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Full text of "Genera insectorum"

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26™ FASCICULE DIPTERA 



Genera 



Insectorum 



PUBLIES PAR 



P.WYTSMAN 



DIPTERA 

FAM. CULICIM 

by Fred. V. THEOBALD 

1905 



Prix : Fr 15. 



50 



On souscrit chez M. P. Wytsman. 108, Boulevard du Nord, Bruxelles. 
Prospectus gratis et franco sur demande. 



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■-,.--■- 



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DIPTERA 



FAM. CULICIDjE 



i 



DIPTERA 

FAM. CULICIDA 

by Fred. V. THEOBALD 

WITH 2 COLOURED PLATES 







.he family Culicida until recently was limited to a few genera and but comparatively few 
species were known, but owing to the important part they play in the spread of certain 
diseases (malaria, yellow fever, filariasis, etc.) great numbers have been collected during 
the last few years in all parts of the world. 

These great collections have necessitated the formation of many new genera and the employment 
of more definite characters for the old genera. 

Culicida? are known under a great variety of popular names, such as : Gnats, Mosquitoes, Galli- 
nippers, in Anglo-Saxon tongue; Moustiques, Cousin, Maringouin, in France; Zanzare and Zanzaroni, in 
Italy; in Germany, Stechmiicken ; Zancudos and Mosquitos, in South America; Mutchers, in India, etc. 

Linnaeus (i735j merely refers to the genus Culex (Syst. Nat.) and upon this genus with its type 
Cidex pipiens the family characters are founded. 

Meigen, in 1804 (Classs. und Beschr. der Europ. zweifliiglichen Insekten), separated the Mosquitoes off 
as Tipularitz culiciformes . 

Later Latreille (i825) grouped them under the name Culicides, which term was also employed 
by Macquart and Zetterstedt. So far only three genera were known, namely Anopheles, Culex and Acdes. 

In 1827, Robineau-Desvoidy, in his Essai stir la tribu des Culicides, added three more genera : 
Megarhinus, Sabethes and Psorophora. 

Stephens, in 1829 (Syst. Cat. Brit. Ins.), placed these insects in the family Culicida and since 
that date all Mosquitoes have been included under that name. 

The chief writings dealing with Culicida;, irrespective of the general works on Diptera are 



2 DIPTERA 

Robineau Desvoidy's Essai sur la tribu des Culicides, in 1827 ; Arribalzaga's description of Argentine Culicida; 
in the Dipterologia Argentina (Rev. del Museo de La Plata), in 1891 ; Ficalbi's Revizione sistematica delta 
famiglia delle Cnlicida Europea, in 1896, and Venti Specie die Zanzare (Culicidas) Italiane, in 1899. 

Arribalzaga added four new genera, namely Taniorhynchus, Janihinosoma, Ochlerotatns and Hetero- 
nycha. The two latter cannot be retained for reasons mentioned later. 

In rgoo, Giles published a Handbook of Gnats or Mosquitoes (Culicidae) which is mainly a compilation 
of the majority of previously described species. The work being of interest however as showing the 
chaotic state of the family at that time. 

In 1901, the Trustees of the British Museum published my Monograph of the Culicidce of the World 
and later, in 1903, a third volume of the same work. 

The enormous amount of material collected since 1900 in various parts of the world necessitated 
the formation of many new genera described in the last mentioned work. Since igo3 they have been 
further augmented. Some new genera are detailed here thus completing our present knowledge with 
the exception of those occurring in the collection of the National Museum of Hungary which will shortly 
appear in my catalogue of the collection. (Ann. Ungar. Nat. Mus. Vol. 3, igo5.) 

The generic characters were previously based on the palpi, the primary genera being distinguished 
as follow : Anopheles, palpi long in both sexes; Culex, palpi long in the cf, short in the 9 '> Aedes, 
palpi short in both sexes. 

Robineau Desvoidy's genera which are all very marked are referred to later and also Arribalzagas. 

The characters used in my recent classification are mainly based on the scales of the head, thorax, 
abdomen and wings. 

In igo3, Neveu-Lemaire proposed a modification of this classification useing also the palpal 
jointing for generic purposes, but for obvious raesons the squamose characters which can be seen in 
museum specimens with the aid of the microscope have been generally adopted. Jointing of the palpi 
can only be see in micro-preparations after the scales have been deunded. 

Characters of the Family. — Mouth parts prolonged into a piercing proboscis, composed of 
mandibles, maxillae, upper and lower lips and a tubular hypopharynx. 

Head clothed with variously formed scales. Thorax with hairs or scales, the metanotum usually 
nude but in some genera (Joblotia, Sabethes, etc.), with scales and chaetae or chaetae alone (Wyeomyia, 
Phoniomyia, etc.). 

Abdomen with either hairs, scales or both. Legs and veins of the wings in all cases clothed with 
scales of varied forms. Wings with six longitudinal veins (in one case seven : Heptaphlebomyia), costal 
vein carried completely around the border of the wing; two prominent fork-cells (i st submarginal and 
2 nd posterior cells). Legs with equal ungues in the 9 ; m the cf the fore and mid ungues unequal, 
hind equal. 

Antenna; in 9 usually plumose, but not always (Deinocerites, Sabethes, etc.), in the 9 pilose. Palpi 
variable, in form composed of from one to six segments. The proboscis usually straight (Culex, Anopheles) 
but may be curved (Megarhinus, etc.), jointed and elbowed {Limatus) or swollen (Mimomyia). Larva; and 
pupae aquatic, living in both salt and fresh water. 

Generic Characters. — The following are characters used as generic distinctions, in my 
Monograph of the Culicidce of the World and in subsequent writings. 

Scales. — These structures vary and are the most important characters to be noticed in grouping 
this family. The}- range in form from fine curved hair-like structures to broad flat plates. The following 
types of scales may be noticed : 

1. Flat or spatulate scales; 3. Broad Aedeomyia scales; 

2. Broad Mansonia scales; 4. Curved hair-like scales; 



FAM. CULICIDyE 3 

5. Narrow-curved scales; 12. Lanceolate scales; 

6. Spindle shaped scales; r.3. Linear scales; 

7. Small spindle shaped scales; 14. Tasniorhynchus-like scales; 
S. Inflated or parti-colored scales; i5. Melanoconion scales; 

9. Pyriform scales; 16. Cycloleppteron scales; 

10. Upright forked scales; 17. Heart shaped scales. 

1 1 . Twisted upright scales ; 

The head is ornamented in a variety of ways with the following scales — upright 
forked, flat spatulate, narrow-curved and spindle shaped, according to the genus. The eyes are large 
and reniform, the number of facets varying in the different species. (This is a useless character however 
as the eyes shrink and become so distorted that the facets cannot be counted.) 

The palpi vary very much in form and also in the number of joints not only in different species, 
but in the two sexes. They may be composed of one segment only (some Aedines) or of six segments 
(some Culicines); there are basal constrictions which sometimes may become joints. All stages in length 
occur from those as long or longer than the proboscis to those single jointed ones scarcely perceptable. 
It is thus impossible to use them as generic characters particularly as they vary even in the same species 
according to Xeveu-Lemaire. 

The antenna are pilose in the 9 m a U cases; in the male the}' are usually plumose, but in some 
genera (Sabethes, Deinoceriies, Wyecmyia, etc.) they are verticillate; the hairs being rather longer than in 
the 5 's. As a rule they are shorter than the proboscis but in one genus {Deinocerites) they are much longer. 
The basal segments may or may not be scaled. In one genus (Lophocerataomyia) (1) the antenna? in the (f 
have a curious sensory organ attached to them forming a distinct brush like process. The relative lengths 
o the basal joints is also of specific importance in the Megarhinina. 

The proboscis in the 9 ' s composed of an upper and lower lip, the latter ending in the so called 
lobelia, jointed processes of somewhat variable form, piobably the labial palps; these two parts form a 
sheath in which lie in the 9 four stylets, two being the mandibles and two the maxillae, and in addition 
a tubular organ the hypopharynx. In the 0* the mandibles and maxillae are much reduced but traces 
may be found in certain species. The tf 's however do not bite. In form the proboscis is usually straight 
and simple as long or longer than the body ; it may be curved (Megarhinina), straight (Culicinee) or elbowed 
and jointed (Limatus). In Uranotania it is usually swollen apically and in the allied Mimomyias much 
swollen along its apical half in the male sex. 

The thorax is divided into three well defined areas, the greater part being the mesonotum, in front 
lie two more a less prominent lateral lobes — the prothoracic lobes — behind this the metanotum and 
between it and the mesonotum is situated the scutellum. The scutellum is trilobed in most Culicidse 
{Culicines and Aedines) but in the Anophtlinis and Corcthrines it is simple. All parts are scaly, except in 
the A nopheles and Corethrina which may have hairs only on the thorax (Anopheles and Myzomyia). As a 
rule the prothorax in Culex is bristly and not scaly, whilst in the Stegomyias,, etc. distinct scales occur. 
In all Anophelina , Megarhinina and most Culicina the metanotum is nude, but in Joblotia it has scales 
and chaetae, as it also has in many Aedines {Sabethes, Limaius, etc.) The scutellum has chaetae bordering 
its edge (posterior border-bristles) these may vary in number in the same species (Culex faiigans) or 
they may be constant (certain Aedines), they cannot however be relied upon as specific characters. 

The abdomen may be nude (Anopheles) or partly scaled (Cellia, Nyssorrhynchns) or completely scaled 
(Aldrickia, Culex, etc.j, the scales may form a complete armour (Aldrichia, Culex, etc.) or may be loose 
and ragged (Mucidus;, occassionally there are lateral tufts of scales (Cellia), ventral tufts (Myzorhynchus) 
or caudal fans ( Megarhinus). The rj 1 abdomen is thinner than the 9 anQ ^ ' s usually (Culicines and 



, The description of this genus will be found in the Annales of the Nat. Mus. Hungary. Vol. 3. 1905. 



4 DIPTERA 

Anophclines) very hairy. The tf genitalia consist of claspers attached to basal segments which vary in 
each species. 

The wings have the veins clothed with scales and the posterior border fringed with the same. The 
scales vary in different genera. In most genera there are median vein-scales and lateral vein-scales; the 
scales may be uniformly colored [Culcx pipicns, etc.) or may be mottled (Grabhamia, etc.); in some (Theo- 
baldia) the} 7 are more dense in certain areas giving the wing a spotted appearance. Most Anophelines 
have spotted wings due to different colored scales and also a few Culicines (Lutsia and Culcx mimeticus) . 
There are six longitudinal veins in all save the genus Heptaphlebomyia in which a distinct seventh vein 
occurs ornamented with scales. The fork-cells (first submarginal and second posterior) are usually long 
(Culex, Anopheles, etc.) but the first submarginal may be very small [Megarhiuits, Uranotania, etc.). The 
relative lengths of the cells cannot be taken as of any specific importance as they vary in each species 
and even in the specimens from one batch of eggs. The cross-veins most prominent are the supernumerary 
mid and posterior, they also vary to a considerable extent in the same species, specially in certain 
species (Theobaldia incidens, Culex fatigans, etc.). 

Seasonal variation. — The spotting of the wings in the Anophelines has been taken to be 
of specific importance. The spots are however variable at all times of the year in certain species. The 
greatest variation occurs however at certain definite seasons, so that we get well marked seasonal 
variations and dark and light varieties. It is probable that some recently instituted species will thus have 
to be sunk as seasonal varieties. 

The legs are usually simple, but in some genera may be provided with outstanding scales giving 
them a ragged appearance (Psorophora, Mucidus) a brush-like appearance (Janthinosoma), or they may 
be provided with paddle-like groups of hairs [Sabrthes, Eretmapodites). The ungues in the 9 s are equal in 
size, they may be simple or uni-serrated, in the rjf's those of the fore and mid-legs are unequal and ma} 7 
or may not be simple or serrated, when the latter, uni-serrated or bi-serrated and a few cases tri-serrated 
(Anophelines). 

Larval and pupal characters. — The species which present such close affinities that the} 7 
cannot be separated with any degree of certainty may often be clearl} 7 defined b} 7 an examination of the 
larvae or pupa?. 

In the Anophelines the frontal hairs of the larvae form the most useful character for differentiation; 
in the Culicines the grouping of the spines on the spine area at the base of the siphon. In regards 
to the pupae the form of the siphons is the most important character, but does not vary much in species 
although generically it is of great use (i). 

The eggs of Culicidae also present great variation. Some are laid singly [Stegomyia] , others singl) 7 
but afterwards floating together in some definite form {Anophelines) ; in Culex, etc. they are laid in masses 
or rafts. They also vary in form some being spindle shaped (Stegomyia, Grabhamia), others bottle shaped 
Taeniorhynchus), some with long thin necks (Mansonia). 

Notes on the classification. — The characters of the three primary genera (Anopheles, Culex 
and Acdes) are now taken as subfamily characters. To these subfamilies Anophelince, Culicince and 
Aedeomyiuis are also added the following Megarhinince, Toxorhy minting, Jobloiince, H eptaphlebomyiiue and 
Corethrina. 

There is some doubt as to whether the last named should be included in the family Culidinae for 
they have not that characteristic piercing proboscis, nor su:h definite scales; on the other hand the 
venation of the wings is similar to Culex and thsir life-history also agrees with that of the true Culicidae. 



(i) Recently Dr. Grabham informs me that the frontal hairs of the larvae vary in form in different stages of the same species.. 



FAM. CULICIDjK 5 

It is considered best therefore to retain the few genera of the Corelhrina in this family. The females 
oiCulicir.tr and Aedeomyinee are so alike that without the examination of the males it is not always 
possible to place them in the right subfamily, the number of palpal joints varying in both and also the 
scale structure and venation. Hence a few genera recorded here are put down with doubt under the 
larger grouping. 

KEY OF THE SUBFAMILIES 

A. Proboscis, formed for piercing, wings with six longitudinal veins. 

I. Palpi long in tf . 

a) Metanotum nude. 

a. Palpi long in rj 1 and 9 , in the 9 n °t quite as long as the 
proboscis. 
i . First submarginal cell, as long or longer than the second 

posterior cell Subfam. AnophelinjE. 

2. First submarginal cell much smaller than the second 

posterior cell. Proboscis curved Subfam. Megarhinin^e. 

|3. Palpi long in the (J , short in the 9 • 

3. First submarginal cell much smaller than the second 

posterior cell. Proboscis curved Subfam. Toxorhynchitin^e. 

4 . First submargi):al cell as long or longer than the second 

posterior cell. Proboscis straight Subfam. Culicin^e. 

b) Metanotum scaly and with chaetae. 

5. Palpi long and acuminate in (f, short in Q : ibfam. Joblotin^e. 

II. Palpi short in (f . 

Palpi short in both sexes, often very minute Subfam. Aedeomyin/e. 

B. Proboscis formed for piercing ; wir.gs with seven scaled longitudinal veins. 

Palpi long in cf , short in 5 . . , Subfam. Heptaphlebomyiisle. 

C. Proboscis not formed for piercing; wings with six longitudinal veins; hairy not 

scaly Subfam. Corethrin/E. 



. SUBFAM. ANOPHELIN^E, Theobald 



This subfamily can be told from all others by the long female palpi and long first submarginal cell. 
The palpal character occurs in the next subfamily, but the members of the Megarhinina have very 
small first submarginal cells. 

Characters. — Head with upright forked scales, now and then with those of other forms; 
thorax scaly or hairy; metanotum nude; scutellum simple. Proboscis straight and thin. Palpi long and 
clavate in the (f , long in the 9 but usually not quite so long as the proboscis, more or less acuminate; 
more or less scaly. Antennae verticiUate in 9 ; plumose in tf ; basal joints may or may not be scaly. 
Wings with longish fork-cells; the first submarginal usually longer than the second posterior; both 
small in the rf . Ungues in tf . unequal on fore and mid-legs, one or both may be simple, uni-, bi- 
or triserrated. Larvae without respiratory siphon. 



6 DIPTERA 

TABLE OF GENERA 

a) Thorax and abdomen with hair-like curved scales. 

a. No flat scales on head, but upright forked ones. 

i. Wing scales large, lanceolate Genus Anopheles, Meigen. 

2 . Wing scales mostly small, long and narrow or slighty 

lanceolate Genus Myzomyia, Blanchard. 

3. Wings with patches of large inflated scales .... Genus Cycloleppteron, Theobald. 
(3. Median area of head with some flat scales; prothoracic lobes mam- 

millated. 

4. Wing scales lanceolate Genus Stethomyia, Theobald. 

b) Thorax with narrow curved scales; abdomen hairy. 

5. Wing scales small and lanceolate Genus Pyretophorus, Blanchard. 

c) Thorax with hair-like curved scales and some narrow curved ones in front; 

abdomen with apical lateral scale tufts and scaly venter ; no ventral 
tuft. 

6. Wing scales lanceolate Genus Arribalzagia, Theobald. 

d) Thorax with hair-like curved scales; no lateral abdominal tufts ; distinct 

apical ventral tuft. Palpi densely scaly. 

7. Wing with dense large lanceolate scales Genus Myzorhynchus, Blanchard. 

e) Thorax with hair-like curved scales and some narrow curved lateral ones ; 

abdomen hairy with dense long hair-like lateral apical scaly tufts. 

8. Wing scales short, dense, lanceolate ; fork-cells short. . Genus Christya, Theobald. 

f) Thorax with very long hair-like curved scales ; abdomen with hairs except 

last two segments which are scaly. Dense scale tufts to hind femora. 

9. Wings with broadish, blunt lanceolate scales. . . . Genus Lophoscelomyia, Theobald. 

g) Thorax and abdomen with scales. 

10. Thoracic scales narrow-curved or spindle shaped ; 

abdominal scales as lateral tufts and small dorsal 

patches of flat scales Genus Nyssorhynchus, Blanchard. 

11. Abdomen nearly completely scaled with long irregular 

scales and with lateral scale tufts Genus Cellia, Theobald. 

12. Abdomen completely scaled with large flat scales as in 

Culex Genus Aldrichia, Theobald. 

I. Genus ANOPHELES, Meigen 

Anopheles, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Eur. Zvveifl. Ins. Dipt. Vol. 1, p. 10, pi. 17, f . 5 & 6 (1818). 

Characters. — Thorax and abdomen clothed with hair-like curved scales, practically hairs. 
Palpi in the 9 thin, not densely scaled, nearly as long as the proboscis ; in the q* clavate. Head with 
numerous upright forked scales. Antennae plumose in rj' ; verticillate in the 9 • Wings with large lanceo- 
late scales, which may or may not be united into denser groups forming spots. Mostly large species. 

Geographical distribution of species. — This genus occurs in Europe, Africa, Asia, 
North America, West Indies and probably Australia. It is essentially a temperate region genus, those that 
occur in other regions being mostly hill species. 



FAM. CULICIDiE 7 

1. A. macuhpennis, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Eur. Zweifl. Ins. Dipt. Vol. 1, p. 11, f. 2 (1818) (Europe and 

North America). — Plate I. Fig. I. 

claviger, Fabricius, No type existed. Syst. Antl. p. 35 (iSo5). 
madrimaculatus, Say, Long's. Exped. St-Peters. River. Vol. 2, app. 356. 

2. A. bifurcates, Linnaeus, Ins. Suec. p. 1891 (1708) (Europe, North America). 

trifurcatus, Fabricius, Ent. Syst. Vol. 4, p. 401 (3) (1792). 

.:>■. Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Vol. 1-2-1 and 6, p. 242 (1804). 
ii'Uosus. Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. (1827). 
walkeri, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 199 (1901). 

3. A. algeriensis, Theobald, Ann. Inst. Pasteur, Vol. 17, p. 2 (rgo3); Mon. Culic, Vol. 3, p. 21 (1903) 

(Algeria). 

4. A. aitkeuii, James & Theobald, Mon. Culic, Vol. 3, p. 22 (igo3) (Goa and Karwar). 

5. A. immaculatus, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 22 (igo3) (India). 

6. A. nigripes, Staeger. Syst. For. o. d. i. Denm. Nid. fundne Dipt. (iS3g) (Northern Europe and North 

America). 

? plumbeus, Haliday, Zool. Journ. Vol. 12 (1S2S). 

- . A. lindesayii, Giles, Hand-Book of Gnats, p. 166 (igoo) (North India). 

8. A. punctipennis, Say, Journ. Acad. Nat. Sc. Philad. Vol. 3 (iS23) (North America). 

CuJtx hy emalis. Fitch, 
g. A. pseudopunciipennis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 3o5 (igoi) (Grenada and New Mexico). 

10. A. gigas, Giles, Ent. Monthly Mag. Vol. 37, p, ig6 (Conoor, Nehilgerri Hills, India). 

11. A. crucians, Wiedemann, Aussereurop. Zweifl. Ins. p. 12 (1828) (North America). 

12. A. wcllcomei, Theobald, Rep. Gordon College Lab. Sudan, p. 64 (igo4) (Sudan, Aden Hinterland). 
c3. A. barberi, Coquillett. Canad. Ent. p. 3io !igo3) (Maryland, U. S. A.). 

Probably a variety of bifurcalus. 
14. A. franciscanus, McCracken, Ent. News. Vol. i5, p. 12 (igo4) (California). 

SPECIES UNCERTAIN 
A.ferrugineus, Wiedemann, Aussereurop. Zweifl. Ins. p. 12 (1S28) (New Orleans). 

2. Genus MYZOMYIA, Blanchard 

Grassia, Theobald, Journ. Trop. Med. Vol. 2. p. 181 (igo2). 
Myzomyia, Blanchard, C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris. Vol. 23, p. 7g5 (igo2). 

Characters. — Thorax and abdomen with hair-like scales, sometimes with a few narrow-curved, 
ones projecting over the head. Palpi not densely scaled, clavate in rf , thicker in the 9 than in Ano- 
pheles. Wings much spotted and marked along the costa; vein-scales small narrowly lanceolate or linear. 
Mostly small species. 

Geographical distribution of species. — This genus occurs in Asia, Africa and a single 
species in South America and another in Europe. This genus in intimately connected with malaria in 
Africa and India. The majority prefer slowly running water in the larval stage. 

1. M . funesta, Giles, Mem. Liv. Sch. Trop. Med. Mem. 2, p. 5o (igoo); Hand-Book. of Gnats, p. 162 

(igoo) (Central and Western Africa, Sudan, Philippine Islands). — Plate I, Fig. 2. 
var. umbrosa, Theobald, Mem. Liv. Sch. Trop. Med. App. p. vi (1900). 
var, subumbrosa. Theobald, idem, p, vi (1900). 

2. .1/. rossii, Giles, Journ. Trop. Med. Oct. (i8gg) (India, Malay States, China, Philippine Islands). 

'.gas, Donitz, Beit. Kennt. d'Anop. p. 80 (1902J. 

3. M. ludlowii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol, 3, p. 42 (1903) (Philippine Islands, Malay). 

4. M. rJwdesiensis , Theobald, idem, Vol. 1, p. 184 (1901) (Central Africa). 

5. M. culicifacies, Giles (9, non cf), Ent. Monthly Mag. p. 197 (1901) (Central Provinces, Berars, 

Madras. India). 

listoni, Giles, Ent. Monthly Mag. p. 197 (1901). 
indica. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. i83 (1901). 
culicifacies, Giles, Ent. Monthly Mag. p. 197, Q c? = turkhitdi, 



S DIPTERA 

6. M. listoni, Liston (non Giles). Ind. Med. Gaz. Vol. 36, p. 12 (1901) (India, Federated Malay States). 

christophersi, Theobald, Proc. Roy. Soc. Eng. Vol. 69, p. 3y8 (1902). 
fiuviatilis, Christophers (1901) ms. 

7. M. longipalpis, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 37 (1903) (British Central Africa). 

8. M. leptomercs, Theobald, idem, Vol. 3. p. 38 (1903) (India). 

9. M. lutzii, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 1, p. 177 (1901) (Brazil, British Guiana). 

10. M. turhhudi, Liston, Ind. Med. Gaz. p. 441 (1901) (India). 

culicifacies, (S Giles, Ent. Monthly Mag. p. 197 (1901). 

11. M. hispaniola, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 49 (igo3) (Spain, Teneriffe), 

12. M . elegans, James & Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. 5i (1903) (Bombay Presidency). 

i3. M. pundiilata, Donitz. Ins. Borse. Vol. 5, 18. 3i p. 37 (1901) (Sumatra, Borneo, New Guinea). 
14. M. tessellata, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. i,p. 175 (1901) (Straits Settlements). 

punctulalus, Theobald (non Donitz), Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 175 (1901). 
i5. M . leiicosphyrus, Donitz, Ins. Borse. Vol. 5, p. 37 (1901) (Sumatra, Borneo, New Guinea). 

