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Full text of "General catalog"

I 



GENERAL 
CATALOG 



195 7-195 8 




BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



Vol. Vll, No. 1 ^ September, 1957 

Brandeis University Bulletin, published four times a year {once in September, 
October, March and May) at Brandeis University, Waltham 54, Massachusetts. 
Entered as second class matter at the Post Office at Boston, Massachusetts. 



Brandeis University 
Bulletin 

General Catalog Issue 



^ 



SESSION 
1957-1958 



WALTHAM. MASSACHUSETTS 



131205 



Table of Contents 

PAGE 

O-Ticers of the University 5 

I. The Role of the University . ... 19 

II. University Facilities 24 

III. The College of Arts and Sciences 29 

A. Admission of Students 29 

B. Scholarships and Financial Aid 32 

C. Student Services 34 

D. Student Activities .37 

E. Fees and Expenses .40 

F. Academic Requirements 43 

G. The Fields of Concentration . . . . . . . .49 

IV. The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 57 

A. General Information 57 

B. Areas of Graduate Studies 64 

Biochemistry 64 

Biology 65 

Chemistry 66 

English and American Literature 68 

History of Ideas 70 

Mathematics , 72 

Music 73 

Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 75 

Physics 77 

Psychology 78 

V. Courses of Instruction .80 

Appendix 

I. Building and Facility Benefactions 178 

II. Endowment Funds 183 

III. Chairs 185 

IV. Fellowships 188 

V. Scholarship Endowment Funds 192 

VI. Scholarship Funds 201 

VII. Loan Funds 224 

VIII. Service Endowment and Service Funds 228 

IX. Prizes .230 

X. Research Funds and Grants 234 

XL Special Grants 238 

XII. General Education S . . . 239 

XIII. Creative Arts Awards Commission 240 

XIV. Art Acquisitions Commission . 242 

XV. Index of Courses 243 

[3] 



Academic Calendar 



1957-1958 



New Students: 
September 10 
September 11 
September 12 
September 13 



Returning Students: 
September 15 
September 16 
September 17 
September 18 



Residence Halls Open 

Registration 

Consult Faculty Advisers 

Enroll; File Study Cards 



September 18 



Graduate Students Register 



FALL TERM 



September 19 and 20, 
Thursday and Friday 

September 26 and 27, 
Thursday and Friday 

October 10 and 11, 
Thursday and Friday 

October 17 and 18, 
Thursday and Friday 

November 11, Monday 

November 28 and 29, 
Thursday and Friday 

December 20, Friday 

January 2, Thursday 

January 20, Monday through 
January 30, Thursday 



Classes begin 

No Classes 

No Classes 

No Classes 

No Classes 
No Classes 

Winter Recess Begins* 

Classes resume 

Mid- Year Examinations 



SPRING TERM 



February 3 and 4, 
Monday and Tuesday 

April 3, Thursday 
April 14, Monday 

May 16, Friday through 
May 29, Thursday 

May 26, Monday 

May 30, Friday 

June 8, Sunday 

* After last class 



Classes Begin 

Spring Recess Begins* 
Classes resume 
Final Examinations 

No Classes 
No Classes 
Commencement 



[4] 




Officers of the University 

1957 - 1958 
Board of Trustees 

Abraham Feinberg, ll.b., ll.m., Chairman 
Joseph F. Ford, l.h.d., Treasurer 
Norman S. Rabb, a.b., Secretary 



George Alpert, ll.b., ll.d. 

James J. Axelrod, l.h.d. 

Sol W. Cantor, b.a. 

Jacob A. Goldfarb 

Reuben B. Gryzmish, b.a., ll.b. 

Meyer Jaffe, l.h.d. 

Milton Kahn, b.s. 

Dudley F. Kimball, m.b.a 

Herbert H. Lehman, ll.d., l.h.d. 

Adele Rosenwald Levy 

Joseph M. Linsey 

isador lubin, ph.d., ll.d. 

William Mazer, b.s. 



Joseph M. Proskauer, ll.b., ll.d. 

Israel Rogosin 

Eleanor Roosevelt, ll.d., l.h.d. 

Samuel Rubin 

Irving Salomon 

Ruth G. Rose, a.b., a.m, 

Jacob Shapiro, b.s. 

Isaiah Leo Sharfman, ll.b. 

Samuel L. Slosberg, a.b. 

Simon E. Sobeloff, ll.b. 

Willard Long Thorp, ph.d., ll.d. 

Frank L. Weil, ll.b., l.h.d. 

Lawrence A. Wien, ba., ll.b. 



President of the University 
ABRAM L. SACHAR, PH.D., LITT.D. 



[5] 



Fellows of the University 



Herbert H. Lehman, ll.d., l.kld., New York, N. Y., Honorary Chairman 

JSamuel Rubin, New York, N. Y, Chairman 

JIrving Kane, b.a., ll.b., Qeveland, Ohio, Vice Chairman 

tPHiLiP M. Meyers, Cincinnati, Ohio, Secretary 



* Fisher Abramson 

New Bedford, Mass. 

♦Sidney J. Allen 
Detroit, Michigan 

* Samuel E. Aronowitz 

Albany, New York 

* Louis Aronstam 

Atlanta, Georgia 

JDavid D. Berlin 

Boston, Massachusetts 

tDavid Borowitz 
Chicago, Illinois 

tSusan Brandeis 

New York, New York 

tMorris Brown 

Palm Beach, Florida 

♦Milton H. Callner 
Chicago, Illinois 

JMax Chernis 

Newton, Massachusetts 

tHenry Crown 
Chicago, Illinois 

tHal Davis 

New York, New York 

tDavid Dubinsky 

New York, New York 

* Harry L. Epstein 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

tMose M. Feld 
Houston, Texas 

tBenjamin Fine 

New York, New York 



tHarry F. Fischbach 

New York, New York 

t Joseph M. Frehling 
Louisville, Kentucky 

tSamuel Friedland 
Miami, Florida 

♦Charles Fruchtman 
Toledo, Ohio 

XL. E. Goldstein 

St. Louis, Missouri 

iMortimer C. Gryzmish 
Brookline, Massachusetts 

tHerman G. Handmaker 
Louisville, Kentucky 

tC. Allen Harlan 
Detroit, Michigan 

^Florence G. Heller 
Chicago, Illinois 

tjacob Hiatt 

Worcester, Mass. 

♦Samuel Kappel 

Brooklyn, New York 

tBenjamin S. Katz 
Racine, Wisconsin 

tCecil D. Kaufmann 
Washington, D. C. 

tCecil H. Kavinoky 
Buffalo, New York 

tPhilip M. Klutznick 
Park Forest, Illinois 

♦Leonard H. Krieger 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



[6] 



tSamuel Lemberg 

New York, New York 

tlrving Levick 

Buffalo, New York 

*Julius Livingston 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 

tSam A. Lopin 

New York, New York 

*Joseph Mailman 

New York, New York 

*Frederic R. Mann 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

tYoland D. Markson 

Los Angeles, California 

tMorton J. May 

St. Louis, Missouri 

JTheodore R. McKeldin 
Annapolis, Maryland 

* Elmer Moyer 
Dayton, Ohio 

tThomas A. Pappas 

Boston, Massachusetts 

JLouis R. Perini 

Ashland, Massachusetts 

J Jack I. Poses 

New York, New York 

*Jacob S. Potofsky 

New York, New York 

tSamuel Rapaporte, Jr. 

Providence, Rhode Island 

tFrank H. Reitman 
Newark, New Jersey 

*Harold L. Renfield 

New York, New York 

tjack Segall Resler 
Columbus, Ohio 

*Tubie Resnik 

New York, New York 



^Abraham A. Ribicoff 
Hartford, Connecticut 

*Mrs. Max Richter 

New York, New York 

* Simon Rifkind 

New York, New York 

t Julius M. Rogoff 

Rowayton, Connecticut 

JEdward Rose 

Boston, Massachusetts 

*Gustave J. Rosen 

"Westport, Connecticut 

tFelix Rosenbaum 

Leominster, Massachusetts 

tjames N. Rosenberg 
New York, New York 

tLouis K. Roth 

Hartford, Conneaicut 

*John D. Schapiro 
Baltimore, Maryland 

*Dore Schary 

Los Angeles, California 

tNathan Schwartz 

Boston, Massachusetts 

tCharles Segal 

Larchmont, New York 

tNate S. Shapero 
Detroit, Michigan 

tAlfred Shapiro 

New York, New York 

tAbe Shiffman 

Detroit, Michigan 

tLeonard N. Simons 
Detroit, Michigan 

*Alvin A. Sopkin 

Providence, Rhode Island 



[7] 



tNathan B. Spingold 
Palm Beach, Florida 

tHarry Starr 

New York, New York 

tNathan Strauss 

New York, New York 

tDavid Tannenbaum 

Los Angeles, California 

* Harold Turk 

Miami Beach, Florida 

*Selman Waksman 

New Brunswick, New Jersey 

tjoseph Weingarten 
Houston, Texas 



*Carl Weinkle 
Miami, Florida 

* Morton Weinress 

Chicago, Illinois 

tHerman Wiener 
Toledo, Ohio 

tCharles H. Yalern 
St. Louis, Missouri 

* Harry Zeitz 

Brooklyn, New York 

*Ben D. Zevin 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Terms expire: * 1958 fl959 $1960 



[8] 



Officers of Instruction 

I. FACULTY 

Abram Leon Sachar, ph.d., litt.d. President of the University 

Saul G. Cohen, ma., ph.d. Dean of Faculty and Rita H. Aronstam 

Professor of Chemistry 
Cyrus H. Gordon, ma., ph.d. Associate Dean of Faculty and 

Professor of Near Eastern Studies 



Paul J. Alexander, ph.d. Cecil and Joel Kaufmann 

Professor of History 
David Sandler Berkowitz, a.m., ph.d. Professor of History 

Joseph Israel Cheskis, a.m., ph.d. Peter and Elizabeth Wolkenstein 

Professor of Romance Languages and Literature 
Osborne Earle, am., ph.d. Professor of English 

Israel Efros, ma., ph.d. Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor of 

Hebrew Literature and Jewish Philosophy 
{Hebrew University, Jerusalem) 
VICTOR L. Ehrenberg, ph.d. Visiting Professor of History 

{University of London) 
Irving Gifford Fine, a.b., a.m. Frederic R. Mann Professor of Music 

Benjamin Friedman, b.s. Professor of Physical Education 

Nahum Norbert Glatzer, ph.d. Michael Tuch Professor of Jewish History 
Abraham Goldin, ma., ph.d. Visiting Professor of Biochemistry 

Kurt Goldstein, m.d. Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor of Psychology 

Eugenia Hanfmann, ph.d. Professor of Psychology 

Arnold Hauser, ph.d. Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor of Fine Arts 

{University of Leeds) 
Erich Heller, ph.d. Jacob Ziskind Visiting Professor of 

German Literature 
{University of Wales, Swansea) 
Martin D. Kamen, b.s., ph.d. Rosenstiel Professor of Biochemistry 

Nathan O. Kaplan, a..b., ph.d. Rosenstiel Professor of Biochemistry 

Louis Kronenberger, litt.d. Sophie Tucker Professor of Theatre Arts 

Svend Laursen, ph.d. James Henry Yalem Professor of Economics 

*MAX Lerner, A.M., PH.D. Max Richter Professor of American 

Civilization and Institutions 
William Farnsworth Loomis, b.s., m.d. Professor of Biochemistry 

** Frank Edward Manuel, a.m., ph.d. Mack Kahn Professor of 

Modem History 

*On Sabbatical leave, 1957-1958 
**On Sabbatical leave, Guggenheim Fellow, 1957-1958 

[9] 



Herbert Marcuse, ph.d. Professor of Politics and Philosophy 

Abraham H. Maslow, m.a., ph.d. Philip Meyers Professor of Psychology 

Hans Meyerhoff, ph.d. Visiting Professor of Philosophy 

(University of California, Los Angeles) 
PAUL Eadin, A.B., ph.d. Samuel Rubin Professor of Anthropology 

Philip Rahv Visiting Professor of Comparative Literature 

Harry Rand, MJ). Professor of Clinical Psychiatry 

♦Simon Rawidowicz, PH.D. Philip W. Lown Professor of Hebrew 

Literature and Jewish Philosophy 
John P. Roche, m.a., ph.d. Professor of Politics 

Julius M. Rogoff, ph.g., m.d. Visiting Professor of Physiology 



Arthur Berger, b.a., m.a. Associate Professor of Music 

Donald N. Bigelow, m.A., phjx Associate Professor of American History 
Erwin Bodky, m.A. Associate Professor of Music 

Leo Bronstein, ph.d. Associate Professor of Pine Arts and 

Near Eastern Civilization 
**Lewis A. Coser, ph.d. Associate Professor of Sociology 

James V. Cunningham, a.b., ph.d. Associate Professor of English 

Leon Ehrenpreis, m.a., ph.d. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Herman T. Epstein, m.a., ph.d. Associate Professor of Biophysics 

(on the Morris Schapiro and Family Foundation) 
David L. Falkoff, B.A., ph.d. Associate Professor of Physics 

(on the Buffalo Foundation) 
Orrie M. Friedman, b.sc, ph.d. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

(on the Helena Rubinstein Foundation) 
Sidney Golden, b.s., ph.d. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

(on the Samuel Berch Foundation) 
Oscar Goldman, A.M., ph.d. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

(on the Benjamin S. Katz Foundation) 
Eugene P. Gross, a.m., ph.d. Associate Professor of Physics 

Aron Gurwitsch, ph.d. Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Milton Hindus, B.A., m.s. Associate Professor of English 

Irving Howe, b.s.sc. Associate Professor of English 

Rudolf Kayser, ph.d. Associate Professor of German Language and 

Literature, Emeritus 
Albert Kelner, m.sc, ph.d. Associate Professor of Biology 

(on the Bernard Aronson Foundation) 
Harold P. Klein, b.a., ph.d. Associate Professor of Biology 

(on the Ben Novack Foundation) 

Alexander Lesser, a.b., ph.d. Visiting Associate Professor of Anthropology 

(on the Samuel Rubin Foundation) 

*On Sabbatical leave, First Semester, 1957-1958 
**On leave, 1957-1958 

[10] 



Henry Linschitz, M.A., ph.d. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

**Robert A. Manners, m.a., phd. Associate Professor of Anthropology 

(on the Samuel Rubin Foundation) 
Edwin B. Pettet, a.b., ph.d. Associate Professor of Theatre Arts and 

Director of the Brandeis Theatre 
Romney Robinson, m.a., ph.d. Associate Professor of Economics 

(on the Jacob S. Potofsky Foundation) 
Silvan S. Schweber, M.S., ph.d. Associate Professor of Physics 

(on the Henry Nelson Hart Foundation) 
Harold Shapero, a.b. Associate Professor of Music 

Arnold S. Shapiro, m.a., ph.d. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Mitchell Siporin Associate Professor of Fine Arts 

Bayard P. Sleeper, ph.d. Visiting Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

(North Dakota Agricultural College) 
Walter Toman, ph.d. Associate Professor of Psychology 

Claude A. S. Vigee, m.A., ph.d. B.E. and Regine S. Levy Associate Professor 

of French Civilization 



Maurice Auslander, b.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Jean-Pierre Barricelli, m.a., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages 

Max Chretien, ph.d. Assistant Professor of Physics 

Harold Conroy, b.s., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Stanley Diamond, a.b., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Julien Serge Doubrovsky, Agrege' de lTJnwersite 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 
James E. Duffy, a.m., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Richard S. Eckaus, m.a., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Economics 

(on the Atran Foundation) 
♦Philip J. Finkelpearl, a.m., ph.d. Assistant Professor of English 

George Fischer, ph.d. Assistant Professor of History 

Lawrence H. Fuchs, BA.., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Jack S. Goldstein, M.S., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Physics 

Lawrence Grossman, b.a., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

(on the Rosenstiel Foundation) 
Richard M. Held, M.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Jerome Himelhoch, M.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

(on the Mortimer Gryzmish Foundation for Human Relations) 
Lionel Jaffe, s.b., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Biology 

William P. Jencks, m.d. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

(on the Rosenstiel Foundation) 

*On leave, 1957-1958 

**On leave, Guggenheim Fellow, 1957-1958 

[11] 



Mary Ellen Jones, b.s., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Richard M. Jones, A.B., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

James B. Klee, m.A, ph.d. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Lawrence Levine, M.S., scd. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

(on the Rosenstiel Foundation) 
Kenneth J. Levy, m.f.a., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Music 

**Leonard W. Levy, A.m., PH.D. Assistant Professor of American History 

(on the Earl Warren Foundation) 
Denah Levy LmA, m.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Margaret Lieb, m.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Biology 

Shlomo Marenof, ph.b., m.A. Assistant Professor of Hebrew Language 

and Literature 
Irving J. Massey, m.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature 
John F. Matthews, b.a. Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts 

Arno J. Mayer, m.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Politics 

Stanley E. Mills, ph.d. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Ricardo B. Morant, M.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

John E. Mulhern, ph.d. Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 

Ulric Neisser, m.A., PH.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Albert Gjerding Olsen, a.m., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Biology 

(on the Julius M. Rogoff Foundation) 

Henry Popkin, a.m., ph.d. Assistant Professor of English 

* * Robert Otto Preyer, m.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of English Literature 

*Philip Rieff, m.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Sidney Rosen, A.M., PH.D. Assistant Professor of Physical Science 

and Education 

Abraham J. Siegel, b.a., m.A. Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics 

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) 

W. D. Stahlman, PH.D. Visiting Assistant Professor of History of Science 

(Massachusetts Instittite of Technology) 

Harry Stein, b.s., m.A. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Maurice R. Stein, b.A. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Robert Leath Stigler, Jr., B.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
(on the Samuel Rubin Foundation) 

*Marie Syrkin, b.A., m.A. Assistant Professor of Humanities 

Caldwell Titcomb, m.A., ph.d. Assistant Professor of Music 

Chi-LIua Wang, M.S., PH.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and 

Research Associate 

John Burt Wight, ed.m., ph.d. Assistant Professor of English Composition 

Harry Zohn, ed.m., ph.d. Assistant Professor of German 

*On leave, 1957-1958 

**On leave, Fulbright Fellow, 1957-1958 

[12] 



Denise A. Alexandre, Licencie es Lettres 



Peter Grippe 

Thalia Phillies Howe, ma., ph.d. 
Suzanne Keller, m.a., ph.d. 
Marvin Lowenthal, b.a., m.a. 
Shelomo Morag, PH.D. 
Marie-Antoinette Untereiner, m.a. 



MOSHE ZELTZER, PH.D. 



Lecturer in Romance 
Languages 
Lecturer in the Fine Arts 
Lecturer in Humanities and Classics 
Visiting Lecturer in Sociology 
Lecturer in Humanities 
Visiting Lecturer in Hebraic Studies 
Visiting Lecturer in European 
Languages 
Visiting Lecturer in Near Eastern Studies 



Joan Evans de Alonso, m.a. 
Albert A. Berman, a.b., a.m. 
Paul Bertelsen 
Jean-Paul Delamotte, b.a. 

Hubert L. Dreyfus, b.a., m.a. 
Eileen Patricia Driscoll, b.a. 
Philip Joseph Driscoll, b.a, m.a. 
Robert Evans, a.b., a.m. 
Emanuel Flumere, b.s., m.ed. 
Raymond Grew, a.m., ph.d. 
Irving Heller, b.s., ed.m. 
William W. Holdheim, m.a., ph.d. 



Frances Crowley LaShoto, a.b., m.a. 

NORBETT L. MlNTZ, PH.D. 

Anna Catherine Nichols, b.s., m.s. 

Arthur Polonsky 

I. Milton Sacks, b.s., m.a. 

Jerome A. Schiff, b.A., ph.d. Instructor and Research Associate in Biology 

Samuel Shapiro, b.s., m.a. .Instructor in American History and Civilization 



Visiting Instructor in Spanish 

Instructor in English and Humanities 

Instructor in Theatre Arts 

Instructor in Romance Languages and 

Literature 

Instructor in Philosophy 

Instructor in Fine Arts 

Instructor in English Composition 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Instructor in History 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Instructor in European Languages and 

Literature 

Visiting Instructor in Speech 

Instructor in Psychology 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Instructor in Fine Arts 

Instructor in Politics 



Walter Milton Spink, m.a., ph.d. 
Philip A. St. John, m.s., ph.d. 
Ronald M. Sukenick, b.a., m.a. 
John Van Doren, m.a., ph.d. 
Harold Weisberg, b.a., m.h.l. 
Marcel Wellner, ph.d. 
Kathleen B. Whitehead, m.a., ph.d. 
Judith Goldsmith Zimmon, b.a., m.a. 

[13] 



Instructor in Fine Arts 
Instructor in Biology 
Instructor in English 
Instructor in American Civilization- 
Instructor in Philosophy 
Instructor in Physics 
Instructor in Mathematics 
Instructor in Dance 



II. RESEARCH ASSOCIATES AND FELLOWS 



L C. R. Alfred, m.sc, ph.d. 
Robert G. Bartsch, ph.d. 
Gideon Blauer, ph.d. 
Eliahu Boger, PH.D. 
Peter R. Brook, ph.d. 
j. k. chakrabarti, ph.d. 
Ramesh Ch. Chatter ji, ph.d. 
Sylvia Honkavaara, ph.d. 
E. A. Jackson, m.a, ph.d. 
Lewis Jacobs, ph.d. 
Bernard T. Kaufman, ph.d. 
Morton L. Mallin, ph.d. 
Jack W. Newton, ph.d. 
Lauri Pekkarinen, PH.D. 
Kurt Schaffner, ph.d. 
Sidney Shifrin, ph.d. 
Harold Sommer, m.sc. 
Robert Stevenson, ph.d. 
J. H. Stuy, m.a. 



Research Associate in Chemical Physics 

Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

Research Fellow in Chemistry 

Visiting Research Associate in Psychology 

Research Associate in Physics 

Research Associate in Biology 

Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Research Fellow in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

Research Fellow in Biochemistry 

Research Fellow in Chemistry 

Research Associate in Chemistry 

Research Fellow in Biology 



[14] 



School Councils 

Creative Arts 

Irving G. Fine, Chairman; Arthur Berger, John F. Matthews, Mitchell 
Siporin. 

Humanities 

Joseph I. Cheskis, Chairman; J. V. Cunningham, Cyrus H. Gordon, 
Claude A. S. Vigee. 

Science 

Herman T. Epstein, Chairman; David Falkoff, Oscar Goldman, Nathan 
O. Kaplan, Harold P. Klein. 

Social Science 

Herbert Marcuse, Chairman; Donald Bigelow, Svend Laursen, A. H. 
Maslow, Paul Radin, John P. Roche. 

Committee on Graduate Studies 

Cyrus H. Gordon, Chairman; Saul G. Cohen, Arthur Berger, J. V. 
Cunningham, David Falkoff, Oscar Goldman, Nathan O. Kaplan, 
Harold P. Klein, Herbert Marcuse, A. H. Maslow. 

Faculty Committees 

Administrative 

Caldwell Titcomb, Joseph F. Kauffman, Charles W. Duhig, Robert 
Evans, Denah L. Lida, Margaret Lieb, Romney Robinson, John B. 
Wight, Harold Weisberg. 

Athletic 

Lawrence H. Fuchs, Clarence Q. Berger, Benjamin Friedman, Anna 
C Nichols, Sidney Rosen, I. Milton Sacks, Harry Zohn. 

Admissions and Scholarships 

Jean-Pierre Barricelli, Joseph F. Fauffman, Philip J. Driscoll, 
Richard S. Eckaus, Orrie M. Friedman, Kenneth J. Levy. 

Degrees, Awards and Prizes 

Osborne Earle, Charles W. Duhig, Joseph F. Kauffman, James E. 
Duffy, Albert Kelner, Harold Shapero, John Van Doren. 

Educational Policy 

Saul G. Cohen, Clarence Q. Berger, Joseph I. Cheskis, Herman T. 
Epstein, Irving G. Fine, Eugene Gross, Joseph F. Kauffman, Herbert 
Marcuse, John P. Roche, Mitchell Siporin, Claude A. S. Vigee. 

[15] 



Faculty Organization 

S. S. Schweber, Erwin Bodky, George Fischer, Richard M. Held, Irving 
Howe, Svend Laursen, Henry Linschitz. 

Library 

Nahum Glatzer, Marvin Lowenthal, Louis Schreiber, Harold Con- 
roy, James E. Duffy, Irving J. Massey, Walter M. Spink. 

Entrance into Graduate and Professional Schools 

Martin D. Kamen, Joseph F. Kauffman, Erwin Bodky, James V. Cun- 
ningham, James E. Duffy, David L. Falkoff, Kurt Goldstein, Nathan 
O. Kaplan, Harold P. Klein, Louis Kronenberger, Svend Laursen, 
Herbert Marcuse, A. H. Maslow, Paul Radin. 

Lecture 

Milton Hindus, Max M. Kleinbaum, Harold "Weisberg, Stanley 
Diamond, Lawrence H. Fuchs, Martin D. Kamen, James B. Klee, Har- 
old Shapero, Maurice R. Stein. 



[16] 



Officers of the University 

Abram Leon Sachar, PH.D., litt.d. .'....' President of the University 

Clarence Q. Berger, a.b., A.m Dean of University Administration 

Saul G. Cohen, m.a., ph.d Dean of Faculty 

Cyrus H. Gordon, m.a., ph.d Associate Dean of Faculty 

Joseph F. Kauffman, a.b., a.m Dean of Students 

C. RUGGLES Smith, A.m., ll.b Special Assistant to the President 

MAX Kleinbaum, b.S., M.A Administrative Assistant to the President 

David L. Rolbein, b.a., m.s Assistant to the Dean of 

University Administration 

Academic Departments 
Admissions 

Philip J. Driscoll, a.b., m.a Director 

Student Personnel 

Harold Weisberg, b.a., m.h.l Director 

Ellen K. Lane, a.b., m.e . Assistant Director 

NATICA Bates, A.b Student Services Secretary 

Registrar 

Charles Warner Duhig, a.b., a.m Registrar 

Health Office 

Robert J. Cataldo, A.b., m.d Medical Director 

Ralph Mankowich, b.s., m.d., f.a.c.s Surgeon 

Florentino P. Pina, A.B., M.d Physician 

Psychological Counseling Center 

Eugenia Hanfmann, ph.d Director 

Andras Angyal, m.d Consultant 

Elliot Baker, ph.d Counselor 

Richard M. Jones, ph.d Counselor 

Visiting Committee of the Psychological Counseling Center: 
Grete L. Bibring, m.d., George E. Gardner, ph.d., m.d. 

Library 

Louis Schreiber, b.s.s., b.l.s Director of Administrative Services 

Marvin LowENTHAL, B.A., M.A Director of Special Services 

Harry N. Tarlin, M.A., M.S. in l.S Technical Processes Librarian 

Edith Frankel, A.B., m.l.S Readers' Services Librarian 

Joseph A. Fagan, a.b., m.l.s. r Cataloger 

Helen Fiske, a.b., m.l.s Cataloger 

Janet Russell, a.b., m.a Cataloger 

Athletics 

Benjamin Friedman, b.s Director 

Harry Stein, b.s., m.a Assistant Director 

[17] 



Faculty Administrative Services 

Gertrude Carnovsky Faculty Administrative Assistant 

Samuel Rosenfield, b.S Manager of Laboratory Supplies and Services 

Summer School 

Lawrence H. Fuchs, b.a., ph.d Director 

Administrative Departments 
Comptroller 

Bernard Gordon, b.s., m.b.a Comptroller 

Norman R. Grimm, a.b Steward 

Marjorie Olson Bursar 

William Dansker, a.b Manager of Services 

Stephen Grabowski, b.b.a., c.p.a. Mass Assistant to the Comptroller 

Public Affairs 

Emanuel M. Gilbert, b.s Director 

Lawrence J. Kane, a.b Assistant to the Director 

University Resources 

Sidney Berzoff, b.s Director, New York Area 

Hyam Korin, b.A., M.A Director, New England, Eastern Canada 

Robert Herzog, b.a Director, Midwest 

Buildings and Grounds 

Sumner J. Abrams Director 

Joseph M. Maher, Jr. Assistant to the Director 

John Foti Construction Coordinator 

Board of Trustees 

Hannah Litt Executive Secretary 

University Relations 

Sandra Berkman, a.b., A.m Executive Secretary, Alumni Association 

Edith A. Steinberg, a.b Director, New York Area 

Anne Zyfers Executive Director, National Women's Committee 

Administrate Personnel 

Esther E. Blauer {Secretary to the President); Paula Blay {Health Office); 
Etta Crevoshay {Athletic Office); Claire Freeman {Scholarships Office); 
Beverly Fanning {Bursar's Office); Anne Gaspari {Accounts Office); Sada 
Gordon {School of Social Science); Beverley Goudey {Graduate School); Betty 
Griffin {Office of Registrar); Barbara Johnson {Office of Dean of Students); 
Louise Lewisohn {School of Humanities); Keitha Lindquist {Office of Comp- 
troller); Dorothy Merrill {Service Bureau); Rosamonde Morrison {School 
of Creative Arts); Miriam M. Ober {Summer School); Minnie F. Piha {Ac- 
knowledgments Office); Rowena Peoples {Office of Buildings and Grounds); 
Ruth Rudik {Office of the Dean of Administration); Esther K. Schroeder 
{Office of Administrative Assistant to the President); Sarah R. Schweitzer 
{Office of Public Affairs); Anastasia H. Sutermeister {Office of Admissions); 
Jean Tooter {School of Science); Nettie Weiss {Office of Student Personnel). 

[18] 



I 

The Role of the University 

Brandeis University is named for the illustrious jurist, Louis Dembitz 
Brandeis, whose wisdom contributed to every aspect of the welfare of his 
country and his people. The founders of the University have been inspired by 
the challenge of Justice Brandeis' ideal of what a university should be: 

"It must always be rich in goals and ideals, seemingly attainable but beyond 

immediate reach . . ." 

"It must become truly a seat of learning where research is ■pursued, books 

written, and the creative instinct is aroused, encouraged, and developed 

in its faculty and students." 

"It must ever be mindful that eudcation is a precious treasure transmitted 

— a sacred trust to be held, used, and enjoyed, and if possible strengthened, 

then passed on to others upon the same trust." 

At the inaugural ceremonies in October, 1948, the aims of Brandeis Uni- 
versity were stated by the first President, in the form of a three-fold promise. 
First, Brandeis will be an institution of quality where the integrity of learning, 
of research, of writing, of teaching, will not be compromised. An institution 
bearing the name of Justice Brandeis must be dedicated to conscientiousness 
in research and to honesty in the exploration of truth to its innermost parts. 

Secondly, Brandeis University will be a school of the spirit — a school in 
which the temper and climate of the mind will take precedence over the 
acquisition of skills, and the development of techniques. Unyielding in the face 
of the defeatism which is inherent in the various phases of nihilism, Brandeis 
will be a dwelling place of permanent values — those few unchanging values 
of beauty, of righteousness, of freedom, which man has ever sought to attain. 

Finally, Brandeis will offer its opportunities of learning and of the cultiva- 
tion of the heart to all. Neither student body nor faculty will ever be chosen 
on the basis of population proportions whether ethnic or religious or economic 

Brandeis University came into being because of the desire of American 
Jewry to make a corporate contribution to higher education in the tradition 
of the great American secular universities which have stemmed from denom- 
inational generosity. By choosing its faculty on the basis of capacity and crea- 
tivity and its students according to the criteria of academic merit and promise, 
the University hopes to create an environment which may cause the pursuit of 
learning to issue in wisdom. 

The Special Character 

The special character of Brandeis, in its undergraduate areas, is difficult to 
define because it is not planned to implement any extremist educational phi- 
losophy. The University has set itself to develop the whole man, the sensitive, 
cultured, open-minded kind of citizen who grounds his thinking in facts, who 
is intellectually and spiritually aware, who believes that life is significant and 
who is concerned about a going society and the role he will play in such a 
society. 

[19] 



THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The University will not give priority to the molding of vocational skills 
nor is it partial to the development of specialized interests at the expense of a 
solid general background. This should not be construed to mean that what is 
termed practical or useful is to be ignored. Brandeis merely seeks to avoid 
specialization which is unrelated to the heritage of the Western World — its 
humanities, its social sciences, its sciences and its creative arts. For otherwise 
it produces fragmentized men with the compartmentalized point of view which 
has been the bane of contemporary life. 

A realistic educational system must offer adequate opportunity for personal 
fulfillment. The ego is precious and it should be protected and enriched. Edu- 
cation at Brandeis encourages the drive for personal fulfillment, but only 
within the framework of social responsibility. 

Thus Brandeis belongs with many of its sister institutions as it strives for 
full-orbed personalities, practical enough to cope with the problems of a tech- 
nological civilization, yet mellowed by the values of a long historical heritage; 
self-sufficient to the point of intellectual independence, yet fully prepared to 
assume the responsibilities which society imposes. 

University Organization 

Brandeis University at the present time comprises the College of Arts and 
Sciences, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the Summer School. 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers instruction leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts degrees in the Schools of Creative Arts, Humanities, Social Science and 
Science. Regularly matriculated students pursuing courses of instruction under 
the Faculty of Arts and Sciences may, upon satisfactory completion of the first 
year, continue as candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Introductory and survey courses in all fields provide a foundation for the 
student's general education as distinguished from his more intensive pursuit of 
knowledge within specialized areas. After the first year's work is satisfactorily 
completed, each student will select a provisional field of concentration from 
the programs of studies offered by one of the Schools. A full listing of courses 
of instruction in the College of Arts and Sciences appears in a later section of 
the catalog. 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences offers courses of study leading 
to the master's and doctor's degrees in ten areas: Chemistry, Music, Near 
Eastern and Judaic Studies, Psychology, English and American Literature, His- 
tory of Ideas, Physics, Biology, Biochemistry and Mathematics. A full listing 
of the courses of instruction in these areas appear later in the catalog. 

The Summer School of Brandeis University, established in 1957, places 
emphasis upon two relatively new developments in summer school study. All 
courses are offered within the framework of Institutes embodying unifying 
themes. The themes vary from year to year. The thematic approach enables 
faculty and students to relate their experience in one course to that in another 
and to meet in colloquia and conferences, sometimes cutting across disciplinary 
lines. 

The other unique feature is the concentration of offerings on the advanced 
undergraduate and graduate level. 

[20] 



THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Full information concerning the Summer School may be obtained by ad- 
dressing: Summer School Office, Rabb Graduate Center, Brandeis University, 
Waltham 54, Massachusetts. 

Ziskind Professorships 

To implement its philosophy of education, the University brings to the 
campus distinguished academic figures from sister universities both in the 
United States and abroad who serve as Ziskind Visiting Professors. This pro- 
gram, made possible by the Jacob Ziskind Endowment Fund, enables the 
University to supplement its regular teaching staff with the presence of acade- 
micians drawn from every major stream of educational thought. Inclusion of 
distinguished foreign academicians serves to challenge and stimulate faculty 
and students with the introduction of new concepts and new educational view- 
points, thus strengthening the entire educational process. 

Among the Ziskind Professors are: Erich Heller, Jacob Ziskind Professor of 
German Literature; Arnold Hauser, Jacob Ziskind Professor of Fine Arts; Israel 
Efros, Jacob Ziskind Professor of Hebrew Literature and Jewish Philosophy; 
and Kurt Goldstein, Jacob Ziskind Professor of Psychology. 

Lectureships 

Private donors and foundations have established lectureships which sup- 
plement the established curriculum and bring to campus prominent authorities 
from varying fields: 

Harry B. Helmsley Lectures 

Established for the purpose of reducing barriers that separate races, creeds 
and nationalities, the Helmsley Lecture series in 1956-1957 presented Otto 
Klineberg, Martin Luther King, Jr., Oliver C. Cox, Ina DeA. Reid, Bruno 
Bettelheim, E. Franklin Frazier, Martin D'Arcy, Paul Tillich, Henry Aiken, 
Northrop Frye, and Emanuel Rackman. 

Sidney Hillman Lectures 

Made possible by the Sidney Hillman Foundation, this program has enabled 
the University to present series of lectures by the following: Robert Maynard 
Hutchins, Max Lerner, Eliahu Elath and Eleanor Roosevelt. The Hillman Lec- 
tures for 1957-1958 will be offered by Hon. Lester Pearson of Canada. 

Annual Louis Dembitz Brandeis Memorial Lecture 

An annual lecture series has been established in commemoration of the 
birthday of Louis Dembitz Brandeis, for whom the University is named. These 
lectures, open to the public, concern themselves with "the cause of justice and 
the rights and dignity of man." Previous Louis Dembitz Brandeis Memorial 
Lecturers have been United States Supreme Court Associate Justices Felix 
Frankfurter and William O. Douglas, and Irving Dilliard, of the St. Louis Post- 
Dispatch, the Honorable Charles E. Wyzanski, Jr., United States District Judge 
for Massachusetts, and the Honorable William Henry Hastie, Judge of the Third 
United States District Court of Appeals. The 1956 guest was Earl Warren, 
Chief Justice of the United States. 

[21] 



THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Ludwig Lewisohn Memorial Lectures 

Sponsored by students of the University in tribute to their late teacher, the 
1956-1957 series presented Stanley Edgar Hyman, Randall Jarrell, Alfred Kazin, 
Malcom Cowley, Maxwell Geismar and Cleanth Brooks. 

Foundation for Advanced Studies 

It is clearly recognized that a properly functioning university assumes the 
dual responsibility of transmitting knowledge to its students and of widening 
the boundaries of knowledge available to students and society; and that it is 
the normal task of members of the faculty to be teacher-scholars who fulfill 
these two responsibilities. To increase the opportunities for research, Brandeis 
University has established a Foundation for Advanced Studies through which 
support may be provided for scholarly activities of members of the faculty, 
distinguished visiting scholars and scientists, and candidates for advanced 
degrees. 

Anthropology 

An annual grant from the Samuel Rubin Foundation supports the program 
in Anthropology on the campus and field work in the Middle East designed 
to explore the origins of civilization. 

Biochemistry 

The graduate and research program in Biochemistry, starting in the academic 
year 1957-1958 which is described in detail in a later section of this catalog, 
is supported by a grant from the Dorothy H. and Lewis Rosensteil Foundation 
made to Brandeis University "in support of research in the natural sciences 
with primary emphasis in Biochemistry". 

Grants in Aid of Research 

Grants are made to the University by individuals and by many privately and 
publicly supported foundations. These grants have provided materials, equip- 
ment, and facilities for research and financial support for advanced students, 
research assistants and members of the faculty. 

University Activities 

The Festival of the Creative Arts 

Biennially the University sponsors a Festival of the Creative Arts which 
is held in the Ullman Amphitheatre. In the past it has featured the world 
premiere of Leonard Bernstein's "Trouble in Tahiti," a choreographed version 
of Stravinsky's "Les Noces," the world premiere of Kurt Weill's "Threepenny 
Opera," in the English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein, the first presentation 
in America of Poulenc's "Les Mamelles de Tiresias," a major art exhibit "Art 
on the Campus," and the American premiere of Darius Milhaud's opera "Medee" 
and ballet "Salade." 

Lowell Institute Cooperative Broadcasting Council 

Brandeis University is a member of the Lowell Institute Cooperative Broad- 
casting Council, which sponsors the national award-winning educational radio 

[22] 



THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

station WGBH-FM and Boston's pioneer educational TV station, WGBH-TV, 
Channel 2. Brandeis, along with Boston College, the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Boston University, Harvard University, Lowell Institute, MIT, the Museum 
of Fine Arts, the New England Conservatory of Music, Northeastern University, 
and Tufts University, makes its teaching facilities available for use by WGBH- 
FM and its television affiliate WGBH-TV. As a member of the Lowell Institute, 
which develops the programming for both stations, the University extends its 
educational facilities and concepts beyond the confines of the campus into the 
Boston community. 

Harvard-Brandeis Cooperative Research 
on Israel's Legal Development: 

Harvard University Law School and Brandeis University jointly sponsor 
a program designed to codify the law of the State of Israel. Launched several 
years ago by Harvard Law School, the new co-sponsorship with Brandeis Uni- 
versity will enable continuance of the research until 1959. The program seeks 
to stimulate the study of comparative law and legislation; to undertake legisla- 
tive research relating to problems raised by bills under consideration in Israel; 
and to establish a possible model for similar undertakings relating to the law 
of other new or rapidly changing societies. 

Brandeis University Creative Arts Awards 

The establishment of the Brandeis University Creative Arts Awards was 
announced by the University during 1956. Awards are presented annually in 
the areas of Theatre Arts, Music, Painting, Poetry and Sculpture. In each of 
these fields of the Arts two types of awards are bestowed. Achievement medals 
are conferred upon successful artists for outstanding accomplishment during 
the year; and grants-in-aid are awarded to young talented persons, in recognition 
of their creative ability and encouragement for future study and training. Special 
juries are appointed annually in each of the five fields to judge the competition. 
Medal recipients for 1956-1957 were as follows: Painting, Stuart Davis; Poetry, 
William Carlos Williams; Music, William Schuman; and Theatre Arts, Hallie 
Flannagan Davis. 

Other Cultural Opportunities 

The favorable location of Brandeis University enables its students to enjoy 
both the charm of rustic New England life and the advantages of metropolitan 
Boston. 

Outstanding musical events are offered at Symphony Hall, home of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, at the Boston Opera House and at Jordan Hall. 
Valuable art collections and interesting exhibits are found in the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Boston Public 
Library, and the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art. Students are urged to 
attend the lectures and forums constantly scheduled in the city. 

Opportunities for entertainment are also plentiful. With more legitimate 
theatres than any city in the nation except New York, Boston is often host to 
new plays before they are taken to Broadway. The ballet, the opera and other 
similar events are equally accessible. 

[23] 



II 

University Facilities 

Brandeis University, some ten miles west of Boston, is situated on the 
southwest outskirts of Waltham, Massachusetts. Adjacent to Wellesley and 
near historic Lexington and Concord, the campus overlooks a Greater Boston 
suburban panorama. From the eastern Charles River boundary, University 
grounds sweep upwards to New England's famed Boston Rock, where Governor 
Winthrop and his Massachusetts Colony explorers first surveyed this region. 

Brandeis' architectural master plan follows the free forms of rolling terrain, 
rock outcroppings, complementary trees and shrubbery. Linked by walks and 
roads, buildings of glass, brick and stone contrast colorfully with winter, and 
blend with New England's bright autumn, flowering spring and green summer 
seasons. 

Brandeis is easily accessible. Trains from Boston's North Station stop at 
Roberts-Brandeis University Station. Watertown cars run from Park Street 
subway station in Boston to Newton Corner, where a Roberts bus may be taken 
directly to the campus on South Street in Waltham. By automobile, Brandeis 
may be reached from Boston on Commonwealth Avenue (Route 30); from 
Exit 45 of Boston's encircling Route 128; or from Exit 14 of the east-west 
Massachusetts Turnpike. Road signs at the Route 30 rotary just west of the 
Route 128 overpass point to Brandeis University. 

♦ Residence Halls 

Men's and women's accommodations consist predominantly of double 
rooms, some single rooms and larger quarters, and each residence hail has its 
own comfortable lounge. Modern laundry and other conveniences are available 
to all students. Each resident student should bring blankets, lamps and such 
rugs and decorations as are desired. Arrangements for linen and towel service 
may be made through the University. 

The Castle 

On the campus heights near Boston Rock is the University's landmark, 
an imposing fieldstone structure designed after medieval architecture. Com- 
pleted some time before Brandeis University came into being, the Castle still 
attracts many visitors. The interior is completely redesigned to provide modern 
living for students, including single and double rooms as well as apartments 
for several students. 

Schwartz Hall 

Duplicating medieval design, this sister structure to the Castle houses 26 
students. The lounge, a retreat for reading, relaxation and entertainment, is 
furnished in contemporary style and equipped with a radio-phonograph-tele- 
vision console. 

[24] 



UNIVERSITY FACILITIES 

Hamilton Quadrangle 

This main women's housing and recreational area consists of the Student 
Union building and five residence halls surrounding the Anne J. Kane Re- 
flecting Pool. Residence halls are a double unit designated temporarily as 
Hamilton A and B, DeRoy Hall, Renfield Hall and Usen Hall. Functionally 
equipped rooms afford maximum living and closet space, with ground floor 
lounges facing the landscaped quadrangle. 

Roosevelt House 

Just off the main campus, this modernized New England home offers co- 
operative housekeeping, including meal preparation, for 16 women students. 

Smith Hall 

At the base of Boston Rock, this men's residence hall has a housing capacity 
of 38. Its colonial, pine-panelled lounge includes a great fireplace, grand piano, 
television console, comfortable sofas and chairs. 

Ridgewood Cottages 

Five modern brick residence halls housing 167 men comprise another of 
the University's basic living areas. They are: Emerman Hall, Fruchtman Hall, 
Danciger Hall, Allen Hall and Rosen Hall. Each has two lounges. 

Study Halls 

Ford Hall 

A red brick building near the central campus, Ford Hall contains classrooms, 
laboratories, a portion of the faculty and administrative offices, and Seifer Hall, 
an auditorium seating approximately 500. This hall is used for lectures, con- 
certs, small dramatic performances, Brandeis-Waltham choral rehearsals, and 
evening sessions of the Institute of Adult Education. 

Sydeman Hall 

This annex to Ford Hall houses laboratories, classrooms, faculty and ad- 
ministrative offices and a faculty lounge. 

Slosberg Music Center 

A major structure for the School of Creative Arts, this center contains a 
recital hall seating 250, classrooms, office studios, practice rooms, music library, 
as well as recording and transcription alcoves. A central, skylighted hall con- 
tains changing displays of the University's permanent art collection. Many of 
the annual University-sponsored art exhibits are also held here. 

Kalman Science Center 

Dominating the central campus, the Kalman Science Center contains in- 
structional and research facilities for the undergraduate School of Science, 
and for advanced work in the Graduate School. Two-thirds of the building's 
walls are glass, allowing maximum natural light into classrooms and laboratories. 

[25] 



UNIVERSITY FACILITIES 

Rabb Graduate Center 

This unique structure includes seminar rooms, classrooms, a circular glass- 
walled lounge, and Graduate School faculty and administrative offices. Air 
conditioned, the center also serves ideally for the Brandeis University Summer 
School. 

The University Library 

About to rise on the north campus is the new Goldfarb Library Building, a 
three-story glass and brick structure embodying the latest library construction 
principles, with a 600,000 volume capacity. Interspersed through open stacks 
will be carrells to ensure privacy for researchers. Adjacent to resources pertain- 
ing to their fields will be private studies for faculty members of the Schools of 
Science, Humanities, Social Science and Creative Arts. Seminar rooms will be 
similarly provided in specific research and reference areas. The library will also 
contain centralized audio-visual aids, and works of art from the University 
collection will be displayed throughout the building. 

The present library, located near the central campus, is a gabled fieldstone 
structure. Remodeled in 1948 with a three-story stack wing, storage and office 
area, its reading rooms can accommodate some three hundred students at a 
time. The current collection, devoted primarily to essential instructional, re- 
search and reference needs, is enlarging constantly in pace with University 
expansion. The University record library, containing close to 2000 albums, is 
on the library Music Balcony, where students have the use of record players. 
Through the courtesy of city officials, Brandeis students have access to the Wal- 
tham Public Library. By arrangement, faculty and students may also use the 
Boston Public Library as well as specialized libraries of neighboring educational 
institutions. 

Recreational Facilities 

Castle Commons 

Constructed in circular conservatory style, this spacious lounge is centrally 
situated on the second story of the Castle, and is a popular gathering place for 
students during leisure hours. Ideal for small dances and social functions, its 
handsome furnishings include a grand piano, radio-phonograph and television 
console, club chairs, divans, desks and bridge tables. The Commons also con- 
tains a portion of the University's permanent art collection. 

Student Union 

The two-story glass wall of this handsome rust-brick structure overlooks 
the pool and gardens of Hamilton Quadrangle. The first floor houses a dining 
hall, and the second floor a faculty dining room, private dining room, dub 
lounge, and music room. 

Feldberg Lounge 

Spacious and comfortable, this glass and brick walled lounge occupies 
the major portion of the Student Union upper level. It is used for informal dis- 
cussions, lectures, songfests and conferences, and is a popular meeting place 

[26] 



UNIVERSITY FACILITIES 

for students between classes. Throughout the year, works by student and con- 
temporary artists are exhibited. 

Mailman Student Center 

This striking glass, brick and granite structure provides a spacious lounge 
for Ridgewood Quadrangle students, a modern recreational room, and lockers 
for commuting students. Conveniently adjacent to South Parking area, the 
building's broad windows and terraces look out on Ridgewood Quadrangle, 
Slosberg Music Center, and the landscaped wooded area gracing the south- 
western campus. 

The Three Chapels 

In the quiet northwest campus are Brandeis University's three chapels. 

Traditionally, an educational institution sponsored by a religious faith has 
one chapel. Though use is almost invariably open to all students, the chapel 
is identified practically and symbolically with the host group. 

Brandeis University, however, goes on the assumption that worship is a 
matter of mood and spiritual climate, not limited merely to words or cere- 
monies. Thus its three chapels serve Protestant, Jewish and Roman Catholic 
faiths. A unifying altar serves a large outdoor area where shared functions, 
such as Baccalaureate, are celebrated. The University has no doctrinal slant, 
official chaplain or compulsory chapel attendance. Student organizations re- 
sponsible for services are Hillel Foundation, Newman Club, and Student Chris- 
tian Association. 

Woodruff Hall 

Overlooking the central campus, this white brick building houses the 
Office of the President and other administrative units. 

Ullman Amphitheatre 

Utilizing a natural bowl below the grape arbor, the Amphitheatre contains 
a complete stage with full lighting equipment and orchestra pit, several class- 
rooms and a faculty office. It is the center of student theatre activity and scene 
of the University's Festivals of the Creative Arts. 

South Hall 

This building, near Ford Hall and the Brandeis Information Bureau, con- 
tains the Post Office, Service Bureau and Campus Store. The store is maintained 
to provide students with a convenient and economical means of securing 
general supplies, books, stationery and refreshments. 

Stoneman Infirmary 

On the forward slope of the campus near the Castle, the Infirmary houses 
a lounge, outpatient clinic, four consulting suites, first-aid treatment room, 
and rooms for sixteen bed patients. 

[27] 



UNIVERSITY FACILITIES 

Ford Psychological Counselling Center 

Situated in the quiet of Ridgewood Terrace, this center is maintained as 
a special service to Brandeis University students. 

Physical Education and Athletic Facilities 

The Memphis Tract, a twenty-six acre area on the eastern side of South 
Street, contains to date the Shapiro Athletic Center, Marcus Playing Field and 
Gordon Field. 

Shapiro Athletic Center 

This center contains classrooms, art studios, offices for faculty and physical 
education staff, physiotherapy, team, and dressing rooms. The main gymnasium 
has provisions for basketball, volleyball and other indoor sports. Adjacent to 
the playing fields, the building is also used for lectures, dances and art 
exhibitions. 

Marcus Playing Field 

This area, with its regulation baseball diamond, bleachers and practice foot- 
ball field, is the scene of spring baseball games, as well as informal competi- 
tions among both student and faculty groups. 

Gordon Field 

The University's varsity playing field contains the main gridiron, bleachers 
for several thousand, and fully equipped press box. 

Dining Halls 

University dining halls are in the Castle, and, in the Student Union where 
a separate kitchen is also maintained for those wishing special dietary meals. 
In addition, light refreshments are provided by the Castle's colorful snack bar, 
a popular between-classes and evening gathering place for students and faculty. 

Scheffres Dining Hall 

Accommodating faculty and administrative members, this private dining 
hall is on the second floor of the Student Union. 



[28] 



Ill 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

A. Admission of Students 

Principles 

Admission to college is not merely a matter of meeting specific require- 
ments. Since the number of qualified candidates each year substantially exceeds 
the limit that may be registered, the function of the Committee on Admissions 
is largely selective. Selection is based solely on merit, without reference to 
geography, race, religion, color, nationality, or the social or economic status 
of parents. The Committee selects those candidates whom it believes to be best 
fitted to and most likely to profit from the University's educational program. 

The Committee on Admissions gives weight to the following considerations 
in the evaluation of candidates: the secondary school record, including aca- 
demic grades, the principal's recommendation, rank in class, test scores, per- 
sonality chart, and extracurricular activities; the scores obtained in the Aptitude 
and Achievement Tests of the College Entrance Examination Board; character 
references; impressions gained from a personal interview; the medical and 
health report; and the candidate's statement concerning his objectives in 
College. 

Entrance Requirements 

The Committee on Admissions has established certain basic standards for 
the guidance of candidates. These standards are not inflexible and will not 
be administered so as to eliminate an applicant who is obviously well qualified 
to do successful work in the College. 

To be eligible for admission to the College, a candidate must have completed 
a college preparatory course in secondary school leading to graduation or its 
full equivalent. He must have presented satisfactory character references, and 
a medical and health report acceptable to the University Health Office. He 
should have received the unqualified recommendation of his secondary school 
principal. His rank in class should be high, and he should have attained 
college certificate grades in at least two-thirds of the courses in his last four 
years of college preparation. 

An adequate course in preparation for college should include four years of 
English (grammar, composition and literature), three years of a foreign lan- 
guage (two years each of two languages is acceptable but less desirable), two 
and a half years of mathematics ( intermediate mathematics, emphasizing basic 
algebraic, geometric and trigonometric concepts and deductive reasoning; sci- 
ence concentrators should have, in addition, a year of advanced mathematics), 
one year of science (chemistry, physics or biology), and one year of history. 

[29] 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

The remaining courses up to the number required for graduation should gen- 
erally be in traditional college preparatory subjects. It is recognized, however, 
that courses in art and music are of value to students intending to concentrate 
in those fields in college. 

The Aptitude and Achievement Tests of the College Entrance Examination 
Board are regarded by the Committee on Admissions as a basic measure of an 
applicant's fitness for college study, and as the fairest method of evaluating 
on a competitive basis the qualification of candidates from different schools 
and areas. The general rule is that applicants must take both the Aptitude 
and Achievement Tests. Exceptions to this rule may be made by the Committee 
on Admissions at its discretion. 

It is recommended that the Aptitude Tests be taken in January or February 
of the senior year and the Achievement Tests in March, although both sets may 
be taken in March. A candidate of exceptional promise may receive a pro- 
visional acceptance after the January Aptitude Tests, subject to his subsequent 
success in the March Achievement Tests. The College recognizes the desira- 
bility of taking the aptitude tests in May of the Junior year, for purposes of 
guidance. 

Full information concerning the tests and applications therefor may be 
obtained from secondary school guidance directors or directly from the Col- 
lege Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, New Jersey, or Box 9896, Los 
Feliz Station, Los Angeles, California. The candidate should direct the Board 
to report his score to the Director of Admissions of Brandeis University. The 
choice of the three Achievement Tests will to some extent be governed by 
the subjects the applicant is taking in his senior year, but it is generally de- 
sirable that the tests cover different areas, including English or a foreign 
language, mathematics or a science, and social studies. 

Admission to Advanced Standing 

Transfer students may be admitted to the sophomore or junior classes of 
the College and receive credit for courses satisfactorily completed in other 
colleges of acceptable standing and in subjects similar in nature to those 
offered in the Brandeis curriculum. Such candidates may be required to take 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board in 
March of the year of the application. It is very seldom that a transfer student 
is admitted at the beginning of the second semester, or to more than two years 
of advanced standing. 

Admission of Special Students 

The Committee on Admissions may accept as special students a limited 
number of applicants who are not candidates for a degree and who may wish 
to elect one or more courses for the study of which they are found to be 
qualified. The category of special students is usually limited to those per- 
sons not of college age who wish to pursue a limited non-degree program 
of study. 

[30] 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

Admissions Procedure 

The college year begins in September and new students are regularly 
enrolled at that time only. The application blank should be filed about eleven 
months before the date of entrance and certainly well in advance of the March 
College Board Tests. The Committee on Admissions will act on an applica- 
tion when it has received the transcript covering three and a half years of sec- 
ondary school work, the College Board test scores, and the essential references 
and recommendations. 

A personal interview is considered advantageous for both the candidate 
and the Committee, and is required whenever practicable. Each prospective 
student is urged to visit the campus *nd to make an appointment for an inter- 
view in the Office of Admissions, which is open Mondays through Fridays in- 
cluding vacation periods but excluding legal holidays. Off-campus interviews 
for candidates from outside of New England may be arranged in cases where 
it appears that there is a reasonable probability of acceptance. 

Upon notification of acceptance, a candidate is required to remit the reser- 
vation fee within the time specified, if he chooses to accept the place offered 
to him. In fairness to qualified applicants on the waiting list, no place in 
class will be reserved for an accepted candidate who has failed to complete his 
reservation. 

Upon formal notice of admission, all new students will be required to com- 
plete a Health Examination Report, Part A of which is to be completed by 
the applicant and Part B by his family physician. The admission procedure 
cannot be considered as complete until this Health Examination Report has 
been approved by the Medical Department. 

Inquiries and correspondence should be addressed to the Director of Ad- 
missions, Ford Hall, Brandeis University, Waltham 54, Massachusetts. 



[31] 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

B. Scholarships and Financial Aid 

Generous benefactors throughout the country have provided Brandeis Uni- 
versity with funds for financial assistance to students. A list of these funds 
will be found in the Appendices. Grants of assistance are made on a com- 
petitive basis of merit; their amount is adjusted to fit the need of the applicant 
and is applied to University fees. Prospective students should direct all in- 
quiries to Director of Admissions, Ford Hall, Brandeis University, Waltham 
54, Massachusetts. Enrolled students should consult the Director, Office of 
Student Personnel. Awards to new students will not be made until they have 
been accepted for admission to the Freshman Class or to advanced standing, and 
all such candidates are required to file a Parents' Financial Statement with the 
College Scholarship Service of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Scholarships 

Scholarships will be awarded in competition on the basis of high scholastic 
attainment, superior character or conspicuous talent. Scholarship stipends will 
be adjusted on the basis of individual need as determined by the Committee 
on Admissions and Scholarships. A few scholarships covering tuition, board 
and room are available to exceptional students. 

The National Scholarship Program 

In addition to the regular scholarship program, a limited number of 
National Scholarships will be awarded to outstanding students. Recipients of 
these scholarships will be selected competitively, and the awards will be based 
solely upon scholastic record, academic potential, and the results of Aptitude 
and Achievement Tests of the College Entrance Examination Board. The stip- 
ends will range as high as $1500, and will be given in each of the undergraduate 
Schools. 

Bursary Aid 

Applicants who do not qualify for scholarships may be considered for 
grants designated as Bursary Aid. The stipends will be determined on the 
basis of individual need by the Committee on Admissions and Scholarships. 

Loans 

Applications for loan funds will be received by the Dean of Students only 
from students who have spent at least one year at Brandeis University. Stu- 
dents receiving loans must be in good standing. 

[32] 



^^m^m^- 



Autumn and the grape arbor . . . 

looking up from Ullman Amphitheatre 



Colby, University of New Hampshire, University of Massachusetts 
Brandeis football at home and away 




*~ ■* ■■■-■ 






*H -Ha -^\,^m<; M^f 



* lm 



Brandeis sponsors the arts . . . 

The Julliard String Quartet performs 



Spring and the Student Union Building . . . 

broad windows look out on Hamilton Quadrangle gardens 







" rt "' 






4'-** .,, 



Newly constructed Mailman Student Center . . . 

as seen from Ridgewood Quadrangle east 



Guitars and a reflective folk song . . . 

students gather in the Castle Commons 









Artists and model . . . 

in the School of Fine Arts studios 



Academics outdoors 



a Brandeis class shares the new season 



JN6&- 



SCHOLARSHIP AND FINANCIAL AID 

Loans are to be repaid in accordance with a schedule agreed upon with 
the Comptroller. 

Student Employment 

In accordance with established policies, part-time student employment 
on the campus may be assigned by the Committee on Admissions and Scholar- 
ships to students who need additional assistance. The sum of money to be 
earned during the school year varies in individual cases. The maximum em- 
ployment permitted is fifteen hours work per week. Not all students can be 
alloted this maximum amount. Assignment of student employment will be 
made by the Office of Student Personnel and will be based upon the individual 
abilities of the applicants as well as on the requisitions for student employment 
approved for the various departments. Students who do not fulfill the responsi- 
bilities of their assignment will be withdrawn from these positions. The Uni- 
versity is not able to provide jobs for all students applying for student em- 
ployment. The Office of Student Personnel can, on occasion, help interested 
students obtain part-time work opportunities in Waltham and the neighboring 
communities. 



[33] 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

C. Student Services 



The Dean of Students is the University Officer responsible for the super- 
vising and coordinating of the Office of Admission and all student services 
referred to below. 

The University makes a policy of encouraging a close relationship between 
faculty and students. One of the first acts of the new student is to consult his 
faculty adviser about his program of study. This meeting will have been 
arranged by the Dean and the staff of the Office of Student Personnel, (Syde- 
man Hall ) , who work with each department's student adviser. They familiarize 
themselves with the backgrounds of new students and assign them to faculty 
advisers who most closely share their probable interests. When students have 
questions which are not answered in the catalog, they should feel free to bring 
them to a member of the Office of Student Personnel. 

The Office of Student Personnel provides several specific services which 
are designed to meet student needs. The Dean and the Staff interpret entrance 
and orientation week test scores for individual students upon their request 
and provide academic, personal and vocational counseling for students seeking 
such aid. In addition they work closely with those students who are having 
difficulty in maintaining satisfactory academic records. 

Class Advisers 

The University maintains an arrangement of class advisers. The Assistant 
Director of Student Personnel serves as Freshman Class Adviser and is available 
for all Freshmen to consult on any matters pertaining to classroom and extra- 
classroom matters. The Director of Student Personnel serves as Adviser to all 
Sophomore and Junior Class members as well as to the elected officers of these 
two classes. The Dean of Students serves as Adviser to the Senior Class and 
should be consulted on matters pertaining to Graduate and Professional School 
work. 

