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Full text of "The general armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales; comprising a registry of armorial bearings from the earliest to the present time"

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fn f titrts 







k. 




k. 



THE GENERAL ARMOEY 



ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, IRELAND, AND WALES. 



THE 



GENEEAL AEMOET 



ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, IRELAND AND WALES; 



COMPBISFNG 



A REGISTRY OF ARMORIAL BEARINGS FROM THE EARLIEST TO 

THE PRESENT TIME. 



SIR BERNARD BURKE, C.B., LL.D., 

ULSTER KING OF ARMS, 

AUTHOB OF " THE PEEEAGB AND BAEONETAOE," " HISTOBY OF THE LANDED GENTEY," " DOHMANT 

AND EXTINCT PEEEAGE," " VICISSITUDES OF FAMILIES," " HEMINISCENCES, 

ANCE8TKAL AND ANECDOTAL," &C., &.C. 



WITH A 




SUPPLEMENT. 



LONDON : 

HARRISON, 59, PALL MALL, 

loohs^ller io iht ©imii m\b g.g.^. H^t f rince of Males. 



1884. 



LOMJDON : 
PRINTED BY HABEISON AND SONS, PBINTERS IN OEDlNARr TO HER MAJESTY, 
ST. martin's lane, CHAKING CKOSS. 



Ileprintpfl by Wm. Clowes & Sons Ltd., Beccles, for the publishers, Burke's 

iVcrage Lt<l., in conjunction with Shaw Publishing Co. Ltd. (Registered 

offices: \m Fleet Street, London, E.C.4. Publishing offices: Mercury House, 

109 - 119 Waterloo Road, London, S.E.I, England). 



UlllVERSITY 01^ CALIFORNIA 

SANTA UAilBARA 



NOTICE. 



The reader is earnestly requested to refer to " THE Supplement " before 
consulting the Work. A few words are all that are required in addition to 
the original Preface. The learned and accomplished friends whose 
co-operation I then gratefully acknowledged, have been equally kind 
and obliging in this re-issue. One, Mr. Stephen Tucker, has since 
become Somerset Herald, ahd has been succeeded as Rouge Croix by 
my son, Mr, H. Farnham Burke, F.S.A., who has rendered me essential 
service in this edition. 

J. BERNARD BURKE, 

Ulster. 



PREFACE. 



The General Armory first appeared in the year 1842, and was most 
iavourably received. The long period that has since elapsed has, by the 
acquisition of vast materials, tended to the completion, and it is hoped to 
the perfection of the original work. Founded on the Heralds' Visitations. 
the County Histories, and the heraldic writings of Dugdale, Camden, Guillim, 
Edmondson, Berry, Nicolas, and others, the present edition of the Armory is, 
I venture to assert, the most comprehensive Collection of Arms ever brought 
together, embracing, as it does, some 60,000 coats. The most minute 
and watchfdl editing, rendered necessary by the technical nature of the 
blazons, has been bestowed upon it. Every line required to be closely 
examined, and each heraldic description to be correctly entered. Despite, 
however, of this anxious attention, errors will doubtless be detected; but 
these will, it is confidently expected, meet with the reader's indulgence. 
The work comprises the Armorial Bearings of the Noblemen and Gentlemen 
of the British Empire, and the various Coats that are to be seen in churches 
and family mansions, together with those traceable on Seals, Deeds, Wills^ 
and Monumental remains. 

History and genealogy, linked as they are with Heraldry, are illustrated 
and in some iastances explained, by the Science of Arms. 
-^ Heraldry arose with feudalism, attained its full growth iu mediaeval 
times, and now, in the 19th century, is prized by all who can show 
honourable ancestry, or wish to found honourable families. 

Valuable as the assistance has been which I have derived fi-om the 
authorities who have written upon the subject, the result of my endeavours 
would be incomplete were it not for the generous aid afibrded me by many 
distinguished friends. 

To George Burnett, Lyon King of Anns, my deepest obligation is 
due. With energy imtiring, with liberality unrestiicted, and with kindness 
unwearied, he has done for this book and for Scotland generally what has 
never before been attempted. The heraldry of the historic kingdom over 
which his jurisdiction extends is, thanks to his learning and abihty, fully 
and authoritatively given in this edition of the General Armory. My debt 
is also great, and my acknowledgments are most cordially ofiered, to several 
members of the Heralds' College England. My old and esteemed friend 



ji PREFACE. 

Sir Albert Woods, Garter, head of that famous Corporation, has responded 
with unfailing courtesy and consideration to every question I have put 
to him; and Chester, Lancaster, and York Heralds, Mr. Murray Lane, 
Mr. Cokayne, and General de Havilland, always so kind and obliging, 
have supphed most important information. And here I take occasion 
to express the gratitude I especially feel to another member of the Heralds' 
College, my accomplished friend Stephen Tucker, Rouge Croix. His skill 
and great heraldic knowledge have, from the Glossary to the very end of 
the Armoiy, amended and adorned the book. There is scarcely a page that 
does not afford evidence of the value of his co-operation. 

Outside of the Lyon Office and the Heralds' College numerous con- 
tributors have essentially aided me in the compilation of this volume. 

John H. Glascott, J.P., of Killowen, co. Wexford, so vrell known as a 
Genealogist and Herald, has, with indefatigable zeal and assiduous care* 
watched the progress of the work from the very beginning. I have also to 
return my warmest thanks to many others who have most kindly seconded 
my endeavours, and particularly to Mr. H. Sydney Grazebrook, Barrister- 
at-law. Captain Alfred E. Lawson Lowe, of Highfield, Sfr John Maclean, 
F.S.A., Mr. Robert Riddle Stodai-t, of the Lyon Office, Mr. Alfred W. 
Morant, F.S.A., Mr. J. Paul Rylands, of Highfields, F.S.A., Mr. Tyssen- 
Amherst, of Didlington Hall, Mr. Reginald Stewart Boddington, Mr. H. A. 
Johnston, of the Irish Bar, Rev. E. H. Mainwaring Sladen, M.A., Mr. George 
D. Tomlinson, Mr. W. Smith ElHs, of Hydecroft, Rev. John Woodward, 
George W. Marshall, LL.D., F.S.A., Mr. Charles J. O'Donel, of Dublin, 
Banister-at-law, Mr. James Greenstreet, Viscount Gort, Mr. E. P. Shiiley, of 
Ettington Park, and Hon. Robert C. Winthrop and Mr. Thomas C. Amory, 
both of Boston, U.S. 

Thus produced and thus largely increased, the Armory will, it is earnestly 
hoped, become a book of general and satisfactory reference on the subject 
of Heraldry and Arms, and form the sequel to my series of works in elucida- 
tion of the genealogy and history of the titled and untitled orders of the 
three Kingdoms. 

J. BERNARD BURKE, 
Ulster. 



-AQt^j^^S^ 



CONTENTS. 



Positions 



HERALDRY 

Animals, Attitudes or Posi- 
tions of 

Archbishop's Anns 

Arms, Right to Bear 

Badges 

Banners 

Birds, Attitudes or 
of . . 

Bishop's Anns 

Blazoning 

Cadency, Marks of 

Chapeaux 

Coronets 

Crests . . 

Crowns 

Escutcheon of Pretence 

Fishes, Attitudes or Positions 
of . . 

Hatchments . . 

Helmets 

Heralds' Visitation 

Heralds 

Impaling 



PAGE 

v-xxvii 

xii 

vii 
xiii 

xii 

X 

viii 

xii 

xvii 

xvii 

xiii 

xvii 

ix 

xii 

xvii 

vii 

xxiv 

ix 



Kings of Arms 

Mantles 

Marshalling . . 

Motto . . 

Quartering 

Seize Quartiers 

Shield of Anns 

Standards 

Supporters 

Visitations 

Wreaths 



PAGE 

viii-xxiv 

xvii 

ix 

XV 

X 

Yirii 

xi 

XX 

xviii 
vii 
xiii 



GLOSSARY .. .. xxviii-xxxvi 
Appendages of the Shield . ,. xxxiii 
Charges in Heraldry . , . . xxxiv 
Colors . . . . . . xxviii, xxix 



Coronets 

Crowns 

Furs . . 

Metals. . 

Ordinaries 

Partition Lines 

Shield, Appendages of 

Sub-Ordinaries 



DICTIONARY OF TERMS USED IN HERALDRY 

ABBREVIATIONS 

THE ROYAL ARMORY 

Her Majesty the Queen 
The Prince of Wales 

The Duke of Edinburgh 

The Duke of Connaught and Stratheam . . 

The Duke of Cumberland . . 

The Duke of Cambridge 

Princes and Princesses of the Blood Royal 

Arms of the different Monarchs since the Conquest 

Arms of Scotland . . , , 

Arms of Ireland 

The Royal Tribes of Wales 

Noble Tribes of Wales and Powys 



xxxiv 
xxxiv 
xxviii 
xxviii 

XXX 

xxix 

, , xxxiii 

xxxi 

xxxv-xlvii 

xlviii 

xlix 

xlix 

1 

li 

m 

liii 
liv 
Iv 
Iv 
Ix 
Ixi 
Ixi 
.. Ixiii 



w 


CONTENTS. 


PAGE 


ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD . . 




, , . . Ixvii 


The Garter 




Ixvii 


The Thistle 


. . 


Ixviii 


St. Patrick 




Ixix 


The Bath 




Ixx 


Star of India . . 




Ixxi 


St. Michael and St. George . . 




. . Ixxii 



THE GENERAL ARMORY, comprising in alphabetical order, the Armorial 
Bearings of the Noblemen and Gentlemen of the three Kingdoms, and 
the various Coats to be seen in Churches and Family Mansions, on 
Deeds and Wills, &c 1- 



1153 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE GENERAL ARMORY . . 



1154-1161 



MOTTOES in alphabetical order . 



1162-1185 



HERALDRY. 



Heraldry may be defined " the art of blazoning', assigning, and marsTialling coat 
armour," or more particularly " the art of arranging and explaining in proper terms 
all that relates or appertains to the bearing of Arms, Crests, Badges, Quarterings, 
and other hereditary marks of honour." The marshalHng of processions, tho 
conducting of public solemnities, the declaring of peace and war, come also within 
^<i province of a herald's duties. 

The origin of badges and emblems may certainly be traced to the earliest times, 
and the enthusiasm of some of the primitive writers on the subject has led them 
to gravely assert that even Noah and Japhet had distinctive armorial bearings ! 
But while it may be admitted that in the ancient world warlike nations bore on their 
shields and standards distinguishing devices, it is not clear that our Heraldry can 
in strictness be traced to a more remote period than the twelfth or, at furthest, 
the eleventh century. Numerous tombs exist of persons of noble blood, who died, 
before the year 1000, yet there is not an instance known of one with a heraldic 
bearing. The Pere Menestrier made a minute and extensive search through France, 
Italy, Germany, and Flanders, and the most ancient Coat of Arms he was able to 
discover was that upon the monumental eflBgy of a Count of Wasserburg, in the 
church of St. Emeran, at Ratisbon : the ensigns were " Per fess ar. and sa. a lion 
rampant counterchanged ; " and the date 1010. Yet even here *' there is good reason 
to believe," says the learned Frenchman, " that this tomb was restored some time 
after the Count's death by the Monks of the Abbey he had endowed." 

Sir John Feme is of opinion that the science was borrowed from the Egyptians. 
Sir George Mackenzie ascribes it to the age of Charlemagne, and says that it began 
and grew with the feudal laws, but took its origin, perhaps, in the time of Jacob, 
who, blessing his sons, gave them marks of distinction, which the twelve tribes 
afterwards bore on their ensigns : but our old reliable friend, Guillim, will have it 
that Heraldry — as a science in England — cannot go back to an earlier epoch than 
about the year 1200. For my own part, I consider that the registry of its birth may 
be found among the archives of the Holy Wars, that its cradle was rocked by the 
soldiers of the Cross, and that its maturity was attained in the chivalrous age of 
Feudalism. 

However, at the trial of the celebrated controversy between Sir Richard Le Scrope 
and Sir Robert Grosvenor, for the right to bear the arms " Az. a bend or," held 
20th August, 1385, before the High Constable of England and Sir John de Multon, 
Deputy to the Earl Marshal, and adjourned to 16th May, 1386, John of Gaunt, Duko 
of Lancaster, deposed that the said arms were of right the arms of Sir Richard 
Le Scrope, and his ancestors at the time of the Conquest, and that in the French 
wars, under Edward III., one Carminow of Cornwall, challenged Sir Richard 
Le Scrope's right to the same, that the dispute having been referred to six 
knights, they found that the said Carminow was descended of a lineage armed " Az. 
a bend or," since the time of King Arthur, and that the said Sir Richard Le Scrope 
was descended of a right line of ancestors armed with the same arms since the 
time of King William the Conqueror. Owen Glendower, the Welsh Prince, deposed 
at the trial that the Grosveuors bore the same axaaa fi-om the time of tha 
Conquest. 



VL 



HERALDRY. 



The word Heraldry is derived from the German «§eer, a host, an army — and «§cli), 
a champion ; and the term hlason, by which the science is denoted in French, English, 
Itahan, and German, has most probably its origin in the German word Skgen, " to 
blow the horn." Whenever a new knight appeared at a Tournament, the herald 
Bonnded the trumpet, and as the competitors attended with closed vizors, it was his 
duty to explain the bearing of the shield or coat-armour belonging to each. Thua, 
the knowledge of the various devices and symbols was called Heraldry, and as the 
announcement was accompanied with sound of trumpet, it was termed " blazoning the 
arms." The Germans transmitting the word to the French, it reached us after the 
Norman Conquest. 

At first, armorial bearings were probably like surnames, assumed by each warrior 
at his free will and pleasure ; and, as his object would be to distinguish himself and 
his followers from others, his cognizance would be respected by the rest, either out of 
an innate courtesy or a feeling of natural justice disposing men to recognize the right 
of first occupation, or really from a positive sense of the inconvenience of being 
identified or confounded with those to whom no common tie united them. Where, 
however, remoteness of stations kept soldiers aloof, and extensive boundaries, and 
different classes of enemies from without, subdivided the force of a kingdom into 
many distinct bands and armies, opportunities of comparing and ascertaining what 
ensigns had been already appropriated would be lost, and it well might happen, even 
in the same country, that various families might be found unconsciously using the 
same arms. 

It has long been a matter of doubt when the bearing of coats of arms first 
became hereditary. The Norman tiles engraved in Mr. Henniker's letter to the 
Society of Antiquaries, were supposed to have fixed the date at the period of the 
Norman Conquest, but Mr. Montagu very ably argues that it is not at all clear that 
these tiles were of the same antiquity as " the Abbaye aux Hommes at Caen," in 
which they were found ; indeed he seems to prove quite the contrary. Certain it is 
that it was not until the Crusades that Heraldry came into general use. In the 
History of Battell Abbey, Richard Lucy, Chief Justice temp. Henry II., is reported to 
have blamed a mean subject for carrying a private seal, when that pertained, as he said, 
to the King and Nobility alone. Under Edward I., seals of some sort were so general, 
that the Statute of Exon ordained the coroner's jury to certify with their respective 
signets, and in the following reign they became very common, so that not only such 
as bore arms used to seal, but others fashioned signets, taking the letters of their own 
names, flowers, knots, birds, beasts, &c. It was afterwards enacted by statute, that 
every freeholder should have his proper seal of arms ; and he was either to appear at 
the head court of the shire, or send his attorney with the said seal, and those who 
omitted this duty were amerced or fined. 

The earliest Heraldic document that has been handed down to us is a Roll op 
Arms, made between the years 1240 and 1245. It contains the names and arms of 
the Barons and Knights of the reign of Henry HI., and affords incontrovertible 
evidence of the fact that Heraldry was at that time reduced to a science. It is 
curious, too, as indicating the changes that have taken place between a period 
approximating so nearly to its origin and the present ; and invaluable, as offering 
contemporary testimony of the exact bearings of the ancestors of some of our most 
distinguished families. This important manuscript as well as three other similar 
collections, " The Siege of Carlaverock," " A Roll of Arms, temp. Edward II.," and 
" A Roll of Arms, temp. Edward III.", were published by the late Sir Harris Nicolas, 
accompanied by prefatory remarks and occasional notes. 

" The Sikge of Carlaverock " is a poem descriptive of the Banners of the Peers 
and Knights of the English army who were present at the siege of Carlaverock 
Castio in Scotland, in February, 1301. 

The Roll of Arms of the time of Edward II., made between the years 1308 and 
1314, is divided into counties, and comprises the names and arms of about eleven 



HERALDRY. vii 

hnndred and sixty persons. It still remains in the Cottonian Library, British 
Museum (Calig. A. xviii.). 

The FoDETH Roll, temp. Edward III., appears to have been compiled between 
the years 1337 and 1350. Its plan was most comprehensive, embracing the arms of 
aH the Peers and Knights in England, arranged in the following order : — 
I. The King, the Earls, and the Barons. 
n. The Knights under their respective counties. 

III. The great Personages who lived in earlier times. 

Besides these Rolls, other collections of arms have been published, adding 
much to our iuformation on the subject. In these ancient rolls Heraldry first 
assumes the appearance of a science, and it would seem that the rules by which it is 
governed then existed. 

The earliest writer on the subject, whose work has descended to us, is Nicholas 
Upton. His treatise was composed in the reign of Henry V., and translated in that 
of his successor, in the work well known to all admirers of the art as " The Boke of 
St. Albans." With the decline of chivalry the study of Heraldry was neglected, and 
the exaggerated dignity to which Feme, Mackenzie, and other enthusiasts endeavoured 
to raise it, only gained for it contempt ; but a taste for the study of antiquities 
generally has gradually revived ; and the use of Heraldry as a key to history and 
biography is becoming every day more and more acknowledged, not only in England, 
but throughout Europe. 



RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS. 

*' Ensigns,'' says a learned writer, " were, in their first acceptation, taken up at 
any gentleman's pleasure, yet hath that liberty for many ages been deny'd, and they, 
by regal authority, made the rewards of merit or the gracious favours of princes." 

In the reign of Henry V. the following proclamation issued, prohibiting the use 
of heraldic ensigns to aU who could not show an original and valid right, except those 
" who had borne arms at Agin court : " " Quod nullus cujuscunque status, gradus sen 
conditionis fnerit, hujusmodi arma sive tunicas armorum in se sumat, nisi ipse jure 
antecessorio vel ex donatione alicujus ad hos sufl3.cientem potestatem habentis, ea 
possideat aut possidere debeat, et quod ipse arma sive tunicas illas ex cujus dono 
obtinet, demonstrationis suae personis ad hoc per nos assignatis manifeste demonstret, 
exceptis illis qui nobiscum apud helium de Agincourt arma portabant, &c." But, 
despite the royal ordinance, a multiplicity of abuses found their way into all matters 
touching descent and arms, which called aloud for reformation, and gave rise, in the 
early part of the sixteenth century, to the Heralds' Visitations, documents of high 
authority and value. Royal commissions were issued under the Great Seal to the two 
Provincial Kings of Arms, Clarenceux and Norroy, authorising and commanding each, 
by himself or his deputy, to visit the whole of his province as often as he should deem 
it necessary, to summon before him aU those who bore or assumed to bear arms and 
were styled esquires, to cause them to produce authority for bearing and using same, 
" to peruse and take knowledge of aU manner of coat armour, cognizances, crests, 
and other like devices, with the notes of the descents, pedigrees, and marriages, of all 
the nobility and gentry therein ; and also to reprove, control and make infamous by 
proclamation, all such as unlawfully, end without just authority, usurped or took any 
name or title of honour or dignity." In these documents are set forth the principal 
hereditary achievements of the kingdom. 

All persons who can deduce descent from an ancestor whose armorial ensigns have 
been acknowledged in any one of the Visitations, are entitled to carry those arms by 
right of inheritance. When, however, no such descent can be shown, the party must, 
if it be possible, prove himself to be descended from some one whose right has been 
admitted ; from a Grantee ; or, in fault of that proof, must become a Grantee himself. 



.^ HERALDRY. 

These observations apply more especially to the usage of arms in England. 

In Eno-land and "Wales, Arms are granted, nnder the authority of the Eavl 
Marshal, by Grarter and one of the Provincial Kings, according to his jurisdic- 
tion. In Scotland, Lyon King of Arms, and in Ireland, Ulster King of Arms, 
have the sole power to grant or confirm Arms in their respective Kingdoms. 
In consequence of the disturbed state of Ireland towards the close of the sixteenth 
and nearly all through the seventeenth century, the very period when the English 
Heralds made their Visitations, and admitted arms to all who proved their right, it 
was impossible to carry out Visitations in Ireland. In fact, there are only three Irish 
Visitations remaining on record, viz., Dubhn County, 1606 ; DubHn City, 1607 ; 
Wexford County, 1618. To provide for this want of Visitation, Ulster King of 
Arms has authority to give a Confirmation (with some slight heraldic difierence to 
indicate the fact of its being a Confirmation), to a claimant who can prove to his 
satisfaction that he, the claimant, and his family have used for a certain number of 
generations the said arms and crest. 

BLAZON OF ARMS. 

Blazon, or Blason, is the proper technical description of Armorial Bearings, 
according to the scientific rules of Heraldry. In blazoning a coat of arms, brevity 
is to be studied, and tautology avoided, care being still taken to give a minute 
description of every bearing, its position, place on the shield, tincture, &c. Though 
the same metal, colour, or fur, may occur more than once, the repetition of its name 
should be scrupulously guarded against, by describing the charge, which happens 
to be of a tincture already mentioned, as of the first, second, or third, according to 
the relative position that tincture may hold in the blazon ; for example, the arms of 
Preston of Furness Abbey are, "Ar. two bars gu. on a canton of the second a 
cinquefoil or." In this blazon the colour of the canton is described of the second, 
to obviate the repetition of the word "gu." The next general rule to be observed 
is to begin the blazon with the description of the field, its tincture or tinctures, 
unless it is divided by any of the main partitions already treated, in which case the 
descriptive blazon would begin as perfess,per pale, per saltire, &c. The principal 
ordinary, if any, should next be described, with its tincture, &c. ; and then the 
charges around it generally, giving the surcharges upon such ordinary, after those 
between which it is borne ; the chief, canton, or any charge placed in a particular 
point of the shield, with its surcharges, if any, being generally blazoned last. 

If a coat consists of two tinctures only, it is blazoned, as in the arms of Lambton, 
*' Sa. a fess between three lambs pass. ar. which indicates that both the fess and lambs 
are of the tincture argent ; when the last-mentioned charge, or bearing, is of the same 
tincture as that one named immediately before it, and yet cannot be included under 
ono word, it is necessary to describe it as " of the last : " thus, in the arms of 
DoEMER, " Az. ten billets, four, three, two and one, or, on a chief of the last a demi lion 
ramp, issuant sa." Of the last is used to prevent a repetition of " or." 

If there be two sets of charges of equal number on any parts of the shield, or 
one set of charges on an ordinary between the same number of charges on the shield, 
the repetition of the number must be avoided, by describing the second set of charges 
by the words " as many." Thus, in the arms of Wilmot, " Ar. on a fess gu. 
between three eagles' heads erased sa. as many escallops or : tho words " as many " 
prevent the repetition of the number " three " in this example. 

When charges are borne without the interposition of the ordinaries, the exact 
position they occupy on the Bhic\d—fes sways, or in fess, if in line across the field ; 
paleways, or in pale, if perpendicular, one over the other ; and hendways, or in 
bend, if placed diagonally from the dexter chief to the sinister base, mast bcdescribcd, 
as well OS the attitude and tinctures of such charges, e.g. 



HERALDRY. ix 

" Matjleverer (Arncliffe, co. York). Sa. three greyhounds courant in pale ar. 
collared or : " in pale signifying that the greyhounds are borne perpendicularly one 
above the other. 

When charges are three, whether with or without ordinaries, the usual way 
they are borne is two in chief and one in base, and this is understood without being 
mentioned ; but if they be not so placed, or exceed the number three, their position 
must be specifically described, according to the preceding rule ; or if horizontal rows, 
of an equal or unequal number, their number, &c., must be stated. The last remark, 
the arms of Brounckee will tend to elucidate, viz. : " Ar. six pellets in pale, three, 
two, and one, a chief embattled sa.," implying that the six pellets are borne in three 
rows, three in the uppermost, two in the second, and one in the lowest. 



MARSHALLING ARMS. 

Marshalling arms is defined by Guillim and Mackenzie to be " the conjoining of 
two or more coats in one shield," or, strictly speaking, the proper arrangement 
in one shield, either by impaling or quartering, of two or more ensigns, 

" Impalikg " applies to the method of using the wife's arms, and is usually practised 
by dividing the shield into two equal parts, and placing the husband's arms in the 
dexter, with the wife's in the sinister. When there happens to be a border round 
one or both of them, the portion of the border where the two coats unite is omitted. 
There are, however, two rules to be attended to : — 

No husband can impale his wife's arms with his own on a surcoat, ensign, or 
banner, nor can a Knight of the Garter, or of any other Order, when surrounding 
the shield with the motto of his knighthood, bear his wife's coat within it ; for, saith 
Sandford, although the husband may give his equal half of her escutcheon, yet he 
cannot share his temporary order of knighthood with her, except she be Sovereign 
of the Order. This restriction is not allowed by Edmondson, who argues that there 
is not a single article in all the Statutes of the Order, that debars the new-made 
knight from continuing to impale, as he had done previously, his wife's arms. It has 
always struck me that the churlish regulation of modern heraldry, which precludes 
a knight from bearing his wife's arms within the ribbon or collar of his order, is an 
anomaly. The wife of a knight shares the precedence, title, and dignity of her 
husband. Why then should she be debarred participation in the heraldic bearings, 
and the beautiful garter that encircles them ? This exclusion is not of ancient date. 
The old Stall Plates of the Knights aSbrd proof of the contrary, and gives several 
instances of husband's and wife's arms impaled within the Garter. In the monu- 
ment at Stanton Harcourt there is not only the Garter tied round Lady Harcourt's 
left arm, but at the head of the tomb appear the bearings of her husband impaling 
within a Garter the lady's own arms. 

If a man marries an heiress or co-heiress, instead of impaling his wife's arms 
with his own he bears them on an escutcheon of pretence in the centre or fess 
point of his paternal coat, but he cannot so bear them during the lifetime of his 
wife's father. When a lady who is an heiress dies leaving her husband surviving, 
his right to bear her arms on an escutcheon of pretence ceases ; the right to bear 
her arms descends to her issue to be borne as a quartering. A man cannot bear his 
wife's arms as an impalement after her death : he must bear his arms as before 
his marriage, otherwise there is no heraldic mode of showing that his wife is dead. 
The case differs, however, as regards a widow : whilst she remains such, she is 
obliged to bear the arms of her deceased husband ; and I am inclined to think that a 
widower should continue to impale or otherwise associate his late wife's arms with 
his own if there was issue of the marriage. A husband whose wife is by descent 
entitled to a shield of quarteringa, may impale all the qaartcrings his wife is entitled 
to ; bafc this is not usual. 



, HERALDRY. 

If a commoner marry the widow of a peer he impales only the arms of his wife's 
father, the lady on a subsequent marriage losing all right to any armorial bearings of 
her former husband or husbands. 

Edward III. appears to have been the first that quartered arms in England, 
•when, in right of his mother Isabella, daughter and heiress of Philip IV. of France, 
he assumed the arms, Az. semee-de-lis or, as a quartering on the national banner ; 
and John Hastings, second Earl of Pembroke, was the first subject who imitated his 
royal master's example, quartering, Az. six lioncels ramp, ar., in right of his grand- 
mother, Julian, daughter of Thomas de Leyburn, and heiress of William de Leyburne, 
summoned to Parliament 1299. 

The intention of Quartering is to show the descent of one family from heiresses 
or co-heiresses of other houses, and to exhibit and perpetuate this representation. 
Thus, the children of an heiress are entitled, at her death, to quarter with their 
paternal coat her arms, as well as all quarterings which she may have inherited. It 
must be borne in mind that an heiress or co-heiress in Heraldry is, by the laws of 
arms, a lady who is, by having no brother, or by her brother or brothers having died 
without issue, a representative in blood of her father, and that thereby she transmits 
to her descendants the right to quarter her family arms. The term " heiress " in 
Heraldry does not apply to the succession to property : Andrew Lynn, Esq., of 
BalHnamona, co. Waterford, disinherited his son, and bequeathed his estates to his 
daughter Ann, the wife of Robert Carew, ancestor of* Lord Carew ; her descendants 
inherited the estates so bequeathed, but did not acquire a right to quarter the 
arms of Lynn. In marshalling quarterings, the first, after the paternal arms, 
is the shield of the earliest heiress, which the bearer's direct ancestor in the 
male line has married, and then succeed any quarterings her descent may bring in ; 
Tfith the second heiress the same rule is followed, and so on, in chronological rotation, 
to the end of the chapter. 

When a daughter becomes heiress or co-heiress to her mother (also an heiress), 
and not to her father, which happens when the father marries a subsequent wife, 
and has by her male issue, to represent him, she is entitled to bear the maternal coat 
with the arms of her father on a canton, taking all the quarterings to which her 
mother was, by descent, entitled. When married, she conveys the whole to be 
borne on an escutcheon of pretence, and transmits them at her death to be borne as 
quarterings by her descendants, the paternal canton on the first shield still indicating 
the nature of the representation. 

If an heiress E.B., marry first F.G., and have a son R.G., and marry secondly 
H.I., and have by her second husband an only child, a daughter, S.I., the son of 
this lady S.I., viz., T.N., would quarter the arms of that second husband as well 
&3 the arms of his grandmother E.B. This point has been thus settled by the 
Heralds' College in London, but the question requires farther consideration and 
adjudication before it can be finally admitted. 

The following sketch wUl illustrate the point: — 





A. B. = C.D. 

1 




P.O., 


= E. B., = H. I., 


let Husb. 


adau. & 2nd Husb. 


1 


heir. 

1 


R. O., 


S. I., = M. N. 


a son. 
1 


an only 
dau. 




lesae. 








T. N., 




a Bon, who claimB to quarter 




the arms 


of A. B. 



An ABcnBiSHOP or a BfSHOP impales the arms of his See with his family arms, 



HERALDRY. xi 

being, if I may so expi-ess it, married to the church, the arms of the See on the 
dexter side, and his family arms on the sinister, but if he be married, he does not 
carry his wife's arms on his shield. On his hatchment he uses two shields, the first on 
the dexter side, viz., the arms of his See impaled with his own arms, surmounted with 
a mitre, the second on the dexter, his own arms impaled with his wife's, in the same 
way as knights of the different Orders. 

If a man marry a widow, he impales her maiden arms. A widower entering on 
a second marriage, marshals with his own the arms only of his second wife. He is 
not, according to the laws of arms, entitled to continue the usa^e of his deceased 
wife's ensigns. 



THE SHIELD OF ARMS. 

According to the received authorities, there are ten classes of arms : — 

1. Arms of Dominion, those borne by Sovereigns and annexed to the territories 
they govern. 

2. Arms of Pretension, used by Sovereigns who are not in possession of the 
dominions to which such arms belong, but who claim, or pretend a right to them. 
Thus the Kings of England from Edward III. to George III. quartered the arms of 
France. 

3. Arms op Community, those of bishoprics, universities, cities, and other 
corporate bodies. 

4. Arms op Assumption, adopted without the grant of the Sovereign or of a 
King-of-Arms, and used as a proper right. For instance, if a prince or nobleman be 
taken prisoner in lawful war, the victor may bear the arms of the person so taken, 
and transmit them to his heirs. 

5. Arms of Alliance : these are adopted by families or private persons, and 
are joined with their ovra heraldic bearings to denote the alliance which they have 
contracted by marriage. Arms of this description are impaled, or are borne in an 
escutcheon of pretence by those who have married heiresses. But the latter arrange- 
ment (that of the separate escutcheon) is not allowed until the death of the father of 
the lady. 

6. Arms of Adoption are borne by a stranger in blood, and are specially granted 
by the Sovereign to empower the person applying for them to obtain certain moneys 
or estates bequeathed on the condition of his assuming the name and arms of the 
testator. 

7. Arms op Concession or Honourable Augmentation are peculiar marks of 
honour granted by the Sovereign for some act deserving of royal approbation. 

8. Arms Paternal and Hereditary are those transmitted from the first 
possessor to his heirs ; the son being a gentleman of second coat armour ; the grand- 
son a gentleman of blood ; and the great-grandson a gentleman of ancestry. 

The Shield admits of various forms, and is divided into nine integral parts to- 
mark the position of the several charges, but I shall only here allude to the relative 
positions of the principal parts. 

First, it is to be observed, that the side of the escutcheon opposite the left hand 
of the person looking at it, is the dexter, or right side, and that opposite to the right 
hand, the sinister, or left. The centre of the shield is called the fess point ; the top of 
the dexter side, the dexter chief ; the top of the sinister side, the sinister chief. 
The hottom of the shield is called the hose, and its respective sides are called the 
dexter and sinister base. 

The Colours common to shields and their bearings are called tinctures, and are 
of seven different kinds ; two metaLs and five colours, viz., or, gold ; argent, silver j 
azuTGy blue ; gules, red ; vert, green ; purpure, purple ; and scMe, black. Some writers 



^ HERALDRY. 

on the science admit two additional, tawney, or tenec, orange ; and sanguine, blood 
colour ; but they are rarely to be met with in British Arms. 

When natural objects are introduced into Heraldry, they are often represented in 
their ordinary colours, and this is expressed by the term proper. 

A shield is said to be quartered when it is divided into four equal parts by 
horizontal and perpendicular lines crossing the centre ; that at the top of the dexter 
side is called the first quarter ; the top of the sinister side is called the second quarter ; 
the tTiird quarter is at the bottom of the dexter side, and the bottom of the sinister 
side is the fourth quarter. When the shield is divided into two equal parts by a 
perpendicular line, it is called impaling : the dexter being the man's side, the sinister 
the woman's. Dividing the shield into two equal parts by a horizontal line is called 
per f ess. 

Charges arc the various figures depicted on shields, by which the bearers are 
distinguished from one another. 

All charges of Arms are either proper or common ; those charges are said to be 
proper which by a certain property do particularly belong to the Art of Heraldry, and 
are of ordinary use therein : hence they are styled " Ordinaeies :" the common charges 
are the representations of all the emblems which retain their own names in the blazon. 
The principal Ordinaries are — the Chief, the Pale, the Bend, the Fess, the Cross, 
the Saltire, and the Chevron. The Sub-Ordinaries are — the Border, the Orle, the 
Inescdtcheon, the Quarter, the Canton, the Paile or Pall, the Gyeon, the Pile, the 
Flaunch, &c. 

Differences, or Marks of Cadency, are the distinctions used to indicate the 
various branches or cadets of one family. The eldest son (during the lifetime of his 
father) bears a Label ; the second, a Crescent ; the third, a Mullet ; the fourth, 
a Martlet ; the fifth, an Annulet ; the sixth, a Fleur-de-lis ; the seventh, a 
Rose ; the eighth, a Cross-Moline ; the ninth, a double Quatrefoil. 

The mode of using these marks of cadency, as practised by the Heralds' College, 
London, and Ulster's Office, Dublin, is to carry them down to the third generation. 
There is no rule as to the colours of cadency marks except one, the label of three 
points must not be argent except for the Royal Family ; but the same heraldic rule 
applies to these marks as to ordinary heraldic charges, colour cannot lie on colour, or 
metal on metal. 

If a younger son, say a third son, who bears a mullet for difference, assume by 
Royal Licence an additional surname, in addition to and after his own surname, and 
the arms belonging to that assumed surname, which would consequently be borne in 
the first quarter of his escutcheon, it is not necessary for him to continue the 
mark of cadency, as the compound coat is sufficient to distinguish him from the 
head of the family -, if, however, he wish to use the mark of cadency, it should bo 
borne in the fess point of the compound coat. 



ATTITUDES OR POSITIONS OF ANIMALS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 

When a lion or other beast of prey stands upright, with only one ear and one 
eye seen, with the head in profile, he is termed rampant; when walking forward, 
with one eye and ear seen, passant ; when sitting, sejant ; when lying down, couchant. 
If in any one of these positions the animal look full face, so that both eyes and 
cars may be seen, the word guardant is annexed to passant, rampant, sejant, or 
couchant, a.s the case may be ; and if he look back, the word reguardant. An 
animal is salient when leaping forwards bendways and having both the hind legs in 
the same position. 

To griffins the term segreant is given, in place of rampant. Animals of the deer 
kind have their positions otherwise blazoned. Thus, when looking full-faced, they 



HERALDRY. xiii 

are said to be at gaze; vfhen standing, statant ; when walking, tripping; when 
leaping forward, springing ; when rnnning, courant ; and when at rest on the ground, 
lodged. 

A horse when running is blazoned courant, or in full speed; when leaping, 
salient, cahre, or effray ; when rearing, forcene, but these three last terms are very 
seldom met with. 

Birds are blazoned, when standing with their wings down, close; when preparing 
to fly, rising; when flying, volant; when spread open, with both wings stretched 
out, and their breasts seen, displayed. The wings open and against each other are 
called indorsed. Two wings conjoined and expanded are calle a vol. One wing is a 
demivol. 

Fishes, when placed horizontally, are naiant ; when perpendicularly, hauriant ; 
when drawn in an arched form like a dolphin, they are embowed. 

Any heraldic figure placed on or apparently emanating from an ordinary or 
other charge is called issuant. The term jessant is applied either to a general issuing 
of one charge from another, as "a chevron jessant-de-lis," or to the common 
device of a leopard's or lion's head "jessant-de-lis." A fish or amphibious creature 
is described as naissant from an ordinary when any portion of the body with the tail 
is seen. A serpeat placed horizontally is said to be gliding. 



CRESTS, TORCES OS WREATHS, AND BADGES. 

The Crest yields in honour to none of the heraldic insignia. It was the emblem 
that served, when the banner was rent asunder, and the shield broken, as a rallying 
point for the knight's followers, and a distinguishing mark of his own prowess. The 
Crest, named by the French Cimier, from Cime, the top or apex, and by the Italians 
Gimiero, originated in the necessity of distinguishing one chief from another, and 
making him known in the battle-field and the tournament ; consequently, no crest is 
ever allowed to a female. As early as the yesir 1101, a seal of Philip, Count of 
Flanders, represents him with his crest ; but at that period, and for a century and a 
half after, few of lesser degree than sovereigns and commanders in the wars ventured 
to carry this mark of distinction. The first example of a crest upon the helmet 
among English sovereigns occurs in the second great seal of Richard Coeur de Lion. 
The helmet has several vertical openings in front, and upon the top is placed a 
golden lion guardant. The seal, too, of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester, one of 
the holy warriors of the reign of Henry III., exhibits on a cylindrical casque a 
dragon as a device. After the institution, however, of the Garter, the knights o£ 
that illustrious order adopted crests, and the practice soon became so general, 
that these emblems were assumed indiscriminately, by all those who considered 
themselves legally entitled to a coat armour.* 

At their first adoption, crests were usually assumed from some charge in the 
shield ; and thus, in very many ancient houses, we find the crest a mere emanation of 
the arms. Little information remains to us of the crests borne by the early nobility ; 
aud the little we do possess we owe to monumental effigies and illuminated manu- 
scripts. Froissart, in particular, affords many curious examples. Nisbet and some 
other writers contend that these heraldic ornaments might be changed according to 
the good pleasure of the bearer, but this has long been forbidden by the Kings of 
Arms. If crests be the distinguishing tokens by which families may be known (and 

• The monument of Sir Oliver de Ingham, in Ingham church, Norfolk, who lived temp. Edward 
m., "affords," says Meyrick, "one of the earliest specimens of the jousting helmet of his times, sur- 
mounted by its crest ; and the sepulchral effigy of Sir John Harsick is a remarkable example of 
English armour towards the close of the reign of the second Richard. The knight is represented 
with his helmet on, over his coat of chained mail, so as to display the mode of wearing the crest and 
the muntle." 



:riv HERALDRY. 

this seems mcsf; assuredly to be the intention of the device), one might as well alter 
a coat of arms as an hereditary crest. Still, however, circumstances may arise in 
•which a change becomes desirable ; but this should never be made on slight or 
•unimportant grounds. In early times, Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, Earl 
Marshal of England, was, by the special concession of Richard II., allowed to carry 
the crest of England — " the lion passant guardant or ; " and John Howard, in a 
subsequent reign, having married the daughter and heiress of Mowbray, substituted 
for the old crest of Howard, viz., " two wings, each charged with the family arms," 
the new but honourable cognizance of the golden lion. 

No one is entitled to more than one crest unless he bears two surnames, or has 
received the additional device by a specific grant. The Germans, indeed, have long 
been accustomed to display in a row over their shields of arms the crests of all the 
houses whose ensigns they quarter ; but their heraldry is peculiar, differing from that 
of the other countries of Europe. In truth, the impropriety of the practice of 
carrying more than one crest is remarkably striking, if we consider for a moment the 
purpose for which these cog^nizances were first designed. 

Originally crests were carved in light wood, or made of boiled leather passed 
into a mould, in the form of some animal real or fictitious, and were fastened to the 
helmet by the torce or wreath, which was formed of two pieces of silk, " twisted 
together by the lady who chose the bearer for her knight." The tinctures of the 
•wreath are always those of the principal metal and colour of the arms ; and it is a rule iu 
delineating the -wreath (shown edgewise above the shield) that the first coil shall be 
of the metal, and the last of the colour of which the achievement is constituted. 
Such are the wreaths in general use. In depicting arms the wreath consists of six 
twists ; when the crest is placed on a cap of maintenance, or on, or issuing out of a 
ducal or other crown, the wreath is not borne. The colours and metals of Liveries are 
governed by the tinctures of the wreath, or in its absence by the principal metal and 
colour of the arms ; thus, if the principal metal of the arms be argent, the buttons 
and lace of the livery is silver ; if or, they are gilt. The cloth is blue, red, black, or 
green, according to the prevailing colour in the arms ; if the colour be red, the colour 
of the livery may be modified to claret colour ; if the field of the arms be a metal, 
and the charge an animal of its proper colour, and no other colour depicted in the 
arms, the colour of the livery should follow as near as possible the proper colour of 
the charge. The most usual colour used in such cases is brown. 

Crests have sometimes, but very improperly, been confounded with " badges," 
altogether distinct de-vices, intended to distinguish the retainers of certain great 
noblemen, and wrought or sewn upon the liveries with which they were supplied by 
their lord. The badge appeared also emblazoned on the chief's standard or pennon, and 
was much esteemed until the reign of Queen Elizabeth, when the last brilliant relics of 
the feudal system — the joust, the tournament, and all their accompanying parapher- 
nalia — fell into disuse. Henry II. bore an escarbuncle or ; and also introduced the 
famous badge borne so constantly by his successors, of the broom sprig or Planta 
Gcnistffi (" II portait ung Gennett entre deux Plantes de Geneste ") ; and his son, 
Richard I., on assuming the title of King of Jerusalem, hoisted the banner of the 
Holy City — the dormant lion of Judah — the badge of David and Solomon. Edward I. 
had a rose, stalk green and petals gold. Edward II. commemorated his Castilian 
descent by the badge of a gold tower. Edward III. bore " silver clouds with rays 
descending." Richard H. adopted the white hart,t the device of his mother, the 
Fair Maid of Kent, and used besides a Wliite Falcon; and his successor, Henry IV., 

t " Among the few friends who attended Richard H. after his capture by the Earl of Northum- 
berland, was Jenico d'Artois, a Qascoigno, that etill wore the cognizance or device of his master, King 
Bichard, that is to say, a white hart, and would put it away from him neither by persuasion nor 
throats ; by reason whereof, when the Duke of Lancaster understood it, ho caused him to be 
committed to prison, within the Castle of Chester. This man was the last (as saith mine author) which 
wore that device, which showed well thereby his constant heart towards his master." — Holmshed. 



HERALDRY. 



XV 



introduced the red rose of Lancaster, which became ever after the badge of tho 
Lancastrians, as opposed to the white rose of Tork. He also had for cognizance tho 
antelope, as well as the silver swan of the De Bohnns. When he entered the 
lists against Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, his caparisons were embroidered with 
the antelope and swan. Henry of Agincourt carried a beacon and fleur-de-lis 
crowned. " The white rose, en soleil," denotes the fourth Edward, and " the white 
boar," the third Richard. Henry VI. had for badge a Panther, and also two ostrich 
feathers in saltire, one silver, the other gold. His Queen, Margaret of Anion, 
adopted a " daisy," in allusion to her name : 

" The daise a floure white and rede, 
In French called la belle Margarete." 

Henry VII. carried " the red dragon " of Wales, and also the porfccnllis as well as the 
red and white roses combined, emblematic of the union of the rival houses. " In the 
marriage procession of Henry Tudor and Elizabeth of York," says an agreeable writer, 
*' each partizan of Lancaster gave his hand to a lady of the York party, holding a 
bouquet of two roses, red and white entwined ; and at the birth of Prince Henry, 
the armorists composed a rose of two colours (the leaves alternating red and white), 
as an emblematical offspring of the marriage. Horticulturists, too, forced nature 
into an act of loyalty, and produced a psirty-coloured flower known to the present day 
as the rose of York and Lancaster." 

The same cognizances were used by Henry VIII, and Edward VI., the former 
of whom displayed sometimes a greyhound courant and collared ; and at others, after 
the seige of Boulogne, a white swan, the arms of that city. Queen Mary, before 
Ler accession, adopted the red and white roses, but added a pomegranate, to show 
her descent from Spain ; but, on assuming the sceptre, she took " Winged Time 
drawing Truth out of a pit," with "Veritas temporis filia" for motto. The badges 
of Queen Elizabeth were the red and white roses, the fleur-de-lis, and the Irish harp, 
all ensigned by the royal crown, to which James I. added the Scottish thistle. Many 
of the greater nobility followed the royal example ; Beauchamp had " the bear and 
ragged stafE ; " FitzAlan, " the white horse of Arundel ; " Vere, " the blue boar ; " 
Percy, " the crescent and manacle ; " Stafford and Bourchier, *' the knot," 

THE MOTTO. 

The Motto is, according to Guillim, "a word, saying, or sentence which gentle- 
men carry in a scroll under the arms, and sometimes over the crest." It had its 
origin, most probably, in the " cri de guerre," or the watchword of the camp, and its 
use can be traced to a remote period. Camden assigns the reign of Henry III. as the 
date of the oldest motto he ever met with, that of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby, 
who encircled his shield with the legend, " Lege, lege ; " and the same antiquary 
mentions the old seal of Sir Thomas Cavall, who bore for his arms a horse, and for 
Lis motto, " Thom8B credite, cum cernitis ejus equum." Other authorities, however, 
refer to several cases, that of Trafibrd of Trafford in particular, and carry up the 
mottoes to a much earlier epoch. Be this as it may, their general usage may be 
accurately dated, if not from an earlier period, certainly from the institution of the 
0»der of the Garter ; and after that celebrated event they became very general, and 
daily gained in public favour. During the wars of Henry V., Henry VI., and 
Henry VIII., innumerable mottoes graced the shields of the waniors of the time, 
and in the courtly days of Queen EUzabeth devices were especially fashionable. 

Mottoes may be taken, changed, or relinquished, when and as often as the bearer 
thinks fit, and may be exactly the same as those of other persons. Still, however^ 
the pride of ancestry will induce most men to retain, unaltered, the time-honoured 
sentiment which, adopted in the first instance as the memorial of some noble action, 
some memorable war-cry, or a record of some ancient family descent, has been handed 
down from sire to son through a long series of generations. 



xn 



HERALDRT. 



" Montjoye Sfc. Denis " was the cri de guerre of the French kings, " St. Andrew '* 
of the Scottish monarchs, and "St. George for merry England," of the English. 
" Dieu ayde au premier Chretien " rallied the Montmorencys ; and " A Douglas ! a 
Dono-las ! " was not infrequently heard on the English borders, in answer to the 
Percy " Esperance." 

The same conceit, as in Heraldic Bearings, of accommodating the motto to the 
name, has prevailed occasionally either in Norman-French or Latin : thus we have 
" Mon Dieu est ma roche," for Roche, Lord Fermoy ; "Let Curzon holde what Curzon 
helde," for Curzon; " Strike Dakyns, the devil's in the hempe," for Dakyns ; " Cavendo 
tutus," for Cavendish ; " Forte scutum salus ducum," for Fortesnue ; " Set on," for 
Seton, Earl of Winton; "Ne vile velis," for Neville ; " Vero nihil verius," for Vere; aud 
♦' Ver non semper viret," for Vernon. 

How admirably suited is " Pro magna charta " to the Premier Barony, Le Des- 
pencer ; and how plaintive is the expressive motto adopted by the oace regal 
Courtenays of Powderham, after the loss of the Earldom of Devon, " Ubi lapsus f 
quid feci?" The " Fuimus " of the Earl of Elgin tells that the Bruces were once 
Kings ; and the " Crom a boo " of the Geraldines recalls the time when an Act of 
Parliament made it treason to repeat that famous war-cry. 

Mottoes are also frequently allusive to the arms and crests, and very often 
commemorative of some deed of chivalry. With reference to " the Hedgehog," the crest 
of the Kyrles of Herefordshire, the family of " the Man of Ross," is the inscription 
" Nil moror ictus " (I do not care for blows) ; the Gores, whose ensigns comprise the 
cross crosslet, have " In hoc signo vinces." " Caen, Cressie, Calais," the motto of 
the Radclyffes, commemorates the services of Sir John Radclyffe, Knt., of Ordsali, 
at the seiges of Caen and Calais, and at the battle of Cressy ; and " Boulogne et Cadiz," 
borne by the Heygate family, records the presence of their ancestor at those famous 
seiges. 

" Grip Fast," the device of the Leslies, has remained unchanged since the time 
of Margaret, Qaeen of Scotland, by whom it was given to Bartholomew Leslie, the 
founder of the family, under the following circumstances : — In crossing a river, 
swollen by floods, the Queen was thrown from her horse, and in danger of being 
drowned, when the knight, plunging into the stream, seized hold of the royal girdle, 
and as he brought her with difficulty towards the bank, she frequently exclaimed, 
*' Grip fast," words which she desired her preserver to retain for his motto, in 
remembrance of this circumstance. 

The traditionary origin of "Lamh dearg Erin " (the Red Hand of Ireland), the 
motto of the O'Neills, is this : — In an ancient expedition of some adventurers to 
Ireland, their leader declared that whoever first touched the shore should possess the 
territory which he reached. The ancestor of the O'Neills, Princes of Ulster, bent 
upon obtaining the reward, and seeing another boat likely to land, cut his hand o£E 
and threw it upon the coast. 

Many mottoes are allusive either to a portion of the heraldic bearings, or to the- 
family surname. " Leoni non sagittis fido," I trust to the lion not to the arrows, is that 
of the Egertons, whose shield exhibits a lion between three pheons ; and the Martins 
use these singular words ; " He who looks at Martin's ape, Martin's ape shall look at 
him ! " having reference to their crest, of " an ape observing himself in a looking- 
glass." The AiTONs of Kippo, a branch of Aiton, of that Ilk, adopted for mottOr 
" Et decerptoo dabunt odorem," an elegant allusion to their crest of "a rose bough 
ppr," and of their being an offshoot of the parent stem. 

The generality of mottoes, however, are expressive of sentiments of piety, hope, 
or determination. 

Many of the most ancient houses in Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, adopted for 
their motto the slogan or war-cry of their sept, which was sometimes derived from the 
name of the chieftain's feudal castle ; thus Colquhoun of Luss bears " Cnockelachan ; " 
Fitz- Gerald of Lcinster, " Crom a boo ; " and Ilughss of Gwerclas, " Kymmer-yu- 



HERALDRY. xvi. 

Edeirnion." The descendants of Irish families also adopted the war-cry of their 
septs as mottoes ; thus O'Brien, " Lamh laidir an nachtar," The strong hand upper- 
most, "Lamh dearg Erin," The red hand of Ireland; O'Hagan, " Buadh no has," 
Victory or death ; O'Donovan, " GioUa ar a-namhuid a-bu," A man over his enemy 
for ever; O'Gorman, " Tosach catha agus deineadh Slvc,'" First in battle and fierce in 
slaughter; O'Doinn, " MuUach a-bu," The tops of the mountains for ever, &c., &c. 
Mottoes not infrequently indicate the antiquity and derivation of the families by 
whom they are borne. In " Loywl as thow fynds," we recognise the Saxon origin of 
the Tempests of Tong, and in " Tou^-s jours prest," the Norman ancestry of the 
Talbots of Bashall : but this rule is far from being general : many families of Norman 
origin used English mottoes at a very early period, as Darell of Calehill, " Trow to 
you." 



CROWNS, CORONETS, CHAPEAUX, HELMETS, AND MANTLES. 

Crowns were not originally marks of sovereignty, but were bestowed on those 
who gained a prize at the Olympic games, and at first were only bands or fillets, but 
subsequently they assumed various forms according to the peculiar feat of valour the 
person to whom they were granted performed. 

The Crown, a distinctive badge of royalty, was anciently made open, but is 
now closed at the top with four arches and is usually called the Imperial Grown. 
That used at the coronation of the Sovereigns of England is made in imitation 
of the Crown supposed to have been worn by Edward the Confessor. The present 
imperial Crown has the rim adorned with four crosses pattee, and as many fleurs-de-lis 
alternately. From each cross rises an arched diadem closed at the top under a 
mound supporting a cross. The cap within the Crown is of purple velvet (heraldic- 
ally represented crimson), and turned up with ermine. See p. xlix. 

The Coronet of the Prince of Wales is, according to a warrant of Charles II, 
dated 19 February, 1660, composed of a circle or fillet of gold, adorned with four 
crosses pattee, and as many fleurs-de-lis alternately ; from the two centre crosses rises 
an arched diadem, closed at the top under a mound supporting a cross, one arch only 
from the centre cross appearing in the representation. The cap is of crimson velvet, 
lined with white sarsnet, and turned up with ermine. The Prince of Wales also bears 
as a badge a plume of three ostrich feathers, encircled by a coronet adorned with 
crosses and fleurs-de-lis ; the motto peculiar to this badge being " Ich dien." 

The Coronet of the Princes of the Blood Royal is similar to that of the Prince 
of Wales, without the arched diadem. The cap is of crimson velvet, bordered with 
ermine, with a tassel of gold. 

The Princesses bear a similar Coronet, but instead of the four crosses and as 
many fleurs-de-lis, it is adorned with three strawberry leaves alternately, with a 
similar number of fleurs-de-lis and crosses. 

The Arms and Coronets of the Members of the Royal Family are always assigned 
by the Sovereign to them individually. 

The Coronet of a Duee is composed of a circlet of gold, chased as jewelled, 
having raised on it eight golden strawberry leaves, five of which are seen in repre- 
sentation. The cap is of crimson velvet, turned up ermine, thereon a golden tassel. 
It is sometimes used as a charge in armorial bearings, when it is called a Ducal 
Coronet, and is represented with only three strawberry leaves, and without the cap, 
tassel, or ermine. 

The Coronet of a Marquess is a circlet of gold, chased as jewelled, charged 
with four strawberry leaves and as many large pearls alternately ; when represented, 
only two pearls and three leaves appear. The cap is similar to that of a Duke. 

An Earl's Coronet is a circlet of gold, chased as jewelled, upon which rise eight 
pyramidical points gold, each of which supports a large silver ball, the spaces between 



xviii HERALDRY. 

the points being filled up at the bottom with strawberry leaves of gold, not rising 
as high as the balls. Only five of the balls appear when heraldically displayed. 
The cap is the same as the Duke's and Marquess's. 

A Viscount's Coronet is a circlet of gold, cbased as jewelled, supporting sixteen 
silver balls, seven of which appear in the representation. 

The Coronet of a Baron is a plain circlet of gold, thereon six silver balls, four of 
which are seen in the representation. 

The two last-named Coronets have the crimson velvet cap with the tassel, and 
the edging of ermine, the same as those of a Duke, Marquess, and Earl. See p. xxxiv. 

The Coronet of a King of Arms is silver gilt, formed of a circle, upon which is 
inscribed part of the first verse of the 51st Psalm, viz., " Miserere mei Deus secundum 
magnam misericordiam tuam ; " the rim is surmounted with sixteen leaves, in shape 
resembling the oak leaf, every alternate one being somewhat higher than the rest, 
nine of which appear in the profile view of it ; the cap is of crimson satin, closed at 
the top by a gold tassel, and turned up with ermine. See p. xxxiv. 

A crest-coronet or ducal coronet, on which, or issuing from which crests are 
often borne, is composed of a circlet of gold chased and jewelled, having raised on it 
four strawberry leaves, three of which appear in representation. 

As the Crown of the Sovereign of England is not exactly similar to those borne 
by other potentates, so most of the Coronets of foreign noblemen are different from 
those of British peers. 

Archbishops and Bishops bear the arms of their Sees impaled with their own 
family arms, without crest or motto, and with a mitre over the shield. The mitre of 
both Archbishops and Bishops is (with the exception of the mitre of the Bishop of 
Durham) exactly the same. It is a high golden cap, enriched with jewels, pointed 
and divided at the top, with fringed pendants hanging from the lower part ; each top 
is surmounted by a cross, the present usual form of which is that of a cross-pattee. 
The mitre of the Bishop of Durham differs from that of the other Prelates in being 
encircled with a ducal coronet. 

The Helmet, helme, casque, or, morion, varied in shape in different ages and 
countries. See p. xxxiii. 

The Mantle, Guillim informs us, was named from the French word " Manteau" 
and served as a protection (being spread over and pendent from the helmet) "to repel 
the extremity of wet, cold, and heat, and withal to preserve the accoutrements from 
mst." Guillim thus continues : " Mantles, like other habits, have not escaped trans- 
formation, but have passed through the forge of fanatical conceit, in so much as 
(beside the bare name) there remaineth neither shape nor shadow of a mantle. But 
as they are used in achievements, whether you call them mantles or flourishings, they 
are evermore said in blazon to be doubled, that is, lined throughout with some one 
of the furs." 

The mantle is sometimes termed a Lambrequin or Lamequin. The numerous 
strips and cuts into which it is usually divided, are supposed to indicate that it has 
been thus torn and hacked in the field of battle, and betokened a certain evidence of 
prowess. 

The Chapeau (cap of maintenance or dignity) is of crimson velvet, lined with 
ermine, turned up into points at the back. It was formerly a badge of high dignity, 
and is now borne under the crest of several eminent families, instead of the wreath. 



SUPPORTERS. 

Sdpporters date from the fourteenth century. Menestrier and other authorities 
ascribe their origin to a practice at the tournaments, and the ground on which they 
base their opinions Hccms tenable enough. In those chivalrous pastimes no one was 
suffered to participate but he who was of noble descent or warlike renown, and each 



HERALDRY. xix 

champion, to prove his title to those qualifications, exhibited his armorial shield upon 
the barriers and pavilions within the lists. Pages and esquires attended to watch 
their masters' escutcheons, and to report the name and quality of any knight who 
thought proper to challenge to the encounter. The chroniclers further relate, that on 
these occasions the armour bearers, who were thus employed, assumed the most 
grotesque, fantastic costume, enveloping themselves in the skins of lions or bears, and 
that hence arose the custom of using supporters. Of these masquerade characters, 
several curious specimens may be found in the illuminated manuscripts of Froissart, 
in the British Museum. 

The appropriation of supporters, as legitimate parts of armorial bearings, does 
not appear to have been recognised in England, earlier than the reign of Edward III. 
An heraldic document, compiled by Cooke, Clarenceux, in 1572, indicates the various 
changes the royal supporters underwent : Edward III. adopted dexter, a lion rampant; 
and sinister, a raven, both crowned ; Richard II. a lion and a stag ; Henry IV. an 
antelope and a swan ; Henry V. a lion and an antelope ; Henry VI. an antelope and 
a leopard; Edward IV. a bull and a lion; Richard III. a lion and a boar; Henry VII. 
a dragon and a greyhound ; Henry VIII. the same ; Edward VI. a lion and a dragon 
Mary I., an eagle and a dragon ; and Queen Elizabeth the same as her brother Edward. 
King James I., on ascending the English throne, introduced the unicorn of Scotland, 
and from that monarch's reign to our own times the lion and the unicorn have 
remained the royal supporters. 

The position of these external ornaments of the shield is, in genuine and ancient 
Heraldry, always erect ; and surely nothing qan be more at variance with true 
blazonry than the absurd attempt of some modern artists to display them in 
picturesque attitudes. Thus the characteristics of a rude and contemporary era are 
violently destroyed, and the vestiges of the graphic art confused or annihilated. 

In England the right to bear supporters is confined to Peers of the Realm, 
Knights of the Garter, the Thistle, and St. Patrick ; Knights Grand Cross of 
THE Bath (G.C.B.) ; Knights Grand Cross of St. Michael and St. George 
(G.C. St. M. St. G.) ; and to those Baronets and others (of which the number 
is extremely limited) who may have obtained them by special grant. The prac- 
tice of the Sovereigns of England granting Supporters to the Peers of each 
degree, seems to have commenced in the reign of Henry VIII., as did that of 
granting the like ornaments to the Knights of the Garter and Bath. Further, 
in addition to these. Supporters are assumed and borne, but without any legal 
right, by the heirs apparent of dukes, marquesses, and earls, and by all the 
children of peers, to whom courtesy allows the prefix of "Lord." In ancient 
times, too, many eminent though unentitled families used these appurtenances 
to their shields. Edmondson says, " It may be justly concluded that those who 
used such additions to their shields, or on their shields, banners, or monuments, 
or had them carved in stone or wood, or depicted on the glass windows of their 
mansion, and in the churches, chapels, and religious houses of their foundation, as 
perspicuous evidences and memorials of their having a possessory right to them, are 
fully and absolutely well entitled to bear them, and that no one of their descendants 
ever ought to alienate such supporters, or bear their arms without them." Among the 
distinguished houses that use supporters under these circumstances, we may mention 
those of Fulford of Great Fulford, Devon, Trevanion of Cornwall, Savage of Cheshire, 
Stawell and Luttrell of Somersetshire, Hilton of Hilton, and Tichborne of Tichborne. 
In Ireland, the heads of the different septs assert their claim to them, but no registry 
of supporters to an Irish chieftain appears in Ulster's Office, in right of his chief taincv 
only, and without the honour of peerage, nor does any authority to bear them exist. 
In Scotland, the right to supporters belongs to the representatives of minor barons 
who had full baronial rights prior to 1587, and to the heads of a limited number of 
importajit families, including the chiefs of the more considerable clans. Lyon may 
also confer supporters e gratia, a prerogative which, generally speaking, has been very 



XX HERALDRY. 

sparingly exercised. Nova Scotia baronets have, as such, no right to supporters, 
though many of them bear them in respect of the baronial qualification. 



BANNERS AND STANDARDS. 

The Banner is coeval with the introduction of Heraldry, and dates consequently 
from the twelfth century. It was of nearly a square form, exhibiting the owner's 
arms, and it served as the rallying point of the several divisions of which the army 
was composed. To judge from the siege of Carlaverock, it would seem that early in 
the fourteenth century there was a banner to every twenty-five or thirty men-at- 
arms, and that thus the battle array was marshalled, kt that period the English 
forces comprised the tenants in capite of the Crown, with their followers ; and it 
appears that such tenants were entitled to lead their contingent under a banner of 
their arms ; but the precise number of men so furnished, which conferred this 
privilege, has not been ascertained. When the tenant in capite was unable to attend 
in person, from illness or other cause, he nevertheless sent his quota of soldiers or 
archers which the tenure of his lands enjoined, and his banner was committed to the 
charge of a deputy of equal rank to his own. Thus, at Carlaverock, the Bishop of 
Durham sent one handred and sixty of his men-at-arms, with his banner entrusted to 
John de Hastings; and "the good Edmund, Lord d'Eyncourt," who could not 
attend himself, sent " ses deux bons filz en son lieu mist," (his two brave sons 
in his stead), and with them his banner of "" blue, billetee of gold with a dancette 
over all." 

The right to bear a banner was confined to bannerets and persons of higher 
rank. In 1361, Edward III. granted to Sir Gruy de Bryan two hundred marks a year 
for having discreetly borne the king's banner at the siege of Calais in 1347 ; and 
Thomas Strickland, the esquire who so gallantly sustained the banner of Henry V. at 
Agincourt, urged the service as worthy of remuneration from Henry VI. In France, 
80 long as the chivalry of the old regime endured, and the observances derived from 
St. Louis, Francis I., and Louis XIV. were respected, the custody of the Oriflamme 
was hereditary; and still in Scotland the representative of the great house of 
Scrymgeour enjoys the honour of being banner-bearer to the sovereign. Ireland 
claims a higher antiquity in the use of banners and standards than any other 
European nation — penetrating even beyond the Christian era. The office of 
standard-bearer was hereditary in families, as, for instance, the O'Hanlons were 
hereditary standard-bearers to the O'Neills, and the Mac AfEreys to the McGuires. 
"Three lions rampant " were borne on the banner of O'Brien, and " the red hand " 
was emblazoned on that of O'Neill. The different septs or clans rushed to battle with 
their banners borne aloft, and uttering war-cries. That of O'Brien, iam^ laider a-bu ! 
*' The strong hand for ever ! " but after the Anglo-Norman period these war cries became 
Anglicised, as, for instance, "O'Neill a-bu!" " O'Donnell a-bu!" i.e., "O'Neill 
for ever," " O'Donnell for ever." The great Anglo-Norman families followed the 
example, by adopting similar war-cries. The Fitz-Geralds had " Crom a-bu!" the 
Butlers of Ormonde, "Butler a-bu!" and the Burkes or De Burgos had " Clanrickard 
a-bu ! " and " MocWilliam a-bu ! " 

The Standard was long and narrow, and split at the end. In the upper part 
of the English standard appeared the Cross of St. George, the remainder being 
charged with the motto, crest, or badge, but never with the arms. It is difficult to 
determine the qualifications which constituted a right to a standard, but there is 
reason to believe that no person under the rank of a knight could use one. 

The length of the standards varied according to the rank of the bearer ; the 
King's was from eight to nine yards in length ; that of a Duke seven yards ; of a 
Marquess, six yards and a half; of an Earl, six yards ; of a Viscount, six yards and 



HERALDRY. xxi 

a half ; of a Baron five yards ; of a Banneret, four yards and a half; and of a Knight, 
four yards. 

Two manuscripts in the British Museum, not older in date than the reign of 
Henry VIII., afford the most authentic information as to the size of banners, 
standards, and pennons. A. question having been recently raised as to what is the 
proper flag (if any) to be hoisted over a private gentleman's mansion, and what the 
correct armorial bearings to be displayed thereon, it appears there is not any 
direct authority or rule on the subject, but it is understood that the flag (if allowed) 
should display the arms of the possessor of the mansion only, and though the 
banner of St. George has been sometimes used, and the Union Jack has been also 
displayed, this seems to be an error, as no right exists for such. 



HATCHMENTS. 

How many are there who look on these heraldic decorations as mere general 
emblems of mortality, indicating nothing more than that a death has lately occurred. 
Yet we can, on making ourselves acquainted with the simple rules by which the 
arrangement of several achievements is regulated, at once know what rank the 
deceased held when Kving. If the hatchment be that of a lady, whether she was 
unmarried, a wife, or widow ; if that of a gentleman, whether he was a bachelor, a 
married man, or a widower. 

To show how easily this information can be acquired, I will briefly state the 
several distinctions. 

On the morning of interment, a hatchment is placed on the front of the house 
belonging to the deceased, and another over the vault or tomb after burial. 

The funeral escutcheon of a bachelor, represents his paternal arms single, or 
quartered with those to which he may be entitled, and accompanied with the helmet, 
crest, and motto. The ground of the hatchment (the vacant canvas of each side of 
the shield) is black. 

For a viaiden, her paternal arms are placed in a lozenge, single or quartered as 
those of a bachelor, with no other ornament than a gold cord loosely knotted at the 
top of the lozenge. The ground outside the shield is, like the former hatchment, 
black. 

When a husband dies, leaving his wife surviving, the ground on the dexter side 
of the hatchment (that is, the side of the escutcheon opposite the left hand of the 
person looking at it) is black ; and that on the sinister side (opposite the right hand 
of the spectator) is white. The arms in this case are impaled, that is, divided by a 
perpendicular line down the centre of the shield ; those of the husband at the dexter 
side being black, to indicate his death. The crest is placed over the shield, and 
beneath it the family motto. 

When a wife dies, leaving her husband surviving, the ground of the hatchment 
is black on the side opposite to the right hand of the person looking at it ; at the 
opposite side white. Their arms are displayed as in the preceding case, but without 
crest or motto, and the shield appears suspended by a ribbon in a bow, and 
ornamented with a cherub's head and wings. 

The hatchments of ladies (except peeresses, who are entitled to a robe of estate) 
are always without mantle, helmet, crest, or family motto, although funeral words and 
sentences are sometimes introduced. 

A widower's hatchment represents his arms with those of his wife in the same 
manner as when living ; that is impaled, or divided by a perpendicular line down 
the centre of the shield. His crest and motto are also emblazoned, and all the 
ground outside the escutcheon is black. 

The hatchment of a widow represents her arms impaled with those of her 



xxii HERALDRY. 

husband and enclosed in a lozenge, having a bow of ribbon at the top, and ornamented 
with a cherub's head and wings ; all the ground outside the shield being black. 

For a man leaving a second wife, the hatchment represents his arms (not impaled) 
on a black ground. On the dexter side, or that opposite the left hand of the 
spectator, is placed, apart fi"om the shield of the husband, a small funeral escutcheon, 
on which his arms, with those of his first wife, are impaled ; all the ground at this 
side of the hatchment being black, to indicate her decease. On the opposite side of 
the hatchment, that is, facing the right hand of the person looking at it, another 
small escutcheon is similarly placed apart from the husband's shield, and on it are dis- 
played his arms impaled with those of his second wife ; the ground at the extreme 
sinister side of the shield being white, to show that she survives him. 

If a widower or a bachelor be the last of his family, a skull or death's head 
(heraldically termed a mart) is annexed to the escutcheon — -the arms, crest, and motto 
beino- displayed in the manner already described ; and the hatchment of a maid or widow, 
who is the last of her house, represents the arms in a lozenge, with a "tnort annexed. 

The hatchments of Peers and Peeresses have their distinguishing coronets. 

On the hatchments of Baronets a front-faced, open helmet is placed over the 
shield, on some part of which is displayed the red hand. 

The armorial bearings of Knights are surrounded with the insignia of their 
respective orders, and surmounted with the front-faced open helmet, which is also 
assigned to knights bachelors. 

The hatchments of Archbishops and Bishops represent their arms impaled with 
those of their See; the latter being placed on the dexter side, that is, opposite 
the left hand of the person who looks at it, consequently the opposite side is painted 
black, that under the arms of the see being white. 

The hatchment of the wife of an Archbishop or Bishop represents two shields ; 
that to the left of the spectator displays the arms of the See impaling the 
paternal coat, and surmounted by the mitre. The sinister shield (that to the 
spectator's right) is suspended by a knot, bearing the prelate's family arms impaled 
with those of his wife : the surface of the hatchment underneath the sinister shield 
being black, to denote the lady's death. 

The same rule is observed with respect to the hatchments of the wives of Knights 
of the different orders, while those of Peeresses who have married commoners display 
the arms of their dignity at the sinister side (that is, the side opposite the spectator's 
right), apart from the heraldic bearings of their husbands. 



SEIZE QUARTIERS. 

If title be with us the test of position and precedence, the Seize Quartiers have 
been considered in Continental Europe as the test of blood, or what is strictly 
signified by tiie term " birth." It is the reverse of what is generally understood by 
" a family tree," for there, the stream commencing with the earliest known ancestor, 
flows down to the living generation; but in the " seize quartiers," beginning with 
the latter, the stream, dividing on the mother's and father's sides into two lines, 
Ihence continues to ascend, ramifying into the several sources whence it derives the 
vital current. Thus at a glance is displayed and analysed the heraldic componency of 
the warm flood circulating beneath each blazoned breast, betraying any alloying 
admixture that may exist, and may, as in the pedigree of a race-horse (if I may 
venture to use the simile), disentitle it to the character of "thorough-bred." 

Increasing ])y a regular succession of reduplications in every generation, the range 
of that of the great-groat-grandfathcr displays a series of sixteen shields of arms, 
the "seize quartiers ; " the generation beyond has thirty-two shields, that succeeding 
it, sixty-four, and so on till in the thirtieth generation the series of names for that 
generation alone would exceed the present estimated population of the whole globe ; 



HERALDRY. xxiu 

and when the number, diminishing by one-half in each descending step, is added to 
the above, the total of individaals whose blood is transmitted into the living man is 
something prodigious ; consequently the number ascending to the beginning of the 
world would be utterly uncountable. In this latter case it must be observed that 
the same individual must have figured several times in different positions of relation- 
ship, for otherwise in the generation contemporaneous with the creation of man, the 
broad array of progenitors would be totally incompatible with the solitary Adam and 
Eve, the fountain sources of all human blood. 

The ancient chivalry of St. John of Jerusalem, which bore successively the titles 
of Knights of Rhodes and Knights of Malta, was variously exacting in its require- 
ments of proof of noble birth from candidates seeking admission to its ranks. 
Vertot, the historian of the Order, tells us that the languages of Provence, Auvergne, 
and France were obliged to prove eight quarters, or coats of arms, that is the genera- 
tion of great-grandfathers and great- grandmothers ; Italy, only four quarters 
or shields, i.e., the grandfathers and grandmothers ; but it was required that these 
four quarters should belong to families of a noblesse acknowledged for the pre- 
ceding two hundred years. Four quarters was the number also required from the 
language of Aragon and Castile, including Portugal, but for German knights sixteen 
quarters were necepsary, that being the number demanded by the Teutonic Order 
from its postulants. This is and was at all times considered a very rigorous ordeal, 
requiring often most laborious searches among archives and sources difficult of access, 
as well as condemning numbers to exclusion, for it is not alone in our days that 
ruined gentle blood sought to establish itself by union with merely plebeian gold : 
title availed nothing. 

The mode of proceeding in drawing up a pedigree of " Seize Quartiers," is as 
follows, and the progression is very simple, though not generally understood : the 
very words being familiarly comprehended neither as to their verbal import, the 
rarity of the possession of such a pedigree, even among some of the most proudly 
titled families in the peerage, its intrinsic genealogical value abroad amid heraldic 
nations, or its being the real and actual test of the nobility of the blood of any 
individual. 

First write down the name of the postulant, then above his name those of his 
father and mother, which form thus two quarters : the father's father and mother 
then follow, and the mother's father and mother fill up the line of getieration, i.e., 
the grandfathers and grandmothers. Proceeding in the same way, we next mark 
down the father and mother of each grandfather and grandmother, which form the 
line of great-grandfathers and great-grandmothers, eight individuals, quarters or 
coats of arms ; and the succeeding line of fathers and mothers of each great-grand- 
father and great-grandmother, constitute the series of the great-great-grandfathers 
and great-great- grandmothers, or sixteen quarters. This ramification, however, is 
best understood by a glance at the following diagram : 

Eight paternal quarterings. Eight maternal quarterings. 

1234567 8123 4567 8 
Line of great-great-grandfathers and great- A=B C=D E=F G=H. J=K L=M N=0 P=Q 

great-grandmothers. I ! ' I 



Line of great-grandfathers and great-grand- A = C E=Q- J=j=L N = l* 

mothers. i i 

' ! ! f 

Line of grandfathers and grindmothers .. .. Ah=E J==N 



L. 



Line of father and mother . . . . . . . . . . A= J 



A 

who combines in his person the blood of the sixteen families, arrajed 
in the uppermost line, and displays sixteen coats of arms in his 
shield, as a postulant in chivalry. 



xxiv HERALDRY. 

I have thus endeavoured to explain the exact meaning of " Seize Quar- 
tiers." By the universal consent of continental Europe, the sixteen quarters 
have been considered the test of blood; they have at all times been the Sesame 
which has opened the door of every presence-chamber of royalty, of every 
high place at foreign courts, and of every rich and noble Chapter. Nevertheless, 
according to our English notions, this test is rather, I think, one of curiosity than 
real value ; for, compare the continental nobility, which very generally still possesses 
it, with the British nobility, which very rarely does, and mark the difference between 
them. Our own aristocracy yields to none other in high breeding, honour, noble 
daring, brilliancy of ancestry, talent, and simple, unostentatious grandeur of character, 
and yet, comparatively speaking, few even among that elevated class can trace their 
descent up to sixteen families on both sides entitled to armorial bearings ; or, at 
least, in cases where this is practicable, many of the progenitors are of a very 
secondary station, and belong to a gentry wholly without illustration. The proof of 
value is its result ; and considering that the aristocracy of Britain may justly claim 
superiority over the more exclusively well-bom aristocracy of the rest of Europe, I 
cannot bring myself to believe that the test of " the Seize Quartiers " enters, neces- 
sarily, into the composition of a first-rate English nobleman or gentleman. That 
which is truly ennobling is a long line of gentle ancestors, either from father to son, 
or through heiresses bringing the right of representation, combined with honourable 
and appropriate alliances. Who would venture to dispute the nobility of birth of 
the ducal representative of the Douglases and the Hamiltons, on the ground that an 
alliance with a Gunning or a Beckford might perchance interfere with the perfection 
of the German test of " the Seize Quartiers ? " 

KINGS OF ARMS AND HERALDS. 

The office of " King of Arms " is of feudal origin, and was one of the attributes 
of the pomp and splendour annexed to feudal sovereignty. There is no trace of such 
an institution anterior to the Norman invasion, which overturned the pre-existing 
system in England, formed as it had been by a fusion of the usages of the ancient 
Britons, Saxons, and Danes. Having so overturned it, the Normans introduced the 
military and chivalrous code of feuds, with its homage, and fealty, and services. Sir 
Henry Spelman is of opinion that the title of King of Arms was attributed to such 
heraldic officers in England as belonged immediately to the person of the King's 
majesty, while those who appertained to princes of the blood royal, or to the nobility, 
were staled simply Heralds. Another learned author states that the title of " King 
of Heralds (of later times called King of Arms) was given to that personage who 
was the chief or principal officer presiding over the heralds of any kingdom, or of 
any particular province usually termed the marches, or of any order of knighthood." 

The primary duty of the English Kings of Arms and Heralds, at the time of 
their establishment, corresponded with that of the Heralds of foreign princes ; they 
carried and delivered all messages of importance to allies, enemies, and rebels, gave 
solemn defiances and denunciations of war; summoned cities, castles, &c., to sur- 
render ; made propositions of peace, truce, and accommodation, and offered mercy 
and pardon to rebellious subjects and insurgents. They had also the cognizance, 
inspection, marshalling, and regulation of coats of armour, and the several marks of 
distinction connected with them ; they received all foreign nobility and others coming 
to England to perform feats of arms, and gave safe conduct to them from their 
arrival to the time of their leaving the kingdom; assisted at tilts, tournaments, and 
feats of arms, and attended to the honour and reputation of military persons, and to 
the safety, welfare, and defence of the King and his realms. They had also the 
arrangement, order, and progress of legal combats; were likewise employed in 
marshalling and conducting coronations, marriages, baptisms, funerals, interviews, 
and other august assemblies, processions, pomps, and solemnities of the ancient 



HERALDRY. xxv 

monarclis, and took care that the orders, rites, and ceremonies established for those 
ceremonials were duly observed; and that the rules of precedence were strictly 
adhered to. 

The pride and ambition of the nobility prompted them to imitate, and oftentimes 
to vie with, their Monarclis in state and magnificence. Hence it is that we find 
the Heralds attending at the faneral rites and ceremonies of the nobility, as well as 
at the celebration of their marriages, christenings, and other festivities, and practising 
the same forms and grandeur as were observed at those of the royal family. 

Noble and illustrious descent having also been held in high esteem, strict 
attention was paid to the observance of a just and exact distinction between the 
different ranks or classes of the people. The ignoble never presumed, in those ancient 
times, to arrogate a participation in the rights annexed to eminence of parentage, or 
to claim honours to which their superiors alone were entitled. And the nobiKty and 
gentry, cautiously jealous of their dignity, avoided mixing with the vulgar, and were 
sedulously careful for the preservation, on all public and solemn occasions, of that 
purity of rank and precedence which was due by the feudal system to their birth 
and station in life. Family arms being the general criterion which distinguished the 
gentleman from the peasant, no persons were suffered to enter the lists to tourney, or 
exercise any feats of arms, unless they could, to the satisfaction of the Kings of Arms, 
prove themselves to be gentlemen of " Coat Armour." And the ancient gentry took 
particular care to have their arms embroidered on their common-wearing over-coats, 
and would not suffer any person of the lower class, although become rich, to use 
such tokens of gentle birth and distinction ; nay, so jealous were they of any 
infringement of the armorial rights to which they were entitled, that whenever the 
arms which they and their families had borne happened to be claimed by any other 
gentlemen, they vindicated their rights in the military courts, and very often by duel. 
Under those circumstances it became essential and was a necessary part of the duties 
of Heralds, to draw out, with accuracy and exactness, the authentic genealogies of 
noble families, and families of " gentle birth " to continue, and from time to time, to 
add to and preserve their pedigrees in direct and collateral lines; and to have a 
perfect knowledge of all hereditary arms, ensigns, badges of honour, and the external 
marks as well of personal as of family rank and distinction. 

Some portion of the ancient duties of the Herald has become obsolete with the 
decay of the feudal system, but enough remains to render the office important and 
useful. That branch of his labours connected with genealogy is valuable in the 
highest degree. Genealogical tables and authentic pedigrees, regularly deduced, 
contain memorials of past transactions and events, and from them chronologers and 
historians have drawn very considerable assistance ; they have operated to the detec- 
tion of frauds, forgeries, and impostures ; cleared up doubts and difficulties ; 
established marriages ; supported and defended legitimacy and purity of blood ; 
ascertained family alliances ; proved and maintained affinity and consanguinity ; 
vindicated and corroborated the titles of lands to their possessors ; and have been of 
essential use in settling claims and rights of inheritance without litigation, by 
furnishing effectual evidence. Such has been, and ever must be, the utiUty of 
genealogies, when they are framed with integrity and authenticated by evidence. 

The HERALDIC AUTHORITY ovcr England and Wales is delegated by the Crown to 
the hereditary Earl Marshal (the Duke of Norfolk), and three Kings of Arms, 
Garter, Clarenceux, and Norroy, who form, together with the Heralds and 
Pursuivants, the College of Arms. Of these, the principal is "Garter King of 
Arms." In his Patent he is styled Principal King of English Arms, and Principal 
Officer of Arms of the most noble Order of the Garter. To him immediately belongs, 
inter alia, the adjustment of arms in England and Wales, and likewise the power of 
granting arms under the authority of the Earl Marshal, in conjunction with the 
provincial Kings of Arms occording to their several jurisdictions, to persons qualified 
to bear them. " Clarenceux King of Arms," so named from the Dukedom of 



ssvi HERALDRY. 

Clarence, bas jurisdiction over the south-east and west parts of England ; and 
" Norroy King of Arms," the most ancient of the heraldic sovereigns in England 
possesses as his province, England north of the Trent. He is the North King — 
" Norroy." The Enghsh Heralds bear the designation of " Windsor," " Chester," 
"Somerset," "Lancaster," "York," and "Richmond," the Pursuivants are known 
by the names of " Rouge Dragon," " Rouge Croix," " Bluemantle," and " Portcullis." 
The date of the creation of the historic and dignified ofl&ce of Garter Kino of 
Arms may be fixed with certainty to have been between May and September, 1417. 
The first Garter was William Bruges, originally styled " Guyenne King of Arms," 
and subsequently " Garteir Roy d'Armes des Anglois." By the constitution of King 
Henry VIII., it was provided that Garter should be Sovereign within the College of 
Arms above all the other officers, that he should have the correction of Arms, Crests, 
Cognizances, and Devices, as well as the power and authority to grant Armorial 
Bearings ; and that he should " walk in all places next to Our Sword, and no one 
between thena except the Constable and Marshal when they carry the batons of their 
office." 

In addition, Garter King of Arms has various other duties of considerable 
importance to perform, such as the regulation of precedence, the guidance of 
Coronations, and State Ceremonials, the control and management of all matters 
concerning the Order of the Garter, &c. 

The Badge of Garter is of gold, having on both sides the Arms of St. George, 
impaled with those of the Sovereign, within the Garter and Motto, enamelled in 
their proper colours, and ensigned with the royal crown. His sceptre is of silver 
gilt, about two feet in length, the top being of gold, of four sides of equal height 
but of unequal breadth. On the two larger sides are the Arms of St. George 
impaling the Sovereign's, and on the two lesser sides, the Arms of St. George, 
surrounded by the Garter and Motto, the whole ensigned with an imperial crown. 

The ancient office of Lyon King of Arms, long styled Lord Lyon King op Arms, 
the King of Arms of Scotland, is found occupying a very prominent position so far 
back as 1371, the year of the coronation of Robert II., at Holyrood. He derives his 
authority directly from the Sovereign, and is entitled to wear an oval badge 
suspended by a broad green ribbon. The Badge consists on the obverse of the e&igj 
of St. Andrew bearing his cross before him, with a thistle beneath, all enamelled in 
the proper colours on an azure ground. The reverse contains the arms of Scotland 
having in the lower parts of the Badge, a thistle, as on the other side ; the whole 
surmounted with an Imperial Crown. Lyon is the chief Heraldic Officer of the 
Order of the Thistle, and enjoys the same rights and privileges in Scotland as Garter 
King of Arms does -in England. The insignia of the Lyon Office are, "Argent, a 
lion sejant full-faced gules, holding in the dexter paw a thistle slipped vert, and in 
the sinister an escutcheon of the second, on a chief azure a St. Andrew's cross of 
the first." 

In Ireland, Ulster King of Arms has the sole heraldic jurisdiction, and has 
under him Athlone Pursuivant: he is, ex-officio, Knight Attendant on the most 
illustrious Order of St. Patrick. 

The title of "Ulster King of Arms," was created in the reign of Edward VI. 
But the office itself, under the designation of " Ireland King of Arms," had its origin 
in more remote times, the first express mention of Ireland King of Arms being in the 
sixth year of King Richard II., 1482 ; Froissart, vol. ii., calls him " Ckaundos le Roy 
d' Irelande.'' A regular succession of officers by the title of " Ireland King of Arms," 
continued from that time to the reign of King Edward IV., who promoted Thomas 
Ashwell to that office. 

This title of " Ireland," as Sir Henry Spelman and Sir James Ware say, was 
afterwards, by Edward VI., altered into that of Ulster. That King himself, in his 
journal, takes notice of it as follows — "Feb. There was a King of Arms made for 
Ireland, whose name was Ulster, and his province was all Ireland." The patent 



HERALDRY. xsvii 

passed under the great seal of England, 1553, with an ample preamble, in testimony 
of the necessity and dignity of the office, \^hich was given to Bartholomew Butler, 
York Herald. And a warrant bearing equal date with the patent was issued to Sir Ralph 
Sadleir, Knt., of the King's Wardrobe, to deliver him " one coat of blue and crimson 
velvet embroidered with the gold and silver upon the same with the King's Arms." 
The Badge of " Ulster " is of gold, containing ou one side the cross of St. 
Patrick, or as it is described in the statutes, " The cross gules of the Order upon a 
field argent, impaled with the Arms of the Realm of Ireland," and both encircled 
with the Motto, " Quis Separabit," and the date of the institution of the Order, 
MDCCLXXXIII. The reverse exhibits the Arms of the Office of Ulster, viz., " Or, 
a cross gules, on a chief of the last a lion of England between a harp and portcullis, all 
of the first," placed on a ground of green enamel, surrounded by a gold border with 
shamrocks, surmounted by an Imperial Crown, and suspended by a sky blue ribband 
from the neck. 

The general precedence of Ulster King of Arms was affirmed by his Majesty King 
William IV. by royal warrant, dated at St. James's, 17th day of May, 1835, which 
was issued for revising and making alterations in the statutes of the Order of St. 
Patrick. After reciting that, by the Act of Union, Ireland became part and parcel of 
the United Kingdom, and " our King of Arms of all Ireland has not had, since that 
event, any specific place or i)recedence assigned to him among our Kings of Arms by 
special ordinance or royal authority ; We do hereby direct and command that in all 
ceremonials and assemblies Ulster King of Arms shall have place immediately after 
the Lord Lyon, King of Arms of Scotland." Hence, the general precedence of the 
Kings of Arms for Great Britain and Ireland stands arranged thus : 1st. Garter King 
of Arms of England ; 2nd, Lyon King of Arms of Scotland ; 3rd. Ulster King of 
Arms of all Ireland ; 4th. Clarenceux King of Aims ; and 5th. Norroy King 
of Arms. 

The local precedence of Ulster King of Arms at the Irish Court was established 
at the institution of the office in Ireland, and the place assigned him the head of the 
officers of state, and next the person of the Viceroy. This order of precedence was 
afterwards confirmed by successive Lords Lieutenants and Lords Justices. In an 
ordinance of the Earls of Orrery and Muontrath, Iiords Justices, dated at Dublin 
Castle, 18th April, 1661, the programme of precedence of the officers of state at the 
Irish Court was set forth in detail, and stated therein to have been " what had 
formerly been used " by the " lords deputies or lords justices," and the place of the 
King of Arms was therein set forth as first in order, and next to the lords justices as 
representatives of the sovereign. 

The Duke of Bolton, by an ordinance dated at Dublin Castle, 17th day of 
August, 1717, confirmed that order of precedence, and assigned the place of Ulster 
King of Aims to be next to the person of his Grace ; and after Ulster, the other 
official personages of the Court. 

By another order, of Lord Carteret, dated from "his Majesty's Castle of Dublin 
the 29th day of October, 1724," the same roll of precedence was affirmed and ordered. 
The last order upon the subject of the precedence of the person holding the office, 
was the royal warrant of his Majesty King William IV., already mentioned. 

Very considerable powers and duties, in addition to the due control and registra- 
tion of arms and pedigrees, were from time to time conferred and imposed upon the 
Ulster King of Arms, in matters of official proceedings and courtly duties, which he 
regulates, whence the archives of his office present not only an interesting record of 
the various ceremonials observed from time to time at the Irish Court, but are also 
landmarks of genealogy, and consist not merely of genealogical materials and 
references, but in great measure of genealogies of families, full, ample, and complete. 



GLOSSARY. 



The Shield, or Escutcheon, 

Is the principal object whereon the emblems or charges of Heraldry are depicted. It Taries much in 
shape, but is depicted triangular, or, as it is technically called, " Heater-shaped," on the oldest 
monuments, coins, and seals. The surface or space within the bounding lines of the shield is called 
the Field. 

The Shield is divided into the following parts, ABC, the chief, subdivided into A' 
the dexter, or right hand chief point ; B, the middle chief point ; C, the sinister, or 
left hand chief point ; D, the coUar, or honour point ; E, the heart, or fess point ; F, 
the nombril, or navel point ; and G H I, the base, subdivided into G-, the dexter base 

^. point ; H, the middle base point ; and I, the sinister base point. 

The Shield is distinguished by certain heraldic colours called Tinctures, separated by division 
lines, and charged with a variety of animals, real or fabulous, instruments, and other objects, which 
themselves bear the designation of charges. 

The Tinctures used in Heraldry are metals, colours, and furs. 

To Svlvester Petra-Sancta, a celebrated Italian Herald, is assigned the invention of the lines and 
points by'which the tinctures are expressed. 






The Metals are — 

Qr — gold — known in uncoloured 
drawings and engravings by dots or 
points. 



Argent — silver — expressed by the 
shield being plain. 



The CoLOUES are — 

Azure — blue — depicted by horizontal 
lines. 



Qules — red— depicted by perpen- 
dicular lines. 



Vert — green— depicted by lines from 
the dexter chief to the siniater base. 



Sable — black — depicted br cross 
lines, horizontal and perpendicular. 











The FuBS are — 

Ermine — a white field with black 
spots. 



Ermines — a black field with white 
spots. 



/ . .1. . \ Erminois — a gold field with black 
'■•i-"^.i» -I spots. 



Pean — a black field with gold spots. 



Vair — composed originally of pieces 
of fur, but now silver and blue, cut to 
resemble the flower of tlie campanula, 
and opposed to each other in rows ; 
when of diflerent tinctures, they ore 
sjiccified and described vaire. 

Counter Vair — differs from " vair " 
by having the bells or cups arranged 
base against base, and point against 
point. 



Potent Counter Potent — is composed 
of figures like crutches' heads. 






GLOSSARY. 



XXIX 



The earliest representation of the indication of colour hy engraved lines, in England, is on the 
impression of a seal to the death warrant of Charles I. 

The old Heralds used more minute distinctions : the Arras of gentlemen, esquires, knights, and 
baronets, they blazoned by tinctures ; those of the nobility by precious stones ; and those of emperors, 
kings, and other sovereign princes, by planets. 



Colours and Metals. 


Tinctures. 


Precious Stones. 


Planets. 


Names Abridged. 


Yellow, or G-old 


Or 


Topaz . . 


Sol 





Or, 


White, or Silver . . 


Argent .. 


Pearl . . 


Luna J) 


A 


Ar. 


Black 


Sable . . 


Diamond 


Saturn li 


S 


Sa. 


Eed 


Gules . . 


Ruby . . 


Mar s ^ 


G 


Gu. 


Blue 


Azure . . 


Sapphire 


Jupiter v. 


B 


Az. 


Green 


Vert 


Emerald 


Venus ? 


V 


Vert. 


Purple 


Purpure 


Amethyst 


Mercury § 


P 


Purp. 


Tawney 


Tenne . . 


Jacynth . . 


Dragon's Head . . 


T 


Ten. 


Murrey 


Sanguine 


Sardonix 


Dragon's Tail 


San 


Sang. 



The term Counterchanged {French, de I'un en I'autre) expresses that the field is of 
two tinctures, metal and colour, and that the charge upon it partakes of both, — the 
charge, or part of the charge, being of metal, which lies upon the colour ; and the 
charge, or part of the charge, being of colour, which lies upon the metal. " Transmu- 
tation, or counterchanging," says GuilLim, " is an intermiiture of the several tinctures of 
the shield and charge, occasioned by the apposition of some one or more lines of 
partition over the whole." 

It is an inviolable rule of Heraldry, that metal shall never be placed upon metal, nor colour 
upon colour ; that is if the field be of colour, the immediate charge must be of metal, and vice versa, 
but numerous exceptions to this rule are found, not only in coals of a date anterior to the systematic 
or scientific arrangement of Armorial Bearings, but in many of foreign origin. 




PARTITION LINES. 

Partition Lines are those that divide the field or charge ; and are always Right or Straight 
Lines, unless when otherwise described ; those that vary from the Right Line are called — 

Enffrailed. 



Invected. 
Wavy. 



Embattled, or Crenellee. 

ISlSlSlSXSlSU ^'''^^- 

Indented. 

Dancettee. 

Raguly. 
Dove-tailed. 

To these may be added, those of rarer occurrence, Champagne or Urde, which resembles an 

embattled line with the battlements and indentures drawn to a point instead of being cut straight, 
and Potentee, when the edge of the hne resembles the heads of crutches. 





line 



Party* per Pale. The field, or charge, divided into two equal parts by a perpendicular 



• This word, in the blazon of Arms, is generally omitted; per pale, per fess, &c. implying the division of the siiield. 



XXX 



GLOSSARY. 




Quarterly; the field, or charge, divided into four equal parts by tvo lines, one 
perpendicular, the other horizontal. 




Party per Fess ; the field, or charge, divided into two equal parts by a horizontal line. 



>< - — =( Party per Send; the field, or charge, divided into two equal parts, by a diagonal 
^ffl line from the dexter chief to the sinister base. 



Party per Bend Sinister ; the field, or charge, divided into two equal parts by a diagonal line 
from the sinister chief to the dexter base. 




Party per Chevron; the field, or charge, divided into two equal parts by two lines 
meeting pyramidically in the fes» point, drawn from the dexter and sinister base. 




Party per Saltire ; the field, or charge, divided into four equal parts, by two diagonal 
lines crossing each other. 




Oyronny of Eight; the field divided into eight equal parts by four lines, two per 
saltire, and two quarterly. 



ORDINARIES. 

All charges of Arms are either proper or common ; those charges are said to be proper which by a 
certain property do partiriularly belong to the art of Heraldry, and are of ordinary use therein ; hence 
they are styled ordinaries ; the common charges are the representations of all emblems which retain 
their own names in the blazon. The term here employed " proper " must not be confused with the 
similar one (see Dictionary of Terms) which indicates that any heraldic chargo in a shield, crest, or 
supporter, is of its natural colour or nature. 




The principal Ordinaries are — 

The Chief (called by French Heralds, un Chef, signifying head, from the place it occupies 
in the shield) is the whole upper part of the field, cut off horizontally by a straight or any 
other of the partition lines used in Heraldry, and should comprise a third part* of the 
escutcheon. 




The Pale is formed by two lines drawn perpendicularly from the top to the base of the 
escutcheon, comprising a third part of the field. " The French," observes Mackenzie, 
" say that Boldiers of old carried pales of wood to encamp them, which they fixed in the 
earth," and thus originated this heraldic bearing. 




The Send (Baltheus) is formed by two lines drawn diagonally from the dexter chief to 
the sinister base, and comprises the third part of the shield. It represents a shoulder- 
beh, or scarf. 



• The Chief and the other ordlnarien which nrc mentioned as ocmipying a third part of the escutcheon, should, strictlj- 
comprlae that ipare ; but In armorial drawings thin rule U seldom adiicred to. 



GLOSSARY. 



XXXI 




The Bend Sinister is the same as the Bend, excepting that the lines are drawn from the 
Binister chief to the dexter base. 



The Fess is formed by two horizontal lines drawn across the field, comprising the 
centre third part of the escutcheon. It is emblematic of the military girdle worn round 
the body over the armour. 



The Bar is a diminutive of the fess, and of the same form, containing one-fifth of the field, and 
may be placed in any part of the escutcheon. 



The Cross is composed of four lines, two parallel lines perpendicular, and two transverse, 
not drawn throughout, but meeting by couples at right angles, near about the fess point. 



The Saltire (the Cross of St. Andrew) is formed by four lines, two drawn from the 
dexter chief towards the sinister base, and the others from the sinister chief towards the 
dexter base, meeting in the middle by couples in acute angles, and resembling two bends, 
dexter and sinister, uniting or blending where they cross. 



When charges are borne upon ordinaries, they are described " on a fess," " on a chevron," " on a 
bend," &c., as the case may be. When charges are placed in the position that ordinaries occupy, they 
are blazoned as "in pale," or " in fess," or " in bend," &c., as the case may be. 





The Chevron (supposed by some writers to have been adopted from the bow of a war 
saddle, which rose high in front) is formed by two parallel lines drawn from the dexter 
base, meeting pyramidically, about the fess point, two other parallel lines drawn from the 
sinister base. 




SUB-OEDIN ARIES. 

The Border {French, Bordure) was formerly a mark of difference, to distinguish one 
branch of a family from another. It surrounds the field, occupying one-fifth of it, and is 
of an equal breadth at every part. 




The Orle, is an inner border that does not touch the extremities of the shield, the field 
being seen within and round it on both sides. It has the appearance of an escutcheon 
voided, or, as it were, insulated. The Tressure is a diminutive of the Orle. 




The Inescutcheon, is a small escutcheon, home within the shield. 




The Quarter, is the space formed by two lines, the one drawn horizontally from the 
side of the shield to the centre, and the other perpendicularly from the chief to meet it in 
the same place, and occupies one-fourth part of the shield, as the term implies. 




The Canton, derived from cantonn6e, cornered, is less than the Quarter, comprising only 
the third part of the chief, and is formed, as the Quarter, by a perpendicular line drawn 
from the top of the shield, meeting another drawn horizontally from the side. The Canton 
always occupies the dexter chief of the escutcheon, unless otherwise expressed. 



^ 



Cheque, or Chequy, is used when the field, or any armorial charge, i^ divided by transverse 
lines perpendicularly and horizontally into equal parts or squares alternately of different 
tinctures, like a chess-board. On ordinaries, chequy must consist of at least three ranges 
of square pieces. 



GLOSSARY. 




Quarterly/; the field, or charge, divided into four equal parts by tvo lines, one 
perpendicular, the other horizontal. 




Party per Fess ; the field, or charge, divided into two equal parts by a horizontal line. 




Party per Bend; the field, or charge, divided into two equal parts, by a diagonal 
^1 line from the dexter chief to the sinister base. 



Party per Bend Sinister ; the field, or charge, divided into two equal parts by a diagonal line 
from the sinister chief to the dexter base. 




Party per Chevron ; the field, or charge, divided into two equal parts by two lines 
meeting pyramidically in the fes» point, drawn from the dexter and sinister base. 




Party per Saltire ; the field, or charge, divided into four equal parts, by two diagonal 
lines crossing each other. 




Oyronny of Eight; the field divided into eight equal parts by four lines, two per 
saltire, and two quarterly. 



ORDINAEIES. 

All charges of Arms are either proper or common ; those charges are said to be proper which by a 
certain property do particularly belong to the art of Heraldry, and are of ordinary use therein ; hence 
they are styled ordinaries ; the common charges are the representations of all emblems which retain 
their own names in the blazon. The term here employed " proper " must not be confused with the 
similar one (see Dictionary of Terms) which indicates that any heraldic charge in a shield, crest, or 
supporter, is of its natural colour or nature. 





The principal Ordinaries are — 

The Chief (called by French Heralds, un Chef, signifying head, from the place it occupies 
in the shield) is the whole upper part of the field, cut off" horizontally by a straight or any 
other of the partition lines used in Heraldry, and should comprise a third part* of the 
escutcheon. 

The Pale is formed by two linos drawn perpendicularly from the top to the base of the 
escutcheon, comprising a third part of the field. " The French," observes Mjxckenzie, 
" say that soldiers of old carried pales of wood to encamp them, which they fixed in the 
earth," and thus originated this heraldic bearing. 




The Bend (Baltheus) is formed by two linos drawn diagonally from the dexter chief to 
the sinister base, and comprises the third part of the shield. It represents a shoulder- 
belt, or scarf. 



• The Chief and the other ordinariei which nro mentioned as ocnipyinpr a third part of the escutcheon, should, strlctlj' 
Gomprlte that space; but In armorial drawings thiR rule is seldom adhered to. 




GLOSS A.RY. 



The Bend Sinister is the same as the Bend, exceptiag that the lines are drawn from the 
einister chief to the dexter base. 



The Fess is formed by two horizontal lines drawn across the field, comprising the 
centre third part of the escutcheon. It is emblematic of the miUtary girdle worn round 
the body over the armour. 



The Bar is a diminutive of the fess, and of the same form, containing one-fifth of the field, and 
may be placed in any part of the escutcheon. 



The Cross is composed of four lines, two parallel lines perpendicular, and two transverse, 
not drawn throughout, but meeting by couples at right angles, near about the fess point. 



TTie Saltire (the Cross of St. Andrew) is formed by four lines, two drawn from the 
dexter chief towards the sinister base, and the others from the sinister chief towards the 
dexter base, meeting in the middle by couples in acute angles, and resembling two bends, 
dexter and sinister, uniting or blending where they cross. 



"When charges are borne upon ordinaries, they are described " on a fess," " on a chevron," " on a 
bend," &c., as the case may be. When charges are placed in the position that ordinaries occupy, they 
are blazoned as " in pale," or " in fess," or " in bend," &c., as the case may be. 





The Chevron (supposed by some writers to have been adopted from the bow of a war 
saddle, which rose high in front) is formed by two parallel lines drawn from the dexter 
base, meeting pyramidically, about the fess point, two other parallel lines drawn from the 
sinister base. 




SUB-ORDINARIES. 

The Border {French, Bordure) was formerly a mark of difference, to distinguish one 
branch of a family from another. It surrounds the field, occupying one-fifth of it, and is 
of an equal breadth at every part. 




The Orle, is an inner border that does not touch the extremities of the shield, the field 
being seen within and round it on both sides. It has the appearance of an escutcheon 
voided, or, as it were, insulated. The Tressure is a diminutive of the Orle. 




The Inescutcheon, is a small escutcheon, home within the shield. 




The Quarter, is the space formed by two lines, the one drawn horizontally from the 
side of the shield to the centre, and the other perpendicularly from the chief to meet it in 
the same place, and occupies one-fourth part of the shield, as the term implies. 




TTie Canton, derived from cantonnle, cornered, is less than the Quarter, comprising only 
the third part of the chief, and is formed, as the Quarter, by a perpendicular line drawn 
from the top of the shield, meeting another drawn horizontally from the side. The Canton 
always occupies the dexter chief of the escutcheon, unless otherwise expressed. 



s 



Cheque, or Chequy, is used when the field, or any armorial charge, i^ divided by transverse 
lines perpendicularly and horizontally into equal parts or squares alternately of different 
tinctures, like a chess-board. On ordinaries, chequy must consist of at least three ranges 
of square pieces. 



GLOSSARY. 




Qri f Billets. Billets are oblong figures. When they exceed ten, and are irregularly placed, 
^ \ their number is not expressed in the blazon ; but the field or charge covered with them is 
said to be billettee. 



The Paile, or Pall, is composed of the upper half of a saltire and half a pale, the latter 
issuiug from the base point of the shield to the centre. 



The Oyron, is of a triangular form, composed of two lines, one drawn diagonally from the 
dexter chief angle of the shield, and the other horizontally from the dexter side, both meeting in the 
centre. 




The Pile (representing a pile used in the erection of miUtary bridges), s-hould contain, 
if borne plain, one-third of the chief in breadth, and when charged, two-thirds : it issues 
from the chief and tapers to a point, like a wedge, towards the base. 




The Flaunch, or Flanque, is made on each side of the shield,. by the segment of a 
circular superfices drawn from the corner of the chief to the base point. 




The Lozenge, in a parallelogram with equal sides, forming two acute and two obtuse 
angles. 



The Mascle, is a Lozenge perforated or voided, so that the field appears through the opening. 

The Fusil (representing a kind of spindle used in spinning) resembles the lozenge in shape, but 
is somewhat longer. The field or charge when divided by diagonal lines dexter and sinister, so as to 
form fusils all over it, is denominated Fusily. There are two other well known, though not modernly 
adopted, forms of the fusil, and more characteristic of the spindle which they are intended to 
represent. 

The Roundle, is of a circular form, like a piece of money, and assumes a different name according 
to its tincture : — 



Sezant 




Yellow, or G-old. 


Plate 




White, or Silver. 


Torteau 




Red. 


Pomey 




Green, or Vert. 


Hurt 




Blue, or Azure. 


Ogress, or 


Pellet '.'. '.'. '.'. 


Black, or Sable. 


Golpe 


. . 


Purple. 


Orange 




Tawncy. 


Guze 




Sanguine. 



For the origin or meaning of these charges, see them, respectively, in the Dictionary of Terms. 
The Annulet, is a ring, the tincture of which must be expressed. 




Lozengy, is when the field or any armorial charge is divided by diagonal linos trans- 
versely, into equal parts or lozenges, alternately of different tinctures. 



The Fret, is composed of six pieces, viz., two long ones in saltiro, extending, as a rule, 
but not necrflHarily, to the extremity of the field, and four pieces conjoined in the centre 
in the form of a mascle, interlaced or fretted by those in saltire. 



GLOSSARY. 



XXXUl 



The Qoutte, is the representation of a drop of liquid, and assumes a different name according to 
its tincture. When yellow, it is called goutte, or gutte, d'or ; when white, goutte d'eau ; when red, 
goutte de sang ; when blue, goutte de larmes ; when green, goutte de vert ; when black, goutte de 
poix. If a field, or charge, be covered with more drops than ten, it is termed goutte d'or, de larmes, 
de poix, as the case may be. 



THE APPENDAGES OF THE SHIELD. 

The Selmet, Mantling, Wreath, Crest, Supporters, and Motto. 

The Selmet, Melme, Casque, or Morion, has varied in shape in different ages and countries. The 
most ancient form is the simplest, composed of iron, of a shape fitted to the head, and flat upon the 
top, with an aperture for the light. This is styled the Norman Helmet, and appears on very old 
seals, attached to the Gorget, a separate piece of armour which covered the neck. In the twelfth 
century, a change was made to mark the rank of the individual bearer. 




The Selmet assigned to Kings and Princes of the Blood Roi/al, is full-faced, composed 
of gold, with the beauvoir divided by six projecting bars, and lined with crimson. 




The Selmet of the Nobiliti/ is of steel, with five bars of gold : it is placed on the 
shield incUning to a profile. 




The Selmet of KnigJifs and Baronets-, is the full-faced steel helmet, with the visor 
thrown back, and without bars. 



The Selmet of Esquires, always depicted in profile, is of steel, with the visor 
closed. 



Each of these Helmets is placed immediately above the escutcheon, and supports the wreath on 
which is the crest. 



iizin 



MAEKS OF CADENCY. 



t^^(6) 



Differences, or Marks of Cadency, are the distinctions used tb indicate the various 
branches or Cadets of one family. The eldest son during the lifetime of his father bears a Label ; 
the second, a Crescent ; the third, a Mullet ; the fourth, a Martlet ; the fifth, an Annulet ; the sixth, 
a Fleur-de-lis ; the seventh, a Rose ; the eighth, a Cross moline ; the ninth, a Double quatrefoiL 



XXXIV 



GLOSSARY. 



Croton0> Coronets, etc. 




Duke's Coronet. 




Baron's Coronet. 



VkmWi 



Naval Crown. 



Celestial Crown. 





Ducal Coronet. 





Marquess's Coronet. Earl's Coronet. 






Yiscount's Coronet. 



Baron's Cap. King of Arms' Crown. 




Crown Pallisado. Eastern Crown, or Antique. 



Crown Vallery. 



Mural Crown. Cap of Maintenance. Civic Crown. 




C6arge0 in 8)etaltirp. 




Mullet. 
Estoile. 
Crescent. 




Escallop. 
Fetterlock. 
Clarion, or Rest. 
Hawk's Lure. 




Galtrap. 

Delve. 

Billet. 




Eagle's head erased. 
Falcon's head coupcd. 
Martlet. 




Annulet. 
Mullet pierced. 
Pheon. 
Chessrook. 




Cinquefoil. 
Quatrefoil. 
Trefoil slipped. 




Bugle. 

Stag trippant. 




Falcon close. 
Falcon rising. 



Water bouget. 
Miilrind, or Fer-de- 

moline. 
Gurges. 
Fountain. 




A Fish naiant. 
Fleur-de-lis. 





Rose. 

Q-arland. 

Garb (orWheatsheaf) . 




Battering Bam. 
Portcullis. 




Lion's head erased. 
Wolf's head erased. 
A Lion's gamb erased. 
An Eagle's head couped. 



Bear's head couped. 
Leopard's face. 
Boar's head couped. 
Stag's head cabossed. 





Unicorn's head erased. 
Bull's head couped. 



A Fish embowed. 
A Fish haurient. 



DICTIONARY 



OF 



TEEMS USED IN HERALDEY. 




Abased (abaise) is applied to an ordinary borne 
below its usual position. 

Abatements, marks of degradation of coat armour , 
of which heraldic writers enumerate nine. 

Accolle (the same as gorged, which see). 

Accosted, side by side. 

Accrued, grown to matuinty. 

Acorned, bearing acorns. 

Addorsed, placed back to back. 

Affrontee, full-faced. 

Aisle, winged. 

Alant, 6r aland, a mastiff dog with short ears. 

Allerion, an eagle without beak or feet. 

Amethyst, a precious stone, formerly used to ex- 
press purpure. 

Ancred, or anchored, applied to a cross, of which 
the four extremities resemble the flook of an 
anchor. See imder Crosses. 

Annulet, a ring. 



Antelope, the animal of that name. 
Theheraldic antelope is represented 
somewhat differently as shown on 
the annexed cut. 



Appaume, the hand open, presenting the palm, 
and the fingers and thumb at full length. 

Argent, silver or white. 

Armed. All birds which have talons and bills 
that aid them to seize and rend their prey, are 
in blazon said to be armed when those weapons 
differ in tincture from their bodies. But to 
swans, wild geese, and other birds without 
talons, the word armed does not apply. They, 
in like case, are termed beaked and membered. 
Beasts are also described as armed, when their 
horns or hoofs are of another colour than their 
bodies. 

Arrache, same as Erased. 

Arrondie, made circular or round. 

Assis, same as Sejant. 

Atchievement, a term used for a fully marshalled 
coat, but generally for a funeral hatchment. 

Attired, is applied to the horns of animals of the 
deer species, instead of armed, as they are 
supposed to wear their antlers not as weapons, 
but ornaments. 

Attires, the horns of a buck. 

Azure, blue. 

Itailloni, applied to a lion holding a staff in his 

mouth. 
Balista, an engine to throw stones and darts, also 

called a Swepe. 
Banded, encircled with a band or ribband. 
Bar. See p. xxxi. 
Barbed, is derived from the French word " barbe." 

The five leaves which appear on the outside of 




a full-blown rose are, in Heraldry, called the 

barbs, and thus blazoned, a rose gu. barbed and 

seeded ppr. 
Barnacles, instruments used by farriers to curb 

horses. 
Baron and femme (per), impalement of the arms 

of husband and wife. 



Bars-Oemel, two bars or barrulets 
placed parallel to each other, the 
the word Gemel being derived from 
" Qemelli," twins. 



Barrulet, a diminutive of the bar. 

Barry and barruly, describes the field or charge, 
divided by lines horizoatal. 

Basilisk. An heraldic monster, resembUng in 
shape the wivem or cockatrice, but having, at 
the end of its tail, the head of a dragon. 

Basnet {basinet), an old name for a helmet. 

Baton, derived from the French word baston, 
staff or cudgel, and generally borne as a mark 
of Bastardy. It does not go from side to side 
of the shield as the bend does ; but is couped 
in the form of a truncheon. 

Battering-ram, an instrument used by the ancients 
to beat down the walls of a besieged city. See 
p. xxxiv. 

Battled arrondie, denotes that the battlement is 
rounded at the top. 

Battled-imbattled, one battlement upon another. 

Beacon, a contrivance anciently used to warn 
against the approach of an enemy, and to alai-m 
the country. It is represented as an iron grate 
or basket containing tire, on the top of a high 
pole or pillar, against which a ladder is placed. 

Beaked. See Armed. 

Bearing, applicable to any single charge or 
heraldic device. 

Belled, applied to the hawk, to which bells are 
generally affixed. 

Bend. See p. xxx. 

Bendlet, a diminutive of the Bend, of which it is 
half the size in breadth. 

Bendy, describes a field or charge divided, dia- 
gonally, into four, six, eight, or more equal 
parts. 



Bendy bordure. 



Bezant, the current coin of Byzantium, or Con- 
stantinople—in English Heraldry, represented 
as round flat pieces of gold without unpress. 

Bezants, seme of bezants. 




2* 



xxxvi 



DICTIONARY OF TERMS 



Billets are oblong squares, by some supposed to 
represent bricks, by others letters. See p. 

ixxii. 
Billete, seme of billets. 
Bird-bolt, a small arrow with a blunt head. 
Border, or bordure. See p. xxxi. 
Botonny, appKed to a cross, whose extremities 

reseirble the trefoil. See Crosses. 
Bouget. See Water bouget. 
Bowed, embowed or arched. 
Braced, same as interlaced. 
Bretesse, imbattled, that has its battlements on 

each side, one against the other. 
Brimsey, a gad-fly. 
Brassarts, and brassets, armour for the elbows 

and arms. 
Burgonet, a sort of steel cap, formerly worn by 

foot soldiers in battle. 



Cabossed, caboshed, caborsed, or trunked, signifies 
the head of any beast looking right forward, or 
full-faced, with nothing of the neck seen. 

Cabree, or effray, or saliant, terms applied to a 
horse rising on its hind feet. 

Cadency, marks of. See p. xxxiii. 

Caltrap, or galtrap, or chevaltrof, an instrument 
made of iron, which, in ancient time, was used 
in war to gall and wound the horses' feet, it 
having spikes so placed that whichever way it 
lay upon the ground one point would always be 
uppermost. See p. xiv. 

Calvary cross. See Cross^ 

Canting arms, such as have any punning reference 
or aUusion to the name of the bearer. 

Canton. See p. xxxi. 

Cartouche, a variously formed and fancifully 
fashioned oval, on which it was the custom of 
the old Heralds to depict the armorials of the 
Popes and all churchmen, deeming the ordi- 
nary shield as inappropriate to their calling. 

Cap of maintenance, or dignity, by the French 
called a chapeau, a head -gear of crimson velvet 
turned up with ermine. See p. xixiv. 

Caparison, the furniture of a war-horse. 

Carbuncle, or escarbuncle, a precious stone whose 
lustre was vulgarly supposed not to be darkened 
by the night ; in Heraldry rays are a represen- 
tation of this bearing. 

Casque, a helmet. 

Castle, this bearing in heraldry is generally repre- 
sented by two towers with a wall between 
them, the wall being embattled and having a 
gateway or entrance. A castle with three 
towers is similar to the last, but has a third 
tower similar to the other two appearing be- 
hind the gateway. 

Cat-a-mountain, a wild cat always drawn guard- 
ant. 

Catharine-wheel, an instrument of torture with 
iron teeth, called from St. Catharine, the virgin 
having suffered upon it. 

Centaur, or Sagittarius, an imaginary creature, half 
man and half horse. 

CercelUe, or recercellie, appUed to a cross curling 
at the ends. 

Chain-shot, bullets united with a chain. 

Chamber piece, a short piece of ordnance without 
a gun carriage. See Mortar. 

Champagne, a lino of partition. See p. xiix. 

Chapeau. See Cap of maintenance. 

Chaplet, a garknd of flower and leaves. 

Charged (French, charg6), applicable to the field 
or ordinaries bearing any device upon them. 

Charges, the bearings and emblems of Heraldry. 

ChautsS, shod. 

Chequy or cheeky. See p. ixxij. 



Cherub, a celestial being, frequently represented 
in Heraldry, as an infant's head between 
wings. This is a Hebrew word, the plural of 
which is cherubim. 

Chess-rook, a piece used in the game of chess. 
See p. xiv. 



Chevron. 
p. ix. 



See p. X. Fer chevron. 





Chevronel, a diminutive of the chev- 
ron, of which it is half the size. 



Chief. See p. xxx. 

Chimera, an imaginary figure, represented with 

a maiden's face, a lion's mane and legs, a goat's 

body, and a dragon's tail. 
Chough. See Cornish chough. 
Cinquefoil, a grass of five leaves. See p. xiv. 
Civic wreath, or crown, a garland composed of oak 

leaves and acorns. See p. xxxiv. 
Clarion, or clarioord, the rest for a lance. See 

p. xxxiv. 
Clenched, the hand shut. 
Close, denotes the wings of a bird lying to the 

body. 
Closet, a diminutive of the bar. 

Cockatrice, a monster with the wings 
and legs of a fowl, and the tail of a 
snake ; it difiers from the wyvern 
by having the head, comb, wattles, 
and spurs of a dung-hill cock. 

Combatant, fighting, or rampant face to face. 

Compony, and compony counter-compony, describes 
a border, pale, bend, or other ordinary made up, 
the first of one row and the second of two rows 
of squares, consisting of metals and colours 
alternately. 

Confronts, facing, or " respecting " each other. 

Conjoined, joined together. 

Conjoined in lure, is applied to two wings joined 
together with their tips downwards. 

Contourne, applied to an animal in any position, 
with its face to the sinister side of the es- 
cutcheon. 

Corded, an ordinary or charge bound with cords. 

Cornish chough, a bird of the raven species, com- 
monly accounted the king of crows ; it is black, 
with beak and legs of a reddish yellow. 

Coronet, the badge or cognizance of Princes and 
Peers. See pp. xvii. and xxxiv. 

Cotised, or cottised (French, bande di- 
minu.'e qui cotoye une autre bande) is j 
a diminutive of the bend, being one- 
fourth of its breadth, and one-half of 
the width of the bendlet. They are ' 
generally borne in couples with a 
bend or charge between them. When there are 
two, they are then termed coftises, but when 
borne on each side of the fess or bend, are 
usually blazoned a bend or fess cotised. 

Cotton-hank, a skein of cotton yam, in a bow or 
knot. 

Couchant, applies to an animal lying down. See 
Lion couchant. 

Counter, clianged. 

Counter changed. See p. xxix. 

Couped, term used when the head or limb of an 
animal, or when any other charge is cut off by 
an even line. 

Couple-close, a diminutive of the chevron, and 
often borne with it as the cotise is borne with 




USED IN HERALDRY. 



xxxvu 



the bend ; it contains one fourth of the chevron, 
and is always borne in pairs, and should be 
blazoned " a chev. betw. two couple-closes." 

Courant, running. 

Covert, a term appHed to a chief which has a 
piece of hanging falling over its upper part, so 
as not to hide, but only to be a covering to it. 

Coward, an animal is termed coward when drawn 
with its tail /between its legs. 

Cramp, a piece of iron, turned up at each end, 
usually borne in pairs. 

Crampet, or batter olle, the steel mounting at the 
bottom of the scabbard. 

Crescent. The crescent differs from the in- 
cescent and the decrescent; in having its horns 
turned towards the chief of the shield. 

Crenelle. See Emlattled. 

Crined, is used when the beard or hair difEers in 
tincture from the body. 

Cronel, the iron head of a tilting-spear. 

Crosier, the staff of a prelate. 

Cross. See p. xxxi. The principal forms of 
crosses are, — 




cross mohne. 
cross crosslet. 
cross patonce. 
cross pattee, or 
formee. 




cross engrailed, 
cross couped, or 

humettee. 
cross potent, 
cross pomel. 




cross fimbriated, 
cross wavy, 
cross formee. 
cross flory. 




cross patriarchal. 




cross rayonnant. 




cross crosslet 

fitchee. 
cross botonnee. 
cross potent, 
cross pattee 

fitchee. 




cross raguly. 

cross quarterpierced. 

cross formee fitchee 

at the foot, 
cross pattee flory. 




cross aiguisee. 
cross recerceUee. 
cross aveUane. 
cross humettee. 




cross calvary. 




cross passion. 



Crusily, when the field or charge is strewed over 
with crosses. 



Cubit-arm, an arm with the hand attached, oouped 

at the elbow. 
Cuisses, the armour covering the thighs and knees. 
Cygnet, a young swan. 

Dancette (in French, dancke and dentelle) is ap- 
plied to lines, of which the teeth or indents are 
larger and wider than those of the line indented. 
See Partition lines, p. xxix. 

Debruised, signifies an ordinary or sub-ordinary 
placed over an animal or other charge. (See 
Surmounted) 

Decked. When the feathers of a bird are trimmed 
at the edges with a small Line of different tinc- 
ture from the rest of the body, they are said 
to be decked of such colour or metal. 

Decrescent, a half moon, having the horns towards 
the sinister side of the shield. 

Defamed, an animal without a tail. 

Degreed, or degraded, having degrees, or steps, 
at the end. 

Dejected, a term in old blazon for anything thrown 
down, as " A garb dejected." 

Delve, one of the nine marks of " abatement," a 
mark of disgrace for him who revokes a chal- 
lenge, or goes from his word ; it resembles a 
square turf or clod of earth. See p. xxxiv. 

Demembre, or dismembered, is said of an animal 
or other charge cut into pieces, which are set at 
small distances from each other, but still pre- 
serve the form of the figure. 

Demi, the half ; in Heraldry the head or top part 
is always understood when no other is men- 
tioned. 

Derrache, the same as demembre. 

Despectani, a term applied to animals looking 

downwards. 
Developed, unfurled, as colours flying. 
Dimidiated, divided into two equal parts. 
Disclosed, expanded, or expansed, terms given to 
ail tame fowl instead of displayed. 



Displayed, applied to any bird of prey 
with its wings expanded. 



Distilling, letting blood. 
Distinctions of houses. See Cadency. 
Dormant, sleeping. 

Dove-tail, in form of the well-known wedges called 
dove-tail. See Partition lines, p. xxxix. 



Dragon, an imaginary heraldic monster. 



Drapeau, a flag. 

Drawing-iron, an instrument used by wire- 
drawers. 

Ducal coronet, or Crest coronet, is composed of 
four leaves, all of equal height above the rim. 
See p. xxxiv. 

Duciper, a cap of maintenance. See p. xxxiv. 

Eastern crown, the crown formerly worn by the 
Jewish kings. See p. xxxiv. 

Eightfoil, an eight-leaved grass {huitfoiT). 

Elevated, applied to the wings of birds when open 
and upright. 

Embattled, or imbattled (French, cre- 
nellee) , the battlementa of towers, i 
churches, and houses ; one of the hnes , 
of partition {which see, p. xxix.). 
When an ordinary is so msirked on I 
each side it is said t^ be " embattled 
and counter-embattled." 






XXXVlll 



DICTIONARY OF TERMS 



Embowed (French, cowrie), applicable to anything 
bent or bowed. 

Embrved, bloody. 

Enaluron, eight birds placed in the border. 

Endorse, a diminutiye of the pale, of which it is 
the fourth part. 

Endorsed, same as Addorsed. 

Enfield, an imaginary heraldic animal, composed 
of the head of a fox, the chest of an elephant, 
the mane of a horse, the forelegs of an eagle, 
the body and hind legs of a greyhound, and the 
tail of a lion. It is the crest of O'Kelly. 

Enfiled, a term appUed to the head of an animal, 
or any other charge, pierced by the blade of a 
weapon. 

Englishman's head, applied in Welsh blazon as 
commemorative of some achievement performed 
in the struggle against the EngUsh for Cambrian 
independence. Thus the Lloyds of Plymog 
derived, in common with the house of Tudor, 
from Ednyfed Vychan, Lord of Brynfenigle, 
who defeated the English army under Ran- 
dolph, Earl of Chester, and killed three of their 
commanders, bear to this day, Gu. a chev. erm. 
betw. three Englishmen's heads in profile ppr. 

Engoule, a term given to all bends, crosses, sal- 
tii-es, and other pieces, when their extremities 
enter the mouths of animals 

Engrailed, a line of partition. See p. xxix. 

Enhanced, denotes an ordinary placed higher than 
its usual place. See the coat of Byron. 

Enmanche, an heraldic sleeve. See Manch. 

Ensigned, a charge having any other relative one 
placed above it is said to be " ensigned " with 
such charge. 

Enurney, a border charged with eight animals, 

Environne, surrounded. 

Enwrapped, folded round. 

Epaulier, the armour on the shoulder. 

Equipped, appUed to a horse when furnished with 
all his trappings. 

Eradicated, torn, or rooted up by the roots ; ap- 
lied only to trees or plants. 

Erased, forcibly torn from the body ; a head, 
Jimb, or other object erased, has its severed 
parts jagged. 

Erect, upright. 

Ermine "| 

Erminois > Furs. See p. xxviii. 

Ermines j 

Escallop-shell, the pilgrims' badge in their ex- 
pedition to holy shrines. 

Escarbuncle, a precious stone, fancifully exag- 
gerated in heraldic representation. JSee the 
coat of Mandeville. 

Escutcheon, points of. See p. xxviii. 

Escutcheon of pretence, is the shield on which a 
man carries the arms of his wife, if she be an 
heiress or co-heiress. It is borne in the centre 
of his own shield, and is usually of the same 
shape. 

Esquirre is a bearing similar to the gyron, but 
differs from it in that the gyron cannot extend 
beyond the fess point of the shield, while the 
esquirre may extend all across. The well-known 
coat of Mortimer is an example of the Esquirre. 

Ealoile, a star ; in heraldry it has six waving 
points, which distinguishes it from the mullet, 
which has five straight ones. 

Evett or lizard, a small animal in form like a 
crocodile, used in the arms of the ancient Irish 
families ; it is generally depicted vert. 

Expanded, or expansed, the same as displayed. 

Falchion, a kind of broadsword. 
Fan, the instrument by which chaff is blown 
away. 



Feathered, is applied to arrows when the pliune is 
of a different tincture to the shafts ; it is also 
c&MeA flighted. 

Fer-de-moline, the original name for the iron fixed 
in the centre of a millstone, serving to bear it 
up and gioide its motion ; by some it is com- 
monly called a millrind, and by others an inJc' 
moline and inke-de-moline. 

Fer-de-Jburchetfe, a term given to all crosses and 
saltires whose extremities end with a forked 
iron. 

Femau, ovfermaile, the buckle of a belt. 

Fess, one of the honourable ordinaries. See p. 
xxxi. Per fess. See p. xxx. 

Fetterlock. See p. xxxiv. 

Feuil-de-scie, a pale, or fess, indented on one side 
with small teeth like the edge of a saw. 

Field, is the whole surface of the escutcheon, or 
shield, upon which the charges, or bearings, are 
depicted. 

Figured, a term sometimes used in blazoning 
charges depicted with human faces, as the sun, 
crescents, bezants, &c. 

File. See Label. 

Fillet, a diminutive of the chief. 

Fimbriated, bordered or hemmed with a different 
tincture. 

Firme, applied to a cross pattee when it extends 
to each side of the escutcheon. 

Fireball, a grenade, or bomb, with flames issuing 
from the top. 

Fire beacon. See Beacon. 

Fitche, pointed at the end. 

Flanches, or flaunches (see ante), divisions of the 
shield, always on both sides, formed by the 
segment of a circle drawn from the chief to the 
base. See p. xxxii. 

Fleur-de-lis, the flower of the lily. The heraldic 
lily differs from that of the garden in having 
three leaves instead of five. See p. xiv. 

Fleury, flurty, fioretty, or flory, flowered vidth 
fleurs-de-lis. 

Flexed, bent, or bowed. 

Flotant, floating. 

Flotoer of the flag, another name for the fleur-de- 
lis. 

Flouretti, same as Fleury. 

Foliated, leaved. 

Formee. See Pattee. 

Fountain, a roundle ban-y wavy of six ar. and az. 
See p. xxxiv. 

Fracted, broken. 

Fraise,frasier, or f raze, the Scotch technical for 
" cinquefoil." The coat of Frazer is a "cant- 
ing " one so blazoned. 

Fresne, rearing or standing on the hind legs. 

Fret. See p. xxxii. 

Fretty, interlaced fillets crossing the field or 
charge lozenge ways. 

Fructed, bearing fruit. 

Fumant, emitting smoke. 

Furchy, forked at the end. 

Furnished, applied to a horse when bridled, sad- 
dled, and completely caparisoned ; it is appUca- 
ble to other things, as the attires of a stag, &c., 
furnished with six antlers. 

Furs. See p. xxviii. 

Fusil. See p. xxxii. 

Fusilly. See p. xxxii. 

Oad-bee, a dun fly, or brinsey. 

Oads, plates of steel or iron. 

Oaltrap. See Caltrap. 

Qallies, ancient ships with oars ; also called lym- 

phad. See Lymphad. 
Oamb (from the French " jambe ") the whole 

foreleg of a lion or other beast ; if couped or 



USED IN HERALDRY. 




emsed near the middle joint, it is then only a 
paw. 

Garb, a sheaf of any kind of grain ; but when 
other than wheat, the kind must be expressed. 

Oardant, or guardant, front or fuUfaced. See 
Oaze, as applied to beasts of chase. 

Garde-visure, the vizor of a helm et. 

Garland, a wreath of leaves or flowers. 

Garnished, ornamented. 

Garter, a circular buckled ribband, generally 
bearing the motto of some order of knight- 
hood. 

Gauntlet, an iron glove, or armour for the hand. 



Oaze, applied to a beast of chase when 
looking full front. See Oardant, as 
appUed to other animals in this 
position. 



Gem ring, a ring set with a diamond or other 

precious stone or gem. 
Gemel. See Bars gemel. 
Gillyflower, or July flower, a, species of cajmation 

of a blood-red colour. 
Giron. See Oyron. 

Girt, or girded, bound round with a band. 
Givers, or gringalee, crosses, saltires, or other 
figures, having serpents' heads at their ex- 
tremities. 
Gliding, applied to snakes, serpents, adders, &.c., 

when moving forward fessways. 
Glory, a series of rays surrounding or issuing 

from a charge or ordinary. 
Gobony, same as Compony. 
Golden fleece. See Toison d'or. 
Golpes, roundles of a purple colour. 
Gonfannon, a standard, banner, or ensign. 
Gordian knot, represents a double orle of annu- 
lets linked to each other, and to one in the 
centre gyi-onwise. 
Gore, or gusset, an abatement of honour, consist- 
ing of two curved lines, one from the sinister 
chief point, the other from the base middle 
point, both meeting in an acute angle at the 
f ess point. 
Gorge, a term used by the old Heralds for a 

water-bouget. 
Gorged, encircled round the throat. 
Gorges, a whirlpool. See p. xxxiv. 
Gorget, armour for the breast. 
Ghutte, a drop. See p. xxxiii., also Onttee. 
Gradient, applied to a tortoise when supposed to 

be walking. 
Chappling-iron, an instrument used in naval 

warfare. 
Greave, armour that protects the legs. 
Grices, young wild boara. 

Grieces, steps, or degrees, on which crosses are 
sometimes placed. 

Qriffin, or gryphon, an 
imaginary animal, the up- 
per haK that of an eagle, 
and the lower half that of 
a Hon. 

Griffin-male, the same as griffin without wings, 

but having large ears. 
Orittie, a term for the field, composed equally of 

metal and colour. 
Chiardant. See Oardant. 
Guidon, or pennon, a flag. 
Guiure, or gringole, from guivris, a viper, or 

serpent, applied to crosses, saltires, and other 

figures, when their extremities terminate with 

heads of serpents, &c. 
Gules, the colour red. 





Gun shot, or gun stone, a very ancient heraldic 
term for the roundle called ogress or pellet, 
which is invariably sable or black. 

Gurges. See Gorges. 

Outtee, or gutty, from the Latin gutta, a drop, 
implies sprinkled and liquid drops, termed 
gouttes, and varying in colour, as follow — 

Guttee d'huile, or guttee d' olive, represents drops 
of oil of vert or green colour. 

Guttee de larmes, sprinkled with tears, painted to 
represent water, or tears. 

Outtee de'eau, sprinkled with water, and so repre- 
sented. 

Guttee d'or, drops of gold. 

Guttee de poix, sprinkled with pitch, painted sable 
or black. 

Guttee de sang, sprinkled with blood, painted 
red. 

Outtee reversed, when the drops are placed con- 
trary to their natural position. 

Guzes, roundles of blood colour. 

Gyron. See p. xxxii. 

Gyronny, the division of the shield by cross and 
saltire, in parts from six to twelve. 

Sabergeon, a short coat of mail, consisting of a 

jacket without sleeves. 
Habited, clothed, sometimes blazoned, vested. 
Halbert, a pole-axe. 
Half-spear, a spear with a short handle. 



Harpy, a fabulous monster, represented 
as a bird with a virgin's face, neck, and 
breasts, and a vulture's body and legs. 



Harpoon, a salmon or eel-spear. See arms of 
Glynn. 

Harrow, the instrument used in husbandry. 

Hart, a stag after its sixth year. 

Harvest-fly, a butterfly. 

Hatchment, or achievement, the bearings of a 
deceased person, usually placed on the front of 
the house. 

Hauberk, a twisted coat of mail. 

Haurient, or hauriant, applied to a fish when 
erect or upright, as if putting the head above 
water to suck in thje air. 

Hausse, or enhanced, applied to a chevron or 
fesse when placed higher than their usual 
position. 

Hawk, or falcon, the ordinary bird of prey. 

Hawk's bells and jesses, the jesses are leather 
thongs with which the bells are fastened to the 
hawk's legs. 

Hawk's lure, a decoy used by falconers, com- 
posed of two wings conjoined, with their tips 
downwards, joined with a line and ring. See 
p. xxxiv. 

Heads, either of men, beasts, birds, &c., are com- 
mon bearings in coat armour, and must have 
their position expressed in the blazon ; in pro- 
file, or sidefaced ; affronte and guardant, when 
f ullfaced ; and reguardant, when looking back- 
wards. The term head, without any addition, 
implies sidefaced, or in profile. 
Healme, or casque, a helmet. 
Helmet. See p. xxxiii. 

Hemp break, or hackle, an instrument formerly 
used to break or bruise hemp. See arms of 
Hampson. 
Herd, used to express a company or number of 

deer together. 
Hill, or hillock, sometimes used in heraldry when 
only one hill is used, but if more than one be 
borne they are called hillocks or molehills. 
Hilted, refers to the handle of a sword. 



DICTIONARY OF TERMS 



Sind, female steg, generally blazoned trippant. 

Honour point. See p. xiviii. 

Sood, the coif or hood of a monk. 

Hooded, is said of the human face when the head 
dress is of a different tincture ; and of the 
hawk, or other bird of prey, when borne with 
a hood over the head, a covering used in 
falconry. 

Hoofed, the particular tincture of the hoofs of 
animals, when borne of tincture different from 
the animal itself, must be expressed in the 
blazon ; cloven footed animals are said to be 
unguled. 

Horned, animals borne with horns arp said to be 
horned of such a metal or colour when the 
horns differ in tincture from the animal itself, 
or from the natural colour of such horns, but | 
see as to this, Attired. 

Huit-foil. See Eightfoil. 

Humet, or humette, applied to a fesse, chevron, 
cross, or other ordinary, when cut off or couped, 
BO that the extremities do not reach the sides 
of the shield. 

Hunting-horn, cornet, or buglehorn, a common 
bearing in coat armour, representing an ordi- 
nary semicircular horn ; and when the baudreck 
or belt is of another colour, it should be ex- 
pressed as stringed of such a tinct\ire. 

Hurst, a group of trees. 

Hurts, roundles of azure or blue. 

Hurty, charged with hurts, or semee of hurts, 
strewed with hvirts without any regard to 
number. 

Husk, the upper part of the stalk from which the 
gillyflower or pink blows ; it is not expressed 
unless borne contrary to its natural colour. 

Hydra, a many -headed dragon. 

Ibex, an imaginary animal, somewhat resembling 

the heraldic antelope, but with two straight 

horns projecting from the forehead, serrated, 

or edged like a saw. 
Imbattled, or embattled (French bretesse, cre- 
nelle), applied to any ordinary when the line 

forming it is embattled. See Lines, p. xxix. 
Imbowed. See JEmbowed. 
Imbrued, or embrued, stained with blood, or 

having drops of blood on it. 
Imbued, stained with blood. 
Impaled and impaling. See Marshalling of Arms, 

p. ix. 
Imperially crowned, denotes that the charge, crest, 

or supporter to which it is applied, is crowned 

with a regal crown. 
Incensed, when fire issues from the mouth of an 

animal it is blazoned incensed. 
Incensed, or incensan, applicable to the boars, 

panthers, &c., when borne in a furious angry 

position, with fire issuing from their mouths 

and ears. 
Increment, or increscent, used when the moon or 

crescent is borne with the horns towards the 

dexter side of the shield. 
Indented, a line of partition. See p. xxix. 
Indian or Assyrian goat, resembles an English 

goat, except that the horns are more bent, and 

tho cars are like those of a talbot. 
Indorsed, or endorsed, pla'ied back to back. See 

Addorsed. 
Inescutcheon, a small shield homo as a charge on 

another, or in its centre, indicating, as a rule, 

marriage with an heir or co-heir. 
Inflamed, burning in flames. 
Infula, a Allot or crown ; the tiara. 
Ink moline. See Fer-de-moline. 
In lure, two wings conjoined and inverted, with 

the tips downward, are said to bo in lure. 




In pride, applied to a peacock, or turkey cock, 
when its tail is displayed. 

Inter, between. 

Interlaced, linked together. 

Invected, a line of partition. See p. xxix. 

luverted, and conjoined, turned the wrong way. 

Invexed, arched. 

Ire, angry, exasperated. 

Iron ring, a tool used by wire-drawers. 

Issuant, rising or coming out of ; when an animal 
is blazoned as issuing or issuant, only the 
upper half of such animal is depicted. 

Jagged, is said of the division of a field or outlines 
of an ordinary which appear rough by being 
forcibly torn asunder. 

Jambe, same as gamb. 

Javelin, a short spear with a barbed point. 

Jellop, or jowlop, the comb of a cock, cocka- 
trice, &c. 

Jessant, shooting forth as vegetables spring forth ; 
half the charge only is depicted when blazoned 
jessant. 



Jessant-de-li^, said of a fleur-de-lis 
passing through a leopard's face, 
through the mouth. 



Jesses, the leather thongs that fasten the bells to 

the legs of a hawk or falcon. 
Joinant, same as Conjoined. 
Jupon, a surcoat. 

Kine, the plural of cow or calf. 

Knots, differently formed, are borne as badges by 
the families of Bouchier, Bowen-Dacre, Har- 
rington, Heneage, Lacy, Stafford, Wake, &c. 

Knowed. See Wowed. 



Label, or lanibel, a piece of silk stuff, or linen, 
with three pendants ; it is generally used as a 
mark of cadency, but is a common charge or 
difference in ancient arms. See p. xxxiii. 

Ladder, scaling, used in ancient and mediaeval 
warfare. 

Lambrequin, the mantling. See p. xviii. 

Langued, used when the tongues of animals are 
to be described as of different tincture from 
their bodies. 

Larmes, Oouttes de. Pee Oouttes. 

Lattice, tirlace, treilee, a kind of fret, where the 
pieces do not interlace each other, but are nailed 
together at the crossings. 

Launce, a tilting-spear. 

Laurel, the emblem of victory and triumph. 

Later, a cutter or ploughshare. 

Lead line, an instrument used by mariners to 
sound the depth of the sea. 

Leash, a small thong of leather, with a button at 
the end, by which falconers (having run it 
through the varvels) hold the hawk fast upon 
the hand, after folding it several times round 
the finger. Leash is also applied to the line 
which passes from the collar of a greyhound or 
other dog ; it signifies moreover a band to bind 
anything. 

Legged, or membered, used when the legs of birds, 
&c., are to be blazoned of a different tincture to 
tho body. 

Lenlally, the same as Indented. 

Leopard, the French heralds call tho lion passant 
giiardant a leopard, and the royal lions of Eng- 
land were and are frequently so blazoned. 

Leopards^ faces, so blazoned when no part of the 
neck appears, and the position ia guardant, or 



USED IN HERALDRY. 



xli 



full-faced ; but when erased, or couped at the 
neck, in profile, the word " head " is used in 
blazoning. 

Level, an instrument used by masons. 

Lever, a name sometimes given to the cormorant. 

Leveret, a young hare. 