16. M. albirostris, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 24(1903) (Malay States). 

17. M . nili, Theobald, Rep. Gordon Coll. Lab. Sudan, p. 66 (1904) (Sudan). 

18. M. thortttonii, Ludlow, Canad. Ent. p. 69 (1904) (Philippine Islands). 

19. M. aconita, Donitz, Beitr. z. d. Anopheles, p. 70 (1902) (Sumatra, Java). 

20. M. hebes, Donitz, idem, p. 84 (1909) (Dar-Es-Salam, East Africa). 

21. M. kumasi, Chalmers, The Lancet. Nov. (1900) (Kumasi). 

3. Genus CYCLOLEPPTERON, Theobald 

Cycioleppteron, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 3 12 (1901). 
Cyclolepidopteron, Blanchard. 

Characters. — Thorax with very narrow curved scales, almost hair-like; abdomen with hairs 
very similar to those on the thorax. Last two joints of cf palpi swollen, in the Q spatulate. Wings with 
lanceolate lateral scales and numerous large black inflated scales, their free ends rounded, either grouped 
in patches or irregularly disposed. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two species only occur in this genus, one from the 
West Indies, the other from Brazil. They appear to be rather uncommon. 

1. C. grabhamii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 2o5; Vol. 2, p. 3i2 (1901); Vol. 3. p. 56 (igo3) 

(Jamaica), 

2. C. mediopunctatus, Theobald (Lutz Ms), Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 60 (igo3) (Brazil). 

4. Genus STETHOMYIA, Theobald 

Stethomyia. Theobald, Journ. Trop. Med. Vol. 5, p. 1S1 (1902). 

Characters. — Head with a patch of fiat scales on the middle line and with very thin upright 
forked scales. Thorax bristly, apparently nude ; prothoracic lobes bristly and mammillated. Abdomen 
pilose, hairs of two sizes, the smaller ones in rows. Palpi of the r? much swollen; in the 9 very long and 
thin. Legs long and thin. 

Geographical distribution of species. — This genus contains but two species, one found 
in South America, the other in the Malay States. 

1. S. nimba, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 62 (igo3) (British Guiana and Para). 

2. S.fragilis. Theobald, The Entom. p. 257 (igo3) (Federated Malay States). 

5. Genus PYRETOPHORUS, Blanchard 

Pyretophorus. Blanchard, C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris, n. 23, p. 795 (1902). 
Howardia. Theobald, Journ. Trop. Med. Vol. 5, p. 181 (1902). 



FAM. CULICIDJE 9 

Characters. — Thorax with narrow-curved scales often rather elongated ; abdomen with hair-like 

curved scales: Q lamellae scaly. Head with upright forked scales, narrow-curved scales now and then. 

Wings with small short lanceolate scales, sometimes appearing narrow; much spotted. Palpi moderately 

■ . This genus is at once told from Myzomyia to which it is most nearly related by the narrow-curved 

thoracic scales. Thev are sometimes quite large species. The larvae frequent puddles and streams. 

Geographical distribution of species. — This genus occurs in Africa, India, Australia and 
Europe. The majority are African. 

1. P. costalis, Loew, Eiit. Zeit. Berl. p. 55 (1866) (Africa, Mauritius). 

s, Loew. Ent. Zeit. Berl. p. 55 (1S66 . 
u, Giles. Handb. of Gnats(2 ed.), p. 5n (1902). 
A . is, Donitz, Beitr. Kenntn. Anoph. p. 76 1 1902). 

■car. melas. Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 76 (igo3 . 

2. P. minimus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. t86 11901) (Hongkong). 

3. P. marshallii, Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. 77 (1903) ^Mashonaland). 
(.. P. 1 .:'. Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3. p. 6S ( I go3) (Algeria). 

5. P. superpidus, Grassi. Reaie Accad. Line. (Stud. Zool sulla Malaria), p. 78 (1900) (S. Europe). 

6. P. palest iueiisis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 71 (1903) (Palestine. Cyprus). 

sis, Theobald, idem. Vol. 3. p. 66 (igo3) (Jeypore, India). 
8. jP. cinereus, Theobald, ibidem. Vol. 1, p. 161 11901) (S, W, and Central Africa) (1). 

P. atiatipcs, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. X. 5. Wales. Vol. 3 (2), p. 1755 (N. S. Wales, Queensland). 

6. Genus ARRIBALZAGIA, Theobald 

Arribalzagia. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 81 (1902). 

Characters. - Thorax with curved ha ; r like scales aud a few narrow curved ones in front. 

scale tufts and scaly venter. No ventral apical scaly tuft present. Palpi 
■'. y scaled. Wings with thick lanceolate scales. 
This genus comes close to the following viz Myzorhynchus, but can be told by having distinct lateral 
scale tufts and no ventral tuft. A s : ngle species only so far known. 

Geographical distribution of species. -- A single species represented by the 9 only found in 
Brazil and Trinidad. It is said to be a malaria bearer. 
1. A. . Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 81 (iqo3) (Brazil and Trinidad). 

7. Genus MYZORHYNCHUS, Blanchard 

Myzorhynchus. Blanchard, C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris, Vol. 23, p. 795 (1902). 
Rossia. Theobald (non Owen. 1823), Journ. Trop. Med. p. 181 (1902). 

Characters. — T!. h hair-like scales: prothoracic lobes with ragged scales. Abdomen 

with ventral and a few apical scales and ventral apical tuft; no apical lateral tufts Wing scales broadly 

or moderately lanceolate, sometimes short and rather broad. Palpi densely scaled in the Q , also the 

A^scis. Mostly large dark species. Wild and breeding in swampy places as a rule. The larvae with 

1. mch branched frontal hairs. 

Geographical distribution of species. - - Twelve species known. Most occur in Asia, but 
.:'rica and Europe. They appear tobe most abundant in numbers in the Malay Peninsula. 
:. M. barbiro tn's. Van der Wulp, Levd. Mus, Notes Vol. 6, p. 48 (Malay Peninsula; India and Old 

Calabar. West Africa . Plate I, Fig, 3. 
-. M. Giles, Hd. Book of Gnats <2 ed.) p. 5n (1902) (Queensland). 

/. umbrosus, Theobald, Mon. Culic, Vol. 3. p. 87(1903) (Malay States). 



mes in Myzon yla. 



io DIPTERA 

4. M. albotaeniatus , Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. 88 (igo3) (Straits Settlements). 

5. M. sinensis, Wiedemann, Ausseurop. Zweifl. Ins. p. 547 (182S) (China, Formosa). 

6. M. vanus, Walker, Journ. Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 4, p. 91 (i860). 

annularis, Theobald (non Van der Wulp) Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 142 (1901). 

7. M. annularis, Van der Wulp, Leyd. Mus. Notes Vol. 9, p. 249 (1889) (East Java). 

8. M. pseudopictus, Grassi (Italy). 

pictus, Ficalbi, Venti. Spec. Zanz. Ital. (1899J. 
9. M. minutus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 91 (igo3) (Punjaub, India). 
10. M. nigerrimus, Giles, Hdb. of Gnats, p. 161 (1900) (India). 

n. M. mauritianus, Grandpre, Les Moustiques. Planters Gaz. Press. (1900) (Mauritius and Central 
Africa). 

paludis var . similis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 129 (1901). 

tenebrosus, Donitz, Beit. Kenntn. Anoph. p. 53 (1902). 
12. M.plumiger, Donitz, Ins. Borse, Jan. (1901) (Hongkong, East India). 

i3. M. paludis, Theobald, Rep. Mai. Com. Roy. Soc. p. jS (1800) (West Africa and Central Africa). 
14. M. pseudobarbirostris, Ludlow, Journ. New- York, Ent. Soc. Sept. (1902) (Philippine, Islands.) 
i5. M. coustani, Laveran, Arch, de Parasit. Vol. 6, p. 359 (1902) (Madagascar). 
16. M . jesoensis, Tsuzuki. 

8. Genus CHRISTYA, Theobald 

Christya. Theobald, Rep. Sleeping Sickness. Vol. 7, p. 34. Roy Soc. (1903). 

Characters. — Thorax with hair-like scales and narrow-curved lateral ones; prothoracic lobes 
with narrow-curved scales. Abdomen with hairs and dense lateral apical tufts and long hair-like scales 
and other long lateral hairs. Palpi densely scaled. Fork-cells rather short; wings with dense short 
lanceolate lateral vein scales. 

Allied to Myzorhynchus, but easily told by the very long lateral tufts of abdominal scales. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species so far only occurs in this genus. 
1. C. implexa, Theobald, Rep. Sleeping Sickness. Roy. Soc. Vol. 7, p. 34 (igo3). 

9. Genus LOPHOCELOMYIA, Theobald 

Lophocelomyia. Theobald, The Entom. p. 12 (1904). 

Characters. — Thorax with very long curved hair-like scales; prothoracic lobes with a tuft of 
spatulate scales. Abdomen with hairs, except the last two segments which have lanceolate scales. 
Head with narrow-curved as well as upright forked scales. Palpi densely scaled. Dense tuft of outstanding 
scales on the apex of the hind femora. Wings clothed with broadish blunt lanceolate scales. 

Allied to following genus but has long curved hair-like scales, not narrow-curved or spindle 
shaped ones. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species so far only found, probably 
others will be found in jungle growths. 

1. L. asiatica, Leicester, The Entom. p. i3 (1904) (Ambang Jungle, Kuala Lumpur, Fed. Malay States). 

10. Genus NYSSORHYNCHUS, Blanchard 

Nyssorhynchus. Blanchard, C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris. Vol. 23, p. 7g5 (1902). 
Laverania. Theobald, Journ. Trop. Med. (1902). 

Characters. — Thorax with narrow-curved and spindle shaped scales. Abdomen with scales on 
the venter and with dorsal patches on the apical segments. Legs banded and spotted with white, 



GENERA INSECTORUM 



DIPTERA 




^Myzorhynchus 
barbirostris 9 




CelUa 
phanoensis 9 




Mcgarh in.iis 
separcUus <S 




MiicicLus 
aTrirarLus 9 




Psorop Hora. 
cilicuta, c? 







Jo. n thinoso ma, 
mzisicci 




ET-etrnapodUes 
quirtaueviuaiv^s d 




S tea o my La 
FasciaJxL p 




Tlxcobaldia, 
ansuilata, p 



FAM.CULICID^ 
1 



GENERA INSECTORUM 



DIPTERA 



GrabhxLinia, 
jamaicGnsis p 




Jobl&iia. 
Ttivipes c 



FAM. CULICID^ 

2 



FAM. CULICIDiE u 

the hind tarsi usually with one or more pure white segments. Wing scales bluntly lanceolate, short, 
some more elogate and narrow. Adults mostly domestic, a few sylvan. Larvae mostly pot and puddle 
breeding species, a few breed in marshes. 

Geographical distribution of species. — This genus centains some i3 species found in Asia 
and Africa only. 
i. -V. maculatus, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. i, p. 171 (1901) (India, Federated Malay States) . 

2. -V. tkeobaldi, Giles, Ent. Men. Mag. p. 19S (1901) (India, Aden Hinterland). 

3. .V. stepkensi, Liston, Ind. Med. Gaz. Vol. 36. p. 12, Dec. (1901) (India). 

metabohs. Theobald. Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. Vol. 69, p. 374 (1902). 

4. N . fiiliginosus, Giles, Hd. Book of Gnats, p. 160 (1900) (India, Federated Malay States). 

sii. Listen non Theobald), Ind. Med. Gaz. p. 411' Dec. (1901). 
Uucopus, Donitz, Ins. Borse, p. 37 (1901). 

5. N. maculipalpis, Giles, Hd. Book of Gnats. (2 ed.)p. 297 (1902) (India, Mauritius, Mashonaland). 

vat . indiensis, Theobald. Mon. Culid. Vol. 3, p. 99 (1903) (India). 

6. N. pretoriensis, Theobald, idem. Vol. 3. p. 99 (1903) (Pretoria). 

7. A r . willmori, James, Mon. Culid. Vol. 3. p. 100 (1904) (Kashmir). 
S. N. harwari, James, idem. Vol. 3, p. 102 (1903) (Karwar, Goa). 

9. N. annulipts, Walker, Ins. Saund. Vol. 1, p. 433 (i85o) (Australia). 
10. .V. master i, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, p. 1757 (1SS9) (Australia). 
n. N. nivipis, Theobald, The Entom. p. 208 (igo3) (Federated Malay States). 
12. X.jamesii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 134 (1901) (South India). 
i3. N. philipphunsis, Ludlow, Journ. New York. Ent. Soc. Vol. 10, p. '128 (Sept. 1902) (Philippine Islands). 

I I. Genus CELLIA, Theobald 

Cellia. Theobald, Mon. Culid. Vol. 3. p. 107 (igo3). 

Characters. — Thorax with flat spindle shaped scales ; abdomen more or less covered with long 
narrow-curved or spindle shaped scales irregularly disposed and with dense lateral tufts; palpi of 9 
densely scaly. Wing scales large, bluntly lanceolate; densely scaled. 

This genus is easliy told by the dense irregular abdominal scales. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Six species only occur and are limited to Africa, 
India, the West Indes, East Indes and South America. 

Two species at least are connected with malaria (pharoensis and argyrotarsis). 

sis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 169 ( 190 1) (Central, Western and Northern Africa and 
Palestine . — Plate I, Fig. 4. 

2. C. puhherrima , Theobald, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. Vol. 69, p. 369 (1902) (Lahore, India). 

3. C. squamosa, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 167(1901) (Central Africa, S. and W. Africa). 

4. C. hochii, Donitz, Ins. Borse, Vol. 5, p. 18. 3i, Jan. (1901) (Fed. Malay States ; Sumatra, Java, Philip- 

pine Islands.i. 

5. C. argyrotarsis, Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai sur les Culicid. p. 411 (1827) (West Indes and S. America). 

■arsis, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Agent, p. 36 (igoi). 

.. .aitts. Wiedemann. Aussereurop. Zweifl. Ins. p. i3 (1828). 

6. C. albipes. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 125(1901) (West Indes, Brazil, British Guiana). 

12. Genus ALDRICHIA, Theobald 

Aldrichia. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 353 (igo3)'. 

Characters. — Thorax with narrow-curved, almost hair-like scales; outstanding flat scales on 
the prothoracic lobes. Abdomen with complete armour of large flat scales in Cidex. Head with large and 
broad upright scales. 



12 DIPTERA 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species, represented by a single specimen 
only known. 

I. A. error, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol 3, p. 353 (igo3) (India). 

GENUS UNCERTAIN. 

i. Anopheles vincenti, Laveran, C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris, 53, p. gg3 (1901) (Tonkin). 

2. A.faranti, Laveran, idem, 54, 908 (1902) (New Hebrides). 

3. A. pursati, Laveran, ibidem, 54. p. 906 (1902) (Cambodia). 

4. A. formosaensis, Tsuzuki. 

5. A. pictus, Loew. Dipt. Beitr. (1845) (Isle of Rhodes, Asia- Minor). 

6. A. (? Nyssorhynchus) deceptor, Donitz, Beit. Kenntn. Anoph. p. 60 (1902) (Sumatra). 

7. A. (? Myzomyia) impunctus, Donitz, idem, p. 67 (1902) (Wadi-Natrun). 

8. A. (? Pyretophorus) merus, Donitz, Beit. Kenntn. Anoph. p. 77 (1902) (East and S. W. Africa). 

9. A. annulimamis, Van der Wulp, Tijdschr. v. Ent. p. 127 (1867) (North America). 

10. A. annulipalpis, Arribalzaga, Et. Nat. Arg. Vol. 1, p. 149 (1878) (Buenos-Ayres and Parana river, 
South America). 

II. A. ziemanni, Griinberg, Zool. Anz. Vol. 25, p. 55o (1901) (Cameroons). 
12. A. martini, Laveran. C. r. Soc. Biol. Vol. 54, p. 906 (1902) (Cambodia). 

i3. A. eiseni, Coquillett, Journ. New-York. Ent. Soc. Vol. 10, p. 192 (Guatemala). 
14. A. (Pyretophorus ?) pitchfordi, Giles (Zululand) (1). 

2. SUBFAM. MEGARHININ/E, Theobald 

This subfamily can be told from the following in which the palpi are long in both sexes by the 
very small first submarginal cell and curiously bent proboscis. They are all large insects with brilliant 
coloration and caudal tufts. They are frequent^ spoken of as Elephant mosquitos. The scale structure 
differs widely from that of the Anophelina, the head especially. In scale structure and general appearance 
they resemble the next subfamiry T oxorhynchitince but the o*'s of the lattei have short palpi. 

Characters. — ■ Head densely clothed with flat scales and some upright forked scales; palpi in 
the £? long, acuminate, in the 9 n °t so long as the g* . Proboscis much curved. Antennae of o* plumose, 
of 9 verticillate, basal joints scaly. Thorax clothed with spindle shaped scales, broader flat ones at the 
sides and over base of wings ; scutellum clothed with flat scales ; metanotum nude ; prothoracic lobes 
with flat scales. Abdomen covered with fiat scales and with a caudal fan of fine hair like scales always 
present in the cj . Wings with very small fork-cells, the first submarginal being very small, the stems of 
the fork-cells very long; in the cf the wings are longer and narrower than in the 9 j supernumerary 
cross-vein nearer the apex of the wing than the mid. Ungues of 9 equal and simple, of q* unequal on 
fore and mid legs, the larger always toothed. 

This subfamily at present contains only one genus (Megarhinus). The species are only found 
in tropical and warmer subtropical countries. 

I. Genus MEGARHINUS, Robineau-Desvoidy 

Megarhinus. Robineau-Devoidy, Essai sur les Culic. (Mem. Soc. Hist. Nat. Paris), Vol. 3, p. 412 (1827). 
Characters. — Same as those of the subfamily. The members present most beautiful metallic 
coloration. Some are said to bite severely. They are mostly confined to South America, West Indes 
Malay States and East Indes. Most are purely sylvan in habits. Larvae with siphon. 



(1) The type is in the British Museum, but I cannot find any description. 



FAM. CULICID/E i3 

Geographical distribution of species. — It is extremely difficult to tell <j* specimens from tf's 
of the next subfamily as the (f characters are practically the same both in regards to scale ornamentation, 
venation and palpi. 
i. M. haemorrhoidalis, Fabricius, Ent. Syst. Vol. 6, p. 401, f. 5 (1794) (Brazil, Mexico, Guiana, Cuba). 

2. M. separates, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 33 (iSgi) (Brazil, French Guiana, Argentine). — Plate I 

Fig. 5. 

3. M. trichopygus, Wiedemann, Ausseurop. Zweifl. Ins. p. 4 (1828) (Brazil). 

4. M. violaceus, Hoffmannseg, Dipt. Exot. p. 7, Wiedemann (1821) (Brazil). 

purpureas. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. i,p. 23o (1901). 

5. M. portoricensis, von Roder, Ent. Zeit. Stett. p. 337 (i885) (Georgia, Porto Rico, Grenada, St.Wincent, 

Mississippi, St. Domingo, Para). 

6. M. sphndens, Wiedmann, Dipt. Exot. p. 7 (1821) (Java, Sumatra, Batavia, Singapore). 

7. M.ferox, Wiedemann, Ausseurop. Zweifi. Ins. p. 1 (1S2S) (Brazil, Bogota). 

S. M. rittilas, Coquillett, Canad. Ent. p. 44 (1896) (North Carolina, Georgia, Florida). 

GENUS UNCERTAIN * \ 

[Megarhinus or Toxorhynchites) 

M. amboinensis, Doleschall, Nat. Tijdschr. Ned. Indie, Vol. 14, p. 38i (Amboina). 
M. christophii, Portschinsky, Hor. Soc. Ent. Ross. p. 122 (iS83) (Amur, Central Asia). 
M. longipes, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 241 (1901) (Mexico). 
M. lutescens, Theobald, idem, Vol. 1, p. 233 (1901) (Mashonaland). 



3. SUBFAM. TOXORHYNOHITIN/E, NOV. subfam. 

This subfamily differs from the precceding in that the 9' s have the palpi short and rather thick; 
differences as great as those between the Anophelina and Culicinte. Both species with caudal tufts and 
species devoid of this form of ornamentation occur and it is probable that two genera founded on 
this character should be formed. Several species previously supposed to belong to Megarhinus (the 
species having been founded on the cf's only) are now included here. A single genus occurs. 

I. Genus TOXORHYNCHITES, Theobald 

Toxorhynchites. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. i,p. 244 (1901). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales and a few upright forked scales. Thorax with 
small flat spindle shaped scales and long spatulate scales; scutellum clothed with long,flat scales. Meta- 
notum nude. Abdomen clothed with flat scales, with or without a caudal tuft. Venation as in Megarhinus 
Palpi of rf long; of 9 short and thick, composed of three segments. Proboscis curved as in Megarhinus. 

The genus occurs in Africa, Asia, East Indes and Australia. 

Geographical distribution of species. — The most widespread species is immisericors Walker 
which is extremely variable, it occurs from Ceylon up India to the Malay States and East Indes and I am 
inclined to think that the Australia Speciosa Skuse is only a variety of Walker's species. Africa also 
seems the home of this genus. 

None have so far occured in South America where its place is taken by Megarhinus. 

1. 7. brevipalpis, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1 p. 243 (1901) (Natal). — Plate I, Fig. 6. 

2. T. leicesteri, Theobald, The Entom. p. 36 (1904) (Kuala Lumpur, Fed. Malay States). 

3. T. mefallicus, Leicester, idem, p. 37(1904) 'Kuala Lumpur, Fed. Malay States). 

4. T. marshallii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 121 (1903) (Mashonaland). 

5. T speciosus, Skuse (Mackay mss), Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, p. 1722 (1889) (Queensland). 



14 DIPTERA 

6. T. immisericors, Walker, Journ. Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 4, p. 91 (i860) (Ceylon, India, Malay 

Peninsula and East Indes). 

subulifer, Dolleschall, Nat. Tijdschr. Ned. Ind. Vol. 14, p. 382. 

gilesii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. I, p. 227 (1901). 

regius, Thwaites, Nat. Hist. Ceylon, Tennant, p. 434 (1861). 

7. T. inomatus, Walker, Journ. Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 8, p. 102 (New Guinea). 



4.SUBFAM. CULlCINyE, Theobald 

This in the largest subfamily and contains a number of diverse genera. They can easily be seen 
to belong to this group, by the short 9 palpi and long (f palpi. They most nearly approach the 
Toxorhynchitinae in this respect, but the longer first submarginal cell at once separates them. 

Characters. — Head clothed with all flat scales (Stegomyia) or a mixture of flat, narrow-curved 
and upright forked ones. Palpi long in the (f , either clavate (Theobaldia, etc) or acuminate (Culex, etc); 
in the 9 short and composed of 3 to 5 segments. Proboscis straight and moderately thick. Wings with 
moderately long fork-cells, the first submarginal as long or longer than the second posterior cell in the 9 ; 
scales of various forms in the different genera. Ungues of the 9 's equal, simple or uniserrated ; of the tf's 
the fore are unequal, simple uni-or biserrated. The chief distinguishing characters are (1) the palpi 
and (2) the venation. 

The subfamily contains 3o genera. 

TABLE OF GENERA 

A. Legs ornamented with dense outstanding scales. 

a. Head clothed with spr indie shaped and broad curved scales. 

k Hindlegs only densely scaled 1. Genus Janthinosoma, Arribalzaga. 

All the legs more or less densely scaled. 

Wings scales thin 2. Genus Psorophora, Robineau-Desvoidy 

Wings scales large inflated, parti-colored. Body 
and head with very long twisted scales ... 3. Genus Mucidus, Theobald. 
act. Head clothed with flat scales. Scutellum with flat scales . 
Wings mith dense scales apically. Hind legs of 9 
with scaly paddles 4. Genus Eretmapodites, Theobald. 

B. Legs normal, no irregular scales. 

a Head clothed with flat and upright forked scales only. 
(3 Scutellum with flat scales. 

Male palpi long thin nude and acuminate. Large . 5. Genus Desvoidya, Theobald. 

Male palpi thin acuminate or clavate. Small . . 6. Genus Stegomyia, Theobald. 

(3(3 Scutellum with narrow-curved scales 7. Genus Skusea, Theobald. 

aa Head clothed with mostly flat scales but also with small 
areas of narrow-curved scales and upright forked ones. 
y Scutellum with all flat scales. Palpi of 9 short. 

Head with median row of narrow-curved scales . 8. Genus Scutomyia, Theobald. 