The Administrative Committee 

The Administrative Committee of the Faculty reviews academic records 
after each return of grades, designates the Dean's List, grants leaves of absence 
and withdrawal, establishes the rules and regulations covering student life, and 
enforces faculty academic regulations by placing students on warning, proba- 
tion, or severing their connection from the University. The Dean of Students 
and the Director of Student Personnel are both members of this Committee. 
Students who wish to petition this Committee may do so through the Office 
of Student Personnel. The decisions of the Administrative Committee are final. 
Certain areas of decision have been delegated by the Faculty to the Student 
Board of Review which is elected by the student body. 

[34] 



STUDENT SERVICES 

All matters pertaining to housing, permission to live off-campus, summer 
employment and placement opportunities and the like are under the jurisdiction 
of the Office of Student Personnel. 

Automobile Regulations 

The University will not allow Freshman students to maintain automobiles 
on th§ University grounds. All other students who plan to drive on the campus 
must register their cars with the Department of Buildings and Grounds and 
are expected to observe all University Traffic and Parking Regulations. 

Office of the Registrar 

The Office of the Registrar (Ford Hall) secures and maintains the official 
records of students. This office conducts registration and arranges the schedules 
of classes and examinations. Students who have class or examination conflicts 
should consult the Office of the Registrar. At the end of each year students 
receive a report of their grades and of their progress toward the degree. This 
office issues the official transcript of the University on request, and it serves as 
the liaison office between students and Selective Service Boards and the Veterans' 
Administration. Foreign students who have visa problems should consult this 
office. 

The University Health Office 

The Medical Director and his staff are responsible for supervision of the 
physical welfare of students, including the establishment and enforcement of 
infirmary regulations. Payment of the required medical fee entitles students 
to treatment available in the new David Stoneman Infirmary, and to par- 
ticipate in the benefits of the University Health Insurance Program. Under 
this arrangement, the services of the Health Office are supplemented by the 
consulting services of medical specialists. 

New students in the college as well as the graduate schools are responsible 
for submission of the physical report and meeting all requirements of the 
Health Office. These include a certificate of inoculation against smallpox. 
Since students are not permitted to register until these requirements have been 
satisfied, it is strongly recommended that reports be submitted at least two 
months before registration. All new students must report for physical exam- 
inations at the beginning of each academic year. 

The health insurance program helps defray expenses during the academic 
year only (September to June) for treatment beyond the scope of the Health 
Office. A brochure outlining the details of this program is distributed to each 
student at registration, and copies are mailed to parents. It should be noted 
here, however, that coverage is not provided for pre-existing conditions, extra- 
ordinary cases, psychiatric treatment, optical and dental services or special 
materials. 

"Within the limitations of the insurance coverage, fees of outside doctors 
and hospitals will be processed for payment only when consultations or hos- 

[ 35 ] 



STUDENT SERVICES 

pitalization have been authorized by the University Health Office in advance 
on a form provided for this purpose. The University is not responsible for 
off-campus medical and hospital care sought by students or their parents on 
their own initiative, or for outside care or consultation which has been 
recommended but not authorized by the Health Office. Students are urgently 
requested to read the Health Office pamphlet with great care. 

The Psychological Counseling Center 

The Psychological Counseling Center is located on the first floor of Ridge- 
wood 20. The purpose of this service is to assist the students in the solution 
of their personal and emotional problems. Those who wish such help can refer 
themselves directly to the Center. All communications of the students are held 
in confidence by its staff. 

Within the limitations of their time, the staff members will also discuss 
with the students the results of their psychological tests whenever such a dis- 
cussion appears desirable. The Psychological Counseling Center shares the 
services of the Psychiatric Consultant to the Health Office. 



[36] 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

D. Student Activities 

Extra-curricular student activity at Brandeis University is a major part of 
campus living. Values and ideas of classroom experience and the traditions of a 
democratic society are extended and developed through an intensive program 
of imaginative student activities. These activities are no mere adjunct to 
formal study, but together with the pursuit of academic disciplines contribute 
significantly to the development of intelligent college citizens. 

Brandeis students consider themselves a part of a community dedicated to 
the advancement of liberal values, the enrichment of life experience and the 
deepening of learning. Organized as the Brandeis Student Union, they con- 
sider it their prime responsibility to create a democratic student organization 
to increase the flow of new ideas and to provide enjoyable and creative recrea- 
tional and cultural activities for all students. 

The Student Union is the assembly of the entire student body. The Student 
Union Council, consisting of elected officers and elected representatives from 
each class, meets weekly to conduct its business and supervise its programs. 

Many problems of student discipline are placed entirely in the hands of 
the Student Board of Review or the Women's Subsidiary Board of Review 
which act as judicial bodies. 

In addition to overall student organization, each class elects its own officers 
to manage various class activities and functions. 

Publications 

The student publications include The Justice, a newspaper edited and man- 
aged entirely by students to cover matters of campus interest; The Turret, a 
student literary magazine published several times yearly and The Retort appear- 
ing semi-annually with student articles of scientific interest. The Yearbook is 
published annually by the Yearbook Club in cooperation with the Student 
Union. 

Organizations 

A broad variety of student organizations exists for all who are interested. 
Organizations are open to any matriculated student on the basis of competency 
or interest. No exclusive or secret societies may be organized. 

Academic interest clubs include the Pre-Medical and Pre-Law Societies, the 
Literary Society, Spanish Club, German Club, Hebrew Circle, Le Cercle Francais, 
and organizations for those interested in Philosophy, Biology, Chemistry, Mathe- 
matics and Physics. 

Religious activities are centered in the Three Chapels and are conducted 
by the three student religious organizations, the Hillel Foundation, the New- 

[37] 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

man Club and the Student Christian Association. In addition, each of these 
groups has a chaplain to serve their needs and interests. 

Musical, dramatic and similar activities are engaged in by a number of 
student groups including the Gilbert and Sullivan Society, the Brandeis Uni- 
versity Chorus, the Glee Club, the Drama Club, Modern Dance Club and the 
Brandeis- Waltham Civic Symphony Orchestra. An original student production 
of a musical comedy nature is presented each year by the Hi-Charlie Association 
and the proceeds are used for a student scholarship. 

Commuters have their own organization, in addition, to serve their in- 
terests. Dormitory residents elect officers and dormitory committees to foster 
a social program within the residence halls. 

The Brandeis Honor Society, which includes members of the faculty, each 
year elects to its membership outstanding juniors and seniors whose academic 
achievement is of a distinguished nature. 

Athletic Activities 

Recognizing the importance of athletics in a sound college educational 
program, Brandeis University offers a wide variety of organized sports. All 
aspects of college athletics, however, are subordinate to the essential purposes 
for which the University exists and must be controlled by educational considera- 
tions as determined by the Faculty Committee on Athletics. The athletic pro- 
gram exists for the welfare of the student, and for the contribution it can make 
to his healthy educational experience. A physical examination is required be- 
fore one may participate in any organized sport. 

Varsity Athletics 

The University fields varsity teams for men in football, basketball, baseball, 
track, fencing, wrestling, swimming and tennis. Women engage in varsity 
competition in basketball, volley ball, field hockey and fencing. These varsity 
squads compete against teams representing colleges and universities which 
regard the concept of athletics in the same light as does Brandeis University. 
Playing on a home-and-away basis, Brandeis teams have journeyed to, and 
have in turn acted as host to, teams from the Midwest, the South and New 
England. All home athletic contests are played on campus on Gordon Field. 
Marcus Field or in the Shapiro Athletic Center. 

Intramural Athletics 

Believing in the values of athletic participation for both conditioning and 
relaxation, the University has embarked upon a full scale intramural program 
for its students. This program centers about the Marcus Field and the Abraham 
Shapiro Athletic Center. All students are required to participate in an intra- 
mural sport of their choice for a minimum of one year. 

The men's intramural program includes football, basketball, softball, and 
badminton. Residence Hall and commuter teams have been organized to com- 

[38] 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

pete against each other in these sports with the competitive aspects subordinated 
to the enjoyment of the game. 

Women's activities include archery, fencing, softball, badminton, basket- 
ball, field hockey and dance. The Women's Physical Education Department 
sponsors the Women's Athletic Council, organized by the students. This 
Council is responsible for the women's sports program. Included among the 
Council's activities is the Modern Dance Group. Students who have special 
talent in modern dance are afforded the opportunity to specialize in more 
advanced technique, individual and group choreography, leading towards a 
dance concert given in the Spring. 



[39] 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

E. Fees and Expenses 

Financial Regulations 

Students will be permitted to register for classes after all financial obliga- 
tions have been met or satisfactory terms of payment have been arranged with 
the Comptroller prior to the due date of the bill in question. Payment received 
after the due dates of August 30, 1957 and January 24, 1958 will be subject 
to a penalty charge of $10. 

Report of grades or transcript of records will be issued to students only 
after all financial obligations to the University have been discharged. 

General Fees 

Each application must be accompanied by a Credential Fee of $10. The 
Credential Fee is not refundable nor can it be credited toward other fees. 

A Reservation Fee of $50 must be filed by each candidate upon notification 
of acceptance. All students who have been accepted for re-admission to the 
University for a new school year must also pay the Reservation Fee upon 
notification of their re-admission. This fee reserves a place in the class and 
is credited toward the first tuition bill. If the student fails to enroll, or with- 
draws his application, the Reservation Fee is not subject to refund. 

The Matriculation Fee of $75 provides medical and health care and library 
privileges during the academic year. This fee also entitles all students to par- 
ticipate in many events specifically sponsored by the Student Council, such 
as plays, dances, music recitals, special lectures, movies, etc. 

Tuition and Other Fees 

The Tuition Fee for the 1957-58 academic year is $1000. 

Laboratory courses, such as chemistry, biology and physics, require a Lab- 
oratory Breakage Deposit of $10 to cover loss or breakage of equipment. 
There is also a fee for laboratory supplies used by students which varies accord- 
ing to the specific course involved. 

Seniors are charged a $10 Graduation and Diploma Fee. 

Transcript Fee 

Students are entitled to one formal transcript of their academic work with- 
out charge. A charge of $1 will be made for all subsequent transcripts. The 
student will pay the $1 transcript fee in advance at the Cashier's Office. A 
receipt will be issued to the student to be taken to the Registrar's Office and 
attached to the transcript request form. If at the time of request for transcript, 
the student's financial account is not in order, the request will be denied and 
the fee will not be accepted. 

[40] 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



Residence Fee 



The Residence Fee for room and board for the 1957-58 academic year 
is $860. 

A deposit of $25 must be mailed to the University with the room applica- 
tion. This application form will be sent to the student with the notification of 
acceptance. This deposit is credited toward the first bill and is not refundable 
if the student fails to register. 

Room and board contracts are signed by each resident student and are in 
effect for the full academic year. 

The Residence Fee for room and board includes a 2 1 meal Dining Hall con- 
tract. A 15 meal per week contract, excluding Saturdays and Sundays will be 
made available for those students who may desire this arrangement. A request 
for such an arrangement must be made no later than two weeks after the 
beginning of classes in the Fall semester and must be accompanied by a written 
statement from a parent and submitted to the Steward's Office. 

When granted a 15 meal contract, a credit of $100 for the full year will 
be applied to the student's second semester bill. 

Non-resident students may eat in the University dining halls or the Snack 
Bar on a cash basis. 

Special Fees 

1. Each change of course after the initial two weeks of each semester must 
have the approval of the Administrative Committee and will incur a charge 
of $5. 

2. Late Registration fee of $10. 

3. Makeup examination fee of $5. 

Schedule of Payment of Bills 

Complete payment of first bill due on or before August 30, 1957: 

Resident Non-Resident 

Tuition-first semester $ 500.00 $500.00 

Matriculation Fee 75.00 75.00 

Residence Fee ...... . 430.00 

$1005.00 $575To"0~ 

Credits for: 

Reservation Fee $ 50.00 $ 50.00 

Residence Deposit Fee 25.00 

$ 75.00 $ 50.00 

Complete payment of second semester bill due on or before January 24, 1958: 
Tuition — second semester .... $ 500.00 $500.00 

Residence Fee 430.00 

Special Fee (Senior graduation fee 

laboratory charges, etc.) . $ 930.00 min. $500.00 min. 

[41] 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



Supplementary Bill: 

A supplementary bill may be rendered in any individual case, for charges 
not included in previous bills. 



jc\ auppicmciiiiuy uui iua.y 

not included in previous bills, 



Refunds 

No refund can be made of the Tuition and Matriculation fees because of 
absence, illness, dismissal or exclusion during the academic year. 

If a student withdraws from the University within the first two weeks of 
the beginning of classes, he may be granted a refund in accordance with the 
following provisions: 

1. He may receive a prorata refund for board in the University dining halls, 
calculated to the nearest full week. 

2. He may petition the Comptroller for a partial refund of tuition. 

3. No refund will be made of the payment for a room in the University 
dormitory for the quarter in which severance occurs. 

Students who withdraw after two weeks from the beginning of classes 
may request, through the Steward's Office, a refund of the board bill, calculated 
to the nearest full week. In no case will refunds be made of tuition and room 
fees. 

All approved refunds will be made by the Bursar's Office. 



[42] 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

F. Academic Requirements 

The College accepts as degree candidates only students who carry a full 
program which is five courses per term. Members of the junior and senior 
classes who are concentrating in a science may work at the four-course rate 
provided that they carry fifteen semester hours credit in each term and are 
making normal progress toward their degree requirements. 

Permission to take one additional course may be granted by the Administra- 
tive Committee of the Faculty to students whose records are above average 
and who have special reasons for needing additional credit. There is a fee of 
$100. per course for each term of additional elective instruction beyond the 
normal five-course rate of work. Students who are required to take a term of 
English Composition may be allowed to take, without extra charge, a sixth 
course for one term during the year in which they take English Composition, 
provided they petition their class adviser and receive approval. 

Regularly matriculated students who wish to audit courses should secure 
the permission of the instructor. 

Class Standing 

The minimum number of credits required for advancement to each class 
is as follows: sophomore, 30; junior, 60; senior, 90; for graduation, 120. Stu- 
dents not accumulating the prescribed number of credits will be listed as un- 
classified. 

Changes in Courses 

All students who wish to make changes in their programs of study must 
consult their faculty advisers and obtain formal approval for such changes from 
the Office of the Registrar. Students who request such changes after the first 
two weeks of instruction of the semester must also obtain the approval of the 
Administrative Committee of the Faculty and pay a fee of $5.00 for each change 
of courses. Students may not enter a course after the fourth week of a term. 

Withdrawal from Courses 

Matriculated students who wish to work at less than the required course 
rate must consult the Office of Student Personnel and obtain the approval of the 
Administrative Committee of the Faculty. Permission to work at a reduced rate 
will be granted only in unusual circumstances. Students who wish to withdraw 
from a sixth course without academic penalty must notify the Registrar by the 
last day of the term on which a lecture or class in that course is given. Students 

[43] 



ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

withdrawing after the first two weeks of instruction from a sixth course for 
which tuition is charged, will be charged a prorated fee for the instruction 
received. 

Withdrawal from the University 

A student wishing to take a leave of absence or to withdraw from the Uni- 
versity must consult the Office of Student Personnel. Clearance by all admin- 
istrative offices and the approval of the Administrative Committee of the Faculty 
are necessary to complete this procedure. 

Attendance 

Starting two weeks after the first meeting of classes, attendance will be 
taken and reported in all courses required under the General Education pro- 
gram, and in courses numbered below 100 normally open to freshmen. 

Freshmen and sophomores in good standing will be permitted no more 
than three unexcused absences per course per semester. 

Freshmen and sophomores on the Dean's List and all juniors and seniors 
in good standing are exempt from the regulations on unexcused absences. 
However, it is assumed that these exempt students will meet their academic 
obligations with a proper sense of responsibility and accordingly, members 
of the Faculty reserve the right to report to the Administrative Committee 
the names of any such students who abuse this privilege. 

All students on warning and probation are required to meet their academic 
obligations and are not permitted any unexcused absences while on warning 
and on probation. Instructors are required to report the attendance of all stu- 
dents on probation or on warning. 

All instructors will report attendance in all classes for all students the day 
preceding and the day following a recess of two days or more. Students who 
have unexcused absences on such days will be subject to severe disciplinary 
action by the Administrative Committee. All students, including those on the 
Dean's List, are subject to this regulation. 

A student absent from classes because of illness must consult the University 
Health Office before attendance is resumed. Students must abide by the rules 
governing excused absences for medical reasons as described in the Health 
Office pamphlet. 

Classes begin at ten minutes after the hour and end on the hour. Tardy 
students may be marked absent at the discretion of the instructor. 

Grades 

Formal grades will be reported to the Office of the Registrar four times a 
year. In determining these grades all components of the student's work in 
a course will be considered: written work, recitations, laboratory technique 
and reports, special -reports or research and final examinations. 

[44] 



ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The following grades will be used: 

A High Distinction 

B Distinction 

C Satisfactory 

D Passing, but unsatisfactory 

E Failure 

Academic Status 

A satisfactory record may contain not more than one D and no E's. Stu- 
dents with satisfactory records will be advanced to the next class. At the end 
of the Fall term, and at the end of the academic year on the basis of the entire 
year's record, the Administrative Committee of the Faculty announces the 
Dean's List of honor students according to the following categories. No stu- 
dent will have his name placed on the Dean's List who has a D or more than 
one C in his record for the period. 

Group I Group II 

1 C 



5 A 




3 A 2 B 


4 A 


1 B 


3 A IB 


31/2 A 


ll/ 2 B 


2 A 3 B 


4 A 


1 c 


1 A 4 B 


3 A 


2 B 


B average 



In order to be eligible for the degree a student must compensate for any 
D beyond two with an A or B. 

Whenever a student's grades are unsatisfactory, the Administrative Com- 
mittee will notify him and his parents in writing. When there are extenuating 
circumstances, no further action is taken. A student is given warning if his 
record is not low enough to incur probation. Students who have been warned 
will be placed on probation at the next grading unless their work is satisfactory. 
A student is placed on probation if his record is seriously unsatisfactory. Such 
students will be in danger of dismissal unless their records show marked im- 
provement. A student's connections with the University are severed if his record 
is so unsatisfactory that the Administrative Committee considers him unable 
to meet the academic requirements. 

Dismissal or Exclusion 

The University reserves the right to dismiss or exclude at any time students 
whose conduct or academic standing it regards as undesirable, and without 
assigning any further reason therefor; neither the University nor any of its 
trustees or officers shall be under any liability whatsoever for its exclusion. 

Requirements for the Degree 

The Brandeis curriculum is based on a two-fold program — a general edu- 
cation curriculum and a coherent program of study within a well defined field 
of concentration. The general education curriculum requires the student to 
participate in courses which are designed to provide a solid general foundation 

[45] 



ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

of knowledge about our cultural heritage. Thus, in addition to concentrating 
in an elected field, the student will be introduced to the major experiences of 
cultural history and to those significant concepts and achievements of science 
which should be the common possession of educated men and women. 

All regularly matriculated students must complete the prescribed work in 
the General Education Program. Freshmen will take Humanities 1, Social Sci- 
ence 1, one course in the Physical Sciences, and, unless they pass the Proficiency 
Examination, a half course in English Composition (la, laR, 2a, or 2aR). The 
requirement in the Physical Sciences may be met by the completion of one 
course selected from Physical Science 1, Physics 10, Physics 11, Chemistry 10. 
(Students who are planning to select a scientific field of concentration should 
not elect Physical Science 1.) See Page 43 for permission to take a sixth course. 

During their sophomore and junior years, each student will take a further 
full course (or the equivalent) which counts towards general education credit, 
in each of the three Schools other than the School responsible for his field of 
concentration. Only the following courses may be selected to meet this re- 
quirement. 

School of Humanities 

One full course or two half courses selected from the following: 

Humanities 2 

Any course in English below 90 except English la 

Any course in Comparative Literature with the consent of the instructor 

Any course in a foreign literature above 10 

Hebrew 13a NEJS 51a 

NEJS 10 NEJS 52a 

NEJS 15a NEJS 53a 

NEJS 17a NEJS 54a 

Philosophy 1 

Philosophy 31a 

School of Social Science 

One full course or two half courses selected from the following: 

American Civilization 2 

American History 1 

Anthropology la, or la and lb 

Economics la and lb 

History 185a and/or History 185b 

Politics la 

Politics 2b 

Psychology la and lb 

Sociology la and lb 

Sociology 3b 

School of Science 



Biological Science 1 
Biology la and lb 



[46] 



ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

School of Creative Arts 

Music 1 
Music 60a 
Music 60b 

Music 101 and any other half course or full course in Music 
Fine Arts 2 
Theatre Arts 1 
General Education S — Must be taken by all seniors. 

Concentration Requirement 

All matriculated students must pursue and complete work in one field of 
concentration, in accordance with regulations established by the School having 
jurisdiction over the program selected. Students must choose their field of con- 
centration at the end of the freshman year. The requirements for the various 
fields of concentration are described in the section which follows. 

English Composition Requirement 

Proficiency in written expression in English is required. This require- 
ment may be met by one term of English Composition, English Composition 
la, IaR, 2a, 2aR, or by passing a Proficiency Examination in English Com- 
position which will be administered during Orientation Week of the fresh- 
man year. Students who are not exempt may, if necessary, postpone the half 
course in Composition to the sophomore year only with permission of the 
Administrative Committee. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

The foreign language requirement for a degree is to be met by all students 
within three years of matriculation through the satisfactory completion of 
Language 10 or its equivalent. The foreign language requirement may be met 
by passing a proficiency test. Failure to meet the foreign language requirement 
within the stipulated period may cause the student to be placed on probation. 

Physical Education Requirement 

All matriculated students must satisfactorily complete the required work in 
Physical Education during the first year of attendance unless exempted from 
this requirement for medical reasons upon the recommendation of the Univer- 
sity Health Office and with the approval of the Administrative Committee. 

Courses Open to Freshmen 

Freshmen will take Humanities 1; Social Science 1; one course selected 
from the following: Physical Science 1, Physics 10, Physics 11, Chemistry 10, 
a foreign language or literature (requirement may be satisfied by passing the 
proficiency test at the beginning of the Fall semester); English Composition 1 
(unless exempted) and one elective. Future science concentrators should elect 
a science course and mathematics in the freshman year. All students interested 
in science may elect a science course in place of Physical Science 1 whether 

[47] 



ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

they intend to concentrate in science or not. Future science concentrators who 
wish to elect two science courses in addition to mathematics in the freshman 
year may petition the Administrative Committee for permission to postpone 
either Humanities 1 or Social Science 1 until the sophomore year. Such peti- 
tions must be signed by the instructor in charge of Humanities 1 or Social 
Science 1. 

In general, students are urged to use their elective course for the purpose of 
exploring their future field of concentration. Students will choose their field 
of concentration at the end of the freshman year in accordance with the regu- 
lations established by the School having jurisdiction over the program selected. 
Before making this decision the student should carefully review the information 
presented elsewhere in this catalog on Academic Requirements and Fields of 
Concentration. More detailed information on the specific courses listed below 
as regularly open to freshmen can be obtained by consulting the section on 
Courses of Instruction. 

Courses Open to Freshmen 

School of Humanities 



English Composition 1 
French 1, 2, 3a, 3b*, 10* 
German 1, 2, 3a*, 3b*, 10* 
Hebrew 1, 2*, 4a*, 4b*, 10*, 13a 
Humanities 1 

School of Science 

Biology la, lb 

Chemistry 10 

Mathematics la, 13a, 14b*, 23a* 

School of Social Science 

American History 1 
Anthropology 1 
Economics la, lb 
Politics la 



Italian 1, 10* 

NEJS 10a, 15a, 19b, 20b, 25b, 6lb 
Philosophy 1, 11, 13a, 21, 31a* 
Spanish 1, 2, 3a*, 10* 



Physics 10, 11 
Physical Science 1 



Psychology la, lb, 2b 
Social Science 1 
Sociology la, lb, 3b 



School of Creative Arts 

Fine Arts 1, 2, 103*, 111 
Music 1, 3, 51*, M 
Theatre Arts 1, 2, 3*, 5c, 8c 



♦Consent of the instructor necessary. 



[48] 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

G. The Fields of Concentration 



The requirements for a Bachelor's degree in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences include the completion of a definite field of concentration. Before the 
end of the freshman year, each student will choose a provisional field of con- 
centration after consultation with a faculty adviser. Plans for concentration 
should become definite during the sophomore year and must be approved by 
a faculty adviser of the appropriate School. An entering student who has reached 
a tentative decision as to his future field of interest should elect the basic in- 
troductory course in this area in his freshman year and cover more of the 
groundwork in the elective courses of the sophomore year. 

The Liberal Arts Approach 

The liberal arts approach characterizes the Brandeis curriculum and the 
student must not expect to find patterns of courses conceived with specific 
vocational goals in mind. At Brandeis the student may obtain a broad and 
sound education in liberal arts and sciences Which will prepare him for further 
study in specific professional and vocational fields at the graduate level. 

On the premise that a liberal arts education is the best preparation for 
professional training, the College of Arts and Sciences does not recommend 
highly specialized courses for pre-professional students. The liberal arts ex- 
perience can simultaneously provide the student with a broad foundation of 
culture and with specific knowledge. For example, the prospective civil engi- 
neer can obtain a liberal education while establishing a sound foundation in 
physics and mathematics. The student interested in a business career has much 
to gain from concentrating in economics. The prospective journalist or lawyer 
will profit from the rich background of literature, creative writing, history, or 
political science. Candidates for teaching positions in primary and secondary 
schools can obtain a competency in a subject area while gaining additional 
insight from work in psychology. Many of the fields should qualify students to 
take Civil Service examinations for junior positions in governmental work. 
The work in the undergraduate science programs is comparable to the technical 
level of instruction offered by other liberal arts colleges. 

Fields for the Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Pre-Engineering, and Other 
Pre-Professional Students 

The Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical 
Association has established, as a minimum educational requirement for students 
entering medical schools, three years of college training for the average student, 

[49] 



THE FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

and strongly recommends that pre-medical students take the full, four-year 
college course. This Council and the Association of American Medical Col- 
leges have also prescribed, in addition to English Composition and Literature 
(at Brandeis, the English Composition and Humanities requirements are equiv- 
alent), a set of minimum requirements for admission to an approved medical 
school. These requirements include general and organic chemistry, physics, 
and biology, and are readily met at Brandeis by the following courses: Biology 
la and lb, Chemistry 10, Chemistry 32, and Physics 10 or 11. However, these 
are minimum requirements, and many schools require more than the specified 
minimum in certain areas. In order to ensure that such additional or special- 
ized requirements can be met in proper sequence within a field of concentration, 
pre-medical students should very early arrange their prospective college program 
with their adviser. In evaluating candidates for admission, medical schools 
attach some importance to recommendations by faculty committees before which 
students generally appear in their junior year. Potential candidates are there- 
fore advised to arrange their schedule wherever possible so that they have taken 
or are in the process of taking the four courses generally required as listed 
above, at the time they appear before the Brandeis Committee on Recommenda- 
tions to Graduate and Professional Schools. In addition to specific course re- 
quirements, most medical schools advocate a broad liberal arts education. 

The medical schools do not advocate any specific field of concentration in 
an undergraduate curriculum, and the field of concentration is not a determin- 
ing factor in admission to medical schools so long as the specific course require- 
ments of that medical school are met. While most pre-medical students con- 
centrate in chemistry, biology, or general science because of the specific addi- 
tional requirements in chemistry and biology of some medical schools, concen- 
tration in the fields of humanities, social sciences or creative arts allows ample 
electives to satisfy the requirements of most medical schools. 

The above generalizations apply in large part to the pre-dental student as 
well as to those planning careers as veterinarians, medical technicians and related 
fields. Medical schools and dental schools require an aptitude examination, 
ordinarily taken by the student in the Spring of his junior year. 

Pre-Engineering 

The University has arrangements with the Carnegie Institute of Technology 
(Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts), and the California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, 
California) for the benefit of students who wish to combine, a liberal arts 
course with education in engineering, science or management. By first com- 
pleting three years of work at Brandeis and then two years at Carnegie, M.I.T., 
or California Institute of Technology, a student may meet the requirements for 
a Bachelor of Arts degree from Brandeis and a Bachelor of Science degree from 
Carnegie, M.I.T., or California Institute of Technology. In order to qualify for 
the combined plan, a student must have a B average or better during his first 
three years at Brandeis, f ulfill the General Education requirements at Brandeis, 
and include certain prescribed courses in his program. 

[50] 



THE FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

The following courses must be taken at Brandeis by students wishing to 
be included in the 3-2 plan with the California Institute of Technology: Mathe^ 
matics 13a, 14b, 23a, 25b; Chemistry 10; Physics 11, 21, 23a, 29c; Biology la, 
lb; Economics la, lb; American History 1; English 3a and English 5b or 6b or 
7a (which may be counted toward the second level General Education require- 
ment in Humanities). 

Students wishing to qualify for the 3-2 Plan with the Carnegie Institute of 
Technology are required to complete the same science courses as above. In 
addition, they must take Physics 24a, Physics 25c, Economics la, lb, and 
Psychology la or b. 

Preparation far Teaching 

While the University does not offer a field of concentration in Education, 
it does offer several courses which help meet the teacher certification require- 
ments of individual states. Students interested in preparing for careers as 
teachers in primary and secondary schools should inform themselves concern- 
ing the certification requirements of the state in which they plan to seek 
employment and should consult the Educational Adviser. 

The courses described elsewhere in the catalogue which help meet teacher 
certification requirements are as follows: 

Education 10c — Practice Teaching 

Philosophy 43b — Philosophy of Education 

Psychology 1 11a — Introduction to Statistics 

Psychology 15a — Child Development 

Psychology 30b — Educational Psychology 

Psychology 11 6a — Advanced Child Psychology 

Psychology 121b — Tests and Measurements 
Social Science 20a — History of Education 

Many students are able to meet certification requirements during their four 
regular undergraduate years at Brandeis by attending one six-weeks' summer 
school session. 

Junior Year in France 

Brandeis University participates in the Sweet Briar College Junior Year in 
France. Under this plan qualified students from colleges and universities in the 
United States spend their junior year in France pursuing a course of studies 
at the University of Paris. The group is under the supervision of Sweet Briar 
College (Sweet Briar, Virginia), which arranges round-trip travel, board and 
room in French homes, sightseeing trips, enrollment in courses, and guidance 
and supplementary instruction by a staff of native-born instructors. Upon satis- 
factory completion of their academic work, the members of the group are 
granted 30 hours American college credit, which is accepted by the colleges 
and universities participating in the plan, and return to their original institution 
with senior status. 

[51] 



THE FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

For the present, Brandeis is limiting participation to two students, chosen 
on a competitive basis. Minimum requirements are (1) at least two years of 
pre-college French, (2) two years of college French (normally French 3a, 3b 
and 10), both passed with a grade of B or higher, or the equivalent, and (3) 
an academic average of at least C plus in all other work. 

Senior Thesis 

The senior thesis, upon which the degree with honors may in part be 
based, must be submitted to the department or committee administering the 
degree before May 1st. 



[52] 



THE FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

THE SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 

The Fields of Concentration 

The School of Humanities offers the undergraduate student a systematic 
introduction to our great literary and philosophic heritage. Requirements for 
concentration are listed on the pages indicated. 

Page 
1. English and American Literature ... . 105 



3. 



European Languages and Literature 

French Literature 

German Literature 

Romance Literature . 

Spanish Literature 
Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 

Hebrew Literature 



4. Philosophy 

5. Committee on Comparative Literature 
All students majoring in the fields of languages and 

to take Humanities 191a, General Linguistics, or Engl 
Structure of the English Language. To the extent that it is feasible, all language 
and literature courses in foreign language areas, particularly those numbered 
above 10, will be taught in the original language. 



110 
115 
118 
167 

172 

141 
121 



147 
99 
literature are advised 
sh 192b, History and 



Requirements for Ordinary and Honors Degrees 

Concentrators in the several fields administered by the School of Humanities 
are required to present a minimum program of seven full courses. Each of these 
fields has designated certain courses as specific requirements for concentration. 
Candidates for honors may include in their seven courses the course 99c required 
for a degree with honors in their field. This course is available only in the 
senior year. The balance of the seven full courses is to be selected from the 
approved list of elective courses establishd for the respective fields. 

To be eligible for honors work a candidate, at the end of the junior year, 
must have obtained a grade of B or better in all courses taken for concentration 
and an average of C or better in all other subjects. He must also have the 
approval of the School Council. At the beginning of the senior year, the can- 
didate will enroll in the appropriate course under the guidance of one of the 
senior teachers in that area of his field of concentration in which the student 
desires to work. Consultations between instructor and student will continue 
throughout the academic year. A paper of no less than 7500 words, representing 
the results of intensive study, will constitute the final requirement. 



[53] 



THE FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

THE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 

The School of Science provides the student with the basic scientific training 
which will qualify him for entry into graduate school or for work at an inter- 
mediate level in a chosen scientific field. The programs in the fields of con- 
centration in Science require the student to devote approximately one-half of 
his time to courses offered by the School of Science. The student is encouraged 
to take such courses outside the School of Science as will best broaden and 
further his intellectual growth. 

To be eligible for honors work, a candidate, at the end of the junior year, 
must have obtained an average of B or better in all courses taken for concen- 
tration and an average of C or better in all other subjects. He must also have 
the approval of the School Council. Students who are candidates for degrees 
with honors in the various programs administered by the School of Science 
may be required to take course 99 in their respective fields of concentration. 

Brandeis University has been placed on the list of approved schools of the 
American Chemical Society. Students who fulfill the requirements for concen- 
tration in Chemistry (Pages 96-99) will also fulfill the minimum requirements 
for professional training adopted by the American Chemical Society. 

Students majoring in Science are urged to elect German or French to fulfill 
their language requirements. Students concentrating in Chemistry, who wish 
their curriculum to meet the standards of the American Chemical Society, are 
required to pass a course in German or to pass a German language examination. 

The Fields of Concentration 

Requirements for concentration are listed on the pages indicated. 

Page 

1. Biology 90 

2. Chemistry 96 

3. Mathematics 132 

4. Physics 151 

5. Committee on General Science 118 



[54] 



THE FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

The Fields of Concentration 

Requirements for concentration are listed on the pages indicated. 

Page 

1. American History and Civilization ..... 80 

2. Economics 102 

3. History .125 

4. Politics -v.; ... 156 

5. Psychology 160 

6. Sociology and Anthropology 167 

Requirements for Ordinary and Honors Degrees 

The minimum program for non-honors candidates in any regular or special 
field of concentration is defined in the requirements established for the several 
fields. The designated requirement in each field of concentration includes a 
half -course of tutorial work (97c). 

Students in the School of Social Science who are candidates for degrees with 
honors will, in addition to the designated requirements for the several fields, 
enroll also in senior research (99). Candidates for honors must have the 
approval of the School Council. 

All candidates in the various fields of concentration are expected to complete 
their program by electing the necessary courses from the list of elective courses 
which have been prepared for each field. However, it should be noted that, 
with approval, concentrators may also include in their elective program the 
equivalent of any one full course from the offerings of the School of Social 
Science, except Social Science 1. 

Although various aspects and approaches may be given special emphasis, 
it is believed that the study and analysis of society and social phenomena should 
be regarded as an undertaking containing many facets. It is for this reason that 
the courses of instruction offered in the School of Social Science have been 
designed to fit into more than one program of concentration and that special 
attention has been given to the comparative approach. 



[55] 



THE FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

THE SCHOOL OF CREATIVE ARTS 

The Fields of Concentration 

Requirements for concentration are listed on the pages indicated. 

Page 

1. Fine Arts Ill 

2. Music 135 

3. Theatre Arts 174 

In exceptional cases, students may petition the School Council for permission 
to pursue a program of concentration combining any two of the regular fields. 

Procedure for Admission to Concentration 

All candidates are expected to apply for concentration through designated 
faculty representatives in the various fields. Candidates should arrange for 
interviews with these representatives at which they can present evidence of 
capacity to pursue programs of concentration successfully. In the field of Music 
there are specific performance and sight-reading requirements listed below 
under Music. 

Requirements for Ordinary and Honors Degrees 

At least seven courses are required for each field, with the additional require- 
ment of the approximate 99c course for honors candidates. Candidates for 
honors must have the approval of the School Council. 



[56] 



IV 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 
A. General Information 

Objectives 

The underlying ideal of the Graduate School is to assemble a community 
of scholars, scientists and artists, in whose company the student-scholar can 
pursue studies and research as an apprentice. This objective is to be attained by 
individualizing programs of study, restricting the number of students accepted, 
maintaining continual contact between student sand faculty, and fostering the 
intellectual potential of each student. 

Degrees will be granted upon the evidence of intellectual growth and 
development, rather than solely on the basis of formal course credits. Fulfillment 
of the minimum requirements set forth below cannot, therefore, be regarded as 
the sole requisite for degrees. 

Areas of Graduate Study 

During the academic year 1957-1958, graduate programs will be offered in 
the following areas: 

1. Biochemistry 

2. Biology 

3. Chemistry 

4. English and American Literature 

5. History of Ideas 

6. Mathematics 

7. Music 

8. Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 
9- Physics 

10. Psychology 
Details of the programs offered in these areas are given below. Specific 
course content will be found in Section V of the catalog. 

In succeeding years, the program will be extended to cover other areas. 

Admission 

As a general rule only those men and women who have completed the 
normal four-year program leading to the Bachelor's degree with distinction will 
be considered for admission to the Graduate School. Graduates of foreign 
schools who have completed the equivalent of a Bachelor's degree program 
may apply, describing the educational program they have completed. 

[57] 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Applicants for admission to the graduate area in Psychology are required 
to take the Miller Analogies Test and the Graduate Record Examination, in- 
cluding the Aptitude Test portion and preferably one Advanced Test in a field 
related to the proposed area of graduate study. Others are advised to take the 
examination. Information concerning the Graduate Record Examination is 
available from the Educational Testing Service, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, 
New Jersey, or P.O. Box 27896, Los Angeles 27, California. Testing dates are 
November 16, 1957, January 18, April 26 and July 12, 1958. Applications for 
these dates close on November 1, 1957, January 3, April 11, and June 27, 1958. 

Specific requirements established by each area of study are to be found 
below. Each applicant should consult these requirements prior to filing an 
application. 

Application Procedure 

Applicants who wish to enter the Graduate School should write to the Grad- 
uate School of Arts and Sciences, stating which Area of Studies they intend 
to pursue. 

An Application for Admission and catalog will be forwarded to the appli- 
cant who should return the completed form at once. The closing date for 
receipt of applications is May 15 although exceptions may be granted. (It 
should be noted that the closing date for fellowship applications is April 1. 
See "Financial Aid," page 60.) 

The applicant is also required (1) to arrange for the forwarding of an 
official transcript of his undergraduate and any graduate records and (2) to have 
forwarded two letters of recommendation, preferably from professors under 
whom the applicant has studied in the field of his proposed Area of Studies. 
Where necessary, other materials or information will be requested. 

Decisions on admission will be made not later than June 15. 

Part-Time Students 

Applications will be considered for part-time resident study. Such appli- 
cants should file with their applications for admission a statement explaining 
why full-time residence is not possible, and how rapidly they propose to com- 
plete their work. 

Special Students 

On occasion, properly qualified persons who wish to take courses without 
working for a degree will be accepted. Formal application must be filed and 
include a statement that admission as a special student is requested. 

Fees 

The annual tuition fee for full-time students in the Graduate School is 
$1,000. This fee is payable in two installments, one-half at registration in 

[58] 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

September, and the remainder at the beginning of the second semester. Pay- 
ment received after the specified due dates will be subject to a penalty charge 
of $10. 

Tuition fees for special and part-time students will be at the rate of $125 
per course per semester. These fees are payable at registration for each semester. 

Graduate students may elect to participate in the University student health 
program (see section under "Health") by paying a fee of $40 at registration 
at the beginning of the academic year. Information about the program may 
be obtained from the Health Office. 

Graduate students are entitled to one formal transcript of their academic 
record without cost. A charge of $1 will be made for all subsequent transcripts. 

A fee of $10 per year is payable by non-resident students who are not using 
the facilities of Brandeis University during the period in which they are pre- 
paring their Master's thesis or Doctoral dissertation. An additional fee of $100 
is payable by Ph.D. candidates in this category in the year the dissertation is 
accepted. 

A course fee of $200 per year is payable by students who have completed 
their residence requirements and are using the facilities of the University dur- 
ing the period in which they are preparing their Master's thesis or Doctoral 
dissertation. 

All candidates for graduate degrees are charged a $10 Graduation and 
Diploma fee which is payable no later than June 1. 

Report of grades or transcript of records will be issued to students only 
after financial obligations to the University have been discharged. 

No refund of the tuition fee will be made because of absence, illness or 
dismissal during the academic year. If a student withdraws from the University 
within 30 days of the beginning of classes, he may petition the Comptroller 
for partial refund of tuition. A refund may be denied without any reason for 
such denial being stated. 

Auditing Courses 

The privilege of auditing courses without fee is extended to regularly 
enrolled full-time graduate students. The courses may be on either the graduate 
or undergraduate level. Students taking less than full-time work may audit 
courses by paying for them at the same rate as though they were taken for 
credit. Students desiring to avail themselves of auditing privileges may make 
the necessary arrangements through the Graduate School Office, and must then 
secure the permission of the course instructor. 

Housing 

The University does not offer graduate housing facilities. The Housing 
Office, however, attempts to serve as a clearing house for rooms and apartments 
available in Waltham and nearby Greater Boston communities, 

[59] 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Dining Facilities 

Graduate students may sign for the twenty-one meal contract or the fifteen 
meal contract in either the Castle Dining Hall or the Student Center Dining 
Hall. Arrangements must be made with the Steward's Office. Individual meals 
may be purchased at either dining hall. Light snacks are served at the Bee-Hive 
snack bar. 

Health 

Payment of the optional medical fee entitles graduate students to utilize the 
facilities of the Health Office and to participate in the benefits of the Uni- 
versity health insurance program. 

The health insurance program helps defray expenses during the academic 
year for treatment beyond the scope of the Health Office. A brochure outlining 
the details of this program may be obtained at the Health Office. It should be 
noted here, however, that coverage is not provided for pre-existing conditions, 
extraordinary cases, psychiatric cases, optical and dental services, or special 
materials. 

Within the limitations of the insurance coverage, fees of outside doctors 
and hospitals will be processed for payment only when consultations or hospi- 
talization have been authorized by the University Health Office in advance on 
a form provided for this purpose. The University is not responsible for off- 
campus medical and hospital care sought by students or their parents on their 
own initiative. Students are urgently requested to read the Health Office 
pamphlet with great care. 

Every student is required to complete a Health Questionnaire (which is 
mailed by the University) before admission to the University. In addition, a 
health examination by the University physician must be taken at the appointed 
time early in the academic year of admission. Failure to meet this appointment 
will result in a fine of $5. 

Financial Aid 

To help students of promise, awards and work opportunities are available. 
These are granted on a competitive basis, the amount of the stipend depending 
upon the financial need of the applicant. For consideration, it is necessary to 
file the Application for Graduate Fellowship or Teaching Assistants hip, each 
year, on or before April 1. In exceptional instances applications submitted at 
a later date may be given consideration. 

The following opportunities are available: 
Scholarships: 

Part or full tuition scholarships are available. 

Graduate Fellowships: 

Graduate fellowships carry stipends up to $2,000 in addition to tuition. 

Teaching Fellowships: 

Benefactors of the University have established Teaching Fellowships 
to enable graduate students to gain teaching experience while continuing 

[60] 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

with their studies. The stipends vary with the hours of teaching and 
degree of responsibility and may reach a maximum of $2400. 

Research Funds: 

Application for research funds may be made to the Chairman of the 
Department or Committee administering the graduate program. 

Loan Funds: 

Applications for loans, available after one year of residence, may be 

made to the Comptroller of the University. 
Proctorships: 

Appointments as dormitory proctors are available to men and women. 

Interested applicants should address the Dean of Students. 
Employment: 

On occasion the University offers part-time employment to specially 

trained personnel. Inquiries should be addressed to the Personnel Office 

of the University. 

Academic Regulations 

Ordinarily, a full-time resident student will register for a number of courses 

per academic year, as may be determined by the Area Chairman. Each course 

meeting 3 hours per week grants 3 credits per semester. 

Registration: 

Every graduate student, whether full-time or part-time, must register 
with the Graduate School Office at the beginning of each term of his 
enrollment, during the period announced for such registration. A study 
card must be filed not later than the first day of classes, and must have 
the approval of the Area Chairman. A fee of $10 will be charged for 
registration not completed at the time specified. 

All graduate students must give their local address at the time of regis- 
tration and must keep the Graduate School Office informed of any 
changes in the address. 

Course Standards: 

Graduate students will be expected to maintain records of distinction 
in all courses. 

Withdrawal from the University: 

Students who withdraw from the University in the course of or at the 
end of an academic year are required to give written notice immediately 
to the Graduate School Office, and, in order to resume studies, must apply 
for readmission. Transcripts of records will not be issued until clearance 
has been obtained from all appropriate departments. 

Dismissal or Exclusion: 

The University reserves the right to dismiss or exclude at any time 
students whose conduct or academic standing it regards as undesirable, 
and without assigning any further reason therefor; neither the Uni- 
versity nor any of its trustees or officers shall be under any liability 
whatsoever for its exclusion. 

[61] 



Degree Requirements 



The following general requirements apply to the awarding of degrees. For 
the specific requirements of each Area of Study, candidates should consult the 
appropriate section of this catalog. 

Master's Degree 

In order to qualify for a Master's degree, the candidate must complete the 
equivalent of one full year of graduate study at Brandeis University, ordinarily 
computed at a minimum of 24 semester hours of approved study. Certain 
areas may, at their option, require additional semester hours of graduate study 
or a qualifying examination or a thesis. 

For programs of study, language requirements, examinations, and thesis 
requirements, consult the section of the catalog dealing with your proposed 
Area of Study. 

Candidates for the Master's degree must file applications with the Graduate 
School Office no later than April 1 of the academic year in which the degree 
is to be offered. The application must have the written approval of the Chair- 
man of the Area of Study. In case of failure or withdrawal from candidacy in 
that year, the student must reapply by filing a new application in a later year. 
Where a thesis is required for the Master's degree, it must be submitted by 
May 1st. The Master's degree must be earned within four years from the in- 
ception of study at Brandeis University. 

Master of Fine Arts Degree 

In order to qualify for the degree of Master of Fine Arts in Music, the 
candidate must complete with distinction 36 semester hours of work at the 
graduate level, and must meet the other requirements for the degree outlined 
on Pages 73-75. 

Candidates for the Master of Fine Arts degree must file applications with 
the Graduate School Office no later than April 1 of the academic year in which 
the degree is to be offered. The application must have the written approval of 
the Chairman of the Area of Study. In case of failure or withdrawal from 
candidacy in that year, the student must reapply by filing a new application in 
a later year. Where a thesis is required for the Master of Fine Arts degree, 
it must be submitted by May 1st. The Master of Fine Arts degree must be 
earned within five years from the inception of study at Brandeis University. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

In order to qualify for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, a student must 
ordinarily complete a minimum of three years of graduate study, including 
two years of residence and a third year devoted to preparation of a doctoral 
dissertation. Under certain conditions, credit for advanced standing will be 
granted for work taken in residence in graduate schools of other universities. 
Each Area of Study reserves the right to require a candidate for the degree 

[62] 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

to perform work in excess of its minimum standards to assure thorough 
mastery of the area. 

For programs of study, language requirements, examinations and dissertation 
requirements, consult the section of the catalog dealing with your proposed 
Area of Study. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must file applications with the Graduate 
School Office no later than April 1 of the academic year in which the degree 
is to be offered. The application must have the written approval of the Chair- 
man of the Area of Study. In case of failure or withdrawal from candidacy in 
that year, the student must reapply by filing a new application in a later year. 
The doctoral dissertation must be submitted to the Chairman of the Area of 
Study before April 15. Representatives of the University Graduate Committee 
will participate in the final oral examination of the doctoral candidate. 

At least two bound copies of the doctoral dissertation must be deposited 
with the University — one for the library and one for the pertinent department. 
Arrangements must be made with the Director of Administrative Services of 
the library for a uniform binding, the cost of which will be borne by the 
student. 

The Ph.D. degree must be earned within eight years from the inception 
of study at Brandeis University. 



[63] 



B. Areas of Graduate Studies 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor Nathan O. Kaplan, Chairman 

Objectives 

The graduate program in Biochemistry leading to the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy is designed to equip the student with a broad understanding of 
the chemistry involved in biological processes and to train him to carry out 
independent original research. Although the student will be primarily responsi- 
ble for a comprehensive understanding of biochemical phenomena, he will be 
encouraged to acquaint himself with the disciplines of biology and chemistry. 
Research and experimental projects rather than formal course training will be 
emphasized. However, the student will be required to register for basic bio- 
chemistry, biochemical techniques, intermediary metabolism, and biochemistry 
seminars. The choice of advanced biochemistry courses and those of other 
scientific disciplines (i.e., organic chemistry, genetics, embryology, etc) 
are therefore subject to the particular interests of the student. The choice 
of research programs should be in areas under investigation by the faculty: 
some of these fields include intermediary metabolism in normal and also tumor 
tissues, enzymology, immunochemistry, radiobiology, biochemical genetics, pro- 
tein chemistry, plant and virus metabolism, problems in growth and differ- 
entiation, photobiology, microbial metabolism, and organic biochemistry. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of the catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this Area 
of Study. The student's undergraduate curriculum should include some funda- 
mental courses in biology and chemistry which will be subject to final staff 
approval. 

Degree Requirements 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
Admission to Candidacy 

The qualifying examinations must be passed at a level considered satisfac- 
tory for this degree. This usually takes place after the second year of graduate 
work. 

Program of Study 

Each candidate for the Doctor's degree is required to complete satisfactorily: 

1) The basic courses: Basic Biochemistry, Biochemical Techniques, Inter- 
mediary Metabolism, Radiobiology, and at least five of the Biochemistry Sem- 
inars. Other courses will be prescribed by the department and will be based on 
the individual interest of the student. 

[64] 



1. Allen Hall 

2. Rosen Hall 

3. Emerman Hall 

4. Danciger Hall 

5. Fruchtman Hall 

6. Mailman Student 
Center 

7. South Parking 

8. Slosberg Music Center 

9. Administrative Center" 

10. Student Personnel 
Center* 

11. Ford Hall 

12. Sydeman Hall 

13- Brown Terrarium 

14. Faculty Center* 

15. Hamilton Parking 

16. Hamilton A and B 

17. DeRoy Hall 

18. Renfield Hall 

19. Usen Hall 

20. Student Union Building 

21. Woodruff Hall 

22. Berlin Chapel 

23. Harlan Chapel 

24. Bethlehem Chapel 
♦Constructed by 1959 



25. University Library 

26. Goldfarb Library 
Building* 

27. Rabb Graduate Center 

28. Ullman Amphitheatre 

29. Kalman Science Center 

30. Friedland Research 
Wing* 

31. Social Science Center* 

32. Olin-Sang American 
Civilization Center* 

33. Shiftman Humanities 
Center* 

34. Men's Residence 
Quadrangle* 

35. Student Commons and 
Dining Room* 

36. Schwartz Hall 

37. Castle 

38. Buildings and Grounds 
Center 

39. Stoneman Infirmary 

40. Shapiro Athletic Center 

41. Memphis Parking 

42. Marcus Playing Field 

43. Gordon Field 

44. Roberts Cottage 

45. Ridgewood 20 




The 

Master Plan 
of the 

Brandeis University 
Campus 




PLEASE OPEN 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

2) A thesis summarizing the result of an original investigation of an ap- 
proved subject which demonstrates the competence of the candidate in inde- 
pendent investigation. 

3) A final examination upon the thesis. 

Language 

A reading knowledge of German and French is required. 

BIOLOGY 

Associate Professor Harold P. Klein, Chairman 
Objectives 

The graduate program in Biology is designed to give the student an under- 
standing of the fundamental nature of living processes, and to train him to 
undertake original research. All students are required to take a group of courses 
which will acquaint them with the principles and techniques of differentiation, 
genetics, microbiology, and physiology. Upon completion of this "core" cur- 
riculum, the student will ordinarily select for more intensive study a research 
field in which a facility member is doing active research. At present these 
include endocrinology, microbial genetics, microbial physiology, radiobiology. 
and virology. 

The graduate program is planned primarily to train students at the doc- 
torate level. At the discretion of the faculty, students who are not candidates 
for the Ph.D. degree may be granted a Master of Arts degree upon completion 
of a part of the required program. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this Area 
of Study. The student's undergraduate record should, ordinarily, include 
courses equivalent to those required of undergraduates concentrating in Biology 
at this institution. Students who are deficient in some of these subjects, but 
with otherwise superior records, may make up their deficiencies in Graduate 
School. In exceptional cases, students may be excused from some of these 
requirements. However, students with serious deficiencies must expect to be 
required to spend extra time in Graduate School. 

Degree Requirements 

MASTER OF ARTS 

The specific requirements for those candidates who wish to pursue a course 
of study leading to this degree will be prescribed by a committee. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
Admission to Candidacy 

The qualifying examination will be given in two parts — the first to be 
completed after the student has taken all the required basic courses. This 

[65] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

should ordinarily be after about two years of graduate study. The second part, 
emphasizing the field of specialization, should be completed before active thesis 
work is initiated. 

Program of Study 

Each candidate is required to complete satisfactorily: 

1) The bask courses: Biochemistry 100b, 101; Biology 101a and b, 102a, 
103b, 105b. 

2) Not less than nine additional semester hours of courses in Biology 
numbered 100-290, the specific course sequence to be prescribed. 

3) Additional seminar and research courses to be designated. 

Thesis 

Each student will conduct an original investigation. The subject of research 
must be approved by a committee and the professor under whose guidance the 
candidate works. In general, the student will be expected to choose a problem 
in the field of study in which one of the faculty is himself doing active research. 

After submission of the thesis, the candidate will be expected to present 
the principal results of his work and its significance during an examination 
in defense of his thesis. 

Language 

A reading knowledge of French and German is required. 

CHEMISTRY 

Objectives 

The graduate program in Chemistry is designed to lead to a broad under- 
standing of this subject. All students will be required to demonstrate, knowl- 
edge in advanced modern areas of inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. 
They will be required also to demonstrate proficiency in selected experimental 
techniques which are used in chemical research. Advanced courses are offered, 
satisfactory completion of which will constitute partial fulfillment of these 
requirements. Research upon which theses may be based is restricted at present 
to the fields of organic and physical chemistry. In these fields, members of the 
Chemistry staff are currently investigating Mechanisms of Organic Reactions, 
Chemistry of Free Radicals, Asymmetric Synthesis, Chemistry of Organo- 
phosphorous Compounds, Chemical-Biological Problems, Chemical Kinetics of 
Elementary Reactions, Statistical Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structure, 
Properties of Non-aqueous Solutions. 

To avoid excessive specialization, related advanced work in mathematics, 
physics and biology may be offered to fulfill degree requirements. 

All aspects of the individual programs must be approved. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this Area 

[66] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

of Study. In addition, the undergraduate curriculum of applicants should include 
courses in physics and mathematics (differential and integral calculus), and 
courses in general, analytical, organic and physical chemistry. 

Admission to advanced courses will be based upon results of a qualifying 
examination in each of these areas of chemistry, which will be taken upon 
entrance. These examinations will determine whether the student will be 
required to make up deficiencies in preparation. 

Degree Requirements 

MASTER OF ARTS 
Admission to Candidacy 

The qualifying examinations must be passed at a level considered satis- 
factory for this degree. 

Program of Study 

Each candidate for the Master's degree is required to complete satisfactorily: 

1 ) Not less than eighteen semester hours of lecture course work in chem- 
istry selected from those designated in the catalog as For Undergraduates and 
Graduates and Primarily for Graduates. Courses in inorganic, organic and 
physical chemistry shall be included in each program. 

2) Six semester hours of advanced laboratory work. This requirement 
may be met by graduate credit in Chemistry 211, but certain laboratory work 
related to the thesis may be offered in partial fulfillment of this requirement. 

3) A thesis upon an approved topic. The thesis may be based upon the 
results of a directed original investigation in an area chosen by the candidate. 

4) A final oral examination upon the subject dealt with in the thesis. 

Language 

A reading knowledge of German and an elementary knowledge of French 
or Russian is required. 

Residence 

The minimum residence requirement for this degree is one year. While 
generally this will be fulfilled in two semesters and one summer, it may in 
certain instances be met in two semesters. Students holding teaching assistant- 
ships will normally work at approximately nine semester hours per semester, 
and may take somewhat longer. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
Admission to Candidacy 

The qualifying examinations must be passed at a level considered satis- 
factory for this degree. 

Program of Study 

Each candidate for the Doctor's degree is required to complete satisfac- 
torily: 

1) The program of study described for the degree of Master of Arts in 
Chemistry, or its equivalent. 

[67] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

2) Not less than nine additional semester hours of lecture course work 
in Chemistry selected from those designated in the catalog as Primarily for 
Graduates. 

3) A thesis summarizing the results of an original investigation on an 
approved subject which demonstrates the competence of the candidate in inde- 
pendent investigation, critical ability and effectiveness of expression. 

4) A comprehensive written final examination in the major area of research. 

5) An oral defense of the thesis. 

Language 

A reading knowledge of German and either French or Russian is required. 

Residence 

The minimum residence requirement for this degree is two years. Ordi- 
narily, three years of full-time study will be necessary for the completion of the 
course work and the preparation of an acceptable thesis. Students holding 
teaching assistantships will normally work at a rate of approximately nine 
semester hours per semester and may take somewhat longer. 

ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Associate Professor J. V. Cunningham, Chairman 

Objectives 

The graduate program in English and American Literature is designed to 
offer training in the interpretation and evaluation of literary texts with some 
attention to the related scholarly disciplines, particularly history and linguistics. 
It also offers for candidates who have some ability in writing an opportunity 
to pursue this in ..rest as a normal part of the graduate program. 

Admission 

Candidates for admission should have a Bachelor's degree, preferably with 
'a major in English and American literature, and a reading knowledge of French, 
■or German, or Greek and Latin. The general requirements for admission to the 
Graduate School, as specified in an earlier section of this catalog, apply to can- 
didates for admission to this Area of Study. 

The program of study in the first year of graduate work leading to the de- 
gree of Master of Arts will consist of eight half -courses (four a semester). 
These will normally include Introduction to Literary Study, at least one seminar 
a semester, Old English or History and Structure of the English Language, 
and may include one or two half -courses in advanced writing. Candidates who 
are deficient in training, however, will in most cases need additional course 
work to fulfill the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts. 

The program of study in the first year of graduate work leading to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy will consist of eight half-courses. These will 
normally include three or four seminars, the Seminar in Teaching, the English 
Seminar, and may include one or two half -courses in advanced writing. The 
program in the second year of doctoral study will normally consist of the 

[68] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

Seminar in Teaching, of Preparation for Examinations in one semester, lead- 
ing to the examination on two special fields, and of Thesis in the other sem- 
ester, leading to the dissertation examination. Candidates who are deficient in 
training, however, may require more than two years of formal course work 
beyond the Master's degree. 

Degree Requirements 

MASTER OF ARTS 

A candidate for the Master's degree: 

1 ) Must have a reading knowledge of French, or German, or of Greek and 
Latin. 

2) He must complete with satisfactory grades at least eight approved half- 
courses, including 201a and 121 or 192b. 

3) He must submit two Master's papers of acceptable quality in two sem- 
inars. 

4) He must pass the Master's examination. • This examination will be 
given regularly in May and September of each year. It consists (a) of a written 
examination testing the candidate's information about English and American 
literature, and (b) of an oral examination on four, five, or six texts of different 
kinds and periods. The texts will be selected by the candidate with the ap- 
proval of his committee. This part of the examination will test the candidate's 
ability to discuss a literary work with intelligence and perception. 

The minimum residence requirement is one year, though students with 
inadequate preparation may require more. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

A candidate for the Doctor's degree: 

1) Must be formally admitted to candidacy for the degree by the Grad- 
uate Committee on English and American Literature. 

2) He must have a reading knowledge of two of the following languages: 
Greek, Latin, French, Italian, German. 

3) He must complete the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts 
in English. 

4) He must pass the examination for the Master's degree at a high level. 

5 ) He must complete with satisfactory grades at least eight approved half - 
courses beyond the requirements for the Master's degree; three or four of 
these must be seminars, and one must be 301b, the English Seminar. 

6) He must pass examination in four special fields of English and American 
literature. Normally one of these fields will be closely related to the topic of 
his thesis; one may be a major text, for example, Paradise Lost; and the other 
two will be on fields in which his formal training has been deficient. The 
examination will be based on reading lists submitted by the candidate and 
approved by his committee; the lists should represent the minimum prepara- 
tion for teaching an undergraduate course on the subject. These examinations 
may be taken at one time, or in groups of two at two separate times. 

7) When the candidate has chosen and explored a topic for his thesis he 
must petition the department for a formal conference. This is the dissertation 

[69] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

examination: in it the proposed topic, the proposed methods, and the candi- 
date's preparation and his ability to deal with the topic will be discussed. The 
decisions and stipulations of the department will be recorded and put on file. 

8) Finally, the candidate must submit an acceptable monograph or some 
comparable contribution to learning, on a topic and in a form approved by 
the committee at his dissertation examination. 

The minimum residence requirement is one year beyond the Master's 
degree or two years beyond the Bachelor's, but candidates will normally take 
three or four years. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 

Professor Herbert Marcuse, Chairman 

Objectives 

The graduate program in the History of Ideas leading to the degree of 
Master of Arts in History is designed to offer broad comprehensive training 
in the history of philosophy, the history of political theory, the history of 
religion, the history of science and the history of social thought. The program 
aims to lay the foundation for instruction in general education courses and 
for specialized work in the History of Ideas. 

Under the same program, the degree of Doctor of Philosophy aims to 
prepare scholars and teachers in the advanced study of the History of Ideas. 

Admission 

An undergraduate major in History, Philosophy, Politics or Sociology is 
desirable but not a requirement for admission. In addition, the general require- 
ments for admission to the Graduate School as specified in an earlier section 
of this catalog apply. 