Lined, the inside lining of a mantle, garment, cap, 
&c., borne of a different tincture. It is also 
appUed to chains as well as lines affixed to the 
collars of animals. 

Lines of partition. See p. xxix. 

Lionel, or lioncel, a young lion. 

Lion, demi. See Lions. 

Lion dragon, the upper half a lion and the other 
a dragon. 

Lion of England, a term sometimes used for a 
Hon rampant guardant. 

Lion poisson, or sea-lion, an imaginary animal, re- 
sembling a lion in the upper half and a fish in 
the lower, with webbed feet. 

Lions, 






rampant. 



rampant 
guardant. 



rampant 
reguardant. 






passant. 



passant 
guardant. 



issuant. 






combatant. 



couchant. 



coward. 






dormant. 



conjoined. 




demi lion. 

Liston, the scroll or ribbbn upon which the motto 
is inscribed. 

Lizard, or lezard, a beast somewhat Uke a cat-a- 
mountain, with a short tail and long dark brown 
hair spotted, to be found in Denmark and 
Sweden ; it is borne as the crest and dexter 
supporter by the Skinners' Company of London. 

Lizard. See Evett. 



Lodged, applied to the stag, hart, &c., 
or beasts of chase, when at rest, or 
lying on the ground. 






Lopped, or snagged, cut so as to show the thick- 
ness. 

Lozenge. See p. xxxii. 

Lozenge, or lozengy. See p. xxxii. 

Lucy, an heraldic name for the fish called a pike. 

Luna, the moon. 

Lure, or leure. See Hawk's lure. Wings con- 
joined with their tips turned down are said to 
be in lure. 

Lymphad, or galley, an ancient ship 
with one mast, and propelled by 
oars. See the quartering for the 
Lordship of Lome in the coat of 
Campbell. 

Maiden's head, used in heraldry for the head and 
neck of a woman couped below the breast, the 
head wreathed with roses, and crowned with an 
antique crown. 

Mail, a dress, or piece of defensive armour for 
the body and arms, wrought in small close rings 
called mails, linked together as if woven in 
a loom, and represented like the scales of a 
fish. 

Mailed, clothed in mail. 

Main, a hand. 

Maintenance, cap of See p. xxxiv. 

Mallard, a wild drake. 

Mallet, a tool used by masons. 

Manacles, handcuffs. 



Manch, or maunch, an old-fashioned \ 
sleeve, with long hanging ends. See 
the coat of Hastings, &c. 



Manchet, a cake of bread, not unlike a muffin. 

Mandrake, a vegetable root. 

Maned, said of a unicorn, horse, or other animal, 
when the mane is of a different tincture to the 
body. 

Mantelle, or chappe, used when the two upper 
angles of the field are cut off by two lines 
issuing frem the middle chief point to either 
side of the shield, forming two triangles of a 
different tincture to the field, as if a mantle 
were thrown over it and the ends drawn back. 

Man-tiger, an imaginary monster, with a hon's 
body, the head and face of an old man, and 
horns on the head like an ox. 

Mantle, or lambrequin, the name given to the 
f oldage or great cloak whereon achievements are 
painted. See p. xviii. 

Mantlings, ornamented foliage-work for the adorn- 
ing of helmets in painting armorial bearings. 

Marined, a term used for an animal with the 
lower parts of the body like a fish. 

Marine wolf, a seal. 

Martlet, or merlion, a fabulous bird, of constant 
adoption in armorials, shaped like a martin or 
swallow, and always drawn without legs, with 
short tiif ts of feathers instead, divided into two 
parts, somewhat like an erasure, and forming, 
as it were, thighs. This is the distinctive mark 
of the fourth son. 

Mascle. See p. xxxii. 

Masculy, covered with mascles. 

Ma'iony, mas^onne, or masoned, is when the field, 
charge, or crest, is divided by lines in the nature 
of a wall or building of stone. 

Maunche. See Manche. 

Meinbered, signifies the beak and legs of a bird, 
when of a different tincture to the body. 

Merlion. See Martlet. 

Mermaid, a fabulous creature, half woman and 
half fish, generally represented with a comb ia 
one hand and a mirror in the other. 



xlii 



DICTIONARY OF TERMS 



Merman, an imaginary seaman. See Neptune. 

Mesle, mingled. 

Metals. See Tinctures, p. xxriii. 

Millpick, an instmment used by millers and mill- 
wrights in dressing millstones. 

Millrind, the iron affixed to the centre of the 
millstone, otherwise called a fer-de-moline. 

Mitre, the cap of dignity borne over the arms of 
a bishop or archbishop. 

Modilion, cotoose, or scroll, the foliage ornament 
of a pillar. 

ifoline. See Crosses. 

Mort, a skiill, or death's head, usually placed on 
the hatchment of the last of a family. 

Moor cock, the male of the black game, or large 
black grouse. 

Moor's head, the heraldic term for the head of a 
Negro man, in profile, couped at the neck, 
wreathed about the temples. 

Mooted, or moulted, used in the same sense as 
eradicated. 

Morion, an ancient steel cap or helmet. 

Mome, or mortne (French, bom dead, or still- 
bom), a lion rampant, without tongue, teeth, 
or claws. 

Morse, a sea-lion. 

Mortar, a piece of ordnance or chamber-piece. 

Morticed, square pieces let one into the other. 

Mortier, a cap of state. 

Motto, a word, saying, or sentence adopted at 
pleasure, and borne on a scroll under the coat 
armour, and sometimes over the crest. Mottoes 
occasionally allude to the name of the bearer ; 
thus, " De raonte alto " is the motto of the 
family of De Monte Alto, Moutalt, or Maude ; 
often to the bearings ; and more frequently are 
short, quaint sentiments, according to the whim 
or caprice of the person who first adopted 
them, or in allusion to some particular actions 
or circumstances they are meant to perpetuate. 
See p. XV. 

Moulted, the same as Eradicated. 

Mound, a corruption of the French word monde, 
or Latin, mundu's, the world ; a name given in 
heraldry to a ball or globe, encircled with a 
horizontal band, enriched with diamonds and 
precious stones, from the upper edge of which 
springs a semicircular band, enriched in like 
manner, and having on the top a cross. The 
mound forms part of the regalia of an emperor 
or king. 

Mount. When the bottom or base of the shield 
is represented green, as a field, and curved 
somewhat semicircularly arched, it ia then called 
a Mount vert. 

Mountain-cat. See Cat-a-mountain. 

Mounted, a term applied to a horse bearing a 
rider. 

Mounting, expresses that position m animals of 
chase which rampant does in those of prey. 

Mourned (moni§), blunted. 

Mullet, the rowd of a spur ; English heralds 
make it of five straight points ; French heralds 
of six ; when borne of six, eight, or more points, 
the number should be expressed in the blazon. 
The best authorities consider when it has more 
than five points it should be described as a 
star. 

Mullet-pierced, same as the mullet ; but is per- 
forated in the centre, allowing the tincture upon 
which it is borne to appear through it. 

Muraille, walled, or enibattlod and masoned. 

Mural crown. See Crotons, p. xxxiv. 

Murrei/, the colour sanguine. 

Muschetors, or mushetours, the black tail of the 
ermine, without the three spots or specks over 
it used in depicting ermine. 



Muzzled, said of a bear or other animal whose 
mouth is banded or tied up to prevent its 
biting. 

Naiant, or natant, swimming ; applied to fish 

when borne horizontally. 
Naissant, rising, or coming out of ; applicable to 

all living things when represented as issuing out 

of the middle of a fess or other ordinary. 
Narcissus, a flower consisting of six petals, each 

resembUng the leaf of the cinquefoil. 
Naval crown. See Crowns, p. xxxiv. 
Nebular, drawn waived, so as to represent clouds. 
Nebule, or nebuly, a Hne of partition. See p. xxix. 
Neptune, the ideal god of the sea ; generally de- 
picted vrith trident, &c. 
Nerved, said of leaves and plants, the fibres of 

which are borne of a different tincture from the 

other part. 
Newt, a small water animal of the lizard species ; 

called also an efTet or eft. 
Nislee, or nyllee, slender, narrow, or reduced 

almost to nothing. 
Nombril, the navel point. See p. xxviii. 
Nowed, tied in a knot ; said of a serpent, wivern, 

or other creature, whose bodies and tails are 

twisted like a knot. 
Naunce, the same as nebule. 

Ogresses. See Pellets, 

Ombre, shadowed. 

Ondi, or unde, wavy. 

Opinicus, a fictitious heraldic animal, with a lion's 

body and an eagle's head and neck ; to the 

body are affixed wings, and a short tail, like the 

camel's. 
Oppresssed, the same as Debruised. 
Or, the tincture gold or yellow. 
Ordinary. See p. xxx. 
Organ rest. See Rest. 
Orle. See p. xxxi. 
Orle, bordered. 
Ounce, or lynx, the upper part of the body of 

this animal is of a tawney white, the lower pai*t 

of an ash colour, and he is sprinkled all over 

with irregular black marks. 
Over all (French, Sur le tout), is when a charge 

or ordinary is placed over other bearings. 

Surmounted, debruised, and oppressed, nearly 

signify the same thing. 
Overt^ applied to the wings of birds when open 

for taking flight. 
Owl, this bird is always drawn full-faced. 

Pack-saddle, a saddle for the conveyance of 
packages (see coat of Hervey). 

Pale, one of the ordinaries. See p. xxx. 

Pall, or paile, an archiepiscopal vestment, made 
of white lambs' wool ; formed in heraldry by 
half a pale issuing from the base, and meeting, 
or conjoined with, in the fess point, half a 
saltire, issuing from the dexter and sinister 
chief ; thus presenting the figure of the letter 
Y. See p. ixxii. 

Pallet, a diminution of the pale. 

Palisado. Sec Crowns. 

Palisse, pily-paly ; that is, a division of the field 
in the form of piles, reaching from top to 
bottom. They are meant to represent the pali- 
sades before a fortification. 

Paly, a field or charge is said to be paly when 
divided into any equal number of pieces of 
alternate tinctures by perpendicular partition 
lines; and the number of divisions must be 
named also, as paly of six, of eight, &c. 

Paly-bendy, is when the preceding divisions are 
again cut by diagonal partition lines. 



USED IN HERALDRY. 



xliii 



Palmer's staff" (French, un bourdon) a pilgrim's 

staff. 
Panther, a wild animal, whose fierceness heralds 
were wont to depict bj drawing him with fire 
issuing from his mouth and ears : his position 
in heraldry is generally guardant. 

Papilone, is a field divided into variegated specks, 
like those on a butterfly, but ranged like the 
scales of a fish. 

Park pales, palings depicted close to each other, 
with pointed tops. See the arms of the Borough 
of Derby. 

Partition lines. See p. xxix. 

Party, Per. The former of these two words 
should be omitted, as the latter implies the 
same ; it is used to denote the particular man- 
ner in which a shield, ordinary, or charge, is 
divided by any of the partition lines — as per 
bend, per pale, &c. See p. xxix. 

Pascaunt, or Pasquant, a term used for animals 
when grazing. 

Paschal, or Holy Lamh, is a lamb passant ar. 
carrying the banner of St. George. 

Passant, the heraldic term for beasts in a walking 
position. A hon passant sa. on a bend ar. and 
a field gu. is the armorial bearing of Davies 
of Q-wysaney ; and its Kenwatine brandies, 
Davies of Harrington, and Davies of Eton 
House. 

Passant guardant. A beast walking, but with 
the head aifrontee or full-faced. 

Passion cross, same as the Cross Calvart/. 

Passant reguardant. Walking, but looking back. 

Passant repassant, when animals are borne pas- 
sant contrariwise to the dexter and sinister. 

Pattee- See Crosses. 

Pater noster, or nostre, a cross composed of beads. 

Patonce. See Crosses. 

Patriarchal. See Crosses. 

Pattes, the paws of any beast. 

Pavement, depicted like masonry. 

Pavilion, an oblong tent with a projecting 
entrance. 

Paiv, the foot of a lion, bear, seal, &c., cut off or 
erased at the first joint. 

Pean, a fur. See p. xxviii. 

Pearched, or perched, applied to birds when in a 
sitting posture upon a branch or other sub- 
stance. 

Peel, a tool used by bakers for drawing bread out 
of the oven. 

Pegasus, a fabulous horse with wings. 

Pelican. This bird is always represented with 
her wings endorsed, neck embowed, and peck- 
ing her breast, from which issue drops of blood. 

Pellet, or ogresses, roundles, black or sable. 

Pelletty or pellettee. Semee of pellets. 

Penner and ink horn, as case for holding pens 
and ink. 

Pennon, a flag of an oblong form. 

Pennoncels, or pencils, small streamers or flags. 

Penny-yard penny, smaU coin. 

Per. See Party per, p. xxix. 

Perforated, voided or pierced. 

Petronel, an ancient name for a pistol. 

Pheon, the head of dart or. arrow. 

Photnix, an imaginary bird, always drawn in 
flames. 

Pierced, signifies when any ordinary or charge is 
perforated, so as to show the field under it. 
The form of the perforation should be expressed 
—square, round, lozenge, &c. 

Pike-staves, formidable instruments of destruction 
used in warfare. 

Pile, one of the ordinaries. See p. xxxii. 
Pilgrim's scrip, a wallet or pouch. See the coat 
of Palmer. 



Plate, a roundle arg. or white. 
Playing tables, when used in heraldiy, are de- 
picted as backgammon tables. 
Plenitude, denotes the moon in her full, or full 
moon. 

Pile, the same as close, applied to a bird. 

Plough, an instrument used in husbandry. 

Ploughshare. That part of the plough which 
cuts the ground at the bottom of the furrow 
and raises the sod to the mould board. 

Ploye, bowed and bent. 

Plummet, an instrument used by masons and 
others to prove perpendiculars. 

Poing, the hand closed, in contradistinction to 
" appaume." 

Points of the escutcheon. See p. xxviii. 

Pomegranate, a foreign fruit, in blazon it is neces- 
sary to add, slipped, leaved, or seeded, as it is 
always so represented in coat armour. See the 
coat of Granger. 

Pomeis, roundles, when vert or green. 

Pommel, the rounded knob at the extremity of the 
handle of a sword. 

Popinjays, small green parrots, with red beaks 
and legs. 

Portant, a term used of a cross that is not erect, 
but placed athwart the shield as if it were 
carried on a man's shoulder. 

Portcullis, an engine formerly used in fortifying 
and defending the gateway of a city, town, or 
castle, before which it hung down by chains, 
and formed a barrier ; it resembles very much 
a harrow, the perpendicular bars being spiked. 

Pose. See Stafant. 

Pot. In armoury, a kind of head-piece or hat 
made of steel. 

Potent, a crutch or walking stick. See also Furs. 

Potente, a line of division, which see. 

Pots, so termed in heraldry, are of iron vnth three 
legs. 

Pouldron, armour for the shoulder. 

Pounce, the talons of a bird of prey. 

Powdered. A term in heraldry, when the field, 
crest, or supporter, is promiscuously strewed 
aU over with minor charges, such as mullets, 
crescents, or fleurs-de-Hs. The French term 
" Semee," has, however, been lately adopted 
by English heralds to express this. 

Prester John, a term obviously applied in error by 
the early heralds to describe the sitting figui-e 
of our Saviour in the arms of the See of 
Chichester. 

Pretence, escutcheon of. See Escutcheon. 

Preying, a ravenous beast or bird standing on and 
in a suitable position for devouring its prey. 

Pride, in its, or their, applicable to a peacock, 
turkey cock, and other birds which spread 
their tails in a circular form, and drop their 
wings. 

Proboscis. The trunk of an elephant. 

Proper, apphcable to every animal, tree, vegetable, 
&c., when borne of their natural colour, and 
abbreviated by the letters ppr. 

Purjled, trimmed, or garnished, terms for the studs 
and rims of armour being gold. 

Purjlew, or purfled, signifies a border or embroi- 
dery of fur, shaped exactly like vair ; when of 
one row it is termed purflewed, when of two, 
counter-purflewed, and when of three, vair. 

Purpura. Purple. See Tinctures, p. xxviii. 

Python, a winged serpent. 

Quarter. See Ordinaries, p. xxxi. 
Quarterings. See Marshalling, p. ix. 
Quarterly. See p. xxx. 
Quatrefoil, a four-leaved grass. 
Queue, tail of an animal. 



xliv 



DICTIONARY OF TERMS 



Quintain, a tilting post or block. 

Quiver of arrows, a case filled with arrows. 

Quise, a la, at the thigh (for a la cuisse). 

Radiant, rayonned,ratiomiant,rayonnee, are terms 
used to express any ordinary or charge edged 
with glittering rays, like those of the sun. 
Rainboio, a semicircle of various colours arising 

from clouds. 
Ragged staff, the bear and ragged staff, the badge 

or crest of the House of Leicester. 
Raguly, ragided, jagged or notched in an irregu- 
lar maner. See Lines of division. 
Rame, a French term for branched or attired. 
Rampant, animals standing erect on the hind 
legs. A lion ramp. sa. on a white field, was 
the armorial bearing of the Princes of Powys, 
and is still borne by their descendants, the 
Hughes' of Gwerclas, Barons of Eymmer-yn- 
Edeirnion. 
Rampant sejant, is said of the lion when in a 

sitting position with the forelegs raised. 
Range, arranged in order. 
Raping, applied to ravenous animals devouring 

their prey. 
Razed, the same as erased. 

Rags. When depicted round the sun they should 

be sixteen in number ; when round an estoile 

line they must be drawn straight and waved 

alternately. 

Rearing, a term appUed to a horse when standing 

on the hind legs with the fore legs raised. 
Rebated, when the top or point of a weapon is 

broken off, or part of a cross cut off. 
Reboundant, an ancient term for the tail of a lion 
when turned up and bent in the form of a 
letter S with the point outwards, the ancient 
way of depicting the tail was usually with the 
point turned towards the back, unless blazoned 
reboundant. 
Rebus, in heraldry means such a coat, as by its 
charges alludes to the name of the bearer, as 
Castles, for Castleton — Salmons, for Salmon, &c. 
Recercellee, a term applied to a cross similar to a 
cross moline, but with the ends turned more 
round. 
Reclinanf, bending backwards. 
Refected, or reflexed, curved or turned round as 
the chain or line from the collar of a beast 
thrown over the back. 
Reguardant, looking behind or backwards. 
Reindeer, as drawn in heraldry, is a stag with 

double attires. 
Remora, denotes a serpent. 

Removed, implies the ordinary has fallen, or be- 
come removed from its proper position. 
Rencontre, same as caboshed. 

Renversp, when anything is set with its head 
downwards, or contrary to its natural way, or 
turned upside down. 
Rere mouse, a bat. 
Rcvpectant, or respecting, applied to animals face 

to face. 

Reserved, contrary to the usual way and position. 

Rests, clarions, or clnricords. Tlie rest for u lance ; 

by some autlioritics called musical inslrunients j 

tficy bear rcMemblaiice to a fluted bracket. Sec 

p. xiv. 

Relorled. Serpents, wreathed one in another, or 

a« a fret, are said to he retorted. 
Reversed, turned upside down. See coats of 

Orcndon and Newton. 
Riband, or ribbon, one-eighth part of a bend, of 

wliicli it is a dituinutive. 
Rising, wlicn birds arc in a position as if prepar- 
ing to take fliglit. 
Rompe, or rompu, broken. 



Rose, this well known beautiful flower, always 
represented in coat armour as f uU blown, with 
the petals or flower leaves expanded, seeded in 
the middle and backed by five green barbs or 
leaves. When an heraldic rose is red it must 
be blazoned gu. not ppr. ; a rose is termed 
barbed and seeded ppr. when the barbs are green 
and the seeds yellow. 
Roundles, are round figures of metal, flat — but 
when of colour, spherical : they change their 
names according to their tinctures, as when 
or, they are called bezant. 

arg a plate. 

vert pomeis. 

azure .... hurt. 
ogress, or pellet, when sable. 

torteaux gu. 

golpes purple. 

oranges tenne or tawney. 

guzes sanguine, or mur- 
rey colour. 
Rousant, the same as rising, applied to a bird. 
Rustre, a lozenge pierced round in the centre. 



Sable, black. See Tinctures, p. xxviii. 

Sabre, a sword with a broad curved blade. 

Saere, or saker, a kind of falcon, with the head 
grey, feet and legs bluish, and back dark brown. 

Sagittarius, one of the signs of the Zodiac. An 
imaginary creature, half man and half horse, in 
the act of shooting with a bow and arrow. 




Salamander, an imaginary animal, 
feigned to be bred in fire ; it is 
represented green, sui'rounded 
with flames. 



Salient, the posture of an animal leaping on its 

prey. 
Salmon spear, the same as a harpoon. 
Saltatit, applied to the squirrel, cat, weasel, rat, 

&c., when springing forward. 
Saltire. See Ordinaries, p. xxxi. 
SaUirewise, in the form or position of the saltire. 
Sanglier, a wild boar. 
Sanguine, murrey colour. 
Sanglant, bloody, torn off, or erased. 
Sans, without. 
Saracen. See Savage. 
Sarcelled, cut through in the middle. 
Satyral, a fictitious creature, with the tail of a 
lion, tail and horns of an antelope, and the face 
of an old man. 
Scallop. See Escallop. 
Scalp, the skin of the forehead. 
Scarpe, a diminutive of the bend sinister, sup- 
posed to represent a shoulder-belt, or officer's 
scarf. 
Sceptre, a royal staff used at coronations, &c. 
Scintillant, sparkling. 

Scorpion, in shape somewhat resembhng a cray- 
fish, and usually placed erect. 
Scrip. Sec Pilgrim's scrip. 
Scroll, whereon the motto is placed. 
Sea dog, sliapcd like a talbot, but with a tail like 
a beaver, a scailupod fin continued down the 
back from head to tail ; the whole body, legs, 
and tail, scaled, and the feet webbed. 
Sea horse, the fore part is like a horse with 
webbed feet, and the hinder ending in a fish's 
tail. 
Seal. See Marine wolf. 

Sea lion, the upper part of a lion's body termi- 
nating in a fish's tail. 
Sea mew, a sort of sea-gull. 



USED IN HERALDRY. 



xlv 



8ea pie, a water fowl of a dark brown colour, 

head red, and the neck and wings -white. 
Seax, a scimetar, with a semicircular notch hoi- 
lowed out of the back of the blade. 
Seeded, applied to the seed of roses, lilies, &c., 

when borne of a tincture different to the flower 

itself. 
Segreant, appHed to a griffin when erect, with 

wings endorsed. 
Sejant, signifies sitting, as applied to the lion, &c. 
Sejant addorsed, when two animals are sitting 

back to back. 
Seme, or semee, strewed over. See Powdered. 
Seraph's head, a child's head between three pairs 

of wings, two in chief, two in f ess, and two in 

base. 
Serpent or snake is borne, coiled, and twisted in 

various forms, as torqued, i.e., erect ; gliding, 

i.e., creeping ; nowed, i.e., twisted into a knot, 

&c., &c. 
Serrated, indented, or cut like a saw. 
Sexfoil, a grass or flower with six leaves, in form 

like the cinquefoil. 
Shackle, a Hnk of a fetter. 
Shack-bolt, a fetter put on the wrists or ancles of 

prisoners. 
Shafted, is used to denote that a spear-head has a 

handle to it. 
Shake-fork, is in form like the pall, but does not 

touch Che edges of the shield, and has a point 

at each end, in the same manner as the pile. 

See the coat of Cunningham. 
Shambrouffhs, a kind of ship. 
Shamrock, trefoil or three-leaved grass, the emblem 

of Ireland. 
Shapewined, in a curved line. 
Sheaf. See Oarh. 
Sheldrake, a kind of duck. 
Shield. See p. xxviii. 
Shinbones, bones of the human leg generally borne 

in saltire. 
Shivered, broken or splintered. 
Shoveller, a species of water-fowl. 
Shuttle, an instrument used by weavers. 
Side, a portion of the shield cut off by a per- 
pendicular line. See coat of Grote. 
Sinister, the left. 

Sinister chief, the left side of the chief. 
Sinople, a French term for " vert," green. 
Siren, a mermaid. 
Skein, a short sword or dagger. A weapon used 

by the Irish. 
Slashed, sleeves of garments but open lengthways, 

and the gashes filled with a puffing of another 

colour. 
Slay, slea, or reed, an instrument used by 

weavers. 
Sledge, a sort of carriage without wheels, used in 

husbandry. 
Slipped, the stalk depicted so as torn from the 

original stem. 
Soaring, flying aloft. 
Soldering iron, a tool used by plumbers. 
Spade iron, or shoeing of a spade. 
Spancelled, or fettered, applied to a horse that 

has the fore and hind legs fettered by fetter- 
locks fastened to the ends of a stick. 
Spear, an ancient weapon of warfare. 
Sear-head imbrued, i.e., with the point bloody. 
Spervers, tents. 
Sphinx, a chimerical animal, said to have the 

body of a lion, the wings of an eagle, and the 

head and breasts of a woman. 
Spindle. See Fusil. 
Spit, a spade. 
Splendour, a term for the sun when represented 

with a human face, and environed with rays. 



Sruttle, a winnowing fan or basket. 

Standard. All standards are split at the end. 
They are regulated in length according to the 
degree of the bearer, and, dating from the 
national ensign, are charged with his badges, 
crests, and motto, arranged on his livery colours. 

Staple, an iron fastening to a door. 

Star. See £stoile. 

Starved, stripped of leaves, &c. 

Statant, standing. 

Staves, walking-sticks used by palmers or pil- 
grims. 

Staves of a carbuncle, the eight rays which issue 
from its centre. 

Sfnel caps, or morions, pieces of armour for the 
head, of various shapes. 

Stern, the hinder part of a ship, and which forms 
part of a naval crown. 

Still, or alembic, an utensil of the distillery. 

Stilt, an instrument made to walk with, anciently 
used for scaling castles, walls, &c. 

Stirrup, of an ordinary saddle. 

Stock, the stump or trunk of a tree. 

Stole, part of the vestment of a priest. 

Stringed, applied to a buglehorn, which is gener- 
ally borfie with strings affixed thereto, tied in 
a bow ; also applied to the harp, &c. 

Studded, adorned with studs. 

Stump, part of the stock or trunk of a tree. 

Subverted, reversed, turned upside down. 

Sufflue, rest or clarion. 

Sun, in heraldry is represented with a human 
face, environed in rays, and is termed a sun in 
splendour, or full glory. 

Super charge, one figure charged or borne upon 
another. 

Supporters. See p. xviii. 

Surcoat, a loose, light, thin, taffety coat, formerly 
worn by military men over their armour. 

Surgeant, rising. 

Surmounted, where one charge is placed over 
another. 

Surtout, or sur-le-tout, an escutcheon placed upon 
the centre of a shield of arms is said to be 
surtout. 

Swepe, the balista, an engine anciently used for 
throwing stones into fortresses. It was formed 
like the machine brewers used to raise water out 
of wells, and therefore was nnmed after their 
contrivance. 

Swivel, two iron Hnks, which turn on a bolt. 

Sykes, a fountain. See coat of Sykes, &c. 

Syren, a mermaid. 



Tabard, the name given to the surcoats embroi- 
dered with the Sovereign's arms, and worn by 
the heralds and pursuivants of arms upon great 
festivals and other public occasions. 

Tabernacle, a tent or pavihon. 

Talbot, a hunting dog, with thick 
snout and hanging ears, borne for 
crest by the Talbots of Bashall, 
the senior line of the house of 
Shrewsbury. 

Talons, the claws of a bird. 

Tjrgant, torganf, or torqued, bending and re- 
bending like the letter S. 

Target, a round buckler. 

Tasces, or f asses, that part of the armour wlxich 
covers the thighs. 

Tassel, an ornament pendant at the comers of 
cushions. 

Tau, a cross nearly like a cross potent. 

Teazel, the head or seed vessel of a species of 
thistle. 




xlvi 



DICTIONARY OF TERMS 



Tenne, or tavmey, orange colour. 

Tite, the head. 

Terras, the representation of a piece of ground at 
the bottom of the base, and generally vert. 

Thatch rake, an instrument used in thatching. 

Thistle, the emblematic plant of Scotland. 

Threstle, three-legged stool. 

Thunderbolt, in heraldry a twisted bar in pale, 
inflamed at each end, sm-mounting two jagged 
darts in saltire betw. two wings expanded, with 
streams of fire issuing from the centre. 

Tiara, or triple crown, a cap or helmet of golden 
cloth, from which hang two pendants, embroi- 
dered and fringed at the end, semee of crosses 
of gold. The cap is inclosed by three mar- 
quises' coronets, on the top is a mound of gold 
with a cross of the same. 

Tierce, a French word, implying that the shield 
is divided into three equal parts of different 
colours. 

Tilting- spear, a weapon used in tilts and tourna- 
ments. 

Timbre, signifies the helmet, when placed oyer 
the arms in a complete achicTement. 

Tincture. See p. xxviii. 

Tirret, a modem name for manacles or handcxiffs. 

Toad, this animal in coat armour is always repre- 
sented as if sitting in water, holding up its 
head : by some called the lordUngs of frogs — 
their heads appearing above water like helmets. 

Toison d'or, a term borrowed from the French, to 
express a golden fleece, or the holy lamb. 

Tomahawk, an Indian war axe. 

Torn, an ancient name for a spinning-wheel. 

Torqued, wreathed. 

Torse, the wreath on which the crest is placed. 

Torteaux, a roundle of red colour. 

Tortille, a French term for nowed, twisted, or 
wreathed. 

Toume, same as reguardant. 

Tower, tripled towered, when the word 
Toioer only is used in blazon, it 
ehould be represented without the 
three small towers or turrets iesuing | 
from the battlements. 

Towered, or turretted, having towers or turrets. 

Transfixed, pierced through. 

TVansfluent, a term for water flowing through the 

arches of a bridge. 
Transmuted, counterchanged. 
Transpierced, pierced through. 
Transposed, reversed or turned contrary to the 

usual position. 
Traversed, turned to the sinister side of the shield. 
Trefiee is said of a cross, the arms of which end 

in three semicircles, each representing the tro- 

Toil or three-leaved grass, a bend treflee lias 

trefoils issuing from the side. 
Trefoil, three-leaved grass. 
Treille, or trellise, latticed. It difiers from fretty, 

for the pieces do not interlace under and over, 

but cross athwart each other, and are nailed at 

the joints. 
Treasure, the diminutive of the orle, being half 

its size. 



Trentwre fiory 



Tresmre fif>ry counter flory, pamc as florj-, but 
that each alternate fleur-de-lis points to the 
centre of the field. 

Trevet, a tripod, or three-legged frame of iron, 
u»ed to set over the fire to support a pan or pot. 





Trevet, triangular. 

Trian aspect, showing three-fourth parts of the 
body. 

Triyle, or treble arched, formed of three arches. 

Tricorporate, is said when the bodies of three ani- 
mals are represented issuing from the dexter, 
sinister, and base points of the escutcheon, and 
meeting conjoined to one head in the centre. 

Trident, a three-pronged barbed fork or spear. 

Trien, three. 

Trippant, applied to stags and other beasts of 
chase, as passant to beasts of prey, &c., repre- 
sented with one foot up as if on a trot. 

Counter-tripping, is when two beasts are tripping, 
one passing one way and the other another. 

Triumphal crown, or garland is composed of 
laurel. 

Trononee, and demembree, signifies a cross or other 
bearing cut in pieces and dismembered, yet so 
as all the pieces preserve and retain the form 
of a cross, or whatever bearing it may be, 
although placed at a little distance from each 
other. 

True lovers' knot, a kind of double knot made with 
two bows on each side, interlacing each other, 
and with two ends ; serpents are sometimes 
twisted in this form. 

Trunk ed, or truncated, trees couped or cut off 
at the top, the branches lopped off, ^nd separa- 
ted from the root. 

Trundles, quUls of gold thread, used by em- 
broiderers. 

Trunk of a tree, is when the root of a tree is torn 
up and the top cut off. 

Trussed, close, or complicated, applied, although 
unnecessarily, when birds are borne with their 
wings close to the body, which is always im- 
pHed unless the contrary is expressed. 

Tuberated, gibbous, knotted, or swelled out ; as 
the middle part of a serpent. 

Tuft, a bunch of grass. 

Tun, a large vessel for holding liquor, similar in 
shape to a barrel. 

Turned up, the lining turned up over the edge. 

Turreted, is said of a wall or tower having small 
towers upon it. 

Tusked, is said of the boar, tiger, elephant, &c., 
when their tusks are borne of a different tinc- 
ture to that of the body of the animal. 

Tynes, a name given by heralds to the branches of 
the horns of stags, bucks, &c. 



Umbraced. See Vambraced. 

Umbrated, or adumbrated, shadowed. 

Unde, wavy. 

Unguled, applied to the hoof of the stag, hind, 
horse, bidl, &c., when of a different tincture to 
the body. 

Unicorn, a beautiful suppositious animal with 
a long twisted horn out of its forehead, its 
head and body like a horse, but lias cloven feet, 
hair under the chin like a goat, tail like a lion, 
and is of a bay colour, unless otherwise described. 

Unifoil, a single-leaved grass. 

Urchin, liedgohog. 

Urdee. See Crosses and Lines, p. xxii. 

Urinant, applicable to the dolphin or other fish, 
when borne with the head downwards and the 
tail erect, exactly in a contrary position to 
bauriant. 

Urvwnt, or urved, turned, or bowed upwards. 



rr • '' e F Furs. See p. xxviii. 
Vaire, &c. J ^ 

Valla/ry Crown. See p. zxxiv. 



USED IN HERA.LDRY. 



xlvii 



Vambrace, armour for the arm. 

Vambraced, applied when the arm is wholly 

covered with armour. 
Vamplate, a gauntlet or iron glove. 
Vamplet, of a tilting-spear ; a broad pan of steel 

formed like a funnel, placed on the lower part 

of the staff to protect the hand. 
Vams, or wamays, an old kind of short hose to 

the ankles only. 
Vannet, the escallop when represented without 

the ears. 
Yarvelled, when the jesses of a hawk have rings 

at the ends. 
Verblee, a hunting-horn edged round with metal 

of different tinctures from the other part. 
Verdoy, a. border charged with eight flowers, 

leaves, fruit, or other vegetables, as a border 

gules, verdoy of oak leaves or. 
Vert, green. See Tinctures, p. xxviii. 
Verted, and reverted, same as Flexed and Rejlexed, 

&c. 
Vervels, small rings to which the jesses of the 

hawks are fastened. 
Verules, or ferrals, several rings, one within 

another, which have the same centre. 
Vested, habited, clothed. 
View, is the footing, treading, or track of a buck, 

and all fallow dear. 
Vigilant, applied to a cat when in a position as if 

on watch for prey. 
Vizor, the part of a helmet which protects the face. 
Volant, flying. 
Voided, signifies a cross, or other charge, which 

has the middle cut so that the field is seen 

through it, and nothing but its outward hem 

or hedge is left. 
Vorant {engoulant), devouring. 
Vulned, wounded so that the blood appears 

dropping. The peUcan is ordinarily described 

as " vulning herself" to feed her young. 



Wales, Prince of, feathers. 



Wallet. See Pilgrim's scrip. 
Wastle cakes, round cakes of bread. 
Watching, better vigilant, for a cat watching to 
seize its prey. 




Water, when borne should be painted to imitate 
nature. 

Water bouget, a vessel to carry water. 

Waterpot, a fontal ; called also a scatebra, out of 
which naiads — river gods — are represented as 
pouring the waters or rivers over which they 
preside. 

Wattled, a term applied to the gills of a cock, 
when of different tincture from the body. 

Waved, the same as wavy or undee. 

Waved sword, by some called improperly a flaming 
sword. 

Wavy, or undee, formed like waves ; a line of 
partition. See p. xxix. 

Weare, weir, or dam, in fess, is made with 
stakes and osier twigs wattled, or interwoven 
as a fence against water. 

Wedge, or stone bill, a tool to split or rend tim- 
ber with. 

Weel, a device for catching fish. 

Welke, a shell-fish. 

Welt, or edge, a narrow kind of border to an or- 
dinary or charge, sometimes improperly called 
a fimbriation. 

Wervels. See Vervels. 

Wharrow-spindle, and old term of blazon for 
" fusil." 

Whirlpool. See Gurges. 

Wine-piercer, an instrument to tap or bore holes 
in wine casks. 

Winged, having wings, or adorned with wings. 

Wings conjoined, are wings expanded, elevated, 
and united at the bottom. See Lure. 

Wi.nnowing -basket, used for winnowing corn. 

Wood, in heraldry, a small group of trees grovring 
on a mount, sometimes called a hurst. 

Woodman, wild man or savage. 

Wool cards, instruments used for carding wool. 

Wound, roundles when purple. Same as Golpes. 

Wreath, a garland, chaplet, or attire for the head. 
The wreath upon which " the crest " is usually 
borne is composed of two bands of silk inter- 
woven or twisted together. See p. xiv. 

Wreathed, having a wreath on the head or else- 
where, or anything twisted in the form of a 
wreath. 

Wyvern, an imaginary heraldic animal, 
the wings and upper part resemble 
a dragon, the lower part resembling 
that of an adder or snake ; it is 
similar in form to the cockatrice, but 
has the head of a dragon. 




ABBREVIATIONS. 



or .... gold, or yellow. 

ar argent, or silver, or white. 

az azure, or blue. 

gu giles, or red. 

vert. . . . green. 

purp. . . purpure, or purple. 

sa sable, or black. 

erm. . . ermine, 

ppr. . . proper, 

chev. . . chevron, 

engr. . . engrailed, 

ramp. . . rampant, 

pass. . . passant. 



d died. 

m married. 

b bom. 

s.p sine prole, without issue. 

d.v.p. . . died vita patris. 
betw. . . between. 
fun. ent. funeral entry. 
F.E.I. . . funeral entry Ireland, 
visit. . . visitation of a county by 
a herald. 

reg registered. 

ped pedigree. 



xlix 



THE EOYAL ARMORY. 




ICTORIA, By the Grace of God of the United Kingdom 
OF Great Britain and Ireland, Queen> Defender of 
THE Faith, Empress of India. 

Arms — Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. three lions pass, gnai'd. in pale or, for England ; 
2nd, or, a lion ramp, within a double tressure flory counterflory gn., for Scotland ; 3rd, az. 
a harp or, stringed ar., for Ireland ; the whole encircled with the Garter. 

Crest — Upon the royal helmet the imperial crown ppr., thereon statant guardant or, a 
lion imperially crowaed also ppr. 

Supporters — Dexter, a lion ramp, giiard. or, crowned as the crest ; sinister, an unicorn 
ar. armed, crined, and uuguled or, gorged with a coronet composed of crosses patt6e and 
fleurs de-lis, a chain affixed thereto, passing between the fore-legs, and reflexed over the back, 
of the last. 

Crest of Scotland — On an imperial crown ppr. a lion sejant affront^e gu. imperially 
crowned or, holding in the dexter paw a sword, and in the sinister a sceptre erect, also ppr. 

Crest of Ireland — On a wreath or and az. a tower triple-towered gold, from the gate a 
hart springing ar. 

Motto — DiEU ET MON Droit, in the compartment below the shield ; with the Union rose, 
shamrock, and thistle engrafted on the same stem. 

Crown of England — A circle of gold, issuing therefrom four crosses patt^e and four 
fleurs-de-lis, arranged alternately : from the crosses pattee arise two arched and golden 
diadems, ornamented with pearls, closing at the top under a mound, surmounted by a cross 
pattee, also gold, the whole enriched with precious stones : cap of crimson velvet, turned 
up erm. 

Badges — 1. England — The red and white rose united. 2. Scotland — A thistle. 3. Ire- 
land — A harp or, the strings ar. 4. Ireland — A shamrock leaf vert. 5. Wales — A dragon 
pass, wings elevated gu. upon a mount vert. All ensigned with the royal crown. 

* * The arms of the three Royal Dyuiisties of Wales were — 

I. North Wales, Quarterly, or and gu. four lions pass, guard, counterchanged. 
II. South Wales, Gu. a lion ramp, within a bordure indented or. 
III. PowYS, Ar. a lion ramp. sa. (the Black Lion of Powys). 



THE ROYAL ARMORY. 




THE PRINCE OF WALES. 



rpHE Most High, Most Pdissant, and Most Illustrious Prince ALBERT EDWARD, 
-*- PRINCE OF WALES, Duke of Saxony, Duke of Cornwall and Rothsat, 
Earl of Chester, Carrick, and Dublin, Baron of Renfrew, and Lord of the Isles, 
Great Steward of Scotland, K.G., K.P., K.T., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., &c., &c. 

Arms — Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gii. three lions pass, guard, in pale, or, England ; 2nd, 
or, a lion ramp, within a double tres.sure tlory and counterflory gu., Scotland ; 3rd, az. a 
harp or, stringed ar., Ireland ; differenced by a label of three points ar. and in the centre of 
the said royal arms an escutcheon of the arms of the august house of Saxony, viz., barry of 
ten or and sa. a crown of rue in bend vert, for Saxe-Coburg. 

Crest — On the coronet of the Prince of Wales a lion statant guard, or, crowned with the 
like coronet, and differenced with a label of three points ar. 

Badge — A plume of three ostrich feathers ar. enfiled by a coronet composed of fleurs- 
de-lis and crosses patt6e alternately, and motto, " Ich Dien," being the badge of H.R.H. as 
Prince of Wales. 

Supporters — Dexter, a lion giiard. or, crowned with the Prince of Wales coronet, and 
differenced by a label of thiee points ar. ; sinister, an unicorn ar. gorged with a coronet 
com{xj8ed of fleurs-de-lis and croa.ses patt^e, therefrom a chain reflexed over the back or, 
differenced with a label of three points ar. 

Motto— Ich Dien. 



THE ROYAL ARMORY. 




THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH. 



TTIS EoTAL Highness Prince Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh, Earl 
* * OF Kent, and Earl of Ulster, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, Prince of 
the United Kingdom, Duke of Saxony, Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, K.G., K.T., 
G.C.S.L, G.C.M.G., &c., &c. 

Arms — The Eoyal Arms, differenced by a label of three points ar. the centre point 
charged with St. George's Cross, and each of the other points with an anchor az. ; and in the 
centre of the said royal arms, an escutcheon of the august house of Saxony, viz., barry of ten 
or and sa. a crown of rue in bend vert. 

Crest— On a coronet composed of crosses pattee and fleurs-de-lis a lion statant guard, 
or, crowned with the like coronet, and difl'erenced with a label of three points ai*. charged 
as in the arms. 



Supporters — The Royal Supporters, differenced with the like coronet and label. 



Ill 



THE ROYAL ARMORY. 




THE DUKE OF CONNAUGHT AND STRATHEARN. 



TTIS RoTAii HionNESs Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connaught 
* ' AND OF Strathearn, anu Earl OF SussEX, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, 
Prince of the United Kingdom, Duke of Saxony, Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, K.G., 
K.T., K.P., G.C.M.G., &c.. &c. 

Arms—The Royal Arms, differenced by a label of three points ar,, the centre point 
charged with St. George's Cross, and each of the other points with a fleur-de-lis az. ; in the 
centre of the said royal arms, an escocheon of the august house of Saxony, viz., barry of ten 
or and sa. a crown of rue in bend vert. 

Crest — On a coronet composed of crosses patt6e and fleurs-de-lis, a lion statant guard. 
or, crowned with the like coronet, and differenced with a label of three points ar. charged as 
in tlie arms. 



Supporters — The Royal Supporters, differenced with the like coronet and label. 



THE ROYAL ARMORY. 



m* 




THE DUKE OF ALBANY. 



TTIS Royal Highness Prince Leopold-George-Duncan- Albert, Duke of Albany, 
-*-■- Earl of Clarence, and Baron Arklow, Prince of the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland, Duke of Saxony, Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, K.G., K.T., 
G.C.S.I., G.aM.G. 

Anm — The royal arms, diflferenced by a label of three points arg., the centre point 
charged with St. George's Cross, and each of the other points with a heart gules ; in the 
centre of the said royal arms an escutcheon of the august House of Saxony, viz., barry of 
ten or and sa., a crown of rue in bend vert. 



Crest — On a coronet composed of crosses-patee and fleurs-de-lis, alien statant guardantor, 
crowned with the like coronet and difiersnced with a label of three points, charged as in 
the arms. 

Supporters — The royal supporters diflferenced with the like coronet and label. 



Uii 



THE ROYAL ARMORY. 




THE DUKE OF CUMBERLAND. 



I I IS Royal Highness George Frederick Alexander Charles Erkest Auqu8TTJs, 
* *■ Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale, in the Peerage of Great Britain, and Earl 

OF Armagh, in the Peerage of Ireland, Prince of the United Kingdom, Duke of Bruns- 

wick-Luneburg, Ex -King of Hanover, K.G., G.C.H., &c., &c. 

Arms, <&c. — The Royal Arms of England, as borne by King George III., with the necessary 
labels of distinction, viz., a label of three points ar. charged with a fleur-de-lis betw. two 
crosses gu. 



THE ROYAL ARMORY. 



liv 




THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE. 



XT IS RoTAL Highness Prix^ce George William Frederick Charles, Duke op Cam- 
■*-*- BRIDGE, Earl of Tipperart, and Baron Cdlloden, in the Peerage of the United 
Kingdom, Prince of the United Kingdom, K.G., K.P., G.C.B., G.C.H., G.C.S.I., Field 
Marshal Ciommanding in Chief Her Majesty's Army, &c., &c. 



Arms— The Royal Arms of England, as borne by King G^orije III., with the necessary 
labels of distinction, viz., a label of three points ar. charged on the centre point with a cross, 
and on either side with two hearts in pale gu. 



THE ROYAL ARMORY. 



It 



The Princes and Princesses of the Royal Blood bear the Royal Arms, Crest, and Supporters, 
differenced with the proper labels assigned to each distinctly. 



lix 



K 



A 



'_ji. 



2I-^1K 



7^ 



in 



S 



^~im: 



22^ 



^^sn^r^^ 



Prixce Leopold George Duncan Albert. A label of 
three points ar., the centre point charged with St. Greorge's 
Cross, and each of the other points with a heart gu. 

Victoria Adelaide Maria Louisa, Princess Royal, 
Crown Princess of Germany. A similar label, charged in 
the centre point with a rose, and in each of the other points 
with a St. George's Cross gu. 



Princess Alice Maud Mart, Princess Grand Duchess 

_ . of Hesse. A similar label, charged in the centre point with 

/ ^ \ a rose gu. barbed vert, and in each of the other points with 

an erm. spot sa. 



^ 



iX 



-M~M~l^ 



Princess Helena Augusta Victoria, Princess Chris- 
tian of Schleswig-Holstein. A similar label, charged in the 
centre point with St. George's Cross, and in each of the other 
points with a rose gu. 

Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, Marchioness of 
Lome. A similar label, charged in the centre point with 
a rose, and in each of the other points with a billet gu. 

Princess Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore. A simi- 
lar label, charged in the centre point with a heart, and in each 
of the other points with a rose gu. 



OF THE DIFFEEENT MONARCHS SINCE THE CONQUEST. 



William I. (the Conqueror). Gu. two lions pass, guard, or. Much 
controversy has arisen regarding leopards or lions, but the latter would 
appear the more correct. John, the Monk of Harmonstier, in Tourain, a 
contemporary writer, relates, that when Henry I. selected Geoffrey 
Plantagenet to be his son-in-law, " Clypeus TiConculos aiireos imaginarios 
habens coUo ejus suspenditur." 



William II. (Rufos), second sou of the Conqueror. The same Arms as those of his 
father. 

Henry I., third son of the Conqueror. Arms similar to those of his predecessor. 





King Stephen. This Prince's Arms are differently described : by some he 
is said to have borne the same Arms as his maternal grandfather, William 
the Conqueror ; by others— Gu. the bodies of three lions pass, the necks with 
men's bodies or, in form of the sign of Sagittarius ; by a third, which is the 
most correct, Gu. a Sagittarius ar. King Stephen is said to have adopted 
the latter bearing from the great assistance afforded him by the archers, and 
having entered the kingdom when the sun was in the sign Sagittarius. 



Ivi THE ROYAL ARMORY. 

<?ri-/^,4^ Henry II. Gu. two lions pass, guard, or, previously to the King's 

^^^^r marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine, when he adopted a third lion, for 

Q^^^^^^ Aquitaine. On the Great Seal no Arms appear, the concave side of the 
aT^;^ /^ shielding only exhibited. Henry II. appears to have been the first monarch 
M ^*^^ U w^o "^®^ ^ badge, he first bore an escarbuncle of gold, an ancient mark of 
^ *V*^^ ^ hj** paternal House of Anjou, and afterwards introduced the sprig of broom 
ff ^^^ Vi ^laxit, or Planta Genista, from which his surname, Plantagenet, was derived, 
> v!^^^_--^ ^^^^ which was a favourite badge with some of his descendants. He is also 
^k<^o-^S^^^J^ said to have borne a jennet between two sprigs of broom. 

Richard I. {Coeur-de-Lion). Before the Crusade, Richard's Great Seal shows but a moiety 
of the shield (the dexter side) with a lion ramp, sinister, from which the inference is that he 
then bore two lions combatant. After his exploits in the Holy Land, another Great Seal 
bears the three lions, which henceforward became the hereditary bearings of the Kings and 
Queens of England. This King bore as a badge a broom branch with the pods open, this 
device appears on his first Great Seal ; he also used a crescent surmounted by a star. Having 
defeated the French at Gisors, 1198, and his watchword there being " Dieu et mou droit," he 
adopted it for liis motto, and it continued the motto of nearly all his successors. 

King John. Prior to his elevation to the throne, when Earl of Mortagne, in Normandy, 
this Prince bore two lions only ; after his accession he assumed the Arms of his predecessor. 
King John used as a badge the crescent surmounted by a star, one of the badges of his prede- 
cessor, Richard I. 

Henry III. bore the same Arms as his father King John, and used the Planta Genista, 
or broom slip, for his badge. 

Edward I. bore the .same Arms as his father, Henry III., and his grandfather, King 
John ; his badge was, A rose slipped, the sialk vert, the petals or. 

Edward II. bore the same as his three immediate predecessors ; his badge was a golden 
tower, in allusion to the arms of his maternal grandfather, Ferdinand III., King of Castile. 

Edward III. This Prince assumed the title of King of France, in sup- 
posed right of his mother, Isabel, daughter of Philip IV., who became that 
monarch's sole heiress, his three sons having died issueless. Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, France, az. semue-de lis or ; 2nd an 3rd, England, gu. three 
lions pass, guard, or. His favourite badge was "Sunbeams issuing from 
clouds." Henry VIII. caused this cognizance to be represented on the 
habits of Knights of the Garter, in memory of this sovereign, the founder 
of the Order. Edward III. also bore, A trunk or stump of a tree eradicated 
and couped or. 

Cre/<t — Upon a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion pass, guard, crowned 

or. Edward III. was the first English King who bore a crest, which was continued by 

succeeding monarchs to Edward VI. inclusive, on the Great Seal. 

The Order of the Garter was instituted by King Edward, and the ribbon was generally 

borne round the Royal Arms by his successors, although not introduced on tlie Great Seal before 

the time of Henry VIII. 

Richard II., son of the Black Prince. This monarch bore the same Arms upon the Great 
seal as Edward III., but iiaving chosen St. Edward the Confessor for his patron, he impaled 
the Arais of the Confcs-sor, Az. a cross patonce Ijetw. five martlets or, with the Arms of France 
and England, quarterly. 

Richard wius tlie finst Engli.sh King who used Supporters, namely, two angels ; beneath 
the shield, a white hart coiichaut, gorged witli a gold coronet, and chained under a tree ; a 
device from the ensigns of his mother Joan, the Fair Maid of Kent, a white hind, which he 
lK>re ;is a badtje. He likewise used other badges, viz., A pe;i.scod branch, with the cods open 
and eini)ty, 'Jhe sun in splendour, and The eradicated st\iinp of a tree couped or ; he also 
used A white falcon. At a tournament held at Windsor, j)revious to his departure for Ireland, 
forty krii{,dits and as many escpiires were apparelled in green, with a white falcon for a badge. 
The "Sunbeams issuing from clouds," the " Pl.mita Genista,'' and the " White hart," appear 
on the mantle and kiitle of his monumental ertigy in Westminster Abbey. An ostrich ducally 
gorged and chained, holding a [Kission nail in the bill and a " knot" are on the effigy of his 
first Queen, Anne. 

Hknry IV. This Prince a[)pears to have taken the Great Seal of his predecessor, the 
second RiciiAHr), merely sub.stituting his own name for that of the late King, and bearing the 
same Arms, with Enol.vnd occasionally in the first quarter. 





THE ROYAL ARMORY. Ivii 

Supporters — Oa the dexter side, a swan ar., gorged and lined or ; on the sinister, an ante- 
lope ar. gorged and lined as the dexter. 

Badge — A "silver swan" was the princijjal cogni;^ance of this King, derived from the 
Bohuus, Earls of Hereford, his first wife being a daughter and co-heir of that House. Another of 
his badges, " a white antelope," is said to have also had a connection with that house. Another 
badge ascribed to him is a fox's tail, derived from his maternal ancestors, the house of 
Lancaster. In a MS. entitled " Arms of the Founders of the Order of the Garter," the 
badge of Henry Plantagenet, Duke of Lancaster, represents a square tablet divided into two 
by a perpendicular line down the centre, coloured white and blue, on the white appears a red 
rose, and on the blue a fox's brush in its proper colours. The double SS was another device 
of this King, the origin of which has not been accounted for. His second wife, Joane of 
Navarre, used for a cognizance, an ermine collared and chained, with the motto, " A tem- 
perance." 

Henry V. Quarterly, France and England. The Arms of France 
having been altered by the French King, limiting the number of fleurs-de- 
lis to three, Henry V. adopted the alteration. 

Supporters (when Prince of Wales) — Two swans, each holding in the 
beak an ostrich feather and scroll ; after ascending the throne, he assumed 
a dexter supporter, a lion. ramp, guard, crowned, the sinister being an 
antelope, as that of his predecessor. 

Badge — Before his accession to the throne he used the silver swan of 
Henry IV., and afterwards a fire beacon. Over his tomb in Westminster 
Abbey there is a representation of an antelope and a swan chained to a 
beacon. 

Henry VI. Arms, same as predecessor. 

Supporters — Two antelopes ar. gorged with coronets, attired and chained or : those 
appear over the porch of Eton College. A tiger ramp, guard, or, semee of roundles alter- 
nately sa. gu. az. and vert, with fire issuing from the mouth and ears, sometimes occurs as the 
sinister supporter. 

Badge — A device of this King was a panther, another ascribed to him was two ostrich 
feathers in saltire, one silver, the other gold. The ostrich feather was a favourite badge of the 
descendants of Edward III., borne, sometimes one and sometimes three, the pen of the feathers 
was fixed in a scroll ; the coronet as now borne by the Prince of Wales was added by 
Edward VI. The badge of Henry VI. 's Queen, Margaret of Anjou, was a daisy, with the 
motto, " Humble et loiall. ' 

Edward IV. France and England, quarterly. 

Supporters — Dexter, a lion ramp. ar. the tail passed between the legs and turned over 
the back (one of the supporters of the King, as Earl of March ; sinister, a bull sa., horned and 
hooped or ; a white hart was likewise borne. 

Badges — A falcon ar. within a fetterlock closed or, as Duke of York. 

A dragon sejant sa. crowned or, as Earl of l3^1ster. 

A bull sa. horned and hoofed or, for the Honour of Clare or Clarence. 

But his favourite device was the " rose en soleil," viz., a white rose surrounded with the 
rays of the sun. 

He also used a white hart attired, gorged with a coronet, and chained or, on a mount vert, 
This badge Edward used in honour of Richard II., it being that King's badge. 

Edward V. France and England, quarterly. 

Supporters— Hexier, a lion ar. (one of the supporters of the Earldom of Mardh) ; sinister, 
a hind ar. 

Badges — The white rose of York, and the falcon within the fetterlock, 

Richard III. France and England, quarterly. 

Supporters — Two boars ar. tusks and bristles or. The white boar was his cognizance. 

Badge — The boar, composed of silver, tusked and bristled gold, called by Shakespear, 
" The bloody and usurping boar." At his coronation thirteen thousand were provided, made an<l 
wrought upon fustian. The devi ce of his Queen, Lady Anne Neville, was a white boar chained 
and muzzled gold, an ancient cognizance of the House of Warwick, 

Henry VII. France and England, quarterly. 

Supporters— DexX^T, a dragon gu. (the ensign of Cadwallader, the last King of the 
Britons) ; sinister, a greyhound ar. collared gu. 
Motto — Dieu et mon droit. 



\y[[[ THE ROYAL ARMORY. 

Badaes—A red dragon, called the Dragon of Cadwallader, was the cognizance of this 
King at first ; it is usually found in illuminations on a ground of white and green the livery 
colours of the House of Tudor. A favourite device of this King was a portcullis gold, with the 
motto, " Altera securitas ;" this w.^ derived from the Beauforts. He also used the Tudor rose 
composed from the roses of York and Lancaster, viz., a rose quarterly ar. and gu., but it was 
sometimes formed of two series of petals, the inner white, the outer red. 

Henry VIII. France and England, quarterly. 

Supporters— The supporters in the beginning of this King's reign were the same as those 
of Henry VII ; but he afterwards discontinued the greyhound, and used the tollowing 
instead— On the dexter side a lion guard, and crowned or, transposing the red dragon to the 
sinister. 

iJotto — Dieu et mon droit. ^ ii-„ ^^ 

Badges— A red rose ; the union roses, red and white ; a fleur-de-lis or ; a portcullis or. 
He likewise used the red dragon, and a cock silver, combed and wattled red 

He was the first English monarch who encircled the Royal Arms with the Garter, sur- 
mounted by the crown, upon the Great Seal. His Queens bore the following badges :— 

Katherine of Arragon. a pomegranate, also a sheaf of arrows silver. 

Anna Boleyn. A silver falcon. 

Jane Seymour. A phoenix (since borne in the family crest by the Ducal House of 
Somerset). 

Anne of Cleves. A black lion charged on the shoulder with an escarbuncle gold. 

Katherine Parr. A maiden's head issuing from a Tudor rose. 

No badge of Katherine Howard has been preserved. 

Edward VI. Arras, Supporters, and Motto, the same as his father, Henry VIII. 

Badqes-Beiore his accession to the throne he bore the three ostrich feathers with the 
pens in a scroll ; he encircled the feathers with a poronet, as now borne by the Princes of 
Wales. After his accession to the throne his device was the sun in splendour ppr. 

> 

Mary I. The Queen, after her marriage with Philip of Spain bore the King's Arms 
(viz., per fess, the chief part quarterly of four pieces : 1st, Castile and Leon, quarterly ; 2nd 
Arragon, impaling Sicily ; 3rd, as the 2nd ; 4th, as the 1st. The base part of the 
escutcheon, also quarterly of four pieces: 1st, Austria modern; 2nd Burgundy modern ; 
3rd, Burgundy ancient ; and 4th, Brabant ; over all an inescutclieon of Flanders and Tyrol 
impaled)" impaling France and England, quarterly. 

,S'wpyDO?-«ers— Dexter, an eagle; sinister, a lion lamp, crowned or. , ,.^ , 

Badcfes-Queen Mary before her accession used both the red and white rose and a 
pomegranate, knit together, to show her descent from the House of Lancaster York, and 
Spain- but on her liccession, Winged Time drawing Truth out of a pit, with Veritas 
temporis filia," for motto, appears on her first Great Seal betore marriage. 

She also bore a sheaf of arrows silver, united with the Tudor rose, the arrows being 
placed on a ground of green and blue. ,11 j v *i,- 

The rose ensigned with the royal crown seem to have been another badge used by this 

Queen. 

Queen Elizabeth. France and England, quarterly, encircled by the Garter 
Si'pporters-Dexier, a lion ramp, guard, and crowned or ; sinister, the red dragon, as 

borne by lier father, Henry VIII- .1 . v * \.^ ^^Aa. 

/iW./..-This Queen's j.riucipal badge wns a silver falcon, as her mother's, but she made 
use of several heroical devices, but most c.n.monly that of a sieve. The badge of Iceland, the 
Irish harp, seems for the first time in tkis Queens' reign to have been placed on the Great 
Seal. 

.Tames I. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, France and England, quarterly ; 2nd, 

or, a lion ramp, within a double tressure flory counterflory gu., for Scotland ; 

:Jrd, ;iz. a harp or, stringed an, for Irkland. -^.i^^ 

,Svpportrr.s-])vxii'r, the English lion ramp, guard, crowned or ; simster, 

. Scottish unicorn ar. gorged with the royal coronet and chained or. 

Mottoes^'' Heati pacifici ;" and, " Dieu et mon droit. 

/iadqes-The three badges of the roses, flour-dc-lis, and harp, and that ot 
'<i::£^^[^'^^j:^ a thistle, for Scotland, all cnsigne.1 with the royal crown, ^/^ borne by 
^'^'^'^^^^'^^ .James I., and on his Great Seal appear banners of the arms of Cadwallader, 
the la«t King of the Britons, viz., :iz. a cross pattce fitchce or, and the Arms of King l^dgar, 




THE ROYAL ARMORY. 



Ux 



az. a cross patonce betw. four martlets or, to show his descent from the blood royal both of 
Wales and England ; but his chief device was the dexter half of the Tudor rose joined to the 
sinister half of the thistle the whole ensigned with the royal crown, 

Charles I. Arms, Crests, Supporters, and Badges, the same as those of his father, 
James I. 

On the Great Seal is represented the standard of St. George, viz., ar. a cross gu. supported 
by the lion of England, and the standard of St. Andrew, being, az. a saltire ar. upheld by the 
unicorn of Scotland. 

Charles II. This Monarch bore the same Arms, &c. as Charles I., and by Royal 
warrant dated 9th Feb. in the 13th year of his reign, directed that in future the heir apparent 
to the crown, for the time being, should use and bear a coronet composed of crosses and fleurs- 
de-lis with one arch, and in the midst a ball and cross, as in the royal diadem ; aud that his 
brother, James, Duke of York, the sons of the Sovereign, and the immediate sons and brothers 
of his successors. Kings of England, should use coronets composed of crosses and fleurs-de-lis 
only ; but that all their sons, respectively, having the title of Dukes, shall use coronets com- 
posed of crosses and flowers, or leaves, such as are used in the coronets of Dukes not being of 
the Blood Eoyal. 

James II. This King used the same Arms, &c., as his brother, Charles II. 







William III. and Mary II. Arms, &c. those of James I. with an 
escutcheon of pretence, thereon the Arms of Nassau, viz., az. biUetty or, a liou 
ramp. gold. 

Motto — Je mainteindra. 



Cbe (Union of tbe Ctoo iBiincftioms!. 




Queen Anne on her accession bore the same arms as William III., 
without the escutcheon of })i'etence for Nassau, viz., 1st and 4th, Franck 
and England, quarterly ; 2nd, Scotland ; 3rd, Ireland ; but after the 
union with Scotland, Her Majesty bore, 1st and 4th, Kngland, impaling 
Scotland; 2nd, France, 3rd, Ireland. 




George II. 



George I. bore quarterly, 1st, England, impaling Scotland ; 2nd, 
France ; 3rd, Ireland ; 4th, gu. two lions pass, guard, in pale or, for 
Brunswick ; impaling or, semee of hearts gu. a lion ramp, az., for Lunen- 
burgh ; on a point in point gu. a horse courant ar., for Saxony ; on the 
centre of the fourth quarter an escutcheon gu . charged with the crown of 
Charlemagne or, as the Arch-Treasurer of the Holy Roman Empire. 



This Sovereign bore the same Arms, &c., as his father, George I. 



Ix 



THE ROYAL ARMORY. 




George III. bore the shield the same as George the First, until 
the union with Ireland, when the ensigns of France were abandoned, 
and by His Majesty's Order in Council, dated 5 Nov. 180:t, it was 
ordered that the following should be the armorial bearings, standards, 
badges, &c., of the United Kingdom : — 

Arms — Quarterly, 1st and 4th, England, viz., Gu. three lions pass, 
guard, or ; 2nd, Scotland, Or, a lion ramp. gu. within a double tressure flory 
counterflory of the last ; 3rd, Ireland, Az. a harp or, stringed ar. On an 
escutcheon of pretence for His Majesty's Hanoverian Dominions, Gu. two 
lions pai's. guard, in pale or, for Brunswick, impaling or, semee of hearts 
gu. a lion ramp, az., for Lunenburg ; on a point in point gu. ahorse courant, 
for Saxony; on an escutcheon gu. the crown of Charlemagne or, as Arch-Treasurer of the 
Holy Roman Empire, the first escutcheon ensigned with an electoral bonnet. 

Crest of England— On the Imperial crown ppr. a lion statant guard, or, imperially 
crowned also ppr. 

Badge of England — The Tudor rose slipped surmounted by the Imperial crown all ppr. 

Crest of Ireland— On a wreath or and az. a tower triple-towered or, from the gate a hart 
springing ar. attired gold. 

Badges of Ireland — A harp or, surmounted by the Imperial crown ppr. ; also a trefoil 
slipped or shamrock vert, surmounted by the Imperial crown ppr. 

Crest of Scotland — On the Imperial crown ppr. a lion sejant affrontee gu. Imperially 
crowned or, holding in the dexter paw a sword and in the sinister a sceptre both erect and 
also ppr. 

Badge of Scotland — A thistle surmounted by an Imperial crown all ppr. 

Badge of the United KiNGDOM--The Tudor rose, shamrock, and thistle issuant from the 
same stalk, the rose between the shamrock and thistle, surmounted by the Imperial crown, 
all ppr. 

Badge of Wales — On a mount vert a dragon pass, wings elevated gu. 

George IV. His Majesty bore the same Arms as his father, George III. bore 
after 1st January, 1801. 

William TV. His late Majesty bore the same Arms as his brother, George IV. 




Queen Victoria bears the shield of George the Third as above 
without the escutcheon of pretence of Hanover. Her Majesty also bears 
the same Crests and Badges. 



arms of ^cotlann* 




Or, a lion ramp, within a double tressure flory counterflory gu. 

Crest — A lion sejant affrontoe, gu. Imperially crowned or, holding in 
the dexter paw a aword erect, in the sinister a sce[)tre ppr. 

Suvporters — Two unicorns ar. gorged with a royal coronet, and 
charged or. 

Mottoes- ovar the crest— In defence ; under the arms — Nemo me 
impune lacessit. 



Ixi 




arms of 3IteIanD. 



Az. a harp or, stringed ar. 

Crest—A. tower triple-towered or, from the gate a hart springing ar. 

The Irish Bards were in early times the sacred musicians and historical 
poets of their country : hence originated the harp in the national arms. 
King James I. was the first English monarch who quartered the ensigns of 
Ireland. * 



iRopal Crities of Wi^\t%, 




NORTH WALES. 



Griffith ap Cynan, King of North Wales, a.d. 1079; derived from 
Anarawd, King of North Wales, eldest son of Rhodri Mawr, King of Wales, 
A.D. 843 : Founder of the I. Royal Tribe. Gu. three lions pass, in pale ar' 
armed az. 



Owen Gwynnedd, King of North Wales, eldest son of Griffith ap Cynau 
bore, Vert, three eagles displ. in fess or. ' 




Llewellyn ap Griffith, Prince of North Wales, slain at Bualth on the 
Wye, in 1272; derived from Owen Gwynedd ; bore, Quarterly, or and gu. 
four lions pass, guard, counterchanged. 




SOUTH WALES. 

TL 

\ ^ ^^^3 ^P Tewdwr Mawr, King of South Wales, A.t>. 1077 ; derived from 
Cadelh, King of South Wales, second son of Rhodri Mawr, Founder of the II. 
Royal Tribe. Gu. a lion ramp, within a bordure indented or. 



Ixii 



ROYAL TRIBES OF WALES. 




POWYS. 
III. 

Bleddtn ap Ctnftn, King of Powys, a.d. 1046, Founder of the III. 
Eoyal Tribe ; derived from Mervyii, King of Powys, third son of Rhodri 
MawT. Or, a lion ramp gu. armed and langued az. 

Meredith ap Bleddyn, Prince of Powys, son of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, 
bore, Ar. a lion ramp. sa. 

Madoc, Prince of Powys-Fadog, son of Meredith ap Bleddyn, Prince of 
Powys, bore the sanae as his father. 



Griffith Maelor, Lord of Bromfield in Powys, eldest son of Madoc ap 
Meredith, Prince of Powys-Fadog, boi'e, Paly of eight ar. and gu. over all a lion 
ramp. sa. 

Owen ap Griffith Vychan, Lord of Glyndwyrdwy, the memorable 

Owen Glendower, representative of Griffith Maelor, bore originally the arms 

of Griffith Maelor; but on acquiring the sovereignty of Wales, assumed the 

arms of Llewelyn ap Griffith, Prince of North Wales, as appears on his Privy 

Seal, viz., Quarterly, or and gu. four lions pass, counterchanged. 

Owen Brogyntyn, Lord of Edeirnion, Dinmael, and Abertanat, in Powys Fadog, son of 

Madoc ap Meredith, Prince of Powys-Fadog, bore the same arms as his father and grandfather, 

viz., Ar. a lion ramp. sa. armed and langued gu. 





Cynric Efelt,, Lord of Eglwys Egle in Bromfield, son of Madoc ap 
Meredith, bore, Gu. on a bendar. a lion pass. sa. 




EiNiON Efell, Lord of Cynllaeth in Deubighland, twin brother of 
Cynric Efell, bore, Per fess sa. and ar. a lion ramp, counterchanged armed 
and langued gu. 

Owen Cyfelioc, Prince of Higher Powys, subsequently called, from of 
son Gwenwynwyn, Powys-Wenwyuwyn, second son of Griffith, Lord of 
Mawddwy Cyfeilioc, who was second son of Meredith ap Bleddyn, bore the 
arms of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, viz.. Or, a lion ramp. gu. armed and langued az. 
Madoc Goch, Lord of Mawddy, in Merioneth, second sou of Gwenwynwyn, Prince of 
Powys- Wen wynwyn, bore the arms of his ancestor, Bleddyn ap Cynfyn. 

John, Lord of Mawddwy, son of Wii.iam (living 17 Edward I.), fourth son of Griffith, 
Lord of Mawddwy (ancestor of the Princes of Powys-Wenwynwyu), second son of Meredith 
ap Bleddyn, Prince of Powys, bore the arms of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn. 

Cadwgan, Lord of Nannau, in Merioneth (for some time time associated in the 
sovereignty of Powys with his elder brother, Meredith), younger son of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, 
King of Powys, bore. Or, a lion ramp. az. 




IV. 

Etheltstan Glodrydd, Tributary Prince of Ferlys (the country between 
the Wye and the Severn), Founder of the IV. Royal Tribe. Quarterly, first" and 
fourth, az three boars' heads cabossed sa. ; second and third, per bend sinister, 
ermine and erminois, over all a lion ramp, or, which latter was the coat of his 
mother Kliingor, dau. and heir of Gronwy ap Tudor-Trevor, Lord of Wliittiug- 
tuii, CO. Salop. 




V. 

JestYN ap Gwroant, Tributary Prince of Glamorgan, Founder of the V. 
Royal Tribe. Gu. three clievronels ar. 



laoible ^tibt^ of i^ortft SHalejJ atttr JJotudJ, 



I. 




AwFA, AP Cynddelw, Founder of the I. Noble Tribe. Gu. a chev. betw. three lioncels 
ramp. or. 



II. 




Llowarch, ap Bran, Founder of the II. Noble Tribe. Ar. a chev. betw. three crows sa. 
each holding in the bill an erm. spot. 



III. 




GwBifiYDD, AP Rhys Goch, Lord of Tal Ebolion, in Anglesey. Ar. on a bend sa. three 
lions' heads cabossed of the first. 



Ixiv NOBLE TRIBES OF NORTH WALES AND POWIS. 



IV. 




CiLMiN Troed-Du. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. an eagle displ. with two heads sa. ; 2nd and 
3rd, ar. three ragged staffs gii. fired ppr. ; over all, upon an escutcheon of pretence ar. a 
man's leg couped a-la-cuise sa. 




CoLLWTN, AP Tagno, Lord of Efionydel, Founder of the V. Noble Tribe. Sa. a chev. betw. 
three fleurs-de-lis ar. 




Nefydd Hardd, Lord of Nant Conway, Founder of the VI. Noble Tribe. Ar. three spears' 
heads erabrued sa. pointed upwards. 



VII. 




Maelor Cuwm, Lord of Llechwedd-Isaff and Creuddyn, in Carnarvon Ar. on a chev. sa. 
three angels or. 



VIIL 




MARcntTDD. AP Ctnan, Lord of Abergelleu, Founder of the VIIL Noble Tribe. Gu. a 
Saracen's head erased at the neck ppr. wreathed about the temples sa. and ar< 



NOBLE TRIBES OF NORTH WALES AND POWIS. 



Ixv 



IX 




Hedd Molwtnoo, Lord of Uwch Aled, Founder of the IX. Noble Tribe. Sa. a hart pass, 
ar. attired or. 




Braint Hir, Lord of Isduks, Founder of the X. Noble Tribe. Vert a cross flory or. 




Marchweithian, Lord of Is- Aled, Founder of the XI. Noble Tribe. Gu. a lion ramp. ar. 
armed az. 



XII. 




Edwtn, Lord of Tegaingle, co. Flint, Founder of the XII. Noble Tribe. Ar. a cross flory 
engr. sa, betw. four Cornish choughs ppr, armed gu. 



XIII. 




Ednowian Bendew, Lord of Tegaingle, a.d. 1079, Founder of the XIII. Noble Tribe. Ar. 
a chev. betw. three boars' heads couped sa. 



Ixvi 



NOBLE TRIBES OF NORTH WALES AND POWIS. 



XIV. 




Efxtdd ap Gwevllian, Founder of the XIV. Noble Tribe. Gu. a lion ramp. or. He 
also quartered the ai-ms of his mother Gwenllian, dau. and heir of Rhys ap Marchen, 
viz., Az. a fess or, betw. tliree uags' heads erased ar. 



XV. 




Ednowain, ap Bradwen, Lord of Llys-Bradwen, in Merioneth, Founder of the XV. Noble 
Tribe. Gu. three snakes nowed in a triangular knot ar. 



IBxiti^sif) ©rner0 of EnigfttftooU. 



THE MOST NOBLE ORDER OF THE GARTER 

Instituted by King Edward III. about August, 1348. 

(K.G.) 




HABIT AND INSIGNIA. 

The Garter of dark-blue velvet, edged with gold, bearing the motto in golden letters, 
with buckle and pendent of gold richly chased. The garter is worn on the left leg below the 
knee. 

The Mantle of blue velvet, lined with white taffeta ; on the left breast the star 
embroidered. 

The Hood of crimson velvet. 

The Subcoat likewise of crimson velvet lined with white taffeta. 

The Hat of black velvet, lined with wh'te taffeta ; a plume of white ostrich feathers, 
in the centre of which a tuft of black heron's feathers, all fastened to the hat by a ba»d of 
diamonds. 

The Collar, gold, consisting of twenty-six pieces, each in form of a garter, enamelled, 
azure, and appended thereto. 

The George, or figure of St. George on horseback, encountering the dragon. The George 
18 worn to the collar ; and the lesser George, pendent to a broad dark-blue ribbon over the 
left shoulder. 

The star of eight points, silver, upon the centre of which the Cross of St. George, gules, 
encircled with the garter. 

Atotto — Honi soit qui mal y pense. Ribbon of the Order — Garter blue. 



Ixviil 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 



THE MOST ANCIENT AND MOST NOBLE ORDER 
OF THE THISTLE. 

Revived by King James II. in 1687. Re-established by Queen Anne, Blst December, 1703. 



(K.T.; 




The Star of this Order, which is worn on the left side of the coat or cloak, consists of a 
St. Andrew's Cross, of silver embroidery, with rays emanating from between the points of 
the cross, in the centre of which is a thistle of green, heightened with gold; upon a held ot 
gold, surrounded by a circle of green, bearing the motto of the Order in golden characters. 

Thb Badge, or Jewel, worn pendent to the collar, or to a dark green ribbon over the 
left shoulder and tied under the arm. It consists of a figure of St. Andrew, of gold enamelled, 
with his gown greon and the surcoat purple, bearing before him the cross, enamelled white, 
the whole surrounded by rays of gold in the form of a glory ; the cross and feet resting upon 
the ground, of enamelled green. 

The Collar is of Thistles, intermingled with sprigs of rue. 
Motto— memo me impune lacessit. Ribbon of the Order — Green. 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 



iTtJT 



THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS ORDER OF ST. PATRICK. 

Instituted by King George III., February btk, 1783. 

(K.P.) 




The Star— The Star of the Order cf Saint Patrick consists of the Cross of Saint Patrick, 
gules, on a field argent, charged with a trefoil aa on the Badge, surrrounded by a sky-blue 
enamelled circle, containing the motto and date, and is encircled by four greater and two 
lesser rays of silver. 

The Collar.— "The Collar of Our Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick," say the 
statutes, "shall be of gold, and it shall be composed of Roses and Harps alternate, tied 
together with a knot of gold, and the said roses shall be enamelled alternately white leaves 
within red, and red leaves within white ; and in the centre of the said Collar shall be an 
Imperial Crown, surmounting a Harp of Gold, from which shall hang 

"The Badge of our said Order ; and the said Badge shall be of gold, surmounted with 
a wreath of Shamrock or Trefoil, within which shall be a circle of Blue Enamel containing 
the Motto of Our said Order in Letters of Gold, viz.,— Quis Separabit, with the date 
MDCCLxxxiii. being the year in which Our said Order was founded, and encircling the Cross 
of St. Patrick, gules, surmounted with a trefoil vert, ^ch of its leaves charged with an 
Imperial Crown or, upon a field argent." 



Motto — Quia separabit. 



Ribbo7i— Sky -hlue. 



Ixx 



BRITISH ORDERS OP KNIGHTHOOD. 



THE MOST HONOURABLE ORDER OF THE BATH. 
Instituted in 1399. Revived in 1725. Enlarged in 1815 and 1847. 

MILITARY KNIGHTS GRAND CROSS. (g.C.B.) 





The Badge for the Military Classes of the Order is a gold Maltese cross, of eight 
points, enamelled argent ; in the four angles, a lion passant guardant or ; in the centre, the 
rose, thistle, and shamrock, issuant from a sceptre between three imperial crowns or, within a 
cLrcle gules ; thereon the motto of the Order, surrounded by two branches of laurel proper, 
issuing from an escroU azure, incribed Ich Dien (I serve), in letters of gold. It is worn by 
the grand crosses pendent from a red ribbon across the right shoulder, by the knights com- 
manders from the neck, and by the companions from the button-hole. 

The Collar is of gold (weight thirty ounces Troy weight), and is composed of nine 
imperial crowns, and eight roses, thistle, and shamrock, issuing from a sceptre, enamelled in 
their proper colours, tied or linked together with seventeen gold knots, enamelled white, 
having the badge of the Order pendent therefrom. 

The Star of the Military Grand Crosses is formed of rays or flames of silver, thereon 
a gold Maltese cross, and in the centre, within the motto, branches of laurel, issuant as in the 
badge. 

civil knights grand CROSa 





The Civil Knights Grand Crosses retain the old badge and star of the Order. The 
Star is of silver, formed with eight points or rays, charged with three imperial crowns, proper, 
upon a glory of silver rays, surrounded with a red circle, upon which is the motto of the 
Order. Their badge is of gold, comjKjsed of a rose, thistle, and shamrock, issuing from a 
sceptre between three imperial crowns, encircled by the motto. The civil knights com- 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 



Ixxi 



manders wear the same badge, of a smallar size, round the neck by a red ribbon, and the 
civil companions the same, but of a still smaller size, from the button-hole, pendent from a 
red ribbon. 

MILITARY KNIGHTS COMMAIfDERS. (k.C.B.) 





CIVIL KXIGHTS COMMANDEBS. (K.C.B.) 





The Star of the Knights Commanders is in the form of a cross-patt6e of silver, 
having the same centre as the Grand Crosses, but without a gold Maltese cross thereon. The 
star of the Civil Knights Commanders is of the same form and size, only omitting the laurel 
wreath round the circle containing the motto and the escroll with the words " Ich dien " 
underneath. 



military companions, (c.b.) 




CIVIL companions, (c.b.) 




Motto — Tria juncta in uno. 



Ribbon of t/w. Order — Red. 



Ixzii 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 



THE MOST EXALTED ORDER OF THE STAR OF INDIA. 



Instituted by Her Majesty Queen Victoria^ February 23rc?, 1861, and enlarged^ 

March 28th, 1866. 




The Star. — Rays of gold iasuing from a centre, having thereon a star in diamonds, 
resting upon a light blue enamelled circular ribbon, tied at the ends, inscribed with the motto 
of the Order, viz. : — " Heaven's light our guide," also in diamonds. 

The Collar. — Composed of the lotus of India, of palm branches, tied together, in 
saltier, and of the united Red and White Rose. In the centre is an imperial crown ; all 
richly enamelled on gold, in their pro[)er colours. 

The Badge. — An onyx cameo of Her Majesty's effigy, set in a perforated and orna- 
mented oval, containing the motto of the Order, "Heaven's light our guide," surmounted 
by a star all in diamonds. The Ribbon of the Order is sky-blue, having a narrow white 
stripe towards either edge, and is worn from the right shoulder to the left side. 

The Mantle. — Light blue satin, lined with white, and fastened with a cordon of white 
silk, with blue and silver taaaehs, ou the left side a representation of the star of the Order. 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 



tytiii 



KNIGHTS COMMANDERS. 





The Knights Commanders wear around their necks a ribbon of the same colours and 
pattern as that of the First Class, but two inches in width, hanging therefrom the Badge of a 
smaller size than that appointed for the Knights Grand Commanders except the star, which 
surmounts it, is of silver ; on their left breast a star composed of rays of silver issuing from 
a gold centre, having thereon a silver star resting upon a bhie enamelled circular ribbon, tied 
at the ends, inscribed with the motto of the Order. 



COMPANIONS. 




The Companions wear from the left breast a Badge of the same form as appointed for 
the Knights Commanders, but of a smaller size pendent to the like ribbon of the breadth of 
one inch and a half. 



Motto — Heaven's light our guide. 

Ribbon of the Orcfor— Sky-blue, with a narrow white stripe towards either edge. 



bmv 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 



THE MOST DISTINGUISHED ORDER OF ST. MICHAEL 
AND ST. GEORGE. 



Instituted 27th April, 1818, by Letters Patent, under the Great Seal of Great Britain, and 
enlarged and extended ith December, 1 868, /or the natural bom subjects of the Crown 
of the United Kingdom as may have held or shall hold high and confidential offices 
within Her Majesty's colonial possessions, ^c. 




HAUIT AND INSIGNIA. 

The Star of a Knight Grand Cross is composed of seven rays of silver, having a small 
ray of gold between each of them, and over all the cross of St. George, gules. In the centre 
in a representation of the Archangel St. Michael encountering Satan, within a blue circle, 
inscribed with the motto, AusriciOM Melioris ^-Evi. 

The Collar is formed alternately of lions of England, of Maltese crosses, and of the 
ciphers S M and S G, having in the centre the imperial crown, over two winged lions, passant 
puardant, each holding a book and seven arrows. At the ojiposite end of the collar are two 
«iniilar lions. The whole is of gold except the crosses, which are of white enamel, and it is 
linked together by small gold chains. 

The Badoe is a gold cross of fourteen points of white enamel, edged with gold, having 
in the centre, on one side, the Archangel St. Michael encountering Satan, and on the other 
St. George on horseback, encountering a dragon, with a blue circle, on which the motto of 
the Order is inscribed. The Cross is surmounted by the imperial crown, and is worn by the 
Knights Grand CYoss to the Collar, or to a wide Saxon-blue ribbon, with a scarlet stripe from 
the right shoulder to the left side. 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 



Ixxv 



The Mantle is of Saxon-blue satin, lined with scarlet silk, tied with cordons of blue and 
scarlet silk and gold, and haa on the left side the star of a Knight Grand Crosa 

The Chapeau is of blue satin, lined with scarlet, and surmounted with white and black 
ostrich feathers. 



KNIGHTS COMMANDERS. 





The Knights Commanders wear the badge suspended to a narrower ribbon from the 
neck, and have on their left side a star composed or four rays, with a small cross of eight 
points in saltire, of silver, surmounted by the cross of St George, gules, and having the same 
centre as the Star of the Grand Crosses. 



COMPANIONS. 




The Cavalieri and Companions wear the small cross of the Order from a still narrower 
ribbon at the button-hole of their coats. 



Motto — Auspicium Meliuris .^vi Ribbon of the Orcfer— Sason-blue, with a scarlet stripe. 



kxvi BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 

THE ORDER OF THE INDIAN EMPIRE. 

Instituted by Her Majesty Queen Victoria, Empress of India, 1 January, 1878. 




This Order was instituted to reward services rendered to Her Majesty and Her Indian 
Empire and to commemorate the Proclamation of Her Style and Title of Empress of India, 
and is to consist of the Sovereign, Gi-and Master, and Companions. 

The Viceroy and Governor-General of India for the time being io be Grand Master of 
the Order. 

The Companions are to consist of such persons who by their services, official or other, to 
the Empire of India, have merited the Royal Favour, and upon such distinguished Eepre- 
sentatives of Eastern Potentates as the Sovereign may think fit. 

The Councillors of Her Majesty for the Indian Empire are to be ex-officio and for life 
Companions of the Order. 

The Companions of the Order to have place and precedency next to and immediately 
after the Companions of the Order of St. Michael and St. George, and to rank among them- 
selves according to the date of their respective nominations. 

The Badge consists of a Rose, enamelled gules, barbed vert, having in the centre Her 
Majesty's Royal Effigy, within a purple circle, inscribed " Victoria Imperatrix," with the 
word " India " on the leaves of the rose, surmounted by an Imperial Crown, all gold, pendent 
from an ornamented gold clasp by an Imperial purple ribbon, one inch and a half in width. 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD 



Ixxvii 



ROYAL ORDER OF VICTORIA AND ALBERT. 



Instituted 10 February, 1862. Enlarged 10 October, 1864, 15 November, 1865, 

and 15 March, 1880. 



FIRST CLAS& 




SECOND CLASS. 




Ixiviii 



BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. 



THIRD CLAS3. 




FOURTH CLASS. 




BRITISH ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD. Ixxix 



THE IMPERIAL ORDER OF THE CROWN OF INDIA. 



Instituted by Her Majesty Queen Victoria, Empress of India, 1 January, 1878. 




This Order was instituted to commemorate the assumption of Her Majesty's Imperial title of 
Empress of India, and is to consist of the Sovereign, and of such Princesses of Her Majesty's 
Boyal and Imperial House, the Wives and other Female Relatives of Princes of the Indian 
Empire and other Indian Ladies, and of the Wives and other Female Relatives of any of the 
persons who have held or may hold the offices of Viceroy and Governor-General of India, 
Governors of Madras or Bombay, or of Principal Secretary of State for India, as the Sovereign 
may think fit. 

The first day of January in every year is to be deemed the Anniversary of the Institution 
of the Order. 

The decoration or Badge consists of Her Majesty's Royal and Imperial Cipher, 
"V.R. «fe I." in diamonds, pearls, and turquoises, encircled by a border set -with pearls, 
surmounted by the Imperial Crown, jewelled and enamelled in proper colours, attached 
to a light blue watered ribbon, edged white, of one inch and a half in width, tied in a bow. 



SUPPLEMENT 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



-*^-g*- 



ABABiSOW (Hants). Sa. two swords in saltire, arg. 
pomels and hilts or, between four fleurs-de-lis of the last. 
Crest — A demi-female habited, holding in her arms a quiver 
of arrows all ppr. 

Abbott (Braemar House, Lancaster Gale, Paddington, co. 
Middlesex). Sa. a pale or, thereou a crosier of the first, on 
a chief of the second three water-bougets of the field. 
Crest — In front of two crosiers saltirewise sa. a unicorn's 
head erased or. 

Abel (Sib Fkedekick Auocstds Abel, Knt. C.B., D.C.L., 
F.B.S.). Sa. on a fesse, engr. between two roses pale- 
wise, arg. three trefoils slipped vert. Crest — In front of a 
dexter arm embowed in armour, the hand grasping a 
thunderbolt, a torch fessewise fired, all ppr. Motto— Ohne 
Bast Zum Ziel. 

Abney Hastings. (Baron Donington). See Hastings. 

Abraliam (Grassendale Park, co. Lancaster, previously of 
Swarthraoor Hall, Ulveraton, same co. ; John Abraham, 
£sq., of Grassendale, had two sons, Thomas Fell Abraham, 
bis successor, Alfred Clat Abraham, and a dau., Emma 
Clarke Abraham). Erm. on a uhev. betw. three mullets 
of eight points gu. as many towers ar. Crest — Upon a 
mount vert in front of two fronds of fei'n a rook ppr. Motto 
— Veritas, libertas. 

Accountants, Chartered (in England and Wales). 
Ar. on a mount in base, in front of a rudder in bend 
sinister, a female figure ppr. representing " Economy," 
habited gu. mantled az. about the temples a wreath of 
olive, in the dexter hand a rod, and in the sinister a pair of 
compasses also ppr. ; a chief of the second thereon a balance 
suspended also or. Motto — Kecte numerare. 

Accrington, Borough of (co. Lancaster; granted 26 
Aug. 1879). Gu. on a fesse ar. a shuttle fessewise ppr. in 
base two printing cylinders, isauant therefrom a piece of 
calico (parsley pattern) also ppr. on a chief per pale or and 
vert a lion ramp, purpure and a stag courant or. Crest 
— An oak branch bent from the sinister chevronwise, 
sprouting and leaved ppr. fructed or. iV/o«o— Industry and 
prudence conquer. 

Acton (Acton Scott, CO. Salop ; exemplified to Adodstus 
Wood, Esq., upon his assuming by royal licence, 1874, the 
surname of Acton). Gu. two lions pass. ar. betw. nine 
cross-crosslets fltch^e or. Crest — A human leg and thigh in 
armour ppr., garnished or, couped and dropping blood. 

Acworth (G. Bbindlet Acworth, Esq.. F.S.A.). Quarterly, 
per fesse dovetail, 1st and 4th, erm. on a chief dancetteegu. 
three ducal crowns ar. within a border sa. bezant^ ; 2nd 
and 3rd, ar. three roses gu. each charged in the centre with 
a mullet or. Crest — An armed arm or, issuant out of a 
coronet of strawberry leaves gu. the hand grasping s ser- 
pent ppr. holding in the mouth an annulet sa. 

Adam (Blair Adam, co. Kinross, bart. ; created 20 May, 
1882). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, arg. a mullet az. pierced o) 
the field betw. three cross crosslt-ts fituhee gu. for Adam; 
2nd, ar. three arrows gu. the niid'llemostpaleways, the other 
two saltireways, points downwards, banded together vert, 
accompanied with six trefoils, slipped of the last, two in 
chief, Vwo in fesse, and two in base, for Littlejohn ; 3rd, 
ar. three hawks' heads erased ppr. on a bordure engr. az. 
eight berants, for Bbtdone. Cie.it— K cross crosslet fitchee 
gu. surmounted of a eword in saltire ppr. Motto— Crux 
mihi grata quies. 



Adams (Francis Ottiwell Adams, Esq., John Street, 
Berkeley Square, London). Az. on a fesse engr. betw. two 
cat-a-mountains pass, guard, ar. a like cat-a-mountain of 
the first. Crest — A cat-a-mountain guard, ar. collared az. 
resting the dexter forepaw on a terrestrial globe ppr. 

Adams (Rev. William Cokatne Adams, M.A., Dummer 
Grange, co. Southampton, eldest son of William Adams, 
LL.D., of Thorpe, Chertsey, by Hon. Mary Anne Cokayne, 
his wife, granddau. and co-heiress of Charles, 5th Viscount 
Cullen). Or, on a cross betw. four martlets sa. five mullet* 
of the field. Crest — A martlet sa. holding in the beak a 
mullet or. 

Adams (Drumelton House and Erne View co. Cavan; 
William Adams son of William Adams. Esq., of Erne 
View, deceased, and grandson of William Adams, of GortA 
gommon, co. Fermanagh). Vert, a pale betw. two grifilns 
segreant or, the pale charged in chief with a trefoil slipped 
of the first. Crest — A griffin's head couped gu. betw. two 
wings sa. each charged with three bezants. 

Adams (Cotswold Grange, Cheltenham, co. Gloucester). 
Vert, a pale betw. two griffins segreant or, quartering 
Shcte : per chev. sa. and or, in chief two eagles displ. of 
the last; and Davis: Ar. a chev. betw. three swans sa. 
Crest — A demi griftln segreant or. Motto — Tout ou rien. 

Adams (Rev. James Williams Adams, B.A., V.C, Senior 
Chaplain on the Bengal Ecclesiastical Establishment). Vert 
a rai-a-raountain betw. three crescents or. Crest— Kn eagle 
reguard. wings elevated sa. pendent from the neck an 
escocheon or, charged with a cat's face vert, resting the 
dexter claw on a crescent also or. 

Adamson (Rushton Park, Robertsbridge, co. Sussex ; 
William Adamson, of Macclesfield, co. Chester, m. Mar- 
garet, dau. of James Stuart, of Edinburgh, and had a 
son, William Rcshton Adamson, Esq., of Rushton Park, 
J.P., D.L.). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a tilting spear 
broken in three pieces, two in saltire surmounted of the 
headpiece in pale, pointed or, banded gu. for Adamson; 2nd 
and 3rd, or, a fesse chequy az. and ar. surmounted of a bend 
gu. charged with a bezant betw. two buckles gold, in chief 
a lion pass, guard, of the fourth, for Stdart; impaled with 
Dakeine: Gu. a lion pass, guard, betw. two mullets or, two 
flanches ar. each charged with a griffin segreant sa. Crust 
— A talbot pass. az. bezantee collared or. Motto — Avant. 

Adamson (co. Aberdeen, and Ewell, co. Surrey, 1883). Ar. 
a fesse wavy betw. three cross-crosslets fitch^ az. Crest 
— A cross crosslet fitchce az. Motto — Crux mihi grata 
quies. 

Adderley (Baron Norton). Ar. on a bend az. three masclel 
of the field. Crest — On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a 
Btorli ar. Sup2iorters — On either side a stork ar. gorged 
with a chain or, suspended therefrom an escocheon az. 
charged with a mascle also ar. Motto — Addere legi 
justitiam decus. 

Alcester, Baron. See Seymoub. 

Alcock (John Alcock, Bishop of Ely, 1486—1500, Founder 
of Jesus College, Cambridge). Ar. a fesse betw. tliree 
cocks' heads erased sa. 

Aldam (Wabde-Aldam, Hooton Pagnell Hall, Donc&ster, co. 
York ; exemplified to William Wright Aldam, Esq., eldest 
son of William Aldam, Esq., of Frickley Hall, same co., 
upon his assuming by royal licence the surname of Wabde, 
in addition to and before that of Aldam, in conse<;uence of 
his marriage, 1878, with Sarah Jclia, dau. of Rev. William 
Warde, of Hootin Pagnell Hall). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 



ALD 



SUPPLEMENT. 



ARK 



perfesse az. and enn. in smister chief and dexter basei an 
eagle displ. or, in the dexter canton isswant towards the 
sinister base seven rays, the centre one gold the others ar. 
for Aldam ; 2nd and 3rd, az. a cross flory or, and for dis- 
tinction in the dexter chief point a crass crosslet of the last, 
for Wardb, Crests —lat, Aldau: Issuant from a mount 
Tert four ostrich feathers ar, conjoined at the points by a 
mill-rind or ; 2nd, Wakde : A wolfs head erased or, charged 
for distinction with a cross crosslet az. 
Aldworth (Newmarket, co. Cork ; originally Aylworth, of 
Berkshire: Sir Richard Aldwokth, provost marshal of 
Munster, was knighted by Lord Deputy Chichester, 22 April, 
1613). Ar. a fesse engr. betw. six billets g». Crest— A 
dexter arm embowed in armour, the hand grasping a straight 
sword all ppr. Motto — Nee temere nee timide. 

Aldworth (Stanlake, Berks. Richarb Neville Aldworth, 
Esq., of Stanlake, assumed, in 1762, the surname and arms 
of Neville, and was father of Richard, 2nd Lord Bray- 
tn-ooke; Visit. Berks, 1665). Ar. a chev. betw. three boars' 
heads ereet and ten cross crosslets fitthee gu. Crest — A 
demi dragon segreant ar. holding a cross crosslet fitch^ gu. 

Aleth (King of Dyfed, South Wales). Az. three cocks ar. 
armed, crested, andjelloped or. 

Alexander (Gr«neral Sir James Alzxamdeb, K.C.B.; so 
created 1871). Az. a chev. ar. betw. three talbots' heads 
erased of the last, collared gu. Crest — A talbot's head, as 
in the arms. Motto — Nil desperandum. 

Alsrar (Saxon Earl of Mercia, d. 1 159). Sa. an eagle displ. or. 

Allardice (Barclat-Allardice, co. Kincardine; matricu- 
lated to Mrs. Margaret Barclat-Allahdice, and her only 
surviving children, Robert Barclat-Allardice and David 
Stuart Barclat-Allardice, Esquires, and their descen- 
dants (formerly Ritchie), with license and authority to bear 
the surnames of Barclat-Allardice only ; at the Lyon 
Office, Edinburgh, 2 July. 1883). Quarterly, Ist and 4th 
grand quarters, ar. a fess wavy gu. betw, three boars' 
heads erased sa. armed and langued of the second, for 
Aiiu.%j)ict: of Allardice : 2nd grand quarter, az. a chevron, 
and in chief three crosses patee ar., for Bakclat o/ Uri/ ; 
3rd grand quarter, counter quartered, Ist and 4tb, ar. on a 
chief sa. three escallops or ; 2nd and 3rd, or, a fess chequy, 
az. and ar. in chief a chevronel gu., for Graham, Earl or 
Henteith and Airth. Crests — Dexter, a naked man from 
the middle, holding in his dexter hand a scymetar ppr. 
Motto — lu defence of the distressed, for Allardice. 
Sinister, a bishop's mitre or. Motto — In Cruce spero, for 
Barclay. 

Allaway. Sa. three boar' heads bendways conped ar. 
Crett — An anchor, thereon a dove holding in the beak an 
olive branch all ppr. 

Allcroft (Stokesay Castle, co. Salop, and Harlington, co. 
Middlesex). Ar. a cross engr. and in the 1st and 4th 
quarters a fret betw. four fleurs-de-lis sa. Crest — Out of the 
battlements of a tower a deml lion ppr. holding in the dexter 
paw a flagstaff, therefrom flowing to tlie sinister a banner 
ar. charged with a fret sa. and resting the sinister paw on an 
escutcheon also ar. charged with a fleur-de-lis sa. Motto— 
Dat Deus incrementum. 

A>len (Streatley co. Berks, P. 12). This family descend from 
John Allen of Streatley, J. P., b. 1593, son of John Allen 
of same place, d. 1654 ; who was grandson of John Allen of 
same place. Visit Berks, 1644-6). Ar. two bars az. over all 
an anchor in pale or. Crest — A deml naked female holding 
in her right hand a spear erect all ppr. 

Allen (B.C. Allen, Capt. R.N.). Per bend wavy ar. and 
az. in sinister chief a crescent, and In dexter base a mullet 
counterchanged. Crest— An arm vested az. the hand hold- 
ing a hunting horn gu. garnished or. .3fo«o— Vivite fortes. 

Allen (Inchmartine. co. Perth). Per bend indented ar. 
and gu. in chief three crescents, two and one, and in base 
a mullet all counterchanged, a bordure also counterchanged. 
Crest — An eagle rising ppr. A/o»o— Fortiter. 

Allett (Liniberton, co. Lincoln, and London ; Sir John 
Ali.ett, Lord Mayor of London 1590, son of Richard 
ALI.ETT, of Limberton, received the honour of knighthooH 
the year of hit mayoralty, and d. 1.591. Arms granted by 
Dethick, Garter, 1680. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. on a 
pale la betw. two pellets a deiui lion ramp. or. Cr«jit— A uni- 
corn's head erased ar. collared wiih a bar gemel sa. homed or. 

Allhusen (Stoke Court, co. Buckingham ; Christian 
Alluuben, Knq., J. P., D.L., 6. at Kiel, in Holstcin, 2 Dec. 
I80e, came to England, March, 1825, settled at NewcastU- 



on-Tyne, and purchased Stoke Court, 1871). Barry of six 
or and az. four fleurs-de-lis, two and two, counterchanged. 
Crest — A demi lion guard, az. holding in the dexter paw 
a passion cross or, betw. two open buffalo horns of the last. 
Motto — Devant si je puis. 
Allison (Roker, Sunderland, co. Durham: Col. John James 
Allison, commanding 2nd Durham militia, J. P., D.L., eldest 
son of James Allison, Esq., of UnderclifT, same co.). Ar. a 
fess gu. betw. three blackbirds per. a bordure of the second. 
Crest — A peacock in his pride ppr. Motto — Vincit Veritas. 

Alliston. Ar. a fesse betw. three boars' heads couped close 
az. Crest — A pheon point downwards or, the shaft broken 
off near the head ppr. 

Allsopp (Hyndlip Hall, co. Worcester, Bart. ; created 7 May, 
1880). Sa. three pheons chevronwise or, betw. as many 
doves rising ar. each holding in the beak an ear of wheat of 
the second. Crest — Upon a pheon a plover close. In the beak 
an ear of wheat all or. Motto — Festina lente- 

Altree (Frederick Altree, Esq.. B.E.). Per chev. or and 
vert, in chief two oak trees eradicated ppr., and in base a 
cinquefoil of the first. Crest — On a mount an oak tree, 
and in front thereof a serpent nowed, all ppr. Motto — 
Sperate futurum. 

Alnred (arms from the monument of Matthew Alubed, of 
Heydon, co. York, who m. Ann, dau. of Sir Henrt Evert, 
and d. 1719). Gu. a chev. betw. three lions' heads erased 
sa. impaling Evert, or, four chevronels gu. 

Ambrose (William Henrt Ambrose, Esq., 9, Grove 
Terrace, West Kensington). Az. two lions pass, in pale ar. 
on a chief dovetailed of the last, a fleur de-lis betw. two 
annulets of the first. Crest — Issuant from the battlements 
of a tower a cubit arm holding a billet in bend sinister all 
or. Motto — J' espSre en Dieu. 

Ampthill, Baron. See Rcssell. 

Anderson (Little Harle Tower, co. Northumberland; 
George Anderson, Esq., M.A , of Little Harle Tower, J. P., 
descended from a family long settled at Newcastle-on-Tyne). 
Gu. three martlets fessewise or betw. as many oak trees 
eradicated ar. Crest— In front of a falcon's head erased sa. 
guttee beaked and eyed or, holding in the beak an arrow 
bendwise head downwards ppr. three hearts gold. Motto — 
Vigilans et certus. 

Anderson (London, late Edinburgh). Ar. a saltire engr. 
vert. betw. a thistle slipped and leaved ppr. in chief, and 
three mullets in flank and base of the second. Crest— A 
crescent ar. Motto — Gradatim. 

Andrew (Tredinick, co. Cornwall). Az. on a saltire engr. 
betw. four ears of wheat or, a stag's head cabossed ppr. 
Crest — A stag at gaze holding in his mouth a wheat-ear all 
or, charged on the side with two mascles interlaced az. 
Motto — Prospice. 

An^us (Town Clerk of Aberdeen, 1877). Ar. a lion pass, 
guard, gu. on a chief az. two mullets of the first. Crest — 
A lion, as in the arms. Motto — Fortis est Veritas. 

Anne (Burghwallis, W.R. CO. York ; exemplified to Ernest 
Lambert Swinbdrne Charlton, Esq., of Burghwallis Hall, 
capt. 3rd batt. Sherwood Foresters, Derbyshire regt., second 
son of William Henrt Charlton, Esq., of Hesleyside, co. 
Northumberland, deceased, by Barbara Tasbdrob, his wife, 
dau. of Michael Anne, Esq., of Burghwallis Hall, also 
deceased, on his taking by royal licence the surname of 
Anne only in lieu of that of Charlton, and the arms of 
Anne and Charlton quarterly). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
Anne, gu. three bucks' heads, cabossed ar. attired or; 2nd 
and 3rd, Charlton, or, a lion ramp. gu. Crests — 1st, Anne : 
A maiden's head couped at the shoulders ppr. ; 2nd, Charl- 
ton: A demi lion ramp. gu. 

Anson (Earl of Lichfield, and the descendants of George 
Anson (formerly Adams), Esq., father of the first Viscount 
Anson) quartered (as registered in the Heralds College) with 
the Anson coat in the first quarter; 2nd, erm. three cats pass, 
guard, sa. for Adams, of Sambrooke ; 3rd, az. three salmon 
in pale, per pale or and arg. for Sambrooke, of Sambrooke, 
CO. .Salop; 4th, bb. abend or, betw. three spear heads ar. 
for Cabbikr, of Wirksworlh, co. Derby. 

Apperley (Morben, co. Montgomery). Ar. a chev. gu. 
betw. three pineapples sa. Crest — A pineapple sa. 

Ardilaun, Baron. See Guinness. 

Arkell (arms in Haddington Church, co. Gloucester). Az. 
on a bend or, fbur tortoaux, a chief engr. «r. charged witli 
a stringed bow fesseways of the first. 



ABN 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BAG 



Amison (Major W. B. Abkisom, of Beaumont, Penrith, 
Cumberland). Per pale az. and sa. a demi lion emsed betw. 
four estoiles saltirewise or. Crest — In front of a fern-brake a 
staff lodged ppr. resting the dexter forefoot upon an estoile 
or. Motto — Ditat servata Qdes. 

Arrol (Glasgow, 1878). Or, a lion ramp. gu. betw, three 
escallops »a. Crest — A demi lion gu., holding a scymetar 
ppr. Motto — Courage. 

Artindale (Brown Hill, Burnley, co. Lancaster ; Thouas 
Fbedebic Aktindale, Esq., of that place). Az. on a fesse 
indented erminois betw. three mullets of six points or, a lion 
pass, guard, gu. Crest — A demi pegasus or, winged fretty 
gu. holding betw. the hoofs a mullet of six poiuts. Motto — 
In lumine luce. 

Ashby (now of Quenby Hall, co. Leicester; Nicholas 
Hermann Bebnabd, Esq., of Bickley, Kent, assumed by 
royal licence, 1871, the surname and arms of Ashbt, in 
right of his wife, Annie, dau. and co-heir of Wiluiam Geobge 
Ashbt, Esq., R.N.). Az. a chev. erni. betw. three leopards' 
faces or, and for distinction a canton of the second. Crest — 
Upon a mural crown arg. a leopard's face or, the rim of the 
crown charged for distinction with a cross crosslet sa. 

Ashcroft (Grange House, Oakhill Park, Old Swan, Liver- 
pool). <}iiartcrly, per fesse indented or and vert four ash 
branches, slipped, leaved, and fructed, all counterchanged. 
Crest — Out of park-pales or, an ash tree ppr. therefrom 
pendent by a riband gu. an escocheon gold charged with a 
branch as in the arms vert. Motto — Floruit fraxinus. 

Ashe (Sowton, alias Clist Fomizon, co. Devoa, and South 
Petherton, co. Somerset ; William Ashe, of South Pethei ton, 
<e7>ip. James I. , ninth in descent from Sir Oliveb de Esse, 
temp. Edward II., whose second son, Henbt Ashe. m. the 
dau. and heir of Bichabd Fomizon, Lord of the Manor of 
Fomieon. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Quarterly, 1st, ar. two 
chev. sa; 2ad, vert a lion ramp. ar. ; 3rd, gu. a cross erm.; 
4tb, sa. a fesse ar. in chief two mullets of the last. 

Ashton (Little Ocn Hall, co. Stafford). Sa. on a pile betw. 
two crescents ar. acinquefoil pierced of the field. Crest — 
On a mount vert, a mower with his scythe, all ppr. Motto — 
Fide et virtute. 

Ashton (Maceentie-Ashton ; Abdndell Mackenzie, Esq., 
Stockport, CO. Chester, assumed the surname of Ashton). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th sa. on a pile betw. two crescents in 
base ar. a mullet pierced of the first, for Ashton; 2 and 3 
Mackenzie. Crest — Ashton: On a mount vert, a mower 
ppr. vested paly ar. and sa, in the act of whetting his 
scythe also ppr. 

Ashurin (Bretforton Manor, Evesham, co. Worcester). Az. 
a chev. betw. three kites' hearts erased or. Crttt — A Moor's 
head couped atthe shoulders in profile ppr. wreathed around 
the temples ar. and az. Motto — Audax Vincendo. 

Ashworth (Egerton Hall, Bolton-le-Moors, co. Lancaster, as 
borne by Edmcnd Ashwobth, Esq., of Egerton Hall, J. P., 
eldest son of Edmcnd Ashwobth, Esq., also of Egerton Hall, 
by Chablotte, his wife, thiid dau. of Thomas Cbbistt, 
Esq., of Broomfleld, Essex ; descended from a family which 
was originally settled in the township of Ashworth, and 
thence removed to Turton, where they have resided for two 
hundred and fifty years). Gu. a cross humett^e or, betw. 
four fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest — On a mount vert, a fox ppr. 

Athill (Guestwick, CO. Norfolk; a family of great antiquity 
In that county). Ar. on a chev. sa. three crescents or. 
Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a plume of three ostrich 
feathers ar. Motto — Crescam ut prosim. 

Atkey (Feedebick Waltee Atket, Esq., Craven Street, 
London). Per pale or and gu, two chevronels betw. as many 
gryphons' heads erased in chief, and a garb in base, all 
counterchanged. Crest — A gryphon segreant or, gorged 
with a collar gemel holding betw. the claws a cross moline, 
and the dexter foot resting on a garb fessewise gu. 

Atkin (Robebts-.\tkin : exemplified by royal licence, dated 
23 Dec, 1882, to John Roberts .A.tkin, Esq., 2nd son of 
John Drew Atkin, Esq., of Merrion Square, Dublin, by 
Geobgina, his wife, dau. of Sir Thomas Kobebts, 1st Bart. 
of Briglitfieldstown, co. Cork). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
Bobebts, az. on a chev. ar. cotised or, three mullets of six 
points pierced sa., 2nd and 3rd, Atkin, ar. gutte de sang, 
a cross cotised flory and in the 1st and 4th quarters a. trefoil 
slipped sa., and in the 2nd and 3rd quarters a mullet of six 
points of the last pierced of the field. Crests, Robebts — On 
a uiouut vert an eagle displ, erai, wings ar. gorged with a 



chaplet of ivy ppr. 2nd, Atkin, two greyhounds' headt 
addorsed and erased ar. gutte de sang gorged with a collar 
vair and each holding a trefoil slipped sa. 

Atkins (Fbedebice Thomas Atkins, of the city of Madras, 
India, banker). Ar. within a cross voided five martlets sa. in 
the 1st and 4th quarters a mullet, in the 2nd and 3rd a teur- 
de-lis az. Crest — In front of two greyhounds' heads addoned 
and erased ar. gorged with a collar flory counter flory %z. 
as many fleur-de-lis of the last. 

Atkinson (Micklegate House, Pontefract, co. York; John 
Fbank Atkinson, Esq., youngest son of Uobebt Atkinson, 
by LocisA, his wife, dau. of Thomas G. Stbeet, Esq., of 
Kilburn, co. Middlesex, was 6. 1821, and in. 1860, Mabi 
Elizabeth, dau. of Chbistopheb Edwabb Damphieb, Esq., 
of The Hollies, co. Southampton, and sister of Cbossl^oh 
Damphieb Cbosslet, Esq., of Scaitcliffe, co. Lancaster). 
Gu. an eagle displ. with two heads ar. on a chief or, a rose 
betw. two martlets az. impaling for Damphieb, or, a lion 
ramp. sa. ducally crowned gu. on a chief of the last a label 
of five points ar. Crest — An eagle, wings expanded ar. 
holding a fleur-de-lis in the beak, beaked and legged gu. 
Motto — Tempus omnia revelat. 

Atkinson (Woolley Grange, Bradford-on-Avon, co. Wilts, 
Wall's End, and Benwell, co. Northumberland; confirmed 
to Claba Atkinson, widow of Bdddle Atkinson, Esq., of 
Woolley Grange, Wall's End, and Benwell, Lieut. B. Art., 
and her descendants). Ar. an eagle displ. with two heads 
pean betw. two flaunches sa. each charged with a bugle- 
horn, stringed of the first a chief gu. thereon betw. two 
martlets or, a pale of the last charged with a rose, also gu. 
barbed and seeded ppr. Crest — For wale desceiidants, an 
eagle displ. with two heads sa. suspended from the neck a 
bugle-horn, as in the arms, and holding in each claw a rose 
gu. slipped and leaved ppr. .^/o((o— Deo et regi fidelis. 

Atton. Barry of six az. and or, on a canton gu. a cross 
patonce ar. 

Atton. Or, a bat volant gu. 

Atton, or Attone(co. Westmorland). Gu. a cross sarcelly 
or, flory ar. 

Audeley (borne by Sir James Addelet. K.G., the hero ot 
Poitiers). Gu. fretty or, a label in chief. 

Aumeral (Jersey). Per fesse gu. and az. three crescents ar- 

Avery (Congresbury and Mells, co. Somerset, and London ; 
John Avebt, of London, merchant, temp. James I., son 
of Jacob Avebt, of Mells, and grandson of William Avert, 
of Congresbury. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Quarterly. 1st and 
4th, gu. a chev. betw. three annulets or ; 2nd and 3rd, az. 
a ram's head ar. horned or. 

Aylward (Toleb-Atlwabd, Shankill Castle, co. Kilkenny ; 
exemplified to Hectob James Charles Toleb, Esq., of 
Beechwood, co. Roscommon, son of Rev. Petee Toleb, by 
Marianne, his wife, dau. of Nicholas Atlwabd, Esq., of 
Shankill Castle, co. Kilkenny, and sister of James .-Vtlwabd 
Keabnet, Esq., of Shankill Castle, upon his assuming by royal 
licence, dated 30 May, 1884, the additional surname of Atl- 
wabd in compliance with the testamentary injunction of 
his maternal uncle, the said Ja»es Atlwabd Keabnet). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a fleur-de-lis betw. in dexter 
chief and sinister base an estoile and in sinister chief and 
dexter base an increscent all or, for Atlwabd ; 2nd and 3rd, 
ar. on a cross gu. betw. four oak leaves vert a fleur-de-lis 
or, for Toleb. Crests — 1st, Atlwabd, out of a ducal coronet 
or, a dexter arm embowed vested az. cuffed ar. the hand 
ppr. holding an anchor gold; 2nd, Toleb, out of a mural 
crown ppr. a fleur-de-lis or, charged with an ermine spot sa. 
.3/o£(»— Verus et fidelis semper. 



BA.BEH (St. George's and Wanstrow, co. Somerset ; Robebt 
Babeb, of St. George's, b. 1596, son and heir of Bichabd 
Babeb, of Wanstrow. Visit, Somerset, 1623). Ar. on a fessa 
gu. three eagles' heads erased of the field. 

Bacon (Rev. Thomas Bacon, M. A., Rector of Wiggonliolt 
and Greatimm, co. Sussex). Gu. a bordure arg. on a chief 
of the last a fret betw. two mullets of six points sa. Crest-~ 
A boar arg. resting the dexter forefoot on a fret sa. 

Bacup (Borough co. Lancaster). Az. on a fesse betw. two 
bales of cotton in chief or, and a block of stone with Lewis 
attached in base ppr. a fleece sable betw. two bees volant 
of the third in the centre chief point a squirrel sejant of 
the second. Crest— \n front of a bale of cotton or, a stag 
ppr. gorged with a collar vair resting the dexter forefoot on 
a trefoil slipped gold. Motto — Honor et industria. 



BAI 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BAB 



Bai?rle (Midg«nr, <--o- Sutherland; Bobest Baiorib, C.B., 
Lieut.-Col. Bombay Staff Corps). Gu. an anchor betw. four 
mullets saltirewiae within a bordure embattled or, on a chief of 
the last an embattled gateway vpr. Crest — In front of the 
battlements of a tower thereon an armed leg couped above 
the knee ppr. garnished and spurred or, a mount vert. 

Bailey (Strctford, co. Lancaster). Gu. on a fesse nebuly 
toetw. four martlets three in chief and one in base ar. two 
roses of the first barbed and seeded ppr. Crest — In front of 
An anchor in bend sinister ppr. a female figure vested vert 
•upporting with the right hand an escocheon gu. charged 
with a martlet ar. and resting with the left on the stock of 
the anchor. Motto — Vallum aeneum esto. 

Balllie (CocB%A.vz-Bkii.i.ts, Lord Lamington). SeeCocHBANE- 
Baillie. 

Bain (Lord Provost of Glasgow, 1876). Az. a woirs head 
erased or, on a chief ar. a salmon on its back ppr. with a 
signet ring in its mouth of the second. Crest — A dexter arm 
embowed gu. the hand grasping a dirk ppr. Motto — Et 
Wte et marte. 

Baker (Bowden, co. Chester, London, and Windsor, William 
Bakeb, of Windsor, h 1582, son of Thomas Baker, citizen 
of London, and grandson of John Bakes, of Bowden. 
Arms and crest granted by Bysshe, Garter; "Visit. Berks, 
J664-6). Ar. on a fess betw. three trefoils az., as many 
•wans' heads erased of the field. Crest — A swan's head 
erased ar. gorged gu. holding in the beak a trefoil as in the 
arms. 

Baker (New Windsor, co. Berks; descended from George 
Baker, chirurgeon to Queen Elizabeth ; Visit. Berks 1664-6). 
Or, a greyhound courantbetw. two bars sa. Crest — A cocka- 
trice eam. 

Baker (Sir Geoeoe Baker, Bart., Loventor, co. Devon). Per 
pale ar. and or, on a saltire nebuly sa. five escallops of the 
first, a chief of the third thereon a lion pass, of the second. 
Crot — A dexter arm embowed vested az. charged with three 
annulets interlaced or, cuff ar. holding in the hand an arrow 
In bend sinister ppr. Motto — True unto death. 

Baker (Caldham, co. Kent, and Calais, French Flanders; 
JoBy Baker, of Caldham, was Gentleman Porter of Calais, 
ttmp. Henry V. and VI., to which office the family arms 
appear to have reference). Ar. on a fess nebuMe betw. three 
keys sa. a tower triple-towered of the first. 

Baker (Skcrton House, Old Trafford,co. Lancaster; Thomas 
Bakes, Esq., J. P., Mayor of Manchester from Nov. 1880 to 
Not. 1882, and Alfred Bakes, Esq., J. P., co. Warwick). 
Az. a lion ramp. ar. gorged with a collar erniinois betw. two 
flaunches of the second each charged with a spur leathered 
of the first. Crest — Two arms embowed in armour grasping 
a tilting spear fessewise the head to the sinister ppr. pendent 
from the staff a spur leathered or. Motto— Etl monte 
alto. 

Baker (Upper Dunstable House, co. Surrey, and Loventor, 
CO. Devon, bart.). See Rhodes. 

Balche (Horton, co. Somerset; George Balche, Esq., of 
Horton, temp. James I., 6. 1854, son of Nicholas Balche, 
grandson of Geoboe Balcoe, and great-grandson of John 
Balche, all of same place, which latter was son and heir of 
William Balche, of Uighani, in same co. Visit. Somerset, 
1623). Barry of six or and az. on a bend engr. gu. three 
ipearhcade ar. 

Balche (Virginia, Maryland, and Philadelphia, North 
America). Same Armt. Crest— <)\xt of a ducal coronet or, 
a dcmi griffin ppr., motto over, Ubi libertas ibi patria. 
Motto — Not laws of man but laws of God. 

Balfour-SIelvllle. See Mklville. 

Baznford {Charles Bamford, Esq., Brookhurst, Brombo- 
rough). Ar. a feme engr. betw. two annulets in chief and as 
many masclea in banc gu. Crest — In front of a dexter arm 
embowed holding a flagstaff ppr. therefrom flowing a banner 
ar. charged with a mascle gu. three annulets interlaced of 
the last. j</o»o— Pcrsevcranlia vincit. 

Bankes (Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, 1597-1632). Az. a 
cross or, betw. four fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest — A griffln scgreant 
ar. resting the forepaws on a cross formee Utchuc gu. 

Barbenson 'Alderney ; Thomas Nicholas Barhenson, Esq.). 
Az. on u chev. betw. two mullets in chief and a branch of 
olive in base or, three gouttes de larmcs. Crest — Three 
mullets or, in front of a mount vert, thereon an olive tree 
ppr. and on the dexter side thereof, rarap. to the sinister, a 
lion gn. Mo'.to — Semper Bilelii. 



Barclay-Allardlce. See Allardicb. 

Barclay (Bev. Joseph Bahclat, LL.D., Rector of Stapleford, 
Hens, and subsequently Bishop of Jerusalem, only son of 
John Barclay, Esq., of Monone Lodge, near Strabane, co. 
Tyrone). Gu. on a chev. erm. betw. ten crosses pattee, six 
in chief and four in base ar. an escallop of the first. Crest — 
A mitre or, charged with an escallop gu. Motto— Dieu avec 
nous. 

Barker (Sunning, co. Berks ; William Barker, Esq., of Sun- 
ning, J. P. ,6. 1697, AnthontBarker, ofsame, J.P., andRev. 
Nicholas Barker, Rector of Stoke Talmage, co. Oxford ; 
sons of Sir Anthony Barker, Knt., of Sunning. Visit. 
Berks, 1664-6). Per chev. nebuly or, and sa. a lion ramp, 
counterchanged, quartering for Bcblet ; Per fesse sa. and 
ar. three tilting spears erect counterchanged. Crests — 
A demi moor ppr. in his dexter hand an arrow or, feathered 
and headed ar. on his sinister arm a shield gold, and over 
his shoulder a sash gu. 

Barker (Oakingham, or Wokingham, Berks; John Barker, 
of Wtikingham, tem;). Queen Elizabeth. Visit.Berks, 1664-6). 
Same Arms and Crest. 

Barker (Sandhurst, co. Berks, descended from John Barker, 
d. 1620, 2nd son of John Barker, of Wokingham). Same 
Arms and Crest. 

Barker (Chignal, co. Essex; Thomas Barker, Esq., of 
Chignal, temp. Queen Elizabeth, grandson of William 
Barker, of Wokingham, co. Berks, m. Dorothy, dau. of 
John Knighton, Esq. of Bayford, co. Hertford. Visit. Essex, 
1612). Same Arms, impaling Knighton, and same Crest. 

Barker (Newbury, co. Berks, Great Horwood, co. Bucking- 
ham, Culworth, CO. Northampton, and Stokesley, co. York : 
Rev. WiLLlA.M Barker, D.D., Prebendary of Canterbury, 
and Hugh Barker, M.D., of Newbury, sons of Robert 
Barker, of Great Horwood, who was nephew to Sir Chris- 
topher Barker, Garter,(fntp. HenryVIII.,and son of Robert 
Barker, of Culworth, the son of William Barker, of 
Stokesley. Visit. Berks, 1664-6). Ar. three bears' heads 
erased gu. muzzled or, a crescent on a mullet, for diff. 
Crest — A bear's head erased gu. muzzled or, betw. two 
wings erect, the dexter az. the sinister gold. 

Barretto (granted 1813 to Joseph Barretto, of London and 
Calcutta, son of Joseph Barretto, who .settled at Calcutta 
1775, descended from a member of the family of Barretto, 
who left Portugal in the 16th century, and settled at Goa 
and Bombay). Erminois three bars gu. on a canton ar. the 
bust of a female habited ppr. t'l-fSf — A demi tiger ppr. 
collared with three barrulets and holding betw. the paws a 
star pagoda or. N.B. The ancient Portuguese coat belong- 
ing to Barretto appears to have been, "Gu. a chev. betw. 
three annulets or." This was borne by Luis de Sodza 
Barretto, of Calcutta, quartered with, "Ar. alien ramp, 
within an orle of eight fleurs-de-lis az. for de Soi'za. His 
dau. and co-heir Rozalin, hi. Joseph Barretto, the grantee 
of 1813. 

Barnard (John Barnard, Esq., Lambeth, co. Surrey). Per 
chev. gu. and ar. in chief two lions ramp, of the last and in 
base a bear ramp. sa. muzzled or. Crest — A lion ar. 
billctty sable supporting with the dexter paw a shield gu. 
charged with a garb or. Motto — Mea gloria fides. 

Barnard. Az. a fesse or, a border engr. of the last. 

Barnard (Downside, co. Somerset; Nathaniel Barnard, 
of Downside, temp. James 1., son of John Barnard, grand- 
son of John Barnard, and great-grandson of Edward 
Barnard, all of same place. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. a 
bear salient sa. muzzled of the field. 

Baron (Heywood, co. Lancaster). Or, on a cross engr. gu. 
betw. four escocheons of the last five mullets pierced of the 
first, (-'retl — A cubit arm in armour, the hand in a gauntlet 
grasping a tilting spear erect ppr. suspended therefrom by 
a chain or, an escocheon gu. charged with a mullet, as in 
the arms. 

Barrett (Barrett's Country, co. Cork. Collection of Moly- 
neux, Ul.iter, 1597-1612). Barry of ten per pale ar. and gu. 
counterchanged. Crest— A. demi lion ramp. sa. ducally 
crowned per pule ar. and gu. 

Barrow-in-Furness niorough of; co. Lancaster). Gu. op 
a bend betw. a serpent nowcd in chief and a stagtrippant in 
base or, an arrow pointing upwards to a bee volunt ppr. upon 
a chief ar. on waves of the sea, a paddle-wheel sicamiihip 
under steam and canvas also ppr. Crest — Out of the hnttU- 



BAB 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BAZ 



ments of a tower a. ram's head ppr. armed and collared. 
Motto — Semper surBum. 
Barrow (Georoe Maktin Basbow, of St. John's Green, 
Essex). Sa. two swords in saltire ppr. pomels and hilts or, 
tlie blades entwined by a wreath of laurel also or, betw. two 
roses in pale ar. barbed, leaved, and slipped of the second, 
and as many fleur-de-lis in tesse of the third. Crest — Dpon 
a mount vert a squirrel sejant ppr. gorged with a collar 
gemel or, holding a rose, as in the arms. 

Barrs (Haden Hill, Dudley, co. Stafford ; Alfred Haden 
Babbs, Esq., 6. Ia04, son of Uev. George Barrs, of Eowley 
Regis, same co., by Mary, his wife, dau. of John Kenrick, 
Esq., and widow of John Ha<ien, Esq., of Haden Hill, s. to 
Haden Hill, 1876, upon the death of Anne Eliza Haden, only 
dau. of John Haden). Gu. two bars engr. vair betw. five 
annulets, three in chief and two in base or. Crest — Upon a 
mount vert in front of a gate or, the trunk of an oak tree 
eradicated and sprouting towards the dexter ppr. 

Barry (Otteb-Bahrt, Emperor's Gate, London). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, gu. three bars embattled ar., for Babri ; 2nd 
and 3rd, or, on a bend gu. guttce d'or, betw. two crosses 
patt^e of the second, three crescents of the first, for Otter. 
Crents — 1st, Barri ; The embattlements of a tower gu. 
charged with three roses in fesse ar. ; 2nd, Otter; Two 
crosses pattee, resting thereon a crescent, all or. Motto — 
A rege et a victoria. 

Bartlett (Ashmead-Bartlett. Ellis Bartlbtt, Esq., of 
Plymouth, m. Sophia, daU. of John King Ashmead, Esq., 
and had, Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, M.P. for Eye, and 
William Lehman Ashmead Bartlett Bcrdett Coutts, hi. 
12 Fib. 1881, Angela Geoboina Baroness Bcrdett-Coctts). 
Per fesse dancett^, sa. and az., in chief, three sinister 
gauntlets, pendent, ar., tasselled or, fessewise, and in base 
four crescents in cross of the last. Crest— In front of a 
tower ppr. a demi swan, wings elevated, ar. collared sa. 
Motto — Mature. 

Bartlett - Burdett - Coutts (exemplified to William 
Leh.man Ashmead Bartlett Bcrdett Coutts, Esq., of 
Piccadilly, M.A. Oxford). Quarterly, first and 4th, Codtts; 
arg. a stag's head erased gu. betw. the attires a pheon az. the 
whole within a bordure embattled of the last charged with 
four buckles or, for distinction in the dexter chief point a 
cross crosslet also gu. ; 2nd, Burdett, az. two bars or, each 
charged with three martlets gu. for distinction in the centre 
chief point a cross crosslet gold ; 3rd, Bartlett, as above. 
Crtsti — CocTTS, a man from the middle shooting an arrow 
from a bow all ppr. charged for distinctiim with a cross 
crosslet or. On the dexter side the crest of Burdett, a lion's 
head erased sa. charged for distinction with a cross crosslet 
or, and on the sinister side, the crest of Bartlett, as above. 

Bartlett (John Adams Bartlett, Esq., Pembroke Place, 
Liverpool). Quarterly, ar. and gu., five lozenges conjoined 
in fesse, betw. four crescents all counterchanged. Crest — 
On a mount vert, a moor cock, sa. couched and wattled gu., 
in the beak an ear of wheat, leaved and slipped ppr. resting 
the dexter claw on a crescent also gu. Motto — Deo favente 
cresco. 

Barry (Dublin, Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, 1597-1632). 
Barry of six, ar. and gu. Crest — A wolf's head couped sa. 

Barton (quartered by Mitford, through Ashton). Erm. on 
a fesse engr. gu three annulets or. 

Basevi (Hove, co. Sussex ; Mabia, dau. of Geobge Basevi, 
Esq., of Brighton, of a Venetian family, m. Isaac Disraeli, 
Esq. of Bradenham Manor, co. Bucks, and was mother of 
Benjamin, Earl of Be<icon>fidiJ). Per pale ar. and az. on 
the dexter side a lion ramp. ppr. on the sinister side an 
eagle displ. of the first, the two conjoined in pale, in chief two 
crescents counterchanged. Crest — A buck's head erased ppr. 

Basford (Grange, co. Derby). Az. three eagles displ. betw. 
two bendlets ar. 

Baskervill (Sunningwell, co. Berks, Hannibal Bakebyill, 

Esq., of Sunningwell, 6. 1.!p96, m. Mary, dau. and heir of 
Captain Nicholas Baskervill, sen of Henry Baskervill, of the 
city of Hereford. Visit. Berks 1664-6). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. 
three hurts, quartering Uees, Butleb, Le Gaos, Bruges, 

PlCHERD, BoDENHAM, BreNTON. 

Bass (Rangemore Hall, co. Stafford, Bart., created 17 May, 
1883. Sir Michael Arthur Bass, Bart, is eldest son of the late 
Michael Thomas Bass, Esq., of Rangemore, M.P. for Derby, 
the son of Michael Thomas Bass, of Burton-on-Trent, whose 
father, William Bass, 6. in 1717, founded the family and 
bought, in 1777, the house and land in Burtoo-on-Trent which 



■till, unaltered, forms part of the great Brewary there : he 
d. and was buried at Burton in 1787). Gu. on a chev. 
cottised arg. between three plates, each charged with a 
fleur-de-lis az., a demi lion ramp, couped of the first. 
Crest — A demi lion gu. resting the dexter paw on a plate 
charged, as in the arms, on the shoulder three annulets, 
two and one, arg. Motto — Basis virtutum constantia. 
Basset (Umberleigh and Watermouth Castle, Devon, th« 
senior line, through heiresses of the great Norman family 
of Basset, of Tehidy ; Charles Henrt Basset, Esq., 
formerly Williams, of Pilton House, Barnstable, Devon, 
fourth son of Sir William Williams, Bart., of TreguUow, 
TO. 1858, Habbiet-Maet, dau. of Abtbub Davie Basset, 
Esq., of Umberleigh, and assumed by royal licence II Oct. 
1880, the surname and arms of Basset). Barry wavy of sis 
or and gu. and for distinction in the centre chief point a 
cross crosslet of the first. Crest — A unicorn s head couped 
ar. mane, beard, and horn or, on the neck two bars indented 
gu. and charged for distinction with a cross crosslet also gu. 
Motto — Pro Rege et populo. 
Bateman (La Tbobe Bateman. John Fbedekick La Tbobb 
Bateman, Esq., F.R.S., Moor t'ark, co. Surrey, took by 
royal licence, 1883, the prefix surname and arms of La Tbobb. 
Mr. La Tbobe-Bateman is eldest son of John Bateman. 
Esq., of Wyke, and afterwards of Ockbrook, co. Derby, by 
Mary-Agnes, his wife, dau. of Rev. Benjamin La Tbobe). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4lh, az. on a fesse with cottises engr. 
betw. three escallops or, as mnny crescents each surmounted 
by a mullet gu., for Bateman; 'Jnd and 3rd ar. on a fesse 
az. a fleur-de-lis betw. two escallops or, for La Tbobe. 
Crests — Ist, Bateman : In front of an eagle's head or, a 
crescent surmounted by a mullet gu. betw. two wings, also 
or, each charged with an escallop az. ; 2nd, La Tbobe ; Out 
of clouds a dexter cubit arm ppr. the hand grasping an 
anchor fesseways or. Motto (over)— Tutto si fa. Motto— 
Sidus adsit amicum. The family of La Tbobe is of the old 
French noblesse, originally from Languedoc, and settled at 
Villemur, near Montaubtn. At the revocation of the Edict 
of Nantes, in 1685, the La Tbobes fled to Holland, and 
thence to Ireland. 
Bates (Aydon, Northumberland, descended from Georor 
Bates, of Horsley, in the parish of Ovingham, son of 
George Bates, mentioned in the will of his uncle, Geobob 
Bates, vicar of Kelloe, co. Durham, and grandson of 
Gawen Bates, of Horsley, whose name appears on the 
Muster Roll 29 of Henry VIII. The present representative 
is Cadwalladeb John Bates, Esq., of Aydon and Langley 
Castle, Northumberland). Sa. a fess engr. or, betw. three 
dexter hands couped at the wrist bendwise ar. ; quartering, 
MooBE, of the Moore, Shropshire, viz., per pale az. and ar. 
barry of twelve counterchanged ; Blaynet, gf Castle 
Blayney, and Blatnet, of Gregynog. Motto — A calow 
blaenawr os na & llaed. 

Bates (Manydown, co. Southampton, and Gym Castle, co. 
Flint, bart. Created 13 May, 1880). Ar. on a fesse betw. 
in chief two quatrefoils, and in base a fleur-de-lis az., a 
quatrefoil betw. two fleur-de-lis of the field. Crest — A stag's 
head erased az. attired or, charged on the neck with two 
quatrefoils in pale, and pierced by as many arrows in saltire, 
all gold. Motto — Lahore et virtute. 

Bath (AUtyferin, co. Carmarthen. Granted to Henbt James 
Bath, Esq., of AUtyferin, J. P. cos. Glamorgan and Carmar- 
then, and high sheriff of the latter 1869, and to the other 
descendants of his father, Hbnrt Bath, of Swansea). Gu. 
a chev. paly of six, arg. and or betw. three plates, on a chief 
of the third as many wolves' heads erased sa. Crest — A wolfs 
head erased sa. gorged with a collar vair, and holding in the 
mouth a rose, slipped and leaved ppr. 

Battersby (Stannanaughts, co. Lancaster, Cleveland, co. 
Somerset, and 72, Onslow Gardens, London. Wobslkt 
Battebsbt, Esq., son of Charles Battersby, Esq., of 
Hindley, co. Lancaster, by Annie, his wife. dau. and co-heir 
of Rev. Thomas Hates, M.A., vicar of Westhoughton, co. 
I.ancaster). Ar. a lozenge sa. on a chief wavy az. a paddle- 
wheel steamship with sails or. Crest — A ram ar. armed or, 
charged on the body with two trefoils slipped vert and 
resting the dexter foreleg on a lozenge sa. Motto — Lahore 
vinces. Impaled with the arms of Mat (.5ce Mat). 

Baxter (Henbt Baxter, Esq. of the Tower, Rainhill, J. P. co, 
Lancaster). Per fesse gu. and sa. in chief two garbs, 
and in base a dolphin naiant or. Crest — A demi eagle displ. 
sa. gorged with a collar gemel charged on the breast, and 
each wing with an annulet holding in the beak as many Mrs 
of wheat leaved and slipped, all or. 



BAX 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BES 



B&zter <BicHiBD Baztbb, Esq., of Leinster Gardens, co. 
Middlesex, and of Lincoln's Inn). Az. a dolphin embowed 
ppr. a chief engr. ar. issuant therefrom a demi eagle displ. 
gu. in the beak an arrow palewise point downwards of the 
second. Crest — A bat, wines expanded sa. each wing charged 
with an annulet or, and in the mouth an arrow fessewise 
ppr. Motto — Deeds not words. 

Bazal^ette (Sir Joseph William Bazalcette, C.B., 
designer of the Thames Embankment). Ar. on a fesse gu. three 
crescents of the first, a chief az. thereon two crosses flory 
or. Crest- A lion rampant ar. gorged with a collar az. 
charged with two crosses flory as in the arms, holding in 
the dexter forepaw a sword erect ppr., pomel and hilt gold, 
and the dexter hind-paw resting on a crescent or. 

Beaznes. Per pale gu. and az. six garbs, three, two, and one 
or, on a chief ar. three mullets sa. Ci-egt — Betw. six sun- 
rays a garb ppr. charged with three mullets, two and one 
ar. Motto — Bene vivere bis vivere. 

Beck (Woodside, co. Surrey). Vert a cross ragulee humettee 
or, on a chief of the last three blackbirds ppr. Crest — A 
8ta£F ragulee fessewise or, thereon a blackbird holding in the 
beak a sprig of holly ppr. Motto — Cruce insignis. 

Bedford (John Bedfobd, Esq., of Oughtibridge, and Birley 
House, West Riding, co. York, only son of John Bedford, 
of Ponds, and of Ouglitibridge, by Anne, his wife, elder 
dau. and eventual sole heir of George Gbatson, of Ros- 
sington, in the West Riding, and of Oughtibridge, by 
Mart, his wife, elder dau. and co-heir of Joseph Hall, of 
Oughtibridge). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per chev. ar. and 
sa. four bears' paws erased, three in chief and one in base, 
within a bordure engr. all counterchanged, for Bedford ; 
2nd, per saltire chequy or, and az. and ar. on a saltire gu. 
betw. two battle-axes erect in fesse ppr. a cross patt<5e of the 
first, for Graison; 3rd, or, three demi-lions couped gu. on 
a chief of the last a rose betw. two chaplets of the first, for 
Hall. Crest — In front of a bear's paw erased sa. holding 
a terrestrial globe ppr. an annulet ar. Motto — Gare le pied 
fori. 

Bed'well (Camden's Grants). Per saltire erm. and lozengy 
or and gu. 

Beerg' (Dublin; Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, 1597-1632). 
Per pale or and ar. a cross foniiee betw. four crescents gu. 
Crest — A naked arm embowed ppr. holding in the hand a 
long cross gu. 

Behrens (Sir Jacob Behrens, of Springfield House, Brad- 
ford, CO. York). Per pale gu. and sa. a bear ramp. ar. 
muzzled of the second, on a chief of the third a bee volant 
ppr. betw. two mullets of six points of the first. Crest — 
A demi bear ar. muzzled sa. holding in the dexter paw a 
mullet of six points a.s in the arms, and resting the sinister 
paw on an escocheon gu. charged with a bee volant ppr. 
Motto— Esse quam videri. 

Belcher (Roehampton, co. Surrey). Same Ai-m» and Cre.st 
as Belcher, of Gilsborough [ir/iicA see^. Motto — Loyal au 
mort. 

Beley (Charles Allen Evans Belet, Esq., of St. John's 
Hill, CO. Surrey). Or, a chev. betw. two gryphons' heads 
erased in chief and a cross patt^ litch& in baseaz. Crext — 
A gryphon sejant or, winged vair, resting the dexter claw 
upon a plate. Motlo — Auspice Deo vinces. 

Belfast, Town of (<o. Antrim). Per fess ar. and az, in 
chief, a pile vair, in base a ship, with sails .ict, of the field 
on a canton of the second, a tower of the first. Crttt — A 
sea-horse ppr. Supporters. — l>exter a wolf, sinister a sea- 
horse, both [ipr. 

Bell H'hirsk Hall, co. York; exemplified to Recinald Smith, 
Esq., Lieut. North York Militia Rifles, son of Rev. Hknhy 
Smith, M.A., by Frances, his wife, dau. of Rev. William 
Macbkan and Kranckb, his wife, dau. of John Bkll, Ks(i., 
of Think, anil sister and heir of John Bell, Ks(|., of siaiiie 
place, upon his assuming by royal licence, 1877, thcsumatue 
and arum of Bell only). Sec Bell, page 67. 

Bellaais (co. York). See Bellasyse, or Bblastsb, co. 
Durliain. 

Bellasis 'co. York). Ar. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis 
gu. Crift—A lion couchanl guard az. 

Belturbet, Borough of (lo. Cavun. Granted by Moly- 
neux, UUlcr, 21 June, 1UI3, ai the lequest of Stephen 
Butler, Kw|., first I'rovont of the Itornugh and the free Bur- 
geitet of the same;. Or, a lower with dome and pennon gu. 



in base waves of the sea ppr. ; on a chief az. a harp of the 

field betw., on the dexter side a rose, and on the sinister a 
thistle both ar. 

Bennett (Sparkford House, co. Somerset ; Rev. Henrt 
Bennett, of Sparkford, m. Euiily, dau. of Edward Moberlet, 
Esq., St. Petersburg, and d. 1»74, leaving a son, Henri 
Edward Bennett, Esq., of Sparkford, J. P., Capt. 1st Somer- 
set Militia, hi. 1»57, Loi'ISA Bibchall, dau. and co-heir of 
Sir James B. Macaulat, C.B., Cliief Justice of Toronto, and 
has Harry Macaclay Bennett, 6. 18G3, and other issue). 
Gu. a bezant betw. three demi-lions ramp. ar. a crescent lor 
difference. 

Bennett (Sir Robert Bennett, Knt., Surveyor of the 
Works of Windsor Castle, knighted 1619 ; grandson and 
heir of Right Rev. Robert Bennett, D.D., Bishop of Here- 
ford, 1603. Visit. Berks 1664-6). Ar. on a cross betw. four 
demi-lions ramp. gu. a bezant. Crest — A demi-Uon ramp, 
gu. holding a bezant. 

