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Xibrars 

ottbe 

Tflntveretts of Wisconsin 




Zbe JBrtttsb Brtfsts Series. 



GEORGE MORLAND 



t 



l GEORGE MORLAND 



HIS LIFE AND WORKS 



BY GEORGE C. WILLIAMSON, Litt.D. 




LONDON 

GEORGE BELL AND SONS 

1907 



FRLVTHB IK OHEAT BRITAIN, 



498030 
JUN 3 1941 

Vs|\0 

W&7 
\S07 

CONTENTS 



CHAPTER PAGK 

Preface *- - - - - v 

List of Illustrations - - xi 

I. The Morland Family ----- i 

II. Early Days ...... 17 

III. Marriage and Housekeeping - - - - 26 

IV. Work in London - - - 39 
V. Debts and Difficulties - - -56 

VI. Morland at the Seaside - - 70 

VII. The End of the Story - - - 85 

VIII. Morlani/s Pupils - - - -99 

IX. The Art of Morland - - - 101 
X. Morland's Engravers and Engravings - - 111 
XI. A Note on Signatures, illustrated by Fac- 
similes - - - - - - 119 

XII. Some Information on the Value of Works by 

Morland - - - - - - 122 



Appendix I. List of Pictures exhibited by George 
Morland : 



society of artists 
free society of artists 
royal academy - 



- 127 

- 128 

- 128 



1"* 



x CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Appendix II. Pictures by Morland exhibited on Loan 
in Public Exhibitions : 

burlington house winter exhibitions, 1871-1907 - 130 

guildhall exhibitions, 1 895, 1 899, i902 - - 1 33 

guelph exhibition, 1891 - - - - 133 

new gallery exhibition, 1899- " " "134 

grosvenor gallery, 1 888- 1 889 - - - 1 34 

Appendix III. Proprietors of Paintings by George 

Morland - - - - - - 136 

Appendix IV. Catalogue of Engravings, Etchings, etc., 
after George Morland, showing Names of 
Engravers and Publishers and Years of 
- Publication - - - - - - 168 

Appendix V. Short Bibliography -• - - - 194 

Index -------- 195 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



COLOURED PLATES 
The Reckoning — Victoria and A tier t Museum - Frontispiece 

TO PACB PACK 

Horses in a Stable.— Victoria and Albert Museum - - 62 

The Door of a Village Inn.— National Gallery - - 92 

Girl Fondling a Dove.— Victoria and Albert Museum - 96 



From the Collection of Mr. F. Abbiss Phillips, 
Stoke DAbernon Manor, Surrey. 

Wreck of a Boat. Signed ..... 2 

The Blind White Horse. Signed ... 4 

The Miller and his Men. Signed, 1797 ... 6 
The Disconsolate and her Parrot. (Portrait of Mrs. 

Morland.) Signed ------ 8 

Peasants Travelling. (The woman is a portrait of Morland's 

sister-in-law.) Signed on the donkey's pack - 10 

Selling Fish. Signed on the rock - - 12 

The Cottage Door. Signed - - -14 

• oman feeding Pigs. Signed - - - - 16 

Friend, the Newfoundland Dog (which saved Mr. William 

Phillips from being drowned whilst bathing in the sea at 

Portsmouth, October 4, 1789). Signed - - - 18 

The Red Lion Inn. Signed - - - - 20 

The First of September - - - - - 22 

Winter. Signed- ------ 24 

'I he Stable Yard. Signed - - - - 26 

' ORTRAIT OF MRS. JORDAN - - - 28 



xii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

From the Collection of Mr, F. Abbiss Phillips {continued). 

TO PACE PAGF. 

Wreck of an Indiaman off the Needles. Signed on a 

package ------- 30 

The Day after the Wreck. Signed on a package - - 32 

Cow and Calf worried by a Dog. Signed - - 34 

From the Coloured Engravings by J. R. Smith. 
The LjBtitia Series : 

plate i. domestic happiness - - - -36 

2. the elopement - - - - -36 

3. the virtuous parent - - - "3$ 

4. dressing for the masquerade - - 36 

5. the tavern door - 36 

6. the fair penitent - - - 36 

From the Collection of Mr. F Abbiss Phillips, 
Stoke UAbernon Manor, Surrey. 

Feeding the Calves ------ 38 

Fishermen waiting for the Evening Breeze - - 40 

Bargaining for Fish ------ 42 

A Sea-Piece ------- 44 

Evening -------- 46 

Shepherds reposing ------ 48 

Summer. Signed 1795 - - - - -50 

Gipsy Encampment. Signed 1795 - - - 52 

Landscape. Signed 1794 - - - 54 

Farmer, Wife, and Child - - - - 56 

George Morland and a Friend - - - 58 

The Waggoner's Halt outside the Bell Inn.— Collection 

of Mr. Eric A. Knight - - - - 60 

Idleness. — Collection of Sir Charles Tennant, Bart. - - 64 

Diligence. — Collection of Sir Charles Tennant, Bart - 64 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS xiii 

TO PACK PAGB 

Children Playing at Soldiers. — Collection of Sir Charles 

Tennanty Bart. - - - - - - 66 

Boys robbing an Orchard. — Collection of Sir Charles 

Tennant, Bart. ------ 68 

La Halte (scene outside an inn). — The Louvre - - 70 

Interior of a Stable.— National Gallery - - 72 

The Door of a Village Inn. — National Gallery - - 74 

A Quarry with Peasants.— National Gallery - 76 

Rabbiting. — National Gallery - - - - 78 

Mr. Plumbley (by permission of Mr. Hubert Garle) - 80 

Grandfather \(in the possession of Sir T. Glen Coats, and by 82 

Grandmother J permission of Messrs. J. and R. Annan and Co. ) 84 
The Market Cart (by permission of Mr. J. T. Herbert 

Baily) - 86 

A Snooze by the Way. Drawing in pencil (by permission of 

Mr. Hubert Garle) - 88 

Morland's Servant. Drawing in pencil (by permission of 

Mr. Hubert Garle) - - - - - 88 

A Tea-Party. Drawing in sepia (by permission of Mr. Hubert 

Garle) -------- 88 

A Scene on the Ice. Drawing in sepia (by permission of 

Mr. Hubert Garle) ------ 88 

The Artist in his Studio with his Man Gibbs (by per- 
mission of the Corporation of Nottingham) - - 90 
Study of Pigs (by permission of the Corporation of Notting- 
ham) -------- 90 

Boat on Seashore (by permission of Mr. J. T. Herbert 

Baily) -------- 94 

The Lighthouse (by permission of Mr. J. T. Herbert Baily) - 94 

Portrait of Morland by Rowlandson.— British Museum 100 

Drawing of a Dog.— British Museum - - - 102 

Drawing of Landscape with Horses.— British Museum - 104 

Sketch of a Man's Head (by permission of Mr. John Haines) 106 

Sketch of a Pig's Head (by permission of Mr. John Haines) 108 



xiv LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

TO FACS PAGK 

Original Watbr-Colour of J. R. Smith by Morland.— 

British Museum - - - - - , - i 10 

Girl feeding Pigs (from the engraving by J. R. Smith) - 112 

Breaking the Ice (from the engraving by J. R. Smith) -* 112 
George Morland at his Work (after the engraving by 

J. R. Smith, January 20, 1805, illustrated in Angelo's 

"Reminiscences") - -. - - - - 112 

Rustic Employment (from the engraving by J. R. Smith) - 112 

Guinea-pigs (from the engraving by Gaugain, 1789) - - 1 14 

Dancing Dogs (from the engraving by Gaugain, 1790) - 114 

Anxiety; or, The Ship at Sea (from the engraving by 

P. Dawe) - - - - - - 114 

Mutual Joy ; or, The Ship in Harbour (from the 

engraving by P. Dawe) - - - - - 114 

St. James's Park (from the engraving by F. D. Soiron) - 116 

Girl and Pigs (from the engraving by W. Ward) - -116 

Duck-Shooting (from the engraving by T. Simpson) - - 116 

Woodcock and Pheasant Shooting (from the engraving by 

T. Simpson) - - - - - - - 116 

The Farmer's Visit to his Married Daughter in 

Town (from the stipple print by W. Bond) - - - 1 16 

Artist in his Studio, surrounded by his Animal Pets 

(from the rare print in " The Eccentric Mirror, " 1807) - 118 

Title from the Wrapper of a Drawing-Book - - 118 

Title-Page of a Drawing-Book - - - - 118 

Six Examples of Morland's Signature (in the text) - 120 






PREFACE 

Six memoirs at least have been written of George 
Morland, as well as numerous accounts of him and his 
works in various books of reference. All the chief 
works, however, from which information can be obtained 
are very scarce, and copies of them are to be found in but 
few libraries. There were no fewer than four biographies 
of the artist written very shortly after his death : by 
William Collins in 1805, F. W. Blagdon in 1806, J. Hassell 
in the same year, and George Dawe, R.A., in 1807. Of 
these four, Blagdon's memoir is a valuable one, and on 
the rare occasions when a copy comes into the market 
it commands a high price. 

The memoir by Dawe — on the whole the best of the four 
— is almost equally rare, and was reissued in sumptuous 
form in 1904, richly illustrated with photogravure plates, 
while that by Collins forms only a part of a curious little 
volume entitled " Memoirs of a Picture," containing the 
adventures of many conspicuous characters. 

Dawe was Morland's trusted friend, although eighteen 
ars his junior, and the book is a very spirited history 
ritten in such excellent style and with such sober 



vi PREFACE 

judgment that, although accepted as the work of Dawe 
himself, it must always be regarded as quite an extra- 
ordinary performance for a young man of twenty-six. 

One other notice of Morland belongs to the same year 
— that contained in the fourth volume of " The Eccentric 
Mirror," by C. H. Wilson, London, 1807. 

It is hardly possible in any library, save a public one, 
to consult all five memoirs, and, that being the case, 
Mr. Ralph Richardson issued, in 1895, a small volume 
compiled from these four rare books. That work is now 
out of print. In 1898 the late Mr. J. T. Nettleship, the 
well-known animal painter, issued in the " Portfolio 
Series " a slight essay on Morland, being to a great extent 
a study of his works from the artist's point of view, speci- 
ally in order to develop Mr. Nettleship's theory respect- 
ing the evolution of some later painters from Morland. 
This work is practically the only one now available on 
Morland, and it does not profess to be a memoir, and 
ignores a great deal of the interesting social informa- 
tion which the artist's contemporaries gave in the five 
biographies to which allusion has been made. In these 
circumstances it seemed reasonable that another book 
should be issued on this ever popular painter, to gather up 
the information contained in the previously issued volumes, 
and to illustrate his pictures to a fuller extent than has 
before been possible. 

Fortunately, a few contemporary letters in which there 
were references to Morland came into the author's posses- 
sion, and enabled him to add a little new informatior 
and to correct some errors previously made. In other 



PREFACE vii 

respects the story of Morland's life has necessarily been 
taken from the biographies already alluded to. 

The present edition is founded on the previous work 
issued by the same author in 1904, but the opportunity of 
preparing it in more portable form has been made use of 
in other respects. Much of it has been rewritten, con- 
siderable additions have been made, and it has been 
brought up to date. Chapter IX. has been amended and 
largely increased, and two new short chapters have been 
added, making the volume, it is hoped, more satisfactory 
and more useful than was its predecessor. 

The author desires to acknowledge in grateful terms 
the way in which he has been assisted by Mr. Richardson, 
who is responsible for the schedules forming Appendices 
III. and IV. Mr. Richardson has not only consented to 
the freest use of his volume, but has also co-operated in 
the production of this book, placing at the author's dis- 
posal his stores of knowledge concerning the works of 
Morland. 

Mr. Algernon Graves has also most considerately per- 
mitted the author to make use of his lists of Morland's 
exhibits at the Royal Academy. 

Hearty thanks are also tendered to Mr. F. Abbiss 
Phillips and to Mr. Eric A. Knight for permission to 
have the fine examples of Morland's work in their posses- 
sion photographed for the illustrations in this book, and 
also to Mr. Marshall Hall for the loan of his brilliant 
engravings, from which the illustrations of the Lsetitia 
Series, " Return from Market " and " Feeding the Pigs," 
have been made. 



viii PREFACE 

The late Sir Charles Tennant was also good enough to 
permit his two pictures to be photographed for the same 
purpose. 

Thanks have further to be expressed to Mr. Herbert 
Garle, not only for kindly permission to quote freely from 
his interesting work, entitled " A Driving Tour in the 
Isle of Wight," but also for the loan of two delightful 
sketches and of two sepia drawings not hitherto repro- 
duced. 

Mr. John Haines has kindly lent his two drawings as 
illustrations ; the Corporation of Nottingham have per- 
mitted reproduction to be made of the two fine works in 
their gallery ; and Mr. J. T. Herbert Baily has afforded 
generous assistance with regard to the pictures and en- 
gravings under his control. 

Burgh House, 

Hampstead, N.W., 
May, 1907. 



GEORGE MORLAND 

CHAPTER I 

THE MORLAND FAMILY 

George Dawe, in his memoir of Morland, states that 
the information he gives is derived from personal and 
intimate knowledge. He tells us that his father, Mr. 
Philip Dawe, was articled to George Morland's father, was 
intimate with the son from his childhood, and kept up a 
familiar intercourse with him during the greater part of his 
life. Mr. Philip Dawe was, he says, " perhaps the only 
person with whom his friendship remained uninterrupted, 
and with whom, as well in adversity as in prosperity, he 
appears to have had no reserve." The author, therefore, 
had the opportunity of becoming closely acquainted with 
the circumstances of Morland's early life, and he gathered 
information as to his later career from those friends and 
associates who were his intimate acquaintances. 

He does not spare the artist in his volume ; he sets down 
in very clear language the grave faults which marked and 
marred the whole of Morland's life, but he does it in no 
bitter spirit, and of the four memoirs written soon after 
the artist's decease, his appears to be not only the 
most reliable and straightforward, but certainly the least 
malicious* 

He tells us that George Morland was born in London 



2 GEORGE MORI^AND 

on the 26th of June, 1763. His father, Henry Robert 
Morland, was a painter in crayons, and being esteemed an 
excellent connoisseur, was much respected in his pro- 
fession. 

We must go, however, a little farther back than to 
Morland's father in order to find the beginning of the • 
artistic genius. It seems probable that a hundred years 
before Morland's birth there was a painter in the family. 
Certainly in the Court Books of the city of Norwich for 
1674 a " Mr. Moreland, painter," is mentioned, and the 
note reads that the " picture of Mr. Francis Southwell, a 
benefactor of the City, was left in the hands of Mr. 
Moreland, painter, to copy it for Sir Robert Southwell, 
Knt., one of the Clerks for H.M. Most Hon. Privy 
Council." Another note records the fact that the copy 
of the picture and a handsome frame were presented 
by the Corporation to Sir Robert Southwell, and then 
we are told that £5 was sent to Mr. Moreland for the 
work, and that this £5 he returned to the Town Clerk, 
begging him to give it to the poor. We are unable to 
state definitely that this independent painter was an 
ancestor of George Morland, but a branch of the Morland 
family is said to have come from Norfolk, and the name 
is not infrequently found in the Norwich records between 
1572 and 1768, and as a rule is spelt without the " e," 
which appears in the quotation above. The spirited 
action of the painter in rejecting the fee sent him is 
worthy of notice. Whether it was because he considered 
it an insufficient one, or because he needed no fee for the 
work he was executing for the City Council; We cannot 
say, but it is exactly the sort of thing we should have 
expected from a Morland, and if George Morland ever knew 
of it, he would have, we are sure, applauded the quixotic 
action. Morland's own grandfather, George Henry Mor- 
land, was a subject-painter, born, says Redgrave, at the 





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W J D 



















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"8 

a 

w 



THE MORLAND FAMILY 3 

beginning of the eighteenth century. He was one of the 
artists who were assisted by an advance of money from 
the Society of Artists, and this he obtained in 1760. 
His pictures were popular in their time, and many of them 
were engraved, but they had very little artistic excellence, 
and no permanent importance. The three most popular 
appear to have been: "The Pretty Ballad-Singer," 
engraved by Watson in 1769; "The Fair Nun Un- 
masked," and " The Oyster- Woman," which were en- 
graved by Philip Dawe about the same time, George 
Henry Morland lived on the south side of St. James's 
Square, and was still living in 1789, but appears to have 
died soon afterwards. 

His son, Henry Robert Morland, was taught drawing 
by his father. He was, according to Collins, "much 
respected by all who knew him for his liberality and 
gentlemanly address," but appears to have been an 
eminently unsatisfactory person. He was a man of 
unsettled habits and of restless disposition, extravagant 
and careless as to money, and frequently indulging in 
most imprudent speculations. He attempted various 
branches of artistic work, practising line engraving and 
mezzotint, painting in oil and with crayons, cleaning 
pictures, restoring them, and at times dealing in them, 
and yet, everything at times and nothing long, he never 
succeeded, and twice at least in his life was bankrupt. 
At one time he must have been a rich man, for he then 
occupied the house in Leicester Square afterwards the 
residence of Sir Joshua Reynolds, but when George was 
born he had been compelled to reduce his expenses, and 
was living in the Haymarket. 

He was undoubtedly clever, and the few pictures by 
his hand which still remain have recently come into 
greater demand, and their excellences been more readily 
recognised. There are two of his works in the National 

1 — 2 



4 GEORGE MORLAND 

Gallery, which form part of a set. They both represent 
laundry-maids, one engaged in washing and the other in 
ironing; but there is little doubt that they are portraits 
of ladies of some importance at the time, who desired to 
be represented, according to the fashion of the day, in 
domestic work, and wearing simple print gowns, specially 
calculated to show off their figure. His work is always 
carefully drawn, and, as Redgrave states, laboriously 
finished. It is expressive, but the colour scheme is not 
rich, but of a cold and bluish quality. " He painted," 
adds Redgrave, " a portrait of George III., which was 
engraved, by Houston; a portrait of Garrick as 
Richard III., which is at the Garrick Club ; and two 
other portraits called ' The Beautiful Miss Gunnings.' " 
His pictures of laundry-maids were very popular in their 
time, and were reproduced in mezzotint. They sold well, 
and he appears to have developed the idea of these 
laundry pictures very largely, and to have painted 
portraits over and over again in this style. It is to be 
feared, however, that, owing to hisextravagant habits, he 
was led to indulge in very questionable proceedings, and 
one of Morland's biographers implies that the copies of 
works by old masters which George did when he was a 
boy were sold by his father as originals.* 

He exhibited eight pictures at the Royal Academy. In 
1771, when living in Blenheim Street, he sent in the 
portrait of a lady, in crayons (132) ; in 1772 he had moved 
to Woodstock Street, and exhibited another picture in 
crayons (158) ; and in 1773 " A Girl hanging out Wet 
Linen." In 1779 he was residing at 4 Mill Bank Row, 
and then exhibited a portrait in crayons (201). In 1781 
there was another change of address, and from 14 Stephen 
Street, he sent in " A Dairy-Maid " (crayons), and in 1786, 
" Distressed Architect." Then, finally, we find him at 
* See also 167. 




CO 



THE MORLAND FAMILY 5 

6 Carlisle Place, Soho, sending in two pictures in 1792 — 
"A Summer Shower " (598) and "Lighting a Person 
Home by a Lanthorn called a Moon " (item 629). 

Morland's mother is believed to have been a French- 
woman. She is described by James Ward in his 
biography as "of an opposite character [to that of her 
husband], and was to me (if I may use the comparison) like 
a little strutting bantam cock. She had," continues Ward, 
" a small independent property, and she crowed over her 
quiet husband most completely. She was a Frenchwoman, 
and had three sons and two daughters ; her partiality was 
to her son George and his youngest sister, Sophia, . . . 
the eldest sister was a most exemplary character, and the 
more praiseworthy as being brought up under the greatest 
temptation to the contrary. One son went to sea. He 
returned to England once, after which he went to sea 
again, and was never afterwards heard of. The other 
brother, Henry, was a dealer in everything, a business for 
which his mind was exactly fitted, being an eccentric, 
money-making character. Latterly, he opened a coffee- 
house in Dean Street, Soho, and (became the last and 
most constant dealer in his brother George's pictures, 
and, I believe, had a greater number of them copied and 
sold as originals than all the other dealers put together." 

Mrs. Morland, whose Christian name was Maria, was 
evidently an artist herself; she exhibited twice at the 
Royal Academy, sending in, in 1785, a " Portrait of a 
Child hugging a Guinea- Pig " (194), and in 1786 " A Girl 
Washing" (114). We have no other evidence beyond 
the exhibition of these two pictures of her artistic merit. 
Dawe tells us that " the domestic affairs were conducted 
by Mrs. Morland with a scrupulous regularity, which 
subjected their children to more -than ordinary restraint ; 
but they were preserved in a state of uninterrupted health, 
and she was herself a remarkable instance of the effects of 



6 GEORGE MORLAND 

exercise and temperance in prolonging activity and cheer- 
fulness to a late period of life." 

The only one of the daughters whom Dawe mentions 
had her mother's name, Maria, and the author says that 
she " voluntarily applied herself to painting, in which at 
an early age she displayed talents which, had they been 
cultivated with perseverance, should have ranked respect- 
ably in the art, but she relinquished that pursuit on 
becoming a wife." 

It is quite possible that the Maria Morland who 
exhibited at the Academy was the daughter and not the 
mother, and in fact many writers have stated that it was 
so. A comparison, however, of the various references to 
the exhibit leads us to believe that Mrs. Morland was the 
artist in question, and not her daughter. 

The Morland family themselves claimed descent from a 
rather celebrated man, a certain Sir Samuel Morland, the 
son of the Rev. Thomas Morland, Rector of Sulhamstead, 
in Berkshire. The family had been connected (so says Mrs. 
Cope in her manuscript volume of notes for the " History 
of Berkshire," now preserved in the Reading Free Library) 
with Sulhamstead parish for some generations. 

They had owned property in the place, and a field now 
incorporated in Sulhamstead Park, the property of Mrs. 
Cope's father, Major Thoyts, and a piece of land near by, 
both bore the name of Morlands. The Morland name 
appeared, in connexion with the parish, as far back as the 
time of Elizabeth, and the parish registers record the 
baptism of Marie Morland in 1628, and her marriage to 
Robert Skinner, of Burghfield, in 1655. Mr. Thomas 
Morland was Rector from 1633 till his death in 1650, and 
several of his children were baptised in the church, 
Samuel amongst the number. He was educated at 
Winchester School and Magdalene College, Cambridge. 
When about twenty-eight he accompanied the Embassy of 




Hyatt, photo.] 



[Collection of Mr. F. Abbiss Phillips. 
THE MII,I,3R AND HIS MEN. 
Signed, and dated 1797. 



THE MORLAND FAMILY 7 

Bulstrode Whitelocke to Sweden, and a little later was 
assistant to Thurloe, then Secretary of State. He was 
sent by the Protector as his representative to Savoy, to 
remonstrate with the Duke for permitting the persecution 
of the Waldenses, and, on his return home, he published, 
in 1658, an account of the Waldensian Church and of the 
persecution it had undergone. It was not, however, for 
his diplomatic or for his literary work that he was 
specially remarkable, but for his wonderful inventive 
genius as a mechanician. To Samuel Morland has been 
attributed the invention of the speaking-trumpet, the fire- 
engine, and the steam-engine, and although, with regard 
to the last, he cannot be credited with the development of 
the engine, yet it appears to be probable that the germ of 
the idea to be developed by other men originated with 
him. He certainly invented two arithmetical machines, 
one of which is now at South Kensington, and his original 
speaking-trumpet can be seen at Cambridge. By his 
plunger pump he raised water to the top of Windsor 
Castle in 1675, and he went so far as to suggest the use 
of compressed steam as a power for the propulsion of, 
vessels on the water. In his own house he fitted up a 
remarkable fountain on the side-table in his dining-room, 
and, when he travelled, his carriage was arranged with 
extraordinary clockwork mechanism, by means of which 
he is said to have been able en route to cook an excellent 
meal, making soup, broiling steaks, or roasting a joint of 
meat. 

He became acquainted with Sir Richard Willis's plot, 
and from that time did his utmost to promote the Restora- 
tion, evidently becoming one of the group of persons who 
met Charles II. at Breda in May, 1660, and for his services 
to the King was created a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber 
and a baronet. He was in high repute at Court, was 
sent to France by the King in 1682, became blind in 1692, 



8 GEORGE MORLAND 

and died four years afterwards. His married life was not 
satisfactory, although he entered upon matrimony no fewer 
than four times. His first wife was a Frenchwoman, his 
second the daughter of Sir Roger Harsnet, and his third 
a Miss Fielding. His fourth wife, by her extravagance 
and evil life, ruined his estate, dispersed his means, and 
destroyed his peace of mind, and from her he was divorced 
in 1688. At the time of his death he was in much im- 
poverished circumstances, and he left one son, who suc- 
ceeded to his baronetcy. This son is said to have died 
without issue in 1716, but the Morland family, the father 
and grandfather of the artist, considered themselves as 
heirs to the title. They certainly could not have been so 
had the son died without issue, unless they were descended 
from Sir Samuel's brothers, which is of course possible ; 
but we have no evidence as to this, save that each writer 
on Morland appears to have taken it for granted that the 
baronetcy could have been obtained if it had been claimed. 
Sir Samuel Morland does not appear to have had artistic 
talent, but we read of the very elaborate mechanical 
drawings which he made, and it is possible, therefore, 
that the genius which came down to George Morland had 
a starting-point in his celebrated ancestor. 

We now have the family before us, and it will be well 
to turn more careful attention to the talented son. Dawe 
tells us that George was the eldest child and the favourite, 
that he was the only one brought up at home, and that 
" he acquired some superficial knowledge of the French 
and Latin languages, probably with the assistance of his 
father, who was a tolerable scholar." It was clear, how- 
ever, that from a very tender age his aptitude was not for 
languages, but for art. When he was between three and 
four years of age, and still dressed in frocks, we are told 
by Collins that he was noticed by the servants drawing 
with his finger in the dust, wherever it happened to accumu- 




Hyait, photo. ] [Collection of Mr. ¥. AM-iss Phillips, 

THE DISCONSOLATE AND HER PARROT. 

Portrait of Mrs. Morland. Signed. 



THE MORLAND FAMILY 9 

late ; but the first work which excited his father's attention 
was " a gentleman's coach with four fine horses, and two 
footmen behind it, which he drew with a bit of broken 
crayon and the small remains of a black-lead pencil which 
his father had thrown away." This drawing, which was 
on a quarter of a sheet of paper, was of so extraordinary 
a kind, when it was considered that it was done from so 
slight and rapid a glance as the child could possibly get of 
a gentleman's carriage just passing by the door, that the 
father beheld it with wonder and parental admiration. 

Dawe says that one of his favourite amusements was to 
draw objects on the floor, that he might laugh at those 
persons who, deceived by their resemblance, stooped to 
pick them up. He was clever enough in this way to 
impose even on his father, who was once alarmed at the 
sight of what he supposed to be his most valuable crayons 
under his feet. Blagdon states that he drew a spider with 
charcoal on the ceiling of the servant-girls' bedroom, and 
they took it for a real one, and shrieked with horror. He 
also drew a beetle on the hearth, which completely deceived 
his father, who tried to crush it with his foot ; and Dawe 
adds that another of his favourite amusements was dissect- 
ing dead mice in order that he might understand where 
their bones and muscles were placed. The genius which 
the boy so early developed was quickly put into training, 
and his father sent him to copy from prints engraved for 
Gay's " Fables," and later on to draw from plaster casts. It 
would appear to be probable that there was a difference of 
opinion in his home with regard to the treatment of 
George. Collins tells us that " at a very early period he 
was admitted as a student at the Royal Academy, 
Somerset House," and goes on to speak of his boyish 
companions whom he met on his way to and from the 
Academy. Dawe, on the contrary, says that he was not 
permitted to study at the Academy, and that he was never 



io GEORGE MORLAND 

allowed to associate with other children, and was deprived 
of playmates of his own age. Blagdon tells us that so 
jealously did his parents guard him that, for fear his 
morals should be subverted, he was kept away from the 
Academy schools. 

It is probable that the facts of the case lie between 
these two statements. It is pretty clear that at one period 
of his life he certainly studied at the Academy schools. 
Perhaps he went there for a very short time as a boy, and 
then was taken away by his mother. It appears that 
quite early in his life, as a mere boy, he commenced the 
evil habit which was the source of so much trouble during 
his life. Collins says: "On his way to and from the 
Academy he had frequently observed some of his brother 
students, who were much older than himself, stop at a 
dram-shop near Exeter 'Change, most of whom were loud 
in their praises of gin. After several efforts to conquer a 
natural shyness ... he entered the shop, and, having 
drunk a small glass, liked it so very much that he never 
after could forget this premature and unfortunate attach- 
ment, which accompanied him through life." May we 
not surmise that this habit was perhaps the reason for his 
being withdrawn for a time from the Academy schools ? 
Much later on, in about his twentieth year, he certainly 
was at the schools, as Dawe tells us that, " unknown to his 
father, he showed some of his drawings to the Keeper, and 
obtained permission to draw as a candidate for becoming 
a student ; yet ... he drew there only three nights, 
though he occasionally attended the lectures." From the 
age of fourteen, however, he was apprenticed to his father 
for seven years, and this apprenticeship seems to have been a 
time of very hard study. The father recognised that he 
had a very talented pupil, and he was determined that he 
should be well trained. We learn that " so just was his 
eye, and so remarkable his facility of execution, that he 



THE MORLAND FAMILY n 

began his chalk drawings from plaster casts without 
previous sketching, and seldom had occasion to alter." 
We learn also that he copied pictures by the best masters, 
which his father had for purposes of cleaning and restora- 
tion, and then it was that the father, as Collins states 
most definitely, on several occasions " sold copies by his 
son after Ruysdael, Hobbema, and others, for originals." 

He executed a large number of sea-pieces from prints after 
Vernet, and of landscapes from highly finished German 
drawings, of which he made enlarged copies," even more 
elaborate than the originals." He copied his father's crayon 
pictures in oil, also the paintings of Gainsborough, both 
of pigs and of dogs ; and the celebrated picture of " Garrick 
between Tragedy and Comedy," by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 
then in the possession of Mr. Angerstein. His days, says 
Dawe, were devoted to painting, his summer evenings to 
reading, during which time, we are told, he especially 
studied the art treatises of Webb and Du Fresnoy, and 
the " Dictionary of Art," and his evenings were given up to 
drawing by lamplight. 

His training, indeed, appears to have been thorough ; 
he was very hard-worked, and allowed scarcely any time 
to himself. His father, who at heart must have been a 
selfish man, with little principle and plenty of outward 
show, kept George hard at work in order that he might 
profit by his genius. Hassell tells us that he was closely 
confined " in an upper room in his father's house, where 
he was constantly employed copying drawings, pictures, 
or plaster casts, with scarce respite for his meals. . . . 
He was almost entirely restricted from society, except 
what was acquired by stealth with a few boys in the 
neighbourhood ; his principal amusement was a walk on 
Sunday with his father to view the new buildings in the 
vicinity of Tottenham Court." It is pretty clear that the 
boy had to supply his father's purse by the proceeds of his 



12 GEORGE MORLAND 

remarkable work ; but closely as he was kept to his easel, 
he was yet able, so great was his perseverance, to execute 
other drawings on his own account, which he sold in order 
to obtain money to indulge the taste for gin which he so 
early acquired. 

From Collins's memoir we learn that the pictures 
which he did on his own account he slipped into the 
large drawer of a great colour-box as soon as he heard 
his father's foot in the direction of the painting-room ; 
and, when the picture was ready, which generally hap- 
pened at night or early in the morning, it was let down in 
this drawer from the window of the painting-room, by 
means of a piece of whip-cord, to the person who had 
established his identity by means of some secret signal 
outside. Ward, in his biography, gives us to understand 
that these pictures were concerned with immodest sub- 
jects. Collins assures us that the subjects were suggested 
by those who employed the young artist ; but, whatever 
was the case, it is clear that they were only done to obtain 
pocket-money, and, considering the drudgery of his regular 
work, it is astonishing that he was even able to produce 
these extra pictures at all. 

It was the works of the Dutch masters, says Dawe, 
which made the greatest impression on him as a boy; 
and, by the practice of copying them, he acquired great 
facility and the excellence of high finish, with broad, easy 
brushwork. From Spenser's " Faerie Queene " he painted 
a series of pictures, and he also illustrated such ballads as 
"Auld Robin Gray" and "Margaret's Ghost." These 
designs found a very ready sale to the extent of some 
hundreds, and were a source of considerable profit to his 
father. The boy was, however, gradually tiring of the 
drudgery of his work, and Dawe tells us that " at so early 
an age as eighteen he formed the intention of adopting a 
new style as soon as he should be emancipated from 



THE MORLAND FAMILY 13 

parental authority, and he would often remark to a friend 
that he would see in what manner he would paint when 
he became his own master," 

Morland's father, according to Ward, was at one time 
very intimate with Sir Joshua Reynolds, and was able to 
introduce his boy to the great President; but later on, 
Reynolds, who considered bankruptcy as a great disgrace, 
did not care to have to do with Morland's father, and it is 
probable that there was never much personal intimacy 
between Reynolds and the Morland family at any time. 
Hassell thought Sir Joshua's gallery was always accessible 
to the young artist ; but this was often the case with young 
students of the time. The picture by Sir Joshua, already 
mentioned, and which Morland copied, " Garrick between 
Tragedy and Comedy," was in the Angerstein Gallery in 
the City, and the copy which the young artist made of it 
was a good one. We are told, however, by Hassell that 
the curious repugnance for educated society which in later 
years characterised Morland showed itself when he was at 
work at this picture. " No persuasion," says the author, 
" or entreaties could ever allure him within reach of Mr. 
Angerstein's family or his visitors." 

During all this time of apprenticeship his life musf have 
been particularly lonely. Such spare time as he had he 
gave to music, acquiring sufficient skill on the violin to 
play concerted music. His parents,' Dawe tells us, never 
played cards or any other game, and therefore he had no 
opportunity of acquiring that form of recreation. The 
same author, speaking of his father's associates, says 
that they were very few, the chief amongst them being 
Mr. Forster, a merchant in the City, who was a great 
connoisseur of art, and to whose house George was taken 
by his father. He had very little interest, however, in 
their conversation; and it would appear that as soon 
as the cloth was removed after dinner the boy was set 



14 GEORGE MORLAND 

to work with pencil and paper to sketch. Another friend 
of the elder Morland was Flaxman ; but George never 
became intimate, says Dawe, with his son, " for, except 
genius, they had nothing in common." The only house 
to which young Morland was allowed to go of an evening 
was the residence of Mr. Philip Dawe, whose son was after- 
wards to be Morland's biographer, and with this young 
man, who was a pupil of Morland's father, the young 
artist was allowed to take walks, especially on Sunday. 
Dawe says, in describing these walks, that George Mor- 
land " fully enjoyed his short-lived liberty ; they were the 
sweetest days of his life, and he often surveyed them in 
retrospect with melancholy pleasure." 

As an instance of the strength of his memory we have 
the following, which is told by Dawe, who remarked that, 
"although Morland never drew upon the spot, he was 
able to design, from recollection alone, most objects he 
had seen." The two friends on one occasion pursued 
their walk over Blackheath, Shooter's Hill, and Wool- 
wich, returning through Charlton by the Sand-pits and 
Hanging Wood, a place which Morland always admired 
as the most romantic within reach of London. Three 
months afterwards he made two drawings of these Sand- 
pits, delineating so cleverly the men digging and loading 
the carts, barrows, and asses, that his young companion 
could scarce believe that he had not sketched them on the 
spot. 

The restraint of his father's arrangements, adopted, no 
doubt, with the best intentions in the world, in order to 
keep the boy from evil habits, the signs of which had 
probably been only too evident, was acting upon him with 
the very opposite effect to that desired. The dull, respect- 
able life which his parents led had no attraction for him ; 
and if, as seems probable, the outward respectability of 
his father's career was united with the practice of acts of 



THE MORLAND FAMILY 15 

fraud, there was but little attraction for the brilliant son 
to follow in his father's steps. Gradually he realised that 
he was being detained not so much for his own good as 
for his father's advantage. He also discovered, as Dawe 
tells us, that the accounts of the vices of the town and 
the evils of ordinary life which his father gave him were 
grossly exaggerated, and were untrue ; and this deception, 
however well intended, was productive of disastrous conse- 
quences. Before his apprenticeship to his father came to 
an end, Romney offered to take Morland into his own 
house, with a salary of £300 a year, on condition of his 
signing articles for three years; but George had had 
enough of restraint, and declared that one experience of 
articles frightened him for the rest of his life, and he 
promptly rejected the proposal, which might have led to 
considerable fortune. 

Dawe tells us that Henry Morland had an extensive 
connexion amongst the most distinguished characters of 
the day ; that he knew Lord Grosvenor, Lord Scarsdale, 
and Lord Fortescue; was acquainted with Reynolds, 
Garrick, Locke, and Angerstein; with Mrs. Yates and 
with Mr. Child; and that by all of them "he was so 
highly respected that he could easily borrow any picture 
in their collections." He does not appear to have been 
penurious. On the other hand, he was generous, if not 
lavish, in some of his expenditure, but he was a man 
deficient in judgment, of very limited understanding. It 
is probable that he was exceedingly selfish, endeavouring 
to keep his son for himself, to train him within rigid lines, 
and, as Mr. Richardson expresses it, to train a wild-flower 
in a hot-house, with the result that when his son was free 
from his control his naturally ungovernable habits led him 
into the wildest excess, and he indulged in the reckless, 
jovial, unhealthy life from which it had been his father's 
most earnest desire to keep him. 



16 GEORGE MORLAND 

From about his nineteenth year, says Dawe, " he began 
to evade all restraint, and fell into those very errors from 
which his parents had endeavoured to deter him by ill- 
judged means. He then first gave the rein to those 
passions which eventually impaired his intelligence and 
destroyed his constitution. His Sunday walks were soon 
exchanged for a ride with some favourite mistress, with 
whom he scrupled not to visit his friends, and exhibit 
himself boldly in a chaise or phaeton, when he could 
procure the necessary supply of cash ; and so much was 
he the dupe' of folly that one of these woman had the 
address nearly to persuade him to marry her." 




.1 



CHAPTER II 

EARLY DAYS 

The expiry of Morland's apprenticeship launched the 
young artist free upon the world, and the result of the 
unnatural training he had received at his father's house 
was at once apparent. In a striking manner Dawe con- 
trasts the extremes of character observable in George 
Morland and his father. " The elder Morland," he says, 
"was economical but liberal; his son profuse without 
being generous. The one was remarkably methodical 
in his habits ; the other uncertain, restless, and versatile. 
Sobriety characterised the one, dissipation of every kind 
degraded the other. The manners of the parent were 
polite and humane, his society select and respectable. 
The son, on the contrary, associated only with the de- 
bauched and illiterate, and his feelings were obtuse ; but 
in talent he as far surpassed as in sensibility and morals 
he was thus lamentably inferior to his father, whose 
imagination was sterile and tardy, while that of the son 
was rapid and prolific." 

The freedom he gained was a very precious thing to 
him, and he employed it exactly as he thought fit. He 
declined, quite flippantly, an excellent proposal made to 
him by Mr. Gress, the drawing-master of the royal family, 
and refused to engage in any constant employment. He 
gave up his time to the wildest of companions, priding 
himself on doing everything his parents had represented 

i7 2 



18 GEORGE MORLAND 

to him as pernicious. So little had he known of the 
world that he had • never lost a natural bashfulness, and 
with all his ideas of wild life, hardly knew what was the 
life he really longed for. " On one occasion," Dawe tells 
us, " being at the Cheshire Cheese, he wished his com- 
panions good night about ten o'clock, and they heard 
nothing of him for two days." When he returned to 
them he described his adventures, saying that he had 
gone by the boat to Gravesend, merely for the sake of a 
spree, and arrived there about two o'clock in the morn- 
ing. Not knowing where to go, he joined company with 
a carpenter and sailor, with whom he travelled five miles 
towards Chatham, quite indifferent in what direction he 
journeyed. When they separated he was in terror as to 
what to do, or whom to follow, and eventually pursued 
his way with the sailor towards Chatham, reaching that 
place about daybreak. He employed his time in drinking 
gin and that extraordinary beverage called purl, made of 
ale and milk with spirits and sugar, and slept on a bench 
until seven o'clock. With his sailor acquaintance he 
went on board a small vessel, which took him as far as 
the North Foreland, and was nearly wrecked in the 
voyage. Back he came to Chatham, spent the night at 
the same inn, and returned to Gravesend with eighteen- 
pence in his pocket, which just enabled him to reach the 
Cheshire Cheese, where his companions were assembled, 
and to relate his experiences. 

His mind, as Dawe tells us, had not been idle during 
the time ; he was an excellent talker, and had gathered 
from the sailor a store of nautical information, some of 
which he was able to put into practice almost immediately 
on the little voyage to the Foreland, and, as Hassell says, 
he was always ready to make use of it before his friends, 
and astonished them with the extent of his seafaring ex- 
perience. Similar nocturnal adventures, appearances ia 




I 



EARLY DAYS ig 

watch-houses and before magistrates, prize-fights and 
wrestling-bouts, and constant attendance at various inns, 
absorbed a good deal of Morland's time, and so a few 
months passed. 

The freedom which he gained in 1784, when twenty-one 
years of age, and his apprenticeship with his father had 
expired, lasted, however, for a short time only. He 
appears to have remained with his father for six months 
after he was actually free, but during that time hkd been 
employing a friend, so Dawe tells us, to dispose of many 
of his designs to a publisher, without disclosing his name. 
For these designs he was being paid satisfactorily, but 
presently the purchaser found out who was the artist, and, 
at once discovering his ignorance of the world, bargained 
with him for other pictures at half the former price. 
None of the books on Morland tell us who this hard- 
hearted dealer was ; we only know that he was an Irishr 
man who lived in Drury Lane, who engaged Morland to 
paint a number of subjects " of a description," says Dawe, 
" that did little credit either to the artist or his employer." 
He attended Morland every morning for three or four 
hours, to direct the manner of treating these pictures, and, 
it seems, commenced this acquaintance with the artist 
while he was yet living with his father. In order, how- 
ever, to appropriate the talents of the youth more entirely 
to himself, he persuaded George to leave his father's 
house, and take an attic apartment in Martlett's Court, 
Bow Street, close to where the dealer was residing. Here 
commenced Morland's second period of drudgery, as the 
Irishman would not allow him to work for any other 
person, and paid him onlyjust sufficient to procure food, lest 
he should gradually acquire the means of being independent 
of him. He was continually, says Dawe, " at his elbow," 
and overlooking him. Morland was not allowed even to 
go out for his meals; they were brought to him by a boy from 

2—2 



20 GEORGE MORLAND 

the neighbouring cookshop, a few pennyworth of meat 
and a pint of ale being all that was allowed him, although 
he sometimes ventured to ask that a pennyworth of 
pudding might be added to the frugal fare. Of payment 
for his pictures he hardly got any. 

On one occasion, upon his begging for five shillings, the 
Irishman handed him half a crown, telling him that he 
might think himself very well off with that, for he had 
not done half a crown's worth of work that day. His 
industry, however, was indefatigable, and he painted suffi- 
cient pictures for his hard employer to fill a whole room, 
the price of admission to which was placed at half a crown. 
Some of the works now belonging to the Duke of West- 
minster are said to have been painted at this time. It 
was bondage over again, and harder, perhaps, than 
Morland had hitherto undergone. The rigid pedantry of 
his father had been less exasperating than the harshness of 
this greedy picture-dealer, and at length Morland had had 
enough, and escaped from his taskmaster. According to 
Dawe, he had an invitation from a rich lady of easy virtue, 
who was residing in Margate, a Mrs. Hill, who desired to 
have her own portrait painted, and those of her friends. 
How she heard of this young artist we cannot tell, but 
she appears to have written to him, and he determined to 
accept her invitation. "He kept secret," says Dawe, 
" his intentions, and on the night of his departure obtained 
from the Irishman as much money as he could, and then 
decamped, taking with him the key of his lodging, for the 
rent of which his employer was accountable." According 
to Hassell, he hired a horse, and went away in the early 
dawn to Margate, where he settled down at an inn. Mrs. 
Hill was an excellent patroness, admired his talents, and 
introduced him to all her friends, insisting upon his 
leaving the inn and coming to her house to stay. With 
W? gqstopjgrv carelessness, he forgot all about returning 




.1 

to 



EARLY DAYS 21 

the horse he had hired for his journey, and kept it with 
him six or seven weeks, till he heard that the owner was 
making serious inquiries about it. He then sent it back 
by a postboy, but left his father to discharge the bill for 
the accommodation, which amounted to about ten pounds. 
Dawe quotes several of Morland's letters, written 
during his sojourn at Margate, and these give very clear 
evidence of his life by the sea. The first letter is dated 
from the Ship Inn, Dover, Friday, and was written in 
July or August, 1785. It is as follows : 

" Dawe, 

" I arrived at Margate on Wednesday, surveyed 
the town on Thursday, and drank tea at Dover on Friday. 
Here is one of the pleasantest places in the world, a fine 
view of the clift (sic) and castle, with the pier and shipping. 
Opposite are the Calais cliffs, which seem so very near as 
to appear not above three or four miles over. A very 
large, pretty town is Dover, and looks something like 
London, but of all the horrible places that can be 
imagined Sandwich is the worst. Tis likely I shall go 
over to France with Mrs. Hill. She is talking about it. 
My compliments to the Congress,* except that Jew- 
looking fellow. I have swam my horse in the sea several 
times. I should be glad of an answer. 

" I am, 

" Yours, etc., 

• " MORLANb." 

The next letter is written from Mrs. Hill's house. It is 

dated 

" Margate, 
"Saturday Night, August 13///, 1785. 

" Dawe, 

" Now I have done some little sketches for you, 
and, as I do not go out of a night, I have time to do you 
* A smoking club at the Cheshire Cheese. 



22 GEORGE MORLAND 

same more. I shall be glad if you will answer it as soon 
as possible, and mention the dimensions more distinct, and 
if it must be from any story, for I have an excellent oppor- 
tunity of drawing some smart women, as there are many 
about, and there is one of the sweetest creatures in the house 
I lodge that ever was seen by man. She is upwards of 
six feet in height, and so extremely handsome that I have 
fell desperately in love, and, what is charming, I find it 
returned. She has not been long come from Liverpool, 
and is but seventeen years of age. ... I should certainly 
marry here, only, as I am a great favourite of Mrs. H., she 
has made me promise to go to Paris this September, and 
marrying would exclude me entirely from that . . . 
besides ... I have a shaking of the hand, and falling off 
very fast (these are not very comfortable symptoms) ; I 
begin to reflect a little now, but hope it is not too late. I 
have smoked but two pipes since my absence. My house 
for smoking is the King's Head Inn in High Street, a 
good pleasant house — for on high water the sea comes to 
the very walls of the house, and if you was to fall out of 
the window must surely be drowned, but I seldom use it 
by reason the company are so disagreeable, a parcel of 
old, sleepy fellows. . . . Now, I will inform you how I 
amuse myself. First, I get up in the morning after being 
called several times, 'tis generally about ten o'clock. 
Then I take a gulp of gin, as I have got some made me 
a present. Then I gang me down to breakfast with a 
young gentleman, some nobleman's brother, but I forget 
the name. I was to find my own breakfast, or to go and 
breakfast with Mrs. Hill, but as he invites me, 'tis more 
convenient to have it in the house. At four o'clock 
dinner is sent to me ; after that comes my hairdresser ; 
then dress, and go and take a little ride upon the sands if 
tis a fine day ; if not fine, why then I only ride up the 
town, down Churchfield, through Cecil Square, and into 



EARLY DAYS 23 

the stable again. Then I drink tea with my companion, 
and sup at Mrs. Hill's, though these two nights I have not 
been out of doors by reason of it being so very stormy. 
There was a violent storm of wind this morning, and 
the sea was covered with breakers. There is plenty of 
diversion here for the polite world, such as dancing, coffee- 
houses, bath-houses, play-houses." 

These two letters give us a good idea of the sort of life 
Morland was leading. The arrangement that he should 
live in Mrs. Hill's house came to an end almost as quickly 
as it had been commenced, very probably by reason of 
Morland's commencing, to court the lady's-maid. He was 
but twenty-two years of age, a very susceptible young 
k man, but appears to have been attracted by this girl, and 
we hear of her again later on. 

It seems that his work in painting was done between 
his late breakfast-time and his early four o'clock dinner ; 
but the letters tell us nothing of the portraits he was 
supposed to be painting, and we know of none which can 
be attributed to this period of his life. He himself speaks 
of the portraits of Lord Loughborough, whom he calls 
Mr. Wedderburn, but who certainly at that time was 
Lord Chief Justice, and had been elevated, in 1780, to the 
peerage. The sentence in Dawe's memoir mentioning this 
portrait speaks of one Morland painted of the Master of 
the Ceremonies, and implies that this was the position 
held by Lord Loughborough. It was not so, however, 
and two distinct portraits are evidently referred to. The 
Master of the Ceremonies was painted in an embroidered 
coat, and Dawe says that Morland spoilt this coat with 
melted tallow by placing a candle upon it when he was in 
a state of intoxication. It is clear that his bad habits 
were, if possible, growing worse at Margate. 