Degree Requirements 

The program is comprised of five fields of study in the history of western 
civilization: 

History of Philosophy 

History of Political Theory 

History of Religion 

History of Science 

History of Social Thought 
For the degree of Master of Arts, a candidate is required to qualify in five 
topics which must be distributed over at least four of the above fields. Quali- 
fication in four of the topics will be achieved by examination; one of the topics 
will be allowed on the basis of course grades of B or better. Students who have 
attained records of highest distinction in at least four full courses or their 
equivalent may, at the discretion of the committee, be exempted from the 
examination for the Master's degree and be recommended for the degree by 
the committee. 

[70] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

For purposes of the qualifying examination a topic is defined as an appro- 
priate segment of knowledge in one of the five major fields of study. The 
Committee in the History of Ideas must approve each candidate's program. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

A candidate must complete one year's residence before he is admitted to 
the qualifying examination for the degree of Master of Arts. At least two 
courses must involve the preparation of seminar papers or written reports 
required in connection with advanced reading courses. A reading knowledge 
of French or German is a prerequisite for admission to the qualifying 
examination. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The minimum residence requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
is two years. Success in the qualifying examination for the degree of Master 
of Arts, or exemption from it as specified above, is a prerequisite for the con- 
tinuation of a candidate's work in a special field leading to the doctorate. The 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy will be awarded upon acceptance of an appro- 
priate dissertation in the History of Ideas and after the defense of the thesis 
at an oral examination. Each candidate must demonstrate a reading knowledge 
of both French and German before admission to the doctorate examination. 



MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professor Oscar Goldman, Chairman 

Objectives 

The graduate program in Mathematics leading to the degree of Master of 
Arts is designed to give the student a broad acquaintance with the most impor- 
tant methods and ideas of modern mathematics. 

The graduate program in Mathematics leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy is designed to prepare the student for independent research by 
providing a broad background of mathematical knowledge and introducing him 
to the problems and methods of the significant fields of modern mathematics. 

All aspects of the individual programs must be approved. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in 
an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this 
Area of Study. In addition, the applicant should have completed the equivalent 
of the requirements for undergraduate concentration in Mathematics at 
Brandeis University as stated in this catalog. 

[71] 



AEEAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

Degree Requirements 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Program of Study 

1) Six 100 courses, as well as two additional approved courses, must be 
passed with a satisfactory grade. 

2) In addition, all first year students are required to attend the graduate 
seminar, Mathematics 299. 

3) A general examination covering Algebra, Analysis and Geometry must 
be taken and passed after completion of the above eight courses. 

Language 

A reading pioficiency in mathematical literature in one foreign language 
must be demonstrated. This may be in French, German or Russian. 

Residence 

At least one year's residence is required. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
Program of Study 

1) The program of study described for the degree of Master of Arts or 
its equivalent must be completed. 

2) A thesis presenting the results of an original investigation of an ap- 
proved subject must be completed in an acceptable manner. The thesis must 
demonstrate the competence of the candidate in independent investigation. 

3) An examination covering the field of the thesis must be passed. 

Language 

A reading proficiency in a second language must be demonstrated. 

Residence 

At least two years' residence is required. 

Notes 

1) In general, in order to satisfy a year's residence requirement, the stu- 
dent is expected to pass eight semester courses. 

2) The performance in the General Examination may determine whether 
the student will be accepted as a Ph.D. candidate. 

MUSIC 

Associate Professor Arthur Berger, Chairman 

Objectives 

The graduate program in Music, leading to the degrees of Master of Fine 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, is designed to assist in promoting creative 
endeavor and the acquisition of deeper insight into the nature and esthetic 
basis of music and the historical development of musical styles and techniques. 

Two general fields of study are offered in Music: 

[72] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

1) Musical Composition 

This program leads to the degree of Master of Fine Arts, which 
is regarded as terminal for composers, who at this point should be 
able to embark upon a professional career. 

2) Music History, Analysis and Criticism 

This program leads to the degrees of Master of Fine Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy. Students may specialize in one of these three cate- 
gories, but are expected to acquire a background in all three. 



Admission 

Only a limited number of students will be accepted. The general require- 
ments for admission to the Graduate School, as specified in an earlier section 
of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this Area of Study. 

Applicants for study in Musical Composition will be required to submit, 
in addition to a transcript of their undergraduate records, evidence of qualifica- 
tion in the form of examples of advanced work in musical theory and original 
work in musical composition. This work should be submitted together with 
the formal Application for Admission. 

Candidates for admission to the Composition program are expected to be 
proficient at the piano or on some orchestral instrument possessing a standard 
solo repertoire. Such students should furnish information about this when 
making formal application. 



Degree Requirements 



Language 



Group A: French, German, Italian 

Group B: Spanish, Latin, Hebrew, Greek (and other languages at the 
discretion of the Music faculty). 
A reading knowledge of a language from Group A is normally required 
of all applicants for admission to a graduate program in Music. 

Candidates for the Master's degree specializing in Musical Composition 
must possess a reading knowledge of two of the above languages, of which at 
least one must be from Group A. (The combination of Italian and Spanish 
will not be approved. ) 

Candidates for the Master's degree specializing in Music History, Analysis 
and Criticism must possess a reading knowledge of two languages in Group A. 
Candidates for the Doctor's degree in Music must possess a reading knowl- 
edge of all three languages in Group A. (In exceptional cases, the Music faculty 
may accept a language in Group B in lieu of Italian.) 

[73] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

Foreign language course credits will not in themselves constitute fulfillment 
of the language requirements for advanced degrees. All candidates must pass 
language examinations set by the Music faculty and offered periodically during 
the academic year. Students are urged to take these examinations at the earliest 
feasible date. In case of failure, an examination may be taken more than once. 

The language examinations are designed to test the students' ability to make 
ready and accurate use of critical and literary works. Normally each examina- 
tion will contain three passages for written translation into idiomatic English: 
(1) classical or modern prose; (2) classical or modern poetry, often poetry that 
has been set to music; and ( 3 ) critical prose dealing with music. Dictionaries 
may be used in these examinations. 

Instrumental Proficiency 

At least moderate proficiency at the piano is required of all candidates for 
advanced degrees. 

Residence 

For the degree of Master of Fine Arts: 

Thirty-six semester hours of work at the graduate level completed with 
distinction and a thesis are required of all candidates (one course meeting 
three times a week for two semesters is counted for six hours' credit ) . 

Applicants who have done graduate or advanced work elsewhere may apply 
for credit for such work. Under any circumstances a minimum residence of 
one year's work at the graduate level is required. 

In general, the program should be completed in two academic years. Stu- 
dents should take no more than four courses in any one year. It is suggested, 
however, that students pursue no more than three courses during the year in 
which they take general examinations and submit a thesis. Those students 
holding teaching fellowships may reduce their load to two courses. 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

A minimum of forty-eight semester hours of work at the graduate level 
completed with distinction is required of all candidates. 

In general, the program may be completed in three academic years. 

Applicants who have done graduate or advanced work elsewhere may apply 
for credit for such work. 

General Examinations 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Fine Arts will be expected to pass 
with distinction a General Examination in musical theory, history, and style 
at the time of the completion of their program of study. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy will be expected to pass 
with distinction a special examination after meeting their language and resi- 
dence requirements. They will also be expected, after completion of their dis- 
sertation, to defend it in an oral examination. 

[74] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 
Thesis and Dissertation 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Fine Arts in Musical Composition 
are required to submit a thesis normally consisting of an original composition in 
a large form. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Fine Arts in Music History, An- 
alysis and Criticism are required to submit an acceptable written thesis on a 
topic approved by the Music faculty. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Music must submit 
an acceptable written dissertation on a subject approved by the Music faculty. 

Written theses and dissertations should demonstrate the competence of the 
candidate as an independent investigator, his critical ability, and his effective- 
ness of expression. 



NEAR EASTERN AND JUDAIC STUDIES 

Professor Nahum N. Glatzer, Chairman 
Objectives 

The graduate program in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies leading to the 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees is designed to further research 
and to train scholars in the various cultures of the ancient and modern Near 
Eastern peoples and of the ancient and modern Judaic civilization. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, as specified 
in an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this 
Area of Studies. 

Program of Study 

Among the main fields in the area of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies m 

which courses will be given in the Graduate School are: 

Hebrew Language and Literature — Classical, Medieval, and Modern. 

Jewish History. 

Jewish Philosophy — Medieval (from 9th to 15 Century) and Modern 
(18th to 20th Century). 

Semitic Languages. 

, History of Ancient Near East, including Palestine. 

>■ History of Near Eastern Arts. ." . 

Fields of study not listed here may be approved. 

[75] 



areas of graduate studies 

Degree Requirements 

MASTER OF ARTS 
Language 

Every candidate for the degree of Master of Arts must show a reading 
knowledge in one Semitic language, and in French or German. In special 
cases, another modern foreign language may be substituted for one of the two 
listed here. This requirement is to be satisfied by examination not later than 
eight weeks before a candidate is to receive his degree. 

Residence 

Advanced students for the Master of Arts degree in this area who can, 
on admission, give evidence of satisfactory competence in one Semitic language 
or in one particular field of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, will be able to 
complete the program for their degree in one year. Additional resident study 
may be required of less advanced students. 

Thesis 

A thesis should be submitted not later than six weeks before the candidate 
is to receive his degree. In certain cases students for the Master of Arts degree 
may be allowed to substitute an additional six semester hours of graduate study 
(to the 24 semester hours normally required) in lieu of the thesis. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Language 

A candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in this area must show 
a reading knowledge in one Semitic and in one modern foreign language as 
required by his special field of research. The Area reserves the right to require 
of a candidate a reading knowledge in an additional Semitic and in two modern 
foreign languages if required by his special field of research. The candidate 
must satisfy his language requirements not later than at the completion of his 
required residence in the Graduate School. 

Residence 

While the residence required of Doctor of Philosophy candidates is two 
years, a longer residence may be required for part-time students and students 
holding teaching assistantships who will normally work at a reduced rate. 

Thesis 

The doctoral dissertation required of Doctor of Philosophy candidates may 
be submitted after two years of resident study in this Area. Prior to its sub- 
mission, however, candidates will be required to pass an oral examination. 

[76] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

PHYSICS 

Associate Professor David L. Falkoff, Chairman 

Objectives 

The graduate program in Physics is designed to equip the student with a 
broad understanding of all major fields of Physics and to train him to carry 
out independent original research. This objective is to be attained by formal 
course work and supervised research projects. As the number of students who 
are accepted is restricted, close contact between student and faculty will be 
maintained, thus permitting close supervision and guidance of each student. 

Advanced degrees will be granted upon evidence by the student of his 
knowledge, understanding and proficiency in classical and modern physics, and 
in mathematics. The satisfactory completion of advanced courses will constitute 
partial fulfillment of these requirements. Research upon which these may be 
based, with residence at Brandeis, can be carried out in the following areas 
of Theoretical Physics: quantum theory of fields; meson theory; quantum 
electro-dynamics; elementary particle physics; nuclear physics; quantum statis- 
tical mechanics; thermodynamics of irreversible processes; physics of the solid 
state; many-particle problem. Research in experimental physics is restricted at 
present to low energy atomic and nuclea: phenomena. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School outlined 
in the general catalog apply also to candidates for admission to the graduate 
area in Physics. 

Admission to advanced courses in Physics will be granted following a 
conference with the student at entrance to determine whether any deficiencies 
must be made up. 

Degree Requirements 

MASTER OF ARTS 
Admission 

A qualifying examination must be passed at a level considered satisfactory 
for this degree. 

Program of Study 

1) Not less than 18 semester hours of advanced courses. 

2) A thesis upon an approved topic. 

3) A final oral examination upon the subject dealt with in the thesis. 

£77] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

Language 

A reading knowledge of French and German is required. Russian may be 
substituted for one of these languages. 

Residence 

Minimum of one year. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
Admission 

A qualifying examination must be. passed at a level considered satisfactory 
for this degree. 

Program of Study 

1 ) Program of study described for the degree of Master of Arts in Physics 
or its equivalent. 

2) Not less than nine additional hours of lecture course work in Physics, 
Mathematics or Chemical Physics. 

3) A thesis summarizing the result of an original investigation of an 
approved subject which demonstrates the competence of the candidate in inde- 
pendent investigation. 

4) A final examination upon the thesis. 

Language 

Same as Master's degree. 

Residence 

Minimum of two years. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Abraham H. Maslow, Chairman 
Objectives 

The graduate program in Psychology leading to the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy is designed for students of promise interested in the field of 
general psychology. Theoretical and experimental studies and research projects 
rather than formal course training will be emphasized. The staff will . work 
out a program of studies, work and research with each individual student. 
Training in clinicalpsychology • and other special areas is offered for all grad- 
uate students, but no specialized degrees are contemplated. AM students are 
expected to be candidates for a Ph.D. in General Psychology. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, as specified 
in an earlier section of this catalog, apply to candidates for admission to this 
Area of Study. 

[78] 



AREAS OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

An undergraduate major in psychology will not be absolutely required, 
although it will be favored. Students with inadequate preparation may make 
up their deficiencies (without credit) while in residence. Preference will be 
given to students who have completed, in addition to basic courses in theoretical 
and experimental psychology, a broad liberal arts program with some training 
in the natural and social sciences. Students will be admitted on a competitive 
basis which will include evaluation of previous academic record and the results 
of the Graduate Record Examinations, (Advanced, Aptitude and Profile Tests) 
and the Miller Analogies Test. Graduate programs will be arranged individually 
in consultation with faculty members. 

Program of Study 

In the normal program graduate students will ordinarily elect three credit 
units in individual research projects, three credit units in readings in psycho- 
logical literature, three credit units in the department colloquium and research 
seminar, and two seminars or courses at the 100 level or above. They are 
permitted, in addition, to audit whichever seminars or courses they desire 
or need. See course listings on Pages 160-167. 

Language 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology will be 
required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of a second language. 

Residence and Thesis 

Customarily it takes four years of full-time graduate study to achieve the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. Of these, two years of residence on the Brandeis 
campus are required. The degree of Doctor of Phil®sophy will be awarded 
upon acceptance of an appropriate dissertation and after the defense of the 
thesis at an oral examination. 



[79] 



V 

Courses of Instruction 

The Courses of Instruction under the Faculty of Arts and Sciences are listed 
below. All courses meet for three hours a week unless the course description 
indicates otherwise. The presence of "a" in the course number indicates a half 
course given in the Fall term; "b" indicates a half course given in the Spring 
term; "aR" indicates a course given in the Spring term which is identical with 
the "a" course of the same number given in the Fall term; the use of "c" after 
a course number indicates that the course is administered as a half course meet- 
ing throughout the year. 

Half courses normally carry three credits and full courses, six. Exceptions 
are noted under the individual course descriptions. Additional credits are given 
for laboratory hours, as indicated in the course descriptions. 

Students may withdraw from whole courses at the end of the Fall term 
only with the consent of the instructor and with the approval of the Admin- 
istrative Committee, the matter of credit to be decided by the instructor and 
the Administrative Committee in individual cases. 

The University reserves the right to make any necessary changes in the 
offerings without prior notice. 

AMERICAN HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION 

Associate Professor Donald Bigelow, Chairman; **Professor Max 
Lerner; ** Assistant Professor Leonard Levy; Mr. Samuel Shapiro; 
Dr. John Van Doren, {Student Adviser). 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: American History 1; American Civilization 
2, 97c. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: American Civili- 
zation 99. 

C. Elective Courses: Select the equivalent of two full courses from the follow- 
ing: American Civilization 98c; American History 113b, 133b, 134a, 134b, 
136a, 136b, 137a, 156, 158a, 158b, 163, 170a, 170b, 175a, 180b, 185b, 191a, 
191b; History of Ideas 230a, 230b. 

Select the equivalent of one full course from the following: English 8b, 
20, 80, 160a, 180b, 181b, 182b; American History 137b. 
Select the equivalent of one and one-half courses from the following: Eco- 
nomics 20a, 131b, 141a; Fine Arts 141a; any History course; Philosophy 
151b; Politics 11a, lib, 106a, 121, 154a, 172b; Social Science 20a; Sociology 
5b, 13b, 106a. 

With the approval of a faculty member in the field of concentration, stu- 
dents may be permitted to include in their elective program the equivalent 

**On leave, 1957-58. 

[80] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

of any full course offered by the School of Social Science, except Social Science 
1, or the equivalent of any appropriate full course in American Literature, 
Philosophy or Fine Arts. 

^AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 2. Contemporary American Life and 

Thought 

An analysis of the major ideas and institutions which form the pattern 
of American civilization, with special attention to the political, economic, 
and intellectual aspects of American society. 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 97c. Junior Tutorial 

Required readings, research, reports and discussions on assigned topics. 

Staff 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 98c. Readings in American Civilization 

Readings and reports under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Avail- 
able to seniors with permission of the School of Social Science. Staff 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 99. Senior Research 

Seniors who are candidates for a degree with honors in American Civili- 
zation are required to register for this course and, under the direction of a 
member of the faculty, prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic. Staff 

AMERICAN HISTORY 1. History of the United States 

A history of the American people from the seventeenth century to the 
New Deal. The course is organized around major periods and within each 
period the significant political and social features are discussed. During the 
first term the following topics are considered: Puritanism and the Colonial 
Experience, The American Revolution, Federalism, Jeffersonian and Jack- 
sonian Democracy, and the Causes of the Civil War. The second term focuses 
on: Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, Industrial Capitalism, Progressiv- 
ism, the Twenties and the New Deal. 

Open to Freshmen. Mr. Bigelow 

^AMERICAN HISTORY 113b. The Era of the American Revolution, 

1763-1789 
The events and causes of the founding of the Republic up to the adop- 
tion of the Constitution, and the historical and philosophical formulation of 
the national dogmas ; liberty, equality and property in the world of Franklin, 
Jefferson, John Adams, and Thomas Paine. 

AMERICAN HISTORY 133b. The Era of the Progressives, 1890-1914 

A general survey of the history of the period of Bryan and Woodrow 
Wilson, with emphasis on the political, economic, social, intellectual and 
moral complex of Reform: Populism, the Muckrakers, Theodore Roose- 
velt, the regulation of business, the humanitarian crusade and the New 
Freedom. Mr. Van Doren 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[81] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

AMERICAN HISTORY 134a. America Between the Wars: The Twenties 

A social and cultural history of the 1920's. The course will deal with the 
conflict between urban and rural values in such events as Prohibition and the 
Scopes Trial as well as with the intellectual expression (in Hemingway, Eliot, 
Mencken and others) of the changing standards of American life. The back- 
ground is the business civilization of an Age of Normalcy whose political, 
economic, and social currents culminated in the Depression. Mr. Van Doren 

AMERICAN HISTORY 134b. America Between the Wars : The New Deal 

The era of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the 1930's. Beginning with the 
nation's response to the Depression, the course will consider the develop- 
ment of the welfare state, the centralization of federal authority and the 
diverse economic and social experiments which comprise the New Deal 
in its various stages. Roosevelt as a political leader and his influence on 
the period will be examined. Emphasis will be given to a study of the 
political and intellectual climate of opinion during the period before the 
Second World War. Mr. Bigelow 

* AMERICAN HISTORY 136a. The Civil War and Reconstruction 

A political and military history of the people who fought the Civil War 
with special attention to the growth of the New South. The course will 
cover the period from the election of Lincoln in I860 to the Compromise 
of 1877. It will examine some of the reasons why Americans fought each 
other as well as the manner in which they fought. A major purpose will 
be to assess the results of the Civil War among which were Radical Recon- 
struction and the growth of the Republican party, Grantism, the struggle 
for white supremacy and Bourbon control in the South, and the development 
of industrial capitalism in the United States. 

*AMERICAN HISTORY 136b. Main Currents in Southern History 

An historical analysis of the development of a distinctive way of life in 
the American South from about 1820 to the present. The concept of "the 
South" and sectional consciousness, the class and caste system; pro-slavery 
thought and the wane of Southern liberalism ; secession and Civil War ; Re- 
construction ; the "New South," Redeemer rule and agrarian revolt; per- 
sisting racial, economic, and political problems, recent social change in 
Southern life and thought. 

AMERICAN HISTORY 137a. Literary History of the Civil War 

The course will consist of discussions based on readings from the prin- 
cipal American authors who have written history, fiction, and poetry about 
the Civil War period, with concern for their changing views of that pivotal 
epoch in American history. The emphasis will be on an understanding of the 
War's image in fact and legend as well as on the character of its heroes 
(notably Lincoln) and their meaning for later generations. Among the 
authors to be considered are Sandburg, Freeman, Bruce Catton, Stephen 
Crane, Margaret Mitchell, McKinlay Kantor, Whitman, Stephen Vincent 
Benet and Allen Tate. Mr. Van Doren 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[82] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

AMERICAN HISTORY 156. History of American Constitutional Law 

and Theory 

The history of the Constitution and its interpretation by the Supreme 
Court against the background of continuing political and economic change to 
the present time. Origins and development of American constitutional 
thought and institutions, with stress on problems of judicial review and the 
role of the judiciary in denning the powers and limitations of Government. 

Mr. Roche 

AMERICAN HISTORY 158a. Conservatism in America: 18th and 19th 

Centuries 

Analyzes the conservative thought in an increasingly industrial and 
democratic society. Examines the ideas and the programs of representative 
political conservatives (Hamilton, Webster, Calhoun, the Adams family) 
and concludes with a survey of cultural conservatism (Melville, Clemens, 
Henry James). Mr. Shapiro 

AMERICAN HISTORY 158b. Conservatism in America: 20th Century 

Surveys political conservatism from Theodore Roosevelt to Eisenhower. 
Examines contemporary conservative thought about labor problems, busi- 
ness, foreign policy, literature, art, and education. Mr. Shapiro 

*AMERICAN HISTORY 163. Intellectual History of the United States/ 

A study of the main currents in American thought from New England 
Puritanism to twentieth century democracy in the United States. The de- 
velopment of an American Enlightenment in the eighteenth century and 
the impact of technology and scientific thinking in the nineteenth will be 
discussed in relation to the growth of American democratic thought. Par- 
ticular emphasis will be placed on Roger Williams, Edwards, Jefferson, 
Emerson, William James, and John Dewey; and on such areas as National- 
ism, social Darwinism, pragmatism, and liberalism. 

*AMERICAN HISTORY 170a. American Political Thought and 

Institutions 

An examination of the origins of American political thought and the 
beginnings of American institutions. Covering the period prior to the Civil 
War, the emphasis will be on the relationship between ideas and actions, 
between theory and institutions. Areas of special concern will be the de- 
velopment of constitutional theory, the Age of Jackson, and the great debate 
over slavery and the nature of the Union. 

*AMERICAN HISTORY 170b. American Political Thought and 

Institutions 

An examination of American political thought and institutional practice 
since the "Second American Revolution/' the Civil War. Concentrating on 
the intellectual and practical reactions to the problems of an industrial 
civilization, the major areas of concern will be the growth of a capitalist 
*Not to be given in 1957-58. , . ... 

[83] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ideology, the reform impulse, the end of isolation, and the depression and 
New Deal pattern. 

AMERICAN HISTORY 175a. Immigration in American Life 

A study of immigration from colonial times to the present day. European 
backgrounds; changing patterns of immigration; the impact of America on 
the immigrant and of the immigrant on American politics and culture. 

Mr. Shapiro 

AMERICAN HISTORY 180b. The Classic American Historians 

Lectures and discussion on the principal American historians and their 
writings, chiefly in American history. Readings in Irving, Prescott, Motley, 
Parkman, H. C. Lea, Mahan, Henry Adams, Turner, Beard, and others. 

Mr. Van Doren 

AMERICAN HISTORY 185b. The Frontier in American Life 

The Commercial Revolution; America as the frontier of Europe; the 
Turner Thesis and its critics ; study of specific frontier areas. Mr. Shapiro 

AMERICAN HISTORY 191a. Colloquium in American History 

A seminar on the role of religion in American society. The current 
renaissance of religion, the problems of prejudice and civil liberties as well 
as the political and social aspects of present-day religious institutions will 
be considered. Writings by such diverse people as Toynbee, Maritain, Nei- 
buhr, Blanshard, Herberg, Schneider, Sperry, and Stokes will be examined. 

Permission of the instructor with enrollment limited to 8 students. 

Mr. Bigelow 

*AMERICAN HISTORY 191b. Colloquium in American History 

A seminar on the influence of Darwin, Marx, and Freud on American 
thought. For the impact of Darwin, the writings and ideas of such men 
as John Fiske, Edward Youmans, Chauncy Wright and Lester Ward will be 
studied; for those of Marx, Daniel de Leon, Eugene Debs, A. M. Simons, 
as well as the later group of Hacker, Hook, Hicks, and Edmund Wilson. 
For Freud, writers like Sherwood Anderson, O'Neill, Cargill, and Trilling. 
Social critics such as Lerner, Mills, and Reisman will also be considered. 

Permission of the instructor with enrollment limited to 8 students. 

AMERICAN LITERATURE — 

See course offerings under English and Comparative Literature. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

See Sociology and Anthropology Requirements for Concentration. 

ANTHROPOLOGY la and lb. Principles of Anthropology 

An introduction to the study of anthropology. Material from the four 
major subdivisions of the field: archaeology, physical anthropology, linguis- 
tics, and cultural anthropology will be presented. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[84] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

First semester: A brief discussion of the various branches of anthro- 
pology. Definitions of culture, culture process and symbols. Problems of 
human evolution, Old- World pre-history and race. 

Second Semester: A comparative analysis of social and political struc- 
tures, the family, magic and religion, education, and other social institutions. 
The course will include discussion of personality and culture theory, ac- 
culturation, "action" anthropology and other concepts and methods involved 
in anthropological research. 

Prerequisite: Anthropology la. Mr. Diamond and Mr. Lesser 

ANTHROPOLOGY lib. Problems of Underdeveloped Areas 

An analysis of the social, economic, and cultural forces at work in selected 
underdeveloped parts of the world and the impact of western civilization in 
these areas. Mr. Lesser 

*ANTHROPOLOGY 13a. Native Peoples of Africa 

An examination of the cultural and natural environment of representative 
African peoples south of the Sahara. Major effort will be devoted to the 
formulation of criteria for and the outlining of an evolutionary typology of 
African cultures, ranging from simple hunters and gatherers such as the 
Bushmen, to the complex proto-states of East and West Africa. 

^ANTHROPOLOGY 13b. Africa in the Modern World 

An intensive survey of contemporary socio-economic, political, and cul- 
tural problems in the major areas of Africa, south of the Sahara, viewed 
against the background of European conquest and African response. 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 13 a. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 15b. Methods and Results in Archaeology 

The field of archaeology; techniques of recovering materials and the 
methods of interpreting data. Illustrations will be drawn from significant 
archaeological regions around the world, with particular emphasis on the 
primitive and pre-literate cultures of the Near East, from the Nile to the 
Indus. Mr. Stigler 

See Sociology and Anthropology 97c, 98c, and 99. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 103a. Native Cultures of America 

A survey of the peoples and cultures of aboriginal America. Mr. Lesser 

ANTHROPOLOGY 103b. Culture Change and the American Indian 

Problems of acculturation and U.S. Government policy and administra- 
tion of American Indians. The course will include consideration of com- 
parable case studies from other world areas. Mr. Lesser 

ANTHROPOLOGY 105b. Human Evolution 

The fossil record of the emergence of homo sapiens from lower hominoid 
forms. Consideration will be given to (1) general principles of biological 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. \ 

[85] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

evolution, and (2) the physical and mental distinctiveness of man as a 
culture-bearing animal. Mr. Stigler 

ANTHROPOLOGY 107b. Primitive Religion 

The function, forms, and content of religion in primitive society, illus- 
trated with a comparative survey of some representative primitive religious 
systems. Mr. Stigler 

*ANTHROPOLOGY Ilia. The Kibbutz 

A problem-oriented interpretation and analysis of the origin, culture, 
social and psychological structure of a representative Israeli collective. Al- 
though the course is based on concrete field experience, issues of general 
concern to social science will be explored. Among these are: Utopianism, 
methods and results of communal child-rearing, definitions of Socialism. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 114a. Primitive Society 

The course will examine economic institutions and the forms of social 
structure and interaction in selected primitive and "underdeveloped" cultures. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Mr. Lesser 

ANTHROPOLOGY 115a. Origin of the State 

An examination of the processes through which early States have evolved 
from kin-based or "tribal" societies in the primitive world. The various 
classic theories of the State will be considered in the light of anthropological 
evidence. Mr. Diamond 

ANTHROPOLOGY 116b. Primitive Law 

The meaning, structure and function of "law" in the primitive world 
will be explored. The major theories accounting for the origin and nature 
of law and the distinctions between customary and legal behavior will be 
examined at length, as will the relationship between law and society. 

Mr. Diamond 

ANTHROPOLOGY 118a. Peoples and Cultures of Contemporary 

Southeast Asia 
A survey of the various ethnic groups of mainland Southeast Asia 
(Burma, Thailand, Malaya, Viet Nam, Laos, Cambodia) and island South- 
east Asia (Indonesia and the Philippines) with emphasis on the relation of 
the traditional cultures to contemporary social problems. Mr, Sacks 

ANTHROPOLOGY 126a and b. The Mind of Primitive Man as Reflected 

in their Mythology and the Narratives 
The course will be devoted to the intensive study of special texts and the 
elucidation through them of the life, thinking and literatures of aborig- 
inal man. Mr. Radin 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. . , • 

[86] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTHROPOLOGY 150. Colloquium on the Siouan-speaking Tribes of 

North America 

Special attention will be devoted to the Winnebago Indians, and the 
cultures of other Siouan-speaking tribes and those of the American Indians 
in general will be discussed in relation to them. 

Permission of instructor required. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Radin 

See also Humanities 191a. 

ARABIC 101. Introductory Arabic 

The course prepares students for classical and modern Arabic literature. 
Basic grammar of the language. Readings. 

Open to those students who have not previously had instruction in Arabic. 

Mr. Zeltzer 
ARABIC 102. Intermediate Arabic 

Selections from the Qur'an will be studied as a key to Islamic civilization. 
The linguistic analysis of the text will bring out the relation between Arabic 
and Hebrew, and lay a foundation for comparative Semitics. 

Prerequisite: Arabic 101 or its equivalent. Consent of instructor required 
prior to enrollment. Mr. Gordon 

ARABIC 103. Arabic Composition 

This course will train the student in orthography, grammar, and sentence 
structure with a view of enabling him to express himself correctly. 

Beginners in Arabic must obtain the consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Gordon 
* ARAMAIC 103a. Biblical Aramaic 

Grammar of Biblical Aramaic. Readings of the Aramaic texts of the 
Bible: Ezra, Daniel. 

Prerequisite: Knowledge of Hebrew. 
BACTERIOLOGY — See Biology 31b. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor Nathan O. Kaplan, Chairman; Professors Abraham Goldin 
{Visiting), Martin D. Kamen, William F. Loomis; Assistant Professors 
Lawrence Grossman, William P. Jencks, Mary Ellen Jones, Lawrence 
Levine, Stanley E. Mills. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

BIOCHEMISTRY 100b. Basic Biochemistry 

A chemical discussion of the basic biological problems which will in- 
clude topics such as: the physical and organic basis of biochemical reac- 
tions, cell physiology, intermediary metabolism, enzyme mechanisms and 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 32. Miss Jones and Staff 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[87] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

kinetics, energy transformations, hormones and other regulatory factors, 
and the basic problems of nutrition. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 101. Biochemical Techniques 

Students registered for this course will participate for a period of ap- 
proximately one month in the several research programs being conducted 
by the staff members. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b {may be taken concurrently). Consent of 
the Department. 

Hours to be arranged. Staff 

^BIOCHEMISTRY 102b. Intermediary Metabolism 

The following aspects of biochemistry will be studied: metabolism of 
carbohydrates, citric acid cycle, fat synthesis and degradation, inorganic 
metabolism, amino acid metabolism, peptide and protein synthesis, metab- 
olism of nucleic acids, vitamins, coenzymes and minerals and the respiratory 
chain. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b. 

Primarily for Graduates 

Courses 200 through 207 will be offered every third year. 

^BIOCHEMISTRY 200a. Physical Biochemistry and Proteins 

The following will be discussed: chemical and physical properties of 
proteins, methods of determination of molecular weight, purity and struc- 
ture. Kinetics of enzyme reactions, the measurement of free energy, heat 
and entropy values in biochemical systems, transition state theory and abso- 
lute reaction rates of enzyme-catalysed reactions and quantum mechanics 
will also be presented. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b. 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 202b. Organic Mechanisms of Enzyme Reactions 

The relationship between structure of substrates and enzyme activity will 
be discussed with such considerations as stereochemical configurations and 
electronic influences on substrate-enzyme reactivity. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b. 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 203a. Immunochemistry 

The course will deal with the mode and mechanisms of antigen-antibody 
interaction and the application of methods for studying these reactions in 
the estimation and characterization of proteins and high molecular weight 
polysaccharides. In addition, the principles of quantitative immunochem- 
istry will be applied in studies pertaining to naturally derived proteins with 
biological activity such as enzymes and toxins. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[88 J 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 204b. Metabolism in Relation to Function 

The biochemical aspects of the following processes will be considered: 
mechanisms of cellular growth, duplication and differentiation, biolumin- 
escence, motility, viral infectivity and replication. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b. 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 205a. Biochemical Genetics 

Recent advances in studies on the chemistry of inheritance will be dis- 
cussed with emphasis on recombination, transformation and transduction 
phenomena in microorganisms. Aspects of the problem of gene function, 
and the enzyme formation and function, will be considered together with 
the contribution of microbial and animal mutants to the study of metabolic 
pathways. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b. 

♦BIOCHEMISTRY 20<5b. Radiobiology 

Among the subjects to be discussed will be elementary examinations of 
the properties of the nucleus and elementary particles: the techniques of 
radioactive measurement: the effect of ionizing radiations on chemical and 
biological systems : the use, potentialities, and limitations of radioactive and 
stable isotope tracers in biology. 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b, 101. 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 207a. The Biochemistry of Malignancy 

A discussion of the metabolic activities of malignant tissues including 
the leukemics will be considered in comparison with normal tissues. Empha- 
sis will also be placed on the discrepancies occurring in glycolysis and res- 
piration in tumor tissues, the differences in protein structure as well as a 
discussion of the origins of malignancy with respect to biochemical phe- 
nomena. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 210. Biochemical Research Problems. 

Independent research for the Ph.D. degree. Staff 

Biochemical Seminars 

Reports and conferences concerned with various aspects of the following 
semester topics: One seminar will be given each semester. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 215a. Structure and Functional Specificity of Macro- 
molecules 

Mr. Levine and Staff 

BIOCHEMISTRY 216b. Biochemical Aspects of Differentiation 

and Growth 

Mr. Loomis and Staff 

♦BIOCHEMISTRY 217a. Factors Regulating Metabolic Activity 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[89] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

^BIOCHEMISTRY 218b. Biochemical Problems in Duplication 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 219a. Mechanisms of Energy Transfer Reactions 

in Living Systems 

^BIOCHEMISTRY 220b. Biochemical Basis of Chemotherapy 

*BIOCHEMISTRY 221a. Photochemical Mechanisms as Applied to 

Living Systems 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 100b. 

Journal and Research Clubs 

In addition to the formal courses announced above, all graduate stu- 
dents will be encouraged to participate in the Journal and Research Clubs of 
the Department. The Journal Club is an informal meeting of the students, 
staff, and postdoctorals where recent publications are discussed. The Re- 
search Club will be a general meeting of the Department in which both 
speakers from the Department and also guest speakers will present their 
current investigations. 

f BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE I 

The fundamental principles of living organisms, including man as a 
biological entity, derived from the data of zoology and botany. The topics 
include the nature and mechanism of living things, relation of organisms to 
their physical environment, theory of evolution and the biological founda- 
tions of behavior. 

Biological Science I is designed as a terminal biology course to be taken in 
the second year by most students except those planning to concentrate in 
one of the fields offered by the School of Science. See statement on the 
individual science requirements. 

Laboratory fee: $5. per semester. Mr. St. John 

BIOLOGY 

Associate Professor Harold P. Klein, Chairman; Associate Professors 
Herman T. Epstein, Albert Kelner; Assistant Professors Lionel 
Jaffe, Margaret Lieb, Albert G. Olsen (Student Adviser); Dr. Philip 
St. John, Dr. Jerome Schiff. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of All Candidates: Biology la, lb, 20a, 21b, 30a, 31b, 40a; 
Chemistry 10, 32; Physics 10 or 11; Mathematics 13a and 14b. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

fUnder exceptional circumstances Biological Science I passed with an honor grade 
may be counted as fulfilling the requirement in General Biology in the several fields 
of concentration in the School of Science. Pre-medical students should take Biology 
la and lb. 

[90] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

B. Elective Courses: All candidates must select three half courses from the 
following: Biology 32a, 33b, 34a, 4lb, 43b, Biology courses numbered 
between 100 and 199; Biochemistry 100b; Chemistry 21a. 

C. Candidates for distinction will offer Biology 99 for three credits each 
semester of the senior year. A satisfactory written report including the 
results of an independent investigation is required by the department. 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

BIOLOGY la and lb. General Biology 

Introduction to the more important principles of biology ; study of plant 
and animal structure and physiology. Major emphasis is placed on plants 
during the second semester, with the angiosperms receiving primary con- 
sideration. This course is designed as a foundation for future professional 
work in the biological sciences, and is a prerequisite for biology concentrators 
to all other courses offered in biology, except as noted in footnote.f Ad- 
mission to any other biology course requires a satisfactory grade in this 
course. Three classroom and three laboratory hours a week. 4 credits each 
semester. 

Laboratory fee: $5. per semester. First Semester: Miss Lieb 

Second Semester: Mr. Jaffe 

BIOLOGY 20a. Intermediate Zoology: Biology of the Invertebrates 

Classification, morphology, distribution, life history, ecology, and eco- 
nomic importance of the invertebrate phyla of the animal kingdom. Field 
trips by arrangement. 

Three classroom and three laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $15. Mr. St. John 

BIOLOGY 21b. Intermediate Botany. Introduction to the Developmental 
Morphology and Taxonomy of Higher Plants 

A developmental treatment of the angiosperm life cycle with emphasis 
on quantitative methods of description of growth and differentiation. The 
second half of the course will be devoted to a study of the orders and fam- 
ilies of flowering plants; their taxonomic relationships, environmental physi- 
ology and ecology. 

Three lectures and three laboratory hours per week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Scruff 

BIOLOGY 30a. Principles of Genetics 

The fundamentals of the science of heredity. Included is a discussion of 
the relationship of genetics to other biological sciences, as well as its impact 
on problems of human society. 

In the laboratory there will be breeding experiments with the fruit flies, 
experiments illustrating selection in evolution, and study of human twins. 

Laboratory is required for all science majors taking this course, but non- 
science majors having honor grades in Biology la or lb, or in Biological 
Science 1, may elect to take the lectures only. 

[91] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 32. (May be taken concurrently.) 
Three classroom and three laboratory hours a week. 4 credits v/ith lab- 
oratory, 3 credits without. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Kelner 

BIOLOGY 31b. General Microbiology 

An introduction to the biology of primitive organisms, including the 
viruses, bacteria, yeasts, molds and protozoa. The laboratory is designed to 
give the student a grounding in bacteriological techniques. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 32. (May be taken concurrently.) 
Three classroom and four laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 
Laboratory fee : $15. Mr. Klein 

BIOLOGY 32 a. Comparative Anatomy 

An intensive comparative study of the anatomy of the principal organ 
systems of vertebrate animals, with detailed laboratory study of representa- 
tive forms. 

Three classroom and six laboratory hours a week. 5 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $15. Mr. Olsen 

BIOLOGY 33b. Principles of Embryology 

A descriptive and analytical study of developmental biology in various 
plant and animal forms; embryology, metamorphosis, and regeneration. In 
so far as the science allows, an understanding of general mechanisms is 
sought. 

Three classroom and three laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Jaffe 

*BIOLOGY 34a. Histology 

Microscopic structure of tissues and organs, with emphasis on vertebrates; 
microscopic techniques. 

Two classroom and four laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 
•'■ Laboratory fee: $10. 

BIOLOGY 40a. Cellular Physiology 

Basic biological problems at the cellular level. Chemical composition of 
cells. Intracellular organization of enzymes, functions of nucleus, cytoplasm, 
mitochondria and microsomes; membrane permeability. 

Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in Chemistry 32. 

Three "classroom hours a week. 3 credits. Mr. Klein 

*BIOLOGY 4 lb. Plant Physiology 

The study of nutrition, growth, water relationships and photosynthesis in 
higher plants. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 32 (may be taken concurrently) ; Biology 40a. 
Three classroom and three laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 
Laboratory fee: $10. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[92] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOLOGY 43b. Vertebrate Physiology 

The basic principles of the physiology of the vertebrates with special 
reference to mammals. Examples of contemporary research will demonstrate 
the methods of attack used in physiological investigations. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 32 {may be taken concurrently}; Biology 40a. 

Three classroom and three laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $15. Mr. Olsen 

BIOLOGY 99. Senior Research 

Introduction to biological research conducted under the supervision of an 
instructor. 

Admission only by permission of the department and of the instructor 
to students with an average grade of B in Biology. 

Laboratory fee: $10. per semester. Staff 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

Admission to any of the following courses in Biology requires the consent 
of the instructor. 

BIOLOGY 101a and 101b. General Physiology 

The fundamental behavior of living plant and animal cells and tissues in 
their relation to matter and energy. Properties of protoplasm, growth, nutri- 
tion, effects of hormones on the cellular and organismal level. 

Prerequisites: Biology 40a or equivalent, Biochemistry 100b or equivalent. 

Three classroom hours ; laboratory to be arranged. 4 credits each semester. 

Laboratory fee : $10. per semester. Mr. Olsen 

BIOLOGY 102a. Developmental Genetics 

The nature of the genetic material and the mechanisms involved in 
genetic control of biological processes. 

Prerequisite: Biology 30a. 

Three classroom hours. 3 credits. Miss Lieb 

*BIOLOGY 103b. Cytology 

Microscopic and submicroscopic organization of the cell and a study of 
the physiological role of cell constitutents. Elements of cytochemistry. 

Prerequisites: Biology 30a, 40a. 

Three classroom hours ; laboratory to be arranged. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. per semester. 

BIOLOGY 105b. Differentiation 

The physiology of growth and differentiation: fertilization, cleavage, 
organ formation, metamorphosis, regeneration, tissue culture. 

Prerequisites: Biology 30a, 32a. 40a. 

Three classroom hours; laboratory to be arranged. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. per semester. Mr. Jaffe 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[93] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*BIOLOGY 110a. Principles of Evolution 

The operation in populations of genetic and non-genetic factors that 
bring about evolutionary changes. Natural selection, isolating mechanisms, 
evidences for evolution. 

Prerequisite: Biology 30 a. 

Three classroom hours. 3 credits. 

BIOLOGY 120. Advanced Microbiology 

An integrated course covering the broad field of microbiology including 
a limited treatment of applied microbiology, but emphasizing various ad- 
vanced phases of the biology of bacteria and related organisms. 

Three classroom hours. 3 credits each semester. Mr. Kelner 

*BIOLOGY 124a. Virology 

Biology of plant, animal and bacterial viruses. 

Prerequisite: Biology 31b or the equivalent. 
Three classroom hours. 

BIOLOGY 14 lb. Physical Biology 

Physical aspects of vision and hearing; properties of membranes and 
muscles; nerve excitation and conduction; forces involved in biological 
events; introduction to radiobiology ; application of physical measurements 
to biology. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in full year courses in Biology, Chemistry, 
Mathematics, and Physics. 

Three classroom hours. • Mr. Epstein 

Primarily for Graduates 

*BIOLOGY 211b. Microbial Genetics 

Mutation, variation, adaptation and other aspects of genetics in bacteria, 
viruses and other microorganisms. Problems of nucleus-cytoplasm relation- 
ships. Population genetics. 

Prerequisite: Biology 102a. 
Three classroom hours. 

*BIOLOGY 212a. Cytogenetics 

Correlation of genetic data with chromosomal aberration. Study of 
classical methods and recent findings. 

Prerequisites: Biology 102a, 103b. 

Three classroom hours; laboratory to be arranged. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee : $10. 

BIOLOGY 214a. Experimental Methods in Microbial Genetics 

Introduction to the study of microbial variations, including spontaneous 
and induced mutations; recombination, transduction and other phenomena,, 
using bacteria, and bacterial viruses. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[94] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Laboratory hours to be arranged. 

Laboratory fee: $20. Miss Lieb 

BIOLOGY 215b. Selected Topics in Microbial Genetics 

Mutation : spontaneous and induced ; relationships of mutageneses to 
growth mechanisms and nucleus-cytoplasm interrelationships; photoreac- 
tivation and other anti-mutagenic reactions. 

Prerequisites: Biology 30a, 31b, 40a, 101a, and 101b, or their equivalent, 
and the consent of the instructor. 

Three classroom hours a week. Mr. Kelner 

BIOLOGY 222a. Microbial Metabolism 

Nutrition and intermediary metabolism of microorganisms. 

Prerequisites: Biology 31b, Biochemistry 100b or the equivalent. 

Three classroom hours. Mr. Klein 

*BIOLOGY 223b. Experimental Methods in Microbial Metabolism 

An introduction to specialized techniques as applied to the study of micro- 
bial metabolism, including manometry, chromatography, spectrophotometry, 
tracer techniques, etc. 

Laboratory hours to be arranged. 3 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $20. 

*BIOLOGY 24lb. Advanced Plant Physiology 
*BIOLOGY 291b. Advanced Laboratory in Embryology 

BIOLOGY 292a. Selected Topics in Developmental Biology 

A seminar course devoted to selected topics in developmental biology. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Biology 33b or Biology 105b or the 
the equivalent. 

Three classroom hours a week. Mr. Jaffe 



BIOLOGY 310. 
BIOLOGY 320. 
BIOLOGY 330. 
BIOLOGY 340. 
BIOLOGY 350. 
BIOLOGY 360. 
BIOLOGY 370. 
BIOLOGY 380. 
*Not to be given 



Courses in Research 

Genetics and Microbiology 
Genetics and Microbiology 
Microbiology and Physiology 
Genetics and Microbiology 
Physiology 
Differentiation 
Plant Physiology 
Invertebrate Zoology 
in 1957-58. 

[95] 



Mr. Epstein 

Mr. Kelner 

Mr. Klein 

Miss Lieb 

Mr. Olsen 

Mr. Jaffe 

Mr. Schiff 

Mr. St. John 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



CHEMISTRY 



Professor Saul G. Cohen; Associate Professors Orrie M. Friedman,. 
Sidney Golden, Henry Linschitz; Assistant Professors Harold Con- 
ROY {Student Adviser), Chi-Hua Wang. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Chemistry 10, 21a, 22b, 32, 33b, 41; Biology 
la and lb; Mathematics 13a, 14b, 23a, 25b; Physics 11. 

B. Elective Courses: All students must elect the equivalent of one additional 
full lecture course and the equivalent of one term of laboratory work from 
the following: Chemistry 51b, 91c, 99, 121a, 131a, 131b, 141, 145b. 

C. Senior Honors Candidates: Must complete a program which meets with 
the approval of the Chemistry Staff. 

D. See German requirement, page 54. 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

CHEMISTRY 10. General Chemistry 

Fundamental principles of chemistry: properties of chemical systems,, 
kinetic-molecular theory, chemical equilibrium, atomic structure and the peri- 
odic system of the chemical elements, electrochemistry. The detection and 
estimation of the common cations and anions by semi-micro methods. 

Three classroom hours a week, two terms. Four laboratory hours a week, 
two terms. 9 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Messrs. Conroy, Friedman, Linschitz. 

CHEMISTRY 21a. Quantitative Analysis 

Theoretical principles of quantitative chemical analysis dealing with 
gravimetric and volumetric procedures, acidimetry and alkalimetry, ionic 
equilibria, oxidation-reduction, electrochemical cells, iodimetry and iodo- 
metry, solubility products. Laboratory work will consist of a variety of an- 
alyses designed to develop further the laboratory technique of the student. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 10 and Mathematics 13a or 14b. 

Chemistry 21a is recommended as preparation for Chemistry 32 and 
strongly recommended for pre-medical students. 

Two classroom and six laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Instructor to be announced 

CHEMISTRY 22b. Inorganic Chemistry 

The Periodic Table from the viewpoint of atomic structure; types of 
bonds and crystal lattices; hydrides, halides, and oxides of representative 
elements; oxidation potentials and complex ions of the transition elements. 
Laboratory work will include preparations and instrumental methods of 
quantitative analysis. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 21a. 

Two classroom and six laboratory hours a week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Instructor to be announced 

196 2 




And winter comes . . . 

skater on Kane Reflecting Pool 



Ridgewood Quadrangle . . . 

a basic men's residential area 









" *« « * 



4 /, jf* 



«,-*. 










*g«3 



Conversation between classes . . . 

in the sun outside Shapiro Athletic Center 




Warm-up time 



crowds gather for football on Gordon Field 



Sound and solitude . 



the rolling lawns of Slosberg Music Center 








Justice Earl Warren 



dedicates statue commemorating Justice Louis D. Brandeis 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
CHEMISTRY 32. Organic Chemistry 

Structure, reactions, preparation and uses of the compounds of carbon. 
The laboratory will give experience in the important techniques of organic 
chemical practice and include synthesis of typical organic compounds. 

Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in any one of the following courses: 
Chemistry 10, Chemistry 21a, Chemistry 22b. 

Three classroom and one 4-hour laboratory period a week. 9 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Cohen and Mr. Wang 

CHEMISTRY 33b. Qualitative Organic Analysis 

Analysis of functional groups in organic compounds and identification of 
organic compounds. 

An 8-week course beginning on March 24, 1958. 

One lecture and four laboratory hours per week. 1 credit. 

This course is required for students concentrating in Chemistry who wish 
to have their program accredited by the American Chemical Society. It is 
recommended that it be taken concurrently with Chemistry 32. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Wang 

CHEMISTRY 41. Physical Chemistry 

An introduction to the theoretical foundations of chemistry dealing with 
thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, real gases, solids, liquids, solutions, 
electrochemistry and chemical kinetics. Laboratory work will consist of a 
variety of experiments designed to illustrate the principles involved as well 
as to develop further the laboratory technique of the student. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in Chemistry 21a. Mathematics 23a or 
25 b and Physics 10 or 11. 

Three classroom hours and four laboratory hours a week, with one lab- 
oratory discussion period each week at the discretion of the instructor. 
9 credits. 

(Students who are not concentrating in Chemistry may, with the consent 
of the instructor, register for the lecture portion of the course, receiving 3 
credits for each term.) 

Laboratory fee: $10. Instructor to be announced 

CHEMISTRY 91c. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory 

Experiments designed to develop the individual student's technique in 
the several areas of chemistry. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 32 and 41 which may be taken concurrently. 
Hours and credits to be arranged. Laboratory fee: $10. Staff 

CHEMISTRY 99. Senior Research 

Research assignment, which may include literature survey, independent 
laboratory work, and presentation of oral and written reports; weekly 
conferences with adviser. 

Students must have completed the German requirements {see page 54) 
before registering for this course. 

Prerequisite: Consent of Chemistry Department. 

Hours and credits to be arranged. Laboratory fee: $10. Staff 

[97] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

Admission to any of the following courses in Chemistry requires the consent 
of the instructor. 

CHEMISTRY 121a. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Atomic structure, theory of valence, coordination complexes and inor- 
ganic stereochemistry. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in Chemistry 22b, 32 and 41 or the 
equivalent. 

Three classroom hours a week. Instructor to be announced 

CHEMISTRY 131a. Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Stereochemistry, electronic theory, molecular rearrangements, mecha- 
nisms of organic reactions. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in Chemistry 32 and 41 or the equivalent. 
Chemistry 41 may be taken concurrently. 
; Three classroom hours a week. Mr. Conroy 

CHEMISTRY 131b. Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Continuation of Chemistry 131a. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 131a. 

Three classroom hours a week. Mr. Conroy 

CHEMISTRY 141. Introduction to Theoretical Chemistry 

Elementary quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 41 or the equivalent. 
Three classroom hours a week. Mr. Golden 

CHEMISTRY 145b. Chemical Kinetics 

Kinetics of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical change. 
Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 41 or the equivalent. 

Three classroom hours a week. Instructor to be announced 

Primarily for Graduates 

CHEMISTRY 211. Graduate Chemistry Laboratory 

Experiments designed to develop the student's technique in preparation 
for chemical research. 

Hours and credits to be arranged. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Wang 

CHEMISTRY 212. Chemistry Colloquium 

Bi-weekly lectures by faculty, graduate students and guests. Required of 
all graduate students. No credit. Staff 

CHEMISTRY 231. Selected Topics in Theoretical Organic Chemistry 

A seminar course devoted to selected topics of modern theoretical organic 
chemistry. 

[98] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 131 or the equivalent and 
consent of the instructor. 

Hours and credits to be arranged. Mr. Conroy 

CHEMISTRY 235a. Selected Topics in the Chemistry of Natural Products 
Synthetic methods of organic chemistry and their application in the chem- 
istry of natural products. 

Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades in Chemistry 32 and 41 or the equivalent. 
Three classroom hours a week. Mr. Friedman 

*CHEMISTRY 241. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 

A seminar course devoted to selected topics in theoretical physical chem- 
istry. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in Chemistry 141 or the equivalent. 
Three classroom hours a week. 

*CHEMISTRY 246b. Electrolytic Solutions 

An introduction to the theory of Debye-Huckel and Onsager with appli- 
cation to the conduction, viscosity and diffusion of ions in solution. 

Courses in Research 

CHEMISTRY 331. Organic Chemistry Mr. Cohen 

CHEMISTRY 335. Organic Chemistry Mr. Friedman 

CHEMISTRY 337. Organic Chemistry Mr. Conroy 

CHEMISTRY 341. Physical Chemistry Mr. Golden 
CHEMISTRY 345. Physical Chemistry 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Committee: Professor Joseph I. Cheskis, Chairman; Professor Philip 
Rahv; Associate Professors Milton Hindus, Claude A. S. Vigee; Assist- 
ant Professor Irving Massey. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Comparative Literature 97c, and two full 
courses chosen from Comparative Literature 117b, 145, 147a, 147b. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Comparative 
Literature 99c. 

C. Elective Courses: (I) Two courses normally required for the major in 
each of two language areas, or a total of four courses. A sample program 
would be: English 2b, 3a, 6b, 7a; French 10, and another course in French 
Literature. 

(II) Three half -courses, selected from the two language areas of the stu- 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

199] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

dent's specialization. If the candidate chooses English as one of his fields, 

he should take only one of these half -courses in English. For example : 

English 147a, French 117a, 117b. 

All students are advised to consult the Committee on Comparative Litera- 
ture about coordinating their inter-area programs. The Committee will endeavor 
to arrange suitable programs for those whose special fields require some de- 
parture from the regular procedure. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 61. The Modern Novel 

Among the writers discussed will be Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Hawthorne, 
Tolstoy, Turgenev, James, Proust, Joyce, Mann, Kafka, Dreiser, Hemingway, 
and Fitzgerald. Mr. Hindus 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 97c. Junior Tutorial 

Independent research on a comparative project, with a term paper pre- 
senting the results. Regular consultations with the instructor supervising 
the project. Messrs. Massey and Vigee 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 99c. Senior Research 

At the beginning of his senior year the student will consult the Commit- 
tee on Comparative Literature about his thesis topic and will be placed under 
the guidance of a staff member in the appropriate field. Conferences with the 
instructor will be held throughout the year. A thesis with a minimum length 
of 7500 words is to be submitted at the end of the course. Staff 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 112. The Latin Tradition and 

English Literature 

The course will begin with a rapid review of the Latin language. This 
will be followed by the reading of selections, both prose and poetry, from 
classical and medieval Latin literature. These will be studied in conjunction 
with comparable selections from English literature. 

Prerequisite: Three years of high school Latin or the equivalent. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 116. The Late Renaissance 

A study of sixteenth century authors and their ideas — in France, Ger- 
many, and Italy; chiefly as seen through the writings and character of. 
Montaigne, the arch-sceptic and humanist of his age. 

Not open to freshmen and sophomores. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 117b. Anglo-French Literary Relations 

in the Seventeenth Century 

The instructor will select two or three topics for study during the term, 
such as the influence of the French Renaissance on the English seventeenth 
century lyric; the Protestant epic; or the borrowings from Moliere in 
Restoration comedy. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 145. European Romanticism 

Readings include Manon Lescatit, Rousseau's essay on inequality, Wert her, 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[100] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The Robbers, and works by Chateaubriand, Scott, Manzoni, "Wordsworth, Byron, 
Shelley, Michelet, Vigny, Hugo, Musset, Buchner, and Lermontov. Lyric 
poetry to be read by individual assignment only, in the language of the stu- 
dent's competence. Classes on the scientific, artistic, and musical background 
of the period will be arranged within the capacity of available staff. 

Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of a modern European language. 

Mr. Massey 
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 147a. Symbolism 

The theory of poetic symbolism in Hegel's Aesthetics. The appearance of 
symbolism in German, English, French and American Romanticism. Gerard 
de Nerval's supernaturalism. Bauderlaire's theory of "Correspondances" and 
"le demon de l'analogie". Mallarme's and Rimbaud's experiments in analogi- 
cal expression; their aims and techniques. 

Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of a modern European language. 

Mr. Vigee 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 147b. The Development of Nihilism in 

Modern Western Poetry 

The French "Symboliste" movement after 1890 and its repercussions on 
modern French, English, American, German, and Spanish poetry. 
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of a modern European language. 

Mr. Vigee 

^COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 160a. Studies in Modern Yiddish 

Literature 

Mendele Mocher Sforim, Sholom Aleichem, Peretz, Asch, Singer, Op- 
atashu, Schneour, and several contemporary Yiddish authors will be studied. 
Lectures will be in English as will the assigned readings. Students capable 
of doing so will be encouraged to read the original texts. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 162. Russian Fiction of the Nineteenth 

Century 
From Gogol to Tchekov. Mr. Rahv 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 171. The Modern Drama 

Plays will be examined as works of literary and dramatic art. In addition, 
attention will be given to the theatrical organization, the social circumstances, 
and the intellectual currents that influenced them. The authors to be read 
include Ibsen, Strindberg, Rostand, Becque, Hauptmann, Wedekind, Gorky, 
Yeats, O'Neill, Eliot, Cocteau, Sartre, Brecht, and Garcia Lorca. Mr. Popkin 

^COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 175a. Theories of the Drama 

A study of conceptions of the drama advanced by critics, dramatists, 
directors, and other men of the theatre from Aristotle and Horace to our 
own time. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 181a. Rousseau and Tolstoy 

Rousseau's "l'homme de Nature" and Tolstoy's "Peasant"; the educa- 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[101] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

tional theories of Rousseau and Tolstoy; their conception of the arts and 
the sciences; their religious "Weltanschauung". Mr. Cheskis 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 191. Ideas of Literature 

From Aristotle to the present. Mr. Rahv 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 195a. The Ethics of Knowledge 

The attitudes of poets and thinkers towards the moral meaning of in- 
tellectual curiosity, exploration, and enlightenment, as expressed in various 
treatments of the Faust theme from the original German Faust book through 
Marlowe, Lessing, Goethe, Lenau, Valery, and Mann. Selected readings 
from Plato, Aristotle, Averroes, Descartes, Leibniz, Lessing, Kant, and 
Nietzsche will be included. 

Students who wish to apply this course towards the major in Comparative 
Literature are required to read either the French or the German texts in the 
original. Mr. Heller 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Svend Laursen, Chairman; Associate Professor Romney 
Robinson (Student Adviser); Assistant Professor Richard S. Eckaus; 
Visiting Assistant Professor A. J. Siegel. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Economics la, lb, 97c, 140, 150a, 190; Social 
Science 10a. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Economics 99. 

C. Elective Courses: Select the equivalent of two full courses from the 
following: Economics 20a, 20b, 98c, 131b, 141a, 150b, 151b, 152b, 160a, 
161b, 170a, Anthropology lib. 

With the approval of a faculty member in the field of concentration, stu- 
dents may be permitted to include in their elective program the equivalent 
of any full course offered by the School of Social Science, except Social 
Science 1. 

ECONOMICS la. Introduction to Economics 

A survey of the major problems encountered by contemporary societies in 
seeking to satisfy the material needs of their members: the organization of 
resources for production; the function of money, credit and prices; the role and 
significance of corporations, labor unions, banks, and government; the problem 
of depression, unemployment and inflation; analysis of fluctuations in National 
Product and National Income; the measures available to check these fluctua- 
tions and to encourage economic growth. 

Students who are not majoring in Economics may take this course but need 
not register for Economics lb. 

Open to freshmen. Mr. Laursen and Mr. Robinson 

[102] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ECONOMICS lb. Introduction to Economics 

The study of economic institutions and problems is continued in this 
course. Special attention is paid to the determination of prices under various 
competitive conditions, to the behavior of business firms, to the nature of 
competition and to the problems arising out of large-scale business and the 
anti-trust laws. Consideration is also given to international trade, to the 
economics of underdeveloped countries, and to the economics of war and 
defense. 

Prerequisite: Economics la. 

Open to freshmen. Mr. Laursen and Mr. Robinson 

ECONOMICS 20a. American Labor Economics and Labor Relations 

The organizational policies, structural evolution, strike tactics, admin- 
istrative methods, leadership problems, economic, political and social objec- 
tives and welfare program of organized labor. Techniques of collective 
bargaining, union-management cooperation. Wage policy. The role of 
government in labor relations. Mr. Siegel 

ECONOMICS 20b. American Labor Economics and Labor Relations 

The economics of collective bargaining, with special emphasis on the 
problems presented by wage determination at firm, industry and economy 
levels and on the question of economic security; the development within a 
free society of public policy towards the collective bargaining participants; 
and the labor problems in economic development. Mr. Siegel 

ECONOMICS 97c. Junior Tutorial 

Required readings, research, reports and discussions on assigned topics. 

