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Full text of "Geographic dictionary of Alaska"

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1773785 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTIOM 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01103 793 



5Tth Congress, < HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ) Document 

J.^t Sessiwi. f "l Xo. 469. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 



BULLETIN 



UNITED STATES 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



c No. 187 

qi ^. 8 

SERIES F, OEOGRAPHY, 27 



GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA.— Bakep 



WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
1901 



UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

CHARLES 1). WALCOTT, DIRECTOR 



GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA 



BY 



MARCUS BAKER 




WASHINGTON 

GOVEKNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

10 02 



1773785 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Letter of transmittal 

United States Board on Geographic Names ■ 

Executive order of September 4, 1890 9 

Members and officers, September, 1901 - - 10 

Adoption of dictionary 

Introduction 

Origin of dictionary - 

Plan and scope 

Mode of preparation " 

Origin of names 

Principles employed and reforms attempted 

Authorities 

In chronologic order ' 

In alphabetic order - 

Conclusion „^ 

Dictionary 

5 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Washington, D. C, July 31. 1901. 
Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith the manuscript oi a 
Geographic Dictionary of Alaska. This dictionary, prepared by Mr. 
Marcus Baker, of the United States Board on Geographic Names, has 
been provisionally approved b}' the Board, and b}' its direction is 
tran.smitted to you with the request that it be printed as a Bulletin 
of the United States Geological Survey. 

Henet Gannett, 
Chairman of JJ. S. Board on Geographic Names. 

Hon. Charles D. Walcott, 

Director of United States Geological Survey. 

7 



UNITED STATES BOARD ON GEOGRAPHIC NAMES. 

EXECUTIVE ORDER. 

As it is desirable that uniform usage in regard to geographic nomen- 
clature and orthograph}' obtain throughout the executive departments 
of the Government, and particularly upon the maps and charts issued 
by the various departments and bureaus, I hereby constitute a Board 
on Geographic Names, and designate the following persons, who have 
heretofore cooperated for a similar purpose under the authority of the 
several departments, bureaus, and institutions with which the}' are 
connected, as members of said Board: 

Prof. Thomas C. Mendenhall, United States Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, chairman. 

Andrew H. Allen, Department of State. 

Capt. Henry L. Howison. Light-House Board, Treasury Depart- 
ment. 

Capt. Thomas Turtle, Engineer Corps, War Department. 

Lieut. Richardson Clover, Hydrographic Office, Nav}' Department. 

Pierson H. Bristow, Post-Office Department. 

Otis T. Mason, Smithsonian Institution. 

Herljert G. Ogden, United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

Henry Gannett, United States Geological Survey. 

Marcus Baker, United States Geological Survey. 

To this Board shall be referred all unsettled questions concerning 
geographic names which arise in the departments, and the decisions 
of the Board are to be accepted by these departments as che standard 
authoritj' in such matters. 

Department officers are instructed to afford such assistance as may 
be proper to carry on the work of this Board. 

The members of this Board shall serve without additional compensa- 
tion, and its organization shall entail no expense on the Government. 

Benj. Harrison. 

Executive Mansion, 

September ^, 1S90. 



10 



UNITED STATES BOAED ON GEOGRAPHIC NAMES. 



MEMBERS AND OFFICERS, DECEMBER, igoi. 



Henry Gannett, Cliairman, 

Unitod States Geological Survey. 
MARCrs Bakeu, Sccreturi/, 

United States Geological Survey. 
Andrew H. Ai>len, 

Department of State. 
Capt. H. T. Brian, 

Government Printing OfTice. 
John Hyde, 

Department of Agriculture. 
A. B. Johnson, 

Treasury Department. 
Harry King, 

General Land Office. 



Maj. J. L. LusK, U. S. Engineers, 

War Department. 
Prof. O. T. Mason, 

Smithsonian Institution. 
H. G. 0(;den, 

Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Lieut. Commander W. H. H. Souther- 
land, U. S. N., 

Navy Department. 
A. Von Haake, 

Post-Office Department. 



ADOPTION OF DICTIONARY. 

At a special meeting of the United States Board on Geographic 
Names held July 29, 1901, the following resolution was adopted: 

Wherea.s the United States Board on Geographic Names some ten years ago deter- 
mined to i)repare a dictionary of Alaska geographic names and appointed a commit- 
tee vi^hich began the work of collecting the material therefor; and 

Whereas such committee, consisting of i\Iessrs. H. G. Ogden and Marcus Baker, 
entered n\n)n the work and prosecuted it for two or three years, collecting the names 
from all pul)lished and original sources; and 

Whereas Mr. Marcus Baker has since collected and discussed the evidence relat- 
ing to the names and alternatives, in connection with his official duties, and has 
written the dictionary: Therefore, 

Resolved, That the Board approve this dictionary, thus prepared, and provisionally 
adopt the approved forms contained therein. 

A few revisions of previous decisions have been made and embodied 
in this dictionary, which supersedes all previous Alaskan lists. 



GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. 



Bv Marcus Baker. 



INTRODUCTION. 

ORIGIN. 



This dictionary is the outgrowth of work undertaken by the Board on 
Geog-raphic Names about ten years ago. Shortly after the Board was 
orgaiiized there was submitted to it a list of two or three hundred 
names of geographic features in Alaska, the names of which were 
variously s'pelled or which bore two or more different names. The 
Board studied these names, sought information and advice from experts, 
and finally decided all the cases. But the studies made in order to 
ascertain the facts and to establish principles for guidance in the deter- 
mination of cases made it plain that nothing short of a complete 
revision of all the geographic names in Alaska could yield satisfactory 
results. Accordingly the Board , after full discussion, decided to under- 
take such revision and to prepare a geographic dictionary. For this 
purpose it appointed a committee to collect and arrange the material. 
The committee consisted of Messrs. H. G. Ogden, of the Coast and 
Geodetic Survey, and Marcus Baker, of the Geological Survey. The 
territory was divided, Mr. Ogden undertaking to catalogue the names 
in Alexander archipelago and Mr. Baker those in the remamder of 

the Territory. 

In September, 1893, the committee reported that about i,300 names 
had then been entered upon cards— about 2,400 in southeastern Alaska, 
by Mr. Ogden, and 1,900 in central, western and northern Alaska, by 
Mr Baker. For some years thereafter comparatively little progress 
was made in this work. ^ The cataloguing had been carried on as mci- 
dental to other duties, and with increasing demands the dictionary 
work came to a standstill. Thus it remained for several years, save 
for a little time given to it now and then. 

Meanwhile the gold discoveries had quickened public interest in 
Alaska. Prospectors swarmed into the Territory and there were 
numerous exploring and surveying expeditions sent out by the War, 



12 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

Treasury, and Interior departments. From these resulted large addi- 
tions to .i>(>()oi'jiphic knowledge and to the list of names, especially of 
features in the interior. The United States Geological Survey took 
an active part in this interior exploration, and thus the Director 
found urgent need of the dictionary as an aid in preparing and pub- 
lishing reports on Alaska. Accordingly in June, 1900, he directed 
the writer to complete it. Since that time the work has progressed 
with little interruption to completion, and it was adopted by the 
Board on Geographic Names on July 29, 1901. 

PLAN AND SCOPE. 

The plan of this dictionary is to show in one alphabetical list all the 
pul)lished names which have been applied to geographic features in 
Alaska. This includes obsolete as well as current names, and also a 
few not previously published. It aims to show the origin, history, 
modes of spelling, and application of each name, and in the cases of 
Indian, Eskimo, and foreign names, their meaning also. And tinally 
it shows, in l)old-faced type, the forms approved by the United States 
Board on Geographic Names. Rejected, doubtful, and obsolete forms 
are shown in italics. 

So comprehensive a scheme as this could not, from the nature of 
the case, be completely realized. The attempt to discover and record 
every name that has been used would require an expenditure of time 
and energy far beyond the value of the result, and would, moreover, 
fall short of absolute success. Nevertheless, thoroughness and com- 
pleteness as well as accuracy have been steadily kept in view. The 
work is brought down to about 1900. While it is an Alaskan diction- 
ar}", a few names of features near but outside of Alaska are included. 
Also, elevations are given, when known. 

The difficulties in executing this plan are deeper than the names. 
In many cases the question is not What is the name? but, To what 
does or should the name apply ? In the beginning of exploration there 
is generally confusion and uncertainty as to the names and their appli- 
cation, growing out of imperfect geographic knowledge. It is certain 
that many of the recent names included herein will not survive, and 
that local usage will have established forms not now known to the 
writer. Thus a complete revision of this work W'ill l)e needed before 
many years. Meanwhile, it is hoped that this dictionary will be found 
helpful in establishing uniformity in the use of Alaska proper names. 

MODE OF PREPARATION. 

The work was begun in 1892 by copying on library cards the names 
found on mother maps and charts, with indications of the maps from 
which they were taken. This work was placed in the hands of a com- 
mittee of two, appointed by the Board for the purpose, consisting of 



BAKEK] MODE OF PREPARATION. 13 

H. G. Ogden and Marcus Baker. The work was divided between 
them. ]Slr. Ogden took charge of the carding of names for the xVlex- 
ander archipelago, using for this purpose the charts and Coast Pilots 
published by the Coast Survey and the British Admiralt}- charts. 
Names in the remainder of the Territory were carded b}^ the present 
writer and were collected from various American, English, and Rus- 
sian maps and books. 

In September, 1893, the committee reported that about 1,300 names 
had been entered upon cards — 2.100 for the Alexander archipelago 
and 1,900 for the rest of Alaska. 

The plan and scope of the dictionary were then discussed and the 
method of publication was considered. Little further progress, how- 
ever, was made at that time. The work done by members of the 
Board and its committee is and has always been, with a single excep- 
tion, incidental to other work. Other duties being pressing the work 
flagged and made slow progress. From time to time the writer 
worked upon it and wrote out the entries from A to F. Then work 
upon it came to a complete standstill. So it remained till June. 1900, 
when the Director of the Geological Survey, who needed the results 
for official purposes, instructed the writer to complete the dictionary, 
and for the first time work upon it ceased to be incidental. 

On taking up the work in June, 1900, the first task was to card the 
new names which had resulted from exploration and survey since that 
work ceased seven j^ears before. It is estimated that the number of 
new names thus catalogued exceeded 2,000. On completing these the 
work of writing the dictionary entries was begun. At first the dic- 
tionary order was followed, but it was shortly abandoned for the 
geographic order. Spreading out the mother maps of an}- given 
region, the cards bearing the names found thereon were taken from 
their trays and the dictionary entries were written upon them in pres- 
ence of the maps. Many of the early entries were rewritten. When 
these were finished the cards were restored to their alphabetic order 
and then the entries were copied on the typewriter for the printer's 
use, chiefly bv Mr. Wilson S. Wiley. This done, Mr. Wile}' went 
over this tj'pewritten copy and copied the rejected and alternative 
names, which were afterwards arranged and inserted in their proper 
places as cross references. The typewritten cop}' was not compared 
with the original, but as a check the proof was compared with the 
original entries on the cards. These cards contain thousands of refer- 
ences to the literature, which references are not printed. The cards, 
however, are preserved and will doubtless prove of service hereafter. 



14 GEOGKArHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

ORIGIN OF NAMES. "-k 

The ircotrraphic names of any rej>ion may be likened to the co3 ,^ 
ciivuhiting in a great .seaport. As these coins are stamped by varic . 
nations. ,so ocographic names are stamped by a conquering, colonizinj^ ' 
or exi)l()ring people upon the regions they visit, colonize, or conquer. 
As some coins are by long use worn till their origin is unrecognizable, 
so some geographic names, Avell known and most useful, are of so 
uncertain origin that men disagree and dispute about them. Other 
coins, and other geographic names, are less worn, and their origin 
and history can be traced. Alaskan geographic names comprise a 
comparati\el3' small number either so old or so corrupted as wholly 
to conceal their origin or meaning. They are derived almost exclu- 
sively from six sources, which may be briefly characterized as follows: 

1. Names hestmved hy the Bmsians. — Prior to about 1750 Russian 
America, now Alaska, was a blank on our maps. Beginning with 
Bering's first expedition in 1725, dim and obscure outlines began to 
appear on this blank space, and as they appeared the Russians who 
were tilling this space applied names to the geographic features which 
the}' discovered and explored. First came the fur hunter, then the 
official explorer, and later the}^ worked side by side. On the part of 
the Russians the work continued till the purchase of Alaska by the 
United States in 1867. Thus the period of Russian nomenclature is 
about one hundred and twenty-five years, dating from Bering's second 
voA'age in 1741 and ending with the cession of the territory to the 
United States in 1867. 

2. Names hestowed hy the Sjxmiards. — There are few names in 
Alaska of Spanish origin. All of them were bestowed in the interval 
between 177-4 and about 1800. The exploratory work of the Spaniards 
was all coastwise and extended from the southern boundary of Alaska 
to and including Prince William sound. One expedition, indeed, 
went as far west as Unalaska and named a few points along this 
stretch of coast. Most of these names, owing to tardy and obscure 
publication, have disappeared from the maps. 

8. jVavies hestoived hy the Emjlkh. — English names in Alaska date 
from Cook's voyage thither in 1778. From time to time during the 
seventy -five or eighty years following Cook's voyage, and to a limited 
extent to the present time, English traders and naval vessels have 
contributed to a knowledge of Alaskan geography and to its nomen- 
clature. Noteworthy in the last century, after Cook, are the voyages 
of Dixon, Mcares, and Portlock, British fur traders, but especially are 
we indebted to the incomparable Vancouver for his masterly explora- 
tion and survey of the coast from Kodiak eastward and southward to 
lower California. Vancouver named man}^ features. At the same 
time the features named were so fully described, mapped, and pub- 



« 



BAKER.] ORIGIN OF NAMES. 15 

bed that most of these names remain unchanged on our maps to-da3\ 
e more important additions by Englishmen after Vancouver were 
ose b}^ Captain Beechey, R. N., in 1826-27; by Sir Edward Belcher, 
N., in 1836-1812, and. more especiall}', by the so-called Franklin 
v^arch expeditions during the period 1818-1851. The work of Cook 
in 1778, of Beechey and Franklin in 1826-27, and of Dease and Simp- 
son in 1837 gave to the world the main outlines of the Arctic coast of 
Alaska and the names of nearly all its large or important features. 

1. ]V{n/u'S hestoiced hi/ Frenchnien. — The explorations by the French 
on the Alaskan coast are small and are confined almost wholly to south- 
eastern Alaska. The ill-fated expedition of La Perouse, in 1786, is 
almost the only one which has left its impress on the nomenclature of 
the countr}-, and that wholly in the southeastern part. 

5. Names bestowed hy Americans. — American whaleships first entered 
the Arctic ocean through Bering strait in 1818 and began a contribu- 
tion to Alaskan geographic names. This naming of geographic fea- 
tures has been continued by priyate citizens and b}^ government 
officers of the United States to the present time. The earliest large 
contribution was made by the North Pacific Exploring Expedition of 
1855, whose Alaskan names are found chiefly in the Aleutian islands 
a \ in Bering sea. Beginning with the cession of the Territory to 
the United States in 1867, numerous ofiicial expeditions have explored, 
surveyed, mapped, and named man}' features. The largest contribu- 
tions, till recently, have come from the numerous surveying expedi- 
tions of the Coast Survey. At the same time, the Revenue Marine 
Service, the naval vessels, the military garrisons and reconnaissances, 
the Census Office, the Bureau of Education, the missionaries, the 
traders, miners, and prospectors, have each taken a part in spreading 
names over Alaska. In very recent years the Geological Survey has 
given manv names, especial!}' in the interior of the country. 

6. Xative mimes. Last in order but first in importance are native 
names. The various native tribes, occupying Alaska for an indefinite 
period before the advent of the whites, had applied names to various 
features. For certain great features each tribe would have its own 
name. Thus even before the advent of the whites there was duplica- 
tion of names. The great river of Alaska which we call the Yukon 
was called by the Eskimo Kweek-puk {l-weeh river and jnd' big), and 
from them the Russians obtained their name which through various 
transliterations into roman characters has appeared as Kwitchpak, 
Kwikhpak, etc. Some of the Indian tribes of the interior called it 
Yukon (the river), it being too great and well known to need a name, 
while the Tanana tribes call it, according to Lieutenant Allen, Niga 
To. It doubtless bears and has borne other names. 

Explorers and geographers visiting new lands and people are always 
prone to ascertain and use the native names of places, mountains, 



16 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull.187. 

rivers, lakes, etc. But this is attended with difficulty, as everyone 
who has ti-i('<l knows. Dealino- with tril)es whose language is strange 
and often wholly uiikiiow'n, the strange sounds are often imperfectly 
understood and the application of the name is uncertain. Hence, as 
a rule, no nati\e name is preserved, but rather some faint imitation 
or corruption of it. Potomac, Kalamazoo, Massachusetts, and Missis- 
sippi are accepted as Indian words, but it is very doubtful whether 
anv Indian past or present would recognize these as words of his native 
tongue. 

A large i)art of the Alaskan native names which, up to a few years 
back, had a})i)ear(^d on our maps were gathered by the Russians, and 
these names, when independently gathered and published, differ from 
one another more or less, as we should expect them to do. Again, 
these names in Russian characters have been transliterated into Roman 
characters by persons unskilled in Russian, and this has served to 
produce yet wider divergence and some extraordinary and unpro- 
nounceable forms. 

The native names as a whole fall into two great groups : (a) The 
Eskimo, covering the Arctic coast, the eastern shore of Bering sea, 
extending some distance up the various rivers, the Aleutian islands, 
and Alaska peninsula as far east as Kodiak ; and (i^) the Indian tribes 
of the interior and of southeastern Alaska. 

PRINCIPLES EMPLOYED AND REFORMS ATTEMPTED. 

The general principles followed are those adopted by the Board on 
Geographic Names and published in its reports, viz: 

(ffl) The avoidance, so far as seems practicable, of the possessive form of names. 

(h) The dropping of the final /; in burgh. 

(c) The spelling of the word center as here given. 

{d) The discontinuance of the use of hyphens in connecting parts of names. 

(c) The simplification of names consisting of more than one word by their co-iibi- 
nation into one word. 

(/) The avoidance of the use of diacritic characters. 

(g) The drojjjiing f)f the words city and town as parts of names. 

(h) The uniform rendering of the Russian termination obl by of, not off", ov, 
nor OIL'. 

In addition to following the foregoing principles, certain reforms 
have been herein attempted with reference to some native names. 
One of the most noteworthy is the omission of the generic parts of 
such names. The Eskimo termination vilut, or viut^ or mute, meaning 
people, is found with wearisome frequency in those parts of Alaska 
occupied by the Eskimo. Unless local usage or euphony required its 
retention this termination has been omitted. For example, an Eskimo 
village on an island in the Kuskokwim has been written Kikkhtaga- 
mute, Kik-Khtagamute, and Kikikhtagamiut, meaning Big island 
people. Kikhtak (whence by corruption Kodiak) means a big island. 



BAKER] PKINCIPLES EMPLOYED AND REFORMS ATTEMPTED. 17 

In this case the Board has adopted Kiktak. The form Ikogmut, 
however, the name of an old and well-known mission on the lower 
Yukon, is retained because it is old and well known; otherwise it 
would be Ikok. How fur this attempted reform can be profitably 
carried is a matter of judgment and discretion. While all ag-ree as to 
the principle, differences arise in its application. Even with the 
shortening of some long Eskimo names b}" such cutting off of their 
generic termination the remainder is so long and unpronounceable 
that it is certain it will not, and ought not, to survive as a geographic 
name. 

In the interior are many rivers bearing native names ending in hakat 
(also written cJmrgut and changut), meaning river, such as Melozikakat, 
Batzakakat, etc. — i. e., Melozi river, Batzi river, etc. In the interest 
of brevitv and simplicit}" this termination kakat has been omitted. 
The same rule Avould reduce Mississippi river to Misis river, which is 
obviously impracticable, since both the word and its spelling are well 
established. Such does not, however, appear to be the case with many 
of the Alaskan names. Among some Indian tribes the ffnal syllable 
na, and among others liln /, means ri\'er. These also have been dropped 
in a few cases. There are a number of cases like Tanana, Chitina, etc., 
where usage seems too firmly rooted to warrant the omission, but 
wherever in the judgment of the Board it was practicable the elision 
has been made. 

Wherever and whenever it appeared practicable to use a simple 
spelling this was done. When a native name had been reported by 
different persons, with different spellings, as is the almost invariable 
rule, the Board has not felt bound merely to select from among these, 
but has from time to time adopted a form of its own derived from 
study and comparison of these and the rules adopted for writing native 
names. 

When features have been named after persons the spelling used by 
those persons has been followed, always excepting corruptions and 
changes too well established to make this practicable. Thus Thomson, 
not Thompson; Ruhamah, not Ruhama, etc. In the case of Russian 
proper names the application of this rule is impossible because the 
names are to be expressed in Roman and not in Russian letters. Thus 
we have Romanzof, a well-established name derived from Count 
Rumiantsof. Most Russian proper names when transliterated into 
Roman characters have peculiarities of form due to the views held and 
knowledge possessed by the transliterator. The Board has not fol- 
lowed a fixed system of rules in these cases. Practically the translit- 
eration of all such names had been made, and in divers ways, before 
the Board began its work. It therefore dealt with cases as it found 
them and selected such form as, all things considered, gave promise 
of being generall}" acceptable. 
Bull. 187—01 2 



18 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALA8Ki*». [bull. 187. 

The Board h:i.s vrWcn little attention or weight to either purit}" or 
priority. The guiding principle has been to discover, record, and 
follow the names b}- which features are now known, irrespective of 
when or how the}-- got those names. Many names, especially of the 
great features, once bore names they do not now bear. To return to 
these first names is neither possi])le nor desirable. Bering sea and 
Bering strait will continue to be so called despite their other names 
earlier given. 

Again, simplitication of the spelling of names, whenever practicable, 
has been kept steadih^ in mind. Early in the Board's work it dropped, 
from native names, silent letters whenever, in its judgment such 
omission would generally commend itself as an improvement. Thus 
Atka, not Atkha; Sitka, not Sitkha; Kitkuk, not Khitkouk. Certain 
Russian proper names begin with the Russian X (equivalent to a very 
hard A'); this letter has been transliterated by J{h. Thus Khrom- 
chenko, Khwostof , etc. The Board has not felt warranted in dropping 
the silent /i in all these cases. 

The sound of oo in food often occurs in Aleut and Eskimo names and 
has been variousl}^ rendered by oo, ou, and ii. Thus, Oonalaska, Oun- 
alaska, and Unalaska. For this sound the letter u has been generally 
though not luiiversally u.sed. Thus, Unga, Umak, Ugalgan, etc., but 
not Chilkut nor Iskut. Chilkoot is a popular and well-established 
.spelling and pronunciation of an Indian word which is unpronounce- 
able M" most white men and which might be written T'sl-kut. 

In the older literature were many names from the Russian which in 
transliteration began with Teh or TIscA, as Tschitschagow, which is now 
written Chichagof. As far as usage would permit, the simple form 
Ch has been used in such cases. 

Curiosities of nomenclature abound. There have been strange trans- 
formations due to carelessness, ignorance, or bad writing. Thus, Gain 
became Cain; Hound, Round; Miller, Mitten; Chornie became Torno; 
Traitors, Traders; Andrew, Lidrejana; Sutwik, Zutchwik, etc. Nu- 
merous illustrations of transformation and corruption will be found 
thi'oughout the dictionary. 

AUTHORITIES. 

Man}^ maps, charts, books, and persons have been consulted in pre- 
paring this Avork. Scattered through the dictionar}^ are references to 
such persons and publications. These constitute the chief "original 
sources of Alaskan names. Below is given a list of the principal ones. 
It does not aim to be exhaustive. First is given a chronologic list. 
This is followed by the same authorities arranged alphabeticalh^, and 
after each entry follows a brief account of the individual, a statement of 
the work by which he became an authority, and references to publica- 
tions containing his results. These references are to the publications 
chiefly used in preparing this work. 



BAKER.] 



AUTHORITIES. 



19 



AUTHORITIES IN CHRONOLOGIC ORDER. 

In the following li.st arc given, in chronologic order, the names of 
the principal authorities used in the preparation of this dictionary. 
An account of each, arranged alphabetically, follows on pages 20-58. 

1848 Doroshin. 

1849 Kuritizien. 

1850 Grewingk. 

1854-1855 Gibson. 

1854-1855 North Paciac ExplcriiiK 

P'xpeilition. 

1861-1863 Tikhnienief. 

1863 Rynda party. 

1865-1867 Western Union Telegraph 

Exploration. 

1865-1895 Dall. 

1867-1900 Coast Survey. 

1867-1869 Davidson. 

1868 Pender. 

1868-1869 Meade. 

1869-1891 Coast Pilots. 

1869 Raymond. 

1872-1876.... Elliott. 

1873-1880 Baker. 

1877-1900 Jackson. 

1877-1881 Nelson. 

1879-1880 Beardslee. 

1879-1881 Hanus. 

1879-1881 Symonds. ■ 

1880-1899 Hooper. 

1880 Petrof. 

1881 Glass. 

1881-1883 Murdoch. 

1881-1883 Nichols. 

1881-1883 Ray. 

1882. Krause Brothers. 

1883-1886 Schwatka. 

1884-1899 Abercrombie. 

1884 Coghlan. 

1885 Allen. 

3885 Clover. 

1886 Snow and Helm. 

1887-1888 Thomas. 

1888-1889 Fish Commission. 

1888 Topham. 

1889-1900 Geological Survey. 

1889-1891 Mansfield. 

1889-1891 Russell. 

1889 Stockton. 

1889-1891 Turner. 

1890-1892 Reid. 

1891 Hayes. 



1741 Bering and Chirikof . 

1763-1766 Glotof. 

1768-1769 Krenitzen and Levashef. 

1775-1779 Maurelle and Quadra. 

1778 Cook. 

1780 Coxe. 

1786 La Perouse. 

1786-1 787.... Meares and Tipping. 

1786-1787 Portlock and Dixon. 

1786 Pribilof. 

1788-1789 Meares and Douglas. 

1789 Colnett. 

1790-1792 Billings. 

1790-1792 Sarichef. 

1790-1792 Sauer. 

1791 Malaspina. 

1792 Caamafio.- 

1792-1794 Vancouver. 

1799-1867 Russian American Com- 
pany. 

1803 Khwostof and Davidof. 

1804-1805 Krusenstern. 

1804-1805 Langsdorf. 

1804-1805 Lisianski. 

1809 Vasilief. 

1816-18] 7 Kotzebue. 

1816-1821 Shishmaref. 

1818-1845 Etolin. 

1818-1842... -Ilin. 

1819-1822 Vasilief. 

1824-1834 Veniaminof . 

1826-1827 Beechey. 

1826 Franklin. 

1827-1828 Lutke. 

1827-1828 Staniukovich. 

1829-1832 Ingenstrem. 

1831-1850 Tebenkot. 

1831-1832 Vasilief. 

1832-1838 Chernof. 

1834-1838 Zarembo. 

1836 Woronkofski. 

1837 Dease and Simpson. 

1838 Lindenberg. 

1839-1840 Murashef. 

1842-1843 Wosnesenski. 

1842-1844 Zagoskin. 

1848-1850 Archimandritof. 



20 



GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. 



[BULL. 187. 



18yi.'-l«95 Moore (W. I.). 

1894 U. S. S. Concord. 

1895 Becker. 

1895-1898 Moore (E. K.). 

1896 Spurr and Goodrich. 

1897-1898 INIoser. 

1898-1900 Barnard. 

1898-1900 Bruoky. 

1898 Eldridge and Muldrow, 

1898-1899 (ilenn. 

1898-1900 Mendenhall. 



1898-1899 Peters and Brooks. 

1898-1900 Schrader. 

1898 Spnrr and Post. 

1899 Harriman Alaska Expedi- 
tion. 

1899 Rohn. 

1900 Davidson and Blakeslee. 

British Admiralty. 

Prospectors and Miners. 

Russians. 

Vasilief. 



AUTHORITIES IN ALPHA BETIC ORDER. 

The following is an alphabetic list of the principal authorities used 
in the making- of this dictionary. Concerning- each one a brief state- 
ment i.s made as to the reasons foi- accepting him as an authority. 
References are also given to such publications, by himself or by others, 
concerning his work, as have been used. 

Abercrombie, 1884, 1898-99. 

In the spring of 1898, by direction of the Secretary of War, three 
military expeditions were organized for exploring the interior of 
Alaska. The second of these expeditions was under the command of 
Capt. William R. Abercrombie, U. S. A., who had in 1884 ascended the 
Copper river to latitude 60° 41' and afterwards visited Port Valdes, 
in Prince William sound. Abercrombie was directed to organize his 
party at Valdes and then explore the valley of the Copper river and 
its tributaries and the country northward to the Tanana. Mr. F. C. 
Schrader, of the United States Geological Survey, was attached to his 
party as geologist. Schrader's report was published in 1900 in the 
Twentieth Annual Report of the Geological Survey, Part VII, pp. 
341-423. Abercrombie's report was published in July, 1899, in War 
Department, Adjutant General's Office, No. XXV, Report of Explor- 
ations in Alaska, pp. 295-351. It was also published in 1900 in a 4° 
volume entitled Compilation of Narratives of Explorations in Alaska, 
Washington, Government Printing Office, 1900, a work which seems 
to have come from the Senate Committee on Military Affairs. 

Ciiptain Al)ercrombie continued the work of exploration in 1899 
undei- instructions, inter alia, to construct a military road from Valdes 
to Fort Egbert on the Yukon. Mr. Oscar Rohn accompanied the 
party as topographer and geologist. For Abercrombie's report see 
the above-cited compilation, pp. 755-766; also separately printed, with 
numerous illustrations, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1900. 
Rohn's report was published in 1900 in the Twenty-first Annual Report 
of the Geological Survey, Part II, pp. 393-440. 



BAKER.] AUTHOEITIES. 21 

Allen, 1885. 

Lieut, (now Major) Honry Tureman Allen, IT. S. A., who was gradu- 
ated from "\^'e.st Point in 1882, made a journey of exploration through 
central Alaska in 1885. Leaving Nuchek on March 20, he ascended the 
Copper river, crossed to and descended the Tanana to its mouth, thence 
traveled north to the Ko^^ukuk, ascended it some distance, and then 
descended to its mouth and arrived at St. Michael August 29, whence 
he returned to San Francisco. His report, with accompanying maps, 
was published in 1887 as Senate Ex. Doc. No. 125, Fort^^-ninth Con- 
gress, second session. 

Archimandritof, 1848-1850. 

Towards the close of the Russian occupation of Alaska, Captain 
Archimandritof commanded one of its vessels in the colonies. He 
made surveys in Kenai peninsula and around Kodiak in about 1850, but 
published nothing. It is probable that some of his results were used 
in Tebenkof's atlas. Copies of his manuscript maps were in use by 
the Russian skippers and others at the time of the purchase, and some 
fragments reached the Coast Survey. A survey by him of Graham 
harbor (Port Graham), in Cook inlet, was published in the Coast 
Survey atlas of Harbor Charts, 1869. 

Baker, 1873-1880. 

Marcus Baker, in the employ of the Coast Survey, svirveyed in the 
Aleutian islands and along the Alaskan coast from Dixon entrance to 
Point Belcher, Arctic ocean, in the seasons of 1873, 1871, and 1880 in 
the party of Mr. William H. Dall. In May, 1880, through the courtesy 
of Captain Beardslee, he made a boat journe}^ from Sitka to Chilkat 
and return. The very few names given during that journey are 
recorded in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 

Barnard, 1898-1900. 

Mr. Edward Chester Barnard, topographer of the United States 
Geological Survey, surve3^ed the Fortymile district, in eastern Alaska, 
in the summer of 1898, and also made surveys in Seward peninsula in 
the summer of 1900. The Fortymile atlas sheet was published in 
April, 1899, in a Congressional document (Public Resolution No. 25, 
Fifty -lifth Congress, second session), entitled Maps and Descriptions 
of Routes of Exploration in Alaska in 1898. The results of the 
Seward peninsula surveys will appear in special reports of the Geo- 
logical Survey. 

Beardslee, 1879-80. 

Capt. (now Rear Admiral) Lester Anthony Beardslee, U. S. N., was 
in 1879-80 stationed in southeast Alaska in command of the U. S. S. 
Jamestown. Among his officers was Lieut. Frederick M. Symonds and 



22 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

Mustor Gustavus C. Hanus, both of whom had served in the Coast 
JSurvov and wore enthusiastic surveyors. These officers and their 
associiitos utilized their oppoi'tunity to increase our imperfect knowl- 
edcre of th(^ Alexander archipelag-o. They surveyed Sitka harbor and 
various coves and harbors and })rought back information as to Glacier 
bay, wiiich. while not absolutely the first, was the first to attract much 
notice. 'I'hcir map of Sitka was published l)y the Coast Survey. 
]Most of the geographic information, except that, is contained in 
Beardslee's report on ailairs in Alaska, which was published in 1882 as 
Senate Ex. Doc. No. 71. Forty-seventh Congress, first session. This 
contains several maps, including reprints of United States Hydro- 
gi-aphic OtHce charts 88:^ and 883. 

Becker, 1895. 

Mr. George Ferdinand Becker, geologist of the United States 
Geological Survey, accompanied by Mr. Chester Wells Purington, 
visited Alaska in the summer of 1895 for the purpose of examining 
and reporting on its gold resources. Their examination was, in 
accordance with instructions, confined to the coast, and embraced 
points from Sitka westward to Unalaska. It included several locali- 
ties in Alexander archipelago, about Kodiak and Cook inlet, and along 
Alaska peninsula, and the trip ended with a visit to Bogoslof. 

Becker's report on this work is published in the Eighteenth Annual 
Report of the Geological Survey, Part III, pp. 1-86. 

Beechey, 1826-27. 

In 1824: the British Government determined to send a ship to Bering 
strait to cooperate with Franklin and Parry in a search for the North- 
west Passage. Capt. Frederick William Beeche}^, R. N., was on Jan- 
uary 12, 1825, selected for the task and placed in command of H. M. S. 
Blossom. On May 11, 1825, he received his instructions, and eight 
days later. May 19, set sail from Spithead, sailed round Cape Horn, 
and on June 28, 1826, reached Petropavlovsk. Thence he sailed to 
Kotzebue sound, arriving on July 22. Sailing northward he made 
surveys on the Arctic coast as far as Point Barrow and then returned 
to Kotzebue sound. On October 13, he quit the sound and, passing 
Unimak strait, reached San Francisco on November 7, where he stayed 
till the end of the year and then proceeded to the Hawaiian islands, 
touching en route at Monterey. He. arrived at Honolulu on January 
26, 1827. Thence he went to China, and on July 3, was l)ack in 
Petropavlovsk. 

Quitting the harbor on July 18, he returned to Kotzebue sound, 
arriving on August 5. The rest of the season was spent in surveys 
a))Out Seward peii insula, till October 6, 1827, when he took his final 
departure and, rounding Cape Horn, retui ned to England in September, 
1828. 



BAKEK.] 



AUTHOKITIES. 23 



A full and satisfactory account of this voyao^e was published by 
authority of the Admiralty in 1831, entitled Narrative of a Voyage 
to the Pacific and Beering's Strait, by F. W. Beechey, 1825-1828, i\ 

London, 1831. 

Bering and Chirikof, 1741. 

The first Russian voyage to bring definite tidings as to northwest 
America was made by Capt. Commander Ivan Ivanovich (otherwise 
Vitus) Bering and Capt. Alexie Ilich Chirikof in 1741. It was an 
official vovage ordered by the government to be made for exploration 
and discovery. Bering in the St. Paul, with whom was Steller, and 
Chirikof in the /St. Peter, with whom went Croyere, sailed from 
Avacha bay on June 1, 1711, and together they cruised eastward. On 
the 20th they were separated by a storm and did not meet again. The 
courses kept were generally eastward. Bering reached the vicinity of 
the mouth of the Copper river and landed there on July 20. The 
next day he turned back, touched at the Shumagins, saw a number 
of the Aleutian islands, and was finally driven ashore and died on 
December 8, 1711, on the island which now bears his name. 

Chirikof landed two boat crews somewhere in the Alexander archi- 
pelago, perhaps near Sitka. Neither of these was seen again, and 
Chirikof, sailing away, arrived in Avacha on October 9. 

Concerning this voyage, which was the first of the Russian official 
voyages to bring back any definite knowledge of America, much has 
been written. A good account of it compiled from original sources is 
contained in Journal of Russian Hydrographie Department, 1851, 
Vol. IX, pp. 190-469, A detailed track chart accompanies this 
account. See also Petrof's account in Bancroft's History, pp. 63-98. 

Billings, 1790-1792. 
Commodore Joseph Billings commanded a Russian exploring and 
surveying expedition in Bering sea and the North Pacific ocean in 
1791-1792. He appears not to have made or published any account 
of it. For the results, see Sauer and Sarichef . 

British Admiralty. 
The British Admiralty has published various charts relating to 
Alaska, most of them being compilations or reproductions of other 
maps. Almost always the source of information is clearly indicated. 
Occasionallv, however, bits of information have been found here and 
there on the British Admiralty charts which have not been traced to 
any other source; in such cases reference is simply made to the Brit- 
ish Admiralty. The region about Glacier bay on British Admiralty 
chart 2431 is an illustration. 

Brooks, 1898-1900. 
Mr. Alfred Hulse Brooks, geologist in the party of Mr. W. J. 
Peters in 1898, made geologic studies in Alaska in that year and again 



24 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

ill isitl). Ill tho jiutumn of lSl»i» he .spent a fcM- weeks in Seward 
peninsula. In the season of 11H»0 he had charge of a geologic party 
in Seward i)('n insula, having as geologic assistants Messrs. George B. 
Richardson and Arthur J. Collier. For reports on this Avork see 
Twentieth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey, 
Tart VII, pp. 425— tlU; also Twenty-tirst Annual Report of the United 
States (Geological Survey, Fart li, pp. 331-391. The report on the 
work of llHtO is now in proof and is soon to appear as a special publi- 
cation of the United States Geological Survey. 

Caamano, 1792. 

Lieut. Don Jacinto Caamano, in the corvette ^lm7i5C/2w, was sent out 
in 17t>2 by Count de Revillagigedo, Viceroy of Mexico, to explore the 
northwest coast about Juan de Fuca strait and northward with a view 
to determining the truth about de Fonte's reported Northwest Passage. 
Sailing from San Bias on March 20, 1792, he arrived in Bucareli bay 
on July 12, and then surve^yed southward along the southern Alaska 
coast and British Columbia. He returned to San Bias on Februar}^ 6, 
1793. No general report on this work was published till long after- 
ward. Vancouver met him in the field and apparently obtained copies 
of some of his maps, especially of places just north of Dixon entrance, 
which he incorporated in his atlas. For an account of this voj^age see 
Salva (Miguel) y Baranda (Pedro Sainz de), Coleccion de documentos 
ineditos, etc., s"^ Madrid. 1849, vol. XV, pp. 323-363. 

Chernof, 1832-1838. 

Ivan Chernof was a pilot in the emploj'ment of the Russian American 
Company and made surveys here and there in Alaska. He surveyed 
Sviechnikof harbor, in Amlia island, in 1832 and made other surveys in 
the Rat Island group of the Aleutian islands at about the same period. 
Lutk(>, in his Voyage, partie nauti(|ue, 1836, p. 327, informs us that 
knowledge of the Rat Island group at that time, though very incom- 
plete, was due to Tngenstrem and Chernof. The latter collected 
detailed information a]>out all the islands and rocks of the group, and 
even wrot(> out some of these notes. It does not appear that these 
were ever published. Tebenkof in his notes several times refers to 
Chernof's work. He is doubtless the same Ivan Chernof who, as a 
lad, was given ))y the Indians to the Russians as a hostage in 1804 
and r(>turned to them in 1805. He attended the navigation school at 
Sitka and afterwards was long in the service of the Russian American 
Company as a pilot. In 1838 he was skipper of the Russian American 
Company's brig Polyfcm^ in which Kashevarof explored the Arctic 
coast. He died in 1877 and his descendents live on Afognak island. 
See Russian Hydrographic Charts 1378 and 1400 for some of his 
results. 



BAKER. J 



AUTHORITIES. 25 



Clover, 1885. 
Lieut. Commander Richardson Clover, U. S. N., in command of the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey steamer Patterson, made surveys in south- 
eastern Alaska in 1885. The field season was from May IT to Sep- 
tember 16, 1885, during which surveys were made of Clarence strait 
from Cape Chacon and Dall Head on the south to Narrow point and 
Union bay on the north, also of the north shore of Dixon entrance 
from Cape Chacon to Cape Muzon, except Cordova bay. Extracts 
from his reports were published in Coast Survey report, 1886, pp. 
80-81. Coast Survey chart 709, issued in 1886, shows the results of 
his work. Some of it also appears on Coast Survey charts 706 and 707. 
Coast Pilots, 1869, 1883, 1891. 
Three Coast Pilots of Alaska have been prepared and published by 
the Coast Survev. The first one, prepared by Assistant George 
Davidson, was published in 1869. See Davidson for an account of 
this. The second was prepared by Assistant William H. Dall, assisted 
by the present writer, between 1875 and 1882 and was published by 
the Coast Survey in 1883 under the title Pacific Coast Pilot, Alaska, 
Part I. An Appendix to this Pilot, devoted to meteorology and 
bibliography, was also prepared by Dall and Baker and published by 
the Coast Survey in 1879, the edition being 250. The meteorological 
tables, the diagrams, the bibliography, and the cartography were pre- 
pared by Baker. They were edited by Dall, who wrote the discussions 
and put the whole through the press. 

The new edition of this Pilot, called third edition, was published by 
the Coast Survey in 1891. It was prepared by Lieut. Commander 
H. E. Nichols, who was assigned to this work in 1888. In the summer 
of that year Nichols visited Alaska and gathered notes for it. He was 
at Kodiak and Unalaska and visited various points between, also 
several of the Aleutian islands, the Pribilof islands, and points in 
Bristol bav. (See Coast Survey Report, 1888, p. 77.) He also visited 
Alexander archipelago in the autumn of 1888 on the same errand. 
The manuscript of the new edition was completed before July, 1890, 
and the volume was issued in 1891. The critical and historical notes 
in the Pilot of 1883, or -Dall's Coast Pilot," has made it more useful 
for this dictionary than the edition of 1891, or, as it is often called, 
"Nichols' Coast Pilot." 

Additional Coast Pilot material has since been published by the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey. Bulletins 37 and 38 of that survey wei^ 
prepared by Lieut. Commander J. F. Moser and published in 1899. 
These relate, the first to Alexander archipelago, the second to Prmee 
William sound, Cook inlet, Kodiak, and westward to LTiialaska. 
Bulletin 40, published in 1900, prepared by the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey and revised by Lieutenant Jarvis, U. S. Revenue Cutter 
Service, relates to Bering sea and the Arctic. 



2(i GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull.187. 

Coast Suhvey, 1867-1900. 

Geoo-rai)lii(' woi-k in Alaska ])y the Coast Survey be^an in the sum- 
mer of ISCT. piior to the purchase of Alaska, made in that year, and 
with more or less intei'ruption it has continued to the present. The 
rt\suhs are set forth in th(> reports, maps, charts, and other publica- 
tions of that organization. So far as practicable, in making this dic- 
tionary names are accredited to the particular individual who applied 
them. It has not l)een possible to do so in all cases, however, and 
aceordino-ly somo of the names are simplj^ recorded as having been 
applied oi- given by the Coast Survey. 

CoonLAN, 1884. 

Commander Joseph B. Coghlan, U. S. N., in command of the U. S. S. 
A(/a/n,s, was stationed in southeastern Alaska in 1884 and with his offi- 
cers made reconnaissance surveys at some of the places where the 
need was especially great. His surveys were principally in the inte- 
rior passages north and east from Sitka sound, through Peril strait to 
Chatham strait, and in and about Barlow cove at the south end of 
Lynn canal. 

For his results see Coast and Geodetic Survey charts 727 and 728, 
published in 1885. 

COLNETT, 1789. 

James Colnett, an English fur trader, sailed under instr actions from 
Captain Meares, from China, in command of the Princess Royal and 
Argonaut, VL\ April and May, 1789, on a trading voyage to northwest 
America. Colnett did not publish any account of his voyage, but 
information concerning it is contained in the Appendix to Meares 
(John) Voyages, etc. 4° London, 1790. 

U. S. S. Concord, 1894. 

The U. S. S. Concord^ in 1894, made surveys in the islands of the 
Four Mountains, in the Aleutian chain. The results are shown on 
LTnitod States Hydrographic Office chart No. 8, edition of Februarv 

1895. " ' 

Cook, 1778. 

Eight days after the American colonies had declared themselves 
free and independent, Capt. James Cook, R. N., the great English 
navigator, sailed from Plymouth, England (July 12, 1776), on his third 
and last voyage of discovery. He had two ships, the Resolution and 
Discovery. He commanded the ReHolution and Capt. Charles Clerke 
the Disccwery. The ships proceeded to Teneritfe, Cape of Good Hope, 
Kerguelen Land, Van Dieman's Land, New Zealand, Friendly isles, 
Tahiti, Christmas island, Hawaiian islands, and to Nootka sound in 
Vancouver island, where they arrived on March 30, 1778. Between 



BAKEK.] AUTHORITIES. 



27 



this date and October 3, 1778, Cook cruised northward and westward 
along- the American coast to Icy cape, in the Arctic ocean, and 
sketched the chief outlines of this coast, hitherto practically unknown. 
Leaving Unalaska on October 27, 1778, he returned to the Hawaiian 
islands, where he was killed by the natives on February l^t, 1779. 
The British A dmiralty published in 1784-85 an account of this voyage 
in three quarto volumes and a large atlas. 

CoxE, 1780. 
Rev. William Coxe, archdeacon of Wilts, spent some time in St. 
Petersburg prior to 1780 and while there specially interested himself 
in the discoveries made by the Russians between Asia and America 
between 1741 and the date of his writing. His results were published 
in 1780 under the title Account of the Russian Discoveries between 
Asia and America, etc. This passed through several editions, the third 
appearing at London in 1787 and the fourth in 1803. Two French 
translations appeared in 1781 and a German one in 1783. This is an 
important work for the student of Alaskan exploration and geography. 
In it are the tirst published accounts of the voyages of Shalaurof , 
1761-1763 ; Sind, 1764-1768 ; and Krenitzin and Levashef , 1764-1771. 

Ball, 1865-189.5. 
Dr W^illiam Healev Dall first went to Alaska in 1865, in the employ- 
ment of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and from that 
beo-innino- has become one of the foremost students, explorers 
waiters, and authorities on Alaskan matters. His book Alaska and 
Its Resources, published in 1870, remains to this day the most useful 
handy reference book on Alaska. 

He came back to San Francisco in the autumn of 1865, returned to 
Alaska in the spring of 1866, and remained in the Yukon country till 
1868 when he came back and published Alaska and Its Resourc^^. 
In 1871 he entered the Coast Survey and from August, 18 ^ to the 
end of 1874 was engaged in reconnaissance surveys along the coast 
from Sitka westward to the end of the Aleutian c^ain aiid nor h- 
ward in Bering sea as far as Nunivak and the Pnbilof islands. W i h 
him, as assistant, in 1871-72 was Mark Walrod Harrington Dall 
returned to Washington at the end of 1874 and was employed in the 
Coast Survev Office on Alaskan matters from 1875 to 1880; m this 
interval was written the Alaska Coast Pilot and its Appendix The 
present writer was associated with him in this and other A asUn 
work as an assistant from March, 1873, till July, 1882. In 18b0 
another season of Alaska field work was had, the ^-"^^^^/^^^^ 
along the coast from Sitka to Unalaska and northward nearl> to Poin 
Barrow. The principal sources of geographic inforniation as to al 
this is a series of some fifty charts and plans issued by the Coa-.t 
Survey and the Alaska Coast Pilot with its Appendix. 



28 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

In 1884 Mr. Dull res io-ned from the Coast Survey and entered the 
Geological Survey, with Avhich oro-anization he has been connected 
ever since. In the summer of 1895 in company with Mr. G. F. Becker 
he revisited Alaska for the purpose of studying and reporting on its 
coal resources. The cruise made was coastwise from Sitka to Unalaska. 
The results are published in the Seventeenth Annual Report of the 
United £tates Geological Survey, 1896, Part 1, pp. 763-908. 

Davidson, 1867-1869. 

George Davidson, assistant in the Coast Survey, accompanied by 
Alonzo Tyler Mosman, G. Farquhar, and Stehman Forney, made a 
cruise in the waters of Russian America just prior to its purchase and 
change of name to Alaska in 1867. They sailed on the revenue cutter 
Lincoht from Victoria on July 29 and returned there October 27, 1867, 
having visited and made observations at Sitka, Chilkat, Kodiak, and 
Unalaska. Davidson wrote a voluminous report on this work, includ- 
ing a description of the southeast coast of Alaska from Dixon entrance 
to Cook inlet. This report was published in Coast Survey Report, 1867, 
Appendix 18, pp. 187-329. This description was afterwards revised 
and published ])y the Coast Surve}^ under the title Coast Pilot of 
Alaska (First Part) from Southern Boundary to Cook's Inlet. 

Charts were made of Sitka, of St. Paul harbor, Kadiak, and of Cap- 
tains bay, Unalaska, and published by the Coast Survey. These are in 
a small atlas issued by the Coast Survey in 1869 and entitled Harbor 
Charts of Alaska. Davidson visited Alaska again in 1869 and observed 
the total solar eclipse of August 7 of that year at Kohklux on the 
Chilkat river. On his journey thither and back he did a little recon- 
naissarce surveying in Alexander archipelago. For an account of this 
see Coast Survey Report, 1869, pp. 177-181. 

Davidson and Blakeslee, 1900. 

Messrs. J. M. Davidson and B. D. Blakeslee, civil engineers and 
United States deputy surveyors, issued in 1900 a map of the Nome 
gold region containing many names not previous!}^ published, most of 
them doubtless given by the prospectors. This map is folded and in 
a cover bearing the title Map of the Nome Peninsula showing new 
Gold Fi(dds of Cape Nome, Golovin Bay and Cape York, Alaska. 
Compiled from Actual Surveys and Explorations on the Ground by 
J. M. Davidson and B. D. Blakeslee, Civil Engineers and United 
States Deputy Surveyors, Nome, Alaska, 1900. The map, which is 
colored, was printed by the Mutual Label and Lithographic Company 
of San Frp,ncisco, Cal. 

Dease and Simpson, 1837. 

Peter Warren Dease and Thomas Simpson, factors of the Hudson 
Bay Company in the summer of 1837 made an exploring journey 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 29 

along the Arctic coast from the mouth of the Mackenzie river to Point 
Barrow. Prior to their journey the coast line from Return reef to 
Point Barrow was a blank on the maps. They left the Mackenzie 
mouth on Jul}^ 9 in two open boats and arrived at Point Barrow on 
August 4, the last part of the journey being overland. For an account 
of their work see Simpson (Thomas), Narrative of Discoveries on the 
North Coast of America, 8"^, London, 1843; also Journal Royal Geog. 
Soc, 8°, London, 1838, Vol. VIII, pp. 213-22.5. 

Dixon, 1785-1788. 

Capt. George Dixon, commanding the ship Queen Charlotte^ made a 
trading voj^age from England to northwest America and round the 
world in 1 78.5-1788 in company with Portlock. (See Portlock.) Dixon 
published an account of this voyage entitled A Voyage Round the 
World, etc., l"", London, 1789. 

DdKosHiN, 1848. 

Peter P. Doroshin, a mining engineer, was sent out from Russia in 
.1847 by the Russian American Company to their American possessions 
with Captain Riedell in the ship Atla, to examine and report on the 
gold resources of the colony. He visited Baranof island and Cook 
inlet and examined these places, and also visited California. His 
results were published in the Russian Mining Journal for 1866, No. 1 
(Part V), p. 136; No. 2 (Part VI), pp. 277-282; also No. 3 (Part III), 
pp. 365-401. The last contains descriptions of Prince William sound 
and Copper river. 

Douglas, 1788-89. See Mkares. 

Eldridge and Muldrow, 1898. 

Mr. George Homans Eldridge, geologist of the United States 
Geological Survey, made a reconnaissance of the Sushitna Ixxsin in 
the summer of 1898. He was accompanied by Mr. Robert Muldrow, 
topographer. Their explorations extended from the head of Cook 
inlet up the Sushitna nearly to latitude 64°. For their results see 
Twentieth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey, 
Part VII, pp. 1-29. 

Elliott, 1872-1876. 

Mr. Henry Wood Elliott was, in 1872-73, an assistant agent of the 
Treasury Department on the Pribilof islands. In the summer of 1874 
he was a special agent of the Treasury Department, and with Lieut. 
Washburn Maynard, U. S. N., visited in the United States Revenue 
Cutter Reliance, Capt. Baker commanding, Sitka, Kodiak, Unalaska, 
the Pribilof islands, St. Matthew, and St. Lawrence. In November, 
1874, he submitted a report, which was printed by the Treasury 
Department in 1875 and by Congress in 1876. He also wrote a mono- 



30 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

graph oil the Tribilof islands, which was published in the Tenth 
Census, l.syO, Vol. VIII, and also separateh' in two editions, one in 
18S1 and the other in 1S82. These contain the maps of St. Paul and 
St. George made by Elliott and Maynard in 1874. 

Etolin, 1818-1845. 

Adolph Karlovich Etolin, who was governor of the Russian Ameri- 
can colonies in 18-1:1-1845, first went to the colony from Russia with 
Golofnin in the KaincJutthi, leaving Cronstandt on August 26, 1817, 
and arriving in Petropavlovsk on May 3, 1818. At least Grewingk 
so states, and is followed by Dall; but Golofnin in his Voyage gives 
a list of all his ship's company, to the number of 138, and Etolin's 
name is not in that list. (Golofnin's Voyage Round the World (in 
Russian), 1 , St. Petersburg, 1822, Vol. I, supplement, pp. i-viii.) 
Etolin, Khromchenko, and Vasilief were engaged in surveying and 
exploring Bering sea in 1822-1821. (Bancroft, History, p. 546.) In 
1839 he sailed from Cronstadt for the colonies, in command of the 
Russian American Company's ship NH'olai. With him went Kupre- 
anof, Woewodski and Dr. Blashke. (Journal Russ. Hyd. Dept., 1850, 
Vol. VIII. pp. 187-188.) From 1841 to 1845 Etolin was governor of 
the Russian American colonies. In 1833 he surve3^ed Tamgas harbor 
and Kaigani strait. (See Russ. Hyd. Chart., 1396, published in 1848.) 

Fish Commission, 1888-89. 

From time to time since 1880 the United States Fish Commission 
has made investigations in Alaskan waters and contributed to a 
knowledge of its geography. Special use has been made in this 
dictionary of the maps of Alaska peninsula and the eastern Aleutians 
contained in the Bulletin of the Commission, Vol. VIII, for 1888, and 
of a map covering part of the same region, together with Bristol ba}', 
in Vol. IX, for 1889. The new names appearing on these maps are 
said to be chiefly due to Mr. Samuel Applegate. 

Franklin, 1826. 

Sir fJohn Franklin made explorations along the extreme eastern 
part of the Arctic coast of Alaska in July and August, 1826. After 
wintering at Foit Franklin, Sir John descended the Mackenzie to its 
mouth and explored along the coast westward as far as Return reef. 
For an account of this see his Narrative of a Second Expedition to the 
Shores of the Polar Sea, 1825-1827, 4°, London, 1828, pp. 124-159. 

Geological Survey, 1889-1900. 

Geologic investigations in Alaska by the Geological Surve}^ began 
with the work of Mr. I. C. Russell in the Yukon valley in 1889. These 
investigations were continued by Russell in 1890 and 1891 in the 
St. Elias region. In 1895 Messrs. Becker and Dall investisrated and 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 31 

later reported on the gold and coal resources of the territory. Since 
that time topographic and geologic work has been activel}^ prosecuted 
by the Geological Survey. The results are set forth in its annual 
reports and in special reports as follows: 

Map of Alaska, with Descriptive Text. Prepared in Accordance with Public 
Resolution No. 3, Fifty-fifth Congress, second session. 8°, Washington, 1899, 44 pp. 

]Maps and Descriptions of Routes of Exploration in Alaska in 1898. Prepared in 
accordance with Public Resolution No. 25, Fifty-fifth Congress, third session. 8°, 
Washington, 1899, 138 pp. 

Preliminary Report on the Cape Nome Gold Region, Alaska. By F. C. Schrader 
and A. H. Brooks. 8°, W^ashington, 1900, 56 pp. 

Reconnaissances in the Cape Nome and Norton Bay Regions, Alaska, in 1900. By 
Alfred H. Brooks, George B. Richardson, Arthur J. Collier, and AValter C. Menden- 
hall. 8°, Washington, 1901, 222 pp. 

The Geology and Mineral Resources of a portion of the Copper River District, 

Alaska. By Frank Charles Schrader and Arthur Coe Spencer. 8°, Washington, 

1901, 94 pp. 

Gibson, 1854-55. 

Lieut. William Gibson, U. S. N. , commanded the U. S. schooner 
Fenimore Cooj>er in 1854-55. This A'essel was one of those compos- 
ing the North Pacific Exploring Expedition, "Lieut. -John Kodgers 
commanding," sometimes known as the Ringgold and Rodgers expe- 
dition. Gibson cruised through the Aleutian islands in the summer 
of 1855, correcting the charts and surveying harbors here and there, 
especially at Attu and Adak. No report of the work has been pub- 
lished. The geogi-aphic results are shown on United States Hydro- 
graphic charts 8 and 55 

Glass, 1881. 

Commander Henry Glass, U. S. N. , succeeded Captain Beardslec on 

the Sitka station in 1881, in command of the U. S. S. WachuKeft. The 

surveying done by Symonds and Hanus under Beardslee was continued 

under Glass and was published by the Coast Survey. See Coast Survey 

chart 726. 

Glenn, 1898-99. 

By direction of the Secretary of War, three military parties were 
to be organized in the spring of 1898 for exploring the interior of 
Alaska. The third, known as Expedition No. 3, was placed under the 
command of Capt. Edwin F. Glenn, of the Twenty-fifth infantry, who 
was instructed to establish a camp at Port Wells, Prince William sound, 
about April 1, 1898, and explore northeastward for routes toward the 
Copper and Sushitna rivers, and on about May 1 to go to Cook inlet 
and explore northward to the Tanana and Yukon. With this party 
went, as geologist, Mr. W. C. Mendenhall, of the United States Geo- 
logical Survey. Glenn's report was published in 1899 ))y the Adjutant- 
GeneraFs Office of the War Department, as (Bulletin) No. XXV, 
Reports of Explorations in Alaska, and also in a quarto volume eman- 
ating from the Senate Committee on Military Afiairs and entitled 



32 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

Compilations of Narratives of Explorations in Alaska; Washington, 
GovorniniMit Printino- Office, 1900, pp. r)27-6-l:8. Mendenhall's report 
was published in i'JOO in the Twentieth Annual Report of the Geolog- 
ical Survey, Part VII, pp. 265-340. 

(ilonn's explorations were continued in 1899. For report on these 
see the above-cited compilation, pp. 711-724. 

Glotop, 1763-1766. 

Stephen Glotof, a Russian fur trader, after wintering, 1763-63, on 
Copper island, sailed away on July 26 and, cruising eastward, discov- 
ered several of the Aleutian islands. He went as far eastward as the 
island of Kculiak, which ho discovered. He wintered there and 
returned to Uninak in 1764 and to Kamchatka in 1766. He published 
nothing. For some account of his travels see Coxe, Account of Rus- 
sian Discoveries, 17S0; Berg, Chron. Hist, of Discovery of Aleutian 
Islands, St. Petersburg, 1823; also Dall's Alaska and Bancroft's His- 
tory. 

Grewingk, 1850. 

Dr. Constantin Grewingk published in Verhandlungen der Russisch- 
Kaiserlichen Mineralogischen Gesellschaft zu St. Petersburg, 1850, a 
contribution to our knowledge of Northwest America and its adjacent 
islands. This work, in German, is a veritable storehouse of informa- 
tion and has been freely used in this dictionary. Its arrangement, 
however, and the lack of an index make its use for dictionary purposes 
both laborious and unsatisfactory. 

Hanus, 1879-1881. See Beakdslee and Glass. 
Harriman Alaska Expedition, 1899. 

In the summer of 1899 Mr. Edward Henry Harriman, of New York, 
visited Alaska for health and recreation. For this purpose he chartered 
the steamer George W. Eldei\ and invited as his guests about 30 scien- 
tific men from various parts of the United States, a considerable num- 
ber being from Washington. The party sailed from Seattle on July 1 
and cruised northward and westward along the British Columbian and 
Alaskan coasts to Bering strait, and returning reached Seattle on 
August 31, having been gone just two months. At various points 
collections were made by his guests, photographs secured, and a little 
surveying and exploration done. The results are being published by 
Mr. Harriman and the Washington Academy of Sciences. 

Hayes, 1891. 

In the spring of 1891 Mr. Frederick Schwatka conducted an explo- 
ration, organized by a syndicate of newspapers, in the region north of 
Lynn cair.d and westward to the Copper river. Dr. Charles Willard 
Hayes, of the United States Geological Survey, was detailed to accom- 



1 



BAKER] AUTHORITIES. 33 

paiiy the expedition as geologist. He published his results, including 
3 maps, in 1S92, in the National Geographic Magazine, Vol. IV, pp. 
117-162. The route was up Taku inlet, down the Teslin and Lewes, 
up the White, over Skolai pass and dow^n the Chitina and Copper. The 
party left Juneau on May 25 and arrived at Eyak, in Prince William 
sound, just in time to miss the August mail steamer. 

Helm, 1886. See Snow. 

Hooper, 1880-1899. 

Capt. Calvin Leighton Hooper, of the United States Revenue Cutter 
Service, was born in Maine on July 7, 1S42, and entered the United 
States Revenue Cutter Service as a third lieutenant on June 6, 1866. 
In this service he remained continually till his death of Bright's disease 
in San Francisco on April 29, 1900. He was promoted to second lieu- 
tenant on June 24, 1868, to first lieutenant on July 20, 1870, and to 
captain on October 23, 1879. He served six years on the North Atlantic 
coast of the United States, three years on the Great Lakes, while his 
last twenty-five years were spent on the Pacific coast, chiefly in Alaskan 
waters, where for many years he patroled in and about Bering sea. 
His annual reports to the Treasury Department have contributed to 
our knowledge of Alaskan geography. 

Ilin, 181M842. 

Staflf-Capt. Peter Ivanovich Ilin, of the Pilot Corps, sailed from 
Cronstadt for the Russian American colonies with Golofnin in the 
Kamchathi on August 26, 1817. In 1831, in a skin boat (baidar) 23 
feet long, he surveyed the eastern coast of Kamchatka from Avacha 
bay northward to Cape Shipunski (Journal Rus. Hyd. Dept., 1852, 
Vol. X, pp. 12.5-135). This man is supposed to be the one who sur- 
veyed, at an unknown date, a bay on the western shore of Chichagof 
island, a bay which after him has been called Ilina— i. e., Ilin's. His 
sketch is contained in Sheet XXIII of Sarichefs atlas, published in 
1826. Ilin died in Okhotsk (one account says Kamchatka) in 1842. 
(Journal Rus. Hyd. Dept., 1850, Vol. VIII, p. 169.) 

Ingexstkem, 1829-1832. 

Ingenstrem was a pilot in the employment of the Russian American 
Company and often visited Atka, where he twice wintered and made 
various surveys on Atka and Amlia. He did not publish anything. 
His results are incorporated in Tebenkof, Lutke, and on Russian 
Hydrographic chart 1400. Very little information is on record 
about him. Even the spelling of his name is uncertain. Grewingk 
says that he made surveys in the western Aleutians in 1829. In 1830- 
1832, in company with Chernof, he did surveying in Prince William 
sound and at the mouth of Kaknu river, Cook inlet. 
Bull. 187—01 -3 



34 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [hvll.hh. 

Jackson, 1S77-1900. 

Rev. Sheldon Jackson, Pre8l)3^terian missionary and since 1885 
general auent for education in Alaska, first visited Alaska in August, 
1877. in tiie interest of schools and missions. He made a second trip 
on the same errand in 1879. Other visits followed, and since his gov- 
ernment appointment in 1885 he has made annual visits to the Terri- 
tory, traveling extensively in various parts on inspecting tours. 
Reports on this Avork are published annually in the Report of the 
Commissioner of PMuoation, 

KiiwosTOF AND Davidof, 1803. 

Two Russian naval officers, Nikolai Alexandrovich Khwostof and 
Gavril Ivanovich Davidof, were in the employ of the Russian Ameri- 
can Company in 1802-1801. They left St. Petersburg in April, 1802, 
and went overland to Okhotsk, arriving in August "of the same year." ^ 
Thence they sailed to Kodiak, conferred wdth Baranof, and returned 
to Okhotsk, whence they returned overland to St. Petersburg, arriv- 
ing there in January, 1804. Davidof published in Russian an account 
of this journey, in 2 volumes, St. Petersburg, 1810-1812. See also 
Journal of the Russian Hydrographic Department, 1852, Vol. X, pp. 
391-433; also Bancroft's History, pp. 458-459. 

KoTZKiuTE, 1816-17. 

By the liberality of Count Rumiantzof, Russian counselor of state, 
in 1815 the l)rig Rurlk was fitted out for exploration in America with 
reference to a Northwest Passage. Lieutenant Otto von Kotzebue, son 
of the distinguished author, and who had accompanied Krusenstern on 
the Neva in 1803-1806, was placed in command. Accompanied by the 
savants Choris, Chamisso, and Eschscholtz, he sailed fromCronstadton 
July 30, 1815, and, rounding Cape Horn, arrived in Petropavlovsk on 
June 19, 1816. Sailing from there on fJuly 18, he landed on St. Law- 
rence island on the 27th, passed through Bering strait on the 31st, and 
on August 3 entered the sound which now bears his name. This he 
explored and mapped, as also the region about Bering strait and St. 
Lawrence island. He then sailed to Unalaska, San Francisco, and the 
Hawaiian islands. From here he returned to Unalaska the following 
year (1817), refitted, and went to St. Lawrence island. Through ill 
health he gave up further exploration and returned to Russia, arriving 
in Cronstadt on August 3, 1818. A full account of this voyage was 
published in 1821, both in Russian and in German. An English trans- 
lation by H. E. Lloyd was published the same vear. 

Kotzebue was born at Revel on December 19, 1787, and died there 

on February 13, 1846. 

■ — 1_ . . 

> Bancroft (H. H.) History of Alaska, 8°, San Francisco, 1886, p. 458. 



I 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 35 

1773785 

Krause Brothers, 1882. 

Two brothers, Dr. Arthur Krause and Dr. Aurel Krause, were sent 
out by the Bremen Geographical Society in 1881 to make ethnographic 
and geographic studies in Alaska. In the summer of 1881 they visited 
and mapped a district about the head of Lynn canal and Chilkat river. 
Later they visited and worked in Bering strait, making a map of the 
country about East cape. Accounts of this have appeared in various 
journals. A summing up of all the work was published in 1885, 
entitled Ergebnisse einer Reise nach der Nordwest Kiiste von Amerika 
und der Berings-Strasse, etc., 8°, Jena, 1885, 16 + 120 pp., with 
illustrations. 

In this dictionary Krause's names have all been taken from a map of 
the Chilkat region, from surveys by Arthur Krause in 1882, which 
was published in Zeitschrift der Ges. fiir Erdk. zu Berlin, 1883, Vol. 

XVIII, plate 9. 

Krenitzin and Levashef, 1768-69. 

On May 1, 1761, the Tsarina of Russia issued an ukaz ordering a 
secret naval expedition to explore between Asia and America. In 
charge of it was placed Capt. -Lieut. Peter Kuzmich Krenitzin, whose 
principal assistant was Lieut. Michael Levashef. Leaving St. Peters- 
burg on July 1, 1764, the party went to Okhotsk and there built two 
vessels, repaired two others, and with the four saik^d from Okhotsk 
on October 10, 1766. Shipwreck soon followed and the shipwrecked 
crews wintered at Bolsheretsk in Kamchatka. The following summer 
they repaired their boats, sailed to Nizhnikamchatsk, and there passed 
the winter. Finally, on June 21, 1768, all was ready and the party 
sailed eastward, Krenitzin commanding the galiot St. Catherine and 
Levashef the hooker St. Paid. They cruised through the eastern part 
of the Aleutian chain, and wintered, Levashef in the port in Unalaska 
which now bears his name, and Krenitzin in the strait between Unimak 
and Alaska peninsula. 

The following year (1769) both ships returned to Kamchatka, 
Krenitzin arriving on July 29 and Levashef on August 21. They 
wintered at Kamchatka. On July 1, 1770, Krenitzin was drowned, 
whereupon Levashef assumed command and returned to St. Peters- 
burg, arriving on October 22, 1771. Coxe published in 1780 the first 
account of this voyage. An official account of it, in Russian, was pub- 
lished in the Journal of the Russian Navy Department in 1852, Vol. X, 
pp. 70-103. Petrof drew largely from this official report for the 
account written by him in Bancroft's (H. H.) History of Alaska, pp. 

157-168. 

Krusenstern, 1804-05. 

Admiral Adam Johann von Krusenstern, in the ship midezMa^ (Hope), 
and accompanied by Lisianski in the ship Nem^ made the first of a 



30 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. Ibiill.187. 

loiio- scries of Riissiiin voyaui's from Cronstadt to the Russian American 
colonies. 

Prior to 1709 tli(MV were several Russian companies in Alaska. 
They derived their su))])lies overland through Siberia. In 1799 a new 
company— the Russian American Company— was organized and given 
very large powers. This company completely supplanted all previous 
ones, and it adopted the policy of sending to the colonies an annual 
supply ship— or rather two of them, for they sailed, after the custom 
of the time, in pairs for mutual assistance. Krusenstern commanded 
the first one sent out, the Nadezhda, which, sailing from Cronstadt on 
July 26, 1803, rounded Cape Horn and arrived in Petropavlovsk on 
July 31, 1801. Refitting here, Krusenstern sailed on August 27, 1804, 
on a diplomatic mission to Japan. The winter, one of disappointment 
and failure, was spent in Japan, and on April 5, 1805, Krusenstern 
sailed away and, cruising northward along the Japanese coast and 
Kurile islands, arrived in Petropavlovsk in June. On board the 
Nadezhda were, among others, the chancellor Resanof, Kotzebue, 
Langsdorf, and Shemelin. Resanof and Langsdorf left the NadezMa 
at Petropavlovsk, and on June 23, 1805, Krusenstern sailed for home, 
arriving in Cronstadt on August 7, 1806. 

Both Krusenstern and Lisianski had served in the English navy. 
Krusenstern became an admiral in the Russian navy and published 
extensively respecting the hydrograph}^ of the North Pacific. In 
1809-10 he published, in Russian, an account of this voyage. This 
appeared in German in 1810-1812, in French in 1821, and in English 
in 1831. He also pu])lished an atlas of the Pacific ocean in 1827, 
accompanied b}^ a collection of hj'drographic memoirs explanatory 
thereof. For a brief account of the voyage see Journal of the Russian 
Hydrographic Ofiice, 1819, Vol. VII, pp. 6-26. The accounts by 
Langsdorf, Lisianski, and Shemelin cover parts of the voj^age. 

KURITZIEN, 1849. 

Full Pilot Kuritzien made a survey of Umnak island in or before the 
year 1819. His map is reproduced as a subsketch in Tebenkof's atlas 
sheet XXV. No particulars concerning him are known to the writer. 

Langsuokf, 1804-05. 

Georg Heinrich von Langsdorf accompanied Krusenstern during 
part of his voyage round the w^orld, in 1803-1806, and i)ublished in 
two volumes an account of his voyages and travels, which appeared 
in German in 1812 and in English in 1813-11. Apparently also there 
was a Russian edition in 1811. Langsdorf was a member of the 
Russian embassy to Japan, of which embassy Resanof was chief. 
Resanof and Langsdorf parted company with Krusenstern at Petro- 



baker] authorities. 37 

pavlovsk on June 24:, 1805, and together V' isited the Pribilof islands, 

Unalaska, Kodiak, Sitka, and California, and afterwards returned to 

Russia. 

La Perouse. 1786. 

In 1785 Louis XVI of France organized a scientific exploring expe- 
dition on a lavish scale and placed it under the command of Com- 
mander Jean Francois de Galaup de la Perouse. 

Two vessels were fitted out for the purpose — La Boussole, com- 
manded bv La Perouse, and B Astrolahe^ commanded by Captain de 
Langle. Sailing from Brest on August 1, 1785, via Cape Horn and 
the Hawaiian islands, they arrived on June 24 in sight of the north- 
west coast of America in the vicinity of Yakutat. From this point 
they cruised southward,' surveying as they went as far as Monterey, 
California, arriving there on September 15. Here they remained till 
the 24th and then took final leave of the American coast. 

La Perouse was an unfortunate navigator. At Lituya bay, which 
he entered and surveyed, 26 of his ship's company were drowned in 
the tide bore at its entrance. Both ships with all hands were lost in 
1788 or 1789, and for many years their fate was a mystery. It has 
been solved, however, and some of the wreckage of the ships has been 
recovered and recently placed on exhibition in the French Naval 
Museum in Pans. 

An ehiborate report upon this expedition, in 4 quarto volumes, with 
an atlas, was published by the French Government in 1797, entitled 
Voyage de La Perouse autour du monde. 

LiXDEXBERG, 1838. 

In 1838 a survey and chart was made of the head of Lynn canal and 
the lower reach of the Chilkat river by a Mr. Lindenberg. This chart 
was published as an inset or subsketch on Russian Hydrographic chart 
1396, published in 1848. It does not appear who this Lindenberg Avas. 
Perhaps it was the Captain Lindenberg who was in command of the 
Russian American Company's ship Prince MensUkof in 1852. Gre- 
wingk records (p. 418) that Lindenberg surveyed Admiralty island 
and Chilkat river in 1838. 

LisiANSKi, 1804-05. 

Krusenstern (Admiral A. J. von) and Lisianski (Captain Urey), in 
the ships NadezMa (hope) and Neva, sailed from Cronstadt around 
Cape Horn and thence to the North Pacific on a voyage to carry sup- 
plies to the Russian American Company and to make exploration and 
discoverv. This was the first of a series of circumnavigations by the 
Russians. Sailing from Cronstadt on October 6, 1803, Lisianski 
reached the Hawaiian islands on June 4. 1804, and proceeded thence 
to St. Paul, Kodiak, arriving on July 14, 1804. Here he heard that 



38 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

the Indians had destroj^ed the Russian settlement at Sitka. Accord- 
ingly he sailed thither (August 15-20), and on October 1, 1804, bom- 
barded and d(>.stroyed the Indian village which was located on Indian 
river near the present site of Sitka. On November 10-15 he returned 
to Kodiak and wintered there. The next year (June 14-22, 1805) he 
returned to Sitka and remained there till September 1, when he set 
sail for Canton and thus ended his work in Alaska. He pul)lished in 
English an account of the voyage in 1814, entitled Voyage Round the 
AVoi-ld in 1803-1806, by Urey Lisianski, 4°, London, 1814. 

LuTKE, 1827-28. 

One of the important authorities used in preparing this dictionary 
is Capt. Feodor Petrovich Lutke, who, in command of the Russian 
corvette Seniavine and accompanied by Capt. Mikhail Nikolaievich 
Staniukovich in command of the sloop Moller, made a voyage round 
the world in 1826-1829. 

An account of the voyage was published in Russian in 1834-1836, in 
3 octavo volumes, a folio atlas, and another volume called Nautical part. 
It appeared at the same time in French. The nautical part is a rare 
book. The two copies of itin the Library of Congress, one in French, 
the other in Russian, are the only ones known to the writer. This 
Partie nautique contains hydrographic and geographic information as 
to Bering sea, Alaska peninsula, etc., derived not merely from Lutke's 
own work but also from various Russian sources previously unpub- 
lished. Pressing public duties delayed the preparation and publica- 
tion of this work, and finally it appeared in a crude form far from 
satisfactor}^ to its author. Despite its defects, however, the work is 
of first importance in dealing with the evolution of our geographic 
knowledge of Alaska. An index to this book was prepared by Mr. 
Dall and published by the Coast Survey in 1883 in the Coast Pilot of 
Alaska. 

Lutke and Staniukovich sailed from Cronstadt on September 1, 1826, 
and, roundiiig Cape Horn, arrived at Sitka on June 24, 1827. Here 
Lutke remained till July 31 and then sailed to Unalaska, arriving on 
August 22. After a stay of eight days in Unalaska he cruised north- 
ward and Avestward in Bering sea to the Pribilof islands, St. Matthew, 
the Connnander islands, and to Petropavlovsk. From here he cruised 
southward and returned to Petropavlovsk on June 9, 1828. After a 
stay of sixteen days he cruised and surveyed along the Siberian coast 
to St. Lawrence bay in Bering strait and returned on September 4, 
1828, to Petropavlovsk. He took final leave of this place on Novem- 
ber 9, 1828, and, rounding the Cape of Good Hope, returned home, 
arriving at Cronstadt on September 6, 1829. 



BAKER. J 



AUTHORITIES. 39 



Malaspina, 1791. 



Capt. Alessandro Malaspina, an Italian navigator in the service of 
Spain, in command of the DescuMerta and accompanied by Bustamente 
in the Atrevida, arrived on the Alaskan coast on June 2, 1791, near 
Sitka and surveyed along the coast to Prince William sound, looking 
for the Northwest passage reported by Maldonado. The journals of 
the voyage were long suppressed. A sketch of the voyage was pub- 
lished in^the Introduction to Galiano\s Kelacion del viage hecho por los 
goletas Sutil y Mexicana, etc.; de orden del rey, 8°, Madrid, 1802; 
yet, strange to say, the name of Malaspina, whose work is highly 
praised, can not be found in the book. On his return to Spain, the 
infamous Godoy, known as the Prince of the Peace, confined him in a 
dungeon at Corunna and there kept him till the peace of Amiens in 1802, 
when, at the express desire of Napoleon, he was liberated. An account 
of his work was published in Salva (Miguel) y Baranda (Pedro Sainz 
de), Coleccion de documentos ineditos, etc., 8=, Madrid, 1849, Vol. 

XV, plp. 268-320. 

Mansfield, 1889-1891. 

Lieut. Commander Henry B. Mansfield, U. S. N., succeeded Thomas 
as commander of the Coast and Geodetic Survey steamer PaMerson in 
the spring of 1889 and remained in command until succeeded by Moore 
on Febru^ary 2, 1892; thus he made surveys in Alexander archipelago 
during the seasons of 1889, 1890, and 1891. In 1889, April 27 to 
September 29, his work was chiefly or wholly in Frederick sound, 
where surveys were made of Cleveland passage. Steamboat bay, Eliza 
harbor. Gambler bay, Mole harbor. Windfall harbor, Holkham bay, 
etc. The season's work of 1890 began at Port Simpson on April 28 
and ended at Juneau on September 17. During this season U harbor 
and large-scale charts were made, chiefly in and about Lynn canal. 
This included Barlow cove, William Henry harbor, Pyramid harbor. 
Portage cove, Gastineau channel, Juneau harbor, etc. Work dunng 
the season of 1891 began on April 30 at Burroughs bay and ended on 
September 18 at Thorne arm. The surveys of this season were chiefly 
or wholly in the waters surrounding Revillagigedo island, southeastern 
Alaska. For an account of his work see Coast and Geodetic Survey 
Reports, 1890, pp. 75-77; 1891, pp. 78-81; 1892, pp. 82-83; also Coast 
Survey charts 8075, 8170, 8216, 8218, 8224, 8235, and 8302. 
Maurelle and Quadra, 1775-1779. ' 
Spanish exploration on the northwest coast of America north of 
California began in 1774. In that year Perez and Martinez reached 
and anchored in Nootka sound, Vancouver island. 

In 1775, bv command of the :Mcxican Viceroy Bucareli there was 
despatched the royal galiot tionora, under command ot Don Juan J^ ran- 



40 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

cisco do lii Bodega y Quadra, to make explorations north of California. 
Witli Quadra went the pilot Francisco Antonio Maurelle. On this 
voyage they discovered, named, and in part surve3^ed Bucareli bay. 
Four 3''ears later a second voyage was undertaken b}^ the Spaniards. 
Quadra, in command of Za Prlncesa., and Don Ignacio Arteaga, in 
connnand of La Favorlta^ with Maurelle as pilot, sailed from San Bias, 
Mexico, on Februarj^ 11, 1779, and cruised northward as far as the 
mouth of Copper river, w^hcnce the}^ returned to San Bias, arriving on 
November 21, 1779. In this voyage the}^ revisited Bucareli ba}^ and 
made additional surveys there. The published results of these voy- 
ages, so far as this dictionarj' is concerned, relate chiefly to Bucareli 
bay. 

A Q,o^y of their map was secured hy La Perouse and published in 
1798, in the atlas accompanying his Voj^age, plate 26. Also Daines 
Barrington, in his Miscellanies, 4°, London, 1781, published Mau- 
relle's journal, yet without the map. The Spaniards were secretive 
about their explorations, avoided publication, and thus have left little 
impress on the geography of the region they visited. For references 
to publications touching this work see Grewingk, pp. 392-393. 

Meade, 1868-69. 

Commander (afterward Rear Admiral) Richard Worsam Meade, 
U. S. N., cruised through Alexander archipelago in the winter of 
1868-69 in the U. S. S. Sagincm and made reconnaissance sketches of 
various places there. An account of this cruise was published by the 
Navy Department on July 26, 1869, as Hydrographic Notice No. 13 of 
1869, a pamphlet of 29 pages. The map results were incorporated on 
United States Hydrographic chart No. 225, a chart of rough and crude 
appearance, but which has been very useful in making this dictionary. 

Meares and Douglas, 1788-89. 

Capt. John Meares, in January, 1788, in connection with several 
British merchants resident in India, bought and fitted out two vessels, 
the Felice and the IpUgenia. Meares commanded the Felice and 
Capt. William Douglas the IpJugenla. The two ships sailed together 
from^Typa, near Macao, China, on January 22, 1788, cruised around 
the Philippines, and, parting company, Meares reached Nootka on 
May 13, 1788, and Douglas arrived in Cook inlet on June 16, 1788. 
From Cook inlet Douglas voyaged east and south and joined Me'ares at 
Nootka on August 27, 1788. Meares cruised and traded about Van- 
couver island and what is now Washington, and later both oflicers 
sailed to the Hawaiian islands. They returned and again traded on 
the northwest coast of America and then sailed to China. 

For an account of their voyage and its results see Meares (John), 
Voyages in 1788-1789 from China to Northwest America, 4° London, 
1790. ' 



I 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 41 

Meares and Tipping, 1786-87. 

Capt. John Meares, in the Nootka, sailed from Bengal, India, on 
March 2, 1786, on a trading voyage to Malacca and northwest America. 
About* the same time sailed also Lieut. William Tipping,- R. N., in 
command of the Sect Otter. The two vessels were owned by the same 
company of merchants and were to cooperate. Meares made the land 
at Atka, in the Aleutian islands, on August 1, 1786, anchored there, 
and met both Russians and natives. He then cruised eastward through 
the Aleutian islands to Unalaska, the Shumagins, Kodiak, Cook inlet, 
and Prince William sound, where the Sea Otter had preceded him and 
departed with a cargo of peltries. Meares thereupon decided to winter 
in Prince William sound. He spent a very uncomfortable winter, 
many of his crew d3dng of scurvy. On May 17, 1787, he was visited 
by Capt. George Dixon, another English trader, just arrived in Prince 
William sound. Of Meares ship's company 23 had died during the 
winter, and on June 21, 1787, he sailed away with his company reduced 
to 21. Ten days later he was at Sitka and sailed thence for the 
Hawaiian islands and thence to China, arriving on October 20, 1787. 
Nothing was ever heard of Lieutenant Tipping in the 8ea Otter after 
he left Prince William sound. 

For an account of these voyages see Meares (John), Voyages in 
1788-1789 from China to Northwest America, 1^, London, 1790, 
pp. i-xl. 

Mendenhall, 1898-1900. 

Mr. Walter Curran Mendenhall, geologist of the United States 
Geological Survey, was attached to a military exploring expedition 
under the command of Capt. E. F. Glenn, known as Military Expedi- 
tion No. 3, which in the summer of 1898 explored east of Cook inlet 
and thence northeastward up the Matanuska and across to the Tanana 
river. Mendenhall's results are published in the Twentieth Annual 
Report of the Geological Survey, Part VII, pp. 265-310. 

In 1900 Mendenhall was attached, as geologist, to a party in charge 
of W. J. Peters, working in the eastern part of Seward peninsula. 
His report is now in proof and will soon appear as a special publication 
of the United States Geological Survey. 

Moore (E. K.), 1895-1898. 

Lieut. Commander Edwin K. Moore, U. S. N., succeeded W. I. Moore 
in command of the Coast and Geodetic Survey steamer Patterson on 
March 15, 1895, and remained in command until recalled in the spring 
of 1898 to participate in the Spanish war. Thus he had three survey- 
ing seasons in Alaska, aU in Alexander archipelago; the first from 
Mav 13 to October, 1895, spent chiefly in Chatham and Peril straits; 
the"^second from August 8 to October 6, 1896, in Peril strait; and the 



42 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

last from April 30 to October 9, 1897, chiefly in and to the north of 
Sitka sound. 

For an account of his work see Coast and Geodetic Survey Reports, 
1895, pp. 50-5i>; 1S9(;, pp. 43-1:5; 1897, pp. 39-40; 1898, pp. 49-50; 
also Coast Survey charts 8170, 8281, 8283. 

MooKE (W. I.), 1892-1895. 

Lieut. William I. Moore, U. S. N., succeeded Mansfield in command 
of the Coast and Geodetic Survey steamer Pattemm on February 2, 

1892, and remained in command till March 15, 1895, when he was 
relieved by Lieut. Commander E. K. Moore, U. S. N. During the 
season of 1892, which began at Vixen bay, in Boca de Quadra, on 
May 12 and ended at Security bay on September 19, surveys were 
made in Dixon entrance, Boca de Quadra, Clarence strait, Revillagigedo 
channel, and Keku strait. In this season's work Lieut. W. P. Ray, 
U. S. N., commanding the McArthtit\ cooperated. 

The season's work of 1893 began at Port Simpson on May 3 and 
ended at Sitka on September 1. A survey was made of Sitka harbor 
and approaches, and the ship was used for transporting boundary 
parties. 

The season of 1894 began on May 27 and ended on August 14, dur- 
ing which surveys were made chiefly in Chatham strait, between Peril 
strait and Icy strait. 

For an account of his work see Coast and Geodetic Survey Reports, 

1893, Part I, pp. 54-56 ; 1894, Part I, pp. 50-51 ; 1895, pp. 50-51 ; 
also Coast Survey charts 8075, 8214, 8240, 8283. 

MosER, 1897-98. 

Lieut. Commander Jefferson Franklin Moser, U. S. N., commanded 
the Fish Commission steamer Alhatross during her cruises in Alaska 
in 1897 and 1898. Moser, in the cruise of 1897, collected hydrographic 
notes and made sketches of harbors and anchorages here and there. 
These notes and maps were published b}^ the Coast and Geodetic Sur- 
vey in 1899 as Bulletins 37 and 38. Moser's report for 1897-98 was 
published in 1899 in Fish Commission Bulletin for 1898, pp. 1-178; 
this was also issued separately. 

MURASHEF, 1839-40. 

Sub-Lieut. Mikhail Murashef sailed with Tebenkof in the Russian 
American Company's ship Elena from Cronstadt on August 5, 1835, 
and, rounding Cape Horn, arrived at Sitka on April 16, 1836. The 
ship was kept in the colonies. Murashef made surveys, apparently 
very good ones, along the strait separating Afognak and Kodiak in 
1839-40. The results are shown on Russian Hydrographic chart No. 
1425, published in 1849. 



1 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 43 

Murdoch, 1881-1883. 

John Murdoch was a member of Ray's party at Point Barrow, 
1881-1883, as naturalist and observer. The natural history in Ray's 
report (pp. 89-200) was written by him. Murdoch also studied the 
Eskimo, acquired some knowledge of their language, and published, 
in 1892, Ethnological Results of the Point Barrow Expedition, in the 
Ninth Annual Report of the Bureau of Eth.iology, 1887-88, pp. l-lll. 

Nelson, 1877-1881. 

Mr. Edward William Nelson was stationed for about four years 
(June 1877 to 1881) at St. Michael, Norton sound, in the employment 
of the United States Signal Service, and as a collector for the Smith- 
sonian Institution. During that period he made sledge journeys in 
the vicinity, and one, especially noteworthy, of about 1,200 miles 
through the Yukon delta. This journey, made in December, 1878, and 
January, 1879, yielded considerable geographic knowledge of the 
region traversed. The map results were incorporated in the maps of 
the Tenth Census, and a special map with a description of the journey 
was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society 
for 1882, Vol. IV, pp. 660 to 670. 

Nichols, 1881-1883. 

Lieut. Commander Henry E. Nichols, U. S. N., in command of the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey steamer Hassler, made surveys in Alex- 
ander archipelago during three seasons, 1881-1883. In 1881 he niade 
surveys in Kaigani and Wrangell straits and magnetic observations 
at various places. In 1882, from July 6 to November 20, his work 
was in and about Revillagigedo channel and northward to Wrangell. 
In 1883, from May 16 to October 13, he surveyed several harbors 
just north of Dixon entrance. lie was relieved of his command by 
Lieut. Commander A. S. Snow on March 6, 1881. 

In 1888-1890 he again served in the Coast Survey and wrote a 
revised edition of the Alaska Coast Pilot, which was published in 1891. 

For an account of his work see Coast and Geodetic Survey Reports, 
1882, pp. 52-53; 1883, pp. 59-60; 1881, pp. 70-71; also Coast Survey 
charts 707, 709, 710, 713, 8072, 8071. 

North Pacific Exploring Expedition, 1854-55. 

Exploration and surveys were made in the North Pacific, Aleutian 
islands, Bering sea, and on the Siberian coast by United States naval 
officers in 1851 and 1855. The expedition was under the command of 
Capt. Cadwalader Ringgold, U. S. N. Owing to ill health he gave up 
the command to Capt. John Rodgers, who conmianded the U. S. S. 
Vi7icennes, while Lieuts. William Gibson and Beverly Kennou were on 



44 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bt,ll.187. 

the U. S. schooner Fenimm-e Coo2)ei\ The expedition is referred to as 
the North Pacific Exploring Expedition and also as the Ringgold and 
Rodgcrs Exploring Expedition. The resulting maps were published 
l)y \\w riiited States Ilydrographic Office, but the journals exist only 
in inaimscrii)t and no general account or report, so far as the writer 
knows, has ever been published. See United States Hydrographic 
Office charts 8, 54, 55, 60, and ^'^. 

Pexder, 1868. 

Staff Commander David Pender, R. N., made a survey of Portland 
canal and vicinity in 1868. This was a survey along the boundary of 
the then newly purchased Alaska. The resulting map was published 
as a fly leaf attached to British Admiralt}^ chart 2431. 

Peters and Brooks, 1898-99. 

In the summer of 1898 a party of the United States Geological 
Survey in charge of Mr. William John Peters, topographer, with 
whom Avent Mr. Alfred Hulse Brooks as geologist, made a reconnais- 
sance of parts of the White and Tanana river basins. A report on 
this woi-k was made by Mr. Brooks and published in the Twentieth 
Annual Report of the Geological Survey, Part VII, pp. 425-494. 

In 1899 Peters and Brooks continued their explorations, going from 
the head of Lynn canal northwestward and northward to Eagle, on 
the Yukon. The report on this work was written by Brooks and 
published in the Twenty -first Annual Report of the Geological Survey, 
Part II, pp. 331-391. 

Petrof, 1880. 

Ivan Petrof Avas special agent of the Tenth Census (1880) for Alaska 
and prepared a Report on the Population, Industries, and Resources 
of the territory, which forms 189 pages of Volume VIII of the Tenth 
Census of the United States, published in 1884. This report and two 
general maps of Alaska issued by the Census Office, one dated 1880, 
the other 1882, have l)een most useful and helpful in making this dic- 
tionar3\ The references to Petrof are chiefly to these two maps. 
References to Bancroft's History of Alaska are usuall}^ credited to 
Petrof, who wrote that work. 

A preliminary report on che population, industries, and resources 
of Alaska was published early in 1881 as House of Representative Ex. 
Doc. No. 40, Eorty-sixth Congress, third session. In this report is a 
general map of Alaska showing Petrof \s route of travel in his census 
work. He was at Kodiak, the Shumagins, Sannak, Belkofski, Una- 
laska, Unimak, Atka, Pribilof islands, and St. Michael, and traveled 
in western Alaska from St. Michael to Kodiak, including journeys for 
considerable distances up the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 45 

PORTLOCK AND DiXdN, 1 7S(i-S7. 

The King" George's Sound Company, organized as a commercial 
partnership in May, 1785, fitted out two vessels for trading on the 
northwest coast of America and China. One of these, the King George^ 
was placed under the command of Capt. Nathaniel Portlock, the other, 
the Queen Charlotte^ under the command of Capt. George Dixon. Both 
of these officers had served under Cook in his voyage on the Alaskan 
coast in 1778. The vessels departed from England on September 16, 
1785 rounded Cape Horn, touched at the Hawaiian islands, and on 
July 16, 1786, arrived in Cook inlet. Leaving this anchorage, the two 
vessels cruised eastward and southward along the coast as far as Nootka 
and went thence to the Hawaiian islands, arriving on December 1, 1786. 
Here both remained until March 15, 1787, and then sailed together for 
Prince William sound, arriving on April 25, and remaining there till 
July 31, when the ships parted company and Portlock cruised east to 
the vicinity of Sitka and thence via the Hawaiian islands and China 
back to England. He made a few additions to the geographic knowl- 
edo'c of the then almost unknown Alaska coast, sketched a few harbors, 
and named a few places. Both Portlock and Dixon wrote accounts of 
their voyages, which were published at London in 1789. Portlock's 
is entitled A Voyage Round the World, etc., 4°, London, 1789. 

Pribilof, 1786. 

Gerassim Gavrilovich Pribilof, master in the Russian Navy, was the 
son of one of the sailors who accompanied Bering in 1741. He entered 
the service of the Lebedef-Lastochkin company in 1778. In 1786 he 
sought for and discovered in Bering sea the breeding place of the fur 
seals, the group of islands that now bear his name. He died in Sitka 
in March, 1796. It does not appear that he published anything. 

Prospkctoes and Miners. 

Ever since the purchase of Alaska, in 1867, prospectors and miners 
have visited it and gone from time to time here and there. Within 
the last four or live years there have been several gold excitements and 
grand rushes to the territory. These prospectors and miners rushing 
in have named many features, though rarely in print. Subsequently 
government explorers and surveyors have obtained these names from 
prospectors' stakes or by word of mouth and have pablished them. 
In this dictionary such names are, as far as practicable or known, 
accredited to the prospectors and miners. 

Ray, 1881-188.3. 

Early in the eighties the leading nations of the world undertook 
simultaneous exploration of the North Polar regions. The plan was 
for each participating nation to establish as far north as practicable a 



4r> GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

station f<n- iiictcorologic and magnetic observations and to maintain it 
for throe j'cars. In this work the United States participated b}^ estab- 
lishing two stiitions, one under Gen. Adolphus Washington Greely, 
U. S. A., at Lad}' Franklin bay, the other under Capt. Patrick Henry 
Ray, U. S. A., at Point Barrow, Alaska. With Ray, as observers, 
assistants, etc., were, among others, John Murdoch, Middleton Smith, 
Edward Perry Herendeen, and Sergie Smolianinof , a Russian, who is 
called in the records A. C. Dark. Smolianinof died in AVashington 
on February 11, 1901. 

The party sailed from San Francisco on July 18, 1881, on the 
schooner Golden Fleece and reached Point Barrow on September 8. 
Here a permanent station was established and maintained till August 
27, 1883. On the 29th the party sailed away on the schooner Leo^ 
reached San Francisco on October 7, and was disbanded on the 15th. 
Between March 28 and April 7, 1883, Ra}' made a sledge journey into 
the interior, and he published a map resulting from this exploration. 
Ray's report with accompanjdng papers was published in 1885 as House 
of Representatives Ex. Doc. No. 44, Forty-eighth Congress, second 
session. 

Raymond, 1869. 

Capt. (now Lieut. Col.) Charles Walker Raymond, United States 
Engineers, was in 1869 directed to go to Fort Yukon and determine 
its geographic position. At that time there was doubt in some minds 
whether Fort Yukon was in British or American territory. Raymond 
went up the river in the summer of 1869, found that the fort was in 
American territory, and made a report on the work assigned him, 
entitled Report of a Reconnaissance of the Yukon River, Alaska 
Territory, July to September, 1869. This was published in 1871 as 
Senate Ex. Doc. No. 12, Forty-second Congress, first session. The 
map of the river accompanying this report is the one cited in this 
dictionary. The map was also issued separately. 

Reid, 1890-1892. 

Prof. Harry Fielding Reid, formerly of the Case School of Applied 
Sciences at Cleveland, Ohio, and now of Johns Hopkins University, 
visited Muir glacier in the summer of 1890 and made a study of it and 
the surrounding region. He returned to it again in 1892 and made 
further studies there. An account of the work of 1890, accompanied 
by sketch maps, was published in the National Geographic Magazine 
in 1892, Vol. IV, pp. 19-84. Later studies were published in 1896 in 
the Sixteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey, 
Part I, pp. 415-461. The map results are incorporated in map No. 
3095 of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. 



lAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 47 

RoHN, 1899. 

In the summer of 1899 Mr. Oscar Rohn, who was attached to a 
military exploring- expedition under the command of Capt. W. F. 
Abercrombie, had charge of a detachment which explored the region 
south and east of Mount Wrangell. A preliminary report on this 
work was submitted to the War Department and a later and fuller 
report to the Geological Survey. The last is published in the 
Twenty -first Annual Report of the Geological Survey, Part II, pp. 
393-140. 

Russell, 1889-1891. 

Prof. Israel Cook Russell, then of the United States Geological 
Survey, visited the Yukon valley in 1889 and the Mount St. Elias 
region in 1890. In the latter year he explored Malaspina glacier and 
Yakutat bay under the auspices of the National Geographic Society 
and the United States Geological Survey. This work he continued 
in 1891. For an account of the work of 1890, see National Geographic 
Magazine, Vol. Ill, pp. 53-203; and for that of 1891 see Thirteenth 
Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey, Part II, 
pp. 1-91. 

Russian American Company, 1799-1867. 

The Russian American Company was chartered on June 8, 1799, for 
twent}^ years. On September 23, 1821, its charter was renewed for 
twenty j^ears. In 1844 it was again renewed for twenty 3^ears, to date 
from January 1, 1842. The unchartered compan}- after 1862 continued, 
on sufferance, till the purchase of Alaska by the United States, in 1867. 
Much geographic information was gathered and published l)v officers 
of the company. Information cited in this dictionary is credited to 
such officers when known, but otherwise to the company. The prin- 
cipal reference to the company's results are to a map of Baranof 
island contained in its report for 1849. 

Russians. 

In this dictionary there are a considerable num])er of names ac- 
credited to the Russians without being more specific. This was 
unavoidable because more specific information was lacking. The 
names so accredited come chiefly from charts issued by the Russian 
Hydrographic Department. Between 1844 and 1854 a dozen (more or 
less) charts of northwest America, Bering sea, and the Arctic were 
issued as parts of a Pacific ocean series and subsequently given new 
numbers. 



48 



GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. 



[bull. 187. 



The i)riiicii)!il charts in tliis serios, with their dates of publication, 
current niuuhers. and tlu> old l'a<'ilic ocean series numbers, are as 
follows: 



Date. 


Number. 


Old number. 


Date. 


Number. 


Old number. 




lcS44 
1847 


1345 
1378 




1849 
1850 


- 1427 
1441 


5 
106 


9 


1847 


1379 


8 


1851 


1454 


4 


1848 


1396 


10 


1852 


1455 


6 


1848 


1397 


10 


1853 


1493 


lOd 


1848 


1400 


7 


1853 


1494 


10c 


1849 


1425 


9 


1854 


1495 


13 



Rynda i'arty, 1863. 

Russian naval officers on board the corvette Rynda in 1863 visited 
Wrangell and the Stikine river and made surveys there, especiall}^ of 
the Stikine. The surveyors w^ere Butirkin and Kadin. Prof. William 
P. Blake, of New Haven, was also a member of the part}^ and pub- 
lished an account of the work done and results obtained, in the Ameri- 
can Journal of Science, New Haven, July, 1867, vol. 41:, pp. 96-101; 
also in House of Representatives Ex. Doc. No. 177, part 2, Fortieth 
Congress, second session. 

The Russian Hydrographic Department in 1867 published a chart 
of the Stikine resulting- from this survey. 

Sarichef, 1790-1792. 

Lieut, (afterwards Vice-Aclmiral and Hydrographer) Gavrila Andree- 
vich Sarichef, of the Russian nav}', made explorations in the Arctic in 
1787, and later was an officer under Commodore Joseph Billings 
during the latter's explorations of Bering sea and Alaska (1790-1792). 
He appears to have been an excellent sailor and geographer. No 
satisfactory account of his life or works has been found by the writer. 
Sarichef published in Russian in 1802 an account of the Billings expe- 
dition, in 2 volumes, accompanied l)y a folio atlas of 50 sheets. This 
work the writer has never seen. In 1826 the Russian Hydrographic 
Office published a large folio atlas, comprising 33 double page sheets, 
of which 26 are charts and 7 are views, entitled Atlas of the Northern 
Part of the Pacitic Ocean, Compiled in Sheets by the Imperial Navy 
Department from the Latest Reports and Maps, 1826, under the Direc- 
tion of Vice-A(hniral and Plydrographer Sarichef j^/'^t^. As indicated 
in the title, this appears to be a collection of separate sheets issued 
from time to time and first collected into an atlas in 1826. Sheet 3 
contains corrections obtained in 1829. Several of Sarichef's surveys 



BAKER.] • AUTHORITIES. 49 

in 1792 appear in this atlas, notably those of the Aleutian islands, 
Unalaska, etc. Separate charts from this atlas are to be found in the 
Coast Survey Office and the H^'drographic Office in Washington. 

The only copy of this atlas known to the writer is owned b}^ Prof. 
George Davidson, of San Francisco, who has most kindly placed it at 
the writer's disposal during- the preparation of this dictionary. Refer- 
ences to Sarichef refer mainly to this atlas. 

Sauer, 1790-1792. 

The publication In 1784 of Cook's explorations of northwest America 
made in 1778 stimulated other nations to like work. La Perouse was 
despatched by France in 178.5; and the same year, by order of the 
Empress of Russia, was organized "A secret astronomical and geo- 
graphical expedition for navigating the frozen sea, describing its 
coasts and ascertaining the situation of the islands in the seas between 
Asia and America." This was placed under the command of Commo- 
dore Joseph Billings, who, according to Sauer, "said he had been 
astronomer's assistant in Captain Cook's last voyage." Martin Sauer 
accompanied this expedition as its secretary and translator, and in 
1802 published an account of it, entitled Account of a Geographical 
and Astronomical Expedition, etc., performed by Commodore Joseph 
Billings in 1785-1794, 4^^, London, 1802. 

Leaving St. Petersburg in the autumn of 1785, the party went over- 
land to Okhotsk and there built two vessels, the Skwa Rossle (Glory of 
Russia) and the DolraiaN'am.erenia (Good Intent), which were launched 
in August, 1789. The latter vessel was wrecked on the bar at Okhotsk, 
and another vessel, the Chornie Orel (Black Eagle), was built to take 
its place. This vessel was under the command of Captain Hall, while 
Billings commanded the Slavie Rossie. The party wintered at Petro- 
pavlovsk and in May, 1790, sailed eastward somewhere near the 
Aleutian islands, saw Amchitka, landed at Unalaska, and thence con- 
tinued on past Sannak and the Shumagins to Kodiak and Afognak, 
visiting Cook inlet and Prince William sound and then returning and 
wintering at Petropavlovsk. On May 19 of the following year (1791) 
the ships again set sail to the eastward, passed Bering island, touched 
at Tanaga, and went thence to Unalaska. From here they went north- 
ward in Bering sea, passed near the Pribilof islands and St. Matthew 
island, landed on St. Lawrence island and later at Point Rodney, 
Seward peninsula, and on August 3 anchored in St. Lawrence bay, 
Bering strait. Here Billings left the party for an overland journey in 
the Chukchi countrv, and Sarichef on August 14 set out to return to 
lliuliuk, Unalaska, Arriving August 28, 1791. Here Sarichef wintered 
(1791-1792). In May, 1792, the party left Unalaska and went back to 
Petropavlovsk and thence to St. Petersburg. 
Bull. 187—01 4 



50 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

ScnuADER, 1898-1900. 

]\lr. Frank Charles Schrader, geologist of the United States Geolog- 
ical Survey, was attached to a military exploring expedition under the 
command of Capt. W. R. Abercrombie, known as Military Expedition 
No. 2. Avhich in the summer of 1898 made explorations from Valdes 
northeastward to and along the Copper river. For an account of this 
see Twentieth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey, 
Part VII, pp. 341-423. 

In 1899 Schrader, in charge of a party, made -imilar explorations 
along the Chandlar and Koyukuk rivers. His results are published in 
the Twenty-first Annual Report of the United States Geological 
Survey, Part II, pp. 441-486. 

Again in 1900, in the latter part of the summer and in the fall, 
Schrader, assisted by Mr. Arthur Coe Spencer, geologist, and T. G. 
Gerdine and D. C. Witherspoon, topographers, investigated the 
geology and mineral resources of the Copper River district. The 
results are now in proof and will soon appear as a special public^ation 
of the United States Geological Survey. 

ScHWATKA, 1883-1886. 

Lieut. Frederick Schwatka, U. S. A., made a military reconnaissance 
in 1883 along the Yukon river from source to mouth on a raft. He 
made an official report on this military reconnaissance in Alaska, in 
1883, which was printed in 1885 as Senate Ex. Doc. No. 2, Forty-eighth 
Congress, second session. A fuller account of the same journey, in 
popular form, was published by Cassel & Co., in 1885, under the title 
Along Alaska's Great River. This has an index. He made a second 
trip to Alaska in 1886 under the auspices of the New York Times and 
explored in the St. Elias region. Schwatka was born on Septeml)er 29, 
1849, in Galena, 111., and died in Portland, Oreg., on November 2, 1892. 

Shishmaref, 1816-1821. 

Capt. -Lieut. Glieb Semenovich Shishmaref accompanied Kotzebue 
on his voyage to Alaska and round the world in 1815-1818, and in 1817 
made survey's in Kotzebue sound and on the east and south coast of 
St. Lawrence island. 

In 1821 he again returned to the colonies, this time in command of 
the ship BhujonwmieTenmie (Good Intent), and in company with Vasilief 
on the Othrietie (Discovery). Sailing from Cronstadt on July 3, 1819, 
and I'ounding Cape Horn, he arrived at Unalaska on June 4, 1820. 
With him went Dr. Stein and asti'onomer Tarkanof. Afterwards he 
cruised through the Aleutian islands, to Amchitka, Semisopochnoi, 
Gareloi, and Bogoslof. He also entered the Arctic, went as far as 
Ic}^ cape, visited St. Lawrence bay, and completed in 1821 the survey 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 51 

of the shore line of St. Lawrence island, partially surs'eyed by the 
Kotzebue expedition in ISIT. (See Grewingk, p. -ilS; Krusenstern 
Memoires hydrographiques, Vol. II. p. 36; Journal of the Russian 
Hydrographic Office, 1849, Vol. VII, pp. 106-116). 

Sxow AND Helm, 1886. 

Lieut. Commander Albert S. Snow, U. S. N. , relieved Lieut. Com- 
mander Richardson Clover of the command of the Coast and Geodetic 
Surve}' steamer Pattersoji in February-, 1886, and made surve3-s in 
southeastern Alaska during- the summer of 1886, beginning the season 
early in May in the vicinity of AVrangell, and ending it on September 
15 at Port Simpson. Snow was succeeded in the command of the Pat- 
terson by Lieut. Commander Charles M. Thomas on April 30, 1887. 
Associated with Snow was Lieut. James M. Helm, U. S. X., in com- 
mand of the JfcArtltiir. Snow and Helm surveyed and charted part 
of Clarence strait, Sumner strait, Wrangell strait, St. John harbor, 
Dewey anchorage, Ratz harbor, Coffman cove, Wrangell harbor. 
Steamer bay. Red bay, Shakan strait, Port Protection, and Port 
]\IcArthur. Charts of these places, issued by the Coast Survey-, have 
been used in the preparation of this dictionar}'. 

Spuer and Goodrich, 1896. 

Mr. Josiah Edward Spurr. geologist of the United States Geologi- 
cal Survey, assisted bv Messrs. Harold B. Goodrich and F. C. Schrader, 
in the summer of 1896 made a geologic reconnaissance from the head 
of Lynn canal over Chilkoot pass to the Yukon and thence down that 
river to St. Michael. For report on this work see Eighteenth Annual 
Report of the Geological Survey for 1896-97, Part III. pp. 87-392. 

Spurr and Post, 1898. 

Mr. Josiah Edward Spurr, geologist, accompanied by Mr. William 
Schuyler Post, topographer, both of the United States Geological 
Survey, in the summer of 1898 made a reconnaissance in southwestern 
Alaska. They began at the head of Cook inlet, went northwest across 
the Tordrillo range, descended the Kuskokwim, crossed from its mouth 
to Nushagak, and thence crossed Alaska peninsula to Katmai. The 
party landed at Tyonek on April 26 and arrived at Katmai on October 
17, 1898, whence they sailed (October 31) on the Alaska Commercial 
Company's steamer Dora for San Francisco. 

For an account of this expedition see Twentieth Annual Report of 
the Geological Surve}^, Part \TI. pp. 31-261. 

Staxu-kovich, 1827-28. 
Capt. Mikhail Nikolaievich Staniukovich, commanding the sloop 
MoIlei\ accompanied Lutk? on his voyage round the world. He made 
a survey of the north shore of Alaska peninsula in the summer of 



52 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

1828. Thv i,ro()<,n-aphic results of this voyage were incorporated by 
Lutke in the Partie nautique of his voyage round the world. For an 
aec'ount in Russian of Staniukovich's voyage see Journal of the Russian 
Hydrographies Department, 1850, Vol. VIII, pp. 63-75. 

Stockton, 1889. 

Lieut. C'onimandcr Charles Herbert Stockton, IT. S. N., command- 
ing the r. S. 8. Thetis^ cruised in Alaskan waters in the summer of 
1S81I. This cruise covered the whole coast from Dixon entrance to 
Unalaska and thence through Bering sea to the Arctic and eastward 
to Mackenzie river. Stockton published an account of this voyage in 
181H) in the National Geographic Magazine, Vol. II, pp. 171-198. His 
geographic results are shown on United States Hydrographic Office 
chart li81>, edition of 1890. 

Symonds, 1879-1881. See Beakdslee and Glass. 
Tebenkof, 1831-1850. 

Capt. Mikhail Dmitrievich Tebenkof was director of the Russian 
American Company and governor of Russian America during 1845- 
1850. As early as 1881 he was in Norton sound, and in that year dis- 
covered the bay that now bears his name. (Lutke, Partie nautique, 
p. 220.) In 1833 he survej^ed and mapped it. His map is reproduced 
by Lutke. In 1835 he was in St. Petersburg, and on August 5 of that 
3^ear sailed in command of the Russian American Company's ship 
Elena from Cronstadt for Sitka, where he arrived via Cape Horn on 
April 16, 1836. He appears to have remained in the colonies thence- 
forward till the close of his term as director, and then returned to i 
Russia, To him more than to any other Russian are we indebted for 
geographic knowledge of the Alaskan coast. Himself a surveyor and 
interested in surveying, he gave much attention to improving charts 
of the coast in the interest of the company. In 1848 and 1849 there 
was compiled, drawn up, and engraved at Sitka his Atlas of the North 
west Coast of America. This atlas of 39 maps shows the entire coast 
line of North America from Bering strait to Lower California, with 
adjacent islands and parts of the Siberian coast. It embodies the 
results of the various surveys made by Russian naval officers, officers 
of the Russian American Company, etc. The maps were engraved at 
Sitka by Tere.ntief , a creole, and for the most part are dated 1849. It 
is probable that they were dated from time to time during 1848 to 
1850 as engraved and afterwards put together as an atlas in 1852. 
With it was issued by Tebenkof a little book of Notes and Explana- 
tions. There appear to be two editions of this book of Notes, both 
very rare, at least in the United States. In the making of this dic- 
tionary Tebenkof 's atlas has been consulted more than any other single 
work. 



I 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 53 

Thomas, 1887-88. 

Lieut. Commander Charles M. Thomas, IT. S. X., succeeded Lieut. 
Conmiander Snow in command of the Coast and Geodetic Survey 
steamer Patterson on April 30, 1887, and remained in command till 
relieved by Manstield on April 1, 1889. During the season of 1887, 
which began at Port Simpson on May 21 and ended there on October 
13, his party surveyed and mapped in whole or in part Frederick 
sound, Duncan canal, Brown cove. Thomas bay, Farragut bay, and 
Portage bay. In the following season, which began on April 27, 1888, 
he made surveys till June 2>3 in the vicinity of Taku inlet, in this time 
mapping Taku harbor, Limestone inlet. Port Snettisham, and Oliver 
inlet. Between July 3 and October 11, 1888, Thomas made surveys 
asked for b}- the Department of State in and about Portland canal. 
For an account of his work see Coast and Geodetic Survey Reports, 
1888, "pp. 73-76; 1889, pp. 78-82, and Coast Survey charts 704, 733, 
and 8227. 

TiKHiMENIEF, 1861-1863. 

p. Tikhmenief has been called the historian of the Russian American 
Company. He published in Russian a work in two volumes, the tirst 
dated 1861, the second 1863, entitled Historical Review of the Russian 
American Company'. This is a useful work, compiled from original 
sources, and gives information on Alaskan matters not to be found 

elsewhere. 

ToPHAM, 1888. 

Mr. Harold W. Topham and his brother Edwin, of London, with 
George Broka of Brussels, and William Williams of New York, left 
Sitka on a little schooner on July 3, 1888, and went to ]\Iount St. 
Elias for the purj)ose of climbing it. They reached an altitude of 
11,460 feet and then turned back. Topham read an account of this 
trip before the Royal Geographical Society on April 8, 1889. This 
account, with a map, was published in the Society's proceedings in 
July, 1889, Vol. XI, pp. 424-435. See also the National Geographic 
Magazine, 1890, Vol. HI, pp. 73-74. 

TcRXER, 1889-1891. 

Mr. John Henry Turner, Assistant in the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, was- engaged on the Alaskan boundary' survev from June, 
1889, to July, 1891. In the summer of 1889, with Mr. McGratli. he 
ascended the Yukon river to Fort Yukon, where the party divided. 
On August 12 Turner began his journey up the Porcupine river to 
the boundary. On the 19th he landed at the site of an abandoned 
camp near the one hundred and forty-tirst meridian, and there began 
the building of quarters for officers and men and the erection of an 
observatory. This camp was named Camp Colonna. Longitude was 



54 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

dcteriuincd l)y inooii-culmination observations in March and April, 
ISW. 

On .Miuvh 21, 1800, he set out upon a sledge journey from Camp 
Colonna northward to the Arctic ocean, where he arrived on April 8. 
The next day he started back, and reached Camp Colonna on April 17. 
Later he left Camp Colonna, descended the Porcupine and Yukon 
rivers, and proceeded to St. Michael, Norton sound, where he was 
compelled to remain until July, 1891, when he departed for Washing- 
ton. He returned to Alaska in 1892 on boundary work, but owing to 
ill health was obliged to give it up. During his stay in Alaska he 
made a valuable collection of bird and animal skins, which he pre- 
sented to the Universit}^ of California. The expenses of this collection 
he bore personally. He died in Washington on June 13, 1893. An 
account of his Avork was published in the National Geographic Maga- 
zine in 1893, Vol. IV, pp. 189-197; see also Coast and Geodetic 
Survey Report 1890-1891, Part I, pp. 86-88. 

Vancouver, 1792-1794. 

Capt. George Vancouver, R. N., in command of the sloop of war 
Di'scoiy /'I/, accompanied by the armed tender Chatham under the com- 
mand of Li(Hit. AVilliam R, Broughton, R. N., made a surveying and 
exploring voj'age from England to Northwest America and round 
the world in 1790 to 1795. An account of this voyage was published 
by the British Government in 1798 in 3 quarto volumes accompanied 
by a folio atlas. 

This is an admirable account of an admirable piece of work and is 
one of the standard works for the region it covers. 

On April 1, 1791, the two vessels departed and, rounding the Cape 
of Good Hope, arrived off the coast of California on April 17, 1792. 
Thence Vancouver cruised northward, surveying and mapping the 
coast as far as Fitzhugh sound, whence he went to Nootka. He then 
cruised southward to San Francisco and Monterey, and about the 
beginning of 1793 went to the Hawaiian islands. 

Leaving these on March 30, 1793, he returned to the north, arriv- 
ing off Cape Mendocino on April 26, whence he proceeded to Fitz- 
hugh sound, joined the Chatham there, and resumed his surveys. 
During the season of 1793 he carried these northward along what is 
now British Colum))ia and in Alexander archipelago to Sumner strait. 
Quitting Alaska and returning southward, he surveyed the California 
coast from Monterey southward to San Diego and down to latitude 
30" on the coast of lower California, finishing on December 15, 1793, 
and going thence to the Hawaiian islands. Quitting these on March 
15, 1794, Vancouver returned on his last voyage to northwest Aiper- 
ica, arriving off Chirikof island, just west of Kodiak, on April 2. 
He then surveyed eastward, in Kodiak, Cook inlet, Prince William 



BAKEB.] AUTHOKITIES. 55 

sound, and so on, to a junction with his survej^s of the preceding 
year. This work eroded at Port Conclusion, from which he took his 
final departure on August 22, 1794, and returned via Cape Horn to 
England, arriving off the Irish coast on September 12, 1795. Van- 
couver's work in the field and the admirable presentation of results in 
his published report constitute his monument. After more than a 
century it remains a standard work of reference. 

Vancouver had had previous experience in exploring. Captain Cook 
selected him in 1771 as one of his oflicers, and thus he accompanied that 
distinguished navigator during his second voyage. He also assisted 
Cook in outfitting and equipping for his third and last voyage. On 
December 9, 1780, he was made a lieutenant and served under Rodney 
in the West Indies till the middle of 1783. From 1784 to 1789 he 
served on the Eurojxi., stationed at Jamaica. In 1790. he was made 
master and commander of the Discovery. In August, 1794, he was 
made a post-captain. After his return to England he worked contin- 
ually on his report till his death in May, 1798. The work, nearly 
but not quite complete at the time of his death, was finished by his 
brother. John Vancouver. 

Vasiliep. 

Sevei'al Russian naval officers known for their work in Alaska have 
borne this name (Williams). Krusenstern, in his Receuil de memoires 
hydrographiques, 1827, Vol. II, p. 76, says: 

It is inuch to )_)e regretted that th,e hydrographic works of a naval officer, Vasilief, 
who was in the enijjloyment of the American Company, were lost. I have already 
had occasion to speak of him in the preceding article. Provided with a sextant and 
chronometer and with much zeal and attachment for his profession, he had during 
his sojourn in our American colonies made a complete survey of all of the Aleutian 
islands without having had specific instructions to do so. Unfortunately he was 
drowned in Okliotsk harbor on his return from America to Russia, and what became 
of his precious pa^KTs and drawings is unknown. He is not to be confounded with 
the Captain (Mikhail Nikolaievich) Vasilief who was sent in 1819 to explore the 
northern parts of the Pacific ocean and particularly Bering strait. 

Vasilief, 1809. 

Ivan Vasilief tJie first ^ pilot or mate in the Russian navy, went with 
Hagemeister in the ship Neva to Russian America in 1806. In 1809 
he surveyed the western shore of Baranof island and at an unknown 
date "died in the service." 

Vasilief, 1819-1822. 

Capt. Lieut. Mikhail Nikolaievich Vasilief sailed on July 3, 1819, 
from Cronstadt on a voyage to the Russian American colonies. With 
him went Shishmaref on the Blagonamierennie (Good Intent). Vasi- 
lief arrived in Petropovlovsk on June 4, 1820. Leaving there late in 
June, he went to Kotzebue sound, where he joined his consort the 



56 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

Good Jntt'ut (Captain Shishmaref), and together they cruised north- 
ward alon^^ the coast to Icy cape, and, returning via St. Lawrence 
and the l^rihilof islands, reached Unalaska on August 19, 1820. 
Thence h(> went to Sitka and southward to San Francisco and the 
Hawaiian islands, and on the 7th of April, 1821, was back in Sitka, 
whence he went to Unalaska, arriving on June 12. He then cruised 
northwai-d as far as Cape Lisburne, explored the eastern part of 
Bering sea. discovered Nunivak island, and arrived at Petropavlovsk 
on September 8, 1821. Thence he returned to Cronstadt, arriving on 
August 2, 1822. 

During this cruise Vasilief and Shishmaref explored the mainland 
coast of Bering sea from Cape Newenham to and including Norton 
sound, and the Arctic coast from Cape Lisburne to Icy cape. (See 
Journal of the Russian Hydrographic Department, 1849, Vol. VII, p. 
100-116.) 

Vasilief, 1831-32. 

Ensign Vasilief, of the corps of pilots, in 1831-32 surveyed and 
mapped a part of Alaska peninsula from Cook inlet westward nearly 
to Chignik bay. The map resulting from this survej^ is published 
by Lutke in his Partie Nautique, p. 274. Of this survey and map 
Lutke says: 

Vasilief s map of the northeastern part of AUaska contains all possible details as to 
the situation of the coast and appears worthy of confidence, but in his journals which 
we have had in our hands Me have found absolutely nothing except the data on 
which the construction of the map was based. Relative to places they contained no 
remark as to their configuration, properties, peculiarities, or their advantages, details 
so important for the navigator. We are therefore able to add but few observations 
supplementary to his map hereto annexed. 

Vasilief began his reconnaissance in 1831 at Cape Douglas, and from 
there in the course of the same summer went as far west as Cape 
Kubugakli, in latitude 57° 52' 30". The following year he extended 
it as far as Cape Kumliun, in latitude 56° 32' 12". Circumstances pre- 
vented him from pursuing his work farther. The reconnaissance was 
made in three-holed l)idarkas, a circumstance which, on the one hand, 
made it possible for him to explore all the windings of the coast in the 
greatest detail, but, on the other hand, prevented him from seeing the 
coast and judging of its appearance at any great distance. His chro- 
nometer stopped in the first days of the reconnaissance, so that it is 
based only on survey and latitude observations. 

Veniaminop, 1824-1834. 

Rev. John Veniaminof, a Russian priest of Irkutsk, went to Una- 
laska as a missionary in 1824. Of this devoted and noble man all 
writers speak in terms of the highest praise. The writer has sought 
unsuccessfully for any satisfactory account of his life and labors. 



BAKER.] AUTHORITIES. 57 

He resided at Unalaska from the time of his arrival there in 1824 
till 1834, when he was made a bishop. He then went, after the cus- 
tom of his church, to Irkutsk and was there invested with his sacred 
office, taking- the name of Innokenti or Innocentius. Returning- he 
went to Sitka and labored successfully among the Indians there for a 
time, and later returned to Russia, where he reached the highest office 
in the Russo-Greek church, becoming Metropolite of Moscow. He 
became blind and died at an advanced age some time prior to 1880. 

Veniaminof was not merely a noble and successful missionary, but 
is known for his ethnologic and linguistic studies as well. There was 
published at St. Petersburg, in Russian, in 1840 his Notes on the 
Islands of the Unalaska District, in two volumes, with a supplemen- 
tary or third part on the Atkans and Koloshians. These books are 
standard works, and it is regrettable that they are accessible only in 
Russian. He learned the Aleutian language and wrote a grammar and 
dictionary of it, which was published in 1846. In the same year he 
also published a sketch of the Koloshian and Kodiak languages. All 
these works have been used in preparing this dictionary. 

AVestern Union Telegraph Exploration, 1865-1867. 

After the failure of the second Atlantic telegraphic cable, the 
Western Union Telegraph Company, believing that an ocean cable 
could not succeed, undertook to construct an overland telegraph to 
Asia and Europe via Bering strait. For this purpose preparations 
were made on a large scale and parties worked, explored, and built 
some line in British Columbia, Alaska, and Siberia in 1865 and 1866. 
When the third Atlantic cable proved, in 1866, to be a success the 
whole enterprise was abandoned and the geographic information col- 
lected by it was scattered. No satisfactory general account of this 
venture has been published. Several manuscript maps were made 
but not published. A photograph of one of these is the authority 
chiefly usea and cited in this dictionary. 

WORONKOFSKI, 1836. 

Lieutenant Woronkofski, of the pilot corps, by direction of the 
Russian American Company, surveyed in 1836 the southern shore of 
Alaska peninsula from the vicinity of Chignik bay, where Vasiliefs 
work ended in 1832, westward to Unimak pass, connecting with 
Staniukovich's survey of the north shore in 1828. He sailed from 
Sitka on this errand on March 6, 1836, in command of the company's 
transport luidicd: The survey was carried on in bidarkas and his 
assistants were Aleuts. He returned to Sitka on August 30. Baer 
and Helmersen speak in high praise of this work in the brief account 
given of it in their Beitrage zur Kentniss des Russischen Reiches, 8°, 



58 GEOGRAPHIC DICTIONARY OF ALASKA. [bull. 187. 

St. Petersburg, 1839, Vol. I, pp. 323-325. He also surveyed about 
Unga and Popof islands in the Shumagins in 1837. See Russian 
Hydrographic chart 1379 for his map. 

WOSNESENSKI, 1842-43. 

Ilia G. Wosnesenski was sent in 1839 to Alaska, by and at the cost 
of the Imperial Academy of Sciences of St. Petersburg, to make col- 
lections, lie sailed with Etolin, who was succeeded in command by 
Kadnikof, on the Russian American Company's ship Nikolai, from 
Cronstadt on August 19, 1839, and reached Sitka on May 1, 1840. In 
1840-41 he was on the coast of lower and upper California, in 1842-43 
in the Aleutian islands, in Bering sea and Kotzebue sound, in 1844 
in the Kurile islands, and in 184.5-1848 about the Okhotsk sea and 
in Kamchatka. He returned to Sitka at the end of July, 1849, 
and sailed thence for St. Petersburg with Captain Riedell on the ship 
Atka. Mining engineer Doroshin returned on the same voyage. 
(Grewingk, pp. 419-420.) 

Zagoskin, 1842-1844. 

Lieut. Laurenti Alexief Zagoskin made explorations on the lower 
Yukon, the Kuskokwim, and in Norton sound in 1842-1844, under a 
commission from the Russian American Company. Of this explora- 
tion he published an account, in Russian, in two volumes, at St. Peters- 
burg, 1847-48. An account of it, and also an extract from Zago- 
skin's diary, accompanied by a map, was published by S. I. Zelanie in 
the Journal of the Russian Geographic Society, 1849, Vol. I, 
pp. 211-2GG. 

Zarembo, 1834-1838. 

Capt. -Lieut. Dionysius Fedorovich Zarembo, in command of the 
Russian American Company's ship Prince Alexander, sailed from Cron- 
stadt on August 14, 1840, and, going via Cape Horn, arrived at Sitka 
on April 3, 1841. With him on the voj^age went Lieutenant Zagoskin. 
Zarembo had previously been in the Russian colonies, having first gone 
out as pilot in 1816 with Ponafidin in the Suworof and again in 1819 
with the same officer in the Borodino. He surveyed Wrangell harbor 
in 1834 and Woewodski harbor in 1838. His maps are shown as insets 
on Russian Hydrographic chart 1390, published in 1848. For a very 
brief and unofficial account of his voyage see Journal Russian Hydro- 
graphic Department, 1850, Vol. VIII, pp. 139-140. Zarembo, in com- 
mand of tlie l)rig Ch/eJuujof, founded the present town of Wrangell in 
the spring of 1834, building there a stockade or fort, which after hini 
was named Dionysius. 