For three months he remained away, and then gave 



24 GEORGE MORLAND 

himself a short holiday in London. The girl who 
had so attracted him had by that time left Mrs. Hill, 
and had come up to town to live with her brother. 
Morland one evening ran into the Cheshire Cheese, 
shaking a purse of guineas before his old friends, 
and boasting that he could get as many of them as he 
pleased. Mrs. .Hill, said he, had recommended him so 
highly as a portrait painter that he had more business 
than he could execute ; but he could not bear " to be stuck 
up in the society of her old maids, and had therefore 
taken, a lodging for himself/ 1 He then told his friends 
about the " finest girl in the world," and insisted upon one 
of them accompanying him to see her. Off they went in 
a. coach, and a tall, handsome young woman made her 
appearance when he gave in his name. He begged her 
to go out with him the following day, Sunday; she 
consented to do so. He introduced her to his friend, and 
drove off. The next day, Dawe tells us, they met as 
arranged, made a circuit amongst all his friends, and a 
day or two afterwards went back to Margate. Now it is 
that we learn the name of the young gentleman referred to 
in the letter. It was Mr. Sherborne, a brother of Lord 
Pigby, who had been attracted to Morland by hearing 
him play the violin, and who had invited him to play 
duets with him. They had made a favourable impression 
upon one another, and, as Dawe tells us, Morland was 
" indeed blessed with that happy art which unlocks every 
door and every bosom, but not with those more solid 
claims upon esteem which should have kept open the 
door he had entered, and preserved the good opinions he 
had gained." It was for a very short time that Morland 
and Mr. Sherborne were close friends. The artist drew all 
the money, he could obtain, and then deserted his friend. 
Whether the pictures Mr. Sherborne commissioned were 
ever delivered we are not told, but we do know that so 



EARLY DAYS 25 

high an esteem had this brother of Lord Digby for the 
artist that he begged him never to think of past accommo- 
dations, and, on arriving in London, called on Morland's 
father, leaving a pressing invitation for the young artist to 
visit him, which, however, was never accepted. Morland, 
says Dawe, " had no taste for the refinements of friend- 
ship," and could not bear even the slight restraint that 
such friendship involved. His sympathies lay in quite 
another direction, and it was in the public-house and on 
the race-course that he found himself most at home. To 
the hotels of Margate he took his violin, and was a very 
welcome guest. He was then a good-looking, merry 
fellow, with a penetrating and expressive countenance, 
large, high forehead, dark hazel eyes — full and somewhat 
piercing — an aquiline nose, and an intelligent mouth. He 
was ready for any frolic, could play and sing well, and had 
long ago put aside any sympathy he ever had for more 
serious pursuits, or for literature. After his apprenticeship 
was over, we are told, he never possessed a book in his 
life ; he had no inclination for study, and prevented any of 
his companions reading even a newspaper, snatching it 
away and insisting upon his friend joining him in what- 
ever frolic was at that time on hand. 



CHAPTER III 

MARRIAGE AND HOUSEKEEPING 

While staying at Margate, Morland had some strange 
adventures, and his letters to Dawe give us an insight, not 
only into the manners of the society in which he was so 
popular, but also into the arrangements for regulating 
horse-races at that time. Not content with the quieter 
amusements to which we have already made reference, 
Morland determined to engage in the very rough life of 
the race-course ; and in writing to Dawe he says : " You 
must know I have commenced a new business of jockey 
to the races. I was sent for to Mount Pleasant, by a 
gentleman of the Turf, to ride a race for the Silver Cup, as 
I am thought to be the best horseman here. I went there 
and was weighed, and was afterwards dressed in a tight 
striped jacket and jockey's cap, and lifted on the horse, 
led to the start, placed in the rank and file ; three parts of 
the people out of four laid great bets that I should win the 
cup, etc. Then the drums beat, and we started ; 'twas a 
four-mile heat, and the first three miles I could not keep 
the horse behind them, being so spirited an animal ; by 
that means he exhausted himself, and I soon had the 
mortification to see them come galloping past me, hissing 
and laughing, while I was spurring his guts out." 

The people who had been backing the horse appear, 
according to Morland's story, to have become enraged 
with him for losing the race, and determined to visit their 

26 




I 



MARRIAGE AND HOUSEKEEPING 27 

vengeance upon him. "A mob of horsemen," he says, 
" then gathered round, telling me I could not ride, which is 
always the way if you lose the heat ; they began at last to 
use their whips, and, finding I could not get away, I 
directly pulled off my jacket, laid hold of the bridle, and 
offered battle to the man who began first, though he was big 
enough to eat me ; several gentlemen rode in, and all the 
mob turned over to me, and I was led away in triumph 
with shouts." This exciting scene does not seem to have 
chilled the ardour of our artist for the race-course, and a 
little afterwards we hear of his riding in another race at 
Margate, and being very nearly killed. " I rode for a 
gentleman," he says, " and won the heat so completely 
that when I came into the starting-place the other horses 
were near half a mile behind me." This time it was his 
success that brought him the vengeance of the mob, and 
poor George Morland appears to have been just as 
unfortunate whether he lost or won the race. " Near four 
hundred sailors, smugglers, fishermen, etc.," says he, 
" set upon me with sticks, stones, waggoners' whips, fists, 
etc., and one man, an innkeeper here, took me by the 
thigh and pulled me off the horse. I could not defend 
myself. The sounds I heard all where (sic), ' Kill him !' 
' Strip him !' • Throw him into the sea V and a hundred 
other sentences rather worse than the first. I got from 
them once and ran into the booth ; some of the men threw 
me out amongst the mob again, and I was then worse off 
than ever. Michiner rode in to me, dismounted and took 
me in his arms, half beat to pieces, kept crying to the 
mob to keep back, and that his name was Michiner, and 
he would notice them. At last a party of my horsemen 
and several gentlemen and their servants, some postboys, 
hairdressers, bakers, and several other people I knew, 
armed themselves with sticks, etc., ran in to my 
assistance, and brought me a horse, though the mob 



28 GEORGE MORLAND 

pressed so hard it was long before I could mount. After 
I was mounted and got to some distance, I missed my hat ; 
at last I saw a man waving a hat at me ; I rode to him, 
and found it to be a person I knew very well. He found 
means to get it to me whilst two sailors were fighting who 
should have it." 

Even this experience, which to an ordinary person 
would have been quite enough for one day, does not 
seem to have seriously troubled Morland, for that very 
night he engaged in a fresh adventure. " I went," says 
he, " to the King's Head at night, met many of my bloods 
and bucks, though none of them could imagine what was 
the cause of the riot, but supposed it was a parcel of 
blackguards who had been laying sixpences and shillings 
against the horse I rode, and afterwards by the riot 
wanted to make it appear 'twas an unfair start, though 
one started before me. We had three crowns' worth of 
punch at the King's Head, and then marched out to meet 
them, or some if possible. We got into a fishing-house to 
look for some of them ; however, there were so many in 
the house that, though we were armed, they put us 
all to flight. It was very dark; I ran over the draw- 
bridge, a stout sailor pursued me, and threatened 
vengeance ; he catched me by the collar ; I had a stick 
with a sword in it ; he didn't see that, and whilst he was 
telling me what he would do, I found means to draw it, 
and had very nearly run him through ; then some of my 
companions coming up, he got his gruel. I found the 
man who dismounted me, and he humbly begged pardon, 
as did most of the rest. One savage fellow," concludes 
Morland, "who is a sore pest of this town, everybody 
advises me to enter an action against him, which I did 
this morning; so I must conclude, as the watchman is 
going past one o'clock." 

A little later than this Morland made his long-antici- 




Hyatt, photo.] [Collection of Mr. F. Abbiss Phillips. 

PORTRAIT OF DOROTHY JORDAN. 



MARRIAGE AND HOUSEKEEPING 29 

pated journey to France, but, just before he started, he 
told Dawe, in a letter of the 22nd of October, that 
" almost everybody in Margate was drunk by reason of 
the Freemasons' meeting and fox-hunt." He says that 
"all my male sitters disappointed me; some sent me 
word they were engaged, some not very well, others 
could not get their hair dressed, and I found it was all one 
general disorder." He was eagerly looking forward, he 
says, to the journey to France, especially as his destination 
was St. Omer, " a towa of more resource than Paris, having 
in it six hundred English families." He appears, how- 
ever, to have done very well in Margate, apart from the 
fees he received for his portraits, as in this same letter he 
says that he had various tokens of remembrance given 
him — " one a fine gold pin, the other al handsome pocket- 
book with a silver lock and full of instruments, and t'other 
day a remarkably fine patent watch-chain, worth about 
two guineas, a fine silver pencil-case and hiding-purse, 
and several dollars." 

A few days afterwards he was in France, and his first 
letter was sent from the Port Royal Inn, St. Omer, 1785. 
He tells us that he set out at one in the forenoon, and 
" had the most amazing quick passage known these twelve 
years; 'twas no longer than one hour and thirty-two 
minutes from pier to pier. The sea," he says, " ran very 
high, and frequently washed quite over us. Mrs. Hill 
came down below to avoid the spray, and she was no 
sooner down than a great sea poured through one of the 
weather ports, and wetted her from head to foot. I was 
the second sick on board," he continues, " and the first 
that got well. After my sickness began I went down, 
tumbled into my hammock, and slept very sound, 'midst 
straining and groaning; however, I slept till I heard, 
' Welcome to Calais, gentlemen and ladies.' " 

On landing, Morland had the customary impression 



30 GEORGE MORLAND 

that almost every person refers to, on the occasion of 
his first visit to France — that of the extraordinary 
difference so short a journey has made. " I flew out on 
deck," he says ; " I was surprised to find myself sur- 
rounded by Frenchmen, and quite a different country 
about me — extraordinary everything should be so different 
in so short a distance as twenty-one miles." On his land- 
ing, he proceeded by a coach sent by the master of the 
hotel, Monsieur Dessein (who, he mentions, was the same 
hotel-keeper Sterne had spoken of), to the H6tel d'Angle- 
terre. He passed through the fish-market, which re- 
minded him of Billingsgate, and, on arriving at the inn, 
his first business was to get dry, and then he wandered 
off into the town. " Coming down the Rue de Rampart, 
some soldiers were flying a kite ; I did not see the string, 
and tumbled over it, for which I got abused in all sorts of 
French jargon." Then he returned to the inn for supper 
and tea, all of which, he says, were very good and very 
cheap, and, after receiving his goods from the Custom- 
house, went to bed, remarking that his bed was so high he 
was obliged to jump into it. 

The next morning, after breakfast, Mrs. Hill and the 
artist set out on their journey in a coach-and-four, and 
reached their destination at ten minutes after three. 
They had dinner, and then Morland began to look out 
for an hotel and to pay some calls, finding in the place 
several English people he had known in Margate. His 
bedroom was, he says, "as big as Westminster Hall, with 
two beds ;" adding, " 'tis rather impossible to find a bed- 
room in France with only one bed. So that makes good 
what Sterne says in the conclusion of his ' Sentimental 
Journey ' — that 'tis very common for gentlemen and ladies 
to lay in the same room at the inns." 

He does not appear to have been very satisfied with the 
accommodation of his inn, for he says in the letter that hQ 



MARRIAGE AND HOUSEKEEPING 31 

doubts whether his friend will be able to read it, " the 
French pens are so bad, the legs of the table so uneven, 
and the paper so coarse. I am now sitting by myself," 
says he, *' over a bottle of claret, in a great room about 
16 feet high, starved with cold; a fireplace as large as 
a moderate room in London, but has not, by the colour 
of it, felt the warmth of a flame these dozen years ; a 
parcel of French waiters, who, as I cannot talk French, 
impose upon me at pleasure. These are not half my 
grievances, but too numerous to write about at present." 

His fame as a painter had preceded him, and he had no 
lack of work whilst he was in France. " I have very 
pressing invitations," says he, "to stay and paint por- 
traits by many gentlemen and marquises here ; $nd there 
are already upwards of six hundred English families, be- 
sides many mote daily coming — all people of fortune — 
upon which I have promised to return as soon as possible, 
and I have already many commissions to bring with me 
from England." He then goes on to add that he intended 
to visit Lille, which was only a day's journey from where 
he was ; and comments in an amusing way upon his ex- 
penses in France and upon the habits of the people. He 
was evidently charmed with the country. He says: " 'Tis 
a delightful country ; no danger of robbing, and travelling 
very cheap, and a person may live very well for thirty 
pounds per ann., and many have not more. People who 
ran away in the rebellion have continued here ever since." 
As to his clothes, he says he bought a fine satin waistcoat 
for a quarter of the price he would have paid for it in 
London ; leathern breeches he bought at half a guinea a 
pair ; shoes at three shillings ; and cotton stockings at 
half a crown ; worsted stockings, he says, were " dear 
and very bad," made all in one piece, without any dis- 
tinction for the feet, the place for them having to be 
formed by putting the stockings on. "The women," 



32 GEORGE MORLAND 

says he, " never have any hats, and in the hardest rain 
they only throw their gowns over their heads." The 
genteel people, he adds, " walk out on foot, and there are 
only two coaches for hire, and there is very little to be 
heard in the town except drums and bells, and very little 
to be seen except priests and soldiers." The church 
music astonished him, as, in his opinion, it consisted only 
of country-dances; and he could not understand the 
reason the bells rang on the occasion of the death of an 
inhabitant of the place. For the friars whom he saw in 
the streets he had no complimentary remarks ; but of the 
other residents in the place he was never tired of saying 
everything good that he could. His sojourn, however, in 
France was a very short one. He was back again for 
the winter at Margate, and then came up to London to 
his old friends. 

•His entanglement with Mrs. Hill's maid seems to have 
caused him some difficulty. In one letter to Dawe he 
says : " Jenny writes letters every post ; I shall be joined 
in about three weeks ; don't say anything about marriage." 
A few days afterwards, in another letter, he says: "As 
for Jenny — but, however, say nothing about that to any- 
body— : I do not know what to do about it ; if I marry her 
I am undone, by reason Mrs. Hill must find it out — it 
cannot be avoided; her acquaintance in London would 
inform her of it in France; she would then throw me 
aside ; besides, many gentlemen would give my acquaint- 
ance up if I performed my promise with her, and which, 
as I certainly like her better than any other, I am deter- 
mined to perform after my arrival in London, if that 
should ever happen. I might marry a lady rather in 
years, with money, which I only got off by declaring my 
aversion to the matrimonial state." 

When Morland did get back to London he appears to 
have renewed his addresses to Jenny, and the banns ot 



MARRIAGE AND HOUSEKEEPING 33 

marriage were published; but he still felt sure that the 
marriage would be an unsuitable one for him, an obstacle 
to his happiness, and very likely the ruin of his life. How 
to avoid it, however, he did not know, but it was eventu- 
ally arranged by strategy. One of his military friends 
called on the bride's brother to fix the day of the marriage, 
and to tell him a story they had concocted together, to 
the effect that Morland was in a very bad way with regard 
both to his health and circumstances, but that, neverthe- 
less, he was at the Gray's Inn coffee-house, ready to fulfil 
his engagement, the friend adding that, in his opinion, 
the union ought not to take place, as it was a pity to 
throw the girl away on a person so unworthy of her. 
That unpleasant piece of scheming answered its purpose. 
The brother went immediately to Morland, and, after 
severely reprimanding him for his conduct to his sister, 
broke off the engagement. The artist was, however, 
hardly out of this complication before he was in love 
again. This time his affections fixed upon a servant- 
maid whose father was a tailor, and he tried to persuade 
an intimate friend to call with him on the father and ask 
for his consent. His friend strongly dissuaded him from 
the proposed engagement, walking with him to the cottage 
where the girl lived, and succeeded in impressing Morland 
with the wisdom of his counsel at the very door of the 
house, when he obtained from him the decision that he 
believed his friend was in the right, and that he would 
think of this girl no more. 

A little while longer passed, and then, for the third time, 
Morland was in love. He had become acquainted with 
William Ward the engraver, then living in London, at 
Kensal Green, on the Harrow Road, and was a frequent 
visitor to the house, eventually taking lodgings in it. Here 
it was he met Ward's sister Anne, and married her in July, 
1786, the wedding taking place at Hammersmith parish 

3 



34 GEORGE MORLAND 

church. As an example of the eccentric ways of the artist, 
his biographer states that he insisted upon being married 
carrying a brace of pistols in his belt The connexion 
between the artist and the Ward family was still more 
emphasised by a marriage which took place between 
William Ward and Morland's sister Maria, about a month 
afterwards, and the two young couples took one house 
between them, and began their married life under bright 
auspices. 

Mrs. Morland is spoken of by contemporary writers as 
an exceedingly beautiful girl. Collins says that no prettier 
couple ever graced the interior of the church. It was 
most certainly a love match, and was productive of a great 
deal of happiness ; but Anne Ward little knew the habits 
of the person into whose keeping she was giving her life. 

They settled down in High Street, Marylebone, but it 
was very soon clear that the two families would not get 
on well with each other. Mrs. Morland and Mrs. Ward 
'were both of them beautiful women, and jealous one of 
the other. Each lady found a spirited supporter of her 
cause in the person of her husband, and the two husbands 
took to threatening each other, and resorting to horse- 
pistols loaded with slugs, with which they determined to 
settle their dispute in a sawpit. Their murderous intent, 
according to Collins, was diverted by the influence of a 
friend, who arranged that the difference should be settled 
over a bottle and a few long pipes charged with Dutch 
tobacco; but it was perfectly clear that fresh domestic 
arrangements must be made, and accordingly Morland, 
with his wife and servants, removed into lodgings in 
Great Portland Street. Here it was that Collins first 
made Morland's acquaintance, and the two men generally 
spent their evenings together. 

" While the artist was in High Street, Marylebone, he 

produced the six pictures known as the" Lsetitia " series.* 

* See Chapter XII. 



■ ^" ^k 




te* 




B| 






■ :. 1 


9& 


^ ^j 






s 


1 


v^H 

■■ 


• 







Hyatt, photo.] [Collection of Mr. F. Abbiss Phillips. 

COW AND CAI,F WORRIED BY A DOG. 

Signed. 



MARRIAGE AND HOUSEKEEPING 35 

They represented the progress of a young lady from a 
state of innocency in the country, where she had been 
carefully brought up, through successive scenes of depravity 
and distress, till at last, having lacked all prudence, she 
got into serious trouble, and then in the final picture is 
received back penitent by her parents. The series was 
popular, and the six pictures were engraved by J. R. Smith, 
and published in London in 1811. The only other im- 
portant works which belong to this period of Morland's 
life were the four he painted whilst living with William 
Ward just before his marriage. They were didactic works 
of very much the same quality : one pair called " The 
Idle and Industrious Mechanic," the other "The Idle 
Laundress and the Industrious Cottager," and the two 
latter pictures were engraved by W. Blake, and published 
in London in 1803. 

Morland and his wife continued in lodgings in Great 
Portland Street for some few months, and then moved 
nearer to Kentish Town, taking a small house with a very 
pretty garden, in a place called Pleasant Passage, at the 
back of Mother Blackcap's, on the Hampstead Road. There 
it was that Mrs. Morland had her only child, unfortunately 
stillborn. The artist was dreadfully disturbed at the loss 
of his son, and a tedious illness and very considerable 
diminution of his wife's good looks, which followed her 
accouchement, seem to have started the first jarring 
element in his household. The surgeon assured Mrs. Mor- 
land that she ought never again to bring her life into 
jeopardy from the same cause, and this piece of information 
Morland overheard. From that time his affection for his wife 
began to diminish, and, as Collins tells us, the Britannia 
Tavern, Mother Redcap's Tea-Gardens, the Castle Tavern, 
and the Assembly Rooms at Kentish Town, became more 
pleasant than his own house. Naturally fond of riding and 
music, these two accomplishments led him away from 

3—2 



36 GEORGE MORLAND 

home. He was possessed of a good voice, and was ready to 
sing in almost any company, while his companions were 
men free-handed and jovial, always ready to flatter him and 
to wheedle money from him. " At this time," says Dawe, 
" one of his favourite amusements was riding on the box 
of the Hampstead, Highgate, or Barnet stage-coaches. 
This was the commencement of his acquaintance with 
coachmen, postboys, and similar characters, to whom he 
always behaved with liberality, and became at length so 
well known among them that he could have been conveyed 
to any part of the kingdom free of expense. During all 
this time, Collins tells us, "his reputation constantly 
increased, and, as he was as yet the sole vendor of his own 
productions, his expenditure was never beyond his income." 
He soon became dissatisfied with the comfortable little 
house at Kentish Town, and was determined to have a 
much larger residence. He settled with a builder for a 
new house at the corner of Warren Place, a very handsome 
residence, just finished in a style which suited him, and 
into this he moved. By this time his income was over a 
thousand a year, so Collins tells us, and his reputation 
very high. He therefore determined to have his house 
magnificently furnished, and his cellars well stocked with 
wine. He entertained large parties between 1787 and 1789, 
and kept up his establishment with the greatest possible 
extravagance. He had ample credit, especially from his 
wine merchant, and, notwithstanding all the expostula- 
tions of his friends, launched out into a career of expendi- 
ture very far beyond his means, large as they undoubtedly 
were. When he was lectured by a friend for his im- 
prudence, he would burst from the house, hire a horse, 
and, % sacrificing his precious time, give up the whole day 
to drink, returning home completely intoxicated, quite 
unable to do any more painting for two or three days to 
come. His wife exerted all her influence to support the 




[From the coloured print. 
I,^TITIA SERIES.— I. DOMESTIC HAPPINESS. 




[From the coloured print. 
L^TITIA SERIES. — II. THE ELOPEMENT. 




[From the coloured print. 
I,^TITIA SERIES.— III. THE VIRTUOUS PARENT. 




[From the coloured print. 
I^TITIA SERIES.— IV. DRESSING FOR THE MASQUERADE. 




[From the coloured print. 
I^TlTIA SERIES.— V. THE TAVERN DOOR. 




[From the coloured print. 
I<^TITIA SERIES.— VI. THE FAIR PENITENT. 



MARRIAGE AND HOUSEKEEPING 37 

protests of his friends, but, says Collins, " opposition to 
his extravagant folly, instead of reclaiming, tended to 
exasperate him to some further acts of frantic imprudence." 
He squandered the money he received for his pictures, 
and having utter contempt of that which he earned, made 
no provision whatever for bills he was constantly drawing, 
and when at length they became due had no alternative 
but to submit to the terms of the holder. These terms, 
however, he frequently anticipated by a proposal far too 
advantageous to his creditors to be rejected — namely, to 
paint a picture for the renewal of the bill. 

For a while he took some pupils, three in succession, 
but they were more companions in idleness than scholars 
in painting, and at length he made the acquaintance of a 
young man of genteel manners whose name was Irwin, and 
who was very largely instrumental in Morland's ultimate 
downfall. This new acquaintance was a person suited to 
his habits, of a gay disposition, and willing to go anywhere 
with the artist, and he took in hand the disposal of his 
pictures. 

"Whether from bashfulness or idleness," says Dawe, 
" Morland never could bear to offer his own works for 
sale, and would rather take a quarter of what he might 
have obtained than submit to that necessity." Irwin 
took advantage of this mood, and arranged with the 
dealers to procure in advance nearly the whole price of 
the pictures, as well as obtaining loans from his own 
brother, who was a man of property, in order that the ex- 
travagant expenditure might be kept up. The connexion 
with Irwin was productive of mutual injury. It induced 
Morland to increase his expenditure, and encouraged him 
to contract debts far beyond his means, while Irwin, on 
the other hand, acquired from Morland habits of excess 
and debauchery. For the dealers the results were equally 
disastrous, for when the money had been drawn for the 



38 GEORGE MORLAND 

pictures in advance nothing would induce Morland to 
finish them, and the paintings were often put aside and 
afterwards finished by other artists. 

Irwin was not Morland's only friend. He made the 
acquaintance of a shoemaker named Brooks, " who, 
having been brought up," says Dawe, " in scenes of the 
lowest dissipation, and possessing some acuteness, was 
well qualified to be agreeable to the artist, and soon 
became his inseparable companion. . . . There was 
scarcely any kind of depravity with which Brooks was 
unacquainted, . . . and for him it was reserved to finish 
Morland's education in vice, which seemed hitherto to 
have been only preparatory." Brooks used to assist the 
artist to escape from his creditors, accompanying him in 
his country excursions, and was entrusted by him with the 
secret of his retreat, and in return the portrait of this 
man was introduced by Morland into many of his pictures. 
Dawe mentions that in a very well-known picture, called 
"The Sportsman's Return," it was Brooks who was 
depicted in the shoemaker's booth at the inn door. u A 
big man," says Mr. Richardson, "with a rubicund face 
and broad grin — a somewhat sensual John Bull, in fact, 
who would rather drag young men down than elevate 
them." 



CHAPTER IV 

WORK IN LONDON 

We are now entering upon the period of Morland's life in 
which he executed the largest number of his best pictures, 
and at the same time did his utmost to bring himself to 
ruin, both morally and physically. His income had 
increased considerably, and with it the ability to pursue 
the prodigal life which so strongly appealed to him. One 
of the sources of his expense and dissipation was, so Dawe 
tells us, "the practice of giving suppers and entertain- 
ments to a large circle of acquaintances, painters, 
colourers, engravers and their apprentices," who frequently 
made large parties at his hous£ He often took the 
chair at the Britannia Tavern ii^rhis neighbourhood, where 
such supper-parties were held, and the meetings generally 
terminated in vulgar excess. /On his return home of an 
evening, says Dawe, " he Would play various kinds of 
frolics upon the inhabitants^ whenever he thought he was 
likely to hear of them again. Indeed, mischief appears to 
have been his principal amusement, in the contrivance of 
which his mind was incessantly active, and to prepare a 
succession of it he endeavoured to make one piece of 
sport afford the occasion for another. Then, if the 
neighbour that had been disturbed taxed him with being 
the cause, when he could no longer conceal it, he would 
deliver up his accomplices in hopes of enjoying the result." 
As an example of this kind of frolic, Dawe tells us that 

39 



40 GEORGE MORLAND 

Morland one night returning from town armed with 
pistols, to try the resolution of the watchman, discharged 
them both close to his ear, and immediately ran off. The 
enraged man pursued him with fixed bayonet, and 
threatened to fire upon him. Upon another occasion he 
took it into his head to serve in the capacity of constable, 
but carried out the duties connected with the position, 
according to his accustomed habit, just when he chose, 
and got all the affairs with which he was concerned into 
difficulties. He was reprimanded by the coroner and 
complained of by the jury, and, having taken up the 
position merely for the fun of the thing, he gave no heed 
either to difficulties or reprimands, and was thoroughly 
tired of the position long before the time of its expiration. 
He was seldom able to refrain from drinking spirits, and 
was often quite unaware of what he was doing in his 
drunken frolics. His extravagance in keeping up his 
house was unbounded, and having always been exceedingly 
fond of horses, he indulged his ideas to the utmost 
extent, so that the bills which came in for the extrava- 
gances of the stable, boots, breeches, bridles and saddles, 
amounted to a very considerable sum. At times, when 
pictures had been commissioned and he had no inclina- 
tion to paint them, he would make excursions with his 
companions on the Highgate and Hampstead coaches, 
paying all the expenses, and returning home, having not 
only wasted the whole day, but put himself into a con- 
dition which entirely prevented work for some time. He 
often oWned six or eight horses at a time, buying them at 
the highest price, and selling them, when he had tired of 
them, for almost anything that was offered. He kept two 
grooms as well as a footman, and preferred not to wear the 
same breeches and boots on two successive occasions. 
The wine sent into His house often remained in open 
hampers in the yard, and the colours bought for his work 



WORK IN LONDON 41 

were used as much for pelting the drivers of the stage- 
coaches and other people who passed his house as for 
painting. He had a regular menagerie, as he bought any 
animals that attracted his notice, with the idea of intro- 
ducing them into his pictures or amusing himself with 
them. He had an ass, foxes, goats, hogs, dogs of all 
kinds, monkeys, squirrels, guinea-pigs, dormice, fowls, and 
rabbits; and all these creatures needed attention, and 
men to look after them. 

In his eager desire to paint the objects in his pictures 
from life he stopped at no extravagance or absurdity. On 
one occasion, when painting a picture called " The Cherry 
Girl," he introduced an ass with panniers into his sitting- 
room, and when employed on stable scenes would 
scatter straw about his rooms, and fill them with the 
appurtenances of the stable, taking no trouble whatever 
after the picture was done as to whether these things 
were removed or not. Once, when acting as constable, 
he started a series of four pictures, to be called "The 
Deserter," and a sergeant, drummer, and soldier, on their 
way to Dover in pursuit of deserters, called upon him for 
instructions where they were to be billeted. " Morland," 
says Dawe, "seeing that these men would answer his 
purpose, accompanied them to the Britannia, and treated 
them plentifully, while he was eagerly questioning them 
on the modes of recruiting, with every particular attending 
on the trial of deserters by court-martial and their 
punishments. In order that he might gain a still better 
opportunity for information, he provided his new 
acquaintances with ale, wine, and tobacco, took them to 
his own house, and caroused with them all night, employ- 
ing himself busily in sketching, and noting down whatever 
appeared likely to suit his purpose ; nor was he satisfied 
with this, for during the whole of the next day, which 
was Sunday, he detained them, against their will, in his 



42 GEORGE MORLAND 

painting-room, and availed himself of every possible 
advantage which the occasion afforded." In this way he 
was able to obtain professional advantage from his own 
course of life ; but as a rule, at the time of his drunken 
frolics, he was quite unable either to paint or to make 
sketches for proposed pictures. Still, however, he never 
appears to have lost a chance when amongst jovial 
companions of obtaining ideas for pictures. His paintings 
often contained the portraits of his acquaintances, and he 
would get one of them to stand for a hand, another for a 
head, an attitude, or a figure, "according as their 
countenance or character suited, or to put on any dress he 
might want to copy." For female models he seldom went 
beyond his wife and sisters, and when painting juvenile 
subjects, Dawe tells us, would ask all " the children of the 
neighbourhood " to come into his house, and play about 
in his rooms, and made sketches of them " whenever any 
interesting situations occurred." 

On some occasions he used models who came to him 
casually, as, for example, Dawe tells us, if he wished to 
introduce a red cloak or any other garment of that sort, 
" he would place a person at the window to watch till 
some one passed that appeared likely to suit his purpose, 
on which he sent for the passenger to come in, while he 
made a sketch and mixed his tints ; and he seldom failed 
to reward the person thus called upon liberally. What 
he could not copy immediately from nature was supplied 
by a retentive memory and acute observation of the 
scenes in which he mingled." As an example of his 
reckless habits, Dawe tells us that when Morland was 
painting his first picture of children, representing a game 
of blind-man's buff, a connoisseur called upon him, who 
engaged to purchase the work for twelve guineas as soon 
as it was finished. So overjoyed was he at this price, 
which was more than he had expected for so simple a 



WORK IN LONDON 43 

work, that he and his companion Brooks made a reso- 
lution that, on receiving the cash, they would each drink 
twelve large glasses of gin. He applied himself sedu- 
lously to his task, finished the picture, and received the 
stipulated sum ; but, hardly waiting till the person who 
had brought the money had quitted the house, he threw 
open the windows, and with his companion gave three 
cheers ; and they set off to the public-house and piously 
fulfilled their engagement. 

Another writer tells us that one of his habits of 
buffoonery was connected with some satirical songs he 
composed about his companions; and he would hire 
ballad-singers and blind fiddlers to sing and play them 
to vulgar tunes under the windows of the persons con- 
cerned. In this way he so annoyed some of his com- 
panions that they were forced to change their place of 
residence in order to avoid his well-paid street-singers. 
Gradually he cut himself off from all decent society, " on 
account of the restraint which it imposed upon him, pre- 
ferring to work for those only who were his intimates, and 
with whom he could act exactly as he pleased. By such 
conduct he became surrounded by a set of men who cut 
off all intercourse between him and his real admirers, the 
consequence being that the latter could procure none of 
his performances but through their medium, and at length 
ceased to apply to him." He* raised money by means of 
promissory notes, which at first he was very anxious to 
take up even before they were due ; but, finding at last 
that the more he earned the more he was involved in 
debt, he became careless whether his notes were dis- 
honoured or not. Sometimes, however, he was in great 
distress as to their renewal, and then, having no courage 
to speak for himself, got his associates to obtain time on 
the bills, which they were generally able to do to their 
own advantage. 



44 GEORGE MORLAND 

On one occasion an important bill had been given a 
chandler in his neighbourhood, a man of a surly disposi- 
tion, and who could not be evaded, and what to do about 
the renewal of it he did not know. Eventually it was 
suggested, so Dawe informs us, that a party at skittles 
should be formed, and the chandler induced to join, in 
order, if possible, that, being fond of the game, he should 
be caught in a good humour. It was arranged that at the 
party Morland was to affect dejection, which a friend was 
to notice, and the creditor was to be given to understand 
that this dullness was in consequence of disappointment 
at not receiving money. The party was formed, and it 
met at the Castle, Kentish Town, and in the height of 
the play Irwin, Morland's companion, appeared, informing 
the artist that he had been quite unsuccessful in obtaining 
any money, " for the gentleman had left town." Morland 
then became apparently sorrowful ; his friends noticed it, 
the chandler inquired the cause, and, on being told, said 
" it could not be helped, and should make no difference," 
and agreed to put off the payment of the bill to a more 
convenient time. Morland's spirits were at once restored, 
the evening was spent jovially, and the party broke up in 
great disorder early in the morning. 

The prodigal line of conduct which the artist was 
pursuing could not, however, go on for ever. Certainly 
he never relaxed his industry, and whenever he was able 
to paint was hard at work producing picture after picture, 
and selling them by means of his acquaintances as quickly 
as they were done ; but there was no limit to his expendi- 
ture, and his debts increased day by day. He now began 
to quarrel with Irwin. They had often disagreed while 
they lived together, but their differences at last rose to 
such a height that they strove to see who should turn the 
other out of doors. Brooks the shoemaker fomented their 
differences for his own advantage, and Morland, having 



WORK IN LONDON 45 

been introduced to a dealer who was ready to take his 
pictures, was in little need of Irwin's assistance. The 
quarrels became, therefore, more and more violent, Irwin 
being particularly jealous of the man who had supplanted 
him in the favour of his patron. At length he was entirely 
degraded, and Morland refused to see him. He did not 
survive his dismissal many months, but fell a victim to 
the excesses in which he had participated. 

" After Irwin left him, Morland reflected how much he 
was indebted to the brother of his late colleague for 
money advanced on pictures, and began to fear his resent- 
ment/' He felt he had lost one resource, and had added 
another creditor to the already large number who were 
about him, all of whom had begun to be extremely im- 
patient for money. He began to fear that he was in 
danger of imprisonment, and consulted an attorney 
named Wedd. This man took lodgings for him in a 
place considered as a sanctuary for debtors, and recom- 
mended him to leave his large house. He was already 
tired of it, and glad to do anything for a change, and 
delighted especially at the idea of " giving the slip to the 
people of Camden Town." To pacify the furniture dealer 
from whom he had much of his furniture, he agreed that 
he should have the furniture of the house back again, 
while the pictures at which he was at work, and the rest 
of his effects, were " by the dexterity of Brooks conveyed 
away before the neighbours had the least suspicion of 
Morland's intention; so that nothing was left for the 
landlord but several loads of cinders, in which were found 
many public-house pots, and he esteemed himself fortunate 
to get back his premises on any terms before they were 
quite in ruins, which doubtless would soon have been the 
case, as he had let them to Morland in a half-finished state." 

We learn from Collins that half a dozen gentlemen 
who knew the artist proposed while he was living in 



46 GEORGE MORLAND 

sanctuary to help him. It was suggested that they should 
buy up his debts at as cheap a rate as possible, and take 
all the pictures he painted at a fair price, till they should 
be reimbursed ; that he should be provided with a good 
table for himself and his wife, have a convenient house, 
rent and taxes free, and be allowed £200 a year for 
pocket-money and clothes, with the use of a horse two 
hours in any part of every day he chose. This offer, 
" liberal and great as it was, he is said to have treated 
with the most sovereign contempt, and, remaining in 
sanctuary for about a month, he obtained in December, 
1789, by the assistance of his attorney, a letter of licence 
as to his debts. He then set himself to clear them off, 
and was able to work so rapidly and so well that in fifteen 
months he had satisfied every creditor." Whether he paid 
them in full is not at all clear. Collins tells us that he 
paid 9s. 5d. in the pound and obtained his freedom, and 
that, probably, is a more accurate statement 

He now removed to Leicester Street, Leicester Square, 
where he occupied a large first and second floor at a 
furrier's, and was visited, says Collins, "by a greater 
number of idle loungers than at any former period." His 
attorney did well over the arrangement, gathering together, 
says Dawe, " one of the largest collections of Morland's 
pictures, having had, in consequence of his connexion 
with the artist, an opportunity of selecting many of his 
best performances." Morland's residence in Leicester 
Street gave him the opportunity for increasing his reputa- 
tion, and painting better pictures than ever before. We 
are told that he could have sold any number of paintings 
at his own price, and had an offer to paint a whole room- 
ful of pictures for the Prince of Wales — a commission 
which, for some reason or other, he would not accept. 

He quickly, however, launched out into luxury — bought 
a violin, a violoncello, and a harpsichord, and determined 



WORK IN LONDON 47 

to give more time to music. He also decided to paint 
more pictures of English rural scenery, and in connexion 
with his first production of this kind, the picture of gipsies 
kindling a fire, we are told the following story : General 
Stuart, who commissioned this picture, and was to pay 
forty guineas for it, called one morning with a friend to 
see the progress of the work, and asked Morland when it 
would be finished, to which the artist replied that by four 
o'clock it would be ready. The General, seeing that it was 
not nearly completed, expressed his doubts, but Morland 
repeated the statement. After looking at the picture for 
some time, General Stuart, speaking in French to the 
companion who was with him, expressed his great admira- 
tion for the picture, but said he was sure it was not 
possible for it to be finished that day. Morland, however, 
understood the remark, and, being very anxious to fulfil 
his engagement, as he had had nothing in advance for the 
picture and was sorely in need of money, determined that 
he would curtail the work, but finish the painting. The 
moment his patron had gone, he obliterated several figures 
sketched into the picture, and in their place introduced one 
in a carter's frock, put in masses of shade and foliage, and 
by three o'clock finished it. He then began to fear lest 
General Stuart would not return, and in the meantime 
amused himself with a game of shuttlecock. The General 
arrived between four and five, and, after expressing great 
surprise at the expedition with which the picture had been 
finished, gave him a cheque for the amount. Morland, 
afraid, however, that he would not get the money that 
evening before the bank closed, entreated a friend, who 
had been waiting by appointment all day to have a picture 
finished, to go for the money, faithfully promising to 
complete his painting the next day. His friend obtained 
the money, and returned for his own picture the next 
evening, but found it untouched. He also found Mrs. 



48 GEORGE MORLAND 

Morland in great perplexity, as she had not seen her 
husband Since he had received the forty guineas, and a 
gentleman, she said, had just been for a picture he had be- 
spoken, and found that Morland had sold it to another 
person. This was the way in which the artist treated his 
patrons. He had little or no idea of honour, his great 
desire being to indulge his own evil tastes. 

He did not stay long in Leicester Street, but went to 
Tavistock Row, where he remained for a very short time, 
and afterwards moved to lodgings in Great St. Martin's 
Lane. Here it was that his brother Henry found him out, 
and the two brothers were brought together by William 
Collins, who afterwards wrote one of the memoirs of the 
artist. Henry Morland had run away to sea at a very 
tender age, and had been absent from England most of 
his life. At this time, however, about 1790, he had come 
back ; and he seems to have remained in England, and to - 
have done his best to look after his brother. 

The other brother, Edward, who also went to sea, was 
never heard of again. 

Morland was getting tired of living in London, and was 
anxious to get further into the country. He was fond of 
Paddington, as it was a great thoroughfare for cattle, and 
he had every chance there of finding the class of person he 
delighted to introduce into his pictures. The landlord 
of the White Lion was also a jolly fellow, and the place 
much frequenjted by drovers. All these were inducements 
. to Morland to settle down in that part of the world, and 
he took a cottage immediately opposite the White Lion, 
with a pretty garden in its rear. He furnished it neatly, 
and made the front room on the first floor his painting- 
room, in order that from its windows he might have a view 
of everything that passed, and see the picturesque old inn, 
with its yard filled with the kind of subjects which em- 
ployed his pencil. 




Hyatt, photo.] 



[Collection of Mr. F. Abbiss Phillips. 
SHEPHERDS REPOSING. 



WORK IN LONDON 49 

Collins gives us a striking picture of Morland's life at 
Paddington. He says that there was not a room in the 
house that was not infested with guinea-pigs, tame rabbits, 
or dogs of various breeds ; and adds that, having one 
morning announced his name, and being permitted to 
follow his guide to the painting-room, he caught sight of 
two large hampers of wine, one unpacked and the other 
full ; while he found seven or eight men in the room, all 
professors of the pugilistic science, and engaged at 
luncheon. The hour was eleven, many of the bottles 
were uncorked, and the glass going merrily round. 
Bread and cheese, cold meat and fresh butter, were 
being handed " from fist to fist," for there were neither 
table nor chairs allowed in the painting-room; and in 
reply to a remark of astonishment made by Collins, one of 
the very muscular and deeply scarred men made the 
remark, "This 'ere's the vay we lives, master: it's our 
luncheon-time." Collins speaks of the house as a bear- 
garden, and tells us that the last idea of Morland was to 
learn boxing, and these men whom he met in his room 
were the professors whom he was employing to teach him 
that fascinating amusement. Not content, however, with 
this method of spending his money, he took it into his 
head to buy horses, and to lend them to his pugilistic 
friends, who took care never to return them ; one of them 
on one occasion telling him that if ever he was troubled 
again by a question respecting the missing horse, he 
would give him " such a proper hiding as would prevent 
the best of his friends from knowing him again for 
about a month of Sundays." He had taken great delight 
in pugilism, and had given prizes to the combatants, and 
provided them with plenty of good cheer ; but the loss of 
this horse, worth about twenty guineas, made him change 
his mind as to further encouragement of prize-fighters. 

His expenses at Paddington were commensurate, as 

4 



50 GEORGE MORLAND 

usual, not with his earnings, but with his credit, and, 
encouraged by the hope of obtaining a picture, every 
tradesman was earnest to supply him with commodities. 

" He attended all the sports in the neighbourhood, such 
as bear and bull baiting, and soon became surrounded by 
quack doctors, publicans, horse-dealers, butchers, and 
shoemakers, all of whom he converted into picture- 
dealers." It was then he had a wooden frame placed 
across his painting-room, similar to that in a police office, 
with a bar that lifted up, allowing those only to pass with 

. whom he really had business. 

He had by this time made his first visit to the Isle of 
Wight, and had stayed at Shanklin, returning to London 
with a pocket full of sketches, afterwards to be used to 
great advantage. His storms at sea and pictures of 
wrecks and fishermen at once attracted great attention, 
and he had a commission from a namesake, a wealthy 
banker, to paint a large sea-piece, and this man also gave 
him a general invitation to his house and table. His old 
friend, Mr. Sherborne, who had treated him so well at 
Margate, tried both by letter and personal application to 
renew his acquaintance with the artist, and help him get 
rid of his associates, but, with his accustomed negligence, 
he rejected both his friends, and burnt Mr. Sherborne's 
second letter unopened, to save himself the bother of 
answering it. 

His creditors now became more and more persistent, 
and he made many excursions farther out into the 

, country, assuming a fictitious name in order to evade 
them; but wherever he went he appears to have been 
recognised, as his talent was so well known and his 
abilities so unusual that every one contended for his 
paintings, and submitted to any terms in order to procure 
them. He had scores of invitations, and might have 
associated, had he cared to do so, with the best people in 







.1 

CO 



WORK IN LONDON 51 

the country, but he rejected them all, and preferred his 
boon companions. Presently he removed to a larger 
house in Winchester Row, Paddington, and it was there 
that the summit of his extravagance was reached. Just 
at that time he was advised to make his claim to the 
baronetcy dormant in his family, and Mr. Wedd, the 
solicitor, made inquiries respecting the proper course to 
pursue. Morland, however, hearing that there was no 
emolument attached to the dignity, but that, on the 
contrary, he would be at some expense in supporting his 
new honours, made the following reply to his attorney : 
" Well, Bobby," said he, " there's more honour in being a 
fine painter than a fine sir, and as for tacking ' Sir ' to my 
name, Til be damned if I stand a glass of gin for it! 
Plain G. M. will always sell my pictures, and secure them 
as much respect all over the world." 

Collins tells us that he hardly ever saw Morland when 
he was living at Winchester Row. He was either out 
riding or in bed, or else he refused to see his 
friend ; but he gives us one anecdote of his life there. He 
says that Morland agreed with him and one or two other 
friends to ride to Otter's Pool on the ensuing Sunday 
morning. They were to start before twelve, to have a 
long ride before dinner, and if the painter failed being 
ready to mount his horse when his companions arrived he 
was to forfeit half a dozen bottles of wine, while a similar 
fine was to be the consequence if the companions did not 
attend at the appointed hour. Upon the appointment 
being kept, the servant at Morland's house stated that his 
master was poorly, and Collins, being shown into the 
parlour, saw Morland in his nightgown and red slippers, 
playing on the harpsichord. After amusing themselves for 
a few minutes, they took a turn in the garden, where 
Morland, with a grave face, declared he had a great secret 
to disclose, which hung so heavy on his heart that, if his 

4—2 



52 GEORGE MORLAND 

friend would put his horse in the stable, he would unburden 
his mind to him in the painting-room, and be greatly 
obliged to him for his advice. The friend assented, 
thinking it was some domestic difficulty, especially as 
Mrs. Morland was not to be seen. On arriving in the 
painting-room, Morland, taking up a plain canvas, said he 
would make a sketch for a large picture while it was in 
his mind, and that would enable him to compose himself 
to narrate with coolness his present distress. He gave 
his friend a volume of Swift with which to amuse himself, 
and, on being asked if he relinquished the idea of dining 
at Otter's Pool that day, his answer was doubtful. 
However, he set to work on the plain canvas, while his 
friend read Swift. An hour later the friend left his book 
to go behind the painter's chair. He was greatly 
astonished on beholding a picture more than half finished, 
having three figures in it, on what had been but a short 
time ago a blank piece of canvas; and in the course of two 
hours and a half Morland painted the complete picture, 
representing two pigs lying down before a sty and a man 
near by. 

As soon as this was finished, Morland made the following 
characteristic statement : " I have been terribly despon- 
dent this morning, for, recollecting our engagement, I put 
my hand in each of my pockets without being able to find 
a guinea in one of them. This made me so low-spirited 
that I flew to the harpsichord, and thumped away till you 
came, without being able to produce a single sound like 
the chink of a guinea, Now, my lad," continued the 
artist, " things look better, for some fool or other will be 
here presently, and tip me a tenner for what I have just 
brushed up, and this is the whole secret I had to tell you. 
Ha, ha ! But I say, mum, we shall have a merry night 
after all." 

The friend at once told Morland it was a pity that a 



WORK IN LONDON 53 

fool should possess such a treasure at that price, and he 
bought the picture of him immediately. The two men 
then set off for their dinner, equally pleased — the one with 
his purchase, and the other with his guineas, the artist, 
however, informing his friend that he was sure he was 
half-seas over, otherwise he would not have been such a 
flat as to be taken in by him. 

On another occasion, the same author tells us, Morland 
asked a dozen people to dinner with him, and determined, 
to use his own expression, "to see them all completely 
sewed up." He had the hampers of wine unpacked in 
the garden, where they remained till the whole was 
drunk or taken away by the servants or anybody who 
pleased ; and the expenditure was declared to be not less 
than £170 pounds, for which a bill was given to the wine 
merchant, and renewed over and over again by the gift of 
pictures. 

The objection he had to associating with respectable 
people arose from his fear they would give him orders and 
instruct him how they wished their pictures painted. He 
never could brook interference, and, sooner than expose 
himself to the whims and fancies of patrons, declined to 
have anything whatever to do with them. There is no 
doubt that at times he would have been subject to annoy- 
ance from people of little artistic intelligence, and Dawe 
gives us one example of what the artist might have expected. 
" There," Morland once exclaimed, " is a picture which a 
man has returned to me to have a fine brilliant sky painted 
in, saying he will allow me five guineas for ultramarine ; 
it will spoil the picture, and the absurdity of it is that he 
will not suffer that tree to be touched, but expects me to 
paint between the leaves I" 

His determination to avoid society lost him many a 
good patron. Blagdon tells us that on one occasion 
Morland was staying with a friend, when Lord Derby 



54 GEORGE MORLAND 

called to commission an important picture, and at first 
declined to give his name. On being told that the artist 
would not see him unless his name was first taken up, 
Lord Derby complied with the not unreasonable request, 
whereupon Morland from a garret window was heard 
exclaiming, " Oh, damn lords ! I paint for no lords ! Shut 
the door, Bob, and bring up Rattler and the puppy." 

On another occasion, at the Rummer, Charing Cross, 
he met the Duke of Hamilton, but the interview only led 
to a boxing competition between the artist and the Duke, 
and then to the Duke driving Morland part of the way 
home. From what Hassell tells us, nothing could have 
persuaded the Duke of Hamilton that a man who behaved 
to him as Morland did could possibly be a painter of any 
eminence. 

Life at Winchester Row was conducted on just as 
reckless an arrangement as life with Morland had ever 
been conducted, and had the usual result. Unlimited 
expenditure exhausted every means of supply, and credit 
after a while came to an end. The very last adventure in 
which the artist took part yielded him a sufficient sum of 
money to engage in an extra long escapade of folly, and 
then the career in Paddington came to a close. A bun- 
baker sent his son with a large sum of money, that he 
might purchase a place of position under Government, but 
for some cause or another payment had not to be made 
at that time. On his way home to Paddington, the young 
man, who had already drunk more than enough, called 
upon Morland, and, proud of having so much money in 
his possession, displayed it. The artist was painting a 
fine landscape, which, Dawe tells us, "was highly 
admired by the young bunman, who had long entertained 
a wish to turn picture-dealer. Morland plied him with 
wine, and induced him to lend him the money," on his 
giving him a note of hand, and the picture, when com- 




•8 

8 



CO 



WORK IN LONDON 55 

pleted, as interest. The young man went home too much 
intoxicated to tell what had happened, but the next 
morning, when the money was demanded, produced 
Morland's note, and explained that the sum no doubt 
would be forthcoming when it was wanted, together with 
the picture, which was worth at least £50. The father 
was furious, and insisted on the note being returned, and 
on his son obtaining the money ; but it was too late. Mor- 
land had disappeared, and was not again seen in Paddington 
till all the money had been disposed of. A small part of 
it had been applied to pay bills then due, and the rest 
squandered ,away in his customary follies. After a while 
the matter was compromised by his giving acceptances for 
the payment of the money, but they were never taken up, 
and so indignant was the bun-baker with the way in which 
his son had been treated that the district round about 
was made too hot for Morland, and after eighteen months' 
residence he fled away. His debts exceeded £4,000, and 
with Mrs. Morland he retired to a farm-house at Enderby, 
in Leicestershire, keeping the place of his residence a 
secret from his numerous creditors. 