Benson (Robbon Benson, Esq., of Perrymead Court, Somer- 
set). Sa. on a chev. invecteil plain cotised or, three pallets 
of the first, each charged with a cross pat^ of the last. 
Crest — In front of a bear's head, couped sa. gorged with 
a collar and muzzled or, two crosses pat6e also or. 

Benson (Salisbury, co. Wilts), Ar. three trefoils sa. betw. 
two bendlets gu. 

Benson (Baron Bitujley, vitlinct 1730; Robert Benson, Esq., 
M.P. for the city of York, was so created 1713, d. s. p. m. ; 
his only dau., Hon. Harriet Benson, 7/1. George Lane Eox, 
Esq., M.P. for the city of York, in whose favour the barony 
was revived in 1772;. Same Arms. Crest — A bear's head 
erased ar. muzzled gu. Supporters — Two bears ar. 

Benson (as borne on the Archie-episcopal Seal of the Most 
Rev. Edward White Benson, D.D., Archbishop of Canter- 
bury and Lord Primate of All England, 1S83). Arg. three 
trefoils slipped sa. betw. two bendlets gu. 

Bentley (,Ely Place, London ; Edward Bentley, Esq.) Or, 
a bend vair betw. two bendlets engr. sa. Ci-est — A talbot 
passant ar. the dexter forefoot resting on an ancient shield, 
vair, charged with an annulet or. 

Berkeley (Bruton, Yarlington, and Pull, co. Somerset; Sir 
Maurice Berkley, Knt. of Bruton, Sir Henry Berkeley, 
Knt., of Yarlington, and Edward Berkeley, Esq., of Pull, 
teiup. James 1., sons of Sir Henry Berkeley, Knt., of 
Bruton, and grandsons of Sir Maurice Berkeley, Standard 
Bearer to Henry Vlll. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Quarterly, 
1st, gu. a chev. erm. betw. ten crosses pat^e, six in chief 
and four in base ar. ; 2nd, or, a saltire sa ; 3rd, or, two 
lions pass. az. ; 4th, gu. ten bezants, four, three, two, and 
one, a label of three points az. 

Berkeley (Ireland; Maurice Berkeley, living there temjt. 
James 1., son of Sir Krancis Berkeley, who was second 
son of Sir Maurice Berkeley, Standard Bearer to Henry 
Vlll. Visit. Somerset, 16^3). Same Anns. 

Berringi:on (Pant-y-Goitre, co. Monmouth, and Cefngole, 
CO. Glamorgan ; Jenkin Davies Bebbinoton, Esq., of Wood- 
laud Castle, in the latter co. ;«. Charlotte Hall, sister of 
Benjamin, Lord Llanover, and d. 1871, leaving a son, 
Arthur Venokjaid Davies Berrincton, 6. 1S33, J. P., D.L., 
M. 1st, IW):), Frances Lennox Henaije, dau. of Rev. Charles 
Lane, liector of Wrolhani, co. Kent, and 2ndly, ls6l, Ada 
Barbara, dau. of John Lane, Esq., of Leyton Grange, co. 
Essex). Quarterly, 1st, counter-quartered 1st and 4th, sa. 
three greyhounds courant ar., for Berrincton, 2nd and 3rd, 
az. a wolf salient ar. for Davies; 2nd, ar. a lion ramp. sa. 
ducally gorged and lined or, for Lewis; 3id, az. a chev. betw. 
three eagles' heads erased or, for Aubrey; 4th, sa. a chev. 
betw. three spear heads ar. imbrued ppr. for Bi.£DDYN ap 
Maenarch. Crests — 1st, Berrincton : An estoile gu.; 2nd, 
Daviks: A wolf salient ar. Jl/o(fo— Solem fero. 

Berryman (CO. Devon). The 3/o< (oof this family is — Via 
trita I'Sl via tuta. 

Bessemer (Sir Henry Bessemer, Knt., of Denmark Hill, 
CO. Surrey, Knight Coiuniander of the Austrian Order of 
St. Erancis Joseph, Knight Grand Cross of the Legion of 
Honour of France, son of Anthony Bessemer, Esq., of 
Charleton, co. Hertford). Az. on a chev. embattled, counter- 
embattled, betw. three flcurs-de-lij or, a crescent betw. two 
estoiles of the first. 6')t'.»( — A demi gryphon az. charged 
with three tteurs-de-lis chevronwise or, supporting a torch 
cieci fired ppr. Mollo—Onwixri ever. 

Best (IIadkn-Hf.pt, lladen Hill, Rowley Regis, co. Stafford : 
exiinplilied ix) (iEoRi.K .^i,FRi.D IIaden Best, Esq., upon 
hit! aKSUiiiirg. by royal licence, the additional surname of 



BET 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BLA 



Hadem). Quarterly, Ist and 4th or, on a chev. betw. two 
martlets in chief, and a pheon in base gu. three boars' heads 
couped of the first, for Bbst; 2n(l and 3rd, sa. on a pile 
betw. two mullets of six points in base are, a human leg 
couped at the thigh az., for Haden. CretU — 1st, Best: In 
front of a rock ppr. thereon a pheon az. a boar's head 
couped or; 2nd Haden : In front of a cubit arm in armour, 
the hand grasping an arrow in bend sinister, a morion, all 
ppr. 

Bethune (Patton-Bkthune; Walter Docolas Phillipps 
Patton-Bethdne, of Clayton Priory, Sussex, Esq., General 
in Her Majesty's Army and Colonel in the 2nd battalion 
Highland Light Infantry, Knight of the Fifth Class of the 
Imperial Turkish Order of the Bledjedie, is eldest son of 
Thomas Paiton, late of Bishop's Hull, Somerset, Esq., 
Commander in the Royal Navy, and grandson of James 
Patton, late of Clatto, co. Fife, Esq., a Major in the 
93rd regiment of Highlanders, who was the eldest son of 
Henry Patton, late of Clatto aforesaid, and Colonel in the 
army, who intermarried with Mary, elder dau. and co-heir 
of Henry Bethune, of Clatto, Esq. He obtained a Royal 
Licence for him and his issue to take and use the 
surname of Bethune, in addition to and after that of 
Patton, and bear the arms of Bethdne quarterly with those 
of Patton). Quarterly, i. and iv., Bethune, viz., quarterly. 
1st and 4th, az. a fesse chequey or, and gu. betw. three 
lozenges of the second ; 2ud and 3rd, arg. on a chev. sa. an 
otter's head erased of the first, ii. and m., " Patton," az. 
guttse d'eau a sword erect ppr. pomel and hilt or, betw. four 
crescents saltirewise arg. Crestt— lit, Bethone : A demi 
otter issuant arg. ; 2nd, Patton : Upon two swords saltire- 
wise ppr. pomels and hilts or, a falcon rising arg. gutte de 
larmes. Mottoes (under the ar/iu)— Virtute adepta; (above 
the Bethune crest) — Debonnaire. 

Sevan (Stone Park, Kent; Thomas Bevan, Esq., J. P. and 
D.L., High Sheriff of the City of London and of Middlesex, 
1879, son of Thomas Bbvan, deceased, of Finsbury Circus, 
St. Giles, Cripplegate, M.D., M.K.C.P.L., and M.R.C.S.E.). 
Az. on a rock in base, a dove ppr. holding in the beak a 
branch of oliveor, on a chief nebule erm. a hurt betw. two 
annulets of the first. Crest — Upon the battlements of a 
tower ppr. a gryphon or, gorged with a collar geniel az. 
resting the dexter claw on an escotcheon ar. charged with 
a hurt. 

Beynon (CROwTHEa-BETSoN, of Slines Oaks. co. Surrey. 
Exemplified to Rev. Samuel Bbtan Cbowthee, M. A., Vicar of 
Lodsworth, co. Sussex, upon his assuming, by royal licence, 
1879, the additional surname of Betnon. Mr. Cbowther- 
Betnon is great-grandson of Richabd Cbowtheb, Esq., and 
his wife, a dau. of Samuel Richardson, the author of 
"Pamela." Per pale wavy az. and gu. on a bend cotised or, 
three cross crosslets vert (for distinction a rose, gold). Crest 
— A lion ramp. ar. sem^e of cross crosslets vert, holding betw. 
the forepaws an escocheon, also ar. thereon a greyhound's 
head erased pean (charged on the shoulder, for distinction, 
with a rose gu.). Motto of Cbowther, Integer vitae. 

Blg'g'S (Yeatman-Biggs, Stockton House, co. Wilts, exempli- 
fied to Captain Abtuub Godolphin Yeatman, of the Royal 
Artillery, upon his assuming, by royal licence, 1878, the 
additional surname and arms of Biogs). Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, Bigos : Per pale erm. and az. a lion pass, within a 
bordure engr. gu. the latter charged with a fleur-de lis or; 
2nd and 3rd, Yeatman, see Yeatman, of Stock House. 
Crest — 1st, Biggs : In front of a javelin erect ppr. a leopard's 
head affronte erased az., charged with two tleurs-de-lys 
fesswise or ; 2nd, Yeatman. 

Billing'Sley (Lysam, co. Gloucester; Sir Henbt Billingslet, 
Knt. of Lysam, knighted 1603, eldest son of Sir Henby 
BiLLiNQSLBT, Lord Mayor of London, 1596. Visit. Somerset, 
16'23). Quarterly, Ist, gu. a fleur-de-lis or, a canton ar.; 
2nd, ar. on a cross resarceled of another betw. four lions 
ramp. sa. five estoiles of the field ; 3rd, per saltire or an*' az. 
a martlet in chief and another in base, and two cinquefoils 
in fesse all counierchanged ; 4th, az. two lions pass, guard. 
In pale or; 5th, ar. a fesse sa. in chief two mullets of the 
last : 6th, ar. two bars and a canton gu. a bend sa. 

Billingrsley (Gray's Inn, London; Henrt Billingslet, 
temp. James I., son of William Billingslet, who was 
second son of Sir Hembt Billingslet, Lord Mayor of 
London, 1596). Sa.me Arms. 

Binerley (Whitley Hall, Ecclesfleld, West Riding, co. York). 
Barry of six sa. and ar. twelve pheons in orle counter- 
changed. C)-6»t— Three arrows, one in pale and two in 
•altire or, the points downwards, barbed and flighted ar. in 



front thereof suspended by a riband gu. an escocbeon n. 
charged with a pheon also ar. Motto— ^t&i\x& qui Im- 
plevit. 

Binns (Sheffield, co. York; Edmund Knowlbb Binns, F.Q.S. 
and F.R.G.S., Liveryman of the Cutlers' Company and 
Freeman of the city of London). Arg. on a pale az. betw, 
two lions' heads erased of the last, three swords in point, 
their points to the base ppr., pomels and hilts or. Crest — A 
lion rapip. az. gorged with a collar flory counter-flory or, 
holding in the paws a sword erect ppr. pomel and hilt gold, 
the dexter hind paw resting on a saltire also or. Motto— 
Deus providebit. 

Birkenhead, To'v^n of. Quarterly, or and ar. on a 

cross gu. betw. in the first quarter, a lion pass, of the last ; 
in the second, an oak tree issuant from a mount ppr. ; in the 
third, an estoileaz. ; and in the fourth, two lions pass, of the 
third, a crozier in pale of the first, and two crescents in 
fesse of the second. Crest — Upon a rock ppr. in front of a 
crozier erect, or, a lion az. resting the dexter paw on an 
anchor also or. 

Bisley (Abingdon, co. Berks ; Alexander Bislet, of Abing- 
don, b. 1602, son of Alexander Bislet, grandson of Thomas 
Bislet, gent., living 1553, and great-grandson of William 
Bislet, all of Abingdon. Visit. Berks, 1664-6). Gu. achev. 
betw. three picks ar. 

Bisse (Batcombe and Stokelane, co. Somerset ; James Bisse, 
of Batcombe, temp. James I., son of James Bisse, of same 
place, and grandson of John Bisse, of Stokelane. Visit, 
Somerset, 16"23). Sa. three escallops in pale ar. 

Black (Edinburgh, 1880). Ar. a saltire sa. betw. a mullet in 
chief and three crescents in flank and base gu. Crett — A 
demi lion sa. Motto — Non crux sed lux. 

Blackburn (Haine, Lew Down, co. Devon ; Robert Black- 
bubn, Esq., of Palmiera, Madeira, and co. York, m. Mary, 
dau. and heir of Rev. Thomas Bellastse, of Brampton Hall, 
CO. Westmorland, and d. 1841, leaving two sons, Edwabd, 
who purchased Haine, 1867, and Robebt (Rev.), rector of 
Selham, co. Sussex. The elder, Edward Blackbubn, Esq., 
of Haine, 6. 1815, m. 1843, Chablotte, dau. of Nicholas 
Bbooking, Esq., of Dartmouth, co. Devon, and has Edwabd 
Brooking Blackburn, 6. 1844, and other issue). Ar. a fesse 
nebulae (originally und^e or wavy) betw. three mullets sa. ; 
quartering, ar. a chev. gu. betw. three fleurs-de-lis, az. for 
Belastse. Crest — On a ducal coronet or a demi lion ramp, 
ppr. holding in dexter paw a mullet sa. gorged with a plain 
collar ar. charged with three mullets of the third. Motto— 
Bonne et belle assez. 

Blacker. See Douglass. 

Bla^den (co. Wilts ; arms from family monuments at Keevil 
parish church). Ar. three trefoils slipped vert on a chief 
indented sa. as many annulets or. 

Blag'den (Honiton, co. Devon; the estate vested in Rev. 
William Henrt Chamberlaine, M.A., vicar of Keevil 1839, 
whose mother was heiress of the Blagdens). Ar. three 
trefoils slipped vert on a chief indented or, two annulets 
gu. 

Blagra'Ve (Bulmarsh, co. Berks; Anthony Blagrave, d. 
1655, John Blagrave, of Reading, b. 1632, and Geobqr 
Blagrave, b. 1638, sons of Anthony Blagrave, Esq., of 
Bulmarsh, son ol Anthont Blagrave, of Bulmarsh ; Visit. 
Berks 1664-6). Quarterly, Ist and 4th or, on a bend sa. 
three legs in armour couped at the thigh ppr. ; 2nd, vert 
on a bend cotised ar. three crescents gu. ; 3rd, sa. a chev. 
ar. betw. three fire balls ppr. Crests— Ist, an oak tree 
eradicated vert ; '^nd, a falcon ppr. 

Blagrrave (Southcote, co. Berks ; Sir John Blaoravb, Knt., 
of Southcote, brother of Anthony Blagrave, Esq., of Bul- 
marsh; Visit. Berks 1664-6). Same ^n?w. CrMt— An oak 
tree eradicated vert. 

Blake (BaJlinacourty and Kilmeadon, co. Waterford, a branch 
of Blake of Renvyle, co. Galway, descended from Richard 
Caddell, aitas Blake, Sheriff of Connaught, a.d. 1306. Ths 
present John Aloysius Blake, Esq., of Ballinacourty and 
Kilmeadon, is M.P. for co. Waterford). Ar. a fret gu. Crest 
— K cat-a-mouniain pass. ppr. Motto — Virtus sola nobilitat. 

Blanchard (Katherine's Court, co. Somerset, and Marshfield, 
CO. Gloucester; William Blanchard, Esq., of Katherine's 
Court, son of John Blanchard, and grandson oi JoHif 
Blanchard, of Marshfield. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Gu. a 
chev. or, betw. two bezants in chief and a griSln's bead 
erased in base of the second. 



BLA 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BOS 



Bland (London and Norwich; Micbabi. Bulmd, Esq., of 
London). Quarterly, ar. and or on a bend Ba. three pheons 
of the second. Crest — Out of a crown vallary or, a lion's 
head ppr. charged with a bend sa., thereon three pheons also 
or. Motto — Potior origine virtus. 

Blandy (Birchamp House, Colford, co. Gloucester ; Feede- 
WCK Blandt, Esq., J. P., b. 1824, third son of John Blandy, 
Esq., of Madeira, purcliased Birchamp 1871). Or three urns 
sa. with flames issuing ppr. Crest — A demi lion reguardant 
gu. holding betw. the paws an urn sa. with flames issuing 
ppr. Motto — Ex urn4 resurgam. 

Blane (granted i Dec, 1809, to Andrew Blane, Esq., of Blane- 
fleld, CO. Ayr, and his heirs male). Ar. on a fess sa. a star of 
five points betw. two crescents of the first, in base a rose gu. 
Crest — The sword of the figure of Justice paleways ppr. hilt 
and pomel or. Supporters — Dexter, a lion gu. ; sinister, a 
griffin ppr. Motto — Pax aut bellum. 

Blane (Foliejon Park, Windsor, Berks ; William Blane, 
Esq., of Grougar, co. Ayr, and Foliejon Park aforesaid, 6th 
son of Gilbert Blane, Esq., of Blanefield, co. Ayr, m. 1798, 
Honoris, dau. of Thomas Newnham, Esq., of Southboro', 
Kent, J. P. and D.L., and d. 1835, leaving issue. The 2nd 
son, Thomas Law Blane, Esq., H.E.I.C.S., is now of Foliejon 
Park. Arms, Crest, and Motto — Same as the preceding. 

Blaney (Thomas Blanet, Esq., one of the Serjeants at arms 
to Charles 11., 6. 1662, son of Evan Blanet, of Kerye, co. 
Montgomery; Visit. Berks 1664-6). Quarterly, 1st, per 
pale or and gu. two lions ramp, addorsed counter-changed; 
2nd, ar. three horses' heads erased sa. ; 3rd, sa. a chev. 
betw. three fleurs-de-lis or; 4th, ar. three fleurs-de-lis sa. 
Crest — A horse's head erased sa. Motto — Hope well and 
home well. 

Blaquiere (Lord de Blaquiere). The estoiles in his lord- 
ship's arms and supporters should be "or," not " ar." 

Bloomfield (Belmount. near Bath, co. Somerset ; exempli- 
fied to Leonard Jenyns, Esq., upon his assuming by royal 
licence, 1871, the surname of Bloomfield). Sa. three 
branches of broom betw. two chevronels or, a canton of 
the last, thereon a spearhead az. embrued gu. Crest — A 
demi heraldic tiger az. tutted and crined or, in the mouth 
a branch of broom as in the arms, holding, in the paws 
a sword erect broken at the point ppr. pomel and hilt 
gold. 

Blount (Dakell Blount, Mapledurham, co. Oxford; John 
Blount, Esq., now of Mapledurham, assumed the prefix sur- 
name of Dabell, in right of his wife, Heneietta Darell, 
of Calehill, co. Kent, the representative of the ancient family 
of Darell, of Calehill). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, Barry 
nebulee of six or and sa., for Blount ; 2nd and 3rd, az. a 
lion ramp, or ducally crowned ar. in the dexter chief point, 
for diff. a cross crosslet of the second, for Darell; an 
rscutcheon of pretence, the Darell arms without the diff. 
Greats — Ist, Blodnt: The sun in splendour charged in the 
centre with an eye all ppr. ; 2nd, Daecll : Out of a ducul 
coronet or, a man's head in profile couped at the shoulders 
and bearded ppr. wreathed round the temples or and az. 
on the head a cap also az. fretty ar. tasselled gold and 
turned up erm. for diff. a cross crosslet az. Motto — Lux 
tua vita mea. 

Blower (Loughborough, co. Leicester, and Reading, co. 
Berks; Thomas Blower, of Heading, b. 1618, son of Chris- 
topueh Blower, of Loughborough, d. 1643; Visit. Berks 
16C4-6). Or, a chev. vert betw. three pomeis. 

Blumbergr (Ludwio Alexander BLDMBERa, Esq., of Palace 
Gardens, Kensington, and Victor Georue BtuMnERfi). 
Vert, on a chev. betw. a lion pass, in chief and a stag lodged 
in base or, five estoiles sa. Crest — On a mount vert a lion's 
head erased or, scmee of estoiles sa. ilfofCo— Concordia 
vim dat. 

Blyth 'granted to the wife of John Fleming, Esq.). Ar. on 
a, fi'Bse indented betw. three crescents gu. as many garbs or. 

Boa^ (Sir Robert Boao, Knt., Mayor of Belfast, 1876, san 
uf Uev. John Boau, of Blackburn, near Edinburgh, author 
of the "Imperial I-exlcon "). Ar. on a chev. gu. thrco 
cinqucfnlU piened erm. in chief a civic crown vert, betw. 
two mullets a?., in base a stag's head erased holding in the 
mouth a trefoil slipped all ppr. Crest -An hour glass betw. 
two oak branches in orle all ppr. Motto — Ue|[it omnia 
tcmpus. 

Board ^Farley Place, Westcrham, co. Kent; previously of 
Puxhill and Bflrrte Hill, co. Kuisex ; Rev. Richard Board, 
Rector of Westerham, m. Elizabeth, dau. of John Jonss, 



Esq., of Derry Ormond, co. Cardigan, and d 1859, leavinK 
John Bo^trd, Esq. of Westerham, J.P., Major Ist batt. 
Kent Royal Volunteers). Per fesse gu. and az. an escutcheon 
within an orle of martlets ar. Crest — An antelope trippant 
or. Motlo — Perforatus. 

Bog'le (Capt. John do Terreau Bogle, R.E.). Ar. two 
chevronels engr. gu. betw. in chic-f three roses of the last, and 
in base a sliip in full sail sa. sails furled ar. and fiag of the 
second. Crest — In front of a primrose gu. stalked and leaved 
vert a fret or. Motto — Dalcius ex asperis. 

Bolton, Borough of (co. York). Gu. two bendlets or. 
Crest— kn elephant pass. ppr. on his back a tower or, 
trappings gu. and gold. 

Bombay, City of. Kz. three ships under sail, lateen 
rigged ppr. actiief or, thereon a lion pass, guard, gu. betw. 
two pallets sa. each charged with an ostrich feather erect 
ar. C)-est — A lion pass, guard, gu. crowned with an eastern 
crown or, supporting with the dexier forepaw an escocheon 
gold, charged with a sprig of the cotton tree slipped and 
fructed ppr. Supporters — On the dexter side a lion or, and 
on the sinister side a leopard ppr. each gorged with an 
eastern crown, pendent therefrom an escocheon az. charged 
with a mullet ar. 

Bonner (South Petherton and Water Leston, co. Somerset ; 
Henry Bonner, of South Petherton, temp. James I., son of 
Walter Bonner, of Water Leston, who was tenth in de- 
scent from John Bonner and Margaret, his wife, dau. of 
Robert Bird, living 10 Edward 111., a.d. 1336. Visit. 
Somerset, 1623). Gu. a crescent erm. within an orle of 
martlets or. 

Bonnor (Queen's Gate Terrace, Kensington, co. Middlesex, 
and Gloucester). Az. a fess paly of six or and gu. betw. 
four lions ramp, three in chief and one in base of the second. 
Crest— A. demi talbot or, gorged with a collar gemel az. 
holding betw. the paws an hour-glass ppr. Motto — A la 
bonne heure. 

Bontein (Sir James Bonteik, Lieut. Col. and gentleman of 
the Privy Chamber to George III. The name has at diffe- 
rent times and by different ineinbeis of the family been 
spelt variously, but the Mildovan and Balglass line of 
Bontine, of Ardoch have used the spelling Bontein; it 
was so spelt in the Patent from the Lyon Office dated 
1813, granting supporters to Sir James Bontein as repre- 
sentative of Ardoch). A^~ms, <fcc., see the body of the work. 

Boreman (Wells, co. Somerset; Andrew Boreman, temp. 
James I., son of William Boreman. Visit. Somerset, 
1623). Erm. on a bend cotised sa. three boars' heads 
erased ar. 

Borneo (North Borneo Company). Az. in base on wave* of 
the sea a native boat of North Borneo with sails manned 
and oars in action ppr. a chief or, thereon a lion pass, guard, 
gu. Crest — Two arms cnibowed, that, on the dexter side being 
an arm of a native of North Bi)rnco ppr. that on the sinister 
being an arm vested az. cuffed ar. the hands grasping a siaff 
jipr. thereon hoisted a flag flowing to the sinister or, charged 
with a lion guard, gu. 

Borton (General Sir Arthur Borton, K.C.B., G.C.M.G., 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Malta). Or, on a 
chev. engr. sa. a mural crown uf the first, in chief a pellet 
betw. two boars' hea<l8 couped of the second, and in base a 
like boar's head betw. two pellets. Crest — In front of a 
sword paleways point downwards ppr. pomel and hilt gold a 
boar's head couped sa. holding in the mouth a sprig of laurel 
fructed also ppr. 

Bosanquet (Broxboumbury, co. Hertford ; exemplified to 
Horace James Smith, Esq , upon his assuming by royal 
licence, 1866, the surname of Bosanquet only). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, or, upon a mount vert an oak tree ppr. a chief 
nebulee gu. thereon a crescent betw. two mullets of six 
points ar., for Bosanquet. 2nd and 3rd, or, a chev. cotised 
betw. three demi grifHns, the two in chief respecting each 
other sa., for Smith. Crests — Ut, Bosanquet: A demi lion 
gu. gorged with a collar ncbuly or, and holding between the 
paws a mullet of six points gu. within an annulet or, motto 
over. Per dainna, per ccedcs; 2nd, Smith: An elephant's 
head erased or, eared gu. charged on the neck with three 
fleurs-de-lis, two and one az. Motlo — Tenax in fide. 

Bostock (Otford, Kent, originally from co. Chester; granted 
ir;i3). Ar. a fcKs huinett^ az. on a canton gu. a maiden's 
heiul eouped at the breast jipr. crined or. Crest — A crescent 
ar. therein issuant a bear's head pean erased gu. muzzled 



BOS 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BBE 



Bostock (Abingdon, co. Berks, Edmond Bostock, of the 
Middle Temple, 1664, son of Thomas Bostock, grandson of 
Edmund Bostock, and great grandson of Ricuabd Bostock, 
who was son of Ralph Bostock, Itmp. Henry Vll., all of 
Abingdon ; Visit. Berks 166i-6;. Quarterly, ist and 4th, 
sa. afess humette ar. a canton ar. ; 2nd and 3rd, sa.a helmet 
closed ar. Crest — An antelope or, gorged gu. 

Bourne (Winscombe and Wyvel.'icombe, co. Somerset; John 
BocBNE, temp. James I., son of Gilbert Boi'bne, grandson 
of Richard Bourne, and great-grandson of Philip Bourne, 
whose brother. Sir John Bourne, was Secretary of State 
to Mary I. Visit. Somerset, 1623. Arms granted 1691). 
Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three lions ramp. sa. a chief 
ermines. 

Bourne (Heathfield House and Rackinsale, co. Lancaster, 
bart., created 1880 ; ext. 1884). Ar. a chev. sa. guttee d'eau, 
betw. in chief two lions ramp, and in base an heraldic tiger 
also ramp. gu. Crest — An heraldic tiger sejant or, guttle de 
sang, resting the dexter paw on a cross patted gu. Motto 
— Semper vigilans. 

Bousfield (granted to the wife of John Robert Vaizet, 
E.sq). Gu. on a chev. cotised or, between three lions' heads 
erased of the last two tilting-spears chevronwise ppr. 

Bowdler (Kirkham, co. Lancaster; descended from Bowd- 
LER of Chirbury. co. Montgomery and co. Salop, represented 
by William Henrt Bowdler, Esq., of Kirkham). Ar. two 
cornish choughs in pale ppr. beaked and legged gu. Creist 
— A dexter arm embowed, holding in the hand an arrow all 
ppr. Motto — Innocue ac provide. 

Bowen. See Colthukst-Bowen. 

Bower (Wells, Alverton, co. Somerset, and Donhead, co. 
Wilts ; Edmund Bower, of Wells, and Adrian Bower, of 
Alverton, sons of Edmosd Bower, of Donhead. Visit. 
Somerset, 1623). Sa. in chief three talbots' heads erased ar. 
in base a cinquefoil erm. 

Bower (The Larches, co. Surrey; exemplified to James 
Marsh Dunn, Esq., eldest son of Richard Marsh Marsh 
Dunn, Esq., of Carleton Lodge, Teignmouth, co. Devon, by 
Eliza Helen, his wife, dau. of James Bower, Esq., of 
Melcombe Regis, co. Dorset, upon his assuming by royal 
licence, 1881, the surname of Bower in lieu of Dunn, in 
compliance with the will of his maternal uncle. Rev. James 
Henrt Bower, of the Larches). Sa. two tilting spears 
saltirewise or, in chief three talbots' heads coupedar. Crest 
— In front of a talbot's head couped sa. gorged with a 
collar gemel or, a tilting spear fessewise head to the dexter 
also or. 3/o»6— Hope well, love well. 

Bowlby (originally seated in the North Riding co. York, 
presumed to have taken the name from Boulby, near Whitby, 
afterwards, for some generations, settled in the city of 
Durham; now represented by Charles Cotsford Bowlby, 
Esq., of London). Az. three mallets or. 

Bowman (Bart., of Joldwynds, co. Surrey, and ClitTbrd 
Street, London). Or, on a chev. betw. three bows stringed 
gu. two lions combatant of the tield betw. as many escallops 
ar. Crest — On a mount vert, the stump of a tree ppr. 
around the upper part a belt sa. therefrom pendent a quiver 
gu. filled with arrows ar. Motto — Quondam taia vicimus 
armis. 

BovHring (Forest Farm, co. Berks, formerly Larkbeare, 
Devon ; John Charles Bowbing, Esq., eldest son of Sir John 
Bowbing, of Claremont, Devon, LL.D., F.R.S., M.P. for 
Kilmarnock, H.M. Plenipotentiary in China, and Envoy 
Extraordinary to Siam, son of Charles Bowrino, Esq., of 
Larkbeare, d. 23 Nov. 1872, leaving John Charles Bowrino, 
Esq., of Forest Farm, and other issue). Gu. three eastern 
crowns chevronwise betw. two chevronels, the whole betw. 
three lions ramp. or. Creat — A demi lion ramp, or, grasping 
in the dexter paw an arrow in bend sinister, and in the 
sinister paw an oriental bow paleways ppr. 

Bowyer (co. Gloucester). Or, a bend vair cotised gu. a 
canton of the last charged with a cross-bow of the field. 

Boyd (Granted to Ven. Willlam Boyd, Archdeacon of Craven 
and Vicar of AmclifTe, Skipton, co. York, and to Edwabd 
Fenwics Boyd, Esq., of Moor House, Leamside, co. Durham, 
&nd to the other descendants of their father, William Boyd, 
Eeq., of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and of Burfield Priory, co. 
Gloucester). Az. a fes.se indented chequy ar. and gu. betw. 
two lozenges of the second. Ciexl — In front of a dexter hand 
couped at the wrist, pointing upwards with the thumb and 
two fingers ppr. three lozenges conjoined and fessewise az. 
iV«</«)— Confido. 



Boyes (New Zealand and Scotland, 1879). Ar. a saltire ar. 
on a chief of the second, a cinquefoil of the first, the saltire 
charged with a crescent also of the first. Crest — A sword 
erect ppr. hilted and pomelled or. Motto — Ex animo. 

Boys (Oldstock, CO. Somerset ; John Boys, 6. 1588, son of 
John Boys, temp. Henry VIII., and grandson of John 
Boys, of Oldstock. Visit. Somerbet, 1623). Ar. on a chev. 
gu. betw. three trees eradicated vert as many bezants; 
quartering, 1st, ar. on a chev. sa. three quatrefoils or, a 
crescent for diff., for Eybe, of Orcheston, co. Wilts; 2nd, 
ar. on a chev. betw. three birds sa. beaked and legged gu. 
five fusils of the first. 

Brabourne, Baron. See IIugessen. 

Bracken (Hillam Hall, South Milford, co. York). Gu. fretty 
ar. semee of plates. Crest — A Catherine wheel. Motto — 
Vigueur de dessus. 

Bradford (co. Northumberland. Visit. 1615). Az. on a 
bend ar. three martlets sa. 

Bradford (Bradford, CO. Northumberland; Visit. 1615). Ar. 
on a fess sa. three stags' heads erased or. 

Bradford (Swindon, CO. Wilts, descended from Bradford, 
of Bradford). Same Arms. Note, James Bradford, Esq., 
of Swindon, about the year 1824, substituted for the family 
the arms, Az. on a bend ar. three martlets sa. But 
Major H. Bradford, 108 Regt., and other members of the 
family retain the ancient arms. 

Bradney (Bradney, Somerset, and Llanfihangel-Ystem- 
Llewern, co. Monmouth. Joseph Alfred Bradney, of 
Llanfihangel-Ystem-Llewern, Esq., J. P., only son of the 
Rev. Joseph Christopher Bradney, rector of Greete, co. 
Salop, and grandson of Joseph Bradney, Esq., of Bradney 
and Ham, co. Surrey, by Elizabeth, his wife, daughter and 
co-heiress of Sir John Hopkins. Knt., of Llantihangel- 
Ystern-Llewern, Lord Mayor of London 1792). He m. 
1883, Rosa, only child of Edward Jenkins, Esq., of the 
Grove, co. Radnor. High Sheriff 1870. Or, a fesse raguly 
plain cotised betw. four crosses pattee fitchee sa. Crest — 
A hawk close ppr. legged, belled and jessed or, holding 
in the beak a trefoil slipped vert, and in the dexter claw a 
cross patce fitchee sa. Motto — Mors gloria forli. 

Bradney (Bayford Lodge, co. Somerset, and Mon- 
mouth. John Bradney, Esq., of Bayford, only son of Rev 
John Hopkins Bradney, of Leigh House, co. Wilts, and 
grandson of Joseph Bradney, Esq., of Ham, co. Surrey, by 
Elizabetli, his wife, dau. and co-heir of Sir John Hopkins, 
Knt., Lord Mayor of London 1792). Same Anus and Crest. 

Bramwell (Baron Bramwell). Per fesse erm. and az. a 
pale counterchanged, three griffins segreant, one and two 
ar. Crest — Two lion's gambs in saltire or, supporting a 
sword in fesse, ppr. Motto — Diligenter. 

Brang'an (Dublin; Collection of Molyneux. Ulster, 1697- 
1612). Per pale gu. and ar. a sinister hand erased at the 
wrist betw. three crosses moline counterchanged. Crut-— 
A cubit arm erect vested vert cuffed ar. the hand ppr. 
holding a cross moline or. 

Brassey (Bulkeley and Buerton, co. Chester, an ancient 
Cheshire family; pedigree and arms admitted and registered 
at the Heralds College to Sir Thomas Brassey, K.C.B., of 
Bulkeley Grange, co. Chester, and of Normanhurst Court, co. 
Sussex, M.P. : and to his brothers, Henry Arthur Bbasset, 
Esq., of Preston Hall, co. Kent, M P., and Albert 
Brassey, Esq., of Heythrop, co. Oxford). Quarterly: Ist, 
quarterly, per fesse, indented sa. and ar. in the 1st quarter 
a mallard of the 2nd; 2nd, gu. in chief three mullets ar. 
and in base a dexter hand appaumc couped at the wrist of 
the last; 3rd, sa. a cliev. betw. three bulls' heads cabossed 
ar. ; 4th, ar. on a chev. gu. three trefoils slipped of the field. 
Crest — A mallard ppr. Motto — Arduis saepe, metu nunquam. 

Brereton (Yard, co. Somerset; Thomas Brereton, temp. 
James I., son of Thomas Brereton, of Yard, near Tauntoa. 
Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. two bars sa. a mullet for diff. 

Bretherton (Runshaw Hall, Chorley, co. Lancaster. Wil- 
liam Bbethebton, Esq., of Heskin Hall, also in co. Lancaster, 
T/i. Alice, dau. of James Boabdman, Esq., of Farington House, 
same co., and had an only surviving son,VViLLiAM Brether- 
ton, Esq., of Runshaw, J. P., 6. 1829; m. 1856, Margaret, 
dau. and heir of Richard Norris, Esq., of Lostock Brow, 
CO. Lancaster, and has, Humphrey William Brereton, 6. 1857, 
and other issue). Sa. a cross raguly flory ar. two flauncbes 
of the last, each charged with a stag's head caboshed of the 
first. Crtst—A cross raguly flory sa., therefrom pendent by 



BBI 



SUPPLEMENT. 



Bsn 



« riband gn. a stag's hflad caboshed ar. MoUo — Per 

aspcra ad dulcia Crucis. 
Bridires (Combe, co. Gloucester, and Lelgh-upon-Mendip, 

CO. Somerset; Edward BaiDOES, of Leigh, son of Thomas 

Bbidoks, of same place, grandson of Thomas Bridobs, of 

Nynne, and great-grandsoa of John Bbidues, of Combe. 

Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. on a cross sa. a leopard's face or, 

a crescent for diff. 
Bii?g« (quartered by Focntain. Visit. Norfolk, 1563). 

Gu. three bars gemel or, a canton sa. 

Brings (Bart, of Briggs Dayrell, &c., page 123). The 

baronet's Motto is — Ne traverse pas le pont. 
Brine (Dorsetshire). Arg. an eagle displayed sa., charged 

on the breast with an anchor gold, on a chief embattled gu. 

» cross moline or. Crest — A lion ramp, arg, billetiee, and 

holding betw. the paws a cross moline ga. Motto — Confido. 

Brisbane (Brisbane, co. Ayr). Sa. a chev. chequy or and 
gu. betw. three cushions pendent by the corners of the 
second, a chief of honorable augmentation embattled 
ar. thereon on waves of the sea a ship of war under sail betw. 
two forts, the guns firing and on the battlements the Dutch 
flag all ppr. Cre»U — Dester out of a naval crown or, a 
dexter arm embowed in the uniform of a captain of the 
Eoyal Navy, the hand grasping a cutlass ppr. hilted and 
pomelled or, and from the hand pendent by a ribbon ar. 
fimbriated az. a gold medal; Sinister a stork's head erased 
holding in the beak a serpent writhing ppr. Mottoes— 
Curasao ; and Certamine summo. 

Brocklebank (Ralph Brocklebank, Esq., J. P. and D.L., 
resident at Childwall Hall, near Liverpool, co. Lancaster). 
Az. an escallop or, betw. three brocks arg. on a chief en- 
grailed of the 2ad a cock ppr. betw. two escallops of the 
first. 

Brocklehtirst (Hurdsfleld House, TytherinRton and Swy- 
thamley Park, MacclesBeld, co. Chester). Armg—PeT pale 
ar. and sa. three chevronels engr. betw. as many brocks all 
counterchanged. Crest — A brock sa. holding in the mouth 
a slip of oak fructed ppr. in front of a mount vert thereon 
two oak trees also ppr. J/of to— Veritas me dirigit. 

Brocklehurst (Henbury Park, Macclesfield; Thomas 
Uneit Bbocklehobst, Esq., of Henbury Park; quarters 
Unett, viz., sa. a chev. erm. betw. two lions' heads erased 
ar. in right of his mother Mabtba, dau. of Thomas Unett, 
Esq.). Arms, &c., aa ahoye. 

Broderwicke(Langford,co. Berks, Bicbabd Bbodebwicke, 
ol Langford, Visit. Berks, 1664-6). Barry wavy of six ar. 
and az., on a chief sa. a coronet or, betw. two spear heads 
of the first guttee de sang. Crest— 0\it of a coronet or, a 
spear head ar. imbrued. 

Bromfleld (Mortyn, co. Denbigh). Ar. a cross flory engr. 
sa. betw. four Cornish choughs ppr. on a Chiet az. a boar's 
bead couped of the first. 

Brooke (Armitage Bridge, co. York. Thomas Bbooke, Esq., 
J. P., eldest son of Thomas Brooke, Esq., of Armitage 
Bridge, who d. 18.')9, by Anne, his wife, dau. of Joseph 
Ingham, Esq., of Leeds). Ar. a cross nebulee per pale gu. 
and sa. in the first and fourth quarters a boar's head couped 
of the last. 

Brooke (Longashton, co. Somerset; Hdgb Bbooke, son of 
Thomas Brooke, who was eldest son of John Bbooke, Ser- 
jeant-at-law to Henry VIII. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Gu. 
on a chev. ar. a lion ramp. sa. crowned or, a mullet for diff., 
quartering, 1st, gu. on a chev. or, three lions ramp. sa. ; 
2nd, erm. on a cliev. gu. three bucks' heads cabossed or; 
8rd, erm. seven masclcs conjoined, three, two, and one az. : 
4th, gu. a chev. dancettee or, betw. twelve crosses crosslct 
ar; 6th, barry nebulee of six ar. and gu. ; 6th, az. a fesse 
dancettee betw. three garbs or; 7th, az. two bars nebulee 
or; 8tli, gu. a (esse ar. betw. six crosses crosslct or. 

Brooke (Glastonbury Abbey, co. .Somerset, and Barrow-Gur- 
ncy, CO. Someriet; Thomas Brooke, of Glastonbury Abbey, 
son of KbWABD Bbooke, of Uarrow-(iurney, and grandson of 
Abtbcb iiRooKE, who was second son of John Bbooke, Scr- 
]eant-Bt-law to Henry Vlll. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Same 
Armi, a crescent on the mullet for cadency. 

Brookes ^'Wanting, co. Berks, Richard Brookes, 6. 1647, 
•on of Richard Brookes, and grandson of Richard Brook ks, 
all of Wanting. Visit. Berks, 1664-6;. Or, a fess vert in 
base three clubs ppr. 



Brookfield (Abthor Montaoc Bbooepibld, Esq., Kensing- 
ton, Middlesex). Vert a fesse wavy arg. on a bend betw. two 
garbs or, three mullets of six points ea. Crett — A cubit 
arm erect in armour ppr. holding a sickle palewise also 
ppr., and two ears of wheat in saltire, stalked and bladed, 
or. Motto — Beware the reaping. 

Brooks (WiLUAM CuNLiFFE Brooks, Esq., of Barlow Hall, 
Manchester, co. Lancaster, and 5, Grosvenor Square, Lon- 
don). Ar. three bars wavy, az. a cross flory erminois, in 
chief a fountain. Cre.it~A demi li'n ar. charged on the 
shoulder with a fountain holding in the paws a harpoon in 
bend sinister ppr. Motto — Finem respice. 

Brooks (Crawshaw Hall, co. Lancaster; Thomas Brooks, 
Esq., of that place, J. P. and D.L., High Sheriff 1884). Same 
as last. 

Brooksbank (Bromley, co. Kent. William Lton Brooks- 
bank, Esq.). Per pale ar. and az. two bars nebuly betw. as 
many stags' heads erased in chief and a qualrefoil in base all 
counterchanged. Crest — A stag's head couped erm. attired 
or, charged with two bars nebuly az. holding in the mouth a 
palm branch slipped in bend vert. 

Brougrbton (co. Somerset; Robert Brodghton, temp. 
James I. Visit. Somerset, 1623. Arms grunted 1591). Sa. 
a cheV. or, betw. three bucks' heads cabossed ar. Crest — 
A spaniel sejant erm. 

BrO'WH (Sir John Brown, Knt., J. P. and D.L., Endclifife 
Hall, Sheffield). Ar. two barrulets between a mullet in 
chief and a representation of a railway conical spiral wheel 
in base sa. Cie.it— A lion sejant ppr. charged with two 
barrulets sa., and supporting with the dexter paw an esco- 
cheon ar. thereon a bee volant also ppr. 

BrO'wn (Nonsuch House, co. Wilts; Rev. Meredith Brown 
of that place) Gu. a chev. erra. betw. three fleurs-de-lis or. 
Crest — A lion's head erased or. A/ot(o— Forward. 

Browne (Woolmers, and Camfield Place, co. Hertford ; 
Thomas Browne, Esq., Norroy King of Arms, and by patent 
18 May, 1761, Garter King of Arm.s, descended from 
Edward Browne. Esq., of Compton-juxta-Ashbume, co. 
Derby, supposed to have been a descendant of Sir Antuont 
Browne, K.G.). Sa. three lions pass. betw. two bendlets ar. 
and as many trefoils slipped erm. Crest — Ist, Browne, a 
griffin's head erased sa. beaked and eared or, charged on 
the neck with a bar gemel ar. and a trefoil as in the arms ; 
2nd, Nedhah, a buck's head sa. attired or, issuing from a 
crown gold pallisado. The second Crest is borne as a 
memorial of the marriage of Thomas Browne, Garter, with 
Martha, dau. and co-heir of George Nedham, Esq., of 
Wyniondley Priory, Herts. Their son. Rev. William 
Browne, of Camfield Place, ni. 1791, Anne, eldest dau. of 
Sir FitzWilliam Barrington, Bart., and left at his death in 
1819, an only son, William Browne, Esq., of Camfield Place, 
who m. 1815, Anna Maria, dau. of Theophilus Salwey, Esq., 
of the Lodge, and d. 1828, leaviog issue. Motto Si sit 
prudentia. 

Bro'wne (Newgrove, co. Clare ; exemplified to Thomas 
Browne Bradt, Esq., upon his assuming, by royal licence, 
1877, the surname of Browne instead of that of Brady, in 
compliance with the testamentary injunction of his grand- 
uncle, Thomas Browne, Esq., of Newgrove). Ar. on a bend 
engr. double cottised plain sa. three eagles displ. with two 
heads of the field, in the sinister chief point a pellet. Cre*t 
— An eagle displ. with two heads per pale ar. and sa. the 
dexter wing charged with a pellet, and the sinister with a 
plate. Motto — Nee timeo nee sperno. 

"Rrovme (Hawkins-Browne, Badger, co. Salop). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th erm. on a fesse embattled, counter-embattled sa. 
three escallops erm., for Browne ; 2nd and 3rd, or, on a 
chev. betw. three cinquefoils az. as many escallops of the 
field on a chief per pale gu. and sa. a griffin passant erm. 
CreiA — ()n a mural coronet a stork's head erased erm. 
charged with an escallop az. Motto— Wer^ita atqae decens. 

Browne (page 133). The correct blazon of the arms granted, 
L815, to Major Gen. Sir George Sackville Browne, K.C.B., 
is gu. a chev. betw. three lions' gambs erect and erased or, 
on a chief crenell^e ar. an eagle displ. sa. 

Bruoe (Hovell-Thorlow-Cdmmino-Bbccb, Baron, Thurlow, 
p. 1013. Thomas John, ■'ith Lord Thurlow, assumed the 
additional surnames of Cumhing and Bruce, and had the 
following arms exemplitied under royal warrant, of August, 
1874). l^uarterly, 1st, Bruce, or, a saltire, gu. on a chief 
of the laKt, in sinister canton a mullet of the first, charged 
with a crescent of the second; 2nd, Ccmminc, az., three 
RHrbsor; 3rd. Thurlow, ar. on a chev. cottised sa. three 



BUG 



SUPPLEMENT. 



C AF 



portcullises, with chains and rings of the Brst; 4th, Hovell, 
or, a cross sa. Crests— I. Bruce. On a cap of maintenance 
ppr. a dexter arm in armour from the shoulder, resting on 
the elbow, also ppr. the hand holding a sceptre erect or, 
Motto over, " Fuimus." 2. Cdmmino. A lion ramp, or, 
holding in the dexter forepaw a dagger ppr. Motto over, 
"Courage."' 3. Thcri-ow. A rav»n ppr. gorged with a 
chain, and pendent a portcullis ar. Motto over, " Justitiae 
soror fides." 4. Hovell. A greyhound couchant or, 
collared and line reflexed over the back sa. Motto over, 
"Quo fata vocant." Supporters — On either side a greyhound 
or, collared and lined reflexed over the back sa. 
Suchanan (Dunburgh, CO. Stirling, bart., created 14 Dec. 
1878). Or, a lion ramp. sa. betw. two otters' heads erased 
in chief ppr., and a cinquefoil in base of the second, all 
within the Royal tressure of the last. Crest — An armed 
dexter hand holding a cap of dignity purpure, facing erm. 
Supporters — Dexter a falcon, wings elevated and addorsed, 
ppr. belled, beaked, and charged on the breast with two 
branches of laurel conjoined or; sinister a gryphon sa. 
charged in Uke manner with two branches of laurel. Motto 
— Nunquam victus. 
Buchanan (W'alden, Kent ; Claud Alexander Francis 
John Buchanan, Esq. (see Buchanan of Drempellier, 
p. 140). 
Buchanan (Grat-Bcchanan, of Scotstoun and Eastfield 
CO. Lanark). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a lion ramp. sa. 
holding in his dexter paw a dagger ppr. a tressure flory 
counterflory of the second, for Buchanan; 2nd and 3rd, 
gu. a lion ramp. betw. three cinquefoils ar. within a bordure 
engr. of the second, the lion charged with a crescent of the 
first for diff., for Gray. Crests — Dexter, two hands grasp- 
ing a two-handed sword ppr., for Buchanan; sinister, an 
anchor in the sea ppr. for Gbat. Mottoes — Clariora 
sequor; and Fast. 
Buckler (Charles Alban Buckler, Esq., Surrey Herald 
Extraordinarii. Same as Buckler, of Causeway. Visit. 
Dorset, 1565 and 1623, M.S. Norfolk, 14 Coll. of Arms). 
Sa. on a fesse betw. three dragons' heads erased or, as many 
estoiles of eight points of the field. Crest — A dragon's head 
coupeed sa. guttee d'or, collared with two bars gemelles 
gold. Motto — Fidelis usque ad mortem. 
Budgett (Ja MEs Smith Budgett, Esq., of Stoke Park, Surrey). 
Az. on a cross invected or, betw. (our water bougets of the 
last an escallop betw. as many horseshoes of the 1st. Crest — 
In front of two palmers' staves in saltire or, a water bouget 
az. 
Bunbury (McClintock-Bcsbckt, Baron RatMonnell, page 
6.'i6). The arms of Thomas-Kane, 2nd Lord Kidhilonnelt, 
are: Quarterly, Ist and 4th, ar. on a bend sa. three chess 
rooks of the field, for BrNBURT; 2nd and 3rd, per pale gu. and 
az. a chev. erm. betw. three escallops ar.,for McClintock. 
Crests — 1st, two swords in saltire ar. hilted gold, pierced 
through a leopard's face or, Bunbury ; 2nd, a lion passant 
ppr. McClintock. Supporttrs — Dexter a lion, and sinister 
a leopard, both ppr. each gorged with a collar erm. and each 
charged on the shoulder with an escallop ar. Mottoes — Vis 
unita fortoir, Bcnburt ; Virtute et labore, McClintock. 

Burdett-Coutts. See Babtlett-Burdett-Coutts. 

Burnyeat (Millgrove, co. Cumberland). Per pale or and 
az. on a chev. betw. three bears' heads couped two quatre- 
foils, all counterchanged. Crests — Issuant from flames ppr. 
a bear's head per pale or and az. gorged with a collar flory 
countertlory counterchanged. 

BurrO'WS (Sydenham, Oxfordshire ; Rev. Henry William 
Bcbbows, B.D., Canon of Rochester Cathedral, son of Lieut. - 
Gen. Montagu Burrows, by Mary Anne, his wife, dau. of 
Capt. Joseph Larcom, R.N., Resident Naval Commissioner 
at Malta, and sister of Major-Gen. Right Hon. Sir Thomas 
Askew Laecom, Bart., K.C.B., Under-Secretary of State for 
Ireland). Az. a sword in pale point upwards ppr. pommel 
and hilt or, betw. three fleurs-de-lis erm. Crest — Betw. two 
fleurs-de-lis erminois an eagle, wings elevated and addorsed 
ppr. ducally gorged and charged on the breast with a cinque- 
foil or. Motto — Together. 

Burton (William Schoolcroft Burton, Esq., of Fogga- 
thorpe, in the parish of Biibwith, in the East Riding of the 
CO. York, of Childrey, co. Berks, and of Walton Hall, in the 
parish of Walton, co. Bucks, J.P for the cos. Bedford and 
Bucks, High .Sheriff, la77). Per pale indented az. and sa. six 
fleurs-de-lis, three, two, and one, each within an annulet ar. 
Crest— In front of two arms embowed in armour, the hands 
ppr. holding a fleur-de-lis ar. six annulets interlaced fesse- 
wise also ar. Mo"o — Sans changer. 



Bury (HowARD-BuRT, Charleville Forest, King's co. ex- 
emplified to Kenneth Howard Bury, Esq., Capt. R.A., 
nephew of the 17th Earl of Suffolk, and Lady Emily Alfreda 
Julia, his wife, dau. of Charles William George, 3rd Earl 
of Charleville, and sister and co-heir of Charles William 
Francis, 4th Earl of Charleville, on his assuming, by royal 
licence, 14 Dec, 1881, the additional surname and arms of 
Bury). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, vert, a cross crosslel or, a 
canton ar, (or diff.. for Bury ; 2nd and 3rd, gu. on a bend 
betw. six cross crosslets fitche^ arg. an escutcheon or, 
charged with a demi lion ramp, pierced through the mouth 
by an arrow, within a double tressure flory, counterflory of 
the first a crescent sa. for diff., for Howard. Crests — Ist, 
Bury : A boar's head couped at the neck or, tusked ar. 
langued gu. transfixed through the neck by a spear ppr. and 
charged for diff. with a cross crosslet vert; 2nd, Howard: 
On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard 
tail extended or, ducally gorged ar. and charged on the 
body with a crescent also gu. for diff. Mottoes— Vnier 
the arms, Virtus sub cruce crescit; over the 2nd crest, 
Nous maintiendrons. 

Bury (Accountants' Institute of). Quarterly, ar. and az. a 
cross parted and fretty, counterchanged betw. an anvil sa. 
in the first quarter a fleece or, in the second two shuttles in 
saltire, threads pendent ppr. in the third, and three culms 
of the papyrus plant issuing from a mount also ppr. in the 
fourth. Crest — Upon a mount a bee volant betw. two 
flowers of the cotton tree slipped all ppr. Jl/o£to— Vincit 
omnia industria. 

Butler (exemplified 18 June, 1878, to John Piers Butler, 
only surviving child of John Kilkelly, 46, Upper Mount 
Street, in the city of Dublin, LL.D., by Maria Elizabeth, 
his wife, deceased, only dau. and eventual heiress of William 
Butler, Esq., of Rathilig, in the Queen's co., who was 
second surviving son of Edmund Theobald Mandeville 
Butler, Esq., of E. T. M. Ville, and next brother of Garret 
Butler, Esq., of E. T. M. Ville, and of Garrendenny Castle, 
Queen's co., who was declared, 29 June, 18'28, by the Law 
Officers of the Crown in Ireland to be the next heir male 
of the body of Sir Edward Butler, Knt., created Viscount 
Galmoye, in the peerage of Ireland, by patent dated 16 May, 
1646). Quarterly, 1st, or, a chief indented az.; '^Jud, gu. 
three covered cups or; 3rd, ar. a lion ramp. gu. armed and 
langued az.on a chief of the second a swan of the first, betw. 
two annulets or ; 4th, erm. a saltire gu. ; the whole within a 
bordure engr. vert. Urest—\ falcon displ. ppr. rising out 
of a plume of five ostrich feathers ar. Motto — Comme je 
trouve. 

Butler (Garryhunden, co. Carlow, Bart., p. 153). The 
proper designation of this Baronetcy is "of Cloughgrenan." 
The correct arms as recorded in the impalement on the 
funeral certificate of Sir John Wilson, Bart., of Wilsonsfort, 
1636, whose wife, Mrs. Martha, dau. of Sib Thomas Butler, 
1st Bart, of Cloughgrenan, are Or, a chief indented az. all 
within a border also indented erm. 

Byng: (Cra.nmer-Btng; Quendon Hall, Essex, exemplified to 
Lieut.-Col. Alfred Moltneux Cranmer-Byng, late Grenadier 
Guards, eldest son of Henry Byng, Esq., of Quendon Hall, 
by Mary Anne, his wife (a descendant of Archbishop Cran- 
mer), only child of William Webb, Esq., of the Views, 
Essex. Col. Cranmer-Byng is grandson of Vice-Admiral 
Hon. Henry Dilkes Byng, 4th son of John, 5th Viscount 
Torrington, and, assumed, by royal licence, dated 1 Feb. 
1882, the prefix surname of Cranmer, and the arms of 
Cranmer quartered with the arms of Byng, in compliance 
with the testamentary injunction of his aunt, AnneCranmeb, 
of Quendon Hall aforesaid). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Byno, 
quarterly sa. and ar. in the first quarter a lion ramp, of the 
second, 2nd and 3rd, Cranmer, ar. on a chev. purpure betw. 
three pelicans az. vulning themselves ppr. as many cinque- 
foils or. Crests — 1st, Byno: An heraldic antelope, passant 
erm. horned, tusked, maned, and hoofed or; 2nd, Cranmer: 
A crane's head, erm. erased gu. pierced through the neck 
by an arrow in bend sinister or, barbed and flighted ar. 
Motto — Tuebor, 



CAFE (CO. Somerset ; spelt " Caffe," 1565, and " Cafe," 1594 . 
See Caffe, Reitstap's General Armorial of Noble and Patrician 
Families of Europe). Quarterly, gu. and az. a cross betw. 
in the first and fourth quarters a sword erect point down 
wards, and in the second and third a Saracen's head couped, 
all ar. Crest — In front of a sword erect, point downwards, 



CAI 



SUPPLEMENT. 



OAS 



«r, hHt and pomel or, an «9catch€on ar. charged with a 
Saracen's head, as in the arms. iVfo«o— Coup sur coup. 

Cairns {Earl Caims). Gxx. three martlets ar. within ahordure 
of the last charged with as many trefoils slipped vert. Crest — 
A martlet ar. charged with a trefoil slipped vert. Sapporters 
— Two hawks, wings expanded ppr. collared, belled, and 
chained or, each holding in the beak a trefoil slipped vert. 
3/o»o— Effloresco. 

Caltborpe (Hickling Hall, CO. Norfolk, and Banwell, co. 
Somerset; Martin Calthowe, of Hickling Hall, and 
RicaARD Calthobpe, of Banwell, sous of Sir Martin 
Calthobpe, Lord Mayor of London 1688. Visit. .Somerset, 
1623). Chequy or and ae, a fesse erm. quartering, 1st, gu. 
on a chief ar. two mullets sa. ; 2nd, az. three grifhns pass. 
in pale ar.; 3rfl, az, a fesse betw, six crosses crosslet or ; 4th, 
ar. a lion ramp, ea. a crescent for dill. 

Calthrop (Holi.wat-Cai.th«op, Stanhoe Hall, co. Norfolk; 
exemplified to Henry Calthrop Hollwat-Calthbop, Esq., 
eldest son of James Hollwat, Esq., of Stanhoe, by Mary 
Esther, his wife, only dau. and heiress of John Calthrop, 
Esq., of Stanhoe, upon his assuming by royal licence, 1878, 
the additional surname of Calthrop, in compliance with the 
will of his maternal grandfather). Quarterly, 1st and 4tli, 
chequy, or and at. on a fesse nebulee erm. betw. two cotises 
of the last a rose gu. betw. two caltraps of the second, for 
Oalthbop ; 2nd and 3rd, gu. on a fesse betw. in chief three 
crescents and in base another all or, three pallets sa., for 
Hollwat, Cmti — 1st, Calthrop : In front ot a boar's liead 
couped at the neck az. collared gemel or, three annulets 
interlaced gold ; 2nd, Hollwat : A goat's head couped ar. 
tem^e of crescents and holding in the moiith two trefoils 
slipped all gu. il/of(o— Quaerere verum. 

Cazamell (Charles Cammell, Esq., J. P., of Norton Hall 
and Brookfield Manor, Hatliersage, co. Derby, and Ditcham 
Park, CO. Southampton, and co. Sussex). Sa. on a chev. ar. 
ootised or, betw. three camels statantof the second, as many 
trefoils slipped of the first. Crest — A camel's head erased 
ar. gorged with a collar gemel Ra. holding in the mouth a 
trefoil as in the arms. Motto — Perseverando. 

Campbell (Blythswood, co. Renfrew, Bart. ; created 4 May, 
HJbO. Quarterly, Island 4th gyronny of eight or and sa. 
eai;h charged with a trefoil slipped counterchanged ; 2nd 
and 3rd, ar. alymphad sa. Crest — A lymphad as in the arms. 
ilvtlo — Vincit labor. 

Campbell (McIvob-Campbell, Asknish, co. Argyll, 1884). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, counterquartercd, 1st and 4th, 
gyronny of eight or and sa. ; 2nd, ar. a dexter hand couped 
in fess grasping a dagger in pale gu. ; 3rd, ar. a galley, sails 
furled and oars in action flagged sa. ; 2nd and 3rd, quarterly, 
or, and gu. a bend ea. Crust— X boar's head couped or. 
Motto — Nunquam obliviscar. 

Campbell-Orde, Bart. See Oede. 

Canada, Dominion of. Quarterly, Ontario, Quebec, 
Nova Scotia, and New Bbcnswick. 

Oktabio, Province of. 'Vert a sprig of three leaves of 
maple slipped or, on a chief aig. the cross of St. George. 

QcEBEC, Province of. Or, on a fesse gu. betw. two 
fleur-de-lis in chief az. and a sprig of three leaves of 
maple slipped vert in base a lion pass, guard, or. 

Nova Scotia, Province of. Or, on a fesse wavy az. betw. 
three thistles ppr. a salmon naiaut arg. 

New Brunswick Province of. Or, on waves a lymiihad 
(or ancient galley) with oars in action, ppr. on a chief 
gu. a lion pass, guard, or. 

Cantrill (Wokingham and Woodley, co. Berks, Hcmphby 
Cantbill, of Wokingham, h. I62o, son of Humphby Cantrill, 
of same, and grandson of Humphry Cantbill, of Woodley. 
Visit. Berks, 16G4-6). Ar. a pelican in her piety ,sa. Crest — 
A tower ar. 

Capel (Swanwlck, co. Somerset; Edward Capel, of Swan- 
wick, Ump. James I., second Bon of Henby Capel, Esq., of 
Reines, co. Essex. Visit. .Somerset. 1623). (Jii. a lion ramp, 
betw. ihiee crosses crosslet or, a crescent for diff. C«.<«— A 
deml lion ramp, holding in the dexter paw a cross crosslet 
flUihec. 

Cappel (Uev. LonsCAppEL, I). I)., Minister of the fJerman 
Lutheran Church, in Little Alie Street, Whitechapel). Az. 
two palmers' staves saltirewiso or, on a chief of the last as 
many Catherine wheels of the first. Crest — In front of a 
palmer's staff erect a Catherine wheel or, betw. two wiogs 
az. gatt^ d'or. 



Caradoc Vreichflras (Prince of Brecon). Sa. a cher. 
betw. three spears heads ar. points upwards, embrned ppr. 

Carbon (page 158). This name is a misprint for Cabron. 

Carlile (Ponsbourne Park, co. Hertford, late Scotland). Or, 
a cross flory gu. on a chief of the second, a saltier of the 
first, the cross charged in the centre with a crescent, also of 
the first for diff. Crest — Two dragons' heads addorsee Tert. 
JV/o«o— Humilitate. 

Carlisle (William Thomas Carlisle, Esq., Lincoln's Inn, 
London). Ar. on a chev. engr. sa. betw. four Cornish 
choughs, three in chief and one in base ppr. three mullets 
of eight points or. Crest — In front of a blackamoor's head 
in profile couped at the shoulders ppr. wreathed about the 
temples ar. and gu. two mullets of eight points or. 

Carlo'W, To'wm of (co. Carlow). Ar. a castle triple 
towered ppr. on the centre tower a staff, thereon a flag per 
pale or, and vert charged with a lion ramp. gu. 

Carring'ton (Thomas Carbinoton, Esq., of Field Head, 
Sheffield). Ar. on a bend az. cotised sa. betw. two horseshoes 
of the second, a unicorn's head erased or, betw. two bezants. 
Crest — Three horseshoes or, thereon a unicorn's head erased 
sa. 

Carroll (granted by Molyneux, Ulster, 16 Nov. 1609, to 
Alderman Thomas Carroll, of the city of Dublin, and to 
his son. Sir James Carroll, Knt., Chief Eemembrancer of 
the Exchequer). Sa. a sword erect supported by two lions 
ramp. or. Crest — The stump of an oak couped thereon a 
falcon close ppr. belled or, fesse gu. 

Carruthers (Mitchell - Cabbdthers, Scotland, 1876). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. two chevronels, engr. betw. 
three fleurs-de-lis, or, for Cabbuthers; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a 
fesse counter-embattled betw. three mascles or, for Mitchell. 
Crest — Dexter, Cabruthebs : a cherub's head ppr.; sinister, 
Mitchell: St. Michael in armour, holdmg a spear in hia 
right hand, face, neck, arms and legs bare, all ppr. wings 
ar. and hair auburn. Mottoes — Promptus et fldelis, and 
Virtute cresco. 

Carson (Accarsane, Capetown, Cape of Good Hope, 1883). 
Az. a fess or, betw. three mascles in chief, and a crescent ia 
base ar. Crest — A dextei hand ppr. holding a crescent ar. 
Motto — Teneo et credo. 

Carter (CoUe'^tion of Molyneux, Ulster, 1597 1632). Ar. a 
cress lozengy gu. betw. four quatreloils vert on a chief sa. 
three plates. Crest — A demi lion ramp. sa. holding betw. the 
paws a cross lozengy gu. each lozenge charged with a 
plate. 

Cartier (Geobge Etienne Cartier, Esq., of Montreal). 
Per fesse gu. and or, a fesse of the last in chief an Ermine ppr. 
and in base five pallets of the first. Crest— An anchor in 
bend sinister sa. cable ppr. pendent therefrom by a gold 
chain an escochcon gu. charged with a fleur-de-lis or. Motto 
— " Franc et sans dol." 

Case (Red Hazlcs, Huyton and Whiston, co. Lancaster; 
Thomas Case, Esq., of Huyton and Whiston, quartering 
Oole and Clayton ; his great-great-grandfather, John Case, 
Esq., of Red llazles, Huyton, having m. Elizabeth, dau. 
and heir of Edward Dole, Esq., and his great-grandfather, 
Thomas Case, Esq., of Red Hazles, having m. Margaret, 
dau. and heiress of William Clayton, Esq., of Fulwood). 
Ar. on a bend engr. gu. cottlsed sa. three round buckles or, 
quartering Ogle, ar. a fess betw. three crescents gu., and 
Clayton, ar. a cross engr. sa. betw. four torteaux. Crest — 
A cubit arm habited erm. cuff az. holding in the hand ppr. 
a round buckle or. Motto — Distantia jungit. These arms 
were confirmed and a crest granted to Thomas Case, of 
West Chester, gentleman, by Seger, Norroy, 21 Dec. 41 
Queen Elizabeth, 

Casey (Caroline, wife of Robert Claddb Smith, Esq., 
of Rcdcliff Tower and Hawkmoor, co. Devon, formerly 
Lieutenant in the Bombay Light Cavalry, widow of 
Thomas Karquhar, Esq., of the Bengal Artillery (who was 
killed at Delhi), and dau. of John Casey, of Calcutta, 
merchant, a native of Ireland). Gu. a chev. betw. three 
greyhounds sejant ar. 

Oashel, City of (co. Tipperary). Vert a castle triple 
towered ar. on the centre tower a double tongued pennant 
on a HtalT or. 

Casley (originally De Cuabtklai, of France, at now borne 
by Casley, of Ipswich and Newcustle-on-Tyne). Gu. a castle 
with two towers or embattled and masoned sa. Cretl — A 
linn ramp. ppr. langued and armed gu. Motto— ^lalo niort 
quam foedari. 



CAS 



SUPPLEMENT. 



CL A 



Cassels (EdiDburgh, 1877). Ar. a chey. gu. betw. two 
cross crossleU fitchee in chief and a lion's head erased in 
base ga. Crttt — A dolphin naiant embowed or. Motto — 
Avise la fin. 

Caswall (CO. Wilts). Ar. six barrulets sa. Crext—A 
dexter arm couped below the shoulder in mail armour hold- 
ing in the hand all ppr. a cross crosslet fitchee or. Motto — 
Kon multa sed niultum. 

Cawnpy (P. 179). This is a misprint for Cawpnt. 

Cawthra (Henry Cawthsa, Esq., of the City of Toronto, 
Canada). Or on a chevron az. betw. three hurts each 
charged with a boar's head couped of the first two arrows 
chevronwise, the points upwards also or. Crest — Upon a 
quiver fessewise filled with arrows or, a boar's head couped 
az. holding in the mouth two arrows saltirewise the points 
resting on the quiver also or. 

Cazalet (Fairlawn, Tunbridge, Kent : Edwabd Cazalet, 
Esq., J. P., D.L., Lord of the Manor of Shipbome, son of 
Peteb Clement Cazalet, of Brighton). Az. a castle triple 
towered ar. betw. two fleurs-de-lis in chief and a boar passant 
in base or. Creat — A casque, in front thereof a tilting spear 
fessewise all ppr. 

Cbalke (Long Ashton, Westbury, and Yatton, co. Somerset, 
Avington, co. Berks, and Shelbome, co. Wilts ; Sir Alex- 
andek Cualke, Knt., of Shelborne, son of Fb»ncis Chalke, 
Esq., of Yatton, and grandson of Richard Chalre, of 
AWngton, who was son of Alexandeh Chalke of Westbury, 
the son of John Chalke, of Long Ashton, and grandson of 
Sir KicHAKD Chalke, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, 
1462. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Sa. three bars ar. quartering 
Ist, ar. three cinquefoils per pale gu, and az. ; 2nd ar. a 
chev. sa. betw. three lions dormant gu., for Lyons; 3rd, ar. 
crusilly az. three fleur-de-lis sa., for Bebesfobd, Crest — 
Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi swan rising ar. crested 

Clialztiers (Sir David Patbick Chalmebs, H.M. Advocate for 
Gold Coast, 1876, Chief Justice of British Guiana, 1878). 
Ar. a demi lion sa. issuant from a fesse gu. charged with 
two bells of the first, in base a flenr-de-lis of the third. Crest 
— An eagle rising reguardant ppr. Motto — Spero. 

Chambers (Clough House, co. York ; descended from 
Chambebs, of Cleadon, co. Durham ; now represented by 
Geoboe Wilton Chambebs, Esq.. of Clough, J. P., grdndson 
of Sir Bobebt Chambers, Chief Justice of Bombay). Gu, 
on a chev. betw. three cinquefoils or, as many eastern crowns 
az. (confirmed 1835), Crest — On a mount vert a bear passant 
ppr. muzzled and gorged with an eastern crown or. from 
the muzzle a chain pendent and reflexed over the back 
gold. 

Chambers (The Hurst, Alfreton, co. Derby; John Cham- 
bebs, Esq., of The Hurs;, m. Anne, dau. of Capt. John 
Platt, K.X., of Hatfield, co. York, and had an only son, 
John Edmund Fbedebick Chambebs, Esq., of The Hurst). 
Ar. on a fesse engr. sa., three cinquefoils or, in chief two 
squirrels sejant ppr. 

Chambers (Sir Geobge Henby Chambebs, Knt.). Erm. 
two chevronels sa. betw. in chief as many chambers, placed 
transverse, fired ppr. and in base an antique galley of the 
second. Crest — In front of an ass's head erased sa. collared 
gemel, an anchor fessewise or. 

Champnes (Orchardleigh, co. Somerset ; John Champnes, 
<e»ip. James I. Visit. Somerset, 1623, states "This cuaie 
hath continued this 100 years in his parlour window "). 
Per pale sa. and ar. a lion ramp. gu. 

Chapman (Frewen Hall, co. Oxford, and Hill End, co. 
Chester : John Chapman, Esq. of Hill End, co. Chester, and 
Carlecotes, co. York, M.P., m. Anne, dau. of Geobge Side- 
bottom, Esq., of Hill End, and d. 1877, when he was 5. by his 
eldest son, Edwabd Chapman, Esq., of Frewen Hall and Hi'l 
End, Lord of the Manor of Hatiersley, J.P., M.A.). Per chev. 
or, and az. a crescent betw. three mullets pierced, all 
counterchanged. Crest — A stag's head erased sa. attired and 
semee of crescents or. Motto— Crescil sub pondere virtus. 

Oheetham (Kycroft House, Rochdale, and Brooklyn, Hey- 
wood, both in co. Lancaster). Ar. a griflin segreant gu. 
over all three bars invected sa. each chcrged with five 
bezants. Crest — A demi griffin, wings adjorsed gu. 
bezants, the mouth transfixed by a tilting spear or, holding 
betw. the claws a bezant. Motto— AA mortem fidelis. 

Oheetham. (JosnrA Milne Cheetham, Esq., of Singleton 
Houce, Broughton, Manchester, J.V.). Ar. gutt^ de sang 



a cross parted and fretiy »a. between, in the first and fonrth 
quarters a griffin segreant, in the second a fieam, and in 
the third a cross potent all of the second. Crest— In from 
of a demi griffin segreant, gu. resting the sinister claw on a 
cross potent sa. a plate. J*/o(to— Qaod tuum tene. 

Cheke (Bruton, CO. Somerset, and London; John Cbeke, of 
Bruton, Edwabd Cheke, of same place, and Thomas, of 
London, temp. James I., sons of Robtbt Cheke, of Bruton, 
by Elizabeth, his wife, dau. of John Kabvoll, of Castle 
Cary. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Eitb. 00 it chief sa. threw 
fusils or. 

Chinnery-Haldane. See Haldane. 

Chorley, Borough of. Or, on a chev. gn. three 
escocheons ar. each charged with a blue bottle slipped ami 
leaved ppr. on a chief of the second, a crown vallary of the 
first. 

Churton (Morannedd, Byhl, co. Flint. John Churton, Esq., 
of Morannedd, High Sheriff 1875, son of William Chcbton, 
Esq., of Whitchurch, co. Salop;. Erm. two chevronels 
gu. betw. four rams' heads erased, three in chief and one in 
base sa. armed or. Crest — Out of the battlements of a 
tower ppr. a demi lion gu. gorged with a collar gemel or, 
holding in the dexter paw a sword ppr. and resting the 
sinister paw on an escocheon erm. charged with a rani's 
head erased sa. armed gold. Motto — Avaccez. 

Clark (Thombury, co. Gloucester, London, and Wells and 
Long Sutton, co. Somerset ; Richabd Clabk, of Long 
Sutton, son of John Clabk, of Wells, grandson of Richard 
Clark, of London, and great-grandson of John Clabk, of 
Thornbury. Visit. Somerset, 1623. Arms granted by Cooke, 
Clarenceux, 1576). Gu. two bars ar. in chief three cinque- 
foils erm. 

Clark (Trowbridge, Wilts, page 198), represented by Thomas 
Clabk, Esq., J. P. and D.L. for Wilts, and late major of the 
Wilts volunteers, of Bellefield (not £eUe>ifield), Trowbridge, 
and Cumberwell {not Cumberland), near Bradford, co. 
Wilts. 

Clark (Edinburgh, 1879). Az. a fesse chequy ar. and sa. 
betw. two boars' heads couped in chief of the second, and a 
crescent in base or, on a canton also of the second a chev. of 
the third betw. three lions ramp. gu. Crest — A falcon rising 
ppr. Motlo — Honor et virtute. 

Clark (Fbedebick Clabk, Esq., Great Cumberland Place, 
London, D.L., co. Hereford). Perpale or and ar. on a bend 
engr. plain cotised gu. betw. (our pellets, a rose betw. two 
swans close of the second. Crest — Upon the trunk of a tree 
eradicated fessewise sprouting to the dexter a lark risini; 
ppr. charged on the breast with a rose gu. holding in the 
beak three ears of wheat slipped or. 

Clarke (Sir William John Clarke, Bart., of Bnpertswood, 
Colony of Victoria, created 1882; this family of Clarke can 
be traced in the registries of Weston Zoyland, Somerset, as 
far back as the reign of Queen Elizabeth). Or two bars az. 
betw. four escallops three in chief, and one in base gu. with 
two flaunches of the second. Crest — In front of a dexter 
arm embowed in armour the hand in a gauntlet ppr. gra-sp- 
ing an ari-ow in bend sinister or, flighted, ar. three escallops 
also or. Motto — Signiun quserens in vellcre. 

Clarke (Waste Court, Abingdon, co. Berks ; John Cbeemer 
Clarke, Esq., son of Robert Clabke, Esq., of St. Giles-in- 
the-Wood, CO. Devon, by Gbaciana, his wife, dau. of John 
Cbeemeb, Esq., of Exboume, co. Devon. He is J. P. for 
Abingdon, and chairman of the Abingdon Railway, was 
mayor of the borough 1876, and elected its MP. 1874 and 
1880). Vert on a bend ermine cotised or, betw. three crosses 
pattfe ar. as many swans of the third. Crest — In front of a 
mount overgrown with clover a lark rising ppr. charged on 
the breast with a cross pattee ar. and in the beak an ear of 
wheat or. 

Clarkson (Fbedebick Scipio Clabkson, Esq., of London). 
Ar. on abend betw. two trefoils slipped sa. three lozenges 
of the field. Credit — An arm in armour couped below the 
elt'ow lying fessways ppr. in the hand a sword erect ar. hilt 
and pommel sa. from the blade a pennon flotant gu. Motto 
— " Ferro comite." 

Claxton fKirkton, co. Xotts, and Bedininster, co. Somerset; 
William Claxton, of Bedminster, tcmii. James I., son of 
John Claxton, of Kirkton, grandson of Michael Claxton, 
and great-grandson of William Claxton, Esq., a Justice 
of the Peace for the co. York. Visit. Somerset 1623). Gu. 
on a lessc betw. three hedgehogs ar. a crescent for diff. 



CLA 



SUPPLEMENT. 



CON 



Oiayton (KMt Cliff, co. Lincoln; Nathaniel Ci^ttos, 
Esq.). Quarterly, or anrt ar. on a crosa nebulae aa. betw. 
four pellets a fescee feasewise of the first. Crest— Upon the 
battlements of a tower a lion's jamb erect and erased ppr. 
grasping a pellet, encircled by a wreath of oak vert. 

Olennell (Clennell, co. Northumberland). Az. a dexter 
arm ppr. issuing from a cuff ar. in the sinister of the shield, 
the hand grasping a b&ton or. The Clennelu, an ancient 
family, long seated at Clennell (now the property of their 
descendant, Anthony Wilkinson, Esq., of Clennell and of 
Sheraton, co. Durham), appear in the Visit. Northumber- 
land, 1615, but no arms are given, and the earliest official 
record of this bearing is in a grant thereof, 6 August, 1796, 
to Thomas Fenwick, afterwards Clennell, Esq., great- 
nephew and heir of Percival Clennell, of Harbottle Castle, 
Northumberland, who, by royal licence, assumed the name 
of Clennell 31 March same year. 
Clifford (Boscombe, co. Wilts, Edwakd Cuffobd, of Bos- 
combe, temp. Queen Elizabeth, son of Henry Clifford, of 
Boscombe, temp. Henry VIII. Visit. Berks 1664). Chequey 
or, and az. a fess and canton gu. Crest— Out of a ducal 
coronet or, a wyvern gu. 
Clifford (Kintbury, ro. Berks. Bicbabd Clifford of Kint- 
bury, 6. 1599. 12th son of Edward Clifford, of Boscombe, 
CO. Wilts. Visit. Berks 1664. Same Arms and Crest. 
Clopton (Radbrooke, co. Gloucester). Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, gu. a bend or, betw. six pears erect ppr.; 2nd and 3rd, 
Quarterly, per fesee dancett^e gu. and or, in the first quarter 
a lion pass. ar. 
Clou^h (Thorpe Stapleton, co. York; granted by St. George, 
Clarenceux, 10 James I., 1612, borne by Edmond Clodgh, 
Esq., of Thorpe S tapleton, who m. Frances, dau. of Sir 
MAnoEE Vavasocb, Knt. of Weston, co. York. Visit. York, 
1612). Sa. a fesse humett^e erm. betw. three leopards' faces 
ar. Crest — A demi lion ramp. erm. holding betw. the paws 
a battle ase, handle sa. headed ar. 
Cloash (Newbald Hall, near Beverley, and Clifton House, 
CO. York; borne by William Clough, Esq., of Clifton 
House, and Newbald Hall, Brough ; and by his brother, the 
Eev. John Clough, M.A., Bector of Clifton, co. Nottingham). 
Arms and Crest as the preceding. 
Clowes (William Clowes, Esq., 51, Gloucester Terrace, 
Hyde Park, co. Middlesex, eldest son of Wiluam Clowes, 
of Garratt's Hall, co. Surrey, and grandson of Willlam 
Clowes, of the city of Chichester). Az. on a chev. ar. 
betw. two unicorn's heads erased in chief and a lion's head 
erased In base or, three pellets gu. each charged with a 
crescent of the second. Crut — A demi lion vert ducally 
crowned, holding in the dexter paw a battle-axe in bend 
sinister or, and resting the sinister paw on an escocheon ar. 
charged with a crescent az. 
Coc'h.rSLne-'BeiiU.ie, Baron Lamington). Quarterly, Istand 
4th, az. nine stars of six points wavy, three, three, two and 
one, or, for Baillie ; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a chev. gu. betw. 
three boars' heads erased az langued of the second, on a 
chief wavy of the third a sphinx couchant of the field, for 
Cocbbane. Crest$ — In the centre a boar's head erased ppr. 
on the dexter side issuing out of a naval crown or, a dexter 
arm embowed, vested az. cuffed ar. the hand holding a flag- 
staff ppr. thereon hoisted the flag of a rear-admiral of the 
white, being ar. a cross gu. and thereon the words "St. 
Domingo" in letters of gold, and on the sinister side a horse 
trotting, also ar. Supporters — On either side a boar, ppr. 
gorged with a dollar or, pendent therefrom an escocheon of 
the arms of Baillee, viz. : Az. nine estoiles, three, three, 
two and one, or. Motto— (iaid clarius astris. 

Oockes (co. Somerset; Walter Cockes, temp. James I., and 
John Cockm, of Haygrave, sons of John Cokkes, who was 
son of Thomas Cokkes, and grandson of John Cokkes, 
living 14 Henry \'1I., who was seventh in descent from 
Wiluam de Chelworth, living 29 Edward 1. Visit. Somer- 
set, 1623). Ou. a spur with leather and buckle or, on a 
chief ar. three cocks' heads erased of the first, combed, and 
wattled of the second. 

Oogxin (Chard, co. Somerset; Philibert Cogan, of Chard, 
b. 1560, son of Thomas Cooan, and grandson of Nicholas 
CooAN, both of same place. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Uu. 
three leaves erect ar. 

Ookayne ^exemplified to Georoe Edward Cokayne, Esq., 
M.A., K.S.A., of R^nhwcll, co. Northampton, Norroy King 
of Anns, on his ansuming, by royal licence in 1873, the sur- 
Dama wul anas of Cokaime, In complianc* with the testa- 



mentary injunction of his mother, the Hon. Mart Anhb, dau. 
of the Hon. William Cokayne, niece and co-heiress of 
Borlase, 6th Viscount Cullen, and widow of William Adams, 
Esq., LL.D., of Thorpe, Surrey). Ar. three cocks gu. 
beaked, combed, wattled, and membered sa. Oi-est — Acock's 
head erased gu. beaked, combed, and wattled sa. 
Colborne (Craton and Wj thehill, co. Somerset ; Visit. 
Somerset, 1623. Arms allowed by Segar, Garter). Ar. 
on a chev. betw. three buglehorns sa. stringed or, aa 
many mullets of the last. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, 
a stag's head ar. attired gold. 

Cole (Nailsea, co. Somerset, Bristol, and Wyke, co. 
Gloucester, and Colchester, co. Essex; Visit. Somerset. 
1623). Per pale or and gu. a bull pass, counter-changed, 
armed ar. an annulet for diff. 

Coleman (Brandon Parva, Norfolk ; James Henry Cole- 
man, Esq., of Napier, New Zealand). Gu. on a pale or, betw. 
two suns in splendour fessewise of the last, a lion ramp, of 
the first, ftest— Upon a mount vert in front of a shepherd's 
crook erect gu. a lamb grazing ar. Motto — Esto sol testis. 

Colznan (Carshalton Park, Surrey; Jeremiah Colman, Esq. 
of that place). Az. on a pale rayonn^ or, guttce d'eau hetw, 
two fleurs-de-lis of the 2nd a lion rampt. betw. two annulets 
gu. Crest — In front of two wings arg. each charged with an 
estoile az. a rock ppr. thereon a caltrap or. Motto — Sat 
cito si sat bene. 

Colman (Carrow House, Norwich ; Jeremiah James Col- 
man, Esq., M.P. for thatCity). Arms &c., same as Colman, 
of Carshalton Park. 

Colmore (Colmore, co. Dorset. Visit. Somerset, 1623). 
Gu. three crescents betw. eleven billets, four, four, two, and 
one, all or. 

Coltliurst (BowEN-CoLTBURST ; exemplified to Robert 
Walter Travers Bowen Colthurst, Esq., of Oakgrove, 
J. P. CO. Cork, and Geobgina de Belasis Bowen Colthurst, 
otherwise Greer, his wife, upon their assuming by royal 
licence, dated 9 Dec. 1882, the surname of Colthurst in 
addition to, and after that of Bowen, in compliance with the 
will of Joseph Colthurst, Esq., of Dripsey Castle, In the 
same CO., deceased). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a fess 
betw. three colts courant sa., as many trefoils slipped or, a 
crescent for diff., for Colthurst ; 2nd and 3rd, per pale az. 
and gu. a stag trippant ar. pierced in the back with an arrow 
and attired or, for Bowen. Crests — 1st, Colthurst: A colt 
courant sa. charged on the shoulder with a crescent or ; 
2nd, Bowen: On a mount vert a falcon close ppr. belled or. 
Motto — Justum et tenacem. 

Com.b (Norton Ferrers and Tisburie, co. Somerset; William 
Comb, of Norton Ferrers, temp. James I., son of Edward 
Comb, of Tisburie. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Sa. two bars 
ar. betw. six bees, three, two, and one of the last. Crest— 
A demi lion ramp. sa. ducally gorged ar. 

Combe (Cobham Park, co. Surrey ; descended from an old 
family in Hants, of which was Harvey Christian Combe, 
Esq., Lord Mayor of London, 1799, and for many years 
M.P. for the City). Az. on a pale erm. betw. two tilting 
spears erect or, three lions pass, palewise gu. Crest — 
On a mount vert a dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. 
garnished or, around the arm a ribbon tied gu. the 
hand grasping a broken tilting spear, also ppr., betw. two 
flag staves, flowing from each a pennon gu. Motto — Nil ] 
timere nee temere. 

Compton (Marquess of Nortftampton, page 219). The 
arms of William, 4th Marqaexs of Northampton, who s. his 
brother 1877, are, Sa. a lion pass, guardant or, betw. three 
esquires' helirets ar. Crest — On a mount, a beacon, fired 
ppr. behind it a riband, inscribed with the words. Nisi 
Dominus. Supporters — Dexter, a dragon erm. ducally 
gorged and chained or ; sinister, a unicorn ar. horned, 
maned, hoofed, and tufted, sa. Motto — Je ne serche qu'un. 

Compton (Sutton Bingham, Wigbear, and Petherton, co. 
Somerset; Thomas CoMProN, of Sutton Bingham, and 
Henry Compton, of Wigbear, temp. James I., sons of James 
Compton, of Petherton, in 1565. Visit. Somerset, 1626). 
Sa. three helmets close ar. a border or, quartering 1st, 
Trivet: Ar. a trivet sa. a border of the last ; 2nd, Storkb: Ar. 
a stork sa. collared or, beaked and legged gu. a border erm. 

Conder (Edward Conder, Esq., of Terry Bank, Westmor- 
land, and Elm Hurst, Essex). Ar. on a bend wavy az. betw. 
two lymphads, sails furled, flags flying and oars in aciion sa., 
an anchor entwined with a cable or. Crest — In front of a 
lymphad, as in the arms, an anchor fesswise, the flUke to the 
dexter or. Motto- Je couduis. 



CON 



SUPPLEMENT. 



00 w 



Conran (Newtown House, co. Louth, and Blacklands, 
Plympton, St. Mary, Devon; now borne by Wii-uam Con- 
ban, Esq., of Blacklands, and by his three brothers. Major 
Henry Conran, Col. Lewis Conran, and Major Marcell 
Conran, sons of Captain James Samoel Conran, 17th Light 
Pragoons, who was younger brother of Lieut. -Gen. Henry 
Lewis Conran, Col. 98th Regt., and son of Major Henry 
Conran (7th in descent from Alderman Philip Conran, 
Mayor of Dublin, 1592), by Jane Mart, his wife, dau. and 
eventually sole heiress of Lewis Marcell, Esq., of Water- 
ford). Quarterly, Ist and 2nd, vert on a chev. betw. three 
hinds' heads erased ar. as many martlets of the first, a 
crescent for diff., for Conran ; 2nd and 3rd, az. a chev. ar. 
betw. in chief a dexter arm in fesse couped below the elbow 
the hand grasping a dagger, point upwards ppr. and in 
base a trefoil, slipped of the second, for Marcell Crest — A 
hind's head, as in the arms. Motto — In Deo spes mea. 

Cooch (Col. Charles Cooch, retired list, Royal Body Guard). 
Per fesse or and gu. an eagle displ. in chief a crescent betw. 
two fleur-de-lis, and a Seur-de-lis betw. two crescents in base, 
all counterchanged. Crest— kn eagle displ. gu. charged on 
each wing with two crescents ar. and resting each claw 
upon a fleur-de lis, or. Motto— XA diem tendo. 

Cookson (FiFE-CooKsoN, Whitehlll, co. Durham ; exempli- 
fied, 1879, to Lieut.-Col. John Cookson Fife-Cookson, of 
Whitehill Park, co. Durham, J.P., D.L., on his assuming by 
royal licence the additional surname of Cookson). Quarterly, 
Ist and 4th, per pale ar. and gu. a pair betw. two legs 
couped at the thigh in armour, all counterchanged, for 
Cookson ; 2nd and 3rd, or, a lion ramp. gu. guttee d'or 
betw. three thistles leaved and slipped vert, for Fife. Crest* 
— 1st, Cookson: A demi lion ppr. guttee de sang, grasping 
in both paws a club, also ppr. ; 2nd, Fife : Out of the battle- 
ments of a tower ppr. a demi lion, holding in the dexter paw 
a saltire ar. and resting the sinister paw on an escutcheon 
or, charged with a thistle as in the arms. JV/o<(o— Virtute 
et opera. 

Cookson-Sa'wrTey. See Sawret. 

Oooper. Gu. three stags' heads erased ar. attired or, on a 
canton of the second a chev. of the first charged with three 
plates betw. as many pears ppr. Crest* — 1st, an escallop 
or ; 2nd, a cormorant, wings endorsed, holding in the beak 
a fish all ppr. Motto -Non parvum est teipsum noscere. 

Cooper (Samdel Josbda Cooper, Esq., of Mount Vernon, 
near Barnsley, co. York). Per pale pean, and gu. on a 
chev. betw. three lions statant ar. an estoile betw. two 
lozenges of the second. Crest — On a mount vert a lion 
sejant pean, holding in his dexter paw a battle axe, erect, 
or. JV/o«(o— Tout vient de Dieu. 

Coping'er (Cork, Cloghane, Rincolisky, BalljTerine Castle 
(now Copihger's Court), LIssapoole, Carhue, Leemount, 
Ac, CO. Cork; Roscoff, in Brittany, Trewiddle, Corn- 
wall, and the Priory, Manchester ; a family traceable to a 
very early period in the annals of that county. Stephen 
CopiNOEB was M.P. for the city of Cork in the first Parlia- 
ment of Queen Elizabeth. Three of his great-grandsons 
were knighted, viz.. Sir Walter Copinoeb, of Cloghan, Sir 
Robert Copinoer, Mayor of Cork in 1644, and Sir John 
CopiNOER, of Crosshaven). Bendy of six or and gu. over 
all on a fesse az. three plates. Crest — A leg in armour 
couped at the thigh and erect, bent at the knee, the foot 
upward, garnished and spurred, all ppr. Motto — Virtuve et 
fldelitate. 

Corbet (Wattlesborough, co. Salop). Or, a raven sa. 
quartering Toret, of Moreton. 

Corbett (Warwickshire, formerly of Dumbartonshire). Ar. 
a key fesseways, wards downwards, between two ravens 
•a. Crest— X branch of a tree ppr. thereon a raven sa. 
Motto — Deus pascit corvos. 

Comick (West Ahngton, Bridport, co. Dorset). Or, on a 
pile az. betw. two trefoils slipped in base vert a tower ar. 
Crest — Upon a mount vert a tower ar. in front thereof a 
garb fessewise. 

Comock (Hawees-Cobnock, Cromwellsfort, co. Wexford ; 
exemplified to John Hawses Cobnock, Esq., of Cromwells- 
fort, eldest son of Zachariab Cornock Hawkes, Esq., of 
Moneens, co. Cork, and grandson of John Hawkes, Esq., of 
Orange, same co., by Mary, his wife, dau. of Isaac Cornock, 
Esq., of Cromwellsfort, upon his assuming, by royal licence, 
dated 31 March, 1883, the surname of Cornock, in com- 
pliance with an injunction contained in the will of his 
kinsman, Zachariah Charles Cornock, Esq., of Cromwells 
fort, who d s. p. 12 Dec. 1882). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per 



fesse gu. and az. a dexter cubit arm issuing from tb9 
sinister, grasping in the hand a sword all ppr. in chief two 
crescents or, for Cornock: 2nd and 3rd, ar. a pale gu. three 
hawks' heads erased, two and one, counterchanged, in the 
centre chief point a cross patt^e or, for Hawkes. C'resti — 
1st, Cornock : A dexter cubit arm fessewise, the hand grasp- 
ing a sword erect all ppr. the arm charged with two 
crescents in fess az.; 2nd, Hawkes: On a liranch of oak 
sprouting lying fessewise, a hawk rising all ppr. jessed and 
belled or. Motto over Hawkes' crest, Virtute non vi. 
Motto — Animo et fide. 

Corry (Lowby-Cobry, Baron Rraton). Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, gu. a saliire ar. in chief a rose of the last, for Cobby; 
2nd and 3rd, sa. a cup ar. with a garland betw. two laurel 
branches all issuing out of the same vert, for Lowby. Crest* 
— 1st, Corry : A cock ppr. charged with a crescent gu. ; 2nd, 
Low*RY : A garland betw . two laurel branches vert. Supporter 
— On either side a stag ppr. semee of mullets ar. gorged with 
a collar and line reflexed over the back or. AfoWo— Loyal 
au mort. 

Coull (Dixon-Codli,, Middleton, Morpeth, co. Northumber- 
land; exemplified to Robert Dixon, Esq., upon his taking 
the additional surname of Cocll). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
az. a unicorn's head, couped ar. in chief three annulets or, 
for Coull ; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a saltire, parted and fretty, 
betw. two crosses pattce in pale, and as many eagles' heads 
erased in fesse gu., for Dixon. Crests — 1st, Copll: In front 
of a unicorn's head couped ar. gorged with a collar gemel 
az. three annulets interlaced or ; 2nd, Dixon: A demi stag 
reguard. ppr. charged on the shoulder with a pheon, and 
resting the dexter foot on a cross pattee or. Motto — Ad 
finem spero. 

Coutts. See Babtlett-Bcrdett-Coctts. 

Coutts (MoNEY-CouTTS, Stodham Park, co. Southampton, and 
Ancote, Weybridge, co. Surrey; exemplified to Mrs. Claba 
Maria Money-Coutts, of Stodham Park, widow ol Rev. James 
Drcmmond MoNEY.Rector of Sternfield, co. Suffolk, and dau. of 
Sir Francis Bdbdett, 5th Bart, of Foremark, by Sophia, his 
wife, dau. and co-heir of Thomas Coutts, Esq., banker, and 
to her son, Francis Bobdett Money-Coutts, Esq., of An- 
cote, upon their assuming by royal licence, 1880, the 
additional surname of Coutts, in compliance with the will of 
Harriet, Duchess of St. Albans, widow of the said Thomas 
Coutts). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a stag's bead erased 
gu. betw. the attires a pheon az. all within a border em- 
battled of the last, charged with four buckles or, for Couns ; 
2nd and 3rd, or, on a pile az. tun bezants, four, three, two, 
and one, for Money. Crests — 1st, Coutts: A man from the 
middle shooting an arrow from a bow all ppr.; 2nd, Money : 
A bezant betw. two wings az. each semfie de lis or. Motto— 
Esse quam videri. 

Co'wan (James Cowan, M.P. for Edinburgh, page 236). The 
name Cown is a misprint for Cowan. The tincture of the 
mullet on the saltire in the arms is ar. not az. 

Co'ward (West Penard and Wells, co. Somerset ; Thomas 
CowABD, b. 1600. son of Thomas Coward, of Wells, and 
grandson of John Cowabd, of West Penard. Visit. Somerset, 
1623). Ar. on a chev. gu. three martlets or, a chief of the 
second charged with a canton of the third. Crest — A demi 
greyhound ramp. sa. holding in the paws a stag's head ar. 
attired or. 

Co'well (Harristown, co. Kildare. Arras registered and 
crest granted by Hawkins, Ulster, 24 June, 1774, to Babtbo- 
LOMEW CowELL, Esq., of Harristown). Erm. a hind trippant 
gu. Crest — A lion pass, guard, gu. ducally crowned and 
plain collared or. Motto — Fortis et celer. 

Cowell (Rev. Geobob Young Cowell, M.A. of Garrison, co. 
Fermanagh, vicar of Lea, Portarlington and canon of St. 
Brigid's, Kildare, and Andrew Richard Cowell, M.D. of 
CuUentra, co. Wexford, late Bombay Army, sons of George 
Clayton Cowell, Esq., of Garrison, who was grandson of 
Richard Cowell, of Ballymore Eustace, son of Thomas 
Cowell, of Harristown, brother of Bartholo.mew Cowell, 
the grantee and son of Bryan Cowell, of Logadowden, co. 
Dublin). Arms, <fec., as Coweu., of Harristown. 

Cowell (Major-Gen. Sir John Clayton Cowell, K.C.B., 
Master of the Queen's Household, son of John Clayton 
Cowell, Lieut. 1st Royals and grandson of Col. John Clay- 
ton Cowell, A.D.C. to H.B.H. Duke of Kent, whose father, 
Bartholomew Cowell, of Harristown, was a younger son 
of Babtholomew Cowell, the grantee). Same Arms, 4c. 

Cowper-Temple (Baron Mount Temple). See Tsmpul 



cox 



SUPPLEMENT. 



DAL 



CJox (Eaton Hastings and Coleshill, co. Berks. Edward Cox, 
of Eton Hastings, 6. 162-2, son of John Cos, of Coleshill, and 
grandson of John Cos, of same place. Visit. Berks, 16C4). 
Vert in chief three cucks or. 

Cranag'e (Quartered by Bev. Geobge Hill). Vert, five 
lozenges conjoined in bend within two bendlets, betw. two 
stags' heads cabosbed, all or. 

Cranbrook, VUcount. See Hardt. 

Cranmer (Quendon Hall, Essex; descended from Thomas 
Ckanmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, great-grandson of 
Edwabd Cbanmeb and Isabel, his wife, dau. and heir of 
WiLUAM DB AsLACTON, of Aslacton, Notts. See Cranmer- 
Btno). The original arms were ar. a chev. betw. three 
cranes sa., but were altered by Henry VIII. to ar. on a chev. 
az. betw. three pelicans sa. as manycinquefoils or, the King 
declaring to the Archbishop that "those birds should signify 
unto him that he ought to be ready, as the pelican is, to shed 
his blood for his young ones brought up in the faith of Christ." 

Cranmer-Byng:. See Btno. 

Craufurd (Auchenames, co. Renfrew, and Crosbie, coAyr). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. a fesse erm. : 2nd and 3rd, ar. a 
stags head erased gu. CreKt—A. stag's head erased gu. 
betw. the attires a cross crosslet fitchee sa. Supporters— 
Two bulls sa. armed and unguled or. Motto — Tutum te 
robore reddam. 

Cra'wford (Overton, co. Lanark, and New Zealand, IS80). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. a fesse wavy erm. betw. three 
mullets ar. pierced az., for Crawford ; 2nd and 3rd, «a. a 
chevalier on horseback, armed at all points cap-^-pie, 
brandishing a scymeter aloft ar. a bordure gu., for Nevat. 
Crest— \n increscent chequy ar. and az. Motto — Fide et 
diligentia. 

Crawhall (co. Northumberland, and co. Durham). Gu., a 
garb or, on a chief ar. three crows sa. Crtst — On a garb 
or, a crow sa. Motto— 'Htc careo nee euro. 

Crawhall (Burton Crofr, York). Ar. three battle axes 
chevronwiee sa. betw. two chevronels engr. gu. the whole 
betw. three crows, also sa. Crest — Upon a mount vert a 
crow sa. holding in the dexter claw a battle axe in bend ppr. 
JV/o«o— Pra;sto et persto. 

Grossman (Cheswick ; Sir William Cbossman, K.C.M.G., 
Col. on the Staff commanding Royal Engineers, Southern 
Di.strict, Northumberland). Sa. on a chev. or, betw. two 
goats' heads erased in chief ar. and an eider duck in base 
ppr. three cross crossleta gu. CreH—ln front of a goat's 
head erased ar. three cross crosslets gu. Motto — In Cruce 
Bpes mea. 

Crumpe (exemplified to SrLVERins Cbdmpe, of HobartTown, 
eldest son of William Mobiabtt, Esq., Commander Royal 
Navy, deceased, by Alphra Cbcmpe, his wife, sister of 
Francis Crumpk, of Tralee, co. Kerry, Doctor of Medicine, 
on his a.'tKuniing, by royal licence, 23 July, 1H8I, the sur- 
name of Chumpe, in lieu of Moriabty). Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, per chev. gu. and az on a chev. betw. three cinquefoils, 
pierced or, a cross crosslet fitchee sa., for Crumpe ; 2nd and 
3rd, per pale or and ar. an eagle displ. sa. charged on the 
breast and on each wing with a trefoil slipped of the first, 
for Moriabty. Crests— \%t, Crumpe: On a mount vert a cat 
salient guard, sa. charged with a crosslet fitchee or; 2nd, 
MoRiARTT : An arm in armour embowed, the hand grasping 
a sword entwined with a serpent, all ppr. charged with a 
trefoil slipped vert. A/o»t<— Scjiudit sublimia. 

Cuffo (Criche, CO. .Sumerset; Robert Cufke, of Criche, 
temp. .lames I., son of IIobert Cufke, uf same place. Visit. 
Somerset. 1C23. Arms granted lfj44). Ar. ou a bend 
dancfttee cotised az. bezantce three fleurs-de-lis or. Crest— 
An arm erect habited bendy wavy ar. and az. cuffed erm. 
holding in the hand ppr. a battle axo also az. headed or. 

Cullum (.MiLNEB- Gibson -CuLLOM, Hardwick, Bury St. 
Edmunds, SufTolk; exemplified to (iEOK<;i: Gert Milner- 
QiBsoN, Kaq., 2n.l son of Right Hon. Thomas Milneb-Gibson, 
of Theberton, by Arethuba .Susanna, his wife, dau. and heir 
of Sir Thomas (;f.rtCullum, 8lh Bart., of Uawstead and Hard- 
wick, upon his assuming, by royal licence, 1H78, the surname 
of CcLLUM). Quarterly, Island 4lh, Cullum, az. a chev. 
«rm. betw. three pelicans or, vulning themselvci ppr; 2nd 
and 3rd, Milnrb-Gibson (see that name). CnHs-Hi, 
Cullum: A lion sejant or, supporting betw. the paws a column 
ar. the capital or; 2nd, Milneb-Gibson (see that name). 

Culme (Dublin, and co. Devon, Collection of Molyneux 
Ulster; Very Rev. Benjamin Cdlme, Dean of St. Patrick s' 
1626 10 1657, a ualivc of Devon). Az. a rhev. erm. betw' 



three pelicans ar. vulning themselves gu. Crest — A Hon 
sejant ppr. supporting acoiumn or, on the top a dove alighting 
ar. Motto — Iininobili.-t inriocentia. 

Cupper (Lovington and Almisford, co. Somerset, and 
London ; John Cupper, of Lovington, temp. James I., son 
of John Cupper, of London, grandson of Richard Cupper, 
of Almisford, and great-grandson of John Cupper, of 
Lovington. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. a sallire sa. on a 
chief or, three lions ramp. gu. 

Ctirtis (Thornfield, co. Lancaster; Matthew Curtis, Esq.). 
Per saltire ar. and az. two horses' heads erased in pale sa. 
and as many fleurs-de-lis in fesse of the first. Crest— In 
front of a horse's head ar. holding in the mouth a flour-de- 
lis az. a fasces fessewise ppr. 3/o{(o— Perse verando vinco. 

Cutlers, Company of (Hallamshire, co. York. In- 
corporated by Act of Parliament, 24 James I., cap. 31). Ar. 
on a fesse indented vert. betw. three pairs of swords ia 
saltire ppr. pommels and hilts sa. eight arrows interlaced 
saltirewise banded of the field, betw. two garbs or. Crest- 
In front of an elephant's head codped or, two swords In 
saltire as in the arms. 



DALBY (Reading, CO Berks; Edward Dalby, of the Inner 
Temple, Steward of Reading, ft. 1615, son of Thomas Dalby, 
of London, merchant, and grandson of Thomas Dalby, 
descended from Dalby, of co. Warwick; Visit. Beik.s, lGt;4). 
Barry wavy of six or, and gu. Crest- A demi griflln segreant 
ppr. 

Dale (Westoe, co. Durham; John Dale, Esq., of Tyne- 
mouth, J. P. CO. Northumberland, r,i. Isabella, dau. of 
William Mitcalf, Esq., of Tynemouth, and had, with other 
issue, John Bbodrick Dale, Esq., of Westoe, J. P.). Gu.on 
a mount ppr. a swan ar. gorged with a collar geinel or, in chief 
three frets of the last. Crest— Upon a rock ppr. a heron ar. 
gorged with a collar gemel gu. resting the dexter foot on a 
fret or. 

Dale (Staindrop, co. Durham, and Gillfleld, co. York. Visi^. 
Durham, 1615. A family seated at Staindrop at least 600 
years. The heiress, Margaret, only child of John Dale, 
Esq., of Staindrop, 1795, m. John Trotter, J.P., Colonel of 
Militia, same co.; from this marriage descend the family of 
Trotter, of co. Durham). Gu. a swan ar. 

Dalgleish (Westgrange, co. Perth, and Ardnamurchan, co, 
Argyll). Ar. an oaktree eradicated fesseways ppr. betw. 
three pheons points upwards az. C«.-<— The stump of an 
oaktree sprouting out, branches and leaves ppr. Motto — 
Rcvirescam. 

Dalg-leish (Ooilvy Daloleikb, Mayfleld, co. Forfar, and 
Woudbume and Baltilly, co. File, 1883). Quarterly, Ist and 
4th, ar. a tree eradicated fessways vert. betw. three 
pheons az., for Dalolkish; 2nd and 3rd cdunfer quartered 
quarterly 1st and 4lh, ar. a lion pass. gard. gu., for Ocilvy; 
2nd and 3rd or, three crescents gu., lor Edmonstonk ; 
over all dividing the coals a cross eng. sa.. for Sinclair, 
charged in the centre with a crescent of the first for dilT. all 
for Ogilvy, of Buyne ; over all an escutcheon of pretenct) 
or, two cro.'ss-erossleis fitchee in chief and in base the attires 
of a hart affixed to the scalp gu. a chief checquy of (he 
second and first, in fess point a crescent sa. for diff. for 
MoLisoN. Crest — The stump of an oaktree sprouting out 
branches and leaves ppr. Afo<(o— Rcvirescam. 

Dalton (Wade-Dalton, Hawxwell Hall, co. York; Hamlet 
CooTE Wade, Esq., of Hawxwell HaU, colonel in the 
aimy, C.B., in. 1845, Maby, eldest dau. of Colonel Fosteb 
Lecumere Coork, of Scrutoii, same co., and granddau. of 
Francis Dalton, Esq., of Hawxwell Hull, and assumed by 
royal licence the additional surname of Dalton, in pursuance 
of the testamentary injunction of his wife's aunt. Miss Annb 
Gale, of Hawxwell Hall). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, az. 
crusilly or, a lion ramp, guard, ar. a chief barry nebulee of 
four of the last and sa. and for distinction a canton erm., for 
Dalton; 2nd and 3rd, az. on a saltire indented betw. four 
escallops or, an escallop of the field, a canton of the Becon<» 
charged with a mullet of six points pierctd of the first, for 
Wade. C«.i(v— 1st, Dalton: A dragon's head couped veit, 
wings elevated or, gorged with a collar nebulee gold, and 
charged on the neck for distinction with a cross crosslet ar. ; 
2nd, Wade: A dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. 
garni.shed or, holding in the gauntlet a sword al.so ppr. 
pommel and hilt gold, and pendent from the nauntlct by a 
chain also gold, an osculthcon az. charged with an e.icaUop 
also or. 



1 



DAL 



SUPPLEMENT. 



DON 



Daly (Melbourne, Australia; the male line of Daly, of 
Raford, descended from Denis Dai.?, Esq., of KaforU, and 
Lady Annb de Burgh, his wife, dau. of Michael, 10th 
£iui o/ Ctaiirkaidc. Hyacinth Daly, Arthdr Disney, 
Joseph Daly, William John Daly, Anthony Daly, and 
Annie Eveline Daly, all of Melliourno, are the children of 
Kichard Gore Daly, Ksq., of Wood view, co. Gal way, and 
Melbourne, Australia, who was grandson of Michael Daly, 
Ksq., of Mount Pleasant (2nd son of the aforesaid Denis 
Daly, Ksq., of Raford), by the Lady Johanna, his wife, dau. 
of Arthur Gore, 1st Earl nf Arran). Per fesse ar. and or. 
a lion ramp, per fes.se sa. and gu. in chief two dexter hands 
couped at tlie wrists of the last. CVcst— In front of an oak- 
tree ppr. fructed or, a greytound courant sa. .J/o(to— Deo 
fldelis et Regi. 

Sarbishire (Penyffryn, co. Carnarvon, and Oakdcne, co. 
Kent). Gu. on a pile issuing from the dexter chief point ar. 
three leopards' faces of the tirst; qunrtering (for Dukin- 
FIELD) ar. a cross voided and pointed sa. Vrmt — Out of 
clouds a dexter arm in armour embowed all ppr. holding in 
the hand a cross voided and pointed sa. MUlo — Durate et 
vincite. 

Davenport (Exempliiied to Sir Salusbory Price 11dm- 
PUREYS, Knt., of Bramhall, co. Chester, C.H., K.C.H., Rear- 
Admiral of the Fleet, and to Mart Lady Hdmpubeys, his 
wife, illegitimate dau. of William Davenport, Esq., of 
BranihuU, upon their assuming, by royal licence, 1838, the 
surname of Davenport only). Ar. a chev. betw. three 
cross crosslets titch^e sa. a canton az. for distinction. 
Crest — A man's head ppr. around the neck a rope or, charged 
for distinction on the neck with a cross ciosslet titch^e sa., 
and to Maria, Lady Davenport aforesaid, Ar. a chev. 
betw. three crosses crosslet titchce sa. a border wavy az. 

Davies (Ticknam, co. Somerset ; Rees Davies, Esq., ofTick- 
nam, temp. James 1., son of Lewis Davies, Esq., of Carmar- 
then, who was great-grandson of William ap David, third 
eon of David ap Ievan ap Rees, and brother of Llewellen, 
of Keven Metgoed, ancestor of the House of Gwydir. Visit. 
Somerset, 1623;. Gu. a griffin segreant or, quartering, sa. 
a chev. or, betw. three spears' beads ar. a mullet for diff. 
Cvest — A griffin segreant or. 

Davis (Here Court, co. Berks; Sir John Davis, Knt., of Bere 
Court, 6. 1611, son of Sir John Davis, Knt., of Bere Court, 
and grandson of John Davis, of London ; Visit. Berks 1665) . 
Az. a dragon segreant or. 

Davis (Maria, dau. of George Davis, of Wilderness, near 
Hastings, co. Sussex, and wife of William Garland Soper, 
of Harestone, Caterham, co. Surrey, and her descendants). 
Ar. a lion ramp, reguard. peau belw. four mullets of six 
points in cross az. 

Da'wson (William Mosley Dawson, Esq. — formerly Perfect 
—of Lancliffe Hall, Giggleawitk W.K .co. York). Verl on a 
bend invected double cotised plain or, three martlets of the 
first. Creit — Upon a staff raguly fcssewise or, a cat's head 
erased affrontee ppr. gorged with a collar flory counter-fiory 
or, and holding in the mouth a rat fessewise also pp, 

Day (Ampthill House, Ampthill Square, London ; Stratton 
House, Swindon, Wilts; Holly Hill, Harvil, Gravesend, 
Kent). Erm. on a pale gu. a horseshoe or, a chief az. 
thereon a crescent betw. two suns in splendour of the third. 
Crest — Upon a mount vert a greyhound's head erased ar. 
collared with line affixed thereto gu. in front a fountain. 

Deakin (Moseley Park, co. Chester, and Werrington Park, 
Cornwall). Gu. a lion pass, guard, and two mullets in pale 
or, betw. as many flaunches ar. each charged with a lion 
ramp. sa. Crest — Out of a naval crown or, a dexter arm em- 
bowed ppr. holding a battle axe ar. round the wrist a ribbon 
also ar. 

De Caux (Jersey). Az. three lions, ramp, or, a border sa. 

De Keyser (Chatham House, Grove Road, Clapham Park , 
PoLYDOBE Db Keyser, Alderman and Sheriff of London, 
1883). Az. a saltire chequy or and gu. a chief of the second 
thereon a fasces erect ppr. betvir. two mallets sa. Crtstt — A 
mallet sa. betw. two brandies of palm slipped vert. Motto 
— Respice, Aspice, I'rospice. 

De la Bere (The Hayes, Prcstbury. co. Gloucester; exem- 
plified to Rev. John Baghot De la Bere, son of Thomas 
Edwards, Esq., upon his assuming by royal licence, 1879, 
the surname of De la Bebe in lieu of Edwards). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, az. a bend or cottised ar. betw. six niartletg of 
the second, for De la Bere; 2nd and 3rd, erm. on a bend 
gu. three eagles displ. or, for Baguot— CcMt — Ist, Djs la 



Bebs: Out of a ducal coronet or, a plume of eight ottricif 

feathers, five and three, per pale ar. and az. ; 2nd, Baohot: 
A buck's head cabossed sa. belw. the attires a greyhound 
courant ar. collared gu. 

De la Hyde (Brimpton, co. Berks, John Db la Htde, of 
Brimpton, b. 1651, son of John De la Hyde, of same place, 
d. 1664, grandson of John De la Htde, and great grandson 
of John De la Hyde, both of same place. Visit. Berks 
1665). Barry of six ar. and gu. a bend sa. 

De Xiande (quartered by Long, of Ipswich). Az. a chev. ar. 

De la Hue (Warren De la Rie, of Portland Place, London, 
M. A., D.C.L. (Oxon), F.U.S., a Member of the Meteorological 
Council, Commander of the Legion of Honour and of the 
Order of SS. Maurice and Lazarus (Sardinia), Knight of the^ 
Order of the Rose (Brazil) ; eldest son of the late Thomas 
De la Bde, of Wesibourne Terrace, Knight of the Legion 
of Honour, by Jane, his wife, dau. of William Warren, of 
Bishop's Nympion, Devon ; and grandson of Eleazab De la 
Rue, of Guernsey, by Rachel, his wife, dau. of William 
.411ez, of the same Island). Or three bars gu. each charged 
■with as many estoiles of the first, in chief an increscent and 
a decrescent of the second. Creft — A brazier gu. fired betv. 
two branches of laurel, issuant from the flames thereof a 
serpent nowed and erect ppr. Motto — Cherche la verity. 

Denmark, Prince of (page 278). The correct blazon of 
these arms is: Or, sem^e of hearts gu. three lions pass, 
guard, az. crowned ppr. 

Depled^e. Erm. on a chev. la. three lozenges of the field. 

Crest — A demi lion ramp. 
Derwent, Baron. See Johnstone. 

Devenish (Collection of Moly.vecx, Ulster, 1597-1632). Ai. 
on a bend wavy betw. two sheldrakes ar. three rose* gu. 
Crest — A sheldrake sa. 

De'war (La.ssodie, Scotland). Or, on a chief az. a fraise ar. 
Crest — A cock, wings raised ppr. Motto — Gloria Patri. 

De'we (East Grinstea<l, co. Sussex, page 282). For "John 
RocoE," Gent., read "John Bowe," Gent., of Lewes. 

De'Whurst (John Bonny Dewhcbst, Esq., of Aireville, co. 
York, J. P.). Or guttle de poix three saltires In fess betw. 
as many escallops gu. Crest — In front of a wolfs head 
erased or, gutt^j de poix three saltires gu. Motto— ^et 
mea in Deo. 

Dig'grs (Chilham and Wootton Court, co. Kent, bart., extinct 
1666, page 285). The correct blazon of this coat is: Gu. on 
a cross ar. five eagles displ. sa. Crest — An eagle's leg couped 
at the thigh sa issuant therelrom three ostrich feathers ar. 

Dil'Wyn (co. Brecon). Same Arms, &c., as Dillwyn, of 
Burroughs Lodge, viz., Gu. on a chev. ar. three trefoils 
slipped of the first. Crest — A stag's head couped ppr. 
3/o;ro— Craignez honte. 

Dixon (Rheda, Cleaton Moor, co. Cumberland ; Troma* 
Dixon, Esq., J. P., son of Thomas Dixon, Esq., Rheda, by 
Mary, his wife, dau. of Joseph Norman, Esq., of the Dash, 
same co.). Az. on a pale ar. a fieur-dc-lis of the first, a chief 
engr. erm. Crest — In front of a cubit arm, grasping a 
Bcymetar ppr. pommel and hilt gold, a staff raguly fessewise 
or. Motto — Quod dixi dixi. 

Donaldson (exemplified to Charles Geoboe Donaldson, 
Esq., lieut. in the army, on his assuming by royal licence, 17 
Sept., 1879, the surname of Donaldson in lieu of Matthews, 
pursuant to the will of his kinswoman, Anne Clewlow, of 
Clermont, co. Antrim). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, Donaldson, 
or an eagle displ. with two heads ppr. surmounted of a 
lymphad, sails furled sa. fiag gu. ; 2nd and 3rd, Matthews, 
ar. three chevronels gu. surmounted of a lion ramp, reguard 
ppr. all betw. three Catherine wheels of the second. Crests— 
1st, Donaldson : an eagle's head erased gu. collared dan- 
cettce or, in the beak a thistle and trefoiled entwined ppr. ; 
2nd, Matthews: An arm embowed in armour ppr. charged 
with a Catherine wheel gu. the hand also ppr. grasping an 
arrow, point downwards or, feathered ar. t/lo'.lo — Tout jours 
prt. 

Donegran (Carrigmore, co. Cork, confirmed, 1883, to Jaues 
HtNRT Donegan, Esq., J. P., Major 3rd Batt. Royal Munsler 
Fusiliers, third son of Daniel Donegan, E.sq., J. P. of Carrig- 
more, and grandson of Daniel Donegan, of Great George's 
Street, Cork, and to the other descendants of his said grand 
father). Ar. three ermine spots in pale sa. betw. four lions 
ramp, those in dexter chief and sinister base gu. those in 
sinister chief and dexter base of the second. Cretl — A 
mural crown thereon a robin redbreast all ppr. Motto— 
Virtus non vertitur. 



f* 



BON 



SUPPLEMENT. 



ETO 



Donlnerton, Baron. See Abnet-Hastimos. 

Doug'las (exemplified to St. John Thomas Douglass, Esq., 
of Elm Park, co. Armagh, eldest son of Rev. Samcel 
Blacker, D.D., Prebendary of MuUaghbrack, in the diocese 
of Armagh, deceased, by Elizabeth, his wife, eldest dau. of 
Thomas Douglass, of Grace Hall, co. Down, deceased, and 
sister of Chables Matthew Douglass, Esq., of Grace Hall 
— on his assuming the surname of Douglass in lieu of that 
of Blacker, pursuant to the will of the said Charles 
Matthew Douglass). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per pale ar. 
and or, a human heart gu. on a chief az. a trefoil slipped 
betw. two etoiles of the second for Douglas: 2nd and 3rd, 
ar. on a mount vert a warrior in complete armour in the act 
of advancing towards the right, and brandishing in his dexter 
hund a battle axe ppr., from his shoulders a mantle flowing 
gu., for Blacker. Cveat — 1st, Douglass : A cubit arm 
erect ppr. grasping a human heart as in the arms, and 
charged with a trefoil slipped vert ; 2nd, Blacker : A dexter 
armed arm embowed ppr. the hand gauntleted grasping u 
battle axe, as in the arms. Mottoes — Douglass, Forward; 
Blacker, Pro Deo et rege. 

Sownes (Cowley, co. Gloucester. John Dow.nes, of Cowley, 
temp. Henry VIII., »i. Juliana Merry, of Cheltenham, visit. 
Berks, 1665). Az. a stag couchant ar. Crest — A slag's head 
gu. attired or. 

Downes (Windsor, co. Berks. George Downes, of Windsor, 
6. 1684. 6th son of John Downes, of Cowley, co. Gloucester. 
Visit. Berks, 1665). Same Arms and Crest. 

Drinkwater (Kirby, Douglas, Isle of Man ; Sir William 
Leece Drinkwater, Knt., First Deemster of the Isle of Man, 
J. P., 2nd son of John Drinkwater, Esq., by Elizabeth, 
his wife, dau. of James Gandt, Esq., and nephew of Sir 
George Drinkwater, Knt., of Kirby). Per pale gu. and 
az.ona fesse wavy ar. betw. three garbs or, as many billets 
of the second. Crest — Three ears of wheat, two in saliire 
and one in pale enfiled with a ducal coronet all or. Motto— 
Sapiens qui assiduus. 

Drogrheda, Town of. Az. per pale dimidiated, on 
the dexter side three lions pass, guard, in pale or, on 
the sinister as many hulls of ships in pale of the last 
surmounted by a castle with two towers triple towered ar. 
N.B. — The small seal of Drogheda exhibits on a shield az. 
three crescents issuant therefrom as many estoiles all ar. 

Drummond - Willoug'hby (Baronett WMouyhby 
D'Eresby and Aveland). See Willoughbt. 

Duncan (Haldane-Duncan, Earl of Camperdown). Quar- 
terly, Ist and 4th, grand quarters gu. two cinquefoils in 
chief ar. and a buglehorn in base of the second stringed az. 
in the centre as an honorable augmentation, pendent by a 
ribbon ar. and az. from a naval crown or a gold medal, 
thereon two figures the emblems of Victory and Britannia, 
Victory alighting on the prow of an antique vessel crowning 
Britannia with a wreath of laurel, below the medal the word 
" Camperdown," for Duncan ; second and third grand 
quarters counterquartered first and fourth ar. a saltire engr. 
sa., for Haldane; 2nd, ar. a saltire betw. four roses gu., for 
Lennox ; 3rd, or a bendchequy sa. and ar., for Monteith; 
in the centre a crescent az., for diff., all for Haldane, of 
(ileneagles. Ci-ist — On waves of the sea a dismasted ship 
ppr. Mottoet — Above the crest, Disce pati. Below the 
shield, Sccundis dubiisque rectus. Supporters — Dexter, an 
angel mantle purpure on the head a celestial crown, the 
right hand supporting an anchor ppr. in the left a palm 
branch gold, sinister a sailor habited and armed ppr. his 
left hand supporting a staff, thereon hoisted a flag az. the 
Dutch colours wreathed about the middle of the staflf. 

SudBOn (Whitley, co. Berks; Edward Dudson, of Whitley, 
b. 1606, son of Edward Dudson, of Eaton. Visit. Berks, 
1664;. Sa. a chcv. betw. three Catherine wheels or. 

Dudson (Brice Norton, co. Oxford ; William Di'dsoh, 2nd 
son of the house of Whitley. Visit. Berks, 16C4). Same 
Arms. 

Dupuis. Az. a chcv. betw. three fleurs-de lis ar. on a chief 
of the last as many pellets. Crest — A demi eagle, wings 
elevated. Motto — I'erscvere. 

DuB|?ate (Kring Hall, King's Lynn, co. Norfolk; exemplified 
to Ui'MAnD Di'aGAiT. Dusoate, Esq. upon his assuming by 
royal licence, 1 87.*), the surname of Dusoatk in lieu of 
BciHBT, under the will of his maternal great uncle, Kichard 
T)C8gate, Esq.). Ar. three magpies ppr. Crmt — A lion's 
liead cra«ed sa. 



Dyer (Roundhill and Wincanton, co. Somerset, and Stongh- 
ton, CO. Huntingdon; Sir Edwabd Dyer, son of Sir Thomas 
Dyer, Knt., was knighted 1696, and appointed Chancellor of 
the Order of the Garter; he d. s.p. 1608. Visit. Somerset, 
1623). Or, a chief indented gu. a crescent for diff. quarter- 
ing sa. three goats trippant ar. Crest — Out of a ducal 
coronet or, a goat's head sa. horned gold. 

E 

EAKLiSMAN (Hants: John Earlsman, circa 1530, of 
Westover, Isle of Wight). Arg. gutt€e-de-poix on a chief 
indented az. three eastern crowns or. Crest — A greyhound's 
head couped arg., guttec-de-poix, collared, az. rimmed and 
studded or. 

East (Bourton House, Moreton-in-the- Marsh, co. Gloucester; 
exemplified to Herbert Hinton MacLavebty, Esq., upon 
assuming by royal licence, 1879, in conjunction with h\n 
wife, Charlotte BIary D'Este, dau. of Edward Hintoh 
East, lieut. R.A., the surname of East, in compliance with 
the will of Sir James Buller East, Bart., of Bourton). Sa. 
on a chev. or, betw. three horses' heads erased ar. two 
passion crosses ohevronwise of the first. Crest — A horse 
pass. erm. the dexter foreleg supporting a passion cross in 
bend sinister sa. 

Edlin fPETER Henry Edlin, Esq., 64, Queensborough Terrace, 
Hyde Park, London, one of Her Majesty's Counsel, Recorder 
of Bridgewater, and Assistant Judge of the Middlesex 
Sessions). Erm. a fesse vair, in chief two arrows saltirewise 
ppr. all within a bordure nebuly sa. Crest — A crescent or, 
therefrom rising a falcon ppr. belled and jessed gold, each 
wing charged with a trefoil slipped vert. Jl/o««— Suspice. 

Edmonds (Wiscombe Park, Honiton, co. Devon; William 
Edmonds, Esq., Lord of the Manor of Southleigh, same co. 
and the other descendants of his father, William Edmonds. 
of Liverpool). Per chev. nebuly ar. and vert, in chief two 
fleurs-de lis of the last, and in base a ship under sail ppr. 
Crest — A rock ppr. thereon a fieur-de-lis vert, surmounted 
by a boar's head couped ar. Motto — Absque labore nihil. 

Edmunds (North Meols, co. Lancaster). Same as Edmonds, 
of Wiscombe Park. 

Edwards (John Edwards, Esq., Q.C., Harcourt Buildings, 
Temple, London). Per saltire az. and or, two demi griffins 
couped in pale and as many quatrefoils in fesse counter- 
changed. Crest — A stag reguardant ar. charged on the 
body with two fleur-de-lis az. and resting the dexter foreleg 
on an esquire's helmet ppr. 

Egginton (South Ella, Hull, co. York ; Gardiner Eoointon, 
Esq., of North Ferriby, co. York, hi. Mary, dau. of Samuel 
Hall, of the same place). Ar. six eaglets displ. sa. three 
tv\o, one, a chief nebulae az. Crest — A talbot sejant ar. 
eared sa. gorged with a collar per fesse nebulee or and az. 
the dexter paw resting upon a sphere ppr. Motto — Integer 
vitse. 

Elliot (as granted to Lady Elliot, wife of Sir George 
Elliot, Ban., of Penshaw House, co. Durham, and dau. of 
George Green, Esq.). Arms for (iReen : Vair arg. and 
vert two stags trippant reguardant in pale or. 

Ellis (Ryfleet, co. Surrey, and Hertford Street, Mayfair, co. 
Middlesex, bart. ; Sir John Whittaker Ellis, Lord Mayor of 
London, was created a Baronet by patent dated 6 June, 1882, 
in commemoration of the Queen's visit to the opening of 
Epping Forest). Or, on a cross engr. sa. the sceptre or 
mace in pale (representing that of the Lord Mayor of the 
City of London) betw. four crescents of the first, in the first 
and fourth quarters a fleur-de-lis az. Crest— \ female 
figure ppr. vested or, holding in the dexter handachaplet ol 
roses gu. and in the sinister a palm branch slipped vert. 
Molto— lime habco non tibi. 

Elphinstone-Stone. See Stone. 

Elwes (Barton Court, co. Berks; Johw Elwes, J. P. co. 
Berks, b. 1626, 2nd son of Henry Elwes, of London. Visit. 
Berks, 1664). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, or, a bend gu., over 
allafessar. ; 2nd and 3rd, a griffin segrcant or, holding a 
flag the pennon charged with an eagl. displ. Crest— VouT 
arrows in pale or, feathered ar. encircled by a snake ppr. 

Emerton (Banwell Castle, co. Somerset). Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, ar. a chev. betw. three pickaxes sa., lor Emekt^n; 
2nd and 3rd, gu. on a fesse engr. tottiscd or, betw. three 
partridges rising of the last, as many torteaux, for Par- 
TRiDoE. Crest — A swan issuant, wings addorsed and dis- 
tended ar. 

EtOUg'h. See Sadxderson, of Little Addinpfon. 



EVA 



SUPPLEMENT. 



Fis 



ETanS (Glascoert, Oswestry, co. Montgomery; William 
Evans, Esq., of Glascoed, m. Ellen, dau. of John Williams, 
Esq., of Melyniog, same CO., and d. 1878, leaving a son, 
David Will.ams Evans, Esq., of Glascoed). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th. gu. a lion pass, guard, betw. tour crosres 
moline, three in chief and one in base al! ar., for Evans; 
2nd and 3rd, sa. three mullets or, on a chief nebuly ar. as 
many lozenges az., for Dorsf.tt. Crest — A lion pass, guard, 
ar. charged on the body with two crosses moline az. and 
resting the dexter forepaw on an escocheon erminois 
thereon acro.ss inoline betw. four lozenges also az. Motto — 
Festina lente. 

Evans (Hur.«t House and Haydock Grange, co. Lancaster. 
Llanddoget Park, co. Denbigh, and Maenan House, co. Car- 
narvon, of ancient Cambrian descent: the present proprietor, 
Joseph Evans, Esq., J. P., is also Lord of the Manor of Parr, 
CO. Lancaster). Sa. three nags' heads erased ar. on a chief 
nebuly or, a pale gu. charged wiih an estoile of the third, 
betw. two estoiles of the fourth. Crest — A nag's head 
erased ar. betw. two estoiles or. Motto — In ccelo quies. 

Evans (John Holditch Evans, Esq., of Bryn Issa, Pershore, 
CO. Worcester, Edwakd Evans, Esq., of Brcnwylfa, co. 
Denbigh, sous of John Evans, Esq., of Leamington, co. 
Warwick, who d. I860, and Edward Bickerton Evans, 
Esq., of Whilbourne, co. Hereford, son of Edward Evans, 
Esq., of Thornloe House, co. Worcester. who(<. 1871. Arms 
granted to Thomas Evans, Esq., of Upper Mill PdoI, co. 
Montgomery, and enrolled with the ped. in the College of 
Arms, 24 July, 1867). Per pale ar. and gu. a lion pass, re- 
guard, betw. two tieur-de-Iis in chief and in base a bundle 
of rods banded all counterclianged. Crest — A lion pass, 
reguard ar. the body charged with three crosses moline gu. 
resting dexter paw upon a bundle of rods banded also gu 
Motto — Libertas. 

Evans (granted to Peteb Fabtan Sparse Evans, of Bristol, 
and Trinmore, Clifton Downs, Esq., in the Commission of the 
Peace for that city, and son of Lavington Evans, of Ottery 
St. Mary, co. Devon, gentleman, deceased). Mr. P. F. Spabke 
Evans is descended in the male tine from Rev. Hichard 
Evans, of Collumpton, Devon, and his wife, a dau. of Kev. 
William Yeo, M.A., Newton Abbott, 6. 1617 ; and also, 
through his grandmother, Sarah Perram, wife of William 
Bdrd Evans, of Ottery, and dau. of William Perram, by 
Sarah, his wife, dau. of Kev. John Lavington, M..\., from 
the old families of Lavington, Sparke (mentioned in church 
records in 1478) and Henley, one of whom was M.P. for Wey- 
mouth in the time of the Commonwealth). Arg. on a bend 
engr. az. betw. two acorns slipped ppr. three leopards' heads 
erased arg. 6Ve<f — Upon a rock a peacock ppr. charged on 
the breast with a quarterfoil or, resting dexter foot on a sprig 
of oak leaved fructed and slipped, also ppr. ..Uo((o— Deo 
favente. 

Evelick (Scotland, page 333). These are the arms of the 
Laird of Evelick, Lindsay, Bart., of Evelick, see page 610. 

Evering'ton (granted to Mitchell Everington, Esq., of 
Denmark Hill, in the parish of Camberwell (or more correctly 
of Lambeth), co. Surrey, and ofTrin. Coll. Cambridge, M..\. 
and LL.B., only son of William Everington, of Heme Hill, 
CO. Surrey, deceased, by his 2nd wife, Catherine, 2nd 
dau. of Stephen Xicolson Barber, of Denmark Hill, and 
grandson of John Everington, of Skegness, co. Lincoln, 
I'eteased. The other descendants of the above-named 
WiLLLAM Everington, also entitled to bear and use these 
arms and crests, are, William Devas Everington, of Castle 
Acre, CO. Noi-folk, and Edgar Rowe Everington, of Merion 
House, Dulwich Wood Park, co. Surrey, and of MertonColl. 
Oxford, M.A.). Per fesse ar. and gu. a stag's head erased 
betw. three martlets all counterchanged. Crest— In front of 
a trunk of a tree eradicated fessewise and sprouting to the 
sinister ppr. a stag current per pale ar. and gu. holding in 
the mouth a trefoil slipped vert. 

Everitt (Knowle Hall, Birmingham, co. Warwick; Georgf 
Allen Evkritt, Esq., J.P., Knt. of the Orders of Leopold 
and of Hanover, son of Allen Everitt, Esq., of Edgbaston). 
Gu. a chev. paly of eight or and az. betw. three mullets ar. 
Creil—A griffin's hcail emsed iipr. the neck encircled gcmelle 
of three pieces ar. Motto — Festina lente. 

Ewens (Wincanton, co. Somerset; John Ewens, temp. 
James L, son of John Ewens, by Ankaeet, his wife, dau. 
of Alexander Dyeb, of Wincanton. Visit. .Somerset, 1623). 
Sa, a fesse betw. two fleurs-de-lis or a crescent for diff. 
Crest — On a mount vert a curlew ppr. 

Eyres (Dumbleton Hall, co. Gloucester). Quarterly, 1st and 
4lh, sa. on a chev. nebulee plain cotised belw. tlnee cinque- 



oils or, as many woolpacks ppr., for Eybes; 2nd and Srd, 
per fesse ar. and or, a fesse chequy gu. and of the flr«t, • 
lion ramp. beiw. two crosses pattie of the third, for Kettle- 
well. Crests — 1st, Eyres: Upon a mount ppr. a human leg 
couped at the thigh in armour quarterly sa. and or, the spur 
gold, on either side three cinquefoils slipped vert; 2nd, Ket- 
TLEWELL : A lion ramp. gu. holding in the dexter forepaw a 
cross pattee fitchee and resting the sinister hind paw on a 
cross pattee or. 



EAIELIE (Scotland, 1876). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. two 
water bougets of the second in chief and a pheon point up- 
wards az. in base. CreH — A lion's head erased sa. Motto 
— Je suis prest. 

Falcon-Steward. See Steward. 

Farside (William Farside, formerly Hdtton, Esq., of 
Fylingdale, Whitby Strand, co. York). Gu. a fesse or betw. 
three bezants, a border wavy erm. Crest — Two lion'i 
gambs erect ar. erased gu. holding a bezant, the whole 
debruised by a bendlet wavy erm. Motto— Funh and fear 
nocht. 

Fenton (Norton Hall, Chipping Campden, co. Gloucester, 
and Dalton Manor, Preston, co. Lancaster ; James Fenton, 
Esq., Lord of the Manors of Bailey, Dalton, and Ribchester, 
M. A. Trin. Coll. Cambridge, F.S.A., J.P.. cos. Gloucester and 
Lancaster, barrister-at-law, of Lincoln's-inn, high sheriff 
CO. Gloucester, 1869). Per pale ar. and sa. a cross dove- 
tailed betw. in the first and fourth quarters a fleur-de-lis, 
and in the second and third Quarters a trefoil, all counter- 
changed. Crest— In front of two arrows in saltire ppr. a 
fleur-de-lis sa. Motlo—Je suis prest. 

Fetherstonhaugh (Hopton Court, co. Worcester; Shir- 
ley Arthur Stephenson Fetherstonhadgh, Esq., of 
Hopton Court). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. two chevroneU 
engr. betw. three feathers within a bordure also engr. ar. 
in the centre chief point (for distinction) a cross erosslet of 
the last ; 2nd and 3rd, gu. on a bend nebulee erminois betw. 
six ears of wheat, three and three, one in pale and two in 
saltire, banded or, three leopards' faces of the first. Creatx 
— 1st, An heraldic antelope's head erased gu. surmounted 
by two feathers in siliire ar. charged on the neck (for dis- 
tinction) with a cross erosslet or; 2nd, In front of a garb or, 
a cornucopia fessewise ppr. 

Fetherston-Whitney. See Whitney. 

Fettiplace (Chilsey and Fernham, co. Berks, Bart, extinct 
1743, p. 348). This family quartered according to Visit. 
Berks, 1664 : Ar. three torteaux and a lion pass, guard, 
crowned. 

Fettiplace (Denchworth, CO. Berks; Edmcnd Fettiplace, 
of Denchworth and Letcomb Regis, d. 1662. Visit. Berks, 
1664). Gu. two chev. ar. a canton erm. a cresceut for diff. 
Crest — A dragon's head veri eared gu. 

Fielden (Oobroyd Castle, co. Lancaster, and Grimston 
Park, CO. York; John Fielden, Esq,, son of John Fielden, 
Esq., of Centre Vale, Todmorden). Gu. on a cross or, betw. 
four doves each holding in the bill an olive branch all ppr. 
five lozenges of the first. Crest— On the stump of a tree 
couped and sproucting ppr. betw. two ears of wheat stalked 
and leaved or, a dove as in the arms. Motto — Virtutis 
praemium honor. 

Fife-Cookson (Whitehill, co. Durham). See Cookson. 

Fillul (Jersey). The Arms are under Fillent, in the Body 
of the Work, by mistake for Fillcl. 

Finnis (Wanstead Park, co. Essex). Ar. a thistle leaved 
vert, flowered gu. betw. three mullets az Crest — A cross 
erosslet fltchee gu. and a sword az. in saltire. Motto — Finis 
coronat opus. 

Firth (Oak Brook, Sheffield, co. York ; Mark Fibtb, Esq.). 
Or, on a pile gu. betw. two Danish battle axes sa. a lion 
ramp, of the field. Crest — On a mount vert in front oc two 
Danish battle axes in saltire sa. a demi lion ramp. Mot o — 
Deo non fortuna. 

Fishbourne (Windsor, co. Berks, and Nottingham. 
Richard Fishboirne, of Windsor, 6. 1620, son of John Fish- 
BOURNE, of Nottingham. Visit. Berks, 1665). Ar. a fieur- 
de-lis and chief sa. 

Fisher (Chlldsey, co. Berks, and Mickleton, co. Gloucester; 
James Fisher, of Childsey, b. 1622, son of Edwakd Fishes, 
Mickleeton, and grandson of Edward Fisher, of same place. 
Vi.sit. Berk>;, 1664). Gu. three deuii lions ramp, and a chief 



F I s SUPPLEMENT 

guard, or, holding an 



FOX 



or. Crtit — A demi lion ramp 
escutcheon gu. 

Fisher (Spring Dale, co. York). Ar. on a chev. gu. three 
trefoils slipped of the field, in chief as many fleur-de-lis of 
the second. Crest— In. front of a bulrush erect a kingSsher 
ppr. resting the dexter claw on a fleur-de-lis or. Motto— 
Virtate et fide. 

Fisher (Winsley and Limpley Stoke, co. Wilts. This family 
were large landowers in these parishes during the 18th 
century. Anns from the Fisher monument in Limpley Stoke 
church, St. Mary the Virgin). Or, a cliev. gu. hetw. three 
kingflsbers, each holding a flsh in the beak all ppr. Crmt — 
A kingflsher as in the arms. 

Fisher (Thornton, co. Surrey, page 352). The seat of this 
family is Thomcombe, not Thornton. 

Fisher (Kilmainham, co, Dublin ; Collection of Molyneux. 
Ulster, 1597-1632). same Arnn and CreH as Fisher of 
Fisher's Prospect, now Courtown, page 352. 

Fison (GretJiholme, Burley-in-Wharfedale, Leeds, co. York ; 
WnxiAM Fison, Esq., of Greenholme, J. P., son of Thomas 
Fison, Esq., of Barningham co. Suffolk). Per fesse az. 
and enn. in chief three battle axes erect or, bladed ar. 
in base an heraldic tiger pass, of the third. Crest — A demi 
heraldic tiger ramp, or, collared gu. holding betw. the paws 
an escutcheon ar. charged with a battle axe sa. Motto — 
Deo conflde. 

FitzQerald (Baron FitzGerald of Kilmarnock-). Erm. a 
mascle or, oyer all a saltire gu. Crest — On the Roman 
fasces, lying fessewise, ppr. a boar passant erm. fretty gu. 
Supporters — Dexter, a griflin ar. gorged with a collar, and 
pendent therefrom an escutcheon az. charged with a trefoil 
also ar. ; sinister, a boar ar. gorged with a collar, and 
pendent therefrom an escutcheon az. charged with a rose 
also ar. Mottoes — Crom a boo and Kortis et fidelis. 