Head with narrow-curved scales behind . . . . 9. Genus ^Edimorphus, Theobald. 

Palpi of 9 l la \f length of proboscis . . ... 



FAM. CULICHXE i5 

Head with flat scales except for some spindle shaped 

ones around the eyes 10. Genus Leicesteria, Theobald. 

yv Scutellum with flat scales to mid lobe narrow-curved 

ones to lateral lobes n. Genus Macleaya, Theobald. 

•■-• Scutellum with large spindle shaped scales . . . 12. Genus Hulecoetomyia, Theobald. V 
yyyy Scutellum with small flat scales on mid lobe, nar- 

roii'-curved ones on lateral lobes 1 3. Genus Phagomyia. nov. gen. 

•-■"• Scutellum with spindle shaped scales on mid lobe, 

flat ones on lateral lobes 14. Genus Polyleptiomyia, nov. gen. 

YTTTTt Scutellum with narrow-curved scales all over. 
Head with flat scales except for a median triangular 

narrow-curved scale area i5. Genus Howardina, Theobald. 



So Head with all flat scales except along the nape. . 16. Genus Danielsia, Theobald. 



'. 



000 Head with narrow-curved scales around the eyes. 17. Genus Lepidotomyia, nov. gen. 
xasr. Head with loose irregular flat scales and narrow- 
curved ones behind. 

Scutellum with flat median scales and narrow- 
curved lateral ones 18. Genus Catageiomyia, Theobald. 

aaaa Head with broad flat spindle shaped scales. Scutellum 
with small flat scales. 

■";/ scales of Taeniorhynchus type 19. Genus Gilesia, Theobald. 

xxy.y.oi Head and scutellar scales narrow-curved only, 
except at the sides of the head 'where they are flat. 
0. Abdomen clothed with flat scales only. 
I . Legs uniform, femora not enlarged at all. 

Palpi of (f clavate. Wings with lanceolate scales 

united into dense spots 20. Genus Theobaldia, Neveu-Lemaire. 

Wingswith rather thick medianscales and short broa- 
dish lateral ones. Fork-cells small; scales mottled. 
Head with broad narrow-ci.ived scalcsandjorked ones 21. Genus Grabhamia, Theobald. 
Head with irregular flat scales dotted all over giving 

a ragged appearance 22. Genus Acartomyia, Theobald. 

Palpi of cf acuminate. Wings ornamented with 
various colored patches . Scales partly Culex like 

partly Taeniorhynchus- like 23. Genus Lutzia, Theobald. 

Wings with narrow linear or lanceolate scales 

Fork-cells long in the Q 24. Genus Culex, Linnaeus. 

Wingswith elongated broadish scales. Fork-cells long 25. Genus Taeniorhynchus, Arribalzaga. 
Wings with large broad and asymmetrical scales . 26. Genus Mansonia, Blanchard. 
II. Femora and tibiae swollen apical ly and basally. 

Wing scales small, dense and broad at the apices 

of the veins. Small blaek gnats 27. Genus Melanoconion, Theobald. 

00 Abdomen with large flat projecting lateral scales, with 
deeply dentate apices, in more or less dense tufts. 

Wing scales of Culex type 28. Genus Lasioconops, Theobald. 

000 Abdomen with scaly ventral tufts. 

Wings scales pyriform, dense and mottled . . . 29. Genus Finlaya, Theobald. 






16 DIPTERA 

I. Genus JANTHINOSOMA, Arribalzaga* 

Janthinosoma. Arribalzaga. Dipt. Argent, p. 52 (1891). 

Characters. — Head covered with rather broad spindle-shaped scales and upright forked ones 
Thorax with short, broad spindle- shaped scales and also the scutellum. Male palpi long, longer than 
the proboscis, both tf and 9 palps densely scaly. Hind legs always densely scaly, giving the insects 
a characteristic appearance, one or more of the hind tarsi always white ; ungues of 9 very thick, 
uniserrated, fore and mid in the cf unequal, serrated. 

They are all somewhat metallic when fresh. 

Geographical distribution of species. — So far this genus has only been found in South 
America, the West Indes and the South of North America. Five species are known. 

1. J. musica, Say, Journ. Acad. Nat. Sc. Philad. Vol. 6, p. 149 (South America, Trinidad, Indiana). — 

Plate I, Fig. 9. 

Culex musicus. Say. 
mexicanus, Bellardi. 

2. J. fiosticata, Wiedemann, Aussereurop. Zweifi. Ins. p. 9 and Dipt. Exot. Vol. 1, p. 43.2 (1828) 

(St Lucia, Argentine). 

Culex posticatus, Wiedemann. 

3. J. lutzii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 257 (1901) (Brazil, British Guiana, Trinidad). 

4. J. discrucians, Walker, Ins. Saund. p. 140(1856) (South America (Walker); Trinidad). 

Culex discrucians, Walker. 

non J. discrucians, Arribalzaga. 

5. J. arribalzaga, Giles, Hdb. of Gnats. 2 d ed. p. 341 (Brazil, Argentine). 

discrucians, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Arg. p. 53 (i855). 

6. J. varices, Coquillett, Canad. Ent. p. 10 (1904) (Fort Simpson, B. C. Canada). 

Conchyliastes varipes, Coquillett. 

2. Genus PSOROPHORA. Robineau-Desvoidy 

Psorophora. Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. p. 412 (1827). 

Characters. — Head covered with small broad curved scales and upright forked ones; meso- 
thorax with curved scales in the middle and short broad ones lateralby. Palpi long in the <~/,of 5 segments, 
longer than the proboscis ; in the 9 short, never more than half the length of the proboscis, composed 
of four segments (? 5). Proboscis short and thick in the <-f ; longer and bent in the 9 • Prothoracic lobes 
have appendages which protect the stigmata of that area. Legs with the apices of the femora and tibiae 
and to some extent the metatarsi with long scales; ungues of 9 thick, equal uniserrated. Wings with 
rather long thin lateral vein-scales; first submarginal only a little longer than the second posterior cell; 
posterior cross-vein close to the mid but usually a little nearer the base of the wing than the mid. 

This genus can at once be told by the arrangement of the thoracic scales, and the densely 
scaled legs. 

Geographical distribution of species. — So far as at present known this genus is confined to 

North and South America and the West Indes. 

1. P. ciliata, Fabricius, Ent. Syst. Vol. 4, p. 401 (1794) (North America and Brazil). — Plate I, Fig. 8. 
perterr.ens. Walker, Ins. Saund, p. 431 (iS56). 
boscii, Robineau-Desvoidy. Essai Culic. p. 413 (1827). 
molestus, Wiedemann, Dipt. Exot. Vol. 7, p. 4 (1S21). 
centaurus, Walker, Brit. Mus. Coll. (Ms. name). 



* Howard and Coquillett, place these insects in a genus Conchyliastes, a ms term used by me before I had fixed the genus but never 
published — there is no such genus. 



FAM. CULICID/E 17 

2. P. hohnbergii, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 40 (1891) (Argentine, Brazil). 

3. P. scintilla 11s, Walker, Dipt. Brit. Mus. Vol. 1, p. 1 (1S48) (Amazon region, Para, Trinidad). 

Sabethes scintillans, Walker. 

4. P. kowardii, Coquillett, Canad. Ent. p. a5S (1901) (South Carolina). 

3. Genus MUCIDUS, Theobald 

Mucidus. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 268(1901). 

Characters. — Head clothed with narrow- curved, upright forked and long twisted scales. 
Thorax with narrow-curved and long twisted scales with expanded heads. Abdomen with dense ragged 
scales, which stand out from the surface. Legs densely scaled with projecting scales; ungues of 9 small, 
thick, equal and uniserrated. Wings ornamented, scales broadly pyriform and particolored, venation as 
in Culex but the posterior cross-vein is nearer the apex of the wing than the mid cross-vein. Palpi of 9 
half as long as the proboscis ; of the rj 1 a little longer. Large mould}' looking species, easily told by 
the twisted head and thoracic scales and the wing scales. 

Geographical distribution of species. — This genus is represented in India, East Indes, 
Australia and Africa. So far no representatives are known to occur in the Americas. 

r. M. alternans, Westwood, Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. Vol.3, p. 384 (1 835) (Queensland, New South 
Wales. Natal?). 

is, Walker, Ins. Saund. Dipt. p. 422(iS56). 
hispidosus. Skuse, Trans. Linn. Soc. X. S. Wales, p. 1726 (1891). 
Culex alter a jus, Westwood. 

2. M. africanus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 274 (1901) (West Africa, Central Africa, Sudan). — 

Plate I, Fig. 7. 

3. M. mucidus, Karsch. Ent. Xachr. p. zS (1887) (Swan River, Delagoa Bay, Whydah, West Africa). 

Culex mucidus. Karsch. 

4. M. scataphagoides, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 277 (1901) (Burma, N. W. Provinces, India). 

5. M. laniger, Wiedemann, Dipt. Exot. p. 9 (1821) (Java). 

Culex laniger. Wiedemann. 

4. Genus ERETMAPODITES, Theobald 

Eretmapodites. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 280 (1901). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat and upright forked scales. Mescir.cifx with cunec' 
like scales; scutellum with flat scales on the mid lobe. Abdomen clothed with flat scales, somewhat 
flattened laterally and expanded apically in the rf . Legs rather long the last two segments of the hind 
legs in the q* densely scaled forming a distinct paddle. Palpi of rj* long and thin, acuminate, no hair 
tufts; in the 9 short of 4 segments. Wings with Culex venation, scales dense and broad. 

Geographical distribution of species. — There maybe two species amongst the specimens 
in the British Museum, but the only difference I can detect is that some rf 's have no paddles and as these 
may have been rubbed off I have only definitely described one species, particularly as they were all 
collected in the same place. 

1. E. quinquevitiahis , Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 28o(igoi)(Westand Central Africa). — Piate I, Fig. 10. 

2. E. austenii, n. sp. ? (Doubtfully district 1 . 

5. Genus DESVOIDYA, Blanchard (i) 

Desvoidya. Blanchard, C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris, n° 37, liii(igoi). 
Armigeres. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 322 (1901). 



1 This is spelt iJesvoid'.'a by Blanchard. 



18 DIPTERA 

Characters, — Head clothed with flat scales and a few upright forked ones. Thorax with 
narrow-curved and long almost hair like scales ; scutellum with flat scales only. Legs longish and simple. 
Palpi of the q< thin, acuminate, with a few bristles, no hair tufts; those of 9 short The wings have the 
third long vein carried on through the basal cell ; subcostal and first long vein densely scaled with 
rather broad scales. Closely related to Stegotnyia but differ in q* palpi, venation and general appearance. 
Larvae and pupae distinct from Stegomyia; they have short, barrel shaped siphons. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Three species are known. At present the genus is 
confined to Asia and the East Indes. 

i. D. obturbans, Walker, Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 4, p. 91 (i860) (Ceylon, S. and N. India, Malay 
Peninsula, East Indes, China. Japan, Formosa, Philipppines Islands). 
centralis, Walker, Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 5, p. 144 (i860). 
Culex obturbans, Walker. 

2. D. panalectros, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 3i7 (1901) (Calcutta, Perak). 

3. D.fusca, Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. i35 (1903) (Kuala Lumpur, Philippines Islands). 

6. Genus STEGOMYIA, Theobald 

Stegomyis. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 283 (1901). 

Characters. — Head covered with flat scales all over and a few upright forked scales. Thorax 
with narrow-curved and almost spindle-shaped scales, scutellum with broad flat scales only. Palpi of 9 
short, small; (f palpi rather thick with scanty tufts. Venation as in Culex but the fork-cells are rather 
small. Scales of the wings broader than in Culex, dense as the apical portions of the veins. 

Larvae with rather short thick respiratory siphons. Eggs laid singly. One species (fasciata) is 
the yellow fever carrier. 

Geographical distribution of species. — The genus occurs in tropical, subtropical and 
warmer temperate zones, to about 48 on each side of the Equator. 

1. S. fasciata, Fabricius, Syst.Antl. 36. i3 (i8o5)(N. and S. America, West Indes, Asia, Australia, Most 

Oceanic Islands, S. Europe, Africa). — Plate I, Fig, 1 1. 

/rater. Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. p. 407 (1827). 

taeniatus. Wiedemann, Ausseuroop. zweifl. Ins. p. 10 (1828). 

konuoupi, Brulle, Ann. Soc. Nat. Paris, Vol. 23 (i83i) (Morea). 

formosus, Walker, List Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 4(1848). 

excitans, Warkerv'trrs. Saund. p. 4J0 (-1-856); 

viridiirons, Walker, List. Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 3 (1S48). 

inexorabilis, Walker, idem, p. 4 (1848)-^. 1 

annuiitarsis, Macquart, Dipt. Exot. tt». 1, (i83£).^6 

zonatipes. Walker, Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 2. p. 229. 

exagitans, Walker, Ins. Saund. p. 430 (i856). 

impatabilis. Walker, Journ. Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 3, p. 91 (i860). 

baitcroftii, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, Vol. 3, p. 1740 (1SS6). 

mosquito, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Arg. p. 60 (1891). 

clegans. Ficalbi, Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital. p. 25i (1896). 

rossii, Giles, Journ. Trop. Med. p. 64 (1899). 

toxorhynchus , Macquart, Dipt. Exot. Vol. 1, p. 73 (i838). 

calopus, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Europ. Zweit. Ins. Vol. 1, p. 3 (1818) ? 
■oar. mosquito, Robineau-Desvoidy, Ess. Culic. p. 407 (1827). 

var. luciensis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. ig5 (1901). . 

var. queenslandensis. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 297 (1901). 

2. 5. africana, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 304 (1901) (West and Central Africa). 

3. S. thomsoni, nov. sp. (1) (N. W. Provinces, India). 



(1) Sirgi-myia t/imnsrwi ', nov. sp. 

Front of mesothorax pure silvery white, with a brown eye like spot on each side, remainder of mesonotum with many white scales, but with 
some yellowish-brown ones over the roots of the wings. Head silvery white. Proboscis black with a broad median white band. Abdomen blackish with basal 
white dagger-shaped median patches : fore legs brown with a white spot on the base of the metatarsi ; mid legs with metatarsi white basally and apically, 
also the first tarsal: hind legs with white apical femoral spot, a white spot on basal half of the tibia, base of metatarsus broadly white and the other 
cegments with basal white bands. Length 3-5 mm. Habitat ; N. W. Provinces, India. 



FAM. CULICID.E 19 

4. 5. grant ii, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 306(1901) (Sokotra). 

5. S. iiigeria. Theobald, idem, Vol. 1, p. 3o3 (1901) (Bonny, W. Africa), 

6. S. crassipes. Van der Wulp, Dipt. Midd. Sumatra, p. 9 (Burma and Soeroelangoen). 

Culex crassipes, Van der Wulp. 

7. S. argent eopunctat a, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 3i6 (1901) (Mashonaland). 
S. S, punctolateralis, Theobald, The Entom. Vol. 36, p. i56 (igo3) (Queensland). 

9. 5. brevipalpis, Giles, Handb. of Gnats. (2 ed.) p. 384 (N. W. Provinces, India). 
10. S. signifer, Coquillett. Canad. Ent. Vol. 28, p. 43 (1S96). 
U.S. amesii, Ludlow. Journ. Xew York Ent. Soc. p. i3g (1903) (Philippine Islands). 

7. Genus SKUSEA, Theobald 

Skusea. Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 291 (1903), 

Characters. — Head with flat scales all over and some upright forked ones. Scutellar scales 
narrow and curved. Wings with denser scales on the branches of the first submarginal and the second 
posterior and its stem. Palpi of 9 short, of 3 segments, of the q* acuminate, hairy. 

Allied to the preceeding but can at once be told by the narrow-curved scutellar scales. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Four species are known. Two occur in abundance 
in the East Indes and Australia. 

1. S.fiinerea, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 292 (1903) (Queensland and East Indes). 

2. S. multiplex. Theobald, idem. Vol. 3, p. 293 (igo3) (Queensland and East Indes). 

3. S. pembaensis. Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 235 (1901) (Pemba Island. East Africa). 

Aed ■•;. Theobald. 

4. S. diurna. Theobald. The Ent. p. 25g (1903) (Kuala Lumpur). 

8. Genus SCUTOMYIA, Theobald 

Scutomyia, Theobald, The Entom. p. 77 (1904). 

Characters. — Head covered with flat scales except in the mid region, where there are narrow 
curved scales forming a median row. Scutellum entirely clothed with flat scales. 

This genus differs from Stegomyia in having narrow-curved scales on the head and from Machaya 
in having the scutellum with all flat scales. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Five species are known, occurring in Africa, 
Australia. Malay States and Philippine Islands. 

1. S. sugens. Wiedemann, Aussereurop. Zweifl. Ins. p. 545 (1828) (West and Central Africa). 

villains. Bigot, Ann. Ent Soc. Fr. S. 4, Vol. 1 (1861). 
Culex sugens, 'Wiedemann. 

2. S. marshallii . Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 3io (1901) (Central Africa). 

3. S. notoscripta, Skuse. Proc. Linn. Soc. X. S. Wales. Vol. 3, p. 1738 (1889) (Australia). 

albopictus, Skuse. Indian JIus. Xotes, Vol. 35, p. 20. 
culex notoscriptus. Skuse. 
subspecies Samarensis. Ludlow, Journ. New York Ent. Soc. p. i38 (igo3). 

4. S. iiivea, Ludlow, Journ. Xew York Ent. Soc. Vol. n, p. 139 (1903) (Philippine Islands, Fed. Malay 

States). 

5. S. albolineata, Theobald, The Entom. p. 77(1904) (Kuala Lumpur). 

9. Genus AEDIMORPHUS, Theobald 

Aedimorphus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 290 (1903). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales all over except behind where they are narrow 



\J 



20 DIPTERA 

curved scales ; there are also upright forked scales; 'Scutellum with flat scales only. Mesothorax with 
curved hair-like and narrow-curved scales. Metanotum nude. Fork-cells moderately long; first submar- 
ginal longer and narrower than the second posterior cell, many of the lateral vein-scales long and broad. 
I originally placed this genus in the Aedeomyinae but now I feel sure it comes near Stegomyia. No 
C? 's have however yet been found. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only at present known. 

i. /E. domesticus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 253 (1901) (West and Central Africa). 
Uranotmnia domestica, Theobald. 

10. Genus LEICESTERIA, Theobald 

Leicesteria, Theobald, The Entom. p. 211 (Aug. 1904). 

Characters. — Head covered with flat scales, upright forked scales and a row of spindle shaped 
ones around the eyes. Mesothorax with narrow and broad curved scales; scutellum and prothoracic 
lobes with flat scales. Palpi of the cf's slender, no hair-tufts, longer than proboscis; of the 9 half the 
length of the proboscis, composed of 4 segments. Wing scales and venation much as in Stegomyia. 

This genus comes near Erctmapodites in appearance but can at once be told by the scales around 
the eyes and the great length of the 9 palpi. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only occurs. 
1. L. longipalpis, Leicester, The Entom. p, 211 (Aug. 1904) (Kuala Lumpur). 

I I. Genus MACLEAYA, Theobald 

Macleaya, Theobald, The Entom. Vol. 36, p. iS5 (1903). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales except in the middle where they are in the form of 
narrow-curved scales. Scutellum with flat scales to the mid lobe, narrow-curved ones to the lateral lobes. 

Geographical distribution of species. — This genus is represented by one species from 
Australia. 
1, M. tremula, Theobald, The Entom. Vol. 36, p. i55 (1903) (South Queensland). 

12. Genus HULECOETOMYlA, Theobald 

Hulecoetomyia, Theobald, The Entom, p. i63 (1904). 

Characters. — Head mostly covered with flat scales, but there is a pronounced median area 
of narrow-curved scales, which also occur along the nape and around the eyes. Scutellum with a rosette 
of flat and somewhat spindle shaped scales to the mid lobe and scattered ones of similar form on the 
lateral lobes; prothoracic lobes with small flat scales. Fork-cells of wings small. Palpi short in the 9 ! i n 
the cf long, but shorter than the proboscis, thin and devoid of hair-tufts; the apical joint about half the 
length of the penultimate. 

This genus can at once be told by the cephalic characters and by the scutellar scales. The scutellar 
scales are apparently all rounded apically and not pointed as in true spindle-shaped scales. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two species occur in this genus, one previously 
included in Stegomayia. 

1. H. trilineata, Leicester, The Entom. p. i63 (1904) (Kuala Lumpur). 
2 H. pseudoianiata. Giles, The Entom. p. 192 (1901) (Northern India). 
Stegomyia pseudotacniata, Giles . 



FAM. CULICIM: 21 

13. Genus PHAGOMYIA, nov. gen. 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales, except for a few along the nape. Scutellum with 
small flat scales on the mid lobe, narrow-curved ones on the lateral lobes. 

Allied to Stegaiiiyia but easily separated by the narrow-curved scales on the lateral lobes of the 
scutellum. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two species are definively known and possibly a 
third belongs here. 

i. P. gubernatoris, Giles. The Entom. p. 194 (1901) (Northern India). 
Stegomyia gubernatoris, Giles. 

2. P. irritans, Theobald, Eep. Liverpool School Trop. Med. p. 3. app. (1901) (Bonny, West Africa). 

3. P. nigricephala, Theobald, idem, p. 4, App, (1901) (Bonny, West Africa). 

14. Genus POLYLEPTIOMYIA, nov. gen. 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales and with narrow-curved ones on the nape. Scutel- 
lum with spindle-shaped scales to the mid lobe, flat ones to the lateral lobes. 

Allied to Stegomyia but told by the narrow-curved scales on the head and the scutellar scales. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only occurs in the genus. 
1. P. albocephala, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 140 (igo3) (Gambia). 

15. Genus HOWARDINA, Theobald 

Howardina, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 287 (1903). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales and narrow- curved scales forming a small narrow- 
curved median area, with the base between the eyes. The scutellum with narrow-curved scales only; 
wings with the lateral vein-scales rather large, long and rather thm, median vein scales small. Palpi of 
$ minute, penultimate joint long, longer than the two basal ones, apical joint minute. Male palpi long 
and acuminate. 

Resemble Aedeomyinae in general appearance but the rf's have long palpi and thus come near 
Stegomyia. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two specias occur in this genus. 

1. H. w.ilkeri, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1. p. 424 (1901) (Jamaica). 

Culex (Stegomyia?) walker i. Theobald. 

2. H gretnii, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 289 (igo3) (Ceylon). 

16. Genus DANIELSIA, Theobald 

Danielsia. Theobald. The Entom. p. 78 (1904). 

Characters. — Head covered with small flat scales, with truncated ends, loosely and rather 
raggedly placed on the head, a few long narrow-curved ones behind and small upright forked ones 
with them. Scutellum with small narrow-curved scales ; mesothorax with narrow-curved scales. Palpi 
short in the 9 > densely scaled; in the rf as long as the proboscis, the two apical joints short, the apical 
rather shorter than the penultimate, hair-tufts scanty; fork-cells of wings rather short. 

This genus comes near Macleaya but can at once be told by the narrow-curved scutellar scales and 
from the allied Catageiomyia by the long ^f palpi. 

Geographical distribution of species. 

1. D. alboiteniata, Leicester, The Entom. p. in (1904) (Kuala Lumpur, Fed. Malay. States). 



' 



■J 



22 DIPTERA 

17. Genus LEPIDOTOMYIA, nov. gen. 

Characters. — Head with flat scales all over except around the eyes where they are almost 
spindle shaped and some narrow-curved ones behind, also upright forked scales. Scutellum with narrow- 
curved scales only. Palpi of 9 rather long, scaly, those of the o< with short hair-tufts. Fork-cells short. 
Proboscis short, not more than half the length of the body. 

Very near Danielsia but with narrow spindle shaped scales around the eyes and shorter proboscis, 
Large species. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only know. 
i. L. magna (i), nov, sp. (Bombay). 

18. Genus CATAGEIOMYIA, Theobald 

Catageiomyia, Theobald, Mem. XI, Liverp. School Trop. Med., p. i app. (1903). 

Characters. — Head clothed with loose irregularly disposed flat scales over most of the area, 
with narrow-curved ones behind and some upright forked ones; in the g* the narrow-curved scales spread 
out over the head rather further them in the 9 • Scutellum with flat scales to the mid lobe, narrow-curved 
ones to the lateral lobes; narrow-curved scales on the mesonotum. Palpi short in the 9> composed of 
3 segments, the last as long as the two basal ones; palpi in of long, but not nearly as long as the pro- 
boscis, the two apical segments short, the apical slightly shorter than the penultimate; apex of the ante- 
penultimate slightly expanded, dense hairs on each side of the penultimate and on one side of the apex 
of the antepenultimate. 