CHAPTER V 

DEBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 

Residence on a farm was most congenial to Morland. 
In all his troubles he remained faithful to certain ideals. 
There was never any question about the affection between 
himself and his wife, and none of his numerous chroniclers 
give any hint of infidelity on his part or on hers. Turbulent 
their married life certainly was, but they were deeply 
attached to one another, and in his sober intervals no one 
could have been kinder to his wife than was Morland. 
Another of his enthusiasms was for children, and with 
them he was always most popular. He delighted to take 
part in their games, was lavish in his expenditure, and 
never happier than when making them happy. 

Very little below his affection for children came the love 
he had for animals. It had sometimes a cruel side, as he 
would set one creature against the other for the sake of 
fun and excitement; but he really had a considerable 
amount of love for the animal creation in his own way, 
and was always ready to buy living creatures and take 
them into his house. Hassell tells us that he met him 
one morning carrying a sucking-pig, which he bore in his 
arms like a child. The author did not recognise who the 
eccentric person was for some time, and was only amused 
at the way in which the man carrying the pig was be- 
having. On his journey through the streets of Marylebone 
he frequently set down the pig, pitting him against the 

56 



DEBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 57 

nearest dog, and delighting in the chase that was sure to 
•follow, and then, gathering up the pig, made a great fuss of 
it, and treated it as kindly as he could. When Hassell 
reached the friend's house where he was going, he found 
seated in. the room the eccentric person, still carrying and 
petting his pig, and was then given to understand that it 
was Morland the painter. 

Collins speaks of meeting him on an occasion at the 
Cavendish Square coffee-house at the corner of Prince's 
Street, sitting in a little back parlour with a basin of rum 
and milk beside him, a pointer who was. sharing his meal 
by his side, a guinea-pig in his handkerchief, and a 
beautiful American squirrel he had just bought on his 
shoulder. 

During the time he lived in Leicestershire he indulged 
to the full his delight in animal life. There were several 
children, says a contemporary letter-writer, at the farm, 
and with them Morland was first favourite, but he divided 
his favours .between them and the animals, and at times 
the artist would be found " seated on the floor of. a large 
barn, surrounded by about a dozen children and a score of 
animals : fowls, pigeons, and ducks were close about him ; 
he was fondling two rabbits, one guinea-pig, and half a 
dozen tiny puppies at the same moment ; a young foal 
had hold of his hat, and a calf was nibbling at his foot ; 
while with one hand he was striving on a bit of rough 
cardboard to make some sketches of the creatures about 
him ; with the other he was patting all his companions ; 
and while all this was going on, was striving to interest 
the children with a fairy-tale." The sight must have been 
an extraordinary one, and as a contrast to the wild, drunken 
scenes in which the artist so often -took part, it is pleasant 
to come upon so* peaceful an episode in Morland's life. 
The man must have had some marvellous fascination 
about him. Children are, as a rule, satisfactory guides 



58 GEORGE MORLAND 

concerning the character of a man, and with children 
Morland was always happy, while it was their most eager 
desire to be in his company. It has been said that no 
really wicked man is fond of animals, and the more the 
affectionate side of Morland's character is regarded, the 
more certain it seems to be that his sins were those of care- 
lessness and utter want of control, rather than the result 
of any vicious nature. The same letter tells us that no 
farm in Leicestershire was so visited as was this one at 
Enderby by proprietors of dancing dogs, by gipsies, and 
by those who had to do with the wild life of the country. 

It was quickly found out that the artist who loved 
animals, and who painted them so well, was staying there, 
and it is said that the reason why Morland made so short 
a sojourn in Leicestershire — remaining only about nine 
months — was that all the cattle of the district was brought 
for him to see, and all the gipsies for miles round congre- 
gated with their dogs and pet creatures, and made their 
encampments close up to the house. 

While Morland was away his attorney was doing his 
best to make things comfortable in London. A letter of 
licence was agreed upon in 1791. Morland made the 
fairest of promises to pay all his debts, and engaged to 
pay £120 per month. A house was taken for him in 
Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square, for the rent of which 
two of his creditors became responsible, and then came 
the conditions of the engagement. An endeavour was 
made to induce him to paint for so many hours a day, to 
frequent the society of eminent artists, and to associate 
himself with respectable people. To this his reply was : 
" I would sooner go to Newgate, by God I" It was, how- 
ever, agreed that he should live in a respectable manner, 
throw off his old Paddington acquaintances, with the 
exception of one man with whom he refused to part, 
and commence a new course of life. Meantime, he 




t Hyatt, photo.] 



[Collection of Mr. F. Abbiss Phillips. 
GEORGE MORI,AND AND A FRIEND. 



DEBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 59 

left the farm, borrowed extensively, without scruple or 
hesitation, from his friends, and went to stay with a 
Mr. Claude Smith in the same county, at whose house he 
painted many pictures. No one knew where he was until 
all the arrangements had been completed, and he then 
came back to London. The friend whom he had deter- 
mined to retain was named Crane. He had been a 
butcher, but had given up his business to follow Morland, 
from whom he received a guinea a week for grinding 
colours and doing the smaller duties of the studio. The 
man was therefore useful to Morland, and his favourite 
companion in his frolics. 

One of the first pictures painted in Charlotte Street 
was " The Benevolent Sportsman," executed for Colonel 
Stuart, and ordered as a companion to the picture of the 
gipsies three years before. For this he was paid seventy 
guineas. He also painted two pictures for his attorney, 
Mr. Wedd, called " Watering the Farmer's Horse " and 
" Rubbing Down the Post-horses." 

He had an excellent chance in Charlotte Street of 
turning over a new leaf and devoting himself to his work. 
Most of his creditors had been pacified, and some of the 
others might have been arranged with, while his own 
abilities were so great that he was able to earn a hundred 
guineas a week. It was not, however, in Morland's 
nature to do without companions, nor was he ever able 
to continue work steadily and free himself from his 
embarrassments. He had certainly got rid of his Pad- 
dington acquaintances, but he quickly acquired others 
of a similar character. A vulgar Jew named Levi, who 
supplied him with colours, a man who Dawe says was 
possessed of some humour and jocularity, became asso- 
ciated with him, and for awhile his buffoonery amused 
the artist. He was not, however, disposed to wait for 
payment of his colour account as long as Morland thought 



60 GEORGE MORLAND 

he ought to wait, and he took steps to get the artist 
arrested. Morland quickly got himself liberated, and 
proceeded to the house of Levi to abuse his antagonist, 
and then, although little more than half the size of his 
gigantic opponent, offered to fight him. A crowd quickly 
gathered, and Morland, spurred on by their cries, reached 
over the colourman's counter and " struck him with all 
his might a desperate blow in the face." There were too 
many supporting Morland for the Israelite to dare to 
engage in a combat with the artist, and he contented 
himself with threatening to take the law of him ; but, as 
Blagdon tells us, Morland was too profitable a customer 
for Levi to continue the quarrel, and no more was heard 
of the fight. 

Another of the artist's companions was a watchmaker 
who had a pretty taste in art, and greatly admired Mor- 
land's paintings. Morland, on his part, took a fancy to 
some of the jeweller's watches, and, eager to acquire 
them, bartered for them the pictures which ought to have 
been sold for considerable sums of money. He was taken 
in by the watchmaker, as a matter of course, and the 
bargaining only increased his embarrassment, instead of 
reducing it. 

Yet another companion whom Dawe mentions was a 
clever ventriloquist ; and on one occasion we are told that 
this man accompanied the artist to Billingsgate — a place 
which Morland was very fond of visiting, " as there," said 
he, " I hear jolly good straight language and see some first- 
rate fights." On this occasion the artist wanted to buy a 
salmon, but his companion, smelling, it, observed that it 
was not fresh. The fish-woman swore it had not been 
out of the boat half an hour ; but the ventriloquist assured 
her that it stunk, and that the fish had told him so. Her 
reply was that the man was a fool to say that the salmon 
could speak. Morland now chimed in by observing that 



62 GEORGE MORLAND 

men, proposing to remain in Derbyshire for some con- 
siderable time and paint. They spent one hour in a 
public-house in Derby, during which time they smoked 
several pipes, and then both of them came to the con- 
clusion that the place was dull, and came back to London, 
having wasted their time and money without any result 
whatever. On another occasion he bought the head of 
a black ox, having a white muzzle, from the butcher. He 
paid a guinea for it, and, admiring it greatly, determined 
to paint it, and went home for the purpose, but put the 
head into his painting -room and forthwith forgot all 
about it, and started off for a ramble in the country. He 
did not return to Charlotte Street on that occasion for a 
month, and, as this happened in the summer, and the 
weather was particularly hot, the whole house, to the 
great distress of his wife, was filled with a terrible odour, 
the cause of which, as his painting -room was safely 
locked up, it was impossible to discover until his return. 
He then had to pay a crown to the dustmen to remove 
the head from his premises. 

His waywardness was so extraordinary that, when taxed 
by his patrons as to the completion of a picture, he would 
obstinately refuse to have anything more to do with it. 
Once, when hard at work at a painting he had faithfully 
promised to complete that afternoon, and which, inas- 
much as he had been sober for a week, was nearly done, 
he received a visit from a well-known pugilist named 
Packer. He at once left the picture, persuaded his friend 
to put on the gloves, and started boxing. In the midst 
of the sport the patron arrived, and the following con- 
versation ensued : 

" Is the picture finished ?" said the visitor. 

" No ; it will be done by and by." 

"Is this the way to do it? A pretty way this of 
going on 1" • 



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DEBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 63 

" Don't you like it ?" 

" You know it's past the time when I was to have 
had it." 

" Don't you like my going on ? William, get my boots." 

" Are you going to finish my picture ?" 

Morland made no reply, but continued dressing himself. 

" You're surely not going out before it's completed ?" 

" I am !" said the artist, with a string of oaths ; and he 
then left the house immediately, swearing that it should be 
a very long time before that picture should be completed. 

During this first period of his life in Charlotte Street he 
executed a good many pictures, but troubled very little 
about the arrangements entered into for paying his 
creditors. He only paid two or three instalments, and 
then disappeared, visiting various parts of England, and 
wandering about wherever stage-coaches could take him. 
A second letter of licence, arranging for the payment of 
£100 per month, was obtained by his attorney in 1792, but 
this was as little regarded as was the first; and, after 
paying a few sums of money, the artist again disappeared, 
roaming into the country, while his attorney for the third 
time endeavoured to "compromise the matter on still 
more easy conditions." In his excursions, Dawe tells us, 
he was accompanied by Brooks the shoemaker, who has 
already been mentioned, his pupil Hand, a man named 
Burn, and at times the watchmaker Tupman, and these 
people brought the pictures up to London, sold them to 
great advantage, and kept secret the place of Morland's 
resort. In all these excursions Dawe tells us that " the 
artist's chief amusements were to mix with the 
peasants of the place where he made any stay, to visit 
their cottages, and play with their children, to whom he 
often gave money, and thus he procured frequent oppor- 
tunities for observing their manners, and occasionally 
assisted his memory by making slight sketches of their 



64 GEORGE MORLAND 

attitude, dress, and furniture, and whatever seeified likely 
to be useful in his art. He joined sporting parties, went 
to races, and made friends of fishermen and sailors,' but he 
was always ready for frolic, and no one was proof against 
his pranks." 

It was then that he is believed to have made another 
visit to the Isle of Wight, a place to which he returned 
some years later (see p. 78), He lodged for awhile at Bon- 
church, and then moved on to Chale and Blackgang, paint- 
ing a fine picture of the latter place, which how belongs 
to Mr. F. Abbiss Phillips. He also stayed with Mrs. 
Williams at Eglantine Cottage, Shanklin, where he 
painted his "Winter Scene, with a Grey Horse" — at 
St. Catharine's Point and at Briddlesford, at the latter 
place painting, according to Mr. Garle, a picture called 
" The Death pf the Hare," and whichi it is suggested, 
.represents a scene with Mr. Jacob's harriers. 

Mr. Garle also states that Morland painted a sign for the 
village inn at Hale — The Fighting Cocks— and introduced 
into it the portraits of two local farmers — Mr. Roach of 
Arreton and Mr. Hills of Horringford— but unfortunately 
the sign, taken down one windy day, has since been lost 
sight of, and cannot be found. 

While at the seaside, Collins tells us, observing the 
fishermen bait their hooks and throw out their lines, 
the ends of which they made fast with tent-pegs or 
stakes on the shore ; Morland determined to play a trick 
upon some men with whom he had been associating, 
and who had not treated him quite fairly. He collected 
together a quantity of old wigs, old shoes, tattered 
breeches, and mop-heads, and taking up all the lines and 
stripping the hooks of the bait, fastened this rubbish to 
the lines, putting on bones and other weights that they 
might sink out of sight, and then withdrew. When the 
fishermen were about to raise their lines, Morland posted 




Hyatt, photo.] 



[Collection of the Exors. of Sir Charles Tennant, Bart. 
IDLENESS. 



DEBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 65 

himself near enough to be a witness to their fury, but at a 
sufficiently safe distance to avoid any retribution for his 
foolish trick. The men were, of course, highly indignant, 
and the loss to them was considerable; but the only 
observation that the artist made was that he had prevented 
their being able to say, with others of their profession, 
"that they had toiled all the night, and had caught 
nothing." 

On another occasion he played very much the same 
trick on an old fisherman and his son who were putting 
down lobster pots, but this time, as the men, accord- 
ing to the Sporting Magazine for 1790, had sat to him for 
models, and had joined in one of his drunken frolics, he 
amply recompensed them for their loss when he declared 
himself the author of the trick. 

When his third letter of licence was procured, Morland 
wanted to return to his house in Charlotte Street, and 
Collins tells us tried to persuade a friend to go first to the 
house to see that no one was in possession. He purposely 
omitted to tell his friend that a number of dogs — pointers, 
bulldogs, spaniels, and terriers — had been left behind, and 
were hungry, and the poor man, a poet, and of a some- 
what timorous nature, was frightfully alarmed by the 
attack these dogs made upon him the moment he opened 
the door. He escaped from them with difficulty, having, 
in addition to the fright they caused him, the anxiety of 
believing that the barking would inform Morland's 
creditors that some one was in the house, and he, being 
taken for the artist, would be put under arrest. Morland 
only laughed at the story, pleading ignorance of any 
concerted plan, and told his friend he had sold the dogs 
directly he heard of their attack upon him, adding that 
" he would never keep a dog so void of natural sagacity as 
not to be able to distinguish between the smell of a poet 
and the smell of a bailiff/ 9 



66 GEORGE MORLAND 

Finding that he could not return to Charlotte Street, 
and that money had come to an end, he started to make 
some drawings in black chalk, tinted with crayons, as 
he appears to have left behind him in the country the 
convenient box which he had made for canvases and 
colours, and which enabled him at the shortest notice to 
take all his impedimenta into the country. These 
drawings, experiments on his part, were sold at once, and 
the publisher made an immense profit by them. Morland 
was urged to etch and publish them himself. He 
declared he would do so, and bought copperplates, but 
Dawe tells us that the only use ever made of them was 
to alarm the publisher, and induce him to give a more 
liberal price. 

One of his largest creditors was a horse-dealer, from 
whom he had been jobbing, and with whom he had got 
into difficulty over the loan of a horse. The man, 
whose name was Dean, and who lived at Barnet, had 
lent Morland a horse, but it was months before he got it 
back, and only through hearing of it in an advertisement 
and paying very heavy expenses. Morland protested 
that he had returned the animal the day he borrowed it, 
giving a boy half a crown to ride it to Dean's, and the 
mistake had arisen from the horse having been taken to 
some stables at Soho, kept by a man of the same name, 
instead of to Barnet. Always ready, however, to sign 
papers, he gave a note for the expenses, and, when it 
became due, prevailed upon the horse-dealer to renew it. 
He paid for the renewal by the promise of a picture, 
which at last he finished ; but, as Mr. Dean neglected to 
take it away at the moment of its completion, Morland 
sold it to somebody else. The man was determined to 
have the money, and was successful in getting some of 
the proceeds obtained from the sale of the picture. 
Meantime the artist kept out of the way, and his solicitor 




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DEBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 67 

persuaded the creditors that Morland was too poor to 
keep by the terms of the letter of licence, and in Decem- 
ber, 1793, got a fourth one granted, by which he was to 
pay only £50 per month. Under this agreement "he 
kept up his payments less regularly than ever; he 
discharged a dividend or two, and then neglected his 
creditors until they became clamorous; he would then 
pay another, and thus continue to act till ... his letter 
of licence became void. In November, 1794, he made an 
agreement with his creditors to paint two pictures per 
month, which were to be sold for their benefit, but . . . 
he never completed any upon these terms. In 1796 a 
fifth • . . licence was granted, which stipulated that he 
should pay only £10 per month. This was signed 
by only a small number of his creditors, and he made 
still fewer payments under this than under any of his 
former engagements, which were all made and broken 
in the course of five years, during which time he had paid 
at the rate of 9s. 5A in the pound to his creditors 
generally." 

All this time, however, he had been continually borrow- 
ing money from new sources, and giving away his pictures 
in return for the accommodation, while his debt to 
his attorney for legal expenses had run up to £1,500. 
He was still able to pacify a great many of his creditors 
by means of his pictures, and these men were entrusted 
by him with the place of his concealment, and bailed 
him out when he was arrested by the more impatient 
ones. It was never very easy to seize Morland, as he 
was on excellent terms with all the bailiffs, and, instead 
of taking him into custody, they very often told him of 
his danger. At other times he would treat his creditors 
so well in a public-house that he would induce them to 
withdraw the writ and set him free, and, having a great 
horror of imprisonment, practised every kind of bribery 

5—2 



68 GEORGE MORLAND 

in order to avoid it. At this period of his life his con- 
stitution began to yield to repeated assaults. " His coun- 
tenance/' says Dawe, " gradually assumed an unpleasant 
character. He became bloated, his hands trembled, his 
eyes failed him, his spirits flagged, and he became subject 
to almost every species of nervous debility," frequently 
bursting into tears, and threatening to put an end to his 
life. He experienced a slight attack of apoplexy, and 
consulted the celebrated physician, John Hunter, who 
warned him of his danger and of the source of his malady. 
All the warnings in the world, however, would not stop 
George Morland from his headlong career. When he 
was absent from home Mrs. Morland resided with her 
parents, and the house was left empty. When he came 
back again he was often there for awhile with only a boy 
to attend to him, and she knew nothing of his return. 
At other times he would be sober for some weeks together, 
conjugal felicity would reign, and he would work hard all 
day, not leaving his painting-room except to retire to bed. 
On these occasions he would cook his own food, and eat 
it by the side of his easel ; but as he had grown too feeble 
to mount a horse, and had frequently to remain in hiding 
from his creditors, his disease speedily increased. Dawe 
tells us that even during his best times, while living in 
Charlotte Street, he would at seven o'clock, in the morn- 
ing have purl, gin, or a pot of porter for breakfast, with 
beefsteaks and onions, and that during the whole day 
was swallowing all kinds of strong liquors and quantities 
of spirits. Tea he would never drink, and when invited 
to partake of it would shake his head and say he never 
drank it, for it was very pernicious and made the hand 
shake. He wrote out for his brother a little document 
stating what he drank, one day at Brighton when he had 
nothing to do, and the following is the list : 



DEBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 69 

Hollands gin. 

Rum and milk (all this before breakfast). 
Coffee (for breakfast). 
Hollands. 
Porter. 
Shrub. 
Ale. 

Hollands and water. 
Port wine with ginger. 
Bottled porter '(all this before dinner). 
Port wine at dinner and after. 
Porter. 

Bottled porter. 
Punch. 
Porter. 
Ale. 

Opium and water. . 
Port wine at supper. 
• Gin and water. 

Shrub. 
Rum, on go'ing to bed. 

To this document he appended the sketch of a tomb- 
stone with a death's head and crossbones, and under it 
put this epitaph, " Here lies a drunken dog." It was 
perfectly clear, therefore, that he recognised what his 
habits were, and to what they would lead him. Up to 
this time in his life he had been careful in his costume, 
and was reckoned rather a ?mart man ; but now he grew 
careless as to his appearance, and adopted the dress of a 
jockey. On two occasions, when in company with a 
stable-keeper, he was asked if he wanted a place as 
a groom by servants whom he met, and who took him 
for a man of their own class. 



CHAPTER VI 

AT THE SEASIDE 

We now enter upon a period in Morland's life in which 
he was constantly changing his residence, moving from 
place to place to avoid his creditors, and yet busy painting 
wherever he was, in order to pacify the more clamorous, 
and to gain means to indulge his bad habits. Wherever 
he went he carried with him not only his easel and 
colours, but some of his companions ; and in his painting- 
room there were generally pigeons flying about, and dogs, 
guinea-pigs, and pigs gambolling on the floor. In Chelsea J 
where he went first, he was arrested by an old friend to 
whom he owed £300, and who, having pleaded sympathy 
with him, got his address and the gift of a picture, and 
then turned round and arrested him. Those of his 
creditors, however, who were glad to take his pictures 
bailed him out, and he got away to Lambeth, and lodged 
in the house of a waterman. This house he never quitted 
till after dusk, when the man rowed him across the river 
by Hungerford Bridge, and there during the hours of 
freedom from arrest he visited various public-houses about 
Charing Cross, and then returned to his lodging. 

Not being satisfied, however, with this apartment, he 
removed to a greater distance, and took a furnished house 
at East Sheen, where he remained for some time. There 
he started a gig, and in it drove about the country. On 
one occasion he called on Ward, the engraver, and per- 

70 



AT THE SEASIDE 71 

suaded him and Collins to come to dinner with him the 
next Sunday. They set off to walk; but the weather 
being very hot, and the way across the fields difficult to 
find, they missed their road, and did not arrive till past 
four o'clock, when they found that Morland had gone off 
to London, had never said a word to his wife and her 
sister about the two visitors, and consequently the dinner 
had been eaten and the table cleared long before they 
arrived. Late in the afternoon, however, a friend of 
Morland's came in his chaise, determined to see the artist, 
and for fear of disappointment brought his provisions 
with him. These provisions he readily set before Ward 
and Collins, and, as Mrs. Morland was able to provide 
some ale and wine, a meal was made, and the party were 
in a jovial mood by the time the artist got home in the 
evening. 

Life at East Sheen, however, did not satisfy him. It 
was, says Blagdon, a great deal too quiet, and the artist's 
brother, who had by this time taken up the position of 
his guardian, so far as any man could be a guardian for 
such an erratic person, took lodgings for him in Queen 
Anne Street East, facing Portland Chapel. Here he was 
close to his creditors — actually in the very midst of them 
— and yet so well hidden that they had no idea where he 
was, and one of them offered £10 for the secret of his 
concealment. Being free from arrest in his own house, 
he spent most of his time indoors ; and, as his rooms were 
opposite to the chapel, no one was able to look into his 
windows. He was not badly off, and we are told that 
his rooms were very well furnished, while he was able to 
keep a manservant, who, Dawe tells us, was " a person 
of demure deportment and of a peaceable and somewhat 
puritanic disposition, whose peculiarity of manners amused 
our frolicsome artist in his solitude." 

Even here, however, he was not safe, and his quondam 



72 GEORGE MORLAND 

acquaintance, Brooks, is believed to have been treacherous, 
and to have revealed his hiding-place for a sum of money. 
He was once again arrested, and again got free, and he 
then set off to the Minories, where he lodged with a 
Scotch lady of the name of Ferguson. There he was 
very much worried by a man and his wife, who took up 
their station opposite to his windows on two successive 
days, gazing at the windows steadily, as though deter- 
mined to find out who lived inside. Morland, who was 
in a thoroughly nervous state of mind, could not be per- 
suaded that these two idle people were merely careless, 
and had no interest in him ; and so, leaving those lodg- 
ings, to the great disgust of the landlady, who objected 
to losing a person who paid her so well, he took up his 
abode with Mr. Grozier, the engraver, who had engraved 
many of his pictures, and had the highest admiration for 
his merits. He agreed to pay Grozier for his lodgings ; 
but his friend having on one occasion left town, Morland, 
tired of the respectable life which he had to live in that 
house, decamped without paying for his board, and, by 
the dexterity of his old friend Brooks, got off with all his 
baggage. Then he went to the house of his father-in- 
law, Mr. Ward, at Kentish Town; after that to his 
brother's residence in Frith Street, Soho ; then back to 
Kentish Town, and a little later to China Row, Walcot 
Place ; then to Poplar Row, Newington ; and after that 
to Kennington Green, to a lodging with a Methodist 
cobbler. 

This man held very strong religious opinions, and did 
his utmost to persuade Morland to give up his evil habits 
and become a religious man ; but all was to no purpose, 
and the man's sermonising so irritated him that he fled 
away. 

His next place of shelter was with the carver and gilder 
who made frames for his pictures, and who was, so we are 



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AT THE SEASIDE 73 

told in the Spectator, the only man he always paid. Dawe 
says that this carver, whose name was Merle, and who 
resided in Leadenhall Street, was one of the " few sin- 
cere friends who never took advantage of Morland's dis- 
tress." Morland appears to have been very much attached 
to Merle, and to have treated him better than he treated 
anyone else, except, perhaps, his wife, and Merle's influence 
upon the artist was always good. During his stay in 
Leadenhall Street he was extremely industrious. He 
rose at six, and continued at his easel till three or four in 
the afternoon ; but nothing could persuade him to give up 
drinking spirits, and he seldom . retired to bed till two or 
three o'clock in the morning, and was generally the worse 
for drink. He told Merle about the religious cobbler, 
describing the man's horror when on one occasion Mor- 
land had given way to . swearing, and drawing a vivid 
picture of the entrance of the puritanic shoemaker into 
his painting-room, holding a Bible in his hand and point- 
ing with a very dirty finger to a text which referred to the 
evil practice. With all his amusement, however, he could 
not refrain from stating that the little shoemaker had the 
gift of speech, and that never in his life had he heard a 
more rational or better delivered discourse from the pulpit. 
He made a rough sketch of the scene, which was exceed- 
ingly clever, but had decency enough left to consign this 
humorous picture to oblivion, lest it should ever find its 
way into a caricature printshop. 

Tired at length even of the companionship of Merle, he 
got his brother, whom he had nicknamed Klobstock, and 
whom he usually called " Klob," to find better lodgings 
for him, and away he went to Hackney, and there for 
awhile had a period of quiet.. No one knew him at 
Hackney, and he was a source of great bewilderment to 
his neighbours. He worked exceedingly hard, kept him- 
self fairly sober, and, determining to turn over a new leaf, 



74 GEORGE MORLAND 

produced picture after picture, exquisitely finished, and so 
pleased all his patrons that his prices went up fully 40 per 
cent. He had a reasonable chance at last of satisfying 
his creditors, who would have been perfectly glad to have 
accepted nine shillings in the pound ; and he seems to have 
determined to do this, when, owing to the inquisitive 
nature of his neighbours, his life at Hackney came to an 
end. The people in the street found out that he was 
receiving considerable sums of money, and they saw he 
was spending it with profusion. Quantities of wine and 
other extravagances were taken to his lodgings, and they 
noticed that he went out very early in the morning or 
else very late at night, while some conversation he carried 
on with his brother, in which the words " impressions " 
and " engraved plates " occurred, was overheard by those 
who resided close to him. They were also puzzled at 
his habit of frequenting the public-houses, although he 
had plenty to drink in his own house ; and they could not 
understand why he entered his rooms secretly, returning 
home at all hours of the night, going in at the back doer, 
and sometimes climbing over the palings of the garden. 
They felt sure that he was a dangerous character, and at 
length it was determined that the method by which he 
was making so much wealth could be no other than by 
coining money or fabricating forged bank-notes. Informa- 
tion was lodged against him, and Messrs. Winter and Key, 
solicitors for the Bank of England, took a party of Bow 
Street officers over to Hackney in order to secure the 
person whom they believed was engaged in counterfeiting 
Bank of England notes. 

Morland saw the coaches coming, and had also been 
told that some people from the City were inquiring for 
a painter living in Hackney, and therefore he concluded 
that the bailiffs had found him out again, and made the 
best of his way over the garden wall, and got off to London. 



AT THE SEASIDE 75 

The officers entered his house, and, having been pro- 
vided by the Bank with full authority, searched the whole 
place from top to bottom. Nothing that his brother could 
say would satisfy them that they were in the house of an 
artist, and every drawer and box in the place large enough 
to hold a pack of cards was broken open. One of the 
officers, however, had heard of Morland, and recognised 
a picture upon the easel, nearly completed, as the work of 
that painter, and decided, therefore, that they had come 
on a fool's errand. They did not, however, leave until 
they had done considerable damage and caused great 
annoyance. Mr. Wedd, the attorney, forthwith threatened 
to commence an action of trespass against the Bank ; but 
they were well within their rights in the course they had 
adopted, although the result had been so hard upon the 
artist. An ex. gratia payment, however, of twenty guineas 
was made to Morland by Messrs. Winter and Key, and 
they sent him an apology for the annoyance which had 
been caused. Allan Cunningham, in his account of the 
artist, tells this same story, but states that the directors 
of the Bank presented the artist with a couple of bank- 
notes of £20 each by way of compensation for the alarm 
given him. 

Morland was so disgusted with this disturbance that he 
declined to remain in Hackney any longer, and, having 
been there nearly six months, went back to his brother's 
house in Soho, this time to Dean Street, Henry Morland 
having left Frith Street a little while before. He then 
moved to Fountain Place, City Road, and, after a sojourn 
there, went back to the residence of Henry Morland, 
where he was really safer than at any other place, as his 
brother looked after him and took charge of his pictures. 

It was at this time, according to Dawe, that he came 
into contact with Mr. Sergeant Cochill. Reference has 
already been made to the way in which Morland refused 



76 GEORGE MORLAND 

to have anything to do with persons of his own rank in 
life ; but, with all his peculiarity in this way, the artist 
retained a considerable, amount of legitimate pride, and, 
however poor he was and however eccentric, revealed 
the qualities of a punctilious gentleman in certain of his 
transactions. 

The Serjeant had for some years conceived a great wish 
to meet Morland and to see him paint. He had always 
been on terms of friendly correspondence with the artist, 
and it would appear that Mr. Wedd, Morland's attorney, 
had at times interested the Serjeant professionally in the 
difficulties of Morland's life ; so that even if he had not 
rendered the artist professions! assistance, he had always 
offered to do so, and there was an understanding between 
the two .men. He possessed a picture which by some 
accident had been injured, and was very anxious that 
Morland should touch it up — if possible, doing it in the 
Serjeant's own house, and allowing the owner of the 
picture to see the work done. Morland protested very 
much against accepting the invitation, but was eventually 
persuade*! by his attorney to accept it, making the condi- 
tion, however, that no money was to be paid him for 
whatever he did to the picture, inasmuch as he did it as 
a personal friend, and not professionally. 

In a few hours Morland set the picture right, greatly to 
the satisfaction of its owner, who presented him forthwith 
with a purse of guineas. No persuasion, however, would 
induce him to accept it, but Dawe tells us that so much 
did he mistrust his resolution that he whispered to his 
attorney not to leave him, lest in his absence he should be 
overcome by the temptation. Mr. Wedd, therefore, in- 
formed Serjeant Cochill of the conditions under which 
Morland had consented to come, and persuaded him to 
withdraw his offer. It had been a great temptation to the 
artist, as he loved to hear the chink of guineas, and to 



AT THE SEASIDE 77 

know that he had money in his pocket. Even though he 
would not accept a fee, the Serjeant hoped that he would 
take some refreshment in his house ; but he could not be 
persuaded to touch anything while either Mr. or Mrs. 
Cochill were present, for fear he should have to conform 
to the regulations of society, and drink the health of his 
patron. His extreme confusion, embarrassment, and 
awkwardness were quite painful, and, abruptly refusing 
an invitation to stay to dinner, he left the house as swiftly 
as possible. It should be mentioned that he had taken 
some slight refreshment in the form of a glass or two of 
Burgundy and some cake, but only while the Serjeant 
and his wife were out of the room, as nothing would 
induce him to eat anything in their presence. He was, 
however, so proud of himself for having refused the sub- 
stantial fee that he took off his attorney with him, and 
they had an extravagant dinner that night at the Old 
Slaughter's 4 coffee-house. 

Two years afterwards we hear that Morland and the 
Serjeant met again. It was at the time when Morland 
was confined in the King's Bench. He had been favoured 
by the Marshal of the prison with what were called " the 
rules," permitting him to leave the prison for a certain 
length of time, provided he followed certain regulations, 
one of which prohibited his entering any public-house or 
licensed place. This regulation Morland was constantly 
breaking, and one day, intoxicated as usual, he quarrelled 
with a Mr. Clifton at a public-house. A Captain Cunning- 
ham, also confined for debt, and, like Morland, out on a 
day's rule, took the part of the artist in the quarrel. The 
dispute ended in blows, and Mr. Clifton brought an action 
against the Captain, which Morland, " having been the 
cause of it, felt himself bound to defend." Remembering 
his old friend, he asked him to accept a brief in the case, 
but when the matter came into court it was proposed by 



78 GEORGE MORLAND 

counsel that it should be settled by each party paying his 
own costs. In lieu of a fee, Morland presented his 
counsel with a drawing, under which were written the 
words indorsed on the brief, " Clifton versus Cunningham, 
brief for the defendant, Mr. Serjeant Cochill, Wedd 
attorney." The Serjeant was delighted with the picture 
Morland gave him, and declared it was the most valuable 
fee which he had ever received. 

During their residence in Hackney Mrs. Morland had 
been ill, and the constant changes of residence since they 
left had prevented her from getting much better. The 
surgeon who attended her was a Mr. Lynn, of West- 
minster, who had been fascinated by the skill of the 
artist. He tried to persuade Morland that he would be 
much happier away from London, and that he would be 
able to free himself from the companions who were doing 
him so much mischief ; and then, pointing out that Mrs, 
Morland needed a complete change, offered them the use 
of his cottage at Cowes, in the Isle of Wight. Accord- 
ingly, in April, 1799, Mrs. Morland and her servant went 
to Surrey House, Carvell Lane, and were soon followed 
by her husband and his faithful servant, George Sympson, 
who at different times, and for several years, was his 
faithful companion. 

Mr. Lynn wished to send a letter of introduction to a 
medical friend of his at Newport, the object of this letter 
being to request his friend to purchase for him whatever 
pictures or drawings Morland might have for sale. The 
artist, however, refused to bear his note, and would not be 
under an obligation to anyone. He was, however, very glad 
a few weeks afterwards to avail himself of the offer of this 
medical man, as he found money no less important in the 
Isle of Wight than it had been in London. The Newport 
doctor, however, was not of an artistic turn of mind, and 
was worried as to the value of the drawings which Morland 



AT THE SEASIDE 79 

• 

sold him for his friend He wrote to Mr. Lynn to say 
that he had been buying drawings for him to a consider- 
able amount, and that in his opinion he was paying very 
dearly for them, as they were mere sketches with a pencil 
upon scraps of paper, adding " that he could buy better 
for threepence each at any of the shops in Newport, and 
that he wished to know whether he was to continue 
his purchases." Mr. Lynn, knowing their value, begged 
. him to be quite easy, and by all means to purchase as 
many as he could obtain. It would seem probable that 
Mr. Lynn was not altogether disinterested in the offer 
which he had made to Morland. He lent him his house, 
it is true, but, in his desire to purchase everything that 
Morland did whilst he was in the island he showed his 
appreciation of the artist's work, his desire to acquire it, 
and his belief in its future value. There is no doubt that 
during the time that Morland was in the island he painted 
a great many excellent pictures connected . with sea-life, 
fishermen, watermen, sailors, and boats, several of which 
appear to have passed into the possession of the surgeon. 
He wandered about from place to place, visiting the 
Needles Rock many times, and being particularly appre- 
ciative of a fine view of the sea he obtained from St. 
Catharine's Point. His house was filled from mt>rning till 
night with sailors, fishermen, and smugglers; the quiet 
that Morland was always seeking he never found, and he 
was no sooner free from his disreputable companions in 
London than he gathered about him* in the Isle of Wight 
another set equally disreputable, but of whom he made 
excellent professional use. His creditors, however, were 
still on the look out for him, and one of them soon found 
out where he was. 

While at Cowes, Morland is believed to have painted a 
picture representing his friend Mr. Lynn and his children 
looking at a horse, with a landscape background, another 



8o GEORGE MORLAND 

of the same gentleman and his manservant, and a third 
representing Carisbrooke Castle. 

About three days after Morland's departure from 
London, his brother by mere accident happened to drop 
into the White Hart in Fetter Lane. He had not been 
long in the parlour, where he sat down unobserved by one 
or two persons in another part of the room, when he 
heard, in a sort of exulting though low voice, the following 
remark : 

" I have found out Morland's retreat at last, and before 
three days more pass over his head we shall fix him as 
fast as the bars in the cells at Newgate. There is now a 
writ preparing, and I shall go down with the officers to 
prevent all palming." Collins, who tells the story, says 
that " Klob," as Henry Morland was always called, without 
losing time, set off the same evening in the mail-coach for 
Southampton, and arrived at Cowes in time to warn his 
brother, who fled at once with his servant to Yarmouth 
(I.W.), and took the greater part of a house belonging to 
a man named George Cole, who had been a smuggler, and 
had acquired a large fortune, and who, Blagdon tells us, 
was a big, powerful man, whom no one dared to attack. 
After a while he moved to more congenial quarters at the 
village inn, the George, then kept by a Mr. Plumbley, and 
here was joined by his wife and brother. There the 
artist settled down for a while, but he was to have no 
peace even at Yarmouth. 

u One morning," says Dawe, " about six o'clock, when 
they were making breakfast from beefsteak and purl, a 
lieutenant, with a file of eight soldiers of the Dorset 
Militia, entered the room, grounded their pieces, and 
arrested them by an order from General Don, commander 
of the district, as spies, declaring them all prisoners." 

This dramatic and sensational arrest took place on 
account of the conclusion which the militiamen had come 



MR. PI,UMBI,EY, 

OF THE GEORGE HOTEL, YARMOUTH. 

In the possession of Mrs. Wheeler. 



AT THE SEASIDE 81 

to that Morland, while making a sketch of Yarmouth 
Castle (a picture now in the possession of Mr. Abiss 
Phillips), was really noting down the coast defences for the 
information of the French Government, and assisting a 
French invasion. The poor artist, who had all his life 
dreaded imprisonment, was in a state of extreme con- 
fusion and agitation, and the suspicion of his guilt was 
confirmed thereby, notwithstanding the efforts he made to 
convince the lieutenant of his innocence. Off he had to 
go to Newport, and although the day was extremely hot, 
he was ordered to carry with him his heavy portfolios 
of sketches. The bench of justices sat in Carisbrooke, 
and Morland was brought before the magistrates. He 
had a very unpleasant experience between Yarmouth and 
Newport, as he was hooted and pointed at by the people 
whom he passed, and by the inhabitants who came out of 
their houses to behold the traitors. 

Very fortunately, the medical man who had been asked 
by Mr. Lynn to purchase the sketches came forward and 
explained the whole state of affairs, and his evidence was 
supported by that of Plumbley, Morland's host at the 
George. The justices therefore dismissed the case, but 
they laid a strong injunction upon Morland that he was 
to make no more sketches of the scenery. An amusing 
piece of evidence is referred to by Collins. He says that 
one of Morland's paintings, nearly finished, was explained 
by the soldiers as an ingenious cipher which had a mystic 
interpretation. It represented a farmer holding his 
purse, considering what he would give the ostler, who 
stood with his hat in one hand and the bridle of a white 
horse over his arm. The white horse, bridled and 
saddled in the stable, the lieutenant said, represented the 
plan of the coast of England, which latter place clearly 
was the stable. The ostler was the spy or draughtsman, 
who would not give up his work till the money was paid 

6 



82 GEORGE MORLAND 

him. The farmer represented the French agent in the 
Channel, who was reflecting upon the chance he had 
of escaping, and was loath to part with all his money to 
the spy, as by that means he cut off all hope of his 
retreat. An unfinished drawing of a spaniel was also 
declared to be a map of the island on which were marked 
its defences and fortifications. 

These very absurd statements appear to have been 
made before a Mr. Rushworth, of Freshwater, a Justice of 
the Peace, and although they were received with roars of 
laughter by the painter and his companions, impressed 
the obtuse magistrate, and he it was who ordered the 
three persons to walk for twelve miles on a melting hot 
day into Newport, escorted by a strong body of soldiers. 
The whole thing seems exceedingly ridiculous, but it was 
serious to the artist and his two friends, who had the 
thankless task of walking back again to Yarmouth, 
although they were able this time to choose their own 
pace, and were free from any escort. Morland does not 
appear to have obeyed the orders of the magistrate, but 
remained in Yarmouth for some time longer, made 
several sketches, and painted two pictures, one of the 
Needles, and the other of Freshwater Gate, both of 
which passed into the possession of Mr. Wedd, his 
attorney. 

He had painted on a mahogany panel a clever portrait 
of Plumbley dressed in his militia uniform, and this he 
presented to the landlord of the inn as an expression of 
his thanks for his timely evidence given on his behalf. It 
passed into the hands of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. 
Wheeler, who in 1904 was residing in Shanklin, and the 
proud possessor of this interesting portrait. An illustra- 
tion of it appears in these pages. 

After leaving Yarmouth, Morland went on to Freshwater, 
where he lodged at a house known as the Orchard. 




Annan, photo.] 



LCollection of Sir T. Glen Coats. 



GRANDFATHER. 



AT THE SEASIDE 83 

His companion on his sketching tours, according to 
Mr. Garle, was a fisherman named James Ball, whose 
granddaughter subsequently owned two prints, after 
pictures by the artist, representing " Jack in the Bilboes " 
land " The Contented Waterman," which Morland gave to 
the watermen at Freshwater, from whom they were 
purchased by Ball's son Benjamin. 

At Freshwater Morland painted many pictures, and it 
was while staying in this place, Mr. Garle says, that he 
made an excursion to Kingston to paint- an old barn 
(since destroyed by fire), which he represented in his 
picture of "The Farmer's Stable," now belonging to the 
Asiatic Society of Calcutta. 

Very many of Morland's finest sea -pictures were 
painted on the occasion of this visit, and are dated 1799 or 
succeeding years, but he had always loved the Isle of 
Wight, and representations of its wild coast are also 
found in his earlier pictures. It is probable that the 
" Storm on the Coast, with Wreck of Man-of-War," 1794, 
"The Coast Scene," 1796, "Calm," 1796, and many 
undated pictures of fishermen, of storms, and of wrecks, 
owe their origin to the scenes Morland witnessed by the 
seashore at the Needles, at Freshwater, Yarmouth, and 
other places in his favourite island. 

Allan Cunningham tells us that a friend once found 
Morland at Freshwater Gate, the little hamlet on the 
seashore, near to the more inland village of Freshwater, 
in a low public-house called the Cabin. He says that the 
sailors, rustics, and fishermen were seated around him in a 
kind of ring, and the whole place was full of laughter and 
song. Morland was called away by his friend, but left 
the society of these people with manifest reluctance. 
His friend was at a loss to understand why he associated 
with such people, and "George," said he, "you must 
have reasons for keeping such company." 

6—3 



84 GEORGE MORLAND 

" Reasons ? — aye, good ones," said the artist, laughing. 
" See, where could I find such a picture as that, unless 
among the originals of the Cabin ?" and with that he held 
up his sketch-book and showed a correct delineation of the 
very scene in which he had so recently been the presiding 
spirit. 

Cunningham adds that one of Morland's best pictures 
contains an illustration of the taproom, with its guests 
and furniture. Mr. Richardson states that Morland 
probably stayed at the Mermaid Inn, the site of which is 
now said to be occupied by the Albion Hotel, in which, by 
the way, Mr. Garle states there are four old rooms, 
perhaps a portion of the original house ; and he adds that 
he met an old fisherman who assisted when a boy in 
pulling down the Mermaid, and whose aunt broke up 
and burned the old sign, a mermaid carved in wood, 
when in want of firewood. 




Annan, photo.] 



[Collection of Sir T. Glen Coats. 
GRANDMOTHER. 



CHAPTER VII 

THE END OF THE STORY 

Morland remained at Yarmouth till November, 1799, 
when he returned to London, and took lodgings at 
Vauxhall, but was allowed no peace by his creditors, 
and soon arrested and sent off to King's Bench Prison. 
He, however, again obtained " the rules " from the Marshal 
of the prison, and was able to occupy a small house, ready 
furnished, in Lambeth Road, St. George's Fields, where 
his wife, his brother, the manservant, and a maid, formed 
his establishment. A garden behind was turned into a 
general receptacle for animals and birds, and, as Collins 
tells us, he had in it asses, goats, sheep, swine, rabbits, 
guinea-pigs, eagles, hawks, calves, dogs, and numerous 
other birds and beasts, of all of which he made many 
sketches. His brother attended to his business affairs, 
and for him he painted during these latter years most of 
his pictures. 

Dawe says that Henry Morland's books proved that for 
him alone he painted 492 finished pictures during the last 
eight years of his life. Besides these, he executed, per- 
haps, 300 more for other persons, and more than a thou- 
sand drawings, one of which he usually produced almost 
every evening for a long time. Numbers of people were 
anxious to see him and to obtain his work ; but, although 
a great many were aware that he was somewhere in 
St. George's Fields, very few knew the precise spot or 

85 



86 GEORGE MORLAND 

the number of the house, as the name of " Pearce, Coal 
Merchant," was engraved upon the brass plate of the door, 
in order to prevent persons who came from motives of 
curiosity finding him out. Here he lived a more regular 
life, though perhaps not a more temperate one. He kept 
open house, and every day sat down to a good table, at 
which Mrs. Morland presided, and, as he gave plenty of 
wine and spirits, was always well patronised. 

We are informed by Dawe that Morland gave strict 
orders that no one should ever carry him to bed when he 
was intoxicated, his idea being that in this way he would 
prevent himself from drinking to excess. The conse- 
quence, however, was very different, as the result of his 
rule was that he generally lay all night on the floor of the 
dining-room. "Here the ruin of his character and 
constitution was completed." The sums he received 
were expended in profusion and drunkenness, and "his 
house was a rendezvous for all the profligates who lived 
within the rules, and who delighted in meeting with one so 
well suited to their propensities." There was no inter- 
mission in his excesses, and no opportunity for the use of 
exercise to counteract their destructive effects. Gradually 
his frame became much weakened, and often when he 
arose in the morning his hand trembled so much as to 
render him incapable of guiding the pencil, until he had 
recruited his spirits with his fatal remedy, and so little 
confidence had he in himself that he feared to touch a 
picture lest he should spoil it. 

Although Dawe speaks most clearly as to the evils of 
Morland's life, he was very anxious to contradict the 
common report, which Cunningham, quite regardless of 
Dawe's statement, repeated again in 1830, to the effect that 
Morland painted best when he was intoxicated. Dawe 
tells us that, on the contrary, when one morning a friend 
called upon him, and noticed a picture in which the 



f 



*tA> 



THE MARKET CART. 



THE END OF THE STORY 87 

colours were particularly crude and distracting, a medley 
without consideration or reflection, Morland begged him 
not to look at it, observing that he was half drunk when 
he did it, and that he was painting it all over again. 
Dawe said that Morland painted best when exhilarated by 
the presence of company, and that he often required in his 
later years a certain quantity of spirits to steady his hand, 
but it would have been quite impossible for him to have 
painted finished pictures when intoxicated, and he never 
tried to do so. His professional work was done during 
the morning or quite early in the afternoon. In the 
evening he was almost always intoxicated. Occasionally 
he was allowed to go away and visit an old acquaintance, 
on the understanding that he was back at a certain time. 
He always came back to the time, but he was always 
completely drunk. 

Directly opposite to his house there were some tea- 
gardens, and he frequently spent his evenings there. 
With eight of his friends he formed a sort of drinking 
club, called "The Knights of the Palette," and "Sir 
George Morland " was hailed as the founder. He took a 
palette and painted on it a bottle and glass and cross 
pipes with a little tobacco burning in one of them, set it 
round with colours, and nailed it to the wall in the club- 
room near the president's chair. Under this palette 
every new candidate, after paying for a bottle of wine, was 
dubbed a knight. Collins was frequently present, and 
says that he has seen as many as eighty persons there, 
with a band of music. Very often the expenses of these 
gatherings were paid by Morland, as all the money 
obtained for his pictures went in extravagance. There 
was never any economy in his house, and now, living in 
what was practically prison, he was more extravagant in 
dress than he had ever been before. 

One day the Marshal of the prison observed him, says 



88 GEORGE MORLAND 

Blagdon, in a public-house, a privilege he was not 
supposed to have when living according to the rules. TJie 
Marshal threatened to recommit him to prison, but that 
very day " Morland painted a view of the taproom with 
portraits of the persons who were in his company, and 
among the rest the Marshal was to be seen, leaning in at 
the window in the act of taking a glass of gin from the 
artist." 