FitzQ-erald (Knight of Kerry : Valencia and Ballinruddery, 
CO. Kerry, bart. Created 8 July, 1880^ Erm. a saltier gu., 
charged with a cross formee ar. Crest — An armed knight 
on horseback, all ppr. Motto — MuUachar a boo. 

FitzGibbon(" Mac an tShen Ridire," of Crohana, formerly 
of Castle Grace, co. Kilkenny ; Philip John FitzGibbon, 
Esq., of Crohana, descended from the line of The White 
Knight, and representative of David FitzGibbon, alias 
Mae an t Shen Ridire (Anglice, son of the old Knight), so 
mentioned in an inquisition post mortem, anno 39 Queen 
Elizabeth). Erm. a saltire gu. on a chief ar. three annu- 
lets of the second. Crest — A boar pass ppr. fretty ar. 
Motto — Honore integro contemno fortunam. 

FitzSymon (Dublin, Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, 1697- 
1632). Ar. on a fesse betw. three crescents sa. as many 
estoiles of the field. Crest — A dove ar. collared gu. 

Flavel (Bushbury Lodge, Leamington, co. Warwick, Sydney 
Flatel, Esq.). Ar. a maunch gu. bezantee, surmounted of 
a chev. az. betw. three keys, wards upwards, of the last. 
Crest — In front of flames of fire ppr. two keys in saltire, 
wards upwards az. 

Flemings (Clayquhat, co. Perth, and Bigadon, Devon). 
Gu. on a chev. ar. three fraises az. on an escutcheon of 
pretence, ar. on a feese indented betw. three crescents gu. 
as many garbs or, for Blytb. Crest — A goat's head erased 
ppr. collared or. Motto — Let the deed shaw. 

Fleming: (Cobam-Flemino, Coham, co. Devon ; John Blyth 
Coham-Fleming, eldest son of John Fleming, of Bigadon, 
Esq. (see preceding entry), m. 5 June, 1883, Elinok 
Makt Bickfobd, only child and heir of William Holland 
BicKFOBD Coham, Esq., of Coham, as and from which date 
he assumed, by royal licence, the additional name and arms 
of Coham). Quarterly : Ist and 4th, Fleming (as above) ; 
2nd and 3rd, Coham (which see page 221). 

Fletcher (Barrow Hedges, Surrey, and 18, Park Lane, 
London, W. ; Geoboe Hamilton F'letcbeb, Esq., J.P., m. 
1854, SoFHiA, 5th dau. of Geoboe Wauseb, Esq., of War- 
minster, Wilts, and(i. 1879, leaving with other issue, George 
Hamilton Fletcueb, 6. 1860). Az. three urrows in trianKle, 
barbs pointing to the centre or, on a chief ar an anchor 
erect sa. betw. two dolphins respecting each other ppr.; quar- 
tering for Waoseb, Or, a leopard's fuce betw. three dexter 
gloves, gu. Crest — In front of a fern brake a centaur ppr. 
wielding with the dexier hand a spear, or. 

Flower (Aston Clinton, co. Buckingham ; conflrmed to 
Philip William Floweb, of Furzedown Park, co. Surrey, 
and his l.isue. His eldest son, Cyril Flower, Esq., of 
Alton Clinton, M.P. co. Brecknock, impales the arms of I)k 



Rothschild in right of his wife, Constance, eldest dau. of 
Sir Anthony de Rothschild, bart.). Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, or, two flaunches vert, in pale three escutcheons of the 
last, each charged with a fleurde-lis of the field, for Flower ; 
2nd and 3rd, ar. two chevronels sa. betw. three roses gu., 
seeded or, barbed ppr., for Wykeham. Crest — Issuant from 
clouds a cubit arm erect, in the band a rose and lily, each 
slipped all ppr. Motto — Flores curat Deus. 

Flux (William Flux, Esq., of Bibury Court, near Ciren- 
cester, CO. Gloucester). Ar. on a chev. nebuly sa. betw. 
two pellets in chief, and a fleur-de-lis in base of the last, a 
trefoil slipped betw. two conies courant respecting each 
other of the first. Crest — Upon the trunk of a tree fesse- 
wise eradicated to the sinister a coney courant ar. Motto 
— Fluctus fiuctu. 

Foljanxbe (Cockglode, co. Nottingham, Haselbech Hall, 
Northampton, and Kirkham Abbey, co. York). Quarterly, 
1st, sa. a bend betw. six escallops or, for Foljambe; 2nd, 
az. on a fesse wavy ar. a cross pattee gu. and in chief two 
estoiles or, as an augmentation a chief also wavy ar. charged 
with a cormorant, sa., beaked and legged gu. holding in the 
beak a piece of seaweed called laver, vert, for Jenkinson, 
Earl of Livti-pool. 3rd, ar. on a bend az. three oat sheaves 
or, for Otley ; 4th, sa. a chev. betw. three mullets ar., for 
Shccebdrgh; 5th, az. a griftin pass, and a chief or, for 
Evelyn ; 6th, ar. two bars gemels, and in chief three mullets 
sa., for Medley. Crests — 1st, a jamb, armed and spurred 
quarterly or and sa. ; 2nd, on a chapeau gu. turned up erm. 
a tiger statant ar. ducally gorged or ; 3rd, a calopus or 
chatloup (afterwards blazoned as an antelope), quarterly or 
and sa. Granted by Henry VIII. to Sir Godfrey Foljambe. 
Motto — Soyez ferme. Badge — A sprig of oak frucied ppr. 
and a crescent ar. 

Forrest (Auchenraith, co. Lanark, 1877). Ar. a fesse 
chequy az. and or, betw. three oak trees, eradicated, 
fructed ppr. Crest — An oak tree fructed ppr. Motto — Live 
while green. 

Fortescne (Crookhill, co. Worcester, p. 369. Lord Cler- 
mont's History of the House of Fortescue devotes several 
pages to a memoir of this family, and clearly shows that 
Nicholas Fortescue, Groom Porter to Henry VIII., was the 
legitimate son of John Fortescue, of Spridlestone). 

Fortnum. Az. on a chev. betw. three crescents or, a fleur- 
de-lis, of the first. 

Foster (Lanwithan, Lostwithicl, co. Cornwall). Per pale 
sa. and gu. on a saltire erm. a bugle horn betw. four escallops. 
Crt.it — A horse's head, couped collared ar. thereon three 
escallops in the mouth an arrow point downwards. 

Foster (Weeke, co. Somerset ; Christopher Foster, temp. 
James I., son of John Foster, and grandson of William 
Foster, of Reading, a younger brother of William Fo«ter, 
Esq., of Aldermaslon, co. Berks. Visit. Somerset, 1623). 
Sa. a chev. engr. betw. three arrows inverted ar. a martlet 
for diff. 

Fountaine (Narford Hall, co. Norfolk). Quarterly, Ist and 
4th, or, a fesse gu. betw. three elephants' heads erased sa. ; 
2nd and 3rd, Price, or, guttce de poix a lion ramp, regard sa. 
gorged with a chain, pendent therefrom an escocheon of 
the first, charged with an elephant's head erased sa. 

Fowler (Gastard House, Chippenham, co. Wilts; Thomas 
Fowler, Esq., of Gastard House, in. Lucy, dau. of Nicholas 
Waterhowse, Esq., of Everton, Liverpool, and d. 1851, 
leaving an only son, Robert Nicholas Fowler, Esq., of 
Gastard House, J. P., M.A., Alderman of the city of London, 
Commissioner of Lieutenancy for the City, SheritTof London 
and Middlesex, 1880-1881, M.P. for Penryn and F'almouth, 
1868 — 1874. Elected M.P. for London, 1880). Az. on a 
chev. betw. three lions passant, guard, or, as many crosses 
formee sa. Cre.it — A cubit arm erect, habited az. holding 
in the hand ppr. a lure vert, feathered ar. lined or, twisted 
round the arm. Motto — Possunt quia posse videntur. 

Fox (Marmaduke Fox, Esq., of Marmaville, Mirfield, in the 
West Riding of co. York). Sa. on a pale betw. two grey- 
hounds' heads erased ar. a mill-rind palewise of the field. 
Crest — A mill-rind fessewise sa. thereon a greyhound sejant ar. 
Motto — Virtute et nuininc. 

Fox-Pitt-Rivers. See Pitt-Rivbbs. 

Fox (WoUintcton, Somerset). Erm. on a chev. az. three 
(oxrs heads erased or a border fleurelte, and over all a 
canton of the second charged with a cup of the third sur- 
mounted by three fleurs-ilelis ar. Crest — A fox sejant or 
gorged with a collar flcurettu the dexter forcpaw resting 
on a flcur-dc-lis az. Motto — Faire sans dire. 



FB A 



SUPPLEMENT. 



OAB 



Prance-Hayhurst (Bostock Hall, co. Chester). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, Haybdrst, per chev. sa. and or, in chief two 
crosses patt^ fltch^e, and in base a pair of wings conjoined 
and elevated, counf erchanped ; 2nd and 3rd, Keance, ar. on 
a mount in base a hurst ppr. on a chief wavy az. three fleurs- 
de-lis or, Cretts — 1st, Hathubst, a cubit arm ppr. holding 
in the hand a cross pattce fitchee or, betw. two wings sa. 
each charged witli an annulet gold; '2nd, Fkance, a mount, 
thereon a hurst, as in the arms, from the centre tree pendent 
by a strap az. a shield pu. charged with a fleur-de-lis or. 
Motto — Virtus semper viridis. 

France-Hayhurst (Davenham Hall, co. Chester; Col. 
Charles Hosken Fbancb-Hathdrst, J. P. and D.L., eldest 
son of Rev. Canon Tho.mas Kbance-Hathdrst, of Bostock 
Hall, by Helen, his wife, eldest dau. of John Hosken- 
Habfer, Esq., of Da%enham Hall, s. 1873, to Davenham, 
at the death of his uncle, William Hosken Hari-er, Ksq.) 
Arm.«, Crests, and Motto same as the preceding, with the 
additional quartering of Hosken- Habpee. 

France (Ystym Colwyn, Bwlch-y-Cibau, co. Montgomery; 
Wallace James Arthur France, Esq., J.P., eldest sur- 
viving son of Henry Haybdrst Hayburst, Esq., of Ystym 
Colwyn, who was third son of Thomas Havhdrst, Esq., who 
took the surname of France in lieu of that of Hayburst, 
resumed, by royal licence, 1876, the family surname of 
France in compliance with his father's will). Ar. on a 
iiioimt in base a hurst ppr. a chief wavy az. charged with 
tliree fleurs-de-lis or. Crest — A mount, thereon a hurst, as 
in the arms, from the centre tree pendent by a strap az. 
a shield gu. charged with a fleur-de-lis or. Motto—X mus 
semper viridis. 

Francis (Combe Florie, co. Somerset; William Francis, 
(e/u/). James I., son and heir of John Francis. Visit. 
Somerset, 16'23). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a chev. betw. 
three mullets pierced gu. ; 2nd and 3rd, barry of six or and 
sa. a bend erui. 

Freake (Cromwell House, Kensington, Fulwell Park, co. 
Middlesex, bart., created '^3 May, 18S2). Per fesse sa. and 
az. two bars engr. or, each charged with three bulls' heads, 
calioshed of the flrst, in chief three mullets of six points of 
the third. Crei^t — Jn front of a bull's head sa. holding in the 
mouth a mullet of six points or, a rock ppr. Motto— 
Integrity. 

Freake (registered to Eliza Pudsey, Lady Freaks, wife of 
Sir Charles James F'reake, Bart., eldest dau. of Cbarles 
Wright, Esq., one of the Hon. Corps of Gentlemen at Arms, 
and sifter of Brigadier-Gen. Sir Tbomas Wbigbt, C.B ). Qr, 
on a fess vair betw. two eagles' heads erased and a portcullis 
in base az. 

Fursman (granted 1742, to Eev. John Forsman, M.A., 
Chancellor and Canon Residentiary of the Cathedral Church 
of St. Peter, Exeter, Rector of Lawhilton, co. Cornwall, and 
Vicar of Lamerton, co. Devon, son of Richard Fursman, of 
the parish of Lamerton, by Johanna, his wife, dau. of 
Robert Rowe, of same parish, and grandson of Thomas 
Fdbsman, also of Lamerton, where his ancestors lived in 
good reputation for several ages. The grant was to Rev. 
John Fcrsman and his descendants, with liiierty to place 
the arms on the tomb of his wife, Martha, dau. of Jasper 
Radcliff, of St. Thomas, near Exeter, and his dau., 
Martha Forsman, both deceased, and with a provLso that if 
the heirs male of the body of the grantee should fail, the 
arms and crest might be borne by Thomas Wyat, son of 
Tbomas Wyat, of Tavistock, by Agnes, his wife, dau. and 
heir of Richard Forsman, elder brother of the grantee's 
father, also named Ricuaro Forsman). Gu. a saltire dove- 
tailed ar. betw. a book expanded in chief ppr. inibeleshed 
gold and three crosses botony or. Crest — A lien pass, with 
wings elevated ar. collared dovetailed gu. reposing the 
dexter paw on a cross as in the arms. 

Fyan (Dublin; Ft an. Mayor of Dublin. Collection of 
Molyneux, Ulster, 1597-1632). Per fesse sa. and erm. on a 
chev. or. three quarterfoils az. in chief as many covered 
cups of the third. Crist— A demi woman ppr. habited per 
pale or and ar. holding in the right hand a branch of lily 
ppr. leaved gold flowered also ar. 

Fysh (Philip Oakley Fysh, Esq., of HobartTown, Tasmania) 
Az. within two barrulets wavy ar. a fret or. betw. as many 
bezants, the whole betw. three flying tish ppr. Crot — 
l.ssuant from a wreath of red coral a cubit arm vested az. 
cuffed ar. in the hand a flying tish ppr. A/o?^o-Nitor in 
adversum. 



GALiLiFNOA (Llandogo, co. Monmouth). Per fesse or and 
gu. in chief a game cock sa. armed, crested, and wattled of 
the second, in base a lion passant ar. impaling Johnssom. 
3/o((o— Vigil et fortis. The family possesses a document 
from the Heralds Office of Turin, countersigned by the 
English Minister, dated 1858, which testifies that these arms 
have been borne by the family since the 15th century. The 
family has no crest. 

G-alt (Rockmount, Shirbrooke and Montreal, Canada, Sir 
Alexander Tilloch Galt, G.C.M.G., High Commissioner, 
representing the Dominion of Canada in England, son of 
John Galt, author of "The Entail," and other popular 
novels). Per fesse gu. and or, in chief an open book betw. 
two thistles, leaved and slipped and in base on waves of the 
sea a ship under sail all ppr. Crest — In front of a demi 
archer equipped ppr. habited vert, holding a drawn bow and 
arrow, also ppr. a thistle leaved and slipped or. Motto — 
Semper paratus. 

Qal'way, Tcwn of (co. Galway). Ar. waves of the sea 
in base ppr. thereon a galley or ancient war ship, charged 
on the rigging with two mullets all sa. on an escutcheon of 
pretence the royal arms, as borne by the later Plantagenet 
and the Tudor sovereign.', viz., quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
France, Az. three fleurs-de-lis or ; 2nd and 3id, England, 
gu. three lions pass, guard, in pale or. 

Oardiner (King's Brompton, co. Somerset, High Sheriff of 
that CO. in 1737). Gu. a plain fesse with cotises engr. ar- 
betw. four roses, three in chief and one in base of the last. 
Creit — A stag ppr. the dexter forelegsnpporting an scutcheon 
ar. charged with four lozenges conjoined in fesse gu. betw. 
two barrulets sa. 

Gardner (Beechfleld, Croxteth Road, Liverpool, and Fluke 
Hall, FMeetwood, co. Lancaster ; Richard Cardwbll 
Gardner, Esq., J. P., Alderman of Liverpool for 25 years, 
and Mayor, 1862-3, vi. 1828, the dau. and heiress of Johm 
.Sykes, Esq., of Fluke Hall, and d. 29 Dec. i88'3, leaving 
John Sykes Gardner, six other sons, and three daus.). 
Per fesse gu. and or, a pale three griffins' heads erased (two 
and one) and as many roses (one and two), all counter- 
changed, an escutcheon of pretence for Sykes, viz., sa. a 
fountain ppr. betw. three molehills or. Crest — In front of 
two half spades in saltire a griffin's head erased all ppr. 
Motto — Animo et fide. 

Qamett-Orme (Tarn House, Skipton in Craven, West 
Biding co. York ; exemplified to George Robinson, Esi^., 
of Tarn House, Lieut. -Col. commanding 9th batt. Wesi, 
Riding Volunteers, Senior District Registrar of the Supreme 
Court of Justice, and Senior Registrar of the County Court, 
CO. Y'ork, and to Mary Hester, his wife, and to their issue 
upon their assuming, by royal licence, dated 6 March, 1882, 
the surnames of Garnett-Orme, in lieu of that of Robinson, 
and the arms of Orme and Garnett quarterly. Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, Orme, az. an eagle displ. or, in chief three 
battle axes of the last; 2nd and 3rd, Garnett, gu. a lion 
ramp. ar. within a bordure invected or, over all a bend erm. 
charged with three covered cups az. Crests — Orme, in 
front of a battle axe in bend surmounted by a tilting spear 
in bend sinister ppr. a dolphin naiant ar. ; Garnett, a 
dexter arm erect ppr. grasping two sea lions' heads erased 
respectant and saltirewise ar. Mottoes — Deus refugium 
nostrum, Obme ; Diligentia et honore, Gabnbtt. 

Garrard (Shinfleld, co. Berks; Gilbert Garrard, of Shin- 
field, b. 16'26, son of Gilbert Gabrabd, of Shinfield, d. 1659, 
and grandson of Tdomas Garrard, of same. Visit. Berks, 
1G64). Az. a chev. engr. erm. quartering, ar. two bars gu. 
on a canton per pale sa., and of the second a boar's head or. 
Crest — Out of a ducal coronet a demi lion ramp. az. 

Garrard (Lambome, co. Berks; descended from Thomas 
Gabrabd, (i. 1657. Visit. Berks, 1664). Same .<4rHi4, with- 
out the quartering, a crescent for diff. 

Garrard (Bockington, co. Berks ; Philip Garrard, b, 1619,* 
descended from Garrard of Laucboriie. Visit. Berks, 1664). 
Same Arms, a. mullet on a crescent for diff. Crest — Same as 
Garrard of Hhivfield. 

Garrard (Inkpen, co. Berks; Robert Garrard, Deputy 
Steward of Newbury, b. 1621, descended from Garrard of 
Lo.mborne. Visit Berks, 1664). Same Aruu and Crttt, 
a crescent on a crescent for diff. 



GAB 



SUPPLEMENT. 



GLY 



Oarrard (Midgbam, co. Berks ; Kichakd Gabeabd, 6. 1631, 
of Midgbam, descended from Qakkakd of lambome. Visit. 
Berks, 1664). Same Anrn and Crest as Garbakd of Booking- 
ton. 
(Jarroway (Netherfleld, co. Lanark, 1883). Ar. a chev. 
betw. two escallops in chief and a cinquefoil in base gu. 
Ci-tst — A gri£Bn pass. or. Motto — Aut vincere aut mori. 
Gatehouse (Chichester, co. Sussex; George Gatehocse, 
Esq.). Per fesse az. and gu. in chief seven mullets, four and 
three ar. and in base on a mount an embattled >;ateway with 
portcullis all ppr. Crest— In front ot two keys saltirewiseaz. 
a portcullis ar. Motto— -Qmx serata secura. 
Oathorne (granted and exemplified ioGathobneGathobne- 
Ha«dt, Vitcount Cranbrook, to be borne quarterly in the 
2nd ami 3rd quarter, with Habdt). Per pale ar. and or, a 
ber.d conipony az. and gu. betw. two pellets each within an 
annulet sa. Cce»f— In front of a woU's head erased ar. a 
staff raguly fessewise or. 
Gtathome-Hardy, Vitcount Cranbrook. See Habdt. 
Oawen (Horsington, co. Somerset, and Norington, co. Wilts ; 
TaoMAS Gawen, of Horsington, temp. James I., son of 
Thomas Gawen, and grandson of William Gawen, of 
Norington. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Erm. on a saltire engr. 
az. five fleurs-de-lis or, quartering Delameke, viz., Gu. two 
lions pass. ar. 
Gerard (Earon Uerard). Ar. a saltier gu. Creil—X lion 
ramp. erm. crowned or. Suptwrters — On either side a lion 
erm. ducally crowned or, gorged with a collar gemel gu. and 
suppoitinf^ a tilting spear ppr. Motto — En Dieu est mon 
^sperai ce. 
Oibb (Saio vbet Gibb'). Gu. a cubit arm erect grasping an 
arrow in be id sinister point downwards betw. four mullets 
in cross or, the whole within a bordure wavy erminois. 
Gibbons (granted to Bev. Benjamin Gibbons, of PooUands, 
ifec, page 396). The crosses on the chief in this arms are 
potent, not pattfie. There is a second Motto (placed over the 
crest), viz., Accipe crucem. 
Gibbs (Venton, co. Devon ; an old family, from which are 
presumed to descend Gibbes, Bavt., of Barbados, and Gidbs, 
of Aldenham, co. Hcrtfuril). Ar. three battle axes sa. 
Gibbs (South I'errott, co. Dorset, iwt Devon, as erroneously 

printed at page 397). 
Gibbs (Aldenham, co. Hertford, and Clifton Hampden, co. 
Oxford. George Henry Gibbs, Esq., of Aldenham, m. 
Caroline, dau. of Kev. Charles Ckawlet, Kector of Stow, 
CO. Northampton, and wass. by his eldest son, Henry Hucks 
Gibbs, Esq., of Aldenham, J. P., a Commissioner of Lieu- 
tenancy for London, and a Director of tlie Bank of England). 
Ar. three battle axes sa. a bonier nebulce of the last, 
quartering for Hccks of .-Mdenhain, Ar. two chevronels betw. 
three owls az. Crest — In front of a rock a dexter arm eni- 
bowed in armoui, the hand in a gauntlet ppr. holding a 
battle axe sa. Molto—I'enax propositi. 
Gibbs (Tyntcslleld and Charlton, co. Somerset, and Clyst 
St. George, co. Devon). Aruu, «fcc., same as Gibbs ot 
Aldenham. 
Gibson (Dublin; Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, l.'>97-1632, 
sheriff of the city of Dublin). Paly of six erm. and ar. on a 
chief of the last a fret betw. two crescents sa. Crest — Ari 
ostrich ar. beaked, legged, and ducally gorged gu. 
Gibson (MiLNtB-GiasoN, Theberton House, co. Suffolk ; 
Right Hon. Thomas Mh.neb-Gibson, M.l'., {'resident of 
the Board of Trade, 1H;')9 to l»6fi. only son of Major Thomas 
Milneb-Gibson, 37th regt.. by Isabella, his wife. dau. of 
H. Gloveb, Esq., of Chester, was b. Is06, m. 183'2, Abethusa- 
S(;8anna, only dau. and heir of Sir Thomas Gery CnLLU.M, 
8th bart., of Hnwstead and Hard wick, and had with other 
issue, .Jasper Joseph Milner- Gibson and George Gery 
MiLNER-GiBson-CuLi.uM, (sccCuLLUM). Az. three bridle-bits 
chevronwise or, betw. as many storks rising ar. Crert — A 
•tork close ar. holding in the beak a branch of laurel ppr. 
retting the dexter foot on a bridle-bit or. 
Gilbert (Dublin ; Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, 1.597-1632). 
(iu. two b.im erminoio, in chief three fleurs-de-lis, ar. Crest 
Out nf a ducal coronet ppr. a buck's head or. 
Gill (Blairythun. co. Aberdeen. This fumily. which is repre- 
■eniid by David (Jill, Esq., LL.D., F.ft.S., of Blairytlinn, 
a .Magistrate for co. Aberdeen, and an eminent astronoiiipr, 
settled in that county and the neighbouring one of Baiifl, 
upwards of three centuries and a half ago, and descends from 
Albiander Gill, of Auchfyne, IJuchnn, Aberdeenshire, 
«bo d. hefoic ItiH;. Lozengy ar. and vert, on a chief gu. 



three martlets of the first. Crest — A demi eagle rising ppr. 
Motto over, Sursuni prorsusque. Motto — In te Domine »pe» 
nostra. 
Gilpin (Halverstown House, co. Kildare, and HocktifT 
Grange, co. Bedford; exemplitied to Lieut. Peter Valentine 
Gilpin, and Amy Mary Louisa Gilpin, his wife, upon their 
assuming by royal licence, dated 1 Feb. 1884, the surname 
of Gilpin in lieu of I'ur.CELL. in compliance with a deed of 
entail of the Hockliff estates executed by Sir Bichard 
Gilpin, Bart., of Hockliff). Or, a boar pass. sa. in chief two 
roses gu. barbed and seeded ppr. a canton az. for diff. 
(The canton az. for diff. to be omitted by their de- 
scendants). Crest — In front of three tilting spears points 
upwards, one in pale, two in saltire ppr. as many mascles 
interlaced fessways or. 
Gladvrln (Goodwin-Gladwin. Richard Henry Goodwin- 
Gladwin, Esq , of Hinchley Wood House, Mappleton, co. 
Derby, J. P., late Capt. 6th Royals, assumed by royal licence, 
28 April, 1881, the name and arms of Gladwin. Arms 
granted, 1686, to Thomas Gladwin, of Tupton Hall, High 
Sheriff of Derbyshire). Erm. a chief az. over all on a bend 
gu. a sword in bend ar. hilt or. Crtst—A lion sejant ar. 
guttee de sang, holding in the dexter paw a sword, as in 
the arms. 
Glascock (page 402). The following are more correct 

blazons of the arms registered to this family : 
Glascock (Trenchfoile, parish of Chignal, Smealy, co. Essex, 
owners of the manor from the marriage of John Glascock 
with Alice Trenchfoile, heires of the manor temp. 
Edward 111., also Patrons of the Rectory. Arms granted 
by Dethick. Garter, 20 Feb. anno. 6 Edward VI.). Erm. a 
chev. sa. betw. three cocks az. beaked, wattled, combed, and 
legged or. Crest — A dragon's head couped per pale ar. and 
gu. l.mgued az. dented ppr. 
Qlascock (Noteley, and Timperley, same co.). Same Arm$ 

and Crest, the chev. charged with a crescent for diff. 
Glascock (Much Dunmow and Roxwell, same co. ; arms 
contirined and crest granted by Cooke, Clarenceux, 14 
July, 1,')71). Same Arms, the chev. charged with a mullet 
or, lor diff. Crest— OM of a ducal coronet or, a dragon's 
head per pale ar. and az. 
Glascock (Daary and Ballyroan, Queen's Co. and Dublin, 
Reg. Ulster s Off.). Same ^rois. C/e«£— A cock az. beaked, 
wattled, combed, and legged or, holding in the beak aD 
annulet gu. Motto — Vigil et audax. 
Glascock (Hertshobury, in Farnhain, and Aldham, co. 
Essex. Visit. Essex, 1661). Same Arnn. Cres —An 
antelope's head erased ar. collared sa. attired or. 
Glascock (Felstedbury, co. Esscx, and Wormley, co. Hert- 
ford; assigned by Sir Richard St. George, 1634). Same 
vJn/i.t. the clievron cliarged with a bezant for diff. Creft — 
An antelope's head ar. attired or, gorged with a garter sa. 
garnished and buckled gold. 
Glascott (Aldeitown, <fcc.). Page 402, for "co. Essex," 

read " co. Warwick." 
Qlencross (Luxtowe, Liskeard, co. Cornwall; Rev. James 
Glencross, M.A., J.P.). Per s.iltire erm. and az. a lion 
ramp, or, holding in the dexter forepaw a cross paionce of 
the last in chief three chaplets of oak ppr. fructed gold. 
Crfst — A greyhound ar. charged on the body with a cross 
patonce az. resting the dexter forefoot on a chaplet, as in 
the arms. Motto — A cruce salus. 
Glyd (Brightling, co. Sussex, and London; Tuo.mas, 
Richard Geoffkey, and Michael Glyd, sons of Ricuabd 
Glyd, of Brightling, who was son of Thomas Glvd, and 
grandson of Richard Glyd, lioth of same place. Visit. 
London, 1633 34). Ar. on a bend az. betw. three annulets 
sa. six tleurs-de-lis, two, two, and two, within two crosses 
crosslet or. Crest— A griffin scjeant the dexter furepaw 
elevated sa. wings elevated and plain collared and lined gu. 
Glynn (Glynn, Cornwall). Ar. three salmon spears, points 
downwards sa. quartering or, a bull pass, sa., for Tbecabne, 
and az. three battle axes or, a martlet for diff., for Uichabd 
Dents. Crest — A demi talbot erm. eared or, allowed at 
Visit. Cornwall, 1620. Since that date other quarterings 
have been brought in by heiresses, viz., 1, through the 
marriage of Nicholas Glynn, M.P. for Bodmin, with Gbb- 
trcde, dau. and eventually sole heiress of Anthony Dennis, 
Esq., ol Orleigh. Anthony Dennis, who bore az. three 
batil»axes or, wusheadof un ancient family entitled to many 
quartermg.s; 2, through the marriage of Dennis Glynn, 
of Glynn, with Elizabeth, dau. and co-heir of Samcbl 
FooTE, Esq,, of Wembworthy Manor, near Tiverton, or, a 
chev. and in chief a trefoil slipped sa. ; 3, through the 



aoD 



SUPPLEMENT. 



GRI 



msiriage of William Glynn, of Glynn, with Rose, dau., 
and at the death of her brother in ITZS, co-heir of John 
Prideacx, of Prideaux Place, Padstow ; Ar. a chev. sa. and 
in chief a label of three points gu. with many quarterings. 

Chjdwyn (Wokey and Wells, Somerset. Visit. Somerset, 
1623). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three leopards' faces or. 

Q-oldney (Beechfteld and Bradenstoke Abbey, co. Wilts, 
Bart. Created U May, 1880). Per pale gu. and az. on a 
bend betw. two eagles displ. arg. three garbs sa. banded or. 
Crest — A garb sa. banded or. Motto — Honor virtutis 
preemium. 

G-oldsmid-SIontefi.ore. See Montefiore. 

Qooch (Chahles C. Gooch, Esq., 8, Porchesler Gate, Hyde 
Park, London, W.). Per pale or and sa. two chevronels 
betw. three talbota pass, counterchanged on a chief gu. 
three leopards' faces jessant-de-lis of the first. Crest — A 
talbot pass, per pale or and sa. charged on the body with 
two annulets counterchanged, and holding in the mouth a 
b^ton also sa. Motto — ilemor at gratus. 

Gore. See Hickma.n. 

Gorg'es (co. Somerset; Sir Ferdinando Gorges, knighted 
1591 ; son of Kdward Gorges, and grandson of ED.MtJND 
Gorges, who was eldest son of Sir Edmusd Gorges, whose 
father. Sir Edmdnd Gorges, was in ward to John Howard, 
temp. Edward IV. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Lozengy or and 
az. a chev. gu. a mullet for diff. quartering Russell, 
Gorges, Pennington, and Enolowise. Cnst — A greyhound's 
head couped ppr. collared or. 

G-OSSe (co. Radnor; William Gosse, High Sheriff of the 
county, 1755). Erm. three fleurs-de-lis gu. Crest — A sword 
in pale ppr. pommel and hilt or, betw. two branches of laurel 
vert. Motto— En Dieu est ma foy. 

Goulter (Ctrcs Gocltel, Esq., of New Zealand). Gu. a 
cross moline and in chief three crescents ar. Crest — Kive 
annulets fessewise interlaced or, thereon a crescent ar. 
Motto — Dedit aemula virtus. 

Qoulter (Thomas Morse Godlter, Esq.. of Almondsbury,, 
Gu. two battle axes in saltire betw. as many anchors in 
pale, and as many mullets of six points infesseall or. Crest — 
A cubit arm vested gu. cuff ar. the hand ppr. holding a 
battle axe sa. suspended from the wrist by a chain, an 
escocheon or, charged with an anchor also sa. 

Grace (Hamilton Grace, Knole, Frant, Tunbridge Wells, 
CO. Sussex ; Lieut.-Col. Sheffield Hamilton Grace, of 
Knole, only son of Sheffield Grace, Esq. of Knole, LL. D., 
by Harriet Georgiana. his wife, dau of General Sir John 
James Hamilton, 1st bart., of Woodbrook, and sister and 
co-heir of Sir James John Hamilton, 2nd bart. of Wood- 
brook, assumed by royal licence, dated 21 Feb. 1880, the 
prefix surname of Hamilton). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. 
a lion ramp, per fesse ar. and or, a crescent for diff., for 
Grace. 2nd and 3rd counter quartered. 1st and 4th, gu. three 
cinquefoils erm. 2nd and 3rd, ar. a lymphad, sails furled, 
sa. in the fessc point, a crescent of the last, together 
with the honourable augmentation, viz., a chief ar. there- 
upon a mount vert, inscribed, " Alba de Tormes," in letters 
Isold, a castle, with the wail on either side broken, and from 
the battlement the flag of Spain flying ppr., for Hamilton, 
of Woodbrook. Crests — 1st, Grace, a demi lion ramp, a r. 
Motto over. En grace aff6; 2nd, for hon. augmentation, a 
mount vert, thereon a castle, as in the arras, and in the 
escrole above the Motto over "Alba de Tormes;" 3rd, 
Hamilton, an oak tree ppr. charged with a crescent sa. a 
frame saw, through the fessewise, also ppr. Motto over. 
Through. Motto — Concordant nomine facta. 

Grace (as borne by Mrs. Sdsan Gates, of Meanwoodside, 
Leeds, co. York, only silrviving daughter and heiress of 
Edward Grace, Esq., of St. Anne's, Burley, Leeds, J. P.). 
Gu. a lion ramp, per fess erm. and erminois, betw. two 
roses ar. barbed and seeded ppr. 

Graham (Master Robert Graham, citizen of London, &c., 
p. 418). The correct blazon of this coat is sa. on a chev. 
ar. betw. three escallops or, a rose gu. barbed vert. 

Graham (Vicar of Ashampstead, Berks, formerly Wester- 
kirk, CO. Dumfries). Or, on a bend sa. three escallops of 
the field. Crest — An eagle preying on a heron ppr. Motto 
— N'oublie. 

Graham (Savage-Graham ; exemplified, 27 July, 1878, to 
Charles Russell Graham, of Clonboo, co. Tipperary, 
gentleman, son of Hugh Graham, of Belfast, merchant, 
deceased, by Charlotte Seli.na Savage, otheinisc Graham, 



his wife, also deceased, on his assuming by royal licence 
the surname of Savage, in addition to and before that of 
Graham and the arms of Graham). Quarterly: 1st and 4th, 
Graham, or, on a chev. gu. betw. in chief two escallops of 
the 2nd, and in base a trefoil slipped vert, a tower ppr. ; 
2nd and 3rd, Savage, gu. six lions ramp. ar. three, two, and 
one betw. two flaunclies or, each charged with a rose of the 
first, barbed and seeded ppr. Crests — 1st, Graham : An 
eagle, wings endorsed ppr. charged on the breast with an 
escallop ar. and holding in the beak a trefoil slipped vert; 
2nd, Savage : A lion's gamb erect or, charged with a rose 
gu. barbed and seeded ppr. 

Granado (SirJAQUEsGRANADO, knt.. Equerry to Henry VIII. 
Kis dau. and heiress m. Edward Chester, Esq., of Royston, 
Herts). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. three eagles' legs or; 
2nd and 3rd, or, a Moor's head and neck ppr. couped at the 
8ho\ilder gu. wreathed round the temples ar. over all an 
inescutcheon or, charged with a pomegranate slipped ppr. 
Crest — A pomegranate slipped ppr. 

Grang-er (Thomas Colpitts Granger, Esq., Q.C, M.P. for 
Durham city). Az. on a fesse ar. betw. three pomegranates 
ppr. slipped and leaved or, two portcullises gu. chained gold. 
Crest — .\n arm embowed, vested az. and cuffed, ar. elbow to 
the sinister, the hand grasping a portcullis gu. by the 
chains or. 

Grantham (Barcombe Place, in the parish of Barcombe, co. 
Sussex). Erm. a gryphon segreant gu. holding betw. the 
claws an escocheon or, charged with a cross crosslet sa. 
in chief two cross crosslcts of the second. Crest — A demi 
gryphon gu. charged on the body with two cross crosslets 
palewise or, betw. the claws an escocheon also or, charged 
with a cross crosslet sa. Motto — Forward. 

Gray (Kinfauns, co. Perth, and Balmerino, co. Fife). Gu. 
a lion ramp. ar. within a bordure engr. of the last charged 
in middle chief with a crescent of the field. Crest — An 
anchor or. Motto — Anchor fast anchor. 



Greatorej 



Same as Greatrakes. 



Greaves ('Sheffield, co. York). Per bend gu. and or, an 
eagle displ. betw. four quatrefoils in cross all counterchanged. 
Crest — A demi eagle displ. or, wings chequy gold and gu. 
holding in the beak three quatrefoils slipped vert. 

Greene (Milton Clifton, co. Somerset ; John Greene, temp. 
James 1., son of Bartholomew Greene, grandson of 
Mathew Greene, and great-grandson of William Greenb, 
all of same place. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. on a fret az. 
five bezants a chief sa. charged with a buck statant betw. 
two mullets or, pierced gu. Crest — An arm erect habited 
vert, holding in the hand a branch of holly ppr. fructed gu. 

Greenwell (London ; borne by Walpole Eyre Greenwell, 
Esq.). Same Arras, Crest, and Motto as Greenwell, of 
Greenwell, co. Durham. 

Gregrory (Buscott, co. Berks, and Cuxham, co. Oxford, 
Edmund Gregory, of Buscott, b. 1620, son of Giles 
Gregory, of Cuxham, and grandson of Edmund Gregory, 
of same place. Visit. Berks 1644). Or, three bars az. in 
chief a lion pass, of the last. Ciest — A demi boar salient or. 

Greville (Baron Greville ; Algernon William Fclkb 
Greville, 2nd Lord Greville, has been confirmed by royal 
licence, in the surname and supporters of Greville. Sa. 
on a cross within a bordure both engr. or, five pellets a 
crescent for diff. Supporters — On either side a swan, wings 
inverted ar. ducally gorged gu. charged on the breast 
with a pellet. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet gu. a demi 
swan wings expanded and elevated ar. Motto — Vix ea 
nostra voco. 

Grieve (Branxholm Park, co. Roxburgh). Az. on a fesse 

ar. betw. three fetterlocks ar. a mullet sa. Crest— An arm 

in armour embowed, the hand grasping a dagger ppr. 
Motto— }loc securior. 

Griffith (city of Durham, originally of co. Carnarvon ; re- 
presented by John Charles Griffith, Esq., of Prior's 
Mesne, co. Gloucester, J. P., and of Morden, co. Durham). 
Erm. a lion ramp. gu. Crest — A demi man az. with a cloth 
round the loins indented at the bottom, on the dexter breast 
a sun, and on the sinister a crescent and on the stomach 
seven stars, in the dexter hand a spear the end resting on 
the thigh all or, the sinister arm resting on that thigh. 

Grigrson (Rev. William Grigson, M.A., Rector of Whin- 
burgh -with -Westfield, CO. Norfolk, sometime of Corpus 
Christi Coll. Camb,, eldest son and heir of Edward Harvf.v 
Grigson, of Saham Toney, in the said co. I'atent includes 



OBO 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BAN 



the other desceiidants of Bev. Habvbt Geiosoh). Gu. two 
bare erm. each charged with as many crosses pattee fltchee 
at the foot of the first in chief three annulets ar. Crett — A 
gryphon's head couped chequy ar. and sa. encircled by an 
annulet or. 

Grover (The Bury, Heme! Hempsted, Herts, and Boveney 
Court, Burnbam, Bucks ; registered to the descendants of 
IUrrt Gkoveb, Esq. fdeceased), of the Bury and Boveney). 
Per bend or and az. a pale enfrr. betw. two mullets in fesse 
all counterchanced. Great — A dcmi lion gu. gorged with a 
collar gcmel, holdingin thedexter paw a palm-branch slipped 
and resting the sinister paw on a mullet all or. Motto — Le 
Roy, la Loy, la Foy. Three other coats have been used for the 
name of Gboveb. The Welsh Groveb family de.'oended from 
Brockbtt Grover, of Porth-y-Glo, near Cardiff, bears Per 
bend gu. and or, a pale vair. Crest — Out of a cloud in the 
fiinister an arm embowed holding a garland of flowers all 
ppr. The second coat appears in an Alphabet Inde.x, College 
of Arms, temp. Charles II., viz., Per bend or and az. a pale 
barry nebuly of ten ar. and of the second (probably a mis- 
representation of vair) ; and the third on a brass in Eton 
College Chapel, placed to the memory of the Kev. !John 
Septimus Gboveb, Vice-Provost, son of Montagoe Groveb, 
and grandson of William Grover, Esq., of Boveney Court, 
Burnham, co. Buckingham, whoil. 1745, viz., per bend az. and 
or, a pale gu. charged with five bars per fesse nebuly ar. 
and of the first. This coat set up at Eton, which is quite 
nnhcraldic, seems to be unauthorized. 

Oroves (Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, 1597-1632). Erm. 
on a chev. cngr. gu. three escallops or. 6Ve«t— A grey- 
bound pass. sa. ducally gorged or. 

Qrowse (Cowling, Dallingham, and Bildeston, co. Suffolk, 
and Wisbeach, co. Cambridge ; Fredebick Sal.'mon Gbowse, 
Esq., Bengal Civil Service, C.I.E., M.A. Oxon, is son of 
BoHEBT Growse, Esq., of Bildeston, and great-grandson of 
John Gbowse, Esq., of Sutton). Barry of six or and sa. a 
pile counterchanged. 

Ouest (Baron Winihtrne). Az. on chev. or, betw. three 
swans' heads erased ppr. as many crosses - moline, sa. 
Supporters — On eacli side a figure habited as a vulean, 
resting bis exterior hand on an anvil and holding in front 
thereof a sledge hannner all ppr. Crest — A swan's head 
era.sed ppr. gorged with a collar or, and underneath 
charged with a cross-moline as in the arms betw. two ostrich 
feathers gold. Motto — Ferro nou gladio. 

Guinness {Baron Ardilavn). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
Guinness, per saltire gu. and az. a lion ramp, or, on a chief 
erm. a dexter hand couped at the wrist of the first, a 
i-rescent for diff. ; 2nd and 3rd, Lee, arg. on a fesse betw. 
three cresceius .sa. a trefoil or. C)-eU«~l»t, Guinness: A 
boar pass, quarterly or and gu. a crescent for dilT. ; Und, 
Lee : On a pillar arg. encircled by a ducal coronet or, an 
eagle preying on a bird's leg erased ppr. Supporters — 
(Granted by Boyal Warrant, May, 1867, to Sir Benjamin- 
Lee Guinness, Bart., and the heirs male of his body, upon 
whom the dignity of a baronet shall descen<l in virtue of the 
limitations of the patent of the 15th April, 1B67): on either 
side a stag gu. attired and gorged with a collar gemel or, 
pendent therefrom by a chain gold an escutcheon, that on 
the dexter cliargcd with the arms of Guinness, and that on 
the sinister with the arms of Lee. Motto — .Spes mea in 
Deo. 

Gunter (Milton, co. Wilts, Gko»feey GrNTER, of Milton, 
temp. Henry VIII. Visit. Berks 1664). Sa. three dexter 
gauntlets ar. Crett. — An antelope's head erased per pale or 
and sa. 

Gunter (Kintbury, co. Berks, Febdinando Gunter, of Kint- 
bury, b. 1606, grandson of John Gunter, of Kintbury, 3rd 
son of frKOFrRET QuNTEB, of Mllton. Visit. Uerks 1604). 
Same Arrm and CreJit. A mullet for diff. 

Gush (William FsKnEEitK Gush, Esq., 5.3, Sussex Gardens, 
Hyde I'arU, London). Sa. a fasces erect ppr. betw. two 
owls ar. a clii.:f trni. Crr.it— \n owl ar. holding in the 
beak a balance or. Afo£<o— Sapiens ct Justus. 

Gwynne (New Windsor, Berks, fiom Montgomeryshire; 
Anne, dau. an<l heir of William Gwtn or Gwynne, Auditor 
of the Exchequer, m. Kichard Aldworiii, Esq., of Stun - 
lake, BcrkHj. ,Sa. three liorsen' heads erased ar. quartering 
Talke, of Apuddercomhe, Isle of Wight. C're»t — a bear 
ps««. »a. feeding on a bruich of ctnqucfoils ppr. and trefoils 
*crl. 



HACKSHAW (Hinton St. George and CorfTe, co. Somer- 
set, CO. Cumberland, and London; Hdmphbet Hackshaw, of 
London, and Uobebt Hackshaw, of Hinlon St. George, tem)K 
James I., sons of William Hackshaw. of CorfTe, who was 
grandson of William Hackshaw, co. Cumberland. Visit. 
Sonier.^t-t, 1623). Or, a chev. betw. three peacocks' heads 
erased gu. 

Haden (Babrs-Haden, High Court, co. Stafford). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, sa. on a pile betw. two mullets of six points in 
base ar. a human leg couped at the thigh az., for Haden; 
2nd and 3rd, gu. two bars eiigr.vair betw. five annulets, three 
in chief and two in base or, for Barrs. Crests — 1st, Haden: 
In front of a cubit arm in armour the hand grasping an 
arrow in bend sinister a morion all ppr. 2nd, Barrs : Upon 
a mount vert in front of a gate or, the trunk of an oak 
tree eradicated and sprouting towards the dexter ppr. 
Motto — Disce pati. Haden, see Haden-Best. 

Hadley (Simeon Charles Hadley, Esq., of London). Gu. 
three chev. or, betw. as many falcons belled ar. in the 
centre chief point a buckle, the tongue erect of the second. 
Crest — Upon a mount vert a falcon belled ar. supporting 
in the dexter claw a buckle as in the arms, and holding ia 
the beak three ears of wheat or. 

Sag'gerstone (co. Northumberland). Az. on a bend 
cotised ar. three garbs of the field. 

Hai? (Beinersyde, co. Berwick, the most ancient family now 
subsisting on Tweedsflde ; for more than seven centuries 
the Haigs have dwelt at Bemersyde House, 

"Tyde what may hetyde, 
Hatg shall be Haig of Bemersyde." 

At the death of Sophia Haig, of Bemersyde in 1878, the estate, 
by the joint disposition of herself and her sisters, the co- 
heiresses, passed to Col. Arthur Balfour Haig, C.M.G., 
Equerry to H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh, now of Bemer- 
syde). Az. a saltire cantoned with two mullets in chief and 
base, and with as many crescents addorsed in the fianks ar. 
Cre.it —A rock ppr. Motto — Tyde what may, above the crest ; 
and Sola virtus invicta, below the shield. 

Haig: (The Garttanda, near Alloa; Roebuck, co. Dublin, and 
kilan, CO. Cavan ; descended from Uobebt, 2nd son of 
James Haig, 17 th laird). Same A rim. 

Saig- (Pen Ithon, co. Radnor; a scion of Bemersyde, 
descended also from Robebt, 2nd son of James Haig, 17th 
laird). Same Arms. 

Saig'h (Longley, co. York), claiming to be of the Bemer- 
syde family, uses the same Arm^. 

Haldane (Right Uev. James Rorkbt Alexander Chinnert- 
Haldane, Bishop of Argyle and t!ie Isles). Quarterly, as 
Haldane of Gleneagles, p. 440 ; en .i%trt.out, az. a chev. erm. 
betw. three lions r.imp. or, on a canton vert a harp of the 
third stringed ar., for Chinnkry. Orexla — On dexter, an 
eagle's head erased or, for Haldane; on sinister., on a globe 
or, an eagle rising ppr. collared of the first, for Chinnebv. 
.Wo^oc'!— Suffer: and nee tcinere nee limide. Supporters- 
Two eagles ppr. 

Haldon, Baron. Sec Palk. 

Hales-Tooke (Baselet Hales-Tookb, Esq.,of Salhouse). Per 
rhcv. sa. and ar. in the centre jioint a cross p«ttee counter- 
changed betw. in chief two griffins' heads, erased of the 
second, collared gu. and in base a griffin's head erased 
of the first, collared or. Crest— A griffin's head erased sa. 
charged on the neck with two bendlets ar. and holding in [; 
the beak a sword in pale, point upwards ar. pommel and 
hilt or. 

Hamilton-Hoare. See Hoabb. 

Hancock (South Porrott, co. Somerset, and Preston, co. 
Leicester : Thomas Hancock, of Gregory Stoke, temp. 
James I., son of John Hancock, of South Perrott, and 
grandson of Thomas Hancock, of Preston. Visit. Somerset, 
16'.'.3). Sa. three chevronels betw. as many cocks ar. 

Handlcy (Pavrnport-Handley, Clipsham Hall, Oakham, 
CO. RulUnd : William IJavenpobt Davenport, Esq., of 
Bramham Hull, co. (Chester ; .1.1'. and D.L., m. as his 2nd 
wife, Diana Ei.izabkth, dau. of John Handley, Esq., of 
Muskhnm Grange, co. Nottingham, and sister of Jobi« 
Handley, Erq., of Clipsham, and d. 1869, leaving by her. 



HAN 



SUPPLEMENT. 



HAY 



John William Handlet DavenpobtHandlet, Esq., of 
Clipsham, J. P., 6. 1851, who assumed by royal licence, 
1881, the additional surname of Handlet, in compliance 
wirh the will of his maternal untie, John Handlet, Esq., of 
Chpsham). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, ar. three mascles in 
fesse within two barrulets gu. all betw. three goats pass, 
sa. bearded, ungulcd and armed or, for Handlet; 2nd 
and 3rd, ar. a chev. b?lw. three cross crosslcts fiichee sa. a 
canton az., for Davenport. Crests — 1st, Handlet, A goat 
pass. sa. bearded, unjruled and armed or, charged on the 
body with two niascles interlaced ar. ; 2nd, Davenport, a 
man's head in profile couped at the shoulders ppr. around 
the neck a rope or, and charged on the breast with a cross 
crosslct fltchee sa. Motto — Audaces fortuna juvat. 

Hankinson. (Robert Chatfield Hankinson, Esq., Eed 
Lodge, North Stoneham, co. Southampton). Or, on a saltire 
betw. two saltires couped in pale sa. an eagle displ. betw. 
four cinquefoils of the field. Creit — An eagle displ. sa. 
charged on each wing with a cinquefoil, and resting each 
claw on a saltire couped all or. iV/yfio— Propositi tcnax. 

Sauna (Paisley, CO. Renfrew ; represented by Hugh Hanna, 
Esq., clerk of the kitchen to George III., who d. 1831). 
Arin» and Crest as Hannat, of Sorbie. 

Hanson (Bowden Derra, Lewannick, Cornwall, a branch 
of Hanson, of Rastric, co. York ; William Dat Hanson, 
Esq., is now of Bowden Derra, J. P. for Cornwall: con- 
firmed 17 July, 1652, by William Ryley, Norroy, to Edward 
Hanson as having been borne by his ancestors). Or, a 
chev. counter componed, ar. and az. betw. three martlets, sa. 
Crest — On a chapeau az. lined ar. a martlet volant sa. See 
Watson's History of H.alifax, page 266. 

Harbin (Henbt Harbin, Esq., Seaford Lodge, Fellows- 
road, London, N.W., and Hampstead, co. Middlesex). Az. 
a saltire parted and fretty betw. two spears heads in pale, 
and as many spurs with leathers in fesse or. Crest — A cubit 
arm in armour, the hand in a gauntlet ppr. holding a spur 
leathered or, betw. two roses gu. leaved and slipped also 
ppr. 

Hard'Wicke (Tytherington, co. Gloucester, 2nd son of John 
Llotd Davies, Esq., of Blaendyffyn, co. Cardigan, by 
Elizabeth Bluett, his wife, only child of Tuohas Bloett 
Habdwicre, Esq., of Tytherington). Ar. a saltire nebulae 
az. betw. two spear heads sa. imbrued in fesse on a chief 
of the second three roses of the field seeded and barbed 
vert. Crest — A stag ppr. supporting with the dexter fore- 
paw a scaling ladder sa. Motto — Cervus non servus. 

Hardy (Gathorne-Habpt, VUcount Cranhrook). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, Hardt: Ar. on a bend, invectcd plain cottised 
gu. three Catherine wheels or, on a chief of the second 
as many leopards' faces of the third; 2nd and 3rd, 
Gathorne: Per pale arg. and or, a bend compony az. and 
gu. betw. two pellets, each within an annulet sa. Crests 
— 1st, Habdt : A dexter arm erobowed in armour ppr. 
garnished or, entwined by a branch of oak vert charged 
with two catlierine wheels, the one above and tlie other 
below the elLiow gu. the hand grasping a dragon's head, 
erased ppr.; 2nd, Gathorne; In front of a wolfs head 
erased ar. a staff raguly fessewise or. Supporters — Two 
leopards guardant ppr. each gorged with a collar gu. there- 
from pendent an escutcheon of the last charged with a 
Catherine wheel or. Motto — Arme de foi babdi. 

Harker (John Hareeb, Esq., M.D., Hazel Grove, near Bur- 
ton, CO. Westmorland, and Lancaster). Ar. a serpent nowed 
ppr. betw. two buglehoms stringed in pale sa. as many 
flanches vaire or and gu. Crest — A dexter arm embowed 
vested per pale sa. and gu. charged with two escallops or, 
cuff ar. the hand ppr. holding a buglehorn stringed sa. 
Motto — Audio et juvo. 

Harkness (Cragbeg and Garryfine, co. Limerick). Gyronny 
of eight or and erm. each piece charged with a crescent 
alternate gu. and az. over all a lion ramp. sa. Crest — A 
dove close per pale or and vert, holding in the bill an olive 
branch also vert, fructed gold. Motto — Hope in God. 

Hartlyngton, or Hertlyng-ton (Hanlington in 
Craven, co. York, which village gave name and residence 
to a knightly family, of whom William de Hartlington, 
Esq., the last of the name, d. 12 Edward IV., 1473 ; his dau. 
and heir, Alicia de Hartltngton, m. Thomas Metcalfe, 
Esq., of Nappa, in Wensleydale, co. York; Chancellor of 
the Duchy of Lancaster, and conveyed the manor of 
Hanlington into that family). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. 



Harmar (David James Harmar, Esq., of Bath). Quar- 
terly or and sa. on a bend engr. gu. betw. two roses arg. 
barked and seeded ppr., three lozenges erminois. Crest— la 
front of a cubit arm vested sa. cuff or, in the hand two rose 
branches leaved and slipped vert, that on the dexter gu. and 
that on the sinister arg. both barbed and seeded ppr. a 
portcullis with chains or. 

Harris (Lunefleld, Kirkby Lonsdale, Camforth, co. Lancas- 
ter and Oxton Hall, Tadcaster, co. York, Alfred Habbip, 
Esq., son of Richard Harris, Esq., of Walworth). Az. on a 
chev. erm. betw. three hedgehogs or, as many wheat stalks 
bladed vert in precise middle chief a faggot of the third, 
banded of the fourth. Crest— In frontof a demi pelican displ. 
collared gemel az. and chargpd on the breast with three 
gouttes de sang, a faggot fessewuys ppr. banded vert. 

Harris (Westcotes, co. Leicester). Sa. three piles, two 
issuant from the chief and one from the base or, each 
charged with a bull's head cabossed of the field. Crest— Owl 
of the battlements of a tower or, a bull's head sa. on the 
neck a cinquefoil gold. Motto— In Deo solum robur. 

Harwood (Edward Harwood, Esq., of Woodhouse, co. 
Gloucester, J. P.). Per pale ar. and or, a stag's head 
cabossed betw. three sprigs ppr. Crest — On a mount betw. 
two trefoils slipped, a stags head cabossed, betw. the antlers 
an acorn leaved all ppr. 

Hastings (Abnet-Hastings, Baron Donington). Quarterly: 
1st and 4lh counterquartered ; 1st and 4th, arg. a maunch 
sa., for Hastings ; 2nd and 3rd, or, on a chief gu. a demi 
lion issuant arg., for Abnet; 2nd and 3rd, Clifton, of 
Clifton and Lytham. Cre^Ji— Hastings, a bull's head erased 
ermines attired and ducally gorged arg. ; Abnet, a demi 
lion or, the sinister paw resting on an antique shield charged 
with the arms of Hastings ; motto over, Trust winneth troth . 
Motto -\n veritate victoria. 

Haswell (John Haswell, of Grange Terrace, Bishopswear- 
niouth). Or, on a bend invected gu. betw. two fountains 
ppr., three goats passant of the first. Crest — In front of a 
Talbot's head erased gu., eared or, a fountain ppr. Motto — 
Mors vitae janua. 

Hatch (Gen. William Spabkes Hatch, H.M. Indian army, 
and late col. in the royal (late Bombay) artillery). Chequy 
or and vert a bend erm. on a chief embattled gu. two demi 
lions pass, of the i^rst. Crest — Issuant from flames a demi 
leopard holding in the dexter paw a grenade fired all ppr. 

Haveland (Cornwall, cliartcr of anno 1235). Ar. three 
chessrco'Ks sa. See also ABtLEiNE. 

Havelland (isle of Purbeck; James, son of Sir Thomas de, 
Havelland Manor, Guernsey, settled in co. Djrset in con- 
sequence of a charter of Edward IV., dated 10 March, 1469. 
He founded a chantry in St. James' Church, Poole, where, 
over the north aisle, is the inscription, " These six arches 
were made at the charge of James Havelland and Hellene 
his wife, on whose .'oulsGod have mercy. Amen, 1512." His 
grandson, John, son of William and Frances, m. Mart, 
dau. and co-heir of John Cabew, of Humworthy, M.P., 1511, 
for Poole. Arms from the brass of the founder of the 
Havelland aisle). Ar three castles sa. portcuUised gu. 
quartering Cabew. Crest— A demi lion ramp, and erased 
ar. 

Ha'wksley (Caldy Island, Tenby, co. Pembroke. Erra" 
a fesse nebuly az. betw. two lions ramp, in chief and 
a hawk in base ppr. CVest— Upon three mascles interlaced 
fessewise az. a hawk ppr. collared az. Motto — Garde 
Phonneur. 

Hayhurst. See France Hathcbst. 

Hayne (Kintbury, CO. Berks, and Aubome, co. Wilu. 
Daniel Hatne, of Kintbury Eaton, b. 1627, son of Thomas 
Hatne, of Auborne, d. 1650. Visit. Berks 1664). Ar. a 
chev. betw. three martlets sa. 

Hays, formerly Hayes (Durham city, seated there for two 
centuries, originally of Lancashire; represented by Rer. 
John Hats, M.A., Canon of Lincoln and Rector of Navenby). 
Erminois, three wolves' heads erased sa. quartering, 
Wetuerell, ar. two lions pass. sa. on a chief indented of the 
last three covered cups or, in right of his grandmother, 
Eleanor, dau. and co-heiress of Richard Wetherell, Esq., of 
Durham, elder brother of Dr. Nathan Wetherell, Dean of 
Hereford and Master of Univ. Coll. Oxford. Creit — A wolfs 
head erased sa. 

HayTVOOd (co. Stafford). Sa. on a bend cotised ar. betw. 
two hawks' heads erased or, three pellets. Crest — In front 



H AZ 



SUPPLEMENT. 



HIC 



of a stump of a tree, thereon a hawk rising ppr. charged on 
the breast with a pellet, three trefoils slipped vert. 

Hazlewood (Belton, co. Rutland). The arms should be 
described, arg. on a chee. iru. betw. three owls sa, as many 
lozenges of the first, each charged with an ermine spot, or. 
a chief az. three branches of hazel or. 

Head (Hartburn Hall, co. Pal. Durham). Ar. a chev. 
ermines betw. three unicorns' heads coiiped sa. Crtsl — 
A unicorn's head couped ermines. Mutto — Study quiet. 

Heap (John Heap, Esq., of Nabbs House, Bury, co. Lancas- 
ter). Gu. on a bend betw. two demi griffins or, a tleur- 
de-Us betw. two escallops sa. Crest — .A. demi stag reguardant 
ppr. gorged with a collar gemel sa. resting the sini-ter fore 
foot on an escocheon, gu. charged with a boar's head erased 
or. Motto-^HxhiX sine labore. 

Hearn (confirmed to Kev. Daniel James Heabn, Rector of 
Kilmuny, in the diocese of Cork, and to Charles Richard 
Mo.NT Obgoeuil Hearn, of 24, Idrone Terrace, Blackrock, 
Dublin, and of EnniskiUen, co. Fermanagh, sons of Robert 
Thomas Hearn, Esq., Major 76th Regt. and grandsons of 
Daniel- James Heab.v, Esq. of Correa, co. Westmeath, 
Lieut.-Col. 43rd Regt. who was grandson of Ven. Daniel 
Hearn, SI. A., Archdeacon of Cashel, 1726 to 1766, and to 
the other descendants of their said grandfather, Daniel 
James Hearn, of Correa). Per pale gu. and az. a cliev. 
betw. three herons ar. Crest— On a mount vert a lieron as in 
the arms. Motto — Ardua petit ardea. 

Heaviside (confirmed to John Bdrrowes Heaviside, Esq., 
of Terenure, co. Dublin, only son of John Heaviside, 
Esq., of 13, Holies Street, Merrion Square, Dublin, 
and grandson of John Heaviside, of Duidin, merchant, 
and to tlie other descendants of his said grandfather). 
Gu. on a pale or, three bulls' heads erased sa. in the dexter 
chief point a trefoil slipped of the second. Crest — A 
Saracen's head atfrontee couped at the shoulders ppr. and 
charged on the breast with a trefoil slipped or. Motto — 
Virtute et industria. 

Henderson (Cleland-Henderson, of Roke Manor, Hants, 
and Scotland;. (Quarterly, 1st and 4th, erm. three piles, two 
in chiet and one in base gu. each charged with a crescent 
ar. on a cbief of the second three esloiles of the third, for 
Henderjjon; 2nd and 3rd, az. a hare salient ar. with a 
hunting-horn vert, garnished and stringed gu. about his 
neck, in chief two crescents of the second, lor Cleland. 
Crests — Dexter, a cubit arm erect vested az. the hand ppr. 
grasping a chain therefrom suspended an escutcheon ar. 
charged with two estoiles in chief and a crescent in ba.se gu., 
for Henderson ; Sinister, a falcon or, upon a sinister glove 
ppr., for Cleland. Mottoes — Virtus solanobilitat; Non sibi. 

Henderson (Hon. Hugh A. D. H. Haldane-Dunoan- 
Mercer-Henderson, of Kordell, co. Fife). Quarterly, 1st, 
per pale dancett^e or and sa. on a chief ar. a crescent az. 
betw. two ermine spots, for Henderson; 2nd, or, on a fesse 
gu. betw. three crosses patl^e in chief of the second and a 
star of six points in base az. three bezants, all within a 
bordure of the third, for Mercek ; 3rd, the coat of Duncan, 
Earl of Carujierdowa, p. 306 ; 4th, the quartered coat of 
Haldane, of Gleneagtes, p. 440, with a crescent az. in the 
centre for dilT. Cre.xts — Isr, a cubit arm ppr. tile hand 
holding an ettoile or, and surmounted by a crescent az., for 
Henderson; 2nd, the head and neck of a heron erased, 
holding in its beak an eel seizing the neck of the former all 
ppr., for .Mercek; 3rd, on waves of the sea a dismasted 
ship ppr., for Ucncan; 4th, an eagle's head erjsed or, for 
Haldane. .V.i^^oei— .Sola virtus nobiliiat; The gi-it poul; 
Discc imti; SufTt;r. 

Henderson (Randull's Park, Surrey: John Henderson, 
Esq., of that place, Bon of the late Rohkrt Henderson, 
Esq., of Randall' Park). Or three piles issuing out of the 
siaistcr side gu. and a chief engr. enn. Crest— \ dexter 
hand ppr. holding a star, surmounted by a crescent, both 
ar. 3/oao— Sola virtus nobilitat. 

Henderson (Hcvcrawood. Kent: GEonr.i; Henderson, Esq., 
of llevrr.Hwuod, youngest son of the late (ieoriie Hender- 
son, K.sq., of BoncHS, Midluiliian). Ar.m, Aic, same as 
the preceding, with a crescent lor ditference. 

Henstock (.Jesse Hknstock, Esq., of Herbert Lodge, 
Bonsall, co. Derby). Sa. three chcvronels betw. two lions 
ramp, in chief and a watvr-bouget in base ar. Crest— In 
front of a demi lion ar. holding betw. the paws a watcr- 
bouget sa. a demi catheiine wheel, also sa. Motto — Nil 
sine magno labore. 

Hepburn (The Ilooke, co. Sussex). Qimrtcily, Isi and 4th, 



counter-quartered: let and 4th, gu. on a chev. ar. a rose 
betw. two lions combatant of the field, in base a buckle 
or, for Hepburn; 2nd and 3rd, counter-quartered, 1st and 
4th, ar. a bend gu. in chief a label of three points sa. ; 
2nd and 3rd, ar. a fesse sa. betw. two cotises componee az. 
and of the second, for Congleton. 2nd and 3rd, az. semee- 
de-lis or, a lion ramp, ar., for Poole. Crest — A horse ar. 
furnished gu. tied to a yew tree ppr. Motto — Keep tryste. 

Heron (Grampoole and Abingdon, co. Berks, and Elying, 
CO. Oxford, James Heron, of Grampoole, t. 1626, and John 
Heron, of Abingdon, sons of James Heron, of Elying. 
Visit. Berks, 1664). Sa. two chevronels or, betw. three 
herons ar. Crest — A heron's head erased ar. charged on the 
neck with two chevronels sa. 

Herschell (Sir Farrer Herschell, Knt., M.P. for the city 
of Durham, recorder of Carlisle, 1873 to 1880 ; solicitor- 
general, 1880>. Per fesse az. and sa. a fasces fessewise betw. 
three stags' heads coujjed or. Crest — Upon a mount vert a 
stag ppr. gorged with a collar gemel az. the dexter forefoot 
supporting a fasces in bend or. 

Hertley, or Hetley (Stirton, co. Notts; arms from a 
Roll of Knights of that co., temp. Edward HI. Visit. Notts, 
1569). Az. three bars ar. on a chief of the last as many 
escallops gu. 

Hertlingrton. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. ducally crowned or. 

Hertling'ton. Gu. a fess betw. three bucks' heads ar. 

Herto?. Ar. a trunk of a tree coupe i in bend, sprouting 
on each side two leaves ppr. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet 
or, two wings endorsed az. 

Herton. Ar. three bends engr. gu. a canton of the last. 

Heysham (East Greenwich, co. Kent. Granted 1723 to 
William Heysham, Esq., of East Greenwich, M.P. for Lan- 
caster, 2nd son of William Heysham, and grandson of 
Giles Heysham, of Lancaster, and to the other descendants 
of his said grandfather. Gu. an anchor in pale or, on a 
chief of the second three tortcaux. Crest— A mount ppr., 
thereon a buck in full course ar. guttee de sang, attired and 
unguled or, and wounded through the neck with an arrow 
gu. feathered and headed gold. 

Hey wood, Borough of (co. Lancaster). Or, five pellets 
tietw. two bendlets engr. the whole betw. as many mascles 
sa. Crest — In front ot a trunk of a tree eradicated fessewise 
and sprouting to the dexter a falcon rising ppr. each wing 
charged with a pellet and holding in the beak a sprig of 
oak also ppr. three mascles interlaced or. 

Hibbert (Holland-Hibbert, Munden, Watford, co. Hert- 
ford; Arthur Henry Holland, Esq., 2nd son of Sir 
Henry Thurston Holland, Bart., C.M.G., of Sandle- 
bridge, by Elizabeth Margaret, his wife, dau. of Natha- 
niel Hibbert, Esq., of Muiiden, deceased, assumed the 
additional surname and arms of Hibbert, by royal licence 
dated 17 May, 1876, in compliance with a proviso in the 
will of his matermil grandiiiollier, Mrs. Emily Hibbert, 
Widow, ot Munden, and of Green Street, Giosvenor Square, 
London). Quarterly, 1st and 4tli, erm. on a bend nebulee 
sa. three crescents ar. in the centra chief point a cross 
botton^e fitcli^e of the second, for Hibbert ; 2nd and 3rd, 
per pale ar. and az. semee-de-lis a lion rniiip. counter- 
changed, for Holland. Mr. Holland-Hibbert is entitled 
10 quarter the following Arms :— Ar. a bend engr. sa. cotised 
gu., tor Tetlow ; vert, on a bend betw. two garbs or, a swan 
sa. betw. as many hurts, for Scholey; ar. achev. gu. betw. 
the points of spears az. tasselled in the middle or, for Arm- 
stead; az. a chev. betw. three pheons or, on a chief gu. as 
many maidens' heads, couped ppr. crined of the second, for 
Swaine; ar. a chev. gu. betw. three bucks trippant sa., for 
Rogers ; ar. a chev. gu. betw. three bucks' heads caboshed 
sa., for Parker; gu. three chevronels ar. on a chief az. a 
sun in splendour, for Fonnereau. Crests — 1st, Hibbert : 
An arm erect couped below the elbow az. cuffed erm. hand 
ppr. grasping a crescent ar. ; 2nd, Holland: Out ot a ducal 
coronet or a demi lion guard, ar. holding in the dexter paw 
a fleur-de-lis az. Motto— Animmn ipse parabo. 

Hickman (exemplified to Francis William fioRE, Esq., of 
Kilmore House, Clare, elilest son and heir of Francis Gore, 
Ks(j., of Tyrcilagh, J.l'., deceased, and grandson of Francis 
(ioRE, K.sq., al.so of Tyrediigh, by Makv, his wife, dau. of 
Kdmund Browne, Esq., of Newgrove, co. Clare, and niece 
of Poole Hickman, ICsq., of Kilmore, on his assuming by 
riiyal licence, 19 Nov., 1878, the surname and Arms of 
Hickman, in lieu of those of Gore, pursuant to the will ot 
the said Poole Hickman). I'cr pale indented ar. and az. 



J 



Hia 



SUPPLEMENT. 



HOW 



in the dexter chief a trefoil slipped vert. Cral—K talbot 
sejant ar. collared and chained gu. charged on the shoulder 
with a trefoil slipped vert. Jfoito— Per tot discrimina rerum. 

Hig'^ins (Henry Hiogins, Esq., J. P.. of Moreton JefTrys, 
CO. Hereford). Per fesse, vert and ar. a pale counterchanged 
three cranes* heads erased, two anj one, of the second, and 
us many lobster's claws erased, one and two, sa. Crest — .\ 
griffin's head erased or, gorged with a collar sa. charged 
with a lorenge ar. belw. two plates, in the beak a lobster's 
claw erased gu. 

Hill, of Dilton, is erroneously printed Ditton, at p. 491. 

Hill (confirmed to John Hill, Esq., Capt. RE., eldest 
son of John Hill, M.D. of Dublin, Inspector of Poor 
Laws in Ireland, and grandson of Fbedebick Ferdinand 
Hill, Esq., of Jamaica, and to the descendants of his said 
giandfather). Gu. on a chev. erminois betw. three leopards' 
faces or, a trefoil slipped vert. Crest — A talbot's head erased 
gu. collared or, and charged with a trefoil as in the arms. 
Motto — Spero meliora. 

Hill (Joseph Hill., Esq., Bradford, in the West Riding of 
the CO. York). Per pale indented gu. and sa. on a fesse 
erminois betw. three leopards' faces or, as many Catherine 
wheels of the second. Crest — In front of a talbot's head 
couped sa. a demi Catherine wheel or, betw. two wings per 
fesse indented or and gu. Motto — Honore et labore. 

Hill (Langford House, Langford, Somerset ; Sidnet Hill, 
Esq.). Az. a chev. nebuly ar. charged with three pallets 
gu. betw. two fieurs-de-lis in chief, and a talbot's head 
erased in base of the second. Crest — A talbot's head couped 
ar. charged with a chev. nebuly, and holding in the mouth 
a fleur-de-lis az. Motto— Omne bonuai Dei donum. 

Hill (Rev. Thomas Pbince Hill, M.A , Rector of Abinger, 
Dorking, co. Surrey). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar.achev, betw. 
three stags courant gu. on a chief of the last as many trefoils 
of the first, for Hill; 2nd and 3rd, ga. a saltire or, sur- 
mounted by a cross engr. erni., for Prince. Crests — 1st, 
Hill: A dragon's head erased ppr. ; 2nd, Prince: Out of a 
ducal coronet or, a cubit arm habited gu. cuffed erm. holding 
in the hand ppr. a branch with -three pineapples gold, 
stalked and leaved vert. Motto — Nil desperandum. 

Hill-Trevor (Baron Trevor). See Trevor. 

Hilliard (Caherslee, co. Keriy), p. 491 . The Crest borne by 
this family is — .\ cock statant sa. combed, wattled, legged, 
and spurred gu. Motto— llXtov 'tifxiav iraPTO^. 

Hillier (Lieut. -Col. George Edwaeo Hilher, C.B., late In- 
spector-General of the Irish Constabulary). Gu. a cross 
indented betw. in chief two leopards' faces or, and in base as 
many swords erect ppr. pommelled and hilted gold, all within 
a bordure of the second. Crest — Infrontof two Panisli battle 
axes in saltire a leopard's face, holding in the mouth a 
scimitar fesswise, all ppr. Motto — Crux niea lux mea. 

Hoare (Hamilton-Hoare. Exemplified to Hamilton Noel 
Hamilton-Hoare, Esq., eldest son of Rev. Willia.m Henrt 
Hoare, M.A., of Oaktield, co Sussex, by Afaminta Anne, his 
wife, 3rd dau. and co-heir of Sir James John Hamilton, 2nd 
bart., ol Woodbrook, upon his assuming, by royal licence, 
the prefix surname of Hamilton). Quarterly, 1st and 4th 
Hoare, sa. an eagle displ. with two heads ar. charged on the 
breast with an ermine spot of the first, all within a border 
engr. of the second ; 2nd and 3rd, Hamilton, quarterly, 1st 
anil 4th, gu. three cinquefoils erm., 2nd and 3rd, ar. a 
lymphad, sails furled sa. in the fesse point a crescent of the 
last, together with the Honourable Augmentation granted 
to Sir John Hamilton (maternal grandfather of the said 
Hamilton Noel Ha.milton-Hoare), a chief ar. thereon upon 
a mount vert inscribed Alba de Tormes, in letters gold, a 
castle,with the wall on either sii'< Liioken, and from the battle- 
ments the flag of Spain flying ppr. Crests, 1st of Hoare, an 
eagle's bead erased ar. charged with an ermine spot, as in 
the arms ; 2nd of Honourable Augmentation, a mount vert, 
thereon a castle, as in the arms and in an escroU above, 
the motto A'ba de Tormes ; 3rd, Hamilton, out of a dUcal 
coronet or. an oak tree ppr. charged with a crescent sa. a 
frame-saw through the stem fessewise also ppr. 

Hodgres (Luftonand Chinnock, co. Somci-set; John Hodges, 
of Lufton, 6. 15»3, son of John Hodges, of same place, 
grandson of William Hodges, and great-grandson of William 
Hodges, of Chinnock. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Or, three 
crescents sa. on a canton of the second a ducal coronet of 
the field. 

Hog-gre (granted to Edith Eliia, wife of Lionel Neville 
Frederick Ames-Ltde, Esq., and only dau. and heir of Major 



HoGOE, of Thornham, co. Norfolk) Az. on a pale ar betv. 
four crescents of the last three boars' heads erased of the first. 

Holbech, or Holbeach (Felton, alias Whitechurch, 
CO. Somerset; Nathaniel Holbeach, of Felton, temp. 
James I., son of John Holbeach, of same place, descended 
from David Holbach or Holbech, living 22 Richard II., 
whose will is dated Wednesday next after the Feast of the 
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 1421. Visit. Somerset, 
1623). Ar. a chev. engr. sa., quartering, 1st, Lyons, ar. 
two lions ramp, combatant sa. ; 2nd, Tristram, ar. three 
torteaux, a label of three points az. : Srd, Bole, ar. three 
bulls' heads couped sa. ; 4th, Lisle, or, on a chief az. 
three lions ramp, of the first; 5th, Compton, ar. on a bend 
sa. three helmets or. Crest — A lion pass. sa. 

Holte (Obford-Holte; exemplified 1825, to Richard Orfobd, 
only son of John Obford, Esq., Manchester, by Elizabeth, 
his wife, only surviving dau. of Robert Holte. Esq., of 
Chamberhouse, co. Lancaster, upon his assuming by royal 
licence the additional surname of Holte). Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, Erm. two bars engr. az. over all a pile gu. thereon 
two crosses patee in chief and a pheon in base or, for Holte ; 
2nd and 3rd : Or, two chevronels sa. betw. three fleurs de-lis 
az. over all a fess vert thereon a greyhound courant ar., for 
Obfobd. Crests — Ist, Holte: Upon a mount vert a squin ell 
sejant ppr. charged on the shoulder with a cross pat^e or, 
supporting with the forepaws a pheon mounted on a staff 
and flighted head downwards gold; 2nd,0RFORD: Out of 
rushes ppr. a demi greyhound ar. charged on the neck with 
two chevronels sa. and holding betw. the paws a fleur-de-lis 
az. 

Hoole (Edgefield and Crooksmoor House, Sheffield, co. 
York). Barry of six or and gu in bend as many roses 
counterchanged. Crest — An eagle displayed gu. each wing 
charged with two roses, and transfixed through the mouth 
with a tilting spear palewise or. Motto — Flectiisnon franges. 

Hoole (Hesbt Elliott Hoole, Esq., of Ravenfield Park, 
llotherham, formerly of Crookes Moor House, Sheffield, both 
in CO. York ). Per fesse or and gu. on a pale two roses, all 
counterchanged. Crest — An eagle displ. per fesse or and 
gu. each wing charged with a rose per fesse counterchanged, 
surmounted by a rainbow ppr. Motto — Spes mea Deus. 

Hoole (William Wright Hoole, Esq., C:ipt. 3rd Batt. 
Princess of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regt., son of Henbt 
Elliott Hoole, Esq., of Ravenfield Park). Per fesse or 
and gu. on a pale two roses, all counterchanged, on an 
escutcheon of pretence for Williams, in right of his wife, 
Mary Caroline Eleanor, dau. and heiress of Kev. George 
Williams, of .Mu' moor, co. Gloucester, by Mary, his wife, 
dau. and co-heir of John Lowsley, Esq. ; or, on a fesse engr. 
betw. three bulls' heads cabossed sa. two bezants. Crest — 
All eagle displ. per fesse or and gu. each wing charged 
with a rose. counterchanged, surmounted by a rainbow ppr. 
Motto — Spes mea Deus. 

Horsford (Gen. Sir Alfred Hastings Hobsford, G.C.B.). 

Az. on a chev. erm. betw. three swords erect points upwards 
ppr. pommels and hilts or, as many lions' heads erased gu. 
Crest — Issuant out of a mural crown gu. a demi pegasus, 
wings addorsed, erm. gorged with a collar gemel also gu. 
and holding betw. the paws a tilting spear erect and resting 
on the wreath ppr. Sui>porters~-On either side a pegasus 
erm. gorged with a mural collar and charged on the 
shoulder with a lion's head erased gu. Motto — Juslitia et 
dementia. 

Hovell-Thurlo-w-Cumming'-Bruce {Saron Thmiow). 
See Bbcce. 

Howard ^descended from John Howard, Esq., of Kingsdon, 
CO. Somerset, 1623, a branch of the noble family of Howard, 
represented by the Rev. Tho.mas Henry Howard, M.A., 
Vicar of Warmley, co. Somerset,). Gu. a bend betw. six 
crosses crosslet, fitchee ar. Cre.<t — On a chapeau gu. turned 
up erm. a lion statant guard, tail extended or, ducally 
gorged ar. Motto — Sola virtus invicta. 

Ho'Ward (Brinnington, co. Chester ; Edward Carringto.n 
Howard, Esq., of that place, J. P., where his ancestors 
have been settled for more than a century). Barry of six 
or and az. on a bend erm. betw. two crosses botony gu. a 
shuttle ppr. Crest — In front of a cross botony fitchee gu. 
a lion couchant or, charged on the shoulder with an estoile 
also gu. Motto — Per fidem omnia. 

Ho'ward (William Howabd, Esq., of St. Mary, Colchester, 
co Essex). Per pale gu. and az. on abend nebuly or, betw. 
four cross crosslets fitchee of the last a crescent betw. two 
lions' heads erased of the second. Cie^t — A UoB paM. u. 



HOW 



SUPPLEMENT. 



J AC 



cH&rged on the body with two trefoils, bolding in the dexter 
paw a cross crosslet fltchee all or. Motto — Nous maintien- 
drons. 

Soward (James Howard, Esq., of Clapham Park, co. Bed- 
ford, High Sheriff of that county, and it.s M.P.). Gu. on a 
chev. betw. two garbs in chief and a tower in base or, nn 
eaffle displ. sa. Crent — In front of an eagle displ. sa. 
holding in the beak an ear of wheat slipped or, a tower of 
the last. jVotro— Progress with prudence. 

Hovrard-Bury. See Bcrt. 

Sowell (Wostbury-in-Marsli, Gibbon, co. Buckingham ; 
Edward Howell sold this manor in I&39, and emigrated to 
NorthAmerica. His eldest son, Major John Howell, d. 3 Nov. 
1696, asred 71. Tlie descendants of the fir.st settler are still 
living in America, one of whom is George Rogers Howell, 
Esq., of the New York State Library. Anns on the seal of 
Edward Howell, and on the tombstone of his son. Major 
John Howell, 169G). Gu. three towers triple-towered ar. 

Sowle.tt (Major -Gen. Arthtjr Howlett, C.B., Madras 
Army). Sa. on a chev. embattled counter embattled erm. 
te.tw. three owls' heads erased ar. an eastern crown gu. 
befw. two swords chevronwise ppr. Crest — A. cross crosslet 
«a. betw. two branches of laurel ppr. Motlo — Fide et 
vigilantia. 

H'O'wley (Right Rev. William Howlet, D.D., BUknp of 
Lviidoiu, 1813). Az. an eagle di.spl. erm. charged on the 
breast with a cross fleury gu. Crest — An eagle displ. as in 
the arms. 

Suddersfield, Borougrli of (co. York), Or, on a chev. 
I>etw. three rams pass. sa. ai many toweis ar. Crest — .\ 
ram's head couped ar. armed or, gorged with a collar sa. in 
the mouth a sprig of the cotton tree slipped and fructed 
ppr. Motto — Juvat impigros Deus. 

Sug'essen (Knatchbull Htjgessen, Jlamn Brabrurne). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a mount vert two boars 
erect respecting each other, sa. their forelegs resting 
against an oak tree ppr., for Hcgessen ; '2nd and .3rd, az. 
three cross crosslets fitchee betw, two bendlets or, for 
Knatchcdll. Crests — Ist, Hcgsssen: An oak tree ppr. 
betw. two wings elevated pinions az. feathered or. vlnd, 
Knatchbdll: On a chapeau az. turned up enn. an ounce 
etatant ar. spotted sa. Supporters — On either side a leopard 
ar. pelletty gorged with a wreath of o;ik vert fructed gold 
holding in the mouth a cross crosslet titchee or. Motto — 
Crucifixa gloria mea. 

Hu^grard (Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, 1597-16.32). Az. 
an e.'^ioiie of sixteen points ar. Crest — An estoile as in the 
nims. Motto—In Heaven is my hope. 

Sug'hes (Wells, co. Somerset; Sir Thomas Hdohes, Knt., 
of Weils, knighted at Whitehall, 1C19, son of Thomas 
IIi'GiiES, or AP HtJGH, and grand.son of Hugh ap .Iohn ap 
Jenkin, desci^nded from GwAixnuoyD, Trinee of Cardigan. 
"Visit. Somerset, 16i:i). (Quarterly, 1st, az. a lion ramp, or, 
for MoRiEN, son of MonaKNAx: 2nd, or. a lion ramp. ,«a.; 
3id, az. three fleurs-d<^li.'^ or, for Vne.s, King of Gwont; 4th, 
az. a fesse or, betw. three horses' heiiits ar., for Rice ap 
Marcham ; bih, nz. a lion statant reguard.or, for Llewellyn ; 
6th, sa. a chev. crminois betw. three goats' heads erased or, 

for lORWORTH. 

Humble (Georgk FUimble, of London, Deputy to the Alder- 
man of the Ward of Langhorne, 163.3, grandson of William 
HiiMULE, of London, and of the Fraternity of the Holy 
Ghost, descended from Hdmble, of Jliaableton, co. York. 
Visit. London, 1633). Sa. a buck trippant or, a chief in- 
drmed of the last. CreM—K demi buck ramp, or, gorged 
with a wreath of laurel ppr. 

Hume (John Home Hume. Esq., formerly Kennedy, of East 
Melbourne, Victoria). Vert a lion ramp, and in chief two 
cinquefoilH ar. two flaunches of the last, each charged with 
a parrot of the first, beaked and legued gu. Crest— \n front 
of a cross eiigr. az. a lion's head erused ar. charged with two 
cinquefoiU in pale gu. ;l/ot(o— True to the end. 

Hurly (Tralee and GlendufTe, co. Kerry). Az. on a fease 
betw. three croancs crosslet or, ns many mullets gu. Creits— 
1st, A naked dexlcr arm einbowed holding a sword wavy all 
ppr. motto over, Oextri\ vincitcor; 2nil, Out of iin antique 
Irish crown or, a naked dextnr arm cmlioweil pi>r. holding 
across crosslet gdld, molU) over, Dcxtra cruce vinvit. 

Hurry (Yannouth). Ar. three lions' head? erased gu. 



Hyde (Holly Wood. co. Kerry ; Arthur Hyde, Esq., descended 
from Hyde, of Castle Hyde, co. Cork). Same as Castle 
Hyde, viz., Gu. two chevronels ar. the upper one charged 
with an erm. spot sa. Crest — A leopards head erased sa. 
bezantfe. Motto — De vivis nil nisi verum. 



ILINOE (granted by Molyneux, Ulster, 1 June, 1604. to 
William Ilinge, Captain and Commander of the Long Boats 
in the river of Loughfoile, co. Londonderry). Chequy or 
and gu. on a chief az. three lions' heads couped of the first, 
langued of the second. Crest — A tiger's head couped gu. 
nianed anj ducally gorged or, langued az. 

Ingfleby (Valentines, Essex ; Clement Mansfield Inolebt, 
Esq., M..V., LL.D.). Sa. an estoile of six points ar. and on 
an escutcheon of pretence for Mrs. Ingleby, Sarah, only 
dau. of Robert Cakes, Esq., Gravesend). Ar. a pale per 
pale or and gu. betw. two limbs of an oak slipped issuant 
from the base ppr. on a chief barry of six of the second 
and third, a rose betw. two leopards' faces nil ppr. Crest — 
A boar's head couped erect ppr. tusked or. Motto — Non 
immemor beneficii. 

Inman (Upton Manor, co. Chester; descended from Michael 
Inman, Esq., of Bewerley, parish of Ripon, co. Y'ork, bapt. 
5 Oct. 1639). Vaire ar. and vert on a chev. cotised or, three 
roses gu. barbed seeded and slipped ppr. Crest — A wyvern 
vert winged fretty or, gorged with a plain collar with line 
reflexed over the body gold, holding in the mouth a rose 
slipped as in the arms. Motto — In Domino o.onfido. 

Insole (James Harvey Insole, Esq., of Ely Court, co. 
Glamorgan). Az. a gryphon pass, in chief three leopards' 
faces jefisant de lis or. Crest — A gryphon pass, or, charged 
on the body with two pheons and resting the dexter claw on 
a leopard's lace jessant de lis az. 

Irland, or Irrland (Thomas Irland, of Albrighton, co. 
Salop, High Sheriflf of that co. 1032; ninth in descent f.-om 
Robert Irrland, of Oswaldstrye, 1362). Gu. six fleurs-de- 
lis ar. three, two, one. Ci-est — A dove ar. in the beak a sprig 
of laurel vert. Confirmed to the above Thomas Irland, 
V^isit. Salop, 1623. The spelling of the name has varied. 
In the Visit. 1584, in four pedigrees it is spelt Irrland. In 
the will of Sir Thomas Salter, 1517, and at the marriage of 
George Salter, 1580, it is spelt Irland. The e is a modern 
introduction. 

Irvine (Robert Irvine, Esq., of Orchard House, co. Durham). 
Or, on a chev. az. betw. three sheaves of holly each con- 
sisting of three leaves slipped vert banded gu. an anchor 
erect with cable of the first betw. two dolphins embowed 
ppr. Crest — In front of two anchors saltirewise with cables 
or, a dolphin embowed ppr. 

Isaack (Burriat, co. Devon). The Arms in the body of the 
work are correct, except that the cross is patonce, and 
not flory, as there stated. Visit. Devon, 1620. 

Ismay (Thos. Henry Ismay, Esq., of Liverpool). Or, on a 
bend wavy az. betw. two anchors erect of the last a mullet 
betw. two crescents ar. Crest — Upon waves of the sea a 
seahorse reg. betw. two coral branches all ppr. Motto — 
Naturae lex processus. 



JACKSON (Combhay, co. Somerset, descended from co. 

York; William Jackson, of Combhay, <<i)i;). James I., son 
of Miles Jackson, of same place, who removed from the 
CO. York. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. on a chev. betw. 
three bucks' beads erased sa. as many cinquefoils of the 
field. 

Jackson (Yorkshire and Curtdesdon, co. Oxon ; borne by 
(iiLBLRT Jackson, who entered his descent at the Oxford 
Vi.sit. of 1669. Ills grandson, Uev. Gilbert Jackson, D.D., 
of Cuddesdon, is now represented by his great-grandson, 
Lieut. -Col. W. H. M. Jackson, Hist foot). Gu. a fesse 
betw. three sheldrakes ar. Crest — A sheldrake ppr. 

Jackson (Upwell, Norfolk and SU Andrew's, co. Fife, as re- 
registered to Randlk Jaokson, Esq., of Upwell, Norfolk). Ar. 
a p;ile engrailed az. Rurniouuted by a cliev. invectcd thereon 
three cinquefoils t)etw. as many eagles' heads eradicated all 
countercliHnged. Crest — Upon the trunk of a tree eradi- 
cated and sprouting to the dexter, a horse currant ar. gutltf 
de poix cJiargerl on the body, witli a pale gu. thereon a 
cinqucfoil also ar. 



JAC 



SUPPLEMENT. 



JON 



Jackson ( Wm. Lawies Jackson, Esq., of Allerton Hall, Leeds, 
Yorkshire). Per chev. gu. and or, in chief two suns in 
splendour of the last and in base three annulets one and 
two of the first. Crc$t — A horse or, holding in the mouth 
an ear of wheat slipped vert, resting the dexter foreleg on 
three annulets as in the arms. Motto — Essayez. 

Jacoby (The Park, Nottincham). Per fesse dancette ar. 
and sa. in chief a cross of eight points gu. betw. two roses 
of the last barbed and seeded ppr. and in base two wings 
conjoined in lure and elevated or. Cre4—X stag ar. 
charged on the body with two roses gu. barbed and seeded 
ppr. resting the dexter forefoot on a cross as in the arms. 
Motto — Opera bona effulgent. 

James (confirmed to Rev. Nicholas James, M.A., diocesan 
curate, Armagh, son of John James, formerly of Coolruss 
Park, near Shillelagh, co. Wicklow, then resident at Ballin- 
glen, same co., and grandson of Matthew James, Esq., of 
Coolruss Park, and the descendants of his said grand- 
father). Per pale gu. and az. on a chev. engr. betw. three 
lions' pass, guard, or, as many purses sa. Crest — A hart's 
head erased ppr. charged on the neck with a fleur-de-lis az. 
Motto — J'aime Si jamais. 

James (of Vanbrugh Fields, Blackhaath, co. Kent, and the 
other descendants of Eev. John James, D.D., Prebendary of 
Peterborough). Per pale gu. and or, on a fesse indented 
betw. three unicorns' heads erased as many escallops all 
counterchanged. Crest — An unicorn's head or, encircled 
by a chaplet of roses ppr. 

James (of Beaconsfield, Much Woolton, co. Lancaster). Or, 
on a chev. betw. two ostriches in chief and a dolphin naiant 
in base sa. a billet of the first. Cre/it — Upon the battlements 
of a tower or, an ostrich sa. holding in the beak a billet 
also or. 

Jam.es (Col. Cbables James). Or, a tiger passant ppr. on 
a chief engr. gu. two spears in saltire also ppr. Crest — In 
front of two spears in saltire and amid flags a tiger couchant 
all ppr. Motto— (i\x<B fecimus ipsi. 

Jeffcock (Edward Jeffcock, of 'Wolverhampton, Capt. 1st 
Royal Cheshire Militia, 4th and youngest son of John Jeff- 
cock, late of Handsworth, co. York, Capt. Sheffield Squadron 
of S. W. York Yeomanrj Cavalry, deceased, and his de- 
scendants and the other descendants of his father). Sa. 
three pickaxes or, on a chief ar. a cross patee gu. betw. two 
ravens of the first. Crest — In front of a mount of coal 
therefrom issuant a dexter arm embowed grasping a coal 
pick all ppr. a cross patee ar. Motto Persevere. 

Jenkins (Maj.-Gen. Chables VANBancH Jones, of Cruckton 
Hall and Charlton Hill, co. Salop). Barry of six az. and 
erm. three annulets two in fess. and one in base or, a pile of 
the last thereon a lion ramp. reg. sa. Crest — Upon a mural 
crown sa. a lion pass. reg. or, supporting with the dexter 
paw an escutcheon barry of six az. and erm. charged with 
an annulet or. Motto — Perge sed caute. 

Jepson. Enn. three bugle horns stringed gu. Crest — A 
wyvern vert. Motto — Vincit Veritas. 

Jerard (Samford Orcas and Chilton, co. Somerset ; Bobekt 
Jebabo, Esq., of Samford, tanp. James I., son of Robebt 
Jebabd, of the same place, and grandson of Thomas Jebard, 
of Chilton, descended from Richard Jebabd, living 44 
Edward III., a.d. 1369. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. a chev. 
gu. betw. three erm. spots sa. 

Jessel (Bart.). Az. a fesse raguly erm. betw. three eagles' 
heads erased ar. in the centre chief point a torch erect and 
fired ppr. Crest — A torch fessewise fired ppr. surmounted 
by an eagle volant arg. holding in the beak a pearl also ar. 

Jodrell (exemplified to Amelia Vibtde Jodkell, widow of 
Chables FitzGebald Higoins, Esq., of Westport, and dau. 
of Sir RicBABD Paul Jodbell, 2nd bart., of Sail Park, 
upon her assuming by royal licence the surname of Jod- 
kell in lieu of Higgins). .firms— Ermines, a trefoil or, betw. 
three round buckles, tongues downwards, ar. 

Jodrell (exemplified to Hebbebt Henbt Chubchill, on his 
assuming, by royal licence, 31 .March, 1883, the surname and 
arms of Jodrell in lieu of Churchill, in right of his wife 
Kmilt Virtue Jane, only cliilil of Cuas. F. Higgins, Esij., 
by Amelia Virtue, his wife, only sisterand eventual heiress 
of Sir Edwd. Repfs Jodrell, 3rd ban.). Ermines, a trefoil 
or betw, three round buckles the tongues pendent ar., for 
distinction a canton of the last. Crest — A cock's head 
and neck coupcd the wings erect or, combed and jelloped gu. 



issuant out of a chaplet of roses gu. barbed and seeded 
ppr. and for distinction on the neck a cross crosslet sa. 

Johnson (Castlesteads, Brampton, co. Cumberland; William 
PoNSONBT Johnson, Esq., of Walton House, same co., m. 
1815, Mart, dau. of Sir George Armttage, 3rd bart., of 
Kirklees, and d. 1865, leaving a son, George John Johnson, 
Esq., of Castlesteads, b. 1816, D.L., High Sheriff 1876. 
Ar. on a saltire sa. five bezants. Crest— V/ilhin a winged 
spur erect, a mullet of six points, all or. Motto — Non- 
quam non paratus. 

Jolinson (John William Denne Johnson Hilton, Esq., 
of Temple Belwood, co. Lincoln, and Sarre Court, Kent, 
who by royal licence, 1871, changed his surname from Hilton 
to Johnson). Quarterly, 1st and 4lh, ar, a lion pasB.gu. on 
a chief vert three acorns, leaved and slipped or; 2nd and 
3rd, erm. two bars az, in chief, an annulet betw. two saF- 
tires of the last. Crests— 1st. UpoT» s mount vert a wolf pass, 
sa. in the mouth a branch of woodbine ppr.; Snd, a man's 
head affront^e betw, two bullrushes ppr, 

Johnson (Kennal Manor, Chislehurst, co. Kent), Or, three 
pheons in fesse az. within two flaunchcs of the last each 
charged with a pheon of the first. Crest — In front of a 
dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. the hand grasping a 
javelin in bend sinister p'aeoned or, and enfiled with a 
chaplet of rosea gu. two branches of oak in saltire vert, 

Johnson (Statharo and Tunstead, co. Norfolk). Gu. on a 
saltire erm. five crosies moline sa. a chief of the second 
charged with three mullets of the third. Crest — A lion 
ramp, erminois, holding in the dexter paw a mullet as in ihe 
arms, the dexter foot resting on a cross moline gu. 

Johnson (Francis Johnson, Esq., of Low Newton, co. 
Northumberland). Per chev. gu. and sa. on a ..h-jv. engr. 
arg. betw. three men's heads affront^ ppr. as many pheons 
sa. Crest— In front of a man's head affronle couped at the 
shoulders ppr. wreathed about the temples arg. and gu. two 
pheons or. Motto — Nil admirari. 

Johnston (Christian Frederick Charles Alexander James 
Johnston, of Hiltoun, co. Berwick; quartered by Halsbt). 
Ar. a saltire engr. sa. onchief as the other gu. three cushions 
or. Crest — A svrord and dagger ppr. hilted or, crossing 
each other saltirewise with the points upwards. Motto — 
Paratus ad arma. 

Johnstone (Vanden-Bempde-Johnstone, Baron De)iceiit). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Johnstone, ac a saltier, »a. 
in base, a human heart, ensigned with a regal crown, 
ppr., on a chief gu. three cushions or; 2nd and 3rd, 
Vanden-Bempde, per fesse, the chief or, the base per pale 
gu. and vert, a demi eagle with two heads displ. issuing 
in chief sa. the dexter base charged with a tower, the 
sinister with live towers in saltier gold the gate and port- 
cullis of each ppr. Crests — 1st, A spur erect rowel upwanl.s 
with wings elevated or, leather gu. buckle ppr.; 2nd, 
issuing from the battlements of a tower ppr. a demi eagle 
with two heads displ. sa. wings or, about the neck a pearl 
collar, therefrom a diamond pendent on the breast a swi>ra 
fesseways ppr. pommel and hilt gold. Stipporters — Deitter 
a lion erm. crowned or, charged on the breast with an 
escutcheon also or, thereon a winged spur gu. ; sinister a 
horse erm. bridled and saddled gu. charged on the shoulder 
as the dexter. Motto — Nunquam non paratus. 

Jones (Brinsey and Wraxhall, co. Somerset; Chbistopheb 
Jones, of Brinsey, temp. James I., son of William Jones, 
of Wraxhall. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Or, on a mount in 
base vert a lion ramp. az. 

Jones (Gungrog, co. Montgomery ; exemplified to Morris 
Charles Jones, Esq., of Gungrog, F.S.A., F.S.A. Scot,, 
J,P, CO. Montgomery, only son of Morris Jones, Esq., of 
Gungrog). Sa. a fasces fessewise or betw. three nags' 
heads erased arg. Crest — A fasces fessewise or, surmounted 
by a nag's head erased arg. Motto— Justus ac tenax 
propositi. 

Jones (Hartsheath and Cefn Coch, co. Flint, and Gelli Gynan, 
CO. Denbigh ; John Carstaibs Jones, Esq., of those places, 
served as High Sheriff for CO. Flint, 1866, and for co. Denbigl*, 
1874). Gu. on a chev. or, betw. three eseocheons ar. each 
charged with a boar's hcadcuuped of the first, an arrow pale- 
wise ppr. Crest — Upon a mount vert a boar's head couped 
gu. in front of an arrow palcways ppr. Motto^-Heb nevol 
nerth nidd sicr saeth : without help from above the arrow 
flies in vain. 



JON 



SUPPLEMENT. 



LAM 



Jones fHENBT Cadman Jon-es, Esq., of Kepton, Derbyshire). 
Arg. a cross indented gu. betw. four speara' heads az. eacti 
betw. two laurel branches ppr. Crest— In front of a spear 
betw. two laurel branches ppr. a cross patee gu. Motto — 
Esto fidelis usque ad mortem. 

Joynt (Francis George Jotnt, M.D., Surgeon-General H.M. 
Indian .Medical Service, son of Anthony Joynt, of Ballina, 
CO. Mayo, by Diana, his wife, dau. of Georob Atkinson 
and Dinah Cobmac, his wife, and grandson of Frank Joynt, 
of Ballinglen, co. Mayo). Ar. on a fesse dancettee az. 
betw. three eagles displ. gu. each charged on the breast 
with an escallop of tlie first, an Eastern crown betw. two 
fleurs-de-lis or. Crest— A. cubit arm ppr. charged with an 
escallop ar. and grasping in the hand a battle axe also ppr. 
Motto — Nee temere nee lente. 

Jump (Henry Jcmp, Esq., Woodlands, co. Lancaster). Az. a 
cross parted and fretty or, in the first and fourth quarters a 
Btag's head erased, and in the second and third a rose ar. 
Cre-tt—A demi stag reguardant ppr. charged on the shoulder 
with three roses chevronwise ar. supporting a passion cross or. 



KARB (Seton-Karb, Kippilaw, co. Roxburgh. Licut.-Col. 
Andrew Ker, grandson of Andrew Kbr, of Zair, same co., 
purchased the estate of Kippilaw, 1657. His grandson, John 
Kabs, changed the spelling of his name and entailed the 
estate on his sister, Kathebine Karr, who m. Gilbebt 
Ramsay. Her dau. and eventual heir m. Daniel Seton, of 
Powder Hall, and had a son, John Seton Karb, who s. to 
the estates, and was s. by his nephew, Andrew Seton Karr, 
Esq., of Kippilaw, grandfather of Henry Seton Kabb, Esq., 
of Kippilaw, and II, Queen's Gardens, Hyde Park, London, 
b. 1853). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. on a chev. ar. three 
mullets of the field, in base a stag's head erased of the 
second, for Karb ; 2nd and 3rd, or an eagle displ. sa., 
charged on breast with an antique crown ppr. betw. three 
crescents az., all within a double tressure flory counter- 
flory gu., for Seton. Ci-est — 1st, Karr : Out of an antique 
crown a dexter hand erect holding a dagger all ppr. Motto 
(over) — Avant sanspeur; 2nd. Seton: On a ducal coronet 
or, a wyvern ppr. Motto (over) — Hazard et forward. 

Keigrhley, Borough of (West Riding co. York). Ar. 
on a fesse sa. betw. three stags' heads caboshed a foun- 
tain all ppr. within a bordure embattled az. Crest— In front 
of a dragon's head erased gu. entwined by a serpent or, a 
fountain [jpr. Motto — By worth. Description of the Arms 
— The crest (a red dragon) was that of the ancient family of 
De Kighley for many generations Lords of the Manor, whose 
last representative (a female) married the then head of the 
house of Cavendish in the time of Queen Elizabeth, and 
thereby carried the Keighley estate into that noble house, 
of which the Duke of Devonshire is the head. His Grace 
still letains the estate which has belonged to his family for 
nearly 700 years. The serpent twined round the head ol 
the dragon is the Cavendish crest. The circle with the 
wavy blue lines at the bottom of the crest, and al.so repeated 
in the shield, is the heraldic emblem of water technically 
calleil a fountain, and refers to the situation of Keighley in 
a well watered valley, the streams of which have greatly 
tended towards the progress of the town, being of great 
Talue for manufacturing purposes. This idea is also borne 
out by the motto " By Worth," that being the name of the 
principal stream on the banks of which Keighley is situate. 
The shield is a combination of the Keighley and Cavendish 
arms. The silver shield and black bar being those of the 
former family, while the three stags' heads are the cogni- 
zance of the Cavendishes. The blue embattled border 
jurrounding the shield shows that the arms are those of 
an ancient town, which is the case, Keighley having 
obtained iu original market charter in the reign of 
Edward I. 

Kelly (William Henry Kelly, Esq., of Porchester Terrace, 
Paddington, co. Middlesex). Or, a lion ramp. az. betw. two 
flaunchcs of the last, each charged with a castle of the first. 
Crol — In front of two anchors in saltlre aa. a castle or. 
JIfoUo— JuBlum perficito nihil timeto. 

Kerr (Glasgow, 1880). Gu. on a cher. cottised ar. three 
mullets of the first. Cresl — A mullet as in the arms. Motto 
— Praise God. 

Kerrich-Walker. See Walker. 

Kersey (Robert Kerbey, Enq., Hurst Lodge, Ix'e, co. Kent). 
Ar. on a pile gu. betw. two roses of the last, barbed and 



seeded ppr. a boar's head couped of the fii-st. Orest — On a 
mount ppr. a boar's head couped ar. on cither side three 
cinquefoils slipped vert. JVfo(fo— Peractus conamine. 

Kettle (Sir Rupert Alfbed Kettle, of Merridale, Wolver- 
hampton, CO. Stafford, and of Glan-y-don, Towyn, co. 
Merioneth, Knt., J. P. and D.L. for co. Stafford, and J P. 
for cos. Worcester, Merioneth, and Hereford, &c.). Az. a 
bee-hive within two branches of palm slipped in saltire all 
or. Crest — In front of a dexter cubit arm, vested az. 
cuffed ar. the hand ppr. holding a balance suspended or, 
a portcullis also ar. Motto —Qui tel. 

Kettlewell (Dumbleton Hall, co. Gloucester ; Cuables 
Tho.mas Kettlewell, Esq., of that place, younger son of 
Rev. Samuel Kettlewell, by Anne-Elizabeth, his wife, 
only dau. and heiress of Samuel Eyres, Esq., of Armley, in 
the parish of Leeds, and West Riding co. York). Per fesse 
ar. and or, a fesse cliequy gu. and of the Hist in chief a lion 
ramp. betw. two crosses patt^e of the third. Crest — A lion 
ramp. gu. holding in the liexter forepawacrosspatt^e fitcbte 
and resting the sinister hind paw on a cross patt^e or. 

Kettlewell. See Eyres. 

Kilmore, See of (page 564). The proper blazon of the 
ancient Arms of this See is — Ar. on a cross sa. a pastoraJ 
staff surmounted of a iiiitre sans labels or 

King' (The Hyde, co. Middlesex). Per fesse nebuly az. and 
sa. a lion ramp. ar. ducally collared betw. in chief two cross 
crosslets and in liase an escallop or. Crest — On a rock ppr. 
a duck's head erased ar. collared az. holding in beak an 
ostrich feather ar. 

King-Tenison (Earl of Kingston). See Tenison. 

Kirk (exemplified to George Edmonstone Kibk Kirk and 
Pardo Archibald Kibk Brett Kirk, of Carrickfergus, co. 
Antrim, sons of Very Rev. George Bull, D.D., Dean of 
Connor, by Anne Kirk, his wife, sister of Maria Kirk, of 
Thornfield, co. Antrim, on their assuming by royal licence, 
1 July, 1881, the surname and arms of Kibk, in lieu of those 
of Bull). Gu. a crosier or, and a sword ppr. pommelled 
and hilted gold in saltire within a bordure indented ar. on a 
chief of the second a thistle betw. two trefoils slipped also 
ppr. Crest — A crosier and sword in saltire as in the arms 
enfiled by a earland of thistles and trefoils ppr. Motto 
Optimum quod primum. 

Kirk (William Kilvinoton Kirk, Esq., Cleveland Row, 
Stockton-on-Tees, co. Durham). Gu. a chev. dovetailed 
erm. on a chief or, three dragons' heads erased of the first. 
Crest — Out of the liattlementa of a tower a demi dragon or, 
charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped gu. holding 
in the claws a flagstaff in bend sinister therefrom flowing a 
pennon also or. Motto — For Kirk and King. 

Klitson (Elmete Hall, near Leeds, co. York). Sa. three 
lucies haurient ar. a chief or. Crest — A unicorn's head ar. 
attired and maned or, environed with pallisadoes gold. 
Motto — Palmam qui meruit ferat. 

KnatchbuU - Hugessen (Baron Brabomne). See 

HUGESSEN. 

Knight (Right Hon. Henry Edmund Kniout, Lord Mayor 
of London, 1883). Or, three bendlets az. on a chief gu. a 
civic crown betw. two spurs of the first. Crest — On a 
Roman fasces lying fessewiae a spur rowel up or, betw. 
two wings displ. gu. each charged with a civic crown as in 
the arms. Motto — Virtute et lubore. 

Knighton (Bayford, co. Hertford ; Thomas Barker, of 
Chignal, co, Essex, temp. Queen Elizabeth, m. Dorothy; 
dau. of John Kniuiiton, Esq., of Bayford, and impaled her 
arms. Visit. Essex, 1612). Ar. two bars az. on a canton 
gu. a ton or. 



LiAClT (Hartrow and Rowberrow, co. Somerset; William 
Lacy, of Hartrow, and Ezelius Lacy, of Rowberrow, temp. 
James 1., sons of William Lacy, of Hartrow. Visit. Somer- 
set, 1623). Ou. two bars wavy erm. 

Lahore, See of. Az. on a fcsae erm. a passion cross in 
bend dexter surmounted by a crosier in bend sinister or, in 
chief rising from behind two snow mountains issuing from 
the fesse a sun in splendour and in base five barrulets wavy 
ar. 

Liamington, Baron. See Cochbane-Baillie. 

Laxaplugh (Kev. David LaMpluoh, M.A.,Vicar of Yalding, 
near Maidstone, co. Kent). Sa. on a pile nebuly or betw. 



LAN 



SUPPLEMENT. 



LEV 



two roses in base of the last across fleury of the flrst. Cresl 
— In front of a goat's head couped ar. armed or gorged with 
a collar nebuly sa. two roses gu. barbed leaved and seeded 
ppr. 

Lancaster, Town of. Per fesse az. aud gu. in chief a 
fleur-de-lis of France or, in base a lion of England pass, 
guar, of the last. Crest — Usually a lion pass, guard, az. 
seniee de lis or, there is some little difference of opinion as 
to the tincture, some considering it as " pean." 

Liancaster (Milverton, co. Somerset; John Lancaster, 
Roger Lancaster (living in Germany), and Edward Lan- 
caster, temp. James L, sons of William Lancaster, Esq., 
of Milverton. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Ar. two bars gu. on 
a canton of the last a liun pass. or. 

liancaster (Richmond, Yorkshire). Arg. two bars gu., on 
a canton of the second a cinquefoil or. 

Lang'more (Dundaire, College Road, Upper Norwood, co. 
Middlesex ; Butler Langmore, Esq.). Az. on a chev. 
cottised ar, three spear heads ppr. a chief engr. erm. Crest — 
Out of the l)attlementsof a tower two tilting spears in saltire 
all ppr. tied by a riband az. pendent therefrom an escutcheon 
or, charged with a trefoil slipped vert. Motto — Labor vincit 
omnia. 

Iiaurie (Laurieston, co. Lanark). Per fesse or and sa. a cup 
ar. and issuing therefrom a garland betw. two branches of 
laurel ppr. 

Xiawe (Drinkwater-Lawe, Kirby, Isle of Man ; exemplified 
to John Drinkwater, Esq., 2nd son of Sir William Leese 
Prinkwater, Knt. of Kirby, upon his assuming by royal 
licence, 1879, the surname of Lawe). Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, ar. an eagle displayed with two heads bctw. two crosses 
pattee in pale and as many fleurs-de-lis in fesse nil vert, for 
Lawe; 2nd and 3rd, per pale gu. and az. on a fesse wavy 
erm. betw. three garbs or, as many billets of the second, 
for Drinkwater. Crests — 1st, Lawe, in front of a spear 
erect ppr. a demi eagle displ. with two heads vert and 
charged on each wing with a fleur-de-lis ar. ; 2nd, Drink- 
water, three ears of wheat, one in pale and two in saltire 
enflled with a ducal coronet all or. il/o((o— Sapiens qui 
assiduus. 

Lawes (Rotlmmsted, co. Hertford, bart. created 19 May, 
1882). Or, two flaunches az. on a chief nebuly of the last, 
three estoiles of the first. Crest — A mount vert, thereon the 
trunk of a tree fessewise, eradicated and sprouting to the 
dexter, surmounted by an ermine pass. ppr. Motto — Pour 
la foi. 

Xiawson (Hall Barn, co. Buckingham). See Levy. 

Lawson-Smith (Togston and Amble, Northumberland ; 
Edward Maule Lawson, 2nd son of Rev. Edward Lawson, 
M.A., of Longhirst, in that CO., by Mart Eliza, his wife, dau. 
of Georoe Macle, Esq., Solicitor to the Treasury, assumed the 
additional surname and arms of Smith in compliance with 
the will of his cousin, THOMAsOEORfiESMiTH, Esq., ofTogston). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Smith, Az. a castle ppr. betw. two 
flanches or, each charged with a fountain, on a chief ar. 
three storks' heads erased of the field ; 2nd and 3rd, Lawson, 
Ar. on a chev. sa. another erm. betw. three martlets of the 
second. Crests — 1st, Smith : On a mount vert, a stork ar. in 
the beak a serpent ppr.; 2nd, Lawson: On a mount vert, 
two arms embowed couped at the elbow, vested erm. cuffed 
or, supporting betw. the hands ppr. a sun in splendour gold. 

Leader (Sheffield, co. York). Same Arms, Crest, and Motto 
as Leader, of Buntingford, co. Herts, with a crescent for 
diff. [see that name]. Motto— Virtas salus ducum. 

Leake (Sir Luee Samuel Leake, Knt., of Perth, in the 
colony of Western Australia, Speaker of the Legislative Coun- 
cil of that colony). Ar. on a saltire invected plain cottised 
gu. a cross patt^e betw. four annulets or. Crest — A tilting- 
spear erect betw. four peacock's feathers ppr. encircled by 
an annulet or. Motto — Perseverando. 

Leaxningi;on, Town of. Per fesse ar. and or. a lion ramp, 
double queued vert a chev. vair in chief, three mullets gu. all 
within a bordure az. charged with eight fleurs-de-lis of the 
second. Crest — In front of a staff raguly in bend ar. sur- 
mounted by a staff in bend sinister or, entwined with a 
serpent ppr. two sprigs of forget-me-nots in saltire slipped 
also ppr. 

Leather (Middleton Hall, co. Northumberland, and Leven- 
thorpe Hall, co. York). Ar. on a bend sa. within two cotices 
gobonnee or, and of the second a fountain betw. two mullets 
of six points of the third. Crest — A demi lion ramp. sa. 



charged on the shoulder with three mullets of six points or, 
and holding between the paws a fountain. Motto — Nil nisi 
quod honestum. 

Leem.ing' (Richard Lee.mino, Esq., Greanes House, and 
Lentworth Hall, both co. Lancaster, J. P.). Per chev. ar. and 
az. a wreath of oak vert betw. two estoiles in chief of the 
second and a cross patonce in base of the first. Crest — Upon 
a rock ppr. a cross patonce or. betw. two ostrich feathers ar. 

Lieeper, or Leper (co. Donegal, originally of Scotland ; 
Reg. Ulster's Offices; John Leper, Burgess of Edinburgh, 
appended his seal to a deed dated 1 Sept. 1189; Andrew 
Leper, of Stranorlar, co. Donegal, made his will 23 Dec, 
1669, and left two sons, William Leper and Andrew Leper). 
Az. a chev. betw. three leopards' faces or. Crest— A leopard's 
face per pale or and sa. Motto — Regi patriaeque. 

Lees (Werneth, Oldham, co. Lancaster ; Major Lees, Acomb 
Park, CO. York, nephew of John Frederick Lees, Esq., of 
Werneth). Per fesse or and gu. a fesse dovetail per fesse 
embattled betw. two falcons belled in chief, and a lion ramp, 
in base all counterchanged. Cresl— A lion ramp. gu. sup- 
porting a flag of the arms, the staff entwined by a wreath of 
oak fructed ppr. Motto — In dubiis rectus. 

Lennard (Wickham Court, co. Kent, bart. Created 6 May, 
1880). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a fesse gu. three fleurs- 
de-lis of the field a bordure engrailed ermines, for Lennabd; 
2nd and 3rd, erm. on a pile engr. gu. a lion pass. ar. in base 
two fishes haurient az., for Cator. Crests — 1st, Lennard, 
out of a ducal coronet or, an heraldic tyger's head ar. the 
whole debruised by a bendlet wavy sinister sa. 2nd, Catob, 
a lion's head erased erminois, charged on the neck with two 
bars engr. gu. 

Leonard (Queensfort, co. Galway, and Kerrfleld, co. South- 
ampton; represented by Patrick Marcellincs Leonard, 
Esq., of Queensfort and Kerrfleld, Judge of County Court 
Circuit No. 51, descended from Stephen Leonard, Esq., of 
Carha, co. Galway (transplanted by Oliver Cromwell), the 
grandson of Stephen Leonard, of Knockaveelish, co. Water- 
ford, whose Funeral Certificate in Ulster's Office, sets forth 
that he died 14 Aug. 1638, and traces his descent from 
James Leonard, of Waterford, temp. Henry VIIL). Per 
fesse dancett^e ar. and az. a fesse gu. 

Lermitte, or L'Hermite (St. Saviour's, Jersey ; Strat- 
ford Green, Essex ; Colney Hatch, and Knightons, Middle- 
sex; descended from Renault L'Hermite, Seigneur do 
Herrimont in Auvergne, a.d. 1020. A branch of bis 
descendants migrated from Normandy to the Channel 
Islands, and, in the records of Jersey, of the flrst part of the 
16th century, Guillacme le Riolet dit L'Hermite is found 
in litigation with Helier de la Rocque concerning lands 
in St. Helier, and St. Sauveur, Jersey. The present James 
Henry Lermitte, Esq., of Knightons, J. P., is great-grandson 
of his descendant Philip le Riolet dit L'Hermite, of St. 
Saviour's, who settled at Stratford Green, and changed the 
spelling of his name to Lermitte). Vert a string of nine 
beads, chevronwise, betw. three cinquefoils, in the centre 
chief point a garb all or. Crest — A hermit habited in russet, 
resting the dexter hand on a staff ppr. holding in the 
sinister hand a cross pat^e, and pendent from the wrist a 
rosary or. Motto — Dieu le veut. 

Lerwick, Burg-h of, Barony of. Or, in a sea ppr. a 
dragon-ship vert under sail, oars in action on a chief gu. a 
battle axe ar. Crest — A raven ppr. Motto — Dispecta est 
Thule. 

Leschallas (Henry Peter Pige-Leschallab, formerly 
Henry Peter Pige, of Page Green, Tottenham, co. Middle- 
sex). Per bend gu. and sa. two hearts conjoined or. Crest — 
On a mount vert a column or, thereon flames of Are ppr. 
and entwined by a vine branch also ppr. 

Levin (Cleveland Square, Hyde Park, London, formerly of 
New Zealand). Vert on a chev. nebulee betw. four escallops 
three in chief and one in base or, a cross crosslet crossed 
of the field. Crest— On a mount a squirrel pass. ppr. resting 
the right foot on an escallop or. Motto — Certavi et vici. 

Levy (granted to Joseph Moses Levy, Esq., of Lancaster 
Gate, Paddington, and 51, Grosvenor Street, London, and 
borne by his son, Edward Levy Lawson, Esq., of Hall Bam, 
Bucks, O.L., Lord of the Manor of Beaconsrield, who 
assumed by royal licence, 11 Dec. 1875, tlje surname of 
Lawson). Gu. a saltire parted and fretty or, betw. two 
rams' heads couped fessewise ar. Crest — A ram ar. holding 
in the mouth a trefoil slipped vert, and resting the dexter 
foreleg on a quatrefoil. Motto — Of old I hold. 



LEW 



SUPPLEMENT. 



LOW 



Zjewes (Wlncalton co. Somerset, descended from the co. 
Monmouth; Barnabt Lewes, Esq., uf Wincalton, terftp. 
Queen Elizabeth and James I., son of Tuomas I.ewes, 
grandson of William Lewes, and greal-srandson of William 
Lewes, of Matherne, co. Monmouth. Visit. Somerset, 1623). 
Erm. on a fesse az. three boars' heads couped ar. 

Ley (Tree Hill, co. Devon). Ar. a chev. betw. three seals' 
heads couped sa. 

Liiddell (co. Northumbeland). Ar fretty gu. two flanches 
or, on a chief of the second an estoil-^ betw. two leopards' 
heads affrontee erased of tlie third. Crest— A cross crosslet 
gu. surmounting two clasped hands ppr. betw. a pair of 
wings or. Motlo — Constans et fidelis. 

liiebenrood (Prospect Hill Park, Reading, co. Berks; 
exemplified to John Hancock, Esq., only surviving son of 
Admiral John Hancock, C.B.. of Newbury, co. Berks, upon 
his assuming, by royal licence, 1865, the surname of Lieben- 
BOOD, on inheriting the estate of his uncle, George Lieben- 
BOOD, Esq.). Ar. ihree benulets sa. on a chief gu. a demi 
stag issuant of the first a canton for diff. CcesJ— Out of an 
Eastern crown gu. the crown charged with a cross crosslet 
or, for diff. two unicorns' horns ar. wreathed vert. 

Lindley (The Uight Hon. Sir Nathaniel Lindley, Lord 
Justice of Appeal). Ar. on a chief nebulee az. a quatrefoil 
betw. two griffins' heads erased of the fir.st. Crest — In front 
of a pelican in her piety, ppr. charged on the breast with a 
pheon gu. three quairefoils fessewise or. Motto— Sii fortis. 

liing'ard-Monk. See Monk. 

Lisle (Compton Devrill, co. Somerset, Wilbraham, co. Cam- 
bridge, Tarridge, co. Surrey, and Ireland ; Can. Lisle, of 
Compton, William Lisle, of Cambridge, Edmune Lisle, 
Nicholas Lisle, living in Ireland, and Thomas Lisle, 
of Wilbraham, temp. James I., sons of Edmond Lisle, Esq., 
of Tarridge, and grandsons of Thomas Lisle, of Wilbraham. 
Visit. Somerset, 1623). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, or, a fesse 
betw. two chev. sa. ; 2nd, gu. a lion statant rcguard ar. 
crowned or; 3rd, gu. four fusils in fesse ar. 

Xiisle (William Beresford Lisle, Esq., of Narrowgate 
House, Alnwick, co. Northumberland). Erm. a lion ramp, 
betw. three frets uz. Crest— A lion pass, guard, az. resting 
the dexter forepaw on a fret and charged on the body with 
two pheons all or. Motto — Incruce non in leone fides. 

Lister (Bart., of Park Crescent, co. Middlesex). Erm. on a 
fess invected sa. three mullets ar. in cliief a caducens ppr. 
Crest — A stag's head erased ppr. in front thereof three 
mullets feaswise ar. Motto — Mulo raori quam foodari. 

Little (Newbold Pacey, co. Warwick; Georoe Arthur 
Kniohtley Howman, P;si., assumed the surname of Little, 
by royal licence, 1879). Az. a cinquefoil betw. four estoiles 
in cross or. Crest — A boar sa. armed, tusked, and maned 
or, charged on the body with two estoiles fessewise gold. 
Motto — Sua gratia parvis. 

Littlejohn (Rev. William Dodolas Littlejorn, Rector 
of Sydenham, Thame, co. Oxford). Az. on a fesse engr. 
with plain cottises betw. three buglehorns stringed or, a bow 
unstrung fessewise ppr. 

Liverpool, See of. Ar. an eagle rising sa. beaked legged 
and a glory round the head or, holding in the dexter claw 
an inkhorn ppr. a chief per pale az. and gu. charged on the 
dexter side with an open book of the third, inscribed in 
letters sa. " Thy word is truth," and on the sinister an 
ancient ship with three masts sail" furled also or. 

Lloyd (Dolobran, co. Montgomery ; Sampson Lloyd, Esq., 
descended from Charles Lloyd, Esq., of Dolobran, h. IGi;j, 
a celebrated antiquary and friend of Lewis Dwnn, the com- 
piler of the Welsh pedigrees, by Elizabeth, his wife, dau. 
of Thomas Stanley, Ehj , of Knockyn). Az. a chev. ar. 
betw. three game cocks of the last spurred jclloped and 
wattled or. Crett—K he goat ramp. ppr. Motto — VI atch. 

Lloyd (granted as a quartering to Sobanna Crawley, of 
Bridport Houie, co. Warwick). Erm. on a saltire g"- betw. 
two boars' heads erased in pale sa. a crescent or. 

Lloyd (Whitklocke-LLoyd, exemplified to Georoe Whitf- 
LOCKE Whiteix>cke-LLotd, Esq., of Strancally Ca.stle, co. 
Waterford, J. P. for that co. and D.L. West Hiding of York- 
shire, only surviving son and heir of William Hobton 
LLoYD, of Calton, co. York, Esq., by Mary Whitei.ocke 
his wife, 4lh dau of Geokok Whitklocke, Esq., of Gloucester 
Place, London, and of Kortoiscau, near Paris, and sister and 
heiress of James Wuitblocke, Esq., of Amboise, Touraine, 



P'rance, who was the lin al descendant of Bclstrode Whitb- 
LOCKE, Ambassador to Sweden, Governor of Windsor Castle, 
and Lord Commissioner of the Great Seal. The first-named 
GtORGE Whitelocke Whitelocke-LLotd, Esq., as.sume<l l>y 
royal licence, 30 Jan., 1880, the additional surname and arms 
of Whitelocke . Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Whitelocke- 
LLoyd : counter-quariered, 1st add 4th, ar three lions 
dormant in pale sa., forLLoYo; 2iid and 3rd, az. a chev. 
engr. betw. three eat,'lels close or, for Whitelocke. 2nd, 
Whitelocke, az, a chev. engr. betw. three eaglct.s close or. 
8rd, De la Beche, ar. on a bend gu. three stags' heads 
cabossed or. Crexts — 1st, LLoyd : A demi arm in scale 
armour, the hand naked ppr., the culTar. grasping a lizard 
vert; 2n0, Whitelocke: On a tower vaire ar. and gu. an 
eaglet, wings endorsed or. Mottoes — Over, Quodcunque 
evcnerit optimuui ; under the shield, Ar ol gwaith gorphvys 
(After labour rest). 
Locker (Frederick Locker, Esq., of 25, Chesham Street, 
Bclgrave Square, London, S.W.). Per pale arg. and sa. on 
a chevron nebuly betw. three dragons' heads erased as 
many padlo.-ks all counterchanged, Crest~ln front of a 
stag's head erased ppr. attired gold, two keys in saltire or. 

Loder-Symonds. See Svmonds. 

Long" (Stiufton, CO. Somerset ; descended from William 
Long, temp. Henry Vlll., second son of Long, of Trow- 
bridge, CO. Wilts. Visit. Somerset, 1G23). Sa. a lion ramp, 
betw. six crosses 'jrosslet ar. within two flaunches erm. 

Long: (Peter Bartholomew Long, Esq., of Ipswich, Suf- 
folk). Sa. eemec of cross crosslets and a lion ramp. ar. 
quartering az. a cross ar., for De Lande. Crest — A lion's 
head erased. 

Longstaff (George Dixon Lonostaff, Esq., Butter Knowle, 
Wandsworth, Surrey). Quarterly, ar. and sa. on a bend 
indented gu. betw. two pheons of the first a quarterstaff or. 
Crest — Two arms embowed vested sa semee de lis and cuffed 
ar. the hand ppr. grasping a quarterstaff fessewise or. 
Afo«o— Vigilate. 

Lonsdale (Heywood-Lonsdale, of Gredington, co. Ellnt, 
Drumgoon, McGuiresbridge, co. Fermanagh, and Carntown, 
CO. Louth; exemplined to Arthur Pembebton Heywood 
Lonsdale, Esq., J. P., D.L., High Sheriff co. Ixiuth 1877, son 
of the late Rev. Henry Gilby Lonsdale. Vicar of Lichfield, 
CO. Stafford, by Anna Maria, his wife, dau. of John 
Pemberton Heywood, Esq., of Wakefield, co. York). Quar- 
terly, 1st and 4th, Lonsdale; quarterly vert and ar. on a 
bend engr. or, betw. two bugle horns ppr. three annulets 
sa. ; 2nd and 3rd, Heywood. Ar. three torteaux in bend 
betw. two bendlets gu. en a canton of the last of cross pattee 
or. Crests — 1st, Lonsdale: A demi stag gu. gutt(5 attired 
and collared or; 2nd, Heywood. Upon a mount vert the 
trunk of a tree with two branches sprouting therefrom and 
entwined by ivy, thereon a falcon with wings displ. ppr. 

Lovell (Pugh-Lovell, of Llanerchydol, co. Montgomery; 
exemplified to Mary Jane Lovell, widow of Peter Audley 
Lovell, E.sq., late of Cole Park, Wilts, younger of the two 
daus. of David Pugh, late of Llanerchydol aforesaid, Esq , 
J. P. and D.L. for Montgomeryshire, Major of the Mont- 
gomeryshire Yeomanry Cavalry, Recorder of Welshpool, and 
M.P. for the Montgomeryshire Boroughs, and sister and co- 
heir of Charles Vauohan Pugh, Esq., Capt. 90th Regt. of 
P'oot, and D.L. for the said co. of Montgomery, on her 
assuming by royal licence, dated 17 June, 1882, the surname 
of Pu<;h, before that of Lovell, and the arms of Pugh 
quarterly with those of Lovell). Arms for Pugh — Or, a 
lion pass, guard, sa. holding in the dexter foi-epaw a fleur- 
de-lis gu. a fleur-de-lis in base, also sa. a chief of the last, 
thereon two fleurs-de-lis of the firstj to be borne, as an 
escutcheon of pretence, on the arms of Lovell. 

Lovell (Cole Park, Malmcsbury, Wilts. Confirmed to 
Peter Audley David Arthur Puom- Lovell, Esq., of Cole 
Park). 1st and 4th, Lovell: Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three 
squirrels sejant gu. each cracking a nut ppr. a garb or all 
betw. two flaunches of the second; 2nd and 3rd, Pcoh: Or, 
a lion pass, guard, sa. holding in the dexter forepaw a 
fleur de-lis gu., a fleur-de-lis in base, also sa. a chief of the 
lust, thereon two fleurs-de-lis of the first. Crests — A garb 
fessewise or, thereon a squirrel sejant gu. cracking a nut 
ppr.; 2nd, Pugh: On a rock ppr. a lion pass, guard, su. 
seme de lis, and holding In the dexter paw a fleur-de-lis, or. 
Motto — Propositi tcnax. 

Lowcay (confirmed to James Money Ix>wcay, of Lipson 
Terrace, Plymouth, Devon, Paymaster Royal Navy, soo o 
Robert Lowcay, Esq., Lieut. R.N., and grandson of Menht 
Lowcay, Esq., of Kilhile, co. Wexford, who was brother of 



I 



LOW 



SUPPLEMENT. 



MAC 



Anthony Lowcat, Esq., of Rosetown, game co., and •on of 
Kev. Robert Lowcat, Rector of St. Jame^, Dunbrody, 
and Killesli, Diocese of Kerns, cu. Wexford). Az. two bars 
ar. betw. three lions pass, guard, in pale of the last, armed 
and langued gu., each bar charged with a trefoil slipped 
vert. Crett — A boar's head erect and erased ppr. charged 
with a bar ar. thereon a trefoil vert. Motto — Virtute et 
valore. 

LiOWe ( Viscount Shtrbrooke). Gu. three mullets fessewise 
ar. pierced of the field betw. two wolves pass, of the second. 
Crest— In front of a wolfs head erased ppr. gorged with a 
collar gemel or, two mullets also or pierced gu. Supporters 
— On the dexier side a wolf ppr. and on the sinister side a 
bay horse, each gorged with a chain and therefrom suspended 
a portcullis or. 

liOWry-Corry {Baron Rowton). See Corrt. 

XiOXton (Samuel Loxton, Esq., of Fern Dell, Cannock, co. 
Stafford). Per fess. gu. and barry of six or and sa. in chief 
an antelope pass, reguard arg. Crest — In front of a mount 
vert thereon a beacon fired ppr., entwined by a serpent 
head to the sinister gu. three tiefoils slipped, also vert. 
Motto — " Fiat Lux." 

IiOyd (Thomas Edward John Lloyd, Esq., of Aberdunant, 
00. Carnarvon). Gu. on a chev. invected erm. betw. three 
Saracens' heads affront^e couped at the neck ppr. an anchor 
erect betw. two fleur-de-lis sa. Crest — A Saracen's head 
affrontee erased at the neck pnr. wreathed about the temples 
or and sa. betw. two iieur de lis of the last. 

liUmsden (Ferryhill, near Aberdeen, 1883). Az. a ship 
under sail betw. two wolves' heads couped in chief and an 
escallop in base ar. Crest — Xn e.igle preying on a Salmon 
jipr. Motto — Fide et perseverantia. 

Ijydiard (granted to Elizabeth, the widow and the children 
of Capt. Charles Lydiard, R.N., of .Meadfields, Surrey, 
commander of H.M.S. "Anson," who received a gold medal 
from the king commemorating his distinguished services at 
the taking of Curayoa, and, 1 Jan. 1807, a royal licence to 
bear the same in his arms, but who i/. Dec. following, being 
drowned by the sinking of the "Anson" before the licence 
was ratified). .A.z. a maunch erm. surmounted by an 
anchor erect within a bordure engr. or: on a chief wavy 
vert a representation of the aforesaid gold naval medal 
pendent from a riband ar. fimbriated of first, with the word 
"Curagoa" iriscribed under the same betw. two naval 
crowns gold. Crest — Out of a naval crown or, a Moor's head 
affrontee ppr. wreathed round the temples with laurel vert. 
round the neck a torse ar. and az. thence pendent a medal 
and ribbon as in the arms. Motto — Virtute et prudentia. 

Lijme (Hants). The Aruis are correctly given in the body 
of the work, but the residence should he Burley Manor, 
South Hants. The family held the manor for some three 
hundred years; it was formerly included in the parish of 
Ringwood, hence the error. 

Lsrtton (BclwerLytton, Earl of Lytton). Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, erm. on a chief dancettee az. three ducal crowns 
or, a canton ar. charged with a rose gu. barbed and seeded 
|ipr., for Lytton; 2nd, gu. on a chev. ar. betw. three eagles 
regard, or, as many cinquefoils sa., for Bulwer; 3rd, or. 
three mullets sa. pierced gu. ou a chief wavy uz. a dove 
regard, ppr., for Wiggett. Crests — 1st, Lytton: A bittern 
in flags ppr. charged with a rose gu. as in the arms ; 2nd, 
Bdlwer: an heraldic tiger's head erased erm. crined and 
armed or; 3rd, Wiooett: A dove regard, ar. holding in the 
beak an olive branch ppr. fructed, gold. Supporters— On 
either side an angel ppr. vested ar. and holding in the 
exterior hand an eastern crown or. Motto — Hoc virtutis 
opus. 



M 



MACABE (Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, L597-1632). Gu. 
a ram's fleece extemU-d ar. horns or. Crest — A demi lion 
ramp. ar. holding betw. the paws an arrow, point downwards 
gu. headed and feathered, also ar. 

HcClintock-Blinbury (Lord Rathdonntll). See Bun- 
bury. 

McCombie (Easterskane, co. Aberdeen, 1883). Ar. a lion 
ramp. gu. armed and langued az. a chief of the second. 
Crest— K wild cat sejant ppr. Motto — Touch not the cat 
but a glove. 



DfcCrea^h - Thomhill (Major Michael McCbeaoh- 
Thoenhill). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. two bars gemel ar. on 
a chief of the last a mascle sa., for Thornhill; 2nd and 3rd, 
or, on a fesse embattled betw. three mullets of six points in 
chief, and a lion ramp, in base gu. a sword fessewise, point 
to the dexter ppr. pommel and hilt gold, for McCeeaoh. 
Creats— 1st Thornhill: A thorn-tree ppr. on the trunk a 
mascle or; 2nd, McCreaou : a demi lion gu. gorged with 
a collar gemel, and charged on the shoulder with two 
mullets of six points fessewise or, holding betw. the paws a 
bezant thereon two mascles interlaced sa. Major McCrkaoh- 
Thobnhill impales in right of his wife the arms of Thorn- 
hill, as above, and the arms of Bacbe, viz., or, a lion ramp, 
guard, pean a bordure sa. charged with eleven bezants. 

mcDermott (Confirmed by Ulster King of Arms, and re- 
corded in Her Majesty's College of Arms, London, as of right 
belonging and appertaining unto UenryThomas McDeemott, 
of Trinity House. Gensing Gardens, St. Leonard"s-on-Sea, 
Sussex, Esq., son of Henry Thomas McDebmott, deceased, 
and grandson of James McDermott, also deceased). Per 
chev. ar. and or. on a chev. gu. betw. in chief three boara' 
heads erased at the neck, and in base a cross crosslet az. 
three trefoils slipped of the second. Crest — A demi lion ramp, 
or, holding betw. the paws a boar's head erased, as in the 
arms. Motto — Honor virtutis praemium. 

Macdonald (Edinburgh, 1878). Quarterly, ar. and or, in 
the first quarter a lion ramp. gu. ; in the second a dexter hand 
couped fesseways, holding a cross crosslet fitchee of the last ; 
in the third a lymphad, sails furled and oars in saltire sa. ; 
in the fourth a salmon naiant ppr. overall on a fesse of the 
third a cushion of the second. Crest — .\ dexter hand holding 
a dirk erect ppr. Motto — Xec tempore nee fato. 

SCcEacheriL (Goathland, co. York, and Queensland ; for- 
merly Scotland). Per fesse or and ar. a lymphad, sails 
furled sa. on a shield gu. pendent therefrom on the sinister 
Bide a trefoil of the second. Crest — .\n arm in armour, the 
hand bare ppr. holding a cross crosslet fitchee or, paleways. 
Motto — Per mare per terras. 

Uacgregror (Capt. Francis Nugent Macoreoob, R.A., 
1883). Same as Macgbeoor-Skinner (page 640), with a 
bordure quarterly az. and erm., for diff. 

HacKenzie (Fawley Court, co. Buckingham, and Newbie, 
CO. Dumfries). Or, a cross parted and frettyaz. betw. in the 
first and fourth quarters a stag's head cabossed of the laai, 
and in the second and third quarters a mountain in flames 
ppr. Crest — A stag's head cabossed az. within the attires a 
cross couped or, the whole betw. two stag's horns gold. 

KaoKenzie ( Auchenskeoch, co. Kirkcudbright, and Craig's, 
CO. Dumfries). Same Anns and Crest, a crescent for diff. 

MacKenzie (Warmanbie, co. Dumfries). Same Amu and 

Crest, a mullet for diff. 

MaoKenzie (Gillott's, co. Oxford). Same Arms and Crest, 
a martlet for diff. 

Mackenzie (.^Xontago-Stdart-Wortley-Mackenzik, Eari 
of Wharncliffe, page 1137). The 3rd Lord Whamcliffe was 
created an earl 1876, and assumed, 1880, by royal licence, 
the prefix surnauie of Montagu, in conjunction wiiU his 
■[i/t>iher, Francis, when the following arms were ex- 
eniplified : — Quarterly, 1st, az. a stag's head caboshed within 
two branches of laurel or, for Mackenzie ; 2nd, ar. on a bend 
betw. six martlets, gu. three bezants a canton charged with 
the arms of Stcabt, being those of the 3rd quarter, for 
Wortley ; 3rd, or, a fesse chequy az. and ar. within a 
double tressure flory counterflory gu., for Stuart; 4th, ar. 
three lozenges conjoined in fesse gu. within a bordure sa., 
for Montagu. Crests — Ist, an eagle rising from a rock ppr. 
and in an escrol over, the motto, Firma et Ardua, for Mac- 
kenzie ; 2nd, an eagle's leg, erased or, issuant therefrom 
three ostrich feathers ppr. charged on the thigh with a fesse 
chequy az. and ar. for Wortley ; 3rd, a demi lion ramp. gu. ; 
and in an escrol over, the motto, Nobilis Ira, for Stdabt ; 
4tli, a griffin's head couped or, wings endorsed and beak sa. 
Supi>orters — Dexter, a horse ar. bridled gu. ; sinister, a 
stag ppr. attired or, each gorged with a collar flory counter- 
flory of the second. Mottoes — Avito viret Honore ; Nobilis 
Ira ; and Firma et Ardua. 

Mackenzie (Winchester, formerly Scotland, 1879). Per 
fesse ar. and az. a buck's head cabossed counterchanged. 
in dexter chief a holly leaf ppr. Crest— A buck's head, aa 
in the arms. Motto — I face all weathers. 



MAC 



SUPPLEMENT. 



MAS 



7/Iackie (St. John's House, Wakefield, co. York; Robebt 
BowNAS iUcKiE. Esq., F.S.A., M.P. for Wakefield), Paly of 
six or and gu. on a bend sinister engr. az. a Narcissus betw. 
two mullets of six points of the first. Crest — In front ot a 
cubit dexter arm erect grasping a sword all ppr. a Narcissus 
ar. betw. two mullets of six points or. Motto — Disce et 
labora. 
Kackie (Manor House, Heath, Wakefield; Col. Edwakd 
Alexakdeb Mackie, of that place, J. P.). Same as the 
preceding, Col. Mackie being brother of R. B. Mackie, Esq., 
M.P. 
Kackintosli (Keir-Mackintosh, of Dalmigavie, co. In- 
Terness, 1882). Quarterly, Ist and 4th graud quarters 
counterquartered ; 1st, or a lion ramp. gu. ; 2nd, ar. a dexter 
hand couped fessways grasping a man's heart paleways gu. ; 
3rd, aj.. a boar's head couped or; 4th, or, a lymphad, oars 
in saltire sa. all within a bordure gu. charged with eight 
annulets or, for di£f., for Mackintosh; 2nd and 3rd grand 
quarters, or, a cross engr. sa. betw. four roses gu., for Kbib. 
Oes(«— On dexter, a cat courant guard, ppr., for Mack- 
intosh; on sinister, a pelican vulning herself ppr. Mottoei — 
Touch not the cat but a glove ; Virescit in arduis virtus. 