Staff 
ECONOMICS 98c. Readings in Economics 

Readings and reports under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Avail- 
able to seniors with permission of the School of Social Science. Staff 

ECONOMICS 99. Senior Research 

Seniors who are candidates for a degree with honors in Economics are 
required to register for this course and, under the direction of a member of 
the faculty, prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic. Staff 

ECONOMICS 131b. American Economic History 

A survey of the economic history of the United States with special em- 
phasis on the determinants of economic growth. Attention will be given to 
the following topics and their interrelation: agricultural, transportation and 
industrial development; changes in commercial organization, the banking 
system and financial markets and the organization of the labor force; the 
changing role of government in the economy. Mr. Eckaus 

ECONOMICS 140. Price Policies and Market Organization 

Price and production policies in the modern business enterprise. Exam- 
ination of types of market organization and price and production practices 
in various sectors of the American economy. The impact of monopolistic ele- 

[103] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ments on the efficiency of resource allocation and the size and distribution 
of the national income. Examination and evaluation of the anti-trust laws 
and public control policies in agriculture, public utilities, retail trade and 
other fields. 

Prerequisites: Economics la and lb. Mr. Robinson 

ECONOMICS 141a. Government and Business in the United States 

The constitutional, legal, economic and administrative aspects of govern- 
ment regulation and control of American business. The historical develop- 
ment of the problems that have called for governmental intervention: 
natural resource development, monopoly, concentration of economic power, 
industrial breakdown, and business cycle fluctuation. Mr. Robinson 

ECONOMICS 150a. National Income Analysis 

The factors that determine the level of national income, production, and 
employment. Inflation, depression, and full employment. Governmental 
policies designed to stabilize income and employment. 

Prerequisite: Economics la. Mr. Eckaus 

ECONOMICS 150b. Money and Finance 

The role of money, the banking system and the capital markets in the 
modern economy. The Federal Reserve banks and their role in income sta- 
bilization. 

Prerequisite: Economics 150a. Mr. Laursen 

ECONOMICS 151b. Public Finance 

The spending and taxing activities of governments, and their effects on 
the economy. Special attention to the Federal budgets and the fiscal policy 
of the United States. General principles will be illustrated by discussion of 
current problems in government finance. 

Prerequisite: Economics lb. Mr. Eckaus 

ECONOMICS 152b. Business Cycles 

The historical and contemporary development of economic fluctuations 
will be traced. Business cycle theories will be examined and the modern the- 
ory of income and employment used to analyze economic fluctuations. Eco- 
nomic forecasting and public policy with respect to business cycles will be 
considered. 

Prerequisite: Economics 150a. Mr. Eckaus 

ECONOMICS 160a. International Trade and Economic Institutions 

A study of international monetary arrangements, foreign exchanges and 
exchange control, capital movements, the theory of international trade and 
price relationships, and foreign economic policy. Major emphasis upon the 
new international institutions and upon the role of the United States in the 
world economy. 

Prerequisites: Economics la and lb. Mr. Laursen 

[104] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ECONOMICS 161b. Contemporary World Economy 

An examination of major trends in the world economy. Special attention 
will be paid to the post-war setting and to economic policies and achieve- 
ments in major regions such as the dollar area, Western Europe and under- 
developed countries. A focal point will be the discussion of how these prob- 
lems are inter-related. Mr. Laursen 

ECONOMICS 170a. Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas 

An analysis of economic growth in the setting of underdeveloped areas. 
Attention will be given to development of a theoretical framework for 
understanding the interaction of economic variables in the growth process. 
The following problems will be examined: population growth, saving and 
investment, resource allocation, agrarian and industrial development, the 
role of foreign trade, sources of enterprise, the creation of a labor force, 
and the role of government. Factual material will be drawn from a wide 
range of sources but special attention will be given to certain areas. 

Prerequisite: Economics la. Mr. Eckaus 

ECONOMICS 190. Topics in Advanced Economics 

This course is designed to serve two purposes: (1) complete the general 
study of economics through the analysis of more advanced problems not 
dealt with in previous courses; (2) provide suitable material for coordina- 
tion with earlier courses in the field of concentration. 

1st Semester: Mr. Laursen 
2nd Semester: Mr. Robinson 

EDUCATION — See also Philosophy 43b; Psychology 11a, 15a, 30b, 116a, 
121b; Social Science 20a. 

EDUCATION 10c. Practice Teaching 

Observation and teaching by students in elementary and secondary 
schools under the supervision of experienced teachers; seminars in which 
students will discuss practical teaching problems and will evaluate their 
experiences. 

60 hours — 2 credits. 90 hours — 3 credits. Mr. Rosen 

ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Associate Professor J. V. Cunningham, Chairman; Professors Osborne 
Earle (Student Adviser), Philip Rahv; Associate Professors Milton 
Hindus, Irving Howe; Assistant Professors **Philip Finkelpearl, 
Henry Popkin, **Robert O. Preyer, **Marie Syrkin, John B. Wight; 
Messrs. Albert Berman, Robert Evans, Ronald M. Sukenick. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: English la, 2b, 3a, 4a, 5b, 6b, 7a, 8b. 

B. Elective Courses: Select three full courses from the offerings in English 

**0n leave, 1957-58. 

[ 105 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

and American Literature or, with the approval of the adviser, in Comparative 
Literature or a foreign literature. However, either English 192b, History 
and Structure of the English Language, or Humanities 191a, General Lin- 
guistics, is strongly recommended for concentrators in English. 
C. Honors candidates will elect at least one of the following: English 90a, 
90b, 92b, 93a, 94a, 97a, 97b. 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

ENGLISH la. Introduction to the Study of Literature 

A course designed to train students in the techniques of literary study. 
Required of all English concentrators in their sophomore year. 

Restricted to sophomore concentrators in English and American Literature. 

Mr. Wight 
ENGLISH laR. Introduction to the Study of Literature 

Open to freshmen, and to sophomore concentrators in English and American 
Literature. Mr. Wight 



ENGLISH 2b. Chaucer 

The Canterbury Tales, with some supplementary reading. 



Mr. Evans 



ENGLISH 3a. Shakespeare 

Lectures and discussions on representative plays. 

Open to freshmen. Mr. Cunningham 

ENGLISH 4a. English Literature to 1603 

A study of representative selections from Old and Middle English litera- 
ture and from the great figures of the 16th century: More, Sidney, Spenser, 
Hooker, Donne. Mr. Earle 

ENGLISH 5b. English and American Literature from 1603 to 1740 

A study of representative selections from Bacon, Jonson, Milton, Dryden, 
Congreve, Swift, Pope, and their contemporaries. Mr. Berman 

ENGLISH 6b. English and American Literature from 1740 to 1832 

A study of representative selections from Johnson, Hume, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and their contemporaries, English 
and American. Mr. Massey 

ENGLISH 7a. English Literature from 1832 to 1900 

A study of the major authors of the Victorian period. Mr. Berman 

ENGLISH 8b. American Literature from 1832 to 1900 

A study of the major authors of the 19th century. Mr. Popkin 

ENGLISH 20. Survey of American Literature 

An introduction to American writing from the beginning to present 
times. The course will consider without any specific emphasis the main in- 

[ 106 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

tellectual currents in the national literature between the New England 
Divines and twentieth century poetry and prose. Mr. Van Doren 

ENGLISH 61b. The English Lyric 

One lyric will be discussed in each class period. 

Open to freshmen. Mr. Cunningham 

ENGLISH 72. The English Novel 

A study of the development of the English novel, beginning with Defoe 
and ending with Conrad. Among the authors treated are: Jane Austen, 
Emily Bronte, George Eliot, Dickens and Hardy. Mr. Howe 

*ENGLISH 80. Twentieth Century American Literature 

This course will deal with intellectual currents and literary trends in 
American literature since 1900. Such prose writers as Sinclair Lewis, Willa 
Cather, Anderson, Fitzgerald, Dos Passos, Wolfe, Faulkner, Hemingway, 
O'Neill, Mencken and Irving Babbitt will be read. Such poets as Robinson, 
Masters, Frost, Lindsay, Sandburg, Eliot and the Imagists will also be 
considered. 

The following half-courses, numbered, in the 90's, are independent reading 
courses. Students who register for one of these courses will obtain a reading 
list from the Office of the School of Humanities, will submit a paper on an 
approved topic, and will take a final examination. Concentrators in English 
and American Literature who submit a paper that warrants the grade of A or 
A- will be considered by the Department for graduation with distinction in 
English and American Literature. 

ENGLISH 90a and b. Independent Study 

Students who register for this course will submit for approval the list 
of texts upon which they will be examined and the proposed topic of their 
paper. 

Open only to students of superior ability with the permission of the Chair- 
man of the Department. Staff 

ENGLISH 92b. Chaucer and his Contemporaries 

The major works of Chaucer other than the Canterbury Tales, and other 
works of the period. 

Prerequisite: English 2b, or concurrent registration in English 2b. 

Mr. Evans 

ENGLISH 93a. Shakespeare 

Extensive reading in the works of Shakespeare not covered in English 
3a, and in the scholarship and criticism on the subject. 

Prerequisite: English 3a, or concurrent registration in English 3a. 

Mr. Cunningham 
ENGLISH 94a. English Drama to 1640 

Prerequisites: English 4a, 5b, 142a, or concurrent registration in one of 
these courses. Mr. Popkin 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. i , \ • ,..i.T* 

[ 1-07 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ENGLISH 97a. Wordsworth and Tennyson 

Prerequisite: English 6b, la, 61 b, or concurrent registration in one of these 
courses. Staff 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

Admission to any of the following courses in English and American 
Literature requires the consent of the instructor. 

ENGLISH 121. Old English 

An introduction to Old English grammar, with special attention to the 
rapid attainment of skill in reading. Texts of prose and the shorter poems will 
be read in the first semester; Beowulf in the second semester. Mr. Earle 

ENGLISH 142a. Elizabethan Drama 

A history of the drama, exclusive of Shakespeare, from the Miracle and 
Morality plays to the closing of the theatres. Mr. Popkin 

^ENGLISH 147a. Milton 

This course will consist of an intensive study of Milton, designed to pro- 
vide a thorough knowledge of his character, thought and art. The reading 
will include Comus and the minor poems, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, 
Samson Agonistes, as well as selections from the prose writings. 

ENGLISH 160a. Whitman and Dickinson 

A study of the work of two American poets of the nineteenth century. 
Their poetic styles will be compared to each other, to those of their con- 
temporaries, and to those of their successors in the twentieth century: Carl 
Sandburg, Hart Crane, and Eleanor Wylie. Mr. Hindus 

ENGLISH 172a. The Eighteenth Century Novel 

Selected novels from Defoe to Jane Austen. Mr. Howe 

ENGLISH 178a. Shaw and His Contemporaries 

See Theatre Arts 121a. Mr. Pettet 

ENGLISH 180b. Studies in American Literature 

American poetry of the last half -century. Mr. Howe 

*ENGLISH 181b. American Literature of the 17th and 18th Centuries 

A study of the literature of exploration and description, Puritanism and 
Quakerism, enlightenment and revolution. Works of Bradford, Cotton 
Mather, Taylor, Edwards, Woolman, Franklin, Crevecoeur, Paine, Freneau, 
Jefferson, and others will be read. 

ENGLISH 182b. American Novels since Dreiser 

An intensive study of six or seven novels, with reference to other works 
by the same authors. Mr. Rahv 

ENGLISH 188b. Contemporary American Drama 

See Theatre Arts 125b. Mr. Pettet 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[108] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ENGLISH 192b. History and Structure of the English Language 

A study of the linguistic structure of modern English and of the historical 
processes through which it developed. 

Required of graduate students in the first year, and recommended for under- 
graduate concentrators in English. Mr. Evans 

ENGLISH 193b. Problems in Criticism 

The thought and influence of Irving Babbitt. Babbitt's ideao will be 
compared with those of his predecessor Emerson, his associate Paul Elmer 
More, and his pupil T. S. Eliot. Mr. Hindus 

Primarily for Graduates 

ENGLISH 201a. Introduction to Literary Study: Shakespeare 

Required of all graduate students in the first year. Mr. Cunningham 

ENGLISH 212a. Seminar in Fiction 

The topic this year will be the 18th century novel. Master's paper. 

Mr. Howe 
ENGLISH 214a. Seminar in Criticism 

The topic this year will be Coleridge, Arnold, and Eliot. Master's paper. 

Mr. Rahv 
ENGLISH 215b. Seminar in the Middle Ages 

The topic this year will be Chaucer. Master's paper. Mr. Evans 

ENGLISH 21 6b. Seminar in the Renaissance 

The topic this year will be the literary situation in the 1590's. Master's 
paper. Mr. Cunningham 

ENGLISH 218a. Seminar in the Nineteenth Century 

The topic this year will be Anti-romanticism in the Romantic period. 
Master's paper. Mr. Massey 

ENGLISH 219b. Seminar in American Literature 

The topic this year will be Hawthorne and Melville. Master's paper. 

Mr. Howe 
ENGLISH 301b. The English Seminar 

Each member of the seminar will present a public lecture embodying 
the results of independent investigation. 

Required of all graduate students in the second year. Mr. Cunningham 

ENGLISH 310a and b. Preparation for Examinations 

Graduate students in the third year will normally register for this course 
in one of the two semesters. Under ordinary circumstances registration in 
this course constitutes a full program. Staff 

ENGLISH 311, Seminar in Teaching 

Required of all graduate students who are engaged in classroom instruction. 

Mr. Wight 
[109] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ENGLISH 390a and b. Thesis 

Graduate students in the third year will normally register for this course, 
in one of the two semesters, in preparation for the dissertation examination. 
Under ordinary circumstances registration in this course constitutes a full 
program. 

ENGLISH 399. Research 

Candidates for the Doctor's degree who are in residence and who have 
completed the formal requirements for admission to candidacy, will register 
under this number. Staff 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION la and laR. Introduction to Writing 

Weekly exercises in the various forms of writing. 

This course fulfills the General Education requirement in English Compo- 
sition. Staff 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 2a and 2aR. Advanced Writing 

This is a more advanced course, parallel to English la and laR. 

Open only to students of more than average ability, with consent of the 
instructor. This course fulfills the General Education requirement in English 
Composition. Staff 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 101a and b. Directed Writing 

Exercises principally in the sketch and the short story. 

Limited enrollment. One two-hour meeting a week. 

First Semester: Mr. Evans 

Second Semester: Mr. Sukenick 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 102b. The Writing of Poetry 

Prerequisite: English 61b, concurrent registration in English 61b, or con- 
sent of the instructor. Mr. Cunningham 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 201a. Advanced Exposition 

A conference course designed to assist graduate students in all areas in 
the preparation of reports and theses. Mr. Wight 

EUROPEAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 



Associate Professor Claude A. S. Vigee, Chairman; Professors Joseph 
I. Cheskis, Erich Heller; Assistant Professors Jean-Pierre Barricelli, 

JULIEN S. DOUBROVSKY, JAMES E. DUFFY, DENAH L. LlDA, IRVING J. MASSEY, 

Harry Zohn {Student Adviser); Mme. Denise Alexandre, Mr. Jean- 
Paul Delamotte, Dr. William W. Holdheim, Dr. Thalia Howe, Miss 
Marie- Antoinette Untereiner. 

For course offerings and requirements for concentration see French, German, 
Greek, Italian, Latin, Romance Literature, and Spanish. 

[110] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FINE ARTS 

Associate Professor Mitchell Siporin, Chairman; Professor Arnold 
Hauser; Associate Professor Leo Bronstein; Mrs. Eileen Driscoll, 
Mr. Peter Grippe, Dr. Walter M. Spink (Student Adviser), Mr. Arthur 

POLONSKY. 

Requirements for Concentration 

Candidates for ordinary degrees are required to take a minimum of seven 
full courses in Fine Arts. The honors candidate, in addition, must take 99c in 
his senior year. The Fine Arts concentrator may elect his concentration in 
either of two subdivisions, (1) Applied Arts (studio), or (2) Art History and 
Criticism. 

A. Required of all Fine Arts Concentrators: Fine Arts 1, 2, 103, 151a, or 152a, 
172a or 173a. Select one semester course from the following: Fine Arts 
l4la, 153a, 154b. Select one semester course from the following: Fine 
Arts 155a, 161b, 172b. 

B. Additional Requirements for Applied Arts Concentrators: Fine Arts 102, 

104, 111 or 121. 

C. Additional Requirements for all Art History and Criticism concentrators: 
Select from the following to complete a total of seven full courses: Fine 
Arts 11a, 151a, 152a, 153a, 154b, 155a, 161b, 171b, 172b, 173a, 181b, 190b. 

D. Additional Requirements for Senior Honors Candidates: Fine Arts 99c. 
(An original creative project in Applied Arts or Art History and Criticism, 
to be approved by the Fine Arts faculty.) 

One additional studio course beyond the minimum of seven courses required 
of all Fine Arts concentrators must be taken by those candidates for senior 
honors in Applied Art. 

FINE ARTS 1. Theory of Art and Principles of Design 

Orientation of the student to the basic grammar of art. Practice study 
of lines, shapes, tones, texture, picture plane, character, and basic theory of 
color. Drawing of the human figure and still life objects, stressing design, 
movement, structure, and quality of line. 

Open to all students. Mr. Siporin 

FINE ARTS 2. An Introduction to the Fine Arts 

A survey of great monuments of architecture, sculpture, and painting 
from ancient times to the modern period. An exploration into the character 
and significance of stylistic changes, and into the relationship between art 
and thought in each age. Materials and methods employed by the artist will 
be discussed. Through a study of the visual experience an approach will be 
developed for the critical evaluation of the art of the past and of the 
present day. 

Two lectures and one section for informal discussion weekly. Trips to 
nearby collections and guest lectures will be included in the course. 

Mr. Spink 

[111 J 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FINE ARTS 11a. Introduction to the Art Experience 

Visual consciousness. The appreciation of art as a living experience. 
Comparative structural approach to the problem and study of artistic cultures 
or "styles". Analysis and discussion of the most representative works of art, 
past and present. 

Open to all students. Mr. Bronstein and Mrs. Driscoll 

FINE ARTS 99c. Senior Research Staff 

FINE ARTS 102. Theory and Practice of Painting 

Organization of natural and abstract forms in space. Psychological and 
emotive potentialities of composition and color. Exploration of the work- 
ing materials of the painter. 

Prerequisite: Fine Arts 1 or consent of the instructor. Mr. Siporin 

FINE ARTS 103. Life Drawing 

Principles of drawing from the human figure. The proportion, action, 
character, anatomy, and design of the figure are studied. Drawing in line 
is especially stressed, and the student is introduced to volume and depth 
through the use of light and shade. 

Studio Fee: $5. per semester. 

Prerequisite: Fine Arts 1 or consent of the instructor. 

Messrs. Siporin and Polonsky 

FINE ARTS 104. Advanced Life Drawing 

Advanced study of drawing of the human figure with special emphasis 
on the anatomical structure and figure composition. Individual expression 
is encouraged. 

Studio Fee: $5. per semester. 

Prerequisite: Fine Arts 103 or consent of the instructor. Mr. Polonsky 

FINE ARTS 108. Individual Art Work in Painting or Sculpture 

A workshop course stressing creative individual art work in either paint- 
ing or sculpture. Study of natural forms and the organization of forms from 
the imagination. The employment of the technical means of art towards 
personal artistic expressions in either painting or sculpture. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Mr. Siporin and Mr. Grippe 

FINE ARTS 111. Sculpture 

This course orients the beginning student to problems of modeling in 
clay and wax, coloring and glazing of tiles, slip making and firing of kiln. 
Compositions from life and also from the imagination are studied in bas 
relief and in the round. 

Studio Fee: $5. per semester. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Mr. Grippe 

FINE ARTS 121. Workshop in Etching and Engraving 

A comprehensive course in new ways of gravure. Techniques covered in 
this course include line engraving, dry point, lift ground, aquatint, and 

[U2] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

bitten textures, as well as intaglio and surface printing. Printing in black 
and white and color are studied. 

Studio fee: $5. per semester. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Mr. Grippe 

FINE ARTS 131. The Sociological Approach to the Study of Art History 

Scope and limitations of the sociology of art. The expression of ideolo- 
gies in art. The social standing of the artists throughout the centuries. 
Art education in workshops, art schools, academies, etc. The history of art 
patronage. (The Church, the Princes, city-states, guilds, collectors, art 
dealers.) The open market and the artist. The art of the different edu- 
cational strata: folk art and popular art. Mr. Hauser 

FINE ARTS 135. French Art and Society in the Seventeenth, Eighteenth, 
and Nineteenth Centuries 

French absolutism and classicism. The King and the Court in their 
relationship to art and literature. Art production and artistic education as 
political concerns. The end of the cultural predominance of the Court. The 
middle classes and their share in the artistic life of the 18th century. The 
French Revolution and Neo-Classicism. The Romantic revolution. The 
social background and the forms of Naturalism in the 19th century. The 
meaning of Impressionism and its part in the formation of the modern 
artistic idiom. Mr. Hauser 

FINE ARTS 14 la. American Art 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in America from the time of the 
colonies to the present day. An analysis of the art forms and of changes 
in taste. A discussion of the "romantic", "revival", and modern styles in 
their social context. The role of the arts and the artist in American life. 

Mr. Spink 
*FINE ARTS 151a. Classical Antiquity and its Legacy 

The emergence of Greece from the Ancient East Mediterranean World. 
Greek art and the concept of nous. Etruscan-Roman art and the Asiatic concept 
of pneuma. The Graeco-Roman synthesis and its impact on the subsequent 
visual cultures of the West and the East. 

FINE ARTS 152a. Medieval Art 

The art of medieval societies as a creative synthesis of the arts of classical 
antiquity and the "barbaric" Asian worlds. The realization of this synthesis 
throughout the art periods known as early Christian, Carolingian, Byzantine, 
Romanesque, Early and Late Gothic. Mr. Bronstein 

*FINE ARTS 153a. Renaissance Art 

A study of Renaissance Art in Italy and in the north of Europe. The 
principal works of Renaissance sculpture, painting and architecture will be 
studied in relation to their cultural backgrounds, and particular emphasis will 
be placed on the individual styles of the Renaissance masters. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[113] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FINE ARTS 154b. From Baroque to Modern Art 

A survey of the fine arts from the flowering of post-Renaissance cultures 
up to contemporary art developments in Europe and the United States. This 
study will center on the individual masters of painting, sculpture, and 
architecture. Mr. Bronstein and Mrs. Driscoll 

*FINE ARTS 155a. Primitive Art 

An attempt to define what the term "primitive" means in relation to the 
visual arts. Pre-history in Europe and Asia; Pre-Columbian America; Africa; 
Oceania. The impact of primitive art on twentieth century visual thinking. 

FINE ARTS 161b. The Islamic Art of the Near and Middle East 

Originality of the Iranian Islamic formula. Its central role. Its radiation 
West and East, including Spain and India. Special emphasis is given to 
Islamic architecture and painting. Mr. Bronstein 

*FINE ARTS 171b. Contemporary Art 

Painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe and America in the 
twentieth century. 

*FINE ARTS 172a. An Introduction to Far Eastern Art: India, 
China, Japan 

A general study of the art of three regions. The independent contribu- 
tions of each and connections established along the trade routes of Asia. 
The history of art will be traced from early beginnings through the rise of 
indigenous religious traditions — Hindu, Confucian, Taoist, Shinto, and 
especially the sculpture and painting of Buddhism. Up to about the year 
1000. 

*FINE ARTS 172b. An introduction to Far Eastern Art: India, 
China, Japan 

The art of these regions during the last thousand years, considering 
some examples of later sculpture and architecture, but with special concen- 
tration on painting in the Far East. Landscape, narrative scrolls, miniatures, 
screens and prints. 

FINE ARTS 173a. The Nature of Japanese Painting 

Historico-philosophical evaluation of Japanese esthetic formula in the 
light of Japan's political and ideological achievements. Shinto and the 
Japanization of Buddhism ; the institution of the Shogunate. The psychology 
of Japanese theatre NO and Kabuki. Evolution of Japanese painting (Yam- 
ato-E) from the Heian to Meiji era. Ukiyo-E and the art of the colored 
print. Mr. Bronstein 

FINE ARTS 181b. Topics in Art History and Philosophical Criticism 

The esthetic problem of space in western and Asiatic arts, or the history 
of ideas through the visual. A seminar for advanced students in art and 
art history. 

Permission of the instructor required. Mr. Bronstein 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[114] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FINE ARTS 190b. An Approach to Architecture 

An analysis of the relationship between form and function in architec- 
tural masterpieces of the past, and an evaluation of the solutions achieved 
by different civilizations. Emphasis will be placed on relating this history 
to contemporary construction, and on developing a meaningful approach 
to architecture of the modern age. The planning, construction, and esthetic 
quality of modern houses and other buildings in the surrounding com- 
munities will be studied. Mr. Spink 

FRENCH LITERATURE 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: French 3a or 3b, 116b, 117a, 117b, 127a, 127b, 
138a, 138b, 167b. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: French 99c. 

C. Elective Courses: Select sufficient courses from the School of Humanities, 
except Logic and Composition, to fill out the requirement of seven full 
courses. It is strongly urged that the candidates consider some of the fol- 
lowing courses: French 10, 149a; Comparative Literature 145, 147a, 147b, 
181a, 191; History 60b; Humanities 191a. 

French majors are advised to acquire a reading knowledge of Latin, Italian 
or Spanish. (See Romance literature.) 

Those students interested in developing their oral fluency in French are 
urged to join La Troupe Francaise de Brandeis in its yearly productions of 
French plays. 

FRENCH 1. Introductory French 

Fundamentals of grammar, gradual building of vocabulary; pronuncia- 
tion; brief compositions and readings in basic French. Conversation in 
French is encouraged among the students. 

Open to those students ivho have never had any instruction in French. 

Staff 
FRENCH 2. Intermediate French 

Intensive review of French grammar ; stress on acquisition of vocabulary 
and idioms; compositions in French; readings of short stories by modern 
French authors; conversation. 

Prerequisite: French 1 or two years of French in secondary school. Staff 

FRENCH 3a. Intermediate Composition and Conversation 

Systematic drill in composition, translation, advanced grammar. Weekly 
written work in the classroom under direct supervision of the instructor. 
Emphasis will be placed on the extension of vocabulary and current French 
syntax. Intensive practice in the spoken language to build up the student's 
vocabulary and oral proficiency while giving some insight into various 
aspects of contemporary French life. Class discussions based on French 
periodicals, newspapers or recent books. This course will be given entirely 
in French. Mme. Alexandre 

[115] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FRENCH 3b. Advanced Composition and Conversation 

Daily practice in spoken French. Translations, composition, advanced 
grammar and syntax. This course wil be given entirely in French. 

Prerequisite: French 2 or consent of the instructor. Mme. Alexandre 

FRENCH 10. Intensive Readings in French Prose Masterpieces 

This course will be based on famous texts — essay, novel, prose theatre 
from the seventeenth century to the present. 

Prerequisite: French 2 or satisfactory Proficiency Test score. Staff 

FRENCH 99c. Senior Research 

At the beginning of the senior year the student will place himself under 
the guidance of one of the senior teachers in that area of his field of concen- 
tration in which he desires to work. Consultations between instructor and 
student will continue throughout the academic year. A thesis of no less than 
7500 words, representing the results of intensive study, will constitute the 
final requirement. Staff 

FRENCH 116b. The Renaissance in France 

Historical background, Ronsard and the Pleiade. The Protestant Poets. 
Rabelais and Montaigne. Mr. Barricelli 

FRENCH 117a. French Prose Writers of the Seventeenth Century 

The course will deal chiefly with the prose masters of French classicism : 
Descartes, Pascal, Bossuet, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyere, and Mme. de 
Sevigne. 

Prerequisite: French 10 or consent of the instructor. Mr. Cheskis 

FRENCH 117b. The French Classical Drama 

A thorough study of the main works of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 
Attention will also be paid to the masterpieces of the minor playwrights. 

Prerequisite: French 10 or 117a or consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Cheskis 
FRENCH 127a. The Eighteenth Century 

Lesage, Marivaux, Prevost. English influence. The Enlightenment: 
Montesquieu, Voltaire until 1750. 

Prerequisite: French 10 or consent of the instructor. Mr. Vigee 

FRENCH 127b. The Eighteenth Century 

Voltaire to 1778. Diderot and the Encyclopaedists. Rousseau, Beau- 
marchais. Andre Chenier and the Revolution. 

Prerequisite: French 10 or consent of the instructor. 

Messrs. Cheskis and Vigee 

FRENCH 138a. The French Novel in the Nineteenth Century 

The emergence of the romantic ego in early 19th century novel: Chateau- 
briand, Senancour, Benjamin Constant, Georges Sand. The historical novel: 
Victor Hugo, A. de Vigny, A. Dumas pere. The realistic and psychological 
novel: Stendhal, Balzac, Merimee, Flaubert, Maupassant, the Goncourts, 

[116] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

A. Daudet. The naturalistic novel: E. Zola. The novel at the turn of the 

century: Paul Bourget, Anatole France, Barres, Huysmans, Jules Renard. 

Prerequisite: French 10 or consent of the instructor. Mr. Barricelli 

FRENCH 138b. Modern French Poetry from Lamartine to Valery 

The Romantic School. The Parnassians. Baudelaire, Mallarme, Rim- 
baud, Lautreamont. The "Symbolistes". The Catholic poets. Valery. The 
Surrealists. Mr. Vigee 

FRENCH 140a. The Theatre in France from Hugo to Montherlant 

A complete study of the 19th century classical, romantic and naturalist 
theatres followed by analyses of 20th century masters including Gide, 
Claudel, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Sartre, and Montherlant. 

Messrs. Vigee and Barricelli 

*FRENCH 149a. Introduction to the Prose and Poetry of the 
Twentieth Century 

The novel: Gide, Proust, Mauriac, Colette, Montherlant, Celine, Mal- 
raux, Jules Romains, Sartre, Camus. The poetry from Claudel to Rene 
Char. The essay: Alain, Valery. The theatre: Porto-Riche, Claudel, 
Maeterlinck, Romains, Giraudoux. 

FRENCH 167b. French Stylistics 

Elements of French syntax and literary usage; themes and advanced 
translations from English literary texts; written and oral drill; analysis of 
poetic problems; comparison of texts; advanced vocabulary building. 

Required of all French majors. Conducted entirely in French. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor (for non-French majors). 

Mr. Doubrovsky 
GENERAL EDUCATION S. The Productive Life 

This course will deal with selected aspects of the creative process in the 
individual life. It will be directed toward giving the student some insight 
into the nature of decision-making, and helping him to formulate stand- 
ards and values for a productive life after leaving college. It will invite 
each year a number of visiting lecturers drawn from the fine arts, the hu- 
manities, the sciences, and social thought and action, each of whom will 
answer questions on his own life and work; this is then used as material 
for a discussion between a faculty panel and the students. 

Among the resource people who have been involved in the past are 
Archibald MacLeish, Hugh Gaitskell, Agnes G. de Mille, Clarence Pickett, 
Margaret Mead, Eleanor Roosevelt, Lewis Mumford, Aaron Copland, 
Martha Graham, Herblock, Leo Szilard, Margaret Webster, Robert Frost, 
Elia Kazan, Danny Kaye, Max Weber, Thurgood Marshall, and Jacques 
Lipschitz. 

Required of all seniors. 

Messrs. Sachar, Bigelow, S. Shapiro, and Faculty Panel 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[117] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Committee: Associate Professor Herman T. Epstein, Chairman; Asso- 
ciate Professors Albert Kelner, Orrie M. Friedman (Student Adviser). 
The General Science program is designed for students desiring a diversi- 
fied program in the sciences; for example, for students planning to teach 
science in secondary schools, to enter medicine or public health and their 
allied fields, or to undertake other programs requiring a general scientific 
background. Students who intend to do graduate work in a specific scientific 
field are advised to fulfill the undergraduate requirements for concentration 
in that field. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Biology la and lb; Mathematics 13a and 14b; 
Physics 10 or 11; Chemistry 10. 

B. Elective Courses: With the approval of the faculty advisers for the pro- 
gram, each concentrator in the General Science program must elect, in 
addition, the equivalent of five full courses from the offerings of the School 
of Science. These five courses must be selected from at least two and not 
more than three fields in the School of Science, so that advanced courses 
will be required of all students in this program. 

C. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: With the approval 
of the General Science advisers, a student may petition the faculty in one 
of the standard science fields to devise an honors program which will suit 
the special background of the individual. 

GERMAN 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: German 3a, 3b, 20a, 30a, 50a, 120a, 130b, 
140b, 160b, 170b, 180b. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: German 99c. 

C Elective Courses: Select sufficient courses to fill out the requirement of 
seven full courses: Comparative Literature 145, 147a, 160a, 191; History 
181; Humanities 191a; any other course from the School of Humanities 
except Logic or Composition. 

GERMAN 1. Introductory German 

Fundamentals of grammar, acquisition of basic vocabulary, pronuncia- 
tion ; brief compositions and readings of simple texts. 

Open to those students who have never had any instruction in German. 

Mr. Zohn 
GERMAN 2. Intermediate German 

Intensive readings in classic and modern literary works and in texts re- 
lated to the main scientific courses of study. Review of grammar, vocabulary, 
and idioms; compositions. 

Prerequisite: German 1 or its equivalent. 

Mr. Holdheim and Miss Untereiner 

[118] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

GERMAN 3a and 3b. Intermediate and Advanced Composition and 
Conversation 

This course will be conducted entirely in German. There will be in- 
formal conversations on a variety of topics and regular oral and written re- 
ports. The class will subscribe to a German periodical, and at least one 
modern play will be read in class. 

Prerequisite: German 1 or its equivalent; the permission of the instructor 
must he obtained. Mr. Zohn 

GERMAN 10. Advanced Readings in German Masterpieces 

Intensive reading and translation of selected narrative prose, essays, and 
dramas. The course is designed to enable students to read German works 
fluently in different fields. 

Prerequisite: German 2, 3, or their equivalent, or consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Holdheim 

*GERMAN 20a. Historical Survey of German Literature 

A study of German literature from the Gothic and Old High German 
periods to the beginning of the 18th century, accompanied by intensive 
reading of a number of masterworks of German literature: prose, drama, 
and poetry. The Middle High German and Baroque periods will be em- 
phasized. The course will be especially concerned with the philosophical 
and social aspects of German literature and the intellectual currents in the 
various periods. 

Prerequisite: German 10 or its equivalent, or consent of the instructor. 

*GERMAN 30a. Introduction to the Life and Works of Goethe 

The aim of the course is to acquaint the students with Goethe's person- 
ality, his life, and his most important works. It traces the development of 
the German classical period as presented by Goethe in his Poems, in his dramas 
Gotz von Berlichingen, Egmont, Iphigenie, Torquato Tasso, and in his novels 
Werther, Wilhelm Meister and other works. 

Prerequisite: German 10, 20a, or their equivalent, or consent of the 
instructor. 

*GERMAN 50a. Nineteenth Century Masters 

This course will deal with German literature from the end of Roman- 
ticism to the emergence of Naturalism, covering the Young Germany move- 
ment, Poetic Realism, and Realism. The main emphasis will be on the chief 
writers of the period : the dramatists Grillparzer, Hebbel, and Biichner ; the 
prose writers Stifter, Keller, Fontane, Storm, and Meyer; and the lyric poets 
Morike and Droste-Hulshoff. However, such writers as Grabbe, Gutzkow, 
Borne, Raimund, Nestroy, Anzengruber, Raabe, Ludwig, Gotthelf, Immer- 
mann, Freytag, Riickert and Auerbach will not be neglected. 

Prerequisite: German 10 or its equivalent, or permission of the instructor. 
*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

f 119] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

GERMAN 99c. Senior Research 

At the beginning of the senior year the student will place himself under 
the guidance of one of the instructors in that area of his field of concentra- 
tion in which he desires to work. Consultations between instructor and stu- 
dent will continue throughout the academic year. A thesis of no less than 
7500 words, representing the results of intensive study, will constitute the 
final requirement. Staff 

*GERMAN 120a. Enlightenment and Idealism: Lessing and Schiller 

Gotthold Ephraim Lessing as playwright, critic, and leader of the En- 
lightenment will be studied through his major works. Friedrich Schiller, 
the poet, playwright, and libertarian, will be similarly treated. 

Prerequisite: German 10, 20a, or their equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor. 

*GERMAN 130b. Goethe's Faust 

The course will deal intensively with the ideas and forms of both parts 
of the tragedy. The history of the Faust saga with its cultural and literary 
ramifications will be studied as well as the gradual growth and development 
of the drama throughout the poet's life. 

Prereqtiisite: German 10, 20a, or their equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor. 

GERMAN 140a. The Thought of Goethe and the Early German Romantics 

Central to the course will be the problem of the "divided sensibility", 
of Faust's "two souls", and the various ways in which Goethe and the 
early German romantic poets and philosophers strove to overcome the 
conflict. Goethe's scientific thought will be examined in relation to his 
poetic practice, and the esthetic theories and philosophies of the romantics 
in relation to later, and even contemporary, assessments of the "function of 
poetry". The course will include select readings from Goethe, Friedrich 
Schlegel, Novalis, Schelling, Schleiermacher, Hegel, and Holderlin. 

The course will be given in English. Mr. Heller 

*GERMAN 140b. The Romantic Movement 

Origins and temper of German Romanticism. The first and second 
schools. The aftermath. Poetry, prose, drama and philosophy from the 
Schlegel brothers, Wackenroder, and Novalis through E. T. A. Hoffmann 
and Heine. Relation of romantic poetry to music and fine arts. 

Prerequisite: German 10, 20a, or their equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor. 

*GERMAN 160b. The Modern Drama from Naturalism to the Present 

This course will be concerned with the main trends and dramas from 
1885 to the present. The dramatic theories of the 19th and 20th centuries. 
The development of naturalism in France and Germany. Arno Holz and 
Johannes Schlaf. The first dramas of Gerhart Hauptmann and the impact 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[120] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

of Henrik Ibsen. Hauptmanns social and romantic dramas. The Viennese 
school: Hofmannsthal, Schnitzler, and Beer-Hofmann. Frank Wedekind 
as forerunner of expressionism. The expressionistic dramas of Toller, Has- 
enclever, Kaiser, and Werfel. Ways to a new realism. Bertolt Brecht and 
the most recent German drama. The development of the German stage: 
Brahm, Reinhardt, and their successors. 

Prerequisite: German 10, 20a, or their equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor, 

*GERMAN 170b. German Poetry from Nietzsche to the Present 

The object of this course is to impart an appreciation of modern lyric 
poetry through intensive study of a great number of poetic masterpieces. 
Friedrich Nietzsche as a poet. Arno Holz and the poetry of Naturalism. The 
Realists Dehmel and Liliencron. The rebirth of the form: Stefan George 
and his circle. Neo-Romanticism : Hofmannsthal, Rilke, Mombert. The 
lyrical renaissance after the first World War: Werfel, Trakl, Heym, and 
other Expressionists. The poetry of the Neue Sachlichkeit. The contemporary 
scene. 

Prerequisite: German 10, 20a, or their equivalent, or -permission of the 
instructor. 

GERMAN 180b. Twentieth Century Prose 

This course will concentrate on the life and works of Thomas Mann, 
Franz Kafka, and Herman Hesse. However, some attention will be given 
to the prose writings of Heinrich Mann, Stefan Zweig, Schnitzler, Hofmann- 
sthal, Werfel, and others. 

Prerequisite: German 10, 20a, or thevr equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor. Mr. Zohn 

GREEK 1. Introductory Greek 

Fundamentals of grammar; brief compositions. Elementary readings 
from various authors. Mrs. Howe 

HEBREW LITERATURE 

Requirements for Concentration 

Students are given a choice of concentrating either in (a) Hebrew Liter- 
ature or (b) Near Eastern and Judaic Studies. In either field of concentration 
students must take seven full courses beyond the level of Hebrew 2. 

A. Required of all Candidates: Hebrew 4a, 4b, 10 (or their equivalents), 14a, 
15a, 29a, 34a, 34b, 99b; NEJS 26a, 51a. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Hebrew 99c. 

C. Elective Courses: Select sufficient courses to fill out the requirement of 
seven full courses. (1) Any Hebrew course or any Semitic language in 
addition to Hebrew. ( 2 ) For NEJS courses, concentrators need the approval 
of their area. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[121] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

HEBREW 1. Introductory Hebrew 

Fundamentals of grammar, acquisition of vocabulary, brief compositions 
and reading of simple texts. 

Open to those students who have not previously had instruction in Hebrew. 

Mr. Marenof 
HEBREW 2. Intermediate Hebrew 

Intensive review of grammar and vocabulary; advanced grammar and 
vocabulary; reading of texts of various literary styles; preparation for gram- 
matical analysis from modern Hebrew literary sources. 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or its equivalent; consent of instructor required 
prior to enrollment. Mr. Morag 

HEBREW 4a. Intermediate Composition and Conversation 

Systematic exercises in translation, speech and composition. Weekly 
written work. An emphasis will be placed on the extension of vocabulary 
and syntax. Mr. Morag 

HEBREW 4b. Advanced Composition and Conversation 

Intensive practice in the spoken language. Class discussions designed to 
build up the student's oral proficiency. Weekly written work. 

Mr. Morag 
*HEBREW 5a. Survey of Hebrew Grammar 

A systematic survey of Hebrew grammar with exercises. The gram- 
matical structures of Biblical Hebrew, of post-Biblical Hebrew and of modern 
Hebrew will be considered. 

HEBREW 10. Survey of Hebrew Literature 

A survey course in Hebrew literature from its post-Biblical period 
through the Haskalah era; reading texts of selections. 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or its equivalent. Mr. Marenof and Mr. Morag 

*HEBREW 13a. Introduction to the Bible — Selected Texts 

Introduction to the literature of the Bible; an account of its character, 
authorship, text, translation; reading and analysis of selected portions from 
the Bible in English translation. 

Open to all students. Concentrators in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 
who take this course will have to fulfill additional assignments within the scope 
of the course. 

HEBREW 14a. The Pentateuch with Classical Commentaries 

Reading of one of the books of the Pentateuch; philological and ex- 
egetical analysis based on readings of commentaries of Rashi, Ibn Ezra 
and Ramban. Mr. Glatzer 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[122] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*HEBREW 14b. The Pentateuch: Text, Analysis, Background 

Analysis and interpretation of fundamental texts selected to illustrate 
some biblical ideas, institutions and literary forms. 

*HEBREW 15a. The Prophets 

Reading of major portions of the prophetic books; interpretation and 
analysis with special reference to literary, historical and cultural problems: 
attention will be devoted to elements of prophetic ideas which have influ- 
enced later thought. 

*HEBREW 15b. The Wisdom Literature: Job, Proverbs, Koheleth 

Interpretation and analysis of the text and selection of classical com- 
mentaries. 

HEBREW 16b. The Book of Job and the Problem of Evil 

A reading of the Book of Job (in English translation) and its parallels 
in the Ancient Near East literature; a discussion of the role of the Book in 
the literature and thought of the Western world ; an analysis of the problem 
of evil and of suffering in Judaism and Christianity. (A knowledge of the 
Hebrew language is not required.) Mr. Glatzer 

HEBREW 18a. Joshua and Judges 

Readings in the books of Joshua and Judges with commentaries. 

Mr. Marenof 
HEBREW 18b. Samuel and Kings 

Readings in the books of Samuel I, II and Kings I, II with commentaries. 

Mr. Marenof 
HEBREW 23a. Introduction to Mishnah 

Introduction to the early codification of the Jewish Law. Analysis of the 
religious, social and political conditions of the Second Commonwealth as 
mirrored in the Mishnah. Attention will be given to the style of the Mishnah 
as contrasted with Biblical Hebrew. Readings of parts of the following 
Mishnah texts: Berakot, Ta'anit, Mo'ed Katan, Kiddushin, Sanhedrin, 
Eduyyot. Mr. Marenof 

HEBREW 23b. Selected Texts from the Midrash 

Introduction to the development of Aggadah. Reading in Midrashic 
texts. Mr. Marenof 

*HEBREW 28b. The Dead Sea Scrolls 

Reading of the Manual of Discipline and parts of the Zadokite Work and 
the Habakkuk Commentary in an attempt to understand the origin of the 
Dead Sea sects, their beliefs and their attitude to the world around them. 

*HEBREW 29a. Maimonides' Mishneh Torah — Selections 

Study of Maimonides' Mishneh Torah as the classical summa of Jewish 
lore and civilization. An introduction to Maimonides as the codifier of 
Halacha, with special reference to the social and political ideas of Biblical 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[123] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

and post-Biblical Judaism. Analysis of Maimonides' achievement in the sphere 
of Halacha, his relation to his ancient sources and to his contemporary schools 
of Jewish learning. {Given in alternate years.) 

HEBREW 34a. Modern Hebrew Prose 

Reading and analysis of the works of the representatives of Hebrew 
pOSt-Haskalah prose; Mendele Mocher Sepharim, Berkowitz, Shofman, Ag- 
non, Hazaz, and others. Attention will be paid to the development of the 
Hebrew prose and style in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

Mr. Morag 
HEBREW 34b. Modern Hebrew Poetry 

Reading of the poetry of Bialik, Tchernichowsky, Shneour, Greenberg, 
and others. Study of the development of modern Hebrew poetry in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Mr. Morag 

HEBREW 99b. Senior Seminar 

Intensive seminar in Judaic studies and Hebrew literature for majors in 
Hebrew in their senior year with the purpose of integrating their studies in 
their field of concentration. 

Required of majors in Hebrew. 

Other students sufficiently advanced in the field of Judaic Studies and 
Hebrew Literature wishing to register for this course must obtain permission 
from the instructor. Staff 

HEBREW 99c. Senior Research 

At the beginning of the senior year the student will place himself under 
the guidance of one of the senior teachers in that area of his field of concen- 
tration in which he desires to work. Consultations between instructor and 
student will continue throughout the academic year. A thesis of no less than 
7500 words, representing the results of intensive study,' will constitute the 
final requirement. Staff 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

^HEBREW 125b. Aggadic and Midrashic Interpretation of Biblical History 

Reading of aggadic texts which deal with the history of biblical Israel. 
Discussion of the major motifs of Jewish philosophy of history as developed 
in the period after the destruction of the second Temple. 

HEBREW 140a. Modern Hebrew Literature 

The development of Hebrew literature from the middle of the 18th 
century to World War II in its centers in Western and Eastern Europe, State 
of Israel and America. Analysis of central motives and principal literary 
schools. The social and political background of modern Hebrew literature; 
its relation to the preceding periods of Hebrew literature and links be- 
tween modern Hebrew and modern Yiddish literature. Mr. Efros 

Also see courses under NEAR EASTERN AND JUDAIC STUDIES 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[124] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



HISTORY 



Professor Paul Alexander, Chairman; Professors David S. Berkowttz, 
Victor L. Ehrenberg {Visiting); ** Frank E. Manuel; Assistant Pro- 
fessor George Fischer, {Student Adviser); Dr. Raymond Grew. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: History 97c. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: History 99. 

C. Elective Courses: 

a) One full course, or equivalent, is to be selected from each of the fol- 
lowing periods: 

1. Ancient and Medieval (up to 1400) 

2. Early Modern (from 1400 to 1700) 

3. Modern (since 1700) 

b) Two additional courses, or equivalent, regardless of period, to be se- 
lected from courses offered in the Department of History. History 99 
( Senior Research ) may be counted as one of these courses. 

c) Two further courses, or equivalent, to be selected, with the approval 
of adviser as follows: One course from American History, Near Eastern 
and Judaic History or the History of Ideas; the other, any course in 
the School of Social Science (except Social Science I). 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

*HISTORY 12a. History of Greece 

This course will stress the political and social structure of the Greek city- 
states, the growth of confederacies and federal states, and the formation of 
territorial states in Hellenistic times to the end of the third century B.C. The 
course will be conducted by lectures and discussions. Among the primary sources 
read will be the Odyssey, Herodotus, the "Old Oligarch", Thucydides, Aristo- 
phanes, Demosthenes and Polybius. 

*HISTORY 12b. History of Rome 

This course will emphasize the political achievement of Rome : the insti- 
tutions of Early Rome, the Roman organization of Italy, her conquest of 
Empire, the Roman Revolution, the Principate, and the government of the 
Empire until Constantine the Great. Intensive readings in Polybius, Livy, 
Cicero, Strabo, Tacitus, and Aristides. 

HISTORY 21a. Europe in the Middle Ages 

An introduction to medieval civilization, with emphasis on the High 
Middle Ages (1000-1300). Both Western Europe and the Near East will 
be considered. Mr. Alexander 

**On Sabbatical leave; Guggenheim Fellow, 1957-58. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[125] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

HISTORY 55a. History of Modern Europe 

This course surveys European history from the French Revolution to 
the mid-nineteenth century. It stresses the changes which followed the 
Revolution and their different national forms. Mr. Grew 

HISTORY 55b. History of Modern Europe 

This course surveys European history beginning with the middle of the 
nineteenth century and emphasizes the quest for political and social stability 
in the major European states. Mr. Grew 

*HISTORY 60b. History of France 

A survey of French history from the fifteenth through the nineteenth 
centuries. Emphasis will be placed on the social and political background 
of French culture. 

HISTORY 63a. History of Italy 

The history of Italy in its European context from the eighteenth century 
to the Second World War. Mr. Grew 

HISTORY 68b. History of Germany 

Germany's evolution from the rise of Prussia to the present. 

Mr. Fischer 
*HISTORY 77b. History of Russia 

Introductory survey of Russia's evolution from its medieval origins to 
the present day. 

HISTORY 97c. Junior Tutorial 

Required readings, research, reports and discussions on assigned topics. 

Staff 
HISTORY 98c. Readings in History 

Required readings, research, reports and discussions on assigned topics. 

Staff 
HISTORY 99. Senior Research 

Seniors who are candidates for a degree with honors in History are 
required to register for this course and, under the direction of a member 
of the faculty, prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic. Staff 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

HISTORY 101a. Intellectual History of Greece 

The course will be conducted by lectures and by discussions of selected 
texts. Topics such as the following will be considered : The nature of Greek 
mythology. The rise of rational thought among the Pre-Socratic philos- 
ophers. Periclean drama and historiography. The rivalry of philosophy 
and rhetoric in the fourth century. The schools of philosophy in the Hellen- 
istic Age. Mr. Alexander 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[126] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

HISTORY 121. History of Social and Political Ideas in Antiquity and 
the Middle Ages 

An advanced course presenting intensive textual analyses of the major 
political documents of Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics, Christian conceptions 
of society, church authority and the church-state relations in the Roman 
Empire. Medieval patterns of reconstruction and conflict from Augustine 
to the rise of the dynastic state. Mr. Berkowitz 

^HISTORY 131. The Renaissance and Reformation 

Lectures, readings and reports on select topics in the development of the 
new European state system in terms of institutional structure, political theory 
and the role of personalities ; new currents in literature, arts, science, and 
exploration ; the problems of late medieval Catholicism, schism, heresy, im- 
pact of new intellectual currents on religious institutions and dogma; the 
Lutheran, Angelican and Calvinistic breaches with Rome, the Counter- 
Reformation. 

HISTORY 136a. The Renaissance and Reformation in Sixteenth Century 
England 

The development of institutions and outlooks in sixteenth century Eng- 
land under the impact of Renaissance and Reformation currents. 

Mr. Berkowitz 

HISTORY 146b. Topics in the Constitutional History of Seventeenth 
Century England 

The intellectual and institutional background of the constitutional crisis 
and the development of related political theories in seventeenth century 
England; the nature of law and authority, the Crown in Parliament, the 
royal prerogative and parliamentary sovereignty, liberties of the subject, 
religious toleration. Mr. Berkowitz 

HISTORY 160b. Diplomatic History of Modern Europe 

This course studies European diplomacy through topics such as the 
efforts at peace-making from Vienna to Versailles, the changing relationship 
between diplomacy and domestic politics, the diplomacy of imperialism and 
the failure of diplomacy before two world wars. Mr. Grew 

HISTORY 178a. Intellectual History of Russia 

Revolutionary, nationalist and liberal thought from the eighteenth cen- 
tury to the twentieth century. Mr. Fischer 

*HISTORY 179a. The British Empire since 1776 

History of British overseas relationships from the period of Adam 
Smith's attack on mercantilism until the present. The evolution of new 
colonial policies in the early part of the 19th century. The impact of the 
Industrial Revolution, the migration movement, the rise of free trade and 
the development of responsible self-government in new areas. Colonial 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[127] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

nationalism, the problem of imperial unity, dominion status and common- 
wealth cooperation; the recent and contemporary economic, military and 
diplomatic problems of the British Commonwealth of Nations. 

HISTORY 180b. History of the USSR 

Soviet history from the 1917 Revolution to the present. Mr. Fischer 

*HISTORY 181. Main Currents in Modern European Thought 

A study of main currents in European thought since the end of the 
seventeenth century as revealed in the writings of men who profoundly 
influenced the ideas and sentiments of the modern world. Emphasis will 
be placed on the great thinkers who formulated a moral outlook for their 
age. Lectures and the reading of selected texts. 

*HISTORY 182 b. Philosophies of History from Vico through Hegel 

A study of central themes in European philosophy of history as exempli- 
fied by the Italian tradition in Vico, the French tradition from Turgot 
through Comte and the German tradition from Herder through Hegel. 

*HISTORY 185a. History of Science to 1600 

The development of science from its beginning to the new trends of the 
sixteenth century. The history of science will be studied as a key to the 
kind of thought valued at various periods. The role of science in predomin- 
antly non-scientific societies will be considered in relation to its role today 
and to the factors which make for scientific advance. Attention will be paid 
to the mutual relations of science and society, including the aberrations of 
magic and mysticism. 

*HISTORY 185b. History of Science in Modern Society 

Beginning with the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, the 
development of modern science will be followed in its relation to the intel- 
lectual, social, economic and religious forces at work in society at large. 
Consideration will be given to the shaping of scientific method, the nature of 
scientific revolutions, and the role of the individual scientist. The important 
new sciences will be stressed in each period at the expense of the more 
established sciences, so that extreme technicality will be avoided. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 

Committee: Professor Herbert Marcuse, Chairman; Professors Paul 
Alexander, David S. Berkowttz, Nahum M. Glatzer, ** Frank E. 
Manuel, John P. Roche; Associate Professors * *Lewis A. Coser, Aron 
Gurwitch; Assistant Professors George Fischer, ** Philip Rieff. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 116b. The Book of Job and the Problem of Evil 
Undergraduates register in Hebrew 16b. Mr. Glatzer 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

**On leave, 1957-58. 

[ 128] 




Baccalaureate 



graduates convene at the Three Chapels 



One long afternoon . . . 

students sun and study in Hamilton Quadrangle 




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Seeds, sun and leaves . . . 

student botanists in Brown Terrarium 



Varied Curriculums . . . 

a student selects fencing for physical education 



Break between classes . . . 

and in the background, Kalman Science Center 







> • ' "■-■ 

.1 \W 



/ 



The familiar 



Schwartz Hall in sun and shade 



And the future . . . 



Shiffman Humanities Center 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 125a. Theories in Psychology 

Undergraduates register in Psychology 125a. Mr. Held 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 131. The Sociological Approach to the Study of 

Art History 

Undergraduates register in Fine Arts 131. Mr. Hauser 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 182b. Philosophies of History from Vico 

through Hegel 

Undergraduates register in History 182b. 

Primarily for Graduates 

Admission of undergraduates to any of the following courses requires the 
consent of the instructor. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 205a. The Idea of Logos. Selected Problems in 

the Development of Western Thought 

Discussion of some of the basic elements in the Western idea of Reason. 
The Pre-Socratics, Plato, Stoicism, Neo-Platonism. Readings and seminar 
papers. Mr. Marcuse 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 212a. Conflict of Religions in the Roman Empire 

Intensive study of texts relating to the conflict of the pagan religions 
with Christianity. Mr. Alexander 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 216b. Reason and Faith in the Middle Ages 

Continuation of History of Ideas 205a: St. Augustine, Thomas, Aver- 
roism. William of Occam and Nominalism. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 217a. English Intellectual History in the 

Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries 

Problems in English religious thought with primary emphasis on the 
attack on Calvin and Calvinism. Graduate seminar requiring a finished 
scholarly report. Mr. Berkowitz 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 218b. Hobbes and Spinoza 

Topics and reports on the respective system of ideas in the major works 
of Hobbes and Spinoza, with primary emphasis on political, ethical and 
religious issues. Mr. Berkowitz 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 219a. Topics in the History of Cosmological 

Thought 

Reading and discussions of selected world systems from antiquity to 
the eighteenth century including the Babylonian, Greek and medieval sys- 
tems. Copernicus, Kepler and their successors to the time of Newton. 
Emphasis will be placed on the interrelationship between cosmological 
and social thought. All necessary knowledge relating to technical astronomy 
will be supplied during the course of the seminar. Mr. Stahlman 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[129] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 220. Seventeenth Century Rationalism 
>■ See PHILOSOPHY 220. 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 221b. Reason and Myth, 1680-1800 

An historical and analytical presentation of theories of mythology and 
the dominant views on the nature of primitive and pagan religion. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 226. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason in 

Historical Perspective 
See PHILOSOPHY 226. Mr. Gurwitsch 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 227a. Rousseau and the Intellectual Origins of 

the French Revolution 
Rousseau's work as turning point in the development of social and politi- 
cal philosophy. The opposition against rationalism and the philosophy of 
progress. Revolution and Totalitarianism. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 228a. Philosophy of History from Hegel to the 

Present 

An examination of major theories of history during the 19th and 20th 
centuries emphasizing: (1) the problem of historical knowledge; (2) the 
problem of historical laws; (3) moral judgments in history; (4) scope and 
limits of a philosophical interpretation of history. Mr. Meyerhoff 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 229b. Marxian Theory: Its Origins and its .... 

Development 

A study centering around the philosophical and sociological works of 
Marx which involves a study of" his antecedents and descendants up to 
about 1870. • ■ " • - ri 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 230a. History of American Political Thought: 

The Colonial Period to the Civil War 

An examination of the American political tradition from its beginnings 
in the Puritan theocracy through the movement towards independence, the 
creation of the Republic, Jeffersonian Democracy, Jacksonian Democracy, 
the Slavery Controversy, to the great crisis of disunion. Emphasis will be 
given to the relationship between political controversies and the develop- 
ment of political thought, i.e., to the interaction between theory and practice. 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 230b. History of American Political Thought: 

Civil War to New Deal 

An examination of the American political tradition from the Civil War 
to the outbreak of World War II, with particular emphasis on the rise of 
American capitalism, the reform movements, and the problems created 
by big government in a complex industrial society. 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 231a. The Intellectual Antecedents of the Russian 

Revolution 

Russian revolutionary thought in the century before 1917. Mr. Fischer 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. . • 

[130] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 232a. A Social Interpretation of Religion 

An historical review of various schools and currents of thought from 
the Renaissance and Reformation to the end of the nineteenth century. 

*HISTORY OF IDEAS 304a, b, or c. Readings in the History of 

Social Thought 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 350a, b, or c. Readings in the History of 

Philosophy Mr. Gurwitsch 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 385a, b, or c. Readings in the History of Science 

Instructor to be announced 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 396a, b, or c. Readings in the History of Religion 

Messrs. Alexander, Glatzer 

HISTORY OF IDEAS 398a, b, or c. Readings in the History of Political 

Theory in the West 

Messrs. Berkowitz, Marcuse 

HUMANITIES 1. Classics of the Western Tradition through the 
Renaissance 

A study of major texts of Western literature, with discussion of ideas 
and values, and training in the various methods of literary interpretation and 
analysis. The reading will include Homer, Greek tragedy, Plato, the Old 
and New Testaments, Virgil, Dante, Chaucer, Cervantes, and Shakespeare. 

Required of all freshmen. Staff 

HUMANITIES 2. Classics of the Western Tradition from the Renaissance 
to the Present 

An introduction to selected masterpieces of Western literature since the 
Renaissance. Discussion of their leading forms, ideas, and values. Shakes- 
peare, Moliere, Milton, Fielding, Goethe, Balzac, Tolstoy, Whitman, and T. 
S. Eliot will he among the authors discussed. Staff 

HUMANITIES 191a. General Linguistics 

A basic course for students who wish to increase their proficiency in the 
study of foreign languages and their understanding of the science of lan- 
guage. The languages of the world. Speech communities. Phonetics. 
Phonemics. Morphology. Grammatical terms. Syntax. Semantics. Word 
formation and derivation. Change of vocabulary. Borrowings. Descriptive, 
historical and comparative linguistics. Mr. Evans 

ITALIAN 1. Introductory Italian 

Designed for students choosing a concentration in Romance Languages or 
for students in the Creative Arts. The course will stress the fundamentals of 
Italian grammar and a reading facility in Italian along with a basic facility 
in conversation. In addition to the work done in class, outside texts will be 
assigned toward the end of the academic year to supplement the regular 
reading preparations. Mr. Barricelli 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[131] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ITALIAN 10. Introduction to Italian Literature 

Readings and discussions of the masterworks of Italian literature from 
the 13th century to the present, along with a brief survey of its accompanying 
historico-intellectual development. The first half of the course will be de- 
voted essentially to Dante and the other Trecentisti; the second half will 
cover the Renaissance and the 19th-20th century highlights. 

Required of Romance Language concentrators minoring in Italian. Con- 
ducted largely in Italian. 

Alternative: Italian 110a with 125b. Mr. Barricelli 

*ITALIAN 110a. Dante 

An analysis of the works of Dante, stressing the Vita Nuova and the Divina 
Commedia. 

*ITALIAN 125b. The Trecentisti after Dante through the Renaissance 

A study of the major works of Petrarca and Boccaccio, followed by an- 
alyses of the main figures of the Italian Renaissance, including Lorenzo, 
Poliziano, Machiavelli, Bicatdo, Ariosto and Tasso. 

LATIN 10. Intermediate Latin Literature 

Selections from prose and poetry. Mrs. Howe 

LINGUISTICS — See Humanities 191a. 

MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professor Oscar Goldman, Chairman, (Student Adviser); 
Associate Professors Leon Ehrenpreis, Arnold S. Shapiro; Assistant 
Professor Maurice Auslander; Dr. K. Whitehead. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Mathematics 13a, 14b, 23a, 25b, 33, 36; Biology 
la, lb; Chemistry 10; Physics 11. 

B. Additional requirements for Senior Honors Candidates: Two semester 
courses in the 100 series of Mathematics courses. 

C. Elective Courses: One full course selected from the following: Physics 21a, 
21b, 23a, 23b; History 185a, 185b. 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

An examination will be given to all students wishing to register for first- 
year Mathematics courses during Freshman Orientation Week. Registration 
in Mathematics 13a requires a passing grade in this examination. 