This genus differs from those related to it in (1) q* palpi shorter than the proboscis and (it) loosely 
applied cephalic flat scales. In general appearance the single species resembles a Culex of the fatigaus 
group. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only occurs. 
1. C. senegalensis , Theobald. Mem. XI, Liverp. Sch. Trop, Med. p. 1 app. (jo,o3) (St Louis, Senegal). 

19. Genus GILESIA. Theobald 

Gilesia. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 233 (igo3). 

Characters. — Head covered with rather broad and flat spindle-shaped scales and narrow- 
curved ones; scutellum with small flat scales and some spindle shaped ones. Palpi of the 9 of four 
segments, rather long, about one-fourth the length of the thick proboscis, apical joint long, penultimate 
joints swollen, globose, the two basal joints small. Basal joint of the antennae with small bristles and a 
few small flat scales. Ungues of 9 very thick, short and with a blunt tooth. Wing venation much as 
in preceding genera ; fork-cells small ; veins clothed with rather broad elongated scales like Taeniorhyn- 
ckus (genus 25). Male unknown. 

This genus comes between the Stegomyians and Cidex, whilst the wings give it a Taeniorhynchus 
like appearance. The chief characters are the scale ornamentation of the head and scutellum. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species is only known at present. 
1. G. aculeata, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 233 ( igo3) (South Queensland). 



(1) Lepidotomyia magna, nov. spec. Head black with a narrow white eye-border and a few pale median scales ; palpi of Q rather long and black. 
Thorax white in front, forming a solid white W. a small white triangular spot on the base of the wings and white lateral spots. Abdomen black with basal 
white lateral spots. Fore legs black with a white apical tibial spot; mid legs with an apical tibial spot, (metatarsi white with a black band towards the apical 
half, apex of first tarsal and remainder black; hind legs -with base and apex of femora white, tibia black, base and apex of metatarsus with white bands, 
base of first tarsal with white band and a minute one to the second segment. Wings normal. — Length, 5.5 mm. Habitat Bombay. 



FAM. CULICIDyE 2 3 

20. Genus THEOBALDIA Neveu-Lemaire 

Theobaldia, Xeveu-Lemaire. C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris (29 Nov. 1902). 

Characters. — Head and scutellar scales narrow-curved, except at the sides of the head where 
they are flat, there are also upright forked scales on the head. Palpi long in the cf, the two apical joints 
swollen, composed of thiee segments, and three incomplete pseudo-joints, the two apical segments and 
apex of the antepenultimate with hair-tufts. Wings with man}- large lanceolate scales, which become 
collected into patches forming more or less distinct spots. 

The members of this genus form a very natural group, easily told by the q* clavate palpi and the 
lanceolate wings scales often collected into definite spots. They were all previously placed in Culex. 

Geographical distribution of species. — All the species belong to temperate climates, when 
thej" occur elsewhere it is usually in the hills. They are domestic forms and thus are easily distributed 
by artificial agencies. 

1. T. anmdata. Schrank. Beitr. Xaturg. p. 97. 70(1776) (Europe, Punjab, India. North America, Mexico). 

— Plate I, Fig. 12. 

affinis, Stephens. Zool. Journ. Nr. I. (1S25). 

varicgalus, Schrank, Enum. Ins. Austriae ind. Aug. Vind. (17S1). 

2. T . penetrans, Robineau-Desvoidy, Ess. Culic. (1827) (France). 

3. T.ficalbii, Xoe, Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital. Vol. 3i. p. 23i (1S90) (Italy). 

4. T. glaphyropttrus, Schiner, Fauna Austr. Die Fliegen. Vol. 2, p. 62S (10) (1S64) (Austria). 

5. T . incidens, Thomson, Eugen. Resa. Dipt. p. 443 (California, New Mexico). 

6. T. spjthipalpis, Rondani, Dipt. Ital. Prodr. Vol. 1 (18S6) (Italy and Mediterranean Islands, Gibraltar. 

India, Cape Colony, Khartoum, Madeira, Canaiy Islands. Algeria). 
? longiareolatus, Macquart. Dipt. Exot. p. 34 (iS38), 

21. Genus GRABHAMIA, Theobald 

Grabhamia. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 243 (1903). 

Characters. — Allied to both Culcx and Taenioi'hynchus. Head clothed with rather broad curved 
scales, upright forked scales and flat lateral ones. All the thorax with narrow-curved scales. Palpi of 9 
composed of 4 segments, the apical one minute; rj 1 palpi long, the two last segments swollen and with 
distinct hair tufts. Wings rather short; fork-cells short ; median vein scales rather thick, lateral ones 
rather short and broadish. neither so long nor as dense as in Taenioi'hynchus ; scales of wings mottled and 
also the le^s mottled and spotted. 

.- laid singly idorsalis, jamaicensis, etc.), larvae with short siphon when adult. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Twelve species occur in this genus, the majority 
e from Europe and North America. Previously placed in the genus Culex. 

1. G. jamaicensis, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 345(igoi)(Jamaica. NorthAmerica). — Plate 2, Fig. 4. 

2. G. fyyn-maea, Theobald, idem, Vol. Z, p. 245 (June igo3)' (Antigua, Jamaica). 

~: Culex nanus, Coquillett. 

3. G. nana, Coquillett, Canad. Ent. p. 256 (Sept. igo3) (Florida). 

Probably my G. fygmaea. 

4. G. discolor, Coquillett, idem, p. 256 i'igo3) (New Jersey). 

5. G. sollicitans. Walker. Ins. Saund. p. 427 iS56^ (United States, Jamaica, Galapagos Islands, Tamsui, 

Formosa). 
G. durbanensis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 247 (igo3) (Durban). 

7. G. ambigims, Theobald, idem, Vol. 3. p. 248 (igo3) (Quilon. South India). 

8. G. cwriei. Coquillett, Canad. Ent. p. 259 (1901) (N. Dakota, Idaho, New Mexico, California U.S. A.). 
".-. spencerii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. gg (1901) (Canada, Philippine Islands). 

dahoensis. Theobald, Mon. Culic. p. 230 (igo3). 



24 DIPTERA 

10. G. pulcripalpis, Rondani, Spec. Ital. Gen. Culex (Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital.) (1S72) (Italy, England). 

11. G. pulcritarsis, Rondani, idem (1872) (Ital}'). 

12. G. dorscilis, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Zweifl. Ins. Vol. 4, p. 242, 18 et I, 2, 3 (1818) (Europe). 
i3. G. penicillaris, Rondani, Spec. Ital. Gen. Culex (Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital.) (1872) (Italy). 

14. G.vittata, Theobald, Canad. Ent. p. 3n (igo3) (New Mexico). 

GENUS UNCERTAIN 

Culex impudicus, Ficalbi, Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital. p. igo (1890) (Sardinia, Sicily). 

Probably comes in Grabhamia. 
C. leucacanthus, Loew, Beschr. Europ. Dipt. 3. Band, Halle (1873) (Kasan). 

22. Genus ACARTOMYIA, Theobald 

Acartomyia, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 25i (igo3). 

Characters. — Allied closely to Grabhamia but differs in cephalic ornamentation. Head clothed 
with irregularly disposed flat scales all over, with patches of narrow curved and numerous upright 
forked scales, giving the head a general ragged appearance. Thorax with narrow-curved scales. Palpi of 
9 composed of 4 segments, of the of much swollen apically involving the last two segments and the 
apex of the antepenultimate segment, the apical one being especially swollen. Wings with rather small 
fork-cells, majority of vein scales broadish and with crenulated edges,, mottled. 

Larvae with short thick siphons when mature. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only occurs at present; the larvae 
living in salt pans along the shore at Malta. This mosquito may have some connection with Mediter- 
ranean fever. 
1. A. zammitii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 252 (igo3) (Malta). 

23. Genus LUTZIA, Theobald 

Lutzia, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. i55 (igo3). 

Characters. — Head scales of all three forms, narrow-curved, upright forked and flat lateral 
ones; scales of thorax narrow-curved. Wings with partly Culex-like and partly T<zniorhynchus-\\ke scales, 
the latter forming dark areas and spots; wing fringe spotted. Palpi of 9 composed of 3 segments; cf 
palpi of 3 segments, the last segment acuminate slightly longer than the penultimate, all the segments 
very hairy, except at the base of the palpi. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only is known in the genus 
coming from South America. It can easily be told by its large size and spotted wings. 
1. L. bigotii, Bellardi, Mem. Accad. Sc. Torino, Vol. 22, p. 200 (2) (Brazil, Mexico). — Plate 2, Fig. I. 

24. Genus GULEX, Linn>eus 

Culex, Linnaeus, S3 r st. Nat. (1735). 

Characters. — Head clothed with narrow-curved and upright forked scales and with flat scales 
at the sides. Thorax with narrow-curved and curved hair-like scales on both mesonotum and scutellum. 
Abdomen with flat scales all over. Legs simple and scaled. Ungues of 9 equal, simple or serrated; of 0* 
in fore and mid legs unequal, simple or serrated. Wings with the fork-cell long or moderately long, the 
lateral vein scales linear or slightly lanceolate. Palpi of (f acuminate. 

This genus, the type of the family still contains a number of species that may possibly be justifiably 
excluded from it. 



FAM. CULICIDiE 2 5 

Geographical distribution of species. — The members of this genus are found in almost all 
parts of the world. By far the largest number of species undoubtedly occur in this genus. One species 
only has spotted wings. 

i. C. mimeiicus, Xoe, Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital. Vol. 3i, p. 240 (1899) (Italy, Mediterranean Islands, India, 
Fed. Malay States . 

realms, Pallas. Reisen Russ. Reich. (1S71) (Near Caspian Sea). 

2. C. taniorhy minis, Wiedemann. Dipt. Exot. p. 43 (1821) (South America, Southern United States, 

West Indes . 

3. C, microanmdatus, Theobald. Mon.Culic.Yol. 1, p. 353 (1901) (Central and Southern India, Philippine, 

Islands. Federated Mala}" States). 

4. C. japonicus. Theobald, idem, Vol. 1, p. 385 (1901) (Japan, Ceylon). 

5. C. mariae, Sergent, Ann. Inst. Pasteur. Vol. 17, p. 62 (igo3) (Algeria). 

6. C. vishnui, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 355 (1901) (Ceylon, Central Provinces and S. India). 

7. C. annulus, Theobald, idem. Vol. i,p. 35S(igoi) (Hongkong, Lamma, Straits Settlements). 

S. C. s:::a:s. Wiedemann. Ausseurop. Zweifl. Ins. p. 544 (1S28) (Fed. Malay States, South India, 

Philippine Islands). 
9. C. impcllais. Walker, Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 4, p. 91 (N. W, Provinces, India, Federated 

Malay States). 

10. C. annuliferus. Ludlow. Journ. Ent. Soc. Xew York, Vol. 2 p. 141 (igo3) (Philippine Islands). 

11. C. annulirosiris, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. X. S. Wales, p. 1737 (1889) (Queensland, New South 

Wales). 
suiispcc : bancroftii, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 36y (1901) (Bupengary. S. Queensland). 

12. C. iiifitla, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 370 (1901) (Straits Settlements). 
i3. C. longirostris. Van der Wulp, Bijd. Sum. Exp. Dipt. Vol. 4, p. 9 (Sumatra). 

14. C. annulioris, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1. p. 371 (1901) (Mashonaland, Philippines Islands). 
. gambiensis, Theobald, Mem. X. Liverp. School Trop. Med. App. p. 5 (igo3). 

i5. C. plumosus, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1. p. 373(1901) (Mashonaland). 
:f. C. auntdioris. 

16. C. dissimilis, Theobald, idem. Vol. 1. p. 376 (1901) (Sierra Leone). 

17. C. hirsidipalpis, Theobald, ibidem. Vol. 1, p. 378(1901) (Mashonaland). 

'. albirostris, Macquart. Dipt. Exot. Vol. 4, p. 10 (1821) (Port Darwin, S. Australia, N. Zealaad). 

19. C. htlloggii, Theobald. Canad. Ent. Vol. 35, p. 211 (1903) (California, U. S. A. New Mexico). 

20. C. twrtitriius , Theobald, Mon.. Culic. Vol. 3, p. i5g (1903) (Fiji). 

21. C. gnuphodus. Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. i63 (igo3) (Straits Settlements). 

22. C. transvaalensis. Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3. p. i65 (1903) (Pretoria). 

23. C. alis, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3. p. 167 (1903) (Christmas Islands). 

24. C. thalasshis, Theobald, ibidem. Vol. 3, p. 168 (igo3) (Gambia). 

25. C. anarmostus. Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3, p. 170 (1903) (West Africa). 

26. C. duitoni. Theobald. Rep. School. Liverp. Trop. Med. App. p. 5 (1901) (West Africa). 

27. C. apicalis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 171 (1903) (Brazil). 
C. cornigtr, Theobald, idem, Vol. 3. p. 173 (1903) (Brazil). 

29. C. alboannulatiis. Macquart. Dipt. Exot. p. 10, Suppl. 4 (South Queensland, N. S. Wales, Eastern 

Coast of Australia). 
3 j. C. hirsutum, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 3g2 (1901) (Mashonaland, Philippine Islands). 
3r. C. vigilax, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. X. S. Wales, p. 1731 (i88g) (Queensland). 
marinus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 3g6 (1901). 

32. C. imitator. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 175 (igo3) (Brazil). 

33. C. pleuristriatus, Theobald (Lutz Mss.), idem, Vol. 3. p. 177 (igoi) (Brazil). 

34. C caictans. Meigen. Syst. Beschr. Zweifl. Ins. Vol. 1, 6 (1818) (Europe, X. America, India). 

conferrals. Walker. Ins. Saund. p 427 fi856) (N. America, India). 
slimulaiis. Walker, Cat. Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 4(1848). 
maculatus, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Zweifl. Ins. Vol. 1, 6. 7 (181 8). 
fumipennis, Stephens, Zool. Journ. Vol. 1, p. 433.5 (i825). 

35. C. anmdipes. Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Zweifl. Ins. Vol. 6, p. pp. 241,15 (i83o) (Europe). 



26 DIPTERA 

36. C. vexans, Meigen. Syst. Beschr. zweifl. Ins. Vol. 6, pp. 241.16 (i83o) (Europe). 

malariae, Grassi, Vent. Spec. Zanz. Ital. p. 175 (1899). 

articulatus. Rondani, Spec. Ital. Gen. Culex. Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital. (1872). 
3-. C. particeps, Adams, Kansas Univ. Science Bull. Vol. 2 (2), p. 26(1903) (Arizona). 
38. C. vittiger, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, p. 1728 (1889) (S. Queensland, N. S. Wales). 
3g. C. sylvestris, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. i,p. 406(1901) (Canada, U. S. America). 

40. C. cantator, Coquillett, Canad. Ent. p. 255(igo3) (New Jersey). 

41. C. testaceus, Van der Wulp, Tijdschr. V Ent. p. 128 (1869) (Canada). 

42. C. flavescens, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 410(1901). 

43. C. vagans, Wiedemann, Ausseurop. Zweifl. Ins. p. 5^.5 (1828) (China). 

44. C. caecus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 410 (1901) (Fed. Malay States, Philippine Islands). 

45. C.pvocax, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, p. 1742 (1S89) (Queensland, N. S. Wales). 

46. C. rubithorax, Macquart, Dipt. Exot. Suppl. 4. p. g.(i85o) (South Queensland, Tasmania), 

47. C. occidentalis, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales p. 1729 (iS85) (Victoria, Western Australia). 

veil-. A. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 421 (1901) (Victoria). 

48. C. flavifrons. Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, Vol. 3. p. 1735 (1889) (New South Wales). 

49. C". maculiventris, Macquart, Dipt Exot. Vol. 1, p. 7 (1821) (Algeria). 

50. C. imprimiens, Walker, Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 5, p. 144 (Amboina). 
5i. C. terrens, W T alker, Ins. Saund. p. 429 (i856) (South America). 

52. C janitor, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 1 S3 (1903) (Jamaica). 

53. C. toitilis. Theobald, The Entom. p. 281 (igo3) (Jamaica). 

54. C. camptot'hynchus, Thomson, Eug. Resa. Dipt. p. 443 (1868) (Sydney, Australia). 
55 C. canadensis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2. p. 3 (igo3) (Ontario, Canada). 

56. C. atropalpus. Coquillett, Canad. Ent. Vol. 34. p. 292 (North America). 

57. C. cingulatus. Fabricius, Syst. Antl. p. 36 (i8o5) (Brazil). 

58. C. secutor. Theobald, Mon. Culic Vol. 2. p. 321 (1901) (Jamaica). 

59. C. theileri, Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. 187 (igo3) (Pretoria). 

60. C. creticus, Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. 189 (1903) (Crete). 

61. C. morsitans, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 8 (1903) (England). 

62. C. gdidus, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 20 (igo3) (South India, Central India, Ceylon, Fed. Malay 

States, Philippine Islands). 

var. cuueatus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 22 (1903) (South India, Fed. Malay States, Philippine Islands). 
var. sinensis. Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. 1S0 (igo3) (China). 

63. C. quasigelidus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 181 (igo3) (Uganda). 

64. C. tarsalis, Coquillett, Canad. Ent. Vol. 28, p. 43 11S96) (California). 

a/finis, Adams, Kansas. Univ. Bull. p. 25 (1903). 
willntotti, Giles, Handb. Gnats, p. 2S1 (1900). 

65. C. albitarsis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 25 (igoi) (West Africa, Guiana ?). 

66. C. longipalpis, Van der Wulp. Bijdr. Midd. Sumatr. Exped. Vol. 4, p. g (Alahn, Pandjang and Soe- 

roelnngoen). 

67. C. univittatiis, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 2g (igoi) (Natal, Mashonaland, Singapore). 

68. C. quasiunivittatus, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 32 (igoi) (Mashonaland), 

69. C. albolineatus , Giles. Handb. Gnats (2), p. 430 (1902) (N. W. Provinces, India). 

70. C. albifasciatus, Macquart. Dipt. Exot. Vol. 1, 354 (i838) (Brazil, Argentine). 

vittatus, Phillippi, Verh. Zool. Bot. Ges. Wien. Vol. i5, p. 5g6 (iS65). 
OchUrotatus albifasciatus . Arribalzaga, 

71. C. confirmatus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. p. 42 (igoi) (Jamaica, Argentine, Brazil, British Guiana). 

72. C. serratus, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 45 (1901) (Brazil, British Guiana. Trinidad). 

73. C. dupreei, Coquillett, Canad. Ent. p. 10 (igo3) (N. America). 

74. C. fusculus, Zetterstedt, Dipt. Scand. Vol. g (i85o) (Scandinavia). 

75. C. iracuiidus, Walker, List. Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 6 (1848) (New Zealand), 

76. C. pulcriventer, Giles, The Entom. p. ig4 (1901) (Northern India). 

77. C. triseriatiis, Say, Journ. Acad. Nat. Sc. Philad. Vol. 3, p. 12 (North America). 

78. C. aurifer. Coquillett, Canad, Ent. p. 255 (igo3) (New Hampshire). 

7g. C lateralis, Meigen. Syst. Beschr. Europ.. zweifl. Ins. 1 (5) (i8i5) (Europe, Algeria). 



FAM. CULICIDjE 27 

80. C. dyari, Coquillett. Journ. New-York. Ent. Soc. Vol. 10. p. 192 (North America). 

81. C. trivittatus, Coquillett, idem (North America). 

82. C. uncus. Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 53 (1901) Selangor) 

s . ; . C. subalbatus, Coquillett Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. Vol. 21, p. 3o2 1 1899) (Japan). 

54. C. atripes, Skuse Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, p. 1750 (1899) (New South Wales). 

55. C. cinereus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p, 58 (1901) (West and Central Africa). 

86. C. nigrochaetae, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 60(1901) (Lagos). 

87. C. pseudocincreus, Theobald, ibidem. Vol. 2. p. 62 (1901) (Mashonaland). 

B8. C. metaUicus. Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p 63 (1 901) (West and Central Africa). 

89. C. mathisi, Neveu-Lemaire. Arch, de Parasit. Vol. 6 (1), p. 5 (1902) (Cayenne). 

90. C.frenchii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 66 (1901) (Victoria). 

91. C. langipes. Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 68 (1901) (Singapore). 

92. C.fredownttisis, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p, 69 (1901) (Sierra Leone). 

93. C. htteolateralis Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 71 (1901) (Natal. West and Central Africa. Fed. Malay 

States) . 

var, pallida, Theobald, Mem. 11, p. 2 App. Liverp. Sch. Trop. Med. (1903). 
var. albothorax. Theobald, idem Senegambia). 

94. C. diver sus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 73 (1901) (England). 

95. C. punctor. Kirby. Fauna Bor. Amer. p. 3og (Hudson's Bay, North America). 

95. C. ornattts Hoffmanseg (Meigen), Syst. Beschr. Eur. zweifl. Ins. Vol. 1 (5,4) (181 8) (Europe). 
us, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Eur. Zweifl. Ins. Vol. 1, p. 71 (1818). 
non ornatus, Ficalbi. 
- C. consobriitus. Robineau-Desvoidy. Ess. Culic. (i838) (North America). 
impatiens. Walker. List Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 5 (1848). 
pinguis, Walker, Science Gossip, pp. 79-81 (1867). 
inornatus, Williston, North Amer. Fauna Washingt. (1893). 

98. C. ncmorosus, Meigen. Syst. Beschr. Eur. zweifl. Ins. Vol. 1, p. 4, (1818) (Europe and N. America). 

sylvaticus, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. 6. Theil (i83o). 

''us. Curtis, Guide At. Brit. Ins. Vol. 1 (1829). 
provocans. Walker, List Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 7 (1848). 
salimis, Ficalbi. Xot. Zanz. Ital. Vol. 9, a, nota (1896). 
reptans, Meigen, Klass, Vol. 1, p. 3, 2. 
1 itus. Meigen, idem, p. 4-5. 
vjr. 1. salinus, Ficalbi. 

var. 2. luteovittata, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 1, p. 85 (1902). 
var. 3. detritus. Haliday, Ent. Mag. Vol. 1 (i833). 

99. C. sagax. Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. X. S. Wales p. 1744 (1896) (New South Wales, South 

Queensland). 

100. C. pervigilans, Bergroth, Wien. Ent. Zeit. p. 295 (1889) (New Zealand, New South Wales and 

Queensland). 

101. C. ausiralis, Erichson, Arch. Naturg. Vol. 8. p. 470(1842) (Tasmania, Victoria). 

crucians, Walker, Ins. Saund. Vol. 1, p. 432 (i856). 
io3. C. nigripes. Zetterstedt, Ins. Lapp. (1838-40) (Northern Europe, Northern India, North America). 

impiger, Walker, List Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 7 (1848). 

implacabilis, Walker, idem, p. 7 (1848). 
io3. C. terriei. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. ig3 (igo3) (Britain). 
104. C. sylvae. Theobald, idem, Vol. 2. p. 96 (1901) ; Vol. 3, p. 194 (1903) (Britain). 
io5. C. hirsuteron, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 1. p. 98 (1901) (Virginia, U. S. A.). 

106. C. ochracetts, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 1. p. io3 (1901) (Mashonaland). 

107. C. trilineatus. Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 1, p. io5 (1901) (Upper Burma). 

108. C. ttrritans. Walker, Ins. Saund. p. 428 (i856) (United States). 

? gtniculatus , Olivier. 

109. C. salisburiensis . Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 112 (1901) (Mashonaland, Pretoria). 
no. C. mediolineatus , Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. n3 (1901) (Upper Burma). 

in. C. inflidus, Theobald, ibidem. Vol. 2, p. n5 (1901) (Grenada). 
112. C. ritsticus, Rossi, Ins. Etrus. Vol. 2. Libar. (1790) (Tuscany). 

punctatus, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Eur. zweifl. Ins. Vol. 1 I1818). 

ijua&ratimaculatus, Macquart (Rev. Syst. Culic. Eur. p. 107, Ficalbi) (1834). 



28 DIPTERA 

n3. C. geniculates, Olivier, Enc. Meth. Hist. Nat. Ins. Vol. 16 (1791) (Paris, Italy, Palestine). 
hortensis, Ficalbi, Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital. p. 292 (1S99). 

114. C. sergentii, Theobald, Ann. Inst. Pasteur, Vol. 17, p. 2 (June 1903); Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 218 

(igo3) (Algeria). 
n5. C. apicalis, Adams, Kansas Univ. Sc. Bull. Vol. 2, n° 2, p. 26 (1903) (Arizona). 

116. C. scholasticus , Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2. p. 120 (1901) (West Indes, British Guiana). 