MacMahon (Lords of Oirghialla or Oriel, the present co. of 
Monaghan, an ancient Sept in Ulster of the same race as 
HcGuibe, Lord of Fermanagh, descended from Colla da 
Cbbiocb ; they had their chief seat at Dartree. The Annals 
of the Four Masters record, under the year 1273, that 
EoCHAiDH MacMahon, Lord of Oirghialla, was slain with 
many others, by the people of Tyrone. Art MacMahon, 
eldest son and heir of Sir Brian MacMahon, Knt., chief of 
his name, died according to his Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, a.d. 
1634). Ar. an ostrich sa. holding in the beak a horseshoe 
or. Cre«<— A naked arm embowed holding a sword all ppr. 
the point pierced through a fleur-de-lis sa. Mottoes — So dorn 
dona dhubhfuiltibh ; and Manus haec inimica tyrannis. 

MacRitchie (Logie, co. Perth, 1881). Or, a lion ramp. gu. 
betw. two mullets in chief vert and a crescent in base of the 
second a bordure of the third. Crest — A cat sejant ramp. 
sa. Motto — Prenez garde. 

ICahon (Cavetown, co. Roscommon, confirmed, 1884, to 
Lieut. -CoL. Maurice Hartland Mahon, son of Rev. 
Abtuub Mahon, of Cavetown, and grandson of Robert 
Mahon, Esq., Cavetown, and to the other descendants of 
his grandfather. This last named Robert was son of Ven. 
Arthur Mahon, Archdeacon of Elphin, whose father. 
Very Rev. Peter Mahon, Dean of Elphin, was 4th son of 
KicuuiAS Mahon, Esq., of Ballinenily, same co. and 
brother of John Mahon, Esq.. of Strokestown, the grand- 
father of Mai'bice, 1st Lord Hartland). Or, a lion ramp. 
az. langued gu. a martlet sa. for diff. Crest — An heraldic 
tiger pass, holding in the dexter paw a broken tilting spear 
all ppr. and charged on the shoulder with a martlet sa. for 
diff. 3/o(to— Buaidh go bragh. 

Uain (Rev. Thomas John Main, M.A.) Or three piles 
two issuant from the chief and one from the base az. each 
charged with a dexter hand couped at the wrist, those in 
chief pendent and that in base erect of the field. Crest — In 
front of a cubit arm erect ppr. holding a cross botonny 
fltche in pale or and a sword fessewise the point to the 
dexter also ppr. poniel and hilt gold three piles reversed az. 

Main'warin^ (Coleby Hall, co. Lincoln ; descended from 
Merton, co. Chester; obtained the estate of Goltho, co. 
Lincoln, by marriage with Elizabeth Grantham, the heiress; 
CflARLEa Mainwabing, the last of the co. Lincoln line, rf. 
1861, unm., at. 75, leaving three sisters, his co-heiresses, 
Anne, Maria, and Elizabeth, ia. respectively to Burton, of 
Burton, co. Carlow, Lee-Mainwaring, of Knaresborough 
Abbey, co. York, and Langton, of Langton, co. Lincoln). 
Same Amit, <fec., as Mainwarino, extinct bart. of Over 
Peover, co. Chester, with ppr. diffs. See Mainwarino, bart. 
extinct. 

Mallinson (John Mallinson, Esq., of Manchester). Az. on 
a fesse cottincd or betw. four crescents three in chief 
and one In base of the last a fasces fessewise of the first. 
Crt»l—\n arm embowed vested az. charged with two 
crescents and cuff or the hand ppr. grasping a fasces 
palewise also or. 

Kale (Ponty prid, Llanwonno, ro. Glamorgan, Richard Male 
Lieut. In the 2nd Urgt. of Glamorganshire Volunteers). Gu. 
on a croM couped betw. four battle axes ar. as many annulets 
of the field. CrfKl~A spear erect ppr. therefrom pendent by 
a, riband az. an escooheon gu. charged with two battle axes 
saltlrewUe ar. Motto— CruA dum splho spero. 



Malone (Dublin, page 653). The cresl of this family is a 
squirrel sejant ar. holding betw. the fore paws an acorn ppr. 

Maltby (Right Rev. Edward Maltbt, D.D., Bishop of 
Durham, son of George Maltby, Esq., of the City of 
Norwich). Ar. on a bend gu. betw. a lion ramp, in chief 
purp. and a cross pattee in base of the second, three garbs 
or. Crest — Betw. two branches of olive ppr. a garb or, 
charged with a cross patee gu. Motto — Nil sine labore. 

Uanchester and Salford Bank. Az. a garb or 
banded gu. a bordure arg. charged with five torteaux, on a 
chief of the second three bendlets of the third. Crest — A 
demi eagle displ. with two heads vert, each wing charged 
with a bezant and on the breast a trefoil slipped or. Motto 
— Kespice et prospice. 

IVEanserg-h (Orenane, co. Tipperary ; Brtan Mansesgh, Esq., 
rf. without male issue: his dau. and co-heir, Dorothea 
Manskrgh, m. Archibald Redfoobd, Esq., of Shroland, co. 
Kildare, and had an only dau. and heiress, Euza Redkoord, 
who ?n. Rev. James Bulwer, Rector of Hunworth-cum-Hody, 
CO. Norfolk, and was mother of James Redfoord Bulwer, 
Esq., Q C. Recorder of Cambridge, Treasurer of the Inner 
Temple, and Lieut. -Col. Inns of Court Rifle Volunteers). 
Ar. a bend raguly gu. betw. three arrows points downwards 
of the last headed and feathered or. 

Marcell (Languedoc, France, afterwards of Waterford, 
Anthony Marcell, an Officer in the Army of William III., 
was killed at the battle of the Boyne, 1690, leaving a son 
Lewis Marcell, who was 6. at Uzes, in Languedoc, was 
naturalized by Act of Parliament 13 Queen Anne, and settled 
in Waterford. By Magdalen Vionolles, his wife, he lelt 
two sons, who both d. s. p., and as many daus., Jane Mary, 
m. Major Henry Conran, and Blandina, to. John Strahan). 
Az. a chev. ar. betw. in chief a dexter arm in fesse couped 
below the elbow the hand grasping a dagger point upwards 
all ppr. and in base a trefoil slipped of the second. Crest — 
A demi eagle issuant ppr. 

Marj oribanks (£a7'07i TweedmoxUh). Ar. on a chief gu. 
a cushion betw. two spur rowels of the field. Supporters — 
On either side a bear ppr. muzzled and collared or. and 
charged on the shoulder with a spur rowel ar. Crest — A 
lion's gamb erect and erased grasping a lance in bend, both 
ppr. Motto — Advance with courage. 

Marling' (Stanley Park, and Sedbury Park, co. Gloucester, 
bart., created 22 May, 1882). Ar. three bars gu. each 
charged with five bezants, in chief, a lion passant of the 
second. Crest — In front of a tower embattled and domed, 
thereon a fiagstaff ppr. with a pennon gu. three bezants. 
Motto — Nulli prseda sumus. 

Marshall (Blowbery and Windsor, co. Berks). The Arms, 
blazoned at p. 661, arc said in Harl. MS. 1441, to have been 
granted by Bysshe, Garter, 14 Dec. 1647, to John Marshall, 
of London, Vintner. 

Marshall (Woodwalton, co. Huntingdon, p. 661). Was also 
of Kinchingfield, co. Essex. 

Marshall (Marston, co. Lincoln, &c., p. 661). Instead of 
the localities there given, read, " Brandon, in the parish of 
Haugh, Marston, Doncaster," Whatton-in-the-Vale, &c. 

Marshall (Ivythome, co. Somerset, granted 1573, p. 662). 
These Anus were granted to Richard Marshall, of Strood, 
1 June, 1573. The mullets in the Anns are " or," not " of 
the field." 

Marshall (Broadwater, co. Surrey, <fec., <fec., p. 662). In the 
blazon of the Crest for "A ciested female figure rested," 
read " A female figure vested." 

Marshall (Bescutt and Walsall, co. Stafford, &c., &c., p. 
662). In the blazon of the Crest for " a shoe shoe az.," 
read " a horse shoe az." 

Martin (Sir Theodore Martin, K.C.B., 1880). Per pale sa 
and gu. a chev. betw. two crescents in chief and a stag's 
head cra.scd in base ar. Crenl — A lion ramp. sa. holding in 
his dexter fore paw a crescent ar. Motto — Spero. 

Mar'wick (Town Clerk, Glasgow, 1877). Per fesse ar. and 
az. a saltire wavy counterchanged betw. a castle triple 
towered sa. masoned ar. thereon a reri-breast ppr. in chief 
and an otter's head erased of the first in base. Crest — A boar 
pa.ss. az. Motto — Firmus et fldelis. 

Mason (Necton Hall, Swaffham, co. Norfolk ; exemplified to 
Robert Harvey Blake Humfry, Esq., eldest son of Robert 
Blake Hdmfbt, Esq., of Wrexham, in same co., upon his 
assuming, by royal licence, March, 1879, the surnauic of 



MAS 



SUPPLEMENT. 



MIL 



Mason, under the will of Col. G«!oroe Blomefiei.d, formerly 
Mason, of Necton Hall). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, ar. on a 
fesse cottised az. two annulets of the first, in chief as many 
lions' heads couped of the second, for Mason; 2nd and 3rd, 
counterquartered, 1st and 4th, qu. a lion ramp, and above the 
head a ducal coronet or, a canton of th« last for distinction, 
for HcMFBET ; 2nd and Srd, ar. a chcv. betw. three garbs sa., 
a border of the last charged with eight fleui-s-de-lis of the 
first, for Blake. Crests — Ist, Hcmfbet : On a ducal coronet 
an eagle, wings elevated, holding in the dextorclaw a sceptre 
all or, and charged on the breast for distinction, with a 
cross crosslet gu. ; 2nd, Mason : A lion's head couped az. 
hQldin^ in the mouth an antler in bend or, betw. two wings 
ar. each charg«d with an annul«t also az. ; 3rd, Blake : On 
a morion a martlet ppr. 

Hassicks (The Oaks, MiHom, Cumberland). Per pale 
or and az. on a fesse betw. four leopards' faces jessant de 
lis, three in chief and one in base, two quarterfoils all 
counterchanged. Crest— A cross pattte az. surmounted by 
a leopard's face jessatt de lis or. Motto — Vestigia nulla 
retrorsum. 

"Matheson (Lochalsh, co. Ross, hart., created 15 May, 
1S8'2). Ar. three dextrr hands, couped two and one gu. and 
for difference within a bordure of the 2nd. Crest — A dexter 
hand holding a scimitar in fesse a,ll ppr. Motto — Fac et 
spera. 

Matthews. See Donaldson. 

Mauley (page 670). For, "Or, a head sa." read, "Or, a 
bend sa." 

Mawdsley (James Platt Mawdslet, Esq., 36, Falkner 
Square, Liverpool). Sa. two chevronels betw. in chief as 
many pickaxes and in base a fleur-de-lis ar. Crest — An 
eagle displ. sa. charged on the body and wings with nine 
annulets and holding in the beak a pickaxe all ar. ^t»tto— 
Conatu 

Maxwell (Lord Farnham, p. 672). The charges on the chief 
in the 1st and 4th quarters are pallets, not pellets. 

Maxwell (Wedderburn Maxwell, Middlebie, co. Dumfries 
and Glenlair, co. Kirkcudbright). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
ar. a saltire sa. in chief a mullet gu. a bordure az., for 
Maxwell; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a chev. betw. three roses gu. 
barbed vert, for Wedderbcrn. Crests — Dexter, a stag 
lodged in front of a holly tree ppr., for Maxwell ; sinister, 
an eagle's head erased ppr., for W'EDDEEBrRN. Mottoei — 
Reviresco; and Kon degener. 

May (Charterhouse, Hinton-upon-Mendip, co. Somerset ; 
Christopher Mat, 6. 1583, son of John Mat, and grandson 
of Robert Mat, all of Charterhouse-Hinton: granted to 
Robert Mat, 1573. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Sa. a chev. 
betw. three roses ar. a chief or. 

May (William Mat, Esq., of the Knowle, Brenchley, Kent). 
Gu. a chev. invected or, betw. three roses ar. on a chief 
of the second a bull statant sa. Crest — Out of the battle- 
ments of a tower a hawthorn tree in blossom with white 
May flower, in front thereof two tilting spears in saltire all 
ppr. Motto — Memor et fidelis. 

Mayo (Avebury, co. Wilts, and Cheshunt House, co. Herts; 
borne by Rev. Charles Mato, D.C.L., of Cheam, co. 
Surrey, Thomas Mato, M.D., President of Royal College 
of Physicians, 1856, and Rev. William Mato, M.A., Rector 
of Folke, CO. Dorset). Sa. a chev. betw. three roses ar. a 
chief or. Crest — A dove holding an olive branch in the 
beak all ppr. Motto — Nuncia pacis oliva. 

Medhop (Collection of Molyneux, Ulster, 1597-1632). Erm. 
a lion ramp. vert. Cr-est — A demi lion ramp. vert, holding 
betw. the paws a ducal coronet or. 

Meiklejohn (Scotland, 1881). Per pale or and gu. on a 
chief two martlets all counterchanged. Crest — A dexter 
arm in armour from the shoulder resting on the elbow, 
the hand holding a scymetar all ppr. il/of(o— Spes magna 
In Deo. 

Mercer (Tod-Mercer. Scotsbanks, co. Selkirk, and Hope 
Park, Edinburgli). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a fesse 
betw. three crosses pattee in cliief and a mullet in base az. 
three bezants a border of the second for diff., for Mercer ; 
2nd and 3rd, ar. a fesse sa betw. three foxes' heads couped 
ppr., for Tod. Crest— A cross patt^ fltch^e gu. Motto- 
Crux Christi mea corona. 

Kolville (Baltoub - Melville, Pilrig, Edinburgh, and 
Strathkinness, co. Fife, 1883). 1st and 4th, ar. on a chev. 
indented sa. betw. a rose in chief gu. and a saltire in base 



az. an otter's head erased of the field, for Balfour ; 2nd and 
3rd, gu. three crescents ar. within a bordure of the last 
charged with eight roses of the first, a crescent of the 
second in chief, far diff., for Melville. Crests — 1st, Bel- 
Fotjm: A dexter hand holding an olive branch ppr ; Motto — 
Adsit Deus. 2nd, Melville: A crescent arg. ; Motto — 
Denique caelum. 

Meredith (Glenelg, Australia; Edward Phillipps Meredith, 
Esq.). Ar. a lion ramp, sa. gorged with a mural crown 
pendent therefrom a chain reflected over the back or, holding 
betw. the paws an escocheon of the first charged with a pear 
leaved and slipped ppr. betw. four mullets of six points gu. 
Crent — A lion ramp. sa. gorged with a mural crown pendent 
therefrom a chain reflected over the back or, holding in the 
dexter forepaw a pear leaved and slipped ppr. and the dexter 
hind paw resting on an escocheon ar. charged with a mullet 
of six points gu. 

Merifield (Crookherne and Huish, co. Somerset; John 
Merifield, of Crookherne, temp. James I., son of Robert 
Merifield, of same place, and grandson of Richard Meri- 
field, of Huish. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Or, on a fesse 
cottised az. between three crescents sa. as many roses ar. 

Metcalfe (Inglethorpe Hall, co. Norfolk; granted in 1810 to 
John Metcalfe, Esq., of Glandford Brigg, physician, great- 
uncle to Frederick Morehocse Metcalfe, F.K.G.S., of 
Inglethorpe Hall, co. Norfolk). Ar. a fesse engr. ermines 
cottised gu. between three calves of the second. Crest — A 
hound erm. resting the dexter paw on an escutcheon gu. 

Mewburn (Darlington, co. Durham). Ar. three lioncela 
ramp> gu. Crest — A demi griffin ramp. Motto — Festina 
lente. 

Meyrick ( A pley Castle, co. Salop, and Bush, co. Pembroke, 
Bart. ; created 6 May, 1880). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, sa. on 
a chev. ar. betw. three brands erect raguly or, inflamed 
ppr. a fleur-de-lis gu. betw. two Cornish choughs, respectant, 
also ppr., for Mbtrick. 2nd and 3rd. or, a lion ramp. gu. a 
sinister quarter quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. ten bezants ; 
2nd and 3rd, ar. on a mount vert a lion pass, guard, or, for 
Charlton. Crests— 1st, Metrick, a tower ar. thereon upon 
a mount vert, a Cornish chough ppr. holding in the dexter 
claw a lleur-de-lis gu. ; 2nd, Charlton, out of an eastern 
coronet or, a leopard's head issuant gu. 

Meyrick (Williams-Metbick, The Hermitage, Beaumaris, 
CO. Anglesey. Exemplified to Rev. John Williams, Rector 
of Beaumaris, and to Clara Scsanna, his wife, sister of 
William Putland Metrick, E.<q., late of Cefn Coch, same 
CO.. on as.suming by royal licence, dated 23 .May, 1877, the 
surname of Meyrick in addition to and after that of Williams, 
in compliance with the testamentary injimction of the afore- 
said William Pctland Mevbick, the issue to dispense with 
the marks of distinction). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, sa. on 
a chev. ar. betw. three brands erect ragulce or, inflamed 
ppr. a fleur-de-lis gu. betw. two Cornish choughs respect- 
ing each other also ppr., and for distinction in the centre 
chief point a cross crosslet gold, for Mktrick; 2nd and 3rd, 
ar, a lion pass. sa. gorged with a collar gemel or, in chief a 
uqatrefoil betw. two fleurs-de-lis, and in base a fleur-de-lis 
betw. two quatrefoils gu., for Williams. Crests — Ist, Met- 
rick: A tower ar. thereon upon a mount vert a Cornish 
chough ppr. holding in the dexter claw a fleur.de-lis gu. the 
tower charged for distinction with a cross crosslet sa. ; 2nd, 
Williams: A lion pass. sa. sem€ of quatrefoils and gorged 
with a collar gemel ar. holding in the dexter forepaw a fleur- 
de-lis gu. Motto — Heb Dduw heb ddim a duw a digon. 

Michael (William Henrt Michael, Esq., Q.C., 54, Corn- 
wall Gardens, Kensington, London). Per chev. or and 
az. three leopards' faces counterchanged, on a chief 
nebulee ar. two saltires couped of the second. Crest — In 
front of a saltire couped az. a leopard's face or. Motto — 
I secundo omine. 

Milbank (Well and Thorpe Perrow, co. York, and Hart and 
Wemiiiergilt, co. Durham, barf., created 16 May, 1882). 
Gu. a saltire ar. gutt€ de poix, betw. two lions' heads couped 
in pale and as many roses in fesse of the second. Crest — A 
lion's head couped ar. gutte de poix, charged with a pale gu. 
thereon three roses also ar. 

Miller (Acre Valley, co. Stirling). Az. a cross milrind or, 
on a chief ar. a cross patee gu. betw. two bulls' heads era.'^ed 
sa. armed vert. Cittt — A horse's head erased ar. M'ltto— 
Celer. 



MIL 



SUPPLEMENT. 



MUS 



Villa (Jo«B»B Mnj.8, Esq., The Beecheg, Kingswlnford, 
Dudley, co. Stafford). Or, two bars Tair betw. three 
escouheons sa. each charged with a millrind erect of the 
first. Out— A hind ppr. hoWing in the niouth an ear of 
wheat leaved and slipped or, resting the dexter foreleg on 
an escocbeon sa. charged with a millrind as in the arms. 
Motto — Ad finem fidelis. 

Kills (granted by Molyneux, Ulster, 1 Oct. 1600, to John 
Mills, Sheriff of Dublin). Gu. on a bend ar. a fer de moline 
betw. two roses gu. barbed, vert, seeded or. 

Milne (Calverley House, Leeds, co. York; Samttel Milnb 
Milne, Esq.). Ar. a millrind gu. within an orle of eight mill- 
rinds sa. Crest — A millrind fessewise sa. thereon a lion 
ramp. ar. holding betw. the paws a millrind gu. 

If llner*Gibson. See Gibson. 

Hilner-Gibson-CTilluin.. See Cctllcii. 

Mitchell (A liberal benefactor to Queen's Coll. Oxford. 
Amu in Upton Scudamore Church, co. Wilts, the patronage 
of which belongs to Queen's Coll.). Az. three leopards' 
faces or, a chief embattled erui. Jl/otJo—Penser devant de 
peur de repentir. 

Mitchell (Westshore and Berry, descended from the family 
of Bandeth, co. Stirling. A baronetcy was conferred, in 
1724, on John Mitchell, of Westshore, in Shetland, and is 
claimed by Jaues William Mitchell, Esq., Kothesay 
Herald, as descended from his youngest son, John Chables 
Mitchell). Sa. a fesse betw. three mascles or, a bordure 
chequy of the second and first. Crest — Three ears of barley 
conjoined in the stalk ppr. Motto — Sapiens qui assiduus. 

Mitchell (Sir Andbew Mitchell, KB., Admiral of the 
Blue Squadron, descended of Westshore, d. 26 Feb. 1806). 
Sa. a fesse ar. in chief a slip of oak fructed betw. two 
mascles and in base an anchor erect cable or, a border 
chequy of the field and of the last. C)«8t— Issuing from 
behind three ears of barley ppr. a cubit arm vested in naval 
uniform the hand grasping a broken staff from which 
suspends the Batavianflag depressed. Supporters — Dexter, 
a sailor habited ppr. his exterior hand supporting a flag az. 
in thedexterchief point amascleor; sinister, a lion reguard. 
or, gorged with a collar sa. thereon two mascles or, on the 
head a naval crown az. JV/of(o— lUis honos venit. 

Mitchell (Audley, Sidmouth, co. Devon; as borne by 
Jaues Williau Mitchell, Esq., Bothesay Herald, sometime 
Lieut, in H.M. 42nd and 17th regts.). Sa. a fesse invected, 
In chief an annulet betw. two mascles, and in base a 
mascle betw. two annulets all or, the whole within a border 
chequy of the last and first, and on an escutcheon of pre- 
tence, ar. on a chev. nebuly gu. betw. three fountains 
as many eagles rising ppr., for Sykes. Crest — A mascle sa. 
interiacd by three ears of barley erect slipped and leaved 
or. Motto- Sapiens qui assiduus. 

Moens (Tweed, Hants; William John Charles Moens, 
Esq., of Tweed, is of ancient Dutch descent, the surname 
derived from the town of Mons, in Hainault. Belonging to 
one of the seven Patrician families of Brussels, Godfrey van 
Mons was Echevin of that city in 1287. See Bi'.tkcn'n Tro- 
phies de Brabant, Sup., Part /., p. 41)7. About 1474-€, 
William de Mons ceded his Seigneurie of Chastres to his 
younger brother, Ian von Mons Kidder, and for political 
reasons left Brabant and settled in Holland, where he was 
called William Moons, or Moeni. Jacob Bemelot Moens, 
Esq., of Rotfcrdam, sprung from this old race, established 
himself in England during Napoleon's conquest of Holland, 
ana was father of the present possessor of Tweed). Gu. a 
chev. or betw. three trefoils ar. Crest — Two eagle's wings 
conjoined ar. 

Mofirg' (ReeA-Mooo, Cholwell House, Somerset. Kev. John 
Bees assumed by royal licence in 1805 the additional sur- 
name and arms of Mogg, in pursuance of the will of the 
maternal grandfather of his wife, Mary, only child and heir 
of William Wooi-dridoe, by Mary, his wife, dau. of John 
Mooo, Esq., of Cholwell House aforesaid). Ann, Crett, and 
Motto correctly given at p. 692. 

Molison (Errol Park, co. Perth). Or two cross crosslets 
fltch^c in chief and in base the attires of a hart fixed to the 
scalp gu. a chief chequy of the second and first, in fees point 
a crescent sa. for diff. 

Money-Coutta. S't Coutts. 

Monteflorc (Goldsmid-Montehore, Claud Joseph Got.n- 
■MIS MoMTETioKE, Ksq., of Purtmau Square, and of Buliol 



College, Oxford, B.A., took by royal licence, 1882, the 
additional name and arms of Goldsmid, and will bear tho.se 
arms quarterly, which see). 

Monk (LiNGARD - Monk, Fulshaw, co. Chester, 1883). 
Quarterly: l.st, counter-quartered, 1st and 4th, ar. a pale 
gu. over all a chev. engr. betw. three lions' heads erased, all 
counterchanged, for Monk ; 2nd and 3rd, harry of six or and 
vair, on a bendcottised sa. three escallops ar., for Linoard; 
2nd, sa. a quadrangular castle ar. betw. two fliiunches of 
the second each charged with a garb of the field, for Bowson; 
3rd, erm. six stags' heads cabossed gu. three, two, and one, 
for Bodghet; 4lh, or, three chevronels engr. betw. three 
plummets az., for Jennings. Crests — Ist, Monk : A dragon 
passant per pale gu. and ar. wings vairee of the same sup- 
porting with its dexter claw an escutcheon ar. charged with 
a lion's head erased gu. ; Motto over — Tout d'en haut. 2nd, 
LiNGABD : A wolTs head erased sa. charged with an escallop 
and holding in the mouth a cross crosslet fitch^e both ar, ; 
Motto over — Toujours prcst. 

Moore (represented by FouAMBr-). Ar. on a chev. indented 
betw. three moor cocki! sa. as many pallets or, each charged 
with a fleur-de-lis of the second. 

MorBra.n(HowABD-SPEAB Morgan, Esq., of Tegfynydd, Llan- 
falteg, CO. Carmarthen, J. P., D.L., High Sheriff, 1875). Gu. 
on a pile ar. betw. two stags' beads couped of the last, a 
dexter arm in armour embowed holding in the band a tilting 
spear all ppr. Crest — A stag's head couped ar. collared gu. 
holding in the mouth a tilting spear bendways ppr. Motto — 
Fortitudine et prudentia. 

Moriarty. See Ceompe. 

Morley (granted to the wife of Henry Hiooins, Esq., of 
Moreton Jefferies, J. P.). Per saltire az. and gu. two 
leopards' faces jessant-de-lis in pale, and as many anchors 
erect in fesse or. 

Morris (registered to Thomas Henry Morris, Esq., of the 
Lodge, Halifax, co. York., J. P., Lieut. 2nd West York 
Yeomanry Cavalry, son of the late William Morris, Esq., 
of the Lodge, J. P. and D.L., and the descendants of his 
father.) Per saltire gu. and sa. guttle d'eau, a lion passant 
arg. betw. four scaling ladders, two in pale and two in fesse 
or. Crest — An heraldic antelope sejant arg. guttle de sang 
resting the dexter foot ou a scaling ladder or. Motto- 
lies non verba quxso. 

Mounsey (Castletown, Carlisle, co. Cumberland). Chequy 
or and gu. a chief of the first thereon betw. two estoiles sa. a 
pale also sa. charged with a mullet gold. Crest — A derai 
grifHn gu. collared and chained or holding in the dexter 
claw a flag staff in bend ppr. therefrom flowing to the sinister 
a pennon az. and resting the sinister claw on a mullet sa. 
Motto — Semper paratus. 

Mountford (Frederick Batting Mountford, Esq., Regina 
Road, Islington). Az. two chevronels betw. as many 
feathers erect in chief, and a fleur-de-lis In base all ar. 
Crest— in front of two feathers sallirtwise ar. a fleu de-lis 
az. 3/o»o— Quod Deus vult volo. 

Mount Temple, Baron. See Temple. 

Mowbray, Baron. See Stodrton. 

Mowbray (Mortimer, co. Berks, and Bishopwearmouth, 
CO. Durham, bart. ; created 3 May, 1880). Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, Mowbray : Gu. a lion ramp. erm. two flaunches or, 
each charged with three billets in pale az. ; 2nd and 3rd, 
Cornish : Per pale az. and sa. a chev. embattled betw. in 
chief two roses and in base a cross patteo or. Crests — 1st, 
Mowbbay: An oak tree or, therefrom pendent an escocheon 
gu. charged with a lion's head erased ar. ; 2nd, Cornish : 
Betw. two branches of laurel in saltire a Cornish chough 
rising ppr. charged on the breast with a cross-palt&j or. 
Motloen—Suo Stat roboro virtus, for Mowbray ; and Deus 
pascit corvos, for Cornish. 

Mulchinock (Cloghers House, co. Kerry; granted to 
Edward Mulchinock, Esq., J. P., son of Michael Mulchi- 
nock, of Trulce, mercliant). Quarterly, or and az. in tlio 
1st and 4th quarters, a trefoil slipped vert in the 2nd and 
3rd, a crescent ar. all within a border gu. Crest — A stag's 
head erased ppr. charged on the neck with a trefoil slipped 
or, and holding in the mouth an olive branch vert. Motto — 
Itur ud astra. 

MusgTOve (exemplified to.IoHN Musobove Musgrove, Esq., 
of Ksworth, near Hadleigh, Suffolk, on his asHumiticr by 
royal licence, 1882, the surname and arms of Mustfruvc, in 



MUS 



SUPPLEMENT. 



OPP 



lieu of those of Norman, in compliance with the testamentary 
injunction of Sir John Musprove, bart.). Ar. two bendleta 
en^r. az. betw. three lozenges, one and two, of the last each 
charged with a fleur-de-lis or. Cresl — A derai lion ppr. 
gorged with a collar gemelle sa. and holding betw. the paws 
a lozenge az. charged with a cross -irosslet or. Motto— Uil 
desperandum. 
Uustard <East Lodjce, CO. Essex; Daniel Mustard, Esq., 
of East Lodge, Mistley). Per pale gu. and or three escallops 
betw. two chevronels, the whole betw. two crosses pat^e 
counterchanged. Crest — Issuant from a chaplet of ohve a 
dexter hand couped at the wrist ppr. holding a passion 
cross gu. 

N 

NATJNTON (Alderton and Letheringham Abbey, Suffolk, 
of great antiquity in that county. "Some avouch," says 
Fuller, in his " Worthies," " that this family came here be- 
fore, the others that they came in witii the Cimqueror." 
The representative temp.. Queen Elizabeth and James I., 
was Sir Robert Naunton, Kt., Principal Secretary of State, 
and afterwards Master of the Wards and Councillorof Stale ; 
author of " Fragmenta Kegalia," grandson of William 
Nacnton, and Elizabeth, his wife, dau. of Sir Anthony 
WiNGFiELD, K.G., of Letheringham. On his monument in 
old Letheringham Church appeared a grand escutcheon of 
all the quarterings of Nadnton. His only dau., Penelope, 
j)i. Pacl, Lord Batnino. Sir Robert's brother, William 
Nadnton, succeeded to Letheringham Abbey, and had a 
son and heir, Robert Nadnton, Esq., of Letheringham 
Abbey, who di.Mart, dau. and co-heir of Abthcb Coke, 
and their only child, Theophila, wife of John Leman, Esq., 
of Charsfleld, was great-grandmother of Theophila Lemon, 
an heiress, who m. Thomas Rede, Esq. and had issue; 
the eldest dau., Elizabeth, m. Rev. Richard Tdbner, who 
d. 1835, and the second, Sarah Leman, »i., in 1787, Kev. 
Samdel Lovick Cooper. Of the former, the great-grandson 
is Major Alfred Edward Tdrner, A.D.C. to H. E. the 
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He is entitled, by descent 
through heiresses, to the numerous quarterings of the 
Nauntons). .'^a. three martlets arg. Crest — A basilisk ppr. 
Mottoes — Ut vidi, ut vici ; Below, Constant et vray. 

liedham (Wymondley, co. Hertford; in 1537, King Henry 
VI II. granted the lordship and site of the dissolved priory of 
Wymondley, to James Nedham, Clerk and Surveyor of the 
King's Works : his descendant, George Nedham, Esq., of 
Wymondley Priory, 6. in 1672, left three daus. his co-heirs, 
Susan, d. unm.; Barbar.t, m. John Sherwin, Esq.; and 
Martha, m. 1733, Thomas Browne, Esq., Norroy, afterwards 
Garter King of Arms). Ar. on a bend enar. az. betw. two 
bucks" heads cabossed sa. attired or, an escallop of the last. 
Crest — A buck's head sa. attired gold, rising out of a crown 
or garland pallisado or. 

Ifeill (Andrew Charles Brisbane Neill, Esq., 22, Ryder 
Street, St. James's, Westminster). Per pale nebulee gu. and 
az. a lion ramp. betw. three pheons in chief and a serpent 
nowed in base all or. Crest — Upon a mount vert the em- 
battlements of a tower ppr. surmounted by a pheoa or. 
Motto — Floresco favenie Deo. 

Newborougrh. (Rarkley, co. Somerset ; George New- 
borough, fem/>. Jamesl., son of Roger Newborough, grand- 
son of Thomas Newboboogu, and great-grandson of John 
Newborow. Visit. Somerset, 1623). Or, three bendlets az. 
a border engr. gu. 

New Branswick, Province of. See Canada, 
Dominion of. 

Ne-wcastle, See of. Arms on the Seal of the Bishop 
of Newcastle impaling WiLBERFORCE. Per fesse az. and gu. 
in chief a representation of the cross of St. Cutbbert or, 
and in base three castles, two and one, ar. 

Ne'Wton (Compton-Deverell. and Swell, co. Somerset ; John 
Newton, of Compton, temp. James I., son of Edward 
Newton, of Swell, and grandson of Thomas Newton, of 
same place, who was great-grandson of William Newton 
and Idonea Montagu, his wife. Visit. Somerset, 1623). 
Ar. a lion ramp. sa. charged on the shoulder with a cross 
pattee of the field. 

ITorth (Baron Nortlt). Az. a lion passant or, between three 
Beurs-de-lis arg. Crest — A dragon's head erased sa. ducally 
gorged and chained or. Supporters — Two dragon's wings 
elevated sa. ducally gorged and chained or. A/o((o— Aninio 
et fide. 

Northampton, Marquess of. See Comptos. 



Norrls (Splate, co. Somerset; John Norris, temp. Jumea I., 
son of Hugh Nobbis, of same place. Visit. Somerset, 1623. 
Granted by Cooke, Clarenceux, 1573). Sa. biUettee ar. a 

cross flory of the last. 

Northover (Aller, co. Somerset : James Northovbb, of 
Allei, temp. James 1., son of Thomas Nobthoveb, and 
grandson of John Nobthoveb, both of same place. Visit. 
Somerset, 1623. Arms granted by Camden, Clarenceux, 
1614). Or, five lozenges in saltire betw. four crosses crosslet 
az. See p. 739. 

Norton, Baron. See Addeblkt. 

Norton (Sir Dddlet Nobton^ Knt., Principal Secretary of 
State for Ireland, tevip. Charles I., page 740). The correct 
blazon of the arms is as follows — .4r. on a chev. betw. 
three crescents az., a crescent of the field for diff. 

Norton (Wainsford, co. Dublin; Baggot Street, City of 
Dublin, and co. Wicklow. Confirmed 1883 to Captain Cecil 
William Nobton, Cromwell Boad, South Kensington, co. 
Middlesex, 5th Lancers, son of Rev. William Norton, 
Rector of Baltinglass, and grandson of Tbeophilds Nobton, 
Esq., of Wainsford, Capt. Battle Axe Guards, A.D.C. to the 
Marquess Wellesley, K.G., Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, who 
was son of William Norton, Esq., of Wainsford, whose 
ancestors settled in Ireland during the Commonwealth, and 
claimed descent from Nobton, of Birlingham, co. Worcester). 
Per pale az. and gu. a maunch erm. on a chief engr. or, a 
lion pass. sa. Crest — A tiger's head erased or, charged with 
a trefoil vert and holding in the mouth a broken spear ppr. 
Motto — Frangaa non flecte*. 

Nova Scotia, Province of. See Canada, Dominion or. 



OAKHADI (co. Berks; confirmed to Ricbabd Oakbam, of 

London, " descended out of Berks." Visit. 1633). Gu. a 
fesse betw. three crescents ar. 

Oates (Leeds, co. York, descended from William Oates, 
of Nether Denby, co. York, temp. Queen Elizabeth, whose 
family had possessed landed estate in that locality from a 
remote period. His grandson settled at Leeds towards the 
close of the I7th century. The head of the family, Joseph 
Henbt Oates, of Carr House, Meanwood, dying in 1868, 
that property was sold, and the local representation devolved 
on Mrs. Scsan Oates, of Meanwoodside, Leeds (only sur- 
viving daughter and heiress of EdwabdGbace, of St. Anne's, 
Burley, Leeds, J. P.), and her surviving sons by the late 
Edwabo Oates, of Meanwoodside, younger brother of 
Joseph Henry aforesaid. The present William Henbt 
Coape Oatbs, of Langford Hall, Newark, late 97th Regt., 
High Sheriff of Notts, 1880, comes vf the same family, 
whence also sprang the late Fbedebice William Oates, of 
Barlings, Lincoln, J. P., and the late Peninsular veteran, 
James Poole Oates, K.H., Lieut. Col. 88th Regt., Con- 
naught Rangers). Ar. two bendlets engr. az. in cTiief a cock 
gu. a canton erm. Crest — A cubit arm in armour ppr. 
charged with two bendlets engr. az. the hand grasping a 
dirk, the point upwards, also ppr. pommel and hilt or. 
Motto — Persevere, changed by some of the family for Esse 
quam videri and sua dextra cuique. 

O'Cuillean (Carbery, co. Cork; an ancient Irish sept, 
descended from Coilean an catba, who was of the same 
stock as the sept of O'Uonovan). Ar. two lions ramp, com- 
batant ppr. armed and langued gu. Crest — A pelican 
Tulning herself ppr. 

Oge (Hampton House, Brentwood, co. Essex; Sir William 
Anderson Ogo, Knt., of Hampton House, Sheriff of London 
and Middlesex 1881-2, son of Robert Ooq, of Arbroath. 
North Britain). Az. a saltire betw. two towers triple 
towered, one in chief and the other in base, and as many 
stags' beads couped in fesse all or. Crest — Within two amis 
couped at the shoulders erect and embowed vested az. cuffed 
or, holding betw. the hands a thistle ppr. a wreath of 
oakleaves vert. Motto — Fugiendo vincimus. 

Ogril'vy-Dalg'leish. See Dalgleisu. 

Omond (Carness, Orkney). Per fesse ar. and az a two- 
masted ship or, sails furled, masts and rigging ppr. Crest — 
A dexter arm erect, the hand holding a spear in bend 
sinister ppr. Motto — A vise le temps. 

Ontario, Pro'Vince of. See Canada, Dominion of. 

Oppenh.eimer (Charles Oppenheimeb, H.B.M. Consul at 

Frankfort-on-Mainr). Quarterly gu. and ar. a cross invected 



OBD 



SUPPLEMENT. 



PEC 



betw. a lion ramp, reguardant supponing a flag staff there- 
from flowing to the dexter a banner ia the first and fourth 
quarters and an anchor erect in the second and third all or. 
Crest— Two branches of oak in saltire vert fructed or, in 
front of a flag staff in bend ppr. therefrom flowing a banner 
?u. surmounting a trident in bend sinister also ppr. 

Orde (Campbell-Obdb ; Sir John William Powlett Om>e, 
3rd ban., of Morpeth, assumed by royal licence 1880, the 
additional surname of Campbell). Quarterly, Ist andl 4thv 
sa. three salmons haurient per pale ar. and or, forOBDE; 
2nd and 3rd, gyronny of eight or and sa. a bordure componee 
erm. and vert, in the centre a crescent of the last for 
difference, for Campbell. C>-e$ts — 1st, Orde, an elk's head 
erased or, gorged with a collar invected sa. ; 2nd, Camp- 
bell, a dexter hand ppr. holding a spur or, strap also ppr. 
Mounts — Over Okde Creit, Mitis et fortis, o.ver Campbell 
Crest, Forget not. 

Omxe. See Gabnett-Obme. 

O'Shee (Sheestown and Gardcnmorris, grantied to Odoneus 
O'Shee, 1381, confirmed to Sir Richard Shee, by Clarenceux, 
1582, and by Ulster, 1795, to John O'Shee, of Sheestown and 
Gardcnmorris. Anns, <i:c. — See page 764. 

Osmand (William Henry Seville Osmaniv, Esq., The Syca- 
mores, Stawell, in the Colony of Victoria). Az. three 
cross crosslets in fesse within two barrulels dancette, the 
whole betw. two eagles displ. all ar. Crest — An eagle ar. 
supporting with the dexter leg a flag staff ppr. th/erefrom 
flowing to the sinister a banner of the arms^ Motto — Fidem 
servare. 

Over Darwen, Boroug'lL of (co. Lancaster). Or, a 
fesse wavy with cottises also wavy az. betw. three sprigs of 
the cotton tree slipped and fructed ppr. Crest — In front of 
a denii miner habited ppr. hotding over his shoulder a pick 
or, a shuttle fessewise gold thread pendent ppr. Motto — 
Absque labore nihil. 

Owen (Glansevem, ro. Montgomery; exemplifled to AsTHnB 
Charles Homphreys-Owen, Esq., of Glansevem, M.A., 
J. P. and D.L., eldest son of Erskine Humphreys, Esq., 
harrister-at-Law, by Eliza, his. wife, dau. of Edward 
JoHNES, Esq., of Garthmyl, upon his takir»g by royal licence 
the additional surname and arms^of Owen in 1876, under a 
settlement made by Mrs. Owen, of Glansevem, widow 
of his maternal great-grand-uncle). Sa. a tilting spear 
erect or, the head ppr. imhrued gu. betw. three scaling 
ladders ar. on a chief erm. a fort triple-towered also ppr. 
Crfit—A. wolf salient ppr. supporting a scaling ladder as in 
the arms A/o»oes— Torav cyn plygav and Flecti non, frangi. 

Owen (Peteb Owen, Esq., The Elms, Eastham, Chjester). 
Per chev. engr. ar. and gu. in chief two fleur-de-lis of the 
last, and in base a lion vert of the first. Crest — A demi 
wyvern ar. semee de lis ga. supporting with the dexter claw 
an escocheon of the last charged with a crescent also. ar. 
Motto — Deo duce comite induslria. 

Owens Collegre (Manchester ; granted H Oct. 1871). Ar. 
a serpent nowed vert on a chief ntbult-e az. a sun issuant or. 
Cr'^st — Betw. two branches of laurel a palm tree ppr. 
suspended in front thereof by a riband az. a shield ar. 
thareon a lion ramp. gu. and a chief of the last cliarKed 
with three bendletaor. MoHo — Arduus ad solem. 



PAGE (Clifton, CO. Gloucester,, and, Ifcidley, co. Middle- 
sex). Gu. on a chev. cottiscd or, betw. martlets of the last 
two arrows chevronwise points upwards ppr. Cmt — A dcmi 
Catherine wheel or, thereon a dove ppr. goiged with a collar 
geniel and holding in the beak an olive branch leaved and 
slipped also or. AIoUo— Seet peace and ensure it. 

Palgrrave (Bryn-y-gynog, co. Denbigh; Thomas Pal- 
riRAve, Esq., J. P., eldest surviving son of William Pal- 
ORAVK, Collector of Revenue and Customs at Yarmouth and 
Dulilin, who was, according to the pedigree of his family 
recorded in the College of Anns, sixth in descent from 
William PALfiRAHE, of Kulham, St. Mary Magdalen, co. 
Korfolk, whose elder brother, Thomas Palobave, d. 6 March, 
1638, and to whose memory a monument still exists with the 
arms of the family of Pali;bave, viz., " A lion ramp, and a 
crescent for diff."). Az. a lion ramp, guard, betw. two 
crescents in fesse ar. Crent — In front of a leopard's head 
affrontce erased ar. gorged with a collar gemel az. a cre.Hcenl 
also az. M'ltlo — Pro rogc et patriA. 

Palk (Rni-oit Halrinn). Ra. an eagle displ. ar. beaked and 
membered or within, a bordure engr. of the second. Sv.p- 



porters—Oa either side an Indian ppr. his waist cloth and 
turban ar. Crett — On a semi-terrestrial globe of the 
northern hemisphere ppr. an eagle rising ar. beaked and 
membered or. Motto — Ducente Deo. 

Palmer (Chables Mark Palmer, Esq., of GrinWe Fjirk, co. 
York, M.P.) Sa. on a chev. betw. thre* crescents in chiel 
and a lion pass, in base ar. two lilting spears chevronwise 
ppr. Crest — In front of a tilling speap e»ect ppr. a wyverD 
or resting the dexter foot on a crescent ar. Motto — Par sit 
fortuna labori. 

Parker (Cuerden). Sec TawNELEY-PABKEB. 

Parker (Castle Lough, co. Tipperary ; confirmed to Anthont 
Parker, Esq., of Castle Lough, High Sheriff co. Tipperary^ 
1876, eMest son of Rev. Standish Grady Parker, of Castle 
Lough, and to the descendants of his grandfather, Anthoni 
Parker, Esq., of Castle Lough, High Sheriff co. Limerick, 
1761, and of co. Tipperary, 17G8). Sa. a stag's head cabossed 
belw. two flaunches ar. in the centre chief point a mullet or. 
Crtst — A stag salient ppr. charged on the shoulder with a 
mullet as in the arms. Mottot — Fideli certa merces. 

Parker (Fair Oak, Whitewell, Clitheroe, co. Lancaster; 
exemplified to Henry Chdte Little, Esq., of Bowland, in 
same co., upon his assuming by royal licence the surname 
ofPABKEBin lieu of Little). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, vert 
on a chev. invected betw. three stags' heads caboshed or as 
many stumps of oak trees eradicated and sprouting ppr. ; 
2nd and 3rd, sa. a saltire vair betw. four escocheons ar. 
Greats— 1st, a staig ppr. gorged with a collar gemel vert 
resting the de^xter forefoot on a stump of a tree, as in the 
anns; 2nd, a leopard's head erased sa. gorged with a collar 
vair, pendent therefrom an escocheon ar. charged with a 
crescent also sa. Motto — Non fluctu non flatu movetur. 

Parker (Moorehouse Hill, co. Cumberland; exemplified to 
Isaac Field, Esq., of Moorehouse Hill, upon his assuming 
by royal licence, dated 11 June, 1790, the surname of 
Pabkeb only, in. compliance with the will of his maternal 
great-uncle William Parker, Esq., of Moorehouse Hill). 
Vert two bars erm. betw. three stags" heads erased or. 
Crest — X mount vert thereon a stag reguard. ppr. collar and 
line therefrom reflexed over thi; back or, its dexter forefoot 
resting on a shield erect az. charged with a garb gold. 
3io((o— Medio. tutissimus ibis. 

Pajnall (The Cottage, Llanstephan^ co. Carmarthen; High 
Sheriff 1877;. Ar. three escallops, in chev. within two 
chevronels betw. two griffins' heads erased in chief tnd 
as many wings joined in lure in base, all gu. Crest — A 
griffin's head betw. two wings gvL each wing charged with 
an escallop, and in the mouth anothen escallop ar. Motto^- 
Spero in Deo. 

Parnell (Thomas-Parnell Pabnell, Esq., of Sheephouse, 
CO. Somerset, Barrisler-at-law). Gu. two cheveronels an 
estoile betw. two escallops in chief and a griffin pass, in 
ba.se ar. CreU — A griffin pass. ar. wings elevated gu. in 
the beak an estoile, and holding in the dexter forepaw an 
escallop both also gu. Mot:o — Est modus in rebus. 

Paul (William. Bond. Padl, Esq., of Wearne Wyche, High 
Ham. Soiiierset, banker). Erm. a chev. az. surmounted 
by anotlicr or, thereon three hiu'ts on a chief sa. as many 
cross crosslets of the third. Crest — .\ demi griGBn 
reguard. or, gorged with a collar gemel and holding betw. 
the claws a cross crosslet az. the winns addorsed of the 
last, seiiice of cross crosslets also or. Jl/offo-^Per crucein 
ccelum. 

Payne (Hutton, co. Somerset). Gu. three cross crosslets or. 

Peacock (Willesden, co> Middlesex). As. on a chev. az. 
bi'tw. two. cockatrices in chief of the last, and a peacock in 
his pride in base ppr. two annulets conjoined palewise of 
the first. Creft — A cockatrice az. charged with two annulets, 
as in the arms, resting tho dexter leg on an escocheon ar. 
charged with a peacock in his pride ppr 

Pease (Hutton Low Cross, and Pinchinthorpe, co. York, 
hart. ; created 18 May, 1882). Per fesse az. and gu. a fesse 
ncbuly erm. betw. two Iambs pass, in chief ar. anil in base 
upon a mount ppr. a dove rising of the fourth, holding in 
the beak a pea-stalk the blossom and pods also ppr. Crest — 
Upon the capital of an Ionic column a dove rising, holding 
in the beak a pea-stalk as in the arms all ppr. Motto — 
Pax et spes. 

Peckover (Ai.fJKBnoN Peckover, Esq., of Sibald's Holme, 
Wisbech, co. Cambridge; descended from Edmund Peckover, 
of Charlton, co. Nonhampton, Ir.uiji. Oliver Cromwell). Per 



PEM 



SUPPLEMENT. 



PON 



j>a1e en. and sa. a garb or, on a chief nebulee of the last, 
three lions Tamp. az. Cre^t — A lion ramp. az. holding in 
the dexter forepaw a sprig of oak leaved fructed and slipped 
ppr. and resting the sinister forepaw on an escutcheon 
charged with the arms. Motto — In Christo speravi. 

Pember ^Lyonshall and Tuthill, co. Hereford ; as recorded 
visit. Coll. Arms, 16»3. to Francis Pember, Esq., of New- 
port House, in the parish of Almeley, High Sheriff in 16.50). 
Arg. three pheasants ppr. a chief az. Crest— On a mount 
vert a pheasant feeding on a stalk of wheat ppr. 

Pender (Middleton Hall, co. Linlithgow, and Footscray, 
Bexley, Kent, as borne by .John Pender, Esq., M.P. for 
Wick, J. P. and D.L.). Gu. on a bend ar. two lions' heads 
erased of the first. Crest — A demi lion or, holding a sabre 
ppr. Motto — Persevero. 

Perrins (James Dyson Perrins, Esq., F.K.A.S., of Daven- 
ham Bank, Malvern, co. Worcester, J. P.). Gu. three piles, 
two in chief and one in base or, each charged with a pome- 
eranate seeded and slipped ppr. on a chief erm. three 
leopards' faces of the first. Crest — A demi talbot ar. gorged 
with a collar nebulfe and charged on the shouhler with two 
annulets interlaced fesswise gu. holding between the paws 
a pomegranate as in the arms. Motto^Perenne sub sole 
nihil. 

Petit des Etans (Huguenot family from the neighbour- 
hood of Caen; the refugee Louis Petit, Brigadier-General 
and Governor of St. Phillips Castle, in Minorca, d. in 1720; 
the last male representative was Rev. John Louis Petit, 
A.M., F.S.A., who d. 1868. He had seven sisters and co- 
heiresses, 1 Harriet Laetitia, m. Thomas Salt, Esq., of 
Weeping Cross, Staffordshire; 2 Mary Ann, m. Henry Chet- 
wynd, Esq., of Brocton Lodge ; 3 Emma Gentille; 4 Eliza- 
beth, 111. David Haig, Esq., of Lochrin ; 5 Louisa, d. unm. ; 
6 Susanna; and 7 Maria Katherine, m. Kev. William 
Edward Jelf, D.D., Vicar of Carleton, Yorkshire). Gu. a 
dexter hand issuing from a cloud in sinister, holding a 
Roman fasces, axe to the sinister all ppr. in chief two 
mullets. 

Pettit (Leighton Buzzard, co. Bedford; Ei>wari> Pettit, 
Esq.). Per fesse erm. and sa.an eagle displ. with two heads 
counterchanged in chief three martlets of the second. Crtst 
— A demi eagle displ. with two heads erm. gorged with a 
crown vallery or, in each beak a cross botoimee fitchee sa. 

Phillpps (Picton Castle, co. Pembroke ; exemplified to 
Charles Edward Gregg Fisher, Esq., eldest sonof Ebward 
Fisher, Esq., of Spring Dale, co. York, upon his assuming 
by royal licence, dated 29 July, 1876, tlie gurnaine of 
I'Hiupps, in lieu of that of Fisher, in compliance with the 
testamentary injunction of his father-in-law, Rev. James 
Henrt Alexander Philipps, M.A., of Picton Castle). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a lion ramp. sa. gorged with a 
ducal coronet, and therefrom a chain reflected over the 
back or, and for distinction in the centre chief point a cross 
crosslet of the second, for Philipps; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a 
chev. gu. three trefoils slipped of the field in chief as many 
fleurs-de-lis of the second, for Fisher. Crests — 1st, Philipps: 
A lion ramp, gorged and chained as in the arris charged on 
the shoulder for distinction with a cross crosslet or; 2nd, 
Fisher: in front ( f a bulrush erect a kingfisher ppr. resting 
the dexter claw on a fleur-de-lis or. Mottoes — Ducit amor 
patrise; Virtute et fide. 

Phillimore (The Coppice, Shiplake, co. Oxford, Bart.; 
created 21 Dec. 1881). Sa. three bars indented erminois in 
chief an anchor betw. two cinquefoils or. Crest — In front of 
a tower ar. thereon a falcon volant ppr. holding in the beak 
a lure gold three cinquefoils fessewise or. Motto — Fortem 
posce animum. 

Phillipps (Landue, co. Cornwall ; exemplified to Thomas 
Winsloe, Esq., upon his assuming, by royal licence, dated 
8 Xov. 1798, the surname and arms of Phillipps). Oi, a 
lion ramp. sa. collared and chain reflexed over the back of 
the first and holding betw. the paws an escutcheon gu. 
charged with a stag's head eraseu ar. Cresl — .\ lion pass, 
tail extended sa. resting the dexter forepaw on an escutcheon 
ar. charged with a chev. also sa. Motto — Ce m'est egal. 

Phillips-Treby. See Trebt, of Goodamoor. 

Pidcock (originally of co. Derby, afterwards of cos. SCaffcrd 
and Worcester). Per pale sa. and gu. a pied cock per fesse 
or and a . betw. three acorns of the third. Crest — A bar 
shot ppr. thereon a griffin segreant sa. holding within its 
claws a grenade fired also ppr. .WvtJO— SeiRBetir, je te prie 
garde ma vie. 



Pilfold (Waraham, Newtimber, and Horsham, co. Sosser; 
granted to James Pilfold, of Newtimber, and John Pilfolb, 
of Horsham, Capt. Royal Navy, sons of Charles Pilfold, 
of EfiBngham, and to their descendants, and to their sisters, 
Elizabeth, wife of Timothi Shelley, Esq., son and heir 
apparent of Sir Bysshe Shelley, Bart. ; Charlotte, wife of 
Thomas Grove, of Fern, co. Wilts ; and Bathia, wife of 
Rev. Gilbert Jackson, D.D., Rector of Upper Donhead, co. 
Wilts; and also to be borne by Mary, wife of Thomas 
Charles Medwin, of Horsham, and Katherine Pilfold, 
daus. and co-heirs of John Pilfold, of Horsham, eldest 
brother of said Charles Pilfold, of Effingham, which said 
John Pilfold, of Horsham, and Charles Pilfold, of Effing- 
ham, were sons of John Pilfold, baptized at Warnham, 26 
Aug. 1680, who was 6th in descent from Richard Pilfold, of 
Warnham, who d. 10 July, 1580). Az. a lion ramp, or, 
holding between the paws a sword erect ppr. pommel and 
hilt gold, two flanches of the second, each charged with an 
anchor erect sa. Crest — A sea horse erect per fesse sa. and 
or, supporting a trident, also sa. Motto — Audaces fortuna 
juvat. 

Pilfold (John Pilfold, of Horsham, co. Sussex, Capt. Royal 
Navy; grant to him and his descendants of Honourable 
Augmentation, 1808). Same ^rms as the foregoing, a canton 
of Honourable Augmentation, gu. thereon pendent by a 
ribbon ar. fimbriated az. from a naval crown a representa- 
tion of the medal given to the said John Pilfold, for hi» 
gallant service in the battle off Cape Trafalgar, 21 Oct. 1805, 
or. Crest same as preceding, gorged with a naval crown, 
and pendent therefrom a medal as in the arms. Mott» — 
Audaces fortuna juvat. 

Pinckney (Middlesex House, Batheaston, co. Somerset, and 
Tawstock Court, Barnstaple, co. Devon). Or, five fusils con- 
joined in fesse gu. each charged with an erm. spot of the field 
on a chief nebulee of the second three griffins' heads erased 
of the first. Crest— hehiod three fusils or, a griffin's head 
erased gn. collared gold. Motto — Deus nobis. 

Pinney (Pretor-Pinney, Somerton, Curry Rivel, and 
Burton Pynsent, all co. Somerset). Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, gu. three crescents or, issuing from each a crosi 
crosslet fitchee ar., for Pinney : 2nd and 3rd, or, an eagle 
displ. with two heads vert, grasping in the claws a fasces 
in base fessewise ppr. in each beak a trefoil slipped of 
the second, for Pretob. Crests — 1st, Pinsey: An anned 
hand and arm ppr. holding a cross crosslet fitchee ar. : 2nd, 
Pretor : A demi eagle or, wings endorsed sa. semee of 
trefoils slipped gold, in the beak a like trefoil vert. Mott» 
— Amor patria. 

Pinney (Pretor-Pinney; Frederick Wake Pretor-Pikney, 
Esq., the Grange, Somerton, co. Somerset). Same A-nsnt, &c. 

Pinney (Pbetor-Pinney; Rev. John Charles Pbetob 
PixsEY, Vicar of Coleshill, co. Warwick). Same Arms, &c. 

Pitt-Rivers (Rushmore, Salisbury, co. Wilts ; exemplified 
to Lieut. -Gen. Adgcstds Henry Lahr Fo,x-Pi.tt-Rivebs, 
F.R.S., late Vice-President of the Society of Antiquaries,. 
President of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain 
and Ireland, and Inspector of Ancient Monnraents in Great 
Britain, eldest surviving son of William Pitt Lane Fox, 
Esq.. Gren. Gds., and grandsoQ of James Lane F"ox, Esq., 
of Braraham Park, co. York, by Hon. Maroia- Lucy Pitt, 
his wife, dau. of George, \st lord Hirers, upon his assuming, 
by royal licence, 25 May, 1880, the surname of Pitt-Ru-ers, 
in compliance with the testamentary injunction of his great- 
uncle, George, 2nd Lovd Rivera. By the aforesaid royal 
licence the children of Lieut. -Gen. Fox-Pitt-Rivers assume 
the surname of Pltt, not Pitt-Rivers. Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, sa. a fesse chequy ar. and az. betw. three bezants, 
for Pitt; 2nd and 3fd, ar. a chev. betw. three foxes" heads 
erased gu., for Fox. Crests — 1st, Pitt: A stork ppr. ; 2nd, 
Fox : On a five leaved ducal coronet or, a fox pass. ppr. 
Motto — .ffiquam servar* mentem. 

Piatt (Bamby Manor, Notts, and Upper Breinton, co. 
Hereford. Sa. platce, a fret couped or, betw. four roses 
aj!g. seeded and barbed ppr. Crest — In front of a demi lion 
ramp. ppr. semife of plates, holding betw. the paws a rose 
arg. an escallop or. 

Pontifex (Bath ; Edmund PosriFES-, Esq., of Bath, 
descended from a family long seated in co. Buckingham, 
and his descendants, and the other descendants of his father, 
William Pontifex, Esq., of Cheshunt, co. Hertford, and( 
of London). Az. in base barry wavy of four ar. and of the 
field, a bridge of three arches embattled ppr. a chief of the 
second, thereon two pallets hetw. as many muUets of the 



POO 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BED 



fletd. Crut—A tower ppr. charged with a cross moline 
az. and tunnounted by a rainbow also ppr. Motto — In hoc 
■igao Tinces. 
Pooll (Hbnbt-Batten-Pooll, Timsbury and Road Manor, 
Somerset. Kobebt Fooll Henbt Battbn-Fooll, Esq., J. P., 
only son of Joseph Langfobd, Esq., ofTimsbury, by Anne 
Pooll, his wife, dau. of William Bkitton, Esq., of Corston, 
same co., assumed, by royal licence 1871, the surnames of 
Henbt-Batten-Pooll in lieu of patronymic). Ar. a lion 
ramp, az., armed and langued g\i., charged on the shoulder 
with a battle-axe ppr. betw. in fess two fountains and in pale 
as many fleurs-de-lis of the second. Crest— In front of a 
griffin's head erased erm., beaked and tongued gu., and 
charged on the neck with a fountain, a battle-axe fesswise 
ppr. Motto — Confide recte agens. 

Popple\7ell (quartered by C. E. G. Boldebo Babnabd, 
Esq., of Cave Castle, co. York;. Per bend az. and sa. 
on a bend betw. two creecenta ar. an eagle displ. of the 
second. 

Porter (Henbt Pobteb, Esq., Birlinghara, co. Worcester). 
Quarterly Ul and 4th, per fesse nebulee sa. and erm. a 
pale counterchanged and three bells ar., for Pobteb; 2nd 
and 3rd, or, on a fesse dancettee gu. betw. two escallops sa. 
a ducal coronet of the first betw. two roses ar. barbed and 
seeded ppr., for Taylob. Greets — 1st, Pobteb : Upon a 
mount vert in front of a portcullis with chains or, a tilting 
spear fessewise ppr.; 2nd, Tatlob: A demi lion sa. gorged 
with a collar pendent therefrom an escocheon or charged 
with two escallops palewise sa. and holding betw. the paws 
a ducal coronet or. Motto — Quod vult, valde vult. 

Powell (Geobge Powell, Esq., of Bock Dale, Kent). Per 
fesse nebulde or and gu. a lion Vamp. betw. three escocheons 
each charged with a sparrow-hawk close, all counterchanged. 
Crest — Two arrows in saltire ppr. thereon a sparrow. hawk 
close ar. holding in the beak a sprig of oak slipped and 
fructed vert. 

Powlea (John Diston Powles, Esq., of London). Per pale 
ar. and az. on a chev. erm. betw. three crosses potent 
counterchanged as many maacles of the second. Crest — -On 
a mount vert in front of two battleaxes in saltire or, a goat 
statant sa. armed gold. Motto — Qualis vita, finis ita. 

Preston, Sorougrh of (co, Lancaster). Az. a paschal 
lamb couchant with the banner all ar. round the head a 
nimbus or, in base the letters P. P. of the last. 

Price (John Pbioe, Esq., of the city of Amiens, France). 
Gu. an antelope pass, holding in the mouth a trefoil slipped 
or, on a chief of the last three spearheads sa. imbrued ppr. 
Crest — An antelope holding in the mouth a trefoil slipped or, 
resting the dexter foreleg on an escocheon also or, charged 
with a spearhead sa. imbrued ppr. Motto — Spee unica 
virtus. 

Price (Marrington Hall, and Brompton Hall, co. Salop ; con- 
firmed to Lewis Kicbabd Pric:e, of those places, Esq., son 
of Stafford Pbice, of Ucndon, Middlesex). Quarterly, 
nebule gu. and erm. in the Ist and 4tli quarters a lion ramp, 
reguard. arg. gorged with a collar sa., and in the 2nd and 
3rd quarters an escallop betw, three boars' heads erased of 
the last. Crest — A demi lion erininois holding betw, the 
paws an escallop sa. and transfixed through the mouth by a 
tilling sjiear paleways ppr. 

Price-Davies (exemplified to Stafford Pavies Pbice, 
Hooii Abthub Lewis Pbice, Llewellyn Albebic Emilius 
Pbice, and Gwendoline Cholita Mary Sceynton Price 
(the children Of Lewis Kichabd Price, Esq., of Marrington 
Hall, CO. Salop, last surviving son of Stafford Pbick, Esq., 
of Hendon House, Middlesex, by Mabcabet, his wife, dnu. 
of William Davies, Esq., of brompton Hall, co. Salop. 
On their receiving a royal iirencc, 7 Jan. laBO, to take 
the surname of Imvies in addition to and after that of 
Price, and to bear the arms of Davies and Price quarterly. 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. on a bend arg. a lion pass. betw. 
two estoilcs sa. in chief a lion's head erased of the second 
duially crowneil or, for Davies; '<Jnd and 3rd, Pbice, as 
above. Creit of Davies — Upon a mount vert betw. two 
antlers or, a lion's head erased arg. dmally crowned gu. and 
charged with an csUjile sa. Crest of Pbice — As above. 

Prior- Wandesforde. See Wandesfobde. 

Pyke (Winckley Square, Preston, Lancashire, as assigned by 
Pau-nt to Joseph Ptke, Esq., of lliat place, J. P.). Pit 
saltire sa. and or, two trefoils in pale, and in fess as many 
talbot«' heads erased, counterchanged. trait— In front of 
ji fountain, a pike flih, fes»ewi»p, ppr. Mottfi—Vpo tavente 
prngredlor. 



QUAIN (Richard Qdain,M.D., F.R.S.,of 67, Harley Street, 
Cavendish Square, London, eldest son of John Qcain, of 
Carrigoon, co. Cork, and the other de.icendants of his said 
father). Ar. a chev. engr. az. in chief two fers-de-moline 
gu. and issuant from the base a rock covered with daisies 
ppr. Crest — Ont of the battlements of a tower ppr. a denii 
lion ramp, or, charged on the shoulder with a trefoil vert, 
and holding betw. the paws a battleaxe also ppr. blade gold. 
Motto — Avorum non immemor. 

Quain (John Qcain, Esq., of Pembroke Road, Dublin, 
brother of Richard Quain, M.D.). Arin*, Ace, same as 
the preceding with due difference. 

Quebec Province. See Canada, Dominion of. 

duicke (Collection of Molyncux, Ulster, 1597-1632). Ar. a 
bend wavy betw. three cocks gu. on a canton per pale gu. 
and vert a swan or. Crest — A demi swan sans wings with 
two necks gu. round the necks a riband or. 



B. 

RAMSDBN (Furness Abbey, Barrow-in-Furness, co. 
Lancaster; Sib James Ramsden, Knt., J. P. cos., Lancaster 
and Cumberland, was first Mayor of the borough of Barrow- 
in-Furness). Az. on a chev. or betw. in chief two rams' 
head couped, and in base a fleur-de-lis ar. a bee volant 
betw. two arrows chevronwise, points upwards ppr. Crest — 
From the battlements of a tour or, a cubit arm in armour 
the hand in a gauntlet ppr. holding a fleur-de-lis ar. 
su.spended from the wrist by a chain gold an escocheon az. 
charged with a ram's head (ouped &r. 

Bankin (James Rankin, Esq., of Bryngwyn, co. Hereford, 
J. P. and D.L., High Sheriff 1873, Chief Steward of the city 
of Hereford, and M.P., only son of Robert Rankin, Esq., of 
Bromborough Hall, Cheshire). Or, a cinquefoil gu. betw. 
in chief a hatchet betw. two boars' heads erased, and in base 
a boar's head erased betw. two hatchets all sa. Crest — In 
front of a cubit arm pur. holding a hatchet sa. and charged 
with a cinquefoil gu. a boar's head erased of the second. 
A/otto— Prudentia et virtute. 

Bathdonnell, Baron. See Bcnbdbt. 

Bawlins (formerly of Houghton and Hook, afterwards of 
Beaucroft, Wimbor'e, co. Dorset, and Bournemouth, co. 
Hants). Sa. three vords in pale, points in chief ar. hiltij 
and pommels or. Crest — An arm embowed in armour ppv. 
holding in the gauntlet a falchion ar. hilt or. Motto— 
Cognosce teipsum, et disce pati. 

Bay (Rev. Joseph Ray, M.A., Magdalene Coll. Camb., Patron 
and Rector of Ashton-upon-Mersey, co. Chester, descended 
from the family of MacUae of the Western Highlands of 
Scotland, distiiuuished for its loyalty to the Royal House of 
Stuart. The direct male ancestor of the Rev. Joseph Ray, 
joined the Standard of Prince Charles Edward in 1745, 
fought at Culloden, and after the defeat was proscribed. 
He eventiiully found refuge in England). Ar. a fesse betw. 
two mullets in chief and a lion ramp, in base gu. Crest — A 
naked dexter arm erect, the hand holding a short sword, all 
ppr. Motto — Fortitudine. 

Raymond (Baron Raymond, extinct 1763). Quarterly, Isb 
and 4th, sa. a chev. betw. three eagles displ. ar. onacniefor. 
a rose betw. two flenrs-dc-lis gu., for Raymond ; 2nd and 3rd, 
or, a fesse gu. over all on a bend sa. five mullets ot the field, 
for FisuEB. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi dragon 
erm. Supporters — Two eagles reguard. ppr. collared or. 
Motti .iKquam scrvare inenteai. 

Bayner (John Rayner, Esq., M.D., Smatldale House, 
Highbury Quadrant, Middlesex). Az. on a chev. or betw. 
three demi lions ramp, of the last, five crosses crosslet of 
the first. Crest — In front of a demi lion ramp, or, holding in 
the dexter paw a cross crosslet az. a serpent uowed ppr. 
Motto — Facta non verba. 

Bedfoord (quartered by Jaheb Redfoobd Bclweb, Esq., 
Q.C., Recorder of Cambridtre, Treasurer of the InnerTumple, 
Lieut. -Col. Inns of Court Rifle Volunteers, son of Rev. 
Jamks Hiilweb, Rector of Hunworth-cuin-Slody, co. Norfolk, 
dcceiiHi'd, by Eliza Redfoord, his wife, also deceased, only 
dtiu. and co-heiress of liavAN Manseboh, of Grenane, co 
Tipperary). Ar. a fesse wavy gu, in ciiicf three piles vert, 
each charged with a quatrefoil of the field. See also nnder 
Manseroh. 



K> £ JS 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BUT 



Beed (Sir Edwabd James Reed, K.C.B.). Ar. two pallets 
SE. betw. two eagles displ. sa. within the pallets a fleur- 
de-lis of the second betw. two roses gu. barbed and 
seeded ppr. Ciest — A demi man in profile looking to the 
sinister supporting in his dexter hand a hammer resting on 
an anvil and holding in the sinister hand an iron ship all 
ppr. 

Sendall (Brigmerston House, Amesbury, Wilts; exemplified 
to Francis Shuttleworth Holden, Esq., youngest son of 
Edward Anthony Holden, Esq., of Aston Hall, co. Derby, 
on his assuming by royal license, 1877, the surname and 
arms of Kendall, in right of his wife, Rachel Frances. 
eldest dau. of John Pincknet, Esq., of Manor House, Great 
Durnford, Wilts, and heiress of Charles E. Kendall, Esq., 
of Brigmerston House). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. on a 
cross coti?ed ttory or, a horseshoe betw. four mullets pierced 
of the first, and (for distinction) a cross crosslet in canton 
of the second, for Kendall; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a fesse engr. 
erminois betw. two chev. erm., for Holden. Crest — 1st, 
Rendall: An antelope's head couped or, gorged with a 
collar gemel, holding in the mouth a horseshoe, and charged 
(for distinction) with a cross crosslet all gu. ; 2nd, Holden : 
On a mount vert a heathcoek rising sa. winged or. 

Senton (Bradston Brook, co. Surrey, and Hedgecocks, co. 
Sussex; John Thompson Kenton, Esq., of Bradston and 
Hedgcock, J.P., son of William Kenton, Esq., Edinburgh, 
by Agnes, his wife, duu. of Henry Duncan, of Comely Green, 
Edinburgh). Az. on a chev. invected or, betw. two towers, 
in chief ar. and a lion ramp, in base of the last holding in the 
dexter forepaw a thistle leaved and slipped ppr. a saltire 
couped of the first. Crest — A lion ramp. az. holding in the 
dexter forepaw a sword point downwards ppr. pommel and 
hilt or, and resting the sinister forepaw on a tower ar. 

Sepingrton (A'Coubt - Repington, Amington Hall, co. 
Warwick). Quarterly, Ist jind 4th, gu. afessedancett^eemi. 
betw. six billets ar., for Repington ; 2nd and 3rd, per fesse 
or and paly of six erminois and az., for a A'Court, in chief 
an eagle displ. sa. beak and legs gu. charged on the breast 
with two chevronels ar. Crests — Ist, Repington : A demi 
heraldic antelope gu. armed, unguled, and tufted or, 
billett^ ar. ; 2nd, A'Court : An eagle displ. sa. on the 
breast two chevronels or, holding in the beak a lily ppr. 
Motto — Virtus propter se. 

Shodes (Loventor, co. Devon, bart. ; see Baker, Upper 
Dunstable House, co. Surrey, bart., page 41). Sir Fbciderick 
Edward Baker, 4th bart., assumed by royal licence, 1878, 
the surname of Rhodes in lieu of his patronymic. Baker, 
and was exemplified the following Arias : Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, ar. a lion pass, guard, betw. two acorns, slipped, bend- 
wise, az. within two bendlets, nebuly, sa. guile d'or, the 
whole betw. as many trefoils slipped, vert, for Rhodes : 2nd 
and 3rd, per pale ar. and or, on a saltire nebuly, sa five 
escallops of the first, a chief of the third, thereon a lion pass. 
of the second, for Baker. Crests — Ist, Rhodes: A cubit 
arm vested az. gutte d'or, cuffed ar. holding an oak branch 
palewise ppr. fructed or, and two trefoils, slipped, in saltire, 
vert ; 2nd, Baker: A dexter arm embowed, vested az. 
charged with three annulets interlaced or, cuffed ar. holding 
in the hand ppr. an arrow also ppr. 

Kicarde-Seaver. See Seaveb. 

Hichardson (Lambeg, co. Antrim; granted to Jonathan 
Richardson, Esq., of Lambeg, formerly M.P. for Lisburn, 
eldest son of John Richardson, of Lisburn, and grandson of 
Jonathan Richardson, also of Lisburn, both deceased, and 
to the other descendants of his said grandfather). Ar. on a 
fesse engr. per saltire az. and gu. betw. in chief a bull's head 
couped of the third, and in base a galley ppr. four escallops, 
two in fesse and two in pale or. Crest — A lion ramp. ar. 
armed and langued gu. holding betw. the paws a laurel 
garland ppr. 3yo«o— Virtute acquiritur hones. 

Sichmond CGeorge Rich.mond, Esq., Royal Acaden)ician, 
Pottern, co. Wilts, and 20, York Street, Portman Square;. 
Az. two fleurs-de-lis in pale betw. as many pallets ar. Crest 
—A demi lion ar. gorged with a collar and chain reflexed 
over the back az. the collar charged with two annulets or, 
holding betw. the paws encircled by a chaplet of oak an 
escocbeon az. thereon a fleur-de-lis ar. Motto — Ancora 
imparo (these words were written by Michael Angelo below 
a drawing of himself by himself at the age of 90). 

Richmond (Town of co. York). Gu. an orle ar. over all a 
bend enn. Crest — A rose gu. crowned or. 

Ridgrway (Brandfold, Goudhurst, Kent, and Wallsuches, 
Horwich, CO. Lancaster, J. P. for the said counties). Ar. 
two wings conjoined In lure and elevated sa. betw. three 



peacocks' beads erased one in chief and two in base ppr. 
each gorged with a collar gemel or. Crest — In front of a 
palm tree a camel couchant ppr. bridled gu. burdened on 
either side with a bale also ppr. and gorged with a collar 
gemel or. 

Ripley (Acacia and Bowling Lodge, co. York, and Bedstone 
House, CO. Salop, bart.. created 8 May, 18S0). Per chev. 
nebuly or and vert a cross crosslet betw. two lions ramp, in 
chief and a lion ramp. beiw. two cross crosslets in base all 
counterchanged. Crest — A demi lion reguard. vert gorged 
with a collar gemel, and charged on the body with a crosi 
crosslet or, holding betw. the paws an escocheon ar. charged 
with a cock ppr. 

Rivers (F'ox-Pitt-Rivers). See Pitt-Rivers. 

Roberts (Lieut. -Gen. Sir Frederick Sleigh Robeets,G.C.B., 
V.C, CLE., Bart., created 15 June, 1881). Az. three 
estoiles or, on a chief wavy of the second an eastern crown 
gu. Crest — A lion ramp, or, armed and langued gu. 
charged on the shoulder with an eastern crown, as in the 
arms, and holding in the dexter paw a sword blade wavy ar. 
pommel and hilt gold. Supporters (to descend with the 
Baronetcy) — Dexter, a Highlander of the 92nd regt. ; 
sinister, a Gcorka, both habited, and holding in their ex- 
terior hands a rifle all ppr. Motto — Virtute et valore. 

Robinson (Baron Rokebt, see pp. 861-2). Morris, 3rd 
Baron Rokeby, who d. unm. 1829, being desirous to change 
the supporters granted to and borne by his predecessors, 
obtained a grant from Fqrtescue, Ulster, 9 June, 1801, of 
the following. Supporters— Dexter, a roebuck or, spotted 
and charged on the breast, with a mullet sa. gorged with a 
ducal coronet gu. and chained gold. Sinister, a horse ar. 
holding in the mouth a broken tilting spear ppr. 

Robinson (John Charles Robinson, Esq., Swanage, co. 
Dorset, and Portman Square, London). Vert on a chev. or, 
betw. three stags trippant reguard. of the last as many 
crosses bottonn^e fitch^e of the first. Crest — A stag ppr. 
holding in the mouth three cinquefoils slipped vert, and 
resting the dexter forefoot on a chaplet of roses also ppr. 

Rochdale (Borough of, co. Lancaster). Ar. a woolpack 
encircled by two branches of coilon tree flowered and con- 
joined ppr. a border sa. charged with eight martlets of the 
field. Crest — A millrind sa. and above a fleece ar. banded 
or. Motto — Crede signo. 

Rocheid (Inverlelth, Edinburgh). Ar. a fess betw. a boar's 
bead erased in chief and two mullets in base az., the fesa 
charged with a crescent of the first for difference. Crest— 
A savage's head ppr. Motto — Fide et virtute. 

Romanis (Wigston Magna, co. Leicester, and Charterhouse, 
Godalming, co. Surrey). Az. a passion cross or, on a chief 
of the last two thistles slipped and leaved ppr. Crest — On a 
mount vert in front of a thistle slipped and leaved ppr. a 
passion cross or. Motto — Per incerta certus amor. 

Ross (Cromarty, Scotland). Gu. three lions ramp. ar. in the 
centre a mullet of the second for diff. Crest — An eagle, 
wings closed ppr. Motto — Dread God. 

Ross (CO. York, formerly Scotland). Per pale sa. and gu. 
two water bougets in chief and a boar's head couped in base 
ar. Crest — A water bougel ar. Motto — Agnoscar eventu. 

Rossell (co. Salop; Peter Rossell, 34 Edward I., a.d. 1306. 
Visit Salop, 1584. Harleian MS. 1396). Gu. on a bend ar. 
three roses of the first. 

Routh (Dinsdale, co. Durham, and Richmond, co. York). 
Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three lions' heads erased gu. 

Row^ton, Saron. See Corrt. 

Royal University of Ireland. See University. 

Royds (Falinge, near Rochdale, and Heysham, near Lancas- 
ter, CO. Lancaster, and Houghton, co. Stafford ; originally 
settled near Halifax). Erm. on a cross engr. betw. four 
lions ramp. gu. a spear in pale ppr. betw. four bezants. 
Crest — A leopard sejant ppr. bezant^e resting the dexter 
forepaw on a pheon. Motto — Semper paratus. 

Russell (Baron Ampthilt). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief 
sa. three escallops ar. a mullet or, for diff. Crest — A goat 
statant, ar. charged with a mullet sa. for diff. Supporters — 
Dexter, a lion, sinister, :in heraldic antelope, both gu. the 
latter ducally gorged, lined, armed and unguled or, and each 
charged with a mullet gold, for diff. Motto — Che sara sara. 

Rutherford (Blackburn, co. Dumfries, 1880). A r. an orle 
gu. in chief a mascle betw. two martlets sa. Crest— A white 
horse's head erased sa.— Afofio— Scdulus et audax. 



B. YD 



SUPPLEMENT. 



SAN 



Syde, Corporation of (Isle of Wight). Ar. in base on 
waves of the sea a schooner yacht under sail ppr. within a 
bordure ar. charged with eight estoiles or. Crest — Upon a 
rock a sea-horse ppr. charced on the body with two estoiles 
or. Motto — Amoenitas salubritas urbanitas. 



SACKVUiLE, BABON. See West. 

Sackville-West (Baron Sacki-ille). See West. 

St. Helen's, Borough of (co. Lancaster). Ar. two bars 
az. over all a cross sa. in the 1st and 4th quarters a saltire 
gu. and in the 2nd and 3rd a gryphon segreant of the third. 
Crest — A lion pass, guard, ppr. charged on the body with 
two fleurs-de-lis gu. resting the dexter forepaw on an ingot 
of silver. 

Salter (cos. Salop, Dorset, and Bucks; Thomas Salter, of 
Oswestry, 2i Richard II., a.d. 1393, from whom descended 
in line of heirs, among others, Robert Salter, of Whit- 
church-by-Lyme, Dorset; William Salter, of Iver, Bucks; 
Sir Edward Salter, Knt., Master in Chancery, Knight. 
Carver to King James I. and Prince Charles, of Richings 
Park Iver, Bucks. Confirmed to William Salter, of Iver, 
by William Harvey, Clarenceux. Visit. Bucks, 1575). Gu. 
ttn billets, or, four, three, two, and one. Crest — A pheasant's 
head and neckcouped gu. beaked and billeted or ten billets, 
one, two, three, and four. 

Salter (co. Salop) ; JoLN Salter, a.d. 1426, 2nd son of 
Thomas Salter, of Oswestry, from whom descended among 
others, John Salter, of Wrockwardine, Clerk of the Peace, 
CO. Salop, 1469; John Salter, of Newport, Welsh Judge, 
1521 ; Richard Salter, who went in to Essex about 1525. 
Confirmed Visit. Salop, 1584 and in 1623, Ly Thomas Tres- 
well, Somerset^. Gu. ten billets or, four, three, two, and one, 
a bordure engr. az. charged with eight bezants. Crtxt — A 
cock's head and neck couped az. combed, wattled, and beaked 
gu. billeted or, four billets, one, two, and one. 

Salter (co. Salop; Richard Salter, of Oswestry, temp. 12 
Henry VI. a.d. 1434, a younger son of Thomas Salter, of 
Oswestry. Visit. Salop, 1684). Gu. ten billets or, four, 
three, two, and one, a label of three pendants across the 
escutcheon of the last. 

Salter (co. Salop ; John Salter, of Salter's Hall, Newport, 
Member of the Council of Wales, Welsh Judge, High Sheriff 
of Salop, 1621, descended from John Salter, 1426, who 
was 2nd son of Thomas Salter, of Oswestry, 1393). Ar. 
three pheons sa. Judge Salter also used the arms of his 
branch of the family: Gu. ten billets or, four, three, two, 
and one, a bordure engr. az. charged with eight bezants. 

Salter (co. Salop; Sir Thomas Salter, Gentleman of the 
Privy Chamber to Henry VIII., son of Richard Salter, of 
Oswestry, 2nd son of Robert, descended from Thomas 
Salter, 1393). Gu. ten billets or, a bordure engr. ar. 
charted with sixteen hurts and torteaux alternate, a label 
of three pendants across the escutcheon debruising the four 
upper billets ar. Crefl — A pheasant's head and neck couped 
gu. beaked and billeted or, ten billetc, one, two, three, and 
four, on a wreath ar. and az. granted for difT. by Thomas 
Wriothesley, Jarretiere King at Arms, and John Young, 
Norroy King at Arms, to Sir Thomas Salter, 2 May, 1613. 

Salter (co. Essex ; Richard Salter, descended from John 
Salter, 1426, went from Salop to Essex, 152.'i, and there 
became chief officer to Bishop Nix, of Norwich, ills son. 
Blase Salter, was Secretarj' to John, Earl of Oxford. Sir 
John Salter, Knt., Master of the Mcrchiint Taylors' Com- 
pany, 1731-2, Lord Mayor of London, 1739-40. Confirmed, 
Visit. Essex, IG23). Gu. ten billets or, four, three, two, 
and one, a bordure engr. az. charged with eight bezants; 
also the same quarterly, 1st and 4th, with ar. three pheons 
»a. 2nd and 3rd — the latter being the coat of Judge Salter, 
of Newport, Salop, uncle of Richard Salter. Oral — A 
cock's head and neck couped az. combed, wattled, and 
beaked gu. billeted or, four billets, one, two, and one. 

Salter ^co. .Salop ; Thomas Salter, of Wrockwardine, de- 
•cended from John .Salter, 1426. Confirmed Visit. .Salop, 
1.084 and 1666). Quarterly, j^u, ten billets or, four, thref-, 
two, and one, a bordure engr. az. charged with eight bezants, 
lit and 4ih; ar. three pheons sa. 2nd and 3rd, the latter 
being the arms of his uncle, Judge Salter. Crrst — A cock's 
he«d and neck couped az combed, wattled, and beaked gu. 
billeted or, four billets, one, two, and one. 



Salter (co. Suffolk; Richard Salter [about 1620], son of 
Richard Salter, of Oswestry, by Margaret, his second 
wife, half-brother of Sir Thomas Salter, whoee arms 
he used. Confirmed Visit. Suffolk, 1612-3). Gu. ten 
billets or, four, three, two, and one, a bordure engr. ar. 
charged with sixteen hurts and torteaux alternate, a label 
of three pendants across the escutcheon debruising the 
four upper billets, ar. Crest — A pheasant's head and neck 
couped gu. beaked and billeted or, ten billets, one, two, 
three, urnl four. (Other Salters went from Essex into 
Suffolk, and the two branches became confused. Martin 
Salter, High Sheriff of Suffolk, 1665, was from Essex, 
being grandson of Blase Salter.) 

Salter (cos. Dorset, Somerset, Bucks, Hants, and in London : 
George Salter, 1550, second son of Robert Salter, of 
Whitchurch-by-Lyme, Dorset, from wnom descended, among 
others, George Salter, of Denham Manor, Bucks; Thomas 
Salter, of London, 1633 ; James Salter, of Puddimore, 
Somerset; Thomas Salter, of Poole, Dorset, J. P., Con- 
firmed to Thomas Salter, of London, Visit. 1633). Gu. ten 
billets or, four, three, two, and one, a bordure engr. ar. 
charged with eight hurts. Crest — An eagle's head and 
neck couped gu. billeted or. 

Salter (cos. Dorset and Middlesex ; Robert Salter, 1655, 
third son of Robert Salter, of Whitchurch-by-Lyme, 
Dorset, from whom descended Sir Nicholas Salter, of 
Bradpole, Dorset, and Enfield, Middlesex. His only dau. 
and heir, Ann, m. Sir Henry Bowyer, of Denham, 1613 ; 
their son, William, was created the first Baronet Bowyer, 
1660). Gu. ten billets or, four, three, two and one, a bordure 
engr. ar. 

Salter (co. Bucks; Sir William Salter, of Iver, Barrister- 
at-law, Gray's-inn, Knight-CarVer to King Charles I. eldest 
son of Sir Edward Salter, from whom descended, among 
others, Nicholas Salter, High Sheriff of Bucks, 1687; 
Christopher Salter, of Stoke Poges, High Sheriff, 1810. 
Aciiievement of arms on Sir William Salter's tomb, Iver 
Church, Bucks). Gu. ten billets or, four, three, two, and one, 
a label of five pendants across the escutcheon ar. Crest — 
A pheasant's head and neck couped gu. beaked and billeted 
or, ten billets, one, two, three, and four. 

Salter (cos. Warwick and Northampton, from Oswestry, 
Salop). Gu. ten billets or, four, three, two, and one, a 
bordure engr. ar. charged with sixteen hurts and torteaux 
alternate. Crest — A cock's head and neck couped gu. 
combed, wattled, beaked, and billeted or. (These Salters 
migrated from Oswestry to these counties about 1660, and 
are stated in the pedigrees to have come from Oswestry, but 
exact line of parentage does not appear in the pedigrees 
given). 

Salter (co. Norfolk; Capt. Nicholas Salter, of Norwich, 
1659. Ven. Samdel Salter, the elder, D.D., Prebendary of 
Norwich Cathedral and Archdeacon of Norfolk. 1734 ; 
Samuel Salter, the younger, D.D., Prebendary of Norwich 
Cathedral, and Master of the Charterhouse, London, 1761). 
Gu. ten billets or, four, three, two, and one. Crest — An 
eagle's head and neck erased gu. billeted or. 

Sanderson (Rev. Edward Sanderson, High Hurst Wood, 
CO. Sussex). Paly of six gu. and sa. on a bend betw. two 
dragons' heads erased or, a cross patt^e betw. two annulets 
of the first. Crext — In front of a dragon's head erased sa. 
gorged with a collar engr. with chain reflected behind the 
neck or, a cross patt^e of the last betw. a branch of palm and 
another of laurel ppr. Motto — Clarior ex obscuro. 

Sanderson (Cheetham, co. Lancaster; Richard Withington 
Bromley Sanderson, of Clieetham, only son of Thomas 
Withington Bromley Sanderson, of Laburnham House, 
same co., Esq.) Paly of six or and gu. a bend engr. vair 
on a chief of the second a lion statant betw. two annulets of 
the fir.st. Crest — A demi talbot or, gorged with a collar 
vair and supporting a flag staff, therefrom flowing to the 
sinister a banner quarterly or and gu. in the first and 
fourth quarters an annulet of the last. Motto — Deo favente 
Don timeo. 

Sandes (Collib-Sandes, exempliOed to Falkiner-Sandes 
Collis-Sandes, of the Middle Temple, Barrister-at-law, 
son of Stephen Edward Collis of Tieraclea, co. Kerry, 
gent., by Makcabet Sandks, his wife, deceased, sister of 
Maurice KitzGebald J-andes, Esq., of Oak Park, Tralee, 
CO. Kerry, on his assuming by royal licence, 8 July, 1879, 
the additional surname and arms of Sandes, pursuant to the 
will of his maternal uncle, the said Maurice FitzGerald 
Sandes). Quarterly, 1st and 4th,. av. a fesse dancettee gu. 



SAP 



SUPPLEMENT. 



SHE 



betw. four cross crosslets fitch^e, three in chief and one in 
base of the last, for Sandes ; 2nd and 3id, ar. on a chev. 
ener.betw. three lions' heads erased sa. five cinquefoils of the 
first, for C0LLI8. Cre.*ts — 1st, Sandes: On a mount vert a 
griffin segreant or, collared fleuretteegru.; 2nd, Collis : On a 
rock a sea-pie ppr. charged on the brest with a fountain, 
and preying on a dolphin, all ppr. Motto — Vinus fortunae 
victrix. 
Sapv^ell (Benjamin Beetham Sapwell, Esq., of Sankence, 
Aylesham, co. Norfolk). Vert, a garb or betw. four 
fountains in cross. Crett — Upon a mount vert in front of a 
passion cross or, a well betw. two branches of oak ppr. 
Motto — Clarior e tenebris. 

Saunders (Cheriton Fitz-Paine, co. Devon ; exemplified to 
Frederick William Akdndell, Esq., upon his assuming, 
by royal licence, 1873, the surname of Sacndeks). Ar. a 
lion ramp. az. betw. t-vo fiaunehes of the last, each charged 
with an estoile of the first, a chief chequy of the second and 
erm. Crest — An eagle's head ar. gorged with a collar 
chequy az. and erm. holding in the beak an estoile also az. 

Saunderson (Little Addington, co. Northampton ; a br^ch 
of the noble family of Saunderson, Eakl of Castleton, 
tee Burke's Extiiict Peerage and Baronetage. Martha 
Saunderson, dau. and heiress of Anthony Saunderson, Esq. 
of Little Addington, baptized Oct. 1759, m. Kev. Henry 
Etoogh, Rector of Lowick and Islip, and d. 20 April, 
1835, leaving two sons. Rev. Richard Saunderson Etodgh, 
and Captain Henry Gladwell Etough, R.N., who d.s.p. 
The elder son, Rev. Richard Saunderson Etough, m. 
Anna Awdry, dau. of Rev. D. S. Olivier, rector of Clifton, 
Beds, and d. 1853, leaving issue). Paly of six ar.and az. on 
a bend sa. three annulets or. Crest — A talbot pass. ar. 
eared sa. 

Sava^e-Graliani. See Graham. 

Savile (.Augustus William Savile, Esq;, of Rufford Abbey, 
CO. Nottingham). Ar. on a bend sa. three owls of the first, 
a bordure wavy of the second. Crest — An owl ar. debruised 
by a bendlet sinister wavy sa. 

Sawrey (Cookson-Sawrey, Neasham Hall, co. Durham). 
Quarterly, 1st ami 4th, ar. on a bendengr. betw. six lioncels 
gu. a rose of the first betw. two arrows ppr. in the centre 
chief point a cross crosslet of the second, for Sawrey; 2nd 
and 3rd, per pale nebuly, or and gu. two pallets betw. as 
many legs couped at the thighs in armour, all counter- 
changed, for CooKsoN. Ci-ests — 1st, Sawrey: In front of a 
dexter arm embowed in armour the hand grasping an 
arrow in bend sinister the pheon downwards, the Roman 
fasces fessewise all ppr. thereon a cross crosslet gu. v 2nd, 
CooKSON : A demi lion ppr. gorged with a collar nebuly gu. 
holding in the dexter paw a club also ppr. and resting the 
sinister paw on a spur, rowel upwards, or. 

Sawtell (co. Somerset, page 901). The correct blazon is as 
follows: — Ar. on a bend embattled counter embattled gu. 
betw. two cocks ppr. a snake torqued or. Ci-fnt — Out of a 
palisado crown sa. a stag's head ppr. Motto — Coelum ipsum 
petimus. 

Scarborough, Borough of. The .^cnis of the Borough 
bear the marks of great antiquity. A ship of the rudest 
form, a watch-tower, and a star appear on the Common Seal. 
Its registry in the Herald's College is without date, and it is 
there classed amongst th« most ancient. 

Scarisbrick (exemplified to Remy Leon de Biaudos- 
ScARisBRicK, of Scarisbrick Hall, co. Lancaster, Marquis de 
Casleja, upon his assuming by royal licence, 1873, the sur- 
name of Scarisbrick. The Marquis de Cast^ja m. 1835, 
Eliza Margaret, dau. of Sir Thomas Windsor Hunloke, 
6th bart., of Wingerworth, and niece of Charles Scaris- 
brick, Esq., of Scarisbrick, co. Lancaster). Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, Scarisbrick : Gu. three mullets in bend betw. two 
bendlets engr. ar. for distinction in the centre chief point a 
cross crosslet or ; 2nd and 3rd, de Biaudos. Crests— 1st, 
Scarisbrick ; A dove sa. beaked and legged gu. holding in 
the beak an olive branch ppr. charged for distinction with 
a cross crosslet or; 2nd, de Biaudos. 

Scott (Mollance, co. Kirkcudbright). Per pale or and az. on 
a bend a mullet betw. two crescents counterchanged, in 
sinister chief a horseshoe of the first. Cmt — A stag t) ippant 
gu. attired and unguled or, charged on the shoulder with a 
horseshoe also or. Motto— Amo. 

Scott (Redfordhill, co. Peebles, 1878). Or, on a bend az. 
betw. two annulets sa. a mullet betw. two crescents ar. 
Crnt—\ stag's head ppr. Motto — Memor et fldelis. 



Scott (Rev. Thomas Scabd Scott, M.A. Oxford, Vicar of 
Holy Trinity, Penge, co. Surrey, and the other descendants 
of Capt. John Scott, R.N.). Az on a fesse ar. betw. two 
mascles in chief or and a bull pass, in base of the second, 
an anchor erect betw. two cinquefoils of the first Crest — 
A sun rising in splendour from behind waves of the sea, 
surmounted by a rainbow all ppr. Motto — Surge illuminare. 

Seaver (Ricarde Seaver ; Major Francis Ignatius Ricarde, 
of Paris assumed by royal licence, 21 April, 1881, the addi- 
tional surname of Seaver; he is Fellow of the Royal Society 
of Edinburgh; of the Royal Geographical Society, London; 
of the Geological Society, Burlington House: Associate of 
the Institution of Civil Engineers, (fcc, late Government 
Inspector-General of Mines of the Argentine Republic, and 
Vice-Consul at Gravesend for the said Republic (since 1874), 
Knight Commander of the Royal Military Order of Christ of 
Portugal, Knight Commander of the Royal and Distinguished 
Order of Isabel the Catholic of Spain, and Knight Officer of 
the Imperial Order of the Rose of Brazil. He m. Her Serene 
Highness the Princess Dona Maria Louisa Christina de Looz 
et Corswarem, nee Princess de Godoy de Bassano, grand- 
dau. of H.S.H. Don Manuel de Godoy, Prince of Peace; 
which lady d. at Paris, 28 Jan. 1880). Az. a chev. em- 
battled betw. two wreaths of oak in chief or, and a pickaxe 
and sword in saltire in base ppr. surmounted by a tower or. 
Crest — In front of a pickaxe erect a Moor's head affrontee 
couped at the stioulders ppr. turban ar. pierced through the 
head by a sword fessewise point to the dexter also ppr. 
Motto — Malo mori quam foedari. 

Sejrmour (Baron Alcester). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on 
a pile gu. betw. six fleurs-de-lis az. three lions pass, guard, 
in pale or; 2nd and 3rd, gu. two wings conjoined in iure or. 
Crest— Om of a ducal coronet or, a phoenix in flames ppr. 
Supporters — On the dexter side a Sailor, and on the sinister 
a Private of the Royal Marines, each habited and holding ia 
the exterior hand a musket and standing on an ArmaCronK 
gun, all ppr. Motto — Foy pour devoir. 

Shaw (Woodfleld, Yorkshire) Ar. a chev. erm. on a cantoa 
gu. a talbot's head erased or. Crest— A talbot pass. erm. 
erased ar. 

Shaw (Londonderry ; conflrmed, 1884, to Rev. James Shaw, 
Prebendary of MuUabrack and Rector of Drumcar, Diocese 
of Armagh, eldest son of Rev. Matthew James Shaw, of 
Leeson Park, Dublin, Vicar of Kilmactranny, diocese of 
Elphin, and grandson of Matthew Shaw, of Lonilonderry, 
who was of Scotti.sh ancestry, and to the other descendants 
of his said grandfather). Az. three covered cups or, on a 
chief erm. as many crosses patee gu. Crest— A pelican in 
her piety ppr. charged with a covered cup gu. Motto — I 
die for those 1 love. 

Shawe (Weddington Hall, Nuneaton, co. Warwick ; repre- 
senting Shawe, of Kesgrave Hall, co. Suffolk, William 
Cunlifie Shawe, Esq., of Singleton Lodge, co. Lancaster, 
)(i. 1st, Dorothy, dau. of Richard Whitehead, by whom he 
had a son, Robert Newton Shawe, of Kesgrave Hall, who 
d. s. p. He ?-i. 2ndly, Puilippa, dau. of Charles Pole, of 
Southgate, and </. 1821. His eldest son by his 2nd wife, 
Samuel Pole Shaw, Esq., became heir of the. family on the 
death of his half-brother in l!?5.'>, and d. 1862, leaving a 
son, Henry Cunliffb Shawe, Esq., ol Weddington Hall, 
representative of the family). Ar. a chev. ermines a 
canton gu., quartering Wingfield. Crest — A falcon 
volant ar. 

Sheffield, Borough of (co. York). Per fesse az. and 
vert in chief eight arrows interlaced saltirewise banded ar. 
and in base three garbs fessewise or. Crest — A lion ramp, 
ar. gorged with a collar and holding betw. the paws an 
antique shield az. charged with eight arrows as in the arms. 

Sheill (Smithfield, co. Forfar). Ar. on a fess az. betw. three 
inescutcheons vert, as many crescents or. Crest — A cubit 
arm erect, surrounded by flames of fire, the hand grasping 
a dagger all ppr. Motto — .Vgere et pati. 

Shepstoue (Sir Theophilus Shepstone, K.C.M.G., 
Member of the Executive and Legislative Councils, Cape 
Colony). Ar. on a fesse vert a lion couchant or, a chief az. 
thereon an anchor erect, with cable of the third betw. two 
assegais in saltire ppr. Crest — A demi eagle displ. ar. 
gorged with a wreath of oak vert in front of two assegais in 
saltire ppr. 

Sherbrooke ( Viscount). See Lowe. 

Sherland (Thomas Sherland, of Wells Hall, co. Suffolk, 
temp. James 1.). Az. six lioncels ramp. ar. three, two, and 
one, a cantcn erm. (Impaled with the arms of Sir William 
Salter in Ivcr Church, Bucks. Inscription on monument). 



SHI 



SUPPLEMENT. 



STE 



Shipman (Sarington, CO. Nottingham, <fec., page 923). For 

Sarington read Scarrington. 
Shorrock (Eccles Shorrock, Esq., of Law Hill House, 

Blackburn, co. Lancaster). Az. a pile or, fretty sa. betw. 

two mallets in base of the second, pierced of the field. Cn'<t 

— A demi stag ppr. seraee of mullets and supporting betw. 

the legs a cross pattee fitch^e all sa. J»/o«o— Perseveranda. 

Shuckburgh. (Bourton Hall, co. Warwick ; exemplified to 
BicBARD Henrt Sbcckburgh, Esq. , of that place on changing 
his surname from Wood to Shuckbcrgh, by royal licence, 
1876, on succeeding to the estates of his maternal uncle, Kev. 
Charles Ble.ncowe Shcckbcrgh. John SarcKBCRCH, of 
Biraingl.ury, one of the six Clerks in Chancery, purchased 
Bourton from Sir Humphry Stafford, Knt., of Blatherwick, 
about the end of the reign of Queen Elizabeth). Sa. achev. 
indented or, betw. three mullets pierced ar. a border of the 
second. Ci-esl — A demi Moor ppr. wreathed about the 
temples or and sa. habited ar. sem^e of mullets pierced also 
sa. and holding in the dexter hand an arrow point down- 
wards ppr. .Votfo— Vigilate et orate. 

Simmons (Gen. Sir John LintornArabin Simmons, (t.C.B.). 
Sa. guU^d'eau a dolphin naiant cmbowed or, voranta fishar. 
a cantoH erm., tneneon a mural crown gu. Crext — A stump 
of an oak tree sproutmg, in front thereof a mount thereon a 
branch of laurel fructed, in bend sinister all ppr. Su-pporleis 
— Dexter an eagle sa. sinister a stork ppr. each gorged with 
a mural crown or, and holding in the beak a rose ar. slipped 
and leaved ppr. 3/o»o— Stabilitate et Victoria. 

Slade (Ash Boleyne, Yeovil, co. Somerset, and Kaninbla, 
Hampstead, co. Middlesex). Or, three horses' heads erased 
sa. on a chief nebuly gu. a mascle betw. two horse shoes of 
the first. Crest — In front of a horse's head erased sa. 
charged with a horse shoe three mascles interlaced lessewise 
all or. Motlo — Facta non verba. 

Smelt (Kirkby Fleetham and Leases-by-Bedale, co. York : 
Leonard Smelt, Esq., of Kirkby Fleetham, was aged 7 years 
at Visit. York by Dugdale, 1665). Az. a chev. betw, three 
smelts naiant ar. Crent — A cormorant's head erased. 

Smith. (Benjamin Brown Smith, Esq., of Wolverhampton, 
CO. Stafford). Barry of six ar gutte de poix and gu. a lion 
ramp, ducally crowned sa. holding betw. the paws a pheon 
or, betw. four pheons, two in chief and two in base of the 
last. Crest — An heraldic tiger ar. vulned in the neck ppr. 
charged on the body with two pheons and resting the dexter 
foreleg on a pheon gu. 

Smitll (Rev. Jeremiah Finch Smith, Hector of Aldridge, 
CO. Stafford, JI. A., F.S.A.). Barry of six erm. and gu. a lion 
ramp. sa. on the head a crown vallary holding betw. the 
paws an annulet or, betw. three passion crosses of the last. 
Crrst — A lion ramp. sa. crowned as in the arms holding betw. 
the fore-paws a passion cross and the dexter hind-paw resting 
on an annulet or. Motto — Doctrina ferro perennior. 

Smith (Rev. Joseph Denham Smith, of St. Marylehone, 
Middlesex, and Vesey Place, Dublin). Or, a lozenge az. 
charged with a mullet of six points of the first betw. three 
dragons' heads era.sed of the second, all within a borduve of 
the last charged with eleven bezants. Crest — A dragon's 
head erased az. charged with a mullet of six points and 
collared flory counter flory or, pitrced through the mouth 
by an arrow fessewise, the point to the dexter ppr. 

Smith (Ryhope, co. Durham. The heiress m. Grey, now 
represented by George John Sci'rfield, formerly Grey, 
Esq., of Hurworth, co. Durham). Ar. on a bend betw. two 
unicorns' heads erased az. three bezants. 

Smiith. See Lawson-Smith. 

Smyth (Henlow, co. Bedford). Az. three hor.se-shoes fesse- 
wise or lietw. as many horses' heads erased arg. Crest — A 
horscB head urg. erased az. within a horse-shoe or. Motlo 
— Kerruni cqultis salus. 

Snape (Stanlake, co. Oxford). Arms, ic, correctly given 
at p. 916, but the name is not correctly spelt. A branch of 
thi' (Hmily went " from .Stanlake " to Maldun, Essex, about 
\b\h, and their pedigree is given in the Visitation of Essex, 
16.14. 

Snape (co. Devon). Visit, of Devon, 16'J3. Arg. a lion 
ramp. sa. 

Somner (Seend, CO. Wilts; an ancient family in that co., 
the heiress of which, sister of Edward Somner, Esq., of 
Seend, m. Daniel Webb, Eiq., of Monckton Farley, same 
CO., and had an only dau. and heiress. Mart, m. 1716, 



Edward, 8th Duke of Somerset, and brought the Seend and 
Monckton Farley estates into the ducal family of Seymour. 
Arms on family monuments in Seend church : Vert, a fesse 
dancett^ erm. 
Soper (William Garland Soper, Esq., of Hareston, Cater- 
ham, CO. Surrey, and of the city of London, B.A. London 
University). Per pale or and gu. on a saltire betw. sixteen 
billets, a trefoil slipped all counterclianged. Impaling for 
Mrs. Soper (Maria, dau of George Davis, of Wilderness, 
Hastings) ar. a lion ramp, reguard. pean betw. four mullets 
of six points in cross az. Crest — A demi lion per pale or 
and gu. holding in the mouth a trefoil slipped vert and sup- 
porting a torch erect fired ppr. 

Soutnport, Borougrb of (co. Lancaster). Ar. a fesse 
dancett^e betw. in chief three cross crosslets fitchee sa. and 
in base a lifeboat with men, sky, and sea all ppr. Crest — A 
serpent ppr. _ entwined about a cross crosslet fiichfc sa. 
Motto — Salus populi. 

Spalding: (South Darenth, Horton Kirby, Kent; Samdel. 
Spalding, Esq., and the other descendants of his father the 
late Rev. Samuel Spaldino, M.A.). Or, on a cross az. 
quarterly pierced of the field, four cross crosslets of the first, 
in the Ist and 2nd quarters a thistle leaved and slipped ppr. 
Crent — Betw. two thistles as in the Arms, an escocheon az. 
charged with a cross crosslet or. Motto — Hinc mihi salus. 

Stallard (of Blandford Square, Marylehone, co. Middlesex). 
Sa. a sword fessewise point to the dexter or, betw. three 
lions' heads era.sed of the last, each gorged with a wreath of 
oak vert. Crest — A stork's head erased sa. supporting in 
the beak a sword point downwards ppr. pomel and hilt or. 

Stansfeld (Shepley; granted by Barker, Garter, 8 April, 
1546, and confirmed by Hervey, Norroy, 15 Nov. 1550). Sa. 
three goats courant ar. attired, <fcc., or, on a bordure engr. 
of the second, eight pellets. 

Starkey (Barber-Starkey, The Hall, Button's Ambo, co. 
York; William Joseph Starkey Barber-Starkey, Esq., 
only child of Rev. William Henry Barber, M.A., by Mary, 
his wife, dau. of John Starkey, of Wheat House, Hudders- 
field, CO. York, took the name of Starkey in addition to that 
of Barber, and adopted the arms of Starkey in compliance 
with the wish of his aunt, Sarah Starkey, of The Hall, 
Hutton's Ambo, co. York). Ar. a bend engr. vair betw. six 
storks sa. Crest — A stork ar. sem^e of estoiles az. 

Staveley (Old Sleningford Hall, and Stainley Hall, near 
Ripon, CO. York ; exemplified to Thomas Kitchingman 
Hdtchinson, Esq., Capt. Royal Engineers, eldest son of 
Michael Hutchinson, Esq., Doctor of I'hysic, by Mary, his 
wife, dau. of John Tanfiei.d, Esq., of Carthorp, co. York, 
and great-grandson of Susanna Staveley, wife of Mr. 
Tanfield, of Carthorp, and dau. of Myles Staveley, Esq., 
of Stainley, who d. 1722, upon his assuming by Royal 
licence, dated 29 Dec. 1815, the surname of Staveley in 
lieu of Hutchinson in compliance with the wish expressed 
by his kinsman, General Miles Staveley, then deceased, 
and from grateful respect to his memory). Per pale embattled 
gu. and ar. on a chev. engr. betw. three mascles two bucks' 
heads cabossed all coiinterchanged. Crest — Within a circular 
wreath of oak fructed ppr. a buck's head cabossed also ppr. 
attired or. Motto— Vt aspirat cervus. 

Stephen (Linthouse, CO. Lanark). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. 
two crescents in chief and a dexter hand couped in ba«e gu. 
three mullets of the first. Crest — A ship under sail ppr. 
Motto — Vi et arte. 

Steward (Falcon-Steward, Newton Manor, Cumberland ; 
exemplified to Rev. Robert Falcon-Steward, M.A., Hector 
of SuUiampstead, Berks, eldest .son of Robert Falcon, M.D., 
ly MARiiARET Steward, his wife, sister of Anthony Benm 
Steward, Esq., of Newton, on his assuming by royal licence 
in 1881 the additional surname and arms of Steward). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Steward: Or, a fesse engr. chequy 
az. and nr. betw. two stags' heads cabossed in chief and a 
round buckle in has ^ of the second, all within a border 
erm.; 2n(l and 3rd, Falcon: Sa. a chev. betw. two falcons 
close in chief and an annulet in base all ar., for Falcon. 
Creits — Isi. Steward: A stag or, charged on the body with 
a buckle as in the arms, and resting the dexter foreleg on a 
Stan's head caboshed ppr.; 2nd, Falcon: On a rock ppr. 
and within an annulet in front thereof sa. a falcon close ar. 

Stewart (Charles Stewart, Esq., late M.P. for Fenryn and 
Falmouth, descended from Wester Cluny, Scotland, 1879). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a fess chequy az. and ar. sur- 
mounted of a lion ramp, gu.; 2nd and 3rd, uz. three garbs 
or, all within a bordure ar. charged with three wolfs' heads 



STE 



SUPPLEMENT. 



SYH 



erased gu. (This quartered coat now counter-quartered 
with Stewabt, of Orandtull}/, q. v.) Crest — A savage's head 
ppr. i\fotto — Xever unprepared. 
Stewart (Binny. co. Linlithgow, paternally Falconeb). Or, 
a fess chequy az. and ar. in chief a mullet gu. in base a 
hunting horn sa. garnished and stringed of the fourth. 
Crest —A dexter hand holding a dagger point downwards 
ppr. Motto — Candide. 

Stewart (Lieut.-Gen. Sir Donald Maktin Stewart, G.C.B., 
C.S.I., Commander-in-Chief of H.M. Forces in India, hart., 
created 1881). Or, a fess chequy az. and ar. betw. in chief 
two garbs of the second, and in base an Indian crown gu. 
Cre.1t — A dexter arm, couped below the elbow and erect, 
vested gu. holding in the hand a dagger ppr. hilted or. 
Motto over — Pro rege et lege. 

Stock (Rev. John Kcssell Stock, M.A., of 20, Bedford 
Square, Ixindon, Rector of All Hallows the Great and the 
Less, in the city of London). Per chev. nebuly erminois 
and sa. a chev. engr. counterchanged, in base a stock 
of a tree couped and sprouting on either side or. Crest — 
Upon a mount vert a stock ol a tree coupea and sprouting 
on either side ppr. surmounted by an estoil irradiated or. 
Motto — Ex stirpe nil turpe. 

Stockton (United States of America, formerly of Malpas, 
CO. Chester). Gu. a chev. vair ar. and az. betw. three 
mullets or. Crest — A lion ramp, supporting an Ionic pillar. 
Motto — Omnia Deo pendent. 
Stone (Elphinstone-Stone.Webb Elphimstone Elphinstone- 
Stone, Esq., 7, Brunswick Terrace, Exinouth, co. Devon). 
Quarterly, Isr and 4th, per pale or and az. an eagle displ. 
with two heads betw. two flaunches each charged with an 
anchor erect, all counterchanged, for Stone; 2nd and 3rd, 
ar. guttee de sang on a chev. embattled sa. betw. three 
boars' heads erased gu. two swords ppr. hilted and pommelled 
or, for Elphinstone. Crests — 1st, Stone In front of an 
anchor lying fesswaysor, a swan's head and neck couped ar. 
beaked sa. ; 2nd, Elphinstone: Out of a mural crown gu. 
a lady from the middle, well attired ppr. holding in her 
dexter hand a sword and in her sinister hand a laurel branch 
both also ppr. Motto — True to the end. 
Storey (Shawe-Storet, Avcot, co. Northumberland; exem- 
plified to Lawrence PauletShawe, Esq., of Arcot, upon his 
assumine, by royal licence, 1S73, the additional surname of 
Stobet). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, quarterly, indented, ar. and 
sa. three falcons counterchanged, and (for distinction) in the 
first quarter a cross crosslet of the second, for Stobet ; 
2ndand 3rd, ar.a chev. erm. cottised sa. betw. three lozenges 
In chief and one in base of the second, for Shawe. Crests — 
1st, Stobet: A falcon sa. within a chap'.et of laurel ppr. 
charged on the breast with an Eastern crown or, and (for 
distinction) charged also with a cross crosslet gold; 2nd, 
Shawe : A hind's head couped ar. charged with three 
lozenges, one and two erm. holding in the mouth an arrow 
in pale or, flighted ar. Motto — Sola virtus reddit nobilem. 
Stourton (Baron Motebray, Segrave, and Stourton). Quar- 
terly of six . 1st, sa. a bend or, betw. six fountams ; 2nd, gu. 
on a bend betw. six crosses crosslet ar. an escutcheon or, 
charged with a demi lion ramp, pierced through the mouth 
by an arrow, within a double tressure flory counterflory of 
the first; 3rd, gu. a lion ramp. ar. ; 4th, sa. a lion ramp. ar. 
ducally crowned or; 5th, gu. three lions pass, guard, or; 
6th, gu. a lion ramp, or, a border engrailed of the last. 
Crest — A demi grey friar, habited in russet ppr. girt or, 
holding in the dexter hand a scourge of three lashes, with 
knots, and in his sinister hand a cross, both gold. Sap- 
porters — Dexter, a lion ar. ducally crowned or ; sinister, a 
sea-dog, sa. scaled and finned or. Motto — Loyal je serai 
durant ma vie. 
Stoveld (Stedham Hall, co. Sussex, exemplified to George 
John Townshend Stoveld, Esq., of Stedham, eldest son of 
Rev. George Ridsdal£, vicar of South Raynham, co. 
Norfolk, by Mart his wife, only dau. of John Stoveld, 
Esq., of Stedham, upon his a-isuming by royal licence 
dated 8th Dec, 1881, the surname of Stoveld in lieu of 
RiDSDALE in compliance with the will of his maternal grand- 
father, the said John Stoveld, Esq., of Stedham). Or on a 
pale engrailed az. betw. two stags' heads couped at the neck 
and affronte of the last a feather erect of the first. Cre.tt — 
A stdg's head couped at the neck and affronte az. betw. two 
feathers or. Motto — Eimi o Eimi. 
Strangman (co. Essex, 1614). Per bend ar. and sa. a bend 
dovetailed counterchanged. Crest — A demi cockatrice 
rising sa. winged ar. holding in the beak a slip of oak 
leaves vert. 



Strathy (Canada, formerly Scotland, 1882). Or, on a cher. 
az. betw. three crescents gu. a stag's head erased of the first. 
Crest — An eagle displ. holding in its beak a thistle slipped 
and leaved ppr. Motlo—Anda.x justum perficere. 
Street (Captain James Frederick D'Arley Stbeet. See 
Wright, of Mottram Hall, co. Chester). Or, a cross parted 
and fretty gu. betw. in the 1st and 4th quarters three 
martlets, and in the 2nd and 3rd as many annulets sa. 
Crest — A demi man in armour ppr. his breast-plate charged 
with a cross as in the arms, and supporting with his dexter 
hand a flagstaff, therefrom flowing to the dexter a banner 
gu. charged with an annulet or. Motto— (^mo virtus vocat. 
Stuart (Harrington-Stuart, of Torrance, co. Lanark). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a bend gu. surmounted of a fess 
chequy az. and ar. a crescent of the second in chief for diff., 
for St0abt: 2nd and 3rd, sa. a fret ar. for Harrington. 
Cie<( — A dexter hand grasping a sword ppr. Motto — Avant. 
Stubbs (Kettel Hall, Oxford ; Rev. William Stubds, Canon 
Residentiary of St. Paul's, London, and Regius Professor of 
Modem History). Sa. on a bend nebuly or, betw. two 
bezants, each charged with a pheon of the field, three round 
buckles also sa. Crest— A. demi eagle displ. sa. each wing 
charged with a pheon, and transfixed through the mouth 
with a tilting spear palewise or. 
Stuckey (Hill House, Langport, Somerset; exemplified to 
Vincent Stucket, Esq., of Hill House, J. P., son of Rev. 
William Wood, by Jdlia, his wife, eldest dau. of Vincent 
Stccket, Esq., of Hill House). Per bend sinister crenellee 
or and az. a lion ramp, double queued erm. on a canton of 
the second a mascle of the first. Crest- — A demi lion ramp, 
double queued erm. charged with a mascle az. Motto — 
Fortitudine et fldelitate. 
Sullivan (GarrydufT, co. Cork, Bart.; Right Hon. Sir Edward 
SnLLivAN, LL.D., Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1884, Master of 
the Rolls in Ireland, 1870 to 1884, and M.P. for Mallow, 1865 
to 1870 ; was created a Baronet, 29 Dec. 1881). Per pale ku. 
and az. on a fesse betw. in chief a boar pass, and in base 
another boar countor-pass. or. three cross crosslets sa. 
Cri-st — The Roman fasces fessewise ppr. banded gu. thereon 
a robin redbreast also ppr. Motto — Tot prsemia vitse. 
Sulyard (Wetherden and Haughley, co. Suffolk, Flemings, 
CO. Essex, and We.-ston, co. Norfolk, descended from Sib 
William Scltabd, Knt. of Eye, co. Suffolk, temp. Edward I. 
Edward Sdltard, Esq., of Wetherden, d. '24 Oct. 1779, 
leaving three daus., his co-heirs, viz., Sophia, wife 
of John Cart, Esq., of Hampstead ; Lucy, wife of HnoH 
Smtthe, 3rd son of the 4th Bart, of Eshe Hall ; and Fbancis 
Henbietta, wife of Sib Geobge William Jebninoham, 7th 
Bart., of Cossey, restored as Baron Stafford, 1825). Ar. a 
chev. gu. betw. three pheons erect sa. quartering, Faibfobd ; 
Bacon, Good, Andbews, Wetland, Babnaville, Stbatton, 
Hetdon, Lovebd, Wheatloafe, Oclton, Wabben, Ponton, 
Stopfobd, Ravenscboft, Holland, Skeffington, Bibkell, 
and Swettenham. Crest — A stag's head ar. 
Swettenham (Wabren- Swettenham, of Swettenham; 
Robert Wabben-Swettenham, Esq., formerly Wabben, of 
Swettenham Hall, Swettenham, co. Chester, J. P. for that 
county). Quarterly: 1st and 4th, Swettenham, ar. on a 
bend vert three half spades of the first; 2nd and 3rd, 
Warren, chequy or and gu. on a canton az. a cross of the 
first. Crent of Swettenham — A lion rampant az. the fore- 
paws against an oak tree ppr. Crext of Warren — Out of a 
ducal coronet or, an eagle's talon also gold holding a cres- 
cent gu. in front of a plume of five ostrich feathers ar 
Mottoes — Swettenham, Ex sudore vultus ; Wabben, Mox 
virtute se toUit ad auras. 
Sykes (Ackworth, co. York ; Annie Tilbubn, wife of James 
William Michell, Esq., of Audley, co. Devon, Rothesay 
Herald, and Maby Emilt Stkes, her sister, daus. and co- 
heirs of Thomas Sykes, of Ackworth). Ar. on a chev. 
nebuly gu. betw. three fountains as many eagles rising 
ppr. 
Symonds (Lodeb-Stmonds, Hinton Manor, Faringdon, 
CO. Berks; Fbedebick Cleave Symonds, Esq., son of 
James Frederick Symonds, Esq., of Okeleinh, co. Hereford, 
by Mary Elizabeth, his wife, dau. of John Cleave, Esq., 
of Hereford, and a descendant of the family of Sy.monds, 
of Pengethly, in that co., took, by royal licence, 8 Feb. 1 882, 
the additional surname of Lodeb). Sa. a dolphin naianl 
embowed vorant a nsh, in chief three trefoils slipped all ar. 
Crtst — In front of a well sa. a dolphin as in the iirnis. 
Motto — Miseris succurrere disco. 
Sjnnonds (Pengethly, co. Hereford). Sa. a dolphin naiant, 
embowed vorant a fish, in chief three trefoils slipped, all ar. 
Crest— In front of a well sa. a dolphin, as in the armi. 



TAL 



SUPPLEMENT. 



TBE 



TALKE (Apuldercomb, Isle of Wight, originally of Sussex). 
Ar. a cross Tau gu. in chief three chaplets »ert. 

Tanner (William Tanneb Farncombe-Tan>-ke, formprly 
WiLLLAM Tasseb Farncombe, of East Lenham, co. Kent, 
Esq.). Sa. three piles ar. two issuant from the chief, and 
one from the base, each charged with a Moor's head in 
profile, couped at the shoulder ppr. wreathed about the 
temples of the second and gu. Crest— A Moor's head, as in 
the arms, betw. two trefoils slipped vert. 

Taylor CBishopwearmouth, co. Durham). Ar. a fesse 
dancett^e sa. and in chief three maunches gu. Crest — On 
the top of a tower a stag at gaze gorged with a ducal 
crown, thence a chain reflexed over the back and fastened 
by a ring to the battlement. 

Taylor (Granard, Eoehampton, co. Surrey). Ar. a greyhound 
current gu. on a chief dancett^ of the last a pheon betw. 
two escallops of the flrst. Crest— A demi greyhound gu. 
holding betw. the paws an escallop ar, and charged on tlie 
shoulder with two escallops lessewise or. 

Temple (Cowpek - Temple, Baron Mount Temple 
Quarterly: 1st, Temple, counter-quartered. Island 4th, or, 
an eagle displ. sa. ; 2nd and 3rd, ar. two barssa. each charged 
with three martlets or. 2nd, Cowper, ar. three martlets gu. 
on a chief engr. of the last three annulets or. 3rd, Nassau 

D'ACVEBQCEBQCE. 4th, BCTLER, of ObMONDE. SuppOHiVS 

— On the dexter side alien with wings inverted pean, and on 
the sinister side a pegasus wings inverted ar. Crest — 
Cowper: a lion's gamb erased or, holding an olive branch 
vert, fructed or. Motto — Tuum est. 

Tenison (King-Tenison Earl of Kingston: exemplified 
to Hesbt EifNEST Newcomen, 8th Earl of Kint/ston, and 
Florence Margaret Christina, Countess of Kingston, his 
wife, upon their assuming by royal licence dated 10 March, 

1883, the surname of Tenison in addition to and after King). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. on a bend engr. or, betw. two 
leopards' faces of the last jessant-de-lis ae. three crosses 
crosslet fitchee sa., for Tenison ; 2nd and 3rd, gu. two lions 
ramp, combatant supporting a dexter hand couped at the 
wrist and erect ar., for Kino. Crests — 1st, Tenison: In front 
of a crozier and a cross crosslet fitchee in saliire sa. a leopard's 
face or, jessant-de lis az. ; 2nd, Kino : Out of a five leaved 
ducal coronet or, a dexter hand erect the third and fourth 
Angers turned down ppr. Supporters — Two lions per fesse 
ar. and gu. ducally crowned also gu. AfoUo— Spes tutissinia 
coelis. 

Tennyson l Baron Tenni/son). Gu. on a bend nebulee betw. 
three leopards' faces jessant-de-lis or, a chaplet veit. Crest 
— A dexter arm in armour embowed the hand gauntlttted 
or, grasping a broken tilting spear enfiled with a garland of 
laurel ppr. Supyiorters — Two tigers guardant gu. ducally 
crowned and seme-de-lis or. Motto — Uespiciens, Prospi- 
ciens. 

Thomas (GnoU, Neath, co. Glamorgan; Charles Evan- 
Tbomas, Esq., J. P. and D.L., High Sherifif co. Brecknock, 

1884, 2nd son of Evan Thoma.s, Esq., Llwynmadoc, co. 
Brecknock). Ar. on a chev. engr. az. two griffins pass, 
counter pass, of the field gorged with two bars gu. on a 
chief of the second three cinqucfoils pierced or. Crest — 
Out of a mural crown ar. a demi sea horse gu. crined or 
resting the paws on an anchor erect la Motto — Dduw 
bordiolch. 

Thorns (Aberlemno, co. Forfar). Or, a lion ramp. gu. 
debruised of aclicv. sa. Crest — A demi unicorn erm. armed, 
crined, and unguled or, supporting a shield also or. Motto 
— Virtutis praemium. 

Thomhill. .See McCreagu Thornbill. 

Thurlow, Baron. See Bruce. 

Thwaites (Krecby, co. Leicester, Billinge Scarr and Wood- 
fuld I'ark, co. Lancaster, and Addison Lodge, co. Middlesex; 
r)ANiKL Thwaites, Esq., of Blackburn, co. Lancaster, m. 
Betty, dau. of Edward DncKwoRTii, of the same place, and 
d. I84:t, leaving, with other issue, Daniel Thwaites, Esq., 
of Freeby, h. 1817, J. P., D.L., M.P. for Blackburn, 1875 to 
1880). Enn. across engr. sa. fretty ar. in the Ist and 4th 
quarters a chaplet of oak vert. Crent—TUe battlements of a 
t'jwrr surmounted by a ihcuf of seven arrows ppr. bandvd 
together gu. betw. two branches of oak vert. 

Tilney (George Adams Tilnet, Esq., of Watts House, 
Bioh'ips Lydeurd, Taunton, co. Somerset). Or two chevronels 
bclw. three grifTlnB' heads erused az. on a chief engr. of 
the last three annuleU of the first. Crest — In front of a 



mount vert the battlements of a tower ppr. therefrom a 
griffin's head gu. issuunt from leaves alternately arg. and 
az. Motto — Sperando spiro. 

Tindal-Carill-Worsley (Piatt Hall, co. Lancaster). 

See WoRsLEY. 
Tod-Mercer. See Mercer. 
Todhunter (Isaac Todhcnter, M.A., F.R.S., St. John's 

College, Cambridge). Vert on a fesse with cottises invected 
betw. three french horns ar. a fox current ppr. Crest — In 
front of a gate sa. a foxhound current ppr. 

Toler-Ayl'ward. Sec Aylward. 

Tolhtirst (Alfred Tolhubst, Esq., Gravesend, co. Kent.)- 
Per fesse sa. and or, in chief two bells of the last and in base 
upon a mount a hurst ppr. Cre^t— Upon a mount vert a 
wolf reguard sa. collared or, resting the dexter forepawona 
bell also or. Motto — Ne cede malis. 

Tomlinson (Heysham House, co. Lancaster, and Richmond 
Terrace, Whitehall, London ; William Edward Mdrrat 
Tomlinson, Esq., M.P. for Preston, M.A. Christ Church, 
Oxford, eldest son of Thomas Tomlinson, Esq., Bencher 
of the Inner Temple, in the Hall of which Society the Amis 
are emblazoned, Ar. three greyhounds current in pale sa. 
on a chief engr. az. three cix)ss crosslets or. Crest — On a 
mount vert a savage ppr. wreathed about the temples ar. and 
sa. charged on the breast with a cross crosslet gu. across 
the sinister shoulder a bearskin, and holding with both hands 
in bend a spear headed at either end also ppr. Motto — 
Propositi tenax. 

Tooke. See Hales-Tooke. 

Tottenham (confirmed, 1879, to Charles Robert Worslet 
Tottenham, Esq., of Tottenham Green, co. Wexford, of 
Woodstock, CO. Wicklow, and of Plas Berwyn, co. Denbigh, 
and to the descendants John Tottenham, of Barrington, 
CO. Cambridge, the first of the family settled in Ireland). 
Gu. three bars dancettee ar. Crest — A lion ramp. gu. armed 
and langued az. Motto — Ad astra scquor. 

Townley-Parker (Cuerden and Rnyle, co. Lancaster; 
exemplified to Thomas Townley Townley-Parker, Esq., of 
Cuerden, Charnock, and Royle (eldest son of Robert 
Townley Parker, Esq., M.P., of Cuerden, deceased, who 
was grandson of Robert Parker, Esq., of Cuerden, by Anne, 
his wife, dau. and heiress of Thomas Townley, Esq., of 
Royle, on his taking by royal licence the additional prefix 
surname and arms of Townley). Quarterly, Ist and 4th 
Parker : Gu. a chev. betw. three leopards' heads or, in the 
mouth of each an arrow fesseways ar.; 2nd and 3rd, 
Townley: Ar. on a fcs.se sa. a cinqucfoil or, in chief three 
mulletsof the second. Crests — 1st, Parker: A buck trippant 
ppr. transpierced through the body with an arrow paleways 
point downwards ar. ; 2nd, Townley ; On a perch sa. a 
sparrow-hawk ppr. 

Travers (co. Cork ; reg. by Molyneux, Ulster). Sa. a chev. 
betw. in chief two escallops and in ba.se a boar's head couped 
ar. Crest — An heraldic tiger statant gu. 

Travers (Clarke-Travers, Ro.ssmore, co. Cork, bart., 
page 102.')). The following is the correct blazon of ilu" 
baronet's Arms, &c. — Quarterly, 1st and 4th, sa. a ehev. ar. 
betw. in chief two escallops and in base a boar's head erased 
of the second, for Travers; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on abend gu. 
cottised az. betw. three pellets an antique crown or, betwixt 
two swans close of the flrst, for Clarke. Crests — 1st, 
Travers : An heraldic tiger pass. ar. ; 2nd, Clarke : On the 
stump of a tree couped, eradicated, and .sprouting on each 
side, a lark perched ppr. wings expanded, holding in the 
beak two wheal ears or. Mottoes — Nee teniere nectiinide; 
and Constantid et fidclitate. 

Trayner (Edinburgh, 1878). Az. on a fe.sse betw. two 
esquires helmets plumed in chief and a fraise in base ar. 
a .saltirc .sa. Crist— \ lion sejant gu. Motto— Var loi et 
droit. 

Treby (co. Devon). Sa. a lion ramp. ar. gorged with a 
collar vatre enninois and a*, in chief three bezants. Crest 
— A demi lion ar. gorged with a collar a.s in the arms. 

Treby /Phillipps-Tbeby, Goodamoor, Plympton St. Mary, 
CO. Devon ; Thomas Winsloe, Esq , assunu'd by royal licence 
8 Nov., 1798, the surname and arms of Phillipps only. He 
»ft. Elieareth Pomeroy Carpenter, and had a son, Thomas 
John Phillipps, Esq., of I..andue, t-o. Cornwall, J. P., 6. 31 
Jan. 1798, )/(. Caroline, dau. of Paul Treby Treby, Esq., 
of Goodamoor, and d. IShh, leaving, with other issue, liis 
eldest son, Padl Winsloe Phillipps, Major-Oen. Royal Regt. 
of Artillery, J. P., 6. 1824, who inherited Goodamoor, under 



TRE 



SUPPLEMENT. 



WAL 



the will of his maternal uncle, Paul Ocbbt Tbkbt, Esq., of 
Goodamoor, and assumed by royal licence, 1877, the 
additional surname and arms of Treby. ^rm«— exemplified 
15 March, 1877). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Tbebt: Sa. a hon 
ramp. ar. gorged with a collar vaire erminois and az. in chief 
three bezants ; 2nd and 3rJ, Phillipps, of Landue (which 
see). Cre.^U — 1st Tbkbt: A demi lion ar. gorged with a 
collar as in tlie arms ; 2nd, Phillipps, of Landue. Motto — 
Benovato nomine; and Ce m'est egal. 

Tregoningr (John Simmons Tbegoning, Esq., of Landue, 
near Launcesten, and Iscoed, near Carmarthen, J. P., for cos. 
Cornwall and Carmarthen). Ar. on a mount vert a stag 
lodged in front of three oak trees ppr. a chief az. thereon a 
passion cross belw. two mullets of the field. Crest — Jn front 
of a rock ppr. thereon a castle ar. a stag lodged or. Motto 
— Semper paratus semper tutus. 

Trenchard (Cutteridge, Wilts; in the parish church of 
North Bradley is a monument to William Tbenchard, 
Esq., J. P., of Cutteridge, in Bradley, who d. 22 Aug. 1713). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per pale ar. and az. on the first three 
palets sa.; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a saltire sa. His wife, who is 
described as a dau. of Sir Geobge Norton, of Abbot's Leigh, 
Somei-set, has her An)is impaled with those of her husband. 
Or, two bars gu. on a chief ar. an inscutcheon erm. 

Trevor (Hill - Trevor, Baron Trevor). Quanerly, 1st and 
4th, per bend sinister erm. and ermines, a lion ramp, or 
for Tbevor ; 2nd and 3rd, sa. on a fesse ar. betw. three 
leopards pass, guard, or, spotted of the field, as many 
escallops gu., for Hill. Crests — 1st, Tbevob : A wyvem sa. ; 
2nd, Hill: A reindeer's head couped gu. attired and 
collared or. 

Trundle (Great Baddow, co. Essex ; granted, 10 Sept. 1785. 
to Thomas Tbondle, Esq., of Crosby Square and Brunswick 
Square, London, only son of RobebtTrcndle, Esq., of Great 
Baddow, represented by the issue of Charles Ehbet Groveb, 
Esq., of Hemel Hempsted, co. Hertford). Gu. a lion pass, 
or, on a chief ar. three bees ppr. Crest— An arm couped at 
the elbow issuant bendways, vested sa. charged with a 
bezant, cuff ar., in the hand a pen ppr. Motlo — Be just 
and fear not. 

Tweedmouth, Baron. See Mabjobibanes. 

Twells (Rev. Henry Twells, M.X., Rector of Waltham, co. 
Leicester). Or, on a fess wavy cottised, also wavy gu. betw. 
six fountains a Tau of the first. Crest — On a fountain a swan 
ar. beaked and legged sa. Motto — Benedicite fontes 
domino. 

Tyrell (Tcfnell-Ttbell, Boreham, co. Essex ; exemplified 
to John Lionel Tcfnell, Esq., son of William Michael 
Tcfnell, Esq., of Hatfield, same co., D.L., by Eliza 
Isabella, his wife, eldest dau. and co-heir of Sir John 
Tyssen Tybell, 2nd bart. of Boreham, upun his assuming by 
royal licence, 1878, the additional surname and arms of 
Tybell). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Tybell, see Tybell, hart., 
of Boreham ; 2nd and 3rd, Tufnell, see that name. Crests 
— 1st, Tybell; 2Bd, Tcfnell 

Tyson (Maryport, co. Cumberland ; Edward Tyson, Esq.). 
Vert, gutte d'eau, three lions ramp. ar. each holding in the 
dexter paw a torch erect, fired, ppr. Crest — A demi lion 
vert guttee d'eau, holding in the dexter paw a torch as in 
the arms, and resting the sinister on a rose gu. barbed and 
seeded ppr. iV/o£(o— Fortiter et vigilanter. 



UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND, ROTAL(granted 
1881, consequent on the institution of the University by 
royal charter, dated 27 April, ISoO). Per saltire erm. and 
ermines an open book ppr. clasped and surmounted by the 
royal crown or betw. four escutcheons, two in pale and two 
in fess, the escutcheons in pale representing respectively 
the Arms of the provinces of Leinsteb and Mcnster, viz., 
Leinster: Vert, an Irish harp or, stringed ar. ; and 
Mcnster: Az. three antique crowns or: the escutcheons 
in fess representing respectively th3 Anns of the provinces 
of DLSTEBand Connacoht, viz., Ulsteb: Or, across gu. on 
an escutcheon ar. a dexter hand couped, also gu. ; and 
Connacoht : Per pale ar. and az. on the dexter a dimidiated 
eagle displ. aa. and on the sinister, conjoined therewith at 
the shoulder, a sinister arm embowed ppr. sleeved of the 
first, holding a sword erect, also ppr. 



VALIANT (Major-Gen.). Per chev. embattled vert and 
gu. in chief two garbs or, and in base as many scimitairs 
saltirewise ppr. surmounted by a leopard's face or. 

Vanden-Bempde-Johnstone {Baron Derwent). See 
Johnstone. 

Vaugrlian (Quilly, co. Down; confirmed to Georob Moh't- 
gomery Vacghan, Esq., of Quilly, son and heir of George 
Vacohan, Esq., of Quilly, and grandson of George Vacghan, 
Esq., also of Quilly, and to the other descendants of his said 
grandfather). Per pale sa. and az. on a chev. engr. ar. 
betw. three boys' heads couped at the shoulders and entwined 
round the neck with snakes all ppr. a cross of Ulster gu. 
Crtsi — A boy's head, as in the arms, charged on the neck 
with a cross of Ulster gu. Motto — Honeste audax. 

Vickers (SbefiBeld, co. York). Ar. on a cross flory gu. five 
mullets of six points of the first a chief sa. thereon three 
millrinds or. Crest — Two arms embowed vested gu. cuffed 
' ar. the hands ppr. holding a millrind or. Motto — Vigore. 

Vivian (Singleton and Park Wem, co. Glamorgan, bart. ; 
created 13 May, 1882). Or, on a chev. az. betw. three lions' 
heads erased ppr. as many annulets of the field, a chief 
embattled gu. thereon a wreath of oak of the first, betw. 
two martlets ar. Crest — Issuant from a bridge of one arch 
embattled at each end, a tower ppr. a demi-hussar of His 
Majesty's ISth regiment of dragoons (hussars), habited, 
armed, and accoutred, holding in his dexter hand a sabre, 
all ppr. and in his sinister a pennon flying to the sinister, gtx. 
Motto — Vive revicturus. 

Vo'wles Brisington, co. Somerset; William Vowles, Esq.). 
Az. a cock's head erased or betw. three bezants, each 
charged with a rose gu. barbed ppr. Crest — Upon a rock 
ppr. a cock or, the dexter foot resting on an escocheon also 
or, charged with a rose gu. barbed ppr. Motto — Perse- 
verantia. 



W 

WADDINO-TON (Waddinoton in Cba\-bn, Yorkshire, 
Alice, dau. and heiress of William de Waddington, 
feudal Lord of Waddington, m. temp. Edward I., Sir 
Roger Tempest, of Bracewell, ancestor, by her, of the 
Tempests of Bracewell, Tong, Broughton, Studley, Stella, 
W^ynyard, ifec). Arg. a chev. between three martlets 
gu. (sometimes sa.). The Waddington arms are 
erroneously given at p. 1060. The error arose from 
a mistake made by Warburton, in the Visitation 
of 1666. One of the Waddington's of Otierbum 
and Allerton Gledhow, co. York, m. the ht-iress of John 
Thwaites, whose arms were arg. on a fess. betw. three fleurs- 
deUs gu. as many bezants, and this coat was ascribed 
incorrectly to Waddington, his son-in-law. Of the Wad- 
dingtons of York.shire, M. Waddington, French Ambassador 
at the Court of St. James's, is a descendant. 

Wade-Dalton (Hawxwell Hall, co. York). See Dalton. 

Walker (Kebrich-Walker, Newker House, Chester-le» 
Street, co. Durham; exemplified to Henry Walker Kerbich, 
Esq., eldest son of Edward Kerrich, Esq., of Arnolds, co. 
Surrey, and grandson of John Kebrich, Esq., of Harleston, 
CO. Norfolk, by Elizabeth, his wife, dau. of John Walker, 
Esq., of Walls End, co. Northumberland, upon his assuming 
by royal licence, 1877, the additional surname of Walker, 
in compliance with the will of John Walker, Esq., of Steb- 
bing Hall, in the latter co.). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a 
fesse embattled, counter embattled with plain cottises sa. in 
chief a quatrefoil betw. two crescents and in base a crescent 
betw. two qualrefoils gu., for Walker; 2nd and 3rd, sa. on 
pileagu. betw. two galtraps or, a galtrap of the field, for 
Kerrich. Crests — Ist, Walker: In front of a greyhound's 
head couped ar. gorged with a collar gemel sa. a crescent 
gu. ; 2nd, Kebrich : In front of two .spears in saltire ppr. a 
galtrap sa. Motto — Faire sans dire. 

Walker (Scotland, 1881). Or, a saltire sa. on a chief erm. a 

cross moline of the second betw. two pallets gu. Crest A 

staghound's head ppr. collared or. Motto — Sapere aude. 

Walton (Henry Crane Walton, Esq., Preston, co. .Lan- 
caster). Sa. three swans ar. on a chief of the last, as many 
pallets gu., each charged with a buckle or. Crest— A wild- 
man, wreathed about the temples and waist with oak leaves, 
over the dexter shoulder a chain in bend sinister, supporting 



WAN 



SUPPLEMENT. 



WHI 



with the dexter hand an axe, head downwards, and holding 
in the sinister hand an oak sapling eradicated and sprouting, 
all ppr. 