Mathematics 13a, 14b and 23a constitute the basic three term sequence in 
calculus which is prerequisite for all advanced courses in Mathematics and 
Physics. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[ 1.32] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

MATHEMATICS la. Trigonometry and College Algebra 

Elements of algebraic computation, solution of triangles. Introduction to 
analytic geometry. Messrs. Auslander, Ehrenpreis 

MATHEMATICS 13a. Analytic Geometry and Calculus, I 

Functions, rates of change, maxima and minima, elementary notions of 
integration, plane analytic geometry. Mr. Shapiro, Mrs. Whitehead 

MATHEMATICS 13aR. Analytic Geometry and Calculus, I 

Same as Mathematics 13a but given in Spring term. 

Messrs. Auslander, Ehrenpreis 

MATHEMATICS 14b. Analytic Geometry and Calculus, II 

Transcendental functions, methods of integration, applications of inte- 
gration, vectors and parametric equations, determinants. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13a. Mr. Shapiro, Mrs. Whitehead 

MATHEMATICS l4bR. Analytic Geometry and Calculus, II 

Same as Mathematics 14b and will be given in the Fall term of 1957. 

Mr. Goldman 

MATHEMATICS 23a. Analytic Geometry and Calculus, III 

Solid analytic geometry, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, infinite 
series. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 14b. Mrs. Whitehead 

MATHEMATICS 23aR. Analytic Geometry and Calculus, III 

Same as 23a but given in Spring term. Mr. Goldman 

MATHEMATICS 25b. Elementary Differential Equations 

Theory of ordinary differential equations, linear equations with constant 
coefficients, numerical methods. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 23a. Mrs. Whitehead 

MATHEMATICS 33. Algebra and Number Theory 

Introduction to the concepts of modern algebra including topics in num- 
ber theory, matrix theory and the theory of groups. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 23a. Mr. Goldman 

^MATHEMATICS 36. Analysis 

Introduction to the concepts of modern mathematics. Real numbers, set 
theory, uniform convergence and continuity, point set topology, and the 
theory of integration. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 23a. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

Admission to any of the following courses requires the consent of the 
instructor. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[133] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

MATHEMATICS 101a. Algebra I 

Groups, rings, fields, vector spaces, etc. Mr. Ehrenpreis 

MATHEMATICS 101b. Algebra II 

Selected topics from ideal theory and structure theory of rings. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101a or consent of instructor. Mr. Auslander 

MATHEMATICS 110a. Point Set Topology 

Set theory, metric spaces, topological spaces, fundamental group. 

Mr. Shapiro 
*MATHEMATICS 110b. Geometry 

MATHEMATICS 121a. Complex Analysis 

Analytic functions, Cauchy theorems, power series, residues. 

Mr. Auslander 
MATHEMATICS 121b. Advanced Complex Analysis 

Selected topics from the theory of meromorphic functions; Riemann 
surfaces. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 121a or consent of instructor. Mr. Ehrenpreis 

MATHEMATICS 131b. Functional Analysis I 

Banach spaces and algebras, applications to classical analysis. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 110a or consent of instructor. Mr. Shapiro 

♦MATHEMATICS 132a. Functional Analysis II 

♦MATHEMATICS 133b. Integration 

Primarily for Graduates 

MATHEMATICS 298. Master's Thesis 

Although a thesis is not required for a Master's degree, some students 
may wish to elect this course in place of some other 100 course. Enrollment 
in this course is limited to exceptional students and is possible only with 
the consent of one of the instructors. 

Messrs. Auslander, Ehrenpreis, Goldman, Shapiro 

MATHEMATICS 299. Graduate Seminar 

A weekly seminar in which special topics will be discussed. Attendance 
in this seminar is required of all first year graduate students. 

Messrs. Auslander, Ehrenpreis, Goldman, Shapiro 

MUSIC 

Associate Professor Arthur Berger, Chairman; Professor Irving G. 
Fine; Associate Professors Erwin Bodky, Harold Shapiro; Assistant 
Professors Kenneth Levy, Caldwell Titcomb, {Student Adviser). 

The program for concentration is directed primarily to those students 
who already possess skill in performance. Upon application for admission to 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[134] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

the field, all candidates are expected to demonstrate proficiency in perform- 
ance and sight-reading at the piano or on an orchestral instrument which 
possesses a standard solo repertoire, or in singing. 

Non-pianists will be expected to acquire minimal piano proficiency by the 
beginning of the sophomore year. ! 

Concentrators have the opportunity of electing instrumental and vocal 
studies for credit under Music M, instruction to be arranged with the School 
Secretary, Slosberg Music Building. (See Music M under Courses of Instruc- 
tion.) 

Beginning with the academic year 1957-58 the University will establish 
a junior Quartet-in-Residence composed of advanced student instrumentalists 
recently graduated from outstanding schools of music. The quartet will be 
coached by a visiting specialist in ensemble music and contribute to the 
musical life of the University through concerts and performances. The quartet 
will also be available to assist the program in musical composition and the 
newly established Collegium Musicum. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Music 51, 102, 103, 152, 153, 154. 

All concentrators in Music or in the combined field of Music and Theatre 
Arts are expected to participate regularly in the Chorus or the Collegium 
Musicum. One credit per semester will be given for participation in Chorus 
and 3 credits per year for Collegium Musicum. Not more than a total of 
. six credits will be counted towards the A.B. degree. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Music 99c. 

C. Elective Courses: Select from the following sufficient courses to fill out the 
• requirement of seven full courses: Music 1, 3, M, 60a, 6lb, 100, 101c, 

135a, 138b, 142b, 148b, 155, 157, 165a, 185a, 194b, 256, 258, 292; Theatre 
Arts 3, 5c, or any other full course from the School of Creative Arts, or, 
; with the permission of the Music Faculty, any other appropriate full course 
in History, Philosophy or Literature. 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

MUSIC 1. Introduction to Music 

A general background to the world of music and a study of musical 
literature from ancient times to the present. The course will acquaint the 
student with the history of the development of this branch of the arts and 
with those esthetic, factors contributing to an understanding of the signifi- 
cance of music and to an appreciation of its content. 

Two lectures and one section meeting weekly, with training in mean- 
ingful and analytical listening, based on selected listening assignments, 

Open to all students. It is assumed that the student has no previous knou4- 
edge of music. , ...... Mr. Levy 

*MUSIC 3. Chorus. A Survey of Choral Music 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[135] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

MUSIC 51. Elementary Harmony 

Scales, intervals, triads and seventh chords, etc. Studies in modulation 
and phrase structure. Written exercises, harmonic analysis and keyboard 
harmony. 

Before admission to the course, students must pass a preliminary ear test 
and will be expected to demonstrate minimal proficiency in piano playing 
and sight-reading. 

Two class meetings and two laboratory sessions. Mr. Berger 

MUSIC 60a. The Opera 

A survey of the development of opera from its beginnings in the later 
sixteenth century to the present. Examples will be chosen from the works 
of Monteverdi, Purcell, Handel, Gluck, Mozart, Weber, Rossini, Bellini, 
Wagner, Verdi, Moussorgski, Puccini, Berg, and Stravinsky. 

Two lectures and one section meeting weekly. 

Prerequisite: Any course in Music, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Bodky 
MUSIC 6 lb. Music in the Romantic Era 

A study of musical romanticism and its relation to the literary, artistic, 
and social currents of the nineteenth century. Examples will be chosen 
from the works of Beethoven, Schubert, Liszt, Chopin, Berlioz, Schumann, 
Wagner, Brahms, Mahler, and others. 

Two lectures and one section meeting weekly. 

Prerequisite: Any course in Music, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Bodky 

MUSIC 99c. Senior Research Staff 

MUSIC M. Applied Music Instrumental and Vocal Instruction 

by teachers accredited to the School of Creative Arts 

Music M is open to all students although only concentrators may re- 
ceive credit for it at the rate of 3 points per year or up to a maximum of 
9 points for 3 full years' instruction. An additional fee of $100 a semester 
will be charged for this instruction. A limited number of grants-in-aid are 
available to gifted students and particularly concentrators in Music or in 
the combined fields of Music and Theatre Arts. The basic semester fee of 
$100 will provide twelve instructional periods. All make-up lessons must 
be accomplished within the semester and there can be no overlapping of 
charges between semesters. In the event that instructional fees exceed $100 
a semester, all overage is to be paid by the student. Grading and the award- 
ing of credit will require a minimum of 75 % attendance. 

Arrangements to be made through the School Secretary, Slosberg Music 
Centre. 

Attention is called to the Chorus and Collegium Musicum to which inter- 
ested students and faculty are invited. One credit per semester will be given 
for participation in Chorus. Credit provisions for Collegium Musicum are 
described under Music 101c. Participation either in the Chorus or the Collegium 
Musicum is required of all concentrators. 

[136] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

MUSIC 100. Studies in the Theory and Practice of Musical Performance 

History, theory, and practice in the performance of instrumental and 
vocal music, from the Renaissance through the Classical period. Interre- 
lationships with contemporary ensemble music. Early instruments, orna- 
mentation, dynamics, tempo, articulation, and other problems in style. 
Selective reading of source material. 

Two lectures, one section meeting weekly, and participation in the 
Collegium Musicum. The Collegium Musicum is a laboratory for Music 
100 and a student who enrolls in Music 100 will not also enroll in Music 
101c. 9 credits. 

Open with the -permission of the instructor to properly qualified instru- 
mentalists and singers. Some background in musical theory is normally expected. 

Mr. Bodky and Assistants 

MUSIC 101c. Collegium Musicum 

Performance of representative works for small instrumental and vocal 
ensembles. Works to be studied will be drawn from the musical literature 
of the sixteenth through the twentieth century. 

One two-hour evening meeting and one additional section. The two- 
hour meeting will normally be divided into vocal and instrumental groups 
which will join, on occasion, for the performance of larger works requiring 
their combined resources. 3 credits. 

Open with the permission of the instructor to all properly qualified students. 

This course in conjunction ivith any other half or full course in music 
history or theory will satisfy the General Education requirements in the School 
of Creative Arts. 

The repertoire in Music 101c will change from year to year. Students 
may repeat it; however, only two years' work with a total of six credits 
may be counted towards the A.B. degree. A student may enroll in Music 
101c without enrolling in Music 100. 

Properly qualified students may participate in the Collegium Musicum 
as an extra-curricular activity. Mr. Bodky and Assistants 

MUSIC 102. Historical Analysis of Music to 1750 

Studies in the development of musical idioms and forms and of the 
relation of music to society. Detailed analysis of representative works, 
collateral reading, papers on assigned topics. 

Prerequisite: Music 51. Music 152 and/ or 153 or their equivalents also 
recommended. Mr. Titcomb 

*MUSIC 103. Historical Analysis of Music from 1750 to the Present 

Given in alternate years. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[137] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*MUSIC 135a. The History of Keyboard Music through Bach 

Historical survey of the development of keyboard music and its styles 
from the fourteenth century to 1750. Analysis, collateral reading, papers on 
assigned topics. 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or Music 51, or permission of the instructor. 

*MUSIC 138b. The Classical String Quartet 

The string quartets of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, with emphasis on 
the last quartets of Beethoven. 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or Music 51, or permission of the instructor. 

*MUSIC 142b. Wagner and Verdi 

An examination of the careers of the two most important nineteenth 
century masters of musical theatre; their theatrical ideas, attitudes and 
achievements, in both theory and practice, as seen from a consideration of 
their writings and an analysis of selected significant works. 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or Music 51, or permission of the instructor. 

*MUSIC 148b. Contemporary Music 

The development of the musical language from Wagner's "Tristan 1 ' until 
the beginning of the First World War: Strauss, Mahler, Debussy, Busoni, 
the young Schoenberg; Expressionism, Impressionism, Neo-Classicism. The 
contemporary scene: Bartok, Hindemith, Stravinsky, the twelve-tone system 
of Schoenberg and his disciples, contemporary American music. 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or 51 or their equivalents. 

MUSIC 152. Advanced Harmony 

Continuation of Music 51 (Elementary Harmony). Keyboard harmony, 
harmonic analysis, realization of figured basses, modern harmony. 

Prerequisite: Music 51 or its equivalent. 

Two class meetings and two laboratory sessions. Mr. Shapero 

MUSIC 153. Principles of Counterpoint 

Studies in strict, modal, and tonal contrapuntal writing. 

Prerequisite: Music 51 or its equivalent. 

Two class meetings and two laboratory sessions. Mr. Fine 

MUSIC 154. Instrumentation and Orchestration 

The instruments of the orchestra; the development of their construction, 
acoustics and playing techniques from the Baroque era to the present, with a 
consideration of their use by major composers; the methods of writing effec- 
tively for present-day instruments, individually and in combination; the 
mechanics of reading and writing a score. 

Written exercises, analysis of scores, study of recorded performances, 
and live demonstrations. 

Prerequisite: Music 51. Music 153 is also recommended. Mr. Titcomb 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[138] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*MUSIC 155. Advanced Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation of the 
Thorough Bass 

Acquisition of skill in applying harmonic theory to keyboard practice. 
Introduction to the art of improvising in the style of 17th and 18th century 
music. Realization of thorough basses in harmonic and contrapuntal treat- 
ment for the accompaniments of solo and trio sonatas, orchestral and vocal 
music from the Italian monodists to the sons of Johann Sebastian Bach. 

Prerequisite: Music 51. 

*MUSIC 157. Composition in the Homophonic Forms 

The melodic phrase; types of accompaniment; studies in harmonic 
rhythm; trio forms, rondo forms, sonata forms, variation forms. Analysis 
and exercises. 

Prerequisites: Music 152 and 153 or then equivalents. 

*MUSIC 165a. The German Solo Song 

The development of the German song from the "Song with Thorough 
Bass accompaniment" of the Baroque period (H. Albert, A. Krieger, Tele- 
mann), via the Lieder of the "Berlin" School (Reichardt, Zelter) to the great 
period of German song represented by Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, 
Schumann, Brahms and Hugo Wolf. 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or 51 or their equivalents. 

MUSIC 185a. Berlioz 

A study of the great representative of Romanticism and versatile pioneer 
of modern music ; Berlioz the man, composer, conductor, producer, mission- 
ary, litterateur, critic, theorist, textbook writer and poet. Main emphasis will 
be on examination and discussion of selected musical works. 

Prerequisite: Some advanced training in music history and/ or theory. An 
acquaintance with French is also recommended. Mr. Titcomb 

MUSIC 194b. History and Practice of Music Criticism 

An examination of music criticism from the Baroque to the present 
day, with special attention to such important nineteenth and twentieth 
century critics as H.F.L. Rellstab, E.TA. Hoffmann, Heine, Berlioz, Schu- 
mann, Hanslick, Philip Hale, W. J. Henderson, Bernard Shaw, Camille 
Bellaigue, James Huneker, Debussy, Richard Aldrich, Ernest Newman, 
Lawrence Gilman, Olin Downes, Paul Rosenfeld, and Virgil Thomson; the 
function and influence of music critics in cultural life; practical exercises 
in writing critiques. Linguistic style will be considered as well as content. 

Prerequisite: A knowledge of music history and theory. Mr. Titcomb 

MUSIC 199. Colloquium 

Informal monthly meetings of faculty and students for the discussion 
of musical topics of general interest. Required of graduate students and 
concentrators in Music. 

No credit. Staff 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[139] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Primarily for Graduates 

*MUSIC 200. Materials of Research 

This course will acquaint the student with the main tools and materials of 
research, so as to enable him readily to pursue musicological, critical, and 
analytical projects in music both old and new. Practical application will be 
made through investigation and discussion of selected topics of importance 
or special interest. 

Given in alternate years. 

*MUSIC 250. Advanced Musical Analysis 

Investigation of methods of analysis of the total musical structure as dis- 
tinct from conventional formulae. The intrinsic nature of tones will be con- 
sidered to determine the relationships to which they lend themselves. The 
concepts of musical unity of Schenker and other original thinkers in the field 
of analysis will be examined, applied and evaluated. The role of analysis in 
criticism. 

MUSIC 256. Canon and Fugue 

Principles governing the construction of invertible counterpoint, various 
kinds of canon, strict and free fugues. Analysis of classic and modern canons 
and fugues and detailed study of Johann Sebastian Bach's 'Art of the 
Fugue". Written exercises. Mr. Shapero 

*MUSIC 258. Twentieth Century Techniques 

Studies in composition employing musical materials developed in the 
modern period. Impressionistic harmony, twelve-tone methods, pandiaton- 
ism, polytonality, asymetric rhythm, modern melody and form. Analysis of 
works by Debussy, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Milhaud, Hindemith, Copland, 
and others. 

Given in alternate years. 

MUSIC 259. Special Studies in Contemporary Music 

The most representative works of Stravinsky will be analyzed in detail 
during the first semester and those of Schoenberg and his chief disciples 
(Berg and Webern) will be similarly treated during the second semester. 
Emphasis will be placed on apprehension of the essential structure and tech- 
nique of individual works under consideration. General stylistic features of 
Stravinsky, on the one hand, and the twentieth century Viennese composers, 
on the other, will also be deduced and the manifestation of these features 
will be observed in works of other contemporaries. Mr. Berger 

MUSIC 260. Historical Survey of Medieval and Renaissance Music 

A comprehensive study of the history of music, using primary sources, 
from early Christian times through the end of the sixteenth century. 

Mr. Levy 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[140] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

MUSIC 270a. Problems in the History of Liturgical Chant in the 
Middle Ages 

Studies in the musical forms, liturgy, and notation of the chants of the 
Western Church (Gregorian, Beneventian, Old-Roman, Ambrosian, Gallican, 
and Mozarabic) and of the Byzantine Church. Consideration will be given 
to the problem of origins in the Early Church and Synagogue. Mr. Levy 

MUSIC 270b. Problems in the History of the French Chanson in the 
Sixteenth Century 

Historical and style-critical studies of French secular music from the 
later works of Josquin through the Airs de Cour of the early seventeenth 
century. The relationship of the music to the poetry and poetic theory 
of the French Renaissance and to the contemporary developments in the 
Italian madrigal will be considered. Mr. Levy 

*MUSIC 280. Problems in the Notation of Music in the Middle Ages 

Trouvere notation; modal and mensural notations of the thirteenth 
century; French and Italian notations of the Ars Nova; white notation of 
the fifteenth century ; introduction to Byzantine and Gregorian paleography ; 
readings from the medieval theorists. 

Given in alternate years. 

MUSIC 292. Free Composition 

Seminar meetings and private conferences. Section 1 — Mr. Fine 

Section 2 — Mr. Shapero 

MUSIC 299- Individual Research and Advanced Work 

Individual research and advanced work in musical literature, musical 
history and in special problems of musical analysis, esthetics, theory and 
criticism. Staff 

MUSIC 399. Direction of Doctoral Dissertation Staff 

NEAR EASTERN AND JUDAIC STUDIES 

Professor Nahum N. Glatzer, Chairman, {Student Adviser); Professors 
Israel Efros, Cyrus H. Gordon, **Simon Rawidowicz; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Shlomo Marenof; Dr. Shelomo Morag, Dr. Moshe Zeltzer. 

Requirements for Concentration 

Students are given a choice of concentrating either in (a) Hebrew Litera- 
ture or (b) Near Eastern and Judaic Studies. In either field of concentration 
students must take seven full courses beyond the level of Hebrew 2. 

A. Required of all Candidates: Hebrew 1, 2, 10, NEJS 25a, 26a, 51a, 52a, 53a ? , 
54a, 99b. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Hebrew 99c 
*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

**On Sabbatical leave, first semester 1957-58. 

[141] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

C. Elective Courses: Select sufficient courses to fill out the requirement of 
seven full courses. Any course in NEJS or Hebrew Literature or any other 
Semitic language or Fine Arts 16 lb, with the approval of the instructor. 
Concentrators in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies who take Arabic 101 
and 102 and NEJS 10b or its equivalent may be exempt from Hebrew 10 
and other Hebrew and NEJS courses. 

As the required courses NEJS 51a, 52a, 53a, and 54a are not given regu- 
larly in alternate years, prospective concentrators in Hebrew Literature 
and Near Eastern and Judaic Srudies are advised to take these in the 
academic years when they are given. 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

See also: Hebrew, Arabic, Aramaic, and Ugaritic. 

*NEJS 10a. History of the Ancient Near East 

This course will correlate written records with archeological materials 
from Iran, Mesopotamia, Anatolia, Canaan, Egypt, and the East Mediter- 
ranean, so as to reconstruct the cultural history of the area down to Alex- 
ander's Conquest. Attention will be paid to the origin and character of 
Hebrew civilization in the light of modern discovery. 

*NEJS 10b. The Literature of the Ancient Near East 

A comparative reading of the epic, mythic, religious, and historical liter- 
ature of the Sumerians, Babylonians, Hittites and Egyptians. The religious 
and social background of these texts will be analyzed and attention will be 
paid to the related motifs and themes in early European literature. 

NEJS 15a. An Outline of Islam 

The foundation of Islam. Practice of Islam. The Muslim State. Sects. 
Modern trends. Islam in the world. Mr. Zeltzer 

NEJS 17a. Introduction to the Qur'an 

Reading and critical analysis. Qur'an and the oral tradition. 

Mr. Zeltzer 
NEJS 19a. The Modern Near East 

A survey of the political history of the states. Emphasis will be placed 
on their social and economic problems, on political institutions and asso- 
ciations. Mr. Zeltzer 

NEJS 19b. Minorities in the Middle East 

Religious communities; national, linguistic, territorial. Emphasis will 
be placed on their social structure. Mr. Zeltzer 

NEJS 20b. The State of Israel 

Historical survey of the Jewish settlement in Palestine. Jewish coloniza- 
tion under Turkish rule. The growth of the national home under the 
British Mandate. The establishment of the State of Israel. Political and 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[ 142 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

social structure; types of settlement; ways of absorption of immigrants; 
demographic and cultural problems ; the State of Israel and the neighboring 
states. Mr. Zeltzer 

NEJS 25a. Archaeological History of Israel 

The methods and results of exploration and excavation in Bible lands. 
How archaeology, correlated with the Bible, enables us to reconstruct the 
material, religious, social and political history of the Hebrews down to 
586 B.C.E. No prerequisites. Mr. Gordon 

NEJS 25b. The Bible as Literature 

A study of the Bible against the background of related ancient Near East 
literatures, especially Egyptian, Babylonian, Ugaritic, Hittite and Greek. 
Open to all students. Mr. Gordon 

NEJS 26a. Jewish History from 586 B.C.E. to the French Revolution 

The Jews in the Hellenistic and Roman Empires; the organization arid 
function of the medieval Jewish community in the Christian and Moslem 
worlds; the great migrations of the Middle Ages; intellectual developments 
and changes in religious doctrine; Jewish mysticism; Messianic movements; 
Hasidism; the structure of Jewish society in Eastern and Western Europe, 
the Jewish community in European economic life. Mr. Glatzer 

*NEJS 26b. Jewish History from the French Revolution to the Present 

The emancipation of the Jews in Western Europe; the Haskalah move- 
ment ; the structure and internal conflicts of the Jewish community in Eastern 
Europe during the nineteenth century. The great migrations to the west; 
Sephardic, German and East European Jews. Renaissance of Hebrew culture; 
anti-Semitism ; Jewish nationalism and Zionism ; the Jews during two world 
wars. Problems of Jewish contemporary life in the United States; political, 
economic, and religious issues confronting the State of Israel. 

*NEJS 51a. Foundations of Jewish Ethics 

Introduction to the foundations of Jewish ethics in general. A survey of 
the central ethical ideas of early Israel as presented in the Biblical and early 
post-Biblical literature. Relation between religion and ethics in Judaism. 
Analysis of the ethical sections of the Bible and the confrontation of Jewish 
Biblical and post-Biblical ethics with the ethics of classical Greek philosophy 
and Christianity. {Given in alternate years.) 

*NEJS 52a. Classical Jewish Thought 

An introduction to the history of the religious and social ideas of Biblical 
and Talmudic-Midrashic Judaism (central concepts of God and the Universe,, 
Man and History). Post-Talmudic currents of traditional Jewish thought; 
Jewish mysticism of the Middle Ages; the philosophy of Hasidism and its 
impact on Jewish thought in modern times. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[143] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

NEJS 53a. Introduction to Medieval Jewish Philosophy 

A survey of Jewish thought from the tenth to the end of the fifteenth 
centuries; Israeli, Saadya, Solomon ibn Gabirol, Bachya ibn Paquda, 
Judah Halevi, Abraham ibn Daud, Moses ben Maimon, Levi ben Gershon, 
Hisdai Crescas, Joseph Albo and some of the philosophic commentators. 
Analysis of the relation between Hebrew thought and the classical Greek 
as well as the Islamic and scholastic philosophical trends of the Middle Ages. 
Readings of selections from various texts of the leading medieval Jewish 
thinkers. Mr. Efros 

*NEJS 54a. Modern Jewish Philosophy in the Eighteenth and 
Nineteenth Centuries 
The transition of the Jewish people from the old to the new era as the 
background of modern Jewish thought. Spinoza and Moses Mendelssohn, 
their philosophies of Judaism. Western and Eastern European Jewish En- 
lightenment and the philosophy of its main representatives. The ideological 
trends in modern Jewry after the Enlightenment period. 

NEJS 6lb. Jewish Institutions and Customs 

A presentation of the main cultural, religious, communal and social 
institutions of Judaism through the ages; Jewish laws, usages and customs 
and their meaning. 

Open to all students. 

Concentrators in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies who take this course will 
have to fulfill additional assignments within the scope of the course. 

Mr. Glatzer 
NEJS 99b. Senior Research 

Intensive seminar in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies for majors in this 
field in their senior year with the purpose of integrating their studies in their 
field of concentration. Staff 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

*NEJS 121b. Biblical Scholarship in our Age of Discovery 

The impact of Assyriology, Egyptology and other branches of Near East 
discovery on the status of biblical studies will be considered both in detail 
and as a whole. Art as well as texts will be used to elucidate biblical passages 
and concepts. The course aims at acquainting the student with the present 
status of biblical research so that he may be equipped to keep up with the 
steady stream of new finds. 

NEJS 144a. History of the Jews in the Second Commonwealth 

Source studies in the history and culture of Palestine from 320 B.C. to 
44 A.D. (Josephus' Antiquities, Books XI to XIX.) Mr. Glatzer 

NEJS 144b. History of the Jews in the Talmudic Period 

Examination of Talmudic-Midrashic material as sources for the political, 
social and cultural history in the first five centuries. Mr. Glatzer 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[144] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*NEJS 158b. Studies in Eschatological Theories from the Prophets 
through the Second Christian Century 

An analysis of Messianic and Apocalyptic concepts in the Ancient World 
and especially in the Old Testament prophets, Apocrypha and the Dead Sea 
writings. Students doing graduate work in the field of Hebrew literature will 
read the texts under discussion in the original Hebrew or Aramaic (as far as 
available) . 

Primarily for Graduates 

NEJS 240. Comparative Egypto-Semitics 

Readings in the ancient Semitic and Egyptian texts with reference to 
comparative literary and linguistic problems. 

Prerequisite: A knowledge of two Egypto-Se-mitic languages or consent of 
the instructor. Mr. Gordon 

*NEJS 255a. Jewish Messianic Movements 

A study, based on original sources, of the origins and development of 
the messianic idea and of the messianic movement in Jewish history. 

*NEJS 255b. Hebrew Historiography 

Reading and critical analysis of selected Jewish historical writings in Late 
Antiquity and in the Middle Ages. Emphasis will be placed on principles 
and ideas underlying the historical records. Reference will be made to his- 
torical thinking in general, especially in Europe. 

NEJS 265a. Central Problems of Medieval Jewish Thought 

Introduction to the main currents and problems of Jewish thought from 
the tenth to the end of the fifteenth century. Mr. Efros 

*NEJS 266. The Halevi School in Jewish Philosophy 

Judah Halevi's philosophy and its place in Jewish thought; comparison 
with non-Jewish trends of medieval thought; analysis of the Ku2ari; the 
Halevi trend in Jewish post-medieval thought. 

*NEJS 267. Maimonides 

Introduction to the philosophy of Moses ben Maimon, the center of 
medieval and post-medieval Jewish thought. Analysis of his "Sefer Ham- 
adda" and "Moreh Nebuchim" in conjunction with his other writings. 

*NEJS 269a. The Idea of Dogma 

An analysis of the problems concerning the establishment of the main 
principles and criteria of "Judaism" in Jewish philosophy. Middle Ages: 
Maimonides, Hisdai Crescas, Joseph Albo, Isaac Abravanel, and others. 
Modern Times: Moses Mendelssohn. Development of the problem of 
Dogma in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

NEJS 270b. Knowledge and Prophecy in Jewish Philosophy 

Theories of knowledge and prophecy in medieval Jewish philosophy 

from the tenth to the fifteenth centuries. Special emphasis on Saadia Gaon 

and Maimonides. Concepts of prophecy in post-medieval Jewish thought. 

Analysis of medieval Jewish texts. 

Mr. Rawidowicz 

*NEJS 273a. Introduction to Modern Jewish Thought 

Background of post-medieval Jewish thought. The philosophies of Moses 

Mendelssohn, Nahman Krochmal, Hermann Cohen and their followers in 

conjunction with the main spiritual and political movements of modern 

Jewry in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

*NEJS 287b. Bialik and Modern Hebrew Literature 

Hayyim Nahman Bialik as poet, stylist and thinker. Bialik and his 
predecessors. His impress on modern Hebrew literature in the first half of 
the twentieth century. 

NEJS 310b. Judaica Seminar 

Studies of central topics in various fields of Judaic and Hebraic learning 
with the view of interrelating some of the main ideas of ancient and mod- 
ern Judaism in their historical development. Analysis of selected ancient and 
modern texts in these fields. Discussion of research methods on the basis of 
papers prepared by the participants as well as of theses and dissertations to 
be submitted by the candidates for the Master's and Ph.D. degrees in this 
area. 

This is a required seminar for graduate students for the M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees (during their period of residence) who work in the field of Hebraic 
and Judaic Studies. 

Graduate students in related areas may apply for admission to the instruc- 
tor of this course. Mr. Rawidowicz 

NEJS 315. East Mediterranean Workshop 

The Minoan and Mycenaean Inscriptions will be analyzed with a view 
to refining the decipherments of Linear B and solving the basic problems 
of the Cretan hieroglyphic and Linear A systems. The epigraphical material 
will be related to the broad problems of the cultural synthesis that gave rise 
to the Greek and Hebrew civilizations in the second millennium. 

Prerequisite: A knowledge of Greek and Hebrew or consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Gordon 

NEJS 390. Dissertation Colloquium Staff 

NEJS 39)1. Dissertation Colloquium Staff 

NEJS 392. Dissertation Colloquium Staff 

See also: Fine Arts 161 b. 
*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[146] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

PHILOSOPHY 

Associate Professor Aron Gurwitsch, Mr. Hubert Dreyfus, Mr. 
Harold Weisberg. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Philosophy 11, 21, 121b, l4la, 141b, 151a, 
15 lb, and two of the following: Philosophy Ilia, 111b, 121a, 122a. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Philosophy 99c. 

C. Elective Courses: Select from the list below sufficient courses to fill out 
the requirement of seven full courses: Philosophy 13a, 31a, 54a, 102a, Ilia, 
111b, 121a, 130b, 145, 152b, 220, 226; History 101, 181, 182b, 185a; 
History of Ideas 201a, 211b, 218b; Humanities 191a; Mathematics 13a, 
14b; Physics 10 or 11; Politics 195; Sociology la, lb, 108a. 

Any other course from the School of Humanities except Composition or 
Languages 1, 2, 3 or Literature 10. 

PHILOSOPHY 1. Problems of Philosophy 

An introductory course designed to give an understanding of the basic 
problems and principles of philosophy. The nature and the value of philo- 
sophical thinking. The persistent questions regarding truth, reality, exist- 
ence, matter, and mind. The different fields of philosophy: metaphysics, 
theory of knowledge, logic, ethics, esthetics. The chief philosophical the- 
ories: rationalism, empiricism, and transcendentalism. The importance of 
philosophy in every phase of cultural life and in the general situation of our 
age is stressed. Mr. Dreyfus 

PHILOSOPHY 11. Classics in Philosophy 

This course is intended to introduce the student to some fundamental 
concepts and problems of philosophy through intensive reading and study 
of some texts of Plato, Descartes and Locke. This course is a prerequisite 
for future systematic work in philosophy. 

Open to all students. Mr. Gurwitsch 

*PHILOSOPHY 13a. Esthetics 

An examination of several classical and modern theories of art, beauty 
and esthetic judgment. Attention will be paid to such recurring problems 
as the origins of artistic creation, the form or structure of artistic works, 
the function or end of art, and the problem of meaning in esthetic judgment. 

PHILOSOPHY 21. Logic 

Analysis of propositions and relations between propositions in Aristot- 
elian logic. The theory of syllogisms. Introduction to modern symbolic 
logic. Elements of the calculus of propositions, the theory of relations and 
an introduction to philosophic problems relating to modern logic. 

Philosophy 21 and 145 will be given in alternate years. 

Open to all students. Mr. Weisberg 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[147] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*PHILOSOPHY 31a. Ethics: Introduction to Ethical Theory 

A discussion of major types of ethical theory with special attention to 
the works of Aristotle, Hume, Bentham, Moore, Dewey, Stevenson and 
C. I. Lewis. 

For JEWISH ETHICS see HEBREW. 

PHILOSOPHY 43b. Philosophy of Education 

Significant tendencies in educational thought, based on a study of classical 
philosophical concepts, but with emphasis on recent and contemporary 
philosophies of education; a critical evaluation of the significance of such 
philosophies. 

This course does not count as a credit towards a Philosophy major. 

Mr. Rosen 

PHILOSOPHY 54a. The Existential Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre 

An introduction to the recent existential philosophy by means of a study 
of the major work of one of its leading proponents. Mr. Dreyfus 

PHILOSOPHY 99c. Senior Research 

At the beginning of the senior year the student will place himself under 
the guidance of one of the senior teachers in that area of his field of concen- 
tration in which he desires to work. Consultations between instructor and 
student will continue throughout the academic year. A thesis of no less than 
7500 words, representing the results of intensive study, will constitute the 
final requirement. Staff 

*PHILOSOPHY 102a. Aristotle 

Introduction to the study of the work of Aristotle through intensive 
reading and discussion of some texts of Aristotle. A conference course with 
frequent student reports in class. 

Prerequisite: One year of philosophy other than Philosophy 43b. 

^PHILOSOPHY Ilia. Philosophy of Classical Empiricism 

Intensive study of one or more texts by Locke, Berkeley and Hume. This 
course serves as an introduction to empiristic philosophy. The texts will be 
studied with reference to both the historical influence and the systematic 
philosophical significance of the problems concerned and the theories 
advanced. 

Prerequisite: One year of philosophy other than Philosophy 43b. 
Philosophy 111a and Philosophy 121a will be given in alternate years. 

^PHILOSOPHY 111b. Kant 

Intensive study of Kant's Prolegomena. Kant's philosophy will be studied 
both from the historical point of view, as the culmination of the philo- 
sophical development since Descartes, and with regard to later philosophical 
tendencies of Kantian inspiration. A conference course with frequent stu- 
dent reports and discussions. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy Ilia or 121a. 

Philosophy 11 lb and 12 lb will be given in alternate years. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[ 148 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

PHILOSOPHY 121a. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Rationalism 

Intensive study of one or more texts by such representative thinkers as 
Malebranche, Leibniz, Spinoza. Stress will be laid upon the historical impor- 
tance of the rationalistic trend in modern philosophy as well as upon the 
systematic significance for philosophical thinking of that trend. 

Prerequisite: One year of philosophy other than Philosophy 43b. 

Philosophy 121a and Philosophy Ilia will be given in alternate years. 

Mr. Gurwitsch 
PHILOSOPHY 121b. Contemporary Philosophy 

Reading and discussion of the works of some contemporary philosophers, 
e.g., representatives of the phenomenological or existentialist movement. The 
position of the philosophers discussed within the whole of contemporary 
philosophy and their contributions to the systematic aspects of the problems 
will be stressed. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy Ilia or 121a. 

Philosophy 12lb and Philosophy 11 lb will be given in alternate years. 

Mr. Gurwitsch 
*PHILOSOPHY 122a. Contemporary Analytic Philosophy 

An analysis of leading problems in contemporary philosophical an- 
alysis. Among issues to be discussed are, the semantic theory of truth, 
verifiability theory of meaning, neo-nominalism, analyticity, and ordinary 
language. Reference will be made to the work of Russell, Moore, Wittgen- 
stein, Carnap, Ayer, Ryle, Austin, Strawson, Goodman and Quine. 

PHILOSOPHY 130b. Contemporary Philosophies of Mind 

A comparison of the theories of mind of the English philosophers of 
ordinary language and the Continental philosophers. Theories of emotion, 
will, sensation, perception, imagination, and intelligence will be compared. 
Their critique of the Cartesian concept of mind will also be explored. The 
basic assumptions of both approaches will then be made explicit and con- 
trasted. Both theories will be judged on the basis of their ability to account 
for the knowledge we have of others. Readings in the works of some of 
the prominent authors. Mr. Dreyfus 

PHILOSOPHY 141a. History of Ancient Philosophy 

Historical survey of Greek philosophy: pre-Socratic thought; the great 
speculative systems; the Sophists; Socrates, Plato, Aristotle; Hellenistic and 
Roman developments: Stoicism, Epicureanism, Scepticism, Neoplatonism. 

Given in alternate years. Mr. Dreyfus 

PHILOSOPHY 141b. History of Modern Philosophy 

Historical survey of philosophical thinking since the Renaissance. The 
rise of modern science and the great rationalistic systems : Descartes, Hobbes, 
Spinoza, Malebranche, Leibniz. British empiricism: Locke, Berkeley, Hume, 
French philosophy and the Enlightenment. Kant and German idealism. 
Currents in the nineteenth century. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy l4la. 

Given in alternate years. Mr. Dreyfus 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[ 149 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*PHILOSOPHY 145. Philosophy of Science 

Introduction to the foundation problems of the mathematical and physi- 
cal sciences. Emphasis will be placed upon the historical development of the 
mathematical and physical sciences and their connection with the history of 
philosophy. 

Prerequisite: By permission- of the instructor. 

Philosophy 145 and Philosophy 21 will be given in alternate years. 

*PHILOSOPHY 151a. Nineteenth Century European Philosophy 

A systematic examination of some of the writings of such influential 
thinkers as Hegel, J. S. Mill, Bergson, F. H. Bradley, Nietzsche. 
Given in alternate years. 

*PHILOSOPHY 151b. American Philosophy 

A study of some of the representative work of certain principal figures in 
American philosophy such as Peirce, James, Dewey, Mead and Lewis. 

Given in alternate years. 

PHILOSOPHY 152b. Philosophical Analysis and Religion 

An attempt to apply methods of contemporary philosophical analysis 
to religious and theological concepts. Among problems to be discussed 
are the nature of evil, the existence of God, religious experience, immediate 
knowledge, immortality, revelation, miracles, justification by faith, etc. 
A number of leading religious thinkers will be discussed, among them 
Plotinus, Augustine, Maimonides, Hume, Schiermacher, James, Kierkegaard, 
Buber, etc. Mr. Weisberg 

*PHILOSOPHY 220. Seventeenth Century Rationalism 

Study of the formation of philosophical rationalism in connection with 
the rise of modern science ; Galileo, Descartes, Malebranche. The main topic 
of the course will be the philosophical interpretation and justification of 
modern science. 

*PHILOSOPHY 226. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason in Historical 
Perspective 

Central passages of the text will be reported by the students at the meet- 
ings of the class. These reports and the text will be discussed. The text will 
be studied under an historical perspective, that is, with reference to the his- 
tory of modern philosophy since Galileo and Descartes. Some acquaintance 
with both the rationalistic and the empiricistic trends in the philosophy of 
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries is therefore highly desirable. 

Mr. Gurwitsch 
PHYSICAL SCIENCE 1. 

This course will reconstruct the development of the major concepts, laws 
and theories of the physical sciences. Attention will be given to such topics 
as the use of abstraction in scientific investigations, the role of mathematics 
in the physical sciences, and the interaction of great scientific ideas with 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[150] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

other areas of thought. The historical and philosophical background of the 
exact sciences will be emphasized. This will be illustrated by reading in 
primary and secondary sources. 

The student is expected to have a working knowledge of the elementary 
operations of geometry and algebra including the solutions of quadratic 
equations. This background will normally be acquired during two and one- 
half years of high school mathematics. 

Mr. Epstein, Mr. Rosen and Staff 

Physical Science I will be taken in the first year by all students except by 
those who elect Physics 10 or 11 or Chemistry 10. 

Under exceptional circumstances, Physical Science passed with an honor 
grade may be counted as fulfilling the requirements in Elementary Physics in 
the General Science field of concentration in the School of Science. 

PHYSICS 

Associate Professor David L. Falkoff, Chairman; Associate Professors 
Eugene P. Gross {Student Adviser), Silvan S. Schweber; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Max Chretien, J. S. Goldstein, Sidney Rosen. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Physics 10 or 11, 21a, 23a, 23b, 29c, 31, 32a, 
39c; Mathematics 13a, 14b, 23a, 25b; Biology la, lb, or Biological Science 
1; Chemistry 10. 

B. Additional Requirements for Senior Honors Candidates: Physics 99- 

C: Recommended Elective Courses: (a) Mathematics 33, 36, 121a, 121b; 
History 185a, 185b; Physics 49c, 90a, 90b. (b) Physics 101, 102a, 110c, 
120. 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

Admission to all Physics courses beyond Physics 10 or 11 require honor 
grades in Physics 10 or 11 (and, in exceptional circumstances, in Physical 
Science 1) and a satisfactory grade in any prerequisite course or permission 
Of the instructor. 

PHYSICS 10. Elementary Physics 

An introductory course in mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity, and 
modern physics with emphasis on basic principles. This course may be taken 
in place of Physical Science I. It does not meet the requirements for concen- 
tration in Chemistry or Mathematics or Pre-Engineering. 

Prerequisite: Proficiency in elementary mathematics including trigonom- 
etry or Mathematics la which may be taken concurrently. 

Two lectures, two recitation hours and three laboratory hours per week. 
8 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Instructor to be announced 

[151] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

PHYSICS 11. General Physics 

Analytical approach to pure and applied physics, stressing fundamental 
phenomena and principles in mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism and 
light. This course is recommended for all eligible students who are likely to 
major in any of the physical sciences or who intend to work towards gradu- 
ate degrees in any of the sciences or engineering. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13a which may be taken concurrently. 

Three recitation hours and three laboratory hours per week. 8 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Goldstein 

PHYSICS 21. Analytical Mechanics 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of point particles; vector analysis, 
oscillators, coupled systems, planetary motion. Rotational motion, rigid 
bodies, Lagrange's equations. Introductory kinetic theory. 

Three classroom hours per week. Instructor to be announced 

PHYSICS 23a. Electromagnetic Theory 

The electrostatic field in vacuo and in dielectric media. Polarization. 
Stationary electric fields and steady currents. Magnetostatic fields. Slowly 
varying fields. Maxwell's equations. The Hertzian oscillator. Wave guides. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 23a which may be taken concurrently, Physics 
10 or 11. 

Three classroom hours per week. 

Instructor to be announced 
PHYSICS 23b. Physical Optics. 

Light as electromagnetic waves. Principle of physical optics with applica- 
tion to interference, diffraction, polarization. Interaction of light with 
matter: dispersion, refraction, scattering. 

Prerequisite: Physics 23 a. 

Three classroom hours per week. Instructor to be announced 

PHYSICS 24cf . Statics 

This course should be taken concurrently with Physics 21. 

Prerequisites: Physics 11, Mathematics 23a which may be taken concur- 
rently. 

One classroom hour per week. 2 credits. Instructor to be announced 

PHYSICS 25bf. Engineering Drawing 

Principle of engineering drawing with practice in instrument and free- 
hand drawing. Graphical methods of solving technical problems. Demon- 
stration of a variety of manual and machine tool operation. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13a. 
One four-hour class. 

fAdditional course offered in Physics primarily for students planning to take the 
combined 3-2 engineering program. 

[152] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

PHYSICS 29c. Sophomore Laboratory 

Laboratory course to supplement the physics course in the sophomore 
year especially Physics 23. Primarily electrical measurements, direct and 
alternating currents, elementary vacuum tube circuitry and optical experi- 
ments. 

Four laboratory hours per week. 4 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Instructor to be announced 

*PHYSICS 31. Methods of Mathematical Physics 

Vector and Tensor calculus. Gauss', Stokes', and Green's theorems. Sec- 
ond order ordinary differential equations. Legendre polynomials. Com- 
plex variables. Potential theory and solutions of Laplace's and Poisson's 
equation. Mechanics of deformable bodies. Stress-strain tensors. Wave 
propagation in solids, stretched strings and membranes. Fourier series and 
boundary value problems. Sturm-Liouville theory. Fourier integral. Wave 
propagation in fluids. Acoustics. Shock waves and turbulence. 

Prerequisites: Physics 21, Mathematics 25b. 

Three classroom hours per week. 

*PHYSICS 32a. Thermodynamics 

The first and second law of thermodynamics with application to thermal 
properties of matter. Reversible and irreversible processes. Entropy. Ther- 
modynamics of system with variable mass. Chemical thermodynamics. 
Caratheodory's principle. 

Chemistry 41 a may be substituted for this course. 

Prerequisites: Physics 21, Mathematics 25b. 

Three classroom hours per week. 

PHYSICS 39c. Intermediate Laboratory 

Laboratory experiments to supplement the physics course in the junior 
year. Primarily advanced vacuum tube circuitry with applications to experi- 
ments in atomic and nuclear physics. 

Four laboratory hours per week. 3 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Chretien 

PHYSICS 49c. Advanced Laboratory 

Laboratory investigations designed by the student in consultation with 
the instructor. 

Four laboratory hours per week. 3 credits. 

Laboratory fee: $10. Mr. Chretien 

PHYSICS 90a. Introductory Atomic and Nuclear Physics 

The basic experiments leading to the concept of quantum theory are 

discussed. Introductory theory of quantum mechanics and special theory of 

relativity are given and applied to atomic structure, radiation, and nuclei. 

Mr. Chretien 

PHYSICS 90b. Quantum Theory of Matter 

The quantum concepts of atomic physics are formulated mathematically 

and applied to the theory of the solid state. Electrons in metals. Fermi-Dirac 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[153] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

statistics. Elementary band theory. Insulators. The electric and magnetic 
properties of matter. 

Prerequisites: Physics 21 and 23. 

Three classroom hours per week. Mr. Falkoff 

PHYSICS 99. Senior Research 

Research assignments and preparation of a report under the direction of 
an instructor. 

Required of honors candidates in Physics. Staff 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

Courses in the 100 series are open to qualified undergraduate students. 
All courses are semester courses. The 100 series are primarily first year 
graduate courses, the 200 series second year, etc. 

PHYSICS 101a. Theoretical Mechanics 

Mechanics of point systems, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods, small 
vibrations, transformation theory, integral invariants, kinematics and dynam T 
ics of rigid bodies, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, perturbation theory, relativ- 
istic mechanics, particle accelerators. Mr. Goldstein 

*PHYSICS 102a. Electromagnetic Theory 

Maxwell's equations. Electrostatics, magnetostatics, boundary value prob- 
lems. Quasi-stationary phenomena. Radiation. 
Three classroom hours per week. 

PHYSICS 102b. Electrodynamics 

Interaction of charged particles with electromagnetic fields. Introduction 
to the special theory of relativity. Radiation from point charges. Multipole 
expansions. 

Three classroom hours. Instructor to be announced 

PHYSICS llOa. Mathematical Physics 

Linear vector spaces, matrices, operators, Hilbert spaces, orthogonal 
functions, probability theory. 

Two classroom hours per week. Instructor to be announced 

PHYSICS 112b. Methods of Mathematical Physics 

Complex variables, differential equations, boundary value problems > 
special functions, integral equations, numerical methods. 

Two classroom hours per week. Mr. Goldstein 

PHYSICS 120. Quantum Mechanics 

A critical review of the experiments leading to the quantum hypothesis, 
the quantum mechanics of a "spin", Schrodinger equation, harmonic oscil- 
lator, hydrogen atom, perturbation theory, atomic and nuclear scattering, 
interaction of electrons with radiation field, Dirac electron theory. 

Mr. Gross 
[154] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*PHYSICS 130b. Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory 

Thermodynamics, chemical reactions, irreversible processes, kinetic the- 
ory, diffusion, Boltzmann equation. 2 credits. 

The first semester of Chemistry 141 may be substituted for this course. 

*PHYSICS 150a, b. Advanced Laboratory 

Laboratory fee: $10. 1 credit. 

Primarily for Graduates 

*PHYSICS 204b. Statistical Mechanics 

Ensembles and phase space, Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, Boltz- 
mann's H-theorem, Ensembles and QM, Einstein-Bose Fermi-Dirac distribu- 
tions, the QM H-theorem statistical explanation of thermodynamics, applica- 
tions, theory of condensation, low temperature phenomena. 

*PHYSICS 221a. Advanced Quantum Mechanics 

PHYSICS 223a. High Energy Phenomena 

Pair production, Compton Effect Bremstrahlung, cosmic ray phenomena, 
high energy meson and nuclear phenomena. 

Three classroom hours per week. Mr. Chretien 

PHYSICS 240. Quantum Theory of Solids 

a) Electronic, vibrational and rotational states of molecules; theory of 
chemical binding and reactions. Adiabatic approximation. Electronic struc- 
ture of solids. Band theory. Semi-conductors, metals, impurities, excitons, 
ferromagnetisms. 

b) Specific heats, lattice, defects, theory of melting, heat conductivity, 
electron lattice interactions, electrical conductivity. Superconductivity. Col- 
lective interactions in solids. Mr. Gross 

*PHYSICS 251a, b. Laboratory Seminar 

Analyzing some important recent experiments (such as molecular beams, 
cyclotron, etc.) to understand apparatus and techniques. 1 credit. 

PHYSICS 260a. Nuclear Physics 

Systematics and properties of nuclei, shell model, apparatus in nuclear 
research, electromagnetic properties, the deuteron. 

Nuclear forces, theory of nuclear reactions, Beta-decay, Bohr-Mottelson 
theory, liquid drop model, shell model. 

Three classroom hours per week. Mr. Falkoff 

PHYSICS 280. Topics in Quantum Theory of Fields 

4 credits. Mr. Schweber 

*PHYSICS 301. Seminar in Special and General Relativity 
3 credits 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[155] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*PHYSICS 302. Seminar in Advanced Statistical Mechanics 

2 credits. 

*PHYSICS 321. Seminar in Group Theory and Quantum Mechanics 

3 credits. 

*PHYSICS 323. Seminar in the Quantum Theory of Solids 

3 credits. 

*PHYSICS 325. Seminar in Chemical Physics 

3 credits. 

*PHYSICS 330. Seminar in Stochastic Processes 
3 credits. 

Research Courses 

PHYSICS 380. Research in Nuclear Physics 

PHYSICS 381. Research in Quantum Field Theory 

PHYSICS 382. Research in the Quantum Theory of the Solid State 

PHYSICS 383. Research in Statistical Mechanics 

PHYSICS 384. Research in Chemical Physics 

PHYSICS 385. Experimental Research 

PHYSICS 386. Research in Meson Physics 

POLITICS 

Professor John P. Roche, Chairman; Professor Herbert Marcuse, As- 
sistant Professors Lawrence Fuchs, Arno Mayer {Student Adviser); 
Mr. Milton I. Sacks. 

Requirements for Concentration* 

A. Required of all Candidates: Politics la, 2b, 97c. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Politics 99. 

C. Elective Courses: Select the equivalent of one full course in each of the 
following areas: 

American Institutions: Politics 11a, lib, 106a, 121, 154a. 
Comparative Government: Politics 69b, 152a, 152b, 154b, 181b. 
Political Theory: Politics 195, History 121. 

International Relations: Politics 167a, 168a, 171a, 171b, 172b, 175a, 
Political History: American History 1, 113b, 134b, 136b, 156; History 12a, 
12b, 21a, 55a, 55b, 60b, 77b, 180b. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

*This is designed as a minimum program for the Politics major. Additional work in 
other areas may be suggested by the department on the basis of individual consultation 
with students. 

[156] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

POLITICS la. The Western Political Tradition 

An introduction to the political tradition of the West. Historical in 
orientation, the course focuses on such problems as justice, power, natural 
law. The material on the past is designed to bring the political tradition to 
bear on the condition of twentieth century man with particular reference to 
the central issue of reconciling individual liberty with social control. 

Messrs. Roche, Mayer, Sacks 

POLITICS 2b. The Democratic Political Process 

An examination of the theory and practice of contemporary democratic 
government concentrating on the systems in the United States, Great Britain, 
and France. Designed to relate the actual operation of democratic govern- 
ments to the broader framework of democratic political theory, analysis 
proceeds on a function by function, rather than a nation by nation, basis. 

Messrs. Roche, Mayer, Sacks 

POLITICS 11a. American Government: President and Congress 

The historical development of the Presidency and of Congress and their 
contemporary roles in American society. The growth of presidential power 
and the separation of powers will be major themes. Special attention will 
be given to such topics as: the politics of presidential and congressional 
power; congressional investigations; and the conduct and control of for- 
eign policy. Mr. Fuchs 

POLITICS lib. American Government: Selected Problems 

Problems in urban and suburban government: where is the money 
coming from? Can the suburbs govern themselves? Is metropolitan gov- 
ernment the answer? Problems in American federalism and state govern- 
ment; the role of the governor; the welfare states; criminal justice. Prob- 
lems of national policy : education, health, housing. The inner relatedness 
of the three levels of government will be stressed and the problem method 
will be employed within an appropriate historical framework. Mr. Fuchs 

POLITICS 69b. Government and Politics: China and Japan 

An introductory study of the development of political thought and gov- 
ernmental institutions in modern China and Japan. The principal forces 
producing the Kuomintang and Communist revolutions in China. The Kuo- 
mintang state structure and the Chinese Communist state. Constitutional 
developments and political parties from the Meiji restoration through post 
World War II occupation in Japan. Mr. Sacks 

POLITICS 97c. Tutorial 

Required readings, research, reports and discussions on assigned topics. 
Normally to be taken in the junior year but may be taken as a senior with 
permission of the chairman. Staff 

POLITICS 98c. Readings in Politics 

Directed readings in politics. Open to students only with the permission 
of the chairman. Staff 

[157] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

POLITICS 99. Senior Research 

Seniors who are candidates for a degree with honors in Politics are re- 
quired to register for this course. Under the direction of a member of the 
faculty, they will prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic and in addition 
will meet together with members of the staff on a regular basis for discus- 
sion of research techniques. Staff 

*POLITICS 106a. Civil Liberties in America 

A study of the freedoms protected by the Constitution. Emphasis is 
placed on the period from the First World War to the present, with special 
consideration of current problems. The legal status of racial, religious, and 
economic minorities ; separation of church and state ; freedom of thought and 
expression ; and criminal justice. 

POLITICS 121. American Political Behavior: Political Parties and 
Electoral Behavior 

During the first semester American parties and pressure groups will be 
considered historically and functionally. Sectionalism, party organization, 
nominations and election procedures, etc. Stress on the relationship of basic 
patterns in American civilization to the American party system and political 
behavior. 

Second semester: emphasis on voting behavior. Class factors, ethno- 
religious influences, psychological and personality determinants, mass media, 
will be considered. Mr. Fuchs 

POLITICS 152a. Political Parties 

The role of political parties in the governmental process. The modern 
mass party contrasted with electoral and legislative parties. Party structure 
— organization, membership and leadership — will be examined with par- 
ticular reference to social bases. One party, two-party and multi-party sys- 
tems and the consequences thereof for democratic government. The Fascist, 
Communist and authoritarian party in modern dictatorships. Mr. Sacks 

POLITICS 152b. Parliamentary Government 

A comparative study of parliamentary systems of government, concen- 
trating on legislative-executive relations in the United Kingdom, France, 
and Germany, emphasizing administrative responsibility and control of the 
bureaucracy as a central problem of democratic government. Political 
alignments will be related to the political tradition in each country studied. 

Mr. Sacks 
*POLITICS 154a. Public Administration and Public Policy 

Study of the principles, processes and practices of government admin- 
istration. Primary emphasis is placed on policy formation ; management of 
organizational, financial, personnel, and material resources ; and the dynamics 
of direction, control, communication and coordination. Topics include: 
codes of ethics for public servants, loyalty and security, centralization and 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[158] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

decentralization, trends in administrative theory, legislative executive rela- 
tionships, government reorganization. The evolution of American public 
administration. The growth of the United States Civil Service. 

*POLlTICS 154b. Government Planning 

The theory and practice of modern government planning. The problem 
of planning and democracy with special reference to the views of Mannheim, 
Schumpeter and others. The limits of the welfare state. The politics of 
planning. The sociology of planning. The problems of organization of the 
planning process. Democracy and the role of the expert. The place and 
contribution of public opinion. 

POLITICS 167a. Nationalism in Asia 

Imperialism as the decisive generator of nationalism. The Sino-Japanese 
War and the Boxer Rebellion. The reaction of the dependent areas to the 
Russo-Japanese War, World War I, and the Russian Revolution. National 
self-determination according to Lenin, Wilson, and Gandhi. The Versailles 
Peace and the Mandates. Asian nationalism between the wars with special 
emphasis on India and China. Japan's drive for a co-prosperity sphere and 
the quickening of the nationalist temper. World War II, the weakening of 
the colonial powers, and the nationalist "revolutions" in India, Burma, 
Indonesia, and Egypt. Mr. Mayer 

*POLITICS 168a. Politics in the Far East 

Analysis of the forces underlying international relations in the Pacific 
area. Soviet Asian policies; the strategic position of the newly emergent 
Southeast Asian states; Sino-Japanese conflict; America's stake in the Far 
East; the Asian Communist bloc; prospects for peace in the Pacific. 

POLITICS 171a. International Politics 

• The foundations and dynamics of national power. Interaction between 
foreign policy and the domestic political process. Multiplicity of aims of .the 
foreign policies of the major powers. Supra-national unification and organi- 
zation. The social implications — imperialism, fascism, totalitarianism. The 
East- West conflict and its prospects. Mr. Marcuse 



POLITICS 17 lb. International Communism 

Origins and development of the world Communist movement. Its 
ideology : Marxism ; Leninism ; Stalinism. The present-day political and 
social systems of Communism in theory and practice. The impact of the 
communist power system on contemporary world politics. Mr. Marcuse 

POLITICS 172b. The History of American Foreign Policy 

A survey of American foreign policy from the beginning of the Republic 
until the present with special emphasis on problems in the twentieth century. 
The object is to examine the present central issues in the light of previous 
experience. Mr. Mayer 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[159] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*POLITICS 175a. International Organization and Law 

This course deals primarily with the United Nations — its history, 
processes, and prospects. The following topics will be emphasized: the UN 
as a vehicle for power politics ; the UN as a method of diplomacy ; the UN 
as a promoter of world community ; the UN and the enforcement of peace. 
Some consideration will also be given to historical efforts at international 
organization up to and including the League of Nations and to the develop- 
ment of international law. 

*POLITICS 181b. Politics of Economic Development 

Economic development problems of select Asian nations will be analyzed 
in the nation-building perspective. Seventeenth century Mercantilism as a 
system of power and a conception of society. The Industrial Revolution in 
England and France. The economics of national power according to Hamil- 
ton and List. Politics of early Japanese economic development. The impact 
of the Soviet model on current economic development thinking. Politics of 
economic development in India, Burma, and Indonesia: the position of their 
major political parties on the pattern of the future society, pace of develop- 
ment, taxing the peasantry, population growth, foreign technical and capital 
assistance and UN help. 

*POLITICS 195. Political Theory 

The development of political thought from antiquity to the nineteenth 
century, discussed in relation to the development of Western society and 
culture. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor A. H. Maslow, Chairman; Professors Kurt Goldstein, 
Eugenia Hanfmann, Harry Rand; Associate Professor Walter 
Toman; Assistant Professors Richard M. Held, Richard M. Jones, 
James B. Klee, Ricardo B. Morant, Ulric Neisser (Student Adviser). 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: The equivalent of six full courses among 
which must be Psychology la or lb and 97c. Three of these six full courses 
should be chosen from among the following: Psychology la, lb, 6b, 11a, 
15a, 20a, 30b, 105a, 107a, 108b, 109b, 110a, 115a, 116a, 118b, 119b, 
121b, 125a, 126b. 

Students who plan to do graduate work in psychology are expected to take 
la and lb, 11a, 20a, and either 125a or 126b. Students primarily interested 
in Child Psychology, Social Work, Education should, in most cases, take 
la, 6b, 15a, 30b, 116a, 121b. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Psychology 99. 

C. With the approval of a faculty member in the field of concentration, stu- 
dents may be permitted to include in their elective program the equivalent 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[160] 






The sports scene shifts . . . 

spring and a home run on Marcus Playing Field 



Close counselling . . . 

student receives personal guidance from his instructor 








*, v..^;t*r 




;.V ' w 



Suburban-metropolitan . . . 

students enjoy out-of-doors campus living 



Another new structure . . . 

Brandeis Faculty Center of the near future 




*$PW' 



..... ■ ■ ■ ?!. 




Old Faithfuls 



Ford Hall and Sydeman Hall Annex 



International interest 



Festival of the Creative Arts, Ullman Amphitheatre 








■ 



Convenient and comfortable . . . 

Feldberg Lounge in the Student Union Building 



Quest and conquest . . . 

students record results of experiment 




COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

of any full course offered by the School of Social Science, or the other 
Schools. This excludes Social Science 1 and the course selected as the 
General Education requirement in Schools other than the School of Social 
Science. 

Primarily for Undergraduates 

PSYCHOLOGY la and lb. General Psychology 

A basic course designed to introduce the student to the study of psychol- 
ogy and to a survey of various phases of the subject. Fall semester: The 
application of principles derived from the study of motivation, emotions, 
and intelligence to the study of interpersonal relations, development of 
personality, education and human relations. Spring semester: Introduction 
to the study of theoretical problems and the experimental literature in the 
areas of learning, perception, and thinking. 