BAKER] AUTHORITIES. 59 

CONCLUSION. 

This work is put forth with a consciousness of its shortcomings and 
defects. The hope is entertained, however, that its errors will be 
found in the excusable class, and that despite these the dictionary will 
be found useful. Though begun about ten years ago, most of the 
work upon it has been done in the last year. The author is indebted 
to many persons for information and assistance, but to none more than 
to his associate Mr. Herbert G. Ogden and to Mr. P. C. Warman and 
his assistants in the Editorial Division of the United States Geological 
Survej^ Grateful acknowledgment is made to these gentlemen and 
also to the officials and proof readers in the Government Printing 
Office for their cordial cooperation in producing this book. 



DICTIONARY. 

Note. — Adopted forms are in black-face type: rejected, obsolete, and doubtful forms in italics. 



Aantlen; glacial stream in the St. Elias Alps debouching a few miles southeast of 
Yakutat bay. Apparently a native name; published by Tebenkof in 
1849. 

Aaron; island, in Favorite channel, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Beardslee in 1880. 

Aats; bay and harbor, on northern shore of Coronation island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Native name, reported by Snow in 1886. Nicliols calls the 
western cove of this bay Aats harbor. 

Aats; point, on northern shore of Coronation island, Alexander archipelago. 
Native name, reported by Snow in 1886. 

Abaknakik, lake; see Aleknagik. 

Abdallah; mountain, at head of Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. So named by 
Reid in 1892. 

Abercrombie; canyon, in the lower part of Copper river. So named by Allen, in 
1885, after Capt. William R. Abercrombie, U. S. A. 

Abercrombie, lake; see Klutina. 

Abercrombie; mountain, on headwaters of White river near longitude 142°. 
Named by the Geological Survey, in 1899, after Capt. William R. Aber- 
crombie, U. S. A. 

Abkun, pass; see Apoon. 

Abraham; islet, northwest from Point Stanhope, Clarence strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by Snow, in 1886, after President Abraham Lincoln. This 
islet has been reserved for light-house purposes by Executive order dated 
January 4, 1901. 

Abre-el-ojo, islet; see Eye Opener. 

Acaponeta; point, on north end of St. Ignace island, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales 
archipelago. Named Punta d' Acaponeta by Maurelle and Quadra in 
1775-1779. 

Achaiak, island; see Aghiyuk. 

Acharon; channel, leading to the Kwemeluk pass in the Yukon delta. Called 
Achiiron by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Achek, island; see Middleton. 

Achenchik, river; see Chandlar. 

Acheredin; point, the southwest point of Unga island, Shumagin group. The word 
means turn or turning. Doubtless it was named after mate Ath. Acher- 
edin, a Russian fur trader, who wintered at Kodiak in 1779. Has been 
written Atcheredina and Otcheredin. The bight east of it is also called 
Acheredin. 

Acherk;. harbor, indenting the northwestern shore of Sannak island. Tebenkof, 
1849, published a sketch {acherk) of this harbor, which was republished 
by the Coast Survey in 1875, with the name Acherk. Thus the designation 
"Sketch of a harbor in the NW. part of Sannak" became Sketch {acherk) 

harbor. ^, 

bl 



Adi— Adiil. 



52 [BULL. 187. 



Achilles; mountain (3,027 foot hifxh), on Rovillajriprerlo island, near Tongass nar- 
rows, Aloxandor archipelago. So named by Nichols iu 1883. 

Achulik, island; see Ayakulik. 

Ackiagmute, Eskimo village; see Akiak. 

AcU'k, cape; see Aklek. 

Arootdii, island; .«ee Akutan. 

Acorn; peak, near mouth of the Nushagak river. So named by the i"ish Commis- 
sion iji 1890. 

A'-palliul, village; see Akpalint. 

Acntini, island; see Akutan. 

Adagdak; cape, the northernmost point of Adak island, Andreanof group, middle 
Aleutians. Aleut name from Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been written 
Adaciidach. 

Adak; island (5,(578 feet high), one of the principal islands of the Andreanof group, 
middle Aleutians. This is apparently the Ayagh or Kayaku island of 
Lazaref in 1761. Also written Ajaga or Kejachu. It is Adak and Adach 
of Billings, 1790, and often written Adakh. According to Dall, adak is the 
Aleut word for rral), while ddnk means fatlier. 

Adak; strait, bt'tween Adak and Kanaga islands, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. 
Ajiparently so named l)y the British Admiralty on chart 2460. 

A<l(tmiig<ni, bay; see Morzhovoi. 

Adams; anchorage, at south end of Shelter island, Stephens passage, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by Coghlan, in 1884, after the U. S. S. Adams, 
which anchored here in that year. 

Adams; channel, in Northern rapids, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by Coghlan, in 1884, after the U. S. S. Adams. 

Adams; creek, triliutary to middle fork of the Koyukuk, from the north, near 
longitude 150°. Named by prospectors in 1899. 

Adams; creek, tributary to Shovel creek, from the west, near its headwaters, 
Seward peninsula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Adams, fort; see Fort Adams. 

Adams; glacier, east of Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Named by Reid, in 1896, 
after C. A. Adams, a member of his party in 1890. In Reid's first publi- 
cation (Nat. Geog. Mag. Vol. IV, map, 1892) this is called the Southeast 
tributary (of jVIuir glacier). 

Adams; mountain peak (7,600 feet high), and also cluster or range of mountains, 
west of Portland canal. Named by Pender in 1868. 

Adams; peak (3,100 feet high), on Woronkofski island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named ])y Snow, in 1886, after the U. S. S. Adams. 

Adams; point, the north point of entrance to Moira sound, Clarence strait, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Adamson, cape; see Bartolome. 

Addington; cape, on Noyes island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Van- 
couver, in 1794, after the speaker of the House of Commons. Has been 
written Adington; also named Barnett by Meares in 1788. 

Admiral; creek, tributary to the Tubutulik river, near its source, Seward peninsula. 
Prospector's name, from Peters, 1900. 

Admiral; range of mountains, on the mainland east of Thomas bay, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

A.dmiralty; bay, on the Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow, forming the head of 
Dease inlet. vSo named by the British Admiralty in 1856. 

Admiralty, bay; see Yakutat. 

Admiralty; island and group of islands, in northern part of Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Vancouver in 1794 (III, p. 276). It is Khutsnoi (bear) 
island of Tebenkof in 1848. 



BAKER.] 63 Ado— Aga. 

Adolphus; point, on northern shore of Chichagof island, Icy strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. Has also been called 
Adolph point on some charts. 

Adugak; islet, north of the west end of Umnak, eastern Aleutians. Native name 
from Veniaminof. Has been written Adougakh. Perhaps from the Aleut 
Adudak, rather long. 

Aektok; island, near west end of Avatanak island, Krenitzin group, eastern Aleu- 
tians. Native name, spelled Aiaktak by Veniaminof and Aektok by 
Lutke and Tebenkof. Also called Goloi (bare) by the Ru.«sians. Krusen- 
stern spells itOuektock, while the Fish Commission, 1888, calls it Rootok. 
Also has been called Goly. Apparently identical with Aiaiepta of Krenit- 
zen and Levashef in 1768. This island has been reserved for light-house 
purposes by Executive order dated January 4, 1901. In that order it is 
called Rootok island. The spelling Rootok apparently arose accidentally 
from Aooktok. 

Affleck; canal, indenting southern shore of Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Affleck's channel by Vancouver, in 1793, after Admiral Affleck, R. N. 

Aiognak; bay, indenting the southwestern coast of Afognak island, Kodiak group. 
So called by Tebenkof, 1849. 

Ajofjnak; cape, the norilwrnmo.^t point of Afognak islrnd, Kodiak group. So 
JU called on the Russian American Company's map of 1849. Tebenkof the 

tP same year uses the name Sievernoi (north). 

Afognak; cape, the soulhernmtm point of Afognak island, Kodiak group. So 
called by Murashef, 1839-40. 

Afog-nak;' forest and fish culture reserve. The island of Afognak was by proclama- . 
tion of President Harrison dated December 24, 1892, set apart as a forest 
and fish culture reserve. 

Afog'nak; island, northeast of Kodiak, and, after Kodiak, the largest in the Kodiak 
group. Native name, which Coxe, 1780, wrote Afagnak and Afagnack. 
Portlock, 1786, calls it Kodiac. Vancouver speaks of the land "which 
the Russians call Fogniak." Langsdorf has Aphoknak and Appoknak. 
By error it has been called Afgonak. The form Afognak is well estab- 
lished by usage. 

Afognak; river, in western part of Afognak island, triljutary to Afognak bay. So 
called by :Murashef, 1839-tO. 

Afognak; village, or row of scattered dwellings, on shore of Afognak bay, in south- 
western part of Afognak island. Population in 1890, 409. In the Eleventh 
Census, 1890, pp. 73-74, it is stated that " Afognak village * * * really 
consists of a series of settlements lining the long curving beach. * * * 
The Creole \illage of Afognak extends in a single row of dwellings, some- 
what widely scattered, about three-fourths of a mile along the beach. 
This settlement was founded during the first quarter of the present cen- 
tury under the name of Rutkovsky village liy superannuated and pen- 
sioned employes of the Russian American Company." Rutkovsky, in 
the passage just cited seems to be an error. Tebenkof (Ch. XXIII) has 
Rubertz and the Russian American Company's map, 1848, Rubtzovskaia. 

Agadak, island; see Rat. 

Agaiak; islet, in Krestof sound, north of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Apparently an Aleut name, first applied by Vasilief in 1833. Has also 
been written Agayak and Agiak. 

Agalitnak, river; see Haliknuk. 

Agamgik; bay, indenting the northern shore of Beaver lay, Unalaska island, east- 
ern Aleutians. Aleut name, from Sarichef 1790. Called Food bay by the 
Fish Commission in 1888. Veniaminof writes it Agamgik. 



Ami-Aa:n. 



64 [in-i.i,. 187. 



Agamsik; tapo, the iiortliorn point of entrance to Tanaga bay, Tanaga island, 
niidilU' AU'iitiaiis. Aleut name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Has also Iteen 
written Aganisikh. 

A_,'i!<fli(>i/orlt, islaiiil; sec Bogosluf. 

Agassiz; piacii-r, in the St. Klias alpine region. So named l)y Lili))ey, in lcS8(i, after 
Prof. ]>onis Agassiz. See also ]\Ialaspina. 

Agassiz; mountain (2,241 feet liigli), near Tamgas harbor, Annette island, Alex- 
ander arebipelago. So nanie<l by Niehols in 188.3. Has been erroneously 
printed Aggassiz. 

Agassiz; peak (5,931 feet high), on the mainland, near Thomas bay, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Agassiz; point, on the mainland in Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Dall, in 1877, after Prof. Louis Agassiz. 

Agattu; island, one of the Near island group, near Attn, western Aleutians. Called 
Agattu or Krugldi (round) by the early Russians. Lutke says it is usually 
called Krugloi (round) by the Russians; also that Attu and Agattu are 
said to have been called St. Etienne and St. Abraham by Bering in 1741, 
Coxe, 1780, -writes it Agatakn. Variously written Agatu, Agattou, etc. 
Native name. 

Agayak, islet; see Agaiak 

A-ga'-zhulc, island; see Aghiyuk. 

Affi'('-t'c-j)i(k, river; see Agiapuk. 

Aghik; islet (250 feet high), one of the Semidi group. Native name from Pall, in 
1874, who wrote it A'ghik. Agik.is Aleut for liver. 

Aghileen; pinnacles, a remarkable row or series of black castellated ro'cks west of 
Pavlof volcano, on Alaska peninsula, northeast of Belkofski. Native 
name, obtained by Dall in 1880. 

Aghiyuk; island (1,500 feet high), one of the Semidi islands. Native name, as 
obtained by Dall in 1874. Tebenkof, 1849, has Agayak. Has also been 
written Aghiyukh and Aghi yukh. Achaiak of Langsdorf is probably 
this island. It is the Aleut name of the cormorant (graculus bicristatus). 
The Eskimo name of the violet -green cormorant is, according to Nelson, 
A-gtV-zhuk. Apparently this is known locally as North Semidi, upon 
which there is a fox farm. See also Chowiet. 

Agial; islet; see Agaiak. 

Agiapuk; river, tril)utary to Urantley harbor, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Eskimo name, from Beechey, 1827, who wrote' it Agee-ee-puk. Has also 
been written Ageepuk and Agiopuk, the last syllable puk meaning big. 

Agiukchuk; Eskimo village, on the mainland, east of Nunivak island, Bering sea. 
Visited by Nelson in December, 1878, and its native name reported by 
him to be Agiukchugamute, i.e., Agiukchuk people. 

Agivavik; lOskimo village, on right bank of Nusbagak river. Native name, from 
Petrof, 1880. 

Agligadak; small island, off the east end of Amlia, Andreanot group, middle 
Aleutians. Native name from Tebenkof. It means a gull half a fathom 
long, i. e., the (dlxdroxx. Has also been written Aglidakh. 

Agovloiilkatul; lake; see Alekuagik. 

Agouloitlpiik, lake; see Agulukpak. 

Agoin/ak; river; .see Ugaguk. 

Agre; creek, just south of Port Clarenci', Seward p(>ninsula. Name from Barnard, 
1900. 

Agripina; bay, on the southern .«hore of Alaska peninsula near the Semidi islands. 
So named by Vasilief in 1882. Has been variously written Agrepin, 
Agrijiin, .\grippine, etc. 

Aguadn, Rio de la; see Wateniiii. 



BAKER.] 65 Agu— Aik. 

Aguclaik; island, in Kukak bay, Shelikof strait. Aleut name, reported by Vasilief 
in 1831. 

Agueda; point, the northeastern point of San Juan Bautista island, Bucareli bay, 
Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Santa Agueda by Maurelle 
and Qvxadra in 1775-1779. Has also been written San Ageda. 

Agugdak, islet; see Asuksak. 

Agugum uda; see Northwest bay. 

Aguirre; point, on the northwestern coast of San Fernando island, Gulf of Esquibel, 
Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Aguirre by Maurelle and 
Quadra in 1775-1779. Aguirre is a Spanish proper name. 

Aguligik; island, in Kukak bay, Shelikof strait. Aleut name, meaning hawk. 
Name reported by Vasilief in 1831. Has been written Aguligat. Pro- 
nounced Ah-goo-lig-ik. 

Aguliuk; cape, on the northern coast of Umnak, eastern Aleutians. Native name 
from Kuritzien, 1849. Said to be the Aleut name for goshmuk. Tebenkof 
calls it Chidak, on his Chart XXV, and Aguliuk on a subsketch on same 
chart. Chidak is the Aleut name for the young of wild birds and animals. 

Agulogak, lake; see Becharof. 

Agulognk, lake and river; see Naknek. 

Agulukpak; large lake, north of Bristol Ijay, near head of Wood river. Eskimo 
name, obtained by Spurr and Post in 1898 from trader A. Mittendorf. 
Spurr and Post w^rite it Agouloukpak, i. e., Aguluk big. 

Agumsadak; cape, the southern point of Umak island, Andreanof group, middle 
Aleutians. Native name, ajiparently from United States North Pacific 
Exploring Expedition, 1855; also written Agumsadakh. 

Agunalaksh, island; see Unalaska. 

Agusta, glacier and mountain; see Augusta. 

Ahgulkignmlut, village; see Aklut. 

Ahklun; range of mountains north of Bristol bay, between the Togiak and Kanek- 
tok rivers. Eskimo name, from Spurr, 1898, who wrote it Oklune. 

Ahluckeyak, hill; see Alukeyak. 

AhjMkagainhif, village; see Apokak. 

Aiachagiuk; Eskimo village on the right bank of the lower Yukon, near head of 
delta. Name from Coast Survey ofllcers, in 1898, by whom it is written 
Ayachaghayuk. 

Aiacheruk. Petrof in the Tenth Census, 1880, shows an Eskimo village, population 60, 
at Cape Nome, Seward peninsula. He spells it Aiacheruk on his map and 
Ayacheruk in his text. 

Aiaialgutak,\ii\siml; see Avatanak. 

Aiaieptu, island; see Aektok. 

Aiak; cape, on the southern shore of Unalaska, near its western end. Called Aiak 
by Tebenkof, 1849, and by the Fish Commission, in 1888, Lake point. 

Aiaktak, island; see Aektok. ^ 

Aiaktalik; village, on one of the Goose islands, near Kodiak. Population in 1890, 
106. Native name, from Petrof, 1880, who writes it Aiekhtalik and 
Ayakhtalik. Sauer, 1790, has Anayachtalik, which, he says, is by Shelikof 
called Egichtalik. 

Aialik; bay, indenting the southern shore of Kenai peninsula. Native name, from 
the Russians, who called it Aialikskaia. Has been written Ajalik and 
generally Ayalik. 

Aialki, islands; see Chiswell. 

Aiekhtalik, village; see Aiaktalik. 

Aiktak; islet, one of the Krenitzin group near Ugamak island, Unimak pass, east- 
ern Aleutians. So called by Tebenkof, 1849. On recent maps called 
Ashmiahk. Probably from the native word Aikak (passage). 

Bull. 187—01 5 



Air— Ako. 



QQ [bull. 187. 



Airs; hill, near the international boundary line in latitude 62° 30^ Named in 1898 
by Peters and Brooks, after A. R. Airs, a member of their party. 

Aishihik; lake, and villajre on its shore, in the southwestern part of Yukon di^^trict, 
Canada. Apparently Ta-ku-ten-ny-ee of Davidson. Glave, in 1892, re- 
ported the name as I-she-ik. It has also been written Ishiih and I-shi-ih 
and, erroneously, Ashink. The above ,form, Aishihik, has been adopted 
by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 

Aiugnak; group of columns or rocks near the Semidi islands. Also written Augnak. 
Native name, from the Russians. 

Ajaga, island; see Adak. 

Ajaffisch, volcano; see Makushin. 

Ajak, island; see Sledge. 

Ajnlik, bay; see Aialik. 

Ajallki, islands; see Chiswell. 

Ajax; reef in Felice strait near eastern entrance to Tamgas harbor, Annette island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Ajngadach, island; see Rat. 

^i A-a/HoA-, island; see Chirikof. 

Akeit, caY>e; see Aksit. 

Akha, lake; see Chilkoot. 

Akhiok; native village on the northern shore of Alitak bay, Kodiak. Native name 
from Petrof, 1880. Apparently identical with Oohaiack of Lisianski in 
1805. 

Akhini, island; see Akun. 

Akiachak; Eskimo village, on right bank of the Knskokwim about 15 miles above 
Bethel. Its Eskimo name, as obtained by Spurr and Post from missionary 
J. H. Kilbuck, in 1898, is Akiatshilgamut, i. e., Akiachak people. The 
name has been published as Akiachagamut. 

Akiak; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Kuskokwim, about 30 miles above 
Bethel. Petrof, 1880, wrote its name Ackiagmute, i. e., Akiak people. 
Spurr and Post, 1898, write Akiitgmut, following missionary J. H. 
Kilbuck. 

Aklek; cape, the western point of entrance to Cold bay, Shelikof strait. Appar- 
ently a native name. Lutke, 1835, has Aklek and Aclek. Vasilief, 1831, 
has Aklek. Tebenkof, 1849, has Yaklek. It has been called laklek, 
Taklek, and generally Yaklek. 

Aklut; Eskimo village, on the eastern shore of Knskokwim river at the mouth of 
the Eek river. Its Eskimo name as obtained by Spurr and Post from mis- 
sionary J. H. Kilbuck, in 1898, is Aklukwilgamut, from Ak-klut, ammunl 
Hon, 2>ro?'?.?ions, belongings. This place is almost certainly identical with 
Akooligamute of Nelson, in 1878-79, and Petrof, in 1880, and Ahguliaga- 
miut of the Eleventh Census. 

aAkmagan, village; see Starichkof. 

Akmute; Eskimo village, on left bank of the Knskokwim, about 10 miles above 
Kolmakof. So called by Petrof in the Tenth Census, 1880, on his map, 
but it is not in his text. Spurr and Post, who passed its site in 1898, do 
not mention it. Akmute means Ak people. 

Akoi; glacial stream, in the St. Elias Alps, debouching through the same mouth 
with the Akwi, between the Alsek delta and Yakutat bay. Name pub- 
lished by Tebenkof in 1849. Apparently Akoi and Akwi are variant 
forms of a native word, Ak. Tebenkof shows two native settlements 
here, the one nearest Yakutat bay being called Akoi blizhn. (Near 
Akoi), the other Akoi daln. (Far Akoi). In Materials for the History 
of the Russian American Company (IV, p. 51) we find "Akoi, a place 
^bout 40 miles from Yakutat, visited by Kuskof in 1802." 



BAKER.] 67 Ako— Ak.u. 

Akom-uda, settlement; see Ucomude. 

AkooUgamuie, village; see Aklut. 

Akoitn, island; see Akun. 

Akoutan, harbor and island; see Akutan. 

AkpalhU. The Western Union Telegraph Expedition map of 1867 shows an Eskimo 
village called Acpalliut a little west of Golofnin bay, Norton sound. It 
is near or possibly identical with Chiukak of recent maps. 

Aksit; cape, near Cape Lazaref, on the southeastern shore of Unimak island, east- 
ern Aleutians. So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Called Akeit by AVoron- 
kofski in 1826. Yeniaminof says that the ship Okenna (Is this 0' Kenna?) 
"having perhaps an American skipper" was wrecked near here. Aksit 
is obviously from Akeit. Can Akeit have been an attempted rendering 
of the name of the ship? And what was the name of the ship? 

Akuaine, cape; see Akuyan. 

Akulik; river, tributary to Norton bay, from the east, Seward peninsula. Native 
name, from Peters, 1900. 

Akulik, village; see Aklut. 

Akuliukpak; Eskimo settlement on the shore of Pamiek lake, between the 
Nushagak and Kuskokwim rivers. Native name, from Petrof, 1880, who 
writes it Akuliukhpak. Ak-klut is said to mean provisioiis, ammunition, 
belongings, etc. and pak or puk means big. 

Akuliukhpak, lake; see Pamiek. 

Akulivikch.uk; Eskimo village, on right bank of the Nushagak river. Native 
name, from Petrof, 1880. 

Akiilogak, lake; see Naknek. 

Akun; cove, indenting the eastern shore of Akun island, Krenitzin group, eastern 
Aleutians. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. Tebenkof calls 
it Riecheshnoi (little river) bay. 

Akun; island, on the western. shore of Unimak pass in the Krenitzua group, eastern 
Aleutians. Native name, from Krenitzin in 1768. Variousl}' written 
Akhun, Akoon, Akoun and Akcxma. Akun is Aleut for distant. 

Akun; strait, separating Akun and Akutan islands of the Krenitzin group, eastern 
Aleutians. So called by Yeniaminof and Lutke about 1830. 

Akun Head; the northernmost point of Akun island, Krenitzin group, eastern 
Aleutians. Named Sievernoi (north) by Tebenkof, 1849, and recently 
designated Akun Head by the Coast Survey. 

Akutan; active volcano (3,900 feet high), on Akutan island, Krenitzin group, east- 
ern Aleutians. Tebenkof gives its height as 3,332 feet and the Coast Sur- 
vey as 3,888. 

Akutan; bay, between Akun and Akutan islands, Krenitzin group, eastern Aleu- 
tians. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Akutan; harbor, indenting the eastern shore of Akutan island, Krenitzin group, 
eastern Aleutians. Called Chinchan bay by Tebenkof, 1849, and Akoutan 
harbor by the Fish Commission, in 1888. 

Akutan; island, northeast of Unalaska, being the largest island in the Krenitzin 
group, eastern Aleutians. Native name, from Krenitzin and Levashef in 
1768. Cook spelled it Acootan. Variously written Akoutan, Acutan, etc. 

Akutan; pass, separating Akutan and Unalga islands, Krenitzin group, eastern 
Aleutians. So called by Lutke and Yeniaminof, 1828. Perhaps identical 
with Paso de Sanganoac of Galiano's atlas, 1802. 

Akuyan; cape, the westernmost point of Great Sitkin island, Andreanof group, 
middle Aleutians. Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849, Has also been 
written Akuaine. 



Ak%v— Ala. 



gg [BULL. ,187. 



Akwi; glacial Htrcani in tlie St. Elias alps debouching between the Alsek delta and 
Yakutat l)ay. .So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Apparently a native name. 
See Akoi. 

Alachs-chak, peninsula; see Alaska. 

Ahii'kaa, peninsula; see' Alaska. 

Alag-anik; native village at mouth of the Copper river. Called by its native name, 
Alagnak and Alaganik, by Serebrenikof in 1848. Allen, who, visited its 
site in 1885, calls it Alaganik ( Anahanuk), and thinks the site has been 
moved. A place near by is called Skatalis by the natives. This, Allen 
thought, was the site of Serebrenikof s Alaganik. 

Alaganik; slough, one ot the passes through the delta of the Copper river. Name 
from Schrader and (lerdizie, 1900. 

Alai; moinitain, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula south of Becharof lake. 
Apparently a native name from Vasilief, 1831-32, who wrote it Alai. Has 
been variously written Alay, Olai, Olav, and Otai. 

Alaid; island (818 feet high), the westernmost of the Semichi islands, western 
Aleutians. So named by the Kussians from its resemblance to Alaid 
island, one of the Kuril islands, near Cape Lopatka and sometimes called 
Little Alaid, presumably to distinguish it from that island. The whale- 
men call it Alida. Grewingk says Alaid or Herzfels (German) = Serdtse, 
Kamen (Russian), Heart Rock or Navel of Alaid (Alaidskaia pupka). 

Ahtksd, cape; see Kabuch point. 

Aldkshak, peninsula and territory; see Alaska. 

Aldkm, territory; see Alaska. 

Alamos, Punta de los; see Poplar. 

Alanzo, point; see Alonzo. 

Al(n-f/ak'-all(i, rock; see Sheer-off-there. 

AhiKca, territory; see Alaska. 

Alasdika, peninsula and territory; see Alaska. 

Alash.uk; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the north, opposite Waite island, 
near longitude 154° 30'. Has been written Allashook and Alloshook. 
Apparently identical with Batzakakat river of Allen in 1885. See Batza. 

Alaska, Gulf of; this name has for the last t-yo or three decades been applied to 
that part of the North Pacific ocean lying, approximately, to the north of 
a line from Sitka to Kodiak. 

Alaska; ])eak, on the mainland west of Farragut bay, southeastern Alaska. So 
named l)y Thomas in 1887. 

Alaska; peninsula stretching from southwestern Alaska southwestward to the Aleu- 
tian islands. 
Lutke, 1836, wrote it Aliaska and adds "Some write it Aliaksa. We follow 
the orthography generally adopted in the colonies. The natives pro- 
nounce it Aliakskha." 
Veniaminof says "Aliaksa or Aliaska, by the Aleuts called Alakskak." 
Cook, 1778 (II, 504) says, "I have already observed that the American con- 
tinent is here called by the Russians, as well as by the islanders, Alaschka; 
which name, though it properly belong only to the country adjoining to 
Oonemak, is used by them when speaking of the American continent in 
general, which they know perfectly well to be a great land." 
Berg, 1823, calls it the Aliaksa peninsula (pp. 43-44, 66). 
Grewingk, 1849, says the usual designation jjf the peninsula in the Russian 
American colonies is Alaeksa, and adds as variant forms, Aljaksa, Aljaska, 
Aliiska and in Aleut, Alachs-chak (p. 116). 
Dall, 1870, says the natives of Unalaska told the earliest Russian explorers of 
a great land to the eastward which they called Al-dk-shak or Al-dy-ek-sa 
(p. 529). 



BAKEK.1 g9 



Ala— Ale. 



r 



Alaska; range of mountains, separating the Kuskokwim and Yukon drainage on 
the north, from the coastwise drainage on the south. Name Alaska 
apparently given by Dall in 1869. On some earlier maps called Chigmit 
mountains. See Chigmit. 

Alaska; territory, formerly Russian America. This word is a corruption of some 
native word or phrase, the meaning of which is uncertain. 
In 1762, Bechevin, a Russian fur trader, wintered in what we now^ call Isanotski 
strait, at the western end of Alaska peninsula. The land constituting the 
eastern end of the peninsula was regarded by him as an island and called 
Alaksu or Alaksiuik. (Coxe, p. 146. ) 
In 1768, Krenitzin wintered in the same plac^e and culls the strait and land to 

the eastward Alaxa. (Same, p. 251.) 
In 1778, Cook reports, "I have already observed that the American continent 
is here called by the Russians, as well as the islanders, Alaschka, which 
name, though it properly belong only to the country adjoining to Oone- 
mak, is used by them when speaking of the American continent in gen- 
eral, which they know perfectly well to be a great land." (II, p. 504.) 
He also writes it Alashka. 
In 1803, Coxe speaks of this country "which is now called Alaska," (p. 101). 
In 1805, Lisianski refers to the peninsula as Alaska and also Alasca (pp. 153, 

196-7). 
In 1818, Kotzebue speaks of the "peninsula of Alaska" and also peninsula of 
Alashka. (Ill, 262, 263.) He also says that the natives of St. Lawrence 
call the great country to the eastward Kililack. (Same, p. 193.) 
Prior to the acquisition of Alaska by the United States in 1867, it was on Eng- 
lish and American maps designated as liussian America. The Russians 
always referred to it as their Possessions in America. 

Alava, point, the south end of Revillagigedo island, Revillagigedo channel, Alexander 
archipelago. So named. by Vancouver, in 1793, in compliment to the 
Spanish governor at Nootka. 

Alava; ridge of mountains near the southern end of Revillagigedo island, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Alaxa, territory; see Alaska. 

Alay, mountain; see Alai. 

Aldijek.-fd, peninsula; see Alaska. 

Albatross; anchorage in Portage bay, Alaska peninsula, north of the Shumagins. 
Surveyed and named by officers of the Fish Commission steamer Albatross 
in September, 1893. ■ 

Albatross; fishing bank, southeast from Kodiak. Named by the Fish Commission 
in 1888, after its steamer Albatross. 

Alder; creek, tributary to Gold run, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name from 
Barnara, 1900. 

Alder; creek, tributary to O'Brien creek from the west, in the Fortymile mining 
region. Prospectors' name, from Barnard in 1898. 

Alder; creek, tributary to South fork of Fortymile creek, from the west, in the 
Fortymile mining region. Prospectors' name, from Barnard in 1898. 

Alder-Nest, mountain; see Eagle Nest. 

Aleknagik; lake, north of Bristol bay, draining through Wood river to Bristol bay. 
Variously spelled Alaknakik, Aliaknagik, etc. Eskimo name fjublished 
in Sarichef's atlas, 1826. According to Spurr and Post, deriving their 
information from trader A. Mittendorf, in 1898, the native name is Agou- 
louikatuk. It appears also t< i be the lake described by Sheldon Jackson as 
well studded with beautiful pine-covered islands and called Abaknakik. 

Aleknagik, river; see Wood. 



Ale— Alg. 



70 [BULL. 187. 



Aleks; i-nnken rock, about 15 miles southwest from Sannak. Reported by Capt. 
William Paternon, of the schooner Alexander, in 1890. Name derived from 
till' name of his vessel. Perhaps this is identical with Hennig rock. 

Aleksashkina; a former native settlement on Wood island, St. Paul harbor, Kodiak, 
near what is now called Ice House point. In 1849 Tebenkof called it the 
Chiniak settlement (Aleksashkina) , while the Russian American Com- 
pany map of the same year calls it the Aleut settlement Tanignag-miut. 

Akvtkina, bay; see Aleutkina. 

Aleutian; islands, the long chain of islands stretching westward from Alaska 
peninsula. "The word Aleutian seems to be derived from the interroga- 
tive particle aU'u; which struck strangers in the language of that people." 
( Kotzebue, III, p. 312. ) Alik-u-a-ia?=What is this? (Veniaminof, II, p.2. ) 
Allik? = What dost thou want? (Bancroft's History of Alaska, p. 106.) 
Have been called Aleutian, Aleoutiennes, etc. Usually called the Fox 
islands by seafaring people. 

Aleutian; mountains, on Alaska peninsula northeast of Becharof lake. So named 
by Spurr in 1898. 

Aleutian, sea; see Bering. 

Aleutkina; bay, indenting the eastern shore of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been called Leesia (fox) and 
Leesoffskaia bay. Also erroneously Aleutkina. The name Leesia (fox) 
appears to be used by Tebenkof as a synonym for Aleutkina ( Aleut woman ) , 
referring to the Unalaskan or Fox Island Aleuts. The bay just north of 
this is named by Tebenkof, Kadiak, referring to another branch of the 
Aleuts. 

Aleutski; island, SE. of the wharf in Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Aleutski (Aleutian) by the Russians. Has also been 
written Aleyoutski. Also named Ball, by Beardslee, in 1880. 

Alexander; archipelago in southeastern Alaska, comprising the great group of coast- 
wise islands between Dixon entrance and Lynn canal. So named by the 
Coast Survey in 1867, after the Russian Tsar. 

Alexander; point, the southeastern point of entrance to Wrangell strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Lindenberg in 1838. 

Alexander; port at the south end of Chatham strait, Baranof island, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published by Tebenkof in 1849. 

Alexander; njck, near Middle channel into Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published on Coast Survey chart 725 in 1881. Origin 
of narhe not discovered. 

Alexander; village, on the western bank, of Sushitna river, about 10 miles from its 
mouth; also creek joining the river there. Apparently a jjrospectors' 
name; published by Geological Survey in 1899, 

Alexandra; point, in Kupreanof harbor, Ivanof bay, Alaska peninsula. Named 
Alexandra by Woronkofski in 1837. Sometimes erroneously Alexander. 

Alexandrovsk; settlement on Graham harbor, Cook inlet. Named Alexandrovsk 
(Alexander) by the Russians in the last century. 

Alexandrovsk, trailing post; see Nushagak. 

Alexeief; very small village in the Yukon delta. Name from Nelson, who passed 
through it in December, 1878. He shows it on his map but does not men- 
tion it in his text. It appears on the census map of 1880 but not in the 
text, unless, indeed, it may be "Village (name unknown)". 

Alger; peak (7,500 feet high) in the Tordrillo range, northw-est of Cook inlet. So 
name<l l)y Spurr and Post in 1898. 

Algonek; river. The western mouth of the Copper river is so called by Moser, 
1899. The village of Alagauik is on this stream. 



BAKER.] ( 1 All— Aim. 

Aliagaagik, river; see AVood. 

AUahiiKj'ik, lake; see Aleknagik. 

Aliaksin; cape or promontory forming the western head of Portage bay, Alaska 
peninsula, north of Unga. Called Aliaksinskie and Aliaksin by the Kus- 
sians. 

Aliaska, peninsula; see Alaska. 
khiskoi, strait; see Shelikof. 

Alice; island, one of the Japonski group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by United States naval officers in 1880. 

Alice; peak (3,623 feet high), in the northern part of Etolin island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Alidu, i.sland; see Alaid. 

Alihark, cape; see Alitak. 

Aliksemit; island (300 feet high), one of the Semidi group of islands. Has been 
called Alikhsemit and Ali'khsemit. Native name, obtained by Dall in 
1874. 

Alilok, bay; see Alitak. 

Alimuda; bay, indenting the northern shore of Unalaska, immediately west of 
Kashega bay. Sarichef, 1792, calls it Kismaliuk. Yeniaminof, however, 
about 1830, calls it by its Aleut name, Alim uda (Alim bay), which bay 
he says is also called Mikhailovskaia, after the ship Michael, which was 
wrecked there. Sariclief applies tliis name Alimuda to the bay just west 
of this one and which is in this dictionary called Middle bay. 

Alimvoak; bay, indenting the northwestern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak 
group. Native name, from the Russian American Company in 1848. 

Alitak; bay, indenting the southwestern end of Kodiak. Corruption of some native 
term obtained by the early Russians. The old Russian charts call the 
bay Yagektaliek and the cape Alitok. Petrof has Kaniat (Alitak) bay. 
Also called Aluta and Alutak l)y Archimandritof in 1849. 

Alitak; cape, the western point of entrance to Alitak bay, on western coast of 
Kodiak. Native name, from the early Russian explorers. Has been 
written Alihack, Alitack and Alutak. 

Alitak; native village on the northern shore of Alitak bay, west shore of Kodiak. 
The Russian American Company map of 1849 shows an Aleut and a Rus- 
sian settlement here called Kashukvag-miut, i. e., Kashukvak people. 

Alituya, bay; see Lituya. 

AliuksKk, bay ; see Pumicestone. 

Aliutik, cai)e; see Trinity. 

Alj(t.'<kii, jjcninsula; see Alaska. 

Allan; point, the eastern point of Halleck island, Nakwasina passage, Alexander 
archipelago. So named l)y Moore, in 1897, after W. S. Allan, recorder in 
his party. 

Allasliook, river; see Alashuk. 

Allen; creek, tributary to headwaters of Topkok river, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Allen; glacier, and mountain (10,000 feet high) near the headwaters of the Tanana 
river. So named by Peters and Brooks, in 1898, after :Maj. Henry Tureman 
Allen, U. S. A. Spurr has proposed to change this to Stoney glacier and 
mountain, after Lieut. Geo. M. Stoney, U. S. N., an Alaskan explorer. 
Allen; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the north, near the Arctic circle. 
Named AUenkakat by Allen, in 1885, the termination btkal meaning 
river. Has been written Allankakat, AUenkakat, and AUatua. See 
Kakat. 
AlmiraUy, bay; see Yakutat. 



Alo— Ama. 



72 [BULL. 187. 



Alonzo; point, on tlie southern shore of Tort Asumcion, Bucareli bay, Prince of 
Wales arehipeiago. Named Punta de Alonzo by Maurelle and Quadra in 
1775-1779. Erroneousely Alanzo. 

Alpha; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the west, in the Cape Nome mining 
region, Seward jieninsula. Prospeetors' name, published in 1900. 

Alsek; river, in the St. Klias region, debouching between Lituya and Yakutat bays. 
Called Riviere <le Behring by La Perouse in 1786, Alsekh by Tel)enkof in 
1849, Jones by the New York Times Expedition of 1886, and Harrison by 
the Coast Survey in 1890. Variously written Alseck, Alsekh, Altsekh, 
Alzech, etc. The above form, Alsek, was adopted by both the United 
States antl the Canadian P>oards on Geographic Names. The form Alseck, 
in the iirst report of the Canadian Board, was a typographical error. 

Ahnitin. bay; see Kaguyak. 

Althorp; port, indenting the nortliwestern shore of Chichagof island, Cross sound, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. p]rroneously 
Altorp and Apthorp. 

Altona, bay; see Lituya. 

AUnckh, river; see Alsek. . 

Altua, bay; see Lituya. 

Alukeyak; hill or ridge (946 feet high) near the middle of St. George island, 
Pribilof group, Bering sea. Aleut nan:ie, from Elliott, who writes it 
Aliluckeyak, and says it means a rough backbone. Also written Ahlu- 
clieyak. 

Alutak, bay and cape; see Alitak. 

Alzane; island, in Lynn canal, the northernmost of the Chilkat islands. Native 
name, obtained by Dr. Arthur Krause in 1882, who writes it Alzane. 

AJzvrh, river; see Alsek. 

Amagalik; cape, on the southwestern shore of Tanaga island, Andreanof group, 
middle Aleutians. Aleut name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been 
written Amagalikh. 

Amag-at; island (1,900 feet high), near the southern shore of Alaska ])pninsula at 
entrance to Morzhovoi bay. According to Lutke, quoting Kudiakof, the 
Aleut name is Amagadak. Tebenkof, who has been generally followed, 
calls it Aniagat. 

Amagul, bay; see Amugul. 

Amak; island, off the northern shore of Alaska peninsula, near its western end. 
Once much frequented by walrus and known as Walrus island, though 
this name does not appear on maps. The Aleut name is Amak (blood). 

Amakagagvak; lake, near to and connected with Nushagak lake. Native name, 
from Tebenkof, 1849. 

Amakdktnii, cai)e; see Eagle. 

Amaknak; cave, or hollow under Cave rock, Amaknak island, Captains bay, Una- 
laska. An ancient burying place of the Aleuts. 

Amaknak; island, in Captains bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Native name 
from Sarichef. Has also been written Amakhnak and Amoknak. 

Aiiifniiit, j)oint; see Hostage. 

Amanka; lake, near the northern shore of Bristol bay, drained by the Igushak 
river. Native name, obtained by Spurr and Post, of the Geological Sur- 
vey, in 1898. Petrof, in 1880, reports its name to be Pogakhluk, while 
Te})enkof, 1849, calls it Kagata (source). 

Amargura; cape, the southern point of San Fernando island, Bucareli bay, Prince 
of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de la Amargura (point of sorrow) 
by Maurelle and Quadra i» 1775-1779. Has also been written erroneously 
Amatgura. 



BAKER.] ( 8 Ania— Aiuli. 

Amatignak; island (1,921 feet high), the south westernmost of the Anclreanof 
group, middle Aleutians. Aleut name, from early Russian explorers. 
Billings, 1790, has Amatignas, while Lutke has Amatignak and Amatyg- 
nak, which he says is the Aleut '•ord for chip. Variously written Ama- 
tiegnak, Araatignake, etc. 

Amatuli; island, one of the Barren islands at entrance to Cook inlet. Native name, 
from the Russians. 

Amawak; promontory, on the northern coast of Kukak bay, Alaska peninsula. 
Native name, from Langsdorf, 1805, who wrote it Amawack. 

Amber; l)ay, on the southern coast of Alaska peninsula, north of Sutwik island. 
So named bj^ the Russians from the reported occurrence here of amber. 
Bernstein (amber) bucht of Grewingk and lantarni (amber) of the Rus- 
sians. 

Amber; lake, on Unalaska island, eastern Aleutians. Veniaminof, getting his 
information from the natives, says (I^ 171): "There is, near Mokrovski 
bay, between the mountains above, a lake, which has an islet in the mid- 
dle, on the eastern precijiitous shore of which excellent amber occurs." 

Amber; small stream tributary to the estuary of the Nushagak river, from the east 
near Etolin point. Named lantar (amber) on Russian Hydrographic 
Chart 1455 (ed. of 1852). 

Ambler; peak (3,058 feet high), on Lindenberg peninsula, Kupreanof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Thomas, in 1887, after Dr. James M. 
Ambler, surgeon of the ill-fated Arctic expedition under De Long, 1879-80. 

Ambler; river, tributary to the Kowak, from the north, near longitude 158°. 
Named by the Coast Survey, in 1890, after Dr. James M. Ambler, U. S. N., 
surgeon of the ill-fated Arctic expedition under De Long. 

AmrJiik, point; see Eagle. 

Amchitka; island (1,281 feet high), one of the principal islands of the Rat island 
group, western Aleutians. Said to have been seen by Bering, in 1741, and 
called St. Makarius. Its native name is Amchitka, which has been vari- 
ously written Amtatka, Amtchitka, Amtschitka, etc. 

Amelia; point, on the western shore of Kruzof island, Alexander archii)elago. So 
named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Amelius; point, on the southeastern shore of Kuiu island, Sumner strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1793. 

American; bay, on the eastern shore of Dall island, at Howkan narrf)\vs, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Amerikanskaia by Etolin in 1833. 

American; creek, tributary to Mission creek, from the south, in the Eagle mining 
district. So named by prospectors in 1898. 

American; creek, tributary to Niukluk river, from the west, Seward jjcninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

American; creek, tributary to Sinuk river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

American; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the east, in the Cape Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, publisheil in 1900. 

American; range of mountains, on the mainland north of Farragut ])ay, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

American; river, tributary to Agiapuk river, from the north, Seward i)eninsula. 
Name from Brooks, 1900. 

American Mouth, pass; see Kwikluak. 

Aiiw'iJ:aiif<kaia, bay; see American. 

Amherst; glacier, tributary, from the east, to College fiord, Port Wells, Prince 
William sound. So named by the Harrimau Expedition, 1899, after 
Amherst College. 



Ami— .%■!('• 



Y 4 [BULL. 187. 



Amlia; island (1,900 feet high), the easternmost of the principal islands of the 
Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. Native name, from Tolstyk, 1761, 
who wn.te it Amlak. Has also been written Amlii, Amli, Amlja, Amlya, 
Amlag, Amluk, etc. The southern part of Atka island has been called the 
Amlia peninsula. 

Aiiiiitiik, point; sec Aspid. 

Amnuk; island, in Bering sea, mentioned by Beechey (p. 563). Location unde- 
termined. 

AiiiokiKik, island; see Amaknak. 

Amoukhta, island; see Amukta. 

Amtagis; islet, or group of islets, off the southern shore of Atka, middle Aleutians. 
Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. 

Amtdtka, island; see Amchitka. 

Amtchitka, island; see Amchitka. 

Amlscliithi, island; see Amchitka. 

Amugul; bay, indenting the southern shore of Beaver bay, Unalaska, eastern 
Aleutians. Aleut name from Sarichef, 1792. Veniaminof callsit Amugulik. 
Perhaps from the Aleut word Anmk (lightning). Into it flow two small 
streams. One of these is doubtless the Amagul creek of Langsdorf (II, 28). 

Amnkta; volcanic island (3,738 feet high), forming the westernmost of the group 
of islands of the Four Mountains as classified by Veniaminof. Native 
name, from the earliest Russians. Coxe, 1780, writes it Amuckta and 
Amukta, taking the name from Krenitzin and Levashef, 1768. Variously 
written Anoghta, Amoukhta, etc. 

Amukta; pass, about 40 miles wide, in the Aleutian islands, between Amukta island 
on the east and Seguam island on the west, near the one hundred and 
seventy-second meridian of west longitude and known to the whalers as 
the Seventy-Second Pass. 

Amy Iianding; place on the Klutina river about 6 miles below the outlet of Klutina 
lake, where the river enters The Gorge. So named by Abercrombie in 
1898, after W. S. Amy of Copper Center. 

Anagaksik; islet, south of Great Sitkin, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. 
Aleut name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been written Anagakhsikh. 

Anagnak; Eskimo village near mouth of AYood river, a little above the head of 
Nushagak bay. Native name, from Petrof, 1880. 

Anah&nuk, village; see Alaganik. 

Anaiaktak, islands; see Geese. 

Anaiuliak, islet; see Ananiuliak. 

Anakotik, creek; see Anikovik. 

Anan; bay, south of Blake island, indenting the southern shore of Bradfield canal, 
Alexander archipelago. So called by Snow in 1886. Written An-An on 
plats in General Land Office. Name wrongly placed on C. S. chart 8200. 

Anannkeik, island; see Dolgoi. 

Anaritptsik, islands; see Gareloi. 

Ananiuliak; islet, near the northwestern shore of Umnak, eastern Aleutians. Native 
name, from Veniaminof. Lutke wrote it Anangouliak and Kuritzien 
Anaiuliak. 

Anavinguk; river, tributary to the Togiak river, from the east, near Togiak lake. 
Native name, reported by Post, of the Geological Survey, in 1898, who 
writes it Anavinguk. Tebenkof, 1849, calls it Anvaniek. 

Anayachtalik, village; see Aiaktalik. 

Ancav; see Ankau. 

Anchor; cove, indenting the shore of Admiralty island, near north end of Stephens 
l)assage, Alexander archipelago. So named by Coghlan in 1884. 



BAKER.] 75 Anc— And. 

Anchor; mountain near Naas river, Portland inlet. So named by the British 
Admiralty. 

Anchor; pas.«age, in Behm canal, between Bell island and the mainland, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1894. Has also 
been called Anchorage pass. 

Anchor; point, in Wrangeli strait, Mitkof island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Meade in 1869. 

Anchor; point, on the ea.stern shore of Cook inlet. So named, in 1778, by Cook, 
who lost an anchor here. Also called Laidennoj (icy), Jakorny (anchor), 
and Kasnatchin, a native name. 

Anchorage; bay, about 12 miles from Tuliumnit point, indenting the southern 
shore of Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula. It is the anchoring place for all 
the canneries in Chignik bay. Local name, published by the Coast 
Survey in 1899. 

Anchorage; cove, in American bay, Kaigani strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Call in 1882. 

Anchorage ; cove, in and near the mouth of Lituya bay, southeastern Alaska. So 
called by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883 (p. 203). 

Anchorage; point, on Hamilton island in Shakan bay, Sumner strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Local name, pubUshed in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 

Anchorage; point, the southern point of entrance to Pyramid harbor, Chilkat inlet, 
Lynn canal, southeastern Alaska. Named Anchorage (Yakorni) by Lin- 
denberg in 1838. It is Sandy point of Meade in 1869. 

Ancon; peak (3,300 feet high), on "Woronkofski island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Snow, in 1886, after the steamship Ancon. 

Ancon; rock, at entrance to Glacier bay, Cross sound, southeastern Alaska. Named 
in 1891 or earlier after the S. S. Ancon. 

Ancon, creek; see Ankau. 

Anderson; bay, indenting the western shore of Makushin bay, Unalaska, eastern 
Aleutians. So named bj* the Fish Commission in 1888. Its native name, 
says Veniamii if, 1840, is Iksiaktak (? burning). It is, at its head, divided 
into two arn.^, the southern one called Udamak and the northern one 
Naginak (sick). 

Anderson, cape; see Northeast. 

Anderson, island; see St. Lawrence. 

Anderson; sunken rock, south of Sannak island. So called by the Fish Commis- 
sion in 1888. 

Andreafski; fort or stockaded post established by the Kussians on the right bank 
of the Yukon, near the head of the delta, in or about 1853. In August, 
1855, the natives killed its two inmates. It has been variously written 
Andreafski, Andreaivsky, Andreievsky, i. e., Andrew's, etc. The place 
appears on the latest maps as Old Andreafski, and Andreafski appears at a 
new site 5 miles farther up the river. 

Andreafski, river; see Clear. ' 

Andreanof; group of islands in the middle of the Aleutian chain, extending from 
Seguam pass on the east to (but not including) Amchitka on the west. 
These islands were first explored by Andreian Tolstyk with Peter Vasiut- 
kin and Maxim Lazaref in 1761. Tolstyk owned the vessel which is 
usually called the Andreian and Natalia. Berg calls it the Adrian and 
Natalia (p. 53); Coxe, the St. Andrean and Natalia (p. 155), and Dall the 
Andrean and Nathalia (p. 302). 
Coxe says: "The first certain account was brought by this vessel, the S?. 
Andrean and Natalia, from whence they are called the Andreauoffskie 
ostrova, or the islands of it. Andrean" (p. 155). 



And-Anl. 



76 [BULL. 187. 



Andreanof— Continued. 

Berg says: "Tolstyk, Lazaref, and Vasiutkin furnished the authorities with an 

exact account of the six islands discovered by them, and accordingly they 

were thereafter called the Andreianofski islands" (p. 55). 
Petrof, speaking of Tolstyk's stay on these islands, adds, "Named after him 

the Andreianovski" (Banc. Hist., 129), and Dall in his Alaska, p. 302, 

savs: "In 1761, Lazeroff explored the islands which have since borne the 

name of Andreunoffsky, from the owner of the vessel." Tolstyk's vessel 

was called the Amhrian and Natalia after himself and wife, hence St. 

Andrean is an error. See also Fox islands. 
Andrew; bay, indenting the northern shore of Adak island, Andreanof group, 

middle Aleutians. Apparently named by Tebenkof, 1849, presumably 

after Andreiana (Andrew) Tolstyk, the first explorer of Adak, in 1761. 

By a double error this has been rendered Lidrejana bay. The Russian L (A) 

differs from A by the omission of the cross mark. This cross mark was 

omitted by the Russian engraver. The Russian 1(H) differs but slightly 

from the Russian N (H). Hence the strange form Lidrejana. 
Andrews, port; see Resurrection. 
Andronica; island, one of the Shumagin group. So named by the Russians after 

the apostle Andrew (Andronika). Dall gives Yasni (clear) or Foggy as 

alternative names. 
Anemuk; Eskimo village, on the left bank of the Anvik river about 30 miles above 

its junction with the Yukon. Native name, from Raymond, 1869. 
Angle; point, on the southwestern shore of Bold island, Revillagigedo channel, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1886. 
Ang-oyaktoli; creek, tributary to the Kuskokwim, from the east, near its mouth. 

Native name, obtained by Spurr and Post in 1898 from missionary J. H. 

Kilbuck and by them written Angoyachtoli. Erroneously published 

Augoyaktoli. 
Anguilla; a supposed- island in the Gulf of Esquibel, Prince of Wales archipelago, 

was named Anguilla (eel) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Anguvik; islet, in Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula. Native name, from Russian 

Hydrographic chart 1379, pul)lished in 1847. 
Aniakchak; l)ay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula north of Sutwik 

island. Native name from the Ru.sHians, who wrote it Aniakshak. 
Anihitsk. Near the beginning of this century there was a settlement on Sitkalidak 

island of the Kodiak group, which Lisianski (map, p. 169) called Onihitsk. 

Name not found elsewhere. 
Anikovik; creek, debouching at Cape York, in western part of Seward peninsula. 

Eskimo name, from Brooks, of the Geological Survey, 1900. Published 

by the Coast Survey and on local maps as Ono-ko-ruk and Onokovuk. 

Pronounced An-y-k5^-vik. It is Youp-nut of Beechey, 1827, and Up-nut 

of Lutke (p. 244). Has also been written Anakovik. 
AniniaJc, island; see Deer. 
Animas; island and point, San Fernando island, Gulf of Esquibel, Prince of Wales 

archipelago. Named Ysla y punta de las Animas by Maurelle and Quadra' 

in 1775-1779. 
Animatchoutchkok, cape; see Tachilni. 
Anita; bay, in Etolin island, opening into Zimovia strait, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Snow in 1886. 
Anita; creek, tributary to Kugruk river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Brooks, 1900. 
Aniyak; Eskimo village, on the Arctic coa.st between Cape Krusenstern and Point 

Hoi)e. Eskimo name, from Petrof, 1880, who writes it An-iyakh. Popu- 
lation in 1880, 25. 



BAKEK.] 77 



Ank— Anv. 



Ankachak; Eskimo village, on the right Ijank of the lower Yukon, about 20 miles 
above Andreafski. Not given in the Tenth Census, 1880. In the Eleventh 
Census called Ankahchagmiut (population 103). By Raymond, 1869, by 
the Coast Survey, and l)y the Geological Survey called Ankachagamuk, an 
obvious error for Ankachagamut, /. e., Ankachak people. Perhaps this 
place is identical with Kenunimik of a recent Coast Survey chart. 

Ankau; creek, or inlet in the peninsula south of Port Mulgrave, Yakutat bay. 
Named Estero del Ancau by Malaspina in 1791, after a Tlinkit chief. 
Dixon says Ancou means/r/end or chief. Spelled Ancau, Ancou, and Ankau. 

Ankau; head, forming the eastern point of entrance to Ankau creek, Yakutat bay, 
southeastern Ala.ska. Called Punta Gorda (broad point) by Malaspina, 
in 1791, and Ankau Head by Harber in 1892. 

Ankitakttik; creek or river, tributary to the Kuskokwim from the north, near 
longitude 162°. Eskimo name obtained, in 1898, by Spurrand Po.st of the 
Geological Survey, from missionary J. H. Kilbuck. See also Kvichivak. 

Aninan; small stream, tributary to the Chilkat river near its mouth. Native word 
reported by Dr. A. Krause in 1882 as Anma^n. 

Anmer; point, the southern point of entrance to Port Snettisham, Stephens passage, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Annette; bay, indenting the northern end of Annette island, Gravina group, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Dall in 1879. 

Annette; island, the largest of the Gravina group, Alexander archipelago. Named 
in 1879 by W. H. Dall, after his wife, Annette Whitney Dall. 

Annette; point, the southeasternmost of Annette island, Felice strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Nichols in 188.i. 

Annin; glacier, near Port Valdes, Prince William sound. So called by Abercrombie 
in 1898. 

Aiinuk, river and village; see Atnuk. 

AnuyJitd, island; see Amukta. 

Anogok; Eskimo village, on the mainland shore just west of Kuskokwim bay, 
Bering sea. Visited by Nelson in December, 1878, and its name reported 
by him as Anogogmute, i. e., Anogok people. 

Anook, river; see Anuk. 

Ano-wik; island (650 feet high), one of the Semidi islands. Native name, obtained 
by Dall in 1874. 

Ansley; island, in Swanson harbor, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Apparently so named by Meade in 1869. Perhaps this is an error for 
Astley. 

Anuk; river, tributary to the Stikine river, from the east, near the international 
boundary line. Native name, obtained by the Coast Survey. Has also 
been written Anook. 

Anvaniek, river; see Anavinguk. 

Anvik; Eskimo village, on the northern bank of the Yukon at mouth of the Anvik 
river. Here in January, 1834, Glazunof found a village of several hun- 
dred people. Population in 1880, 95; in 1890, 191. Late maps call the 
place Anvik mission. Raymond, 1869, calls it Anvic (American station). 
Has also been written Anvig and Anwig. A post-office, called Anvick, 
was established here in September, 1898. 

Anvik; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the west, near longitude 160°. Explored 
by Glazunof in 1833. Called by the Russians Anvich, Anvig, Anvik, and 
sometimes Anwig, 

Anvil, city; see Nome. 

Anvil; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the east, in the Cape Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, pubhshed in 1900. 



Anv— Arc. 



78 [BUI'I'- 187. 



Anvil; mountain (2,157 feet hiph), at the northern end of Annette island, Alex- 
ander archipelajjo. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Anvil; peak (1,050 feet high), just north of Nome, Seward peninsula. Local name, 

from Withenspoon, 1899. 
Anvil Head; broad promontory forming the western point of entrance to Annette 

bay, Annette island, Nichols passage, Alexander archipelago. So called 

in the Coast Pilot, 1883 (p. 80). 
Anuig, village; see Anvik. 
Anxiety; point, on the Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow. So named by Franklin, 

in 182(5, in connnemoration of his state of mind when there. 
Anyaguk; river, tri])utary to the Kuskokwim, from the south, near longitude 160°. 

Eskimo name, obtained by Spurr and Post in 1898. 
Ape; point, on the southern shore of Revillagigedo island, near southern entrance 

to Behm canal. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. Erroneously 

Cone Island point of British Admiralty chart 2431. 
Aphoknak, island; see Afognak. 
Apoka; river, tributary to Kuskokwim bay, between the Eek and Kanektok rivers. 

Called Apogaby Spurr and Post, who obtained this name from missionary 

J. H. Kilbuck in 1898. 
Apokak; Eskimo village, on the eastern shore of Kuskokwim bay, at mouth of 

Apoka river. According to Nelson, 1878-79, its native name is Apokaga- 

mute, i. e., Apokak people. In the Eleventh Census, 1890, it is called 

Ahpokagamiut. 
Apollo; post-office established in May, 1899, on the south shore of Unga island, 

Shumagm group. 
Apoon; mouth and pass, the northernmost in the Yukon delta. Called by Teben- 

kof, 1849, Abkun, and by later Russians, Apkun. Dall calls it Uphoon 

and the Coast Survey, Apoon, Aphoon, and Aphroon. 
Apple; group of islands, in the northern part of Ritka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Sredni (middle) by Vasilief in 1809, and lablochnie (apple) on 

later Russian maps where it is also written labloshnie. Thus it has been 

variously called Apple, lablosh, lablochnie. Middle and Sredni. 
Apple, islands; see Watch. 

Applegate; cove, indenting the southeastern shore of Izembek bay, Alaska penin- 
sula. So named by the Fish Commission, in 1888, after Mr. Samuel 

Applegate. 
Appleton; cove, in Rodman bay. Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by 

Moore in 1895, after W. G. Ajipleton, a member of his party. 
Apthorp, port; see Althorp. 
Arboles; island, in Portillo channel, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Named Ysla de los Arboles (island of the trees) by Maurelle and Quadra 

in 1775-1779. 
Arboleda; point, the northwestern point of Suemez island, Bucareli bay. Prince of 

Wales archipelago. Named Arboleda (grove) by Maurelle and Quadra in 

1775-1779. 
Arch.; rock, near Sand point, Popof strait, Shumagins. Descriptive name, given by 

Dall in 1872. 
Arch; rock, on the western shore of Amaknak island, Captains bay, Unalaska. 

Descrii)tive name, given by Dall in 1871. The rock is perforated. 
Archangel Gabriel, fort; see Sitka. 
Archer, creek or river; see Tonsina. 
Archimandritof; rocks, in Kachemak bay. Cook inlet. Named by Dall in 1880, 

after Cajitain Archimandritof, of the Russian American Company. 
Archimandritof, islands; see Geese. 



BAKER.] 79 



Arc— A si. 



Arctic; creek, tributary to Cripple creek, from the east, in the Cape Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. Erroneously 
Artie. 

Arctic; mining camp, on the Koyukuk river, near the Arctic circle in longitude 
153°. Called Arctic City by the miners in 1899. 

Arden; point, the northeastern point of Admiralty island, Stephens passage, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Ariswaniski; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the lower Yukon, about 25 miles 
above Andreafski. Name published by the Coast Survey, in 1899, as 
Ariswdniski. 

ArJcell, lake; see Kusawa. 

Arm; mountain (2,177 feet high), just west of Nakat inlet, Dixon entrance, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Armstrong; port, near the southern end of Baranof island, Chatham strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Arre; rocks, off the southern shore of Hall island, Bering sea. Apparently so 
named by Elliott, in 1874, who says Arrie, a sea bird, the Murre, was so 
named by the Eussians from its harsh cry Arra-arra. It is the Uria lomvia 
arra of some of the ornithologists. Sarichef says, "The aar, or am tarda 
alca, is the name of a Kamtschadale water fowl, of the species of the 
Gagara [colymhus arcticus) or water-hen. At Kola it is called Gegarka." 

Arrecifes; point, on the mainland in Yakutat bay, opposite Port Mulgrave. 
Named Punta de Arrecifes (point of reefs) by Malaspina in 1791. 

Arricifr, Punta del; see Eeef. 

Arriaga; passage, in the northern part of Bucareli bay. Named Bocas de Arriaga 
by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Arrowsmith, island; see Rat. 

Arroyo Blanco; see White. 

Arroyo de la Cruz; see Cross gulch. 

Artelnof. On the rocky southwestern coast of Akun island, Krenitzin group, east- 
ern Aleutians, existed, in 1830, a small village named Artelnofskie. The 
bidarshik or foreman for the Krenitzin group lived here. 

Arthur; peak (3,434 feet high), on the mainland, near Limestone inlet, southeast- 
ern Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1888. 

Arthur; point, on Chichagof island. Peril strait, between Northern and Southern 
rapids, Alexander archipelago. So named by Coghlan in 1884. 

Artie, creek; see Arctic. 

Arucenas; point, the eastern point of entrance to Port Dolores, Bucareli bay. 
Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Arucenas by Maurelle and 
Quadra in 1775-1779. 

A^cheeshna, river; see Fickett. 

Ashby; mountains (5,200 to 5,500 feet high), east of Portland canal. So named by 
Pender in 1868. 

Ashiiak; island, between Port Wrangell and Agripina bay, Alaska peninsula. 
Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. 

Ashington; range of mountains, between Portland canal and Observatory inlet. 
So named by Pender in 1868. 

A.'^hmk, lake, and village; see Aishihik. 

Ashishik; cape, on the northern shore of Umnak island, near its eastern end. 
Native name, from Kuritzien, 1849. 

Ashivak; native village (population 46 in 1880), near Cape Douglas, Cook inlet. 
Native name, reported by Petrof in 1880. 

Ashmiahk, islet; see Aiktak. 

Asiak, island; see Sledge. 



Ami— Ata. 



80 [BULL. 187. 



Asiiilclink, point; see Roinanof. 

Askinak. The Kli'vt'iitli ConsuP, 1890, includes an Eskimo village called Askina- 
ghaniint in the Kuskokwiiii district. Population 138. Not found on any 
map and its location unknown. 

Askinuk; Eskimo village, on the southern shore of Hooper bay, Yukon delta. 
Native name, from Nelson, who visited it December 14, 1878, and was 
welcomed by its entire population of nearly 200 people. 

Askinuk; range of hilly or mountains, nearly 1,500 feet high, in the Yukon delta 
along tlie northern bank of Askinuk river. So called by Nelson in 1878. 

Askinuk; river, in the Yukon delta, deboiiching into Hooper bay. Native name, 
from Nelson, who crossed it December 15, 1878. 

Asko; Hskimo village, on the right bank of the Yukon, below Anvik. Native name, 
from Nelson, 1878-79, who wrote it Askhomute, i. e., Asko people. 

Aslik; cape, the northern head of Inanudak bay, on the northern coast of Umnak, 
eastern Aleutians. Native name, from Kuritzien, 1849. 

Aspid; bay, indenting the northern shore of Unalaska, immediately east of Cher- 
nofski harbor. So called by Veniaminof, 1840. 

Aspid; cape, on the northern shore of Unalaska, between Chernofski harbor and 
Aspid bay. Called Ammak by Sarichef, in 1792, which is Aleut for night. 
Veniaminof calls it Aspid (slate) and"Says (1, 169): "It obtained the name 
Aspid (slate) not from the presence of slate rock, but from a chief, who 
formerly dwelt near by and was so called by the Russians." The Fish 
Commission, in 1888, called it Nellie Juan, presumably after the schooner 
Nellie Juan belongiug to Mr. Samuel Applegate. 

Aspid, islets; see Slate. 

Asses Ears; moimtain, south of Goodhope bay, Kotzebue sound, on Seward penin- 
sula. So named by Kotzebue, in 1816, because "its summit is in the form 
of two asses' ears." 

Asses Head; cape, on the northern coast of Unalaska, near Chernofski village. So 
named in a pencil memorandum on Sarichef's chart of 1792. 

Asmmpdoii, port; see Asumcion. 

Assurance, bay; see Disenchantment. 

Astley, island; see Ansley. 

Astley; point, the southern point of entrance to Holkham bay, Stephens passage, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Aston; island, in Tlevak strait, Cordova bay, Dixon entrance. Named by Nichols 
in 1881, after Chief Engineer Ralph Aston, U. S. N., a member of his 
party. Has also been called Wright island by Sheldon Jackson. 

Astrolabe; point, on the mainland between Cross sound and Lituya bay. Named, 
in 1S88, by Dall, after one of the French exploring ships under La Perouse. 

Astronomical; point, the eastern point of entrance to Halibut bay, Portland canal, 
southeastern Alaska. So named by the Coast Survey. 

Asuksak; islet, southwest of Great Sitkin, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians.. 
Aleut name from Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been written Agugsiak. Per- 
haps it is from the Aleut word 'Asuk (kettle). 

Asumcion; port, in Bucareli bay. Named by Maurelle and Quadra, in 1775, Puerto 
de nuestra Senora de la Asumcion. Published as Puerto de nostra Senora 
de la Asumcion in La Perouse's voyage, 1797. Copied by the Russians 
thus: " Nuesta Sensora de la Asimsion " harbor. Also written Port Asun- 
cion and Port Assumption. 

At, island; see Attn. 

Atdhni, island; see Attn. 

Ataku; island, one of the Necker islands, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Apparently a native name; reported by Vasilief in 1809. Has been writ- 
ten Atakou. 



BAKER.] 81 - Ata— Atu. 

Atayak; mountain, at the headwaters of the Kanektok river, western Alaska. 

Native name, oVjtained by Spurr and Post, of the Geological Survey, in 

September, 1898. More exactly perhaps it might be written Ah-tah-ai-ak. 
Atcha, island; see Atka. 
Atchaka, island; see Middleton. 
Atchercdina, point; see Acheredin. 
Atherton; mountain (1,700 feet high), on south shore of Wrangell island, Arctic 

ocean. So named by the British Admiralty in 1884. 
Atka; island (4,988 feet high), one of the principal islands of the Andreanof group, 

middle Aleutians. Native name, from early Russian traders. Coxe calls it 

Atchu, and Cook, 1778, Atghka. Also written Atcha, Atchka, and Alcha. 
Atkins; island (about 800 feet high), northeast of Little Koniuji island, Shumagin 

group. So named by Dall in 1872, after the fishing schooner Minnie G. 

Atkins. Erroneously Atkin. 
Atkritoi, rock; see Discovery. 
Atkritoi, rock; see Open. 
Atkroi-glaza, rock; see Eye Opener. 
Atkulik; island, near the entrance to Chignik bay, Alaska jieninsula. Native name, 

from the Russians. Erroneously Atkunk. 
Atlin; lake and river, northeast from Lynn canal. This name has been adopted by 

the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 
Atmugiak; creek, tributary to Kagati lake, from the east, near source of Kanektok 

river. Native name, obtained by Spurr and Post, of the Geological Survey, 

who passed near it September 7, 1898. 
Atna, river; see Copper. 
Atnik; Eskimo village, on the Arctic coast at or near Point Belcher. Called Ataniek 

by Tikhmenief in 1861. The Eleventh Census map has Attanak and the 

text Atnik. Perhaps it is Pinoshuragin of Petrof, 1880, or Nunaria of Ray, 

1885. See also Sedaru. 
Atuiliak. This is the native name of one of the smaller Shumagins, which one is 

not knowm. So given by Veniaminof and Lutke. Perhaps Aniliak and 

Animak are other forms of the same name. 
Atnuk; river, and Eskimo village at its mouth, on the northern shore of Norton 

bay, Norton sound. Tebenkof, 1849, calls the river Atniek and Tikh- 
menief, in 1861, calls the settlement Atniek-miut. Petrof, 1880, writes it 

Atnuk. Erroneously Annuk. 
Atonisuk; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, about 50 miles above 

Rampart. Native name, from Raymond, 1869, who wrote it Atonisonik. 

Petrof, 1880, wrote it Ahtonisuk. This may be identical with Ray river 

of Allen, 1885, and of recent maps. See Ray. 
Atrevida; glacier, near the head of Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. Named 

Atrevida (intrepid) by Russell, in 1890, after one of Malaspina's vessels. 
Atroic, village; see Stebbins. 
Attanak, village; see Atnik. 
Atten; Eskimo village, near the headwaters of Buckland river. Its name is given 

by Dall, 1869, as Attenmut, i. e., Atten people. 
Attu; island (3,084 feet high), the westernmost large island of the Aleutian chain of 

islands. Native name, from the early Russian explorers, which has been 

written At, Atako, Atakon, Ataka, Attak, Attou, Otma, etc. According 

to Petrof it is St. Theodore of Chirikof, in 1741, and according to Lutke, 

St. Abraham or St. Etienne of Bering, 1741. 
Atushagvik; cape, in Shelikof strait, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, 

east of Katmai. Native name, from the Russians. Lutke, 1835, writes it 

Atouchagvik. 

Bull. 187—01 6 



Am— Aja. 



82 [Bl'LL- 187. 



Atutsak; river, trilmtary to tlie Yukon from the south, just below Nukhikyet. Its 
native name wa.s reported by Kaymond, in 1869, as Atutsakulakushchargut; 
Allen, in 1885, wrote it Atutsakulaknshakakat, and Petrof, in 1880, Atut- 
nakulakushchakat, while a recent Coast Survey chart has Atutzehhuilcusten 
creek. See Kakat. 

Atwater; creek, trilmtary to Sontli Fork of Fortyniile creek. Prospectors' name, 
publislied by the (Jeological Survey in 1899. 

.V-ii-ini, island; see I'nalaska. 

Aueruk; cn-ek, tributary to Norton ])ay from the northwest, between the Tubutulik 
antl Kwiniuk rivers, Seward peninsula. Native name, from the Davidson 
Blakeslee map of 1900, where it is spelled Oweruk. 

Augoi/aktoU, creek; see Angoyaktoli. 

Aug-usta; glacier and mountain (18,918 feet high), in the St. Elias region; named, 
in 1S91, by Prof. I. C. Russell, after his wife. Has been printed errone- 
ously Agusta. 

Augusta; jioint, the northeastern point of Chichagof island, Chatham strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Augustine; bay, indenting the western coast of Quadra island, Prince of Wales 
archipelago. So named by Dall in 1883. Has since been written St. 
Augustine bay. 

Augustine; cape, near the above. Named in 1775, by Maurelle, Cabo de S. 
Augustin. Also called cape Saint Augustine. 

Augustine; island (about 3,000 feet high), in Cook inlet. Named Mount St. 
Augustin bv Cook in 1778. It is Chernoburi or Chernabura (black-brown) 
of the Russians. 

Auke; cove, indenting the northern shore of Admiralty island, Stephens passage, 
Alexander archipelago. Called Auke bay by INIeade in 1868, after a poor 
tribe of Indians living near it. 

Auto; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, about 20 miles below the 
mouth of Kaiyuh river. Name from Coast Survey chart 3098 (1898), 
where it is called Autokakat, i. e., Auto river. Raymond, 1869, shows 
this stream without name, but has a village called Yakutsklitnik. From 
this place a trail leads to Unalaklik on Norton sound. Tikhmenief, 
1861, shows a village here (on the opposite bank of the Yukon) called 
Ttutaho. 

Avatanak; island (1,207 feet high), between Akutan and Tigalda of the Krenitzin 
group, eastern Aleutians. Native name, from the Russians. Has also 
been written Avatanok and Awatanok. Apparently identical with Aiai- 
algutak of Krenitzin and Levashef in 1768. 

Avatanak; strait, separating Akun island from Avatanak and other islands, Kre- 
nitzin group, eastern Aleutians. So called by Veniaminof and Lutke, 
1828. 

Avinof; capi', on the mainland southeast from Nunivak island, Bering sea. Pre- 
sumably so named by Vasilief, in 1821, after Lieut. Alexander Avinof, a 
member of his party. See also Shoal Ness. 

Avon; islet, in McIIenry anchorage, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

A)ifichaf/]iat/iil-, village; see Aiachagiuk. 

Ayochernl-, village; see Aiacheruk. 

Ayagh, island; see Adak. 

Ayaglml), volcano; see INIakusliin. 

Ayak, island; see Sledge. 

Ayfiklitalil; village; see Aiaktalik. 

Ayakulik; island, off the west coast of Kodiak. Native name, from Tebenkof, 



1849. Erroneously Achulik. 



II 



BAKER.] 83 Aya-Bal. 

Ayakulik; river, on the west coast of Kodiak. Native name, from Tebenkof, 

1849. Erroneously Ayakulih. 
Aijalik, bay; see Aialik. 
Ai/alik, islands; see Chiswell. 
Ai/u[ja(lok, island; see Rat. 
Ayutka; cape, in Aniakchak bay, Alaska peninsula. Native name, as published by 

the Coast Survey in 1900. 
Azdik, island; see Aziak. 
Azamis; cape, the eastern point of Little Tanaga island, iVndreanof group, middle 

Aleutians. Name from Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been written Azimis. 
Azmchak, point; see Romanof. 
AzktJ;, island; see Sledge. 
Aziak; islet, southwest of Great Sitkin, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. Native 

name from the Russians. Lutke says Tebenkof calls it Azki, but Teben- 

kof's chart XXVIII has Aziak. Has also been written Azik and, errone- 
ously, Azaik. 
Aziavik; river, tributary to Hagemeister strait on northern shore of Bristol bay. 

Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849, who writes it Azvichviak. 
Aziavik; Eskimo village, on northern shore of Bristol bay. Name from Petrof, 1880, 

who wrote it Aziavigamuto, i. e., Aziavik people. Population in 1880, 132. 
Azimuth; point, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. So named by the Coast 

Survey. 
Azimuth; point, on the northern coast of Kodiak, near Spruce island. Named 

Pelenga (magnetic azimuth) by Mm-ashef, who in 1839— tO took bearings 

here. 
Azl:i, island; see Aziak. 
Azun; river, in the Yukon delta. Usually written Azoon. Native name, from 

Nelson, who crossed it in December, 1878. 

Baby; creek, tributary to Chandlar river, from the west, near longitude 148° 30'. 
So named by prospectors in 1899. 

Baby; creek, tributary to Squaw creek, from the south, in the Fortymile mining 
district. Prospectors' name, from Barnard, 1898. 

Back; island, in Behm canal, near Betton island, Alexander archipelago. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1886. 

Back; point, between Gwydyr bay and the mouth of the Colville river, on the 
Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow. So named by Franklin, in 1826, 
"after my excellent companion, Lieutenant [afterward Captain] George 
Back," R. N. 

Backbone; movmtain (2,525 feet high), on the mainland, near Revillagigedo chan- 
nel. So named by Nichols in 1885. 

Backhouse; point, on the Arctic coast near the international boundary. So named 
by Franklin, in 1826, after Mr. Backhouse, one of the under secretaries of 
state for foreign affairs. 

Badger; bay, indenting the northern shore of Boca de Quadra, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Bagial; cove, in Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Puerto Bagial 
by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. On Sarichef's map called cape 
Bagial. 

Bakia de las Islas; see Salisbury sound. 

Baht; harbor, indenting the northern shore of Zarembo island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by the Russians after Engineer Baht, of the steamer 
Alexander. Erroneously Bath harbor. 

Bate de Monti; see Yakutat. 



Bai-Bak. 



84 [BULL. 187. 



Baikron; creek, tributary to Kanektok river, from the north, near its northernmost 
bend. Native name (i)ronouneed By-kron), obtained l)y Spnrr and Tost, 
of the Geolofrieal Survey, who passed its mouth September 5, 1898. 

Bailey; bay, indentiii-,' tlie mainland north of Revillagigedo island, Behm canal, 
Alexander archipelafio. So named by Dall, in 1879, in the Coast Pilot 
(p. 7:i). Erroneously Baily. 

Bailey; liarbor, in nortbern ])art of Belkofski bay, Alaska peninsula. Surveyed by 
('apt. (ieorfxe W. Bailey, U. S. R. M., in 1879, and named after him by the 
Revenue-Marine Service. Captain Bailey was lost overboard on the 
return voyage to San Francisco, October 16, 1879. 

Bailey; sunken ledge, off Obernoi point. Port Levashef, Captains bay, Unalaska. 
Shown on the earliest charts, then omitted and rediscovered in 1872 by 
Silvanus Bailey, mate of the Coast Survey schooner Humboldt, for whom 
it is named. 

Bainbridge; peak (.3,467 feet high), on the mainland, near Thomas bay, Frederick 
sound. So named by Thomas, in 1887, presumably after Commodore 
William P.ainbridge, U. S. N. 

Bainbridge; port, at extreme southwestern corner of Prince William sound. So 
named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Baird; hank, off the northern shore of Alaska peninsula. Named by the Fish Com- 
mission, in 1890, after Prof. Spencer F. Baird, of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 

Baird; canyon, tributary to Copper river from the west, just north of Miles glacier. 
So named by Allen, in 1885, after Prof. Spencer Fullerton Baird, Secretary 
of the Smithsonian Institution. 

Baird; glacier, at head of Thomas bay, southeastern Alaska. So named by Thomas, 
in 1887, after Prof. Spencer F. Baird, Secretary of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 

Baird; glacier, near headwaters of Lowe river, about 25 miles east of Valdes. So 
named })y the Geological Survey after a prospector who, in the spring of 
1898, lost his life while exploring it. 

Baird; inlet, on the western coast of Alaska, northeast of Nunivak. So named by 
Petrof, in 1880, after Prof. Spencer F. Baird, Secretary of the Smithsonian 
Institution. 

Baird; mountain, near Mt. Augusta, St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. So named 
b}' Russell, in 1890, after Prof. Spencer F. Baird, Secretary of the Smith- 
sonian IiLstitution. 

Baird; peak (8,260 feet high), on the northeastern coast of Prince of Wales island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Baituk; creek, in western end of Seward peninsula, debouching a few miles south- 
east of Cape Prince of Wales. Eskimo name, which has been written 
Bituk and Botuk. Pronounced Bye-took. Name published by the Coast 
Survey in 1900. 

Bajo Pamplona; see Pamplona. 

Baker; creek, tributary to INIiddle fork of the Koyukuk, from the north, near longi- 
tude 150°. So named by prospectors in 1899. Has 'also been called 
Nelson creek. 

Baker; creek, tributary to Tanana river, right bank, about 60 miles above moiith of 
latter, near longitude 151°. So named by Allen in 1885. Apparently 
identical with Saklekageta of Petrof, 1880. 

Baker; inlet, in Kasaan bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. This 
name was given by Dall, in 1880, to a supposed iidet indenting the south- 
ern shore of Kasaan bay. When Clover surveyed Kasaan bay, in 1885, 
and found the inlet did not exist he applied the name to a point near by. 



BAKER.] 85 Bak— Ban. 

Baker; island, in Bucareli bay, Print-e of Wales archipelago. Named l)y Dall, in 
1S79, "after INIareun Baker, of the Coast Survey, engaged 187.3-1881 in 
surveys and office work relating to Alaska." 

Baker; mountain, on west bank of the 'Wiiite river, near latitude 63°. So named, 
in 1898, by Peters and Brooks, after H. B. Baker, a member of their party. 

Baker; point, being the northwestern point of Prince of Wales island, Sumner 
strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Lieut. 
Joseph Baker, R. N., of Vancouver's party, w'ho drew the maps in Van- 
couver's atlas.- Has also been called North Point Baker. 

Baker; point, on the southern shore of Kasaan bay. Prince of Wales island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Clover, in 1885, after Marcus Baker. 

Balaena, island; see Ballena. 

Balandra; island, in Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named La Balandra 
(the sloop) by Maurelle and (Quadra in 1775-1779. See also Fish Egg. 

Bald; mountains, near Taku river. Probably so called by the exploring parties of 
the Western Union Telegraph Company in 1865. 

Bald; ridge of mountains (2,241 feet high), east of Tanigas harbor, on Annette 
island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Bald, cape; see Chacon. 

Bald Head; promontory, on the northern side of Norton bay, Norton sound, Ber- 
ing sea. So named by Cook in September, 1778. Quite recently it has 
been called Point Inglestat, and also Isaacs point, by the miners and pros- 
pectors. Some part of it was also called Point Ennis by the Western 
Union Telegraph Expedition of 1867. Has also been written Bald-Head. 

Baldwin; creek, tributary to Fish river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Local 
name, 1900. 

Baldy; mountain, on east bank of the Kugruk river, Seward peninsula. Name from 
Brooks, 1900. 

Ball; group of islets, forming eastern part of the Galankin group, Sitka sound, 
Alexander an-hipelago. So named by United States naval officers, in 1879, 
after Col. Mottrom Dulany Ball, at that time collector of customs at 
Sitka. 

Ball, island; see Aleutski. 

Ballast; island, in Portage bay, Alaska peninsula. So named by the Fish Commis- 
sion in 1893. 

Ballena; islands, in Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named La Ballena 
(the whale) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. Has been written 
erroneously Balaena and Balena. 

Bamdoroslini; island, one of the Galankin group, Sitka sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named l)y Vasilief in 1809. Has been written Bamdorotchnoi. 
Has also been called Russian island. According to George Kostrometinoff, 
U. S. Court interjireter at Sitka, this is a corruption of the Russian Podo- 
rozhnie meaning on the road. 

Bamer; creek, tributary to Koksuktapaga river, from the east, Seward i)eninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Ban; island, in Paramanof bay on the northwestern coast of Afognak island, Kodiak 
group. Named Ban (? of baths) by the Russians. On a map by the 
Russian American Company, 1849, it is Bok (side) island. 

Bancas, Bahia de las; see Disenchantment. 

Bancas; point, the north point of entrance to Disenchantment bay, Yakutat bay. 
Called Punta de las Bancas (point of the banks or shoals) by Malaspina 
in 1791. 

Band; cove, just south of entrance to Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Glass in 1881. 



Ban— Bar. 



86 [BULL. 187. 



liiiiidii; bay; sco Banner. 

Bangor; rri't'k, tril)utaiy to Snake river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, WOO. 
Banks; iKiint, the nortli point of Shuyak island, Kodiak group. So named by Cook 

in 1778. Also erroneously Benkes. 
Banks; port, an arm of Wliale bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. Called 

Tort Banks by Dixon in June, 1787, "in honour of Sir Joseph Banks." 

It is Zakritoi (closed) bay of Tebenkof and others. 
Banks, ])ort; see AVhalc bay. 
Banner; bay, indenting tlie northern shore of Atka, middle Aleutians. Named by 

Lutke, about 1830, after the Dane Ivan Ivanovich Banner, long the Russian 

American Company's agent at Kodiak. Variously written Baner, Bander, 

etc. Perhaps this bay is identical with Glubokoi (deep) of some 

charts. 
Banner; creek, tributary to Nome river from the west, in the Nome mining region, 

Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published by the Coast Survey 

in 1900. 
Baptist, bay; see St. John Baptist and San Juan Bautista. 
Bar; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the west, in the Nome mining region, 

Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published by the Coast Survey in 

1900. Has also been jirinted Barr. 
Bar; point, on Revillagigedo island, Tongass narrows, Alexander archipelago. So 

called by Capt. W. E. George, a pilot in southeastern Alaska. 
Baralof; bay, on the eastern coast of Unga island, Shumagin group. Called by 

Veniamino'', Yavilofskaia, and by Dall, in 1872, New harbor. Later it 

was called Baraloff bay and Barloff harbor. Apparently a corruption of 

Yavilof. 
Baraiii, island; see Sheep. 
Baranof; large island, in Alexander archipelago. Variously written Baronoff, 

Baranov, Baranow, etc. Also called Sitka island. Named by Lisianski, 

in 1805, after Alexander Andreievich Baranof, then Governor of the Rus- 
sian American colonies. It, with the adjacent islands, has been called 

the Baranof archipelago. 
Baranof Packing Company; cannery, on Redfish bay, Baranof island, Alexander 

archipelago. 
Baranovich.; lishing station, at the head of Kasaan bay, Prince of Wales archipelago, 

established by Philip Baranovich in or about 1878. Variously written 

Baronovitch, Baronovich, etc. See Karta. 
Baranovich' s l)ay; see Karta. 
BanuKrin, island; see Baranof. 

Barber; point, near Nuchek, Prince William sound. So named by Portlock in 1787. 
Barca; point, on the western shore of Port Refugio, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales 

archipelago. Named Punta de la Barca (boat point) by Maurelle and 

Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Barclay; valley, on the eastern shore of Portland canal, back of Belle bay. So 

named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Bare; islet, near edge of flat in Port Krestof, Kruzof island, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Goloi (bare) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Bare; island, in Kupreanof strait, Kodiak group. Named Goloi (bare) by Murashef 

in 1839-1840. 
Bare; islet, in Furtter bay, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

Mansfield in 1890. 
Bare; islet, in Mitchell bay, Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 



i 



BAKEK.] 87 Bar— Bar. 

Bare; islet, in AVrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. Either this or an islet near 
it was named Goloi (bare) by Lindenberg in 1838. There seems to be 
confusion of names here. 

Bare; mountain, on the mainland of Alaska, east of Admiralty island. So named 
by the British admiralty in or about 1865. 

Bare; point, on the eastern side of ilcClellan flats, at mouth of the Chilkat river, 
southeastern Alaska. Named Goloi (bare) by Lindenberg in 1838. The 
name is obsolete. 

Bare; rock, about half a mile westerly from Sentinel rock in Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Name apparently derived from the descriptive phrase golia 
kamennia ostrofki (bare rocky islets), applied by Vasilief in 1809. The 
Passage islets in Sitka sound have also been called Bare islets. 

Bare; rock, in Hawk inlet, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by 
the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Bare; rock, in Hot Springs bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Goloi 
(bare) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Bare; see Goloi and Naked, 

Barigon; cape, on the western shore of Port Dolores, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales 
archipelago. On La Perouse's copy (1798) of the Spanish map by Mau- 
relle and Quadra, 1775-1779, it bears the designation El Barigon. 

Barlow; cove, in northern end of Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by Whidbey, of Vancouver's party, in 1794. Also lATritten Barlow's, Bar- 
lows, and erroneously Burlow. 

Barlow; islets, formmg the east side of Barlow cove, above. Also called Barlow 
islands. Named by the Coast Survey in 1884. 

Barlow, mountain; see Lone. 

Barlow; point, on east side of Barlow cove, above. So called by Dall in the Coast 
Pilot, 1883. 

Barnabas; cape, the eastern point of Sitkalidak island, on the southeast coast of 
Kodiak. Called by Cook, in 1778, cape St. Barnabas and also cape Barna- 
bas. Has also been written Barnaba. 

Barnard; island, in the Koyukuk river, near longitude 155° 30^. So named by Allen, 
in 1885, presumably after Lieut. J. J. Barnard, of H. M. ship Enterprise, 
W'ho w^as killed by the Koyukuk Indians, February 16, 1851. 

Bamett, cape; see Addington. 

Barometer; mountain (2,310 feet high), near St. Paul, Kodiak. Apparently so 
named by the Coast Survey, in 1867, from its reputed power as a weather 
indicator. _ On the old Kussian chart of 1809 it is called Ostraia (steep) 
mountain. Tebenkof calls it Skotnik (cow keeper). 

Barometer; mountain, on the south side of Kuskokwim river, near longitude 157°. 
So named by Spurr and Post in 1898. 

Barren; rock (20 feet high), in Dixon entrance, 7 miles south of Cape Northum- 
berland. Called Barren rock by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 

Barren, island; see Long. 

Barren; islands, at entrance to Cook inlet. So named by Cook, in 1778, "from their 
very naked appearance." Also called Barren isles. Islas Esteriles of the 
Spaniards,. Bezploanie (sterile) of the Russians, Bareninseln of the Ger- 
mans, etc. Peregrebni of Tebenkof and Russian Hydrographic chart, 
1378. 

Barrie, island; see Strait. 

Barrie; point, the southwestern point of Kupreanof island, Sumner strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Mr. Barrie, a 
member of his party. 

Barrier;- group of islands, in southeastern part of Cordova bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So called by the Coast Survey in 1899. 



Bar— Uat. 



88 [Bi'i-i- 1S7. 



Barrier; two iplamls and numerous adjacent rocks and reefs in Sumner strait, 

Alexander arcliipelago. So desijrnated ]>>• Dall in tlie Coast Pilot, 1883. 

At liigh water they appear like two islands. 
Barrow; jxtint, the nofthernmost point of Alaska. So named by Beechey in Sep- 

ti-inher, 181.'<), after Sir John Barrow. Dease and Simjjson, in 1837, called 

it Point Barrow or Cape North. 
Barry; arm of Port Wells, Prince William sound. So named by Cik-nn, in TS9S, 

after Col. Thomas Henry Barry, assistant adjutant-general, U. S. A. 
Barry; <,'lacier, tributary to llarriman fiord, Port Wells, Prince William sound. 

Named Barry by Glenn in 1898, after Col. Thomas H. Barry, assistant 

adjutant-general, U. S. A. Was also named Washington glacier by the 

llarriman Expedition, in 1899, before the prior naming was published. 
Barter; island, near Camden bay on the northern coast of Alaska, near the interna- 
tional boundary line. So named by Franklin, in 1826, on account of the 

annual trading carried on there between the natives. 
Bartlett; cove, in (Jlacier bay, southeastern Alaska. So named ]>y tlie pilot, Capt. 

W. K. (Jeorge, in or al)out 1881. 
Bartlett; point, between S'urprise harbor and Murder cove, near the southern 

extreme of Admiralty island, at junction of Chatham strait and Frederick 

sound. So called in the Coast Pilot" (1891, p. 141). 
Bartlett; jioint, mi northwest shore of Whitney island, Fanshaw bay, Frederick 

sound, Alexander archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1891. 
Bartlett; i)oint, tlie westernmost point of Wales island, Dixon entrance. Name 

])u})lished by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Bartolome; cape, being the north point of entrance to Bucareli bay, Alexander 
. archipelago. Named by Maurelle, in 1775, Cabo dg S. Bartholome, or 

cape of St. Bartholomew, which has appeared under various forms since, 

such as St. Bartoloin, St. Bartolome, Bartholomew, etc. In 1778 Meares 

called it Adamson, and Lisianski, in 1805, called it Cheericoff or C. de St. 

Bartolome. 
Barirell, jioint; see Resurrection. 
Basarg-in; mountain, on mainland on north bank of Stikine river, near Popof glacier. 

Named Bassarguine by Hunter, in 1877, after Lieut. Vladimir Basargin, 

I. N., commanding the Russian corvette Ryndn, which explored the 

Stikine in 18^3. 
Baxf, point; see Cliff. 
Basin; creek, tributary to Klokerblok river, from the south, Seward iieninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Basin; creek, tributary to Melsing creek, from the east, Seward jieninsula. Name 

from P.aniard, 1900. 
Basin; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the east, in the Nome mining region, 

Sewai-d. peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 
Basket; bay, on the eastern shore of Chichagof island, Chatham strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Has been called Kakagin inlet. Its Indian name is Kook. 

The name basket was given by the Alaska Oil and Guano Company's 

employes at Killisnoo. 
Bass; point, on south shore of Revillagigedo island, near entrance to Behm canal. 

Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Basmrguiuc, mountain; see Basargin. 
Bat; point, near head of George inlet, Revillagigedo island, Alexander archiiielago. 

Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Batan; i.oint, on west shore of Port Caldera, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archi- 
pelago. Named Punta de Batan by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Batan is Spanish ior falUng-inilL 



BAKER.] 89 Bat— Baz. 

Batarcinoi, island; see Battery. 

Bates; pa.«?, over Valdes glacier. So named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Bates; rapids, in middle jjart of the Tanana river, central Alaska. So named by 
Allen, in 1885, after an Englishman of that name, who is reported to have 
descended the Tanana. Also called Bates Rapid. 

Bath, harbor; see Baht. 

Battery; island, between Whiting harbor and the western anchorage of Sitka har- 
bor, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Batareinoi (battery) by 
Vasilief in 1809. It was once occupied by an earthwork, now obliterated. 

Battery; islets, in southern part of Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Lindenberg in 1838. They are the Clear islets of Meade in 1869. 

Battery; point, on Seduction tongue on west shore of Chilkoot inlet, Lynn canal, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey, in 1891, from its 
resemblance to an earthwork fortification. According to the Krause 
brothers its native name is Ketlrachtii. This point has been reserved for 
light-house purposes by executive order dated January 4, 1901. 

Battery; point, the eastern head of Sarana bay on south shore of Akutan island, 
Krenitzin group, eastern Aleutians. So named by Yeniaminof, about 1830, 
who describes it as a perpendicular cliff of volcanic rock, and the southern- 
most part of the island. Possibly identical with South Head of the Fish 
Commission, in 1888, which is in turn identical with cape Kaianak of 
Tebenkof, 1849. 

Batza; mountains, village and river of central Alaska, tributary to the Koyukuk, 
from the north, near longitude 154°. The native name is Batzakakat, as 
reported by Allen, in 1885, kal-Kf meaning river. See Kiikat. 

Batzakakat, river; see Alashuk. 

Batzulnetas; post, on north bank of the Copper river in latitude 62° 37^. Appar- 
ently a native name. Published by the Coast Survey in 1898. Has also 
been printed Batzulnatos. 

Batun; cape, near Belkofski, Alaska peninsula, west of the north end of Dolgoi 
island. Named by the traders after one of the employes of the Alaska 
Commercial Company. The name has also been applied to the north- 
westernmost point of Dolgoi island. 

Bay; creek, tributary to Grantley harljor, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Bay; group of four wooded islets, in American bay, near Dixon entrance, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1881. 

Bay; island in Koyukuk river near longitude 157°. So named by Allen in 1885. 

Bay; islet on eastern shore of Portland canal. So named by Pender in 1868. 

Bay; point, the northwestern point (jf Unga island, Shumagiu group. Named Zaliva 
(bay) by the Russians. Lutke, 1835, calls it Tonkoi (narrow) point. 

Bay; point, the western point of entrance to Farragut baj', Frederick sound, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named by Dall in 1879. 

Bay of Islands, Adak; see Islands, Bay of. 

Bay of Islands; see Salisbury sound. 

Bay of Pillars; see Pillars, Bay of. 

Bay of J^tarrigavan; see Old Harbor bay. 

Bay of W((terfalls; see Waterfalls, Bay of. 

Bay Point Knoll; mountain (2,108 feet high), on the mainland, near Bay point, 
the western point of entrance to Farragut bay, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by Thomas in 1887. 

Bayou; point, on the western shore of Wrangell strait, Alexander arc-hipelago. So 
named by Meade in 1869. 

Bazan; point, the south point of entrance to Port Bazan, Prince of Wales archi- 
pelago. So called by Tel^enkof, 1849. 



Baz— Bea. 



90 [BULL. 187. 



Bazan; port, on west coast of Dall island, Alexander archipelago. Visited by 

C'auniafio in July, 179li, and named Puerto del Baylio Bazan. Has been 

calK'd Ba/an bay or harbor. 
Bazhi; Kskinio village, on left bank of the Yukon, at upper mouth of the Innoko 

or Shagaluk slough. Name from Tikhmenief, 1861, who writes it Bazhi- 

gagat, i. e., Bazhi river. 
Bazil; point, on the northwestern coast of Montague island, the northeast point of 

entrance to Hanning bay, Prince William sound. So named by Vancouver 

in 1794. 
Beacon; rock, in entrance to Mole harbor, Seymour canal, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Mansfield in 1889. 
Beacon, rock; see Makhnati. 
Bean; island, in Dixon entrance Just west of Cape Chacon. So named by Dall, in 

1880, after Dr. Tarleton Hoffman Bean, of the Fish Commission. 
Bean; ridge, on north bank of the Tanana, opposite mouth of the Toklat river. 

Named, in 1898, by Peters and Brooks, after the first trader to establish a 

post on the Tanana. The post was at Harper bend, and here Mrs. Bean 

was murdered by the Indians. 
Bear; bay, indenting the northwestern shoro of Baranof island. Peril strait, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So called by Coghlan in 1884. 
Bear; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, north of Belkofski. 

Named Medvednikova (bear's) by the Russians, presumably from the 

abundance of brown bears found in its vicinity. 
Bear; cape, the northern point of entrance to Bear bay, Alaska peninsula, near 

Belkofski. Called Medviednik (bear) by Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been 

called Middle point. 
Bear: cape, the northwestern point of entrance to Port Etches, Prince William 

sound. Named Medviezhi (bear) by Chernof in 1830. 
Bear; cove, indenting the northern shore of Silver bay, Sitka sound, Alexander 

archipelago. A stream tributary to this small bay was named Medviezhia 

(bear) by Vasihef in 1809. 
Bear; cove, near the head of Kachemak bay. Cook inlet. So called by Dall in 

1880. 
Bear; creek, tributary to Fortymile creek, from the east. Prospectors' name, from 

Barnard in 1898. 
Bear; creek, tributary to Resurrection creek, from the east, near Hope city, on Turn- 
again arm of Cook inlet. Prospectors' name, reported by Becker in 1895. 
Bear; i-reek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the south, near latitude 

67°. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 
Bear, creek; see Lime. 
Bear, fort; see Khutsnu. 
Bear; harbor, in Affleck canal, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

Helm in 1886. 
Bear; island, near or in Uyak anchorage, Uyak bay, northern coast of Kodiak. So 

called by Moser in 1899. 
Bear, island; see Woewodski. 
Bear; mountain, about 40 or 50 miles north, by compass, from Mount St. Elias. So 

named by Ru.ssell, in 1891, after the U. S. revenue cutter Bear. 
Bear; mountain, on right bank of the Tanana river, near latitude 62°. So named 

by Peters in 1898. 
Bear; river, tril)utary to the head of Portland canal. Apparently so named by 

Pender in 1868. 
Bear; river, tributary to the Niukluk river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 



BAKER. J 91 Bea— Bea. 

Bear Bay; island, in Bear bay, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

Coghlan in 1884. 
Beardslee; group of islands, in Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. So named by 

ITnited States naval officers, in 1880, after Rear- Admiral Lester Anthony 

Beardslee, U. S. N. Have also been called Sand islands. 
Beardslee; group of islands, forming part of the Galankin group in Sitka sound, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by United States naval officers, in 1880, 

after Rear- Admiral Beardslee. Has been erroneously printed Beardsley. 
Beardslee, island; see Kayak. 
Beardslee; river, on the mainland, tributary to William Henry bay, Lynn canal, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by United States naval officers, in 1880, 

after Rear- Admiral Beardslee. 
Beaton, island; see Betton. 
Beatiie, creek; see Slate. 
Beauclerc; island, near the entrance to Port Beauclerc, Sumner strait, Alexander 

afchipelago. Also, erroneously, Beauclere. Named by Dall in 1879. 
Beauclerc; mountain peak (2,500 feet high), on Kuiu island, near Port Beauclerc. 

So named by Helm in 1885. 
Beauclerc; port, in Kuiu island, Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Vancouver in 1793. Also, erroneously, Beauclere. 
Beaufort; bay, on the Arctic coast of Alaska, near the international boundary line. 

So named by Franklin, in 1826, after his friend, Capt. Francis Beaufort, 

R.N. 
Beaufort; cape, on the Arctic coast of Alaska, near Cape Lisburne. Named, in 1826, 

by Beechey, ' ' in compliment to Captain Beaufort, the present hydrographer 

to the Admiralty." Has also been written Bophor. 
Beautems, cape and mountain; see Fairweather. 

Beaver; bay, gulf or inlet indenting eastern shore of Unalaska island, eastern Aleu- 
tians. Named Bobrovoi (sea otter) by Sarichef in 1792. Saner, 1802, has 

Bobrovoi guba or Bay of Otters; Langsdorf has "Sea-Otters bay of Cook, 

Sarichef, and others." 
Beaver; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northvi^est of the 

Shumagins. Named Bobrovoi (sea otter) by the Russians. The maps are 

confused in this locality. Perhaps this is identical with Otter bay of some 

maps. 
Beaver; bay, indenting the southern shore of Atka island, middle Aleutians. Named 

by the Russians Bobrovaia (sea otter). 
Beaver; cove, just north of Cape Providence, in Port Wrangell, Alaska peninsula. 

So called by the Russians, before 1831, Ijecause parties of sea otter hunters. 

from Katmai usually stopped there. Lutke calls it Port Bobrovoi (des 

loutres). 
Beaver; creek, on Mary island, Gravina group, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Nichols in 1883. 
Beaver; creek, tributary to Eldorado river, from the east, near its mouth, Seward 

peninsula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Beaver; creek, tributary to Matanuska river, from the west, a few miles north of 

Knik river. Cook inlet. Local name, from Glenn, 1898. 
Beaver; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the south, a little below the mouth of 

the Tozi river. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
Beaver; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the south, near latitude 66°. Name 

published by the Coast Survey in 1897. This may be the stream called 

Nocotocargut by the Western Union Telegraph Company explorers in 

1867. 
Beaver, islet; see Sea Otter. 



Bea— Bod. 



92 [BITI.L. 187. 



Beaver; lak.-, iK-tw.vn tlu' lu-a(hvaU>ri^ of the Unalaklik and Yukon, draining into 
till' hitlt-r. •• An oin'n tundra known as Beaver lake, as it is covered with 
wat^T in the sprinjr." I.oc-al name from Dall, 18tj6. 

Beaver; mountain, near Beaver bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. ( ailed Bobrovskoi 
(sea otter) by Lutke in 1836. 

Beaver; iiinimtain range, in central Alaska. Is so indicated on map of Alaska, 
piiblislied by Parliament in 1855. (Arctic papers III, 916. ) Probably the 
Xanana mountains. The name also appears on a map issued 1 )y the United 
suites (ieneral Land OiWce in 1869. 

Beaver; p(jint, the southern jjoint of entraniie to Shelikof bay, on western coast of 
Kruzof islantl, Alexander archipelago. Probably named Bobrovie (sea 
otter) by Rikord in 1810. 

Beaver; village, or native settlement on northern shore of and near entrance to 
Bi'a\er bay, Unalaska. Called Bobrova and Bobrovo (sea otter) by 
Sariclu'f in 1792. In about 1830 it consisted of 4 huts (yourts) and 41 
people. Its native name is Uguiiig. 

Beavertail; island, in Big Branch bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by IMoser in 1897. 

Becharof; lake, on Alaska peninsula. The lake was named at an early day by the 
Russians after Becharof, a master in the Russian navy, who was at Kodiak 
in 1788. It has been variously written Becharoff, Betehareff, Bocharof, 
Bochonoff, Botcharoff, Rochanoff, etc. The Eskimo name appears to l)e 
Igiagiuk, or Ugiagwik, or Ugashik, etc. It has also been known as Tugat 
or Ninuan-Tugat, etc., while Agulogak of Sarichef is probably this lake. 

Becharof; mountain, on Alaska peninsula. Name as above, recently applied. 

Becher; ]>oint, the western head of (Iwydyr bay on the Arctic coast, near Beechey 
point. This name has resulted from confusion. Franklin, in 1826, named a 
point near here Beechey. In 1837 Deaseand Simpson transferred Franklin's 
name to another point a little farther east, viz, to the one here called Be(;her, 
and to Franklin's Beechey point they gave the name Berens. Later maps 
retain the name Beechey as applied by Franklin and give to i]m cape a 
new name Becher. 

Bechevin; bay, in Isanotski strait, indenting the western end of Alaska peninsula. 
Called Port Betchevinskoi, by Lutke, in 1836. Named presumably after 
Bechevin, a wealthy merchant of Irkutsk Siberia, who in 1760 dispatched 
the largest vessel sent out, up to that time, to the Aleutian islands — the 
(ravril or Gabriel. The bay has also been called Isanotski. 

Bechevin; bay, indenting the northern coast of Atka, Andreanof group, middle 
Aleutians. Ajjparently so named by Billings about 1790. On Billings 
track chart in Sauer's account it is Belsheviuskoi. Named doubtless 
after the Irkutsk merchant Bechevin. Variously written Betchevinskoi, 
Bichevina, etc. 

Bechevin; cape, near Bechevin bay, on the north shore of Atka, middle Aleutians. 
Calle<l Betchevinskoi by Lutke, who seemingly took it from the jiilot 
Ingenstrem. 

Beck; hills, or mountains near junction of Fickettand Koyukuk rivers. So named, 
in 1,S85, by Allen, "in honor of Senator James B. Beck, of Kentucky. 
The Indians seemed to have no names for these." 

Beck; jioint, in 1 1 assler harbor, Annette island, Alexander an-hipelago. So named 
by the Coaat Survey in 1883. 

Bede; ])oint, on the eastern side of entrance to Cook inlet. So named by Cook in 
1778. "In naming this (Cape Bede) and Mt. St. Augustin, Captain Cook 
was directi'd by our calendar." 



BAKER.l 93 Bed_Bel. 

Bflciuioi, islets; see "Watch. 

Bee; rocks (10 feet high) , in southern entrance to Clarence strait, south of the Percy 
islands, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Beeclier; pass, between ■\\'oewodski and Kupreanof islands, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Thomas, in 1887, after Ensign Albert Morrison Beecher, 
IT. S. N., a member of his party. It is Duncan passage of Meade in 1869. 

Beecliey ; pomt, near mouth of the Colville river, Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow. 
Named by Franklin, in 1826, after his friend, Capt. Frederic William 
Beechey, R. N. Called Berens by Dease and Simpson in 1837. Erroneously 
Beechy. 

BeeMve; creek, tributary to Budd creek, from the n(jrth, Seward iieninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 

Beehive; island, in southern entrance to Nakwasina passage, Baranof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Baker, in 1880, from its fancied resem- 
blance, seen from the west, to the conventional straw beehive. 

Beering; see Bering. 

Becriiif/'s, bay; see Dr}\ 

Behm; canal, in southern part of Alexander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 
1793, after IMaj . !Magnus Carl von Behm, commandant of Kamchatka in 1779. 
1779. 

Behm; mountain (2,867 feet high) , on the mainland, near southern entrance to Behm 
canal. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Behm; narrows or strait, in Behm canal, separating Bell and Revillagigedo islands. 
Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Behring, Riviere de; see Alsek. 

Bi'lirlnrj; see Bering. 

Belcaro; post-office, estabUshed in August, 1899. It is about 50 miles north of 
Valdes, Prince William sound. 

Belcher; ])oint, on the Arctic coast, between Icy cape and Point Barrow. So named 
by Beechey, in 1827, after Lieutenant (afterwards Sir Edward) Belcher, 
wh(j accompanied him during his explorations here. 

Belknap; islands, forming the eastern part of the Eckholms group, Sitka sound, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by United States naval officers in 1880, 
presumably after Capt. (afterwards Rear-Adtniral) George Eugene 
Belknap, T. S. N. 

Belkofski; bay, cape and village on s<juth coast of Alaska peninsula. Named by 
the Russians, as early as 1835, and probably earlier. Derived from hielka 
(squirrel) . Variously written Belkoffski, Belkoffsky, Belkovsky, etc. 

Bell; arm, in northern part of Behm canal, north of Bell island, below. So named 
by the Coast Survey in 1883. 

Bell; island (2,500 feet high), in Behm canal, north of Revillagigedo island. Called 
Bell's island by Vancouver, in 1793, after a member of his party. 

Bell ; island^ in entrance to Red bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander arcliipelago. 
Named by Helm, in 1886, after Lieut. John Arthur Bell, V. S. N., a 
member of his party. 

Bell; river, tril)utary to Gwydyr bay, Arctic coast of Alaska. Named Bell's by Dease 
and Simpson in 1837. 

Belle; bay, on the ea.stern shore of Portlaml canal. So called by the Coast Survey. 

Belle Jsle, village; see Eagle. 

Bellevue; river, in northernmost Alaska, tributary to Elson bay, near Point Bar- 
row. Named Belle Vue by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, conmiemorating 
their pleasure at seeing the end of their exploratory journey from the 
Maclj;enzie river mouth to Point Barrow. 

Belshevinskoi, bay; see Bechevin. 



Bel— Ber. 



94 [bull. 187. 



Belt; creek, tributary to the Kuzitrin liver, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 

Beluga; mountain (3,500 feet high), near the head of Cook inlet. So named by the 
(■Jeolou'ical Survey in 1898. 

Beluga; river, tril)utary to Cook inlet, from the north, near longitude 151°. Appar- 
ently a prospectors' name, given in 1896, and published in 1899. 

Ben- lake on Kenai peninsula tril)utary to Kaknu lake. May be identical with 
Second lake or Skilak lake. So called on Russian Hydrographic chart 
1378, edition of 1847. 

Bence; mountain (4,800 feet high), near the head of Klutina lake. So named by 
Abercrombie in 1898, after Private Bence, of his party. 

Bench; creek, tributary to headwaters of Sixmile creek, Kenai peninsula. Pros- 
pectors' name, from Mendenhall, 1898. 

Bend; mountain (5,000 feet high), on the east bank of Chandlar river, near latitude 
68°. Descriptive name given by Schrader in 1899. There is a large bend 
in the river near this mountain. 

Bendel; cape, the northwest point of Kupreanof island, Frederick sound, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So named by Dall, in 1877, after Mr. Bernhard Bendel, 
formerly of Bremen, an Alaskan pioneer, to whom the early Coast Survey 
parties were indebted for valuable information and generous hospitality. 

Bendel; island, between Big Koniuji and Nagai islands, Shumagin group. So 
named by Dall, after Bernhard Bendel, a trader in Alaska in 1871-72. 
Has also been called Morse island. 

Bendeleben; mountain, north of Golofhin bay, Norton sound. Named in 1866, 
after Baron Otto von Bendeleben, who made explorations in this vicinity 
while a member of the Western Union Telegraph Exploring Expedition. 
Erroneously Berdeleben. 

Benham; point, the eastern point of entrance to Rodman bay. Peril strait, Alexan- 
der archipelago. Named by Moore, in 1895, after Ensign Henry Kennedy 
Benham, U. S. N., a member of his party. 

Benjamin; island, in southern part of Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Beardslee in 1880. 

Benkffi, jioint; see Banks. 

Bennett; cre^ek, tributary to the Niukluk river, from the south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Bennett; island, in the Arctic ocean, north of the New Siberian islands. Discov- 
ered by De Long, in 1881, and named by him, after Mr. James Gordon 
Bennett. 

Bennett; lake, north of Chilkoot pass. Named by Schwatka, in 1883, after James 
Gordon Bennett. Has been erroneously written Bennet. 

Bennett; town, at head of Bennett lake, the present terminus of the railroad from 
Skagway. 

Bentera; island, in Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. Nained La Ben- 
tera ])y Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Bentinck, point; see Steele. 

Berdeleben, mountain; see Bendeleben. 

Berens, point; see Beechey. 

Berezhnoi, island; see Caution. 

Berezoraia, cove; see Birch. 

Berg; bay, or inlet, on the southwestern shore of Glacier bay. So called in the 
Coast Pilot (1883, p. 169). 

Berg; lake, on the eastern border of Muir glacier. So named by Reid, in 1890, 
because of tlie large number of icebergs found floating in it that year. 

Bergman; store or trading post, on the Koyukuk river, near the Arctic circle. So 
named by prospectors, in 1899, after its owner. 



BAKBB.] 95 Ber— Ber. 

Bering; .Several ^eographie features in and adjacent to Alaska have been named 
after Commander Bering, tlie pioneer explorer of northwest America. So 
applied the name has been variously spelled Behring, Bhering, Beering, 
etc. Nearly all are now agreed that the spelling should be that used by- 
Bering himself, viz, Bering. Capt. Commander Ivan Ivanovich Bering, 
selected by the Tsar, Peter the Great, for the work of exploring eastern 
Asia and western America, was the son of Jonas Svendsen by his second 
wife, Anne Pedersdatter Bering, and was born at Horsens, in Jutland, in 
the summer of 1681. On his mother's side he was descended from the 
distinguished Bering family which, during the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries, flourished in various parts of Denmark, and included a number 
of ministers and judicial officers. Baptized the 12th of August, 1681, he 
received the baptismal name Vitus Jonassen Bering. On entering the 
Russian navy, however, he took, as was the custom of the Danish and 
Norwegian officers serving in Russia, a new or Russianized form of name. 
This form is Ivan Ivanovich Bering. The name Ivanovich is an exact 
translation of Jonassen; in English, Johnson or John's son. All the Russian 
and Danish records agree as to the spelling of the family name; both in Dan- 
ish and in Russian it is Bering. His autograph is always Bering. 

The insertion of an // in the name, giving the form Behring, appears to 
have been made in Germany. 

In 1748 was published Harris's Collection of Voyages, in two folio 
volumes. In the second volume, pages 1016-1041, is contained "A distinct 
account of part of the northeast frontier of the Russian Empire, commonly 
called the countr}' of Kamschatka or Kamschatska, including the voyages 
of Captain Behring for discovering toward the east, etc., collected from the 
]>est authorities, both printed and manuscript." This account was pre- 
pared by Dr. Campbell, who made use of the form Behring. From this 
it may be inferred, as pointed out by 'Sir. William H. Dall, that Dr. Camp- 
bell did not have access to original documents, but got his material from 
German sources or from German translations of the original. As Harris's 
Voyages is an elaborate work, long accepted as a standard, the use of the 
form Behring gained wide adoption among English-speaking people. 
That the form Bering should be adopted, however, appears (1) because it is 
the form always used by Bering himself, by his ancestors for five generations 
at least, and by his descendants; (2) because it is the form almost, though 
not quite, universally adopted in all non-English works, and (3) because 
even in English works it is gradually superseding the form Behring. 

On this subject see note by Dr. T. N. Gill in report upon the condition 
of affairs in Alaska, by H. W. Elliott, Washington, 1875, p. 246; also in 
report on the seal islands of Alaska by same, pp. 151-2, this being contained 
in Tenth Census of the United States, AVashington, 1884. 

For information touching Bering and his family see Vitus J. Bering 
og de Russiske opdagelsesrejser fra, 1725-1743, af P. Lauridsen, 12mo, 
Kj0benhavn, Hegel & S0n, 1885, pp. 4-6. See also translation of same, 
entitled, Russian Explorations, 1725-1743, Vitus Bering, the discoverer of 
Bering Strait, by Peter Lauridsen, etc., translated from the Danish by 
Julius E. Olson, 12mo, Chicago, Griggs & Co., 1889, pp. ix, xii, 10, 11. 
See also note on Bering's name by W. H. Dall in The National Geographic 
Magazine, 8°, Washington, 1890. Vol. II, No. 2, p. 122. 

The Encyclopaedia Britannica, ninth edition, has Behring's Island and 
Behring' s Strait. Johnson's New Universal Cycloptedia, New York, 1877, 
has Behring or Beering (Vitus). The American Cyclopaedia, 1883, vol. 2, 
p. 480, has Behring or Bering (Vitus). Appleton's Cylopsedia of Ameri- 
can Biography, New York, 1887, vol. 1, p. 245, has Vitus Bering. 



|{<r IC<'I. 



96 [Bi'i'i. 1K7. 



JicrliK/, biiv; srt' Yakutiit. 

Bering-; L'hu-UT, hi'twcrii Mount St. Klian an.l tlu- C»\>\>ri- rivi-r. So nuuied by tlio 

Coast Survey in 18S0. 
liiriiK/, liavni; see Controller bay. 
Bering-; island, one of the Commander ^M-onp. IUtIiik sea. Bering ,li,.,l an.l was 

buried here Deeend^er 8, 1741. 
/>./•("//</. river; see Alsek. 
Bering; sea, between Alaska and eastern Siberia. First so called after CcMtmmnder 

Bering, by Cai)tain Uolofnin, in 1822. Before this dat?; it was for the 

most part eal led the Sea of Kami-hatka (variously spelled). On a very 

old map it is called the Mer d'Ormante and on another the Sleepy sea. 

It has also been called the Sea of Otters (Bobrovoi) and also the Sea of 

Alaska (variously spelled) or Aleutian sea. Also the Eastern (;. r. 

Pacific) < >cean. For very full account of this name see Fur Seal Arlntration. 
Bering-; strait, si-parating Asia froni North America. Variously written as strait 

and straits, and also variously written sometimes in the possessive form, 

as Bhering, Behring, Beering, etc. As early as 1572, it is shown on a map 

with the name Strets de Anian. Cook, in 1778, called it Bhering's straits. 
Bering; village, on the eastern shore of Port Clarence, Seward i>eninsula. Xame 

from Brooks, 1900. Locally called Bering City. 
Bernard; creek, tributary t<j the Tonsina river from the southeast. Name from 

Gerdine, 1900. 
Berners; V)ay, indenting the eastern shore of Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by Vancouver in 1794. 
Benitifcl)!, bay; see Amber. 
Berry; arm, of Port Frederick, Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. So callc<l 

in the Coast Pilot of 1883, p. 192. 
Berrij, inlet; see Tenakee. 
Berry; island, in Kasaan bay. Prince of Wales group, Alexander archi])elago. So 

named by Clover in 1886. 
Berry; island, one of the Kutchuma group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Yagodnoi (berry) by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been called John- 
son island. 
Berry; knoll (894 feet high), east of Tamgas harbor, on Amiette island, Alexander 

archipelago. Called Berry Knoll ]>y Nichols in 1883. 
BeiT'i, passage; see Tenakee. 
Berry; peak (2,500 feet high), on AVrangell island, Arctic ocean. So named by the 

United States Navy in 1881, after Lieut. Robert Mallory Berry, IT. S. N., 

whose party was the first to land upon this island. 
Berry; jioint, the end of a sandy shoal forming the northernmost point of WrangcU 

island, Arctic ocean. Named after Lieut. Robert M. Berry, U. S. N., who 

di.scovered it in 1881. 
Bertha; glacier, on the mainland near the head of Chilkat inlet, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by Fnited States naval officers in 1880. 
Besboro; island, in eastern part of Norton sound, Bering sea. Named Besborough 

by Cook in Septeml)er, 1778. 
Be-fimennij, cape; see Nameless. 
Bessie; peak (4,130 feet high), in the northern part of Etolin island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 
Betchareff, lake; see Becharof. 
BelcheriiiKhol, bay, cape, etc.; see Bechevin. 
Bethel; mission (M(jravian), on the lower Kuskokwim near or at the native village 

^lunitrelega; founded by the missionaries William H. Weinland and 

John IL Kilbuck in 1885. 



KAKEK.] 97 Bet-Big. 

Bctniij, cape; see Deceit. 

Bettles; river, tributary to ^Middle fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near longi- 
tude 150°. Named by the miners, in 1899, after Mr. Bettles, of the firm 

Pickarts, Bettles tt Pickarts, OMners of the post Bergman. 
Betton; cape, on the western coast of Betton island. Called Betton Head by the 

Coast Survey in 1886. 
Betton; island, in the northern entrance to Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after ]\Ir. Robert Betton, one of his party, 

Avho was wounded in a tight with the natives. The name occurs several 

times in Vancouver's text, but in the atlas is erroneously Beatons. This 

erroneous form has been widely copied. 
Between; cape, between Spruce and Inner Spruce cape, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. 

Named Promezhutochnie (between) byMurashef in 1839-40. 
Between; mountain (1,526 feet high), near Tamgas harbor, on Annette island, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1886. 
Bezlciiiidniioi, islet; see Nameless. 
Bezplo(hili', islands; see Barren. 
Bher'mg; see Bering. 
Bibb; shoal, in the entrance to Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Glass, in 1881, perhaps after one of the Coast Survey vessels. 
Bibora; reef, off the northern end of St. Ignace island, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales 

archipelago. Named La Bibora l)y Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Apparently intended for la biharo (beaver). 
Blrherina, bay; see Bechevin. 
Bieli; rock, near Middle island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Bieloi 

(white) by Vasilief in 1809. Called White by Dall in the Coast Pilot 

(1883, p. 140). Erroneously Beloi. 
Bieli, rock, Chatham strait; see White. 
Big; bowlder, near Danger point in W'rangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

called by Nichols in 1881. 
Big; creek, tributary to Chandlar river, from the east, near longitude 149°. Pros- 
pectors' name, given in 1899. 
Big; iTcek, tributary to Grouse creek, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Big; creek, tributary to Red bay. Prince of Wales island. Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Helm in 1886. 
Big; island, at entrance to Deep bay. Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Named 

Bolshoi (big) by Vasilief in 1833. 
Big; island, in the Yukon river just below the mouth of Melozi river. Descriptive 

name, published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
Biij, island; see Big Gavanski. 
Big; lake, in northern part of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. Elliott, 

1874, calls it Great lake. According to Elliott, its Aleut name is Mee- 

sulk-mah-nee, i. e., very shallov. 
Big; mountain (8,750 feet high), on the mainland, east of the Stikine river and near 

the international boundary. So called on recent Coast Survey charts. 
Big; rock, at entrance to Afognak bay, Kodiak group. Named Bolshoi (big) by 

Murashef in 1839-tO. 
Big Arruir, l)ay; see Big Branch. 
Big Blark, river; see Rat. 
Big Branch; bay, indentmg the southwestern shore of Earanof island, Alexander 

archipelago. Named Bolshoi strelka (Big arrow or Big off-shoot) by the 

Russians. Has been called Great Strelki bay; also Bolshoi Rukav (big 

sleeve). 
Bull. 187—01 7 



i 



BIsr— Blu. 



98 ~ [bull. 187. 



Big Branch; rock, off Bijr Branch bay, Barauof island, Alexander arcliipelago. So 

named hy .Moser in 1S1)7. 
Big Diomede; island (1,759 feet hijrh), the westernmost and largest of the Diomede 

islan<ls Bering strait. It is the easternmost land of eastern Siberia, Asia. 

For name of the grouf) see Diomede. Commonly known as Big Diomede. 

Saner, 1802, calls it Inalin and Inellen; Lutke has Inalik, while Beechey, 

18.S0, ha.s Ratmanoff (Noo-nar-book). Tebenkof, 1849, has Iraaklit, while 

Nordenskjol<l has I-ma-ltn. Be«chey, 1826, says that he transferred to 

this island the name Ratmanoff, which had been bestowed upon the sup- 

l)osed discovery of Kotzebne. 
Big Fort; islet, on southeastern shore of Shuyak island, Kodiak group. Named 

Bolshoi Krieposti (Big fort) by the Russian American Company in 1849. 
Big Four; creek, tributary to Koksuktapaga river, from the south, Seward penin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Big Gavanski; island, one of the Gavan.«ki group, immediately in front of Starri- 

gavan bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Gavanski Bol- 

slioi (big harbor) by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been called Big island 

and Gavanski island. 
Big Gorntc, island; see Goose. 
Big Hurrah; creek, tributary to Soiomon river, from the east, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Bii/ Ikiiit, river; see Xiuklnk. 
Bl<j Jl'iiizhik, island; see Outer Iliasik. 
Big Koniuji; island, one of the Shumagin group. Named by the Russians Bolshoi 

Koniuzhi, a word derived from Koniuzhka, the crested auk. Also written 

Konioujii, Koniugi, etc. See Koniuji. 
Big Lake. A region of flat country abounding in lakes, between the lower Yukon 

and the Kuskokwim rivers, was, as early as 1878 and probably earlier, 

known to the fur traders as the Big Lake country. 
Big Rose ; island, one of the Opasni islands in Northern rapids. Peril strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Coghlan, in 1884, doubtless after the little steamer 

TlO.SV. 

Big "Whitefish; island, in the Yukon river, at the Palisades. Called Big White 
Fish island by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Bill; point, the north point of Whitney island, Fanshaw bay, Frederick sound, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Billy; creek, tributary to Hicks creek, from the north, near longitude 147° 30^. 
Loi-al name from Glenn in 1898. 

Bingham; the northwestern point of Yakobi island, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by Vancouver in 1794. Tebenkof calls it Takhanis, while Cook and La 
Perouse call it Cape Cross. Vancouver located Cape Cross seven miles 
from this. 

Bingo; moiantain, in northern part of Annette island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Nichols in 1883. 

Biorka; cape, the northeasternmost point of Biorka island near LTnalaska, eastern 
Aleutians. Called Burka by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Biorka; island, near the east end of Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Its Aleut name 
is Siginak (braided, curled), Avhich Sauer wrote Sithanak. Sari chef, in 
1792, called it Spirkin; Veniaminof has Borka or Spirkin, while Lutke 
says Spirkine, otherwise called Borka. Now commonly w-ritten and pro- 
nounced Biorka. Erroneously Burka. It is from the Norwegian Bjerk 6, 
or Swedish Bjork O, meaning Birch island. 

Biorka; island, the northwesternmost of the Necker islands, at entrance to Sitka 
sound, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vasilief in 1809. It is 
South island of Lisianski in 1805. 



UAKEE.] 99 Bio— Bit. 

Biorka; snukeu reef, in Sitka sound, westward from Biorka island. So named by 
Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883. Has also been called Biorka rock. 

Biorka; village (population in 1890, 58), on the eastern end of Biorka island, 
eastern Aleutians. Has been written Borka and Burka. Its native name, 
according to Yenianiinof, is Ugiii-ug, but Sauer, 1790, says it is called 
Sidankin, while Sarichef, in the same party with Sauer, has Sedanka and 
Sedanki. 

Biougaiii, island; see Bushy. 

Birch; cove, east of Pyramid island, Chilkat inlet, southeastern Alaska. Named 
Berezovaia (birch) bay by Lindenberg in 1838. The name is obsolete. 

Birch; creek, tributary to Big Four creek, from the south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Birch; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, about 15 miles below the 
mouth of Tozi river. Xame published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Birch; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the south, a little below Fort Yukon. 
Named by traders of the Hudson Bay Company. Its Indian name is 
reported to be Tohwun-nukakat. Either this creek, or the one next below 
it, is Nocotocargut of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition in 1867. 

Birch; lake, near Tetling river, between the Copper and Tanana rivers. So named 
by Lowe, in 1898, after Stephen Birch, a member of his party. 

Birch Creek; trail, from the Tanana river, near longitude 147°, to the headwaters 
of Birch creek. Local usage. Apparently identical with Circle City trail 
of some maps. 

Bird; cape (1,008 feet high), at western end of Amchitka island, western Aleutians. 
Lutke says the Aleuts call it Satanna, i. e., des oiseaux (of birds). The 
Russians called it Ptichie (bird) cape. 

Bird; cape, on southern shore of Kittiwake island, Kodiak group. Named Ptichie 
(bird) by Murashef in 1839-10. 

Bird; creek,. 'tributary to Turnagain arm, Cook inlet, from the north, opposite the 
mouth of Sixmile creek. Prospectors' name, published by the Geological 
Survey in 1900. 

Bird; island, in Favorite channel, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Beardslee in 1880. 

Bird; island, in St. Paul harbor, Kodiak island. Named Ptichie (bird) by the 
Russians in 1809. 

Bird ; island, in southern part of the Shumagin group. Named Ptichnie or Ptichnoi 
(bird ) by the early Russians. Has also been written Petitski and Ptitchny. 