After spending about two years in the rules of the 
King's Bench, Morland was liberated under the Insolvent 
Act in 1802 ; but the result of this liberation was that a 
certain group of his creditors were free to trouble him 
again, and some of them, who cared nothing for his 
pictures, and did not realise that by means of them they 
could have obtained payment in full, proceeded to attack 
him. He remained for a short time in the house in 
Lambeth Road, doing his best to deal with these 
clamorous persons, but at last was seized by a second fit 
of apoplexy, which, Dawe says, greatly alarmed him, and 
for a short time rendered him quite incapable of follow- 
ing his profession. His creditors then became more 
clamorous than ever, and in order to get out of their way 
he left Lambeth, and went to Highgate, where he stayed 
at the Black Bull, then kept by one of his old associates. 
Mrs. Morland accompanied him, and he had with him 
a new manservant in the place of honest George Symp- 
son, who had been obliged to leave him soon after he 
went to the King's Bench. In all his difficulties Morland 
never relinquished his habit of keeping a personal man- 
servant, his link with . respectability, as it reminded 
him, so one of his biographers says, of the life he used 
to live in his father's house. It was his new man whom 
Morland sketched on Good Friday, 1802, making the 
pencil drawing, so he records, " in two minutes," and 
writing underneath his opinion of the man — " The 










& 




K- k • % 2. fcj-n u^ 







i 



Pencil drawing.] [Collection of Mr. Hubert Garle. 

MORIfAND'S SERVANT, REAR VIEW. 



THE END OF THE STORY 89 

greatest liar in England." This sketch is reproduced by 
Mr. Garle's permission, together with two other clever, 
spirited drawings, executed about the same time. He 
paid the man, according to Collins, a guinea a week, and 
kept him always in his painting-room, and at the time of 
the artist's life to which we are now referring, the man 
was especially necessary, for Morland was in such a weak 
condition of health by reason of his excesses that he 
could not do without a personal attendant. He stayed at 
Highgate only two months, and then had a serious 
quarrel with the landlord, which resulted in his returning 
to live with his brother in Dean Street, whither he came 
in November, 1802. 

Collins gives us the story of the quarrel, and it would 
appear to have arisen from some remarks the landlord 
made to him, which the artist considered were not suffi- 
ciently respectful. Morland demanded his bill, but the 
landlord, doubtful as to whether he would receive pay- 
ment, seized whatever pictures and movables there were 
in the artist's room, and the painter fled to his brother, 
" breathing nothing but vengeance against his old friendly 
host the postboy for thus unfairly getting the whip hand 
of him." 

There is no doubt this landlord did get the better of Mor- 
land. He presented a very heavy bill, part of which Morland 
knew had been paid, but unluckily the artist had just 
quarrelled with his manservant and dismissed him, and 
he alone could have proved the payment. As he could 
not be found, the whole bill had to be paid, and it is said 
that hardly another event of the artist's life gave him more 
continual uneasiness, both sleeping and waking, than the 
imposition of his old friend, whom he now styled " a 
despicable reptile." 

Mrs. Morland was at this time in very poor health, and 
had taken lodgings in Paddington; and the biographers 



90 GEORGE MORLAND 

record that it was greatly to the artist's credit that, in all 
his difficulties and his extravagances he continued to 
provide sufficient means for his wife to live in comfort, and 
while she was residing in Paddington regularly allowed 
her two or three guineas a week. He used upon occasion 
to go and see her, and once in her lodgings painted a 
curious picture of the garret with himself at work at his 
easel, and his man Gibbs, who acted as his cook, busily 
employed in frying sausages. This picture now hangs in 
the Nottingham Art Gallery, and by the kindness of the 
Corporation is here reproduced. He declared that the 
picture was to be a companion to the one Sir Joshua 
Reynolds painted of the kitchen in the house in Leicester 
Square, and recalled to his wife the circumstance that the 
very residence where Sir Joshua painted his picture had 
once belonged to Morland's father. 

In January, 1803, another attack was made upon him 
by his creditors, and he had to settle with them for £45. 
Collins went bail on this occasion, and assures us that, 
notwithstanding the poor condition of the artist's health, 
he went to work and painted pictures which enabled him 
to clear off the debt in less than a month. A little while 
after this, to avoid some other creditors, he placed himself 
in the custody of Mr. Donalty, a Marshalsea Court officer, 
who resided in Rolls Buildings, Chancery Lane. While 
with this man, in a sort of courteous custody, he was safe 
from every one else, and he paid his convenient friend by 
means of pictures he painted for him. With the exception 
of occasional visits to his wife at Paddington, he stayed 
in Rolls Buildings during the whole summer of 1803, just 
occasionally going out to the Garrick Head in Bow Street, 
at that time kept by a Mr. Spencer. This man always 
reserved a room with a bed for Morland, and the artist 
knew that he was very welcome, and that the company 
frequenting the house rejoiced in his visits. It seems to 



THE END OF THE STORY 91 

be probable, however, that he did very little work at the 
Garrick Head, spending most of his time over the bottle. 
Spencer had everything ready for him* f in the way of 
canvas, easels, and colours, but Morland was generally 
incapable of doing more than a few hasty drawings. 

He had one other friend, a Mr. Harris, of Gerard 
Street, to whom he used to pay occasional visits. 

It was during this year that Collins paid a visit to Mor- 
land, and took with him one of his sons, a lad of about 
fourteen. The boy was extremely anxious to see Morland 
paint, and, having some artistic genius, had eagerly looked 
forward to the visit. Morland happened to b$ in a 
particularly good humour, and he allowed the young 
student to stand behind for a couple of hours, watching 
him at his work. He gave the lad several pieces of useful 
instruction, and a month afterwards had him again to his 
room for an hour, but never afterwards could be persuaded 
to renew his kindness. 

Collins, in telling the story, was extremely anxious that . 
all the readers of his book should give him credit for having 
been a disinterested friend to the artist for twenty years* 
He says that this instruction for his son was the only 
favour he asked at the hands of Morland ; and he makes 
a solemn declaration that " he never had directly from 
him either picture or drawing during the whole twenty 
years." It is perhaps a little unfortunate for Collins's 
credit that we know of the existence of a room in his house 
which, after the death of Morland, was discovered to 
contain very many of the artist's best works. We may, 
however, accept his statement, and believe that he pur- 
chased all the pictures, although his contemporaries hinted 
very strongly that the reverse was the case. 

We are now approaching the last few months of this 
sad story. The excesses in which the artist indulged 
became greater than ever, and fits of an apoplectic nature 



92 GEORGE MORLAND 

more frequent. Dawe presents a pathetic picture of Mor- 
land's condition. " To such a state of debility," he says, 
"was his nervous system at last reduced that a single 
glass of liquor would sometimes intoxicate him, while a 
knock at the door, or shutting it suddenly, would agitate 
him extremely; and he has been known to fall off his 
chair, or be unable to remain in the house, on the most 
trifling incident. He grew so hypochondriacal that the 
idea of being alone in darkness, though but for a moment, 
became insupportable; and, if a light happened to be 
extinguished in a room where he was sitting, he would 
creep towards the fire or the person next him." Dawe 
goes on to tell us that at this time Morland was afraid 
after dark to venture out alone ; that he would not sleep 
without two lights in his room, fearing lest one by some 
accident might be put out ; and was so little able to walk 
that more than once he had been discovered lying in the 
snow, almost frozen. His sight also became extremely 
dim, and he was obliged to employ spectacles of strong 
magnifying powers, and often to be led by his man even 
from the door of his house to a coach. " His paralytic 
affection," Dawe says, " deprived him for a time of the 
use of his left hand, and rendered him incapable of hold- 
ing his palette; he was consequently reduced to the 
necessity of making drawings, which his man sold for 
what he could get, and from mere habit he became so 
expert at these sketches that he would often execute them 
at a public-house, when half asleep, to raise a little 
money." 

His only amusement was riding in a coach, and he was 
so feeble that if he had to go from place to place these 
rides were really a necessity. We are told that his valise 
was once stolen from behind the chaise, and in it he lost 
all his clothes. He did not care to buy a fresh stock, but 
declared that in the future he would imitate a snail by 



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THE END OF THE STORY 93 

carrying his clothes on his back. Dawe tells us that he 
literally observed this plan, and "as soon as his suit 
became shabby he ordered a new one, giving the other to 
his servant ; hence, however dirty he might be, he was 
seldom ragged. At that time he generally wore a coat 
of . a mixed colour, with long and square skirts, and 
breeches of velveteen ; these, with two or three waistcoats 
and a dirty silk handkerchief round his neck, completed 
his appearance, which was that of a hackney coachman. 
In other parts of his dress he was equally mean and 
slovenly, seldom taking the trouble to undress, and rarely 
that of going to bed." 

It was in this condition that Collins saw him. He 
describes how he was crossing the corner of Dean Street 
when he heard his name called in a voice he knew, and 
"poor George, as dirty as a scavenger, reeled out of a 
public-house at the corner." Morland immediately laid 
hold of his friend, and, taking him to a hackney coach, 
the door of which stood open, he showed him a chafing- 
dish half full of glowing red charcoal, and the seats and 
bottom of the coach strewed all over with chestnut skins, 
explaining that Jimmy, his man, and himself had been 
roasting and eating chestnuts ever since six o'clock that 
morning. It was then about ten. Collins inquired why 
the coach had been kept waiting for four hours, and 
Morland replied that Jimmy had been sent for some 
canvases "which Klob, the scoundrel, had thought proper 
to retain." While they were discussing the question, the 
man arrived in triumph with the canvases on his shoulder, 
and deposited them in the coach. Morland was most 
anxious that his friend Collins should accompany him in 
the vehicle, and endeavoured to push him into it, but 
Collins objected to what he calls the smothering atmo- 
sphere, and as both Morland and his servant were con- 
siderably the worse for gin, they were unable to accomplish 



94 GEORGE MORLAND 

their purpose. Before the coach drove off, Collins was 
requested to call on Morland in Fetter Lane. He did so 
at nine o'clock that night, and found a harper, a fiddler, 
and a bassoon-player waiting for the artist, having been 
commissioned to come and play to him. 

In July, 1804, Collins saw Morland again, this time at 
work for " Klob " in Dean Street. Henry Morland had con- 
verted his house into an hotel and tavern ; had made up 
his quarrel with his brother, and had got him back to live 
with him, in order that he might obtain all his work. 
Collins describes the appearance of the artist. " He 
looked besotted and squalid : cadaverous, hanging cheeks, 
a pinched nose, contracted nostrils, bleared and bloodshot 
eyes, swelled legs, a palsied hand, and a tremulous voice 
— all," says Collins, " bespeaking the ruin of what had 
once been one of the soundest of frames, containing the 
brightest of genius." 

The man's genius was so remarkable, and his ability so 
extraordinary, that even though he was in such a helpless 
condition he was able to paint so well and so rapidly 
that every one about him, eager to obtain the money his 
pictures realised, kept him at work unmercifully. His 
own statement to Collins was as follows : " The greatest 
trouble I have been cursed with for some time past is 
that, whether sick or well, my mind easy or distracted, 
these ignorant negro-driving taskmasters expect me to 
take a handful of pencils and a few bladders of paint and 
make them pictures faster than a man can make shoes. 
They think," added he with an oath, " that I can strap to 
like a paper-hanger, and fill their rooms with pictures 
as fast as he can cover the walls." Even then, with all 
his complaining, he seemed to think that he could do as 
good work as ever, could he but find an assistant who 
would do the drudgery of background and sky painting. 
Collins at once offered him the assistance of his son, the 




BOAT ON SEASHORE. 




THE LIGHTHOUSE. 



THE END OF THE STORY 95 

boy who has already been mentioned, and showed him 
one of his juvenile works. Morland praised it, and was 
disposed to think that he and his young pupil could work 
together. Collins, eager to remove him from the society 
where he was, offered him board and lodging, a comfort- 
able room, and no restraint in any particular, save as to 
gin, and Morland was disposed to accept the offer. He 
bound himself, under the forfeiture of a ten-guinea picture, 
to carry out this resolution, and the matter was so far 
settled. Three days afterwards Collins again saw him. 
He was in a cheerful and loquacious state, his memory 
was excellent, and his health better than usual ; his pencil 
kept pace with his tongue, and for more than two hours 
the friends were together, Morland working steadily the 
whole time, but keeping himself going by constant potions 
of gin. Nothing, however, would induce him to agree to 
the proposition which had seemed so favourable to him 
a few days before. He said he had been recommended 
sea-bathing, and intended to set off to Brighton next 
month. He was reduced, he said, down to a single one- 
pound note, but was quite sure of earning more money 
before the day was over. Collins never saw his friend 
after this, for, having a threatening of gout, he determined 
himself to go to Brighton, and with his son started at the 
latter end of July. He was back in September, and went off 
to Dean Street to find the artist, but was told by " Klob " 
that George had taken himself off " in some of his airs," 
and was then living in Gerard Street. Early in October 
Collins called at Dean Street, being very anxious to 
show Morland some sketches young Collins had made at 
Brighton. He found Henry Morland in a state of great 
annoyance concerning the wasteful conduct of his brother, 
who had spoilt some expensive paper, for which " Klob " had 
had to pay two guineas. " Now," said this enraged son 
of thrift, "I've done with him for ever; he's gone to 



96 GEORGE MORLAND 

Gerard Street : there let him stay, for here he shall never 
humbug me again — no, never !" 

By the middle of October Collins was again attacked 
with rheumatic gout, and was unable to go and see his 
old friend during that month, the last of his eventful life. 

It was on the igth of October, 1804, as Morland was turn- 
ing the corner of Gerard Street, that he was arrested by a 
publican for a debt, which Collins says was £3 10s., but 
which Dawe tells us amounted with costs to £10. He 
was conveyed at once to a sponging-house in Eyre Street 
Hill, Coldbath Fields, and the next day, in attempting to 
make a drawing which could be sold for the discharge of 
the debt, dropped off his chair in a fit, and never after- 
wards spoke intelligibly to any of those few friends who 
knew of his situation. The drawing represented a bank 
and a tree, with some cattle, and when the biographies of 
the artist were written was in the possession of the painter's 
mother, who was with him at the last, and who gave to 
Collins the account of his death. The fit proved to be the 
commencement of brain fever. For eight days Morland 
was delirious and convulsed, in a state of utter mental 
and bodily collapse, and he expired on the 29th October, 
1804, in the forty-second year of his age. His body was 
removed to the house of his brother-in-law, William Ward, 
Buckingham Place, Fitzroy Square, and thence conveyed 
to the new burying-ground at St. James's Chapel. 

Collins was not able to attend the funeral, but his son 
was present on the occasion. He wrote an epitaph for 
his friend as follows : 

Ye sons of genius, pause one moment here, 

And pay the tribute of a kindred tear. 

A gifted brother rests beneath this stone, 

Whom Nature smiled on, and proclaimed her own. 

His magic touch could animation give, 

And make each object on the canvas live : 



GIRL FONDLING A DOVE . 

(Victoria and Albert Museum ) 



THE END OF THE STORY 97 

To him was given the plastic art to trace 
The rustic vigour of our peasant race. 
The bleating sheep upon the mountain's brow, 
The living pig, the calf, and lowing cow, 
The rosy milkmaid, and the chubby youth, 
None e'er portrayed with so much ease and truth ! 
The coming storm, which spreads a gloomy shade 
Of partial darkness o'er the sunny glade ; 
The howling tempest, and the billows' foam, 
Through which our hearty sailors dauntless roam ; 
Or vet'ran smugglers, braving hardest gales, 
Dashing through frightful serf, with tattered sails ; 
These varied scenes 'twas thine, amidst the strife 
Of warring elements, to paint like life ! 
Adieu, ill-fated Morland I Foe to gain ; 
Curs'd be each sordid wretch that caused thy pain, 
Spite of detraction, long thy envied name 
Shall grace the annals of memorial fame. 

Notwithstanding all their domestic differences and 
separations, Morland and his wife, Dawe assures us, were 
sincerely attached to each other, "insomuch," he adds, 
" that the one was extremely alarmed and affected when- 
ever the other happened to be indisposed." To the truth 
of this statement Ward bears distinct evidence. " Let it 
be clearly understood," said he, "there never was a 
separation between Morland and his wife beyond his own 
removals from her, and those longer or shorter, according 
to his bwn irregular temper and according to the necessity 
of avoiding his creditors." Mrs. Morland used to say, as 
Ward tells us, " My friends think it would be a relief to 
me if George were to die, but they do not know what 
they say, for whenever that takes place I shall not live 
three days." The presentiment which the husband and 
wife had that neither of them would long survive the 
other led their friends to strive to keep the death of 
Morland a secret. Mrs. Morland had, however, to be 
told, but could not be induced at first to believe that 

7 



98 GEORGE MORLAND 

the statement was true, "At last, having obtained the 
assurance of her fears from the servant, she gave a shriek, 
fell into convulsive fits, in which she continued for three 
days, and expired on the 2nd November, in her thirty- 
seventh year. Their remains were interred together in the 
burying-ground of St. James's ChapeL" 



CHAPTER VIII 

morland's pupils 

By some writers Morland is said to have had only one 
pupil, but Collins assures us that there were at least five, 
and two of them, he adds, " were of considerable service 
to him in all the inferior departments of laying on 
dead colour, filling in outlines, and bringing several of 
their master's designs to a state which only required the 
magic of his finishing touch and manual signature." 

The chief pupil whom Collins mentions was named 
Tanner. He was the son of a master tailor, and his 
father gave Morland a considerable premium for taking 
the lad into his studio. He was a bony, tall youth of 
about nineteen, with a hard, unprepossessing countenance, 
high cheekbones, very dark complexion, and small grey 
eyes; his eyebrows exceedingly thickly covered with 
coarse black hair, and the whole of his face deeply pitted 
with smallpox. He received in the studio the nickname 
of " The Mohawk," as he is said to have resembled an 
American Indian. This man worshipped Morland with 
much fervour, and, absolutely idolising his master, was 
ready to do any office of the meanest drudgery that he 
might be near him. 

Another pupil was named Davis, and was usually 
nicknamed "Davey Brown." He was older than "The 
Mohawk," and a far better artist; in fact, after some 
years of study with Morland, he was able to copy his 
master's style with extraordinary skill. 

99 7— Z 



ioo GEORGE MORLAND 

The third important pupil was Thomas Hand, a good- 
humoured, inoffensive! careless young man. He had a 
striking eye for colour, but was greatly lacking in skill of 
draughtsmanship, and only employed by his master in 
laying in the colour for the backgrounds of the pictures. 

We are not told the names of the other two ptipils. 
They were persons of small importance; Collins calls 
them "respectable brushes, neither much above or 
below mediocrity.'/ 

It was owing, however, 'to the labours of these pupils 
that Morland was able to execute so vast a number of 
finished pictures, but we are assured that no work was 
signed by the master until he had most carefully gone 
oyer every portion of it with his brush, giving to it the 
magic of his own wonderful- inspiration. So great, how- 
ever, was the demand for pictures by Morland that we are 
told of one dealer a story of the ingenious method by 
which he increased the output of the artist. He bound 
Morland down to paint* about a dozen pictures for him, 
and to work upon them at his own house every morning 
up to twelve o'clock. Immediately, however, after 
Morland had left, expert copyists were called in, and 
employed in making accurate and elaborate repetitions of • 
the day's work, which were then carefully concealed. 
Returning to his work at the picture-dealer's house on 
the following morning, any changes which, upon recon- 
sideration, Morland might think well to make in his 
picture were in the afternoon transferred to each copy in 
progress under the hands of his traitorous copyists. Thus 
at least four or five pictures were carried on together to 
completion, the painter never suspecting the trick that 
was played upon him, and each counterfeit bearing those 
marks of changes in design and alteration of effect which 
would seem to give proof of its genuineness. It is owing 
to such tricks as this that there are so many duplicates of 
Morland's most attractive pictures. 









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[British Museum. 



GEORGE MORI,AND. 

By Rowlandson. 



CHAPTER IX 

THE ART OF MORLAND 

In respect to bis art, Morland occupies a place by 
himself. It is unique in the greatness of its qualities and 
the flagrancies of its defects. There are at least three 
methods in English art by which the country and the 
country life of England have been depicted. The pictures 
are either pretty and sentimental, as those of Wheatley ; 
melodious and full of the perfection of poetry, as those of 
Gainsborough; or simple, unaffected, straightforward 
representatives of everyday life. It is to the latter class 
that the works of Morland belong, and they appeal to 
what is immediately discernible by the humblest intelli- 
gence. Thoroughly English in every quality, and full of 
unsophisticated portraiture of the people and animals 
about him, his pictures, if not refined, are painted with a 
truth which is unimpeachable. 

He has been compared with several other artists. The 
early series of pictures, entitled " Laetitia," recall in their 
power of telling a story the best efforts of Hogarth ; but 
the sad story they tell is set forth with a purity and 
simplicity far removed from the coarser ideas of the 
English portrait-painter. This particular series of six 
pictures constitutes the most graceful portraiture Morland 
ever executed. The colouring is exquisite, the drawing 
far more careful than was Morland's wont, and there is a 
tenderness about the manner in which the story of 
Laetitia is told that cannot fail to be attractive. 

IOI 



102 GEORGE MORLAND 

In later life the artist worked with such feverish speed 
that he was quite unable to put into his pictures the 
wealth of careful detail which appears in the Laetitia 
series, and the strain of production was so great that he 
contented himself with bolder and less highly finished 
work, in order that he might keep pace with the demands 
of his creditors. 

As a psychological problem, Morland, in respect to 
his life and works, offers ample material for consideration. 

It has been cleverly said that he " appears to typify all 
that Reynolds strove to dissipate in the popular theory of 
genius as a Divine gift, entirely unrelated to the faculties of 
ordinary intelligence and thought." 

Here was a dissolute, drunken man, able to spend the 
greater part of his time loafing about in evil company, 
and yet when three-parts drunk he could by the magic of 
his genius produce pictures which in his day passed " to 
his creditors as current coin," and are now of incalculable 
importance. He was a man of no ambition, content to 
repeat himself indefinitely — an inveterate pot-boiler, and 
possessed of a cynical disregard of anything beyond the 
desire to satisfy quickly the immediate cravings of himself 
or his creditors, and his productions were the hasty efforts of 
a careless craftsman ; but yet, owing to some astonishing 
faculty, they were works of genius, easy, spontaneous, 
truthful, and the greater part of them really valuable con- 
tributions to English art. 

There is a healthy sweetness about his work, whether he 
depicts domestic life, the joys of children, or the delights 
of the sportsman, or whether his pictures are merely 
representative of pure English landscape, inland or by 
the sea. In such subjects Morland is triumphant, and 
has never been surpassed. He painted what he loved, 
and in such a manner as to show he loved it. Land- 
scape and sport, gipsy life and the life of the poacher, 










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THE ART OF MORLAND 103 

the happy fun of children, the quiet content of the 
cottage life — all appealed strongly to him. He knew 
them through and through, and we know them as well as 
he did, from his paintings of them. 

Morland's colouring in his earliest days was low in 
tone and exquisite in quality; later on his pictures are 
marked by much grander, finer colouring, and by masterly 
execution ; but towards the latter end of his life, although 
his painting continues to be broad, liquid, and trium- 
phantly harmonious, there is a heaviness about the 
shadows, and all the signs of very rapid execution, in 
which effect was striven for, rather than careful detail. 

Mr. Walter Sickert, in a comparison between the works 
of the Barbizon painters and those of Morland, points out 
that all, or nearly all, of Morland's works are restful or 
even lazy in subject, whereas those of Millet and Bastien 
Lepage are full of toil, or the sense of toil past and 
inevitably to come. 

This is an illuminating criticism, and the same author 
goes on, in another place, to point out how little sense of 
motion there is in any of Morland's pictures, and how 
invariably in the French artists this quality of motion can 
readily be discerned. 

Morland at his best had a " supreme power of observa- 
tion," says Mr. Nettleship, " an exquisite perception, and 
a fine executive gift, and his great skill was that of his 
ability to select the vital constituents of a scene, and to 
render them in fitting terms." He was a realistic painter 
of lively humour, his commonplace always relieved by 
artistic grace, and the least interesting subject assumed 
under his brush a definite character which appealed both 
to the eye and the mind. It is his power of faithful 
representation which gives the charm to his works. They 
appeal to the heart with a force irresistible, and their 
simple truth of outlook is so marked, and their directness 



104 GEORGE MORLAND 

of aim so definite, that their errors are forgiven by 
reason of the splendour of the result. Morland cannot, 
however, by any strain of expression, be termed a poetical 
painter, and the melody which marks the works of 
Gainsborough does not appear in his landscapes. His 
earliest paintings certainly have somewhat of the Gains- 
borough refinement ; but the bulk of his work is marked 
by a spirit and a dash combined with a realism which 
is much more akin to the Dutch painters than to his 
English contemporaries. He never sought inspiration in 
other countries ; he had no sympathy with classic art, and 
the paintings of the Italian, French, or Flemish schools 
do not appear to have attracted him. His pictures 
always represent English scenes, and those in which 
the rougher sides of life connected with agriculture, 
farming, or fishing were concerned. Occasionally a little 
domestic episode slips in, a mother with a child, a scene 
in a tea-garden, a girl at a tavern serving a rider with 
drink ; but all these are, strictly speaking, accessories to 
the main representation, and serve but to accentuate the 
truth of the scene which the artist desired to represent. 

It was Morland's facility that constituted his evil 
genius. He never strove to do anything beyond what he 
had learned to do, so easily, in early days. He combined 
the same figures, the same cottages, the same horses, the 
same trees, over and over again, even to the point of 
monotony, and allowed himself no chance of change, let 
alone improvement. His pictorial counters were com- 
bined in varying methods, but were always the same 
counters, and having learned to work with consummate 
ease, he was indifferent to results as long as he could turn 
out pictures which would sell quickly and supply him 
with the means to gratify his appetite. 

The unfortunate characteristic of his work, therefore, is 
that of carelessness. Had he but liked he could have 










Hyatt, photo.] [British Museum. 

DRAWING OF LANDSCAPE WITH HORSES. 

Signed, and dated 1792. 



THE ART OF MORLAND 105 

drawn animals thoroughly well; but he would never 
devote the necessary time to studying their anatomy, or 
to perfecting his own drawing. He knew well that by a 
few rapid strokes he could present forms that would be 
re&dily accepted as those of pigs, sheep, and the like, 
and which bore a sufficient resemblance to those animals 
to be recognised and even praised. He often shrouded 
these creatures either in the straw of the stable or the 
grass of the field, or in deep shadow, so that the im- 
perfections of his drawing, of which he must have been 
perfectly aware, should not be so noticeable. When he 
selected horses as the subject of his pencil, he was on 
firmer ground. He chose as a rule an old nag, not only 
on account of its picturesqueness,.but because it did not 
require the same care in drawing as a younger horse, and 
the characteristics of its form lent themselves to his style 
of painting. The angularities of shape and the bony 
irregularities of form he was able to represent, and the 
same old horses appear over and over again in his favourite 
pictures. 

The scenes he depicts are never crowded, but have just 
the distinctive, vital features about them which no one 
knew better than Morland how to select. As a rule, a 
considerable part of the picture is shrouded in shadow, 
and it is there that the greatest inequalities in drawing 
are to be seen. . He delighted in dark interiors, such as 
stables, cowhouses, inn-parlours, and small cottages, and 
he painted them with a force and directness which 
left little to be desired. His lightning, as a rule, is 
eccentric, for he contented himself with one strong light 
streaming in from door or window, and losing itself in a 
mysterious manner before it extended to the other side 
of the picture. He grouped the men and women of his 
pictures so close to the animals they were tending that 
they mutually concealed the inaccuracies of the drawing, 



106 GEORGE MORLAND 

and there are very few of his figures, whether men, women, 
or children, which will bear careful scrutiny. The feet 
are frequently seriously out of proportion, the forms are 
often too squat, the head very often far too large, while 
the carelessness of the drawing is concealed to a great 
extent by a smock-frock, a large white apron, or a long 
coat with capes. Such carelessness can be exemplified 
in the well-known picture, '• Paying the Ostler," in which 
the feet of both men are entirely inaccurate in drawing ; 
but at the same time the effect desired to be conveyed by 
the picture is clearly apparent, and so clever is the group- 
ing and so mellow the colouring that the errors are readily 
overlooked. 

When he came to deal with seaside scenes he was not 
so successful. There is generally a woolliness about both 
water and sky, and the figures in the foreground, whether 
of men or dogs, are, as a rule, strikingly inaccurate, and 
will not bear examination. There again, however, it is 
only effect which is aimed at, and the scene is presented 
with a rapid, if a careless brush, in a manner that no 
critic can fail to call masterly. 

In another respect we must be critical. His trees are 
not often wholly satisfactory: they are sometimes very 
poor indeed. The boughs are awkward, the leaves too 
much, as he said, " like silver pennies," or, as Dawe said, 
" too much like cabbage-leaves," and there is a dullness 
and monotony in his woodland scenes, almost inevitable 
from his fatal facility and the waywardness of his genius. 

Although there is a close kinship between the art of 
Morland and that of certain Dutch painters, such as 
Teniers, Brouwer, Cuyp, and Ostade, yet we do not learn 
that Morland, in his professional career, ever studied their 
works. We are told that on one occasion he went, in 
company with Mr. William Ward, to visit the collection 
of Dutch pictures belonging to the Marquess of Bute, then 



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SKETCH OF A MAN'S HEAD. 



THE ART OF MORLAND 107 

at Luton Hoo, and now at St. John's Lodge, Regent's 
Park ; but having sauntered through one of the rooms, he 
refused to look at any more pictures, declaring that he 
would not contemplate another man's works, for fear that 
he should become an imitator. As a young man, how- 
ever, there is no doubt that he did study the Dutch 
masters rather closely, but towards the middle and latter 
part of his life he strove to put aside every idea which he 
had gathered from these painters. 

It was from his early severe training and from con- 
temporary English art that he got his ideas of composi- 
tion ; and his technique, as has been well said, was " part 
of the common inheritance of the artists of his day." 

There are marked divergencies between the works of 
Morland and those of the Dutchmen with whom he has 
often been compared. Morland may have been vulgar, 
but was never indecent, and the indelicacies in which 
some of the Dutchmen delighted do not appear in his 
pictures. The exquisite poetic refinement of Cuyp, the 
perfection of drawing which marks the works of Potter, 
the brilliant colouring of Ostade, and the clearness of 
lighting and definite finish of Teniers, can all be con- 
trasted with the vigorous but careless work of Morland. 
Yet there is a sympathy between Morland and the Dutch 
masters which careful observation cannot fail to perceive. 
Perhaps in the selection of subjects he was nearer to 
Brouwer than he was to any of the others, and, had he 
but lived a more careful life, devoted more pains to his 
work, and produced far fewer pictures, he might have 
delighted us with the exquisite perfection and glorious 
colouring of the Dutch school. His personal character- 
istics, however, ran riot with his art, and the huge demand 
for his works, partly in order that he might pay his 
creditors, and partly that he might gratify his admirers, 
who thought that every picture might be his last, seriously 



io8 GEORGE MORLAND 

injured the quality of his work. As we have already 
shown, his earlier pictures were marked by wonderful 
refinement, but the chief characteristics of his later ones 
are happy conception, skilful composition, mellow colour- 
ing, and faithfulness to truth. With all, one can never 
get away from carelessness. If he paints the rabbit and 
guinea-pig in the foreground with unusual care, he neglects 
the background. If he depicts some of the folds of a red 
cloak with very careful drawing, he leaves the remainder 
of it in deep shadow to practically suggest itself. If he 
paints the old white horse with all the attention to struc- 
tural form which he could give in his pictures, and if in 
the same stable the broom and pail are cleverly drawn, 
he neglects all the atmospheric and aerial tints, arranges 
the lighting inaccurately, concentrating it all upon one 
spot in the picture, and then hurriedly brushes in the re- 
mainder, as though he were wholly indifferent to its effect. 

Composition by line was quite beyond him. He never 
built up his pictures or arranged them, and he avoided 
all difficulties in their execution. If embarrassed with a 
figure, he covered it up with a smock-frock, or he hid the 
extremities of it with a deep shadow. If perplexed about 
the drawing of an animal, he would give a few minutes to 
the careful drawing of the head, or the legs, as the case 
might be, and would hastily put in the rest, and tone it 
with a thick glaze in order that the faults might not be 
perceptible. 

His hand, by reason of his perfect knowledge of certain 
technical formulae, could perform whatever his mind dic- 
tated, but it was not directed by judgment, and the artist 
was always in far too great a hurry. He was quite unable 
to finish highly, and it was only character of a broad and 
obvious kind at which he could aim. It certainly never 
could be said of his pictures that they smelt of the lamp. 
Everything appears to have been done in great haste, 



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Collection of] [Mr. John Haines. 

SKETCH OF A PIG'S HEAD. 



THE ART OF MORLAND 109 

careless, erratic, irregular, and as he grew older his faults 
became greater and greater, and his want of variety more 
perceptible. He had no desire to correct himself, and, 
in fact, as Dawe tells us, he considered that his own 
errors of judgment and carelessness would pass as the 
proofs of a fiery genius. His life was so irregular, and 
his characteristics were so extraordinary, that there is no 
doubt his patrons accepted from him what they would 
not have taken from any other man, and the general 
survey of his works leads us more than ever to regret that 
a genius so marked and so exalted was allowed to be so 
desecrated by the evil habits and propensities that year 
by year increasingly marred the life of Morland. 

His earliest work shows us of what he was capable, and 
all his successive paintings have the same stamp of genius 
upon them. Their simplicity, their humour, and the 
ever-pleasant affection for the sub-human creation and 
sympathy for English country life which marks them, 
cannot fail to attract, while they increase the regret that 
all must feel in considering the waste of the artist^ life, 
and the manner in which his incomparable genius was 
ruined by careless indifference. He did so much that one 
cannot fail to realise how much he might have done. 

It has, of course, been said that morality has nothing to 
do with art criticism, and that the Bohemian life led by 
Morland, with all its sordid details, must be ignored, or, at 
least, forgotten, in considering the pictures he painted. 
The magic of Morland's wonderful inspiration must, it is 
argued, be allowed to explain all that needs explanation, 
and we, who have inherited a legacy of beautiful works 
of art, have no right, in considering their charm, to trouble 
ourselves with the squalid details of their creator's life. 
Such a position, however, it is almost impossible to 
take up. Criticism applied to Morland's pictures cannot 
fail to notice their glaring faults. It may be fully aware 



no GEORGE MORLAND 

of their wonderful attraction, of their harmonious colour- 
ing, of their absolute truth, but some explanation of their 
monotony is needed, some reasons must be given for their 
enormous number, for their careless execution, and for 
their avoidance of all difficulties, and these reasons can 
only be found in the life of the painter. No critic doubts 
that Morland was a great master, that his pictures rank 
amongst the finest of English landscapes, but at the same 
time every one is struck by their flagrant defects, and by 
their extraordinary monotony of subject, as also by the 
striking want of advancement to be seen in his art when 
viewed in its successive phases. The life, with all its 
extraordinary adventures, is the true explanation of the 
art, and it is only by understanding the environment 
in which Morland lived that we can appreciate the 
striking peculiarities of his genius. We claim, therefore, 
that, unpleasant as are many of the details of Morland's 
life, they cannot be separated from a consideration of his 
art, if that consideration is to be complete, and by them 
only can the eccentricities of that art be defended. 

As representations of a rough form o£ life which has 
almost entirely passed away, his pictures have another 
value. They are documents which reveal to us the life of 
the country tavern, the cottage, the stable, and the post- 
boy. They bring before us the days of the press-gang 
and the deserter, the stage-coach and the post-waggon. 
They reveal the inner features of cottage life, and some 
of the less pleasant scenes of town life, and they bring 
these before us in very vivid form, painted with fiery truth 
and a brilliant sense of the picturesque. For all this we 
owe another debt of gratitude to Morland, and, despite all 
his carelessness and his culpable haste, we are grateful for 
the unaffectedly simple pictures he has left behind him, so 
notable and so important in the range of English land- 
scape art. 




Hyatt, photo.] 



[British Museum. 



J. R. SMITH, ENGRAVER. 
By George Morland. 



CHAPTER X 

morland's engravers 

The popularity of Morland's works has been the result, to 
a considerable extent, of the engravings made from his 
pictures. They were eminently suitable for reproduction 
either by mezzotint or etching, and both the weak colouring 
and the careless drawing were lost sight of when the 
pictures were engraved. 

Considerably over a hundred mezzotint engravings were 
made during Morland's life, and this number was increased 
after his death. His brother-in-law, William Ward, and 
Ward's younger brother, James, were amongst the chief 
of his engravers. William Ward executed the first 
mezzotint made after a picture by Morland. It was 
entitled " The Angler's Repast," and was issued in 1780, 
and reissued nine years afterwards. In 1786 Ward did 
the picture of " Tom Jones's First Interview with Molly," 
in 1787 "Domestic Happiness" and "The Coquette at 
her Toilet," and in 1788 he commenced a long series of 
works, continued down to 1814. 

Both the Wards were pupils of J. R. Smith, and 
perhaps his best pupils. The elder brother engraved the 
larger number of mezzotints, the work of James Ward not 
appearing in the list until 1793, and the engravings for 
which he was responsible numbering, perhaps, not more 
than half a dozen altogether, whereas those by William 
were about seventy in number. In the case of both 

in 



H2 GEORGE MORLAND 

brothers the plates were engraved very quickly, and in 
such a manner as to give the greatest effect with as little 
effort on the part of the engraver as possible. 

William Ward was an Associate Engraver of the Royal 
Academy, and mezzotint engraver to the King, the Prince 
Regent, and the Duke of York. 

James Ward was a Royal Academician, entering the 
mystic circle in 1811. The student of mezzotints is 
always particularly grateful to James Ward, as he kept 
the working proofs from his various plates, and presented 
them to the British Museum, where they constitute a 
most instructive series of illustrations of mezzotint en- 
graving. The Wards lived at No. 6, Newman Street, and 
there it was that they published most of the engravings. 

A considerable number of Morland's pictures were 
engraved by John Raphael Smith. His first work appears 
in 1788, when he engraved " Delia in the Country " and 
" Delia in Town." In 1789 he published his six plates of 
the " Laetitia " series ; in 1791 " African Hospitality," 
"The Slave Trade," and "A Christmas Gambol." Two 
very popular pictures, " Feeding the Pigs " and " The 
Return from Market," were his work in 1793, and " Fight- 
ing Dogs " in 1794. He did " The Corn Bin " in 1797, 
"The Horse Feeder " and "The Milkmaid and Cowherd " 
in 1798, and five pictures in 1799. Another picture of 
" Feeding the Pigs " was engraved by him in 1801, and 
he executed five others in 1803. Morland's own portrait 
was engraved by Smith in 1806, and five pictures in 1807, 
while in 1811 he reissued the " Laetitia " series of 1789, 
and in 1814 the two African pictures originally issued 
in 1791. 

Smith, who was one of the foremost English mezzotint 
engravers, was well acquainted with Morland, and shared 
many of his pleasures and adventures. Toward the latter 
part of his life he fell into the habits of intemperance he 




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GEORGE MORIyAND AT HIS WORK. 
From the engraving by J. R. Smith, 1805. 




RUSTIC EMPLOYMENT. 

From the engraving by J. R. Smith. 



MORLAND'S ENGRAVERS 113 

learned from his friend, and was compelled to relinquish 
the practice of the art in which he was so successful. It 
is, however, to him that we owe some of the finest 
of the mezzotints after Morland, and, as he was the 
master of both James and William Ward, lovers of fine 
prints owe a still further debt of gratitude to him. 

Rather more than a dozen plates after Morland were 
engraved by Samuel William Reynolds, who issued the 
wonderful series of three hundred and fifty-seven mezzo- 
tints after all the then known paintings by Sir Joshua 
Reynolds, and will also be ever remembered by reason of 
the fact that the illustrious David Lucas was his pupil. 
The earliest work bearing the name of S. W. Reynolds is 
the " Rustic Ballad," engraved in 1795. This was followed 
by "The Bear Hunt" and "The Kennel," in 1796; 
" Playing at Dominoes " and " Playing with a Monkey," 
in 1797 ; " A Land Storm," in 1798 ; *' Setters," in 1799 ; 
"The Fisherman's Dog," "The Butcher," and "The 
Millers," in 1800 ; " The Mail-coach," in 1801 ; " Fisher- 
men Going Out " and " Paying the Horse-seller," in 
1805 ; and " The Emblematic Pallette," in 1806. 

In addition to these, there are three plates not dated : 
" Four Men Towing a Boat Ashore," " The Pointer," and 
" A Landscape with the Carrier's Cart." 

The celebrated "Deserter" series, in four plates, was 
engraved by George Keating, the Irish engraver, who 
studied under W. Dickinson, and executed several plates 
after Reynolds, Romney, and Gainsborough. We meet 
with his name first of all in 1788, when he engraved 
"Children Playing at Soldiers." In 1789 he did "A 
Party Angling " ; in 1791, his celebrated " Deserter " 
series, and in the same year " Nurse and Children in the 
Fields." 

Philip Dawe, to whose son, George Dawe, we are 
indebted for the most interesting life of Morland, engraved 

8 



U4 GEORGE MORLAND 

" Love and Constancy Rewarded " in 1785, and two very 
popular pictures called " Children Fishing " and " Children 
Gathering Blackberries." He also engraved " Anxiety " 
and " Mutual Joy," a pair of pictures representing a ship 
at sea and a ship in harbour, in the same year. 

Another engraver responsible for some of Morland's 
popular pictures was T. Gaugain, a Frenchman, who came 
to England about 1760, studied under Houston, and 
died in 1805. His first two works were executed in 1785, 
and published by himsel£ They were entitled " How 
Sweet's the Love that meets Return " and " The Lass of 
Livingstone." In 1789 he engraved two companion plates, 
both entitled " Louisa," and one called " Guinea-pigs." 
The very popular "Dancing Dogs" was engraved and 
published by him in 1790, and he engraved a portrait of 
Morland in 1804, the year of the artist's death. This was 
published by J. Stephens. 

James Fittler, the line engraver, who was an Associate 
Engraver of the Royal Academy in 1800, and executed 
the plates in Forster's "British Gallery," Bell's 
"British Theatre," and the portraits in "Dibdin," 
engraved five pictures after Morland in 1790. They were 
entitled "Pedlars," "Travellers Reposing," "Sliding," 
"The Bell," and "Virtue in Danger." In that same 
year we find the work of Henry Hudson, a man of whose 
life and career absolutely nothing is known. He engraved 
" Affluence Reduced," and a pair called "The Miseries of 
Idleness " and " The Comforts of Industry." 

Another engraver responsible for pictures in that same 
year was George Graham, who produced most of the 
illustrations for Campbell's "Pleasures of Hope." He 
engraved a pair called "The Soldier's Farewell" and 
"The Soldier's Return," but does not appear to have 
done any other pictures until 1813, when he executed 
another pair called "The Angry Boy and Tired Dog" 
and "The Young Nurse and Quiet Child." 



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GUINEA-PIGS. 
From £A* engraving by T. Gaugain, I78g. 




DANCING DOGS. 
From the engraving by T, Gaugain, 1790. 




anxiety; or, the SHIP AT SEA. 
From the engraving by P. Dawe. 




MUTUAL JOY ; OR, THE SHIP IN HARBOUR. 
From the engraving by P. Dawe. 



MORLAND'S ENGRAVERS 115 

A French line engraver named Suntach executed four 
animal plates, one in 1790, and the other three in 1791. 
They are almost the only works by this engraver after 
English subjects, and practically nothing is known of his 
career. The four pictures are called " Snipe," " Duck," 
" Woodcock " and " Hare." 

Peltro Tomkins engraved the well-known chalk illus- 
tration by Morland in 1792, called "Children Feeding 
Goats." 

Joseph Crozer, the mezzotint engraver (born about 
1755, and died before 1799), was responsible for some 
plates himself, and for the publication of others engraved 
by Edward Bell. The first plate, engraved by him in 
1789, was called "Youth diverting Age." We then 
meet with his name in 1793 in connexion with "The 
Happy Cottagers " and " The Gipsy Tent." A second 
plate of " Youth diverting Age " was produced in 1794, 
and in the following year he issued " Morning, or the 
Benevolent Sportsman," and " Evening, or the Sports- 
man's Return." " A Litter of Foxes," in 1797, was his 
work ; and two plates, published for Bell in 1706, were 
called " Mutual Confidence, or the Sentimental Friends," 
and "Delicate Embarrassment, or the Rival Friends." 
Bell was also responsible, in 1793, for " Cows." In 1800 
he did the four hunting-scenes called "Going Out," 
"Going into Cover," "The Check," and "The Death." 
In 1801 he produced " Selling Peas " and " Selling 
Cherries"; in 1804, "The Rustic Hovel" and "The 
Cottage Stye"; and in 1805, "The Frightened Horse." 

An engraver named Thomas Williamson, who is better 
known for his very minute work, and for such a triumph 
of skill as the engraving of the Lord's Prayer in the size of 
a threepenny-piece, was responsible for fourteen pictures 
after Morland. He engraved in 1803 " The Woodcutters 
at Dinner "; in 1804, " Lazy Shepherds," " The Young 

8—2 



n6 GEORGE MORLAND 

Dealer," and "First Love"; in 1805, " Morland's 
Cottager " and " Morland's Woodman," executed in 
chalk; the five plates called "Travellers Reposing," 
" Rustic Cares," " Tired Gipsies," " Summer's Evening," 
and " Winter's Morning." In the next year he produced 
" Woodcutters ° and " Cottagers in Winter "; and in 1817 
the well-known picture of " The Land Storm," published 
by Palser. 

John Dean, the pupil of Valentine Green, scraped seven 
mezzotint plates. His first two were in 1787 — "Valen- 
tine's Day " and " The Happy Family." In the following 
year he did a pair called " The Power of Justice " and 
"The Triumph of Benevolence," and a single picture 
called "The Widow"; while " The Tomb," in 1789, and 
" The Happy Family " of 1794, were also his work. 

John Young, Keeper of the British Institution, and 
one of the active promoters of the Artists' Benevolent 
Fund, put his name to four pictures : " Seduction " and 
" Credulous Innocence," in 1788 ; " Travellers," in 1802 ; 
and " Villagers," in 1803. 

Another man who scraped six mezzotints, and, like 
Young, became Keeper of the British Institution, was 
William Barnard; and his "Summer" and "Winter," 
produced in 1802, were perhaps the best plates he ever 
executed. His name is also attached to the " Brown Jug," 
" The Flowing Bowl," " The Country Butcher," and 
" The Cottage Fireside." 

Robert Mitchell Meadows, who worked for Boydell's 
" Shakespeare Gallery," engraved " Gathering Wood " 
and " Gathering Fruit," in 1795 ; also another plate of 
" Gathering Wood," in 1799, and a second one of " Gather- 
ing Fruit," in 1816 ; and was responsible for a picture 
called " Pigs," issued in 1806. 

One or two other foreign engravers besides Monsieur 
Suntach executed plates after Morland. 




ST. JAMES'S PARK. 
From the engraving by F. D. Soiron. 




GIRI, AND PIGS. 
From the engraving by W. Ward. 




BUCK-SHOOTING. 
From the engraving by T. Simpson. 




WOODCOCK AND PHKASANT SHOOTING. 
From the engraving by T. Simpson. 




THE FARMER'S VISIT TO HIS MARRIED DAUGHTER 
IN TOWN. 

From the stipple print by W. Bond. 



MORLAND'S ENGRAVERS 117 

There are two which bear the name of E. J. Dumee, 
"The Fair Seducer" and "The Benevolent Lady"; two 
called " Indulgence " and " Discipline," by Prattent ; two 
entitled " The Squire's Door " and " The Farmer's Door," 
by Duterreau ; and three by Soiron, " St. James's Park." 
and " The Tea-Garden," issued in 1798, and a reissue of ' 
" The Tea-Garden " in 1889. 

Another foreign engraver who must not be overlooked 
is Prestel, who engraved u The Country Girl at Hojne " 
and " The Country Girl in London," in 1792. 

Amongst the minor men. whose names appear in con- * , 
nexion with Morland's prints, we may mention E. Dayes, 
who engraved " Children Nutting," in 1783, and a fresh 
plate of it in 1788 ; John Pettitt, who did " Harley and 
Old Edwards," in 1787; W. Nutter, who did "The 
Strangers at Home," in 1788 ; C. Josi, who was respon- 
sible for " The Labourer's Luncheon" and " The Peasant's 
Repast," in 1797; R. Clamp, who in that same year 
executed two fishermen subjects; W. Humphrey, who 
engraved " Temptation," in 1790 ; E. Scott, who did 
" Boys Robbing the Orchard " and " The Angry Farmer," 
in that same year; J. Hogg, responsible for "Changing 
Quarters" and "The Billeted Soldier," in 1791; and 
S. Aiken, who engraved the well-known picture of 
" Evening," in 1792 ; and the companion ones of " The 
Rabbit Warren " and " Sportsmen Refreshing," in 1801. 
J. Jenner did two in 1792 ; G. Shepheard produced " The 
Fleecy Charge," in 1798 ; R. S. Syer engraved " The Ale- 
house Door " and " The Alehouse Kitchen," in 1801 ; 
and amongst other names may be mentioned those of 
E. Jones, Mango, W. T. Annis, T. Burke, T. Hodgetts, 
W. Hilton, Blake, Jakes, Dodd, and Bond. 

Of etchings after Morland, perhaps the best-known 
series was that etched by T. Rowlandson, and produced in 
aquatint by S. Aiken in 1790; the four scenes being 



n8 GEORGE MORLAND 

"Pheasant Shooting," "Partridge Shooting," "Duck 
Shooting," and " Snipe Shooting." 

J. Baldrey did several etchings of studies of animals in 
1792, and J. Wright was responsible for a series of half a 
dozen works in 1794. The same man did the etchings of 
" Huntsmen and Dogs " and " Foxhunters and Dogs," in 
1795 ; and a series of a dozen etchings were executed by 
by T. Vivares in 1800. In addition to these there were 
a great many etchings by J. Baldrey, J. P. Thompson, 
J. Wright, and T. Vivares, published by Harris and by 
Orme in 1792-96 and in 1799; and in 1801 by J. P. 
Thompson ; while in other years etchings after Morland 
were issued by Orme, to which no engravers' names 
are attached. 