Open to freshmen. The student may begin with either la or lb. 

Fall semester: Mr. Maslow 
Spring semester : Mr. Morant 

PSYCHOLOGY 6b. Abnormal Psychology 

Discussion of the genesis and dynamics of the major forms of psychologi- 
cal disturbance and psychopathology. 

Prerequisite: Psychology la or permission of the instructor. Mr. Toman 

PSYCHOLOGY 11a. Introduction to Statistics 

This course aims to equip the student with the minimal statistical con- 
cepts and techniques required for elementary manipulation and interpreta- 
tion of statistical data. Consideration will be given to the meaning, signifi- 
cance, limitations and abuses of statistical methods. Topics include problems 
of data collection, graphic representation of data, measures of central ten- 
dency and variability, cumulative distributions, properties of the normal dis- 
tribution curve and applications in psychological statistics and correlational 
methods. Mr. Held 

PSYCHOLOGY 15a. Child Development 

Data and facts of child development will be studied and discussed with 
the help and in the light of personality theory. Emphasis will be on the 
first six years of life. There will be demonstrations. 

Prerequisite: Psychology la or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Toman 
PSYCHOLOGY 20a. Elementary Experimental Psychology 

Individual or group research carried out under supervision. Techniques 
of experimentation, experimental design. 

4 credits. Mr. Morant 

PSYCHOLOGY 30b. Educational Psychology 

A general course covering the role of education in society, contemporary 
systems, current techniques and methods, the growth of interests, individual 

[161] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

differences and the psychology of motivation and thinking, problems of 
discipline and adjustment. Demonstrations and field trips. 

Prerequisite: Psychology la; 15 a, or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Jones 

PSYCHOLOGY 97c. Junior Tutorial 

Required readings, research, reports and discussions on assigned topics. 

Mr. Klee and Staff 

PSYCHOLOGY 98a, b, and c. Readings in Psychological Literature 

Readings and reports under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Avail- 
able to juniors and seniors with permission of the area. 

May be taken for 3 credits in either semester or for 3 credits throughout 
the year. Mr. Klee 

PSYCHOLOGY 99. Senior Research 

Seniors who are candidates for a degree with honors in Psychology are 
required to register for this course and, under the direction of a member of 
the faculty, prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic. Mr. Klee and Staff 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

♦PSYCHOLOGY 104a. Advanced Social Psychology 

Selected problems and projects in social psychology for advanced stu- 
dents. 

PSYCHOLOGY 105a. Memory 

The classical determinants of forgetting will be considered, together 
with such factors as attention, mnemonic tricks, stereotyping, and repression. 
Prerequisite: Psychology lb or permission of the instructor. 
'■•'■>■ Mr. Neisser 

PSYCHOLOGY 106a, and/or 106b. Field Work in Clinical, Abnormal 

and Child Psychology 

In this course junior and senior majors in Psychology will be given an 
opportunity for observation and practical work in mental or related insti- 
tutions, nursery schools, kindergartens under the supervision of experts and 
trained personnel. Direct contact with patients or children and discussion 
with staff members will be afforded. The Waltham School System, Red 
Barn Nursery School, Medneld State Hospital, and other institutions are 
cooperating. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 6b or 15a. 

Either half course may be taken for 3 credits, or both of them for 5 
credits. Mr. Toman 

PSYCHOLOGY 107a. Motivation 

The theoretical, comparative, clinical, and experimental contributions to 
a deeper understanding of human needs, wishes and drives. Mr. Maslow 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[ 162 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

PSYCHOLOGY 108b. Personality 

Study of the theoretical, clinical and experimental contributions to our 
understanding of human character and personality, with special emphasis on 
psychological health and on dynamic theory. 

. Prerequisite: Psychology 6b, 107 a or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Maslow 

PSYCHOLOGY 109b. Perception 

Study of the history and implications of selected problems in current 
research in perception. 

' Prerequisite: Psychology 20a or permission of the instructor. Mr. Morant 

PSYCHOLOGY 110a. Psychology of Problem Solving and Learning 

A study of the creative process, .its background and consequences and its 
relation to perception and learning theory. 
. \ For upper classmen only, except with permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Klee 

PSYCHOLOGY 111b. Psychology of Symbolic Processes and Thinking 

Culture as studied primarily from the frame of reference of psychology. 
Dreams, myths, and art as created, expressed, and as used in language, the 
humanities, and sciences will be studied as psychological data. The place of 
psychology in relation to the humanities and the other sciences will be evalu- 
ated. 

For upper classmen only except with permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Klee 
PSYCHOLOGY 112b. Psychology of Emotions 

A consideration of the value dimension of the individual's dynamic rela- 
tion to the world about him in both its positive and disruptive aspects. 

For upper classmen only except with permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Klee 
PSYCHOLOGY 113a. Choice, Will and the Ego 

A revaluation of the "active person". Choice, freedom, and responsibility 
will be considered as psychological problems. A study will be made of the 
relevance to choice and action of hedonics, knowledge, reason, and religion, 
and of man's relation to his perception of good and evil, sickness and health. 
An assessment of the individual's role in disease and conflict. 

Restricted to upper classmen and graduate students. Mr. Klee 

PSYCHOLOGY 115a. Developmental Psychology 

An organismic approach to the study of the comparative psychology of 
mental development. The developmental principles of Werner, Goldstein 
and Piaget will be applied to selected contemporary problems in psychology. 

For upper classmen only except with permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Morant 

I 163 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

PSYCHOLOGY 116a. Advanced Child Psychology 

Students will be given the opportunity of individual contact with chil- 
dren as an aid to appreciation of developmental principles. 

Prerequisite: Open to students who received an A grade in Psychology 15a 
or 115a, or by permission of the instructor. Mr. Jones 

PSYCHOLOGY 118b. Physiological Psychology 

Those aspects of physiology most relevant to psychological investigation: 
the anatomy and physiology of receptor and effector organs, the neuron and 
synapse, sensory and motor neural pathways, the integrative activity of the 
central nervous system, the autonomic nervous system and the action of 
hormonal factors. 

Prerequisite: Psychology lb or permission of instructor. Mr. Held 

PSYCHOLOGY 119b. Comparative Psychology 

Comparison of the behaviors and forms of animal species aimed at 
placing human behavior in zoological perspective. Topics include: methods 
for the study of behavior with consideration of their implied universality, 
the relevance of evolutionary theory, instinct and learning, survey of species, 
forms of animal communication and society, man in perspective. 

Mr. Held 
PSYCHOLOGY 120b. Advanced Experimental Psychology 

The class as a whole will design, execute, and interpret original experi- 
ments in various areas of psychology. 

Ordinarily open to junior and senior majors who have taken Psychology 
11a and 20a. Mr. Neisser 

PSYCHOLOGY 121b. Tests and Measurements 

A study of the standardized psychological tests and measurements with 
analysis of several of the more widely used individual and group tests. Top- 
ics include: techniques of test construction, principles of selecting tests for 
specific uses, problems of administration and scoring, techniques of inter- 
pretation. 

Restricted to seniors with permission of the instructor. Mr. Jones 

PSYCHOLOGY 125a. Theories in Psychology 

An historical and critical approach to the central concept and problems 
of psychology aimed at an understanding of current formulations. The 
underlying structures and assumptions of modern theories will be analyzed 
as products of the development and transformation of ideas commencing 
with the rise of modern science. 

For senior majors who plan to do graduate work in psychology, and 
to others with permission of the instructor. Mr. Held 

PSYCHOLOGY 126b. Contemporary Theories of Psychology 

Discussion of the viewpoints and controversies that characterize psy- 
chology in mid-twentieth century. 

Open to senior majors who plan to do graduate work in psychology, 
and to others with permission of the instructor. Mr. Neisser 

[164] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

PSYCHOLOGY 130. The Nature of Man 

Man and the structure of his world. Abstract attitude and concrete 
behavior. The motives activating human behavior. The trend toward 
self-realization. The problem of mutual understanding. Sexuality and love. 
Neurosis, therapy, education, and social organization. Mr. Goldstein 

*PSYCHOLOGY 145b. Personality and Ideology 

A study of the interaction of psychological needs and cultural pressures 
in the formation of social attitudes — political, economic, religious, sexual, 
racial, etc. The results of research on group differences in these attitudes will 
be discussed along with studies of the personality traits which are corre- 
lated with the attitudes. Students will be given practice in the use of such 
research techniques as attitude scales and content analysis of projective test 
and case history data. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 190a. Psychological Statistics 

This course attempts to clarify the logic underlying various statistical 
procedures, as well as to familiarize the student with the more important 
techniques. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 11a and permission of the instructor. 

Primarily for Graduates 

PSYCHOLOGY 200a, b, and c. Individual Research Projects 

Mr. Morant and Staff 

*PSYCHOLOGY 205b. Research Seminar on Theories in Psychology 

Critical and historical analyses of some major viewpoints in scientific 
psychology will be made by delineating those assumptions — philosophical, 
physical, biological, and social — which define the domain, structure, and 
programs of extant theories. 

PSYCHOLOGY 206a. Seminar in Learning 

Discussion of selected current problems. Mr. Neisser 

*PSYCHOLOGY 207a. Seminar in Perception 

Discussion of selected current problems. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 208a. Seminar in Cognition 

Discussion of selected current problems. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 209a. Seminar in Physiological and Comparative 

Psychology 

Discussion of selected cmrrent problems. 

PSYCHOLOGY 213. Introduction to Projective Techniques 

Discussion of theoretical background; demonstration and practice of 
selected projective techniques. Mr. Toman 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[165] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*PSYCHOLOGY 214. The Psychological Interview 

Discussion of theoretical background ; demonstrations or records of data- 
gathering, diagnostic, counselling, psychotherapeutic, and psychoanalytic 
interviews; practice in data-gathering and diagnostic interviewing. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 215. Psychoanalytic Theory 

The development of Freudian theory to its present status ; the conceptual 
structure of psychoanalytic theory; its significance for psychotherapy, re- 
search and understanding of man. 

PSYCHOLOGY 216a. Selected Clinical Topics 

Discussion of theoretical and methodological topics pertinent to the 
critical study of personality; practice in collecting and interpreting data. 
The selection of topics and/or exercises will be determined in part by the 
interests of the participants. Miss Hanfmann 

^PSYCHOLOGY 218a. Assessment of Traits and Abilities 

..■ Discussion of theoretical background; demonstration and practice of 
selected instruments of clinical assessment. 

*PSYCHOLOGY 219b. Approaches to Psychotherapy 

PSYCHOLOGY 220. Supervised Individual Field Work 

Mr. Toman and Staff 

PSYCHOLOGY 221. Clinical Psychopathology Mr. Rand 

PSYCHOLOGY 230. Seminar — Selected Problems in Psychology from 
the Organismic Point of View Mr. Goldstein 

PSYCHOLOGY 290-293. Readings in Psychological Literature 

Mr. Toman and Staff 

290-1 Methodology: Statistics, Experimental Design, Philosophy of 

Science 
290-2 Systematics: Theories, History, Points of View 
291-1 Sensation and Perception 
291-2 Learning and Higher Processes 
291-3 Physiological 
292-1 Personality and Motivation 
292-2 Psychopathology and Clinical 
293-1 Genetics and Child 
293-2 Social and Anthropology 
293-3 Comparative 

PSYCHOLOGY 300. Department Colloquium and Research Seminar 

Mr. Maslow and Staff 

PSYCHOLOGY 301. Seminar in Advanced Psychological Topics I 

To be offered by a visiting professor. 

♦Not to be giren in 1957-58. 

[166] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

PSYCHOLOGY 310. Dissertation Mr. Maslow and Staff 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE --r- See French, Italian, 

and Spanish 

Students concentrating in Romance Literature must select sufficient courses 
to fill out the requirement of not seven but eight full courses, to include at 
least one full course in the literature of the second chosen language. 

SEMITICS — See Hebrew, Arabic, Aramaic, Near Eastern and Judaic 
Studies, and Ugaritic. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 1. The Development of Western Thought and 
Institutions 

The course will center on the key factors and forces which have shaped 
the development of Western society from the ancient to the modern world. 
Major emphasis will be on social, economic, and political ideas embodied in 
institutional developments. Messrs. Alexander, Berkowitz, Fischer, 

Required of all freshmen, Marcuse, Roche 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 10a. Introduction to Statistics 

The sources, methods of compilation and characteristics of selected bodies 
of statistical data, the tools of elementary statistical analysis — tabular and 
graphic presentation, averages, index numbers, measures of trends and fluc- 
tuations, coefficients of correlation, etc., the use and limitations of statistics 
and statistical processes in the analysis of social problems. Mr. Eckaus 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 20a. History of Education 

Development of educational institutions and values within the frame- 
work of American history; influences of foreign educational concepts' Oh 
American education; the interaction between educational ideas and eco- 
nomic, socio-political and intellectual forces in American civilization. 

Mr. Rosen 
SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

Professor Paul Radin, Chairman; Associate Professors **Lewis A. 
Coser, Alexander Lesser, **Robert A. Manners; Assistant Professors 
Stanley Diamond, Jerome Himelhoch, **Philip Rieff, Maurice Stein 
{Student Adviser), Robert Stigler, Dr. Suzanne Keller. 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Anthropology la, lb; Sociology la, lb, 3b or 
4a; Sociology and Anthropology 97c. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Sociology and 
Anthropology 99. 

C. Elective Courses: Select the equivalent of three full courses from the fol- 
lowing: (Note: Concentrators who do not elect Sociology 112a or Sociology 
130a will not receive recommendations to graduate schools in Sociology.) 
Anthropology lib, 13a, 13b, 15b, 103a, 103b, 105b, 107b, Ilia, 114a, 
115a; 116b, 118ba, 126a and b, 150; Sociology 3b or 4b, 5a, 5b, 7a v 9a, 10b, 

**On leave, 1957-58. 

[167] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

11a, 13b; Sociology and Anthropology 98c, 130a, 130b; Sociology 102a, 
103b, 104a, 106a, 107a, 108a, 109a, 112a, 112b, 113b, 115a; Fine Arts 
155a; History 181, 185a, 185b; Humanities 191a; Politics 152a, 195; Psy- 
chology la, 104a; Social Science 10a. 

With the approval of a faculty member in the field of concentration, stu- 
dents may be permitted to include in their elective program the equiva- 
lent of any full course offered by the School of Social Science, except 
Social Science 1. 

SOCIOLOGY la. Introduction to Sociology 

The course will introduce the student to the main areas of present-day 
sociological investigation. The major groups and institutions of modern 
society will be discussed and such guiding concepts as social norms, status 
and role, interaction, social structure and function will be considered. 

Open to freshmen. Miss Keller, Mr. Stein 

SOCIOLOGY lb. Introduction to Sociology 

The second part of the course will examine sociological theories with 
emphasis on twentieth century contributions. The systematic theories of Max 
Weber, Simmel, Durkheim, Mannheim, Parsons and Merton will be given 
special attention. The emphasis will be on the relation of theoretical insight 
into empirical investigation. Sociological classics and recent monographs 
will be studied with this purpose in mind. 

Open to freshmen. Miss Keller 

SOCIOLOGY 3b. Social Psychology 

A study of the relation of an individual to his society. Topics include the 
development of prejudice and other attitudes and values ; methods of chang- 
ing attitudes and values; group dynamics; group conflicts and the relation 
of personality to culture. 

Open to freshmen. Mr. Himelhoch 

♦SOCIOLOGY 4b. Dynamics of Group Behavior. 

Interaction between the individual and the group. Impact of reference 
groups (such as clique, family, class, ethnic and national groups) upon 
motivation, perception, attitudes, values, beliefs, and overt behavior. Cul- 
tural and sub-cultural factors in personality development and personality 
disorganization. 

Open to freshmen. 

♦SOCIOLOGY 5a. Jews as a Minority Group 

A study of interaction between Jews and non-Jews in institutional areas 
such as religion, education, economics, government, housing, and community 
organization. Problems of discrimination, segregation, mutual prejudice, 
assimilation, intermarriage, and Jewish identity. Ideologies and movements 
concerned with Jewish adjustment. While the primary emphasis will be on 
the American experience, there will be discussion of comparative material 
from other societies. 

Open to freshmen. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[ 168 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

SOCIOLOGY 5b. Racial and Ethnic Relations 

A study of the changing status of European immigrants, Negroes, Ori- 
entals, Indians, Jews, and other minorities in American society. Comparison 
with Latin American and African race relations. Problems of conflict, segre- 
gation, desegregation, and assimilation. Measures to reduce prejudice and 
discrimination. Students will be given an opportunity for field research in 
these problems. 

Open to freshmen. Mr. Himelhoch 

SOCIOLOGY 7a. Social Pathology 

A study of social problems and the possibility of their control. Critical 
examination of sociological theory and research concerning crime and de- 
linquency; mental desease, drug addiction, and suicide; family disorganiza- 
tion and deviant sexual behavior; ethnic prejudice and discrimination. An 
opportunity will be given for observation in institutions dealing with social 
problems, such as mental hospitals, social work agencies, and intergroup 
relation agencies. Mr. Himelhoch 

*SOCIOLOGY 9a. The City 

The growth of modern cities and the urban way of life. The impact of 
urbanization on modern society and the socio-psychological consequences of 
urban living. City areas, residential segregation and urban disorganization. 
The impact of urban living on the family, leisure activities, politics and 
religion. Crime, juvenile delinquency and mental illness in modern cities. 

SOCIOLOGY 10b. Public Opinion and Mass Communication 

This course deals with the nature of the mass media of communication — 
newspapers, radio, television, movies, magazines, books, and comics — and 
their effect on public opinion and attitudes. It will analyze the structure and 
control, audience, content, effects, and social functions of the mass media. 

Mr. Stein 
SOCIOLOGY 13b. Social Stratification and Social Mobility 

Theories of social stratification; the function of social stratification in 
different types of societies; consequences of social stratification for the in- 
dividual; mobility upward or downward in the social system; social mo- 
bility in relation to individual well-being. Miss Keller 

SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 97c. Junior Tutorial 

Required readings, research, reports and discussions on assigned topics. 

Staff 

SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 98c. Readings in Sociology and 

Anthropology 

Readings and reports under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Avail- 
able to seniors with permission of the area. Staff 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[169] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 99. Senior Research 

Seniors who are candidates for a degree with honors in Social Relations 
are required to register for this course and, under the direction of a member 
of the faculty, prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic. Staff 

SOCIOLOGY 102a. Forms of Social Organization: Bureaucracy 

Types of bureaucratic organizations; evaluation of theories of bureau- 
cracy in light of modern findings ; discussion of Weber, Merton, Gouldner, 
Blau, Selznick; bureaucratic structures in non-industrial societies. 

Miss Keller 

SOCIOLOGY 103b. The Family and Other Agencies of Socialization 

Structure of the family in selected African, Asian, and Western societies ; 
the family and the social system; changes in the structure and function of 
the modern American family and implications of these changes for the 
children and for men and women; the family and its relation to other 
agencies of socialization such as peer groups, delinquent gangs, mass media 
and schools. Miss Keller 

*SOCIOLOGY 104a. Personality and Culture 

A study of personality differences among primitive and modern societies 
and among various classes and ethnic groups in America. The major focus 
will be upon the alleged importance of child-rearing institutions in the 
formation of socially standardized personality types. Consideration will 
be given to cultural differences in mental health and mental diseases. 

SOCIOLOGY 106a. American Communities 

Field studies of American cities of diverse sizes, economies, and regional 
locations are examined and a general theory of community growth, struc- 
tures and functioning is developed. Community responses to urbanization, 
industrialization and bureaucratization as described by Park, Lynd and 
Warner constitute the central focus. Attention is paid to the effects of large- 
scale social catastrophes including the depression and World War II on 
group consciousness and institutional patterns of living. Mr. Stein 

SOCIOLOGY 107a. Political Sociology 

The course will review the sociological contributions to theory and re- 
search in politics; the current "ethnic" theory; elites; party cadres; the 
analysis of parliaments in terms of their social class structure; etc. Special 
attention will be given to the changing relations of various professional 
Strata to the State. Instructor to be announced 

SOCIOLOGY 108a. Sociology of Religion 

Sociological analysis of contemporary and historical religious institutions 
and experiences, in relation to other social institutions and aspects of society. 
The reciprocal influences of the religious and the social. Religious leadership 
and f ollowership ; the problem of conversion; sect, denomination, and 
church as types of religious organization; the religious society; religion and 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[170] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

society ; religion and politics ; the social and political thought of leading 
contemporary schools of theology. The course will develop around the 
reading of relevant texts, including Weber, James, Troeltsch, Durkheim, 
Hall, Radcliffe-Brown, Barth, the Niebuhrs, Ryan and Boland, and others. 

Instructor to be announced 
SOCIOLOGY 109a. Sociology of Literature j 

Major changes in the structure of literary and intellectual life from the 
Renaissance to the present, with emphasis on the changing relations of' the 
writer to the state and to the public. From the patron to the state as patron. 
From the courtier to the professional writer. Literature and art in the service 
of politics and religion. Political drama and poetry. The development of 
journalism. The mass audience. Instructor to be announced 

SOCIOLOGY 112a. Methods of Social Research 

A study of research methods in sociology and social psychology. Stu- 
dents will participate in a group project involving field work in a com- 
munity setting. Practice will be afforded in the use of such techniques as 
experiments, opinion polls, questionnaires and schedules, attitude and per- 
sonality scales, life history records, interviews and projective tests. > • 

Mr. Himelhoch 
SOCIOLOGY 112b. Methods of Social Research 

A continuation of Sociology 112a with an opportunity for more ad- 
vanced field research. Students will be admitted to the second semester 
without having taken Sociology 112a providing they have the instructor's 
permission. Mr. Himelhoch 

SOCIOLOGY 113b. Social Psychiatry 

Conceptions of psychological health, psychological disorder and psycho- 
therapy advanced by leading psychiatric theorists are examined in their socio- 
cultural contexts. Empirical studies of socio-cultural influences on mental 
disorders are reviewed along with recent sociological interpretations of the 
therapeutic processes. The place of sociological insight in healthy personality 
development is discussed and its relation to psychological and philosophical 
considerations elucidated. Mr. Stein 

SOCIOLOGY 115a. Elites and Society 

Theories about the formation of elites ; different kinds of elites ; recruit- 
ment to the business, labor, diplomatic and governing elites in American 
society; comparative material from non-industrial societies; analysis of the 
writings of Pareto, Mannheim, Fahlbeck, Mills, and others. Miss Keller 

SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 130a and 130b. Advanced Field 

Research 

The dual purpose of this course is (1) to investigate a typical American 
community in depth. Socio-economic, cultural, and psychological dimen- 
sions will be explored. (2) To introduce advanced students to the tech- 
niques of social anthropological field of research. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructors. 

Mr. Diamond and Mr. Stein 
[171] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

SPANISH 

Requirements for Concentration 

A. Required of all Candidates: Spanish 3a, 4b or 5a, 120b, 131b, 150a. 

B. Additional Requirement for Senior Honors Candidates: Spanish 99c 

C. Elective Courses: Select two and one-half full courses from the Spanish 
course offerings above Spanish 2. 

To fill out the requirement of seven full courses select any two full courses 
from the School of Humanities except Logic or Composition. 
Students concentrating in Spanish are urged to have a sound reading knowl- 
edge of Latin and French or Italian. 

SPANISH 1. Introductory Spanish 

The course will stress the fundamentals of grammar, building of vocabu- 
lary, and readings in basic Spanish texts. 

Open to those students who have had no instruction in Spanish. 

Mr. Cheskis 
SPANISH 2. Intermediate Spanish 

The course is designed to furnish an intensive review of Spanish gram- 
mar, vocabulary and idiom practice, elements of conversation, and readings 
in contemporary Spanish literature. 

One section will be given in Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or at least two years of secondary school Spanish. 

Staff 
SPANISH 3a. Elementary Conversation and Composition 

A course essentially designed to strengthen the student's expression in 
Spanish. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish and will empha- 
size written and spoken Spanish. Aspects of Hispanic life and culture will 
be discussed. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or permission of the instructor. Staff 

SPANISH 4b. Intermediate Conversation and Composition 

A more intensive continuation of Spanish 3a. Discussion of topics of 
general interest will be included. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3a or permission of the instructor. Mrs. Lida 

SPANISH 5a. Studies in Advanced Conversation and Composition 

Studies in current Spanish expression with reference to both insular 
and Spanish-American usage. Elements of technical and commercial Spanish 
will be included. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Mrs. Lida 

SPANISH 10. Readings in Spanish Literature 

An intensive reading of representative Spanish texts. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 2, appropriate score on Spanish Placement test, or 
permission of the instructor. Staff 

[ 172 ] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

SPANISH 99c. Senior Research 

Guided readings in selected texts and critical materials in Spanish under 
the guidance of a member of the area. The candidate will choose the field in 
which he wishes to specialize. The requirement for the course will be met by 
an honors thesis of no less than 7500 words. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the area. Staff 

SPANISH 120b. Cervantes 

A study of Cervantes as a novelist of Spain and of the world. A detailed 
examination of the Quixote as the first modern novel. Selections from the 
Novelas exemplar es and Cervantes' dramatic works will be read. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 10. Mrs. Lida 

SPANISH 130a. The Spanish Novel to 1700 

A study of the development of the novel from the Celestina to 1700, 
exclusive of Don Quixote. The novelistic forms of the sixteenth and seven- 
teenth centuries will be considered in detail through the study of representative 
works. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Mrs. Lida 

*SPANISH 131b. The Spanish Novel in the Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Centuries 

A study of the novel as a social and an esthetic creation from the end 
of the Golden Age to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the realistic 
novel of the nineteenth century and the novelistic innovations of the twentieth 
century. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

SPANISH 140a. Spanish Lyric Poetry 

A survey of the lyric poetry in Spain from its earliest manifestations to the 
present. Emphasis will be placed on the poets of the Siglo de Oro and those of 
the twentieth century. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 10. Mr. Duffy 

*SPANISH 150a. Spanish Drama of the Siglo de Oro 

A survey of the Spanish theatre from 1500 to 1680 with special emphasis 
on the comedia of the Siglo de Oro as it is represented in the ciclo de Lope 
and the ciclo de Calderon. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

*SPANISH 151a. Spanish Drama of the Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Centuries 

A study of the romantic and realistic theatre of the nineteenth century 
and the traditional and experimental theatre of the twentieth century, including 
the relation of modern dramatic themes with traditional themes in Spanish 
literature. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[173] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

*SPANISH 160b. Introduction to Latin America 

A general study of colonial and modern literature in Hispanic America 
based on the reading of representative texts. The course will treat several 
problems of Brazilian literature through texts in translation. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

*SPANISH 161a. Studies in the Spanish-American Novel 

An examination of the novel in Spanish America, especially in the 

twentieth century, as it reveals certain characteristics of Spanish-American 

history and thought. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

SPANISH 170b. The Generation of 1898 

An intensive study of representative members of the generation and of 
their contributions to Hispanic literature and thought. 

Permission of the instructor. Mr. Duffy 

THEATRE ARTS 

Assistant Professor John F. Matthews, Chairman {Student Adviser); 
Professor Louis Kronenberger; Associate Professor Edwin B. Pettet; 
Mr. Paul Bertelsen, Mrs. Frances LaShoto, Mrs. Judith Zimmon. 

Requirements for Concentration 

Theatre Arts concentrators fall naturally into two classifications; those 
whose primary interest in the stage lies in the area of production and per- 
formance, and those whose impulse is mainly creative and critical. Hence 
two ways of majoring in Theatre Arts are now being offered. (See below) 
This revised curriculum represents a step toward a full Theatre Arts pro- 
gram at Brandeis, devoted at least as much toward serving the needs of 
the prospective playwright, critic and theatre historian as to those of the 
potential performer, designer and director. 

A. Required of all Concentrators: Theater Arts 1, 2, plus any two full courses 
from the following list (courses from this list elected in completion of Gen- 
eral Education requirement may not be counted toward completion of 
major): Theatre Arts 115a, 115b, 121a, 125b, 131a, 132b, 151; Compara- 
tive Literature 175a; English 3a, 93, 142a; French 117b, 140a; German 50a, 
130b, 140b, 160b; Spanish 150a, 151a. 

B. Required of all Candidates who elect a Production and Performance major 
in Theatre Arts. Any three full courses chosen from among the following: 

, Theatre Arts 3, 5c, 6c, 7, ,8c, 9c. 

C. Required of all Candidates who elect a Theatre Arts major in Dramatic 
..Writing and Criticism: Any three full courses chosen from among those 

listed in Group A (but without duplicating any course elected above) and 
from among the following: Theatre Arts 104; English Composition 101a, 
101b, 102b; Music 60a, 142b. 

*Not to be given in 1957-S2 

[174] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

THEATRE ARTS 1. Introduction to Drama and the Theatre 

A survey course in dramatic theory and practice, with lecture-discussions 
of plays and playwrights from Sophocles through Arthur Miller. Problems 
of content, literary value and production methods are discussed along with 
comparative explorations of radio, television and movies. 

Open to all students. Mr. Matthews 

THEATRE ARTS 2. Elementary Stagecraft and Production Studies 

An introduction to the theatre in its technical aspects. The course in- 
volves both lecture-discussions and laboratory exercises, and covers such 
topics as stage and costume design; lighting; construction techniques; 
makeup; history of production methods; the organizational structure of a 
theatre; stage management; business management; and publicity. 

Four classroom hours per week. 8 credits. 

Open to all students. Mr. Bertelsen 

Brandeis Theatre Workshop 

The Workshop aims at intensive study of theoretical and practical prob- 
lems of the theatre in its interpretative aspect. Over and beyond the course- 
content listed below, the Workshop includes in its program 2 major student 
productions plus 6 "studio" productions per academic year; lectures by 
guests from the professional theatre; field trips to downtown Boston produc- 
tions; and additional lecture-discussions by various staff members. Work- 
shop students also participate in the Creative Arts Festival in the years when 
this event is held. , 

It is expected that students in Theatre Workshop will fulfill assigned 
duties in performance and production. With permission of the department 
these courses are open to all students. 

THEATRE ARTS 3. Theatre Workshop 

Acting-Directing Laboratory, 3 hours; Dance for the Actor, 2 hours; 
Voice and Diction, 1 hour; Oral Interpretation, 1 hour; plus lectures and 
workshop productions. 

Eight classroom hours per week. 10 credits. 

Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 1. Mr. Pettet 

THEATRE ARTS 5c. Introduction to Dance 

Beginning analysis of dance forms; dance history; basic dance tech- 
niques. 4 credits. Mrs. Zimmon 

THEATRE ARTS 6c. Advanced Dance and Choreographic Problems 

This course stresses advanced techniques and choreographic problems 
with assignments directed toward studio and major productions. 

Mrs. Zimmon 
THEATRE ARTS 7. Advanced Stagecraft and Design 

An intensive advanced study of problems of stage and costume design. 
Intended primarily for those interested in concentrating in this aspect of the 
theatre. Mr. Bertelsen 

[175] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

THEATRE ARTS 8c. Elementary Oral Interpretation 

An introduction to the interpretation and appreciation of literature 
through oral expression. Analysis of styles and techniques of vocal delivery 
using material from the standard repertoire of drama, prose and poetry. 

Open to all students. Mrs. LaShoto 

THEATRE ARTS 9c. Voice and Diction 

Designed to develop in the individual student's voice a wide range of 
controls in pitch, volume, and quality. Correction of individual speech faults 
and regional accents. Study of acceptable American pronounciations. In- 
troduction to the mechanics of voice production and speech sounds. 

4 credits. Mrs. LaShoto 

THEATRE ARTS 99c. Senior Research Staff 

THEATRE ARTS 104. Playwriting 

An exploration of the complex problem of writing an effective play. The 
course covers such topics as play construction, characterization, action, dia- 
logue, the use of verse and music, the sources of dramatic material, and tech- 
niques of script-development. Includes experiments in scene-writing, reading 
and analysis of student play projects, and critical examination of current 
Broadway scripts. 

Three hours per week. 

With the permission of the instructor, this course may be taken for two 
successive years. Mr. Matthews 

THEATRE ARTS 115a. Restoration Comedy 

A study of classic English comedy, chiefly of the Restoration dramatists — 

Etherege, Wycherley, Dryden, Congreve, Vanbrugh. The course will open 

with the great Restoration ancestor, Ben Jonson, and continue into the 

eighteenth century to Goldsmith and Sheridan. 

Term paper required. 

Two classroom hours per week. Mr. Kronenberger 

THEATRE ARTS 115b. Modern Comedy 

A consideration of comedy, in the wide sense, since its rebirth in the late 
nineteenth century. There will be particular emphasis on Shaw and Chekhov, 
and treatment of such playwrights as Wilde, Synge, O'Casey, Pirandello, 
Molnar, Maugham, George Kelly, S. N. Behrman, T. S. Eliot and Christo- 
pher Fry. 

Prerequisite for concentrators: Theatre Arts 115a. 

Term paper required. 

Two classroom hours per week. Mr. Kronenberger 

THEATRE ARTS 121a. Shaw and His Contemporaries 

A study of English and Continental playwrights of the late nineteenth 
and early twentieth centuries with a particular emphasis upon the philosophy 
and writing of Bernard Shaw. 

See ENGLISH 178a. Mr. Pettet 

[176] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

THEATRE ARTS 125b. Contemporary American Drama 

A study of major American plays from the eighteenth century to the 
present 

See ENGLISH 188b. Mr. Pettet 

THEATRE ARTS 131a. Esthetics of the Theatre 

A study of the anatomy of the theatre's arts. An analysis of the philos- 
ophy underlying dramatic conventions and composition. An intense ex- 
ploration through plays and critics of the art of the playwright and dramatic 
communication. Mr. Pettet 

THEATRE ARTS 132b. Dramatic Criticism 

A study of dramatic criticism from Aristotle to the present. An investi- 
gation into the development of the dramatic arts seen through the records 
of critical observers. Mr. Pettet 

THEATRE ARTS 151. Tragedy 

An inquiry into the nature of tragic drama based on the study of plays 
and theories appropriate to the subject. Various ancient and modern atti- 
tudes toward the problems of tragedy will be explored through reading 
and discussion of works by Sophocles, Shakespeare, O'Neill, Anderson, etc., 
as viewed from the perspective of Aristotle, Hegel, Nietzsche, Schopen- 
hauer and others. Mr. Matthews 

*UGARITIC 101b. Introductory Ugaritic 

An introduction to the Ugaritic language and literature. Reading of 
Ugaritic epics and myths; analysis of their influence on the poetry and 
prose of the Bible. 



*Not to be given in 1957-58. 

[177] 



APPENDIX I 
Building and Facility Benefactions 

ALLEN HALL This men's residence hall in Ridgewood Quadrangle is named for 
Sidney J. Allen in honor of a benefaction from the Allen Industries Foundation, 
Inc. of Detroit, Michigan. 

BERLIN CHAPEL The Jewish Chapel of Brandeis University's Three Chapels is 
named for Mendel and Leah Berlin in memory of the parents of Dr. David D. 
Berlin, distinguished Boston surgeon. It was created by his friends in honor of 
his fiftieth birthday. 

BETHLEHEM CHAPEL The Catholic Chapel, of the University's Three Chapels, 
was underwritten by a number of friends under the leadership of Louis Perini of 
Boston and Milwaukee, and former governor Paul A. Dever of Massachusetts, and 
by individual members of the Board of Trustees. Its Sacristy is a gift of Louis 
Perini in memory of his parents. 

BORNSTEIN LIBRARY A facility of the Kalman Science Center, The Samuel and 
Lena Bornstein Science Library is the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Bornstein and 
family of Boston, Massachusetts. 

BROWN TERRARIUM This facility of the Brandeis University School of Science 
memorializes Samuel J. Brown in honor of a benefaction from Mrs. Samuel J. 
Brown of the Samuel J. Brown Foundation, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland. 

CASTY LABORATORY The Matilda and Frank Casty Science Laboratory, located 
in Ford Hall, is a gift from the Casty family and friends in Massachusetts. 

CHAPEL AREA The central landscaped area of the Three Chapels, with its walks 
and outdoor altar, has been made possible by a grant from the Mu Sigma Fra- 
ternity of New York through Colonel Bernard S. Barron. 

CHERNIS CLASSROOM This study facility, located in Sydeman Hall, honors Max 
and Harriet Chernis of Boston, Massachusetts. 

COHEN LOUNGE The Hyman and Frances Cohen Faculty Lounge in Sydeman 
Hall honors the designees of Boston, Massachusetts. 

COHN LABORATORY The Richard Cohn Chemical Laboratory in Sydeman Hall 
is a gift of the Richard Cohn Foundation of Detroit, Michigan. 

COHN STOCKROOM The Richard Cohn Science Stockroom in Ford Hall is a 
gift of the Richard Cohn Foundation of Detroit, Michigan. 

CROWN WING The Crown Chemistry Wing of Kalman Science Center com- 
memorates Arie and Ida Crown, and is the gift of their son, Colonel Henry 
Crown of Chicago, Illinois. 

DANCIGER HALL This men's residence hall in Ridgewood Quadrangle is named 
in honor of a benefaction from David Danciger and the late Dan Danciger of 
Fort Worth, Texas, and the late Sadie Danciger of Tucson, Arizona. 

[173] 



APPENDIX 

DeROY HALL This residence hall in Hamilton Quadrangle, the University's main 
housing and recreation area for women, is designated in honor of Mrs. Helen 
L. DeRoy of Detroit, Michigan. 

EDISON LABORATORY The Ida and Mark A. Edison Biological Laboratory in 
Sydeman Hall has been created by family and friends to memorialize these dis- 
tinguished St. Louisans. 

EMERMAN HALL Louis E. Emerman Hall, a men's residence hall in the Ridgewood 
Quadrangle, is named in honor of a memorial benefaction by the Emerman family 
of Chicago, Illinois. 

FALK LABORATORY The Morris Falk Atomic Structure Laboratory in Sydeman 
Hall is a gift of the Morris Falk Foundation of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, Mr. 
Eli Goodstein, Trustee. 

FEIL ROOM Located in the Stoneman Infirmary, Feil Room is the gift of the Henry 
Feil Philanthropic League of New York. 

FEINBERG CLASSROOM This study facility located in Ford Hall is established 
as a memorial to Frieda and Leo Feinberg of New York City, through Colonel 
Bernard S. Barron. 

FELDBERG LOUNGE Occupying the major portion of the Student Union upper 
level, this lounge has been named by the Board of Trustees in honor of a bene- 
faction from Mr. and Mrs. Max Feldberg and Mr. and Mrs. Morris Feldberg of 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

FLEISHER WING The entrance hall and doctors' suites of Stoneman Infirmary are 
located in Fleisher Wing, designated in memory of Mr. and Mrs. J. Morris 
Fleisher of Boston, Massachusetts by Mrs. David Stoneman of Chestnut Hill and 
Mr. Albert Fleisher of Newton, Massachusetts. 

FORD HALL A major classroom building, the red brick Clara and Joseph F. 
Ford Hall is named to commemorate the gift of devoted friends in honor of the 
sixtieth birthday of founding trustee Joseph F. Ford of Boston. 

FORD PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELLING CENTER This special center is main- 
tained through the generosity of employees of the Ford Manufacturing Company, 
in tribute to Clara and Joseph F. Ford. 

FRUCHTMAN HALL This men's residence hall in Ridgewood Quadrangle is 
named in honor of Charles Fruchtman of Toledo, Ohio, and was made possible 
through his generosity and that of his sons, Leonard and Irwin. 

GIBBS LABORATORY A facility of Kalman Science Center, The Jacob Gibbs 
Laboratory is dedicated in his memory by his sons, Henry and Paul Gibbs of 
Saugus, Massachusetts. 

GOLDFARB LIBRARY BUILDING The Goldfarb Library Building, presently under 
construction, is made possible by the benefaction of Jack A. and Bertha Goldfarb 
of New York, and a matching pledge from the National Women's Committee: 



APPENDIX 

GOLDSMITH WING The Louis Goldsmith Memorial Wing, in the Kalman Sci- 
ence Center, is the gift of family, friends and co-workers in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania and New York City. 

GORDON FIELD The University's varsity field is named in memory of Celia Gordon 
and Samuel Gordon of Brookline, Massachusetts, by their children, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank B. Gordon and Louis Gordon. 

GROSBERG CLASSROOM The Oscar Grosberg Memorial Classroom is established 
in memory of her husband by Mrs. Oscar Grosberg of St. Louis, Missouri. 

GRUNDFEST WING Located in the Kalman Science Center, the Sam and Mabel 
Grundfest Research Wing is a memorial tribute established by family and friends 
of Hollywood, Florida, and Little Rock, Arkansas. 

HALPERIN LABORATORY The Abraham Halperin Physical Chemistry Laboratory 
in Sydeman Hall is a gift from the Halperin family of Brooklyn, New York, 
Esther, Meyer, and Samuel J. Halperin and Nettie H. Melker. 

HARLAN CHAPEL This, the Protestant Chapel of the University's Three Chapels, 
has been named in memory of former Supreme Court Justice John Marshall 
Harlan, and underwritten by a group of friends of the University under the 
leadership of Mr. C. Allen Harlan of Detroit, Michigan. 

HARRIS CLASSROOM The Nathan and Ella Harris Memorial Classroom in Ford 
Hall is established by their son, Herman Harris, of St. Louis, Missouri. 

HELLER LABORATORY Named to honor a benefaction by the designee of San 
Francisco, California, the Clara Hellman Heller Biology Laboratory for Student 
Research is in Ford Hall. 

KALMAN SCIENCE CENTER The Julius Kalman Science Center, named in honor 
of the late Boston financier, is the major facility of Brandeis University's School 
of Science, and the main structure of the future Hayden Science Quadrangle. 

KANE REFLECTING POOL This central feature of Hamilton Quadrangle's land- 
scaped area is a memorial to Anne J. Kane, given by her family of Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

LEHMAN LOUNGE One of the residential hall lounges in the men's Ridgewood 
Quadrangle, designated in honor of Leo Lehman by Mrs. Mortimer Gryzmish of 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

LOPIN WING The Sam A. and Anna M. Lopin Physics Wing is located in the 
Kalman Science Center. It is the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sam A. Lopin and William 
Mazer of New York, New York. 

MACK LABORATORY The Frank Mack and Rebecca Mack Research Laboratory 
in Sydeman Hall is a memorial gift from Mr. Sol Mack and family of Edwards- 
ville, Illinois. v 

MAILMAN STUDENT CENTER This major adjunct to the Ridgewood Quadrangle 
men's residential area is made possible through a gift from Abraham and Joseph 
Mailman, industrial bankers of Hollywood, Florida and New York City. 

[180] 



APPENDIX 

MARCUS FIELD The Abraham Marcus Playing Field is dedicated in memory of the 
late Baltimore community leader by his family and the late Richard Marcus. 

MARCUS WING Located in the Kalman Science Center, the Richard Marcus 
Microbiology Wing is established in his memory by family and friends of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

McKINLEY LOUNGE The William McKinley Lounge, donated by the William 
McKinley Lodge of New York City, is located in Ridgewood 20 men's residence 
hall. 

MEMPHIS TRACT A 26-acre plot on the eastern side of South Street, purchased 
by friends of the University in Memphis, Tennessee, is accordingly designated 
the Memphis Tract. 

PROSTERMAN LOUNGE The Samuel and Yeva Prosterman Lounge, in Ridgewood 
Quadrangle, is a gift of the Prosterman family of Miami Beach, Florida. 

RABB GRADUATE CENTER Chief facility of the Brandeis University Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences, the Rabb Graduate Center is made possible by the 
benefaction of Joseph and Lottie Rabinovitz of Boston, and their children, Sidney, 
Norman and Irving Rabb of Boston and Mrs. Sydney Solomon of New York. 

RENFIELD HALL A women's residence hall in the Hamilton Quadrangle, Anna 
Renfield Hall has been so designated in honor of a bequest by the Anna Renfield 
Charitable Trust through Mr. Louis Geller, Trustee. 

ROGOFF WING The Dr. Julius M. and Fannie Rogoff Physiology Wing in Kal- 
man Science Center is the gift of the Rogoff Foundation of Rowayton, Connecticut. 

ROSEN HALL This men's residence hall in Ridgewood Quadrangle is named for 
Arthur and Sadie Rosen in honor of a benefaction by their children, Carl and 
Leo Rosen of Boston, Massachusetts. 

ROSENSTIEL WING Located in Kalman Science Center, the Dorothy H. and Lewis 
Rosenstiel Foundation Biochemistry Wing is the gift of the Dorothy H. and Lewis 
Rosenstiel Foundation of New York, New York. 

SCHEFFRES DINING HALL The Scheffres Dining Hall, for members of the 
faculty and administration, is located in the Student Union Building. It is the 
benefaction of Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Scheffres of New York City. 

SCHWARTZ HALL This sister structure to the Castle, a men's residence hall, is 
named in honor of Nathan and Ida Schwartz of Boston, Massachusetts, and was 
presented to the University by their children, Joseph and Irving Schwartz. 

SEIFER HALL Seifer Hall is an auditorium in Ford Hall with a seating capacity 
of approximately 500. It was given to the University as a memorial to the late 
Nathan Seifer through the Nathan Seifer Foundation by Bernard and Daniel 
Seifer of New York City. 

SHAPIRO ATHLETIC CENTER Dedicated to the memory of a founding Trustee, 
the Abraham Shapiro Athletic Center is the gift of his family and friends. It is 
the University's main athletic structure. 

[181] 



APPENDIX 

SHELLEY-LEVINSON MUSIC ROOM This recreation and practice room, in Ham- 
ilton A women's residence hall, is a gift of the Shelley-Levinson Foundation of 
Chicago, Illinois, through Mr. J. J. Shelley. 

SHMIKLER HALL Located in Stoneman Infirmary, this hall is designated in mem- 
ory of Sam and Norman Shmikler in honor of a benefaction from his sons, Joseph, 
Raymond, William and Gilbert Shmikler of Champaign, Illinois. 

SIMONOFF ROOM The George Simonoff Infirmary Room, located in Stoneman 
Infirmary, is the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Simonoff of New York City. 

SLOSBERG MUSIC CENTER A major facility for the School of Creative Arts, 
the J. A. and Bessie Slosberg Music Center is made possible by a benefaction of 
the J. A. and Bessie Slosberg Charitable Foundation of Brookline, Massachusetts. 

SMITH CLASSROOM The Celia Alch Classroom in Ford Hall is the gift of 
Elwin Smith of St. Louis, Missouri, in honor of his mother. 

SMITH ROOM The Harry B. Smith Memorial Room in Ford Hall is established 
through a gift of his son, Elwin Smith of St. Louis, Missouri. 

SMITH HALL This men's dormitory is named in honor of Dr. John Hall Smith 
who pioneered a medical school within the present University" campus. The 
land and some of the earliest buildings became the first gift to the new Brandeis 
University. 

STONEMAN INFIRMARY The David Stoneman Infirmary, mainly underwritten 
by Mrs. David Stoneman and family of Newton, Massachusetts, memorializes her 
late husband and sons, Harold and George Stoneman. 

SYDEMAN HALL The William H. Sydeman Hall, an annex to Ford Hall, memorial- 
izes the former Bostonian and New York merchant. It is the gift of his former 
New York associates James G. Faherty, Abraham Mandel and Joseph J. Wood. 

SYDEMAN LABORATORY The William H. Sydeman Laboratory memoralizes 
the donor and is located in the facility which was established by his business 
associates. 

ULLMAN AMPHITHEATRE Adolph Ullman Amphitheater is made possible by 
a benefaction of the late Boston philanthropist who helped to found and develop 
the Brandeis University School of Creative Arts. 

USEN HALL A residence hall in the University's main housing and recreational 
area for women, Edyth and Irving Usen Hall is named to honor the gifts and 
the service of the designees since the University's founding days. 

WOODRUFF HALL The Louis S. and Millie Woodruff Hall is named to com- 
memorate the gift of Harold Woodruff of Toledo, Ohio, in memory of his parents. 
A two-story annex is named in honor of Tamra Lou Woodruff. 



[132} 



APPENDIX II 



Endowment Funds 

The creation of specialized endowment funds to provide for recurring academic expenses 
is one of the greatest assurances of continued development. The University is heartened 
by the linking of family names in perpetuity to its efforts. 

DELIA AND LOUIS BAER MEMORIAL LIBRARY ENDOWMENT FUND (1955) 
Established by Mrs. Don Wallace of New York City as a memorial tribute to her 
parents. The income from this fund will be used for the purchase of books in the 
field of the Humanities. 

BECKERMAN FAMILY ENDOWMENT FUND (1949) Established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Beckerman of Newton, and Mrs. Louis Beckerman of Brookline, Massachu- 
setts, as a permanent fund at Brandeis University, the income of which will be used 
for a purpose to be determined at a later date by the donors. 

HYMAN COHEN FOUNDATION AND MR, AND MRS. EDWARD E. COHEN 
ENDOWMENT FUND (1948) A fund created by the Hyman Cohen Foundation 
and Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Cohen of Boston, Massachusetts, to support medical 
research at Brandeis University. 

JOHN DRUKER ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) Established in honor of Mr. John 
Druker of Boston, Massachusetts, on his 70th birthday by his wife and children. 
The income from this fund will be used for books and periodicals for the Science 
Library, with special reference to the health sciences and geriatrics. 

FELDMAN FAMILY ENDOWMENT FUND (1949) An endowment fund con- 
tributed by Mr. and Mrs. Frank Feldman, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Feldman, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Feldman of Newton, and Mr. and Mrs. Albert Feldman of Brookline, 
Massachusetts, to be designated at a future date. 

FORD FOUNDATION ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) An allocation of $530,500 
the income of which is to be used for ten years to augment faculty salaries. At the 
end of the decade the capital is to be disbursed at the discretion of the Board of 
Trustees. This endowment has been further augmented by a grant of $329,000 
which will be used to increase junior faculty salaries. 

FANNIE AND ISRAEL FRIEDLANDER ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) Established 
by Mrs. Israel Friedlander and the late Israel Friedlander of Waban, Massachusetts, 
to be augmented from time to time, as a permanent fund, the income of which is 
to be used for a purpose to be determined at a later date. 

GLASS FAMILY ENDOWMENT FUND (1949) Mr. and Mrs. Hyman S. Glass, Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred M. Glass, and Mr. George B. Glass of Newton, Massachusetts, have 
established this as a permanent fund, the purpose of the income to be determined 
at a later date. 

[ 183 ] 



APPENDIX 

SARAH AND HARRY GRANOFSKY AND ANNA AND ISAAC LERMAN EN- 
DOWMENT FUND (1949) An unrestricted endowment fund, established by 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Granofsky and Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Lerman of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

HAYM SALOMON LODGE #1213, B'NAI B'RITH ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) 

Established by this Lodge of Boston, Massachusetts, through Mr. Benjamin J. 
Shoolman, Chairman of the Trustees Fund. The income is to be used for library 
purposes. 

JOSEPH HOLTZMAN AND NATHAN SILVERMAN ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1950) An unrestricted endowment fund established by Messrs. Joseph Holtz- 
man and Nathan Silverman of Detroit, Michigan. 

ANNA WASSERMAN LOWENBERG FUND (1949) A memorial fund established 
by the Wasserman Charitable Foundation of Cambridge, Massachusetts, the income 
of which is to be used "to defray the cost of teaching or equipment in the pre- 
medical field or in the field of science." 

BERTHA LUXNER ENDOWMENT FUND (1955) Established as a memorial to 
Bertha Luxner of West Orange, New Jersey, by her family. The income from 
this fund is to be used for scholarship assistance until the Brandeis library is 
completed. At that time, the income will be applied for library purposes. 

ALEXANDER L. AND FANNIE B. SHLUGER ENDOWMENT FUND (1954) 

Established through the Will of Mrs. Fannie B. Shluger of New York City, the 
income of which will provide lectures in the area of the social sciences. 

SOLAR FAMILY ENDOWMENT FUND (1949) Created as a permanent fund by 
Mr. and Mrs. Hervey L. Solar of Brookline, Massachusetts, to be designated for 
a specific purpose at a later date. 

ESTHER SPEAR ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) Established by Mrs. Alfred Spear 
of Providence, Rhode Island, the income of which is to be used by the University 
at its discretion. 

JENNIE AND HERMAN VERSHBOW LIBRARY FUND (1949) The income from 
this endowment fund, established by Mr. and Mrs. Herman Veshbow of Brookline, 
Massachusetts, is to be used for library purposes. 

JACOB ZISKIND ENDOWMENT FUND (1954) The income from this fund 
which was created by a $500,000 grant made under the Will of Jacob Ziskind 
of Fall River, Massachusetts, will provide for the establishment and support in 
perpetuity of the Jacob Ziskind Professorships. In order that the intellectual life 
of the University may profit from the continuous stimulation of fresh ideas and 
viewpoints, each year invitations will be extended to distinguished scholars to 
join the arts and sciences faculty for a single academic year. Support is also to 
be provided each year for a series of lectures on a unified theme. 



[184] 



APPENDIX III 



Chairs 

The establishment of Chairs to support distinguished faculty in each area of specialization 
is a most urgent need of the University. It is gratifying that the University already has 
received a number of such grants to support the development of its educational program. 

BERNARD ARONSON CHAIR IN MICROBIOLOGY (1955) Established by Mr. 
Bernard Aronson of New York City, to support instruction in the field of micro- 
biology. 

RITA H. ARONSTAM CHAIR IN CHEMISTRY (1950) An annual subvention 
established by the Rita H. Aronstam Charitable and Educational Foundation of 
Atlanta, Georgia, to support instruction at Brandeis University in the field of 
chemistry. 

ATRAN FOUNDATION CHAIR IN LABOR ECONOMICS (1956) Established by 
the Atran Foundation of New York City, to support instruction in the field of 
labor economics. 

SAMUEL BERCH CHAIR IN CHEMISTRY (1953) Established by Mrs. Samuel 
Berch of Beverly Hills, California, in memory of her husband, to support instruc- 
tion at Brandeis University in the field of chemistry. 

BUFFALO CHAIR IN PHYSICS (1954) A four-year grant established by friends 
of the University in Buffalo, New York, to support instruction in the field of 
physics. 

HARRY AND MAE EDISON CHAIR IN LABOR RELATIONS (1952) An annual 
grant from Mr. Harry Edison of St. Louis, Missouri, to support instruction in 
the field of labor relations. 

FOUNDERS OF PARK FOREST CHAIR (1956) A grant of $100,000 to strengthen 
the area of sociology so that enlarged provision can be made for the study of com- 
munity and regional planning. Established by Messrs. Sam Beber, Philip Klutz- 
nick, Jerrold Loebl, and Nathan Manilow of Park Forest, Illinois. 

MORTIMER GRYZMISH CHAIR IN HUMAN RELATIONS (1952) Established 
by Mr. Mortimer Gryzmish of Boston, Massachusetts, to stimulate objective re- 
search and instruction in the problems of group conflict. 

HENRY NELSON HART CHAIR IN PHYSICS (1956) Established by Mr. Henry 
N. Hart of Chicago, Illinois, to support instruction in the field of physics. 

MORRIS HILLQUrT CHAIR IN SOCIOLOGY (1957) An endowment, established 
by the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and its membership, to 
honor the memory of a distinguished founder. 

[185] 



APPENDIX 

MACK KAHN CHAIR IN HISTORY (1951) An annual grant to bring a dis- 
tinguished historian to Brandeis University, established by Mr. Mack Kahn of 
New York City. 

BENJAMIN S. KATZ CHAIR IN MATHEMATICS (1951) An endowment fund 
established by the Benjamin S. Katz Family Foundation, Racine, Wisconsin, to 
support instruction in the field of mathematics. 

KAUFMANN CHAIR IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (1951) Established by Messrs. 
Cecil and Joel Kaufmann of Washington, D. C, to support the teaching program 
in the social sciences. 

B. E. AND REGINE S. LEVY CHAIR IN FRENCH CIVILIZATION (1957) Estab- 
lished by the Charles of the Ritz Foundation to honor the memory of Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin E. Levy of Ridgefield, Connecticut. An annual subvention to sup- 
port a distinguished authority in the area of French Language and Literature. 

DR. MENO LISSAUER CHAIR IN NATURAL SCIENCE (1957) Set up through a 
major gift by Dr. Meno Lissauer of New York City and the birthday tributes 
of his colleagues in the Metals and Mining Industry. 

PHILIP LOWN CHAIR IN JUDAIC STUDIES (1955) Annual grant established 
by Mr. Philip Lown of Boston, Massachusetts, to support instruction in the field 
of Judaic studies. 

FREDRIC R. MANN CHAIR IN MUSIC (1953) Established by Mr. Fredric R. 
Mann of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in memory of William Kapell, to support 
instruction in music. ■!•;.-! 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT McKELDIN CHAIR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (1957) 

A permanent endowment fund the income of which will assure a distinguished in- 
cumbent in the area of political science, set up by friends and admirers of Gov- 
ernor McKeldin of Maryland. 

PHILIP MEYERS CHAIR IN PSYCHOLOGY (1951) Established by Mr. Philip 
Meyers of Cincinnati, Ohio, to bring a distinguished psychologist to the faculty 
of Brandeis University. 

BEN NOVACK CHAIR IN SCIENCE (1955) An annual grant established by Mr. 
Ben Novack of St. Louis, Missouri, to support instruction in the field of science. 

JACOB S. POTOFSKY CHAIR IN ECONOMICS (1953) Established in honor of 
Mr. Jacob S. Potofsky of New York City, by his devoted colleagues of the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America and his other associates to support 
instruction in the field of economics. 

MAX RICHTER CHAIR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (1949) An endowment fund 
established by the directors of the Richter Memorial Foundation, under the terms 
of the Will of Max Richter of New York City, to support instruction in political 
science, and especially in international affairs. ■ '<■ : 

[186] 



APPENDIX 

JULIUS M. ROGOFF CHAIR IN PHYSIOLOGY (1953) An annual subvention 
from a fund of $50,000, established by the Rogoff Foundation of Belle Island, 
Connecticut, to maintain instructors, research and laboratory development at 
Brandeis University in the field of physiology. 

SAMUEL RUBIN CHAIR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (1951) Established by the Board 
of Trustees in accordance with the terms of an annual grant from Mr. Samuel 
Rubin, of New York City. 

HELENA RUBINSTEIN CHAIR IN CHEMISTRY (1956) An annual subvention 
established by Madame Helena Rubinstein of New York City, to support instruc- 
tion at Brandeis University in the field of chemistry. 

MORRIS SCHAPIRO AND FAMILY FOUNDATION CHAIR IN SCIENCE (1956) 

An annual grant established by the Morris Schapiro and Family Foundation of 
Baltimore, Maryland, to support instruction in the areas of science. 

MICHAEL TUCH CHAIR IN HEBREW LITERATURE AND ETHICS (1950) An 

annual subvention established by the Michael Tuch Foundation of New York City, 
to maintain instruction and research at Brandeis University in the field of Hebrew 
letters. 

SOPHIE TUCKER CHAIR IN THE THEATRE ARTS (1955) Established by Miss 
Sophie Tucker of New York City, to support instruction in the field of theatre arts. 

EARL WARREN CHAIR IN AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES (1956) 

Established in honor of the Chief Justice of the United States by a group of 
admirers in California, headed by Mr. Benjamin H. Swig of San Francisco, to 
support instruction in the field of American constitutional studies. 

I. M. WEINSTEIN CHAIR IN HUMAN RELATIONS (1954) Established by Messrs. 
A. J. Weinberg and Joseph Jacobs of Atlanta, Georgia, in memory of their late 
colleague, I. M. Weinstein. The Chair will stimulate the study of prejudice and 
intolerance and the techniques which may minimize social friction. 

HARRY AUSTRYN WOLFSON CHAIR IN PHILOSOPHY (1957) Established 
by Mr. Erwin S. Wolfson of New York City to honor his distinguished kinsman, 
one of the most creative and original minds of our times. An endowment of 
$250,000 the income of which, in perpetuity, is to provide the salary of appoint- 
ments to the Chair. 

PETER AND ELI2ABETH WOLKENSTEIN CHAIR IN THE HUMANITIES 
(1956) Established by Mr. David Borowitz of Chicago, Illinois, in memory of 
his wife's parents, to support instruction in the field of the humanities. 

JAMES HENRY YALEM CHAIR IN ECONOMICS (1951) Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Yalem of Clayton, Missouri, have established this Chair as a memorial to their 
son. An annual grant to support instruction in the field of economics. 



[187] 



APPENDIX IV 



Fellowships 

Supplementing other benefactions which come to the University are teaching fellowships, 
a number of which have already been established. These fellowships bolster instruction 
and at the same time enable promising graduate students to gain valuable teaching experi- 
ence while continuing with their studies. 

MAXWELL AND FANNIE ABBELL TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN JUDAIC 
STUDIES (1954) Created by the late Maxwell Abbell of Chicago, Illinois, to 
support a teaching fellowship in the field of Judaic studies. 

ABRAHAM S. AND GERTRUDE BURG FELLOWSHIP FUND (1947) Estab- 
lished in the names of Abraham S. and Gertrude Burg of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
the income from this fund is to be used for fellowship purposes. 

CAPLAN TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN MATHEMATICS (1950) Created at 
Brandeis University by Mr. H. Caplan of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory 
of Gutman and Rebecca Caplan. 

IDA AND MARK A. EDISON TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1955) Established as 
a memorial to Ida and Mark A. Edison by the Shapiro Brothers of Auburn, 
Maine, to support a teaching fellowship, the field of study to be designated by 
the University. 

ESSO EDUCATION FOUNDATION TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1956) A grant 
from the Esso Education Foundation of Standard Oil Company (New Jersey), 
assigned as a teaching fellowship, to assist in the undergraduate educational 
program. 

MAX FACTOR MEMORIAL TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN CHEMISTRY (1952) 

Established by the Max Factor Memorial Fund of Hollywood, California, to 
support a teaching fellowship in the field of chemistry. 

HERMAN GOLANTY MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. 
George C. Golanty of Detroit, Michigan, in a field of study to be designated 
by the University. 