Bird; island, off south shore of Ikatan island, near east end of Unimak island. 
Named Ptichie (bird) by Tebenkof, 1849. 

Bird; rock, in eastern part of Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. Name from the 
Coast Survey, 1899. 

Bird; rock, in Fanshaw bay, Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. Named by 
the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Bishop; point, the western jioint of entrance to Taku inlet, Stephens passage, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Originally named Salisbury by Yancouver, in 1794, 
after the Bishop of Salisbury. The name Salisbury having been acci- 
dentally transferred to a point about 3 miles farther w^est, the name 
Bishop was given to the point by Dall in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 171). 

Bissau ; lake, triVjutary to Chuitna river, near the head of Cook inlet. Name pub- 
lished by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Biluk, creek; see Baituk. 

Bitzla; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the east, near longitude 157° W. 
Part of a native name reported in 1885 by Allen, who has Bitzlatoilocta 
on his map and Bitzlatoiloeta in his text. 



Bla-BIH. 100 [r^vu.AH7. 

Black; Muffs, i-ast <.f St. Paul village, St. Taiil islan.l, Pribilof group, Bering sea. 

Apparently a local descriptive name, published by the Coast Survey in 

1S75. 
Black; eape, forming the ea.^tern head of Driftwood bay on the southern shore of 

Tmnak islan<l, t-astern Aleutians. Named Chornoi (black) by Kuritzien 

in 1S-4!I. 
Black; cape, on iiorllicrn siioiv ..f Afognak island, Kodiak group. Named Chernoi 

or Chornoi (black) by tlic Russians as early as 1848. Has also been writ- 
ten erroneously Torno. Presumably a descriptive name. 
Black; cape, on southeastern coast of Spruce island, Kodiak group. Named Cher- 

nie (black) by Murashef, 1839-40. 
Blnrk, cape; see Newenham. 
Black; glacier, in the Mt. St. Elias region near Disenchantment bay. Descriptive 

name, given by Russell in 1890. 
Black; island, in Behm canal, northwest of Kevillagigedo island, Alexander archi- 

pcdago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Black; islet, in Kevillagigedo channel, north of the southern entrance to Behni 

canal. So named by Nichols in 1883. Descriptive term. 
Black; lake, near Black peak on Alaska peninsula. So called by Petrof in 1880. 
Black; mountain (5,130 feet high), in the Muir glacier, southeastern Alaska. So 

named by Muir in 1882. 
Black; mountain (1,883 feet high), in the southern part of Kevillagigedo island, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Black; mountain (5,000 feet high), northeast of Yaldes glacier. So named l)y 

Abercrombie in 189S. 
Black; peak on Alaska peninsula, northwest of Chignik bay. Named Chornaia 

(black) by Tebenkof in 1849. Also called Black volcano. 
Black; point, on northern shore of Whitewater bay. Admiralty island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Glass in 1881. 
Black; point, the southwesternmost point of Sitkalidak island, Kodiak group. 

Descriptive name, given by Tanner in 1888. It is Miesofski or Miesof of 

Tebenkof and Mizofek of Archimandritof, 1849. 
Black; reef, in Port Frederick west of Green island, Chichagof island, Alexander 

archiiielago. Descriptive name given by United States naval officers in 

1880. 
Black; river, in the Yukon delta, called by Dall Kipni'uk or Black. Russian Hydro- 
graphic chart 1455 (edition of 1852) calls it Kipnaiak and late Coast Survey 

charts Kripniyuk. Nelson says the native name is Kipniaguk, spelled 

Kipniuk on most maps, and shows it as a river distinct from and to the 

north of Black river. It is Naulchi river of Tebenkof, 1849. 
Black; rock (150 feet high), east of Crooked island, in the Walrus island group, 

Bristol bay. So named by the Fish Commission in 1890. 
Black; rock (25 feet high), in Revillagigedo channel, south of entrance to Boca de 

Quadra, Alexander archipelago. Presumably a descriptive name, given 

by Nichols in 1883. 
Black; rock, in Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago, less than a mile westerly from 

Sentinel rock. This may be the ]\Iakhnak or the golla l^amennya ostrorl'i 

(bare rocky is^ts) of Vasilief in 1809. The early and later representation 

and nomenclature here is confused. 
Blackbird; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Drozdof (blackbird) by A''asilief in 1809. 
Blackburn; mountain (16,140 feet high), near the Copper river. Named by Allen, 

in 1885, after Hon. Joseph Clay Styles Blackburn, of Kentucky. 
Blackburn; river, tributary to the Copper, from the east, a little south of latitude 

62°. So named by Abercrombie in 1898. 



BAKER.] 101 



Bla— Bli. 



Black Crag-; i)eak (5,895 feet liigli), on the mainland, about 8 milen south of the 

Stikine river. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 
Black Crook; creek, trilnitary to Igloo creek, from the north, Seward peninsula. 

Xanie from Brooks, 1900. 
Black Diamond; creek, tributary to liead waters of ^lission creek, in the Eagle 

]\Iining region. Local name, pubHshed in 1899. 
Black Head; point, on the eastern shore of Dease inlet, Arctic coast. . So named by 

Dease and Simpson in 1837. 
Black River; settlements. The Eleventh Census, 1890, speaks of the Black River 

settlements in the Yukon district. I suppose this refers to Eskimo villages 

along the Black river in the Yukon delta. 
Blackstone; bay and glacier, in Prince William soimd, opposite Port Wells. Named 

in 1S99 after a miner who lost his life there "a few years ago." 
Blackthorn; i)eak (4,010 feet high), on the western shore of Glacier bay, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named Black Thorn by Reid in 1896. 
Blaine; bay, a small bight in Izembek bay, Alaska peninsula. Named by the Fish 

Commission, in 1888, after Hon. James Gillespie Blaine. 
Blaine; i.oint, on the mainland, near north end of Pearse canal, southeastern Ala.ska. 

Named by the Coast Survey, in 1891, after Hon. James G. Blaine. 
Blaine; point, the western point of entrance to Blaine bay in Izembek bay, Alaska 

peninsula. Named by the Fish Commission, in 1888, after Hon. James G. 

Blaine. 
Blake; channel, separating southern part of Wrangell island from the mainland, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1879, after Prof. WilUam Phipps 

Blake, of New Haven, Conn. , who made explorations in this region in 1863. 
Blake; island, at junction of Blake channel and Bradiield canal. Named Ham by 

Snow in 1886, and Blake by Nichols in 1891. 
Blahr, point; see Blaquiere. 
Blanche; white rock (10 feet high), in Ernest soimd, between Etolin and Deer 

islands, Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 
Blank; inlet, indenting southeastern coast of Gravina island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Nichols in 1888. 
Blank; two islets, at entrance to Blank inlet, above. 
Blanqtiizal; point, on w'est coast of Prince of Wales island. Named by Maurelle 

and Quadra, 1775-1779, and first published by La Perouse, in 1798, as Pta. 

del Blanquizal. Also has been w^ritten Blanquisal. Blanquizal is Spanish 

ior jiljjeclay. 
Blaquiere; point, the southeastern point of Mitkof island, Alexander arcliipelago. 

So named by Vancouver in 1793. By the Russians written Blaker. 
BlasKke; island, one of the Kashevarof group, Clarence strait. Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by the Russians, after Dr. Edward Leontief 'Blashke, 

surgeon on the ship Xikolai, Capt. A. K. Etolin, commanding, 1839-1841. 

Has also been written Blaschke and Bloshke. 
Blaasom, point; see Blossom. 
Blatchford; creek, in the Nome mining region, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' 

name, i)ul)lished in National Geographic Magazine in 1900. 
Bligh; island, in Prince William soimd. Named Bligh's island, by Vancouver, in 

1794. Has also been written Blighs. 
Blind; island, near mouth of Blind river, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Nichols in 1881. 
Blind; passage, between Black island and Hassler island, in Behm canal, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Blind, inlet or passage; see Tenakee. 
Blind; point, near mouth of Blind river, Mitkof island, Wrangell strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Called Blind Passage point by Nichols in 1881. 



Bll— Bill. 



10 'J [Bri.L.18-. 



Blind; river, in :\Iitk..t" island, Iribntary t.i Wran^n>ii strait, Alexander archipelago. 

Jii'fore this rt-jrion was explored it was supposed that a choked or 

ohsitructed i)assa're existed here and connected with Blind slough, on the 

south shore of Mitkof island. Lindenberg, in 1838, calls it Sul'hol pralif 

(dry strait). Meade, in 1868,' has Blind passage, said to lead to (Clarence 

strait. This supposed channel which has been variousl>- called Dry or 

Blind pa.ssage or channel does not exist. 
Blind Slough. .Vn indentation of the southern shore of Mitkof island, Sumner 

strait, Alexander archipelago, was, prior to the surveys by the Coast Sur- 

A^ey, supposed to connect with Blind passage in Wrangell strait. The 

Avestern part of this supposed (but non-existent) Blind passage is now 

known as Blind river and its southern end, Blind slough. 
Blizhni; point, on northern shore of Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. Named 

Hlizlinic (near) by Tebenkof in 1849. Has also been called Blitzhni and 

Nearei'. 
Block; island, in Tl(>vak narrows, Prini-(' of Wales archipelago. So named by 

Nichols in 1881. 
Bloshkf, island; see Blashke. 
Blossom; cape, on eastern shore of Kotzebue sound, opposite Cape Espenberg. So 

named by Beechey, in 1827, after his ship Blossom. 
Blossom; island, a rocky mass, protruding through the Malaspina glacier in the 

St. Elias region, was found l)y the National Geographic Society exploring 

party, of 1890, t(5 be covered with flowers and accordingly named Blossom 

island. 
Blossom; point, the end of a sandy shoal on southwestern shore of Wrangell island, 

Arctic ocean. So named by Berry in 1881. Erroneously Blassom point. 
Blossom; shoals, off Icy cape, Arctic ocean. Described by Beechey, in 1826, and 

named by him after his ship. In September, 1889, Commander C. H. 

Stockton, of the U. S. S. Thetis, erected a beacon on Icy cape to mark the 

beginning of Blossoms shoals. 
Blue, island; see Crow. 
Blue; ])oint, on eastern shore of Portland canal. Descriptive name given by Pender 

in 1868. 
Blue Fox; bay, indenting the northern shore of Atka i.sland, middle Aleutians. 

Named Pestsovaia (blue fox) by Ingenstrem about 1830. 
Bluestone; river, tributary to Tuksuk channel, from the south, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Bluff; cape, on the eastern shore of Kizhuyak bay, Kodiak island. Named Otni- 

bistoi (bluff) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Bluff; cape, the northernmost point of Dolgoi island, near Belkof.ski. Named by 

Dall in 1880. 
Bluff; cape, the southwestern head of Afognak bay, Afognak island, Kodiak group. 

Named Otrubistoi (cut around, i. e., abrupt, jierpendicular, bluff) by 

.AInrashef in 1839-40. 
Bluff; creek, tributary to American creek from the east in the Eagle mining region. 

Local name obtained by Barnard in 1898. 
Bluff; island, in entrance to Shipley bay, Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. 

Descriptive name given by Dall in 1879. 
Bluff; island, one of the Kashevarof group, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by Snow in 1886. 
Bluff, island; see Buyan. 
Bluff; islet, on the southeastern edge of the Sandman reefs northeast of Sannak. 

So called by Dall in 1880. 
Bluff; ])oint, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. So called bv Pender in 1868. 



il 



BAKER.] 103 Bin— Boa. 

Bluff; i)oint, on the northern shore of Kachemak bay, Cook inlet. Descriptive 
name given by Dall in 1880. 

Bluff; point, on the northern shore of Woewodski harbor, Frederick sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Bluff; point, on the right bank of the Yukon, about 20 miles below Nulato. So 
called on recent maps. 

Bluff; point, the eastern point of entrance to Stepovak bay, Alaska peninsula. So 
named by Dall in 1880. 

Bluff; pomt, the northeastern head of Kootznahoo roads. Admiralty island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Name published, in 1881, on United States Hydro- 
graphic chart 882. 

Bluf; point, the northern point of entrance to Wachusett cove, Freshwater bay, 
Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Glass in 1881. 

Bluff; point, the western point of entrance to Yes bay, Cleveland peninsula, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Bluff; settlement, at mouth of Daniels creek, Seward peninsula. Locally called 
Bluff City. 

Blume; creek, tributary to Johnston creek, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Blunt; mountain, on eastern shore of Annette island, Alexander archipelago. 
. Named by Nichols in 1883. 

Blunt; "point, in Wrangell strait, near its northern end. Named by Lindenberg, in 
1838, Zhila (vein or lode), and a place about 1 mile farther north was 
named, also by Lindenberg, Tupoi (blunt) point. This Blunt point of 
Lindenberg was, in 1869, called Cone point by Meade and, in 1881, Turn 
point by Nichols, by which name it is now known. This name Blunt is 
now applied to Lindenberg's Zhila point. 

Blunt; point, on the western shore of Stepovak bay, Alaska jaeninsula. Named by 
Dall in 1880. 

Blunt; point, the northern point of entrance to Letnikof cove, Chilkat inlet, Lynn 
canal, southeastern Alaska. Named Tupoi (blunt) by Lindenberg in 1838. 
Name obsolete. 

Blying; sound, or open bay, on the southeastern shore of Kenai peninsula. Accord- 
ing to Vancouver, it was so called by the Russians, before 1794, and called 
by Portlock, in 1787, Poi't Andrews. Also written Blyings and Blying's 
and canal Blyings. 

Boat; channel, in Red bay between Danger island and Prince of Wales island. So 
called by the Coast Survey in 1888. May not be intended for a name, but 
only designed to indicate that here exists a channel for boats. 

Boat; harbor, a little west of Golofnin bay on northern shore of Norton sound. 
Apparently so named by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Boat; harbor, in Peninsula ridge at south end of Revillagigedo channel. Visited 
but not named by Vancouver, in 1793, who describes it as "a very commo- 
dious well-sheltered little cove about half a league to the westward of 
Cape Fox." 

Boat; harbor, on western coast of Lynn canal, just north of St. James bay. De- 
scribed in Coast Pilot as "a boat harbor" and on Coast Survey chart 8300 
(edition of 1893) called Boat harbor. 

Boat; rock, in Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. Name published by the Coast 
Survey in 1899. 

Boat; rock, in entrance to Nakat inlet, near Cape Fox, Dixon entrance, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by Nichols in 1883. 

Boat Extreme. This name was given by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, to the west- 
ernmost point reached by them, by boat, in their journey from the 
McKenzie river mouth to Point Barrow. 



Bou— Boi 



1 04 [biti.i.. 187. 



Boat Harbor; point, Ixmiij: mw ..f the heads of Boat harbor, near Cape Fox, Alex- 
ander arcliipeUifro. t^<> culled hv Meade in 1869. 

liahrnf, l)ank, ete. ; see Sea Otter. 

Ji,>hr<>/, island, hi'tween Kanajra and Tanaga; see Sea Otter. 

Jiiihrof, island; see Beaver. 

Jdthrin-u; point, Krn/.of island; .«ee Beaver. 

Jiohroi'oi, bay; see Otter. 

liiihrovo'i, bay, cove, etc. ; see Beaver. 

Bobrovoi; jioint, near south end of Baranof island, the southern poiijt of entrance 
to Larch bay, Alexander archipelago. Named Bobrovoi (sea otter) by the 
Russians. 

Bohrorxkoi, mountain; see Beaver. 

Boca de Quadra; canal ( )r fiord, indenting the mainland coast of southeastern Alaska, 
east of Kevillagigedo channel, Alexander archipelago. Apj)arently so 
named by Caiimano in 1792. Has also been called Quadra bay and 
Quadra channel. Boca de Quadra is Spanish for channel or passage of 
Quadra, i. e., Quadra's channel. 

Boca Fina; see Bocas de Finas. 

Bocas; point, in Port Refugio, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named 
Punta de las Bocas (point of the mouths) by Maurelle and Quadra in 
1775-1779. 

Bnrax <!(• ArruKja; see Arriaga. 

Bocas de Finas; a name applied by early Spanish exj^lorers to the unexplored inlets 
or bays at the extreme northern part of Bucareli bay, where their explo- 
rations ended. The name appears to have intended the commemoration of 
the fact. Termination bays or inlets would seem to be the meaning. Has 
also been called Boca Fina. 

Bocas del Almirante. Some unexplored inlets on the north shore of Bucareli bay, 
Prince of Wales archipelago, were so designated by Maurelle and Quadra 
1775-1779. 

Bocharojf, lake; see Becharof. 

BorJinnoff, lake; see Becharof. 

Bock; bight, in Thomas bay, eastern coast of Frederick sound, Alexander archipel- 
ago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Bog; cape, between Protection bay and Three Island bay, on south shore Qf Unalaska, 
eastern Aleutians. So called by the Fish Commission in 1888. It is 
lanaliun or Yanaliun of Tebenkof, 1849, and Alexander of the Coast 
Survey in 1900. 

Boga Slov, hiW; see Bogoslof. ' 

Bogert; point, on eastern shore of Port Snettisham, Stephens passage, Alexander^ 
ari'hipelago. So named by Thomas in 1888. 

Bogoslof; hill (591 feet high), on St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. Called 
Bogosluff mountain by the Coast Survey. II. W. Elliott calls it Boga slov. 
and adds Boga s\o\ or word of God, indefinite in its application to "the 
place, but is, perhaps, due to the fact that the pious Russians, immediately 
after landing at Zapadnie, in 1787, ascended the hill and erected a hug$ 
cross thereon." 

Bogoslof; V(jlcanic island,, in Bering sea, about 25 miles north of the western end 
of Unalaska. This island rose fnjm the sea May 18, 1796, St. Johns Day, 
and received from the Russians the name Joanna Bogoslova, or John the 
Theologian's island. It has been called Bogoslov, Johann Bogoslow, St. 
Jean Bogosloff, etc. Its native name, according to Grewingk, is Agafih 
chagoch, or, as it may be written, Agashagok. In 1883 a new volcanic 
island rose near this one, which is accordinglv now called Old Bogoslof. 



li.vKER.J 105 Bolj— Bor. 

Bohemian; raiijj;e of iiiunntains (2,000 to 2,500 feet high), on the north shore of 

Kupreanof ishind, Alexander archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Boidarkin; island, one of the Kutchnnia group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been called Boidarka and 

Hawley. It is a ccjrruption of Jiidarbi, the Aleut name of their skin canoe. 

Boil, cape; see Mohican. 

Boil; creek, tributary to Skookum river, near its source, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Boise; creek, tributary to Coal creek, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 

irom Barnard, 1900. 
Bok, island; see Ban. 

Bold; cape, near Belkofski, Alaska peninsula. Named Stolb (pillar) by the Rus- 
sians, and usage divided between Pillar and Bold. Descriptive name. 
Bold; cliff, on northeastern shore of Hood bay, Admiralty island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Descriptive name, said to have been given by Meade in 1869. 
Bold; island, in Revillagigedo channel, northeast of Annette island, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Nichols in 1883. 
Boldrin; creek, tributary to Eldorado river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Bolivnoi, rocks; see Surf. 

Bolles; inlet, indenting western shore of Long island, Kaigani strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1882, after Lieut. T. Dix Bolles, IT. S. N. 

Bolles; ledge in Ward cove, Tongass narrows, Alexander archipelago. Discovered 

and named after Lieut. Timothy Dix Bolles, U. S. N., in about 1882. 
Bolahoj, island. Peril strait; see Big. 
Bolshoi, point; see Manby. 
Bolshoi Krieposti, islet; see Big Fort. 
Bolshoi Malinof, island; see Raspberry. 
Bolshai rukav or Great sleeve; see Great. 
Bolshoi Rukav, bay; see Big Branch. 
Bolshoi Strelki or Big Arrow bay; see Big Branch. 

Bolshoiger. Petrof, on his census map of 1880, gives this as the name of a village 
on the right bank of the Yukon, about 25 miles above the mouth of the 
Koyukuk. Name not found in his text nor anywhere else that I have dis- 
covered. 
Bomb; point, Cordova bay. Prince William sound. So named by Abercrouibie in 

1898. 
Bomchol, island; see Large. 

Bonanza; bar, on Fortymile creek, near the international boundary line. Pros- 
pectors' name, reported by Barnard in 1898. 
Bonanza; creek, tributary to Koksuktapaga river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. " 
Bonanza; creek, tributary to Salmon lake, fr.im the south, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Bonanza; creek or river, tributary to Port Safety, in the Bonanza mining district, 
Seward peninsula. Local name published in 1900. Also called Bonanza 
Cal. A late map makes California creek a principal tributary of this 
stream. 
Bonnet, creek; see Slate. 
Bonnie; point, on southern shore of Whitewater bay, Chatham strait. Admiralty 

island, Alexander archipelago. Named by Glass in 1881. 
Bophor, cape; see Beaufort. 

Border; two rocks, forming part of the Gavanski (harbor) group of islands, Starri- 
gavan bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Griada (border) 
by Vasilief in 1809. 



Bor— Boil. 



•jOfi [BULL. 187. 



Bore; rock, in eiitranc-e to Duncan canal, Kupreanof inland, Alexander archii)elago. 

Named by Thomas in 1887. 
Boreas; i)oint, the north ])oint of entrance to Breezy bay, Dall island, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Dall in 1882. 
linrbi, ifiland; see Biorka. 
Ittirhi, village; see Biorka. 
Borlase; point, (Ui the northwestern shoreof Warren island, Sumner strait, Alexander 

arcliipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Capt. Sir John Borlase 

Warren. 
Boroshkl, bay; see No Thorofare. 
Boston; islands, near the southwestern shore of Wales island, Dixon entrance, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Pender in 1868. 
Bostwick; inlet, indenting the southeastern shore of Gravina island, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Nichols, in 1883, presumably after Lieut. Frank 

INIattfson Bostwick, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Bostwick; sunken reef, in Felice strait, (iravina group, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by Nichols hi 1883. 
Botcharqf, lake; see Becharof. 
Botinski; island, not identified, near Unimak pass; mentioned by Langsdorf (Voyage, 

II, 54). 
Bottomless; lake, near Portage bay, Alaska i^eninsula. Named l)y the Russians 

Bezdonnoi (without bottom). 
Botuk, creek; see Baituk. 
Boulder; bav, indenting eastern shore of Stepovak Imy, Alaska peninsida. Named 

by Dall in 1880. 
Boulder; cape, on north coast of Kodiak. Named by the Russians 3/*V'.s pokaingo 

iitesu. (cape of the rolling rock). Descriptive term. 
Boulder; creek, tributary to the Copper river, from the east, north of Mount San- 
ford. Named by Abercrombie in 1898. 
Boulder; creek, tri]>utary to Kanata river, from the west. Name from Schrader, 

1900. 
Boulder; creek, tributary to the Klehini river, in the Porcupine mining region. 

Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 
Boulder; creek, tributary to Sinuk river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Boulder; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the west, in the Nome mining 

region, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900 and 

spi'lled Bowlder and Boulder. 
Boulder; cn-ck, tributary to Stewart river, from the south, Sewai'd peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Boulder; creek, tributary to Vulcan creek, from the west, southeast of Omalik 

mountain, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, from Peters, 1900. 
Boulder; crei'k, tributary to the Yukon, from the west, near Eagle on the Yukon. 

Prospectors' name, obtained by Barnanl in 1898. 
Boulder; extensive flat of mud and boulders near Vexation point, in WrangelL 

strait, Alexander archipelago. So called by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 
Boulder; island, in Camden bay, Arctic coast. So named by Franklin, in 1826, 

because it appeared "to be a collection of boulder stones" (p. 148). 
Boulder, island; see Karpa. 
Boulder; mountain (3,790 feet high), on the mainland, near junction of Katete and 

Stikine rivers. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 
Boulder; point, in Tlevak narrows. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 
Boulder, point, on the eastern shore of Kuiii island, Sumner strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named ))y Ilclni in ISSH. 



BAKER.] 107 Bou-Bre. 

Boulder; point, the eastern point of entrance to Portage bay, Kupreanof island, 

Alexander archipelago. 80 named by Nichols in 1882. 
Botildi/i\ island; see Buldir. 

Boundary; butte or peak (about 2,500 feet high), near junction of Seventymile, 
creek and the Yukon at the international boundary. Named Boundary 
Butte by Schwatka, in 1883, who says its native name is Ta-tot-lee. 
Boundary; creek, tributary to the White river, from the south, near the interna- 
tional boundary line. Descriptive name, published by the Geological 
Survey in 1900. 
Boundary; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the west, at the international 

boundary, in latitede 64° iC/. Local name, published in 1898. 

Botmdary; mountain, on south bank of Porcupine river, at the international 

boundary. So named by the Coast Survey about 1890. Erroneously 

Boundry. 

Boundary; moimtain (4,805 feet high), on west bank of the Stikine river, near 

international boundary line. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Boundary; rock, on the international boundary, about 15 miles north of Porcupine 

river. So called by the Coast Survey about 1890. 
Boundary, strait; see Dixon entrance. 
Bourbon; creek, tributary to Dry creek, very near Nome, in the Nome mining region, 

Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 
Boussole, Point de la; see ^Manby. 
Bore, lake; see Tagish. 
Bow; cape, on north coast of Alaska peninsula. So named by the Fish Commission 

in 1888. 
Bowhead; creek, tributary to Cripple Creek, from the east, in the Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. Has 
been written Bowheads and Bowherd. 
Bmvlder, creek; see Boulder. 
Bozman, mountain; see Seattle. 

Bradfield; canal, penetrating the mainland north of Cleveland peninsula, Alexan- 
der archipelago. Called Bradfield channel by Vancouver in 1793. 
Bradford. The Eleventh Census, 1890, reports a village of this name in the Nusha- 
gak enumerating district, with a population of 166. Location not shown 
on any map I have seen. 
Bradley; river, tributary to the Tanana river, from the south, near longitude 149°. 

So named by Allen in 1885. 
Brady; glacier, in Taylor bay. Cross sound, southeastern Alaska. Named by the 
Coast Survey, in 1883, after Rev. (afterward Governor) John G. Brady, a 
missionary and teacher who went to Sitka and began work in 1878. 
Branch; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near lati- 
tude 68°. Prospectors' name, published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 
Breakers, cape; see Burimof. 
Breast; island, one of the Galankin group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by United States naval officers in 1880. 
Breed, island; see Tanginak. 
Breezy; bay, in Tlevak strait, Dall island, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

Nichols, in 1881, on account of the strong winds encountered there. ' 
Breezy; point, on the western shore of Portland canal, southeastern Alaska. So 

named by Pender in 1868. 
Bremner; river, tributary, from the east, to the lower part of the Copper river. 
So named by Allen, in 1885, after John Bremner, a miner who, in 1884, 
ascended the Copper as far as Taral and wintered there 1884-85. Allen 
reports its native name to be Tetahena, i. e., Teta river. Often miscalled 
Brenner. 



Brl— Bro. 



108 [BULL. 187. 



Brian, islands; see Iniaii. 

Brickyard; harbor, in Long island, near St. Paul, Kodiak. Name not before i)ub- 
lished so far as known. Old Russian charts indicate the existence of 
brickyard on the shores of this unnamed harbor. 

Bride; point, in Port Snettisham, Stephens passage, on the mainland, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by Thomas in 1888. 

Bridge; point, on northern shore of Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty island, Alexaij- 
dcr archii)elago. So named by Meade, in 1869, after Midshipman (after- 
wards Lieutenant) Edward W. Bridge, U. S. N., one of his officers. 

Bridget; cove, in Lynn canal, near Bridget jwint. Named by the Coast Survey in 
1893. 

Bridget; point, the south point of entrance to Berner's bay, I^ynn canal, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Brightman; point, the south point of entrance to Herring bay, Frederick sound, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1899. This point 
may be identical with Townshend of Vancouver. 

Bristol; bay, indenting the southeastern shore of Bering sea. So named by Cook, 
in 1778, "in honour of the admiral Earl of Bristol." Grewingk has Bristol 
or Kwitschak. 

Bristol, river; see Nushagak. 

Bristolsli, point; see Etolin. 

British; chain of mountains, on northern coast of Alaska, near international bound- 
ary. So named by Franklin in 1826. 

British; point, on the eastern shore of Portland canal, near its head. Name pub- 
lished by the Coast Survey in 1897. 

Broad; bay, on western shore of Captains bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Called 
Shirokaia (broad) by Veniaminof. Descriptive name. 

Broad, cape, in Sitka sound; see Burunof. 

Broad; cape, the eastern point of entrance to Pavlof bay, near Belkofski, Alaska; 
peninsula. Named by the Russians Tolstoi (broad), and variously calledt 
Broad or Tolstoi. Descriptive term. I 

Broad; island, near junction of Hooniah sound and Peril strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Poperechnoi (across on the other side, crosswise, trans- 
verse, lying across, "thwart-ship," etc.) by Vasilief in 1833. Has been 
translated Broad and has appeared as Poperetch or Broad island. 

Broad, pass; see Caribou. 

Broad; point, between Kalsin and Middle bays, in Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named 
Tolstoi (broad) by Russian naval officers in 1809. 

Broad, point; see Tolstoi. 

Bronaugh; islands, off Dall Head, Gravina island, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by Nichols, in 1883, after Lieut. William Venable Bronaugh, U. S. N., a 
member of his party. 

Bronson; creek, tributary to Middle fork of the Koyukuk, from the north, near 
longitude 150° 30^ Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 

Brooks, harbor; see Nuchek. 

Brothers (The); group of islands and rocks off Point Pybus, Frederick sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Nichols in 1882. 

Brothers (The); islets, in Gulf of Esquibel, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named 
Los Hermagos by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. Los Hermagos is 
here assumed to be an error for Los Hermanos (the brothers). 

Brothers (The); islets, in San Christoval channel, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales 
archipelago. Named Los Hermanos (the brothers) by Maurelle and 
Ciuadra in 1775-1779. 

Brothers (The) ; see Lynn Brothers. 



BAKER.] 109 Bro— Bnc. 

Brow; point, in Behm canal, the south point of entrance „o Gedney pa.«sage. Named 
by the Coast Survey in 1891. Nose and Chin points are near by. 

Brown; cove, in mainland, northeast of north end of Wrangell strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Brown; glacier, at head of Fords Terror, Endicott arm, Holkham bay, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Brown; mountain, in western part of Revillagigedo island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Clover in 1885. 

Brown; mountain (5,800 feet high) , on the eastern shore of Portland canal. Named 
by Pender in 1868. 

Brownlow; point, the western head of Camden bay, Arctic coast. So named by 
Franklin in 1826. 

Brownson; bay, indenting the southern shore of Prince of Wales island, Alexander 
archipelago, aboi;t 8 miles west of Cape Chacon, Dixon entrance. Named 
by the Coast Survey after Commander Willard Herbert Brownson, V. S. N. 

Brownson; island, separated from Etolin island by Canoe passage, in Ernest sound, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1891, after Com- 
mander Brownson. 

Bruch; spit, off northeastern coast of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. So named by 
Berry in 1881. 

Brumeu.r, cape; see Foggy. 

Brumez, point; see Foggy. 

Brundige; reef or ledge, in south end of Clarence strait, designated in the Coast Pilot 
(1883) after Capt. J. C. Brundige, R. N., who reported it. This reef or 
one near it has since been located and named, by the Coast Survey, Hassler 
reef. It is now established that these are different names of the same thing. 
See Hassler. 

Brush; hill, on Revillagigedo island, near Ward cove, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Nichols in 1883. Erroneously Bush hill. 

Bryant; creek, tributary to Seventymile creek, from the south, north of the Forty- 
mile mining region. Local name, reported by Barnard in 1898. 

Bryant; point, in Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Meade, in 1869, after 3Ir. Charles Bryant, for several years 
United States Treasury Department agent on the Pribilof islands. 

Bryant; point, the south head of McLeod harbor, Montague island, Prince William 
sound. AVas so named by Portlock in 1787. 

Bryn Mawr; glacier, tributary from the west, to College fiord. Port Wells, Prince 
William sound. So named by the Harriman Expedition, 1899, after Brj'n 
Mawr College. 

Bubb; creek, tributary to Tazlina river, from the north, near latitude 62°. Proper 
name, given by Glenn in 1898, who gives its native name as Taiklano. 

Bucareli; bay, on the western side of Prince of Wales archipelago. Discovered by 

I Maurelle, in 1775, and surveyed and named by him Puerto del Baylio 

Bucareli, in honor of Don Antonio Maria Bucareli y Ursua, viceroy of 
^lexico. Variously called a bay, gulf, harbor, port, or sound and its name 
variously written Bucarelli, Buccarelli, Bukarelli, etc. 

Bucdeugh; sound. The eastern part of Dixon entrance was named Buccleugh's by 
Meares in 1789. Spelled, erroneously, on his charts Bucclugh. Name 
obsolete. 

Buck; mountain, on Revillagigedo island, near Nichols passage, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by Nichols in 1883. Doe and Fawn mountains are near by. 

Bucks; house and store, on the lower Stikine, of which the name is Choquett's or 
Choquette's, but is commonly called Buck's. W^as so called, in 1877, and 
presumably earlier. 



Biic— Bur. 



WQ [BULL. 187. 



Buckeye; creek, tributary to the Yukon from the west, near Eagle, eastern Alaska. 
Prospectoi-s' name, published in 1899. 

Buckland; mountains, on the Arctic coast, near the international boundary. So, 
named by Franklin, in 1826, "in honour of Professor Buckland." 

Buckland; river, in tlie Seward peninsula, tributary to Eschscholtz bay. So named 
by Beechey in September, 182B, "in compliment to Dr. Bucklantl, the 
professor of geology at Oxford." Its Eskimo name, according to the Rus- 
sians is Kaniek or Kotsokotana; according to Dall, 1869, Kiing-uk, and 
according to Petrof, 1880, Konguk. 

Buckskin; creek, tributary to South fork of Fortymile creek, from the west. Pros- 
l)ectors' name, published by the Geological Survey in 1899. 

Budd; i-reek, tributary to American river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 

Buen-tiempo, cape and mountain; see Fairweather. 

Buffalo; creek, at headwaters of Nome river, Seward peninsula. Name from Bar- 
nard, 1900. 

Bug; island, in Seymour canal, Adnuralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Mansfield in 1890. 

Bug; islet, in Neets bay, Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast 
Survey in 1891. 

Buhner; creek, tributary to Anikovik river, near Cape Prince of Wales, Seward 
peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 

Bukarelli, bay; see Bucareli. 

Bvl-ti, point; see Cove. 

Buldir; island (1,145 feet high), between Kiska and Attn, western Aleutians. So 
called by the early Russian explorers. Langsdorf calls it Buldir, or the 
round island. Variously written Bouldir, Bouldyr, etc. Buldier is the 
Russian word for hut or Jiocel. 

Bull; island, near head of George inlet, Revillagigedo island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

BuUen; point, on the Arctic coast, near Point Barrow. Named by Franklin in 1826. 

Bullion; creek, on northeastern shore of Douglas island, Alexander archipelago. 
Presumably a miner's name in use prior to 1890. 

Bulshaia, mountain; see McKinley. 

Bunker; hill, on north bank of the Kuzitrin river, Seward peninsula. Name from 
Brooks, 1900. 

Burg; creek, in the Nome mining region, Seward peninsula. Name published in 
National Geographic Magazine in January, 1900. 

Burka, cape; see Biorka. 

Burlaw, cove; see Barlow. 

Burnett; inlet, in Etolin island, opening into Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Snow in 1886. 

Burniston; range of mountains, east of Portland canal. So named by Pender in 1868. 

Burnt-; islet, near Keene island, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Obgorielie (burnt off) by Lindenberg in 1838. It is Captain's island of 
Meade in 1869. 

Bund; point, just south of Anchorage point, Chilkat inlet, southeastern Alaska. 
Named Obgorielie (burnt off) by Lindenberg in 1838. The name is 
obsolete. 

Burnt Islet; reef, near Burnt islet, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
called in the Coast Pdot, 1883. 

Burroughs; bay, in the mainland north of Revillagigedo island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Burrough's bay by Vancouver in 1793. Rendered Bur- 
rong ( burro wer) on one Russian chart. 



BAKER.] Ill Btir— Cab. 

Burroug-hs Bay; cannery and village, at junction of Unuk river with Burroughs 
hay, southeastern Alaska. Population in 1890, 134. A saltery was oper- 
ated here by James Miller in 1886 or 1887. Cannery built here, in 188S, 
by Andrew and Benjamin Young, of Astoria, known as the Cape Lees 
Packing Company. It was dismantled and abandoned in 1894. 

Buntn, rocks; see Surf. 

Burunof; cape, on eastern shore of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Burunof (breakers) by Vasilief in 1809, and variously 
written Bouronov, Burunoff, Breakers, etc. Tebenkof calls it Tolstoi 
(broad) cape. 

Bash, hill; see Brush. 

Bush; islets, near Kell bay, on Avestern shore of Affleck canal, Kuiu island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Snow in 1886. 

Bush; island, in Tlevak narrows, Prince of Wales archipelago. So named by 
Nichols in 1881. 

Bush; mountain (1,805 feet high), in northern part of Annette island, Alexander 
archipelago. Descriptive name, given by Nichols in 1883. 

Bush; rock, in Redtish bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. Named by 
Moser in 1897. 

Bush. Top; islet, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols 
in 1881. It is Goloi (bare) of Lindenberg in 1838. 

Bushy; island, in Tlevak strait, Prince of Wales archipelago. So named by Nichols 
in 1881. It is "small and covered with bushes." 

Bushy; island, the northernmost of the large islands of the Kashevarof group, 
Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1793. 
Erroneously Biugam on some charts. 

Bushy; islets, in Endicott arm of Holkham bay, Stephens passage, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Bushy; point, between Neets bay and Traitors cove, on Revillagigedo island, in 
Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 
1891. 

Buskin; river and village, near St. Paul, Kodiak. Named Sapozhkova (little boot) 
by Russian naval officers in 1808-10. 

Buster; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the east, in the Nome mining region, 
Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 

Butler; peak (1,163 feet high), on the mainland near Slocum inlet, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1888. 

Butte; creek, tributary to South fork of Fortymile creek, from the w-est. Pros- 
pectors' name, published by the Geological Survey in 1899. 

Buyan; island, south of the Iliasik islands, in the Sandman reefs. So called by the 
Fish Commission in 1888. Perhaps this is Bluff island of others. Buyan 
is a Hus^ian feminine noun meaning a turbulent, noisy fellow; also a mas- 
cidine noun meaning wharf or landing place. 

Caamano; point, the southernmost point of Cleveland peninsula, Clarence strait, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Don Jacinto 
Caamano, who had made a chart of this region prior to Vancouver's 
survey. 

Cabras; islets or rocks, in Bucareli bay, Alexander archipelago. This name does 
not appear on La Perouse's chart of Bucareli bay, which was the first 
publication of the Spanish surveys, of 1775 and 1779. On all the later 
charts it appears as here written, being variously called islands, island, 
and rock. In the late Coast Pilot erroneously Cabas. Cabras is Spanish 
for goats. 



<'af-ral. 112 [HI-M..1S7. 

Cache; rreek, tributary to nortli Hhure of Norton sound, between the mouths of 
Solomon and Topkok rivers. Prospectors' name. Its Eskimo name is 
reported by Barnard to be Orobuktuldk. Near it the Davidson-Blakeslee 
map of 1900 locates an Eskimo village called Opiktulik. 

Cache; island, in the Koyukuk river, a little below the mouth of Batza river. So 
named 1)y Allen in 1S85. 

Cache; island, in Nairn bay, Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. So named by 
the Coast Survey in 1886. 

Cactus; point, on Revillagigedo island, in Behm canal, opposite entrance to Rud- 
yerd bay, Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Cadiack, island; see Kodiak. 

Caetani, lake; see Castani. 

Caiganec, cape; see Muzon. 

Cain, island; see Gain. 

Cairn; jioint, in All)atross anchorage. Portage bay, Alaska peninsula. So named by 
the Fish Conmiission in 1893. 

Cairn; island, near entrance to Snag cove, Gambler l)ay. Admiralty island, Alexander 
archipelago. Named l)y the Coast Survey in 1889. 

Calder; bay, near Mount Calder, in Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Helm in 1886. 

Calder; mountain (3,371 feet high), in the northwestern part of Prince of Wales 
island, Alexander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after 
Captain Calder, of the British navj-. 

Calder; rocks, westerly from Mount Calder, in Sumner strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by Dall in 1879. 

Caldera; port, in Malaspina island, Bucareli l)ay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Puerto de la Caldera by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779, pre- 
sumably on account of the rough or boiling water in its vicinity. Has 
also been called a harbor and the name spelled, erroneously, Caldero and 
Coldera. 

California; bay, indenting north end of Prince of Wales island, near Point Colpoys, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883 {jt. 90), 
after the steamer Califoniia. 

California; boulder or boulder patch, near Blind point, in Wrangell strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Presumably so named by Nichols, in 1881, after the 
steamer Cnliforniu. 

California; creek, tributary to Bonanza river, from the east, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

California; gulch and creek, tributary to Glacier creek, just north of Turnagain 
arm. Cook inlet. Local name, jiublished in 1899. 

California; head, a bluff point on southwest shore of Revillagigedo island, separat- 
ing George inlet from Carroll inlet. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1880, 
jiresumably after the steamer California. 

California; ridge or range of mountains, in eastern jjart of Gravina island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Nichols, in 1883, presumably after the 
steamer California. 

California; rock, near southern end of Tongass narrows, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by the Coast Survey, in 1885, after the steamer California, which 
touched upon it. Has also been called Wayanda (misspelled Wyanda) , 
from the U. S. revenue cutter Wayanda having touched upon it. 

Calm; a high point somewhere on the north shore of Bristol bay was so named by 
Cook, July 13, 1778, who had calm weather when off it. Tebenkof, 1849, 
identifies it with the south point of Hagemeister island, which he calls 
Shtilia (calm), and this usage is followed by the Fish Commission and 
Coast Survey. Possibly identical with Peirce. See Peirce. 



BAKER.] 113 Cal— Can. 

Calming; islet, in southeastern part of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Name published by Xichols in the Coast Pilot, 1891. It is Utichi 
(escape) island of Vasilief, 1809, or perhaps this is intended for some 
derivative of Utikat (to grow calm) . 

Cahon, point; see Catton. 

Cam; islet, in Port Camden, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So named by- 
Moore in 1892. 

Cambon; cape, on northwestern coast of San Juan Bautista island, Prince of AValea 
archipelago. So named by ]Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Camden; bay, on the Arctic coast, about 4° west of the international boundary. So 
named by Franklin, in 1826, "in honour of ^larquess Camden." 

Camden; point, the eastern point of entrance to Port Camden, Kuiu island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Moore in 1892. 

Camden; port, indenting the northeastern shore of Kuiu island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Cameron; point, near Halkett point, on the Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow. So 
named by Dease and Simpson in 1837. 

Camp; creek, tributary to Canyon creek, from the east, in the Fortymile mining 
region. Local name, obtained by the Geological Survey in 1898. 

Camp; creek, tributary to Niukluk river, from the south, Seward peninsula. Xame 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Camp; creek, tributary to Sinuk river, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Camp; island, in Dry strait, near entrance to Le Conte bay, southeastern Alaska. 
So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Camp; mountain (5,300 feet high), northeast of Yaldes glacier. So named by 
Abercrombie in 1898. Sawmill camp was at the foot of this mountain. 

Camp; jioint, near the Indian village Kutkwutlu, on left bank of the Chilkat river, a 
few miles above its mouth. So named by United States naval officers in 
1880. 

Camp; point, on the western shore of Portland canal. So named by Pender in 1868. 

Camp Coogan; l)ay, indenting the eastern shore of Sitka sound, Baranof island, 
Alexander archipelago. Xamed after ^Michael Coogan, of Battery I, Second 
United States Artillery, who, in August, 1871, was reported "on extra duty 
in Quartermaster's Department in charge of wood party." Coogan had a 
wood-cutting camp here and the bay was named after him. Erroneously 
published as Camp Kogan and Camp Cogan. From the description, it is 
not certain what bay is intended. It may be either Kadiak bay of Teben- 
kof, 1849 (Nachlezhnaia of Vasilief, 1809), or Lisefskaia bay of Tebenkof, 
1849 (Aleutkina of Vasilief, 1809). See Aleutkina. 

Campbell; point, at head of Cook inlet. Named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Campbell; river, tributary to the Porcupine, from the south, near the international 
boundary line. So called by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Camp Kogan, bay; see Camp Coogan. 

Canal (The). About 15 miles below Bethel in the lower Kuskokwim is a large 
island. The slough or channel which separates it from the river's south 
bank is known locally as The Canal. 

Canal; point, at western entrance to St. Michael canal, Norton sound. Naiiwd by 
the Coast Survey in 1897. 

Canal; point, behind St. Ignace island, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Punta de la Canal by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Canal de Portillo; see Portillo and similarly for this kind of names. 

Canas; i^jlet, in eastern jjart of Bucareli Ijay, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named 
Ysla de Canas by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Canas, Punta de; see St. Elias. 
Bull. 187—01 8 



Can— <'Mi>. 



114 [bull. 187. 



Candle; island, botwecn Sineaton and Rudyerd bays, in Behm canal, Alexander 

archipelafio. So named l)y Dall in 1879. 
Outc, mountain; see Cone. 
Cangrejo; jxiint, the western jKiint of entrance to Port Refugio, Bucareli bay, 

Prince of AVales archipelago. Named Punta Cangrejo (cral) point) by 

Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. Has l^een called, erroneously, Grego. 
Canning; river, in extreme northern Alaska, de])ouching into Camden bay. So 

named by Franklin, in 1826, after "the late Mr. Canning." 
Cannon; island, at entrance to Jamestown bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago . 

Named Pushki (cannon) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Canoe; bay, at the head of Pavlof bay, Alaska peninsula. So named l)y Dall in 1880. 
Canoe; cove, on the southwestern coast of Annette island, Gravina group, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. It is a stopping place for the 

natives when waiting for good weather and affords excellent shelter for 

their canoes; hence the name. 
Canoe, island, in Peril strait; see Povorotni. 
Canoe; i)assage, separating Brownson island from Etolin island, in P>nest sound, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. Descriptive term. 
Canoe; point, in eastern part of Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago, named 

Punta de la Canoa (canoe point) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Canoe; point, near south point of entrance to Fanshaw bay, Frederick sound, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by Mansfield in 1889. 
Canon, creek; see ('any on. 
Canonakle, island; see Koniuji. 
Cantwell; river, tributary to the Tanana, from the south, near longitude 149°. 

Named by Allen, in 1885, jiresumably after Lieut. John C. Cantwell, 

TJ. S. R. M., who explored the Kowak river in 1884 and 1885. According 

to Peters and Brooks, the native name is Tutlut. According to Lieutenant 

Castner, it is Nanana. 
Canwell; glacier, tributary to Delta river, from the east, near latitude 63° 30^. So 

named by Glenn, in 1898, after Private Canwell, of the Hospital Corps, a 

member of his party. 
Canyon; creek, tributary to Fortymile creek, from the south, at Deadman riffle. 

Local name, obtained by the Geological Survey in 1898. Has also been 

written Canon. 
Canyon; creek, tributary to Imuruk Jjasin, from the west, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Canyon; creek, tributary to Iron creek, from the south, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Canyon; creek, tributary to the Koksuktapaga river, from the west, Seward i)enin- 

sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Canyon; creek, tributary to Turnagain arm. Cook inlet, from the south, Kenai 

peninsula. Prospectors' name, from Becker, 1895. Has also been shown 

as u tril)utary of Sixmile creek. 
Canyon Creek; glacier, on north shore of Port Valdes, Prince William sound. So 

named by Abercrombie in 1898. Has also been called Shoup glacier. 
Cape, bay, indenting southwestern shore of Sitkalidak island, near Kodiak. So 

named by Lisianski in 1804. Name apparently now obsolete. 
Cape, island, in Sitka sound; see Lazaria. 
Cape; mountain, at (.'ape Prince of Wales, Seward peninsula. Name from Brooks, 

1900. 
Cape Jhnu/Ins, village; see Kaguyak. » 

Cape Fox; Indian village at Kirk point. Foggy bay, Revillagigedo channel, Alex? j 

ander archii)elag(). Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. Petrof ' 

in the Tenth Census, 1880, has a Cape Fox village on Cape Fox. 

I 



BAKER.] 115 Cap-Car. 

Cape of the Straits; see Strait. 

Cape Seppings; E.«kiuio village, at Cape Seppings, of which the E.skimo name is 
given by Tikhnienief, 1861, as Kivalinag-miut, and by U. 8. Hydrographic 
chart No. 68 as Kechemudluk. 

Capones; point, near St. Ignace island, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Punta de Capones by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Captains; bay, indenting northeastern shore of Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Capt. 
Lieut. Michael Levashef wintered in the arm or branch at the head of this 
bav, September 18, 1768, to June 6, 1769, and named that arm St. Paul 
harbor after his vessel. The large bay was, however, nameless till Veni- 
aminof, in 1840, applied the name Captains to the whole bay, in 
memory of Levashef s visit. It was called Unalashka bay by the Fish 
Commission in 1888 and afterwards Unalaska by the Coast Survey. 

Captain.^, harbor; see Levashef, port. 

O'jitains, island, in Wrangell strait; see Burnt. 

Car; point, on eastern shore of Portland canal. Name published by the Coast Sur- 
vey in 1899. 

Caracol, point; see Snail. 

Caribou; creek, the chief tributary of Matanuska river, northeast of Cook inlet. 
Local name, published in 1899. 

Caribou; creek, tributary to Igloo creek, from the south, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 

Caribou; mountain, on west bank of White river, near latitude 63°. Named by 
Peters and Brooks, who ascended it in 1898. 

Caribou; pass, between the Chulitna and Cantwell rivers. So named by Glenn in 
1898. Muldrow calls it Broad pass and applies the name Caribou to 
another pass immediately east of this. 

Caribjv, river; see Cutler. 

Carl; creek, tributary to Eldorado river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Carlile; bay, shown on United States Hydrographic chart No. 225, made by Com- 
mander Meade in 1869, in Dry strait. So named by the Coast Survey, in 
1883, after Carlile P. Patterson, the superintendent. Later surveys dis- 
prove the existence of the bay indicated. 

Carlisle; rapids, in the Tanana river, between the mouths of Johnson and Cerstle 
rivers. So named by Allen, in 1885, presumably after Hon. John Griffin 
Carlisle, of Kentucky. 

Carlisle; volcanic island (7,500 feet high), one of the group of islands of the Four 
Mountains. So named l)y officers of the U. S. S. Concord, in 189-1, after 
Hon. John G. Carlisle, Secretary of the Treasury. 

Carlook, village; see Karluk. 

Carlton; island, in Dewey anchorage, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Snow in 1886. 

Carmel; Moravian mission and school, esta])lished in 1886, and village, near the 
mouth of Nushagak river. Population in 1890, 189. 

Carmen, island; see Kayak. 

Carol, inlet; see Carroll. 

Caroline; shoal, in Muir inlet, (jlacier bay, Alaska. Origin of name not known. 
First appears on British Admiralty chart 2431, corrected to February, 1890. 

Carolus; point, the western point of entrance to Glacier bay. Cross sound. So 
named by Dall in 1879. 

Carolyn; island, in Golofnin bay, Norton sound. Named by the Coast Survey in 
1900. 

Carp; island, in entrance to Smeaton bay, Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 



<'ar— <'a». 



116 [Bl-LL.IW. 



i'arr, liills; see Karr. 

Carr; ran<re of iiuniiitains (4,000 to 4,500 feet high), on castfiii i- ho re of Portland 
canal. Nanie<l l)y Peniler in 1S08. 

Carrew; point, the south i)oint of entrance to DeMonti bay, Yakntat bay, south- 
easterji Alaska. So named by Dixon in 1787. There has been confusion 
in the application of the name Phipps, Carrew, and Ocean. See Phipps. 

Carrhalcs, I*untade; see Keed Grass. 

Carroll; anchorage, on north shore of Prince of Wales island, at entrance to Red bay, 
with which it connects by a narrow passage, dry at low water. Named by 
the Coast Survey, in 1883, after Capt. James Carroll, of the steamer Cali- 
fornia, who had anchored here and found the anchorage good. 

Carroll; glacier, at head of Glacier 1>ay, southeastern Alaska. So named by Reid, 
in 1892, after Gapt. James Carroll, who in that year was the first to take 
a ship into the upper jiart of Glacier bay. Erroneously Woods. 

Carroll; inlet, indenting southern shore of Revillagigedo island, Alexan<ler archi- 
pelago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1880, after Capt. James Carroll, 
long in command of steamships in these waters. It was then called a 
channel, being unexplored. It has since been shown to terminate and 
constitute a canal or inlet. Erroneously Carrol and Carol. 

Carroll; island, about 3 miles east of Murder cove, at south end of Admiralty island, 
Alexander archipelago. Named after Capt. James Carroll and published 
by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Carroll, point; see Walker. 

Carroll; point, at entrance to Carroll inlet, Revillagigedo island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1880, after Capt. James Carroll. 

Carroll, straits; see Gastineau channel. 

Carry; inlet, off the northern end of Shuyak island, Kodiak grouj). Named by the 
Russians Carry {perewalnoi; from pereival, a dragging over or across, a 
jxjrtage). Has been called, erroneously, Perewamno and Perevainoy. 

Carter; lake, and creek tributary to Trail creek, Kenai peninsula. Local name 
puldished in 1899. 

Carter; mountain (4,700 feet high), near the outlet of Klutiua lake. So named by 
Abercrombie in 1898. 

Casann, bay; see Kasaan. 

Casa-df-Parya, creek; see Koksuktapaga. 

Cascade; bay, in Baranof island, west of Point Gardner, Chatham strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Moore in 1895. 

Cascade; creek, about two miles northwest of Sitka, on Baranof island, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by United States naval officers in 1880. 

Cascade; glacier, at head of Valdes glacier. So named by Abercroml)ie in 1898. 

Cascade; glacier, in the St. Elias region. So named by Prof. I. C. Russell in 1890, 
"on account of its splendid ice fall." 

Cascade; glacier, near Harriman fiord. Port Wells, Prince William sound. So 
named by the Harriman Expedition in 1899. 

Cascade; inlet, on eastern coast of Annette island, Alexander archipelago. Local 
descriptive name, published by the Coast Survey in 1883. There is a 
large cascade near its southern point of entrance. 

Cascade; point, the southeasternmost point of St. George island, Pribilof group, 
Bering sea. Called luzhnie (south) by Tebenkof, 1849, and generally 
Southeast point. On a recent Coast Survey map it is called Cascade. 
Thi're is a waterfall near it. 

Casfdilf, point; sec AVaterfall Head. 

Case; mountain (5,509 feet high), near the head of Glacier bay, southeastern 
Alaska. Named by Reid, in 1890, after the Case School of Applied 
Science, Cleveland, Ohio. 



UAKER,] 1 1 



Cas— Cat. 



Casement; glacier, trilmtary to Muir gliiciei-, southeastern Ala.^ka. Reid, in 1890, 

called this the First Xnrih Trihuhiri/ (of Muir glacier) and later Casement, 

after E. L. Casement, a memljer of liis party in 1890. 
Castalia; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the west, near Eai,'le. Local name, 

obtained l)y the (Geological Survey in 1898. 
Castani; lake, in the St. Elias region. "Named Lake Caetani" by Prof. William 

Libbey, of Princeton College, in 1886, "in honor of the Duke of Sermo- 

neta, president of the Itahan Geographical Society." (Am. Geog. Soc 

Jour. 1886, XVIII, 149. ) All references except this one here cited have 

the name Castani. 
Castigo, Punta de; see Punishment. 
Castilla; a supposed bay on the mainland coast a few miles north of Lituya bay; 

was called Ent'^ de Castilla, by Mala.spina, in 1792. In this place Teben- 

kof shows no bay, but has a river called Katagini. 
Castle; bay, indenting the southern shore of Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula. Local 

name. Tuliumnit point is turreted like a castle, and this bay near it takes 

its name from this circumstance. 
Castle; islands, in Duncan canal, Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Thomas in 1887. 
Castle; mountain, on the mainland west of the Stikine river. Xame published by 

the Coast Survey in 1895. 
Castle; mountain peak, in the Talkeetna range, about 40 miles from Knik arm of 

Cook inlet. Local and descriptive name, published l)y the Geological 

Survey in 1899. 
Castle; peak (10,314 feet high), about 12 miles south of Mount Blackburn, near 

Kaskulana pass. Prospectors' name, reported by Gerdine in 1900. 
Castle; rock, off the north end of Big Koniuji island, Shumagin group. So called 

by the fishermen. Descriptive name, reported by Dall in 1872. 
Castle Island; slough, one of the passes through the delta of the Copper i-iver. 

Xame from Schrader, 1900. 
Castner; glacier, tributary to Delta river, from the east, near latitude 63° 30^. So 

named by Glenn, in 1898, after Lieut. Joseph C. Castner, JJ. S. A., a 

member of his party. 
Cat; island, between Duke and Mary islands, Gravina group, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Catalina; island, in San Alberto bay, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Named Ysla Catalina (Catalina island) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775- 

1779. 
Cataract; bight, in Bay of Waterfalls, Adak island, middle Aleutians. Descriptive 

name, given by United States naval officers in 1893. 
Cataract; glacier, tributary to Harriman tiord. Port Wells, Prince William sound. 

Descriptive name, given by the Harriman Expedition in 1899. 
Cathedral; bluff and rapids, on the Xanana river, near longitude 144°. Descriptive 

name, given by Allen in 1885. 
Cathedral; mountain, in the Tordrillo range, between the headwaters of the 

Skwentna and Kuskokwim rivers. So named by Spurr in 1898. 
Catherina. "That great series of islands extending from the mouth of Cook's inlet 

to the end of the Aleutian chain, and perhaps properly including the 

Commander's islands, was named by Forster, in 1786, the Catherina archi- 
pelago, in honor of Catherine the Great, Empress of all the Russias." 

Name obsolete. 
Caton; island, the easternmost of the Sannak group. So called by the Fish Com- 
mission in 1888. 
Caton; shoal, in Popof strait, Shmnagin islands. Reported to the Coast Survey, in 

i880, by Mr. Caton and named after hira. 



rat— Con. 



118 [BULL. 187. 



Catton; iioiut, on the Arctic coast, near llcrschel island. So named l)y Franklin 
in ISL'H. Erroneously Calton. 

Caution; island, on the northern shore of Redoubt bay, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Berezhnoi (cautious) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Caution; point, the southern point of entrance to Whitewater bay, Adniiralt>' island, 
Chatliam strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in LStiVI. 
This name is erroneously transferred to another point, farther south, on 
British Admiralty chart 2431. 

Cave; point, the southwestern head of Oksenof bay, on western coa.st of Uniniak 
island, eastern Aleutians. Named Shishkova (Shishkof's) by Lutke in 
1828, who wrote it in French Chichkoff. Veniaminof calls this Pogromnoi 
second, and the next one west from Sarichef he calls Pogromnoi first. 
Tebenkof gives Pogromnoi as an alternate name, the cape l)eing near 
Pogromnoi volcano. The Fish Commission, in 1890, called it Cave point, 
taking the name from Samuel Applegate who reports it as local usage. 
"Cave point takes its name from a cave on its face." 

Cave; rock, on Amaknak island. Captains bay, Unalaska. Under it is a burial cave 
which Pall investigated in 1872-73, and which he has called Amaknak 
cave. 

Cauiaskdkdl, river; see Kautas. 

Cayman; point, in North bay, Tlevak strait, Dall island, Alexander ar(;hipelago. 
So named by Dall, in 1882, from its fancied resemblance to an alligator's 
head. 

Cedar; bight, indenting the northern shore of Hawkins island. Prince William 
sound. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1900. 

Cedar; bight, in Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. Named by 
Meade in 1869. 

Cedar; cove, in Freshwater bay, Chichagof island, Chatham strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Cedar; island, in Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So named l)y 
Meade in 1869. 

Cedar; point, in Kootznahoo archipelago. Admiralty island, Alexander archipel- 
ago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Cedar; point, near the entrance to Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipel- 
ago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Cedar; point, the northern head of Snuiggler cove, Annette island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

C'elenic, lake; see Selenie. 

Cenotaph; island, in Lituya bay. So named by La Perouse in memory of 26 
officers and men, constituting two of his boats' crews, who were caught 
in the bore or boiling ebb tide at the entrance to Lituya bay and drowned 
July 13, 1786. A cenotaph then erected on the southeastern end of this 
island to commemorate the event was sought for by a Coast Survey jnirty, 
in 1874, and no trace of it found. The island has since been called Egg 
(Yaichnoi) by the Russians. 

Cenotaph; point, the southeastern extreme of Cenotaph island above, where the 
cenotaph was erected. So named by Dall in 1874. 

Center; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the north, in the Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. Has also 
been called Wonder creek. 

Center; island, in Dewey anchorage, Clarence strait, southwestern coast of Etolin 
island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. Descriptive 
term. 

Center; island, in the southern entrance to Wales passage, Portland canal. Named 
bv the Coast Survev in 1891. The island lies in the middle of the entrance. 



BAKER.] 119 Cen— Clia. 

Center; island, on the southeastern shore of Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. 
Name published by the Coast Survey in 1897. 

Central; river, of eastern Alaska, which unites with South river to form the Chitina. 
First called by Allen, in 1885, "Central branch (of the Chittyna)." 

Chacliooh; bay; see Shaktolik. 

Cliacon; breakers or reef, in Dixon entrance, off Cape Chacon. Reported by Cap- 
tain Carroll, of the steamer IdaJto, April 1.3, 188.3. Called also Chacon 
reef and Chacon breaker. 

Cliacon; ca^^, the southeastern poi:it of Prince of Wales island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Cabo de Chacon by Caamano in 1792. It is Cape Mur- 
ray of Douglas, 1789, and Bald cape of Rowan (ship Eliza) in 1799. 
According to Rowan, the native name is Intankoon. Tebenkof has the 
name Shakon. "Sometimes known locally as Musatchie Nose." (Coast 
Pilot, 1891, p. 86. ) 

Chagafht, cove; see Shahafka. . 

Chagak; cape, on the northern shore of Uninak, eastern Aleutians. Native name, 
frcm Kuritzien, 1848. It means ditch or tretidi. 

Chagak, bay, Adak island; see Shagak. 

Chagamil, island; see Kagamil. 

Cliagavenapuk; river, tributary to the Kuskokwim, from the east, near latitude 
62°. Eskimo name obtained by Spurr and Post, of the United States 
Geological Survey, in 1898, from trader A. Lind. 

Chageliuk, slough; see Shageluk. 

Chagulak, island; see Chilgul. 

< 'Jiagidiak, island; see Herbert. 

Chagvan; bay, indenting mainland coast just north of Cape Newenham, Bering 
sea. Native name, published by Sarichef , 1826. It is called Portage bay 
on a recent Coast Survey map. On its shores Petrof, 1880, locates a set- 
tlement which he calls Tzahavagamute, which has been copied on some 
maps as Tzaharagamute. 

Cliaiag-aguk; river, trilnitary to the Togiak river. Not shown on any map. Name 
from Spurr, 1898, who wrote it Tshayagaguk. An Eskimo village, pre- 
sumably at the junction of this river with the Togiak, is called by 
Spurr Tshayagdgamut. 

Chaicliei; islands, south of Middle island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Chaichei (gull) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Chaichie, islet, point, etc. ; see Gull. 

Chalk; bay, indenting the southwestern shore of Admiralty island, Alexander 
archipelago. Native name, published by the Coast Survey, in 1896, as 
Cha-ik. Supposed to be identical with Chaqua cove of Eliza, in 1799, and 
Chaque bay of Meade in 1869. 

Chaiki, islet; see Gull. 
CliaUna, river; see Chuit. 

Chaix; hills, back of Icy bay, in the St. Elias region. Named, in 1886, by Prof. 
William Libbey of Princeton College, after Prof. Paul Chaix, president 
of the Geneva Geographical Society. 

Chakik; cape, the northwest point of Umnak island, middle Aleutians. Native 
name, apparently from officers of the United States North Pacific Exploring 
Expedition, 1855, by whom it was written Tchakhikh. 

Chakina; river, tributary to the Chitina river, from the south. Native name, from 
a manuscript map made by prospectors in 1900. 

Chakok; small stream on Kenai peninsula, debouching near Anchor point, Cook 
inlet. Apparently a native name, reported by Wo'snesenski, about 1840, 
and printed by Grewingk as Tchakoch. 



riia— riia 



120 [BULL. 187 



Chakwa; hay, or cove in Hood bay, Chatham strait. Native name, first mentioned 
l)y Captain Rowan, of the ship Eliza, in 1799. Has been called Chaqne 
bay and Chaqne cove. See also Cha-ik. 

Chalit; Eskimo village, of about 60 people in 1878, on left bank of the Kuguklik 
river, northwest of Kuskokwim bay. Visited by Nelson in December, 
1878, and its name reported by him to be Chalitmiut, i. e., Chalit people. 

Chaliuknak. An Aleut village bearing this name existed, in 1790, on the northern 
shore ot Beaver bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. 

Chaljchnikikaljdun. Grewingk following Wosnesenski, 1840, gives this string of 
letters as the native name of a small stream on Kenai jjeninsula debouch- 
ing a little south of the Kaknu river, Cook inlet. Perhaj^s it sounds like 
Kal-ik-nik-ik-al-is-lun. 

Chalmers; port, in Montague island. Prince William sound. Named Chalmer's 
harbour by Portlock in 1787. 

Chahekahin, river; see Kicking Horse. 

Chamisso; island (231 feet high), in Kotzebue sound, at entrance to Eschscholtz 
bay. So named by Kotzebue, in 1816, after Dr. Louis Adelbert von 
Chamisso, who accompanied him during his explorations here. The 
native name, according to Beechey, 1827, is E-ow-ick. 

Champion; creek, tributary to Fortymile creek, from the east, near latitude 64° 30^. 
Local name, reported by Barnard in 1898. 

Chandtk, river; see Klondike. 

Chandlar; lake, and river tributary to the Yukon, from the north, near the Arctic 
circle. Locally known as the Chandlar and said to be named after John 
Chandlar, a factor of the Hudson Bay Company. Has also been called 
Gens de Large. Apparently identical with Achenchik river of Raymond, 
1869, and Petrof, 1880, and with Tadrandike of recent Coast Survey maps. 

Chandos; point, the eastern point of entrance to Yarboro inlet, on the Arctic coast, 
east of Colville river. So named by Franklin in 1826. 

Chankliut; island, near Chignik bay, south shore of Alaska laeninsula. Native 
name, from the Russians. Has been written Chankluit. 

Channel; island, in Howkan strait, Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Nichols in 1881. They appear like two islands, but are connected by 
a sand spit. Rev. Sheldon Jackson has named the northern part Sheldon 
island and the southern Jackson island. 

Channel; island, in Tongass narrows, near Ward cove, Alexander archipelago. Pre- 
sumably so named by pilot Capt. W. E. George, about 1880. Descriptive 
term. 

Channel; islands, in Behm canal, near Walker cove, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Channel; rocks, in Kakul narrows, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Coghlan in 1884. Descriptive term. Have been called indiscrimi- 
nately islets and rocks. 

Channel; jioint, in Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Meade in 1869. Descriptive term. 

Channel; rock, in entrance to Hassler harbor, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Nichols in 1882. Descriptive term. 

Channel; rock, in middle of the entrance to the western anchorage, Sitka harbor. 
So named by Beardslee in 1880. Descriptive term. 

Channel; rock, in entrance to St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named by the Coast Survey 
in 1869. Descri])tive name. 

Chapeau; mountain (2,000 feet high), a spur of Davison mountain, east of Tamgas 
harbor, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. Named by Nichols in 
1883. 



BAKER] 121 Cba— Clia. 

Chapel; (.-ove, indenting eastern side of Bay of "Waterfalls, Adak island, middle 

Aleutians. So named by Gibson in 1855. 
Chapel; islet, near south point of entrance to Gambier bay, Admiralty island, 

Alexander archipelago. So named ])y Mansfield in 1889. 
Chapin; bay, indenting the southern shore of Admiralty island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Moore, in 1892, after Ensign Frederick Lincoln 

Chapin, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Chapman; creek, tributary to ^Middle fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near 

longitude 148°. Prospectors' name, published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 
Chapman; creek, tributary to INIinook creek, from the east. Prospectors' name, 

published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
Chapman, point; see Entrance. 
Chaqua, bay; see Chakwa. 
Charcoal; island, one of the Japonski group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Ugolnoi (stone coal) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Chariot (The). A spur of the peak of Mount St. Elias was so named by Russell in 

1890. This may be identical with The Hump of Topham in 1889. 
Charles; point, on the Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow. So named by Dease and 

Simpson in 1837. Not found on any max^ and its exact location imknown. 
Charley; creek, tributary to Sinuk river, from the south, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Charm, point; see Chasina. 
Charpentier; glacier, on the western shore of Glacier bay. So named by Reid, in 

1892, after a Swiss glacialist. 
Chasen, point; see Chasina. 
Chasik, island, in Cook inlet; see Chisik. 
Chasina; anchorage, at entrance to Cholmondeley sound, Clarence strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Surveyed and named by Clover in 1885. 
Chasina, bay; see Cholmondeley sound. 
Chasina; point, in Clarence strait, near southern point of entrance to Cholmondeley 

sound, Alexander archipelago. Apparently a native name adopted from 

the Russians and in some cases erroneously transliterated Charm. It is 

Chasen of Tebenkof and Chasina of Russian Hydrographic chart 1493. 

Has also been written Tchaseni. The settlement near it is Chasintsef of 

the Russians, Avritten (Jhasintzeff on United States Hydrographic; chart 225. 
Chastie. Lutke, 1836, applied the name Tchastie (serrees) to a group of 13 rugged 

islets "and 5 large isolated rocks lying between Atka and Adak, middle 

Aleutians. Also written Tschastiji. It means crowded together, dose-set, etc. 
Chastie. Tebenkof, 1849, applies this name Chastie (compact, crowded together) to 

some islets and rocks lying very near the south shore of Adak, Avhile 

Lutke applies it to a group lying farther east between Atka and Great 

Sitkin. 
Chatham; port, immediately behind Cape Elizabeth, at eastern point of entrance to 

Cook inlet. Surveyed by Vancouver, in 1794, and named after one of his 

vessels. 
Chatham; strait, in Alexander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1794, after 

Lord Chatham. "It was also called Menzies' strait by the fur traders as 

late as 1799." To its expanded southern end Colnett gave the name 

Christian sound in 1789. La Perouse had, in 1786, called this part Chirikof 

(Tschirikow) bay, while the Spaniards, in 1791, called it Ensenada del 

Principe. 
Chatinak; Eskimo village, on right bank of the Yukon, a little l)elow Andreafski. 

Native name, from Nelson, 1878, who writes it Chatinakh. 
Chatiik; mountain (3,510 feet high), a little east of Mount Bendeleben, Seward 

peninsula. Native name, from Peters, 1900, who wrote it Chowik. 



Clia-Che. 122 [bull. 187. 

Chayagagulc, river; see Chaiagaguk. 

Chtcholkiu, inlet; see Linnet. 

Checkers; camp, on Kuzitrin river, Seward peninsula. So called by the pros- 
pectors, 1900, after one of their comrades, nicknamed Checkers. 

Cheenik; village and mission at head of Golofnin bay, Norton sound. This is said 
to be a native name and has been written Chee-nik, Chenik, Chinick, 
Chinik, etc. Pronounced Chee-nik. Tikhmenief, 1861, shows an Eskimo 
village here called Ikaligvig-miut. It is also called Dexter Post-Othce, 
though no post-office has been established there by the Government. 

Cheerful; (;ape, the western head of Captains bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. 
Called Veselofski (cheerful) by Kotzebue in 1817. Sarichef, 1792, shows 
a village near here called Veselofski. Lutke, 1836, has V^celovskoi 
cape and mountains. An unnamed Cascade near it is a landmark for 
Captains bay. 

Cheerful. Sarichef, 1792, shows a native village, Veselofski (cheerful), near Cape 
Cheerful, Unalaska. Veniaminof says this village lies on the left side of 
Cape Cheerful, in the left corner of a bight of the same name, on a spit. 
Population about 1830 was 15. 

Cheer icqf, cape; see Bartolome. 

(Iteev'icof, island; see Chirikof. 

Chefoklak; Eskimo village of 4 huts in the Yukon delta, near Kusilvak mountain, 
visited by Nelson in December, 1878. He reports its name to be Che- 
fokhlagamiut, i. e., Chefoklak people. 

Chegoula, island; see Chugul. 

Chelekhqtf', strait; see Shelikof. 

Chena; river, tril)utary to the Tanana, from the east, near longitude 147° 30^. Native 
name, reported by Schrader in 1898 as Che-na, i. e., Chee river. 

Chenango; mountain (2,987 feet high), in the northern part of Annette island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Chenega; island, on the western shore of Prince William sound. Apparently a 
native name. On Petrof's map of 1882 in the Tenth Census this name is 
given for an Indian village (population, 80) on Knight island. On late 
maps this village is shown oii an island called Chenega, immediately 
west of Knight island. On one recent map written Cheniga. 

Chenik, mission; see Cheenik. 

C/)en/A', village; see Chimekliak. 

Clientansitztan; village, on north bank of the Yukon, about 30 miles below the 
mouth of Melozi river. Native name, published by the Coast Survey 
in 1898. 

( 'hepp, river; see Chipp. 

Chernabura; island, the southernmost of the Shumagin group. Named Cherno- 
burie (black-brown, whence also a priest thus clad) by the Russians. The 
native name is Nunik ( porcupine ) . Has been variously written Cherna- 
bour, Chernabur, Niunak, Niunyak, Niuniak, Nuniak, etc. Lutke has an 
island Tounak in his list of the Shumagins, apparently a typographical 
error for Nounak. 

Chernabura, island. Cook inlet; see Augustine. 

Chernabura; islet (100 feet high) and surrounding rocks on the western edge of the 
Sandman reefs, northeast of Sannak. Called Chernabura (black-brown, 
or a priest clad in black-brown garb) by the Russians. Lutke says Taga- 
mak, called by the Russians Tchernoboury, while Veniaminof says the 
Aleut name is Kagak Unimak, i. e.. East Unimak. Sarichef has Taganak. 
Variously written, Chernabour, Chernabur, Chernobura, Chernaboor, 
Tchernobour, etc. 



BAKER.] 123 Che— Clii. 

C]ieriiirs])ef, mountains; see Devil's Prongs. 

Chernof; cape, in Kupreanof strait, on northern shore of Kodiak. So named by 

Murashef, in 1839-40, presumably after Ivan Chernof, who made explora- 
tions and surveys in the Russian American colonies, 1832-1838. 
Cliernofski; harbor, indenting the northern coast of Unalaska near its western 

end. Named Chernofski by Sarichef, in 1792, presumably from Chernof, 

a Russian family name. Variously written Tchernovskaia, etc. 
Chernofski; native village, in Chernofski harbor, Unalaska. So called by Sarichef 

in 1792. In 1831 it consisted of 4 huts (yourts) and 44 people. Popula- 
tion in 1880, 101; in 1890, 78. 
Cherry; creek, in the Fortymile mining region, tributary to Walker fork. Local 

name, from Barnard in 1898. 
Cheshni; river, tributary to the Copper river, from the east, near latitude 62°. 

Native name, from Abercrombie, 1898, who writes Cheshnena, i. e., 

Cheshni river. 
Chedohm, bay; see Seldovia. 
Chesta; creek, tributary to Copper river, from the east, near latitude 62°. Native 

name, from Abercrombie, 1898, who wrote it Chetastena and later Ches- 

talena. Also written Chetaslena. 
Chestakof, island; see Chistiakof. 
Chester; lake, near Poi't Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. Named 

by the Coast Survey in 1897. 
Chester; port, on the western coast of Annette island, Gravina group, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Nichols, in 1883, after Commander Colby 

Mitchell Chester, U. S. N. 
Chestochina, river; see Chistochina. 
Chestohiu, bay; see Seldovia. 
Chetaslina; glacier, on the southern flank of Mount Wrangell and drained by the 

Chetaslina river. Native name, from Schrader, 1900. 
Chetaslina; river, tributary to the Copper river, from the northeast and heading 

near IVIount Wrangell. Native name, given by Abercrombie, in 1898, as 

Chestalena. Apparently this is Liebigstag river of Allen in 1885. 
Chetaut; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, at the Lower Ramparts. 

Native name, given by Dall as Tseetoht and by Raymond as Chetaut. 

Schwatka has Che-taut and Petrof Chetaht. 
Chetierek, mountain; see Fourpeaked. 
Chetlechuk; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, a few miles below Pall 

river. Native name, from Raymond, 1869, who wrote it Chetletchuk. 

Petrof, 1880, wrote it Chetlechuk. 
Chettyna, river; see Chitina. 
Chiachi; cape, on western shore of Kittiwake island, Kodiak group. Named Chai- 

achie (gull) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Chiachi; islands, northeast of the Shumagins, on south shore of Alaska peninsula. 

So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Has been written Chiache (gull) and 

Chiacht. 
Chiachi; islet, near the southeastern coast of Unimak island, eastern Aleutians. 

Called Chaiachie (gull) by Tebenkof, 1849. 
Chibukak; the northwesternmost point of St. Lawrence island, Bering sea. Called 

Northwest by Tebenkof, 1849, who shows a settlement on the cape. In 

copying his map the name of the village was taken as the name of the 

cape. According to Kotzebue the native name of the island is Tschibocki, 

or, as it may be written, Chiboki. 
Chicagos, island, see Chichagof. 
(Jiican, village; see Shakan. 



Chi— Clil. 



124 [Bri.L. 1S7 



Chir Clouih, bay and river; see Chickaloon. 

Chichagof; bay, in Clarence strait, on southeastern coast of Prince of "Wales island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by the Russians and variously spelled 
(ihichagoff, Chitchagoff, and erroneously Tehitchagoff. It is not an 
uncommon Kussian jyroper name. Admiral Vasili lakob Chichagof, with 
a fleet of three ships, made explorations in the Arctic regions in 1765- 
1766. One of the vessels of the Russian American Company, an armed 
brig, was named Clurhitijuf. The name of this bay has been misplaced on 
some charts. On Tebenkof's map it is very obscurely printed, making it 
(lidicull t(} say whether it is (Jhichagof or Chigatz. Also called a harbor. 

Ch.ichag'of ; caj)!^, on the northern coast of Alaska peninsula, at mouth of Ugaguk 
river. Named Chichagova (Chichagof's) by Lutke, in 1828, after Admiral 
Chichagof, of the Russian navy. Variously written Chichagov, Chichagow, 
Tchitchagow, etc. 

Chichagof; harbor, indenting north shore of Attn island, western Aleutians. Sur- 
veyed and presumably named by Etolin, in 1827, after one of the early 
Russian Arctic explorers. Sometimes written Tschitschagoff. 

Chichagof; island, or group of islands, Alexander archipelago. Named by Lisianski, 
in 1805, after Admiral Chichagof. First known to the Russians as Yakobi 
or Jakobi, a name restricted by Lisianski, in 1805, to an island at the 
northwestern angle of the group, and the name Chichagof applied to the 
remainder. It forms the northern part of King George the Ill's archi- 
pelago of Vancouver. The native name is Khuna or Hooniah. Variously 
called Chichagov, Chichagoff's, (^tc, and erroneously Chicagos. 

Chichagof; passage, between Etolin and Woronkofski islands, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by the Russians and variously spelled as above. Called 
also pass and strait. 

Chichagof; peak (2,600 feet high), in the northwestern part of Wrangell island, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by Snow in 1886. Erroneously Chica- 
goff on Coast Survey chart 706. 

Chichaldmskoi, volcano; see Shishaldin. 

Chichinak; Eskimo village on the mainland, east of Nunivak island, Bering sea. 
Visited by Nelson in December, 1878, and its name reported by him as 
Chichinagamiut, i. e., Chichinak people. 

Cliiclnnaref, inlet; see Shishmaref. 

Chickalobn; bay, at head of Cook inlet. Presumably a local name. A stream 
tributary to this bay, from the south, is called bj' Becker, 1895, Chic 
Cloon. 

Chickaloon, creek, tributary to theMatanuska river, from the west. Said byMen- 
denhall to be a proper name in local use and the spelling as above well 
established. Reported by Mendenhall, of the Geological Survey, in 1898. 

Chickamin; river, of southeastern Alaska, flowing into Behm canal. Native name, 
reported by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Chicken; creek, in the Fortymile mining district, tributary to Mosquito fork, from 
the north. Prospectors' name, pul)lishe(l l)y the Geological Survey in 
1899. 

Chicken; creek, tributary to Cache creek, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Chi dak, cape; see Aguliuk. 
Cliief, island, Sitka sound; see Nachlezhnoi. 
Cliirf, mountain; see Tyee. 

Chief Stephen; Indian village, on right l)ank of the Copper river, near latituile 62°. 
Name from Al)ercrombie, 1898, who wrote it Chief Stephan. Is also 
written Stiphan and Stijihan or Stick. Aj)parently it is the English name 
Steplien, derived through Russian jyrununciation and spelling. 



r.AKKR.] 125 



CliI— Clii. 



Chli/dt:, Iniy; see Chichagof. 

Chigrinagak; bay and mountain, on southern coast of Alaska peninsula, north of 
the Semidis. Native name, reported by Vasilief in 1831-32. Usually 
spelled as above. Has been written Tchighinagak and, erroneously, 
Tiginagak. 

Chigmit. Grewingk, 1849, applies the name Tschigmit to the high range of moun- 
tains between Cook inlet and the Kuskokwim river. Dall, 1869, calls this 
the Alaskan range, and says the portion of them immediately northwest 
of Cook inlet has been termed Chigmit mountains on some maps. A map 
made by the United States Land Office in 1869 calls the southwestern part 
of the Alaskan range Chigmit mountains and the northeastern pan Beaver 
mountains. Eldridge, 1898, adopts the name Chigmit for a range west of 
Cook inlet, in which are the volcanoes Iliamna and Redoubt. See also 
Ala^ska, range of mountains. 

Chignik; liay, on the south shore of Alaska peninsula. Probably a native name. 
From the Russians. Also, erroneously, Tiznik. 

Chignik; lagoon, at head of Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula. Local name, pub- 
lished by the Fish Commission in 1899. 

Chignik; river (about 6 miles long), tributary to Chignik lagoon, Chignik bay, 
Alaska peninsula. Local name, published by the Fish Commission in 
1899. 

Chignik Bay; fishing station on Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula. Population in 
1890, 193. 

Chigul, island; see Chugul. 

Chikalari. Grewingk, following Wosnesenski, 1840, gives Tschichkaliinsk or 
Tschichkiin Tan as the native name of a point on the eastern shore of 
Cook inlet just south of Kenai. Name apparently obsolete. 

Chjlcat; see Chilkat. 

Chilcoot; see Chilkoot. 

Childs; glacier, tributary to Copper river, from the west, opposite INIiles glacier. 
So named by Abercrombie, in 1884, after George AVashington Childs, of 
Philadelphia. 

Chilga. An island of this name between Adak and Great Sitkin, middle Aleutians, 
is mentioned by Lutke. Not identified. 

Chilkat; group of islands near entrance to Chilkat inlet. So named by Beardslee 
in 1880. According to Dr. Arthur Krause, the native names of the four 
islands constituting the group are Alzane, Katagiine, Nechrajg, and Schi- 
kossean. 

Chilkat; inlet, at head of Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. Name of a native 
triV)e obtained by the Russians and first applied to the inlet by United 
States naval oflBcers in 1880. It has had various spellings, Chilcat being 
most common. Also written Chilkaht, Tchillkat, T'silkat, etc. The 
native word is a difficult one for an American to spell or pronounce. 
Perhaps Tsl-kaht pronounced explosively is as near as it can be rendered. 

Chilkat; lake, near the head of Chilkat inlet, southeastern Alaska, draining through 
the Tisku river into the Chilkat river. So called by U. S. naval oflicers 
in 1880. It is Tschilkat of the Kraiise brothers. 

Chilkat, mountains; see Chilkoot. 

Chilkat; pass (3,100 feet high) about 60 miles northwest from the head of Lynn 
canal, southeastern Alaska. Local name. 

Chilkat; peak, near west bank of the Chilkat river. So called by Beardslee in 1880. 
It is Tschilkat (Chilcat Pik) of the Krause brothers, 1882. See also High 
point. 

Chilkat; point, near the Chilkat Indian village, Klukwan, Chilkat river. So named 
by United States naval officers in 1880. 



Chi— Chi. 



126 [BULL. 187. 



Chilkat; river, llowinjr into t'hilkat inlet at the head of Lynn canal. Named Chilkat 
bv the Russians, after the Indian tribe inhabitnig its banks. Spelled 
variously Chileat, Chilkaht, Tchillkat, T'silkat, etc., and Tschilkathin by 
Krause. 
Chilkat, villaire; si-e Klukwan. 

Chilkoot; inlet, at head of Lynn canal. So named from a tribe of Indians which 
has a village near its head. Also written Chilcoot and called by Meade 
False Chilkaht or Tschillkat inlet. See also Dyea and Taiya. 
Chilkoot; lake, near the head of Chilkoot inlet. Named from the Chilkoot Indian 
village on its shores. Also written C^hilcoot and Tschilkut. Has also been 
called Akha lake. 
Chilkoot; mountains or range of mountains near the bead of Lynn canal. Variously 
called Chilkat, Chilkoot, and Tschil-kut. Called Kotusk mountains on a 
recent map. 
Chilkoot; pass (8,500 feet high) , 20 miles from Skagway, between the drainage into 
Lynn canal and the Yukon basin. Variously spelled. Has also been 
called Perrier and Dejah. Possibly also identical with Shasheki of Dall 
in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 200). 
Chilkoot; river, tributary to head of Chilkoot inlet, Lynn canal, southeastern 
Alaska. Native name, variously spelled. Its lower part, between Chil- 
koot lake and Chilkoot inlet, has been called Deyea, and the upper part, 
above the lake, Krause calls Katschkahin; also written Kachkahin. 
Chilkoot; village, or settlement of Chilkoot Indians, at outlet of Chilkoot lake. 

Has been called Tschilkut and Tananei or Chilcoot. 
Chimekliak; Eskimo village, on the eastern shore of Kuskokwim bay, near mouth 
of Kuskokwim river. This may be identical with Chenik of a Russian 
Ad-airalty chart of 1802. Petrof in the Tenth Census, 1880, calls it Chi- 
miagamute, i. e., Chimiak people, while the Eleventh Census, 1890, has 
Chimingyangamute. Spurr and Post, in 1898, obtained from Missionary 
Kilbuck the name Chini-e-kliag-a-mut. 
Chimiagamute, village; see Chimekliak. 
Chimmgyangamvte, village; see Chimekliak. 
CIrimindi, islands;"^e Kudiakof. 

Chin; point, the northern point of entrance to Neets bay, in Behm canal, on north- 
western shore of Revillagigedo island. Named by the Coast Survey in 
1891. Brow and Nose points are near by. 
China, river; see Tsina. 
Chinaldna, creek; see Chunilna. 
Chinchan, bay; see Akutan harbor. 

Chiniak; bay, indenting the eastern end of Kodiak. Native name, obtained by the 
early Russian explorers and variously written Chiniak, Chiniatskoi, and 
even, by error, Tuniak. Chiniak is Aleut for a rocky, impaxxaldc, wretrJu'dsea. 
Chiniak; cape, on the mainland coast, northwest of Afognak island. Native name 
from early Russian explorers. Written Chiniakskie, Chiniatskoy, Tchin- 
eyak, and even Tuniak. 
Chiniak; cape, the easternmost extremity of Kodiak. Named Greville by Cook in 
1778. Langsdorf identifies it with Cape Hermogenes of Bering in 1741. 
The Russians usually called it Tolstoi (broad). It has also been called 
Elovoi (spruce) and Chiniatskoy. According to Tanner, 1888, it is locally 
known as Chiniak. 
Odniak, cape; see Shakmanof. 

Chiniak; islet, off Cape Chiniak, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Langsdorf, who accompanied 
Kruseustern in his voyage round the world, 1803-1806, says (II, 56) Cape 
Chiniak "is bounded to the north Ijy two small islands, one of which, in 
the language of the country, is called Giniak, the other Ugak." 



BAKER.J 127 Cl»l— Clli. 

Chiniak; islet, near the northern coast of Afognak island, Kodiak group. Native 
name, published liy the Russian American Company, in 1849, as Chiniak- 
skoi. 

Chiniak, settlement; see Aleksashkina. 

Chinick, village; see Cheenik. 

Chiniklik; peak, in the Ilivit mountains, south of Anvik. Native name, from the 
Russians. 

Chinitua; bay, indenting the western shore of Cook inlet, south of liiamna peak. 
Name published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

cliiokuk, village; see Chiukak. 

Chipp; peak (2,532 feet high), in the northeastern part of Kupreanof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Lieut. Charles 
Winans Chipp, U. S. N., who perished in the Lena delta in November, 
1881. 

Chipp; river, in northernmost Alai'ka, trilmtary to Admiralty bay, at the head of 
Dease inlet. Its supposed P'skimo name Ik-pik-pung was iniblished by 
the Coast Survey in 1884. Has also been written Ikpikpung. Is also 
called the Chepp or Ik-pik-})uk on United States Hydrographii- chart 1189, 
pu1)lished in 1890. I have assumed that it was named, about 1890, by the 
Hydrographic Office after Lieut. Charles W. Chipp, U. S. N., who perished 
in the ill-fated De Long expedition ii\ the Lena delta, November, 1881. 

Chirikqf; bay, the south end of Chatham strait (Christian sound of Colnett in 1789), 
was named "Baie Tschirikow" by La Perouse, in 1786, in honor of the 
distinguished Russian navigator, who visited this part of the coast in 
1 741 . Name obsolete. See Chatham strait. 

CJvrikof, cape; see Bartolome and Ommaney. 

Chirikof; island, southwest of Kodiak. Usually called Ukamok or Chirikof island 
and spelled most diversely. Ukamok is said to be a native name of the 
marmot, but this is not verified. The island appears to be the Tumannoi 
(foggy) island of Bering in 1741. Cook so identified it in 1778. Sarichef, 
according to Saner, called it Elkamok and Vancouver, in 1794, in honor of 
Bering's companion, Capt. Alexie Chirikof, called it Tscherikow's island. 
It is variously written Akamok, Ookamok, Oukamok, Ukamok, and 
Ugamok, while Chirikof appears variously as Chirikoff, Chirikov, 
Tchirikoff, Tscherikow, Tscliirikoff, etc. 

Chisana; mountain (3.200 feet high), on left bank of the Tanana, near Tetling 
river. Name from Peters and Brooks, 1898, who report it to be an Indian 
word. It is near the Chisana, i. e., Chisa, river of Allen, 1885. 

Chisana; river, tril)utary to the Tanana, near its headwaters. Native name, from 
Allen, who wrote it Chisana, i.e., Chisa river. Has since been written 
Chusana. Identity of this river is doubtful. 

Chisliehwi, islet; see Sushilnoi. 

Ohisik; island, on western shore of Cook inlet, near liiamna volcano. Native 
word, given by Tebenkof, in 1849, as Khazik and in Eichwald's (Jernian 
text Chasik. Commonly now called Chisik. Has been printed Chisick. 

ChislrrJiiii'i, river; see Chistochina. 

Chistiakof; island, in Heiden 1)ay, on north shore of Alaska peninsula. Named 
Chestakof by the Fish Commission, in 1890, presumably after Peter 
Egorovich Chistiakof, who wa^ director of the Russian American Colonies, 
1826-1831. 

Cliistocliina; river, tributary to the Copper river, from the north, near latitude 63°. 
Native name, obtained, in 1885, by Allen, who has Chistotchina on his map 
and Chitsletchina in his text (pp. 65, 66). Has also been written Chesto- 
china, Chislechina, Chitsletchina, Tieschenni, etc. According to Spencer, 
of the Geological Survey, Chistochina represents local usage. 



<"l»l— Clio. 



128 [BULL. 187. 



Chiswell; islands, off the southern coast of Kenai peninsula. Named Chiswell'^ 
islands by Portlock in 17S(). Also, erroneously, Chisswell's. They are the 
Aialiki islands of Tebenkof, which may be a native name. Has also been 
written Ajaliki. 

Chitchagoff, bay; see Chichagof. 

Chitina; river, tributary to the Copper river, from the east, near latitude 62°. Native 
name, reported, in 1885, by Allen, who spells it Chittyna, from c}iitt>i, 
copper, and na, river. Hayes wrote it Chittenah; Brooks, Chittena, and 
Abercrombie, Chettyna. 

Chitistone; river, tributary to the Chitina. Named Chittystone by Allen in 1885; 
from chiltif, copper and stone, the English word^ i. e., Copperstone river, 
on account of copper discolorations on the bowlders and rocks of the 
river's bed. 

Cliititu; creek, tributary to the Nizina, from the south. Called Chitty Too (copper 
water) by Allen in 1885. Hayes, 1891, says fuo means river and di'k means 
creek, and that he has usually omitted these generic endings. The water 
of this stream is reported to be of a dark copper color. 

Chitnak; native village, on the southern shore of St. Lawrence island, Bering sea. 
Native name, from Tebenkof, who wrote it Shitnak. Has also been written 
Chitnak, Sshitnak, and Tchitnak. 

Cliitnmlnmk, village; see Sitnazuak. 

Chit.^lilcliina; see Chistochina. 

ChUienah; see Chitina. 

Chittyna, river; see Chitina. 

Cluttystone; see Chitistone. 

Chittii Too, creek; see Chititu. 

Chiukak; Eskimo village near Golofnin bay, on north shore of Norton sound, 
Bering sea. Eskimo name called Chiukak-miut by the Russians and 
Chiokuk by Petrof in 1880. This appears to be the same as that called 
Knecktakimut by the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, in 1867, and 
Scookuk on a late Coast Survey chart. See also Akpaliut. 

Chkazehin, river; see Katzehin. 

('}ilach(ili<rh, island; see Pyramid. 

Chlanak; cape, on the southeastern coast of Kanaga island, middle Aleutians. 
Probably a native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Erroneously Ulanach. 

ChJehmkoff, cape; see Khlebnikof. 

Chnikchak, creek or river; see Ninilchik. 

Chock; island, near entrance to Snug cove, Gambier bay. Admiralty island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Chokfoktolcgltdtjammt, lake and village; see Shokfaktolik. 

Chokosna; river, triliutary to the Kuskulana river, from the south. Native name, 
from a manuscript map made by prospectors in 1900. 

Chokoyik; island, in the Yukon river, about 15 miles above the mouth of the Nowi 
river. Native name, from Raymond, 1869, who shows a fishery on the 
island. 

Cholmondeley; sound, indenting the eastern shore of Prince of Wales island, oppo- 
site Gravina island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 
1793. Erroneoxisly Colmondeley. It is Chasina bay of Tebenkof. Pro- 
nounced Chum-ly. 

Chomly; post-office, on the north shore of Cholmondeley sound. Established in 
July, 1900. 

Choris; peninsula, partly separating Kotzebue sound from Eschscholtz bay, Arctic 
ocean. Aitparently so named by Beechey, in 1826, after Louis Choris, who 
accompanied K(jtze]>ue on his voyage roimd the world. 

C'hurnoi, cape; see Black. 



BAKER.] 129 



Clio— Cliu. 



Chortof, island; see Devil. 
Chouiiak, island; see Shuyak. 

Chowiet; island (1,200 feet high), one of the largest of the Semidi group. Native 
name, obtained by Dall, in 1874, and spelled at first Chowee-et. This and 
Aghiyuk are of about equal size and are the two largest islands of the 
group. Billings speaks of "Evdokeeff, the largest Siniedan," and Lutke 
also says "Semidin, the largest of the Evdokeevskies." This name, 
, applicable to either, probably refers to Aghiyuk. 

Chraalrh. The Krause brothers, 1882, show on their map a supposed river, drain- 
ing from a glacier southward to the Tahini river (of their map), which in 
turn debouches into the Chilkat river. They write it Chraalch. 

Christian; sound, the southern end of Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Capt. James Colnett of the Argonaut, an English fur trader on 
this coast in 1789. Also called Christians, Christian's, and, erroneously, 
Christiana. 

Christie; point, the western point of entrance to Dease inlet, on the Arctic coast, 
just east of Point Barrow. So named by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, after 
Chief Factor Christie, of the Hudson Bay Company. Erroneously Christy. 

Chvixtina, islet; see Cristina. 

Christmas; island, in Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Glass in 1881. 

Chrisloval, channel; see San Christoval. 

C huarlitilik ; a deserted Eskimo village on the Kanektok river, north bank, about 
55 miles from the Kanektok's mouth. Is called by Spurr and Post, of the 
Geological Survey, who passed by it September 3, 1898, Chwarlitiligamut, 
i. e., Chu-ar-li-til-ik people. 

Chuck; mining camp, on a small stream, flowing into the head of Windham liay, 
Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. Local name, published by the 
Coast Survey in 1891. Perhaps Shuck, across the bay, may refer to the 
same camij. 

Chudnoi, island; see Queer. 

Chudoekoiv, islands; see Kudiako.. 

Chugach; islands, near eastern entrance to Cook inlet. Native name, from the 
Russians, who wrote it Chugatskie or Chugatzkiia. Has also been written 
Chugatz. 

Chugach; mountains (5,000 to 6,000 feet high), near the head of Cook inlet. A 
native name, obtained by early Russian traders and by them written 
Chugatz and Tchougatskoi. Now usually Chugach or Chugatch. 

Chugach, gulf; see Prince William sound. 

Chugachik, bay; see Kachemak. 

iChugachik; island at head of Kachemak bay. Cook inlet. Native name, from 
Tebenkof, 1848. 

Chugatch, mountains; see Chugach. 

Chugatz, islands; see Chugach. 

Chugiginak; rock (123 feet high) between Amukta and Yunaska, in the group of 
11 islands of the Four Mountains, eastern Aleutians. Native name, from 

I Veniamiuof, 1840. 

Chuginadak; island, the largest of the group of islands of the Four Mountains, 
eastern Aleutians. Discovered by Stepan Glottof in 1764. Called by 
the natives Tanak-angunak (land-big), and variously called Tana, Tano, 
Tana-unok, Tanakh-Angounakh, etc. In 1849 Tebenkof * called it Chugi- 
nadak, variously written Tchoughinadokh, Chuginok, etc. Tradition has 
it that there were formerly two islands which were united' by a volcanic 
eruption filling the strait which separated them. 

Bull. 187—01 9 



€llU-CllU. 130 [BULL. 187. 

(Vnujinok, island; see Chnpinidak and also Herbert. ^1 

Chugul; island (2,69t> feet high) , east of Kiska, Rat island group, western Aleutians. ? 
Apparently a native name, from early Russian explorers. Variously 
written Chugal, Segula, Sigoola, Tschechovla; also Tchougoule or Iron 
island of the North Pacific Exploring Expedition, 1855. 

Chugul; island, southeast of (Treat Sitkin, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. 
Native name, from the early Russians. Billings, 1790, wrote it TshuguUa. 
Has also been written Chigul, Tchigul, Tchougoul, Tchougoulak, etc. 

Chugul; volcanic island (4,300 feet high), one of the group of islands of Four 
Mountains, as classified by Yeniaminof. It is between Amukta and 
Yunaska. Native name, from Sarichef, al)out 1790, who wrote it Chugula. 
Yariously written Chegoula, Chagulak, Tchougoulok, etc. 

Chuit; river, tributary to Cook inlet, from the northwest, near its head. Native, 
name reported as Shuitna and Chuitna, i. e., Chuit river. Also has been, 
written Chaitna, Chuitan and Shuitna. Called Chuitan by the Coast' 
Survey, in 1898, i. e., Chui cape. 

Chuiu; river, tributary to south shore of Kamishak 1)ay, Cook inlet. Native name, 
published liy Teljenkof in 1849. 

Chukajak; creek, triljutary to the Tubutulik river, from the east, Seward jieninsula. 
Prospectors' name, from Peters, 1900. 

Chukchuk; Eskimo village on right bank of the lower Yukon, called Chukchuka- 
mute, i. e., Chukchuk people, by Raymond, 1869. Perhaps identical with; 
Takshak. See Takshak. 

Chuligmhd, villages; see Upper Chulik. 

Chulik. The Eleventh Census, 1890 (p. 114), speaks of two Eskimo villages on the 
eastern shore of Nunivak, together containing 62 people, and called Upper 
Chuligmiut and Chuligmiut, i. e., Chulik people. Not found on any map.i 

Chulitna; pass, between the Sushitna and Chulitna rivers. So called by Eldridge 
in 1898. 

Chulitna; river, one of the principal western tril)utaries of the Sushitna river. 
Native name, from Eldridge, 1898, who says it is often pronounced Chu- 
litno. Chulitna or Chulitno means Chulit river. 

Chulitna; river, the principal southern tributary of the Kuskokwim. The first 
white man to visit it was the Russian creole Lukeen, who descended it in' 
1832. Its native name appears to be Holitno, Holiknuk, Hulitna, Hulit-; 
nak or Hulitno. By transliteration from the Russian this has been! 
written Chulitna, Hoolitna, Khulitno, etc. The name first appears on 
sheet 3 of Sarichef s atlas, corrected to 1829, as Hulitna. According t< 
Spurr, 1898, deriving his information from A. Lind, a trader, it is Chu-' 
litna, i. e., Chulit river of the Indians and Holiknuk of the Eskimo. 

Chuliun; lake, south of Nushagak lake. So called by Tebenkof, 1849. 

Chunak; cape, on the northeastern coast of Unimak island, at entrance to Isanot 
ski strait. Native name, reported by Lutke, who wrote it Tchounok 
Tebenkof, 1849, wrote Chmiak and Dall, Chunnok. Yeniaminof in hi^ 
notes (I, 214) writes it Chunnak. 

Chuniksak; cape, on the southwest coast of Attn island, western Aleutians. Nativi' 
name, jtublished In- Tebenkof in 1848. ' 

Chunilna; creek, tributary of the Talkeetna, from the north, in longitude 150°. 
Name from Eldridge and Muldrow, 1898. On one map they have Chun- 
ilna on another Chinaldna. I 
CliKuiKjk, cape; see Chunak. I 

Chunu; cape, the southwesternmost point of Kanaga island, middle Aleutians. Sfj 
called by Tebenkof in 1849. Has also been written Tchuna. 

Church; peak, on mainland, east of Frederick sound, southeastern Alaska. Named 
bv Thomas in 1887. 



■'-^'^""•^ 1^1 Cliu-€le. 

, Cturcli; point, on the southern coast of Gambier bay, Admiralty island, Alexander 
I archipelago. So named by JNIansfield in 1889. 

[ Chusana, river; see Chisana. 
i Ckustidena, lake; see Tustumena. 
. Chumd-, island and strait; see Shuyak. 
Chvilnuk; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, a little above Andreafski. 
Called Chvilnuk by the Russians and 3Iilavanoff (a Russian proper name) 
by Dall. Possibly identical with Clear river. See Clear. 
; ChmtrlitUigamuf, village; see Chuarlitilik. 
Ciprt's, Puntade; see Cj'press. 
Circle; islet, in or near Revillagigedo channel, Alexander archipelago. So called 

by the Coast Survey in Coast Pilot, 1883. Not found on any map. 
Circle; point, the south point of entrance to Slocum inlet, Stephens passage, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Descriptive name given by Thomas in 1888. 
Circle; trail and mining camp, on west bank of the Vukon, near latitude 66°. 
Called Circle City by the miners from its supposed location on the Arctic 
circle. See also Birch Creek trail. 
Clalwria, river; see Klahini. 
Clam; island, in Neets bay, Behni canal, Alexander archipelago. Named bv the 

Coast Survey in 1891. 
Clam; island, in northeastern part of Prince William sound. Name published by 

the Coast Survey in 1900. 
Clara; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Clarence; port, indenting western end of Seward peninsula, Bering strait. Long 
known to the Russians under the name of Kaviaiak bay. First described 
by Beechey, who visited it in September, 1827, and named it Clarence, 
after the Duke of Clarence. According to Sauer its native name is 
Imagru. 
Clarence; strait, in Alexander archipelago. Surveyed and named by Vancouver in 
1793, "in honour of His Royal Highness Prince William Henry * * * 
The Duke of Clarence's Strait. ' ' Also written Clarence sound and Clarence 
strait. 
Clark; island, the westermnost large island of the Siginaka group in extreme north- 
, ern part of Sitka sound. Named Kliarkof (Clark) by Vasilief in 1809. 

, Clark; lake, west of and near Cook inlet. Supposed to have been discovered by 
John W. Clark, chief of the Nushagak trading post, in 1891, and in late 
I charts named after him. It is, however, shown on a Russian govern- 

ment map, of 1802, with the name Ilima, while IHamna lake is called 
Shelikof. 
Clark; point, near mouth of Nushagak river. Named Clark's point by the Fish 
Commission, in 1890, perhaps after Prof. Samuel Fessenden Clark, of 
Williams College. See also Ekuk cape. 
Clashmore; mountain (5,502 feet high), east of Portland canal. Named by Pender 

in 1868. 
Claude; point, on the northern shore of Revillagigedo island, Behm canal, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Clear; creek, tributary to the Kotsina, from the north. Prospectors' name, reported 

vjy Gerdine, 1900. 
Clear; creek, tributary to the TubutuUk river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 

Prospectors' name, from Peters, 1900. 
Clear, islets; see Battery. 

Clear; point, the north point of- entrance to Funter bay, near south end of Lynn 
canal, Alexander archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1890. 



C'lo-Clo. 132 [Bi'i.i.. 1X7. 

Clear; river, trilmtary to the Yukon, right l)ank, at Andrcafpki, near head of the 

Yukon (leha. Called Andreafski ))y the Coast Survey in 1898. Raymond, 

1869, calls it Konnekova or Clear river. On several maps called Clear 

river. Its native name as used by the Russians is Niegieklik. 
Clrar, river; see C-hvilnuk. 
Cleare; eape, the southern end of Montague island, Prince William sound. So 

named by Portlock in 1789. Also called Cape Clear and Southwest cape. 
Cleave; creek, tributary to the Copper river, from the west, near latitude 61°. Local 

name, from Schrader in 1898. 
Cleft; island, in Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. Descriptive 

name, given by i\Ieade in 1869. 
Clerke's, island; see St. Lawrence. 
Cleveland. A mountain near Mount St. Elias was so named l)y the New York 

Times expedition of 1886, after President Grover Cleveland. j 

Cleveland; passage, between Whitney island and the mainland, Frederick sound, | 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Thomas, in 1887, after President \ 

Grover Cleveland. J 

Cleveland; peninsula, a projection of the mainland between Behm canal and Ernest ' 

sound. Named by the Coast vSurvey, in 1886, after President Grover \ 

Cleveland. | 

Cleveland; volcanic peak (8,150 feet high), on Chuginadak island, one of the group I 

of islands of the Four Mountains, eastern Aleutians. So named by officers j 

of the U. S. S. Concord, in 189-1, after President Grover Cleveland. 
Cliff; islet, in entrance to Womens bay, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named Utesistoi 

(cliffy) by Russian naval officers 1808-10. 
Cliff; point, between Middle and Womens bays, in Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named 

LTtesof (cliff) by Ruf-sian naval officers in 1808-10. 
Cliff; point, on the eastern shore of Port Frederick, Icy strait, Alexander archi- j 

pelago. Named by United States naval officers in 1880. ] 

Cliff; point, on the southeastern shore of Pearse island, Portland inlet, Alexander [ 

archipelago. So called by Pender in 1868. Has also been called Base 

point and Rose point. 
Clifford; creek, tributary to Mission creek, from the southwest, in the Eagle mining 

region. Local name, published in 1899. 
Clifford; island, off the south shore of and near to Sannak. So named by the Fish j; 

Commission in 1890. j 

Clinker; plateau, in western part of St. George island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. 

Descriptive name, published by the Coast Survey in 1875. 
Clondyke, river; see Klondike. ' 

Close; bay, on outer coast of Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. Named Close 

(dushnaia) by the Russians before 1850. Has been called Close or Dush- 

naia. Close, and Doushnai. 
Close, island; see Near. I 

C/oxt'd, 1)ay; see Banks harbor. ^ 

Cloudman; bay, indenting the southeastern shore of Bligh island. Prince William l 

sound. Local name from Schrader, 1900. 
Clover; bay, indenting eastern shore of Prince of Wales island, just north of Chol- 

mondeley sound, Alexander archipelago. Surveyed and named Thomas 

by Connnander Richardson Clover, V. S. N., in 1885. Afterwards the 

name was changed to Clover by direction of the Superintendent of the 

Coast and Geodetic Survey to prevent confusion with another Thomas bay 

in the Alexander archipelago. 
Clover; passage, in northern entrance to Behm canal, separating Betton and other 

islands from Revillagigedo island. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1886, 

after Commander Richardson Clover, U. S. N. 



baker] 183 



ClH— Col. 



Club; iKiint, on Liesnoi island, Eliza liarbor, Frederick sound, Alexander arehi- 

pelago. Named by Mansfield in 1889. 
Club: roi'ks, two in number (15 feet high), 3 miles south of Cape Northumberland 
, Dixon entrance. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

' Chibokoi, lake; see Deep. 

' Coal; bay, on the northern shore of Kachemak bay, Cook inlet. Called Ugolnoi 
(stone coal) by Tebenkof, 1849. Coal abounds here and mines are in 
operation. 
Coal; bay, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northwest from the Shuma- 
gins. So named by Dall in 1880. Near it is Ugolnoi (stone coal ) island of 
the Russians. 
Coal; bay, on the southern shore of Kasaan bay, Prince of Wales island, Alexander 
archipelago. Apparently so named by Nichols, in 1891, who reports out- 
crops of coal here. 
Coal; cape, on southern coast of Alaska peninsula near the Chiachi islands. So 

named by the Coast Survey in 1882. 
Coal; cove or harbor, in Port Graham, Cook inlet. Named Coal harbor by Dixon, 

in 1786, who found "a vein of coals" there. Also called Coal bay. 
Coal; creek, tributary to Matanuska river, from the south, opposite the mouth of 
Chickaloon creek, near longitude 148° 30^ Local descriptive name 
from Mendenhall, 1898. ' 

Coal; creek, tributary to Solomon river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Coal; glacier, tributary to Tyndall glacier near Mount St. Elias, southeastern Alaska. 

So named by Topham in 1888. 
Coal; harbor, at the head of Zachary bay, Unga island, Shumagin group. Proba- 
bly so named by the Western Union Telegraph Expedition in 1865. The 
; name has also been applied to Zachary bay. Also called North harbor of 

Unga. 
Coal; point, the end of a long spit projecting from the northern shore of Kachemak 
bay. Cook inlet. Called Ugolnoi (stone coal) by Tebenkof, in 1849, from 
the presence of coal upon and near it. 
Coarse Gold; creek, tributary to the Kugruk river, from the west, Seward penin- 
sula. Name from Brooks, 1900. 
Cobb; island, near Silver point in Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by United States naval officers in 1880: 
Cobblestone; river, tributary to Imuruk basin, from the south, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
iCoblura. This word Coblura appears on British Admiralty chart of Point Barrow 
No. 2164, published in 1854, near a small sand spit in the northern part of 
Elson bay, Arctic coast. 
Cochrane; point, opposite Port Wells, on the northwestern shore of Prince William 

sound. So named by Vancouver in 1794. Erroneously Cochran. 
Cocos; point, on south end of St. Ignace island, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archi- 
pelago. Named Punta de Cocos (cocoa point) bv Maurelle and tiuadra in 
. 1775-1779. 

\Codiac, island; see Kodiak. 
Cofee, creek; see Slate. 
CofiFee; point, near the mouth of the Nushagak river. Traders' name, published by 

the Fish Commission in 1891. 
Coflfinan; cove, indenting the northeastern shore of Prince of Wales island, at south- 
ern entrance to Kashevarof passage, Alexander archipelago. Named by 
Snow, in 1886, after Lieut. Dewitt Coffman, U. S. N., a member of his 
party. 



<ol— Col. 



134 [Hri.i..is- 



Cofiinan; island, near Coffman cove, at southern entrance to Kashevarof passage, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by Snow in 1886. 

Coghlan; island (4o0 feet high), near the western entrance to Gastineau channel, 
Alexander archij^elago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1885, after Com- 
mander Joseph Bullock Coghlan, U. S. N. Erroneously Coglan. 

Cogrua, river; see Kugrua. | 

Vogtua, river; see Meade. 

Cohen; island, in Favorite channel, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by the Coast Survey in 1893. 

Cohen; island, on southern shore of Kachemak bay, Cook inlet. Named by Dall, in 
1880, after a trader of that name stationed in Cook inlet at that time. 

Cohen; reef, in Favorite channel, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Coghlan in 1884. 

Cohoes; creek, in the southern part of the St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1889. 

Coke; point, the northern point of entrance to Holkham bay, Stephens p9.ssage, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Cold; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, just west of Belkofski. 
Named Morozovskie or Morozova (cold, frozen) by the Russians. Has 
been called Cold, Frozen, ]Morozoffski, etc. i 

Cold; bay, on southern shore of Alaska peninsula, west of Kodiak. Named Stude- ; 
naia (cold, freezing) by the Russians on account of the cold winds which i 
draw through a deep ravine or gorge from Becharof lake. The native j 
name appears to be Puale. Variously called Studenaja, Puale, Pouale, ! 
and, erroneously, Stulchena. I 

Coldera, port; see Caldera. 

Coleen; mountain, on north bank of the Yukon, near mouth of the Coleen river. 
So called by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Coleen; river, tributary to the Porcupine, from the north, between the upper and 
lower Ramparts of the Porcupine. So called by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Coleman, point; see Thatcher. 

Coleman; reef or shoal in Chatham strait, off Thatcher point, near the eastern end I 
of Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Dall in the Coast I 
Pilot in 1883. The name Coleman had been given by Homfray, in 1867, 
to the adjacent point, now called Thatcher. 

College; fiord, in Port Wells, Prince William somid. So named by the Harriman 
Expedition in 1899. 

Collie; point, on the Arctic coast, at entrance to Wainwright inlet. Named by i 
Beechey, in 1826, after his surgeon, Alex. Collie. Called Kalidge on 
Russian Hydrographic chart 1495. Perhajis this comes from an errone- 
ous transliteration of Collie into Russian. 

Colling; mountains (3,000 to 4,000 feet high), on the eastern shore of Portland 
canal. Called Colling range by Pender in 1868. 

CoUinson; point, near Camden bay, on the Arctic coast, about 4° west of the inter- 
national boundary. Capt. Richard Collinson, R. N., of Her Majesty's 
ship Enterprise, wintered here in 1853-4, whence the name. 

Colmondeley, sound; see Cholmondelej'. 

Colorado; creek, tributary to Cripple creek, in the Nome mining region, Seward 
peninsula. Prospectors' name published in 1900. Identical with Dog 
creek or Ryan creek of the Davidson-Blakeslee map of 1900. 

Colorado; creek, tributary to Klokerblok river, from the south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Colorado; creek, tributary to Mission creek, from the south, in the Eagle mining 
region. Local name, published in 1899. 



BAKER] 135 Col-ion. 

Colpoys; point, at northeast angle of Prince of Wales island, Sumner strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Admiral Col- 
poys, R. N. 

Colt; island, west of Douglas island, in Stephens passage, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Columbia; bay, immediately west of Port Valdes, indenting northern shore of 
Prince William sound. So called by the Harriman Expedition in 1899. It 
is Glacier bay of Abercrombie, 1898. 

Columbia; creek, tributary to O'Brien creek, from the west, in the Fortymile min- 
ing region. Local name, obtained by the Geological Survey in 1898. 

Columbia; glacier, discharging into Columbia bay, Prince William sound. So 
named by the Harriman Expedition in 1899. 

Columbia; peak (7,500 feet high), in the Tordrillo range. So named by Spurr and 
Post in 1898. 

Columbia; point, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. Name published by the 
Coast Survey in 1891. 

Column; point, the northeast headland of Lisianski strait, Chichagof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Descriptive name given by Dall in 1880. Vancouver's 
name Lucan has been accidentally applied to this point. 

Colville; river, draining to the Arctic ocean near longitude 151°. Named by Dease 
and Simpson, in 1837, after Andrew Colvile, esq., of the Hudson Bay 
Company. On Dease and Simpson's map it was spelled Colville. The 
Eskimo name is reported to be Or-kim-ya-nook. Ray (Report, 1885, 
p. 55) says: "The Colville river was always spo"ken of as 'Neg-a-len- 
mi-ku,' 'the river at Negalek,' and we did not obtain the name." 

Colwell; bend, in the Koyukuk river, near longitude 157°. So named by Allen in 
1885, "in honor of Mr. Colwell, of the Adjutant General's Office, who 
gave me such conscientious work in working up my observations and 
making my maps." 

Comet; creek, an affluent of Fortymile creek. Local name, obtained by the Geo- 
logical Survey in 1898. It is Count creek of Abercrombie's map. 

Comfort; point, near Cape Halkett, on the Arctic coast east of Point Barrow. So 
named by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, "in gratitude for seasonable com- 
forts." 

Composite; island, near the head of Glacier bay. Descriptive name, given by Reid 
in 1892. 

Conclusion; island, in southern part of Keku strait, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by Vancouver, in 1793, who concluded his season's work of 1793 at this 
point. 

Conclusion; port, near the south end of Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named, in 1794, by Vancouver, who here concluded his survey of the 
northwest coast of America. 

Concord; point, the southeastern point of Chuginidak island, islands of the Four 
Mountains group, eastern Aleutians. So named, in 1894, by officers of the 
U. S. S. Concord, who made surveys here at that time. 

Cone; hill (551 feet high), in the western part of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Ber- 
ing sea. Descriptive name, published by the Coast Survey in 1875. 

Cone; island (300 feet high), in Revillagigedo channel, at entrance to Thorne arm, 
Alexander archipelago. Descriptive name, given by Nichols in 1883. 

Cone; mountain (2,718 feet high), in the northern central part of Annette island, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by Nichols in 1883. 

Cone; mountain (1,395 feet high), near the mouth of Cripple river, Seward penin- 
sula. So called by the prospectors in 1898. 

Cone; mountain, on north bank of the Koyukuk river, near longitude 156°. 
Descriptive name, given by Schrader in 1899. 



Con— Coo. 



136 [Bri,i..lii7. 



Cone; mountain (3,800 feet hijjih), on the mainland, about 14 miles northeast of Cape 
Fox, Dixon entranee. So named liy Nichols in 1883. 

Cone; mountain, on the mamland, about 10 miles s(nith of the Stikine river. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Cone; mountain (6,100 feet high), on the mainland, on east bank of the Stikine and 
near Scud river. Erroneously Cane mountain. Name published by the 
Coast Survey, in 1891, as Cane and, in 1899, as Cone. 

Cone; point, the southern head of Thorne arm, Revillagigedo channel, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by Nichols in 1883. Also called Cone Island point. 
Descriptive term. 

Cone, point, in Clarence strait: see Grindall. 

Cone, point, in Wrangell strait; see Blunt and Turn. 

Cone Hill, river; see Fortymile creek. 

Cone Island, point; see Ape. 

Coney; island, near the junction of Dry strait and Frederick sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Coidcdl, hill; see Potato. 

Conical; volcano, on the northwestern shore of Atka island, middle Aleutians. 
Called Koni'cheskaia by Ingenstrem, 1829, and Chernof, 1832. 

Constantine; anchorage, near Ilin bay, on western shore of Chichagof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by the Russian ])ilot Ilin near the beginning 
of the century. 

Constantine; bay, indenting eastern shore of Captains bay, Unalaska, eastern 
Aleutians. So called by Veniaminof, 1830. Said to derive its name from 
the Russian American Company's ship Constantine, which was wrecked in 
attempting to enter it. 

Constantine; cape, the western point of entrance to the estuary at mouth of the 
Nushagak river, Bristol bay, Bering sea. So named by Ustiugof in 1818. 
Also written Constantin and Konstantina. 

Constantine; harbor, indenting north shore of Amchitka island, Rat island group, 
western Aleutians. So named, apparently, by Klinkofstrem prior to 1849. 
Also written Constantin and Konstantina. 

Constantine and Helena, Fort; see Nuchek. 

Convenient; cove, in Hassler island, Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Controller; bay, near the mouth of the Copper river. Named Comptroller's bay 
by Cook in 1778. Has also been called Bering haven. 

Cook; bend, in Klutina river about 12 miles above its mouth. Name from Aber- 
crombie, 1898. 

Cook; inlet, on south coast of the Alaskan mainland. First explored and mapped 
by Capt. James Cook in 1778. Not having in his journal applied any 
name to it "Lord Sandwich directed that it should be called Cook's River." 
Vancouver calls it Cook's inlet, and also refers to it as Groosgincloose 
or Cook's inlet. The Russians call it Kenai bay. It has been called an 
arm, l)ay, gulf, inlet, and river, and the name Kenai has been rendered 
Kenaiskoi, Kenaiskaia, Kenaiskischer. According to Grewingk, quoting 
Zagoskin, the correct name is " Ttunaiskysch " bay. 

Cook; mountain (13,758 feet high), in the St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. 
Named by Dall, in 1874, after the great English navigator, Capt. James 
Cook. 

Cook, strait; see Etolin. 

Cook's rock; see Signals (The). 

Cool, bay; see Graham harbor. 

Coon; island, in George inlet, Revillagigedo island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 



baker] 137 



Coo— Cor, 



Cooper; creek, tributary to Kenai lake, Kenai peninsula. Local name, published 
in 1899. 

Cooper; island, near entrance to Chichagof harbor, Attn island, western Aleutians. 
So named, in 1855, by Gibson, of the North Pacific Exploring Expedition, 
after the U. S. schooner Fenimore Cooper. 

Cooper; island, near Dease inlet, just east of Point Barrow, Arctic ocean. Appar- 
ently so named by the British Admiralty in 1855. 

Cooper; lake, drained by Cooper creek, Kenai peninsula. Local name, published 
in 1899. 

Cooper; pass, Vjetween the Nabesna and Xanana rivers, near latitude 62°. So named 
by Peters in 1899. 

Cooper; point, on the mainland, on western shore of Taku inlet, southeastern Alaska. 
So named by Mansfield in 1890. 

Coot; cove, on the northern shore of Funter bay, Admiralty island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1890. 

Copleston; mountain, near Camden bay, on the Arctic coast. So named by Frank- 
lin, in 1826, "in honour of Dr. Copleston, provost of Oriel College, now 
Bishop Landaff." Erroneously Coplestone and Coppleston. 

Coply; reef, near Keene island, Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Coposo; island, in Port Real Marina, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Ysla Coposo (tufted) by ^laurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Copper; bay, in the northeastern part of Prince "William sound. Name published 
by the Coast Survey in 1900. 

Copper; creek, tributary to the Kotsina, from the south. Prospectors' name, from 
Gerdine, 1900. 

Copper; creek, tributary to Nugget creek, from the south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Copper; lake, on Unalaska island, eastern Aleutians. Veniaminof, getting his 
information from the natives, says (I, 171): "Near 3Iakushin bay, 
between a long isthmus and Tarasof bay, in the mountain, is a lake on 
whose shores native copper occurs." Name not heretofore used. 

Copper; mountain peak (5,000 feet high), and range on eastern shore of Prince 
William sound. So named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Copper; point, in Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Nichols in 1883. 

Copper; river, in central Ala.ska. Discovered by Nagaief, in 1781, and named Cop- 
per (miednaia), on account of the reported existence of copper in its 
vicinity. The native name is Atna, i. e.. At river. Often called the Atna 
or Copper. 

Copper Center; mining camp or village, on the Copper river. Prospectors' name, 
first published in 1898. About 300 miners and prospectors wintered here 
in 1898-99. 

Copper Citi/; see Yaldes. 

Copper Mountain; point, on the northeastern shore of Prince William sound. So 
named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Copper River; plateau between Copper and Sushitna rivers, about latitude 62°. 
Named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Cora; creek, debouching between capes Douglas and Woolley, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Cora; point, the northeastern point of Coronation island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Snow in 1886. 

Coral; rocks off the southwest end of Montague island. Prince William sound. This 
name appears to have been first applied by the Coast Survey in 1868. 



Cor— Cor. 



138 [Bnu..is7. 



Corbin; ghu-icr and pass, neai Valdcs, Prince William sound. Named by Aber- 
erund)ie, in 1898, after Adjt. Cien. Henry Clark Corbin, U. S. A. 

Cordova; bay, indenting the eastern shore of Prince William sound. The first 
publication of the name appears to be on chart 11 of Vancouver's atlas 
(1798), where it is called Pto. Cordova, a name either given by Vancouver 
or atlopted by him from the Spaniards. 

Cordova; bay, on the northern shore of Dixon entrance in Prince of Wales island, 
• Alexander archipelago. The name Puerto Cordova y (Jordova appears to 
have been first applied by Caamafio, in 1792, and published by Vancouver 
in 1798. 

Cork; islet, in Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So named by 
Glass in 1881. 

Corlies; group of two islets, on eastern shore of Tlevak strait, opposite View cove, 
in Dall island, Alexander archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1882, after Rev. 
AV. H. R. Corlies, of Philadelphia, a missionary who began work in Alaska 
in 1879. Sheldon Jackson has named the north one Rankin and the south 
one Young. 

Corlies; point, the nortli point of entrance to Sawmill cove, Howkan strait, Cordova 
bay, Alexander archipelago. Named l:)y Sheldon Jackson, after Rev. 
AVilliam Henry Richards Corlies. 

Cormorant; rock, near the entrance to Lituya bay, southeastern Alaska. Named 
Cormorants by La Perouse in 1786. 

Corner; mountain, on south side of Silver bay, at the corner or angle where the 
bay turns to the southeast, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Uglovaia (corner) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Cornwall; ridge, on east side of Copper river, north of Mount Sanford. Named 
by Lowe, in 1898, after John Cornwall, a member of his party. Erro- 
neously Corwells and Cornwell. 

Cornwallis; point, the north head of Liscome bay, Dall island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Name published by the Hydrographic Office in 1882 and perhai)S 
earlier. 

Cornwallis; point, the north point of entrance to Saginaw bay, Kuiu island, Fred- 
erick sound, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Coronados; group of islands, in eastern part of Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archi- 
pelago. Named Los Coronados (tonsured priests), by Maurelle and 
Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Coronation; island, at junction of Sumner and Chatham straits, southeast of Cape 
Ommaney, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Van- 
couver in September, 1793, "the day of our passing it having been the 
anniversary of that happy event" (II, 423). Koronatsie of the Russians. 

Coronation, islands; see Spanish. 

(Jonrdh, ridge; see Cornwall. 

Corwin; cape, the southeasternmost point of Nunivak island, Bering sea. So called 
by Tebenkof, in 1849, after Capt. Mikhail Nikolaevich Vasilief, I. N., of the 
Otkrietie (discovery), who, in 1821, discovered Nunivak island. The Rus- 
sian Hydrographic office, 1852, called it Etolin and the Coast Survey has 
recently called it Corwin. 

Corwin; (iliffs, in the St. Elias region. So named by I. C. Russell, in 1890, after the 
U. S. R. M. steamer Corwin. 

Corwin; coal mine, on Arctic coast, east of Cape Lisburne. Definitely located and 
used by Captain Hooper, of the U. S. revenue cutter Corwin, in July, 
1880, and named after his vessel. 

Corwin; lagoon, on the Arctic coast, between Cape Seppings and Cape Krusenstern. 
Named by the Coast Survey, in 1884, after the U. S. revenue cutter Coruin. 



i 



BAKEK.J 139 Cor-CoW. 

Corwin; rock, in the group of is^hiuds of the Four Mountains, eastern Aleutians. 80 

named, in 1894, by oUicers of the U. S. S. Omcord, after the U. S. revenue 

cutter (hnrin. 
Cosinas; point, on the southern shore of Port Asumcion, Bucareli hay. Prince of 

Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Cosinas bv Maurelle and Quadra in 

1775-1779. 
Cosmos; cove, on the northeastern shore of Earanof island, C-hatham strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by ]\Ioore, in 1895, after the surveying steamer 

Patter><o)t')i steam launi-h Cosotxis. 
Cosmos; point, on the northeastern shore of Mitkof island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Thomas, in 1887, after the steam launch of the Coast Survey 

steamer Patterson. 
Cosmos; range of mountains (;^,900 feet high), on the mainland near Thomas bay, 

Frederick sound. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after the steam launch 

Cosmos attached to the Coast Survey steamer Patterson. 
Cottonwood; group of low wooded islands, at mouth of the Stikine river. So named 

Ijy Thomas in 1887. 
< '(illiiiiipood, point; see Martin. 
Council; mining camp and post-office, on the Niukluk river, at mouth of Ophir 

creek, in the Eldorado mining district, Seward peninsula. Called Council 

City by the prospectors. A post-office was established here in September, 

1899, and named Council. 
Count, creek; see Comet. 