117. C. modestus, Ficalbi, Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital. Vol. 21 (1889) (Italy). 

118. C. similis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 207(1903) (Jamaica). 

119. C. virgultus, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 123 (1901) (Brazil). 

120. C. masculus, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, iz5 (1901) (Sierra-Leone). 

121. C. virideventer, Giles, Journ. Bomb. Nat Hist. Soc. Vol. i3, p. 609, n° 4 (1901) (Naini Tal, India). 

122. C. angitlatus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 324(1901) (Naini Tal, India). 

123. C. tip uh [for mis, Theobald, idem. Vol. 2, p. 327 (1901) (N. W. Provinces, India). 

124. C. pipiens, Linnaeus, Ins. Suec. 1890(1758) (Europe, Mediterrannean Islands, United States and 

Canada, Egypt., Madeira, Teneriffe, Algeria). 
vulgaris, Linnaeus. 
albinns, Linnaeus. 

agilis, Bigot, Bull. Soc. Ent. Fr. Vol. 9, p. 122. (1884 ?) 
ciliaris, Linnaeus, Syst. Nat. Vol. 12, p. 1002. 2 (1767). 
communis, De Geer, Ins. Vol. 6, p. 3i6 (1777). 
ruins, Meigen, Syst. Beschr Vol. 1, p. 7 (1818). 
phytophagus , Ficalbi, Rev. Sist. Culic. Eur. p. 276 (1SS9). 
domesticus, Germar, Reise Dalm. (1817). 

125. C. qitasipipiens, Theobald Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. i36 (1901) (Central Provinces, India). 

126. C. varioannulatus, Theobald, idem. Vol. 3, p. 198(1903) (Azores). 

127. C . foachowensis , Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2. p. i37 (1901) (Fou Chow, China). 

128. C. perexiguus, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3, p. 199(1903) (Palestine). 

129. C. salinarius, Coquillet. I have no reference to the description if it is distinct (vide. Ent. News, p. 73, 

Feb. 1904). 
i3o. C. nigrihdus, Zetterstedt, Dipt. Scand. Vol. 9 (i85o) (Scandinavia, Crete, Britain). 
i3r. C. pains, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 194 (1903) (St. Vincent, Barbados). 
i32. C. rcstuans, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 142 (1901) (Toronto). 
i33. C. bilineatus, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3, p. 196 ( 1903) (Brazil). 

134. C. zombaensis. Theobald, ibidem. Vol. 2. p. 143 (1901) (Zomba, British Central Africa). 
i35 C. reesii, Theobald, ibidem. Vol. 2, p. 140 (1901) (Hong Kong). 
i36. C. sericeus, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 147 (1901) ^Hong Kong). 
137. C. cylindricus, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3, p. 202 (1903) (South Queensland). 
i38. C.flavipes, Macquart, Dipt. Exot. Vol. 1, p. 355 (i838) (British Guiana, Brazil, Argentine, Chile, 

Uruguay. Trinidad). 

serotinus, Philippi, Auf. Chil. Dipt. Vol. 1, p. 1 (iS65). 

139. C. invidiosus, Theobald, Rept. Liverp. School. Trop. Med. Mem. 4. App. p. n (1901) (Bonny). 

140. C. invenustus, Theobald, idem. App. p. 9 (Degama. West Africa). 

141. C. nebulosus. Theobald, ididem. App. p. 10 (1901) (Old Calabar, West Africa). 

142. C. puinosus, Theobald, ibidem, App. p. 8 (1901) (West Africa). 

pruina, Theobald, ibidem. 

143. C. fatigans (1), Wiedemann, Aussereurop. zweifl. Eur. Ins. p. 10 (1828) (Asia, S. Centr. and N. Ame- 

rica, West Indes, Africa, Southern Europe, Australiaand most Oceanic Islands). — Plate 2, Fig. 2. 

auxifer, Coquerel (Bigot), Ann. Soc. Ent. Fr. (i858). 

acstuans, Wiedemann, Aussereurop. zweifl. Ins. (182S). 

pallipes, Meigen, Sj'st. Beschr. Supp. (i838). 

dolosa, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 56(1896). 

sfotsii, Giles, Handb. Gnats, p. 292(1900'). 
? macleayi, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales p. 1745 (1896). 
? pungeris, Wiedemann, Auss. zweifl. Ins. p. 9 (1828). 



(1) If prtrig-ens is the same as fattpans that name must stand as it appears on the page before fatigans. 



FAM. CULICIDiE 29 

subspt mlatus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. i5g (1901). 

subspec. machayi, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, p. 1745 (1S96). 
subspe:. skusii, Giles Handb. Gnats, p. 292 (1900) 
subspec. trilincjtiis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. i5g (1901). 

144. C. litualis, Skuse. Proc. Linn. Soc. N. S. Wales, p. 1747 (1896) (New South Wales). 

145. C. pitst'lltis, Macquart, Dipt. Exot. p. 9, 4, Siipp. iS3S) (Eg}-pt). 

146. C.fuscaiius. Wiedemann, Dipt. Exot. p. 9 (1821) (East India, Malacca, Singapore, Sarawak). 

147. C. bicolor. Meigen, Syst. Berschr. Zweifl. Ins. Vol. 1 (1S18) (Europe). 

? marginalis, Stephens. 

148. C. lutesceits Fabricius, Syst. Ent. Flensb. et Lips. (1775) (Europe). 

Saaescens, Fabricius, Syst, Antl. 1 iSo5). 
thoracicus, Robineau-Desvoidy, Ess. Culic. (1S27}. 

149. C. pollens, Coquillett. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. Vol. 21. p. 3o3 (1S99) (Japan). 

i5o. C. deceits, Theobald, Rep. Liverp. School Trop. Med. Mem. IV, p. 7 App. (1901) (Bonn}'). 

i5i. C. ititbilis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 208 (igo3) (British Guiana). 

i52. C. crinifer, Theobald, idem, p. 209 (1903) (Brazil). 

i53. C. azoriensis, Theobald, ibidem, p. 210 (1903) (Azores). 

154. C. viridis, Theobald, ibidem, p. 212 (1903) (Uganda, Gambia, Abyssinia, Sudan). 

i55. C.fragilis, Ludlow, Journ. New York Ent. Soc. Vol. n, p. 141 (igo3) (Philippine Islands). 

i56. C. ocellattts, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3,"p. 222 (1903) (Brazil). 

157. C. halifaxii, Theobald, idem, p. 23i (1903) (Straits Settlements). 

[58. C. eitclasttts, Theobald. Mem. Liverp. School. Trop. Med. Mem. N, App. p. 8 (igo3) (Gambia). 

i5g. C. exentcians. Walker. Ins. Saund. p. 429 (i856) (Nova Scotia). 

GENUS UNCERTAIN 

160. C. concolor, Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. Vol. 4, p. 400 (1823 . 

161. C. cumminsii, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 214 (1903) (Uganda, Central Africa). 

162. C. melanurits, Coquillett. Journ. N. York. Ent. Soc. Vol. 10, p. ig3 (1901) (North America). 
i63. C. squamiger, Coquillett. Proc. U. S. Mus. Vol. 25, p. !>5 (North America). 

C. tigripes, Grandpre. Les Moustiques (Planters. Gaz. Press.) (1900) (Mauritius, West Africa ; British 
Central Africa. Mashonaland, Natal, Mombasa, Queensland, Uganda, Transvaal, Straits Settle- 
ments) (1). 

macuUcrnra, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 34 (1901). 
.1 imbasaensis, Theobald, idem, p. 36 (1901) (Mombasa). 
. B, sierra-Ieonis. Theobald, ibidem, p. 36 (1901) (Sierra Leone). 

i65. C. varipalpus, Coquillett. Canad. Ent. Vol. 34, p. 292 (North America). 

166. C. quadrivittata, Coquillett, idem, Vol. 34, p. 2g3 (Guatemala). 

167. C cyanescens, Coquillett, ibidem, p. 137 (Texas). 

C. bimacitlatus, Coquillet. Proc. U. S. Mus. Vol. 25, p. 84 (North America). 
C.fletcheri, Coquillett, idem, Vol. 25, p. 84 (North America). 

170. C. kermorganti, Laveran, C. r. Soc. Biol. Vol. 53, p. 56g (rgoi) (New Caledonia). 

171. C. siphonalis, Grossbeck, Canad. Ent. Vol. 3G, p. 332 (1904) (New Jersey). 

THE FOLLOWING NEW SPECIES HAVE ALSO RECENTLY BEEN DESCRIBED 

172. C. cinereoborealis, Felt & Young, Science(n.s.) Vol. 3o, n" 5o5, p. 3i2 (1904) (North America) (A true 

Culex near C. impiger). 

173. C. lazarensis, Felt & Young, idem ('1904) (North America) (near C. impiger). 

174. C. abserratus. Felt & Young, ibidem, p. 3i3 (1904) (North America). 

175. C.fitchii, Felt & Young, ibidem, p. 3i3 (1904) (North America) (near squamiger, Coquillett). 



is is probably only :i spotted variety of Qulex concolor. 



3o DIPTERA 

SPECIES UNIDENTIFIABLE EXCEPT FROM THE TYPES (i) 

The following species are described so briefly that they cannot possibly be identified except by 
means of the types which I have been unable to trace. 

C. luridus, Doleschall, Natur. Tijdschr.v. Ned. Ind.Vol. 14, p. 384 (? = inflidus, Theobald) (Middle Java.) 

C. rufinus, Bigot, Exped. Sc. Tunisie, Dipt. p. 7 (Tunis). 

C. molestus, Wiedemann, zweifl. Ins. p. 544 (? = ftlipes, Walker) (Sumatra). 

C. ochripes, Macquart, Dipt. Exot. Suppl. Vol. 4, p. n (South America), 

C. sicuhis, Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Tribu Culicid. (1827) (Sicily). 

C. setulosus, Doleschall, Natur. Tijdschr. v. Ned. Ind. Vol. 14, p. 384 (Middle Java). 

C. calcitrans, Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. Vol. 4, p. 40 ( = pipiens ?) (1827). 

C. rubidus, Robineau-Desvoidy, idem, p. 404 (1827) (Carolina). 

C. meridionalis, Leach, Zool. Journ. n° 7 Oct. (1825) (Nice). 

C. pallipes, Macquart, Dipt. Exot. p. 35 (i838) (Egypt). 

melanorhinus, Giles, Handb. Gnats, p. 342 (1900 1. 
C. filipes, Walker, Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 5. p. 229 (Dorey, New Guinea). 
C. pinguis, Walker, Science Gossip, p. 79 (1867) (British Columbia). 
C. tibialis, Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. p. 404 (1827) (Brazil). 

C. parvus, Macquart, Nouv. Suit. Buffon, Hist. Nat. Ins. Dipt. Vol. 1 (1834) (Bordeaux). 
C. nicaensis, Leach, Zool. Journ. n° 7 Oct. (1825) (Nice). 
C. fuscanus, Wiedemann, Dipt. Exot. 4th Supp. p. 9 (i838). 
C. t&oracicus, Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. Vol. 3 (1827) (Paris). 
C. ochripes, Macquart, Dipt. Exot. Suppl. 4, p. 4 (i838) (South America). 
C. doleschallii, Giles, Handb. Gnats, (ed. 1), p. 338 (Java). 

cingulatus, Doleschall, Natar. Tijdschr. v. Ned. Ind. Vol. 10, p. 405. 
C. musicus, Leach, Zool. Journ. n° 7. Oct. (i825) (Nice). 
C. bipundatus, Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. Vol. 3 (1827) (France). 
C. flavirostris, Meigen. Syst. Beschr. 7. Theil(i83o] (Europe). 
C. concinnus, Stephens, Syst. Cat. Brit. Ins. (1829). 

C. unistriatus, Curtis, Guide to an Arrang Brit. Ins. Vol. 2, Ed. (1837). 
C. pallipes, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. 7. Theil (i838). 
C. fusculus, Zetterstedt, Dipt. Scand. (18S0) (Scandinavia). 

25.GenusTAENIORHYNCHUS,Arribalzaga (modified byTheobald) 

Taeniorhynchus. Airibalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 47 (1899), modified by Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2. 
p. 190 ( 1 901). 

Characters. — Head clothed with narrow-curved, upright forked and flat lateral scales. Thorax 
with narrow-curved scales. Abdomen with flat scales. Palpi long in the rf , short in the 9> the fifth 
segment in the 9 minute, buried in the preceeding, the cf palpi longer than the proboscis. Wings with 
similar venation to Culex but clothed with thick elongated scales ending either diagonally, convexly or 
acutely; median linear scales often absent. Legs usually spotted and proboscis banded. This genus is 
separated from Culex as account of the wing scales. Probably the group of yellow species centered around 
T.fulvus. Wiedemann, will have to be excluded and placed in a new genus. 

Geographical distribution of species. — The genus is represented in Europe, Asia. Africa 
America and New-Zealand but so far no species have been found in Australia or any of the Oceanic 
Islands. 
1. T. fasciolatus, Arribalzaga, Rev. Mus. La Plata, p. 5o (Brazil, Argentine, British Guiana, Trinidad). 

— Plafe 2, Fig. 5. 



(1) These and a few others I propose to abolish as the descriptions are not sufficient to identifv the species and I cannot trace the types. 



FAM. CULICIDiE 3i 

2. T. richardii, Ficalbi, Bull. Soc. Ent. Ital. p. 261 (1896) (Italy, Britain, Canada). 

3. T. ter.ax, Theobald, Mon. Culic.Vol. 2, p. 19S (1901) (Straits Settlements, West Africa, Natal, China). 

4. T. ager, Giles. The Entomologist, p. 196 (1901) (Ceylon, Madras, N.W. Provinces of India). 

5. T.perturbans, Walker. Ins. Saund. p. 428, pt. 1 (i856) (United States). 

6. T. arrii ' igae, Theobald, Mon. Culic.Vol. 3, p. 261 (1903) (Para, Brazil). 

7. T. confinnis, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 49 (1S91) (British Guiana, Argentine, Brazil, Trinidad). 

8. T. conopas, Frauenfeld, Verh. Zool. Bot. Ges. Wien.Vol. 17, p. 45i (1867) (Federated Malay States, 

Formosa) (r). 

conopas, Frauenfeld. 

9. T. annettii, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 2o5 (1901) (West Africa). 

10. T. fulvus, Wiedemann, Ausseurop. zweifliig. Ins. p. 546 (1828) (Brazil, British Guiana). 

'avicosta. Walker. Ins. Saund. p. 431 (i856). 

11. T. auritis, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 209 (1901) (West Africa, Federated Malay States). 

12. T. acer, Walker. Cat. Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 7 (184S) (New Zealand, Queensland). 

i3. 7. brevicellultts, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 22 (1901) (Burma, Hosiarpur India, Federated 

Malay States). 
14. T. ochracais, Theobald, idem, Vol. 3, p. 263 (1903) (Kuala Lumpur, Federated Malay States). 
i5. T. fuscopauiat'.ts, Theobald, idem. Vol. 3, p. 265 (1901) (Central Africa, Sudan). 

26. Genus MANSONIA, Blanchard 

Mansonia, Blanchard, C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris n° 37. Vol. 53, p. 1046 (1901). 
Panoplites, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 173 (1901). 

Characters. — Head clothed with narrow-curved and long upright forked scales. Thorax with 
thin hair-like curved scales and numerous bristles. Abdomen with flat scales with very convex apices; 
often rather ragged ; in the 9 tne apex truncated and the penultimate segment usually has a row of 
short thick spines. Legs mottled and banded with white. Palpi of cf long, of four segments and with 
hair tufts; in the Q short, the first segment small, the apical one nipple-like. Wings densely clothed with very 
broad asymmetrical flat scales on each side of the veins. 

This genus is very distinct owing to the curiously formed scales on the wings. The only other 
genus with which the 9 s might be confused is Aedeomyia, the scales however are broader than in that 
genus. 

The name I described the genus under (Panoplites) was previously used, the genus being renamed 
by Prof. R. Bianchard. Species of this genus occur in Asia, Africa, North and South America and 
in Australia. 

Geographical distribution of species. — The chief home of this group seems to be Africa 
and South America. 
i.M. titillans, Walker, List Dipt. Brit. Mus. p. 3 (1848) (South America, South of North America, 

West Indes). 

Tatniorhynchus taeniorhynchus, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 48 (1896). 

2. M. pseudotitillans, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 178 (1901) (Lower Amazons). 

3. M. uni/ormis, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 180 (1901) (India, Ceylon, Fed. Malay States, Central and 

Western Africa, Philippine Islands). 

africanus. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 187 (1901). — Plate 2, Fig. 6. 
australiensis. Giles, Handb. Gnats, (2 e ed.), p. 355 (igo3). 
var. reversus. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 189 (1901). 

4. M. amazonensis . Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 182 (1901) (Lower Amazon). 



'ill probably have to be excluded and placed in a new genus. They are all rather large yellow, orange, or yellow and brown and 
purple ipeciea. 



32 DIPTERA 

5. M. annulifera, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. i83 (1901) (India, Ceylon, Fed. Malay States, Philip- 

pine Islands). 

6. M, annulipes, Walker, Proc. Linn. Soc. Lond. Vol. 1, p. 5 (18D7) (Federated Malay States, Batavia). 

dives, Schiner, Reise. der Novara, p. 3i. 

nero, Doleschall, Nat. Tijdsch. Ned. Ind. Vol. 14, p. 383. 

Culex annulipes, Walker. 

7. M. major, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 270 (igo3) (Bahr el Ghazal, Central Africa), 

27. Genus MELANOCONION, Theobald 

Melanoconion, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 238 (1903). 

Characters. — Head clothed with narrow-curved scales and upright forked ones, the latter pre- 
dominating. Thorax and scutellum with narrow-curved scales. Palpi short in the 9 > lon g i n cf • Proboscis 
expanded apically. Wings with the veins covered with small dense broad flat scales at their apical 
portions and along the costal border, which has on its upper side spine-like scales. Femora swollen at the 
apex and base, tibia? swollen at their apices. 

Mostly small black gnats which bite viciously and which swarm in swamps and forests. 

They are easily told from Culex by the form of the wing scales on the apical half of the wing. 

Geographical distribution of species. — The six members of this genus occur in Asia, 
Afiica, South America and the West Indes. 

1. M. atratus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 55 (1901) (British Guiana, Brazil, West Indes). 

Culex atratus, Theobald. — Plate 2, Fig. 3. 

2. M. luteofileurus, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 23g (igo3) (Para). 

3. M. humilis, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, 336 (1901) (Brazil). 

Culex humilis, Theobald. 

4. M. rimus, Theobald, Rep. Liverp. School Trop. Med. IV, p. 11, app. (1901) (Old Calabar). 

Culex rima, Theobald. 

5. M. indecorabilis , Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 241 (1903) (Para. Brazil), 

6. M. spissipes, Theobald, idem. Vol. 3, p. 242 (igo3) (Trinidad). 

7. M. nigripalpus, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 322 (1901) (S. Lucia). 

Culex nigripalpus, Theobald. 

28. Genus LASIOCONOPS, Theobald 

Lasioconops, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 235 (1903). 

Characters. — Head clothed with similar scales to Culex. Thorax with narrow-curved scales. 
Abdomen clothed with flat scales and with large projecting flat lateral scales with deeply dentate apices, in more 
or less dense tufts. Wings with typical Culex scales and venation. Palpi short in the 9 • 

This genus is separated from Culex on account of the very peculiar abdominal scales. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only known in the 9 sex - 
1. L. poicilipes, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 236 (igo3) (Bonny, Gambia). 

28. Genus FINLAYA, Theobald 

Finlaya, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 281 (igo3). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales, broad curved scales and numerous upright forked 
ones and with long projecting bristles in front; the broad curved ones border the eyes and form a median 
area, the flat ones are much rounded apically and not so closely applied to the surface as in Stegomyia. 
Mesothorax with narrow-curved scales. Scutellum with flat scales, somewhat rounded apically and 
narrow-curved ones form a basal row; prothoracic lobes with flat scales. Abdomen clothed with flat 
scales, the apical segments with ventral scaly tufts. Palpi of 9 short, densely scaly, of 4 segments (?) in 



FAM. CULICIDvE 33 

the 9 > l° n g- Eves with large and pronounced facets. Legs with rather prominent scaly tufts on the femora. 
Wings spotted, with large broad, more a less pyriform light and dark scales. 

This genus can at once be told hy the scales of the head, wings and abdomen. Recent discovery 
of q?'s show it to belong to the Cidicinae. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Three species occur, two being found in Asia and 
one in the East Indes. 

1. F. poicilia, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 2S3 (igo3) (Penang, Philippine Islands). 

2. F. kocbi, Donitz. Ins. Borse. Vol. 5, p. 38 (1901) (New Guinea). 

CuUx kochi, Donitz. 

3. F. anophcloidcs, Giles. Journ. Trop. Med. Oct. i5 (igo3) (India). 

Mansonia anopkeloides, Giles. (This is not a Mansonia at all, but comes in this genus.) 



5. SUBFAM. JOBLOTIN/E, Theobald 

Trichoprosoponina. Theobald. 

This subfamily so far contains but a single genus (Joblotia), It is separated from the Cidicinae on 
account of the metanotum having scales and chaetae. 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales and with a ring of upright forked scales across the 
posterior part. Thorax with rather flat spindle- shaped scales ; prothoracic lobes with flat scales; scutellum 
with dense flat spindle-shaped scales; metanotum with a tuft of chaetae and with flat scales; apex of 
abdomen in 9 bristly; in the cf the basal lobes of the genitalia densely scaled. Palpi of 9 short, 
densely scaled, in the (f long, acuminate, not hairy, apex bristly. Wings with densely scaled veins, with 
rather broad flat scales, somewhat like Taeniorhynchus but shorter ; fork-cells long; anal cell veiy large; 
mid cross- vein nearer the apex of the wing than the supernumerary; posterior cross-vein in a line with 
the mid. Clypeus bristly, also basal segments of the antennae. Second long vein nearly reaching the 
base of the wing. Larvae with short, thick, barrel shaped siphon. Eggs laid singly. Sylvan in habits. 

I. Genus JOBLOTIA, Blanchard 

Joblotia. Blanchard. C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris (37) Vol. 53, p. 1843 (1901). 
Trichoprosopon. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 283 (1901). 

Characters. — Same as for the Subfamily. Two species only known. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Both species occur in South America and one in the 
West Indes. 

1. J. nivipes, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2. p. 285 (1901) (Trinidad, Brazil, Bolivia, Mexico). 

Trichoprosopon nivipes, Theobald. — Plate 2, Fig. I 2. 

2. J. lunata, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 279 (1901) (Brazil). 

Wycomyia lunata, Theobald. 



6. SUBFAM. AEDEOMYIN/E, THEOBALD (1) 

This subfamily contains all those Culicids in which thee? and 9 palpi are short, often very short, 
the rf palpi never being long as in the preceding subfamilies. There are at present known i5 genera and 



1 Blanchard prefers the term Aedinae. 



34 



DIPTEEA 



one Hodgesia Theobald may possibly come here. There are no definite characters by which rj 1 A edcomyinae 
can be told from 9 Culicinae or 9 Joblotinae. There is similar squamose, nervation, and palpal variation 
here as in the other sections. Most of the genera are tropical and subtropical. 

Characters. — Head clotbed with all varieties of scales (Aedes) ; or flat scales and upright forked 
ones only (Uranotania, etc.); Thorax with flat, spindle shaped and narrow curved scales, also the scutellum ; 
metanotum may be nude, or may have chaetae (Wyeomyia, etc.) or chaetae and scales [Limatus, Sabe- 
tkes, etc.). Palpi short in the 9 often minute, from 2 to 5 segments, never more than half the length 
of the proboscis; in the g* short, never more than half the length of the proboscis, often very small. 
Antennae pilose and verticillate in the 9- plumose or verticillate in the g*. Proboscis usually normal, 
sometimes very long (Phoniomyia), elbowed (Limatus) or much swollen (Mimomyia). Venation variable, 
fork-cells normally long (Aedes ; Haemagogus, etc.), occasionally small (Uranotaenia). Ungues equal in 9 » 
the fore and mid ungues in the rf simple and serrated. 

Larvae siphonate. The majority of species are sylvan in habits, none truly domestic as in Culicinae 
and Anophelinae. 

TABLE OF GENEEA 

A, Antenna of (f plumose, of 9 verticillated and pilose. 

a. Head with narrow-curved, upright forked and plat lateral scales. 

Scutellum with narrow curved scales Genus Aedes, Meigen. 

aa Head with upright fan shaped scales. 