Wandesforde (Prior- Wandesfobde; exemplified to Sarah 
Prior- Wandesforue, widow of Rev. John Prior, of Mount 
Dillon, CO. Dublin, and only surviving dau. of Hon. Charles 
Harward Bdtler-Clarke-Soithwell-Wandesfobde, of 
Castlecomer, co. Kilkenny, on lier a.'ssuming by royal 
licence, 30 Aug. 1882, the additional surname and arms of 
V7andesporde). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Wandesforde: Or, 
a lion ramp, double queued az. armed and langued gu. : 
2nd and 3rd, Prior: Vert, on a bend erm. three chevronels 
gu. Ci-t.v(«— (exemplified for the male descendants of the 
said Sarah Priob-W'andesforde), 1st, Wandesforde: A 
church ppr. the spire az., over it the motto Pour I'eglise: 
2nd, Prior : An estoile vert, over it the motto Quis audeat 
luci aggredi? 

Warren-Swettenham. See Swettenham. 

Warrin^on (Thomas Warrington, Esq., of Durham 
Villas, Phillimore Gardens, Kensington). Ar. on a bend 
invected gu. betw. two bulls' heads erased sa. three eagles 
displ. of the first. CrcU — A demi eagle displ. and erased sa. 
charged on the breast with a shield ar. thereon a bull's head 
as in the arms and holding in the beak a cross pattee fitchce 
gu. Motto — Constantia et labore. 

"Waterfall (Rev. George Howard Waterfall, M.A. 
Eector of Tollard Royal, Salisbury, co. Wilts, and the other 
descendants of his father, John Gray Waterfall). Sa. 
gutte d'cau on a pale ar. betw. two pallets wavy of the last 
three fountains. Crtst — In front of a demi eagle wings 
addorsed sa. holding in the beak an escallop or, a fountain. 
3/o(to— Aqua cadit resurgere. 

Waterlow (Alfred James Waterlow, Esq., J. P., Member 
of the Common Council of the City of London, and his son, 
Alderman Herbert J. Waterlow, Sheriff of London and 
Middlesex, 1881). Ar. a lion ramp, within a bordure nebuly 
az. on a chief sa. two shin bones saltirewise, the dexter sur- 
mounted by the sinister or. Creft — A demi lion guard. 
az. in the mouth a shin bone in bend and holding betw. the 
paws a human skull both or. Motto — Per mortem vinco. 

Watkin (Rose Hill, Northenden, co. Chester, hart. Created 
12 May, 1880). Ar. gulte de poix a leopard's face jes.sant- 
de-lis az. betw. three harvest files volant ppr. Crest — A 
cock's head eouped transfixed through the mouth by a tilting 
spear pale«ise all ppr. Motto — Sale and doe. 

Wateon {Baron ]\'atMn). Or, an oak tree ppr. growing 
out of a mount in base vert surmounted of a fesse erm. 
charged with two mullets az. CreH — The stump of an oak tree 
with two branches sprouting from it and grasped on either 
side by a hand issuing from a cloud, all ppr. Supporters — 
On the dexter side a highland deerhound ppr. and on the 
sinister side a lion ar. each charged on the shoulder with a 
thistle leaved and slipped ppr. Motto — A Deo floruit. 

Watson (Henry Edward Watson, Esq., of Shirccliffe Hall, 
Sheffield, co. York). Or, a pale gu. surmouiited by a chev. 
Invected thereon three crescents betw. as many martlets all 
counterchanged. Crest — In front of an eagle's head eouped 
gu. gorged with p crown vallcry three crescents all or. 

W^atson (John Watson, Esq., Whitney Terrace, Bowdon, co. 
ChpHter, and Thomas Clemans Watson, Esq., Holland Park, 
London). Az. on a chev. ncbulce betw. in chief two martlets 
and in base a rose ar. as many crescents of the first. Crest 
— In front of a griffin's head erased az. collared gemel ar. 
holding in the beak two white rosea slipped and leaved ppr. 
an escutcheon also ar. charged with a martlet also az. 
Motto — Esto quod esse videris. 

Watson (I^ngley, co. Bucks, late Scotland). Ar. an oak 
tree pj^r. growing out of a mount in base vert surmounted 
of a feK.te sa. charged with three stars of six points of the 
first ; en surlout, ar. a cross flory vert betw. four martlets gu. 
a chief dovetail uz., for Bird. Crest— An oak tree ppr. 
growing out of a mount vert. Motto — Klorescit. 

Watt (CJibson-Watt, Doldowlod, co. Radnor; exemplified 
to-JAMyjt Watt-Ojbson, Esq., upon his assuming, by royal 
licence, the additional surnuiiic of Watt). (Quarterly, Island 
4th, hurry of six or and az. over all a club in bend sinister 
surmnunted by u caduceus sultirewise all ppr., for Watt ; 
2nd and Srd, az. on a fesse engr. betw. two keys fes.sewise 
wards downwards az. a like key of the Held, for Gibson. 
CrtAt'—]»l, Watt: Upon a ferde-mollne fessewise or, an 
elsphsnt tlatont ppr. charged on the body witli a cross 



moline gold; 2nd, Gibson: Upon a key fessewise wards 
downwards az. a pelican in her piety or, wings addorsed az. 
senile of crescents ar. Motto — Pandite coelestes portae. 

Weldon (Shottisbrook, co. Berks, William Weldon, of 
Sliottisbrook, temy). Charles I., ni. Margaret, dau. and co-heir 
of Clarke of Streatley, same CO., and had William, Richard, 
George, John, Robert, Charles, and Thomas, Visit. Berks, 
1665). Ar. acinquefoil gu, on a chief of the second a demi 
lion ramp, of the field, quartering ar. on a chev. sa, three 
e.scallops or, on a chief of the second a lion pass, regard. 
Crtsl — .\ demi lion ramp. ar. gutted de sang. 

Weldon (Cookham, co. Berks, Georoe Weldon, of Cookhara. 
William Weldon of same place, b. 1614, and Christian 
Weldon, sons of George Weldon of same place, d. 161G, 
Visit. Berks, 1665). Same Arms and Crest. 

Weston (Joseph Dodge Weston, Esq., four years Mayor of 
Bristol). Ar. on a fess sa. an eagle's head era.sed betw. two 
fleurs-de-lis or, in chief an arm enibowed,the hand grasping 

a sei-pent entwined about the arm ppr., the whole within a 

bordure nebuly gu. charged with eight bezants. Crest — Upon 
a mount vert an eagle's head erased or, around the neck a 

ribbon gu. pendent therefrom an escocheon sa. charged with 

an estoile gold. Mntto — Semper sursum. 

Wells (Bart.). Az. a lion ramp. ar. holding betw. the paws 
a horse shoe or, in chief a serpent nowcd of the last. Crest — 
In front of a demi ostrich displ. ar. holding in the beak a 
horse shoe or, a serpent nowed ppr. il/ot(6— In scientia 
Veritas, in arte honestas. 

West (Sackville-West, Baron SackciUe). Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, ar. a fesse dancettce sa., for WfcsT; 2nd and 
3rd, quarterly, or and gu. a bend vair, for Sackville. C)-ests 
— 1st, West: Out of a ducal coronet or, a griffin's head az. 
beaked and eared gold ; 2nd, Sackville: Out of a coronet com- 
posed of fleurs-de-lis or, an estoile ar. Stipjtorters — On either 
side a griffin a,z. gorged with a ducal coronet or, therefrom 
pendent on the dexter an escutcheon of the arms of West, 
and on the sinister an escutcheon of the arms of Sackville. 
Motto — Jour de ma vie. 

WharnclifFe, Earl of. See Mackenzie. 

Whitburn (C. J. Sofer M'hitburn, Esq., 16, Ennismore 
Gardens, London). Az. a lion ramp. ar. holding betw. the 
paws a bezant, on a chief or, a palet gu. charged with two 
swords in saltire points upwards ppr. betw. as many mullets 
of six points of the first. Crest — An eagle's head erased az. 
charged with a mullet of six points arg. and holding in the 
beak a bezant. Motto — Virtus difflcilia vincit. 

Wnite (Kilbyme and Nursctown, co. Cork. Confirmed to 
James Grove White, Esq., Captain Duke of Cambridge's 
Own Middlesex Regt. and to the other descendants of John 
White, Esq., of Kilburne, son of the marriage in Nov. 1694, 
of James White, Jun., of Dronianagh, in the Barony of 
Decies, co. Waterford, with Grace, dau. and heir of John 
Grove, Esq., of Caliirduggan and Kilburne, co. Cork). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three roses 
of the last barbed vert seeded gold a cross pattee or, for 
White; 2nd and 3rd, erm. on a chev. engr. gu. three 
escallops ar., for Grove. Cre.it — A dexter arm in armour 
embowed holding in the hand a dagger all ppr. the arm 
charged with a cross pattee or. Motto — Nounssez I'es- 
pe ranee. 

Whitehead (Tayi.or-Whitehead, Burton Closes, Bake- 
well, CO. Derby ; S.mith Taylor, Esq., only son of 
Georoe Taylor, Esq., of Spring Side, Lees, co. Lancaster ; 
in. 1863, Alice Jane Whitehead, niece and hejre.ss of 
William Whitehead, Esq., of Dobcross, co. York, and 
a.ssumed, by royal licence, 1866, the surname of Whitehead). 
Ar. a fesse dancett(5e az. betw. in chief two taus, and in base 
a pheon gu. Crest — In front of a tau gu. a pheon ar. Moilo 
— Cruce non hasta. 

Whitfeld (Haniesey House, near Lewes, co Su.'scx, as 
borne by GF,oR(iE Whitfeld, Esq., of thai place, J. P., ninth 
in descent from Robert Whitfeld of Wadhurst). Ar. a 
bend plain within two cotises engr. sa. Crest — <)ut of a 
pullisade crown ar. a buck's head or. Motto — Medio tutis 
Biiiius ibis. 

Whitney (Fetherston-Whitney, exemplified to John 
Henry Ketiikbston-Whitnev, lOsq., of New Pass, co. Wesl- 
nieath, grand-nepliew of Elizabeth Westby, widow of 
William Westby, of Thomliill, co. Dublin, and dau. of 
George Boleyn Whitney, of New Pass, co. W(tslmeath, 
decea.sed, on his assuming, by royal licence, 26 Oct., 1880, 
the additional surname and arms of Whitney). Quarterly 



WHI 



SUPPLEMENT. 



WOB 



l9t and 4th, az. a cross chequy or and sa. in ttie dexter 
quarter a crescent of the second, for Whitney; 2nd and 3rd, 
gu. on a chev. betw. tliree ostrich feathers ar. a pellet, for 
Fethebston. Cre.its — lit, Whitney: A bull's head couped 
sa. homed ar. tipped gu, gorged with a collar chequy or and 
sa. ; 2nd, Fetherston : An antelope statant ar. armed or. 
Motto— Volens et valens. 

Whitney (Fethebston- Whitney, exemplified to Henbt 
Ernest Willia.m Fetuebstonhaugh-Whitnet, Esq., Capt. 
7th Batt. King's Royal Rifle Corps, brother of the 
foregoing John-Henry Fetuerston-Whitney, Esq., on his 
a.ssuming, by royal licence, 23 Aug., 1881, the additional 
surname and arms of Whitney). Same Amis, Crest, and 
Motto. 

Wig'an (Fbedk. Wioan, Esq., of Clare Lawn, Surrey). Vair 
on a pile or a mount in ba.se vert thereon a mountain ash 
tree ppr. Crest— Upon a mount a mountain ash tree, sur- 
mounted by a rainbow, all ppr. 

"Wilcox (Creswell, parish of Bray, co. Berks, Thomas Wil- 
cox, snn of Thomas Wilcox, of Creswell, d. 1662, and 
grandson of Eichard Wilcox, of Tysoe, co. Warwick; 
Visit. Berks, 1665). Gu. a lion ramp. ar. on a chief of the 
second three Cornish choughs sa. 

Whiles (Charles Barsham Wiles, Esq., of Attleborough, co. 
Norfolk, and the other descendants of his father, William 
Wiles, Esq., of Waterbeach, co. Cambridge). Ar. three bars 
az. each charged with as many cross crosslets tilchee of the 
first, all betw. two flaunches of the second. Cie??— Upon a 
rock ppr. three arrows, one in pale and two in saltire az. 
interlaced with a Catherine wheel ar. Motto — (Equam 
servare mentem. 

Williams (Appledore, co. Devon, and St. Edmunds Terrace, 
Regent's Park, co. Middlesex: John Edger Williams, Esq., 
son of William Williams, Esq., of Northam, co. Devon, by 
Betty, his wife, rtau., and heir of C«sab Edger, Esq., 
representative of an ancient family long settled in co. 
Devon, whose name was spelled Adgeb from a.d. 1450 to 
teriip. George HI.). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a pile az. 
betw. two horses' heads, erased in base, a like horse's head, 
each charged with a trefoil slipped, all counterchanged for 
Williams ; 2nd and 3rd, gu. on a fesse raguly or, three 
pellets in chief a fleur-de-lis betw. two escallops, and in base 
an escallop betw. two fleurs-de-lis ar. for Edger. Cre.H — 
In front of two spears in saltire ppr. a horse's head erased 
per pale ar. and az. charged with a trefoil slipped counter- 
changed. Motto — Nulla dies sine linca. 

Williams (Beaumaris, co. Anglesey). Ar. a lion pass. sa. 
gorged with a collar gemel or, in chief a quatrefoil betw. 
two. fleurs-de-lis, and in base a fleur-de-lis betw. two quatre- 
foils gu. Crest — A lion pass sa. semee of quatrcfoils and 
gorged with a coUar gemel ar. holding in the dexter forepaw 
a fleur-de-lis gu. 

Williams (Mugmoor, co. Gloucester ; Rev. George 
Williams, of Mugmoor, left an only dau. and heiress ; ?/i. 
William Wright Hoole, Esq., of Ravenfield, co. Vork). Or, 
on a fesse engr. betw. three bull's heads cabossed sa. two 
bezants. 

W^illmott (Cheltenham, co. Gloucester : registered to 
Henry Willmott, Esq., of that place). Gyronny of eight ar. 
and or, a lion ramp, guard, sa. betw. in chief two leopards' 
fisices, and in base a pa.s.sion cross gu. Cre.<t — A riemi lion 
guard sa. gorged with a collar pendent therefrom an 
escutcheon or, resting the sinister paw on an escutcheon 
also or, charged with a passion cross gu. Motto — Migremus 
hinc. 

Willougllby (Dbummond - WiLLODGHBY, Barnness Wil- 
loughbi/ d' Eresby, pages 302 and 1117). The Arras of 
Clementina-Elizabeth, Baroness WiUouyhhy d'Eresby, are: 
— Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, fretty az. ; 2nd and 3rd, or, 
three bars wavy gu. Supporters — Dexter, a pilgrim, or 
friar, vested in rus.set, with his crutch and rosary or; Sinister, 
a savage, wreathed about the temples and waist with ivy, 
all ppr. 

Wilson (Western Bank, Sheffield, co. York). Ar. a ?.olf 
ramp. ppr. betw. two buglehoms in fesse sa. garnished and 
stringed or, in chief three estoiles az. Crest — A demi wolf 
ppr. charged on the shoulder with an estoile az. betw. the 
paws a buglehom as in the arms. Motto— V incit qui se 
vincit. 

Wilson (Cumberland Terrace, Regent's Park, co. Middlesex; 
Greenwich, co. Kent; and of Molesworth House, Brighton, 
CO. Sussex). Ar. a chev. betw. a quatrefoil betw. two 



mullets in chief and a cart wheel in base, all gu. Ci-esl — 
A demi lion gu. betw. the paws an escocheon ar. charged 
with a cart wheel, as in the arms, and holding in the mouth 
three cinquefoils slipped vert. 

Wimborne, Baron. See Guest. 

Winwood (Tyglyn Ayron, co. Cardigan, and Wellesford 
Manor, Wellington, Somerset; Thomas Henry Winwood, 
Esq., High Sheriff co. Cardigan, 1856, m. Phcebe Anne, dau. 
of David Henderson, Esq., M.D., and d. that year, leaving 
a son, Thomas Henby Ricketts Winwood, Esq., J. P., Capt. 
Cardigan Artillery Militia). Gu. on a pile ar. betw. two 
roses in base of the last barbed and seeded ppr. a cross 
botonn^e sa. Crest — Upon a mount vert in front of an 
eagle's head erased sa. holding in the beak a wreath of 
laurel ppr. two wings saltirewise ar. Motto — Merere et 
confide. 

Wise (Hillbank, co. Forfar, ISTS). Per chev. sa. and or, in 
chief two chevronels erm. and in base a stag trippant az. 
Crest — A demi Moor in armour ppr. issuing out of the top of 
a tower ar. holding in his dexter hand a dart of the last 
'plumed and barbed or, with the point downwards and in his 
sinister a Roman shield ppr. Motto — Circumspice. 

Wolseley {Baron Wolseley). Ar. a talbot passant gu. a 
crescent, for diff. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a wolfs 
head ppr. Supporters — Two wolves ppr. each charged on the 
shoulder with a laurel and palm branch in saltire or, gorged 
with a mural crown also or, and holding in the paw a sword 
erect ppr. pommelled and hilted gold. Motto — Homo homini 
lupus. 

Wood (Newbold Revel, co. Warwick ; Raasay, Isle of Skye). 
Per fesse or and sa. a wolf ramp, counterchanged betw. two 
trees eradicated in chief ppr. C^-ent — A demi lion ramp. ar. 
sem^e of buckles sa. resting the .sinister paw on a shield also 
sa. charged with a wolfs head erased ar. il/o»o— Virtute et 
labore. 

Wood (George Swinford Wood, Esq., and Albert Wood, 
Esq., of Bodlondcb, en. Carnarvon, J. P. and D.L. High 
Sheriff, 1884, of an old co. Worcester family). Or, three 
mullets of six points in bend betw. two bendlets nebuly the 
whole betw. three roses all gu. Crest — In front of a moimt 
thereon an oak tree fructod ppr. three bezants. 

Wood (Talbot House, GIossop, co. Derby; Samuel Wood, 
Esq., J. P., son of Samuel Wood, Esq., of same place). Sa. 
on a bend engr. ar. betw. two roses of the last barbed and 
seeded ppr. three fleur-de-lis gu. Crest — On a mount in 
front of an oak tree fnicted, the trunk of a tree fessewise, 
eradicated and sprouting, all ppr. Motto — Omne bonum 
Dei donum. 

Wood (impaled by Osmand for Mary Jane, his wife, only 
child of Thomas Wood, Esq., of Bideford, co. Devon). Gu a 
cross betw. a demi man couped and afrontfc holding over his 
dexter shoulder a club in the first quarter, an oak tree eradi- 
cated in the second, a bull's head caboshed in the third, and 
a leopard's face in the fourth, aU or. 

Wood-Wrigbt (William Henry Edward Wood- Wright, 
Esq., of Golagh, co. Monaghan, J. P., D L., High Sheriff, 
1877, only child of Rev. William Henby Wood-Wbight, 
M.A., of Golagh, by Jane Elizabeth, his wife, only dau. of 
Nathaniel Stewabt, Esq., of Shellficld, co. Donegal, and 
grandson of James Wood, Esq., Capt. 18th Begt., J. P., 
High Sheriff co. Monaghan, 1825. by Elizabeth Isabella, 
his wife, only dau. of William Cairnes Wright, Esq., of 
Golagh). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Wood-Wbight: Az. on 
two bars engr. ar. three oak leaves vert, in chief as many 
leopards' faces or ; 2nd and 3id, Stewart : Or a fesse chequy 
az. and ar. betw. in chief a thistle ppr. and in base a trefoil 
slipped vert a bordure gu. Cre.it — A cubit arm vested az. 
cuffed ar. charged with a leopard's face of the arms holding 
in the hand a broken tilting spear ppr. headed or. Motto — 
■Veritas vincit. 

Worthingrton (Burton-on-Trent and Derwont Bank, co. 
Derby). Per fesse dancettde ar. and sa. a pale counter- 
changed and three tridents erect of the .second. Crest — On 
the trunk of a tree fcs.sewise eradicated and sprouting ppr. a 
goat pa-ss. ar. gorged with a collar gemel sa. holding in the 
mouth a sprig of oak fructed also ppr. Motto— Viitate 
dignus avorum. 

Worsley (Tindal-Cabili.-Worsley, of Piatt Hall, co. Lan- 
caster ; exemplified to Nicholas Tindal, Esq., eldest son of 
Acton Tindal, Esq., of the Manor House, Aylesbury, upon 
his assiuning, by royal licence, 1878. the additional surnames 
of Cabill-Worsley, in consequence of his marriage, 1875, 
with Elizabeth, dau. and heir of Charles Cabill-Wobslei, 



WRI 



SUPPLEMENT. 



YOU 



Esq., of Piatt Hall). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a chief 
gu. a mural crown or, and for distinction a cross crosslet of 
the last, for W'obslet; 2nd, ar. three bars sa. in cliief as 
many martlets and for distinction a cross crosslet all of the 
la.st, for Carill: 3rd, ar. a fesse dancettee gu. in chief a 
fleur-de-lis az. beiw. two crescents of the second, and in 
base a crescent of the last betw. two fleurs-de-lis of the 
third, for Ti.sdal. Crest.^ — 1st, Worslet: On a mural crown 
or, a wyvern wings expanded gu. charged on the body for 
distinction with a cross crosslet ar. ; motto over, Quod adest 
graturajuvat. 2nd, Cabill: Ona mount vert astagreguard. 
lodged or, charged en the body for distinction with a cross 
crosslet sa. ; hiotto over. Per castra ad astra. 3rd, Tindal: 
In front of five ostrich feathers ar. a fleur-de-lis az. betw. 
two crescents gu. : motto over, Nosce teipsum. 

Wrig-ht (Caleb Weight, Esq., of Lower Oak, Tylde.sley, co. 
Lanca-ster). Per fosse az. and ar. a pale counterchanged, 
three unicorns, heads erased, two and one of the second, 
and as many sprigs of the cotton tree slipped and frucled, 
one and two ppr. Crest— A demi unicorn ar. gorged with 
a collar vair, and supporting betw. the legs a battle axe 
erect and proper. Motto — Audax et Justus. 

Wrigrht (impaled by Fbeake, bart. for Eliza Pddset, dau. 
of Charles Wright, Esq., of St. Mary Abbots, and one of 
the Hon. Corps of Gentlemen at Arms, to be borne by her 
descendants). Or a fesse vair betw. in chief two eagles' 
heads erased, and in base a portcullis az. 

Wrigley (Timberhurst, co. Lancaster, and The Greenways, 
Leamington, co Warwick ; Edwin Gbcndt Wrigley, of 
Timberhurst, and the Greenways, Esq., eldest son of Thomas 
Wbiolst, Esq., ofTimberhurst, and of Wansfell, Westmorland, 
.J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff, Lancashire, 1872, by Hannah, 
his wife, dau. of Edmund Gbdndt, Esq., of Park Hills, near 
Bury). Or, a chev. sa. thereon three mullets of the first, 
betw. two flaunches gu. each charged with a stag's head 



erased of the field. Crext — A stag's head erased or, semSe- 
of mullets sa. holding in the mouth a trefoil slipped vert. 
Motto — Aquiret qui tuetur. 

Wigan (Fbedebick Wigan, Esq., of Clare Lawn, Surrey). 
Vair on a pile or, a mount, in base vert, thereon a 
mountain ash tree ppr. Creat — Upon a mount a mountain 
ash tree ppr. surmoimted by a rainbow. Motto — Carpe 
diem. 

Wylie (Twynersh, Chertsey, co. Surrey, as borne by 
Alexander Henry Wylie, Esq., of a branch of the family 
of WiLiE, Bart., and of Wylie, of Corlock). Az. a bend ar. 
betw. a fox pass, in chief and two mullets in base of the 
second. Crest — A fox courant ppr. 



Yates (Oakwood Hall, co. York ; Ernest Bentlet Sbaw- 
Yates, E.sq., of Oakwood Hall, is eldest son of the late 
Egbert Bentley Shaw-Yates, Esq., by Elizabeth Ellbn, 
his wife, only dau. and heir of James Yates, Esq., of Oak 
wood Hall, and grandson of Bentley Shaw, Esq., of Wood- 
field, CO. York). Az. on a chev. engr. erminois, betw. two 
goats' heads erased in chief ar. armed or, and a gate in 
base of the last three pellets quartering Shaw, of Ardersley, 
and Lancaster, of Richmond. Crest — Upon a mount vert 
a goat's head erased ar. armed or, charged on the neck with 
a pellet and surmounting two branches of oak in saltire ppr. 
fructed or. 

Yeatman-Biggrs. See Biggs. 

Younger (Auchen Castle, Dumfries, 1880). Ar. three piles 
in point sa. each charged with an annulet of the first, on 8. 
chief gu. a crescent betw. two mullets also of the first. 
Crest — A dexter arm, the hand holding a Unce bendways 
ppr. Motto — Tout prest. 



THE 



GENEEAL AEMOEY. 



ASADAlff (Sir John Abadam, Baron of Beverston, co. 
Gloucester; summoned to Parliament temp. Edward I.). 
Ar. on a cross gu. five mullets or. In the ancient painted 
glass in Tidenham church, Gloucestershire, the mullets are 
pierced of the field. The heiress of Ahadam, 'm. Tomlin 
Huntley. 

Abarle (1572). Or, three falcons ppr. Crest — A flute in 
pale ppr. 

Abarough, or Abarow (Dychet, co. Somerset). Sa. two 
swords in saltire ar. betw. four fleurs-de-lis or, a bordure 
erm. Crest — A ferret ar. collared or, lined az. 

Abbeford (Leicestershire). Erm. a chief gu. fretty or. 
Creet — On a chapeau ppr. a water-bouget sa. 

Abbeball (Gloucestershire ; temp. Edward II. The place 
is now called Abenhall). Or, a fosse gu. 

Abberbury, or Aberbury (Oxfordshire and Suffolk). Or, 
a fess embattled sa. Cred — A hawk with wings expanded, 
resting its dexter claw upon a mount, ppr. 

Abberton. Ar. a chev. betw. three wolves' heads erased sa. 

Abbetot. See D'Aeetot. 

Abbetot (Warwickshire). Az. a chev. or, betw. three be- 
zants. Crest — A dexter hand, holding a cutlas in pale ppr. 
hilted or. 

Abbetot (Elmlcy Castle, co. Worcester). See D'Abbetot. 

Abbey. Gu. five fusils conjoined in fessc, betw. three escal- 
lops ar. Crest — An eagle's head erased ppr. 

Abbis, Abbes, or Abbs (Norfolk). Gu. a fesse lozengy 
betw. three escallops ar. Crest — A spur az. leather sa. 
buckle of the first. 

Abbome. Az. a chev. or. Crest — A dexter arm vested az. 
cuffed or, in the hand ppr. a baton gu. tipped with gold. 

Abbot. Erm. on a pale gu. three pears or. Cre-it — A demi 
unicorn erm. armed and maned ar. gorged with a collar, az. 
studded or. 

Abbot (Lord Mayor of London, 1638). Gu. a chev. betw. 
three pears pendent stalked or. Crest — Out of a ducal coro- 
net a unicorn's head or, betw. two ostrich feathers ar. 

Abbot {Baron Colchester). Gu. on a chev. betw. three pears 
or, as many crosses raguly az. within a tressure flory of the 
second. Crest— Out of a ducal coronet or, a unicorn's head 
erm. maned and tufted of the first betw. six ostrich feathers 
ar. quilled gold. Supporters — On either side a unicorn erm. 
maned hoofed and tufted or, gorged with a collar az. within 
another gemel flory counter-flory gu. therefrom a chain 
reflexed over the back gold and charged on the shoulder 
with a cross raguly of the third. Motto — Deo patriae 
amicis. 

Abbot (Baron Tenterden). Vwrp. a pile wavy vaird gu. and 
ar. in base two water bougets or, on a canton of the second 
a crosier erect sa. Crest — A fox pass. sa. charged on the 
shoulder with a water bouget, per pale or and ar. Sup- 
porters — Dexter, a dragon wings elevated vert, gorged with 
the collar of Lord Chief Justice, and charged on the wing 
with a water bouget or; sinister, a pelican wings elevated 
or, beaked vulned and gorged with a collar of roses gu. 
Motto — Lahore . 

Abbot (Shropshire). Ar. three shredding knives sa. 

Abbot (Lincolnshire). Ar. on a pale sa. betw. two ogresses, 
a demi lion issuant from the base or. Crest — A unicorn's 
bead erased ar. attired and crined or, charged with a bar 
gemel sa. 

Abbot (Bellasis, co. York. Quartered by Webster of Flam- 
boro'). Ar. a chev. betw. three wolves' heads erased gu. 

Abbot. Erm. on a bend engr. sa. three crescents or. Crest — 
A cubit arm erect vested az. cuffed erm. holding in the hand 
ppr. a crescent ar. 
1 



A'bbot (Hartland, co. Devon, Vis. Devon, 1620; one of the 
heiresses )7i. Luttrell). Sa. a cross voided betw. four eagles 
displ. or. Crest — A griffin sejant az. platt^e winged and 
beaked or. 

Abbotsbury Abbey (Dorset). Az. three pair of keys 
two in chief and one in base or, each pair addorsed and con- 
joined in the rings wards in chief. 

Abbott. Ar. a cross sa. fimbriated or, betw. four eagles 
di.<!pl. of the second. Crest — A griffin sejant az. bezant^e. 

Abbs (Cleadon, co. Durham). Gu. a bend engr. or, betw. 
six hons ramp. ar. Crest — The sun in splendour. Motto — 
Noli irritare leonem. 

Abbs (The Hall, Barrow Point HiU, Pinner, co. Middle- 
sex). Gu. on a fesse betw. three escallops ar. five fusUs in 
fesse sa. Crest— OmX, of a ducal coronet or, an eagle's head 
with wings displ. ar. collared gold. Motto — In te Domine 
speravi. 

Abby. Gu. five fusils in fesse betw. three escallops ar. 
Crest — A cross crosslet az. 

Abden. Ar. three fleurs-de-lis sa. Crest — A swan's head 
betw. two wings az. 

Abdy (Yorkshire, London, Felix Hall, co. Essex, and Chob- 
ham Place, co. Surrey, Bart.). Or, two chev. betw. three 
trefoils slipped sa. Crest — An eagle's head erased ppr. 
beaked or. 

Abdy (Albyns, co. Essex, Bart.). Or, two chev. betw. three 
trefoils slipped sa. Crest — An eagle's head couped ppr. 
Motto — Tenax et fidelis. 

Abdy (Moores, co. Essex, extinct baronet, a cadet, of Felix 
Hall). Same j4/ms. 

Abdy (Essex). Or, a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped sa. 

Abeck or Habeck. Or, two bars vert. Crest — Out of a 
mural coronet an arm from the elbow vested az. cuff ar. 
holding in the hand ppr. a mullet gu. 

A'Beckett. See Beckett. 

Abeinsherles (Suffolk). Gu. a bend crenelMe ar. 

Abeleyn, Abeline, or Abeleine. Ar. three fleurs-de- 
lis sa. Crest — A peacock ppr. 

Abeline. Ar. on a cross sa. five (another four) eagles di?;)!. 
of the field. Crest — A sword in pale enfiled with a savage's 
head ppr. 

Abell (Essex). Ar. a fesse purp. betw. three boars' heads 
couped gu. Cred — An arm in armour embowed ppr. hold- 
ing a sword ar. hilted or, enfiled on the arm with a wreath 
ar. and gu. 

Abell (co. Kent). Barry of four or and az. on a chief sa. 
three plates. 

Abell, or Abel (Kent and London). Ar. a saltire engr. aa. 
(another gu.). Crest — The same as Abell of Essex. 

Abell (Stapenhill, co. Derby. Visit. 1611). Ar. on a saltire 
engr. az. nine fleurs-de-lis of the field. 

Abell. Ar. on a saltire engr. az. twelve fleurs-de-lis or. 

Abell. Vert fretty ar. and a fesse gu. 

Abelon, or Abilou, as Abeleyn. Crest — A mitre ppr. 
stringed gu. 

Abeljm, Abyleyne, or Aylin. Ar. three chess-rooks 
sa. 

Abelyn. Ar. on a cross sa. an eagle displ. with two heads 
or. Crest — On a globe ppr. an eagle wings expanded and 
inverted gu. 

Abelyne. Ar. in chief three chess-rooks sa. Crest — The 
same as the last. 

Abenball (.\benhall, co. Gloucester). Or, a fesse gu. 

Abenhall, or Ablehall (Gloucestershire). Gu. a fcss? 
or. Crest — Two branches of laurel issuing from the wreath 
chevronways vert. 



ABE 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ABE. 



Aber. Or, a fesse embattled a2. Oest — A demi talbot 

ramp. ar. ducaUy gorged gu. 
Aberbury. See Abberbukt. 
Abercom, Duke of. See Hamilton. 
Abercom. Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three mullets gu. 
Abercromby (of that Ilk, co. Banff). Ar. a chev. gu. 
betw. three boars' heads erased az. Crest — An oak tree 
acomed on a mount ppr. Motto — Tace. 
Abercromby (Birkenbog, co. Banff, Bart., representative 
Bince the 17th century of Abercromby of that Ilk). Ar. a 
chev. gu. betw. three boars' heads erased az. Crest — A fal- 
con rising belled ppr. Supporters— Two greyhounds ar. 
collared gu. Mottoes — Above the crest, Petit alta; under 
the shield, "Vive ut vivas. 
Abercromby (Tullibody co. Clackmannan). Ar. a chev. 
indent, gu. betw. three boars' heads erased az. armed and 
langued or, in the middle chief point a crescent vert. 
Abercromby (Baron Abercrombn, representative of Aber- 
cromby, of Tullibody). Ar. a fesse embattled gu. therefrom 
issuant in chief a dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. 
garnished or, encircled by a wreath of laurel, the hand sup- 
porting the French invincible standard, in bend sinister, also 
ppr.; in base, a chev. indented gu. betw. three boars' heads 
erased az. Crest— \ bee volant ppr. Motto — Vive ut vivas. 
Supporters — Two greyhounds per fesse ar. and or, coUared 
and lined gu. each charged on the shoulder with a thistle 
ppr. 
Abercromby {Baron Dunfermline, extinct). Ar. a fess 
embattled gu. betw. in base the ancient family arms of Aber- 
cromby, viz., a chev. indent, gu. betw. three boars' heads 
erased az. and in chief issuing out of the battlements of the 
fess a dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished or, 
the cubit part of the arm encircled by a wreath of laurel, 
and the hand grasping a French republican military flag, in 
bend sinister. Crest — A bee erect ppr. Supporters — Two 
greyhounds per fess ar. and or, each plain collared with line 
reflexed over the back gu. and suspended from the collar a 
shield az. charged with the Speaker's mace in pale gold, 
betw. the shield a thistle ppr. 
Abercromby (Fettemier, a scion of Birkenbog, created in 
ltJS5, Lord Glassfoord). Ar. a chev. engr. gu. betw. three 
boars' heads erased az. Crfist — A cross crosslet fitch^e or. 
Motto — In cruce salus. 
Abercromby (Glasshaugh). Ar. a chev. indented gu. betw. 
three boars' heads erased az. Crest — A bee volant ppr. 
Motto — Vive ut vivas. 
Abercrom.by (South Carolina, 1778). Ar. on a chev. gu. 
betw. three boars' heads erased az. langued of the field an 
antique crown or. Crest — A cross Calvary gu. Motto — In 
cruce .salus. 
Aberdare, Baron. See Brcce. 
Aberdeen, Earl of. See Gordon. 

Aberdeen (Cairnbulg). Gu. a chev. ar. betw. three mullets 
or. Cre-U — A dexter hand holding up an annulet ppr. 
Motto — Intcmerata Fides. 
Aberdeen, Town of. Gu. three towers triple towered 
within a double tressure flowered and counter-flowered arg. 
Supporters — Two leopards ppr. Motto — Bon Accord. The 
honourable augmentation of the double tressure was granted 
as a recompense for the loyalty of the citizens of Aberdeen, 
in their services against the English. 
Aberdour. Ar. three swords paleways in fesse ppr. sur- 
mounted by a bend gu. within a bordurc az. Crest — An 
anchor and cable and a Sword saltireways, all ppr. Motto — 
Hinc spes cffulgct. 
Aberdwell, or Abredrobell. Gu. a fosse betw. six 
annulets ar. Cre:t — A greyhound ar. running towards a 
tree vert. 
Abergavenny, Earl of. See Neville. 
AberberdoTir, Aberkirdor, or Aberkerdour. Az. 
three swords in fesse paleways, points upward, hilted and 
pomelled or, surmounted of a bend gu. Crest — A sword in 
pale ppr. Motto — Pro rcge et patrid. 
Abemethy (of that Ilk, co. Fife ; Alexander Abernethy, 
dominus de eodem, temp. Robert I. left three daus. his 
coheirs : Margaret, wife of John Stewart, Earl of Angus ; 
Helen, m. to Norman Lindsay, of Crawford ; and Mary, m. 
to Andrew Lcsly, of Itothcs). Or, a lion ramp. gu. sur- 
mounted of a ribbon sa. 
Abemethy (iorrf .Sa/(oun). Quarterly: 1st and 4th, as the 
laet; '2nd and .3rd, ar. three piles with points conjoined in 
base gu., for Wisuabt. Crext—A parrot feeding on a bunch 
of cherries ppr. Supporters — Two falcons ppr. armed 
Jessed, and belled or. Motto — Salus per Christum. 
Abemethy (Auchindoich). Quartcriy, as Lord Saltoun, 
within a bordure engr. az. Crest — A parrot ppr. Motto — In 
Cbristo salus. 
2 



Abernie, or Aberton. Az. a chev. or. 

Aberton. Ar. a chev. betw. three bears' heads erased sa. 

Aberton, or Aburton. Or, on a fesse gu. betw. three 
mullets sa. a cross crosslet fitch^e of the first. Crest — On a 
human heart gu. an eagle's claw erased ppr. 

Aberton, or Aburton. Or, on a fesse gu. betw. three 
mullets pierced sa. as many crosses crosslet fitch^ ar. Crest 
— The same as the last. 

Abew. Ar. on a cross gu. five bezants. 

Abew (Cornwall). Erm. on a cross gu. five annulets or. 

Abibson. Ar. a fesse botonnee gu. 

Abing-don (Abingdon, co. Cambridge, Whichcnford, Brok- 
harapton, and HindJip, co. Worcester: the heiresses were 
Mary, wife of Walter Compton, of Hartpury ; Francis, wife 
of John Branthwaite ; and Elizabeth, 7)i. to Francis Fountain, 
Esq.). Ar. on a bend gu. three eagles displ. or, beaked and 
legged az. Crest — An eagle close or. 

Abingdon, or Abing-ton (Dowdeswell, co. Gloucester, 
granted 1595, to Anthony Abinton, gentleman-usher to 
Queen Elizabeth, Ad. MS. B. M., 14,'295). Ar. on a bend gu. 
three eagles displ. or, an annulet of the second. Crest — A 
hand and arm, couped at the shoulder, in armour, garnished 
or, embowed fesseways, holding in the hand an ancient mace, 
handled sa. headed and studded gold, girt round the arm 
near the shoulder with a sash tied in a bow ar. fringed of 
the first. 

Abingrdon. Ar. a cross patonce betw. five martlets sa. 

Abingrdon, Town of (co. Berks. Confirmed to the borough 
in 1623). Vert a cross patonce or, between four crosses 
pattde ar. 

Abing'don, Earl of. See Bertie. 

Abing-er, Baron. See Scarlett. 

Abing-ton (Dorsetshire). Ar. on a bend cottised sa. three 
eagles displ. of the field in the sinister chief point an escal- 
lop sa. 

Abitot. See D'Abitot. 

Abland. Ar. on a bend sa. three pheons of the field. 

Able. Sa. two bars ar. in chief as many plates. Crest — An 
arm in armour embowed holding a sword all ppr. 

Ablehall. Or, a chief gu. 

Ablehall, or Abelhall. Gu. a fesse or. Cre.t — A lion's 
head erased sa. betw. two wings or. 

Ablehall, or Ableshall (Warwickshire and Gloucester- 
shire). Or, a fesse gu. 

Abnet (Staffordshire). Gu. an eagle displ. betw. three 
pheons ar. 

Abney (Willesley, co. Derby). Ar. on a cross sa. five be- 
zants. This was the true coat of the family, and was borne 
by Sir Thomas Abnet, Knt., Lord Mayor of London, 1694 
(Harleian MSS. 6076), but in consequence of the marriage, 
circa 1400, of John de Abeney, with the co-heiress of Ing- 
wardby of Willesley, most of the Abneys, descendants thereof, 
adopted for their hereditary arms the coat of Ingwardbt, 
viz., or, on chief gu. a Iionpas.sant ar. Le Neve's "Knights," 
gives as the arms of Sir Edward Abnet, of Willesley, 
knighted at Wiitehall, 2 Aug. 1673, this latter coat. 

Abney (Measham Hall, co. Derby). Or, on a chief gu. a lion 
pass. ar. Crest — A demi lion ramp, or, a pellet betw. the 
paws. Motto — Fortiter et honeste. 

Abney-Hastings. See Hastings. 

Abnott. Az. a smew, or white nun, ppr. 

Abrahall (Eaton Tregoz, Abrahall, and Ingeston, Hereford- 
shire: Johan, daughter and heir of Hugh Abrahall, Esq. m. 
Walter Kyrle, Esq. of Walford Court, co. Hereford). Az. 
three hedge-hogs (or porcupines) or. Crest— A hedge-hog 
ppr. 

Abraham (SwarthmoorHall, co Lane). Sa. a chev. betw. 
three cstoiles ar. Cre.tl — A raven ppr. 

Abraham (John Abraham, slain at Beggar's Bush, near 
Dublin, l.')97, then secretary to Sir John Norreys, President 
of Munster). Per fess or and sa. on a bend three annulets 
all counter-charged. 
Abraham. Az. a sun or. Ci-est — A sun or. 

Abrahams. Lozcngy or and gu on a chief sa. the sun in 
his splendour or. Crest — A cap of maintenance decorated 
with a plume of ostrich feathers, all ppr. Another crest — 
The sun rising from a cloud ppr. 
Abram (Abram, co. Lancaster; descended from Richard de 
Edburgham, mentioned in the Ti'Kta de NfviU. John Abram, 
of Abram, temp. Henry V. left an only dau. m. to James 
Holt, of Grizzlchurst). Az. a sun or. Crest — A sun or. 
Abrell. Az. three boars pass. or. 
Abrey. Bendy of six erm. and gu. Cre^t — A chevalier on 

horseback, at full speed, holding a broken spear all ppr. 
Abrincis [Earl of Clicxlcr). Az. a wolf's head erased ar. 
Abrincis (Folkestone, co. Kent). Or, five chev. gu. 
Abris. Gu. a chev. betw. three rowels ar. 



ABB 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ACS 



AbriscoTlTt (Oxfordshire). Erm. (or vert) three bars hu- 
mett^e gu. (or or,) Cresl — A hare close among grass 
ppr. 

Abrol, or Aboril (Worcestershire). Per pale or and gu. 
three roundles counterchanged. Crest — A lion's head vomit- 
ing flames ppr. 

Abrook. Or, a cross engr. per pale gu. and sa. a chief erm. 
Crest — A woirs head erased sa. 

Abry (Glamorgan). Az. a chev. betw. three grififins' heads 
erased or. 

Absall. Ar. a cross sa. 

Abyne. Erm. on a cross gu. five annulets or. 

Abys (Derbyshire). See Abbis, Norfolk. 

Academy, Koyal Irish. Ar. a saltire gu. charged with 
the imperial crown of England ppr. Crest — Out of a pointed 
or Irish crown or, an etoile of. eight points ar. charged with 
a cross gu. Supporters — On the dexter a female figure 
representing Liberty, holding in her right hand a wand, 
thereon a cap gu., on the sinister a figure of Minerva, hold- 
ing in her right hand a lance, and in the left a scroll. Motto 
— We will endeavour. 

Academy of the Muses. Ar. two bars wavy az., on a 
chief of the second a music book open or, betw. two swords 
in saltire, of the first, hilted and pommelled of the third. 
Crest — A Sagittarius in full speed ppr. shooting with a bow 
or, and arrow ar. Supporters — Dexter, a satyr, sinister, a 
merman with two tails, both ppr. Motto — Nihil invita 
Minerva. 

Acberts. Az. three fishes haurient two and one ar. 

Accotts (Ireland). Or, on a cross quarter-pierced az. twenty 
plates five in each quarter. 

Aceles (Cornwall). Or, four pallets sa. 

Acgniillum. Gu. three fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest — A dexter 
hand holding a holly-branch ppr. 

Acliam.ber (Suggerton). Az. a key in pale, ward upwards, 
betw. two mullets of six points or. 

Achannay, or Aliannay (Sorbia, an old family in Gallo- 
way, the name of which is now written Hannat). Ar. three 
roebucks' heads couped az. collared or, with a bell pendant 
to the collar gu. Crest — Out of a crescent a cross crosslet 
fitch^e sa. Motto — Per ardua ad alta. 

Acbard (Berkshire). Or, a bend engr. sa. 

Acbard (Berkshire). Gyronny of six ar. and gu. a label of 
five points az. 

Acbard (co. Gloucester). Barry wavy of six ar. and gu. 
a label of five points az. 

Acbard. Or, a bend of five fusils sa. 

Acbart. Barry wavy of six ar. and gu. 

Acbas (Leicestershire). Sa. three fleurs-de-lis ar. 

Ache, Acche, or Achey (Devonshire). Sa. (another gu.) 
two demi lions pass, guard, in pale or. 

Acbefield. Per chev. ar. and sa. three leopards' faces 
counterchanged. 

Achefield. Per chev. ar. and sa. in chief a label of three 
points gu. in base three leopards' faces or. 

Acbeley (London and Shropshire). See Atcheblet. 

Acheley. Gu. on a fesse engr. betw. three leopards' heads 
erased or, as many crosses crosslet filnh^e sa. Crest — A 
griffin's head erased ppr. 

Acbeley. Per pale gu. and or, a Hcur-de-lis counter- 
changed. 

Acbeney. Ar. five lozenges in salUre betw. four of the 
lozenges gu. 

Acbeltou. Gu. three falcons close ar. belled or. 

Acheson {Earl of Oof-ford). Ar. an eagle displ. with two 
heads sa. beaked and membered or, on a chief vert two 
mullets of the third. Crest— A cock gu. standing on a 
trumpet or. Supporters — Two leopards ppr. the sinister 
reguard. both collared and chained or. Motto — Vigilantibus. 

Acbeson. See Aitcheson. 

Achmuty (that Ilk, Fifeshire). Ar. a broken spear bend- 
ways betw. two mullets az. 

Aobmuty, or Auchmuty (Brianstown, co. Longford). 
Ar. a broken spear bendwise betw. two spur rowels of six 
points az. pierced of the field. Another coat — Ar. two spur 
Towels in chief pierced of the field and a spear's head in 
base az. Crest — An arm embowed in armour holding a 
broken spear, the arm ppr. the lance az. Motto — Dum spiro 
epero. 

Achym (Pelynt, co. Cornwall). Ar. sem^e of cinquefoils a 
maunch gu, (monument in Bodmin church, 1639). Cre^t — 
A lion sejant or, collared and lined sa. and sometimes a demi 
lion ar. holding a maunch gu. 

Achym (Trenake, Pelynt, Cornwall). Ar. a maunch within 
a bordure sa. charged with eight cinquefoils of the field. 
Crest — A crescent or. 

Ackelam. See Acloue. 
3 



Ackers (Lancashire, and The Heath, Leintwardlne, co. Salop). 

Ar. on a bend sa. three acorns or, husked vert. Crest — A 

dove rising ppr. in the beak an acorn of the arms. Motto— 

La Libert^. 

Ackers (Prinknash Park, co. Gloucester). As of Lancashire. 

Ackers (Moreton Hall, co. Chester). Ar. on a bend sa. three 

acorns or, husked vert. Creit — A dove rising in the beak 

an olive branch ppr. Motto — La liberty. 
Ackerson, or Akers. Sa. a bend betw. three acorns or. 

Crest — A doric column or. 
Ackford. Ar. a horse's head sa. bridled or, issuing out of 

water in base az. on a chief gu. a cross of the first. Crest — 

A horse's head, as in the arms. 
Ackhurst. Ar. on a bend sa. three acorns or. Cre-t — A 

demi lion ar. holding in the dexter paw an acorn slipped 

vert fructed or. 
Ackles. See Aclet. 
Ackleward, or Acle-ward. Sa. a chev. betw. three 

garbs or. 
Acklow. Quarterly, indented ar. and az. 
Ackroyd, or Ackeroyd. Per saltire or and az. on a 

saltire betw. four fleurs-de-lis an annulet all counter- 
changed. Crest — A dog sleeping ppr. 
Ackworth (Suffolk). Ar. a griffin segreant (another, salient 

per fesse az. and purp.) and sonutimcs sa. and az. armed or. 

Crest — A griffin's head erased ppr. 
Ackworth. Erm. on a chief indented gu. three coronets or. 
Acland (Colomb John, and KiUerton, co. Devon, Bart.). 

Chequy ar. and sa. a fesse gu. Crest — A man's hand couped 

at the wrist in a glove lying fesseways thereon a falcon 

perched all ppr. Molto — Inebranlable. 
Acland (Fairfield, co. Somerset, and Newhouse, co. Devon, 

created a baronet 3 Oct. 181S). Arms as the last, homo 

quarterly with Palmer and Fdllee. 
Acland (Devonshire). Gu. a bend or, charged with three 

trefoils vert betw. a lion ramp, in chief and three lozenges 

in base of the second. 
Acle (Devonshire). Gu. two lions pass, reguard. or. Crcsl — 

An annulet or, stoned sa. 
Acley, or Ackles. Or, three palets az. 
Aclome (Moreby, co. York). Gu. a maunch ar. within an 

orle of cinquefoils of the last (another or). Crest — ^A deuii 

lion holding a maunch ar. 
Acock. Ar. a fesse betw. three fleurs-de-lis gu. Crest — Out 

of a mural coronet a demi swan issuing ppr. 
Acombe (Granted 1574, to John Acombe, of Stratford-upon- 
Avon). Erm. three Uons pass, in fesse gu. Crest — A dext<?r 

arm in armour embowed sa. garnished or, tied roimd with a 

ribbon ar. and gu. in the hand a broken tilting spear. 
Acootes, or Acotes. Ar. on a cross quarterly pierced 

az. twenty bezants placed by fives in saltire. 
Acotes (Ireland). Az. a cross voided betw. four cinquefoils or. 
Acotes (Caton Hall, co. York). Or, on a cross az. five 

cinquefoils or. 
Acottes. Or, on a cross counterpierced az. twenty bezants 

five at each end in saltire. Crest — A lion ramp. gu. support- 
ing a standard az. charged with a saltire ar. 
Acotts. Or, on a cross pierced az. four cinquefoils of the 

field. Crest — Same as the last. 
Acotts. Or, a cross pierced az. bezant^e. 
A'Cotirt (Baron Heytesbury). Per fesse or, and paly of six 

erminois and az., in chief an eagle displ. sa., beaked and 

membered gu., charged on the body with two chevronels ar. 

Crest — An eagle displ. sa., charged with two chevronels or, 

beaked and legged gu., holding in the beak a Uly sUpped ppr. 

Supporters — On either side an eagle, wings elevated sa., each 

holding in the beak a lily slipped ppr. J/otto— Grandescunt 

aucta labore. 
A'Court. Per fesse in chief az. an eagle displ. ar. in base, 

paly of six of the first and second. Crest — A Icon's head 

reguard. gu. 
A'Court-Holmes {Baron Heytesbury). See Holmes. 
Acre, or D'Acre. Gu. three escallops ar. 
Acre (Westmorland). Gu. three fusils in fesse or, and in 

chief as many escallops ar. 
Acre. Gu. three escallops betw. nine trefoils slipped, three 

three two and one ar. 
Acre. Gu. a fesse fusily betw. three escallops ar. 
Acre. Gu. three lozenges or, in chief as many escallops ar. 
Acres. Gu. three trefoUs shpped in fesse or, betw. as many 

escallops ar. 
Acres (Northumberland). Ar. a fesse betw. six fleurs-de-lis 

sa. Crest — An eagle displ. ppr. charged on the breast with 

a torteau sa. 
Acres. Or, a cross potent gu. 
Acrit, or Acre (Westmorland). Az. on a cross or, (another 

ax.) four escallops gu. 



ACT 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ADA 



Acton (Aldenham, co. Salop). Gu. two lions pass. ar. betw. 
nine crosses crosslet fitch^e or. Crest — Within a wreath ar. 
and gu. a human let; and thigh in armour ppr. garnished or. 
couped and dropping blood. 

Acton (Gatacre Park, co. Salop, the second branch of the 
Actons of Aldenham). Arms and Crtst — As Acton of 
Aldenham. 

Acton (Acton Scott, co. Salop). Arms and Crest— As Actok 
of Aldenham. 

Acton, Dalbergr (Baron Acton). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
gu. semfe of cross crosslets fitch^e or, two lions pass, in pale 
ar., for .4.cton; 2nd and 3rd, quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. six 
fleurs-de-Us three two and one ar. ; a chief dancett^e of 
the last ; 2nd and 3rd, or, a cross patonce gu., over all an 
escutcheon of the first thereon a tower of the second and 
chief dancett^e of the last. Supporters — Two lions guard, 
ppr. each gorged with a chain or, and charged with a cross 
patonce gu. Crest — A human leg and thigh in armour 
couped and dropping blood all ppr. embellished or. 

Acton (Cheshire). Gu. a fesse erm. in chief and in base a 
lion pass. ar. betw. two crosses crosslet or. Crest — A demi 
lion ramp, guard, ar. grasping a spear or, enflled with a 
boar"s head sa. couped gu. 

Acton (Cheshire). Ar. a chev. gu. 

Acton (Leicestershire). Quarterly, per fesse indented ar. 
and az. 

Acton (London). Quarterly, per fesse indented ar. and gu. 
in the first quarter a Cornish chough sa. 

Acton (Bipford). Ar. a fesse within a bord. engr. erm. 

Acton (Shropshire). Quarterly, per fesse indented ar. and 
gu. in the first a bordure sa. 

Acton (Warwickshire). Gu. a fesse within a bordure erm. 

Acton (Worcestershire. The Sutton branch terminated with 
an heiress, Joice Acton, m. to Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charle- 
cote, but its male representation vested in William Joseph 
Acton, of Wolverton, Esq.). Gu. a fesse erm. within a bor- 
dure engr. of the second. Creat — An arm in armour em- 
bowed ppr. holding in the hand a sword ar. hilt or, thereon 
a boar's head couped sa. the neck distilling blood. Motto — 
Vaillance avance I'homme. 

Acton (Bockleton, co. Worcester). Same as preceding with 
a mullet for difference. 

Acton (Acton Hall, Ombersley). Gu. a chev. betw. three 
cinquefoils ar. Visit. 1634, has the chev. or. 

Acton (Worcester). Gu. a fesse and bordure both engr. 
erm. in chief a chaplet ppr. 

Acton (granted to Sib Robert Acton, of Worcestershire, 
Knt., and to his nephew, Robert, " who at ye siege of BuUeyn 
toke Mons. Honingcourt prisoner"). Gu. a fesse and bordure 
engr. erm. on a canton or, a tree eradicated of the field. 
Crest — An arm embowed in armour sa. garnished or, in the 
gauntlet a sword thereon impaled a boar's head erased of 
the first armed of the second. 

Acton. Gu. a bordure engr. erm. 

Acton. Per fesse indented ar. and az. Crest — A pine tree 
leaved vert fructed or. 

Acton. Quarterly, per fosse indented ar. and gu. on a bend 
az. three crosses formde fitchde or. 

Acton. Gu. a cross or, within a bordure engr. erm. 

Acton. Or, three bars vair. 

Acton (Cheshire, two distinct male branches of Hellesley). 
Az. a chev. between three mullets or (another without 
the chev.). 

Acton. Ar. three piles wavy gu. 

Acton (Gloucester). Gyronny of eight ar. and gu. 

Acton. The same ; adding in the second quarter a cross 
patt<;e ar. charged with five escallops gu. 

Acton. Gu. crusilfe of crosses crosslet fltch^ or, two lions 
pass. ar. 

Acton. Quarterly, ar. and gu. in chief an annulet counter- 
chunccd, on a bend az. three crosses patt^e fitch^e or. 

AcAvell. Paly of six ar. and az. on a chief gu. a leopard 
paiss. or. 

Acwrell. Paly of six ar. and az. a chief sa. 

Acworth (Suffolk). Ar. a griffin segreant per fesse vert 
and az. armed or. 

Acworth (The Hook, co. Herts). Erm. on a chief indented 
gu. three coronets or. Motto — Vincit qui patitur. 

Adair (Kinhilt, co. Wigton). Per bend or and sa. three 
dexter hands appaum<k; couped and erect gu. Crest — A 
man'D head couped and bloody ppr. Motto — Loyal au mort. 

Adair nicatherton Park, co. Somerset). Arms, Ac, same as 
preceding, 

Adair (Baron Waventy). Arms — Per bend or and ar. three 
dexter hands couped and erect gu. quartering SnAFTo. 
Supporters — Dexter a knight-banneret armed all ppr. 
holding banneret of family arms diapl. ; sinister, an Irish 



chief armed all ppr. Crest — A man's head affronts 
couped at the neck ppr. Motto — Loyal au mort. 

Adair (Genoch, 1772). Ar. a lion rampant az. between three 
dexter hands appaum^e erected and couped gu. Crest — A 
man's head affront^e couped ppr. distilling drops of blood, 
and fixed on the point of a sword erected in pale, also ppr. 
hilted and pommeled or. Mottoes — Arte et niarte ; and For- 
titudine. 

Adair (Loughanmore, co. Antrim). Arms, &c. as the pre- 
ceding. 

Adam (Blair Adam, co. Kinross, 1815). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
ar. a mullet az. pierced of the field betw. three cross crosslets 
fitchde gu. ; 2nd and 3rd, ar. three arrows gu. the midmost 
paleways the other two saltireways, points downwards baaded 
together vert, accompanied with six trefoils slipped of the 
last, two in chief two in fess and two in base, for Little- 
JOHN. Crest — A cross crosslet fitchfe gu. surmounted of a 
sword in saltire ppr. Motto — Crux mihi grata quies. 

Adam (Whiteslaid, co. Selkirk, 1731). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
ar. three passion crosses gu.; 2nd and 3rd., or, a burning hill 
az. in chief three ravens wings expanded ppr. a borduro 
of the second charged with eight passion crosses of the 
first. Crest — A passion cross or, charged with a man's heart 
ppr. Motto — In cruce salus. 

Adam (Walden, co. Essex, assigned by Camden, Clarencenx 
to Thomas Adam, Esq., 30 Sept. 1614). Vert on a cross or, 
an etoile sa. Crest — Atalbot passant az. bezant^e collared ar. 

Adam (London). Gu. on a bend or, three leopards' heads 
vert. 

Adam (Lincolnshire). Sa. three bars ar. in chief three 
mullets of the last. 

Adam (Christchurch, co. Hants). Ar. a crescent betw. three 
crosses crosslet fltchfe gu. Crest — A crescent as in the 
arms. 

Adam. Az. a ray of the sun issuing out of the dexter 
corner bendways ppr. 

Adam (Lord ap Adam temp. Edward I.). Ar. on a cross gu. 
five mullets or. 

Adam. Gu. five estoiles in cross ( — ). 

Adam (Bury St. Edmunds). Erm. on a cross gu. five mullets 
or. 

Adam (London, 1590). Ar. on a cross gu. five estoiles or. 

Adams (London, 1598). Ar. on a cross gu. five mullets 
(another five estoiles) or, quartering Squire, &c. Crest — Out 
of a ducal coronet or, a demi lion affront^e arg. Another 
crest — A lion saliant or. 

Adams (Paterchurch, co. Pembroke, a.d. 1422). Sa. a 
martlet ar. Another coat — Quarterly, 1st and 4th, sa. two 
martlets ar. ; 2nd, sa. five martlets in saltire ar. ; 3rd, sa. a 
lion ramp, within a bordure engr. or. (See Lewis Dwnn's 
Visitation of Wales, a.d. 1591). 

Adams (Holyland and Loveston, both co. Pembroke, de- 
scended from Adams of Paterchurch). Quarterly, 1st and 
4th, ar. on a cross gu. five mullets or. ; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a 
martlet ar. Crest — A martlet ar. Motto — Certior in coelo 
domus. 

Adams (Drummer Grange, Hants, Thorpe, Surrey, and 
Chastleton, Oxon, descended from Adams of Loveston). Or 
on a cross betw. four martlets sa. five mullets of the field. 
C-cst — A martlet sa. holding in the beak a mullet or. 
Ji/oMo— Cruce Duce. 

Adams (London, a.d. 1682, from Broseley, Salop). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th sa. a martlet ar. ; 2nd, quarterly, ar. and sa. on. 
a cross gu. five mullets or. ; 3rd, per pale az. and sa. three 
fleur-de-lis or, over aU a mullet for difference. Crest — A 
martlet ar. 

Adams (Middleton Hall, co. Carmarthen). Ar. on a cross 
gu. five mullets or. ft-e't — Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi 
lion affronttje gu. Motto — Aspire, persevere, and indulge not. 

Adams (Anstey, CO. Warwick, lormerly of Northamptonshire, 
now represented by Henry Cadwallader Adams, of 
Anstey Hall, Esq.). Vert on a cross or, an estoile sa. Crest 
— A talbot passant az. bezants collared ar. Motto— S\xh 
crucc Veritas. 

Adams. Vert a cross or. Crest— A griffin's head betw. two 
wings endorsed vert charged on the breast with a cross or. 

Adams. Vert on a cross or, a mullet gu. 

Adams. Arg. on a cross gu. a mullet or. 

Adams (Longdon, Salop a.d. 1584, 1623 and 1663). Quarterly, 
1st and 4tli, erra. three cats pass. az. ; 2nd and 3rd, per 
pale ar. and gu. a chevron between three bees counter- 
changed, for Mascott. 

Adams, alias Tasker (London, descended from Doning- 
ton, Salop). Erm. three cats pass, az., quartering Mascott, 
Tasker, .fee. Crcii — (a.d. 1584) Issuing outof aducul coronet 
a boar's head erect or. Crest (altered in a.d. 1590) A boar'B 
head ar. couped gu. 



ADA 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ADD 



Adams (London, a.d. 1634, Norfolk, a.d. 16G4, descended 
from Wcm, Salop). Erm. three cats passant az. Crest — A 
greyhound's head erased erm. 

Adams (Charwelton, co. Northampton, descended from 
William Adams, Esq. who purchased Charwelton Manor in 
1360. The heiress, Selina Anne, daughter of the Rev. 
Fitzherbert Adams, LL.B. of Charwelton, m. George 
Wharton Marriott, of the Middle Temple, Esq.). Erm. three 
cats-a-mountain in pale az. Crczt — A greyhound's head 
erased erm. 

Adams (Welton co. Northampton, a branch of Adams of 
Charwelton). Same Aruis and Crest. 

Adams (Owston, Stainsby, East Hardwick and Camblcsforth, 
all in CO. York, a.d. 16G5, granted 1612 by St. George). Gu. 
a lion ramp, or, between three escallops ar. on a chief of 
the last three pallets engr. sa. Crext — A demi griffin erm. 
winged and beaked az. holding an escallop or. 

Adams (Cheaton and Kaynham, Salop, a.d. 1584, London, 
1634). Erm. a fess vaire (in another place chocquy) or and 
sa. between three roses gu. Cre^t — A griffin's head erased 
erm. beaked gu. charged with a chevron chequy or and sa. 

Adams (Tydd St. Mary, co. Lincoln, 1559 and 1634). Vert 
a pale arg. between two griffins segreant or. Cmt — A 
griffin's head couped gu. beaked az. between two wings or, 
pcUetfee. Granted 1559, and confirmed 1562. 

Adam.s (Middle Temple, 1639). Sa. on a bend or, betw. two 
bezants three martlets of the field. Crest — On a bezant a 
demi eagle sa. 

Adam.s (.Middlesex). Ar. on a bend az. (another, sa.) three 
trefoils slipped or. 

Adams (Middlesex). Ar. a fesse betw. four martlets gu. 
three and one. Crest — .Vn eagle volant reguardant. 

Adam.s (St. Ives). Ar. on a chev. sa. three mullets or, 
pierced gu. 

Adam.s (Wales). Az. a crescent betw. three mullets or. 

Adams. Quarterly, erm. and az. in the 2nd and 3rd an 
eagle rising or. 

Adams. Barry of six or and az. a saltire gu. 

Adams. Barry of six ar and gu. over all a lion ramp. or. 

Adam.s, alias Apadam. (formerly of Charlton, co. Somerset, 
and afterwards of Fenne, co. Devon, recorded in the Visita- 
tion of Devon, 1564). Or, a lion ramp. betw. six cross crosslets 
sa., quartering Godrnet and others. 

Adams (Brompton, co. Kent, descended from Adams of 
Devonshire). Or, a lion ramp. betw. eight crosses ci»r~let 
fitcn^e sa. all within a bordure engr. az. 

Adam.s (liowdon, co. Devon, originally of Charlton Adam, 
CO. Somerset). Or, sem^e of crosses crosslet fitch^e sa. a 
lion ramp. gu. within a bordure engr. of the second. CreU — 
A dexter arm in armour ppr. embowed, grasping a cross 
crosslet fitch^e sa. charged on the elbow with a torteau. 
Motto — Libertas et natale solum. 

Adams (quartered by the late Sir Wiluam Adams Rawson, 
knt. of Putney, Surrey). Per fesse, az. and sa. on a pale 
betw. two mullets in chief ar. a mullet betw. two crescents 
of the second. Crest — On a mount vert an eagle, standing 
the reverse way and reguardant, wings expanded ppr., beak 
and logs or, holding in the mouth a mullet sa., the sinister 
claw resting on a crescent, reversed, gold. 

Adam.s (Fun. Entry Ireland, 1630). Or, senile of cross cross- 
lets and a lion ramp. sa. 

Adams (Fun. Ent. of John Adams, son of Randall Adams, 
Esq. of Lcdwichtown co. Westmeath 1669). Vert, a pallet 
betw. two griffins segreant or. 

Adams (Francis Ottiwell Adams, Esq., Secretary of Her 
Brittanic Majesty's Embassy at Paris). Az. on a fesse engr. 
betw. two cats-a-mountain passant guardant ar. a like cat-a- 
mountain of the first. Crest — A cat-a-mountain guardant 
ar. collared az. resting the dexter fore paw on a terrestrial 
globe ppr. Motto — Suaviter sed fortiter. 

Adams (Northlands, co. Cavan). Gu. a heart between three 
cross crosslets fitch^e or. Crest — On a mount vert, a cross 
crosslet fitch^e or, charged with a bleeding heart gu. 
Motto — In cruce salus. 

Adams (granted to Thomas Adams, Esq. of Bath). Ar. a 
cross engr. gu. quarterly pierced and charged with four 
mullets of the field and in the centre point a mullet of the 
second and in dexier canton a battle-axe erect sa. Crest — 
Out of a crown vallery or, a demi lion affrontde ar. sem^e of 
mullets gu. 
Adams (Tuos. Adams, Esq. of Nottingham, J. P.). Vert a 
cross parted and fretty betw. two mullets in the 1st and 4th, 
and as many cinquefoils in the 2nd and 3rd quarters or. 
Crest— A talbot sa. sem^e of cinquefoils or, resting the 
dexter paw upon a mullet also or. 
A dam son (Westmorland). Vert on a cross or, an estoile sa. 
Crett — A talbot passant az. bezant^e collared or. 
5 



Adamson. Ar. three crosses crosslet fitchfe gu. Crest — 
A lion passant holding in the dexter paw a cross crosslet 
fitchee gu. 

Adamson (Graycroock, North Britain). Ar. a crescent gu. 
betw. three crosses crosslet fitchee az. 

Adamson (John Adamson, of Newcastle, Esq.). Ar. three 
crosses crosslet fitclnSe gu. Crest — A cross crosslet gu. 

Adamson (Scotland). Ar. a star gu. betw. three crosses 
cros.^let fitchee az. 

Adcock. Az. on a saltire ar. nine pellets. Crest — A foi's 
head issuing ar. 

Adan. Vert on a chev. ar. three pheons of the field. 

Addelley. Gu. on a chev. or, three crosses bottony sa. 

Addenbrooke (Wollaston Hall, co. Worcester, granted 20 
April, 1795, to John Addendrooke Addenbrooke, Esq. of 
Wollaston, high sheriff of Worcestershire, 1798. He was only 
child of John Homfray; assumed the surname and arms of 
Addenbrooke, under the will of his kinsman, Edw. .\ddes- 
BRooKE, Esq. of Over Sapey, co. Hereford ; m. in 1780, Ehza- 
bcth, daiL of Michael Graztbrook, Esq. of Audnam, and was 
father of the late Edw. Addenbrooke Addenbrooke, Esq. 
of Kingswinford House, co. Stafford, whose eldest son, the 
Rev. Edw. Addenbrooke, vicar of Smethwick, co. Stafford, 
is the present representative of the family). Quarterly, az. 
and ar. a fesse wavy or, between three crescents counter- 
changed. Cnst — On the banks of a river an otter party per 
pale ar. and sa. and ';harged with two crescents counter- 
changed. 

Adderbury (Sussex). Or, a fesse embattled sa. 

Adderley (originally of Blakehagh, co. Stafford, and sub- 
sequently of Weddington, co. Warwick, Coton, co. Stafford, 
and Hams Hall, co. Warwick, conDrmed by the Deputies of 
Camden, Clarenceux, to Hcmfredus Adderley, of Widding- 
ton or Weddington, co. Warwick, son of Humfredus Ad- 
derley, of the same, fourth son of Tho.mas Adderley, of 
Blackhagh, co. Stafford, and fourth in descent from Henrt 
Adderley). Ar. on a bend az. three mascles of the field. 
Cr,st — On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a stork ar. 

Adderley (Coton Hall, co. Stafford). Ar. on a bend az. 
three lozenges of tlie liey each charged with a pheon gu. 
Visit, of Stafford, 158:). 

Adderley (Staffordshire). Ar. on a bend gu. betw. two 
lions' heads erased sa. three crosses pattee of the field. 

Addice. Ar. three addices az. handles or. 

Adding-ton, or Adington (London). Per pale erm. and 
ermines a chev. countcrchanged. 

Addingi;on. Per pale erm. and ermines on a chev. five 
lozenges all countcrchanged betw. three fleurs-de-lis or. 
Crest — A cat-a-mountain sejant ppr. bezantee supporting 
an escutcheon az. charged with a mace in pale or, ensigned 
with a regal crown ppr. within a bordure engr. ar. 

Addington (High Bickington, Devon, came from London 
temp. Henry VIII. The sisters and coheirs of Thomas 
Addington, Esq. who died in 168S, married Incledon, Docton, 
and Willyams). Per pale ermine and ermines on a chev. 
betw. three fleurs-dchs four lozenges all countcrchanged. 
Crest — A leopard sejant guardant ar. pellett^e. 

Adding1;on (Viscount H'diuoi'th). Per pale ermine and 
ermines a chev. charged with five lozenges countcrchanged 
betw. three fleurs-de-lis or. C/'csS— A cat-a-mountain sejant 
guardant ppr. bezantee, his dexter fore paw resting on an 
escutcheon az. charged with a mace erect surmounted with 
a regal crown or, (in memory of the first lord having been 
Speaker of the House of Commons) within a bordure engr. 
ar. Supporters — Two stags, the dexter ermines, the sinister 
ermine, each attired and gorged with a chain therefrom 
pendant a key all or. Motto — Libertas sub rege pio. 

Addison (Preston, co. Lancaster). Same Arms. Crest — A 
tower ar. 

Addison (Sudbury, and of Chilton). Erm. on a bend gu. 
three annulets ar. on a chief az. three etoiles of the third. 
Cre^t — A unicorn's head erased ar. pierced through the neck 
with an arrow and charged on the breast with three an- 
nulets 

Addison (Joseph Addison, Secretary of State temp. Queen 
Anne). Erm. on a bend gu. three annulets or, a chief az. 
charged with three leopards' heads of the third. Crest — A 
unicorn's head erased transpierced by an arrow in bend 
sinister. 

Addison. Erm. on a bend gu. three annulets or, on a chief 
vert as many leopards' faces of the third. 

Addison (Newark House, Maidstone, Kent). Sa. a bend enn. 
betw. two snakes nowed or, a chief ar. thereon three leopards' 
faces gu. Cresi — A snake nowed as in the arms in front of a 
demi eagle wings displ. sa. holding in the beak a snake en- 
twined round the neck ppr. Afo(to— Addecet honeste vivere. 

Addison (Wednesbury, co. Stafford). Ar. a pile gu. three 



ADD 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AG A 



annulets one and two counterchanged a chief of the second 
thereon three garbs or. Crest— X demi unicorn couped ar. 
armed hoofed and crined or, the sinister foot resting on an 
inescutcheon gu. charged with a leopard's face gold. 

Addott. Per chev. gu. and ar. 

Addots. Per chcv. gu. and ar. two squirrels in chief sejant 
cracking nuts or, and three piles in base vert. 

Addreston, or Aderston. Az. three martlets within a 
bordure cngr. ar. two and one. 

Addyes (Droitwich, co. Worcester). Ar. a chev. betw. three 
crosses patt^e gu. 

Addyes, or Addis (Great Barr, CO. Stafford, descended 
from Sir Degoby .iVddis, Knt., who died 1521). Arms as the 
last. 

Adeane (Babraham, co. Cambridge). Vert on a chev. betw. 
three griffins' heads erased or, as many estoiles sa., quarter- 
ing JorfEs, Bbtdges, and Chandos. Crest— A griffin's head 
collared betw. two wings. 

Adeleigh, or Audley. Gu. fretty or. 

Adeley. Or, three ravens in pale sa. 

Adelmare, alias Caesar. Gu. three roses ar. on a chief 
of the second as many roses of the first. Crest — The sea 
vert thereon a dolphin embowed ppr. 

Aderson. Lozengy az. and ar. a chief or. Crest — A cup 
ar. therefrom three branches of laurel vert. 

Aderton, or Alderton (Lancashire). Sa. three sword 
chapes or. Crest— A. hand holding a scimetar ppr. 

Adgrer. Az. on a fesse ar. three water bougets sa. Crest — 
A swan with wings endorsed rcguard. ar. murally crowned 
gu. resting the foot upon an escallop shell or. 

Adey (Daniel Goodson Adey, of Merkyate Cell or Prioij', 
CO. Hertford, Esq., descended from the Kentish family of the 
.■same name, formerly settled at Doddington, in that county, 
and representative of the branch domiciled for the last two 
centuries at Combe, co. Gloucester). Ar. on a bend az. 
three leopards' faces or. Crest— A leopard's face or, jessant 
a fleur-de-hs gu. 

Adingrton. Ar. a fesse betw. three escallops sa. 

Adingrton. Sa. a bend ar. 

Adinstoun (that Ilk, co. Berwick). Ar. a cross engr. sa. 
cantoned with four crosses crosslet fitch^e gu. 

Adis (Middlesex). Gu. a chev. betw. three crosses patt(5e ar. 

Adkins. Erm. in chief two lions ramp. az. Crest — A lion 
ramp. gu. supporting a flagstaff and ropes ppr. flag ar. 
charged with a cross gu. 

Adlam (Manor House, Chew Magna, co. Somerset, con- 
firmed to William /U)lam, Esq. of that place, J. P., F.S.A.). 
Az. seven rays issuing from the sun in the dexter canton 
bendwise ppr. the centre ray betw. two etoiles in bend sinis- 
ter ar. ; quartering ar. two bars engr. vert each charged 
with a spear head or, betw. nine martlets gu., for Moobe; 
on an escutcheon of pretence ar. a chev. betw. three stags' 
heads affront^e gu., for Pahker. Cre^i — A mount vert, 
thereon in front of rays of the sun an eagle ppr. gorged with 
a collar sa. Motto — Tyine proveth trvth. 

Adlam. Or, three mullets az. on a bordure of the last as 
many bezants in chief. Cre.tt — A hand gu. holding a lure or. 

Adlard. Ar. on a fesse gu. betw. three wolves' heads erased 
sa. as many mullets of the field. Crest — A cubit arm holding 
in the hand a dagger erect all ppr. 

Adler (Ilaverstoke, co. Essex). Sa. two bends erm. on a 
caViton ar. a lion ramp, of the first. Crest — A denii eagle 
with wings displ. sa. charged on the breast with an etoile or. 

Adley, or Adelley (Somersetshire). Gu. on a chev. or, 
three crosses crosslet sa. 

Adlington (Cheshire). Ar. a cross flory sa. 

Adllngton (Adlington, co. Lancaster, 1567, IGl.?, 1664). 
Sa. a ctuT. hetw. three antelopes' heads ar. attired or. 

Adlington (Holme Hale Hall, Norfolk). Sa. a cliev. betw. 
three goats' heads erased ar. Crext — A goat's head as in the 
arms. Motto — Per antiquam cartam. 

Adlyn (London, 1590). Gu. nine martlets, three, three, two, 
and one, or. Crest — On a mount vert a martlet or. 

Adney. Az. a fesse dancett<$e betw. thiec cherubs' heads 
ar. Crest — An eagle's head holding in the beak an acorn, 
slipped ani leaved ppr. 

Adokes (Lancashire). Ar. across sa. in the first quarter a 
fleur-Oe-lis gu. 

AdolphuB (Sir Jacob Adolpiids, M.D., Knt., Inspector- 
general of Army Hospitals). Az. a knight's helmet with 
snake entwined round it betw. three lions' heads erased or. 
Crr.t — A dcmi lion ramp, murally crowned holding a 
knight s helmet betw. the pawa. 

Adott. Per chev. gu. and paly of six Tcrt and az. in chief 
two squirrels respecting each other cracking nuts or. 

Adrian. Gu. four escallops in cross or, the top of each 
•hell meeting in the centre point. 
ti 



Adronkel. Ar. on a cross form^e gu. a mullet pierced or. 

Adryan. Barry nebula ar. and sa. a chief chequy or and az. 

Adrypayn (Lincolnshire). Gu. a fesse hummett^ ar. 
chief three griffins' heads erased or. 

Adston. Ar a bend indented sa. 

Adston, or Adiston. Ar. a fesee gu. betw. three pellets. 

Adventurers (Merchant), or Hambrough Mer- 
cliants. (This society was incorporated 2i Edw. I., 1296, 
and obtained ample privileges, and a confirm^ition of their 
charter from Queen Elizabeth.) Barry nebulee of six ar. 
and az. a chief quarterly gu. and or, on the 1st and 4tli 
quarters a lion pass, guard, of the fourth; on the 2nd 
and 3rd, two roses gu. barbed vert. Cre:t — .V pegasus cur- 
rent with wings indorsed ar. Supporters — Two pegasi ar. 
with wings indorsed each charged on the wing with three roses 
in pale gu. Motto — Dieu nous adventure donne bonne. 

Adventurers (Ne-w), or Frencli Merchants. Barry 
wavy of six ar. and az. a chief quarterly gu. and or, on the 
1st and 4th, a Hon pass, guard, of the last; on the 2nd 
and 3rd two roses gu. seeded or, barbed vert over all on an 
inescutcheon az. a sceptre in pale or. Crest— Two anchors 
in saltire and a sceptre in pale all or. Supporter.^ — Two 
pegasi ar. with wings indorsed or. maned and hoofed of the 
last. Motto — Reddite cuique suum. 

Adwood. Gu. a lion ramp, tail fourohiSe nowed ar. 

Ady (Kent and Southwark, granted 1615). Az. a fesse daun- 
cett^ betw. three cherubims' heads or, faces ar. Crest — 
On a mount vert a stag lodged ar. attired and ducally 
crowned or. 

Ady, or Adry. Gu. on a bend ar. three leopards' faces sa. 
Crest — A leopard's face or, jessant a fleur-de-lis gu. 

Ady, Adey, or Addey (Kent, London, and Hereford- 
shire). Gu. on a bend ar. three leopards' faces vert langucd 
of the field. 

Adyer (Kent). Ar. a chev. dauncett^ betw. three cherubims 
gu. Crest — 'A cherub's head ppr. 

Adyn (Dorchester). Ar. on a saltire gu. five lions saliant or. 
Crest — A lion's head ppr. 

Adys (Herefordshire and London). Ar. a chev. couped 
betw. three crosses pattee gu. Crest — A cock erm. (Vis. 
of London, 1633-4. JIarl. MSS. 1476.) 

Adzwood. Ar. three ravens' heads couped ppr. 

Aerboroug-h, or Aerburg'. Or, an eagle's head with 
hounds' ears az. 

Afla.eck (Dalham Hall, co. Suffolk, Bart.). Ar. three bars sa. 
Crest — An ear of wheat bearded ppr. Motto — Pretiosum 
quod utile. 

Affleck, or Auchinleck (Glenbcrvie, Kincardineshire). 
Ar. a cross embattled sa. Crest — An eagle rising ppr. 

Afordbie (Afordby, co. Lincoln). Ar. a saltire engr. sa. 
Crest — A horse's head erased sa. bridled or. 

Afton (Devonshire). Ar. a chev. cngr. betw. three fleurs- 
de-lis sa. 

African (Royal) Company (Incorporated 20 Jan. 14 
Charles II. 1G62). Or, an elepliant az. on his back a quad- 
rangular castle ar. masoned ppr. ; on the sinister tower a 
flagstaff and banner gu. on the dexter corner of the 
banner a canton arg. chai-ged with a cross gu. on the 
dexter corner of the escutcheon a canton quarterly of 
France and England. Crest — On a ducal coronet or. an 
anchor erect sa. cabled of the first betw. two dragons' 
wings expanded ar. each charged with a cross gu. Sup- 
jiortcrs — Two African blacks ppr. vested rounii the waist 
with a skirt ar. pearls in their ears and round their necks 
banded round the temples or, thereon feathers erect of va- 
rious colours each holding in his exterior hand an arrow or, 
barbed and feathered ar. Motto — Regio floret patiocinio 
commercium commercioque regnuni. 

Agane. Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. erm. betw. six mart- 
lets counterchanged of the field. 

Agar (Gowran Castle, co. Kilkenny). Az. a lion rairip. or. 
Crest — A demi lion ramp. or. 

Agar (Viscount Cii/den). Same Arms and Crest. Sup- 
porters — Two lions per fess or and az. collared and chained 
gu. Motto — Spectcmur agendo. The second Viscount Clif- 
den assumed the name and arms of ElLis, 'whicK see. 

Agar {Lord Callan). The same Arms and Cirst as Agar of 
Gowran. Supporters — Dexter a unicorn ar. horned maned 
hoofed and tufted or ; sinister a white horse ppr. Motto — 
Via trita via tuta. 

Agar {Counlcsi of Brn)idon). Same Arms and Supporters. 

Agar (Eiirl of Normnnton). Arms and Crest same as AoAR 
of Gowran. A nudlet for difT. Supporters — Two lions the 
dexter per bend and the sinister per bend-sinister or, and 
az. collared and chained gu. each charged on the shoulder 
with a crescent. Motto — Via trita via tuta. 

Agar (Ireland, and Cranham llall, co. Essex). Az. a lioD 



A G A 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AIT 



ramp. or. Crest — A demi lion ramp. or. Motto — Spectemur 
agendo. 
Agrar-Robartes. See Robartes. 

Agard (Lancashire). Ar. a chev. betw. three boars' heads 
erased sa. langued eu. armed or. Crest — A buglchorn ar. 

garnished or, stringed sa. 
Agrard (Lancashire). Ar. a chev. (another engr.) gu. betw. 
three boars' heads coui)ed sa. Crest — An ibex's head or, 
charged with hurts mancd tufted horned and collared az. 
Agrard (Koston, co. Derby : the last male heir, Charles 
Agard, Esq. d. temp. Charles IL; one of his coheiresses m. 
John Stanhope, of Elvaston). Same Arms as foregoing, ex- 
cept that the chev. is engr. 
Ag'ard (Sudbury, co. Derby). Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. 

three boars' heads coupcd sa. a fleur-de-lis or. 
Ag'as (Wymondham, co. Norfolk). Az. a fesse cottiscd erm. 

in chief three stags' heads cabossed or. Crest — A Moor's 

head sa. wreathed about the temples ar. and gu. 
Aeayle, or Ayale. Or, three pallets sa. 
Ag'g'assiz. Az. three savages' heads in profile ar. 
Ag'g'e (Overbury, co. Worcester). Ar. a fess engr. sa. betw. 

three fleurs-de-lis gu. 
Ag'g'S, or Ag'all. Gu. a fesse cottised or, surmounted by 

two sabres addorsed saltireways az. hilt and pomel of the 

second. Crest — On a chapeau ppr. a bull statant sa. 
Ag'illon, Agrillun, and Ag-ilmo. Gu. a fleur-de-lis ar. 
Aginal (Cresscley). Ar. a lion ramp, reguard. gu. 
Aglionby (Aglionby, co. Cumberland, Carlisle and Nunnery). 

Arg. two bars and in chief three martlets sa. Crest — A 

demi eagle displ. or. 
Aglionby (Bulsall Temple). Same as the preceding. 
Agmondesham (Horseley, co. Surrey;. Ar. on a chev. az. 

between three boars' heads couped sa. langued or, five cinque- 
foils of the last. Cre^t — A stag or. 
Agnew (Lochnaw, co. Wigton, Bart.). Ar. a chev. between 

two cinquefoils in chief gu. and a saltier couped in base az. 

Crest — An eagle issuant and reguard. ppr. Supporters — 

Two heraldic tigers ppr. collared and chained or. Motto— 

Consilio, non impetu. 
AgTLe'W (Dalragle, co. Wigton). As Lochnaw within a 

bordure engr. gu. Cre^t — An eagle reguard. ppr. Motto — 

Consil'o non impetu. 
Agnew (Vans - Agnew, of Bambarroch, co. Wigton, 

as representative of Vans of Bambarroch, and Agnew 

of Sheuchan, a scion of Lochnaw). Quarterly, 1st and 

4th, ar. a bend gu. ; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a chev. ensigned 

with a cross crosslet fltch^e sa. betw. in chief two cinque- 
foils gu. and in base a saltire couped az. Crests — 1st, a lion 

ramp, holding in the dexter paw a pair of balances ppr. ; 

2nd, an eagle issuant and reguard. ppr. Mottos — Be faithful, 

for Vans ; Consilio non impetu, for Agnew. 
Agnew (Castlewige, co. Wigton). As Lochnaw within a 

bordure ar. charged with fleurs-de-lis gu. 
Agollon, or Agnlltin (Yorkshire). Gu. on a canton ar. 

a cross flory sa. 
Agon. Ar. a chev. between three martlets sa. 
Agras. Ar. a hind trippant gu. on a canton of the second 

three lozenges of the first. 
Agxevell (Chesley). Or, a lion ramp, reguard. az. Crest 

— A bezant. 
Agruall. Gu. crusul^ or, a lion ramp, guard, of the second. 

Crest — A lion's face guard, betw. two wings ppr. 
Aguilliams. Ar. a lion ramp, ermines armed sa. collared or. 
Agnillon. Sa. a lion ramp. erm. Crest — A pelican vulning 

herself ppr. 
Agnilluni, or Agnllum. Gu. on a canton ar. a cross 

flory az. 
Agworthi Ar. a fesse gu. betw. three torteaux. Crest — 

A torteau. 
Ahlen. Per fesse ar. and az. a stock or trunk of a tree 

couped and eradicated in bend or. 
A Tl rends. Ar. five stalks of rye growing out of ground in 

base vert. Cre^t — An eagle ppr. Motto — Post nubila Phoebus. 
Aicken (Fun. Ent. of David Aicken, of Dublin, gent., died 

8 Sept. 1654). Barry of six ar. and az. on a chief of the last 

a cinquefoil or, betw. two bezants. 
Aidgman. Sa. five plates on a chief or, a lion pass. gu. 

between two thistles ppr. Crest — A demi eagle or, charged 

on the breast with a thistle ppr. 
Aigler, or Ayler. Az. a cinquefoil erm. pierced witliin 

a bordure engr. or. Crest — Two wings in lure. 
Aigbton (Lancashire). Sa. three garbs or. Crest — A snake 

ceiled up ppr. 
Aigles (Northumberland and Northamptonshire). Sa. three 

lions ramp, (sometimes guard, or pass.) ar. Crest — A 

hunting horn ppr. 
Aiken. Ar. a chev. betw. three cockt' heads ta. 
7 



Aiken, or Aicken. Gu. a cross crosslet or, cantoned with 

four bezants. Crest — A fountain throwing up water ppr. 
Aikenhead (of that Ilk, Scotland). Ar. three acorns slipped 
vert. Crest — A demi savage holding in the right hand three 
laurel sprigs fructed ppr. 3/o((o— Kupto robore nati. 
Aikin (Liverpool). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. two cocks in 
chief and a buckle in base gu. a lion ramp, of the field 
crowned or (as maternally descended from the family of 
Macdowal). Crest — An oak tree vert. Motto — Sub robore 
virtus. 
Aikman (Lodurn, afterwards Caimie, co. Forfar; William 
Aikman, the Painter, was representative of this family). Ar. 
a sinister hand holding an oaken batton paleways ppr. sur- 
mounted of a bend engr. gu. Crest — An oak tree ppr. 
Motto — Sub robore virtus. 
Ailard. Ar. two bars betw. nine martlets vert. 
Aile, or Ayles. Chequy or and gu. a bend ar. Crest— A 

dexter arm embowed fist clenched ppr. 
Ailesbnry, Marquess of. See Bkcdenell-Bbuce. 
Ailsa, Marquess of. See Kennedy. 
Aime, or Aine. Az. a ship in full sail or, in the sea ppr. 
Crest — A pillar barry of four gu. and or winged ppr. 

Ainge (London). Az. a chev. erm. betw. three crosses patt^e 
ar. Crest — A cross form^e fitch^e or, betw. two wings az. 

Ainslie (Pilton, co. Edinburgh, representative of Dolphing- 
ton). Or, a cross, flory gu. Crest — On ti chapeau a naked 
arm embowed grasping a scimitar ppr. Supporters — Two 
knights in chain armour armed at all points, the dexter hav- 
ing the beaver of his helmet up and leaning on a shield or, 
charged with a cross flory gu., the sinister capuched with a 
skull cap holding a spear with a flowing pennon az. in 
which in a canton ar. is the above-mentioned crest. Motto 
— Pro patria ssepe, pro rege semper. 

Ainslie (Bart. 1804). Or, a cross flory gu. charged with a 
mullet ar. Crest — A naked arm from the shoulder embowed 
grasping a scimitar all ppr. Supporters — Two chevaliers 
armed at all points ppr., the dexter leaning on a shield or, 
charged with a cross flory gu., the sinister holding over his 
shoulder a battleaxe ppr. Motto— Vto rege et patria. 

Ainslie (Blackhill, Scotland). Or, across flory gu. a bordure 
az. Crest — A pelican's head erased ppr. Motto — Pietas 
tutissima virtus. 

Ainslie (Grizedale, Lancashire). Or, a cross flory sa. Crest — 
An eagle's head erased ppr. Motto — Pietas tutissima 
virtus. 

Ainsworth (Smithills Hall, and of Moss Bank, co. Lane.). 
Gu. three battleaxes ar. Crest — A man in armour holding 
a battleaxe ppr. Motto — Spero meliora. 

Ainsworth (formerly of Plessington, now of Showley, co. 
Lancashire). Az. three spades within a bordure or. Crest 
— A man at arms fully armed affront^e holding a battleaxe 
over his right shoulder all ppr. 

Ains'wortll (Spotland, co. Lancashire). Gu. three battleaxes 
ar. Crest — A man at arms in complete armour holding in 
his right hand arm extended a battleaxe all ppr, 

Aiphant. Gu. three crescents ar. 

Air. Ar. a chev. betw. three quatrefoils sa. Cre^t — ^The 
stump of an oak sprouting out new branches, ppr. 

Airay. Paly of six gu. and ar. in chief a mullet or. 

Aird. Sa. on a chev. betw. three wolves' heads erased ar. a 
falcon's head couped of the first. Crest — A cock ppr. 
Motto — Vigilantia. 

Aire. Az. three water bubbles ppr. 

Airlie, Earl of. See Ogilvie. 

Airmine. See Armine. 

Airth. (Scotland : Sir William de Airth of that Ilk, mentioned 
in Ragman's Roll as one of the great proprietors who swore 
fealty to Edward I., died without male issue. His elde.st 
daughter and co-heir conveyed the estate of Airth, in 
marriage, to Robert Bruce, ancestor of the Brdces of 
Airth). Ar. achiefsa. Crest — A cock crowing ppr. 

Airy. Sa. a fesse or. 

Aiscough, or Ayscoghe (of Stallingbro' and Kelscy, co. 
Line). Sa. a fesse or betw. three asses passant ar. Crest — A 
cross crosslet fitchfe az. Motto — In hoc signo vinces. 

Aisincourt. Ar. an eagle displ. with two heads gu. Crest 
— A demi eagle displ. with two heads. 

Aiskell, Aiskill, and Askill. Erm. a chief embattled 
gu. Crest — In the sea an anchor in pale ppr. 

Aislabie (Osgodby, Yorkshire, 1623). Gu. three lozenges 
conjoined in fesse ar. betw. as many lions' heads erased or. 
Crest — A lion's head erased gu. gorged with three lozenges 
conjoined in fesse ar. 

Aitclieson (Gosford, co. Edinburgh). Ar. a two-headed 
eagle displ. sa. on a chief vert two spur rowels or. 

Aitcheson (Sydserff, Scotland). The same within a bordure 
invecked of the second. Motto — Ane chast arbor. 



AIT 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



A L C 



Aitcheson (Pittenweem Scotland, 1672). Or, a double- 
headed eagle displ. sa. on a chief vert a cross staff between 
two spur rowels gold. Crest— An astrolob ppr. Motto- 
Observe. 

Aitcheson (RochsoUoch, co. Lanark). Ar. a double-headed 
eagle displ. sa. on a chief vert a crescent of the field 
betw. two spur rowels or. Crest — A cock ppr. ilotto — 
"Vigilantibus. 

Aitcheson (Gen. Sir John Aitcheson, K.C.B., 1867). Ar. 
a double-headed eagle displ. sa. charged on the breast with 
a garland of laurel or, a bordure embattled of the third, 
on a chief also of the third a mural crown between two 
mullets of the fourth. Crest— A cock standing on a trumpet 
or. Motto — Vigilaniibus. 

Aitken (Saltcoats, co. Stirling, 1871). Ar. a chevron gu. 
between three cocks sa. Crest — An oak tree ppr. Motto — 
Eobore et \ieilantia. 

Aitkin, or Atkin. Or, a bend chequey gu. and ar. in chief 
a talbot pass. sa. Crest— A boat ppr. 

Aito, or Auito (Devonshire). Or, three Moors' heads in 
profile sa. two and one wreathed about the temples ar. and 
pearls in their ears. Crest— Out of a cloud an arm ppr. 
holding a sword erect ar. hilt or, on the blade a Moor's head 
as in the arms. 

Akarys, Akers, Akeris, or Akjrris. Ar. on a bend 
sa. three acorns or, husked vert. Crest — A griffin's head gu. 

Akaster. Ar. on a chev. sa. three acorns or. Crest — A 
demi griffin or. 

Akeholt (Kent). Quarterly ar. and az. a bend compony 
counter compony or and gu. 

Akeland (Devonshire). Barry of eight ar. and sa. a pale 
counterchanged and afesse gu. 

Akeland (Devonshire). Ar. a pale sa. overall a fesse gu. 
voided of the first cottised of the second. 

Akeland, or Akelout (Gloucestershire). Ar. on a bend 
cottised gu. three mullets (another, martlets) or. 

Akelham (Yorkshire). Gu. a maunch betw. eight cinque- 
foils in orle ar. 

Akelyot. Gu. a fesse dancett^e "ar. betw. three battle- 
axes or. 

Akeney. Ar. a cross betw. four lions ramp. vert. 

Akenbead (Northumberland, 1685). Per fesse or and ar. 
three acorns erect in base gu. and in chief a woodman with 
a club over his dexter shoulder wreathed round the middle 
all ppr. 

Akenhead (Otterington Hall, co. York). Ar. three acorns 
Bhpped vert. Crest — A demi savage holding in his dexter 
hand three laurel slips fructed ppr. Motto— Rupto robore 
nati. 

Akenside. Sa. a chev. betw. three darts points upwards 
.shafts broken ar. Crest — An arrow ppr. 

Akenthorp (Akenthorp, co. Derby). "Vert, a chev. betw. 
three escallops or. 

Aker, or Acre. Gu. three fusils in fesse or, betw. as 
many escallops ar. Crest — A triangular harrow. 

Akerman, or Ackerman (granted 20 May, 1761, to Isaac 
Akerman, of London and Surrey). Quarterly per fesse in- 
dented tirst and fourth, gu. in chief a maunch ar. in base an 
acorn sprig or, second and third or, three dragons' heads 
couped of the first. Crest — Out of a palisado coronet or, an 
arm eml)owed habited gu. cuff ar. holding in the hand ppr. 
an oak-branch leaved vert fructed gold. 

Akeroyd (Koggathorpc, co. York). Az. a chev. erm. betw. 
three stags' heads erased ar. 

Akers. See Aokarys, and Ackers. 

Akers (Kent; and St. Christopher, St. Vincent, and other 
islands of the West Indies). Quarterly, 1st an 4th, Douolas 
of liaads; 2nd and 3rd, Akers. See Douglas of Baads. 

Aket (Derbyshire). Ar. two bends gu. 

Aket. Ar. on a fesse betw. two cottises gu. three fleurs- 
do-lis of the field. 

Akroyd (Banlifield, co. Y'ork. Edward Akhotd, Esq. of 
Bankficld and Denton Park, co. York, M.P., J. P. and D.L., 
ton of the late Jonathan Akroyd, Esq.) Az. a chev. and in 
base a stag's head erased arg. on a chief of the last two 
•tags' heads erased of the field. Crest— In front of a stag's 
head ppr. three spear heads sa. encircled by a wreath of oak, 
mho ppr. Motto — In veritale victoria. 

Alaband. Sa. a dog couchant on a cushion or. 

Alan (Galloway). Az. a lion ramp. ar. crowned or. 

Alan. Sa. a cross crosslet or. 

Alan. Gu. ten mancles or. 

Alanby. Ar. a chev. cngr. sa. 

Alanby. Ar. a chev. engr. within a bordure ac. 

Aland (Ireland). Az. a bend engr. ar. betw. two cottises or. 
'■.''■'<( — A leopard pass. or. 

Alanson. Or, three pallets az. on a chief gu. a lion pass. 



gfuard. ar. Crest — A lion ramp, guard, gu. supporting a 

long cross or. 
Alanson. See Allanson. 
Albalanda (Nansavallon or Blanchland, in Kea, Comw. 

whose heiress m. Boscawen). Gu. three bendlets arg. 
Albam (Cornwall). Erm. on a cross gu. five bezants. 

Crest — An urchin ppr. 
Alban. Erm. a crescent in the fesse point gu. Crest — A 

lion's head erased pierced in the breast with an arrow. 
Albane, erm. 

(This coat belonged to Albane, Earl of Britain, upon 

whom William the Conqueror conferred the earldom of 

Richmond, and honour of Middleham). 
Albange. Gu. a wolf saliant or. 
Albany (London, Shropshire, and Bedfordshire). Ar. on a 

fesse betw. three cinquefoils gu. a greyhound pass, of the 

field. (Another, courant or). Crest — Out of a ducal coronet 

gu. a demi dolphin hauriant or. 
Albany (Shropshire. Francis Albany, of Fernehill and 

Whittington, Esq., sheriff, 1595). Ar. on a fesse betw. three 

cinquefoils gu. a, greyhound courant or. 
Albany. Or, two chev. and a bordure gu. 
Albany, or Daubig-ny. Gu. an eagle displ. within a 

bordure ar. 
Albany. Or, a lion ramp. az. 
Albaster. See Arblaster. 
Albemarle, Earl of. See Keppel. 



Albemarle 
Albemarle. 

gu- 
Alb er bury. 
Albert. Az. 



Gu. a cross patonce vair. 

Ar. a chev. betw. three lions' heads erased 



See Abbesburt. 

a griffin segreant or. Cre'<t — A demi savage 

wreathed about the middle with leaves, and over his shoulder 

a sled-hammer, all ppr. 
Alberton (Devonshire). Ar. two bars sa. betw. three 

ogresses within a bordure engr. of the second. 
Alberton. Ar. a chev. betw. three bulls' heads erased sa. 

Crest — A pennon in bend gu. staff-headed sa. and tasselled 

or. 
Alberton (Plympton). Az. a talbot pass. ar. collared gu. 
Alberton. Ar. a chev. betw. three bears' heads erased sa. 

langued gu. muzzled or. 
Albery (Wickingham, co. Berks, 1590). Gu. a cross engr. 

betw. four stock doves ar. Crest — A stock dove az. holding 

in its beak a branch, leaves and stalk vert fructed gu. 
Albing". Ar. three bendlets gu. 
Albini (Earl of Arundel). Gu. a lion ramp. or. 
Albominster (Cornwall). Ar. a chief az. 
Albon. Vert on a bend ar. three crosses form^e fitch€e az. 

Crest — A bull's head affrontije. 
Alon, or Albin. Ar. a tombstone gu. 
Albone. Ar. a lion unarmed gu. 

Alborougb. Gu. (or sa.) a fesse betw. six crosses cross- 
let ar. 
Alborough, or Albrough. Ar. a fesse betw. three 

cros.«es crosslet fitch^e az. 
Albrecht, or Albreg-ht. Gu. a fleur-de-lis or. Cred—A 

dexter hand ppr. holding a fleur-de-lis or. 
Albrizth, St. (a Dane, founder of the Minster of Hert- 
ford). Az. three chev. or, a label of as many points ar. 
Alby. Paly of six or and sa. 
Alby. Gu. a fesse chequy or and az. betw. three fleurs-de-lis 

gold. 
Albyn. Or, on a cross sa. five eaglets displ. ar. Crest — A 

lion's gamb issuing sa. holding a spear or, at thetopaflag gu. 
Alche. Or, two chev. sa. 
Alchorn (Kent). Ar. a buck's head cabossed sa. and chief 

indented of the second. Crest — A human heart gu. ducaUy 

crowned or, betw. a pair of wings, ar. 
Alcock (Cheshire). Ar. a fesse gu. bebv. three scythes 

sa. 
Alcock (Badly, co. Suffolk). Ar. a chev. betw. three cocks' 

hearts erased gu. beaked and wattled ar. 
Alcock (Bi hop of Ell/).. At & (esse betw. three cocks' 

heads erased sa. within a bordure gu. chorgcd with eight 

crowns or. 
Alcock (Kent). Ar. on a fe.<:9e gu. betw. three scythes ssl 

as many fleurs-de-lis or. Ci-e.'t — Out of a ducal coronet az. 

a demi swan erm. wings expanded, and ducally crowned 

or. 
Alcock (Silvertoft, co. Northampton. Granted, 8 June, 

1616). Gu. a fesse betw. three cocks' heads erased ar. 

beaked and crested or. Crest — A cock erm. beaked and 

mcmbered or. 
Alcock. Ar. on a chev. betw. three cocks' heads erased sa. 

the two in chief respecting each other, an escallop shell or, 

in the middle chief point the letters a i, az. 



AL C 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



Ali B 



Alcock. Per pale or and az. a chev. betw. three eagles displ. 
all counterchangcci, on a chief gu. three lozenges erm. 

Alcock. Ar. a fesse betw. three cocks' heads erased sa. 
membered gu. Crest — A cock. 

Alcock (WiLLiA.M Alcock, Esq. Waterford, tem'p. Charles 
II.). Gu. a fesse betw. three cocks' heads erased ar. combed 
and wattled or. Crest — A pomeis charged with a cross 
patt^e or, thereon a cock sa. Motto — 'Vigilate. 

Alcock (Grange, co. Waterford, and Wilton, co. Wexford). 
Ar. a fesse betw. three cocks' heads erased sa. Crest — On a 
pomeis charged with a cross pat^e or, a cock sa. Motto — 
Vigilate. 

Alcock (Kilbritain Castle, co. Cork). Sa. a fesse betw. three 
cocks' heads erased ar. combed and wattled or. Crest — A 
cock ar. combed and wattled gu. spurred az. Motto— \igi- 
lanter. 

Alcocke (Ridge, CO. Chester, 1449). Ar. a fesse az. betw. 
three scythes sa. 

Aldaine. Az. a pile or. 

Aldam (Kent). Az. the sun in splendour or. 

Aldam (Kent and Sussex). Az. a pile waved, issuing out 
of the dexter corner of the escutcheon bendways or. 

Aldam (SuffolU). Az. a bend wavy or. 

Aldam. Az. one ray of the sun issuing out of the dexter 
corner of the escutcheon bendways or. Cre^t — Out of a ducal 
coronet a plume of five ostrich feathers. 

Aldam. (Frickley Hall, co. York). Per fesse az. and erm. in 
the sinister chief and dexter base an eagle displ. or, in the 
dexter canton issuant towards the sinister base seven rays, 
the centre one gold the others ar. Crest — Issuant from a 
mount vert four ostrich feathers ar. conjoined at the points 
by a mill-rind or. 

Aldam., or Alden. Gu. three crescents erm. (Another, 
the same within a bordure engr. ar.) 

Alday. Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three griffins segreant of the 
second, those in chief respecting each other. 

Aldboroug'h, Earl of. See Stratfokd. 

Aldboroug-h, or Aldebiirg-h (Town of Suffolk. Granted 
20 Oct. 1561). A ship of three masts in full sail, on the waves 
of the sea, the mainsail charged with a lion rampant, and 
the sail on the foremast charged with the cross of St. George, 
on the round top of each are four spears with their barbs 
upwards. 

Aldborough. Gu. a chev. engr. betw. three escallops or. 
Crest — An escallop or, betw. two wings az. 

Aldborougrh, or Aldeburgrhe (Aldborough, Yorkshire). 
Az. a fesse ar. betw. three crosses crosslet or. Crest — An 
ibex pass. or. 

Aldborougrll (in the great chamber of Harwood Castle, 
A.D. 1584). Gu. a lion ramp. ar. charged on the shoulder 
with a fleur-de-lis az. 

Aldburg'h. Gu. a lion ramp. ar. charged on the breast 
with a fleur-de-lis az. 

Aldbri^bt. Ar. a fesse betw. three crosses crosslet az. 

Aide (Kent). Erm. on a chief sa. two griffins combatant ar. 
Crest — A torteau. 

Aide. Ar. on a pale sa. betw. two ogresses, a demi lion 
ramp. or. 

Aldeburgll (Baron Aldeburgh, summoned to Parhament, 
1371). Az. a fess ar. betw. three crosses crosslet or. 

Aldelym. (Audlem, co. Chester, descended from Hugh 
Traylebrw, lord of Audlem, teiup. Wm. Conq.). Gu. three 
boars' heads erased erm. 

Alden (Hertfordshire, and the Temple, London. By Camden, 
Clarcnceux, Sept. 1607). Gu. three crescents within a bor- 
dure engr. erm. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet per pale gu. 
and sa. a demi lion or. 

Alden. Or, a bat's wing gu. surmounted of another ar. 
Crest — Out of a coronet ar. two wings as in the arms. 

Alden. Gu. three crescents within a bordure engr. erm. 
(sometimes ar.). 

Alden, or Aldon. Gu. a mullet ar. betw. three crescents 
erm. within a bordure engr. of the second. CreU — Out of a 
ducal coronet or, a demi lion gu. 

Alder. Gu. three crescents erm. and bordure engr. ar. 
Crest — A griflin's head gu. 

Alderbery. Ar. three bunches of alder berries ppr. 

Alderbery. Or, a fesse embattled sa. 

Alderby. See Alberbori. 

Alderford (Norfolk). Ar. a saltire az. Crest— A rat ppr. 

Alderford (Warwickshire). Ar. on a saltire az. betw. four 
griflSns' heads erased erm. a leopard's face and four lozenges 
or. 

Alderford (Warwickshire and 'Worcestershire, allowed 
with three quarterings by the Deputies of Camden, Clarcn- 
ceux, to John Alderford, of Knightwick, co. Worcester, 
and Salford, co. Warwick, fourth in descent from John 
9 



Alderford, of Salford). Ar. on a saltire az. a tiger's bead 

erased or. 
Alderford. Or, a saltire az. 
Alderley. See Addeblet. 
Alderley (Alderley, co. Chester). Ar. on a bend gu. betw. 

two boars' heads couped sa., three crosses patt^e of the first 

(or, in some). Crest— A mailed dexter arm embowed ppr. 

grasping a cross-hilted sword ppr., hilt or, piercing or trans- 
fixing a boar's head sa. 
Alderley. Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three boars' head* 

couped sa. three crosses crosslet or. 
Aldemam. Az. the sun in splendour ppr. 
Alderne (Suffolk). Gu. three crosses crosslet or, a chief of 

the second. 
Alderne. 'Vert, a lion ramp, or, crowned gu. 
Aldersey (London and Kent). Gu. on a bend engr. ar. betw. 

two cinquefoils of the second three leopards' faces vert. 

Crest — On a plume of feathers ar. a demi griffin gu. 
Aldersey (Cheshire). Gu. on a bend betw. two cinquefoils 

or, three leopards' faces az. 
Aldersey (.Vldersey, co. Chester). Gu. on a bend engr. ar. 

betw. two cinquefoils or, three leopards' faces vert. Crest — 

A demi griffin segreant gu. beaked and armed issuing from 

a plume of tive ostrich feathers or. 
Aldersey (London, lier. Visit. 1563). Same Arms. 
Alderson (Christopher Aldebson Alderson, of Homerton, 

Middlesex, Esq., who, by sign manual 1812, changed his 

patronymic Llotd for the name of Aldersok only). Ar. 

three saracens' heads affront^e couped at the shoulders ppr. 

wreathed about the temples of the first and sa. quartering 

az. three boars' heads couped in pale or, for Llotd. Crests 

— A dove, holding in the beak an olive branch ppr., for 

Aldebson ; and a boar's head couped or, for Lloyd. 
Alderson. Az. a chev. engr. erm. betw. three suns in 

splendour ppr. Cre t — Behind a mount vert, thereon a branch 

of alder, the sun rising ppr. 
Alderson. Ar. three chev. az. on each a cinquefoil of the 

field. Crest — A pillar ppr. 
Alderton (Ipswich). Vert on a bend ar. three crescents sa. 

in the sinister chief point a mullet of the second. Crect — A 

crescent ar. 
Alderwicke. Az. a pale or, betw. six cross crosslets of the 

last. 
Alde'winckle (confirmed 1584). Ar. a cross form^e gru. 

Crest— A wivern, wings endorsed and ducally crowned, vomit- 
ing fire. 
Aldewinckle. Gu. four lozenges ar. one, two, and one. 

Crest — The same as above. 
Alde'winckell. Erm. on a cross form^e gu. a mullet or. 

Crc't — The s.iriie as above. 
Aldford (Aldford, and Alderley, co. Chester). Gu. fretty 

erm. 
Alci h am (Shrimpling, co. Norfolk). Or, two talbots pass. sa. 

langued gu. betw. two flflunches of the second. Crest — A. 

talbot's head erased or, gorged with a collar sa. lined gu. 
Aldliam (Suffolk). Or, a chev. gu. on a chief az. three 

mullets of the field. 
Aldham (Kent). Az. a pile or. 
Aldh.am. Az. a star of nine points or. 
Aldbam. Az. a sun or. 

Aldham. Az. an etoile of sixteen points pierced or. 
Aldhouse, Aldus, or Aldous (Suffolk). Ar. a chev. 

betw. three birds rising gu. on a chief sa. three mullets of 

the first. Crest — A bird rising of the arms. 
Aldine. Gu. a saltire ar. 
Aldington (of that Ilk, Scotland). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. 

betw. three escallops of the last. 
Aldixford. Ar. a saltire az. Crest — A monkey's head ppr. 
Aldjo. Ar. three human hearts conjoined at the points gu. 

in base a buck's head cabossed of the second within a 

bordure az. Crest — A stump of an oak sprouting new 

branches ppr. 
Aldjoy (Scotland, came, it is said, originally from Italy: 

Peter Aldjoy obtained the lands of Easter Walkinshatw, by 

marrying, in 1547, the heiress. Marion Morton). Ar. three 

hearts gu. their points meeting in the centre, in base a 

martlet sa. 
Aldmen. Ar. three bars humettde gu. betw. four martlets 

in pale sa. 
Aldred. Gu. a chev. (another engr.) betw. three griflBns' 

heads erased ar. Crest — An arm frum the elbow in armour 

holding a cross crosslet fitchfe in pale. 
Aldrich (Ipswich and Oxfordshire). Or, on a fesse vert a 

bull pass. ar. 
Aldricll (Suffolk). Erm. on a chev. engr. ar. betw. three 

griffins' heads erased as many lozenges. Crest— A griffin 

segreant. 



Ali D 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ALF 



fesse vert a bull 



Aldrich (Cheam, co. Surrey). Ar. 

pass, of the first. 
Aldridg-e (Kingsclere, co. Hants, by giant, 1/72). Ar. a 
bordure az. bezant^e on a dexter cnnton gu. three swords 
barways in pale of the first, hilt and pommels or, the points 
to the dexter side. Crest— A phoenix in flames ppr. on the 
breast and each wing a bezant. 
Aldrid^e. Vert on a fesse or, betw. three garbs of the 
second a crown enclosed by a mound and a bird az. two 
leaves in saltire in the crown of the first. Crest— A phcenix 
in flames ppr. 
Aldrig-h. Vert a chev. betw. three garbs or.over all a bend gu. 
Aldrington. Sa. on three hawks' lures ar. as many annu- 
lets gu. Crest— A dexter band holding a hawk's lure ppr. 
Aldrin^on. Sa. three hawks' lures, penned, stringed, 

and ringed ar. Crest— The same as the last. 
Aid-well (>Ioyne, CO. Tipperary). Per lesse nebulee ar. and 
sa. in chief two lions ramp, of the second, and in base an 
osprey wings displ. ppr. Crest — An osprcy, as in the arms, 
resting the dexter claw on an escutcheon of the Botur 
arms, viz., or a chief indented az. 
Aid-worth. (Bristol and Wiltshire). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. 
three boars" heads couped within an orle of eight crosses 
crosslet fitchde az. 
Aid-worth (Newmarket, co. Cork, originally Stanlake, Berks: 
Fun. Ent. of Sir Richard Aldworth, of that place. Provost 
Marshal of Munster, who d. 21 June, 1629.) Ar. a fesse 
engr. betw. six billets gu. Crest— A dexter arm embowed 
in armour the hand grasping a straight sword, all ppr. 
ytotto—'Sec temere nee timide. 
Aid-worth. Ar. crusilly fitch^e az. a chev. gu. betw. three 

boars' heads couped of the second. Crest — A tortcau. 
Aleg-h. Vert a saltire betw. four eagles displ. or. 
Alement. Gu. on a bend ar. betw. six fleurs-de-lis or, a 

rose of the first. 
Alen (St. Wolstan's, co. Kildare, originally of Cotteshall, co. 
Norfolk, confirmed to Sir John Alen, lord chancellor of 
Ireland, a.d. 1551, and borne by his grandnephew. Sir 
Thomas Alek, Bart, of St. "Wolstan's : the present represen- 
tative is Capt. Luke John Henry Alen). Ar. a chev. gu. 
betw. three torteaux each charged with a talbot pass, or, on 
a chief az. a lion pass. betw. two crescents erm. Crest — A 
demi heraldic tiger quarterly or and gu. gorged with a 
collar counterchanged chained gold holding betw. the paws 
a juilie flower of three branches ppr. JVfoffo— Fortis et fidelis. 
Alen. Sa. three lozenges or. 

Alencanthorp. Ar. a fesse betw. three escallops gu. 
Alresford. Gu. a fret engr. erm. 

Aleston. Az. an escutcheon ar. Crest — A lion pass, re- 
guard, gu. ducally gorged and chained or. 
Alestry. Ar. on a bend az. three escutcheons of the first on 

each a chief of the second, a chief gu. 
Alexander (of Menstrie, Earls of Stirlixg). Quarterly, 1st 
and 4th, per pale ar. and sa. a chev. and in base a crescent, 
all counterchanged ; 2nd and 3rd, or, a lymphad sa. saTls 
furled and flags flying betw. three crosses crosslet fitchde gu. 
for Mac Donald. Crest — A bear sejant, erect, ppr. Svp- 
porlers — Dexter, an Indian with long hair, and a dart in his 
right hand all ppr. having a circle of gold on his head with 
a plume of seven feathers or and az. and round his waist a 
like circle of feathers ; sinister, a mermaid with a comb and 
mirror all ppr. Motto — Per mare per terras. 
Alexander {Earl of Cakdon). Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. 
and in base a crescent counterchanged on a canton az. a 
harp or, stringed of the flret. Crest — An arm in armour 
embowed ppr. holding a sword of the last hilt and pommel 
or. Supporters — Dexter, a mermaid holding a mirror ppr. ; 
sinister, an elephant ar. Hollo — Per mare per terras. 
Alexander (confirmed, witli ten quarterings, to Henbt 
Alexander, Esq. of Forkhill, co. Armagh, D.L., fourth son 
of Nathaniel Alexander, Bishop of Meath (nephew of the 
first Karl of Calcdon), by Anne, his wife, dau. and, in her 
Isaac, heiress of the Right Hon. Richard Jackson, of 
Coleraine). Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. betw. In chief an 
annulet and in base a crescent all counterchanged. Crest — 
An arm in armour embowed the hand grasping a sword all 
ppr. on the clliow an annulet sa. Motto — Per marc per 
terras. 
Alexander (Frowick House, Essex, and Ahilly, co. Done- 
gal). Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. and in base a crescent, 
all counterchanged. Crest — An arm in armour embowed 
ppr. holding a sword of the last hilt and pommel or. Motto 
— Per marc per terras. 
Alexander (Ncwtownllmavndy, and Londonderry). Per 
pale ar. and sa. a chev., and in base a crescent counter- 
changed, on a canton az. a harp or, stringed of the first. 
Alexander (.Sir Jkrome). Bee ALLEXAMoea. 
10 



Alexander (City of Dublin, Bart.). Per pale ar. and sa. s 
chev. and in base a crescent counterchanged, on a canton 
az. a liarp or, stringed of the first, in the sinister chief point 
a mullet of the last. Crest — A dexter arm embowed, holding 
a dagger, all ppr. charged on the wrist with a mullet or. 
Motto — Per marc, per terras. 
Alexander (Dover, Kent). Barry of ten (another fourteen) 
ar. and az. (another gu.) a lion ramp. gu. holding a battle- 
axe or. 
Alexander (Scotland). Gu. a chev. betw. three talbots' 

heads erased or. Crest — A talbot ar. coUared gu. 
Alexander (Francis Alexander, D. D., prebendary of Win- 
chester, son of John Alexander, of Hampshire, by Mary, his 
wife, sister of Thomas Belsonn, Bishop of Winchester). Az. 
a chev, betw. three talbots' heads erased ar. collared gu. 
Crest — A talbot's head erased ar. collared gu. 
Alexander (Auchmull, co. Aberdeen). Per pale ar. and 
sa. a chev. betw. two mullets in chief, and a crescent in base, 
all counterchanged. Cred — A hand sustaining a pair of 
balances of equal scales ppr. Motto — Quod tibi ne alteri. 
Alexander (Kinglassie, Scotland). Quarterly: 1st and 4th, 
per pale ar. and sa. a chev. bruised at the top, and in base a 
crescent counterchanged ; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a cross engr. 
betw. four roses gu. a mullet of the field, for Aytoun. Creit 
— A horse's head couped gu. bridled ar. Motto — Ducitur 
non trahitur. 
Alexander (Pitkclly, co. Perth). Per pale engr. ar. and sa. 
a chev. and in base a crescent all counterchanged. Crest — 
Two hands conjoined in fess ppr. Motto — Ora et labora. 
Alexander (Knockhill, Scotland). Per pale ar. and sa. 
a chevron and in base a crescent all counterchanged, a 
mullet for difference. 
Alexander (Boghall, co. Edinburgh). Per pale ar. and sa. 
a chev. betw. a writing pen fesseways in chief and a cre- 
scent in base all counterchanged. Crest — A hand holding 
a quiU ppr. Motto — Fidem servo. 
Alexander (Boyd, 3rd son of Claud Alexander, of Bog- 
haU, 1784). As the last within a bordure per pale gu. and 
or. Same Crest and Motto. 
Alexander (Ballochmyle, 1788). Per pale ar. and sa. a 
chev. betw. a fleur-de-lis in chief and a crescent in base all 
counterchanged, a bordure per pale gu. and or. Crest — An 
elephant pass. ppr. Motto — Per mare per terras. 
Alexander (Haughton, Scotland, M.D., 1772). Per pale sa. 
and or, a chev. and a chief of the last charged with three 
cushions all counterchanged. Crest — A crested serpent 
gliding ppr. Motto — Ingcnium vires supcrat. 
Alexander (Glasgow, 1861). Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. 
and in base a crescent all counterchanged, in dexter chief a 
cross crosslet fitch^c gu., in sinister chief a galley sails 
furled or. Crest — On a mount vert on otter pass. ppr. 
Motto — Per mare per terras. 
Alexander. Gu. a lion sejant on a chair, and holding in 

the paws a battle-axe ar. 
Alexander. Paly of six ar. and az. on a bend gu. three 

mullets of the first. 
Alexander. Az. on a mount ppr. a falcon with wings ex- 
panded looking at an ctoile ar. 
Alexander. Per palo ar. and sa. a chev. betw. two mullets 

in chief and a crescent in ba.'io all counterchanged. 
Alexander, or Sanderson (Durham). Paly of six ar. 

and az. on a bend sa. a sword or. 
Aleyn. Or, a chev. betw. three leopards' heads gu. 
Aleyn. Az. a buck's head cabossed ar. attired or. 
Aleyne. Ar. three pellets, m a chief gu. a lion ramp. 

guard, erm. betw. two an<' s of the first. 
Aleynsherls. Gu. a b( 



■■nibattled counter-embattled ar. 



Alfe-w, or Alfwyn. t. :. a fesse betw. three boars' heads 
couped sa. armed or. 

Alfeyn. Gu. a fret erm. 

Alford (Berkshire). Gu. six pears or, three and three, bar- 
ways a chief of the second. Crest — A boar's head ar. with 
a broken spear handle thrust down the mouth or. 

Alford (of Holt, CO. Denbigh, P'awlcy, co. Berks, and of 
Mcux, CO. York, Su.ssex, and Hertfordshire, descended from 
Thomas Alford, of Holt, mentioned in the last visitation 
of York, 1015). Gu. six pears or, three, two, and one, a 
chief of the second. Cred — A boar's head ar. in his mouth 
three feathers of a pheasant's tail ppr. 

Alford (Ipswich, CO. SufTolk). Ar. a hind's head couped az. 
collared or, betw. two hazel boughs vert fructcd gold. Crest 
— A hind's head ppr. 

Alford (Devon). Ar. two greyhounds courant in pale sa. 

Alford (Northamptonshire). Gu. fretty erm. 

Alford (Suffolk). Ar. on a saltire az. betw. four griffins' 
head.^ erased gu. a lion pas.s. or. 

Alford. Gu. a croii moline ar. 



ALF 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



Alil. 



Alfounder (Kirkby and Dedbam, co. Essex). Ar. on a 

cross az. betw. four birds sa. five nails or. Crest — An arm 
couped at the elbow and erect vested gu. cuffed ar. in the 
hand ppr. three nails or, all betw. two wings also ar. 

Alfray. Ar. on a chev. sa. a fleur-de-Us ar. 

Alfred. Gyronny of four az. and gu. a cross botton^e, on 
the upper end a crown or, on the nether end a bezant. 

Alfreton, or Alfretton (the coheirs m. Latham and Cha- 
worth). Az. two chev. or. 

Alfrey (Salchurst, Battel, and Portsman's Catsfleld, Sussex, 
1591). Per fesse sa. and erm, a pale countercbanged, three 
ostrichs' necks erased ar. gorged with crowns and lines 
or. Crest — An ostrich's head and neck betw. two ostrich 
feathers ar. 

Alfrey. Erm. on a chief indented sa. three swans' necks 
erased ar. gorged with a crown gu. and thereto chains 
affixed or. 

Alfrey (Gulledge, in East Grinstead, co. Sussex). Ar. on a 
chev. sa. a Ueur-de-lis of the field. 

Alfrey. Ar. a fesse betw. three boars* heads couped sa. 

Alfrey (Sussex). Ar. on a chev. sa. three fleurs-de-lis of the 
field. 

Alfroy. Party per fesse gu. and sa. three swans' heads 
"rased ar. crowned or. 

Alfwyn. See Alfew. 

Alg'ar, or Algrer. Or, an eagle displ. sa. membered gu. 
Crest — A greyhound's head sa. charged with four bezants. 

Algreo (confirmed to Henry James Algeo, Esq., Ballybrack, 
CO. Dublin, grandson of Robert Algeo, Esq. of Hollymount, 
CO. Leitrim). Ar. in chief three hearts in triangle gu. and 
in base a martlet sa. Crest — The stump of a tree ppr. 
Motto — Non deficit alter. 

Alg'emon. Or, a lion ramp. az. maned gu. 

Al'^ist. Gu. a saltire or. Crest— T\ro arms from the 
shoulder in saltire vested gu. cuffed or, each holding in the 
hand ppr. a scimetar ar. hilt of the second. 

Alg'Oe, or Alg-eo. Ar. two pallets gu. on a chief of the 
last two mullets of the first. Crest — A bear ramp, sup- 
porting a baton. 

ATherley (Shanklin, Isle of Wight). Or, on a bend az. 
three lozenges of the field. Crest — On a chapeau gu. 
turned up erm. a stork ppr. Motto — Pro patria. 

Alicock (Northamptonshire; confirmed, 1616). Gu. a fesse 
or, betw. three cocks' heads erased ar. combed and wattled 
gold. Crest — A cock erm. combed and wattled or. 

AJie, or Ally. Az. a pale erm. Crest— A dexter hand 
holding up the sun ppr. 

AUngton (Wymondley, co. Herts, and Horsheath, co. Cam- 
bridge, Barons Alington). Sa. a bend engr. betw. eight 
billets ar. Crest — A talbot p.iss. ppr. biUette'e or. Suppor- 
ters— Tvio talbots ppr. billett^e or. Motto — Dieu est tout. 

Alington (of Swinhope, co. Lincoln, descended (rom Horse- 
heath). Arms and Crest — As Alington, of Wymondley. 

Alisbome. Az. a cross ar. 

Alison (Bart.). Az. a bear's head arg. muzzled gu. betw. 
in chief two fleurs-de-lis or, and in base a fir-tree eradicated 
of the last surmounted of a sword in bend. Crest — A hawk's 
head erased ppr. JV/ot(o— Vincit Veritas. 

Alison. Party per bend gu. and or, a fleur-de-lis (another, 
in bend sinister) counterchanged. 

Aliston, or Aleston (co. Kent). Per pale gu. and vert an 
eagle displayed ar. beaked and legged or. Crest — An 
eagle's head ar. beaked and erased gu. and murally gorged 
az. 

Alliston (Tillingham, co. Essex, Visit. Essex, 1634). See 
Aliston. 

Aljoy. See Aldjo. 

Alkington (Shropshire). Quarterly or and gu. an eagle 
displ. counterchanged. 

ATkins. Ar. three bars az. in chief three torteaux. 

Allaire (Guernsey). Gu. a chev. or, betw. three butterflies 
ar. Crest — On a lily a butterfly volant ppr. 

Allan (Herefordshire and Staffordshire). Sa. a cross po- 
tent or. 

Allan (Blackwell Grange, and Blackwell Hall, co. Durham, 
descended from the Allans of Buckenhall and Brockhouse, 
CO. Stafford, seated there temp. Edward III. and now re- 
presented by lioBERT Henbt Allan, Esq., F.S.A. of Black- 
well and Barton). Sa. a cross potent quarter pierc"d or, 
charged with four guttes de sang, in chief two lions' heads 
erased of the second all within a bordure engr. erminois. 
Quartering, Pemberton, Hindmabsh, Killinghall, Hbrde- 
WYK, Lambton, and Dodswobth, /or the arms of which see 
their respective names. Crest — A demi lion ramp. ar. ducally 
crowned gu. holding in the dexter paw a cross potent or, 
and supporting in the sinister paw a rudder of the second. 
Motto — Fortiter gerit crucem. 
11 



Allan (Glen, CO. Peebles, 1813). Ar. a pelican in her piety, 

gu. on a chief of the last three mullets of the first. Crest— A 
dexter arm bendways grasping a sabre ppr. Afo«o— Dirigat 
Deus. 

Allan (Sauchnell, Scotland). Per bend indented ar. and gu. 
in chief two crescents and in base a mullet all counter- 
changed. Crest— A comet ppr. Jl/o«o— Luceo sed terreo. 

Allan (Rotterdam). Per bend wavy ar. and gu. in chief a 
crescent of the second, in base a stags head couped or. 
Crest— A cross crosslet gu. Motto— Fide et labore. 

Allan (Glasgow, 1870). Per bend indent, erm. and gu. in 
sinister chief a stag's head erased of the second attired or, 
in dexter base a crescent of the last. Crest— A talbofs head 
erased sa. Motto — Spero. 

Allan-Fraser. See Fbaseb. 

Allanby {temp. Rich. II.). Ar. a chev. az. within a bordure 
of the last. 

Allanson. Erm. on a fesse vert three eagles displ. sa. 
Crest— A demi eagle wings expanded. J*/o«o — Virtute et 
labore. 

Allanson. Az. an incscutcheon ar. 

Allanson (Middleton Quernhow, co. York, originally of 
Adhngton, co. Lancaster). Az. an incscutcheon ar. within 
an orle of quatrefoils or, borne quarterly with Wade and 
NowELL, by the late Rev. George Allanson, of Broughton. 
Crest — A demi grifiSn wings dispU erm. collared gemclle. 

Allard. Ar. three bars gu. on a canton az. a leopard's 
liead or. 

Allardice (of that Ilk). Ar. a fesse wavy gu. betw. three 
boars' heads erased sa. Crest— A naked man from the 
middle holding in the dexter hand a scimetar all ppr. 
Motto — In the defence of the distressed. 

Allardice (Duninnald, co. Forfar). The same Arm^ within a 
bordure of the second. Crest— An ear of wheat and branch 
of palm in saltire ppr. Motto — Bene qui pacifice. 

Allaton, Allatton, or Alton. Gu. three chev. vair, on 
a chief ar. a lion pass, guard, az. 

Allaunson (Durham). Ar. a fesse az. betw. two boars' 
heads sa. couped gu. Crest— A pheon ar. in it a broken 
staff-handle or. 

Allaxinson (Huby, co. York, co. Essex, and London; 
Anthony Allaunson, of Huby, John Alladnson, of co. 
Essex, and Richard and Christopher Allacnson, both of 
London, temp. Queen Elizabeth, sons of Edward Allaiinson, 
who was son of Christopher Allaunson, of co. Durham. 
Visit. London, 1.^68). Ar. a fess az. betw. three boars' beads 
couped sa. a martlet for diff. Ci-cst — A pheon ar. staff 
broken, handle or, charged with a martlet for diff. 

Allaway (Pencraig Court, co. Hereford). Per bend az. and 
sa. three boars' heads couped bendways betw. two estoiles 
ar. Crest — Two anchors in saltire sa. tlioreon a dove hold- 
ing in the beak a branch of olive ppr. Hollo — Dei dono 
sum quod sum. 

Allaway. See Supplemmt. 

Allcard (Warrington, co. Lancaster, as borne by the late 
Wm. Allcard, Esq., J.P.). Quarterly, ar. and or, on a bend 
nebulee az. three swans heads erased of the first, beaked gu. 
Crest — A demi swan wings elevated ar. seinee of mullets 
az. in the beak a buUrush ppr. Motto— Semel et semper. 

Alleet (Fun. Entry, Ireland, 1659). Az. a fess embattled 
between three unicorns' heads erased ar. horned and maned 
or. Crest — A demi unicorn salient reguardant ar. horned 
and maned or. 

Allen {Viscount AUenJ. Ar. two bars wavy az. on a chief of 
the last, an etoile betw. two escallops or. Crest — A bezant 
charged with a talbofs head erased sa. Supporters — Two 
talbots sa. Motto — Triumpho morte tarn vita. 

Allen, or Alleyn (Cheshire, Suffolk, and Wilts). Per bend 
sinister rompu. ar. and sa. six martlets counterchanged. 
Crest — A martlet ar. winged and holding in the beak an 
acorn or, leaved vert. 

Allen (Dale Castle, co. Pembroke, whose heiress Elinor, 
daughter of John Allen, of Dale Castle, Esq. m. in 177& 
John Llotd, of Foes-y-blsidiad and Mabws). Per bend 
rompu ar. and sa. six martlets counterchanged. Crest — A 
bird ar. holding in the beak an acorn or leaved vert. Motto 
— Amicitia sine fraude. 

Allen (Cresselly, co. Pembroke, a younger branch of the 
Allens of Dale Castle, now represented by John Hensleigh 
Allen, of Cresselly, Esq.). Arms, and ftesi — Same as Allen 
of Dale Castle. 

Allen (Dorothy Allen, dau. of Patrick Allen, Esq., and 
wife of Adam Loftos, Viscount Lisburne). Ar. a chev. engr. 
gu. betw. three pellets each charged with a talbot pass, of the 
Seld on a chief az. a lion pass. betw. two crescents of the first. 

Allen (Chelsea, 1563). Ar. a pale gu. surmounted with a 
chev. counterchanged charged with a cinqucfoil of the 



A li l4 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



Alil. 



second. Crest— A talbot's head erased per pale indented ar. 
and gu. collared and chained sa. 
Alien (Errol, CO. Perth). Per bend indented ar. and gu. in 
chief three cre.<:cents two and one. in base a mullet all 
counterehanged. Ciest—.\n eagle rising ppr. Motto— 
Fortiter. 
Allen (Stanton ■Woodhouse, Derbyshire, 1586). Or, a fesse 

gu. betw. three oak leaves ppr. 
Allen (Derbyshire, London, and Staffordshire). Per chev. 
gu. and erm. in chief two lions' heads erased or. Crest— Out 
of a ducal coronet or, a horse's head ar. 
Allen (Devonshire). Barry of six ar. and gu. six mullets, 

three two and one or. Crc^it-A mullet gu. pierced or. 
Allen (F:ssex). Or, on a chev. engr. az. throe crescents of 
the first betw. as many pellets each charged with a grcy- 
hoimd current gold collared gu. 
Allen (Essex). Sa. on a chev. or, betw. three bezants charged 

with as many talbots pass, of the first three crescents az. 
Allen (Essex). Or, on a fesse vert three lions ramp, of the 

field. 
Allen (Grove, near Maidstone, co. Kent, 1610). Or, a chev. 
betw. three bloodhounds pass. sa. collared of the first armed 
gu. Ci-e^t — On a coronet or, lined erm. a bloodhound pass. 
sa. collared gold armed gu. 
Allen (Kent). Per fesse sa. and or, a pale engr. counter- 
changed and three talbots pass, or, collared gu. Crest — 
A talbot pass, or, collared gu. 
Allen (Kent). Or, a chev. betw. three bloodhounds upon the 
scent sa. Crest — On a mount vert poled round or, a hound 
sa. collared of the last. 
Allen (Hoyland, W. R. co. York). Or, three greyhounds 
pass. sa. two and one. Cr^it — A demi greyhound ramp. sa. 
holding in his dexter paw a crescent ar. Motto — Diligenter 
et fideUter. 
Allen (Brouehton, co. Lane. 1664). Erm. on a chev. betw. 
threel eopards' faces gu. a bezant. Crest — Out of a coronet 
a wolf's liead erm. mancd or. 
Allen (Brindley, co. Chester, granted by Sir Richard St. 
George, 1613). Per bend sinister or and sa. six martlets 
counterchanged. Crest — A martlet or, wings elevated sa. 
collared gu. 
Allen (The Rhyd). Same as last. 

Allen (City of Chester, 1697). Per bend sinister ar. and sa. 

six martlets, counterchanged. Crest — A martlet rising or 

winged sa. 

Allen (Rathtimney, co.Wcxford,"Visit. co. Wexford, 1618). Ar. 

two bars sa. in chief a mullet betw. two crescents of the last. 

Allen, or Alen (Alenscourt or St. Wolstan's). See Alen. 

Allen (Lancashire). Barry nebulee of six ar. and gu. a label 

of three points az. 
Allen (^yhetston, Leicestershire, Visit. Leicester, 19). Per 
pale ar. and sa. a chev. betw. three talbots pass, collared or, 
all counterchanged. 
Allen (London). Same arms (the talbots sejant). Crest — A 

demi griffin holding in the paws a brnnch vert fructed or. 

Allen (Sheriff of London, 1620, Camden's Grants). Per fesse 

gu. and sa. a chev. rompu betw. three griffin's heads erased 

erm. Crest — A griffin's head erased per fesse erm. and gu. 

Allen (London), l^er fesse gu. and sa. a chev. rompu, 

counterchanged. 
Allen (London). Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. engr. betw. 

three talbots counterchanged. 
Allen (London). Harry of six ar. and az. over all an 
anchor in pale with two cables fixed to the ring noded and 
pendent or. 
Allen (London). Ar. a bend indented betw. a crescent and 

mullet gu. 
Allen (Suffolk and Sussex). Ar. two bars sa. in chief three 

mullets of the second. 
Allen, or Alleyn (Edward, Founder of Dulwich College, 

CO. Surrey, Ij. in 1.S60, d. in 16i6). Sec Alle¥n. 
Allen (St. Wolstan's, CO. Klldarc). See Alen. 
Allen (Capt. KoDNTAiNE Hogoe-Allen, had royal license to 
take the name and arms of Allen in addition, dated 1st July, 
18.%7). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, Allen : per chev. engr. gu. 
and or, two chcvroncls counterchanged, in chief two lions' 
heads couped of the second. '2nd and 3id, Hoooe : ar. scmee 
of acorns vert, three boars' heads erased, two and one, az. 
Crctli — Allen : the battlements of a tower ppr. therefrom 
issuing a horse's heail per chev. engr. ar. and gu. IIqc.c.e: 
two spears in saltire in front of an oak tree, eradicated and 
fructed, nil ppr. Motto — Quercus glandifera arnica porcis. 
Allen. Or, three pellets, two and one, each charged with a 
talbot pass, of the first; on a chief gu. a lion pass, guard, 
betw. iwo anchors ar. Crext — A demi greyhound ramp, paly 
of aix ar. und sa. collared gu. holding betw. the paws a 
crescent or. 

12 



Allen (William Feknelet Allen, Esq., J. P., Aldermatj of 

the city of London). Per chev. gu. and erm. in chief two 

lions' heads erased or. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a 

horse's ^ead ar. Motto — Sine labe decus. 

Allen (llossal, CO. Lancaster, to which family belonged 

Cardinal Allen, who d. 1594). Ar. three conies pass. sa. 
Allen (Huddersfield, Yorkshire). Sa. a fesse engr. erm. betw. 

tliroe talbots pass, or, collared gu. 
Allen (Perthshire, of Errol, in Carse of Gowrie). Per bend 
indented ar. and gu. in sinister chief three crescents, and in 
dexter base a mullet, all counterchanged. Crest — An eagle, 
rising, ppr. 
Allen (William Allen, Esq. of Streatly, co. Berks, J. P., who 

d. 1745). Ar. two bars az. over all an anchor or. 
Allen (Sir William Allen, Lord Mayor of London, 157'2). 
Per fesse sa. and or, a pale engr. counterchanged three 
talbots pass, of the second collared gu. Crest — A talbot pass, 
sa. collared gu. ears and chain or. 
Allen (from brass tablet, St. Michael's church, Pembroke, to 
the memory of Joshda Allen, grandfather of Ven. John 
Allen, M.A., archdeacon of Salop and vicar of Rees, co. 
Salop). Per bend rompu ar. and sa. six martlets counter- 
changed. 
Allen (allowed by Narbonne, Ulster, to Giles Allen, 
Mayor of Dublin, 1577, 6. in London, d. 1600). Ar. a chev. 
gu. betw. three torteaux, on each a lalbot pass, of the field 
collared az. on a chief of the last a lion pass, guard, of the 
first, armed and langued of the second. 
Allen (Lyno Shany, co. Cavan, 1633, Killowning, co. Tippe- 
rary, 1G91, afterwards of Dublin). Gu. three plates, two and 
one, each charged with a talbot pass, sa., on a chief or, an 
anchor of the second betw. two lions pass, counterpass. of 
the first. Crest — A demi tiger ramp. gu. Motto — Virtus 
auro praefercnda. 
Allen (granted by St. George, Garter, to William Allen, 
capt. of a company of foot). Gu. a castle triple-towered 
or, in base two swords saltierwise ppr. Crest — Out of a ducal 
coronet or two swords or, falchions saltierwise all ppr. 
Allen. Or, on a chev. sa. three martlets ar. betw. as many 
ogresses, each charged with a talbot or, on a chief az. a 
demi lion ramp. betw. two dragons' heads erased of the 
first. 
Allen. Ar. on a chev. gu. three lozenges of the field, each 

charged with a cross crosslet sa. 
Allen. Gu. on a cross patt^e ar. five escallops az. 
Allen. Sa. a cross patoncfe or, fretty gu. 
Allen. Ar. three bars gu. over all as many towers triple- 
towered two and one or. 
Allen. Sa. a cross form^e or. 

Allen. Per chev. ar. and sa. six martlets counterchanged. 
Allen. Az. a fesse nebulee erm. 
Allen. Ar. a chev. betw. three roses gu. 
Allen. Sa. three lozenges or. 
Allen. Ar. three lozenges sa. 
Allen, or Alleine. Or, a chev. betw. three leopards' 

faces gu. 
Allenson. Sa. a fesse erm. betw. three talbots pass, or, 
over all a sinister bendlet. Crest — A talbot's head or, col- 
lared and ringed az. betw. two wings expanded of the last. 
Allenson. Paly wavy of six or and az. on a chief gu. a lion 
pass, guard, or. Crest — A demi lion ramp, guard, or, hold- 
ing a cross gu. 
Allenson, or Allanson (granted 1635 to Allanson, Lord 
Mayor of York). Same Arms. Crest — On a mount ppr. a 
lion ramp, guard, or, holding a long cross gu. 
AUerton. Per chev. sa. and ar. in chief two barrulets of 

the last. 
Allerton. Ar. three (another two) bars sa. in chief three 

pellets within a bordure engr. of the second. 
Allerton. Ar. two bars sa. in chief three pellets. 
Allerton. Ar. a chev. betw. three lions' heads erased sa. 