Countess; point, on the western shore of Prince William sound. Named by Van- 
couver, in 1794, "after Captain Countess, of the navy." 
Course; point, in Narrow strait, on northern shore of Kodiak. Named Kursa (course, 

of a ship) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Course, point; see Turn. 

Couverden; island, at junction of Lynn canal and Chatham and Icy straits, Alexan- 
der archipelago. Apparently so named by Meade in 1869. 
Couverden; i^oint, the southwestern point of entrance to Lynn canal, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1794, after the seat of his ancestors 

(III, 245). 
Cove (The); cove, in San Antonio bay, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Called "The Cove" (El Puertezuelo) by Maurelleand Quadrain 1775-1779. 
Cove; hill (619 feet high) , on the mainland, nearly east of Cape Fox, Dixon entrance. 

So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Cove; islet, near Applegate cove, in Izembek bay, Alaska peninsula. So named by 

the Fish Commission in 1888. 
Cove; mountain, near Ward cove, in the western part of Revillagigedo island, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1886. 
Cove; point, on Raspberry island, on the northern shore of Kupreanof strait, Kodiak 

group. Named Bukti (bight or cove) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Cove; point, on the northeastern shore of Glass peninsula. Admiralty island, Stephens 

passage, Alexander archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 

1893. Descrijjtive term. 
Cirr, point, the southern point of entrance to Kah Shakes cove, Revillagigedo 

channel, Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1883. 

Name not found on any map and presumably obsolete. 
<'(ire, point, Wrangell strait; see Mountain. 
Corearak, tract and river; see Kaviruk. 
Cor-vee-arak, tract and river; see Kaviruk. 
Cow: island, between Annette and Percy islands, Gravina group, Clarence strait, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1886. 



I'ow-Cra. 140 iRi'M,. 1.S7. 

Cowpen; ))av and river, on tlie iiorllu'rn sliore of Prince William .^uiuid. l.oral 
name, reported by (Jlass in 1898. 

Cox; laixling, on Klntina river, at or near foot of "The (Joi^re." Name from Aber- 
croinbie, 1898. 

Coyote; creek, tributary to Gnuitley harbor, from tlie south, Seward ])eninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Cojiuk-id-, river; see Koyukuk. 

Cozian; leef, in Peril strait, Alexander archii>elago. Named after Anton George 
Cozian, a native of Dalmatia, and long a pilot in the employment of the 
Russian American Company. This reef was discovered by him and named 
after liim by naval officers in 1880. Said also to have been called Nikolas 
rock, after the steamer Nikolas, which touched upon it in 1854. The name 
has also been erroneously written Cozain and Kozian. 

Crab; cove, at the head of Funter bay, near the junction of Lynn canal and Chatham 
strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by Mansfield in 1890. 

Crab; point, on the western shore of Tamgas harbor, Annette island, Alexander 
ari'hipelago. Apparently so named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Crafton; island, northwest of Knight island, in western part of Prince AV^illiam 
sound. Name from Schrader, 1900. 

Craig; jioint, on the northeastern coast of Zarembo island, the northwestern point 
of entrance to Stikine strait, Alexander archipelago. Named ])y Van- 
couver in 1793 (II, 400). 

Craig; sunken rock, in entrance to Nakat inlet. Named by Nichols, in 1888, j)re- 
sumably after Commander Joseph Edgar Craig, U. S. N. 

Cranberry; peak (5,200 feet high), near Cranberry marsh, on the northern shore 
of Klutina lake. So named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Cranberry Marsh; name used by the prospectors to designate the flat marshy 
mouth of the valley northwest of Klutina lake. Name published in 1899. 

Crane; cove, near Hot Springs bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Zhuravlina (crane) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Crater; creek, tributary to Kruzgamejia river, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Crater; hill, an extinct volcanic crater, in western part of St. Paul island, Pribilof 
islands, Bering sea. Name pu1>lished, in 1875, by the Coast Survey. 

Crater; lake, near Chaix hills, in the St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. Named 
by Prof. William Libbey, of Princeton College, in 1886. Descriptive term. 

Crater; mountain or hill (633 feet high), about 7 miles south of St. Michael, Norton 
sound. So named by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Crater; peak, near head of Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. Named In- Russell 
in 1890. 

Crater; point, the southeastern point of Otter island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. 
So named by Elliott, in 1874, who, in his notes accompanying his map of 
St. Paul, in his Seal Fisheries of Alaska, 1881, says: "A slight mistake of 
the engraver causes Crater point to appear as a bifurcated tongue. It is 
not so; but there is a funnel-shaped cavity here plainly emarginated from 
the sea, and on that extreme point constituting and giving to it this name." 

Craven; point, the southeastern extreme of Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Meade, in 1869, after Admiral Thomas Tingey Craven, U. S. N. 
Erroneously Graven. Has also been called Point Williams by Homfray 
and Tliakinikut by Tebenkof. The correct native name is said to be 
T'liankhini. 

Crawfish; inlet, indenting the outer coast of Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by the Russians Rakof or Rakovoi, from Rak (crawfish). Has 
also been called Rokovoy. 



BAKER.1 141 



^I^^— Cro. 



Creadon; river, tributary to Khiane lake, from the ea^t, near latitude 62° So 

ralle.i by Teters in 1899. 
Creek; point, on the eastern ^hore oi Tamgas harbor, Annette island, Alexander 
arehii)elago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. It is at or near the 
mouth of a ereek. 
Creek; point, on the southwestern shore of Halleck island, Ulf;a strait, Alexander 

an-hipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1885. 
Creig, mountain; see Greig. 

Crescent; low san.ly island, in front of Elson bay, Arctic coast, just east of Point 

Barrow. So named by the British Admiralty in 1853. Descriptive name. 

Crete; creek, debouching between capes Douglas and^ Woolley, Seward peninsula. 

Xame from Barnard, 1900. 
Crib; point, on the mainland, near head of Port Snettisham, Stephens passage, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1888. 
Crillon; glacier, near Mount Crillon, in the southern part of the St. Elias alps, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named by Dall in 1874. 
Crillon; mountain (15,900 feet high), in the southern part of the St. Elias region, 
southeastern Alaska. So named by La Perouse, in 1786, after the French 
minister of marine. 
Cripple; creek or river, in the Nome mining region, Seward ])eninsula. Named by 

the prospectors, in 1898, after the famous Cripple Creek in Colorado. 
Cripple; creek, tributary to ^Mission creek, from the east, in the Eagle mining 

region. Prospectors' name, published in 1899. 
Cripple; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the south, near lati- 
tude 67°. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 
Cristina; islet, in Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. So named by Mau- 

relle and Quadra in 1775-1779. Has also been w^ritten Christina. 
Crooked; creek, tributary to Birch creek, from the west, near Circle city. Descrip- 
tive name, published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 
Crooked; creek, tributary to headwaters of Ophir creek, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Crooked; creek, tributary to Seventymile creek, from the north, in the Eagle min- 
ing region. Local name, published by the Geological Survey in 1899. 
Crooked; island, in St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Krivoi (crooked) l)y the 

Russians in 1809. 
Crooked; island, one of the Walrus island group, in northern part of Bristol bay, 
Bering sea. So called by the Fish Commission in 1890. Apparently 
identical with Nizkoi (low ) of Sarichef,-1826, and Ugushtuof Tebenkof, 1849. 
Crooked, island, Yakutat bay; see Kriwoi. 
Crooked, river; see Igushik. 
Crooze, island; see Kruzof. 

Cross ; cape, on the western coast of Yakobi island, Alexander archipelago. Described 
by Cook, in 1778, as "a high promontory" and named Cross from having 
passed it on Holy Cross day, ]May 3. 
Cross; cape, the northeastern point of Unga island, Shumagin group. Named Krest 

(cross) by the Russians. 
Gross, cape; see Bingham. 
Ooss, cape; see Theodore. 

Cross; gulch, in Port Santa Cruz, Suemez island. Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Arroyo de la Cruz (gulch of the cross) bv Maurelle and Quadra, 
1775-1779. 
Cross, harbor, Kruzof island; see Krestof. 

Cross; hill, on Northeast point, St. Paul island, Pril)ilof group, Bering sea. So 
called by Elliott in 1874. Perhaps this is the local name. 



Cro-CHb. 142 [Bri.i..l.S7. 

Cross; island an<l strait, in San Christoval channel, But-areli l)ay. Prince of Wales 
archipelago. Xamed Canos y Ysla de la Cruz by Maurelle and Quadra in 
177.V-1779. 

CrosK, island, north of Sitka sound; see Krestof. 

Cross; island, the westernmost of the Midway islands, (m the Arctic coast, east of 
the mouth of the Colville river. So named by Lieut. Commander Charles 
Herbert Stockton, of the U. S. S. Thetis, in 1889, because a wooden cross 
has been erected on the island by the whalers. 

Cross; islet, "small and wooded," in Portland canal, just north of Halibut bay. 
So called by Nichols in the Coast Pilot, 1891, p. 70. Not named on any 
chart. 

Cross; mountain (2,597 feet high), near Sitka, on Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Apparently so named by Davidson in 1869. 

Cross, point, Krestof island; see Kresta. 

Cross, i)ort; see Krestof. 

Cross; sound, between the mainland and Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. 
Discovered by Cook, May 3, 1778, and named Cross sound, after this day, 
designated in the calendar as Holy Cross day. By the Russians this has 
been called Lohtianoi (icy) and Kresta (cross); by the Spaniards Puerto 
de la Cruz. Variously called Cross sound or Icy strait. Both names are 
now in use. Cross sound for the western and Icy strait for the eastern part. 

Cross, strait, north of Sitka; see Krestof. 

Cross Cape; rocks, off Cape Cross, Yakobi island, Alexander archipelago. So called 
by Dall in 1880. 

Cross-wise; island, in southern entrance to Nakwasina passage, Baranof island, 
Alexander archipelago. Named Poperechnoi (crosswise) by A'asilief in 
1809. 

Crow; creek, tributary to Glacier creek, near the head of Turnagain arm. Local 
name, published by the Geological Survey in 1899. 

Crow; island, in Redoubt bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So called by 
the Coast Survey in 1898. On the old Russian chart of 1809 it is called 
Korga. 

Crow; island, in Sawmill cove, Howkan strait, Dall island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Nichols in 1881. Slieldon Jackson has named it James. 

Crow^; island, one of the Middle island group, in Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Voronie (the raven, corvus corax) by Vasilief in 1809. The Rus- 
sian dictionaries give roronie as the adjective form of voron, a raven or crow. 
Elliott gives Varrone as the Russian for raven, while Dall gives the form 
Varonie, translating it crotr. Has been erroneously called Blue island, 
while one chart gives Crow, Voroni, or Blue island. 

Crow; point, on San Fernando island, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Punta del Cuerbo (crow) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1776-1779. 

Croyere, Isles de la; see Hazy. 

Crucifix; mountain, in the pass between the headwaters of the Skwentna and Kus- 
kokw'im rivers. So called by Spurr in 1898. Not shown on the map. 

Cruz, Puerto de la; see Cross. 

Cub; creek, tributary to Sixmile creek, from the west, at Sunrise, Kenai peninsula. 
Prospectors' name, from Becker, 1895. 

Cub; i)oint, between Boulder and Fox bays in Stepovak bay, Alaska jieninsula. 
Named l)y Dall in 1880. 

Cuban; gulch, on left bank of the Yukon, 6 miles above Eagle, eastern Alaska. 
Prospectors' name, published Viy the Geological Survey in 1899. 

Cube; ])oint, the southern head of Square cove, near northern end of C!hathara 
strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Dall in 1880. 



I 



«*KER.] 143 Cud— Dag. 

CudaJiy; post, on the west Ijank of the Yukon, near mouth of Fortymile creek. 
Also called Fort Cudahy. The above form, Cudahy, has been adopted by 
the Canadian Board on Geographic names. 

Culebrina; island, in eastern part of Bucareli l)ay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Culebrina (culverin) l)y 3Iaurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Culross; point, near Port Wells, on the northwestern shore of Prince William sound. 
So named by Vancouver in 1794. Erroneously Cull Eoss and Gulrass. 

Cupola; peak, near the head of Silver bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Kupolnaia (cui^ola) by the Russians. 

Curlew; ledge, in Funter bay, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Mansfield in 1890. 

Curlew; point, on the northwestern coast of Revillagigedo island, being the south- 
west jioint of entrance to Behm narrows, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Current; cape, on the northern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak group. Strong 
currents flow between Shuyak and Afognak islands, and the cape on the 
Afognak shore of the narrow strait separating the islands was named by 
ilurashef, in 1839—10, Silnago techenia (of strong current). Hence the name 
which on all the American charts is erroneously applied to a point farther 
east. 

Curtis; creek, tributary to the Koksuktapaga river, from the south, Seward penin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Curtis; gulch, on the western shore of Klutina lake. Apparently a prospectors' 
name; reported by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Curve; mountain, in California ridge, on Gravina island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Cushing; glacier and plateau, at head of Glacier bay. So named by Eeid, after 
Prof. Henry Piatt Cushing, one of his companions, in 1890. In Reid's 
account, published in 1892 (Nat. Geog. Mag., vol. iv), the plateau is called 
"Northwest tributary" of Muir glacier. 

Custom House; cove, on the western shore of Mary island, Revillagigedo channel, 
Alexander archipelago. A custom-house which existed here for some 
years was moved to Ketchikan in 1900. 

Cutler; river, tributary to theNoatak, from the south, near longitude 158°, north- 
western Alaska. Origin of name not discovered. First applied by the 
• Coast Survey in 1890. Has recently been called Caribou river. 

Cutter; two rocks, awash, in Revillagigedo channel, at entrance to Carroll inlet, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Cyane ; peak, on the mainland, north of Frederick sound, near Farragut bay. Named 
by Thomas, in 1887, after a vessel of that name. 

Cygnet; island, at mouth of ^link bay, Boca de Quadra, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Cypress; point, on the eastern shore of Port Refugio, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales 
archipelago. Named Punta de Cipres (cypress point) by Maurelle and 
Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Darhhiziig; cape, on Seduction tongue, northwest of Seduction jtoint, Lynn canal, 
southeastern Alaska. Native name, reported by the Krause brothers in 
1882 as Dachlazug. 

Dagelet; mountain (9,708 feet high), in the southern part of the St. Elias alps. So 
named by Dall, in 1874, after Lepaute Dagelet, the astronomer of f-a 
Perouse's expedition to this coast in 1786. Often written D'Agelet. 

Dagitli; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the north, near longitude 157°. 
Native name, reported by Allen, in 1885, as Doggetlooscat and Dogget- 
looskat. Schrader writes it Doggetiikakat. See Kakat. 



Dag-Dan. 144 [bull. 187. 

Dagorashapka; mountain, on tlie north bank of the Yukon, about 25 miles l)elo\v 
Koj^erefski. So called })y Raymond in 1869. Not seen on any other map. 
Perhaps this is an error for Pogoreshapka. Petrof, 1880, has a village 
Pogoreshapka (burnt hat) near this mountain. 

Dahlgren; peak (3,502 feet high), on the mainland north of Frederick sound and 
near Farragut bay. Named Dahlgreen by Thomas, in 1887, after Rear 
Admiral John Adolf Dahlgren, U. S. N. 

Daisy; glacier, tributary to the Tyndall glacier, near Mount St. Elias, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by Topham in 1888. 

Dakli; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the north, near longitude 157°. 
Native name, reported by Allen in 1885. In his text Allen calls it 
Dakliakakat and on his map Daklikakat. The latter has been copied by 
the Coast Survey. See Kakat. 

Dall; head, a promontory at the south end of Gravina island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by the pilots prior to 1879, after Capt. C. C. Dall, of the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's service. 

Dall; island, in the Koyukuk river, near the mouth of Huslia river. Named by 
Allen, in 1885, after William Healey Dall. Has also been written Dolls 
island. 

Dall; island, on the northern side of the mouth of Dixon entrance. Named by the 
Coast Survey, in 1879, after W. H. Dall. Port Bazan indents the western 
shore of Dall island and (according to present information) nearly, but 
not quite, cuts it in two. Coast Survey chart 8050 calls the southern part 
of the island Dall and the northern part Quadra. 

Dall; lake, in the delta coast region between the Yukon and Kuskokwin rivers, east 
of Cape Vancouver, drained by the Kiniak river. Named by Nelson, in 
1878, after W. H. Dall. 

Dall; point or cape, on the mainland coast, near Cape Romanzof, south of the 
Yukon mouth and north of Nunivak. So called, in 1869, after ^Y. H. Dall. 

Dall; ridge of mountains, on the western coast of Gravina island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by Nichols, in 1883, after W. H. Dall. 

Dall; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, at the Lower Ramparts. It is 
Notokakat or Dall of the Coast Survey in 1869; Notochangut or Dall of 
Raymond, 1871, and Notochargut of Schwatka, 1883. 

Dalnie, cape; see Far. 

Dalnie, island, Yakutat bay; see Knight. 

Dalnoi; point, the westernmost point of St. George island, Pribilof islands, Bering 
sea. Tebenkof and Tikhmenief call it West Konetz (west end). Other- 
wise known as Dalnoi (distant) point. 

Dalton, glacier; see Turner. 

Dalton; post, range of mountains and ti-ail leading from head of Lynn canal to the 
interior. As applied to a range of mountains near Dezadeash lake this 
name has been adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 
Dalton trail is a well known local name. Named after John Dalton, a 
well known miner and frontiersman, "justly considered the pioneer 
explorer of the region." 

Dana; peak (4,260 feet high), on the mainland near Thomas bay, southeastern 
Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Prof. James Dwight Dana, of 
Yale College. 

Danaaku, lake; see Silver. 

Danger; bay, indenting the southern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak group. 
Named Opasnaia (dangerous) by Murashef in 1839-40. 

Danger; cape, on the northeastern coast of Kittiwake island, Kodiak group. Nanied 
Opasnie (dangerous) by Murashef in 1839-40. 



baker] 145 Dan— Bav. 

Dang-er; it^land, in the entrance to Red liay, Prinee of AVales inland, Alexander 

archipelago. So named hy Helm in 1886. Erroneously Dead island on 

one chart. 
Danger; island, near Ward ?ove, in Tongass narrows, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Nichols in 1883. 
Daiigi'f, island; see Dead. 
Danger; islet, "small and wooded" at the southern end of Mary island, Revillagi- 

gedo channel, Alexander archipelago. So called by Nichols in the Coast 

Pilot (1891, p. 98). It is now called Danger. 
Danger; passage, between Cat island and Mary island, Revillagigedo channel, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Danger; point, on the eastern or Mitkof island shore of Wrangell strait, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Dall in 1879. 
Danger; point, the southern point of entrance to Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty 

island, Alexander archipelago. Descriptive name given by Meade in 1869. 
Danger; reef, in Tongass narrows, near Ward cove, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by the Coast Survey in 1883. Name not found on any chart. 

Also called Danger Island reef. 
Danger; rock, in Narrow strait, between Kodiak and Spruce islands, Kodiak group. 

Named Opasnie (dangerous) by Murashef in 1839—40. 
Danger; rock, near Danger jjoint, Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Meade in 1869. 
Dangerous; cape, between Kiliuda and Ugak bays, on the southeastern shore of 

Kodiak. Namel Opasnie (dangerous) by Lisianski in 1805. Has also 

been written Onatzno. 
Dangerous; cape, the northern point of entrance to Graham harbor, Cook inlet. 

Named Opasnoi (dangerous) by Tebenkof in 1849. 
Dangerous; channel, separating Biorka from other islands in or near Sitka sound. 

So named by United States naval officers in 1879-80. Nichols, in the 

Coast Pilot, suggests that this name is premature. 
Dangerous; passage, on the western shore of Prince William sound, separating 

Chenega island from the mainland. So named by Abercrombie in 1898. 
Danger Point; reef, off Danger point, Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by 3Ieade in 1869. 
Daniels; creek, west of Golofnin sound, Seward peninsula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Darby; cape, between Golofnin bay and Norton bay, on northern shore of Norton 

sound. So named by Cook in 1778. Has also been written Derby. 
Dure, creek; see Dora. 
Dark, creek; see Dora. 
Dark; island, off north coast of Shuyak island, Kodiak group. Named Temnie (dark) 

by the Russian American Company in 18-19. 
Dark; point, the southernmost point of the mainland between Nakat and Willard 

inlets, Dixon entrance. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Dassar-dee-asli, lake; see Dezadeash. 
David; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
fJuiid, creek; see Sheep. 
[David; island, in Wrangell harbor, Alaska peninsula. So named by Vasilief in 

1831-32. Also called Davidoff. 
Davidof; island, one of the Rat islands, western Aleutians. So named in Krusen- 

stern's atlas, 1827, after Gavriil Ivanovich Davidof, a Russian naval officer, 

who, with Khwostof, made explorations in Alaska in 1802-1804. The 

existence of this island, at least in the place it occupies on most charts, is 

doubtful. 

Bull. 187—01 10 



Dav-Dea. 146 [bull. 187. 

Davidson; l>ank or tisliiiig ground, near Uniinak pass. Named by the Fish Com- 
mission, in 1888, after Prof. George Davidson, of the United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey. 

Davidson; glacier, on the mainland; near head of Lynn canal, Alexander archipel- 
ago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1867, after Prof. George Davidson. 
According to Krause, 1882, the native name is Ssitkaje. 

Davidson; inlet, south of Kosciusko island, on the western coast of Prince of Wales 
archii)elago. Named by Dall, in 1879, after Prof. (Jeorge Davidson. 

Davidson; mountain, on the south side of Sanborn harbor, Nagai island, Shumagin 
group. So named by Dall, in 1872, after Prof. George Davidson. 

Davis; creek, in Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Meade, in 1869, after General Jefferson C. Davis, V. S. A., then 
in command of the military division of Alaska. 

Davis; creek, tributary to Fortymile creek, from the south. Local name obtained 
by the Geological Survey, in 1898, and published in 1899. It is Smith 
creek of Abercrombie's map. The Yukon map, sheet 10, published by 
Canada, in 1898, makes Davis creek tributary to "Walker creek. 

Davis; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the south, near latitude | 
67°. Prospectors' name, published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Davison; mountain (2,652 feet high), in the southern .part of Annette island, Gra- 
vina group, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Davison; point, the southernmost point of Annette island, Gravina group, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Alexander Davi- 
son, esq., " owner of our storeship." 

Davres; glaciers, two in number, at the head of Endicott arm, Holkham bay, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named by the Coast Survey, in 1891, after Hon. 
Henry Laurens Dawes, of Massachusetts. 

Davrson; peak, near Teslin lake, Yukon; 

range of mountains at the confluence of the Lewes, Pelly, and Yukon 
rivers, Yukon; 

town. Government headquarters, and post-office on the Yukon river, at 
mouth of the Klondike river, Yukon. (Not Dawson City.) 
The above entry for Dawson is taken from the first animal report of the 
• Canadian Board of Geographic Names. Named after Dr. George Mercer 
Dawson, of the Canadian Geological Survey. 

Day; harbor, on the southeastern shore of Kenai peninsula. Named Day's by 
Portlock in 1787. 

Day ay, inlet; see Taiya. 

Dead; islet, in the entrance to Red bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Helm in 1886. See Danger. 

Deadman; reach, in Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Named Deadman's bay 
by Meade, in 1869, in memory of the 150 Aleuts killed by eating poisonous 
mussels in this vicinity in 1799. Variously written Deadman's, Dead- 
mans, and Deadman. 

Deadman; riffie, on Fortymile creek, near the international boundary. Commemo- 
rative name given by the miners. Published by the Geological Survey fe 
1899. 

Dead Pine; island, in Tlevak strait, Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. Descrip- 
tive name, given by Nichols in 1881. 

Dead Tree; bluff, in Mitchell bay, Kootsnahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander 
archipelago. Descriptive name, given by ]\Ieade in 1869. 

Dead Tree; island, in Hanus bay, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Descriiitivc 
name, given by Moore in 1895. 

Dease; creek, lake, and river of British Columbia. Named as early as 1867, and 
perhaps earlier, after Peter Warren Dease, of the Hudson Bay Company.! 



BAKER.] 147 Dea— Dee. 

Dease; inlet, on the Arctic coast of Alaska, near Point Barrow. Named by Thomas 
Simpson, in 1887, after his "worthy colleague," Peter Warren Dease. 

Deceit; cape, on the southern shore of Kotzebue sound, Arctic ocean. Named 
Betrug (deceit) by Kotzebue in August 1816. He writes: "I had double 
reason to call it c-ape Deceit." He was deceived by its appearance, indi- 
cating a bay, which he found not to exist, and he found the natives expert 
cheats. 

December; point, on Mitkof island, in southern part of Wrangell strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. Lindenberg, in 1838, called it 
Zelonoi (green). 

Deception, islands; see Near. 

Deception; islet, in Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by JNIeade in 1869. 

Deception; jioint, on Woewodski island, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Meade in 1869. The mariner may be deceived as to which 
is the main channel. 

Decision; cape, the southernmost point of Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by A^ancouver, in 1793 (II, 420), to commemorate his decision 
against the pretensions of De Fuca, De Fonte, and others to a i^rior 
knowledge of this region. In Russian called Rishenia and Razrishenia 
(decision). 

Deep; bay, indenting the southern shore of C'hichagof island, Peril strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Glubokoi (deep) by Vasilief in 1833. 

Deep; bay, near Banner bay, on the northern shore of Atka, middle Aleutians. 
Called Glubokaia (deep) by Lutke about 1830. Not shown on any chart. 

Deep, bay; see Kelp. 

Deep; inlet, about 5 miles from Sitka, in Baranof island, ojiening into Sitka sound. 
Named Glubokaia (deep) by Vasilief in 1809, on account of its great depth. 
It is Dorokhova (fool's) bay of Tebenkof, 1849. 

Deep; lake, about 10 miles from Sitka, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Gloubokoi (deep) by A^asilief in 1809. Tebenkof calls it Redoubt 
lake. A fishing station at the lake's outlet was called The Redoubt. 
Erroneously given also as Glubokoi. Grewingk also calls it Der tiefe see. 
Has also been erroneously called Kluchev (springs) bay. 

Deep; point, on the western bank of the Chilkat river, near its mouth. Named 
Glubokie (deep) by Lindenberg in 1838. This name is obsolete. 

Deep, river; see Klondike. 

Deep'water; i>oint, the northern point of entrance to Woewodski harbor, Frederi'k 
sound, Alexander archijjelago. In 1838, Zarembo made a sketch of Woi*- 
wodski harbor and named its south point of entrance Glubokoi (deep 
water). On late charts this name is applied to the north point of entrance. 

Deer; creek, tributary to Anikovik river, near York, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 

Deer; island, in Ernest sound, Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Deer; island, southwest from Belkofski, on southern shore of Alaska peninsula. 
Named deny (reindeer) by the Russians, who derived the name from 
the Aleuts, whose name for reindeer, says Veniaminof, is Itkaiak. Lutke 
has Animak, and Billings Animok, for the Aleut name. 

Deer; islet, in Port Moller, northern coast of Alaska peninsula. So named by Dull 
in 1882. Apparently this is Kudoljin jieninsula of Lutke in 1828. 

Deer; mountain, near Tongass narrows, on Revillagigedo island, Alexander aivlii- 
pelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. Has also been called Deer 
mountains. 

Deer; point, on the western shore of Tamgas harbor, Annette island, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1886. 



f>es— Deu. 



148 [HIM.. 187. 



De GroflF; bay, in Krestof island, nortli of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Moore, in 1S97, after a prominent merchant of Sitka. 

Deilrick, river; see Dietrich. 

Dejah, inlet; see Chilkoot and Taiya. 

Di'jah, pass; see Chilkoot. 

Dejalissankc, harbor; see Taiyasanka. 

DejahssankcKxil, glacier; see Ferebee. 

Dek. Indian word for creek. Used in the Copper river region. Tt is apjiended to 
the name, thus: Taton^fcA', Taton creek. 

Delarof ; harbor, in I'nga island, Shumagin grouj). Api)arently named by Telienkof, 
in 184.S, after Eustrate Ivanovich Delaruf, a native of (Ireece, who Avas 
chief director of the Russian American colonies from about 1784 to July, 
1791. Also written Delaroff and Delarovskoi. Generally spoken of as 
Unga harbor, and the village on its shores called Unga. Lutke says the 
native name of the village is Ougnagok. 

Delarof; islands, at western end of the Andreanof grouj), middle Aleutians. The 
two islets, Skagul and Ogliuga, are called Delaroff islands by Lutke, who 
says the group consists of seven islands. They were named after the former 
superintendent at Kodiak. 

Delgada; point, in Portilla channel, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Punta Delgada (narrow or sharp point) by Maurelle and < Quadra 
in 1775-1779. 

Del Monte; peak (2,482 feet high), on Lindenberg peninsula, Kupreanof island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Delome; creek, tributary to Garfield creek, from the west, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Brooks, 1900. 

De Long; islands, in Foggy bay, at south end of Eevillagigedo channel, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1885, after Lieut. Com- 
mander George Washington De Long, U. S. N., of the exploring steamer 
Jeanndte, who perished in the Lena delta in November, 1881. 

De Long-; islands, off the north coast of Siberia. Discovered by the Jeannette 
exploring expedition, in 1881, and named after its commander, De Long. 

De Long-; peak (3,737 feet high), on Lindenberg peninsula, Kupreanof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Lieut. Commander 
George W. De Long, U. S. N. 

Delta, creek; see Silok. 

Delta; liver, tributary to the Tanaua river, from the south, near longitude 146°. 
So named by Allen in 1885. This and Silok creek (Delta creek of Allen) 
are distinct streams, their mouths being about 22 miles apart. Errone- 
ously Delt on one chart. 

Demarcation; point, on the Arctic coast, at the international boundary line. So 
named by Sir John Franklin, in 1826, as marking the boundary between 
British and Russian possessions. Has also been written Demarkation. 

De Monti; bay, between Khantaak island and a jieninsula on the eastern side of the 
entrance to Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. Named Bahia de Monti 
by IMalaspina in 1791. La Pe rouse, in 1786, had called Yakutat bav or 
some part of it, not identifiable, Baie de jNIonti, after Lieutenant de ]\lonti, 
first officer of the Astrolabe, who first landed and reconnoitered it. Mal- 
aspina applied La Perouse's name to the bay above ti escribed. The Coast 
Pilot says: "This modified application has the advantage of preservnig an 
historic name, and also of naming a part of the bay which otherwise would 
have required a new name. ' ' 

Denbigh; cape, the southern point of entrance to Norton bay, on eastern shore of 
Norton sound. So named by Cook in 1778. Erroneously Dembigh. 



BAKER.] 149 Ben— »ev. 

Dennison, f(n-k, of South fork of Fortymile creek. Called Denisou by Barnard 
(Fortyaiile sheet of Geological Survey) in 1898. Abercroinbie has, also 
in 1898, Dennison fork of Fortymile creek. Apparently these are two 
spellings of one name. 

Denslow; lake, tributary to the Chuitna river, near the head of Cook inlet. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Dent; mountain (5,057 feethigh), on the eastern shon^ of Portland canal. Named 
by Pender in 18(38. 

Derbin; strait, separating Avatanak and Tigalda islands of the Krenitzin group, 
eastern Aleutians. Called Derbenskoi by Yeniaminof. Lutke has Derl)in 
and Derbinskoi. Perhaps the name is derived from Denibin or Deriabin 
or Derzhavin, who was massacred at Nulato in 1851. 

Drrhy, cape; see Darby. 

Desconocida; point, in Gulf of Esquibel, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named 
Punta d'e la Desconocida (point of the unknown) by INfaurelle and Quadra 
in 1775-1779, whose surveys ended near this point. 

Dese; creek, tributary to Grantley harbor, from the south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Deaem/iuio, Puerto de; see Disenchantment. 

Desert {The). For 12 miles above Point Rothsay, at the mouth of the Stikine 
river, "the river valley is sandy and almost destitute of vegetation. This 
tract * * * lias received the name of the Desert," probably from the 
prospectors and miners. (Coast Pilot, p. 109.) A(^cording to Ogden this 

^ is a misnomer. 

Desgraci(«l(i, islet; see laducky. 

Deshka; river, tributary to the Sushitna river, from tlie north, about 35 nules above 
the mouth of the latter. Apparently a native name, from Muldrow, in 
1898. 

Deslitt, A'illage; see Haines. 

Destruction; point, on the northeastern shore of Security bay, Kuiu island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Meade, who in February, 1869, destroyed 
two Indian villages in Security bay. 

Detached; rock, near Outer Spruce cape, near St. Paul, Kodiak. So named by the 
Coast Survey in 1869. 

Devaatdtluii, volcano; see Pogromnoi. 

Deviation; peak, on the mainland east oi Kotzebue sound. So named by Beechey 
in 1827. 

Devil; mountain, in northern part of Seward peninsula, southwest from Kotzebue 
sound. Named Teufelsberg by Kotzebue in August, 1816. It is Chortof 
(devil) mountain of Russian charts. 

Devil; rocks, in Dixon entrance. Tebenkof, in 1848, shows a sunken danger called 
Devil bank. Later a United States Hydrographic Office chart shows 
similarly a danger called Devil ridge. The later charts abandon this 
name and show two sunken dangers, called, respectively, East Devil rock 
and West Devil rock. See East Devil and West Devil. 

Devils Prongs. This ai)pellation was applied by the Coast Survey, in 1869, to two 
mountain peaks near St. Paul, Kodiak. Elevation of the north i)eak, 
2,057 feet. Also called Devil's moiintains. Named by the Russians, in 
1809, Chernieshef, a name not found in any Russian dictionary at my 
command, but which is very suggestive of the Black One. 

Devils Thumb; a remarkable pinnacle, on the summit of a mountain on the main- 
land east of Frederick sound. So named by Meade, in 1869, according to 
whom it is 400 feet high. According to Nichols the shaft or thumb is 
1,662 feet high; the elevation of the whole is 9,077 feet. 



Dev-Dlg. 150 ' [Biu.i,.187. 

Devine; c-ape, the southeastern point of Kovovin ii^lan(l, Shumagin gronp. Named 
by Dall in 1880. 

Dew; point, on the mainland, in Behni canal, near north end of llevillagigedo 
inland. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Dewey; anchorage, in the southern end of Etolin island, Clarence strait, Alexan- 
der arcliipelago. Named by Snow, in 1886, after Ensign Theodore Gibbs 
Dewey, U. S. N., a member of his party. 

Dewey; creek, tributary to the Copper river, from the east, opposite the mouth of 
Tiekel river, near latitude 61° 10^. So named by Abercrombie, in 1898, 
after Admiral George Dewey, U. S. N. 

Dewey; creek, tributary to Eureka creek, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Dewey; creek, tributary to Fox river, from the south, Seward i>eninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Dewey; creek, tributary to Grantley harbor, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Dewey; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the east, in the Cape Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula Local name published by the Coast Survey in 
1900. Near by is Sampson creek and Schley creek. 

Dewey; rock (30 feet high), in entrance to Cordova bay, Dixon entrance, Alexan- 
der archipelago. Named by Clover, in 1885, after Ensign T. G. Dewey, 
U. S. N., a member of his party. 

Dexter; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the west, in the Cape Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 

Dexter; point, on the southern shore of Norton bay, Norton sound, Bering sea. 
Local proper name, published in 1900. 

Dexter, post-office; see Cheenik. 

Deyea, river; see Chilkoot. 

Dezadeash.; lake, back of the St. Elias range of momi tarns. Native name reported 
by Davidson as Tots-an-tee-ash and by E. J. Glave, in 1892, as Dassar-Dee- 
ash. Variously written Deza-de-ash, Dazadeash, etc. The above form, 
Dezadeash, has been adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 

DgaJ:, bay; see Ugak. 

Diamond; island, in Mitchell bay, Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Diamond; point, on the west end of San Juan Bautista island, Bucareli bay, Prince 
of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Diamante (diamond point) by 
Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Diana; momitain, near "Ward cove, in the western part of Revillagigedo island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1886. 

Diane, roads; see Tianna. 

Dick; port, on the outer coast of Kenai peninsula. Named Dick's harbor by Port- 
lock in 1786. Port Dick of the Russians. 

Dickason; mountain, on the southern bank of the Skwentna river, near longitude 
152°. Named, in 1898, by Post, of the Geological Survey, after Col. L. T. 
Dickason. Erroneously Dickerson. 

Dickens; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Dickens; point, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. Named by Pender in 1868. 

Dierovdtie, point; see Holes. 

Dietrich; river, tributary to Middle fork of the Koyukuk, near its source. Pub- 
lished, in 1899, by the Geological Survey with the spelling Deitrick; here 
changed to Dietrich. 

Digges's, sound; see Disenchantment. 



BAKER.] 151 IMk— I>iV. 

Dikoi, island; see Wild. 

Diomede; a group of three Lslands, in Bering strait, known as the Big Diomede, 
Little Diomede, and Fairway rock. They, or one of them, appear to have 
been tirst discovered Ijy Bering, August 16, 1728, and named by him the 
island of the holy martyr Diomede. August 16 is St. Diomede's day of 
the church calendar. It also bore on early maps the name of St. Deme- 
trius. August 14 is St. Demetrius' day of the chxirch calendar. It is 
possible that this name was applied by Bering, but usage has established 
Diomede. Michael Gvozdef, surveyor, also explored in Bering strait, in 
1730, and after him the islands have been called by the Russians Gvozdef 
islands. Thus the islands have been called Diomede, St. Diamed, St. 
Diomede, St. Diomed, Diomedis, St. Deomid, S. Dimitre, Gwozdeff, and 
Gwosdew; doubtless several other forms have also been used. 

Dirt; glacier, near ^Muir inlet, Glacier ]>ay, southeastern Alaska. Descriptive name, 
given by Reid in 1892. 

Dirt, glacier; see Mud. 

Discovery; creek, tributary to Flambeau river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 
So called in the Cape Nome report of 1899, where it is shown as debouch- 
ing in Port Safety. On a late map called Seattle or Discovery. 

Discovery; creek, tributary to Birch creek, from the south, near latitude 66°. 
Prospectors' name, published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Discovery; fork, of American creek, in the Eagle mining region. Prospectors' 
name, published bj' the Geological Survey in 1899. 

Discovery; rock, in Chiniak bay, near St. Paul harlx)r, Kodiak. Xamed Atkritoi 
(discovery) by Russian naval officers in 1808-1810. 

Disenchantment; bay, at the head of Yakutat bay. Xamed Puerto del Desengaiio 
by ^Malaspina in July, 1791, who, looking for a northeast passage, com- 
memorated, by this name, his failure to find it here. This name was not 
published until 1802, and meanwhile Vancouver had named it Digges's 
sound. Malaspina's Spanish name has been rendered by Disenchantment 
in English and Razuvirenie in Russian. Recent additions to our knowl- 
edge of this region require some modification in the application of the 
names. This name appears to have been applied by 3Ialaspina to the head 
of Yakutat bay, while to the ice encumbered arm stretching eastward and 
southeastward was given the name Bahia de las Baucas (bay of shoals). 
The water is, however, very deep, more than 120 fathoms, and hence the 
name may have been applied with reference to the floating ice as suggested 
by Dall. This name appears to have never come into use. Perhaps our 
imjjroved knowledge will revive it. Vancouver's name Beerings Bay is, 
on his chart, applied to this part of Yakutat bay. Tebenkof has the name 
Ferrer applied t(j the entrance of this bay, and says it was given by Malas- 
pina, in 1791, after his first mate Ferrer. 

Disraeli; momi tains (5,000 feet high), near the head of Portland canal. Named 
by Pender m 1868. 
] Distant, island. Peril strait; see Otstoia. 
I Distant, island, Yakutat bay; see Knight. 
I Distant, point, St. George island; see Dalnoi. 

Distant; point, the southern point of entrance to Hood bay. Admiralty island, 
Chatham strait, Alexander archijaelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Distin; movmtain (2,300 feet high), at head of Snake river, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Distin; peak, on the north bank of Happy river, near latitude 62°. So named by 
Post in 1S98. 

Divide; creek, tributary to Sixmile creek, Kenai peninsula. Local name, published 
. by the Geological Survey in 1899. 



DIv-Dol. 152 [BUi.i.. IsT. 

Divide; islancl, in Shakan bay, Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Helm in LSS6; it divider an unnamed bay into two parts. 

Divide; peak, on tlie mainland, east of Frederick sound and near Patterson glacier. 
Named Divide (peak?) by the Coast Survey in 1888. (See Coast and 
Geodetic Survey chart 705. ) 

Divide; point, separating Herendeen bay from Port Moller, Alaska peninsula. So 
named by the Fish Commission in 1890. 

Dix; ])oint, the northern point of entrance to American bay, Kaigani strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1882, after Lieut. Timothy Dix 
Bolles, U. S. N. Also named Graham by Sheldon Jackson. 

Dixon; creek, tributary to the Koksuktai)aga river, from the north, Seward penin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Dixon; harbor, on the mainland coast a little north of Cross sound. Name published 
by the Coast Survey in 1889. 

Dixon; mountain (4,800 feet high), near the head of Yakutat bay, southeastern 
Alaska. Named by Russell, in 1890, presumably after Capt. George Dixon, 
who, in 1787, made the first sketch of Port Mulgrave. 

Dixon Entrance; a broad open sound or strait, between the Columbian and Alexan- 
der archipelagoes, through which passes the southern boundary line 
between British Columbia and Alaska. It has been variously called an 
inlet, channel, strait, sound, and entrance. Usage seems to have settled 
upon the above name. Dixon Entrance was discovered by the Spaniards, 
in 1774, and called Entrada de Perez. Dixon, in 1787, visited it and named 
it, after himself, Dixon's straits, the name being applied to the waters 
east and north of Queen Charlotte islands. Meares at about the same 
time named it Douglass entrance, after Capt. William Douglass (or Douglas) 
who commanded his consort ship the packet-boat Iphigenia ( Nubiana) . 
To its northeastern part he applied the name Buccleugh sound, which he 
also spelled Bucclugh. The Russians have called it Granitsa (boundary) 
strait, whence we find Dixon entrance or Granitsa channel and Graenz 
strasse. Tebenkof, using the native name, has Kaigani strait. 

Dlinnaia, reef; see Long. 

Dohriek Vestei, bay; see Goodnews. 

Doctor; low sandy island, on the Arctic coast, near Point Barrow. Perhaps this is 
identical with Crescent island or Martin island or both (called Il-liut-kak 
by the Eskimos) of British Admiralty chart 2164, published in 1854. (See 
Martin. ) 

Doe; mountain (2,976 feet high), on Revillagigedo island, near Tongass narrows, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. Buck and Fawn 
mountains are. near by. 

Dog; cape, the southeasternmost jioint of Agattu island, western Aleutians. Called 
by Tebenkof Southwest or Sabak (dog). 

Dog, creek; see Colorado. 

Dog; island, on the northern shore of Duke island, Gravina group, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Dog; jioint, the south point of entrance to Nakwasina passage, Baranof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named Sabachi (dog) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Dogfish; bay, on the eastern shore of Portland canal, near its mouth. Named by 
Pender in 1868. 

Doggetlooscat; see Dagitli. 

Dolgay, island; see Long. 

Dolgoi; cape, the south point of Dolgoi island, near Belkofski, Alaska peninsula. 
So called by Dall in 1880. 

Dolgoi, cape; see Kukistan. 



BAKEK.] 1 'SS w» 

J^'-'^ Dol— Dor. 

Dolgoi ; harbor, indenting the western cuast of Dolgoi island, near Belkofski. Prob- 

al)ly a local name, published by the Coast Survey in 1882. 
IhJ'joi, island, Cordova bay; see Long. 
Dolgoi; island, in Port Bazan, Call island, Prince of Wales archipelago. Xamed 

Dolgoi (long) by Zarembo in 1834. 
Dolgoi; island, in Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. Called Dolgoi (Ions) bv 

Tebenkof in 1849. & v g; > 

Dolgoi; island, near Belkofski, on southern shore of Alaska peninsula. Named 

Dolgoi (long) by the Eussians. Its Aleut name, according to Yeniaminof 

(I, 252) , is Ananakeik. 
Dolgoi, island, Sitka sound; see Long. 
Dolgoi, lake; see Lower. 
Dolomi; post-otfice, between Moira and Cholmondeley sounds, on the eastern shore 

ot Prmce of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. Established in August, 

Dolores ; port, in Suemez island, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. Named 
Puerto de los Dolores (port of the sorrowing) by Maurelle and Quadra in 
1775-1779. 

Dolls, island; see Dall. 

Dome; creek, tributary to American creek, from the south, in the Eagle mining 
region. Local name, reported by Barnard in 1898. 

Dome; creek, tributary to O'Brien creek, from the east, in the Fortymile mining 
region. Local name, reported by Barnard in 1898. 

Dome; creek, tributary to Tisuk river, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Dome; momitain (2,100 feet high), on the western side of Portland canal, in lati- 
tude 55° 04^ Named by Pender in 1868. 

Dome; pass (4,300 feet high), in the St. Elias alps. Descriptive name given by 
Russell in 1890. 

Dome; peak, near the head of Thomas bay, southeastern Alaska. Descriptive name 
given by Thomas in 1887. 

Dome; peak (4,420 feet high), on the mainland, west of Lincoln island, Lynn canal, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Dome; peak (6,500 feet high), on the western side of Portland canal, in latitude 
55° 25^ Descriptive name given by Pender in 1868. 

Dome, peak; see Fortymile dome. 

Dome; point, on the eastern shore of Stepovak bav, Alaska peninsula. So named 
by Dall in 1880. 

Dome; point, on the western shore of Long island. Port Frederick, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by United States naval officers in 1880. 

Dominion; creek, tributary to the headwaters of Mission creek, from the west, near 
latitude 64° 20^ in the Eagle mining region. Local name, published by 
the Geological Survey in 1899. 

Donjek; river, tributary to White river, from the south, near latitude 62°. Native 
name; has also been written Donjeck. The above form, Donjek, has been 
adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 

Dora; bay, m Cholmondeley sound. Prince of Wales archipelago. So named by 
Clover, in 1885, presumably after his wife, formerly Miss Dora Miller. 

Dora; creek or river, tributary to the Chitina river, from the north, about 25 miles 
above junction of the Chitina and Copper rivers. Named Dora by Lieu- 
tenant Allen, April 14, 1885, after Miss Dora Johnson, of Chicago, after- 
wards his wife. On map 1 of Allen's report it is printed Dora, but on map 
2 of same report it is printed Dare, and this form Las been copied on 
Coast and Geodetic Survey chart 3091. On a late map it is printed Dark. 



Dor-Doii. 154 [BULU187. 

Dora; liarbor, indenting the southern shore of Ikatan island (or peninsula), near 
Isanotski strait, Unimak island. Named Loras by the Fish Commission 
in 1888. Called Lords by the Coast Survey and known locally as Dora 
harbor. 

Doran; strait, separating the front of Washington glacier from the opposite main- 
land, Harriman fiord, Port Wells, Prince AVilliam sound. So named by 
the Harriman Expedition, in 1899, after Capt. P. Doran, of the steamer 
George W. Elder, which bore the expedition. 

Doris, bay; see ]Mud. 

Dorn; island, in Seymour canal, Alexander archipelago. So named by Mansfield, in 
1890, after Lieut. Edward J. Dorn, U. S. N., a member of his party. 

Domin; sunken rock, off the western end of Douglas island, Stephens passage, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Mansfield in 1890, after J. B. Dornin, a 
member of his party. 

Dorokhnra, bay; see Deep. 

Doroshin: glacier, on Kenai peninsula, near Kachemak bay. Cook inlet. So 
named by Dall, in 1880, after Peter P. Doroshin, a Russian mining engi- 
neer, who made investigations in Cook inlet in 1848. 

Dorothy; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Dorozhnoi, island; see Road. 

Double; island, in Krestof sound, north of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Dvoinoi (twin) by Vasilief in 1809. Called Dwinoi in the Coast 
Pilot (1883, p. 155) and Double in late Coast Survey publications. 

Double; island, in St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Dvoinoi (double, or twins) by 
Vasilief in 1809. 

Double; island, near Dewey anchorage, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Snow in 1886. The island is double at high water. 

Double; islands, between Cat and Dog islands, in Felice strait, southeast of Annette 
island, Gravina group, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 
1883. 

Double Point; mountain, on the north bank of the Koyukuk, near Arctic city. 
Descriptive name, given by Allen in 1885. 

Doubtful; harbor, on the southern coast of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. So 
named by Berry in 1881. Possibly this is a synonym for Selfridge bay. 

Doug'las; bay, indenting the southern coast of Kupreauof island, Sumner strait, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by Helm, in 1866, and spelled on various 
charts Douglas and Douglass indiscriminately. 

Douglas; cape, on the western shore of Seward peninsula, just south of Port 
Clarence. So named by Beechey in 1826. 

Douglas; cape, the western head of Cook inlet. So named by Cook, in 1778 (II, 
385), after Dr. Douglas, canon of Windsor. It is Kamieshatskoi of a 
Russian chart of 1802. The native name is given as Kukvak, Koukhat, 
and Kuchat. 

Donglds, entrance; see Dixon. 

Douglas; island, opposite Juneau, at the north end of Alexander archipelago. 
Named Douglas's by Vancouver, in 1794, after the Bishop of Salisbury. 
Has sometimes been written Douglass. 

Douglas; post-office on Douglas island, southeastern Alaska. Established in Jan- 
uary, 1888. 

])i,a<jl((s City. The mining town on Douglas island (population 402 in 1890) is often 
so called. 

Douglass; peak, on the mainland, east of Farragut bay, southeastern Alaska. So 
named bv Thomas in 1887. 



BAKKR.l 155 JDou— Dry. 

P(nt.'<hmi!, bay; see Close. 

Dove; islet, at entrance to Jamestown bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by "United States naval officers, in 1880, after a Mr. Dove, employed 
on the U. S. S. Jamestown in that j'ear. 

Dowling'; peak, on the north shore of Klutina lake. So named by Abercrombie 
in 1898. 

Drake; island (about 1,000 feet high), in Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Origin 
of name not discovered. First found on British .Vdmiralty chart 2431, 
corrected to 1890. 

Dranishnikof; mountain or peak, near Deep lake, Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Yasilief in 1809. Has been called Mount Dranish. 
Locally known as Redoubt mountain. 

Dranishnikof. The settlement or fishing station at the outlet of Deep lake, in Sitka 
sound, was sometimes so called. More commonly it Avas, and still is, 
spoken of as The Redoubt. 

Draper; mountain (7,54(i feet high), near the head of Disenchantment bay, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by Russell, in 1891, after Prof. John William 
Draper. 

Dress; point, in Behm canal on the northwestern shore of Revillagigedo island, 
Alexander archipelago. Xamed by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Drew; point, on the Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow. Named by Dease and Simp- 
son, in 1837, after Richard Drew, esq., of the Hudson Bay Company. 

Drier; bay, indenting the western shore of Knight island, Prince William sound. 
Name from Schrader, 1900. 

Driest; point, the north point of entrance to Port Chester, Annette island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named liy Nichols in 1883. Erroneously Dreist. 

DriftwQDd; small open bay, on the southern shore of Umnak island, eastern Aleu- 
tians. Named Drovenaia (firewood) by the Russians on account of the 
abundance of driftwood found here. ( )n acc()unt of its shape the Russians 
sometimes called it Dvoinoi (double or twin) . Also it was known as Sta- 
raia gavan (old harbor), because one of the early Russian tradmg vessels 
anchored here. Has also been written Drovianaia. 

Drovenaia, bay; see Driftwood. 

Drozdof, island; see Blackbird. 

Drum; mountain (13,700 feet high), east of and near the Copper river, near longi- 
tude 144°. Named, in 1885, by Allen, after Adjt. Gen. Richard Coulter 
Drum, U. S. A. 

Drum Head; peak, on the northern coast of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. Named 
Drum Head, by Berry, in 1881. Also written Drmiihead. 

Drunkard; bay, on the southeastern coast of Kodiak. This name was given by 
Lisianski, in 1805, in his text. Name not foimd elsewhere and the place 

' not identified. 

Dry; bay, on the mainland coast, between Lituya bay and Yakutat. So called by 

I Davidson in 1869. It appears to be a shallow lagoon w'here the waters 

I from the melting glaciers contend with the ceaseless surges of the Pacific. 

Cook saw this place, in 1778, and under the supposition that it was the sjiot 
where Bering anchored July 20, 1741, named it Beerings's bay (II, 347). 
This name, variously spelled, was adopted by 3Ialaspina, Dixon, and 
others. La Perouse called it Behring's river. Tebenkof represents this 
as the delta of the Alsek, debouching through five mouths or rivers, of 

' which four bear the names Tlegan, Taaltsug, Vankahina, and Kakanhina, 

the fifth being unnamed; whence arose the name Five Rivers or Dry bay. 
In the Coast Pilot of 1869 Davidson also calls it Shallow bay. 

Dry; cove, on the western shore of Portage bay, Kupreanof island, Alexander archi- 
jjelago. Descriptive name given bj' Nichols in 1882. 



Dry-Diif. 1 5(> [bull. 187. 

Dry; creek, trilKitary to Cainp creek, from the north, Seward i)eniiisula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Dry; creek, tributary to Copper river, from the east, imrtli ()f Sanford river. 8o 

named by Abererombie in 1898. 
Dry; creek, tril)ntary to Snake river, from the eant, near itn mouth, in the Xome 

miniug region, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. 
Dry; island (2,4()1 feet high), in <lelta at mouth of the Stikine river, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 
Dry; open bay, just north of Alitak bay, on southwestern shore of Kodiak. Named 

Sukhoi (dry) by Tebenkof in 1849. 
Dry, passage; see Blind. 

Dry, river; see Blind. j 

Dry; strait, much obstructed by shoals, separating Mitkof island from the mainland, ' 

near Stikine river mouth, Alexander archipelago. Named Sukhoi (dry) 

by the Russians. Also written Suchoi channel and Soukhoi strait. 
Dry, strait; see Hay ward. 
Drying; point, the western point of entrance to Dry Spruce bay, on the northern 

shore of Kodiak. Named Obsiekaiushie (drying up romid about) by 

Murashef in 1839-40. 
Dry Spruce; bay, on the northern coast of Kodiak. Named Sukhoi Elnik (dry 

spruce) by INIurashef in 1839-40. Written erroneously Sucho Emnik bay. I 
Dry Spruce; peninsula (at high.water), in Kupreanof strait, on the northern shore 

of Kodiak. Named Sukhaho Elnika (of dry spruce) by Murashef in 

1839-1840. Sucho Emnik on one chart by error of transliteration. i 

Dschenuteche; a ridge of mountains, near the head waters of Klehini river, south- j 

eastern Alaska. The Krause brothers report this name, Dschenuteche, to 

be the native name, and give its meaning as Back of the mountain goat. 
Dubuque; mountain (2,145 feet high), in the eastern part of Annette island, Alex- 1 

ander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. I 

Duck; bay and settlement, on the southeastern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak ( 

group. Named Selezneva (wild duck or drake) by the Russians. Selezni 

(Russian) is Kalagin (Aleut) for a lake bird. Kalagak, according to 

Veniaminof, is Aleut for Selezen (Russian for duel;) and also for a marine [_ 

fish, Kaiaga. Elliott says the Aleuts call all the small cottoid fishes Kalog. 
Duck; cape, on the northeastern coast of Afognak island, Kodiak group. Named 

Selezneva ( wild duck) by the Russians in 1848. 
Duck; creek, tributary to Red bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexaiider archijielago. 

So named by Helm in 1886. 
Duck; island, near the head of Bradfield canal, Alexander archipelago. So named ^ 

by Snow in 1886. 
Duck; islet, near Kukak bay, Shelikof strait, west of Afognak island. Named 

Utinoi (of ducks) by the Russians. Lutke calls it I'ilot Outinoi (de 

canards). 
Duck; islet, southeast of Grave point, Duke island, Gravina group, Alexander 

archipelago. Apparently so named by local pilots. Name not f( )und on 

any map. 
Duck; point, the south point of Whitney island, Fanshaw baj', Frederick soundi 

Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Dude; mountain, in the western part of Revillagigedo island, Alexander archi^ 

pelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1886. 
DufiS.eld; peninsula, forming the northern end of. Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Moore, in 1895, after Gen. William Ward Dulfield, 

Superintendent of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Duffield, glacier; see Turner. 



BAKKU.] 157 Dug— I>Ut. 

Dugan; river, tributary to the Tanaua, from the south, near longitude 150°. Named, 
in 1885, by Allen, after Lieut. Thomas Buchanan Dugan, U. S. A. 

Duke; hill (540 feet high), on the eastern edge of Duke island, Gravina group, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Dall in 1879. 

Duke; i.sland, the southernmost of the Gravina group, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Dall in 1879. The southernmost point of this island had been 
named Northumberland by Vancouver, in 1793, after the Duke of Nor- 
thumberland. 

Duke; j^oint, the easternmost point of Duke island, Gravina group, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Dall in 1879. 

Dvke of Clarence, strait; see Clarence. 

Dnke of York, islands; see York. 

Dulbi; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the east, in longitude 156° 30'. Native 
name, reported 1>y Allen, in 1885, as Dulbikakat, i. e., Dulbi river. See 
Kakat. 

Dunbar; inlet, opening into Tlevak strait, Prince of Wales island, Alexander archi- 
I pelago. Named liy Dall, in 1882, after Mi.ss Margaret J. Dunbar, of Steu- 

\ benville, Ohio, who l>egan missionary work in Alaska in 1879. 

Dunbar; point, the southern point of entrance to Young cove, Howkan strait, 
Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. So named l)y Sheldon Jackson, 
after Miss Margaret J. Dunbar. 
.Duncan; canal, indenting tiae southern coast of Kupreanof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Admiral Duncan, R. N. Has 
also been called Duncan channel and Canal de Dunkan. 

Duncan, passage; see Beecher. 

Duncan; peaks, two in number, east of Duncan canal, on Kupreanof island, Alex- 
ander an-hipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Dundas; bay, indenting the mainland coast, on northern shore of Cross sound, 
southeastern Alaska. So named by Dall in 1879. 

Dundas; point, the eastern point of entrance to Dundas ba}'. Cross sound, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Duminak, village; see Tanunak. 

Dupont; peak (5,794 feet high), on the mainland coast east of Frederick sound, 
southeastern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Admiral Samuel 
Francis Du Pont, U. S. N. 

Durelle; mountain (4,300 feet high), east of Klutina lake. So named by Aber- 
crombie in 1898. Also has been written Du Relle. 

Durrant; creek, triliutary to Stewart river, from the south, Seward jjeninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Dushwtoi, islands; see Fragrant. 

Dushkot; islet, near the head of Beaver l)ay, Unalaska. Probably so named by 
Sarichef, who made a sketch or reconnaissance of Beaver bay and Cap- 
tains bay, Unalaska, June 3-10, 1790. 

(htslniaia, bay; see Close. 

Dutch.; creek, tributary to Ophir creek, from the north, in the Eldorado mining 
district, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. 

Dutch; harbor, on the eastern side of Amaknak island, in Captains bay, Unalaska. 
So named from the tradition that a Dutch vessel was the first to enter it. 
Veniaminof says that it is called, by old navigators, Dutch (Hollandish) 
harbor. Sarichef, 1792, calls it Udakta. According to Lutke, Tebenkof 
calls it Ougadakh. Davidson and Dall wrote Ulakhta harbor. It, and 
the village on its shores, is now universally known as Dutch harbor. 

iXitch Camp; basin, on Lowe river, east of Valdes, Prince William sound. So 
named by Abercrombie in 1898. Now generally known as Dutch Flat. 



Ovo—lEagt 



158 [BULL. 187. 



Dyer; 



Dvoini-bratef (twin brotlier^), Sitka pound; see Twiii;. 

Dioinoi, bay; see Driftwood. l 

Dvoinoi, island; see Double. 

Dwinoi, islet, Krestof sound; see Double. j 

Dyea; i)ort of entry and post-office (established in June, 1896) at the head of Lynn | 
canal. The inlet was called Tyya by Meade, in 1869, Dejah by Krause, in i 
1882, Dayay by Schwatka, in 1883, and Chilkoot or Taiya by the miners. ' 

Dyer; cape, on the Arctic coast between Point Hope and Cape Lisburne. So named t 
by Beechey in 1827. : 

cape, on the mainland coast, southwest from the mouth of the Yukon river. | 
So named by Dall, in 1869, after .Joseph Tarbell Dyer, now of Washington, | 
D. C., who explored in this region, in 1865-66, for the Western Union f 
Telegraph Company. i 

Dying; glacier, near Muir inlet. Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Descriptive I 
name, given by Reid in 1892. " Dying glacier belongs to the past and is j 
melting away." ! 

Dyke; mountain (6,700 feet high), on the western shore of Klutina lake. So ^ 
named by Abercrombie in 1898. ■; 

Eads; peak (4,636 feet high), on the mainland, north of Frederick sound, south- 1 
eastern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after the distinguished 
engineer, James Buchanan Eads. . 

Eagle; bay, on the southern coast of Unalaska, immediately east of Kashega 1)Hy. 
So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Eagle; cape, on the northwestern shore of Shuyak island, Kodiak group. Called 
Orlinie (eagle) by the Russians, who in turn seem to have taken it from 
the native name Amakaktuli, supposed to mean eagle. 

Eagle; creek, tributary to the right fork of the Bluestone river, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Eagle; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the east, near Eagle. Local name 
obtained by the Geological Survey in 1898. 

Eagle; glacier (1,200 feet high), on the mainland, east of Lynn canal. Apparently 
so named by Meade, in 1869, from its fancied resemblance to an eagle with 
outstretched wings. 

Eagle; harbor, indenting the western shore of Nagai island, Shumagin group. 
So named by Dall in 1872. 

Eagle; harbor, on the southern [or (?) northern] shore of Ugak bay, on eastern 
shore of Kodiak. The Eagle Harbor Packing Company, of Kodiak, hasji 
an establishment at this harbor, which, on a late Fish Commission map, li 
is located on the nortJi. shore of Ugak bay. According to some. Eagle har- ; 
bor village or settlement is identical with Orlova of the Russians. A post- ji 
office was established here in November, 1898. The Kodiak Packings 
Company established a saltery here prior to 1890. 

Eagle; island, east of Onslow island, near junction of Ernest somid and Clarence ji 
strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Eagle; mining camp, on left bank of the Yukon near the international l)()un(lary. 
A trading station, consisting of one log house, was built here, in 1881, and 
abandoned the next year. This was called Belle Isle. On its site was 
established the mining camp locally calleil Eagle City, about 1898. An 
United States post-office, called Eagle, was established here in November, 
1898. 

Eagle; mountain (about 1,500 feet high), at head of Eagle harbor, Nagai island, 
Shumagin group. So named by Dall in 1872. 



BAKEK.] 159 Eag— Eas. 

Eagle; point, on the mainland, near head of Portland canal. Apparently so named 
by the Coast Survey in 1891. [May possibly have been named bv Pender 
in 1868. 

Eagle; point, on the southern shore of Unalaska, separating Eagle and Kashega 
baya. Named by the Fish Commission in 1888. From a manuscript note 
on Sarichef s Chart XIV of 1792 it would appear that the native name of 
this point is Amtchik. It is East point of the Coast Survey in 1869. 

Eagle; reef, in Favorite channel, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Coghlan in 1884. 

Eagle Crag; mountain (5,705 feet high), on the mainland, east of the Stikine river 
and near the international boundary. Has also lieen called Eagle. 

Eaglek; bay, indenting the northern shore of Prince William sound. Apparently 
a native name, pul^lished by the War Department, in 1900, as Eagleck. 

Eagle Nest; mountain, on north bank of the Lewes river, Yukon, a little above 
the mouth of Xordenskiold river. According to Schwatka, 1883, the 
Chilkats call it by a name which means Eagles' Nest, the Tahk-heesh by 
a name which means Otter Tail. To settle the matter he named it Park- 
man, after the historian. Prof. Francis Parkman. It is Adler-Nest butte 
of one German publication. 

Eananukhtn, bluffs and hills; see Einahnuhto. 

Ears; two peaks on the Arctic coast, between Point Hope and Cape Lisburne. 
Descriptive name given by Beechey in 1827. 

Ears; two peaks, southwest of Shishmaref inlet, on Seward peninsula, northwestern 
Alaska. Descriptive name given by Beechey in 1827. 

East; bay, immediately south of Pavlof volcano and near the entrance to Pavlof 
bay, Alaska peninsula. Presumably a local name, reported by Dall in 1880. 

East, bay; see Nazan. 

East; beacon, on the Middle Eckholm, Sitka sound. Erected and named by United 
States naval officers in 1880. 

East; bight of Xagai, a bay or harbor indenting the eastern shore of Xagai island, 
Shumagin islands. So called by Dall in 1872. 

East; cape, on the eastern end of St. Lawrence island, Bering sea. Called Yostochnoi 
(east) by Tebenkof, 1849. 

East; cape, the easternmost point of Amehitka island. Rat island group, western 
Aleutians. So called by the North Pacific Exploring Expedition, 1855. 

East; cape, the easternmost point of Attn island, western Aleutians. Named 
Vostochnie (east) by the Russians. 

East; cape, the easternmost point of Spruce island, Kodiak group. Named Vostoch- 
nie (east) by Murashef in 1839-40. Tikhmenief calls it Ostrovskoi (islets) 
point. 

East; fork of the Chaudlar river, near longitude 147°. Prospectors' name, published 
in 1899. 

East; fork of the Kusawa river, one of the tributaries of the upper Yukon. Little 
is known of it. Krause calls it Kussooachrawathini (Yukon). 

East; island, near Duke island, in southern entrance to Revillagigedo channel, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

East; island, near the entrance to Ward cove, Tongass narrows, Alexander archi- 
[ pelago. Probably so named by pilot W. E. George. Name published by 

I the Coast Survey in 1883. 

(East; island, one of the Inian group. Cross sound, Alexander archipelago. Appar- 
f ently so named by DalL in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 

East; island, one of the Kashevarof group, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Snow in 1886, 



Eaet— Eat*. 



160 [BrLi..lS7. 



East; ledge, east of Keene island, on Mitkof shore of Wrangell strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So called by Nichols in the Coast Pilot, 1891. 

East; peak (1,406 feet high), near Chichagof harbor, Attn island, western Aleu- 
tians. 8() named by Gibson in July, 1855. 

East; peak (4,900 feet high), near Valdes, Prince William sound. Named l)y 
Abercroinbie in 1898. 

East; point, between Freshwater bay and Tenakee passage, on the eastern coast of 
Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. The name was applied by 
Meade in 1869 to the eastern ])ointof entrance to Freshwater bay. Neither 
of these names, East and Freshwater, has its original application. 

East; point, in the eastern part of Whitewater bay, Admiralty island, Chatham 
strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by Glass in 1881. 

East; i;oint, on the eastern shore of Portage bay, Kupreanof island, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by Nichols in 1882. 

East; point, on the eastern shore of Woronkofski island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Snow in 1886. 

East; point, on the southeastern shore of Kittiwake island, Kodiak group. Named 
Vostochnie (east) by Murashef, 1839-40. It is Uskosti (narrow) of the 
Russian American Company map of 1849. 

East; point, the eastern point of entrance to Chernofski harbor, Unalaska. So 
named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

East; spit, at the south end of Cleveland passage, Frederick sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Apparently so named by Nichols in 1891. 

East, cape; see Eagle. 

East Anchor; cove indenting the eastern shore of Ikatan island (or peninsula), near 
southern entrance to Isanotski strait, Unimak island. Named by the Fish 
Commission in 1888. 

East Clump ; "a small high-water islet ' ' in Tongass narrows, ' ' called by the pilots 
East Clump." Dall, in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 80), calls it Seat island, 
and says it is so named from a conspicuous and peculiar seat-shaped rock 
at its outer end. 

East Devil; rock or reef, bare at low water, in Dixon entrance, 4 miles northwest 
of Zayas island. Named by Dall in 1883. Prior to that date a sunken 
rock of doubtful position had been called Devil rock, a name suggesting 
the sailor's state of mind as to sunken rocks. In 1883 Capt. James Car- 
roll, in the Idaho, found another sunken reef farther west, and this was 
called by Dall West Devil rock. 

East Foreland; "steep, cliffy point" near the head of Cook inlet, so named by 
Vancouver in 1794. Wosnesenski, about 1840, according to Grewingk, 
calls it East cape and gives its native name as ]\Iikischkin or Tuchan Tan 
(tan meaning cape), and a nearby stream is called Kantiitschike. Russian 
Hydrographic chart 1378 (ed. of 1847) calls it East or Katiushkin cape. 

Eastern; anchorage, between the Mission buildings and northern entrance to Mid- 
dle channel, Sitka harbor, Sitka sound. Old descriptive name. 

Eastern; channel, leading into Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Vostochnie (eastern) by the Russians. 

EaMern, ocean; see Bering sea and Pacific ocean. 

Eastern; passage, ])etween the northern part of Wrangell island and the mainland, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Dall in 1877. 

Eastern; passage, leading from Glacier bay to ]\Iuir inlet, southeastern Alaska. 
Has been called East pass. Origin of n^ne not discovered. 

Eastern; point, the easternmost point of Krestof island, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Apparently so named by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 

Eastern, ahoal; see Southeast. 



BAKER.] IQ-^ 



Eas— Ed£ 



E'istini Sitkli), island; see Great Sitkin. 

East Francis; sunken rock, in Southern rapids, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago 
Discovered and named by Coghlan, in 1884, after pilot E. H. Francis the 
tirst person who succeeded in making soundings upon it 
East Head; promontory, between Porpoise and Sanborn harbors, on the western 

cast ot Xagai island, Shumagin group. So named bv Dall in 187'? 
East Head; the northeastern point of entrance to Popof strait, Shumagin islands 

X'amed by Dall in 1872. 
East Kusawa; lake, near the headwaters of the Yukon river. Native name \l«o 
I spelled Kussua and Kussooi The Canadian Board on Geographic Names 

has adopted the spelling Kusawa. 
East Na^ai; strait, separating Big Koniuji and Nagai islands, Shuma-in -roun 
Named by Dall in 1872. » » f- 

Eaton; mountain, between Corwin cliffs and Mount Augusta, in the St. Elias alps, 

southeastern Alaska. So named by Russell in 1890. 
Eaton; post-office, established in May, 1899, at the Eaton Reindeer station, on the 
L nalakhk river, about 10 miles above its mouth, northwestern Alaska 
So named after Gen. John Eaton, formerly United States Commissioner 
of Education. 
Eaton; river, tributary to Grantley harbor, Seward peninsula. So called in 1900 
Formerly called Fish river, that name including what is here called Niu- 
kluk and Eaton. 
Eckholms (The); group of islets, on the south side of Eastern channel into Sitka 
harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So named bv Vasilief in 
1809. Has also been written Eckholm, Eckholmes, and,"bv error in 
transliteration, Ekgalit-tch. It has also been called Beacon group. Eck- 
holm is a Swedish family name. 
Eclipse; creek, tributary to Melsing creek, from the east, in the Eldorado mining 

district, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. 
EcoJik, point; see Ikolik. 
Edgecumb, island; see Kruzof. 

Edgecumbe; cape, at entrance to Sitka sound. Named Edgecumbe by Cook, in 
1778, presumably after Mount Edgecumbe, at the mouth of' Plymouth 
harbor, England. It has been variously spelled Edgcumbe, Edgcombe, 
Edgecombe, Edjecumbe, and Edgkomb. It was seen and named Cabo 
del Engano (deceit or deception) by Maurelle in 1775. This name has 
been variously spelled Enganno, Engano, and Engario. By the early 
Russians it was called St. Lazaria or St. Lazarus, on the assumption that 
Mount Edgecumbe was the peak seen and named St. Lazaria by Chirikof 
in 1741. Also, it has been called Trubitsina. This name is said to have 
been given by Baranof, in honor of boatswain Trubitsin, one of Chirikof's 
■ officers. In the official list of Chirikof's officers and men, however, this 
name is absent. The name Sitka (spelled Sitkha, Sitcha, etc.) has also 
been applied to this cape, and on some charts both names are retained 
and applied to different parts of the same locality. This and adjacent land 
to the eastward has been reserved for light-house purposes by Executive 
order dated January 4, 1901. In that order it is spelled Edgecombe. 
Edgecumbe; lake, near Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Edgecomb by the Coast Survey in 1897. 
Edgecumbe; mountain (3,467 feet high), an extinct volcano, on Kruzof island 
near the entrance to Sitka sound. Elevation given as 2,676, 2,800, 2,855, 
3,467, and 8,000 feet, the last being an estimate by Lisianski, who climbed 
it in 1805. The elevation 2,855 is that determined by the Coast Survey 
in 1867, and 3,467 the determination by the Coast Survey in 1897. 

Bull. 187—01 11 



Eds— Eg;: 



-Ig2 [BULL. 187. 



! 



Edgecumbe— Continued. , ,, 

Named Edgecumbe bv Cook, in 1778, presumably after Mount Kdgecaunbe, 
at the entrance to Plymouth harbor, England. It is Mount St. Lazarus or 
St. Lazaria of early Russian charts, this name, it is said, having been given 
by Chirikof in 1741. Maurelle, in 1775, called it Mount de S. Jacinto, 
which La Perouse, translating, writes Mount Saint-Hyacinte. Variant 
spellings of all these forms are found including the erroneous one San 
Yacinto. 
Edciecinnbe, M&nd; see Krnzoi. 
Editli; lake, near the Tanana river in latitude 62° 4(y. So named by Abercrombie 

in 1898. 
Edward; cape, on the western coast of Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Vancouver in 1794. Tebenkof calls it Elkugu, which is pre- 
sumablv the native name. 
Edward; creek, trib-utarv to Cripple river, from the east, near its mouth, Seward 

peninsula. Local name, published in 1900 as Eduards and Edward. 
Edward; passage, between Fillmore island and the mainland, southeastern Alaska. 

Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Edward; point, the northern point of Deer island, Port ^loller, Alaska peninsula. 
So named by Dall, in 1882, after Capt. Edward Perry Herendeen, to whom 
is due a considerable extension of our knowledge of the geography of Port 
Moller. This name has, on one chart, been transferred to an adjacent point 
on the mainland. I 

Edwards; island, in Port Beauclerc, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So named | 

by Helm in 1886. 
Eek- river, tributary to the Kuskokwim, from the east, near its mouth. Eskimo . 
name, published in Sarichef's atlas, 1826, where it is spelled Ik; on late 
maps it is Eek. 
Eek; inlet and lake, in southwestern part of Prince of Wales island, Alexander 

archipelago. Called Eeke by the Coast Survey in 1899. 
Eenanul-lito; see Einahnuhto. 

£<76er<, fort; see Fort Egbert. ■■,,, .i i 

Egg; bay, west of Egg cape, on the northwestern shore of Atka island, middle Aleu- [ 

" tians. Called laitchnoi (egg) by Lutke in 1836. 
Egg; cape, the south point of entrance to Korovinski bay, on northwestern coast of 
Atka, middle Aleutians. Named lachnoi (egg) by Lutke or Ingenstrem 
about 1830. Has been written lachnoi, laitchnoi, Jaichnoi, Yaitchni. 
Egg; harbor, on the north shore of Coronation island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Snow in 1886. "It is a rendezvous for the Indians, who here i 
await favorable weather to go out to the Hazy islands to gather eggs." 
Egg; island, between Kittiwake and Little Raspberry islands, Kodiak group. : 

Named lachnoi (egg) by Murashef, 1839-40. 
Egg; island, in Disenchantment bay, Yakutat bay. Named by the Coast Survey m | 
1891. Not found on any chart. ^ ■ 

Egg; island, in Moira sound, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Snow in 1886. 
Egg, island; see Fish Egg. 

Egg; island, northeast of St. Michael, in Norton sound. Named lachnoi (egg) by 
the Russians. It is L'ile des Oeufs of Lutke. Archimandritof calls it 
Zharot. .^ 

Egg; island or mud bank, in the Copper river delta. Name from manuscript Coast 

Survey map, 1900. 
Egg, island, Lituyabay; see Cenotaph. 
Egg, island, Sandman reefs; see Hunt. 
Egg, island, Unalga pass; see Ugalgan. 



BAKER.] 1 A^ 

J^Od Egg-Eld. 

:Egg; islands, in Popof strait, Shumagin islands. 80 called by Ball in 1872 
Egg, islets, Neoker bay; see Guibert. 

Egrgr Shell; island, east of Cape Whitshed, at mouth of the Copper river. So called 
by Moser in 1899. These are the Egg islands of Coast and Geodetic 
Survey chart 8500 (ed. of 1900). 
Egashal; river; see Igushik. 
Egichtallk, village; see Aiaktalik. 
Eg ilka, island; see Igitkin. 

Egoochshac Cook gives this as the native name of a bav in Unalaska, which one I 
have not determmed. He entered it October 2, 1778, and sav^ (II 49'>). 
"As all harbours are alike to me, provided thev were equallv safe and 
convenient, I hauled into a bay, that lies 10 miles to the westward of 
Samganoodha, known by the name of Egoochshac; but we found very 
deep water; so that we were glad to get out again." 
Egorkovskoi, cape; see Tanak. 
Egoushik, river; see Igushik. 
Egowik, creek and village; see Iguik. 
Egypt; mountain (2,500 feet high), on the west bank of the Kuskokwin river near 

latitude 62° 30^ So named by Spurr and Post in 1898 
Eidenu; Eskimo settlement, on Cape Prince of Wales. Yariouslv written Eidannou 
Iden-noo, etc. It is not an Eskimo word. Can this be an Eskimo 
rendering of "I don't know"? Beechey, 1826, writes Ei-dan-noo and 
iden-noo. 
Eider; anchorage and point, on the western shore of Captains bav, Unalaska 
eastern Aleutians. Sarichef, 1792, shows a village here called Pestriakovo 
(eider duck). Kotzebue, 1816, calls it Igognak or Pestriakovo. Thus it 
has been called Eider, Igognak, Pestriakof, etc. 
Eider; native village, at Eider point. Captains bay, Unalaska, called by Sarichef 
1792, Pestriakof (eider duck). Veniaminof, about 1830, says it was com- 
posed of five huts (yourts) and 37 people. 
Eighteenmile, arm, of Kasaan baj- see Twelvemile. 
Eig-htmile; bend, in the Koyukuk river, near longitude 152° 30^. Descriptive 

name, given by Allen in 1885. 
Einalinulito; bluffs and hills (600 feet high), in the western part of St. Paul island, 
Pribilof islands, Bering sea. Also written Ein-ah-nuh-to and Eenanukhto' 
According to Elliott this is Aleut for the "mammae." Also, according 
to same, it means the "three mammae." 
Eivoogiena, island; see St. Lawrence. 
Eivugeu, island; see St. Lawrence. 
Ekgalit-tch, islets; see Eck holms (The). 

Ekilik; Eskimo village, on the west bank of Togiak river, about 10 miles from its 
mouth. Eskimo name obtained by Spurr and Post, in 1898, who write it 
Ekiligamut, i. e., Ekilik people. 
Ekogmute, village; see Ikogmute. 

•Ek^; cape, on the eastern shore of Nushagak river, near its mouth. Xative name 
from Lutke, 1828, who wrote it Ekouk. Clark point of the Fish Commis- 
sion, 1888, may be a synonym for this. In the Eleventh Census written 
Yekuk. 

Ekuk: Eskimo settlement, near the mouth of the Nushagak river. Xame from 
Lutke, 1828, who spelled it Ekouk. Has also been written Yekuk 

Elbow;, mountain (4,111 feet high), at the first great bend or elbow of the Stikine 
river, on its northern bank. So named bj- the Coast Survey. 

Eldorado; creek, tributary to headwaters of Budd creek, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 



Eld— Klo. 164 [BULL. 187. 

Eldorado; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near longi- 
tude 147°. Prospectons' name, published in 18'J9. 
Eldorado; creek, tributary to Tisuk river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Eldorado; river, tributary to Port Safety, Seward peninsula. So called by Barnard 

in 1900. Previously called Eldorado creek. 
Eldred; passage, in Kachemak bay, Cook inlet, separating Cohen, Hesketh, and 

Yukon islands from the mainland. Named by Dall, in 1880, after Sarah 

Eldred, wife of Marcus Baker. 
Eldred; rock (50 feet high), in Lynn canal, east of Sullivan island. Visited, located 

and named, in 1880, by Marcus Baker, after his wife, Sarah Eldred. Krause, 

in 1882, reported the native name to be Nechraje. Reserved for light-house 

purposes by p]xecutive order of January 4, 1901. 
Eleanor; cove, in eastern part of Yakutat bay, behind Knight island. So named 

by Puget of Vancouver's party in 1794. 
Eleanor; point, the north point of Knight island. Prince William sound. Named 

by Vancouver in 1794. 
Elephant; point, in Eschscholtz bay, Kotzebue sound. So named by Beechey, ir 

1826, "from the bones of that animal being found near it." 
Elephants Head; mountain peak, on the eastern shore of Thomas bay, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by Thomas'in 1887. 
Eliza; harbor, indenting the southern coast of Admiralty island, Frederick sound, 

Alexander archipelago. Discovered April 17, 1799, by Mr. Bumstead, ol 

the ship Eliza, from Boston, Captain Rowan, and named "Eliza's Har- 
bour, in compliment to our ship." 
Eliza; point, the southern point of entrance to Port Armstrong, Baranof island 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 
Elizabeth; cape, at the southwestern angle of Kenai peninsula. So named by Cook, 

in 1778, because "the discovery of it was connected with the Princess" 

Elizabeth's birth-day" (II, 382). Sauer calls it, erroneously, cape St. ; 

Elizabeth. i 

Elizabeth; point, the northwest point of entrance to Rodman bay. Peril strait, Alex- | 

ander archipelago. So named by Moore in 1895. 
Elkamok, island; see Chirikof. , 

Elkhorn; creek, tributary to the Niukluk, from the south, in the Eldorado mining | 

district, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. Also, errone- | 

ously, Elkorn. 
Elhugu, cape; see Edward. i, 

Ellamar; post-office, established September, 1900, at Virgin bay, between Ports ^ 

Fidalgo and Valdes, on the northeastern shore of Prince William sound. 
Ellice; point, on the Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow. Named by Dease and 

Simpson, in 1837, after the Right Hon. Edward Ellice. Erroneously Elice. 
Elliot; creek, tributary to the Kotsina, from the east. Name from a manuscript I 

map made by prospectors in 1900. 
Ellis; point, the northwestern point of entrance to Tebenkof bay, Kuiu island, , 

Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

An Indian village here has been called Point Ellis village. 
Ellsworth Cut; a narrow channel, in Sitka sound, separating Harris island from 

the Baranof shore. Named Ellsworths Cut by United States naval officers, 

in 1879, after Lieut. Henry G. Ellsworth, United States Marine Corps. 
Elma; island, one of the Sannak group. So named by the Fish Commission in 1890. 
Elovoi, cape; see Chiniak. 
Elovoi, cape; see Spruce. 



BAKER. J 165 Elo— End. 

Elovoi; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named P^lovoi (spruce) l)y Vasilief in 1809. Variously called Spruce, 

Yelowoi, etc. 
Elovoi; islet, opposite Hooniah sound, in Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Elovoi (spruce or fir) by Vasilief in 1833. Has also been written 

Yelowoi, Firtree, or Spruce island. See also Spruce. 
Elovoi, strait; see Narrow. 
Elonii viintrennie, cape; see Inner Spruce. 
Elrington; point, the eastern point of entrance to Port Bainbridge, Prince William 

sound. Named by Vancouver in 1794. 
Elsie; point, the easternmost point of Bell island, Behm canal, Alexander arciii- 

pelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Elson; l)ay, near Point Barrow. So named by Beechey in September, 1826, "in 

compliment to Master Thomas Elson," R. N., a member of his party. Its 

Eskimo name, according to English naval officers, is Tasuk. 
Emgeten; island, in northeastern part of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Vasilief in 1809. Has been variously given as 

Emheleni, P^mgayten, etc. It has also been called Luce island. Origin 

or meaning of name not discovered. 
Emheleni, island; see Emgeten. 
Emilia; canyon, on Sanford river, near latitude 62° 30^. So named by Abercrombie 

in 1898. 
Emily; island, in Duncan canal, Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Thomas in 1887. 
Emily; peak, in eastern part of Mitkof island, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Thomas in 1887. 
Emma; cape, on the southern shore of Bennett island, Arctic ocean. At this point 

the shipwrecked crew of the United States arctic exploring steamer 

Jeanneltc landed, in 1881, and De Long named the cape after his wife. 
Em.merich; mountain (6,940 feet high), about 6 miles west of Pyramid harbor, Lynn 

canal, southeast Alaska. So named by the Coast Survey in 1897. 
Emmons; island, in Hooniah sound, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by the Coast Survey, in 1899, after Lieut. George Thornton Emmons, U. S. N. 
Empalizada, Punta de la; see Palisade. 
Empinado; cape, on the southeastern shore of Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales 

archipelago. Named Cabo Empinado (high cape) by Maurelle and 

Quadra in 1775-1779. Erroneously Etpinado. 
Empty; island, one of the Kasiana group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Pustiia (empty) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Emukpun. This Eskimo name appears on Ray's map of 1885 for some feature, per- 
haps a lagoon near western end of Elson bay at Point Barrow, Arctic coast. 

Possibly an error for Emukpuk. 
Ench.aiitm.ent; cape, on the northwestern shore of Russell fiord, Yakutat l)ay, 

southeastern Alaska. So named by Russell in 1891. 
Endicott; arm, of Holkham bay, Stephens passage, southeastern Alaska. Named 

by Mansfield, in 1889, after Hon. William Crowninshield Endicott, then 

Secretary of War. 
Endicott; lake, on the eastern border of ]\Iuir glacier. Named by Reid in 1890- 

1892. The valley was named ]Main by Muir, and by Reid changed to 

Endicott on account of improved knowledge of its relation to Endicott 

river. 
Endicott; river, on the mainland, tributary to Lynn canal, from the west, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by United States naval officers in 1880, after 

Hon. William C. Endicott, Secretary of War. 



find— £nt. 166 [bull. 187. 

Endicott; valley, southeast of ]\fuir glacier. Named -Main valley by Miiir, and tliis 
name changed, by Reid, to Endicott valley on account of improved knowl- 
edge of it.« relations to Endicott river. 

Endora, mountain; see Eudora. 

Eiujano, Cabo del; see Edgecumbe. 

Engaijini, island; see Emgeten. 

Engineers; point, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. Name jmblished by the 
Coast Survey in 1897. 

English, bay, Cook inlet; see Graham harbor. 

English, bay, Unalaska; see Samganuda. 

English.; shallow bay, indenting the southern shore of St. Paul island, Pribilof 
islands, Bering sea. Local name derived, according to Elliott, from the 
circumstance that a large British vessel was wrecked here in 1847. 

Ennis, point; see Bald Head. 

Enright, creek ; see Slate. 

Ensenada del Principe; see Chatham. 

Entrance; cape, forming the western point of entrance to a small bay on northern 
shore of Kupreanof strait, Kodiak group. Named Ustia (entrance) 1)y 
Murashef, in 1839-40, a name which, in 1849, was applied by the Russian 
American Company' to a point a little farther west. 

Entrance; island, at entrance to St. John Baptist bay, in Neva strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Coghlan in 1884. 

Entrance; island, at entrance to Swanson harbor, near southern end of Lynn canal, 
Alexander archipelago. Descriptive name, given by United States naval 
officers in 1880. 

Entrance; island (45 feet high) , at mouth of Symonds bay, Biorka island, Sitka sound. 
So named by Symonds in 1879. 

Entrance; island (4.58 feet high), in mouth of Hobart bay, Frederick sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Entrance; island, near the north end of Winstanley island, in Behm canal, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So called by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Entrance, island; see Twins (The). 

Entrance; point, being the eastern point of Raspberry island, Kodiak groujj, and 
marking the beginning of Kupreanof strait. Named Nachalnie ( beginning) 
by IMurashef in 1839-40. 

Entrance; point, on Douglas island, marking the western entrance to Gastineau 
channel, Alexander archipelago. So named by Symonds in 1880. 

Entrance; point, the eastern point of 'entrance to Port MoUer, Alaska peninsula. 
So named by Dall in 1880. 

Entrance; point, the eastern point of entrance to Port Valdes, Prince William 
sound. So named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Entrance; point, the eastern point of entrance to Sawmill cove, Dall island, How- 
kan strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Dall in 1882. Also 
named Chapman point by Sheldon Jackson, after James E. Chapman, 
commissioned as a teacher at Howkan village in August, 1881. 

Entrance point, the northern point of entrance to Hooniah harbor, Port Frederick, 
Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Symonds in 18S0. 

Entrance; point, the western point of entrance to Narrow strait (between Kodiak 
and Spruce islands). Named Nachalnie (entrance) by Murashef in 
1839-40. 

Entrance; point, the western point of entrance to Port Frederick, Icy strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Entrance; rock, in entrance to Hassler harbor, Annette island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Nichols in 1882. 



i 



p 



baker] 167 



Ent— Esq. 



Entry; peak (1,400 feet hiwh), on the southern coast of Wales island, Dixon 
entrance, Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Eolus; point, the southern point of entrance to Breezy bay, Tlevak strait. This 
name, given by Dall in 1882, was suggested by the strong winds encoun- 
tered there. 

E-oo-vogen, island; see St. Lawrence. 

E-oic-ick, island; see Chamisso. 

Ericsson; peak (4,296 feet high), on the mainland, northeast of Frederick sound. 
Named l)y Thomas, in 1887, after the distinguished Swedish engineer John 
Ericsson, inventor of the Monitor. Erroneously Ericson on some charts. 

Ermine; island, on the southeastern shore of Shuyak island, Kodiak group. Named 
Gornostai (weasel or ermine) by the Russian American Company in 1849. 

Fnnoshl-inskie, cape; see Ko'STizhka. 

Ernest; sound, east of Prince of Wales archipelago, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Prince Ernest's sound by Vancouver, in 1793, "after His Royal Highness 
Prince Ernest." 

Ernestine; creek, tributary to the headwaters of Kanata river. Local name, 
reported by Schrader in 1900. 

Error; island, one of tlie Kutchuma group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Oshibki (error) by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been written Oshinpi 
and Oshipki. Has also been called White island and Ship island. 

Erskine; bay, at head of Beaver bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. So named by 
the Fish Commission, in 1888, after Captain Melvin C. Erskine of the 
Alaska Commercial Company. Sarichef, 1792, calls it Kikukalen, appar- 
ently its native name. Yeniamenof calls it Kikukalia. 

Erskine; point, the eastern head of Kalekta bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. So 
named by the Fish Commission, in 1888, after Captain Erskine, of the 
Alaska Commercial Company. 

Escape; cape, on Kruzof island, at junction of Hayward strait and Krestof sound, 
Alexander archipelago. Named Koloshskoi strechi (Koloshian escape) 
by Vasilief in 1809. 

Escape; point, on the western shore of Revillagigedo island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Vancouver, in 1793, in commemoration of his escape from a 
hostile attack by the natives. Izbavlenia (deliverance) of the Russians. 

Escarpment; cape, on the northern shore of Norton sound. Named Utes (cliff 
or bluff) by Tebenkof, in 1833, which is translated escarpe by Lutke. 
l)escripti\'e name. Not found on recent maps. 

Eschscholtz ; bay, an arm of Kotzebue sound. Named by Kotzebue in August, 
1810, after Dr. Frederick Eschscholtz, his physician and naturalist. Also 
has l>een written Eschholtz, Escholtz. 

Esker; glacial stream, from the Malaspina glacier, debouching near the head of 
Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. So named by Russell in 1891. 

Eskimo; island, in Harrison bay, Arctic coast, east of Point Barrow. Named Esqui- 
maux by Dease and Simpson in 1837. 

Espacki, Punta de; see Sword. 

Espenberg; cape, the southern point of entrance to Kotzebue sound. Named by 
Kotzebue, in 1816, after his friend. Dr. Karl Espenberg, who, as surgeon, 
accompanied Krusenstern on his voyage round the world 1803-06. Erro- 
neously Espenburg and Spanberg. 

Esperanza, point; see Latouche. 

Esquibel; bay or gulf, on the western coast of Prince of Wales archipelago. So 
named by ^laurelle in 1779. 'S'ariously denominated bay and gulf. ]\Iis- 
spelled Esquible. The original name is given by Petrof as Bahia de 
Esquivel. 



iBsq-Kva. 108 [bull. 187. 

Esquimaux, island; sco Eskimo. 

Estelle; niomitain, near headwaters of the Knskokwim river, longitude 153° 15^ 
So named hy Post, of the Geological Survey, in 1898. 

Esterilcit, islas; see barren. 

Esther; island, in I'ort Wells, Prince William sound. So named by Vancouver 
in 1794. 

Estrella; port, in Walaspina island, Bucareli hay. Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Puerto de la Estrella (port of the star) by Maurelle and Quadra 
in 1775-1779. 

Emktu, river; see Usuktu. 

Esutkwa; small stream, in northernmost Alaska, near tlie United States refuge sta- 
tion Utkiavi. Eskimo name from Ray, 1885. 

Etches; ])ort, indenting the western shore of Hinchinbrook island, Prince William 
sound. Visited and named by Portlock, in 1787, after John and Camden 
Etches & Co., of London, early fur traders on the Northwest coast. 
Dixon, 1787, called it Port Rose. The Russians adopted the native name 
Nuchek, which has l)een variously written Noocheck, Nutschek, etc., and 
even Nooscha. 

Etolin; cape, the northernmost point of Nunivak island, Bering sea. So named 
by the Russians after Capt. Adolph Karlovich Etolin, Director of the Rus- 
sian American colonies, 1841-1845 who, with Khromchenko, explored 
this region in 1821. It has also been called Khromchenko. 

Etolin, cape; see Vasilief. 

Etolin, harbor; see Wrangell. 

Etolin; island, between Wrangell island and Prince of Wales island, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by the Russians after Etolin, governor of the Rus- 
sian American colonies, 1841-1845. Variously written Etholen (Bancroft's 
Hist., p. 559), Etholine, Etoline, etc. 

Etolin; mountain (3,778 feet high), in the southern part of Etolin island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Snow, in 1886, after Director Etolin. 

Etolin; point, in Bristol bay, the eastern point of entrance to Nushagak river. So 
called by Lutke, about 1830, after Director Etolin, who made surveys and 
explorations in this region in 1821. Variously spelled Etholin, Etoline, 
and also called Bristol and Bristolski. 

Etolin; strait, separating Nunivak island from the mainland, Bering sea. Dis- 
covered, in 1821, by Etolin, afterwards governor of the Russian American 
colonies, who named it Cook strait, after Capt. James Cook. Krusen- 
stern, however, proposed that it be called after its discoverer, Etolin, and 
accordingly it appears variously as Cook or Etolin strait. 

Eudocla or Eudohla, islands; see Semidi. 

Eudora; mountain (3,500 feet high), on Prince of Wales island, between Moira and 
Cholmondeley sounds, Alexander archipelago. So named by Clover in 
1885. Erroneously Endora. 

Eudoxia, islands; see Semidi. 

Eugenia; point, on the northern shore of San Juan Bautista island, Bucareli bay. 
Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de [illegible] Eugenia by 
Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Eureka; creek, tributary to Skookum river, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Eureka, ledge; see Wayanda. 

Eva; islands, in the eastern part of Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Moore in 1895. 

Eva; islet, near the entrance to Hamilton bay, Keku strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Moore in 1895. 



BAKER.] 169 Eva— Fal. 

Eva; lake, on the north shore of Baranof island, near Hanns bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Moore in 1895. 

Eva; {teak, in the divide 1)et\veen the headwaters of the Kuskokwim and Skwentna 
rivers, near longitude 153°. So named by Post in 1898. 

Eva; point, on the mainland, the north point of entrance to Rudyerd bay, Behm 
canal. So called by the Coast Survey, in 1891; also called Slide point by 
tlie Coast Survey in 1894. 

Evans; riKumtain (5,400 feet high), between Valdes glacier and Klntina lake. So 
named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Evans; point, on the northern coast of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. Named by 
Berry, in 1881, presumably after Commander (now Rear Admiral) Robley 
Dunglison Evans, U. S. N. 

Erdol-rt'ft] island; see Chowiet and Semidi. 

Everett; peak (3,645 feet high), on the mainland, near Port Snettisham, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1888, after the distinguished 
orator Edward Everett. 

Errnslilchichie, cape; see Marmot. 

Errmhht, bay; see Marmot. 

Eir(h)lijrffti(in, islands; see Semidi. 

Ewen Nass. Vancouver gives this as the supposed Indian name of Portland inlet 
and connecting waters. Ewen was by him supposed to mean great while 
the meaning of Nass he did not discover. 

Excelsior; creek, tributary to Mission creek, from the west, in the Eagle mining 
region. Local name, reported by Barnard in 1898. 

Exchange; cove, in Prince of Wales island, opening into Kashevarof passage, 
Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by Snow in 1886. 

Exchange; island, in Kashevarof passage, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Snow in 1886. 

Excursion; inlet, on the northern shore of Icy strait, between Lynn canal and 
(xlacier l)ay. It was entered by the excursion steamer Idaho, in 1883, and 
named Excursion inlet l)y pilot AV. PL George. It is said to be known as 
Hudson Bay inlet, and appears on the charts as Hudson Bay inlet and 
Hudson Bay or Excursion inlet. 

Expedition; islet, in Iliuliuk harbor, Cajitains bay, Unalaska. So named by Dall 
in 1871. 

Expedition; point, on the northeastern shore of Security bay, Kuiu island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Extra Dry; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the west, in the Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. The neigh- 
Ijoring creek is named Dry. 

Eyak; lake, native village, and river, at western edge of the Copper river delta. 
Petrof in the Tenth Census, 1880, wrote it Ikhiak. The Eleventh Census, 
1890, has Ighiak or Odiak. Recent maps have Eyak. Closer, 1899, calls 
it Odiak. Pronounced Ai-ak. 

Eye Opener; a dangerous rock, covered at three-fourths tide, near the middle of 
Sumner strait, off Red bay, Alexander archipelago. Named Atkroi- 
glaza (eye opener) by the Russians. Also known locally as Shoo Fly 
rock. 

Eye Opener; islet, in Portillo channel, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Abre-el-ojo (open the eye) l)y Maurelle and (Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Fair; island, at junction of Beecher j^assage and Duncan cana', Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Fairmount; island, on north shore of Prince William sound, near mouth of Lnakwik 
l)ay. Name from Schrader, 1900. 



Fai— Fal. 



170 [bull. 187. 



Fairs; island, in Stockdale liarlwr, on western nhore of Montague island, Prince 
William sound. So named hy Portloek in 1787. 

Fairview; ereek, tributary to Bering sea near Cape Woolley, in western part ol 
Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, from Barnard, 1900. 

Fairway; island (100 feet high), and reef, in entrance to Affleck canal, Sumner 
strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Fairway; island, in the eastern entrance to Peril strait, Alexander archijjelago. So 
named by Meade in 1869. It has heen reserved for light-Iiouse i)urp()ses 
by Executive order dated January 4, 1901. 

Fairway; rock, forming part of the Diomede group of islands in Bering strait. So 
named by Beechey, in 1826, because, he says, "it is an excellent guide to 
the eastern channel. " Its native name has been variously written Oki- 
vaki, Oo-ghe-e-ak, Ugiiak, etc. 

Fairway; rock, south of Whale island. Redoubt bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Farvaternoi (fairway) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Falriraj/, rocks; see Green. 

Fairweather; cape, on the mainland, in the St, Elias region. Named Fair Weather 
by Cook in May, 1778. It is Beautems of La Perouse in 1786; Buen- 
tiempo of Galiano, 1802; Cape de Beau temps of De Mofras in 1844; Gutwetter 
of Grewingk, 1849; Horoshi pogodi of the Russians, and L'tua of Tebenkof, 
1849. The last is the native name. 

Fairweather; mountain (15,292 feet high), in the St. Elias region. So named by 
Cook in IVIay, 1778, doubtless on account of fine weather at the time of 
his visit; universally called Fairweather by English-speaking people. It 
is Beautems of La Perouse, 1786; Buen-tiempo of Galiano, 1802; Horoshi 
pogodi of the Russians; Phaier-veder of Tebenkof, 1849; Gutwetterberg 
of Grewingk, 1850, and Schonwetter Berg of Justus Perthes, 1882. This 
mcjuntain with its neighboring peaks and crest constitute the Fairweather 
range. 

Fairweather Ground. The waters of the north Pacific in the vicinity of the Fair- 
weather range, was nmch frequented by the whalemen fifty years ago, and 
by them called the Fairweather Ground. 

Falfan; ])oint, on the southern shore of Port Asumcion, Bucareli bay. Prince of 
Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Falfan by Maurelle and (Quadra in 
1775-1779. 

Fall; creek, tributary to Imuruk basin, from the south, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Fall; creek, tributary to the headwaters of Kanata river. Name from Schrader, 1900. 

Fall; creek, tributary to Kluvesna creek, from the north. Prospectors' name, from 
Genline, 1900. 

Falmouth; harbor, indenting the western shore of Nagai island, Shumagins. So 
named by Dall, in 1872, after a vessel of that name driven into it by a gale, 
which is the first vessel known to have entered it. 

False; l)ay or anchorage, on the eastern shore of Chichagof island, Chatham strait, 
Alexander archipelago. Name adopted by Meade, in 1869, from the fur 
traders. 

False; cape, near Franklin point, Arctic coast. Perhaps it is the easternmost point 
of the Seashore islands. So called on British Admiralty chart 593 (ed. of 
J 882). 

False; liill, at head of Tamgas harbor, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. So 
called by the Coast Survey as early as 1891 and perhaps earlier. 

False; island, on the northern shore of Peril strait, opposite Rodman bay, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So named by Moore in 1895. 
False; i)oint, (jn the eastern shore of Port Frederick, Icy strait, Alexander archi 
l)elago. So named by United States naval officers in 1880. 



1 



BAKER.] ]7l 



Fal— Far. 



Jlf/.s-.', ruck, Sitka sound; see Liar. 

False Channel; bay, in Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty Island, Alexander archipelago. 
Descriptive name, given by Meade in 1869. 

Fdhe Chilkat, inlet; see Chilkoot. 

False Ears; mountain, on Seward peninsula, south of Goodhope bay, Kotzebue 
souna. So called on British Admiralty chart 593 (ed. of 1882). Perhaps 
so^alled by some of the English naval officers engaged in the Franklin 
search expeditions 1849-1854. 

False Green; point, on the mainland near the mouth of the Stikine river. Called 
by Durkin and Kadin, who made a survey here, in 1863, "Lower limit of 
Zelonoi (green) cape," whence the name False or South Zelonoi point. 
False Green point, and False Zelonoi point. 

False Island; point, near to and resembling Island point. Linden berg peninsula, 
Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Thomas m 1887. 

False Lead; an opening leading from Tlevak strait to View cove, Dall island, 
Alexander archipelago. Being liable to be mistaken for the main channel 
it was named False Lead by Nichols in 1881. 

False Lindenberg; rocky bluff, on the northern shore of Peril strait, on the south- 
eastern shore of Chichagof island. Xame i)r()l)al»ly adopted by the Coast 
Survey from the ])ilots. 

False Mount ('aider; see Red Bay mountain. 

Fuhe Pnax, strait; see Isanotski. 

False Point Pybus; point, the southeastemmost point of Admiralty island, Fred- 
erick sound, Alexander archipelago. It has been confused on some charts 
with the true point Pybus, which is about 5 miles southwest from it. 

False Point Retreat; point, on the western shore of Admiralty island, Alexander 
arcliiijelago, a1)OUt 5 miles .south of the true Point Retreat. Xamed from 
fancied reseml)lanc-e to Point Retreat. 

Fahe Zelonoi, point; see False Green. 

Fankuda; island, on the southern shore of Redoubt bay, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. So called by Vasilief in 1809. 

Fannie; island, in Port Snettisham, Stephens passage, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Thomas in 1888. 

Fanshaw; bay, indenting the mainland coast on the eastern side of Frederick 
sound, Alexander archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Fanshaw; cape, on the northeastern shore of Frederfcii sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Fanshaw; peak (2,818 feet high), on the mainland, near Cape Fanshaw, northeast 
of Frederick sound. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Fanshaw; range of mountains, on the mainlancT, northeast of Frederick sound, 
southeastern Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Far; cape, on the northern shore of Kitti wake island, Kodiak group. Xamed Dal- 
nie (far or distant) by Murashef in 1839-40. 

Far; point, the easternmost of the Barrier islands, Cordova bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Farallon; see Kekur. 

■Farewell, island, Lynn canal; see Pyramid. 

Farewell; mountain, on the left bank of the Kuskokwim river, near longitude 154°. 
So named by Spurr and Post in 1898. 

Farewell; point, the southern extreme of Chernabura island and the southernmost 
point of the Shumagin group. Name supposed to have been adopted by 
the Coast Survey from the fishermen or Russians. It is the last land seen 
by the fishermen when setting out from their fishing grounds for home. 

Farm; island, in delta at mouth of the Stikine river. So named by Thomas in 1887. 
The island is low and fiat. 



Far— Fol. 



172 [Buij,.is7. 



Farmi'r. A cape in Dixon enti-ance was so named by Douglas in 1789. Identity 

doubtful and name obsolete. 
Farrag-ut; ])ay, on the northern shore of Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by Thomas, in bS87, after Admiral David (ilascoe Farragut, U. 8. N. 
Fassett; island, in Albatross ani'horage, Portage bay, Alaska peninsula. So named 

by the Fish Commission in Septemljer, 1893. 
Fassett; islet, in Sitka sound, one of the Kutchuma group. Named by Beardslee, in 

1880, presumably after sailmaker Thomas O. Fassett, U. S. N. Has been 

erroneously written Fasseet and Fasset. 
Fatig-ue; bay, between Smith bay and Dease inlet, on the Arctic coast, east of I'uint 

Barrow. So named by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, in memory of their 

tedious and fatiguing walk around it. 
Fault; mountain, on headwaters of the Koyukuk river, near latitude 68°. So 

named V)y Schrader, in 1898. 
Faust; island, in Seymour canal, Alexander archipelago. So named by Mansfield, 

in 1890, after Ensign William H. Faust, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Faust; sunken rock, in Saginaw channel, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. 

Discovered and named by Mansfield, in 1890, after Ensign William Harry 

Faust, U. S. N., a membei' of his party. 
Faustino; point, on the northwestern shore of San Juan Bautista island, Bucareli 

bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de San Faustino by 

Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Favor; peak, in extreme eastern part of Mitkof island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Thomas in 1887. 
Favorite; anchorage, in Deadman reach, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by United States naval officers, in 1880, after the little steamer 

Favorite, belonging to the Northwest Trading Company. 
Favorite ; channel, at south end of Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. Named by 

United States naval officers, in 1880, after the steamer Favoriie, above. 

Also, erroneously, Favourite. 
Favorite; glacier, on the western shore of Glacier bay. Named by Reid, in 1892, 

after " the little steamer Favorite, in which Captain Beardslee first entered 

Glacier bay in 1880." 
Favorite; reef, in Saginaw channel, on the southwestern shore of Shelter island, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1885, after the 

little trading steamer Favorite. 
F wn; mountain (2,112 feet high), near the southern end of Revillagigedo island, 

Alexander archipelago. So nametl, in 1883, by Nichols. Buck and Doe 

mountains are near by. 
Fawn; point, the southernmost point of Deer island, near Belkofski. So named by 

Dall in 1880. Called South cape by the Fish Commission in 1888. 
Fawn; river, near Return reef, Arctic ocean. So named by Dease and Simpson in 

1837. 
Feather; river, in the Cape Nome mining region, Seward peninsula, debouching a 

little north of Cape WooUey. Local name from Barnard, 1900. 
Fee. One of the glacial streams emerging from the Malaspina glacier was called Fee 

river by the New York Times expedition of 1886. Seton Karr calls it Fee 

Springs. 
Felice; strait, se]mrating Annette island from other islands south and east of it, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey, in 1883, after the 

Felice, one of Meares' ships, which visited this coast in 1788. Is also 

called Felice passage. 
Felix; cape, the southeastern point of entrance to Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales 

archipelago. Named Cabo de San Feliz by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775- 

1779, and variously called Saint Felix point, Point Saint Feliz, etc. 



BAKKK.] 1^3 Fer— Fin. 

Ferebee; glac-ier, near the head of Lynn eanal, Alexander archipelago. Named by- 
United States naval otticers, in 1880, after Surg. Nelson Macpherson Ferebee, 
I'. S. N., who visited the region that year. According to Dr. A. Krause, 
who visited the region in 1882, its native name is Dejahssankessit. 

Ferebee; rocks, in the Galankin group of islands, Sitka sound, Alexander archipel- 
ago. Named by United States naval officers, in 1880, after Surg. Nelson 
^I. Ferebee, U. S. N. Erroneously Ferabee. 

Ferebee; valley, in which Ferebee glacier heads. Named by United States naval 
officers in 1880. 

Ferguason, point; see Rocky. 

Ferrer; passage, the entrance to Disenchantment bay, from Yakutat l)ay. Variously 
called entrance, inlet, passage, and strait. According to Tebenkof it is 
said to have been so named by Malaspina, in 1791, after Ferrer Maldonado. 
The name is obsolete. 

Fetkina; Eskimo village, in the Yukon delta. So called by Nelson, who visited it 
in December, 1878. Population 30, in 1880. Origin of name not discovered. 

Fickett; river, of central Alaska, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the north, near 
1( mgitude 150° . So named by Allen, in 1885, after Private Fred. W. Fickett, 
U. S. A., a member of his party. Its native name, according to Allen, is 
Ascheeshna, /. e., Ascheesh river. On recent charts called Oschesna and 
Ochesna. 

Fidalgo; mountain, on the northern shore of Prince William sound. "Was called 
Volcan de Fidalgo by the Spaniards, probably in 1790, the name being 
published in 1802. 

Fidalgo; port, indenting the eastern shore of Prince William sound. So named by 
Vancouver, in 1794, in honor of Seiior Don Salvador Fidalgo, who visited 
this region in 1790. 

Fighting John; j^eak (5,078 feet high), on the mainland, east of Thomas bay, 
southeastern Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Figure Four; mountain (about 2,000 feet high), near shore of Bering sea, a little 
north of Goodnews bay. Local name from missionary Romig and pub- 
lished by the Geological Survey in 1898. 

File; point, the southeasternmost point of Liesnoi island, Frederick sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Fillmore; inlet, separating Fillmore island from the mainland, Dixon entrance. 
Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. Has been erroneously called Nakat 
inlet. 

Fillmore; island, west of Pearse island, Portland canal, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by the Coast Survey, in 1885, presumably after Ensign John Hudson 
Fillmore,' U. S. N. 

Fillmore; peak (3,633 feet high), on the mainland, near Port Snettisham, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named by Thomas, in 1888, after President IMillard 
Fillmore. 

Fillmore; rock, in Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
j by Nichols in 1883. 

! Finas, Bocas de; see Bocas de Finas. 

Finger; islets, in Sumner strait, off Ruins point, Kost-iusko peninsula, Prince of 
Wales island. So called in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 101). 

Finger; lake, a few miles from the head of Knik arm of Cook inlet. Descriptive 
name, given by Glenn in 1898. 

Finger; mountain, in the Moore range, Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Finger; point, on the western shore of Wrangell strait, Alexander arclii])elago. 
Descriptive name, given by Nichols in 1881, 



Fir— FiB. 



174 [BULL. 187. 



Fir; island, lietween Ilput and Kanjru i>^lands, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelafro. 
Named Sosnovoi (fir) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Fire; i.sland, near Knik (fire) arm, at head of Cook inlet. Name published by the 
Geological Survey in 1895. Tt was named Turnagain, by Vancouver, in 
1794. It is Mushukli of Russian Hydrographic chart 1378 and Fire 
island of late chart.«. 

Fire; islet, in the northern end of Kashevarof passage, Clarence strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named l)y Snow in 1886. 

Fire; imint, the northern point of entrance to Saks cove, Belun canal, Alexander 
archii)elago. Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Fired; point, on the southern shore of Norton sound, a few miles east of St. ^lichael. 
Called Palenoi (fired) by Tebenkof, 1849. 

Fired, point; see Palonoi. 

J^(>.s/, glacier; see Popof. 

First; islet, in Sitka sound, near Whale island. Named Nachalnie (beginning) by 
A'asilief in 1809. Descriptive term. 

First; narrows, in Eedfish bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. So called 
by Moser in 1897. 

Fh\^t, point, Sitka sound ; see Shoals. 

First, rapid. Peril strait; see Northern. 

First Kekur; an isolated rock or rocky islet, on the western shore of Baranuf island, 
Alexander archipelago. So called by the Russians. Also written Kekour. 
See Kekur. 

Firtree, island; see Elovoi and Spruce. 

Fish; bay, indenting the northwestern shore of Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Rieba (fish) by the Russians, and variously called Rubia,- 
Ribnaia, Fisch and Fishing and designated as bay or gulf. 

Fish; iTeek, on Revillagigedo island, flowing into Tongass narrows. Name proba- 
bly adopted l)y the Coast Survey from the pilots and published in 1883. 

Fish; creek, tributary to Chandlar river, from the east, near latitude 08°. Local 
name from Schrader in 1899. 

Fish; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the south, near longitude 
151°. Prospectors' name, published in 1899. 

Fish; island, in the Koyukuk river, near longitude 151°. So named ])y Allen 
in 1885. 

Fish; islet, in Felice strait, southeast of Annette island, Gravina group, Alexander 
archipelago. So named l)y Nichols in 1883. 

Fish; mountain, in the southwestern part of Revillagigedo island, near Tongass nar- 
rows, Alexander arcliipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Fish; point, on the mainland, on eastern shore of Behm canal, the northern point 
of entrance to Chickamin river. So named by the Coast Survey- in 1891. 

Fish; ]ioint, the northern point of entrance to Fish bay, in Peril strait, on the north- 
western shore of Baranof island. Named Riebnie (fish) by the Russians. 

Fish; river, in Seward peninsula, which late maps show as one of the eastern afflu- 
ents of tiie Niukluk. What is here regarded as the Niukluk bore the 
name Fish on most maps from 1809 till quite recently. Named Ijy the 
Western Union Telegraph Exjiedition, 1865-1867. Its Eskimo name was 
reported by the Russians as Ikeuti)ak and l)y the Telegraph Expedition 
as Icathliuk. See also Eaton. 

Fish; rock, in Iliuliuk harbor. Captains bay, Unalaska. So named by Dall in 1871. 

Fish Egg; islets, in San Alberto bay, Bucareli bay, Alexander archipelago. North- 
east of San Juan Bautista island about 1 mile, according to Nichols (Coast 
Pilot, 1891, p. 121), is a wooded rocky islet, named by Maurelle and 
Quadra, in 1779, La Balandra (the sloop). Somewhat more than a mile 



BAKER.] 175 Fis— Fla. 

Fish Egg — Continued. 

farther, in the same direction, are two more rocky, woody islets, also 

named by Maurelle and Quadra, Los ilondragones, and called Balena by 

Moserinl897. These three islets says Nichols (Coast Pilot, p. 121), "have 

received the local name of Fish Egg islets." Moser, 1897, uses the name 

Fish Egg for an island about a mile north of these. Moser's name is here 

adopted for the island and the islets near it. 
Fishery; point, on the western coast of Admiralty island, Chatham strait, Alexan- 
der archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1883. There is 

an Indian fishing station here. 
Fish Rancli; bay, in Mitrofania ])ay, Alaska peninsula, northeast of the Shumagins. 

So called by the Fish Commission in 1888. 
Fitzg-ibbon; cove, in the mainland debouching into Behni canal, near Burroughs 

l)ay, Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Fitzgibbon; point, on the mainland, in Behm canal, at entrance to Burroughs bay, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1793. 
Five Fathom; rocky patch in Rediish bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Moser in 1897. 
Five Fingers; group of islets and ledges, in Frederick sound, off Port Houghton, 

Alexander archipelago. Descriptive term given by JMeade in 1869. This 

group, or the southeastern part of it, has been reserved for light-house 

purposes by Executive order dated January 4, 1901. 
Fivemile; islet, in Sumner strait, 5 miles from AVrangell, whence the name Piati- 

milni (five mile) given by the Russians in 1863. ^lay be Scraggy island 

of :\Ieade in 1869. 
Fire ii'Vt ;•.^•,• See Dry bay. 
Flag; hill (1,200 feet high), on the eastern bank of the Tanana river, near longitude 

147°. Descriptive nanie, given l)y Peters and Brooks in 1898. 
Flag; point, in Whitewater bay. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Glass in 1881. 
Flambeau; river, tributary to Port Safety, Seward peninsula. Name from Barnard, 

1900. 
Flat; liay, on the western shore of Chilkoot inlet, Lynn canal. Said to have been 

so named by Dr. Arthur Krause in 1882. He reports its native name to 

be Ntlchk, also written Nakh. 
Flat; creek, tributary to Chandlar river, from the north, near longitude 148°. Pros- 
pectors' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 
Flat; island, in Red bay, Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
1 by Helm in 1886. 

Flat; island, in Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. Descriptive 

name, given by JMeade in 1869. 
Flat, island; See Wolf rock. 
iFlat; islet, in Wrangell harbor, Alaska peninsula, north of the Semidi group. 

Named Gladkie (flat) by Vasilief in 1832. Has also l)een called Platte. 
Flat; islet, near Graham harbor. Cook inlet. Descriptive name, given, presiuuably, 

by Dall in 1880. 
Flat; mountain (1,800 feet high), in California ridge, in tlie southeastern ]>art of 

Gravina island, Alexander archipelago. Presumably a descriptive term, 

published by the Coast Survey in 1885. 
Flat; i)oint, on the eastern coast of Pearse island, Portland inlet. Named by Pender 

in 1868. 
Flat; point, on the western shore of Portage bay, Kupreanof island, Alexander arclii- 

pelago. So named by Nichols in 1882. 



Fla— Foil. 



176 [BULL. 1S7. 



Flaw; point, in Mole harbor, Seymour canal, Admiralty island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 
Flaxman; island, on the Arctic coast, near Camden bay, east of Point Harrow. So 

named by Franklin, in 1826 (p. 151), "in honour of the late eminent 

sculptor. ' ' 
Fleece; rock, about 12 feet above high water, in Dixon entrancie, ni'ar ( 'ape Fox. So 

named by Nichols in 1883. 
Flemming-; island, in the southwestern part of Prince William sound. So called by 

Schrader in 1900. 
Flock; rock, in Farragut bay, Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Flood; glacier, on the western bank of the Stikine, near the international Ixuindary. 

So called by the Coast Survey. 
Floral; hills and pass, between Hayden and Lucia glaciers, St. Elias alps, south- 
eastern Alaska. So called by Russell, in 1890, "on account of the 

luxuriance of the vegetation covering them." 
Florence; bar, on the Koyukuk river, near longitude 154". Prospectors' name, given 

in 1899. 
Florence; cape, on the northwestern coast of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. So 

named by Berry in 1881. 
Florence; creek, tributary to Eldorado river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Flores; Canal de; see Shelikof. 
Flores; cape, the eastern point of entrance to Port Refugio, in Bucareli bay. Prince of 

Wales archipelago. Named Cabo de Flores (cape of flowers) by Maurelle 

and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Flusser; peak, on the mainland, east of Frederick sound, southeastern Alaska. So 

named by Thomas in 1887. 
Foggy; bay, indenting the mainland, in the southern part of Revillagigedo channel, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey, in 1883, or earlier. 
Foggy; cape, the eastern end of Sutwik island, Alaska jieninsula, near theSemidis. 

Named by Cook in 1778. Exact locality of Cook's Foggy cape uncertain, 

as might be guessed from the weather conditions prevailing when it was 

named. Lutke identifies it with Cape Kumliun, which see. Lutke also 

calls it Brumeux. 
Foggy; island, between Camden bay and Colville river, Arctic coast. So named by 

Franklin, in 1826, who describes (p. 155) "the propriety of designating 

this dreary place by the name of Foggy Island." 
Foggy, island; see Andronica. 
Foggy; islands; see Semidi islands. Vancouver thought Chirikof island was the 

"Foggy island of Beering." But Cook applied the name Foggy to the 

present Semidi group and Vancouver named Chirikof (Tscherikow) , after 

Bering's companion. 
Foggy, islet; see Poa. 
Foggy; point, on the mainland, in Revillagigedo channel, the south point of entrance 

to Foggy bay. So named by Vancouver in 1793. The Russians called it 

Foggy or Brumez (Tumannie). On some charts it is Point Brumez. 
Foggy; point, on the western shore of Portland canal, southeastern Alaska. 

Apparently so named by the British Admiralty in 1890. 
Foggy Island; bay, between Camden and Harrison bays, Arctic coast. So named 

by Dease and Simpson in 1837. 
Fogniak, island; see Afognak. 
Fohlin; creek, tributary to Lakina creek, from the north. So named by Rohn in 

1899, after a member of his party. 



bakek] 177 



Fon— For. 



Fontaine; island, in Shakan bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. So named by Helm 
in 1886; has also been Avritten Fontain. 

Food, bay; see Agamgik. 

Fools; inlet, indenting the southern shore of Wrangell island, and opening into 
Ernest sound, Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Fools; point, on the western shore of Portland canal. Apparently so named by the 
Coast Survey in 1891. 

Foot; island, in Steamboat bay, Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Mansfield in 1889. 

Foot; island, Prince William sound. See Latouehe. 

Foote; peak (5,176 feet high), on the mainland, nearThoma.s bay, Frederick sound, 
southeastern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Rear-Admiral 
Andrew Hull Foote, U. S. N. 

Ford; cove, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. Named Ford's by the Coast 
Survey, in 1891, after Harry L. Ford. 

Fords Terror; narrow inlet, on the northern shore of Endicott arm, Alexander archi- 
pelago. It i.s very narrow at one point. Floating ice from glaciers, with 
falling tide, jamming in this contracted throat, make it a dangerous place. 
Named by Mansfield, in 1889, after Harry L. Ford, a member of his party. 

Forrest, cape; see Icy point. 

Forrester; island, off the southwestern coast of Prince of Wales archipelago. So 
named by Dixon in July, 1787. Perez, in 1774, called it Santa Cristina, 
which is also written in the journal of his voyage Santa Christina and 
Santa Catalina (Banc. Hist., vol. 33, pp. 196, 201). Douglas in August, 
1788, named it Douglas island (3Ieares, p. 327); Maurelle, 1775, called it 
San Carlos island. This name was published in Barrington's Miscellanies 
in 1781. La Perouse, 1786, called this island and Wolf Rock the San 
Carlos islands. Vancouver adopted Forrester, and this name has been 
adopted and used for a century, to the exclusion of all others. 

Fort; point, on the northern shore of Tongass island, Tongass harbor, eastern part 
of Dixon entrance. So named by Nichols in 1891. 

Fort; point, the north point of entrance to Steamboat bay, Frederick sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Fort Adams. An American trading station was established on the north bank of 
the Yukon, at the mouth of the Tozi river, in 1868 or 1869, and called 
Fort Adams. The place is still so called. St. James Mission is at this place. 

Fort Alexander; see Nushagak. 

Fortaleza; point, in Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de 
la Forteleza (fortitude) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Fort Archangel Gabriel, Baranof island; see Sitka. 

Fort Cosmos; trading post, on the Kowak river, near longitude 157°. Local name, 
published in 1900. 

Fort Cuduhy; see Cudahy. 

Fort Davis; military postal mouth of Snake river,' near Nome, Seward peninsula. 
Established in 1899. 

Fort Egbert; military post, at Eagle, on the upper Yukon, near the international 
boundary. Established and so named by the War Department in 1889. 

Fort Gibbon; military post and reservation, on north bank of the Yukon, at mouth 
of the Tanana river. Named after Gen. John Gibbon, U. S. A. 

Fort Hamilton; village, in the Yukon delta, on right bank of the Apoon pass, 
about 25 miles above its mouth. Called Nunapithlugak or Fort Hamilton 
]jy the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Fort Hamlin; station or post, on the south bank of the Yukon, near longitude 
1 149°. Local name, published by the Coast Survey in 1897. 

' Bull. 187—01 12 



For— Foil. 



178 [BULL. 187. 



Fort Iiiscum; military post, Port Yaldes, Prince William sound. 

Fort Morton; see Alorton. mR 

Fort Nicholas^, Cook inlet; see Kenai. j^ 

Fort Reliance; post, an old trading post of the Hudson Bay Company, now in 
ruins, on the east bank of the Yukon, a few miles below Dawson, Canada. 

/'<)/•/ -sy. Michael; see St. Michael. 

Fort Selkirk; Canadian military headquarters, at mouth of the Lewes river. The 
site of the old fort of the Hudson Bay Company is on the opposite bank 
of the river. This name has been adopted by the Canadian Board on 
Geographic Names. 

Fort Tongass. A military post of the United States known as Fort Tongass was j 
maintained on Tongass island, from June 1868 to September 1870. Fort 
Tongass was the official spelling. Variously called Fort Tongas, Fort i 
Tomgas, etc. [ 

Fort Wrangell; post-office, established in OctoVjer, 1895, at Wrangell. ^ 

Fort Wrangdl; see Wrangell. 

Fort Yukon; fort and trading post, established by McMurray, of the Hudson Bay 
Company, in 18-17, on the supposition, it may be assumed, that it was in 
British territory. The boundary line between the British and Russian | 
possessions had been agreed upon in 1825, but the line had not been 
marked on the ground. Shortly after Alaska had been acquired by the ' 
United States, Lieut, (now Col. ) C. W. Raymond, United States Engineers, 
ascended the river and determined the longitude of this post, which was 
found to be on American territory. 

Fortuna, island; see Klokachef. , 

Fortuna; strait, separating Chichagof island from Klokachef .island, Alexander 
archipelago. Has also been called a passage or channel. Named by the 
Russians. The Sjianish schooner Forttma, with seven natives of the 
Hawaiian islands on board, was found ashore here and taken by the 
Russian American Company's vessels as a prize in 1819. The name has 
doubtless come from this circumstance. 

Fortymile; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the west, near latitude 6-1° Sty, 
Prospectors' name, given, presumably, by prospectors, in 1886, when gold 
was first found here. It takes this name from being about 40 miles below 
old Fort Reliance. It was called Cone Hill river by Schwatka, in 1883, 
"from a conspicuous conical hill in its valley." The Canadian Board on 
Geographic Names has adopted the name Fortymile. 

Fortymile; mining camp, at the mouth of Fortymile creek, near latitude 64° 30^, 
It was started in 1893. 

Fortymile; trail, from Fortymile creek to the Tanana river. Local name. 

Fortymile Dome; peak (3,900 feet high), in the Fortymile mining region, near the 
international boundary. It is Dome peak of some maps and Fortymile 
Dome of others. 

Foster; creek, tributary to Camp creek, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Foster, creek; see Pine. 

Foster; glacier, on the mainland, near the head of Taku inlet, southeastern Alaska. 
Named, in 1890, by the Coast Survey, after Hon. Charles Foster, Secretary 
of the Treasury. 

Foul; passage, in Peril strait, near the Southern rapids. Descriptive name, given by 
Coghlan in 1884. 

Found; island, in Ernest sound, at the mouth of Zimovia strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Snc v in 1886. 



BAKER.] 



179 



Foil— Fox. 



Fountain; glacial stream, from :\Iala9pina glacifr, debouching between Sitkagi bluffs 
and Icy bay. So named by Russell in 1891. 

Fovintain; sunken rock, near ^Middleton island, Gulf of Alaska. Descriptive name 
given by the Russians. 