Altogether it will be seen that most of the celebrated 
engravers of the eighteenth century produced plates after 
pictures by Morland, some of which, notably the works 
by Ward, Raphael Smith, Barnard, S. W. Reynolds, and 
Dean, are amongst the best of English mezzotints. 

In 1895, and again in 1904, there were remarkable 
exhibitions of engravings after Morland at Colnaghi's 
Gallery, and a large number of the coloured engravings 
were shown. Some of the finest of the coloured stipple 
engravings at the present moment in such great demand 
are the work of J. R. Smith ; but many of the works of 
Ward, Dean, Bond, Gaugain, Soiron, Graham, Jenner, 
Burke, Williamson, and Bell, were also issued in colour. 




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TITI,E-PAGE OP A DRAWING-BOOK BY GEORGE MORLAND. 



CHAPTER XI 

A NOTE ON SIGNATURES 

A few words on George Morland's signatures may be of 
interest to those who possess examples of his work or 
are collecting his pictures. Typical signatures are here- 
with reproduced, and in every case have been copied 
from paintings the authenticity of which is beyond dis- 
pute. It will be noticed that they differ considerably 
from each other, both in the manner in which they are 
written and in the form of the signature and of the letters 
composing it. It is this curious variety which creates 
one of the pitfalls for the collector, and yet at the 
same time constitutes one of his securities, as Morland 
usually adapted his signature somewhat to its surround- 
ings, varying its shape or form in such a way as to be 
suitable to the subject. For example, a large curved 
signature is written on a sack of wheat, and lends itself 
to the curved surface orf which it appears. 

The signature on Morland's pictures must be looked for 
very carefully, as, contrary to the practice of other painters, 
*he did not append it in the left corner of the canvas, but 
put it in any odd place which seemed to be suitable. The. 
forged signature is, as a rule, in the left corner, the true 
one very seldom in that position. Sometimes, as in the 
" Blind White Horse," it appears on the water trough ; 
in " Winter " it is on a beam of the cottage ; in the 
" Wreck," on one of the boxes being washed ashore ; in 

119 



120 GEORGE MORLAND 

>?9? 



A NOTE ON SIGNATURES 121 

another " Wreck," on part of the vessel itself; in "Bar- 
gaining for Fish " it is on a stone ; in the " Wreck of 
the East Indiaman " on a cask ; in the " Miller and his 
Men," as already stated, on a sack of wheat. In other 
pictures it is to be found on a log of wood, a finger-post, 
the eave of a cottage, a public-house sign, part of a stile, 
the load on a donkey's back, the handle of a rush basket, 
the ribbon round a peasant's cap, a notice in a tap 
parlour, a loose stone by a doorway, the doorstep, or 
the stick in the hand of a traveller. All these odd posi- 
tions, and many others as unusual, were selected by the 
artist. 

The signature is bold and strong, each letter well 
formed, and written in liquid manner with a very full 
brush. A forged signature is often thick and lumpy, a 
real one very seldom ; but beyond these few indications 
the author can be of very little assistance to collectors. 

It will not follow that if a signature differs from the 
typical ones given in this chapter it is a forgery, as with 
such an eccentric artist, eccentricity of signature must 
be expected. Neither does it follow that if a picture is 
not up to the accepted standard of skill it is a forged 
work ; in fact, it is more likely that the reverse is the case, 
for, as a rule, the forger is too anxious to make his picture 
pretty and his drawing accurate, and does not fall into 
the errors which are generally to be found in the work 
of Morland. Nothing but experience, the result of having 
seen many works by Morland, will ever enable the collector 
to distinguish the true work by the artist from the in- 
numerable forgeries of it that exist in the present day. 



CHAPTER XII 

SOME INFORMATION AS TO THE VALUE OF PICTURES BY 

MORLAND 

When Henley wrote an epitaph of Morland he made use 
of the following words: "Obliging dealers aiding, he 
coined himself into guineas, and so, like the reckless and 
passionate unthrift he was, he flung away his genius and 
his life in handfuls, till nothing else was left him but the 
silence and the decency of death." In these words the 
great critic summed up the life of the artist ; but when 
he came to deal with his pictures, said that there was 
hardly anything so good in English art as a really fine 
Morland. Even he did not anticipate, however, that col- 
lectors would attach so much importance to the works 
of this artist as to break all records for English pictures 
by a Little Master, and to push the value of the finest 
paintings by Morland up to a perfectly extraordinary price. 
A couple of years ago the six pictures describing on 
canvas the story of Laetitia came into the market at 
Christie's. The last five of the series had been exhibited 
at Burlington House in 1881, having been acquired from 
the Jolley Collection in 1853. Subsequently the late 
Mr. Edmund Macrory, K.C., from whose collection they 
were sold, obtained the " Domestic Happiness " to com- 
plete the set. They were not uniformly excellent, but 
each picture was in good condition, and they were delight- 
ful exercises in soft colour harmonies, and painted with 

122 



THE VALUE OF PICTURES 123 

the charm of elegance and grace. Each canvas measured 
17J by 13 J inches, and it was anticipated by many dealers 
that the series would fetch £2,000. A pair of small works 
by the same artist, " The Soldier's Departure " and " The 
Soldier's Return," had fetched 500 guineas in the previous 
December. In the Huth sale, 1895, 1,050 guineas had 
been given for " The Visit to the Child at Nurse." In 
the Haskett-Smith collection the same purchaser had 
acquired the " Cherry Sellers " for 1,000 guineas. One of 
the pictures now in the National Gallery sold for only 
40 guineas, and the " Visit," at Hertford House, is said to 
have been acquired by Sir Richard Wallace for 200 guineas. 
In the Rankin sale, 1898, Messrs. Agnew had given 1,250 
guineas for the " Post-boy's Return," which has now passed 
into the collection of Sir Samuel Montagu. We must not, 
also, forget to record the sale of " Mutual Confidences " 
from the Price Collection for 940 guineas. The five 
pictures of the Laetitia series were sold at the Jolley 
sale in 1853 for 225 guineas; and on Mr. Woodruff 
coming forward, and proving that he possessed the 
" Domestic Happiness," Mr. Macrory gave him £350 for 
it, and completed the set. 

When the group of pictures forming the story of 
Laetitia was put up, the first bid was 1,000 guineas, and 
the competition commenced very strongly between Messrs. 
Agnew, Messrs. Colnaghi, Mr. Seligmann, and Mr. Lepper, 
and eventually Messrs. Colnaghi purchased the pictures 
for the sum of 5,600 guineas — an average of 933 guineas 
apiece. In the Huth sale in the following year other 
remarkable prices were realised. " The Higglers in the 
Morning" were sold to Mr. Locket Agnew for 2,000 
guineas ; " A Country Stable " fetched 1,000 guineas ; a 
wood scene, with a wonderful decorative canopy of trees, 
was sold to Mr. Leggatt for 600 guineas. Mr. Barratt 
purchased a woody landscape with a cottager for 580 



•124 GEORGE MORLAND 

guineas, and Messrs. Agnew bought the Frozen Pond scene 
for 250 guineas and the Snowballing subject for 480 
guineas, the latter having fetched 100 guineas in the 
Robert Benson sale thirty years ago. An endeavour 
was made to sell the " Lucky Sportsman " and the 
" Unlucky Sportsman " together, but an objection was 
raised and they were offered separately, Mr. Barratt 
obtaining the first at 420 guineas and the second at 400 
guineas ; and, finally, Mr. Agnew gave 130 guineas for a 
small study of two donkeys and a pig. 

Some more high prices were realised in 1907, when at 
the sale of Saturday, February 23, Morland's " Happy 
Cottagers " was sold for 2,800 guineas to Mr. Sabin, who 
had been collecting for many years the best mezzotints 
after that artist. He began the contest at 200 guineas, 
but was opposed step by step by Messrs. Colnaghi, whose 
bidding, however, ceased at 2,000 guineas, when an un- 
known competitor entered the field ; but at length, by his 
final bidding, Mr. Sabin secured the picture. This price 
removes from the second place the " Higglers Preparing 
for Market," already alluded to ; and the " Happy 
Cottagers " now comes next to the " Dancing Dogs " at 
the Tweedmouth sale, sold to Mr. Charles Davis, which 
holds the first place, and constitutes the Morland record. 

The other Morlands in this same sale included the 
"Gipsies' Tent" — a rather larger canvas than the 
"Cottagers," and, like it, engraved by Grozier — which 
Colnaghis bought for goo guineas ; the " Gipsies," dated 
1792, and measuring 28 by 36 inches, which fetched 420 
guineas in the Levy sale in 1899 and 730 in the Mievalle 
sale for the same year, and which now realised 800 guineas ; 
" Paying the Horseler," 27 by 36 inches, 480 guineas ; and 
the " Check," 20 by 26 inches, 240 guineas ; the com- 
panion picture to the " Check," called " Going Out," 
realised 95 guineas; a "View near a Sea Port," 25 by 



THE VALUE OF PICTURES 125. 

30 inches, signed, and dated 1795, which in 1864 was 
bought for 48 guineas, sold this time to Mr. Wise for 
100 guineas ; and the " Interior of a Stable," 19 £ by 
25J inches, signed, and dated 1792, was bought by Mr. 
Leman for 125 guineas. Altogether the prices realised 
at this latest sale prove the high value the dealers are 
placing upon choice works by this artist. 

It is as well to record these astonishing prices, in order 
to show that the very finest works by Morland will fetch 
almost any sum of money, and that there is a very great 
competition amongst collectors in order to obtain works 
by this artist of his best period and of absolutely un- 
doubted genuine quality. The ordinary owner of pictures 
by Morland must not, however, come to the ready con- 
clusion that, because these prices are large ones, any 
work by the artist is necessarily of great value. That is 
by no means the case. The pictures already mentioned 
were picked specimens, as fine as possible, and many that 
come into the market are by no means satisfactory, and 
will not, therefore, realise more than a moderate price, 
ranging from 50 guineas up to 200 guineas. 

The demand for the work of Morland has quickened 
the energies of the forger to a very serious extent. In 
Morland's own time there were artists at work copying 
his pictures and doing them very cleverly ; but since he 
has obtained his apotheosis in the auction-room a new race 
of forgers has come forward, and the collector will need 
to be more on his guard than ever. As already stated in 
the chapter on signatures, very little information can be 
given to enable a collector to decide whether the picture 
offered to him is genuine or not. He must either consult 
some well-known expert or purchase his experience him- 
self. The important dealers are almost always ready to 
acquire a fine picture themselves, or, for a small fee, to 
give the information whether the painting in question is 



126 GEORGE MORLAND 

genuine or not; but the collector himself, by inspecting 
the works in the National Gallery, the wonderful series in 
the possession of Mr. Abbiss Phillips, or the pictures 
which every year appear at the Old Masters Exhibition, 
can train himself to acquire knowledge as to the technique 
and special characteristic of Morland's work, and such 
knowledge he most certainly will need if he is entering 
upon the costly and rather hazardous amusement of 
collecting paintings by George Morland. 



APPENDIX I 
LIST OF PICTURES EXHIBITED BY GEORGE MORLAND 



SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. 

Master George Morland, 
36, Windmill Street, 
Tottenham Court Road. 



DATB. NUMBER. 



1777 



n 
n 
99 
99 



254 

255 
256 

257 
258 
259 
260 



Sketch in black lead. 



A stained drawing. 



783 


193 


99 


194 


»» 


195 


99 


196 


99 


197 


99 


198 



Mr. G. Morland, 
Stephen Street, 
Rathbone Place. 



A hot mist 
Forest gale on 

rocky shore. 
Fog in September. 
Moonlight. 
A stained drawing. 



Mr. G. Morland, 

Paddington. 

1790 191 Landscape with gip- 
sies. 

„ 192 Landscape with 
children bird's- 
nesting. 

,, 193 An ass race. 

„ 194 A mad bull. 



DATE. 1 
I790 

99 

99 



195 
IO6 
197 

198 
199 



200 
20I 



202 



203 
204 



A sow and pigs. 

Calf and sheep. 

Landscape and 
figures. 

Fording a brook. 

European shipwreck 
on coast of Africa 
{new engraving by 
J. R. Smith). 

A storm. 

Encampment of gip- 
sies. 

The cottage door. 
{Above two new 
engravings by J. 
Grozer.) 

A shipwreck. 

A small snow piece. 



1791 



Mr. G. Morland, 

20, Winchester Row, 
Paddington. 

205 A large snow piece. 

206 Fording a brook. 

207 Returning from 

market 

208 Gipsies dressing 

dinner. 

143 Sea-storm and ship- 

wreck. 

144 Land-storm (its Com- 

panion). 

145 Shooting. 



127 



128 



GEORGE MORLAND 



FREE SOCIETY OF 
ARTISTS. 

Master George Morland, 
ten years old. 

DATS. NUMBER. TITLE. 

1775 l %9 A sketch, painted in 

chalk. 

„ 190 A sketch, painted in 

chalk. 

Master George Morland, 
twelve years old. 

1 776 171 A conference, stained 

drawing. 
„ 172 A conference, stained 

drawing. 
„ 173 A corn loft, stained 

drawing. 
„ 174 A cow farm, stained 

drawing. 
„ 175 A washerwoman, 

stained drawing. 
„ 176 A farmhouse in a 

wood, stained 

drawing. 

Mr. Morland, Junior. 

1782 17 Landscape: a 
shower of rain on 
a heath. 

21 Landscape in the 
manner of Vango- 
yen. 

33 Boy's head (a draw- 
ing). 

35 Girl's head (manner 
of Piazette). 

47 Thatched cottage. 

48 Cornfield, with wind- 
mill. 

53 Landscape, with a 
farmhouse. 

55 Sunset, with cattle 
and figures. 

56 Burst of lightning, 
with wind and rain. 



DATS. NUMBER. TITLE. 

1782 58 Moonlight, with gip- 
sies by a fire. 

„ 62 A fog in September. 

„ 63 Landscape, with 
watermill. 

„ 68 A windmill. 

„ 78 Winter piece (a draw- 
ing)- 

„ 79 A landscape in black 
lead. 

,, 80 Two landscapes in 
black lead. 

,, 87 Country peasants 
dancing in a barn. 

„ 89 Dancing peasants. 

„ 93 Chalk cliffs, with a 
man and horse. 

„ 95 A paper mill, with 
gipsies resting. 

„ 96 A girl attending pigs. 

„ 97 A stained drawing. 

» 102 „ „ 



168 



Travellers resting on 
a summer's after- 
noon. 



ROYAL ACADEMY OF 
ARTS. 

Master George Morland, 
Woodstock Street. 

1773 357 Sketches. 

Master G. Morland. 

1778 373 Two landscapes 

(stained drawings). 

George Morland, Junior, 
4, Millbank Row. 

1779 2 ° 2 A drawing with a 

poker. 

George Morland, Junior, 14, 
Stephen Street, Tottenham 
Court Road. 

1780 463 Landscape (a draw- 

ing). 



APPENDIX I 



129 



G, Morland, 14, Stephen Street, 
Rathbone Place, 



DATS. NUMBBS. 



1781 


404 


Hovel with asses. 


1784 


26 


A fog in September. 
"Vicar of Wakefield," 


99 


42 






•vol. i., chap. 8. 


1785 


132 


Sketch. 


99 


134 


»f 


99 


150 


Maria Lavinia and 
the Chelsea pen- 
sioner (see " Ad- 










ventures of a Hack- 






ney Coach," vol. i.). 


J» 


166 


Sketch. 


99 


167 


99 


99 


178 


99 


99 


179 


99 


1786 


126 


The flowery banks 
of the Shannon. 


1787 


M or land did not exhibit. 


G. Morland, 9, Warren Place, 




Hampstead Road* 


1788 


201 


Execrable human 
traffick, or the affec- 
tionate slaves. 


1789] 
1790J 


- Morland did not exhibit 



G, Morland, 20, Winchester Roaa\ 
Edgware Road, 

1791 58 Inside of a stable. 

G. Morland, 63, Charlotte Street, 
Rathbone Place, 

1792 23 Benevolent sports- 

man. 

„ 63 Goats. 

„ 145 A farmyard. 

„ 324 A shipwreck. 

„ 460 The sportsman's re- 
turn. 

1 793 Morland did not exhibit. 



G. Morland, 5, Gerrard Street, 
Soho, 

DATS. NUMBBS. TITLE. 

1794 52 Bargaining for 
sheep. 
„ 169 Interior of a stable. 
186 A farrier's shop. 



i795\ 
1796/ 



Morland did not exhibit. 



G, Morland, 28, Gerrard Street, 

1797 130 Landscape and 

figures. 
„ 218 Thirsty millers. 
„ 690 Landscape and 

figures. 
, 691 Pigs. 
„ 708 Sea beach. 
„ 724 Landscape and 

figures. 
„ 805 Sand cart. 

1798 Morland did not exhibit. 



G, Morland, 28, Red Lion Square, 

1799 178 Landscape and 
figures. 
„ 193 Landscape and 

figures. 
„ 265 Christmas week. 
i8oo| 

1802 f Morland did not exhibit, 
1803J 



G, Morland, 19, Rolls Buildings, 
Fetter Lane. 

1804 252 Saving the remains 
of a wreck. 

„ 279 The fish market. 

„ 630 A landscape with 
hounds in full 
chase. 



APPENDIX II 

LIST OF PICTURES BY MORLAND EXHIBITED ON 
LOAN IN PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS 



WINTER EXHIBITIONS, 
BURLINGTON HOUSE. 

1871. 

25. PORTRAIT OF A LADY. 17J 

in. x 14^ in. Oval. Lent 
by Rev. John Abiss. 

26. FEEDING THE PIGS. I4J 

in. x 19^ in. Lent by the 
same. 

. 28. FIRST OF SEPTEMBER. 2$ 

in. x 30 in. Lent by the 
same. 

57. A CALL AT THE RED LION. 

28 in. X36 in. Lent by 
the same. 

1872. 

4. THE CATASTROPHE. 19} 

' in. x 35£ in. Lent by 
Haskett Smith, Esq. 

43. THE PIGGERY. 17$ in. X 

23^ in. Lent by the 
same. 

141. THE WRECKERS. 38in.X 

52 in. Lent by the 
same. 

1873. 

7. MILKMAID AND COWHERD 
WITH COWS. 20 in. X 

26 in. Lent by W. A. 
Tollemache, Esq. 
36. GROOMING A WHITE 

horse. 1 1£ in. x 14] in. 
Lent by the same person. 



i*> 



37. AN INTERIOR. THE PEAS- 
ANT'S HOME. I4f in.X 

1 2 in. Lent by the same 
person. 

1875. 
39. THE HORSE FAIR. 28 in. 
X35J in. Lent by 
H.W. F.Bolckow,Esq n 
M.P. 

67. LANDSCAPE AND GIPSY 
ENCAMPMENT. 1790. 

Signed. 27J in. x 35J in. 
Lent by A. Levy, Esq. 
69. A WRECK ON THE COAST. 

28 in. x 354 in. Lent by 
General G. H. Mac- 
kinnon. 

95. THE POSTBOY'S RETURN- 
EVENING. 27 in.X35j 
in. Lent by A. Levy, 
Esq. 
102. the OSTLER. Signed, and 
dated 1 792. 1 1 J in. x 1 5 
in. Lent by J. W. Adam- 
son, Esq. 

2l6. A GIRL FEEDING PIGS. 2Ji 

in. x 35 $ in. Lent by the 
Baroness Gray. 
221. TWO SHEEP. 27 in. x 35 in. 
Lent by the same. » 

1876. 

94. A RUSTIC COTTAGE. 1 5 in. 
x 13^ in. Lent by 
Joseph Robinson, Esq. 



APPENDIX II 



131 



268. A WOOD SCENE. 1 1 J in. X 

1 5 in. Lent by the same. 
276. THE roadside inn (un- 
finished). 38^ in. X54$ 
in. Lent by Sir W. G. 
Armstrong. 

1878. 

77. GIPSIES. 9i in. x n£ in. 

Signed. Lent by J. E. 

Fordham, Esq. 
8l. FISHERMEN. 8 in. X 13 m. 

Signed and dated 1793. 
Lent by J. H. Anderdon, 
Esq. 
292. A GIRL SEATED. 9 in.X 

8 in. Lent by the same 
person. 

1879. 

2. THE FISH-GIRL. 24 in. X 

29^ in. Signed and 
dated 1792. Lent by 
Haskett Smith, Esq. 

6. THE CHERRY-SELLER. 27 

in. x 36 in. Signed. 
Lent by the same person. 

21. LANDSCAPE AND FIGURES. 

19J in. x 25$ in. Signed. 
Lent by the same person. 

242. THE CARRIER'S WAGGON. 

Qfcin. x 11 J in. Signed 
Lent by the Rev. E. 
Hale. 

1880. 

I. A LADY WITH A LETTER. 

10J in. x 8 J in. Oval. 
Lent by Samuel Denton, 
Esq. 

^7 2. COAST SCENE WITH 

/ FIGURES. 1 1£ in. x 14* 

in. Signed and dated 

1795. Lent b y T - God " 

dard Williams, Esq. 

5. THE PLEDGE OF LOVE, ioj 

in. x Si in. Lent by 
Samuel Denton, Esq. 

l8 HORSES ENTERING A 

STABLE. 1.8 in. x 23 in. 



Signed. Lent by Antony 
Gibbs, Esq. 
42. TREPANNING A RECRUIT. 

200 in. x 160 in. Lent 
by Samuel Denton, E#q. 

1881. 

IO. LANDSCAPE. I7J in. X 23 

in-. Signed, and dated 
1 790. Lent by Henry C. 
Ames, Esq. 

The five pictures of " Laeti- 
tia," each 17 m. x 13 J in. 
Lent by Adam Macrory, 
Esq. 

TRAVELLERS AT AN INN. 

18 in. X24 in. Signed, 
and dated 1792. Lent 
by Stanley Boulter, Esq. 

1882. 

5. A landscape. Signed. 
1 1£ in. x 14& in. Lent 
by Archdeacon Burney. 

25. THE FRUIT SELLER. . 17$ 

in. x 134 in. Lent by 
Wm. Lee, Esq. 

26. GIPSIES. Signed, and dated 

1791. Lent by W. Gil- 
bey, Esq. 

267. HUNTING SCENE. 54 in. 

x 73 in. Lent by J. 
Page-Darly, Esq. 

270. wreckers. Signed. 58 m. 

x 80 in. Lent by W. 
Gilbey, Esq. 

273. A THUNDERSTORM. 27 in. 

x 36 in. Lent by E. 
Cock, Esq. 

1883. 

227. A GIPSY ENCAMPMENT. 

33 in. x 43 in. Signed, 
and dated 1789. Lent 
by the Earl of Nor- 
manton. 

271. THE SURPRISE. IO in. X 

11 J in. Lent by A. T. 
Hollingsworth, Esq. 
284. THE TURNPIKE GATE. 24 
9 — 2 



132 



GEORGE MORLAND 



n. x 29} in. Signed, 
and dated 1793. Lent 
by John Fleming, Esq. 

1884. 

a GIRL WITH CALVES. 14 in. 

x 17 in. Lent by Rev. 
F. P. Phillips. 
39. farmyard. 28 in. x 35 in. 
Lent by the same. 

48. A FARMYARD. 58 in. X OO 

in. Signed, and dated 
1794. Lent by Rev. H. 
West. 

1885. 

7. idleness. 1 1 J in. x 9} in. 
Oval. Lent by Charles 
Tennant, Esq. 
14. diligence. Companion 
picture to " Idleness. 1 ' 
Lent by the same person. 

30. DANCING DOGS. 29 in. X 

24 in. Lent by Frederick 
Davis, Esq. 

31. two PIGS. 7 in. X9I in. 

Signed. Lent by R. G. 
Millns, Esq. 
36. LANDSCAPE AND FIGURES. 

7 in. xoj in. Signed. 
Lent by the same person. 

1886. . 

23. THE TEA-GARDEN. l6 in. 

xi9in. Oval. Lent by 
Frederick Fish, Esq. 

1887. 

32. LANDSCAPE AND FIGURES. 

38. in. x 48 in. Lent by 
C. T. D. Crews, Esq. 
N . B . — Th is picture was 
painted by J. Ibbetson 
on April 29th, 1793, a°d 
his signature is upon it, 
but the figures in it were 
put in by Morland. 
42. SEASHORE. 39 in. x 55 in. 
Lent by C. F. Fellows, 
Esq 



1888. 
2. OLD COACHING DAYS. 33J 
in. X45J in. Lent by 
H. B. Arnaud, Esq. 
14. LANDSCAPE WITH PIGS. 

10 in. x 11J in. Lent 
by Martin H. Colnaghi, 
Esq. 
l6. SOLDIERS ON THE MARCH. 

29 in. x 38 in. Lent by 
Colonel R. H. Rosser. 

25. MOUNTAIN SCENE, NORTH 

WALES. 9i in. x 1 1£ in. 

Lent by Major Corbett- 

Winder. 
29. SNOW scene. 9J in. x 12 

in. Lent by the same 

person. 

1889. 

137. INTERIOR OF A STABLE. 

24J in. x 29J in. Signed, 
and dated 1791. Lent 
by H. J. Tollemache, 
Esq. 

148. THE FARMHOUSE DOOR. 

26J in. x 29J in. Signed, 
and dated 1792. Lent 
by the same person. 

1890. 

II. A FARMYARD. 2j\ in. X 35 

in. Signed, and dated 
1791. Lent by the Rev. 
B. Gibbons. 

27. THE PIGSTYB. I9J in. X 

25} in. Signed. Lent 
by Stephenson Clarke, 
Esq. 
59. THE MASK. Ill in. X9$ 
in. Lent by James Or- 
rock, Esq. 

1891. 
25. landscape. 19 in. x 25 in. 
Lent by Martin Col- 
naghi, Esq. 

1892. 

THE STRAWYARD. 39 in. 

x 55 in. Signed, and 



I* 



APPENDIX II 



133 



dated 1792. Lent by the 
Rev. Sir Talbot Baker, 
Bart. 

l6. LANDSCAPE. 9} in. X 9J 

in. Lent by C. C. 
Barton, Esq. 

26. LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES. 

13 in. x 16} in. Lent by 
the same person. 

31. SEASHORE. 39} in. X 55J 

- in. Lent by the Rev. 
Sir Talbot Baker, Bart 

I04. SMUGGLERS. 39 in. X 53 J 

in. Lent by the same 
person. 
136. A STABLE. 40 in. x 53} in. 
Lent by the same person. 

1893. 

9. THE FARMYARD. 58 in. X 

80 in. Lent by Martin 
Colnaghi, Esq. 

1894. 

41. FARMYARD WITH PIGS. 
30 in. x 24J in. Signed. 
Lent by Samuel Mon- 
tagu, Esq. 

1895. 

35. THE FARMYARD. 2j\ in. 

x 36 in. Signed, and 
dated 1791. Lent by 
Martin Colnaghi, Esq. 

1896. 

41. A FISHING PARTY. 24 in. 
X29 in. Lent by Sir 
Charles C. Smith. 

45. A LUNCHEON PARTY. 24 

in. x 29 in. Lent by the 
same person. 

1903. 

17. THE FARMYARD. 7Tj\ in. 

x 35i in. Signed. Lent 
by T. J. Barratt, Esq. 
1906. 

8. THE TEA-GARDEN. l6 in. 

x 19 in. Oval. Lent 
by Sir W. Cuthbert 
Quilter, Bart. 



26. CHILDREN PLAYING AT 
SOLDIERS. 28 in. X 25 J 

in. Lent by Sir C. Ten- 
nant, Bart. 

3a NUT-GATHERERS. 24$ in. 

x 29} in. Lent by Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Fairfax 
Rhodes. 

1907. 
140. THE POSTBOY'S RETURN. 
27 in. x 35 J in. Lent by 
Sir S. Montagu, Bart. 

GUILDHALL EXHIBI- 
TIONS. 

1895. 

8a AN APPROACHING STORM. 

36 in. x 56 in. Lent by 
Lord Hillingdon. 

1899. 

182. THE STABLE YARD. 28 in. 

x 36 in. Signed, and 
dated 1791. Lent by G. 
Harland-Peck, Esq. 

186. CHILDREN FISHING. 12 in. 

x ioj in. Lent by the 
same person. 

190. FEEDING-TIME. 13 in. X 

18 in. Lent by James 
Orrock, Esq. 

1902. 

63. LANDSCAPE: SNOW SCENE. 

12 in. x 10 in. Lent by 
Martin Colnaghi, Esq. 

69. A HILLY LANDSCAPE. IO 

in. x 12 in. Lent by 
C. D. T. Crews, Esq. 

76. LANDSCAPE WITH GIPSIES. 
10 in. x 12 in. Formerly 
in the collection of Dr. 
Franks. Lent by Mrs. 
Martin Colnaghi. 

GUELPH EXHIBITION. 
1 891. 

284. PORTRAIT OF MORLAND BY 

HIMSELF, with a bottle 



134 



GEORGE MORLAND 



and glass by his side. 
29 in. x 24 in. Lent by 
W. P. Boxall, Esq. 

NEW GALLERY EXHIBI- 
TION. 



1899. 

LANDSCAPE. 27± in. 

35} in. Lent by Lionel 
Phil' - 



197. 



Phillips, Esq. 



GROSVENOR GALLERY. 
1888. 

5. FIRST OF SEPTEMBER — 
EVENING. 28 in. X 35J 

in. Lent by W. Fuller- 
Maitland, Esq. 
10. STABLE. 28 in. X35 in. 
Lent by R. Rankin, Esq. 

39. THE STABLE. IlJ in. X 

14 J in. Lent by B. 
Dobree, Esq. 

43. THE INN PARLOUR. IlJ 

in. x 14J in. Lent by 
the same person. 

44. THE KEEPER'S HOME. 14} 

in. x 12 in. Lent by 
James Orrock, Esq. 

48. OLD WATER-MILL, WITH 

figures. 27 in. x 354 
in. Lent by R. Gibbs, 
Esq. 
52. THE CORN-BIN. 2$ in. X 

30 in. Lent by B. 
Dobree, Esq. 

58. SHEEP IN A BARN. 2j\ in. 

x 35J in. Lent by the 
same person. 

T »«o ( Both lent by 
67. idleness I sir Charles 

73. INDUSTRY. J Tennant . 

8 1 . LANDSCAPE WITH SOLDIERS 
ON A BRIDGE. IlJ in. 

x 13J in. Lent by R. 
Gibbs, Esq. 
99. THE WHITE HORSE. 20J 

in. x 27 in. Lent by L. 
Huth, Esq. 

176. THE INTERIOR OF A 
stable. 24J in. x 30 in. 



181. 
191. 

207. 

212. 

219. 

227. 
238. 

240. 
242. 

248. 
249. 

265. 
300. 

341. 
342. 



Lent by W. Garnett, 
Esq. 

THE PIGSTYE. 23J in. X 

29 in. Lent by Mrs. 
Ford. 

THE ARTIST IN HIS STUDIO. 

24} in. x 29} in. Lent 
by W. H. Matthews, 
Esq. 

THE SOLDIER'S RETURN. 

7 in. x 10 in. Lent by 
W. W. Lewis, Esq. 
GIPSIES. 6J in. x 9 in. 
Lent by the same person. 

A LANDSCAPE. $t in. X 8 

in. Lent by the same 

person. 
WINTER. 4} in. x 7 in. 

Lent by the same person. 
PIGS. 19} in. x 25} in. 

Lent by B. Dobree, Esq. 
RETURNING FROM WORK. 

9 in. x 11 J in. Lent by 

A. Andrews, Esq. 
OLD CLOTHES. II J in. X 

14} in. Lent by John 

Cleland, Esq. 

f Each 10} in. 



THE FIND. 
IN FULL CRY. 



x 15 in. 
Lent by 
Sir Charles 
Tennant 

A WOODLAND COTTAGE. 

17} in. x 23 J in. Lent 
by John Cleland, Esq. 

LANDSCAPE AND FIGURES. 

12 in.x 15 in. Lent by 
Richard Gibbs, Esq. 

Each 17 in. 

THE BONNY ? *\ if* 

fishwife. Lent by 

SELLINGFISH. &£££ 
V Esq. 



GROSVENOR GALLERY. 
1889. 

THE KITE ENTANGLED. 2oJ in. 

x 26} in. Lent by Mrs. 
Thwaites. 



APPENDIX II 



135 



PARTRIDGE SHOOTING. Two 

pictures, each 10J in. x 15 in. 
Lent by Colonel H oil way. 

BELINDA, OR THE BILLET-DOUX. 

9$ in. x 1 1} in. Lent by A. T. 
Hollings worth, Esq. 
XHE MINIATURE. 9} in.X II& 

in. Lent by the same person. 

CAROLINE OF LICHTFELD. 9} in. 

x 11J in. Lent by the same 

person. 
THE POACHERS. 9$ in.X II& in. 

Signed. Lent by J. P. Crush, 

Esq. 
YOUTH DIVERTING AGE. 9J in. 

2 x 1 1$ in. Lent by W. Simpson, 
Esq. 



THE CARRIER'S STABLE, I9I * n - 

X25J in. Signed, and dated 
1791. Engraved by W. Ward. 
Lent by A. T. Hollings worth, 
Esq. 
COTTAGERS. Including portraits 
of Morland and his wife. 194 
in.x 25i in. Engraved by W. 
Ward. Lender's name not 
stated. 

NURSE AND CHILDREN IN THE 

fields. 2oiin.x26m. Lent 
by Mrs. Thwaites. . 

THE ARTIST'S PORTRAIT. 19* "}• 

X23f in. Lent by J. W. 
Knight, Esq. 



APPENDIX III 
PROPRIETORS OF PAINTINGS BY GEORGE MORLAND 



Abraham, Walter J., na, King 
Street, St. James's Square, 
London. 

SHEPHERDS REPOSING (oc- 
tagonal). Engraved by W. 
Bond, 1803. 12 in. x 15J in. 
Signed. (From the late C. F. 
Huth's Collection.) 

Agnew, W., Lockett Gardens. 

THE PIGGERY. l8 in. X 24 

in. Signed. 

Anderson, Robt. W., 93, Mul- 
grave Street, Liverpool. 

the intruder : three dogs 
meet on a country road. 1 5 in. 
x 18 in. Unsigned. (Said to 
have been painted at a village 
ale-house by Morland.) 

Andrews, S., and Sons, Art 
Gallery, Glyn-y-Weddw Hall, 
Llanbedrog, Pwllheli, North 
Wales. 

1. winter SCENE : skating. 
9 in. x 12 in. 

2. INTERIOR OF A STABLE: 

white horse in stable, two goats, 
two dogs, and boy leaning at 
open door. 21 in. x 26 in. 

3. FEEDING THE PIGS. 19 in. 
x 22 in. 

Armitage, Benjamin, Sorrel 
Bank, Pendleton, Manchester. 

THE WOODCUTTER (upright 

canvas). Engraved by W. 
Ward, 1792. 20 in. x 36 in. 
Signed. (Cf. Oldham and 
Peck.) 



Arnold, Howard Payson, 156, 
Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., 
U.S.A. 

Half-length portrait of Mor- 
land's landlady, Mrs. Duns- 
combe, who was reported to 
have confined him in an attic 
room until he had painted off 
his score for liquor. (Panel.) 
$i in. x 7J in. Unsigned and 
undated. Has never been en- 
graved. 

Ashton, Mrs., Widow of Charles 
Ellis Ashton, Woolton Hall, 
Lancashire. 

THE SPORTSMAN'S RETURN. 
Engraved by W. Ward, 1792. 
25 in. x 30 in. Signed. 1792. 

Asiatic Society, Calcutta. 

THE FARMER'S STABLE : A 

man leaning against a horse 
eating at a stall, beneath which 
are two dogs. An amorous 
couple to right among straw. 
30 in. x 40 in. Signed. (Cf. 
Huth, Louis, No 3.) 

Baker, Miss, Endcliffe Edge, 
Sheffield. 

farmer's boy with Cart- 
horses, Pigs, etc. 30 in. x 36 in. 
Signed. Undated. 

Baker, Rev. Sir Randolf L., 
Bart., Ranston, Blandford. 

1. a stable. 39} in. x 54}in. 
Signed. 1792. 



136 



APPENDIX III 



137 



2. FARMYARD. 39J in. X 

54 J in. Signed. 1793. 

3. SMUGGLERS. 39J in. X 

55J in. Signed. 1792. 

4. WRECKERS. 39$ in. X 

55 i in. Signed. 1793. 

All exhibited at Old Masters, 
1 892, and at the Victoria and Al- 
bert Museum, 1904. No.2iscon- 
sidered one of Morland's best. 

Bamford, H. B., Hawthornden 
Manor, Uttoxeter. 

two sheep, one standing, the 
other lying down. 27J in. x 
35 in. Signed. Undated. Bought 
at Lord Parker's Sale in 1895. 

Barratt, Thomas J., Bellmoor, 
Hampstead Heath, London. 

1. BELINDA. Engraved by 
Burrows ', 1794. 

2. THE PLEDGE OF LOVE. 
Engraved by W. Ward, 1788. 

. 3. CAROLINE OF LICHTFELD. 
Engraved by F. R. Smith. 

4. THE farmyard (hori- 
zontal). Farm outhouse under 
a spreading tree. On left, be- 
side a wheelbarrow, donkey 
suckling foal. Pigs. A farm 
man converses with woman 
leaning over gate. A dog at 
his feet. 28 in. x 35 in. Signed. 
Undated. 

5. CONSTANCY (upright). Girl 
in large hat and feathers leaning 
on rock by seashore, weeping 
and looking out to sea. En- 
graved by W. Ward, 1788. 

10 in. x 11J in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

A portrait of Mrs. Ward. Com- 
panion picture to " Variety." 

6. setters (horizontal). One 
black -marked standing; one 
red-marked couching. 9} in. x 
n\ in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Barrow, Alfred, Ulverscroft, 

. Barrow-in-Furness. 

stable amusement. En- 
graved by W. Ward, 1 80 1. Un- 
signed. Undated. 17 in. X22 in. 



Barton, Chas., Hartford Villa, 
2, Evelyn Terrace, Queen's 
Park, Brighton. 

1. selling fish. 20 in. x 
34 in. Initialed. 1786. (Cf. 
Egerton and MacDougall.) 

2. mountain sheep. Sketch 
on paper. Male and female 
sheep with two lambs, amid 
rocky scenery. 1 2 in. x 1 5 J in. 
Signed. 1793. 

Barton, C. A., 44, Fitzjohn's 
Avenue, Hampstead, London. 
Mr. C. A. Barton's Collec- 
tion was sold at Christie's on 
3rd May, 1902, and fetched the 
prices named below. 

1. THE SHEPHERD'S MEAL. 

Engraved by F. R. Smith, 1803. 

24 in.xjo in. Signed. 1793. 
920 guineas (Falcke). (Cf. 
Ussher.) 

2. THE CARRIER'S STABLE. 

Engraved by W. Ward, 1792. 
19 in. X25 m. Signed. 1790. 
1,100 guineas (Falcke). 

3. THE BULL INN. 1 9 in. X 

25 in. Initialed. 820 guineas 
(Falcke). 

4. A HUNTING SCENE. 19 in. 

x 12 in. Initialed. 
Beardsley, Amos, Surgeon, 
Grange-over- Sands, Lancashire. 

TWO SHEEP UNDER A TREE 

(oak panel). 9$ in. x 13 in. 

Beausire, Joseph George, 
the stable door. 

Bell, T. J., The Old Hall, 
Cleadon, via Sunderland. 

two shepherds, seated 
under an oak, one cutting a 
twig. A dog tying down, while 
another puts its paws on a 
shepherd's knee. Sheep and 
a farmhouse in background. 
Painted on wood. 16 in. x 
18 in. Signed. Dated 1790 
or 1796. (The physiognomies 
of the peasants are not such as 
Morland usually depicts. The 
picture corresponds in details 



138 



GEORGE MORLAND 



to No. 42 of Canon Phillips's 
Collection.— R. R.) 
Birch, Claude C, Granville 
House, Granville Place, Port- 
man Square, London, W. 

THE WOODLAND COTTAGE. 

Same as Mr. Cleveland's 
(p. 97). 19$ in. x 22 in. Signed. 
1779. 
Birkett, James, 37, Heaton 
Park Road, Newcastle - on - 
Tyne. 

BLACK AND WHITE PIGS 

feeding. 7 J in. x 9 in. 

Birmingham, City of, Museum 
and Art Gallery. 

pigs (on canvas). 28 in. x 
37! in. Signed. Undated. 
Exhibited by Morland at R.A. 
Exhibition of 1797. Presented 
by Mrs. Luckock. 

Black, James Tait, 33, Palace 
Court, London. 

peasant and pigs. En- 
graved by J. R. Smith, 1803. 
19 in. x 24 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. (Cf. Richardson, etc.) 

Blackburn, G. A., Northgate, 
Halifax. 

winter scene: Oak-tree; 
farmer; young man with hay 
under his arm, going towards 
three sheep. 17 in. x 26 in. 
Signed. 

Blathwayt, Mrs. E., Hunt- 
spill Rectory, Bridgwater. 

1 . THE RUTLAND FENCIBLES. 

Interior of a stable. To right, 
a man in red jacket, tight 
breeches, and pigtail, sits, mug 
in hand. Another leans against 
a stall. A stableman forks up 
straw, and a fourth man leans 
against a cornbin. 28 in. X38 
in. Signed (on cornbin). 1795. 
This painting was purchased 
by Mrs. Blathwayt's husband's 
father off Morland's easel. Her 
husband was the Rev. C. W. 
Blathwayt. 

2. Morland's Last Sketch 



(that of a bank and a tree). 

Pencil. 
Morland's mother gave this 

sketch to the grandfather of 

Rev. Mr. Blathwayt, Rector of 

Huntspill, Bridgwater, who 

purchased from Morland u The 

Rutland Fencibles." 
Blathwayt, Rev. R., 7, De 

Vere Gardens, Dover. 
ST. James's park (sketch in 

oils on paper). Engraved by 

F. D. Soiron % 1790. 
BOUSSOD, VALADON AND CO., 

5, Regent Street, London. 

1. WOMEN DRAWING WATER 
FROM A POND. 

2. THREE MEN CHATTING, 

seated on large stones. (Panels, 
a pair.) j\ in. x 10 in. Signed. 

1795. 
Boyes, Edward, 26, Delauney 
Road, Crumpsall, Manchester. 

Oil-Paintings, 

1. the shepherds. (Very 
fine.) Engraved by W. Ward, 
1806. 19 in. x 25^ in. Signed. 
Undated. 

2. THE THATCHER. (Faded.) 
Engraved by W. Ward, 1806. 
18 m. x 24 in. Signed. 1795. 

3. RETURN FROM MARKET. 

(In good condition.) A woman 
on left with mob-cap and red 
cloak, kettle in left hand, jug 
in right. A man (lifting latch 
of door) in light brown long 
coat carries a small tree over 
his right shoulder. Boy with 
dark ruby coat. Both man 
and boy wear broad-brimmed 
hats. Dog near cottage door. 
On right a thatched roof and 
old oak. Snow -clad winter 
scene behind. 18 in. x 22 in. 
Signed. 1793. 

Water^Colours. 

4. DRAWING OF GROUP. 

Child on donkey. Man, woman, 



APPENDIX III 



139 



and child lighting fire under 
pot on crossed sticks. Si m - 
x 8 in. Initialed. 

Sold at Christie's in 1868 for 
£13, from Hanbury Collection, 
of Stamford. 

5. DRAWING OF GIPSIES. A 

man leads a pack-horse. 10} in. 
x 13 in. Signed. 

6. DRAWING OF SCENE IN 

wood. (Fine.) A group of 

haymakers resting. Thatched 

cottage and water, 10} in. x 
14 in. Signed. 

7. RUSTIC SCENE WITH 
WOMAN AND CHILDREN. 

Damaged. 
Sketch in Oil (on panel). 

8. MAN, with broad-brimmed 
hat and red coat, looking at 
pigsty. 6J in. x 12 in. Initialed. 

Bridport, Viscount. 

a storm. Sold at Christie's, 

13 July, 1895, f° r °°o guineas. 
Brown, Mrs., 24, Murton Street, 

Sunderland. 

landscape, with horse and 
cart and figures in foreground. 
23 in. x 30 in. 
Bunbury, Hamilton J., Slin- 
don, Arundel. 

1. white horse and cart. 
26 in. x 3o£ in. Signed. 1795. 

2. GAMEKEEPERS IN A PUB- 
LIC-HOUSE WITH DOGS. 24 in. 

x 30$ in. Unsigned. Undated. 

3. A GIRL WITH TWO PIGS, 
which drink at a trough. 14 m. 
x 17 in. Unsigned. Undated. 

4. A GIRL FEEDING CALVES. 

14 in. x 17 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

3 and 4. Engraved by W. 
Ward, 1802, entitled " Girl and 
Pigs " and " Girl and Calves." 

5. SPORTSMAN WITH DOGS, 

with cottage and landscape. 
16 in. x 23 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

All the above painted on 
canvas. 



Calcutta. (See Asiatic 
Society.) 

Carleton Cowper, Mrs., Carle- 
ton Hall, Penrith. 

1. a sportsman. (On can- 
vas.) 12 in. x 15 in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

Man in a red coat holding 
gun. Brown pony behind him. 
Two spaniels ; dead game in 
front ; large tree on left. Wood- 
land scenery. 

2. COTTAGE AND FIGURES. 
(On canvas.) 28 in. x 36 in. 
Signed on door lintel, "G. 
Morland, 1790." 

Two men standing talking to 
woman in front of an inn. Sign 
of Bull's Head. Two men 
standing at door, one with pipe. 
A dog in foreground. Over- 
hanging trees. 

3. HORSES AND FIGURES. 

(On canvas.) 28 in. x 36 in. 
Signed " G Morland n on front 
of cart. Undated. 

Brown horse in cart, white 
horse in chains as leader. Some 
men sitting, one cutting a loaf 
of bread ; another pouring beer 
out of a barrel into a tin. Two 
dogs, white and brown. Quarry 
or gravel-pit with trees. 

4. HORSES DRINKING. (On 

canvas.) 18 in. x 24 in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

Man in red coat on white 
horse, no saddle, rope halter, 
drinking. On left a brown 
horse, also drinking. Brown and 
white dog standing in stream. 
Moorland with crags. 

5. gypsies. (On canvas.) 
10J in. x 13 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

Man and a woman in red 
cloak, standing in front of fire. 
On right donkey with panniers. 
Woodland scenery. 

6. LANDSCAPE AND FIGURES. 

(On canvas.) 8 in. x 12 in. 
Unsigned. Undated. 



140 



GEORGE MORLAND 



Thatched cottage in fore- 
ground. Man, woman, and 
child, all standing. Dog ; cot- 
tages and church in distance. 

7. gypsies. (On panel.) 
8 in. x 1 1} in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated 

Two thatched cottages. Man 
on white horse. Man in red 
coat with dog. Woodland 
scenery with stream in fore- 
ground. 

8. pencil drawing, tinted. 
(On paper.) 14} in.xi7} in. 
Signed, "G. Morland," del. 

1794. 

Cottage with porch, thatched 
roof, and lattice window, and 
gable end ; overhanging tree. 
Man standing holding pony; 
woman pouring liquor out of 
jug into glass. Dog on left. 
Chancellor, Edward, Muries- 
ton, Midcalder, N.B. 

1. gipsy encampment. (On 
Oak.) A number of figures, 
including an old woman wash- 
ing clothes. Linen hangs on 
a tree to dry. 5 i in. x6J in. 
Initialed. 1798. 

2. cottage. Female figure 
in red cloak, with boy. Two 
horses, one feeding. (On can- 
vas.) nin.xijfin. Signed. 
Dated, but illegible. 

Clegg, Samuel, Rye Hill Close, 

New Sawley, Derby. 
a pigsty (oblong panel). 

17 in. x 21 in. Signed. 1792. 
Clyma, W. J., St. Nicholas 

Street, Truro. 
pigs feeding. Man and 

girl and farmhouse. I9§ in. 

x 23J in. Unsigned. 
Coats, Sir Thomas Glen, Bart., 

Ferguslie Park, Paisley. 

TWO PORTRAITS OF CHIL- 
DREN. Engraved by Appleton, 
1896. 14 m. x 16 in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 
Collins, Ernest, The Gables, 



Wedderburn Road, Hampstead, 
London, N.W. 

1. the gleaners, 9 in. x 
11 in. 

2. VAGRANT IN A WOOD. 

3. peasant and PIGS. En- 
graved by F. R. Smith, 1803. 
(Cf. Heatherley, Mather, Mc- 
Clintoch, and Richardson.) 

Collins Wood. See Wood. 

Colnaghi, Martin H., Pall 
Mall East, London. 

farmyard. 27I in. x 36 in. 
Signed. 1791. (Exhibited Win- 
ter Exhibition, 1895.) 

landscape (snow scene). 
Canvas. 10 in. x 12 in. (Ex- 
hibited at Guildhall, 1902.) 

Colnaghi, Mrs. Martin H. 

LANDSCAPE WITH GIPSIES 
(panel). 10 in. x 12 in. (Ex- 
hibited at Guildhall, 1902.) 
Cole, W. G., Stoughton, Guild- 
ford. 

OLD ROADSIDE INN, with 

figures. Horses at trough, pigs, 
dogs, etc., and a large tree. 
16 in. x 20 in. Signed. Undated. 

Corcoran Gallery, The 
Washington, U.S.A. 

the farm-house. 35 in. x 
44 in. (One of the first 
pictures acquired by Mr. Cor- 
coran.) 

Cornish, John R., 187, St 
Ann's Road, South Tottenham, 
London, N. 

ISLE OF WIGHT COAST SCENE. 
In background, a ruin on a 
lofty cliff. In foreground, to 
left, three men, with their coats 
off, pulling something ashore. 
20 in. x 24 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

Crews, C. T. D., Portman 
Square. 

a hilly landscape (panel). 
10 in. X12 in. (Exhibited at 
Guildhall, 1902.) 