Crest — A lion's head collared. 
Allerton. Per chev. sa. and or, three bars gemels ar. the 

bottom one passing behind the chev. point. 
Alles, or Allez (Guernsey). A chev. betw. three mullets 
in chief and as many annulets in base. Crest — A thistle ppr. 
Allesley (Warwickshire). Vert three chev. in base inter- 
laced and a chief or. 
Allesley. Ar. a bend az. in chief an annulet of the second. 
Allesley. Az. fretty ar. a chief of the last. 
Allestrey. (Tumditch, Alva-Ston, and Walton, co. Derby, 
mentioned in deeds of the 13th rontury, and in the Visita- 
tions of 1634 and 1662). Ar. a chief gu. over all a bend az. 
charged with three escutcheons or. 
Allestrey. Ar. a bend oz. betw. three escutcheons gu. each 

charged with a fesse of the first, a chief of the second. 
Allestry. Ar. a chief az. on a bend gu. three escutcbeona 



ALL 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ALM 



parted per fesse vert and ar. Crest — A demi lion az. 
brandishing a scimctar ar. hilted or. 
Allett (I wood, CO. Somerset). Or, on a pale sa. betw. two 
pellets a demi lion ramp. gold. Crest — A unicorn's head ar. 
collared sa. 
Allexander (Sir Jerojie Allexander, d. 25th July, 1670, 
F. E. I.). Sa. achev. betw. three talbots' heads erased ar. 
collared gu. 
Allexander. See Alexander. 

Alley. Az. a pa'.e erm. betw. two lions ramp, of the second, 
ducaUy crowned or. Crest — A lion's head cabossed or, 
betiv. two wings ppr. 
Alley (Ireland). Or, a cross gu. on a chief of the same three 
mullets of the field. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a 
mullet gu. betw. two laurel branches vert. 
All ey. Gu. a cross ar. within a bordure invecked of the 

second. 
All ey. Gu. a cross engr. within a bordure ar. 
Alley. Az. a pale erm. 

Alleyn (Edward Alleyn, Esq., Master of his Majesty's game 
of bulls, bears, and mastive dogs, 1623, and Founder of the 
College of Godsgift in Dulwiche). Ar. a chev. betw. three 
cinquefoils gu. Crest — An arm couped at the elbow and 
erect, holding a human heart, the arm issuing out of flames 
of fire, all ppr. 
Alleyn (Thaxted and Hatfield Peverill, Essex, barts. created 
1629, extinct 1759). Sa. a cross potent or. Crest — A demi 
lion az. holding in the paws a rudder of a vessel or. 
Alleyn (The Mote, co. Kent, and Greseley, co. Derby. Sir 
John Alleyn, twice Lord Mayor of London, temp. Henry 
VIII.). Artiw, &c. as Alleyn of Hatfield and Thaxted, 
quartered by Hincks. 
Alleyn. See Allen (Cheshire). 

Alleyne (Bart.) Per chev. gu. and erm., in chief two 

lions' heads erased or. Crest— Out of a ducal coronet a 

horse's head ar. Motto — Non tua te moreant, sed publica 

Tota ; or, Non tua te sed publica vota. 

Alleyne (Hayesleigh, co. Essex). Or, on a fess vert three 

fleurs-de-lis of the first. 
Alleyne. Per bend sinister double dancett^ ar. and sa. 

six martlets counterchanged. 

AUfrey (Wokcfield Park, Berks, Hemingford, co. Warwick). 

Per fesse sa. and erm. a pale counterchanged three 

ostrichs' heads erased, ar. gorged with crowns and lines 

or. Crest — An ostrich's head and neck gorged with a crown 

as in the arms betw. two ostrichs' feathers ar. 

Allg'OOd (Nunwick, Northumberland). Ar. a cross engr. 

gu. betw. four mullets az. on a chief or, three darnask roses 

of the second seeded gold barbed vert. Crest — Two arms 

embowed in armour ppr. holding in the hands a human 

heart gu. inflamed or, charged with a tower triple towered 

arg. Motto — Age omne bonum. 

Allg'OOd. Or, a leopard's head az. and two cocks gu. in pale 

betw. as many flaunches sa. each charged with afleur-de-Iis ar. 

Alii bone. Vert on a bend ar. three crosses form^e fitch^e 

az. Crest — A bull's head affrontfe. 
Allieson, or Allison. Party per cross quarterly ar. and 
gu. a cross betw. four cinquefoils counterchanged. Crest 
— A demi savage wielding a scimetar ppr. 
Allin (Blundeston and Somerleyton, co. Suffolk). Gu. a 
cinquefoil pierced or. Crest— A snake coiled up and en- 
vironed with flags {i.e. rushes) ppr. 
Allin (Bart.). Gu. three swords barwise ar. points to the 
sinister side hUts and pomels or, betw. four (sometimes 
twelve) mullets of the third. Crest — A sword erect ar. hilt 
and pomel or. Anotlier Crest — On a Bible open a hand 
couped close holding a sword erect. 
Allin. Gu. three swords barwise ar. points to the sinister 
hilts and pomels or, betw. four mullets two in chief and two 
in base of the third. Crest— Pl sword in pale point up- 
wards ppr. 
Allin gham. Or, three lozenge buckles az. Crest — A 

church environed with trees ppr. 
Allingidgre. Gu. a cross engr. or. Crest— A. castle triple 
towered ppr. on the sinister tower a flag displ. ar. charged 
with a cross sa. 
Allington (London). Or, a lion ramp, within a bordure 
engr. az. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a buck's head 
ppr. attired of the first pierced through the neck with an 
arrow of the last barbed and flighted ar. 
Allington (Timswell, co. Rutland, Her. Visit. 1619). Sa. a 

bend engr. betw. six billets ar. 
Allington (Horsheath, co. Cambridge). See Alington. 
Allis on (described in the Visitations as having been settled 
for five generations at Yardslcy Hall, co. Cambridge). Ar. a 
fesse gu. betw. three blackbirds within a bordure of the 
second. Crest — A peacock ppr. 
13 



Allison. Sa. a fesse engr. betw. three talbots pass, ar 
Cr«s(— An eagle's head erased ppr. Motto— Wncet Veritas 

Allison. Ar. an inescutcheon gu. Crest — A pheasant 
holding in the dexter foot a key, and in his beak an ear of 
barley ppr. 

Allison. Sa. a fesse engr. betw. three talbots pass. ar. sur- 
mounted by a bend sinister. 

Allix (WUloughby Hall, co. Lincoln, and Swaffhani, Cam- 
bridgeshire, founded in England by Dr. Peter Allix, of 
Alencjon, in Normandy). Ar. a wolf's head erased at the 
neck ppr. in the dexter chief point a mullet gu. Crest— A 
wolfs head erased, as in the arms. 

Allmack. See Awmack. 

Allott (South Kirkby, Yorkshire, granted 9 June, 1729). Or, 
a fesse az. betw. four barrulets wavy of the last, on a canton 
of the second two barrulets ar. charged with three swallows 
volant sa., viz. on the first two, second one. Crest— X 
cubit arm erect vested or, charged with a fesse betw. four 
barrulets cuffed ar. holding in the hand ppr. a mullet gold. 

Allott (Great Easton). Ar. a fesse double cotisert wavy 
sa. Crest— A dexter arm from the elbow- vested gu. cuffed 
or, hand ppr. holding a mullet gold. 

Allott (Hague Hall, co. York). Or, a plain fesse double 
cotised, wavy, az. ; on a canton of the second two bars ar. 
charged with three swallows volant sa. Crest— A dexter 
arm couped at the elbow habited or, charged with a fesso 
double cotised wavy az. cuff ar. the hand ppr. holding a 
mullet gold. Jl/otto— Fortiter et recte. 

Allott (Lancashire and Lincolnshire). Ar. (another, or) on 
a bend sa. betw. two ogresses a demi lion of the field. Crest 
An arm couped at the shoulder embowed ppr. vested gu. 
and resting the elbow on a wreath holding a sword enfiled. 
with a leopard's head. 

Allott (Lord Mayor of London, 1591). Ar. on a pale sa. 
betw. two pellets a demi lion couped or. 

Allport (Cannock, Staffordshire). See Alport. 

All Souls CoUegre, of Oxford. Or, a chev. betw. thre& 
cinquefoils gu. 

Allsopp (Hindlip Hall, co. Worcester. Henry Allsopp, 
Esq., J. P. and D.L.) Sa. three plovers rising ar. legged 
and beaked gu., quartering ar. three bears passant ppr. 
for Bearcroft. Crest— A plover wings expanded or, beaked 
and legged gu. in its beak an ear of wheat gold. Jl/otto — 
Festina lente. 

Allwent. Gu. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis erm. 

Allworth (Devonshire). Ar. a fesse betw. six billets gu. 

Allwright, or Alwright. Gu. a bend or, and thi-ee 
sinister bendlets ar. the centre one surmounting the bend. 
Crest — On a chapeau a greyhound statant all ppr. 

Allye (Tewkesbury, co. Gloucester). Az. a lion ramp. ar. 
Ci-est — A leopard's head or, betw. two wings sa. 

Allye (Dorsetshire). Or, a lion's head erased sa. on a chief 
embattled of the second three plates. Crest— A stag's head 
erased per pale ar. and or, attired of the first gorged with 
a collar double embattled gu. charged with three escallops 
gold. 

Allym, or Audlym. Ar. three crabs erect sa. 

Alljm. Per fesse gu. and sa. a chev. rompu betw. three 
griffins' heads erased erm. on a canton ar. a cross potent 
betw. four crosses patt& az. Crest — A tree eradicated vert 
fructed with branches of berries gu. 

Allyn (Bampton, co. Devon). Per bend rompu ar. and sa. 
six martlets and an annulet in the dexter chief point coun- 
terchanged. 

Allyn (London). Az. a pale engr. erm. 

Alljm. Ar. on a chev. gu. three lozenges of the first each 
charged with a cross crosslet sa. 

Allyn (William Allyn, of Aylmer, whose dau, and heiress 
m. Gilbert, son and heir of Gilbert Gerrard, Lord Chan- 
cellor of Ireland temp. Henry VII , Reg. Fed. Ulster's office). 
Ar. two bars nebulae gu. in chief a label of three points sa. 

Allyson (Pardsey Hall, co. Cumberland, Her. Visit., 1615). 
Ar. a fess. gu. betw. three birds sa. a border of the last. 

Allyn. See Alen. 

Almack (Suffolk). Per bend ar. and sa. a cross potent 
counterchanged. Crest — On a tower sa. a flag az. with the 
word PAX ar. Motto — Mack al sicker. 

Alman (Pcvensey and Warbleton, co. Sussex, descended 
from Robert Alman, living 10 Edw. III. : the representation 
vested in the families of Parnell and Meres). Per bend or 
and sa. a cross potent counterchanged. Cres; — A leg in 
armour spurred or, couped in the middle of the thigh. 

Alman. Ar. an eagle displayed sa. armed or. 

Almand. Vair, on a fesse gu. three martlets or. 

Almarade. Ar. a dragon segrcant winged az. 

Alxnard. Per pale indented ar. and gu. Crest — A stag 
trippant ppr. 



AI. K 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



Ali T 



Almayne. Or, an eagle displ. sa. armed gu. Crest — On a 
ducal coronet or, a cinquefoil gu. 

Almears, or Almeers. Ar. a long cross gu. on three 
grieces or steps the upper one az. the second as the cross 
and the undermost sa. Creit — Along cross recrossed on 
three steps ar. 

Aimer, and Almor (John Almor, one of the Marshals of 
the Hall to Henry VH., derived from Efnydd ap Gwenllian). 
Az. a lion ramp, or, armed and langued gu. Crest— A pal- 
mer's staff erect or. 

Almert. Gu. a cross vert. 

Almiger. Az. two bars or, betw. three helmets ar. Crest — 
On a ducal coronet ppr. a tiger sejant gu. 

Almond. Ar. an almond slip fructed ppr. Crett — ^Three 
cinquefoils az. stalked and leaved vert. 

Almond. Az. two piles in point or, a canton erm. Crest— 
A terrestrial globe vert garnished and ensigned with a cross 
patt^e or. 

Almonder. Or, an almond slip fructed ppr. 

Almont. Gu. a cross vair^. 

Almot (Suffolk). Ar. a chev. betw. three escallops sa. 

Almot, Alneot, and Alnot. Quarterly, per pale in- 
dented or and gu., in the 1st and 4th quarters five mascles 
conjunct in cross. Crest — A thunderbolt ppr. 

Alms. Gu. three stags' beads erased or. Crest— A stag's 
head as in the arms. 

Alneham. Az. five fusils in fesse or a benillet gu. 

Alnwick, or Alnwyk. Ar. a cross moUnc sa. 

Alnwick, or Almewake. Paly of six ar. and or, on a 
chief gu. three crosses crosslet of the first. Creit — On a 
chapeau a cock ppr. 

Alors. Gu. a chcv. betw. three rowels ar. 

Alpe (Gressenhall, co. Norfolk). Az. a fesse erm. betw. 
three alpes ar. Crest — A bull's head erased sa. 

Alphe (Hampshire). Ar. a lion pass. betw. three boars' 
heads couped sa. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a 
hawk's head ar. 

Alphen. Ar. a fesse betw. three boars' heads erased (some- 
times cooped) sa. 

Alphraham. Az. three eagles displ. betw. nine crosses 
crosslet or. 

Alpin. Or, a fesse betw. three bullfinches ppr. 

Alfram. (Cheshire). Az. three eagles displ. or. 

Alfram. Az. crusily three eagles displ. or. 

Alport (Cannock, co. Stafford ; quartered by Fletchek of 
Dudley). Barry wavy of eight, ar. and az. on a bend gu. 
three mullets or. C)-est — A demi lion ramp, erminois col- 
lared with a mural crown gu. 

Alport of Overton. Gu. six peara, three, two, and one, 
and a chief or. 

Aired (llolderness, co. York). Gu. a chcv. betw. three 
griffins' heads erased ar. armed or. Crest — A grifiSn's head 
ppr. 

Alrey. Ar. three escallop shells gu. two and one. 

Alsacber, or Alsager (Cheshire). Az. three askers* (or 
water lizavU.s') heads couped or. 

Alsarin. Az. an asker's (or water lizard's) head erased or. 

Alshonier (Scotland). Gu. a chev. or, in base a cres- 
cent ar. 

Alsop (Alsop, CO. Derby. Settled there about the time of 
the Conquest, and continued in an uninterrupted descent 
for nineteen or twenty generations). Sa. three doves rising 
ar. legged and beaked gu. Crest — A dove with wings ex- 
panded or, beiiked and legged gu. holding in the beak an 
ear of wheat gold. 

Alton (Nottingham). Or, on a chief vert a lion pass. ar. 

Alsop (London, granted 1738). Az. three doves ppr. on a 
canton or, a key erect sa. Crest — A dove holding in the beak 
an ear of corn all ppr. in the dexter claw a key as in the 
canton. 

Alsop (Lord Mayor of London, 1752). Az. three doves or, 
on a canton ar. a key in pale gu. 

Alsope (Derbyshire). Per fesse or and erm. a pale counter- 
changed three mullets sa. Ci-c^t — A dove with an olive 
blanch in the be.ik ppr. 

Alsoppe (London, 1797). Sa. on a bend betw. six doves 
ar. legged gu. three phcons of the first. Crest — A dove ar. 
legged gu. betw. two ostrich feathers sa. 

Alspach. Ar. a bend cottiscd within a bordurc cngr. in 
tlif sinister corner a mullet pierced sa. 

Alspath (Kai.pii I'ECJIK temp. Kdward II., m. Annora, dau. 
and heir of Gkhrahij de Alspath, grandson of William de 
Albpath, temp. Kdward I., who was son of Walter, Lord of 
Alspath, Dugdale). Ar. a bend sa. cotiscd gu. a mullet 
for dilT. 

Alspath, or Alspach. Ar. a bend sa. cottiscd gu. 
Crut — Two Rjicars in saltire az. 
14 



Alspathe. Ar. a bend sa. cottised gu. within a bordure of 

the third. 

Alstanton. Az. three sea-urchins (or hedgehog fish) erect 
ar. Crest — Out of a mural coronet or, an arm in armour 
embowed holding a dagger all ppr. 

Alstoines. Az. ten etoiles or, four, three, two, and one. 

Alston (Elmdon Hall, co. Warwick). Az. ten estoiles or, 
four, three, two, and one, on a chief ar. a crescent reversed 
gu. between two boars' heads sa. Crest — A demi eagle, 
wings displayed or, on each wing a crescent reversed gu. 
Motto — In altum. 

Alston (Saxham Hall, Suffolk, and Odell, co. Beds, Extinct 
Baronet). Az. ten estoiles or, four, three, two, and one. 
Crest — Out of a crescent ar. an etoile or. Motto — Immotus. 

Alston (Edwardston, Suffolk, and Chelsea, Middlesex, 
descended from a second son of the Alstons of Saxham 
Hall ; Sir Joseph Alston, of Chelsea, younger brother of Sir 
Edward Alston, Knt., M.D., President of the College of 
Physicians, was created a baronet in 1681). Same Aimis as 
Alston of Odell. 

Alston (Westertown, co. Dumbarton, 1792). Az. a unicorn's 
head erased in chief ar. maned and horned or, and a cross 
moline of the second in base betw. ten stars, four, three, 
two, and one, of the third. Crest — A demi eagle rising ppr. 
Motto — Sursum. 

Alston (JoBN Alston, Banker, Glasgow, 1816). Az. ten 
Btars of six points, four, three, two, and one, or. Crest — 
A demi eagle rising ppr. Motto— In altum. 

Alston (Craighead, co. Lanark, 1869). The same within a 
bordure ar. Same Crest and Motto. 

Alston (Stockbriggs, co. Lanark, 1872). Az. ten stars of 
six points, four, three, two, and one or, a bordure of the last 
charged with three fleurs-de-Us gu. Crest — A demi eagle 
rising ppr. on each wing a crescent reversed gu. Motto — In 
altum. 

Alston Stewart (Urrard, co. Perth, 1830). Coupe one, 
parti two : Ist and 6th, az. ten stars, four, three, two, and 
one or, a bordure embattled gu., for Alston ; 2nd, or, a fess 
checquy ar. and az. surmounted of a lion ramp. gu. a 
bordure of the last ; 3rd, az. three garbs or; 4th, ar. a bend 
az. charged with three buckles or; the last three quartenngs 
for Stewart of Urrard ; 5th, gyronny of eight or and sa., 
for Campbell. 

Alstone. Az. ten etoiles or, on a chief ar. a crescent 
reversed gu. betw. two boars' heads couped sa. Cresi — A 
demi eagle with wings expanded and inverted ppr. on each 
wing a crescent reversed gu. Motto— In altum. 

Alstowne. Gu. three sea-urchins in pale ar. 

Alswin, or Alswyn (F. E. I. 1C38). Ar. a fess betw. 
three boars' heads couped sa. 

Alsworthy. Or, a chev. sa. betw. three trefoils slipped in 
chief vert and a muUet in base gu. 

Alt (Loughborough, co. Leicester). Quarterly, gu. and ar. 
within a bordure of annulets and crosses patte'e alternately 
counterchanged. 

Altaripa. Az. five fusils in fesse ar. a bendlet gu. 

Altaripa (The dau. of John de Altaripa m. William 
Sidney ; Sidney ped. by Cooke, Clarenceux). Ar. four lions 
pass, in bend gu. betw. two double cottises of the last. 

Alten. Ar. a bend of lozenges and roses alternately dis- 
posed gu. 

Alten. Gu. three eagles' wings expanded or. 

Alten. Ar. a ragged staff embowed to the sinister sa. 

Alteripe. Az. five fusils in fesse ar. on the third a crescent 
gu. 

Altham (London and Essex). Paly of six erm. and az. on 
a chief gu. a lion pass, guard, or. Crest — A demi lion hold- 
ing a ship's rudder sa. 

Altham. (Timbercombe, co. Somerset, exemplified to Wil- 
liam Sdbtees Cook, Esq., on his assuming the surname of his 
maternal grandmother, Mary, dau. of Koger Altham, Esq. 
of Mark Hall, co. Essex, by royal licence in 1862). Quarterly, 
Ist and 4th, paly of six erm. and az. on a chief gu. a lion 
pass, reguard. or, armed and langticd gu., for Altham ; 
2nd and 3rd az. on a chcv. ar. betw. three garbs or, as many 
fleurs-de-lis gu., for Cook. Crests — 1st, a demi lion or, 
holding a ship's rudder sa., Ai.tham; 2nd. A talbot sejant 
sa collared or, reposing the dexter fore paw on an escut- 
cheon ar. charged with an cstoile az., Cook. Motto — Pro 
Deo ct catholica fide. 

Altham (Essex). Ar. a lion salient sa. Crcst-'Thc same as 
the last. 

Althan. Per pale beviled az. and or. 

Althan, or Althaun. Gu. a fe.s,sc ar. Crest— A demi 
art'her shooting a bow ppr. clothed vert cap sa. 

Althoun. Gu. on a fesse ar. a Roman A. Crest— A dexter 
hand apaum^o ppr. 



AliT 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AM E 



Altreuw. Per fesse gu. and ar. two hands couped and con- 
joined chevronways countcrchanRed. 
Altrew, or Altrue. Sa. two bands couped above the 

wrist conjoined chevronways sleeved or, cuffed ar. 
Altringliain, Town of (Cheshire). Quarterly, gu. and 

or, in the first quarter a lion pass. ar. 
Alvanley, Baron. See Arden. 
Alvanston. Ar. three crabs erect gu. 
Alvarde. Ar. on a saltire az. betw. four griffins' heads 

erased gu. a leopard's head enclosed by four lozenges or, 

pointing to the ends of the saltire. 
Alvares. Chequy ar. and gu. Crest — X demi lion ramp. 

ppr. holding in the dexter paw a mascle az. 
Alvas. SeeALVES. 
Alverd, or Alured (Ipswich). Ar. on a saltier az. hetw. 

four griffins' heads erased gu. a leopard's head betw. four 

lozenges or. Crest — A mill-rinde or. 
Alverston (Dunmore). Az. a cross patonce betw. four 

fleurs-de-lis or. Crest — A greyhound salient sa. 
Alvert. Ar. on a saltier az. betw. four griffins' heads 

erased gu. a leopard's head or. Crest — An eagle's head ppr. 

charged with a saltier gu. 
Al'verthorp. Sa. a cross pattfe or. 
Alves, or Alvas. Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three trefoils 

slipped vert as many mullets of the field a bordure sa. 

Crest — A garb or. Jfb<(o— Deo favente. 
Al'vey, or All'vey. Sa. a boar pass. or. Crest — A plough 

ppr. 
Alving'haiii Abbey (co. Lincoln). Ar. threfc bars gu. 

over all a crozier in bend or. 
Al'way. Ar. a fesse betw. three lions ramp. sa. crowned or. 
Al'Waye (Streetley, co. Bed.). Or, a talbot pass. sa. on a 

chief of the second three mullets of the first. Crest — A 

hind's head ar. betw. two holly branches vert fructed with 

berries gu. 
Al'well (Gloucestershire). Ar. a pile sa. over all a chev. 

coimterchanged. 
Alworth, or Aylworth (Oxfordshire). Or, a saltier 

engr. betw. twelve billets sa. 
Alworthy. Or, on a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped sa. 

three muUets of the field. 
Alwrigrht. See Allweight. 
Alwyn. (Devonshire). Two coats : first, ar. three lions pass. 

(another, ramp.) sa. fretty az.; second, per pale or and az. 

three eagles counterchanged. 
Alwyn, or Aylwin (Canons in West Dean, Preston in 

Biderton, and Treyford, co. Sussex: the daus. and co- 
heirs were MaetAlwin, wile of the Hon. Chaeles Talbgt; 

and Elizabeth, m. to Sir William Mannock, Bart.) Ar. a 

fesse nebulae gu. betw. three lions ramp. sa. Crest — A lion's 

gamb. erect and erased sa. enfiled with a mural crown or. 
Al'Wyn (Lord Mayor of London, 1499). Ar. a fesse nebulae 

az. betw. three lions ramp, guard, sa. 
Al'wyn (London). Ar. a fesse wavy az. betw. three lions 

salient sa. 
Alwyn. Ar. a fesse nebulae az. betw. two lions pass. sa. 
Alwyn. Sa. a chev. hetw. three goats ar. 
Al'wyn. Or, a chev. betw. three goats pass. sa. 
Alwyne. Or, a chev. az. betw. three goats' heads of the 

second attired of the first. 
Alye (Gloucestershire). Az. a Uon ramp. ar. Crest — A lion's 

head cabossed betw. two wings sa. 
Alye (Edwakd Alte, of Tewkesbury, gent., at Visit, co. 

Gloucester, 1623, and confirmed to his grandson, Bicbabd 

Alte, citizen of London, by the Earl of Aylesbury, D.E. Mar- 
shall, 2 Nov. 1679). Az. a lion saUent ar. Crest — A 

leopard's head or, betw. a pair of wings displayed sa. 
Alye (co. Dorset, Visit. Dorset, 1623). Or, a talbot's head 

erased sa. on a chief crenelliS of the last three plates. Crest 

—A stag's head erased i^er pale ar. and or, on the neck a fesse 

crenelle gu. charged with three escallops gold. 
Alyn. Az. a fess nebuly erm. 

Alyne. Ar. three bars and betw. them as many towers gu. 

Alyson (Kent, 1583). Ar. a fesse az. betw. three boars' 

heads couped sa. Crest — A pheon ar. with part of the 

broken shaft in it, or. 

Alyson. Ar. a fesse betw. three bears' heads couped sa. 

armed gu. 
Am ade. Ar. an oak-branch acomed (or, fructed) ppr. 
Amades (Plymouth, CO. Devon.) Az. a chev. erm. betw. 

three oaken slips acorned ppr. 
Am and. Or, fretty sa. on a chief of the second three 

bezants (another, three plates ; and another, two mullets). 
Amand. Ar. a Uon ramp, coward purp. 
Ama nd, Amane, or Amarme. Per pale ar. and sa. a 

chev. erm. and ermines betw. six martlets counterchanged. 
Crest — A pomegranate ppr. 
15 



chief of the last three 



Amant. Or, a fret sa. 

bezants. 
A m arie. Az. two bars within a bordure ar. guttde-de- 

sang. 
Amarle, or Armarle. Ar. gutt^e-de-sang, three bars 

humel^e az. Crest — A lion pass, or, resting the dexter paw 

on a mullet gu. 
Amary (Essex). Gu. a cross engr. ar. charged with five 

cinquefoils of the field. Crest — A cat's head and neck issu- 
ing affront^e ar. in the mouth a rat sa. 
Amary. Gu. on a cross engr. ar. four cinquefoils of the 

field. 
Amatyst. Ar. on a bend sa. three cinquefoils of the field. 
Ambemont. Erm. on a pile az. three fleurs-de-lis or. 
Amberg". Gyronny of six az. and or. 
Ambers. Gu. a chev. betw. three rowels or. 
Am bersam. Or, on a chev. betw. three boars' heads couped 

sa. as many (another, five) cinquefoils of the first. 
Ajnbesace, and Amboraes. Or, three dice sa. (another, 

gu.) each charged with an ace ar. Crest — Out of a ducal 

coronet or a man's head in profile ppr. 
Ajubett. Gyronny of eight or and az. four annulets of the 

first. 
Ambler, and Anbler. Sa. on a fesse or, betw. three 

pheons ar. a lion pass, guard, gu. Crest — Two dexter hands 

conjoined, sustaining a royal crown. 
Am bler (Kirton -in -Holland, co. Lincoln). Sa. across 

ermine in the dexter quarter a leopard's face ar. 
Amboraes. See Ambesace. 
Amborrow, Anbury, or Anborow. Ar. a chev. ea. 

betw. three bears' heads erased of the last muzzled or. 

Crest — A bear's head as in the arms. 
Ambridge. Gu. two lions ramp, in pale ar. Oiest—A cross 

crosslet fitch^e in pale gu. surmounted by two swords in 

saltire ppr. 
Am brose (Lancashire). Or, three humets sa. charged with 

as many annulets ar. 
Ambrose (Lancashire). Ar. three dice (by some called 

billets) sa. each charged with a mullet of the field (another, 

annulets or). Crest— A. hand holding a billet ar. 
Ambrose (Ambrose Hall, co. DubUn). Per fess or and sa. 

three dice each charged with an annulet all counterchanged. 

Crest— A. pelican in her piety or, charged on the breast with 

a shamrock ppr. Motto — In heaven is aU my trust. 
Am cotes (Astrop, co. Lincoln, granted 1548). Ar. a tower 

betw. three covered cups az. Crest — A squirrel sejant gu. 

holding in the mouth a nut or. 
Amcotes (Writenby, co. Lincoln). The same, a crescent 

for diff. 
Amcots (Essex). Ar. a tower triple towered betw. three 

covered cups az. Crest — A squirrel pass. gu. holding ia 

the mouth a nut or. 
Amcotts (Kettlethorpe, co. Lincoln, Bart.). Ar. a tower 

triple towered betw. three covered cups, two and one, az. 

Crest — A boar's head couped and erect arg. issuing out of 

the mouth an estoile or. 
Amcotts (Hackthom, co. Lincoln.) See Cbaceoft-Am- 

COTTS. 

Amenes and Annennell. Ar. a fesse betw. six annu- 
lets gu. 

Amentom. Gu. a cross patonce ar. Crest — An antelope's 
head ppr. 

Amerance. Gu. four mascles in bend ar. betw. eight 
crosses crosslet or. Crest — A mascle ar. 

Amerdley. Ar. a Uon ramp. sa. ducaUy gorged and chain 
reflexed or. Crest — A heart inflamed gu. winged or. 

Ameredith (Marston and Tamerton, co. Devon). Gu. a 
lion ramp, reguard. or. Crest — A demi Uon sa. ducaUy 
gorged and Uned or. 

Ameredith (Devonshire). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. coUared and 
chained or. 

Amerex, or Americe. Paly wavy of six or and sa. 
Crest — A torteau gu. charged with a talbot's head ar. 
erased or. 

Amerie. Per pale dancett^e gu. and ar. Crest — A dexter 
hand ppr. holding a fleur-de-hs in pale or. 

Amerie. Gu. a cross patonce vair (another, ar.). Crest- 
As, the last. 

Amerley. See Amcadle. 

Amervile. Party per fess indented ar. and gu. three 
annulets counterchanged. 

Amervill. Party per fesse indented ar. and gu. three 
annulets counterchanged. 

Amery (John Ameet, Esq., F.S.A., J.P. and D.L. co. 'Wor- 
cester, who claims to be descended from Amort of CodA'ins- 
ton). See Amobt. Motto— To. ne cede malls. 

Ames. See Amos. 



AH E 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AMY 



Ames (granted to Henrt Metcalfe Ames, Esq. ofLindon, co. 

Northumberland, and his descendants, and the descendants 
ofLioNELAMEs, Esq., of theHyde, co. Bedford). Ar.onabend 
cottised between two annulets sa. a quatrefoil betw. two roses 
of the field; quartering for Poole, per pale or and gu. a 
saltier betw. two mascles in pale and in fesse as many 
leopards' faces jessant de lis, counterchanged, and for Met- 
CALF, per fesse or and sa. in chief two calves statant and in 
base a dove volant counterchanged. Crest— A. rose ar. slipped 
and leaved ppr. in front thereof an annulet or. 

Ames (Cote House, Wcstbury-on-Trym, co. Somerset). Same 
Arrm, quartering Poole, Cha-cncet, <fcc. Motto — Fama 
Candida rosa dulcior. 

Amest. Ar. three holly leaves barways the stalks towards 
the dexter ppr. 

Amherst (Earl Amhurst, representative of an ancient 
family seated in the 13th century at Amhurst, Pembury, 
Kent, whence the name). Gu. three tilting speass two 
and one erect or, points ar. Crest — On a mount vert 
three tilting spears or, headed ar., one in pale and two 
in saltire environed with a chaplet of laurel vert. Sup- 
jMrlers — Two Canadian war Indians, of a copper colour, 
rings in their noses and ears, and bracelets ou their arms 
and wrists ar. cross-belts over their shoulders buff. To one 
a powder-horn pendent, to the other a scalping-knife ; each 
of their waists covered with a short apron gu., their gaiters 
az. seamed or, their legs fettered and fastened by a chain 
to the bracelet of the outer wrist ppr., the dexter Indian 
holding in his exterior hand a battle-axe the sinister hold- 
ing in his exterior hand a tomahawk, thereon a scalp all 
ppr. JV/o££o— Constantia et Viriute. 

AJnlierst, or Amliurst (Amhurst, co. Kent, Didling- 
ton Hall, co. Norfolk, and Hackney, co. Middlesex, ex- 
emplified, Coll. of Arms, to William - Amhcbst Ttssen- 
Amhuest, Esq. of those places). Quarterly: 1st and 4th, 
as preceding, viz., gu. three tilting spears two and one 
erect or, points ar. for Amhdrst, as representing Nicho- 
las Amhurst, living at Judds, in Tudeley, temp. Queen 
Elizabeth, one of the four sons of Thomas Amherst, of 
Amherst, and brother of John Amherst, ancestor of Earl 
Amherst ; 2nd, Daniel, per saltire ar. and or, two dexter 
arms fessewise, couped in pale, vested gu. cuff az. the hand 
ppr. holding a cross crosslet fltch^e erect of the third and as 
many lions ramp, in fesse, also of the third; 3rd, Ttssen, 
or, on a chev. az. betw. three French marygolds slipped 
ppr. two lions pass, respecting each other of the first, 
within a bordure compony ar. and of the second. Quartering 

AUCHMCTY, EVEBING, WaTLAND, StDNOB, MoRB!3, EaRDE, 

Babisfobd, and Leach. Crests — Amhurst : On a mount 
TCrt three tilting spears, one in pale and two in saltire or, 
encircled by a wreath of laurel ppr. Daniel : In front of 
a trefoil slipped vert a dexter arm couped fesseways habited 
gu. cuffed az. the hand ppr. holding a cross-crosslct erect 
abogu. Tyssen : A demi-lion rampant per fesse wavy or 
and az. ducally crowned gu. and holding in the paws an 
escutcheon of the second charged with an estoile of the first. 
Mottoes — Amhcbst : Victoria concordift crescit. Daniel : 
Toujours pret. Tyssen : Post mortem virtus virescit. 

Amherst, or Amhurst (Pembury Court Lodge, East 
Farleigh, Barnjett and Boxley Abbey, Kent, confirmed by 
Camden, May, 1607). Gu. three tilting spears two and one 
erect or, points ar. Crest — On a mount vert three tilt- 
ing spears headed ar. environed with a chaplet of laurel 
vert. 

Amias. Gu. three pallets sa. 

Amicable Society (Incorporated by Royal Charter of 
Queen Anne, 1706). Az. encircled by a snake or two hands 
conjoined in fcssc couped above the wrist ppr. on a chief 
embattled of the second an hour glass sa. betw. two wings 
expanded of the Held. Cre>t—A snake nowed the head 
dcbruiacd towards the sinister thereon a dove ppr. beaked 
and legged gu. from the beak an escroll with the motto 
Prudens Simplicitas. Motto — Beneath the arms, Esto 
perpetua. 

Amidas (London). Az. a chev. crm. betw. three oakslips, 
within a. bordure engr. or (sometimes ar.). Crest — A branch 
of oak ppr. acorned or. 

Amiel. Gu. »ix. escallops three and three arg. Crest — A 
hunting horn unntrung sa. 

Amlel (Guadaloupe, Charleston, and Boston, U.S. North 
America). Gu. six escallops three and three ar. Crest — A 
bunting horn unstrung Ra. 

Amltesly (Gloucestershire). Per pale or and ar. a fesse wavy 
gu. fnomctimcs four bars wavy). Crest — A bezant charged 
with a palo Indented gu. 

Amler (.Ioiin Amleb, of Ford, co. Salop, Esq., Sheriff, 1758). 
Ax. a fesse betw. three crescents ar. 
16 



Ammory (Oxfordshire). Az. on a bend or, three eaglets 
displ. sa. (sometimes gu.) armed gu. 

Amock. Erm. a chev. couped gu. Crest — A man's head 
in profile ppr. vested gu. wreathed round the head ar. 
and sa. 

Amondeville (Wotton, in 'Wardall). Vair three palets gu. 

Amonde'vill (Nottinghamshire). Az. a fret or. 

Amorie (Lord d'Amorie, summoned to parliament, ISIT). 
Barry nebulae of six ar. and gu. a bend az. 

Amory (Heathcoat-Amory, Knightshayes Court, co. Devon, 
Bart.). Quarterly : 1st and 4tli, Amory, viz., ar. two bars gu. 
on a bend engr. with plain cottises sa. two annulets of the 
field ; 2nd and 3rd, Heathcoat, vert, three piles one re- 
versed in base betw. the others issuant from the chief each 
charged with a pommels thereon a cross of the 2nd. Crests — 
Amoby: The battlements of a tower or, therefrom issuant 
a talbot's head az. charged with two annulets fessewise and 
interlaced gold. Heathcoat: Upon a mount vert. betw. 
two roses springing from the same gu. stalked and leaved 
ppr. a pommels charged with a cross or. il/o(;o— Amore 
non vi. 

Amory. Az. on a bend or, three eaglets displ. gu. 

Amory, or D' Amory (Codrington, co. Gloucester, 'Wor- 
cestershire Visit. 1634). Barry nebulde of six ar. and gu. 
over all a bend engr. az. Crest— Out of a mural crown or, a 
talbot's head az. eared of the first. 

Amory (St. Ann's, near Bristol, co. Somerset, Bunratty 
Castle, CO. Clare, and Boston, United States of America. The 
Amobys of America are a family of considerable distinction; 
Thomas Amory, Esq. of Bunratty Castle, was Lord Palatine 
of South Carolina, under John Locke's charter, and his uncle, 
Jonathan Amory, Esq., also emigrated to South Carolina 
about 1690, and became Advocate-General and Speaker of the 
House of Assembly there. His descendant is the present 
Thomas C. Amory, Esq. of Boston, U.S.). Barry nebulee of 
six ar. and gu. a bend az. Crest— Out of a mural crown or, a 
talbot's head az. eared of the first. Motto~Ta ne cede malis. 

Amos or Ames. Potent counterpotent gu. and ar. a chev. 
or. Ci-est — A square collegiate cap sa. 

Amphlett (Hadsor and Clent, co. Worcester, anciently of 
Sahvarpe, descended from William Amphlett, Lord of the 
Manor of Hadsor temp. James I. The Hadsor line is repre- 
sented by Sir Richard-Paul Amphlett, now of Wychbold 
Hall, CO. Worcester, one of the Barons of the Court of Ex- 
chequer; the Clent branch is represented by John Amph- 
lett, Esq. of Clent House). Ar. on a fesse betw. three 
lozenges az. a cinquefoil or. Crest — A dromedary ppr. 

Amphlett (Kev. Charles Amphlett, Earlscombe, Worces- 
ter, who adopted the surname of Amphlett in lieu of his 
patronymic, Dunne). Erm. two barrulets az. in chief a 
cinquefoil sa. betw. two lozenges of the 2nd, and in base a 
cinquefoil of the 3rd. Crest — On a mount vert, a dromedary 
statant ppr. charged with three cinquefoils sa. 

Amras (Norfolk, originally Kent). Erm. on a bend sa. three 
acorns or. Crest — A stag's head erased gorged with a 
wreath tied in a bow. 

Amreuell. Ar. a fesse betw. six annulets gu. 

Amsden, or Amsdon. Ar. a chev. betw. three sinister 
wings gu. Crest — A cross flory fitch^e or fleuHy gu. betw. 
two wings ppr. 

Amsou (Chester). Ar. on two bars az. betw. three leopards' 
faces in pale gu. six bezants. Crest — A cock blackbird ppr. 
betw. two ostrich feathers ar. 

Amuaule, and Amerley. Gu. a cross pattde vair. 

Amunde'ville (Winthorpo, Nottingham). Az. a fret or. 

Amy (Cornwall). Gu. on a pile ar. three bears' heads couped 
sa. muzzled or. 

Amy (Jersey). Or, on a chief embattled sa. three annulets 
ar. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet, a peacock's head ppr. 
holding a sprig vert. Motto — Hostis honori invidia. 

Amy (Botienno Castle, Cornwall). On an escutcheon three 
bears' heads erased and muzzled. Monument in Minster 
Ch. Cornwall, 1656. 

Amy. Or, on a chief embattled sa. three mullets ar. Crest— 
Out of a ducal coronet or, an eagle's head holding in the 
beak a sprig ppr. 

Amyand (London, Bart.). Vert a chev. betw. three garbs 
or. Crest — A naked arm embowed ppr. holding in the hand 
three ears of corn bladed all or, (sometimes an arm em- 
bowed vested or, holding in the hand ppr. three stalks of 
wheat gold). 

Amyas (Cambridgeshire). Ar. a fesse az. in chief a demi 
lion ramp. gu. 

Amyas (Essex). Ar. two bars gu. charged with three mullets 
or. Crest — A hind ppr. collared gu. 

Amyas (Norfolk). Ar. a boar's head couped sa. armed or, 
betw. three crosses crosslet (sometimes six crosses crosslet 



AMY 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AND 



fltclJ*) of the second. Crest— X staff's head erased or, gorged 

with a wreath ar. and sa. tied at the end. 
Amyas (Yorkshire). Ar. on a bend cottised sa. three roses 

of the field. 
Amyas. Sa. a chev. hetw. three escallops ar. 
Amyas. Gu. three pallets az. 
Amyatt (Southampton). Or, on a chief embattled sa. three 

mullets of the first. Crest — A ram pass. ar. 
Am.ys (Ksscx). Ar. on two bars gu. three mullets of the 

first. Crest— K hind pass. ar. collared gu. 
Anables. See Annabell. 
Anby, Andby, or Andelby. Gu. a fcsse hetw. two 

chev. or. 
Ancell. Gu. a bend masculy ar. 
Ancell. Gu. a bend lozengy or. 
Ancell, or Anscell (Cornwall). Gu. a saltire engr. ar. 

betw. four bezants. 
Anchitel (Dorsetshire). Or, a saltire ragiily vert. 
Ancketill (Shaftesbury, co. Dorset). Ar. a cross embattled 

vert. Cre^t — Dn a mount vert, an oak tree ppr. 
Ancketill (Dorsetsliire). Ar. a saltire raguly vert. Crest— 

The root of an oak tree erased, out of it a Uvo branch 

sproutins ppr. acomed or. 
Ajicketill (Ancketill's Grove, co. Monaghan, descended from 

the old Dorsetshire family). Ar. a saltire raguly vert. Crest 

.^An oak tree ppr. acomed or. Motto — Vade ad formicam. 
Ancketill (Killyfaddy, co. Tyrone, descended from the old 

Dorsetshire family). Ar. a saltire raguly vert a martlet for 

difference. Cce.J— An oak tree ppr. acorncd or, and charged 

on the stem with a martlet of the last for difference. Motto— 

Vade ad formicam. 
Ancotes (Lincolnshire). Az. a castle betw. three covered 

cups ar. 
Ancottes. Ar. three covered cups sa. on a chief gu. a castle 

betw. two lions pass. or. 
Ancram (Hill House, Frome, co. Somerset). Sa. a chev. 

betw. three anchors erect or. Crtst — An anchor erect sa. 

Motto — (Over the crest) Hold fast. 
Ancreng'es. Ar. a cross gu. and a bor'duro sa. 
And. Gu. a Roman & ar. 
Andborough. Az. a fesse betw. three crosses botton€e ar. 

(another, crosses crosslet). 
Andby, Andy, or Andey (Devonshire). Ar. on a bend 

cottised az. three roses or, barbed vert. Crest — On the stump 

of a tree a crane statant ppr. 
Andby or Andelby, and Anderby. Gu. on a bend 

or, three martlets sa. 
Andby, or Andly. Ar. a fesse oppressing three chev. gu. 

Crest — A dexter band ppr. holding a cross patt^e fitche'e in 

pale gu. 
Andelby. Ar. a chev. sa. in chief three chess rooks of the 

second. Crest — An escutcheon gu. charged with a cross 

moline or. 
Andelby. Ar. a fesse betw. two chev. gu. 
Andeley (Essex). Or, on a fesse betw. three coneys courant 

sa. as many martlets ar. 
Andemarle or Anbem.arle (Dorsetshire). Gu. crusuly 

or, on a bend of the second a mascle ermines. 
Anderdon (Beech House, co. Hants). Sa. two single shackle- 
bolts in chief, and a double one in base ar. Crest — A dexter 

arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished or, the hand apau- 

m^e also ppr. 
Anderley. Or, on a chief sa. three crescents ar. Crest— X 

dolphin haurient, devouring a fish ppr. 
Anderson-Pelbam {EaH of Tarborough). See Pelham. 
Anderson (Penley, co. Herts, bart., created 1643 ; extinct 

1699 ; the heiress, Elizabeth Andebson, m. Simon Harcourt, 

Esq. Clerk of the Crown). Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses 
crosslet (another, three crosses form^e) sa. Crest— A water 
spaniel pass. or. 
Anderson (Fermoy, co. Cork, bart., created 1812). Quarterly, 
or and ar. a saltire engr. per saltire gu. and sa. betw. a, 
mullet pierced in chief two boars' heads erased respecting 
each other in fesse of the fourth and in base a trefoil shpped 
vert. Crest— A tree ppr. surmounted by a saltire humett^e 
•a. Motto — Stand sure. 
Anderson (Aberdeen). Ar. a saltire wavy betw. three 
mullets in chief and flank and a crescent in base gu. Crest — 
A cross staff erect ppr. marked with the degrees of latitude. 
Motto — Per mare. 
Anderson (West Airderbrcck). Ar. a saltire engr. betw. 
two mullets in chief and base gu. and as many boars' heads 
erased in the flanks az. Crest — An oak tree ppr. Motto — 
Stand sure. 
Anderson (Dowhill). Ar. a saltire engr. sa. betw. a cres- 
cent in chief and three mullets in the flanks and base gu. all 
within a bordure az. Motto — Providentia et industria. 
17 



Anderson (Edinburgh). Ar. a saltire engr. cantoned y, ith 
a mullet in chief two crescents in the flanks and a cross 
crosslet fitch^e in base gu. Motto— Honest, and fast. 

Anderson (Edinburtrh). Ar. a saltire engr. sa. betw. a 
crescent in chief and three mullets pierced of the field, two in 
fesse and one in base gu. Crest— An eagle holding in the 
(texter claw a twig of olive ppr. Motto — Qui honeste fortiter. 

Anderson (Glasgow). Ar. a saltire engr. cantoned with 
two mullets in chief and base and as many crescents in tlie 
flanks gu. Ci-eH — A cloud ppr. Motto — Eecte quod honeste. 

Anderson (Stobeross, Scotland). Ar. a saltire engr. sa. 
betw. a crescent in chief and three mullets in fesse and base 
gu. a bordure quarterly of the second and third. Moiio — 
Providentia. 

Anderson (Tushilaw, co. Selkirk, 1732). Quarterly: 1st and 
4th, ar. a saltire engr. sa. betw. two crescents in chief and 
base and as many mullets in flank gu. a bordure wavy of the 
last : 2nd and 3rd, az. three bucks' heads couped ar. attired 
or, for PoBTEocs. Crest — A sword in pale encircled with two 
olive branches ppr. Motto — Pro bello vel pace. 

Anderson (London, 1794). Ar. a saltire engr. betw. four 
mullets gu. in the dexter point of a chief az. a blazing comet 
ppr. Crest — A phoenix in flames ppr. Motto — Providentia. 

Anderson (Newbiggin, Scotland, 1780). Ar. a chev. gu. 
betw. three stars in chief and a crescent in base az. Crest— 
A star az. Motto — Nil conscire sibi. 

Anderson (Mayor of Liverpool, 1860). Gu. a saltire betw. 
three mullets in chief and flanks and a crescent in base ar. 
on a chief of the second a stag's head cabossed of the fiirst 
betw. two martlets sa. Crest — An oak tree and equally 
pendent therefrom two weights ppr. Motto — Pro Deo certo. 

Anderson (Sir James Anderson of Blairvadich, co. Dum- 
barton, Lord Provost of Glasgow, 1862). Ar. a saltire engr. 
betw. a mullet in chief and a crescent in base gu. and in 
each flank a carpenter's axe az. on a chief of the last a fret 
of the first betw. two crescents or. Crest — A stag lodged 
ppr. Motto— Recte quod honeste. 

Anderson (New South Wales, 1863). Or, on a bend engou- 
lee of two dragons' heads vert, a lymphad with sail furled 
and oars in action of the first. CVsst— A yew tree ppr. Mottoet 
— Sic viret virttis. Ubi solum ibi coelum. 

Anderson (James Alexk. Anderson, capt. 14th regt. 1868). 
Ar. on a saltire engr. sa. betw. two mullets in chief and base, 
and as many crescents in flank gu. a boar's head erased or. 
Cref't — A crescent sa. Motto — Gradatim. 

Anderson (Sir Alexr. Anderson, Lord Provost of Aber- 
deen, 1872). Ar. a saltire engr. sa. betw. a crescent in chief 
two mullets in flank and a boar's head erased gu. in base. 
Crest— An oak tree ppr. Motto — Stand sure. 

Anderson (London). Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses cer- 
ceDeg sa. in chief a fleur-de-lis gu. Crest — Out of a ducal 
coronet ar. a hind's head or, pierced through the neck with 
an arrow sa. feathered of the first. 

Anderson (confirmed to Anderson of Sudbury, Her. Vii.). 
Sa. a chev. betw. three crosses flory ar. 

Anderson (granted by Cooke, Clarenceux, to Edkomd 
Anderson, of Ebury, co. Warwick). Sa. five estoiles ar. 
Crest — A talbot pass. or. 
Anderson (Grace Dieu, co. Waterford). Quarterly : 1st and 
4th, ar. a saltire engr. betw. two mullets gu. one in chief 
and one in base and in the flanks two boars' heads erased 
az. ; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a chev. erm. betw. three estoiles ar., 
for Brewster. Crest — An oak tree, ppr. Motto — (Over the 
crest) Stand sure ; (under the arms) Dum spiro spero. 
Anderson (Mill Hill, co. Middlesex, Lord Mayor of London 
in 1798). Az. on a saltire erm. a sword and key saltireways 
environed with a laurel wreath ppr. betw. three mullets and a 
crescent in base ar. Crest — Three ostrich feathers encircled 
with a chain or, on the centre one a crescent. 
Ajlderson (Newcastle, co. Northumberland). Or, on a chev. 
gu. betw. three hawks' heads erased sa. as many acorns 
slipped ar. Crest — An eagle's head erased ar. holding ia 

the beak paleways an arrow gu. headed and feathered or. 
Anderson (The same coat with a canton of the third, 

charged with three martlets of the fourth, was granted to 

Henry Anderson, of the town of Newcastle, gent., 3 Nov. 

1 Edward VI.). 
Anderson (Erbury, co. Warwick). Sa. five estoiles in 

saltire ar. 
Anderson. Gu. a saltire or, charged with a- other vert. 
Anderson. Ar. a saltire engr. sa. betw. four mullets gu. 
Anderson. Az. three martlets and a bordure engr. ar. 
Anderson. Gu. three trees eradicated ar. 
Anderson (Jcsmond House, Northumberland). The elder 

branch of the family settled more than half a century ago in 

St. Petersburg). Per chev. nebuMe az. and vert, a bugle 

horn stringed betw. three bucks lodged or. Crest— Vpoa a 



ANB 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ANO 



mount Tert a stag lodged wounded in the breast by an 

arrow and holding in his mouth an ear of wheat all ppr. 

charged on the side with a bugle horn or. Afotfo— Nil 

desperandum, auspice Deo. 
Anderson (Coxlodge, near Newcastle). Same as Anbeeson 

of Jesmond House, John Andebson of Coxlodge, Esq., having 

been younger brother of Thomas Anderson, Esq. 
Anderton (Anderton, CO. Lancaster). Sa. three shacklebolts 

ar. two and one; quartering, az. a lion ramp, guard, ar.; 

and vert three bugle-horns ar. Crest— A stork ppr. 
Anderton (Elderton). Ar. three water bougets sa. 
Anderton (Birchley, co. Lancaster, 1664). As Andeeton 

of Anderton, with a canton or. 
Anderton (Lostock, co. Lancaster, 1664). As Andebton of 

Anderton, with a mullet or. 
Anderton (Euxton and Ince, co. Lancaster). Sa. three 

shacklebolts ar. quartering Ince. Crest — A curlew ppr. 

Motto—Vt'e stoop not. 
Anderton (Haighton House, near Preston, Lancashire). 

Vert three hour glasses in bend ppr. betw. two bendlets ar. 

Crest— Issuant out of a crescent vert a buck's head in the 

mouth an ear of wheat ppr. 
Anderton (Lancaster). Sa. three bugle-horns (or hatchets) 

garnished ar. two and one. Crest — A curlew ar. 
Andesley. Ar. two lions' gambs erased in ealtire gu. 

(another, sa.). Crest— A sword in bend ppr. surmounted by a 

cross crosslet sa. 
Andesley. Ar. two lions' gambs erased in saltire gu. on a 

quarter or canton of the second three purses or. 
Andlaw. Or, a saltire quarterly quartered ar. and gu. 

Crest — An eagle's head sa. 
Andover Town (Hampshire). Ar. on a mount vert a lion 

statant guard, gu. against a tree ppr. 
Andrade. Gu. three griffins' heads erased ar. Crest — A 

wolfs head or. 
Andrea, or St. Andrew. Gu. seven mascles, three 

three and one conjoined or, in chief a label ar. Crest — A 

cinquefoil ar. 
Andre, or Andree. Ar. two mullets in chief az. and a 

galley her oars in action in base sa. Crest — A millrind az. 
Andrew (Backhould and Plymouth, Devonshire). Sa. a 

saltire ar. betw. four crosses crosslet or. Crest— A stag's 

head erased sa. attired or. 
Andrew (Gloucestershire). Sa. a saltire engr. enn. on a 

chief or, three fleurs-de-Us of the field. 
Andrew (Clockmilne, Scotland). Ar. on a fesse sa. six 

lozenges pierced or, in base a crescent gu. and on a chief az. 

three mullets of the field. Crest — A dexter hand holding a 

laurel branch ppr. Motto — Virtute et fortuna. 
Andrew (Nethertarvit, Scotland). Per bend ar. and az. 

three mullets counterchanged. Crest — A star or. Motto — 

Give and forgive. 
Andrew. Gu. three mascles in bend or, betw. two lions 

ramp. ar. 
Andrew (granted 1334 by Guyon King of Arras, to Thomas 

Andeew and his brothers Randolfe, Richaed, William 

James and Andbew). Gu. a saltire or, surmounted of an- 
other vert. 
Andrew (confirmed 1476 by Holm, Clarenceux, to Thomas, 

son and heir of Ricbabd Andbew, of co. Warwick, Gent.). 

Same as preceding. 
Andrew (Fun. Ent. of BiohtBev. George Andrew, Bishop 

of Ferns, 1635-1660). Gu. on a saltire or, surmounted by 

another a saltire vert. 
Andrewes (Doddington). Gu. a saltire voided or. 
Andrewes (London). Ar. a saltire az. on a chief gu. three 

mullets or. 
Andrewes (Blsbrooke, co. Rutland). Az. across erm.betw. 

four fleurs-dc-Iis or. Crest — A demi lion or, ducally crowned 

ar. holding in the dexter paw a human heart gu. 
Andrewes (Suffolk). Ar. on a bend. engr. cottised sa. betw. 

two lions ramp, of the last, three mullets of the first. 

Crfsl — A stag's head erased ar. 
Andrewes (St. Edmund's Bury, Suffolk and Wiltshire). Or, 

on a bend engr. gu. cottised sa. charged with three mullets ar. 
Andrewes. Az. a saltire betw. four crosses form^e or. 
Andrew^es. Sa. three escutcheons ar. each charged with a 

lion ramp. gu. 
Andre'wes. Ar. a cross gu., a martlet sa. for difference. 
Andrews (Bart., Denton). Gu. a saltire or, surmounted 

of another vert. Crefl—A blackamoor's head in profile 

coupcd at the thouldcrs and wreathed about the temples 

all ppr. 
Andrew* (granted to Bir.na Andbews, Esq., Q.C., of the 

Middle Temple). Or, on a pile az. a dove ppr. in base on 

dUter side a mullet of the icrond piorcrd of the field. 

Crut — Upon a mount vert a dove holding In the beak an 
1» 



oUve leaf slipped ppr. and charged on the breast witb an 
escallop gu. 

Andrew^S (Meriden, co. Warwick). Ar. on a bend cottised 
sa. three mullets of the first. Crest — A demi lionaz. gorged 
with a collar or, charged with three mullets az. 

Andrew^S (Shaw, Berkshire, created a bart. 19 Aug. 1766). 
Gu. a saltire ar. surmounted by another az. charged in tho 
centre with a bezant. Crest— Out of an eastern crown or, a 
blackamoor's head coupod ppr. in the ear a pendant ur. 
Motto — Victrix fortunae sapientia. 

Andrews (Lathbury, co. Buckingham, cos. Norfolk and Suf- 
folk). Ar. on a bend cottised sa. three mullets of the field. 
Crest — A stag's head erased or. 

Ajldrews (c(>nfirmed with four quarterings by the Depu- 
ties of Camden, Clarenceux, to William Andrews of Meri- 
den, CO. Warwick, third in descent from William Andbews 
of Harbome, co. Warwick). Arms same as the preceding. 

Andrews (Barnes Hall, co. Worcester ; Longdon, and 
Elderton, co. Warwick). Gu. a saltire or, surmounted by 
another vert. Crest — A Moor's head in profile, couped at 
the shoulder and wreathed about the temples all ppr. 

Andrews, or Andrew (Charwelton, co. Northampton, 
Ellsworth, &.C.). The same as Andeews, Bart. Denton. 

Andrews (Durham). The same Ai-ms and Crest as Ak- 
dbews, Bart., Denton. 

Andrews (London, and Hampshire). Ar. on a chev. engr. 
betw. three quatrefoUs slipped vert as many mullets or. 
Crest — An arm erect habited vert cuflfed ar. charged on the 
sleeve with a quatrefoil or, in the hand ppr. a branch vert 
thereon three quatrefoils or. 

Andrews (Kimpton Park, co. Middlesex, granted 2 Sept. 
1704). Ar. on a bend wavy cottised betw. two lions ramp, 
sa. crowned or, three estoiles of the first. Crest — On a naval 
coronet or, a dove volant with an olive branch in the beak 
all ppr. 

Andrews (Suffolk). Ar. on a bend engr. betw. two cottises 
sa. three mullets or. Crest — A stag's head erased ar. 

Andrews (Suffolk). Ar. on a bend engr. betw. two cottises 
and as many lions ramp. sa. three mullets ar. Crest — A 
bird, wings expanded az. holding in the beak alaurel branch 
(another, an acorn) vert. 

Andrew^s (Suffolk). Ar. on a bend engr. sa. three mullets 
of the field. 

Andrews. Ar. on a bend cottised sa. a mullet of the field. 

Andrews (granted 1529 to Bichabd Andrews, of Synton, 
CO. Worcester). Ar. on a chev. engr. gu. betw. three mullets 
vert as many quatrefoils or, pierced az. Crest — A grey- 
hound's head couped per pale or and sa. on the neck a sal- 
tire counterchanged betw. a pellet and a bezant. 

Andrews (co. Hants, Visit. Hants, 1634). Same as the 
preceding. 

Andrews. Per saltire gu. and or. 

Andros. Ar. a chev. engr. gu. voided az. three quatre- 
foils betw. as many mullets sa. Crest— Oa a tower a lion 
ramp. sa. 

Andros (Guernsey). Gu. a saltire or, surmounted of ano- 
ther vert on a chief ar. three mullets sa. Crest — A blacka- 
moor's head couped at the shoulders and wreathed about 
the temples ppr. Motto — Crux et proesidium et decus. 

Androwas. Ar. on a cross sa. five bezants. 

Andro'wey, or And'wey. Az. a lion ramp, guard, or, 
within an orle of ten cinquefoils ar. 

Anes (Dunstan Anes, purveyor and merchant for the 
Queen's Grocery, son of Geoboe Anes, of Valladolid, in 
Spain, Visit. London, 1568). Ar. lion ramp, guard, gu. 
within an orle of torteaux. 

Anfrons. Vaire or and gu. on a canton of the second a 
mullet erm. 

Ang'as, or Angres. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. Crest — An 
ostrich's head erased ar. holding in the beak a horse shoe ppr. 

Ang'e. Az. a chev. erm. betw. four crosses formfe ar 
Crest — A cross formic fitch^e or, betw. two wings az. 

Angel, Ang-le, Anegall, or Anegral. Gu. a cinque- 
foil or, within an orle of eight crosses crosslet of the last. 
Crest— On a chapeau a tower ppr. 

Angreldon (London). Az. sem^e of crosses crosslet fitch^e 
or, a unicorn ar. (another, the unicorn or). Crest — A knot 
sa. betw. two wings or. 

Angell (London, originally from Lancashire). Or, three 
fusils in fesse az. over all a baslon gu. Crest — Out of a ducal 
coronet or, a demi pogasus ur. crined gu. 

Angell (Cbables Fbederick Anoell, Esq., Camberwell, 
Surrey). Same Arms and Crest. Motto — Stare super visa 
antiquas. 

Angell (London, Camden's Grants). Or, five fusils in fesso 
az. over all a bendlet gu. Crest — On a mount vert a swan 
ar. ducally gorged or, beaked and legged gu. 



ANO 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ANS 



Angrell, or Anegoll. Gn. a cinquefoil within an orle of 

crosses crosslet or. 
Angrellis, or Angles. Sa. a fleur-de-lis ar. Creit—A. 

lion's gamb erect holding a cross patt^e fitch^e or. 
Angrer. Erm. on a chief az. three lozeDges or. Crest — An 

escarbuncle or. 
Anger, or Angler (Kent). Erm. on a chief az. a lion 

ramp. or. Crest — A martlet flying over a castle ruined in 

the sinister tower ppr. 
Anger, or Annger (Yorkshire and Essex). Erm. a griffin 

segreant per fesse or and az. 
Angerstein (Weeting Hall, Norfolk, and Woodlands, Black- 
heath, Kent, originally of St. Petersburg). Paly of eight az. 

and or, a saltire ar. Crest — A lion's head erased gu. in the 

mouth a quatrefoil vert. 
Angerton. Ar. on a bend sa. three lozenges erm. 
Angerville (Leicestershire). Gu. a cinquefoil or, within an 

orle of eight bezants. 
Angevile, or Angeville (Thethelthorpe, co. Lincoln). 

Ar. two bars gu. on a chief vert three bezants. Crest — A 

branch of three roses ar. leaved and stalked vert. 
Angevyne (Lincolnshire). Ar. two bars gu. in chief three 

torteaux. 
Angevyne (Lincolnshire). Ar. two bars gu. on a chief 

vert, three bezants. 
Angle (confirmed as a quartering to Sir John Newton, Knt. 

of Eichmond Castle, co. Somerset, 1567). Or, four fusils 

fessewise az. over all a bend gu. 
Anglesey, Marquess of. See Paget. 
Anguisb. (Norfolk; Edmund ANoniSH, Esq., of Moulton, in 

that county, m. Alice, daughter of Admiral Sir Thomas 

Allin, Bart., of Somerleytown, in Suffolk, and thus ac- 
quired that estate). Gu. a cinquefoil pierced or. Crest — A 

snake nowed ppr. betw. two branches of fern vert. Motto — 

Anguis in herbll. 
Anguisll. Ar. an orle gu. 
Angns. See Uufbaville, Eabls of. 
Angy. Gyronny of twelve ar. and sa. charged with crosses 

crosslet or. 
Anhault. Ar. a wine press gu. 
Anhelet. Per saltire az. and gu. three annulets or, two and 

one. Crest — A gem ring or, stoned gu. 
Anjon. Az. sem^e of fleurs-de-lis or, a bordure ar. 
Anjou. Gu. a chief ar. over ^11 an escarbuncle of eight 

staves nowed and flowered or. 
Anke, or Ankey. Gu. two bars ar. in chief three annulets 

of the second. 
Anke, or Ankbr. Erm. on a chief gu. three lozenges or. 

Creit — A buU's head erased gu. 
Anketell. See Ancketill. 
Anketell (Dorsetshire). See Ancketill. 
Anketel (Anketel Grove, co. Monaghan). See Ancketill. 
Ankyrsley. Or, two bars gu. betw. three martlets in pale 

sa. Creit — A hunting horn sans strings vert veruled ar. 
Anlaby, or Hanlaby. Ar. a fesse betw. six fleurs-de-lis 

sa. Crest — On a mount an oak tree ppr. 
Anleby, or Anselby (Eaton, co. York. Lansd. M.S. 865). 

Ar. a chev. betw. three chess rooks sa. Crest — An arrow in 

pale en filed with a ducal coronet or. 
Anlet (Yorkshire). Per saltire gu. and az. four annulets in 

cross ar. Crest — On a rock a fire beacon ppr. 
Anlett. Az. three annulets or (another, ar.). 
Anley. Vert three escallops ar. Crest — A dexter arm 

hand gloved holding a hawk's lure ppr. 
Aniners, or Anners (Cheshire). Gu. a chev. or, betw. three 

bezants. Crest — A lion's head erased ppr. 
Anmers, or Anners (Cheshire). Gu. a chev. betw. three 

mullets or. 
Anketill (Ballynekill, co. Limerick, temp. Charles L). Anns 

and Crest same as Ancketill of Shaftesbury. Motto — 

Eobor in cruce. 
Ann. Gu. three bucks' heads erased ar. 
Anna De (Farringdon). Ar. a saltire gu. on a chief of the 

second three bezants. Crest — .\ bezant. 
Annabell, or Annables. Ar. two bars engr. gu. Crest — 

A stag at gaze ppr. 
Annaly, Lord. See White. 
Annand (Lord of Annandale). Ar. a saltire and a chief 

Ann and (Auchterellon, co. Aberdeen). Ar. a chief and jaltire 
gu. cantoned with two mascles, in the collar and base points 
az. and in the flanks a spot of erm. Crest— A griffin segreant, 
ppr. Supporters — ^Two griffins ppr. Motto — Sperabo. 

Ann burgh. Az. a fesse ar. betw. three crosses flory or. 

Anncell, or Ann cell. Erm. on a fesse gu. three crosses 
crosslet or. Crest — A stag's head affronts ducally gorged, 
ppr. 

19 



Ann cey. Quarterly, per fesse wavy or and gn. a bend 
counterchanged. Crest— On a mural coronet a stag gejant 
ppr. 

Anne (Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire). Ar. on a bend 

sa. three martlets of the field (another, mullets). Crest A 

woman's head couped at the breast face ppr. vested ar. hair 
dishevelled or. 

Anne (Frickley and BurghwaUis, co. York, descended from 
Sir William de Anne, Constable of the Caatle of Tickell, 
temp. Edward II.). Gu. three bucks' heads cabossed ar. 
attired or. Crest — A buck's head cabossed ar. 

Anneles. Per saltire gu. and az. four annulets or. Ci-est — 
A mermaid ppr. tail vert. 

Ann elshie. Per pale or and ar. a hound gu. Crest— X 
bezant or, charged with a pale indented gu. 

Annering. Ar. on a chev. az. three bezants. 

Annering. Ar. a chev. engr. gu. betw. three mullets sa. 

Ann esley (Annesley, co. Notts., Hedington, co. Oxford, 
and Newport Pagnell, co. Bucks). Paly of six ar. and az. a 
bend gu. Crest — A Moor's head in profile couped 'ppr. 
wreathed about the temples ar. and az. Motto — Virtutis 
amore. 

Aimesley {Viscount Fakntia). Paly of six ar. and az., 
over all a bend, gn. Crest — A Moor's head in profile, 
couped ppr., wreathed about the temples ar. and az. Sup- 
porters — Dexter, a Boman knight in armour or, short 
sleeves and apron gu., face, arms, and legs bare, the last 
sandalled, ar. ; on his head a helmet or cap, gold, on the top 
thereof three feathers of the second, holding in his exterior 
hand a shield, thereon a female head ; sinister, a Moorish 
prince in armour or, short sleeves and apron gu., face, 
neck, arms and legs ppr., on the latter boots, gold, behind 
him a sheaf of arrows, ppr., fastened by a pink ribbon, 
wreathed round the temples ar. and az., in his exterior 
hand a bow ppr. Motto — Virtutis amore. 

Annesley (Sari of Anglesey and Mountnorris, and Baron 
Altkam, extinct.). — Arms, Crest, Supporters and Motto the 
same as Annesley, Viscount Valentia. 

Annesley (Earl Annesley). Paly of six ar. and az. over 
all a bend gu. Crest — A Moor's head in profile couped ppr. 
wreathed about the temples ar. and az. Supporters — Dexter 
a Roman knight; sinister a Moorish prince habited ppr. 
Motto — Virtutis amore. 

Annesley (Raddlphds Anneslef, of Kirkby Woodhousc, 
second son of Sir John de Annesley, Lord of Annesley 
temp. Edward II.). Paly of six ar. and az. a bend 
vair. 

Annesley (Arley Castle, co. Stafford. Aethuk Ltttelton 
Anneslbv, Esq., son of Major-Gen. Norman Macleod, and 
nephew of the last B^rl of Mountnorris). Quarterly : 1st 
and 4th, Annesley, paly of six ar. and az. a bend gu. ; 2nd 
and 3rd, Macleod, quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a castle triple 
towered and embattled ar. masoned sa. windows and porcli 
gu. ; 2nd and 3rd, gu. three legs armed ppr. conjoined in 
the centre at the upper parts of the thighs flexed, in tri- 
angle, spurred and garnished or, all within a bordure em- 
battled of the last. Crests — 1st, Annesley, a Moor's head in 
profile ppr. wreathed about the temples ar. and az. ; 2nd, 
Macleod, a bull"s head caboshed ppr. betw. two flags gu. 
Mottoes— (VndeT the arms) Hie murus aheneus; (over the 
Annesley crest) Virtutis amore; (over the Macleod crest) 
Hold fast. 

Annesley (Ballysax, co. Kildare, exemplified imder Royal 
license, 1844, to Ricbabd Joynt, Esq. of Banagher, King's 
CO., on his taking the name and arms of Annesley under the 
will of his maternal uncle, Cbables Annesley Esq., of 
Ballysax). Paly of six ar. and az. a bend gu. thereon a 
mullet or. for difference. Crest. — A Moor's head couped in 
profile ppr., wreathed about tUe temples ar. and az. and 
charged with a mullet or. AfotJo^ Virtutis amore. 

Annesley. Paly of six ar. and az. a bend gobonated gu. 
and or. (another, the bend vaire ar. and sa.). 

Ann ess, and Anniss. Gu. a mullet ar. and a chief or. 
Crest— A mascle or. 

Anngell (Kent). Or, four fusils in fesse az. a bend gu. 
Crest — 'Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi pegasus ar. 

Annois. Ar. three bendlets az. 

Annott, or Annat. Erm. two bars gu. in chief three 
hearts of the last. Crest — A boar pass. sa. transfixed with an 
arrow ppr. 

Anns. Gu. on a bend cottised or, three popinjays vert. 

Anny (Scotland). Or, a cross flory gu. 

Annyslay. See Annesley. 

Anquetil (Jersey). Or, three leaves vert. 

Anscell, or Anstrell (Barford, co. Bedford). Gu. on » 
saltire or, betw. four bezants as many mascles gu. Crett — 
A demi lion az. ducally gorged and Uned or. 



AKS 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



APE 



AnadelL Pair of six ar. and gn. a chief or. Crest— A. 

dexter hand ppr. holding a buckle or. 
Anseignes (Gloucestershire). Gu. three cinquefoils enn. 
Ansell. Gu. a bend fusilly or. Crest— &. demi lion ppr. 

ducally gorged and chained or. 
Ansell. Erm. on a fesse gu. three cresents or. 
Anselme (Middlesex). Erm. on a canton sa. a fleur-de- 
lis or. 
Anselme, or Aunselme. Gu. on a saltire or, betw. four 

bezants a mascle of the field. 
Ansert. Or, a bend gobony az. and gn. Crest — A demi lion 
crowned with an imperial crown, wielding a sword wavy ppr. 
Ansiam, or Ansym. Ar. (another, or,) a fesse betw. six 

martlets gu. 
Ana ingtinTn. ga. a bend ar. 

Ansley (John Anslet, Esq., Lord Mayor of London, 1808). 
Paly of six or and gu. on a bend sa. three escallops of the 
first. 
Ansley (Colonel Anslet, of Otto House, North End, Ham- 
mersmith). The same Arms. Crest — A blackamoor's head 
in profile, couped at the shoulders ppr. gorged with a collar 
or, charged with three escallops. 
Anson {Earl of Lichfield). Ar. three bends enfrr. gu. in the 
■inister chief, a crescent of the last. Crest — Out of a ducal 
eoronet or, a spear-head ppr. Supporters — Dexter a sea- 
horse; sinister a lion both ppr. gorged with a coUar gemel 
cr. Motto— fiW desperandum. 
Anson (Birch Hall, co. Lancaster, Bart.). Ar. three bend- 
lets engr. gu. in the sinister chief a crescent of the second. 
Crtft — Out of a ducal coronet or, a spear erect ppr. Motto 
— Nil desperandum. 
Anstaboth. Barry of six ar. and gu. in chief three mart- 
lets of the second. 
Anstaboth, or Anstalboth. Ar. two bars gu. in chief 

three martlets of the second. 
AnstavilL Gu. fretty ar. a canton az. Crest— \ castle 

triple-towered a demi lion issuing from the top. 
Anstead, Ansted, or Antishead. Per fesse or and 
ar. a fesse nebulae gu. Crest — A cross formde or, charged 
with five torteaux. 
Anstell. Gu. a saltire betw. four leopards' faces or. 
Anstell. Ar. on a cross sa. betw. four torteaux a leopard's 

face of the first a bordure of the second gutte'e d'or. 
Anstell, or Asnell (Cornwall). Gu. a saltire engr. ar. 
betw. four bezants. Crest — A cross forni6e ar. guttee de 
I)oix. 
Anstie. "Vert a pale betw. two griffins segreant ar. Crest 

— A leopard's face ppr. jessant-de-lis gu. 
Anstie, or Anstey. Ar. on a cross betw. four martlets 

gu. five bezants. Crest — A martlet or. 
Axistis (Cornwall). Ar. a cross raguly gu. betw. four birds 
az. legged of the second. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet five 
ostrich feathers ppr. 
Anstis, or Anstice. Arms the same. Crest — A dexter 
arm vested per pale embattled holding in the hand a griffin's 
head erased. 
Anston. Ar. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis sa. 
Anstruther (of that Ilk, co. Fife, bart. 1798, now repre- 
sented by Sir W. C. J. Carmichael-Anstruther). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, ar. three piles sa., for Anstbdther ; 2nd and 
3r(l, ar. a fess wreathed az. and gu., for Cabmichael. Crc~ts 
— Two arms in armour holding in the gauntlets a battle axe, 
all ppr., for Anstbdthek; an armed arm erect holding a 
broken spear ppr., for Cabmichael. Supporters — Two fal- 
cons with wings expanded ppr. armed gu. jessed and belled 
or. Mottoes— Periitacm ni periissem, for Anstbctheb; Tou- 
Jours prest, for Cabmichael. 
Anstruther (Balcaskie, co. Fife, bart. 1694). Ar. three 
piles sa. Crest — Two arms in armour holding in the gaunt- 
lets a battle axe ppr. Motto — Periissem ni periissem. 
Anstruther (Airdrie, co. Fife). Ar. three piles ss. withia 

a bordure gu. .Same Crest and Motto. 
Anstruther-Thomson. See Thomson. 
Anstey (Cambriclgcshire and Cumberland). Or, a cross 

enttr. betw. four martlets gu. CreU — A martlet or. 
Ansty (Cambridgeshire;. Or, a cross quarter-pierced botw. 

four martlets gu. 
Ansty (Cornwall). Or, a saltire eng^. gn. betw. four mart- 
lets »a. 
Ansty (Sussex). Or, a cross engr. gu. betw. four martlets 



sa. 
Anstybath. 



Erm on a chief indented gu. two mullets 



Ans'wilty (Scotland). Ar. three pile.s meeting in point sa. 
AntblnKham, Autlng'ham, or Antingrham (Lan- 

rnKhire unil Norfolk). .Sa. a bend ar. 
Anthinerham. Sa. a bend ar., a crescent az. for diB. 
20 



Anthony (Guernsey). Per pale and per chey. or gii. and 

erm . a cross tau ar. 
Anthony (London). Ar. a leopard's head betw. two 
flaunchcs sa. each charged with a plate. Crest — A goat's 
head ar. 
Anthony (Visit. London, 1568. Deeick Anthoist, son of 
William Anthony, who was 6. at Cologne in Germany, was 
chief graver of the mint and seals to Edward VI. and Queens 
Mary and Elizabeth). Ar. a leopard's head gu. betw. two 
flaunches sa. ; also a former coat, viz., ar. a leopard's head 
gu. betw. two flaunches sa. on the dexter a rose on the sinis- 
ter a mullet or, in chief a crescent for difference. Crest — A 
demi goat ppr. charged with a bezant armed and attired or. 
Anthony. Gu. ten plates, four, three, two, and one. Crest 

— A goat's head or. 
Anthony. Gu. biUett^o and a lion ramp. or. 
Antick. Vert a parrot wings disclosed holding up the 

left foot or. 
Antigna, See of. Ar. a passion cross. r\\., on the 
dexter side a serpent erect and wavy vert, looking towards 
the sinister; and on the sinister side a dove holding in the 
beak an olive branch all ppr. ; on a chief of the second a 
crosier in bend dexter surmounted by a key in bend 
sinister the ward upwards or, and in the centre chief point 
an imperial crown, ppr. 
Antilupe. Ar. an heraldic antelope gu. tusked, homed, 

maned, and hoofed or. 
Antingham (Antingham, co. Norfolk ; also in east window, 

north aisle, Bristol cathedral). Sa*. a bend ar. 
Antiquaries, Society of. Ar. on a cross gu. a regal 
crown ppr. Crest — An antique Roman lamp or, over it, 
Non extinguetur. 
Antiquaries of Scotland, Society of. Az. the cross 
of St. Andrew ar. betw. an imperial crown in chief and a 
thistle in base both ppr. all within a double tressure flory 
countei-flory gu. 
Antisell. See Entwisle. 

Anton (Stoatfleld, co. Lancaster, London, and Ireland). 
Az. a fesse or, a bordure erm. Crest — Out of a mural 
coronet a lion's head ar. 
Antony, or, Antonie (Suffolk). Ar. a leopard betw. two 

flaunches sa. Cred — A goat's head gu. 
Antrim, £arl of. See Mac Donnell. 
Antrobus (Antrobus Hall, Cheshire and Rutherford, co. 
Roxburgh, Bart., 1815). Lozengy or and az. on a pale gu. 
three estoiles of the first. Crest — Issuing out of rays ppr. 
a unicorn's head couped ar. horned and maned or, gorged 
with a wreath of laurel vert. Sapx>orters — Two white horses 
ppr. Motto — Dei memor, gratus amicis. 
Antrobus (confirmed by Camden, Clarenceux, Sept. 1604 to 
Thomas Antbobds, one of the six clerks in Chancery). Same 
Arms and Crest. 
Antrobus. Ar. three bitterns gu. 
Antron, or Dc Antrenon. Ar. a chev. betw. three 

garbs sa. 
Ant'weisel. Sa. (sometimes, gu.) three mullets ar. Crest 

— An eagle with wings expanded and inverted ppr. 
Antwilley. Barry of eight ar. and gu. in chief a lion pass.. 

guard, sa. 
Antjmgham. Sa. a bend ar. in dexter point a crescent gu. 
Anvaile or Anvil. Gu. a smith's anvil ar. 
Anvenell. Ar. a fesse betw. six anuulets (another, mart- 
lets) gu. 
Anvers (Cheshire). Gu. a chev. betw. three mullets of six 

points or. Crest — A branch with three roses ppr. 
Anvers, or Anvery. Gu. a chev. or, betw. three bez.ints. 
Anvine. Ar. three playing tops sa. two and one (another 

adds a martlet gu.). 
Anvory. Az. on a bend or, three eaglets sa. armed gu. 

Crest — A dexter hand holding a holly branch ppr. 
Anvrick (London). Paly of six or and az. on a chief gu. a 
cross crosslet ar. Crest — A dexter arm gu. the hand ppr. 
holding a broken tilting spear or. 
An'wicke. Ar. a cross calvary sa. 
Anvrris. Gu. a chev. ar. betw. three plates. 
Anwyl (Park and Bala, co. Merioneth). Vert three eagles 

displ. in fesse or. 
Apadam. Gu. five stars or. 
Apadam. See Abadam. 

Apeele. Ar. three bars gu. a canton erm. Crest — A fleur- 
de-lis or, betw. two wings ar. 
Apelby (Leicestershire). Az. six martlets or, three, two, 

and one. 
Apelby (Shrop.shire). Az. six sea-gulls ar. three, two, and 

one. the dexter wing displ. the .sinister close. 
Apelby, or Apleby (Shropshire and Staffordshire^ Az, 
six martlets ar. three, two, and one. 



APE 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



APTJ 



Apelderfleld. Or, on a fesse gn. four fusils ar. 
Apelesbury, or Applesbury. Sa. a fesse embattled 

Ijetw. three cinqnefoils or. 
Apelton, Appelton, and Appolton (Apleton, co. Lan- 
caster). Ar. a bear salient sa. crowned or. 
Apelton, Apleby, and Apulby. Ar. on a bend sa. 

three apples or. 
Ap-Enion (Baron of Malpas, co. Chester, temp. Henry II.). 

Gu. three pheons ar. 
Apenrith (Ireland). Gu. on a fesse betw. three lozenges 
or, each charged with a fleur-de-lis a demi rose crowned 
betw. two griffins segreant all of the field. 
Apesley (Surrey and Sussex). Ar. three bars gu. a canton 

ermines. Crest— X fleur-de-lis or, betw. two wings ar. 
Ap-Griffyn (Wales). Quarterly or and az. four lions pass. 

guard, counterchanged. 
Ap-Harry, or Parry. Ar. a fesse betw. three lozenges 

a bordure az. 
Ap-Howell (Gloucestershire, descended from Wales). Ar. 

a lion ramp. sa. over all a fesse engr. gu. 
Ap-Hugh (Fun. Ent. Ireland, of Capt. Eice Ap-Hcgh, 
1612). Az. a lion ramp. ar. armed and langued gu. and 
charged on the shoulder with a torteau. 
Apifer. Or, an escarbuncle sa. Crest — A hand holding a 

spiked club ppr. 
Apiliard, Appleyard, or Appulyard (East Carlton, 
CO. Norfolk). Az. a chev. betw. three owls ar. membered or, 
Crest — A demi tiger, quarterly gu. and az. the tail of the 
last tufted or, iii the mouth a rose gu. stalked and leaved 
vert. 
Ap-John (Streatham, co. Surrey). Sa. a fesse or, betw. three 
children's heads ppr. couped at the shoulders about each 
neck a snake vert. 
Apleby. Az. three harts sejant or. 
Apleby, or Apulby. Ar. on a bend sa. three bezants. 
Apledorfield. Erm. a bend gu. 
Aplegath. Ar. three apples slipped gu. 
Apleg-ath, or Aplegrarth. (Rapiey, co. Hants). Az. a 
chev. or, betw. three owls ar. in chief a fleur-de-lis erm. 
Crest— A (Temi tiger gu. bezants armed and tufted or, 
charged with a bend gold. 
Aplertfold. Or, on a fesse gu. three lozenges ar. 
Apleton (Kent). Vert, a fesse engr. betw. three apples ar. 

stalked gu. 
Apleton. See Appletos. 
Apleton. Ar. three leaves vert. 
Apletre (Dodington, co. Oxford). Ar. on a fesse gu. three 

lozenges vair. 
Apletree (Egioake, co. Worcester). Or, on a.-fess gu. three 

lozenges vair. 
Apletree (Basingstoke, co. Hants). Ar. on a fesse gu. 

three lozenges or, quartering Edssell. 
Apletresend, or Appeltresend. Erm. a bend gu. 
Apleyard (Norwich and Yorkshire). Az. a chev. or, betw. 

three owls ar. a crescent for diff. Crest — An owl ar. 
Ap-Madock, or Ap-Madoke (Wales). Sa. a chev. betw. 

three hawks' lures ar. 
Apmenrice (Wales). Paly of six or and az. on a fesse gu. 

three mullets ar. 
Ap-Meredith (Wales). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. 
Apmericlie (Wales). Per pale gu. and sa. two griffins ar. 
Apmerick (Wales). Per pale sa. and gu. two griffins com- 
batant ar. 
Apothecaries' Company. Az. Apollo, the inventor of 
physic ppr. his head radiant, holding in his left hand a 
bow, and in his right an arrow or, supplanting a serpent 
AT. Crest — A rhinoceros ppr. supported by two unicorns or, 
Armed and unguled ar. 3Jotto — " Opiferque per orbem 
dicor." 
Appeley (Staffordshire). Az. six martlets or, two, two, 

and two. 
Appenrich. Gu. a fesse betw. three lozenges or, each 

charged with a fleur-de-lis gu. 
Appleby (Leicestershire, Her. Visit., 1619). Az. six mart- 
lets or, three, two, and one. Crest — ^An apple or, stalked 
and leaved vert. 
Appleby (Larington, co. York). Ar. a ship in full sail sa. 

on waves ppr. 
Appleby, To'wn of (Westmorland). Az. three lions pass. 

gtiard. in pale or, ducally crowned of the last. 
Ajrpleby (John Appleby, temp. Eich. II.) Az. six martlets 

01. 

Apijlederfield. Erm. a bend gu. 

Appledore. Gu. a fesse nebulfe ar. 

Ai>pleford. Ar. acinquefoil, gu. andachief vert. Crest — A 
demi savage in the dexter hand a sword, and in the sinister 
aconstable's baton ensigned with a royal crown. 
21 



Applegh.. Vert an ape sejant holding up the paw braceil 
round the middle and chained to the sinister side of the 
escutcheon ar. 
Appleheun. Gu. two apples in pale, stalks counterposed or. 
Appleton. Az. three pine-apples erect ar. 
Appleton, or Apylton (Little Brook). Ar. a fesse engr. 
(another, plain) sa. betw. three apples leaved and shppedppr. 
Appleton. Vert on a fesse engr. ar. three apples gu. 
Appleton (Little Waldingficld, co. Suffolk, now of the United 
States of .America). Ar. a fess sa. betw. three apples gu. 
sUppedand leaved vert. Crest— An elephant's head couped sa. 
tusked and eared or, round the trunk a serpent entering the 
mouth vert. Anotlcer Crest. Out of a ducal coronit or, threo 
pine-apples vert the tops purfled gold. 
Appleton. Ar. a bear salient sa. on the shoulder a cinque- 
foil of the first. 
Apple'whaite (Suffolk). Gu. on a fesse ar. three pine- 
apples slipped vert in chief a sword barwise pointed to tho 
sinister side ar. liilted or. Ciest — A cubit arm erect vested 
holding in the hand an open book. 
Appleyard (Shotsham, co. Norfolk). Quarterly, 1st, az. a 
chev. or, betw. three owls ar. ; 2nd, az. an eagle displ. or, 
membered gu., for Speak; 3rd, vert, ten eagles ar. four, 
three, two, and one ; 4th, gu. a chev. betw. three boars' 
heads couped ar. within a bordure engr. of the last, for 
Whyte. Crest — An owl ar. 
Appleyard (Dunstan, co. Norfolk, 1406). Az. a chev. or, 

betw. three owls ar. 
Appleyard (Yorkshire). Az. on a chev. betw. three ow!t 

ar. a mullet gu. 
Applock. Ar. an oak branch with three apples ppr. 
Appryand. Az. a boar ar. betw. ten trefoil slipped of the 

last. 
Appulby. Ar. on a bend sa. three bezants. 
Appulby. Ar. on a bend sa. three apples stalked end 

leaved or. 
Appuley, or Appurley. Ar. a chev. betw. three pine- 
apples gu. 
Appulton. Vert, a chev. engr. betw. three apples ar. 
Apreece (Buckinghamshire and Huntingdonshire). Sa. threo 
pheons ar. Crest — An otter ppr. collared and lined or. 
Another Crest — A spear erect ar. over it this Motto — Labora 
ut in aaternum vivas. 
Apreece (Washingly Hall, co. Huntingdon, bart.). Sa. three 
spears' heads ar. gutt^ de sang. Crest — A spear's head as 
in the arms. Motto — Labora ut in aetemum vivas. 
Aprestby, or Apresby. Sa. a cross ar. in chief a cin- 

quefoil of the last. 
Ap-Rhys Goch (Wales). Ar. on a bend sa. three lions* 

faces of the field. 
Aprice (Herefordshire). Sa. on a chev. hetv. three leopardB' 
heads ar. as many spears' heads of the first, on a chief of the 
second three cocks gu. Crest — A cock with wings expanded 
gu. holding in the beak a rose ppr. leaved and stalked 
vert. 
Aprice (Wales). Sa. a cross patonce ar. 
Ap-Rice. Ar. on a fesse az. three boars' heads couped or, 
in chief a lion pass. gu. Crest — A boar's head erect ar. 
pellets betw. two oak branches vert fructed or. 
Ap-Rice. Sa. three roses ar. 
Ap-Rice. Ar. three roses sa. 
Apris. Gu. a chev. betw. three mullets (another, spur 

rowels) ar. 
Ap-Roberts. Sa. a chev. betw. three mullets ar. 
Apryce (Wiltshire). Sa. three crosses form^e ar. 
Apsey. Vair a chev. ar. Crest — A dove with an olive 

branch in the beak volant over water all ppr. 
Aspland (Abthtr Palmer Aspland, of Wemeth Lodge, 
Gee Cross, Cheshire, and Li>rDSAY Middleton Aspland, 
of the Middle Temple, barrister-at-law, LL.D., sons of the 
late Eev. Eobert Brook Aspland, M.A.). Az. three chevronels 
erminois betw. as many crescents in chief and a cross flory 
in base ar. Crest — In front of a ram's head couped sa. 
armed or, three mascles interlaced fesswise ar. Motto — Ex 
libertate Veritas. 
Apsley, or Apesley (Apesly, co. Suffolk). Barry of six 

ar. and gr. a canton erm. 
Apsley (Sir Allan Apslet, knighted in Ireland, 5 June, 

160.5). Same as the last, an annulet or, for difference. 
Apsley (Hospital, co. Limerick). Arms, same as the last. 
Crest — A flem'-de-lis or, betw. two wings erect and conjoined 
ar. 
Apton. Ar. a chev. betw. three martlets sa. 
Apulderfield (Devonshire). Sa. a cross or, voided of the 

field. 
Apulderfleld, or Appeldorfield. Or, on a fesse gu. 
four lozenges ar. 



APTT 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ARC 



Apuldrefield (Cudham and ChaHock, co. Kent). Erm. a 

bend vaire or, and gii. 
Apuldrefield (Linsted, Kent). Sa. a cross voided or. 
Apuldrefield (Apuldrefield, Kent; assigned by Philpot in 

his Visitation, 1619). Erm. a fesse vaire or and gu. 
Apuldrefield (Ottreply, in Challock, Kent). Erm. a bend 

vaire or and gu. Crest— On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. 

a man's head in profile couped at the neck ppr. wearing a 

cap ar. fringed in front and back gu. 
Apuldrefield (Stephen de Apdldbefield, temp. Edw. I.). 

Or, on a fesse gu. four lozenges ar. 
Apuldrefield (Kent). Erm. a bend vaire or and gu. Crest 

On a chapeau a man's head in profile couped at the neck 

wearing a cap ar. fringed gu. 
Apulton (Lancashire). Ar. a bear pass. sa. muzzled or. 
Apxilton. At. a fesse sa. betw. three pine-apples pendent 

sUpped vert. 
Apulton, or Apulstone (Lancashire). Ar. three goats 

salient sa. 
Apultresend. Or, on a fesse gu. three lozenges vair 

(another, three mascles or). 
AQuila. Or, an eagle close gu. 
Aqullis. Paly of six gu. and vair on a chief or, three 

eagles displ. sa. 
Aquitain. Gu. a lion pass, guard, or. 
Aquitar (London). Gu. an eagle displ. or, on a chief ar. a 

mount vert thereon three pear trees ppr. fructed of the 

second. Crest — A demi lion ramp, or, murally crowned 

az. holding in the dexter paw a laurel branch slijped 

ppr. 
Aqmtten, or Aquillon. Gu. a fleur-de-lis ar. 
Arabin (Beach Hill Park, co. Essex). Quarterly, 1st and 

4th, az. in base an arm couped at the wrist lying fesswise 

holding a sword all ppr. on the point thereof a crescent arg. 

betw. two mullets in chief or, in the dexter base point a 

heart ppr.; 2nd and 3rd, ar. an eagle displ. sa. ducally 

crowned or. Crest — An eagle's head erased betw. two wings 

sa. ducally crowned or. Motto — Nee temere nee timide. 
Arabin. Or, three vine leaves vert. Crest — The sim rising 

behind a movmtain ppr. 
Aragund, or Aragome. Ar. a fesse betw. three mullets 

Aragron. Paly of ten ar. and gu. 

Arblaster, or Allebaster (Staffordshire and Essex). 

Erm. a cross-bow in pale gu. Crest — A feather in pale 

enfiled with a ducal coronet. Aiwther Crest — Out of a ducal 

coronet a greyhound's head ar. collared or. 

Arblaster (Longdon, co. Stafford, Visit. 1583). Erm. a cross 

bow gu. stringed or. 
Arbouin. Sa. a lion ramp. ar. 
Arbreth (Lancashire). Or, two bars vert. 
Arbroath, or Aberbrotheck, Town of (Scotland). 

Ar. a portcullis gu. chains az. 
Arbuckle (Scotland). Gu. on a fesse ar. betw. three garbs 

or, as many mullets az. Crest — A ram ppr. 
Arburtlinot (Findourie, Scotland). Az. a crescent betw. 
three stars within a bordure ar. Crest — A peacock ppr. 
Motto — Interna prcestant. 
Arburthnot (Catherlan). Az. a crescent betw. three stars 
within a bordure ar. charged with eight cinquefoils of the 
first. Crest — A peacock's head couped ppr. charged with a 
mullet or. Motto — Sit laus Deo. 
Arburthnot (Montrose, 168S). Az. a crescent betw. three 
stars ar. all within a bordure indented and quartered of the 
second and first. Crest — A dove within an adder disposed 
orlcways. Motto — Innocue ac provide. 
Arbuthnot (Vincount ArbathnotJ. Az. a crescent betw. 
three stars ar. Crest — A peacock's head couped ppr. beaked 
or. Supporters — Two dragons wings expanded and tails 
nowcd vert vomiting flames of fire ppr. Motto — Laus Deo. 
Arbuthnot (Weymouth, 168.")). Az. a crescent betw. three 
stars ar. a bordure wavy of the last. Crest — A ship under 
sail ppr. A/o«o— Fluctuo ficd affluo. 
Arbuthnot (Dr. James Arbuthnot, grandson of 2nd Vis- 
count Arbuthnot). Az. a crescent betw. three stars ar. 
within a borduro crenelM or. Crest — A peacock's head 
coupod ppr. Mottoes — Deus me sustcntat. Laus Deo. 
Arbuthnot (Fiddes, co. Kincardine). Az. a crescent betw. 
thr<'f Htars within an orlc of eight frazes ^r. Cre^t — A pea- 
cock pa.i«. ppr. Motto — Tam interna quam externa. 
Arbuthnot (Sir William Arbuthnot, Bart., Lord Provost 
of Edinburgh in 18'.i2). Az. a crescent betw. three mullets 
ar. within a bordaro or. charged with as many boars' heads 
erased gu. Cre^t — A peacock's head ppr. Sup/iorters — 
I)f:jtcr, a wyvcm with wings expanded and tail nowcd vert 
spouting out fire ; sinister, a greyhound ppr. collared gu. 
loaHlicd or. Motto — Innocent and true. 
22 



Arbuthnot. Az. a crescent betw. three stars ar. within 

an orle of eight frazes of the last. 
Arbutt. Gu. three flocks or flounders ar. 
Arcedeckne - Butler (exemplified to James Henrt 
Edward Butler, Esq., son of Hon. St. John Butler, by 
Anna Maria his wife, only dau. and heiress of Walter 
Arcedeckne Bcrke, Esq., of Gortnamona, co. Galway, upoa 
his taking by royal licence, 4 Nov., 1867, the additional 
name of Arcedeckne). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a chief 
indented az. three escallops in bend countcrchanged, a label 
on a crescent for difference, for Butler; 2nd and 3rd, ar. 
three chevronels sa., for Arcedeckne. Crests — 1st, out of a 
ducal coronet or, a plume of five ostrich feathers therefrom 
a demi-falcon rising ar. a label on a crescent for difference, 
for Butleb; 2nd, a cubit arm erect vested ar. charged with 
three chevronels sa. the hand ppr. grasping a sword ar. 
pommel and hilt or, for Arcedeckne. Motto — Timor Domini 
fons vitae. 
Arcedeckne (Glevering Hall, co. Suffolk). Ar. three 
chev. gu. Crest— A. dexter arm holding in the hand a sword. 
Arcedekne (Cornwall, summoned to Parliament as Baront 

Le Arcedekne, 1321). Ar. three chevronels sa. 
Arcester (Gloucestershire). Ar. a chev. az. and label of 

three points gu. Ci-est — On a bezant an escarbuncle sa. 
Archall (co. Salop). Ar. a bar. gemel sa. 
Archard (Grays, Kent). Or, a bend engr. sa. 
Archard (Kent). Erm. on a cross sa. a crescent or. Crett 

— Out of a ducal coronet a demi fish ppr. 
Archard (Yorkshire). Or, five fusils in bend sa. 
Archard. Ar. five fusils in cross sa. 
Archard. Or, a bend engr. sa. 
Archas (Leicestershire). Sa. three fleurs-de-lis ar. 
Axchat. Ar. on a bend cotised gu. three fleurs-de-lis or; a 

bordure of the second. 
Archbold (See Pears-Archbold). 

Archbold (Kilmacud, co. DubUn). Erm. a saltire and a 
chief gu. Crest — A lion's head couped erm. gutt<?e de sang. 
Archbold (Worcestershire, Visit, of London, 1634). Ar. a 
lion ramp. betw. six fleurs-de-lis sa. a crescent for difference. 
Crest — A dove rising ar. 
Archby. Purp. a bend archy, or crenelle ar. 
Archdall, or Archdale (Castle Archdall, co. Fermanagh, 
and Trillic, co. Tyrone, originally of Norton Hall, co. Nor- 
folk, settled in Ireland ter/ip. Elizabeth). Az. a chev. erm. 
betw. three talbots pass. or. Crest— Out of a ducal coronet 
or, an heraldic tiger's head ar. maned tufted and armed sa. 
Motto— Dsita. fata secuta. 
Archdall (London, confirmed by Cooke. Clarenceux). Az. 

a chev. betw. three talbots pass. or. 
Archdall (Grat- Archdall, granted to Henry Archdall 
Ghat, Esq. of Derryargan, co. Fermanagh, on assuming the 
additional name of Archdall, under the will of Gen. Mer- 
VTN Archdall of Castle Archdall, in said co., 1840). Az. 
a chev. erm. betw. three talbots pass, or, all within a border 
gobony ar. and sa. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet gu. an 
heraldic tiger's head ar. langued gu. tufted sa. Motto — 
Data fata secutus. 
Archdeacon (Cornwall). Ar. a chev. sa. Crest — A mart- 
let flying over a tower ppr. 
Archdeacon (Cornwall, Devon, and Hertford). Ar. three 

chev. sa. 
Archdeacon. Sa. three chev. or. 

Archdecon (.Monkstown, co. Cork). Ar. three chevronels 
sa. Crest— A dexter cubit arm vested ar. and charged with 
three chevronels sa. the hand grasping a sword both ppr. 
Archdekin (registered by Hawkins, Ulster, 1776, as the 
arms of Edward Archdekin, Esq., co. Kilkenny). Ar. 
three chevronel.s , i. 
Archebold, or Archbold (Staffordshire). Ar. a lion 
ramp. betw. three (another, six) fleurs-de-lis .sa. Crest — A 
lion's head erased ar. collared gu. 
Archer (Baron, of Umberslade, co. Warwick, extinct, 1778). 
Az. three arrows, two and one, points downwards or. Ciest 
— Out of a mural coronet gu. a dragon's head ar. Sup- 
porters — Two wiverns reguard. ar. murally gorged or. Motto 
— Sola bona quae honcstii. 
Archer (granted, l.)97, by Lee, Clarenceux, to Andreit 
Archer of Tamworth, and contirmed by the deputies of 
Camden, Clarenceux, to Sir Symon Archer, knt. of Tam- 
worth, twelfth in descent from John Archer, temp. Edward 
III., who was fourth in descent from Rorert Sagittarius 
of Umberslade, temp. Henry II.) Az. three arrows or. 
Cre<t — Out of a mural coronet gu. a dragon's head ar. 
Archer (settled in co. Kilkenny since the reign of King 
John). Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three pheons sa. three 
mullets or. 
Archer (Capt. J. H. Lawbence-Abcuer, 18S8). Per fess nz. 



ABC 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ABB 



and ar. in chief three broad arrowg in pale points downwards 
or, in base a cross raguly gu. charged in the centre with a 
saltire of the third. Crest — Out of a mural crown or, a 
wivem's head gu. Motto — Deus salutem disponit. 
Arclier (Cornwall). Sa. a chev. betw. three broad arrows 
ar. Crest — On a quiver full of arrows lying fesseways a 
serpent all ppr. 
Archer (Trelaske, Cornwall). Sa. a chev. engr. ar. betw. 
three pheons or. Crest — A quiver full of arrows ppr. 

Archer (Lincolnshire, granted 24 March 1684). Per pale gu. 
and az. three arrows or, barbed and feathered ar. Crest — A 
dragon's head per pale gu. and az. with wings expanded, 
the sinister wing or, the dexter ar. issuing out of a mural 
crown per pale of the last and third. 
Archer (Chelmsford, co. Essex). Az. a garb erect or, 
betw. two branches of laurel tied by a ribbon in base, on a 
chief embattled ar. three arrows, points downwards, betw. 
eight erm. spots, two and two, in pale sa. Crest — A griffin's 
head erased ar. transpierced by a spear in bend sinister, 
point downwards, collared gu. charged with two crosses 
patt^e of the first, in the beak a slip of oak fructed ppr. 

Archer (Essex). Erm. on a chief az. three lions ramp. or. 
Crest — A bull's head erased gu. 

Archer (alias De Boys, Essex). Erm. a cross sa. Two 
Cresti — First, a wivem ar. ; second, a leg couped at the thigh, 
embowed at the knee, quarterly sa. and ar. spur and leather 
or. 

Archer (Ballyseskin, co. Wexford). Amis same as the pre- 
ceding. Crest — A duke's coronet ppr. Motto — Pro reli- 
gione et patria. 

Archer (Theydon, co. Essex, granted 2 April, 1574). Erm. 
a cross sa. a crescent ar. for difference. 

Archer (Highlow, co. Dublin). Erm. a cross sa. Ci'est — 
A wyvern ar. 

Archer (Salop). Sa. a lion ramp, or. 

Archer. Or, five fusils in bend sa. 

Archer. Az. three arrows in pale ar. 

Archer. Ar. three pheons gu. 

Archer. Sa. three pheons ar. 

Arches (Devonshire). Gu. three door arches ar. their capi- 
tals and pedestals or (another, the arches or). 

Arches. Gu. three arches ar. two and one, masoned sa. 

Arches (Grove, co. Nottingham). Erm. a chief az. 

Arches. Gu. three arches or, two single and one double in 
base. 

Archest. Ar. a chev. az. 

Archibald (Blackhall, Scotland). Ar. on a bend az. betw. 
two mullets of the second a crescent of the first. Crest — A 
decrescent ar. Motto — Ut reficiar. 

Archibald (Cadet of BlackhaU). Ar. on a bend betw. two 
stars az. as many crescents of the first within a bordure 
engr. of the second. Crest — A branch of palm tree slipped 
ppr. Motto — Ditat servata fides. 

Archibald (as granted to Sir Thomas Dickson Akcoibald, 
Knt., one of the Judges of the Court of Queen's Bench, son 
of the late Hon. Samuel George Archibald, Master of the 
Bolls, Nova Scotia, and younger brother of Cbakles Dixon 
Arcbibald, Esq. of Rusland Hall, co. Lancaster, originally 
from Scotland, but settled for several generations at 
Coleraine, co. Londonderry, Ireland). Ar. on a bend az. 
betw. two estoiles of the last three crescents of the first all 
within a bordure invecled sa. charged with three mullets, 
or. Crest — A palm branch slipped in bend ppr., in front 
thereof a mount vert thereon an estoile or. Motto — Palma 
non sine pulvere. 

Arcy. Sa. a fesse or. 

Ard. See Aihd. 

Ardaff. Sa. a bar gemels betw. six mullets pierced ar. on a 
chief or, three mullets of the first. Crat — A dcmi Uon ar. 
guttle de sang holding in the paws a lily of three flowers az. 
slipped and leaved vert. 

Arda^h. Sa. two barrulets betw. six mullets ar. on a chief 
or, three martlets of the field. Crest — A demi lion ramp, or, 
peUettee, holding three lilies ar. slipped and leaved vert. 
Motto — Mea gloria fides. 

Ardagh (DubUn, temp. Charles L, Fun. Ent. Ireland). Sa. 
two barrulets betw. six mullets ar. on a chief or, three 
martlets of the field. 

Ardagh, See of. Or, a cross gu. in each quarter a trefoil 
slipped vert on a chief sa. a key erect of the first. 

Ardall, or Ardoll (Essex). Ar. a chev. betw. three 
stars gu. 

Ardan. Party per pale az. and gu. a lion ramp. or. 

Ardborough, Ardeborough, and Ardbo'w. Ar. 
a chev. betw. three escallops gu. (another, sa.). 

Axden {Lord ALvanley, extinct 1857). Gu. three crosses 
croBslet fitch^e fesseways and a chief or. Crest — Out of a 
23 



ducal coronet or, a plume of six ostrich feathers disposeA 
in two tiers of three each ar. Supporters— Two talbots, 
the dexter, ar. collared gu. and thereon three arrows barwise 
ar. ; the sinister, sa. collared ar., and thereon three arrows 
barwise gu. Motto— 'Pa.tientia. vinces. 
Arden, Baron. See Percival. 

Arden (Park Hall, Warwickshire, and Longcroft, Stafford- 
shire, allowed by the Deputies of Camden, Clarenceux, to 
IloBERT Abdek, of I'ark Hall, co. Warwick, 15th in descent 
from SiWARD DE Arden, temp. Henry I., son of Turkill db 
Warwick, and grandson of Alwyn, Earl of Warwick, temp. 
Edward the Confessor, and borne by his descendant Bev. 
H. C. Aeden of Longcroft, co. Stafford. The Visit, of 
Warwick, 1619, states that the Ardens were " meerly English 
of the auncient bloud of the Saxons, and they were before 
the Conquest Lordes of Warwick.") Erm. a fesse chequy or 
and az. Crest — On a chapeau az. turned up erm. a wild boar 
pass. or. Motto — Quo me cunque vocat patria. 
Arden (Watford, co. Northampton, derived from Eostacb db 
Arden, a scion of the Abdens of Warwickshire. John db 
Arderne, grandson of Eustace, had a grant of the honor of 
^Idford, CO. Chester, temp. John, and was progenitor of tho 
Ardens of Cheshire). Gu. a chief or, thereon a label of 
three points az. 
Arden (Sunbury Park, Middlesex, and Rickmansworth Park, 
Herts). Erm. two barrulets compony or and az. in 
chief three boars' heads erased of the last armed of the 
second langued gu. Crest — A mount vert thereon a boar 
pass. ar. sem^e de lis az. langued gu. and armed and 
unguled or. Motto — Doluere dente lacessitii. 
Arden (Blackden Hall, co. Chester). Erm. a fesse cheqnj 
or and az. Crest — On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a boar 
pass. or. Motto— 'Nihil obstavit bunti. 
Arden (East Burnham, co. Bucks). Erm. two bars com- 
pony or, and gu. in chief three boars' heads erased of the 
last. Crest — A boar pass, or, sem^e of fleurs-de-lis gu. Motto 
— Doluere dente lacessiti. 

Arden. Or, three palets az. on a chief gu. as many 
lozenges ar. 

Arden (Cottesford and Kirtlington, co. Oxford, Her. Visit.) 
Erm. a fesse chequy or and az. Crest — A boar pass, 
quarterly or and az. 

Arden (Enston, co. Oxford, Her. Visit.). Same Arms. Crett 
— A lion's gamb. erased gu. holding a cross patt^e fitchfc. 

Arden. Barry of eight or and az. a bordure gu. 

Arden or Arderne (Bedfordshire and Warwickshire). 
Gu. three crosses crosslet fitchee or, on a chief of the second 
a martlet of the first. Crest — A plume of feathers az. 
charged with a martlet or. 

Arder, or Ardern. Erm. a fesse gu. charged with three 
cinquefoils or (another, pierced). 

Arderley. Ar. on a bend gu. betw. two lions' heads erased 
sa. three crosses crosslet or. 

Arderne (Sutton in Priestbury, co. Chester, a branch of 
Arderne or Arden of Alvanley, now represented in tho 
female line by Latham of Bradwall). Gu. three crosses 
crosslet fitchee and a chief or. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet 
ppr. a plume of three ostrich feathers gu. turned, down or, 
and surmounted by a similar plume. Another Crest — Out of 
a ducal coronet or, seven feathers ar. tipped gu. 

Arderne (Timperley co. Chester, the heiress m. Geo.Brere- 
TON, of Ashley, circa 1580). Gu. six crosses crosslet fitchee 
and a chief or. Crest — Two plumes of ostrich feathers or, 
turned down gu. the second plume rising over the first, and 
the whole issuing from a ducal coronet ppr. 

Arderne, Arden, or Ardren (Ireland). Per pale az. 
and gu. a lion ramp. ar. armed of the second. 

Arderne (Warwickshire). Erm. a fesse chequy or, and 
az. Crest — On a chapeau az. turned up erm. a bear pass. or. 

Arderne (Staffordslure and Warwickshire). Same Arms, 
field ar. 

Arderne (Warwickshii'e). Ar. a fesse chequy or and az. 
betw. three crescents gu. CreH — A boar pass. or. 

Arderne. Gu. three crosses patt^e fitchee, and a chief or. 
Crest — Out of a case or bandage or, a plume of feathers ar. 

Arderne. Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet fitch€e 
sa. a bordure engr. gobony of the field and the second. 

Arderne. Ar. three chev. az. within a bordure engr. gu. 

Arderne. Erm. on a fesse gu. three lozenges or. 

Arderne. Sa. three lions pass. or. 

Arderne. Or, a chief az. 

Arderne. Or, scmde of crosslets a lion ramp. sa. 

Arderne. Gu. three crosses botton^e fitchee or. 

Arderne. Same Anns, with a chief engr. op. 

Arderne. Erm. a chief chequy or and az. 

Arderne. Ar. a lion ramp. az. oppressed with a bend gu. 

Arderne. Vert a lion ramp, or, armed and langued gu. 



ABD 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AKU 



Ardeme. Vert a lion ramp, or, crowned az. 

Ardes (Sharington, co. Bucks.). Ar. a bend between six 

mullets (another, martlets) sa. Crest— Within a catharine- 

wheel sa. ducaDy crowned or, a sun in splendour. 
Ardes. The same as above. Crest— A Catharine wheel or, 

pierced sa. ducaily crowned of the first. 
Ardesley. Ar. a fcsse fusU^e gu. in chief three bulls' 

heads couped sa. 
Artiing-ton (Berkshire and Leicestershire). Az. two lions 

pass. or. 
Ardington. Or, two lions pass. sa. 
Ardin^on, or Arthington (Yorkshire). Or, a fcsse 

betw. three escallops gu. Crest — A dove and olive branch 

Ardington. Ar. & fesse betw. three escallops sa. 
Ardis. Ar. a bend az. Crest — A demi-lion gu. in the 
sinister paw a rose or, leaved vert. 

Ardley (London). Quarterly, per fcsse indented ar. and gu. 
on a bend engr. az. betw. two eagles displ. or, a fret of the 
last enclosed by two doves ppr. 

ArdoU. See Abdall. 

Ardon (Essex). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three stars ffu. 

Ardonff and Ardonse (Essex). Ar. a chev. betw. three 
stars gu. 

ArdyzL (Kent). The same as Akdebne, Staffordshire. 

Ardyn, or Ardem. Or, a lion ramp, within an orle of 
eittht crosses crosslet sa. (another, the field ar. and an orle 
of ten crosses crosslet sa.). 

Ardys. Ar. a bend betw. six mullets sa. 

Are. Az. on a cross ar. five escallops gu. 

Areas. Sa. three fleurs-de-lis ar. 

Ares. Ar. a chev. 8a._ 

Arey. Gu. three bird's or. 

Arey. Sa. a fesse or. 

Arfane. Gu. a bend or, cottised ar. 

Arfece, Arfois, or Arforce. Ar. three castles gu. 
Crest — A scaling ladder az. 

Argrall (Much-Baddow and Low-Hall, co. Essex). Per fesse 
ar. and vert a pale counterchanged three lions' heads 
erased gu. Crest — A sphinx with wines expanded ppr. 
Anotlur Crest — ^An arm embowed in armour ppr. supporting 
a battle-axe. 

Arg'all (Ireland). Same Arms and Oe«<. 

Argrall (East Sutton). Same Arms and Crest. 

Argrall (Lancaster). Per fcsse or and vert a pale counter- 
changed on tlie first and fourth quarters a lion's liead 
erased gu. on the second and third an acorn slipped gold. 

Argall, Argrel, or Argill. Per fesse or and sa. three 
palets counterchanged, as many lions' heads erased gu. 
Crest — A lion's head erased ppr. 

Argrall, or Argrnall. Or, a Hon ramp, regard, az. 

Arg'all.. Ar. a chev. betw. three martlets sa. 

Arganor. Sa. a chevaUer in full armour with balbert 
ppr. 

Argent (John Argent, of London, Doctor of Physic, temp. 
Charles I.). Gu. three covered cups and a chief ar. 

Argentine (Cambridge and Huntingdon, summoned to 
Parliament, 1297). Gu. three covered cups ar. Crest — A 
demi lion gu. holding a covered cup. Gtles de Argen- 
tine held the manor of Wymondeley, co. Cambridge, by 
grand serjeantry, viz. to serve the King at his coronation 
with a silver cup. 

Argenton (Cambridge). Gu. pcm^e of crosses crosslet, 
three cups covered ar. 

Argenton. Gu. three covered cups betw. nine crosses 
crosslet fitchfe ar. 

Argentyne. Gu. a cross lozengy or, in the first quarter 
an eagle displ. ar. 

Argles (llev. Marsqam Arcles, canon of Peterborough, 
and Fbank AtkinsoS Arqles, Esq., of Eversley, Miln- 
thorpe, Westmoreland, J. P., D.L., sons of late Capt. George 
Arcles, K.N.). Per fcss ar. and vert a pale counterchanged, 
three lions' heads erased gu. Cicsl — A lion's head erased 
gu. Molto-VaXrix non sibi. 

ArgTim, or Argnine. Ar. a chev. betw. three mart- 
lets sa. CreH — A hand erect issuing from a cloud holding 
a book expanded ppr. 

AjcfcyW, Duke of. See Campret.l. 

AjK-yll, See of. Az. two croziers in saltire or, and in 
chief a mitre of the last. 

Ariel, or Ariell. Or, a cornish chouR'.i sa. within an 
orle of ciRht ficurs-de-lis az. Crest — An anchor cabled, and 
■word In aaltire aU ppr. 

Aries Hrcland; granted by Roberts, Ulster, 1C47, to Edward 

Arim, capt. of a company of foot, who landed in Dublin 

28 March, 1647). Vert three rams' heads cabosscd ar. 

attired or. Crul — A satyr holding in the doxtcr hand a 

24 



sword, in the sinister a parlizan, all ppr. JfoMo— Udes 
mihi panoplia. 
Arissel (Cornwall). Gu. a saltire engr. ar. betw. our 

bezants. 
Arkell, or Arkell. Gu. a fesse embattled counter- 
embattled ar. Crest — A griffin sejeant ar. holding in the 
dexter claw a garland of laurel vert. 
Arkin stall. (Cambridgeshire). Erm. a fesse betw. three 
martlets sa. Crest — On a mount vert a greyhound sejeant 
erm. 
Arkley (Dunninald, Forfarshire). Or, on a chev. az. a garb 
of the, first in chief two stars go. Crest— A. rose gu. barbed 
and seeded within two thistles disposed in orle ppr. Motto 
— Bene qui sedulo. 
Arkroyd. See Aokrotd. 

Ark-wnriglit (Sutton Scarsdale, and Willersley, co. Derby, 
Mark Hall, Essex, and Hampton Court, co. Hereford ; granted 
to Sir Richard Arewriqht, Knt. of Sutton Scarsdale, who 
d. 1792). Ar. on a mount vert a cotton tree fructed ppr. on 
a chief az. betw. two bezants an inescutcheon of the field 
charged with a bee volant ppr. Crest — An eagle rising or, 
in its beak an inescutcheon pendant by a ribbon gu. thereon 
a hank of cotton ar. 3/otfo— Multa tuU fecique. 
Arkybus. Ar. on a fesse engr. sa. three mascles or. 

Crest — A lion's head erased ar. 
Arling:. Gu. a fesse vair, in chief a unicorn courant betw. 

two mullets and a bordure engr. or. 
Arlote, or Arlott. Gu. a leopard pass, guard, or, spotted 
sa. Crest — On a chajpeau, a leopard pass, guard, with three 
blades of rushes on each side, all ppr. 
Armagrh, Archbishopric of. Az. an episcopal staff 
ar. ensigned with a cross pat^e or, surmounted by a pall of 
the second, edged and fringed gold, charged with four 
crosses fonnfe-fltch^e sa. 
Armball. Erm. abendcompony ar. and sa. 
Arme. Gu. a naked arm embowed barways ppr. 
Armeny. Az. a lion ramp. erm. (another, ar. crowned or.) 
Armery (of Pavy ; who betrayed Calais). An escutcheon 

reversed az. fbur mullets or, two and two. 
Armes. Or, on a bend az. three bands clenched and 

couped at the wrist of the first. 
Armesbury (tssex). Sa. two dexter arms conjoined in 
fesse ar. betw. three crosses crosslet or (another, the crosses 
botonn^e fitch^e or). Crest — Two hands issuing from 
clouds ppr. 
Armesley. Paly of six ar. and az. over all a bendlet gu. 
Armeston (Leicester). Sa. a chev. betw. three spears' 

heads ar. Crest— A. dragon's head erased ppr. 
Armeston (Burbage, co. Leicester, Her. 'Visit. 1619). Same 
Arms, a crescent for diff. Crest — A dragon's head erased 
vert scaled or, charged with a crescent of the same for diff. 
Armestrong' (Nottinghamshire). Gu. three armed arms 

lying paleways ar. 
Armestrong:. Gu. three arms embowed armed erect 

two and one ar. 
Armig-er, or Armeier (North Creek, co. Norfolk). Az. 
three helmets or, betw. two bars ar. Crest — On a ducal 
coronet or, a tiger sejant gu. crined and tufted gold. 
Armigrer (Suffolk). Az. a fcsse cottised ar. betw. three 

close helmets or. 
Armiger. Erm. a griffin az. armed gu. 
Armigrer. Per pale az. and or, a griflin segreant, counter- 
changed. 
Armine (Osgodby, co. Lincoln). Krm. a saltire engr. gu. on 
a chief of the second a lion pass, (another, guard.) or. 
Crest — On a mount vert an ermine ppr. 
Armine (Baroness Belasyse of Osgodby, 1674). Same Arms. 
Armine. Ar. three martlets sa. 

Armistead. Ar. a chev. gu. betw. the points of spears az. 
tasseled in the middle or. Crest — A dexter arm in armour 
embowed ppr. holding the butt end of a broken spear or. 
Motto — Suivez raison. 
Armit, Armuet, or Armet. Az. three helmets close 
ar. a bordure or. Crest — A demi lion ramp. gu. holding 
betw. the paws a helmet as in the arms. Motio—¥oTii& in 
arduis. 
Armitagre (Ireland), Gu. a lion's head erased betw. three 

cro.s.-^os-crosslet ar. 
Armitag'e (Milnsbridge House, co. York). Gu. a lion's 
head erased betw. three cro.ss crosslets ar. Crest — A dexter 
arm embowed couped at the shoulder habited or, cuffed ar. 
holding in the hand ppr. a staff gu. headed and pointed or. 
Motto — Semper paratus. 
Armitage (Sir Elsanad Armitaoe, of the Priory, Pen. 
dleton, near Manchester). Gu. a lion's head erased within 
an orle ar. betw. three crosses potent or. Crest — In 
front of a dexter arm embowed vested gu. cuff ar. the hand 



ABM 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ABN 



grasping the blade of a sword in bend sinister, the point 
downwards, ppr. pomel and hilt or, an escocheon gold, 
charged with a cross potent gii. 
Armitag'e ^Dadnor, CO. Hereford, and Coole, co. Louth; 
as borne by the late Whalet Abmitage, Esq., J. P., and his 
sons, the Rev. Braithwaite Abmitage, J. P., and Abthub 
Abmitage, Esq., J. P., of Dadnor, claiming from the senior 
branch of the Abmitages of Yorkshire). Gu. a lion's head 
erased betw. three cross crosslets ar. Motto — Fractum non 
abjicio ensem. 
Armitagre (Milnsbridge House, co. York). Same Arms as 

Aemttage, Bart. 
Armitage (Keresford Hill, co. York, Visit, co. York, by 
Dugdale, 1665). Gu. a lion's head erased betw. three crosses 
bottonee, and in chief a mullet ar. 
Armitag'e (Egremont, co. Chester). Or, two piles issuant 
from the chief, and one from the base gu. those in chief 
charged with a cross crosslet, and that in base with a lion's 
head erased ar. Crest — An arm bendwise or, vested gu. 
crusily and cuffed gold, holding a holly branch erect 
slipped and fructed ppr. Afot(o— Fortiter et fideliter. 
Armitstead. (Geo. Abmitstead, Esq., now resident at 
Errol Park, Perthshire, J. P. and D.L.. M.P. for Dundee). 
Or, a chev. embattled sa. betw. three pheons gu. a border of 
the last. Crest — A sinister and a dexter arm embowed in 
armour, each hand grasping a spear erect, ppr. Motto— 
Ever ready. 
Armitstead (granted 1799 to the Rev. John Abmitstead, 
of Middlewich, co. Chester, and his descendants, and to 
the other descendants of his grandfather, John Abmit- 
stead, of Horton, co. York, gent.).' Or, a chev. counter- 
embattled sa. betw. three pheons az. two flaunches gu. each 
charged with a tilting spear erect of the field headed ar. 
Crest— X dexter and sinister arm embowed in armour, each 
hand grasping a spear erect ppr. 
Arm.O. Quarterly, or and gu. in the 1st and 4th 
quarter, a lozenge of the second. Crest — Three passion nails 
ppr. one in pale and two in saltire. 
Armony. Gu. a bend ar. (another, erm.) betw. six be- 
zants. Crest — A stag. gu. 
Armony. Az. a bend enn. betw. six bezants. Crest — A 

stag gu. 
Armorer (London). Gu. on a chev. ar. betw. three sinister 
gauntlets or, two palets betw. three half fleurs-de-lis split 
paleways. 
Armorer (Sir Nicholas Aemobeb, Knt., Ireland). Gu. a 
chev. betw. thre« dexter arms in armour embowed and 
couped ar. Crest — A gauntlet bendwise holding the shaft of 
a tilting spear broken, all ppr. 
Armory (Kerry, Ireland). Paly nebulae of six ar. and gu. 
on a chief of the first a lion pass, guard, of the second. 
Crest— An eagle's head or. 
Armour (Scotland). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three arms 
in armour fesseways ppr. embowed of the second three 
mullets of the first. Crest — A dexter hand holding an 
esquire's helmet, all ppr. Afo^io— Cassis tutissima virtus. 
Armourer. Barry of four counter-cscalloped ar. and gu. 

each scule nailed sa. 
Arm.ourers, Company of. (London, borne on the 
dexter side of the escutcheon, impaling on the sinister the 
ensigns of the Braziers [refer to that name], with which 
company it is now incorporated). Ar. on a chev. sa. a 
gauntlet of the first betw. two pair of swords in saltire of 
the last, hilts and pomels or, on a chief of the second an 
oval shield of the field, charged with a cross gu. encircled 
with a carved shield of the third betw. two peers' helmets 
ppr. garnished gold. Crest — A demi man of arms armed ar. 
open-faced, porflcd or, holding in his hand a mace of war. 
Armstrecll. Ar. an arm extended and couped, vested gu. 

buttoned the whole length sa. 
Armstrong' (Parknowe, Scotland). Az. a fesse or, betw. 
two arms armed couped at the shoulder ar. Ci'est — An 
arm issuing out of a cloud holding a club ppr. Motto — 
Invicta labore. 
Armstrong (Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire). Gu. 
three dexter arms vambraced ar. hands ppr. Crest — A 
dexter arm vambraced in armour, the hand ppr. 
Armstrong (Sir Ricbabd Abmstbong, knt. of Lincoln, col. 
in the army, and C.B.). Arms, &c. as preceding, the hand 
of the crest holding a leg in annour couped at the thigh ppr. 
Armstrong. Sa. three dexter arms conjoined at the 
shoulders and flexed in triangle or, turned up (or cuffed) ar. 
the hands clenched ppr. 
Armstrong. Ar. three torteaux. 

Armstrong (Bart, of Gallen Priory, King's Co.). Quar- 
terly, 1st and 4th, ar. issuing from the sinister side a dexter 
arm habited gu. the hand grasping the trunk of an oak tree 
25 



eradicated and broken at the top ppr. ; 2nd and 3rd, ar. 
three pallets az. Crest — An armed arm embowed, the hand 
grasping the broken trunk of an oak tree eradicated all ppr. 
Motto — Invictus maneo. 

Armstrong (Mount Heaton, King's Co.). See Macdonnell, 
of New Hall, co. Clare. 

Armstrong (Rev. Benjamin John Abmstrong. M.A., vicar 
of East Dereham, co. Norfolk). Gu. in pale three dexter 
arms vambraced in armour ar. hands closed ppr. Crest — An 
arm in armour, as in the Arvis. Motto — Vi et armis. 

Armstrong (Willow Bank, co. Clare). Gu. three arms in 
armour vambraced hands ppr. Crest — An arm vambraced. 
ppr. Motto — In Deo robur mens. 

Armstrong- (Ballycumber, Claia, Ireland). Gu. three 
dexter arms vambraced ar. hands ppr. Crest— A dexter 
arm vambraced in armotir ar. the hand ppr. Motto — 
Viet armis. 

Armstrong: (Hemsworth, co. York). Same as Abmstkong 
of Ballycumber. 

Armstrong' (Ballyard, King's Co.). Gu. three dexter arms 
vambraced p|)r. the fists closed. Crest— An armed ana 
holding a broken tilting spear ppr. 

Armstrong (Termonfechan, co. Louth). Per pale, gu. 
and vert three dexter armed arms couped at the shoulders 
and embowed the hands clenched ppr. Crest — Out of a 
mural coronet or, an armed arm embowed the hand grasp- 
ing an oak tree eradicated ppr. Motto — Invictus maneo. 

Armstrong- (Mangerton, co. Roxburgh). Ar. three pallets 
az. Crest— An arm from the shoulder armed ppr. 

Armstrong (Whittoch, co. Roxburgh). Ar. three pallets 
sa. Crest — An arm from the shoulder gu. Motto — Invictus 
maneo. 

Armyn (Cornwall). Or, a chev. betw. three escallops az. 

Armyn. Gu. six roses ar. three, two, and one. 

Armyne. See Abmine. 

Arniytage (Kirklees, co. York, bart.) Gu. a lion's head 
erased betw. three crosses crosslet ar. Crest — A dexter arm 
embowed couped at the shoulder vested or, cuff ar. holding 
in the hand ppr. a staff gu. garnished gold. Motto—Sempev 
paratus. 

Armytage (London and Yorkshire). Ar. three crosses 
boionn^e gu. Crest — A demi lion ar. holding in the dexter 
paw a cross botonn^e gu. 

Armytage (Yorkshire). Az. a lion's head erased betw. 
three crosses crosslet or. 

Arnais (France). Ar. a cross sa. 

Arnald, or Arnauld. Az. a chev. betw. three palm 
branches or. Cre^t — A demi cat guard, ppr. 

Arnalt. Gu. a stork in trian aspect to the sinister ar. on a 
moimt vert in base. 

Ameford, or Arnford. Az. three bars or, a bordurc 
erm. 

Arneil (Scotland, 16th century). Ar. two serpents linked 
together in pale az. betw. two mullets in fess gu. 

Arnes (Cornwall). Vert five martlets ar. two, two, and one. 

Arnest (Devonshire). Ar. three holly leaves barways, two 
and one, the stalk towards the dexter part of the escutcheon 
ppr. 

Arnest. Ar. a holly-leaf ppr. 

Arnett, or Arnott. Gyronny of eight sa. and or, on a 
chief ar. a galley the sails furled of the first flags gu. Cregt — 
On a tower ppr. a flag displ. az. 

Arne-way, or Arnaway, and Arnold (Buckingham- 
shire). Ar. three escallops sa. Crest — A crosier or. 

Arnewood (Hampshire). Erm. on a bend betw. two cottises 
az. three lions pass. or. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet a 
demi leopard. 

Amey (Chambury, co. Dorset). Ar. a fesse compony or, 
and az. in chief three martlets gu. Crest — On a mural 
crown or, three arrows through a human heart two in sal- 
tire and one in pale ar. 

Arnford. See Aenefoed. 

Arnold (Devonshire). Sa. a chev. betw. three dolphins em- 
bowed ar. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet an antelope's 
head. 

Arnold (Cromer, co. Norfolk and Ballesford, co. Suffolk). 
Arms the same. Crest— A dolphin embowed ar. 

Arnold (Gloucestershire, granted 1653). Gu. a chev. erm, 
betw. three pheons or. 

Arnold (Gloucestershire). Gu. a cher. erm. betw. thre« 
escallop shells or. 

Arnold (Chilwick, co. Hertford). Gu. a chev. quarterly 
erm. and ermines, betw. three pheons or. Crest— An eagle's 
head erased gu. gorged with a mural coronet ar. holding in 
the beak an acorn, slipped, leaved vert. 

Arnold (Huntingdonshire). Sa. two lions pass. or. 

Arnold (London, granted 31 December, 1612). Gu. three 



ASK 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AST 



pbeons ar. on a chief of the second a bar nebulee az. Crest 
—A demi tiger sa. bezant^e, maned and tufted or, holding a 
broad arrow shaft gu. feathers and pheon ar. 
Arnold (little Missenden Abbey, co. Buclis). Same as pre- 
ceding. J J r 
Arnold (Ashbj Lodge, co. Northampton, descended from 
BicHARD Abhold, of ArmsweU, co. Dorset, Esq., d. 1595.) 
Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three pheons or, quartering Cope. 
Crest— A demi leopard reguard. ppr. bezants holding a 
pheon or. Motto— Vt vivas vigila. 
Arnold. Gu. a chev. betw. three pheons or. 
Arnold. Az. a lion ramp. ar. 
Arnold. Gu. a chev. ermines betw. three pheons or. Crest 

—A demi tiger ar. pellett^ betw. the paws a fire-ball sa. 
Amot (of that Ilk, co File, bart., 1629). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. 

two mullets in chief and a crescent in base gu. 
Arnot (Ferny, co. Fife, assumed the name of Balfour on 
marrying the dau. and heiress of the first Lord Balfour of 
Burleigh). Az. a chev. betw. three mullets ar. a crescent 
for diff. 
Arnot (Balcormo, co. Fife). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three 
mullets gu. a bordure indented of the second. Motto — 
Spcratum et completum. 
Aniot (East Bynd, co. Fife). As the last, the bordure 
charged with eight crescents of the field. il/o«o — Com- 
pletur. 
Amot (Arlary, co. Kinross, 1817). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. two 
mullets in chief and a fret couped of four pieces in base 
charged with as many hearts or, and in every interstice a 
rose of the third. Crest— A crescent or. Motto — Speratum 
et completum. 
Arnott (Fermanagh). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. in chief two 
mullets and in base a .crescent gu. Crest— An arm erect in 
armour the hand grasping a dagger all ppr. Jtfotto— Spe- 
ratum et completum. 
Arnoul. Gu. an anvil ar. 
Arnulfe. Az. an anvil or. 
Amway (Lincolnshire). Quarterly, az. and ar. a saltire 

engr. counterchanged. Crest — A crosier or. 
Amway. Az. in chief a mullet betw. two crescents or, in 

base a fish naiant ppr. 
Amway. Ar. three escallopssa. 
Amyston. Or, six lozenges sa. 
Arpe. £rm. on a bend betw. two crosses sa. three lozenges 

ar. 
Arpin. Sa. a cross ancred ar. Crest— An arm in armour 

holding a holly branch, all ppr. 
Arquill . Per fesse or and vert a pale three lions' heads 

erased and as many oak slips all counterchanged. 
Arran, Earl of. See Goke. 

Arras (Buckinghamshire). Ar. on a cross sa. four fleurs-de- 
lis or. 
Arras. Ar. on a cross az. five fleurs-de-lis or. 
Arras. Ar. on a cross az. five fleurs-de-lis or, a bordure 
engr. of the second. Oest— On a tower gu. embattled or, a 
lion 8 head of the last. 
Arras. Erm. a chev. sa. (another, gu.). 
Arrat (of that Ilk, Scotland). Az. three crosses patt^ fitch^e 
or, two and one, and as many stars ar. one and two. Crest — 
A dexter hand holding a Rword erected ppr. hilted and pom- 
melled or. Motto — Antiquam assero decus. 
Arrell. Or, a Cornish chough ppr. a bordure ar. charged 

with eight fleurs-de-lis az. 
Arrepon. Chequy or and az. on a fesse ar. three martlets 

sa. 
Arressell. Gu. a saltire engr. or, between four bezants. 
Arrov^ood, or Arwood (Lancashire). Ar. three conies 
az. (another, three conies courant). Crest — A savage, his 
ciub in the right hand resting on the wreath ppr. 
Arrowsmyth (Uuntiqgfleld Hall, co. Suffolk). Gu. two 
broad arrows in saltire or, feathered ar. betw. four lions' 
heads eraied and crowned of the second. Crest — Seven 
arrows ppr. entiled with a ducal coronet or. 
Arrovrsmyth (Lancashire). Ar. five billets in fcsse sa. 

betw. three pheons gu. 
Arsacke. Gu. a bmd cottised or. 
Arsacke, or Arsake. Gu. a bend or, cottised ar. 
Arscott (Norton in Launcels, Cornwall, and Annery, co. 
Devon). Per chev. az. and erm. in chief two bucks' heads 
caboiscd or. Crest — A demi man in a Turkish habit looking 
forward, in his dexter hand a scimctar held over his head, 
and the sinister resting on a tiger's bead, issuing out of the 
wreath. 
Arscott (originally of Holsworthy, and subsequently of 
Dunxlanrl, Devon). Per chev. az. and erm. in chief two bucks' 
heads cabossed or. 
Araick. quarterly, gu. and or, on • bordure sa. eight bulls' 
26 



heads couped ar. Crest — A talbot sejant ppr. rest'ing the 

dexter paw upon a shield gu. 
Arsie. Az. a quarter or. 
Arsnick. Ar. a chief indented sa. 
Arsycke. Ar. (another, or) a chief indented sa. Crest— 

The same as Aesick. 
Art (Greenwich, Kent). Az. two piles bendways, the one 

dexter, the other sinister, each charged with an anchor sa. 

betw. three plates, one in chief and two in base. 
Artas. Sa. three fleurs-de-lis or. 
Arth.awe. Sa. two flaunches ar. in chief a bar gemel of the 

second. 
Arthekill. Gu. six mullets pierced (another, martlets) ar. 

three, two, and one. 
Arther. Erm. a cross sa. Creit — A mullet of six points gu. 
Arthington (Arthington, West Biding, Yorkshire). The 

same as Ardington. 
Arthingrton (Yorkshire). Sa. a fesse betw. three escallops 

ar. Crest — A dove holding an olive branch ppr. 
Arthington (Yorkshire). Or, a fesse betw. three escallops 

gu- 
Arthoby. Sa. on a chief ar. three chess rooks of the first. 
Arthur (Bart, created 1841). Or, on a chev. az. betw. two 
clarions in chief gu. and a kangaroo sejant in base ppr. 
two swords the points upwards also ppr. points and huts 
of the first, on a chief of the third a horse courant ar. 
Crest — In front of two swords in saltier ppr. pommels and 
hilts or, a pelican in her piety sa. the nest gold. Motto— 
Stet fortuna domOs. 
Arthur (granted to John Abthub, Lord Mayor of Dublin, 3 
Oct. 1606). Gu. a chev. ar. betw. three rests or, on each fis 
many hurts. Crest — A falcon volant ppr. jessed and belled 
or. 
Arthur (Springfield, co. Essex). Gu. a chev. betw. three 
rests (or clarions) or. Crest — A pelican in her piety sa. 
standing in her nest or. (Her. Off. Essex, c. 21). 
Arthur (Clopton, co. Somerset). The same Arms. 
Arthur (Wales). Sa. three cocks and a chief ar. 
Arthur. Gu. a chev. betw. three clarions or. Crest — An 
eagle sa. in her nest or, feeding her young of the first, on 
her breast a crescent. 
Arthur. Sa. three chess rooks and a chief ar. (another, 

the chief or). 
Arthur. Gu. a chev. ar. betw. three bowls or. 
Arthxir. Sa. three wheels in chief ar. 
Arthur. Sa. three wheels ar. a chief or. 
Arthur (Shanakiel House, Cork). Gu. a chev. erm. betw. 
three rests or. Crest — A falcon wings addorsed az. belled 
or. Motto — Impelle obstantia. 
Arthur (Ireland). Gu. a chev. betw. three Irish brogues 

or. Crest A demi savage reguard. ppr. 
Arthur (Glanomera, co. Clare : Settled there for many gene- 
rations. In 1659, Edward Arthcb was M.P. for Limerick, 
and Thomas Arthur in 1585.) Gu. a chev. betw. three 
rests (or clarions) or, quartering the ensigns of the noble 
house of Ormonde : the present Mr. Arthdb's grandmother 
having been heiress to the Butlers of Kilmoyler. Ci-est — A 
falcon volant ppr. jessed and belled or. 
Arthur (granted to Francis Bobert Arthcb, Esq. of 
Blackburn in Somerset, colony of Tasmania, and of Draytoa 
Manor in co. Dalhousie, colony of Victoria, AustraUa). Or, 
on a chev. betw. three escocheons gu. each charged with a 
clarion of the first as many quatrefoils also gold. Crest 
— Upon the capital of an Ionic column ppr. a pelican in her 
piety sa. (the nest ppr.) charged on the wing with a quatre- 
foil or. Motto — Teneo tenuere majores. 
Arthur (Leven Bank, Scotland, 1803). Sa. on a chief erm. 
three cocks ppr. Crest— A peUcan feeding her young ppr. 
in a nest vert. Motto — Fac et spera. 
Arthur (Jas. Arthur, K.G.H., deputy inspector general of 
hospitals, 1837). Gu. on a chev. hetw. two claricords in chief 
and a galley sail furled and oars in action in base or, a thistle 
ppr. Crest — A pelican feeding her young ppr. ar. in a nest 
vert. Motto — Nil durum volenti. 
Arthur (W. B. Arthur, Lord Provost of Glasgow, 1870). Ar. 
a chev. betw. two masclcs in chief and a cross crosslet fitchfie 
in base gu., in middle chief a redbreast ppr. Crest — A peli- 
can in her piety, fuUfaced, wings elevated feeding her young 
in a nest all ppr. Motto — Fac et spera. 
Artillery Company (London). Ar. on a cross gu. a lion 
pass, guard, or, on a chief az. a portcullis of the third 
betw. two ostrich feathers of the first. Crest — A dexter 
arm in armour cml>owed ppr. garnished or, holding in a 
gauntlet a truiling-pike or leading-staff ppr. tasselled gold 
all betw. two dragons' wings expanded ar. each charged with 
a cross gu. Supporters— Dexter, a man ppr. his head 
and body in armour, his arms habited in huff, breeches gu. 



ART 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ASH 



Stoclcings ar. shoes ppr. holding in his exterior hand a pike. 
Sinister, a man ppr. habited as the dexter, except the 
armour on the body, this having a coat of buff ppr. over his 
left shoulder and under his right arm a belt strung with 
cartouches gu. in his sinister hand a musket erect, a resting 
staff and match-rope, and at his side a schimetar, all ppr. 
Motto — Arma pacis fulcra. 

Artked. Ar. on a fesse sa. three lozenges or. Crest — A 
dexter arm from the shoulder couped and resting on the 
elbow ppr. holding a cross crosslet fitchde in pale sa. 

Arton. Or, on a chev. sa. five fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest — \ 
candlestick or. 

Artus. Sa. an eagle close or. Crest — An eagle's head, in 
the beak a quill ppr. 