Scutellum with flat scales. Wing scales broad and short 

and asymmetrical apically Genus Aedeomyia, Theobald. 

aaa Head with flat scales all over. 
[3 Fork-cells of normal length. 

Scutellum with flat scales Genus Ficalbia, Theobald. 

ji|3 Fork-cells small. 

First submarginal cell much smaller than second pos- 
terior. Scutellum with flat scales Genus Uranotania, Arribalzaga. 

p[3[j First submarginal cell slightly smaller than second pos- 
terior. 
Scutellum with narrow curved scales Genus Mimomyia, Theobald. 

B. Antennae of q? and 9 ver y similar, both pilose and verticillate. 

y Antennae very long, much longer than proboscis, the second 

joint very long Genus Deinocerites, Theobald. 

vy Antennae of normal length. 

o Head and scutellum with flat metallic scales. 

e Metanotum nude Genus Haemagogus, Williston. 

es Metanotum with chaetae or squamae or both. 
Metanotum with chaetae. 
5 Legs simple. 

n Proboscis very long. 

Wing scales broadish, the lateral ones Taeni 

orhynchus- like. 
Proboscis longer than whole body ; small species. Genus Phoniomyia, Theobald. 
Wing scales dense and large; proboscis as long 
as thorax and abdomen; frons drawn out into 
a blunt spine. Large species Genus Runchomyia, Theobald. 



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FAM. CULICID^E 35 

-- Proboscis of mod trait length. 

Wing scales narrow Genus Wyeomyia. Theobald. 

Wing scales dense, long and broad . . . Genus Dendromyia, Theobald. 
TI ~ing scales broad and rather short, ending 

obliquely Genus Sabethoides, Theobald. 

ess Metanotum with scales and chaetae. 

i Legs with scaly paddles Genus Sabethes, Robineau-Desvoidy. 

:: Legs simple. 

Proboscis straight Genus Goeldia, Theobald. 

Proboscis elbowed Genus Limatus, Theobald. 

I. Genus AEDES, Meigen 

Aedes. Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Dip. Vol. I. p. i3 (1818). 

Characters. — Head clothed with narrow-curved scales on the middle, flat ones laterally, 
rather more spread out than in Culex, the narrow-curved scales forming a broad median area. Thorax 
with narrow-curved or almost hair-like scales; scutellum with narrow-curved scales; metanotum nude. 
Wing scales much as in typical Culex, the lateral ones long and thin, the median small and flat; fork- 
cells moderately long. Palpi small in both sexes; of 2 segments in the (f , of 4 in the 5, apical joint 
minut.-, mammilliform (traces of 5th segment?) Antennae verticillate in 9 ! densely plumose in the rf . 

Geographical distribution of species. — Four species only known to belong definitely to 
this genus. 

1. AE. cimreus, Meigen, Syst. Beschr. Zweiflug. Ins. Vol. 1, p. i3 (1S18) (Europe). 

. Gimmerthal. 

2. AE. fuscus. Osten-Sacken, Bull. U. S. Geol. Surv. p. 191 (1845) (North America). 

3. AE. obscurus. Giles, Handb. Gnats. (1 ed.) p. 348(1900.). 

4. AE. pembaensis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 235 (1901) (Pemba Island). 

GEx\ T US UNCERTAIN. 

5. AE. butler i, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 23o(igoi) (Selangor). 

6. AE. nigrkorpus, Theobald, idem, p. 23i (1901) (Lower Amazon). 

7. AE. niger, Theobald, ibidem, p. 237 (1901) (Old Calabar). 

2. Genus AEDEOMYIA, Theobald 

Aedeomyia. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 218 (1901). 

Characters. — Head clothed with narrow fan shaped upright forked scales. Thorax with broad 
flat spindle-shaped scales; scutellum with broad scales. Abdomen denseby scaled with flat scales often 
rather irregular. Palpi short in both sexes, scaly. Antennae plumose in (f ; verticillate in the 9 • Legs 
densely scaled, with dense scab' outstanding tufts. Wings densely scaled, mottled or spotted; wing scales 
broad and asymmetrical, ver5 - similar to those of Mansonia and also with elongate lateral ones. Forked 
cells moderately long. 

This genus is easily told by the peculiar wing scales, no other Aedine genus having them at all 
the same. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two species only known to occur definitely, but a 
third described by Skuse as an Aedes probably belongs here. 

1. AE. squammipennis, Arribalzaga, Et. Nat. Arg. Vol. 1, p. i5i (3) (1878) (South America, West Indes, 

Ceylon, India, Fed. Malay States, Sudan). — Plate 2, Fig. 9. 

2. AE americana, Neveu-Lemaire, Arch, de Parasit. Vol. 6, p. 23 (1902) (Counani, French Guiana). 



36 DIPTERA 

GENUS UNCERTAIN. 
3 AE. venustipes, Skuse, Proc. Linn. Soc.N. S.Wales, Vol. 3, p. 1761 (18S9) (Elizabeth Bay, Nr. Sydney). 

3. Genus FICALBIA, Theobald 

Ficalbia. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 296.(1901). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales entirely, with a few upright forked ones behind. 
Thorax with narrow-curved scales; scutellum with flat scales only, metanotum nude. Palpi very small. 
Proboscis rather long, swollen apically. Wings with the fork-cells moderately long, the 1st submarginal 
longer than the 2d posterior; median vein-scales broad and spatulate ; upper border of costa spiny. 
Ungues of c? unequal on fore and mid legs, all simple. Small species. The 9 unknown. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two species only known, both tf's. 

1. F. simplex, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 297 (1901) (Ceylon). 

2. F. minima, Theobald, idem, p. 262 (1901) (Quilon, S. India). 

4. Genus URANOTAENIA, Arribalzaga 

Uranotaenia. Arribalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 63 (1899). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales all over, and upright-forked ones (apparently not 
always visible, if present). Thorax clothed with narrow-curved scales and some flat ones; scutellum 
with flat scales ; metanotum nude. Palpi ver}' small in both rj' and 9- Proboscis expanded apically. 
Antennae plumose in the Q? ; verticillate in the 9 • Wings with marked venation, the fork-cells both 
small, the first submarginal very small, smaller than the second posterior cell, stems of the fork-cells 
long; veins clothed with small broad equilateral scales, abruptly truncated and with lateral clavate or 
elliptical scales to some of the veins; on the roots of the wings are usually some flat scales of more or less 
brilliant hue ; spine like scales along the costa. Of small size and usually with some metallic scales. 

This genus is easily told by the marked fork-cells and scales on the head and thorax. 

Geographical distribution of species. — This genus chiefly occurs in South America and 
the West Indes but also in North America, Africa and Australia. 

1. U. pulcherrima, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 65 (1899) (Brazil, Argentine, Antigua). 

2. U. geometric a, Theobald (Lutz Ms.), Mon. Culic. Vol. 2. p. 247 (1901) (Brazil). — c late 2, Fig. 10. 

3. U. saphirina, Osten-Sacken, Trans. Araer. Ent. Soc. Vol. 2, p. 47 (United States). 

Acdis saphivinus, Osten-Sacken. 

4. U. annulata, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 25o (1901) (Bonn}', Gambia). 

5. U. naialia, Arribalzaga, Dipt. Argent, p. 64 (1899) (Argentine, Brazil). 

6. U . pygmaea, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 254 (1901) (Queensland). 

7. U. caeruhocephala, Theobald, idem. Vol. 2, p. 256 (1901) (Old Calabar. Gambia, Sudan). 

8. U. malayi, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 258 (1901) (Selangor). 

9. U. alba, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3, p. 3o3(igo3) (Mashonaland). 

mashonaensisvar. alba. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 262 (1901). 

10. U. apicalis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 298 (1903) (Antigua). 

11. U. pallidoventer, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 3oo (1903) (Brazil). 

12. U. lowii, Theobald, ibidem, Vol 2, p. 339 [ 1 9° 1 ) (St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Trinidad, Brazil). 
i3. U. socialis, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 340 (1901) (Jamaica). 

5. Genus MIMOMYIA, Theobald 

Mimomyia, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 304 (igo3). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales and somewhat upright forked ones; Thorax 



FAM. culicim: 37 

with narrow-curved scales, no flat ones; scutellum with narrow-curved scales only. Fork-cells very small, 
but rather larger than in Uranotauia, the first submarginal smaller than the second posterior, and the 
supernumerary cross-vein nearer the base of the wing than the mid cross-vein ; scales short and rather 
broad along the veins, with lateral clavate scales to the veins here and there. No lines of flat metallic 
scales at the base of the wings. Palpi very small in both sexes. Proboscis in the male swollen. 

Allied to Uratiotania but can at once be separated by the larger fork-cells, absence of metallic flat 
scales at the base of the wings and on the scutellum. 

Geographical distribution of species. — The genus is represented by two definite species and 
probably a third. 

1. M. splendens, Theobald, Mori. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 304 (igo3) (Uganda, Sudan). 

2. .1/. uniformis, Theobald. Rep. Lab. Gordon Coll. Khartoum, p. So (1904) (Sudan). 

GENUS UNCERTAIN 

3. .1/. mashonaensis \110n var. alba), Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p.. 269 (1901); & Vol. 3, p. 3o6 

11903,1 1 Mashonaland). 

6. Genus DEINOCERITES, Theobald 

Deinocerites, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 2i5 (1901). 
Brachiomyia, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2, p. 343 (1901). 

Characters. — Head ornamented with thin curved flat scales on the vertex and occiput and long 
forked upright scales. Thorax with flat curved narrow spindle-shaped scales; scutellum with narrow-curved 
scales. Palpi of the O and q* short, slightly longer in the g* than in the 9 • Antennae moderately long in 
the 9 • second joint very long, scaly, other segments pilose and finely verticillate ; rj< antennae very long, 
filiform and pilose, longer than the whole body, the second segment long, the segments become gradually 
shorter towards the apex, first four or more segments scaly, in life the apical segments are swollen. 
Proboscis not as long as the antennae. Venation as in Culex; fork-cells rather long; scales rather large. 

The essential characters of the genus are the long scaly antennae, especially the elongation of the 
second segments. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two species only known, both from the West Indes 
Larvae live in crabholes. 

1. D. cancer. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 2i5 (1901) (West Indes and British Guiana). — Plate 2, 

Fig. 7. 

2. D. magna, Theobald, idem, Vol. 2. p. 344 (1901) (Saint Lucia). 

Brachiomyia magna. Theobald. 

7. Genus HAEMAGOGUS, Williston 

Haemagogus. Williston, Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. p. 271 (1896). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales Thorax with flat scales often irregularly disposed. 

Scutellum with flat metallic scales. Metanotum nude. Abdomen clothed with flat metallic scales. Palpi 

short in both sexes, of 5 segments in the 9 • Wings with normal venation. 

Antennae verticillate and pilose in both sexes, rather denser in the rf than 9- 

Easily told by their flat metallic scales and Ctdex-Wke venation, from other allied genera. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Three species occur in South and Southern North 
America and the W T est Indes. 

1. H . cyar.eus, Fabricius, Syst. Antl. p. 35 (9) (i8o5) (South America, West Indes). 

2. H. albomaculatus , Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 3o8 (1903) (British Guiana). 

3. H. equinus, Theobald, The Entom. p. 282 (igo3) (Jamaica). 



38 DIPTERA 

8. Genus PHONIOMYIA, Theobald 

Phoniomyia, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 3n (igo3). 

Characters. — Head scales flat. Thoracic scales flat and spindle shaped, irregularly disposed; 
scutellum with flat scales; metanotum with chaetae, no squamae. Palpi short in both sexes. Wing scales 
broad, the lateral ones Taeniorhynchns-\\ke; the second long vein not carried past the marginal transverse. 
Proboscis very long, longer than the whole body. 

Clearly distinct from Wyeomyia on accound of the broader wing scales and the greatly elongated 
proboscis. 

Geographical distribution of species. 

i. P. longirostris, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 275 (1901) (West hides, Brazil). — Piate 2, Fig. 1 1. 

Wyeomyia trinidadensis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 277 (1901). 

9. Genus RUNCHOMYIA, Theobald 

Runchomyia, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 3ig (1903). 

Characters. — Head covered with flat scales all over with some upiight-forked ones behind in 
line as in Jobloiia. Thorax with narrow-curved scales and broader flatter ones over the roots of the wings 
and in front of the scutellum; scutellum and prothoracic lobes with flat scales ; metanotum with a tuft ot 
chaetae. Abdomen with flat scales and a ventral apical tuft of bristles. Palpi short in the 9 1 apparently 
of 2 segments. Proboscis very long in the 9' as ion §' as the whole body, scaly; basal joint of 
antennae bristly, flagellum verticillate; clypeus nude; frons drawn out into a blunt spine. Legs 
with hind tibiae dilated. Wings with rather broad scales; fork-cells long; cross-veins normal. 

This genus is closely related to Dendromyia but can be told by the long 9 proboscis, the 
wings scales, and peculiar blunt projecting frontal process. The q* is unknown. 

Geographical distribution of species. — One species only described, but I have another 
distinct one not yet examined. 
1. R.frontosa, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 3ig (igo3) (British Guiana). 

10. Genus WYEOMYIA, Theobald 

Wyeomyia, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 267 (1901); Vol. 3, p. 3i8 (igo3). 

Characters. — Head covered with flat scales. Thorax with spindle shaped and flat scales; 
scutellum and prothoracic lobes with flat scales; metanotum with chaetae. Palpi very small. Antennae 
pilose and verticillate in 9 • Male very similar to 9 • Proboscis not as long as the whole body. 

Wings with the veins with narrowish lateral scales ; fork-cells long and narrow. Distinguished 
from the preceeding and the following genera by the narrow linear vein scales and short proboscis. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two species occur in this genus as now restricted 
both from the West Indes and South America. 

1. W . grayii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 269 (1901) (West Indes). 

2. W . pertinans, Williston, Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. 271 (1896) (Saint Vincent). 

GENUS UNCERTAIN 

3. Aedes {Wyeomyia) perturbans, Williston, Trans. Ent. Soc. Lond. p. 272 (1896) (Saint Vincent). 



FAM. CULICID.E 3g 

I I. Genus DENDROMYIA, Theobald 

Dendromyia, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 3i3 (igo3). 

Characters. -- Head covered with flat scales. Mesothorax with large spindle-shaped scales ; 
prothoracic lobes with flat scales ; scutellum with small flat scales much rounded apically. Basal segments 
of the antennae seal} - . Proboscis of moderate length, swollen apically. Wings with long broad, dense, 
Taeniorhyne/iusAike scales, some ending asymmetrically; fork-cells long. 

This genus is allied to Wyeomyia but differs in scutellar and wing scale characters, being 
easily told by the dense wing scales. From Phoniomyia, die much shorter probocis and more densely 
scaled wings will enable it to be separated at once. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Five species are known, one previously placed in 
the genus Wyeomyia. 
i. D. idocoma. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 3i3 (1903) (British Guiana). 

2. D. asuUepta, Theobald, idem. Vol. 3, p. 3i5 (igo3) (British Guiana). 

3. D. paracusis, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3, p. 3i6 (igo3) (Para, Brazil). 

4. D. quasihiteoventralis, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3, p. 317 (igo3) (British Guiana). 

5. D. luteoventralis, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 2, p. 348 (1901) (Brazil, British Guiana, Trinidad). 

12. Genus SABETHOIDES, Theobald 

Sabethoides, Theobald, .Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 328 (igo3). 

Characters. — Head covered with flat scales. Thorax with small and large flat scales ending 
convexly, dense over the roots of the wings and scutellum; metanotum with cl atae. Palpi very short 
n § (q* unknown), of 2 segments, about one tenth the length of the probocis. Proboscis as long 
or a little longer than the abdomen, not swollen to any extent apically. Antennae of 9 dencely pilose, 
not as long as the proboscis. Wings with rather short, broad scales, asymmetrical; the posterior cross- 
vein either in a line with or just in front of the mid cross-vein. Legs simple, ungues of 9 equal and 
simple. 

This genus is closely allied to Sabethes but differs in (1) having simple legs (2) shorter 9 palpi 
and (3) longer proboscis, not so distinctly swollen at the apex. 

Geographical distribution of species. — The single species known was described as a 9 
Sabethes. It was taken to be the (> of Sabethes by the collectors, the (fs' of Sabethes were supposed to be 
paddled, the gs' with simple legs. 

1. S. confusus, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3. p. 328 (Brazil, British Guiana). 

Sabethes rimipts, .". Theobald 'nun Wiedemann), Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 246 (1903). 
Sabethts nilidus, Q Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 247 (1901). 

13. Genus SABETHES, Robineau-Desvoidy 

Sabethes, Robineau-Desvoidy, Essai Culic. (1827). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales and with very short upright forked ones. Thorax 
with short flat scales; scutellum with flat scales; metanotum with chaetae and squamae. Antennae of 9 
pilose, of cf pilose, but rather denser than the 9- Palpi short, slightly longer in the q< than in the 9- 
Clypeus nude, proboscis of moderate length. Wings rather long and narrow with dense broad scales 
ending asymmetrically, fork-cells long, posterior cross vein normally nearer the apex of the wing than the 
mid cross-vein, in the c? nearly its own length nearer the apex, in the 9 m a l' ne with the mid or nearly 
so. One or more pairs of legs with dense paddle like masses of scales in bolh q* and 9 • Ungues in cf all 
simple, the fore and hind equal, the mid unequal, and of peculiar form. 



4 o DIPTERA 

The cfs' and 9 s ' are so much alike they cannot be separated except by an examination of the 
ungues or genitalia. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Five species are known, all occurring in South 
America. 

i. 5. remipes. Wiedemann, Auss. Zweifi. Ins. Eur. Vol. I, p. 573 (1828) (Brazil, British Guiana). 

2. 5. nitidus, Theobald, Mon. Cube. Vol. 2. p. 347 (1901) (Brazil). 

3. S. longipes. Macquart, Syst. Antl. Vol. 4, p. 400 (1794) (Brazil, Guiana). — Plate 2, Fig. 8, 

locuhpes, Robineau-Desvoidy, Ess. Culic. (iS23). 
Culex longipes, Macquart. 

4. 5. lutzii, Theobald. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 323 (igo3) (Brazil). 

5. S. albiprivus, Lutz, Ms. idem, Vol. 2, p. 323 (1903) (Brazil). 

14. Genus GOELDIA, Theobald 

Goeldia. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 33o (1903). 

Characters. — Head clothed with flat scales; mesothorax with flat spindle-shaped scales and 
larger narrow-curved ones, lanceolate in form before the scutellum ; scutellum with fiat scales ; meta- 
notum with chaetae and squamae. Palpi in the $ nearly one-third the length of the proboscis, in the 9 
quite small ; proboscis short and thick, not as long as the body. Wing scales dense and elongated, ending 
asymmetrically. Cross-veins of q? like Culex. 

This genus differs from Sabethoides in its Culex-Yike venation. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only known. 
1. G.fluviatilis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 33i (igo3) (Brazil, British Guiana). 

15. Genus LIMATUS, Theobald 

Limatus. Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 349 (1901). 

Simondella. Laveran, C. r. Soc. Biol. Paris. Vol. 54, p. n58 (190/) (Laveran& Simond). 

Characters. — Head covered with flat scales. Thorax with large flat scales of two sizes, very 
convex at their free ends; scutellum with dense flat scales; metanotum with chaetae and squamae. Palpi 
minute in 9 an d cf ■ Proboscis in 9 °f moderate length, swollen apically. straight, in the o* elbowed 
above the middle with dense scales standing out at the joint and apex. Wings with rather broad 
elongate, more or less conical scales, the free end broad and convex, some slightly asymmetrical; in 
the (jf the scales on the basal parts of the veins pedunculated: fork-cells long ; coss-veins as in Culex. 

This genus can at once be told by the elbowed and tufted proboscis in the q* and by the wing and 
metanotal scale ornamentation. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Two species from Brazil known. 

1. L. durhamii, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2. p. 35o, 9 ( I 9° I ) & Vol. 3, p. 333, rjf (igo3) (Brazil). 

2. L. curvirostris, Simond & Laveran, C. r. Soc. B ; ol. Vol. 5^vp. n58 (190/) (Rio de Janeiro) (1). 

POSITION UNCERTAIN 

16. Genus HODGESIA, Theobald 

Hodgesia. Theobald, Journ. Trop. Med. Jan. i5. (1904). 

Characters. — Head clothed with small flat scales, rather rounded apically and loosely applied 



(1) I cannot consult this paper. The species curvirostris may be identical with my DitrJiamii 



FAM. CULICID.E 



4 1 



to the surface. Thorax with large, long, narrow-curved scales on the mesonotum ; small fiat scales on the 
scutellum and flat scales as the prothoracic lobes. Abdomen with flat scales arranged ventrally so as to 
form slightly projecting tufts. Palpi very small, apparently of one segment only, scaly; antennae with 
large globular basal joint, long hairs at the nodes, short along the internodes. Proboscis not quite as 
long as the whole bod}'. Legs long, especially the hind pair. Apices of femora and tibiae dilated; fore 
femora slightly swollen. Wings with normal Culicine venation, but the 3rd vein, is carried past the mar- 
ginal cross-vein as a scaled-vein; lateral vein-scales long and nearly over-lapping those of contiguous 
veins, their apices with marked lateral spines. Male unknown. 

This genus presents affinities to Stegomyia, but can at once be told by the marked lateral vein-scales. 
The minute palpi however seem to place it in the Aedcomyhiae. Until the tf is found its exact position 
cannot be defined. 

Geographical distribution of species. — One species only occurs, which is a bloodsucker 
and very annoying. 
i. H. sanguine, Theobald, journ. Trop. Med. Jan. i5. (1904) (Uganda). 

7. SUBFAM. HEPTAPHLEBOMYINyE, THEOBALD 

This subfamily has been formed to include an aberrant species in which there is a distinct scaled 
seventh longitudinal vein. 

Characters. — Head covered with median narrow-curved, flat lateral and upright forked scales 
as in Culex. Thorax with narrow-curved scales and also the scutellum; metanotum nude. Abdomen 
simple as in Culex. Palpi of 9 short, clavate, apical segment swollen. Wings with normal Cukx-scales ■ 
fork-cells long, a distinct scaled seventh long vein present. Male unknown (1). 

I. Genus HEPTAPHLEBOMYIA, Theobald 

Heptaphlebomyia. Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 337 (1903). 

Geographical distribution of species. — The single species >vas taken in Mashonaland (Also 
recendy found in Angola, Portugese West Africa). 
1. H. simplex, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 3, p. 337 (igo3). 



8. SUBFAM. CORETHRINAE, THEOBALD 

This subfamily contains two old genera Corethra and Mochlonyx to which Coquillett has recently 
added several new ones. These insects have no true scales as in the other subfamilies and no piercing 
mouth, but as they venation so closely agrees they have been included in the family Culicida. Undoubt- 
edly they form a connecting link between the Culicidm and Chivonomidce. It would probably be best to 
treat them as a distinct family : Corethrinidae. 

Characters. -- Body with hairs, not scaly. Wings with typical Culicine venation but with 
hair-like scales not true scales, except along the wing fringe. Proboscis very short, not formed for piercing 
Antenna^- of rj* plumose; of O pilose. Palpi about the same length in the cj and 9 ■ Scutellum simple, 
-r trilobed. Legs long and slender, hairy, unarmed. 



of males and females has b re ei ert whilst this work was in the press from P»ih6, Angola. Further details will be given in the 
Entos \of Iso een received from Madagascar. 



42 DIPTERA 

TABLE OF GENERA 

a. Metatarsus shorter than first tarsal Genus Corethra, Meigen (= Mochlonyx, Loew). 

aa. Metatarsus longer than first tarsal. 

Large species 10 or more mm, tarsal claws bifid . Genus Pelorempis, Johannsen. 
Small species with simple tarsal claws. 
Antennae with second segment long . 

Spaces between verticels bare . . ' Genus Sayomyia, Coquillett. 

Spaces between verticels hairy Genus Corethrella, Coquillett. 

Antennae with second segment short. 

Spaces between verticels bare Genus Eucorethra, Coquillett. 

I. Genus CORETHRA, Meigen (not Loew) 

Corethra. Meigen, Illig. Mag. Vol. 2, p. 260 (i8o3). 
Mochlonyx. Loew, Ent. Zeit. Stett. p. 121 (1844). 

Characters. — Proboscis short in rj< and 9- Palpi twice as long as the proboscis. Last two 
segments of the antennae longest, segments increase in\size from base to apex. Wings with the cross- 
veins nearer the base than in Sayomyia; fork-cells long, stems short. The legs have the first tarsal joint 
(Metat irsus) always shorter than the second tarsal; ungues moderately large, uniserrated. 

