John B. Kemp in 
1872. No children. 

Blandina Baxter, born 1854, married E. A. Lindsley 
in 1878; she died 1880. No children. 

Hamilton Charles, born 1857, married Willie Tunstall 
in 1886. 



James Dinkins and Sue E. Hart were married Nov. 15, 
1866, at Canton, Mississippi. 

Their son, Lynn Hamilton, born in Madison County, 
Mississippi, August 15, 1867. 

Their daughter, Myriam Cynthia, born in Madison 
County, Mississippi, Dec. 6, 1870, married C. G. Robinson, 
of Charlottesville, Va., in 1903. 

Their son, Earl Jeffrey, born February 3, 1887, in Madi- 
son County, Mississippi, died July 3, 1891. 



Margaret Springs Dinkins and John L. Henderson's 
children : 

Pauline, born 1868, died 1869. 

Lee Dinkins, born 1870, died 1879. 

John Hamilton, born 1872. 

Lula Kemp, born 1874, married Meeks. 

Charles Coolidge, born 1876, died 1876. 



W. L. Dinkins' and Kate McWillie 's children 

15 



Remp M< Willie, bum 1870, died 1904. 
Louise Springs, born 1877. 
Ki rni: Lee, born 1879. 
Li/cy Calhoun, born 1885. 
Sitenette, born 1892. 



II C. Dinkins' and Willie Tunstall's children 
Wiii. i am Tunstall, born 1889. 
John Hamilton, born 1893. 




THE ALEXANDER FAMILY 



IN CONNECTION WITH THE SPRINGS FAMILY. 



From Wheeler's History of North Carolina, Hunter's 
Sketches of Western X. C, and From family records. 



The Alexanders, as numerous almost as the sands, were 
quite prominent during the Eevolution. 

Poote relates "that among Presbyterian emigrants from 
Scotland to Ireland to escape persecution for conscience sake, 
from Kilo to KiSS, there were seven brothers who sought quiet 
in the New World. They all landed safely on Manhattan 
[sland, where some remained, while others wandered into 
Xew Jersey, and thence to Cecil County, Maryland, and 
(heir children moved into Pennsylvania. 

It is relate< 1 thai Win. Alexander, known as Lord Ster- 
ling, a Major General of the Revolution, descended from one 
of the brothers who remained on Manhattan. 

A 1 m mi 1745, the Alexanders and the families into which 
they had married, in great numbers, migrated from Penn- 
sylvani and Maryland to the Catawba Country, following the 
greal Valley of Virginia. The movement continued until 
1760. 

Prominent among those referred to were Hezekiah and 
John MeKnilf Alexander, brothers, and Abraham, Adam 
Charles and Ezra Alexander were brothers, and cousins of the 
two lirsi mentioned. 

Col. Adam Alexander, one of the signers of the Meck- 
lenburg Declaration of Independence, and further known to 
history by hisjnilitary service, was horn in Cecil County, Md., 
Sept. 24, 1728 of Scotch Irish parents. He married Sarah 
Shelby, of Bolston County, Md.. a sister of General Evan 
Shelby and of Col. Isaac Shelby. The latter, the hero of 
King's Mountain, and afterwards first Governor of Ken- 
tucky, There were many branches of the Alexanders, all 
Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, who settled in North and South 
< iarolina. 

Colonel Adam Alexander settled in what is known as 
Clear Creek neighborhood, X. C. where his family wor- 
shipped at Rock Springs Church. 

18 




CAPTAIN JAMES DINKINS AND WIFE 



On Dec. 18, 1775, Adam Alexander was appointed 
Lieutenant Colonel of a battalion of minute men, and Thos. 
Polk, Colonel, with Charles McLain, Major, by the Provin- 
cial Congress held at Johnstown Courthouse. 

Within a short time, and at the suggestion of Col. Polk, 
it was ordered that delegates be sent to Charlotte to sit in 
council and take such action as might seem advantageous to 
the Colonies. Among those selected was Adam Alexander, 
the subject of this sketch, who, together with his co-laborers 
drew up and signed the resolutions which constitute the 
famous Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. 

On the 4th day of April, 1776, he was appointed Col- 
onel by the Provincial Congress, held at Halifax, and placed 
in command of the troops of Mecklenburg County. 

His force became a terror to the British. He was a gal- 
lant officer. His name appears frequently in the Church 
and State records of North Carolina as a man of the highest 
character. The old slab which marks his grave, beside that 
of his wife, in the old Rock Springs graveyard, bears this 
inscription : 

COLONEL ADAM ALEXANDER, 

Patriot and Soldier, departed this 
life Nov. 13, 1798. 