Four Mountains; a group of volcanic islands just west of Umnak, in the eastern 
Aleutians, was discovered by the Russians at an early day and called 
ostrova chetierek sopochnie, i. e.. Islands of the Four Craters, or Islands of 
the Four Mountains, as they are usually called. The group consists of 
five principal islands, though on many charts only four are shown. Our 
knowledge of the group, still very imperfect, has been considerably 
improved by the work of the U. S. S. Concord, there in 1894. Their Aleut 
name, according to Veniaminof, is Unigun, or, according to Sauer, 1790, 
Oone-agun. Sarichef, who was the first to give any details, says (Phillips 
Voyages, vol. 6, pp. 4-5) on May 30, 1791, "we fell in with the four vol- 
canic islands which take their names from the four craters which they 
contain. They lie contiguous to each other and bear distinct names. That 
to the southwest is called Ulaga; that northeast, Tschiginsk; that to the 
north, Tana; and that to the southeast, Chagamil." The names applied 
by different authorities are as shown below, but this correlation is to a 
considerable extent conjectural. 



Authoritv. 



Names of islands. 



Carlisle. Herbert. 



Cliuginadak. 



Kagamll. Kigalgin. 



ITiis. Krenitzen and Lev- 
ashef. 

1791. Billings 

1791. Sarichef 

1830. Veniaminof 

1836. Lutke 

1 1817. Rus. Hyd. chart 1397 

i 1849. Tebenkof 

!l893. Coast Survey 

) 189-5. Hyd. Office chart 8. 



Ulaga '• Tchagulak . 



Ollaga 

Uliaga 

Uliagan . . . 
Oulliaghin 
Ulliagin ... 

Ulliaga 

Uliaga 

Carlisle. . . . 



Tshugidi ... 
Chuginok .. 
Chuguliak.. 
Tchegoulak 
Chegulak... 



Kitalga 

Tanaguni 

Tano 

Tanak-aniunak 

Tanakh-angounakh 
Tanak-Angunak ... 

Chuginadak 

Chuginadak 

Chuginadak 



Kagamila. 



Chamil 

Kagamil 

Kagamlliak. Kigalga. 
Kigamiliakh' Kigalga. 
Kigamiliak . Kigalga. 



Kagamil 

Kagamil 

Kagamil 



Kagalgin. 
Kigalgin. 
L'liaga. 



Fourpeaked; mountain, near the western entrance to Cook inlet. Descriptive term, 
given by the Russians, who called it Gora chetierek glavaia, i. e., mountains 
with four heads. On one chart Chetierek (four) has been written Tapirag 
and the peak called Mount Tapirag. 

Fox; l)ay, indenting the eastern shore of Stepovak bay, Alaska 2:)eninsula. So called 
by Dall in 1880. 

Fox; cape, on the mainland, at eastern end of Dixon entrance. Xamed by Van- 
couver, in 1793, after the Right Hon. Charles James Fox. 

Fox; cape, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northeast of the Shumagins. 
Named Leesy (fox) by the Russians. 

Fox; cape, the northernmost point of Little Tanaga (or possibly Kagalaska) island, 
Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. Apparently named (fox) by the 
Russians, though I have not found this in any Russian map or book. On 
United States Hydrographic chart No. 8, made from reports by the United 
States North Pacific Exploring Expedition, of 1855, occurs the entry "C. 
Lises (Fox cape)." 

Fox; creek, tributary to Eldorado river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Xame 
from Barnard, 1900. 



T on [BULL. 187. 

Fox: cR'i'k. tril.utary to Salmon lake, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnanl, 1900. ' , -r. -x -w tj • 

Fox- hill in the sonthwe.tern part of St. Panl island, Pnbilof group, Bering sea. 

'pre^umahlv a local name. Published l)y the Coant Survey m 1875. Elliott 

luuM this name Fox, and near it in quotation marks "Seethah." Perhaps 

this is the native name. 

Fox; hill (563 feet high), on the mainland, near Cape Fox, Dixon entrance. So 

named by Nichols in 1883. 
Fox- island near Port Valdes, Prince William sound. On this island Mr. Story, 
agent of the Alaska Packing Association, and some others, are engaged in 
raising foxes. Local name. 
Fox- islands, the easternmost group ot the Aleutian chain of islands. The limits 
of the ai>plication of the name are now rather vague. Veniammof, the 
best authority of his time, writing in 1840, says the islands lying between 
Amukta and Alaska peninsula, together with the islands near the penin- 
sula, are called the Fox islands. Cook, in 1778, calls them the Fox islands. 
Probably named Leesy (fox) by early Russian fur traders. They are Fox 
or Andreanof islands of Langsdorf, lies aux Renards of Lutke, etc. The 
whole Aleutian chain is known to mariners and whalemen as the Fox 
islands. The Coast Survey now restricts this name Fox to include only 
Unimak, Unalaska, and Umnak with their various associated islands. 
See also Aleutian islands. 
Fox; islet, near the north shore of Deer island, between Sannak and Belkofski. 

Called Leesy (fox) by Tebenkof in 1849. 
Fox; lake, near Nome, Seward peninsula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Fox; point, on right bank of the Yukon river, a little above Hall rapids. So named 

bv Raymond in 1869. 
Fox; point," on the southeastern shore of Revillagigedo island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by the Coast Survey :n 1891. 
Fox; river, tributary to Fish river, from the west, between the Niukluk and Klo- 

kerblok rivers, Seward peninsula. Local name. 
Fragrant; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Dushistoi (fragrant) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Fran(;ais, Port des; see Lituya. 
Francis; anchorage, in Farragut bay, Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Thomas, in 1887, after pilot E. H. Francis. 
Francis; island, in Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Apparently so named l)y the 

British Admiralty in 1890. 
Francis; mountain (4,800 feet high), near Port Valdes, Prince William sound. So 

named by Abercrombie in 1898. 
Francis; mountain (3,015 feet high) , on the southern shore of Shipley bay, Sum- 
ner strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow, in 1886, after pilot 
E. H. Francis. 
Francis; point, in Behm canal, on the eastern coast of Cleveland peninsula, oppo- 
site Traitor cove. It is the south point of entrance to Port Stewart. Named 
by the Coast Survey, in 1886, after pilot E. H. Francis. 
FranciKt, river; see Stikine. 

Francis; sunken rocks, in Southern rapids. Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Discovered and named by Coghlan, in 1884, after pilot E. H. Francis, the 
first person to secure soundings on them. 
Franklin; creek, tributary, from the west, to South fork of Fortymile creek. Pros- 
pectors' name, from Barnard, 1898. Has also been called Franklin gulch. 
Franklin; mountains, in northernmost Alaska, east of the Colville river. So named 
by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, after Sir John Franklin. 



BAKER.] 181 



Fra— Fug. 



Franklin; peaks (3,909 and 4,314 feet high), on the mainland, north of Frederick 
sound, southeastern Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Franklin; point, on the Arctic coast, between points Belcher and Barrow. So 
named by Beechey in September, 1826, after Sir John Franklin. 

J'lxlerick, harbor; see Hooniah. 

Frederick; lake, east of and near Dezadeash lake, in longitude 137°. Name pub- 
lished by Canadian Board on Geographic Names in 1899. 

Frederick; point, on the northeastern shore of Mitkof island, Alexander archipel- 
ago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Frederick; port, in the northern end of Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Vancouver in 1794. According to Meade its native name is 
Komtok Hon. 

Frederick; sound, separating the Admiralty island group from the Kupreanof island 
group, Alexander archipelago. Named Prince Frederick's sound by Van- 
couver, in 1794 (III, 285), after His Royal Highness Frederick, Duke of 
York, a name now shortened to Frederick. 

Frederika; glacier, tributary to Skolai creek, from the north. So named by Hayes, 
in 1891, presumably after Frederick Schwatka, with whom he visited it. 

Freemantle; point, the western point of entrance to Port Valdes, Prince William 
sound. Named by Vancouver, in 1794, who on his chart has Freemantle 
and in his text Fremantle. In the 8° edition of his voyage, in 1801, it is 
Freemantle in both text and chart. 

Frmrhman\^, bay; see Lituya. 

Freshwater; bay or inlet, on the eastern shore of Chichagof island, Chatham strait, 
. Alexander archipelago. Nichols says (Coast Pilot, 1891, p. 163): "Pavlof 
harbor was sketched by Meade, in 1869, and published as a subsketch on 
Hydrographic Office chart No. 22.5, under the name of Freshwater bay; 
this latter name is now applied to the whole inlet." It was called Xovaia 
(new) by Vasilief, in 1848, and New harbor on British Admiralty chart 
2431 (ed. of 1882). See also Pavlof. 

Freshwater; creek, tributary to Mitchell bay, Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Fresno; creek, tributary to Turnagain arm, from the south, Kenai peninsula. 
Prospectors' name, from Becker, 1895. 

Frezas, Laguna de las; see Strawberry. 

Fripo; islet, in Danger pa,ssage, between Duke and ]Mary islands, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Fritz; cove, in the western end of Douglas island, Alexander archipelago. Named, 
in 1880, by Symonds, after his son Fritz. 

Fritz; islet, in the Japonski group, Sitka sound. Named by naval officers, in 1880, 
after little Fritz, son of Lieut. F. M. Symonds, U. S. N. 

Frocadero, strait; see Trocadero. 

Frog, rocks; see Hog. 

Frogs (The); group of rocks and islets in Port Real Marina, Bucareli bay, Prince 
of Wales archipelago. Named Las Ranas (the frogs) by Maurelle and 
Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Frosty; peak, west of Cold bay, near the western end of Alaska peninsula. So 
named by Dall in 1882. 

Frozen, bay; see Cold. 

Fruit; small group of islets in the Japonski group, Sitka sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by United States naval officers in 1880. 

Fugitive. Lisianski, 1805 (Voyage, p. 178), mentions a "thriving village" of this 
name on Sitkalidak island, Kodiak group. It appears to have been on or 
near the Port Hobron of recent maps. 



Ifiil— Oap. 



182 [Bru..l,s7. 



Fula; i><>iiit. (ui Suemez island, Bncareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named 
I'luita de Fula 1)y Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Full; creek, tributary, from the north, to Tort Yaldes, Prince Williani ^ound. So 
named by Abercronibie in 1898. 

Fulton; peak (8,252 feet high), on the mainland, northeast of Frederick sound, 
southeastern Alaska. So named by Thomas, in 1887, after the distinguislied 
engineer, Rol)ert Fulton. 

Funter; bay, in Admiralty island, near the south end of Lynn canal. Named by 
Dall, in 188;>, after Capt. Robert Funter, one of the very early explorers 
and surveyors of the northwest coast oi America. 

Fur Si'dl, islands ; see Pribilof. 

Gable; mountain (4,490 feet high), at the head of (ilacier l)ay, southeastern Alaska. 
So named by Reid in 1892. 

Gagahjin, island; see Ugalgan. 

Gagara, rocks; see Arre. 

Gagarin, island; see Loon. 

Gain; island, in (Taml)ier bay. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by IMansfield in 1889. Errpneously Cain. 

Gako; river, tributary to the Copper river from the west, near latitude 62° 30'. 
Native name from Allen, 1885, who writes it Gakona, i. e., Gako river. 

Galankin; group of islands, between Eastern channel and Middle channel, Sitka 
sound, Alexander archipelago. Name apparently first applied by Dall in 
the Coast Pilot, 1883. About a dozen islands in the group have been 
named, the largest of which are Galankin, Whale and Bamdoroshni. 

Galankin; island, the principal island in the Galankin group, Sitka sound, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So called l)y Tebenkof in 1850. Was also called 
Peschani (sandy) by Yasilief in 1809. Has also been called Thomjison 
island by Beardslee, in 1880, after the then Secretary of the Navy. The 
name is derived from Galanka, the Russian name of their brick stuve. 

Galena; bay, near Port Valdes, Prince William sound. Local name. "Supposed 
to be named from the occurrence of galena on its shores. ' ' 

Galera; island, in Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. Named La Galera 
(the gallery) by Maurelle and Quadra, in 1775-1779. 

Galiano; glacier, near the head of Yakutat bay. So named by Russell, in 1S91, 
after Don Dionisio Alcala Galiano, tlie reputed writer of the rejx^rt on 
Malaspina's voyage. 

Gambler; bay, in Admiralty island, Stephens i)assage, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Gambler; island, at entrance to Gambler bay, Stephens passage, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Gambler; point, the eastern point of entrance to Gambler bay, Stephens passage. 
Alexander archiijelago. So named by Yancouver in 1794. 

Game; cove, near Marsden point. Admiralty island, near the north end of Chatham 
strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Baker, in 1880, on account of 
the al)undan(!e of game there. 

Gannet; island, in Boca de Quadra, at the moutli of Yixen bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Giin-h'-ij(is-lak-hr]t; Indian village, consisting, in 1867, of 12 large houses and, in 1880, 
of 16 houses and 171 people, at mouth of the Chilkat river, southeastern 
Alaska. Yariously called Tondustek, Yendestaka, etc. The name obtained 
by Baker, in 1880, from an Indian interpreter, was Gan-te-gas-tak-heh,' 
meaning village on right bank of river. Beardslee, in 1880, has Tondustek; 
Krause, 1882, Jendestaka, and the Eleventh Census, 1890, Hindasetukee. 

Gap; mountain (.'^>,400 feet high), (jn the mainland, west of the mouth of Portland 
canal. I'resumablv so named bv Pender in 1868. 



BAKER.] 183 Gar— Gas. 

Garcia; island and point, on the northwestern coast of San Fernando island, Gulf 
of Esquibel, Prince of Wales archipelago. Xamed Ysla y Punta de Gar- 
cia by ^laurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

G-arden; cove, near the head of Port Etches, Prince William sound. So named ])y 
Davidson in 1869. 

Garden; cove, on the eastern shore of St. George island, Pribilof islands, Bering 
sea. Local name. Origin not discovered. Published by the Coast Sur- 
vey in 187-5. 

Garden; island, in Garden cove. Port Etches, Prince William sound. So named, in 
1787, by Portlock, who, in that year, made a garden upon it. 

Garden, island; see Kutkan. 

Garden; point, at the mouth of Indian river, Sitka harbor. Descriptive name, 
published by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Gardiner; ci'eek, tributary to the Tanana river, from the north, near longitude 141° 
3(K. So named by Peters and Brooks, in 1898, after L. D. Gardiner, a 
meml>er of their party. Erroneously Gardner on the maps. 

Gardner; bay, indenting the southeastern shore of Prince of Wales island, Clarence 
strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Kupreanof in 1848. Also 
called Port Gardner. 

Gardner; point, the southernmost point of Admiralty island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Gareloi; volcanic island and peak thereon (5,334 feet high), near the western end 
(jf the Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. Named Gareloi (variously 
written Goreloi, Gorely, Gorelloi, etc., i. e., burnt, or burning) by early 
Russian explorers. Its Aleut name, according to Tebenkof, is Anangusik. 

Garfield; bay, on the northern shore of Alaska peninsula. So named l)y the Fish 
Commission, in 1888, after President James Abram Garfield. 

Garfield; creek, tributary to the Kuzitrin river, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Xame from Brooks, 1900. 

Garfield; peak (3,929 feet high), on the mainland, north of Frederick soimd, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after President Garfield. 

Garfield, point; see Lieskof. 

Garforth; island, in 3Iuir inlet. Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Apparently 
so named by the British Admiralty in or about 1890. 

Garnet; point, the southernmost point of Kaunaghunut island, Dixon entrance. So 
named by Nichols m 1883. Erroneously Garnot. 

Garnet; point, the southwesternmost point of Choris peninsula, Kotzebue sound, 
Arctic ocean. So called by Beechey in September, 1827. 

Gams, point; see Harris. 

Garrett; peak (5,700 feet high), between Valdes glacier and Klutina lake. So 
named by Abercrombie, in 1898, after private Garrett, a member of his 
party. 

Ga risen; glaciers, at head of Kicking Horse river, near the head of Chilkat inlet, 
southeastern Alaska. So named by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 

Garry; river, emptying into the Arctic ocean near Cape Halkett. So named by 
Dease and Simpson, in 1837, after Nicholas Garry, esq. 

Gassman; creek, tributary to Eldorado river, from the east, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Gastineau; channel, between Douglas island and the mainland, southeastern Alaska. 
So named on Homfray's manuscript map of 1867, furnished to the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, the name being derived from one of the 
Hudson Bay Company's steamers, which in turn took its name from the 
Gastineau or Gatineau river of Quebec, a branch of the Ottawa. Has also 
been designated Gastmeaux channel. Icy channel, and Carroll straits. 
Gastineau, point; see Hobart. 



Oat— <>oo. 



184 [bttm., 187. 



Gates; ^'lacier, an arm of Kennioott >;lacier, on tho southern flank of ]\Ionnt Regal. 
So named by S(;hrailer, in 1899, after INIr. Gates, a sojourner in the vicinity. 

Oaug-e; ishiinl, near the middle of Funter bay, Admiralty island, Alexander archi- 
jtelago. So named by Mansfield in 1890. 

Gavaiiski, islet; see Little Cravanski. 

(iiintiishl, peak; see Har])or. 

Gavanski; two islands (Big and Little Gavanski), immediately in front of Old 
Sitka harl)or, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Gavanski 
(harbor) by the earliest Russian visitors. 

Cnntnxki Jinlslioi; see Big ( Javanski. 

Gawanka; brook, draining from a lake into C'hichagof harbor, Attn island, western 
Aleutians. So called by Grewingk, 1850. 

Gechiak; creek, tributary to the Togiak river, from the west, a few miles above its- 
mouth. Native name obtained by Spurr and Post in 1898. An Eskimo 
village at its mouth is called Gechiagamut, i. e., Gechiak people. 

Gedney; island, in the northwestern part of Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by the Coast Survey, in 1891, after one of its vessels. 

Gedney; passage, between Hassler and Revillagigedo island, in Behm canal, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Gi'garkd, rocks; see Arre. 

Geese; islands, off the southwestern end of Kodiak. Early Russian maps have the 
native name Anaiaktak and Anaiaktalik. Archimandritof, in 1849, has 
Gusinaia (goose). Petrof, in 1880, calls it Goose island, and shows a native 
settlement upon it called Aiakhatalik. Now usually called Geese islands. 
According to the Eleventh Census they were called Geese islands by the 
Russians under Solovief in 1762. This must be an error, as the first visit 
of Russians to Kodiak was in 1763, under Glotof. 

Geike; glacier and inlet, on the western shore of Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. 
Names from Muir and Reid, published in Appleton's Guide, 1893. Named 
after Sir Archibald Geike. 

Geiss^en. The Krause brothers, in 1882, report this to be the native name of a hill 
just back of Gan-te-gas-tak-heh village, at head of Chilkat inlet, south- 
eastern Alaska. 

Gelch. The Krause l)rothers, in 1882, report this to be the native name of a liill 
between the heads of Chilkat and Chilkoot inlets, southeastern Alaska. 

Gem; ])oint, the eastern point of entrance to Snug cove, Gambier bay. Admiralty 
island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

GeriH de Large, lake and river; see Chandlar. 

Gens des Bidtes, river; see Tanana. 

Gninvrnn, island; see Seguam. 

George; arm, in the southern shore of Revillagigedo island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named George arm or inlet by the Coast Survey, in 1880, after pilot W. E. 
George, to whom is due the first sketch of Revillagigedo channel and Ton- 
gass narrows. 

George; island, in entrance to Port Althorp, Cross sound, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Dall in 1880. 

George; mountains (3,225 feet high), east of Portland canal and west of Hastings 
arm, British Columbia. Perhaps so named by Pender in 1868. 

George; reef, near Skowl point, in Kasaan bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander 
archipelago. Apparently so named by the Coast Survey, in 1883, after 
pilot W. E. George. 

George; rock ((!Overed at spring tide), off the western end of Douglas island,, 
Stephens passage, Alexander archipelago. So named ])y Beardslee, iii 
1880, i)resumably after pilot W. E. George. 

George SlmjixDu, capi-; see Simpson. 



185 



Oeo— Gla. 



Qeorgiana; cape, the northwesternmost point of Kruzof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Portloc^k in 1787. Called Siuchi (sea lion) by 
Vasilief, in 1833, and Olga by Tebenkof in 18-18. Also has been written 
Sionchi. 

Geroe; creek, tributary to the Chandlar river, from the south, near latitude 68°. 
Local name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 

Gerstle; Itay, indenting the northern shore of Alaska peninsula, west of Port Hol- 
ler. Named by the Fish Commission, in 1888, after Lewis Gerstle, presi- 
dent of the Alaska Commercial Company. 

Gerstle; point, the northern point of entrance to Gerstle bay, Alaska peninsula. 
Named by the Fish Commission, in 1888, after Lewis Gerstle, president of 
the Alaska Commercial Company. 

Gerstle; river, tributary to the Tanana, from the south, near longitude 145°. So 
named by Allen, in 1885, after Lewis Gerstle, president of the Alaska 
Commercial Company. 

Gertrude; creek, tributary from the west, to Slana river, near its junction with the 
Copper river. So named by Lowe, in 1898, after Miss Gertrude Wagner. 

Giant, island; see Grant. 

Giant; point, the northernmost of Mary island and the western point of entrance to 
Mary island anchorage, Mary island, Gravina group, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by Nichols in 1883. Formerly called Winslow point, 
which name is now transferred to the eastern point of entrance to Mary 
island anchorage. See Winslow. 

Giant; rocks, in Port Valdes, Prince William sound. So named by Abercrombie 
in 1898. 

Gibbon, fort; see Fort Gibbon. 

Gibson; creek, tributary to Dietrich river, from the west, near latitude 68°. Local 
name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 

Gibson; island, near the entrance to Chichagof harbor, Attn island, western Aleu- 
tians. Named by the United States North Pacific Surveying p]xpedition 
of 1855, after Lieut. William Gibson, U. S. N., commanding the U. S. 
schooner Fenimore Cooper. Gibson surveyed Chichagof harboi- in July, 
1855. 

Gilahina; river, tributary to the Chitina river, from the north. Native name, from 
a manuscript map made by prospectors in 1900. 

Gilder Head; promontory, between Cape Thomas and Zanes cliff, on the western 
end of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. Apparently so named by the Coast 
Survey in 1890. 

Gillmore; islands, part of the Galankin group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Gilmore by Beardslee, in 1880, after Ensign James C. Gillmore, 
U. S. N. 

Gilmer; cove, indenting the western shore of Kruzof island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Moore, in 1897, after Lieut. William Wirt Gilmer, U. S. N. 

Gilmour. The north point of entrance to Port Chalmers, Montague island, Prince 
William sound, is so designated on a sketch by Portlock in 1787. 

Giniak, islet; see Ugak. 

Girdled; glacier, on the eastern border of Muir glacier, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by Reid, in 1890, on account of the moraine, which completely 
surrounds it. 

Gisasa; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the west, near latitude 65°. Native 
name, reported by Allen in 1885. In his text (p. 106) it is Gissassakakat; 
on his map 4 it is Gissakakat. See Kakat. 

Glacier; bay, penetrating the Alaska mainland in the Fairweather region and open- 
ing into Icy strait. Entered by Lieut. Chas. E. S. Wood, in 1877, and 
named by Beardslee in 1880. Descriptive name. 



<; III— 4; la. 



186 ' [BULL. 187. 



Glacier; creek, tributary to Tninnik l)asin, from thesouth, Seward peninsula, ^'ame 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Glacier; ereek, tributary to Sixtyniilo creek, from tbe we^^t, near lon<j:itude 147°. 

J^ocal name. 
Glacier; creek, tril)utary to Snake river, from the east, in the Cape Nome mining 

region, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name pul^lished in 1900. 
Glacier; creek, tributary to Turnagain arm of Cook inlet, from the north, near its 

head. Local name, i)ul)lished in 1899. 
G'l(irl(i\ inlet; see Taku. 
Glacier; island, on the northern shore of Prince William sound. So called by 

Abercrombie in 1898. 
Glacier; mountain (about 6,000 feet high), 18 miles west of Eagle, eastern Alaska. 

Presumably a local name. Published by the Geological Survey in 1899. 
Glacier; mountain (4,769 feet high), on the western bank of the Stikine river, near 

( ireat glacier. 
Glacier; luountains, east of the Stikine river, near the international l)oundary line. 

Dall, in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. Ill), says, "The miners term the rugged 

region of this vicinity the Glacier mountains." Also called Stikine 

mountains. 
Glacier; point, in front of Davidson glacier, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. 

So called by Meade in 1869. .Lindenberg, in 1838, called it Lohtianoi (icy) 

point. 
Glacier; point, on the western shore of Portland canal, near its head, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by the Coast Survey. 
Glacier; prominent point or butte, in upper part of the Matanuska valley. Local 

name, published in 1899. 
Glacier; river, in the western pai-t of the Copjier River delta. So named by the 

Coast Survey in 1900. 
Glacier; spit, in front of Grewingk glacier, Kachemak bay, Cook inlet. So named 

by Dall in 1880. 
(llacirr, valley; see ]\Iakushin. 
Glacier Cone; mountain peak, on Kenai peninsula, near Kachemak bay. Cook inlet. 

So named by Dall in 1880. 
Gladhaugh; bay, indenting the northeastern coast of Prince William sound. An 

iron and copper mine was found and staked here by a Mr. Gladhaugh in 

1897. It or an arm of it is also known locally as Virgin bay. 
Gldflkie, islet; see Flat. 
Gladstone; mountain (4,800 feet high), near the head of Portland canal. Named 

by Pender, in 1868, after the Right Hon. William Ewart Gladstone. 
Gladys; small lake, in the valley of the Matanuska river, about 35 miles from Knik 

arm of Cook inlet. So named by Mendenhall in 1898. 
Glagolm; islets, near the entrance to Redoubt bay, Sitka so''"d, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So called by Vasilief in 1809. 
(^ihi-lmls, island; see Kochu. 
Glass; j)eninsula, between Seymour canal and Stephens passage, Alexander archi- 

l)elago. Named by the Coast Survey, after Connnander Henry Glass, 

U. S. N., who made surveys in the Alexander archipelago in 1881. 
Glass; jioint, on the eastern shore of Glass peninsula, Alexander archipelago. So 

naiiKMl l)y the Coast Survey. 
Glass; jM.int, on the left bank of the Chilkat river, opposite the mouth of Tiehini 

river, southeastern Alaska. Named by naval officers, in 1880, after Com- 
mander Henry Glass, U. S. N. 
Glave; river, tributary to Chilkat river, from the west. Named by the Geological 

Survey^ in 1899, after Mr. E. J. Glave, who explored in tliis region in 1891. 



BAKER.] 187 



Gla— «ol. 



Glazenap; cape, the western point of entrance to Izembek bay, on northern shore 
of Alaska peninsula. So named by Lutke, in 1828, presumal)ly after two 
midshipmen, Vladimir Glazenap and Gotlieb Glazenap, members of his 
party. Has also been called Round point by the Fish Commission. 

Glen; island, the westernmost of the Kudiakof islands, Izembek bay, Alaska 
peninsula. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Glenora; small town, at head of steam navigation on the Stikine river, near mouth 
of Great canyon, British Columbia. 

Glorious; high point, near Pinnacle pass, in the St. Elias alps. So named by Rus- 
sell, in 1890, on account of the view it affords. 

Glory of Russia. An extinct Russian penal colony established, in 1795, near Ankau 
creek, on the southeastern shore of Yakutat bay. It has been referred to 
as the Yakutat colony or settlement, Xew Russia, Xovarassi, Slavarassi, 
Slawa Rossij, etc. Presumably named after Billings's vessel the Slara 
Ros»ia (Glory of Russia). The history of the place is very obscure. It 
appears to have been founded in 1795, fortified with a blockhouse and 
stockade by Polomoshnoi in 1796, and in perpetual trouble ever after till 
exterminated by the natives in about 1803 or 1804. Russell visited the 
site in 1891, and reports that the cellars marking the site contain spruce 
trees, son:ie of them 2 feet in diameter. 

Gtori/ of Russia, bay; see Tanaga. 

Glory of Russia; cape, the northwestern point of St. Matthew island, Bering sea. 
So named by the Russian Hydrographic Office after Billings's ship, the 
,Slava Rossia (Glory of Russia). 

GluhoJcoi, bay; see Banner. 

Glubokoi, bay; see Partof. 

Gluhokoi, bay, inlet, etc. ; see Deep and Deepwater. 

Gnat; cove, on the eastern shore of Carroll inlet, Revillagigedo island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Gobler; creek, tributary to Livingston creek, from the south, Seward i)eninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Gold; creek, on the mainland, in edge of the town of Juneau, southeastern Alaska. 
Miner's name, published in 1883. 

Gold; creek, tributary to Bluestone river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Gold; creek, ti'ibutary to Middle fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near longitude 
150°. Prospectors' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 

Gold; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the west, in the Cape Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. 

Gold; islet, southwest of Japonski island, Sitka sound, Alexander archii)elago. So 
named by United States naval officers in 1880. 

Gold; mountain, on north bank of the Y^ukon, near longitude 154°. So named by 
Allen in 1885. Its native name is given by the Coast Survey as Nulikahl- 
lanny. 

Gold; run, tributary to American river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 

Goldbottom; creek, tributary to headwaters of Snake river, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Goldbottom; creek, tributary to Niukluk river, from the north, in the I'ldorado 
mining district, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. 

Goldbottom; creek, tributary to Skookum river, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Golden; peak, just east of Mount Bendeleben, Seward peninsula. Local name, i)ul)- 
lished bv the Coast Survev in 1900. 



Gol— Goo. 



138 [BULL. 187. 



Goldengate; creek, tributary to Kruzgamepa river, from the west, Seward penin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Qolofnin; bay and sountl, on north shore of Norton sound, Bering sea. Discovered, 
' in 1821, by Khromehenko, who named it after his vessel, the brig Golofnin, 
which in turn had been named after Capt. Vasili Mikhailovich Golofnin, 
of the Russian navy. In Roman letters this name has been written 
Golovnine and Golofnin. The native name is said to be Tatchik. A large 
and shallow sound stretches inland from the bay. This inner bay the 
Russians, it is reported, called Sun Golovine or Golovine sound. The 
name Golofnin is here applied to both the inner part, the sound, and the 
outer part, the bay. 

fSolofuin, point; see Hope. 

Goloi; island, between Inner Iliasik and Dolgoi islands, near Belkofski. Named 
Goloi (bare) by Veniaminof. 

Goloi, island; see Aektok. 

Goloi, island; see Kalibri. 

Goloi, island; see Long. 

Goloi, island, point, etc. ; see Bare. 

Goloi; islands, in the northeastern part of Salisbury sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Goloi (bare) by the Russians. 

Goloi; islands, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Goloi (bare) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Goloi, islands; see Passage. 

Goloi; islet, near Kruzof island, in entrance to Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Goloi (bare) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Goloi, islet; see Bush Top. 

Golova, cape; see Head. 

Golora, cape; see Mountain. 

Golovni; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Golomiannoi (sea breeze) by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been 
written Golomi, which, according to George Kostrometinoff, U. S. Court 
Interpreter at Sitka, is a corruption of the Russian Golovni or Golovni^ 
(fire-brand). 

Golsova; river, debouching in the southeastern part of Norton sound. Dall, 1866, 
calls it Golsova and Nelson, 1879, Goltzovaia, obviously two forms of the 
same word. Perhaps from the German holtz (wood). Tebenkof uses the 
native name Negvelnuk. 

Goltsovaia, bay; see Holtz. 

Gomair, lake; see Gumaer. 

Good; island, in Gambler bay. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
])y Mansfield in 1889. 

Good; island, in the Yukon river, about 4 miles below the mouth of Soonkakat 
river. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Goodhope; bay, in the southeastern part of Kotzebue sound, Arctic ocean. So 
named by Kotzebue in August, 1816, because here he had "good hope" 
of making important geographic discoveries. 

Goodman, glacier; see Goodwin. 

Goodnews; bay, indenting the mainland coast a little south of the mouth of the 
Kuskokwim river. Called by Sarichef, 1826, port Dobriek Vestei (good 
news) or Imakpiguak bay. Lutke, following this, calls it Bonnes Nou- 
velies bale, and adds, "it might better be called the hay of false reports." 
It was visited and probably named Good News by the land expedition of 
Ustiugof and Korsakof of 1818-19. 

Goodpaster; river, trilmtary to the Tanana, from the east, in latitude 64°. So 
nuiiic<l by Allen, in 1885, after the Goodpaster family of Kentucky. 



BARER.] 189 Goo— <iOV. 

Goodwin; glacier, tributary to the Copper river, from the west, just south of Childs 
glacier. So named by Abercrombie, in 1884, after Maj. W. E. Goodwin, 
U. S. V. Erroneously Goodman. 
Goose; cove, at the head ot Portage bay, Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Nichols in 1882. 
Goose; creek, on the northern shore of Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Gusinaia (goose) by Vasilief in 1833. Has also been written Gousna 
and Gusna. 
Goose; creek, tributary to Koksuktapaga river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Goose; creek, tributary to Red bay, Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Helm in 1886. 
Goose; island, at western point of entrance to Mud bay, Cross somid, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Hanus in 1880. 
Goose; island, on the northeastern shore of Prince William sound. So named by 

Abercrombie in 1898. 
Goose; island or islands, on the southern edge of the Sandman reefs. Named Gus- 
innoi (goose) by the Russians. Lutke calls them "Civoutchy (du lion 
marin) rocher," i. e., sea lion rocks. They are still un.surveyed. Dall's 
chart of 1882 (Coast Survey, 806) shows two islands, Big Goose and Little 
Goose. 
Goose, island; see Geese. 

Goose; point, on the Arctic coast, at mouth of Sinaru creek, just west of Refuge 
inlet. Presumably so named by British naval officers connected with the 
Franklin search expeditions, 1849-1853. 
Gora, cape; see Mountain. 

Gora Chetierek Glaraia, mountain; see Fourpeaked. 
Gorbun, rock; see Humpback. 
Gorda; point, in Port Refugio, Bucareli bay. Prince of AVales archipelago. Named 

Punta Gorda (broad point) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Gorda; point, on the northwestern shore of St. Ignace island, Bucareli bay. Prince 
of Wales archipelago. Named Punta Gorda (broad point) by Maurelle 
and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Gorda, point; see Ankau. 

Gore; cape, on the southwestern coast of St. Matthew island, Bering sea. Named 
Gore by Lutke, in 1836, to preserve the name which Cook gave to the 
island, in 1778. 
Gore; point, the eastern point of entrance to Port Dick, Kenai peninsula. Gulf of 

Alaska. So named by Portlock in 1786. 
Goreli, island; see Seguam. 
Goreloi, islands; see Gareloi. 
Goreloi, volcano; see Redoubt. 
Gore's, island; see St. Matthew. 
Gorge (The); canyon, in Klutina river, a little below Klutina lake. Name from 

Abercrombie, 1898. 
Gorman; strait, between Andronica and Korovin islands, Shumagin group. So 

named by the fishermen prior to 1872. 
Gornoi; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Gornoi (mountair.ous) by Vasilief in 1809. Erroneously Coruoi. 
Gornostai, island; see Ermine. 
Goshawk, cape; see Aguliuk. 
Goulding; harbor, near Portlock harbor, on the western shore of Chichagof island, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Portlock in 1787. 
Gousna, creek; see Goose. 
' Government Station; see Utkiavi. 



<;ov— <irn. 



190 [BULL. 187. 



Gotrrnor Siinpsoti, rape; see Simpson. 

G'oi'orushtchi, oape, point, etc.; see Gull. 

Goi'oni«hcchit; island; see Kittiwake. 

Goi/i't, plai'ier; see ]\ralaspina. 

Grace; point, the northeriuiiost point nf Latouclic island, Prince William sonnd. So 

called in Vancouver's atlas, 1798. 
Graham; harbor, in Cook inlet. Called Graham's harbor by Tortlock in 178t). It 

is Cool bay of INIeares, in 1788, and English bay of the Russians. Often 

called Port Graham. 
Graham, point; see Dix. 
Grand; island, in Htephens passaise, Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade 

in 1869. 
Grand; island, in Tlevak strait, Cordova l)ay, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Nichols in 1881. Has also been named McNair by Sheldon Jackson. 
Grand; point, the east point of entrance to Farragut bay, Frederick sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 
Grand Central; river, tributary to Salmon lake, from the west, Seward peninsula. 

Name fi'om Barnard, 1900. 
Grand Pacific; glacier, at head of (i lacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Apparently so 

named by Reid and the name jjublislied in Appleton's guide in 1893. 
Grand Plateau; glacier, in the Fairweather range, southeastern Alaska. La Perouse, 

in 1786, called this place Le Grand Plateau and Dall, in 1874, called it, as 

above, Grand Plateau glacier. 
Grand Wash, river; see Kwik. 
Granwhioi, point; see Termination. 
Granite; cove, in George island. Port Althorp, Cross sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Descriptive name, given l)y Dall in 1880. 
Granite; creek, tributary to Chandlar river, from the west, near latitude 67°. Pros- 
pectors' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 
Granite; creek, tributary to Matanuska river, from the west, about 25 miles al)ove 

the mouth of the latter. Prospectors' name, published in 1899. 
Granite; creek, tributary to Sixmile creek, Kenai peninsula. Local name from 

ISIendenhall, 1898. 
Granite; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the west, near longi- 
tude 150°. Prospectors' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 
Granite; creek, tributary to Tisuk river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Granite; point (1,500 feet high), forming the south point of entrance to Sanl)oni 

harbor, Nagai island, Shumagin group. Name published by Dall in 187C. 
Granite; point, in Redfish bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Moser in 1897. 
Granite Canyon; glacier, on the eastern border of the Muir glacier, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by Reid, in 1890, from the crystalline nature of the 

rock, which, however, turns out to be not a true granite. 
Granilzn, strait; see Dixon entrance. 
Grant; island, in \W\\\n canal, on the western side of Revillagigedo island, near 

Naha bay. So named by Clover in 1885. Erroneously Giant. 
Grant; peak (5,291 feet high), on the mainland north of Frederick sound, south- 

easti'rn Alaska. Named by Thtnnas, in 1887, after President Ulysses S. 

Granl. 
Grant; ])oint, in Izcndjek bay, Alaska peninsula. Named by the Fish Conmiission, 

in 1888, after President Ulysses S. Grant. 
Grant, i)o\nt; see Whidbev. 



BAKER.] 191 



Ora— Ore. 



Grantley; harbor, at head of Port Clarence, Bering strait. Surveyed by Beechey 

in Septem})er, 1827, and named Grantley "in comphment to Lord 

Grantley." 
Grass; islet, in Sawmill cove, Howkan strait, Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. 

So called by Sheldon Jackson, in 1880. 
Grass; rock, in entrance to Tamgaa harbor, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Nichols, in 1883. 
Grass Kiioll; islet. This name was applied by Dall, in 1883, to that part of Bush 

Top islet, which is detached at high water. 
Grass Top; rock, in the entrance to Deep bay, Chichagof island. Peril strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Coghlan in 1884. 
Grassy; islet, south of Iliasik islands, in Sandman reefs, northeast of Sannak. So 

called by Dall in 1880. 
Grave; creek, tributary to Middle fork of Chandlar river, near longitude 148°. 

Prospectors' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 
Grave; point, the northeasternmost point of Duke island, Graviua group, Alexander 

archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1882 (map in Coast 

Pilot, p. 72). Presumably a descriptive name, obtained from the pilots. 
Grave; point, the northwestern point of Pitt island, Hooniah harbor. Port Fred- 
erick, Alexander archipelago. So named by United States naval officers 

in 1880. 
Grave; point, the western point of entrance to Taku harbor, Stephens passage, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. There were a few 

graves on the point. 
Gravel; island, one of the Kutchuma group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Pesiak (gravel) by Yasilief in 1809. Has also been called Martin 

island. 
Grarpii, point; see Craven. 
Graveyard; cape, in ^Marmot l)ay, on the southern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak 

grouj). Named Kladbitsha (graveyard) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Gravina; groui) of islands, in Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago, of whicli the 

principal ones are Annette, Duke, Gravina, and Mary. They were thus 

designated by the Spaniard Don Jacinto Caamaiio in about 1790. 
Gravina; island, at entrance to Port Gravina, Prince William sound. So named by 

Abercrombie in 1898. 
Gravina; island, in Clarence strait, between Revillagigedo island and Prince of 

Wales archipelago. It is the northernmost of a group named Gravina ])y 

Caamaiio in about 1790. 
Gravina; point, separating Cordova bay and Port Gravina, Prince William sound. 

Named by Abercrombie in 1898. 
Gravina; point, the easternmost point of Gravina island, Alexander archipelago. 

So nameii by Dall in 1879. 
Gravina; port, indenting the eastern shore of Prince William sound. So named by' 

Fidalgo in 1790. 
Gray; peak (4,694 feet high), near the head of Thomas bay, southeastern Alaska. 

Named by Thomas, in 1887, presumably after Prof. Asa Gray, of nar\anl 

College. 
Great; arni; of Whale bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. Named Bolslioi 

roukav (big sleeve) by the Ru.ssians. 
Great; canyon, about 50 miles long, on the Stikine river, British Columbia. This 

canyon marks the head of steam navigation. 
Great; glacier, on the western bank of the Stikine river, southeastern Alaska. 

Hunter, writing in 1877, says: " Great glacier is said to extend nortwest- 

wardlv to the coast about 70 miles, from 350 to 400 feet high." 



tire— Ore. 



19i{ • [BULL. 187. 



Great; lake, near Nortlieast point, Ht. Paul island, Bering sea. Ho c-alled by Elliott 

in 1874. 
Great Bend; local name for an ox bow in the Kuskokwim river, near longitude i 

lnS°, ol)tained by Spurr and Post from missionary J. H. Kilbuck in 1898, 
Great Bering; glai-ier, west of Icy bay, in the St. Elias alpine region. So named 

by Seton-Karr in 1886. 
Great Sitkin; island (5,033 feet high), between Atka and Adak, Andreanof group, 

middle Aleutians. Native name from the earliest Russian explorers. 

Called Great Sitkin to distinguish it from Little Sitkin, near Kiska. Has 

been written Seetien, Sigdak, Sitchin, Sitchini, Tschechina, Tsetchina, etc. 

Lutke calls it Eastern Sitkin, while Dall calls it Sitkin or Great Net island. 
Great Streiki, bay; see Big Branch. 
Greely; point, on the mainland, in Taku inlet, southeastern Alaska. So named by 

Mansfield, in 1890, after Gen. Adolphus Washington Greely, U. S. A. 

Erroneously Greeley. 
Green; creek, tributary to Seventymile creek, from the south. Local name from 

Barnard in 1898. 
Green; island, in Port Frederick, Icy strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by i 

United States naval officers in 1880. 
Green; islands, northwest of Montague island, in Prince William sound. So named 

in May, 1778, by Cook, who found them "Low, free from snow, and cov- 
ered with wood and verdure." Also called lies Vertes. Nikolai island 

of Russian Hydrographic chart 1378 (ed. of 1847). 
Green; islets (at high water), on eastern shore of Portland canal, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by Pender in 1868. 
Green; point, on Lindenberg peninsula, Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. ' 

Apparently so named by Dall in Coast Pilot, 1883. It is point Meli (shoal) > 

of Lindenberg in 1838. i 

Green; point, on the mainland, a little south of the mouth of the Stikine river. I 

Named Zelenoi (green) , in 1863, by the Russian surveying party, under 

Commander Ba.sargin, on the steamer Rynda. Has been called Zelonoi, 

Zelony, and Green. The name is descriptive. 
Green; point, on the northeastern shore of Hemlock island. Port Chester, Annette '< 

island, Alexander archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in j 

1876. 
Green; ridge, of wooded hills (about 1,300 feet high), near Cape Fox, Dixon 

entrance. Named by Nichols in 1888. I 

Green; point, the northern point of entrance to Pyramid harbor, Chilkat inlet, Lynn ' 

canal, southeastern Alaska. Named Zelenoi (green) by Lindenberg in i 

1838. It is Indian point of Meade, in 1869, and Pyramid point of Beardslee i 

in 1880. j 

Green; rocks, between Island and Rock points, Wrangell strait, Alexander archi- i 

pelago. Named Zelenoi (green) by Lindenberg in 1838. Meade, in 1869, ! 

called them Fairway rocks. ! 

Greenhorn; mountains, east of Mount Bendeleben and north of Golofnin sound, 

Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. 
Greenough; mountain (4,800 feet high), in extreme northeastern Alaska. So 

named by Franklin in 1826. 
Grecjo, point; see Cangrejo (crab). 
Greig-; cape, on the north shore of Alaska peninsula, at the mouth of Ugashik 

river. Named by Lutke, in 1828, after Admiral Greig, of the Russian 

navy. Variously written Greigh, Grey, etc. I 

Greig; mountain (6,500 feet high), in the Tordrillo range, between the Kuskokwiix^ 

and Skwentna rivers. So named by Spurr and Post in 1898. Errom " 

ously Creig. 



KAKER.l 193 



Gre— Gul. 



Crcvllle, cape; see Chiniak. 

Grewingk; glader, on Kenai peninsula, tributary to Kachemak bay, Cook inlet. 
Named by Dall, in 1880, after Dr. Constantin Grewingk, a distinguished 
writer on Alaska. 

Grewingk; volcanic island, near Bogoslof island, Bering sea. This island rose from 
the sea, in 1883, and was at first called New Bogoslof. Dall proposed the 
name Grewingk, after Dr. Constantin Grewingk, who had previously 
written on the geology and vulcanism of Alaska. 

Grey; point, on the western shore of Tamgas harbor, Annette island, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Greys; island, on the southern edge of the Stikine flats, Sumner strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Apparently so named by Meade in 1869. 

Griada, rocks; see Border. 

Grief; islet, in Duncan canal, Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Thomas in 1887. 

Grifl3.n; ]>oint, on the Arctic coast, a little west of the international Ijoundary line. 
So named by Franklin in 1826. 

GriflB.th; island, in western anchorage of Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1885. 

Grindall; island, in Clarence strait, at entrance to Kasaan bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Dall in 1880. 

Grindall; passage, between Grindall island and Grindall point, Clarence strait, 
Alexander archipelago. So called by Nichols (Coast Pilot, p. 90) in 1891. 

Grindall; point, the north point of entrance to Kasaan bay, Clarence strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Captain Grindall, 
R. N. Sometimes called Cape Grindall. It is Cone point of the traders. 

Grindall; post-office, at Grindall point, Alexander archipelago. Established in 
July, 1900. 

Groosgindoose, inlet; see Cook. 

Grouse; creek, tributary to the Kruzganiepa river, from the west, Seward ])eninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Grouse; creek, tributary to Mint river, Seward peninsula. Name from Brooks, 
1900. 

Grouse; creek, tributary to the Tubutulik river, near its source, Seward peninsula. 
Prospectors' name, from Peters, 1900. 

Grouse; island, at mouth of Mink bay, Boca de Quadra, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Grunt; point. Gambler bay, Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Mansfield in 1889. 

Guadalupe, Puerto de; see Shelikof. 

Guanton; mountains (5,163 feet high), east of Portland canal. So named by Pender 
in 1868. 

Guard; islands (25 feet high), at junction of Behm canal, Clarence strait and T.m- 
gass narrows, Alexander archipelago. Name given by local pilots about 
1880. These islands have l)een reserved for light-house i)urposes by 
Executive order dated January 4, 1901. 

Guertin; islet, in Jamestown bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archij)elago. So named 
by United States naval officers in 1880, after INIaster Frank Guertin, U. S. N. 

Guibert; islets, in the entrance to Necker bay, Baranof island, Alexander arclii- 
pelago. Called Necker isles by La Perouse in 1786. By tlie Russians 
called Yaichnia (egg) and by Dall, in 1883, Guibert, in order •' to distin- 
guish them from the host of others which have likewise received from the 
Russians the title of Egg (Yaichnia) islands." Variously called Egg, 
Necker, Yaitchny, etc. 

Bull. 187—01 13 



Oiil— nnn. 



194 [BULL. 187, 



(; II Hurt, iiort; see Whale l)ay. 

Guide; island, in the northern i)art of Pitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Krostofskoi (cross) hy Vasilief in 1809. Later it was called Ukazatel 
(guide) island by the Russians. Has also been called Index island. In 
the Coast Pilot, 1891, it is called Guide (p. 168) and Unastal (p. 176). 

Guide; rocks, in the southeastern part of Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. 
Name pubHshed by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Guillemot; island, north of the Hhuniagins. Named lachnoi (egg) by Tebenkof in 
1849. Renamed Guillemot by Dall in 1880. 

Gulch; creek, trilnitary to Sixmile creek, Kenai neninsula. Local name, obtained 
by Becker in 1895. 

(jull, bay; see Udaniat. 

Gull; cape, the southern point of entrance to Kafla bay, on north shore of Shelikof 
strait. Named Govorushechi or Govorushek (gull) by the Russians. 
According to Elliott Goverooskie, Russian for gulls, refers to Larus hrevi- 
roslrh and Lnrus tridnclylvs. 

Gull; hill, at east end of St. George island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. Perhaps a 
local name; used by Elliott in 1873-74. 

Gull; island, in Favorite channel, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Beardslee in 1880. 

Gull; island, in Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. So named by 
Nichols in 1883. 

Gnll, island; see Kutkan. 

Gull; islet, in western anchorage St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Chaichi (gull) 
by the early Russians. 

Gull; islet (20 feet high), near the northern coast of Unga island, Shumagins. Pre- 
sumably so named by the AVestern Union Telegraph Expedition in 1865. 

Gull; islet, near the northwestern shore of Shuyak island, Kodiak group. Named 
Chaichi (gull) by the Russian American Company in 1849. 

Gull; islet, southeast of Long island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Chaiki (gull) by Vasilief in 1809. Called Gull rocks by Nichols in the 
Coast Pilot (1891, p. 173). 

Gull; point, the northwestern point of Onslow island, Clarence strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Gull; point, the south point of entrance to Igak bay, on eastern shore of Kodiak. 
Named Govorushiche (Kittiwake, a kind of gull) and Chaichi (gull) by 
the Russians. Lisianski, 1805, calls it Gull's point. Elliott says Chikie 
is the Russian for the Burgomaster gull {Larus glaucus) . 

Gull; rock, near Pinnacle island, Bering sea. Apparently so called by Elliott in 
1874. Sarichef shows the rock and calls it Rock ivith gravel. 

Gull; six rocky islets, between Unalga and Akutan, in Akutan pass, eastern Aleu- 
tians. Locally known as Chaiki (gull) rocks. The name Chaichi (gull) 
was published by Tebenkof in 1849. Called Gull rocks by Dall, who in 
1871 established a tide gauge upon one of them. See Unalga island. 

Chilrafix, point; see Culross. 

Gumaer; lake, near Tetling river, in about longitude 142°. So named by Lowe, in 
1898, after John Gumaer, a member of his party. Erroneously Gomair 
on the maps. 

GunahadeiAje. The Krause brothers, 1882, report this to be the native name of a 
lake in or near the Krotahini pass, southeastern Alaska. 

Guria; see Kekur. 

Gimnaia, creek, islands, etc.; see Goose. 

Gwiinain, islands; see Geese. 

Gumu, creek; see Goose. 



195 



(ins— Hal. 



Gustavus; point, the eastern point of entrance to Glacier bay, Icy strait, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named by Dall in 1879. 

Gut; ])ay, on the southeastern coast of Baranof island, Chatham strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1889. 

Ciiltrdicr, cape; see Fairweather. 

I iuiivetterherg; see Fairweather. 

Guyot; glacier, between Karr hills and Robinson hills and trilmtary to Malaspina 
glacier, near ^Nlount St. Elias. Originally this name was applied by the 
New York Times expedition, of 1886, to the western lobe of Malaspina 
glacier. The above description follows Russell's application. Named 
after Prof. Arnold Guyot, of Princeton College. 

(irozdef, islands; see Diomede. 

(Jirozdef, cape; see Prince of Wales. 

(ivozdeff, islands; see Diomede. 

Gwydyr; bay, a little east of the mouth of the Colville river, Arctic coast. So 
named by Franklin in 1826. Erroneously Gwydir. 

Hadon; peak, near the head of Libbey glacier, in the St. Elias region. So named 
by Topham in 1886. 

Haenke; island, in Disenchantment bay, Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by Malaspina, in 1791, after Thaddeus Haenke, botanist and nat- 
uralist of his expedition. 

Hafuoche, point; see Kamachi. 

Hagemeister; island, in northern part of Bristol bay, Bering sea. So named by 
the Russians, after Capt. Leontius Vasilevich Hagemeister, who made 
three voyages to the Russian American colonies and round the world, 
1806-7 in command of the Xera, 1816-1819, in command of the Kutuzof, 
and 1828-1830, in command of the Krotkoi. This name was published in 
Sarichef's atlas in 1826. Erroneously Hagenmeister. 

Hagemeister; strait, separating Hagemeister island from the mainland, Bristol bay. 
Name published by Sarichef in 1826. 

Hague, cape; see Umshaliuk. 

Hague; rock, between Sannak island and Sandman reefs. Named by the Fish Com- 
mission in 1890. Possibly identical with Midway island. See ^Midway. 

Haines; village and post-office, on Portage bay, near the head of Chilkoot inlet, 
southeastern Alaska. Prior to 1880 there existed here an Indian village 
called Kutkwutlu (Deshu or Daschu, according to the Krause brothers). 
In 1881 a Presbyterian mission school was established here, a trading 
post having been already established, and called Willard Mission. This 
name was soon afterwards changed to Haines. The post-office is called 
Haines and the whole place known locally as Chilkoot. The post-office 
was established here in February, 1884. 

Hakorcins; two stations (old and new) on north bank of the Yukon, about 75 
miles below the mouth of the Tanana. Name published by the Coast 
Survey in 1898. 

Haley; anchorage, in Fish bay, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by 
Coghlan, in 1884, after a miner, Nicholas Haley. 

Halfmoon; anchorage, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. Traders' name, 
first reported by Meade, in 1869, and published by the Hydrographic 
Office in 1869. 

Halfway; point, on the southeastern shore of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Bering 
sea. It is about midway between "the village and Northeast point." 
Named Polovinnoi (halfway) by the Russians. 

Halibut; bay, on the western shore of Portland canal, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by Pender in 1868. 



Hal-Hal. 



196 [BULI.. 187. 



Halibut; covo, indenting the eastern shore of Kachemak bay, Cook inlet. Appar- 
ently so named by Dall in 1880. 
Hiilihiit, ishinil; see Sannak. 
Halibut; point, 4 miles northwesterly from Sitka, Baranof island, Alexander arehi- 

jH'lafio. Named Paltus (halibnt) by Yasilief in 1809. Also written Pal- 

toose. Ihis also ])een ealled Pesehani (sandy). 
Halibut; point, on the western shore of Portland canal', at entrance t(j Halibut l)ay. 

Name published by the Coast Survey. 
Halibut; rock, l)are at low water, in the entrance to Port Frederick, Icy strait, 

Alexander arcliipelago. Name published in the Coast Pilot (1883, 

p. 191). 
Haliknuk; river, tributary to the Chulitna river, from the east, in longitude 156° SO'. 

Eskimo name, obtained by Spurr and Post, in 1898, from A. Lind, a trader. 

It is pronounced Hal-fk-nook, and said to mean sudden or unexpected. 

Tikhmenief, 1861, calls it Agalitnak. 
Halkett; cape, between Smith and Harrison bays, on the Arctic coast, east of Point 

Barrow. So named by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, in compliment to one 

of the directors of the Hudson Bay Company. Has often been written 

Halket. 
Ilalkin, island; see Raven. 
Hall; cape, the north point of Hall island, Bering sea. So called by Tebenkof, 

1849, after Lieut. Robert Hall, who accompanied Billings and visited this 

locality in 1791. Has also been called North cape. 
Hall; creek, tributary to Canyon creek, from the east, in the Fortymile mining 

region. Local name from Barnard in 1898. 
Hall; island, near the southeastern shore of Big Koniuji island, Yukon harbcjr, 

Sliumagin group. So named by Dall, in 1874, after Captain Hall, sailing 

master of the Coast Survey schooner Humboldt, 1871-72. 
Hall; island (1,500 feet high), off the western end of St. Matthew island, Bering 

sea. The early Russian hunters called this Morzhovoi (walrus), because 

they found these animals there. Lutke and Tebenkof follow this, Lutke 

writing Morjovi (aux morses) and Morjovy. Russian Hydrographic chart 

1427 calls it Sindsha, probably after its alleged Russian discoverer, Sind. 

Billings and Sarichef anchored between it and St. Matthew, July 14, 1791 

(o. s. ), and on American maps for the last thirty years it has borne the 

name Hall, presumably after Lieut. Robert Hall, who accompanied 

Billings. 
Hall; peak (3,726 feet high), in the northern part of Kupreanof island, Alexander 

art'hipelago. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Captain Charles Francis 

Hall, the distinguished Arctic explorer, who died November 8, 1871. 
Hall; rapids, in the Yukon river, 25 miles above Anvik. Named Hall's Rapids ])y 

Raymond, in 1869, "in honor of Capt. Benjamin Hall, who first ])assed 

this point in a steamer." 
Hall; rock, in the Kasiana group of islands, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Yasilief in 1809. 
Halleck; harljor, in Saginaw bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So named 

])y Meade in 1869, after Major-General Henry Wager Halleck, U. S. A. 
Halleck; island, a little nortli of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Meade, in 1869, after General Halleck, U. S. A., then in 

command at Sitka. 
Halleck; range of mountains (3,500 to 4,000 feet high), west of Portland canal. So 

named by Pender in 1868. 
Hallet; valley and river, tributary to the head of Klutina lake. So named by 

Abercrombie, in 1898, after Private Hallet, a member of his party. Errone- 

ouslv Hallett. 



BAKER.] 197 



Hal— liar. 



Hallo; bay, on the northern shore of Shehkof strait. Corruption of a native word 
given by Tebenkof as Aho, and which has appeared as Ago and Hioo. 
The local pronunciation is Hke the telephone call, Hello. 
Ham, cove; see Sawmill. 
Ham; island, near the eastern shore of Annette island, Revillagigedo channel, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Ham, island; see Blake. 
Hamilton; bay, in Keku strait, Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by the United States Navy, presumably in 1879 or 1880, after the 

owner of a sawmill there. Sometimes called Hamilton harbor. 
Hamilton; island, in Shakan bay, Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Dall in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 101). 
Hamilton; landing, on right bank of the Yukon, a little above Kaltag. Called 

Hamilton's landing on recent maps. 
Hamilton; mountain peak (about 2,500 feet high), in the Kilbuck range, western 

Alaska, about 30 miles ENE. of Bethel. So named by Post, of the Geo- 
logical Survey, in 1898. 
Hamilton; point, the southern point of entrance to Hamilton bay, Keku strait, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Moore in 1892. 
Hamittons Mill. A sawmill and wharf, on Shakan strait, Kosciusko island, Alexander 

archipelago; so called after its owner. The post-office Shakan is at this 

place. See Shakan. 
Hamond, cape; see St. Elias. 
Hanag-ita; trail, valley and river trilnitary to Tebay river, from the east. So named 

by Gerdine, in 1900, after an Indian chief in the vicinity. 
Hancock; peak (3,851 feet high), on the mainland, west of Thomas bay, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named Ijy Thomas, in 1887, presumal:)ly after the first 

steamship to cross the Atlantic. 
Hanin; rocks, near the northern jjoint of entrance to Chiniak bay, Kodiak island. 

Named Haninskia (Hanin) by Murashef in 1839-40. Twins of Coast 

Survey charts. 
Hanning-; bay, on the northwestern coast of Montague island. Prince William 

sound. So named by Portlock, in 1787, "after the worthy family of the 

Hannings." Erroneously Hunning. It is Port Bazil of Russian Hydro- 
graphic chart 1378. 
Hantak, island; see Khantaak. 
Hanus; bay, indenting the northern shore of Baranof island, Peril strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by United States naval officers, in 1880, after Lieut. 

Gustavus Charles Hanus, U. S. N. Was called Hanus inlet in the Coast 

Pilot of 1883. 
Hanus; islet, at eastern entrance to Symonds bay, Biorka island, Sitka sound. 

Named by Symonds, in 1879, after Lieut. G. C. Hanus, U. S. N. 
Hanus; point, the eastern point of entrance to Hanus bay. Peril strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Moore, in 1895, after Lieut. G. C. Hanus, LT. S. N. 
Hanus; reef, in the eastern entrance to Icy strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Beardslee, in 1880, after Lieut. G. C. Hanus, U. S. N., who discovered 

and surveyed it. Also called Hanus rocks. 
Happy; river, tributary to the Skwentna, from the north, near its source. So named 

by Spurr and Post in 1898. 
Harbor; island, immediately in front of the wharf at Sitka, Sitka sound, Alexander 

archipelago. Named Gavanski (harbor) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Harbor; island, in Holkham bay, Stephens passage, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Meade in 1869. 
Harbor; island, in Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

Meade m 1809. 



liar— llur. 



198 [BUIX.187. 



Harbor, island ; see Pitt. 
Ilnrhor, islet; see Danger. 

Harbor; peak (2,200 feet high) , near Sitka harbor, Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Called Gavanski (harbor) mountain by Tebenkof in 1850. Has 

also been called Gavan. 
Harbor; point, a sand spit in Port Moller, Alaska peninsula. So named by Dall in 

1882. 
Harbor; point, on Annette island, the southern point of entrance to Hassler harbor, 

Kevillagigedo channel, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 

1882. 
Harbor; point, on the eastern shore of Long island. Port Frederick, Icy strait, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by United States naval officers in 1880. 
Harbor; point, the eastern point of entrance to Lituya bay, southeastern Alaska. 

Named by Dall in 1874. It is luzhnoi (south) point of Tebenkof, 1849. 
Harbor; point, the southern point of Old Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander 

archipelago. Named Gavanski by Vasilief, in 1809, and called, indiffer- 
ently, Gavanski and Harbor. 
Harbor; ridge (1,700 feet high), on the mainland, east of Nakat harbor, southeast- 
ern Alaska. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Harbor; rock, between the middle and western anchorages, Sitka harbor, Sitka 

sound, Alexander archipelago. So called by Dall in the Coast Pilot 

(1883, p. 149). 
Harman; point, the eastern head of Day harbor, Kenai peninsula. So named by 

Portlock in 1786. Meares calls it Harmon. 
Harold; mountain (3,428 feet high), on the mainland, east of Stikine river and near 

the international boundary line. Name published by the Coast Survey 

in 1895. 
Harper; bend, in the Tanana river, about 20 miles below the mouth of the Toklat 

river. Locally known as Harj^er's bend, this designation being derived 

from Arthur Harper, a pioneer trader on the Yukon. Here, in a log house, 

was Harper's trading station, the scene of the murder of Mrs. Bean, wife 

of the agent stationed there. 
Harrell; island, in the Kuskokwim river, near latitude 63°. So named by Spurr, in 

1898, after A. E. Harrell, a member of his party. 
Harriet; creek, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the south, near longitude 151°. 

Prospectors' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 
Harriet; point, on the northwestern shore of Cook inlet, near Redoubt volcano. 

So called in Vancouver's atlas (1798, chart 10). 
Harriman; fiord, opening into Port Wells, Prince William sound. Discovered and 

named by the Harriman Expedition, in 1899, after Mr. Edward Henry 

Harriman. 
Harriman; glacier, tributary to the head of Harriman fiord. Port Wells, Prince 

William sound. So named by the Harriman Expedition, 1899. 
Harrington; point, the north point of Observation island, forming the western 

])oint of entrance to Steamer bay, Etolin island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Van(;ouver in 1793. 
Harrington; rock, in Portage bay, Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Ni(;hols in 1882. 
Harris; creek, tributary to the north fork of Kugruk river, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Brooks, 1900. 
Harris; island, near the mouth of Tamgas harbor, Felice strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Clover in 1885. 
Harris; islet, near the entrance to Silver bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

So named l)v Beardslee in 1880. 



BAKER.] 199 



Har— Hat. 



Harris; point, the northern point of entrance to Port Mahnesbury, Knin island, 
Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 
1794. By transcription into Russian letters, an error in lettering, and a 
retranscription into English, this has appeared on some charts as Gams. 

Harrisburg, city, harbor, etc. ; see Juneau. 

Harrison; bay, on the Arctic coast, near mouth of Colville river, east of Point Bar- 
row. So named by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, in honor of the deputy 
governor of the Hudson Bay Company. 

Harrison; mountain (6,955 feet high), on the mainland, near Holkham l)ay, 
Stephens passage, Alexander archipelago. So named by Mansfield, in 
1889, after President Benjamin Harrison. 

Harrison; point, on the western shore of Portland canal, southeastern Alaska. So 
called by the Coast Survey. This is Leading point of British Admiralty 
chart 2431 (1865-1888). 

Harrison, river; see Alsek. 

Harry Saddle; mountain (2,086 feet high), just north of Cape Fox, Dixon entrance. 
Apparently so named by Meade in 1869. 

Hartford; range of mountains, on the mainland, north of Farragut l)ay, southeast- 
ern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Admiral Farragut' s flag- 
ship. 

Hartman; river, tributary to the headwaters of the Kuskokwim river. So named 
.by Spurr, in 1898, after George Hartman, a member of his party. 

Hartt; point, on Dall island, Howkan strait, Cordova bay, Alexander archijjelago. 
So named by Sheldon Jackson, in 1880. 

Harvard; glacier, tributary to the head of College fiord. Port Wells, Prince William 
sound. So named by the Harriman Expedition in 1899. 

Harvester; island, near or in Uyak anchorage, Uyakbay, northern coast of Kodiak. 
So named after the bark Harvester and name pu]:)lishe(l in 1899. 

Hassler; harbor, indenting the northeastern shore of Annette island, Revillagigedo 
channel, Alexander archipelago. Surveyed, and named, by Nichols in the 
Coast Survey steamer Hassler, in 1882. 

Hassler; island, in Behm canal, on the northwestern shore of Revillagigedo island, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1891, after its 
surveying steamer Hassler. 

Hassler, island. It was supposed, in 1882, that Carroll inlet or arm extended 
entirely across Revillagigedo island, cutting it in two. The soutliern part 
was then named Hassler. The name is, however, inapplicable, there being 
no such island. 

Hassler; passage, separating Hassler island from Revillagigedo island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Hassler; point, the northern point of entrance to North bay, Tlcvak strait, Dall 
island, Alexander archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1882, after the Coast 
Survey steamer Hassler, which was in this vicinity on a surveying cruise 
in 1881. 

Hassler; reef (10 feet out at low water), 5 miles south of the Percy islands and in 
the southern entrance to Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. Named 
after the Coast Survey steamer Hassler by Nichols, in 1883, who says (Coast, 
Pilot, p. 74), "probably identical with Brundige Rock." And again (p. 
85), "This is without doubt the reef reported by Captain Brundige, though 
his bearings would not so confirm it." See Brundige. 

Hastings; creek, debouching near Cape Nome, in the Cape Nome mining region, 
Seward peninsula. Local name published in 1900. 

Hat; mountain, on Wales island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 
1888. 



Hat— 1 1 II)-. 



200 ["ui-i.. 1S7. 



Jfatnu, cajie; see Ko\Ti7,hka. 

Hatchet; point, on the eastern wliore of Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. Called 
Topor (hatchet) l)y Tebenkof in 1849. Also has been written Tapor. 

Hattie; island, in Portland canal, in latitude 55° 19^ So named by the Coast Sur- 
vey in 1891. 

Hawaii; rape, the southeastern point of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. Seen for 
the first time, August 16, 1867, by Capt. Thomas Long, of the American 
wiialing bark .Y//(', and l)y him named Hawaii. 

Hawk; inlet, indenting the northwestern sliore of Admiralty island; Chatham strait, 
Alexander archipelago. Name published in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 182) . 

Jldtrh; island; see Aguligik. 

Hawkins; island, in the entrance to Prince William sound. Named Hawkins's by 
Vancouver in 1794. Has also been printed Hawkin. 

Hairlfji, island; see Boidarkin. 

Hawthorne; peak (4,021 feet high), between Juneau and Taku inlet, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by Mansfield in 1890. 

Hay; islet, on the southeastern edge of Sandman reefs, northeast of Sannak. So 
called by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Hayden; glacier, tributary to Malaspina glacier, northwest of Yakutat bay, in the 
St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. Named by Russell, in 1890, after 
Prof. Ferdinand Vandiveer Hayden, founder and long director of the 
United States Geological Survey of the Territories. 

Hayden, port; see Heiden. 

Hayes; glacier, at the source of Hayes river, northwest of Cook inlet. So named 
l)y Spurr and Post, in 1898, after Dr. Charles Willard Hayes, of the 
United States Geological Survey. 

Hayes; mountain (about 14,000 feet high), near latitude 63° 30^ and longitude 147°. 
So named by Peters and Brooks, in 1898, after Dr. C. Willard Hayes, of 
the United States Geological Survey. 

Hayes; point, the northeastern point of entrance to Peril strait, Chatham strait, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by United States naval officers, in 1880, 
presumably after President Rutherford Birchard Hayes. 

Hayes; river, tributary to the Skwentna, from the south, northwest of Cook inlet. 
So named by Spurr and Post, in 1898, after Dr. C. Willard Hayes, of the 
United States Geological Survey. 

Haystack; island (450 feet high) , one "of the Proctor group, off the southwestern 
shore of Wales island, at southern entrance to Tongass passage, Alexander 
archipelago. Descriptive name, given by Nichols iu 1888. 

Haystacks; a group of five large and a number of small rocks, extending about 2 
miles southerly from Andronica island, Shumagin group. Name published 
l)y Dall in 1875. 

Hayward; point, the northernmost point of Partofshikof island, at junction of 
Suk(ji inlet and Neva strait, Alexander archipelago. So called by Dall 
(Coast Pilot, 1883, p. 155). On British Admiralty chart 2337 and Coast 
Survey chart 727 the name is erroneously applied to the north end of 
Krnzof island. 

Hayward; strait, separating Krestof and Kruzof islands and uniting Krestof and 
Sitka sounds, Alexander archipelago. This is recent Coast Survey usage. 
The name Hayward was given by Portlock, in 1787, to a body of water 
which on late Coast Survey charts bears three names, viz, Souhoi inlet, 
Krestof sound, and Hayward strait, i. e., to the waters bathing the eastern 
Bhore of Kruzof island and uniting Salisbury and Sitka sounds. Portlock 
named his Hayward strait after his mate, who was the first white man to 



BAKER] 201 Hay-Mel. 

Hayward — Continued. 

pass through it and thus establish the insularity of Kinizof island. The 
Russians called it Sukoi (dry), variously written Soukhoi, Soukoi, etc., 
and erroneously Souhoi. 
Hazel; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Hazen; bay, northeast of Nunivak island, Bering sea. So named by Xelson in 
December, 1879, after Gen. AVilliam Babcock Hazen, Chief Signal Officer, 
U. S. A. 
Hazen; point, in the eastern part of Izembek bay, Alaska peninsula. So named by 

the Fish Commission in 1888. 
Hazy; group of islands, south of Cape Ommaney and west of Coronation island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by early English fur traders in the 
eighteenth century. La Perouse, 1786, called them Isles de la Croyere. 
In Galiano's atlas, 1802, they are called Los Hermanos (the brothers). 
The Russians called them Tumannoi (foggy). 
Head; cape, the southern point of Afognak island, Kodiak group. Called Golova 
(liead) by the Russian-American Company in 18-19. Apparently identical 
with Zhila (lode) point of Murashef in 1839-10. 
Head, mountain; see Tyee. 
Headland, island; see Sebree. 
Heald; point, the western point of entrance to Yarboro inlet, on the Arctic coast, 

east of the mouth of the Colville river. So named by Franklin in 1826. 
Healy; rock, in Whitewater bay, Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Glass in 1881. 
Heart; mountain, on the north bank of the Yukon, a little above the mouth of the 

Melozi river. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
Heceta; island, on the western border of Prince of Wales archipelago. Named l)y 
Dall, in 1879, after Don Bruno Heceta, a Spaniard, who, in the Santiago, 
explored and surveyed hereabouts in 1775. 
Heesman, point; see Hiesman. 

Heiden; canyon, in upper part of Lowe river, east of Port Valdes. So named by 
Abercrombie, in 1898, after Corp. Robert Heiden, a member of his party. 
Erroneously Hyden. 
Heiden; port or bay, indenting the northern shore of Alaska peninsula, north of 
Chignik bay. Named Heldena (Heiden's) by Lutke, in 1828, after Count 
Heiden. In French, Lutke wrote it Heyden and Krusenstern wrote it 
Hayden. Has also been written Haiden. 
Helen; peak "(3,675 feet high), in the northern part of Etolin island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 
Helikoff, strait; see Shelikof. 

Hell Gate; rapids, in the Klutina river, above Copper Center. Prospectors' name, 
in use in 1898. Used by prospectors, during season of 1898, to denote the 
extreme rough waters on the Klutina above Copper Center. 
Hells Acre; a place of violent tidal currents and rough water in Kootzuahoo inlet. 

Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 
Helm; bay, in Cleveland peninsula, opening mto Behm canal, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Snow, in 1886, after Lieut. James Meredith Helm, 
U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Helm; point, the southernmost point of Coronation island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Snow, in 1886, after Lieut. James 31. Helm, U. S. N., of his 

party. . 

Helm; rock, off Point Baker, Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. Named alter 
Lieut. J. M. Helm, U. S. N., who surveyed this region in 1886. 



Hel-Hor. 202 [bull. 187. 

Helmick; mountain (about 2,000 feet high), near the coast and east of Kuskokwim 
bay, western Alaska. Named by Post, of the Geological iSurvey, in 1898, 
after the Moravian niis.sionary. Rev. Benjamin Helmick. 

Hemlock; island (peninsula at low water), in Port Chester, Annette island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Hemlock; point, in Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named l)y Meade in 18(i9. 

Henderson; island, near the western point of Korovin island, Shumagin group. 
Named by Dall in 1872. 

Hendrickson; mountain (4,430 feet high), in the St. Elias alps, southeastern 
Alaska. Named by Russell, in 1890, after the Swedish missionary, Rev. 
Karl Johan Hendrickson. Erroneously Hendriksen, Hendricksen, etc. 

Hennig-; sunken rock, west of Sannak island. Named by Dall, in 1880, after Captain 
E. Hennig. Perhaps Aleks rock of Coast Survey chart 8800 is identical 
with this one. 

Henrietta; island, in the Arctic ocean, north of the New Siberian islands. Discov- 
ered and so named by De Long in 1881. 

Henry; peak (3,386 feet high), on the mainland, near Thomas bay, southeastern 
Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Prof. Joseph Henry, Secretary 
of the Smithsonian Institution. 

Hepburn; point, on the northwestern shore of Admiralty island, Chatham strait, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Homfray, in 1867, after James Hep- 
bum, of Victoria, Vancouver island, long a naturalist and explorer in this 
region, and who died about 1866. 

Herald; island (856 feet high), east of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. Discovered 
and landed upon in July, 1849, by Captain Kellett, of H. M. S. Herald and 
named by him after his ship. 

Herbert; glacier, on the mainland, just south of Eagle glacier, southeastern Alaska. 
Named by Mansfield, in 1890, after Hon. Hilary A. Herbert, Secretary of 
the Navy. 

Herbert; volcanic island (5,291 feet high), one of the group of islands of the Four 
Mountains, eastern Aleutians. So named by officers of the U. S. S. Concord, 
in 1894, after Hon. Hilary Abner Herbert, Secretary of the Navy. This may 
be the island Tshugidi of Billings, 1791, and variously called since then 
Chuginok, Chaguliak, Tchegoulak, etc. See Four Mountains islands. 

Herendeen; bay, indenting the northern shore of Alaska peninsula, near or in 
Port Moller. The bay was first explored and sketched by Capt. E. P. 
Herendeen, in about 1881, and named for him by the Coast Survey. 

Herendeen; island, forming the northern side of Northwest harbor. Little Koniuji 
island, Shumagin group. So named by Dall, in 1874, after Capt. Edward 
Perry Herendeen, sailing master of the Coast Survey schooner Yukon, 
1873-74 and 1880. 

Hermogenes, cape; see Chiniak. 

Herring; bay, indenting the southern shore of Admiralty island, Frederick sound, 
Alexander archipelago. Named Seldovaia (herring) l)y the Russians. 

Jlrrriiiij, cove; see Salmon. 

Herring; islets, at entrance to Tutka bay, Kachemak bay. Cook inlet. So named 
l)y Dall in 1S80. 

Herschel; island (about 500 feet high), on the Arctic coast, near the international 
boundary line. So named by Franklin in 1826. Has sometimes been 
written llershel. 

Jlery, point; see Hey. 

Herzfeh, island; see Alaid. 



BAKER.] 203 Hes-Hlg. 

Hesketh; island, on the southern shore of Kachemak bay, Cook inlet. Named by 
Dall, in 1880, after Sir Thomas Hesketh, who in his yacht, the Lancashire 
Witch, visited Cook inlet that year. 
Hess; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the east, near Ramjiart city. Raymond, 
1869, calls it Yokuchargut (Yoku-kakat) or Whymper. Dall calls it 
Yukutzchiirkat, and says Captain Ketchum called it Whymper, after his 
Mend and companion. On recent maps called Hess creek. 
Hessa; inlet, in Prince of Wales island, opening into Cordova bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 
Hetta; inlet and lake, in the southwestern part of Prince of Wales island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 
Hey; point, on the northern shore of Controller bay. Gulf of Alaska. Named by 

Vancouver in 1794. Erroneously Hery.. 
Hibaliibgik; pinnacle rock, off Scotch Cap, in Unimak pass. Native name from 

Veniaminof. Lutke calls it Ounga. 
Hicks; creek, tributary to the Matanuska river, from the north, near latitude 62°. 
So named by Glenn, in 1898, after H. H. Hicks, guide of his expedition. 
Hicks; point, on Mitkof island, Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by Meade, in 1869, after a Mr. Hicks, pilot and trader of the Hudson Bay 
Company, who piloted the U. S. S. Saginmv on her first trip in Alaskan 
waters in 1868-69. 
Hid; reef, in Nichols passage, off Canoe cove, western side Annette island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Hidden; glacier, tributary to Russell fiord, from the east, near Yakutat bay, south- 
-eastern Alaska.* So named by Russell, in 1891, who only obtained glimpses 
of it as he passed. 
Hidden; inlet, in the mainland north of Pearse island, southeastern Alaska. 

Descriptive name, given by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Hidden; island, at the northern entrance to Dry strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Thomas in 1887. 
Hiesman; point, on the southwestern shore of Chichagof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Erroneously Heesman and Heis- 
man. 
Higgins; point, the westernmost point of Revillagigedo island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after ' ' Senr. Higgins de Vallenar, 
President of Chili." Higgins was an Irishman from Ballenagh, Ireland, 
and spelled his name O' Higgins. 
High; island, between Korovin and Popof islands, Shumagin group. Named 
Viesokoi (high) by Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been written Vesoki and 
Visokoi. 
High; island, in the entrance to Kasaan bay, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Dall in 1880. 
High; island, in the entrance to W^omens bay, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named 

Viesokoi (high) by Russian naval officers in 1808-1810. 
High; island, one of the ^Valrus island group, in northern part of Bristol bay. So 
called by the Fish Commission in 1890. Apparently identical with 
Ingekvak of Sarichef in 1826. 
■ High; islet, near Kita island, in Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Viesokoi (high) by Vasilief in 1809. 
High; mountain (2,540 feet high), in California ridge, Gravina island, Alexander 

archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1886. 
High; mountain, in Peninsula ridge, on the mainland, east of ReviUagigtdo chan- 
nel, southeastern Alaska. So named by Nichols m 1883. 



Ilii^-lllll' 



204 [BULL. IbT. 



High; ]"'int. bctwoen Port Tongass aii.l Nakat inU't, soatheaPtern Alaska. So 
iiaiiic<l by Nichols in 1883. 

High; iMiiiil. ..ii Dall island, Tlevak strait, Cordova ])ay, Alexander an-hipelago. 
So named by Nichols in 1881. 

Jllijli. i.oint, on left bank of the Ghilkat river, al)out 10 miles above its mouth. 
Named Vie.sokie (high) by Linden])erg in 1838. The name is obsolete. 
The place seems to be identical with Chilkat peak (4,000 feet high) of 
United States Hydrographic chart 883. 

High; rock (123 feet high), near the easternmost jjoint of Chngnl island, eastern 
Aleutians. So called, apparently, by the United States North Pacific 
Exploring Expedition in 1855. 

High; rock, off the southeastern coast of Amukta island, eastern Aleutians. So 
called by the North Pacific Exploring Expedition in 1855. 

High; rock, off the southwestern end of Near island, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named 
Mesokoi (high) by the early Russians. It may be identical with Inner 
Himipback ; see Inner Humijliack. 

Highfield; anchorage, off the north end of Wrangell island, Alexander archipelago. 
Surveyed, in 1862, l)y F. O. Simpson, master H.^l. H. Devastation, and by 
him called Anchorage off Point Highfield. Meade, 1869, calls it Point 
Highfield harbor, while the Hudson Bay traders called it Labouchere bay 
or anchorage, after the steamer Labouchere. 

Highfi.eld; point, the northernmost point of Wrangell island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Vancouver in 1793. 

Highland; point, on the mainland on the northern shore of Frederick sound, 
Alexander archipelago. Descriptive name given by Meade in 1869. 

HigJi liix-k, Sitka sound ; see Viesoki. 

Highwater; islet, in Neva strait, near St. John Baptist bay, Alexander archipel- 
ago. So named by Coghlan in 1884. At low water it is not an inlet. 

Hijosa, Isla de ; see Middleton. 

Hilda; creek, tributary to North fork of Fortymile creek, from the east. Pros- 
pectors' name, from Barnard in 1898. 

Hilda; i:)oint, on the southern shore of Douglas island, Stephens passage, Alexander 
archipelago. So called by the Coast Survey in 1890. 

Hilgard; mountain (1,500 feet high), near Sanborn harbor, Nagai island, Shumagin 
group. So called by Dall, in 1872, after Julius Erasmus Hilgard, after- 
wards Superintendent of the Coast Survey. 

Hill; island, at entrance to Portloek harbor, Chichagof island, Alexander archii)el- 
ago. Named Hills by Portloek in 1787. 

Hill, islets; see McFarland. 

Hinchinbrook; cape, the southwestern point of Hinchinbrook island. Prince 
William sound. Named, in 1778, by Cook Avho spells it Hinchingbroke in 
his text and Hinchinbrook on his chart. This name, with several varia- 
tions of spelling, wa-s used by Dixon, Meares, Portloek, and Vancouver. 
Tebenkof calls it ^lorskoi (ocean) cape. 

Hinchinbrook; island, in I'rince William sound. So called ])y Vancouver in 1794. 
It is Rose island of Meares and Portloek, 1787-88, and Islade la IMagdalena 
of the Sjjaniards in 1791. Tebenkof uses the native name Khtagaliuk or 
Khta-ahik, according to Petrof, while an old Russian chart of 1802 has 
Tkhalka, which has a manuscript French rendering of Tchalka. Aber- 
crombie, in 1898, calls it Nuckek island. 

Hindasclukee, village; see Gan-le-gas-tak-heh. 

Hines; glacial stream, debouching immediately west of the western mouth of the 
Alsek river, southeastern Alaska. So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Appar- 
ently a native word, pronounced Hc-nes. 



PAKKR.] 205 



Hiu— Hok. 



Hini. All Indian word meaning river, in nge in southeastern Alaska. It is appended 
to the names of rivers, as Klehini, Krotahhu, etc. 

Hitchcock; range of mountains, between Marvine and Seward ghn-iers, St. Ellas 
alps, southeastern Alaska. So named by Russell, in 1890, "in acknowl- 
edgment of the services to science rendered by the first State geologist of 
Massachusetts." 

iriil-tit-i/uh, bay; see Lituya. 

Hobart; bay, indenting the mainland coast, Frederick sound, Alexander arc-hipel- 
ago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Hobart; point, on the mainland coast, Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Vancouver in 1794. Has also been called Gastineau point. 

Hobron; port, indenting the northeastern shore of Sitkalidak island, near Kodiak. 
It is "a snug harbor on the north side of Sitkalidak Island, in the second 
deep bay coming from seaward. ' ' Apparently so named by Petrof, in 1887 
or 1888, who at that time established here a fishing station for the Alaska 
Coast Fishery Company and became its manager. Lisianski, 1805, locates 
a village, called Fugitive, at or near this place. 

Hobson; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Hockley; hills, east of Kotzebue sound and north of Selawik lake. Apparently 
so named by English naval officers during the Franklin search expedi- 
tions, 1849-1854. 

Hnrfnung, point; see Hope. 

Hog'; island (300 feet high), near Hot Springs l)ay, Sitka .sound, Alexander archi- 
I^elago. Named Svinoi (hog) by Yasilief in 1809. 

Hog'; island, west of Amaknak island, in Captains bay, Unalaska. Called Swinoi 
(hog) by Tebenkof, 1849. Its native name as given by Sarichef, 1792, is 
Uknodok, and by Veniaminof, Uknadak. Lukte calls it Ouknadok. 
Venianiinof records that in olden time an Aleut village existed here and 
that a fight occurred between the Unalaskans and Aleuts from Unimak, 
in which the latter were exterminated. Hogs were placed on this island 
by the Russians, whence the name. 

Hog; rocks, near the southern end of Revillagigedo island, Revillagigedo channel, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. Eri'oneously Frog 
rocks on some charts. 

Hogan; island, at the entrance to Portlock harbor, Chichagof island, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Hogans by Portlock on his sketch of Portlock har- 
bor, made in August, 1787, and published in his Voyage, p. 258. On his 
general chart it is called Vincent islaml. 

Hogatza; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the north, near longitude 156°. 
Native name, reported by Allen, in 1885, as Hogatzakakat. See Kakat. 
This may be the same river as the one called Hokachatna and Hoku- 
chatna. Has also appeared as Hogatiakakat. 

Hogback; hill (300 feet high), near the shore of Pastol bay, Norton sound. Named 
Hog Back by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Hogback; small glacier, a few miles east of Valdes, Prince \\'illiaiii sound. So 
named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Hoggatt; bay, on the southeastern shore of Baranof island, ("hathaiu strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Moore, in 1895, after Ensign Wilford 
Bacon Hoggatt, U. S. N., a member of his party. Erroneously Hoggat. 

Hohonilla, mountain; see Totanilla. 

Hokachatna, river; see Hogatza. 

Hokotena; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the north, near longitude 149°. 
Native name, published l>y ttie Coast Survey in 1899. 



Uok— H4M». 



206 r [BUM.. 187. 



Ifo-ku-rh<it-)i<i, river; see Hogatza. 

Holden; jxMiit. on Dall island, opposite Howkau village, Cordova bay, Alexander 
ar('hii)elago. So naTncd l)y Sheldon Jackson in 1880. 

Hole-in-the-Wall; small rove, in the northwestern part of Prince of Wales island, 
opiMiiiig into Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by rfelm 
in 188(5. 

Holes; point, on the southern sluire of Kittiwake island, Kodiak group. Named 
Dierovatie (full of holes) by :\Iurashef in 18.39-40. 

Holiday, island; see Praznik. 

Holikitmk. The Eleventh Census, 1890 (p. 165), records a native village of this 
name in the Yukon enumerating districtwith a population of 114. I have 
not discovered its location. 

Holikmd; river; see Chulitna. 

Jfoliino, river; see Chulitna. 

Holkliam; bay, indenting the mainland and opening into Stephens passage, south- 
eastern Alaska. So name<l l)y Vancouver in 1794. 

HoUings, cape, Kodiak; see Narrow. 

Holomtna, river; see Kowak. 

Iloltkagelia, mountain; see Totanilla. 

Holtz; open bay, indenting the northern shore of Attn island, just west of Chicha- 
gof harbor, western Aleutians. Lutke calls this Goltsovaia bay. Perhaps 
the name comes from the German word lioUz (wood). It has also 
appeared as Goltzeb and even Gotzeb. 

Holy Cross; Jesuit mission school, on the northern bank of the Yukon, about 25 
miles below Anvik, at or near Koserefski, established in 1886. 

Holyoke; creek, tributary to Niukluk river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Homer; post-office, in Coal bay, Kachemak bay, Cook inlet, establislied in Novem- 
ber, 1895. 

Homeistake; creek, tributary to the Kruzgamepa river, from the west, Seward 
peninsula. Prospectors' name from Barnard, 1900. 

Honey; creek, tributary to Penny river, from the east, in the Cape Nome mining 
region, Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 

Hoorhinoo, archipelago, village, etc. ; see Kootznahoo. 

HoochUna. Allen, 1885, reports this to be the Indian name of the main stream of 1 
the Koyukuk river at its source. Name found only in his text (p. 100), 
where it is written Hoochitna. 

Hood; l)ay, indenting the western shore of Admiralty island, Chatham strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So called by Vancouver in 1794. There has beeu 
confusion of names and geographical representation in this vicinity. The 
latest Coast Survey chart available calls this bay Hootz (from Khutz or 
Khudz, meaning bear). 

Hood; point, at the southern end of Lindenberg peninsula, Duncan canal, Alexandef 
archipelago. So named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Admiral i\.lexandef 
Arthur Hood, R. N. , afterwards Lord Bridport. 

Hood; point, on the northeastern shore of Killisnoo island, Chatham strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Hoof; hill, in Tyndall glacier, near Mount St. Elias. So called by Topham in the 
Alpine Journal (vol. 14), 1889. 

Hook; point, on the western shore of Portage bay, Kupreanof island, Alexander 
archipelago. Presumably so named by Nichols in 1882. 

Hooniah; harbor, in Port Frederick, Chichagof island. Icy strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Native name meaning cold lake and variously spelled Hooniah, 
Hoonyah, etc. Has also been called Port Frederick harbor. 



BAKKR.] 207 



Hoo— Hor« 



Hooniah; hot or warm springs, on the northern nliore of Tenakee inlet, Chichagof 
island, Alexander archipelago. So called by Nichols in the Coast Pilot 
(1891, p. 163). 

Hooniah; sound, indenting the southern shore of Chichagof island, Alexander 
archipelago. Name derived from a resident tribe of Indians, and variously 
spelled Hoonah, Hoonjah, Huna. The Sitka Indians are said to call it 
Shekak. 

Hooniah, village; see Kantukan. 

Hoonynh, island; see Chichagof. 

Hooper; bay, in the Yukon delta. Visited and named by Nelson in December, 1878, 
after Capt. Calvin Leighton Hooper, of the United States Revenue Marine, 
well known for his investigations in Bering sea and the Arctic ocean. 

Hooper; mountains, along the Arctic coast, between Cape Lisburne and Point Bar- 
row. So named by Petrof, in 1880, after Capt. C. L. Hooper, United States 
Revenue MaTme. Apparently identical with the Meade river mountains 
of Ray in 1885. 

Hoorts; mountain (2,077 feet high), east of Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. So 
called by McGrath in 1893. 

Hoosier; creek, tributary to Minook creek, from the east. Prospectors' name, pub- 
lished by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Hoosnoff, archipelago, etc. ; see Kootznahoo. 

Hootalhtqaa, river; see Teslin. 

HootcJuf-ei/e, lakes; see Hutshi. 

Hoof:, bay; see Hood. 

Hope; mining camp, at mouth of Resurrection creek, Turnagain arm. Cook inlet. 
Called Hope City by the prospectors. 

Hope; point, on the Arctic coast, about 30 miles to the southward of Cape Lisburne. 
So named by Beechey in August, 1826, in compliment to Sir William 
Johnstone Hope. Called Hoffnung (hope) by German map makers, and 
Golofnin and Golovin by the Russians. 

Horace; mountain, on headwaters of the Koyukuk river, near longitude 149°. 
Prospectors' name, reported by St^hrader in 1899. 

Horboon, rock; see Humpback. 

Horhoon vnutrennie ; see Inner Humpl^ack. 

Horn; cape, near the entrance to Falmoutli harbor, Nagai island, Shumagin group. 
Named by the fishermen prior to 1871. 

Horn; cliffs (1,800 feet high), on the mainland, opposite northern entrance to 
Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So called in the Coast Pilot 
(1883, p. 127). 

Horn; island, the largest of the Ball group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by United States naval officers in 1880. It was named Rogova 
or Rokhova (from Rog, horn) by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been printed 
Homey and Morne. 

Horn; mountain (2,929 feet high), just back of Horn cliffs. So called by Tliomas 
in 1887. 

Horn; point, the southern point of entrance to Port Etches, Prince William sound. 
So named by Portlock in 1787. 

Horoshi pogodi, cape and mountain; see Fairweather. 

Horse; island, west of Douglas island, Stephens passage, Alexander archipelago. 
Apparently so named by Mansfield in 1890. 

Horse; shoal, near Horse island, Stephens passage, Alexander archipelago. Named 
by Mansfield in 1890. 

Horton; creek, tributary to headwaters of the Fox river, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 



IIOM— How. 



208 [mti.r,.lS7. 



Hose; jxiint, <>m tlic iiiainlaiid, tlie north point of entrance to Fitzgibbon cove, 
Hi'lim canal, ^i()utheaste^l Alaska. Named l)y the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Hostage; point, in AVrangell harbor, Alexander archii)elago. Named Anianat 
(hostajre) by Zareml)0 in 1834. Zarembo's sketch was jmblished on Rus- 
.<iaii Ilydrographic chart 1396 in 1848. Called Amanat point on United 
Stat»'s Hydrographic chart 225. 

Hot; springs, on Hot Springs bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Name from 
the Russians. 

Hot; springs, 20 miles northwest of Katmai, Alaska peninsula. Rei)orted by Spurr 
and Post, of the Geological Survey, in 1898. 

Hotham; inlet, east of Kotzebue sound, Arctic ocean. Named by Beecliey, in 1826, 
"in comi)liment to the lion. Sir Henry Hotham, K. C. B., one of the 
lords of the Admiralty." 

Hot Springs; small bay, near Sitka sound, on the western shore of Baranof island, 
Alexander archipelago. Named Kluchef or Kluchevoi (hot .spring) by 
Vasilief, in 1809, on account of the warm* springs there. On British 
Admiralty chart 2337 this name, called Klucher and translated Marsh, is 
applied to the southwest end of Deep lake, and from this we have, on 
Coast Survey chart 8240 (ed. of 1898), one end of Deep lake named Marsh 
bay. 

Hotspur; island, betM'een Annette and Duke islands, Gravina group, Alexander 
archipelago. Presumal)ly so named by local pilots. 

IfiiiicJoiou, archipelago; see Kootznahoo. 

Houghton; jiort, indenting the mainland, Frederick sound, southeastern Alaska. 
So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Hound; island, in the northern part of Keku strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Moore in 1892. Erroneously Round island. 

Hourigan; point, the southern point of entrance to Band cove, Kuiu island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Glass in 1881. | 

House; island, in Revillagigedo channel, between Foggy bay and Boca de Quadra, ' 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

House; mountain, in California ridge, Graviiui island, Alexander archipelago. So I 
named by Nichols in 1883. ; 

House; mountain, on left bank of the Matanuska river, alwut 35 miles from Knik j 
arm of Cook inlet. Local name, published in 1899. 

House; peak (6,001 feet high), on the mainland, east of Frederick sound, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named-by Thomas in 1887. i 

Howard; mountain (2,340 feet high), northwest of Port McArthur, Kuiu island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Helm in 1886. 

Howard; point, on the mainland, near south end of Lynn canal, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by Mansfield, in 1890, after Ensign A^'illiam Lanriston i 
Howard, II. S. N., a member of his party. 

Howe; j.oint, on the southern shore of Mitkof island, Sumner strait, Alexander j 
archiijclago. Named by Vancouver in 1793. Erroneously Hove. 

Howkan; narrow strait, l)etween Dall island and Long island, west of Cordova bay, 
Dixon entrance. The narrcjwest part of the strait is called Howkan nar- 
rows. Has been written Howcan. Native word, published by the C'oast 
Survey in 188:". 

Howkan; reef, in HoMkau narrows, iimucdiately in front of Howkan village. 
Named l)y Nichols in 1881. Has also been written How-kan. 

Howkan; village of llaida Indians on Long island, Tongass narrows, Cordova l)ay, 
Alexander archipelago. At this village is the Jackson (Presbyterian) 
mi.ssion and also the post-office Jackson. 



BAKER.] 209 



Hna— Hon. 



Huagin; river, in the St. Elias alpg, debouching immediately north of Lituya bay. 

So called by Tebenkof in 1849. It is Riviere aux Saumons (Salmon 

river) of La Peroufje, French edition, and, erroneously, Silmon in the 

English edition. 
Hub; ruck, in Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

Mchols in 1883. 
Hubbard; glacier, near the head of Yakutat bay, southea.stern Alaska. So named 

by Russell, in 1890, after Gardiner Greene Hubbar<l, president of the 

National Geographic Society. 
Hubbard; mountain (12,064 feet high) north of Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. 

So named by Russell, in 1890, after Gardiner Greene Hubbard, president 

of the National Geographic Society. 
Hubbard; peak (5,700 feet high), on the left Ijankof the Kotsina river. So named 

on a manuscript map made by prosjiectors in 1900. 
Hudson Bay; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the south, near 

latitude 67°. Prospectors' name, from Schrader in 1899. 
Hudson Bay, inlet; see Excursion. 
2r(/(i.s«/;uo, archipelago, etc. ; see Kootznahoo. 
Huggins; island, 14 miles long, in the Koyukuk river, near the mouth of Batza 

river. So named by Allen, in 1885, after Capt. Eli Lundy Huggin?, 

U. S. A., for a long time a resident of the territory and a warm friend of 

Allen's expedition (Allen, p. 103). On his map 4 Allen calls this 

ilcQuisten island. This last, which should be ^IcQuesten, has also been 

printed McQuister and McQuestion. 
Hugh; j)oint, the southernmost point of Glass peninsula, Admiralty island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named b}' Vancouver in 1794. , 
Hugh. Miller; glacier and inlet, near the head of Glacier bay. So named by Reid, 

in 1892, after the distinguished geologist, Hugh Miller. 
Huiak, island; see Shuyak. 
Hulitnak, river; see Chulitna. 
Hull; })oint, the eastern point of entrance to Port Moore, Elson bay, Arctic coast, 

just east of Point Barrow. So named by the British Admiralty in 1853, 

after Master Thomas Hull, R. N., of H. M. S. Plover. 
Humboldt; harbor, indenting the western shore of Popof island, Popof strait, 

Shumagin group. So named by Dall, in 1872, after the Coast Survey 

schooner Humboldt. 
Humbug; point, on south end of Lindenberg peninsula, Wrangell strait, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 
Hump; island, in Clover passage, Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. So nanu'tl 

by Clover in 1885. 
H\imp; island, north of Point Retreat, in Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Meade, in 1869, from its appearance. 
Hump {The); see Chariot. 
Humpback; rock (18 feet high), in Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named Horboon 

(humpback) by Lisianski in 1804. Also written Gorbun. The Coast 

Survey, 1869, called it Humpback or Sugarloaf rock. 
Humphrey; point, on the Arctic coast near the international boundary line. Named 

Ity Franklin, in 1826, who has in his text Humphrys (p. 145) and Hum- 
phreys (p. 169). On his map it is Humphreys. 
Hump Knoll; peak (3,116 feet high), on the mainland, near head of Thomas bay, 

southeastern Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 
Huna, sound; see Hooniah. 

Bull. 187—01 14 



Hull— l»l>' 



210 [BTTI.T,. 187. 



Hungarian; criH'k, trihntary to South fork of the Koyuknk, near longitude 150°. 
rrosi>ect()rs' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 

Hungry; rrt-ek, tril)ntary to Oregon creek, from the .south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from liarnard, 1900. 

lIiinniiKj. hay; see Hanning. 

Hunt; island, near western end of the Sandman reefs, south of Deer island and 
nortiieast of Sannak. So called by the Fish Commission in 1888. This 
may l)e Kgg (lachnoi) island of Te!)enkof, 1849. 

Hunt; i)eak (3,494 feet high), in tin- northeastern part of Kupreanof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Ensign Henry J. 
Hunt, U. S. N. 

Hunt; point, the western head of Rodgers harbor, on south shore of Wrangell island, 
Arctic ocean. So named by Berry in September, 1881, after Ensign Henry 
Jackson Hunt, U. S. N., a member of his party. 

Hunter; bay, in Prince of Wales island, opening into Cordova bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Hunter; creek, tril)utary to Minook creek, from the east. Prospectors' name, pub- 
lished by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Hurtle; creek; tributary to Tonsina lake. Name from Schrader, 1900. 

Huskisson; mountain, in extreme northeastern Alaska. So named by Franklin, in 
1826, after the "president of the board of trade." 

Huslia; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the west, near longitude 156° 30^. 
Native name, reported by Allen, in 1885, as Hussliakatna, on his map 1 
and 4, and Husliakakat in his text '^p. 105). See Kakat. 

Hut; point, on the mainland, the north point of entrance to Walker cove, Behm 
canal, southeastern Alaska. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Hut; point, on the northwestern coast of Douglas island, at entrance to Gastineau 
(channel, Alexander archipelago. So named by Symonds in 1880. There 
were some Indian houses or huts on the point. 

Hut; point, on the southern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak group. Named Zhila 
(hut, cabin, house) by Murashef in 1839-40. 

Ifiilcliinsoii, creek; see Quartz. 

Hutchinson; hill, on Northeast point, St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. 
Called Sealion by Dall, in 1874, which may be the local name. Later it 
was called Hutchinson, after Hayward Malcolm Hutchinson, of the Alaska 
Commercial Company. P^lliott speaks of it as the "volcanic nodule known 
as Hutchinson's hill." 

Hutchinson; sunken reef, off Outer Spruce cape, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1881. 

Hutshi; chain of lakes draining northward into the Lewes river in longitude 137°. 
Native name, apparently first published by Glave in the Century, Septem- 
ber and October, 1892, where it is spelled Hootchy-Eye. It has been 
variously written Hootch Eye, Hootch-i, Hutchi, Hotchi, Huchai, etc. 
The Canadian Board on Geographic Names has adopted the above form, 
Hutshi. 

Huxley; peak (11,907 feet high), in the St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by Topham, in 1886, after Prof. Thomas Henry Huxley. 

Ilydah, cove; see IVIission. 

Ililden, canyon; see Heiden. 

Hydra; island, near the southern coast of Alaska peninsula, north of the Semidi 
islands. Name published by Tebenkof in 1849. On a manuscript Russian 
map, of 1849, it is called Zatschra island. Apparently identical with Otter 
i.sland of Coast Survey chart 8500. 

labloshnie, island; see Middle. 



BAKER.] 211 



lac— Ida. 



larhnni, cape and island; see Egg. 

lachnoi, island; see Ugalgan. 

loUrhnoi, bay; see Egg. 

laklek, cape; see Aklek. 

lanaliun, cape; see Bog. 

lantar, stream; see Amber. 

lantami, bay; see Amber. 

Imthlmk, river; see Fish. 

Icathhiik, river; see Niuklnk. 

Ice; river, tributary to Copi)er river, from the east, near Wood canyon. So named 
by Allen in 1885. 

Ice; spit, off the northeastern shore of Wrangell island, Arctic oceq^i. So named Ijy 
Berry in 1881. 

Iceberg; point, on the southeastern shore of Lemesurier island. Icy strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Hanus in August, 1880. At that time 
much drift ice had stranded there. 

Icehouse; point and lake, on the western shore of Woody island, St. Paul harbor, 
Kodiak. Named Pestchanoe (sandy) by Russian naval officers in 1808- 
1810. This is the lake from which the Kodiak Ice Company obtains its 
ice. On this spot Tebenkof, 1849, shows a native village Aleksashkina, 
which he calls the Chiniak settlement. On the old Russian Chart XVI 
of 1808-1810 the Aleut village of Aleksashkano is shown about a mile 
farther south. 

Ice W(tter, river; see Soynai. 

Ichock. Langsdorf (II, 234) gives this as the name of a creek southwest from Kukak 
bay. Not identified. 

Icy; bay, in front of the Malaspina glacier, St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. 
So called by Vancouver in 1794. It is Lothianoi (icy) of Tebenkof, 1849. 

Icy; bay, on the western shore of Prince William sound. So named by Vancouver 
in 1794. 

Icy, bay; see Pal ma. 

Iq/. Billings, in July, 1790, when off the entrance to Cook inlet, saw at a distance 
of 15 miles northwest, behind the Chugach islands, a glacier used by the 
traders a^s a landmark for entering Cook inlet and called by them 
"Ledeneaia Reka (Icy river)." 

Icy; cape, on the Arctic coast about midway between Cape Lisburne and Point Bar- 
row. So named by Cook, in 1778, "because it was nuu-h encumtered 
with ice." 

Icy; cape, the northern head of Icy bay, near Mount St. Elias. Called Ledianoi 
(icy) by Tebenkof, 1849. 

Icy, channel; see Gastineau. 

Icy; passage, separating Pleasant island from the mainland. Icy strait, southeastern 
Alaska. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Icy; })eak, near Kialagvik bay, on the south shore of Alaska jieninsula. Name 
apparently derived from Tebenkof, 1849. 

Icy; point, on the mainland coast, between Lituya bay and Cape Spencer. Named 
Ledianoi (icy) by Tebenkof in 1849. Has also been called Cape Forrest. 

Icy; reef, on the Arctic coast, near the international boundary. So named by 
Franklin in 1826. 

Icy; strait, north of Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. So called iiy the Rus- 
sians. See Cross sound. 

Idaho; inlet, indenting the northern shore of Chichagof island, Cross sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by pilot W. E.George, after the steamer 
Idaho, which grounded here. 



Idu— IcVi 



212 [BULI,. 1S7 



Idaho; p^ak (:{,1W iVet hi^'li), on Woronkofski island, Alexanck-r archipelago. So 

nanu'd by Snow, in 1886, after the steamship Idaho. 
Idak; cape, the northeasternniost point of Unniak island, eastern Aleutians. Native 
name, from Kuritzien, 1849. Apparently it means outlet or exit. It is 

the northwestern head of Umnak strait. 
Idaliuk; capt', on the northern shore of Umnak island, near its western end. Native 

name, from Kuritzien, 1849. 
Idaliuk, cape; see Prominence. 
Idalug; cape, on the northern shore of Amlia island, Andreanof uroup, middle 

Aleutians. Native name from Tebenkof, 1849. 
Ideal; cove, in 3Iitkof island, near the northern! of Dry strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Descriptive name, given by Thomas in 1887. Nichols reports 

"excellent anchorage here for small vessels." 
Idelfonso, point; see Ildefonso. 
Iditi-non, village; see Ei-dan-noo. 
Ides Neck; narrow isthmus, separating Schulze cove from Peril strait, P>arauof 

island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Coghlan in 1884. 
Igagik, river; see Ugaguk. 
Igak, bay; see Ugak. 
Jgatakai, bay; see Ugak. 
Jghiak, village; see P]yak. 
Igiagmk, lake; see Becharof. 
Igial:, cape; see Ugyak. 
Igiak; Eskimo village of two huts, visited by Nelson in December, 1878. He reports 

its name to be Igragamiut (text, p. 665), and on the map Igiaganuite. 

Petrof, 1880, has Igiagagamute. 
Ig-itkin; island, near Great Sitkin, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. Aleut 

name, from the Eussians, written Igitkihn, Igitkilm, Igitkum, etc., and 

Egilka by Billings, 1790. 
Igloo; creek, in western part of Seward peninsula, debouching near dxyv Woollcy. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. It is the Eskimo word for house. 
Igloo; creek, tributary to Grantley harbor, from the north, Seward jjcninsnla. 

Eskimo name, meaning house, from Barnard, 1900. 
Igloo; (-reek, tributary to American river, from the east, Seward peninsula. P^skimo 

name, meaning house, from Brooks, 1900. 
Ignaliuk, island; See Little Diomede. 
Jgnaticf, cape; see Mendenhall. 
Ignaiio, island; see St. Ignace. 
Ignok; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Yukon, near Koserefski. Petrof, 

1880, calls it Ignokhatskamute and Ignokhatskomute. Raymond, 1 869, has 

Ingekasagnn. Both name and village have disappeared from recent maps. 
Igognak, anchorage; see Eider. 
Igognak, cape; see Kalekta. 
Igragainixd, village; see Igiak. 
Iguik; creek, and very small Eskimo village at its mouth, on eastern sliorc of 

Norton sound, jusjt north of the Unalaklik river. Native name, written 

on the Western Union Telegraph Expedition map, of 1867, Igouik; by 

Dall, Egowik, and by Petrof, Igowik. 
Igushik; river, draining southward from Amanka lake to Nushagak bay. Eskimo 

name reported by Tebenkof, in 1849, as Iguzhak; by Petrof, 1880, as 

Igushek; by the Fish Commission, 1890, as Egashak; by the Coast Survey, 

1897, as Egashik, and by Spurr, in 1898, as Egoushik or Crooked. 
Igvak; c^pe, the western point of entrance to Portage (Kanatak) bay, on the 

southern shore of Alaska 2>eninsula, west from Kodiak. Native name, 

from the Russians. Erroneously Iswak. 






BAKER.] 218 Ilia— 11a. 

Jhack, bay; seeJUgak. 

Jjool, cape; see Izhut. 

]k, river; see Eek. 

Ikak; Kskiiuo village, east of Naknek lake, Alaska peninsula. Native name, from 
tiie Russians. Petrof, 1880, calls it Ikkhaginute, i. e., Ikkak ])eople. The 
Eleventh Census and C'oast Survey call it Ukak. Poi)ulation in 1880, 162. 

Ikaligriij-niitit, village; see Cheenik. 

Ikalu; li>\v sandy islet, on the Arctic coast, abreast of Dease inlet. Eskimo name, 
fi-om British Admiralty chart 593 (1830-1882), where it is written Ikalue. 

Ikatan; bay, at the south end of Tsanotski strait, Alaska peninsula. So called by 
Dall in 1880. 

Ikatan; island, or possibly a peninsula joined to Unimak island, at south end of 
Isanotski strait, Alaska peninsula. Native name, variously written Ika- 
tak, Ikatan, Ikatane, Ikatok, Ikatun, etc. Yeniaminof says Ikatok or, 
properly, Ikatan. 

Ikatlek; Eskimo village, on right bank of the lower Yukon, a1)out 30 miles l)elow 
Anvik. Nelson, who passed through it, in 1879, reports its name to be 
Ikatlegomute, i. e., Ikatlek people. Not shown on late mai)S. 

Ikeutpak, river; see Fish. 

IkJiiak, lake and village; see Eyak. 

Jkikiktoik, village; see Kiktaguk. 

Ikiginak; high rocky islet, a few miles west of the western end of Atka, middle 
Aleutians. Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Lutke calls it Nerpitchy 
(seal). 

Jkiraaluk, (channel; see Moore. 

Ikkluujaviiil, village; See Savonoski. 

Iknetuk; Eskimo village, on the western shore of Golofnin bay, Norton sound. 
Called Kniktag-miut by the Russians as early as 1852. By Petrof, 1880, 
called Ignituk. 

Iknetuk; point, near Golofnin bay, Nortonsonnd. Nativename, f rom Schrader, 1900. 

Ikogmut; village and Russian Orthodox Church mission (Pokrovskaia mission), 
which appears to have been first occupied in or about 1843. For many 
years spoken of as "The Mission," and shown on the maps with the des- 
ignation Mission. It is on the north bank of the lower Yukon, near its 
southernmost bend. Has been variously written Ekognuite, lkogmiut,etc. 

Ikolik; point, on the western shore of Kodiak. Called Southwest point by Lisianski, 
in 1805, and Ikolik by later Russians. Yariously given as Ecolik, Ikalik, etc. 

Ikpikpimg, river; see Chipp. 

Ikpiling. This Eskimo name appears on Ray's map, of 1885, for some feature just 
east of the United States Signal Service station Utkiavi, near Point Barrow, 
Arctic ocean. 

Iksialdak, bay; see Anderson. 

Ikti; cape, between Chignik bay and Mitrofania island, on the southern shore of 
Alaska peninsula. Native name, from the Russians. Has been written 
Itkhi and, accidentally, Itkbi. 

Iktigalik; native village, of eight or ten houses, on right bank of the I^nalaklik 
river, about 25 miles above its mouth. Native name, from Dall, 1866. 

Ikuak; Eskimo village, on right bank of the lower Yukon, near head of delta. 
Eskimo name, from Raymond, 1869, who wrote it Yukagamut. Tikh- 
menief, 1861, presumably quoting Zagoskin, writes it Ikuagmiut, i. e., 
Ikuak people. Apparently identical with Ingahameh (also Ingaliame) of 
Petrof, 1880. Population in 1880, 63. 

llak, cape; see Ugyak. 

Ilak; islet, in Kukak bay, Alaska peninsula, mentioned by I^angsdorf (II, 234). 
Not identified. 



Ila-luia. 214 [Bi,u..l87. 

Ilak; isU't, southwest of Tanajia island, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. Aleut 

iianie, given by Billings, 1790, as Illuk, and by Lutke, Tebenkof, and 

other Knssians as Illiak. Has also been written Illakh. 
Ildefonso; jx.int, in San Alberto bay, Bneareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Named Pnnlit. de San YIdeforiso by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Erroneously Idelfonso. 
Iliamna; lake, the largest in Alaska, about 25 miles wide by 75 miles long, between 

Bristol bay and Cook inlet. Named Shelekof by the Russians as early as 

1802, but now universally known by its native name, Iliamna. A Russian 

map of 1802 calls this Shelekof, while Clark lake, supposed to have been 

discovered in 1891, is shown and called Ilima lake. 
Iliamna; volcano (12,066 feet high), on the west coast of Cook inlet. Native name, 

from the early Russian explorers. The Spanish explorers of the last 

century called it Volcan de Miranda. 
Iliasik; group of islands on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, near Belkofski. 

Native name, from the Russians. Veniaminof and Lutke have Eliazik 

and Tebenkof, laliasik. See also Inner Iliasik and Outer Iliasik. 
Iliaviki, island; see Inner Iliasik and Outer Iliasik. 
lUazhek, island; see Inner Iliasik. 
Ilin; bay, on the western shore of Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Ilina (Ilin's) by the Russians early in the century, after the Rus- 
sian naval officer, Peter Ivanovich Ilin. 
Iliuk; lake, which is either an arm of Naknek lake or, possibly, a lake wholly 

separate from bivt near to it. On some Russian maps this name is applied 

to Naknek lake. 
Iliuliuk; harbor, in Captains bay, Unalaska, just west of town of same name. 

Veniaminof called this Gavanskaia (harbor) bay. 
Iliuliuk; the chief town of Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Founded by the "terrible" 

Solovief between 1760 and 1770 and named Iliuliuk (Aleut for harmony 

or good mid er standing). Population in 1890 was 317. It is often called 

Unalaska. The spelling oi the name has been Uliouliouk, Ululuk, etc. 

See Unalaska. 
Iliutak; Eskimo village, on the eastern shore of Kuskokwim bay. Native name, 

from Nelson, 1878-79, who wrote it Uiutagamute, i. e., Iliutak people. 

Population 40 in 1880. 
Ilivit; group of hills or mountains on right bank of the Yukon, south of Anvik. 

Native name, from the Russians. 
Ilkognak; rock, between Kodiak and Kittiwake islands, Kodiak grouj). Native 

name, from Murashef, 1839-40. 
Ilktug-itak; cape, between Katmai and Kukak bays, on north shore of Shelikof 

strait. . Native name, from the Russians. 
///((/,-, island; see Ulak. 
Jlkunna, vol(;ano; see Iliamna. 
Illiuk, lake; see Naknek. 
Il-luit-kuk. This is given by the British Admiralty, 1853, as the Eskimo name of 

the low sandy islands in front of Elson bay, on the Arctic coast, just east 

of Point Barrow. 
Illuk, islet; see Ilak. 
Ilmalianuk; cape, the western head of Inanudak bay, on the north shore of Umnak, 

eastern Aleutians. Native name given by Kuritzien, 1849, as Ilmalianok. 
Ilput; islet, in the southeastern part of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander 

archipelago. Ajiparently a native name, obtained by Vasilief, in 1809, 

who wrote it Ilpiet. Has also been written Ilpit. 
JIuiak, island; see Shuyak. 
LiuKjIin, island; see I kittle Diomede. 



BAKER.] 215 Ima— Ind. 

Imag-nee; Aleut village, in Summer bay, on eastern shore of Captains bay, Unaiaska, 
eastern Aleutians. Sarichef shows a settlement here, in 1790, which he 
calls Sinagnia. Veniaminof, however, calls the village and bay Imagnin- 
skoe. Imagnee is the local and, presumably, the native name. Popula- 
tion in 1830 was 32. 
Imagninskoe, bay; see Summer. 
Imagru, port; see Clarence. 
JmaMit, island; see Big Diomede. 
Imakpiguak, bay; see Goodnews. 
Imiak; Eskimo village, at outlet of Aleknagik lake, northwest from mouth of the 

Nushagak. Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. 
Jmoktegokshuk. Eskimo village, on south shore of Seward peninsula, a little east 
of Nome. Petrof, in 1880, reported its population as 30, and its name 
Imokhtagokshuk in his text (p. 11) and Imokhtegokshuk on his map. 
Both town and name have vanished. 
Impassable; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Nepropusknoi (impassable) by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been 
called Neprop, which Kostrometinof translates not to he oinitted. 
Imuruk; basin, east of Port Clarence, Seward peninsula. Eskimo name, reported 
by Beechey, in 1827, as Imau-rook. Variously written Imaourouk, Imau- 
rook, Imurook, Imagazuk, and on a late map Cowvinik. Murdoch writes 
it Imau-ruk. 
Imuya; bay, just west of Kialagvik bay, on south shore of Alaska peninsula. Native 

name, from the Coast Survey. 
Inalak. Small island, near Unaiaska, not identified, perhaps Unalga. Name from 

Berg, 1823 (p. 59). 
Inalin, island; see Big Diomede. 

Inanudak; bay, indenting the northern shore of Umnak, eastern Aleutians. 
Native name from Veniaminof. There are some coves in this bay, one of 
which is probably the one called Stepanofskaia by Lutke. According to 
Grewingk, Lutke called Inanudak bay Stepanow bay, but this appears to 
be an error. 
Inaru; river, in northern Alaska, flow^ing northeasterly and supposed to debouch 
into Dease inlet. Crossed by Ray in March, 1883. The natives, he says 
in his text (p. 27), call it Inaru; on his map he calls it Kuahroo, and this 
name has been copied on Coast Survey and other charts. 
Independence; creek, tributary to Sinuk river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Independence; island, in Steamer bay, Etolin island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Snow in 1886. 
Index, island; see Guide. 
Indiada; islet, in Port Santa Cruz, Suemez island. Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Named Isleta de la Indiada by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Indian, bay; see Sumner. ■ ^ 

Indian; creek, tributary to the Sushitna river, from the north, near latitude 03 . 

So named by Muldrow in 1898. 
Indian, creek; see Tsadaka. 
Indian, point; see Green. 

Indian; point, the northern point of entrance to Naha bay, Behm canal, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Clover in 1885. There are Indian graves on 
the point. 
Indian; rock, bare at lowest water, in Felice strait, Gravina group, Alcxandi'r 

archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Indian; rock, in Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander arclupelagn. S<. iKUu<'d by 
Meade in 1869. 



lud— lul. 



216 



Indian; river, near Sitka, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. Locally so called. 
It is Koloshanka and Koloshenka (Koloshian) of Russian charts. 

Indian; sunkt-n rock, at month of Taiya inlet, Lynn canal, southeastern Alaska. 
So called hy Nichols in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 203). 

Indian; sunken rt)ck, in middle anchorage of Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 188L 

Jndut, cape; see Izhut. 

JndUii, island; see Big Diomede. 

Int/iilKniu'h, village; see Ikuak. 

Ingakalik; island, off the south shore of Alaska peninsula, northeast of Sutwik 
island. Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. 

Iiiijcbixdf/ini, village; see Ignok. 

IiKjckvak, island; see High. 

Ingenstrem; rocks, just east of the Semichi islands, western Aleutians. So named 
by the Russians after pilot Ingenstrem, who visited the Andreanof group 
of islands, in 1829, and twice wintered at Atka, correcting the charts of this 
general region. The name appears variously, Ingenstern, Ingenstrem, 
Ligenstrom, Inghestrom, etc. 

Inger; Eskimo village, in southeast part of Nunivak island, Bering sea. Native 
name, from the Eleventh census, where it is written Ingeramiut (moun- 
tain village), the termination miat meaning people. Population, 35 in 
1890. 

Ingichuak; hill (525 feet high), in the Yukon delta, northeast of Kusilvak moun- 
tain. Eskimo name, from the Russians. On a late Coast Survey chart 
this is called Ingrikchoa. 

Ingichuk; P^skimo village (of 8 people in 1880) in the Yukon delta. Native name, 
from Nelson, who visited it in December, 1878. Also has been written 
Ingeehuk. 

Ingiegnk, mountain; see Kusilvak. 

InrjJestut, j)oint; see Bald Head ])romontory. 

IiKjUJdtakli, island; see Kar})a. 

Inglutalik; i-iver, tributary to the head of Norton l)ay, Norton sound. An Eskimo 
name. Tebenkof, 1849, calls this river, or one which appears to lie this 
one, Inaktuli. The Western Union Telegraph Expedition map of 1867 
calls a native village on this stream, Ingletalik. For the rest there has 
been hopeless confusion, Ingluealik, Inglucalik, Inglaliktalik, etc. 

Ingraham; bay, indenting the southeastern shore of Prince of Wales island, Clarence 
strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Dall, in 1879, after Joseph 
Ligraham, master of the brig Hope, of Boston, 1791-92, whose unpublished 
hydrographic notes of this region were used in compiling the Coast Pilot 
of 1883. 

Ingrakak; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the lower Yukon, near longitude 
161° 30''. Native name, from Coast Survey officers, in 1898, by whom it is 
written Ingrakaghamiut. 

Inian; islands, in Cross sound, southeastern Alaska. So named by Dall in 1879. 
Have also been called Brian islands. 

Initial; island, at entrance to Redoubt bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Nachalnie (initial or beginning) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Initkilly; Eskimo village, on the Arctic coast, just east of Cape Lisburne, near the 
Corwin i-oal mines. Eskimo name, published by the Coast Survey in 1890. 

Inland, river; see Noatak. 

Inlet; i)oint. Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. Name i)ublished 
by the Coast Survey in 1896. 

Inlet; \m\\{, the northernmost point of Woewodski island, Wi-angell strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Dall in 1879. 



BAKEK.] 217 lul— Isa. 

Inlihil-, inland; see Karpa. 

Inner; t-ape, on the western shore of Kizhuyak bay, northern coa-^t of Kodiak. 

Named Vnntrennie (inner) 1)y Mnranhef in 1839-40. 
\ Inner; jioint, on the southeastern shore of Krnzof island, Sitka sound, Alexander 

archipelago. Named Otmeloi vnntrennie (inner shoals) ])y \'asilief, in 

1809, to distinguish it from another point called Shoals, and also Outer 

Shoals point. Shoals extend off ])oth points. Lisianski, in 1804, called it 

Second point. It has also in late charts been called Rocky point. 
Inner; rocks, in Chichagof harbor, Attu island, western Aleutians. So named by 

Gibson in July, 1855. 
Inner Humpback; rock, in St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Horboon vnutrennie 

(inner humpback) by Russian naval officers in 1808-1810. This maybe 

identical with High rock of the Coast Survey in 1869. 
Inner Iliasik; island, near the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, off Belkofski. 

Native name, from the Russians, who wrote it Iliaviki and lliazliek. This 

one is nearest the shore of the peninsula, the other, Outer Iliasik, is farther 

out. The group has been called Iliasik islands. 
Inner Spruce^ cape, at entrance to St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Ehjvoi vim- 

trennie (spruce inner) by the Russians in 1808-1810. 
Innoko; river, tributary to Shageluk slough, northeast from Anvik. Native name, 

from the Russians. Tikhmenief calls it Innoko or Shiltonato. Dall, 1866, 

calls it Innoko or Shageluk. Petrof calls it Innoko on his map and Innok 

in his text. 
Inside; passage, from Clarence strait to Tongass narrows, between Vallenar point 

and Guard inlands. So named l)y Clover in 1885. 
Insignificant; ridge of mountains (2,050 feet high), near Port Chester, Annette 

island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
loalakh, island;. see Ulak. 
-Ipewik; river, in northwestern Alaska, tributary to the Kookpuk river. Eskimo 

name, published, in 1890, as Ippewik. 
Iphig-enia; l)ay, on the western border of Prince of Wales archipelago, between 

Bucareli bay and Sumner strait. So named by Davidson, in 1869 (Coast 

pilot, p. 95), after the packet boat Tjihigeuia Xvhiana, C-a\A. William 

Douglas, which was here in 1788. 
Ipliigenia; point, the eastern point of entrance to PortCaldera, Bucareli bay, l^rince 

of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Santa Eligenia by Maurelk; and 

Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Ipnot; Eskimo village, on the Arctic c;oast, near Cape Thomson, a little south of Point 

Hope. Name from Petrof, wluj wrote it Ip-Not and Ipnot, and reported 

a jiopulation, in 1880, of 40. 
Ippewik, river; see Ipewik. 
Irak, bay; see Ugak. 
Irene, creek; see Moss. 
Iron; creek, tributary to Flambeau river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Iron; creek, tributary to Kruzgamepa river, from tiie south, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Irving, cape; see Muzon. 
Irving-; mountain (9,000 feet high), north of the Maiaspina glacier, St. Elias alps, 

southeastern Alaska. So named by Russell, in 1890, after Roland Duer 

Irving, United States geologist. Has been erroneously printed Irvin. 
Irving; peak (2,169 feet high), on the mainland, near Slocum inlet, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1888. 
Isaacs, point; see Bald Head. 
Isanotski, bay; see Bechevin 



Ina— Ittni. 



218 [BULL. 187 



Isanotski; islaivls, in Bechevin bay, Isanotski strait, Alaska peninsula. Named 
Is.xiinakh islands, by Pall, in 1S,S2. 

Isanotski; point, <>n the eastern end of ITninuik island, near entrance to Isanotski 
strait. ' So calle.l l>y Tebenkof, 1849. 

Isanotski; ridge of mountains, on eastern end of Unimak island, eastern Aleutians. 
Called Issanakski by Veniaminof in 1831. 

Isanotski; strait, at the western end of Alaska peninsula, separating it from Unimak 
island. According to Veniaminof, the name is Issanakskie, a Russian 
adjective from the Aleut name imnak (hole, tear, rent). Lutke, 1836, 
says "not Issanotsky, as ordinarily called; the name of the strait is the 
same as that of the island Sannakh or Issannakh." On the early Russiau 
charts it is Isanotskoi, Isanotzky, etc., and Lutke so uses it in 1828. It is 
usually called Isanotski and sometimes False Pass. 

Isanotitkoi, volcano; see Pogromnoi. 

J-xlie-ik, lake; see Aishihik. 

i;s7///A-, lake and village; see Aishihik. 

Iskoot; mountain (4,800 feet high), near the junction of the Iskoot and Stikine 
rivers. Native name. Hunter, in 18.77, wrote it Skoot. 

Iskoot; river, tributary to the Stikine, from the east. Native name given as Skoot 
and Iskut. 

Island; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, about 20 miles below the 
mouth of Tozi river. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1898. This 
appears to be the stream called Sitzikunten by Dall, 1869, Newchukli- 
cargut by Raymond, 1869, and Nuchuklikakat by Petrof, 1880. 

Island; point, at the southern side of entrance to Kasaan bay, Clarence strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Dall in 1880. 

Island; point, on Baranof island, near Southern rapids, Peril strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named, in 1884, by Coghlan, who shows an island off the 
point. 

Island; point, on Lindenberg peninsula, Wrangell strait, Alexander an'hipelago. 
So named by Coghlan in 1884. There is an island off this point. 

Island; point, on the western shore of Carroll inlet, Revillagigedo island. Named 
by the Coast Survey in 1891. There is an island off the point. 

Island; point, the southeasternmost of Sitklan island, Tongass passage, Alexander 
archipelago. Descriptive name, given by Nichols in 1883. There is a 
small island off the point. 

Island; slough, on the south side of Big island, Yukon river. Name published by 
the Coast Survey in 1898. Its native name, according to Zagoskin, 1842- 
1844, is Notliagepia-ta. 

Islands, Bay of; indenting the western shore of Adak island, middle Aleutians. 
Descriptive name, given by Dall in 1873. 

Jslamh of the Four Mountains; see Four Mountains. 

Islet; cape, on the northern shore of Kodiak, in Kupreanof strait. Named Ostrovka 
(islet) by Murashef in 1839-40. 