Courcelles, Rev. J. Hector 
DE, M.A. Oxon, 24, Arundel 



APPENDIX III 



141 



Gardens, Kensington Park 
Road, London. 

two DOGS, about to quarrel 
over a stick brought out of 
water in background. 27J in. 
x 35 in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Dawe, in his " Life of Mor- 
land," 1807 (p. 236), states that 
this picture was then in the 
Collection of Mr. H. H. Town- 
send, of Busbridge, near Godal- 
ming, Surrey. It was after- 
wards acquired by Sir John St. 
Aubyn, grandfather of the 
present proprietor's wife. 
Crosse, E. Meredith, New- 
house Park, St. Albans. 

1. rabbits. Engraved by 
W. Ward, 1806, and F. R. 
Smith, 1807. 2o| in. x 26 J in. 
Signed. Undated. 

2. GUINEA-PIGS. (Cf. Low- 
ther.) (Replica of painting 
engraved by T. Gaugain, 1789O 
2oi in. x 26J in. Signed. 1792. 

/' Rabbits" and "Guinea- 
Pigs " were engraved as a pair 
by W. Ward, 1806, and by J. R. 
Smith, 1807. 

3. TWO FISHERMEN LANDING 

FISH. Other two fishermen 
and dog resting on beach. 
Dog looking out of boat. 25 in. 
x 38 J in. Signed. Undated. 

Daniel, George A., Nunnery 
Court, Frome, Somerset. 

the hard bargain. En- 
graved by W. Ward, 1800. 
21 in. x 26 in. Unsigned. 

Denman, George, 8, Cranley 
Gardens, London, S.W. 

I. A WOODLAND GLADE. A 

woman in a mob-cap turning 
away from spectator watches a 
man kneeling, while he prepares 
a fire under some crossed 
sticks. A boy in red waistcoat 
is seated on the ground to right, 
with a linen bundle, tied to 
a walking-stick, by his side. 



Two large oaks to right 
(autumnal tints). Blue sky 
and clouds in background. On 
oak panel. 8£ in. x 10J in. 
Signed. 1791. 

2. SPORTSMEN AND DOGS. 

A man in red coat, wide- 
brimmed hat, knee breeches 
and gaiters, looks towards the 
spectator with a gun on his 
nght arm. Another sportsman 
in blue coat with brass buttons 
is walking towards him on the 
other side of a low bank of turf, 
also carrying a gun. A brown 
and white dog to left. Woody 
landscape and blue sky. 
Painted on a piece of iron, 
apparently a portion of a tea- 
tray. (Cf. Sir Chas. Hamil- 
ton.) \\ in. x 6 in. 
Donovan, Mrs. Alexander, 
the late, The Drive, Hove, 
Brighton. 

1. stable with white 
HORSE. 23 in. x 28 in. 

2. DOG WORRYING A BOAR. 

(Small picture.) 

These were sold at Brighton, 

3rd March, 1897, by Messrs. 

Jenner and Dell, Auctioneers, 

Brighton. 

DOWDESWELL AND DOWDES- 

well, Limited, 160, New Bond 
Street, London. 

1. SOW AND LITTER. IO in. 

x 12 in. Signed. 1791. 

2. GIPSY SCENE. 8} in. X 
12} in. Initialed. 

3. landscape (sketch), ioin. 
x 12 in. Signed. 

4. BEACH SCENE. II in. X 

14I in. Initialed. 

5. the wreck. 4oin.x5oin. 
Unsigned. 

6. smugglers. Engraved 
by James Ward, 1793. I2 i m - 

x 14J in. Unsigned. 

7. rustic courtship. 16J 
in. x 2o£ in. Signed. 1794. 

8. CAVERN SCENE, Isle of 



142 



GEORGE MORLAND 



Wight 20 in. x 26 in. In- 
itialed. 

9. GIPSY ENCAMPMENT. 17} 

in. x 24 in. Signed. 

10. COAST SCENE. 17 in. X 

23 in. Unsigned. 

11. MORLAND'S SUMMER. 
Engraved by IV. Barnard, 
1892. 20 in. x 24 in. Signed. 

12. SMUGGLERS CAROUSING. 
12 in. x 14$ in. Signed. 

Drake, T. Clayton, Elm 
Grove, Dawlish, Devon. 

EVENING; Or, THE POST- 
BOY'S RETURN. Engraved by 
D. Orme, 1796. 22 in. x 30 in. 
Unsigned. (Cf. Rankin and 
Montagu.) 

Supposed to be a replica of 
that sold at Christie's, 14th May, 
1898, to Sir S. Montagu for 
1, 2 jo guineas (Agnew), and 
which was exhibited at Bur- 
lington House, 1875. 



Eastwood, C, Scotton Grange, 
Knaresborough. 

1. sea-piece. Storm. Wreck 
off Isle of Wight (canvas). 
23} in. x 28} in. Unsigned. 
Dated 1796. 

2. GREY HORSE IN STABLE. 
Dog under manger. 12 in. x 
15 in. Signed. 1795. (No 2. 
exhibited at Leeds, 1868.) 

Egerton, J. M., Hendersyde, 
Torquay. 

selling fish. Engraved 
by F. JR. Smithy 1799. 25 in. x 
30 in. Unsigned. Undated. 
(Cf. Chas. Barton and Mac- 
Dougail.) 

This painting is represented 
in an illustration opposite p. 71 
of Mr. Richardson's " Life of 
Morland." Its history is re- 
lated in a foot-note, p. 62. A 
sketch for this painting was 
sold at Do well's, Edinburgh, 
November 14th, 1896. 



Essex, Major T. Cowper. 

1. A FARMYARD. 28 in. X 

36 in. Signed. 

2. fishermen. 28 in. x 
36 in. Signed, and dated 1793. 

3. A landscape. 12 in. X 
1 5 in. Signed. 

Exhibited at the Victoria and 
Albert Museum, 1904. 

Fine Art Society, 148, New 
Bond Street, London. 

LA FLEUR AND THE DEAD 

ASS. Scene from Sterne's 
"Sentimental Journey." (In 
oil.) Exhibited October, 1896. 
Fitzwilliam Museum, Cam- 
bridge. 

1. GIPSIES AND GENTLEMAN 
WITH DOGS. 

2. PIGS AND DONKEY (small). 

Signed. 

3. SHEPHERD ASLEEP, with 

calf, sheep, and dog (small). 

4. SEASHORE WITH FISHER- 
MEN (small). Signed. 

5. PEASANTS TRAVELLING 

(small). Signed. 

6. landscape, with stream 
and figures (very small). 

Firth, Joseph, 2, Greenmount 
Terrace, Beeston Hill, Leeds. 

1. peasant and pigs (can- 
vas). 25 in. x 30 in. Signed. 
(Cf. Richardson, etc.) 

2. YARMOUTH ROADS (panel). 

10} in. xi 2 J in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 
Feret, Charles J., 3, Norfolk 
Road, Margate. 

1. BARN AND GATE, With tWO 

hogs, one feeding and one rest- 
ing (canvas). ioj in. x 13 in. 

2. RUSTIC LANDSCAPE, with 

villagers, sheep, and dogs. In 
foreground the artist is seated at 
his easel, painting. (Canvas.) , 
9$ in. xii in. Signed. I 

Fellows, Lieut.-Col. 

sea-piece. Fishermen. 39 in. • 
x 55 in. Signed. 1792. 



1 



APPENDIX III 



143 



Flamank, Henry, 153, Ken- 
sington, Liverpool. 

1. SMUGGLERS. 21 in. X 

31 J in. Signed. 

2. MUSSEL GATHERERS. 

17 in. X22 in. Signed. 1797. 
(Sold at Christie's, January 4, 
1896, for £S$ is.) 

3. LAND STORM. I4J in. X 

18 in. 

4. FISHERMEN GOING OUT. 
18 in.X2£ in. Signed. (Sold 
at Christie's, January 4, 1896, 
for £39 iSs.) 

5. shipwreck. 27J in. x 
35 in. Signed. (Sold at 
Christie's, January 4, 1896, for 
£44 2J.) 

6. boatwreck. 18 in. x 
25 in. Signed. 

Fleming, John, 83, Portland 
Place, London, W. 

1. THE TURNPIKE GATE. 

(Oblong.) Engraved by W. 
Ward, 1806. (Cf. Knight, 
J. W.) 24 in. x 29 in. Signed. 
1793- (Exhibited some years 
ago at Burlington House at an 
Exhibition of Old Masters.) 

2. mare and foal. (Ob- 
long.) 12 in. x 14} in. Signed. 
1792. (Belonged to a partner 
of Overend, Gurney and Co.) 

3. waggoner buying 
vegetables from a woman 
with two children. (up- 
right.) 24 in. x 29 in. Signed. 

1797. 

Waggon loaded with full 
corn sacks, on one of which, 
in red, is signed, " G. Morland." 
The woman is very good-look- 
ing, and the waggoner evidently 
admires her. 

FOXHUNTERS LEAVING A 
WAYSIDE INN. (Oblong.) 

31 in. x 41 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Five horsemen and pack and 
a small dark terrier with light- 
brown muzzle (the original fox- 



terrier). A rustic on horseback 
looks on, and holds another 
horse at the door of the inn, on 
sign of which is painted a 
horse. (Companion to No. 5. 

5. THE DEATH. (Oblong.) 

31 in. x 41 in. Signed. 1803. 

The hounds are killing the 
fox, and the huntsman (in pink 
is whipping them off. The 
small terrier is near the hounds. 

Mr. Fleming acquired Nos. 
4 and 5 about thirty years ago. 
He has also a fine painting by 
Morland ' s brother - in - law , 
James Ward, R.A., represent- 
ing a scene on the beach. 

George Morland used to 
paint and hunt in Leicester- 
shire with Charles Loraine 
Smith, a great foxhunter, and 
known as " the Enderby 
Squire." He was the second 
son of Sir Charles Loraine, 
third Bart., of Kirke Horle, 
Northumberland. 
Freeman, G. Broke, 12, New 
Square, Lincoln's Inn, W.C. 

1. WINTER. Very dark sky. 
Boys snowballing. 12 in. x 
15 in. Signed. Undated. 

2. autumn. Gipsy encamp- 
ment. 12 in. x 15 m. Signed. 
Undated. Both painted on 
canvas. 

Garle, Hubert, Billingham, 
Chillerton, Isle of Wight. 

SELLING FISH ON BEACH 

(canvas). 27 in. x 35 in. 
Signed. Undated. 

Man and woman in fore- 
ground on rock with basket 
and Newfoundland dog. Two 
men in a cart with white horse 
receiving fish in basket from a 
man. (Was for seventy years 
in possession of Rev. — Har- 
man, Eagle House, Enfield 
Highway.) 

Also several sketches* 



144 



GEORGE MORLAND 



Gilbey, Sir Walter, Bart-, 
Elsham Hall, Essex. 

1. THE FOX INN. 54 in. X 

63 in. Signed. 1792. 

2. DEATH OF THE FOX. 

56} in. x 92$ in. Signed. 
Undated. 

3. duck-shooting! 9i in. 
x 1 if in. Signed. Undated. 

4. partridge-^ 

shooting I A .„ 

5. PHEASANT- J A Pair# 

shootingJ 
1 Si in. x 20 in. Unsigned. 
Undated. (Cf. Huth, C. F.) 
Nos. 4 and 5 etched by T. 
Rowlandson, 1790. 

6. setters. Engraved by 
W. Ward, 1806. nf in. x 
I4f in. Signed. Undated. 

7. the weary sportsman. 
Engraved by W. Bond, 1805. 
11 J in. xi 5} in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

8. WINTER (Cattle), uf in. 
x 14 j in. Signed. Undated. 

9. winter (Skating). 19$ 
x 25 J in. Signed. Undated. 

10. gipsy encampment. 
24 i in. X29$in. Signed. 1791. 

11. gipsy encampment. 
I7f in. x 24 in. Signed, " G. 
Morland, J. Rathbone." 1791. 

12. wreckers. 58 in. x 
80J in. Signed. Undated. 

13. sand-carting. 18 J in. 
X25U1. Signed. 1791. 

14. POSTBOYS AND HORSES 

refreshing. 19 in. x 25 in. 
Signed. 1794. 

15. THE dram. Engraved 
by W. JVara\ 1796. 24J in. x 
29J in. Signed. Undated. 

16. THE DESERTER'S FARE- 
WELL. 16} in. x 21 J in. 
Signed. 1792. 

17. THE EFFECTS OF YOUTH- 
FUL EXTRAVAGANCE AND IDLE- 
NESS. Engravedby W. Ward, 
1789. 24J in. x 29 J in, Un- 
signed. Undated, 



8. THE MERCILESS BAILIFF. 

I3f in. x 18 in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

19. THE COTTAGE DOOR. 

33i in. x 45^ in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

20. INNOCENTS ALARM'D; 
Or, THE FLASH IN THE PAN. 

Engraved by F. R. Smithy 
j'unr., 1803. 27J in. x 36 in. 
Unsigned. Undated. 

21. BOY TENDING SHEEP 

18} in. X25 in. Signed. Un 
dated. 

22. GATHERING STICKS. IlJ 

in. xi 5 J in. Signed. 1791. 

23. the fall. 9 J in. x 1 1 J in. 
Signed. 1794. 

24. the dipping well. 
1 1 J in. x 1 4 J in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

25. a storm off black- 
gang chine. 36 in. x 54$ in. 
Signed, and dated 1790. 

Sir Walter Gilbey exhibited 
all his collection at the Victoria 
and Albert Museum in 1904. 
Glasgow. The Corporation 
Galleries of Art. 

1. landscape. An inland 
stream. 1 1 in. x 14$ in. Signed. 
Undated. 

Sketch of a landscape with 
stream spanned by a bridge, 
near which are a cottage and 
some figures. 

2. seacoast scene. Smug- 
glers. I2lin.xi5in. Signed. 
1793. M'Lellan Collection. 

A rocky seacoast, with boat 
containing barrels, which men 
are unloading in a creek, 
where stands a man with white 
horse. 

3. SEACOAST SCENE. Storm 

and Wreck. 19J in. x 24 in. 
Signed. Undated. Euing Col- 
lection. 

Rock-bound seacoast, with 
stormy sea and ship wrecked 
near the shore. Men launch a 



APPENDIX III 



145 



boat from shore, whilst man 
and woman in foreground look 
on. 

4. sbapiece. 12 in. x 16 in. 
Initialed. Undated. Euing 
Collection. 

A seashore with high cliffs 
and calm sea. Several boats 
drawn up on shore. Figures 
in foreground. (All the above 
on canvas.) 
Gray, Hon. Morton Stuart, 
Kinfauns Castle, Perth. 

woodland scene. Women, 
Man, Boy and Donkey. 38} in. 
x s°i in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 
Grice Hutchinson, G. W., 
The Boynes, Upton-on-Severn. 

seascape (Isle of Wight). 
36 in. x 38 in. Initialed. Un- 
dated. 



Hamilton, Duke of, The late. 

STABLE SCENE. 20 in. X 

26$ in. 

A postilion in a hay-loft 
caresses a very pretty girl 
seated on his knee. A man 
peeps from behind a truss of 
hay. (Beautifully painted.) 
Previously belonged to Mr. 
Louis Huth. 
Hamilton, Lieut.-Col. Sir 
Chas. £., Bart., 82, Cadogan 
Square, London, S.W. 

I. THE CORNISH PLUNDER- 
ERS. 54 in. x 78 in. Signed. 
Undated. (Described by J. 
Hassell in his "Life of Mor- 
land.") 

This picture belonged to 
Louis Philippe, and hung for 
years in the Louvre. It then 
came into the Standish Collec- 
tion, on the sale of which Sir 
Chas. Hamilton obtained it. 
In 1892 ^840 was bid for it at 
Christie's, but t was not sold, 
but withdrawn. It represents 



an animated scene on a beach 1 
with " Cornish wreckers " ran- 
sacking shipwrecked goods. 

2. SHRIMPING OFF THE ISLE 

OF wight. 30 in. x 48 in. Un- 
signed. 

3. COTTAGE WITH DONKEY 

and boy (Snow Scene). 19 in. 
x 28 in. Unsigned. 

4. SHEEP, COW AND BOY. 

18 in. x 24 in. Unsigned. 

5. SEA-COAST, MEN AND 

boat. 18 in. x 24 in. Un- 
signed. 

6. ALEHOUSE KITCHEN. 

Engraved by R. S. Syer, 1801. 
11 in. x 24 in. Unsigned. 
(Referred to by Hassell.) 

7. DONKEY AND PIGS IN 
FARMYARD. 1 9 in. X 25 in. 
Unsigned. 

8 and 9. RUSTIC SCENES, 
painted on iron tea-trays, each 
18 in. x 24 in. Unsigned. 
(Painted by Morland when 
under nineteen, when he was 
trout-fishing on the borders of 
Lancashire and; Yorkshire.) 
(Cf. Denman.) 

Mr. R. Dyson Nutt, 2, 
Westfield Terrace, Loftus-in- 
Cleveland, has a painting done 
on a tea-tray, and signed M G. 
Morland," representing sheep 
and lambs in a barn, with two 
children looking in. The 
family has possessed the picture 
for a very long time. 

IO. PORTFOLIO OF SKETCHES 

by Morland. 
Hargreaves, Mrs., Arborfield 
Hall, Reading. 

1. GIPSY SCENE. 

2. RURAL SCENE. 

Hatherley, H., 23, Brunswick 
Place, Brighton. 

PEASANT and PIGS. En- 
graved by F* R. Smith. 17 in. 
X24 in. Unsigned. (Larger 
than Mr. Richardson's pic- 
ture.) 

IO 



146 



GEORGE MORLAND 



(Cf. Mather, McClintock, and 
Collins.) 
Hawkins, C. H., 10, Portland 
Place, London. 

two landscapes, each about 
10 in. x 10 in. 
Hearn, Arthur H., 20, West 
14th Street, New York. 

forester's home. 16J in. 
x 24} in. 
Hearn, George A., 20, West 
14th Street, New York. 

1 . WEARY WAYFARERS, 1 6 in. 

X21 in. 

2. NOONDAY REST. 17 m. X 

19 in. 

3. SHEPHERDS REPOSING. 

15 in.x 18 in. 

4. BLISSFUL PIGS. IO in. X 
12 j in. 

Hogarth, D., Union Bank of 
Scotland, Dundee. 

1. gipsies. Engraved by 
W. Ward, 1792. 274 in. x 
36 in. Signed. 1792. 

(Cf. McClintock, Paton. and 
Peck.) 

2. YOUNG MAN COURTING 
YOUNG WOMAN. A girl on 
white pony. Dogs, donkey, 
etc. 19 in. x 23$ in. Un- 
signed. 

3. SHEEP. 9$ in. x 13 in. 
Unsigned. 

4. FARMER'S STABLE. 1 7 in. 

X21 in. Unsigned. 
Hogg, John, 13, Paternoster 
Row, London. 

two pigs .in a sty, one 
standing, the other lying down. 
26} in. x 33J in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

HOHENLOHE, PRINCE, Castle 

Duino, near Trieste. 

" There are two pictures here 
that I am convinced are by 
Morland." — Princess Mary if 
Thum and Taxis in "Travels 
in Unknown Austria" (Mac- 
millan and Co., London, 1896, 
p. 19). 



1. DEAD DOG. 

2. LIVING DOG. I 



Holburne (of Menstrie), Art 
Museum, Bath. 

\ Small, un- 
\ attractive 
J pictures. 

3. PORTRAIT OF GEORGE 

morland (so catalogued). 

(This does not resemble 
contemporary portraits of Mor- 
land, and " Hogarth " is printed 
on its frame. Hogarth died 
when Morland was a year old, 
and this portrait is of a middle- 
aged man.) 
Holloway College, Royal, 
Egham. 

1. THE CARRIER PREPARING 
TO SET OUT. 34 in. x 46 in. 
Signed. 1793. (From the Earl 
of Dunmore's Collection.) 

2. JACK IN THE BILBOES. 
Engraved by W. Ward, 1790, 
and R, Clamp, 1797. 14 in. x 
18 in. Signed. 1790. 

3. THE CONTENTED WATER- 
MAN. Engraved by W. Ward, 

1 790, and R. Clamp, 1 797. 1 4 in. 
xi8in. Signed. 1790. (The 
two last are companion pic- 
tures.) 

Huth, Charles Frederick, 
The late. 

1. VISIT TO THE CHILD AT 
NURSE. Engravedby W.Ward, 
1788. (Sold at Christie's, July 6, 
1895, for 1,050 gs.) 

2. PARTRIDGE-) 

shooting A pair. {Cj. 

3. pheasant- " Gilbey.) 

shooting; 
Nos. 2 and 3 etched by T. 
Rowlandson, 1790. (Sold at 
Christie's, July 6, 1895, for 
480 £?. the pair.) 

4. A COTTAGE DOOR. (Sold 

at Christie's, July 6, 1895, for 
7iogs.) 

5. THE STRANGERS AT HOME. 

Engraved by W. Nutter, 1788. 
(Sold at Christie's, June 25, 
1898, for 150^3.) 



APPENDIX III 



147 



Sale of the late C. F. Huttis Mor- 
lands at Christie '*, March 19, 
1904. 

1. THE TRAVELLERS' RE- 
PAST; Or, THE TRAVELLERS. 

Engraved by W. Ward % 1791, 

11° gs- 

2. THE TRAVELLERS' HALT, 
130 gs. 

3. A SHEPHERD REPOSING, 
2IO gs. 

4. " LOUISA." Engraved by 
T. Gaugain, 1789, 330 gs. 

HUTH, LOUIS, Possingworth, 
Cross-in- Hand, Hawkhurst. 

1. INTERIOR OF ALEHOUSE. 

9i in. x n£ in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

A tired sportsman, in green 
coat, sitting astride a chair, and 
resting his head and arms on 
back, asleep. Two dogs at his 
feet, also his hat. Two men in 
background sitting at a window. 

(Thinly painted, silvery, and 
harmonious.) 

2. MAN IN BLUE COAT AND 

red COLLAR, leaning against a 
tree in middle of a wood and 
talking to two seated women, 
one of whom suckles a baby. 
Setter in foreground. 9$ in. x 
11^ in. Unsigned. Undated. 

3. interior of stable. 
Engraved by W. Ward. 20 in. 

x 26$ in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

White horse (much admired 
by Sir E. Landseer). A man 
leaning on same, looking at 
man and woman romping in 
straw (mentioned by Hassell, 
p. 14). (C£ Asiatic Society.) 

4. two donkeys, one with 
cropped ears. A pig with collar 
lyinjj down. n£ in. x 143 in. 
Unsigned. Undated. 

5. winter piece. 27f in. 
x 35^ in. Signed. Undated. 

Cottage and oak-tree covered 



with snow. Three donkeys, 
dog, and woman in red cloak. 
Children sliding on small pond, 
one of whom has fallen. 

6. RUSTIC SCENE. I3J in. X 

15 in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Cottage and oak- tree on bank. 
Pigs, donkey, and group of 
gipsies. 

7. MORNING J Or, THE HIG- 
GLERS PREPARING FOR MAR- 
KET. Engraved by D, Orme, 
1796. 27J in. x 35^ in. Signed. 

1791. 

8. SNOW-PIECE. 27^ in. x 
35 i in. Signed. 1790. 

Cottage and oak-tree. Two 
ponies. Two lads snowballing 
an old woman, who shakes her 
fist at them, whilst a dog barks 
at her. 

9. THE PERCH-FISHER. Sold 

at Christie's, May 7, 1898, for 
^So gs. (Coinaghi.) 

Ichenhauser, J., Berkeley Gal- 
leries, Bruton Street, London. 

1. THE VILLAGE PUMP. 

2. THE CHARCOAL-BURNERS. 

Both reproduced in the Sketch 
of November 27, 1895. 
Iveagh, Lord. 

a wayside inn. By G. 
Morland. Size of picture, 40 in. 
x 57 in. (Painted on canvas.) 

Landscape, with figures at the 
door of an inn. A covered cart 
drawn by two horses under a 
large tree ; a boy feeds one of 
the horses. On a seat round 
the foot of the tree a game- 
keeper and a woman holding a 
child ; two children stand near 
her. At the door of the house 
three men, one holding a dead 
hare, three sporting dogs near 
the tree, some pigs on the right ; 
on the left the inn sign on a 
post near a well ; the sign bears 
the artist's signature, " G. Mor- 
land." 

10 — 2 



148 



GEORGE MORLAND 



Jewell, Mrs. C. S., 27, Lans- 
downe Crescent, Cheltenham. 

THE TURNPIKE GATE. l8 in. 
X24in. Signed. 1793. 
(Cf. Fleming and Knight.) 
Johnston, Mrs. Rose, Broom- 
field, Stanmore. 

winter scene, with cottage 
and figures on a road. Signed. 
Johnston, Robert B. L., Lea- 
hurst, Hoole, Chester. 

A BUTCHER BARGAINING IN 
A BARN WITH A FARMER FOR A 

calf, a man in scarlet coat 
sitting on manger with a dog at 
his feet. (Canvas.) 20J in. x 
26} in. Signed. Undated. 

(Has never been engraved, 
although another very similar 
picture has. It was originally 
purchased by Mr. Bainbrigge 
of Woodseat, near Uttoxeter, 
who died fifty years ago. Mr. 
Johnston inherited it from his 
grandfather, General J. H. 
Bainbrigge, of Guernsey.) 
JOULE, A. J., 45, Montreal Street, 
Victoria, British Columbia. 

WOODLAND SCENE, with COW, 
sheep/and goat in right fore- 
ground. 1 3 in. x 1 5 in. I nitialed. 
Undated. 

Kelly, F. A., South Street 
Brewery, Sheffield. 

1. A SCENE IN DERBYSHIRE. 

Cottage door. Man and gray 
horse. 34 in. x 50 in. Signed. 
1792. 

2. THE DEAD PORKER. 

Farmyardwith butcher, peasants 
looking on, dog, etc. 25 in. x 
30 in. Initialed. Undated. 

No. 2 from John Raphael 
Smith's Collection. See Has- 
sell's " Life of Morland." 

Kensington (see South). 

Knight, E. A., Esq., Wolverley 
House, Kidderminster. 

the waggoner's halt out- 
side THE BELL INN. (A superb 
picture.) 



Knight, J. W„ 33, Hyde Park 
Square, London, W. 

1. GEORGE MORLAND'S POR- 
TRAIT, done by himself when a 
boy. 19J in. x 23J in. Un- 
signed. (Cf. Millard and 
National Portrait Gallery.) 
Grosvenor Gallery, 1888-89. 

2. the GYPSIES' TENT. En- 
graved by y. Grozer, 1793. 
36 in. x 4 1 in. Unsigned. (Cf. 
Rutherford.) 

3. A farmyard, A former 
on grey horse faces a brown 
horse, whose near fore-leg is 
examined by a man. A brown 
horse in loose-box. Dog in 
foreground. Landscape and 
farm building. 2j\ in. x 35 J in. 
Signed. 1789. 

4. THE TURNPIKE GATE. 
Engraved by IV. Ward, 1806. 
24$ in. x 29J in. Signed. (Cf. 
Fleming and Jewell.) 

5. THE HORSE - FEEDER. 
Engraved by J. R. Smith, 1799. 
1 6J in. x 21 in. Signed. (Cf. 
Rankin.) 

6. GIPSY ENCAMPMENT. 

n£ in. x 14J in. Unsigned. 

7. shipwreck. 15J in. x 
19 in. Unsigned. 

8. LANDSCAPE WITH GIPSIES. 
1 1 \ in. x 1 if in. Signed. 1 795. 

9. LANDSCAPE WITH GIPSIES. 

6£ in. x 8f in. Signed at back 
on panel. 

10. FEMALE PORTRAIT. 

(Oval.) 6 in. x 4$ in. 

Lawrie and Co., 15, Old Bond 
Street, London. 

MR. LYNN'S COTTAGE AT 
COWES, ISLE OF WIGHT, with 
portrait of Mr. Lynn looking at 
his horse. 34 in. x 42 in. 1799. 
(Dawe's "Life of Morland," 
p. 231.) 
Lawson, Rev. F. P., Sudborough 
Rectory, Thrapston. 

villagers. Woman, child, 
and dog crossing a bridge. 



APPENDIX III 



149 



(Panel.) Engraved by John 
Young, 1803. io£ in. x 23 £ in. 
Signed. Undated. 
Leake, P. D., Church House, 
Weybridge Village, Surrey. 

Two paintings by John Rath- 
bone (born, 1750; died, 1807), 
containing groups by G. Mor- 
land. Both 12 in. x 15 in. 
Signed "J. Rathbone, G. Mor- 
land." They are not dated. 
Their subjects are — 

1. WOOD SCENE, with groups 
of gipsies round a fire with 
cauldron ; red-cloaked woman 
and dog. 

2. TREES AND WATER. A 

red-cloaked woman with basket 
on arm, walking through a 
wood; cattle on banks of stream. 
Both are in excellent pre- 
servation, and were probably 
bought about 1829 at Lord 
Blandford's sale at White- 
knights Park, Reading. 

3. pigs in sty. (Panel.) 
12 in. x 17 in. Initialed. 1792. 

Leicester Art Gallery, 
calm off the coast of 

the isle OF wight. (Painted 

on a mahogany panel.) 1 1 j in. 

x i6J in. Signed. Undated. 
Lenox Library Gallery, New 

York. 

1. PIGS IN A FODDER YARD. 

20 in. x 26 in. 

Bought at Christie's, June 21, 
1850. 

2. REVENUE CUTTER IN 
CHASE OF A SMUGGLER OFF 
ISLE OF WIGHT. 20 in. X 26 in. 

Bought at Christie's, 
March 11, 1848. 
Louvre, The, Paris. 

la halte. Scene outside an 

inn. Engraved by Rajon y Paris. 

Lowther, Captain Francis, 

R.N., 73, Pont Street, London, 

S.W. 

1. GUINEA-PIGS. Engraved 
by T. Gaugain, 1789. 25 in. X 



29} in. Unsigned. 
(Cf. Cro k 



Undated. 
(Cf. Crosse.) 

2. DANCING DOGS. Engraved 
by 71 Gaugain, 1790. 25 in. x 
29} in. Unsigned. Undated. 

No. 1 engraved (with 
"Rabbits") by W. Ward, 1806, 
and J. R. Smithy 1807. 

Exhibited at Victoria and 
Albert Museum, 1904. 

MacDougall, G. R., Manhattan 
Club, New York. 

1. SELLING fish. Engraved 
by J. R. Smithy 1799. 20 in. x 
24 in. Signed. 1791 or 1797. 
(Cf. Barton and Egerton.) 

2. COTTAGE INTERIOR. Blue- 

coated man, seated, with pipe 
and jug ; another man, stand- 
ing, leaning against door-post. 
(Panel.) 11 in. x 14 m. Initialed. 
Undated. 

McFadden, J. H., Esq. 
The Manchester Coach. 

Macturk, G. G., Ryeland Hall, 
South Cave, Yorkshire. 

INTERIOR OF A STABLE. 

Two farm lads, two asses, a 
dog, some straw, a horse collar. 
Mahaffy, W. Truru, Ward 
Villa, W., Bangor, Co. Down. 

LADY IN WHITE DRESS RE- 
CLINING IN LEAFY BOWER, 

and a man with red vest and 
blue stockings near her. 10 in. 
xi2in. Unsigned. Undated. 
Manchester Art Gallery. 

THE FARRIER'S FORGE. 28 in. 

X36in. Signed. 1793. 

Presented by John Greaves, 
of Irlam Hall, 1835. A white 
horse is brought by a smocked 
swain, with a bull-dog, to a 
red-jacketed farrier, who kneels 
down and points to the horse's 
fore-leg : forge and inn behind, 
with four figures ; an oak to right. 
Mappin Art Gallery, Sheffield. 
the village inn. 23 in. 
x 30 in. Signed. Undated. 



150 



GEORGE MORLAND 



Marshall, George W., LL.D., 
Sarncsfield Court, Weobly. 

PIGS in A sty. Woman look- 
ing over gate at them. 24 in. 
x 30 in. Initialed. Undated. 

Mason, W. H., 41, Handsworth 
Road, Blackpool. 

PIGSTY. Two men look into 
it, in which are a sow and 
three piglings. 18 in. x 20 in. 

Mather, Dr. George H., 11, 
Annfield Place, Dennistoun, 
Glasgow. (Died Nov. 29, 1895.) 
PEASANT AND PIGS. En- 
graved by J. R. Smithy 1803. 
12 in. X15 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. (Cf. Hatherley, Collins, 
and McClintock.) 

Same as Mr. Richardson's 
picture, except that the little 
girl has a brown frock. The 
canvas also is smaller. 

Mawson, John, 44, Railway 
Terrace, Southport. 

GIPSY ENCAMPMENT. (In 

crayons.) 1 5 in. x 19 in. Signed. 

McClintock, Major H. S., Kil- 

warlin House, Hillsborough, 

Co. Down, Ireland. 

1. PAYING THE HORSELER. 
Engraved by S. W. Reynolds, 
1805. (On canvas.) 23 in. x 
32 in. Initialed. Undated. 

2. THE PUBLIC-HOUSE DOOR. 
Engraved by W. Ward, 1801. 
(On canvas.) 18 in. x 21 in. 
Unsigned. Undated. 

3. gipsies. Engraved by 
W. IVard,i792. (On canvas.) 
21 in. x 24 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. Cf. Hogarth, Paton, 
and Peck.) 

4. peasant and pigs. En- 
graved by /. R. Smith, 1803. 
(On canvas.) 18 in. x 24 in. 
Signed. 1791. (Cf. Hatherley, 
Mather, Richardson, and 
Collins.) 

Mee, Rev. Dr., The Chantry, 

Westbourne, Emsworth, Hants. 

1. landscape. Village inn, 



with figures. (On canvas.) 
20J in. x 25 in. 

2. landscape. Cattle and 
figures. (On panel.) 15 in. x 
20} in. 

3. WINTER SCENE. (On 

panel) 11^x15 in. 

4. LANDSCAPE AND CATTLE. 

(On panel.) 12 in. x 14J in. 

No dates or signatures on 
above. 
Metropolitan Museum, New 
York. 

MID-DAY meal. 28 in. x 36 in. 
Presented by Mr. George A. 
Hearn. 
Meyer, Carl. 

mutual confidence, 
1 6} in. xi 3 J in. 
Michaelis, Max, Tandridge 
Court, Oxted, Surrey. 

1. TEMPTATION. A replica 
of painting engraved by W. 
Humphrey, 1 790. 25 in. x 30 in. 
Signed. 1792. 

2. selling cherries. En- 
graved by E. Bell, 1801 . 20 in. 

x 36 in. Signed. Undated. 

3. THE DEATH OF THE FOX. 

Engraved ^by J. Wright, 

1794. 

20 in. x 26 in. Signed. 1794. 
Millard, Henry, 52, John 
Street, Barnsbury, London. 

1. THE ARTIST'S PORTRAIT. 

Half length. When a lad of 
twelve or thirteen. (Cf. Knight, 
No. 1, and National Portrait 
Gallery.) 

2. TWO PIGS IN A STY. 

Montagu, Sir Samuel, Bart., 
M.P., 12, Kensington Palace 
Gardens, London. 

1. FARMYARD WITH PIGS. 

25 in. x 30 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Bought at J. M. Eager's sale 
at Christie's, 1883. Exhibited 
at R.A. Exhibition of Old 
Masters, 1894. 

2. EVENING J or, THE POST- 



APPENDIX III 



I5i 



boy's RETURN. Engraved by 
D. Orme. 1 796. 36 in. x 27J in. 
Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1875. From the col- 
lection of G. H. Morland. 
Albert Levy, 1876; F. Fish, 
1888. Bought by Sir S. Mon- 
tagu at Rankin's sale at 
Christie's, May 14, 1898, for 
1,250 gs. (Cf. Drake and 
Rankin.) 
Morgan, J. Pierpont. 

EVENING, OR THE SPORTS- 
MAN'S return. Engraved 
at Society of British Artists, 
1790. as "The Cottage 
Door." Engraved by /. 
Grozer in 1795. (Canvas) 
39 U1.X48 in. Companion 
picture to " Morning, or 
the Benevolent Sportsman." 
From Collection of Sir Julius 
Wernher. 

A LADY IRONING. A joint 

work by Henry Robert and 

George Morland. 
Morland, Captain George, 
22, St. Stephen's Square, 
Bayswater, London. (Grand- 
nephew of George Morland.) 

GIRL WITH DOLL. 7 in. X 

8£in. 

Nathan, J., Burlington Gallery, 
27, Old Bond Street, London. 

LANDSCAPE WITH GIPSIES. 

28 J in. x 36J in. 
New York. (See Metropolitan 

Museum of.) 
National Gallery, London. 

I. THE FARMER'S STABLE. 
Engraved by W. Ward y 1792. 
57 in.X79$ in. Signed. Un- 
dated. [No. 1 030. J 

Two horses and a pony are 
being led by a boy into a stable. 
To the left a man is stooping 
and collecting together some 
straw. (On canvas.) 

Said to be that of the 



White Lion at Paddington. 
Exhibited at the Royal Academy 
in 1 79 1, purchased from the 
exhibition by the Rev. Sir 
Henry Bate Dudley, Bart., and 
presented to the National 
Gallery by his nephew, Mr. 
Thomas Birch Wolfe, in 1877. 
Engraved by William Ward 
in 1792. 

2. A QUARRY, WITH PEAS- 
ANTS. 7 in. x 9 in. Unsigned. 
Undated. [No. 1067.] 

Broken ground, with a high, 
gravelly bank studded with 
scrub. (On panel.) 

Sold at Mr. Jesse Curling's 
sale in 1856. Purchased at the 
Anderdon sale in 1879. 

3. DOOR OF THE RED LION 
COUNTRY INN. [No. I35I.] 

41 in. x 49 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Farmer on white pony at inn 
door. Landlady oners him a 
mug of ale. Children at door. 
Two dogs. Youth burns brush- 
wood. Distant hills and 
meadows. (On canvas.) 

Bequeathed by Sir Oscar 
M. P. Clayton, C.B., in 1892. 

The original, or a replica, 
was sold in June, 1896, by 
Messrs. Colnaghi to Mr. Or- 
rock, q.v. 

This painting is described in 
the new official catalogue, pub- 
lished in 1896, where, however, 
some errors occur in the bio- 
graphical notice of George 
Morland. (1) Maria Morland 
was married to William, not 
James, Ward. (2) George 
Morland's wife never separated 
from him, for they were always 
a most affectionate couple. 
(3) The portrait of Morland 
by Muller, engraved by Ed- 
wards, is unreliable, being 
unlike other contemporary 
portraits, including those by 



*5* 



GEORGE MORLAND 



Morland himself. (4) 'The 
"Drawing with a Poker" 
was not Morland's first exhibit 
at the Royal Academy. 

4. RABBITING. [No. I497.] 

(Canvas.) 34 in. x 47 in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

A bequest of Mr. Joseph 
Travers Smith, added August, 
1897. 

Man, woman, and boy watch- 
ing a man slipping a greyhound 
at a rabbit leaving a hole in a 
warren, the other holes being 
netted. Dead rabbits in fore- 
ground. A thatched cottage 
in left background. A spread- 
ing oak behind the warren. 
National Gallery of Scot- 
land, Edinburgh. 

THE STABLE DOOR : A STUDY. 

(Canvas.) 13 in. x 15 in. 
Signed. Undated. 

Two horses drinking at a 
trough. Two men, one in a 
blue coat with a glass in his 
hand, stand beside door of 
thatch -covered stable. 

A poor example of Morland. 
National Gallery or Ire- 
land, Dublin. 

landscape, with figures 
and cattle. (On canvas.) 
2o£ in. x 26J in. Signed. Un- 
dated. Purchased in 1883. 

The Registrar of the Gallery 
(Mr. Strickland) remarks : 
"This is an undoubted and 
genuine work of Morland, al- 
though the signature is not 
quite above suspicion." 
National Portrait Gallery, 
London. 

PORTRAIT OF ARTIST WHEN 

A boy. 12 in. x 14 in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

Morland is represented with 
long brown hair and blue eyes. 
He wears a brown coat and 
white neckerchief. The picture 
is carefully painted. 



Presented May, 1876, by 
William Smith, F.S.A. (Mor- 
land as a boy was represented 
with fair hair in portrait exhi- 
bited by Mr. Knight, q.v.) 

Another of the artist, by 
himself, drawn in chalks. 18^ in. 
x 13 in. Purchased by the 
Trustees, 1899. 
Nottingham Gallery. 

the wreckers. 27 in. x 
20 in. [56.] From the Cart- 
wright Collection. 

the artist in his studio, 
and his man gibbs. 30 in. 
x 25 in. Signed. [57.] 

LANDSCAPE, WITH TWO MEN 

and sheep. Pencil and red 
chalk drawing on paper, of in. 
X7in. [127.] 

PEASANTS LEADING HORSES 

TO water. Chalk drawing. i6in 
x 12 in. Dated 1794. [128.] 

Oldham, John, St. Vincent's 
Presbytery, 13, Hardy Street, 
Liverpool. 

THE WOODCUTTER. En- 
graved by W. Ward, 1792. 
23 in. x 27} in. Unsigned. 
(Cf. Armitage and Peck.) 
Orton, Dr. Charles, Ochiltree, 
near Hastings. 

sheep and shepherds in 
a storm. 25 in. x 30 in. 
Signed. 1 790 or 1796. 
Orrock, James, 48, Bedford 
Square, London, W.C. 

1. DOOR OF THE RED LION 
COUNTRY INN. 

The original, or a replica, of 
painting in National Gallery, ^.v. 

Mr. Louis Huth thinks Mr. 
Orrock's is the finer in tone. 

2. LOUISA. 15! in. x 12J in. 
(Oval.) 

Oxford University Gallery. 

landscape. 1 7i in. x 2 1 in. 

From the Archbant sale, 1839. 

Bequeathed by Dr. Penrose, 

1 85 1. [No. 106.] 



APPENDIX III 



153 



A HUNTING SCENE. l6> in. 
X 22 in. 
Paton, James, Superintendent of 
the Corporation Galleries of 
Art, Glasgow. 

1. Gipsies. A group of four 
figures under an oak-tree. 
Engraved by W. Ward, 1792. 

19 in. x i\\ in. • Unsigned. 
Undated. 

(Cf. Hogarth, McClintock, 
and Peck.) 

2. HILLY LANDSCAPE, 
SUSSEX. A slight sketch 
(injured). $i in. xy in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

Peck, George Harland-, 9, 
Belgrave Square, London, 
S.W. 

1. THE WOODCUTTER. En- 
graved by W. Ward, 1792. 

20 in. x 26 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. (Cf. Armitage and Old- 
ham.) 

A woodman lops the branches 
off an oak, whilst two children 
play with a donkey. In back- 
ground gipsies beside a fire. 
In foreground dog asleep and 
baskets. 

2. WASHING DAY. 20 in. X 

26 in. 

Cottage scene. A woman 
pours water from a kettle into 
washing-tub. On right a man 
dips up water from a pond. In 
foreground two children play 
with dolls. To left a woman 
hangs up clothes to dry. 

3. THE QUARRY. l6 in. X 

20 in. Signed. 

Stone quarry near roadside. 
Two men work, whilst three 
pull up with ropes a trolley 
laden with stone. A cart waits 
to receive it. 

4. COAST SCENE. IO in. X 

12 in. Initialed. 

Seacoast, with high ground, 
and a cottage on right Four 
figures on shore. 



5. FOREST SCENE. l$\ in. 
x 17 in. Signed. 

Outskirts of a wood, with 
man, woman, and child seated 
on a bank in foreground. 

A rather sth% early work, 
very carefully painted. 

6. THE FISHERMAN'S TOAST; 
or, fishermen ASHORE. En- 
graved by W. Hilton, 1806. 
19 in. x 22 in. 

In centre a fishwoman with 
a basket on her head. Two 
fishermen sitting on right hold 
up their glasses to her health. 
Behind, a view of sea and a 
ship. On left, a dog. On 
right, an inn. 

7. MARKET CART. 1 7 in. X 

22$ in. Initialed. 

A country lane, down which 
passes a cart with a man 
driving, a red-cloaked woman 
and white dog following. A 
spreading oak to right and 
some felled timber. 

A bad copy of a part of this 
picture is in the Foster Gallery 
at the South Kensington 
Museum. 

8. pigsty. 27b in* x 35i in- 
Signed. Undated. 

On the left, a sow and two 
little pigs. Carrots and turnips 
in foreground. On right, a 
trough, against which rests a 
broom. A man with car- 
penter's basket leans against 
the rails of the sty, dressed in 
a white smock, and without a 
hat. (Cf. Roe.) 

9. gipsies. Engraved by W. 
Ward, 1792. 17 in. x 23J in. 
(Cf. Hogarth, Paton, McClin- 
tock.) 

10. LOUISA. (Oval.) En- 
graved by T. Gaugain, 1789. 
12^ in. x 15$ in. Signed. 1782. 

Louisa is listening to the 
voice of her lover, which she 
seems to hear through the 



154 



GEORGE MORLAND 



storm which is raging on the 
seacoast, where a vessel being 
wrecked is seen in the distance. 

A very beautifully finished 
work. Soft colouring. 

One of the pair engraved to 

illustrate a poem by Mrs. , 

of Bath. 

11. THE LABOURERS' LUN- 
CHEON. Engraved by C. Josi, 
1797. ioj in. x 1 si in. Signed. 
1792. 

In foreground, two labourers, 
one seated on the ground with 
a mug in his hand, whilst the 
other, holding a knife, stands 
with his back turned. A 
dog looks up at the standing 
figure. 

12. children fishing. En- 
graved by P. Dawe, 1788. 10 
in. x 1 1 in. Signed. Undated. 

Two children on the bank of 
a stream. The boy holds a 
stick which has a string to it, 
from which hangs a small fish 
he has caught. The girl is 
seated, but turns towards the 
boy to try and secure the fish. 
Her hat lies on the ground 
beside her. She wears a white 
dress and scarlet shoes. 

This picture is an exquisite 
gem, both in finish and colour, 
and forms one of the finest 
examples of Morland's com- 
bined breadth and finish, with 
lovely colour, especially in the 
painting of the children and of 
the dress of the girl. The old 
oak behind the figures, and the 
bank, grass, and water, are also 
beautifully painted. ( Vide 
remarks under Sir Charles Ten- 
nan t, No. 1, as to Morland as a 
painter of children.) 

13. FOREST GLADE. 7 \ in. 

x 10 in. Signed. 1791. 

A small (rather dark) view in 
a wood. In the foreground, a 
man wearing a red jacket, and 



a dog. In the distance, another 
figure and dog. 
Picture in bad condition. 

14. A STABLE YARD. 28 in. 

X36in. Signed. 1791. 

Exterior of a turf-thatched 
stable -hut. Two men at door, 
one in a red vest, the other 
holding a bag. An old brown 
horse, harnessed, is about to 
enter stable. Three pigs in 
foreground. In background a 
precipice, and two small water- 
falls to right hand. 

An excellent picture. 
Peynton, Rev. Francis J., 
Rector of Kelston, near Bath. 

A farmyard. 27 in. x 36 in. 
Philadelphia Public Gal- 
lery, U.S.A. 

landscape, 15 in. x 18 in. 
Phillips, F. Abbiss, Esq., 
Manor House, Stoke d' Abernon, 
Cobham, Surrey. 

This collection is known as 
the "Abbiss and Phillips Col- 
lection," and its nucleus appears 
to be the collection of " William 
Phillips, Esq., of Gloucester 
Place," mentioned at p. 233 of 
Dawe's •■ Life of Morland." 

1. WRECK OF BOAT. 1 1} in. 

x 14^ in. Signed. Undated. 
Sailors climbing up a rock. 
(Oblong.) 

2. the storm (off Black 
Gang Chine). 36 in. x 54J in. 
Signed. 1790. 

Sea breaking over a rocky 
coast. Men drawing up a boat 
and bales of goods. Ship under 
double-reefed sails. Small 
lugger under shelter of the 
land. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at DowdeswelPs in 
1894. 

J. THE BLIND WHITE HORSE, 
in. X35 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Man driving horses to water 
from stable. (Oblong.) 



APPENDIX III 



155 



Exhibited at DowdeswelFs in 
1894. 

4. PORTRAIT OF MORLAND 
AND HIS DOG. 1 1 J in. X 1 5 in. 
Unsigned. Undated. 

Morland rests at table and 
talks to fishermen with nets. 
(Upright) 

Exhibited at DowdeswelFs in 
1894. 

Bought from a public-house 
at Carshalton. 

5. man in snow. (Upright.) 
10m. x 12 in. Signed. Undated. 

6. MILLER AND HIS MEN. 

iijin. x 14J in. Signed. 1797. 
Sacks of corn. (Upright.) 

Exhibited at Dowdeswell's 
in 1894. 

7. A wreck. 27 J in. x 36 in. 
Signed. Undated. 

Wreck of a boat. Sailors 
climbing up a rock. Dismasted 
ship in distance. (Oblong.) 

8. BARGAINING FOR FISH. 

tj\ in. X36 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Fishermen in boat returning 
from fishing. Selling fish on 
shore. (Oblong.) 

9. THE DISCONSOLATE AND 
HER PARROT. <ft in. X IlJ in. 
Signed. Undated. 

Portrait of Mrs. Morland. 
(Upright.) 

Exhibited at Dowdeswell's in 
1894. 

10. PEASANTS TRAVELLING. 

17 J in. x 24 in. Signed (on 
donkey's pack). Undated. 

Figures outside building. 
Donkey laden. Dog. 

The woman is a portrait of 
Morland's sister-in-law. (Ob- 
long.) 

11. SELLING FISH. 24 in. X 

30 in. Signed (on a rock). 
Undated. 

Figures sitting in foreground 
with fish and basket and dog. 
Cart with white horse. ( Oblong.) 



Exhibited at Dowdeswell's in 
1894. 