Adam Alexander and Sarah Shelby had six children : 
Evan Shelby, Isaac, Charles Taylor, Sarah, Catharine and 
Mary. 

His oldest son, Evan Shelby, was a graduate of Princeton 
in 1787, a lawyer and a member of Congress from Saulsbury 
district, 1805-1809. 

Sarah married Captain John Springs, son of John 
Springs and brother of Richard Springs. 

Decsendants of Col. Adam Alexander and John Springs 
quite numerous, are living .in North Carolina, the Erwins. 
Myers, Davidsons, Harris, Pharrs, Baxters, Brevards, Alex- 
anders and Springs. 

The Sp/ings family has been from the earliest period 
well-to-do, thrifty people. John and Richard Springs were 
both large land-owners, and were the first to operate a gold 
mine in North Carolina. 

They coined their gold into money, without alloy, by 
consent of the Government, a few pieces of which are still in 
possession of members of the family. 

The descendants of John and Richard Springs have 
contributed as much to the upbuilding of North 
Carolina, and possibly more, than any family in 
the State. They have honored every profession — lawyers, 
doctors, bankers, planters and merchants. 

19 



\ 



THE RIDDICK FAMILY 



IN CONNECTION WITH THE TEMBLE, CUNNINGHAM, BARRON, 
SMITH AND OTHER FAMILIES OF VIRGINIA. 



Copied from an Old Bible of Lemuel Riddick, Now Owned 
by Hon. R. R. Smith, of Suffolk, Va. 



The Bible was printed by John Baskett, printer to the 
university, MDCCVII. 

Lemuel Riddick was born August 23, in the year 1711. 

Anna Riddick, wife of Lemuel, was born April 1715. 

Lemuel and Anna were married Dec. 17th, 1729. 

Edward Riddick, son of the above, was born Jan. 29th, 
1735. 

Edward Riddick married Margaret, the daughter of 
Captain Henry Temble, January last, and she was delivered 
of a female child on the third day of this inst., Nov. 3rd, 
1760, and the mother departed this life Saturday morning, 
last the 15th inst., and is this day buried at her father's 
plantation, Nansemond County, Virginia. 

Edward Riddick departed this life September, 1783. 
My son Edward's daughter was baptized and named Mar- 
garet, on third day of June, 1761. 

Samuel Barron Cunningham and Margaret Riddick 
were married the 27th of September, 1778. 

Ann Cunningham, daughter of Samuel B. Cunningham 
and Margaret, his wife, was born the 13th day of October, 
1781. 

Washington Smith, of Somerton, Virginia, born Aug- 
ust 11th, 1777, and Ann Cunningham, were married the 3rd 
of January, 1799. 

Sophia Emeline Smith, daughter of Washington Smith 
and Ann, his wife, was born the 3rd of January, 1813. 

Washington Smith departed this life April 14th, A. D. 
1835, leaving a second wife and eleven children. 

Ann Cunningham Smith, consort of Washington Smith, 
of Somerton, Virginia, departed this life the 4th of June, 
1816. 

Captain John Drew Hart and Sophia Emeline Smith 
were married on the 18th day of October, 1834. 

21 

/ 



/ 



John Drew Hart, son of John Hart, and Susan Boone, 
was bora January 12th, 1802, in South Hampton County, 
Virginia. 

Their children: 

John W. Hart, born October 13th, 1835, died 1848. 

Robert II. Hart, born January 17th, 1838; married 
Agnes Cornelia, Magette, 1862. 

James E. Hart, bora May 24th, 1840. 

Ann C. Hart, born April 10th, 1842, married M. C. 
Daughtrey 1864; she died 1904. 

Susan Emeline Hart, born April 17th, 1844; married 
James Dinkins, of Mississippi, 1866. 

Mary S. Hart, born December 6th, 1846. married Rev. 
Wallace Carnahan 1871; died 1902. 

Sarah Jane Hart, born September 27th, 1848; married 
Hugh W. Virden. 

John D. Hart, born April 3, 1850; died 1855. 



SueE. Hart, fifth child and second daughter of Captain 
John D. Hart and Sophia Emeline, his wife, married James 
Dinkins, of Madison County, Mississippi, November 15th, 
1866. 