Islet; point, on the southern shore of Port Santa Cruz, Suemez island. Prince of 
Wales archipelago. Named Punta de la Isleta (point of the islet) by 
Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. There is an islet off the point. 

Islets; ])oint, in Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de los 
Yslotillos (point of the barren islets) l)y ]\Iaurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Ismailof ; island, near Halibut cove, Kachemak bay. Cook inlet. Named by Dall, 
in 1880, after a Russian naval officer, Gerassiim Grigorovich Ismailof, who 
made exjdorations in Alaska in the last century. Cook calls him Erasim 
Gregorieoff Sin Isniyloff and Vancouver Mr. Smyloff. 



BAKER.] 219 Iss-lzh. 

Issannakh, strait; see Isanotski. 

Isthmus ; bay, on the southern shore of Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named Peresheinoi 
(isthmus) by Russian naval officers in 1808-1810. 

Isthmus; island, in Kalsin bay, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named Peresheechnoi 
(isthnnis) by Russian naval officers in 1808-1810. 

Isthmus; island, near Hot Springs bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Peresheechnoi (isthnuis) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Jsimk, cape; see Igvak. 

lukuk ; bay, indenting the northeastern shore of Raspberry island, Kodiak group. 
Native name, from Murashef in 1839-40. 

Jnkuk, island; see Rasjjberry. 

Jiiri, point; see Urey. 

Jnzhnie, cape; see South. 

Jiizlmie, point; see Southeast. 

Jnzlmol, cape; see Trinity. 

Inzhnoi, point; see Harbor. 

Ivakin ; cape, the eastern point of entrance to Constantine harbor, Amchitka island, 
western Aleutians. So called by Tebenkof, 1849. 

Ivan; barnlbora or house belonging to one Ivan (John) on the divide between 
LTnalaklik and the Yukon. Name from Dall, 1866. Since 1869 has 
appeared on maps as a village Ivan. 

Ivan ; small island, in Pavlof bay, Alaska peninsula. Presumably named Ivan 
(John) by the Russians. Name reported (or given) by Dall in 1880. 

Ivanof ; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northeast of the 
Shumagin group. Named by Dall in 1880. A cape near by was named 
Ivanof (John's) by Lutke, 1835. 

Ivanof, cape; see Kupreanof. 

lyoukeen; cove, on the northeastern shore of Chi(!hagof island, Chatham strait, 
Alexander archipelago. . Native name, reported by Davidson, in 1869, as 
I-youk-een. 

Izbavlenia, point; see Escape. 

Izembek; bay, indenting the northern shore of Alaska peninsula, near its western 
end. Named by Lutke, after Surgeon Karl Izembek, a member of his 
party. Lutke spells the name Izenbek and Isenbeck. (irewingk follows 
the spelling Isenbeck. The official list of the officers of the Moller, Captain 
Staniukovich commanding, on which vessel this surgeon served, has Sur- 
geon Karl Izembek. That list, in the Journal of the Russian Hydro- 
graphic Office for 1850 (Vol. VIII, j). 182), appears to have been carefully 
prepared and leads to the belief that the name should be written Izembek. 

Izhiga; cove, in Inanudak bay, on the northern shore of Umnak, eastern Aleutians. 
Native name from Veniaminof. 

Izhut; bay, indenting the southeastern coast of Afognak island, Kodiak group. 
Apparently a native name; from Tebenkof, 1849. Variously given as 
Izhutskaia, Ujut, Uyut, etc. Izhut bay of Tebenkof is wed of Pillar 
point; Izhut bay of the Russian-American C'ompany's report for 1849 is a 
smaller bay east of Pillar point. 

Izhut; cape, forming the western head of Izhut bay, Afognak island, Kodiak group. 
So called by Tebenkof, who identifies it with AVhitsuntide of Cook, in 
1778, calling it Piati-desiat-nitzi (Pentecost or Whitsuntide). It is Cape 
Shariepof of Murashef, 1839-40. The Russian-American Company's map 
of 1849 applies the name Izhutskoi to the western head of a small bay 
farther east. Thus we have Ijoot, Ishoot, Indut, Izhutskoi, Pentecost, 
Piatidesiatnitzi, Shariepof, Shirip.if, an.l Whitsuntide as names which 
have been applied to this cape. 



Izli— Jam. 



220 [liui.L. 187. 



Izhut; (R'ck, triliiitary to Anikovik river, from the north, in western part of Seward 
jiriiiuHula. Kt^kinio name, whii-h has been published as Ishoot and Ishout. 

Izig-an; cape, on tlie soutliorii sliore of Unahiska, near its western end. 80 called 
by Tebcnkof in 184!i. 

JiiHiach, cape; see Yakak. 

JitrhldnisKd, island; see Kochu. 

Jack; hav, indenting the southeastern shore of Port Valdes, opposite Lowe point, 
I'rince William sound. Named Jack's by Abercrombie, in 1898, presuma- 
bly after W. G. Jack, a prospector in this region. 

Jack; ri\er, tributary to Cantwell river, from the south, near latitude 63° 30^. So 
named by Eldridge and Muldrow, of the Geological Survey, in 1898, pre- 
sumably after W. G. Jack, a prospector. 

Jackass; islet, near the southeastern shore of Akun island, Krenitzin group, eastern 
Aleutians. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Jackass; ))oint, the southernmost i)oint of Akun island, eastern Aleutians. So 
named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Jackson; co\e, indenting the southern shore of Glacier island, Prince William 
sound. Name from Schrader; 1900. 

Jackson; creek, tributary to Bonanza river, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Jackson; island, near the head of Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883, after Rev. Sheldon Jackson. Jackson, in 
his Alaska (1880, j). 376), (-alls it Norcross island. 

Jdck-xnii, island; see Channel. 

Jackson; point, the north point of entrance to Port Clarence, Bering strait. So 
named by Beechey, in 1827, in compliment to Capt. Samuel Jackson, K. N. 

Jackson; post-office, Presbyterian mission, and trading post at Howkan village, 
Long island, Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. Rev. Sheldon Jack- 
son, in his, report for 1886 (p. 19), says: "On the 22d of August, 1881, I 
established a mission among them (Haidas) at the village of Howcan, 
placing Mr. James E. Chapman in charge as a teacher. The station was 
(;alled Jackson bj' the missionaries." A post-office called Jai-kson was 
establislied here in February, 1884. 

Jdck Wade, creek; see Wade. 

Jacob; island, on the southern shore of Alaska i^eninsula, noi'theast of the Shuma- 
gins. Named St. Jacob by AVoronkofski in 1837. 

Jdcoh, island; see Yakobi. 

Jaroolai, bay; see Yakutat. 

Jade; mcjuntaiii, or mountains (3,500 feet high), on the north bank of Kowak river. 
Name published by the Coast Survey in 1884. The green stone, jade, of 
which the Eskimo make ornaments, is said to be derived from this moun- 
tain. 

Jaiclmoi, cape; see Egg. 

Jtiiinchnoi, island; see Ugalgan. 

Jiikobia, island; see Chichagof. 

Jdkorny, point; see Anchor. 

James; island, in Ivanof bay, northeast of the Shmnatjins. So called b^■ Dan in 
1880. 

Jnmvti, island; see Crow. 

Jamestown; Itay, in the northeastern part of SitKa sound, Baranof island, Alex- 
ander an;hipelago. In 1879-80 the U. S. ship Javwstoirn was stationed in 
southeastern Alaska and for the most part was at Sitka, where her officers, 
e82)ecially IJcut. F. M. Symonds, navigating officer, and Master G. C. 



BAKKR.] 221 JaiM-Jim. 

Jamestown — Continued. 

Hanus, engaged in surveying, and added materially to previous knowledge 
of Sitka sound and some other places. This bay or cove was named after 
the ship and various islets in the sound after officers of the shi[). 

Jamestown; peak (2,940 feet high), on the mainland, northwest of Farragut bay, 
southeastern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after the U. 8. ship 
Jmnestown, at one time stationed in Alaskan waters. 

Jamestown; point, on left bank of the Chilkat river. Named by United States 
naval officers, in 1880, after the U. S. ship Jam'estou-n. 

Janesville; mountain (2,620 feet high), east of Port Chester,- Annette island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. Erroneously 
Janeville. 

JiijKdi, island; see Japonski. 

Japonski; island, near Sitka, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Jai)onski 
(Japanese) by the Russians. In 1805 the storm-drifted hulk of a Japan- 
ese junk went ashore on this coasi. Its rescued sail(jrs lived f(jr a time on 
this island; hence the name Japonski, i. e., Japanese. Erroneously 
Jeponski; also has been written Japan and Yaponski. 

Jarvis; creek, tributary to Delta river, from the east, near its junction with the 
Tanana, in about latitude 64°. So named by Glenn, in 1898, perhajis after 
Lieut. David Henry Jarvis, U. S. Rev. Cutter Service. 

Jauncey; mountain (3,654 feet high), on the eastern shore of Portland canal. So 
named by Pender in 1868. 

Jaw; point, on Liesnoi island, the southwestern point of entrance to Woewodski 
harbor, Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. So named l)y Mans- 
field in 1889. 

Jaw; point, on the mainland, east shore of Taku inlet, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by Mansfield in 1890. 

Jeannette; island, northeast of the New Siberian islands, Arctic ocean. Discovered 
by De Long, in 1881, and named by him after his ship Jeannette. 

Jeannette; mountain, in the Augusta range, St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. So 
named Ijy Russell in 1890. 

JelckUni; river, tributary to Chilkat river, southeastern Alaska. Native name, as 
reported by the Krause brothers in 1882. 

Jelloira, isla«d; see Spruce. 

JeltakatM-hkahin; river, tributary to the Klehini river, from the north, in S(jutheastern 
I Alaska. Native name, as reported by the Krause brothers in 1882. 

Jendestakd, village; see Gan-te-gas-tak-heh. 

Jenkins; peak (3,292 feet high), on the mainland, east of Thomas bay, southeastern 
Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, presumably after Rear-Adniiral 
Thornton Alexander Jenkins, U. S. N. 

Jenkins; sunken rock, near the head of Cliilkat inlet, Lynn canal, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Jeponski, island; see Japonski. 

Jerome; creek, tributary to Solomdu river, fnjiu the west, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Jesus Mary; cape, in Gulf of Esquibel, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta 
de Jesus Maria by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Jet, island; see Loon. 

Jim; creek, tributary to Taylor creek, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name from 
Brooks, 1900. 

Jim; river, draining into the South fork (.f the Koyukuk, from the south, near lon- 
gitude 151°. Prosi)ectors' name, published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 



Jim— Jon. 



222 [BITLL.187. 



Jimtown; miniiifi camp, at mouth of Jim river, near longitude 151°. Prospectors' 
name, reported by the (Geological Survey in 1899. 

Jockmch; river, tributary to the Klehini river, from the north, southeastern Alaska. 
Native name, as reported by the Krause brothers in 1882. 

Joe; i.^land, in Clover passage, Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. So named by 
Clover in 1885. 

JoIkiiiii Ho(joKloir, island; see Bogoslof. 

John; island, near the southwest coast of Nagai island, Shumagins. So called by 
Dall in 1880. 

John; island, northeast of the Shumagins, in Ivanof bay, Alaska peninsula. So 
called by Dall in 1880. 

John; peak, on the mainland, east of Farragut bay, southeastern Alaska. So named 
by Thomas in 1887. 

John; rock, off Alaska peninsula, southeast of Belkofski. Presumably so named by 
the traders. Published by the Coast Survey in 1882. 

Johns; creek, tributary to Solomon river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Johns; Indian house, near Mentasta lake, on trail between the Xanana and Copper 
rivers. It is near the head of Slana river. So called by Lowe, in 1898, 
from the name of its Indian occupant. Known as Johnnie's village. 

Johns Hopkins; glacier, at the head of Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Named 
by Reid, in 1892, after Johns Hopkins University. 

Johnson; creek, tributary to the Koksuktapaga river, from the south, Seward pen- 
insula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Johnson, island; see Berry. 

Johnson; mining camp, west of Council, in the Fish river mining region, north of 
Golofnin bay, Seward peninsula. Called Johnson City by the prospectors 
and this name published by the Coast Survey in 1900. 

Johnson; mountain (6,000 feet high), near the head of Portland canal. So named 
by Pender in 1868. 

Johnson; river, tributary to the Tanana river, from the south, near latitude 64°. 
Discovered and named by Allen, in 1885, after Peder Johnson, a Swedish 
miner, member of his party, of whom he speaks in high praise. 

Jolmsons, point; see Johnstone. 

Johnston; creek, tributary to Feather river, from the east, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Johnston; hill, near the mouth of Naknek river, Bristol bay. Named Johnston's 
by the Fish Commission in 1890. 

Johnstone; passage, separating Khantaak island from the mainland, Yakutat bay, 
southeastern Alaska. Named by Dall, in 1879, after Master James John- 
stone, R. N., one of Vancouver's officers. 

Johnstone; point, on the northern shore of Hinchinbrook island. Prince William 
sound. Named by Davidson, in 1868, presumably after Master James 
Johnstone, R. N. of Vancouver's party, in 1790-1795. Erroneously John- 
sons and Johnston. 

John's Village. The Yukon map, sheet 10, published at Ottawa in 1898, gives this 
name to a village on the upper Yukon near the mining camp Eagle. It 
is Johnnie's village of Schwatka in 1883. 

Jones; islands, on the Arctic coast, a little east of the Colville river. Discovered 
and named by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, after "Rev. David T. Jones, 
the faithful and eloquent minister at Red River." Renamed Thetis by 
Stockton, who, in 1889, made a cruise along this coast in the U. S. ship 
Thetis. 






B.vKKR.] 223 jou— Kar. 

Jdiiis, river; see Yahtse. 

.Iiiiimikh, islet; see Unak. 

Jude; island (100 feet high), west of Unga, .Slmmagiii group. Named by the Rus- 
sians after the apostle. 

Judy; hill (631 feet high), in the eastern part of Gravina island, Alexander an-hi- 
pelago. So named by Clover in 1885. 

Jug; island, in Kalsin bay, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named Kubieshka (jug) by Rus- 
sian naval officers in 1808-1810. 

Jug-; island, in the southern part of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Kubieshka (jug) by Yasilief in 1809. 

Jiikchann, river; see Yukon. 

Jinid, river; see Yukon. 

jHnii.'<k(i, island; see Yunaska. 

Juneau; city, harbor, and island, southeastern Alaska. " Two prospectors, Harris 
and Juneau, found mineral here, in 1880, and soon afterwards a camp was 
located." This camp, it is said, was named Harrisburg and the district 
Juneau. United States naval officers reconnoitered the harbor about this 
time, and called the camp Rockwell, after Commander Charles H. Rock- 
well, U. S. N. Owing to the resulting confusion in names, the residents 
held a town meeting and adopted the name Juneau. A post-office, called 
Juneau, was established here in April, 1881. 

Juneau; creek, tributary to Kenai river, Kenai peninsula. Local name, puy>lished 
in 1899. 

Junior; creek, tributary to iMills creek, from the east, Kenai peninsula. Local 
name, from Becker, 1895. 

Juno; mountain, in the western part of Revillagigedo island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Just; island, at entrance to Willard inlet, northeast of Dixon entrance. Name pub- 
lished by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Eaatl; river, tributary to the Chilkat river, from the east. Native name, reported 
by LTnited States naval officers in 1880. 

Kabakof; bay, indenting the southern coast of Atka, middle Aleutians. So named 
by the Russian-American Company's pilot Ingenstrem, about 1830. 

Kahhalcher, cape; see Kaphalsek. 

Kabuch; point, the southwesternmost point of Alaska peninsula. Called Khaboutcha 
l)y Lutke, 1835, and Khabuch by Tebenkof, 1849. Apparently a native 
name. It is probably identical with Alaska cape of Billings, 1790. 

Knrhek, island; see Middleton. 

Kachcl, island; in Kaiuchali. 

Kachemak; bay, indenting the eastern shore of Cook inlet. It is Chugachik or 
Kachekmak of the Russians. Tikhmenief has Kachetmakskaia. Gre- 
wingk has Kotschekmaksky, and it has been often written Kachekmak. 

Kachiginskaia, bay; see Kashega. 

Kdchkahin, river; see Chilkoot. 

Kach-khanna, island; see Wrangell. 

Kadiak, bay; see Camp Coogan. 

Kadin; island, on the southern edge of the Stikine flats, Sumner strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by the Russian surveying party on the R>/n<ia, in 
1863, "after the veteran pilot, M. I\L Kadin, a native of the Aleutian 
islands, and who drew, at Sitka, the charts contained in Tebienkof's atlas." 

Kadugin, islands; see Pavlof. 

Kadngnak, cape; see Kudugnak. 

Kaflia; bay, near Kukak bay, on the north shore of Shelikof strait. Named Kaflia 
(Dutch tile) by Yasilief in 1831. Lutke, 1835, wrote it Katia. 



Ka:;— Kul. 



224 [BULL. 187. 



K'lKjni; islaml, oneof tlif SliuiiiULrin <:r()ui>, whicli one not determined. Was so called 
by Sariflu'l". 

Kagak Vniiitdk, islet; see ("licrnaliura. 

Kagalaska; islaml, inunediatel.y east of Adak island, Andreanof group, middle 
Ak'utians. Lntke calls it Kagalaska, but Tebenkof and the Russian 
II ydro^Maphic charts have Kajralaksa. 

K(i(jal(/a, island; see Tiijalda. 

Kagalus; cape, the southeastern point of Chugul island, near Great Sitkin, Andre- 
anof grouj), middle Aleutians. Perhaps a native name; from Tebenkof, 
lS4ii. lias also been written Kagalis. 

Kag-amil; volcanic island, one of the group of islands of the Four Mountains. 
Native name, from Sarichef, about 1790. Has been variously written 
Chagamil, Khoganiil, Kigamil, etc. Veniaminof calls it Kagamiliak. 
Several nuinunies in the Smithsonian Institution came from this island. 

K(i(/a!<i, lake; see Anianka. 

Kagigikak; i'ai)e, on the southern side of Adak island, Andreanof group,, middle 
Aleutians. Aleut name from Tebenkof, 1849. Has been written Kagi- 
gikhnach. 

KiKjujim, islands; see Shumagin. 

Kaguyak; bay, indenting the southern shore of Kodiak, immediately west of Two 
Headed island. Called Alsentia bay by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Kaguyak; village, at Kaguyak bay, on the southwestern shore of Kodiak. Native 
name, published by Petrof in the Tenth Census, 1880, where it is spelled 
Kaguiak. It may be identical with the Kaniag-miut of the Russian- 
American Company, in 1849. In 1868, the Coast Survey i>ublished the 
name Alsentia for this village. Of the origin of this I find no trace. 

Kaguyak; village, on Svikshak bay, Shelikof strait, about 25 miles southwest of 
Cape Douglas. Lutke, 1835, says (nautical part, p. 275), "Kaiayak river 
and Kaiayakak village in Svikhchak golfe. The Russians wrongly call 
this village Naouchkak." The bay was called Noakchak on manuscript 
map of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, 1867. Tebenkof, 1849, 
has Kaiaiak settlement, which has on many charts appeared as Kayayak. 
Prior to 1884 the Coast Survey charts had Kayayak, but since that date 
Kaguyak. The change appears to have been accidental and unfortunate, 
there being a Kaguyak on the southwest shore of Kodiak island. In the 
Eleventh Census, 1890, the village is called Douglass, after Cape Douglas. 
Kaguyak seems to be the proper name for what is sometimes called 
Alsentia, on the southwest shore of Kodiak. 

Kaliltofi, village; see Kaltag. 

Kah Shakes; cove, in Revillagigedo channel, near the southern point of entrance 
to Boca de Quadra, southeastern Alaska. • So named from Kah Shakes, 
the chief of an Indian village, situated at its northern point of entrance. 

Kah Shakes; Indian village " of half a dozen houses" on Kah Shakes cove, south- 
east Alaska. The Tenth Census, 1880, has two settlements on P^tolin 
island, called Kash's village and Shake's village, population 49 and 38, 
respectively. Evidently there is some confusion as to names here. 

Kahsitsnah; bay, indenting the southern shore o* Kachemak bay, Cook inlet. 
Native name, published by the Coast Survey in 1883. 

Kahurno), cape; .see Kekurnoi. 

Kmmak, village, see Kaguyak. 

Ka tkak; native village, on right bank of the Yukon, a little below Nulato. So 
called by Petrof, in 1880, who reported a population of 124 at that date. 

Kaiukklnuj-mha, village; see Otukah. 



BAKKR.] 225 Kal-Kak. 

Kaialik; Eskimo village, in the Yukon delta northeast of Hazen bay. Visited by 
Nelson in December, 1878, who reports its name as Kaialigumiut, i. e., 
Kaialik people. Population in 1880, 100; in 1890, 157. The Eleventh 
Census calls it Kailwigamiut (p. 164) and Kialigamiut, i. e., people of 
Kialit mountains (p. 110). 

Kaianak; cape, the western head of Vulcan cove, on south shore of Akutan island, 
Krenitzin group, eastern Aleutians. So called by Tebenkof, 1849. The 
Fish Commission, in 1888, called this South Head. Possibly this point is 
the Battery point of Veniaminof. See Battery. 

KaiasJiik; island; see Round. 

Kaiashik, islands; see Walrus. 

Kaiasik; one of the Shumagins, not identified. Native n^me from Veniaminof, 
who says it is high and rocky. Lutke writes it Kassik. 

Kaichali, island; see Kaiuchali. 

K(tt-'j(i}i-nee, strait; see Dixon entrance. 

Kaigan; portage, between the heads of Cholmondeley sound, Moira sound, and 
Tliakaek bay, Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. Called 
Kaigantsef on Russian Hydrographic chart 1493, and Kaigan l)y Dall in 
the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 85). It is doubtful whether it exists as described. 

Kairjani, cape; see Muzon. 

Kaigani; harbors. South, Middle, and North, in Dall island, opening into Kaigani 
strait, near Dixon entrance, Alexander archipelago. So called by Etolin 
in 1833. Presumably a native name, often or generally written Kaigahnee. 
South Kaigani harbor was known, in 1799, as Taddiskey, a native name, or 
Taddy's cove, a corruption of the former. 

Kaigani; point, the southern point of Long island, Cordova bay, Dixon entrance. 
Named luzhnoi (south) by Tebenkof, 1848. Has also been called Kaigan 
and Uzhnoi. 

Kaigani; strait, the southern part of the strait between Long island and Dall island, 
Cordova bay, Dixon entrance. Native name, reported })y Etolin, in 1833, 
as Kaigan. Variously called Kaigahnee, Kaigan, Kaijani, etc. 

Kaigani; village of Haida Indians, at Cape Muzon, Dixon entrance, Alexander 
archipelago. 

Kailwigamiut, village; see Kaialik. 

Kaimttd, island; see Kasiana. 

Kaiuchali; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Apparently a native name, from Vasilief in 1809. Has also been written 
Kaichali. Apparently a corruption of the Russian kachel, from kachat, 
to siving, rock, roll. 

Kaiugnak; bay, west of Sitkalidak island, on the southern coast of Kodiak. So 
called by Tebenkof, 1849. Perhaps from the Aleut word kayuk, meaning 

Kaiulik, bay; see Kujulik. 

Kaiyuh; mountains, in western Alaska, between the Innoko and Yukon rivers. 
Native name, from the name of a tribe of Indians living in the region. 

Kaiytili; river, tributary to the lower Yukon, from the east, about 60 mile3 below. 
Nulato. Called Kaiyuh on most maps. Tikhmenief, 1861, calls it Kutul- 
nakt. Dall, 1866, has Kaiyuh, and Raymond, 1869, Kayuh for the 
mountains and Kaiyuh for the river. 

Kai-yukh-pal-ik, island; see Kiukpalik. 

Kak; islet, at entrance to Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula. The native name, accord- 
ing to Tebenkof, is Kak or Kakh, which has also been written Katch 
By the Coast Survey, in 1875. it was called Rocky island, 

Kokayin, inlet, see Basket. 

Bull. 187—01 15 



Kak— Kak. 



226 [BULL. 187. 



Kakan; river, one of the five rivers in the delta of the Alsek ri-'er, Hontlieastem 

Alaska. Called Kakaiigina or Kakan/u/ti, meaning Kakan river, by 

Tebenkof in 1849. Native name. 
Kabnihini, bav; see Dry. 
Kakani; lake, immediately l)ehind the beach in the St. Elias alpine region, l)etween 

the Alsek delta and Yakutat bay. So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Appar- 
ently a native name. It is near Kakan river. 
Kakat. This is an Indian word, used in northwest Alaska, meaning river and is 

appended to the name. Thus we have: 
AUenkakat river = Allen (river) Ri\er. 
Batzakakat river = Batza (river) River. 
Oaklikakat river = Dakli (river) River. 
Dulbikakat river = Dulbi (river) River. 
Gisasakakat river = Gisasa (river) River. 

Ilogatzakakat river = Hogatza (river) River. ,, 

Husliakakat river = Huslia (river) River. I 

Tozikakat river = Tozi (river) River, etc. | 

In such cases it has been thought best to drop the generic termination btkat 

and write Allen, Batza, Dakli, etc. This word kahif, was written, in 1S71, 

by Captain Raymond, U. S. A., on his maps of the Yukon, kargut and 

chargut, as Atutsakulakuschchargut, Tosekargut, etc. 
Kakati; lake, on north bank of the Stikine river, opposite mouth of Katete river, 

southeastern Alaska. Native name, reported by Hunter, in 1877, as 

Kahkahtoi. 
Kakatkusik, cape; see Sarichef. 
Kaki', strait; see Keku. 
Kake; village, in the northwestern part of Kupreanof island, Alexander archijielago. 

It is the principal village of the so-called Kake Indians. Keku (islands 

and strait) is apparently only another form of this same name. Meade, 

1869, says the Indians here are called the Kakes, Kekis, or Kehons, the 

terms being indifferently applied. 
Kakhvalga, island; see Kavalga. 
Kakhvcgivd, stream; see Kakvi. 
Kakidaguk; cape, the western point of entrance to Morzhovi bay, near west enil of 

Alaska peninsula. According to Lutke it was called Kakhidagouk by 

Kudiakof in or about 1791. Obviously this is the native name. 
Kakka, village; see Makak. 
KakUakUa; native village, on right l)ank of the Koyukuk, at mouth of the Suklo- 

seanti river. Name from Tikhmenief, 1861, who wrote it Kakliaklia- 

kakat, 1. e., Kakliaklia river. Not found on recent maps. 
Kakim, lake; see Skilak. 
Kaknu; river, on Kenai peninsula, tributary to Cook inlet. Native name, from the 

Russians; apparently first used by Wosnesenski about 1840. Grewingk 

has called it Nik river, an abbreviation of Nikolas. 
Kakogkakat, creek; see Medicine. 
Kakovo; islet, in Whale bay, Baranof bay, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

the Russians as early as 1850. 
Kakuak; Eskimo village, on right bank of the Nushagak river, about 00 miles above 

its mouth. Native name, from Petrof, 1880. On recent maps written 

Kakwok. 
Kakul; narrows, the contracted part of Peril strait near its western end. So named 

by Moore in 1897. 
Kakul; i)()int, between Fish bay and Neva strait, in eastern part of Salisbury sound, 

Alexander archipelago. So called l)y the Russians. Perhaps derived 

from Kekur. See Kekur. 



I 



BAKER.] 227 



Kak— Kal. 



Kakvi; ^rlaoial stream, in the Fairweather range, debouching a few miles north of 
Lituya bay. Tebenkof on his Chart A^II, 1849, calls this Kakhvegina, and 
on his Chart YIII, 1849, Katagina. The word is apparently of Indian 
origin, the termination (/ina or hini meaning river. 

Kakwan; point, on the northern bank of the Stikine river, near Popof glacier. 
Xative name, from Hunter, 1877. 

Kakwok; see Kakuak. 

Kalabri, islet; see Kalibri. 

Kalchagamut, \-illage; see Kaltshak. 

Kalekta; bay, indenting the eastern shore of Unalaska, Ijetween Beaver and Cap- 
tains bays. Aleut name, from Sarichef, 1790. Also has been written 
Kalekhta, Kalekhtak, and Kaleakhta. 

Kalekta; cape or promontory, on the eastern shore of Unalaska, Ijetween Cajitains 
and Kalekta bays. Aleut name, from Sarichef, 1790. Veniaminof also 
calls it Kalekta, but Lutke says the natives call it Igognak. The Fish 
Commission has called it Priest point. 

Kalekta. Native village on Kalekta bay, Unalaska;, was found by Sarichef, in 1790, 
and shown on his chart. Veniaminof describes it (about 1825) as com- 
posed of 3 huts (yourts) and 14 people. Xot now in existence. 

K'llija, cape; see South. 

Kalgin; island, near the head of Cook inlet. Apparently a native name, reported 
by Wosnesenski about 1840. In Galiano's atlas, 1802, it is called Isla del 
Peligro (danger island). On a Russian map of 1802 it is called Kulgiak. 

K'lllaUaktna, river; see Sukosleanti. 

Kalibri; islet, at junction of Sukoi strait and Krestof sound, Alexander archipelago. 
So called by Vasilief in 1833. Apparently identical with Coloi (bare) 
island of Vasilief in 1809. Also written Kalabri. 

Kalidge, point; see Collie. 

Kalig'ag'an; islet, one of the Krenitzin group between Tigalda and Ugamak, eastern 
Aleutians. Xative name, from Tebenkof. The Fish Commission, in 1888, 
called it Sealion. 

Kalignak; native village, on one of the western tributaries <>f the Nushagak river. 
Eskimo name, from Petrof, 1880. 

Kalinin; bay, indenting the northern shore of Kruzof island, Salisbury somid, 
Alexander archipelago. Xamed Kalinina (Kalinin's) by Vasilief, in 1833, 
doubtless after Kalinin, pilot of the Ru.?sian ship Neva, who, with 34 
others, was drowned January 9, 1813, near Mount Edgecumbe in the 
wreck of the Neva. 

Kaliiikluk; Eskimo village, on Nelson island, near Cape Vancouver, Bering sea. 
Visited by Nelson in December, 1878, and its name reported by liim as 
Kaliokhlogamute, i. e., Kaliukluk people. 

Kalivinaguk; channel, connecting Baird inlet with Etolin strait and separating 
Nelson island from the mainland, Bering sea. Eskimo name, from Nel- 
son, who crossed it in December, 1878. 

Kalsin; >)ay, in the southwestern part of Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named Kalsin- 
skaia by Russian naval officers, 1808-1810. 

Kalsin; island, in Kalsin bay, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named Kalsinskoi by Russian 
naval officers, 1808-1810. 

Kalsin; reef, in Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named by Russian naval officers in 1808- 
1810. It is Kalisin of the Coast Survey in 1869. 

Kaltag; native village, on left bank of the Yukon, near eastern end of the trail 
from Unalaklik to the Yukon. Called Kaltag by tlie Russians. Petrof, 
1880, show^s two villages on the right bank, called Lower Kaltag and 
Upper Kaltag. Tikhmenief, 1861, writes it Kkhaltel and Raymond, 1869, 
Kahltog. 



Kal— Kan. 



228 [BULL. 1S7. 



Ealtag; raii>:t' <>f nioiuitaiiis, on thi' nortliern l>ank of the Yukon, T)etween Nulato 

an<l tlu' coast. So called by Petrof in 1880. 
KiiltliiKjiiinutf, villajre; s^ee Kaltshak. 

Kaltshak; K.<kiin< > village, ( )n the right bank (jf the Kuskokwim, near longitude 161°. 
Eskimo name, reported l)y Petrof, in 1880, as Kaltliaganuite and Kaltkha- 
gamute, and by Spurr and Post as Kaltshagamut, i. e., Kaltshak people. 

Kaluiak; native village, on the southern shoi-e of Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula. 
8o given by Petrof, in 1880, and the Fish Commission in 1888. The census 
of 1890 rej)orts the only village existing in this locality to be one on ]\Iit- 
rofania island. No name is applied to it. 

Kamaclii; point, the northern point of entrance to Wrangell harbor, Alexander 
archipelago. Apparently a native name, reported by Zarembo in 1834. 
It appears on Zarembo' s sketch on Russian Hydrographic chart No. 1396. 
Has also been called point Ilafuache. 

KmiH-hatka, Sea of; see Bering. 

Kama; glacial stream, debouching on the northwestern shoieof Yakutat bay, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named Ijy Russell in 1891. 

Kaniegli; Eskimo village, on tlie right bank of the Kuskokwim river, about 10 miles 
above Bethel. Its native name, according to Spurr and Post, who obtained 
it from missionary J. H. KilVmck, in 1898, is Kameglimut, i. e., Kamegli 
people. 

Kameuaia; peak, north of Silver bay, Baranof island, Alexander ai'chipelago. 
Named Kamennaia (rocky) by the Russians. 

Kamenistaia, bay ; see Necker. 

Kamenistie. This is the Russian adjective for stony, covered ^vith stones, from hnnen, 
a stone or rock. This word, spelled Kamminista and Kamninista, is apjilied 
to a spot on St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. Elliott, 1874, has 
Kamminista, Russian for rocJcii jAace. 

Kamenistie, islets; see Rocky. 

Kamenistie, point; see Rock. 

Kamenoi; island, south of Middle island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Kamennoi (stony) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Eamenoi; jjoint, on the eastern shore of Kruzof island, in the northernmost part of 
Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Kamennoi (rocky) by Vasi- 
lief in 1809. Variously written Kamenni, Kamennie, Kamennoi, Kame- 
noi, Rock an<l Rocky. 

Kimieshaiskoi, cape; see Douglas. 

Kamishak; bay, in the southwestern part of Cook inlet. Native name, reported by 
the early Russians and variously spelled Kamiskuk, Kamieshatskaia, 
Kamiischatskaja, Kamychatskoi, etc. 

Kamishak; river, tributary to Kamishak bay. Cook inlet. Native name, reported 
by the early Russians. 

Kamminida; see Kamenistie. 

Kanaga; island (1,392 feet high), one of the principal islands of the Andreanof 
group, middle Aleutians. Aleut name, from early Russian explorers. 
Probably identical with Kanaton island of Cook. Has also been written 
Konega and Konniaga. 

Kanagunut; island, near Tongass harbor, Dixon entrance, Alexander archipelago. 
Native name, from Davidson, 1869, who wrote it Kan-na-ghu-nut. Also 
erroneously Kannagkhunut. 

Kanak; island, in Controller bay, east of the mouth of Copper river. Native name, 
pul)lislied by Teltenkof in 1849. 

Kanakanak; Eskimo village, in the Nushagak enumeration district of the Elcvcntli 
Census, 1890; population, 53. I>ocation not given nor discovered. 



BAKER.l 229 



Kau— Kan. 



Kanalku; bay, in Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty island, AlexandiT aicliipelacro. 

Native name, given by the Coast Survey, in 1891, as Kanalkuo. 
Kanata; river, the north fork of the Tiekel, northeast of Port Valdes, Prince 

William sound. Native name, from Eohn, 1898. 
Kunatak, bay; see Portage. 
Kanatak; cape, between Portage bay and Cold bay, on the northern shore of 

Shelikof strait. Aleut name, from the Russians, supposed to mean snom/. 

Has been written Kanalak and Kanatah. 
KdiHtton, island; see Kanaga. 
Kanaug-uk; river, near York, in western part of Seward peninsula. Native name, 

from Brooks, 1900, who wrote it Kanaugok. 
Kane; islands, in the northern part of Neva strait, Alexander archipelago. Named, 

ajiparently by the Eussians, after Captain Kane, an American pioneer 

trader on this coast at the beginning of the 19th century. Have also 

been called Kan islets. 
Kane; peak (3,292 feet high), on Lindenberg peninsula, Kupreanof island, Alex- 

I ander archipelago. Named by Thomas, in 1887, presumably after the 
" arctic explorer Elisha Kent Kane. 

Kanektok; river, just south of the Kuskokwim river and tributary to Kuskokwim 

bay. According to Spurr, who uses Kanektok, its Eskimo name is Kwina 

or Kanektok (snowy). 
. KaiH'irok, district; see York. 
Kang-a; bay, indenting the southeastern shore of Sitka sound, Bai-anof island, 

Alexander archipelago. Name applied by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 
Kanga; islet, in the southeastern part of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Vasilief in 1809. It is an Asiatic name of the 

Mongolian gun. 
KniKjaiulo^ik, island; see Spectacle. 
KangusuJc, river; see Kvinguk. 

I I Kanud, bay; see Alitak. 
K(miek, river; see Buckland. 

Kaniek; small stream, tributary, from the west, to Kulukak bay, on north shore of 

I Bristol bay. Native name, from Tebenkof , 1849. 
I Kanig-miut, village; see Kaguyak. 

Kanikluk; native village, on the northern shore of Prince William sound. Native 
name, reported by Petrof, in 1880, as Kanikhluk. 

II Kanilink; island, one of the Shumagin group; which one is not discovered. Name 

from Veniaminof and Lutke, who write it Khainiliakh. 

Kuniugl, island; see Koniuji. 
I Kunoozhki, island; see Koniuji. 
•■ Knnoivock or York, mining district; see York. 

Kantukan; village of Hooniah Indians, Hooniah harbor. Port Frederick, Icy strait, 
Alexander archipelago. Name from the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 191) , where 
it is written Kan-tu-kan. The post-ofRce Hoonah has been established 
liere recently. 

Kanuktik; creek, tributary to the Kanektok river, from the southeast, about 60 
miles above the mouth of the Kanektok, western Alaska. Native name, 
from Spurr and Post, of the Geological Survey, who passed its mouth Sep- 
tember 4, 1898. 

Kanulik; Eskimo village, near the moutli of the Nusha^ak river, on left bank. 
Native name, from Petrof, 1880. 

Kanuti; village, and also a river tributary to the Koyukuk, from the south, near 
Arctic city. Native name, reported by Allen, in 1885, and by him written 
KonootenA, i. e., Kanuti river. This is, apparently, Old Man river of the 
prospectors. 



Kuu— Kan. 



230 [BULI..1S7. 



Kaoiiiiklilii, islaml; hoc Kaualka. 

Kaphalsek; capi-, in Wraiijroll liarljoi-, Alexander archipelago. Native name, 
reixirted by Zarenibo, in 1834, as Kap-khal-tsech. The name was pub- 
lished, in 1848, on Zarembo'.s sketch of the harbor on Russian Hydrographic 
chart No. 1396. On United States TIydrograi)hic chart No. 225 this point 
is calle.ll Kal)halcher. 

Kapho; mountain (0,000 to fi,000 feet high), on the mainland, near head of Brad- 
iicld c-anal, southeastern Alaska. Apparently a native name, obtained by 
Snow, in 188G, and said to mean brothers. 

Karahliii, islet; see Ship. 

h'arlourh, village; see Karluk. 

Karluk; cape, at mouth of the Karluk river, on the northwestern shore of Kodiak. 
Native name, from the Russians. It is a precipitous mountain mass al)out 
1,600 feet high, locally known as Karluk Head. 

Karluk; lake, drained by the Karluk river, in the western part of Kodiak. Native 
name. 

Karluk; reef, on the eastern shore of Cook inlet, between Kaknu and Kasilof river 
mouths. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1900. 

Karluk; river, draining from Karluk lake, in the western part of Kodiak. Native 
name. 

Karluk, strait; see Kupreanof. 

Karluk; village, at mouth of Karluk river, Kodiak. Native name, from the Russians. 
IJsianski, 1805, spells it Carlook and Karlooch. Shelikof, according to 
Coxe, called it Karluta. There are several canneries here, and the place 
is locally known as Karluk spit. A post-office called Karluk was estab- 
lished here in March, 1895. 

Karlusi; rock, the largest of the Old Sitka rocks, Sitka sound, Alexander archipel- 
ago. So named by Yasilief in 1809. 

Karpa; island, the northeasternmost of the Shumagin group and at or near the 
entrance to Stepovak bay. Called Buldyr (hovel) by the Russians. The 
Aleut name is Inlikak, or, as Lutke writes it, Inglikhakh. Russian 
Hydrographic chart 1379 (ed. of 1847) calls it Karpa (carp) island, while 
Tebenkof, 1849, calls it Tangimak. Tangik is the Aleut word for wland 
and Tangidak for islet. Thus this island has been called Boulder, Bouldyr 
(hovel), Inglikhakh, Inlikak (perhaps from Ingliakun, inhiskers), Karpa 
{carp) and Tangimak (Isletf). 

Karr; hills, back of Icy bay and near Mount St. Elias, southeastern Alaska. Named 
by Topham, in 1888, presumably after Mr. Seton-Karr. Erroneously Carr. 

Karta; bay, at the head of Kasaan bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Called, in 1880, Kasaan anchorage (Coast Pilot, p. 85). Kasaa,n 
bay was then called Karta, following the erroneous form on British 
Admiralty chart 2431. Later the charts adopted Kasaan for the large 
bay and retained Karta for this little bay at its head. Just east of it is 
the Baranovich fishery, the salmon fishery of Philip Baranovich having 
been established here in about 1878 or earlier. 

Kasaan, anchorage; see Karta bay. 

Kasaan; bay, indenting the eastern shore of Prince of Wales island, Alexander 
archipelago. Name of Indian origin obtained by the Russians and vari- 
ously written Casaan, Kasan, Kazarn, and even, by error, Karta. 

Kasaan; post-office, on north shore of Kasaan bay, Prince of Wales island, Alexan- 
der archi{)elago; established in December, 1899. 

Kasaan; village, of Haida Indians, on Skowl arm, Kasaan bay. Prince of Wales 
island, .Vlcxander archipelago. Native name. 



liAKEK.] 231 



Kas— Kas. 



Kasatochi; island (1,018 feet high), northwest of the western end of Atka, middle 

Aleutians. Called Kassatotehy by Lutke, about 1830, who says it is an 

extinct crater reported to contain a lake. 

. Kashaiak; Eskimo village, on the north bank of Togiak river, near mouth of the 

I Kashaiak river. Its native name, according to Spurr and Post, 1898, is 

Kashaiyagamut, i. e. , Kashaiak people. 
' Kashaiak; river, tributary to the Togiak river, from the north, about 30 miles above 
the mouth of the latter. Native name, from Spurr and Post, who write it 
Kasluiiyak. 
Kashaw; river, tributary to the Kaskawulsh, from the northeast, north of the St. 

Elias alps. Native name, from Brooks, 1900. 
Kasheg^a; bay, indenting the northern shore of Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Named 
Koshiginskoi by Sarichef, in 1792, supposedly after Yelim Koshigin, who 
wintered at Unalaska in 1763. Has been variously written Kachiginskaia, 
Kasheega, Kashuga, Koshigin, etc. 
Kashega; cape, between Kashega and Pumicestone bays, on northern shore of 

Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. So called by Tebenkof, 1849. 
Kasheg'a; native village, in Kashega bay, on the northern shore of Unalaska. So 
called by Sarichef in 1792. In 1831 it was the headquarters of the bidar- 
shik or foreman of the Eussian-American Company for the western half 
of Unalaska. Its pojjulation then was 41; in 1880, 74, and in 1890, 46. 
Has been called Kashigin and Koshigin. 
Kashevarof; group of islands, in Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. Appar- 

- ently so named by Ball in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 89). 
Kashevarof; passage, separating the Kashevarof group of islands from Prince of 
Wales island, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by the 
I Russians. Variously written Kashevarow, Kashevaroff and, erroneously, 

I Kashvarow. It is an oft-recurring Russian family name. 

KasMgaluk; Eskimo village, on Nelson island, Bering sea. Visited by Nelson in 
December, 1878, and its name reported by him to be Kashigalogamute, 
I i. e., Kashigaluk people. 

j Kashuga, bay; see Kashega. 

i Kashunuk; Eskimo village, of 20 houses, in the Yukon delta, near the Kashunuk 
river. Eskimo name, from Nelson, who visited it in December, 1878, and 
reported a population of 100 or 200. Petrof, 1880, writes Kashunok and 
j reports a population of 125. The Eleventh Census, 1890, calls it Kashu- 

I nahmiut and gives a population of 232. 

Kashunuk; river, in the Yukon delta, forming one of the outlets of the Yukon 
river. Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849, who wrote Kizhmiak. Also 
has been written Kizhunok. Nelson, who crossed it in 1878, calls it 
Kashunuk. 
Kashutuk; Eskimo village, in the Yukon delta, near Andreafski. Eskimo name, 
from Nelson, who visited it in December, 1878. Also has been written 
I Kashutok. 

Kaslivaroir, passage; see Kashevarof. 
Kashvik; bay, immediately southwest of Katmai bay, Shelikof strait. Native name 

from Tebenkof, 1849. 
Kasiak; cape, the w^estern point of entrance to Sitkalidak strait, on the southeastern 
. shore of Kodiak. So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Native name. Kasik 

I • is Aleut for seed and Kaiasik for high and rocky. 

Kasiana; group of islands, in the northern part of Sitka sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Vasilief in 1809. Erroneously Kaisana. It is a 
Russian family name. 



KiiM— Knt. 



232 [BITLI..187. 



Kasilof; caiu-, at luotilli of tlic Kasilof river, ( 'ook inlet. The cape appears to have, 
l)eeii iianieil liv WosncHciiski ahont 1S40. AIho Avritten Kassilow, Tvussi- 
loff, I'tC. 

Kasilof; fishiiifr village, at mouth of the Kanilof river, Cook inlet. Upon ornear 
the 8ite of thi.s village the Russian foreman Kolomin, in 1786, hegan for 
the Lebedef-Lastochkin Company a settlement by building two log houses 
surrounded by a stockade. This was called St. George, presumably after 
one of the ships of the company. The name Georgiefskaia appears on 
the old maps. 

Kasilof; river, on Kenai peninsula, draining from Tustumena lake to Cook inlet. 
Apparently a Russian proper name, due to Wosnesenski about 1840. ^''ari- 
ously written Kasilof, Kasilova, Kasilovka, Kussiloff, Kussilowa, etc. 

Kaskawulsh; river, northeast of Yakutat bay, and tributary to the Alsek. Native 
name, published, in 1898, and probably earlier. Has l)een variously written 
Kaskarwurlch, Kaskarwulch, etc. The above form, Kaskawulsh, has been 
adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 

Knsnatchin, point; see Anchor. 

Kasnyku; bay, on the eastern shore of Baranof island, Chatham strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Native name, reported by Moore in 1895. 

Kasook; inlet and lake, on the northern shore of Cordova bay, Alexander archipel- 
ago. Named published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Kmsalotchy, island; see Kasatochi. 

A'rt.w//.-, island; see Kaiasik. 

Knusilof, river and village; see Kasilof. 

Kasson; creek, tributary to Shovel creek, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Kataguni; island, one of the Chilkat islands, in Lynn canal, southeastern Alaska. 
Native name obtained by the Krause brothers, in 1882, and by them written 
Katagiine. 

Kntak. The Russian American map of 1849 shows an Aleut settlement on Afognak 
bay, Afognak island, called Kattagmiut, i. e., Kat-tak people. 

Katch, islet; see Kak. 

k'litrlirhJdf, river; see Yentna. 

Kateekuk; island (300 feet high) , one of the Semidi islands. Native name obtained, 
in 1874, by Dall, who wrote it Katee'khuk. 

Kate; mountain (4,600 feet high), near Port Yaldes, Prince William sound. So 
named by Abercrombie in 1898. 

Kateel; river, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the west, about 40 miles above mouth 
of the latter. Native name, reported by Allen, in 1885, as Kateelkakat (on 
his map) and Koteelkdkat (in his text, p. 105), i. e., Kateel river. Has 
also appeared as Kotelkakat. See Kakat. 

Kates Needle; mountain (9,960 feet high), on the western bank of the Stikine, 
near the international boimdary. Also called Kates Needles. 

Katete; mountain (4,170 feet high), near the Katete river. Native name, from 
Hunter, 1877, who has Kwah-tee-tah and Ka-t6-t^. 

Katete; river, tributary to the Stikine river, from the southeast. Native name, 
published by the Coast Survey, in 1883, as Kwahteetah and later as Ka-te-te 
and Kahtite. 

Katiushkin. A small stream on Kenai peninsula, debouching in Cook inlet, near 
East Foreland, is on Wosnesenski's map (1840) in Grewingk (map 3), 
called Kantiitschike. The cape East Foreland is called Katiushkin on 
Russian Hydrographic chart 1378 (ed. of 1847). 

Katlian; bay, in the northeastern part of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named l)y Lisianski after Katlian or Kotlean, one of the native chiefs of 
Sitkain 1809. Has been called Katlianofagulf and Kotleana (Kotlean' s) bay. 



BAKER] 233 Kat— Kay. 

Katmai; bay, indenting the northern shore of SheHkof strait. Native nanu>, from 
Vasilief, 1831-32; written Katmai and Katmaiskoi. 

Katmai; creek, tributary to Katmai l)ay, Shelikof strait. Native name. 

Katmai; village, on Katmai bay, Shelikof strait, northwest of Kodiak. This is one 
of the most important of the native villages. Population in 18S0, 218; in 
1890, 132. 

Katnu; river, debouching on the northwestern shore of Cook inlet, immediately 
west of the "West Foreland. Native name, from the Russians. 

Katrina; river, tributary to the White, from the west, in latitude 63°. This name 
has been adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. It is 
apparently an accidental corruption of the native word Katsina, published 
by the Coast Survey in 1890. Katrina is reported to be the local usage. 

Katfichadilrh. The Krause brothers, 1882, report this to be the native name of a 
river tributary, from the west, to the upper waters of the Chilkat river. 

Katschin, river; see Katzehin. 

KulncJibthin, river; see Chilkoot. 

Ktitxi'hi]iin, river; see Kicking Horse. 

Katselina; river, tributary to the Co])per river, from the east, a little north of the 
Chitina river. Native name, from Abercrombie, 1898, who writes it 
Katselena. 

Katsina, river; see Katrina. 

Katz; island, one of the Galankin group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by United States naval officers in 1880, after Ensign Edward M. 
Katz, IT. S. N. 

Katzehin; river, on the mainland, tributary to Chilkoot inlet, from the east, south- 
eastern Alaska. Native name, variously written Chkazehin (Krause), 
Katsehin (Coast Survey), and, by error, Katschin. Apparently it is 
Katz-hini, i. e., Katz river. 

Kaualka. One of the Shumagin islands, not identified, is called Kaouakhta by Lutke, 
who in turn obtained this name from Veniaminof . Veniaminof ' s notes, 1840, 
has the form Kauatka, meaning "long, narrow, andivUh some stony places." 

Kautas; river, draining from a lake, northward to the Koyukuk river, near longitude 
157°. Native name, from Allen, 1885, who wrote it Cawtaskukat, i. e., 
Kautas river. 

Kavalga; island, one of the westernmost of the Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. 
Aleut name, from the Russians. Lutke and others write it Kakhvalga, 
but Tebenkof has Kavalga. Erroneously Ravalga. 

Karlaiak, bay; see Clarence, port. 

Kaviak; Eskimo village, between Golofnin bay and Port Clarence. Called Kaviaga- 
mute on the map and Kaviazagamute in the text of the Tenth Census l)y 
Petrof, in 1880, who reports the population to be 200. Kaviazagemut of 
Dall and the Coast Survey in 1869. Near it many maps, since 1869, show 
a river called Kaviavazak, a name said to be now unknown locally. 

Kaviruk; swampy tract and small river at head of Imuruk basin, east of Grantley 
harbor, Seward peninsula. An Eskimo word, apparently from some of 
the Franklin search parties about 1850, and spelled Cov-vee-arak. Has 
also been written Covearak. Billings, 1790, shows a river here called 
Kauveren on his chart and Ka-ooveren in his text. On a Russian chart 
of 1802 it is called Kvuveren. 

Kayak; cape, the eastern head of Protection harbor, on south coast of Unalaska, 
eastern Aleutians. So called by Tebenkof, in 1849, perhaps from a real or 
fancied resemblance to the native skin boat called l-mak. Called Moun- 
tain cape by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Kayak; group of islets, at the southwestern end of the Galankin group, Sitka 
sound, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vasilief in 1809. Kayak is 



Kuy— Keg. 



2i34 [Bui.i.. 187. 



Kaytik (.^jiitinued. 

tlie iiativi' name for their small skin-covered boats. The name has 

appeared a.s Kayaik, Kayakteh, and Kayatchi. Was also called Beardslee 

inland hy Tnited States naval officers in 1880. 
Kayak; island, on the southern border of Controller bay, Gulf of Alaska. This is 

the island which it is believed Bering saw and named St. P^lias in 1741. 

Cook, in 1778, saw and named it Kaye's island, after Rev. Dr. Kaye, dean 

of Lincoln. It has also appeared as Kay's island. The Spaniards Arteaga 

and Bodega, in 1779, called it Nuestra Senora del Carmen, whence the 

name Carmen island. The Russians called it Kayak from a fancied 

resemblance of its outlines to an Eskimo kayak or skin canoe. This has 

been written Kaiak and Kyak. 
Kayakliut; cape, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, west of Kodiak. 

Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Also written Kayagliuk. 
Kayaku, island; see Adak. 
Kayayuk, village; see Kaguyak. 
Kay-e-ghleri, bay; see Whale. 
Kaye's, island; see Kayak. 
Kaynk, river; see Koyuk. 
Kazakof ; cape, forming the western point of entrance to Danger bay, on south shore 

of xlfognak island, Kodiak group. So named by Murashef in 1839^0. 

Tebenkof applies this name, spelled Kazakofskie, to the eastern head of 

the bay. Its meaning is Cossack's. 
Kazam, bay; see Kasaan. 
Kazhyi-Igvat, cape; immediately north of Cape Douglas, Cook inlet. So called on 

Russian Hydrographic chart 1378 (ed. of 1847). Obviously a Russian 

rendering of some native phrase or name. 
Kazik, island; see Chisik. 
Kchisakh. On United States Hydrographic chart No. 8 a cape, the southernmost 

point of Little Tanaga island, middle Aleutians, is called C. Kchisakh. 

This name has not been found on any chart of earlier date. Most of the 

names upon it are taken from Tebenkof s charts. In this case Tebenkof 

shows an islet which he calls Sllak island, but does not name the ca])e. 

The hydrographic chart does not name the island, but calls the nearby 

cape C. Kchisakh. Perhaps this is the origin of the name. 
Kchukich, point; see Kulah. 
Keating: range of mountains (3,000 feet high), in the western part of Etolin 

island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 
Kechumstuk; range of hills, south of the Tanana, in longitude 145°. Often called 

Razor Back Divide by the prospectors. On Coast Survey chart T, editions 

of 1895 and 1896, it is called Razor Back Divide, and on later editions and 

maps Ketchumstock Hills. 
Keeli' Klitaglkh, island; see Kiliktagik. 
Keene; channel, north of Keene island, Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Keene's channel by Meade, in 1869, after the pilot J. W. Keene. 
Keene; island, in San Christoval channel, Bucareli bay, Alexander archipelago. 

Name published in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 121). 
Keene; island, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. Named Keene's island 

by Meade, in 1869, after the pilot J. W. Keene. 
Keene; rock or rocky ))atch, northwest of the middle channel into Sitka harbor, 

Sitka sound, Alexander archii)elago. Named by the United States Navy, 

in 1879, after pilot J. W. Keene, who reported it in that year. 
Kegezruk, creek; see Kigezruk. 



I 



BAKER.] 235 Kee— Kel. 

Keete; inlet, indenting the southwestern shore of Prince of Wales island, Alexander 
archipelago. Ai)parently a native name, published hy the Coast Survey 
in 1899. 

Keetoraia, bay; see Whale. 

Kegikioirruk, village; see Kiktaguk. 

Kejachu, island; see Adak. 

Kckoor; rock; see Second Kekur. 

Ki'lrnir, rock; see Third Kekur. 

Keku; group of islets, in the north end of Keku strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Native name, which has been written Kekou and Kiku. 

Keku; strait, between Kuiu and Kupreanof islands, Alexander archipelago. A 
native name, which has been variously written Kake, Kiku, etc. 

Kekur. This word, spelled Kekoor, Kekour, Kekur, etc., is frequently found on 
Russian maps of Alaska and Eastern Siberia. It appears to be some 
native term adopted into the Russian and to mean any high isolated rock 
or rocky islet. Apparently it is an exact equivalent of the Spanish word 
Farallon. In the Journal of the Russian Hydrographic Office (1844, vol. 
2, pp. 115-129) is a list of words in use by the seafaring folk ( promieshlen- 
niki) of the Archangel government. In this list occurs these two entries: 
Gurie; pyramid of rocks. Kekur; same as gurie, but oftener by this 
word is meant an isolated pillar-like rock. The word is in use in Nova 
Zembla. Paktusof, in 1833, speaks of Guria or Kekura. Petrof (Ban- 
croft's History of Alaska, p. 225) says, "This expedition fell in with a 
large party of savages, who had taken up a position on a Kekour, ' ' and 
then adds this explanation, " Such places, to which the Russians applied 
the Kamchatka name of Kekour, were often used by the natives as natural 
fortifications and places of refuge. War parties or hunting expeditions 
would leave their women and children upon such cliffs for safe-keeping 
till their return." In Wrangell's narrative, edited by Sabine, we find 
(p. 354) Kekury, Kekurnoi, or columns. 

Kekur, cape; see Pillar. 

Kekur; islet, near the entrance to Kalsin bay, Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Called Kekur- 
noi (pillar) by Russian naval officers in 1808-1810. 

Kekur, rock; see First Kekur. 

Kekur, rock; see Pinnacle. 

Kekumie, cape; see Rocky. 

Kekurnoi; cape, on the northern shore of Shelikof strait, between Katraai and Cold 
bays. By Tebenkof, 1849, it is called Kekurnoi, from Kekur (pillar), and 
by mistranslation this appears on current charts as Kahurnoi. Lutke, 
1835, calls it Nelupaki or Neliupiaki, apparently a native name, while 
Russian Hydrographic chart 1379 has another native name, Nukakalkak. 

Kell; bay, Affleck canal, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. Said to be so calletl 
by the Indians. Name reported by Helm in 1886. 

Kellek, island; see Summit. 

Kellett, island; seeWrangell. 

KeUogg; point, the northern point of entrance to Young cove, Howkan strait, Cor- 
dova bay, Alexander archipelago. Named by Sheldon Jackson after Miss 
Fannie E. Kellogg, a teacher at Sitka in 1878. 

Kellogg; point, the western pomt of entrance to Dunbar inlet, Prince of Wales 
island, Alexander archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1882, after Miss Fannie 
E. Kellogg, a teacher at Sitka in 1878. 

Kelly; moimtain, in northwestern Alaska, near headwaters of Pitmegea river. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1890. 



Kol— Kcil. 



236 [BI-LI..187. 



Kelp; l>ay, inil.'ntiiit: tin- northeastern shore of Baranof island, Chatham strait, 
Alexander areliii)ela^'o. Often referred to as Deep bay, and in 1S79 named 
Kelj) hay l)y Dall in the Coast Pilot, published in 1883. 
Kelp; island, m-ar the southern shore of Duke island, Dixon entrance, Alexander 

archipelajro. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Kelp; i>oint, l)et\veen Dewey and McHenry anchorages, on Etolin island, Alexander 

arehii)elajio. So named by Snow in 1886. 
Kelp; rocks, off Tort Chester, Nichols passage, Alexander arcliipelago. So named 

by Nichols in 1888. 
Kenachananak; Eskimo village, on the seashore east of Nunivak island, Bering 
sea. In the Eleventh Census, 1890, it is called Kennachananaghamiut, 
i. e., Kenachananak people, described as composed of 8 dwellings and 181 
])eop]e. 
KoKii, bay; see ("ook inlet. 

Kenai; lake, on Kenai peninsula, between Turnagain arm and Eesurrection ])ay, 
and draining through Kenai river westward to Cook inlet. On some maps 
(ailed Second lake. See also Skilak. 
Kenai; mountains, forming the axis of Kenai peninsula. Commonly so called. 
Name published in the Tenth Census, 1880. Grewingk, 1849, deriving his 
information from Wosnesenski, 1842, gives the native name of these 
mountains as Triiiili; also written Trufdi. 
Kenai; peninsula, between Cook inlet and Prince William sound. Native name, 
from the Russians. On early Russian maps the peninsula bears no name, 
but Cook inlet is called Kenaiskaia gulf. Billings, 1802, calls it Kanaiski 
land. . Grewingk calls it Tschugatsk (Chugach) peninsula. 
Kenai, strait; see Shelikof. 

Kenai; village, at mouth of Kaknu river, on eastern shore of Cook inlet. A forti- 
fied post was established here by Grigor Konovalof, commanding the ship 
St. George, of the Lebedef-Lastochkin Company, in August, 1791, and 
called fort or redoubt St. Nicholas or St. Nicolas or St. Nikolas. On a 
Russian map of 1802 it is called Pavlovskaia, i. e., Paul, and a manuscript 
note says fort De Pawlofsk. In the summer of 1869 there was a military 
post of the United States here called Fort Kenai, and by this name Kenai, 
a native name, the place is now known. A post-office, Kenai, was estab- 
lished here in February, 1899, 
Ke>iahHkisc}u'r, inlet; see Cook. 
Kenasnow, archipelago, etc.; see Kootznahoo. 
Kcnnmow, island ; see Killisnoo. 

Kenasnow; rocks, in Kootznahoo roads, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Called Kootznahoo by Meade, in 1869, and Kenasnow by Nichols in 1891. 
Kendrick; bay, indenting the southeastern shore of Prince of Wales island, Clarence 
strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1879, after Capt. John 
Kendrick, of the sloop Cohiinbia, from Boston, who wintered at Nootka 
in 1788-89. 
Kennedy; point, the eastern point of entrance into Saook bay. Peril strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Moore, in 1895, after Surgeon Rol)ert 
Morris Kennedy, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Kennicott; glacier, on the southeastern flank of Mount Blackburn, forming thesource 
of Kennicott river. So named by (iierdine, in 1900, after Robert Kennicott. 
Kennicott; i)ass, ])etween Lakina river and Kennicott glacier. So named by 

Gerdine, of the Geological Survey, in 1900. 
Kennicott; river, tributary to the Nizina, from the north. Local name, in memory 
of the Alaskan explorer, Robert Kennicott, a pioneer on the Yukon river, 
who died at Nulato, May 13, 1866. 



BAKER. J 287 



Keu— Kill. 



Kennon; island, in tlie entrance to Chirhagof harl)or, Attu island, western Aleu- 
tians. >So named by Gibson in July, 1855, after Lieutenant Beverley Ken- 
non, U. S. N. 

Kentucky; creek, tributary to Igloo creek, from tlie south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Brooks, 1900. 

Kentucky; creek, tributary to Klokerblok river, from the south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Kenunimik; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the lower Yukon, 15 miles alcove 
Andreafski. Native name, from the Coast Survey, 1898. Perhaps this is 
identical with Ankachak. 

Kestrel; islet, on the north shores of Boca de Quadra, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Ketavic, point; see AVhale. 

Ketchikan; post-office and village, on Revillagigedo island, in Tongass narrows, 
Alexander archipelago. The post-office was estabhshed in Ajml, 1892. 
Also has been written Kichikan and Kitch-i-kan. 

Ketchumstock; see Kechumstuk. 

Ketchumville. This name is found on Nelson's map of 1878-79, published in the 
Proceedings of the Royal Geographic Society for 1882 (p. 712), and is 
applied to a post or fort on the mainland just south of St. Michael, Norton 
sound. It was copied on the census maps of 1880, but is not found on 
later maps. 

Ketlrachtd, point; see Battery. • 

Ketoy, island ; see Kittiwake. 

Kettle; cape, on the southeastern shore of Umnak island, near Umnak pass, eastern 
Aleutians. Named Kotelnoi (kettle) by the Russians. The native name 
is Utmak, presumably from the Aleut, vMidn (out of the middle). 

Kevulik; river, of northwestern Alaska, debouching between Point Hoj)e and Cape 
Krusenstern. Eskimo name, published by the Coast Survey, in 1890, with 
the spelling Kevuleek. The village near its mouth is called Kivalinag- 
miut by the Russians and Cape Sepping village by Petrof, 1880. 

Key; reef, east of Kashevarof islands, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Snow in 1886. 

Keystone; canyon, on Lowe river east of Valdes, Prince William sound. So named 
by Abercrombie, in 1898, presumably after Pennsylvania, the Keystone 
state. 

Khaboutcha, point; see Kabuch. 

KhabucJi, point; see Kabuch. 

Khnignmute, village; see Nunaikak. 

Klia'miliakh, island; see Kaniliak. 

Khaltsekahin, river; see Kicking Horse. 

Khantaak; island, in Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. This is the native name 
of a wooden dish used for holding food. First applied by Tebenkof in 
1849. Has been written Hantak and Khantak, and might better be writ- 
ten Kontog, to agree with the pronunciation. 

Khal)iolniil:i', creek; see Medicine. 

Khaz; ))ay, indenting the southwestern shore of Chichagof islami, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Apparently named Khaz (fag-end) by Tebenkof in 1849. 

Khazaniil, island; see Kagamil. 

Khazik, island; see Chisik. 

Khiltat; river, tributary to the Tanana, from the north, near longitude 144° 30^. 
Named by Allen, in 1885, after an Indian chief, Kheeltat. 

Kliitkhovk, cape; see Scotch Cap. 

Khituk, cape; see Scotch Cap and Seal. 



Kbl-Kig. 



238 [BUM.. 187. 



Khlebnikof; capo, between Chichagof harbor and Sarana bay, on the northern 
sliore of Attn island, western Aleutians. So named by Etolin, in 1827, 
presinuably after the pilot, Andrei Khlebnikof, who made surveys about 
Kodiak in 1810. Also written Chleljnikoff. 

Khlikakhlik; island; see Latouche. 

Khoiidojf, island; see Khwostof. 

Khoudlakojf, islands; see Kudiakof. 

Khrvmclwnkii, cape; see Etolin. 

Khhiyoliuk, island; see Hinchinbrook. 

Kliulilno, river; see Chulitna. 

Klndiikh, bay; see Kuluk. 

Khun, bay; see Kun. 

Klitma, island; see Chichajrof. 

Khulsnoi, island; see Admiralty. 

Khutz-ii'lni. archipelago, etc. ; see Kootznahoo. 

Khwostof; island (1,873 feet high), one of the Rat island group, western Aleutians. 
Apparently so named by Krusenstern, 1827, after Nikolai Alexandrovich 
Khwostof, a Russian naval officer who, with Davidof, made explorations 
in Alaska, 1802-1804. According to Lutke the name was applied to a 
group of which Khwostof island was one. Variously written Khoostoff, 
Khvostoff, Khwostov, etc. | 

Kiakasia; river, tributary to the Stikine river, from the south, 3 miles below mouth I 
of the Iskoot. Native name, published as Ki-ka-hay, in 1868, and written 
Kiah-kah-seah by Hunter in 1877. 

Kialagvik; bay, on the southeastern coast of Alaska peninsula, near Mount Becha- ' 
rof. Native name, from the Russians. Also written Kialagvit. 

Eialegak; native village, on the eastern end of St. Lawrence island, Bering sea. 
Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849, who wrote Kgallegak. Also has ])een i, 
written Krallegak. The above spelling, which seems more probable, is 
from Russian Hydrographic chart 1455 (ed. 1852). 

Kiavak; bay, west of Sitkalidak island, indenting the southern shore of Kodiak. 
So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Native word. Has been written Kiawak 
and Kiyavak. It is apparently identical with Naumliack bay and village 
of Lisianski in 1805. 

Kiavak; cape, at the south point of entrance to Kiavak bay, Kodiak. So called by 
Tebenkof in 1849. 

Kiawak, passage; see Kiawak. 

KicJdkan, village; see Ketchikan. 

Kichzulik, bay; see Kuzhulik. 

Kicking- Horse ; river, triVxitary to the Chilkat river, from the south, near its 
mouth, southeastern Alaska. So called on a recent railroad map. Its 
native name has been variously given as Chalzekahin (Krause), Katsekahin 
(Nichols), Khaltsekahin (Coast Survey), Khalzekahin (Dall), etc. 
Apparently its native name sounds like Katsek-Ztm?, i. e., Katsek river. 

Kielkek, island; see Summit. 

Kit'xiotnak, cape; see West Foreland. 

Ki€t((rpik, village; see Kiktaguk. 

Kigalfja, island; see Tigalda. 

Kigalgin; island, one of the group of islands of the Four Mountains, eastern Aleu- 
tians. Native name, from Veniaminof, about 1830. Not inhabited. Has 
been written Kigalga, "a name often recurring in the Aleutian islands." 
See also Tgalgaii. 

Kif/diiiil, islantl; see Kagamil. 



BAKER.] 239 



Klg— Kil. 



Kiganln; island, one of the Shumagin group, not identified. Called Kiganghyni 
by Lntke, who, in turn, obtained the name from Veniaminof. In a later 
publication Veniaminof calls it Kiganin. 

Kigezruk ; river, in the extreme western part of Seward peninsula, debouching 
l>etween capes York and Prince of Wales. Named after Kiviarzruk, a 
Prince of Wales Eskimo, who discovered gold here in June, 1899. Has 
been written Kiryarzark, Kiugaarzruk and Kivyearzruk, and is now 
called, locally, Kigezruk. 

Kightak Sichiimak, islands; see Trinity. 

Kigluaik; range of mountains, in western part of Seward peninsula. Eskimo name, 
from Beechey, 1827, who wrote it Kig-low-aic. Has also been called 
Kiglowa, and by the miners Kiglo-white and Craggly-white. On a late 
map called Sawtooth. 

Kigmil, cape; see Prince of Wales. 

Kig-uga; cape and cliff, on the northwestern coast of Adak island, Andreanof group, 
middle Aleutians. Aleut name, from Telienkof, 1849. 

Kignn; cape, the westernmost point of Atka, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. 
Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Perhaps from the Aleut Mgulc (diver 
or grebe ) . 

Kigunak; cape, in Inanudak bay, on the northern coast of Umnak, eastern Aleu- 
tians. Native name, from Kuritzien, 1849. 

Kigushimkada; cape, on the northern shore of Umnak, eastern Aleutians. Native 
name, from Kuritzien, 1849. 

Kikhtuk, island; see Kodiak. 

Kikiktak; Eskimo village, at the mouth of Hotham inlet, Kotzebue sound. Eskimo 
name, from Petrof, 1880, who writes it Kikiktagamute, i. e., Kikiktak peo- 
ple. Population in 1880, 200. 

Kiktagaliuk; islets, north of Chirikof island, near Cold bay, Alaska peninsula. 
Native name, from the Russians. 

Kiktaguk; Eskimo village, on the southern shore of Norton sound, about 22 miles 
east of St. Michael. Dall, who visited it October 8, 1866, reports its name 
to be Kegiktowruk, a " word derived from Kikhtuk, meaning an island." 
Tebenkof, 1849, calls it Kiektaguk, while the Coast Survey parties of 1898 
call it Ikikiktoik and the hill near it Toik. 

Kiktak; Eskimo village, on a large island in the Kuskokwim river, about 25 miles 
above Bethel. Native name, from Nelson 1878-79, who wrote it Kikkhta- 
gamute, i. e., Big Island people. Kiktak is the native word, which has by 
corruption become Kadiak and Kodiak. Petrof in 1880 gives its popula- 
tion as 232 and its name Kik-khtagamute. The Eleventh Census gives 
a population of 119 and the name, Kikikhtagamiut. 

Kiku, islet and village; see Kake. 

Kikukalen, bay; see Erskine. 

Kilbuck; range of mountains, east of the lower reach of Kuskokwim river, western 
Alaska. So named by Spurr, in 1898, after Rev. John H. Kilbuck, a Dela- 
ware Indian missionary and teacher at Bethel. 

Kiliatva; river, in St. Elias alpine region, debouching between the Alsek delta and 
Yakutat bay. Apparently a native name; published by Tebenkof in 1849. 

Kiliktagik; island (750 feet high), one of the Semidi islands. Native name, 
obtained, in 1874, by Dall, who wrote it Keeli'Khtagikh. 

Kilimantavie; Eskimo village, near Wainwright inlet, Arctic coast. Tikhmenief, 
1861, calls it Kilametagag-miut; Petrof, 1880, calls it Kolumakturook; 
Hydrographic chart 68 calls it Kelamantowruk, while later charts oniit it 
or call it Kilimantavie. According to Murdoch this name is Ke-lev-a- 
tow-tin (^ sling). 



Kll-Kln. 



240 [BULI,. 187. 



Kiliuda; l>ay, indenting the southeastern shore of Kodiak. Native name, n-iwrtedby 
the Russians. Has been written Kiliouda, Kiliouk, Kiliuda, Kihiidinskoi, 
Kiliuk, KiUuda, Kiluden, etc. Perhaps it is a corruption of Kfliak, an 
Aleut word meaning morniny, or Kiliak, early hi. the moridnfj, and uda, 
Lay. 

Kiliuda; native village, on the north shore of Kiliuda Imy, Kodiak. Has been gen- 
erally written Kiliuda. 

Kill III id; bay; see Kuliliak. 

Kllhil. Petrof, 1880, shows two native villages on the headwaters of the Kok river, 
northern Alaska, designated as Killaimutes, i. e., Kilai people. 

Killisnoo; island, opposite Peril strait, in Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Corruption of some native word. Apparently only another form of 
Kootznahoo (Khutz-n'hu = bear fort). It is identical with Kenasnow 
island of Meade in 1869. Speaking of this island and the liarljor east of 
it, etc., Meade says: "The names Kenasnow and Koteosok are the Indian 
names of these places, and as such I have inserted them on my charts." 

Killisnoo; post-office and native village, on or near Killisnoo island, Chatham 
strait, Alexander archipelago. The post-office was established here in 
July, 1884. 

Killisnoo; reef, off west end of Killisnoo island, Chatham strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Kenasnow by Meade, in 1869. On late charts changed to 
Killisnoo. 

Kilxkvihii; creek, tributary to Kruzgamepa river, from the east, Seward peninsula. 
So named by Brooks, in 1900, after his cook, Charles Kuhn. 

Kiliuda, village; see Kiliuda. 

Kilokak; rocks, near Agripin bay, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula. I 
Native name, published by the Coast Survey in 1900. 

Kiliii'lii/.fkoi, bay; see Kiliuda. 

Kimball; mountain (10,000 feet high), south of the Tanana river, near longitude 
145°. So named by Allen in 1885. 

Kimball; pass, west of the Copper river, in latitude 61° 30^. Name from Aber- 
crombie in 1898. 

Kinak; Eskimo village, on right bank of the lower Kuskokwim. Visited by Nel- ; 
son in January, 1879, who reported its native name to Ije Kinagamiut, 
i. e., Kinak people. Its population was at that time al)out 175. Popula- 
tion in 1880, 60; 1890, 257. Kinak is said to be the Eskimo word iorface. i 

Kinak; river, on the mainland, east of Nunivak, draining from Dall lake, south- 
ward to Bering sea. Native name, from Nelson, 1878. According to 
J. H. Kilbuck, the word means face. Late niaps show the Kinak river 
flowing not southward to the sea, but eastward to the Kuskokwim. 

Kinegnagmiut, village; see Razboinski. 

Kinegnak; Eskimo village, of 76 people in 1890, near Cape Newenham, Bering sea. 
Name from the Eleventh Census, where it is Kinegnagmiut in the text 
(p. 99) and Kniegnagamute on the map, i. e., Kinegnak people. 

King, cove; see Peterson bay and Salmon bay. 

King George Third's ardiipelago. That part of the Alexander archipelago wliich 
lies west of Chatham strait and south of Cross sound and Icy strait was 
named by Vancouver King George Third's archipelago. The name j 
is obsolete. 

King; island (700 feet high), in Bering strait. Discovered by Cook, August 6, 1778, j 
and named by him King's island, after Lieut. James King, a member of [i 
his party. Its native name, according to Nelson, is U kiwuk, a name which j 
has been given as Okiben, Oo-ghe-book, Oo-ghee-a-book, Ookivok, Oukivok, 
Ukivok, etc. 



BAKER.] 241 



Kin— Ki8. 



King; mountain (about 1,300 feet high), in the Nome mining region, Seward penin- 
sula. Local name, published in 1900. 

Kingegan; Et^kimo village, with population, in 1890, of 488, at or near Cape Prince 
of Wales, Bering strait. Beechey, in 1827, .says: "The natives have a vil- 
lage upon the lowland near the cape called Eidannoo, and another inland, 
named King-a-ghe. ' ' Dali says : ' ' Known to natives as far south as Norton 
sound and to local navigators as King-e-gan." It ha.s been written King- 
a-ghee, Kingigamute, King-a-khi, etc. 

Kinghiak, village; see Suworof. 

Kings; cove, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, just west of Bel- 
koi'ski. Named King's cove by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Kings; creek, tributary to the Matanuska, from the north, about 30 miles above the 
mouth of the Matanuska. So known locally. Presumably named after 
Al. King, one of Alaska's pioneer prospectors. Name published in 1899. 

King Salmon; river, tributary to the Nushagak. Local name, obtained by Spurr 
and Post, in 1898, from trader A. Mittendorf. 

Kings Cabin; home of Al. King, a prospector, at junction of Kings creek and Mata- 
nuska river. 

Kingsmill; point, on the northwestern shore of Kuiu island, Chatham str£t, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver, in 1794, after Vice-Admiral 
Kingsmill, R. N. 

King Solomon; creek, in the Fortymile mining district, tribuuary to O'Brien creek. 
Local name, obtained by Barnard in 1898. 

Kiniaak, village; see Suworof. 

Kinik, arm, river, etc. ; see Knik. 

Kini kl i k ; . %dllage, on northern shore of Prince William sound. Native name, from 
Schrader, 1900, who wrote it Kinicklick. 

Kinkaid; mountain, on the eastern shore of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey, presumably after C. A. 
Kinkaid, who was one of the first council elected at Sitka, shortly after 
the transfer of Alaska from Russia to the United States in 1867. It is the 
mountain of four stone pyramids of Vasilief in 1809. 

Kinuiak, village; see Suworof. 

Kiougilakh, cape; see Kiugilak. 

K'qtnaiak, river; see Black. 

Kipniak; Eskimo village and Coast Survey tidal station, at mouth of the Black river, 
in the Yukon delta. Nelson, 1879, reports its name to be Kipniaguk and 
Dall writes it phonetically Kip-nai-iik. A late Coast Survey chart has 
Kripniyukamiut. 

Kipniak, river; see Black. 

Kirbas; island, immediately south of Spruce island, of the Necker group, Sitka 
sound, Alexander archipelago. So called by Vasihef in 1809. 

Kirilof; bay, indenting the northern shore of Amchitka island, Rat island group, 
western Aleutians. So named by Ingenstrem in 1830. Has been written 
Kirilovskaia, Kirloff, etc. 

Kirinskaia, creek; see Sawmill. 

Kirk; point, the northern point of Foggy bay, Revillagigedo channel, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. The point is almost an island 
at high water and w^as in the Coast Pilot of 1883 called an island. 

Kirushkin; island, southwest of Japonski island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipel- 
ago. Named Kiriushkin (smelt) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Kiri/arzark, river; see Kigezruk. 

KisJinak, cape; see Seal. 

Bull. 187—01 1»^ 



Ki»»-Kkl.. 242 [nuL.,.187. | 

Kiska; liarbor, indenting the eastern shore of Kiska island, Rat island group, west- 
ern Aleutians. Named Kyska by Dall in 1873. 

Kiska; i.^^land, one of the principal islands of the Rat island group, western Aleu- 
tians. reriiai)s this is St. Stephen island of Bering in 1741. Kiska or 
Keeska is, according to Dall, the Aleut word for gut. Variously written \ 
Kiksa, Kisiika, Kyska, Kiiska, Kysa, etc., and often Great or Big Kiska 
to distinguish it from Little Kiska, near by. 

KIsinallul; bay; see Alimuda. 

Kisselen; bay, at the head of Beaver bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Sarichef, 
1792, gives its Aleut name as Kisselen, but Veniaminof has Kissialiak. 
The Fish Commission, in 1888, called it Worsham bay. 

Kita; islet, in the southeastern part of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Kita (whale) by Vasilief in 1809. 

KiUtffiUak, island; see Ukolnoi. 

Kitchen; anchorage, in Belkofski bay, Alaska peninsula. So called by the Fish 
Commission in 1888. 

Kite; island, in Boca de Quadra, near Vixen bay, southeastern Alaska. So named 
by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Kitkuk, cape; see Scotch Cap. 

Kitovi, island; see Whale. 

Kittens (The) ; two rocky islets, in the southern end of Lynn canal, near Funter 
bay, Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Mansfield 
in 1890. 

Kittiwake ; island, between Afognak and Kodiak. Called Govorushechie or Kitoi 
{red-legged kiltiwake — a species of gull, or whale) by Murashef in 1839-10. 
This usage was followed by Tebenkof and the Russian American Company, 
1849. Has also been called Ketoy. 

Kiugaarzruk, river; see Kigezruk. 

Kiugilak; cape, on the southwestern shore of Great Sitkin island, Andreanof group, 
middle Aleutians. Native name, apparently from North Pacific Explor- 
ing Expedition, 1855, which wrote it Kiougilakh. 

Kiukpalik ; island, in the northeastern part of Shelikof strait. Native name from 
the Russians. Russian Hydrographic chart 1378, edition of 1847, has 
phonetically U-kai-yiikh-pal-iek, and Tebenkof, 1849, Kai-yukh-pal-ik, 
» It has appeared as Kaiuklipalik (1868), Kiukhpalik (1869), and Kiukpalik , 

(1886). 

Kivalenag-miut, cape; see Seppings. j 

Kiviarzruk, river; see Kigezruk. ' 

Kivdchavak, river; see Kvichivak. 1 

Kiwalik; river, on Seward peninsula, tributary to Spafarief bay, Kotzebue sound. 
Eskimo name, publisned by the British Admiralty as early as 1882 and 
probably earlier as Kee-wa-lik. 

Kiyavak, bay; see Kiavak. 

Kizhuchia ; small stream, on the northern shore of Redoul)t Vjay, Baranof island, 
Alexander archipelago. So called by Vasilief in 1809. 

Kizlnniiik, river; see Kashunuk. 

Kizhuyak ; bay, indenting the northern shore of Kodiak and opening into Marmot 
bay. Named Shakmanof or Kizhuyakskaia by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Called Kizhuyak by Tebenkof, 1849. 

Kizhuyak; cape, the western point of entrance to Kizhuyak bay, on north siiore 
of Kodiak. Named Kizhutskoi by Murashef in 1839-40. Called Kizhuyak 
by Tebenkof in 1849. 

Kklmlfi'l, village; see Kaltag. 

Kkliulakli, point; see Kulak. 



BAKER.] 2-1:3 



Kla— Kle. 



Kladlnisha, cape; see Graveyard. 

Klahini; river, tributary to Burroughs bay, Behm canal, Alexander archipelago. 

Native name, from the Coast Survey. Variously written Clahona, 

Klaheena, Klahena, etc., i. e., Kla river. 
Klak; creek, tributary to the Kanektok river, from the south, about 40 miles east of 

Kuskokwim bay. Native name, obtained by Spurr and Post, of the 

Geological Survey, in 1898. 
Klakas; inlet (unexplored), indenting Prince of Wales island and opening into 

Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. Native name, pubi.shed bv the 

Coast Survey in 1899. 
Klakas; lake, in the southern part of Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 

Native name, published by the Coast Survev in 1899. 
KInkvaii, village; see Klukwan. 
Klamaskwaltin; native village, on the north bank of the Yukon river, near the 

mouth of the Kaiyuh. Native name, from the Coast Survey, 1898, who 

wrote it Klamasqualttin. 
Klan; hill, on Sitklan island, Dixon entrance, southeastern Alaska. Native name 

being part of the word Sit-klan, reported by Nichols and published in 

1889. 
Klanachargut, creek; see Minook. 
Klanakakat, creek; see Minook. 
Klalassin, river; see Klotassin. 
Klatena, river; see Klutina. 
Klatsuta; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the south, about 25 miles below the 

mouth of the Tozi river. Native name, reported by Raymond, 1869, as 

Klatsutachargut; by Petrof, 1880, as Klatsutachakat, and by Allen as 

Klatsutakakat, i. e., Klatsuta river. 
Klawak; inlet, opening into Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. Corrup- 
tion of some native word, obtained by the Russians. Variously written 

Klawack, Klawok, Kliavakhan, Tlevakh, Tlevak, etc., and erroneously 

Kiawak. 
Elawak; post-office and village, on Klawak inlet, Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Variously written Klawock, Kliawak, Kliavakhan, Kiawak, Tlevak, 

Tlewak, etc. Corruption of some native word, obtained by the Russians. 

The post-office here was established in February, 1884. 
Ellawasi; river, tributarj^ to the Cojiper river, from the east, near Copper Center. 

Native name from Allen, 1885, who wrote it Klawasimi, i. e., Klawasi 

river. Has also been written Klawasena. 
Klchakuk; Eskimo village, on the eastern shore of the Kuskokwim bay, just north 

of Goodnews bay. Sarichef, 1826, has at this place the words Kchakuk 

bay, though no bay is shown. Petrof, 1880, shows a village which he calls 

Klchangamute or Kl-changamute, i. e., Klchank people. 
Kleguchek; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Kuskokwim, at its mouth. 

According to Spurr and Post, who obtained this information from mis- 
sionary J. H. Kilbuck, in 1898, its native name is Klegutshegamut, i. e., 

Kleguchek people. 
Klehini; river, tributary to the Chilkat, from the west, in latitude 59° 24'. Native 

name, reported by United States naval officers, in 1880, as Kluheeny. 

Krause, in 1882, spelled it Tlehini. The above form, Klehini, has been 

adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. Perhaps the same 

word as Klahini, which see. 
Eletsan; creek, flowing northward to the White river, near longitude 141°. Native 

name, reported by Hayes in 1891 as Klet-san-dek, or Copper creek, the 

termination dek meaning creek. 



K 11— Kin. 



244 [BULL. 187. 



Kliarkof; island, one of the Siginaka group, .Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Kliarkof (Clark) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Kliavakhan, inlet and village; see Klawak. 

Klikiiklik, ii-land; see Latouche. 

Kliiirhcf, peak; see Kliuchef. 

Klinkwan; Haida Indian village, near Hunters bay, Cordova bay, Alexander arehi- 
pelago. Native name from the Coast Survey in 1900. 

Klinkwan; Haida Indian village, on the western .shore of Long island, Cordova 
bay, Alexander archipelago. Native name, called Klinquan in the Elev- 
enth Census, 1890, and Koianglas village by Sheldon Jackson in 1880. 

Kliuchef; mountain, near Hot Springs bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Kliuchevaia (hot springs) by Vasilief in 1809. Has been called 
Kliucheff or Springs mountain, a name recently transferred to another 
near-by peak and spelled Klinchet. Erroneously, Klinchef. 

Kliuchef; volcano, in the northern part of Atka, middle Aleutians. Named Kliuch- 
evskaia (springs) by the Russians, says Lutke, on account of the large 
number of warm springs on its western slope. Variously written Kliout- 
chevskoi, Kljutsehewskoj, etc. 

Klochkof; rock, 2 or 3 miles ENE. (by compass) from the eastern end of Amlia 
island. Named after the pilot of the Kussian-American company's ship 
Chirikof, who discovered it in 1818. It is Siuvich (sea lion) rock of the 
natives. A manuscript note in Davidson's copy of Sarichef's atlas indi- 
cates a rock aivasli here. The pilot Ingenstrem denies the existence of 
:his rock. 

Klokachef; island, at the northern point of entrance to Salisbury sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Name apparently first used on British Admiralty 
chart 2337. Has also been called Fortuna island and Vincent island. 
Klokachef is a Russian family name. 

Klokachef ; point, the southwesternmost point of Klokachef island, Salisbury sound, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Vasilief in 1833. Has also been 
called Olga point. 

Klokachef, sound; see Salisbury. 

Klokerblok; river, tributary to the Niukluk river, from the west, in the Blake j 
Recording district, Seward peninsula. The local rendition of some native 
name, which is variously written Klokblok, Kluchablok, etc. \ 

Klondike; gold district, and river, tributary to the Yukon, from the east, near 
latitude 64°. This river was named Deer river by the Western Union j 
Telegraph Expedition, in 1867, and so appeared on various maps. Later ' 
it was called Ralndeer and afterwards Reindeer. Ogilvie, writing Septent- i 
ber 6, 1896, from Cudahy, says: "The river known here as the Klondike;" 
and in a footnote says: "The correct name is Thron Duick." It has also 
been called Clondyke and Cliandik, or Deer. 

Kloqudn, village; see Klukwan. 

Klotassin; river, tributary to the White, from the east, near latitude 62° 30'. Native 
name, reported by Hayes in 1891. The above form, Klotassin, has been 
adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 

Klkujatan. This name is given by Petrof, 1880, as the name of a large lake southwest 
of Fort Yukon. The lake was shown as an enlargement of Birch creek 
on some maps. All late maps omit it. 

Klu; i-iver, tributary to the Chakina, from the west. Apparently so called by the 
prospectors. 

Kluane; lake and river, flowing therefrom to the Donjek river, near latitude (>1° 30^. 
Native name, reported by Hayes, in 1891, as Kluantu river, the termination 



BAKER. J 245 KlU— KUO. 

Kluane — Ci mtinued. 

ta lueauing river. The name has also been written Khiahne. The above 
form, Khiane, as applied to Ixtth lake and river, has been adopted bj^ the 
Canadian Board on Geographic Names. This is, doubtless, the lake called 
by Glave (Century, Oct., 1892, p. 877) Tioo Amy. Possibly, also, this may 
be Ta-ku-ten-ny-ee of Davidson. 

Klvantu; see Kluane. 

Kltichablok, river; see Klokerblok. 

Kiuchev, bay; see Hot Springs. 

Khichev, lake; see Deep. 

Klukwan; village, near the mouth of Chilkat river. Native name, first reported 
by naval officers, in 1880, as Chilkat or Klukquan. Krause, in 1882, calls it 
Kloquan. Has also been written Klakwan. The above form, Klukwan, 
has been adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 

Klutina; glacier, extending from Valdes Summit down inland to the headwaters 
of the Klutina river. Native name, which has generally been written 
Klutena. 

Klutina; lake, about 40 miles north of Valdes, Prince William sound. Native-name, 
adopted by the several hundred earliest prospectors camped at the lake 
in the season of 1898; has also been called Abercrombie lake. Generally 
written Klutena. 

Klutina; river, draining from Klutina lake, northeastward to the Copper river. 
Native name, reported by Allen, in 1885, as Klatena, i. e., Klati river. 
Generally written Klutena. 

Klutlan; glacier, and river, draining from it northward to the White river in longi- 
tude 141°. Native name, reported by Brooks in 1899. 

Kluvesna; creek, tributary to the Kotsina, from the north, draining from Kluvesna 
glacier. Native name, from manuscript map made by prospectors in 1900. 

Kluvesna; glacier, on southern flank of Mount Wrangell. Native name, from the 
prospectors, 1900. 

Knakatnuk; Indian village, on the northern shore of Knik arm of Cook inlet. 
Native name, reported by Petrof in 1880. 

Knecktukhnut, village; see Chiukak. 

Kneep, arm, river, etc. ; see Knik. 

Knetina; river, tributary to the Copper river, from the east, in latitude 62°. Native 
name, from Abercrombie, 1898, who wrote it Knetena. 

Knight; island, in the western part of Prince William sound. Named Kniglits 
island by the Coast Survey in 1869. 

Knight; island, in Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. So named by Vancouver in 
1794. It is Dalnie (distant) island of Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been writ- 
ten Dalni. 

Knik; arm, river, and village at the head of Cook inlet. Knik is the Eskimo word 
iorfire. It has been printed Kinik, Kneep, Knick, Knik, Kook, Knuyk, 
Kweek, etc. 

Kniktag-miut, village; see Ignituk. 

Knob; mountain (4,250 feet high) , near the eastern bank of the Stikine river. So 
named by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Knowles; creek, tributary to the Koyuk, from the north, Seward peninsula. So 
called by Peters in 1900. 

Knowles; head, on the northeastern shore of Prince William sound. So named by 
Abercrombie in 1898. 

Knox; peak, in the Teocalli mountains, near headwaters of the Kuskokwim. So 
named by Spurr and Post in 1898. 



KllU— Ko<l. 



246 [BULL. 187. 



Kvuiik; arm, rivor, etc.; see Knik. 

Kobakof; bay, on the southern coast of Atka, middle Aleutians. So named by the 
Russians. Called Kol)akotshaia on Russian Hydrographic Chart No. 1400. 

Kochu; island (150 feet liigh), in Chilkat inlet, Lynn canal, southeastern Alaska. 
Named Kochu by Lindenberg in 1838. It is Ventosa island of Meade in 
1868. The native name is said to be Gla-hiits, but the Krause ))rothers, 
1882, report the native name to be Jachlanissa. 

Kodiak; large island near Cook inlet. Discovered l>y Stephen Glotof, a Russian fur 
hunter, who anchored in AHtak (Kaniat) bay, in the southwestern part 
of the island, on September 8, 1763. He learned from the natives that the 
island was by them called Kikhtak. (Banc. Hist., 141, 145.) Kikhtuk 
is the Innuit word for island. (Dall's Alaska, 532. ) Petrof (Banc. Hist., 
224) says: "Kikhtak or Kikhtowik is the Innuit word for island. At the 
present day (1886) the natives of the peninsula speak of the Kadiak people 
simply as Kikhtagamutes, islanders. The tribal name appears to have 
been Kaniag, and the Russian appellation now in use was probably derived 
from both." Martin Sauer, who wrote the account of Billings' expedition, 
1785-1794, says (p. 174): "Shelikof has called this island Kichtak as the 
original name of it, in which, however, he is mistaken, for Kichtak or 
Kightak is merely an island; they call the Trinity island Kightak Sich- 
tunak, thus, Kightak Kadiak; and to my astonishment one of them called 
Alaksa a Kightak or island. ' ' Cook in 1778 got the name Kodiak from the 
Russian Ismailof (II, p. 504). This spelling was followed by Meares 
(1788), Vancouver (1794), and Langsdorf (1804), who has Kodiak, Kad- 
jak or Kuktak, i. e., Great Island (II, p. 58). The British Admiralty 
charts, Nos. 260, 278, 787, 2172, 2460, and 2558, followed the spelling 
Kodiak. Sauer, about 1790, has Kadiak (Billings' Voyage, pp. 168-170), 
and so also has Lutke, 1836 (Naut. part, p. 268). Dixon, 1789, has Kodiac 
and Codiac (p. 145) ; Lisianski, 1804, has Cadiack. At the time of the 
purchase of Alaska the form Kodiak (pronounced KO-dy-ak) was in gen- 
eral use among English speaking people, and the same form, Kodiak (pro- 
nounced Kad-yjik) , was in general use among the Russians. Dall (Alaska, 
p. 529) says: "The Russian when not accented should be rendered in 
English by A; from the neglectof this (comes) Kodiak instead of Kadidk." 
Also, at p. 532, he says: "Kadiilk. — The name of the largest island south 
of Aliaska. It is a derivative, according to some authors, from the Russian 
Kiidia, a large tub; more probably, however, it is a corruption of Kanidg, 
the ancient Innuit name. The inhabitants, according to Coxe, called 
themselves Kaniagist or Kanidgmut. This name is almost invariably mis- 
spelled by English authors as Kodiak, Codiac, Codiack, Kadiack, and in 
other similarly absurd ways. The above is the only correct spelling." 
The spelling of this name was submitted to the Board on Geographic 
Names in 1890 and the form Kadiak adopted. . Local usage has, however, 
remained Kodiak, both in form and pronunciation, while the pronunci- 
ation Ka-dy-ak is often heard from the lips of those who have learned the 
name, not from hearing it, but from the printed page. Moser, in Report 
of the Fish Commission (1899, p. 19), says: "Though the present approved 
spelling of the name of this island is Kadiak, the company retains the 
former spelling Kodiak." Martinez and Lopez de Haro in 1788 named 
the island Florida Blanca. 

Kodiak; rock, near the entrance to St, Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Kadiak by the 
Coast Survey. 

Kodiak; town, on Kodiak island, one of the principal towns of Alaska. The first 
Russian settlement on Kodiak was made by Shelikof at Three Saints bay. 



BAKER] 247 Kod-Kol. 

Eodiak — Continued. 

Ill or about 1792, the settlement was removed to this place, which was 
named St. Paul. It is popularly known as Kodiak. The post-office Kodiak 
was established here in August, 1888. In the Eleventh Census (p. 74) it is 
stated that ' ' The place was selected as a central station and headquarters 
of the Russian fur-trading companies in the year 1789 on account of its 
good harlior and the close vicinity of good building timber. Previous to 
the establishment of New Archangel, or Sitka, on its present site Kadiak 
was also the headquarters of the Russian-American Company. The Rus- 
sians gave it the name of Paiiovsky gavan (Pavlof's, i. e., Paul's harbor), 
and- the natives and Creoles of the island speak of it to the present day 
simply as gavan, or the harbor. The canonization into St. Paul is the result 
of faulty translation by our map makers." 

The above is not wholly borne out by the record. The Russian 

Lisianski, on his map of 1805, published in 1814, has St. Paul. Pavlof is 

the Russian for Paul. Early Russian charts have Pavlorski gavan, but 

Tebenkof, 1849, has gavan St. Pavla. 

Kodiak; post-office at St. Paul, Kodiak, established in August, 1888. 

Kogiung; Eskimo village, at mouth of Kvichak river, Bristol bay. Native name, 

reported, in 1880, by Petrof who spelled it Koggiung. 
Kogok; river, debouching into Norton sound, about 20 miles southwest from St. 

Michael. Native name, obtained by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
Kohklux, village; see Koklux. 
Kohlsaat, peak; see Kolsaat. 
Koianglas, village; see Klinkwan. 
Koidern; river, tributary to the White river, from the south, near longitude 140° 

30'. Native name, reported by Hayes in 1891. 
Koikpak, river; see Koyuk. 

Kok; river, tributary to Wainwright inlet, Arctic coast. Eskimo name, published 
by the Coast Survey, in 1869, as Kook. Since then given indifferently as 
Kok or Koo. Hydrographic chart 68, edition of 1892, shows two rivers, 
one called Koo and the other Kee, and near their mouths, on Point Collie, 
a village called Koogmute, i. e., Kuk people. Tikhmenief, 1861, calls 
this village Kululin. Koog river of the Eleventh Census may be this 
river, or Kukpuk river. 
Koka; islet, in southeastern part of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. A Finnish family name, applied by Vasilief in 1809. 
Kokliix; astronomical station, near Klukwan, Chilkat river, southeast Alaska, occu- 
pied by Davidson, August 7, 1869, as a solar eclipse station. Native name 
from Davidson, who wrote it Kohklux. 
Kokok; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the lower Yukon, near the Yukon- 
Kuskokwim portage. Native name, from Raymond, 1869, who wrote it 
Kochkogamute, i. e., Kokok people. 
Kokolik; Eskimo settlement, at Point Lay, Arctic coast. Name published by the 

Coast Survev in 1899. 
Koko; Eskimo village on the right bank of the lower Yukon, a little below Ikog- 
mut. Name published by the Coast Survey, in 1898, as Kochkomut, i. e., 
Koko people. 
Koksuktapaga; creek, tributarv to the Niukluk river, from the south, in the 
Eldorado Recording district, Seward peninsula. Native name, variously 
written Casa-de Parga, Koshotok, Kosoktok, Koksukdeparga, etc. 
Kolkiket; mountain, northwest of Togiak lake, in the Ahklun range. Native name, 
from Post, 1898, who wrote it Kolchichet. Not shown on any map. 



Kol— Kou. 



248 [BULI,. IST 



Kolmakof; an olil Russian trading prtst and stockade or redoubt, on the nortli V)ank 
of the Kuskokwim, about 200 miles above its mouth. Ivan Simonsoii 
Lukeen, a Russian creole, ascended the Kuskokwim in 1832 to this place, 
where he built a stockade, which was for a time known as Lukeen' s fort. 
In 1841 it was partially destroyed by the Indians with fire, whereupon it 
was rebuilt ])y Alexander Kolmakof and took his name. Variously known 
since as Kolmakof redoubt, Kolmakovski, etc. 

h'nlnslianbt, river; see Indian. 

Kolosh; island, in Hot Springs bay, Sitka soimd, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Vasilief in 1809. 

Kolosliiaii; island, one of the Siginaka group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Koloshenkin (Koloshian) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Koloshskoi, cape; see Escape. 

KolumalinrHk, village; see Kilimantavie. 

Komarof. Nelson, in 1878, shows a village bearing this name in the Yukon delta, 
near Kotlik. It is not shown on recent maps. 

KiiridnJ: Hoi), port; see Frederick. 

Kolsaat; peak, in the Tordrillo mountains, near headwaters of the Kuskokwim. 
Native name, from Spurr and Post, in 1898, who wrote it Kohlsaat. 

Konaton; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, a little above the mouth 
of the Yuko or Soonkakat river. Name from Dall, 1869, who wrote i1 
Konaton. Neither name nor river found on recent maps. 

Konega, island; see Kanaga. 

Kondz, point; see Dalnoi. 

Kongiganak; Eskimo village (of about 175 people in 1878), on north shore o 
Kuskokwim bay. Visited by Nelson in December, 1878, and its native 
name reported by him as Kongiganagamiut, i. e., Kongiganak people. 

Kongik; Eskimo village, on the Buckland river, Seward peninsula; reported by 
Petrof, in 1880, as Kongigamnte, i. e., Kongik people. The Eskimo name 
of the river, on which is this village, the Eskimo are said to call Konguk or 
Kunguk. 

Konguk, river; see Buckland. 

Konicheskaia, volcano; see Conical. 

Konioujii, island; see Big Koniuji. 

Kimingx, island; see Big Koniuji. 

Koniuji; island (1,113 feet high), off the northwestern shore of Atka, middle Aleu- 
tians. So called by the early Russians from the al)undance there of crested 
auks (simorhynchus cristatellus), called by the Russians Kanoozhki or 
Kanooskie. The Aleut name of this bird is Kunuliuk. The word Koniuji 
often appears and is variously spelled Kaniugi, Koniouji, Koniouzhka, 
Canooskie, etc. See also Little Koniuji. 

Koniuji; islet, in Little Raspberry strait, between Kittiwake and Kodiak islands. 
Named by Murashef in 1839-40. The name is a corruption of the Aleut 
name Kun-u-liuk, meaning crested nuk. Elliott spells it Canooskie. 

Koniuji; strait, between Big and Little Koniuji islands, Shumagin group. Called 
Koniushi by Dall in 1872. 

Konnekova, river; see Clear. 

Konnuiga, island; see Kanaga. 

Konootena, river and village; see Kanuti. 

Konsina, river; see Tiekel. 

KmstantiiKt, harbor; see Constantine. 

Kontog, island; see Khantaak. 

Koongamulcx, villages; see Kowak. 

Kooak, river; see Kowak. 



BAKER] 249 KOO— KOS. 

Koog, river; see Kok. 

K<>(i(p'ocl; mining district, etc. ; see Kugruk. 

Koivjroog, river; see Kugruk. 

A'ooA-, l)ay; see Basket. 

Kooh, river, etc. ; see Knik. 

Kookpoowrool; river; see Knkpowruk. 

Konl-pul; river; see Kukpuk. 

Koolvagangamvte , village; see Kulvagavik. 

Kii'isetrien, river; see Kuzitrin. 

Koot; Eskimo village, near Cape Etolin, Xunivak island, Bering sea. Native name, 
from the Eleventh Census. Population in 1890, 117. 

KootznaJioo; archipelago, head, inlet, roads, and village. Admiralty island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. This word comes from a native word, Khutz-n'hu 
(bear's fort). Its obscure and difficult gutturals have produced great 
diversity of rendering. It has been called Hoochinoo, Hoosnoff, Houch- 
nou, Hudsunoo, Kenai^now, Khutz-n'hu, Kootsnoo, Koutsnou, Kutznou, 
Koutznow, etc. An island near and the post-office bear the name Killis- 
noo, another form of this word. See Kenasnow and Killisnoo. 

Koourorskaia, bay; see Ko^-iirof. 

Kooyak, slough; see Kuiak. 

Korga, island; see Crow. 

Kork-pourook, river; see Knkpowruk. 

Koronotsie, island; see Coronation. 

Korovin; bay, indenting the northwestern shore of Atka, middle Aleutians. Pre- 
sumably so named by the Russians, after Ivan Korovin, captain of the 
trading vessel Trinity, in these waters in 1762. Written Korowinsky, 
Korovinskaia, etc. 

■^orovin; cape, the northern head of Korovin bay, Atka island, middle Aleutians. 
It is Korovei of Sarichef, in 1790, and usually Korovinski. 

Korovin; island, one of the Shumagin group. Named by the Russians, presmnably 
after Ivan Korovin, one of the early Russian explorers, who, in command 
of the Sv. Troitzka (Holy Trinity), explored the Aleutian islands in 1762. 
Also called Korovinskoi and Korovin. The word is from the Russian 
Korova (cow). 

Korovin; volcano (4,988 feet high), on the north end of Atka, middle Aleutians. 
Called Korovinskaia by Lutke about 1830. 

Korovinski; deserted native village on Korovin bay, Atka island, middle Aleutians. 
Lutke calls it Nikolskoi. The village now appears to be abandoned, the 
natives having removed to Nazan bay, across the island. 

Kosciusko; island, in the northwestern part of Prince of Wales archipelago. So 
named by Dall in 1879. 

Koserefski; village, on the left bank of the Yukon, near the mouth of Shageluk 
slough. Called Leather village by Dall, 1866, who reports this to be the 
Russian usage. Has appeared on various maps as Koserefski, Kosyrof, 
Kozerevsky, Kozyrof, etc. Holy Cross Mission is at or near this i^lace. 

Koserefsky; post-office, at Koserefski, on the Yukon, established in September, 
1899. 

Koshigin, bay; see Kashega. 

Koshotok, creek; see Koksuktapaga. 

Kostromitinof ; cape, forming the eastern point of entrance to Danger bay, on the 
southern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak group. So named by :Murashef 
in 1839-40. It is a Russian family name. The U. S. court interpreter at 
Sitka at the present time is George Kostrometinoff. 

Kosyrof, \dllage; see Koserefski. 



Kut— Key. 



250 [Buix. 1S7 



Kohlbibil, river; see Kateel. 

h'litiliiul, cape; see Kettle. 

K'litfuxok; liarl)or. The anchorage at east end i)f KiUisnoo ( Kenasnow of Meade) island 
was so called by Meade in 1869. Has also been called Koteosok creek. 
The name appears to be obsolete. 

Kiitcotiok, island; see KiUisnoo. 

Kotlik; Eskimo village (population 31 in 1890), at the mouth of Kotlik river. An 
Eskimo name which, according to Nelson, means breeches. It was, in 1878, 
the fur-trading station for the district. 8o named to designate the junction 
of two small streams. 

Kotlik; small river, in the Yukon delta, near Pastol bay. Named Kotlik (breeches) 
by the P^skimo. 

Kotory, islands; see Pribilof. 

Kutsechekmaksh/, bay; see Kachemak. 

Kotsina; river, near Mount Wrangell, tributary to the Copper river, from the east 
in latitude 61° 30^. Native name, reported by Peters in 1899. 

Kotsokotana, river; see Buckland. 

Kotusk, mountains; see Chilkoot. 

Kotzebue; sound, on the northern shore of Seward peninsula, Arctic ocean. Dis 
covered, explored, and named by Kotzebue in August, 1816. He says. 
"In compliance with the general wish of my companions, I called this 
newly discovered sound by my own name, Kotzebue' s sound." 

Kou, island; see Kuiu. 

KoubougluikkJtli, cape; see Kubugakli. 

Kougrok, mining district, etc. ; see Kugruk. 

Koujalik, bay; see Kujulik. 

Koujulik, bay; see Kujulik. 

Kouknk, bay; see Kukak. 

Koukhat, cape; see Douglas. 

Koulagayakh, island; see Kuliugiak. 

Koulakh, lake; see Kulik. 

Koulichkow, bay; see Snipe. 

Koulitzkoff, rock; see Kulichkof. 

Koulugmid, cape; see Kuliuk. 

Koumloun, cape; see Kumliun. 

Koittznow, archipelago, etc. ; see Kootzuahoo. 

Kovrizhka; cape, forming the north head of Makushin bay, on the northwestern 
shore of Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Sarichef, 1792, called it Hatan, per- 
haps from the Russian word hat (sea wall or dam), and the Russian Hydro- 
graphic charts have Hattan. Veniaminof calls it Ermoshkinskie and 
applies the name Kovrizhka to another point 12 miles farther south. It 
is Makushin cajx (not Makushin point) of the Fish Commission, 1888. 
Kovrizhka is Russian for a small loaf or gingerbread cake. 

Kovurof ; bay, indenting the northern shore of Atka, middle Aleutians. So named 
by Ingenstrem or Lutke about 1830. Lutke calls it Koourovskaia. Has 
also been called Kovurova. 

Eowak; river, tributary to Hotham inlet, Kotzebue sound. An Eskimo word, long 
in use and variously spelled Kooak, Koowak, Kowuk. According to 
Spurr it is Kubuk or Kuvuk, meaning great river. According to Allen it 
is Holooatna or Kowak river. It has also been called Putnam or Kowak 
river. 

Kvw-e-vok, village; see Kaviruk. 

Koyana; creek, west of Golofnin sound, Seward peninsula. Name from Barnard, 
1900. 



BAKER,] 251 Koy-Kri. 

Koyuk; river, tributary to the head of Norton bay, Norton sound. An Eskimo 
name, given by Tebenkof as Kvieguk, by the Western Union Telegraph 
Expedition map as Koikpak (river big), by the Seward map of 1867 as 
Koipak, and since then as Kayuk, Koyuk, Kuyuk, etc. As here used this 
name appUes also to what has been called the Kanguksuk or Left Fork 
of the Kviguk (Koyuk). According to Brooks, 1900, this river is now 
locally known as Koyuk. 
Koyukuk; mountain, near the mouth of the Koyuknk river. Native name pub- 
lished by the Coast Survey in 1884. 
Koyukuk; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, a little above Nulato. 
Native name, reported by the Russians as Kuiuk and by the Western 
Union Telegraph Expedition, 1867, as Coyukuk. On Coast Survey maps 
called Kouiak, Koyoukuk, and Koyukuk. 
Kozerevsky, village; see Koserefski and Holy Cross Mission. 
Kozlan, rock or shoal; see Oozian. 
Kozyruf, village; see Koserefski. 
Krainie, cape; see Last. 
Krallegak, village; see Kialagak. 
Kramoi, cape; see Red. 
Krasnoi Ribi, islets, etc.; see Redfish. 
Krasnoriechnoi, cape; see Red River. 

Krenitzin; cape, the western end of Alaska peninsula, the northeast point of 
entrance to Isanotski strait. Named by Lutke, 1828, presumably after 
Peter Kuzmich Krenitzin, who explored in the Aleutian islands in 
1768-69. Variously written Krenitsyn, Krenitsine, Krenitsyn, etc. 
Krenitzin; group of islands, between Unalaska and Unimak, eastern Aleutians. 
So called by Tebenkof, prior to 1836, presumably after Capt. Peter Kuzmich 
Krenitzin, who explored in this region in 1768. The principal islands of 
this group are Aektok, Akun, Akutan, Avatanak, Tigalda, Ugamak, and 
Unalga. 
Kresta, cape; see Northwest Shoulder. 
Kresta; point, at south end of Krestof island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Kresta (cross) by Vasilief in 1833. 
Kresta, sound; see Cross. 
Krestof, bay; see Winter anchorage. 
Krestof; island, north of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Krestof 

(cross) by the Russians. Krestof is a Russian family name. 
Krestof; mountain, on Krestof island, north of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Krestofskaia (cross) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Krestof; port, indenting the eastern shore of Kruzof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Called Mielkoi (shoal) bay by Vasilief in 1809. Also called 
Krestof (cross) very early by the Russians. 
Krestof; sound, between Krestof, Kruzof, and Partofshikof islands, just north of 
Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So designated in recent Coast Sur- 
vey publications. It constitutes a part of what Portlock, in 1787, called 
Hayward strait. It was called Krestof (cross) by Vasilief in 1833. Vasi- 
lief, sr., in 1809, applied the name Krestof to what is here called Olga 
strait. See Hayward and Olga. 
Krestof skoi, island; see Guide. 
Kripniyuk, river; see Black. 
Kripniyukamiut, village; see Kipniak. 

Krischa; ridge, south of the Takhini river, near Chilkat inlet, Lynn canal, south- 
eastern Alaska. Native name, as reported 1 )y the Krause brothers in 1882. 
Krissey, island; see Rat. 



Krl— Kiia. 



252 [Bi-Li.. 1S7. 



Kritskoi; island nuv of tlio Kudol^in inland!-:, on the northern shore of Alaska 
ptMiinsnla. So named by Lutke, in 1828, who says that this island was 
i-rroneously called I'Ue aux Loups (wolf) on his Chart XIV. 

Kriroi. island; see Crooked. 

Kriwoi; island, in Yakntat bay, southeastern Alaska. Named Kriwoi (crooked) by 
Tebenkof in 1849. Also written Krivoi. Has also been called Crooked 
island. 

Krogh; lake, in southern part of Etolin island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Snow in 1886. 

KrotaJiini; pass, between the valley of the Alsek and Chilkat rivers. Name 
published in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 

Krotahini; river, tributary to the Alsek river, southeastern Alaska. Native name, 
reported l)y the Krause brothers, in 1882, as Krotahini, i. e., Krota river. 

Kroto; Indian village, on the right bank of the Sushitna, 33 miles above its mouth. 
Native name, from Muldrow, 1898. 

Krugloi; island, in Peril strait, opposite Hooniah sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Krugloi (round) by Vasilief in 1833; by error, Kruoloi. 

Krugloi; islands, in Salisbury sound, near entrance to Peril strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Krugloi (round) by Vasilief in 1833. 

Knujloi, island; see Agattu. 

Krugloi, island; see Pound. 

Knt(/J(ii, islet; see Mills. 

Krugloi; point, the southernmost point of Halleck island, north of Sitka sound. 
Named Krugloi (round) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Kruscnstern, island; see Little Diomede. 

Erusenstern; promontory, constituting the northern point of entrance to Kotzebue 
sound, Arctic ocean. So named by Kotzebue in August, 1816, after 
Admiral Adam Johann von Krusenstern, of the Russian navy. Has been 
written Kruzenstern. 

iTrutoi, cape; see Steep. 

Krutoi; island, in Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. Named Krutoi (steep) by 
Tebenkof in 1849. Erroneously Krustoi. 

Krntoi, point, on the western shore of Chilkat inlet, Lynn canal, southeastern 
Alaska. Named Krutoi (steep) by Lindenberg in 1838. The name is 
obsolete. 

Kruzgamepa; river, in the Seward peninsula, flowing into the Kaviruk and thence 
to Imuruk basin. Local name, from the Eskimo ; written Kruzgamapah 
or Kruz-ga-ma-pa. Also sometimes called Pilgrim. Pronounced Krooze- 
gay-mdy-pah. 

Kruzof: island, one of the large islands of the Alexander archipelago, northwest 
of Sitka. Tebenkof, 1849, calls it by its native name, Tleekh. According 
to Grewingk (p. 93), Mount Edgecumbe was called St. Lazaro by Juan d' 
Ayala, in 1775, and the island became afterwards known as San Jacinto 
(St. Hyacinth). In 1787 Portlock named it Pitt island. Early Russian 
traders called it Sitka island. Lisianski, in 1805, named it Crooze "after 
our late Admiral" (p. 221, English edition). Grewingk, 1849, calls it 
Edgecumb or Krusow island. Kruzof (possessive of Kruze) has been 
selected and adopted, that being, in some of its variant forms of Kruse, 
Krusoff, Kruzoff, Kruzow, etc., more frequently used. 

Kri/ci, islands; see Rat. 

Kshaliuk; cape, on the northern shore of Umnak, eastern Aleutians. Native name, 
from Kuritzien, 1849. 

Kowak; Eskimo villages, on the lower part of the Kowak river, northwestern 
Alaska. Rei)orted by Petrof, 1880, as Kooagamutes, i. e., Kuak peoples, 

Ka-uh-rn, inlet; see Woody. 



BAKER.l 253 Kua-Kiii. 

KitahriH), river; see Inaru. 

Ktil'ic'fhka, island; see Jug. 

Kubugakli; cape, the south point of entrance to Katmai bay, Shelikof strait, Alaska 
peninsula. Native name, from the Russians. Variously written Kou- 
boughakkhli, Kubugakhli, etc. 

Ki(hiil\ river; see Kowak. 

Kudiakof; islands, in front of Izembek bay, on the northern shore of Alaska penin- 
sula. Tebenkof, 1849, calls them Chimiudi, apparently a native word, the 
endingiida meaning bay and rhim possibly from chbnik, a species of marine 
fish found there. Dall, in 1882, named these islands Kudiakof, after 
Kudiakof, the surveyor, who in the autumn of 1791 was sent there from 
Unalaska in a baidarka by Captain Sarichef. He wintered on Unimak 
island, and in the following spring made a tour of the island in his 
baidarka, passing by Sannak and Deer islands. Variously written Chu- 
doekow, Khoudiakoff, Khudiakoff, etc. 

Kudobin; a string of low islands l)or(lering the north shore of Alaska peninsula from 
Port MoUer westward, of which the principal ones are Walrus, Kritskoi, 
and Moller. Called Khudobiu by Dall, in 1882, after Andrew Khudobin, 
one of the naval officers of Lutke's party. 

Kudohlii, peninsula; see Deer islet. 

Kudugnak; cape, the northern head of Nazan Imy, Atka island, middle Aleutians. 
Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Has been written Kadugnak and 
Kudugnake. 

Kuearuk; river, tributary to Fish river, from the east, north of Golofnin sound, 
Seward peninsula. Name, from the Eskimo, published in 1900. Also 
called Right fork of Fish river. 

Kugulga, island; see Tigalda. 

Kugaluk; Eskimo village, on Spafarief bay, Kotzebue sound, Seward peninsula. 
Population in 1880, 12. According to the Russians, in 1852, its name is 
Kualiug-miut, and according to Petrof, 1880, it is Kugalukmute, i. e., 
Kugaluk people. 

Kugidach-Jagutscha; see Pogromnoi volcano. 

Kugirukruk; river, tributary to the Kuzitrin river, from the north, in the central 
part of Seward peninsula. Eskimo name, from Brooks, of the Geological 
Survey, 1900. 

Kugrua; river, tributary to the Arctic ocean at the Seashore islands. Native name, 
from English naval officers during the Franklin search expedition. Always 
hitherto has been written Cogrua. According to Murdoch, Kug'ru is the 
Eskimo name of the ivMstling swan. 

Kugruk; mining district, and river, tributary to the Kuzitrin, from the north, in 
western part of Seward peninsula. Eskimo name, variously written 
Koogrock, Kougrok, Kugrock, etc., from Barnard and Brooks, 1900. 

Kugruk; river, tributary to Kotzebue sound, Seward peninsula, a little west of Cape 
Deceit. Eskimo name, from Brooks 1900. Has been written Koogroog. 

Kuguklik; river, in western Alaska, a little north of Kuskokwim bay. Eskimo 
name, from Nelson, who crossed its mouth in December, 1878. 

Kugulik, bay; see Kuzhulik. 

Kuiak; slough, about 2 miles from St. Michael canal, near St. Michael, western 
Alaska. Eskimo name, from the Coast Survey, 1898, who wrote it Kooyak. 

Kuik-anuik-puk; see Kuyikauuikpul. 

Kaikli, village; see Kwik. 

Kuilkluk; Eskimo village, on the left bank of the Kuskokwim, about 20 miles above 
Bethel. Native name, from Nelson, 1878-79, who wrote it Kuilkhloganmte, 
i. e.,Kui]klok people. Petrof gives its population, in 1880, as 75, and its 
name Kulikhlugamute in his text (p. 17) and Kuilkhlogamute on his map. 



Kiii-Kiil. 



254 [Bi'Li..i87. 



Kiiivild, pass; sco Kwemelnk. 

Kuiu; island, diu' of tlio largtMslands of tlie Alexander archipelago. Native name, 

obtained by the Russians. Has also been called Kou island. 
KiiiiiL, river; see Koyukuk. 
Kuiukta; bay, northeast of Mitrofania island, indenting the southern shore of 

Alaska peninsula. Native name, from the Russians. 
Kujulik; bay, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, immediately east of 

Chignik bay. Native name, from the Russians. Pronounced Kee-zhu- 

lik. Has also been written Kaiulik, Koujalik, Kugulik, etc. 
Kuka, rock; see Signals (The). 
Kukak; liay, west of Afognak, on the northern shore of Shelikof strait. Native 

name, from early Russian explorers. Sometimes written Koukak. Langs- 

dorf, ISlo, wrote it as above, Kukak. 
Kukak; Indian village, on Kukak bay. Lutke, 1835, has Koukak bay and village. 
Kukistan; cape, on the eastern shore of Cook inlet. Called Dolgoi (long) or 

Kukis-Tan by Wosnesenski about 1840. Native name. The termination 

tan appears to mean point or cape. 
Kiikkriu, harbor; see Portlock. 
Kuklax; lake, near the water portage, between the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. 

Raymond, in 1869, reported its native name as Kuklaxlekuhta. I have 

follow-ed him part way and called it Kuklax. 
Kukluktuk; Eskimo village, on the left bank of the Kuskokwim river, about 30 

miles below Kolmakof. Name from Petrof, 1880, who writes it Kokh- 

lokhtokhpagamute. 
Kukpowruk; river, tributary to the Arctic ocean, between Cape Lisburne and Icy 

cape. Eskimo name, i^ublished, in 1890, as Kookpoowrook and Kook- 

powrook. Kuk in the dialect of the northwestern Eskimo means river. 

It is probable that Kukpaurungmiut of the Eleventh Census refers to 

some village or people near or on this river. 
Kukpuk; river, tributary to Marryat inlet, near Point Hope, Arctic ocean. Eskimo 

name, published by the Coast Survey, in 1890, as Kookpuk (river big). 
Kukuliak; native village, on the northern shore of St. Lawrence island, Bering sea. 

Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. 
Knkuyukvk. Raymond, 1869, gives this as the name of a small river tributary to the 

Yukon, from the south, about a dozen miles above the mouth of the Koyu- 
kuk. Name not found elsewhere. 
Kukmk, cape; see Douglas. 
Kulak; point, the southern point of entrance to Tanaga bay, Tanaga island, middle 

Aleutians. Aleut name, from Tebenkof, 1849, who indicates the initial K 

as very hard. His spelling has been transliterated Kchulach, or, as it 

might be, Kkhulakh. 
Kiilgink, island; see Kalgin. 
Kuliak; cape, west of Afognak island, on northern shore of Shelikof strait. Native 

name, from the Russians, who write it Kuliak and Kuliakuiak. 
KiiHcharak, river; see Kvichivak. 
Kidiclikof, l)ay; see Snipe. 
Kulichkof ; islet, east of Near island, in St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Kulichkof 

(snipe) by the early Russians. 
Kulichkof; islet, near the southern point of entrance to Kukak bay, Shelikof strait. 

Named Kulichkof (snipe) by Vasilief in 1831. 
Kulichkof; rock, off Burunof cape, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named 

Kulichkof (snipe) by Vasilief in 1809. Has been variously written Kou- 

litzkoff, Kulichek, Kulitch, etc. 



BAKER.l 255 



Kul-Kiin. 



Kulik; lake, in the water portage between the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. 
Called KuUik by Tikhmenief, in 1861, and Koulakh by Raymond, in 1869. 
Spurr and Post, who passed here, in 1898, make no mention of this, but 
call a lake in this vicinity Oknakluk. 

Kuliliak; bay, indenting the southern shore of Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Called 
by its Aleut name, Kuliliak (sorrow, anguish), by Sarichef in 1792, and 
since spelled in many ways, as Kiliuluk, Kouliliak, Kullilak, etc. 

Kuliugicl: One of the Shumagins, not identified, is so called by Veniaminof and 
Lutke. It is a native word, meaning round and rocky. Lutke writes it 
Koulagayakh. 

Kiillugmliii, cape; see Kuliuk. 

Kuliuk; cape, between Uganuk and Uyak bays, on the northern shore of Kodiak. 
Native name, from the Russians. Lisianski, 1805, shows a village here 
called Koloock. Usually called Kuliug-miut (Kuliuk people) on maps 
and written Koulugmut, Kulinyemute, Kuliugmiut, Kumelmot, Kumol- 
mot, etc. 

KhliKjrua, river; see Meade. 

Kuluk; bay, indenting the eastern shore of Adak island, Andreanof group, middle 
Aleutians. Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. Has also been written 
Khulukh. 

Kulukak; lake, draining to Kulukak 1)ay, on north shore of Bristol bay. Native 
name, from Tebenkof, 1849, who wrote it Kuliukak. Perhaps this is 
identical with Oallek lake of Spurr in 1898. 

Kulukak; small shallow^ bay, indenting the northern shore of Bristol bay, about 
35 miles northwesterly from Cape Constantine. Native name, from Teben- 
kof, 1849, who wrote it Kuliukak. Has also been written Kouloukak, 
Kouloulak, Kuliuk, Kululuk, etc. To a large oj^en bay outside this bay 
a late Coast Survey chart applies the name Kululak. 

Kulvagavik; Eskimo village, on the western side of Kuskokwim bay, Bering sea. 
Visited by Nelson in January, 1879, and its native name reported by him 
to be Koolvagavigamiut, i.e., Kulvagavik people. 

Kumelmot, cape; see Kuliuk. 

Kumisik, cape and island; see Kumlik. 

Eumlik: cape and island, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northwest of 
Sutwik island. Native name, from the Russians. Erroneously Kmnisik. 

Kumliun; cape, the northern point of entrance to Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula. 
Native name, from the Russians. Variously written Koumloun, Kum- 
lium, Kumtiak, etc. It may be identical with Foggy cape of Cook in 
1778. 

Ktimtiak, cape; see Kumliun. 

Eun; river, in the Yukon delta, tributary to the head of Scammon bay. Native 
name, written Khun by the Coast Survey in 1898. Dall, 1869, wrote it 
Kun, and says it is Kun of the Imiuit, and was named Maria Louisa by 
Captain Smith of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, al)out 1867. 

Kunaiugiuk, island; see Spectacle. 

Kunakakvak. The Russian-American Company's map of 1849 shows a native village 
of this name near Karluk, on the north shore of Kodiak. 

Kunakan, island; see Sitkalidak. 

Kungitak, cape; see Reef. 

Kungiugan. The south end of Big Koniuji island, Shumagin group, has the appear- 
ance of an island, and is by Tebenkof shown as a separate island with the 
native name Kungiugan. Dall gives the name as Kungagingan. I.utke 
calls one of the islands in the Shumagin group Kiganghym, which seems 
to be another rendering of this word. 



KUI.-K.1-. 256 [BULL.187. ] 

f 

Kung-nk, river; see Buckland. | 

Kunikakagi; island (perhaps a lump of ice now melted), in the delta of the Alsek 

river, southeastern Alaska. So called by Tebenkof in 1849 (Chart VII). 

Apparently a native name. In the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 205, footnote), 

it is spelled Kunakagi and applied to a river. 
Kunmik; cape, the northeastern point of entrance to Aniakchak bay, Alaska i)enin- | 

sula. Name published ])y the Coast Survey in 1899. j 

Kuntilluk, island; see Koniuji. 
Kunui/u-tmion. One of the Shumagin islands, not identified, is called by Sarichef 

Kunujutanany (Phillips Voyages, VI, 15) and by Lutke Kunuyou- 

Tanany, i. e., Kunuyu-feigr. 
Kitpolruia, peak; see Cupola. 
Kupreanof; harbor, between Paul and Jacob islands, off the southern shore o* 

Alaska peninsula, northeast of the Shumagins. So named by Woron- 

kofski, in 1837. 
Kupreanof; island, one of the principal islands of the Alexander archipelago. So 

named by the Russians, after Capt. Ivan Andreevich Kupreanof, who 

succeeded Wrangell, as governor of the Russian-American colonies, in 

1836. Variously spelled Kupreanoff, Kupreanov, Kupr^anow, etc. 
Kupreanof; point, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northeast of the 

Shumagins. Named Ivanof (John's) by Lutke, 1836, and afterwards 

Kupreanof by the Russians. Called Ivanoff, Ivanovsky, Kupreanoff, and 

St. John. 
Kupreanof; strait, between Kodiak and Afognak islands. Named Karluk by 

Murashef, in 1839-40, Kupreanof by the Russian-American Company's 

officers, in 1849, Sievernoi (northern) by Tebenkof , in 1849, and variously | 

called North, Northern, and Kupreanof. 
Kusawa; lake (elevation 2,700 feet), northwest of Chilkat pass, draining to lake j 

Laberge. Native name, written Kiissooa by Krause, in 1882, KussQa by 

the Coast Survey, in 1883, Kusawah by the Canadian Geological Surv^ 

in 1898. Has also been called Arkell. The above form, Kusawa, has 

been adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 
Knshti; island, one of the Siginaka group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So j 

named bv Vasilief in 1809. 