12. THE COTTAGE DOOR. 

27J in. x 35 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Summer. Family group. 
Man cutting wood in fore- 
ground. Church in the dis- 
tance. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at- 
Dowdeswell's in 1894. 

13. WOMAN FEEDING PIGS. 

14J in. x 19^ in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Donkey and child with dog. 
(Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. 

14. FARMER, WIFE AND 

child. 14 in. x i9i in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

Lad asks for work. Donkey 
saddled. (Oblong.) 

Companion to No. 13. 

15. WOOD - GATHERERS IN 
THE SNOW. 13J in. x 17 J in. 
Signed. Undated. (Upright.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. 

16. GAMEKEEPER (O R 
POACHER) WITH DOGS. 14 in. 

x 17J in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Portrait of Morland's servant 
Simpson. (Upright.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at 
Dowdeswell's in 1894. 

17. MR. PHILLIPS' DOG 

friend. Engraved by W. 
Ward. 39 in. x 49 in. Signed, 
Undated. 

Portrait of the Newfoundland 
do£ which saved Mr. William 
Phillips from being drowned 
whilst bathing in the sea at 
Portsmouth, October 4, 1789. 
(Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Guildford, May, 
1884. Exhibited at Dowdes- 
well's in 1894. 



156 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1 8. THE SHEPHERD ASLEEP. 

24 in. x 30 in. Signed. Dated. 

1795. 

Dog keeping watch over 
sheep. (Upright) 

Exhibited at DowdeswelFs in 
1894. 

19. FISHERMEN SELLING 
THEIR FISH ON SHORE. 28 in. 
x 36 in. Signed. Undated. 

Storm brewing. (Oblong.) 
Exhibited at DowdeswelFs in 
1894. 

20. THE RED LION INN. Yj\ 
in. x 36 in. Signed. Undated. 

Man on chestnut horse is 
drinking, whilst landlord and 
landlady talk to him. Pigs in 
foreground. Man leaning over 
fence. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. 

The Red Lion is also de- 
picted in No. 3, National 
Gallery. 

21. YARMOUTH FORT. Sea- 
piece. 27J in. x 36 in. Signed 
(on sail). 1803. 

Stormy day. Boat with 
sailors. (Oblong.) 

22. WOOD - GATHERERS IN 
SAVERNAKE PARK. 2j\ in. X 36 

in. Unsigned. Undated. 
Donkey, laden. (Oblong.) 
Exhibited at Burlington 

House, 1870. 

23. WATERING HORSES. I9J 

in. x 25 J in. Signed. Undated. 
Farm men seated outside 
barn. Boy on chestnut horse. 
Dog. (Oblong.) 

24. 1ST SEPTEMBER. 29$ in. 

x 30 in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Lyndhurst, in the New 
Forest. Sportsmen and Dogs 
in foreground. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at 
DowdeswelFs in 1894. 

25. 1ST OCTOBER. 27$ in. X 

36 in. Unsigned. Undated. 



Pheasant-shooting in Saver - 
nake Forest. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at 
DowdeswelTs in 1894. 

26. winter. 24 in. x 30 in. 
Signed. Undated. 

Snow scene. Woman and 
girl at door, ajar. Horses and 
dogs. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at DowdeswelFs in 
1894. 

27* THE STABLE YARD. 9} 

in. xiij in. Signed. Undated. 

Man in red jacket enters 
stable. Horses, one lying in 
straw. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at DowdeswelFs in 
1894. 

28. GIPSY ENCAMPMENT. 
6f in. x 9f in. Signed. 1795. 

Man, woman, and child in a 
wood. (Oblong.) 

29. PORTRAIT OF MRS. JOR- 
DAN. 14 in. x 17 in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

Actress, mother of first Earl 
of Munster. (Upright oval.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at 
DowdeswelFs in 1894. 

30. WRECK OF AN INDIA- 
MAN (off the Needles, Isle of 
Wight). 24 m. x 29^ in. Signed 
(on a package). Undated. 
(Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at 
DowdeswelFs in 1894. 

31. THE DAY AFTER THE 

wreck. 24 in. x 29 in. Signed 
(on a package). Dated 1795. 

Hauling in and gathering up 
wreckage. ( Oblong. ) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at 
DowdeswelFs in 1894. 

32. COW AND CALF WORRIED 
by DOG. 14 in. x 16J in. 
Signed. Dated 1795. (Up- 
right) 



APPENDIX III 



157 



Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at 
DowdeswelFs in 1894. 

33. FEEDING THE CALVES. 

14 in. x 17 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

Cowhouse. Woman stand- 
ing by door. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Dowdes well's 
in 1894. 

34. WAYFARING MAN IN THE 

SNOW. 10 in. x 12 in. Signed. 
Undated. 

Dog running beside him. 
(Upright.) 

35. FISHERMEN WAITING 
FOR EVENING BREEZE. 22$ in. 

X30 in. Signed (on boat). 
Undated. 

Background of chalk cliffs. 
Men resting on shore. Women 
standing. (Oblong.) 

36. MORNING. 28Jin. X38J 
in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Sheep. Shepherds resting. 
Peasants talking to shepherds 
Cottage with water. En- 
graved. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at DowdeswelFs in 
1894. 

37. evening. 28 in. x 36 in. 
Signed. Dated 1795. 

Man driving cow and sheep. 
Figure of boy behind. Castle 
on wooded height. (Oblong.) 

38. GIRLS ON SEASHORE IN 

A gale. 10} in. x 12 in. Signed. 
Undated. (Oblong.) 

39. THE HERMIT. 9j in. X 12 
in. Signed. 1795. (Upright.) 

Exhibited at DowdeswelFs in 
1894. 

40. CROSSING THE BROOK. 

13I in. x i6£ in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

Figures and donkey. (Ob- 
long.) 

41. THE SMUGGLERS. 1 6 in. 
x 24 in. Signed. Dated 1789. 

Band of smugglers hauling 
up a boat carrying bales and 



casks. A woman, loaded horses, 
etc. (Oblong.) 

42. SHEPHERDS REPOSING. 
15 J in. x 20 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Two shepherds and dogs. 
Sheep. Evening. Farmhouse 
in distance. (Upright.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. 

Carefully finished. A fine 
work. 

43. LANDSCAPE. 9] in. X 12 

in. Signed. 1794. 

Figures and donkey in fore- 
ground. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Dowde swell's in 
1894. 

44. THE FERRY. 10 in. X 14 

in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Men waiting for the boat. 
(Oblong.) 

45. LANDSCAPE. 9} in. X 12 

in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Cows resting under trees. 
Two figures. (Oblong.) 

46. SHEEP IN THE SNOW. 
12 in.xi4 in. Signed. 1798. 
(Oblong.) 

47. SHEEP IN THE SNOW. 

12 in. X15 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. (Oblong.) 

(Companion to No. 46. The 
same sheep, but in different 
positions.) 

48. SUMMER. 24 in. x 29 in. 
Signed. 1795. 

Waggon and horses descend- 
ing hill. Guide-post. Waggoner 
directing a woman sitting beside 
a pond and pointing to guide- 
post. (Oblong.) 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1870. Exhibited at 
DowdeswelFs in 1894. 

49. MENDING THE NETS. II 
in. x 16 in. Signed (on boat). 
1796. 

Two fishermen mending nets; 
other men painting boat. (Ob- 
long.) 



158 



GEORGE MORLAND 



50. SEASHORE. IO in. X 14 

in. Unsigned. Undated. 
Men and boats. (Oblong.) 

51. A WINTER NIGHT. 8 J in. 

x 11 J in. Unsigned. Undated. 
Farmer and his man driving 
sheep home from market. Snow 
on tree. (Oblong.) 

52. BREAKING COVER. 5fin. 

x 7 in. Signed. Undated. (Up- 
right.) 

53. FULL CRY. Engraved 
1824. 6£in. x8£in. Unsigned. 
Undated. (Oblong.) 

(Cf. Richardson.) 

Mr. Phillipps exhibited his 
collection at the Victoria and 
Albert Museum in 1904. 
Platt, Mrs. T., 716, Country 
Road, Small Heath, Birming- 
man. 

THE STARTLED HORSE. 

(Sepia drawing.) 18 in. x 24 in. 
Signed. 1780. 
A wild horse startled by a lion. 

Porter, Rev. Alfred S., F.S.A., 
Vicar of Claines, Canon of Wor- 
cester and R.D. 

Full-length portrait of Mor- 
land's friend, Thomas Wilkin- 
son of York, who died August 
11, 1826. 134 in.x 18 in. 

Most beautifully painted. 
Left to Canon Porter by Mrs. 
Davies, his aunt, who married 
Mr. Robert Davies, F.S.A., 
nephew of Mr. T. Wilkinson, 
who is represented seated at 
table with his hair powdered, 
and wearing a scarlet coat. He 
was a great dandy, and nick- 
named " Count w Wilkinson. 

Pratt, Robert, Crow Trees, 
Killinghall Road, Bradford. 

Mr. Pratt kindly prepared 
this description of his extensive 
collection of Morlands. 

I. WHITE HORSE AND BLACK 

horse. 26 in. x 31 in. Signed 
in two places, "G. Morland, 
1 791." 



Man standing between the 
two with a hayfork in his hand, 
setter dog with lemon-coloured 
ears, lemon spot on body. Man 
sitting on sacks of straw with 
smock and red handkerchief 
round his neck. 

2. OUTSIDE THE BELL INN. 

24 in. x 32 in. Signed "G. 
Morland." 

Man on white horse drinking 
beer out of a bowl which the 
landlady has handed him. 
Brown horse in front of him 
with four white legs, a saddle, 
and white nose, two liver-and- 
white-coloured spaniels looking 
at the brown horse. Cobbler 
at his work, and another man, 
with his shoe off, sitting in front 
of him having it mended. 

3. MAN AND DROVER, with 

three sheep inside a yard, hay- 
rack, and a boy dressed in red 
coat bringing hay for the sheep. 
A shepherd's dog looking out 
of the doorway. The snow is 
coming in at the crevices of the 
palings while the shepherd 
stands by the doorway. Snow 
on the heels of the drover and 
the boy. 15! in. x 22 J in. 
Signed "G. Morland, 1791." 
Painted on tin tray, supposed 
to be in payment of account 
for ale. (Cf. Denman and 
Hamilton.) 

4. MAN AT A FARM DOOR. 

19 in. x 24^ in. 

Two pigs, a donkey, and a 
donkey foal ; a cow looking out 
of the mistel door. Oak-trees 
behind, man in a smock and 
unkempt hair, and a hayfork in 
his hand. 

5. TWO MEN, A WOMAN AND 
CHILD SITTING AT A TABLE. 

14 in. x 19 in. Signed, above 
the heads of the man and 
woman, " G. Morland." 
The outside of ail inn, light 



APPENDIX III 



159 



coloured, a donkey fastened to 
a stone post. 

6. A GOAT AND TWO MEN. 

20 in. x 24J in. 

Rocky coast scene. Man 
with fish basket on head. A 
boy and girl, donkey, and white 
spaniel dog. 

7. GEORGE MORLAND AT A 

wayside inn. 21 in. x 24 J in. 
Red coat, white buckskin 
trousers, top boots. A woman 
with white dress and blue 
underskirt, in slippers, with 
white stockings, a white cap 
with blue ribbons. An old man 
seated on a seat with a pint 
measure in his hand. The land- 
lady standing with bottle and 
a wine-glass in her hand. 
Pointer dog sitting at foot of 
old man. 

8. BOY AND GIRL GOING TO 
market. 7$ in. x 94 in. 

The boy with a red jacket 
on, the girl with a basket on 
her head. Boy leading a horse ; 
horse chestnut-coloured, with 
white face and three white 
stockings. A sheep slung 
across the horse's back and a 
spaniel dog. 

9. white horse, foal and 
dog standing by building in a 
yard. Boy in red jacket serv- 
ing a pig. 11 in. x 13 in. 

Very good example of Mor- 
land. This picture is portrayed 
in Hassell's work, 1806. 

10. skating SCENE. 28$ in. 
x 37 J in. 

Man skating with stick and 
arms crossed, with a big wide- 
awake hat ; woman with a very 
fascinating bonnet of the olden 
style, and child similarly 
dressed. One man down, two 
other men putting skates on. 
Very rustic-looking men. Rus- 
tic old cot, covered with snow, 
and two old oak-trees such as 



Morland was noted for paint- 
ing. A spaniel dog. 

1. A TRAVELLER CALLING 
AT A WAYSIDE COUNTRY INN. 
20 in. x 24J in. Signed 
"George Morland, 1793." He 
has with him a saddled 
horse which is dark brown, 
with one fore-leg white half-way 
to the knee, white nose. A 
man is sitting at a table on 
which there is a large portion of 
a leg of mutton. Near the table 
is a bull-dog with brindled ears, 
also brindled spot on the body. 
The landlady, who is dressed in 
a blue and drab dress (this 
dress is blue on the front and 
drab sides and back), is serving 
a man with a drink out of a 
bottle into a wine-glass. Just 
over the table is a window, 
half of which is open, and a 
curtain is hanging out. Behind 
the inn are some oak-trees. 

12. MAN IN GREEN VELVET 
COAT, soft hat, white shirt, 
sitting on mile-post, marked 
"XVI E R." 10 in.xi 4 in. 
Initialed "G. M." Donkey 
with saddle grazing behind. 
Woman kneeling down, leaning 
on knee of man with white 
handkerchief on head, child 
behind, red hood on, also 
pointer dog with head outside. 
Man in dirty red breeches and 
top boots. 
Price, James. 

i. the labourer's home. 
Very small. Sold at Christie's 
on June 15, 1895, for 320 gs. 

2. MUTUAL CONFIDENCE. 

Very small. Sold at Christie's 
on June 15, 1895, for 940 
guineas. 

Rawlinson, James, 124, Granby 
Street, Liverpool. 

WATERINGTHECART-HORSE. 

Engraved by J. R. Smith, 1799. 



i6o 



GEORGE MORLAND 



"Watering the Cart-Horse" 
is erroneously attributed to 
Gainsborough by Ernest 
Chesneau in his "English 
School of Painting" (Cassell 
and Co., London, 1887, page 
116), showing how the occa- 
sional similarity of style in 
both artists may deceive art 
critics. 
Rankin, Robert, the late. 

1. EVENING ; Or, THE POST- 
BOY'S return. 27 in. x 35 in. 

Sold at Christie's, May 14, 
1898, for 1,250 gs. Bought 
by Agnew. 

2. THE HORSE-FEEDER. 27 

in. x 35 in. Signed. 1792. 

Sold at Christie's, May 14, 
1898, for 400 gs. 

3. CAUGHT IN A STORM. 
(Oval.) 8 in. x 10 in. 

Sold at Christie's, May 14, 
1898, for 40 gs, 

4. A COAST SCENE WITH 
FIGURES. 5 J in. x 7\ in. 

Sold at Christie's, May 14, 
1898, for 20 gs. 
Raphael, Cecil F. 

1. WAGGON AND TEAM OF 
HORSES. 17 in. x 21 in. 
Signed, and dated 1794. 

2. LANDSCAPE WITH CATTLE 
AND SHEEP. 17} in. X 21 in. 
Signed, and dated 1784. 

Rayner, George Herbert, 
29, Vernon Road, Leeds. 

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST'S 
WIFE. (Oval on oak.) 8 in. x 
10 in. Signed. 

Mrs. George Morland is 
seated at an open window with 
a letter in her hand. She is 
dressed in white, with short 
sleeves and open neck. Her 
hair is in ringlets, with a fillet 
round the crown. Very care- 
fully painted. 
Read, J. H., 48, Wilbury Road, 
West Brighton. 

LANDSCAPE AND PORTRAITS 



OF DR. LYNN AND HIS MAN- 
SERVANT. 33 in. x 44 in. 

A horse, dog, and two pigs. 
Painted at Cowes, 1797. Sold 
on Mr. Read's behalf by P. and 
D. Colnaghi for /35a Present 
owner unknown. 

Revell, Frank F., 130, Belmont 
Road, Liverpool. 

THREE PIGS IN A SHED. 9 in. 
X12 in. 

Richardson, Ralph, F.R.S.E., 
F.S.A. Scot., 10, Magdala 
Place, Edinburgh. 

1. peasant and PIGS. En- 
graved by J. R. Smith, 1803. 
(Canvas.) 16 in. x 20 in. 
Signed. 1791. 

A boy leans against the out- 
side of a thatched pigsty. 
Beside him is a little girl in a 
blue frock. Two pigs, one 
black, one yellow, drink out of 
a trough. A white and brown 
spaniel looks into it. 

(Cf. Mather, McClintock, 
Hatherley, and Black.) 

An indifferent example of this 
painting without the little girl 
was sold at Dowell's, Edin- 
burgh, November 14, 1896. 

2. FULL CRY. Hunting 
scene. Engraved 1824. 5 J in. 
x 7 in. Unsigned. Undated. 

A red-coated huntsman on 
grey horse is followed by a 
blue-coated huntsman on a 
brown horse. Other huntsmen 
in distance. 

(Cf. Phillips, No. 53, which 
represents the same scene.) 

3. RETURNING FROM WORK. 

9jin. xii J in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

A woman in a red cloak 
carries a bundle of faggots over 
her shoulder, and a carpenter's 
basket in her left hand. A boy 
and hairy dog follow her. 

Exhibited at Grosvenor 
Gallery, 1887-88. 



APPENDIX III 



161 



4. STORMY WEATHER. l6J 

in. x 20} in. Signed. Undated. 
In foreground, preceded by a 
white dog, a red-cloaked woman 
carrying a vegetable basket is 
followed by a blue-cloaked litde 
girl. Behind, a man on an ass 
holds on his hat, while his hand 
also grasps a stick. In back- 
ground, a thatched cottage and 
a stormy sky. 

5. BURNING BRUSHWOOD. 

9$ in. x 14 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

A smock-clad man, a woman, 
and two children round a fire. 
In background a cart with two 
men, followed by woman and 
child. 

This water-colour drawing 
belonged to Mr. Billington 
(the celebrated singer's hus- 
band) in 1789. 
Ridpath, Thos., 12, Church 
Street, Liverpool. 

1. interior of a stable. 
20 in. x 24 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

To left, two horses standing 
at stall. To right, sheep, 
poultry, etc. 

Formerly in collection of late 
Dr. Whittle, Liverpool. 

2. the penniless wag- 
goner. 12 in. x 18 in. Signed. 
Undated. 

An oil-painting purchased at 
sale of the house of an old 
Cheshire family in August, 1900. 
Its colouring is very fine. 
ROE, Robt. H., 68, Ommoney 
Road, New Cross, London, S.E. 

CONTENTMENT. I3J in. X 

20} in. Initialed. 1787. 

A man looks into a pigsty in 
which reclines a sow. Beside 
her are three little pigs, one 
standing. A pail, crossed by a 
broom, to right. Mr. Roe is 
etching this picture on copper. 

(Cf. Peck, No. 8.) 



Ruston, J. S., Monk's Manor, 
Lincoln. 

1. gipsies. 7 in. x 9 in. 

2. MOUNTAIN SCENE, with 

sunset glow and figures, one a 
friar in red, and a donkey. 
11 in. x 14 in. 
Rutherford, Mrs. Andrew 
D.,9, Prince's Terrace, Dowan- 
hill, Glasgow. 

the gipsies' tent. En- 
graved by J. Grozer y 1795. 
22 in. x 28 in. Signed. 17911 
(Cf. Knight.) 



Salting, George, 86, St. James's 
Street, London. 

1. GIPSY ENCAMPMENT. 

20 in. x 26 in. 3igned. 1789. 

2. COWHERD AND MILK- 
MAID. (Engraved) 20 in. x 
26 in. Signed. 1792. 

3. COUNTRY INN ("The 

Grapes"). 20 in. x 26 in. 
Signed. 1790. 

Group of gipsies reposing in 
foreground to right. White 
horse led to stable. Two travel- 
lers on horseback leaving] the 
inn. 

4. THE BELL INN*: Sum- 

mer-time. 20 in. x 26 in. Signed. 
Undated. 

Hay - wain and group of 
hay • makers regaling them- 
selves in front of the inn. 
Landlady and little girl appear 
at inn door. 

5. THE ALEHOUSE DOOR. 
Engraved by R. S. Syer t 1801. 
(Upright.) 11 in. x 14 in. 
Signed. 1792. 

Two labouring men, the elder 
one seated with pipe and pot 
of beer, the younger standing 
and talking to him. 
(Cf. Ussher.) 
Sanderson, Arthur, 25, Lear- 
mouth Terrace, Edinburgh. 

I. THE DOLPHIN ALEHOUSE 
II 



162 



GEORGE MORLAND 



DOOR. 27 in. x 35 J in. (A 
fine example.) 

2. cottages. Engraved by 
IV. Wordy 1791. 19J in. x 
25 J in. 

3. STABLE SCENE. yi\ in. 
x 42} in. 

4. gipsies. 17 in. x 23} in. 

5. MORLAND'S "GAINS- 
BOROUGH." 9j in. x 1 1 \ in. 

6. MORLAND'S "SIR JOSHUA." 
, 9i in. x 11 J in. 

The last two pictures (ovals) 
are said to have been painted 
as the result of Morland wager- 
ing he could paint as well as 
either Gainsborough or Rey- 
nolds. 
Sargeaunt, John, Burton Lati- 
mer, Kettering, Northampton- 
shire. 

AN EVENING LANDSCAPE. 

(On wood.) 9 in. x 11J in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

In the foreground stands a 
white horse, and behind it a 
peasant boy seated. 
Scott, Alex, Queen Mary's 
House, Jedburgh, N.B. 

1. WINTER SCENE. l8in.X 

26 in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Three sheep in snow near a 
snowclad tree. Bareheaded 
lad with bundle of hay. Man 
with pole. 

2. SOW AND LITTER OF PIGS. 

14 in. x 18 in. Initialed. Un- 
dated. 
Scott, Col. C. H. S., 17, Eccle- 
ston Square, London, S.W. 

portrait, said to be of the 

artist's wife. (Oval.) 25 in. x 

30 in. Unsigned. Undated. 

Mob cap with blue ribbons. 

" : eyes ; long, dark, curling 

White muslin dress, blue 

Background, blue hill 




and tn 
Scott, E 
Kirknewtoi 
INTERIOR 



Erskine, Unburn, 
idlothian. 
F A STABLE. 



26J in. x 33 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Sheffield. (See Mappin Art 
Gallery.) 

Smith, H. Haskett, Trowswell, 
Goudhurst (deceased). 

1. selling cherries. En- 
graved by E. Belly 1 801. 20 in. 

x 26 in. Signed. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
1,000 gs.; bought by McLean. 

2. THE DEATH OF THE FOX. 

Engraved by E. Bel/, 1800. 
Signed. 1794. 

Sum offered at Christie's, 
May 28, 1864, 41 gs., when the 
picture was exposed, but bought 
in. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
300 gs.; bought by Dowdes- 
well. 

3. landscape, with gipsies 
round a fire. 19 in. x 25 in. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
3^0 gs.; bought by Agnew. 

4. RETURN FROM MARKET. 

Original engraved by J. R. 
Smith, 1793. 25 in. x 30 in. 
Signed. 1795. 

Sum offered at Christie's, 
May 28, 1864, 62 gs., when the 
picture was exposed, but bought 
in. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
1 30 gs.y bought by Phil pot 

5. temptation. Original 
engraved by W. Humphrey, 
1790. 25 in. x 30 in. Signed. 
1792. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
410 gs.; bought by Dowdes- 
well. 

6. the piggery. 18 in. x 
24 in. Signed. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 



APPENDIX III 



163 



320 gs.; bought by Dowdes- 
well. 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1872. 

7. THE CATASTROPHE. 20 in. 

X2oin. Signed. 1791. 

Sum offered at Christie's, 
May 28, 1864, 36 gs., when the 
picture was exposed, but bought 
in. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
320 gs. ; bought by Wilson. 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1872. 

8. INTERIOR OF STABLE, 

with two peasants, dog, and 
donkey. 15 in. x 20 in. 

Sum offered at Christie's, 
May 28, 1864, 45 gs., when 
the picture was exposed, but 
bought in. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
100 gs. ; bought by Price. 

9. THE WRECKERS. 41 in. 

x 54 in. Signed. 1791. 

Sum offered at Christie's, 
May 28, 1864, 161 gs., when 
the picture was exposed, but 
bought in. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
520 gs.; bought by Frazer. 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1872. 

10. FISHWIFE BUYING FISH 
ON BEACH. 27 in. x 35 in. 
Signed. 1794. 

Sum offered at Christie's, 
May 28, 1864, 121 gs., when 
the picture was exposed, but 
bought in. 

This picture was sold at 
Christie's, May 9, 1896, for 
240 gs. 

The foregoing details are 
given to show the advance in 
the prices of Morlands which 
has taken place of late years. 
Mr. Max Michaelis is now owner 



of "Temptation," "Selling 
Cherries," and "The Death of 
the Fox." 
Smith, Sir Chas. Cunliffe, 
Bart., Suttons, Romford. 

1. a fishing party. En- 
graved by G. Keating, 1789. 
25 in. x 30 in. 

2. LUNCHEON party. En- 
graved by W. Ward, 1780. 
25 in. x 30 in. 

Both exhibited at Winter 
Exhibition, 1896, and at Vic- 
toria and Albert Museum, 1904. 

3. LANDSCAPE. 9fin. x 12 in. 

4. LANDSCAPE. loin. X 12 in. 

South Kensington : Victoria 
and Albert Museum. 

1. THE RECKONING. (Ob- 
long ; fine.) 29 in. x 39 in. 

2. HORSES IN A STABLE. 
(Oblong.) 34 in. x 46^ in. 
Signed. 1791. 

3. seashore. Fishermen 
hauling in a boat. (Oblong ; 
fin e«) 33f in. x 46J in. Signed. 
1791. 

4. coast scene. Boats and 
figures on the beach. (Panel, 
oblong.) 8 in.x 12J in. Signed. 
1792. 

5. A girl seated in a land- 
scape and fondling a dove. 
(Oval.) 7} in. x 9 in. Signed. 

6. VALENTINE'S DAY ; or, 
JOHNNY GOING TO THE FAIR. 
Engraved by /. Dean, 1787. 
(Upright, fine.) 13$ in. x 
18 in. 

7. WINTER SCENE, with 

woman and donkeys. Sketch. 
(Panel, upright.) 5 in. x 6£ in. 

8. LANDSCAPE AND COT- 
TAGE, with market cart, dog, 
etc. (Oblong.) i6in.xi7fin. 

Said to be a copy of Mr. 
Peck's No. 7. 

9. BEACH SCENE, with boats, 

boatmen, and dogs. (Oblong.) 
i9i in. x 25$ in. 
(By or after Morland.) 
II— 2 



164 



GEORGE MORLAND 



10. A HUNTING SCENE. 
9$ in. x i if in. Signed. 

11. A FARMYARD. 1 4 in. X 

i8± in. 

A portrait in this gallery by 
John Russell, R.A., said to be 
of George Morland, was the 
subject of letters by Mr. 
Richardson in the Times of 
7th and 20th November, 1895. 
He maintained, and Mr. Arthur 
N. Gilbey supported his con- 
tention, that it was not a por- 
trait of George Morland, as it 
bore no resemblance of con- 
temporary portraits of him, 
such as those by Morland 
himself, or by his friend, T. 
Rowlandson. 

Tennant, Sir Charles, Bart., 
of The Glen, Innerleithen, N.B. 

1. CHILDREN PLAYING AT 

SOLDIERS. Engraved by G. 
Keating, 1788. Painted for 
Dean Markham of York. (Can- 
vas.) 28 in. X35 in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

Woody landscape; children 
looking on. 

From the collection of Joseph 
Strutt. 

Exhibited at Manchester, 
1857. 

Although Morland is facile 
princeps as the English painter 
of children, none of his paint- 
ings of children were exhibited 
in the recent "Fair Children" 
Exhibition in the Grafton 
Gallery. (See Peck, No. 12.) 

2. BOYS ROBBING AN OR- 
CHARD. Engraved by E. Scott, 
1790. 27 in. x 35 in. Unsigned. 
Undated. Bolckow Collection. 

Four boys stealing apples ; a 
farmer appears with a bulldog. 
(Canvas.) 

Exhibited at Glasgow in 1889. 

3. THE FIND. IOJ in. X 

15 in. Unsigned. Undated. 



A spirited scene in the hunt- 
ing-field. (Canvas.) 

Exhibited at the Grosvenor 
Gallery, 1888. 

4. FULL CRY. IOJ in. X 

15 in. Initialed. Undated. 

A spirited scene in the hunt- 
ing-field. (Canvas.) 

Exhibited at the Grosvenor 
Gallery, 1888. 

J. LANDSCAPE WITH RIVER. 

12$ in. x 17J in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

A horseman going down a 
road, and a peasant talking to 
a woman m a red cloak, 
seated, holding a baby. To the 
right a man fishing. (Panel, 
oval.) 

6. TWO DONKEYS, MARE AND 

foal, standing in a landscape. 
(Canvas.) 10 in. x 12 in. 
Signed. Undated. 

7. LANDSCAPE WITH 

FIGURES. 12 in. x 16 in. 
Signed. 1792. 

A stage-coach going down a 
road. Cattle and a horse in 
foreground. Sheep on grass 
to right. (Canvas.) 

Formerly in collection of 
J. H. Anderdon, Esq. 

8. HILLY LANDSCAPE, with 
river and figures. (Canvas.) 
12 in. x 15 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

9. IDLENESS. Engraved by 
C. Knight, 1788. (Canvas, 
oval.) 9} in. x \\\ in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

Exhibited at Burlington 
House, 1885, and at the Gros- 
venor Gallery, 1888. 

10. diligence. Engraved 
by C. Knight, 1788 (Canvas, 
oval.) 9j in. x \\\ in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

Exhibited at the Old Masters' 
Exhibition, 1885, and at the 
Grosvenor Gallery, 1888. 



APPENDIX III 



165 



Thwaites, Mrs., Addison 
Lodge, Addison Road, Lon- 
don, W. 

1. THE KITE ENTANGLED. 
Engraved by W. Ward y 1790. 
20} in. x 26J in. Unsigned. 
Undated. 

Exhibited at Grosvenor 
Gallery, 1888-89. 

2. the family party. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

TOLLEMACHE, H. J. 

1. INTERIOR OF A STABLE. 

25i in. x 50 in. Signed, and 
dated 1791. 

2. THE COUNTRY BUTCHER. 

25 J in. x 30 in. Signed, and 
dated 1792. 
Trotter, Coutts, 17, Charlotte 
Square, Edinburgh. 

FARM STABLE, with two 

horses. 28J in. x 36 in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

A youth sits on ground. A 
girl hands him a mug of 
beer. 

(Belonged to Mr. Trotter, 
of Dreghorn, owner's grand- 
father.) 

The physiognomies seem 
rather too refined for G. Mor- 
land. 
Turner, Thomas, 42, Mill Hill 
Road, Norwich. 

1. outside an inn. Man 
with white horse in conversa- 
tion with a woman. (On 
canvas.) 1 \\ in. x 16 in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

2. three sheep under 
stunted pollard oak. (On 
canvas.) 12 in. x 14J in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

3. exterior of a farm- 
house, with figures, carts, and 
animals. (On panel.) 11 in. 
x 13 in. Initialed. Undated. 

4. COAST SCENE, with figures. 
A storm coming up. (On 
panel.) 10J in. x 13 in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 



Ussher, Rev. R., Vicar of West- 
bury, Brackley. 

1. THE SHEPHERD'S MEAL. 
(Cf. Barton.) 

2. THE ALEHOUSE DOOR. 
(Cf. Salting.) 

These have been in the 
Vicar's family for about one 
hundred years. 

Vernon, J. Y. V., Strathallan, 
Southbourne, Hants. 

GIRL and PIGS. (On panel.) 
14 in. x 17 in. Signed. Un- 
dated. 

Walker, Rev. George, B.D., 
The Manse, Castle Douglas, 
N.B. 

THE NAG'S HEAD, OR TOOT- 
ING INN, SURREY. 28 in. X 

36 in. Signed. 1791. 

On sign, head of black horse 
with white face. A stable- 
boy holds a white pony, from 
which a blue-coated rustic has 
alighted. The landlady hangs 
clothes on a line. Two dogs 
eye each other. 
Wallace Collection, Hert- 
ford House, Manchester Square, 
London, W. 

A VISIT TO THE BOARDING- 
SCHOOL. Engraved by W. 
Ward, 1789. 23 j in. x 29 in. 
[No. 574.] 
Waller, J. G., 68, Bolsover 
Street, London, W. 

SCENE OUTSIDE COTTAGE. 

Farmer in conference with 
woman and child. Two horses, 
one white, one bay, held by a 
youth. A woman hangs out 
clothes. Oak-tree before cot- 
tage. 18^ in. x 24 in. Signed. 
Undated. 
Walling, John, 24, Holland 
Road, New Brighton, Cheshire. 

THE COUNTRY BUTCHER. 

Engraved by T. Gosse, 1802, 
and W. Barnard^ J 8 10. 



i66 



GEORGE MORLAND 



(Painted on mahogany or teak.) 
16J in. x 21 in. Signed. Date 
indistinct. 
Wallis and Son, 120, Pall Mall, 
London, S.W. 

1. THE STORM. 28 in. X 36 

in. Signed. 

2. a gipsy camp. 18 in. x 
24 in. Signed. 

3. winter. 25 in. x 30 in. 
Signed. 

4. THE STAGE -COACHMAN. 
12 in. X15 in. Signed. 

5. THE SHEPHERD. 2$ in. 
x 30 in. Signed. 

6. THE SHEPHERD. II | in. 

xi5in. Signed. 1793. 

7. THE GENTLE ART. 10 in. 

x 12 in. Initialed. 

8. SHELTERING FROM THE 
STORM. 12 in. x 14 in. Un- 
signed. 

A man holding on his hat, 
and mounted on a rough white 
pony, takes shelter under an 
oak-tree, beneath which are 
seated a woman in a red cloak, 
with a basket on her left arm, 
and a little boy dressed in a 
blue coat and wearing a Scotch 
blue bonnet. 

A sketch for this painting 
was sold at DowelPs, Edin- 
burgh, November 14, 1896. 
Walters, Mrs. Caer Llan, 
Cwmcarvan, near Monmouth. 

1. AN OLD WHITE HORSE 

standing at a manger in an 
open shed, a brown horse lying 
down behind. A snowy land- 
scape seen through the open 
door. 8 in. x 10 in. Signed. 

2. A mastiff (with collar) 
defending a dead sheep from 
another dog. A cottage in 
the distance. 12 in. x 15 in. 
Signed. 

Mrs. Walters inherited above 
from her maternal grandfather, 
the late George Boyd, Esq., 
Chief Clerk of the Treasury, 



who resided at 11, Chesham 
Place, London, S.W. 

Warren, E. B., 2,013, Spruce 
Street, Philadelphia, U.S.A. 

A storm. (Fine oil-paint- 
ing*) 34 in* x 45i in. Signed. 
Undated. 

Sold by Lord North's trustees 
to Mr. L. C. Delmonico, New 
York, through Messrs. Agnew 
and Sons, London, and ac- 
quired by Mr. Warren, Octo- 
ber, 189$. 

Warren, Rev. B. J., SS. Peter 
and Paul Vicarage, Upper Ted- 
dington. 

winter scene. A snow- 
clad barn and tree stump. 
Children skating and sliding 
on a pond, and a dog drinking 
where ice broken. 30 in. X36 
in. Signed. 1787. 

(Left to Mr. Warren's father 
ninety years ago by a gentle- 
man who bought it from Mor- 
land himself. Never engraved.) 

Washington, U.S.A. (See 
Corcoran.) 

White, Lieut. -Col. F. A., 
Castor House, Northampton. 

1. boys bathing. Engraved 
by E. Scott, 1804. (Canvas.) 
26 in. x 35 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

2. bund man's buff. En- 
graved by W. Ward, 1788. 
(Canvas.) 26 in. x 35 in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

3. CHILDREN BIRDS'- NEST- 
ING. Engraved by IV. Wara\ 
1789. (Canvas.) 24 in. x 30 in. 
Unsigned. Undated. 

4. JUVENILE NAVIGATORS. 
Engraved by W. Ward, 1789. 
(Canvas.) 24 in. x 30 in. Un- 
signed. Undated. 

Whitehead, T., Down's House, 
Cedars Road, Clapham, 
London. 

the fisherman. (Never 
engraved.) 20 in. x 26 in. 



APPENDIX III 



167 



Williams, Romer, 58, Great 
Cumberland Place, Hyde Park, 
London, W. 

1. THE BELL INN. 1 5 in. X 

1 8 in. 

Outside inn. Landscape. 
Horses, one white. Figures 
reclining on seat round a tree 
in front of inn door. 

2. YOUTH DIVERTING AGE. 
Engraved by J. Grozer, 1789 
and 1794. 1 \\ in. x 14 in. 

3. THE STARTLED MILK- 
MAID. 12 in. x 14^ in. 

Young milkmaid sits by cow 
with overturned milk-pail, she 
being startled by youfig man 
coming up suddenly behind 
her. {Engraved.) 
Wilson, John, 272, Sauchiehall 
Street, Glasgow. 

THE FIRST OF SEPTEMBER: 

MORNING. Engraved by IV. 
Ward, 1794. 20 in. x 24 in. 

THE FIRST OF SEPTEMBER : 
EVENING. Engraved by W. 
Ward, 1794. 20 in. x 24 in. 
Wolseley, Field - Marshal 
the Right Honourable 
the Viscount, etc., War 
Office, London. 

Several drawings by G. Mor- 
land. 
Wolverhampton Art Gal- 
lery. 

the coding storm (Isle of 
Wight). 



Wood, Edward Collins, Keith- 
wick, Coupar Angus, N.B. 

1. THE COMFORTS OF INDUS" 
TRY. Engraved by H. Hud- 
son, 1790. 12 in. x 15 in. Un- 
signed. 

2. THE MISERIES OF IDLE- 
NESS. Engraved by H. Hud- 
son, 1790. 12 in. x 15 in. Un- 
signed. 

Presented by George Mor- 
land to Mr. Wood's grand- 
father, £. Collins, Esq., of 
Maize Hill, Greenwich. 
Wood, Richard, Cattal, York. 

1. roadside inn or cot- 
tage, with man seated on a 
bench holding his horse, while 
a woman pours something into 
a wineglass. A basket con- 
taining a leg of mutton on 
bench, and a dog on ground. 
18 in. x 23 in. Unsigned. Un- 
dated. 

2. COTTAGE BY SEASIDE, 
with boat containing two men 
and dog. Man and woman on 
shore, the latter holding a 
barrel and pouring something 
into a quart pot. 18 in. x 23 
in. Unsigned. Undated. 

(Mr. Wood has had above 
for twenty-five years, and the 
person he got them from 
possessed them for forty 
years.) 



APPENDIX IV 

(Contributed by Ralph Richardson) 

CHRONOLOGICAL CATALOGUE OF ENGRAVINGS, ETCH- 
INGS, ETC., AFTER GEORGE MORLAND, SHOWING 
THE YEARS OF THEIR PUBLICATION, ETC. (ALL 
WERE PUBLISHED IN LONDON) 



ABBREVIATIONS. 

M. = Mezzotint 
C. = Chalk, or stipple. 
A. = Aquatint. 
L. = Line engraving. 
Col. = Coloured copies published. 
B.M. = In British Museum Collection. 

A brace connecting engravings signifies that they form a pair 
or series. 

The prices marked are those obtained, during recent years , at 
public auctions in London, 



W. Ward. J. R. Smith. 



I78O. ENGRAVER. PUBLISHER. 

'The Angler's Repast, 

B.M., M. (reissued^ 

1789) 

A Party Angling. 

I789- £99 15*. 

(Bulteel sale, 1904) Ditto. Ditto. 

1783. 
Children Nutting, M. 
(reissued^ 1788). 
6gs. E. Dayes. Ditto. 

1785. 

'How Sweet's the Love 
that meets Return, 
B.M., C. i$gs. ... 

The Lass of Living- 
stone, B.M., C. 
£7 17s. 6a\ ... Ditto. Ditto. 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



Sir C. Cunliffe 
Smith, Bart. 



T. Gaugain. T. Gaugain. 



168 



APPENDIX IV 



169 



1785* ENGRAVER. 

Love and Constancy 

rewarded, B.M., 

M., A P. Dawe. 

Scene from " The 

Gentle Shepherd," 

%s«« Jd.IVL. ••• ••• 



1786. 
Tom Jones' First In- 
terview with Molly 
Seagrim, M. £$ ior. 



PUBLISHER. 



W. Hinton. 



T. Merle and 
R. Dodd. 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



W. Ward. W. Holland. 



John Pettit 
J. Dean, 



1787. 

Harley and Old Ed- 
wards {from " Man 
of Feeling"), B.M. 
£2 12s. 6a\ 

Valentine's Day, 
B.M. ,<:<?/. M. 2gs. 

'Domestic Happiness, 
col. M. 3#r. 

The Coquette at her 
Toilette, col. M. 
£6. The pair, col- 
oured, £76 ... Ditto. 

The Happy Family, 
B.M J. Dean. 

The Delightful Story, 
B.M W. Ward. 



Ditto. 
J. Dean. 



W. Ward. W. Dickinson. 



Ditto. 



South Kensing- 
ton Museum. 



1788. 

A Visit to the Child 
at Nurse, col. M. 
(for companion see 
first entry \ 1789). 
33* gs. (May 9, 
1900) ; with com- 
panion, 18^., Z&gs., 
and 120 gs. ... Ditto. J. R. Smith. 

The Power of Justice, 
B.M., M. £19 ... J. Dean. J. Dean. 

The Triumph of Be- 
nevolence, B.M., 

^ M. £16 Ditto. Ditto. 

j3Sportsman's Hall, 

B.M W.Ward. W.Holland. 

The Widow, B.M., 
M. £7 17s. 6d. ... J. Dean. J. Dean. 



170 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1788. 


ENGRAVER. 


PUBLISHER. 


OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 


Blind Man's Buff, col. 








M. 6gs.,£7i7s.6d., 








and proof 1 logs..,. 


W. Ward. 


J. R. Smith. 


Col. F. A. 


Children playing at 






White. 


Soldiers, B.M., M. 








£8, 13^., and 36^. 


G. Keating. 


Ditto. 


Sir C. Tennant, 


The First Pledge of 






Bart. 


Love, C 


W. Ward. 


T. Prattent. 




Suspense, M. 11 gs. 


Ditto. 






Delia in the Country, 








B.M., C, col £\b 








$s. 6d. 


J. R. Smith. 


J. R. Smith. 




Delia in Town, B.M., 








C, col. £28 7s. 








The pair, coloured, 








> 178 #r 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




r Anxiety ; or, The Ship 








at Sea, B.M., M. ... 


P. Dawe. 


W. Dickinson. 




Mutual Joy; or, The 








Ship in Harbour, 
B.M., M. The pair, 














> 9gs 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




The Fair Seducer, C. 


E.J.Dum^e. 


J. R. Smith. 




The Discovery, C. 








A pair in bistre, 








> 21 gs 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




'Variety, B.M., C, col. 








/3 1 7 s. 6d. and 








£33 


W. Ward. 






Constancy, B.M., C, 








col. In bistre, ^5 








10s. The pair, col- 








^ oured, £66 


Ditto* 


W. Dickinson. 


T. J. Barratt 


The Pledge of Love, 








B.M., col. M. 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 


Children Nutting, col. 








M. 7i^.(^.i783) 


£. Dayes. 






Morning Reflection, 








B.M 


G. Graham. 


£. Jackson. 




Children fishing, col. 








M 


P. Dawe. 


W. Dickinson. 


G. Peck. 


Children gathering 








Blackberries, col. 








M. The pair, 17 gs.; 








"Blackberries" 








alone, ioj gs. 








k (May 5, 1900) ... 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




The Strangers at 






\ The late 
J C. F. Huth. 


Home, B.M., C. ... 


W. Nutter. 


E. M. Diemar. 



Also engraved by Bartolozzi, B.M. 



J 



APPENDIX IV 



171 





1788. 


ENGRAVER. 


PUBLISHER. ' 


3WNER OF ORIGINAJ. 
PAINTING. 


fSpring, C 


W. Ward. 


T. Prattent. 




J Summer, C 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




1 Autumn, C 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




{.Winter, C 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




The Idle Laundress, 








C. (v. 1803) 


W. Blake. 


J. R. Smith. 




/Indulgence, C. 


J. Prattent 


J. Brydon. 




J Discipline, col. C. 








I Oval, coloured, 








I £$ ioj 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




The Agreeable Sur- 








prise, M 




C. Bowles. 




On the Wings of Love, 








M. ... ... ... 




R. Sayer. 




Seduction, B.M., M. 








£4 1 4s. 6d. and 6 gs. 








(May 5, 1900) ... 


John Young. 






Credulous Innocence, 








B.M., M. £2 








17s. 6d. 


Ditto. 






/Idleness. % gs. 

I Diligence 


C. Knight. 


} 


Sir C. Tennant, 


Ditto. 


Bart 


1789. 








A Visit to the Board- 








ing School, col. M. 








(for companion see 








first entry, 1788). 








With companion, 
coloured, 88 gs. y 














120 gs., ^115 IOJ. 








(Bulteel sale, 1904) 


W. Ward. 


J. R. Smith. 


Wallace Col- 
lection, Hert- 
ford House. 




A Party angling, col. 










M 


G. Keating. 


Ditto. 


Sir C. Cunliffe 




The Angler's Repast, 






Smith, Bart. 




col. M. The pair, 








* 


coloured, £29, £54, 
and i40gs. (Novem- 
ber 19, 1900) (v. 










L 1780) 


W. Ward. 


Ditto. 




Youth diverting Age, 
M. £6 (v. 1794). 


J. Grozer. 


W. Dickinson. 


R. Williams. 


(A Mad Bull, B.M., 








J A 


R. Dodd. 


P. Cornman. 




1 An Ass Race, B.M., 










I col. M. £2 


W. Ward. 


Ditto. 





172 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1789. 
Juvenile Navigators, 
B.M., col. M. 

£ll OS.6d. t £l2 lOS. 

(proof) 

Children Birds'-nest- 
ing, B.M., col. M. 
The pair, coloured, 
£26 5j. and £90... 

Louisa {two com- 
panion flates), 
B.M., col. C. The 
pair, coloured, £27 
(March 8, 1900), 
£31. £39 8*. ... 

The Pleasures of Re- 
tirement, B.M., M. 
6^"J. 

'Guinea-pigs, B.M., C, 
col. 

v. Dancing Dogs, 

1790, a pair. The 

pair, coloured, ^36 

'June 27, 1903), 



ENGRAVER. 



PUBLISHER. 



OWNER 9T ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



£63 



W. Ward. J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 



T. Gaugain. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 



W. Ward. J. T. Smith. 
T. Gaugain. T. Gaugain. 



Col. F. A. 
White. 



Ditto. 



One of the pair, 
G. Peck. 



Capt. F. Low- 
ther, R.N. 



The L*titia Series, 

viz. : 
Plate 1. Domestic 
Happiness, 
C, col. 
„ 2. The Elope- 
ment, C, 
col. 
„ 3. The Virtuous 
Parent, C, 
col. 
„ 4. Dressing for 
the Masque- 
rade, C, col. 
„ 5. The Tavern- 
door, C.,col. 
„ 6. The Fair Peni- 
tent, C, col. 
The first three 
plates, coloured, ^25 
4s. ; the six plates, 
^30 gs.y the six col- 
oured, /60 ; separate 
plates, £& ioj.,^9 10s. 



J. R. Smith. J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 



APPENDIX IV 



173 



1789. 
The Tomb, B.M., C, 

col. ... ••• ••• 

Refreshment, A., 
B.M 

The Fruits of Early 
Industry and 
(Economy, B.M., 
M., col. Coloured, 

;£ii 15* 

The Effects of Youth- 
ful Extravagance 
and Idleness, B.M., 
M., col. The pair, 
coloured, £15, ^30, 

, ^33 (v. 1794) ••■ 
The Listfning Lover, 

B.M.. 

f Farmer's Visit to his 

Married Daughter 

in Town, C, col., 

B.M. £9 
The Visit returned in 

the Country, C, col. 

B.M. The pair, 

£$ I5*> £ l 7 l 7 s " 
. £3° 



BNGRAVKR. 



J. Dean. 



PUBLISHER. 



J. Dean. 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



W. Ward. P. Cornman. 



Ditto. T. Simpson. 



Ditto. 

T. Rowland- 
son. 



W. Bond. 



Ditto. 



Sir W. Gilbey, 
Bart. 



1790. 

A Rural Feast, B.M., 
M. £7 17*- M. ... 

The Kite entangled, 
M. £3 

Jack in the Bilboes, 
col. M. £1 2s. (cf. 

1797) ; 

The Contented 
Waterman, col. M. 

- 4& s * ••• ••• 

The Squire's Door, 

B.M., C, col. 
The Farmer's Door, 
B.M., C.,col. The 
pair, coloured, £60 
i8j. and /94 IOS - 
, (Bulteel sale, 1904) 



J. Dean. 
W. Ward. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 

B. Duter- 
reau. 



Ditto. 



J. Dean. 
J. R. Smith. Mrs. Thwaites. 

P. Cornman. Royal Hollo- 
way College, 
Egham. 
Ditto. 

J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 



174 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1790. 


ENGRAVER. 


PUBLISHER. 


OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 


/St. James's Park, C, 








col. 


F. D. Soiron. 


T. Gaugain. 


Rev. R. Blath- 


A Tea-garden, B.M., 






wayt. 


C, col. The pair, 








coloured, ^49 Js. 9 








457, £6S 5^., £76, 
£86, £92, and 136 














V gs. (June 4, 1901). 


Ditto.* 


Ditto. 




Temptation, B.M., M. 


W. Hum- 


W. Dickin- 


Max Michaelis. 




phrey. 


son. 




Dancing Dogs, B.M., 


T. Gaugain. 


T. Gaugain. 


Capt. F. Low- 
ther, R.N. 