Captain John Drew Hart, son of John Hart and Susan 
Boone, descended from John Hart, of Pennsylvania, one of 
ihe signers of the American Declaration of Independence. 
Captain Hart moved from South Hampton County, Virginia, 
to Madison County, Mississippi, in 1855. He amassed a 
large fortune in lands and negroes, and at the outbreak of 
thf war in 1861 Avas one of the wealthiest men in the State. 

lb- was horn and reared an aristocrat, and during his en- 
tire life was honored by every person who knew him. He died 
in 1873 in his seventy-second year. 

Sophia E. Hart, wife of Captain John D. Hart, was 
known far and near for her charities. She made it a rule to 
visit each of her husband's plantations once a month, and 
gave her personal attention to the welfare of the negroes. 
She was one of God's greatest works, the writer speaks from 
personal knowledge, and feels a pride and satisfaction in 
being able to say. she never turned a way from any worthy 
appeal for assistance. 



• lames Dinkins, son of A. H. Dinkins and Cynthia 
Springs Dinkins. his wife, was born in Madison County, 
Mississippi, April 18th, L845. He attended a country school 
until I860, at which time he was entered at the North Caro- 
lina .Military Institute at Charlotte, X. C. 

He enlisted in the Confederate Army before his six- 

22 



teenth birthday, and served as a private in Company C, 
Eighteenth Mississippi Regiment, Griffiths-Barksdale 's Miss- 
issippi Brigade, until April 9th, 1863, when he was ap- 
pointed first Lieutenant of Cavalry in the Confederate 
States Army. He was appointed Aide-de-Camp to General 
James R. Chalmers in October, 1863, and served in that 
capacity until December 15th, 1864, at which time he was 
appointed Captain to command Company C, 18th Mississippi 
Cavalry, detailed as escort to General Chalmers. He was 
Captain of Cavalry at nineteen years of age. 

He participated in the battles of Bethel, Leesburg, Dam 
No. 2, New Kent Courthouse, Savage Station, Malvern Hill, 
Harpers Ferry, Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg, with Army 
of Northern Virginia, and Coldwater, Colliersville, Moscow, 
Okolona, Brice's Cross Roads, Oxford, Fort Pillow, Harris- 
burg, West Point, Memphis, Athens, Sulphur Springs, 
Paris Landing, Johnsonville, Herryville, Columbia, 
Springhill, Franklin, Nashville and Pulaski under Forrest. 
He participated in all the desperate and daring movements 
of General Forrest, and during the entire four years of the 
war was not sick nor wounded. He never missed a march 
nor an engagement in which his command was engaged, 
and was not quite twenty years of age when the war closed. 

Captain Dinkins published his experiences and recollec- 
tions of the Confederate War, in 1897. Title, "1861 to 1865, 
by an old Johnnie.'' 

He also wrote and published a history of "Forrest and 
his Cavalry" in 1902, and is the author of "The Southern 
Girl." 

Captain Dinkins, after the war, married Sue E. Hart, 
daughter of Captain John D. Hart, on November 15th, 1866, 
and lived on a plantation until 1874, when he entered the 
service of the New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern 
Railroad at Canton, Miss. This company was absorbed by 
the Illinois Central, and when the line was built to Aber- 
deen, Miss., Captain Dinkins was appointed agent of the 
company at that place.. In 1891 he was appointed agent 
of the Illinois Central Railroad at Memphis, and when that 
company purchased the Louisville, New Orleans and Texas 
Railroad in 1892, he was appointed Division Passenger 
Agent of all lines south of the Ohio River. He removed to 
New Orleans in 1899, and in 1903 participated in the organi- 
zation of the Bank of Jefferson, Gretna, La., opposite New 
Orleans, and at this time is Cashier of the Bank. 

Captain Dinkins has a son, Lynn H. Dinkins, who is 
president of the Interstate Trust and Banking Company, 
President New Orleans Real Estate Mortgage and Security 
Company and a member of the Finance Committee, Board 
of Directors New Orleans Railway Company. 

23 



M 



His daughter, Myriam Cynthia, married C. 6. Robin- 
son, of Virginia. 

Their daughter, Lynn Dinkins Robinson, the only grand- 
child, was born in Charlottesville, Virginia, on September 
22nd, 1905. and is therefore two years and five months old at 
this writing, February 20th, 1908. 



GENEOLOGICAL 




The Dinkins 
and Springs 
Families 



in connection 
with the 

KENDRICK RIDDICK 

FOX SMITH 

BALL HART 

ALEXANDER and Others 



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