Kii^lntkrag-miut, village; see Alitak. 

Kusilvak; island, one of the outer islands of the Yukon delta. Native name. Hasi 

I 
also been written Kusalvak. I 

Kusilvak; mountain (2,449 feet high), in the Yukon delta, about 35 miles westerly 
from Andreafski. Apparently a native name, obtained by Dall, who, in 
1870, published the form Kusilvak, as above. Earlier Russian charts call 
it Ingieguk. Tebenkof calls it Ingun. 

Iviis/c't, island; see Kiska. 

Kuskok; Eskimo village, on the left bank of the lower Kuskokwim, near its mouth. 
Native name, from Nelson, 1879, who wrote Kuskogamute, i. e., Kuskok 
people. Has also been written Kuskohkagamiut, Kuskokvagamute, etc. 
Population in 1880, 24; in 1890, 115. 

Kuskokwim; bay, at mouth of the Kuskokwim river, Bering sea. Native name, 
from Ustiugof, who visited it in 1818. Variously written Kouskokviin, 
Kuskoquim, etc. The word Kuskokwim, according to missionary J. H. 
Kilbuck, is the genitive of Kuskokwik, the last syllable meaning river and 
the rest of doubtful meaning. 

Kuskokwim; river, one of the large rivers of western Alaska, south of the Yukon. 
Native name, apparently obtained by Ustiugof, in 1818, and published in 
Sarichef s atlas, 1826. Variously spelled. 



BAKER.] 257 



KUB— Kut. 



t Kuskovak; Eskimo village, on the right hank of the Kuskokwiiu river, ni^ar its 

Miouth. Name from Nelson, mIio j.assed near it in January, ]S7!», and 

who writes it Kuskovakh. 
Kuskulana; glacier, on the southwestern slope of Mount Elackhurn. So nameil hy 

Cienline in 1900. 
Kuskulana; pass, hetween the Chokosna and Kuskulana rivers. Ho named hy 

Sehrader in 1900. 
Kuskulana; river, trihutary to the Chitina river, from the east, and draining from 

Kuskulana glacier. Native name, from Rohn, 1899. Kuskulana means 

Kuskula river. 
Kuslina; creek, trihutary to the C'opper river, from the east, hetween the mouths 

of the Kotsina and Cheshnina rivers. Native name, from Schrader, 1900. 
Kit.ssllqif, cajjc; see Kasilof. 
A'«woo(/, lake; see Kusawa. 
Kunsouarhr(iw<(th'mi. The Krause hrothers, 1882, report this to he the native <lescrip- 

tion of the stream which drains Kusawa lake, southeastern Alaska. See 

also East. 
Kustatan; Indian village (population (55 in 1880), on shore of Redou])t hay, Cook 

inlet. Native name, reported hy Petrof in 1880. The last syllable, tan, 

means jtoint or cape. 
Kussua, river; see Kusawa. 

Kutchuma; group of islands, in northeastern part of Sitka sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Russian naval officers, in 1809, called this group Boidarkin, which 

has also appeared as Boidarka. Have also been called Kutchiuma. It is 

a I'orruption of Kuchumof, a Russian family name. 
Kutenige; creek, tril)utary to Jockeach river, Chilkat region, southeastern Alaska. 

Native name, reported by the Krause brothers, in 1882, and by them written 

Kutenige. 
Kiithtlildtnu, river; see Gisaaa. 
Kutkan; island, in Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by the Russians, after a famous Indian chief who freed his slaves and 

embraced Christianity. Has also been written Kuch-kan and Kukh-kan. 

It has also been called Garden, Gull, Popof, and Stanovoi (rocky). The 

last-named was given by Vasilief in 1809. 
Kutkwutlu; Indian village, on the left bank of the Chilkat river, near its moutii, 

southeastern Alaska. Katkwaltu or Kut-kwutlu is said to mean place of 

gulls. A Presbyterian missionary station called Willard (afterwards 

changed to Haines) was established at this village in 1881. 
Knllik, village and river; see Kotlik. 
Kiit/iKtl, island; see South. 
Kutmuknuk; channel, leading into the Kwemeluk pass, in the Yukon delta. 

Eskimo name, from the Coast Survey, 1898. 
Kiilsi-h-i((:il--7tmtsrlia, lake; see Salaniatof. 
Kiitsrli-lschchnm)Kt. Grewingk, 1850, following Wosnesenski, 1840, gives this as the 

native designation of a small lake on Kenai peninsula, near KaA Foreland. 

Perhaps Kutsch means lake, and the rest of this might be prouounivd 

Shamna. 
Katten. Dall, writing in 1869, says there is a native settlement in the Yukon delta, 

on the Kun river, about 10 miles from the head of Scanunon bay, known 

as Kiittennuit (Kutten people). 
Kut-tuk-ivah, island; see Tongass. 
Kutul; native village, on the right bank of the Yukon, about 50 miles above Anvik. 

Name from Nelson, 1878-79, who writes it Khutulkakat, i. e., Kutul river, 
Kidulnakt, river; see Kaiyuh. 

Bull. 187—01 17 



Kllt-Kwi. 



258 



Kutuzof; ra|u'. nii tin' iiurtlu-ni .shore of Alaska pt'iiiii.siila, a little eant of I'ort 
Moller. xVaiued Kutuzova (Kutuzof's) by Liitke, in 1828, pre.snma))Iy 
lifter Ilafreiueister's ship, the Kntuzof. This cape and the one next east of 
it, Seniavini", iiave sometimes l)een confounded on the charts. It lias 
been variously spelled Koutousoff, Kutuzoff, etc. 

Knuk, river; see Mungoark. 

Kuiiikniimkjml. Raymond, 18H9, gives this as tlie native name of an Eskimo village 
on the right bank of the Yukon a little below Koserefski. Village 
an<l name appear to be obst)lete. Perhaps it should have been written 
Kuik-anuik-puk. 

Kiti/t(k, river; see Koyuk. 

Kii)iitki(k; lakes, near the south bank of the Yukon, drained by the Kukuyukuk 
river. Name from Raymond, 1869. Not found on recent maps. 

Kuyuyukak; i'ai)e, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northeast of Sutwik 
island. Native name, published by the Coast Survey m 1899. 

Kuzitrin; river, in the Seward peninsula, flowing westward to Kaviruk and through 
this to Imuruk basin. Eskimo name, from Brooks, of the Geological Sur- 
vey, 1900. Locally written Koosetrien. 

Kvichak; village, and river, draining from Iliamna lake to Bristol bay. Native 
name, reported by the early Russians. Lutke, writing in 1828, says: 
"Kvitchak (river), called by Cook Bristol." 

Kvichivak; river, between the Kuskokwim and Yukon rivers, tributary to the 
Kuskokwim, from the west. Name from Nelson, who ti'aveled along this 
sluggish stream in January, 1879, which he says is by the natives called 
Kivvichavak. Apparently identical with Ankitaktuk creek of Spurr and 
Post, of the Geological Survey, in 1898, who obtained this name from 
missionary J. H. Kilbuck. Tlkhmenief, 1861, calls it Kvinchagak. Has 
also heen called Kulichavak and Kulichivak. 

KrirlijHtk, river; see Yukon. 

Krieguk, river; see Koyuk. 

Kvigatluk; Eskimo village, in the Big Lake country, Ijetween the Yukon and 
and Kuskokwim. Nelson, in 1879, passed near it and reports its name to 
he Kvigathlogamute, i. e., Kvigatluk people. 

Kviguk; Eskimo village, on north shore of Norton bay, at mouth of the Kviguk 
river. Eskimo name, from the Russians. Tlkhmenief, 1861, has Kvieg- 
miut and Kvieguk-miut, i. e., Kviguk people. 

Kvikak; Eskimo village, on right bank of the Yukon, al)out 30 miles above Anvik. 
Native name, from Nelson, 1878-79, who wrote it Kvikhagamute, i. e., 
Kvikak people. 

KrikJi, river; see Kwik. 

KrlriHiiigak, river; see Kvichivak. 

Kvingak; suiall stream, tributary to the head of Norton bay, Norton sound. 
Eskimo name, from Tebenkof, 1849. It ajipears to be identical with 
Kvienkak of Tlkhmenief, 1861. 

Kruveren, tract and river; see Kaviruk. 

KtvahteeUiIi, iIvit; see Katete. 

Kirrrk, arm, etc.; see Knik. 

Kweleluk; Eskimo village, in the Kuskokwim district, given in the Eleventh 
Census, 1890 (j). 164), as (^lelelochamiut, i. e., Kwelelok people. I'opnla- 
tion in 1890, 112. Location unknown. 

Kwemeluk; pass, in tlie Yukon delta. Native name, from the Coast Survey in 
1S98. The Russians wrote it Kuimla. 

Kirirlilliiiiil, river; see Kwikli. 



259 



Kwi— Kwi. 



Kwik; Kiskimo village, on the western side of Bald Head, Ncrtdu hay, Norton 

sound. On a recent map called Isaacs, from the name of a i)erson living 

there. 
Kwik; Eskimo village, northeast of Bald Head, on the northern shore of Norton 

hay, Norton sound. Called Kvikh by Petrof, 1880. On a late map called 

Kuikli. 
Kwik; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Kuskokwim, about 10 miles above 

Bethel. Nelson, 1878-79, reports its native name to l)e Kwigamute, i. e., 

river people. Petrof, 1880, follows this spelling. 8purr and Post in 1898, 

following missionary Kilbuck, write Kwegamut. 
Kwik; Eskimo village, on the southern shore of Nunivak island. Native name, 

from the Eleventh Census, which spells it Kweegamute on the map and 

Kwigamiut in the text (p. 164). 
Kwik; river, flowing from the Malaspina glacier into Yakutat bay, southeastern 

Alaska. So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Kwik is the Eskimo word for 

river. Has also been called the Grand Wash. 
Kwik; river, tributary to north shore of Norton bay,. Seward peninsular. Called 
L Kuik by Peters in 1900. It is the Eskimo word for river. Earlier maps 

^ show a village here called Kvikh. 

Kwik. The Eskimo name for river. (Singular Kwik, dual Kweek, plural Kweet. ) 
Kwikak; Eskimo village, on the left (? right) bank of the Kuskokwim, about 25 

miles below Kalchagaumt. It is apparently identical with Kwigalogamute 

of Petrof in 1880. Missionary Kilbuck, according to Spurr, 1898, writes it 

C^ue^kagamut, and it was pul)lished by the Geological Survey as Kwika- 

ganmt, i. e. , Kwikak people. 
Kwikak; Eskimo village, on the outer coast in the Yukon delta, a little south of the 

t mouth of Black river. Native name, from the Coast Survey, 1898, who 

give it as Kwikagamiut. 

Kwikli; river, tributary to the Kuskokwim, from the east, a little above Bethel. 
Its Eskimo name, according to Spurr and Post, who obtained it from mis- 
sionary J. H. Kilbuck, in 1898, is Kwiklimut, i. e., Kwikli people. 

Kwikluak; pass, in the Yukon delta, one of the outlets of the Yukon river. Eskimo 
name. On late Coast Survey charts called Kwiklok. Tebenkof, 1849, 
has Kwikliuak and Kwikltak, and Raymond, 1869, called it American Mouth. 

Kwikpak; pass, one of the mouths of the Yukon river. Eskimo name. Kwik 
means river (dual Kweek, plural Kweet) and puk means Jiig, large. Vari- 
ously written Kwikhpak, Kwikhsak, etc. 

Kirif:]n(l\ river; see Yukon. 

Kwiktalik; mountain (1,200 feet high), on Seward i)eninsula, between (iolofnin and 
Norton bays, north shore of Norton sound. Native name, from Peters, 
1900. Also written Quiktalik. 

Kwiria, river; see Kanektok. 

Kwinak; P'skimo village, on the eastern shore of Kuskokwim bay, at the inouth of 
the Kwinak or Kanektok river, Bering sea. So given by Sarichef, 1826, 
and Tebenkof, 1849. Petrof, 1880, writes it Quinehahanmte, or, omitting^ 
the termination 7/H(?e, meaning ^jrr^^^A', it would be Quene-it-ak. Varicnisly 
written Quinhagamute, Quinehaha, etc. 

Kwiniuk; mountain, Seward peninsula. Native name, from the prospectors, who 
write it Quinnehuk. 

Kwiniuk; river, east of Golofnin bay and tributary to north shon- of Norton bay. 
Eskimo name, written Quinnehuk by the prospectors. 

Kwisnon. Raymond, 1869, shows a western tributary of the Tozi river called Quisnon. 
Name not found elsewhere. 



K\«i— Liik. 



260 [BULL. 187. 



Kwiyadik; iTwk, trilmtaiy to Knskokwiin river, just si.iitli nf Kancktok river, 

western Alaska. Native name, ol)tained by Si)iirr and Post, of tliedeo- 

lofjieal Snrve\', in 1SW8, and by them written Qniyaidik. 
Ki/ak, island: see Kayak. 
Ki/i/ntu; eape; see IMuzon. 
Ktiijmil, cape; see Prince of Wales. 
Kifsko, harbor, etc.; see Kiska. 
Ki/lltk; island; see Sonth. 
Lab; reef, between Cat and Mary is-lands, Revillagisedo channel, Alexander archi- 

l)elajio. Name published in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 98) . 
Labandera; reef, in the entrance to Port Santa Cm/, 8uemez islan<l. Prince of 

Wales archipelago. Named La Labandera (the washer-woman) by 

INIanrelie and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Labouchere; bay, indenting the northeastern coast of Prince of Wales island, and 

opening into Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by the trad- 
ers, after the Hudson Bay Company steamer Labouchere. Has also been 

called a port and a harbor. 
Labouchere, bay; see Highfield anchorage. 
Labouchere, harbor; see Pyramid. 
Labouchere ; island, at entrance to Labouchere bay, Sumner strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Called Ship island by Helm in 1886. 
LalxiKcliere, island; see Pyramid. 
Labouchere ; mount, west of Chilkat inlet, near Pyramid harbor, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by Meade, in 1869, after the Hudson Bay Company's 

steamer Labouchere, which in turn was named after a Mr. Labouchere, of 

the Hudson Bay Company. 
L<i Chaussee. From the northern point of entrance to Lituya bay there extends a 

spit called by La Perouse la. chaussee (the road). On the English edition 

of La Perouse's chart (No. 19) this is designated as "Road to the Fishery 

& INIorai ' ' ( burial i>lace ) . 
Lachimi, river; see Lakina. 
Ladds; fishing station, at mouth of the (_!huitna river, near head of Cook inlet. 

Apparently a local name, in use in 1895. It is at or near the site of an 

Indian village called Chuitna. 
Ladue; creek, tributary to the White river, from the west, near longitude 140°. 

Presumably named after a prospector. La Due, who wintered on the Yukon I 

in 1884-85. ™ 

Ladronrx, Islas de; see Robber. 
Lagoon; point, on the northern shore of Alaska peninsula, a little west of Port Mol- 

ler. So named byDall in 1882. Possibly identical with Rozhnof of Lutke 

in 1828. 
La Grand Plateau; see Grand Plateau. 
Laida. This is a Kamchatkan word meaning shoal, and was adopted by the Russians 

in the American possessions. 
f,niiluiiioj, point; see Anchor. 
I.'ijii. An islet with rocks about it near San Fernando island, Bucareli l)ay. Prince 

of Wales archipelago, was named by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779 

la Laja (the thin fiat stone). 
Lake; creek, tributary to Chandlar river, from the east, near longitude 148° 'MY. 

Presumably a descriptive name, from Schrader, 1899. 
Lake; hill, on St. l*aul island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. Presumably a local name, 

l)ublished ))y the Coast Survey in 1875. 
Lake, point; see Aiak. 



2(U 



I^ak— lias. 



Lake Bay; i?mall fishing village, on the northeastern shore of Prince of Wales island, 
Alexander archipelago). It is near Stevenson island, in Kashevarof pas- 
sage. So called in the Eleventh Census, 1890. 

Lakina; river, tributary to the Chitina river, from the north, near longitude 143°. 
Native name, from Rohn, 1899, who wrote it Lachina. Pronounced 
Liik-i-nu. 

Lancashire; rocks, on the southern shore of Kachemak bay. Cook inlet. Named 
by Dall, in 1880, after the Knglish yacht Lanatnldrc Witch (Sir Thomas 
Hesketh, owner), which visited Cook inlet that year. 

Landlocked; bay, on the northeastern shore of Prince William sou7id. Local 
descriptive name, published, in 1898, by the Geological Survey. 

Landmark; conspicuous gai> in the foothills of the Alaskan mountains, near the 
head of Delta river, longitude 146°. Descriptive name, by Mendenhall, of 
the Geological Survey, in 1898. 

Landslip; jjoint, on the western shore of Portland canal, near its head. Descrijnive 
name, given by Pender in 1868. 

Lane; islet, in Danger passage, l)etween Mary and Duke islands, Gravina group, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

L<iuiii, caiH'; see Lapin. 

La Perouse; glacier, in the southern part of the St. Elias alps. So named by Dall, 
in 1874, after J. F. G. de La Perouse. 

La Perouse; mountain (10,740 feet high), in southern part of the St. Elias a]i)S. 
S(^ named by Dall, in 1874, after Jean Francois de Galaup de la Perouse, the 
celebrated and unfortunate French navigator, who explored this coast in 
1786. 

Lapin; cape, forming the eastern head of Urilia bay, on northern shore of Unimak, 
eastern Aleutians. Tebenkof called this Lanin, Init it has usually ))een 
written on American charts Lapin. Capt. Ivan Savich Lapin was a fur 
trader in this region, in 1 762, and is an authority on the early history of the 
Aleutian islands. Perhaps the name Lanin is derived from the Russian 
word Ian (deer). On most modern charts the name is misplaced, being 
applied to Mordvinof and Cave. 

Larch; bay, near the south end of Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Listvinichnaia (larch) by the Russians. 

Large; island, in Nazan bay, Atka, middle Aleutians. Named Bolshoi (large) 
by the Russians. Erroneously Bomchoi. 

Large, Isle du; see Navy. 

Larger or (treat Am), W^hale bay; see Great arm. 

Larraiila, islet or reef; see Larzatita. 

Larsen; bay. indenting the western shore of Uyak bay, on nortiiern shore of 
Kodiak. So called in the Eleventh Census, 1890. IVIoser, 1899, has 
Larsen (Uyak) bay. 

Larzatita; islet or reef, in San Christoval channel, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales 
archipelago, called by Maurelleand Quadra, in 1775-1779, Larzatita, accord- 
ing to the English edition of plate 26 in the plates accompanying La 
Perouse's voyage. On the old Russian copy of this it is Larratita. 

Las Aniinax, island and point; see Animas. 

Lascano; islands. This name appears to have l>een api)lied by the Spaniards, in 
1788, to some of the islets in Unimak pass. 

Las Puercas, islets; see Sows (The). 

Las Ranas, islets and rocks; see Frogs (The). 

Last; cape, on the northern shore of Afognak bay, near mouth of .\fognak river. 
Named Krainie (the very last) by Murashef in 183!»-40. Near l)y he lias 
Posliedni (last) cape. 



liHH— Lra. 



'20)2 [mu.i.. 1.S7. 



Last Chance; creek, just south of Tort Clarence, Seward peninsula. Name from 
Harnard, litOO. 

Last Chance; creek, tributary to the Snake river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Last Chance; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the east, near Eagle. Pros- 
pectors' name, published by the Geological Survey in 1899. 

Last Timber; cape, on the southern shore of Raspberry island, Kujjreanof strait, 
Kodiak grouj). The des(Tiptive name Posliednaho liesy (last of the 
woods) was given by Murashef in 1889-40. 

Late; jjoint, the south jioint of Windfall island, Seymour canal, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Latouche; island, in the southwestern part of Prince William sound. So called by 
\'ancouver in his atlas, 1798. Portlock, 1787, called it Foot island, pos- 
sibly from a fancied resemblance to a human foot. The native name is 
reported to be Klikaklik or Klikaklit, also spelled Khlikakhlik. 

Latouche; ])oint, the eastern point of entrance to Disenchantment bay, Yakutat 
bay, southeastern Alaska. Named Latouche by Puget, of Vancouver's 
party, in 1794. It was called Punta de la Esperanza (hope point) by 
Alalaspina, in 1791, perhaps in allusion to his hope of here finding the 
famous Northwest passage. 

Lauder; ])oint, the southern point of entrance to Whale bay, Baranof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Dixon in 1787. Has also been called 
South point. 

Lauf ; islands, in Rodman bay, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So named liy 
Moore in 1895. 

Launch; cove, at Southern rapids. Peril strait, Baranof Lsland, Alexander arcliip( 1- 
ago. So called by Coghlan in 1884. 

Laura; mountain (7,527 feet high), on the mainland, east of the Stikine river. 
Name published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Luurmla , (;reek; see Moss. 

Lava; islet, near Kruzof island, in entrance to Sitka sound, Alexander archii)elago. 
■^o na'.ned by Vasilief in 1809. 

Lavinia; point, on the northwestern shore of Chichagof island, Cross sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 

Lay; point, on the Arctic coast, between Cape Lisburne and Icy cape. So named by 
Beechey, in 1826, after George Tradescant Lay, the naturalist of his expe- 
dition. On Tikhmenief's map this is called Sloistie (in layers). 

Lazaref ; cape, on the southeastern shore of Unimak island, eastern Aleutians. So 
named by Lutke, in 1828, who says that Kudiakof, in 1791, reported its 
native name as Touliouliaga. 

Lazaro; mountain (1,767 feet high), on the south end of Duke island, Dixon entrance. 
Named St. Lazaro by Douglas in June, 1789. Usage has shortened the 
name to Lazaro. 

Leader; island, in the entrance to Ivanof bay, Alaska peninsula. Named Provoclnik 
(leader) by Woronkofski in 1837. 

Leading; point, on Prince of Whales island, in southeastern part of Cordova bay, 
Alexander archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Liit(l'(ii<i, point; see Harrison. 

Leadville; mountain (1,797 feet high), near Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

League; j)oint, on the mainland, Stephens passage, Alexander archiiielago. So 
named by Meade in 1868. 

Leather, village; see Koserefski. 



i 



BAKER.] 263 Liob— L,eii. 

Lebarge; river, tributary to the Yukon river, from the north, about 40 miles above 
the moutli of the Koyukuk. So named by Dall, in 1869, after his friend 
and companion, familiarly called Mike Lebarge. Its native name, according 
to Dall, is Miskuntl'kakat. 

LebedevsJci, islands; see Pribilof. 

Lebiazhe, lake; see Swan. 

Le Conte; bay, in the mainland, east of Mitkof island, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by Thomas, in 1887, presumably after Joseph Le Conte, professor 
of geology in the University of California. Has also been written Leconte. 

Le Conte; glacier, at head of Le Conte bay, southeastern Alaska. So named by 
Thomas, in 1887, presumably after Prof. Joseph Le Conte. Has also been 
written Leconte. 

Ledge; islet, in Funter bay. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Mansfield in 1890. 

Ledge; point, on the mainland, the south point of entrance to "Walker cove, Behm 
canal. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Ledge; point, the southwestern point of entrance to Nakat inlet, southeastern 
Alaska. Descriptive name given l)y Nichols in 1883. 

Ledlanui, cape; see Icy. 

Leduc; river, on the mainland, tributary to the Chickamin river, southeastern Alaska. 
Name pul)lished by the Coast Survey in 1898. Also written Le Due. 

Lees; i)oint, the eastern point of entrance to Anchor j^assage, Behm canal, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1793. 

Leesia, bay; see Aleutkina. 

Leesqffskaia, bay; see Aleutkina. 

Leesy, cape and islet; see Fox. 

Left; cape, the western head of Kiliuda bay, Kodiak. Named Lievoi (left hand) 
by the Eussians. It is on the left hand as one enters the bay. 

Leg; island, west from Latouche island. Prince William sound. So named l)y Dixon 
in 1787. 

Legma; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Vasilief in 1809. Legma is Aleut for culm. 

Leila; small lake, near the headwaters of the Matanuska river, aljout latitude 62°. 
So named by Glenn in 1898. 

Leisnoi, island; see Liesnoi. 

Lemesurier; island, near entrance to Glacier bay, Icy strait, southeastern Alaska. 
So named by Dall, in 1879, after the officer who commanded one of Van- 
couver's boats during the exploration and survey of Cross sound in 1794. 

Lemesurier; point, at the junction of Ernest sound and Clarence strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Mr. Le Mesurier, a mem- 
ber of his party. Sometimes it has been written Mesurier. 

Lemly; rock and group of rocks, off Lemesurier point, at the junction of Ernest 
sound and Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Clover, 
in 1885, presumably after Capt. Samuel Conrad Lemly, Judge-Advocate- 
General, U. S. N. Erroneously Lemley. 

Lemon; point, the north point of entrance to Port McArthur, Kuiu island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Helm in 1886. 

Lena; cove, indenting the mainland, in Favorite channel, Lynn canal, southeastern 
Alaska. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1893. 

Lena; point, on the mainland, near southern entrance to Favorite channel, Stei)hens 
passage, southeastern Alaska. So named by Beardslee in 1880. 

Lenard; harbor, in Cold bay, near Belkofski, Alaska peninsula. Apparently so 
named l)v the Fish Commission in 1888. 



ItOii— Liia. 



2 A 4 [bui,t,.1S7. 



Lenard; sunki'ii mck, Houtlnvcstof Saniwik island. So named ))y the Fisli Com- 
mission in ISSS. 

Lennan; shoal, off south i>n<l of Dol^'oi island, near Belkofski. So named by Dall 
inlSSO. 

Lennox; island, near the eastern })()iiit of entrance to Izembek l)ay, Alaska penin- 
sula. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Leo; aucliorafje, in Fortuna strait atsoutli end of Chirhau;of island, Alexander archi- 
nelajro. Surveyed and so named by Cojrhlan, in 1884, ])resumably after 
the schooner Ijeo. 

Leontovich; cajie, tiie western point of entrance to Gerstle bay, on north shore of 
Alaska })eninsula,'l)et\veen Port MoUer and Izembek bay. Named by 
Lutke, in 1828, after Lieut. Alexander Leontovich, I. N., a member of his 
jiarty. Ha^ also been called Leon cape and Starling cape. 

Leroy; creek, tributary to Bluestone river, from the south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Lcxhiff, cupe; see Lieskof. 

Lcxiioi, islet; see Liesnoi. 

Lcmr or Small arvi, Whale bay; see Small arm. 

Letnikof; cove, on the eastern shore of Chilkat inlet, Lynn canal, sontlieastern 
Alaska. So named by Lindenberg in 1838. 

Lelushkwln, village; see Old Kootznahoo. 

Levashef; port or har1)or, at head of Captains bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. 
Capt.-Lieut. Michael Levashef wintered here, September 18, 1768, to June 
6, 1769, and, after his vessel, called the place St. Paul harbor. In 1790, 
Sarichef surveyed in this locality, and, after Levashef, named this jilace 
Captains harbor. Krusenstern, in 1827, says of this place that it is i)r( )perly 
called Captains, but to distinguish it from others it will be convenient to 
call it Port Levacheff. It has generally been called Captains harbor. 

Level; island, at entrance to Duncan canal, Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Descriptive name, given ])y Snow in 1886. At high water it becomes two 
islands. 

Level; mountain, on Revillagigedo island, near Tongass narrows, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Lewes; river, one of the affluents of the upper Yukon. In 1847 or 1848 Robert 
Campbell, of the Hudson Bay Company, descended this river and named 
it Lewes. Present usage appears to regard the Yukon as beginning at 
the junction of the Lewes and Pelly rivers at Fort Selkirk. Often 
written Lewis. The form Lewes has been adopted by the Canadian 
Board on Geographic Names. 

Lewis; cape, on the Arctic coast, between Point Hope and Cape Lisburne. So 
named by Beechey, in 1826, presumably after Mr. Charles Lewis, who 
accompanied him as a volunteer. 

Lewis; low islet, west from Alava point, Revillagigedo channel, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Apparently so named by local pilots. Near it is Walker island, 
and there has l>een confusion between these names. Called Side island 
in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 77). 

Lewis; point, on Gravina island, Tongass narrows, Alexander archipelago. Named, 
presumably, by local pilots about 1880. 

Len-h, river; see I^wes. 

Lewis; reef, off Lewis point, Tongass narrows, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by local pilots. 

Lgun, rock; see Liar. 

Lhik'ik, bay; see Three Saints. 



IIAKEK.] 265 lila—Iiig. 

Liakik; cape, forming the eastern point of entrance to Three Saints bay, Kodiak. 
So called by Tebenkof, 1849. Perhaps from Liak, the Aleut name for the 
Hack-footed goose. 

Liar; rock, the westernmost of the Eckholms group, Sitka sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Lgun (liar) by the Russians in 1809. Has also been 
ca'"ed False rock. 

Liard; river, tributary to the Mackenzie, from the west. Has also been called 
Mountain river. The above name, Liard, has been adopted by the Cana- 
dian Board on Geographic Names. 

Libby; river, tributary to the headwaters of Niukluk river, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. Presumably so named after Daniel B. Li})l)y, 
of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, in 1866. 

Libbey; glacier, tributary to Agassiz glacier, St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. 
Named by Topham, in 1888, after Prof. William Libbey, jr., of Princeton 
college. Erroneously Libby. 

Liberty; fork, of O'Brien creek, in the Fortymile mining district. Local name, 
obtained by Barnard in 1898. 

Lida; island, near the northeastern point of Sannak island, Sannak group. So called 
by the Fish Commission in 1880. 

Lidrejann, bay; see Andrew. 

Liebigstag; river, tributary to the Copper river, from the east, near latitude 62°. So 
called by Allen, in 1885, after an Indian chief living at or near its mouth. 
Apparently identical with Chetaslina. 

Liesisfoi, islet; see Wooded. 

Lieskof; cape, on the northern shore of Alaska peninsula, northwest of Pavlof bay. 
Named Lieskova ( Lieskof s) by Lutke, in 1828, after Lieut. Arcadie Lieskof, 
I. N., a member of his party. Has 1)een written Leskoff, Lieskoff, Liskoff, 
etc. Apparently identical with Garfield point of the Fish Commission in 



itesnoi, cape; see Wooded. 

Liesnoi; island, between Woewodski and Eliza harbors, Frederick sound, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Liesnoi (woody) by Zarembo in 1838. 

Liesnoi; island, in Krestof harbor, Kruzof island, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Liesnoi (woody) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Liesnoi; island, northwest of Wrangell, in Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Liesnoi (woody) by the Rynda party in 1863. The island is low 
and wooded. Has been printed erroneously Leisnoi. 

Liesnoi; island, one of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Liesnoi (wooded) by Vasilief, in 1809, who has a North Liesnoi 
and a South Liesnoi. Has also been erroneously written Lusnoi. 

Liesnoi, island; see INIakhnati. 

Liesnoi; islet, near Kruzof island, in entrance to Sitka sound, Alexander ar.-liipelago. 
Named Liesnoi (woody) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Liesnoi; islet, near Southern rapids. Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Namcxl 
Liesnoi (woody) by Vasilief in 1833. Has also been written Lesnci. 

Liesnoi; shoal, near Southern rapids, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
named bv Coghlan in 1884. 

Lietnik; cape, in Kizhuyak bay, north coast of Kodiak. Named Lietmka (sum- 
mer village) by Murashef in 1839-40. 

Lietnik, cape, on the western shore of Afognak bay, Afognak island, Kodiak group. 
Named Lietnika (summer village) by Murashef, 1839-40. 

Lievoiy cape; see Left. 

Lighter; creek, in Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander anlnpelag. 
named by Meade who, in 1869, opened a coal mine here. 



So 



Ll:r-l'in> 



200 



Li;/lilli(>i(.<r, island; see Signal. 

Lig-hthoiise; roi-ks, southwest of the Seniidis. So named by Dall in 1874. Tehen- 
kof, 1S49, calls it Nanidak crag or pinnacle. Also called Nanitschak. 

Lillian; creek, trilnitary to Buster creek, from the nartli, Seward i)eninsula. Nanie 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Lilly; l.ikc, 10 miles north of and tributary to Klutina lake. So named by Aber- 
cniiiibie in ISOS. Also written Lily. 

Lime; creek, tributary to the Niukluk river, from the south, in the Eldorado min- 
ima district, Seward peninsula. Local name published by the Geologi<;al 
Survey in 1900. Called Bear creek on a recent local maj). 

Lime; ])oiiit, the western point of entrance to Nutkwa inlet. Prince of AVales island, 
Alexander archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Limestone; creek, tributary to Bettles river, from the north, near longitude 149° '.HY. 
Descriptive name, from Schrader, 1899. 

Limestone; creek, tributary to Clear creek, from the east, on south slope of Mount 
Wrangell. Apparently a local name, reported by Schrader in 1900. 

Limestone; gap, in the Talkeetna mountains, between the headwaters of Bubl> and 
Hicks creeks. So named by Glenn in 1898. 

Limestone; inlet, in the mainland, opening into Stephens passage, southeastern 
Alaska. Descriptive name, given l)y Meade in 1869. On the north shore 
are some high limestone bluffs. 

Limestone Bluffs; mountain, on the north shore of Limestone inlet, Stephens pass- 
age, southeastern Alaska. So named by Meade, in 1869, who says: "From 
a remarkable-looking streak on the side of the mountain forming the west 
side of the inlet I called it Limestone Inlet and the mountain Limestone 
Bluff." 

Liva, bay; see Lituya. 

Lincoln, cape; see Mordvinof. 

Lincoln; channel, between Sitklaii and Kannaghmint islands, Dixon entrance. 
Bresumably named, in 18()9, after the U. S. revenue cutter Lincoln. 

Lincoln; island, north of Point Retreat, in Lynn (^anal, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Meade in 1869. 

Lincoln; mountains (6,200 feet high), near the head of Portland canal. Apparently 
so named by the Coast Survey. Erroneously Licoln. 

Lincoln; open bay, on the northwestern shore of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, 
Bering sea. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1890. Designated 
as Lincoln bight on a recent Coast Survey chart. 

Lincoln; peak (4,894 feet high), on the mainland, north of Frederick sound, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named l)y Thomas, in 1887, after President Abraham 
Lincoln. 

Lincoln; rock, awash at lowest water, southeast of Kashevarof passage, in Clarence 
strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by Snow, in 1886, after President 
Lincoln. This rock has been reserved for light-house purposes by Execu- 
tive order dated January 4, 1901. 

Lindeman; lake, near Chilkoot pass, in the Yukon drainage basin. Named by 
Schwatka, in 1883, after Dr. Moritz Lindeman, \ice-presidentof the Bremen 
Ge()graphi(;al Society. 

Lindenberg; harbor, indenting the southern shore of Chichagof island. Peril strait, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Yasilief in 1833. 

Lindenberg; head, the eastern head of LindeidDerg harlwr. Peril strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Name apparently first applied by Moore in 1895. 

Lindenberg; peninsula, constituting the eastern part of Kupreanof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. The Russians called its eastern side Lindenberg shore 
or coast, after G. Lindenberg, who explored and surveyed in the Alex- 



BAKKR.l 2()7 Llll— Lit. 

Ijindenberg' — Continued. 

ander archipelago in and about 1838. Dall, in the Coast Pilot, 1883, applied 

the name to the peninsula. 
Lindenherg, point; see Glacier. 
Line; island, at entrance to Whiting harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by United States naval offi(;ers in 1880. 
Linnet; islet, near Spruce island, of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander 

archipelago. Named Chechotkin (linnet) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Lion; juvint, on the eastern shore of Portland canal, near its head. So named by 

tlie Coast Survey as early as 1891. 
Lion; reef, on the Arctic coast, east of Colville river. So named by Franklin after 

his boat Lion, which grounded upon it, August 7, 1826. 
Lisburne; cape (849 feet high), on the Arctic coast of Alaska. Discovered and so 

named by Cook, August 21, 1778. Erroneously Lisburn and Lisbon. 
Liscome; bay, on the southern shore of Dall island, Dixon entrance. A bay in this 

vicinity, not exactly identified, was named Port Liscome by Ingraham in 

1792. 
Lhcum, fort; see Fort Liscum. 
Lhefrka'm, bay; see Camp Coogan. 
Lisianski; peninsula, between Katliana bay and Nakwasina passage, Baranof island, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Dall in the Coast Pilot of 1883. 
Lisianski; point, the north point of entrance to Katliana bay, Sitka sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Dall, in the Coast Pilot of 1883, after Capt. 

luri Fedorovich Lisianski, I. N., who was at Sitka in 1804. 
Lisianski; small bay, on the southeastern coast of Kodiak, northwest of Sitkalidak 

island. Name given by the Fish Commission in 1888. 
Lisianski; strait, separating Yakobi island from Chichagof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Dall, in 1879, in the Coast Pilot, after Capt. luri 

Fedorovich Lisianski, upon whose chart of 1814 it first appears. Has 

been written Lisiansky. 
Liskoff, cape; see Lieskof. 
lAtnik; Indian village, on Afognak bay, Afognak island. This name is found on a 

map made by the Fish Connnission in 1889. Apparently it is the Afognak 

of other maps, and may be intended for Lietnik (summer village). 
Little; bay, indenting the northeastern shore of Akun island, Krenitzin group, 

eastern Aleutians. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 
Little; canyon, on the Stikine river, British Columbia. 
Little; cove, at head of Middle bay, Chiniak l)ay, Kodiak. Named INIielkoi (very 

small) by Russian naval officers in 1808-1810. 
Little; creek, tributary to Red bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Helm in 1886. 
Little; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the north, in the Nome mining region, 

Seward peninsula. Local name, obtained by the Geological Survey in 

1899. On a late map this is shown as a branch of Moonlight creek and 

Moonlight creek made a tributary of the Snake. 
Little, glacder; see Popof. 
Little; island, at entrance to Deep bay. Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Named 

IMalie (little) by Vasilief in 1833. 
Little: island, in southern part of Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Symonds in 1880. 
Little; islands, west of Unga and north of Wosnesenski island, near entrance to 

Pavlof bay, Alaska peninsula. So called by Dall in 1882. 
Little; mountain, on the south bank of the Yukon, near mouth of the Koyukuk 

river. So named by Allen in 1885. 



LIt-Mt. 



2(i8 lBiu,i,.l,s7. 



Little; river, about one mile west of Cape Ugat, on northern coast of Kodiak. So 

called by .Mo«er in 18i»9. 
Little: rock (10 feet a \'e biyh water), near north end of Duke iwland, in Revil- 

lapigedo channel, Alexander archipelago. Presumably so named by local 

pilots about 1880. 
Little Anvil; creek, just east of Topkok river, Seward {peninsula. Name from 

Barnard, liKH). 
Ijlth IllnrI:, river; see Big Black. 
Little Blanche; creek, tributary to Seventymile creek, from the south, aliont 10 

miles from Kagle, on the Yukon. Prospectors' name, from Barnanl in 

1898. 
Little Branch; bay, indenting the southwestern shore of Baranof island, Alexander 

archipelago. Named Maloi Strelka (little arrow, /. c, little offshoot) by 

the Russians. 
Little Diomede; island, one of the Diomede group, in Bering strait! Commonly 

known as the Little Diomede. Sauer and, after him, Lutke give its name 

as Imaglin. Beechey, 1830, has Kruzenstern (Igna-look), while Teben- 

kof, 1849, calls it Ignaliuk. Beechey named this island, in 1826, after the 

Russian admiral, Krusenstern. 
Little Fort; island, on the southeastern shore of Shuyak island, Kodiak group. 

Named Maloi Krieposti (little fort) by the Russian-Americ^an Comj)any 

in 1849. 
Little Gavanski; island, immediately opposite Starri-gavan bay, Sitka sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named Gavanski menshoi (little harbor) by Vasilief 

in 1809. Has also been called Little island. 
Little Goofie, island; see Goose. 

Little Hurrah; creek, tributary to Big Hurrah creek, from the south, Seward penin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Little Kiska; island, just east of Kiska, Rat island group, western Aleutians. So 

called by Lutke. See Kiska. 
Little Eoniuji; island, between Big Koniuji and Simeonof islands, Shumagin group. 

So named by the Russians. According to Veniaminof this is Tangimak 

island of the Aleuts. Lutke writes it Tounghimik. See also Koniuji. 
Little Minook; creek, tributary to Minook creek, from the east. Prospectors' name, 

published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
Little Naked; island, near Naked island, Prince William sound. Local name. 

There is a fox farm on this island. 
Little Polovina; hill, in the northeastern part of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, 

Bering sea. Presumal)ly the local name. Name published by the ("oast 

Survey in 1875. Polovina is Russian for Jialfivai/. 
Little Rapids; islet, in Southern rapids, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Coghlan in 1884. 
Little Raspberry; island, between Afognak and Kodiak, Kodiak group. Named 

Maloi ISIalinovoi (little raspberry) by Murashef in 1839-tO. 
Little Raspberry; strait, between Kittiwake and Kodiak islands, Kodiak group. 

Named Maloi Malinovoi (little raspberry) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Little Rose; island, one of the Opasni islands, in Northern rapids, Peril strait, Alex- 
ander archij)elago. So named by Coghlan in 1884. 
Little Sitkin; island (3,585 feet high), betwen Kiska and Semisopochnoi islands. 

Rat island group, western Aleutians. So called by the Russians. Lutke, 

1835, calls it Little or Western Sitkin. Also has been written Little Sitchin. 
Lilth' Slrrlki, arm, of Whale bay; see Small. 
Little Sushi tna; stream, entering head of Cook inlet, V)etween Sushitna river and 

Knik arm. Local name, published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 



BAKEK.] 269 Lit— Lorn. 

Little Tanaga; island, east of Adak island, Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. 
Called Tannak on Russian Hydrographic chart 1400, edition of 1848; 
Tanaga by Tebenkof, in 1849, and Little Tanaga by the United States 
North Pacific Exploring Expedition, 1855, doubtless to distinguish it 
from the larger Tanaga island, about 70 miles west of this one. Native 
name. 

Lituya; l)ay, in southern part of the St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. This name 
is of Indian origin and was obtained and used by the Russians. The 
Indian word is thought by Dall to be H'lit-tu-yiih, accented on the la.st 
syllable. Lisianski, in 1805, wrote it L'tooa bay, and Tebenkof writes it 
Ltua. Russian Hydrographic chart 1378 has Altua bay or Port Frantsuy.of. 
Out of these has come Ltuya, Alituya, Altona, and Lina. La Perouse 
surveyed the bay, in 1786, and named it Port des Franyais and to the whale- 
man it has been known as Frenchman's bay. The name Skecter has also 
been applied to it under a misapprehension. 

Lituya; mountain (11,832 feet high), in the Fairweather range, .southeastern Alaska. 
Name published by Tebenkof in 1849. 

Lively; group of islands, in Tlevak strait, near Tlevak narrows, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Dall, in 1882, after the steam launch of the Hassler. 
Sheldon Jackson has called this group Voorhees isles. 

Lively; sunken rock, in Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by Nichols, in 1883, after the Hassler' s steam launch Lirehj. 

Livingston; creek, tributary to Feather river, from the east, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Lizard; point on the southeastern shore of Pearse island, Portland inlet. So named 
by Pender in 1868. Erroneously Lizzard. 

Loaf; ridge of mountains (2,200 feet high), on the mainland, northeast of Dixon 
entrance. So called by Nichols in 1883. 

Lockwood; peak (3,510 feet high) in the northeastern part of Kupreanof island, 
Alexander archipelago. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Lieut. James 
Booth Lockwood, V. S. A., who perished at Cape Sabine in 1883. 

Lockwood; point, on "Woewodski island, Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Meade in 1869. It was called Poverotni (turning) by 
Lindenberg in 1838. 

Lnde; point, on the right bank of the Chilkat river, near its mouth. Named Zhila 
{lode, also hiU) by Lindenberg in 1838. The name is obsolete. 

Lofka; hut, of an Indian named Lofka, where the earliest American travelers on 
the Yukon used to spend a night. Called Lofka, Lofka's and Lofka's 
barrabora (hut). It was on the right bank of the Yukon and due east 
from St. Michael. 

Log; ])oint, on Liesnoi island, Woewodski harbor, Frederick sound, Alexander 
ari'hipelago. So named by ^Mansfield in 1889. 

Logan; mountain (19,539 feet high), in the St. Elias region. So named ])y Russell, 
in 1890, in honor of Sir William Edniond Logan, "founder and long direc- 
tor of the Geological Survey of Canada." The name has been adopted by 
the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 

Logan; point, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. So named by Pender in 1868. 

I.'ilitimioi, point; see Glacier. 

L'llitiiinoi, sound; see Cross. 

Lomas; cape, on the western shore of Port Caldera, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales 
archipelago. Named Cabo de las Lomas (cape of the hillocks) by Mau- 
relle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Lomavik; Eskimo village, on the left bank of the lower Kuskokwim. Name from 
Nelson, 1879, who wrote it Lomavigamute, i. e., Lomavik people. 



Loll — L<4><>. 



270 [avi.L. 1K7. 



Lone; iiinuiituin (2,142 feet high), near Barlow cove, on northern end of A.lniiralty 
island, Alexander archij)elago. So called I )y Meade in 18()9. Has, on a 
recent C'oa.«t .Survey chart, ]>een called Barlow mountain. 

Lone; rock, in Hood bay, Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named by 
Meade in 1869. 

Lone: rock, in or nearl'ort Wrangell, Alaska [teninsula. Named Odinakoi (isolated 
or lone) hy Vasilief in 1832. 

Lone; small islet, in Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Descriptive name, given liy 
Keid in 1892. 

Lone Tree; islet, near entrance to Whitewater l)ay, Chatham strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So called by Nichols in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 157). 

LutKj. A sunken bank or reef, called by the Russians Dlinnaia (rather long), and 
Iving near Pamplona rock, Gulf of Alaska, is shown on Russian Hydro- 
graphic chart 1378 (1847). 

Long'; l>each, in Mitrofania bay, Alaska peninsula. So called by the Fish Commis- 
sion in 1888. 

Long'; glacier, on the southern flank of Mount Wrangell and tributary to Kotsina 
creek, from the north. So named by Schrader, in 1900, from its shape. 

Long; island, in Chiniak bay, near St. Paul, Kodiak. Named Dolgoi or Goloi (long 
or bare) by the Russians in 1809. Lisianski, in 1804, called it Barren island. 

Long; island, in Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. De- 
scriptive name, given by Meade in 1869. 

Long; island, in Kasaan bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by the Coast Survey in 1880. 

Long; island, in northeastern part of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Dolgoi (long) by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been called 
Dolgay and Dolgoi. 

Long; island, in Port Frederick, Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named l^y United States naval officers in 1880. 

Long; island, on the western shore of Cordova bay, Dixon entrance. Named Dol- 
goi (long) by the Russians. 

Long; peak (about 2,500 feet high), on AVrangell island, x\rctic ocean. Climljed by 
Lieutenant Berry, in 1881, and its height measured by aneroid barometer. 
Capt. Thomas Long, of the whaling bark Nile, measured its height in 1867 
and obtained the result 2,480 feet. Named Long peak ])y the Hydro- 
graphic office in (or before) 1879 and Berry's peak by the same (Office in 
1881. 

Longfellow; peak (2,955 feet high), on the mainland, near Port Snettisham, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1888, after the poet, Henry Wads- 
worth Longfellow. 

Lookout; mountain, about 800 to 1,000 feet above the river, on west bank of Koyu- 
kuk river, near latitude 67°. So named by Allen, who ascended it in 
August, 1885. 

Lookout; point, on the mainland, Stephens i)assage, Alexander archii)elago. 
named by Meade in 1869. 

Lookout; point, on the south shore ui Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander archi- 
l)elago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Lookout; point, the eastern point of Caton island, Sannak group. So called by thai 
Coast Survey in 1900. I 

Loon; island, one of the Middle islands, Sitka sound, Alexander archi])elago. I 
Named Gagarin (loon) by Vasilief in 1809. Also called Jet by a mis- 
translation. Has also been written Gagari (diver). 

Loon; i)oint, in Eliza harbor, Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. So named 
bv :\Iansfield in 1889. 



l-.AKEK.] 27l 



li01» — liOW. 



Lopp; lagoon, junt north of Cape Prinoe of Wales, Seward jieniusula. So named l)y 
Brooks, in 1900, after Rev. William Thomas Lopp, of Indiana, a mis- 
sionary to the Eskimo, who began work here in 1890. 

Loras, harbor; see Dora. 

Lord; islands, in Dixon entrance, near Cape Fox. 80 named by Pender in 18(58. 

Lord; r(jek, near Lord islands, Dixon entrance, south of Cape Fox. Named by 
Nichols in 1883. 

Jj'i-ds, harbor; see Dora. 

Lorentz: river, tributary to the Xanana, from the south, near longitude 150° 30^ 
Named by Allen, in 1885, after Mr. Lorentz, of the Alaska Commercial 
Company, chief trader for the Yukon country. On some maps it is Lorenz. 

Loring; post-office, and fishing village, on Naha bay, west side of Revillagigedo 
island, Alexander archipelago. The post-office was established here in 
November, 1885. 

Los Coronados, islands; see Coronados. 

iciS' Hermaitos, islands; see Hazy. 

L(i!< Mondragones, islets; see Fish Egg. 

Lost; creek, tributary to the Klokerblok river, from the south, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Lost; creek, tributary to the Tubutulik river, fron:i the east, Seward peninsula. Pros- 
pectors' name from Peters, 1900. 

LotManoi, bay; see Icy. 

Lothianoi, inlet; see Taku. 

Louisa; point, on the mainland, at south end of Favorite channel, Stephens passage, 
southeastern Alaska. So named by Beardslee in 1880. 

Lotiise; lake (elevation 2,200 feet), on the Copper River plateau, in about latitude 
62° 30^, and in the Sushitna drainage system. So called, in 1898, by Glenn, 
who indicates that this is its local name. 

Louise, point; see New Eddystone. 

Love- islet, one of the Japonski group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by United States naval officers, in 1880, after a ]Mr. Love, employed 
on the Jamestown at Sitka in that year. 

Low; bluff, on the northern shore of Amchitka island, western Aleutians. So desig- 
nated by the North Pacific Exploring Expedition of 1855. 

Low; cape, on the southwestern shore of Kodiak. Named Nizmennoi (low) by 
Tebenkof in 1849. Has also appeared as Nizmenno point. 

Low; cape, the western head of Kizhuyak bay, Kodiak. Named Nizmennie (low) 
by Murashef in 1839-10. 

Loiv, cape; see Narrow. 

Low; hill, in the northern part of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. Name 
from Elliott 1873-74. 

Low; island, between Spruce and Kodiak islands. Named Nizmennie (low) l)y 
ilurashef in 1839-40. 

Low; island, off Shoals jioint, in entrance to Sitka sound, Alexai; ler archipelago. 
Named Nizmennoi (low) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Low No. 1; island, southwest of Deer island, near Belkofski. So t'allc<l l)y the Fish 
Commission in 1888. 

Low No. 2; island, southwest of Deer island, near Belkofski. So called li\' tlie Fish 
Commission in 1888. 

Low; point, on the eastern shore of Bay of Waterfalls, Adak island, n Mdle Aleu- 
tians. Descriptive name, given by Gibson in 1855. 

Low; point, on the eastern shore of ITnimak, eastern Aleutians. Called Nizmennoi 
(low) by Tebenkof in 1849. 

I«OW; point, the eastern point of entrance to St. John harbor, Zareml)o island, 
Alexanfler archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 



t)7') [HULL. 187. 

Low; i...iMt, ..M .•a.t .i.le of Portage Lay, Alaska peninsula. Name published by the 
H vdroLTaphic Offire in March, 1893. 

Lowe- point an.l river, on the north shore of Port Valdes, Prince William sound. .^ 
' Named by Abcrcrombie, in 1898, after Lieut. Percival G. Lowe, U. S. A., 
a lueinber of his party. 

Lowenstern; cape, tlie eastern point of entrance to Shishmaref inlet, Seward pen- 
iusiila, .\rctic ocean. Named Liwenstern by Kotzebue in August, 1816. 

Lower- lake, near 8t. Paul, Kodiak, draining to Shahafka cove. Called Dolgoi 
' (long) by the Russians, in 1808-1810, but byTebenkof, 1849, called Nizhni 
( lower) . 

/.,.((■,/• K'>,,izwih(>(>, bav; see Whitewater. 

Lower Ramparts; gorge, in tbe Yukon river, between the mouths of the Dall and 
Tanana rivers! Apparently so called by Dall in 1884. See also Ramparts. 

Lower Ramparts; gorge or canyon in the Porcupine river, about 75 miles above 
F..rt Ynkon. So called by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Lowrie; island, near Forrester island, off the west coast of Prince of Wales archi- 
pelago. So named by Dall, in 1879, after Captain Lowrie, of the snow 
Captain (hok, in 1786, who was perhaps the first English-speaking navi- 
gator to visit Queen Charlotte islands, and i^ossibly the first who saw this 
island. 

L'inuii, bay; see Lituya. ;; 

iJiifi, l)ay; see Lituya. 

Lucan; i)oint, the western point of entrance into Port Althorp, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. See also Column. 

Luce; island, one of the Kutchuma group, Sitka sound, Alexander archii)elago. 
So named by United States naval oflicers, in 1880, after a Mr. Luce, 
employed on the Jamestown at Sitka in that year. See also Emgeten. 

Lucia; glacier, northwest of Yakutat bay, in the St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. 
So named by Mark Brickell Kerr in 1890, after his mother. 

Lucile; small lake, about 10 miles north of Knik arm, Cook inlet. So named by 
Glenn in 1898. Written Lucile on his map and Lucille in his text. 

Luck; point, on Prince of Wales island, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Snow in 1886. 

Lucky Strike; creek, tributary to Bluestone river, from the north, Seward i)enin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Lukanin; open bay, on the southern shore of St. Paul island, Pribilof gruup, Bering 
sea. Usually written Lukannon. Elliott says it derives its name from 
"one Lukannon, a pioneer Russian, who distinguished himself with one 
Kaiecov, a countryman, by capturing a large number of sea-otters at that 
point, and on Ottter island, in 1787-88." Petrof (Banc. Hist., p. 183) says 
that Ivan Lukanin was the peredovchik (senior officer) with Ismailof. 

Lnkcm's Fort; see Kolmakof. 

Lull; p(jint, the northern point of entrance to Kelp bay, Chatham stfait, Alexander 
archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1883, after Capt. Edward Pheli)s Lull, 
U. S. N., hydrographic inspector of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

Lulu; peak, in southern part of the St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. Name 
liu))lished by the Coast Survey in 1889. 

Lung; island, near the south end of Duncan canal, Kupreanof island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 
Lnmioi, island; see Liesnoi. 

Lutke; cape, the southern head of Unimak bay on south shore of Unimak island, 
twitern Aleutians. Veniaminof, 1831, calls this Siuchi (sealion) and is 
followed ])y Tebenkof (1849). The Russian Hydrographic charts (1847) 
call it Lutke, while the Fish Commission (1888) calls it Promontory. 



BAKER.] 273 



liyn— OTfC. 



Lynch; rape, on the western shore of Heceta island, Alexander archipelajiQ. So 

named by the local pilots. Not shown on existing charts. Name pub- 
lished by Nichols in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 122). 
Lynn ; .-anal, the great northern arm of Alexander archipelago. It was explored and 

so named by Vancouver in 1794. Has also been called Lynn channel. 
Lynn; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the east, in the Nome mining region, 

Seward peninsula. Local name, obtained bv the Geological Survey in 

1899. 
Lynn Brotliers; group of islands, in St. James l)ay, Lynn canal, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named The Brothers by ]\Ieade, in 1868, and since modified to Lynn 

Brothers. 
Lynn Sisters; two small islands, in the southern jsart of Lynn canal, Alexander 

archiiielago. Called The Sisters by Meade, in 1868, and modified to Lynn 

Sisters in the Coast Pilot in 1883. 
; Lynx; creek, tributary to Sixmile creek, from the south, in the Kenai peninsula, 
I about 20 miles southeast of Sunrise, Cook inlet. Local name, published 

' 1 )y the Geological Survey in 1 899. 

Lyre; point, on the eastern shore of Port Refugio, Bucareli ])ay. Prince of Wales 

archipelago. Named Punta de Lira (lyre point) ])y ]\Iaurelle and Quadra 

in 1775-1779. 
Mab, island, near Bridget cove, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

:\Iansfield in 1890. 
Mabel; island, in Dewey anchorage, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Snow in 1886. Erroneously ^Mable. 
McAdam; creek, tributary to Tisuk river, from the north, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
McArthur; peak (2,239 feet high), near Port McArthur, Kuiu island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Helm, in 1886, after the Coa.«t Survey steamer 

McArthur. 
McArtliur; port, near the southern entrance to Affleck canal, Kuiu island, Alexan- 
der archipelago. Named by Helm, in 1886, after the Coast Survey steamer 

McArtliur, under his command. 
McArtliur; reef, in Sumner strait, off the mouth of Clarence strait, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey, after its surveying steamer 

McArtltur. 
McBride; glacier, part of the Muir glacier. Called Second North tributary by Keid, 

in 1890, and later, ]McBride after H. McBride a member of his party. 
McCartey; point, the southernmost point of the Bronaugh islands, off Dall Head, 

Gravina island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nii-hols in 1883. 

Also erroneously ^IcCarty. 
McCarthy; creek, tributary to Kennicott river, from the east. Prospectors' name, 

reported by the Geological Survey in 1899. 
McClellan; flats, at head of Chilkat inlet, Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by naval officers, after Lieut. Edward P. McClellan, U. S. N., who 

visited the locality in 1880. 
McClellan; group of islets, forming part of the Galankin group, Sitka sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by United States naval officers, in 1880, after 

Lieut. E. P. McClellan, U. S. N. 
McClellan; rock, near Lindenberg harbor. Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by United States naval officers, in 18S0, after its discoverer, Lieut. 

E. P. :\IcClellan, U. S. N. Erroneously McLellan. 
McCulloug-li; rock, in Dixon entrance, west of Zayas island. Reported by Captain 

:\IcCullough, of the Hudson Bay Company steamer Otter, and named after 

him by the Coast Survey in 1883. Erroneously McCoUough. 

Bull. 187—01 18 



.n«l»— -^lur, 



274 [BULL. 187. 



McDoel; pi-ak {(J.OUO feet lii^'h), ni-ar lu-adwattTj^ of the Ku.Mkokwiin river, in lati- 

tiule 62°. So named l)y Po!:*t of the Geological Survey in 1898. 
\[,l)n,i'il,l, bay; sec Yes. 
McDonald; c-reek, tributary to Nome river, from tlie nortli, near its month. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
McDonald; islands, opposite the north end of Wrangell strait, in Frederick gound, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Ensign Jolui 

Daniel McDonald, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
McDonough; peak (2,873 feet high), in southeastern part of Douglas island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1893. 
McFarland; group of islands, on the eastern shore of Tlevak strait, north of Dunbar 

inlet, Alexander archipelago. Named by Dall, in 1882, after Mrs. A. R. 

McFarland, a missionary and teacher, who began work in Alaska in 1877. j 

Sheldon Jackson has named them Hill islets. 
McFarland, islet; see Village. I 

McFarland; point, on Dall island, opposite Howkan village, Cordova bay, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Sheldon Jackson, after Mrs. A. K. McFarland, a , 

missionary and teacher, who began work in Alaska in 1877. j 

McGrath; mountain (6,179 feet high), on the mainland, on north side of Iskoot i 

river. So named l)y the Coast Survey, after Assistant John Edward I 

McGrath. j 

McHenry; anchorage, in Etolin island, opening into Clarence strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Snow, in 1886, after John McHenry, a member of 

his party. t 

McHenry; inlet, in Etolin island, opening into Clarence strait, Alexander archi- j 

pelago. Named by Snow, in 1886, after John McHenry, a member of his ; 

party. 
McHenry; sunken ledge, at entrance to Union bay, Cleveland peninsula, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Clover in 1885. 
McKinley; creek, in the Porcupine gold district. Prospectors' name published in 

1900. 
McKinley; lake, just north of or in edge of delta of the Copper river, 3 miles north i; 

of Alaganik. Local name, from Gerdine, 1900. f 

McKinley; mountain (20,464 feet high), near the headwaters of Kuskokwim river. 

Name published by the Coast Survey in 1897. Also called Bulshaia. a 

corruption of the Russian word for big. It was named McKinley l)y a i 

prospector, Dickey, who published an account of it in the New York Sun, 

January 24, 1897. 
McLean; arm, indenting the southeastern shore of Prince of Wales island, about 6 

miles north of Cape Chacon. Named by Clover, in 1885, after Ensign 

Walter McLean, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Mrljcllan, rock; see McClellan. 
MrXair, island; see Grand. 
McNairy; point, the south point of entrance to Steamboat bay, Frederick sound, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 
MrFlier.sim; point, not shown on any map and not identified, on the Arctic coast 

somewhere east of Point Barrow. Named by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, 

after M. McPherson. 
McQuesleii, island; see Huggins. 
McTavish; point, on the western shore of Dease inlet, Arctic coast. Name from I 

British Admiralty chart 593 (1830-1882). 
Macartney; point, the northeastern point of entrance to Keku strait, Knpreanof 
island, Alexander archipelago. So named l)y Vancouver in 1794. 



BAKKK.l 275 



Mac— »lai. 



Mackay ; iiilot, iuuuediately east of Dease inlet, on the Arctic coast. Named M'Kay's 
inlet by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, after one of their guides, James 
M'Kay, a Scotchman, who had served with Sir George Back in 1834. 

Mackenzie; point, at the head of Cook inlet. Named hy Vancouver, in 1794, "after 
the Right Hon. James Stuart Mackenzie." Erroneously Mackinzie. 

Mackenzie; river, in Canada, named after its first explorer, Alexander Mackenzie. 

Mackenzie; small bay, between Dease inlet and Point Barrow, Arctic ocean. So 
named l)y Dease and Simpson, in 1837, after Chief Factor Roderick Mac- 
kenzie, of the Hudson Bay Company. 

Mackx, l)ay; see Tanaskan. 

Macks Head; promontory, Sanborn harbor, Nagai island, Shumagins. Local name, 
from the Coast Survey. 

Macks Head; small rounded island, off northern point of entrance to Sanborn 
harbor, Nagai island, Shumagins. Local name, reported ))y Dall in 1872. 
The point behind it has also been called Mack's Head. 

Macleod; harbor, on the northwestern (;oast of Montague island. Prince William 
sound. Named McLeod's by Portlock, in 1787, after one of his othcers. 

Macleod; point, in Smith bay, on the Arctic coast, l)etween Cape Halkett and Tan- 
gent point. Named M'Leod by Dease and Simpson, in 1837, after A. R. 
M'Leod. 

Macmillan; mountains (3,500 feet high), and river, tributary to Pelly river, from 
the east, near latitude 63°. Sometimes written McMillan. The spelling 
Macmillan has been adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic 
Names. 

Macnamara; point, on Zarembo island, the northeast jioint of entrance to Clarence 
strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver, in 1793, after 
Captain Macnamara, R. N. Often written ^IcNamara. 

Macooslthio, village; see Makushin. 

Madan; point, on the mainland, in Eastern passage, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Vancouver in 1793. 

Madeira; creek, Seward peninsula. Name from Brooks, 1901. 

Madison; peak (2,507 feet high), on the mainland, near Port Snettisham, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named by Thomas, in 1888, after President James 
Madison. 

Madre de Dios; island, in Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. Named 
Isla de la iNIadre de Dios (island of God's mother) by Maurelle and Quadra 
in 1775-1779. Has also l)een written erroneously Madre de Deos. 

Magdalena; cape, the north point of entrance to Port Bazan, Dall island. Prince of 
Wales archipelago. Either this cape or Cape Muzon was named Cabo de 
Santa Maria Magdalena by Perez in 1774. 

Magdnlenu, Isla de la; see Hinchinbrook. 

Magnolia; creek, tributary to Igloo creek, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 

Magoun; islands, between Krestof and Kruzof islands, Alexander archipelago. 
Named liy the Russians, after a Captain Magoun, who traded on this coast 
in early times. Has also been written Magun. 

Mahid; island, one of the Necker islands, Sitka sound, Alexander Archipelago. 
Named Ma-id by Vasilief in 1809. Is often Avritten Maid. Pronounced 
Miih-id. 

Mahlo; valley, and river flowing through it, at east end of Klutina lake. Named 
l)y Abercrombie, in 1898, after Emil Mahlo, a member of his party. 

Mahutzu; river, tributary to the Tanana, from the south, near longitude 146° 30'. 
Native name reported by Peters and Brooks in 1898. 

yMalachnoi, island; see Signal. 



Ilal-.^lul 



276 iK^'j-'" 187. 



Main, lake and valk-y; s-w Kiidifott. 

Major; cow, on the southeastern shore of Norton sound. Called Major's eove by 
Dall, in lS(5(j, because it was the first point at which Major Kennicott 
landi'd with liis party after setting out from St. Michael. 

Makak; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Yukon, betwt'en Anvik and 
Koserefski. Called Makka by Tikhnicnief in IStil. Raynumd, 18(59, 
calls it Makagannite, i. e., Makak jieople, and IVtrof, l.SSO, Makeynmte. 
Population in IS.SO, 121. 

Makaka; point, the northwestern point of Hawkins island, Prince William sound. 
Apparently a native name, reported by Abercrombie in 1898. 

MdLliiKik, rock; .see Black. 

Makhnati; islan<l, at southern entrance to western channel into Sitka harlxjr, 
Sitka sound, Alexander archipelgo. Named Makhnatie (rough or shaggy) 
by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been called Liesnoi (wooded) island. 

Makhnati; islet, in Whale bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Makhnatoi ( rough or shaggy) by the Russians. 

Makhnati; submerged rock, in Sitka sound, 2^ cables from a beacon on Makhnati 
island. So nameil by the Coast Survey in 1883. Has also been called 
Beacon rock. 

}f(iknashka, bay; see Sycamore. 

Maknashka, cape; see Rocky. 

Maknashkina, cape; see Miller. 

Mnkrornkoi, bay; see Pumicestone. 

Makushin; active volcano (5,631 feet high), on Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. Sari 
chef, 1792, designates it as ognedieshuUliakt gora (burning mountain) 
By Kotzebue, about 1825, it is called Makuschkin volcano. According tc 
Grewingk, quoting Sarichef, its native name is Aigiigin, which appears 
be from the Aleut word Aigak, big. Coxe writes it Ayaghish, and Ore 
wingk, Ajiigisch. Postels, in 1835, called it Wesselow, i. e., Cheerful moim 
tain. It is near Cape Cheerful. 

Makushin; bay, indenting the northwestern shore of Unalaska, eastern Aleutians 
Presumably so called by Krenitzin and Levashef in 1768-69. Coxe, in hi 
account of their voyage, published in 1780, has on an accompanying niaj 
Makyshinskaia bay. Written Makushi, INIakushinskoi, etc. 

Makushin; cape, on the northern shore of Makushin ))ay, Unalaska. Callec 
Makushi by Tebenkof, 1849. It is Makushin i)oint (but not .Alakushii 
cape) of the Fish Conunission in 1888. 

Mitkualihi, cape; see Kovrizhka. 

Makushin; native village, on the northern shore of ]\Iakushin bay, Unalaska 
Sarichef, 1792, shows this village, w'hich he calls Makushniskoe settle 
ment. Lisianski, 1805, has Macooshino settlement. Veniaminof, 1831 
says it was the headquarters of the Russian- American Comjiany's bidar- 
shik or foreman and that it contained 6 huts (yourts) and 35 natives. 
PojHdation in 1880, 62; in 1890, 51. 

Makushin; valley, l)eginning at Broad bay, in Captains l)ay, Unalaska, and strett'h- 
ing inland. So called by Davidson in 1869. Uall called it (ilacier valley 
in 187.3. 

Malaspina; glacier, on the flanks of the St. Elias alps, innnediately north of Yaku- 
tat bay. This was named Malaspina plateau by Dall, in 1874, who did not 
then get near enough to recognize its true character. In 1880, ho\vever, 
it was approached nearer and its true c-haracter seen. Since that time it 
has Vjeen called the Malaspina glacier. In 1886 the New York Times 
expedition applied the names Agassiz and Great Agassiz, also Guyot and 
Great Guyot, to glaciers now regarded as i>arts of this one. 



BAKER.] 277 ■ IWal— Man. 

Malaspina; island, in Bucareli bay, I'rint'e of Wales archipelago. So named by 

Dail, in 1879, aftt-r Capt. Don Alessandro Malaspina, the distingnished and 

unfortunate Italian navigator, who, in the service of Spain, explored and 

surveyed on the northwest coast of America in 1791. 
Malaspina; mountain, in the St. Elias alps, near Mount St. Elias. So named l)y Dall, 

in 1880, after the unfortunate Malaspina, who was in Yakutat bay in 1791. 

Dall suggests that this may be identical with Piton of La Perouse in 1786. 
Malchatna, river; see Mulchatna. 
Malcolm; river, on the Arctic coast, near the international boundary line. Named 

Sir Pulteney Malcolm river by Franklin in 1826. 
Male; point, the southwestern extremity of Fillmore island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Mahif Roubiv; see Small. 
Malir, island; see Little. 
Mal'mof, island and strait; see Raspberry. 
Mafinoroi, CApe; see Raspberry. 
MalmovnhA, cape; see Nuniliak. 
Malmesbury; port, on the western side of Kuiu island, Chatham strait, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 
Malol Krieposti, island; see Little Fort. 
Maloi Malinovoi, island; see Little Raspberry. 
Maloi Sirdka, bay; see Little Branch. 
Mamma', bluffs and hills; see Einahnuto. 
Mammoth; river, on Seward peninsula, tributary to Kotzebue sound, immediately 

east of Cape Deceit. So named l)y Petrof, in 1880, from the occurrence of 

mammoth bones in the vicinity. 
Manby; glacial stream, from Malaspina glacier, debouching near Manby point, 

Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. So named by Russell in 1891. 
Manby; point, the northwestern point of entrance to Yakutat bay, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by Vancouver, in 1794, after a member of his party. 

Apparently identical with Pte. de la Boussole of La Perouse in 1786. It 

is St. Elias of Malaspina, in 1792, and Bolshoi (great) point of Tebenkof 

in 1849. 
Mandarin; rock, at head of Zachary bay, Unga island, Shumagin grou]). So named 

by Dall in 1872 
Manila; creek, tributary to Hobson creek, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Manila; creek, tributary to Solomon river, from the west, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Manker; valley, near foot of Klutina lake, through which ilows Manker creek. 

So named by Abercrombie in 1898. 
Manning-; point, on the Arctic coast near or on Barter island. So named l)y 

Frankhn in 1826. 
Man of "War ; peak, on the mainland, west of Farragut bay, southeastern Alaska. 

So named by Thomas in 1887. 
Manopiknak; river, in the Yukon delta, one of the outlets of the Yukon river. 

Eskimo name from Nelson, 1878, who in his text writes Manopiknak and 

Manokinak and on his map Manokinak. 
Mansfield; lake, in the Kechumstuk hills draining southward to the Tanana. 

Origin of name not discovered. It was^ pul:)lished by the Coast Survey 

in 1895. 
Mansfield; peninsula, forming the northern part of Admiralty island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named l)y the Coast Survey, in 189:^, after Lieut. Com- 
mander Henry Buckingham Mansfield, U. S. N., who made surveys in 

the Alexander archipelago in 1S89-91. 



iflaii— ITIar. 



278 [miiJ,. 1.S7. 



Mdnlnlik, rrcck; see Mentalik. 

Manzanita; island, in liehni canal, northwest from the entrance io Rudyei'd bay. 
So named l)y the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Manzanita; peak (:^,!t59 feet high), in the eastern part of Mitkof island, Alexander 
archipi'lago. So named by Thomas in 1887. 

Maple ; jioint, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. So named by Pender in 1S68. 

Marabilla; island and point, in Gulf of Esquibel, Prince of Wales archii)elago. 
Named Ysla y Punta de la Marabilla ])y ISIaurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Marble ; islet, in the southern i>art of AtHeck cailal, Kuiu island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Snow, in 1886, "from its formation." 

Marble ; two small bare islets, in Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. So called 1)y 
the Coast Survey, in 1883, on account of the- rocks of which they are 
composed. 

Marble BluflFs; locality on the western shore of Admiralty island, Chatham strait, 
Alexander archipelago. Descriptive name of local origin, published by 
the Coast Survey in 1883. 

Maria; point, the northern point of entrance to Port Asumcion, Bucareli bay, Prince 
of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Maria Josefa by Maurelle and 
Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Maria Louisa, river; see Kun. 

Mariner; creek, tributary to Canyon creek, from the west, in the Fortymile mining 
region. Local name, obtained by Barnard in 1898. 

Marion; creek, tributary to American creek, from the east, in the Eagle mining 
regioi. Local name, obtained by Barnard in 1898. 

Marion; creek, tributary to Middle fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near longi- 
tude 150°. Prospectors' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 

Marmion; island, at junction of Gastineau channel and Stephens passage, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 1883. 

Marmot; bay, between Afognak and Kodiak. It was named Whitsuntide by Cook 
in 1778. Called Evershichie (marmot) by Tebenkof, 1849. The word 
Evrashka comes from Siberia. Kotzebue says (I, 229): "An animal in 
many respects similar to the squirrel; but it is much larger and lives in 
the earth; it is called in Siberia Gewraschka. The Americans (in Kotze- 
bue sound) call it Tschikschi." Chi-gik', according to Nelson, is the 
Eskimo name of Parry's spermophile, so thatChigik and Tschikschi seem 
to be two renderings of the same Eskimo word. Veniaminof gives the 
Koloshian name of Evrashka as Tsalk and the Aleut name as Uhiik. 

Marmot; island, east of Afognak island, Kodiak group. Named Evrashichie (mar- 
mot) by the early Russians. It is St. Hermogenes of Billings, about 1790, 
and of Galiano, 1802. "The only land animals (on this island) are the 
foxes and myriads of ground squirrels (spermophilus) upon which the 
foxes prey for their subsistence. These rodents are called yevrashka in 
Russian. This word our map makers erroneously translated marmot, and 
thus misnamed the island." (Eleventh Census, p. 73.) 

Marmot; river, tributary to Portland canal, from the east, near its head. So named 
by Pender in 1868. 

Marmot; strait, between Marmot and Afognak islands. Named Evrashichichie 
(marmot) by the Russians in 1849. 

Muwonilch; old village site, on north shore of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Ber- 
ing sea. Name from Elliott, 1873-74, who says: "Site of a pioneer village, 
established by one Maroon." 

Marr; ])utte (3,000 feet high), near junction of the Delta and Tanana rivers. So 
named by Glenn, in 1898, after Private Marr, a member of his party. 



BAKER.] - 279 



itiar— Mar. 



Marr; mountain (2,447 feet high), near the south end of Cleveland peninsula, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1886, after Robert 
j Athelston Marr, then subassistant. Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

I Marr; mountain, on north bank of the Porcupine river, near the Lower Ramparts. 

So named by the Coast Survey as early as 1895. 
Marryat; cove, immediately north of Point Hope, Arctic coast. So named by 

Beechey, in 1827, after Captain Marryat, R. N., who discovered the cove. 

Called Marriet by Tikhmenief. 
Marsden; point, on the northwestern shore of Admiralty island, Chatham strait, 

Alexander archijjelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 
M(ir!<h, bay; see Hot Springs. 
j Marsli; island, southeast of the Kashevarof group of islands, in Clarence strait, 
' Alexander archipelago. Named by Snow, in 1886, after Ensign Charles 

Carlton Marsh, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Marsh; lake, northeast of Chilkoot pass, on headwaters of Lewes river. Named, in 

1883, by Schwatka, after Prof. Othniel Charles Marsh, of Yale College. 

This name has been adopted by the Canadian Board on Geographic Names. 
I Marsli; peak, on the mainland, near head of Thomas bay, southeastern Alaska. 

Named by Thomas, in 1887, presumably after Prof. O. C. Marsh, of Yale 

College. 
Marsh; point, the eastern point of entrance to Cordova bay, Dixon entrance, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Clover, in 1885, after Ensign Charles C. 

Marsh, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Marsli; point, the western point of entrance to Wainwright inlet, Arctic coast. So 

named by Beechey, in 1826, after his purser, George Marsh. 
Marshall; creek, tributary to Matanuska river, from the north, just below the 

Chickaloon. So named by Mendenhall, in 1898, after a prospector, W. H. 

Marshall. 
Marshall; islet, near the entrance to Silver bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by United States naval officers in 1880. 
Marshall; mountain (5,200 feet high), on the eastern shore of Klutina lake. So 

named by Abercrombie in 1898. 
Marshall; mountain (4,500 feet high), on the eastern shore of Portland canal. 

Named Marshal by Pender in 1868. 
Marshall; peak (3,017 feet high), on the mainland, near Port Snettisham, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1888, after the great Chief Justice, 

John Marshall. 
Marten; arm, of Boca de Quadra, southeastern Alaska. So named by the Coast 

Survey in 1891. 
Martin; harbor, a small arm of Korovinski bay, Atka island, middle Aleutians. 

Named Pestchanaia (sandy) by Ingenstrem, about 1830, and called Sand, 

Peschani, etc. Locally known as Martin's harbor, after Capt. ]\Iartin 

Klinkofstrom, of the Russian-American Company's service, who hrst 

entered and afterwards used it. 
Martin, island; see Gravel. 
Martin; low sand island, in front of Elson bay, Arctic coast, just east of Point Barrow. 

So named by the British Admiralty in 1853. It may be identical witli 

Doctor island of later charts. 
Martin; point, at the eastern edge of the Copper river delta. So named by Van- 
couver, in 1794, after Sir Henry Martin. Cottonwood point of late charts 

seems to be identical with this point. 
Martin; point, on the Arctic coast, a little east of Camden bay. Named Point Sir 

Henry Martin by Eranklin in 1826. 



.liar— .^ay. 



9 SO [p.n.i,. 1S7. 



Martin- river, tributary to Copper river, Iroin tlie east, near its mouth. So named 
by Aberorombie in 1898. 

Martin; rock, in Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander arehipelago. So named 
by Nichols in 1883. 

Marvine; glacier, tributary to the Malaspina glacier, in the St. Elias aljis, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by Russell, in 1890, after the geologist Archibald 
Robertson Marvine. 

Mar;/, bay; see Shelikof. 

Mary; cttve, in Shelikof l)ay, Kruzof island, Alexander archipelago. So named by 
Vancouver in 1794. See Shelikof bay. 

Mary; island, north of Duke island, in Revillagigedo channel, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by pilot W. E. George in 1880 (Coast Pilot, 76). Erroneously St. 
]\Iary island, on British Admiralty chart 2431, edition of 1882. 

Mary; point, the northern point of entrance to Shelikof bay, Kruzof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Mary Island; anchorage, in the northern end of Mary island, Revillagigedo chan- 
nel, Alexander archipelago. Local name, published by the Ccjast Survey 
in 1883. 

Mary Island; light-house reservation, in northeastern part of Mary island, Revilla- 
gigedo channel, Alexander archipelago. Reserved for light-house purposes 
by Executive order dated January 4, 1901. 

Mashik; native village, at Port Moller, Alaska peninsula. Native name, reported 
by Petrof, in 1880, who wrote it Mashikh. 

Mason; narrows, in the Tanana river, near longitude 146°. So named, in 1885, by 
Allen, in honor of Prof. OtisTufton Mason, of the Smithsonian Institution. 

Massacre; Imy, indenting the southeastern shore of Attn island, western Aleutians. 
Named Ut)iennoi (massacre) by Davidof, about 1802, presumaljiy to com- 
memorate the wanton massacre hereof 15 natives by Cossack fur hunters, 
in 1745, under Alexai Bieliaef. Lutke wrote it Oubiennaia and Grewingk 
has Subienna. 

Massacre; brook, flowing from a lake into Massacre harbor, Attu island, western 
Aleutians. Name from Grewingk, 1850, who has Subienna, apparently 
an error for UV)ienna (massacre). 

Mastic; sunken rock, in Revillagigedo channel, near entrance to Thorne arm, 
Alexander archipelago. Named after the vessel Mastirk, which struck 
upon it in July, 1882. Is now usually written Mastic and has been, 
erroneously, IMystic. 

Matanuska; glacier, near the source of the Matanuska river. So named by Meu- 
denhall in 1898. 

Matanuska; native village, on the eastern shore of lake on Copper river plateau. 
Native name, obtained by Glenn in 1898. 

Matanuska; river, tributary to Knik arm. Cook inlet. Native name, published by 
the Coast Survey in 1897. Has also been written Matanooski. 

Mdliri, island; see St. ^Matthew. 

Maud; lake, draining to Kusawa lake, near latitude 60°. Name pulilished by the 
Coast Survey in 1895. 

Maurelle; islands, in Iphigeniabay, Prince of Wales archipelago. So named l)y Dall, 
in 1879, after the Spaniard Don Francisco Antonio Maurede, who made 
surveys in this region in 1775 and 1779. 

Maury; peak (5,566 feet high), on the mainland, between Thomas ])ay and Port 
Houghton, southeastern Alaska. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1895, 
after ("apt. ]\Iatthew Fontaine Maury, U. S. N. 

Mai/iislilcluioi, island; see Signal. 



BAKEK.] 281 Iflay— JTIel. 

Mayer; peak (8,100 feet high), near the head of Klutina lake. So named by Aber- 

crombie in 1898. Has also ])een written Meyer. 
Mayo; bend, in the Koyukuk river, about 10 miles Itelow the mouth of Allen river. 

So named by Allen in 1885. Erroneously Mays on a late chart. 
Mayoral; cove, behind St. Ignace island, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Named Puerto Mayoral (Steward port) by Maurelle and (Quadra in 1775- 

1779. 
Maysil; cape, on the western shore of Port Refugio, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales 

archipelago. Named Cabo Maysil by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Meade; glacier, east of Chilkoot inlet, Lynn canal. So named by the Coast Survey, 

presumably after Rear-Admiral Richard Worsam Meade, U. S. N., who 

surveyed in southeastern Alaska in 1868 and 1869. 
Meade, mountains; see Hooper. 

Meade; point, on the northwestern shore of Kuiu island, l)etween Security and Sag- 
inaw bays, Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survev, after 

Rear-Admiral R. W. Meade, IT. S. N. 
Meade; river, of northern Alaska, explored by Ray in April, 188.S, and liy him 

named Meade. Its P'skimo name, according to Murdoch, is Kulugrua, 

which has been printed Kol u gru'a, and, by error, Cogtua. 
Meares; passage, between Suemez and Quadra islands, near Bucareli bay, Alexan- 
der archipelago. So named by Dall in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 97). 

Called Sea Otter bay by Lisianski after Meares (?), Ingraham, and other 

early traders. 
Mcarea, port; see Prisoners cove. 
Medicine; creek, tributarj' to the Yukon, from the north, a])out 15 miles below 

Lower Kaltag. Raymond, 1869, calls it Takaltski; Tikhmenief, 1861, 

Kakogkakat, i. e., Kakog river. A native village at its mouth is called by 

Petrof, 1880, Khatnotoutze; he gives its population as 115. 
Mi'dcednikora, bay; see Bear. 
Medretcha, creek; see Sawmill. 
Medviednik, cape; see Bear. 
Medinezhl, island; see Woewodski. 
Medrit'zhid, cove; see Bear. 
Meiklejoh.li; entrance, to Prince William sound, lietween Hinchinbrook and ]\b)n- 

tague islands. So named by Abercrombie, in 1898, after Hon. George D. 

Meiklejphn, Assistant Secretary of War. 
Meiklejohn; pass (4,500 feet high), one of the passes between the Copper and 

Tanana rivers. It lies between Tok river and Wagner lake. Named ))y 

Lowe, in 1898, after Hon. G. D. Meiklejohn, Assistant Secretary of War. 
Melanson; lake, near Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by the Coast Survey in 1897. 
Mell, point; see Green. 
MelJcowadia, point; see Shallows. 
Mellish; cabin, on shore of Knik arm of Cook inlet. So called, in 1898, after its 

owner, Henry Mellish. Has also heen written Melishe's. 
Melnichnoi, cape; see Miller. 
Melozi; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the ncjrth, between the mouth of the 

Koyukuk and Tanana rivers. Native name, reported l)y tlie Western 

Union Telegraph Expedition, in 1867, as Melozecargut and usually written 

Melozikakat. See Kakat. 
Melsing; creek, tributary to the Niukluk river, from the north, in the Eldorado 

mining district, Seward peninsula. Local name, i)ul)lished in 1900, after 

L. Melsing, a miner. 



.TI«'ni-1I«'t. 



282 [B'"-'- 1;-7- 



Mcmlnligamnlc, village; see :\Inintrel(>k. 

Mni<i-hik-n->^}Kth, lake; see Walki-r. 

Mendenhall; cape, the southeriiniost point of Nunivak island, Bering sea. Named 

Ignaticf bvTebenkof, in 1849, after Lieut. Ivan Ignatief, I. N., who accom- 
panied siiishmaref in the Blagonamierennw (good-intent) 1819-1822. 

Recently renamed ]\Iendenhall by the Coast Survey. 
Mendenhall; glacier, on the mainland, northwest of Juneau, southeastern Alaska. 

So nametl bv the Coast Survey, in 1892, after Prof. Thomas Corwin ]\Ien- 

dcnhall, its Superintendent. 
Mendenhall; river, tributary to the Takhini river, southeastern Alaska. So named 

bv the Coast Survey, in 1898, after Superintendent T. C. Mendenhall. 
Menefee; anchorage, at the entrance to Moira sound, Clarence strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Named by Clover, in 1885, after Ensign Daniel Preston 

Menefee, U. S. N., a meml^er of his party. Has been written, erroneously, 

Menafee. 
Menefee; inlet, in Etolin island, opening into Ernest sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by Snow, in 1886, after Ensign D. P. Menefee, U. S. N., a member 

of his party. Has also been written, erroneously, Menafee and Menefes. 
Menendez. The western part of the Copper river delta was called Ensenada de 

Menendez by the Spaniards in 1788. 
Menshikof; cape, on the northern shore of Alaska peninsula, near the mouth of 

Ugashik river. -Named Menshikova (Menshikof's) by Lutke in 1828. 

Has often been written Menchikoff. 
Mentalik; creek, tributary to the Yentna, from the north, near latitude 62°. 

Native name, from Eldridge and Muldrow, 1898. Post obtained the name, 

in 1898, through J. Madison, a resident of Cook inlet, as Mantalik. 
Mentanontli; lake and river, near longitude 152°. Native name, reporteil by Allen 

in 1885. On his map 4 it is Mentantlekakat, and in his text (p. 97, etc. ) it 

is Mentanontlekakat. See Kakat. 
Mentasta; lake, mountain range, pass (2,300 feet high), and trail, between Copper 

and Tanana rivers. Native name, reported by Allen in 1885. 
Mentokakat; native village, on the south bank of the Yukon, about 20 miles above 

the mouth of the Melozi river. Native name, reported by Petrof in 1880. 

Population 20 in 1880. Late maps omit the village and show a creek 

called Montekakat creek, i.e., Monte river creek. Zagoskin, 1842-1844, 

gives the name of the river as Minkotliatno. 
Menzies, cape; see Ommaney. 
Menzies\ strait; see Chatham. 
Mercier. Petrof, in his map in the Tenth Census, 1880, shows a place called Mer- 

i;ier station on the north bank of the Yukon, about 40 miles below the 

mouth of the Tanana. Name not found elsewhere. 
Mrr <r Ormanie, sea; see Bering. 
Mark; cape, the western point of Hall island, Bering sea. Named Merka (Merk's) 

by Tebenkof, 1848, presumably after Dr. Karl Merck (or Merk), surgeon 

and naturalist in the Billings expedition, 1785-1794. 
Mertz; islet, in l)ight on the northern shore of Long island, Sitka sound, Alexander 

archii)elago. Named by United States naval officers, in 1880, after Lieut. 

Albert Mertz, U. S. N. 
Mesquatilla; mountains, on the north bank of the Yukon, between the mouths of 

the Melozi and Tozi rivers. Native iiume, from Raymond, 1869. 
Mesurin; point; see Lemesurier. 

Metlakatla; post-office and Indian village, at Port Chester, Annette island, Alexan- 
der archipelago. Called Port Chester and Metlakatla. Metlakatla is the 

name of a group of Tsimpsean or Chimsyan Indians that founded the 



BAKER.] 283 ITlet— Jttld. 

Metlakatla — Continued. 

village. It has been variously spelled Metlahcatlah, :Metlahkahtla, Metla- 
katla, etc. The post-office was established here in October, 1888, and 
spelled Metlakahtla. 

Prior to 1887 there was a village of Metlakatla Indians about 15 miles 
south of Port Simpson, on the western shore of Chimsyan peninsula, 
British Columbia, where the Scotch missionary, William Duncan, had 
lived and successfully labored for many years. Owing to disagreement 
with the established church, Duncan and his Indians, in 1887, al)andoned 
their village, which thereafter became known a.s Old Metlakatla, and 
founded the pre.sent Metlakatla, which was at first called New ^letlakatla, 
and is sometimes still so called and sometimes Port Chester village. As 
to this Capt. D. D. Gaillard, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., who surveyed 
and built storehouses in Portland canal, in 1896, says (Senate Doc. No. 19, 
Fifty-fourth Congress, second session, p. 4) : 

''The largest settlement in the region under discussion is at New 
]\Ietlakahtla (Port Chester), where there is a store, a cannery, a sawmill, 
and about 850 Christian Indians who, in 1887, to obtain greater religious 
liljerty, abandoned their village in British Columbia and followed their 
devoted missionary, ^Ir. "William Duncan, to their present abode, upon 
arrival at which it is said that they hoisted the United States flag and 
formally transferred their allegiance from Canada to the United States. 
By act of Congress, approved March 3, 1891, the body of lands known as 
Annette Islands was set apart as a reservation 'for the use of the 
Metlakahtla Indians and those persons known as Metlakahtlans who have 
recently emigrated from British Columbia to Alaska, and such other 
Alaskan natives as may join them,' etc." 

Mexico; point, on Prince of Wales island, in Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. 
Name published 1)y the Coast Survey in 1899. 

Meyer, peak; see ^Nlayer. 

Mice; islands, in Behm canal, opposite entrance to Rudyerd bay, southeastern 
Alaska. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Mid; rock (25 feet high), between Cat and Dog islands, Gravina group, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 

Middle; anchorage, between the Indian village at Sitka and Japonski island, Sitka 
sound, Alexander archipelago. There are three anchorages. Eastern, 
Middle, and Western. Descriptive appellation. 

Middle; arm, of Kelp bay, Baranof island, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Moore in 1895. 

Middle; arm, of Three Arm bay, Adak island, middle Aleutians. Descriptive name, 
given by Gibson in 1855. 

Middle; bay, an arm of Chiniak bay, Kodiak. Named Srednaia (middle) by the 
Russians. 

Middle; bay, indenting the northern shore of Unalaska, between Kashega bay and 
Chernofski harbor. Given the descriptive name Srednaia (middle) by 
Veniaminof, 1840. The Fish Commission used this name :Middle in 1888. 
Sarichef used the name Alinuida for this place, a name which belongs to 
the bay next east of it. 

Middle; cape, on the northern coast of Kodiak, near Spruce island. Named Srednie 
(middle) by Murashef in 1839-40. 

Middle; channel, leading into Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander archi]H'lago. 
Named Srednie (middle) by the Russians. 

Middle; fork, of the Chandlar river. Descriptive name, from Schrader, in 18yy. 



.tli<l-.TIi<l. 



284 i.uM.i.. ],s7. 



Middle; fork, of the Koynkuk river. IVHcriptivc iiaiiio, from Schrader in 1S99. 
Middle; island, in ("hiniak hay, near Kaisin ))ay, Ko.liak. Named Srednic (middle) 

hy Russian naval officers, 1808-1810. 
Middle; island, in Sliakan bay, Sumner strait, Alexan.ler arehipelajio. So named 

l)v Helm in ]88(). 
Middle; islands, in the Kashevarof group, Clarence strait, Alexander archiiielago. 

So named by Snow in 1886. 
Middle; group of i.slands, in northern part of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Name not heretofore used. 
Middle; island, the principal island of the Middle island gronp, in northern part of 

Sitka sound, Alexander archipelego. Named Sredni (middle) by Vasi- 

lief in 1809. By later Russians called labloshnie (apple) and afterwards 

variously called lablosh or Middle. 
Middle, islands; see Vitskari. 
Middle; mountain, on the eastern side of Annette island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Middle; mountain, on the mainland, east of the Stikine river and near the interna- 
tional boundary. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 
Middle; peak (1,908 feet high), near Chichagof harbor, on Attn island, western 

Aleutians. So named by Gibson in July, 1855. 
Middle; point, between East and Volcano bays, northeast of Belkofski, on south 

shore Alaska peninsula. Presumably a local name, reported by Dall 

in 1880. 
Middle; point, on Baranof island, between Northern and Southern rapids, Peril 

strait, Alexander archipelago. Named Srednie (middle) by Vasilief in 

1833. Has been called Mid and Sredni. 
Middle; point, on the southern shore of Sawmill cove, Howkan strait, Cordova bay, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Sheldon Jackson in 1880. 
Middle; point, the north point of entrance to Chapel cove. Bay of Waterfalls, Adak 

island, middle Aleutians. Named by United States naval otiicers in 1893. 
Middle, point; see Bear cape. 
Middle; rock, in Bay of Waterfalls, Adak island, middle Aleutians. Descriptive 

name, given by Gibson in 1855. 
Middle; rock, in the Necker group of islands, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Srednie (middle) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Middle, rock; see Prolewy. 

Middle; rocks, in the middle of the entrance to Chichagof harbor, Attn island, west- 
ern Aleutians. So named by Gibson in July, 1855. 
Middle; shoal, immediately east of Turner point, Port Mulgrave, Yakutat bay, 

southeastern Alaska. So called by Dall in the Coast Pilot (1883, j). 208). 
Middle Station; trading post, on the Nushagak river at the mouth of the Muk-hatna. 

Local name, obtained in 1898 bj' Spurr and Post from trader A. Mitten- 

dorf. 
Middleton; island, in the Gulf of Alaska. So called by Vancouver in his atlas. The 

Spanianis, in 1791, called it Isla de Hijosa. Tebenkof calls it Achek or 

Ochek, and some Russian charts Kachek or Kochek. The earliest name 

applied is Atchaka or Achakoo, apparently the native name. 
Middy; point, the northeast point of Ham island, Revillagigedo channel, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Midnight; mountain, near headwaters of Kugruk river, Seward peninsula. Name 

from P.rooks, 1900. 
Midun; island (1,50 feet high), near Deer island, in the Sandman reefs, northeast 

f)f SaiuKik. So called by Dall in 1880. Presumably a local name. 
Midway; island, in Redfish bay, Baranof island, Alexander arehipelago. So named 

by Moser in 1897. 



.KEu.] 285 Miid-raii. 

(Midway; island, northeast of Saiinak. So called hy the Coast Survey in 1900. It 

is apparently identical with Hague Rock of the Fish Commission, 1890. 
Midway; islands, between Holkhambay and Port Snettisham, in Stephens passage, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. These islands were 
reserved for light-liouse purposes by Executive order dated January 4, 
1901. 
Midway; islands, on the Arctic coast, east of the mouth of Colville river. So named 
by SttM'kton, in 1889, from the circumstance that they are about midway 
between Lion reef proper and Return reef. 
Midway; point, on Glass peninsula, Stephens passage, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Manstield in 1889. 
Midway; reef, at the eastern entrance to Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Call in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 167;. 
Midway; rock (awash at highest water), in southern part of Wrangell strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Descriptive name, given by Meade in 1869. Linden- 
berg, in 1838, called it Polivnoi (awash). 
Midway; rock, near the Southern rapi<ls. Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Named 

Srednie (middle) by Vasilief in 1833. 
Midkoi, bay; see Krestof harbor. 
M'irJhji, cove; see Little. 
Mieshak; cove, on south shore of Alaska peninsula, between Cold and Portage l)ays. 

So called by the Russians. 
MiesofsH, point; see Black. 
il//V.sv*/.s'Aoc', lake; see Round. 

Mig-a; cape, on the northwest shore of Kanaga island, Andreanof group, middle 
Aleutians. So called by Tebenkof in 1849. Miga is the genitive of the 
Russian mig (wink, twinkling of an eye, no time). 
MikhailovsJcaia, bay; see Alimuda. 
Mikischkin, point; see East Foreland. 
Milavanof, river; see Chvilnuk. 
Miliflores, Punta de los; see Thousand Flowers. 

Miles; canyon,, in the Lewes (formerly Yukon) river, between lakes Marsh and 

Laberge, often spoken of as the Great canyon of the Yukon. Schwatka, 

who passed through it and its rapids on a raft, July 2, 1883, named it 

after his department commander. General Nelson Appleton Miles, U. S. A. 

Miles; glacier, near the mouth of Copper river. So named by Allen, in 1885, after 

Gene^-al Nelson A. Miles, U. S. A. 
Miles; pass, between the headwaters of the Copper and Tanana rivers. So named 

by Allen, in 1885, after General Nelson A. Miles, U. S. A. 
Milkie, point; see Rock. 
Mill; lake, near St. Paul, Kodiak, draining to Popof bay. At the mouth of the 

stream draining from it, Tebenkof, 1849, shows a melnitza (mill). 
Mill; reef, in Howkan strait, northwest from Howkan village, Cordova bay, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Sheldon Jackson in 1880. There v 
(or was) a sawmill near this place. 
Millard; trail, about 90 miles long, from Copper Center to Mentasta pass along the 
western slopes of Mounts Drum and Sanford. Prospectors' name. Some 
60 or 70 miles of this trail were cleared, under the direction of Mr. B. F. 
Millard, in or about 1898. 
Miller; cape, the eastern head of Sycamore bay, north coast of Kodiak. Named 
Maknashkina by Murashef in 1839-40. Tebenkof, 1849, calls it melnu-h- 
noi (relating to a mill), perhaps by reason of a mill in the adjacent bay. 
It has been called Millers eape by the Coast Survey. 
' Miller, cape; see Popof. 



,1111 -.11 1 r. 



286 ' [BiTi.i,.i87. 



Miller; crivk, trilmtary to Sixtymile creek, fmm tlie west, near longitude 141°. 

l^ocal name, from Al)ercronibie, 1898. 
Miller; lake, at iiead of North arm, IMoria sound, Prinee of Wales island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Clover, in 1885, perhaps after his wife. Has 

been printed erroneously Mitten and Mitter. 
Millerton; village, in the Nushagak enumerating district of the Eleventh Census, 

1890, «"ontaining a population of 165. Location not discovered. 
Mills; creek, tributary to Canyon creek, from tlie east, Kenai peninsula. Prospect- 
ors' name, from Becker, 1895. 
Mills; islet, in Krestof sound, north of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. Named 

Krugloi (round) by Vasilief in 1809. Renamed Mills by Moore, in 1897, 

after a prominent merchant at Sitka. 
Milne; jKMnt, somewhere on the Arctic coast, east of Colville river. So called l)y 

Dease and Simpson, 1837, in their narrative (p. 129). Location not dis- 
covered. 
Mine; harbor, in Herendeen bay, Alaska peninsula. So called by the Fish Commis- 
sion in 1S90. A coal mine was opened here in 1888. 
Mine: point, in Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by ]\Ieade, who in 1869 opened a coal mine near this point. 
Mineral; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the east, in the Nome mining region, 

Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. 
Mineral; creek, tributary to Port Valdes, from the north, near Lowe point, Prince 

William sound. Presumably a local name; puV)lished in 1898. 
Mineral; point, on the southern shore of San Antonio bay, Bucareli bay. Prince of 

Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Mineral by Maurelle and Quadra 

in 1775-1779. 
Miners; bay, in Unakwik inlet. Prince William sound. Local name, reported l)y 

Glenn in 1898. 
Mlium; cove, in Gastineau channel, near the town of Juneau. Local name, published 

by Dall in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 171), where it is written Miner's. 
Miners; point, on the eastern shore of Portland canal. Name published by the 

Coast Survey in 1897. 
Miners; river, triljutary to Miners bay, Unakwik inlet, Prince AVilliam sound. 

Local name, reported by Glenn in 1898. 
Minerva; mountain, in the southwestern part of Revillagigedo island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Minett; islet, in Jamestown bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by United States naval officers, in 1880, presumably after Lieut. Henry 

Minett, U. S. N. 
Mink; bay, indenting the southern shore of Boca de Quadra, southeastern Alaska. 

So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Minook; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the east, near longitude 150°. 

Apparently identical with Klanachargut (Klana-kakat) river of Raymond 

in 1869. Has been spelled Mynook and Munook. Named, presumably, 

after a Mr. Minook, the interpreter at Fort Reliance. 
Mint; river, tril)utary to Lopp lagoon, Seward peninsula. Name from Brooks, 1900. 
Mintok; lake, somewhere in the region south of Minook creek, draining to the 

Tanana river. Native name, from Raymond, 1869, who spells it Mintokh. 
Minx: islands, at head of Thorne arm, Revillagigedo island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Miraballes; jwint, in eastern part of Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Named Punta de Miraballes (point of white plums) by Maurelle and 

Quadra in 1775-1779. 
M'miiidd, volcano; see Iliamna. 



BAKEK.] 287 IWir-OTog. . 

Mirror; rreek, tributary to the Taiiana, fnnn the east, near latitude 62° 30'. Descrip- 
tive name, given by Peters and Brooks, in 1898. 

Miskuntrkakat, river; see Lebarge. 

Mission; cove, just north of Howkan village, Cordova bay, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Dall in 1882. Has also been named Hydah by Sheldon 
Jackson. 

Mission; creek, in the Eagle mining district, tributary to the Yukon, from the west, 
at Eagle. Local name, published in 1898. Its native name, as obtained 
by Schwatka in 1883, is Tatotlinda. 

Mission; creek, tributary to Port Clarence, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Missionary; range of mountains (2,500 to 2,800 feet high), east of Portage bay, on 
Lindenberg peninsula, Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Thomas in 1887. 

Mission Warehouse, village; see Shiniak. 

Mist; harbor, indenting the eastern shore of Nagai island, Shumagin group. Name 
published by the Coast Survey in 1882. 

Mitchell; bay, in Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Meade, in 1869, after his classmate, Lieut. Commander John 
Gardner Mitchell, V. S. N. 

Mitchell, island; see Wingham. 

Mitcliell; point, on the southern shore of Kupreanof island, Sumner strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver, in 1793, after Capt. William 
Mitchell, R. N. 

Mitchell; sunken rock, in Middle channel, Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by United States naval oflBcers in 1880. 

Mitchell; post-ofRce and trading post, on the upper Yukon, near the mouth of Forty- 
mile creek. The post-office was established in 1892, and discontinued in 
1896. Mr. L. N. (Jack) McQuestin was postmaster. In 1890 the popu- 
lation was reported to be 238. 

Mitkof; large island, off the mouth of the Stikine river, Alexander archipelago. 
Named by the Russians after a Captain Mitkof. Variously written Mitgoff , 
Mitkoff, etc. 

Mitrofania; bay, northeast from the Shumagins, indenting the south shore of Alaska 
peninsula. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Mitrofania; harbor, in Mitrofania bay, Alaska peninsula. So named by the Fish 
Commission in 1888. 

Mitrofania; island, west ot the Semidi islands, and near the south shore of Alaska 
peninsula. So named by the Russians, who wrote it Mitrofania and St. 
]\Iitrofania. Has also been written Mitrofa. 
Miiten, lake; see ]\Iiller. 
Mizofek, point; see Black. 

Moffet; cove, at east end of Izembek bay, on the north shore of Alaska peninsula. 
Named by Dall in 1882. The Fish Commission, 1888, show this eve 
divided into two parts, one called Sloss bay, the other Neumann l)ay. 
Moffet; point, the eastern point of entrance to Izembek bay, on north shore of 
Alaska peninsula. Named by Lutke, in 1828, after Midshipman Samuel 
Moffet, a member of his party. Has been called Neumann by the Fish 
Commission. 
Mogilnoi; island, southwest of Japonski island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Mogilnoi (grave) by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been called Shell 

island. 
Mogul; creek, tributary to Seventymile creek, from the south. L-.cal name, 
obtained bv Barnard in 1898. 



.Tloli — Tloo. 



288 [Bm,i..lS7. 



Mohican; rain-, Uu- wcstfiiuiiost i)<)int of Niinivak island, Bering sea. Named 
Boil l)v Telienkof, in lS4it, after Lieut. Roman Boil, who was in the party 
of Vasilief when Nunivak was discovered by Vasilief in 1821. Recently 
called Cape INfohican by the Coast Survey. 

Moira; hare rock (r»0 feet liigh), at entrance to Moira sound, Clarence strait, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Clover in 1885. 

Moira; sound, indenting the southeastern shore of Prince of Wales island, Clarence 
strait, Alexander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, "after the 
noble Earl of that title." 

Mukrorxktii, ])ay; see Puniicestone. 

M(ikri)rsh)i, cape; see Spray. 

M(Mniliia, river; see Mulchatna. 

Mole; harbor, in Seymour canal. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named ])y Mansfield in 1889. 

Moller; island, one of the Kudobin islands, on north coast of Alaska peninsula, near 
Tort Moller. So named by Dall in 1882. Also written Moller. 

Moller; j)ort, on the northern shore of Alaska peninsula. Partially explored by 
Staniukovich, of Lutke's party, in 1828, and named after his vessel, 
Moller. 

Mimilnti/otH's (Lus), islets; see Fish Egg. 

Monolith; point, on the western side of Portage bay, Alaska peninsula. Name 
l)ublished in Hydrographic Office Notice to Mariners No. 48, 1893. 

Montag-ue; island, in entrance to Prince William sound. Named Montagu V)y Cook 
in 1778. The native name Tsukli was also used by the Russians. The usual 
si)elling Montague has largely superseded the original spelling INIontagu. 

Montana; creek, tributary to Fortymile creek, from the south. Prosi^ectors' name, 
obtained by Barnard in 1898. 

Montekakat, creek; see Mentokakat. 

Monument; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Monument; point, rocks, and river, on eastern side of Kruzof island, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Monumentalnoi (monument) by Vasilief in 1809. 

Moonlight; ci'eek, tributary to Eldorado river, from the west, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Moonlight; creek, trilnitary to (Trantley harbor, from the north, Seward i)eninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Moore; channel, leading through some low sandy islands to Port Moore, Arctic 
coast, near Point Barrow. So named by the British Admiralty, in 1853, 
after Commander Thomas E. L. Moore, R. N. Its Eskimo name was given 
l)y the British as Ik-ke-ra-luk. Ray calls it, 1885, Ikiraaluk. 

Moore; island, in the Koyukuk river, near latitude 67°. So named by Allen 
in 1885. 

Moore; mountains, on the southern border of Chichagof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by the Coast Survey, in 1895, after Lieut. Commanders 
Edwin King Moore and William Irwin Moore, U. S. N. 

Moore; nunatak, in the Agassiz glacier, near southeastern end of the Chaix hills, St. 
Ellas alps. So called by Russell, in 1891, presumably after Will C. Moore, 
a member of his party, who was drowned in landing at Icy bav on June 
6, 1801. 

Moore; port, at Point Barrow. So named, in 1853, after Commander Thomas E. L. 
Moore, R. N., of the Franklin search expedition. 

MDornrsbni, V)ay; see Puniicestone. 

Moose; creek, tril)utary to Canyon creek, from the south, Kenai j)eninsula. Local 
name, from Becker, 1895, 



289 



.tloo— .Hor. 



Moose; nvek, tril.ntary to Fortymile creek, from tlie south, at tlu- international 
boundary. Loral name, published by the Coast Survey in 1,S98. 

Mndse, ereek; see Tsadaka. 

Moose Camp; place, on the northern l)ank of the Klutina river, about 10 miles 
above its mouth. Name from Abercrombie, 1898. 

Moosehorn; mountain (5,000 feet high), near the international boundary and lati- 
tude 63°. So named by Peters and Brooks in 1898. 

Mop; iMjint, at the head of Thorne arm. Revillagigedo island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Mordvinof; cape, forming the northern head of Oksenof bay, northwest coast of 
Unimak island, eastern Aleutians. Named Mordvinova (Mordvinof's) 
by Staniukovich in 1828. Lutke uses Noisak or Mordvinof. Apparently 
Noisak is the native name. Veniaminof, 1831, calls it Oksenof or Mord- 
vinof and Tebenkof. 1849, calls it Mordvinof or Oksenof. The Fish Com- 
mission, in 1888, called it Lincoln. 

Mordfinof, cape; see Lapin. 

Morgan; cape, the southwesternmost point of Akutan island, Krenitzin group, 
eastern Aleutians. So named by the Fisli Commission in 1888. 

Morjevskoi, peak ; see Walrus. 

Murjovi, island; see Hall. 

Mnrkovskoi, baj^; see Pumicestone. 

M'li'iii', island; see Horn. 

Morning Call; creek, trilnitary to Grand Central river, from the .-^outh, Seward 
peninsula. Name from Barnard. 1900. 

Morozovskie, bay; see Cold. 

Morris; reef, in Chatham strait, at eastern entrance to Peril strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by United States naval officers, in 1880, after William 
Gouverneur Morris, United States collector of customs at Sitka. 

Morse; cove, indenting the eastern shore of Duke island. Gravina group, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Nichols, in 1883, presumably after Fremont 
Morse, a member of his party. 

Morse; glacier, part of the 3Iuir glacier, southeastern Alaska. Named by Reid, in 
1892, after J. F. Morse, one of his companions in 1890. In Reid's tii-st 
publication of this (Nat. Geog. Mag., 1892, Vol. IV, map) the glacier is 
called West tributary (of Muir glacier). 

Mors, , island; see Bendel. 

Morse; rock (awash at low water), near Hemlock island. Port Chester, Annette 
island, Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey, presum- 
ably after Mr. Fremont Morse, of the Coast Survey. 

Morskoi; breaker, about half a mile westerly from Olga rock, at entrance to Salis- 
bury sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Morskoi (sea) by ^loore in 
1897. 

M'n-skoi, cape; see Hinchinbrook. 

M<n:<koi, cape; see Ocean. 

M'liskoi, cape; see Phipps. 

M'n:<koi, islet; see Navy. 

Miii'xkoi, rock; see Sea. 

Morton; fort, at mouth of the Kowak river, Hotham inlet, Arctic ocean. This 
name. Fort Morton, was published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

Morzhovoi; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula near its west- 
em end. Named Morzhovoi (walrus) by the Russians. Its Aleut name 
is Adamagan. Has been variously written Morjevskaia, Morshevoi, Mor- 
shovoi, 3Iorzovia, etc. 

M'lrzhoroi, island; see Hall. 

Morzhovoi, island; see Walrus. 

Buii. 187—01 riy • 



.tlor— ■'loll. 



v)<)() [Bl-I.l,. 1S7 



Morz/iox.i, isk't: m-i' Shaiak. 

Morzhovoi; native villajrc at western end (jf Alaska i)eiiin(snla. Xaiiu'd :M()i-/liovoi 

(walrus) liy the Russians. Variously spelled. There are or were loo 

villa^'es. one calUMl Old Morzhovoi, the other, New Morzhovoi, bein<j; 

about IL' miles apart. Old Morzhovoi was at the head of Morzhovoi l)ay; 

New Morzhovoi is on Tciders cove, which oj)ens into Isanotski strait. 

The Greek church here is named Protassof, and Petrof, 1880, called tlie 

settlement Protassof. 
Moser; hay, in Behm canal, indenting the western shore of Revillagigedo island, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey, in 1886, after Com- 
mander Jefferson Franklin Moser, V. S. N. i 
Moser; island, near hea<l of Ilooniah sound, Chichagof island, .Alexander ar<-hipel- | 

ago. So named l)y the Coast Survey, in !S99, after Lieut. Commander f 

Jefferson Franklin Moser, U. S. N. | 

Moses; point, the western point of entrance to llanus bay. Peril strait, Alexander ' 

archipelago. Named by Moore, in 1895, after Asst. Engineer Stanford , 

I'',lwood Moses, a member of his party. 
Mosman; inlet, in Etolin island, opening into Clarence strait, Alexander ai-chii>el- j 

ago. So named by Dall, in 1879, after Alonzo Tyler Mosman, Assistant 

Coast and Geodetic Survey, who made surveys in Alaska in 18()7. i. 

Mosquito; creek, tributary to Fish river, from the east, Seward j^eninsula. Proa- p 

pectors' name, of ol)vious origin. | 

Mosquito; creek, tributary to Tonsina river, from the south. Name from Sclu-ader, 

1900. 
Mosquito; fork, of South fork of Fortymile creek. Prospectors' name, i)ublished 

by the Coast Survey in 1890. 
Mosquito; fork, of South fork of the Koyukuk, near longitude 150°. Prospectors' 

name, of ol)vious origin; from Schrader, 1899. 
Moss; cape, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, a little east of Belkofski. 

Presumably a local name, reported by Dall in 1880. Erroneously Mosk. 
Moss; creek, tributary to Nome river, from the east, in the Nome mining region, 

Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. Ajiparently 

this is Irene creek or Laurada creek of a late ma]>. 
Moss; island, in Douglas bay, Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. So nameil l)y 

Thomas in 1887. 
Moss; mountam (1,631 feet high), east of Tamgas harbor, .Vnnette island, Alex- 
ander arcliipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
Moss; point, on the western shore of Tamgas harbor, Annette island, Alexander 

aichipelago. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Moth; j)oint, at entrance to Thorne arm, Revillagigedo island. So nanie(l hy the 

Coast Survey in 1891. 
Mound; hill (1,956 feet high), near the southern end of Revillagigedo island, Alex- 
ander ar(;hipelago. So named by Nichols in 1888. 
Mound; point, the northwestern point of entrance to Karta bay. Prince of Wales 

island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Clover in 1885. 
Mountain, bay; see Uniktali. 
Mountain; cape (500 or 600 feet high), Nagai island, Shumagin grou].. Named 

(4olova (mountainous) by Tebenkof, 1849. 
Mountain; cape, on Raspberry island, Kupreanof stiait, Kodiak group. Named 

Gorie (mountain) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Mniinhiin, cape; see Kayak. 
Mountain; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the east, in the Nome minii^;; 

region, Seward peninsula. Prosi)ectors' name, published in 1900. 
Mountain; creek, tributary to Stewart river, from the south, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 



BAKER.] '^91 



ITIou— Mul. 



Mountain; glacier, on the luaiiilaud, near liead ..f Thomas bay, Houtheastern 

Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 
Mountain; point, on Lindenberg peninsula, Wrangell strait. Alexander archipelago. 
Apparently so called by Coghlan in 1884. In the Coast Pilot, 1883, this is 
called Cove point. Apparently identical with Waterfall (vodopada) cape 
of Lindenberg, in 1838, or possibly Krutoi (steep) of Lindenberg. 

Mountain; point, on Revillagigedo island, near north end of Annette island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. !>^o named by Nichols in 1883. 

Mouiitdin, river; see Liard. 

Mountain Head; jioint, near Southern i-a})ids, Peril strait, Barauof island, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Coghlan in 1884. 

Mount Little; island, in the Yukon river, just above mouth of the Koyukiik. So 
named by Allen in 1885. 

Mud; bay, indenting the northern shore of Chichagof island, Icy strait, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by Hanus in 1880. 

Mud; bay, indenting the southern shore of Chignik bay, Alaska peninsula, bocally 
so known. There is an extensive mud flat at its head. Also called Doris 
bay. 

Mud; creek, tributary to Red bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Helm in 1886. 

Mud; glacier, on the western bank of Stikine river, near the international boun<lary. 
Called Dirt glacier l)y Hunter in 1877. On late maps Mud glacier. 

Muerta; island, in Port Real Marina, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Ysla del Muerto (island of the dead) bv Maurelle and Quadra in 
1775-1779. 

Muffin; islands, in the entrance to Ernest sound, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Snow in 1886. 

Mug-anolowik; shallow stream, in the Yukon delta, debouching between Scannnon 
bay antl the mouth of Black river. Eskimo name from Dall, who 
wrote it Muganolowik. By the Western Union exploring jjarties, 1865- 
1867, this was called Pope's river, after Frank L. Pope, of that expedition. 

Muir; glacier, at head of Glacier bay, southeastern Alaska. Named in a])out 1880, 
after Jolm Muir. 

Muir; inlet, at head of (ilacier bay,, southeastern Alaska. Name published in the 
Coast Pilot (1883, p. 189). Named after John :\Iuir. 

Muiiopki, island; see St. Lazaria. 

Mukacharni; hill ( 1,700 feet high), north of Grantley harbor, Seward i)eninsula. 
Name from Beechey, 1827, who wrote it Muck-a-char-ne. 

Mulchatna; river, tributary to the headwaters of the Nushagak river; also Eskimo 
villages on same. Written 3Iolchatna l)y Petrof in 1880. Has been often 
written Malchatna. Here written Mulchatna to confoi'm to the reported 
local pronunciation. 

Mule; rock (awash at high water) , in entrance to Tamgas harbor, Annette island, 
Alexander archipelago. So named, presumably, by Nichols in 1883. 

Mulg-rave; hills or mountains, north of Kotzel)ue sound, between the Noatak river 
and the sea. Cook, in August, 1778, named a jioint in this vicimty 
Mulgrave, back of which were "hills of a moderate height" Beecley, 
coming nearer, in 1826, saw that these hills were farther inland than Cook 
suppose<l and called them the Mulgrave range. 

Mulgrave; port, in Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. Visited, sketche<l and 
named by Dixon in 1787, "in honour of the Right Honourable Lord ]\Iul- 
grave." It was called Rurik harl)or by Khromchenko, in 1823, presum- 
ably after the Russian American (-ompany's 1)rig Rvrik. 

Mulligan; creek, tributary to Eldorado river, from the east, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 



II II III — .'I J •!• 



292 [Rri.l.. 187. 



Mumtrak; KskiiiK- villajrc, at ln'a.l ui <T()n(liK-\\>i hay, Bering' «'a. Poi-ulatioii in 
IStH), Itil'. NaiiH'fniiii I Vtrof, 1880, who spelled it Muiutrahaiunte. Vari- 
ously givt'ii Mniiitrahahanmt, etc. 

Mumtrelek; Eskimo vilhifre, on left bank of the lower Kuskokwim. Bethel Mis- 
sion is at this place. First reported by Petrof, in 1880, as Mumtrekh- 
lojraniute, and variously written Mumtreleganiut, Munitreckhlagainute, 
etc. Munitrelega-mut (smokehouse people) was so called from the fact 
that here a peculiar house for smoking fish was first erected. 

Mungoark; river, tributary to F:schscholtz bay, from the east, Seward peninsula. 
Called Kuuk on British Admiralty chart 593 (ed. of 1882) and Mungoark 
on a recent map. 

MimiiKi, village; see Ninilchik. 

Mvni)i)k, creek; see Minook. 

Munoz; point, the westernmost point of Khantaak island, Yakutat }>ay, suutheast- 
ern Alaska. Named Munoz by Malaspina in 17(»1. It is Southwest 
point of Tebenkof in 1849. 

Murder; cdve, at the south end of Admiralty island, Alexander archii)elago. So 
named by ^leade, in 1869, on account of the murder here, by the natives, 
of a small party of traders. 

Murdo; islet, in Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander aix'hipelago. S(j named 
by Nichols in 1883. 

Murray, cape; see Nunez. 

Murre; point, in Kiliuda bay, Kodiak. Named Arie (a sea bird, the arrie or 
murre or guillemot, Pallas's murre, Uria lomvia arru) byTel)enkof in 
1849. 

Murre; rocks, near Yukon harl)or, Big Koniuji island, Shumagin group. Named 
by Dall in July, 1874. There were clouds of murres in this vicinity at 
that time. 

Mnsaichie Xuf<e; see Chacon, cape. 

Muse; island, in Gambier bay. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by ]\Iansfield in 1889. 

Mnshukii, island; see Turnagain. 

Mu^koieika. Raymond, 1869, shows a native village on the right l)ank of the Y'ukon, 
about 65 miles above Anvik, bearing this appellation. Both place and 
name have vanished from recent maps. 

Mussel; point, in Redfish bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. Named 
Mussle by Closer in 1897. 

Mussel; jjoint, on San Fernando island, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales arc-hipelago. 
Named Punta Almejas (mussel point) by Maurelle and (Quadra in 1775- 
1779. 

Mute. Eskimo word lor j)eople; variously written iniut, )iiutt'. and miif, and added 
to the name of the people. Thus, Ak-mute, Pai-nuite, etc. 

Mutnaia; small stream, on Kenai peninsula, debouching at Anchor point. Cook 
iidet. Named Mutnaia (muddy) by Wosnesenski about 1840. 

Muzon; ca])e, the southernmost point of Dall island, Dixon entrance. It is highly 
Ijrobable that this is Cabo de Mufioz or Muiioz Goosens or Mufioz (Jorcns 
of Caamafio, in 1792, and that Vancouver, in copying from Caamafio, trans- 
posed two letters, making INIuzon. In this form it has come into general 
use and is well established. Dixon, in 1787, called it Cape Pitt, and about 
the same time it was named Irving by Douglas. Tebenkof, in 1848, 
«;al]ed it Kaigani, evidently the native name wliich has also been written 
Caiganee, Kygane, etc. 
MiliiunL; creek; see Minook. 



BAKER.] 298 



Myr— IVak. 



Myrtle; creek, tril)ntary to ^[iddle fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near loiijri- 
tilde 150°. Prospeetors' name, reported by Selirader in 1899. 

Mystery; creek, tributary to the Niakluk river, from the north, in tiie Eldorado 
milling district, Seward peninsula. Local name, pul;)lishe(l in 1900. 

Mystery; creek, tributary to Shovel creek, from the west, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Mystir, rock; see Mastic. 

Na. .Vn Indian word meaning rirer; much used in the Copper river region and 

added as a final syllable to the names of rivers; as Tanana, Chitina, etc. 
Nabesna; river, one of the principal tributaries of the Upper Tanana. According 

to Allen (p. 136) "The natives of the Upper Tanana call that river 

Nabesna." Peters and Brooks, 1898, say that this use, mentioned by 

Allen, is locally obsolete, and they apply the name not to the main stream, 

but to a principal tributary. 
Nachalnie, island; see Initial. 
Xadialnie, point; see Entrance. 
Nachr/elmt; glacier, on the southern side of Klehini river, southeastern Alaska. 

Native name, from the Krause lirothers, in 1882, who write it Nachgelssit. 
Nachk, bay; see Flat. 
NacMezJima, bay; see Cam}? Coogan. 
Nachlezhnoi; island, south of Middle island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Nachlezhnoi (chief) by Vasilief in 1809. 
Nackchamik, island; see Nakchamik. 

Nadezhda; group of islets, in the M'estern part of Krestof sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named Nadezhda (hope) by Vasilief, in 1833, after Krusenstern's 

vessel. 
Naducha; islet, on the southwestern edge of the Sandman reefs, northeast of 

Sannak. Called Nadoutcha Iw Lutke and Nadoucha by Dall. Nada is 

the Aleut word for tvest, from which word the name of this western islet 

is obviously derived. 
Naerie; rock, at entrance to Hot Springs bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Vasilief in 1809. 
Nagai; island, one of the largest of the Shumagin group. Native name, from early 

Russian explorers. Has also been written Nagay. 
STagai; rocks, off the -western shore of Chirikof island. So named by Kashevarof 

in about 1830. Erroneously Naga and Nagau. 
Naghn ikhla rigamute, village; see Nakolkavik. 
Nag-inak; cove, at head of Anderson bay, Makushin ba\-, Unalaska. Native name, 

from Veniaminof, 1840. 
Nagru'l-, river; see Naknek. 
i\\^/:(^fy«;Z', island; see Nakchamik. 
Naha; bay, indenting the western shore of Revillagigedo island, Behm canal, 

Alexander archipelago. Native name. Dall in the C'oast Pilot (1883, 

p. 75) says, "known as Naha bay." 
Nahihmud; native village, in Kiluden bay, on southern coast of Kodiak. Was 

called Nahimood by Lisianski in 1S04. Presumably- a native name. 
A^ahsai/rrniiu, point; see North. 
Xdliincuk, lake; see Salmon. 
Nakalilok; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northeast of 

Sutwik island. Native name, from Russian Hydrographic chart 1379 

(ed. of 1847), where it is written Nakkhalilok. 
Nakat; harbor, about 3 miles northeast of Port Tongass, Dixon entrame. So named 

bv Nichols in 1888. 



Niik— Njio. 



294 [Bru,.l«7 



Nakat; inlet, north east of Dixon entrance. Local name, of Imiian oiiijin. Xichols 
savs in tlie t'oast Pilot (1S91, p. 7H). "The body of water between Cai)e 
Kox anil Toiifrass is sometimes called Nakat Inlet, Imt that name really 
ai>j)lies only to the inlet proper," whose southwest point of entrance is 
he(lf,'e jioint. See also Fillmore. 

Nakat: inonntain (2,!>21 feet hi^h), on the mainland, nortlu-ast of Dixon entrance, 
••^o named by Xichols in 1883. 

Nakchamik; island, near the entrance to Chignik bay, Alaska i>eninsula. Native 
name, from the Russians. Variously written Nackclminik, Nagzamik, etc. 

Naked; island, at the south end of Lynn canal, near Funter })ay, Admiralty island, 
.Vlexan<ler archipelago. Descriptive name, given by Manstield in 3890. 

Naked; i-lands, in the northern part of I'rince William sound. So name<l by Aber- 
crombie in 1898. 

X<il:h. bay: see Flat. 

Naknek; lake, between Becharof and lliamna lakes, Alaska peninsula. Native 
name, from Lutke, 1828. According to Vasilief its native name is Aku- 
logak. Has also been called Illiuk lake. Petrof, in 1880, named it Walker, 
after (ien. F. A. Walker, Superintendent of the Tenth Census. 

Naknek; river, draining from Naknek lake westward to Bristol ))ay, Bering sea. 
Native name, from Lutke, 1828. Erroneously Naknik. 

Xaknek, village; see Snworof. 

Nakolkavik; Kskimo village, on the left bank of the Kuskokwim, near its mouth. 
Its native name, according to Nelson, 1878-79, is Naghaikhlaviganuite, 
and according to Spurr and Post, 1898, getting their inforniation from mis- 
sionary Kilbuck, Nacholchavigamut, i. e., Nakolkavik peoj^le. Petrof 
wrote Naghaikhlaviganuite on hismaji and Naghikhlavigamute in his text 
(p. 17). Population in 1880, 193. 

Nak'wasina; island, one of the Siginaka group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Nakwasinskoi by Vasilief in 1809. 

Nakwasina; passage, separating Halleck is'and from Baranof island, Alexander 
archipelago. It was called Nakwasinskaia gulf ])y Vasilief in 1S09, and 
lias also been written Noquashinski and Little Noquashinski bay. Accord- 
ing to (ieorge Kostrometinoff this is from the Russian nnkirnsJiiKit (fer- 
mented ). 

NaluJdchrak, cape; see Providence. 

yitiiKlak, crag; see T^ighthouse rocks. 

Nameless; vnyw, on the western shore of Kenai peninsula. Called Besinienny 
(without a name) by Wosnesenski about 1840. 

Nameless; islet, in tlie southern part of the Necker group, Sitka sound, Alexander 
archi])elago. Named Beziemiannoi (nameless, anonvnionsj bv Vasilief in 
1809. 