C, col. (See 






Guinea-pigs, 1789, 








a pair.) 








Shooting Series— 








etched by T. Row- 








land son ; aquatint 








by S. Aiken ; pub- 








lished by J. Harris 








and T. Merle : 








/i. Pheasant-shooting. 






1 and 2 Sir 


2. Partridge • shoot - 






Walter Gilbey, 


\ »ng.t 






Bart 


3. Duck-shooting. 








V4« Snipe-shooting.f 








.1 and 2, /24 y.; 
3 and 4, £24 y. 














Morning; or, 








Thoughts on 








Amusements f r 








the Evening, £&. 




M. Colnaghi 




Affluence reduced, M. 




and Co. 




£$&>>£$ lor- ... 


H. Hudson. 


J. R. Smith. 




The Soldier's Fare- 








well, C, col. 


G. Graham. 


T. Simpson. 




The Soldier's Return, 








« B.M., col. £7 1 7s. 6d. 








The pair in brown, 








4 gs. j coloured, 








v *ogs 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




Pedlars, B.M., L. {v. 








1805) 


J. Fittler. 


J. Fittler. 




Travellers reposing, 








B.M., L 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 




Sliding, B.M., L. ... 


Ditto. 


P. Cornman. 





* Also engraved by Mile. Rollet, B.M. 
f Also engraved by C. Catton, jun., B.M 



APPENDIX IV 



175 



I790. ENGRAVER. 

The Bell, L 

Virtue in Danger, 
B.M., L 

The Miseries of Idle- 
ness, B.M., col. M. 

The Comforts of In- 
dustry, BM.,col. M. 
The pair, coloured, 
£3 1 7 s. &/., £6 6s. Ditto. 

La Chasse de la B6- 
cassine (Snipe), 

B.M., L A. Suntach. 

/Boys robbing an Or- 
chard, B.M., col. M. E. Scott. 

The Angry Farmer, 
BM. 9 col.M. These 
two, with "Boys 
bathing" and 
"Boys skating" 
(1804), in colours, 
\ £i6$s.6d. 

The Amorous Plough- 
man, B. M . (v. 1 792) . 

1791- 
Cottagers, B.M., M. 

13^ 

Travellers, B.M., M., 

col., £6, and 

coloured, 31 gs. 
k The pair, 66 gs. ... Ditto. 



The Recruit, or 

Deserter, Series : 
Plate I. Trepanning a 
Recruit, B.M., 
M., col. 

„ 2. Recruit de- 
serted, B.M., 
M., col. ... Ditto. 

„ 3. Deserter 
taking leave 
of his Wife, 
B.M., M., col. Ditto. 

„ 4. Deserter par- 
doned B.M., 
M. col. ... Ditto. 

The four plates, 

£22 ios. 9 ^30 ; and 

in colours, £54, ^61. 



PUBLISHER. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



J. Fittler. J. Fittler. 

Ditto. P. Cornman. 

H. Hudson. J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 



E. Collins 
Wood. 



Ditto. 



Sir C. Tennant, 
Bart. 



Ditto. 

I. Jenner. T. Jones and 
I. Jenner. 



W. Ward. T. Simpson. A. Sanderson. 



Ditto. 



G. Keating. J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 



176 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1 79 1. ENGRAVER. 

"African Hospitality, 

M 

Slave Trade, M. 

The pair, £4 i$s., 

£$ 1 S s - M. ; v. 1814. Ditto. * 

A Christmas Gambol, 

M., $gs Ditto. 

The Benevolent 

Lady, C 

(Changing Quarters, C 
The Billeted Soldier, 
C, coL £$ ios. f and 
coloured 8 gs. ... Ditto. 

Girl and Calves, M. 
(v. 1802) 

Nurse and Children 
in the Fields, M. 
col. Coloured, ^45. 

The Sportsman 
Enamour'd; or, 
The Wife in Dan- 
ger, B.M., M. 

La Chasse du Canard 
(Duck), B.M., L. 

La Chasse de la 
Becasse (Wood- 
cock), B.M., L. ... Ditto. 

La Chasse du Lievre 
(Hare), B.M., L. ... Ditto. 



PUBLISHER. 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



J. R. Smith.* J. R. Smith. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

E. J. Dumee. T. Prattent 
J. Hogg. T. Simpson. 

Ditto. 

W. Ward. Collins and 
Morgan. 
Moore and 
Kirton. 
G. Keating. J. R. Smith. 



A. Suntach. 



1792. 
The Woodcutter, M. 

7 gs 

The Carrier's Stable, 

M. 22 gs 

(The Country Girl at 
Home, A., B.M., 
\g* 

I The Country Girl in 

London, A., B.M. 
The Country Stable, 
B.M. j£4 14*. &/. ... 



W. Ward. 
Ditto. 



M. C. Prestel 

and E. M. 

Diemar. 

Ditto. 

W. Ward. 



T. Macklin. C, A Barton. 



E. M Diemar. 



Ditto. 

D. Orme and 
Co., E. Walker, 
and J. F. 
Tomkins. 



* Also engraved by Mile. Rollet, B.M. 



APPENDIX IV 



177 



1792. 



ENGRAVER. 



W. Ward. 



Ditto. 
Ditto. 



PUBLISHER. 

T. Simpson ; 
Darling and 
Thompson. 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



The Barn-door, M. 

4gs. 

The Sportsman's Re- 
turn, M., col. £% 
i8j. 6d. (proof), 
and j£i7 coloured 
The Shepherd's Boy, 
B.M. £35* ... 
The Farmer's Stable,* 
B.M.j M. col. 
Coloured, ^9 and 
£37 (Bulteel sale, 
1904). (Original in 
National Gallery, 

London.) 

Gipsies, B.M., M. 

6 gs. ... 

'Morning : Hunters 

starting, A. 
Evening: Sportsmen 
refreshing, A. (cf. 

1801) 

Coursing, A. (Etched 
by G. Morland) ... 
Children feeding 

Goats, C, col. 
Children feeding 
Chickens, C, col. 
The pair, coloured, 
33 gs. (March 8, 

1900) 

The Amorous Plough- 
man, col. M. {v. 

1790) 

Gipsy Courtship, col. 

B.M. The pair, 

, £\'l\os. ... 

Rubbing down the 

Post-horse, B.M. (v. 

1794 and 1799+)- 
Duck-shooting, B.M. 
Studies of following, 
etched by J. Baldrey ; 
B.M. : 

Pigs, Sheep, etc. 

Men, Donkey, etc. 

# Same title, but different subject, 1705. 

f The companions to this print have been " Fighting Dogs," 1794, and " Water- 
ing the Cart-horse," 1799. 

12 



1 



Ditto. 

Ditto. 

S. Aiken. 

Ditto. 



P.W.Tom- 
kins. 



Ditto. 



Thos. Macklin. Mrs. Ashton. 

D. Orme and 
Co., E. Walker, 
and J. F.Tom- 
kins. 



T. Simpson. 

J. Vivares and 
Son. 

Ditto. 

J. Read. 

D. Orme and 
Co. and E. 
Walker. 



J. Jenner. T. Jones and 
Is. Jenner. 



Ditto. 



T. Rowland- 
son. 



Ditto. 



178 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1792. 

Horses, Sheep, etc 
Cart, Wheelbarrow, 

etc. 
Men, children, etc. 

Ditto. 
Dog, Ass, etc 
Cart-horses. 
Studies of following, 
the etchings published 
by J. Harris ; B.M. 
Men. 

Horses, etc 
Sheep, etc. 
Man at Watering- 
trough, a woman 
seated near. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



1793. 

A Carrier's Stable, 
B.M. 

Feeding the Pigs, M. 
col. iO£3.,j6i6,and 
coloured, 40 gs. ... 

Return from Market, 

B.M., M. 13 gs., 24 

gs., £19 Ss. 6<t. ... 

/The Happy Cottagers, 

The Gipsies' Tent, 
B.M., M. The pair, 
Hi gs. (May 5, 
1900); separate, 6 
gs. and £4. 15J. ... 

{Smugglers, B.M., M. 
£2 Ss. 
Fishermen, B.M., M. 
£2 i6j 

Burning Weeds, M. 
col. Coloured, qigs. 

Cows, M 

"Original Sketches 
from Nature" Title- 
page, B.M. Etch- 
ing published by T. 
Simpson. 
Woman and Child, 
Goat, etc Etching 
published by T. 
Simpson. 



W. Ward. T. Simpson. 
J. R. Smith. J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 
J. Grozer. 

Ditto. 

J. Ward. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 
E. Bell. 



Ditto. 
B. B. Evans. 

Ditto. 

J. R. Smith. 

Ditto. 

B. Tabart. 

E. Bell and 

J. Dixie. 



J. W. Knight. 
Dowdeswell. 



APPENDIX IV 



179 



1793. 

Sunset: A Scene in 
Lancashire* 

Two Country Boys. 
Etching published 
by T. Simpson. 

Two Boys, GirPs 
Head, etc. Etch- 
ing published by 
T. Simpson. 

Boy at Pump. Etch- 
published by T. 
Simpson. 

Cart passing Wooded 

Scenery, B.M. 

Etching published 

by D. Orme 

Studies of following, 

the etchings published 

by J. Harris; B.M.: 
Horses, etc. 
Children, etc. 
Harrowing a Field. 
Greyhounds, etc 
Fisherwomen, etc. 
Men, etc. 
Children, etc. 
Two Men. 



OWNBR OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



J. Ward. 



1794. 

The Effects of Youth- 
ful Extravagance 
and Idleness, B.M., 
M. (cf. 1789) 

Fighting Dogs, B.M., 
col. M. 4 gs. y in 
colours 

The Happy Family, 
M. £2 4J. 

The First of Septem- 
ber : Morning, col. 
M. ... ... ... 

The First of Septem- 
ber: Evening, 
B.M., coL M. The 
pair, coloured, ^20, 

, £31 *os. t £361$*. 

A Man asleep, B.M. 



W. Ward. T. Simpson. 
J. R. Smith. J. R. Smith. 



Sir W. Gilbey, 
Bart 



J. Dean. 



W. Ward. 



Ditto. 



T. Simpson and John Wilson. 
W. Ward. 



Ditto. 



Ditto, 



* This represents a scene at the door of the Red Lion Inn. 

12 — 3 



i8o 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1794- 

Studies of Horses' 

Heads, etc., B.M. 
Foxhunters and Dogs 

leaving the Inn, 

B.M. Etching by 

J.Wright 
Foxhunters and Dogs 

in a Wood, B.M. 

Etching by J. 

Wright. 
Full Cry, B.M. Etch- 
ing by J. Wright. 
Fox about to be Killed, 

B.M. Etching by 

J.Wright 

Boy and Pigs. B.M. 

Etching by J. 

Wright. 
Shepherds, B.M. 

Etching by J. 

Wright. 
Country Lads at a 

Gate, B.M. Etch- 
ing published by 

J. D. Orme. 
Belinda ; or, The 

Billet-Doux, C, «?/., 

B.M. 
Studies of following, 
the etchings published 
by J. Harris ; B.M. : 

Pigs, etc. 

Group of Goats. 

Rabbits eating a 
Carrot. 

Boy and Girl. 

Sheep. 

Men. 

Men and Horse. 

Dogs. 

Church and Milk- 
man. 
Youth diverting Age, 

B.M., M. (v. 1789). 

£6 

Rubbing down the 
Post-horse, B.M., 
M. (v. 1792 and 
1799^ 



ENGRAVER. 



PUBLISHES. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



Max Michaelis. 



Burrows. 



J. Read. T. J. Barratt. 



J. Grozer. 



J. R. Smith. 



Fomer 

Williams. 



APPENDIX IV 



181 



1794. 
Children feeding 
Goats, B.M. (v. 
1792). 

I7 *5- ™_ 
'Morning ; or, The 

Benevolent Sports- 
man, B.M., M., col. 

7g*- — •- 

Evening ; or, The 
Sportsman's Re- 
turn, B.M. M. coL 
£13 2s. 6d., £20 
(fine). The pair, 
proofs, in colours, 

1 £42 

'The Farm-yard, B.M., 

M., 7gs.,£i(> ... 

The Farmer's Stable, 

B.M., M. 14 &. 

I (cf. 1792) 

The Rustic Ballad, 

M. £3 

Hunting: Full Cry, 

B.M. 
Women going up 

Ladder, B.M. 
Rustic Scene: Cattle, 

etc., B.M. 
Huntsmen and Dogs, 

B.M. Etching by 

J. Wright 
Foxhunters and Dogs 

at Bluebell Door, 

B.M. Etching by 

J. Wright. 
Studies of following, 
the etchings published 
by J. Harris ; B.M. : 

Men and Girl. 

Sloop in a Creek. 

Boat Ashore. 
Friendship, B.M. 
'Gathering Wood, 

B.M. (cf. 1799) — 
• Gathering Fruit, 

B.M. The pair, 

> £i6s 

The Lucky Sports- 
man. B.M. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



J. Grozer. J. Grozer. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 



W. Ward. J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 

S.W. Rey- 
nolds. 



Ditto. 
J. Read. 



R. M. 
Meadows. 

Ditto. 

F D. Soiron* B. Tabart. 



182 



GEORGE MORLAND 



{ 



1796. 

The Fleecy Charge, 

M. £1 is. 
Mutual Confidence ; 

or, The Sentimental 

Friends, M. 
A Bear Hunt, B.M., 

M. £1 16s. 
The Dram, B.M., M. 

The Storm, B.M., M. 

£3 5* 

The Turnpike, L., 

B.M. ... ... 

Delicate Embarrass- 
ment; or, The 

Rival Friends, M. 
The Kennel, M. 
Woodland, B.M. 

Etching published 

by J. Harris. 
Ruined Tower, B.M., 

Etching published 

by J. Harris. 
Ruined Church, B.M. 

Etching published 

by J. Harris 
The Lovers' Retreat, 

B.M., M. 
The Bell, B.M., L. ... 
The Turnpike, B.M., 

'Morning ; or, The 
Higglers preparing 
for Market, B.M., 

N^a, CO*>* . a. ... 

Evening ; or, The 
Post-boy's Return, 
B.M., CyCoL The 
pair, coloured, ^26, 
£36 1 5 j. ; " Morn- 
ing " alone, colour- 
ed, ,£35 

1797. 

Playing at Dominoes, 
M. £3 10s. 

Playing with a Mon- 
key, B.M., M. 
£3 15* 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



G. Shepheard. T. Macklin. 



E. Bell. 

S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 
W. Ward. 

Ditto. 

J. Fittler. 



E.Bell. 
S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 



J. Fittler. 
Ditto. 

D. Orme. 



Ditto. 



J. R. Rey- 
nolds. 

Ditto. 



J. Grozer. 

S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 

J. R. Smith. SirW. Gilbey, 
Bart 
Ditto. 

J. Fittler. 



1 



. Grozer. 
.W.Rey- 
nolds. 



D. Orme. 



Louis Huth. 



Ditto. 



Sir S. Montagu, 
Bart 



T. Ladd and 
Wm. Atkins. 

Ditto. 



APPENDIX IV 



183 



1797. 

Inside of a Country 
Alehouse, B.M., 
M * £36 (Bulteel 
sale, 1904) (v. 1800) 
/The Labourer's Lun- 
cheon, B.M., C, 
£2 10s. ... ••• 

The Peasant's Repast, 

B.M., C. 6 gs. and 

v ;£io 15*. (fine) ... 

The Corn-Bin, col. M. 
£2 10s. 

A Litter of Foxes 
(Animals by C. 
Loraine Smith, 
Landscape by G. 
Morland), M. 

Girl and Pigs, M. ... 

Man, Woman, and 
Boy on Road, B.M. 
Etching by T. 
Vivares. 

Tree, B.M. Etching 
by T. Vivares. 

The Horse - Feeder, 
B.M., M. ^17 (cf. 

1799) 

Jack in the Bilboes, 

B.M. ... ... 

The Contented 

Waterman, B.M. 

1798. 

Breaking the Ice, 
B.M., M. col. $gs., 
and 1; rgs. coloured. 

Milkmaid and Cow- 
herd, B.M., M. col. 
4 gs., and £24 3* 
coloured 

A Land Storm, B.M., 

AtA •••• ... ••• 



PUBLISHER. 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 



{ 



W. Ward. W. Ward. 

C. Josi. J. R. Smith. George Peck. 

Ditto. Ditto. 

J. R. Smith. Ditto. 



J. Grozer. 
W.Ward. 



J. Grozer. 

Collins and 

Morgan ; 

Moore and 

Kirton. 



J. R. Smith. 

R. Clamp. 

Ditto. 



\cf.W. 

J ' 



Ward, 
1790. 



Royal Hollo- 
way College, 
Egham. 



J. R. Smith, 
jun. 

J. R. Smith. 

S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 



1799. 
The Fisherman's Hut, 

B.M., M. 11 gs. J. R. Smith. 
Selling Fish, 



M. £nos.6d. 



[gs. 
B.M., 



Ditto. 



J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 



Ditto, 
Ditto. 



* For outside scene, see " The Public-house Door," 1801. 



184 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1799. 
Gathering Wood, C. 

(cf. 1795) 

The Horse - Feeder, 
col. M. 11 gs. ... 

The Fern- Gatherers, 
col. M 

"Watering the Cart- 
horse, B.M., M. ... 

Rubbing down the 
I Post-horse, M. ... 

Old and Young Man, 
and Young Woman, 
B.M. Etching 
published by D. 
Orme. 

Setters, B.M., col. M. 
£1 is. (Setters by 
Ward, 1806.) ... 



1800. 

The Fisherman's 
Dog, B.M., M. ... 

The Poacher, M. 
£2 10s 

The Last Litter, B.M., 
col. M. 12 gs. 
coloured (fine), ^15 
and ^42 (Bulteel 
sale, 1904) 

The Hard Bargain, 
B.M., col. M. 
^13 1 5 s. coloured 
(fine) 

Woodland Scene, 
B.M. Etching pub- 
lished by J. P. 
Thompson. 

River Scene, B.M. 
Etching published 
by J. P. Thomp- 
son. 

Ruined Church, B.M. 
Etching published 
by J. P. Thomp- 
son. 

Tree and Cottage, 
B.M. Etching pub- 
lished by J. P. 
Thorn son. 



PUBLISHER. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



R. M. 

Meadows. 

J. R. Smith. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 



J. R. Smith. 

Ditto. J. W. Knight. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. Jas. Rawlinson. 

Ditto. 



S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 



Ditto. 

S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 



W. Ward. 



Ditto. 



S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 
W. Jeffryes 
and Co. 



J. L. Cart- 
wright. 



Ditto. 



G. A. Daniel. 



APPENDIX IV 



185 



180a. 

Ruined Tower, B.M. 
Etching published 
by J. P. Thomp- 
son. 

Coast Scene, M. ... 
Ditto. 

Cattle crossing a 
Bridge, B.M. 
Etching published 
by J. P. Thomp- 
son. 

Two Pointers, B.M. 
Etching by T. Vi- 
vares. 

Kennel of Dogs, 
B.M. Etching by 
T. Vivares. 

Woman Washing, 
B.M. Etching by 
T. Vivares. 

Study of Cat, B.M. 
Etching by T. Vi- 
vares. 

Two Dogs in Kennel, 
B.M. Etching by 
T. Vivares. 

Woman and Child 
at a Door, B.M. 
Etching by T. Vi- 
vares. 

Ass, B.M. Etching 
by T. Vivares. 

Man and Woman in 
Wood, B.M. Etch- 
ing by T. Vivares. 

Two Dogs, B.M. 
Etching by T. Vi- 
vares. 

Dog, B.M. Etching 
by T. Vivares. 

Dog with Bone, B.M. 
Etching by T. Vi- 
vares. 

Cattle crossing 
Bridge, B.M. Etch- 
ing by T. Vivares. 

The Millers, B.M., 
M. 16s 

Fishermen, B.M., M. 
£1 is. 



ENGRAVER. 



PUBLISHER. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



Hill. 
Ditto. 



) Random, Stain- 
) bank and Say er. 



S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 
John Young. 



i86 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1800. 
Inside a Country Ale- 
house, B.M., col. 
M. (v. 1797) 

Hunting Scenes: 

Going Out, col. M. ... 

Going into Cover, 
col. M. 

The Check, col. M. 

The Death, col. M. 
The set, £22 iar.y 

in colours, 24 gs. y 

£$*• 

1801. 

The Shepherd, M. ... 

Selling Peas, M. col. 
£12 

Selling Cherries, M. 
col. £14. The 
pair, in colours, 
£5° MJ 

(Alehouse Door, B.M., 
M. £1 14J. 
Alehouse Kitchen, 
B.M., M. 42 as. 
Alehouse Politicians, 
B.M., M. /12 
is. 6d. and £49 
(Bulteel sale, 1904) 
The Mail-coach, M. 

£3 V 

The Public-house 
Door, col. M. logs.y 
£4 (proof) (see 
note, 1797) 

Stable Amusement, 
B.M., M. £9 ... 

Returning from 
Labour, col. M. 
£l 2S 

The Rabbit Warren, 
B.M., A. 16s. ... 

Sportsmen refreshing. 
B.M., A. (cf. 1792) 

Coast Scene, M. 
Ditto 

Two Boys fishing, 
B.M. Etching 
published by J. P. 
Thompson. 



ENGRAVER. 



W.Ward. 

£. Bell. 

Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 



PUBLISHES. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



W. Barnard. W. Barnard. 
E. Bell. T. Ladd. 



Ditto. 


Ditto. 


Max Michaelis. 


R. S. Syer. 


J. R. Smith. 


G. Salting. 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 


Sir C.E. Hamil- 
ton. 



W. Ward. Wards and Co. 

S. W. Rey- R. Ackerman. 
nolds. 



W. Ward. J. R. Smith. Major H. J. 

McClintock. 
Ditto. Ditto. A. Barrow. 



T. Burke. 
S. Aiken. 



H. Macklin. 
J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. Ditto. 

I. Bailey. 1 Random, Stain- 
D itto. J bank and Sayer. 



APPENDIX IV 



187 



1 801. 

Three Portraits of 

Countrymen, B.M. 

Etching published 

by J. P. Thompson. 
Two Portraits of 

Stablemen, B.M. 

Etching published 

by J. P. Thompson. 
Feeding the Pigs, 

B.M., M. col. In 

colours (proof), 

£14 14J. {v. 1793) J. R. Smith. 



PUBLISHER. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



T. Gosse. 



Ditto. 



1802. 

'Sailors' Conversation, 
B.M.,«>/.M. ;£u 

The Country Butcher, 
B.M., M. £3, £S 

. 10s. (v. 1810) 

The Flowing Bowl; 
or, Sailors returned, 
B.M. ... ... 

The Brown Jug ; or, 
Waggoner's Fare- 
well, B.M. The 
pair, 7 gs. 

(Morland's M Summer," 
B.M., col. M. ... 
Morland's M Winter," 
col. M 

r Girl and Pigs, B.M., 

Girl and Calves, B.M., 
M. The pair, £2 
, 6s. (v. 1791) 
Travellers, B.M., M. 
Dogs, B.M., col. ... 



1803. 
Shepherds reposing, 

B.M., C. £1 14* W. Bond. 
Shepherd's Meal, * 

B.M., M. £2 6s. J. R. Smith. 
A Conversation, B.M., 

M ... Ditto. 

Peasant and Pigs, 

B.M., M. £$ 10s. Ditto. 



W. Ward. J. R. Smith. 



Ditto. 



J. Walling. 



W. Barnard. W. Barnard. 



Ditto. 



... 




... 


Dowdeswell. 


Ditto. 


W. 


J. SargarcL 




W.Ward 






H. J. Bunbury, 


Ditto. 
J. Young. 
G. Shep- 

heard. 






Ditto. 



H. Macklin. W. I. Abraham. 

J. R. Smith. C. A. Barton. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. R. Richardson. 



i88 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1803. 



ENGRAVER. 



PUBLISHES. 



OWNER OP ORIGINAL 



A Visit to the Don- 








keys, M. £2 lOS.y 








Sgs 


W. Ward. 


H. Macklin. 


, 


Peasant Family, C, 








col.* 5^-j. 


J. Pierson. 


J. Pierson. 




Giles, the Farmer's 








Boy, B.M., col. M. 








^52 ior. (Bulteel 








sale, 1904) 


W. Ward. 


H. Macklin. 




Woodcutters at Din- 








ner, B.M 


T. William- 






Girl, Boy, and Sheep, 


son. 






B.M., M. ... 


J. R. Smith. 






Villagers, B.M., M. 








£1 15' 


J. Young. 




Rev. F. P. 


The Weary Sports- 






Lawson. 


man, B.M. (v. 1805) 


W. Bond. 




Sir W. Gilbey, 


A Cottage Family, 
M. £6 






Bart. 


J. R. Smith. 


J. R. Smith. 




Industrious Cottager, 








B.M 


W. Blake. 






The Idle Laundress, 








k B.M. (v. 1788) ... 


Ditto. 






Innocence alarm'd, 








B.M., col. M. £14 








1 or. and 48 ^j. ... 


J. R. Smith, 
jun. 


H. Macklin. 


Ditto. 


1804. 








George Morland 








(died, 1804), etch- 








ing, B.M. £1 is. 


T. Gaugain. 


J. Stephens. 




The Rustic Hovel, 








B.M 


£. Bell. 


E. Orme. 




The Cottage Spy, 
B.M. The pair, £4. 








Ditto. 


Ditto. 




Morland's Ass, M. 








£2 


Malgo. 


Ditto. 




Man, Woman, Ass, 








and Dog in Stable, 








B.M 


J. Young. 


J. Young. 




Lazy Shepherds: 
"Go, mind them," 














B.M 


T. William- 






The Young Dealer: 


son. 






"Well, what will 








you give?' B.M. 


Ditto. 






* The companion to this is 


"Pedlars," 1805. 





APPENDIX IV 



189 



1 8O4. ENGRAVER. 

First Love: "Well, I 
shall have my 
mother after me," 
B.M Ditto. 

Ass and Pigs, with 
Boy, B.M. Etch- 
ing by T. Vivares. 

Conversation, B.M. 
Etching published 
by D. Orme. 

Duck-shooting, I. and 
II. B.M. 

Woodcock and Pheas- 
ant Shooting, B.M. 

The Setters, B.M. 

(Boys bathing, B.M., 
col. M * E. Scott. 
Boys skating, col. M. Ditto. 



OWNER OP 'ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



Colonel F. A. 
White. 



T. Vivares. 



W. Bond. 



S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 
E. Jones. 



1805. 

George Morland, 
etching, B.M. 
£l us 

The Weary Sports- 
man. C. £1 i$s. 
(v. 1803) 

Fishermen goingout, f 
B.M., M. /17 
dr. 6d. 

P a r t r i d g e-shooting, 
M. £S ioj. (proof) 

The Attentive Shep- 
herd, col. B.M. 

£1 4* 

Shepherd, Dog, and 

Ass, B.M 

Morland's Cottager, 

C, col. £1 2s. ... T. Williamson. 
-{ Morland's Woodman, 

C, col. B.M 

£l 12s. 

The Frightened 

Horse, col. M. 2gs. 
Pedlars,! C.,col. B.M. 

(v. 1790 and 1803) J. Shepherd. 



E. Orme. 



H. Macklin. Sir W. Gilbey, 
Bart. 



J. R. Smith. 
J. Cary. 



R. Brooke. H. Macklin. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 
E. Bell. 



Ditto. 

T.Williamson 

and 
John Barrow. 

E. Orme. 

J. Shepherd. 



* Also engraved by Bartolozzi, B.M. 

•f- The Companion is " Fishermen on Shore," 1806. 

i The companion is " Peasant Family," 1803. 



igo 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1805. 

Paying the Horseler, 
B.M., col. M. 
£18 ioj. (Mayi5, 
1900) 

Frost-piece, B.M., C. 

Travellers reposing, 
B.M. ••• ... 

Rustic Cares: 
" Chuck, chuck, 
chuck," B.M. 

Tired Gypsies, B.M. 

Summer's Evening, 
B.M., col. £2 i$s. 

Winter's Morning, 
B.M., col. £$ ioj., 
and £10 in colours 

George Morland, 
B.M. Etching by 
T. Vivares from the 
Drawing by G. 
Morland 

Pointer and Hare, 
B.M., L. ... ... 

The Farm-yard, B.M., 

L** ... ... ... 

Winter Scene, B.M. 



FUBUSHRK. 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
FAINTING. 



S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 



H. Macklin. 



Major H. J. 
McClintock. 



T. Williamson. Jas. Cundee. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 



Ditto. 

J. Scott 

Ditto. 



1806. 
The Female Pedlar 
The Disabled Soldier 
George Morland, M. 
Morland's Emblem- 
atical Palette, B.M. 
The Turnpike Gate, 
B.M., M. 19 gs. 
and £23 ••• 
Pigs, C 

/Rabbits, B.M., M. ... 
Guinea-pigs, B.M., 

M. The pair, £5 

1 or., and £1% 7s. 6d. 

* (proof) 

The Warrener, B.M., 

M. 13 gs. 
Fishermen on Shore, 

B.M., M. col (v. 

1805). £$i$s.6d., 

and £28 7s. 6d. 

(proof in colours) ... 



R. H. Heath. 

Ditto. 
J. R. Smith. 

S. W. Rey- 
nolds. 

W. Ward. 

R.M. 
Meadows. 
W. Ward. 



Ditto. 
Ditto. 



Thos. Tegg. 

Ditto. 
J. R. Smith. 

J. Linnell. 



Ditto. 
W. T. Strutt 



J. Linnell. E. Meredith 

Crosse. 



Ditto. 

Henry Mor- 
land. 



Captain F. 
Lowther, R.N. 



W. Hilton. J. R. Smith. George Peck, 



APPENDIX IV 



191 



1806. 



ENGRAVER. 



Setters, B.M., M. col 

£$ i$s. and ^21 

coloured (cf. 1799) W. Ward. 
Boy and Pigs, M. ... W. T. Annis. 
The Thatcher, B.M., 

Coast Scene, B.M. 

Studies of Dogs, B.M. T. Williamson, 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



J. Linnell. 
H. Macklin. 



Sir W. Gilbey, 
Bart. 



W. Ward. G. Morland. Edward Boyes. 



Woodcutters, B.M. 

Cottagers in Winter, 
B.M. 

Men in Cart, Child, 
etc., B.M. Etch- 
ing published by 
D. Orme. 

Donkey and Boy, 
B.M. Etching 
published by D. 
Orme. 

The Contented Water- 
man, B.M., M. ... 

The Shepherds, B.M., 
M. £1 35. and 
£6 ioj. ... •,. 

1807. 
The Pigsty, M. £1 

its. 

f Guinea-pigs, M. 



Ditto. 



W. Ward. 



Ditto. 



R. Smith. 
Ditto. 

(.Rabbits, M. (v. i8o6) # Ditto. 

Girl with Bottle and 
Glass, B.M. Etch- 
ing published by 
D. Orme. 

Dog following a Man, 
B.M. Etching pub- 
lished by D. Orme. 

Donkey and Girl, 
B.M. Etching pub- 
lished by D. Orme. J. R. Smith. 

Boy and Pigs, B.M. 
M Ditto. 

Rabbits eating, B.M., 
M Ditto. 

Guinea-pigs eating, 
B.M., M. 



* Guinea-pigs, engraved by T. Gaugain, 1789. 
„ W. Ward, 1806. 

,1 ,, J. R. Smith, 1807. 



T. Palser. 
Ditto. 



Ditto. 



Captain F. 
Lowther, R.N. 
E. Meredith 

Crosse. 



Companion. 
Dancing Dogs, 179a 
Rabbits, 1806. 
.1 1807. 



192 



GEORGE MORLAND 



1808. 

Rest from Labour, 

B.M., C. £1 i$s. 

Puss alarmed, M. ... 



ENGRAVER* 

T. Burke. 
P. Dawe. 



PUBLISHER. 

R. Lambe. 
Ditto. 



OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 



1 8 10. 

The Country Butcher, 

M. (v. 1802) ... W. Barnard. J. Higham. John Walling. 
Puss, B.M., M. ... T. Hodgett H. Morland. 



181 1. 

The Cottage Fireside, 
M ... 

Fishermen preparing 
to go out, A. 

The Fishermen re- 
turning, A. 

Snipe-shooting, B.M. 

The Laetitia Series of 
1789 republished, 
B.M. ... 



W. Barnard. T. Palser. 



- Jakes. 
Ditto. 



J. R. Smith. 



J. Deeley. 
Ditto. 



1812. 

Tottenham Court 
Road Turnpike, and 
St. James's Chapel, 
B.M. 



1813. 

The Angry Boy and 
Tired Dog, B.M., 

The Young Nurse and 
Quiet Child, B.M., 
C 

Vocal Music, B.M., 
C £1 



G. Graham. 

Ditto. 
J. Baldrey. 



T. Palser. 

Ditto. 
Ditto. 



1814. 

Bathing Horses, 
B.M., M 

African Hospitality, 
B.M., M 

Slave Trade, B.M., 
M. ... 

Coursing, B.M., C. 



W. Ward. 



R. Lambe. 



J. R. Swiih.'\ 0yiginaay ^ m 
Ditto. J *W79i. 



APPENDIX IV 



193 



1816. 

Gathering Fruit, C. 


ENGRAVER. 

R. M. 
Meadows. 


PUBLISHER. 

T. Palser. 


OWNER OF ORIGINAL 
PAINTING. 


1817. 








Morland's Land- 
Storm, C. id?. ... 


T. William- 
son. 


Ditto. 




1824. 
Hunting Sctene, B.M. 






R. Richardson. 



1889. 

A Tea-garden (origin- 
ally published 

*790)>C;CoL ... F.D.Soiron. Supplement of 

the Graphic 
of March 23, 
1889. 



*3 



APPENDIX V 
SHORT BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Blagdon, F. W. : Authentic Memoirs of the Late G. Morland. 

London, 1806. 
Collins, W. : Memoirs of a Picture. London, 1805. See vol. ii. for 

an account of Morland. 
Dawe, G. : The Life of G. Morland. London, 1807. 
H ASS ell, J. : Memoirs of the Life of the Late G. Morland. London, 

1806. 
NETTLESHIP, J. T. : G. Morland and the Evolution from him of 

Some Later Painters. London, 1898. 
Richardson, R. : G. Morland, Painter. London, 1895. G. Mor- 

land's Pictures. London, 1897. 
Sandos, W. : Tears of Nature, an Elegy on the Death of that 

Celebrated Artist, Mr. G. Morland. London, 1804. 
Williamson, G. C. : George Morland, his Life and Works. 

London, 1904. 

See also Bryan's Dictionary (new edition, 1904), vol iii. ; Cunning- 
ham's Lives, 1830, vol. ii., and 1879, vol. ii. ; Redgrave's 
Dictionary of British Artists, 1874 ; Nagler's Kunstler Lexicon, 
1840, vol. ix. ; Encyclopaedia Britannica (ninth edition), vol. xvi. ; 
Catalogue of Drawings by British Artists in the British Museum, 
vol. iii. ; Royal Academy Exhibitors, by Algernon Graves, vol. v., 
etc. 



194 



INDEX 



Academy, Royal, Morland's ex- 
hibits at, 4. 

Aiken, S- ,' engravings by, 117. 

Angerstein, Mr., 11, 13. 

Angler's Repast, The, the first 
mezzotint after Morland, in. 

Annis, W. T., engravings by, 117. 

Arreton, 64. 

Baldrey, J., etchings by, 118. 
Barnard, William, engravings by, 

116, 118. 

Bell, Edward, engravings exe- 
cuted and published by, 115, 
118. 

Benevolent Sportsman, The, 59. 

Black Gang, 64. 

Blagdon, F. W., his George Mor- 
land' s Pictures, quoted, 10, 53, 
54, 60, 71, 80, 88. 

Blake, W., engravings by, 35, 
"7. 

Bond, William, engravings by, 

117, 118. 
Briddlesford, 64. 

Brooks, the shoemaker, his 
acquaintance with Morland, 
38, 43> 44, 45, 63, 72. 

Burke, T., engravings by, 117, 
118. 

Burn, an acquaintance of Mor- 
land, 63. 

Bute, Marquis of, his collection 
visited by Morland, 106. 

Chale, 64. 

Cherry Girl, The, 41. 

Clamp, R., engravings by, 117. 



Clifton, Mr., his quarrel with 

Morland, 77, 78. 
Cochill, Sergeant, Morland and, 



75, 76, 77* 78. 

Collins, William, his Sketch of 

George Morland, quoted, 3, 8, 



9, 10, 12, 34, 35, 36, 37, 45, 46, 
49, 5i, 57, 64, 65, 80, 81, 87, 89, 
90, 93, 94, 95, 99 J acquaintance 
with Morland, 34 ; brings 
Henry and George Morland 
together, 48 ; anecdote referring 
to, 71 ; Morland's kindness to 
his son, 91 ; his description of 
Morland at the end of his life, 
94; his epitaph on Morland, 
96, 97; 
Colnaghi, Messrs., exhibitions of 
engravings after Morland, by, 

Cope, Mrs., her MSS. notes on 
Berkshire, 6 

Cowes, 79. 

Crane, Morland's man, 59. 

Crozer, Joseph, engravings exe- 
cuted and published by, 115. 

Cunningham, Captain, takes 
Morland's part in a quarrel, 77. 

Cunningham, Allan, quoted, 75, 
83, 84, 86. 

Davis, a pupil of Morland, 99. 

Dawe, George, his Life of Mor- 
land, quoted, 1, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 
13, 14, 15, 16,17, 18,19,20,21, 
23, 24, 25, 37, 38, 39, 41, 42, 44, 
46,53.61,63,66,68,71,73,76, 
80, 85, 86, 87, 88, 92, 93, 97, 109. 



195 



vI3— 2 



ig6 



INDEX 



Dawe, Philip, I ; engravings of 
G. H. Morland's pictures, by, 
3 ; Morland's friendship with, 
14 ; letters from Morland to, 
21-23, 26, 29, 32 ; engravings of 
Morland's pictures by, 1 1 4, 1 1 5. 

Dayes, E., engravings by, 117. 

Dean, a horse dealer, Morland 
and, 66. 

Dean, John, engravings by, 116, 
118. 

Derby, Lord, story of Morland 
and, 53, 54. 

Deserter, The, 41 ; engraved by 
Keating, 113. 

Dodd, R., engravings by, 117. 

Dumee, £. J., engravings by, 117. 

Dutch painters, the, Morland 
compared with, 106, 107. 1 

Duterreau, engravings by, 117. ' 

Fittler, James, engravings by,i 1 4. 
Flaxman, John, a friend of Henry 

Morland, 14. 
Forster, Mr., a friend of Henry 

Morland, 13. 

Gainsborough, Thomas, 101, 104. 

Garle, Mr. H., 64, 83. 

Garrick, David, portrait ofj as 

Richard III., by Henry Mor- 
land, 4. 
Gaugain, T., engravings by, 114, 

118 ; portrait of Morland by, 

114. 
George III., portrait of, by Henry 

Morland, 4. 
Graham, George, engravings by, 

114, 118. 
Gress, Mr., his proposal refused 

by Morland, 17. 
Grozier, the engraver, Morland 

lodges with, 72. 
Gunning, the Misses, portraits of, 

by Henry Morland, 4. 

Hale, 64. 

Hamilton, Duke o£ story of Mor- 
land and, 54. 

Hand, Thomas, a pupil of Mor- 
land, 61, 63, 100. 



Harringford, 64. 

Harris, Mr., a friend of Morland, 

Harris, etchings published by, 

118. 
Haskett-Smith, sale, 123. 
Hassell, J., his Life of Morland, 

quoted, 11, 13, 18, 20, 54, 56. 
Henley, epitaph on Morland, 122. 
Hill, Mrs., her friendship with 

Morland, 20-24; goes with 

Morland to France, 29. 
Hilton, W., engravings by, 117. 
Hodgetts, T., engravings by, 117. 
Hogarth, William, Morland com- 
pared with, 1 01. 
Hogg, J., engravings by, 117. 
Houston, Richard, engraving 

by, 4. 
Hudson, Henry, engravings by, 

114. 
Humphrey, W., engraving by, 

117. 
Huth sale, 123. 

Idle Laundress, The t 35. 

Idle Mechanic, The, 35. 

Industrious Cottager, The, 35. 

Industrious Mechanic, The, 35. 

Irwin, his connexion with Mor- 
land, 37, 44 ; quarrel with Mor- 
land, 44 ; death of, 45. 

Jakes, engravings by, 117. 
Jenner, J., engravings by, 117. 
Jolley, sale, 123. 
Jones, E., engravings by, 117. 
Josi, C., engravings by, 117. 

Keating, George, engravings by, 

"3- 
" Knights of the Palette, The," 

87. 

Latitia (six pictures), 34, 35, 101 ; 

engraved by J. R.Smith, 112, 

122-3. 
Levi, Morland's attack on, 59, 

60. 



INDEX 



197 



Loughborough, Lord, portraits 
of, 23. 

Lynn, Mr., the surgeon, lends 
Morland his cottage at Cowes, 
78; buys Morland's pictures, 79. 

Macrory, Mr. E., 122. 
Mango, engravings by, 117. 
Meadows, Robert Mitchell, en- 
gravings by, 116. 
Merle, a carver, Morland and, 

73- 

Millet, J. F., Morland compared 
with, 103. 

" Moreland, Mr., painter," 2. 

Morland, Mr., a banker, 50. 

Morland, Edward, brother of 
George, 48. 

Morland, George, birth of, 2 ; his 
family, 2-8 ; his early talent, 
8, 9 ; studies at the Academy 
Schools, 9, 10 ; apprenticed to 
his father, 10; copies Dutch 
and other pictures, 11,13; hard- 
worked by his father, 11 ; his 
illustrations to Spenser, etc., 
12; his repugnance to educated 
society, 13 ; his friendship with 
Philip Dawe, 14 ; rejects Rom- 
ney's offer, 1 5 ; falls into bad 
habits, 15, 16 ; compared with 
his father, 17 ; adventures at 
Chatham, 18 ; engaged to work 
for a dealer, 19, 20 ; goes to Mrs. 
Hill at Margate, 20; letters 
from Margate, 21-23 ; attracted 
by Mrs. Hill's maid, 22-24 
his friendship with Mr. Sher- 
borne, 24 ; his tastes, 25 ; ex 
periences as a jockey, 26-28 
journey to France, 29 ; im 
pressions of France, 30-32 
entanglement with Jenny, 32 , 
frees himself by a stratagem, 
33 ; again in love, 33 ; marries 
Anne Ward, 33 ; domestic 
difficulties, 34; moves to 
Kentish Town, 35 ; his com- 
panions and habits, 36; his 
acquaintance with Irwin, 37 ; 
and with Brooks, 38 ; stories 



of his follies and extravagance, 
yzetseq.; many animals kept 
by> 4 l » 49> $5 ; the objects 
in his pictures painted from 
life, 41, 42 ; in money dif- 
culties, 43-45 ; quarrels with 
Irwin, 44, 45; hides' from 
his creditors, 45 ; moves to 
Leicester Street, 46 ; story of 
Colonel Stuart and, 47 ; his 
treatment of his patrons, 48, 62, 
63 ; his life in Paddington, 49 ; 
his method of learning boxing, 
49 ; stories of his eccentricity, 
51-53 ; reasons for his objection 
to associating with respectable 
people, 53 ; story of Lord 
Derby and, 54 ; the Duke of 
Hamilton and, 54 ; story of the 
bun -baker and, 54 ; flees from 
his creditors to Enderby, 55 ; 
his affection for his wife, 56 ; 
his love of children and animals, 
56, 57 ; his arrangements with 
his creditors, 58, 59, 63, 67, 90 ; 
returns to London, 59 ; his 
quarrel with Levi, 59, 60 ; 
Billingsgate stories of, 60, 61 ; 
wanders about the country, 
63, 64; his trick on the 
fishermen, 64 ; his failing 
health, 68 ; list of drink taken 
on one day, 69 ; his frequent 
change of residence, 70 ; his ac- 
quaintance with Merle, 73 ; life 
at Hackney, 73, 74 ; his house 
entered by the Bank authorities, 
75 ; lives with his brother, 75 ; 
goes to Cowes, 78 ; flees to 
Yarmouth, 80 ; arrested as a 
spy, 80; released, 81 ; paint- 
ings at Freshwater, 82, 83 ; re- 
turns to London, 85 ; arrested, 
85 ; his life in "the rules" of 
the King's Bench, 85-88 ; liber- 
ated, 88 ; goes to Highgate, 
88 ; quarrels with his host and 
returns to his brother, 89 ; 
places himself in the custody 
of Mr. Donalty, 90 ; his kind- 
ness to Collins's son, 91 ; his 



1 



198 



INDEX 



debility and nervousness, 92 ; 
Collins's description of, 94 ; his 
last days, 94-96 ; death of, 96 ; 
epitaph on, 96 ; his pupils, 99- 
100 ; fraudulent copies of his 
pictures, 100 ; characteristics of 
his art, 101-110; compared with 
Hogarth, 101 ; compared with 
the Barbizon painters, 103 ; his 
kinship with the Dutch school, 
106, 107 ; his engravers, 111- 
118 ; portrait of, by Gaugain, 
114 ; exhibitions of engravings 
after, 118. 

Morland, Mrs. George, marriage 
of, 33 ; Mrs. Ward and, 34 ; 
has a stillborn child, 35 ; her 
relations with her husband, 56, 
68, 89, 90, 97, 98; illness of, 78 ; 
in lodgings in Paddington, 89, 
90 ; death of, 98. 

Morland, George Henry, grand- 
father of George, 2; pictures 

by, 3- 

Morland, Henry, brother of 
George, 5 ; deals in his brother's 
pictures, 5 ; returns to England 
and finds out George, 48 ; be- 
comes George's guardian, 71 ; 
nicknamed " Klobstock," 73 ; 
George lives with, 75 ; gives 
George warning at Cowes, 80 ; 
pictures painted for, 85 ; deal- 
ing with George in his last 
years, 93"96- 

Morland, Henry Robert, father of 
George, 2 ; character of, 3, 1 1, 
1 5 ; works by, 4 ; George ap- 
prenticed to, 10 ; sells George's 
copies as originals, 11; intimate 
with Reynolds, 13 ; failure of 
his treatment of George, 14, 15, 
16. 

Morland, Maria, mother of 
George, Ward's description of, 
5 ; pictures by, 5. 

Morland, Maria, sister of George, 
6 ; marries William Ward, 
34- 

Morland, Sophia, sister of George, 
5- 



Morland, Sir Samuel, account of, 

6-8. 
Morland, Rev. Thomas, 6. 

Nettleship, J. T., his Morland, 

quoted, 103. 
Norwich, Records of the City of, 

2. 
Nutter, W., engraving by, 117. 

Orme, etchings published by, 118. 

Paying the Ostler, 106. 
Pettitt, John, engraving by, 117. 
Phumbley, Mr., 80, 81, 82. 
Prattent, engravings by, 117. 
Prestel, engravings by, 117. 
Price, sale, 123. 

Redgrave's Dictionary oj 
Painters, quoted, 2, 4. 

Reynolds, Sir Joshua, his Gar- 
rick between Tragedy and 
Comedy, copied by Morland, 
13 ; relations between the 
Morlands and, 13. 

Reynolds, Samuel William, en- 
gravings by, 113, 118. 

Richardson, Ralph, his George 
Morland, quoted, 15, 38, 84. 

Romney, George, offers to take 
Morland into articles, 15. 

Rowlandson.T., etchings by, 117. 

Rubbing down the Post-horses, 
59- 

Sales of pictures by Morland, 

122, etc. 
Scott, E., engravings by, 117. 
ShaYikiin, 64, 82. 
Shepheard, G., engraving by, 

117. 
Sherborne, Mr., Morland and, 

24, 50. 
Sickert, Walter, his comparison 

of Morland and Millet, 103. 
Smith, Claud, Morland's visit to, 

59- 
Smith, J. R., engravings by, 35 ; 

engravings by, 112, 118. 

Soiron, engravings by, 117, 118. 



INDEX 



199 



Southwell, Mr. F., 2. 
Southwell, Sir R., 2. 
Spencer, Mr., the landlord of the 

Garrick Head, 90, 91 . 
Sportsman's Return, The, 38. 
St. Catharine's Point, 64, 79. 
Stephens, J., portrait of Morland 

published f>y, 114. 
Stuart, General, story of Morland 

and, 47 ; picture painted for, 

59. 
Sulhamstead Parish, records of, 6. 
Sulhamstead Park, 6. 
Suntach, M., engravings by, 115. 
Syer, R. S., engravings by, 117. 
Sympson, George, Morland's ser- 
vant, 78, SS. 

Tanner, a pupil of Morland, 99. 

Thompson, J. P., etchings pub- 
lished by, 118. 

Tomkins, Peltro, engraving by, 
115. 

Tupman, a watchmaker, Morland 
and, 60, 63. 

Tweedmouth sale, 124. 

Vivares, T.j etchings by, 118. 



Ward, Anne. See Morland, Mrs. 
George. 

Ward, James, the Conversations 
of Northcote and Ward, quoted, 
5, 12, 13, 97, 98; engravings 
of Morland's pictures by, 1 1 1 , 
112. 

Ward, William, marries Mor- 
land's sister, 34 ; anecdote re- 
lating to, 70, 71 ; engravings of 
Morland's pictures, by, 11 1, 
112, 118. 

Watering the Farmer" s Horse, 59. 

Watson, T., engraving by, 3. 

Wedd, Morland's attorney, 45, 51, 
75, 76, 78, 82. 

Wedderburn, Mr. See Lough- 
borough, Lord. 

Westminster, Duke of, collection 
of, 20. 

Williams, Mr., 64. 

Williamson, Thomas, engravings 
by, 115, 118. 

Winter and Key, Messrs., 74. 

Wright, J., etchings by, 118. 

Young, John, engravings by, 116. 
Yarmouth, 81, 82. 



THE END 



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