Geographical distribution of species. — Three species only known, two in Europe, the other 
in North America. 

1. C. velutinus, Ruthe, Isis. p. i2o5 (i83i) (Europe). 

Mochlonyx velutinus, Ruthe. 

Mochlonyx effoetus, Walker, Ins. Brit. Dipt. Vol. 3, p. 252 (i85i) 

2. C. cinctipes, Coquillett. The Canad. Ent. p. igo, July (igo3) (North America). 

3. C. culiciformis , De Geer, Mem. Hist. Ins. Vol. 6, p. 372 (1776). 

2. Genus PELOREMPIS, Johannsen 

Pelorempis. Johannsen, Bull. 68 Ent. 18. New York State Mus. p. 402 (1903). 

Characters. — Large species resembling Psorophora in general appearance. Palpi longer than 
the proboscis, of 4 segments; antennae of i5 segments, the ba=al one disc-like, second short and thick, 
rest including the apical one small, verticillate with a few hairs of moderate length, no ocelli. Legs long 
and slender; metatarsus nearly as long as the following four joints taken together; ungues slender, 
each with a single tooth. Wings long and slender; the margins and veins except the cross-veins and 
first anal covered with flattened hairs. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only known. 
1. P. amerkana, Johannsen, Bull. 68 Ent. 18 New York State Mus. p. 403 (igo3). 

3. Genus SAYOMYIA, Coquillett 

Sayomyia. Coquillett, The Canad. Ent. p. 1S9, July (1903). 
Corethra. Loew (non Meigen). 

Characters. — Hairs of antennae gathered into whorls (verticillate) spaces between the whorls 
nude. Pilose in 9 \ plumose in tf . First tarsal segment longer than the second; ungues small and 
simple. Venation typical. The majority of species described as Corethra belong here. 



FAM. CULICIDjE 4 3 

Geographical distribution of species. — The genus is i _ epresented over most of the globe, 
but the species nowhere seem abundant except in some parts of Africa. 

i. S. punctipennis, Say, Journ. Acad. Nat. Sc. Philad. Vol. 3. p. 16 (North America, West Indes). 
Corethra punctipennis. Say. 
Cortthra tririttati.'Loew , Ent. Zeit. Stett. p. 3SS (iSS51. 

2. 5. plumicornis, Fabricius, Ent. Syst. Vol. 4. p. 246, 58 (1792) (Europe, North Amorica). 

lateralis, Latreille, Gen. Crust. Vol. 4, p. 247. 
Iia/nitnsis, Gmelin, Syst. Xat. Vol. 5. 2S, 26, 101. 
?crystallina, De Geer. Ins. Vol. 6, p. 149, 20. 
pilicornis, Fabricius, Mant. Ins. Vol. 2, 325, 49. 
i.ir. americana, Johannsen. 

3. 5. ? nybltei, Zetterstedt. Ins. Lapp. p. S3o (Scandinavia, Riga?). 

Erioptera nyblai, Zetterstedt. 

tCoretkra pilipes. Gimmerthal. Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscou, Vol. iS, p. 279 (1845). 

4. 5. pallida. Fabricius, Ent. Syst. Antl. Vol. 4. p. 240 (Europe). 

5. S. flavicans, Meigen. Syst Beschr. p. 24S (1S1S) (Germany). 

6. 5. asialica, Giles, The Entomologist, p. 196 (1901) (India). 

7. S. fusca, Staeger, Nat. Tidskr. Vol. 2. p. 556 (i83g) (Denmark). 
- S. manillicnsis, Schiner, Reise Novara, Dipt. p. 3o (Manila). 

9. 5. rufa. Zetterstedt, Ins. Lapp. p. 80S (Lapland), 
to. S. obscuripes, Van der Wulp, Tijdschr. v. Ent. Vol. 2 1601 (Holland). 

11. S. pollens, Schiner (vide Theobald, Mori. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 307). 

12. S. antarciica. Hudson. Man. Ent. N Zeal., p. 43 (New Zealand). 

1 3. 5. braziliensis, Theobald, Mon. Culic. Vol. 2, p. 3o2 (1901) (Brazil). 
14. S. ceratopogones, Theobald, idem. Vol. 3, p. 338 (1983) (Gambia). 
i5. S. cornfordii, Theobald, ibidem, Vol. 3, p. 339 (1903) (China). 

16. S. appendiculata, Herrick, Minnesota Geol. Nat. Hist. Surv. (1S84) (Northern America). 

17. 5. albipes, Johannsen, Bull. 68 Ent. iSNew York Sfate Mus. p. 398 (igo3)(Northen America). 
i". S. queenslandensis, now sp. (1) (Bupengary, Queensland). 

4. Genus CORETHRELLA, Coquillett 

Corethrella. Coquillet, Journ. New York Ent. Soc. Vol. 10, p. 191. 

Characters. — Thorax, scutellum and abdomen and legs covered wifh long coarse hairs, many 
being as long as the fore metatarsus. Antennae of cf thiklv covered with long hairs arranged all along 
the shaft excepting in the apical half of the i3th and all of the 14th and i5th which have ouly short bairs. 
The i5th or apical joint is slightly enlarged and conical. Antennae of the 9 has a circlet of a few long 
hairs at the base of each joint and another irregular circlet of somewhat shorter hair on the middle of 
it. Palpi and proboscis short, the former about twice as long as the latter. The metatarsus is longer than 
the following joint and the tarsal claws are simple and much curved. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only known. 
1. C. brakeleyi. Coquillett. Ent. News. March, p. g5 (1902J (North America). 

5. Genus EUCORETHRA, Underwood 

Eucorethra. Underwood, Science Aug. 182 (1903). 

Characters. — Intermediate between Corethrella and Sayomyia having the antennae 14-jointedas 



1 S. queens/amiensis, nov. spec. 

Head grey; eyes black ; antennae grey with uscous bands, basal segment globular, yellowish-grey; hairs pallid; proboscis brown. Thorax pale 
tawny with a medial and lateral bright chestnut -brown spots and with long pale golden hairs. Abdomen pale yellowish-brown, the apices of the segments 
chestnut- brown ; hairs pale. Legs with the femora and tibiae with many alternate bands of brown and white giving a spotted appearance ; tarsi brown with 
a few broad pale bands; hair}-. Wings with two brown spots near the costa and one at the basa of the fork of the fifth long vein and another at the apex of 
per branch. Abdomen of male transparent white, with traces of dark apical bands. Tarsi deep brown with minute pale apical bands. - Length 2.5 
to 3 mm. 



44 DIPTERA 

in the former, but the spaces between the verticels almost bare as in the latter; differs from each in the 
much shorter second segment of the antennae which in only slightly longer than wide. Antennae of cT 
rather robust, submoniliform on the basal half, first six segments only slightly longer than wide, the 
remaining segments increasing in length and decreasing in diameter towards the apex, the antepenultimate 
is half the length of the penultinate ; verticels composed of numerous very long bristly hairs except on the 
last segment; antennae of 9 nearly cylindrical, the segments gradually increasing in length to the apex 
scarcely thickened at the insertion of the verticels, which consist of a few rather short bristly hairs, 
proboscis about one and one half times as long as height of head, palpus inserted near three-fourths of its 
length, of 4 segments; first tarsal segment much longer than the second; venation as in Culex. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only known at present, 
i. E. underwoodi, Underwood, Canad. Ent. 272 (1903) (North America). 



ADDENDA 

Genus ETORLEPTIOMYIA, Theobald 

Etorleptiomyia. Theobald, Gordon Coll. Lab. Report p. 71 (1904). 

Characters. — Head clothed with a mixture of narrow-curved scales, upright forked ones and 
small loose flat scales all over; antennae scaly on the basal joints. Thorax with scales of mesonotum 
narrow and curved, those of the scutellum flat and small. Abdomen clothed with flat scales. Wings with 
very marked heart-shaped scales, on the basal halves of the second, fourth, fifth and sixth veins; on the 
first long vein, base of second and fourth also are more or less Mansonia-like scales and along costal 
border also, scales on the apical halves of the veins pedunculated, clavate, peduncles very short; costa 
spiny ; fork-cells moderately long. 

This forms a very distinct genus, easily told by the curious heart-shaped scales on the wings. The 
proboscis seems very weak. 

The Mansonia-like scales are not exactly as in that genus, but approach them very closely. 

Geographical distribution of species. — A single species only has so far been found in'the 
Sudan. 
1. E mediopunctata, Theobald, Gordon Coll. Lab. Report p. 71 (1904) (Sudan). 



FAM. CULICID.E 



4 5 



INDEX OF GENERA AND SPECIES 



Pages . 

abserratus. Felt ov- Young [g. Ctilex) 29 

Acartomyia genus . Theob. 24 

acer. Walk. 1 f. Taeniorhynchus) 3i 

aconita. Don. [g. Myzomyia S 

aculeata. Theob. (g. Gilesia) 22 

Aedeomyia genus), Theob. 35 
Aedes gen • . lleigen 
Aedimorphus genus . Theob. 

aestuans. Wied. g . C 2* 

affiriis. Adam? g. Ctilex 1 26 

alr.r.is. Stephens g. Theoba 23 

africanus, Theob. [g. Mansonia) 3i 

africana. Theob. -ia) iS 

.nus, Theob. j. Mucidus) 17 

Giles g.Taettiorhyncht 3i 

. 2S 
Aitkenii. James & Theob. „■. 

7 

alba. Theob. \g. Uranotaenia) 36 

albifascia' 26 

26 

all imanus. Wied. j. C 11 

43 

albipes, The ib. 11 

albiprivus. Lutz. g. Sabethes) 40 

albirostri=. 8 

-'ris. Macq. , . C 25 

rsis. Arrib. ... C 11 

albitarsis. Theob. j. C«/«) 26 

Aidrichia I heob. 11 

Theob. ,. Anopheles) 7 

alis. Theo! 25 

nus, Linn. . ■ 28 

ans, Westw. (g. Mucidus) 17 

i.ensis. The ' insonia) 41 

Grabhamia) 23 

americana. mpis) 42 

americana. myia) i3 

americana. Xev.-I.rm. %. Aedeomy 

amesii. Ludl miyia) 1 1 

anar: 25 

itus. The.'; 

: 
annu'.; Myzorhynchu 

. heol '. . Ur motaenia 

Schrai 1 23 

32 



annuliferus. Ludl. (g. Culex) 25 

annulioris. Theob. [g. Culex) 25 
annulimanus, V. d. Wulp (g. Ano- 

12 

annulipalpis, Arrib. (g. Anopheles ?) 12 

annulipes, Meigen {g. Culex) 25 

annulipes. Walk. (g. Mansonia) 32 

annulipes. Walk. [g. Nyssorhynchus) 11 

annulitarsis. ilacq. (g. Stegomyia) 18 

annulirostris. Skuse if. Cfifc.i 1 25 

annulus. Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

Anopheles genusi. Moif, 6 

anopheloides, Giles if. Finlaya) 33 

antarctica. Hudson (f. Sayowj'/ff) 43 

alboannulatus, Macq. (g. Culex) 25 

albolineata, Theob. (g. Scntomyia) 19 

albolineatus, Giles (g. Culex) 26 
albomaculatus, Theob. lg. Haema- 

37 

albopictus, Sknse (§•. Scutomyia 19 
jniatus, Theob. [g. Myzorhyn- 

10 

albotaeniata. Leic. (f. Danielsia) 21 

albothorax, var.. Theob. ff. Culex) 27 

asiatica. Giles (4*. Sayomyia) 43 

asiatica. Leic. (5-. Lophocelomyia) 10 

asullepta. Theob. (j. Dendeomyia) 39 

atratipes. Skuse [g.Pyretoph 9 

atratus. Theob. <;'. Melanoconioii) 32 

atripes. Skuse (jj. Culex) * 27 

atropalpus. Coq. (f. Culex 1 26 

apicalis, Adams (5. Culex) 28 

apicalis. Theob. if. Culex) 25 

apicalis, Theob. (f. Uranota nia) 36 

appendiculata, Herrick (g - . Sayomyia 43 
argenteopunctata, Theob. if. .s 

19 
argyrotarsis, Rob.-Desv. [g.Cellia) 11 
arribalzagae, Giles (£. Janthinosomd) i5 
arribalzagae. Theob. Vaeniorhyn- 

3 1 

Arribalzagia (genus). Theob. 9 

Armigeres genus),. Blanch. 17 

ulatus, Rondani (g. Culex) 26 

- r, Coq. f. ' 26 

. Taeniorhynchu 3j 

['hi . /■.. etmapoditt s) 17 



Pages. 

australiensis. Giles if . Mansonia) 3i 

australis, Erichs. (f . Culex) 27 

anxifer, Coquerell if. Culex) 2S 

azoriensis, Theob. if. Culex) 29 

bancroftii, Giles (f. Myzorhynclms) 9 
bancroftii, Skuse (f. Stegomyia) 18 
bancroftii. Theob. (f. Culex) 25 
barberi, Coq. if. Anopheles) 7 
barbirostris. V. d. Wulp lg. Myzo- 
rhynchus) q 
bicolor. Meig. (f. Cuh . 29 
bifurcatus, L. (g. Anopheles) 7 
bigotii, Bell. (g. Lutzia) 24 
bilineatus, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 
bimaculatus, Coq. if. Culex) 29 
bipunctatus. Rob.-Desv. (g. Culex) 3o 
boscii, Rob.-Desv. (g. Psorophora) i5 
brakeleyi, Coq. (g. Corethrella) 43 
brasiiiensis, Theob. lg. Sayomyia) 43 
brevicellulus, Theob. if. Taenio- 
rhynchus) 3 1 
brevipalpis, Giles [g-. Stegomyia) 1.8 
brevipalpis, Theob. {g. Toxorhyn- 

cliites) i3 

butleri. Theob. if. Aides) 35 

caecus. Theob. if. Cuh 1 26 
caeruleocephala, Theob. (f. Urano- 
taenia 1 36 
calcitrans. Rob.-Desv. if. Culex) 3o 
calopus, Meigen (g. Stegomyia 18 
camptorhynchus, Thorns, (g . Culex) 26 
canadensis, Theob. [g. Cult < 26 
cancer, Theob. if. Deinocerites) 37 
cantator, Coq. (g. Culex) 26 
Catageiomyia (genus), Theob. 22 
cantans, Meigen lg. C 25 
Cellia (genus), Theob. 11 
centaiirus, Walker ff. Psorophora) i5 
ceratopogones, Theob. ff. Sayomyia) 42 
chaudoyei, Theob. if. Pyretophorus) 9 
christophersi, Theob. (g. Myzomyia) 8 
Christya fgenus . Theob. 10 
ciliaris. L. \g. Culex) 28 
ciliata. Fabr. i . . / i5 



4 6 



DIPTERA 



Pages. 

cinctipes, Coq. (g. Corethra) 42 
cinereoborealis. Felt & Young (g. 

Culex) 29 

cinereus, Meig". (g Aedes) 35 

cinereus, Theob. (g. Culex) 24 

cinereus, Theob. (g. Pyretophorus) 9 

cingulatus, Fabr. (g. Culex) 26 

claviger, Fabr. (g. Anopheles) 7 

claviger. Meigen (g. Anopheles) 7 

commovens, Walk. (g. Mucidus) 17 

communis, De Geer, (g. Culex) 2S 

concinnus, Steph. (g. Culex 3o 

concolor, Rob.-Desv. (g. Culex) 29 

confmnis, Arrib. (g. Taeniorhynchus) 3i 

confirmatus, Theob. (g. Culex) 26 

confusus, Theob. (g. Sabethoides) 3i 
conopas, Frauenf. (g. Taeniorhynchus) 3i 

consobrinus, Rob.-Desv. (g Culex) 27 

constani, Lav. Ig. Myzorhynchus) 10 

conterrens, Walk, (g . Culex) 25 

costalis, Law. {g. Pyretophorus) 9 

Corethrella (genus), Coq. 43 

Corethra (genus), Loew. 42 

Corethra (genus), Meig. 42 

cornfordii, Theob. (g. Sayomyia) 43 

corniger, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

crassipes, V. d. Wulp (g. Stegomyia) 19 

creticus, Theob. (g. Culex) 26 

crinifer, Theob. ig. Culex) 29 

crucians, Walker (g. Culex) 27 

crucians, Wied (g. Anopheles) 7 

crystallina, De Geer [g. Sayomyia) 43 

Culex (genus), L. 24 

culicifacies, Giles (g. Myzomyia) 7 

culiciformis, De Geer (g. Corethra) 42 

cumminsii, Theob. (g. Culex) 29 

cuneatus. var , Theob. (g. Culex) 26 

curriei, Coq. {g. Grabhamia) 23 

curvirostris, Sim. & Lav. (g. Limatus) 40 

cyaneus. Fabr. [g. Haemagogus) 37 

Cyclolepidopteron igenus), Bl. 8 

Cycloleppteron (genus). Theob. 8 

cyanescens. Coq. (g. Culex) 29 

cylindricus. Theob. [g. Culex) 28 

Danielsia (genus), Theob. 21 

decens, Theob. (g. Culex) 29 

deceptor, Don. (g. Anopheles ?) 12 

Deinocerites igenus), Theob. 37 

Dendromyia (genus), Theob. 39 

Desvoidya (genus), Blanch. 17 

detritus, var., Hal. (g. Culex) 27 

discolor, Coq. (g. Grabhamia) 23 



Pages, 

discrucians, Arrib. (g. Janthinosoma) i5 

discrucians, Walk (g. Janthinosoma) i5 

dissimilis, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

diurna, Theob. (g. Skusea) 19 

diversus, Theob. (g. Culex) 27 

dives, Schiner (g. Mansonia) 3g 

doleschallii, Giles (g, Culex) 3q 

domesticus, Germ. (g. Culex) 28 

domesticus, Theob. (g. Aedimorphus) 20 

dorsalis, Meig. (g. Grabhamia) 24 

dupreei, Coq. (g. Culex) 26 

durbanensis, Theob. (g. Grabhamia) 23 

durhamii, Theob. (g. Limatus) 40 

duttoni, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

d5'ari, Coq. (g. Culex) 27 

effoetus, Walk. (g. Corethra) 42 

eiseni, Coq. (g. Anopheles ?) 12 

elegans, Ficalbi (g. Stegomyia) 18 
elegans, Jam. & Theob. (g. Myzo- 

myia) 8 

equinus, Meigen (g. Culex) 27 

equinus, Theob. (g. Haemagogus) 37 

error, Theob. (g. Aldrichia) 12 

Eretmapodites (genus), Theob. 17 

Etorleptiomyia (genus), Theob. 44 

euclastus. Theob. (g. Culex) 29 

Eucorethra (genus), Und. 43 

exagitans. Walk. (g. Stegomyia) 18 

excitans, Walk. (g. Stegomyia) 18 

excrucians, Walk. (g. Culex) 29 

faranti, Lav. (g. Anopheles ?) 12 

fasciata, Fabr. (g. Stegomyia) 18 

fasciolatus, Arrib. (g. Taeniorhynchus) 3o 

fasciatus. Meig. (g. Culex) 27 

fatigans. Wied. (g. Culex) 28 

ferox, Wied. (g. Megarhinus) i3 

ferrugineus. Wied. (g. Anopheles) 7 

Ficalbia genus), Theob. 36 

ficalbii, Xoe (g. Theobaldia) 23 

filipes. Walk. (g. Culex) 3o 

Finlaya (genus), Theob. 32 

fitchii. Felt & Young (g. Culex) 29 

flavescens. Theob. (g. Culex) 26 

flavicans, Meig. {g. Sayomyia) 43 

flavicosta, Walk. (g. Taeniorhynchus) 3i 

flavifrons, Skuse (g Culex) 26 

flavipes, Macq. (g. Culex) 28 

flavirostris, Meig. (g. Culex) 3o 

flavescens, Fabr. (g. Culex) 29 

fletcheri, Coq. (g. Culex) 29 

fluviatilis, Christ, (g. Myzomyia) 8 



Pages, 
fluviatilis, Theob. (g. Goeldia) 40 
fouchowensis, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 
formosaensis, Tsuzuki (g. Anopheles'!) 12 
formosus, Walk. (g. Stegomyia) 18 
franciscanus, McCr. (g. Anopheles) 7 
fragilis, Theob. (g. Stethomyia) 8 
fragilis, Ludl. (g. Culex) 29 
frater, Rob.-Desv. (g . Stegomyia) 18 
freetownensis, Theob. (g. Culex) 27 
frenchii, Theob. (g. Culex) 27 
frontosa, Theob. (g. Runchomyia) 3S 
fusca, Theob. (g. Desvoidya) 18 
fusca, Staeg. (g. Sayomyia) 43 
fuscanus, Wied. (g. Culex) 3o, 29 
fuscopennatus, Theob. (g. Taenio- 
rhynchus) 3i 
fusculus, Zett. (g. Culex) 26, 3o 
fuscus Osten Sacken (g. Aedes) 35 
fuliginosus, Giles (g. Nyssorhynchus) n 
fumipennis, Steph. (g. Culex) 25 
funesta, Giles (g. Myzomyia) 7 
funerea, Theob. (g. Skusea) 19 
fulvus, Wied. (g. Taeniorhynchus) 3i 

gambiae, Giles (g. Pyretophorus) 9 
gambiensis, var., Theob. (g. Culex) 25 
gelidus, Theob. (g. Culex) 26 
geniculatus, Ol. (g. Culex) 27 
geometrica, Theob. (g Uranotaenia) 36 
gigas, Giles {g. Anopheles) 7 
Gilesia (genus), Theob. 22 
gilesii, Theob. (g. Toxorhynchites) 14 
glaphyropterus, Schiner (g. Theo- 
baldia) 23 
gnophodus, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 
Goeldia (genus), Theob. 40 
Grabhamia (genus), Theob. 23 
grabhamii, Theob.-(g\ Cycloleppteron) 8 
gracilis, Don. (°. Pyretophorus) 9 
Grassia (genus), Theob. 7 
grantii, Theob. [g. Stegomyia) 19 
grayii, Theob. (g. Wycomyia) 38 
greenii, Theob. (g. Howardina) 21 
gubernatoris, Giles (g. Phagomyia) 21 
guttatus, Curt. (g. Culex) 27 

Haemagogus (genus), Will. 37 
haemorrhoidalis, Fabr. (g. Mega- 
rhinus) i3 
hafniensis, Gmelin (g. Sayomvia) 43 
halifaxii, Theob. (g. Culex) 29 
hebes, Don. (g. Myzomyia) 8 
Heptaphlebomyia (genus), Theob. 41 



FAM. CUL.ICID.tE 



47 



Pages. 

hirsuteron. Theob. (g. Culex) 27 

hirsutipalpis, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

hirsutum, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

hispaniola. Theob. [g. Myzomyia) S 

hispidosus. Skuse (g. Mucidus) 17 

Hodgesia genus). Theob. 40 

holmbergii, Arrib. (g. Psoropkora) 17 

hortensis. Fie. (g. Culex) 28 

Howardia genus), Theob. S 

hotvardii. Coq. (g. Psoropkora) 17 

Howardina (genus). Theob. 21 

Hulecoetomyia genus . Theob. 20 

humilis. Theob. (g. Melanoconion) 32 

hyemalis. Fitch (g. Anopheles) 7 

hyrcanus, Pallas (g. Culex) 25 

idahoensis.var.. Theob. (g.Grabhamia) 23 

imitator, Theob. Ig. Culex) 25 

immaculatus. Theob. (g. Anopheles) 7 
immisericors.Walk Sg.Toxorkynchites) 14 

impatabilis. Walk. t>. Stegomyia) 18 

impatiens, Walk. (g. Culex) 27 

impellens. Walk. {g. Culex) 25 

impiger. Walk. (g. Culex) 27 

implacabilis. Walk. Ig. Culex) 27 

in-,; !exa, Theob. Ig. Chris: 10 

rimiens. Walk. !g. Culex) 26 

impudicus. Fie. <g. Grabhamia ?) 24 

impunctus. Don. [g. Aldric 12 

inciiens. Thorns, {g. Theobaldia) 23 
indecorabilis. Theob. Ig.Melanoconioh) 32 

indica. Theob. tyia) 7 
indiensis, var.. Theob. (g. Nysso- 

11 

inexorabilis. Walk, [g-. Stegomyia) iS 

inflictus. Theob. Ig. Culex) 27 

a. Theob. Ig. Culex) 25 

in mat is. Walk. (g. Toxoryhnchites) 14 

atus, Willist. (°\ Cafef) 27 

invenustus. Theob. Ig. Culex) 28 

':iosus, Theob. Ig. Culex) 28 

lus. Walk. Ig. Culex) 26 

irrkans. Theob. Ig. Phagom 21 

jamaicensis, Theob. Ig. Grabhamia) 23 

: . Liston 'g. Nyssorhynckus) 11 

;. Theob. .-. . '■ torhynchus 11 

Janthinosoma genus), Arrib. 16 

janitor, Theob :-. C 26 

japonicus. Theob. v. Culex z$ 

; :s. Tsuzuki j. Myzorhynchus) 10 

;nsis. Theob. (j-. Pyretophorus) 9 

Joblotia genus . Blanch. 33 



Pages. 

karwari, James (g. Nyssorhynckus) 11 

kelloggii, Theob. [g. Culex) 25 

kermorganti. Lav. (g. Culex Y) 29 

kochi, Don. \g. Finlaya) 33 

kochii, Don. (g. Cellia) 11 

konuoupi, Brulle (g. Stegomyia) iS 

kumasi, Chalm. (g. Myzomyia) S 

laniger. Wied. [g. Mucidus) 17 
Lasioconops (genus). Theob. 32 
lateralis, Latr. [g. Sayomyia) 43 
lateralis, Meig. (g. Culex) 26 
lazarensis. Felt & Young (g. Culex) 29 
Laverania (genus), Theob. 10 
leicesteri, Theob. Ig. Toxorhynchites) i3 
Leicesteria (genus), Theob. 20 
Lepidotomyia (genus). Theob. 22 
leptomeres, Theob. (g. Myzomyia) S 
leucacanthus, Loew. [g. Grabhamia) 24 
leucopus. Don. (g. Nyssohynchus) 11 
leucosphyrus, Don. Ig. Myzomyia) 8 
linealis. Skuse (g. Culex) 29 
Limatus igenus), Theob. 40 
lindesayii. Giles Ig. Anopheles) 7 
listoni. Giles (g. Myzomyia) 7 
listoni, Liston Ig. Myzomyia) 8 
loculipes. Rob.-Desv. (g. Sabethes) 40 
longipalpis, Leic. Ig. Leicesteria) 20 
longipalpis, V. d. Wulp Ig. Culex) 26 
longipalpis, Theob. (g. Myzomyia) 8 
longipes, Theob. Ig. Culex \ 27 
longipes, Macq. (g. Sabethes) 40 
longirostris, Theob. (g. Pkoniomyia) 38 
longirostris, V. d. Wulp Ig. Culex) 25 
Lophocelomyia (genus), Theob. 10 
lowii, Theob. Ig. Vranotacnia) 36 
luciensis, var. Theob. Ig. Stegomyia) 18 
ludlowii. Theob. Ig. Myzomyia) 18 
ludlowii, Theob. Ig. Myzomyia) 7 
lunata, Theob. (g. Joblotia) 33 
luridus. Dol. Ig. Culex) 3o 
luteoannulatus. Theob. Ig. Culex) 28 
luteolateralis, Theob. Ig. Culex) 27 
luteopleurus, Theob. Ig. Melanoco- 
nion) 32 
luteoventralis, Theob. (g. Dendro- 

myia) 39 

luteovittata. var. Theob. (g. Culex) 27 

lutescens, Fabr. Ig. Cidex) 29 

Lutzia (genus), Theob. 24 

lutzii. Theob. Ig. Sabethes) 40 

lutzii, Theob. (g. Janthinosoma) i5 

lutzii, Theob. Ig. Myzomyia) 8 



Pages. 