ALEXANDER GOLDSTEIN TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 
(1950) The income from this $25,000 fund will be used to support a teaching 
fellowship in the field of social science. Established as a memorial to her brother 
by the late Miss Lutie Goldstein of San Francisco, California. 

EDWARD GOLDSTEIN TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1954) A grant from Mr. 
Edward Goldstein of Boston, Massachusetts, to support a teaching fellowship in 
a field of study to be designated by the University. 

[188] 



APPENDIX 

ANNA C. GREENSTONE MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP (1952) Established by her 
children, Mr. Charles R. Greenstone of San Francisco, California, Mr. Stanford 
M. Green of Livermore, California, and Mrs. Simon Rubin of New Bedford, 
Massachusetts. The field of study to be designated by the University. 

LOUIS H. HARRIS TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1955) Established by Mrs. Max 
S. Hillson and the late Mr. Hillson of New York City, to support a teaching 
fellowship in a field of study to be designated by the University. 

EDDIE JACOBSON MEMORIAL FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIPS (1957) Two 

fellowships in the amount of $2,000 each for gifted students from Israel, who 
are preparing themselves at Brandeis University for a more effective career of 
service in the State of Israel. Established by friends of the late Eddie Jacobson 
of Kansas City, under the chairmenship of former President Truman and Mr. 
George Roth. 

ROBERT E. AND HARRY A. KANGESSER FELLOWSHIP TRUST (1951) Estab- 
lished by Messrs. Robert E. and Harry A. Kangesser of Cleveland, Ohio, the income 
to be used for teaching fellowships. 

LEVINSON TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN BIOLOGY (1951) Established by the 
James and Rachel Levinson Foundation of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

ARTHUR LEVITT TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1956) Established in his honor 
by Mr. Sidney Blauner of New York City, in a field of study to be designated by 
the University. 

BENJAMIN LORD TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Ben- 
jamin Lord of New York City, in a field of study to be designated by the 
University. 

CHARLES MERINOFF FELLOWSHIP (1955) Established by Mr. Herman Merinoff 
of New York City, in a field of study to be designated by the University. 

BERTHA C. REISS MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1955) 

Created by Dr. Henry Reiss of New York City, to provide for the establishment 
of the Bertha C. Reiss Memorial Fellowships or teaching fellowships. These 
awards are to be made to students in the Graduate School on the basis of their 
accomplishments in the field of research and /or teaching. 

JULIUS ROSENWALD TEACHING FELLOWSHIPS (1952) A series of teaching 
fellowships in memory of the distinguished philanthropist, Julius Rosenwald, 
established by his daughter, Mrs. Adele Rosenwald Levy, to subsidize the develop- 
ment and teaching of gifted graduate students. 

ISRAEL SACHS TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN SOCIAL RELATIONS (1952) 

Established by his wife and children in his memory. 

SAMUEL AND RAE SALNY FELLOWSHIP ENDOWMENT IN SOCIAL RELA- 
TIONS (1952) Established by Mrs. Samuel M. Salny and the late Mr. Salny of 
Boston, Massachusetts, the income of this fund will support a fellowship in the 
field of social relations. 

[189] 



APPENDIX 

SAMUEL D. AND GOLDIE SAXE FELLOWSHIP IN SCIENCE (1955) Established 
by Mrs. Goldie Saxe of Brookline, Massachusetts, and children, to support re- 
search and teacher training in the field of science. 

KURT AND HORTENSE SCHWEITZER TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN AMERI- 
CAN CIVILIZATION (1951) A grant from Mr, and Mrs. Kurt Schweitzer of 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to support a teaching fellowship in the field of 
American civilization. 

MORRIS SEPINUCK TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1954) Created at Brandeis Uni- 
versity as a memorial to Morris Sepinuck by his children, Messrs. Samuel and 
Nathan Sepinuck, and Mrs. George Sorkin of Boston, Massachusetts. • 

ISAIAH LEO SHARFMAN TEACHING FELLOWSHIP ENDOWMENT (1956) 

Established by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel R. Rosenthal of Highland Park, Illinois, in 
tribute to Professor Sharfman of the University of Michigan, with preference 
given, to teaching fellows in the area of economics. 

MONA BRONFMAN SHECKMAN MEMORIAL TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1952) 

A grant from the Mona Bronfman Sheckman Memorial Foundation of New York 
City, to support a graduate teaching fellowship. 

SOLAR STEEL CORPORATION CHARITABLE AND EDUCATIONAL FOUNDA- 
TION TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1951) Established by the Solar Steel Corpo- 
ration of Cleveland, Ohio. The field of study is to be designated by the President 
and the Board of Trustees of the University. 

MR. AND MRS. HARRY STADLER TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN MUSIC (1956) 

Established by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stadler of Hollywood, Florida, in memory 
of their loving mothers, Sarah Stadler and Etta Berger. This grant will be used 
to support a teaching fellowship in the field of music. 

GERTRUDE W. AND EDWARD M. SWARTZ FELLOWSHIP ENDOWMENT 
FUND (1954) Established by Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Swartz of Brookline, 
Massachusetts, to support a teaching or research fellowship in a field of study to 
be designated by the University. 

BEN TOBIN TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1955) Established by Mr. Ben Tobin of 
Hollywood, Florida, to support a fellowship in the field of science. 

UNIVERSAL MATCH FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP (1957) A stipend of $3600 

to be awarded to a graduate student, or students, who are concentrating in the 

fields of physics, chemistry, biochemistry or microbiology, set up by the Uni- 
versal Match Foundation of St. Louis, Missouri. 

JANE AND MORTON WEINRESS TEACHING FELLOWSHIP IN ECONOMICS 
(1955) Established by Mr. Henry Hart of Chicago, Illinois, in honor of Jane and 
Morton Weinress, to support a teaching fellowship in the field of economics. 

HERMAN WEISSELBERG MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP (1957) Established as a 
memorial tribute by Mr. Arnold Weisselberg of Long Island City, New York, to 
support a fellowship in a field of study to be designated by the University. 

[ 19Q ] 



APPENDIX 

CARRIE WIENER TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1950) The interest from this 
$25,000 fund, when completed, is to be used for the establishment of a fellowship 
in a field of study designated by the President and Board of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity. Established by Mr. Herman Wiener of Toledo, Ohio, in the name of his 
wife. : 

BENJAMIN YEAGER TEACHING FELLOWSHIP (1952) Established by Mr. 
Benjamin Yeager of Sullivan County, New York, for a teaching fellowship in a 
field of study to be designated by the President and the Board of Trustees of the 
University. 



[191] 



APPENDIX V 



Scholarship Endowment Funds 

AMELIA K. ACKERMAN ENDOWMENT FUND (1954) Established in memory 
of their mother by Messrs. Max H., Abraham B., and Myron H. Ackerman of 
New York City, and Mrs. Stella A. Yarvin of Springfield Gardens, Long Island. 
The income from this fund to be used for tuition scholarship aid for a gifted 
and deserving student who might otherwise be unable to have the advantage of 
a college education. 

AMELIA K. ACKERMAN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1954) Estab- 
lished by Mr. and Mrs. Myron H. Ackerman of New York City in memory of his 
mother. The income from this fund to be used each year as scholarship aid for 
a gifted and deserving student who might otherwise be unable to have the ad- 
vantage of a college education. 

FLORENCE M. AGOOS SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) Estab- 
lished by the Estates of Florence M. and Solomon Agoos of Boston, Massachu- 
setts, as a perpetual trust, the income to be used for scholarships for Catholic, 
Protestant and Jewish students. 

TAMARA AND JACOB BAXT SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1957) 

Established by Mrs. Jacob Baxt of New York City, as a memorial tribute to her 
husband. The income from this fund will provide a tuition scholarship for a 
gifted, deserving student, majoring in pure science or mathematics, regardless 
of race, creed or color, who could not otherwise enjoy a college education. 

ABRAM J. BERKWITZ SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) A fund 
of $5,000 established by Mr. Abram J. Berkwitz of Brookline, Massachusetts, the 
income of which will provide scholarship assistance for worthy and needy stu- 
dents of the Catholic, Protestant and Jewish faiths. 

FRIEDA AND BENJAMIN BITTAN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1956) Established by Mr. D. R. Bittan of Lawrence, Long Island, New York, in 
memory of his parents. The income from this fund will provide tuition assistance 
for gifted and needy students. 

CORA BLOCK SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) An endowment 
fund of $20,000 established by Mrs. L. E. Block of Chicago, Illinois, the income 
of which will provide tuition assistance to a gifted and needy student. Preference 
is to be given each year to students who have been victims of tyranny in other 
lands and the first year's assignment goes to a student who is a refugee from the 
Communist tyranny in Hungary. 

MORRIS AND BESSIE BRAFF SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) 

The income from this fund established by Mr. and Mrs. Morris Braff of Boston, 
Massachusetts, to be used for an annual scholarship to a deserving student. 

[192] 




Construction in 'fifty-eight . . . 

Friedland Research Center 



Carols at the Castle 



singing French students tour the campus 









* 



C.C.N.Y., West Point, Harvard . . . 

Brandeis hoopsters at home and away 



A quiet campus corner . . . 

Stoneman Infirmary 






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*.**- ,* ssssfsasBgllll 

l ■ iiIieilB§!!I!S 

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._ • 




The free forms of rolling terrain . . . 

a scene on the central Brandeis campus 



From classic to contemporary . . . 

The Brandeis Theatre Workshop produces "Othello' 







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£>W: 



> 7k 



-- 







Speed and skill 



varsity tennis on the Brandeis court 



Gift to graduates . . 



The Rabb Graduate Center for advanced studies 




APPENDIX 

EVA AND NATHAN BREZNER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1951) 

The initial grant given by Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Brezner of Boston, Massachusetts, 
is constantly being augmented. The income is to be supplemented by the donors, 
if necessary, to finance one semester's tuition for a worthy student. 

BRUKENFELD FAMILY FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

(1953) A scholarship endowment fund of $20,000 established in honor of 
Morris and Sarah Brukenfeld of New York City, the income to be used for aid 
to a deserving student. 

MORRIS BURG SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1957) Established as 
a memorial tribute to his father-in-law by Mr. A. Raymond Tye of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the income will provide, in perpetuity, scholarship assistance to a gifted 
and needy student. 

MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL BURTMAN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

(1954) Established by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Burtman of Detroit, Michigan, 
the income from this fund will provide scholarship assistance to a deserving 
student. 

RUHAMMAH FEINGOLD CATES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT 
FUND (1952) Established by Mrs. Esther J. Edinburg of Worcester, Massachu- 
setts, in memory of her sister. The income from this fund will be used for 
scholarship purposes. 

MAX AND HARRIET CHERNIS SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) 

Established by Mr. and Mrs. Max Chernis of Newton, Massachusetts, in honor 
of their 47th wedding anniversary. The income from this fund will provide 
scholarship assistance for gifted and needy students. 

PHILIP AND BERNICE COLEMAN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1956) A scholarship endowment fund established by Philip and Bernice Coleman 
of Boston, Massachusetts, the income of which is to be used for the assistance 
of worthy and needy students. 

HARRY B. DENNER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1951) The income 
from this $18,000 fund, when completed, will provide a tuition scholarship for a 
gifted, deserving student who might otherwise be unable to have the advantage 
of a college education. Established by Mr. Harry B. D'enner of New York City, 
who, until the fund earns the necessary income, makes supplementary grants. 

MARY DENNER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) Established 
by Mr. Harry B. Denner of New York City, in honor of his wife, Mary. The 
income from this fund will be used for scholarship assistance to worthy and 
deserving students. 

CAMILLE AND HENRY DREYFUS FOUNDATION, INC., SCHOLARSHIP EN- 
DOWMENT FUND (1956) Established by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus 
Foundation, Inc., of New York City, the income from this fund is to be used 
annually for scholarship assistance to students excelling in the fields of chemistry, 
chemical engineering or related sciences. 

[193] 



APPENDIX 

FRANCIS N. EHRENBERG SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) A 

scholarship endowment fund established by Mr. Francis N. Ehrenberg of New 
York City, to provide tuition assistance to worthy students. 

FISCHBACH SCHOLARSHIP AND ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) A fund set 
up by the family of Henry F. Fischbach of New York City, the income of which 
will provide maintenance and tuition assistance for gifted and needy students, 
with preference given to those who plan for a career in engineering. 

BEN FRANKLIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1953) 

A $10,000 endowment fund established by members of the family in memory 
of their father of Bellaire, Ohio. Income from this fund to be used for scholar- 
ship aid for a deserving student. 

ISRAEL FRIEDLANDER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT (1956) An endowment 
established by the Boys' Apparel Industry, which will provide an annua! tuition 
scholarship to be awarded to a deserving student planning a career in business, 
with particular emphasis on retailing. 

G AND S FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) The 

G and S Foundation Scholarship Endowment Fund established by the Schwarz 
and Gilfix families of Middletown, Connecticut, which will provide tuition 
assistance to deserving students of high scholastic standing. 

JACK GALEWITZ MEMORIAL ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) Established by 
the Estate of Jack Galewitz of New York, the income from this fund is to be 
used each year for scholarship aid to a deserving student. 

MR. AND MRS. NATHAN GLOSSER SCHOLARSHD? ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1953) A scholarship endowment fund in honor of the 45th wedding anni- 
versary of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Glosser of Miami Beach, Florida, established by 
their children, Dr. and Mrs. William H. Bernstein, Mr. and . Mrs. Meyer N. 
Silberstein and Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Glosser, the income of which is to be used 
for student assistance. 

LEONARD J. GOLDSTEIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1953) Established by friends in memory of Leonard J. Goldstein of Boston, 
Massachusetts, income to be used each year for scholarship aid to a deserving 
student. 

MARION AND HENRY HASSENFELD SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1955) The income from this fund established by Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hassen- 
. feld of Providence, Rhode Island, in honor of their 40th wedding anniversary, 
to be used for assistance to gifted and needy students. 

PHILIP HERSHON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) 

Established by the family and friends of the late Philip Hershon of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. The income from this fund is to be awarded annually to a needy fresh- 
man from the Metropolitan Boston area, who has shown by his character and 
perseverance great future potentialities; - -...,,: ..,:.> 

[194] 



APPENDIX 

ROSE B. AND SAMUEL HESSBERG MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT 

(1953) The income from this bequest of $5,000 established under the terms of 
the Will of Rose Brilleman Hessberg of Albany, New York, is to be used for 
scholarship aid to a worthy student. If possible, the recipient should be a resident 
of the city of Albany or its environs. 

JOHN S. AND AGNES E. HOWLAND SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

(1955) To establish four annual scholarships to be granted to one worthy 
student in each undergraduate class, who, in the judgment of the Faculty Com- 
mittee, displays that character and that leadership which already predict his or 
her lifelong interest in contributing to the sum total of human understanding 
and human compassion in the world. Given by those who knew them well during 
their lifetimes and who believe that this would be in accordance with their wishes. 

BEN B. AND NETTIE JACOB SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) 

Established as a memorial tribute to Ben B. Jacob of Detroit, Michigan, by his 
family and friends. The income from this fund, to assist a worthy student, will 
be supplemented by an annual contribution from the family to provide a full 
tuition scholarship. 

JEWISH VOCATIONAL AID SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

(1954) A scholarship endowment fund established by the Jewish Vocational 
Aid Society of Boston, Massachusetts, for deserving students regardless of 
race, creed or color. 

DAVID AND ANNIE KAHN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT 
FUND (1955) Established by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Yager, Mr. and Mrs. Julius 
Kahn, and Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Kahn, in honor of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
David Kahn of North Bergen, New Jersey. The income from this fund will pro- 
vide scholarship assistance to any sophomore, junior or senior who maintains 
good academic standing, is an effective campus citizen, and is in need of financial 
aid to complete his or her education. 

LEAH AFFRON KARTMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1957) Established by the National Council of Sigma Delta Tau as a $25,000 
endowment fund whose income will provide full tuition each year to a gifted 
student who is concentrating in the area of social relations. A memorial tribute 
to a founder of the national sorority and one of its most distinguished leaders 
since her student days at the University of Illinois. 

JAMES D. AND MARION KAUFFMAN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

(1956) Established by Mr. and Mrs. James D. Kauffman of New Haven, Connec- 
ticut, the income from this fund will be used for scholarship aid to a worthy 
student from the New Haven area. 

J. BENN AND ALFRED H. KEIZER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

(1955) Established by Messrs. J. Benn and Alfred H. Keizer of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the income from this fund will be used for scholarship purposes. 

LOUIS I. KEVITT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1954) 

Established by Mrs. Ida S. Kevitt of Sherman Oaks, California, as a memorial 
to her husband, the income to be used for a perpetual scholarship endowment 
fund that will help worthy students. 

[195] 



APPENDIX 

HERMAN P. KOPPLEMANN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1955) 

Established with an initial grant by Mr. Leo Wasserman of Boston, Massachusetts, 
in honor of the 75th birthday of former Congressman Herman P. Kopplemann of 
Hartford, Connecticut, to be awarded annually to a gifted and needy student. 

JACK KRIENDLER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1951) 

This memorial to the founder of Club Twenty-One was created by the Mu 
Sigma Fraternity of New York City with an initial grant of $11,900 for scholarship 
assistance to deserving students, without regard to race, creed, or color. 

EVA A. LENSON SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) Established in 
memory of Eva A. Lenson of Boston, Massachusetts, by her children. The income 
from this fund, when complete, is to be awarded annually to a deserving student. 

SARA AND ROSA F. LEON SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) The 

income from this bequest established under the terms of the Will of Miss Rosa 
F. Leon of New Milford, Connecticut, is to be used for scholarships "for needy 
students of high scholastic standing." 

MAX LEO LIPSON SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) Established by 
Mr. Max Leo Lipson of Boston, Massachusetts, to provide tuition assistance to 
worthy students. 

BEATRICE E. A. LOURIE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1956) Established in memory of his wife by Mr. Harry L. Lourie of Washing- 
ton, D. C. Special consideration in making this award, when the fund is com- 
plete, will be given to women students interested in the social sciences. 

DR. ALEXANDER J. MAYSELS AND CLARA MAYSELS SCHOLARSHIP EN- 
DOWMENT FUND (1955) Established by Dr. Alexander J. Maysels of Bethle- 
hem, Pennsylvania, the income of which is to provide financial assistance to 
students of high academic standing interested in a medical career or in the 
field of music, regardless of race, creed or color. 

HARRY AND CELIA MEYERS SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1955) 

Established by Mrs. Celia Meyers of Lawrence, Massachusetts, the income from 
this fund will assist a student who specializes in the field of social relations 
and more particularly, in the field of human relations. 

MOUNT SCOPUS-GEORGE K. GORDON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOW- 
MENT FUND (1951) Created by the Mount Scopus Lodge, A.F. and A.M., of 
Maiden, Massachusetts, in memory of Dr. George K. Gordon, eighth master. 
The income from this fund will assist a worthy student. 

SOL AND SUSANNE MUTTERPERL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1953) Established in honor of the Golden Wedding Anniversary of Mr. and 
Mrs. Sol Mutterperl of New York City by their children through the Mutterperl 
Foundation, Inc., with an initial grant of $5,000 and supplemented by gifts from 
friends and family. The income from the fund is to be used for students 
of high academic standing, who are in financial need. 

[196] 



APPENDIX 

NATIONAL LADIES AUXILIARY, JEWISH WAR VETERANS OF THE UNITED 
STATES, SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) The income from the 
fund established by this organization will provide in perpetuity two annual 
scholarships for the daughters of war veterans. 

SAMUEL NETZKY SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1955) Established in 
memory of Samuel Netzky of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by his family and friends 
as a perpetual endowment fund to provide a tuition scholarship to gifted and 
needy students concentrating in the general field of Hebrew Literature and Judaic 
Studies. 

SOLOMON AND ANNIE H. NISSON SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1952) Established by Mrs. Samuel Cikins of Newton Highlands, Massachusetts, 
Mrs. Seebert J. Goldowsky of Providence, Rhode Island, and Mr. Irving L. Nisson 
of Watertown, Massachusetts, in memory of their parents. 

MORRIS POLIVNICK SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1951) The income 
from a fund of $12,000, established through a bequest under the terms of the 
Will of Morris Polivnick of Brooklyn, New York, and further augmented, plus a 
portion of the principal, if necessary, will provide a $500 scholarship "to aid a 
needy student to undertake or continue his studies." 

VICTOR AND MILDRED POTEL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1950) 

The income from this bequest of nearly $4,000 established under the terms of 
the Will of Mildred Potel of Los Angeles, California, is to be used for "a per- 
petual scholarship for the assistance of deserving students." 

GERTRUDE RABB MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1957) 

Created by her friends as a tribute to the late Gertrude Rabb of Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, the income from this fund will provide scholarship assistance to worthy 
and deserving students, with preference given to those majoring in the life 
sciences or music. 

SAMUEL AND RIEKA RAPAPORTE, JR., SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1950) The income from this $15,000 fund, when completed, is to be used for 
a perpetual scholarship for aid to an outstanding student. The fund was estab- 
lished by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rapaporte, Jr., of Providence, Rhode Island. 

CARL RICE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) Estab- 
lished in memory of the late Carl Rice of Hartsdale, New York, by his family 
and friends. Income from this scholarship fund will be awarded annually to 
assist a deserving student in the School of Creative Arts, majoring in the field 
of music. 

MAX AND FRANCES G. RITVO SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1947) 

The income from this fund established by Dr. and Mrs. Max Ritvo of Boston, 
Massachusetts, is to be used for a student of high academic standing, preferably 
one interested in medicine, who is in financial need. 

ROGAL-COHAN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1948) Founded by 
Messrs. Harry Rogal and Abner Cohan of Boston, Massachusetts, the income 
from the fund is to be used for scholarship aid to deserving and outstanding 
students. 

[197] 



APPENDIX 

MARION ROTHENBERG SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1954) Estab- 
lished by Dr. and Mrs. Zucio Rothenberg of Brookline, Massachusetts, in memory 
of their beloved daughter. The income from this fund is to be used for annual 
assistance to a worthy student who plans for a medical career. 

DIANE L. RUKIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1955) 

Established in memory of their daughter, Diane, by Mr. and Mrs. David Rukin 
of West Englewood, New Jersey, the income of which will be used for scholarship 
assistance to deserving students who plan to study in the field of medicine. 

GEORGE SAGAN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) Established by 
Mr. George Sagan of New York City, through the Sagan Foundation, the income 
from this fund will be used for scholarship assistance based on scholastic attain- 
ment and need. 

SAMUEL SALNY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) 

Established by Mrs. Samuel Salny and other devoted friends as a tribute to the 
late Samuel Salny of Boston, Massachusetts. The income from this fund will 
provide scholarship assistance to gifted and needy students. 

ABRAHAM AND DORA SANDLER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1955) Established by Messrs. Philip, Samuel, Jack and Max Sandler of Boston, 
Massachusetts, in honor of their parents. The income of this fund is to be awarded 
annually to a needy student who preferably has some family connection with the 
shoe and allied industries. 

DAVID SAXE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) Estab- 
lished as a memorial to Mr. David Saxe of Brookline, Massachusetts, by his family. 
The income from this fund is to be used for scholarship purposes. 

BENJAMIN SCHARPS AND DAVID SCHARPS FUND (1952) Established by the 
Estates of Benjamin Scharps and David Scharps of New York City, as a perpetual 
endowment, the income from which is to provide scholarships to students in 
the field of music, and upon the establishment of a law school, in the field of law. 

JEROME SCHARY SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) A permanent 
endowment in accordance with the Will of Ben Schary, established by Mrs. Byrde 
Schary of New York City, in memory of her beloved son who gave his life for 
his country in World War II. The income will cover a partial tuition scholarship 
in perpetuity, with preference given to the children of war veterans. 

ABBEY SURREY SCHWARTZ SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) 

Established by Mrs. Morris Schwartz and the late Mr. Schwartz of New York 
City as a memorial to their son. The income from this fund will provide a 
partial tuition scholarship for a deserving student. 

[198] 



APPENDIX 

IDA HILLSON SCHWARTZ AND ELIAS EDWARD SCHWARTZ MEMORIAL 
FELLOWSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1949) Established as a memorial to 
Ida Hillson Schwartz of Winter Hill, Massachusetts, by her family, the fund 
has been augmented by a bequest from the Estate of Elias Edward Schwartz. 
The income from this fund is to be used in perpetuity as an exchange fellowship, 
either to bring gifted young people from Israel to Brandeis University or to send 
Brandeis University students to the Hebrew University in Israel. 

DR. SAMUEL SCHWEBEL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1957) A fund 

set up by Mrs. Dora Schwebel of Youngstown, Ohio, in memory of her di6- 
tinguished son. The income will provide in perpetuity one-half tuition, one year 
to an Israeli student studying at Brandeis, and in the alternate year to a student 
preferably from Youngstown, Ohio. 

GERTRUDE AND MORRIS SELIB SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1954) 

A scholarship endowment fund in honor of the 45th wedding anniversary 
of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Selib of Brookline, Massachusetts, established by their 
children, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Selib, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rothstein, Dr. and 
Mrs. Samuel Bolan, and Mr. and Mrs. Eliot Michaelson. The income from this 
fund is to be used each year for student assistance. 

JOSEPH H. SHAW SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) The income 

from this bequest established under the terms of the Will of Joseph H. Shaw of 
Dallas, Texas, will provide scholarship assistance for gifted and needy students. 

ETTIE STETTHEIMER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1957) Estab- 
lished by the Estate of Ettie Stettheimer of New York City as a perpetual endow- 
ment, the income of which will be assigned annually to a student or students 
concentrating in the area of philosophy. 

HELEN SACHS STRAUS SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1955) A 

scholarship endowment fund established by Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Straus of New 
York City. The income from this fund is to be awarded annually to a deserving 
freshman, irrespective of sex, color, creed or national origin, who is seriously 
interested in pursuing an academic career leading to work in the field of better- 
ment of interracial relations or betterment of international understanding and 
world brotherhood. 

GERALD SUGARMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

(1950) The income from this fund, created in memory of Gerald Sugarman by 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Myer Sugarman of Cambridge, Massachusetts, is to 
be used for assistance to outstanding and deserving students. 

SUISMAN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1952) Estab- 
lished by the Suisman Foundation of Hartford, Connecticut, the income is to be 
used for scholarship purposes. 

[1^9] 



APPENDIX 

HAROLD WARSHAW MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1952) A permanent endowment established by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irving 
Warshaw of Brookline, Massachusetts, and the Zelmyer Post, Jewish War 
Veterans. The income will provide a scholarship for a student upon completion 
of the freshman year, who best personifies the ideals by which Harold Warshaw 
lived. 

JOSEPH M. AND EVELYN R. WEIDBERG SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT 
FUND (1952) Established by Dr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Weidberg of Miami 
Beach, Florida, to assist a needy student of outstanding academic ability. 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT YUSEN SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) 

Established by Mr. Robert R. Yusen of Boston, Massachusetts, the income from 
this fund will be used for scholarship assistance for a worthy boy of any race, 
creed, or color, with preference given to a deserving student athlete. 



[200] 



APPENDIX VI 



Scholarship Funds 

MAXWELL ABBELL JUNIOR YEAR IN ISRAEL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Estab- 
lished by the late Maxwell Abbell of Chicago, Illinois, to provide opportunity for 
Brandeis students to enrich their academic program by studying for a year in 
Israel. 

ABELSON AND GETZ FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition scholar- 
ship given by Messrs. Lester S. and Morton S. Abelson and Oscar Getz of Chicago, 
Illinois, for a deserving student. 

EVELYN ABRAMSON SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A tuition and maintenance scholar- 
ship established in honor of his wife by Mr. Fisher Abramson of New Bedford, 
Massachusetts. 

MICHAEL ADDISON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND (1956) Estab- 
lished by Mrs. Viola G. Addison of New York City, as a memorial to her 
beloved husband. The income and part of principal, where necessary, to be used 
for a perpetual annual scholarship to a deserving student. 

ADELPHI SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A five-year partial tuition scholarship established 
by the Adelphi Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Roxbury, Massachusetts, for a needy student. 

MAX AND SOPHIE R. ADLER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established 
in memory of Max and Sophie R. Adler by their children through the Max and 
Sophie R. Adler Fund, of Chicago, Illinois. Preference to be given to music majors. 

SAUL ALEXANDER FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by the 
Saul Alexander Foundation of Charleston, South Carolina, this grant will be 
used for scholarship assistance to worthy and deserving students. 

SIDNEY AND PHYLLIS ALLEN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A tuition scholarship 
established by Mr. and Mrs. Sidney J. Allen of Detroit, Michigan, to be awarded 
to an outstanding and deserving student residing in Allen Hall on the Brandeis 
University campus. 

SAMUEL AND BESSIE ALPERS SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition scholar- 
ship established by Mr. Moses Alpers of Salem, Massachusetts to aid a deserving 
student. 

ALPHA OMEGA (LONG ISLAND ALUMNI CHAPTER) SCHOLARSHIP (1953) 

An annual partial tuition scholarship established by the Long Island Alumni Chap- 
ter of the Alpha Omega Fraternity for aid to a pre-dental student. 

MORRIS ALTER SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. Frank R. Alter of 
Davenport, Iowa, as a memorial tribute to his father, to provide a partial tuition 
scholarship for a gifted and deserving student. 

[201] 



APPENDIX 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP (1957) A scholarship of $500 for aca- 
demic excellence, established by the Alumni Association of Brandeis University. 

ROBERT AND LILLIAN AMPER BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP 
(1955) Established by Mr. and Mrs. Robert Amper of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, 
to assist deserving students from McKeesport. 

ANNIVERSARY SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1954) This fund is maintained by gen- 
eral contributions to the scholarship program. Awards will be made as partial 
tuition aid to deserving students on the basis of academic standing, all-round 
ability and school spirit. 

BRIAN ARONSTAM SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A scholarship fund established by 
Mr. Louis Aronstam of Atlanta, Georgia, in honor of his grandson, Brian Aron- 
stam of Atherton, California, to aid deserving students. 

ARTISTS' EQUITY ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by the 
Board of Trustees of Brandeis University for scholarship assistance to a gifted 
and worthy student majoring in the field of Fine Arts. 

EARL AND GLADYS ASHWORTH SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. 
Earl Ashworth of Haverhill, Massachusetts, to provide a tuition scholarship for 
a gifted and needy student. 

BALDOC HILLS SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1951) Established by the Baldoc Hills 
Scholarship Committee for Brandeis University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to 
provide annual scholarships for students from the Tri-State area. 

SAMUEL BARIT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Given in memory of Sam- 
uel Barit by his wife, Sophia Barit, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, and children as 
an annual scholarship to a worthy student in recognition of outstanding scholastic 
achievement. 

DR. PAUL S. BARRABEE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Max Kargman of Boston, Massachusetts, as a partial tuition scholarship 
to assist a deserving student, in memorial tribute to Dr. Paul S. Barrabee of 
Newton, Massachusetts. 

JAMES B. BEAM DISTILLING COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition 
scholarship given by the James B. Beam Distilling Company of Chicago, Illinois, 
for a worthy student. 

WALTER BEATMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph W. Beatman of East Norwalk, Connecticut, in memory of Mr. 
Beatman's father, to provide a tuition scholarship for a talented and needy student. 

DAVID BERGER SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. Arthur M. Berger 
ef Scarsdale, New York, in memory of his brother, David, of St. Louis, Missouri, 
to assist a deserving student. 

ABEL BERLAND SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition scholarship established 
in honor of Mr. Abel Berland by Mr. Louis Oppenheimer of Chicago, Illinois, 
to assist a gifted and needy student. 

[202] 



APPENDIX 

ROSE FROMMER BERMAN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Rabbi and 
Mrs. Samuel A. Berman of Jersey City, New Jersey, in memory of Rabbi Ber- 
man's mother, for tuition assistance to worthy and deserving students. 

GOTTFRIED AND DORIS BERNSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1949) A tuition and 
maintenance scholarship totaling $1,000 for a student with a visual handicap, 
established by the Blind Service Association of Chicago, Illinois, as a tribute to 
the work of Mrs. Gottfried Bernstein who has been president of this Association 
for many years. 

LEONARD BERNSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1957) A partial tuition scholarship for 
a gifted student concentrating in the area of the Creative Arts, set up by Mr. 
Leonard Bernstein of New York City, who thus adds to the service which he 
gladly renders to the University. 

FRANK STANLEY BEVERIDGE SCHOLARSHIP (1957) An allocation to provide 
scholarship assistance to a gifted and needy student from the Trustees of the 
Frank Stanley Beveridge Foundation of Westfield, Massachusetts, in memorial 
tribute to the distinguished philanthropist who established the Foundation. 

CHARLES A. BINGER SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. Charles A. 
Binger of West Englewood, New Jersey, to provide a partial tuition scholarship 
for a gifted and needy student. 

HAROLD Y. BLACK SCHOLARSHIP (1951) A partial tuition scholarship given 
by Mr. Harold Y. Black of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to aid a worthy student 
interested in the athletic program of Brandeis University. 

MAX BLECHNER CHARITABLE FUND, INC., SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Estab- 
lished by Mr. Norbert Blechner of Mt. Vernon, New York, to provide a tuition 
scholarship for a worthy and deserving student. 

HARRY BLOCH, JR., SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A partial scholarship given by 
Mr. Harry Bloch, Jr., of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to be awarded on the basis 
of scholastic attainment and need. 

DR. DAVID A. BLOCK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition 
scholarship established by Mr. Edward Block of San Antonio, Texas, in memory 
of his father, for assistance to deserving students. 

FANNIE BLOOM MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established as a five-year 
tuition scholarship by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gottlieb of Fall River, Massachusetts, 
in memory of Mrs. Gottlieb's mother. 

HENRY BLOOMFIELD SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established in honor of Mr. 
Henry Bloomfield of Chicago, Illinois, by his wife, Beatrice, to assist a worthy 
student. 

CARL BLUMENTHAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A partial tuition scholarship for 
a needy student whose special interest is Jewish History and Philosophy, given 
by family and friends in Roselle and Linden, New Jersey. 

[ 203 ] 



APPENDIX 

RAYMOND H. BOHR SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. Raymond H. 
Bohr of West Englewood, New Jersey, to provide a partial tuition scholarship 
for a worthy and gifted student. 

BOSTON AID TO THE BLIND SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A partial tuition scholar- 
ship given by the Jewish Guild of the Boston Aid to the Blind of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

BOSTON SPIRIT LODGE #1968 B'NAI B'RITH SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Estab- 
lished by members of the Boston Spirit Lodge of Boston, Massachusetts, this 
scholarship will provide tuition assistance to a worthy and deserving boy or girl. 

BRADLEY LAMP SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established by the Bradley Manufactur- 
ing Company of Chicago, Illinois, as a tuition scholarship. 

BERNARD BREGSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. Bernard Breg- 
stein of New York City, to provide scholarship assistance for worthy and deserving 
students. 

ESTHER AND HARRY BROWN SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1956) A tuition scholar- 
ship established by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brown of Haverhill, Massachusetts, in 
honor of Mr. Brown's 70th birthday, to be awarded to a worthy student of out- 
standing ability. 

BRUMBERGER SCHOLARSHIP (1953) Given by the Brumberger Foundation, Inc., 
as a partial tuition scholarship to be awarded to a junior from New York City 
or within a fifty-mile radius of that city. 

JOSEPH BURACK SCHOLARSHIP (1953) Established by Mr. Joseph Burack 
of Boston, Massachusetts, as a four-year tuition scholarship for aid to a deserving 
student. 

MR. AND MRS. SELIG S. BURROWS SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A tuition scholar- 
ship given by Mr. and Mrs. Selig S. Burrows of New York City, for aid to a 
deserving student. 

H. B. CANTOR FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by the H. 
B. Cantor Foundation of New York City, through Mr. Hyman B. Cantor, to 
provide two annual tuition scholarships for gifted and worthy students. 

BENJAMIN N. CARDOZO SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established by the Benjamin 
N. Cardozo Lodge No. 1874 of B'nai B'rith, New York City, as a partial tuition 
scholarship. 

ROBERT A. CARPENTER POST NO. 485, JEWISH WAR VETERANS SCHOLAR- 
SHIP (1954) A partial tuition scholarship established by the Robert A. Carpenter 
Post 485, Jewish War Veterans of Boston, Massachusetts, to provide financial 
assistance to a worthy boy or girl graduating from a high school in the Boston area. 

FRANK CASTY SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established as a tuition scholarship by 
Mr. Frank Casty of Boston, Massachusetts, to aid a promising and worthy 
student. 

[204] 



APPENDIX 

CHILDREN'S COAT FIRM SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A tuition and maintenance 
scholarship established jointly by five children's coat firms in New York City: 
Cy Anstendig & Co., Ellen Girl Coat Co., Little Empress Coat Company, New 
Cameron Coat Company and Victory Girl Coat Company. 

CITY OF ROME SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1955) Established by Brandeis Uni- 
versity to provide a tuition scholarship for a needy and worthy student from 
Rome, Italy. 

CLASS OF 1957 SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by the Class of 1957 to cover 
part tuition for a gifted student in the hope that opportunities can be opened 
for future students, which were the privilege of many in the Class of 1957. 

PENNETH M. AND LUCILLE G. CLINE SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by 
Mrs. Penneth Cline, family, and friends to honor Mr. Penneth Cline of Newton, 
Massachusetts, on his 40th birthday. This partial tuition scholarship will be 
awarded to a worthy and deserving student majoring in the physical sciences. 

ALTA COHEN SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A four-year tuition scholarship fund 
established by Mr. Alta Cohen of South Orange, New Jersey, which will provide 
financial assistance to worthy students. 

ESTA AND OSCAR COHEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1957) Set up by Mr. Oscar 

Cohen of Boston, Massachusetts, and his friends as a birthday tribute. To be used 
for subsidies to gifted and needy students. 

GILBERT COHEN SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A partial tuition scholarship established 
by Mr. Gilbert Cohen of West Springfield, Massachusetts, for financial assistance to 
worthy students. 

J. W. COHEN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1953) Established as a partial 
tuition scholarship by the J. W. Cohen Foundation of Chicago, Illinois, to aid 
a deserving student. 

SAMUEL COHEN AND JOSEPH EDELSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A tuition 
scholarship given by Messrs. Lawrence Cohen, Harry and Arthur Edelstein of 
Chicago, Illinois, in honor of their fathers. 

SOL COHEN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Sol Cohen of New York 
City, to be awarded annually as scholarship assistance for worthy and deserving 
students. 

COMMITTEE OF THE PERMANENT CHARITY FUND, INC., SCHOLARSHIP 
(1956) Established by the Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund, Inc., of 
Boston, Massachusetts, to provide scholarship aid, with preference being given 
to students from Massachusetts. 

SANDRA CONSTANTINE SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established in honor of his 
sister, Sandra, by Mr. Lawrence Constantine of Boston, Massachusetts, for assist- 
ance to a student who might otherwise not enjoy the advantages of a college 
education. 

[205] 



APPENDIX 

ABE CORENSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by the Cheer- 
ful Helpers for Handicapped Children of Los Angeles, California, in memory 
of Abe Corenson. This partial tuition scholarship will be used to help a student 
who may have some handicap. 

PAULINE COSLOV MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition scholarship 

established by the children of Pauline Coslov of Glassport, Pennsylvania. 

B. F. DANBAUM SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A tuition scholarship established by 
Mr. B. F. Danbaum of Miami, Florida, for help to a deserving student. 

DREYER & TRAUB SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established as a tuition and mainte- 
nance scholarship by Dreyer & Traub, through Mr. Abraham Traub, of Brooklyn, 
New York. 

HARRY L. DRUCKER SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition scholarship established by 
Mr. Harry L. Drucker of Boston, Massachusetts, to aid a deserving student. 

JACOB AND PAULINE EDER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established 
as a partial tuition scholarship for "a needy student who is deserving because 
of good citizenship" by Messrs. Arthur and Sidney Eder of New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, in memory of their parents. 

ELSON ALUMNAE CLUB SCHOLARSHIP (1949) Created by the Elson Alumnae 
Club of Newton, Massachusetts, preferably "to further the musical education of 
a scholastically worthy and needy student who shows musical talent or expects 
to specialize in the field of music . . ." 

MANDEL AND JENNIE ELUTO SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A partial tuition scholar- 
ship created by Mr. Mandel Eluto of Manchester, New Hampshire, to assist a 
gifted and needy student. 

MRS. L. E. EMERMAN SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A tuition and maintenance 
scholarship in honor of Mrs. L. E. Emerman, given by her daughters, Mrs. Saul 
Sherman and Mrs. Perrv Cohen, of Chicago, Illinois. 

HARRY L. EPSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established as a partial tuition 
scholarship by Messrs. Irving Rhodes and Milton Polland of Milwaukee, "Wis- 
consin, in honor of Mr. Harry L. Epstein, for aid to a deserving student. 

HARRY L. EPSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1954) Established as a partial tuition 
scholarship by Mr. Harry L. Epstein of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to aid a student 
of academic promise. 

FEINBERG FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established through Mr. 
George J. Feinberg of West Long Branch, New Jersey, to provide a tuition 
scholarship for gifted and needy students. 

I. IRVING FELD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1951) An annual partial tuition 
scholarship established in memory of I. Irving Feld by his nieces, Mrs. Robert 
Wolfson of St. Louis, Missouri, and Mrs. Leonard Strauss of Kansas City, 
Missouri. 

[206] 



APPENDIX 

SAMUEL FIELD FAMILY FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by 
the Samuel Field Family Foundation of New York City, through Mr. Samuel 
Field, to provide a tuition scholarship for a gifted and needy student. 

MR. AND MRS. ADOLPH FINE SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1956) Established by 
Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Fine of Minneapolis, Minnesota, to provide tuition and 
maintenance assistance for worthy and deserving students. 

ROBERT AND AUGUSTA FINKELSTEIN FUND (1956) Established by Mrs. 
Robert Finkelstein of Woonsocket, Rhode Island, this fund will be used to pro- 
vide scholarship assistance. 

FOOD FAIR STORES SCHOLARSHIPS (1956) Established by the Food Fair Stores 
Foundation for tuition and maintenance assistance to two students exemplifying 
qualities of civic interest, leadership and scholarship. Preference is to be given 
first to freshmen and then to upperclassmen who are employees, or sons and 
daughters of present or deceased employees of Food Fair Stores; if such 
applicants are not available, the University may award the scholarships to two 
qualified freshmen. 

ANNE FOREMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established in memory 
of Mrs. Samuel Foreman by Dr. and Mrs. Irving Helfert of Dayton, Ohio, to 
provide scholarship assistance for worthy and deserving students. 

ALEX FORMAN SCHOLARSHIP (1951) An annual partial tuition scholarship 
created by the late Alexander Forman of Washington, D. C, to assist an out- 
standing student. 

ROBERT AND PHILIP FORREST SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A fund established in 
honor of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Finkelman of Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, to provide tuition assistance for a needy and deserving student in the 
field of science. 

MR. AND MRS. J. L. FRADKIN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. and 
Mrs. J. L. Fradkin of Washington, D. C, as a partial tuition scholarship to assist 
a gifted and needy student. 

ANNE FRANK SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established in her memory by Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Hackett of Los Angeles, California, to provide scholarship aid to 
gifted and needy students, concentrating in the field of writing. 

HARRISON JULES LOUIS FRANK AND LEON HARRISON FRANK CORPORA- 
TION MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A partial tuition scholarship in 
memory of the founders of the Bulldog Electric Products Company of Detroit, 
Michigan, to be awarded to an outstanding junior or senior majoring in the 
physical sciences. 

GUSRIED V. FREUND MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1955) A tuition 

scholarship established by the Frankfort Distillers Company of New York City, as 
a memorial to Gusried V. Freund. 

[2©7] 



APPENDIX 

ANNA FRIEDLANDER SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1955) Established in memory 
of Anna Friedlander by Samuel and Rose Waldman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
to assist a deserving student. 

FRIEDMAN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1949) Established as a partial tui- 
tion scholarship by the Friedman Foundation of New York, for a gifted boy 
from the New York City area. 

FROMM AND SICHEL, INC., SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A tuition scholarship 
established by Mr. Franz W. Sichel of New York City, to aid a deserving student. 

RICHARD FROST SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition scholarship established by 
Mr. Charles Frost of New York City, in honor of his son. 

JULES E. AND ETTA M. FURTH SCHOLARSHIPS (1951) Two tuition scholar- 
ships for outstanding students created in memory of his parents by Mr. Lee J. 
Furth of Chicago, Illinois. 

RACHEL, MICHAEL AND AARON GALENA SCHOLARSHIPS (1956) Two 

tuition scholarships established by Mrs. Edward Hyman of Columbus, Ohio, 
in memory of her parents and brother, to aid worthy students regardless of race, 
creed, or color. 

MORRIS GASTWIRTH SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Morris Gast- 
wirth of New York City, this fund will provide tuition and maintenance assist- 
ance for gifted and needy students. 

MAX GERSON SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Max Gerson of New 
York City to provide tuition and maintenance assistance for worthy and deserving 
students. 

MAX H. GLUCK FOUNDATION, INC., SCHOLARSHIPS (1956) A fund estab- 
lished by the Max H. Gluck Foundation, Inc., of New York City, to provide 
six tuition scholarships for worthy and deserving students. 

MR. AND MRS. BERNARD L. GOLD SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Bernard L. Gold of Dallas, Texas, this scholarship will provide financial 
assistance for a deserving student who might otherwise be unable to have the 
advantage of a college education. 

LIEUTENANT JOEL H. GOLDBERG SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1956) Established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Sam A. Goldberg of Atlanta, Georgia, as a memorial tribute to 
their son, Joel, to provide scholarship assistance to worthy and deserving students. 

JACK A. GOLDFARB SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established by Mr. Jack A. Goldfarb 
of New York City as a maintenance scholarship for qualified students with limited 
financial means. 

[208] 



APPENDIX 

MINNIE GOLDMAN AND ISADORE H. KAPLAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
(1952) Established in memory of her mother and husband by Mrs. Blanche 
Kaplan of Chicago, Illinois, as a partial tuition scholarship. 

ROBERT GOLDSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established in honor of his 60th 
birthday, this tuition scholarship was made possible by devoted friends in Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

GOULED FOUNDATION, INC., SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by the Felix 
and Cecile Gouled Foundation, Inc., of South Orange, New Jersey, to provide 
the opportunity for an undergraduate from the State of Israel to study at Brandeis 
University. 

DAVID S. GREEN SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A ten-year tuition scholarship given by 
Mr. Benjamin Green of Fall River, Massachusetts. 

HAYIM GREENBERG SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Set up by the Pioneer Women of 
New York City, the Women's Labor Zionist Organization of America, Inc., out 
of its Hayim Greenberg Educational Fund. To be assigned to a graduate stu- 
dent whose major interest is in service to Israel and the Jewish community. 

REBA AND MEYER B. GREENBERG SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND (1957) Es- 
tablished by Mr. Meyer B. Greenberg of New York City, to provide scholarship 
assistance for gifted and needy students to fulfill their educational goals. 

SAMUEL GREENBERG SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A partial tuition scholarship given 
by Mr. Samuel Greenberg of Westport, Connecticut, to aid a deserving student. 

L S. GREENFELD SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1953) A ten-year partial tuition 
scholarship established by the relatives and friends of Mr. I. S. Greenfeld of 
New York City, in honor of his 60th birthday. 

GULF COAST SCHOLARSHIP FROM FRIENDS OF BRANDEIS IN NEW 
ORLEANS (1957) Established by friends of the University in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, and nearby areas as a tuition scholarship for a worthy and deserving 
student who is a resident of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama or Northwest 
Florida. 

BENJAMIN HANDLER SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Benjamin 
Handler of New York City, to provide scholarship aid for gifted and worthy 
students. 

JOSEPH HARRIS SCHOLARSHIPS (1953) Four scholarships of $1,400 each to be 
awarded to four students each year for four years. One scholarship to be 
awarded to an outstanding music student and three to theatre arts majors. Given 
by the Joseph Harris Foundation of New York City. 

HAYM SALOMON CHAPTER No. 152 B'NAI B'RITH SCHOLARSHIP (1949) A 

partial tuition scholarship established by this Women's Chapter of B'nai B'rith 
of Roxbury, Massachusetts, for worthy students. 

DR. IRVING HELFERT SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition scholarship 
established by Dr. Irving Helfert of Dayton, Ohio, for aid to a deserving student. 

[209] 



APPENDIX 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS HELLMAN SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition 
scholarship established by Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hellman of Boston, Massachusetts, 
in honor of their 30th wedding anniversary. 

PETER HERSHMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by Mr. 
Samuel I. Hershman of New Haven, Connecticut, in memory of his son, Peter, 
to provide tuition assistance to a worthy student majoring in the field of science. 

HI CHARLIE ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP (1951) The Hi Charlie Association 
of Brandeis University has voted that a portion of the proceeds from the annual 
student revue "Hi Charlie" be used for a scholarship to aid a worthy student. 
This award has been established in memory of Israel Ravreby, a member of the 
Class of 1952. 

FLORENCE HOBERMAN PHILANTHROPIC LEAGUE SCHOLARSHIP (1953) 

An annual partial tuition scholarship made possible by this League of Brooklyn, 
New York, to aid a deserving student. 

HOFFBERGER BROTHERS FUND (1950) Established as a tuition and mainte- 
nance scholarship by the Hoffberger Brothers of Baltimore, Maryland, in honor 
of the first grandchild of Judge Joseph Sherbow. Preferably for a resident of the 
Baltimore area. 

JOSEPH HORWICH SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1955) Established through a bequest 
under the terms of the Will of Joseph Horwich of New York, to provide scholar- 
ship assistance to needy students. 

INFANTS*, CHILDREN'S AND TEENS' WEAR BUYERS' ASSOCIATION 
SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Two scholarships established by the Infants', Children's 
and Teens' Wear Buyers' Association of New York City, for a boy and a girl 
who plan careers in merchandising. 

INSTITUTE OF SCRAP IRON & STEEL INC. SCHOLARSHIPS (1956) Four 

scholarships established by the Institute of Scrap Iron & Steel Inc., with national 
headquarters at Washington, D. C, to provide tuition assistance for gifted and 
needy students. 

FRANK JACOBY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A tuition scholarship estab- 
lished by the Frank Jacoby Foundation of Bridgeport, Connecticut, to aid a 
gifted student in need of financial assistance. 

JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION OF HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA, SCHOLAR- 
SHIP (1953) A tuition scholarship established by the Board of Trustees of this 
organization, to be given to a worthy graduate of the South Broward High School 
of Hollywood, Florida. 

JEWISH WELFARE FUND OF ROANOKE, VIRGINIA, SCHOLARSHIP (1953) 

Scholarship established to assist a deserving student. 

ANNIE AND PAUL JUNGER SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1951) A fund established 
by the Joseph H. Cohen and Sons Foundation of New York City, in meis&oxy 
©f Annie and Paul Junker, for aid to gifted and needy students. 

[210] 



APPENDIX 

NATHAN E. AND HARRY S. KAMENSKE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
(1951) This fund, established by the family of Messrs. Nathan E. and Harry S. 
Kamenske of Nashua, New Hampshire, is to be used each year to assist worthy 
students, preference to residents of Nashua first and then to residents of New 
Hampshire. If there is no suitable recipient from this area, the scholarship may 
be awarded to any other student selected by the Faculty Committee. 

MRS. SAMUEL KAPPEL SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A scholarship fund in honor 
of Mrs. Samuel Kappel of Larchmont, New York, created by her daughters, to 
aid worthy and deserving students. 

MAX AND ELIZABETH KAROL SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Messrs. 

Ralph and Arthur Karol of Newton, Massachusetts, in honor of their parents' 

40th wedding anniversary, this scholarship will assist a needy and deserving 
student of the junior class. 

JAY AND MARIE KASLER FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1950) A tuition 
scholarship founded by Mr. Jacob M. Stuchen of North Hollywood, California, 
in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Jay Kasler, for aid to a gifted boy or girl who might 
otherwise not enjoy the advantages of a college education. 

GARFIELD KASS SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A tuition scholarship given by Mr. 
Garfield Kass of Washington, D. C, to assist a deserving student of outstanding 
academic ability. 

BARNED AND MOLLY KATZ SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by their sons, 
Charles and Edward, of Los Angeles, California, to provide scholarship assistance 
to worthy students. 

WILLIAM H. KATZ SCHOLARSHIPS (1956) Four scholarships established by 
Mr. William H. Katz of New York City, in honor of Miss Evelyn Shea. These 
grants will be awarded to worthy students for tuition and maintenance assistance. 

ABRAHAM P. KAUFMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1954) Established in 
memory of her father, by Mrs. Claire K. Kagno of Brooklyn, New York, to provide 
partial tuition assistance to a worthy boy or girl majoring in Hebrew Literature 
and allied subjects. 

HERMAN AND MORRIS L. KLEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Messrs. 
Herman and Morris : L. Klein of New York City, to provide tuition and mainte- 
nance assistance for worthy and deserving students. 

NATALIE S. KLEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Henry Klein of 
; New York City, in memory of his beloved mother,' to provide scholarship as- 
sistance for gifted and needy students. 

NATHAN LEO KLEIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A partial tuition 
scholarship given by Mr. William Einzig of Vancouver, British Columbia, ia 
'memory of Nathan Leo Klein, son of Mr. and Mrs. I. j. Klein of Vancouver . 

[211] 



APPENDIX 

KLEV-BROTHERS SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Messrs. Louis and Paul 
Kleven of Derry, New Hampshire, to provide a tuition scholarship for a worthy 
and deserving student. 

ADA AND GUSTAVE KLINKENSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by 
Dr. Gustave Klinkenstein of South Orange, New Jersey, for assistance to a gifted 
and needy student. 

GRACE KAPLIN KOOK SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by the Chester H. 
Roth Co., Inc., through the Gustave & Sarah Roth Foundation, of New York 
City, to pay tribute to the loyalty and good will of Mrs. Kook to Brandeis Uni- 
versity. This fund will provide scholarship and maintenance assistance to gifted 
and needy students. 

DR. LOUIS KRAMER SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition scholarship estab- 
lished by Dr. Louis Kramer of Boston, Massachusetts, to assist a gifted and 
worthy student. 

MR. AND MRS. HYMAN KRIVOFF SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A fund established 
by Mr. Hyman Krivoff of New Bedford, Massachusetts, to provide scholarship 
assistance for worthy students. 

EDWARD KUZON SCHOLARSHIP (1954) Established by Mr. Edward Kuzon of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, to be used for scholarship aid to a deserving student. 

LADO MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Established by this New York organization 
to assist a talented student of music to continue his study in any branch of in- 
strumental music or composition. 

FANNIE FEIN LAKRITZ SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A partial tuition scholarship 
in memory of Fannie Fein Lakritz will be awarded annually to a worthy student 
interested in pre-medical studies. This has been made available through the 
generosity of Joseph Fein and Edith Lakritz of New York City, and Zena Graham 
and Lorraine Friedman of Chicago, Illinois. 

DR. EDWARD LANGNER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A tuition scholar- 
ship established by Mr. Jay Langner of New York City, in memory of his father. 

SAMUEL AND HATTIE W. LANSKI MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1953) Estab- 
lished by Mr. Arthur Lanski of Chicago, Illinois, in memory of his parents, as 
a tuition scholarship to an outstanding student regardless of race, creed or color. 

MAX LAZARE SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mrs. Max Lazare of New 
York City, in honor of her husband's 70th birthday. This scholarship is to be 
awarded to a gifted and worthy student concentrating in the area of economics 
and preparing for graduate or professional schools of business administration. 

MR. AND MRS. HAROLD S. LEE SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition scholar- 
ship established by Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Lee of New York City, to provide 
assistance to a worthy student. 

ALLAN LEVIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Maurice Levin of Irvington, New Jersey, in memory of their son, to aid a gifted 
and worthy student. 

[212] 



APPENDIX 

GEORGE AND MAURICE LEVIN SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by Messrs. 
George and Maurice Levin of Irvington, New Jersey, to provide financial assistance 
for deserving students. 

NORMAN LEVINE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1950) A partial tuition scholar- 
ship given by the Haym Salomon Chapter AZA No. 255 of B'nai B'rith, Dorchester, 
Massachusetts, in memory of Norman Levine. 

EDWARD C. LEVY FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A tuition scholarship 
established by the Edward C. Levy Foundation of Detroit, Michigan, for aid to 
a student who might otherwise be unable to attend college. 

JOSEPH AND PEARL LINCHITZ SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND (1955) Estab- 
lished by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Linchitz of Brookline, Massachusetts. The in- 
come from this fund is to be used for scholarship aid to a deserving student. 

MENO LISSAUER SCHOLARSHIP (1953) Tuition scholarship for ten years estab- 
lished by the Associated Metals and Minerals Corporation of New York City, 
in honor of Dr. Meno Lissauer, to be awarded to students outstanding in the 
field of chemistry. 

BEATRICE E. A. LOURIE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Established in her 
memory by Mr. Harry L. Lourie of Washington, D. C, as a partial tuition 
scholarship. Special consideration in making this award will be given to women 
students interested in the social sciences. 

RABBI BENJAMIN B. LOWELL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1953) Established 
by Mrs. Ethel Hammel of Havana, Cuba, in memory of Rabbi Benjamin B. Lowell 
who died while serving as the Rabbi of the Havana community. 

LOYAL LEAGUE PHILANTHROPIES SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A tuition and 
maintenance scholarship established by the Loyal League Philanthropies of New 
York, to be awarded to a male graduate of a public or private school in the 
Greater New York City area. Selection of the recipient will be based upon 
demonstrated scholastic ability and financial need. 

MACK FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established through Mr. Howard 
Mack of Hackensack, New Jersey, as a tuition scholarship to be awarded to 
gifted and needy students. 

MARY MANN SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition scholarship established 
by the Mary Mann Philanthropic League, Inc., of New York City, to aid a 
deserving student. 

ANNA GERTRUDE MANSHEL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established in memory 
of his wife by Mr. Charles Manshel of East Orange, New Jersey, to assist gifted 
and needy students. 

MURIEL MARCUS FINE ARTS SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. Leonard 
Marcus of West Englewood, New Jersey, to provide a tuition scholarship for a 
gifted and needy student concentrating in the area of fine arts. 

[213] 



APPENDIX 

RICHARD MARCUS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition 
scholarship established in memory of Richard Marcus of Baltimore, Maryland, 
by Mr. Abert Schloss of Chicago, Illinois, to provide financial assistance to a 
deserving student. 

MOSES M. AND MARION MARCUSE NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP (1956) 

A four-year $5,000 subsidy established by Mr. and Mrs. Moses M. Marcuse of 
Long Island City, New York, and administered through the National Merit 
Scholarship Corporation, which enables a National Merit winner to study at 
Brandeis University. 

MYER MARKOVITCH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A scholarship given 
by the Boston Sports Lodge No. 1934 of B'nai B'rith, in memory of Myer Mark- 
ovitch, to assist a deserving male student who combines scholastic ability and 
athletic promise. 

DR. BEN MARKOWrTZ SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established as a memorial trib- 
ute to Dr. Ben Markowitz of Bloomington, Illinois, by family and friends to 
provide scholarship assistance for students who are planning professional careers 
in the field of science. 

MRS. YOLAND MARKSON SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A scholarship fund established 
by Mrs. Yoland Markson of Los Angeles, California, for financial assistance to 
worthy students. 

SAMUEL AND EVELYN MARYN AND JACOB SURLOFF SCHOLARSHIP (1957) 

Established by Mr. and Mrs. Earl R. Surloff of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as a 
memorial tribute to Mrs. Surloff's parents and Mr. Surloff's father. To be awarded 
to a worthy and deserving student who, without assistance, would be unable to 
have the advantage of a college education. 

MASON BURROWS SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. Julian M. Rosen- 
berg of Long Island City, New York, as a tuition scholarship for a deserving 
student. 

HELEN MASSELL MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by Mr. Ben Massell 
of Atlanta, Georgia, in honor of his wife, Helen. This fund will provide scholar- 
ship assistance to talented and worthy students majoring in the field of music. 

McKEESPORT B'NAI B'RITH SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Two partial tuition scholar- 
ships established by the McKeesport B'nai B'rith Lodge, for a deserving student, 
preferably from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania area. 

EDITH MICHAELS SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Established by the Board of Trustees 
of Brandeis University as a perpetual tuition scholarship in tribute t& the 
pioneering zeal of the founder of the National "Women's Committee. 

MOGEN DAVID WINE SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by the Mogen David 
Wine Charitable Foundation of Chicago, Illinois, in honor of Mr. Abraham 
Feinberg, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Brandeis University. This scholar- 
ship will provide financial assistance for a young man or woman of great intel- 
lectual promise and' marked economic need, who is a member of the senior class. 

[214] 



APPENDIX 

HENRY MONSKY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established in memory 
of Henry Monsky by Mr. and Mrs. Hubert W. Monsky of Omaha, Nebraska, to 
aid students whose liberal outlook will stimulate understanding among all races, 
creeds and colors. 

MUSARTS SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A partial tuition scholarship established by the 
Musarts Club of Chicago, Illinois, to assist a gifted and needy student majoring 
in the field of creative arts. 

HARRY E. MYERS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established as a partial 
tuition scholarship in memory of Harry E. Myers by his wife and son, Peter, of 
New Haven, Connecticut, to aid a worthy student. 

IRVING B. MYERS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1950) A partial tuition scholar- 
ship for a deserving student, established in memory of Irving B. Myers by his 
parents, the late Harry E. Myers, Mrs. Harry E. Myers and his brother, Peter. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MANUFACTURERS SCHOLARSHIP (1955) 

Established by the National Association of Manufacturers, to be awarded as partial 
scholarship assistance to a worthy student for both junior and senior years. 

NATIONAL JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established by the 
Board of Trustees of Brandeis University as a tuition scholarship, to be awarded 
annually to a member of Junior Achievement who has been outstanding in 
scholastic ability and Junior Achievement leadership. 

W. H. NICHOLS COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A partial tuition scholarship 
given by the W. H. Nichols Company of Waltham, Massachusetts, for the assist- 
ance of a deserving boy or girl. 

CLARA NICKOLL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A scholarship created by 
Mr. Ben Nickoll of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in memory of his wife, to be used 
for assistance to worthy students. 

MRS. FANNIE L. OCHS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A partial tuition 
scholarship established by the Illinois Federation of Jewish Youth, for assistance 
to a deserving student. 