Arundel (Baron Jrundel of Trerlce; created 16G4; extinct 
1773). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, sa. six swallows close, 
three, two, and one ar. Cmt — On a chapeau gu. turned up 
erm. a swallow ar. Supporters — Two panthers reguard. or, 
spotted of various colours with fire issuing out of their 
mouths and ears. Motto — Nulli proeda. 

Arundel (Harris-Arundel, Menedarva, and Trengwainton, 
Cornwall, and Lifton Park, Devon), Sa. six swallows ar. 
three, two, and one, quartering Habris (for which see that 
name). Crest — First, a stag's head ppr. horned or ; second, 
on a chapeau sa. turned up erm. a martlet ar. Mottoes — 
De hirundine, and Nulli proeda. 

Arundel (Sir Wiluam Abundel, K.G., temp. Richard II., 
son of Sir John Abcndel, Marshal of England, by Eleanor 
his wife, granddau. and heiress of Lord Maltbavebs, and 
grandson of Richabd Fitzalan, 5th Earl of Arundel, by 
Lady Eleanor Plantagenet, his wife, dau. of Henbt, Earl of 
Lancaster: from Garter Plate remaining, the second stall 
Sovereign's side). Quarterly: 1st and 4th, gu. a lion ramp. 
or, for Fitzalan, 2nd and 3rd, sa. a fret or, for Maltravers. 
Crest — Out of a ducal coronet gu. turned up erm. a griffin's 
head ar. beaked of the first. 

Arundel, To-wm of (Sussex). Ar. a swallow volant in 
bend sinister sa. 

Arundel, Earl of. See Fitzalan and Howard. 

Arundell (Baron Anindell of Wardour). Sa. six swallows 
ar. three, two, and one. Crest — A wolf pass. ar. Sup- 
porters — Dexter, a lion guard, erminois ducally crowned 
or: sinister, an owl ar. wings disclosed or, crowned as the 
dexter. Moiio—Deo date. 

Arundell (Monckton-Arundell, Viscount Galway). Quar- 
terly: 1st and 4th, sa. six swallows three, two, and one, ar., 
for Abundell; 2nd and 3rd, sa. on a chev. betw. three 
martlets or, as many mullets of the field, for Monckton. 
Crests— Abcndell, On a chapeau az. turned up erm. a 
swallow ar. Monckton, A martlet or. Supporters — Two 
unicorns erm. crined armed and unguled and each gorged 
with an Eastern diadem or. Motto — Famam extendere 
factis. 

Arundell. Purp. two flanches, the dexter per fesse in 
chief chequy or and az. in base gu. a lion ramp, or, the 
sinister per fesse in chief gu. a lion ramp, or, in base 
chequy or and az. 

Arundell. Gu. a lion ramp, or, armed and langued az. 

Arundell. Az. a lion ramp, or, a bordure of the second. 

Arundell. Barry of six or and az. a saltire gu. 

Arward, or Arwood. Ar. three hares current in pale az. 

Arwennack. Ar. three mascles gu. 

Arwood. See Abbowood. 

Asbitter. Sa. a bittern ar. 

Asbone. Erm. on a cross gu. five bezants. 

Asborne. Gu. a fesse betw. six martlets ar. Crest — A lion's 
gamb erect holding a flag ar. charged with an eagle displ. 
sa. 

Ascham (London). Gu. a fesse or, betw. three dolphins 
naiant embowed ar. 

Aschavr. Ar. a molehill in base sa. 

Asche. Az. three pigeons (or doves) ar. two and one, beaked 
and membered gu. 

Asche, Aschey, or Ascher. Or, a fesse az. over all a 
saltire gu. Crest — A ship in full sail ppr. 

Ascheby. Ar. a lion sa. billett^e or. 

Ascheley. Quarterly ar. and gu. a bend sa. 

Aschey. See Asche. 

Ascley. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. charged on the shoulder with 
a cinqiiefoil of the first a label of three points az. 

Ascon. Ar. on a chief sa. three lozenges of the field. Crest 
— A mascle ar. 

Ascot. Per chev. az. and or, in chief two bucks' heads of 
the second. 

Ascott. See Abscott. 

Ascoug'h. See Atscough. 

27 



Ascoum. Or, on a chief az. a lion ramp. ar. 
Ascue (Lincolnshire). Sa. a fesse betw. three asses ar. 
Ascue (Lincolnshire). Ar. a fesse gu. betw. three asses" 

heads couped sa. 
Ascue. Gu. on a fesse engr. betw. three asses' heads couped 

or, a cross patt^e and two martlets az. 
Ascum. Ar. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis sa. Crest— A 

fleur-de-lis sa. 
Asdale. Gu. a swan ar. 

Asea. Or, two bars gu. on each a shrimp naiant ar. 
Aselocke, or Aslake (Suffolk). Az. a chev. erm. betw. 

three Catharine wheels ar. Crest — A talbot's head sa. guttle- 

d'eau. 
Aserburn. See Ashebbubn. 
Asgil. Az. three asses' heads erased ar. 
Asg'ile (London, 1761 ; afterwards of Fawley, co. Hants, 

bart.). Per fesse ar. and vert a pale countcrchangcd in 

chief two lions' heads erased gu. Crest — A sphinx wings 

endorsed ar. crined or. Motto— Sm oblitus commodi. 
Ash (Fun. Ent. of Robert Ash, of Naas, co. Kildare, d. 1608). 

Gu. three mews ar. legged and beaked or, each holding in his 

beak an ash leaf slipped vert. 
Ash (Sheriff of Dublin, 1593, Visit. Dub. 1607). Arms same 

as preceding, a crescent or, for diff. 
Ash (.\sh, temp. Elizabeth, Fun. Ent. of Sir Richard Bolton 

Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1639, whose mother was dau. of 

Richard Ash, Esq., of Ash). Az. a saltire ar. debruised by 

a fcss erm. 
Ash. Or, three bars az. Cre^t — An old man's head sidefaceJ 

ppr. wreathed on the head and stringed or and az. 
Ash. Or, a fesse az. depressed by a saltire gu. Crest — On a 

rock a goose, wings endorsed ppr. 
Ash (co. Warwick, granted by Dcthick, Garter, confirmed 

by St. George, Clarenceux, to Joseph Ash, of Coventry, son 

of Joseph Ash, and grandson of Hugh Ash, of the same). 

Ar. two chev. sa. Crest — A cockatrice gu. 
Ashafen. Ar. on a cross patriarchal gu. another or. 
Ashaw (Lancashire). Or, on a chev. betw. three martlets- 
vert, as many crosses crosslet fitchfo ar. 
Ashaw. Ar. on a chev. betw. three martlets vert as many 

crosses pattde fitch^e of the first. 
Asha'W (Roger Ashaw, Esq. of Hill, co. Lancaster, 1 Edward 

IV. 1461., Reg. Peds. Ulster's office). Vert on a chev. betw. 

three martlets or, a cross form^e fitch^e of the field. 
Ashawe (Lancashire. Granted 1599). Arms as the last. 

Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, an arm embowed habited 

with green leaves, holding in the hand a cross patt^e 

fitch^e ar. 
Ashbee. Az. a chev. or, betw. three eagles displ. with two 

heads ar. Crest — An eagle displ. with two heads, as in the 

arms. Motto — Be just, and fear not. 
Ashberton. Per fesse ar. and sa. a greyhound and mule 

within a bordure engr. all counterchanged. 
Ashberton. Az. a talbot pass, or, coUared gu. Crest — On 

a chapeau ppr. a communion cup or. 
Ashborne. Ar. on a fesse betw. three crescents gu. as 

many mullets or (another, the mullets ar). 
Ashborne, or TJshbtirne (Ireland). Ar. on a bend sa. 

three towers triple-towered of the field. Crest — A tower 

triple-towcrcd ppr. 
Ashbrenham. See Ashbuenham. 
Ashbridg-e Monastery (Bucks). Gu. on an altar-tomb 

a lamb pass, guard, ar. cairying a banner of the last charged 

with a cross of the first, resting the dexter fore-foot on a 

mound or. 
Ashbroke, or Ashbrook. Vaire ar. and sa. a chev. gu. 
Ashbrook, Viscount. See Flower. 
Ashburner (.\shburner and India; Dalton-in-Fumess, co. 

Lancaster). Ar. a fesse (sometimes charged with three 

mullets of the field) betw. three crescents gu. quartering 

MonLTON, &c. Crest— An ash tree ppr. Motto — Actio 

virtutis laus. 
Ashburner (Furncss, Lancashire). Ar. on a fesse betw. three 

crescents gu. as many mullets or. Crest — An ash tree ppr. 

Motto — Quicquid crescit in cinere perit. 
Ashburner (from a seal of William Asbbubnes, governor 

of Poonah, India, b. 1737). Ar. on a fesse betw. three cres- 
cents gu. three mullets of the field. Crest — An ash tree vert. 
Ashburnham {Enrl of Ashbumham). Gu. a fesse betw. 

six mullets ar. C>-est — Out of a ducal coronet or, an ash tree 

ppr. Sup20orters — Two greyhounds sa. their faces, breasts, 

and feet ar. collared and lined or. Motto — Le roy et I'estat. 
Ashburnham (Broomham, co. Sussex, hart.). Ar^ns and 

Crest as the last. Motto —Will God, and I shall. 
Ashburnham (Hampshire). Gu. on a fesse betw. six. 

mullets ar. a crescent sa. for diff. 



ASH 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ASH 



Ashburnham (Sussex and Suffolk). Gu. a fesse ar. betw. 
six plates. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet ar an ash tree 
fructed ppr. Motto — Will God, and I shall. 
Ashburnham. Gu. a fesse betw. three mullets ar. 
AshbTirnham. Ar. on a fesse betw. three crescents gu. 

as many mullets or. 
Ashburnham, or Ashbrenham. Az. a fesse betw. 
three martlets ar. (another, the fesse or). Crest— A griffin's 
head ppr. collared ar. 
Aahburton, Baron. See Bakisg. 

Ashburton, Town of (Devonshire). A church with a 
spire, on the dexter chief the sun in splendour, on the sinister 
a crescent ; at the dexter end of the church three ears of corn 
on one stalk, at the sinister end a saltire. 
Ashbury (Worcester). Gu. a fesse betw. three mullets ar. 
Ashbury. Per. chev. gu. and ar. in chief three martlets of 
the last and in base on a mound vert an ash tree ppr. fructed 
of the first. Crest — A lion's gamb. erased or, holding a spear 
pendant therefrom a flag ar. thereon a martlet gu. Motto— 
.Squitate ac diUgentia. 
Ashbury. See Asubodbne. 

Ashby (Quenby HaU, co. Leicester, Her. Visit. 1619, seated 
there since the U<th century). Az. a chev. erm. betw. 
three leopards' faces or, quartering Ashley of Lowesby, 
BCBDET, ZoDCH, and Shdkbobgh. Crest — Out of a mural 
crown ar. a Uon's face affrontge or. Aiwtlier Crest— (Cam- 
den's Grants, 1602). On a mural coronet ar. a leopard's 
face or. Motto— Be just, and fear not. 
Ashby (Xaseby, co. Northampton). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, 
az. a chev. erm. betw. three leopards' faces or, for Ashby ; 
2nd and 3rd, per pale az. and gu. three pheons in fesi. 
betw. two lions pass, or, for Maddock. Quarterings, Ashby, 
Shuckburgh, Carbonell, Napton, Lidenhall, Dyssent, Lunell, 
Hawten, and Waring. Crests— Ut, out of a mural crown ar. 
a Uon's face affront^e or, Ashby ; 2nd, a demi lion couped 
or, fretty gu. holding in the dexter paw a dagger erect ar. 
pommel and hilt or, Maddock. Motto— lie just, and fear 
not. 
Ashby (Fun. Ent. Ireland). Sa. on a fess ar. 'a crescent 

of the field in chief three fleurs-de-lis of the second. 
Ashby (Loseby, co. Leicester, Her. Visit. 1619). Ar. a lion 

ramp. sa. and a chief gu. Crest — A ram's head attired or. 
Ashby (Leicestershire). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. billett^e or. 
Ajshby (Leicestershire). Ar. a lion ramp. az. guttle d'or 

(another, the Uon gu.). 
Ashby (Leicestershire). Az. a chev. betw. three spread 

eacles or. Crest — An eagle close ar. ducally .crowned or. 
Ashby (Middlesex). The same. 
Ashby. Az. a fesse betw. three martlets ar. 
Ashby. Per pale az. and gu. a chev. erm. betw. three 

leopards' heads ar. 
Ashby. Ar. a lion ramp. sa. 

Ashby. Gu. sem^e of nails ar. three stems of a flower vert. 
Ashcomb, or Lishcomb (Berkshire, 1612). Or, a lion 
r£imp. queu^e forch^e gu. a chief az. Crest — On a chapeau 
a demi eagle displ. sa. ducally crowned or. 
Ashdoun, or Ashdo'wn. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. gorged 
with a collar or, charged with three ogresses. Crest — A 
lion's head gu. collared or, and bezant^e. 
Ashe, or Eshe (Sowton, Devonshire, settled there temp. 
Edward III.; the last direct male heir, Henby Ashe, Esq. d. 
in 1763). Ar. two chev. sa. Crest — A cockatrice close or, 
legged and beaked gu. 
Ashe, or Esse (co. Devon, confirmed by Camden, Claren- 
ccux, December, 161.3). Ar. two cliev. sa. each charged 
with a trefoil slipped or. Crest — A cockatrice ar. charged on 
the breast with a trefoil slipped gu. 
Ashe. (Freshford, co. Somerset, Fifefield, Heytesbury, and 
Langlcy Burrell, Wiltshire, and Ashgrove, co. Limerick, 
all descended from the Ashes of co. Devon). Same Arms, 
Crett, and Motto. 
Ashe (Ashflcid, CO. Mcath). Ar. two chevronels sa. Crest — 
A cockatrice or, combed and wattled gu. Mottoes— Ahoyc 
the ahield " Fip:ht"; below "Non nobis scd omnibus." 
Ashe (Somersetshire). Ar. a fesse az. over all a saltire gu. 
Ashe. Or, a fcisc az. over all a saltire gu. charged with a 

mullet of the field. 
Ashe. Az. three mewg ar. beaked and membered gu. 
Ashfeld. Sec Ashfield. Oxon. 
Asheldam, or Ashelden (Essex). Erm. a fesse dan- 

ceti^c gu. 
Asheley. Ar. on a pale cngr. sa, three crescents or. 
Asheley. See Armlet. 

Ashelson. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. and a bend az. 
Ashenden. Ar. a lion rump. gu. armed and langued nz. 
Creit—K llon'i gamb. erased gu. holding the hilt of a bioken 
swort ppr. 

28 



Ashenden (Ashenden, Kent). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. charged 

on the shoulder with a bee or. 
Ashenden. Ar. (another, or.) a lion ramp. gu. collared and 
chained or. Crest — A lion ramp, supporting an arrow in 
pale point downwards. 
Ashendon (Suffolk). Gu. a fesse betw. three mullets ar. 
Ashenhurst (Beardhall, co. Derby, Visit. 1GG2). Or, a 
cockatrice tail nowed with a serpent's head sa. comb wattles 
and head gu. in the beak a trefoil vert. Crest — A cockatrice 
as in the Amis. 
Asherburne. Ar. a fesse betw. three crescents gu. 
Asherburn, or Ashbxirner (Cockermouth, co. Cumber- 
land). Ar. on a fesse betw. three crescents gu. as many 
mullets or. Crest — An ash tree ppr. Motto — Quicquid 
crescit. in cinere perit. 
Asherte. Gu. a cross engr. or, in the first quarter a fleur- 
de-lis ar. 
Asheton (Hampton Court). Ar, a chev. betw. three cbap- 

lets gu. 
Asheton (Great Lever and Whalley, co. Lancaster). Ar. on 
a mullet sa. an annulet of the field, in the dexter chief point 
a crescent gu. Crest — A boar's head couped ar. armed 
langued and bristled gu. Motto — In Domino confido. 
Asheton, or Assheton (Assheton). Arms the same. 
Crest — A mower habited ar. and sa. paleways counter- 
changed the scythe ppr. 
Asheton. See Ashton. 
Ashets. Or, three pallets sa. 

Ashfield (Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, and Warwick- 
shire, confirmed by the Deputies of Camden, Clarenceux, to 
HoMPHBEY Ash, third in descent from John Ash of Hey- 
thorp). Ar. a trefoil slipped sa. between three mullets gu. 
Crest — A wolf courant erm. 
Ashfield (Lancashire). Sa. a fesse betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar. 
Ashfield (Suffolk). The same as of Lancashire (another, the 

fesse engr.) 
Ashfield (Sir RoBEBT Ashfield, knighted in Christchurch, 
DubUn, 24 Sept. 1598). Sa. a fess engr. betw. three fleurs- 
de-lis ar. 
Ashfield (Suffolk). Gu. a fesse indented counter-indented, 

two points at each end betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar. 
Ashfield (Sussex). Sa. a fesse engr. betw. two fleurs-de-lis 

ar. a crescent for diff. 
Ashfield (Yorkshire). Sa. a fesse betw. three fleurs-de-lis 

and a bordure ar. 
Ashfield (Oxfordshire). Barry wavy of six ar. and sa. 
Ashfield. Or, on a mount vert a Magellan goose, body sa. 

head ar. 
Ashford, or Ayshford (Ayshford, co. Devon, and Corn- 
wall; the last male heir, John Ayshford, Esq. d. in 1688; 
the heiress m. Sanfobd, ancestor of William Ayshfobd San- 
FOBD, Esq., of Nynehead, co. Somerset : a branch of the 
family settled at Wonwell, in Kingston, co. Devon, and is 
now represented by L. L. Ayshford Wise, Esq.). Ar. betw. 
two chev. sa. three ashen keys az. (another, the keys vert). 
Crest — A Moor's head in profile sa. wreathed about the 
temples ar. and issuing out of a chaplet of oak leaves vert. 
Ashford (Cornwall). Ar. a chev. betw. three bunches of 

ashen keys vert. 
Ashford. Ar. on a chev. couple-closed sa. three pineapples 

or. 
Ashford. Ar. betw. two chev. sa. three pincE pendent vert. 
Ashford. Ar. three escallops vert, betw. two chev. sa. 
Ashill. Per pale ar. and sa. three leopards in pale, counter- 
changed 
Ashhurst (Ashhurst, co. Lancaster). Gu. a cross betw. 
four fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest— A fox statant ppr. Motto— 
Vincit qui patitur. 
Ashhurst (Waterstock, co. Oxford). Same Ai-ms, Crest, 

and Motto. 
Ashingrhurst. Or, a cockatrice close sa. wattled and legged 
gu. tail nowed and ending with a serpent's head, in the 
mouth of the cockatrice a sprig vert. Crest — A cockatrice, 
as in the Anns. 
Ashley. See Ashley Coopeb (Earl of Shafleshui-y). 
Ashley, or Astley (Devonshire). Quatterly, ar. and gu. 

a bend sa. 
Ashley (Dorsetshire). Az. a cinquefoil pierced and a bor- 
dure engr. erm. Crest — A hai-py ppr. 
Ashley (Dorsetshire). Vert a cinquefoil erm. a bordure 

engr. ar. 
Ashley (Ashley, co. Chester). Ancient .i4ni!«— Quarterly, ar. 
and sa, on a bend gu. three mullets of the first. Later Arras 
— Ar. two bars sa. a crescent of the first. Crest — Abear'i 
head muzzled ppr. 
Ashley (Ashby Ledgers, co. Northampton). Az. a cinque- 
foil and a border engr. erm. Crtst — A harpy ppr. 



ASH 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ASH 



Ashley, or Asheley (Dorsetshire). Sa. another az. on 

a pale engr. ar. three crescents of the field. 
Ashley (Lowesby, co. Leicester). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. 

crowned or. 
Ashley (London). Gu. three woolsacks ar. in chief a 

mullet or. 
Ashley (London). Gu. on a fesse engr. ar. betw. three 
griffins' heads erased or, as many crosses form6e fitchee of 
the field. 
Ashley (Norfolk and Suffolk). Sa. a fesse engr. betw. three 

fleurs-de-lis (another, crescents) ar. 
Ashley (Somersetshire). Ar. three bulls pass. sa. armed 
or. Crest— On a chapeau gu. turned up erm, a hull sa. 
ducally gorged or. 
Ashley, ga. on a pale engr. ar. three crosses formfc gu. 
Ashley. Quarterly, ar. and gu. on a bend sa. three 

mullets of the first. 
Ashley. Gu. pn a fesse engr. ar. betw. three griffins' heads 

erased or. as many crosses form6s sa. 
Ashley. Ar. a Uon ramp. gu. 
Ashley. Ar. a lion ramp. sa. and a chief gu. 
Ashlin. Or, three double scaling ladders sa. Crest — A fir 

tree ppr. 
Ashman (Lymmington, co. Wilts). Or, on a bend gu. 
betw. two talbots' heads erased sa. three fleurs-de-lis ar. 
Crest — A hautboy in pale. 
Ashmell. See Aspi.nwaix. 

Ashinole (Staffordshire). Quarterly, sa. and or, in the 
chief dexter quarter a fleur-de-Us of the second. Ci-est — A 
greyhound courant sa. 
Ashmore (granted to Chables Asumobe, of Belfast, Esq., 
Lieut.-Col. 30th Foot). Ar. a lion ramp. ppr. betw. in 
chief two stars of six points gu. and in base a trefoil vert. 
Crest — A star wavy of six points ar. betw. two branches of 
laurel ppr. Motto — Cave adsum. 
Ashmore (Ireland). Sa. three lions' heads erased or. 
Crest — A demi eagle displ. with two beads or, each regally 
crowned ppr. 
Ashmore. Or, three lions' heads erased sa. 
Ashoe. Or, a fesse az. in the chief dexter quarter a saltire 

gu. Crest — A hawk ppr. belled or. 
Ashonden. See Ashendon. 
Ashorp, or Arthorp. Ar. a chev. betw. three martlets 

SU. 
Ashow. Ar. on a chev. betw. three martlets vert, as many 

crosses form^e fitch& of the first. 
Ashpitel. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a chev. gu. betw. 
three dragons' heads erased sa.; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a full 
moon gu. Crest — A demi dragon erased sa. winged collared 
and clawed or. JV/o<(o— Omnia certa fac. 
Ashpoole. Az. three chev. or. 

ABhridg-e Monastery (Bucks). Gu. on an altar-tomb a 

lamb pass, guard, ar. carrying a banner of the last charged 

with a cross of the first, resting the dexter forefoot on a 

mount or. 

Ashthorp. Ar. a chev. betw. three martlets sa. 

Ashton (Cheshire). Ar. on a mullet sa. a plate, in chief a 

crescent of the second. Crest — A boar's head couped ar. 
Ashton (granted by Roberts, Ulster, 1647, to Major Miles 
Abhton, descended of a noble and ancient family of that 
name in co. Pal. Lancaster). Ar. an ash tree on a mount 
base all ppr. growing through a tun or, on a chief sa. a 
mullet of the first. Crest — A man armed cap-a-pie striking 
with a scythe ppr. Motto — Quid non resolutio. 
Ashton (Cheshire). Or, a muUet sa. 
Ashton, or Aston (Ashton, co. Chester). Per chev. sa. 

and ar. 
Ashton, or Asheton (Cheshire and Lancashire). Ar. a 
mullet sa. Crest — A boar's head couped ar. Motto— la 
Domino confido. 
Ashton (Polefield Hall, Prestwich, Manchester. Howabth 
Ashton, Esq., J. P., capt. Duke of Lancaster's Own yeo- 
manry). Same as last, quartering sa. a chev. ar. betw. 
three plates, each charged with a cross pat^ az. 
Ashton (Clubcliffe, co. York). Barry of six ar. and sa. a 

bend gu. 
Ashton (Chaeles Ashton, Esq. of Maplewell Grange, co. 
Leicester, M.A., F.B.G.S.). Armg, Crest, and Mottu same 
as Ashton of Polefield. 
Ashton (Hefferston, co. Cheater and Woolton, co. Lancas- 
ter, confirmed 1664). Ar. a mullet sa. a canton gu. in chief 
an annulet for diff. Crest— A stag at gaze ar. attired and 
unguled or, collared with a wreath vert. 
Ashton (Preston, co. Lancaster). Ar. a mullet pierced sa. 

a canton gu. quartering Fleetwood of Penwortham. 
Ashton (Chadderton, co. Lancaster, 1667). Ar. a mullet sa. 
Crest — ^A mower with his scythe ppr. habited quarterly 
29 



ar. and sa. the handle of his scythe or, the blade of the 

first. 
Ashton (Penketh, co. Lancaster, 1567, 1613 Ar. a chev.- 

betw. three mascles gu. 
Ashton (Great Lever, co. Lancaster; allowed 1562 by 

Dalton, Norroy). Ar. on a mullet sa. an annulet of the 

field (sometimes a canton gu.) quartering Barton, Midleto.v, 

and Leveb. In fess point a crescent charged with a cre- 
scent for diff. Crest— As Ashton of Chadderton, the mower 

having upon his breast crescents as in the Arms. 
Ashton (Shepley, co. Lancaster). Ar. a mullet sa. pierced 

of the field. Crest — A mower with his scythe, his face and 

hands ppr. his habit and cap counterchanged ar. and sa. 

the handle of the scythe or, the blade ar. as in action. 
Ashton (Crofton, CO. Lancaster). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. 

a chev. sa. betw. three mascles gu. ; 2nd and 3rd, ar. two 

bars sa. 
Ashton, or Asheton (Crofton, co. Lancaster). Ar. a 

chev. betw. three chaplets gu. (another, the chev. sa.). 

Crest — Out of the clouds ppr. a demi angel with wings ex- 
panded, vested ar. face and hands ppr. hair, wings, and 

girdle or. 
Ashton (Penketh, co. Lancaster, derived from the marri.igc 
of Richabd Ashton with Margaret, dau. and heir of Kicuakd 
Penketh. Thomas Ashton of Penketh suffered for 
his loyalty in 1646). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three 
mascles sa. 
Ashton (Lancashire). Ar. a mullet sa. pierced erm. Crcsl 

— A boar's head couped ar. 
Ashton (Weston, co. Leicester). As Ashton or Asheton, 

Cheshire, with a crescent for diff. 
Ashton (Spalding co. Lincoln, and London). Ar. a mullet 
pierced sa. in the dexter chief a fleur-de-lis gu. CreH — Out 
of a mural coronet ar. a griffin's head gu. ducally gorged 
and beaked or. 
Ashton (Ashton-under-Line, co. Lancaster, and Sheering, 

CO. Essex). The same, a crescent for diff. 
Ashton (Staffordshire). Ar. a fesse sa. in chief three 

lozenges of the second. 
Ashton (Suffolk). Ar. a fesse sa. in chief three fusils of the 

second. 
Ashton (Wiltshire and Yorkshire). Sa. a saltire ar. 
Ashton. Ar. a chev. under it the dexter side of a demi 

chev. both betw. three chaplets gu. 
Ashton. Ar. two bars sa. over all a bend gu. 
Ashton (Lamorran, co. Cornwall). Ar. an ash tree ppr. 

issuing from a tun or. 
Ashton (Castleton, Stony Middleton, Hathersage, &c. co. 
Derby, descended from the Ashtons of Lancashire : of the 
Stony Middleton family was the learned Dr. Charles Ashton, 
Master of Jesus' College, Cambridge). Ar. a mullet sa. a 
crescent for diff. Crest — A boar's head couped ar. 

Ashton (KiUamarsh, co. Derby, descended from Sir John 
Ashton, a natural son of Sir John Ashton, of Ashton-under- 
Line). Ar. a mullet sa. a baton sinister gu. Crest — A 
mower with his scythe, his face and hands ppr. his cap and 
habit counterchanged ar. and sa. the handle of the scythe- 
or, the blade ar. as in action. 

Ashton (Thomas Ashton, M.D. of Manchester). Erm. a 
muUet betw. three heraldic tigers' heads erased sa. Crest — 
Upon a mount vert an heraldic tiger' ramp, or, gorged with 
a collar dancett^, and holding betw. the paws a mullet sa. 
Motto — Agere pro aliis. 

Ashton, or Assheton (quartered by Mitford as repre- 
senting a second son of Assheton of Middleton). Ar. a 
mullet pierced sa. 

Ashton. Ar. a pile sa. over all a fesse engr. erm. 

Ashton. Ar. a chev. betw. three roses gu. 

Ashton. Ar. a rose and thistle conjoined paleways all ppr. 

Ashto-wn (Lord). See Trench. 

Ashurst. See Asbhcrst. 

Ashurst (Cheshire). Gu. a cross engr. or, in the chie. 
dexter quarter a fleur-de-lis gold. 

Ashurst (Lancaster). Gu. a cross engr. or, betw. four 
fleurs-de-lis ar. 

Ashurst (Lord Mayor of London). Gu. a cross betw. four 
Sours-de-lis ar. 

Ashurst. Gu. on a cross or, five fleurs-de-lis az. Crcsi— A 
wolf pass. ppr. 

Ash-weed. Or, three squirrels gu. 

Ash-nrood. Gu. a bend ar. in chief a griffin's head of 
the last. Crest — On a chapeau the sun all ppr. 

Ash-worth (Ashworth, and Hall Carr, co. Lancaster, and 
Elland Bank, in Yorkshire : represented by Bev. John 
Hebvey Ashworth, M.A.). Gu. a cross engr. couped or, 
betw. four fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest— On a mount vert a fox 
ppr. Motto — Appetitus rationi pareat. 



ASH 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AST 



Ashworth (Heyford-Warren, co. Oxford, allowed by Flower, 
Norroy, and Glover, Somerset). Same Ai-ms and Crest. 

Ashworth (1585). Gu. a cross engr. humett^e or, betw. 
four fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest — As the last. 

Ashwy. Gu. sem6e of crosses crosslet fitcWe or, a lion 
ramp. ar. 

Askam. Gu. a fesse or, betw. three dolphins ar. 

Aske (Aske, CO. York). Or, three bars az. an annulet for 
diff. Crest— An old man's head sidefaced ppr. wreathed 
about the temples or, and az. and tied with a bow of the 
colours. 

Aske (Chowbent, co. Lancaster). Barry of six ar. and az. 
Crest — As the last. 

Aske (Aughton, CO. York). Same as the preceding. 

Aske (Yorkshire). Or, three bars az. a bordure engr. 
gu. (sometimes the bordure plain). 

Aske (Yorkshire). Or, two (sometimes four) bars az. 

Aske. Az. four lozenges ar. 

Askeam, Askeham, or Askham. Gu. a fesse betw. 
three dolphins or, (another, the dolphins ar). Crett — A 
dolphin az. 

Askeby (Cheshire). Ar. a chev. engr. az. 

Askeby. Or, three chevronels az. 

Askeby. Ar. a lion ramp. sa. billet^e or. 

Askeby. Az. a lion ramp. ar. betw. eight escallops or. 

Askeby, Asklaby, or Aslakeby. Az. a fesse betw. 
three martlets ar. Crest — A sun dial on a pedestal ppr. 

Askeley. Erm. a chief engr. az. 

Askeley, Askley, and Skaley, Ar. a chev. engr. az. 
(another, the field erm). 

Askerby. Az. a fesse betw. three mullets ar. 

Askerton. Or, a trefoil slipped vert. 

Asketine (West Peckham, co. Kent). Or, on a chev. 
betw. three lions' gambs couped and erect sa. three cres- 
cents of the first. Crest — Two lions' gambs erect 8a. sup- 
porting a crescent or. 

Askew (Greyraanes, co. Cumberland, afterwards of New- 
castle-upon-Tyne, and Redheugh, co. Durham, and Pallins- 
burn, CO. Northumberland). Sa. a fesse or, betw. three 
asses pass. ar. maned and hoofed of the second. Crest— A 
naked arm ppr. grasping a sword ar. hilt and pomel or, 
enflled with a Saracen's head couped ppr. wreathed about 
the temples or and sa. blood issuing from the neck of the 
first. Motto (over the point of the sword)— Fac et spera. 

Askew (Lord Mayor of London, 1533). Gu. on a fesse ar. 
betw. three asses' heads couped or, as many mullets az. 

Askew, or Askue (London). Gu. on a fesse engr. ar. 
betw. three asses' heads couped or, a cross crosslet and two 
stars az. Crest — An ass's head ppr. gorged with three bars 
or, betw. two wings or and ar. 

Askew. Ar. a fesse betw. three asses pass. sa. 

Askewe. Gu. a lion ramp, or, oppressed with a bend 
vert. 

Askey. Erm. three escutcheons gu. 

Askham (1675). Gu. a fesse betw. three dolphins embowed 
ar. 

Askwith (Yorkshire). Sa. a fesse betw. three crosses cross- 
let ar. Crest— A mascle gu. 

Askwith (co. York. Lansd. MS. 856). Sa. a fesse betw. 
three asses pass. ar. 

Askyton (Lancashire). See Asbton, or Asheton, of Crofton. 

Aslaby (Spittle, co. York, Lansd. MS. 865). Az. a fesso 
betw. three martlet.s ar. 

Aslabye (Yorkshire, Lansd. MS. 865). Gu. three cushions 
erm. Uusclled or, a border invected of the third. 

Aslack, Aslake, or Asloke (Holme, co. Norfolk). Sa. 
a chev. enn. betw. three Catharine wheels ar. Crest — A 
talbol'a head sa. guttle d'cau. 

Aslakby, or Aslakeby. Gu. a fesse betw. three mart- 
lets ar. Crest — A sun dial on a pedestal ppr. 

Aalacton (Aslacton, co. Nottingham. The heiress m. 
Cbanmeb, lemji. Henry VI.). Ar. five fusils conjoined in 
fesse gu. each charged with an escallop or. Crest— A moor 
cock's head erased, sa. 

Aslie. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. 

Aslin (London). Ar. a chev. crencll^e az. betw. three roses 
gu. Ktalkfd iind leaved ppr. Crest — A demi horse ppr. 

Aslin, Aslyn, or Aislan. Or, on a chev. crennell^ 
gu. three rowc^ of the field slipped vert. Crest— Aa escut- 
cheon char^fd with a rose gu. 
Aslin, or Aslun. Or, a chev. betw. three lozenges gu. 
Aslyn. Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three crosses crosslet 
fltchdc az. Oil many lozenges of the field, each charged with 
a cross crosslet of the lecond. 
AsnanteH. Gu. two bars danccttCe or. 
Aapall (.SofTolk and Northamptonshire). A*, three chev. or 
80 



(another adds a fieur-de-Us gu.). Crest — A dragon's bead 
couped or. 

Aspall (Suffolk). Az. a fesse betw. two chev. or. 

Aspall (Suffolk). Az. three chev. or, a bordure ar. Cref.t 
— A man's head bearded ppr. on his head a cap gu. 

Aspele, Aspelle, and Aspley. See Apslet. 

Aspenell,^ or Aspandall. Vert, three asps in pale or. 

Aspilon. Ar. a chev betw. three escallops sa. 

Aspilon. Ar. on a chev. betw. three escallops sa. as many 
boars' heads couped or. 

Aspin (Buckinghamshire). Az. three chev. ar. betw. ns 
many quatrefoUs or. Crest — A dragon's head or, betw. two 
aspin branches ppr. 

Aspinall (Preston, co. Lancaster). Or, a chev. betw. three 
grifBns' heads erased sa. Crest — A demi griffin erased sa. 
beaked, legged, and collared or. Motto — ^^gis fortissima 
virtus. 

Aspinall. Ar. an aspin leaf ppr. 

Aspine. Az. an aspin leaf or. 

Aspinwall (co. Lancaster, subsequently of Hale. Maet, 
dau. and eventual heiress of Edward Aspinwall, Esq., m. 
Isaac Gkeen of Child wall, Esq.). Per pale gu. and az. a fesse 
dance tt^e erm. 

Aspinwall, Ashmell, and Asmall (Northumber- 
land). Gu. two bars dancett^e or, a bordure sa. 

Aspley. Vaire ar. and sa. three bars gu. a canton erm. 

Aspolle. Erm. a saltire and a chief gu. 

AspoU (Ireland). Ar. a cross gu. betw. four erm. spots sa. 
a chief of the second. 

Aspull, Az. a chev. or. 

Assakar, or Assakur. Sa. a chev. engr. betw. three 
crescents ar. 

Assells. Gu. a saltire and a chief ar. 

Asselock. Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three Catharine wheels 
ar. 

Assent. Ar. a chev. betw. three crescents gu. a bordure 
erm. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet a horse's head ar. 
bridled gu. 

Assethorp. Ar. a chev. betw. three martlets sa. 

Assey (Beccles, co. Suflfolk). Az. on a pale ar. betw. two 
lions ramp, combattant or, a sword ppr. on a chief erm. 
an eastern crown betw. two leopards' faces gu. Crest — A 
demi leopard ramp. ppr. ciwwned with an eastern crown gu. 
and holding in his paws a sword erect. 

Asshawe (Heath Chamook and Shaghe'Hall, co. Lancas- 
ter ; the last heir male, Leonard Asshawe, sheriff 1620, d. 
1633, leaving two daus,, of whom Elizabeth, heiress of 
Shaghe, m. Petee Egerton, Esq.). Or, on a chev. betw, 
three martlets vert as many crosses crosslet fitch^e of the 
first. 

Asshavre. Erm. sem& of cross crosslets sa. a chev. ermines 
betw. three fer-de-molines of the second. On a chief of the 
last three erm. spots ar. 

Assil. Sa. an ass ar. 

Assheton (originally, temp. Henry III., of Ashton-under- 
Lyne, co. Lancaster, now of Downham and Cuerdalc, in 
that county, represented by Ralph Assheton, of Downham 
and Cuerdale, Esq., M.P. for Clitheroe). Ar. a mulletr sa. 
pierced of the field. Crest — On a cap of maintenance, a 
mower, vested and capped quarterly, ar. and sa., the sleeves 
and stockings counterchanged, holding a scythe handled 
or, the point of the blade towards the dexter. Motto — Nee 
arrogo nee dubito. 

Assheton (Chadderton, co. Lancaster, Edmund Assbeton, 
second son of Sir Thomas Assheton of Assheton, m. Jo- 
hanna, duu. of Richard Radcliffe of Cadderton. The last 
heir male, the Rev. William Assheton, rector of Prcstwick, 
d. 25 Feb. 1731, leaving two daus. Catherine, m.. John 
Blackbdrne, of Orford, Esq., and Dorothy, m. Dabcy Lever, 
of Alkington, Esq.). Quarterly, Ist and 4th, ar. a mullet 
sa. ; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a cross crosslet or. Crest — A boar's 
head couped or. 

Association, North American Colonial. Quar- 
terly, 1st, ar. a ship of three masts on the sea, in full sail ppr. ; 
2nd, on a mount a beaver, and in the distance a forest, all 
ppr. ; 3rd, gu. a plough or; 4th, az. a garb or. On an 
escoclicon in centre point ar. a trefoil slipped vert royal 
crowned of England ppr. Crest — An Irish wolf dog couchant 
ppr. Su]i)iorlers — Dexter, an Irish peasant habited, jacket 
az. trousers ar. his hat of straw, holding over his dexter 
shoulder a felling axe ppr. ; sinister, a similar flgure of an 
Irishman holding in his left hand a reaping hook or sickle 
ppr. Motto — Magnum vcctigal industriae. 

AsBOr. Ar. a fesse az. betw. two barrulets, each charged 
with a plain barrulet or. and gu. 

Astable. Quarterly, valre ar. and gu. a bordure engr. or. 



AST 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ATH 



Astbnry (Astbuiy, co. Chester). Gu. a fesse betw. three 

martlets ar. 
Astell (Everton, co. Bedford, Huntingtonshire and London). 
Gu. a lion pass, per pale or and ar. betw. four crosses cross- 
let of the last. C)-est—A cross crosslet or, entwined with a 
serpent vert. Motto — Sub cruce glorior. 
Astell (Leicestershire). Gu. crusily a lion pass, guard, ar. 
and on a canton of the last an eagle displ. sa. on the breast 
an escutcheon gold, charged with three bars az. 
Asten, or Ansten. Ar. on a fesse betw. two chev. sa. 

three crosses or. 
Asterby (Lincolnshire). Ar. a saltire engr. sa. Crest — 

An oak tree ppr. 
Asterley, Asterly, or Asterley. Sa. a bend betw. 

three etoiles or. Crest — An etoile or, betw. two wings ppr. 
Astley (Astley, co. Warwick). Az. a cinquefoil pierced 
erm. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a plume of seven 
ostrich feathers gu. surmounted with another plume gold. 
Astley (Lord Astley, summoned to Parliament 1296, the 4th 
lord d. temp. Henry V., leaving an only dau., m. to Lord 
Grey de Ruthyn). Same Arms. 
Astley {Baron Hastings), representative of the ancient house 
of Astley, of Hill Morton, and Melton Constable). Quarterly, 
1st, az. a cinquefoil pierced erm. within a bordure engr. or, 
for AsTLET ; 2nd, ar. a lion ramp. gu. ducally crowned or, 
for Constable ; 3rd, ar. two lions pass, gu., for Le 
Steange; 4th, or, a maunch gu., for Hastings. Crest — Out 
of a ducal coronet or, a plume of five feathers ar. Sup- 
porters — On either side a Uon gu. ducally crowned and 
gorged with a collar or, therefrom pendant an escutcheon 
of the arms of Hastings. Motto — Justitiae lenax. 
Astley (PatshuU, co. Stafford, extinct baronets, derived from 
Sir Thomas de Astley, second son of Thomas, third Lord 
Astley of Astley). Az. a cinquefoil pierced erm. Ci-eit — 
Out of a ducal coronet ar. a plume of feathers gu. sur- 
mounted with another plume or. 
Astley (Everley, co. Wilts, bart.). Az. a cinquefoil pierced 
erm. Crtst. — On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a plume of 
seven ostrich feathers gu. Motto — Fide sed cui vide. 
Astley (Essex). Same as the preceding. Crest — On a chapeau 
a plume of feathers ar. banded gu. and environed with a 
ducal coronet or. 
Astley (Staffordshire). Same as the preceding within a 
bordure of the second. Crest — A seahorse couchant ducally 
gorged. 
Astley, or Asteley (Staffordshire). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. 

armed and langued or. 
Astley (Wolvey, CO. Warwick). Az. a cinquefoil erm. 

betw. three mullets or. 
Astley (Warwickshire). Ar. on a bend az. three grifBns' 

heads erased of the field. 
Astley (Warwick; confirmed by the deputies of Camden, 
Clarenceux, to Thomas Astley, of Wolvey, co. Warwick, 
grandson of George Astlet of same, who was 4th in descent 
from Giles, son of Thomas Lord Astley, temp. Edward IL 
which Lord Astley was 6th in descent from Philipds de 
EsTLEGA, temp. Henry II.). Az three cinquefoils erm. 
Astley (Ansley Park, co. Warwick ; confirmed with two 
quarterings as the arms of Astlet, Visit. Warwick). Az. a 
cinquefoil pierced erm. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a 
plume of feathers ar. Motto — Fide sed cui fide. 
Astley punkinfleld Lodge, Cheshire). Same as Astley of 

CO. Warwick. 
Astley. Az. a cinquefoil erm. Crest — Out of a ducal coro- 
net or, a harpy ar. ducally gorged and crined of the first. 
Astley. Gu. a wolf salient ar. within an orle of crosses 

crosslet or. 
Astley. Az. a leopard pass. ar. within an orle of six crosses 

crosslet or. 
Astley. Az. two leopards pass. ar. armed and langued az. 
Astley. Gu. a leopard ramp. ar. armed and langued az. 

within an orle of eight crosses crosslet or. 
Astley. Gu. a Uon ramp. ar. armed az. 
Astley. Az. a lion pass, guard, ar. (sometimes the lion or, 

and sometimes semee of cross crosslets ar.). 
Astlo'W. Az. a chev. betw. three owls az. 
Aston (Lord Aston, of Forfar, title extinct or dormant, 
1836). Ar. a fesse sa. in chief three lozenges of the last. 
Crest — A bull's head coupcd sa. Supporters — Two Roman 
knights in armour ppr. their faces, hands, and knees bare. 
Motto — Numini et patriae asto. 
Aston (Aston, co. Chester, bart. Catherine Aston, even- 
tual heiress, vi. the Hon. and Rev. John Hervey, D.D.). Per 
chev. sa. and ar. Crest — An ass's head ppr. JI/o(io— Prest 
d' accompUr. 
Aston (confirmed, 1647, by Roberts, Ulster, to Sergeant- 
Major William Aston, of Col. HungcrforU's regi. in Ire- 
Si 



land, grandson of Robert Aston, of Park Hall, uncle of th« 
Lord Aston of the House of Tiiall, co. Stafford). Ar. a fesse 
and in chief three lozenges sa. Crest — A bull's head couped 
or, armed ar. tipped sa. Motto— In Papam comua tendo. 
Aston. Per pale sa. and or, three stiirups countercbanged. 
Aston. Ar. a bend dancett^e enhanced sa. 
Aston (Cheshire). Ar. a chev. betw. three mascles gu. 
Aston (Cornwall). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three fleurs-dc- 

lis sa. 
Aston (Aston, CO. Lancaster). See Aston, Cheshire. 
Aston (Enfield, co. Middlesex, and co. Gloucester). Go, a 

lion ramp. ar. oppressed with a bend vair. 
Aston (Northamptonshire). Sa. a saltire ar. 
Aston (Staffordshire). Or, (another, ar.) on a chief az. a 

lion pass, of the field. 
Aston (cos. Suffolk and Wilts;. Az. a bend cottised betw. 

six crosses crosslet or, another fitch^e. 
Aston. Az. a bend ar. cottised or, betw. eight trefoils of the 

last. 
Aston. Az. on a chief or, three lozenges sa. Crest — A bull's 
head or, horned per fesse sa. and ar. Another Crest — A 
chapeau gu. turned up erm. on each side of the cap within 
the erm. a horn ppr.). 
Aston. Ar.a chief und^ sa. 
Aston. Az. a chief or, over all a lion ramp, of the second 

(another, the tail double queued). 
Aston. Ar. a chief az. over all a lion ramp. gu. (another, 
within a bordure gobonated ar. and sa. charged with escol- 
lops countercbanged.). 
Aston. Or, a chief az. 
Astorell (Huntingdonshire). Ar. on a bend gu. three 

escallops or. 
Astowne. Gu. three sea urchins (or hedge-hog fish) in 

pale ar. 
Astroby. Sa. a bend betw. six estoUes or. 
Astroll. Az. an astrolabe or. 

Astry (Wood-end, co. Bedford, and Henbury, and of cos. Lin- 
coln and Huntingdon, descended from Sir Ralph Astry, 
Lord Mayor of Lon-^on). Barry wavy of six ar. and az. on 
a chief gu. three bezants. Crest — A stag's head erased gu. 
attired or. 
Astrye (Ralph Astrye, of Harlington, Beds, second son of 
Sir Ralph Astrye, of co. Hertford). Barry wavy of six 
nr. and az. on a chief gu. three bezants. Crest — An ostrich 
or, wings endorsed, in the beak a horse shoe (Harl. MSS., 
1095 and 1656). 
Astwell. Gu. a cross betw. four crosses-crosslet fitch^ or. 
Astwicke (Bedfordshire). Ar. three crosses boton^e sa. 
Asfrwicke. Sa. a chev. engr. ar. 
Ast'wicke, or Astvryke. Sa. a chev. engr. betw. three 

crosses crosslet fitch6i ar. (another, or.) 
Aswell, or Ashwell. Per pale ar. and sa. three leopards* 
heads in pale countercbanged. Crest — On a chapeau a 
wheat sheaf ppr. 
Ataster. Ar. on a chev. az. two acorns or. 
Atbaro'W, or Atborough. Sa. two swords in saltire 

ar. betw. four fleurs-de-Us or. 
Atcbelay, or Atcbley (London). Gu. on a fesse engr. 
betw. three griffins' heads erased ar. as many crosses formeo 
fitch^e sa. 
Atchele. Gu. on a fesse betw. three griffins' heads erased 

or, as many crosses patt^e fitch^e sa. 
Atcherley (Marton, co. Salop, descended from Sir Bogeb 
Atcherley, Knt., Lord Mayor of London in 1511). Gu. on a 
fesse engr. ar. betw. three griffins' heads erased or, as 
many crosses patt^e fitch^e sa. Crest — A demi bustard, 
couped gu. wings elevated or, in the beak a lily ar. slipped 
vert. Motto — Spe posteri temporis. 
Atcliff, or Atcliffe. Sa. three seapyes ppr. Crest — A 

cross crosslet ar. 
Atclyffe (Kent). Az. three quatrefoUs or, slipped vert. 
Atclyfife. Az. three shovellers ar. 
Atconxb (Devonshire). Sa. three marlions, sinister wings 

displ. ar. 
Ateste. Gu. a crosslet erm. Crest— A Cornish chough ppr. 
Atfield. Per chev. erm. and sa. (another ar. and sa.) in 

chief two dolphins of the second. 
Atfield. Per chev. sa. and ar. in chief two dolphins 
hauriant respecting each other or. Crest — An arm embowed, 
throwing an arrow in fesse. 
Atford (Devonshire). Gu. a castle ar. crowned or, in tho 

port a cross form^e of the second. 
Atford (Surrey and Yorkshire). Gu. three (another, six) 

pears or, a chief of the last. 
AtgTove. Erm. on a chev. gu. three escallops ar. 
Athael (Sherborne). Sa. a chev. betw. three sinister lumds 
couped ar. 



ATB 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AT li 



Athel (Northamptonshire). Ar. a chev. sa. guttle d'or. 
Athell. Or, a lion ramp. az. armed gu. on the shoulder a 

crescent of the third. Crest— A. dog sleeping ppr. 
AtheU. Ar. a lion ramp. az. armed gu. charged on the 

shoulder with a crescent of the field (another, the crescent or). 
Athell (ScoUand). Or, three palets sa. Crest — A castle ar. 

masoned sa. 
Athelston. Gyronny of four pieces az. and gu. a cross 

patonce or. 
Athelston. Per saltire gu. and az. a cross flory or. 
Athelston, or Athilston. Ar. a saltire az. betw. four 

crossf s crosilct fitch^ gu. 
Atherley. Ar. on abend betw. two lions' heads erased sa. 

three crosses formde or. Crest— A. lion's head erased sa. 
Atherley (Derbyshire). Ar. on a bend az. three lozenges of 

the field, each charged with a pheon gu. 
Atherley. Ar. on a bend betw. two lions' heads erased sa. 

three crosses formfe or. Crest — A lion's head erased sa. 
Atherton-Friary (Warwickshire). Or, three piles gu. a 

canton erm. 
Atherton (Atherton, co. Lancaster, 1664). Gu. three 

sparrow hawks ar. Crest— A swan ar. Another Crest— On 

a perch a hawk belled ppr. 
Atherton (Lancashire). Ar. two bends and a bordure sa. 
Atherton, or Atterton (Lancashire). Gu. three 

sparrow-hawks ar. beaked, belled, and jessed or. Crest— 

A hawk ppr. legged and beaked or. Another Crest— A swan 

az. ducally gorged and lined or. 
Atherton (Atherton, co. York). Same Arms. Crest — A 

demi swan ar. beaked gu. enfiled with a ducal coronet or. 
Atherton. Ar. a bay horse, holding in his mouth a tulip 

slipped all ppr. 
Atherton (\Vm. Atherton, Esq., M.P. for Durham). Gu. a 

bend engr. betw. three sparrow hawks close ar. Crest— 

Upon a fountain a sparrow hawk close ppr. 
Atheson (Scotland). Ar. an eagle displ. with two heads sa. 
Athill. Ar. on a chev. sa. three pears or. Crest— An 

arm embowed in armour holding a sword all ppr. 
Athlone, Earl of. See Ginkell. 
Athlowe (Essex). Ar. on a chev. az. three lions ramp. or. 
Athlumney, Lord. See Somebville. 
Athole, Duke of. See Mcbkat. 
Athorpe (Dinnington, near Sheffield). Per pale nebulee ar. 

and az. two mullets in fesse counterchanged. Crest — .^fal- 
con ppr. belled or, the dexter claw resting on an escutcheon 

of the Arms. 
Atho"we (Brysley, co. Norfolk). Sa. a chev. betw. three 

carpenters' squares ar. Crest — A bird ar. 
Ath'wat. Az. a lion ramp. ar. Crest — A horse's head erm. 

issuing out of a plume of feathers gu. 
Athy (Gahvay). Chequey gu. and ar. a chev. sa. Crest — A 

demi lion ar. Another Crest— A lion pass. or. Motto — Duel 

et non trahi. 
Athy (John Athy, of Galway, tem}i. Charles I.). Chequey 

ar. and gu. on a chev. of the last three estoiles or. 
Athyll. Sa. a chev. betw. three garbs or. Crest— An arm 

in armour embowed holding a sword all ppr. 
Atkins (Bristol and Somersetshire). Or, a cross quarterly 

pierced flory and counterflory az. betw. four mullets sa. 

Crfif — Two hounds' heads endorsed, collar dovetailed per 

pale or and az. counterchanged erased gu. 
Atkins (Ucbnaby-Atkins, Halsted Place, Seven Oaks, 

Kent I. See Bcrnabt. 
Atkins (Fountainville, co. Cork, now represented by Auons- 

TC« AxHELiNO A. M. Atkins, Esq., eldest son of the late T. 

R. Atkins, Esq., and his wife Sdsanna Aogcsta, dau. of 

Col. Ncttal Gbeene, of Kilmanahan Castle, co. Tipperary, 

J.l". and D.L.). Ar. a cross of half fleurs-de-lis betw. (our 

mulk'tH sa. pierced of the field. Crest — .V nag's head erased 

■a. bridled ar. Motto — By the sword; also, Honor et virtus. 

The Cri-tl and Motto of the Gloucester family of Atktns 

have Ijcin used by some of the branches. 
Atkins fUrville, CO. Cork, now represented by the Misses 

Ciiahi.'itti; Klizaretu, and Henrietta Lol'isa Atkins, 

daui. and co-heirs of the late Rev. Philip Goino Atkins- 

GoiMo). Same as the elder line of Fountainville. One 

gent-ration only bore the arms of Atktns of Yelvcrton, 

Norf..lk. 
Atkins (Staffordshire and London, confirmed by Camden, 

Clarrnccux, to IIcnrt Atkins, of I»ndon, M.D.). Az. three 

barrulrts ar. in cliicf as many bezants. Crest — A pelican 

ppr. preying on a w) vcrn vert. 
Atkinson (Newark. CO. Nottingham, granted 1663. Jasper 

Atki.siion, Esq., of the Mint, non of IIe.nry William Atkin- 

•ON, Ksq., Provost of the lion. Company of Moiieyer.s). Erm. 

on a (ftiic m. t'*rce pheons ar. Crejt — A phcon or. Motto 

—Nil sine labore. 
32 



Atkinson (Newcastle). Gu. an eagle displ. ar. on a chief 
or, a rose betw. two martlets az. Crest — An eagle wings ex- 
panded ar. beaked and legged ga 

Atkinson (London). Same as the last. 

Atkinson (Cambridgeshire, granted 1624). Sa. a cross 
flory ar. betw. four escallops or. Crest — A sea lion sejant ar. 
holding in the dexter paw an escallop or. 

Atkinson (Stowcll, co. Gloucester). Az. a cross patonce 
betw. four lions ramp. ar. 

Atkinson (Newcastle). Erm. on a fesse gu. betw. three 
pheons az. a lion pass. or. Crest — A pheon az. 

Atkinson (Newcastle). Ar. an eagle displ. with two heads 
sa. on a chief gu. a rose botw. two martlets or. 

Atkinson (.\ngcrton, near Morpeth, co. Northumberland). 
Erm. on a fesse double cottised gu. betw. three pheons az. a 
lion pass. betw. two roses ar. Crest — On a mount betw. 
two roses stalked and leaved ppr. a pheon az. Motto — 
Crede Deo. 

Atkinson (Mayor of Norwich, 1702). Ar. an eagle displ. sa. 
on a chief az. a cinquefoil betw. two martlets or. 

Atkinson (Morton, co. Nottingham. Her. Visit.). Or, an 
eagle displ. gu. beaked and niembcred az. on a chief of 
the last three bezants. Crest — A demi eagle wings displ. or, 
collared sa. 

Atkinson (Somersetshire). Az. a cross voided betw. four 
lions ramp. or. Crest — An eagle wings expanded ar. beaked 
and legged gu. 

Atkinson (Yorkshire and Northumberland). Erm. a fesse 
betw. three pheons sa. Crest — A pheon or. 

Atkinson (Rehins and Ballylahan, co. Mayo). Erm. on a 
fesse per pale gu. and vert three fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest — An 
eagle displ. with two heads ar. charged on the breast with 
a fleur-de-lis sa. Motto — Est pii Deum et patriam diligere. 

Atkinson (granted to Richard Atkinson, Esq., Highfield 
House, Rathgar, co. Dublin, Lord Mayor of Dublin, 1857 and 
1861). Erm. on a fcss engr. betw. three pheons sa. a civic 
crown or. Crest — On the battlements of a castle ar. flam- 
mant ppr. a pheon or. M<jtto — Esperance en Dieu. 

Atkinson (granted 1604 to Capt. Roger .\tkin30n). Gu. 
on a bend cotised or, three helmets of the first. Crest — A 
wolfs head erased sa. 

Atkinson (Morland, co. Westmoreland, and Lee, Kent). 
Gu. an eagle displ. with two heads ar. on chief of the second 
three mullets of the first. Crest — A falcon, wings expanded. 

Atkinson (Rampsbeck Lodge, co. Cumberland). Same 
Arms^ &c. as preceding. 

Atkinson. Ar. a cross betw. four muUcts pierced az. 

Atkinson (Cangort, King's Co.). Or, an eagle displ. with 
two heads az. beaked and legged gu. in cliief a rose of the 
last seeded gold betw. two martlets sa. Crest — .\n eagle 
displ. with two heads az. beaked and legged gu. Motto — 
Deo et regi fidclis. 

Atkinson. Gu. an eagle displ. with two heads ar. on a 
chief of the last three estoiles of the first. 

Atkinstan. Erm. a fesse betw. three martlets sa. 

Atkyns (Saperton Hall, co. Gloucester, granted by Barker, 
Garter, 154S). Ar. a cross sa. a tressure of a half fleur-de- 
lis betw. four mullets pierced of the second. Crest — On a 
mount vert two greyhounds' heads endorsed ar. and sa. col- 
lared and ringed counterchanged. Motto — Vincit cum 
legibus arma. 

Atkyns (Totteridge, co. Herts). Arms, Crest, and Motto 
same as the last. 

Atkyns (Great Berkhampstead, co. Hertford, and afterwards 
of Clapham, co. Surrey, extinct barts. represented by Pitt 
Lord Rivers). Az. three bars ar. in chief as many bezants. 
Crest — A stork ar. wings and tail sa. beaked and legged 
gu. preying on a dragon vert. 

Atkyns (London). Ar. on a cross cottised flory sa. betw, 
four mullets az. pierced of the field, five mullets or. 

Atkyns. Ar. a cross forin^a az. flory or, betw. four mullets 
of the second. Crest — An arm embowed in armour ppr. 
holding in the gauntlet a cross formde fltchcc az. flory or. 

Atkyns (Yelvcrton, co. Norfolk). Ar. on a chev. .sa. three 
unicorns' heads erased of the field. 

Atlay (Rt. Rev. James Atlat, Bishop of Hereford). See 
Atley. 

Atlee (Sussex). Az. a lion ramp. ar. (sometimes tail 
forked). Crest — Two lions' heads addorse'e ppr. 

Atley. Ar. a fesse betw. three crescents sa. Creit — On au 
csc-utchoon ar. a pheon az. 

Atley, Atleys, or Atleig'h. Gu. a cross crosslet erm. 

At-Leese (Loes Court, co. Kent). Gu. a cross crosslct erm. 

Atloe. Or, a cross sa. 

Atloe. I'or pale indented sa. and ar. 

Atlow. Ar. a chev. betw. three carpenters' squares sa. 

Atlow. Ar. a chev. betw. tliiee owls az. 



I 



ATM 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



A U B 



Atmore. Ar. two bars -vert. betw. six martlets gu. three, 

two, and one. Crest — A mermaid ppr. crined or, comb 

and mirror of the last. 
Aton. Or, three covered cups gu. 
Aton, De (Barons de Aton, summoned to Parliament in 

1324, in abeyance, temp. Edward III.). Or, three bars az. 

on a canton gu. a cross patonce ar. 
Atsea. Or, two bars wavy betw. three shrimps gu. 
Atsley. Or, on a fesse az. three lions ramp, of the first. 

Crest— A leopard's head erased or, spotted sa. and ducally 

gorged gold. 
Atslow (Downham, co. Essex). Ar. on a fesse az. three 

lions ramp, guard, or. 
Atsoe. Barry wavy of six or and gu. Crest — On a chapeau 

a lion's head erased gu. 
Atsoe. Barry wavy of six ar. and gu. three shrimps or. 
Atsoe. Barruly or and gu. three shrimps of the second 

(another, of the first). 
Atte Breg-ge (of Kent). Gu. an eagle displ. ar. 
Atte Church (1431). Quarterly, ar. and sa. 
Attehethe. Gu. on a bend cotised ar. three birds sa. 
Atteleys. Gu. a cross crosslet erm. 
Attelounde. Ar. two chev. httmettee sa. Crest — A hound 

couchant guard, ar. 
Attemore. Ar. a fesse per fesse dancettee gu. and sa. betw. 

three mullets az. 
Attemore. Erm. a bend sa. 
Atterbury. Paly of eight or and sa. a chief vair. 
Atterbury (Dr. Fbancis Atteebcbt, Bishop of Rochester). 

Paly of six or and gu. a chief vair. 
Atthill (Brandiston Hall, Cawston, co. Norfolk). Ar. on a 

chev. gu. three crescents or. Cr:sts — 1st, a demi griffin 

Tamp.; 2nd, a falcon or, ducally gorged az. belled and 

leashed of the first. Mottoes — Honorantes me honorabo ; 

and Monte de alto. 
Atton. Or, a cross gu. (another, sa.). 
Atton. Gu. a cross pattee (another, bottonee) ar. Crest — 

Out of a ducal coronet or, two lions' paws in saltire sa. 
Attree (Fbedeeick William Town Attree, Lieut. E.E., 

eldest son of Kev. Francis Town Attree, B.A., late In- 
cumbent of Middleton by Wirksworth, co. Derby). Per 

chev. or and vert, in chief two oak trees eradicated ppr. 

and in base a cinquefoU of the first. Crest — On a wreath of 

the colours an oak tree and in front thereof a serpent 

nowed ppr. 
Attwood (Wolverley Court, Park'Attwood, and Perdiswell, 

Worcester, Visit. 1634). Gu. a lion ramp, double queued ar. 

Crest — As represented in a window in Wolverley Church, a 

swan's head issuing from a coronet. 
Att'WOOd (Stoke Bishop, and Shirehampton, co. Gloucester, 

Visit. 1623). Gu. semee of acorns a hon ramp. ar. Crest — 

A demi lady holding a balance and scales ppr. 
Attwood (Bevere, co. Worcester). Same as preceding. 
Atty (Penley HaU, co. Flint, Ingon Grange, and Rugby, co. 

Warwick). Az. a bend betw. two lions ramp. or. Crest — 

On a ducal coronet a fox pass. Motto — Eamus quo ducit 

fort una. 
Attyngham. Sa. a bend ar. 
Atwater (Kent). Sa. a fesse voided (another, wavy) ar. 

betw. three swans ppr. 
Atwater. Vert a lion ramp, guard, with two bodies and 

one head or, within a bordure engr. ar. 
Atwater. Vert two lions sejant with two bodies and one 

head within a bordure engr. ar. 
Atwater. Barry wavy of six ar. and gu. three crevices 

(another, three dolphins) or, two and one. 
Atwater. Erm. on a chief gu. three roses or. 
Atwell (Mamhead, co. Devon, Camden's grants, 1614). Ar. 

a pile in point sa. and a chev. counterchanged. Crest — A lion 

ramp, erminois holding in the paws an annulet or. 
Atwell (Devonshire). Ar. three leopards' heads az. 
Atwell, or Atwill (Devonshire). Ar. a pile gu. a bor- 
dure engr. or. 
Atwood (Bromfield, Essex). Ar. on a fesse ragnly az. three 

fleurs-de-lis or. Cres:t — On a branch of a tree trunked lying 

fesseways or, a fleur-de-lis az. betw. two sprigs vert. 
Atwood (Broughton, co. Salop). Gu. a lion ramp, double 

queued ar. 
Atwood. Gu. a lion ramp. ar. Crest — An antelope's head 

ppr. 
Atwood (Suffolk). Gu. a lion ramp. ar. betw. six acorns 

slipped or. Cre t — A cubit arm in armour erect ar. holding 

in the hand ppr. a battle-axe. 
Atwood. Gu. (another, sa.) the field replenished with acorns 

or, a Hon ramp. ar. 
Atwood. Gu. a lion ramp. erm. 
Atwood. Gu. a lion ramp, guard, ar. 
33 



Atwood. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. 

Atwood. Ar. a wolf saliant sa. collared of the first within a 
bordure of the second. 

Atwood. Ar. a wolf saliant sa. within a bordure engr. of 
the second, charged with an entoire of eight bezants. 

Atw^ood (Northwick, co. Worcester). Ar. a wolf saliant sa. 
between three torteaux, within a bordure of the second. 

Atwood. Gyronny of eight pieces ar. and or, a wolf 
saliant sa. 

Atwood. Ar. a greyhound skipping in bend sa. 

Atwood. Erm. three leopards' heads az. 

Atwood. Ar. an oak tree erased vert, fructed or; on a 
chief az. three treefoils shpped of the third. 

Atworth (Suffolk). Ar. a griffin segreaut per fesse sa. and 
g"- 

Atworth. Ar. a griffin segreant per fesse az. and sa. 

Atwyll. Sa. a pile ar. over all a chev. counten;hanged. 

Atwyne. Or, on a bend sa. three goats pass. ar. armed of 
the first. 

Aty, or Attye (Newington, co. Middlesex. Granted 
1533). Az. a bend betw. two lions ramp. or. Crest — ^An 
ermine pass. ppr. 

Aubemarle. Gu. a bend lozengy erm. betw. six crosses 
crosslet or. Crest — An ear of wheat bladed, and a palm 
branch saltireways ppr. 

Aubemarle. Gu. crusily or, a bend lozengy erm. 

Aubemarle. Gu. three fusils in bend erm. TOided of the 
field, betw. six crosses crosslet or. 

Aubemarle. Gu. a bend lozengy betw. six crosses cross- 
let or. 

Aubemarle. 6u. five lozenges in bend, erm. betw. six 
crosses crosslet or. 

Aubem.arle. Gu. a cross patonce vaird. 

Aubemond, or Aubemunde. Erm. a chief indented 
az. replenished with fleurs-de-lis or. 

Aubemont, Aubemount, or Aubemonde. Erm. 
on a pile az. three (another six) fleurs-de-lis or. 

Aubermin. Az. a chev. or. 

Aubert. Quarterly, 1st, or, three talbots' heads erased at 
the neck ppr. ; 2nd, paly of six ar. and az. a chief or; 3rd, ar. 
on a chev. sa. three roses of the first ; 4th, ar. a Uon ramp. 
sa. debruised with a fesse gu. all betw. three mullets of six 
points az. Crest — A talbot pass. ppr. a broken collar betw. 
his fore legs as if fallen from the neck, a line affixed to the 
collar, and reflexing over the back, and passing betw. the 
hind legs, with a double bow at the end, all or. Motto — 
Fide et fortitudine. 

Aubert (John Daniel Aubert, Esq.). Per pale az. and gu. 
a tilting spear in pale ppr. surmounted by an hauberk or 
coat of mail or. Crest — A tilting spear erect ppr. passing 
through an hauberk, as in the Arms. Motto — Aides Dieu. 

Aubertin (Yeulands, Banstead, co. Surrey). Az. on a fesse 
or, betw. three plates in chief and a cross moline in base 
ar. an eagle displ. sa. Crest — Two banners of the arms in 
saltire. Motto — Esto fidelis. 

Aubervil (Suffolk). Per fesse dancettee az. and ar. two 
annulets in chief and one in base counterchanged. 

Aubery (Lord Mayor of London, 1339, 1340, and 1351). Or, 
a saltire az. betw. four griffins' heads erased gu. 

Aubery (Suffolk). The same, field ar. 

Aubery, Aurrey, and Arobrey (Herefordshire). Gu. 
a fesse engr. ar. 

Aubig'ney. Gu. a fesse engr. ar. 

Aubiu, St. Ar. on a cross gu. betw. four erm. spots sa.flvo 
bezants. Crest — On a rock a Cornish chough ppr. 

Aubin, St. (CornwaD). Or, on a cross sa. five bezants. 
Crest — On a rock an eagle rising ar. 

Aubley, or Aubly. Gu. a fesse betw. two chev. or. 
Crest — A dexter hand ppr. holding a cross pattee fiteh^e gu. 
in pale. 

Aubrey (Lantrithyd Park, co. Glamorgan, bart.). Az. a 
chev. betw. three eagles' heads erased or. Crest — ^An eagle's 
head erased or. Motto — Solem fero. 

Aubrey (Broom HaU, co. Salop). Arms and Crest the same. 

Aubrey (Dorton House, Bucks. Charles Adbret Kicketts, 
Esq., was authorized by Royal Warrant, 7th March, 1874, to 
take the surname of Aubrey only, and to bear quarterly the 
ACBRET and Ricketts arms in comphance with the will of 
his grand imcle Sir John Adbbey, last bart.). Quarterly, 
1st and 4th, az. a chev. betw. three eagles' heads erased or, 
for Aubret : 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a chev. engr. betw. tliree 
quatrefoils gu. an escallop of the field betw. two scimitars 
chevronwise ppr., for Ricketts. Crests — Aubbet, an eagle's 
head erased or; Ricketts, issuant from a wreath of quatre- 
foils gu. an arm embowed, vested ar. charged with two 
escallops also gu. the hand holding a scimitar ppr. Motto — 
Solem fero. 



AXTB 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AUN 



Aubrey (Clehonger, co. Hereford). Az. a chev. betw. three 
falcons' heads erased or. 

Anbyn, St. (Alfoxton, co. Somerset). See St. Albtn. 

Aucher (of Saxon origin, originally of Losenham, and 
afterwards of Otterden and Bishopsboume, Kent, bart.). 
Erm. on a chief az. three lions ramp, or, armed and langued 
gn. Crest — A bull's head erased gu. 

Auchinleck (Balmanno, co. Perth). Ar. a cross counter- 
embattled sa., said to be the arms of Balmanno, which the 
first Auchinleck of this family took on his marriage with the 
heiress of Balmanno of that Ilk. 

AncMnleck (that Ilk, co. Angus). Ar. three bars sa. 
C'Ttst—An ear of rye ppr. 3/otto— Pretiosum quod utile. 

Auchinleck (Crcvenagh House, co. Tyrone, and Shamrock 
Green, CO. Fermanagh). Ar. a cross counter embattled sa. 
in the 1st quarter a bugle horn az. stringed and embellished 
or, and in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quarters an estoile gu. Cnst 
—A wheat sUlk bladed and eared all ppr. Jlfot^o— Pretiosum 
quod utile est. 

Auchmenan. Ar. a chev. betw. two cinquefoils gu. in 
chief and a saltire couped in base az. 

Auchmuty (that Ilk, eo. Fife). Ar. a broken spear bend- 
ways betw. two mullets az. 

Auchmuty (Brianstown, co. Longford, and Kilmore, co. 
Koscommon, a branch of the ancient Scottish family of 
Auchmuty of that Ilk, co. Fife, which settled in Ireland in 
the early part of the 17th century). Ar. the upper part of a 
broken spear bendwise betw. two spur-rowels (or mullets of 
six points pierced) az. 

Auchmtity (as above, a crescent for diff., quartered 
by W. A. Ttssen Amhcrst, Esq., of Didlington Hall, (see 
Amhuest) as representative of Doecas Acchmctt, sole 
heir of Thomas AucHMnxr, second son (who left issue) of 
Thomas Acchmctt, Esq., of Brianstown, co. Longford, and 
boRCAS ni-e TowNLET his wife. 

Auchmuty (Gen. SirSAMCEi, Benjamin AccHMtiTy,K.C.B.). 
Ar. the upper part of a broken spear bendways betw. two 
mullets of six points az. pierced of the field. Crest — An 
arm embowed in armour ppr. holding the lower part of a 
broken spear bendways az. Motto — Dum spiro spero. 

Auchterlony. See Ochteblont. 

Auckland, Baron. See Edeic. 

Audborougrh. Az. a fesse ar. betw. three crosses cross- 
let or. Crest — An escallop or, betw. two wings az. 

Audby, or Eudeby. Gn. on a bend or, (another, ar.) 
three martlets sa. 

Audeley. Gu. a fret or, within a bordure ar. Crest — A 
mullet of six points or, betw. two wings az. 

Audesley. Ar. two lions' paws erased in saltire gu. 

Audice. Ar. three hinds' ear* gu. 

Audin. Ar. on a cross gu. five lioncels ramp, or, in the 
first quarter an annulet. Crest — A lion pass, or, in the 
dexter paw a banner gu. thereon a cross ar. 

Audlem (Audlcm, co. Chester). See Aldeltm. 

Audley (Sir James Acdlet, K.G., one of the Founder 
Knights of the Garter). Gu. a fret or. 

Audley, Baron. See Toochet. 

Audley, or Alditheley (Lord Audley of Ueleigh, sum- 
moned 15 May, 1321 ; the heiress, Joane, dau. of James, 
Lord Audley, ttmp. Edward III. jk. Sir John Toochet, and 
the grandson of this marriage. Sir John Tocchet, was sum- 
moned as Baron Audley). Gu. a fret or. 

Audley {,L<rrd Audley of Walden, co. Essex, 1538, extinct 
1644). Quarterly, per pale indented or and az. on a bend of 
the second betw. two eagles displ. gold a fret betw. two 
martlets of the last. Crest — On a chapeau gu. turned up 
erm. a wyvem with wings endorsed, quarterly or and az. 
Another Creft — The wyvem with wings endorsed ppr. 

Audley (Bcerchurch, co. Essex). Or, on a fesse az. betw. 
three conie»' heads couped sa. three martlets ar. 

Audley (Uoob Acdlet, co. Gloucester, temp. Edward II.). 
Gu. a fret of six pieces and a border or. 

Audley. Gu. a fret or. Creit — A Saracen's head couped 
ppr. wreathed about the temples ar. and purp. 

Audley. Gu. a fret or, within a bordure ar. 

Audley. Gu. a fret or, within a bordure counter-compony 
ar. and vert. 

Audley. Gu. a fret of eight or, a label az. 

Audley. Ar. six bears' paws erased in saltire, four in 

chief and two in base sa. 
Audley. Gu. on n chev. or, three martlets sa. 
Audley, or Audly (granted 1608). Or, a fesse cottised 

betw. tlirec conies sa. Crtst — A martlet sa. 
Audley (ancient from MS. Arms Visit. Stafford, 1583.). Az. 

throe buttcrfliea volant ar. 
Audley (Sutton, CO. Kent. IIcgu Aodlkt, of the Inner 
Temple, d. <. p. 1662, son of John Adout, of the former 
84 



place. Visit. Middlesex, 1663, granted by Camden, Clarcn- 
ceux). Or, a fess cotised betw. three conies sa. Crest — A 
martlet sa. 
Audouin (East Hill, co. Wicklow, granted 1801 to George 
AcDociN, Esq., of that place). Az. on a pale or, four 
bendlets sa. Crest — A stag's head erased ppr. Motto — 
Chasse pour foi. 
Audouin-Liamb. See Lamb. 
Audrin. Ar. on a cross gu. five lioncels ramp. or. 
Audry (Wiltshire). Ar. on a bend betw. two cottises az. 

three cinquefoils of the field. Crest — A stag trippant ppr. 
Audjm (Dorchester). Ar. on a cross gu. five lioncels 
salient or, a mullet gu. for diff. Great — A lion pass, 
crowned or, bearing on the shoulder a pascal banner dis- 
velloped ar. staff and cross gu. (some bear the lion ramp, 
per pale or and ar. holding up the banner). 
Audyn (Dorchester). Ar. on a cross gu. five lioncels ramp, 
or. Crest — A lion pass, his tail extended or, bearing a 
banner ar. charged with a cross gu. 
Aufferton. Az. two chev. or. 

AufErick. Gu. three legs armed ppr. conjoined in the 
centre at the upper part of the thighs, flexed in a tringle 
garnished and spurred or. Crest — Two arms embowed and 
erect in armour, holding in their hands a gem ring all ppr. 
Aufrere (Bumside, co. Westmoreland, and Foulsham Old 
Hall, CO. Norfolk). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. in chief two 
bunches of grapes ppr. (purple and green leaves) and in 
base a lion ramp, of the second. Crest — A lion ramp. gu. 
Motto — Esto quod esse videris. 
Aug'er (Bordeaux, France, Arms confirmed in Ireland, and 
Crest granted 10 Feb. 1701, to Pacl Adger, a refugee, with 
some of his younger brothers, at the Revocation of the Edict 
of Nantes, tenth son of Pacl Aoger, of Bordeaux, merchant). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a mount in base a Cupid shoot- 
ing at a jay perched on a tree all ppr., on a canton az. issuing 
from the dexter chief point, rays of the sun or ; 2nd and 3rd, 
or, a stalk with three thistles betw. two palm branches in 
saltire ppr. Crest— On a mount an oak tree thereon perched 
a jay all ppr. 
Aughton (Devonshire). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three 

fleurs-de-lis sa. 
Aug'hton (Hadlington, co. Lancaster). Sa. three garbs or. 
Auke. Gu. two bars ar. in chief three annulets of the last. 
Auld. Ar. on a motmt vert, a tree pierced through in bend 
by a sword ppr. upon the point a crown. Crest — ^A lion's 
head erased. 
Auld, or Aulde. Erm. on a chief gu. two griffins respect- 
ing each other ar. Crest — A cherub's head ppr. wings in 
saltier. Motto — Virtute et constantiS. 
Auldis (Scotland 1826). Ar. three hearts conjoined in triangle 
by the points gu. in base a mullet sa. on a chief az. a saltier 
of the first, surmounted of a deer's head cabossed and 
counterchanged. Crest — The trunk of an oak with a branch 
spurting forth on either side vert. Motto — Non deficit 
alter. 
Aula. Sa. three awls, points erect ar. hafts or. 
Aulas. Az. a chev. betw. three awls points reversed ar. 

hafts or. 
Aumerle. Per fesse az. and gu. three crescents ar. Crest 

— An arrow in pale ppr. 
Aumarle. Gu. a cross patonce vair (another, ar.). 

Crest — As the last. 
Aumont (Guernsey). Ar. a chev. betw. seven martlets gu. 

four in chief and three in base. 
Auncall (Cornwall). Gu. a saltire engr. ar. betw. four 

bezants. 
Auncell. Gu. five fusils in bend or. 
Auncall. Or, a bend gu. 
Auncell. Gu. a bend fusily ar. 
Aundby. Ar. three chev. and a fesse gu. 
Aundelig'h. Barry of four sa. and ar. on a chief or, three 

crosses crosslet of the first. Crest — A sceptre in pale or. 
Aundy. Ar. on a bend cottised az. three roses or. 
Auna. Or, three birds betw. two cottises in bend sa. 
Aung'ate. Per bend embattled gu. and erm. Crest — On a 

tortcau an estoile or. 
Aungrell, or Angrell. Or, a fesse lozcngy az. over all a 

bendlet gu. 
Aungrer, or Angrer. Erm. on a chief az. three mascles 

ar. 
Aungier. Erm. a griffin segreant per fesse or and az. 

Crest — An escarbuncle or. 
Aung'ier (Fun. Ent. of Sir Francis Acncier, Master of the 
Holls in Ireland, temp. James I.). Erm. a griffin segreant az. 
armed gu. forelegs and claws or, quartering, gu. a boar pass, 
or, armed and langued az. 
Aun^er {Earl of Longford, ext., 1704). Erm. a griffin 



ATTN 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



AVK 



tegreant az. armed and langued ga. beaked and forelegs and 

claws or. Crest — A griflBn of the arms holding an escarbuncle 

or. Supporterf — Dexter a lion az. armed and langued gu. 

charged on the shoulder with an escarbuncle or, sinister a 

grif&n az. armed and langued gu. beaked and forelegged or, 

wings addorsed erm. Motto — Scio cui confido. 
Aunsell. Paly ar. and az. a baston gu. 
AureicMer, or Aurticher. Or, in the dexter chief point 

a liou pass, in the sinister chief point and in base a cinque- 
foil, all sa. 
Aurelis. Gu. three cinquefoils ar. Crest — A demi youth 

ppr. vested ar. coat az. buttoned or. 
Auriol (London and Brussels). Ar. on a mount vert a tree 

of the last, with two birds' nests pendent by strings gu. 

Crest — An eagle rising, right wing erect, left close. 
Ausborne. Sa. billettee or, a griffin segreant of the last. 
Auscot. Erm. a chev. gobony ar. and az. betw. three 

leopards' heads of the third. 
Auste. Sa. three garbs or. Crest — A garb ppr. 
Austell (Sheriff of CorawaU, Edward III. and Henry IV.). 

Ar. a saltire raguly gu. 
Austen (Tenterden, co. Kent, and Guildford co. Surrey). 

Az. a chev. betw. three birds or. Crest — A three-quarter 

spread eagle, with three annulets on the breast. 
Austen (Grovehurst and Broadford, co. Kent, from which 

family derives Acsten of Hertfordshire and Hamp- 
shire, of which was Jane Adsten, the novelist. Her 

brother, Edwabd Adsten, Esq. inheriting the Godmersham 

estates, assumed the surname and arms of Knight). Or, 

a chev. gu. betw. three lions' gambs erect, erased sa. 

armed of the second. Crest — On a mural crown or a stag 

sejant ar. attired gold. 
Austen (Capel Manor, Horsmonden, Kent). Or, on a chev. 

betw. three lions' gambs erect sa. as many plates. 
Austen (Taywell, co. Kent, granted 20 April, 1603). The 

s:\me Ariiis and Crest. 
Austen (Norfolk). Az. a chev. or. 
Austen (Norfolk). Az. a chev. ar. betw. three birds or. 
Austen. Ar. on a chev. gu. three lozenges or, each charged 

with a cross crosslet fitchee sa. 
Austen. Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three lions' gambs bendy 

and erased sa. as many crescents or. 
Austen. Ar. on a fesse betw. two chev. sa. three crosses 

crosslet or. 
Austen. Gu. a saltire engr. erm. betw. four plates. 
Austen (Shalford, co. Surrey). Az. a chev. ar. betw. 

three Cornish choughs or. Crest — A falcon or, on a 

leopard's head az. Motto — Ne quid nimis. 
Austill. Ar. a saltire raguly vert. 
Austin (Walpoole, co. Norfolk). Gu. a chev. betw. three 

long crosses or. 
Austin (Surrey, Camden's Grants, 1611). Ar. on a chev. 

betw. two chevs. sa. three crosses or. Ci-est — A passion cross 

or, betw. two wings erect sa. 
Austin (Camden's Grants). Or, a chev. gu. betw. three 

lions' gambs erased and erect sa. CVest — On a mural crown 

or, a stag statant ar. 
Austin. Gu. a chev. engr. erm. betw. three ducal coronets 

or. Crest — A pascal lamb ar. 
Austin (Doddington Grove, co. Surrey). Gu. on a chev. 

ar. betw. three ducal crowns or, as many crosses pattee of 

the field. Crest — A ducal coronet or, thereon a pascal lamb 

ppr. Motto — Crux nostra corona. 
Austin (The Rt. Eev. William Pieecy Austin, D.D., first 

Bishop of Guiana). Gu. on a chev. engr. betw. three passion 

crosses or, as many lions' heads erased of the field. Crest 

— A demi lion or, holding betw. the paws a passion cross gu. 

and charged on the body with three fusils two and one az. 
Austin-Gourlay. See GorRLAT. 
Austrey (Hartington, co. Bedford). Barry wavy of six ar. 

and az. on a chief gu. three bezants. Crest — A demi ostrich 

ar. wings gu. 
Austrey (Sommerton, co. Huntingdon, and Yorkshire). 

Ar}7is the iame . Crest — An ostrich's head erased ar. betw. 

two ostrich wings gu. in the beak a horseshoe sa. 
Austyn (Somersetshire). Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three 

lions' gambs bent and erased of the second, three bezants. 
Austyn (Cornwall). Ar. a fesse betw. six martlets gu. 
Austyn. Az. a chev. betw. three birds or, beaked and 

legged gu. 
Austyn. As. on a fesse betw. two chev. sa. three crosses 

crosslet or. 
Austyn. Ai. a chev. betw. three falcons or, beaked and 

legged gu. 
Austyn (John ArsTTN, of London, jeweller. Le JVcw'i 

Knighti.) Vert a chev. engr. cnn, betw. three ducal coronet* 

or. 

So 



Autingrhain. See Antingham. 

Autrey (Hampshire). Az. a fesse fnsily ar. in chief a label 

of five points or. 
Autreyn (Sussex). Az. a fesse fusily ar. over all a bendlet 

Avan (Wales). Ar. on a bend gu. an annulet or (another, 

three annulets). 
Aveland, Lord. See Heathcote. 

Aveleirs (Suffolk). Ar. three escutcheons gu. two and one. 
Aveline (Windsor and Frogmore, co. Berks). Per pale az. 

and gu. three eagles displ. or. Crest— A lion's head erased 

ar. holding ia the mouth paleways a sword ar. hilt and 

pomel or. 
Avelingr (Wisbeach). Az. a griffin pass. ar. on a chief engr. 

or, a cross crosslet fitchee of the field. Crest — A griffin pass. 

or, winged and ducaUy gorged az. resting dextep foot on a 

cross crosslet as in the Arms. 
Aven, or Avery (Gloucestershire). Gu. three chev. ar. 
Avenant (Shelsley-Walsh, co. Worcester, Visit. 1682-3). 

Erm. on a pale gu. a cross formee flory or, on a chief sa. a 

billet of the third within a mascle betw. two escallops ar. 
' Crest — A parrot's head erased vert betw. two wings expanded 

per pale az. and gu. double collared or, in the beak of the 

third, an oKve branch of the first. 
Auenayne, or Avenar. Gu. a fesse betw. eix annulets 

ar. Crest — A buck's head cabossed ppr. 
Avene. Gu. a chev. ar. 
Avenell (Netherhaddon, co. Derby. The co-heiress, temp. 

King John, m. Vernon and Bassett). Gu. six annulets ar. 
Avenell, or Avenett (Cambridgeshire). Ar. a fesse 

betw. six annulets gu. Crest — Out of a baron's coronet a 

hand holding a scimetar ppr. 
Avenell (Gloucestershire). Ar. six annulets gu. 
AvenelL Or, on a fesse gu. three crosses crosslet of the 

first. 
Avenell (Blackpool, parish of South Molton, co. Devon, 

quartered by HtrysHE, of Sand, Wtkes, of North Wykes, and 

HoLCOMBE, who m. the daus. and co-heirs of John Avenell, 

about 1450.) Ar. five fusils in fesse sa. betw. two cottises gu. 
Avenell (Loxbeare, co. Devon. Eleanor, dau. and heir of 

John Avenell, m. Edward Eichards, who d. 5 Henry VIII. 

inq. p. m. Bichabds seems to have adopted the Avenell 

Arms). Same Arms. 
Avenet, or Avnett. Ar. on a fesse betw. six annulets 

gu. three annulets of the first. Crest — On a torteau a lion's 

head erased or. 
Aveney (Gloucestershire). The same as Avbn. 
Avenon (Lord Mayor of London, 1569, Her. Visit. London, 

1668). Erm. on a pale gu. a cross flory or, on a chief sa. a 

billet of the third within a mascle betw. two escallops ar. 

Crest — A parrot's head erased vert, wings expanded per pale 

az. and gu. double collared or, holding in his beak of the third 

an olive branch of the first. 
Avenon, or Avenant (London.) Arnu as Atenakt, of 

Shelsley. 
Avensly, or Anstey. Barry of six ar. and az. over all 

a bendlet gu. 
Avensly. The same with a bendlet compony ar. and gu. 
Averance. Gu. crusily or, a bend of mascles erm. 
Averance. Gu. five fusils in bend erm. betw. three crosses 

crosslet or. 
Averell (co.' Gloucester, Smith's Ordinary). Az. a cross 

erm. fleury or, in dexter point a buck's head cabossed ar, 

attired of the third. 
Averill (Broadway, co. Worcester, settled there since 1602). 

Gu. a cross fleury erm. charged in chief with a buck's head 

of the field. Crest — A buck's head, cabossed, as in the 

Arms. 
Averingr. Or, five chev. az. 
Avering-e. Ar. a cross gu. within a bordure sa. (another, 

the bordure engr.). 
Avering'es. Ar. a cross gu. within a bordure sa. Cr«t— 

A raven sa. 
Avering'es (Folkstone). Or, five chev. gu. 
Avem (Warwickshire). Or, on a chev. sa. betw. three boa"^' 

heads erased of the second, armed and langued gu. a mullet 

ar. Crest — A horse's head erm . 
Averthorp. Sa. a cross flory or. 
Avery (Huwish, co. Somerset and Enfield, co. Hiddlesex). 

Gu. a fesse (sometimes a chev.) or, betw. three bezants. Crett 

— Two lions' gambs or, supporting a bezant. 
Avery (Fun. Ent. Ire., 1682). Sa. a chev. or, betw. three 

bezants. 
Avery (Haddon, co. Derby). Ar. six annulets gu. three, two, 

and one. 
Avery, or Averey (Fillongley, co. Warwick, 167». 
Confirmed by Cooke, Qarenceux). Erm. on a pale engr. as. 



AVE 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



ATI. 



three lions' heads couped or. Crest— An ounce couchant ar. 

bezantee ducally gorged or. 
Avery (Smitli's Ordinary). Sa. a chev. or, betw. three 

bezants. CYest — A bezant betw. two lion's paws. 
Avesnes. Bendy of six gu. and ar. 
Avesness. Bendy of six ar. and gu. 
Avison. Az. three wheat sheaves or. Ci-est — A dexter 

hand vested, cuffed, holding an anchor. 
Avonmore, Viscount. See Yelverton. 
Awbene. Gu. sis lozenges ar. three escallops in chief or. 
Awbig-ney. Sa. three helmets ar. 
Awbmarle (Dorsetshire). Gu. five fusUs m bend erm. 

betn-. six crosses crosslet or. 
A'wbom. Az. a pillar or column erect betw. two angels' 

wings elevated or. Crest— A unicorn pass, or, gorged with 

a dncal coronet and chained sa. 
Awbre (Suffolk). Ar. a saltire betw. four griffins' heads 

erased sa. 
Awbrey (Chadenwich and Burton, co. Wilts). Bendy of 

eight erra. and gu. 
Awbrey. Az. a chev. betw. three eagles' heads erased or. 

Crest — .-Vn eagle's head erased or. 
A'wbrey. Gu. a fesse engr. erm. 
Awdrey (Devonshire and Oxfordshire). Ar. on a bend 

cottised az. three roses or. CreU — On a lion's gamb. ppr. 

a chev. or, charged with a mullet sa. 
Awdry (Seend, co. Wilts). Ar. on a bend cottised az. three 

cinquefoils or. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a lion's 

head az. Motto — Nil sine deo. 
Awdry (Xotton, co. Wilts, a branch of the Awdkts of Seend). 

Same Arms and Crest. 
Awger, or Agrer (Kent and Gloucestershire). Erm. on 

a chief az. a lion ramp. ar. Crest — A bull's head erased gu. 

attired ar. 
Awing:. Quarterly, vert and gu. over all a lion ramp. ar. 

Crest — On a quatrefoil party per cross gu. and vert, a lion's 

head on a wreath ar. 
Awmack, or Allmack. Crest— A tower ppr. 3Totto — 

Cavendo Tutus. 
Aw^nsam. Ar. on a canton sa. a fleur-de-lis or. Crest — An 

escallop shell or, betw. two palm branches vert. 
Awnsar. Ar. three talbots' heads erased gu. 
Awood. Ar. an oak tree vert acorned or, on a chief az. 

three trefoils slipped of the third. 
Avrsthwaite (Awsthwaite, CO. Cumberland, extinct temp. 

Edward HI. ; the heiress m. Stanley). Gu. two bars ar. in 

chief three mullets of six points pierced or. 
Awston (London, Camden's grants, 1606). Ar. on a fess 

betw. two chevronels sa. three bezants each charged with a 

cross crosslet of the second. Crest — A greyhound's head 

couped ar. gorged with a plain collar sa. charged with three 

bezants. 
Avcstrey. The same as Aostret. 
Awys. Ar. a chev. betw. three foxes' heads erased (another, 

couped) gu. 
Axall, or Axeson. Gu. three axes ar. 
Axg-riffith. Quarterly, gu. and or, four leopards' faces 

counterchanged. 
Axtell. Az. three axes ar. handles or. 
Axton. Gu a fesse erm. 
Ayala (Spain). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. two wolves pass. 

in pale sa. within a bordure gu. charged with eight saltires 

or; 2nd and 3rd, or, a four towered castle az., for Castile. 
Ayburgr. Ar. two bars vert. 
Ayde. Or, a fesse counter embattled betw. three leopards' 

heads ar. 
Ayer. Az. three barks or. 
Ayer. Gu. three covered cups ar. 
Ayer, or Ayre (Nottinghamshire). Gu. three doves close 

ar. beaked and membered or. 
Ayerst. Ar. on a bend engr. az. a sun in chief or, and an 

eagle wings elevated of the field in base; in the sinister 

cliif'f point a cross flory gu. 
Ayest. Per pale or and gu. three roundles counter- 

chiinged. 
Ay^le. Sa. three lions pass, guard, in pale ar. Crest — A 

biit'lp horn ar. 
Ayland. Sa. on an inc^cutcheon ar. a bend gu. 
Aylberton. Or, two bars betw. three ogresses within a 

bfirilure f-ngr. sa. 
Ayle. Or, three palets »a. 
Aylemer. Ar. on a cross engr. ea. five bezants betw. four 

•on .-lylpts within a bordure gobonatcd az. and purp. 
Aylemer. Ar. a croM betw. four eaglets close gu. 
Aylemer. Ar. a cross sa. betw. four daws ppr. 
Ayleph (Fun. Ent. Ire., 1758). Sa. a lion ramp. betw. three 

crosses formed or. 
36 



Aylesbury. Az. a cross ar. over all a label gti. 

Crests — First, a staff erect raguly or ; second, a dragon's 
head or, gorged with three bars gu. 

Aylesbury (Aylesbuiy, co. Bucks, of whom was John 
DE Atlesburt, sheriff in 1377 and 1381). Az. a cross ar. 

Aylesbury (Joh.n Aylesbury, or Ailesbury, of Erdington, 
CO. Warwick, whose dau. and heir m. Somerville of Somer- 
ville Aston, same co. Said John was 5th in descent from 
Walter de Aylesbury, temp. Edward I.). Ar. a cross az. 

Aylesford, Earl of. See Finch. 

Aylesford. Gu. a fret engr. erm. 

Aylesworth (Kineton, co. Warwick, Visit. Warwick). Ar. 
a fesse engr. betw. six billets three and three gu. 

Aylet. Az. three annulets ar. 

Aylet (Howells, CO. Essex). Gu. three annulets and a chief ar., 
as augmentation a canton or, charged with the rose of Eng- 
land. Cre.it — An arm gu. holding a sword hilted or, blade 
ar. Motto — Not in vain. 

Aylett (Braintree, co. Essex). Az. a fesse embattled betw. 
three unicorns' heads erased ar. crined and armed or. Crest 
— A demi unicorn reguard. ar. crined and armed or. 

Ayleward (Norfolk). Per pale sa. and ar. two fleurs-de-lis 
in pale counterchanged. Crest — Betw. the horns of a cre- 
scent or, a cross pattee gu. 

Ayleward. Sa. a chev. betw. three garbs or. 

Ayleway (Taunton, co. Gloucester). Az. a lion ramp, or, 
betw. three crosslcts fitchee ar. 

Aylewortb. Sa on a bend ar. three birds gu., on a chief 
or, three reindeers' heads cabossed of the first 

Ayleford. Gu. fretty erm. (another, or). Crest — A fire 
betw. two branches of palm in orle both ppr. 

Aylford, or Aynford. Gu. a fret engr. erm. 

Ayliffe (London and Brinksworth, co. Wilts). Ar. on a 
chev. engr. sa. betw. three stars gu. streaming on the dexter 
side downwards in bend or, as many bucks' faces of the 
field. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, an oak tree ppr. 
fructed gold. 

Ayliffe (Skeres, co. Hants). Quarterly, gu. and sa. a lion 
ramp. betw. three crosses pattee or, all within a bordure ar. 
charged with eight torteaux. 

Aliflfe. Quarterly, gu. and sa. 

Aylmer (Lyons co. Kildare, settled in Ireland since the 12th 
century). Ar. a cross sa. betw. four Cornish choughs ppr. 
Crest — A Cornish chough rising out of a ducal coronet all 
ppr. Motto — Hallelujah. 

Aylmer (Donadea Castle, co. Kildare, hart., a branch of the 
ancient house of Aylmer of Lyons). Ar. a cross sa. betw. 
four Cornish choughs ppr. Crest — A Cornish chough rising 
out of a ducal coronet all ppr. Motto — Hallelujah. 

Aylmer (confirmed by Camden, Clarenceux, June 1647, to 
Sir John Aylmer and Samuel Aylmer, of Moglington, 
alkts Nowden Hall, co. Essex). Ar. a cross betw. four sea- 
aylets sa. beaked and legged gu. Crest— On a marquess's 
coronet or, an aylet's head erased sa. beaked gu. betw. two 
eagles' wings expanded gold. 

Aylmer (London). Or, on a cross engr. betw. four martlets 
sa. five bezants within a bordure gobonated purp. and ar. 

Aylmer. Ar. a fesse betw. three asses pass. gu. 

Aylmer {Lord Aylmer). Ar. a cross sa. betw. four Cornish 
choughs ppr. Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a Cornish 
chough rising ppr. Siqiporters—Two sailors temp. George I. 
affront^e ppr. habited az. the dexter holding a cross staff, 
sinister a lead-lino, also ppr. Motto — Steady. 

Aylmer (Walworth Castle, co. Durham, a branch of Atlmeb 
of Donadea). Same Arms, Crest, and Motto. 

Ayloflfe (Braxted Magna, Essex, and Framfield, co. Sussex, 
and also of Suffolk). Sa. a hon ramp, collared gu. betw. 
three crosses form^e or. Crest — A demi Uon or, collared 
CU. 

Ayloffe (Kent and Wiltshire). Quarterly, gu. and sa. a lion 
ramp. betw. three crosses formic fitchee or, collared az. 
within a bordure pcUettee. 

Ayloft. Ar. a fcs.ie betw. three hens sa. 

Aylward (Shankill Castle, co. Kilkenny). Az. a fleur-de- 
lis betw. in the dexter chief and sinister base an estoile, and 
in sinister chief and dexter base an increscent or. Crest — 
Out of a ducal coronet or, a dexter arm embowed mailed 
the hand ppr. holding an anchor of the first. 

Aylward (SufTolU). Ar. on a saltire az. betw. four grifSns' 
heads erased gu. a leopard's face betw. four lozenges or. 

Aylward. Ar. on a cross az. a leopard's face betw. four 
lozenges or. 

Aylwarde, or Alwarde (Suffolk). Ar. a saltier az. 
betw. four giiflins' heads erased gu. 

Aylworth (Devonshire, Gloucester.'ihiro, and Kent). Ar. a 
fesse engr. betw. six billets gu. Crest — An arm habited sa. 
issuing out of rays or, in the hand ppr. a luuuan skull ar. 



ATI. 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



BAB 



Aylworth (Somersetshire). Ar. on a fesse engr. cottised 

betw. six (another, three) billets gu. three infants' heads 

couped at the shoulders of the first, crined or. Crest — As 

the last. 

Aylworth (co. Essex). Az. a fleur-de-lis or, betw. three 

bezants. 
Aylworth. (Tackley, co. Oxford, Her. Visit.). Ar. a chev. 

engr. betw. six billets gu. 
Aylworth. Ar. on a fesse engr. betw. six. billets gu. a 

crescent of the first. 
Aylworth. Sa. a chev. betw. three garbs or. 
Ayncotes. Ar. three covered cups az. on a chief gu. a 
tower or, betw. two lions pass, of the field. Crest — A 
covered cup or, between two wings sa. 
Ayncotts. Ar. three covered cups az. a chief gu. 
Ajmcotts. Ar. a tower triple-towered az. betw. three 
covered cups; the lower part sa. the upper of the second. 
Crest— A squirrel sejant gu. collared or. 
Ayncourt. Ar. a fesse dancettee betw. ten billets sa. in 

chief a label of three points gu. 
Ayncourt. Az. billettce, a fesse dancettee or. 
Aynesford. Gu. a fret engr. erm. 
Aynesford, or Alford. Gu. fretty erm. 
Aynesw^orth (Lancashire). Gu. three battle-axes ar. 
Crest—Two battle-axes in saltier ppr. Motto — Courage 
sans peur. 
Aynesworth. Az. three spades ar. (another, within a 

bordure or). Crest — As the last. 
Aynesworth. Ar. on a bend sa. three crescents of the first. 
Aynford. See Aylford. 
Aynisworth. See Ayneswokth, Lancashire. 
Aynscomb (Mayfield, Sussex, and Cowdon, Kent). Ar. a 
chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis sa. Crest — A cubit arm erect, 
in the hand ppr. a fleur-de-lis sa. 
Aynscourt. Ar. an imperial eagle displayed gu. 
Aynsley (Mdrray-Atnsley of Little Harle Tower, North- 
umberland, andUnderdown, co. Hereford). Gu. on a bend 
erm. betw. two quatrefoils or, three mullets of six points 
sa., quartering, for Mukray, az. three mullets and in chief an 
annulet ar. within a double tressure flory counterflory or. 
Crest — A man in armour, holding in the dexter hand a 
sword erect ppr. pomel and hilt or, on his breast a shield, 
thereon the arms of Aynsley. ilotio — Furth fortune and 
fill the fetters. 
Aynsworth. Sa. on a bend ar. three crescents of the field. 
Ayot. Vert on a chev. ar. three phcons sa. 
Aype. Erm. a bend gu. Crest — An antelope pass. ar. 

collared sa. 
Ayr, Town of. Gu. a castle triple-towered ar. betw. a holy 
lamb with cross, staff, and banner of St. Andrew, on the 
dexter, and the head of St. John the Baptist in a charger on 
the sinister, all ppr., in the base the sea az. 
Ayre (Wotton, Devonshire). Gu. on a bend betw. six 

crosses formce fitchee ar. three mullets sa. 
Ayre (Isle of Ely). Ar. on a chev. sa. three quatrefoils or. 
Ayre (Nottinghamshire). Gu. three martlets ar. membered 

or. Crest — On a ducal coronet or, a wivern vert. 
Ayre. Ar. a bend az. betw. two mullets gu. 
Ayre (Lincolnshire). Ar. on a chev. sa. three quatrefoils 
or. Crest — A leg erect in armour per pale ar. and sa. 
couped at the thigh gu. knee-cap and spur or. Motto — 
Laeto aere florent. Another Motto — Lighter than air. 
Ayrmin (Lincolnshire). Ar. a saltiro engr. and a chief gu. 
Ayrton. Per cross gu. and or, in the first and fourth 

quarter an escallop ar. 
Ayrton (Kight Hon. Acton Smee Ayrton, late Chief Com- 
missioner of Works, son of Frederick Ayrton, Esq., of Bom- 
bay, by Julia his wife, only dau. and heir of Lieut. -Col. 
Nugent). Per pale gu. and az. a fesse humettee erm. betw. 
three leopards' faces ar, quartering Nugent. Crest — A demi 
lion ram.p. erm. holding a pennon per pale gu. and az. 
thereon a leopard's face of. Motto — Pro aris ct focis. 
Ayscough (Nutthall, CO. Lincoln, Her. Visit.) Sa. a fesse 

betw. three asses pass. ar. 
Ayscougrh. Sa. a fesse or, betw. three asses erm. Crest — 

An ass erm. 
Ayscough. See Askue, Newcastle. 
Ayscue (Lincolnshire). Ar. three asses heads" couped sa. 
Ayshcomb (Liford, Berkshire). Or, a lion ramp. gu. armed 

and langued az. tail forked, a chief of the third. 
Aysildey. Ar. a hon ramp. gu. collared of the field, and 

charged on the shoulder with a mullet az. 
Aysingcourt. Ar. an eagle displ. with two heads gu. 

Crest — An eagle's head betw. two wings ppr. 
Ayson (Essex and London). Ar. a mullet sa. in the dexter 
point a fleur-de-lis gu. Crest — Out of a mural crown ar. a 
griffin's head gu. ducally gorged or. 
37 



Asrton. Barry of six or and az. on a canton gu. a cross 

pattee ar. Crest — A hand gauntleted holding a hawke'» 

lure ppr. 
Ayton. Gu. a cross patonce ar. 
Aytoun (that Ilk, co. Berwick, the heiress m. George, son 

of the first Lord Home, and the male representation passed 

to Aytoun of Dunmure, co. Fife). Ar. a cross engr. betw. 

four roses gu. Crest — A hand pulling a rose ppr. Motto 

— Decerptae dabunt odorem. 
Aytoun (Inchdairnie, co. Fife). The same, with a crescent 

ar. in fesse point for difif. Crest — A rose gu. Motto — 

Virtute orta occidunt rarius. 
Aytoun (Kinaldie, co. Fife). Ar. a cross engr. betw. four 

roses gu. a bordure of the second. Crext — A rose tree vert, 

flowered gu. Motto — Et decerptae dabunt odorem. 
Aytoun (Sii John Aytoun, of Kippo, Gentleman Usher of 

the Black Rod, ternp. Charles II.). Ar. on a cross engr. betw. 

four roses gu. a baton sa. ensigned on the top with one of the 

lions of England. Crest and Motto as Aytoun of Kinaldie. 



BAA (Bedfordshire, Harl. MSS. 1531, vol. I.). Gu. a chey. 

ar. betw. three plates. 
Baa, or Bao (Bedfordshire). Gu. a chev. betw. three 

mullets ar. (another, the mullets with six points pierced ar.). 
Baad, or Bad (Scotland). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a 

galley ar. : 2nd and 3rd, or, a crescent sa. Crest — A dexter 

hand ppr. holding a trident az. 
Baare, or Bare. Gu. three lions ar. 
Babalake. Ar. on a chev. betw. three crosslets fitchee az. 

five bezants. 
Babastre. Az. four fusils in pale or. 
Babb, or Babe. Barry of six ar. and sa, on a canton of 

the last, a leopard's face or. Crest — A dexter hand erect 

pointing with two fingers to the sun ppr. 
Babbington. Gu. three bezants (another, plates). 
Babe (Castle Derver, co. Louth). Az. three crest ents, two 

and one or. Crest — On a mound a babe in swaddling 

clothes all ppr. 
Babeham, or Babehaw (London). Sa. on a chev. 

betw. three wings ar. as many torteaux, each charged with 

a pheon or. Crest — A demi man ppr. wreathed on tlie head 

with a knot gu. holding in his right hand a wing sa. gutteo 

d'or. 
Babeham. Sa. on a chev. or, betw. three wings ar. three 

torteaux, each charged with an eagle's head of the second. 
Babelake. Ar. on a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet 

fitchee az. three annulets of the first. 
Babepull. Az. a chev. betw. three (another, ten) crosses 

crosslet or. 
Baber (Somersetshire and Middlesex). Ar. on a fesse go, 

three hawks' heads erased of the first. Crest— On a mount 

vert a cock with wings expanded ar. comb, wattles, and legs 

Baber (Somersetshire and Oxfordshire). Ar. on a chev. sa. 
betw. three ogresses, each charged with a martlet of the 
first as many mascles or. 

Babetote. Erm. on a chief or, three bendlets sa. 

Babington (East Brigford, co. Nottingham, and afterwards 
by the marriage of an heiress, Detliick, co. Derby, also Chil- 
well and Rampton, co. Notts., and Rothley Temple, co. Lei- 
cester). Ar. ten torteaux, four, three, two, and one, in chief 
a label of three points az. Crest — A demi bat dispL gu. 
(another a dragon's head betw. two dragons' wings gu. out of 
his mouth a scroll). Motto — Foy est tout. 

Babington (Sir William Babington of Kiddington, who 
was granted the Manor of Broadway on the dissolution of 
Pershore Abbey, and Gekvaise Babington, Bishop of Wor- 
cester, 1597-1610). Same Arms. 

Babington (Lodlcy, co. Leicester, Dorset, and Stafford). 
Ar. ten torteaux, four, three, two and one. Crest — A fox's 
head ppr. 

Babrampore (The Maharajah Dirg Bmte Sino of Bab- 
BA.MPORE). Ar. on a fess az. betw. in chief a sword in bend 
surmounted by a matchlock in bend sinister and in base on a 
mount a tiger couchant all ppr. an Eastern crown betw. two 
stars of six points of the first. Crest— Oa a trunk of a tree 
eradicated fesswise and sprouting to the dexter a falcoa 
surmounted by a rainbow all ppr. il/o££o— Fides et justitia. 

Babthorp (co. York). Sa. a chev. or, betw. three cres«ent» 
erm. Crest— A cockatrice's head erased ar. beaked, combed, 
and wattled or. 

Babthorp (co.York). Sa. a chev. or, betw. three crescents ar. 

Babthorpe. Ar. on a chev. sa. five fleurs-de-lis of the field. 

Babthorpe (formerly on glass, Worcester Cathedral). Sa. 
a chev. betw. three crescents or. 



BAB 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



BAD 



Babthorp. Gu. a fret ar. 

Babthorp. Gu. fretty ar. on a canton barry of six ar. and 

az. an orle of martlets of the first. 
Babthorp. Ar. fretty gu. on a canton barry of eight gu. 

and or, a cross pattee of the last. 
Babthorp. Sa. five plates betw. two chev. and three 

lozenges ar. 
Babtot (Byfold, CO. Hereford). Enn. on a chief az. three 

talbots" heads couped ar. 
Babwell, or Babbwell (co. Middlesex). Paly of six 
ar. and az. over all an eagle displ. sa. armed or (another 
adds a bend gu.). Crest— A. gate or. 
Bacey. Gu. a chev. ar. betw. three plates. 
Bache (Stanton, co. Derby, Visit. Derby, 1662 ; the heiress 
TO. Thornhill). Or, a lion ramp, reguard. pean within a 
bordure bezantee. Crest— A demi lion ramp, reguard. pean 
holding in the paw a bezant. 
Bache (granted to Thomas Bache, Esq., of Coventry). 
Erm. a lion ramp, guard, sa. holding betw. the paws a wool- 
pack ppr. within a bordure of the second charged with eight 
bezants, a chief wavy gu. thereon a bend engr. or, betw. 
two roses ar. barbed and seeded ppr. Crest— On a mount 
▼ert a demi lion guard, sa. bezantee, gorged with a wreath of 
oak or, holding betw. the paws a woolpack as in the Anns. 
Bache, or Batch (Thomas Bache, or Batch, sheriff of 
Worcester, temp. 5 Queen Anne, 1706). Or, a lion ramp, 
gu. within a border sa. bezantee. 
Bachecot. Or, on a bend engr. gu. three eagles displ of 

the first. 
Bacheler (Aston Clinton, 1606). Or, a fesse betw. three 
dragons' heads couped and erected in bend sa. Crest— A 
dragon's head erased or, vulned in the neck gu. 
Bacheler. Ar. a bend betw. three wings az. (another, sa). 
Bacher. Gu. two bendlets, one or, the other ar.). 
Back (William Back, Esq. M.D.). Per saltire ar. and gu. 
a hon ramp, guard, or, on a chief wavy az. a woolpack of 
the first betw. two bezants. Crest— A griffin pass, per pale 
gu. and erm. collared or, winged erminois, resting his dexter 
claw on a woolpack ar. 
Back. Ar. an eagle recursant overture sa. 
Backcombe (Devonshire). Ar. three bats displ. sa. 
Backhouse (Sunderland, co. Durham, and Killet, co. 
Lancaster). Per saltire or and az. a saltire erm. Crest— 
An eagle vert wings closed preying on a snake ppr. Motto — 
Confido in Deo. 
Backhouse (Middleton Lodge, co. York). Same as Bace- 

HODSE of Sunderland. 
Backhouse (Whitridge, co. Cumberland, Visit. London, 

1568). Artns and Crest same as Backhodse of Sunderland. 
Backhouse (Kent and London). Same as Backhouse of 

Sunderland. 
Backhouse (Swallowfield, Berkshire). Or, a saltire enn. 
Backhurst. Az. a saltire erm. 
Backome. Ar. a chev. betw. three bats gu. 
Backs (Trumpington, co. Cambridge). Erm. ou a bend gu. 

three eagles displ. or. 
Backwell (Middlesex). Paly of six ar. and az. on a chief 

gu. a lion pass. or. 
Backwell (Ixindon). Ar. on a chev. sa. three covered cups 

or. Crcal — Out of a mural crown or, a demi bull sa. 
Backwith. Sa. on a fcsse betw. three billets in chief and 
one in base ar. each charged with a mullet az. three fleur»- 
de-lisof the first. 
Bacon (Redgrave, co. Suffolk, premier bart. descended from 
the LonD Keeper Bacon). Gu. on a chief ar. two mullets 
pierced sa. Crat — A boar pass. erm. Motto — Mediocria 
firma. 
Bacon ( FUcount St. Albans). Same Arms with a crescent for 

difT. 
Bacon (Newton Cup, co. Durham, and Stewart Pile, co. 
Northumberland, granted 1752). Erm. a wild boar pass. az. 
briitled armed and ungulcd or, langued gu. on a chief of 
the thiid two mullets of the fourth. Crext — A demi wild 
boar inmp. guard, az. bristled armed and ungulcd or, 
langued gu. holding in the mouth a tilting spear ar. stricken 
In the shoulder and vulned ppr. 
Bacon (Itaconsthorpc, co. Norfolk). Az. three boars pass. or. 
Bacon (llarlcston, co. Norfolk). Ar. a fleur-de-lis betw. 
thrtt toars pass. or. Creit—A demi boar erect or, armed 
and bristled oz. 
Bacon (llcs.iet, co. Norfolk, and co. Suffolk, the heiress 
m. Eicon of Kriston). Ar. on a fesse engr. betw. three 
«*cutcheons gu. a» many mullets ar.. pierced aa. C)-eit — A 
talbot's head sa. erased gu. holding in the mouth a deer's 
lee or. 
Bacon (Drlnkston, co. Suffolk, and London, Visit. London, 
1568). Same ArmM and Crtst, with a mullet for diff. 

88 



Bacon (Major Cksae Bacon, Seafield, St. Anne, Isle of 

Man). Same as Bacon, Bart, of Kedgrave. 
Bacon. Gu. a bordure invecked ar. on a chief of the last two 

mullets pierced sa. 
Bacon (in the east window, north aisle, Bristol Cathedral). 
Az. three boars pass, in pale or. 

Bacon (exemplified 1829 to Robert M'Cadsland, Esq., son 
of DoMiNicK M'Oausland, Esq., of Daisy Hill, co. London- 
derry, by Mart, his wife, dau. and heir of Rev. Benjamin 
Bacon, D.D., on his taking the name of Bacon). Gu. a 
mullet or, on a chief erm. two mullets sa. Creit — A boar 
pass. erm. charged on the side with a mullet or. Motto 
— Mediocria firma. 

Bacon (Twyhouse, co. Somerset). Ar. a fesse betw. three 
round buckles gu. Crest— A greyhound's head erased sa. 
holding in the mouth a stag's foot or. 

Bacon (Suffolk). Gu. three trefoils pierced ar. 

Bacon (Suffolk). Az. on a fesse betw. three fleurs-de-lis or, 
as many srrifBns' heads erased of the field. 

Bacon (Sutton Bonnington. George Bacon, Esq., of Notting- 
ham). Vert a cross engr. erm. on a chief ar. a ducal 
coronet gu. betw. two mullets sa. Crest — On a mount veit 
a boar ar. bristled and tusked or, semee of mullets sa. in the 
mouth a ragged staff vert. Motto — Mediocria firma. 

Bacon (Yorkshire). Gu. on a chief ar. two mullets with six 
points sa. pierced or. 

Bacon. Gu. three cinquefoils pierced ar. (another, erm.). 

Bacon. Gu. a cross, engr. erm. on a chief vert two mullets 
or. 

Bacon. Ar. three boars' heads or. 

Baconsthorpe (temp. Edward III., armorial window, 
manor of West Bursham, co. York). Az. three grifBns' 
heads erased or, collared sa. 

Baconthorp. Az. three peacocks' (another, lapwings') 
heads erased or. 

Baconthorpe. Ar. a cross engr. gu. 

Bacton. Sa. three bars gemelles ar. on a canton of the 
second a crescent of the first. 

Bacwort. Or, on a saltire engr. sa. a mullet ar. 

Bacy. Gu. a chev. ar. betw. three bezants. 

Badam (monument to Thos. Badam in St. Endellion Church, 
Cornwall, 1723). A chev. erm. betw. three bulls' heads. 

Badby (North Okenden, co. Essex). Sa. a chev. engr. erm. 
betw. three swans ar. 

Badby (Suffolk). Sa. a chev. engr. betw. three swans ar. 

Badby (London, 1383). Ar. a saltire betw. four rooks sa. 
Crest — A sphinx pass, guard, ppr. wings endorsed. 

Badby. Ar. a saltire engr. gu. betw. four crows ppr. 

Badcock (St. Winow, co. Cornwall). Sa. a fesse betw. 
three cocks ar. 

Badcock (Essex, and Kensington, co. Middlesex). Sa. on a 
pale ar. three cocks gu. Crest — A stag lodged and guard, 
betw. two branches of laurel in orle, ppr. 

Badcock (Devonshire). Arms, the same. Crest — A demi 
cock gu. 

Badcock. Ar. two bars and in chief three cocks gu, 

Badd (Cames-Oysells, co. Hants. Granted 2 Jan. 1626). Az. 
five fleurs-de-lis in saltire ar. 

Badd (Fareham, co. Hants). Ar. five fleurs-de-lis in saltire 
az. Crest — A lion's head guard, erased ar. ducaUy crowned 
az. 

Baddeley, or Badley. Erminois, a bend sa. 

Baddiford (Dartmouth, co. Devon). Erm. on a bend flory 
counter-flory sa. three eagles displ. or. Crest— An eagle's 
head or, crowned with a coronet flory sa. betw. two branches 
of lilies ar. stalked and leaved vert. 

Baddingrton. Gu. three bezants. 

Bade. Ar. six fleurs-de-lis in saltire az. 

Badel. Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three escallops az. 

Badeley (Suffolk, and Leigh Halls, co. Essex.) Gu. a chev. 
betw. three boars' heads erased ar. Ci-est — A boar's head 
couped at the neck ar. 

Baden. Ar. on a bend double cottised sa. three eagles displ. 
or. 

Badenock (Scotland). Or, three lions' heads erased gu. 

Badesbury. Az. fretty ar. a fcsse betw. two cottises gu. 

Badew^e. Ar. on a bend cottised sa. three eagles of the field 
(another, the eagles or). 

Badford, or Badishford (Kent). Az. three eagles displ. 
in bend betw. two cottises nr. 

Badg'er, or Baerehott (cos. Cambridge, Gloucester, and 
Leicester, allowed at Her. Visit, co. Gloucester to Badoeb, 
or Badoehott, of Hall Place. Elizabeth, dau. and heir of 
ItowLAND Badohot, of llanlcy Castle, m. Nathaniel 
BosTocK, M.D., and d. 1682). Erm. on a bend gu. three 
eagles or. Crest — A bull's head caboased sa. betw. the 
attirea a greyhound courant ar. collared gu. 



BAD 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



B Aa 



Badgrer (Hanley Castle, co. Worcerter. Monumental in- 
spection at Hanley, to Maby, dau. of John Wakeman, of 
Beckford, and late wife of John, son of Bowi.and Badoes). 
Erm. on a bend gn. three eagles displ. or. 

Badger (Pool House, Hanley, co. Worcester). Or, a badger 
ppr. 

Badg'er (Upton, co. Worcester). Or, a badger pass. az. 

Badger. Or, a badger pass. sa. Crest— A badger ppr. 

Badlxam. Or, on a cross gu. five mullets of the first. Crest 
— An eagle displ. with two beads, ar. charged on the breast 
with a saltire gu. ilfoffo— Virtus astra petit. 

Badifforde. Az. on a bend cottised ar. three eagles displ. 

Pi- 
Badisford. Az. three eagles displ. ar. betw. two bendlets 

of the second. 
Badland. Ar. three spindles in fesse threaded or. 
Badlesmere {Baron Badlesmere ; summoned to Parliament 

1309 ; abeyance 1309). Ar. a fesse betw. two bars gemelles 

ga. Crest — A lion's gamb. erased sa. holding a luurel branch 

vert. 
Badlesmere. Ar. a fesse and canton gu. 
Badlesmere (Kent). Erm. a fesse betw. two bars gemels 

gu- 
Badlesmere. Ar. a fesse double cottised gu. 
Badley (Suffolk). Sa. a chev. engr. betw. three swans ar. 

Crest — A demi lion ramp. ar. charged with two bendlets az. 
BadlO'we. Per chev. erm. and sa. two greyhounds in full 

course, within a bordure of France. 
Badrick. Sa. a fillet and a chev. humettee reversed ar. 
Badstone. Ar. three bats' wings displ. sa. 
Baeshe (Stansted, co. Hertford, Visit. London, 1568). Per 

cheT. ar. and gu. in chief two cocks sa. in base a saltire 

or. 
Baett, or Batt. Sa. a fesse betw. three hands erect or. 

Crest — A demi lion or, guttee de sang. 
Bafford (Nottinghamshire). Sa. three dancing bears or, 

(another, a bordure, ar.). 
Bafford (Yorkshire). Ar. a saltier sa. (another, adds a label 

and three points gu.). 
Bafyn. Sa. an escutcheon erm. 
Bagraret. Erm. on a bend gu. three escallops or. 
Bag'ecroft (Boxwell, co. Norfolk). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. 

armed or. 
Bagecroft (Norfolk). Ar. a lion sa. tail queued. 
Bagecroft. Ar. a fesse gu. betw. three eagles displ. sa. 
Bagehott (Droitwich, CO. Worcester), Or, on a bend gu. 

three eagles displ. of the field. See Bdtleb of Droitwich. 
Bageley, or Bag-ley. Or, three lozenges az. Crest — On 

the top of a spear issuing a wivem sans legs tail nowed in 

a knot. 
Bagenal. See Bagnall. 
Bagenald. Sa. a leopard's face betw. eight martlets in 

orle or. 
Bagenden. Or, on a pale sa. three stars of the first. 
Bagenliolt. Per saltier or and erm. a lion ramp. az. 
Bager. Gu. a goat pass. ar. 

Bager, and Baget (Cambridgeshire). See Badgeb. 
Bagesover (Salop). Gu. a fesse betw. three birds ar. 
Bagg (Plymouth, co. Devon, granted 1G07). Paly and bendy 

of six coimterchanged ar. and gu. on a chief or, three 

cinquefoils az. Crest — Or, two wings endorsed, the dexter 

gu. the other ar. charged with a cinquefoil az. 
Bagg (Plymouth, Visit. Devon, 1620). Lozengy ar. and gu. 

on a chief or, three cinquefoils az. Crest — Two wings gu. 

and ar. a cinquefoil az. on the second. 
Bagge (granted to William Bagge, of Shipdam, Norfolk, by 

Edward Byese, Garter, 15C6). Az. a griffin ramp. erm. 

betw. three cinquefoils or. Crest — A demi griflfin erm. 

holding a cinquefoil stalk and leaves vert. 
Baggallay (registered to Ricoard Baggallat, Esq. of 

Kingthorpe House, Upper Tooting, CO. Surrey, father of Sir 

BiCHABD Baggallat, Attorney-General, 1874). Per chev. 

gu. and az. on a chev. or, betw. three goats' heads erased 

ar. as many fleurs-de-lis of the second. Crect — A goat's 

head erased ar. charged on the neck with three fleurs-de-lis 

one and two az. Motto — Stemmata quid faciunt. 
Bagge. Az. a griffin segreant erm. betw. three cinquefoils 

ar. Crest — A sword in pale, supporting a garland of laurel 

all ppr. 
Bagge (Stradsett HaU, co. Norfolk, bart.). Lozengy paly 

bendy ar. and gu. two flaimches or, on a chief of the last an 

annulet betw. two cinquefoils of the second. Crest — A pair 

of wings addorsed or, semee of annulets gu'. Motto — Spes 

est in Deo. 
Baggiley (Baggiley, CO. Chester). Or, three lozenges az. 

C>est — A ram's head az. charged with three lozenges and 

attired or. 

39 



Bagglnton, or Baggin^on. Or, a pile ai. 

Baggs. Lozengy gu. and ar. on a chief of the second three 
cinquefoils of the first. Crest — ^A rose charged with a thistle 
ppr. 

Baghot (Prestberie, co. Gloucester, Visit. Leicester, 1619). 
Erm. on a bend gu. three eagles displ. or. Crest — A 
stag's head cabossed sa. betw. the attires a greyhound 
conrant ar. collared gu. 

Bagley. Ar. on a fesse betw. three martlets gu. as many 
plates. 

Bagnall (Kent). Barry of six or (another, erm.) and sa. over 
aU a lion ramp. az. Crest — A dragon's head erased gu. 
gorged with two bars or. 

Bagnall (Staffordshire and Wales). Erm. two bars or, over 
all a lion ramp. az. Crest — An antelope sejant ar. billettee 
sa. ducaUy gorged, lined, armed, and tufted or. 

Bagnall (Sir Henby Bagnall, of the Newry, co. Down, 
knighted at Christ Church, Dublin, 24 April, 1579). Erm. 
two bars or, over all a lion ramp. az. Crest — An heraldic 
antelope sejant vert crined ducally gorged and chained or. 

Bagnall (Wick and Worcester. After the Battle of Wor- 
■cester William Bagnall, of Upper Wick, who d. 21 Sept. 
1652, aged 36, gave his horse to Charles II., on which His 
Majesty fled through St. Martin's Gate). Ermines two bars 
or, over all a lion ramp, double queued vert. Crest — An 
antelope sejant ar. billettee sa. horns and tail or, collared 
and chained of the same, chain reflexed over the back. 

Bagnall (Staffordshire). Sa. an inescutcheon erm. charged 
with a lion's head erased vert within an orle of eight 
martlets or. 

Bagnall (Staffordshire). Sa. an inescutcheon erm. charged 
with a leopard's face, within an orle of martlets or. 

Bagnall. Sa. an inescutcheon within an orle of martlets 
or. 

Bagot (Lord Bagot, of Bagot's Uromley, co. Stafford). 
Erm. two chev. az. Crest— Oxxt of a ducal coronet or, a 
goat's head ar. attired of the first. Supponers — Two goats 
ar. attired or. Motto — Antiquum obtinens. 

Bagot (Staffordshire). Ar. two chev. az. 

Bagot. Or, on a cross gu. five escallops ar. 

Bagot, or Bacot. Erm. on a bend gu. three spread 
eagles or. 

Bagot. Erm. a bend gu. 

Bagot (William Bagot, Sheriff of Warwick and Leicester, 
temp. Henry III., son of Robert Bagot, of Morton Bagot, 
temp. Henry I.). Ar. two chevronels az. 

Bagot (confirmed to Chbistopheb Neville Bagot, Esq., of 
Aughrane Castle, co. Galway). Erm. two chevronels az. 
in the dexter chief point a trefoil slipped vert. Crest — Out 
of a ducal coronet or, a goat's head ermines homed of the 
first. JVfoi^o^Antiquum obtinens. 

Bagot ifrom glass in Worcester Cathedral). Ar. a chev. gu. 
betw. t;iree martlets sa. N.B. — ^This coat was for a time 
borne by Bagot of Bagots Bromley, co. Stafford, but the 
original bearings were resumed by Richabd Bagot, who d. 
1596. 

Bagot (Castle Bagot, Dublin). Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. 
three martlets sa. as many mullets or. Crest — As the last. 

Bagshaw (Delaridge, co. Derby). Ar. a bugle-horn sa. 
betw. three roses gu. seeded or. Crest — An arm couped at 
the elbow and erect ppr. grasping a bugle-horn sa. stringed 
vert. 

Bagshaw (South Okendon, co. Essex, and London). Or, a 
bugle-horn vert, stringed gu. betw. three roses of the same 
barbed and seeded ppr. Crest — A bugle-horn or. 

Bagsha-w. Ar. a bugle -hom sa. stringed vert, (another, 
the same betw. three cinquefoils, gu.). 

Bagshaw^e (Gbeaves-Bagshawe, Ford Hall, co. Derby, and 
Banner Cross, co. York). Or, a bugle-horn sa. betw. three 
roses gu., for Baoshawe ; quartering Greaves, and subse- 
quently, Child, Foxlowe, Murray, Bcstabd, Clay, Elm- 
SALL, &c. Crests— l&t, A dexter cubit arm couped the 
hand ppr. grasping a bugle-horn sa. stringed vert, for 
Bagshawe; 2nd, Gbeaves. Motto — Forma flos, faraa flatus. 

Bagsliaw (Inkberrow, co. Worcester. From a gold seal pro- 
duced at the Visit. 1682 but which were disallowed). Same 
as Bagshawe. 

Bagshaw (Wormhill Hall, and the Oakes, in Norton, co. 
Derby, originally of Abney, in the same co. and Ridge 
and Farewell, co. Stafford). Per pale erm. and gu. a bugle- 
horn stringed betw. three roses all counterchanged barbed 
and seeded ppr. Crest — A cubit dexter arm issuing out of 
the clouds the hand ppr. holding a bugle hom or, the 
handle sa. within the strings a rose gu. iUotJo^Forma flos, 
fama flatus. 

Bagshote. Erm. on a bend gu. three eagles displ. ar. Crat 
— An acorn slipped and leaved ppr. 



BAG 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



B AI 



Ba^ue. Sa. a saltire or, betw. four fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest- 
On a chapeau, a pelican vulning herself all ppr. 

Bag-way. Ar. three cries gu. 

Bag-way. Ar. an orle gu. -K-ithin an orle of the last. 

Bag-way. Ar. two cries in fesse gu. 

Bag-well (Ballyloughane, Burgagery, and Marlfield, co. 
Tipperary). Paly of six ar. and az. on a chief gu. a lior. 
pass, of the first. Crest— Oa\. of a mural crown a demi bull, 
all ppr. iloilo — Tn fide et in bello fortis. 

Bag-well. See Pckefot. 

Bagrworth. Ar. a chev. ermines betw. three boars' heads 
couped sa. 

Bag-worth. Ar. a chev. gu. a bordure engr. sa. 

Bahon. Az. a bend ar. cottised cr. 

Baiggendens. Or, en pile sa. three etoiles of the field. 

Baikie (Tankerness, co. Orkney). Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. 
three flames of fire ppr. a lion ramp. betw. two stars of the 
field. Crest— X flame of fire ppr: Supporters— Tyio angels 
ppr. Motto — Commodum ncn damnum. 

Baildon (Yorkshire). Ar. a fesse betw. three fleurs-de-hs 
sa. 

Bailey (Norwich). Per pale az. and sa. a cross crosslet sal- 
tirewise betw. four estoiles or. Crest — A cubit arm erect 
vested bendy of six az. and sa. cuff ar. the hand ppr. holding 
a crosier and surmounted by an estoile both or. Motto — Deo 
duce. 

B alley (Ightham Place, and Nepicar House, co. Kent) . Ermi- 
nois a 'lion pass. sa. holding in the dexter paw a cross patt^e 
fitch^e gu. on a chief nebulee of the second a cross pattee, or. 
Crest — In front of a demi lion erminois holding in the dexter 
paw a cross pattee fitchee gu. the trunk of a tree eradicated 
fesswise and sprouting ppr. Motto — Nee temere nee timide. 

Bailey. Erm. three bars wavy sa. Crfst — A demi lady 
holding on her dexter hand a tower, in her sinister a laurel 
branch vert. 

Bailey (Bart, of Glanusk Park, co. Brecon). Ar. betw. two 
bars, three annulets in fesse gu. all betw. as many martlets 
of the last. Crest — A griffin sejant ar. sem^e of itnnulets 
gu. Motto— Liberia.a. 

Bailhache (Jersey). Az. a lion ramp, or, in chief a cres- 
cent betw. two mullets of the last. Crest — A ship, ppr. 
Motto — Vive momor lethi, fugit hora. 

Bailie (Uingdufferin, co. Down). Az., nine stars, three, two, 
and one, ar. Crest— A hand and dagger. Motto — Quid 
clarius astris. 

Bailiffe. Ar. on a bend betw. three martlets gu. three 
plates. 

Bailies (Yorkshire, granted 1578). Or, a fesse wavy az. 
betw. two lions pass, guard, sa. 

Baillie (Kennedt-Baillie: exemplified, 1836, to Rev. James 
Kennedv-Bailue, D.D., Rector of Ardtrea, Armagh, on his 
assuming by Royal License the additional name of Baillie). 
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. nine etoiles three, three, two and 
one, for Baillie; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a chev. gu. betw. three 
cross-crosslets fitchee sa. within a double tressure fiory 
counterflory of the .second, for Kennedy. Crests — l.st, A 
boar's head couped ar., for Baillie: 2nd, A dolphin naiant 
az. Mntlo—(l\.iii clarius astris. 

Baillie-Hamilton. See Hamilton. 

Baillie (Hoperig, co. Haddington, and Lamington, co. Lan- 
ark). Az. (in some early blazons, sa.) nine stars three, three, 
two, and one, ar. Crest — A boar's head erased ppr. Motto— 
Qiiiil clarius astris. v. Cochrane. 

Baillie (Jervieswoode, co. Lanark ; the heiress m. Lord Bin- 
ning, and lier 2nd son, who inherited Jervieswoode. took the 
name of Baillie : his descendants eventually succeeded to the 
Earldom of Haddington). Sa. the sun in his splendour betw. 
nine stars, three, two, and one, ar. Crest — A crescent or. 
Miitto — Major virtus quam splendor. 

Baillie (Walstoun, Scotland). Ar. the moon in her comple- 
ment betw. nine stars, three, two, three, and one, ar. Crest — 
A dove volant holding in her beak a branch of olive ppr. 
Miilln — I'atior ct spcro. 

Baillie (Manncrhall). A«. Jervieswoode, a crescent ar. for 
difference. Cr«*i— A crescent or. Motto — Major virtus quam 
uplendor. 

Baillie (Caimbroc, co. Lanark, 1780). Sa. the sun in his 
(picndour betw. five stars two, two and one, ar. in middle 
chief an eagle's head erased or. Crest — On the point of a 
sword erected ppr. hiltcd and pommeled or, a laurel wreath 
fru( tuated of the first. Mnlto — Pcrscveranf i. 

Baillie (I'olkemmct, co. Linlithgow, bart., I«23). Quarterly, 
Inland 4lh, aj.. nine stars three, three, two, and one or, a 
bordure counter ncbuly ar. and sa. ; 2nd and 3rd, az. a lion 
ramp, and in chief three stars ar., Inglis of Murdistown. 
Ci-f«(— A star of eight points issuing out of a cloud ppr. 
Supporteri—Tvio lions guard, ar. Motto— la caliginc lucct. 
40 



Baillie (Innishargy, Ireland). Az. nine stars, three, three, 
two and one ar. a bordure wavy or. Crest — A star of eight 
points ar. issuing from a cloud ppr. Motto — Nil clarius 
astris. 

Baillie (William Baillie, of Rosehall, co. Sutherland, son 
of Alexander Baillie of Dochtour, 1747). Az., nine stars, 
three, three, two and one. ar., a bordure or, charged with 
ten cinquefoils vert. Crest — A cat sejant ppr. Matter— 
Spero meliora. 

Baillie (Gen. Sir Evan Baillie, Bart., 1812). Az. nine stars, 
three, three, two and one, ar. Crest — .A. boar's head erased 
ppr. Supporters — Two tigers ppr. each gorged with an 
antique crown or, and thereto afBxed a chain passing betw. 
the forelegs and reflexed over the back of the last. Motto — 
Ubi bene ibi patria. 

Baillie (Monkton, co. Ayr, 1874). Az. nine stars three, three, 
two and one, or, a bordure engr. ar. Creit—A-n eagle reguar- 
dant his wings raised ppr. Motto — Libertas optima rerum. 

Baillie (Paignton, co. Devon, 1855). Az. nine stars of six 
points wavy three, three, two and one, or, a bordure of the 
last charged with two boars' heads erased in pale and two 
hands holding daggers erect in fess all ppr. Crest— \ boar's 
head couped ppr. Motto — Quid clarius astris. 

Baillie (Balmeddiesyde, Scotland). Az. nine stars or, three, 
three, two and one, a bordure ar. charged with eight cres- 
cents of the first. Crest — A morning star ppr. Motto — ^Ver- 
titur in lucem. 

Baillie (James Baillie, descended of LittlegiU, 1763). Az. 
nine stars, three, three, two and one ar., a bordure indented 
of the second charged with eight stars gu. Crest — A boar's 
head erased ppr. Motto — Quid clarius astris. 

Baillie (William Robekt Baillie, Edinburgh, 1858). Az. 
eight stars three, two, two and one, or, in fess point a stag's 
head cabossed of the last, a bordure erm. Crest — The 
sun in his splendour ppr. Motto — Clarior astris. 

Bain (Tulloch, co. Aberdeen). Az. a wolf's head erased or. 
Crest— A. dexter arm armed grasping a dirk ppr. Motto— ^t, 
marte et arte. 

Bain (Capt. Michael Bain, 1784). As. Tulloch, within a 
bordure ar. Crest — A dexter arm grasping a dirk ppr. Motto 
— Et marte et arte. 

Bain (Pitcairlie, a cadet of Tulloch). The same, within a bor- 
dure counter compony or and az. Same Crest and Motto. 

Bain (Kindall, CO. Perth). Az. a garb or, banded of the first 
betw. three thistles ppr. 

Bain (Sheriff Clerk of Berwick, 1680). The same within a bor- 
dure or. Crest — A hand holding a scroll of paper ppr. Motto 
— Virtute. 

Bain (Sheriff Clerk of Fife, 1672). Az. a garb or, banded of 
the first betw. three thistles of the second. Crest and 
Motto same as last. 

Bain (Lynton, co. Devon, 1871). Az. a wolfs head erased ar. a 
bordure of the last. Crest — A dexter hand ppr. holding a rose 
gu. slipped and leaved vert. Motto — Benedic nobis Domine. 

Bail^w•all (Visit. London, 1568). Sa. a chev. or, betw. three 
daggers erect ar. 

Bailward (Horsington, co. Somerset). Ar. a chev. betw. 
three bees volant in chief gu. and three torteaux in base. 
Crest — A bull's head couped ar. 

Baily (Thomas Farmer Bailt, Esq. of Hall Place, co. Kent). 
Or, on a fesse engr. betw. three nags' heads erased az. as 
many fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest — A goat's head erased az. 
bczantee horned or. Motto — Vestigia nulla restrorsum. 

Bainard. Erm. a fesse betw. two chev. sa. 

Bainard. Sa. a fesse betw. two chev. ar. 

Bainbridg-e. Az. three battle-axes or, staffs ar. Crest — 
An arm from the shoulder issuing from the sea, holding an 
anchor, all ppr. 

Bainbridg'e. Az. two battle-axes or, a bordure engr. of 
the last. 

Bainbridge. Az. two battle-axes in pale ar. on a chief or, 
two mullets gu. pierced of the field. 

Bainbrigg-, or Bambridge ( Leicester.shirc). Ar. a chev. 
embattled betw. three battle-axes sa. Crest — On a mount 
vert a goat sa. collared ar. 

Bainbrigge (Lockington, co. Leicester). Ar. a chev. 
embattled betw. three battle-axes sa. Crest — A goat sa. 
horned and unguled ar. around liis neck a collar of the 
same standing on a hill vert. These Arms were confirmed 
and the CreH granted in 1583, by Klowrr, Norroy, to William 
Bainhrigue, of Lockington, descended from the ancient 
family of the Batnbbioges, of the North. 

Baine (Chester). Az. a fesse crenellee or, betw. three mart- 
lots ar. 

Baines. Sa. two shank bones in cross ar. that in pale 
surmounting the one in fesse. Crest — A bone and palm 
branch in saltire ppr. 



B A I 



THE GENERAL ARMORY. 



B AK 



Baines (Bell Hall, co. York). Same Arms. Crest — A cubit 
arm erect holding in the hand a sUank bone in bend sinister 
ar. 

Baines (Peteonly, Scotland). Az. a wolfs head erased or. 
in chief a crescent ar. Crest— A dexter hand holding a 
dagger ppr. Motto — Vel arte vel raarte. 

Bainfield. Paly of ten or and gu. 

Bainfrons. Paly of six, ar. and gu. 

BaintOZL. Erm. a bend fusilly gu. 

Baird (Auchniedden, co. Aberdeen, last of main line d. 1777, 
represented by 1'raser of Findrack as heir of line). Gu. a 
boar pass. or. Crest — A griffin's head erased ppr. Motto — 
Dominus fecit. 

Baird (.Vewbyth, co. Aberdeen, cadet of Auchmedden, bart. 
1C95). Gu. a boar pass, or, a canton erm. charged with 
a sword paleways ppr. Crest — A boar's head erased or. 
Motto — Vi et virtute. 

Baird (Saughton Hall, co. Edinburgh, bart. 1696). The same 
Arms with a crescent or, surmounting the sword for diff. 
Same Crest and Motto. Sir James Gardener Baird was 
allowed, in 1845, to drop the crescent, having become repre- 
sentative of Newbyth. 

Baird (Newbyth, bart. 1809, cadet of Saughton Hall, as 
recorded in London for Sir David Baikd of Ferntower, co. 
Perth, 1st bart, and G.C.B.). Gu. in chief within an in- 
crescent an etoile of eight points ar. (in allusion to the badge 
of the Ottoman Order) in base a boar pass, or, on a canton 
erm. a sword erect hilted and pommeled or. First Crest — 
A m