Macleaya (genus), Theob. 20 

macleayi, Skuse {g. Culex) 28 

macleayi, Skuse (g. Culex) 29 

maculatus, Theob. (g. Nyssorhynckus) n 
maculatus, Meig. (g. Culex) 25 

maculicrura, Theob. (g. Culex) 29 

maculipalpis, Giles (g. Nyssorhynckus) 
maculipennis, Meig. (g. Anopheles) 7 
maculipes, Theob. (g. Arribalzagia) 9 
maculiventris, Macq. [g. Culex) 26 

magna, Theob. (g. Lepidotomyia) 22 

magna, Theob. {g. Deinocerites) 37 

major, Theob. (g. Mansonia) 32 

malariae, Grassi (g. Culex) 16 

malayi, Theob. (g. Uranotaenia) 36 

manilliensis, Schiner (g. Sayomyia) 43 
Mansonia (genus), Blanch. 3i 

marginalis. Steph. (g. Culex) 29 

mariae, Sergent (g. Culex) 25 

marinus, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

marshallii, Theob. (g. Pyrctophorus) 9 
marshalli, Theob. (g. Scutormyia) 19 

marshallii, Theob. (g. Toxorhynchites) i3 
martini, Lav. (g. Anopheles ':) 12 

masculus, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 

mashonaensis, Theob. (g. Mimomyia) 3y 
mashonaensis, var., Theob. (g. Ura- 
notaenia) 36 
mastersi, Skuse (g. Nyssorhynckus) 11 
mathisi, Nev.-Lem. (g. Culex) 27 
mauritianus, Grandpre (g. Myzo- 
rhynchus) 10 
mediolineatus, Theob. (g. Culex) 27 
mediopunctata, Theob. {g. Etorlep- 

tiomyia) 44 

mediopunctatus, Theob. (g. Cyclo- 

leppleron) 8 

Megarhinus (genus), Rob.-Desv. 12 
Melanoconion (genus), Theob. 32 
melanorhinus, Giles (g. Culex) 3o 

melanurus, Coq. (g. Culex) 29 

melas, var., Theob. (g. Pyretophorus) 9 
meridionalis, Leach (g. Culex) 3o 

merus, Don. (g. Anopheles '?) 12 

metaboles, Theob, Ig. Nyssorhynckus) 11 
metallicus. Leic (g. Toxorhynckitcs) i3 
metallicus, Theob. (g.. Culex) 27 

mexicanus, Bellardi (g. Janthino- 
soma) 1 5 
microannulatus, Theob. Ig. Culex) 25 
mimeticus, Noe (g. Culex) 25 
minima, Theob. (g. Ficalbia) 36 
minimus, Theob. (g. Pyretophorus) 9 



48 



D1PTERA 



Pages. 

Mochlonyx (genus), Loew. 42 

modestus, Fie. {g. Culex) 2S 

molestus, Wied. (g. Psorophora) i5 

molestus, Wied. (g. Culex) 3o 

mombasaensis, var. .Theob. (g. Culex) 29 

morsitans, Theob. (g. Culex) 26 
mosquito, var., Rob.-Desv. (g, Ste- 

gomyia) 18 

mosquito, Arrib. (g. Stegomyia) iS 

Mimomyia (genus), Theob. 36 

minutus, Theob. (g. Myzorhynchus) 16 

Mucidus (^enus), Theob. 17 

mucidus. Karsch (g. Mucidus) 17 

multiplex, Theob. (g. Shusea) 19 

musica, Say (g. Janthinosomd) i5 

musicus, Leach (g. Culex) 3o 
Myzomyia (genus), Blanch. 

Myzorhynchus (genus), Blanch. 9 



ocellatus, Theob. (g. Culex) 29 

ochraceus, Theob. (g.Taeniorhyuchus) 3i 
ochraceus, Theob (g. Culex) 27 

ochripes, Macq. (g. Culex) 3o 

occidentalis, Skuse (g. Culex) 26 

ornatus, Hoffm. (g. Culex) 27 



nanus, Coq. (g. Grabhamia) 
nataliae, Arrib. (g. Uraiwtaenia) 
nebulosus. Theob. (g. Culex) 
nemorosus, Meig. (g. Culex) 
nero, Dol. (g. Mansonia) 
nicaensis, Leach (g. Culex) 
niger. Theob. (g. Aedes) 
nigeria, Theob. (g. Stegomyia) 
nigerrimus, Giles (g. Myzorhynchus) 
nigricephala, Theob. (g. Phagomyia) 
nigricorpus, Theob. (g. Aedes) 
nigripalpus, Theob. (g. Melanoco- 

nion) 
nigripes, Staeg. (g. Anopheles) 
nigripes, Zett. (g. Culex) 
nigritulus, Zett. {g. Culex) 
nigrochaetae, Theob. (g. Cidex) 
nili, Theob. (g. Myzomyia) 
nimba, Theob. (g. Stethomyia) 
nitidus, Theob. (g. Sabethoides) 
nitidus, Theob. (g. Sabethes) 
nivea, Ludl. (g. Scutomyia) 
nivipes, Theob. (g. Nyssorhynchus) 
nivipes, Theob. (g. Joblotia) 
nocturnus, Theob. (g. Culex) 
notoscripta, Skuse (g. Scutomyia) 
notoscripta, Skuse (if. Scutomyia) 
nubilis, Theob. {g. Culex) 
nyblaei, Zett. (g. Sayomyia) 
Nyssorhynchus (genus), Blanch. 



2.3 

36 
28 
27 
32 
3o 
35 

19 
10 
21 
35 

32 

7 
27 
28 
27 



3 9 
40 
19 
11 
33 
25 

19 
29 

43 



obscuripes, V. d. Wulp (g Sayomyia) 43 
obscurus, Giles (g. Aedes) 35 

obturbans, Walk. (g. Desvoidya) 18 



palestinensis, Theob. (g. Pyretophorus) 
pallens, Schiner (g. Sayomyia) 
pallens, Coq. (g. Culex) 
pallida, Fabr. (g. Sayomyia) 
pallida, var., Theob. (g. Culex) 
pallidoventer, Theob. (g. Uraiwtaenia) 
pallipes, Meig. (g. Culex) 28, 

paludis. Theob. (g. Myzorhynchus) 
paludis, var. similis, Theob. (g. My- 
zorhynchus) 
palus, Theob. (g. Culex) 
panalectros, Theob. (g, Desvoidya) 
paraensis, Theob. (g. Dendromyia) 
particeps, Adams (g. Culex) 
parvus, Macq. (g. Culex) 
Pelorempis (genus), Joh. 
pembaensis, Theob. (g. Skusea). 
pembaensis, Theob. (g. Aedes) 
penetrans, Rob.-Desv. (g. Theobaldia) 
penicellaris, Rond. (g. Grabhamia) 
perexiguus, Theob. (g. Culex) 
perterrens. Walk. (,§-. Psorophora) 
pertinans, Will. (g. Wyeomyia) 
perturbans.Walk. (g. 1 ' aeniorhynchus) 
perturbans, Will. (g. Wyeomyia) 
pervigilans. Bergr. (g. Culex) 
Phagomyia (genus), Theob. 
pharoensis, Theob. (g. Cellia) 
philippinensis, Ludlow ig. Nysso- 
rhynchus) 
Phoniomyia (genus), Theob. 
phytophagus, Fie. (g. Cidex) 
pictus, Fie. (g. Myzorhynchus) 
pictus, Loew. (g. Anopheles ?) 
pilicornis, Fabr. Ig. Sayomyia) 
pilipes, Gimm. (g. Sayomyia) 
pinguis, Walk. (g. Culex) 27, 

pipiens, L. (g. Culex) 
pitchfordi, Giles (g. Anopheles ?) 
pleuristriatus, Theob. (g. Culex) 
plumbeus, Hal. (g. Anopheles) 
plumicornis, Fabr. (g. Sayomyia) 
plumiger, Don. (g. Myzorhynchus) 
plumosus, Theob (g. Culex) 
poicilia, Theob. (g. Finlaya) 
poicilipes, Theob. (g. Lasioconops) 



9 
43 
29 
43 
27 
36 
3o 
10 

10 
28 
18 
39 
26 
3o 
42 

19 
35 
23 
24 
28 
i5 
38 
3i 
38 
27 
21 
11 

11 
38 
28 
10 
12 
43 
4 3 
3o 
28 
12 

25 

7 
4 3 
10 
25 
33 
32 



Pages. 

Polyleptiomyia (genus), Theob. 21 

portoricens'is, Roder (g. Megarhinus) i3 

posticata, Wied. (g. Janthinosomd) i5 
pretoriensis, Theob. (g. Nyssorrhyn- 

chus) 1 1 
procax, Skuse (g. Culex) 26 
provocans, Walk. (g. Culex) 27 
pruina, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 
pseudobarbirostris, Ludl. (g. Myzo- 
rhynchus) 1 o 
pseudocinereus, Theob. (g. Culex) 27 
pseudopictus, Grassi {g. Myzorhyn- 
chus) 10 
pseudopunctipennis, Theob. (g. Ano- 
pheles) 7 
pseudotaeniata, Giles (g. Hulecoeto- 

myia) 20 
pseudotitillans, Theob. (g. Mansonia) 3i 
Psorophora (genus) Rob.-Desv. 16 
puinosus, Thepb. (g. Cidex) 28 
pulcherrima, Arrib. (g. Uranotaenia) 36 
pulcherrima, Theob. (g. Cellia) 11 
pulcripalpis, Rond. (g. Grabhamia) 24 
pulcritarsis, Rond {g. Grabhamia) 24 
pulcriventer, Giles (g. Culex) 26 
punctatus, Meig. (g. Culex) 27 
punctipennis, Say (g. Sayomyia) 43 
punctolateralis, Theob. (g. Stego- 
myia) 19 
punctor, Kirby (g. Cidex) 27 
punctulatus, Theob. (g. Myzomyia) 8 
punctulata, Don. (g. Myzomyia) 8 
punctipennis, Say (g. Anopheles) 7 
pungens, Wied. (g. Culex) 28 
purpureus, Theob. {g. Megarhinus) i3 
pursati, Lav. [g. Anopheles ?) 12 
pusillus, Macq. (g. Culex) 19 
Pyretophorus (genus), Blanch. 8 
pygmaea, Theob. (g. Grabhamia) 23 
pygmaea, Theob. (g. Uranotaenia) 36 

quadratimaculatus, Macq. (g. Culex) 27 
quadrimaculatus, Say {g. Anopheles) 7 
quadrivittata, Coq. (g. Culex) 29 

quasigelidus, Theob. (g. Culex) 26 

quasiluteoventralis, Theob. (g. Den- 
dromyia) 3g 
quasipipiens, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 
quasiunivittatus, Theob. (g. Culex) 26 
queenslandensis, Theob. (g. Sayo- 
myia) 43 
queenslandensis, var., Theob. (g. Ste- 
gomyia) 1 8 



FAM. CULICID.-E 



49 



Pages. 

quinquevittatus , Theob. (g. Eretma- 
podites) 17 



reesii. Theob. (g. Culex) 
regius, Thwaites [g. Toxorhynchites) 
remipes, Theob. [g. Sabethoides) 
remipes, Wied. (g. Sabtt/ies) 
reptans. Meig. [g. Culex) 
restuans. Theob. (g. Culex 
reversus. Theob. \g. Mansonia) 
rhodesiensis. Theob (g. Myzomyia) 
richardii. Fie. [g. Taeniorhynchus) 
rimus. Theob. [g. M clanoconion) 
Rossia jenus'i. Theob. 
rossii, Giles §•. Mysom 1 
rossii. Giles (g. Stegomyia) 
rubidus, Rob.-Desv. {g. Culex) 
rubithorax, Macq. [g. Culex) 
rufa. Zett. {g. Sayon: 
rufinus. Bigot [g. Culex) 
rufus. Meig. 5 -. Culex) 
Runchomyia genus). Theob. 
rusticus, Rossi (g. Cul 
rutilas. Coq. kinus) 



28 

14 
3 9 
40 
27 

2S 



01 

32 
9 
7 
iS 
3o 
21 
43 
3o 
28 
38 

27 
i3 



Sabethes genus . Rob.-Desv. 39 

Sabethoides genus 1, Theob. 39 

sagax. Skuse Ig. Culex) 27 

sa'.inarius, Coq. (g. Culex) 28 

salinus. Fie. (g. Culex) 27 

salisburiensis. Theob. [g. Culex) 27 

sanguinae. Thenb. ig. Hodgesia) 41 

saphirina, Ost.-Sack. (g. Uranotaenia) 36 

Sayomyia genus), Coq. 42 

scataphagoides. Theob. (g. Mucidus) 17 

scholasticus, Theob. <g. Culex) 28 

scintillans. Walk. [g. Psorophora) 17 

Scutomyia genus , Theob. 19 

'.nus. Phil. {g. Culex) 28 

tor, Theob. (g. Culex) 26 

- ; lensis. Theob. Ig Calageionn • zz 

31 -as. Arrib. [g, Megarhinus) 12 

sergentii, Theob. . C 28 

sericeus, Theob. . C ■ 28 

. I ■ . ' fe* 29 

sierra-leonis, Theob. ig. Culex) 29 

. Stegomyia) 19 

sitiens, Wied. Ig. Culex) 25 

siculus. Rob.-Desv. Ig. Culex) 3o 

similis, Theob. \g. Culex, 28 

simple::. Theob. :;. Heptaphlebomiyia : 41 

simple . Fiedlbia) 36 



Pages. 

sinensis, Wied. (£. Myzorhynchus) 10 
sinensis, var., Theob. [g. Culex) 26 

siphonalis, Grossb. (g. Culex) 29 

Skusea (genus). Theob. 19 

skusii. Giles (£•. Culex) 2S, 29 

socialis. Theob. (g. Uranotaenia) 36 

sollicitans. Walk, (g Grabhamia) 23 

spathipalpis, Rond. (g. Thcobaldia) 23 
speciosiis, Skuse (g. Toxorhynchites) i3 
spencerii. Theob. (g. Grabhamia) 23 

spissipes. Theob. (g. Melanoconion) 32 
splendens, Theob. (g. M imomyia) 3j 

splendens, Wied. (g. Megarhinus) i3 
squamiger, Coq. (g. Culex) 29 

squammipennis, Arrib. (g.Aedeomyia) 35 
squamosa, Theob. (g. Cellia) 
Stegomyia (genus), Theob. 
stephensi, Liston (g. Nys'orhynchus) 
Stethomyia (genus), Theob. 
stimulans. Walk. (g. Culex) 
subalbatus, Coq. [g. Culex) 
subulifer, Doll. (g. Toxorhynchites) 
subumbrosa, var., Theob. (g. Myzo- 

■ ■ 
sugens, Wied. (g. Scutomyia) 
superpictus, Grassi (g. Pyrethophorus) 
sylvae, Theob. (g. Culex) 
sylvaticus. Meig. (g. Culex) 
sylvestris. Theob. (g Culex) 



Taeniorhynchus (genus), Arrib. 
taeniorhynchus, Arrib. (g. Mansonia) 
taeniatus, Wied. (g. Stegomyia) 
treniorhynchus, Wied. {g. Culex) 
tarsalis, Coq. {g. Culex) 
tenax, Theob. (g. Taeniorhynchus) 
tenebrosus, Don. ig. Mysorhynchus) 
terrens. Walk. (g. Culex) 
terriei, Theob. (g. Culex) 
territaris. Walk. (g. Culex) 
tessellata, Theob. (g. Myzomyia) 
testaceus, V. d. Wulp (g. Culex) 
thallasius, Theob. Ig. Culex) 
theileri, Theob. Ig. Cuiex) 
theobaldi, Giles Ig. Nyssorhynchus) 
Theobaldia (genus), Nev.-Lem. 
thomsoni, Theob. (g. Stegomyia) 
thoracicus (Rob.-Desv.) (g. Culex) 
thorntonii, Ludl. (g. Myzomyia) 
tortilis, Theob. Ig. Culex 1 
Toxorhynchites (genus), Theob. 
tibialis, Rob.-Desv. Ig. Culex) 
tigripes, Grandpre ig. Culex) 



11 

IS 

11 

8 

25 

27 

14 

7 
19 

9 
27 

27 
26 

o3 
3i 
18 
25 

26 
3i 
10 
26 
27 
27 
8 
26 
25 

26 

11 

23 

18 

3o 
8 
26 
i3 
3o 
29 



Pages . 

tipuliformis, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 

tilillans, Walk. (g. Mansonia) 3i 

toxorhynchus, Macq. (g. Stegomyia) iS 

transvaalensis, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

tremula, Theob. (g. Macleaya) 20 

trichopygus, Wied. (g. Megarhima) i3 

trifurcatus, Fabr. (g. Anopheles) 7 

trilineata, Leic. (g. Hulecoetomyia) 20 

trilineatus, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 
trinidadensis, Theob. ig. Phoniomyia) 38 

triseriatus, Say ig. Culex) 26 

trivittata, Loevv. (g. Sayomyia) 43 

trivittatus, Coq. (g. Culex) 27 

trukhudi. List. (g. Myzomyia) 8 

vagans, Wied. (g. Culex) 2 

vagus, Don. (g. Myzomyia) 7 

vanus, Walk. (g. Myzorhynchus) 10 

variegatus, Schrank (g. Thcobaldia) 23 

varioannnlatus, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 

varipalpus, Coq. (g. Culex) 29 

varipes. Coq. 'g. Janthinosoma) i5 

velutinus, Ruthe Ig. Corethra) 42 

ventralis, Walk. (g. Desvoidya) 18 

venustipes, Skus. (g. Aedeomyia) 36 

ulocoma, Theob. (g. Dendromvia) 39 

umbrosa, var., Theob. (g. Myzomyia) 7 

umbrosus, Theob. (g. Myzorhynchus) 9 

uncus, Theob. \g. Culex) 27 
underwoodi, Underw. (g. Encore 

thra) 44 

uniformis, Theob. Ig. Mimomyia) 37 

uniformis, Theob. (g. Mansonia) 3i 

unistriatus, Curt. (g. Culex) 3o 

univittatus, Theob. (g. Cidex) 26 

Uranotaenia (genus), Arrib. 36 

vexans, Meig, Ig. Culex) 26 

vigilax, Skuse ig. Culex) z5 

villosus, Rob.-Desv. Ig. Anopheles) 7 

vincenti, Lav. (g. Anopheles ?) 12 

violaceus, Hoffm. (g. Megarhinus) i3 

virgultus. Theob. (g. Culex) 28 

viridifrons, Walk. Ig. Stegomyia) 18 

viridis, Theob. (g. Culex) 29 

virideventer, Giles (g. Culex) 28 

vishnui, Theob. (g. Culex) 25 

vittata. Theob. ig. Grabhamia) 24 

vittatus, Bigot (g. Scutomyia) 19 

vittatus, Phil. (g. Cidex) 26 

vittiger, Skuse ig. Culex) 26 



5o 



DIPTERA 



vulgaris, L. (g. Culex) 

walkeri, Theob. (g. A/wpheles) 
walkeri, Theob. (g. Howardina) 
wellcomei, Theob. (g. Anopheles) 



28 

7 
21 

7 



Pages. 

willistoni, Giles (g. Culex) 26 

willmori, James iNyssorhynchus) 11 

Wyeomyia (genus), z'Theob. 38 

zammitii, Theob. (g. Acartomyia) 24 



Pages . 

ziemanni, Griinb. (g. Anopheles ?) 12 
zombaensis, Theob. (g. Culex) 28 

zonatipes, Walk. {g. Stegomyia) 18 



DESCRIPTION OF PLATES 
Plate i 

Fig. 1. Anopheles maculipennis 9, Meigen. 

— 2. Myzomya funesta Q, Giles. 

— 3. Myzorhynchas barbirostris 9, Van der Wulp. 

— 4. Cellia pharoensis 9- Theobald. 

— 5. Megarhinus separatus rj!< , Arribalzaga. 

— 6. Toxorhynchites brevipalpis 9 , Theobald. 

— 7. Mucidus africanus 9 > Theobald. 

— 8 Psorophora ciliata Q , Robineau-Desvoidy. 

— 9. Janthinosoma musica 9 , Say. 

— 10. Eretmapodites quinqiievittatus cf , Theobald. 

— 11. Stegomyia fasciata 9, Fabricius. 

— 12. Tkeobaldia annulata Q, Linnaeus. 

Plate 2 

Fig. 1. Lutzia bigotii 9. Bellardi. 

— 2. Culex fatigans 9> Wiedemann. 

— 3. Melanoconion atratus 9. Theobald. 

— 4. Grabhamiajamaicensis 9 1 Theobald. 

— 5. Taeniorhynchus fasciolatits 9) Arribalzaga. 

— 6. Mansonia africana 9 , Theobald. 

— 7. Deinoceritcs cancer 9 . Theobald. 

— 8. Sabethes longipes 9- Fabricius. 

— 9. Aedeomyia squammipennis 9 < Arribalzaga. 

— 10. Uranotaenia geometrica 9 > Theobald. 

— 11. Phoniomyia longirostris 9 , Theobald. 

— 12. Joblotia nivipes 9, Theobald (q* palp.). 



Wye (Kent), i5 th January igo'S. 



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