JOSEPH OTTENSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1951) An annual tuition scholarship to 
aid a promising student, established by Mr. Joseph Ottenstein of "Washington, D. C. 

FANNIE PEARLMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A partial tuition 
scholarship established by Mr. Raymond Pearlman of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 
memory of his mother. 

PHI SIGMA DELTA NATIONAL FRATERNITY SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Estab- 
lished by the Student Scholarship Fund of the Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity of 
Chicago, Illinois, as a partial tuition scholarship. 

DAVID AND BYRTHA PHILLIPS SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tea-year partial tui- 
tion scholarship established by Mr. and Mrs. David Phillips of Miami Beach, 
Florida. 

[215] 



APPENDIX 

PITTSBURGH POST NO. 49, JEWISH WAR VETERANS OF THE UNITED 
STATES SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Pittsburgh Post No. 49 of Penn- 
sylvania, as a four-year grant to enable a worthy and deserving student to pursue 
training in the field of science or the humanities. Preference is to be given to a 
student from Pittsburgh or vicinity. 

HENRY PLEHN SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Peter Pan Foundation 
Inc., through Mr. Henry Plehn, of New York City, to provide scholarship assist- 
ance for gifted and needy students. 

MAURICE POLLACK FOUNDATION RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Estab- 
lished by the Maurice Pollack Foundation of Quebec, Canada, this grant will enable 
gifted graduate students to pursue research programs in the field of Judaic 
Studies. 

MORRIS AND MARY PRESS FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1950) Contributed 
by the Morris and Mary Press Foundation of Beverly Hills, California, for tuition 
assistance to a gifted and worthy student. 

PROBUS NATIONAL CLUB SCHOLARSHIP (1949) Probus National, a civic 
club of business and professional men, has established a partial tuition scholarship 
to be awarded, without regard to race, creed or color, to an outstanding and 
deserving boy. 

ARDEN RAPPAPORT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A tuition scholarship 
established in memory of their beloved daughter by Dr. and Mrs. Ben Z. Rap- 
paport of Glencoe, Illinois. This fund will provide assistance to a girl who has 
high scholastic ability, financial need, and superior qualities of campus citizenship. 

RAPPAPORT FOUNDATION — MAX AND FRED RAPPAPORT SCHOLARSHIP 
(1956) Established by the Rappaport Foundation, through Messrs. Max and 
Fred Rappaport, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, to provide tuition and maintenance 
assistance for gifted and worthy students. , 

RATNER FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP (1951) A scholarship fund given by the Ratner 
Family of Cleveland, Ohio, for aid to deserving students. 

BERNARD RAVITCH MUSIC FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A fund 

established as a memorial tribute to Bernard Ravitch of New York City by his 
former students, friends and relatives to provide a partial tuition scholarship for 
a gifted and needy student majoring in music. 

TUBIE RESNIK FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1953) Associates and 
friends of Mr. Tubie Resnik of New York City have established the Tubie Resnik — 
Brandeis Foundation which will provide an annual tuition scholarship, to be 
awarded to a student who combines scholastic excellence and athletic ability. 

RENNAH SCHOLARSHIPS (1950) Four partial tuition scholarships established by 
Rinnah, Inc., of New York, for aid to gifted and needy students, one from 
each class. 

[216] 



APPENDIX 

GEN— MORT ROBBINS FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established as 
a tuition scholarship by the Gen — Mort Robbins Foundation of Chicago, Illinois, to 
assist a worthy student. 

HARRY A. ROBINSON SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A fund established by Mr. Harry 
A. Robinson of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to provide scholarship assistance for 
worthy students. 

HAROLD CHARLES ROLFE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Established by 
Mrs. R. A. Selig-Schlueter of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in memory of her nephew, 
to be used for a partial tuition scholarship to a student regardless of race, creed 
or color. 

JERRY ROSE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition scholarship estab- 
lished by members of the family and campers of Camp Echo Lark and their parents 
in memory of Jerry Rose. This scholarship is to be awarded annually to a needy 
student who exemplifies the outstanding citizenship and leadership qualities which 
characterized Jerry Rose during his lifetime. 

ALVIN ROSENBAUM SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established in memory of his son, 
Alvin, by the Honorable Charles Rosenbaum of Denver, Colorado, to provide 
scholarship assistance to a gifted and needy student. 

ROSENBERG FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHB? (1951) Preference in making this 
tuition award, which was established by the Rosenberg Foundation of New York 
City, is to go to an Israeli student of outstanding promise. 

I. H. ROSENBERG MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. and 
Mrs. Adolf Robison of West Englewood, New Jersey, to provide a partial tuition 
scholarship for a worthy and deserving student. 

CHARLES ROSENTHAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established by his children in 
honor of the 75th birthday of Mr. Charles Rosenthal of New York City, as a 
partial tuition scholarship, and further augmented in honor of his 80th birthday. 

CHARLES ROSS SCHOLARSHIP (1955) Established as a partial tuition scholar- 
ship by Mr. Charles Ross of Chicago, Illinois, to assist a deserving student. 

SAMUEL ROTHBERG SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established by Mr. Samuel Rothberg 
of Atlanta, Georgia, for scholarship aid to a deserving student. 

ARTHUR J. ROTHSCHILD SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established through a bequest 
under the terms of the Will of Arthur J. Rothschild of Los Angeles, California, 
for annual scholarship assistance to a deserving student. 

ROTTER-SPEER COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established by this com- 
pany of Cleveland, Ohio, as a partial tuition scholarship to aid a deserving 
student of academic promise. 

RUDNICK CHARITABLE FOUNDATION, INC., SCHOLARSHIP (1953) Created 
by the Rudnick Charitable Foundation, Inc., of Boston, Massachusetts, in memory 
of Abraham G. Rudnick, to provide tuition assistance to a gifted and worthy 
student. 

[217] 



APPENDIX 

ROSE AND MICHAEL RUDNICK SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established in honor 
of the 70th birthday of Mr. Michael Rudnick of Brookline, Massachusetts, by 
his children as an annual partial tuition scholarship for a gifted and needy 
student. 

JULIUS A. RUDOLPH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Established as a 
partial tuition scholarship by his sons, Messrs. Sidney and Leonard Rudolph, of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

ETTA AND JACOB SANG SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Established by the Sang Founda- 
tion of Chicago, Illinois, to provide a tuition scholarship for a deserving and 
gifted student. 

SCHAFFER CHARITABLE FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1954) Established as 
a ten-year tuition scholarship by Mr. and Mrs. Edward Schaffer of Longmeadow, 
Massachusetts, for aid to a gifted boy or girl who might otherwise not enjoy 
the advantages of a college education. 

CHARLES SCHIMMEL FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1957) Estab- 
lished by the Charles Schimmel Foundation through Mr. Edward T. Schimmel 
of Omaha, Nebraska, to provide two partial tuition scholarships for needy and 
deserving students. 

MR. AND MRS. ROY M. SCHOENBROD CREATIVE ARTS SCHOLARSHIP 
(1955) Established by Mr. and Mrs. Roy M. Schoenbrod of Chicago, Illinois, to 
assist a needy and gifted student majoring in the field of creative arts. 

ROBERT L. SCHWARTZ MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1951) A ten-year scholar- 
ship given in memory of Robert L. Schwartz by his wife, Mrs. Rose Schwartz of 
Miami Beach, Florida, for aid to a promising student. 

SCHWEITZER SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Established as a tuition scholarship by the 
Schweitzer Foundation of New York City, to aid a student majoring in chemistry. 

SCRAP AGE SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A partial tuition scholarship established by 
the Scrap Age Press through Mr. M. D. Oberman of Springfield, Illinois. 

BELLA AND HYMAN SEGAL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND ( 195 1) Created 

by the Empire Furniture Association, the income from this fund, plus a portion 
of the principal if necessary, is to be used each year for a tuition scholarship for 
a deserving student. 

SHAPIRO BROS. FACTORS CORP. SCHOLARSHIPS (1956) Established by the 
Shapiro Scholarship Fund, Inc., through the Shapiro Foundation of New York 
City, this annual grant will provide scholarship assistance to not less than . five 
students, based on financial need and scholastic ability. 

ARANT H. SHERMAN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A partial tuition scholarship estab- 
. lished by Mr. Arant H. Sherman of Davenport, Iowa, to be awarded annually to 
<. a student who. exemplifies qualities of good citizenship and potential community 
leadership. 

[218] 



APPENDIX 

ALICE KLEIN SHERWIN SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by the Chester H. 
Roth Co., Inc., through the Gustave & Sarah Roth Foundation, of New York 
City, to pay tribute to the devotion and friendship of Mrs. Sherwin to Brandeis 
University. This fund will provide scholarship and maintenance assistance to 
worthy and deserving students. 

LOUIS A. SHERWIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition 
scholarship established by Mr. Derek G. Caplane of Huntington Woods, Michigan, 
to aid a deserving student. 

HERMAN SHULMAN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Herman Shul- 
man of Lawrence, Long Island, New York; President of Rex Electric Mfg. Corp. 
and Tidy House Paper Corp. of New York. This scholarship will be awarded 
to a student who will best further the interests of brotherhood amongst university 
students. 

ALBERT I. SHUSTER— DR. MORRIS E. RUBIN SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established 
by Mr. Albert I. Shuster and Dr. Morris E. Rubin of New Bedford, Massachu- 
setts, as a tuition scholarship to aid worthy and deserving students. 

SAMUEL T. SIEGEL AND JULIUS M. WEINBERGER SCHOLARSHIP (1950) 

A partial tuition scholarship established by the Trojan Lodge No. 1098 A. F. 
& A. M. of New York, in memory of two valued members of the Lodge. 

SADYE SILVER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A tuition scholarship given 
by Mr. Morris Silver of Manchester, New Hampshire, in memory of his wife, 
Sadye, to provide financial assistance to a deserving student from the State of 
New Hampshire. 

CHARLES J. SINGER SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established in honor of Mr. Charles 
J. Singer of Chicago, Illinois, by his friends, associates and co-workers in the 
men's, women's and children's wear industry. This tuition scholarship will be 
awarded to a worthy student from the Chicago area, who is majoring in economics. 

SISTERHOOD OF TEMPLE EMANUEL SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1951) A partial 
tuition scholarship established by the Sisterhood of Temple Emanuel of Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, for a gifted and needy student concentrating in Judaica. 

MRS. ELKIN SMITH SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mrs. Elkin Smith of 
Norwich, Connecticut, for scholarship assistance to gifted and needy students. 

JOHN HALL SMITH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1950) A full tuition scholar- 
ship established by the Board of Trustees of Brandeis University in memory of 
the founder of Middlesex University, for his direct descendants. 

MORTON SMITH SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Morton Smith of 
Providence, Rhode Island, for scholarship assistance to worthy and deserving 
students. 

SOUTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION B'NAI B'RITH SCHOLARSHIP (1952) Estab- 
lished as a tuition scholarship by the South Carolina Association of B'nai B'rith 
Lodges for a student from the State of South Carolina, regardless of creed or 
origin. 

[219] 



APPENDIX 

ETHAN STAVITSKY SCHOLARSHIP (1950) A partial tuition scholarship estab- 
lished by Mr. Michael Stavitsky of Newark, New Jersey, as a memorial to his 
son, Ethan, to aid a deserving student. 

SAM STEIN SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. Sam Stein of Englewood, 
New Jersey, to provide a partial tuition scholarship for a gifted and needy 
student. 

STEIN, STEIN AND ENGEL SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established through Mr. 
Sam Stein of Jersey City, New Jersey, for partial scholarship assistance for a 
worthy and deserving student. 

REBECCA STERN MEMORIAL SCIENCE FUND (1951) Established with a grant 
obtained through Mr. David Stern of Boston, Massachusetts, to assist students 
concentrating in science. 

WILLIAM AND HENRY STRAUSS SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A tuition and mainte- 
nance scholarship established by Messrs. William and Henry Strauss of Pittsfield, 
Illinois, to be awarded to a gifted and needy student. 

MORRIS AND SARAH STRUHL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Archie Struhl and Mr. and Mrs. Louis Struhl of Jersey City, 
New Jersey, to provide a tuition scholarship for deserving and needy students 
from the State of New Jersey, with preference given to a resident of Jersey City. 

SUPERMARKET MERCHANDISING SCHOLARSHIP (1950) A tuition and main- 
tenance scholarship for a student of high academic standing and an interest in 
merchandising as a career, given by Supermarket Merchandising of New York. 

MAE AND BEN SWIG SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A tuition scholarship for aid to 
a deserving student, contributed by Mr. Joseph F. Ford of Boston, Massachusetts, 
Treasurer of the Brandeis University Board of Trustees, in honor of the 40th 
wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Benj. H. Swig of San Francisco, California. 

MICHAEL TACKEFF SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND (1956) Established by Mr. 
Michael Tackeff of Boston, Massachusetts, the income from this fund is to be 
used for scholarship assistance to gifted and needy students. 

MEYER TENENBAUM SCHOLARSHIP . (1955) A tuition scholarship for a de- 
serving student established by Mr. Meyer Tenenbaum of Providence, Rhode 
Island. 

THRIFT DRUG COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A partial tuition scholarship 
established by Messrs. Philip Hoffman and Reuben Helfant of Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, to aid a deserving student. 

TIDY HOUSE PAPER CORPORATION SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition scholar- 
ship established by Mr. David Adlman of the Tidy House Paper Corporation of 
New York, preferably to a student whose curriculum will prepare him for a 
future in the supermarket industry. 

[220] 



APPENDIX 

HYMAN TREISMAN SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND (1955) Under the terms of 
the Will of Hyman Treisman of Manchester, New Hampshire, the income plus 
a portion of the principal of the bequest is to be" awarded annually as scholarship 
assistance to a deserving student. 

MAX UNGER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1954) Established as a tuition 
scholarship by Mr. Myron P. Unger of Huntington Woods, Michigan, in memory 
of his father, to aid a deserving student. 

WILLIAM AND RACHEL UNGERMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1953) 

Established in memory of their parents by Dr. Arnold H., Dr. Milford S., and 
Mr. Irvine E. Ungerman of Tulsa, Oklahoma, to provide scholarship assistance 
to a deserving student athlete. 

UNITED CHARITABLE FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A tuition scholar- 
ship established by the United Charitable Foundation, United Lodge A. F. & A. M. 
of Brookline, Massachusetts, to provide financial assistance to any student whose 
need and outstanding scholastic ability shall be deemed worthy of such an award. 

UNITED JEWISH CHARITIES OF GREATER MUSKEGON SCHOLARSHIP (1956) 

A contribution from this organization of Muskegon, Michigan, designated for 
scholarship assistance to worthy and deserving students. 

UNITED ORDER OF TRUE SISTERS— JOHANNA LODGE No. 9 SCHOLARSHIP 
(1956) A partial tuition scholarship contributed by this organization of Chicago, 
Illinois, to assist a visually handicapped student. 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP FOR HUNGARIAN REFUGEES (1956) Established 
by Brandeis University from its general funds as a tribute to the courage of 
liberty-loving Hungarians. Full tuition and maintenance assistance for two 
qualified students escaping from Communist tyranny in Hungary. 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP FOR ISRAELI ARAB STUDENTS (1957) Two full 
maintenance and tuition scholarships established by Brandeis University for qual- 
ified Israeli Arab students who have been brought to this country through the 
generosity of the Samuel Rubin Foundation of New York City. 

SAM VER VEER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1956) A partial tuition scholar- 
ship established by Sam and Virginia Binswanger of Richmond, Virginia, in 
memory of Mrs. Binswanger's father. 

MICHAEL VICTOR SCHOLARSHIP (1951) A tuition scholarship to give a col- 
lege opportunity to a student who might otherwise be unable to have this ad- 
vantage, contributed by Mr. Benjamin Victor of Springfield, Illinois. 

BEN VOLID MEMORIAL FUND SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established in his mem- 
ory by Mr. Peter Volid of Chicago, Illinois, to provide a full tuition scholarship, 
preference to be given to a student majoring in economics and preparing for a 
business career. 

BIRDIE WAGNER SCHOLARSHIP (1950) An annual grant to aid deserving stu- 
dents, contributed by Mr. Isaac Wagner of Chicago, Illinois, in honor of his wife. 

[ 221 ] 



APPENDIX 

ESTHER AND SYLVAN WAGNER SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Sylvan Wagner of Chicago, Illinois, as an annual partial tuition 
scholarship to assist a worthy and needy student. 

ELLEN AND HAROLD WALD SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A partial tuition scholar- 
ship established by Mr. and Mrs. Harold Wald of Brookline, Massachusetts, to 
assist a worthy student who might otherwise be unable to attend college. 

DAVID I. WALSH— JOSEPH M. LINSEY SCHOLARSHIP (1956) In memory of 
David I. Walsh, and in honor of Joseph M. Linsey, this tuition scholarship has 
been given by their friends in Massachusetts. To be awarded to a student who, 
in the opinion of the Faculty Committee, exemplifies the broad spirit of under- 
standing and liberal ideals of both men. 

WALTHAM SCHOLARSHIPS (1948) Two tuition scholarships created by the 
Board of Trustees of Brandeis University for worthy graduates of Waltham 
High School. 

MR. AND MRS. ELLIS H. WARREN SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by Mr. 
Ellis H. Warren of Flint, Michigan, to provide two full tuition scholarships for 
gifted and needy students. 

NATHAN AND ZIPPORAH WAR3HAW SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A partial tuition 
scholarship established in memory of Abraham Warshaw by Mr. and Mrs. Nathan 
Warshaw of New York City, to aid a deserving student. 

FRANK L. WEIL SCHOLARSHIP (1957) A full tuition scholarship set up by the 
Board of Trustees in grateful tribute to Mr. Frank L. Weil of New York City, 

honoring Mr. Weil's incumbency of six years as the first Chairman of the Fellows 
of the University. The scholarship goes each year, in perpetuity, to a gifted 
student who intends to prepare for a career in law or government. 

MR. AND MRS. DAVID W. WEINER SCHOLARSHIP (1957) Established by 
Mr. and Mrs. David W. Weiner of Fort Lee, New Jersey, for partial tuition 
assistance for gifted and needy students. 

CHARLES WEINREB SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition scholarship established by 
Mr. Charles Weinreb of Newton, Massachusetts, to aid a deserving student. 

SEYMOUR WEISS SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A partial tuition scholarship given by 
Mr. Seymour Weiss of New Orleans, Louisiana, to assist a deserving student. 

JACOB AND CILLIE WEIZENBLATT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1955) A 

partial tuition scholarship established by Dr. S. Weizenblatt of Asheville, North 
Carolina, in memory of his parents, to provide assistance for a student irrespec- 
tive of race, religion or sex, who needs and deserves help. 

RICHARD WELLING MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A partial tuition 
scholarship established by the National Self Government Committee of New York 
in memory of its distinguished founder, an award to be made available annually 
for his snior year to that student whose contribution to the development of 
student government at Brandeis University has been outstanding. 

[222 ] 



APPENDIX 

EVA H. WHITE SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established by Mr. Mack White of New 
York City in honor of his wife, Eva, to provide tuition assistance for a gifted 
and needy student. 

LAWRENCE AND MAE WIEN SCHOLARSHIP (1954) A scholarship created 
by Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. Wien of Weston, Connecticut, to aid a deserving 
student of outstanding ability. 

GOVERNOR G. MENNEN WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP (1957) A partial tuition 
scholarship set up by the Governor of Michigan in lieu of acceptance of ex- 
penses related to his visit to the University to address the student body. 

HERBERT WINTER SCHOLARSHIP (1952) A tuition scholarship established by 
Mr. Herbert Winter of New York City, to help a worthy student. 

AL WISE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1953) An annual partial tuition scholar- 
ship given by Mrs. Dorothy B. Wise of New York City, in memory of her hus- 
band, for aid to a deserving student regardless of race, creed or color. 

SIMON AND DORA WOLFSON SCHOLARSHIP (1953) A tuition scholarship 
to assist a worthy and needy student established by Mr. and Mrs. Howard E. 
Wolfson of Chicago, Illinois, in honor of Mr. Wolfson's parents. 

WOMEN'S DISTRICT GRAND LODGE No. 6 B'NAI B'RITH SCHOLARSHIP 
(1949) A partial tuition scholarship established by the Women's District Grand 
Lodge No. 6 B'nai B'rith of Chicago, Illinois, for aid to deserving' students. 

WOMEN'S SCHOLARSHB? ASSOCIATION (1947) Up to $400 of the principal 
of this fund of $5,000, contributed by the Women's Scholarship Association of 
; Boston, Massachusetts, plus accumulated interest, may be used each year to aid 
needy women students in their freshman year. 

TENA B. 2AMOISKI MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (1951) Established by the 
Zamoiski Foundation, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland, as a partial tuition scholar- 
ship in memory of Mr. Caiman J. Zamoiski's mother. 



[223] 



APPENDIX VII 



Loan Funds 

MR. AND MRS. NORMAN ASHER LOAN FUND (1953) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Norman Asher of Chicago, Illinois, with a grant of $1,000, for student 
loans, preference to be given to those majoring in science and mathematics. 
Loans to be repaid in accordance with University regulations. 

BETTY BALANTZOW REVOLVING LOAN FUND (1953) Established with an 
initial grant of $7,500 by Mr. Leonard Simons of Detroit, Michigan, and friends 
in memory of Mrs. Louis Balantzow of Cleveland, Ohio, to be used for loans 
for needy students and younger faculty members. Loans to be repaid in accord- 
ance with University regulations. 

SAMUEL J. AND ANNE MANSON CAPLAN LOAN FUND (1951) Established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Caplan of Detroit, Michigan, to aid worthy students. 
Loans to be repaid in accordance with University regulations. 

ESSIE W. AND ARTHUR COHEN LOAN FUND (1955) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Shapiro of Highland Park, Illinois, in honor of Mrs. Shapiro's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Cohen of Miami Beach, Florida. This loan fund 
may be drawn upon by students who need help in a critical period, without 
interest charges, to be repaid in accordance with the University regulations. 

COHEN FOUNDATION FUND (1951) Established by the Joseph H. Cohen and 
Sons Foundation with a grant of $450 through Mr. George L. Cohen of New 
York City, for loans to needy students. Loans to be repaid in accordance with 
University regulations. 

DORA-JOSEPH CLUB STUDENT LOAN FUND (1956) A contribution from the 
Dora-Joseph Club of Chicago, Illinois, to be used for loans to students. To be 
repaid in accordance with University regulations. 

ABRAHAM DVLINSKY MEMORIAL LOAN FUND (1953) Established with an 
initial grant of $650 by Mrs. Abraham Dvlinsky of Newtonville, Massachusetts, 
in memory of her husband, for loans to needy students and younger faculty mem- 
bers. Loans to be repaid in accordance with University regulations. 

MORRIS AND BESSIE FALK LOAN FUND (1954) Established by the Morris 
Falk Foundation in honor of Morris and Bessie Falk of Fitchburg, Massachusetts. 
This fund will make loans available to the same student for four years. Loans 
are to be repaid, without interest, on liberal terms in accordance with University 
regulations. 

MAURICE J. FELDMAN LOAN FUND (1955) Established by Mr. Maurice J. 
Feldman of Chicago, Illinois. Loans to be repaid in accordance with University 
regulations. 



[224] 



APPENDIX 

GENERAL LOAN FUND (1950) Established at the University by various con- 
tributors for loans to deserving students. The fund is to be administered in 
accordance with the University regulations on loans. 

SARAH GOLDBERG FUND (1955) Established through the Estate of Sarah 
Goldberg of New Bedford, Massachusetts, to aid deserving students. Loans to 
be repaid in accordance with University regulations. 

GOLDEN RULE LOAN FUND (1956) A fund established by Messrs. Ralph Car- 
son, Seymour Fabrick, Norman Hanak, Larry Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mayers, 
Messrs. Seymour Owens, Harry Painter, Jack Roberts and Phil Rosenberg of Los 
Angeles, California, to be utilized as a rotating living expense fund, with prefer- 
ence given to graduate students and younger faculty members. Loans to be repaid 
in accordance with University regulations. 

MATILDA WEIN GOODMAN MEMORIAL LOAN FUND (1956) Established 
by Mr. S. Wynn Goodman of Shaker Heights, Ohio, for loans to worthy and 
needy students. To be repaid in accordance with University regulations. 

COL. BERNARD L. GORFINKLE GRADUATE STUDENT LOAN FUND (1955) 

A loan fund established by Col. Bernard L. Gorfinkle of Boston, Massachusetts, 
to provide assistance to deserving graduate students. The fund is to be admin- 
istered in accordance with University regulations. 

HI CHARLIE FUND (1951) A portion of the proceeds of the annual student revue 
"Hi Charlie" has been set aside by the participants for the establishment of a 
loan fund to aid deserving students who might otherwise be unable to complete 
their education. The fund is to be administered by the University in accordance 
with its regulations. 

HOLYOKE HEBREW LADIES FREE LOAN SOCIETY (1954) A contribution 
from this Society of Holyoke, Massachusetts, for loans to students to be repaid 
in accordance with University regulations. 

FANNIE E. AND JACOB HORWITZ LOAN FUND (1954) Established by their 
daughter, Miriam, and an anonymous friend of the University for assistance to 
needy students, in remembrance of her own son's financial difficulties while at- 
tending Brandeis University. To be administered in accordance with the University 
regulations on loans. 

ALFRED J. KOBACKER STUDENT LOAN FUND (1957) Established by the 

Alfred J. Kobacker Memorial Foundation through Messrs. James and Arthur 

Kobacker of Steubenville, Ohio. Loans to be repaid in accordance with Uni- 
versity regulations. 

JACOB KORSEN MEMORIAL LOAN FUND (1956) Established in memory of 
Jacob Korsen by friends and relatives in Beverly Hills and Los Angeles, California, 
this loan fund is to be used exclusively for worthy students in the field of music. 

DORA KRAUS WELFARE LEAGUE FUND (1950) Established by the Dora Kraus 
Welfare League of New York City, to aid worthy students. Loans to be repaid 
in accordance with University regulations. 

[ 225 ] 



APPENDIX 

LOUIS K. LAMBERT MEMORIAL LOAN FUND (1951) Established by the family 
and friends of the late Louis K. Lambert of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, this fund 
is to be used for loans to all-round students rather than those whose interests 
are purely academic. Loans are to be repaid, without interest, in accordance with 
the individual's ability to pay, beginning two years after the completion of his 
academic career. 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL LERMAN STUDENT LOAN FUND (1955) Established 

by Mr. George Lerman of Newton, Massachusetts, in honor of his parents, Mr. 

and Mrs. Paul Lerman, on their 36th wedding anniversary. Loans to be repaid 
in accordance with University regulations. 

REBECCA AND EDWARD LEVINE LOAN FUND (1956) Established with an 
initial grant by Mr. and Mrs. Saul Fechtor of Brookline, Massachusetts, in honor 
of the 50th wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Levine of Newton, 
Massachusetts, for loans to students, to be repaid in accordance with University 
regulations. 

DR. SAMUEL A. AND ROSALIND W. LEVINE LOAN FUND (1952) A fund 
of $2,276.72 established by Dr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Levine of Newton Centre, 
Massachusetts, to provide loans to deserving students. The fund is to be ad- 
ministered by the University in accordance with regulations. 

PHILIP AND SALLY LOWN LOAN FUND (1955) A fund established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Philip Lown of Auburn, Maine, for loans to worthy students, members 
of the faculty or for administrative personnel. Loans to be repaid in accordance 
with University regulations. 

MARTIN ELLIOTT MANGEL FOUNDATION FUND (1950) Established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Emanuel Mangel of New York City, in memory of their son, Martin. 
Preference is to be given to all-round students rather than to those whose in- 
terests are purely academic. Loans to be repaid, without interest, in accordance 
with the individual's ability to pay, beginning two years after the completion of 
his education. 

SAMUEL PATROWICH LOAN FUND (1951) Established by Mr. Samuel B. 
Solomon of Detroit, Michigan, in memory of Samuel Patrowich, to be used 
for loans to worthy students. 

BENNETT A. PEMSTEIN STUDENT LOAN FUND (1955) A fund established 
through the Estate of Bennett A. Pemstein by the Pemstein family of Worcester, 
Massachusetts, for loans to deserving students. Loans to be repaid in accordance 
with University regulations. 

JOSEPH POLLAK LOAN FUND (1949) A fund contributed by Mr. Joseph Pollak 
of Dorchester, Massachusetts, for loans to worthy students, to be repaid in 
accordance with University regulations. 

JOSEPH AND LOTTIE RABINOVITZ STUDENT AID FUND (1949) Founded 
by the Stop and Shop employees and other friends of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Rabinovitz of Boston, Massachusetts, in honor of their Golden Wedding Anni- 
versary. A fund of $5,000 is available for loans to deserving students. Loans 
to be repaid in accordance with University regulations. 

[226] 



APPENDIX 

ST. LOUIS LOAN FUND (1953) Established by an anonymous friend of the Uni- 
versity for assistance to needy students, in remembrance of his own financial 
difficulties while attending the University of Illinois. 

JACK SATIN LOAN FUND (1953) A contribution from Mr. Jack Satin of Tulsa, 
Oklahoma, for loans to students, to be repaid in accordance with University 
regulations. 

JOSEPHINE N. SCHEY FREE LOAN FUND (1953) Established by the late 
Berthold M. Schey of New Rochelle, New York, in memory of his sister, with 
an initial grant of $2,000. Loans to be repaid in accordance with University 
- regulations. 

EVELYN SHEA LOAN FUND (1956) Established in honor of Miss Evelyn Shea 

of New York City by her buyers at the Lerner Shops, and further augmented by 

},., friends and associates. This fund will aid worthy students and may be drawn 

,.- upon by those who need help in a critical period, without interest, on liberal 

terms in accordance with University regulations. 

BEN AND ROSA STEIN MEMORIAL LOAN FUND (1952) Established with an 
initial grant by Mr. Phil Stein of Terre Haute, Indiana, in memory of his parents, 
and augmented by contributions from the family. Loans to be repaid in ac- 
cordance with University regulations. 

SARAH STRIER MEMORIAL LOAN FUND (1954) Established with a grant of 
, $5,000 under the terms di the Will of Sarah Strier of New York, for loans to 
faculty members. The fund is to be administered in accordance with University 
regulations. 

EDWARD A. SUISMAN FACULTY LOAN FUND (1952) A fund established 
by Mr. Edward A. Suisman of Hartford, Connecticut, to aid faculty members 
who are in need of emergency loans. Loans to be repaid in accordance with 
University regulations. 

ISRAEL AND BELLA UNTERBERG LOAN FUND (1957) Established in memory 
of Mr. and Mrs. Israel Unterberg of New York City by the Unterberg Family 
Group, to be used for loans to needy students. Loans to be repaid in accordance 
with University regulations. 

WIDOWS AND ORPHANS FUND (1952) A loan fund established by the Widows 

and Orphans Fund of the John Hancock Lodge No. 70 Memorial Fund of New 
York City, to aid worthy students. Loans to be repaid in accordance with Uni- 
versity regulations. 



[227] 



APPENDIX VIII 



Service Endowment and Service Funds 

MAX AND EVA APPLE SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP AWARD (1954) Established 
with an initial grant of $5,000 by Mr. and Mrs. Max Apple of Cleveland, Ohio, 
to provide student employment opportunities. 

HENRY I. AND BERTHA ARONSON FUND (1954) Created by Mr. Henry 
I. Aronson and the late Mrs. Aronson of Brookline, Massachusetts, to provide 
funds for employment of gifted and needy students. 

HARRY E. BASS SERVICE FUND (1953) Established with an initial grant of 
$1,000, and further augmented, by Mr. Harry E. Bass of Houlton, Maine, to finance 
student employment. 

MAX L. BEAR SERVICE FUND (1956) Established by Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. 
Marcus of Atlanta, Georgia, in memory of Mrs. Marcus' father, Max L. Bear, of 
Pensacola, Florida, to provide employment opportunities for worthy students. 

MRS. ESTHER BLACKER SERVICE FUND (1954) A memorial created by the 
staff of the South Omaha Sun, Dundee News and Blacker Printing Company of 
Omaha, Nebraska, to provide assistance through employment on campus to a worthy 
student. 

GEORGE S. CARP AND ROSE CARP SERVICE ENDOWMENT FUND (1951) 

Established under the terms of the Will of George S. Carp of Boston, Massachu- 
setts, this $5,000 fund is to be invested and the interest used to provide part-time 
employment for needy and deserving students. 

EDITH M. CHECK SERVICE ENDOWMENT FUND (1953) A $5,000 fund created 
as a memorial to Edith M. Check by her husband and son, Max M. and Isaac Dean 
Check of Brookline, Massachusetts, to give assistance to worthy students through 
employment on campus. 

CHARNA COWAN MEMORIAL SERVICE FUND (1955) Established in memory 
of Charna Cowan by the Pilgrim Foundation of Brockton, Massachusetts, this fund 

will provide assistance through employment to gifted and needy students who 
specialize in the creative arts. 

SELMA AND LOUIS GORDON STUDENT AID ENDOWMENT FUND (1956) 

Established by Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Gordon of Boston, Massachusetts, the 
income from this fund is to be used for assistance primarily to visually handicapped 
students; and secondly, to other needy students. 

GROSSMAN FAMILY TRUST ENDOWMENT SERVICE FUND (1955) A bene- 
faction created by Mr. Reuben A. Grossman and the Grossman Family Trust of 
Quincy, Massachusetts, to provide employment opportunities for needy and de- 
serving students. 

[228] 



APPENDIX 

REUBEN A. AND LIZZIE GROSSMAN SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Estab- 
lished by the employees of L. Grossman's, Inc., of Quincy Massachusetts, in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben A. Grossman on their Golden Wedding Anniversary. 
This fund will be used to provide employment opportunities for worthy students. 

MORRIS HOMONOFF ENDOWMENT SERVICE FUND (1954) An endowment 
fund established with an initial grant of $1,000 by the wife and children of Morris 
Homonoff of Brighton, Massachusetts, in honor of his 70th birthday. The income 
from this fund to be used each year to aid needy and deserving students. 

BENJAMIN MILLER ENDOWMENT SERVICE FUND (1955) A benefaction 
created as a memorial to Benjamin Miller through the Trustees of his Estate. The 
income from this fund will provide needed help for worthy students who require 
financial assistance in order to complete their college program. 

DR. DAVID MONASH SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP (1956) Established as a memorial 
to her husband by Mrs. David Monash of Chicago, Illinois, to provide assistance 
for gifted and needy students through employment opportunities on campus. 

ABRAHAM PERSKY FUND (1951) Under the terms of this benefaction from Mr. 
Abraham Persky of Worcester, Massachusetts, an annual grant is to be made 
available in support of the student employment program. 

ALAN I. STERN SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND (1957) Estab- 
lished as a memorial tribute to their son, Alan, by Mr. and Mrs. Morris Stern of 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and other members of the family. The income will be 
used to provide service opportunities for needy students. 

IDA AND JENNIE WEXELMAN MEMORIAL SERVICE ENDOWMENT FUND 
(1957) Established by Miss Yetive Wexelmah of Chicago, Illinois, in memory 
of her mother and sister, the income of which will provide employment oppor- 
tunities for needy students. 



[229] 



APPENDIX IX 



Prizes 

MAX, BERTHA AND NORMAN M. BEHR SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE (1950) Estab- 
lished by Mr. Julian J. Behr of Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of his parents and 
brother. An award of $50 will be made each year by the Faculty Committee to 
a student for some outstanding achievement to be determined by the Committee. 

LOUIS D. BRANDEIS HONORARY SCHOLARSHIPS (1950) Established as a 
prize designation without stipend. To be awarded each year to twelve students who 
have Dean's List standing and who, in the opinion of the Committee, are deserving 
of recognition for scholastic attainments. 

JOSEPH AND IDA BUTMAN AWARD (1953) The income from this fund estab- 
lished by the family and friends of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Butman of Swampscott, 
Massachusetts, in honor of their Golden Wedding Anniversary, is to be used as 
an annual prize to a gifted student who displays scholarship and general leadership. 

PATRICK THOMAS CAMPBELL AWARD IN HISTORY (1951) A tribute to an 
outstanding educator, this $50 annual award is to be made to a student selected by 
the Faculty Committee on Awards in recognition of distinction in the field of 
history. Established by Messrs. Sidney, Norman and Irving Rabb of Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

CLASS OF 1955 ENDOWMENT FUND PRIZE (1955) Approximately six awards 
of $10 each, established from the Class of 1955 Fund, to be given annually com- 
mencing with the academic year 1960-61. These prizes, in the form of books, will 
be awarded to students who have demonstrated extraordinary academic or creative 
achievement in any field of endeavor within the four schools of the University. 

PHYLLIS AND LEE COFFEY AWARD IN MUSIC (1955) An award of $100 
established by Mr. and Mrs. Lee Coffey of New York City, to be presented to 
a student outstanding in the field of music. 

SIDNEY S. COHEN PRIZE AWARD IN ECONOMICS (1951) The income from 
this fund established by Mr. Sidney S. Cohen of St. Louis, Missouri, to be awarded 
to one or two students for outstanding work in the field of economics. 

SAUL AND SARAH FECHTOR PRIZE (1953) A prize of $100 to be awarded to 
a student selected by the Faculty Committee on Awards, who excels in the field 
of political science. Given by Mr. and Mrs. Saul Fechtor of Boston, Massachusetts. 

YOLANDA AND LOUIS FLEISCHMANN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (1955) Es- 
tablished by the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Louis Fleischmann Benevolent Society, 
Inc., of New York City, as an annual award of $25. This prize is to be presented 
to a student in the graduating class on the basis of outstanding leadership in 
Jewish activities. 



[ 230 ] 



APPENDIX 

ISRAEL AND FANNIE L. FRIEDLANDER AWARD (1957) Established by Mrs. 
Israel Friedlander of Waban, Massachusetts, in memorial tribute to her beloved 
husband. This award is to be presented to a student outstanding in the field of 
music. 

CANTOR I. G. GLICKSTEIN MEMORIAL AWARD (1954) An annual prize estab- 
lished by the Glickstein Family Circle in memory of Cantor I. G. Glickstein. 
This prize, in the form of a book or set of books, to be purchased by the Uni- 
versity and presented to a student outstanding in the field of Hebrew studies. 

ELI D. AND MOLLIE L. GOODSTEIN ENDOWMENT FUND PRIZE (1954) Es- 
tablished by Mr. Eli D. Goodstein of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, the income from 
this fund is to be used as an annual prize to a student outstanding in the study 
of Spanish. 

ELI D. AND MOLLIE L. GOODSTEIN ENDOWMENT FUND PRIZE (1955) 

Established by Mr. Eli D. Goodstein of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, the income of 
which is to be awarded as an annual prize to a student outstanding in the study 
of Hebrew. 

BESSIE GREENWALD PRIZE IN JUDAIC STUDIES (1957) Established by Mrs. 
Bessie Greenwald of Brooklyn, New York, as an annual prize to be awarded 
to an outstanding student in the field of Judaic studies. 

HENDEL FAMILY ASSOCIATION PRIZE (1954) Established as an annual prize 
by the Hendel Family of New London, Connecticut. To be awarded each year 
at Commencement to a freshman who excels academically in all areas of study. 

HI CHARLIE AWARD (1951) Established by the Hi Charlie Association of 
Brandeis University. This award is to be given to a graduating student, or stu- 
dents, who have made an outstanding contribution to the Theatre Arts Depart- 
ment and the activities of this organization. 

BRUCE R. MAYPER MEMORIAL AWARD (1950) The income from this fund 
established by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mayper of New York City, in memory of 
their son, is to be used for an annual award of not less than $100 to a "regularly 
enrolled student at the University who, in the judgment of a Faculty Committee, 
is deemed worthy of recognition for general activities promoting interracial amity 
or for individual work in the field of interracial relations." 

FLORENCE AND CHARLES H. MILENDER PRIZE IN MUSIC (1953) A fund 
established by Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Milender of Boston, Massachusetts, the 
income to be used for an annual prize to a student excelling in music. 

DR. JOSEPH GARRISON PARKER PRIZE (1954) An endowment fund established 
by Dr. and Mrs. Philip Parker of New York City, in memory of their beloved 
son, the income to be used annually at Commencement as a prize for a student 
outstanding in the field of science or creative arts. 

LOUIS P. RABINOVITZ ENDOWMENT ART AND SCHOLARSHIP FUND (1957) 

An endowment fund established by the Trustees under the terms of the Louis P. 
Rabinovitz Trust Fund of Boston, Massachusetts, to provide an annual award of 
$100 to the student who shall have been judged to have exhibited the most 
promising work in painting, sculpture, or the graphic arts. 

[231] 



APPENDIX 

ISRAEL RAVREBY AWARD (1951) The Student Council of Brandeis University 
has set aside $50 for an award to a student, selected by the Committee on Awards, 
in recognition of outstanding performance in the field of mathematics or chemistry. 
This allocation was made in memory of Israel Ravreby, a member of the Class 
of 1952. 

TIBIE ROSENFIELD AWARD (1955) Established by Mr. Coleman Rosenfield of 
West Hollywood, Florida, in honor of his mother. An award of $50 will be 
made each year to a student outstanding in the field of dramatics. 

MITCHELL M. ROSSER MEMORIAL FUND PRIZE (1955) Established by the 
Trustees of the Mitchell M. Rosser Memorial Fund of Chestnut Hill, Massachu- 
setts, to be awarded to the undergraduate submitting the best paper on the follow- 
ing subject: 'The Newman Clubs nationally — and how the Newman Club at 
Brandeis University might best contribute to the continuance of the exemplary 
spirit of understanding that now exists in this non-sectarian University." 

ROSE SCHLOW AWARD (1950) The income from this $2,000 fund is to be used 
for an award to a student designated by the Faculty Committee on Awards, who, 
by thoughtfulness and kindness to others rather than by academic brilliance, has 
contributed to the well-being of his fellow students. Established in her memory 
by her children, Mr. Charles Schlow and Mrs. A. Leopold of State College, 
Pennsylvania. 

ESTHER L. SCHNEIDER AWARD OF THE NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 
(1955) Established by the National Women's Committee of Brandeis University 
to honor outgoing National Presidents. The award is to be given annually to a 
student who has demonstrated leadership in campus activities and who, through 
academic achievement, exemplifies the well-rounded student. 

ROSE SERKESS MEMORIAL AWARD (1956) Established in her memory by her 
husband, Joseph, and family of Boston, Massachusetts. This award is to be given, 
in the form of appropriate books, to the female student majoring in Philosophy 
or Philosophy of Religion, who best exemplifies humanitarian idealism. 

DR. PHILIP SHER SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE (1954) Established by Dr. Philip Sher 
of Omaha, Nebraska", as a prize for the student presenting the best essay on 
"Racial and Religious Mutual Respect." 

MELVIN M. SNIDER PRIZE IN CHEMISTRY (1954) Established in his memory 
by his wife and children, the income from this fund will be awarded annually 
as a prize to a student outstanding in the field of chemistry. 

FANNIE SPIELMAN MEMORIAL PRIZE (1957) An annual prize to be given 
to the student writing the best piano composition, contributed by Mrs. Amelia 
S. Zeisler of Los Angeles, California, in memory of her beloved mother. 

BEN AND ROSA STEIN ANNUAL MEMORIAL PRIZE IN CREATIVE ARTS 
(1952) A $50 prize to be awarded annually to a deserving graduating student 
in the field of creative arts. Contributed by Mr. Phil Stein of Terre Haute, Indiana, 
in memory of his parents. 

[232 3 



APPENDIX 

IDA STEIN MEMORIAL AWARD (1954) An annual $100 award established by 
Mr. Harry Stein of Newtonville, Massachusetts, in memory of his beloved mother, 
to be presented to the student who combines scholastic ability with good sports- 
manship and athletic achievement, as demonstrated in either intramural or varsity 
athletics. The recipient of this award will also have his name inscribed on the 
Ida Stein Memorial Trophy permanently housed in the Trophy Room of the 
Abraham Shapiro Athletic Center. 

TEMPLE SHALOM PRIZE (1950) A $50 prize to be awarded to a student who is 
a candidate for Hebrew Union College, for excellence in Hebrew. Contributed 
by the pupils of the Temple Shalom Religious School of Newton, Massachusetts. 

JACOB AND BELLA THURMAN AWARDS (1950) The income from this $3,000 
fund is to be used for an award each year to a "student or students who have 
demonstrated the highest type of social citizenship; who have displayed kindli- 
ness, sympathetic understanding, and high moral character in the judgment of 
the faculty and of their fellow students." Established in memory of Jacob and 
Bella Thurman by their children. 

EUGENE M. WARREN POETRY PRIZE (1952) A fund established by Mrs. 
Eugene M. Warren of Boston, Massachusetts, in memory of her husband, as an 
annual award for excellence in poetry. 

YIDDISH CULTURE CLUB PRIZE (1954) Established by the Yiddish Culture 
Club of Boston, Massachusetts. This prize is to be awarded to the student writing 
the best essay, between 2500 and 3000 words in length, on any subject pertaining 
to Yiddish literature. 



[ 233 ] 



APPENDIX X 



Research Funds and Grants 

AGOOS FAMILY CHARITY FUND RESEARCH GRANT (1956) Established by 
the Agoos Family Charity Fund of Boston, Massachusetts, for research in the 
Life Sciences. 

MAY BALKIN RESEARCH FUND (1957) Established through a bequest under the 
terms of the Will of May Balkin of Kansas City, Kansas, to aid in the research 
program of the University, with special emphasis on cancer research. 

SAM BEBER RESEARCH FUND (1955) Established by Mr. Sam Beber of Park 
Forest, Illinois, for the purpose of strengthening the research program of the 
University. 

JACK G. BERMAN SCIENCE RESEARCH FUND (1954) Established by Mrs. Jack 
G. Berman of Brookline, Massachusetts, and friends in memory of Jack G. Ber- 
man. This fund will enable gifted young scientists at Brandeis University to 
develop their research plans. 

ETHEL BRESLOFF FUND (1954) Established through a bequest from the Estate 
of Ethel Bresloff of Boston, Massachusetts, administered by Col. Bernard L. Gor- 
finkle, this fund is to be used primarily for research in developing a history of the 
early Jewish settlers in the North End of Boston. 

FREDERICK GARDNER COTTRELL GRANT (1956) Established by the Board of 

Directors of Research Corporation of New York City and awarded to Dr. Saul 
G. Cohen, Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis University, to support his work 
in asymmetric synthesis. 

FREDERICK GARDNER COTTRELL GRANT (1956) Established by the Board 
of Directors of Research Corporation of New York City and awarded to Dr. 
Harold Conroy, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis University, for 
research on "The Structure of Aspidospermine." 

FREDERICK GARDNER COTTRELL GRANT (1955) Established by the Board 
of Directors of Research Corporation of New York City to support Dr. Sidney 
Golden, Associate Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis University, in his project 
entitled "Physical-Chemical Aspects of Alkali Metal-Pyridine Reactions." 

GROSBERG FAMILY CHARITY FUND RESEARCH GRANT (1956) Established 
by the Grosberg Family Charity Fund, Inc., of Boston, Massachusetts, for research 
in the Life Sciences. 

MAX ISAACSON RESEARCH FUND (1956) Established by Mr. Max Isaacson of 
Dayton, Ohio, for research in the Life Sciences. 

[234] 



APPENDIX 

JOINT COMMISSION ON MENTAL ILLNESS AND HEALTH GRANT (1956) 

A grant in support of an interdepartmental seminar on social and cultural back- 
grounds of mental health, awarded to Dr. Stanley Diamond, Assistant Professor 
of Anthropology, and Mr. Maurice Stein, Assistant Professor of Sociology, at 
Brandeis University. 

ISAAC AND ESTHER KAPLAN RESEARCH FUND (1953) Established by friends 
in honor of the 50th wedding anniversary of Isaac and Esther Kaplan of Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

SIMON G. LATIES RESEARCH FUND (1951) Established with an initial grant 
from Mr. Simon G. Laties of Peabody, Massachusetts, to help finance the re- 
search program at the University. 

JANE LIEBERMAN RESEARCH FUND (1956) Established by friends of Mrs. 
Bernard Lieberman of Huntington Woods, Michigan, to subsidize research at the 
University. 

MARY MANN PHILANTHROPIC LEAGUE, INC., RESEARCH GRANT (1955) 

Established by the Mary Mann Philanthropic League, Inc., of New York City, for 
research in the Life Sciences. 

HAL A. MILLER RESEARCH FUND (1954) An annual contribution from Mrs. 
Menasha E. Katz of Baltimore, Maryland, to encourage research at the University. 

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE GRANT (1956) Awarded by the United States 
Public Health Service, Federal Security Agency, to Dr. Albert Kelner, Associate 
Professor of Biology at Brandeis University, for research in microbial growth 
and genetics. 

NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT (1957) Awarded by the United 
States Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, Division of Research 
Grants, to Dr. Orrie M. Friedman, Associate Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis 
University, for research on "Chemotherapy of Cancer." 

NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT (1957) Awarded by the United 
States Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, Division of Research 
Grants, to Dr. Orrie M. Friedman, Associate Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis 
University, for research on "Degradation of Desoxyribose Nucleic Acid." 

NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT (1956) Awarded by the United 
States Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, to Dr. Saul G. Cohen, 
Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis University, for research on "Asymmetry in 
reactions of molecules of type Ca, b, d, d." 

NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT (1956) Awarded by the United 
States Public Health Service, Federal Security Agency, to Dr. Herman T. Epstein, 
Associate Professor of Biophysics at Brandeis University, for research on the sub- 
ject, "Reproductive Sites in Phage-infected Cells." 

NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT (1956) Awarded by the United 
States Public Health Service, Federal Security Agency, to Dr. Harold P. Klein, 
Associate Professor of Biology at Brandeis University, for a project entitled "Syn- 
thesis of Lipids in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae." 

[235] 



APPENDIX 

NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT (1956) Awarded by the United 
States Public Health Service, Federal Security Agency, to Dr. Harold Conroy, 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis University, for research in "Structure 
and Theological Biogenesis of Some Dihydroindole Alkaloids." 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRANT (1957) Awarded to Dr. Margaret 
Lieb, Assistant Professor of Biology at Brandeis University, to support a re- 
search project of "Mechanisms of Mutation in Microorganisms." 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRANT (1956) Awarded to Dr. Harold 
P. Klein, Associate Professor of Biology at Brandeis University, for reasearch 
on "Formation of Alpha-Amylase by Pseudomonas Saccharophila." 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRANT (1956) Awarded to Dr. Richard 
Held, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Brandeis University, for research on 
"The Role of Reafference in Spatial Coordination." 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRANT (1954) Awarded to Dr. Saul 
G. Cohen, Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis University, for research on the 
"Chemistry of Free Radicals." 

OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH GRANT (1955) Awarded by the Department of 
the Navy, Office of Naval Research, to Dr. Sidney Golden, Associate Professor 
of Chemistry at Brandeis University, for research in the application of quantum 
mechanics to problems of molecular structure and chemical kinetics. 

ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION GRANT (1957) Awarded by the Commission on 
Legal and Political Theory of the Rockefeller Foundation to Dr. John P. Roche, 
Professor of Politics at Brandeis University, for research on the changing con- 
ception of individual liberty in the United States. 

DOROTHY H. AND LEWIS ROSENSTIEL FOUNDATION RESEARCH FUND 
(1956) A grant of $840,000 whose income and principal, over a period not to 
exceed ten years, is to be expended for basic research in biochemistry with special 
reference to glandular disorders. The research is to be conducted in the Rosenstiel 
Wing of the Science Center, largely financed through a supplementary grant of 
$160,000 from the Dorothy H. and Lewis Rosenstiel Foundation of New York City. 

SAMUEL RUBIN FOUNDATION FUND (1954) This fund has been established 
by the Samuel Rubin Foundation of New York City, through contributions 
totalling $200,000, for the purpose of further developing the area of anthropology 
at the University and of subsidizing a planned program of archaeological research 
in the history of early man. 

SMART RESEARCH FUND (1953) Established by the Smart Foundation of Chicago, 
Illinois, to help finance the cancer research project of Dr. Albert Kelner, Associate 
! Professor of Biology at Brandeis University. 

SMITH, KLINE & FRENCH FOUNDATION RESEARCH FUND (1955) Estab- 
lished by the Smith, Kline & French Foundation of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
to support research in the field of biology at Brandeis University. 

[236] 



APPENDIX 

ABRAHAM AND REBECCA SNIDER SCIENCE FUND (1953) Established by the 
late Melvin Snider in honor of the 50th wedding anniversary of his parents, 
Abraham and Rebecca Snider of Brookline, Massachusetts, to be used in the field 
of scientific research. 

I. JOSEPH UNGER MEMORIAL SCIENCE GRANT (1954) Created by Mrs. Ida 
K. Unger of Cleveland, Ohio, in memory of her husband, the funds to be used 
for scientific research, with some emphasis on cancer research. 

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE GRANT (1956) Awarded by the United States Air 
Force, Office of Scientific Research, to Dr. Eugene P. Gross, Associate Professor 
of Physics at Brandeis University, to support research on "Collision Processes 
in Gases." 

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION GRANT (1957) Awarded 
by the United States Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Research, to Dr. 
Henry Linschitz, Associate Professor of Chemistry at Brandeis University, for 
research on "Photochemical Reactions of Complex Molecules." 

ABRAHAM WARSHAW RESEARCH FUND (1951) Established by the late 
Abraham Warshaw of New York City through the Abraham and Mae Warshaw 
Foundation, Inc., to provide funds for the science program of Brandeis Uni- 
versity, with special reference to cancer research. This fund has been further 
augmented, in his memory, by the family. 

WATER RESEARCH FUND (1956) Established by Mr. Henry L. Shuldener of New 
York City, for the purpose of strengthening the research program of the University, 
with special emphasis in the field of water chemistry. 

SAMUEL WEINRESS RESEARCH FUND (1956) Established by Mr. Samuel Wein- 
ress of Chicago, Illinois, for research in the Life Sciences. 

SAUL AND MILDRED WEINRESS RESEARCH FUND (1956) Established by Mr. 
Saul Weinress of Chicago, Illinois, for research in the Life Sciences. 

WALLACE WEINRESS RESEARCH FUND (1956) Established by Mr. Wallace 

Weinress of Chicago, Illinois, for research in the Life Sciences. 



[237] 



APPENDIX XI 



Special Grants 

JOSEPH B. ABRAMS AND ANNA THURMAN ABRAMS PHILATELIC COLLEC- 
TION (1950) A substantial collection of valuable stamp series presented by 
Mr. Joseph B. Abrams of Brookline, Massachusetts. In later years income from 
the collection will be used for the needs of the University. 

BRANDEIS TRIBUTE FUND (1948) A special fund for the general operating 
expenses of the University has been established by friends of Brandeis University. 
This fund may be augmented from time to time in honor of happy occasions or 
as a memorial to departed dear ones. 

CREATIVE ARTS AWARDS (1956) A fund of $10,000 from friends of the Crea- 
tive Arts Program supplemented by a University allocation, to be assigned each 
year as awards for outstanding achievement in the areas of music, theatre, sculp- 
ture, painting, and poetry. The awards will be determined by a jury which, each 
year, will be selected by the University. 

HARVARD— BRANDEIS LEGAL CODIFICATION PROJECT (1956) A fund of 
$100,000, underwritten by a group of friends who are interested in helping to 
create a modern logical code of law for the State of Israel, which makes possible 
a co-operative venture sponsored jointly by the Harvard Law School and 
Brandeis University. 

HARRY B. HELMSLEY FUND (1956) A grant of $75,000 allocated by an outstand- 
ing Quaker family. Principal and interest are to be disbursed in a period not 
to exceed ten years for the purpose of bringing to the campus noteworthy per- 
sonalities from every faith and creed, whose message may help to promote inter- 
faith amity and to break down the barriers that separate races, creeds and colors. 

SIDNEY HILLMAN LECTURESHIPS (1954) Established by the Sidney Hillman 
Foundation, Inc., of New York City, to subsidize lectures in the area of the late 
Sidney Hillman's interests. 

RAYTHEON MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC, GRANT (1957) A grant 
of $5,000 to help support the Institute in Theoretical Physics in the 1957 summer 
school of Brandeis University. 

UNITED STATES STEEL FOUNDATION GRANT (1957) A special unearmarLed 
grant to assist the University in the fulfillment of its general needs. 



[238] 



APPENDIX XII 



General Education S 

Below are some former participants in the General Education S series. For 
description of this course, see page 111 . 



Archibald MacLeish 



Alfred A. Knopf 
Herbert Block (Herblock) 
Harrison Brown 
Mordecai M. Kaplan 
Pierre Emanuel 
Hugh Gaitskill 
Martha Graham 
Eleanor Roosevelt 
norbert weiner 



Leonard Bernstein 
Norman Thomas 
Danny Kaye 
Sidney Hook 
Margaret Mead 

Lewis Mumford 
Elia Kazan 
Leo Szilard 

Harlow Shapley 

PlTIRIM A. SOROKIN 

Alvin S. Johnson 
Margaret Webster 
Robert Frost 
G. Mennen Williams 
Thurman Arnold 

Aaron Copland 



Poet and Boylston Professor of Rhetoric 

and Oratory, Harvard University 

President, Alfred A. Knopf, Publishers 

Cartoonist 

California Institute of Technology 

Professor of Homiletics, Jewish Theological Seminary 

Jacob Ziskind Professor 

Leader of the British Labor Party 

Choreographer 



Professor of Mathematics, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Composer and Conductor 

Political Leader 

Comedian 

Professor of Philosophy, New York University 

Associate Curator of Ethnology, 

American Museum of Natural History, New York 

Philosopher and Author 

Director 

Professor, Institute of Radio biology 

and Biophysics, University of Chicago 

Harvard College Observatory 

Research Center for Creative Altruism, 

Harvard University 

President Emeritus, New School for Social Research 

Actress and Director 

Poet 

Governor of Michigan 

Legal Counsel, National Association for the 

Advancement of Colored People 

Composer and Conductor 



[239] 



APPENDIX XIII 



Creative Arts Awards Commission 

To extend recognition and assistance for outstanding achievement in the fields 
of music, poetry, painting and sculpture, and the theatre, Brandeis University 
has inaugurated annual Creative Arts Awards. Medal awards are presented 
for creative accomplishment, and grants-in-aid to promising young artists in 
each of the four fields. 

The Commission 

David B. Wodlinger, Chairman Mrs. Milton Steinberg, Secretary 

Harry N. Abrams 
Arthur Berger 
Clarence Q. Berger 
Leonard Bernstein 
James Cunningham 
Enrico Donati 



Edwin Eisendrath 
Marjorie Falk 
Irving Fine 
Edgar Kaufmann, Jr. 
Louis Kronenberger 



James Laughlin 
Adele Rosenwald Levy 
John Matthews 
Hermon More 
Earl Morse 
Mitchell Siporin 
Samuel L. Slosberg 
Carlton Sprague Smith 
Nathan Spingold 
Anita Warburg 
Mrs. Milton Weill 



Peter Grippe Designer of the Brandeis University Creative Arts Award Medal 

The First Annual Awards 

Presented at the Ambassador Hotel, New York City, March 3, 1957. 



Nelson A. Rockefeller 

MUSIC AWARDS JURY 

Arthur Berger 
Milton Babbitt 
Otto Luening 
Wallingford Riegger 
Norman dello Joio 



Presentation of Awards 

POETRY AWARDS JURY 

James Cunningham 
John Brinnin 
Louise Bogan 
Marianne Moore 
Robert Lowell 



[240] 



APPENDIX 

PAINTING AWARDS JURY THEATRE AWARDS JURY 

Mitchell Siporin Louis Kronenberger 

John Baur Frances Ferguson 

Isabel Bishop William Inge 

Meyer Schapiro Lillian Hellman 

James Johnson Sweeney Robert Whitehead 

Edgar Kaufmann, Jr. Marc Connelly 

MEDAL RECIPIENTS 

William Schuman, Music Composer and president of the 

Juilliard School of Music 

William Carlos Williams, Poetry Physician and poet 

Stuart D avis, Painting Contemporary artist of New York City 

Hallie Flanagan Davis, Theatre Professor-emeritus of Theatre Arts 

at Smith College 

GRANTS-IN-AID RECIPIENTS 

Robert Kurka, Music Composer at Columbia University 

James Ernst, Painting Assistant Professor at Brooklyn College 

The Shakespearewrights, Theatre A group of New York City players 

KATHERINE Hoskins, Poetry Author of "Villa Narcisse," etc. 



[241] 



APPENDIX XIV 

Art Acquisitions Commission 

The following committee has been appointed by Brandeis University to select 
works to be added to its art collection. 

Mitchell Siporin, Chairman Associate professor of Fine Arts, 

and artist-in-residence at Brandeis University 



Walter Spink, Secretary 



Bartlett Hayes 



Instructor of Fine Arts, and curator of the 
Brandeis University Art Collection 

Director, Addison Gallery of American Art, 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts 



Director, Whitney Museum of American Arts, 

New York City 

Chairman, Department of Fine Arts, Washington Square 
College, New York University, New York City 



John I. H. Baur 

H. W. Janson 

Nathaniel Saltonstall Architect and art collector of Boston, Massachusetts 



[242] 



APPENDIX XV 
Index of Courses 

PAGE 

American Civilization 80 

American History 80 

American Literature 84 

Anthropology 84 

Arabic 87 

Aramaic 87 

Bacteriology 87 

Biochemistry 87 

Biological Science 90 

Biology 90 

Chemistry 96 

Comparative Literature 99 

Economics 102 

Education 105 

English 105 

English Composition 110 

European Languages and Literature 110 

Fine Arts Ill 

French 115 

General Education S 117 

General Science 118 

German 118 

Greek 121 

[243] 



PAGE 

Hebrew 121 

History , ..,< 125 

History of Ideas 128 

Humanities . . . ... . . 131 

Italian 131 

Latin 132 

Linguistics 132 

Mathematics 132 

Music 134 

Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 141 

Philosophy 147 

Physical Science 150 

Physics 151 

Politics 156 

Psychology 160 

Romance Languages and Literature 167 

Semitics 167 

Social Science 167 

Sociology 167 

Spanish 172 

Theatre Arts 174 

Ugaritic 177 



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