Xamtschak, rocks; see Lighthouse. 

XnnniKt, river; see Cantwell. 

Nandell; Indian village, on Tetling river, near Wagner lake, about 20 miles from the 
Tanana river. Visited by Allen, in 1885, who found a village of four houses 
and SH jieople, presided over Ijy tlie chief Nandell. Has l>een called 
Nandell's and, by error, Nandellas. 

Nanok. This, says Lang.sdorf ( II, 83 », was the nickname given to Baranof l)y the 
natives about Sitka. 

Xinnofjolokkik; Kskimo village, in the Big Lake country. Visited by Nelson in 
January, 1879, wiio rej)orted its native name to be Nanvogalokhlaganmte. 
1. e., Nan-vog-a-lok-lak people. Erroneously Nauvogalokhlaganiute in 
text of Tenth Census. In Eleventli Censu.«, 1890, called Nunavoknak- 
chlugamiut. Population in 1880, 100; in 1890, 107. 

X'luni-hhiL, village; see Kaguvak. 



''^KF.R] 295 Nao— Nat. 

X(t)tiiclil(i(/(iiiuil, villajre; see Nanklak. 

Napai; Eskiiao village, on the northern hank of the Kuskokwim, a little ahove 
Kohnakof. Spnrr and Post ohtained from Dr. Roniig, in 1898, the name 
Xapainuit, i. e., Napai people, as the Eskimo name of this place. 

Napaiskak; Eskimo village, on the left bank of the Kuskokwim, about 4 miles 
lielow Bethel. Aeeording to Nelson, 1878-79, its native name is Napaskiag- 
amute, and according to missionary Kilbuck. 1898. it is Napaiskdgamut, 
i. e., Napaiskak people. 

Napakiak; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Kuskokwim, about 10 miles 
below Bethel. Nelson, 1878, reports the native name as Napahaiaganuxte, 
and this is copied l)y Petrof and the Hydrographic Office. Spurr and Post, 
1898, following missionary Kilbuck, write Napachiakachagamut, i. e., 
Napakiakai'hak people. 

Napean; point, the southwestern point of entrance to Eliza harbor. Admiralty island, 
Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. Named by ^'ancouver, in 1794, 
who, in the text of his original editit)n of 1798, spells it Napean. It 
occurs there four times, always spelled Napean. On his chart, on the 
French copy of it, and in the 8° edition of 1801 it is Nepean, and this form 
has gained wide usage; variously corrupted to Nepen and Nepken. 

Napoleon; creek, tributary, from the east, to South fork of Fortymile creek. 
Prospectors' name, from Barnard, 1898. 

yapiiliiiii: point, in the Yukon delta, on right bank of the Kwikpak pass; was so 
called by Raymond in 1869. Not identifiable on recent charts. 

Narro-w; cape, the northwestern point of Unga island, Shumagin group. Named 
Tonkie (narrow) by the Russians. 

Narrow: cape, the northern point of entrance to Ugak bay, on eastern shore of 
Kodiak. Named Tonkie ( narrow ) by the Russians. 1 1 was named Hollings 
l>y ^Vleares in 1788. It has been called Low, Narrow, Tonkeye, etc. 

Narrow; creek, tributary to Red bay, Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Helm in 1886. 

Narrow^; passage, in Behm canal, separating Rudyerd island from Revillagigedo 
island. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Narrow; point, on Prince (jf Wales island, in Clarence strait, opposite mouth of 
Ernest sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Tonkie (narrow) by the 
Russians. Has also been written Tonkey. 

Xarriiir; point, on the right bank of the Chilkat river, near its mouth. Named 
Tonkie (narrow) by Lindenberg in 1888. The name is obsolete. 

Narroti^ point; see Tonki. 

Narrow; strait, between Kodiak and Spruce islands, Kodiak group. Named I'zen- 
koi (narrow) or Elovoi (spruce) l)y 3Iurashef in 18;W-40. 

Narrows; mountain (2,940 feet high), in the eastern part of Annette island, Alex- 
ander ari'hipelago. So nameil b\- Nichols in 1888. It is near Tongass 
narrows, whence the name. 

Narrows; point, on the southern shore of Kittiwake island. Kodiak group. Named 
Uekosti (narrows) by Murashef in 18:^9-40. 

Narrows; two peaks (2,750 and 2,759 feet high ), at the northern entrance to Wran- 
gell strait, Lindenberg peninsula, Alexander archipelago. So named by 
Thomas in 1887. 

Xamnkl, harbor; see Pavlof. 

Nuftikiiu, island; .see Two Headed. 

Ndtac/fhln. The Krause brothers, 1882, report Natagehin to be the native name of a 
small stream near Krotahini pass, southeastern .Vlaska. 

Natazhat; mountain range, north of ^fount St. Elias. Native name, reported l)y 
Hayes in 1891 as Nat-a/.h-at. 

yatrlinl:, villayfe: see Xuchek. 



IVal — >«'«•. 



2\)C) [Bn.i,. 1ST. 



Nateekin; Ali'iit villa>,'('. at Xatfckin hay, in Captaiii.s l)ay, Uiialaska. Sarichef 
shows a villairi' lifH', in 17!t2, wliicli lie calls Natieka settlcinciit. Vciiia- 
iiiiiiof, hs:; '.calls it Xatickiiiskdc, and says it consists of two huts (yoiirts) 
and h'l pcojiU'. 

Nateekin; hav, indcntin.uM lie southwestern shore of Captains hay, I 'nalaska, east- 
ern Aleutians. (iille<l Natiekinskaia hy Venianiinof and known locally 
as Xatet'kin l)ay. 

Nathlie; uiountain, east of Copper river, l)etween Drum and Sanford mountains. 
So uained hy Ahercromhie in 1898. Perhaps it should he Nathalii'. 

Nation; jioint, tlie western point of entrance to Egg harhor. Coronation islan<l, 
Alexander archipelago. So named hy Snow in 1886. 

NalKiita, river; see White. 

Xatiilteu, village; see Notaloten. 

X<iu(jrik, village; see Suworof. 

Nauklak; Eskimcj village, in the interior of the eastern part of Alaska peninsula, 
on the trail from Kamishak hay, Cook inlet, to Naknek lake, and about 
15 miles east of the latter. According to Spurr and Post, who oljtained 
their information, in 1898, from the chief of Savonoski, its native name is 
Xaoui'hlagamut, i. e., Nauklak people. 

Xdii/clii, l)ay and river; see Black. 

Sniihilidck, l)ay; see Kiavak. 

Navy; islet, near Port Wrangell, Alaska peninsula. Named Morskoi (sea) hy 
Vasilief in 1832. Lutke has Isle du Large and the Coast Survey, 1869, 
Navy islet. 

Navy; i)eak (3,734 feet high), near McHenry inlet, Etolin island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Nazan; hay, indenting the eastern shore of Atka island, Andreanof grou}), middle 
Aleutians. Aj^parently so named hy Tel)enkof. Lutke (;alls it East Ijay. 

Nazan; hay, indenting the southern shore of Little Tanaga island, Andreanof gnjup, 
middle Aleutians. So named hy T('l)enkof in 1S49. 

Xazi'hik, island; see Two Headed cape. 

Xf((-L-/iih; river; see Niukluk. 

Near; caj)e, on the northwestern shore of Kittiwake island, Kodiak grou}). Named 
Blizhnie (near) by Murashef in 1839-40. 

Near; groui)of islands, the westernmost of the Aleutian chain, and hence nearest, of 
all the Aleutians, to Asia. The early Russian explorers, accordingly, called 
them Blizhnie (near) islands. Langsdorf has (II, 13) Plishnie ostrowa or 
nearest islands. Have also been called lilijnie or Rat islands. Berg says 
Bering called them Deception islands, l)ut Lutke says he tinds no warrant 
for this in Bering's journal. Variously written Blijni, Blijnies, etc. 

Near; island, in St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Blisnieand Bliskie (nearor close) 
by tlie early Russians. Lisianski, 1804, calls it Close island. 

Near; island (600 feet high), near the southeastern shore of Nagai island, Shumagin 
group. Named Blizhnie (near) by the Russians. 

Near; point, on the western shore of Piper island, Fish bay, Peril strait, . Alexander 
archipelago. So named l)y United States naval officers in 1880. 

Nearer, point; see Blizhni. 

Xeclmiji', rock; see Eldred. 

Necker; bay, indenting the western shore of Baranof island, Alexander archii)elago. 
Calle.l l»ort Necker by La Perouse in 1786. Called Kamenistaia (rocky or 
stony) by the Russians. Has been called Rotiky, Stone, and Stony. 

Necker; islands, near the southern entrance to Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alex- 
ander aniiipelago. So called in the Coast Pilot, 1883, and attributed to 
ha I'erouse, 1786. La Perouse's chart 16 shows Port Necker in this jdace 
an. I chart 17 I'.irt Xeker for the .sune place. 



BAKER.] 297 



Neo— Ner. 



' Xt'chir, islos; peo Guibert. 

Nedostatka; islet, in the uorthein part ni Krestuf sound, Alexander aicliipelairo. 
Named Nedostatka (want) island by Vasilief in 183:!. 

Needle; peak (1,700 feet high), near the eenter of Coronation island, .Vlexander 
areliipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Needle; peak, near the head of Bay of Waterfalls, Adak island, middle Aleutians. 
Descriptive name, given by Gibson in 1855. 

Needle; roi-k, near the northwestern shore of Amaknak island. Captains bay, 
Unalaska. Descriptive name, given by Dall in 1874. 

Needles; mountain (7,000 feet high), on right bank of the Tanana river, near latitude 
iV2°. Descriptive name, given by Peters and Brooks in 1898. 

Neets; bay, in Behm canal, indenting the northwestern shore of Revillagigedo 
island, Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Negro; I'ape, in the eastern part of Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Calxi Negro (black cape) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Neg-sue: creek, tributary to Penny river, from the east, in the Nome mining region, 
Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 

Neycdnak, river; see (xolsova. 

Nellie Juan; jxirt, indenting the western shore of Prince William sound. Discov- 
ered and named, in 1887, by Samuel Applegate, after his schooner, XrUie 
Jtdiii. This spelling is from Applegate' s map, where it is also written Nell 
Juan and sometimes Nelly Juan. 

Nellie Juan, cape; see Aspid. 

Nelwn, creek; see Baker. 

Nelson; island, on the western coast of Alaska, northeast of Nunivak island, Bering 
sea. So named by Gannett, in 1880, after Edward William Nelson, who 
spent about five years in this region as an observer for the United States 
Signal Service and collector for the Smithsonian Institution. 

Nelson; lag(jon, on tlie northern shore of Alaska peninsula, a little west of Port 
MoUer. So named l)y Dall, in 1882, after Mr. E. W. Nelson. 

Nelson; point, in Behm canal, on the mainland, the southern" point of entrance to 
Smeaton bay. So named 1)y Vancouver, in 1793, after Lord Nelson. 

Ni'hipiiki, ca}»e; see Kekurnoi. 

Nemeth; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near longi- 
tude 148°. Presumably a prospectors' name, published by the Coast 
Survey in 1899. 

Nenevok; lake, between the headwaters of Togiak and Kanektok rivers, western 
Alaska. Native name, from Spurr and Post, of the (leological Survey, 
who camped on its shore September 10, 1898. They give the name as 
Nenevokuk adding " Nenevok =?«Av' with descripti\e ending."" 

Nenllt.9r}iik, cape; see Ninilchik. 

Nepean, })oint; see Napean. 

Nepovorotni; group of rocks, south of Japonski island, Sitka sound, .Mexander 
archipelago. Named Nepovorotnoi (not turning) by \'asilief in 1S09. 
Entering Sitka harbor by Middle channel, these rocks, on the port hand, 
are noi to be turned around. The course is to be kept for aliout a mile 
further, when one reaches Povorotnoi (turning) island, around which one 
turns to the anchorage. Has also been written Nepoverotni. 

Neprop, island; see Impassable. 

Xeprojiiisknol, island; see Impassable. 

Nerelna; creek, tributary to the Chitina river, from the south. Native name, from 
a manuscript map made by prospectors in 1900. 

Nerpichi; islets, south of Middle island, Sitka .sound, Alexander archii)elago. 
Named Nerpichi (seaH by \'asilief in 1809. 

.\irpii-liH', l)ay, etc.; see Seal. 



Nor— ><'\v. 



298 



.\rri>ilrli;i, islet; sec Iki-rinaU. 

Nesbitt; ixiiiit, tlic sontlu'iiuiiost puint of Zan-iul^u inland, Alexander archiiK'lairo. 
So iiaiiu'tl l>v \";ui(ouver in 179:!. Has alsj been written Nesbit, this foini 
heiiif,' foun<l ill the 8° edition of Vancouver (vol. 4, p. 245). 

Nesbitt; reef, off Point Nesbitt, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Snow in 1S8(). 

Netne; lake, near Tyoiiek, at head of Cook inlet. Name pnblishe<l l.y the Coast 
Survey in 189S. 

.\,iiiii<iiiii, bay and jniint; see Moffet. 

Neumann; island, the easternmost of the Kudiakof islands, Izembek l)ay, Alaska 
peninsula. So named by the Fish Commission, in 1888, after Mr. Rndolpli 
Neuniaim, of the Alaska Commercial Company. 

Neva; bay. immediately north of Cape Edgecumbe, on the western side of Kruzof 
island, Alexander archipelago. So named by officers of the Russian- 
American Company in about 1849. 

Neva; island, east of the Parker group, Sitka sound, Alexander archij)elago. So 
named by Vasilief in 1809. Has also been called Nevi. Named after the 
ship Xera. 

Neva; point, at junction of Nakwasina passage and Neva strait, on Baranof island, 
Alexander archipelago. Apparently so named by Dall in the Coast Pilot, 
1888. 

Neva; strait, separating Baranof island from Partofshikof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Named by TJsiaiiski, in 1804, after his vessel; called Olga strait 
by Vasilief in 1809. It then included what has been termed Olga strait. 
The present Neva channel is the Olga strait of the Russian chart of 1809, 
Init not of Tebenkof. 

Nevski; group of islets, south of Japonski island, Sitka sound, Alexander archipel- 
ago. Presumably named by the Russians, in 1809, after the war ship 
Neva, which was at Sitka in 1804. 

Xi'ir, harbor; .see Baralof. 

Xeir Archangel, town; see Sitka. 

Xeiv Balaam; see Uzinkee. 

Xeirhi'tT)/, river; see Teslin. 

Xeir Bnyoitlof, island; see Grewingk. 

A'tirrhiih-li. Allen, 1885, shows a river tributary to the Yukon, from the north, near 
longitude 153°, which he calls Newchuklikakat, i. e., Newchukli river. 
Late maps have in this vicinity two streams, called Birch creek and Island 
creek. The latter seems to be the Newchukli of Allen. 

New Eddy stone; islands, in Behm canal, near entrance to Rudyerd l)ay, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Apparently so named by the British Admiralty about 
1865. 

New Eddystone; point, in Behm canal, the south point of entrance to Riulyerd 
l)ay, .Mexaiider archipelago. So named on the Russian charts. The jioint 
is a short distance from New Eddystone rock. On a late Coast Survey 
chart the point is called Louise. 

New Eddystone; rock, in Behm canal, between Smeaton and Rudyerd bays, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver, in 1793, from its resemblance 
to the Light-House rock off Plymouth, England. 

Newell; sunken rock, in Port Chester, Annette island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 93). 

Newenham; cape, on the mainland, the northern point of entrance to Bristol bay, 
I'eriiig sea. So named by Cook, July 16, 1778. The natives call it Black, 
on account of its color, and Telienkof has Newenham followed by chcrnoi 
(black) in i>arentliesis. 



I 



BAXKR-l 299 IVow-Nik. 

Neirirarf/iit, island; t^ee Xowi. 

Xfir Morzliori, xilla^c; see Mdrzliovoi. 

}\f)r Itiixxiii, colony; see (ilory ol Russia. 

Newton; creek, tributary to Dry creek, near Nome, Seward ]>eninsula. Name from 

Barnard, 1900. 
Newton; jrlaoier and mountain (13,774 feet high), near Mount St. Elias, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named l.y Russell, in 1890, after Henry Newton, 

author of a report on the geology of the Black Hills of Dakota. 
Niblack; anchorage, in Moira sound. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archii)elago. 

So named by Clover, in 1885, after Ensign Albert Parker Niblack, V. S. N., 

a member of his party. Erroneously Niblick on British Admiralty chart 

1>4.S1. 
Niblack; islands, in Ernest sound, Alexantler archipelago. So named by Snow, in 

1886, after Ensign A. P. Niblack, U. S. N., a member of his party. 
Niblack; point, on Cleveland peninsula, in Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Clover, in 1885, after Ensign A. P. Niblack, U. S. N., a 

member of his party. Erroneously Niblick point. 
NiclKjln.y, settlement; see Korovinski. 
Nichols; bay, indenting the southern end of Prince of Wales island, Dixon entrance. 

So named by the Coast Survey, in 1880, after Commanrler Henry Ezra 

Nichols, r. S. N. 
Nichols; group of islands, in Tlevak strait, opposite Breezy bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Dall, in 1882, aft er Commander H. E. Nichols, V. S. N., 

who reconnoitred this region in 1881. Near them are " The Sentinels " 

or Sentinel islands. Coast Survey chart 713, published in 1883, calls the 

whole group Sentinel islands. 
Nichols; hill (280 feet high), at mouth of Nushagak river. So named by the 
'X Fish Commission, in 1890, presumably after Commander li. E. Nichols, 

" r. R. N. Erroneously Nicholls. 

Nichols: mountain, near Mount St. Elias. So named by the New York Times 

Expedition, of 1886, after Conuuander H. E. Nichols, U. S. N. 
Nichols; passage, between Annette and Gravina islands, Gravina group, Alexander 

archipelago. Called Nichols pass in the Coast Pilot (1883, \^. 79), after 

Commander H. E. Nichols, V. S. N. 
Nichols Bay; cannery (now l)urned and abandoned), in Nichols bay, at the 

southern end of Prince of Wales island, Alexander archii»elago. So called 

in the Eleventh Census, 1890. 
Nicholson; rocks, north of Makhnati island, Sitka sound, Alexander an"hii>elago. 

So named by United States naval officers in 1880. 
Nlegh'kUk, river; see Clear. 
Nickta, cape; see Prince of Wales. 
Nigaluk; Eskimo village, near the mouth of Colville river, Arctic coast. Native 

name, published as early as 1867, and probably earliei-. 
yii/(i 7'(/, river; see Yukon. 
Nights Lodging; cape, on the southern shore of Afognak island, Kotliak group. 

Named Nochlega (night's lodging) by Murashef in 18:>9-40. 
Nik, river; seeKaknu. 
Nikolai; creek, tributary to McCarthy creek, from the east. So called l)y the 

prospectors, after the Indian chief, Nikolai. 
Nikolai; house, on Nizina river, south bank, near the mouth of the Chitistone. 

Name of an Indian chief, reported by Hayes, in 1891, who says " Nicolai, 

or Scolai, as the Yukon Indians call him." 
Xikohii. isian<is; see (ireen. 



,lk-Mz. 



300 fK'''-'" i«. 



Nikolaief; nii.-lioniirf aii.l small vilhiKf, ni-ar Bclkofski, Alaska peninsula. Called 
Nikiilaicvskx I'V retnif, in ISSO, and Xicoloffsky by the Kisli Coniniission. 
rrcsiniiaiil.v named by the Russians after Tsar Nikolas. 

Mkolii.i, nick or shoal; si'e C'ozian. 

Xikiilslci, rn]K'; see Taiiak. 

Nikolski; nativi' villaj^e, on the northern shore of Uinnak, opposite Driftwood hay. 
So called hy the Russians as early as ISHO. Venianiinof s])eaks of it a.s 
Kiecheshnoe (river), now called Nikolski. Population in 18:54, S;i; in 1S80, 
127; in 1890, about 100. Lutke writes it Retchechnoi and Petrof, Nikolsky. 

yikolsbii, village; ><«e Korovinski. 

Nilkoka; river, tributary to the Tanana, from the north, near latitude 65°. Native 
name, reported by Peters and Brooks in 1898. 

Ninag-iak; island, in Hallo bay, Shelikof strait. Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. 

Niiiilchik; cape and river, on the eastern shore of Cook inlet. So called by Tebenkof, 
1849. Wosnesenski, aV)out 1840, calls the cape Neniltschik or Sunit and 
the river Chnik-Chnak. 

Ninilchik; rock or rocks, on the eastern shore of Cook inlet, between Kasilof and 
Ninilchik river mouths. Native name, from Tebenkof, 1849. 

Ninilchik; village of 81 people (1890), on eastern shore of Cook inlet, south of the 
Kasilof river mouth. Late maps show a fishery here. A small Russian 
settlement was made here early in the century. Petrof (Tenth Census, 
VIII, p. 27) says: "A number of 'colonial citizens,' or superannuated 
employes, of the old Russian Company were ordered to settle some fifty 
or sixty years ago (1830 or 1820) at Ninilchik, and their descendents live 
there still." On Wosnesenski' s map in Grewingk, about 1840, the place 
is called Munina and the nearby cape Neniltschik or Sunit. 

NitiH(tii-7''n(/<it, lake; see Becharof. 

Nipple; mountain, in California ridge, Uravina island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Nichols in 1883. 

Nipples (The); two mountains (elevations 2,450 and 2,900 feet high), near Sha- 
kan ])ay, on Koscitisko island, Alexander archipelago. .Called Shakan 
nipples in the Coast Pilot of 1883 (p. 101). Usually called The Nipples. 

Xi/irnhitdiii, bay; see No Thorofare. 

Nisling; river, tributary to the White river, from the east, near longitude 140°. 
Native name, reported by Hayes in 1891. 

Nismeni; cove, at north end of Baranof island, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. 
So named l)y ^Nloore in 1895. 

Nismeni; lake, on the border of Malaspina glacier. Tebenkof shows such a lake just 
behind Point Riou (Nismeni of Tebenkof), which he calls Nizmennie( low). 

Nismeni; j)oint, the northernmost point of Baranof island, Peril strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Nismeni (low or low-lying) by Vasilief in 1833. 
Has also been written Nismenna and Nizmennie. 

Nitak; Indian village, on Knik arm of Cook inlet. Native name, reported by 
I'etrof, in 1880, as Nitakh. 

Niukluk; river, in Seward peninsula, tributary to Golofnin sound. An Kskimo 
name, now used locally, and variously written Nea-kluk, Neukluk, 
Neukeluk, etc. The Western Union Telegraph P^xpedition map of 1867 
calls it Icathluik. In 1869 it was called Fish river, apparently by Dall, 
and has since borne this name on most maps till quite recently. The 
Russians, as early as 1852, call e<l it Ikiut-pak (Ikiut-big) or Big Ikint of 
the Eskimo. See also Eaton. 
Xiiiiiiil:, island; see Chernobour. 
.\ (';/(//(', lake; see Lower. 



BAKEI!.] 801 MZ— ^OU. 

Nizina; glacier, and river, trilmtary to the Chitina. Native name reported, in 1S91, 
l)y Hayes, who spells itNizzenah, i. e., Nizi river. 

Nizkoi, island; see Crooked. 

Nizmeiinia, point; see Shoals. 

'Nizmennoi, cape, island, etc.; see Low. 

Xi:in('iiiii>i, point; see Rion. 

Noatak; Eskimo villages, on the lower part of tiie Noatak river, northwestern 
Alaska. Called Noatagamutes, i. e., Noatak peoples, Ity Petrof in 1880. 

Noatak; river, in northwest Alaska, triVjutary to Hotham inlet. On early map.s 
this is called Inland river and sometimes Inland or Nunatok. The pre- 
vailing modern usage is Noatak, as above given. 

Nob; mountain, near George inlet, Revillagigedo island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Nichols in 188.3. 

Nocarh'ro, strait; see Trocadero. 

Nodili'ijd, cape; see Night's Lodging. 

Nocotncargiii, creek; see Beaver and Birch. 

Nohoolcltinta. Allen, 1885, gives this as the name of a native village on the right 
bank of what is now called the South fork of the Koyukuk, about 3 miles 
from its mouth; see South fork of Koyukuk. 

Xoldaloldon, village; see Notaloten. 

Noisdk, cape; see Mordvinof. 

Noisy; islands, near the northeastern .shore of Kodiak. Called Sodomniia ( noisy ) 
by Tebenkof, 1849. A cape near it was called Noisy cape by the Coast 
Survey in 1867. Has also, on one chart, been called Zotschomnia. 

Nokrot; Eskimo village, near Cape Romanof, on south shore of Norton sound. 
Native name, f)btained by the Coast Survey, in 1898, and pultlished as 
Nokrotmiut, i. e., Nokrot people. 

No Man; creek, tributary to the Koksuktapaga river, from the east, Seward penin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Nome; cape, on the northern shore of Norton sound. Named Tolstoi (blunt or 
broad) by Tebenkof in 1833. Russian Hydrographic chart 1455, pub- 
lished in 1852, calls it Sredni (middle), adding Tolstoi as a synonym. 
The name Nome first appears on British Admiralty charts, after the 
Franklin search expeditions, and was given by Kellett, in 1849. Sir 
William Wharton, hydrographer to the British Admiralty, writing in 
April, 1901, says: "The name Cape Nome, which is off the entrance to 
Norton bay, first appears on our charts from an original of Kelletts in 1849. 
I suppose the town gets its name from the same source, but what that is 
we have nothing to show." Prof. George Davidson says that this nameless 
cape on the original sheet bore the memorandum "fXame^' which the 
draftsman interpreted to be C. Nome. 

Nome; mining camp, near Cape Nome, on southern shore of Seward peninsula. 
Local name. Schrader and Brooks, who visited it in October, 1899, speak 
of the thriving young city of Nome, first called Anvil City, now officially 
Nome. Gold was found here in June, 1898, and on October 18, 1898, the 
Cape Nome mining district was organized. 

Nome; mountains, in the Nome mining region, in southern ])artof Seward peninsula. 
Local name, published in 1900. 

Nome; post-oftice, at Nome, Seward peninsula. E.^tablished in .June, 1899. 

Nome; river, in the Nome mining region, Seward peninsula. Name pul)lished in 
1900. 

Noocheek, village; see Nuchek. 



Noo— >«»r. 



302 ■ [Hn.i.lsT 



Nook (The); <-<'Vt', iii.U-iitiii^' the ea.sU'iii slioic ofTi^alda island, Kn-nitziii .monp, 

(•astern AU-ntians. So named l)y the Fish Commission in 1888. 
.\oi,k ( 7'//. ). village; see Teller. 
Xoakiiiiit. station; see Teller. 
Noon; |H)int. tlie nortlieastermuost point of Pleasant island. Icy strait, Alexandcf 

archipelago. Name published by Dall, in 1883, in the Coast Pilot. 
Noon; i)oint, the southernmost point of Jacol) island, northeast of the Shunuiirin 

group. Named Poludennic (noon) l)y Woronkofski in 1887. 
yuuloirttkioii, lake; see Nutuvukti. 
Noouook, settlement; see Nuwuk. 
Xotfunshinshi, passage; see Nakwasina. 
Norcnixs, island; see Jackson. 
Nordenskiold; river, tributary to Lewes river, from the south, near longitude 136°. 

Named by Sehwatka, in 188;^, after Baron Nils Adolf Erik von Nordenskiold, 

the celebrated Swedish arctic explorer. 
Xtjrjtill:, sound; see Sitka. 
Noriega; point, on the southern shore of San Juan Bautista island, Bucareli bay, 

Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta Noriega by Maurelle iuid 

Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Norma; bay, indenting the western end of Izembek bay, Alaska peninsula. So 

named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 
Norris; glacier, in Taku inlet, southeastern Alaska. So called by Keid, in 1892, 

(National Geographic Magazine, vol. IV, p. 46). 
North; anchorage, on the northern shore of St. George island, Pril)ilof grouj^ P»ering 

sea. Local name. 
North; arm, of Bay of Pillars, Kuiu island, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. 

Name published by the Coast Survey in 1899. 
North; arm, of Hooniah sound, Chichagof island, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by the Coast Survey in 1899. 
North; arm, of Moira sound, Clarence strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by 

the Coast Survey in 1894. 
North; arm, of Three Arm bay, Adak island, middle Aleutians. Descriptive name, 

given by Gibson in 1855. 
North; bay and point, on the northern shore of Stuart island, Norton sound. So 

named by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
Xorlli; bay, in Dall island, opening into Tlevak strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Nichols in 1881. 
Xorth; bay, on the northern shore of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, Bering sea. 

Name published by the Coast Survey in 1890. 
North; cape, between Necker and Whale bays, on the western shore of Baranof 

island, Alexander archipelago. So named by the Russians. 
North; cape, on the northern coast of St. Lawrent-e island, Bering sea. Named 

Sievernoi (north) by the Russians. Erroneously Siepernio. 
North; cape, the northernmost point of Atka, middle Aleutians. Named Sievernoi 

(north) l)y Tebenkof. 1849. 
North; cape, the northernmost point of Kanaga island, middle Aleutians. So 

named by Gibson in 1855. 
North; cape, the northernmost point of Spruce island, Kodiak group. Named 

Sievernie (north) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Xorth, cape; see Afognak. 
Xfirth, cape; see Hall. 
Xtjiili, cape; see Stag. 

North; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk, from the east, near longi- 
tude 147°. Name i)ublished by the Coast Survey in 1899. 



I'.AKEi;.] 303 Nor— Nor. 

North; dat, in Wnuigell strait, Alexander archii)elairo. Called Wran<iell North 

Flat by Meade in 18(i!). 
North; fork, of Birch rreek, eauterii Alaska. Loeal name, i^ihlished by the Coast 

Survey in 1899. 
North; fork, of Fortyniile creek, iieai- the international boundary line. Local 

designation, published by the Coast Survey in 1890. Presumably in use 

as early as 1886. 
North; fork, of the Koyukuk river. Prospectors' name, reported l)y Schrader 

in 1899. 
Xorlh. harbor; see Coal. 
North; hill (422 feet high), on the northern coast of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, 

Bering sen. Presumal)ly a local name, pul)lished .l)y the Coast Survey 

in lS7r). 
North; island, at entrance to Port McArthur, Kuiu island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Helm in 1886. 
North; island, in the southern part of l^ynn canal, Alexander arciH])elago. So 

named l>y Beardslee, in 1880, or i>ossibly by Meade, in 1869. 
North; island, in Whitewater bay. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by (xlass in 1881. 
North, island; see Raspl:>erry. 

North; ledge, in the southern end of Lynn canal, near Funtei- bay, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Manstield in 1890. 
North; ledge, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in 

1869. 
North; i)assage, connecting Eliza harl)or with Woewodski harbor, Admiralty island, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 
North; point, in Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by INIeade in 1869. 
North; point, on Lindenberg peninsula, Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Dall in 1879. 
North; point, on the northern shore of St. Paul island, Pril)llof grouj), Bering sea. 

Local name, from the Russian Sievernoi (north). A late Coast Survey 

map has Severnoye, while Elliott, 187-t, wrote it Nahsayvernia, which he 

translates "on the north shore." 
North; rock, at northern point of entrance to Iliuliuk harbor, Captaiiis bay, Lhia- 

laska. So named by Dall in 1871. 
Xurth, strait; see Kupreanof. 
Nortli; sunken rock, in Dixon entrance, just north of and near West Devil rock. 

Name published by the Coast Survey, in 1886, but appears to be now- 
obsolete. 
Xoiih Broaaiu/li; island, in Nichols passage, Alexander archipelago. So called by 

Nichols in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 95). 
Northeast; bluff, on the northern shore of Attn island, western Aleutians. So 

named by Gibson in 1855. 
Northeast; cape, the easternmost point of St. Lawrence island, Bering sea. So 

called by Tebenkof, 1849. It is Cape Anderson of Russian Hydrographic 

chart 1455 (ed. of 1852), chus preserving the name which, in 1778, Cook 

gave to St. Lawrence island. Krusenstern in his Hydrographic Memoirs 

named this Shishmaref (Chichmareff), after Captain Shishmaref, who 

surveyed the shore of the island in 1821. 
Northeast; harbor, between Karluk and Ugak bays, on the northern shore of 

Kodiak. So called by Moser in 1899. 
Northeast; harbor, indenting the southwestern shore of Little Koniuji island, Shu- 

magin group. Local name, })ublished by Dall in 1875. 



>or— >i«»r. 



304 [Hi'i.i.. 1S7. 



Northeast; |...iiit. the M..rtlii"asti'rmn(.st |»nnt ul Saint Paul islaixl. I'nl)il,.l -n,u]), 
Bi'riiijr sea. Local name. Tiklinicnief, \Si)2, calls it Voytochnic (cast) 

point. 

Northeast; i>oinI, Ilic northcastcrnniost point of Saniiak island. 80 cailc<l hy Dall 

in iSSO. 
Northeast; point, tlic noriiicrnniost point of Khantaak island, Yakutat l)ay, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named by Tebenkof in 1849. 
Northerly; island, in St. John harbor, Zarembo island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by otticers of the V. S. S. Arhims in 1884. 
Northern; rapids, in Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Called Perwie porogi 

(first rapids t by the Russians and often spoken of as the First or Northern 

rapids. 
North Foreland; cape, on the northwestern shore of Cook inlet. So named by 

Vancouver in 1794. 
Xoiih (,'mii; rock, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So called l)y Nicliols 

in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 132). 
North Head; i>oint, the northern point of entrance to Coal liarb(jr, [Tnga island, 

Shumagin group. So named, ]iresuinably, by the Western Tnion Tele- 

grai>h Expedition in 1865. 
Xorlh Jli'dd; si-e Sigak. 
Ndiih Ilmd; see Clakta Head. 
Xnrlli M'irhh, i.<let. (dacierbay; see Marble. 
North Passage; i)oint, the northern point of entrance to Freshwater ])ay, Chichagof 

island, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. It was named Xortli 

l)y iNIeade in 1869. 
North Passage; rock, near Stockdale harl)or, Prince William sound. S(( named ))y 

Vancouver in 1794. 
North Point; ledge, in Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So caik'd hy 

Nicliols m the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 181). 
Xoiili I'liivt Bdker; see Baker. 
North ftuadra; mountain (2,353 feet high), on the mainland, just north of entrance 

to P.oca de Quadra. So named ])y Nichols in 1883. 
Xijrlli .Senudi, island; see Aghiyuk. 
North Star; creek, tributary to Windy creek, from the east, Seward j)eninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Northumberland; cape, the southernmost i»oint of Duke island, (iravina group, 

Alexander archipelago. Named by Vancouver, in 1793, "in honor of that 

illustrious family." 
Northntiiljcrknid, i.sland, see Duke. 
Xorllwt'st, cape, Tanaga island, see Sajaga. 
Xr/rtlnvest, cape, Unimak island, see Sarichef. 

Northwest; harlx)r, indenting the northern shore of Little Koniuji island, Shuma- 
gin group. So called by the fishermen. This may be the Agugum m\& 

(God's bay) of the Aleuts. 
XortlnrcKl; island, one of the Inian group. Cross sound, Alexander archipelago. 

Apparently so named by Dall in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 186). Has also 

been written North-west. 
Northwest; point, the northwestenimost i>oint of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, 

Bering sea. This may be the Zapaihiie (west) point of Tebenkof, 1849. 

Name pul)lished by the Coast Survey in 1890. 
X'irlliirrsi, point; see Chibukak. 
Northwest; shoal, lying northeast of the anchorage in Port IMulgrave, Yakutat 

bay, southeastern Alaska. Called Northwestern by Dall in the Coast 

Pilot (1883, p. 208). 



HAKKK.l 3Q5 



Nor — l\oj'. 



Northwest Shoulder; cape, on tlie northwestern shore of Attn island, western 
.leutians. So called by the United States North Pacific Exploring Expe- 
dition, 1855. Tebenkof, 1849, calls it Kresta (cross) cape. 
Norton; bay, in the northeastern part of Norton sound, Bering sea. Name pub- 
lished l.y the Coast Survey in 1884. 
Norton; sound, in the northeastern part of Bering sea. Discovered by Cook in 
September, 1778, and by him named Norton "in honour of Sir Fletcher 
Norton (afterwards Lord Grantley), speaker of the House of Commons." 
Sometimes called Norton bay. The designation Norton bay is now gen- 
erally applied to the northeastern arm of Norton sound. 
Norutak; lake, near the Arctic circle, drained by the Kowak river. Native name, 
reported by Cantwell, in 1885, as Nor-u-tak. Schrader, in 1899, calls it 
Nowgettoark. 
Nose; j.oint, in Behm canal, on the northwestern shore of Revillagigedo island. 
Named by the Coast Survey in 1891. Brow and Chin points are near by. 
Nosovskoi; native village, on the western end of Unimak island, eastern Aleutians, 

alx.ut « miles northwest from Scotch Cap. So called by Lutke in 1828. 
Notaloten; \illage (of 15 people), on north bank of the Yukon, about 20 miles 
above the moutli of the Koyukuk. A native name, reported in the Tenth 
Census (1880) as Natulaten, in tlie Eleventh Census (1890) as Notaloten, 
and on Coast Survey chart 3093 (ed. of 1898) as Nohtalohton. 
Notch; mountain (1,879 feet high), on the southern end of Revillagigedo island, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
No Thorofare; bay, indenting the eastern shore of Sitka sound, Baranof island, 
Alexandei' archipelago. Named Niprohodni (no thorofare) by Vasilief 
in 1809. It is Poroshki bay of Tebenkof, which name has also been 
wiitten Boroshki and Paroshki. 
No Thorofare; island, in Wrangeli strait, Alexander archipelago. Called No 

Thoroughfare by Nichols in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 131). 
No Thorofare; point, on Woewodski island, Wrangeli strait, Alexander archipel- 
ago. Named No Thoroughfare l)y Meade in 1868. Has also Ijeen written 
No-thoroughfare. 
Not/i(((jij>i(i-t<i, slough; see Island. 
Notokdkdt, river; see Dall. 
N<}iir!i(iij<(k; river, etc. ; see Nushagak. 
No Use; ledge, in Swanson harbor, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by the Coast Survev in 1890. Has also been written No-use. 
NorartixKi, colony; see Glory of Russia. 
Novie Balaam, village; see Uzinkee. 
Novy, islands; see Pribilof. 

Nowell; i)oint, on the western shore of Prince William sound. So named by Van- 
couver in 1794. Has also been printed No wall . 
NowgeUoark, lake; see Norutak. 

Nowi; island, mountains, village, and river tributary to tlie Yukon, from the south, 
about 100 miles below the mouth of the Tanana river. Native name, first 
reported by the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, in 18()7, as Newi- 
cargut, the termination cargut, now written kabif, meaning river. (See 
Kakat. ) Petrof, in 1880, wrote the name Noyakakat, now usually written 
Nowikakat. 
Noiiakakdt, island; see Nowi. 

Noyes; island, off Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archijielago. So named by Dall, 
in 1879, after Mr. William M. Noyes, of the Coast Survey jjarty employed 
in Alaska, 1873-1880. 

Bull. 187—01 -20 



Miia— Niik. 



H(U) [BIU.I,. 1S7.. 



Nuasuknan; lii^'li I'lnl'l. l)cin>r a •'notcMl laiidiiiark visiMc for many iniU"^; arotiii<l, 
nil tin- Mi'ade river, northern Alaska. Native nann> from Kay, who j>a><j^ed 
it March 2it, 1883. Ray writes it Nua-suk-nan. 

Nubbins; mountain, in northern i)art of Annette island, Alexander archii)elago. 
So named hy Nichf)ls in I880. 

Nubble; point, the western point of entrance to Kahsitsnah bay, Kachemak hay, 
Cook inlet. Descriptive name, given hy Dall in 1880. 

Nuchek; liarl)or, in Port Etches, Prince William sound. Native name, from the 
early Russians. Chernof, in 1830, calls Port Etches, as here used, Nuchek 
l)ay, and what is here called Nuchek harbor he calls Constantine harbor. 
Portlock, in 1787, called this Brooks harbor. 

Nuchek; village, on Nuchek harbor. Port Etches, Hincliiniirook island, Prince! 
Wilhani sound. Native name, adopted by the Russians at an early day 
and variously spelled Natcheek, Noocheek, Nutschek, etc. The Russians 
built here, in or al)out 1793, a stockaded post, called Fort Konstantine or 
Konstantinovsk. On a Russian chart of 1802 it is called fort and harbor 
of [illegible] Konstantine and Helena. It was visited by Vancouver in; 
June, 1794, and was not in existence in June, 1792. Ball's Alaska (p. 318) 
gives the date 1798, wkich appears to be an error for 1793. 

Xuclifk, island; see Hinchinbrook. 

yucliek, port; see Etches. 

Nndre-irok, lake; see Selby. 

Nuestra Senora del Carmen; see Kayak. 

Nugget; creek, tributary to Grand Central river, from the south, Seward penin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Nugget; creek, tributary to Kuskulana river, from the north. So named, in 1900, 
by Gerdine, who found a large block of native copper near it. 

Nugget; creek, tributary to Oregon creek, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Nugget; gulch, in Eagle City mining district, near headwaters of American creek. 
Miner's name, obtained l)y Barnard in 1898. 

Nugget; gulch, near Bonanza bar, Fortyniile creek. Prospectors' name, obtained 
by Barnard in 189S. 

Xnlikdlil/iiiiiii/, mountain; see Gold. 

Nuka; bay, indenting the southern shore of Kenai peninsula, Gulf of Alaska 
Ajjparently a native name. Published by the Russians, in 1847, an( 
perhaps earlier. 

yiihrlni/ithrliakiik; creek, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, a little below 
Nulato. Native name, published by the Coast vSurvey in 1898. 

Nuklit; Eskimo village, on the eastern shore of Norton sound, immediately behinc 
Cape Denbigh. Name from Tebenkof, 1849. Name not shown on recen 
maps. 

Nukluk; creek, tributary to the Kanektok river, from the south, alxtut 30 mile! 
east of Kuskokwim bay. Native name, Niik-luk. obtained by Spurr an< 
Post in 1898. 

Xukiukdijel, station; see Walker. 

Nuklukayet; village, on the north bank of the Yukon at mouth of the Tozi river 
'//■on north l)ank at mouth of the Tanana. The maps are confused anc 
contradictory as to its site. Perhaps it has occupied two sites. Populatior 
in 1880, 29; in 1890, 120. Native name, variously spelled. Dall spells i 
Nuklukahyet, I'etrf)f, Nuklukaiet. Also Nuklakyet. Nuklukyet, etc Se( 
also Tuklukyet. 

Nuklunek; mountain, at headwaters of the Kanektok river, western Alaska 
Native name, obtained by Spurr and Post, of the (ieological Survey, wh< 
l)a.ssed near it September 7, 1898. Pronounce<l Nu-khi-nek. 



Nukshak; rape, foriiiini^ the ssouth western point of entrance to Hallo bay, on north 
sliore of Shelikof strait. Native name, from'the Russians, which has been 
})rinte(l Nnchtschak and Xukhshak. 

Nulato; i>ost .tr village, on the Yukon river, north bank, about 400 miles above the 
mouth. Founded >)>• the Russian Malakof who built a l)loekhouse here in 
bS3S. Shortly after, in his absence, this was burned by the Indians. It 
was relniilt by Vasili DerzhalMn or ('.*) Derabin in 1842. 

Nulato; river, tributary to the Yukon, from the north, at Nulato. Tikhmenief, 
1861, calls it Xulata. 

yulv/cto/ul:: Eskimo village, in the southern part of Nelson island, Bering sea. 
Visited by Nelson in December, 1878, and its name reported by him as 
Nuloktolgamute. Petrof writes it Nulokhtologamute, i. e., Nuloktolok 
people. 

yiiii/ii/cdk-; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Yukon, opposite the mouth of 
Shageluk slough. Name from Raymond, 1869, who wrote it Nnnaikaga- 
nuite. May be identical with Khaigamute, or perhaps Ookaganuite of 
Petrof, 1880. Both name and place have vanishexl from recent maps. 

Nunaktak; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Yukon, about 30 miles above 
B Anvik. Native name, from Nelson, 1878-79, who wrote it Nunakhtagamute, 

i. e., Nunaktak people. 

Nuiiamiut; native village, on the shore of Three Saints harbor. Kodiak. Errone- 
ously Ziatitz. See Three Saints harbor. 

yiiiKuniut, harbor; see Three Saints. 

Xii)iapil)ilugak, village; see Fort Hamilton. 

ytinaria, .settlement; see Sedaru. 

Nunatak; glacier, near the mouth of Russell tionl. So named hv Kussell, in 1891, 
because of a rounded butte of bare rock, a )iunatiik. rising through it. 

Nanatok. river; See Noatak. 

Nttnavii. This P^skimo name appears on Kay's map, of 1885, for some feature just west 
of the United States signal station Utkiavi, Arctic coast. 

Nunez ; point, the southeast point of Bean island, near Cape Chacon, Dixon entrance. 
Named by Caamaiio in 1792. Vancouver, following Caaniano, has on his 
chart Punta de Nuiiez. It is C'ape Murray of some of the early traders. 

Nunez; reef, l)are at half tide, off Nunez point, Dixon entrance. So named by the 
Coast Survey in 1885. Has also been written Nuiiez. 

Nunigvaiak. Crooked island, in the northern part of Bristol hay, is shown by 

VSarichef, 1826, as conii)Osed of two islands, the northern one being desig- 
nated by its Eskimo name Nunigvaiak. TeVwnkof, 1849, calls it Nunaliugak. 

ynitik. island; see Chernobour. 

Nuniliak; cape and summer village, on the southwestern shore of Afognak island, 
Kodiak group. The cape was called Malinovskoi (raspberry) by 3Iurashef 
in 1839-40, who gives Nuniliak as the native name. .\ village here he calls 
the Malinovskie lietnik (Raspberry .«ummer village). Tel)enkof calls the 
.settlement Nunalik. 

Nunivak; island, on the eastern shore of Bering sea. Discovered by tin- Russian 
naval officer Vasilief, July 21, 1821, and named by him after his ship 
Ofkritif (discovery). Etohn and Khromchenko, in ships of the Russian- 
.\merican Company, found this island at about the same tune. Speaking of 
this, Lutke says the native name Nunivak (lie writes Nounivak) has been 
properly retained on thecharts, and headds had thiscourse l)een followed in 
similar cases much confusion and embarrassment would have been avoided. 
Has been variously written Nounivak, Nounivok, Xunivack, Nuniwak,etc. 

Nunochok; Eskimo village, in the Big Lake region. Visited by Nelson in .January, 
1879, who reports its native name to be Nuiun-hogmute, i.e., Nunochok 



%UII «H»f». 



308 



Nunochok— Cniitiiuud. 

pi-oplc. Tojuilatioii in 1880, 40; in 1890, 185. Sjjelled Nnnochogaiunte 

in till' Tenth Census (text, p. 1 1 ) and Nunachanagluuniut in the Eleventh 

Census (p. 1()4). 
Nushag-ak; l)ay or estuary, at nunUli of tlie Nusiia<j;ak river. C'alled Nusiui]j;ai<^ bay 

l.y Tehenkof, 1849. 
Nushag-ak; lake, between Kuskokwini river and Bristol bay. On late maps this is 

railed Tikchik, and the river draining from it to the Nushagak river is 

railed Tikehik river. 
Nushagak; river, tributary to the head of Bristol bay. Native name, reported l)y 

the early Ru.ssian explorers as Nushegak and Nushagak. Lutke, 1828, 

writes it Nouchagak. Apparently it is the river which ("ook, in 1778, 

named Bristdi. 
Nushagak; trading post, at mouth of Nusliagak river. The Russians estal)iished a 

tra<ling post at the mouth of the Nushagak, in 1818 or 1819, and called it 

.\lexandrovsk, perhaps after Alexander Baranof, under whose orders the 

post was established. Variously called since then redoubt or fort and 

spelled Alexander, Alexandrovsk, Alexandre vski, etc., and erroneously 

.Vlexandra. Now generally known as Nushagak. The post-office Nusha- 
gak was established here in August, 1899. 
.XiishiiL'diitiKi, river; see Toklat. 
Nutkwa; inlet and lagoon, on the northeastern shore of Cordova bay, Alexander 

art'hipelago. Native name given as Nutqua by the Coast Survey in 1899. 
Nutuvukti; lake, near the Arctic circle, drained by the Kowak river. Apparently 

a native name, reported by Schrader, in 1898, as Nootowucktoy. 
Nutzotin; range of mountains, near the headwaters of Tanana river. Named h} 

Peters and Brooks, in 1898, after a tribe of Indians in the region. 
Nuwuk; Eskimo settlement, at Point Barrow. Nu-wuk or Noowook means Th 

I 'dint. "The assemblage of winter huts at Point Barrow is so named bj 

tile Eskimo." Variously written Noowook, Noo-wook, etc. Populatior 

in 1853, 309. 
.\i/rlilii, cape; see Prince of Wales. 
Oiillrk, lake; see Kulukak and Ualik. 
OdHiijiiiinit, village; see Ualik. 
Obernoi; point, on the eastern shore of Port Levashef, Captains bay, Cnaiaska, 

Called Oliernoi (upper) by Dall in 1872. Presumably it was locally sc 

known. 
Obetavannaia; open bay, between Banner and Korovin bays, on northwestern coas' 

of Atka. So called by Lutke about 1880. 
Olxjiiritii, islet, point, etc. ; see Burnt. 
O'Brien; i-reek, tributary to Fortymile creek, from the north. Miners' name 

published by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
O'Brien; creek, tributary to Klokerblok river, from the south, Seward peninsula, 

Xauir from Barnard, 1900. 
Obsechki; islet, in the eastern part of Sitka sound, Baranof island, Alexandei 

Hichipchigd. Named Obsechki (miss fire) by Vasilief in 1809. Has alsc 

bi-eii written Obsetchka and Obsetchki. 
Observation; island, at entrance to Steamer hay, Clarence strait, .Vicxander archi- 

l)elago. So named by Snow, in 1886, whose astronomical station was or 

this island near its north end. 
Observation; pcmit, (,n the northeastern shore of Stuart island, Norton sound. Sc 

nanicil by the Coast Survey in 1898. 
Observation; ruck, in the inner arm of Nakat inlet, southeastern Alaska. So cal 

by Nichols in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 79). Not named on any chart. 



BAKER.] 309 



Obs— Oks. 



Obfiervatory, island; see Pyramid. 
Obsiekaitisliie, point; see Drying. 

Ocean; cape, the southern point of entrance to Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. 
Named Morskoi (ocean or sea) by Tebenkof in 1849. It is dou])tless 
identical with Cape Phipps of earlier charts. See Phipps. 

Ocean; creek, debouching between York and Cape Prince ( )f Wales, Seward i)eninsnla. 

Name from Brooks, 1900. 
(Jchck, island; see Middleton. 
(h-hmkieen, creek; see Oksa. 

Oconnor; glacier and river, on upper waters of the Alsek river, northeast of Yakutat 
bay. So named bv Petsrs in 1899. 

Odd Fellmus, cape; see Starichkof. 

Odgovigamiit, village; see Uknavik. 

Odiak; cannery, of the Alaska Packer's Association, about 3 miles south of Orca, 
Prince William sound. Apparently this is only another rendering of some 
native word which is written Eyak, Ighiak, etc. See Eyak. 

()di(tk, lake and village; see Eyak. 

(kJinakoi, rock; see Lone. 

Ogliug-a; island, at the western end of the Andreanof group, middle Aleutians. It 
is Ogloga of Lutke. This with Skagul island constitute the Delarof 
islands of Lutke. Has also been written Ogliouga. 

Oglodak; islet, off the western end of Atka, middle Aleutians. So called by Lutke 
aljout 1830. Also has been written Oglodok, Ogmodak, and Ogmodakh. 
This would seem to come from the Aleut word Agligak (albatross). 

Ogowinag-ak; Eskimo village, on the northern shore of Norton bay. Native name, 
from Petrof, 1880, who reported its population as 20, and its name Ogow- 
inagak in his text (p. 11) and Ogowinanagak on his maps. 

Ohio; creek, tril)utary to Jackson creek, from the north, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Okag-anak; Eskimo village, on the left bank of the Kuskokwim, about 85 miles 
aljove Bethel. Native name, from Nelson, 1879, who wrote it Okhaganak. 

Okiben, island; see King. 

Oklvaki, rock; see Fairway. 

Okhme, mountains; see Ahklmi. 

Oknag-amut; Eskimo village, on the north bank of the Kuskokwim, above Kal- 
chagamut. Eskimo name, from Nelson, 1879, who wrote it Okhogamute, 
i. e., Okok people. Has also been written erroneously Okhagamute. 
Coast Survey charts have Oknagamut, and this is the name, according to 
missionary Kilbuck. It is said to mean village on the other side. Pro- 
nounced Ook-n;t-ga-miite. Has also been written Oh-hagamiut. Popula- 
ti(jn in 1880, 130; in 1890, 36. 

Oknakluk; lake, on the water portage between the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. 
Eskimo name, from Spurr and Post, 1898. Apparently this lake, 2^ miles 
long and 4 feet deep, is the one called Ookaht on Coast Survey chart 3092. 

Ok}i(iri(/amiit, village; see Uknavik. 

Okiiiifl:(iteInie, cape; see Termination. 

<>kj)iktalik, village; see Opiktulik. 

Oksa; creek, tributary to the Stikine from the east, near Little Canyon. Native 
name, from late Coast Survey charts, where it is written Ochsakieen, 
Och-sa-ki-een, and Oksakiin. The termination seems to l)e a variant foi-m 
of hi)ii (river), so often occurring in this region. 

Oksenof; bay, on the northwestern coast of Unimak island, ea-«tern Aleutians. 
Called Oksenov'a (Oksenofs) by Veniaminof in 1831. 

Okaenof, cape; see Mordvinof. 



Okh-Oll. 



310 ri"-i.i- 187. 



Ok.oiku'ok: riviT, somowlu-iv in llif Yiikcii .U-lta. I...ra1i<iii \uA .IcIcriniiUML Name 
from KK'ViMith (Vnsiis, ISiK) \\k • "" 

Okwega; pass, into the Apoon inoutli of the Yukon river. So calltMl })y tlu- Coast 
Survey in ISitS. 

Ohii, mountains; sec Aiai. 

<)l,l Ainheafdl, fort; see Andreafski. 

Old Crow; river, tributary to tlie i'oreupinc. I'roiu tlie north, about 25 miles east of 
tbe international buiuulary line. So called by the Coast Survey in 1895. 

Old Harbor; small harbor, on the eastern sliore of Makushin bay, Unalaska. The 
present settlement of Makusiiin is on its shores. It is so called, says 
Veniaminof, because a Russian ship wintered here in 1761. Tebenkof, 
probably erroneously, applies the name to a harbor or open bay on the 
sndlh sliore of Fnalaska, nearly o])posite the head of Beaver bay. 

(>/(/ Jlarhnr, t)ay; see Old Sitka. 

(M Ilarlinr, Kodi«k; see Three Saints. 

Old Kootznahoo. Formerly a populous Indian village stood on tlie northern side 
III Cliaik bay, on the western coast of Admiralty island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Its native name, according to Dall (Coast Pilot, 1883, p. 175), was 
Letushkwin. Now generally referred to as Old Kootznahoo. 

Old Man; island, in the eastern part of Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Ysla del Viejo (island of the old [one]) by Manrelle and Quadra 
in 1775-1779. 

01(1 .Uaii, river; .see Kanuti. 

Old Morzhonii, village; see Morzhovoi. 

Old Sitka; harbor, in Starri-gavan bay, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. It 
was on the shores of this harbor that the first Russian settlement was 
planted, by Baranof, in 1799. Here he built the fort Archangel Gal)riel, 
which the natives destroyed in 1802. Thereupon this site was abandoned 
for the present site of Sitka, and henceforward this place is referred to as 
the (lid harbor (starri-gavan). Vasilief, in 1809, calls this Starri-gavan (old 
harbor) bay. 

Old Sitka; rocks, in entrance to t^tarri-gavan bay, Sitka sound. Alexander archi- 
j>elago. Name i>ublished by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Old Ti/onek; see Tyonek. 

Oletiy, island; see Deer. 

Olga; bay, an ann of Alitak bay, indenting the western shore of Kodiak. Presum- 
ably so named by the Russians. Name published l)y the Eleventh 
Census, 1890. Olga is a Russian feminine proper name. 

Olga; islands, in Dolgoi harboi', Dolgoi island, neai' Belkofski. Local name, reported 
by Dall in 1880. 

Olga; jioint, the northernmost point of Krestof island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by the Russians. 

OI<j<i, i)oint; see Klokachef. 

Olga; rock, off Alaska iieninsula, southeast f>f Belkofski. Name 7-eported liy Dall 
in 1880. 

Olga; rock, off entrance to Salislmry sound, Alexander archipelago. So namcil by 
Moore in 1897. 

Olga; strait, sejjarating Halleck island from Krestof island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Vasilief in 1833. It has also been called Krestof (cross) 
strait, having been so named by Vasilief, sr., in 1809. 

Olilfi, strait; see Ni'va and Salisbury. 

Oliver; inlet, in the northern coast of Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. So 
named bv Mansfield in 1890. 



B^KERi *^11 Oma-Ooii. 

Omalik; creek, mountain, and silver and lead mines, in the Fish river region, Seward 
peninsula. Eskimo name, wliich has been given as Omilak and Omalik, 
and might jierhaps be better written tlmalik. 

Omeg-a; creek, tributary to American river, from the east, Seward j^eninsula. Name 
from Brooks, 1900. 

Ommaney; cape, forming the southern point of Baranof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Colnett in 1789. La Perouse, in 1786, named it 
Chirikof, after the distinguished Russian navigator. Malaspina, in 1791, 
called it Punta Oesta de la P^ntrada del Principe. The traders, 1796-1799, 
called it Menzies cape, and Lisianski, in 1804, South cape. 

O)i(it:iio, cape; see Dangerous. 

One Tree; rock, in Redtish hixy. Baranof island, Alexander arcliijH'lago. So named 
by ]\Io8er in 1897. 

Oiilhltsk; native village, on the eastern end ,>i Sitkalidak island, near Kodiak. So 
called by Lisianski in 1805. 

Oni}iit><k, settlement; see Anihitsk. 

Onman, cape; see Romanof. 

Onokovuk, creek; see Anikovik. 

Onslow; island, at junction of Clarence strait and Ernest sound, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named l>y tlie Coast Survey in 1887. 

Onslow; point, in Clarence strait, the southwestern point of entrance to Ernest 
sound, Alexander archipelago. So named"*l)y Vancouver in 179:1 Erro- 
neously Onelow. Has also been called Onslow rock. 

OoalUkh, village; see Ualik. 

Oobakagamute, village; see Unakak. 

Ooganok, bay; see Uganik. 

Oogashik, village; see Ugashik. 

Oo-ght'-book, island; see King. 

Oo-ghe-e-ak, rock; see Fairway. 

Ooglumie, village; see Etkiavi. 

OogocigamuU'. village; see Fgovik. 

OoJiack, bay; see Ugak. 

Ouliaijtck, village; see Akhiok. 

Oohaiack, village; see Uhaiak. 

OoJundck, island; see Uganik. 

OoJiciskeck, village; see I'haskek. 

Oohiack, bay; see Uyak. 

Oo-innakhtagowik, village; see Uinuk. 

Ookagamute, village; see Xunaikak. 

Ookagamute, village; see Ukak. 

Ookaht, lake; see Oknakluk. 

Ookakhl, lake; see I'kak. 

Ookamok, island; see Chirikof. 

Oomanak, island; see Umnak. 

Oonakagamute, village; see Unakak. 

OunakJitolik, village; see Ungalik. 

Ooitalakleel, river; see I^nalaklik. 

Oonulaklik, village; see Unalaklik. 

Oonalashka, island; see Unalaska. 

Oonalgi, island; see Unalga. 

Oomnigashik, village; see Unangashik. 

Ooiu'-aguji, islands; see Four Mountains. 

Oovelld, island; see Unalga. 



Ooii-^Oxk. 



312 [BU.U..1S7 



(hiuiiKih, island; scr rniiuak. 

Oatkrarit, villatri'; see Ttkiavi. 

(hiloo-kok, villajie; sei' Otnkah. 

(t/nu^tiaia, bav, cape, etc.; see Danger and Dangerons. 

Opasni; -ironiiof islands, in Northern rui)ids, Peril strait, Alexander archii)ela,u;o. 
Named Opasnie (perilons or danj,'erons) 1)y Yasilief in 18;«. 

Open; l)ay, on the southern shore of Unalaska, east of Kasheoja bay. D.-scriptive 
nanu'. <riven by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Open; roek, in tiie Kasiana group of islands, Sitka sound, Alexander arehipelago. 
Named Atkritoi (open, i. e., uncovered or discovered), by Vasilief in 1809. 

Operl; island, one of the Kudiakof islands, Izembek bay, Alaska peninsula. So 
named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Ophir; creek, tributary to Niukluk river, from the north, in the Eldorado mining 
district, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. 

Opiktulik; J]skinio village, on the northern shore of Norton sound, 40 miles east of 
Nome. Petrof reported its population in 1880 as 12, and its name Okpik- 
tolik, in his text (p. 11), and Okpiktalik on his maps. A recent local 
map calls it Opiktulik, i. e., Opik region. 

Oratia; mountain (7,300 feet high), near the headwaters of Kanektok river, western 
Alaska. So named by Spurr and Post, of the Geological Survey, who 
passed near it in September, 1898. 

Orca; cannery, of the Pacific Steam Whaling Company, and post-oHice, on the 
eastern shore of Prince William sound. Named after one < )f the company's 
vessels. The post-ofRce here was established in December, 1894. 

Orca; ])oint, on the southern shore of Boca de Quadra. So named by the Coast Sur- 
vey in 1891. 

Oregon; creek, tributary to Cripple river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Oirl, shoal; see Pamplona. 

Or-lini-iid-nook, river; see Colville. 

Orhmi; nati^■e settlement, at Eagle harbor, Ugak bay, Kodiak. Named Orlova 
(Orlof's) by the Russians and "erroneously renamed St. Orloff in our 
Coast Survey maps. It is now popularly known only by the name of the 
bay," i. e.. Eagle harbor. 

Orobuktuhtk, creek; see Cache. 

Orzenoy; cannery (established in 1889) on western shore of Stepovak bay, Alaska 
peninsula. So called by Moser in his report, 1899 (text, p. 171), but on 
his map Ozernoi. Apparently from the Russian adjective 0/ernoi, mean- 
ing l(th'. 

Osar; glacial stream, debouching northeast of Manby point, on the northern shore 
of Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. So named by Russell in 1891. 

Osborn; mountain (4,700 feet high), in tlie Kigluaik mountains, Seward peninsula. 
Name fnjm Barnard, 1900. 

Osborn; creek, tril>utary to Nome river, from the east, in the Nome mining region, 
Sewai'd peninsula. Also written Osborne. Prospectors' name, published" 
in 1900. 

OschestKt, river; see Fickett. 
Osemki, bay; see Redoubt. 
Oxhih}.!, island; see Error. 

Osier; Lsland, near or in the entrance to Russell fiord. Disenchantment bay, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named by Russell in 1891. "It is covered with a dense 
growth of willows, hence its name." 

Oskawalit; river, tributary to the Kuskokwim river, from the east, near longitude 
b%°. Nati\'e name, pronounced Os-ka-wil-lit, obtained by Spurr and l*ost, 
in ]S!)S, iVuiii A. Lind, a Inulei-. 



BAKER, J 818 Oss— OtII. 

Ossipee; cliannel, between Bushy and Shnihby islands of the Kashevarof group, 
L'larence strait, Alexander arcliii)elajro. Named by the Coast Survey, in 
1895, after the V. S. S. Ossipn'. 

Ostoria, island; see Otstoia. 

Otitniia, mountain; see Barometer. 

Osfrorkd, cape; see Islet. 

Ostrorkl, islands; see Pribijoi. 

Otai, mountain; see Alai. 

Otclwredm, point; see Acheredin. 

Otkidwik, village; see Utkiavi. 

OtiiKi, island; see Attn. 

Oliiii'li, cape, etc.; .see Shoal. 

Otmeloi; island, in Yakutat ))ay, .southeastern Alaska. Named Otmeloi (shoal) l)y 
Tebenkof in 1S49. Tliere is a shoal extending off from the island. Also 
called Shoals island. 

Olmi'loi vnieshnie, point; see Shoals. 

OlineJoi vnntrennie, point; see Inner. 

Oiok-kol-, village; see Otukah. 

Otriiliixtoi, vsipe; see Bluff. 

Otstoia; island, opposite Hooniah sound, in Peril strait, Alexander art^hipelago. 
Named Otstoia (off-lying) by N'asilief in I800. Also called Ostovia and 
sometimes translated dixtdnl. (Tcorge Kostrometinoff calls this Otstoi 
(shelter). 

Otter; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, northwest from the 
Shumagin group. It is Bobrovoi (beaver) bay of Tebenkof, 1849, and 
Otter l)ay of later charts. On some charts Otter hay is shown as a small 
bay indenting the western shore of Portage bay. 

Otter: creek, tributary to Nome river, near its mouth, in the Nome mining region, 
Seward jteninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 

Otter; island, one of the Pribilof group, Bering sea. So called T)y the Russians, as 
early as 1816, and probably earlier. Kotzebue has, in the English text, 
Bober. Lutke calls it Bobrovi (des loutres), and the Russian charts gen- 
erally Bobrovoi (sea otter). Now well known as Otter Island. 

Otter, island; see Hydra. 

Otter; sound, in the western part of Prince of Wales archipelago. Meares, in 1788, 
named some body of water in this vicinity and which can not now be 
identified with certainty, "Sea-Otter Harbour," which he writes Sea- 
(jtter, Sea Otter, and on his charts calls it Harbour and Sound. In the 
Coast Pilot of 1869, by Davidson, this is called Otter sound. 

Otter; strait, between Bird and Chernobour islands, Shumagin grouj). So named 
by Dallin 1882. 

Otters, Sea of; .see Bering. 

OttOTvay; valley, on the north border of Klutina lake. So named by Abercrond)ie 
in 1898. 

Otukah.; Eskimo village, on the Arctic coast, at or near Icy cape. Eskimo name, 
from Petrof, 1880, who wrote it Otok-kok. Has also been written Ootoo- 
kok. Russian Hydrographic chart 1495, dated 1854, shows a settlenient 
here called Kaiakishvig-miut. According to Murdoch, the name is O-tu- 
kah [mun]. Population 50 in 1880. 

Otukah.; river, in northwestern Alaska, debouching between Point Laj'^ and Icy 
cape. Eskimo name, published by the Coast Survey, in 1899, as Ootokok. 

Otumg-wilut; creek, tributary to Kanektok river, from the north, about 50 miles 
east of Kuskokwim bay, western Alaska. Native name, obtained by 
Spun- and Post, of the Geological Survey, in 1898, and by them written 
Otiimgwilute. 



4M\ Oya. 



314 [KriJ..]sT 



(JtviiKiii'i. capf; SCI' Uprijrlit. 

OuMol, isli't; stH' Ubiloi. 

(hdiii'tniniit, I lay; see Mas^iafie. 

Oiiil'Kjokh, strait: see Uclagak. 

(htiynlJi, island: see Fegak. 

(hifklixl:, islaiiil; see Aektok. 

(Jinjiiildkli, harbor; see Dutcli. 

OiKjdtrhik; river; see Ugasiiik. 

(huflorald, village; see Ugloviiia. 

OinjiKitjuL; harbor; see Delarof. 

(>nbiiiti>l\ island; see Chirikof. 

Oiikirok; island; see King. 

OakniiOok, island; see Hog. 

Ouliaga, island; see Uliaga. 

OulicJiiklii'. An island, not identified, somewhere between Adak and (ireat Sitkin 

islam Is, nuddle Aleutians, is so called by Lutke. 
Oumakh, island; see Umak. 
Ounnlaklei't, village; see Unalaklik. 
Oimalmhbi, island; see Unalaska. 
Oamdga, island and pass; see Unalga. 
Oumjd, island; see Tnga. 
Omifja, pillars: see Hihahibgik. 
OiiiKjaklitalik, river; see l^ngalik. 
Ourand; mountain (4,300 feet higli), between Valdes glacier and Klutina lake. So 

nameil l)y Abercromlne in 1898. 
Ouxerdi, point; see Zeal. 
Outer; point, the eastern point oi entrance to Tachusett cove. Freshwater bay, 

Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Glass in 1881. 
Outer; point, the westernmost point of Douglas island, Stephens passage, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Symonds in 1880. 
Outer; rock, in Nazan bay, Atka, middle Aleutians. Called Vnieshnie (outer) by 

Tebenkof, 1849. 
Outer Iliasik; island, off the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, near Belkofski. 

Name from the Russians, who wrote it Iliaviki and Big Iliazhek. 
Outlet; cape, on the northern shore of Kodiak, being the point where vessels pass 

out from Kupreanof strait intoShelikof strait. Named Yiekhoda (2:>assage 

out) by Murashef in 1839-40. 
Overhang; point, in Redfish bay, Baranof island, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Moser in 1897. 
Owen; mountain, east of Seward glacier, in the St. Elias alps, southeastern Alaska. 

So named by Russell, in 1890, after David Dale Owen, United States 

geologist. 
Owen; .shoal (3J fathoms water), about 10 miles northeast from Point Barrow, Arctic 

ocean. So called after Captain Owen, of the whaling ship .Vac// and Helen. 

Published on United States Hydrograj)hic Office {•iiart 1189, in 1890. 

Hydrographic Notice No. 7 of 1890 (p. 80) has a statement from Capt. 

Everett Smith, of the steam whaler Bakna, that this shoal does not exist. 
Ou-ernk, creek; see Aueruk. 

Ox; i)oint, on the mainland, in Port Snettisham, at mouth of Whiting river, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1888. 
Oxide; creek, tributary to Ophii- creek, near its headwaters, Seward peninsula. 

Name from Barnard, 1900. 
Oyak; native village, on the eas+ern shore of Kuskokwim bay, just north of the 
mouth of the Kanektok river. Native name, obtained by Spurr and Post, 



I 



BAKER.] 815 



Oja— Paiu. 



Oyak — ( 'ontinued. 

in 189,s, trom the iu=>Hionary Jolin H Kilhiutk. who jrivos it an OyaKaiiiiit. 

i. e., Oyak people. 
I >:t'rsk<'i, station; see Redoubt. 
piililof, harlior; see Pavlof. 
Pacific: shoal, off ("ape Halkett, Arctic ocean. Reported by Captain Knowles, of 

the whale .>^hip Parifir. prior to 1889, and named Pacific by the Hydro- 
graphic Office. 
Pacific; ocean. This is the South sea or Great South sea of the old navijjators and 

V<).stochnie (ea.stern) ocean of the Ru.ssians. Named .Mar del Sur (South 

sea) by Balboa, in InlH, and Pacific })y Magellan in lo21. 
Pagonhvoy, strait; see Peril. 
Pah; rapids, in the Kowak river, near longitude 156°. Near these rapids debouches 

a river whose name, according to Cantwell, 1885, is Shok-ah-i)ok-shegiak. 

The name of the rapids Pah, transformed to Par, has ])een applied to this 

river. 
Paimute; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Kuskokwim, about 25 miles 

above Bethel. Eskimo name, from the Russians, who wrote it Paimute, 

i. e., Pai people. Population in 1880, oO. Omitted from recent majis. 

Tikhmenief, 1861, placed it on the left liank of the river. 
Pajara; creek, trilmtary ti> Eldorado river, from the east, Seward peninsula. Name 

from Barnard, 1900. 
Pakenhani; point, in Port Wells, Prince William .*onnd. So named by Vancouver 

in 1794. 
Pdkirik, Eskimo village; see Pawik. 
Piileiioi, point; see Fired. 

Palisade; i)oint, on San Fei-nando island. Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 
► Named Punta de la Empalizada (point of the palisade) by Maurelle and 

Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Palisades; l)luffs, on the south bank of the Yukon, about 4(> miles below the 

month of the Tanana. So called by Allen in 1885. 
Palma; bay, on the mainland coast, a little north of Cross sound. Named Bahia de 

Palma by Malaspina in 1791. Has also been called Icy bay. 
Palmer; creek, tributary to Resurrection creek, from the east, Kenai peninsula. 

T^ocal name, from Becker, 1895. On one map this is tributary to Fresno 

creek. 
Palmers Store; trading place, on the shore of Knik arm of Cook inlet. Local 

name, i^ublished in 1899. 
Palmetto; point, on the south shore of San Juan Bautista island, Bucareli baj', 

Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta del Palmito (Palmetto point) 

by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Palo Cano; point, on San Fernando island, San Alberto bay, Bucareli bay. Prince 

of Wales archipelago. Nameil Punta del Palo Cano (point of the white 

pole) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 
P((/oin<is, Ysla de; see Pigeon. 
Palonoi; point, on the mainland, very near Point Rothsay, at mouth of the Stikine 

river. Named Palonoi (fired) by Basargin, of the Ri/tithi party, in 1863. 
PdllHH, point; see Halibut. 
Pamiek; lake, draining through Wood river to the Nushagak. Native name, from 

Tebenkof,- 1849. It is Akuliukhpak of Petrof in 1880. 
Pamplona. The Spaniard Arteaga reported that on July 16, 1779, he saw at the dis- 
tance of a mile the appearance of a bank or shoal {bajo) . This shoal, in 

the Fairweather ground off .Mount St. Elias, he placed upon his chart 

with the name Bajo Pamji/orm. Vancouver refers to it as Ron) Pitnqihnia 

of the Spaniards. Tebenkof .-^ays that Talin, inat<' of the Russian vessel 



I'll III— l»ar. 



816 



Pamplona— ("out iniu'il. 

0/v7, saw it, ill 1794, and iiaiiicil it Orri (eagle), alter his shij). liecent 

charts omit it altogether, it having heen searched for and not foniid. 
J'lmnirLr, creek; see Slate. 
Pankof; cape, the southeastern i)oint of Ikatan island, near Isanotski strait, Alaska 

peninsula. Named Pankova ( I'ankof's) hy the Russians. Also written 

Pankoif. 
Ptilii)!, river; see Parantulik. 
Papka; Kskimo village, on the north shore of Kuskokwim bay, near the mouth of 

Kuskokwim rivt'r. According to Spurr and Post, who obtained their 

information from missionary J. H. Kilbuck, in 1898, its native name is 

Pitpkamut, i.e., Papka people. 
Paps (The); two small rounded hills, on the southern side of the entrance to 

F.ituya bay, southeastern Alaska. Name pul)lished in 1875 on Coast Sur- 
vey chart 742. Descriptive name. First use of the name not dist^overed. 
Par, rapids; see Pah. 
Paradise; fiats, at head of Saook bay. Peril strait, Alexander arcliii)elago. So 

named by Moore in 189.5. 
l'(iri(l;hotn\a, bay; see Steamer. 
Paralysis; point, separating Band cove from Security bay, Kuiu island, Alexander 

archipelago. Called South point by Meade, in 1869, and Paralysis i)oint 

by Glass in 1881. 
Paramanof; bay, indenting the northwestern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak group. 

Named by the Russians. Apparently a proper name. Has also appeared 

as Paramano and Paramonofskaia. 
Paramanof; cape, the western point of entrance to Paramanof bay, Afognak island, 

Kodiak group. Named by the Russians. The native name is Tamutl:; 

perhaps from tanuk, the Aleut word for hig. 
Parantulik; river, in Seward peninsula, draining to Golofnin sound. Local name, 

derived from the Eskimo. The termination tuUk is said to mean place or 

region. It has been called Pajian, Papin, and some alleged lakes at its 

head Paran. 
Parida; island, in San Alberto bay, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Named Parida (woman just delivered of a child) liy Maurelle and Quadra 

in 1775-1779. 
Paris; creek, near Douglas, Douglas island, Alexander archipelago. Perhaps a local 

name, published by the Coast Survey in 1893. 
Parker; group of islands, near the western channel into Sitka harbor, Sitka sound, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by United States naval officers in 1880. 
Parker; point, on the west shore of Admiralty island, Chatham strait, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1794. 
Parlor, harbor; see Pavlof. 
Piiroi^hki, bay ; see No Thorofare. 
Parsons; peak (5,500 feet high), near head of Taiya inlet, southeast Alaska. So 

named by the Coast Survey in 1897. 
Partennoi; point, on the western shore of Chichagof island, near entrance to Ilin bay, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by mate Ilin early in the 19th century. 
Partof; bay, indenting the southern shore of Umnak, near Vsevidof volcano. Called 

Partovaia by Kuritzien in 1849. ^'eniaminof and Lutke call it Glubokoi 

(deep) bay. 
Partofshikof ; island, between Baranof and Kruzof islands, Alexander archipelago. 

Named Partofshikof (party) by the Russians. Variously written Partoffs- 

chikoff, Partovstchikoff, etc. 
Party; cape, the northwestern point of Siuiyak island, Kodiak grouj). Named 

I'arlif (party) V)y the Russian-American ("ompany in 1849. 



BAKKK.] :^|7 I'as-Hav. 

Pasco; creek, tributary to Middle Inrk of tlie Koynknk, Iron: the H)ntli, lu-ar lati- 
tude 67°. Prospeetors' name, from Schrader, IS*)!*. 
Paso; i-oint, in Uinnak strait, near the western end of Unalawka, eastern Aleutian.-^. 

So named by the Fish (~!ommission in 1888. 
Pass; creek, tributary to the Kotsina, from the south. Descriptive name, iriven by 

Schrader in 1900. 
Passage; canal, or arm, in the northwestern part of Prince William sound, from 

which there is a portage to Turnagain arm of Cook inlet. Called Passage 

channel by Vancouver in 1794. Has recently been called Portage bay. 
Passag-e; group of islands, at entrance to Middle channel into Sitka harbor, Sitka 

sound, Alexander archipelago. Named Prokhoda (passage) by Vasilief 

in 1809. Hasalso been written Prokodi. Tebenkof calls them Goloi (bare). 
Passage; island, in Graham harbor, Cook inlet. So named by Portlock in 178(>. 
Passage; island, northeast from Sannak, between Deer island and the Sandman 

reefs. So called Vjy the Fish (-onmiission in 1888. 
Passage; islet and point, in Mitchell bay, Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, 

Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 
Passage; islet, between Kodiak and Spruce islands, Kodiak trroup. Named 

Prikhoda (passage) by Tebenkof in 1849. 
Passage; rock, near the entrance to Tongass harbor, Alexander arclii})elago. So 

named by Nichols in the Coast Pilot (1891, p. 79). 
Passage; sunken rock, in the entrance to Lituya bay, southeastern Alaska. So 

named by Dall in 1874. 
Pastol; open bay, between St. Micliael and the main mouth of the Yukon. Eskimo 

name, from the Russians, 1852. Also written Pastole, Pastoli, and Pas- 

tolik. 
Pastoliak; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Postoliak river, a few miles 

above its mouth, on southern shore of Norton sound. Native name, from 

Tebenkof, 1849. It is, or rather was, for it is not shown on late maps, a 

few miles north of Pastolik, with which it should not be confounded. 

Dall writes it Pastoliiik. 
Pastoliak; river, tributary to Pastol bay, Norton sound, western Alaska. Eskimo 

name, from Tebenkof, 1849. 
Pastolik; Eskimo village, on the right bank of the Pastolik river, a few miles above 

its mouth. Population in 1890, 113. 
Pastolik; river, tributary to Pastol 1)ay, western Alaska. Called Pastol by TclH'ukof, 

1849. Eskimo name, pronounced Pas-to-lik. 
Patterson; bay, on the southeastern shore of Baranof island, Chatham stniit, .Vlex- 

ander archipelago. Named by the Coast Survey, after its surveying 

steamer Patter sov. 
Patterson; glacier, on the mainlaml, east of Frederick sound, soutlieastern Alaska. 

So named by Dall, in 1879, after Carlile Pollock Patterson, the then 

Superintendent of the Coast Survey. 
Patterson; island, in the entrance to Kasaan l)ay, Clarence strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Clover, in 1885, after the Coast Survey steamer 

Patterson. 
Patterson; peaks (4,746 and 4,848 feet high), near Patterson glacier, southeastern 

Alaska. So named by Thomas in 1887. 
Paul; island, off tlie southern shore of Alaska peninsula, nortlu-ast ot the Shuinagins. 

Named St. Paul by Woronkofski in 1887. 
Pavlof; active volcano, on the Alaskan peninsula, west of the Shumagins. Named 

Pavlof (Paul or St. Paul) by the Russians. 
Pavlof; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, west of the Shuma- 
gins. Named Pavlofskie (Paul) by the Russians. Variously s.i.elled. 

Its Aleut name is Tachik or Tatschik. 



Fav-IVI. 



318 



Pavlof; ^'nmi> ni islaiKls, near Hclkot'ski, consist injj: of Loiiir, (ioloi (l>arc), I'koliioi 

(coah. r«)|u'nH'hii()i (crosswise), and Wosnesenski. Its Aleut name, 

according: to Veniaininof, is Kadugin (narrow). 
Pavlof; liarl>or, indenting the northern coast of Sannak. C^alled ravioli' l>y tlie 

Fisli (Vnuniission in 1888. Also designated "Cove." 
Pavlof; iiarltor, in Fresiiwatcr bay. C'hichagof island, ("hathani strait, Alexander 

archipelago. Named Pavlof (Paul) by Tebenkof in 1849. Has also been 

called Pablof and, erroneously. Parlor. Its native name is said to be 

Nasanki. Meade, in 1869, made a sketch of it and published it with the 

name Freshwater bay. This name Freshwater i-~ now applied to the 

whole inlet and Pavlof to the anchorage within it. See Freshwater. 
Pavlof; village, at Selenie point, Pavlof bay, Alaska peninsula. Called Pavlovsk l)y 

Petrof in 1880. 
Porlorsk; village; see Selenie, i)oint. 
I'diiiirskaia, village; see Kenai. 
I'orlovsiH, town; see Kodiak. 
Pawik; Eskimo village, on the eastern side of Bristol l)ay, Bering sea. Also 

written Pawig. The name Pawik was obtained l)y Spurr and Post, in 

1898, from Fritz Blando, a resident. Apparently this is the Pakwik of the 

Eleventh Census, 1890. 
Peabody; mountains (4,000 to 5,000 feet high), on the western shore of Portland 

canal. So named by Pender in 1868. 
Pea,cock; creek, tributary to the Kotsina, from the south. Apparently a prosi)et-tors' 

name, reported by Schrader in 1900. 
Peak; point, on the north shore of St. Matthew island, neai- its eastern end. Named 

Pik (peak) by Sarichef in his atlas of 1826. 
Peaked; island, off the western end of Attn island, western Aleutians. A])i)arently 

so named by Gibson in 1855. 
Peard; cliff, on the southern shore of Peard bay, Arctic coast. Presumaldy so called 

l)y the British Admiralty as early as 1855. 
Peard; open bay, on the Arctic coast, between the Seahorse islands and Point BarroM', 

Named by Beechey in August, 1826, after his tirst lieutenant, George Peard. 

Often written Pearl and on one chart Pedrl. 
I'nirl, bay; see Peard. 
Pearl; jioint, in the eastern part of Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. 

Named Punta de Perlas (point of i)earls) by Maurelle an<l Quadra in 

1775-1779. 
Pearse; canal, north of Pearse island, Alexander ai-chipelagt). S(j named by Pender 

in 1868. 
Pearse; island, at mouth of Portland canal, Alexander archipelago. So named l)y 

Pender in 1868. 
Peavey; post-oflice and mining camp, on the north bank of the Koyukuk, near 

longitude 152°. It is also called Peavy and Peavy Trading Post. 
I'eiM, bay; see Peard. 
Pcerleshin; mountain, on the mainland, east of the Stikine river and near the 

international boundary. Native name, from the Coast Survey. Has beer 

written Peerleshin and Pereleshin, i. e., Pereles river. 
Peirce; cape, a little east of Cape Newenham, on the north shore of Bristol bay. 

Named Peirce, in 1869, by the Coast Survey, after Prof. Benjamin Peirce, 

then Superintendent of the Coast Survey. Tebenkof calls it Peschera (cave) 

p(jint. Perhaps it is Calm point of Cook in 1778. See Calm. 
Peirce; mountain (more than 2,000 feet high), on the northern part of Nagai island, 

Shnmagin group. So called by Dall, in 1872, after Prof. Benjamin Peii( 

then Superintendent of the Coast Survey. 



BAKKit] 319 Pel-I»er. 

Peisax; islaiKl, in tlu' southwistern part of Sitka sound, Raranof island, Alexan(ier 
archipelago. Named Peisar (writer) by Vasilief in 1809. Pronounced 
Pe-sar. 

FclciHja, point; see Azimuth. 

Pdujro, Isla del; see Kalgin. 

Pellew; point, on the northern sliore of Prim-e William sound. So named by Van- 
couver in 1794. 

Pelly; mountains (5,000 to 7,000 feet high), lake, and river, Yukon, Canada. 
Named after a former governor of the Hudson Bay Company. 

I'ellij, mountains; see Romanzof. 

Pflozlkh'lla; mountains, on the north bank of the Yukon river, near mouth of the 
Melzoi river. Name published by the Coast Survey in lcS9S. 

Peluk; creek, just south of Port Clarence, Seward iieninsula. Native name, from 
Barnard, 1900. 

Peluk; creek, tributary to the Kugirukruk river, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Native name, from Brooks, 1900. 

Penelope; creek, tributary to Koksuktapaga river, from the south, Seward j.enin- 
sula. Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Pciiiki, islet; see Pinnacle. 

Peninsula; island (8oo feet high ) , near the northwestern shore of Big Koniuji island, 
Shumagin group. So named V)y Dall in 1875. 

Peninsula (The): isolated hill, near east bank of the Copper river, just north of 
Bremner river. So named by Abercromliie in 1898. 

Peninsula; point, on Revillagigedo island, in Tongass narrows, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Local name, given by the pilots. 

Peninsula; ridge of mountains, on the mainland, between Boca de Quadra and 
Dixon entrance, southeastern Alaska. So named by Nichols in 188H. 

Peninsula Bluff; cape, the northern point of entrance to Albatross anchorage, 
Portage bay, Alaska peninsula. So named in 189."1 

Peninsular; point, on the southeastern shore of Chichagof island, opposite Kootz- 
nahoo, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. This name, which is 
descriptive, first appears in the Coast Pilot of 1891 (p. 162). 

Pennock; island, at the south end of Tongass narrows, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by the pilot W. E. ( ieorge. 

Pennock; reef, off the northwestern end of Pennock island, Tongass narrows, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Dall in 1883. 

Penny; creek, tributary to Solomon river, from the north, Sewanl peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Penny; river, in the Nome mining region, Seward ]ieninsula. Local name, given by 
prospectors in 1898. Was also called by Schrader No Name river. 

Pnilrrost, cape; see Izhnt. 

Pepper; point, the southern point of entrance to Port Asnmcion, Bucan-li bay, 
Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de la Pimienta ( pepper point) 
l)y Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Percebes; point, the easternmost point of San Juan Bautista island, Bucaicli l)ay, 
I Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Punta de Percebes by ^Maurelle and 

■ Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Percy; group of islands, at junction of Felice and Clarence straits, Alexander arciii- 
pelago. So named by Dall in the C<jast Pilot (1888, p. 83). 

Percy; point, the westernmost jtoint of the Percy islands, Clarence strait. Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Vancouver in 1793. 
' Pereg-rebni; cape, in Kizhuyak bay, on the northern coast of Kodiak. Nanu'd 
Peregrebnie (passable, i. e., a point which can be rowed i)ast) by the Rus- 
sians. 



L 



|.,.r-IVl. 320 im-LL.lS" 

I'tm/irliiii, i.><lumls; si-e Barren. 

IWigrffiuij, island; see Wosnesenski. 

J'erniosii, point; see Poitafje. 

J'rn'uoKmtid, bay orereek; see Tortage. 

Pcrishca-hti'ii, island; see Isthmus. 

Prnniiitoit, inlet; see Carry. 

Perevalnie; islet, at the north end <>l' Shuyak island, Kodiak group. Named I'ere- 
valnie (wallowing) l»y the Russians. 

J'cirinniniit, inlet; see Carry. 

J'crcz, Kntrada de; see Dixon. 

PerigTiak; P^skimo summer camp, on the western shore of Elson bay, near Toint 
Bariow. Native name, from English naval officers in the Franklin search 
expeditions, 1849-1S53, who wrote it Pergniak. Ray, in 1885, writes it 
Perignax. 

Peril; strait, separating Baranof island from Chiciiagof island, Alexander archipelago. 
This strait derives its name from the circumstance that on its shores, in 
1799, a large number of Aleuts (said to be 150) perished from eating poi- 
sonous mussels. Lisianski, who reports this story, calls it Pagoobnoy or 
Pernicious strait. The later Russian charts call it Pogibshie (peril) strait. 

I'crpendkulaire, cape; see Upright. 

Pernicious, strait; see Peril. 

Perrier, pass; see Chilkoot. 

Pini-ie poro(ji; see Northern rapid. 

Poschani; point, on the northeastern shore of DufKeld peninsula. Peril strait, Alex 
ander archipelago. Named Peschani (sandy) by Vasilief in 1833. Ha 
also been called Pestchani, Sandy, and, l)y mistranslation, Stony. 

Pesrliaiil, island; see Galankin. 

Peschani, point; see Halibut. 

Peschanie, cape, etc. ; see Sand. 

Peschanie, island; see Pyramid. 

Peschern, cape; see Peirce. 

Pesink, island; see Gravel. 

Pestchmumt, harbor; see Martin. 

Pestchanoe, point and lake; see Ice House. 

PestcJiarii, island; see Pyramid. 

Peslchanay, bay; see Sandy. 

Pestriakof. The Russian- American Company ma{> of 1849 shows a village on the 
south shore of Spruce island, Kodiak group, called Pestriakova (of eider 
duck) settlement. 

I'cxIfKth)/, anchorage; see Eider. 

Pesisovdin, bay; see Blue Fox. 

Petelin; mountain, near Katmai bay, Alaska peninsula. So named })y S])ii>r an<l 
Post, in 1898, after missionary A. Petelin. 

Petersburg; post-office, at north end of Wrangell strait, on north en(i of Mitkof 
island, Alexander archipelago. Established in March, 1899. 

Peterson; bay, indenting the southern shore of Sannak island. So called })y the 
Fish Connnission in 1888. Perhaps this is identical with King cove of 
Dall in 1880. 

I'i'tfrxim, creek: see Slate. 
I'i'lllxki, island: see Bird. 

Petka: point, on the right bank of the lower Yukon, near Andreafski. Called 
i'ctka's i)oint by the Coast Survey in 1898. 

PfliiK'ijin, island, .si'e Pitmegea. 



BAKER.] 321 



Pet— Pil. 



Petrel; island, one of the Chiachi islands, off southern shore of Alaska peninsula. 
So named by Dall in 1875. 

Petrel; point, on the western shore of Portland c-anal. So named hy the Coast Sur- 
vey in 1895. 

Petrie'x, strait; see Shelikof. 

Petrof; point, the westernmost point of Sannak island. Named Petrova (Petrof's) 
by Tebenkof in 1849. 

Fhairr-rtdcr, mountain; see Fairweather. 

Phelan; creek, tributary to Delta river, from the east. So named by Glenn in 
1898. 

Philadelphia; mountain, near George inlet, Revillagigedo island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named 1iy Nichols in 1883. 

Philkhtulik, lake; see Pilktulik. 

Phipp; point, on the northwestern shore of Wales island, Dixon entrance. So 
named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Phipps; peninsula, at the southern entrance to Yakutat l)ay, southeastern Alaska. 
Dixon, in 1787, named some point on its shore for Hon. Constantine 
John Phipps, Baron ]\Iulgrave. (See Coast Pilot, p. 206.) There has 
been some confusion in the application of this name, it lieing the same as 
Carrew and Morskoi (ocean or sea) of some charts. Has been misprinted 
Phips. 

Phipp'i, point; see Carrew. 

Phoebe; creek, tributary to Bettles river, from the east, near longitude 149°. Pros- 
pectors', name from Schrader, 1899. 

Pi, island; see Pye. 

Pinfideniafnitzi, cape; see Izhut. 

Pickarts; creek, tributary to the Koyukuk, from the north, near Arctic City. 
Named, in 1899, after Pickarts, of the firm of Pickarts, Bettles & Pickarts, 
owners of the trading p(^st Bergman. 

Picdrnti, Isla de; see Rocky, island. 

Piedras; point, the eastern jwint of entrance to Rurik harljor, Khantaak island, 
Yakutat bay. Named Punta de las Piedras (point of rocks) by ]\Ialaspina 
in 1791. 

Piedras Blancas, rocks; see White. 

PidmiektnUgmiut, village; see Pikmiktalik. 

Pigeon; island, in Port Real ]\Iarina, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. 
Named Y'sla de Palomas (island of pigeons) by Maurelle and Quadra in 
1774—1775. 

Pigot; point, the western point of entrance to Port Wells, Prince William sound. 
So named l)y Vancouver in 1774. Erroneously Piqot. 

Pik, point; see Peak. 

Pikmiktalik; Eskimo village, near the mouth of Pikmiktalik river, about 30 miles 
to the south of St. Michael, western Alaska. Native name, from the Rus- 
sians, who wrote it Pietmiektaligmiut. Nelson wrote it Pikmiktalik. The 
termination talik or tulik means place or region. 

Pikmiktalik; river, a little south of St. Michael, western Alaska. Eskimo name, 
from the Russians, who wrote it Pietmiektalik. 

Pihjriin, river; see Kruzgamepa. 

Pilktulik; lake, on the portage between the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. Ray- 
mond, 1869, reports its name as Philkh Tulik (Philk region) and later 
maps write Philkhtulik. 

Pillar; cape, in Kizhuyak bay, on north coast of Kodiak. Named Kekurnoi (pillar) 
by the Russians. 

Pillar, cai)e; see Bold. 

Bull. 187—01 21 



IMI-IMii. 



822 [Bi'i.i.. i,s7. 



Pillar; ra\n'. \hv castcrii iioiiit of entrance to Izhut })ay, on the southeastern shore 
(if Afo^rnak island, Kodiak grouj). This may be Cape Whitsunday of Cook 
in 177S. Called l)y the RnsHians Kekur (pillar). 
Pillar; hill or mountain (1,491 feet high), very near St. Paul, Kodiak. A note on 
the old Russian chart made by Russian naval othcers in 1808-1810 says: 
"On (this) mountain a pillar rises 150 fathoms above sea level." On the 
Coast Survey chart of 1869 this hill was called Pillar mountain. 

Pillar; jioint, on the eastern shore of Wrangell island, Arctic ocean. So named by 
Perry, in 1881, who shows a rock near it. 

Pillar; mck, northwest from Kiska, Rat island group, western Aleutians. The 
Russians designated it as Viesokie kamen (high rock); Tebenkof, 1849, 
calls it Stolb (pillar), and the United States North Pacific Exploring 
l'",xpedition, in 1855, called it Pillar rock. 

Pillars, Bay of; bay, ii;denting the western shore of Kuiu island, Chatham strait, 
Alexander archipelago. Descriptive name, published by Dall in the 
Coast Pilot (1883, p. 120). 

Pillars (The); high rocks, off the southern shore of Umnak, eastern Aleutians. 
Local name, from the Russians. 

Pillsbury; point, in Kootznahoo inlet. Admiralty island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Meade, in 1869, after Lieut. Commander John Elliott Pills- 
bury, U. S. N., a member of his party. 

Pilot; point, on the southeastern shore of Hemlock island. Port Chester, Annette 
island, Alexander archipelago. So named by the Coast Survey in 1896. 

Pimienta, Punta de la; see Pepper. 

Pin; peak (1,300 feet high), on the northwestern shore of Coronation island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Snow in 1886. 

Pin; peaks, on the mainland, east of Frederick sound, southeastern Alaska. So 
named by Thomas in 1887. 

Pin; point, on Liesnoi island, at entrance to Eliza harbor, Frederick sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Pinttl, Punta del; see Pinegrove. 

Pine; creek, just east of the mouth of Solomon river, Seward })eninsula. Name 
from Barnard, 1900. 

Pine; creek, tributary to Niukluk river, from the south, in the Eldorado mining 
district, Seward peninsula. Local name, published in 1900. Has also 
been called Foster creek. 

Pine; creek, tributary to Red bay. Prince of Wales island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Helm in 1886. 

Pine;, island and point, in Port Real Marina, Bucareli bay, Prince of Wales archi- 
pelago. Named Punta y Ysla del Pino by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775- 
1779. 

Pine, island; see Spruce. 

Pine; point, the eastern point of entrance to Red bay. Prince of Wales island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Helm in 1886. 

Pinegrove; point, on San Fernando island, Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archi- 
pelago. Named Punta del Pinal (pinegrove) by Maurelle and Quadra jn 
1775-1779. 

I'liichl, islet; see Pinnacle. 

Pine Tree; islet, in Sawmill cove, Howkan narrows, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by Sheldon Jackson in 1880. 

Pingolee; low sandy island, off the mouth of Dease inlet, Arctic ocean. Apparently 
so named by the British Admiralty. 

Pimjoslnujurun, village; see Pinoshuragin. J 

P'mlk, islets; see Punuk. ? 



BAKEK.] 323 



Pin— Plr. 



Pinnacle; pat^s, in tlu> St. Fllias alpitie region. Descriptive name, jriven In- Russell 
in 1890. 

Pinnacle; point, on the northwestern shore of Nagai island, Shumagin group. It 
in the north head of the nameless bay at the head of which is Sanborn 
harbor. So called liy Dall in 1872. Descriptive name. 

Pinnacle; rock, in Chignik lagoon, Chignik Ijay. Alaska peninsula. So named by 
Moser in 1897. 

Pinnacle; rock, in entrance to Tavlof harbor. Freshwater bay, Chatham strait, 
Alexander archipelago. So named by Meade in 1869. 

Pinnacle; rock, in the Chiachi group of islands, off south shore of Alaska peninsula. 
So named by Dall in 1875. 

Pinnade; rock, off Entrance point, Hooniah harbor, Port Frederick, Alexander 
archipelago. So named by United States naval officers in 1880. 

Pinnacle; rock, on the southwestern edge of the Sandman reefs, northeast of 
Sannak. Designated as Kekur (pillar) by Tebenkof, 1849; as Pinnacle 
by Dall, 1880, and later called Pinnacle rock. 

Pinnade, rock; see Second Priest. 

Pinnacle; sunken rock, near Cape Fox, in Dixon entrance. Shown on British Admi- 
ralty charts and in Tebenkof's atlas. Called Pinnacle rock on United 
States Hydrograi)hic chart 225. Its existence is denied by local navi- 
gators. 

Pinnacle; volcanic islet (930 feet high), south of St. Matthew island, Bering sea. 
Descriptive name, given by Cook in 1778. Variously Pinekl, Penikl, 
Pinacle, etc. Lutke calls it ile des tours {tnirers) or iles des fieches {ftpires) . 

Pinnacle Pass; cliff, forming the north wall of Pinnacle pass, St. Elias alps, south- 
eastern Alaska. So named Ijy Russell in 1890. 

Pinnacles. Between Unga island, Shumagin group, and AVosnesenski island, Teben- 
kof shows some rocks called Kekuri ([)illars). These appear on Coa.st Sur- 
vey chart 806 (1882), with the designation Pinnacles, but are not found 
(in later charts. 

Pinoshuragin. Petrof, 1880, shows a native village of this name (population 29) on 
the Seahorse islands. On British Admiralty chart 593 (ed. of 1882) it is 
calletl Pingoshugarun. 

Pinta; head, on Baranof island, near Southern rapids, Peril strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by Coghlan, in 1884, after the U. S. S. Pinta. 

Pinta; mountain (5,000 feet high), northeast of Yakutat bay, southeastern Alaska. 
So named by Russell, in 1891, after the U. S. S. Pinla. 

Pinta; jteak, on the niauiland, near Farragut bay, southeastern Alaska. So named 
by Thomas, in 1887, after the U. S. S. Pinta. 

Pinta; rocks, off Cape Bendel, Frederick sound, Alexander archipelago. Named by 
the Coast Survey, after the U. S. S. Pinta. 

Pinusuk; island (850 feet high), one of the Chiachi group, on southern shore of 
Alaska peninsula. Native name, obtained by Dall m 1875. 

Pio; point, at head of Woewodski harbor, Frederick sound, Alexander an-hipelago. 
So named by IMansfield in 1889. 

Piper; island, at entrance to Schulze cove, Fish bay. Peril strait, Alexan<ler archi- 
pelago. So named by United States naval officers in 1880. Family name. 

Pujot, point; see Pigot. 

Pirate; cove, on the northeastern shore of Popof island, Shumagin group. Local 
name, based on the reputation of the place. In use as early as 1880. 

Pirate; point, on the southeastern shore of Pearse island, Portland inlet. So named 
by the Coast Survey in 1891. 

Pirate; peak (3,289 feet high), on the mainland, near Thomas bay, southeastern 
Alaska. So named bv Thomas, m 1887, after his steam launcli. 



IMr -l»ou. 



324 



Pirie; iM.iMl, on ihi' castcrii shore of Portland canal. So named by Pender in 1868. 
Pisa Tower; rmk, near the entrance to Chichagof harbor, Attn island, western 

.Mi'utians. So named by Ciil)son in July, 1855. 
Piskuk; mountain peak, near the head of Togiak river, western Alaska. Eskimo 

name, obtained l)y Spurr and Post, of the Geological Survey, who passed 

near it September 13, 1898. They write it Piskuk. 
Pitak; island, one of the Necker grouj), Sitka sound, Alexander archii)elago. So 

called by Vasilief in 1809. 
Pitmegea; river, tributary to the Arctic ocean, near Cape Sabine. Eskimo name, 

pul dished in 1890. Has been written Petmegea and Pitmigea. 
J'iOtti, mountain; see Malaspina. 
Pitt, cape; see Muzon. 
Pitt; island, in Ilooniah harbor. Port Frederick, Icy strait, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by United States naval officers in 1880. In Hydrographic 

Office Notice to Mariners No. 97 of 1880 it is called Harbor island. 
/'///, island; see Kruzof. 
Pitt; point, the eastern point of entrance to Smith bay, east of P(jint Karrow, Arctic 

coast. So named by Dease and Simpson in 1837. 
Plain; mountain (2,035 feet high), in California ridge, Gravina island, Alexander 

archipelago. So named by Nichols in 1883. 
rialtc, islet; see Flat. 
J'larczJtnoi, lake; see Tazlina. 

Pleasant; island, in Icy strait, southeastern Alaska. So named by Dall in 1879. 
Pleasant Camp; locality, on the Dalton trail, in Porcupine gold district, south- 
eastern Alaska. Local name, from Brooks, 1900. 
Pteveznie, lake; see Tazlina. 
Plies, Islas des; see Sannak. 
Plishnie, islands; see Near. 
Plover; point, the western point of entrance to Port Moore, in Prison bay, Arctic 

coast, just east of Point Barrow. So named by the British Admiralty in 

1854, after H. M. S. Plorer. 
Plover; sui)posed island, in the Arctic ocean, near Herald island. Reported and 

named ])y Kellett, in 1849, after H. B, M. ship Plover. Perhaps some part 

of Wrangell island was seen by Kellett and given this name. The island 

does not exist and does not a2)pear on modern maps. See Wrangell. 
Poa; islet, between Akun and Avatanak islands, eastern Aleutians. Tebenkof, in 

1849, calls it Tumannoi (foggy). Called Poa by the Fish Commission in 

1888. Poa is the name of a genus of grasses. 
Pocket; island, at the northern end of Dry strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 

by Thomas in 1887. 
Podsopochni; cape, on the northern shore of Atka island, near Kovumf bay. It 

is near a volcanic i)eak (sopka), and was therefore designated by Lutke, 

about 1830, Podsopochni {under the jtcak) cape. 
J''i'/(tl:hliil:, lake; see Amanka. 
Pogibshi; point, on the northern shoie of P>aranof island, Peril strait, Ak-xandcr 

archipelago. Named Pogibshi (perilous or dangerous) by Vasilief in 1833. 
J'o(/lhshii', strait; see Peril. 
Pogoreshapka; p:skimo village, on the right bank of the lower Yukon, about 20 

miles below Koserefski. Name from Petrof, 1880, who gives its ]i(jpula- 

tion as 121. Near it is Dagorashapka mountain of Raymond. Pogo- 

reshapka ajjpears to be Russian for hurnt liat. 
Pogoreshitjtbt, mountain; see Dagorashapka. 
Pof/romnol, cape; see Sarichef. 
Pogromnoi, cape; see Shishkof. 



baker] 325 Pog— Pon. 

PogTomni; native village, 7 or 8 miles northeast from Cape Sarichef, on the northern 
shore of Unimak island, eastern Aleutians. So called by Lutke, 1828. It 
is near Pogromni volcano. 

PogTomni; volcano (5,525 feet high), in the western part of Unimak island, eastern 
Aleutians. Named Pogromnoi (destroying, desolation) l)y Sarichef in 
1790. Variously spelled Pogromnia, Pogrumnoj, Pogromskaia, etc. Also 
called Isanotskoi or Devastation. The native name, according to ( Jrewingk, 
is Kngidach-Jagutscha. 

Point Barrie; village and salmon salting station, on the southernmost point of 
Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. Local designation. Name 
published in the Eleventh Census, 1890. 

point Ellin; village and cannery, "at the head of a bay opening into Chatham 
strait, about 3 miles from the south point of Kuiu island." The cannery 
was brought "from Freshwater bay, on Baranof island," and established 
here in 1890. See Ellis. 

J'oint Retreat; peninsula. The northern part of Admiralty island was so designated 
on Coast Survey chart 728, published in 1885, but has not since been used. 

Pointer; peak, on Lindenberg i)eninsula, Kupreanof island, Alexander archipelago. 
So named by Thomas in 1887. Perhaps it is a pointer for the northern 
entrance to Wrangell strait. 

Poison; cove, in Chichagof island. Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So named 
by Meade, in 1869, in commemoration of the death of 150 Aleuts, some- 
where in the vicinity, in 1799, from eating poisonous mussels. 

PoiaiDi; rocks, opposite Povorotni point, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
called by Dall in the Coast Pilot, who says that these "are the rocks from 
which Baranof's Aleuts, in 1799, picked the poisonous nuissels which 
caused the death of over 100 persons." 

Pok; native village, on the right bank of the Koyukuk river, near its mouth. 
Native name from Tikhmenief, 1861, who wrote it Pokkakat, i. e., Pok 
river. Not found on recent maps. 

Pokolitaid, harbor; see Quiet. 

Polar, sea; see Arctic ocean. 

Pole; cape, on the western end of Kosciusko island, Sumner strait, .\lexander archi- 
pelago. Named t)y Vancouver, in 1793, after Captain Pole, R. X. 

Polivnoi; rock, near the southern entrance to Umnak pass, eastern .\leutians. 
Kuritzien, 1849, designates it as a rock awash (kamen polivnie) . 

Polivnoi, rock; see Midway. 

Polivnoi; rocks, in Woewodski harbor, Frederick sound, Alexandi-r archipelago. 
Named Polivnoi kamen ( washed-over rock) by Zaremlto in 1S3S. 

Polivnoi, rocks; see Surf. 

Polnoi; islet, in Krestof sound, north of Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. 
Named Polnoi ( full) by Vasilief in 1833. Renamed Brady, by Moore, in 1897. 

Polovina; hill (470 feet high), on the eastern side of St. Paul island, Pribilof group, 
Bering sea. It is near Halfway (polovinnoi) point. Local name. Writ- 
ten Polavina, Poluvina, etc. 

Poloinnnoi, point; see Halfway. 

Poltava; island, in or near Port Wrangell, Alaska peninsula. So named 1)\- \'asi- 
lief in 1832. Usually written Pultava. 

Polwhnnir, point; see Noon. 

Pond; bay, in Dall island, Kaigani strait, Alexander archipelago. So named l)y 
Dall in 1882. It is Sinclair cove of Sheldon Jackson in 1880. 

Pond; l)ay, indenting the northern shore of Duke island, Gravina group, Alexan- 
der archipelago. Named by Nichols, in 1883, presumably after Ensign 
Charles Fremont Pond, U. S. N., a member of his party. 



I»«n — r«»r. 



326 [BULL. 187. 



Pond; cn-t'k, trilmtary to Imuriik hasiii, fn.iii tlic smith, Scwanl peninsula. Xainc 

fn.ni Barnanl, U)00. 
Pond; rc.'f, in nortlicrn entrance to Tongass narrows, Alexander arfhipelajro. Name 

]ml)lishe(l in the Coast Pilot (1888, p. 81). 
Pond; i<i('l< (awash at low water), in Howkan narrows, Cordova l)ay, Alexander 

archipelajro. Named by Nichols, in 1881, after Ensign C. F. Pond, 

V. S. N., a member of his party. 
Ponte; point, on Woodehopper island, Kootznahoo inlet, Admiralty island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named by Meade, in 1869, after a ]\Ir. Ponte, an expei-t 

on coal, employed on board the U. 8. 8. Sarjmair. 
Poll, monntain; see Toj). 
Pop; point, at head of Thorne arm, Revillagige(ii> islaml, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by the Coast 8nrvey in 1891. 
Poperechnoi; island, off the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, west of the 8hu- 

niagin group. Named Poperechnoi (crosswise) by the Russians. The 

Aleut name is Kuiagdak. Variously written Poperetchny, Popereshnoi, 

etc. 
Poperechnoi, island; see Broad. 
Poperechnoi, island; see Crosswise. 
Poplar; jioint, at west end of San Juan Bautista island, Bucareli bay. Prince of 

Wales archipelago. Named Punta de los Alamos (point of the poplars) 

by ^lanrelle and Quadra in 177.5-1779. 
Popof; l)ay, on the northeast coast of Kodiak, near St. Paul. Named Popofskaia by 

Murashef in 1839-40. Has also been called Popoff or Priest bay. Yasili 

(William) and Ivan (John) Popof were pioneer traders and fur hunters in 

Alaska in 1762-63. 
Popof; cape, on the western shore of Popof bay, Kodiak island. Name<l Popofskie 

by Murashef in 1839-40. Popof is a Russian i)roper name. This may be 

identical with ]\Iiller (melnichnoi) cape of Tebenkof. 
Popof; glacier, on north l)ank of the Stikine river, near its mouth. Called First or 

Little glacier by Hunter in 1877. Ajiparently named Popof by the Ryn<ht 

party in 1863. 
Popof; island, in St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. So named by the Russians in 1808-1810. 
Popof; island, one of the principal islands of the Shumagin group. Named Popov- 

skoi by the early Russians. Popof is a Russian proper name, often written 

Popoff. 
PojKff, island; see Kutkan. 

Popof; reefs, in Popof strait, Shumagins. Named Popoff by Dall in 1872. 
Popof; rock (42 feet high), near the northern shore of Popof island, Shumagins. 

Named Popcjff l^y Dall in 1872. 
Popof; strait, separating Unga and Popof islands, Shumagin group. Surveyed and 

named by Dall in 1872. 
Popof Head; point (500 feet high), the southern point of Popof island, Shumagins. 

Local name, published, in 1872, and perhaps derived from Vasili and Ivan 

Popof, traders and fur hunters here in 1762-63. 
Porcupine; city, creek, and gold district, near Chilkat river, southeastern Alaska. 

Prospectors' name, reported by the Geological Survey in 1899. 
Porcupine; creek, tributary to Middle fork of the Koyukuk, from the north, near 

longitude iriO° 30^ Prospectors' name, reported by Schrader in 1899. 
Porcupine; creek, tributary to South fork of the Koyukuk river, from the north, 

near latitude 68°. Published by the Coast Survey in 1899. Perhaps this 

creek is identical with the previous one. 
Porcupine; creek, tributary to Steamer bay, on Etolin island, Alexander archipelago. 

So named bv Snow in 1886. 



HAKKR.] 827 Por— Por. 

Porcupine; islands, in Kenai lake. Kciiai in-iiiiisnla. ^^o called l)y Mt'iidi'iihall in 

189S. 
Porcupine; jxjint, on the northeastern sliore of Prince William sonnd. So named 

by Abercronibie in 1898. 
Porcupine; river, in northeastern Alaska, tributary to the Yukon, old name, 

lirobably given by factors of the Hudson Bay Company. 
Porcupine; river, tributary to the Stikine, from the east, near the international 

l)oundary line. Name pul)lished by the Coast Survey in 1S91. 
Porfia; cai)e, at entrance to Port Santa Cruz, Suemez island, Prince of Wales archi- 
pelago. Named Cabo de la Porfia (cape of the dispute) by ^laurelle and 

Quadra in 1775-1779. 
Poroga, island; see Rapids. 
Poro^^hki, bay; see No Thorofare. 
Porpoise; harbor, indenting the western shore of Nagai island, Shumagins. Name 

derived from small schooner Porpoixe, which wintered there some time 

prior to 1871. 
Porpoise; islands, off the mouth of Excursion inlet, ley strait, Alexander archi- 
pelago. So named by United States naval officers in 1880. 
Porpoise; islets, in the entrance to Port Etches, Prince William sound. Named 

Ptichi (bird) liy Chernof, in 1830, and Porpoise or Bird islands by the 

Coast Survey in 1869. 
Porpoise; point, on the northern shore of Boca de Quailra, southeastern Alaska. 

So named by the Coast Survey in 1891. 
Port; mountain, on Wales island, Alexander archipelago. So named by Nichols in 

1888. 
Portage; arm, of Kelp bay, Baranof island, Chatham strait, Alexander archipelago. 

So named by Moore in 1895. 
Portage; bay, indenting the northern shore of Afognak island, Kodiak group. 

Named Perenosnaia (portage) by the Russian-American Comjiany in 1849. 
Portage; ]»ay, indenting the northern shore of Kupreanof island, Alexander archi- 
pelago. Called Perenosnaia (portage) bay by the Russians. ^leade, in 

1869, calls it Perenosnaya creek. Has also been called Portage harbor. 

Presumably there is a portage from its head to the head of Duncan canal. 
Portage; bay, indenting the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, immediately north 

of the Shumagins. A short portage connects it with Herendeen bay. 

Named Perenosnaia (portage) by the Russians. 
Portage; bay, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, west from Kodiak, from 

which there is a portage to Becharof lake. Named Perenosnoi (portage) 

by Tebenkof, 1849. Earlier Russian charts use the native name Kanatak. 
Portage, bay; see Chagvan. 
Portage, bay; see Passage canal. 
Portage; cove, near head .of Chilkoot inlet, Eynn canal, Alexander aichipelago. 

Called Portage bay by the traders. From it there is a short portage 

between Chilkat and Chilkoot inlets. 
Portage; creek, tributary to American river, from theeast, Sewai-il peninsula. Name 

from Brooks, 1900. 
Portage; creek, tributary to headwaters of the Skwentna river in the Tordrillo 

range. So named by Spurr and Post in 1898. 
Portage; creek, tributary to the Sushitna river, from the north, near latitude 68°. 

So named by Muldrow in 1898. 
Portage; glacier, on Kenai peninsula, between Passage canal ami Turnagain arm. 

So called by Mendenhall in 1898. 



Por— I»oi. 



328 [BULL. 187. 



Portage; momitains (3,500 feet high), near head of Portage bay, Kujireanof island, 
Alexander arciiipelago. 80 named by Thomas in 1887. 

Portage; i>oiiit, ea.^^t of Mi'Clellan flats, Chilkat inlet, Lynn canal, Alexander arehi- 
pelago. The western en<l of the portage across Seduction tongue to Haines 
is near this point. 

Portage; iioint, the eastern point of entrance to Dry Spruce ])ay, on northern shore 
of Kodiak. Named Perenosa (portage) by Murashef in 1839-40. 

Portage; river, on the west coast of Kodiak. So designated by the Fish Commis- 
sion in 1888. Tebenkof has the word Perenos (portage) here. 

Portage; two small islets, near the entrance to Portage bay, Kupreanof island, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Called Perenosnaya (portage) by Meade in 1869. 

Port Chester, village; see Metlakatla. 

Port Clarence. The P^leventh Census, 1890, gives the population of Port Clarence 
as 485. This does not appear to refer to any particular settlement or vil- 
lage, though it has sometimes been so used. 

Port (lex Franqim; see Lituya bay. 

Porter; ]ieak (4,798 feet high), on the mainland east of Thomas bay, southeastern 
Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Admiral David Dixon Porter, 
U. S. N. 

Portillo; channel, in Bucareli bay. Prince of Wales archipelago. Named Canal de 
Portillo (passage canal) by Maurelle and Quadra in 1775-1779. 

Portland; canal, in southeastern Alaska, through which runs the boundary line 
between Alaska and British Columbia. Named Portland's canal, in 1793, 
)iy Vancouver, who says: "The distance from its entrance to its source is 
about 70 miles, which, in honor of the noble family of Bentinck, I name 
Portland's canal." The canal is here regarded as terminating at Point 
Ramsden. 

Portland; inlet, east of Dixon entrance, separating Pearse island from the mainland 
of British Columbia. Dall in the Coast Pilot (1883, p. 57) says: "The 
broader portion (of Portland canal) on modern charts is often denomi- 
nated Portland inlet, the name of Portland canal being then restricted to 
that part of it of contracted width which lies to the westward of Observa- 
tory inlet." 

Portland; island (206 feet high), near the northern end of Stephens passage, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Beardslee in 1880. 

Portland; point, on the northeastern coast of Pearse island, at southern end of 
Portland canal, Alexander archipelago. 

Portlock; bank, northeast of Kodiak. So named, in 1888, by the Fish Commission, 
after Capt. Nathaniel Portlock. 

Portlock; harbor, on the western coast of Chichagof island, Alexaniler archipelago. 
This name was given, in 1787, by Capt. Nathaniel Portlock, ar. English fur 
trader, who published a sketch of it in 1789. Nichols, in the Coast Pilot 
(1891, p. 189), regards it as identical with Kukkan of the Indians. 

Posliedni; cape, on northern shore of Afognak bay, Afognak island. Named Pos- 
liedni (last) by Murashef in 1839-40. Near by he has Krainie (the very 
last). 

Possession; point, on Kenai peninsula, at head of Cook inlet. Named by Cook, in 
1778, who here "displayed the flag and took possession of the river and 
country in llis Majesty's name." Tebenkof, 1849, indicates a settlement 
(naseleniia) here 

Post; creek, tributary to the Niukluk river, from the north, Seward peninsula. 
Name from Barnard, 1900. 

Potainikof; cape, on the northwestern coast of Atka, middle Aleutians. A reef, 
with islets and rocks above and below water, extends off the point for 



329 



Pot— Pri. 



Potainikof — Continued. 

about 2 miles. Potainik iss Russian for a hidden or secret j>l.ae(' and in the 

colonies was applied to a rock- which never uncovered, but revealed itself 

l)y breakers in heavy weather. At such times they said "The Potainik is 

playing." 
Potato; mountain, on 8e\vard peninsula, about 10 miles northeast of Cape Prince of 

Wales, near Bering strait. Name published by the Coast Survey in 1900. 

Apparently this is C^onical hill of Reechey, 1827. 
Potato; point, in Valdes narrows. Prince William sound. So called by Aber- 

croml)ie in 1898. 
Fouale, bay; see Cold. 
Poundstone; rock, in the southern part of Lynn canal, Alexander archipelago. 

Named by Mansfield, in 1890, after Ensign Homer Clark Poundstone, U. 

S. N., a member of his party. 
Poverotni, point; see Lockwood. 
Poverntnie, point; see Vanderbilt. 
Poverty; island, off the south end of Long island, Chiniak liay, Kodiak. Named 

I'bezhitsha (?poverty) by Russian naval officers in 1808-1810. 
Povorotni; island, in Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Named Povorotni (turn 

or turnabout) by Vasilief in 1833. Has also been written Povero and 

Poverotni; also called Turnabout. It is Return island of Meade in 1869. 

For a long time, 1835-1875, it was conspicuously marked by a canoe, 

marking the burial place of a family of Sitka Indians who died of measles 

in 1835. From this it derived the local name of Canoe island. 
Povorotni, island; see Turnalwut. 
Povorotni; point, the northeast point of entrance to Redoubt bay, Sitka sound, 

Alexander archipelago. Named Povorotnoi (turnabout) by Vasilief in 

1809. Also has been called Povorot, Poverotnoi, and Turnabout. 
Povorotni, point; see Turner. 
Povorotnoi, point; see Protection. 
Pow; island, in Hassler harbor, Revillagigedo channel, Alexander archipelago. So 

named by Nichols in 1882. 
Powell; peak (2,655 feet high), on the mainland, near Thomas bay, southeastern 

Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Maj. John Wesley Powell, 

then Director of the United States Geological Survey. 
Powell; peak, on the northwestern shore of Klutina lake. So named by Aber- 

crombie in 1898. 
Pratt; mountain, on the mainland, west of the Stikine river. Named by the Coast 

Survey, after John Francis Pratt, assistant, Coast and (Tcodetic Survey. 
Pravoi, point; see Right Hand. 
Praznik; island, in St. Paul harbor, Kodiak. Named Rocky l)y Lisianski in 

1804. Russian naval officers, 1808-1810, named it Prazdnichnoi (iioliday 

or picnic). It has also been called Holiday island. 
Preacher; creek, tributary to Birch creek, from the south, near latitude 66°. Name 

published by the Coast Survey in 1895. 
Preble; peak (5,028 feet high), on the mainland, near Thomas ))ay, southeastern 

Alaska. Named by Thomas, in 1887, after Rear- Admiral George Henry 

Preble, U. S. N. 
Pribilie; island, at the north end of Krestof sound, Alexander archipelago. Nanietl 

Pribllie (profitable) by Vasilief in 1833. 
Pribilof ; group of islands in Bering sea, composed of two larger ones, St. Paul and 

St. George, and two smaller ones. Otter and Walrus. Often called the Fur 

Seal islands. They were "discovered in 1786 by the pilot Pribilof and 

then called Novy (new), afterwards Lebedevski, from the name of the 



PH-Prl. 380 [Bn.....lSV. 

Pribilof — ('(iiiliiuic'l. 

owiuT of the vessel wliich discovered them. Shehkof ciiUed them Zoii- 
hoff (after the then Russian Minister of the Interior). Later they were 
allied Kotow (fur seal) from the immense number of these animals found 
there and Sieverny (north) from their relation to I'ualaska. Sarichef 
on liis map named them Pribilof, after their discoverer." (Lutke ;r5»)-887) . 
In the colonies they were, under the Russians, usually called Ostrovki, 
the liUle ii<lands. St. George was first seen and landed upon June 'f . 
1786. Hunters wintered there, and the next year, on June 29, in the morn- 
ing, they saw St. Paul. On visiting it they found the copper handle of a 
sword, a clay pipe, and fireplaces— proofs of prior visits by parties unknown. 
Often now c-alled Thi' Seal Idamh. 

Price; island, near the entrance to Gambier bay. Admiralty island, Alexander arciii- 
pelago. So named by Mansfield in 1889. 

Priest, bay; see Popof. 

Priest, point; see Kalekta. 

Priest; rf)(;k, near Cape Kalekta, the eastern head of Captains bay, Unalaska, east- 
ern Aleutians. Locally so called from fancied resemblance to a Russian 
priest. Lutke says (p. 281) "The broken down cliffs and isolated rocks 
sometimes take the most fantastic forms; as, for example, the one just in 
front of Cape Kalekta exactly resembles an old man having his head 
inclined and his arms crossed on his breast." 

Prince; creek, tributary to Caribou creek. So called 1)yH. H. Hicks, guide of Cap- 
tain Glenn's expedition in 1898. Not identified and name not fonnd on 
any map. 

Prhiri' J-'Jnu'sfs, sound; see Ernest. 

Prince of Wales; archipelago, between Dixon entrance and Sumner strait, south- 
eastern Alaska. Named "The Prince of Wales's Archipelago" l)y \'an- 
couver in 1793. 

Prince ofWales; cape, at the western end of Seward peninsula, Bering strait, 
being that point of North America which approaches nearest to Asia. So 
named by Cook, August 9, 1778. The Eskimo name is reported to be 
Niekta, also written Nychta. Billings, 1790, calls it Prince of Wales or 
Kigmil or Kygmil. It is said to have been named Gwozdef by Bering in 
1 728. Now universally known as Cape Prince of Wales. 

Prince of Wales; island, the largest island of Prince of Wales archipelago, in Alex- 
ander archipelago. The earliest use of this name appears to l)e in the 
treaty between Great Britain and Russia of February f|, 1825. 

Prince of Wales; passage, in the southwestern part of Prince AVilliam sound. So 
named, in. 1787, by Hayward, of Portlock's vessel. 

Prince of Wales; shoal, off Cape Prince of Wales, Bering strait. So called ])y the 
Coast Survey in 1890. 

Prince William; sound, indenting the northern shore of the Gulf of Alaska. Named 
Prince William's by Cook in 1778. The Russians called it Chngach gulf 
or PriTice William sound. 

Princes Head; cliff, on the eastern shore of Captains bay, Unalaska, eastern Aleu- 
tians. So called by Dall in 1871. 

Prisoners; cove, on the southern shore of Middle Kaigani harbor, Kaigani strait, 
near Dixon entrance. Named Prisoners cove (pliennaia gavantza) by 
Etolin in 1833. Some persons identify this, probably erroneously, with 
Port Meares of Douglas. 
Pritchard; rocks, in the Galankin group, Sitka sound, Alexander archipelago. So 
named by United States naval officers in 1880. Called Pritchard shoals 
in Hydrographic Notice No. 5 of 1880. 



I 



BAKEK] 33 1 Pro— Pro. 

Proctor; i.slaiub, in Dixon entrance, near the southwestern siiore of Wales island. 
(Originally they were included in the group called Boston islands. Named 
l)y Nichols in 1891. 

Prokhodd, islands, etc. ; see Passage. ' 

Prolewy; point, the northwestern point of entrance to Wrangell strait, Alexander 
archipelago. Named Prolewy (strait) by Lindenberg in 18:!.S. It is Pro- 
liva point of Meade's sketch, 1869. 

Prolewy; rock, in Southern rapids, Peril strait, Alexander archipelago. Prolewy 
is the Russian word for strait. This name seems to have been first 
applied by Coghlan in 1884. 

Prolewy; rock, off Prolewy point, Wrangell strait, Alexander archipelago. So 
called by Coghlan in 1884. It is Middle rock of Meade in 1868. 

Promezlmtochvie, cape; see Between. 

Prominence; cape, on the southern shore of Unalaska, between Open and Usof 
bays. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. Its native name is 
given by Tebenkof as Idaliuk. 

Promisla; bay, indenting the southern shore of Krestof island, Sitka sound, Alex- 
ander archipelago. Named Promisla (business) by Vasilief in 1833. 
Bozhie promisla means d'od's business;, which a Russian dictionary trans- 
lates Prondence. Thus this bay has been called Providence. Kosirometinoff 
translates this furx. 

Proniuutonj, cape; see Lutke. 

Promontory; cove, indenting the southern shore of Unimak island, eastern Aleu- 
tians. So named by the Fish Commission in 1888. 

Prospect; creek, tributary to Snake river, from the east, in the Nome mining region, 
Seward peninsula. Prospectors' name, published in 1900. 

Prospect; point, on the eastern shore of Port Snettisham, Stephens passage, Alex- 
ander archipelago. So named by Thomas in 1888. 

Protitssof. The Russian orthodox church at Morzhovoi is called Protassof in the 
Tenth Census, 1880, and Eleventh Census, 1890. Petrof in the Tenth 
Census called the town Protassof; accidentally Protasso on his map. 

Protection; bay, between Old harbor and Three Island bay, indenting the southern 
shore of Unalaska, eastern Aleutians. So named by the Fish Commission 
in 188S. 

Protection; point, on the western shore of Nushagak bay or estuary. Named 
Povorotnoi (turn) by Tebenkof, 1849. The coast line bends or turns at 
this point. Renamed Protection by the Fish Commission in 1890. 

Protection; port, in the northwestern part of Prince of Wales island, opening into 
Sumner strait, Alexander archipelago. So named by Vancouver, who in 
1793 here rode out a heavy gale, and, "grateful for such an asylum," 
named it Port Protection. 

Prorodiiik, island; see Leader. 

Providence; cape, on the southern shore of Alaska peninsula, west of Kodiak. 
Named Provide